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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Fans :. 
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PnMished With The New Yoris Times and The Washington Post 

** . PARIS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1985 


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Jordan, Peres Say 


Claude Simon Gets Literature Nobel, ] Craxi, Criticizing U.S., 

F^FrM anm u,Wu^cei 964 Over Hijacking 

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' •'■“■*:•?£ . WASHINGTON — Prime Mb- 
. ’ •"•: T ‘- : ister Shimon Peres said Thursday 

• Israel was ready to meet Jor 

•:■: ‘ : v dan without preconditionsto con- 
•• •.. rider any peace proposal offered by 

.■ ._. the Jordanians. 

■ Mr- Peres .made the statement 

.; - after talks with President Ronald 

<\ Reagan at the White House. 

' - „? T v, “W e ready to meet, without 
. * 2 ; preconditions without losing rim*» 

• ■_- /'* a t any suitable occasion be it in 
i. A mm a n , in Jerusalem or Washing. 
. . ton,” be said. 

. “We are prepared to consider 

: any proposal put forward by the 

' '• Jordanians," he said. “With our 
: hand of peace extended across the 

' : *•■(*£ Jordan River we caD upon our east- 

• ■'?. era neighbor to. heed and accept 

- >^' 1 , this sincere invitation." 

•"•■• Mr. Reagan said Mr. Peres had 

- Lv made clear his desire for direct ne- 

^ gotiations and noted that Jordan’s 
■; King Hussein had welcomed talVs 




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Suicide Bomb 
Attack Kills 
6 in Lelxmon 

By William Claiborne 

Wiixhixgron Pan Service 

JERUSALEM — Six persons, 
including four guerrillas, were 
Jailed Thursday when four suicide 
bombers with explosives strapped 
to their bodies detonated the 
bombs at a fundamentalist Chris- 
tian radio station in southern Leba- 
non near the Israeli border. 

The station was owned and oper- 
a ted by an American missionary 
organization. 

A guard of .the Israeli-backed 
South Lebanon Army militia and a 
Civilian broadcast teAnirian rncidp 
the station were lolled in the attack, 
the Israeli Army command said. 
The building was heavily damaged 

The Lebanese cabinet <qet for 
tile first txme in two- saonths to 
{fiscuss a peace pad Page 2. '■* 

by the esrimated 200 po^ds (90.6 


the bombas, mflitaiy sonrees-sad. 

{The Lebanese Communist Party 
later daimed rt^jonsbflity for the 
attack. United Press International 
reported from Beirut. _ 

. [Hie party's statement said that 
two of the four men who took part 
in the assault were Moslem and two 
were Christian. 

[The Communists are part of the 
Lebanese National Resistance, an 
umbrella group that has carried out 
suicide attacks on South Lebanon 
Army positions in the past.] 

Israeli Army sources said that 
two South Lebanon Army guards 
posted at the radio station com- 
pound about one mile (1.6 kilome- 
ters) north Of the border opened 
■fire on the guerrillas as they ran 
toward the budding: By firing, the 
sources said, the guards may have 
detonated the explosives carried by 
one of the attackers. 

The other suicide attackers ap- 
parently detonated their explosives 
as they neared the budding, the 
sources said. The attack occurred 
shortly after 1 A^L 

The radio station is uot far from 
Lbe site where 12 Israeli soldiers 
died on March 10 when a suicide 
truck bomber drove into a. uoop 
transport convoy. 

' The radio station began broad- 
casting in September 1979 with Iv 
rad’s financial support. The Israeli 
Army earli er had installed Major 
Sand' Haddad, the. head of rightist 
Christian militia farces, in the bor- 
der enclave in 1978. 

Israel replaced Major Haddad, 
who died in January 1984, with 
General Antoine Lahad and the 
South Lebanon Army militia. 

The station, called rite Voice of 
Hope, was founded by Geoige 
Otis, wbo runs an evangdical mis- 
sion in California called High Ad- 
venture Ministries: 

The Voice of Hope's transmitters' 
beam a mixture, of country music, 
inspirational biblical messages and 
news broadcasts that tend to favor 
the South Lebanon Army and an 
Israeli presence in southern Leba- 
non. .. 

Before -Israel's 1982 invasion, 
residents of Lebanese villages just 
north of the Utani' River used to 
refer to the station as “The Voice of 
Death” because Major Haddad, 
would go on the air to announce 
artillery bombardments a few min- 
utes before Ms guns opened fire. 
The- villages were targeted because 
they were inhabited by Palestine 
Liboation Organization guerrillas. 

Because the Vcace of Hope is 
financed and controlled by Ameri- 
cans, Lebanese officials lave long 
resented what they vie w- as U.S. 
government involvement in broad- 
casting pro-Israeli messages 
throughout Lebanon. ... 

A spokesman for the Voice of 
Hope said the station .planned^ 10 
resume broadcasts soon with 
equipment borrowed from its affili- 
ate, Middle East Television. 


with Isradi&eD hi? wiled Wash- 
ington onSepL’30. 

. . Jordan eanifr thig y ^r n^g/Ycipt - 

frtt, chauman-of the PafestineLib- 
eration Organization, foi a 
Jordaman-Paksrmian - 'delegation 
to represent the two partiet’ posi- 
tions. ■ 

But rite dances of success for 
. this initiative appeared mimmaT af- 
ter recent events, including the Is- 
raeli attack on PLO^ headquarters 
in Tunisia on Oct. 1, the Palestinian 
hijacking of the Italian cruise ship 
AcMEe Laim> w Qct. 7, : and this 
week’s refusal by Britain -to receive 
FLO members within rite context 
6f the -Inr rfamTim-pal^ti m mi plan. 

Hussein supportolTSntain’s re- 
fusal saying chat London's inter- 
pretation of conditions for the 
meeting, which granted recognition 
of Israefs right to oast, had been 
. fixed in advance: The PLO has de- 
nied this. 

Preaden* Reagan, asked iT the 
PLO still had a rok in the Middle 
East peace process, said, “the less 
said the better"' ' 

Mr. Reagan said serious obsta- 
cles still had; to be overcome but 
that chances for moving toward 
peace were better now than they 
might'be m future. . 

“This kind of determination and 
good faith grves tfce United States 
confidence that the hurdles to 
peace can .be overcome,” he said. 

Mr. Reagan -said he and Mr. 
Peres also dismissed “the evil 
scourge of ., terrorism.” He said, 
“Terrorism isthe cynical, remorse- 
less enemy <rf peace and it strikes . 
mast viciously whenever real pro- 
gress seems possible . 

“We need no further .proof of 
this than the events of the past few 
weeks. The prime musster and I 
share the determination to see that 
terrorists are denied sanctuary and 
arejustiy’phrnshed,"h£said. ■ 

Mr. Pere^ in a reference to the 
hijacking . of . the AdriDe Lanro, 
praised Mr. Reagan’s “correct in- 
stincts and dedrive reaction" in or- 
dering; the mtaception of the air- 
finer .-carrying the hijmkas out of 
Egypt:.- ^ 

Shidiz. said qirlHT lhat the Rowan 
administration was detennined to 
push ahead with'a mqor arms sale 
to Jordan despite warnings of al- 
most certain ddeat in Ogress. 

Mr. Shultz insisted the sale was 
needed toad vance the Middle East 
peace process, particnlariy in liglu 
of the Adrille Lauro irijadring. 

Hussein had con tinned working 
far peace despite growing Middle 
East terrorism, Mr. Shultz told the 
House Foreign Affairs .Committee 
in urging them to approve the sale 
of S1.9 billion worth of sophisticat- 
ed jets, and antiaircraft defenses. 

But key members of the strongly 

g ro- Israeli committee told Mr. 

hultz that defeat of the proposed 
sale was virtually certain. 

(Reuters, AP) 


{Mud Press lMTenmkmai 

STOCKHOLM — Claude Si- 
mon, the French sovetisi, won 
the 1985 Nobel prize for Biera- 
- tore on Thursday, becoming the 
first French water to win the 
literary world’s latest distinc- 
tiofl since Jean- Paul Sartre in 
1964. 

The Swedish Academy said 
Mr. Simon, 72, “combines the 
poet’s and the painter's creative- 
ness whh a deepened awareness 
of time in die depiction of the 

human fn nJjtjnB'. " 

The announcement of the 
award was made in four lan- 
guages by the academy’s perma- 
nent secretary, Lars GyDensteo, 
in the 18th-century stone build- 
ing faxing the academy and the 
stock exchange. 

Mr. Gylloisten, describing 
Mr. Shnon’s reaction on learning 
. be won the prize, said, “He was 

^^«anber r ’ for the awardsca? 
emony, which is to be held in 
Stockholm on Dec. 10. 

The prize carries an award of 
1.8 .million kronor, about 
$225,000, this year. 

No French author had been 
chosen for the prize since 1964. 
when it was declined by Sartre, 
who contended that naming a 
wodd champion in literature 
corrupts the recipient. 

In 1969, the Irish writer Samu- 
el Beckett, who lives in France 
and many of whose works were 
wriiiai in French, won the prize. 

Mr. Simon, the 13th French 
winner since the prize was first 
awarded in 1901, also is a play- 
wright and essayist The acade- 
my has considered him for the 
prize for the past three years. 





"P 




Claude Simon at his borne in the sooth of France after 
the announcement that he had won the Nobel prize. 


“This is a courageous choice 
by the Nobel committee," said 
Roger Shaituck, professor of 
French at the University of Vir- 

a m Charlottesville and a 
g U.S. expert an French 
literature. 

“Simon’s works are neither 
popular nor traditional" Mr. 
Shatiuck said. “Simon has 
earned a place as a major writer 
working seriously to extend the 
relations between lan g ua g e, vi- 
rion and the novel form." 


Mr. Simon’s British publisher. 
John Colder, said: “For 30 years 
we have supported the outstand- 
ing contemporary French school 
of fiction known as the nouveau 
roman. Now' at last this much 
respected but considered uncom- 
mercial school has w on the No- 
bel prize in the person of its old- 
est member." 

The academy said that Mr. Si- 
mon's best known work is "The 
Flanders Road.” Published in 
(Continued on Page 5, CoL I) 


Marcos, Reagan Emissary Discuss 
Concerns About Manila’s Stability 


By Abby Tan 

Washington -Pan Strict 

MANILA — Preridpm Ferdi- 
nand E Marcos said Thursday that 
hthad a ‘‘fraakexriiangc of views" 
with. President Ronald Reagan’s 
special emissary, Senator Paul Lax- 
alt, over U-S. concerns that his re- 
gime is seriously threatened by a 
long-running Communist insnr- 

gency-' 

. Mr. Marcos made the statemait 
when he emerged from a meeting 
with Mr. Laxalt at the presidential 
palace. Stephen Bosworth, the UJL 
ambassador!© the Philippines, also 
was present at the meeting. 

Mr. Laxalt, a dose friend of Mr. 
Reagan, was sent to express Ufi. 
feats that Mr. Marcos's 20-year re- 
gime risked being overthrown un- 
less meaningful economic and po- 
litical reforms were achieved. The 
growing Communist insurgency re- 
portedly is threatening the security 
of two large UJS. mOitazy bases 
here: 

The senator’s visit was the most 


significant step by the U.S. admin- 
istration in reassessing its ties with 
the Philippines. It reflects growing 
Washington impatience with Mr. 
Marcos, who seems unable or re- 
luctant to institute changes. 

A spokesman for Mr. Marcos 
quoted him as saying that he and 
Mr. Laxalt “took up points where 
there may be some anticipated con- 
flict in the national interest of both 
the Philippines and the U.S.” and 
that “both agreed that the Philip- 
pines will have to take care -of its 
national interests." 

“This is the first guideline in any 
foreign policy," Mr. Marcos said. 

Mr. Marcos has expressed re- 
sentment over U.S. efforts to seek a 
shift in Philippine policy. The Rea- 
gan administration has pressed Mr. 
Marcos to dismantle economic mo- 
nopolies in the bands of his dose 
friends as well as to cany out mili- 
tary reforms to strengthen the 
armed forces. 

Mr. Marcos said that he and Mr. 


Laxalt also discussed the treaties 
between the two countries. 

The Philippines and the United 
States are bound by a mutual de- 
fense treaty and a bases agreement 
covering the use of two military 
bases in the country, which are the 
largest outside the United States. 
The United States has hinted that it 
might move the bases to the Mari- 
ana Islands if the Philippines be- 
came loo unstable. 

Mr. Laxalt left for Washington 
on Thursday. The senator, chair- 
man of the Republican Party, said 
he would report 10 Mr. Reagan first 
before be commented on his meet- 
ings with Mr. Marcos. 

The U.S. Embassy in Manila 
said the meetings were “cordial and 
mutually beneficial as befitting dis- 
cussions among long-standing al- 
lies and friends." 

■ Soldiers Blamed in Killings 
The head of a military team in- 
(Contmned on Page 5, CoL 2) 


By Loren Jenkins 

Washington Post Setvit e 

ROME — One or Italy's most 
stable postwar governments col- 
lapsed Thursday following internal 
political divisions and U.S. criti- 
cism arising from its handling of 
Iasi week's hijacking of the Italian 
cruise ship the Achille Lauro. 

Prime Minister Bettino Craxi. 
whose five- party coalition govem- 

Israel released a tape ft said 
proved Mohammed Abbas’s role 
in the hijacking. Page 2. 

mem was just 29 days short of 
being the longest-lasting Italian 
government since World War U, 
submitted his resignation to Presi- 
dent Francesco Cossiga after deliv- 
ering a long defense of his govern- 
ment’s actions to the Chamber of 
Deputies. 

The prime minister said that 
U.S. criticism of his handling of the 
hijacking “could not but provoke 
the strongest and displeased sur- 
prise as well as a feeling of bitter- 
ness." 

Mr. Cossiga accepted Mr. 
Craxi’s resignation but asked him 
to stay on in a caretaker role pend- 
ing consultations with party lead- 
ers about the designation of a new- 
prime minister. Italian analysis say 
that Mr. Cossiga may ask Mr. 
Craxi to uv to form a new govern- 
ment. 

The government's collapse be- 
came inevitable Wednesday when 
Defense Minister Giovanni Spado- 
lini, the head of the small but influ- 
ential and pro-U.S. Republican 
Parly, announced that he and the 
two other Republican ministers in 
the government were resigning be- 
cause of the government's handling 
of the affair. 

Mr. Spadolini also cited Mr. 
Craxi’s failure to consult with his 
coalition partners at the height of 
the crisis with the United States 
over its demands to extradite Mo- 
hammed Abbas, the Palestinian of- 
ficial who negotiated the hijackers' 
surrender. 

In a 40-minuie speech before 
parliament. Mr. Craxi criticized the 
“polemical tone" of the U.S. reac- 
tion to Italy's handling of the hi- 
jacking and its aftermath and said 
that Washington's criticism could 
only be the result of “an incomplete 
assessment of the facts and the cir- 
cumstances." 

He defended the legal grounds 
on which he allowed Mr. Abbas to 
leave Italy last Saturday despite 
strong demands from Washington 
that he be arrested pending extradi- 
tion on charges of having master- 
minded the hijack. 

At the same time, Mr. Craxi add- 
ed new details of (he the hijacking. 

He said that not only did the 
United States force an Egyptian 
Boeing 737 with the hijackers and 
Mr. Abbas on board to land on 
Italian soil on Oct. 1 1 after it was 
intercepted by U.S. Navy jets, but, 
without permission, it also landed 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 4) 



The Auoosnrf Frau 

Prime Minister Bettino Craxi of Italy bitterly attacked the 
United States hi the Chamber of Deputies on Thursday 
before be formally presented his government’s resignation. 


Shultz Persuaded Reagan 
To Observe Limits on SDI 


By Don Oberdorfer 

Washington Pfal Smite 

WASHINGTON —Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz persuaded 
President Ronald Reagan to pre- 
serve key limits of the Ami-Ballis- 
tic Missile Treaty in an emotionally 
charged meeting with a few top 
officials at the White House last 
Friday, administration sources say. 

Mr. Reagan's decision, an- 
nounced Monday by Mr. Shultz, 
partially reversed a shift in policy 
concerning work on a UJS. space- 
based anti-missile system an- 
nounced a week earlier by Robert 
C. McFarlane. White House na- 
tional security adviser, and strong- 
ly advocated by Defense Secretary 
Caspar W. Weinbeiger. 

Mr. Shultz. Mr. McFarlane. Mr. 
Weinberger and Director Kenneth 
L Adelman of the .Arms Control 
and Disarmament Agency are re- 
ported 10 have been the only offi- 
cials present with Mr. Reagan 
when a new ABM policy was for- 
mulated in wbat one administra- 



U.S. Growth Rate Expanded to 3.3% in Summer 


By Martin Crucsinger 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The econo- 
my, after six months of disappoint- 
ing growth, picked up steam during 
the summer, but the pace still re- 
mained below the rebound predict- 
ed by the Reagan administration, 
the government reported Thurs- 
day. 

The Commerce Department said 
that the gross national product, the 
broadest measure of economic 
health, grew at a 3.3-percem annual 
rate from July through September. 

This represented a three-fold in- 
crease over the anemic I.I -percent 
growth rate turned in during the 
first six months of the year. 

In a separate report, the depart- 
ment said that construction of new 
bouses and apartments plunged 9.3 
percent in September, the biggest 
drop since May. 

The sharp decline lowered the 
annual budding rate to a seasonally 

adjusted 1.58 million units last 
month, the slowest since October 


1984. It followed a rate of 1.75 
million units in August. 

The GNP figure represented an 
upward revision from an initial 
“flash" estimate made last month, 
which put third-quarter growth at 
18 percent. 

However, the administration was 
predicting growth in the second 
half of the year would increase five- 
fold. On the basis of this optimism, 
the administration forecast growth 
for the entire year of 3 percent. 

But private economists are say- 
ing growth will average only 
around 2 percent this year, a slug- 
gish rate that would qualify as a 
“growth recession," a period when 
economic activity picks up so slow- 
ly that unemployment rises. 

While the economy strengthened 
in the July-September quarter, 
many private economists are wor- 
ried that growth will slacken again 
in the final three months. 

They base their concern on the 
belief that little has been done to 
solve one of the country's biggest 
problems, a flood of foreign im- 


ports cutting into sales of U.S. 
manufacturers. 

The weakness in manufacturing 
has dampened overall growth as 
both income and employment have 
shown little improvement this year. 

The GNP report showed that in- 
flation remained well under control 
during the summer. 

Another inflation measure, 
which is tied to the GNP and mea- 
sures a fixed group of items, rose at 
an annual rate of 2.9 percent in the 
July-September quarter, down 
from a 3.9-percent rate of increase 
in the second quarter. That had 
been the best inflation perfor- 
mance in more than 13 years. 

The upturn in economic activity 
in the third quarter followed a 
barely perceptible 0.3-percent 
growth rate in lbe first three 

months of the year and a slightly 
better 1.9- per cent rate in the sec- 
ond quarter. 

The changes in the GNP were 
expressed with the effects of infla- 
tion taken out These changes left 


the inflation-adjusted GNP at an 
annual level of St. 68 trillion. 

Before inflation was removed, 
the GNP grew at an annual rate of 
6.7 percent in the third quarter fol- 
lowing a 4.5-percent second-quar- 
ter rise. The changes left the cur- 
rent-dollar GNP at a level of $3.92 
trillion in the third quarter. 

With inflation taken out, the 
GNP grew at an estimated annual 
rate of 1.8 percent in the first nine 
months of this year, close io the 2- 
percent annual growth predicted 
by many private analyst*. 

To reach the administration's 3- 
percent projection, growth in the 
Octobcr-Deccmber quarter would 
have to soar at a 6.7-percent pace. 

Private analysis are divided 
about the economy's future. Some 
predict strengthening based on 
strong consumer demand during 
the Christinas buying season. Oth- 
ers see a slight drop from the third- 
quarter level based on the belief 
that many consumers will curtail 
buying because of their large debts. 


- TfcaMoecMdPna 

St Lonis won the National League baseball champion- 
ship to set up a Worid Series with Kansas City. Page 17. 

- INSIDE 

■ lbe UN General Assentty rqecied an Arab move to challenge 

IsraeTsseatin the 159-nationbody. Page 1 

■ Hopffang blocked U.& aid intended for N i ca rag ua n rebds. reports 

said. ■ • . Page 3. 

■ Sooth Africa blocked a trip to Zambia by eight white students to 

meet guerrillas of the African National Congress. Page 4. 

WEEKEND' 

■ frdriAufity and. expressiveness seem to be making a comeback 

among young instrumental soloists. . Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ BaakAmerica Corp. reported a drop in third-quarter profit, bucking 

the trend of major U.& banks. ’ Page if. 


Ancient Plague Is Reported Similar to Toxic Shock 


BOSTON — A plague that swept Athens 
from 430 to 427 B.C M killing tens of thousands 
of people and paving the way for the ancient 
city’s decline, was caused by a disease similar to 
unde shod: syndrome, a team of medical re- 
searches concluded in a report published 
Thursday. 

Using a detailed description of the epidemic 
written by Thucydides, a general who survived 
an attack of the disease, the team contended 
that the victims had died from a combination of 
influenza and infection by smpbylococcus bac- 
teria. 

The initial influenza infection allowed the 
staphylococcus bacteria to grow in the mem- 
branes of the respiratory system and in skin 
wounds, they said. The bacteria, in turn, re- 
leased poisons that proved fatal to many of the 
victims. 


The research team, ted by wo doctors, Alex- 
ander Longmuir. a retired chief of epidemiology 
at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control in At- 
lanta. and Thomas Worthen, of the University 
of Arizona, said the mechanism is similar to the 
one that kills in toxic shock syndrome. 

Toxic shock is caused by a poison produced 
by a form of the staphylococcus bacterium. 
Victims suffer fever, kw blood pressure, a rash 
and occasionally gangrene. 

The syndrome was recognized in 1978. short- 
ly before an outbreak in the United States 
linked it to the use of highly absorbent tampons. 

The researchers, writing in the New England 
Journal of Medicine, also suggested that the 
disease responsible for the Athens plague may 

still exist 

"It may be present now at such low frequency 
that no one has yet identified a sufficient num- 
ber of cases” to recognize it as a separate dis- 


ease, they said. Because both the influenza virus 
and the staphylococcus bacterium can easily 
change from one form to another, the disease 
“may reappear as a minor or even major mani- 
festation in some future epidemic or pandemic 
of influenza." the team warned. 

.According to Thucydides' account, a victim 
developed fever, redness of the eyes, tongue and 
throat, a violent cough, vomiting, diarrhea, blis- 
tering skin, open sores and an extreme sensitiv- 
ity to touch. In some cases, sufferers lost fingers, 
toes or genitals. There were cases of blindness 
and severe amnesia. 

With a death rate of 33 percent, the city was 
ill-prepared to fight its war with Spam, and its 
cultural dominance began to fade. 

Previous investigators have suggested that 
smallpox, scarlet fever, measles, typhoid fever 
and other diseases caused the plague. 


lion source called a “knock-down, 
drag-out meeting." 

CBS News reported Wednesday 
night that Mr. Shultz had prevailed 
after “a subtle threat of resigna- 
tion" was conveyed to the White 
House. CBS said that Mr. Shultz 
had told close associates “that un- 
less he’s allowed greaier input on 
crucial decisions concerning arms 
control, his very presence in the 
administration could be in ques- 
tion." 

A State Depanmem spokesman 
quoted Mr. Shultz as saying the 
CBS account was “nonsense." 

[Edward P. Djerejian, the deputy 
White House press secretary, said 
Thursday (hat the reports were 
“very inaccurate in almost every 
respect,” The Associated Press re- 
ported from Washington. He said 
the question of Mr. Shultz threat- 
ening to resign was “sheer fanta- 
sy."] 

Previously, the 1972 ABM treaty 
had been construed by the United 
Slates as limiting testing and devel- 
opment of ami-ballistic missile sys- 
tems based on exotic technologies 
such as lasers and directed energy 
■weapons. Many elements of Mr. 
Reagan's Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive are based on such technology. 

A new Pentagon legal study ar- 
gued that the Soviet negotiators in 
1969-72 never accepted the limits 
on exotic technology and therefore 
the United Slates was not bound to 
do so. This position, which had not 
yet been formally accepted within 
the administration, was unexpect- 
edly made public by Mr. McFar- 
lane on Oct. 6 and affirmed as 
administration policy in a briefing 
two days later. 

The White House meeting took 
place Friday as Mr. Shultz pre- 
pared to speak Monday to a San 
Francisco meeting of legislators 
from North Atlantic Treaty Orga- 
nization countries. Mr. Shultz also 
was preparing to fly from San 
Francisco to Brussels to see NATO 
foreign ministers, who were show- 
ing signs of dismay about the new 
ABM stance. 

As a result of the meeting. Mr. 
Shultz was able to tell both groups 
that Mr. Reagan had decided to 
continue to conduct the Strategic 
Defense Initiative program “in ac- 
cordance with a restrictive inter- 
pretation" of the ABM treaty even 
though the administration believed 
that the - new interpretation was 
“fully justified." 

in’ effect, Mr. Shultz said that 
Mr. Reagan agreed with the new 
legal interpretation, which would 
allow virtually unrestricted testing 
and development of space-based 
weapons, but would continue to 

pursue the program under greater 
restrictions as a measure of volun- 
tary self-restraint 

Mr. Shultz suggested that ihe 

self-restraint would not end soon. 
He said in Brussels that “we ha^c 
designed our research program to 
fall within the narrower definition 
of Lhe ABM treaty's provisions, 
and we intend to keep it that way." 

Assistant Secretary of Defense 
Richard N. Perle, whose office 
originated the new legal interpreta- 
tion, said Wednesday that “with 
respect to the future. 'it remains to 
be seen" whether the United Steles 
will continue to accept a restrictive 
interpretation of the treaty. 









Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1985 


Israelis Release Tape of Abbas, 
Say It Shows He Ran Hijacking 


By William Claiborne 

Washington Post Service 

JERUSALEM — Israel has re- 
leased a partial transcript of a ship- 
toshore telephone conversation 
between a Palestinian guerrilla 
leader, Mohammed Abbas, and the 
hijackers of the Achihe Lauro that 


tradition request “legally unfound- 
ed.’' Mr. Abbas bad flown to Yugo- 


Shipboard Investigation 

John Tagtiabue of The New York 


sla™ after tolm . smliorife Tinn rqZmi jm» (knoa, UM . 

declined to hold him.] - - nr» . 


Officials said that 24 Italian 


The transcript ora conversation pr0MaimSi pofa 

that the Israeli spokesman sad ofrtdaU boarttedlhe Achffle Unto 


“S PtoOo, 9 skon-ed drat Ivtr. a t sk, ^ it headed For its home port 
Abbas told the four hijackers not to al 


it'said proved Mr. Abbas was in h ? r ™ The dcdsioD t0 tegto the in ves Li- 

con trol of the hijackers at least dux- §*“ “ d , S J S A SL S 3 ^ 11 of hijacking and the kill- 


andcaptnm.An.tattricannassen- 5 * S KESKtak 
ger. Leon Klinghoffer, 69. was sh f n , Md lhe 


The Israeli Army command said {■»?£. 
Wednesday that intelligence offi- “ijf? ^ *' 
cers had given the transcript to the The uansci 


LTvTs^^ shi P ***** ,and reflected the 

lied Oct. a. sense of urgency surrounding the 

The transcript quotes Mr. Abbas case, which has cast a shadow over 


Italian authorities before Mr. Ab- as telling the hijackers to explain to the close ties between Italy and the 
bas was allowed to leave Italy for those on board that “our objective” United Slates. 

Yugoslavia on Saturday night, os- was not to hijack the vessel. The The investigation is being han- 
tensibly because there was a lack of group Mr. Abbas beads, the Pales- died by prosecutors from Genoa, 
evidence linking him to the hijack- due Liberation Front, has previ- where the Achiile Lauro set out 
ers. ously said the original plan was to Oct 3 for an 1 1-day Mediterranean 

An armv spokesman said tbe use the vessel to infiltrate guerrillas cruise, and from Catania, Sicily, 
transcript was being released in re- into Israel The front is a faction of where die four hijacking suspects 
sponse to requests by reporters the Palestine Liberation Organiza- were arrested last Friday after an 
seeking evidence to support an Is- don, which is headed by Yasser airliner carrying them from Cairo 
radi claim that Mr. Abbas was not Arafat. was forced down. 

only a negotiator in the surrender Until Wednesday night. Israel 

of the hijackers to Egyptian au- had refused to provide d etail s of 



* tl 
■ u (> l 

I# . 


-iU 


TtaAttMfeMdPmi 

Leon Klinghoffer posed for this picture by a friend on tbe 
Achiile Lauro last week. Mr. Klinghoffer, who was partly 
paralyzed because of a stroke, was killed by the hijackers. 


AoodcMsl Pm 

The AchQIe Lauro puDed into the dock at Genoa on Thursday to, end an 11-day ordeal after' 
being hijacked in die Mediterranean. The cruise ship carried more than 400 passengers. 


only a negotiator in the surrender 
of the hijackers to Egyptian au- 


thorities in Port Said, but was a key Mr-. Abbas' alleged involvement. 


figure in the ship's takeover. 


saying that to do so would compro- 


[In Yugoslavia, the government mise intelligence sources. The Is- 
Thursday formally rejected a U.S. radi government has not supplied 


UN Assembly Rejects Arab Attempt to Oust Israel 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Security Council with the United 
States abstaining. 


request for the extradition of Mr. evidence connecting Mr. Arafat By Elaine Sciolino Security Council with the United The vole was almost identical to 

Abbas, who was believed to have with the incident. York Times Service States abstaining. last year’s result, when 80 members ence, which would include Israel n,/ varu*™** rsJP* 

left the country Monday, The As- The English-language transcript, UNITED NATIONS — The "Because of the Tunisia raid, we opposed Iran’s initiative to oust Is- an Arab delegate said. nJSESnnThSrSSS u£ft • ' 

sedated Pre^reported From Bel- which an array command spokes- Geoeral ^*mbly has rejected an thought .1 was high fae to give a tbsL AQ were in favor and 23 ab- , Algeria Won’t Attend dA^£E 

p ra rir man said was part of a converse- attempt bv 18 Arab defecations to message lo the world about con- stained. _ ,. ... , “ 7 . Y . J ‘iY'r , j 

tion" as the Achiile Lauro lay at chaSge Israel’s seat mtiie 159- Israeli expansionism,’’ said In a news conference after the - ' 

anchor off Port Said, suggested nation bodv. All the Arab mem- Kuwait’s chief delegate to the Arab assembly vote, Benjamin Netan- Al^a ranged plans to al- gM-to dM Fmmsh Foreign Ministry, the spokesman sad. He deefined . 
that Mr. Abbas knew the hijackers bers. except Egypt, Jordan and group this month, Mohammad yahu, Israel’s chief delegate, called the United Nations 40th an- to give details. . ■ _ ... ... , 3 . 

byname. Om^t^mSd the Semm Abulhasan. h a "siamticant defeat” forits Arab nversaiyceremtm.es the FMaud s Foragn Mmtsay saripoEce had shot at the amtaaafc* 


left the country Monday, The As- The English-language transcript. 


The vote was almost identical to call for an international confer- PortUgUCSC EhVOY PrOtCStS ShoOtillff 
yt Year’s result when 80 members wire* whi.^h would mrJnde Israel 15. _ ■ • _ • _ O 


|The government called the ex- 


Israel Sentences 4 in Plot 


HELSINKI (Reuters) — The Portuguese ambassador, to Finland 
protested on Thursday an incident in which Finmsii polk* shot at his car 
as he tried to drive away from a roadblock, an embassy spokesman sad, 
Ambassador Antonio Cabral de Mancada personally delivered the - 
protest to the Famish Foreagn Miniary, the spokesman said. He deefined '. 


To Attack U.S. Embassy 

Reuters 


Mr. Abbas is quoted as saying: Wednesday. 


leaders of the Palestine Liberation car Friday night, pun ct u r in g one onto tires, after fee ambassador refused 


“Listen to me weU. First of all. the 


„ . . crvmcnrc MnArinltv >u>niiv (hmu M»»WS 01 ure raiesone uooauau riiiikvy rngui, pu 

South Afnca is the only US OrganiraUon and the South-West to obey an order to 


The move to oust Israel from the 

sneral Assemb v has become an AitkA,..k «r support than last year. f .^ 7 . j j 


passengers should be treated veiy General Assembly has become an been rweeted. Although South At- su PP ort 
welL In addition, you must apolo- annual effort since it was first tried „ca remains a member; it has not . V 1 * c 


been excluded, Tlie Associated Embassy denied that. 


out and tried to drive away. Finnish ; 
igeroudy. but the spokesman for the 1 


seven years for plotting to attack objective is. Can you hear me 
the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv last well?" 


year, court officials said. 

The police disclosed in Decern- 


that Arab delegations had done Ht- 


ine snip, leu mem wnai your main of support oy mem Der nations. lenced because of its sWem nf tenoea 10 pass, iney pointea out " * cml onvi. 

objecuve is. Can you hear me T hV challenge sponsored ipffieii ^ ° dra t Arab d elegation, had done Et- ^J gJS& ^SL 1 ! 

weU7 Wednesday, which followed a deci- The United States has repeatedly de to persuade others to 

The answer from, the hijacker sion last week at a meeting of the threatened to walk out of the Unit- v0 * e * OT “ iar ameildmen ^ 

identified as “Majed” was: “Right, 21 -member “Arab group,” was an ed Nations and withhold its annual “The last tiring the Arabs want is -m/r* • 


and Sam Nujoma, SWAPO’s lead- Britain's Sikh community were charged in court Thursday with plotting' 
er, as “unfortunate and unjust.” to murder Prime Minister Rajiv f&m flit of India during his visit to - 
^ Britain this week, court sources said. * 

The accused were amone 15 Indians detained under f he Prewmrifmnr ^' 11 ' 


ber that they had foOed a plot to we talked to them and we told them attempt to prevent Iran from intro- contribution, which amounts to 25 Israel’s expulsion from the United 

throw hand grenades at the embas- that our objective was not to take during the issue as it has for the last percent of the UN budget, if Isra- Nations," a Western delegate said. 

sy- control of the ship. Roger?" three years. Iran bos persistently el's credentials are rejected. Even Kuwait’s Mr. Abu l hasan 

Z__ 1 Israeli officials have maintained attacked Arab reticence to chal- Several Arab diplomats said they said, “You oould call it a symbolic 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


that Mr. Abbas, in league with Mr. lenge Israel as “un-Islamic" behav- believed their challenge, which gesture. 


Arafat, planned to place the hijack- ior. 


came in the form of an amendment In recent Security Council de- 


ers aboard the Italian ship with the “We did not want Iran to make to the report of the Credentials bates on the Israeli raid and the 


SACHaors •master's . doctorate 

fer Wo*. Acndwnfc. Iff* Expwfanc* 


intent of infiltrating them into the the challenge in the nam<» of Is- Committee, would gain a few more Palestinian question, Arab delega- 
Israeli port of Ash dod for a terror lam," said Clovis Maksoud, the votes this year because of its Arab lions overwhelmingly repeated 
°P erat “> n - Arab League’s permanent UN ob- sponsorship. their call for an international con- 

Mr. Abbas and other leaders of server. “We had to co-opt Iran. 


Ministers 
In Lebanon 
Review Pact 


The accused were among 15 Indians detained under the Prevention of 1 
Terrorism Act before Mr. Gandhi arrived Monday for a two-day visit 
The other 11 were later released. The police announced the alleged pfct j 

Wednesday night. 24 hours after Mr. GandhTs depart u re for a Co rnmnn . ft l » 
wealth meeting in the B ahama* 

One of the defendants, Jarnwil Smgh Bannana, 45, a mmpany /tinxxifr, - 1 

was also charged with illegal possession of a revolver. The other accused L^U 
were identified as Sukhvinder Singh GUI 30, a dyer; Haxsrinder Srn gh 
Rai, 30, a company director; and Parmatma Singh Marwaha, 43, a 
factory owner. • (Reuters, AP) 


Aid 


Send detailed resume 
for free evaluation. 


onsorship. their call for an international con- 

But the vote, which was taken on ferenoe with the participation of all 


United Press International 
BEIRUT — The Lebanese cabi- 


Progress Reported in Duarte Case 


PAORC WESTBtN UNIVBtSITY 

' S00 N. Sepulveda BIvcL 

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the Palestine Liberation Front had The move also was intended to a procedural maneuver introduced concerned parties under the auspic- net met Thursday for the first time c»xr cai VATV^n fNVTi — 

already admitted that the hijackers refocus attention on Israel's air raid by Sweden to prevent the introduc- es of the United Nations'. in two months asfightingbrokeout ^ 

had planned to land at Ashdod. 0 n the Tunisian headquarters of tion of the Arab amendment, was ~ - okm. •!« «tv»« Onw. l.i»<hn» - aTCDmsDO P 01 ^ ^ alvador 


T . - . . , . — — - - : 1 — -vra w. u. u , uavw »uu UM ih . Jordan and Oman refrained the dtys Green Line despite ^ ^ 

seized the the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 80 in favor of not taking action on from cosponsoring tbe amendment a 1 cease-fire agreement betwem Naoole&i Date’s 

ship only after they were discov- tion two weeks ago. The raid was the Arab proposal and 41 opposed, because the expulsion of Israel Ctosmn and Moslem militia lead- mild hr rraoNed by the 

ered by the ships crewmen. condemned unanimously by the with 20 abstentions. would be “inconsistent” with the .. . end of this week. • 




The cabinet meeting was called 


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Forces militia, Amal and the c _ 0 ___ _ _ 'r • 

Druze-lcd Progressive Socialist at. LaMTCBlCe SeaWBY Still Blocked - 

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field commanders to trouble mots Wflt ^ a yd°sed. The closure has forced dapping compa- : • . 

on the Green Line, which senates ^ t *ips and lay off wodceis. . 

Beirut into Moslem and Christian f Authonty said work began Thursday. to . 

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PrimeMhiirter Rashid Karami, Monday, halting traffic m both directions. 


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mayd for the first tune, since heavy 0n ®^ esea ?^ r ' Id ® n 8 >he vessels costs an estimated ■" 

fighting between rival Moslem mi- » 10.000 to 520,000 per ship each day. 

litias erupted in Tripdi in Septan- ■ TT (1ni __ 

ber, state-run Beirut television said. JUCIPOCratB IJPVP.ll Plfln ayn IJ_S TraHp 
Lebanese newspapers said the wa^urwr-mv r*wv . . v . 

tentative peace agreement between — Democrats m the House of Representativts 

the Christian Lebanese Forces, nwomme^ations Thursday to dose the $150- . - 

Amal and the Progressive Socialist -SSKSiSf® d f iat ofthe Umted by cutting the value of The dollar 1 : 
Party would be submitted to Mr. tiSTS? 0 ?,»v p0r ^ . , „ ' 

Gemayel and leaders of the Sunni ^ House Demxratic Trade Task Force, •> 

. Moslem community for their ap- for re f?^S®P r and quotas, an issue that r 

provaL 2- j S e P* 1 ?' R{ V re scotative Bill Alexander, a Democrat of Arian- 

. The peace accord would be package would Wot* U.S. partiripation in any new round of 

signed next week by leaders of the i^tiatora attacked the problem of 

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By Stephen. Kinzer 

New York Times Service 

MANAGUA — Opposition ac- 
tivists at divided on the im p a ct of 
the government’s announcement 
roesaay that it -was imposing 
sweeping restrictions on civil 

tighlS. 

^Someactmsts said they feared 
me restrictions would mean the end 
^political debate in Nicaragua. - 
jpttt others said the hew measures 
— H not have so drastic an inj- 

Jn some cases, the decree mendy 
tonnafaes whai has been standard 
practice. For example, many politi- 
. M .nj ' eaj activist say their mail has been 
: ^!5 89 1 U, • feonitoied for years. ! 

- J The right to assembly, officially 

guaranteed until now, has been 
I \ I) t»T\ li m ited in practice because the gov- 
•*-* O n iPhr, emmenl has prohibited some meet- 
• mgs and pnygovenunem demo* 

strators have disrupted others. 

1 1 \ |) p Some leading domestic aides of 

_ - 1 * ^t(Slc to *e governing Sandmist Front said 
' - that the new decree would severely 
_ •£>.. , ' hamper their work. 

" -“The peaceful, civic struggle in- 
• . ;* ts-T 5 *: side Nicaragua is over. 1 ’ said Enri- 

que Sotelo Borgen, a Conservative 
politician who is a member of the 
National Assembly. “The freedoms 
' j.. that were once limited are now 

~ ,> e^ -eliminated en fry^y w 

- - .. 7 %; - Several anti- Sandinist politicians 
' : *3s- said that if the new measures clwni - 

nate the possibility of political op- 
position, the measures will likdy 
^Ikhsinf' prompt more Nicaraguans who chs- 

1 ^ baftfc hke the government to take up 

. - , arms alongside UiL-badted insnr- 
gents. 



^Hondurans 

^Block U.S. 
'Contra 9 Aid 


. The enw^e^of h^hant pro- 
tests by labocumdris doniroBed by 
the SooaHst a^ Communist par- 
tieswas said t(?fewTieea>factor. 

On Tuesttey ;a pp an - nd y acting 
under provKioos.of the new decree, 
government agents -adzed 'the first 
edition of a newspaper published 
by the Roman Church 

and siitf they -wbuld not jtermft 
subsequent editions. An Interior 
Ministry cOTUBuniqrt sad the pa- 
per contained material that was 
“not rdigious but hi ghly p olitical " 

■ Qnffcb toSpeakOnt 

The CalbdicChnrdt wiH speak 
cait in Nicaragua “from the pedpit” 
despite the suspension of Tree 
Speech, the archbishop ofMana- 
ma. Cardinal Miguel Obando y 
Bravo,- said Wednesday, Agence 
Franec-Presse reported from Ma- 


al Obando y Bravo said 



al guarantees is a ^dwrniietingmMh 
sore and a step towatutotafiiarian- 
ism, but we wul deliver ipur message 
from the pulpit.” . 

■ Visa Delay Afleged 
The Sandtmsr government has 
accused the United States of un- 
necessary delays in issuing a visa to 
allow President Damd Ortega Saa- 
vedra to visit the United Nations. Jt 
called the delay “another trampling 
of the dignity of our country.* 

But on Thursday, the State De- 
partment said, the Sandimst leader 
would have the visa before his 
scheduled departure Friday. 

Foreign Minister Miguel d*Es- 
coto Brockmami had sent a note of 


Daniel Ortega Saavedra 

protest Wednesday to Secretary of 
Stale George P. Shultz, noting that 
the request had been made “days 
ago" and that no answer or ac- 
knowledgment had been received. 

U.S. officials, who asked not to 
be identified, conceded that the ad- 
mbristrafion had beat slow to act 
on Mr. Ortega’s application, partly 
because of his planned appear- 
ances in other UJS. dries. 

They said it was undear whether 
the administration would restrict 
Mr. Ortega's visit to his UN ap- 
pearance or allow him to visit the 
other points on his itinerary. 

Some officials have contended 
that no. UJ3. purpose would be 
served by permuting Mr. Ortega to 
keep his appointments, outside 
New York, while others have said 
be should be allowed to travel, ac- 
cording to the sources. 

Bat a Nicaraguan Embassy 
spokeswoman, Sarah Porta, said 
tnar Mr. Ortega dr o p p ed his 
plans to travd outside New York. 


iv\* 


t 



The Associated Press 

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — 


ir * l • n t cUUdviAUfA, Honduras — 

! * l,; j «il Dlliyfylj The Honduran government has 
* seized the first smpmeint of UA 
humanitarian aid intended for re- 
jP*%bels trying to overthrow the Nica- 
jf iaguan government, according to 

¥ news reports hoe. 

jf Foreign Minister Ed garrip Paz 

aft Banrica said the shipment had ar- 
t”'’. rived in Honduras without the gov- 

* ^ i OTiment’s knowledge and an ur- 

gent meeting of the country's 
* v* National Security Council would 

be Called to digams the incident- - 
40 , . ' He did not say when the meeting 
would be held, arid (Ed 'not com- 
- merit 6 n a.mew^aper rnort that- 
. s the cargo had been seized.^- ... . 
-jK-'-l "Honduras is a dose ‘.US. ally,. 
JBl f find has aUowed extexuave nrilitmy 
dflH I maneuvers by US. troc^JS to take 
MyHmJ^place on its territory. But it sp- 
gliPl neared to be leery about j)Iaymg a 
<firca role in the delivery of aid to 
||g|Jl|w the “contra” guerrillas righting the 
^ ^^BW I^an&rist government 
HM' “This is a very delicate matta” 
ffP g fl BM H 'Mr. Paz Banrica said at a news. 

conference; "This cargo effectively 
arrived without the knowledge of 
iw®.* the government of Honduras.” 

, The supplies, purchased with- 
i* , • i Miji RloCk P 3 ^ of the *27 million in humaxri- 
* • > •* tl ■ ■“* tari»n aid authorized last summer 
. by the U^S. Congress, arrived late 
- -_ . • last weds at Toncontin airport in 
_ Tegucigalpa. 

... A Tegucigalpa newspaper, El 
_ . & '■ Heraldo, rqwrted Wednesday that 

' the shipment had been seized and 

. was being bdd at an armed forces 

center near the capital. 

■' H Heraldo quoted the com- 

' mander-in-chief of the armed 

- forces. General Walter L 6 pez 
Reyes, as saying. “Our country 
cannot, under any circumstances, 

r if alkiw this type of operation, which 
;j iMjji j)fl’- ,L lends to inflict serious moral dam- 
*- • : ‘ , age to the Honduran nation." . : 

• _ .7’ •• The general said that 14 tons of 
_ .T.’-c5 ' medical equipment, boots and uni- 

- ■"■■■ forms being sent to the guerrillas 

r r ji were sozed when a DC -6 tran^xnt 
v ' plane landed in T^urigalpa. 

- ■ • .“We will not tolerate a similar 

. offense, nor can we admit this car- 

'~ 's go or allow others" to enter! the 

' country, he was quoted as saying. 

’' Y-rS- - Mr. Paz Barnica would not dab- 

- ' ’j- orate on General Ldpezfs com- 
m men is. 

- A U^. Embassy spokesman, Ar- 
^ thurSkop, said Wednesday that rite 
' Y; shipment contained medical sop- 
plies paid for by the UiL govern- 
ment, but that “ transportation ax- 
, rangements” were made by 

. represen tati^ of the Nicaraguan 

* l T , : f _i Democratic Force, the main rebel 
group. 

. . Mr. Skop would not discuss any 

,i possible U^. involvement in the 
' transportation of the supplies out 

. - > > of the United States and would not 

^ " say whether shipments to rebds in 

Honduras would be attempted 

a flnin 

yi • The embassy, aware of Hocdu- 
l ras’s sensitivity over the presence of 

- • r^. ■;? Nicar aguan rebds on its soil, has 

- J said it will play no role in the distri- 

. ilJ'j butioa or maritoring of md. 

Y- i? ' ' • T^ e rebels are fighting to over- 
'"Y- j t throw the leftist Sandimst gqvem- 
ment 


DEATH NOTICE 



VISITING RIO’S POOR — President Francois Mit- 
terrand of France, right, with Governor Leonel de 
Moura &izola of Rio de Janeiro state, visiting a shnn in 
Rio. Mr. Mitterrand b oo a five-day visit to Brazfi. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TEIBtJNE, FRIDA Y, OCTOBER 18, 1985 


Utah Police 
Tie Mormon 
Hurt in Blast 
To 2 Deaths 

The Associated Press 

SALT LAKE OTY — A Mor- 
mon researcher, seriously injured 
when a bomb exploded in his car, 
has been accused by the police of 
responsibility for two fatal explo- 
sions linked to a diluted account 
of the church's origins. 

The police said Marie W. Hof- 
mann was expected to be charged 
with violation of U.S. firearms and 
explosives laws in connection with 
Tuesday's bomb deaths of a Mor- 
mon bishop and the wife of another 
church history enthusiast. 

They said they believed the 
bomb that exploded in Mr. Hof- 
mann's car went off accidentally. 

' Mr. Hofmann was blown from 
his parked car in Salt Lake Gty <m 
Wednesday afternoon. He was fist- 
ed in saious but stable oonduion 
Thursday at a local hospital. 

In 1984, Mr. Hofmann reported- 
ly sold the bishop, Steven F. Chris- 
tensen, a document called the “Sal- 
amander Letter," which eh»ngng «s 
official accounts of (he founding of 
the dmrch, known formally as the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
day Saints. 

Police were unclear about what 
the motive might have been for the 
two bombings. 

But friends and associates said 
that Mr. Hofmann b^rrw dis- 
traught when Mr. Christensen 
could not make payment on an 
expensive document they believe 
he had agreed to buy. 

Searches of Mr. Hofmann's 
home and car uncovered evidence 
linking him to Tuesday’s bomb- 
ings, the police said. Mr. Hofmann 
is a former Mormon missionary 
and deal er in historical documents. 

The police said it was possible 
that others may have been involved 
in the bombings that KIWI Bishop 
Christensen and Kathy < *h^»$ - 50. 
the wife of J. Gary Sheets, a former 
business associate of the bishop 
who helped finance a S20.QGO study 
to determine the authenticity of the 
“Salamander Letter." 

The letter, which Mr. Hofmann 
reportedly sold to the bishop for 
$40,000, questions accounts of how 
the church's founder, Joseph 
Smith, acquired gold plates he , 
claimed to have translated into the : 
“Book of Mormon," the faith’s 
most treasured scripture. 

Bishop Christensen tinned the 
letter over to leaders of the Mor- 
mon Church in early 1984. Its au- 
thenticity is a matter of debate. 

The nderence to a salamander 
came from an assertion in the letter 
that Smith was prevented at first 
from gaining possession of the 
{dates by an “old spirit” that had 
transformed itself from a while sal- 
amander. 

After Tuesday’s explosions, the 
police said at first that they were 
focusing their investigations on 
CFS Financial Corp., a financially 
troubled investment company 
founded 12 years ago by Mr. 
Sheets. 

But the authorities also began 
looking at the “Salamander Letter" 
connection and said they were 
searching for Mr. Hofmann as a 
suspect at the time of the apparent- 
ly accidental explosion. 



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SOUTH GERMAN STATE LOTTERY 


Mayor on dash With MOVE Radicals 


By Lindsey Gtuson 

A Jew York Times Service 

PHILADELPHIA — The city’s 
former managing director has con- 
tradicted key details of Mayor W. 
Wilson Goode’s testimony about 
the confrontation. May 13 with the 
radical-group MOVE. 

Appearing before a panel that 
the mayor appointed to investigate 
the confrontation, the former man- 
aging director, Leo A. Brooks, said 
the mayor was mistflloai -when he 
said he did not know die details of 
the police plan to assault the 
MOVE house. Eleven MOVE 
members were killed in the assault, 
which toadied off a fire that de- 
stroyed a .neighborhood. 

Mr. Brooks, who resigned short- 
ly after the confrontation, saying 
that he wanted to spend more time 
with his family, said he had told die 
mayor that the police planned to 
use explosives and that they would 
diiop a bomb from a heKcopter. 

. In. both of these points, Mr. 


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Mr. Goode said Tuesday that his 
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Brooks and the poKce commission- 
er, Gregore J. Sambor,hSd misfe d, 
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Mr. Brooks, however, said the 
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siege, which culminated when the 
police dropped a bomb on the 
MOVE house. 

Mr. Goode said be was given too 
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bomb and that he was never told 
that it would be dropped from a 
helicopter. However, he said he 
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dropped. 


But Mr. Brooks, who supervised 
the day-to-day operations of the 
city government's 10 departments, 
said be bad told Mr. Goode that the 
police would use a helicopter to 
deliver the bomb to avoid being 
fired upon. . 

[Mr. Sambor also contradicted 
Mr. Goode, testifying Thursday 
that the mayor was told before May 
13 of the plan to use explosives. 
United Press International report- 
ed. It said he had accepted respon- 
sibility for the overall plan, saying 
no one would have died if MOVE 
members had left the house.] 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1985 


Liverpool — Dreaming of Rebirth but Facing a Dismal Present 


By Jo Thomas 

New York Times Service 

LONDON — The once areai 


port of Liverpool, which 

when Britain :> trade shifted from 
the west coast to the east, is experi- 
encing a rebirth these days. But not 
without complications. 

The city council, locked in battle 
with the national government over 
the city’s budget deficit, now plans 
to lay off its 31,100 employees for 
the month of January. And no one 
has found a solution yet for the 
troubled, racially mixed neighbor- 
hood of Toxteth, where unemploy- 
ment and anger are running espe- 
cially high. 

Flans for turning Liverpool into 
a center for tourism focus on the 
city’s greatest asset, its waterfront. 
At the Albert Dock, which only a 
few years ago was choked with 
slime, dean water flows through 
new river gates, and the place is 
alive with the sound of workmen. 
Historic dock and warehouse 
buildings are being transformed 
into shops, bars and restaurants. 

The Tate Gallery will open its 
northern gallery there, near the 
maritime museum, and up-scale 
riverside apartments are planned in 
the SI 12-million redevelopment. 
Farther down the river, rotting 
warehouses and petrochemical 
storage tanks are gone. In their 
place, ships' smokestacks in the 
colors of the steamship companies 
range along the Mersey River like 
brightly colored tombstones. 


Alexandre Savin 

THE CASHMERE 
DESIGNER IN PARIS 


LL DESIGNS 



LL STYLES 


LL COLORS 


LL PRICES 


From l to 10 plys. 
FOR LADIES AND MEN 

EXCLUSIVELY FOR 


Cashmere House 

2. rue d'Aguo.scau 
angle 60. Faubourg Si- Honor t 
PARIS * 

EXPORT PRICES 
TAX FREE 


But, around the port, the ruin 
remains: derelict businesses, gutted 
homes and vacant lots. As sugar 
re fining , soap making, ship repair- 
ing, marine engineering and rope 
making died, so did half the city’s 
manufacturing jobs. It has hap- 
pened in the last six years. 

Liverpool now has 60,000 unem- 
ployed. or one person in four, al- 
though in some public housing pro- 
jects, city officials sav, it is nine out 
of 10 . 

The largest single employer is 
Liverpool City Council, which now 
has 31,100 on the payroll Like 
many councils controlled by the 
Labor Party, the Liverpool council 
feels it needs to help residents sur- 
vive. 

Where there are no jobs, it will 
provide them. Where there are no 
bouses, the city will refurbish and 
build. This philosophy has brought 
the Liverpool council into open 
battle with the Tory central govern- 
ment, which feels cities should pro- 
vide services, not relief. 

The government, which supplies 
about half of Liverpool's budget, 
set up a formula to force cities not 
to spend so much. It designates 
what it feels is a reasonable budget 
— in the case of Liverpool, £220 
milli on ($310 million). If a city 
wants to spend more, as Liverpool 
did when it set a budget of £263 
million, the government then with- 
draws financial support at roughly 
the rate of £2 for each £1 overspent. 

This cut Liverpool’s government 
grant of £116 million to just £28 
million. The city, which said it 
would have to cut 5.000 jobs to 
meet the government’s target will 
run out of money unless it agrees to 
cut spending to reclaim govern- 
ment money. 

Faced with similar quandaries, 
all the other cities that had vowed 
to defy the government gave in. “In 
a sense." said a government offi- 
cial, “it’s a poker game. Liverpool 
is the only one left. If Liverpool got 
away with it. die whole system 
would collapse.” 

But Liveipool is still defiant- The 
city council is controlled by a 





v. 


Pretoria Bars Students 
Of White College 



‘ ! ■ -land 


1 -i; -• 

< • -.~sA * • 


~ • •*** trr - J 

V/V- '****i#' • •• 


:*• ■■ 


— 

Visiting Exiled Rebels 

i /i mi nr. 4 _ a 


..... 


'■Mil*. If - . 


By Alan Cowell 

- New York Times Service 

CAPE TOWN — South African 
authorities withdrew the passports 
of eight white university students 
Thursday who were to have trav- 
eled to Zambia this month to meet 


Perez de Cuellar. Wednesday tb- 
oewed his appeal to South Africa's 

rulers to spare Mr. Moloise, 
Agence-France Press* reported 
from New York. 

He said he was "convinced that 
the carrying out of the execution 
will result in a further deterioration 





. - .fit 


;;cv 


. 4 ?* y i 


- * •• », i JE* 






g+iVW* y 

Id the racially mixed neighborhood of Toxteth, UverpooFs jobless rate and other economic problems tave led to Hi ring 


Trotskyist faction of the Labor 
Parly, the Militant Tendency. Al- 
though its members are in the mi- 
nority among Labor councilors, the 
faction has control of the local par- 
ty. whose decisions the Labor 
councilors must follow. So it is 
Derek Hatton, a Militant, who is 
the council's spokesman, even 
though he is only the deputy leader. 

Last month, the Militant Ten- 
dency suggested that the city's 
workers go on strike, a move that 
would have thrown Britain's fourth 
largest city into chaos while saving 
enough wages to keep the city from 
going broke. 

The unions refused. 

Then the council sent its employ- 
ees notices, delivered by taxi, that 


they would all be dismissed at the 
end of the year. This would have 
given the city enough money to 
maintain emergency services until 
ApriL 

Liverpool was swept by rumors it 
was about to run out of money as 
union leaders and the Labor Par- 
ty's national leadership tried to 
help sort the situation out. 

On Friday the city council 
dropped its plans to dismiss its 
woricers and decided on the layoffs 
as a way to balance the city’s 
books. 

“They’re Marxists," said Sir Tre- 
vor Jones, a leading Liberal Party 
councilor. “What they’re seeking is 
to overthrow the system. The more 
chaos, the more deprivation, the 


more misery you can create, the 
more you get the proletariat to re- 
volt." 

One revolt Mr. Hatton did not 
seem to want very much arrived at 
bis office door last week. A large 
delegation from the city's Black 
Caucus, after new rioting in Tox- 
ic th, arrived to tell him they still 
would not work with the council's 
race relations adviser, a black 
building surveyor from London, 
appointed instead of local candi- 
dates. 

Liverpool has a nonwhite popu- 
lation or about 7 percent, according 
to the Merseyside Community Re- 
lations Commission, but only 270 
of the 31,100 dty employes are . 
black. In the modem, up-scale dty 


center stores, the work force is 99.2 
percent white: 

. “We’re in dire straits,” said a 
Toxteth housewife. “And it will get 
worse." 

Again and again, amid the com- 
plaints, one bears praise far the 
people of Liverpool, for their gen- 
erosity and good humor and will- 
ingness to work. It is these qualities 
that fuel hopes that the dty can 
become a prime c andidate for teww- 
ism and the new in dustries . 

In the short run, however, the 
problems of this dty are great. The 
other day a West German company 
that had dedded to locate in Liver- 
pool with 200 jobs changed its 
mind. Gting fears of urban riots 
and the Militants, it pulled ouL 


77 : “--T- - vr. f will result m a runner owenoranon 
repre^tanves of the outlawed Af- - cmemely grave situa- 

ncan National Congress. - « 

The action. South African com- u • : 

mcotators said, seemed to reflect ■ _ 

mounting offidal anger at the TT If 
readiness of some South Africans »J\-» /llA/IWd. 
to ignore offidal policy and meet - \ m ■ 

considOTSlversaries. 80 Pretoria Issue 

Meanwhile, confrontations con- 
tinued between protesters and po- 
lice for a third straight day in Cape 

Town's mixed-race suburb of Ath- 
lone. At least nine persons have 
been killed in unrest in the Cape 
Town area since Tuesday. 

Many of Thursday’s demonstra- 
tors were Moslems who were in- 
censed by what they called police 
insensitivity to the Islamic custom 
of burying the dead as soon as 
possible. 

In Athlohe, police used tear gas 
and shotguns in two confrontations 
against crowds that demanded the 
bodies of those killed Tuesday. 

The slayings have prompted an 
outcry because police hid in boxes 
on the back of a state railway truck 
rather than in their usual armored 


U.K. Riot Toll Reaches 4 as Injured Man Dies 


Reuters 

LONDON — A photographer 
injured in a Sept. 28 riot died 
Thursday, increasing the death toll 
from inner-city violence in Britain 
thisyear to four. 

The police said that David 
Hodge, 29, a free-lance photogra- 
pher, died in a neurological clinic 
in Oxford in central England. He 
suffered head injuries while cover- 
ing riots involving mostly black 
youths in the south London suburb 
of Brixton. 


The riots early this men th and in 
September were the worst in Brit- 
ain since 1981. A policemen was 
hacked to death Oct. 6 in a riot in 
Tottenham in north London. Two 
Asians died in a fire in a post office 
during riots in Birmingham, Brit- 
ain’s second dty. 

London policemen met Wednes- 
day and called fora new strategy to 
deal with the rioting, warning that 
failure to use stronger force could 
have serious consequences. More 


than 220 police officers were in- 
jured in the Tott enham not 

In a radio interview. Home Sec- 
retary Douglas Hurd once again 
backed the use of plastic buOets 
and tear gas by the police, but only 
as a last resort. 

Plastic bullets are in use in 
Northern Ireland but have never 
been used in England. The police 
have used tear gas against beseiged 
criminals but not against rioters. 




ometo 
ere the 



David Hodge 


Rutin 


Party in East Germany 
Expels 3,787 in Purge 

Reuters 

BERLIN — The East German 
Communist Party announced 
Thursday it had expelled 3,787 of 
its 22 million numbers following 
ideological screening. 

The party newspaper, Neues 
Deutschlan d , said that derisions on 
a farther 3,167 members inter- 
viewed by party functionaries as 
part of preparations for next 
April's congress were pending. 
More than L300 have resigned, the 
paper said, adding that die party 
haa“parted ways” with members 
who bad failed to accept its politi- 
cal doctrine or discipline. 


Bomb Damages 
Paris Offices of 
Broadcast Board 

Reuters 

PARIS — A bomb exploded ear- 
ly Thursday outride the offices of 
the French radio and television au- 
thority, damaging the entrance but 
causing no injuries, a state-run ra- 
dio station said. 

It said that the extreme leftist 
'group Direct Action claimed re- 
sponsibility for the blast, which oc- 
curred hours after Jean-Marie Le 
Pen, the leader of the rightist Nar 
tional Front, appeared Wednesday 
night in a Eve interview on France’s 
Channel 2. 

The authority supervises French 
state radio and television .broad- 
casting. 

Direct Action -claimed responsi- 
bility Monday for two bomb at- 
tacks in Paris, one on Channel 2’s 
headquarters and the other at the 
main French radio studio, where 
Mr. Le Pen was scheduled to be 
interviewed that evening. 


fire at Iran Embassy in Spain 

Reuters 

MADRID — A fire destroyed a 
house Thursday that apparently 
was used for storing archives in the 
Iranian Embassy compound here, 
the police said They said that po- 
licemen entered the compound to 
rescue a reporter who was beaten 
by embassy personnel after he took 
photographs of the fire. 


personnel vehicles before opening 
fire. Protesters did not know the 
truck was carrying armed men. 

Police defended their action 
Thursday, saying in a statement 
that the use of. a “decoy vehicle” 
was “devised to offset the strategy 
of the rioters, to maintain law and 
order and to protea the local in- 
habitants” of Athlon e. 

Some of those wounded in the 
incident said Thursday at a news 
conference that contrary to police 
accounts, they had seen no stones 
thrown, before officers opened fire 
Tuesday. 

At Stellenbosch University near 
Cape Town, officials told, universi- 
ty students who had planned to 
visit' Lusaka, 7amhi« ; that their 
passports were being withdrawn 
immediately. 

The African National Congress — rrr : — 
is the most prominent of the out-- 
lawed and exiled movements fight- """ 
mg Pretoria's white-; minority rule. 

In recent weeks, senior , white 
businessmen and leaders of the of- 
ficial white opposition in South Af- 
rica’s segregated parliament have 
met with members of the gnwrffln 
group in Zambia, die organiza- 
tion’s headquarters in exile. 

The government’s withdrawal of 
the passports, said Caria Suther- 
land, a student leader at the Uni- 
versity of Cape Town, reflected its 
“immense fear of negotiations at 
anyleveL" 

The University of Stellenbosch is 
an Af rikaan s-language i ns tit utio n, 
and President Pieter W.Botha is its 
chancellor. 

■ Mother Visits Jailed Poet 

The mother- of a condemned 


At Meeting 

Reuters 

NASSAU, Bahamas — Brit rid 
backed away Thursday from an 
early confrontation with its Com- 
monwealth partners over South Af- 
rican sanctions. Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher dropped aH ref- 
erence to the issue in a speech to the 
49 -nation group’s meeting here, 
British officials said. 

But Thatcher aides said her deci- 
sion not to men turn South Africa in 
the opening address to the first 
working session did not indicate; a 
softening in her complete opposF^ 
dun to economic sanctions as Af 
means of ending; apartheid. ' 

Mrs. Thatcher’s address includ- 
ed a review of the worid situation, 
from. East-West relations to pat- 
terns of international trade. 

British ftffiraafc said that dw. had 
decided to leave her views on South 
Africa until a later session. 

Mis. Thatcher so far has had 
three bilateral meetings with Com- 
monwealth leaders — President 
Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia, Prime 
Minister Brian Mulroney of Can* , 
da and Prime Ministe r Bob Hawke 
of Australia. 

British officials said that they 
believed the feeling emerging was 
that the Commonwealth should 
move away from slogans about 
sanctums toward practical meth- 
ods of promoting a dialogue be- 
tween South Africa’s white rulers 
and leaders of the majority blade 


Commonwealth sources said 
that, without British participation. 
C omm o n wealth sanctions against k 
South Africa would be meaning^? 
less. 

Britain has at least £10 billion 
($14 laDion) invested in South Afri- 
ca and is its largest trading partner. 

The Commonwealth is an associ- 
ation of 49 countries with historical 
and .coiamal Jmlcs to Britain. South 
Africa withdrew under pressure 
from rite, multiracial Common- 
wealth uti96I because of its gov- 
ernment's racial segregation poti- 
ons. - ... 

. Officials with a number of the 
delegations said that they under- 
stood Britain’s problems on sanc- 
tions. One said: “I do nor think we 
want to isolate Britain. Wc want to 


w 






l> 


itu- 


' - w -v**-*«m*i« WflUllWWIOIfc 

blade poet and guerrilla, supporter, be persuasive." 

Benjamin Moloise, 30, visited him. Mia. Thante made some tough 


on death row in advance of ins 
scheduled execution and said t h a t 
he urged Macks to continue thrir 
campaign against wirite rule, Reu- 
ters reported from Johannesburg. 

Mr. Moloise is. to be executed 
Friday for the .1982 slaying of a 
black policeman. 


references to Internationa] terror- 
ism Thursday, according to confer- 
ence sources, mid said she wanted -V. 
to see a strong communique at thev L_V 
end . of the conference on how to* ~ 
combat it by all legitimate means. r. ' 

British sources said that the 

“He* says the straggle most go on South African question was unlike- : v> 
tin we people get freedom,” Ma- *9 1* resolved before the week- .. v ' 
mike Moloise «a jd . end, when the Commonwealth : 

■ UN CWef Reneafe Ptoa leaders are scheduled to spend ah ^ ~ 
Th-,rxri 4V ^^ >eatS ^T, . infonnal two-day retreat at a near- 
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Spain Breaks Up 12 Estates, 
Distributes land to Peasants 


Reuters 

MADRID — Spain has 
launched its first land reform pro- 
gram in more than 50 years as a 
regional Socialist government ex- 
propriated 12 unproductive states 
in the poorest part of the country. 

“This is the first real attempt to 
redistribute the land,” Miguel 
Manau te, agricultural counselor in 
Andahida’s regional go v e rnm ent, 
said Wednesday. 

, Th® expropriations affected 
15,000 acres ( 6,000 hectares) of 
farm land in Malaga province, one 
<rf four areas in winch the Andahi- 

cian government said it Would act 

to break up neglected holdings. 

“Wctold the owners they were 
not meeting the legal requirements 

Of land productivity/* Mr. Man- 
ante said. 

Spain last tried to dismanile ne- 
gtetted estates under a 1932 law 
abolished when Franco took power 

after the Spanish Gvil War, which 
ended in 1939. . 

The reform plan was drawn up 
two years ago following wide- 
spread labor unrest in Andaliida. 


Spam's Socialist prime minister, 
Felipe Gonz&kz, who comes from 
Andaluda, helped to press for the 
reform. 

Militant peasant onions have 
st aged hunger strikes and protest 
marches in the region, which is in 
southern Spam and is the country’s 
most economically depressed area. 

Mr. Manaute said that peasant 
cooperatives would be set up on 
some estates to make them produc- 
tive. Others would be added to gov- 
ernment forest reserves. He said the 
owners of the estates would be 
compensated. 







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Reuters 

CANBERRA — The Aust ralian 
Army recently bought 541,000 con- 
doms for waterproofing 
government minister told 
ate on Thursday, 

fnrlk? 11 a !? red ^ contract 
Sw the purchase of these condoms 

after independent leak 
■jjd-borst tests in which the coit- 

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™e*anl2hters," or 3.1 gallons. 
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SOUrccs and energy minister. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1985 


Page 5 




r ••• w 

— A. 


Israeli Aides 

Say links 

With Poland 
Imminent 

Afaw York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — ■ Israd and Po- 
land are to restore limited diplo- 
matic relations after a break of 18 
years, Israeli offi cials «»iri Thur s- 
day. 

The ti ming of the move is to be ; 
determined in the “very near fu- 
ture" Through a formal exchange of 
diplomatic notes, the Israeli offi- 
cials said. 

J The decision, by Poland to estab- 
lisJran “interest section” in Td 
Aviv and to allow some Israeli dip- 
lomats to work in Warsaw, proba- 
bly out of the Dutch Embassy, is 
bong viewed by Israeli officials 
and political analysts as an indica- 
tion of a gradual thaw in relations 
between Israel and the Soviet 
Union. 

An interest section is the lowest 
level of diplomatic contact, involv- 
ing an exchange of official repre- 
sentatives with some diplomatic 
status but without their own em- 
bassies or full ambassadorial privi- 
leges. 

. Poland strictly adheres to the So- 
viet line on foreign policy issnes. 
and h. is tmliVHy that Warsaw 
would have agreed to even this tim- 
iled restoration of ties without a 
nod from. Moscow. .The. Kremlin 
led the Soviet bloc countries in 
breaking relations with Israd after 
the 1967 war. 

“There is no doobt that the Rus- 
sians are b ehind it," said Nahum 
Bamea, editor of the Koterit Ra- 
sheet political weekly, which has 
been closely monitoring the public 
and private signals being ex- 
changed by Prime Minis ter Shimon 
Peres of load and the Soviet lead- 
er, Mikhail S. Gorbachev. “It is 
another in a series of good wiQ 
gestures between the Soviets and 
Israel” 

An Israeli Foreign Ministry offi- 
cial: “I would not say that tomor- 
row the Soviet Union and Israd arc 
going to be restoring diplomatic 
relations, but let’s jnst say . these 
kind of things don't happen with- 
out Russian knowledge. 5 ’ 





TWA Suspects 
Named by U.S.; 
Reward Is Set 

Vmed Prat-itamaaonal 

WASHINGTON — The 
United States announced 
Thursday the names of three 
men it has charged with air pi- 
racy and murder for the June 
hijacking of a TWA jet and fbe 
shooting death of a navy sea- 
man. They are not in custody. 

Earlier, the Stale Depart- 
ment aimornicrri a reward of up 
ti> 5250,000 for information 
leading to the men's arrest and 
conviction. 

The three men woe identi- 
fied by Attorney General Ed- 
win Mcese 3d as Mohammed 
Hamad ei. Ah Aiwa and Hassan 
hz al-Din. Each was charged 
with air piracy in the June 14 
semire of TWA Flight 847. 

Each of the three men was 
also c harge d in the death of 
Robert Dean Stethem, the sea- 
man, who was beaten and shot. 
Mr. Meese said the murder 
charges fell within the “special 
aircraft jurisdiction of the Unit- 
ed States." 


President Ferdinand E. Marcos with Senator Paid I-axalt. 

Marcos, Reagan Envoy Meet 
To Discuss Manila’s Stability 

(Confirmed from Page 1) 
vestigating file murder of 14 jour- 
nalists in the Philippines said 
Thursday that soldiers were in- 
volved in most of the killings. Ren- 
ters reported from the Philippines. 

Brigadier General Eustaquio 
Poroganan, who beads the team. 

Said that militar y mwi were the 
mam suspects in nine of the cases. 

He said the killings were not HnV^i 
to the journalists’ work. The mo- 


tives were persona] antagonism and 
robbery in most cases, he said. 

The inquiry team was set up by 
: Mr. Maxims after journalists com- 
plained that the murders had re- 
mained unsolved. General Poro- 
ganan said be had recommended 
prosecution in 10 cases and that the 
remaind er still were being investi- 
gated. 

At least 21 journalists, many of 
them radio reporters, have been 
lolled in the Philippines this year. 


V . . 
■»-- . 

».r , 

1TT-.S.- 


• -'S-St-; 
■~2 «■ 

— I 5; 
- .'•sjJ: 


Simon Wins Nobel Prize for Literature 


V . 




• hii 


... ; . 

is# 
— Jlssf 


(Continued from Age 1) 

1 960. the strongly autobiographical 
work depicts minds in turmoil fu- 
eled by the forces of nature. 

Four of Mr. Simon’s novels, 
“The Grass." “The Flanders 
Road,” “The- Palace” and' “His- 
toire,” form a single work connect- 

Icelandic Cabinet 
Is Reshuffled 

Reuters 

REYKJAVIK — Prime Minister 
Stemgrimur Hermannsson of Ice- 
land has reshuffled his two-yeardd 
centrist coahtian government and 
brought the leader of Iceland’s 
largest party into the new cabinet 
as finance minister. 

Mr. Hermannsson gave Tbor- 
striim Palssan, head of the rightist 
Independence -Party, the finance 
portfolio, demoting Albert Gud- 
m»wwlyy >n to the hodustzv Minis- 


“hr. 


■si* 

v- 


Palsson had not previously 
held a cabinet post, and conse- 
quently often found it difficult to 
persuade minis ters from his own 
party to follow his policies. The 
reshuffle, announced late Wednes- 
day, was aimed mainly at overcom- 
ing this problem, political sources 
said. 


ed by iecumcg characters and inci- 
dent*. .- 

Mr. Simon's sentences are virtu- 
ally without punctuation and often 
lyncaL Mr. Simon also uses jum- 
bled chronology and abrupt transi- 
tions., 

“It takes hard work to read Si- 
mon and it requires a good memo- 
ry,” Mr., Gyileosteu. ..said. “Yon 
have to read trim sewraLtimes.” 

Mr. Shattndc said that Mr. Si- 
mon’s novds “are very rich in de- 
tail and odor, almost cinemati c, 
graphic, in tracing in exact details 
of the visual field.” 

Mr. GyUensten said Mr. Smon’s 
latest novel “Les Georpques,” 
published in, 1981, “is by far his 
most important.” Compassionate 
and ironic, the novel describes 
war’s reality and man’s inability to 
guide bis tale and correct his condi- 
tions. 

Mr. Simon was a favorite of a 
powerful academy member, Artur 
Lundkvist, 79, who has single-han- 
dedly kept the British novelist Gra- 
ham Greene from winning the 
prize: In 198& Mr. Lundkvist tojda 
British newspaper that he simply 
did not like Mr. Greene's work. 

Boro Oct 10, 1913, in Aniaruum- 
rivoi, Madagascar, to French par- 
ents, Mr. Simon first wanted to bea 
painter. 


In a 1966 article discussing the 
role of writers in a changing world, 
Mr. Smnn said that art and litera- 
- tore “answer human needs as baric 
as hunger, thirst, even the need to 
breath? 

To suppress literature, Mr. Si- 
moQ wrote, would be to “literally 
doom mankind to suffocation and 
despair.” 

' His first novel, “The Cheater," 
was published in 1946 and gained 
recognition at the end of the 1950s, 
when the nouveau roman move- 
ment emerged in France. 

In the tradition of other New 
Novelists, Mr. Simon attempts to 
create an awareness of reality 
through experimentation with dif- 
ferent points of view. 

“Claude Simon’s narrative art,” 
the academy said, “may appear as a 
representation of something that 
lives within us whether we will or 
not, whether we understand it or 
not, whether we believe it or not.” 

Giess Game Ends in Draw 

Reuters 

■ MOSCOW — The 17th game of 
fire world dress title rematch ended 
Thursday in a draw, giving the 
challenger. Gary Kasparov, a 9-to- 
8 point advantage over Anatoli 
Karpov, the champion. 


Craxi Resigns , 
Attacks U.S. 

(Continued from Page 1) 
two C-141 military transports full 
of Delta Force Commandos just 
afterward az Sicily’s SigoneQa base. 

He said that their mission was to 
take the hijackers and Mr. Abbas 
by force from Italy to stand trial in 
the United States. 

The commandos, Mr. Craxi said, 
were commanded by a U.S. general 
under direct orders from Washing- 
ton who only stood down after a 
conversation between Mr. Craxi 
and President Ronald Reagan in 
- the early hours of Ocl 11 when Mr. 
Craxi insisted that the hijackers, 
having committed crimes on an 
Italian ship, should stand trial in 
Italy. 

Even after thai, Mr. Craxi said, 
the United States violated its air- 
space by sending two jets over Italy 
to trail the intercepted Egyptian 
airliner as it flew, escorted by four 
Italian fighters, from Sicily to 
Rome’s Gampjno military airport 
“The Italian government derid- 
ed to open an investigation,” Mr. 
Craxi said, “and a protest was im- 
mediately filed with the Washing- 
ton government. 

Mr. Craxi defended his govern- 
ment's decision to allow Mr. Ab- 
bas, the leader of the Palestine Lib- 
eration Front, a faction of Yasser 
Arafat’s PLO, to leave Italy cm Sat- 
urday despite U_S. requests that be 
be arrested because of suspicions 
that be was the actual “master- 
mind" of the hijacking 
As he. bad stated' before, Mr. 
Craxi said Mr. Abbas was allowed 
to leave Italy after Italian legal offi- 
cials, from the justice minister to 
the magistrates investigating the hi - 


had faded to supply Italy with the 
minimum proof required under 
Italian law for him to be detained. 

He reiterated that Mr. Abbas 
also had diplomatic immunit y and 
die official protection of the Egyp- 
tian government, winch had insist- 
ed that, as a passenger in an official 
plane, he should be freed. 

Mr. Craxi said that even though 
Mr. Spadolini claimed his reason 
for abandoning the government 
over the Abbas affair was the result 
of a lack of consultation before the 
derision to let the Palestinian lead- 
er leave Italy was taken, Mr. Spa- 
dolini had been personally in- 
formed Saturday that the Italian 
judicial authorities could find no 
reason to hold Mr. Abbas on the 
basis of U.S. “evidence:” 


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LONDON ALUANCE Bart Sarriat 
Tali 301 6853 

PRIVATE BCORT SBVXX. London 
01-2459002. 


RESCUC BCORT SBMCE Tefc H 20- 
903022 / 2090905$ 


MIMCH - BLOMrr A TAM1A &mrt 
Service. Tet 31 1 79 OB or 311 79 36 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 




r i / j- if V 1 ’Jmh.u 

FSANKRJST - PETVA Escort & Travel 
Service. TeL 069/ 66 24 05 

MtMCH ESCORT SBMCE Tefc 
089/33 SO 2Q or 089/35 94 21 2. 

MUMCH - WELCOME ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tefc 91 B4 59 

AMSTERDAM POUR ROSES Escort 
Service |0) 20-964376 

AMSTERDAM IOM SUE Escort 5erwce 
Tefc 020953892 

AMSTERDAM BARBARA ESCORT 

Serviee. 020-954344 

BRUSS&5 MKHBiE BCORT and 
guide service. Tefc 733 07 98 

DOMBUT AMSTBtDAM ESCORT 
Guide Semen. Tefc (0201 762842 

JRAM0URT SONJA ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tel: 06948 34 42. 

HtANXRiRT POLAM> ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tri. 069/63 41 59. 

LONDON KOTOS ESCORT Servtce 
Tel; 01-225 036S 

■aussas. CHANTAL BCORT Ser- 
vice: Tefc 02/520 2361 

LONDON CARIBBEAN ESCORT Se>- 
vies. 01-589 0661. 

GBCVA4MA Female & Mde esari 
sentae. MuMnguaL 022/342955. 

EDEN Baal Agency Joxteta TefcSl- 
225 9499 or Q1 M3 3026 cnereng 

BBCKA NEW YORK Escort Service. 
212-484-9887. 

fUANHUB - EVA’S E5CCTB & tro* 

ri service. Tefc 069/44 77 75 


INTERNATIONA 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA 

COMMERCIAL 
4 INDUSTRIAL 


fajrhed county, a usa 

1 Hour Pram Now York Qry 
WVESTMOir PROPHUY 

20.000 jq. fr. Office Rjlrf-ig wnti 
25/X30 sq. b. ihaoping eanmr on 
mom higmey. Norxai. CT. 

Ollier Asracnve Propertei Araiks* 
Coetocl Rmte VUd 
VIDAL REALTOkS, KC 
7» Pan Rd Eos. Weeper? CT 06880 
CT; 203-2267101 WO 3i;-H2.t555 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


mom A. a m ldah aqaeped. R3 
(Sc eou v fawf. free Nov. PI 01300 / 
momri. T*t (6} 920 16 36 


MARAIS, EXCffllONAL 2/3 room, 
60 aom. g frfyrd krtdwi, fitted. 
F2J300/TOr4h. Key tn oney. Tet 0 
95*68 57. 


NEAR AVL MONT; 

uvriM. 2/3 mirth*. 

5006941 bcftrt«t 11 am /3 pm. 


TAIG^Sreomi. 
MhL ram 0 l Tet 
H 11 am / 3 pm. 


TUDOR NOTH, 

FDR SA1£ 

icw York an 

480 Roams Geee to tinted Natxxa 
John G. Sfrong 

43 Portmo Rd. L Hmwton, W 1 1937 
516324-^00 


3 TOBACCO MIMS in North Carw- 
na, taaL 310 rot* Pnoe 5330JXC 
Write So* 2863. Herald Triune. 
92521 NaJhrC edci. fiance 


NAiKAU OOtMTY, MY STATE 
50.000 ft offiai baWna. Gcrixi 
Hahn Assoc 5I6-935025S 10 We* 
Owry St, Hkbvfe NY 11001. 


tCARPANIWON-IL. 

am. period hocM. 2}. < 
ream. TeL 331 64 03. 


No ojenfc. TeP 329 33 33. 


CHAMPS B.YSSS. law Hjjti 

vtudao. nmr. an color IV. 5C9I 


TROCADBBO. Sudc, ntrwfy re 

barn, tn du n . QjOOO net 72) 9< 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


SHOmNG CBOBtS. Wmhngtsr. 
DC area. AAA Wiann. gx n r xee i 
rawntJteHIITOaSIsfse. 


lOUVECttf#es. Only 15 tan fr 
Para, vary btauhfid haaa wtii g 
den. P96Q0 per north for 137 sg 
KAUFMAN if HOAD Tefc 958 S 
from 10 tn to 7 pm, IWiday _ 
Monday. 9N 184. Some de Vertexes. 
7B LOUVKJS^NK. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


BAHAMAS 


lYFOO-CAY, Saxnc* Fcxr bed- 

room house November to April, raft- 
mum 2 unrig, fufiy staffed S 


CANADA 


FRANKnWJBMY ESCORT & travel 
servia. 069/5572-10. Credt cuds. 


HAMBURG - SABRINA £*wt Ser- 
Tri) (MV58 45 35. 


LONDON VBtONQUE Eseon Se- 
vice Tab 01-225 2335 


Services. 212-307-5942. 


Smoe. 


CAPITOL Escort 
146. 


Service. Credt Cords. Tefc 62 84 32 


Eicert Service £2 88 05. Gedh &>rii 


Escort Sanica. 21231S3899. 


Tet 01/69 58 71 


london4Q2 T9S3 or 289 797S 


rice. 069/5W&-52 


HONG KONG EUROPEAN ESCORT 
Serricro Kowtoon 668480/660569 


TORONTO, CANADA - LUXURY. 
Mv formstod and a p-i p p e d 1 & 2 
bedroom suites. Super cr services. 
Shcxt/long term rentals. Marter Sums 
80 Front SL EoC, Sto. 222. Toronto 
MSE 1T4 Ccooda [4161 862-1096 

CHEAT BRITAIN 


LUXURY EXECUTIVE APARnWrt5. 
ILrightstridBe'Chetea. Over TOO 
fuly serviced srudos, 1 A 2 bedroom 


ap a rt m ents. All rsaderri 

Minimum pay 23 days. Prices front 
CU5 per week. Please coraaa Lor* 
rare Young, NGH Apartraeres. NeC 
Gwvm Hcxrse, Some Ave. Lender) 
SW1 Tet 0 Tm 9 1105. Tb 295817 G. 


CB4TRAL LONDON - Enoarve ret- 
not apaTOnena in new bukinm. 
eernforiabty furnished end Wf 
•quipped. Wj nod Service (Mon 
woogh FnJCotor TV. Asoe for Bro- 
chure (011 388 1342 or write Presdert- 
ed Estates (Mayfair) ltd. 1 li-vers-Ty 
Sr _ London VvClEfiiE 


LONDONNEARBLKKMGHAMPofc 

ace. Superbly farridied hrewy 2-bed- 
room not far short term (1 week - 3 
months) rented. 5650/weefc mdsdux 
iraraportafion to and from aro art Q 
requesL Apply Mr. KradP, tefc UX 
0«S «62T»or 092574753 

HAY HU BERKELEY SQUARE, 7th 
floor perthouw with ponorettte view] 
over London. Completely refartHhed 
interior desisted. 2 double bedrooms 
with brthroom ensurta. 2 gorgeous 
receptions, fully equrpptd toaiPL 
£750/wasL Tri: 0UQ61433. 

LUXURY SERVTCE HATS N Kcn- 
ringwn a the dtemoive to expensive 
hotel occommodarroi. Corext Aw 
doh & Corapary. 21/23 Pdbcc Gate. 
London W85L1 Tel: (01) 589 2956. 
Trio 418216 

LONDON MARBU ARCH, netr, self- 
catering luxury 2-bedroom flats. fuCy 
equipped, cofer TV. bnen art tele- 
dcres £250- £430 per week. Crow- 
ford Hofidav Hats. 33 Crawford 
Siroel. London W1. 01-402 6165. 

LUXURY FURNISHED APARTMENTS. 
FiAy servKsd. chdoe of Moyfarr or 
odfacert to Kertonstan Pdace. From 
£300 to £550 per vroek. 3 months to 2 
yean. Atomtaraon Management Ltd 
01-491 2626. Telex: 2991 S. 

BBS A BUTCHOFF. A large seteoton 
of poperies in St John's Wood. 
Regents Port:, Swiss Cottage, Hamp- 
stead & envrtnt 6 mom +. Td 
01-586 7561. Tbr 883168 ACO G 

LONDON. For the best fombhed flats 
and homes. Consult the Spechfvs: 
FhOps. Kay and Lewi. Tel: South of 
Park 352 Bill. North of Pad 722 
5135. Telex 27&6 RESIDE G. 

TOWNHOUSE, SYDFCY ST., Chefc 
soalinaffy fixrvshed. 3 bedroom^ 3 
bathrooms, Trecerttorts. htdten, ay - 
den & garage. Bent £750 *e«fy. 
minimum 6 months let. 01-644 5048 

CENTRAL London, luxury hrnohed 
flats, American lichens. E280'week- 
sW 4 or £175/ week - deep. 1 Tefc 
064221 2204or01-4863415(UKl 

FOR FURMSWD LETTINGS IN S.W. 
London, Surrey & Berkshire. Canton 
MAYS, Oxshott |D37 384) 3811 UK. 
Telex: 89551 1Z 

JOHN 81804 has 20 years e^enence 
in Rentals Long or short tenancies, 
Cerrtrd & lubufban London & Aber- 
deen. Btrth £ Co. 01-499-8802. 

SR»C A CO. Exoritem Setecuon of 
Houses & Fiefs for rental in North, 
Northwest & Central London. Tefc 01- 
625 8611. 

MTBNATK3NAL EXECUTIVES / Vo. 

tan to London - far qxSty furnished 
ceortmerts t houses coll Hurtferstiyi- 
don (01)6377365. 

[■|P '* 



HOLLAND 

DUTCH HOUSNG CENTRE B.V. 
Deluxe retook Vderrustfr. 17< 
Amsterdam. 020621234 o> 623222. 

PETER BRUM MAKELAA8DU 

Infl Housing Service-Rentafa 
Arosterdom. Tel: 020-768022. 


SPAIN 


Pmae 
&eo • _ .. 
Aiforao {34-5 


SWITZERLAND 


Brand New 

THE EXCELSIOR 

A Umque 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 

Ferturmg 

1-, 2-, and 3- 
Bedroom Suites 

Al! Magnificently 


Offering 

ReeiAig far f oreigners 


Unique Salting 


1 for 

Sports and Leiswra 


Pad 
Fitnoie FadEfid 
2* Houff Modicd Awblance 

Exncnrivo Sorvicw AvoBdila 

Model Suites 


SWTTZBdAND (211 63-51-04 
KE SON PORT 
1820 MONTOUX 


months m meet baition overlook! r 
locamo & lake. SFl^OD per man! 
plus heating and garden expense 
SujLtna 694^7. 


ISRAEL 


THE DAMEL HOTa AND SPA setting 

a new standard of opulence. On the 
Mediterranean, 20 nrinuns from Tel 
Avtv. Freehdd & leasebodt, fuOy fur- 
ashed / equipped 1 - 3 bedrooms. 
Sea wet* apartments & rerehouses, 2- 
room duplexes overioetina pooL FuS 
hotel service fbcShes: world desi 
heobh & beauty 6 regoeraaa, 4 
bors, ewedhae busmen center, ball- 
room, audtorium. stmrmng pooh, 
tports, ertertdnmert. The Dmsel Ho- 
tri S Spa, rWjkx»S«cL -46769. tsro- 
■L Td; (052) 544444, £^<1812. Lon- 
don Officer 14-16 Codts tw Si. 
London SW1. Tefc 67TI94. Tk 
8950055. 


ITALY 


MILAN RJRMSHED APARTMB4T to 
Id S900 avnlftty. teidon 870 0512 


MOROCCO 


MARRAKECH. 

carter. 2 vSca m exotic 


6 fan* 
i. her- 
... iS175 

per weefc Wormonon PO to 577, 
Morrokedu Tefc 431901 


per west mrormanon i 


toje., goroot SF3JOO. i 
15 years, let 65 88 41 


USA 


Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 

offering 

pre-opening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. lease 

foerfunng 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All mognificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 

Executive Services Avdlabli 

Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


MIAMI. RLORSDA 
ribbean & Laftn America. 


service, busmess n 

305-576-8310. “ 


eeenrooves. Tefc 
ABSC 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


UEURE TO IRAK me of hidone 5 
bedroom sen coptam’s home on Nan- 
tudeet bland. Mmoehusetts. far En- 
glish coortry home of sunlar ax ‘ 
dur*iQ August, 7986. Send full del 
to- Bcu 44, New Canaan, Connecticut 
06840 USA. 


TO RENT JULY/ AUGUST 1986. Pro- 
vence or Burgundy viBo with a lec 
bedrooms, write 919 Ante Why. Los 
Anyte,CA9Qa7. 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-RYSSS 8th 

Studo. 2 or 3-reore apBTmert. 
One morth Or more. 

1C CLABDGE Z59 67 97. 


pua VICTOR HUGO 

Sumptuous Nab das ax u tctere. 

7 roams. 3C0 sqm. mage, 
privrte gaden. B68ASSY563&8 38 


LUXEMBOURG 


Bawri rogte eda terre, 
rded, n townhort*. 


deep- 

6838 


SH0RT7BM STAY. Attentoges of a 

hotel vriRto ut mconveni en cas. reel rt 

home m net Puric s, on e bedroom 

end mere in Ptre SOB&HA B0 roe 
de ftJftvnrsiri. fans 7r1n 544 39 4Q 


MAKE YOURSRF AT HONS 7 days 
to 3 mends in Paris 14th & 75th, U 
roo m epu rtiwum, fuffy eqtapped. Tet- 


ADMMBTKATIVE ASSISTANT, 28, 

good entrepeneund foundation. 
txxigrourd m Inrerrusond Finance. 
Mosfera De^ee m hternatBud Pubk 
AdwiisJrcbon, French & computer 

fiuert. 3rd World expenence. Doub- 
les CcWk, 40 fafed. Cdorado 
Springs, C(5 80906 Tefc 3034718027. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


EXPERT SALES LADY / Manager 
■ro u nd for 2 and hrgh-iaUxOn bau- 
Bquss « Si. P-Tiielejii)i (Caribbean]. 
Muaspeak&nEdi&ftetot. Conn ad 
for 6 months Nmr. / April wirtl possi- 
b£ty d higher deve lopmen t in main 
oranzarion (St. Madiri. Ea m fc n t 
leery, a c commodation S other ad- 
vmaoaes. Send resume between Oa. 
17 ■ *T to Mn. Atarin ob HoW 
George V, faro. France. 


URGENT. fWessond sdes woman Far 
a tax-free shop m Peris. Mrunum 5 
yean expenancB, trdnguoL Pfeose 
cprttoe t- Pan* 720 84 20. 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


AKCRACT ENGMBR 
Bt flfrii Lfce mee Co nti ne nt s 0200 
rt*d RoBe-Revc* Dirt Engines 
9eda toix, some Frentit, 

pSes ta'&»g?^9 1 Aut F. Bessoa, 

1217 Meyrm, Geneva, Switzsdand 


EMPLOYMENT 


_ general 

POSITIONS WANTED 

■ GENTLEMAN 38, SBBOU5, good e>- 
S penenoe, specks Arntx, Engbh, 

/ French. RoLan, several years to 

France, traveled to Europe, Conodd. 

" Middle East, Africa Seek job as pn- 

i franco or abroad with faties or 

21 biBHiessmen. free to hovel, ovo3ohte 
- now. Td Paris 553 21 05 sertort only. 

*l YOUNG SWISS WOMAN. Svmg m 
Geneva with import-export S. finance 
- experience, sew o new chdenpng 
position. CV. & ufatww may be 
!- given ufson request. Reply is M 18 
TiM32.Pd*atos.CH-l3Tj Ge«ew3 

R NICE ENTHUGENT HOSTESS 24 Lon- 
don based 100‘s for openra. inter- 
~ esied m business and art. Tree to 
? trovd. Tefc 01 225 03 68 3om-12. 

~ LADY. 37. SSCS part lime work as 
*• housdeMper/eonipanion or sporocr 
- far I yew while renewm to eolege. 

■, Tel: UK01-674 5897 

j SECRETARIAL 

- POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

1 PAMS WTL CORPORATION is took- 

L mg far a young En^ish mother- 
7 tongue secretary. ReguvemenK for 
s Engfcih & French with srong daOs m 
Engfcsh daotioo essennoL fle&c duties 
umlraguro typing, telex operaeon & 

- rcrasrtonot. PeTorcfcty & ftccb-bty to 
adoplto deofag wJh xtfl d*nh an a 
day-to-day boos, an asset. Cand- 
■ deres should send their CV. to Bor 

L 2876, Herdkf Tribune, 92521 Neuily 
|j Cedex, France 

“ MUtrpwr 5a>S for AM5BCAN 
miruxve rrms m Paris: 

” Engfcth, Belgian. Dutch or German 
soerrtaies, mawiedge of Fiench re- 
qured, Engfah shorthand. Bfcngual 
tetajuW. Wnte or phone: 133 Avenue 
Victor Hugo, 75116 Parts, France. TeL 
727 61 69. 

Dent mas 
INTERNATIONAL 
SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

in Ike BIT Oaerified SecBen, 

BUT SUBSCRIPTION Department re- 
quires shorthand typrt, Engfah moth- 
er tongue, worimg knowledge of 
FrendCFVcse colt 747 12 65 ext. 
4327 from 1&30 am - 1230pm 

EDUCATIONAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 

INSTRUCTOR rasmoN 
Bnfary-Riddfa AeranouiKoi Unhandy is 
aaeepring inaraeor oppfiocbnro. An 
Atf licence. O Master s degree and 
aviation related experience are re- 
quired in order to teach Aircraft Mrin- 
tanance cmd a wide range of aviation 
related courses. Apphcoms must be wifi- 
«<g to five in Span. Imereaed parties 
stouid contact: 

Embry -f6dtfie Aeronautical Ureverrity. 

406 DSG/DPE. 

Alto Karen Pamplona 

APO NY 09286 USA 

BUSIES STUDIES PROGRAM advis- 

er ad Leaurer reqmred by Anencan 
University in London. Apptanons: Dr. 
bdtard Taytor, Dvteaor, Sdirier ln- 
Semaxted University, 51-55 Water 
100 Rood, London SET 8TX 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 

INGUSH NANME5 t mothers' hdpe 
Nath Agency, 53 Church Sd. Hove, 
Sussex. DX. Tel: Brighton (273j 290M 

AUTOMOBILES 

ROUS-ROYCE bufiet proof 1976 IHD 
S8ver Shctdow LWB vrth (fivBMR. Vd- 
vet green, blade Everflex roof with 
qnool beige leather [rim. All security 
- extras induing owner's cufcout a 
British Home Office, b new. Offen to 
excess of 570,000. Tel: En^ad 0706 
£3523. 

ROLLS ROYCE CORNKHE convert, 
ible. 1974 IHD, 75)000 original km, 
alhenian blue, blue top, tan interior, 
xnmoeuirte. BF3200/U0. Cdl B am. 
to IT an. Sdaum 91/23 37 77 or 
write Bax 2865, Herdd Triune, 
92521 NeoSty Cedex. Ftaice. 

AUTO CONVERSION 

• 5URECONVEKT * 

The irtfert way fa import a 
European cor into the USA. 
Wdridwide Amerknn insurer 
provides d required nsurance 
and qtmntoes your ear wB 
pass aT US government ^ondords 
or your money bad: rndwfing 
conversion cost 

Wnte or phone for free brochure. 
GERMANY® 69-7152425 or 
(0) 7031 / 223059 
AMBOCAN wn UNDBtWBTBS 
Oberfindou 7678 

D-6000 Fronkfurt/Mean 

DOT A EPA 
CONVERSIONS 

Done In Ike USA. 

The Hght Wayf 

WEPROVOE BO>®iNG, 

US CUSTOMS CLEARANCE i 
PIOUJP SERVICE FROM PORT 

EUROPEAN FINE CAR 

Imparts & Conversions 

36-21 31st St. UC. NY 
716729-2407 Tlx 5101009922 

B>A/ DOT 

CONVERSIONS 

• Customs broteroge/bonefing service 

• Pick-vp & deftvery anywhere m the 

Eastern US & Texas 

* Professional work using only the 
Nghesl quafcty conponents 

* Guaranteed EPA / DOT approval 
CHAMPAGNE IMPORTS WC. 

2294 North Peat Rd, Hatfidd. 

PA. 19440, USA Tufc 215 822 6852 
Telex 4971*1 7-CHAMP 



AUTO CONVERSION 


DOT/ EPA CONVERSIONS 

Shipping, banting, insurance: 
Door to door serves Europe 
to USA. rvrr . T fcnof auuiuntixd 
Etropean Automotive Compfcna 
Sempasttroat 117. 2586 HC 
Tfm Hogue, Hollsnd 
PhoneWO-559245 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


Joke It Or 
lease H 

BMW • MEBCEDE5 - POfiSOC 
JAGUAR ■ FERRAB ETC 
New and Ue-new used fine European 
an oganst the lowest possUe prices 
5Bnna= Search Service for daisies, 
guaranteed &OT/P* conversions, 
worldwide shipping. inurcnce. 
bonding. 

New 

Bank to bank teasing in U.SA. pouiHe 

TRY BH All B&OBE 
YOU CAU 
CAR -NATION 
249 fGbrirarivteg 
3956 fcN Uersom 
The Netheriandi 

Til {031 
Tito " 

For sale and Ui-leae program 
Springfield, Va (703) 4554160 


TRASCO 

INTERNATIONAL 

LHJ). Mercedes Tax Free 
Urnmnes 36" 8. 44" 
Armoured can and Imotrines 
Coach buh cart 
Cutter makes & sxona 

Over 100 unts m Stock 
World wide defivery 
Direct ham source 
D.OX & E.PJL. 

Tel: London (441(1) £29 7779 
Trie- (51) 8956022 TBAS G. 

Trasco London Ud. 

6567 Farit lane. London W.l. 

SwiterfandLDC-W. Germany 


BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FRS AND USE OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 

WRITE FOR FSS CATALOG OR 
(WEE BUY-BACX FOLDS! TO 
SHKUDE B.V., P.O. Sax 7563. 1118 ZH 
AmsSerdrtn Airport The Netherlands. 
Phone (020)1528*3. Telex: 12568 

SfcUPSDE Inc. £76 Fifth Avenue. 
7* Floor. New York, N.Y. 10036. U$A. 
Phone {£)2J 8694484. Telex: 427965 

SMPS1DE SA. Chavoee de Wavre 
465. 1040 Brussels Brigerm. 
Phone: {p2]6499oSTTelex: 63290 


Cars of 
Copenhagen 

TAX FREE 

• International Scfcs 

• Worldwide Delivery 

• Evropeat Priae Leoders 

• Tefc w45 I 37 78 00 

• Telex 19932 DK 

55 Vodrofisvri DK-1900 
CPH V.-D04MAK 


MERCHJES SPECIALISTS 
FOR USA + MIDDLE EAST 

for 20 years. 

1985 Modeb at Daaiiint nricec: 
280 51. 280 ^500 SO. 500 51 


1986 


from Stock: 


230E. 300E, 300SL 260 St 300 SL 
300 SB. 500 SL 500 SEL 500 « 
Shipment £ detvery worldwide. 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 

MAINZBt LANDSTR. 191 
D-6000 FRANKFURT/M 
TEj (01 69-73 30 61 
TtiL 414018 


LMI. SA 

OFFICIAL ROUS ROYCE 
DEALS? FOR BQ.GIUM 

TAX FRS CARS 
ROLLS ROYCE BB4TLEY 
RANGE and LAN DROVE? 
SAAB 

Also Used Cal 

rue MIDDELBOURG 74-82 
1170 Brussels 
TBj 2-673 33 92 
TLX 20377 


ENGLISH EXPERTS 

We (peak the language of Tax-free 
CorsT JAGUAR. MERCEDES 
PORSCHE, BMW, l ROUS-ROYCE 
LH/RH dmm. New & Pre-Owned. 

8 years experience in Import/ Export. 
Documentation, shippng etc. 

USA our jpeaaity. 

Talue advntfage of cur expenence. 

HUGHS MOTOR COMPANY 
Bournemouth. England 
(0) 202 7446437 
Tlx 41254 HUGHS G. 


TlANSMUNDt BBGfUM, 21 Gestefc 
teboon. B-2241 Zoersd, Antwerp. Tefc 
CB384.10.54 He 3230d Trartsm i. In 
nocL ALL TYPES, NEW & USED. 


NEW PEUGEOT. Lord Rover, Range 
Rover. Toyota, 4c4. tropical specs. 
Britos, Zarmeboan 18, MortSSen- 
broet. Holand (0130445492. rU 47062 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRANSCO 

THE LARGBT SHOWROOM 
AM> STOCK W EUROPE 
Keeping a amort stock of more than 
300 Braid new e» of aS European + 
Joponese motes coopetnmly priced. 
Tax free itiei ihipping mswanee. 
Send for multiuior fnw catalogue. 
Transm SA, 95 Noatdeftxai, 
2030 Antwerp. BeUwa 
Tel 323/542 6240Tx 35207 Tin 


OCEANVm 
MOTORS GmbH 

Since 1972, experienced cor trader fa 
Mercedes. Porsche. BMW. Jogucr. hif 
mediate dekvery Import /export, US. 
DOT & ffA. shaping for tourre and 
deafer. Oceanwide Motors GmbH, 
Te rseeoenflr. B, * Duesseldarf. W. 
Germany (0} 211-434646, «x 8587374. 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE FROM STOCK 

Beet service, sh ip png, ins urance, 

RUTt INC. 

TAUNUSSTR. 52. 6000 HtAMCFURT 

W Germ., td (0)09-232351, tU <11559 


EUROPE A USA SPEC. 

AS makes for worldwide defcvery from 
unrir Send for c TAX-FREE catalog. 

BMW - MBtOTES - PORSCW 
VW - SAAB - VOLVO - PEUGEOT 

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Page 6 


FRIDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1985 


lleralh 


INTERNATIONAL 


(tribune. 


PaUnM With The V> York Time** pad The Washington Post 


In the Wake of Achille Lauro 


Egypl and Italy axe caught in the turbulent 

wake of the AchxDe Lauro affair. This is, in any 
long-range scheme of things, a matter for keen 
regret. As Americans move beyond their anger 
at seeing the two countries do less than they 
could have to apprehend the killers, a concern 
for their political health comes to the fore. 

As Egyptians see it, Cairo could have taken 
political cover and turned the ship away, as 
others did; but to save lives and do a service it 
took the ship in. Having gone that far, it 
became politically unthinkable to hand over 
Arab perpetrators to non-Arab prosecutors. 
President Hosm Mubarak has incurred sub- 
stantial costs as well as fftins for having stuck 
in his fashion with his predecessor’s openings 
to the United States and Israel, despite the 
continuing impasse on the Palestinian issue, 
which is critical to him. He should not have 
dismissed President Ronald Reagan's explana- 
tory letter and demanded an apology, which 
was almost guaranteed to produce Mr. Rea- 
gan's terse “never." Still, it is posable to think. 
as we do, that Mr. Reagan was right to inter- 
cept the Egyptian airliner, and to understand 
the measure of humiliation and increased vul- 
nerability that it brought upon an already 
frustrated Arab friend. 

For Italy, the political repercussions to date 
have been more severe. The government has 
been forced to resign after a severe govern- 
mental crisis, apparently the first since the war 


to spring from a foreign-policy issue — an 
issue bearing directly on links with Italy’s 
principal ally. Before the government resigned, 
Giovanni Spadolini, the defense minister, look 
his Republican party out of Prime Minister 
Be uino Craxi’s five-party coalition, complain- 
ing that he bad not been consulted in the 
release of the fifth man. This is true. Mr. 
Spadolini is a known opponent of the pro- 
Arab tilt that produced the release. He believes 
that in Lbe release certain legal and political 
obligations to the United States were ignored. 
The Reagan administration concurs with Mr. 
Spadolini on this point. 

But « g»in, it is possible to think, as we do, 
that Mr. Reagan was right to reach for the fifth 
man. and to appreciate that Mr. Craxi has 
been an exemplary ally, one especially ad- 
mixed by a conservative American administra- 
tion for his stands on defense. 

The distressing fallout leads some to con- 
clude that had the results been properly antici- 
pated. the actions precipitating them might 
have bom avoided. But the actions were not 
accidental: they reflected logical though not 
unchallengeable political choices. Egypt and 
Italy did what they felt they had to do. So did 
the United States. They are all adult govern- 
ments, and now they mast deal with the conse- 
quences. They should do this in knowing re- 
spect for the importance of their bonds. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



■ r. 1 £ 


To 


By William Safire 


ASHTNGTON — Never un- 


Saudi Arabia has been providing 






Just when the Orgamzauon --- much of their next .year's pn> 
troleum Exporting dSSon to the Saudis; without these 
jo be^g^ wtj nauonsffio and loans, Saddam fiuf . 

Nigeria making in Iraq would b«e«* 


the carters tlxed pncmjus Iraa refrained from attacking Q* < ' 


sure off international ofl prices. juguiar: m ^ 

TSffi? SraBdn* now about the servers agree, the Saodis would od 


Nobody is talking now about the 
imminenc e of a steep slide in oil 
prices by the end of the year- Such an 


hoftcthicr inflation, and give the oil- letung &e Iraqis go after Iranian oil 


tolerate an escalation of the .war grip 
the business of oiL . ; 

The reason for the tight Saudi 


boostme inflation, and give the oil- letting u< uaa «■», 

dSSSiSdWorid Sew life. sales. One cause •- 


Myth of PLO Moderation Is Exploded 


W ASHINGTON — Rarely has a 
single terrorist incident creat- 


A Hanging in South Africa 


Benjamin Moloise. a 30-year-old black 
South African, is scheduled to be hanged in 
Pretoria today. He has been described in news 
accounts in America as a poet and as a politi- 
cal prisoner, but he is not about to be executed 
because of his writings or his opposition to the 
government- The penalty has been imposed 
because he has been tried and found guilty of 
killing a Mack policeman. 

Many governments, including the govern- 
ment of the United States, have joined in 
international appeals for clemency. The UN 
Security Council even adopted a resolution 
urging South African authorities not to carry 
out the sentence, and on Wednesday the State 
Department affirmed its opposition. 

The United States would have been in a 
better position to make this case, however, if 
the sentence had been given because of Mr. 
Moloise's publications or political activity, 
since America does not penalize either with 
capital punishment. But when the offense is 
the murder of a police officer — a crime for 
which many states in the United States would 


impose capital punishment — Americans do 
not occupy the high moral ground. 

In cases such as this, in fact, the United 
States stands squarely with South Africa and 
the Soviet Union, the only large, white-ruled 
nations that allow capital punishment. 

The imposition of this ultimate penalty 
on Mr. Moloise is deplorable, but so is the 
sanctioned killing of dozens of Americans for 
similar offenses. The South Africans executed 
1 15 convicted criminals last yean the United 
States has more than 1^00 on death row. 
Executions are occurring in the United States 
with such regularity that they no longer 
command sustained interest or provoke the 
outrage that they should. 

The hanging in Pretoria must be protested, 
but so should the execution in Honda, the 
lethal injection in Texas and the filing squad in 
Utah. Government-sanctioned killing for vio- 
lations of the law, no matter how vile the 
crimes of those on death row, is no more 
consdonable in America than anywhere else. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


YY single terrorist incident creat- 
ed such international commotion. 

The Achille Lauro affair has pro- 
duced anger between Egypt and the 
United States, strains between the 
United Stales and Italy, a convulsion 
in Italy’s ruling coalition followed by 
the government's resignation, anti- 
government riots in Egypt, and can- 


By Charles K ranthnmniOT 


cell a lion of a breakthrough meeting 
of the British foreign minister with 


Other Opinion 


Mixed Messages on 'Star Wars 9 


Secretary of State George P. Shultz is strug- 
gling manfull y to repair the damagp done by 
reckless administration statements suggesting 
that the United States is prepared to scrap the 
1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty rather than 
accept meaningful constraints on President 
Ronald Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative. 
He may be fighting a losing battle. 

The ABM treaty does not proscribe research 
and development work on anti-ballistic missile 
defease systems. Both the United States and 
the Soviet Union were in fact pursuing large- 
scale ABM research long before Mr. Reagan 
announced his “star wars" program. 

With those continuing programs, there 
would be a case for renegotiating the ABM 
treaty — to draw a line between allowable and 
oon-aDowable development and testing — 
even without Mr. Reagan’s “star wars" speech 
in 1983. But careful renegotiation is one thing 
and reckless destruction quite another. 

Supposedly the current SD1 program is 
aimed only at providing an answer to the 
legitimate question of whether an effective 
defense system is technologically feasible. The 
administration, however, has caused trouble 
for itself by seeming to prejudge the answer. 

That pro-SDI zealotry has aroused suspi- 
cions — adroitly fanned by Moscow — that 
Washington is prepared to tear up the ABM 
treaty. That impression was seemingly con- 
firmed by a television interview in which the 
national security adviser, Robert G McFar- 
lane, gave a broad interpretation of what is 
allowed under the treaty. As he explained it, 
the ABM pact allows research, development 
and testing of “new physical concepts . . . Only 
deployment is foreclosed." 

That was a shocking statement for several 
reasons. First and foremost, the ABM treaty is 
worth saving. Beyond this, Mr. McFar lane’s 
broad interpretation alarmed America's Euro- 
pean friends, provided a windfall to the Soviet 
campaign to split the United States from its 
allies, and put the onus on Washington for any 


breakdown in anns-comrol talks in Geneva. 

Mr. Shultz fought an inside battle to repair 
the damage. Apparently he scored a partial 
victory. He made two speeches this week as- 
serting that, while the administration consid- 
ers the broader interpretation of the ABM 
treaty warranted, it will continue to adhere to 
narrower, more generally accepted interpreta- 
tions in practice. 

That helps. But the erratic spokesmansbip 
leaves the administration's actual intentions 
open to question. As some congressional crit- 
ics point out, the hair-splitting in fact gives the 
Soviet Union, already accused of bending or 
breaking the ABM treaty, an excuse to go 
further without incurring international wrath. 

— Los Angeles Times. 


of the British foreign minister with 
the Palestine liberation Organiza- 
tion. Even the General Assembly, un- 
der heavy U.S. pressure, tabled a 
planned invitation to Yasser Arafat. 

The diplomatic din you hear is the 
sound of a myth exploding. The myth 
is PLO moderation, its vaunted turn 
from terror to diplomacy. 

On this assumption has been built 
the Middle East policies (its center- 
piece: engaging the PLO in the 
“peace process”) of Egypt, Italy, Brit- 
ain, and increasingly, the United 
States. Policies, alliances, even gov- 
ernments are now being rearranged 
not because of individual blunders or 
lies, but because of the logic of the 
situation: After the Achille Lauro, to 
talk of a new, moderate, post-tenor 
PLO is to risk ridicule. 

To avoid the risk, the British gov- 
ernment took the precaution of ask- 
ing the PLO delegation it was to meet 
with in London to sign a statement 
renouncing terror and recognizing Is- 
rael. But the PLO refused and Britain 
called off the meeting. 

Not everyone decided to bend be- 
fore the facts. Italy decided to send 
the facts to Yugoslavia. At the first 
available moment, it released Mo- 
hammed Abbas, the “notorious Pal- 
estinian terrorist” (the White House's 
phrase) who was aboard the hijack- 
ers’ getaway plane that the United 
Slates diverted to Italy. 

With Mr. Abbas, the PLO double 
game — commit terror, talk peace — 
is up. Here is the man sent by Yasser 
Arafat as an “ intermediary” between 


civilization and the Achille Lauro hi- 
jacker-murderers. Mr. Abbas turns 
out, in fact, to be the man who sent 
the hijackers. He turns out further to 
be neither a freelancer, nor a PLO 
renegade, nor head of a PLO “off- 
shoot," as the chronically apologetic 
Western press speculated for as Tong 
as it could. He is a top Arafat aide, a 
loyalist whom Mr. Arafat himself 
placed on the FLO’S highest body, its 
11-man executive committee. 

Why did Italy let him go? Incom- 
prehensible, said the White House. 


Theory and fact collided 
aboard the Adude Lauro, 
and Italy chose theory. 


Ever mindful of alliance sensibilities, 
the administration was being land. It 
is entirely comprehensible. 

The first consideration is fear. Af- 
ter a 1973 PLO attack on a Pan Am 
airliner at Rome airport, foreign min- 
ister Ginlio Andreotti, who was then 
prime minister, worked out a deal 


with the PLO: Italy agrees not to gel 
in the way of the PLO, and the PLO 
finds non-Italian targets for its terror. 

A more grandiose but no less cyni- 
cal consideration is Italy's diplomatic 


amour-propre. A pro-PLO policy to 
win the favor of the Arab stales was 
the cornerstone of Mr. Andreotti’s 
Med-politik. This policy not only 
guarantees Italy access to oil, but 
allows one of the weakest of the for- 
mer imperial powers to puff itself up 
as the most influential European 
power in the Mediterranean. It ain’t 
Abyssinia, but it's something. That 
this “power” is gained purely by ap- 
peasement — for example, acquiesc- 
ing to Arab demands for releasing a 
criminal whom Italy was treaty- 


bound to America to hold for at least 
45 days — is an inconvenient, appar- 
ently not insupportable, detail . 

Above all, releasing Mr. Abbas was 
for Mr. Andreotti and Prime Minis- 
ter Craxi a kind of cognitive necessi- 
ty. Their entire Middle East policy is 
built on the assumption that the PLO 
has turned moderate. Mr. Abbas — 
and his association with Mr. Arafat, 
sure to come oat at any trial — is its 
refutation. Theory and fact collided 
aboard die Achille Lauro. Italy, not 
for' the first time, cbose theory. 

The facts, after all, are intolerable. 
Mr. Abbas’s group issued a commu- 
nique in Cyprus explaining that its 
men had really planned to land at 
“Asbdod-harbor in occupied Pales- 
tine” to attack “military targets.” 
Now, Ashdod is not on the West 
Bank or Gaza. It is within pre-1967 
Israel, the Israel that Andreotti & Co. 
insist the PLO is ready to accept. If 
Ashdod is “occupied," then all of 
Israel is occupied. 

As for “military targets,” Israelis 
are painfully familiar with Mr. Ab- 
bas’s so-called targets. 

In its most successful raid, his 
group kidnapped a family in Nahar- 
iya, shot (he father and dashed the 
bead of his daughter, aged 5. a gains t 
a rock. The man who did this was at 
the top of the list of 50 “Fighters" the 
Achill e Lauro hijackers demanded 
released from Israeli jails. 

As if to confirm the point, on the 
very day the UJ5. Navy intercepted 


dependent Third World new Ute. sa**- 

^instead, we see the spot price of oil chance of retaliation by Tra m an 

layinthe drop past the coming wm- RasThnura. Saudi Arabia s great wl; 
IS, fOTtecteSand seasonal rea- facility. Another 
sons. The prospect of oversupply is Kuwaiti the country witiiUie highest 
diminishing, andlowered OPEC pro- P jO-antt income in the world. * 
duction can no longer be attributed Saudi afly wOnerable to the rage of 
to Saudi restraint. What happened? Ayatollah Kbranram s followers. . ■ - 
The story of what happened is the That was toe^M.^w lsmwand 
subject ofnmors in the U.S. ofl in- 


dmary and of speculation at intdli- Saudis apparently be&ye thatth* 


aence services in Moslem countries, threat to them from Iranian atiack is 

» . i ’ m v - ^ «- - * -C rt J 


To recap the gusher: Tlxc« is this less thaathe threat of the dropofifafr 
war going on in the Gulf, without price of oQ to 515 a barrel ; 


television, , between Iran Here is where auspicious specula' 


and Iraq, both big OPEC oil produc- tiem, or ample deduction, comes into 
era. Only about a million people have play. According to these 02 source*. 


been killed so far, but they are just 
settling into trench warfare. 


the Saudis let Their ally, Iraq, know 1 
this summer that the kingdom would. 


The Iranians have shifted opera- oo longer look with displeasure Mian 
tional control of the war from the attack mi Kharg Island- With the. 


mullahs to the military; that proba- restraint from; mar bankroQer- rih 
bly means a war of attrition has been moved, ihe Iraqis promptly bandied 


upon, which makes strategic a series of damaging taws against 
r the Iranians and spells slow Iran’s ba d is tribution center. ,, 


decided upon, wbidt r 
sense fra the Iranians ; 
disaster for the Iraqis. 


the h§ ackers’ getaway plane, a boo- 
by-trapped soft drink bottle explod- 
ed in a cafe in Tel Aviv. In Ttinis, the 
PLO took credit fra the blast 
On the Achille Lauro. one man was 
murdered. The defense of the man 
who sent the killers — when not ab- 
surdly denying the fact of the murder 
— is that he intended instead the 
killing of other innocents. That is a 
land of defense, a PLO defense. 
What is Italy's? 

Washington Past Writers Group. 



Drawflng by Jun^o). 


What has thfr thought about? De- 
spite. frantic Iranian - efforts to use. 
alternate prats, and cut-rate deals to" 
offset the risks: to tankers, the' <&■ 
coming out. of Iranian territory, has. 
bcendedknng significantly. ' 

. That is the equivalent of new “re- 
straint” by a major producer, and it is. 
a major fact holding up.ofl prices. i" 

~ But what if the Iranians go ahead 
and retaliate against Kuwait, the San r 
dis' devoted- ally? Sorry,; Charlie, 

- business h business; A; blow to Ku- 
wait’s ofl fields would further Finn up 
, the price of Saudttighl crude. . 

No evidence, hard or soft - can be 
produoed to show that the sheikhs in 
Riyadh gave a hide shrug when the: 
Iraqis said “Now?” Bui when a major; 
developmen t takes place in a mega-* 
death war, it is fair . to ask: Who 
benefits most? What, nation could 
continue., to prevent -this specific 
event from happening and evidently 

. When tius world’s attention is fo- 
cused on’ terrorist murder and tho 
failure of allies to stand together, a 
quick sideways glance is permissible 
at what plain logic suggests may be 
the skillful manipulation of a much 
bloodier conflict by the power that 
gains most from hs continuation. 

’’ The New York Times^ . 


Ethiopia: Another Pol Pot Rule? 


America’s Democratic Showcase in Grenada Shows Signs of Rot 

o 


The 1 1-year-old dictatorship in Ethiopia is 
more responsible than any other agency, hu- 
man or meteorological, for the tragedy that 
afflicts Ethiopia. Unfortunately the unsavory 
nature of the Ethiopian regime, and the end- 
less evidence of its crimes against the Ethiopi- 
an people, is ignored by most Western govern- 
ments and charitable agencies whose 
hu manitarian instincts towards the famine are 
being ruthlessly exploited in Addis Ababa. 
Resettlement has beat used openly as a weap- 
on in the civil war between the regime and the 
Tigre peoples. If we start assessing Colonel 
Mengistu as an African Pol Pot, it mig h t alert 
more people to the enormity and criminality of 
what is going on in Ethiopia behind the televi- 
sion pictures of starving children. 

Transport for the resettlement program is 
provided by the Soviet Union. Soviet assis- 
tance also helps the Dergue, the ruling military 
council, pursue a major offensive in the north. 
That explains Why deck space priority is al- 
ways given to Soviet ships carrying arms. leav- 
ing Western grain ships to idle off shore to the 
point where the grain has decayed too far fra it 
to be worth trucking inland. 

— The Tunes (London). 


N EW YORK — Two years after 
the Grenada invasion, tire last 


FROM OUR OCT. 18 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


i ^ the Grenada invasion, the last 
of the Green Berets have moved out 
The last American flags and bunting 
have gone from the cricket field 
where Vice President George Bush 
once spoke to crowds of cheering 
schoolchildren. And the democratic 
government that was left behind may 
be on the verge of disintegrating. 

When the official annals of the 
Rea gan years are written, Grenada 
will figure prominently. The Uik-led 
invasion of the island was a resound- 
ing success for the sort of symbolic 
politics the administration holds 
dear. The action was swift, decisive 
and telegenic. It played out the dra- 
ma of the East-West conflict in a tiny 
theater. The images that remain be- 
hind are of unwitting actors in the 
larger play, cowering Cuban con- 
struction workers and U.S. medical 
students kissing the soO of home. 

fn their desire to cast Grenada as a 
showcase, a bloodied but resolute 
front line in the battle between de- 
mocracy and totalitarianism, US. of- 
ficials made sweeping promises- Ted 
Morse, who beaded the mission of the 
Agency for International Develop- 
ment on the island alter the invasion. 


By George Black 


spelled out the message: “The UJS. 
has made a major political invest- 
ment. If Grenada can stand up to 
totalitarianism and say, *So far, no 
further,’ that gives great confidence. 
Investors want elections, security, in- 
frastructure: we will give all three.” 

The problem is that politics oper- 
ate more on the level of load reality 
than global spectacle. It is never easy 
fra small, underdeveloped societies 
to wear the symbolic mantle that 
larger powers want to them to wear. 

Grenadians first suffered the long 
years of brutal and eccoatric rule un- 
der Sir Eric Gairy, then the disinte- 
gration of a once-popular revolution- 
ary regime. Such a society may be 
poorly equipped to play the role as- 
signed to it. But it may be led to think 
of its own future is the most apoca- 
lyptic teems. After Sir Eric, revolu- 
tion and invasion, phrases like “make 
or break” and “this is our last 
chance” are on the lips of many is- 
landers, above all the business com- 
munity, which talks of joining the 
community in Brooklyn — where 
half of all Grenadians already live — 
if the democratic showcase fails. 


And fail it may. The inheritor of 
Grenada’s democratic f utu re was 
Herbert Blaize, an honest journey- 
man. of politics, now aging and in- 
firm, who never promised miracles. 
His New National Party government 
was designed less as along tern solu- 
tion to Grenada’s fils than as a stop- 
gap. Its main goal was to head off a 


The riding coalition may 
have done too good a job 
in crushing its opponents. 


return to power by Sir Eric, still a 
popular politician. 

Mr. Blaize’s coalition is a patch- 
work erf three parties, whose pro- 
found disagreements were never any 
secret Even the most optimistic erf. 
U.S. officials expected the cracks to 
show within a couple of years. Mr. 
Blaize’s old Grenada National Party, 
founded by a UJS. -trained dentist m ' 
the 1950s, had effectively been ait 
back since 1967 to Mr. Blaize's own 
personal following on Carriacou is- 


land: Offering “the development of 
both the rich and the poor of Grena- 
da,” there was little in Mi. Blaize’s 
program to appeal to. the disenchant- 
ed young people who make up most 
of Grenada’s electorate. 

In the wings were younger, more 
adroit and more charismatic politi- 
cians. To the new- prime minister’s 
right was lawyer Pranas Alexis and 
hji Grenada Democratic Movement. 
To the left was George Brizam a 
talented young educator and histori- 
an, with Ms National Democratic 
Party.. He continues to espouse 
broadly social democratic goals. - 

The coalition certainly did its job 
in crushing Sr Eric in. the December 
1984 elections. In fact, it may. have 
done it too wdL Having swept afibnt 
rare seat in Parliament, it has func- 
tioned virtually without ap por tion. 
Without a common enemy, inev- 
itable conflicts within the alliance 
have turned inward and festered. 

The first major flare-up" came last 
July between Mr. Blaize and Mr. 
Alexis, who made an unsuccessful 
attempt to unseat the prime minister . 
through a parliamentary vote of no : 


confidence, Mr. Blaize has dealt witii 
.a divided, cabinet of dubious loyalty 
largely by ignoring h. His accusers “ 
complain that he prefers to make 
policy alone, or beltind closed doors 
with officials from theU.S. Embassy. 

By July, Parliament had met just 
. twice in seven months. . 

- The Blaize government also faces 
daunting economic problems. By the 
time he announced his budget for 
1985-86, Mr. Blabs was tallnTig in 
desperate terms: “We can compare 
this Grenada situation with the kind 
of situation that faced Europe after 
the Second World War . . r We -catt 
for a kind of Marshall Plan fra Gre- 
•nada." '.That is a vain hope^The $57 
million in U.S. aid to the island, de* 

. scribed by of ficiate as a “one-year 
bulge,” expired at the end of Septent 
ber, and the investors supposed, to 
flock to the island have stayed away* \ M 
: AD that holds the Grenada..experi- * 
.ment together today is- the fear of 
what might follow its collapse. 


(limi 


The writer is editor of the Repot 
an the Americas, published by the 
Noth American Congress on Latin 
America. Be contributed Ais- comment 
to the Los Angeles . Times. - ; ' 


1910: U*S. Soldiers to Get New Look 
WASHINGTON — A radical if not revolu- 
tionary change in the unif orming of soldiers 
has been decided upon by the War Depart- 
ment. Under the new plan the soldier's entire 
load will be placed on his back, permuting him 
free use of the arms and hands in handling a 
gun. Even the bayonet will be on the back. The 
soldier’s blanket and other equipment will be 
rolled up on his back, so that he can sleep 
without much discomfort, even in foil equip- 
ment. The blouse will also be replaced by 

sweaters. The sweaters will not be erf the athlet- 
ic kind, but more like jerseys, buttoning up the 
front with dull buttons. Ihe long overcoat is 
also to give way to a short pea jacket. It is 
believed this win give soldiers more free move- 
ment in the use of their legs. The new uniforms 
will be in service before winter is over. 


1935: France Recalls Madagascar 
PARIS — France is commemorating the 40th 
anniversary of the conquest of Madagascar. In 
1890, Britain, is return for concessions in 
Zanzibar, had consented to recognize a French 
protectorate over Madagascar, but [Madagas- 
car] refused to make concessions. In 1894. 
France addressed an ultimatum to the sover- 
eign, demanding powers that would malm 
French authority supreme in the land. The 
demands were refused. A French force landed. 
General Duchesne and his men, who had 
looked forward to a rapid campaign, found 
themselves transformed into road builders. 
Thousands of soldiers died of disease: [Two 
months later], Duchesne mounted his men on 
mules and within twenty days stood overlook- 
ing Tananarive. Shells were thrown into the 
capital, which surrendered [on Sept. 30, 1895]. 


LETTER 


dibits 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman l9S8-i9$2 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

CthChaumen 


L ONDON — There is no crop in the world more 
j political than sugar- There is no free market 
Everybody has a deal, often with an outside pro- 
tector. The Cuban economy leans heavily on the 
over-th©- market prices paid by the Soviet Union. 
The Caribbean and African countries sunfiariy 
depend on special favors granted by the European 
Community. Fra long enough a number of Carib- 
bean. and Central American, countries have rdied 
on preferential access to the United Stal es . 

But over the last few years these “sugar-daddy” 
arrangements have come to mean less as the lag 
trading blocks — the United States, the EC ana 
Japan — have increased protection and snbadies 
for their own sugar farmers and as some Third 
World producers, like Brazil and Argentina, have 
gone into the subsidy business themselves. 

According to the London-based International 
Sugar Organization, prices are “in real trams quite 
possibly the lowest ever ” It is cheaper fra many 
countries to bum sugarcane rather than harvest it 


By Jonathan Power 


Over the last 25 years, prices in most years have 

been depressed, often below the cost of production 


PHILIP M.FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 
Exmaht Editor RENE BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LBCOUR 

Dnm Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director $ Operation: 

Aomau Editor FRANCOIS DESMAlSONS Director tk Omdatitm 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Know ofAdtmuag Saks 


Depiay PubBdier 
Anodate PabG&er 
Associate Ptddhher 
Director of Operations 


International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Cbarles-de-Gaulle. 92200 Neni liy-sur-Seipe. 
France. TeL: (1)747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 
Direeteur de in publication: Waiter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Hcnnasy Rd. Hoag Kqn S-Yd.J-2856IJ.Tefa 6II70. 
MtatasbaDv. U.K.: Robin MocKidm. 63 Long Acre. London WC2. TeL S36-4901 Telex 262009. 
Gen Mgr. W. German ; W. laaertoA Fnedndtstr. IX GOQOFnatkjmlM- 71 (069)726751 7 2c 416721. 
S.A. au capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Naatem B 732021 126. Commission Paruaire No. 61337. 
U.S. subscription: 5 322 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Long Island City. N. Y. II 101. 
© 1985. International Herald Tribune. AH rights reserved. 



waai uepresea, oi wn oeiow me cost ot procucuon 
of even the most efficient producers. Despite this 
world output has doubled since 1960. 

Ten Central American and Caribbean natio ns 
recently formed a “Sugar Group" to persuade the 
United States to halt the dosing up of its eng^r 
marketplace. Meanwhile, ThirdWorld producers 

are gearing up for a big battle with the EC when its 
sugar regime is due for renewal next year. 

The EC has been the greatest sinner in the sugar 
marketplace. In the United States and Japan pro- 
tectionist measures have kept in being industries 
which would otherwise have gone into dwimg in 
Europe the sugar sujmort system has actually 
boosted the sugar growing economy, at the cost to 
taxpayers and consumers erf an estimated $2 bil- 


lion a year. Sugar production expanded from 9 
million tons in 1970 to a record high of 15 milli on, 
tons in 1982. This amounted to an addition of over 
S percent to world production capacity. 

Euphoria dominated the sugar market in 1973. 
and 1974 when there wax a boom in prices; There 
was a widespread feeEng that sugar was eatering.a 
new period of short supply in the face of growing 
demand. Aid agencies poured in money to help 
developing . countries expand their production. 
However, the wodd recession, changing dietary 
habits and the development of sugar substitutes 
soon combined to juncture that euphoria. 

This depression m sugar prices has compelled 
the EC to adjust hs pabdes. During the lyfJOs it 
has been wfifing to carry higher stoats and it has’ 
engineered a cut in production. The United States, 
however, reacted by becoming more protectionist 
It introduced import quotas in 1982 and then later 
sharply reduced the size of these quotas. In the last 
three years U.S. levels of support for domestic 
sugar producers have risen to virtually the same as 
those in the EC At present this is the most 
significant factor depressing the wodd sugar mar- 
ket. No wonder that tbeCaribbean and Central 
American nations arc screaming. They are losing 
more from their loss of the UJ>. sugar market than 
they are gaining horn America’s vaunted Caribbe- 
an Rawtr Initiative. - 


the past has become capitalized into land values. 
Drastic reductions in support levels would impose 
severe asset losses on landholders. Important pro- 


Anger Within the Law 


■ w , _ a — _ O — Vl IW 

pie are dependent on the sugar crop. 

Another alternative urged in a-receat document 
published by tbe UN Food and Agriculture (W 
ncatimris a new International Agreement “in 
wtnch all participants recognize that the only way 
to achieve remunerative prices and maximize reve- 
nue rs by homing exports.” But if this could be 
done it would have been done long ago. There are 
too many producers and too much sdf-disdDlme 

rwmirwf fnr ♦/* I— rui.. . - 


Othras-argue that improvement in the suaar 
market mil come about on its cwa because rabra 
countries are now unlikely to Tmdertake major 
sugar investment programs. Because the EC and 
Brml in particular are so well placed to respond 
quickly to anv new «im in 


nCW m P™ “d increase 
then production fast, the temptation to take ad- 

VffflTV KrVvrti •_ 


■ * : . — » lu uncr 3n- 

SSl'W 3 * 3 ' boom conditions is now 
repMvcd. But while some countries, such as An*. . 


In theoty, the solution is obvious: a dhmanriing 
of protectionism. After all sugar is one of the few 
export-crops that -some Third wodd countries can : 
grow succKrfnBy. In practice, there arc ewnnoos 
problems in reducing agricultural juptecticausin in; , 
Europe anti North America. Farm support gjveain 


letrawcd. But while some countries, sudi as Ans- 
tralu, on afford .o swallow the IS “to 
sugar industry, others tike Jamaica, -Trinidad and 
Venezuela would find it painful. • • 

Other industry experts believe new uses, in bid- 

^ecte tottn to unrav^ the siniation oveonght bm 
some judicious reduction in the dearorfTnS 

non given to home based £S?JSS2£ : ' 

necessary. This is a crisis, and onefitioS^nd 

Amraica cannot shy away from. .vT- : 

International Herald Tribute. 

Ail rights reserved. . ; ' 


the opinion column u Isra- 
ecs Air Haul on Tunisia .Cannot Be 
CondonetTfOcL I0)by LlaydN. Cutler 

Mr. Cutler’s comments shine a le* 
gal tight upon some of the horrible 
events of the past few.days. A little of 
Mr. UutWs cool analysis coaid well 
be utilized in drawing opinions je^ 
83«ting both sides of the frightening 
situatkMi in the Middle East. A flood 
ra pasaohate angra is washing away 
the shreds of international law that 
remain in effect to protect the people 
of roe world, and it would be ex- 
tremety pratbent fra the Unitetf 
Stop to dearly set forth the lead 
authority it had . for intercepting a 
av jtian airraafr over - international 
waters. America has righteous anger 

On hra ride, bta the world has need of 
jundial proceedings, else we staff 
soon be asking ourselves “How. did 
“tings get so far?” 


# v 


FAmscoSSA. 
■- Geneva. 


in * enfi ed for. publication ' 
addressed "Letters to die 
Motor and must contain the writ- ' 
efs dgrihturez TkDnt ahd M od- 
1 dress. Letters Skoold be brtef and 
subject to Jufitjng. W e catmoT 
/«■ the return of . 
^^oted manuscriiTt.r - - 


:i. .; ...**■» A 2 a 







Page 7 


EW YORK — Lowell George of 
to* 1970s rock band Little Feat 
was probably kidding when he 








■ .7 


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<$o»*e contend that rock and roll = ? 

is bad for the body and bad for the soul 
bad for the heart, bad for the mind, 
bad for the deaf and bad for. the blind 
Yet with an elaborate media «iwpaign 
that culminated last month in a day of Sen- 
ate hearings and stern, if vague, admonitions 
from Commerce Committee members to 
U- 5 . record companies, some parents have 
upset the record business. 

The Parents Music Resource Center (a 
Wa sh i ng ton, D.CL, organization that in- 
cludes the wives of 10 senators, 6 congress- 
men and a cabinet seexetazy) and the nation- 
al Parent-Teacher Association, with five 
million members, have demanded that -pop 
record albums cany warnings about poten- 
tially offensive song lyrics — preferably ah 
*7C" label The parents’ group has sponsored 
a touring slide show of excerpts from rock 
songs dubbed “The Filthy 11" The topics 
cited are sex, violence, the occult and en- 
couragement of drug or alcohol use." - 
- As of this writing, some major record 
companies had agreed to put warning labels 
on albums that included certain specific 
words — not the topic-by^topic warnings 
advocated by the national FTA or die broad- 
er ratings demanded by the parents* group. 
While representatives 'of the parents’ group 
say they do not advocate censorship, many 
retailers have said they would not cany a 
record with an “X" rating. Through the 
years, however, many rode albums (such as 
Prince’s “Dirty Mind,” which has been died 
fry the parents’ group) have been packaged 
with stickers noting that some listeners 
might find .the content offensive. 

No matter how the. battle over labeling is 
resolved, however, the issue is unlikely to- 
disappear soon. 

Why has the content of rode music come 
.. . . under fire in 1985, nearly 30 years after such 
~f Sty eyebrow-raising songs as “Good GoDy Miss 
•' e >5 ' Molly ” and a year in which ibek musicians 
have raised some SlOOmiBton for hunger 
relief? One reason is the cmrent conservative 
political dimate. Another is that the record 
business may feel particularly vulnerable 
even to implied congressional pressure, since 
the industry organization, the Recoding In- 
dustry Association of .America, has been 
lobbying, for a tax on blank taw jnd Jape 
recorders that would bring miffions of dol- 
lars to copyright holders, notably, record 

companies. ••• 

A third and major — catalyst is tdevi- 


cs 

Debate 
Words 

Tbke It,^in which* parent is thrown out a 
modow. 

.i,A recent cover story in People 
suggested a connection between the so- 
caS«d ^8JkStaIItei"Ti^ 

Tes and ttealkgedperpetraior's fondness for 
die rode grbop AC-DC — a connection that 
the -Lw Angdcs district attorney finds far- 
fetched- Ahhoogh Mrs. Baker believes that 
only 8 percent of aH rode lyrics are offensive; 
parauswfco have been following the media 
coverage might well begin to worry that their 
childrens’ record collections could mate 
rhwrv in fri ght«Tifr» g behavior. 

The rtietaric should not obscure the lyrics 
thdnsdvesTAn average rock song, particu- 
larly in the 7 crude, heavy-metal rode most 
1 dften.dted : by.ibe parents' group, cnniawK 
perhaps 250or, for a particularly literary 
effort, BOO words. Since it's difficult to tell a 
story in 300 weeds (including a repeating 
chorus)," rock songmiters inevitably pare 
doWn lyrics. Since most songwriters also 
want to reach the widest possible audience, 
they alw lyrics open-ended; if more 
recede identify with a song, nx»re people are 
nkdy to buy it. For tonilar commerdal rea- 
sons, very few songs use outright profanity, 
Since Federal f!ftn r niTminH tions P/wnmifiginn 
gmddines prohibit the broadcast of some 



Susan Baker. 



=sti 


movies, in which sexual and 
vkdeni.acts are seen directly on the 
screeq, song lyrics don’t necessarily 
defiver the same message to everyone who 
hears them. What worries the record busi- 
ness and music fans, as- wdl as defenders of 
First Amendment free speech guarantees, is 
that the meanings of songs are fflwt in by 
listeners, and a hostile listener can supply 
broad interpretations. 

'• One excerpt the parents* group dtes is 

from “Under the Wade” by Twisted Sister: 

Your toms are strapped 

Your tegs are tied 

You're going under the Node. 

' Does tins signify violent sex, as members 
of the parents* group believe: is it about 
surgery, as its author. Dee Snider, says; or is 
k a Perils-of-Paalme scenario, sa wmill whir- 
ring in the background? ]s the Jacksons’ 
“Torture,” another song cited, sadomasoch- 
istic, oris it simply hyperbole, a metaphor 
fair unrequited love? 

' The parents*group has also died Bruce 
Springsteen’s *Tm on Fire” as obscene. 
While “fire” is virtually the only four-letter 
,wojrd in the lyrics, it would be sophistry to 
soggiest that toe song is not about lust It is 
also deaf, from Springsteen’s delivery, that 
the character in the song is utterly miserable 
about the state he’s in. Even if the song were 
tmequivocally, joyfully lusty, should all 



sicn. Muse video elms have maderock per- songs about hist bear warnings? 
fanners widely visible as they brandish their ‘ • fjfost ~~ 


Sij^iis of Hoi 


- • isn't iai 
... .. fts T- 

• - yis. 1 1 

’’ii 5- 


'■ c ” 


- 

■ 

' ,T.- r& : 

.VYr * 

•".’G* -a: 

. 


, ; « 1 


pointed guitars, shake their fists and, some- 
times, wear as little clothing as- a Ziegfdd 
Follies gfrL Studded leather outfits, spiky 
haircuts, extreme makeup and the kind of 
hip-wiggling that got Ehns Presley censored 
on the Ed Sullivan show in the 1950s are 
accessible to evqy tdevirion watcher. : 

, Madonna’s corae-hithcr glances and other 
performers’ rebdlious styles may threaten 
some viewera every hit as much as motorcy- 
cle jackets or bikinis threatened their par- 
ents. But while video dips have hdpedspafk 
the c urren t debate, those dips (which are 
carefully reviewed by tire; stations that air 
them, and generally would qualify for a PG 
movie rating) are not at issue now -— only 
lyrics. 

_ In tte entreat tatties, however, few of the 
disputants have limited their comments, to 
the words on the records. Susan Baker of the 
Parents Musk: Resource Center (the wife of 
the secretary of the Treasury, Janies A Bak- 
er 3d) has said that Madonna teaches young 
giris how to be “a pom queen in heat”; the 
has also objected to a video dip of 
Sister’s song “We’re Not Gonna 


of the example died by the parents’ 
group come from heavy-metal rock, a deter- 
minedly abrasive musical form consumed 
ahnost exdusivdy by teen-age boys. Among 
the fewri on-obscure ^roups dted are Motley 
Cme, whose song “Live Wire” on the album 
“Too Fast for Love” indudes this verse: 

PU either break her face 
Or takedown her legs 
Get my ways at yall 
Go for the throat 
Never let loose 
Goin’inforthekilL 

Six lines of a 38-line lyric, admittedly 
vulgar— -but even execrable taste is protcct- 
ed by the First Amendment 
- That ugly verse should be putin context 
Unlike the fully visualized violence of the 
movie “Rambo” t» the television series “The 
A-Tcam,” both of which have been seen by 
more people than were ever exposed to Mot- 
hsy ^Gnw^IJye Wire” doesn’t nxvcdve three- 
dimensional characters and doesn’t last for 
-very long. And while Rambo and the A- 
Team are presented as heroes, Motley Crue 
members dress like downs. Heavy-metal 
bands are the bad boys of current rode; they 


ham r *• *-nrri **t q — 1 *~~‘ 

Dee Snider testifying. 

package themselves as outlaw's, not role 
models. 

One argument made by the parents* group 
is that an album is marketed by a relatively 
tasteful tingle but also contains other, more 
offensive songs. There is, of course, a simple 
solution: Buy the tingle, not the album. Or 
avoid both. But that private choice would 
not affect whether a store stocks the record. 
A ratings label, which would taint the whole 
album for perhaps one verse of one song, 
would warn that a song could be interpreted 
as offensive; the parents' groups say that the 
issue is truth in packaging. 

In current rode, no one is selling Heruy 
Miller in the guise of “Rebecca of Sunny- 
brook Farm.” The kinds of style that alarm 
some parents signify, dearly that a. .band 
plans to be openly rude. 

What heavy-metal bands unabashedly de- 
liver is shock value — a taste of noisy, 
authority-threatening, vulgar thrills. They 
are an outlet for the feelings of rebellious 
adolescents. In that, they fulfill a function — 
public bad taste — that has always been 
served by some kind of popular culture, from 
bear-baiting to burlesque. 

S INCE the days of Plato, there have 
been arguments over whether an 
should be disturbing; in the modem 
era, however, shocking art and cultural arti- 
facts — Picasso's “Guernica,” William Bur- 
roughs’s “Naked Lunch,” the Rolling 
Stones’ “Gimme Shelter” — are facts of life. 
The Parents Music Resource Center itself 
knows the uses of shock value; a touring 
presentation called "The Clean 15” wouldn’t 
make the evening news. 

Rock, the parents’ groups argue, reaches a 
young, impressionable audience. It is true 
that the 8 percent of lyrics that the parents' 
group considers dangerous are occasionally 
heard by children, in an information barrage 
that also includes television, radio, movies, 
newspapep, books, classes in school, conver- 
sations with friends, time with parents and, 
perhaps; religious instruction. 

Continued on page 9 


New Passion in Music-Making 


by John RockweU 


N EW YORK — Sometimes con- 
ventional wisdom turns out not to 
be so wise, after all. Cliches codify 
what everyone knows, to the point 
of banality, but sometimes clichfcd assump- 
tions become outmoded; they aren't even 
trivially true anymore. 

Take the widespread notion that young 
instrumental virtuosos these days, while 
tec hnically profi ci ent, are bland, conserva- 
rive and utterly lacking in individuality, 
“soul” or “heart.” 

This is an assumption with a carious com- 
bination of proponents. Older music teach- 
ers believe it, out of nostalgia for their own 
youth (although naturally they carefully ex- 
empt their own best students from the gener- 
al stigmal 

Record collectors and scholars with an 
interest in Romantic performance practice 
believe it, dinging to their scratchy old disks. 
Lots of knowledgeable ooncertgoers and mu- 
sic-business professionals, dispirited from 
the general round of mechanically executed, 
calculated ly careerist concerts they encoun- 
ter, believe it. 

Even some contemporary-music special- 
ists believe it, arguing (hat young performers 
today are spiritually dead because of their 
lack of contact with their own time. 

But what if this widely held thesis isn’t 
valid? Or, more likely, that while it accurate- 
ly described much of the previous genera- 
tion, it is taring hs aptness for the best young 
performers in their 20s and 30s who are now 
gaining favor with the musical public? 

When the present-day concert scene is 
observed dispassionately, it would seem 
there is indeed a lively younger generation of 
instrumental soloists who evince ample 
heart, soul, personality, distinctiveness — 
however you choose to describe those quali- 
ties that distinguish real artists from profi- 
cient also-rans. These yoimg musicians bring 
to their playing a mnsicality that speaks 
directly from the emotions, conveying a hu- 
manistic sense of musical meaning beyond a 
merely proper rendition of the nous an the 
page. 

O NCE one accepts the existence of this 
new breed of high-quality young in- 
strumentalists, then one is led to the 
reasons why they should have come on the 
scene just now, and why they might have 
been discouraged in the previous generation. 
And those reasons can possibly tell us some- 
thing interesting and important about the 
general climate of music in our time. 

Some explanations and qualifications: 
There is no point in worrying overmuch 
about just who belongs within the magic 
circle of those dubbed “soulful” and those 
(young or old) who should still be branded as 
mechanistic. Here, just for argument’s sake, 
is a short list, ranging among the pianists, 
from the Romantically communicative Radu 
Lupu to the willfully flamboyant Ivo Pogor- 
elich to the introvertedly intense Youri 
Egorov to the coolly mystical, experimental- 
ly offbeat Peter Serkin to the cnanneristically 
swooning Keith Jarrett, who made his fame 
in jazz and is now carving out a Romantic 
niche for himself as a classical pianist. 

Among the young violinists there are Gi- 
don Kroner, restlessly curious and impos- 
ingly musical; the wonderfully poetic Fltnar 
Oliveira; the big-toned and exciting Kyung- 
Wha Chung; the still evolving, eagerly com- 
manding Nadia Salerno-Sonnenberg. There 




is the preeminent young cellist, Yo-Yo Ma, 
masterly in standard repertory and willing to 
branch out into the j as-flavored composi- 
tions of Claude Bolling. There is the clarinet- 
ist Richard Stoltzman, who offends some 
purist technicians but who takes all sorts of 
invigorating risks with his art. 

Anyone who thinks about these matters 
will and should question one or another 
name in this grouping, or c hplJengp the 
shorthand description of some of the artists, 
or lobby fervently for the inclusion of others. 
No problem — this is a representative list, 
meant to suggest rather than define. The 
more worthy young musicians one can name 
who aren’t on the list, the more strongly the 


Jo* Kennedy. The New York Toe 

general point is reaffirmed — that there are 
indeed lots of distinctive young intiumenta- 
Hsls these days. 

Similarly, there is no need here to engage 
again in that age-old argument about wheth- 
er the younger players stack up adequately 
next to the masters. Maybe Hofmann or 
Lbevinne or Rubinstein or Cortot were “bet- 
ter.” Or maybe the differences of Zeitgeist 
make such comparisons suspect in the first 
place. The point is that, as a group, we have 
better, more personable, more engaging in- 
strumentalists today than we had in the 
generations that came to the fore in the 
1950s, '60s and 70s. 


T HE issue, it should be stressed, is 
distinctive personality, not style. The 
best young soloists today hardly all 
sound alike — in fact, their very differences 
reinforce the thesis. That said, however, a 
prevailing shift can be detected away from a 
faceless modernist reductionism, a too-sober 
concern for getting the notes “right” and 
eschewing expressivity as willful indulgence, 
and toward a greater flamboyance, color and 
poetic intensity. In short, a shift from Classi- 
cism to a contemporary kind of Romanti- 
asm. 

What, then, cast a pall over the previous 


JaofrlWr* Ukw 


Cellist Yo-Yo Ma (above) and the 
Yugoslav pianist Ivo Pogorelich. 

generation of intrumentalists, and why, pos- 
sibly. is that pall lifting in the 1980s? 

(hie explanation is a general condemna- 
tion of the modem age. “Students today are 
technically advanced; we live in the age of 
technology." says Rafael Bronstein, who 
teaches violin at the Manhattan School of 
Music and who counts Oliveira among his 
prize pupils. “But they lack a knowledge of 
the great composers, a deep understanding 
of past eras.” 

Bronstein 's complaint is echoed by those 
who blame American conservatories in gen- 
end and the dominant Juilliard School in 
particular for turnin g out uninteresting mu- 
sicians on an assembly-line basis. “I remem- 
ber a teacher at Juilliard telling me proudly 
that Murray Perahia could never have made 
it past their entrance requirements," says 
Mark P. Malkovich 3d, general director of 
the Newport Music Festival and the Palm 
Beach Festival 

The complaints against Juilliard and the 
other conservatories have partly to do with 
their pouring out of vast numbers of aspiring 
soloists into the marketplace, cluttering up 
the process by which the best rise to the top, 
and encouraging a narrow-minded concen- 
tration on “sure fire” repertory. 

Today, the conservatories are beginning to 
take steps to counter their image as factories 
for spiritually limited musician-technicians. 
Joseph W. Polisi, the new president of Juil- 
liard, has instituted course requirements to 
encourage a more hunoanistic education for 
young musicians. “We want to get them 
more interested in ihinkmg about their mu- 
sic.” he said. 

Similarly, more and more competition los- 
ers, like Egorov, are coming to the fore, or 
pianists are making careers outside the com- 
petition circuit, like Serkin, or competitions 
themselves are being restructured with an 
eye toward avoiding their own worst ex- 
cesses — as with Yehudi Menuhin’s violin 
competition in Paris, which stresses all man- 
ner of repertory, and chamber and orchestral 
concern, as well as the traditional 19th- 
century warhorses. 

Many of the older teachers represented an 
extension of European traditions, and espe- 
cially Russian- Jewish traditions, into an 

Continued on page 9 



in the Baby Blue Rolls-Royce 



. 

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P ARIS — Judith De Paiil fikespreay clothes arid nice fiumih- 
ings and admiring- glances from men. She ikes her new 
RoDs-Royce a lot — it is baby-bhie and has a telephone — 
and what she really loves most of allisdcmg deals. . 

“Tvc been a television producer since 1978 and what you would 
call a deal-maker for the last three or four years, slowly getting a. 
reputation as someone who can do deals, who is a good negotiator, a 
tough maverick.** At the end of the sentence her eyes narrow slightly 
in a smfle-when-you-say-that look, but she accompanies that with a 
hearty and lusty laugh. In her 40s, Judith De PanTisin the fast lane 
and is lapping it up. - - ■ - . - 

De Paul, who was in Paris to start adeal with French TV 1 , is a New 
Yorker who began as a child hoofer, was a soprano at the Metropoli- 
tan Opera from the age oE-ZZ to 31, and then went into television 
production, winning two Emmies for “An Evening of Jerome Rob- 

Maby Blume ~ 

bins Ballets” and “A Tribute to Toscanini,” both in 1980. She came 

to London fom ^veor s^ago and 18 months ago 

^on’are budgeted at S18 million and she just received a $15- 
inilBon revolving credit line from a City of London bank! She hopes 
Silver Chalice will go public within three years. 

Her six-hour mini- scries, “Mountbatten: The Last Vi 
be aired in the United States cm MobiFs Mat 
starting in January. Itis, she says, “qurtelovdy 
Coming mx with filming to start at the end of the year, in India and 
Britain, is "Indira Gandhi,” probably with Anne Bancroft in the title 
idle. In the spring, filming will start bn “The Sefited Mn,” die story 
of Latin’s return to Russia in i 917. Also this spring, De Paid plans to 
maV>- a film about Kfom Barbie, tbe fomer GeTman officer who is 
now awaiting trial for Work! War II crimes in France. • • 

The Barbie story, De Paid says, will not depend on theootcome.of 
the trial and even if Barbie, as so many people hope, dies, before the 
t rial it will make no difference. The film is called “A Blind Tfye to 
Murder.” ■> - 

*Tm vay interested in some of the factsthat havebeen unearthed 
about the late ’40s- and *50s and the AHies\strange inydyeaneni in 

protec ting |h*majv wa gBm'i t whatthev frit w'i^aTrighteiungnew 
frontier,, the Soviet Mod. The' way they weni >roand piOtecting 
tbemsdvesl find rather abhoctent and he was smack in tbemfckB&of 
h. Barbie. Thafs what’s so fascinating. The" poiril is not tojknodc 
anybody, it’s totry be. helpful and say, “Holy Oirist >| thi& is what 
happened, please dear God, let's never let it happenagami” .*■ 


will 



Judith De Pend. 


David Fend 


Judith De Paul made her first big splash in England with 22 hours 
of televised Gilbert and Sullivan. Her gradual move from musical 
programs to controversial drama has coincided with her increased 
power in, as she puts it, doing deals. Two specific acts precipitated 
the transformation: attending such, courses as “Theatrical Con- 
tracts” at the New School while a fledgling producer in New York, 
and reading a book caUed,“Winning Through Intimidation.” It's a 
nice book, she'. says, despite the title. It’s about a turtle- 
• “The turtle represented everyone and everyone’s fears. Can I close 
the deal? Should I have my lawyer with me?” (Her lawyer was along 
for her meeting with French TV.) “Should Toe bullish? Should I be 
soft? Should I try to smile? And he, this little turtle, went about all 


these various types of deals. Reading it as a very young woman, I 
started to Laugh and say, Tm not the only one,' because this book is 
for men and! realized that men also worry about their ability to 
maneuver or mani pulate the strategy within the deal in order to win 
or to close.” 

De Paul is a good-natured and kind employer to her mostly female 
staff of 15, who occupy a four-story town bouse in Mayfair. But she 
spends most of her time playing hardball with the guys: She is not 
just another corporate woman trying to blend in with a gray- tailored 
suit (she wouldn't dream of wearing one, except to the bank) but one 
of that rare breed, a swashbuckling entrepreneur, eager to stand out 
m a crowd. 

“We're talking about show biz, entrepreneurs and a macho ap- 
proach in business. And perhaps what makes it a little unusual is that 
I’m a woman in that climate. I do have an entrepreneurial brain and 
it’s a creative brain so that means I find deal-making very creative. 
So I can sit in a meeting and when it gets hot I can usually find 
another way to go around the deal. Or I can be tough and stonewalL 

“It probably sounds aggressive, and I don't mean it to, but you 
must want to win. You must. You must be fearless. And you must 
have an unstoppable drive to close the deal, to be one of the boys, be 
one of the players. You have to learn about strategy. You have to 
learn how to communicate, you have to learn bow to coordinate, you 
have to learn to read P-and-L statements. You've got to familiarize 
yourself with all toe tactics and all the back-up that your opponents 
have, or your colleagues have:” 

G OMING from a male tycoon, none of this would surprise. 
Coming from a good-looking woman in a print dress and 
suede pumps, it often diets shocked headlines simply because 
there aren't that many women in a postion to talk openly about 
power. Judith De Patti doesn’t mind the boss lady image — it gets her 
publicity and throws male counterparts usefully off-balance. She is 
perfectly ready to disconcert if it gives her an advantage in a deal, 
just as she is willing to use fooiall metaphors in wheeling and dealing 
although toe knows nothing about the game. 

“It’s good for the image,” toe says, laughing. 

She is a workaholic. She wears on her right ring finger a knuckle- 
duster star ruby that toe bought in India while shooting “Mourn bat- 
ten." It was during the shooting that she met Indira Gandhi, toe 
subject of her next series. 

“It’s one of the most exciting projects I’ve ever worked on because 
it’s what we're talking about — a woman in power. And it’s a 
personal view, it shows how she changed from a loving wife who gave 
birth to two boys to a woman thrust m toe political arena at the age 


of 48.” The program will not take political sides. “ It's very easy not 
to like a powerful woman," De Paul says. “You know there's the old 
saying, the man is forceful, toe woman is a bitch.” 

Bom in New York of Russian and Italian parents, De Paul made 
her dancing debut at tbe age of seven on the Ted Mack Amateur 
Hour, switched to singing at toe School of Performing Arts (later 
immortalized in “Fame”), and was married for seven years to an 
Italian painter duing her stint at toe Met (“He was wonderful, he 
taught me a lot about life and we’re still good friends”). She gave up 
singing at 34 and turned to TV producing, starting with “Amah! and 
the Night Visitors" because toe composer Gian Carlo Menotti was a 
friend glad to give her toe rights. 

Successful as toe was in New York, she decided that rather than be 
a little fish in a big pond she would rather be a big fish in London. 
She seems to have toe best of both worlds because, although U.K.- 
based, Silver Chalice represents such American companies as MTM 
(creators of “Lou Grant,” “Hill Street Blues" and other hit series), 
and her own product is intended for U.S. consumption. 

She notes that as a singer she was always close to her conductors, 
“very charismatic men, very aggressive.” When toe started in TV, 
first in New York and then in London, she chose as partners men 

who were older, charismatic and aggressive. “And I found in produc- 
ing I have become of a similar personality to these men, hatting 
nothing to do with femininity or sexuality. They were my role 
models. I didn’t have a female role model." 

Her handsome office is a study in toe iconography of power, 
suggesting force, femininity, commerce and an. Dress is also impor- 
tant: since she is interested in power more than seduction, each 
garment has a symbolic role. “Sometimes I want a hard approach in 
a meeting, sometimes a soft approach.” The real pros, toe says, 
appreciate her style. 

“The funny thing is, toe City guys like me. The Qty guys are tough 
as nails and they are smart as whips and what they like is someone 
who’s blunt, who cites toe bottom line and believes totally in what 
they do. Because they consider that anyone who, to use an English 
term, waffles, who strays from the point, is not gong to be able to 
make toe mark.” 

She has made it. She likes toe civilities of Europe though toe 
misses what she calls toe American cowboy instinct — “It is 
something I was trained to have and do have.” ‘Sensibly, toe r ealiz e s 
it is best to exercise it in a climate where it is rare. 

She has no plans yet to write an Iacocca-style book. “They're not 
ready for it," she says with her rich, operatic laugh- Like film mogul 
Sam Spiegel she lives in an apartment in toe Grosvcnor House hotel 

“1 like living in a hotel, I almost always have. What a woman needs 
is to be on equal footing with a man and not to have to make the 
damn beds." ■ 






i 



Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1985 


TRAVEL 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


AUSTRIA 


VIENNA, Kouzerthaus(tel:72.I2.I I). 
CONCERTS— Ocl 20 and 22: Alban 

Berg Quartet (Bartok. Berg. Schubert 1 . 
Ck:L 23: ORF Symphony Orchestra, 
ORF Choir, Lolhar Zagrosek conduc- 
tor (WozzeckV 

Oct. 24 and 25: Vienna SymphonDter, 
WofgangSawallisch conductor. Chris- 
tian Altenburger violin (Mozart. 


Avam-Garde: 1910-1930” (Maie- 
viich, Kandensky. Gomjarova). 
KLAMPENBORG. Bellevue Theater 
{Wl.39.87.87j. 

DANCE — To Ocl 20: The Danish 
Dance Theater. “The Li/e of Dance." 


CONCERTS — Ocl 24: Helsinki 
Phil harmonic Orchestra, Jerzy Mak- 
svmiiik conductor. AlsnkoTeiuna vio- 
lin (Mozart, Penderecki). 


•ThiAtre du Rond-Point 


nd:256.70m 

cor 


FRANCE 


ENGLAND 


TALS — OcL 21: Jessye Nor- 
man soprano, Philipp Mod piano 
(Ravel. Brahms. Mahler). 

OcL 23: Gemot Wimschhofer violin, 
Elisabeth Fbeodoroff piano (Bach. 
Beethoven). 

•Muakverem (tel: fi5.Sl.90). 
CONCERTS— Ocl 19 and 21 : Vien- 
na P hilhar monic. Leonard Bernstein 
conductor (Haydn, Mozart). 
RECITALS — Ocl 20: Paul Badura- 
Skoda piano (Beethoven, Schubert). 
Ocl 25: Hans Kann piano (Beethoven. 
Schubert). 

•Staatsoper (td. 53240). 

BALLET — Ocl 21: “Sylvia" iMcr- 
anie, Delibes). 

OPERA — Ocl 20: “Le Nozze di Fi- 
garo” (Mozart). 

Ocl 22: “Aida” (Verdi). 

OcL 25: “Lohengrin" (Wagner). 
(Strauss). 


CANTERBURY, Mariowe Theatre 
(tel: 67246;. 

BALLET — Ocl 19: Sadler's Wdk 
Royal BalleL “Giselle," (Petipa) “The 
Lady and (he Fool" (Cranko. Verdi) 
“Card Game." (Cranko. Stravinsky). 
LONDON. Barbican Centre (tel: 
638,41.41). 


CONCERTS— Ocl 20: London Sym- 
lickox 


phony Orchestra. Richard Hid 
conductor. Heather Harper soprano 
(Britten. Mahler). 

Ocl 20: London Concert Orchestra, 
Fraser Goulding conductor, Gillian 
Knight contralto (Handel. Mendels- 
sohn). 

Ocl 24: London Svrnpbony Orches- 
tra. Claudio Abbado conductor 
(Nono. Mahler). 


EXHIBITIONS— To Nov. 3: “Eg>p- 
nn the 


Uan Landscapes: Weaving from 
' iWassef.* 


BELGIUM 


BRUSSELS, Musee de Costumes et 
DenteDe (tel: 51 1.27.42). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 1 “Opera 
Costumes from 1959tothePre$enL" 
•Palais des Beaux Aru(tel : 5 12.50.45). 
EXHIBITION —To Dec. 22: “Span- 
ish Splenders and Bel g ia n Villages, 
1500-1700." 

•Musfies Royaux des Beaux-Arts de 


Belgique((ef: 513.55.46). 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22 


El 
“Goya." 


BRAZIL 


SAO PAULO, 18th Biennial Celebra- 
tion (tel : 572.7732). 
EXHIBITIONS— To Dec. 15: "Con- 
temporary An" (Borofsky, DokoupD, 
EckeCL Duarte, Senise). 

ToDec. ^“ModemGasac^CPonin- 
ari, SegalL Malfacti). 

To Dec. 15:“TbeAppremiceTourist: 
Pbotosof the Amazon Region by Mau- 
reen Bistllial and Mario de Andrade." 


DENMARK 


School of Ramses Wissa 
To Nov. 3: “Rod eric O'Coner." 
MUSICAL — Oct. 22: “HMS Pin- 
afore" (Gilb ert and Sullivan). 
THEATER— ToOet 3 1 : "Les Miser- 
able*" (Hugo. Musical Adaption: 
Boubil and SchOnbuzg}. 

•Bri tish Museum (tel : 636- 1535). 
EXHIBITION —To Jan. 1 986: “Bud- 
dhism: Art and Faith." 

•London Coliseum (tel: 836.01.1 1). 
OPERA— Ocl 19 and 23: “Rigoletto” 
(Verdi). 

OcL 22 and 25: “Don Carlos" (V erdi). 
Ocl 24: “Faust" (Gounod). 

•National Theatre (tel: 633.08.80). 
THEATER — Ocl 19 and 21 : “The. 
Real Inspector Hound" (Tom Stop- 
pard) and "The Critic” (Richard 
Brinslev Sheridan ). 

•Tate Gallerv (tel: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 10: 
“Pound’s Artists." 

To Dec. 1 : “Howard Hodgkin: Prints 
from 1977-1983.” 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (id: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To October 22: 
“Textiles from the Well come Collec- 
tion: ancient and modem textiles from 
the Near East and Peru.” 

To Nov. 17: “Browne Muggs: English 
Brown Salt-Glazed Stoneware." 

Ocl 23-Jan. 26: “Hals from India." 

To Jan. 19: “Shots or Style: Great 
Fashion Photographs Chosen by Da- 
vid Bailey." 


FINLAND 


HUMLEBAEK, Lo uisiana Museum 
of Modem Art (tel: 19.07.19). 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. 1: “Russian 


HELSINKI, Finlandia Hall (tel: 
904.04.21). 


DUON, Musfie National Maurice 
Magnin(td: 67.1 1.10). 

EXHIBITION —To Nov. 18: “XIX 
Century French Portraits," 

PARIS, American Center (tel: 
335.21.50). 

EXHIBITION— To Nov. 30: “Wi- 
liam T. Wiley: California L” 

•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 
277.1233). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 16: 
“Malta." 

To Jan. 1 : “Klee et la Musique." 
•Centre Culture! du Mexique (tel: 
549.16.26). 

EXHIBITION — To Oct. 26: “Cinq 
Visions Mexkaines." 

•Eglise Saint-Michd (td 742.70.88). 
CONCERT — Ocl 19: Cardiff Poly- 
phonic Choir, Richard Elfyn Jones di- 
rector (Byrd, Tallis). 

•Galerie Agathe Gaillard (tel: 
277.38-24). 

EXHIBITION — To Nov. 9: "Fran- 
cois Delebecque." photographs. 
•Galerie Bernard Jourdan (tel:' 
296.37.47). 

EXHIBITION —To Oct 26: "Vin- 
cent Bane." 

•Galerie Lahumiere (id: 763.03.95L 
EXHIBITION —To Ocl 30: “Andre 
Masson." 

•Galerie 1900-2000 (td: 32S.S4.20). 
EXHIBITION — Oct. 21 -Nov. 30: 
“Reuo-Music. 1890-1970." 

•Hotel Prince de Galles (tel: 
723.55.11). 

EXHIBITION — To Nov. 13: “Ere 
Terre-Mere," sculpture by Marion. 
•Maison de la Radio (tel: 524. 1 5. 10). 
RECITAL — Ocl 22: Jean-Louis Gil 
organ (Bach, Lenot). 

• Musee d’Art Moderne (tel: 
723.6 1-27). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan- 5: “Vera 
Szekdv." 

•MusAe Cama valet (td:27121 .1 3). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Ocl 27: “Les 
Grands Boulevards de Paris." 

To Jan. 1 2: “Eugene BejoL" 

•Musfie du Grand Palais (tel: 
261.54.10). 

EXHIBITIONS— To Nov. 3: “Salon 
d'Automne," CoroL Courbet, Monet 
To Dec. 16: “Sir Jcehoa Reynolds: 
1723-1792." 

ToJan-6:“LaGIoiredc Victor Hugo.” 
•Musee du Louvre (td: 260-39.26). 
EXHIBITION —To Jan. 6: “Le Bran 
a Versailles." 

•Salle Pleyd (tel: 563.07.96). 
CONCERT — Ocl 19: Ensemble Or- 
cbesral de Paris. Jean-Pi erre Wallez 
conductor. Jean-Phillipe Coll and pi- 
ano (Haydn. Mozart). 


ONCERT — Ocl 20: Mel os Quartet, 
Michel Portal darinette (Brahms, 
Schumann). 

■Th&fUre Musical de Paris (tel: 
261.19.83). 

RECITAL — Ocl 21 : Montserrat Ca- 
balle soprano, Miguel Zanetti piano. 
ROUEN, Musee des Beaux Arts (id: 
7138.40). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec. 31: 
“Tolmer." 


GERMANY 



FASHION SHOW 


Kashion in the Heart of 
OCTOBER 19-20-21 





aris 


NOVA PARK ELYSEES 

51, rue Francois-!' 1 75008 Paris Tel. 562.63.64 - Telex 643256 F 


ACME 

ALGO 

CERRARI 

CLAUDE PATRICK 

CLAUDE RIHA 

COCKTAIL COUTURE 

(Styl' st e M. TELLIN) 

DANIEL DIMER 
ELISABETH WESSEL 
FRANCK OLIVIER 
GEORGYA 
HENRI RAVOUX 

(BABOUCHKA) 

KAZA-SPORT 

KAZAZIAN 

LASSO 

NORBERT NEL 

(IDEM DE N. NEL) 

PAULETTE BURAUD 
PRINCIPE 

TREVISE COUTURE 


COLLECTION SPRING - SUMMER 86 


TRADE ONLY 



WEEKEND 


appears every 
Friday 

For information call Dominique Bouvet 
in Paris on 747.12.fe 
or your local IHT representative 

(Uet in Classified Section) 


SHOPPING 


rtveiinsh house 

Unique in Paris 


A 


For a treat, drop 
in to our tea room 


Taste our own smoked salmon 
6c the real Irish coffee. 

On dispby: lovely knitwear, 
suits, separates, tweeds 8c superb 
selection of gifts. 

Tax free 

33, r. de Longdurap, Paris 16*. 
M 1 Koa/Bolsslire. 

_T&: (1)704 85 22. mhmi 


COOKING SCHOOL j 




Eca/ede Cuisine A Patisserie 
Fondle en I89S 


COOKING COURSES 


IN BS1GUSH 


Wednesday, 7-9 pjiv. Oa. 30T>c- 18. 
F.Fr. 110 per person, F.Fr. 880 for 8. 
Fee information phase Gaft 

55&42.9B, 

Le Cordon Biw, 

24 R. du <X-deMan, 

75007 PARIS. 



COLOGNE, Oper der Stadt (td: 
2125.81). 

OPERA— Oct 19: “La Garza Ladra" 
( Rossini j. 

Ocl 20: “The Magic Flute" (Mozart). 

for children. 

Ocl 2 1 : *Turandot" ( Pnceinj 1 
FRANKFURT. Cafe Theater (tel: 
77.74.66). 

THEATER — To OcL 31: “The 
Homecoming" { Piwer). 
HAMBURG, Staatsoper (tel: 
35.15.55). 

BALLET — Ocl 19: “Midsummer's 
Night Dream" (Balanchine, Mendels- 
sohn). 

OPERA —Ocl 19 and 22: “Le Nozze 
di Figaro” (Mozart). 

OcL 20 and 24: “Faust" (Gounod). 


IRELAND 


Theatre 


October 


DUBLIN. Abbey 
(tel:744.505). 

THEATER — Through 
“Souper Sullivan" (Ham). 
•Douglas Hyde Gallery 
77.29.41). 

EXHIBITION — To Oct. 27: 
“Sources." 

•Dublin Civic Museum (tel: 77. 1 6.42). 


(tel: 


EXHIBITION — Through October: 

Musici 


iusicmDub- 


- Through October 
foriarty” (Leonard). 


“1 8th Century Popular 
lin. 

•Gate Theater (td: 74.40.45). 
THEATER — 

“The Mask of M 

•Hendriks Gallery (td: 75.60.62). 
EXHIBITION — Ocl 25-Nov. 15: 
“T. P. Flanagan." 

•National Concert Hall (tel: 
71.15.33). 

CONCERT— Ocl 23: RTE Concert 
Orchestra, Owain Arvd Hughes con- 
ductor, Dennis O’Neill tenor. 
•Olympia Theatre (td:77.89.62). 
MUSICAL — Through October: 
“Blood Brothers” (Russel). 


ITALY 


BOLOGNA, Galleria if Arte Mo- 
dems (id: 50.28.59). 

EXHIBITION —To Nov. 30: “Luigi 
Bertelli." 

•Tea tro Comm unale (tel: 2229.99). 
CONCERTS — Ocl 20 and 22: Or- 
chestra del Tea tro Comunalc di Bolo- 
gna. Michi Inoue conductor, Coro 
Fe mminil e Del Tea tro Comunalc di 
Bologna (Gustav Holst. Frederick De- 
lius, Edward Elgar). 

FLORENCE. Museo Arcbeologico 
(td: 21.52.70). 

EXHIBmON — To Ocl 20: “The 
E t n acan Gvilization.” 

•Tea tro Comunale di Firenze (td: 
277.92.36) 

OPERA — Ocl 20:, “Faust" (Gou- 
nod). 

MILAN, Teatro alia Scala (tel: 
80.91 -261- 

CONCERTS — Ocl 16-18: Orchestra 
dd Teatro alia Scala. Riccardo Chailly 
conductor. Krystian Zunerman piano 
(Liszt, Bruckner). 

Oct. 23-26: Prague Philharmonic 
Chair, Gerd Albrecht conductor, La- 
borrrir Mall Choir conductor (Dvo- 
rak). 


AMSTERDAM, Concengebouw (td: 
71JJ3.45). 

CONCERTS — Ocl 19 and 21: Am- 
sterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, 
Thomas Sanderiing conductor, Ruud 
van der Meer baritone (Brahms, Mah- 
ler). 

Ocl 20: Netherlands Chamber Or- 
chestra. WHfried Boettcher conductor, 
Imogen Cooper piano (Copland, Mo- 
zart). 

Ocl 23 and 24: Concengebouw Or- 
chestra, Bernard Haitink conductor, 
Faye Robinson soprano (Britten). 

Oct 25: Netherlands Chamber Or- 
chestra, Wilfried Boettcher conductor, 
Rian de Waal piano (Haydn. Mendds- 
sdhn). 

•RHksnmsenm ( id: 73.21.21). 
EXHIBITIONS — Ocl 24-Jan. 26: 
“Spanish Masters” (El Greco. Murillo, 
Velasquez). 


SCOTLAND 


EDINBURGH, National Museum of 
Antiquities of Scotland (tei: 
55735-50). 

EXHIBITION — To Nov. 3: T Am 
Come Home: Treasures of Prince 
Charles Edward StuarL” 
GLASGOW, Theatre Royal (tel: 
331.1234). 

OPERA— OcL 23 and 26: “Oberon” 
(von Weber), 


SPAIN 


BARCELONA. Festival (tei: 
317.9938). 

CONCERT — Ocl 24: Sant Jordi 
Choir. Oriol Martoreli cob doctor 
(Scbutz). 

RECITAL — OcL 20: Pinchas Zuker- 
man violin. Mark Ndkrug piano (Bee- 
thoven, Mozart). 

Ocl 22: Alexis Weissenberg piano 
(Scarlaxti). 

•Gran TeaLre del Liceo (tel: 
318.92.77). 

DANCE— Ocl 19and20;TheDance 
Theater of Harlem. "La Mer" (Debus- 
5yX“CaravaosaFBir (Beaty, Santana). 
MADRID, Museo Espanol de Arte 
Contempordneo (td: 449.7 130). 
EXHIBITION — Through October: 
“Joan Mird." 

•Museo del Prado (id: 468.09 30). 
EXHIBITION — Through October: 
“The Queen of Holland,” “Xvn Cen- 
tury Paintings from Naples." 


UNm STATES 


NEW YORE, Metropolitan Museum 
of An (td: 535.77.10). 

EXHIBITION —To Jan. 5: “India!" 
• Museum of Modern Art 
(ld:708.94.00). 

EXH3BITON — To Dec. 3: “New 
Photography" (Berman, Mendoza, 
Ross, Spano). 

SAN FRANCISCO. M.H. De Young 
Memorial Museum (td; 75036.14). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 3: “Mu- 
rals from Mexico." 

To Jan. 6:.**Te Maori: Maori Art front 
New Zealand GoBectionsL" 


Montenegro, Bad but Heroic 


by David Binder 



F 


ROM pebbly shores to jagged ranks 
of mountains, Montenegro fnk the 
eye at every azimuth. — some of its 
vistas almost frigh tening, $och as 
the plunges of rockface beneath n ar r o w ser- 
pentine roads or tornado-like waterspouts 
suddenly sweeping in from the Adriatic. 

Long considered one of the remote cor- 
ners of Europe, it has lately become accessi- 
ble with the completion a few years, ago of 
the rail line to Belgrade and improvements at 
its airports. It is now possible to tour Monte- 
negro on asphalt roads, bob on a yacht in a 
snug harbor, arrive at an international air- 
port and never encounter the wild, the primi- 
tive or the perilous. But that could as well be 
a series of fortuitous moments, for this re- 
public, one of six that make up Yugoslavia, 
retains the strangeness of a place that is too 
dose to heaven and too dose to heEL 

Beyond the olive groves, the coves and the 
karstic crags lie legacies of tribal warfare, 
sheep rustling and bandits — the stuff of 
epic poetry. 

The Black Mountains, so called from the 
14th century when abundant firs held the 
heights in a hundred hues of darttnpgg were 
gradually denuded by a peasantry seeking 
firewood or clearing a' piece of land to tfll. 
The darkness has been bleached whit** in 
myriad patches of exposed limestone rock — 
white except when the son dips behind the 
peaks into the burnished sea. Then in the 
night shadows the mountains put on their 
original coats of blackness. 

There is something ominous about the 
land, as if too much blood had been spilled, 
too much destruction wrought to allow it to 
remain as peaceful as it seems. Slav a gainst 
Turk, Turk against Venetian, Slav against 
Albanian. And, if the hand of man is not 
strong enough at the moment to spread ruin- 
ation, that nature is a powerful proxy, as 
with the earthquake of 1979, cracking open 
ancient towns — Kotor. Budva, Bar, Ulcinj 



~ a - 




Women in traditional Albanian dresses sell onions in Old Bar. 


DmJBvEb 


idiot and to do business with you. 

His minimum for sale remains tWO kdos. 

And poor. Qjtias recounts that he never 
wore undershorts until he entered high 
school “because of custom.” Before World 
War II many Montenegrins wore homespun, 
haired bread in a she s for lack of ovens and 
illuminated their homes with pitchpine 
torches. Trade was conducted by barter. Su- 
perstition was and is strong. Houses have 
spirits to guard them against witches, vam- 
pires. werewolves and bad spells. 

We entered Montenegro on the coastal 


— Hire so many w alnu ts Much of the dam- 
age to venerable buildings has yet to be 
repaired. 

Little wonder that Montenegro gave rise 
to the poetic inspiration of Petar Njegos, the 
19th-century prince-bishop, who saw Satan 
and God as equals resembling Montenegrin 
clan chieftains in a titanic dam of evil versus 
good. Or that MDovan Djilas, Montenegro’s 
most renowned 20th-century writer and a 
biographer of Njegos, should be the transla- 
tor of Milton’s “Paradise Lost” 

“A bad land, but a heroic one,” wrote 
Njegos. “Accursed but ours.” 

In ancient times the Illyrians held sway. 
They were here when the Greeks sailed up 
from Corinth to build their trading colonies, 
on the coast as always. Illyria's Queen Teuta 
waged a spirited defense against the spread- 
ing Roman empire. It took Rome's legions 
200 years to subjugate the Illyrians and to 
establish the profitable province of Dioclea. 
Who was here first, who last? The proto- 
Yugoslavs appeared in the seventh century 
and formed their kingdom of Dnldja in the 
11th, centered in what is now the republican 
capital of Titograd. They warred with By- 
zantium, Bulgars and Normans. Out of that 
grew the Serbian dynasty, making Montene- 
gro the uncle of today’s Serbia. 

Montenegro is an anomalous combination 
of alpine heights and mountain meadows in 
the interior, a seacoast of infinite variety, of 
rushing streams and a piece of Skadar I ib, 
bordering on Albania. The coast remains 
largely I talo- Albanian, the mountains Slav. 
Scarcely 600,000 people occupy the 5,332 
square miles (13,810 square kilometers). 

Until 1912 a large chunk of Montenegro 
was jealously, bloodily possessed by the 
Turks, descendants of the 14th-century Mos- 
lem invaders who conscripted not only in- 
digenous Albanians but also Montenegrins 
as their converted proconsuls. So Montene- 
gro's struggle for independence also became 
the fight of Christian Slavs against Mode- 
rnized Slavs — and anyone else who served 
under the flag bearing the crescent moon. 

Montenegrins think big. On a pass across 
the Rumija range overlooking the Albanian 
border a youth offers a basket of blue musca- 
tel grapes for 100 dinars — less than a dollar. 
You explain that you can use only half a kilo 


down the valley of Sutorina. Soon came the 
first view of the deeply scalloped Bay of 
Kotor — four indentations dug into the 
xnountainscape. Here in Herceg Novi the 
Montenegrin confusion begins. The town 
was founded 600 years ago by Tvrtko, the 
first Bosnian king, plainly a Slav. But it 
displays fortifications of Venetian, Turkish 
and Spanish design, a heritage of Mediterra- 
nean rivalries. It became part of Montenegro 
only in this century. The town of 12,000 
meanders along the sharply sloping shore few 
a mile. 

An evening storm was blowing in from 
Africa and the high breakers splashed the 
promenade that corves along the bay be- 
neath palm trees. We found refuge in the 
modest and dean Hotel Topla lodged among 
pines and mimosa. Herceg Novi, the New 
Duchy as it was when placed under 
the protection of the Holy Roman E mpire , is 
a place of resplendent gardens and parks. In 
the almost tropical climate that prerails even 
in winter it is difficult to imagine there is 
skiing on the slopes of Subra, 10 miles to the 
north. Describing the clima te, an acquaint- 
ance, Mama Beta, tefls us with pride that 
Herceg Novi is “the rainiest spot in Europe," ; 
which may nor be in the record books but 
with 333 inches a year could be dose: Monte- 
negro also boasts the most thunder. 


Sl George has a burial ground for sabqjs •/. 
and Perast, the town opposite on the shore, ' ' 
and Kotor were homes to famous seafarers. 
Russia’s Peter the Great sent young men V 
from bis court to attend Pdast’s naval 
school, and it was a Perast commander, who 
helped Peter defeat the Swedes in the Baltic; - 
using harrying tactics that wise the specialty . - 
of the Adriatic pirates. “ r : 

RussophSia is among the carious tfam-jj ' 
dons of Montenegro. It begm in ihe l8t& 
centtuywhm Bidrop DaniloPetrovic sought 
and received support in the commco struggle 
against the Ottoman Turks. As a Russian ? - 
ally. Montenegro declared war oskJapau ,v 
1905. and ance this went unacknowledged it 
still considers itself in a state of war with the £. : • 
land of the rising sun. " ; V 

The old coaaal towns retain their markets, 
particularly Stari (OkJ) Bar and Ularg. Th$ -r 
Bar market is just bdow the ruined battled ; -: 
ments of the Roman (Illyrian) town of Anjfi- 
vari next to olive grweswith tree trunks #s 
thick as an elephant and as old as the IHyn- . 
ans themselves — pe r hap s 3,000 years. . . .. 

In Uldnj we saw fleeting prbof of the ' ' v t 
saying that “the sweat of a Montenegrin is 
the most expensive liquid in the worid” — -A c_- 

Montenegrin was tiding the 1 aunty donkey 1 . 
to market, while his wife trotted behind - 
carrying a huge bundle. It was a Kni Of 
heroic tradition (so called by the Moniene- * ’ . . 

grins) in which the male lazed about in the 
intervals of battles and the female did almost . 
all the daily woxk. l\ ". 

At Vladimir it was market day with Alba- I' ~ . 
nian women in print ptaitaloods... tightly “ .. 
woven .striped muons in orange and red^ > . 

silver eanhigs^ bmigles, sequins^ .HpstickrT '* 
powder, rouge, mascara, white or pastel " 
green stockings and dehcate dippers. The 
men, drab by c onyai ison, wore dark' dou- ' “ 


O 


— a pound. He locks at you as if you are an • ages. 


NE could ^jend months exploring 
the Kotor grottoes, coves and lays, 
with their waterfalls spouting out of a 
diffside a hundred feet above the road, their 
frescoed churches, their island convents and 
monasteries. We paused here and there, far 
instance in Risan, the last redoubt of the 
Illyrian Queen Teuta. . 

According to legend, she drowned herself 
in the bay rather than submit to the Romans 
in 228 B.G Legend would also make her a 
pirate queen, the godmother of two mfllenia 
of Adriatic pirates, who had (drains drawn, 
across the Verige narrows to block access to 
the inner bays of Kotor. A ferry crosses here 
now, a distance of 900 feeL Few vestiges of 
the Illyrians remain, but Risan does rave a 
fine Roman mosaic floor featuring garland- 
ed Hypnos, the god of sleep.- , 

On the nertbmd we paused again to gaze 
at the tiny twin islands, SL George -?Sv. 

mer with the ruins of a Benedictine monas- 
tery that inspired the German romantic Al- 
fred BOcklin to paint Ms “Island of the 
Dead” and the latter still a site of pilgrim- 


ble-breasted jackets and brown berets. 

TTk newly asphalted road jwound ever 
highex up tte 2, 148-foot Runqa range, past . 
the double-plowed no man’s land outcrop- * 
pngs of the Albanian frontier. In the dis- ■ 
tance were a f ew ^ires. of Shkoder, the 
hortiamAIbainahniefr^olis onceTuledas ' 
Skadar by Serbian despots and before thar a : 
powerful myriaa fortress called Skodra. 

Then the highway eaters the clouds. Only - 
now and then does Skadar Lake becomje . 
visible: But for a moment we could gaze - 
vpon its westmn shore witit its Byzantine ; 
island doistera — Maracnik^ Beska, Gorica 
— i nh ab it e d a thousands years ago by her- 
mit ascetics much tike the Irish skdligs. No 
boats on the lake; which Yugoslavia shares 
with Albania. No tourists, just breathtaking 
vistas. Orchards of pomegranates, lemons * 
arid the odors of sage; rosemary and mush-f^ 
roams. ' ^ 

The mountain road twists, serpentines; 
sikh that even the curves have curves, with 
ever new glimpses of the biggest lake in the 
Balkans, the crump of heavy Albanian how- 
itzers in practice maneuvers sounds across 
tbewater. In longloops we descend to Virpa- 
zar with inlets thick with water Kites, the 
home of cormorants, pelicans, dudes, her- 
ons. 



E VEN with locally purchased maps the 


NwrYotlW 


road to the Ostrog Monastery was 
somewhat hit or miss. The Balkan 
rule, even with good roads, is that any dfe- *- 
tancc is twice as far as you are told. A native 
said the monastery was about 25 mfles.d^ ? ? 
tant Fifty miles up the valley of theZeta-a . 
sign pointed eastward to Ostrog., Ever. nax- .* -J “• 
rowing, the road curved up the side of the i .. 
towering mountainside, past the ail of the » . 

Bar-Bdgrade Taihray, then became hairpins 
bending higher, to the monastery.. Hhndieq^ 
of feet above one could espy the white* t.„’_ 
washed outlines of the Ostrog diapd play . 1 IV'" 
tcred onto the dark rockface like a Mock erf ’ - 
a* cream: the home of Sl Vasfle (Barilla C.I 
17th-«amiry holy man who ”had the power 
to shake and crush" Montenegro’s en^ni - 
i-rve buses stood in a small clearing 200, £ ~ 

feet bdow the white chapel, thedrivCTsduS* ■ O ; I 

nig; °P®kng bottles of local Niksic beer with 
r^ l fL tC *i w k3e the passengers went on foot ' 

tor the last portion of the pilgrimage. Some 

S V De la ™ e ’ cajT ybigvotive can: . 

and flasks to tap some^ SL- Visile’s ••.; <: - 
dusk vesper bells tangsevoi 
Sf** dow n the long- deep valley; - 

“J, S 01 ** fragrant withMoSe cotf C ^ 
fenced evensong for the pilgrims. The? 

SSJSe™*® dear that theEafYa; 

nationaltreasuqc* 

*®* a «**wsrs3h.-.«id j , . 

Pe ri*ed on the mountain 
O root -re. .. • 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1R, 19S5 


by Roper TAIKg - fe'fiSabnfTrtmtiiie traveler wants in terms 

.r*wgcix^>ms . - . ■ '• ^^j^m'ltfljnpinr -r’dtilrrtnimnm’” 

EOFFRIY LIPMAN, whoj^*, 

sgned as director of govcmSent- 'WS^SSF'fnT*'™ Lq ^ s conc S n -. 
and mdnstrv affairs »t*ST^Sr . .^TOSMwJlfaetocanyoiia reaaouabte- 
nati^alS TVmSJ^ 4 , 5 ^ ' azcJn 88*P e ' At die same tone, I recognize 
#on to start a new found^SSliASfS tbingfs got oat of hand. If the' 



_ can bring on and have 
facilities -few handling k." 

Lipman beheves there is a need topushfor 
more experiments in tariffs — like British 
OfttedtiaiauV < *Tfanc-FIycr M fares. Which 




'• 

-- .~ r h -^i k ‘ 
> ^*>1% 




■ ' /•*& 

" u ' T ^'edB B - ■ 

Vr. 


a worldwide 

poi^has no ^parent difficulty in rcconefl- 
?3§ “S previous role as a prime mover in. the 
Jp“«oes regulatory system to that of con-: 
r sumcr advoczae. i- 

^?ack when IATA regrihtnd - everythin g " 

Ff m scat.pm* to sandwiches,. that 5£ 'T A7T» A. : 

^ve required some; fancy d i alec ti cal foot JAi A 31u€ XO TUU 

work Bmm the last hauWn years, LiiM.. ;;’ 

naan claims to have been a. voice of EberaK-''^ « ^{..J 
ism, helping IATA to become a forum for ]3SCFrOl!l^lltC(l 
pace discussions rather than price firing- » 
realpoHtik that has been fairly swccessfcflm 
™ f ftce of pressure from governments 
the EC Commission for more competition. 

lipman doesn’t see himself as a game- 
keeper turned poacher. “It’s not as dramatic 
as that What I’m going to have to do is lock 
at everything that I’ve been doing fabm a 


a .ui- 




n 




‘V 


(Efferent perspective, from a user’s point of 
View, and ask, is that a valid activity? Tvc 
never needed to ask that question in the' 
'past,” 

.’‘.His objective is to exploit his insider’s. 
_ knowledge to ‘influence the dedaqnrimal^ 

. ll *JiTaT' 'A JP® wh, *ever.ii may be, not just in lheiriiv 
- .. L ^ but at governmental lewd, with, travel 

“-•Sioiw* agents and airport authorities, so that they 
IAke more into account what users may 
punk. There are possibilities for inflnaichig 
the system that haven’t beat used before. 1 
hhderstand where these possibiEtLes are.” 
..-Lipman, 41, has spent 19 years at IATA 
As executive director in the office of the 
director-general, be has bad prime- responsi- 
pfli ty for political issues, the interaction of 
government regulations with airlines’ com- 
mercial activities, » nd strategic planning. He 
win leave IATA shortly after its animal gen- 
eral meeting in Hamburg later this monthto 
become executive director of IAPA’s new 
foundation in Geneva. 

* ' IAPA, as an unabashedly profit-making 
Orga niz a t ion, Is possibly unique as a con- 
sumer advocacy group. It efom* to have 
more than 100,000 members and makes' its 
money by subscriptions linked to travel* 
related insurance plans. 'Members are of- 
fered free luggage retrieval, lounges at a few 
airports, discounts on hotds, car rentals and 
other travel sendees. It is closely involved 
with airline safety issues. 

A foundation is' dearly defined . under 
Swiss law. It must be non-] 


. u ^ i l5aV 

. .V n-- f 

■ *•'**,?« 

-- 

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T "‘■’■t !tQ|f £ 

: truadi; 

i: '.®. t 
~ ~ it dr ^ 

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vsdxijjj 
" * ‘ ■rajfis: 


‘ - x. cii E^/seen to operate m the public interest, not be 
-sin ^ h front for a busine 


:'~Si sto: 

veil: 

’ 7^5iaq 
. ".ctrSie 
■■T'T ofSfeS 
-T-rrpdjitsia 
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cdiic 

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, - -si Kfldi 
. -j-iTcate 

- Iras W 

■ . .*• rjahss 
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business activity and must 
provide an annual report to the authori ties. 
IAPA has guaranteed the existence of its 
foundation until the year 2000 with an amm- 
al grant u of at least 500,000” Swiss francs. 

Says Lipman, “IAPA is making a real 
commitment in setting up an autonomous 
organization that they can’t totality control? 
Nevertheless, he is conscious crf passibleiroj- 
age problems. “The qa^ity df 6urii&eith3us 
fundamental to whdbex weTl^be Seen' as a 
subtle PR ploy of IAPA or as making a real 
contributiOT. The proof win be after a year 
when I know whether people ine.igionng us 
brtaDdngtdns.*'' ' 

" ,! lipman has identified four mam areas:- 
passenger safety, comfort and health; fares 
and services; preferences and travel treads, 
and passenger rights and obligations. He 
plans to develop positions derived from re- 
search among IAPA’s membership, having 
first determined how representative this is of 
business travelers in various 'parts of the 
world. He hopes that ultimately tMrd par- 
ties, such as airlines, might make research 
donations. "They might say, Tf you’re going 


. VJ5.S? 3 ; 

• y.v^ttr 

. . ... -.2; JUDe :C 

'* I. 


' U«E5.' 

*■ -uti- 4 " 

- 3 ^ 


vary suxordix^g to the time you fly — and 
frequent .flier programs in Europe. He ap- 
plands fiart^JcaiL aufines’ acceptance last 
month bfl“feiHf zones? for discount fares 
-(this se^sjtosimum grid wi^T im n ni prices as 
currenily applied on the North Atlantic and 
in [ accordance with the EC Commissian’s 
dereghlatim fcamula. Memorandum -2, and 
the nseeqt initiative ot the European Gvfl 
Aviaridn/vConference). But he won’t ao- 
knowiedgetirat what’s really needed is pric- 
hffi flpomfity on unrestricted fufl-ccomomy 
aid bnsiness-daK fares. 

. Then there’s “bnmpmg,” or denied board- 
ing compensation, Nobody outside the 
.U.'S. has dame up with concrete proposals 
. for giving a decent break to the public. 
Maybe overbooking is unavoidable, but air- 
lines «bb>iM be able to manag e thesr inven- 
tories better: They need to focus cm what 
happens when you as an individual get 
caught in the situation," lipman says. 

Another issue is the bias of airlines’ com- 
puterized reservations systems, which typi- 
cally favor ibeirriwn services at the expense 
of competitors who may want access to 
them. (IATA is developing its own “Neutral 
Industry Booking System.") “But what I’ve 
scarcely heard discussed in industry circles, 
is die impact on the p^>lic, M Lipman says. 
‘Anders Stork, who is rapporteur of the 
it, had checked his own 
travel mnmgemente over the past year. He 
found, that a . third of- his trips had been 
boioiced, not for his convenience, but for the 
person entrusted to look after than. The 
average consumer isn’t aware of being a 
victim of this boas, of this game between the 
airiines." 

How does Li prmm intend to apply pres- 
sure on the r^ulatoiy es tablishmen t as a 
consumer advocate? “The best example I 
can give is the IATA traffic conferences 
which now allow for representations by dif- 
ferent interest groups. By knowing how the 
conferences work, which ones are going to 
make a decision and what are the key issues 
coming up, I think I’ll be able to make 
presentations- in an effective way.” 

- -For five years he has beeninvolved In a 
fazes and xates paud with the International 
Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), “which 
not all that many people know about" He 
will also work closely with ECAC commit- 
lees, -where “there is scope for consumer 
opinions to be applied at government level” 
as well as with the EC Cormnissian and the 
European Parliament’s economic and social 
committees. . . . - 

Lipmaa’s plans have raised a few eye- 
brows in industry circles, especially at a 
criticaljuncturem the development of all EC 
air transport pohey. But tt s the tinting that 
9eems to excite him. “If this thing takes off, h 
wifi be a red change, and I can play a key 
rote,” he says; ■ 


TRAVEL 


Restaurant Renaissance in Rouen 



QUEN. France — Next to the sparkling Norman 
magic of Deauville, TrouviUe, and Honfleur, Rouen 
comes on a like a giant, groggy bear of a town, more 
an exit on the auloroute than a serious destination. 

- Until a few years ago, that were few gastronomic excuses to 
venture into town — nu»»rydtfi^gtlifipntcbpH thanhiflj 
fed of having seen and having served one tourist too many, ; 
it looked as though Rouen would never pull out of the Norman 
rut of boudin and apples, cream sauce and caivados. 

Now, wandering through the city’s open-air markets and 
studies menus posted outside half-timbered bouses, one senses 


Patricia. Wells 


that there is a small revival lairing place. Rouen is displaying a 
new sense of pride. To go with it, the city now offers two 
extremely worthy restaurants, important enough to hire you off 
the amoroute. even if only for a few boors. 

One of a handful of young French chefs to watch today to 
Gillcs Toumadns, a bright, consdentioasman who was last seen 
ai Normandy's lovely Chilean iTAiidrieu, not far from Caen. A 
little more than a year ago, Toumadze moved off on his own, 
establishing the Restaurant GD in the center ot the dry’s 
charming maze ot pedestrian streets, just steps from the grand 
11th-century cathedral. 

His small, ultra -contemporary dining room, decorated in 
shades of pale pink, blue and brown, has a smart and serious 
look, and service is cheery and professional. 

Even afew months later, I can still see and taste every dish I 
sampled ax GiD. When was the last time you tasted sole that 
actuklly had some character? Do you remember the last restau- 
rant meal or any meal for that matter, where every bite from 
start to finish, actually made you sit up and take notice? 

Totmtadre has a special gift, not only for making you aware 
of that sculptured Inf of mint resting atop the feuitlontine de 


[raises, but for making sure the herb is so fresh your palate 
cannot fail to register the flavor. He can take the most mundane 
Of dishes — a panache de pensions or a blanc manger — and 
transform them imo gustatory symphonies. 

What's best is that he does all this not with a larder of spices 
or seasonings, nor a bombardment of sauces, but, quite simply, 
with freshness. His panache de poissons has an almost breathless 
visual beauty, a play of vibrant orange salmon, oyster-white 
lone, alabaster sole and barbue, and glistening red rouge L The 
fish is so fresh, and treated with such respect, that each bite 
makes your palate tragi e. 

Even his platter of ravioli de langoustines — a dish made 
famous by Joel Robuchon of Paris’s Jamin — was so exception- 
al you could forgive the chef for being a copycat. The giant 
ravioli are made of perfect pasta dough, filled with moist, 
rinnHirVr mouihfuls of langousiine. 

We ordered the blanc manger almost as a challenge- If that 
classic nursery dessert could excite the palate, this chef would 
gain a convert. He did. of a bland, faintly almond 

dessert with that unmistakable gdadn wobble, Toumadre of- 
fered one that captured the pure essence of almonds, marked 
with cream, dotted with strawberries, raspberries and red cur- 
rants, and surrounded by a bright-flavored strawberry cotdis. 

O NLY a few blocks away, hidden in one erf the streets that 
fan out from the Platt du Vieux-Marche. is Bertrand 
Warm, a tiny, elegant spot perfect for an extended 
Sunday hmdt on your way back from a weekend in the country. 

Go with a lot of time on your hands, for although service is 
friendly and accomodating,' it is slow. Of more than a dozen 
dishes sampled here recently, almost all were memorable, no- 
ticeable for their imagination anti careful execution. Oversalting 
sadly marred a few dishes, and though Warm's cooking is less 
perfected titan Touroadre's, he is another chef to add to your 
“to try” list. 

Dishes that stand out most include his rougeu en habit vert (a 


first course salad of tiny whole rouget wrapped in strips of leek 
and set on a bed of dressed greens); th esatade de langoustines et 
de mangue (a copious langousiine and mango salad served with 
a healthy dose of greens); and the errteloppe de saumon aux 
huitns (a lively marriage, consisting of warm oysters sand- 
wiched between thick slices of fresh salmon). Both the courgettes 
en fleurs aux girolles (stuffed squash blossoms showered with 
fresh wild mushrooms) and noisettes tTogneau a ("estrogen (lamb 
nuggets with tarragon sauce) were well executed, but salt, 
regrettably, dominated. 

Desserts here are imaginative, and above average. The unusu- 
al beignets de melon — chunks of fresh melon dipped in batter 
and quickly fried — were remarkably light and not the least bit 
greasy, and the rrois tartelettes offer a nice change from the 
classic fruit xarL Warm presents a trio of delicate raspberry, 
lemon and kiwi tarts, with a good shoncrust base. I'm not sure 
what he did with the kiwi, but it was the first time that the 
normally bland fruit did not make me say “So whai?" 

The setting here is gracious and harmonious, and there is no 
question dial you are in Normandy. The carefully restored 
coitage-like restaurant is reached through a courtyard and the 
small dinin g room is attractively and simply adorned with 
wooden beams, mirrors and pleasant oil paintings, with the 
handful of tables looking out onto a bright, welcoming garden. 

GilL 60 Hue Sainr-Nichoias. 76000 Rouen ; tel: (55) 71.16.14. 
Closed Sunday and at hatch Monday, the last week in January and 
first week of February. Credit cards: American Express. Diner's 
Club. Vise. Menu at 145 francs^ including service but not wine, at 
hutch only. A la carte, about 280 francs a person, including wine 
and service 

Bertrand Warin, 7-9 Rue de la Pie, 76000 Rouen; tel: (35) 
89.26.69. Closed the last three weeks of August, Sunday evening 
and Monday. Credit cards: American Express. Diner’s Club, Visa. 
Menu at 98 francs, not including wine and service, at lunch only 
( but not on Sunday). A la carte, about 350 francs a person, 
including wine and service. ■ 


New Passion in Music-Making 


Continued from page 7 


American context Just as immigrant mod- 
ernist composers shaped a generation of 
young American composers, so these instru- 
mental teachers attempted to bend the 
American temperament — and the tempera- 
ment of their many Oriental students, as well 
— to the styles they had grown up with. It 
didn't always quite “take.” 

Today, younger players seem to be work- 
ing out a healthier synthesis of their own 
traditions and interests with those of their 
teachers — and perhaps the teachers now 
actively practicing are more wfTljng to let 
their students express thtir individuality. 
“You have to believe and trust your own 
ears,” says Yo-Yo Ma. “Tve defended my 
generation often with older musicians, like 
my teacher Leonard Rose. They passed on 
thieir traditions to us. But some traditions are 
not worth keeping, if they’re just copies of 
habits. Every generation has to reexamine 
the values that come down to them.” 

Many of the older generation of teachers 
dung to the Romanticism of their teachers, 
and attempted to preserve its traditions in a 
modernist climate that was unsympathetic to 
excessive emotionality. Others were them- 
selves exponents of a hard-driving, austere, 
intense modernist style, the soloistic and 
chamber-music equivalent of Arturo Tosca- 
nini's intensity, which proved SO wiflnentinl 
in America especially, where Tos canini 
spent his last decades. 

The great performers of this sort —Artur 
Schnabel, Rudolf Sedan; perhaps Alfred 
Brendd *n*t Maurizio Pollini today —have 
been full of personality, albeit a personality 
foreign to lovers of the Romantic style. But 
their students and admirers aped, their aus- 
terity without being able to sustain their 
intensity. 

Today’s new individuality among the 
younger soloists, in tmn, may be part of the 
broader^ post-modernist reaction, the swing 
of fashion away from modernism and to- 
ward a new expressivity in the arts. Oliveira’s 
poetidsm, Peter Sedan's mysticism, Pogore- 
Hcfa’s eccentricities, all may be the perfor- 


mance eqmvalents of the new Romanticism 
in composition, the fripperies of post-mod- 
ernist architecture, the new Expressionism in 
painting. And if there is a parallel between 
newly expressive performance and newly ex- 
pressive composition, then perhaps young 
composers and performers can reforge their 
lost links, and mainstream performers can 
begin once again to define their styles in 
shared sympathy with the best young com- 
posers. 

For Ma, the most interesting musicians of 
his own age are those who question the 
Assump tions about career and repertory that 
others tried to impose upon them. 

“What ties all these younger people to- 
gether is that they care more about music 
than about their careers,” Ma says. “If you 
do something really, really well, you are 
encouraged to market that skill. The people I 
find interesting are those who try' to thwart 
that system. If you're only concerned with 
having big successes in every city, and play- 
ing 10 million concerts a year, you limit your 
areas of creativity. Musicians today are be- 
ginning to think in terms of long-range de- 
velopment, as opposed to the immediate 
benefits of short-term success." ■ 

<01985 The New York Times 



Gidon Kremer. 



by Frank J. Prial 


ARIS — There are a lot of problems 
with group travd, but a lot of people 
seem to lAc it arid, when you come, 
right down to it, it’s probably the 
best way to see the European wine country. 
The preferred way to see the California wine 
tountry seems to be in what is known- out 
there as a recreational , vehicle, but that’s 



at 

• •"•V 
- 

■ 

i 


^•jjjr another story 


In Europe, the adventurous can rent a car, 
buy a couple of good guides to the _ wine 
country — Hi 



ugh Johnson’s “World Atlas of 

Wine”" or “Alexis Lichme's Guide to the 
Wines and Vineyards of France,” for fair 
stance — and take o£E. But for the most part 
wineries in France, West Germany and Italy 
tee not the tourist attractions U. S. wineries 
are. Tom up in Beaune, for example, in the 
Center of the Burgundy region, arid yoa will 
find plenty of tours, fart they can be pretty 
boring. To visit smaller producers and really 
get a fedfor the country, you have to write in 
advance or know someone who can help you. 

In Burgundy, you also Have to speak French. 

'Bordeaux is not much better and' the dis- 
tances between, say, Sarnl-Emihon . and 
Saint-Estfcpbe, can be daunting. Champagne 
is the easiest trip from Paris -because it is so 
dose — about 90 miles (145 kil o meters) — 
arid because the big Champagne houses ar? . . 
tourist-minded. But even there ifs possible 
to spend most of the day trying to find the. 
R firm you set out to viriL 

: The organized trip is a way . around most . 
of these problems. Travel people arid wine 
people lave been getting togtaher to run .. 

wine trips years. Some of them are good, ^ 

and some are not "because, frankly, wherf' 

you’ve seen one wine cellar, yquVe seen 
mem alL Thai first day, when it dawns on the 

p ilgrims tha t visiting old chateaus is 
not just old sDyer and views of the padc^ but a 

'Succession of cold cellars — that can be a 
^difficult day; 


Now, however, a group of peqple here in 
Fans have came up with what seems like a 
good - — though by no means ch e ap — wine 
trip idea, one that might just be the answer 
for those who want to see the wine country 
but not on their own. The group calls itself 
die French Wine Institute, winch lends the 

S^Scu-put on a two-week wine'^nbiar^ 
r Fans with side trips to the wine country for 
hands-on or, more precisely, tongue-and- 
nosc-on experience. Tbe idea of combining a 
bit of classroom work with wine country 
travel is good'because most people on wine 
tours really don’t know much about wine — 
except, of course^for that boring couple who 
asked questions about volatile acid and an- 
tagonized everyone the first day out. 

The groups are limited to 15. The cost is 
$4,300, double occupancy, and that includes 
the fare for the excursions from Paris (there 
is a 53,000 option for those who find their 
own lodgings). Everybody arrives on Satur- 
day and is free wnfil Sunday at 10:30 AM. 
when the first session begins. It’s a nice 
harmless lecture called “How toLJnderstand 
and Enjoy Wine Tasting.” Then there is a 
. lunch and everyone is free until Monday, 
-when there tee two two-hour lectures, “The 
Structure of Dry White Wines” and “Tbe 
Composition arid Appreciation of Red 
Wink” Tuesday: same cmlL -The lectures are 
■ on describing wines and bn tasting sweet 
white wines. All the lectures are accompa- 
nied by the appropriate wines. 


N Wednesday, everyone is up and 
opt at Oriy Airport for an 8:35 flight 
' to Bordeaux; This is a Saint-Emilion 
day, with visits to chateaus — Pavie, Figeac 
and La Cbosefllante. Dinner arid lodging are 
at the Refcris de .Margaux in Margamc, about 
35 miles from Saml-Emiiion, but a good 
place. Thursday is in the M6doc, with visas 
to fStMt^nns Palmy , Fkhon-Longueville, 


Cos d’Estoumel and LtoviUc-Las-Cascs. 
Lunch is at Pichoo-Longuevilte. 

1 Friday, bade in Paris, there is a lecture on 
white Burgundy. On Saturday there are two 
se ssio ns, one on fln< l clima te and another 
cm zed Burgundy- Sunday is free and Mon- 
day everyone who has gotten this far takes 
the 8:05 AML high-speed train to Dijon. 
There are visits in Morey-Saim-Denis and 
Volnay, a lunch in Beaune, overnight at 
Lamdoise, the Michdin three-star restau- 
rant-bold in Cbagny. 

Then another day in Burgundy, doing 
white wines. A session on country wines 
back in Paris, then a day in Champagne. 
Friday there is a blind tasting, a dinner at 
Taflkfvent and school is out In all: 20 hours 
of lectures, 18 in Paris and 2 in Champagne; 
3 field trips, to Burgundy, Bordeaux and 
Champagne; 9 lunches and 3 dinners that 
should be quite good, and all the hand- 
holding and tender loving care that people 
who spend $4,300 for a trip seem to expect 

There is also plenty of free time and, 
unlike a lot of lock-step tourism, no pressure 
to eat too much. There are 11 imschednled 
nights, and Paris has enough to fill them ah. 
There are some 15,000 restaurants, and the 
French Wine Institute people promise to 
steer their guests — or students — to some 
good ones. 

The French Wine Institute is run by both 
Frenchmen and Americans and is well con- 
nected in France. There is one seminar a 
month beginning Nov. 9. The address of (he 
Institute is 76 Avenue des Chanms-EIysfces, 
75008 Paris. 

Just one thing : Besides sounding academ- 
ic, the French Wine Institute also has a 
sturdy bureaucratic ring to it. But this is 
in the best traditions of 
list France and has nothing to do with 
the government. If you hit a corked Monton- 
Rothschfld along the way, you’re on your 
own. ■ 

01985 The New York Times 



Can afew rock songs overwhelm all that? 
>jTSo far, there appears, to be ao reputable 
‘ scientific evidence to support suchfcara. **A.- 
3ot of people have studied pock lyrics.” said - 
| Dr. Roger Desmond, a' writing fellow at the 

‘ izes injbhildxen und the media, “and they 
\ haven’t beat able to find any effects at aD — 
r no effects on soaaHoripe, Tor. i n s tan ce. In. 


Continued from page 7 

one stiidy,- it was found that if you ask a 
high-school student to tell you the story of 
his favorite: song, he can't. What they're 
listening fa is the beat, jiist like they said on 
‘American Bandstand.”' . 

' Even ‘if aU- segments of American.sodety 
woe to, agree that all entertainment should 
be sanitizedTo a.drikTs -level — and don’t 
: for^t toTwn there violent Grimm’s fairy 
: tales-^- ipck lyrics would be an odd place to 


start. They are not as immediately accessible 
as the genuine violence on the evening news 
and simulated mayhem on prime-time televi- 
sion; they are not as graphic as many films; 
even when they can be deciphered amid 
guitars and drums, they are clearly figments 
of the imagination. They are only words. Yet 
in the current controversy, they are bring 
treated as deeds. ■ 

C I98S The New York Timet 


Torvil and Dean at the Writer Olympics 


Newman and Gedeno in Gntinnati". 



<* <■ '* • * •• v • 



Keen on sports? Get twice as much sports coverage for your 
money. Take advantage of our special rates for new subscribers 
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To: Subscription Manager, Inlemationd Herdd Tribune, 

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1SZ322 401,720 5,904 

124473 29X761 378 

14X7S0 351,167 1JA4 

150317 320778 781 


Tables Inducts the natlenwMe prices 
up to the closing on Wall street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Pla The Associated Press 


industnats 

Trams. 

utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


HWi Urm Clou OTPS 
21034 200.18 2094V— OM 
17X39 17059 17074 — 1-01 
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■y+'J- 




Dow Hits 2d Straight Record 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New Yale 
Stock Exchange dosed higher in heavy volume 
Thursday, and the Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age set a record for the second consecutive day. 

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 0.79 
to 1 369 29, a dosing high, managing to hold the 
more than 17-point advance made Wednesday. 

The market was mixed for nearly the entire 
session. Profit-taking wiped out a brief midaf- 
temoon rally, but in the last minutes of trading 
the Dow again moved into plus territory. 

Among the 2,003 issues traded, advances out- 
paced declines by 813 to 723. Volume totaled 
140-51 million shares — the heaviest trading 
day since Oct. 2 — compared with 1 17 J6 mil- 
lion Wednesday. 

Charles Comer of Oppenheimer & Co. said 
the market probably was at the high point of its 
recent move. He said the expiration of the 
October option scries Friday has been a factor 
in helping to extend gains this week. 

Some third-quarter earnings reports and in- 
terest in potential takeover situations «!«* has 
supported the market’s advance, Mr. Comer 
said. But he said the market lades consistent 
leadership and investors could back off. 

The divergence between the performance of 
the Dow industrial average and the broader 
market indexes is a “significant negative,'’ he 
said. So is the fact that the interest-sensitive 
sector of the market “has not done all that 
weU,” be said. 

“The next move of consequence will be 
down,” he said. 

Others disagreed. 

“The market is headed higher,” said Irwin 


M-l Drops $ 3.3 Billion 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The basic measure of the 
US money supply, M-I, which represents 
funds readily available for spending, 
-plunged $3.3 billion in the first week of 
October, the Federal Reserve Board said 
Thursday. 

The Fed said M-l fell to a seasonally 
adjusted SGI 15 billion in the week ended 
Oct. 7 from a revised $614.8 billion in the 
previous week. The previous week's figure 
originally was reported as $615.0 billion. 

M-l consists df cash in circulation, depos- 
its in checking accounts and nonbank trav- 
eler's checks. 


Berger of Stuart, Coleman. “It will make sub- 
stantial new .highs over a short-term period.” 
Mr. Berger said that the strength currently fo- 
cused on blue-chip issues would spill over into 
second-tier stocks and predicted that the broad- 
er market indexes also would move higher. 

Gulf & Western was the most active NYSE- 
listed issue, down 1 to 43% in volume of more 
than 7 million shares. Gulf & Western bought a 
6.7-million-share block as part of its commit- 
ment, made earlier this month, to boy back 
about 12 millio n of its shares. 

Beatrice Cos. followed, climbing 1% to 45%. 
Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. made an unso- 
licited offer of $45 a share in cash and stock for 
Beatrice. 


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Statistics Index 

P-M teuton report* P.15 
■£t!£ C w £“ /to "»P.M TOM rat* now P.12 

Ifcralb^^Sribunc. 

U.S. Stocks 

NYSE fesht/km P.12 Intent rofto P.ll 
uawflon itaete P.i* Mototi summary P.W 
tewncyretn P.11 Outturn P.I4 

E?™" 6 ** 8 * P.14 OTCttock P.1J 

“'rtkn* P.I4 Oaw marteh P.H 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 

Report, M-l, 


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1985 


TECHNOLOGY 


Selling Luxury-Car Radios 
That Can Outsmart Thieves 


'We figure even the 
stupidest thief isn't 
going to steal a radio 
if it won't work.' 


By MARSHALL SGHUON 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — A new study by an insurance trade 
group shows that parts to reconstruct a 1985 U.S. sport 
coupe would cost three times the car's original price. 
That explains not only the high price of repairs but also 
the lure that has made auto theft the bigtrest property crime in the 
United States. 

Not ah thieves go for the complete car, of course, a fact readily 
apparent to the thousands of drivers who have returned to a 
vehicle to find a window broken and the radio gone. Finally, 
however, technology is coming to the rescue. 

Sound systems are at the top of the thieves’ hit list, and the 
makers of three luxury cars ■ 

have begun to phase in audio trrr~ *. j. 

components that, while not ™ ® DgHT® CVCI1 tile 

stupidest thief isn't 

the dashboard. go ing tO Steal a radio 

The systems sold by Mer- ® . “ 
cedes- Benz. BMW and Saab if it won’t work, 
for their cars are similar, but , -- 

they work in slightly different 

ways. Daimler-Benz AG of West Germany makes the Mercedes, 
Bayerische Motoren Werke AG of West Germany makes BMWs 
and Saab Scania AB of Sweden makes Saabs. 

'j‘; A.B. Shuman, a spokesman for Mercedes, said his company's 
"new audio components are protected by a system that is armed 
when the driver's key locks the door. “When that happens," he 
said, “juice begins to trickle through a special circuit in the radio. 
If the connection is broken, the microprocessor goes into a 
scramble mode and Forgets everything it ever learned." 

The next time the radio is hooked up, its display panel shows 
nothing but dashes. Restoration is accomplished by the dealer, 
and Mr. Shuman said that the repair system was highly confiden- 
tial. 

“We want to maintain security,” he said, “so we aren’t getting 
too specific. We want it known that the radios are in the cars, but 
not how they work. It’s the old thing about progress. When you 
invent better armor, somebody else invents better armor-piercing 
shells." 

The BMW version, made by Alpine, was introduced earlier this 
year. If the radio is disconnected from the electrical current in 
any way, it must be reprogrammed. That is accomplished by 
punching a five-digit code into the radio with the station-selec- 
tion buttons. 

Saab's system, which is new, goes the others one better and is 
more theft-proof, since the radio can be removed from the 
dashboard easily and carried away by the driver. The separate 
graphic equalizer, apart that tailors sound in seven bands of the 
audio spectrum, also can be removed, bat with more difficulty. 

A black rubber faoeplate is provided to hide the equalizer from 
view. That way, both components need not be logged into the 
, house or locked in the trunk, and a thief will not mistake the 
equalizer for a radio. A battery inside the radio allows the 
"microprocessor to retain 18 preset stations in its memory for at 
least a month. 

Both radio and equalizer are removed with a pair of keys that 
unlock them from the dashboard. And the sequence for restoring 
ihem to sound health is similar to that of the BMW. 

Hrsu the part is retained to its slot in the dashboard. Next, the 
ignition must be turned on. The radio’s power button is depressed 
one time, then the Dolby noise-reduction button is held in whiles 
six-digit combination is punched in, using the station selectors. 
Without the proper combination, the radio emits constant and 
irritating beeps while the display flashes on and off. 

When the 80-watt radio and tape deck are «#»«« working, they 
represent state-of-the art audio — and complication. There are 34 
buttons to control the functions, but even that does not say it all, 
because many of the buttons work, in separate modes to serve 
more than one purpose. 

- However good it is, though, and despite the fact that it will not 
(Continued on Page 15, Col 4) 


Currency Bales 


Crone Kates 

i C 

Am*tanfo« UP 019 
Bnmch(a) suns 7 mqb 
FT an W a rt 2AM 170 

London (b) MM5 

Milan 12792S ISEJO 

New YorttCJ 82157 ■ 

Paris UN 11.01 

Tokyo Z1&J&5 36521 

Zorich 2.1715 WU 


DM FJ=. 
11277* M29* 

70733 0325 

3279* 

1743 II. «00T 
47X23 221.12 

2641 MSP 

US 

IBM 2*58 

B2155* 96215* 


HA. GMr. ILF. 

0.167* £571* 

31004* 17JN 

Mx 8848* 4M5* 

2J2100 4X0 75575 

517X5 32X04 

1XSU0 25*4 5UD 

4517* 2709 15JJ71* 

1202* 7VB1 40027* 

HUM* 72775 * 4DM* 


Oct 17 
5J=. Yon 
12732* 13293 V 
74X0 345025* 
12122 * 12305* 
3X605 304225 

SM.M BX06 
21X7 214X0 

271 32515* 

7127 

1.0112 • 


1 ECU U337 0507 22092 17381 1X72X7 2X736 447BM 1X133 177X55 

1 5 DR 1X6136 024765 212831 157065 1X07X2 21000 57X275 23141 227X71 

CMAw In London and Zurich, Hxinpa In ptnor European confers, new York rates ate pal 
fat Commercial franc (bl Amounts needed fo buy one poirtd (c) Amounts needed to buy one 
dollor C) Unltsof I00(x) Unltso/LOOOtvl Units of IOOOO W.O.: not quoted! NJL: not avaHatde. 
|W TO boy one pound: XUA1XT7 

OtterlMlarValww 

Currency par UJk* Currency per UJX Currency par USX Currency per u SS 

Aruon-msM 0X0 Fta-martHa 2738 MjXay.rVw. 2X635 S-Kor.woo 894X5 

AustraLI 1X31 Greek drew. 157X0 Mulpmo 289X0 Span. nesala 1X3X0 

Austr.scBB. 1*27 HaiKml 7X015 ftarw. krona 7 2* SwMLkreM 7X875 

Bein.Rn.tr. 54X7 ledlcra rupee 12X637 PMLpao T7 25 Taiwan $ 40.10 

i Brazil crux. 2040X0 todo. nnUak 1,122X0 Port, ascudo 163X0 Thai baM 26X35 

Canadians 1X6X3 Irtibc 0X6SB Saadi rival 3X512 Turfcbb Hra 54740 

OUaese yuan 3X5B2 Hraeasbefc. 148340 Ston-J 21418 UAEcflrtam 16736 

Danish krone 746 KewalH dinar 02766 S.Afr.rand 27473 Venez-baHv. 1448 

EnypLpaand 1X4 
c Simian: 1X077 Irish c 

Sources: Bonquo du Benelux (Brusmtrl; Banco Commerdote ttaUana (Muon); Sam* no- 
Hanot 'e de Parts /Paris}; Bonk of Tokvo /Tokyo); IMF (SDR); BAll (dinar, rival atrium). 
Other data from Reuters andAP. 


Interest Rales 


K iu n tun twy Bcpo dte 

Snubs 

Dollar Wtort Franc 

1 month MJ6 AMU 44 Hi 

2 months IMH 4KK466 

] months BW-Btt 446 46 . 4IW4K. 

6 months 8V6-SH 4 w. IMH 
I year HMs nwssw 4«w47k 


French 

Fr« sterling Franc 

44 Mi 11 <16-11 W6-9V* 

IMS. 1J4V11U 9W-946 

4 Rr4 Vh 1116-1166 7 Hr* Sy 

4V4 86 1116-1146 Wt-IOfe 

4«W4 6k 11 16-11 M. HPfc-llVa 


ECU SDR 
aVi-CMi 776 
SMhfllAi 7 *. 
Oft-BH TV, 
!HH 766 
834BW 8th 


Sources: Maroon Guaranty (dollar, dm. SF. Pound. FF); Lkrvds Bonk /ECU I: Reuters 
I SDR). Ratos astpUcabto to tntorOonk deposits of St million minimum (or equivalent). 


Key Mh< 7 Rates Oct n 

-tidied Metes Ciosu Prev. 

Dtacaont Rdt 7V> 7Vi 

Federal Feeds 7IS7U 7 1571* 

Prime Rot* 9a 740 

Broker Leon Rati ■* 8* 

Odn Paper 7*-179 days 745 747 

2-monJe TimeiY Ms 7.16 7.17 

Batenik Treasury BBb 727 733 

CD'S 3657 days 745 745 

COV 60B7 days 745 745 


S5B 540 
440 445 

425 4J5 

US 425 
4X5 450 


716 766 

91* 714 

71/14 YU 

9 3/16 9% 

76. 95/16 


Overdgnt Rate 
On Month (Hnrtnnk 

6-nMntti Intertask 

France 

interred** Rote 

Call Money 

One in oath interbank 

3*nantii interbank 
6-maath Inleraa nk 

Britoln 

Book Bom Ran 
Call Money 
M-day Traesorv Bn 

J-awtotl Interbank 


Dbcsmt Rue 
Call m—bt 
Od or taterhcBk 


Adan Dollar Pcp Belto 

Oct IT 

I month 8-816 

1 month* 0,-8*, 

3 months 8V, -81, 

emaoths aui-rn 

(year m-tra. 

Source: Reuters. 


UJ5- Money Metrlu-C Fandti 

Oct 17 

Merrill Lynch Ready Assets 
30 day overate yield: 740 

TOSmrtdm Interest Rate Indus: 7X62 


Source: Merrill L yacti Teterate. 


Gold 


1116 1116 
1176 like 
111/16 U 1/16 
111/36 ni/16 


Sources: Reuters, Qemaenboak. Credit 
{.nmols. Bo** retro. 


Hang Kaon 33440 

Luxembourg 33465 
Parts (115 kHo] 33547 
Zorich 33441 


Lusamuooro. Paris and London official Rx- 
tnus: Hans Kona and Zurich onentno and 
closing prices: New York Co me* current 
contrac t All ortces In US four ounce. 
Source; Routers. 


Profit 
Declines 
At BofA 

Net Dawn 28 , 6 % 

In 3d Quarter 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

NEW YORK — BankAmerica 
Corp., the second-largest U.S. 
banking company, said Thursday 
that its third-quarter profit feO 28.6 
percent despite a pretax gain of 
$3 10 million on the sale of its world 
headquarters property. 

Most major U.S. banking com- 


Most major U.S. banking com- 
panies have reported double-digit 
profit increases for the third quar- 
ter. Manufacturers Hanover Corp. 
and Bank of Boston Corp. reported 
an increase Thursday. 

The San Francisco-based parent 
of Bank of America, the nation's 
largest bank, said its net income fell 
to $65 million, or 31 cents a share, 
in the luly-September period from 
$91 million, or 47 cents a share, a 
year earlier. 

For the first nine months, Bank- 
America reported a loss of $159 
million, compared with net income 
of $302 million. 

BankAmerica sold its world 
headquarters properties for S660 
milli on in the third quarter. It de- 
ferred pretax gain of $237 million 
on the sale, which will be reflected 
in earnings for 10 years. 

Samuel Aimacost, president and 
chief executive, said, “We’re seeing 
ongoing pressure in the foreign, 
shipping, commercial real estate 
and agricultural sectors of the 
economy." 

Manufacturers Hanover, whose 
principal subsidiary is Manufactur- 
ers Hanover Trust Co, reported 
that earnings in the third quarter 
totaled SI 00.5 million, a 13 4- per- 
cent increase from $88.6 milli on in 
the third quarter last year. Per- 
share earnings rose to $2.10. com- 
pared with S1.69 a year earlier. 

For the first nine months, earn- 
ings totaled S299.1 million, com- 
pared with $246 3 milli on. 

Bank of Boston Corp. reported 
third-quarter earning *; of $46.5 mil- 
lion, on increase or 38 percent from 
the $33.7 milli on in the third quar- 
ter of 1984. 

For nine months, earnings to- 
taled SI30 million, compared with 
$89.5 million. (AP. UPI) 



EC-U.S. Dispute 

Intensifies Over 
Wheat Subsidies 


Reagan’s Nominations to the Fed 

Manuel H. Johnson Wayne D. Angell 


By Peter T. Kilbom 

New York Tima Service 

* WASHINGTON — Jude Wanniski, the supply- 
side pamphleteer, calls Manuel H. Johnson Jr. a 
diplomat: “He’s dvfl. He doesn't attempt to put 
other people down. He doesn't ridicule their 
views." 

William A. Niskanen, who until early this year 
was a member of the President's Council of Eco- 
nomic Advisers, said that Mr. Johnson “is quiet 
and fairly effective," adding. “He doesn’t come to 
a meeting with fire in his eyes.” 

By his own account, Mr. Johnson, the assistant 
secretary of the Treasury for economic policy, is a 
supply-side economist and, as such, is a member of 
a s mall , vociferous and often contentious school 
that captured the fancy of Ronald Reagan before 
the 1980 election and that has been a major influ- 
ence on the course erf the president’s economic 
policies. 

Last week Mr. Reagan nominated Mr. Johnson 
and Wayne D. AngeQ, also thought to be a supply- 
si der, to the Federal Reserve Board. In joining two 
other members who hold similar views — the vice 
chairman. Preston Martin, and Martha R. Scacr — 
the appointments could mark a watershed m the 
policies of the seven-member board 

The board and five presidents of the district 
Federal Reserve banks make up the Federal Open 
Market Committee, an enormously powerful insti- 
tution that controls interest rates and the U.S. 
money supply. Mr. Johnson would assume the seat 
of Charles Partee (who leaves the Fed Jan. 31). 
Appointments to the Fed are for 14 years, except 
for the chairman, whose term is for four years. 

Many economists fear a Fed that would abdi- 
cate control of the money supply and therefore of 
interest rales. According to the supply-ade view, 
the Fed often controls interest rates and the money 
supply far too rigidly. 

The new Fed appointments distress many cou- 
(Gmtinued on Page 15, CbL 5) 


By Steven Greenhouse 

Yew York Tima Sendee 

CHICAGO — The Federal Reserve Board is not 
bursting with farmers or small bankers. In Wayne 
D. Angell, who was nominated last week to be a 
member of the Federal Reserve Board, the c entral 
hank will now have someone with firsthand experi- 
ence in dealing with the consequences of Fed 
policy on both troubled areas. 

By Mr. AngcH’s reckoning, his correct interpre- 
tation of earlier Fed decisions enabled banks un- 
der his family’s control to avoid the fate of many 
financial institutions that have lent heavily to the 
nation's farmers. 

“In 198! 1 became convinced that the monetary 
policy in place would cause the value erf farm land 
to fall by 40 percent,” the 55-year-old Kansan said. 
“None of the directors believed me except my 
brother, but they agreed that we would not lend 
more than 60 percent of the value of any piece on 
land.” 

Many of Mr. AngeQ’s friends are hoping he will 
use his new position to go to bat for embattled 
rural America. But Mr. Angell takes a less parochi- 
al view of his new role. 

“I don’t believe that monetary policy should be 
run solely for agriculture’s interest or for com- 
merce’s interest or to industry’s,” he said in a 
telephone interview from his home in Ottawa, 
Kansas, where he lives with his wife and four 
children and teaches at Ottawa University, his 
alma mater. “I think each governor should have a 
responsibility to the entire country.” 

Mr. Angdl showed his concern about the effects 
of monetary policy on farmers in a statement that 
he recently gave to Senator Robert J. Dole, the 
Kansas Rqmbhcan who is his chief sponsor for the 
Fed seat In the statement, Mr. Angdl borrowed a 
novel idea from other economists and said the 
Federal Reserve Board should aim, as one of its 
priorities, to assure that a selected market basket 
(Cootimeii on Page 15, CoL 6) 


By Steven J. Dry den 

Iniemadoytal Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The European 
C ommuni ty, responding to Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s decision to 
contest EC support of wheat ex- 
ports, said Thursday that it Trill 
initiate a similar complaint about a 
U5. subsidy program in the Geocr- 
g] Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

The dual com plain ts mark wors- 
ening trade relation* between the 
United States and the lO-nathm 
community, EC officials said. Dis- 
putes have increased in the past 
year, panicalady ewer U.S. chal- 
lenges to the community’s agricul- 
tural trade policies and attempts to 
limit EC sted exports. 

Mr. Reagan asked Clayton KL 
Yen t ter. the U-S. bade representa- 
tive, to file aconmlaijit with GATT 
about EC subsidies of wheat ex- 
ports, which U.S. officials said lost 
American farmers $2 billion amm- 

aQy- 

Tne European Com mis sion, the 
EC's executive body, stud the com- 
munity had “always followed a 
price policy c onformi ng to its inter- 
national obligations." The new 
U.S. program to subsidize farm ex- 
ports contradicted GATT's subsi- 
dy code, the statement said, and 
has cansed a “drop in wheal prices 
on the world market which is detri- 
mental to other exporters." 

A complaint filed wiih GATT 
sets in motion a lengthy, complex 
series of talks supervised by 
GATT, which regulates world 
trade. 

Mogen Marcussen, a commis- 
sion expert on international agri- 
cultural affairs, said that US. stzb- 
ridkson such commodities as daby 
products, sugar and tobacco areas 
nigh as those of the EC nations. He 
said that it was “politically very* 
difficult" for tile EC to take action 
against its farmers by forcing a re- 
duction in production. 

Another commission official, 
pointing to the current trade dis- 
putes, said, “things are bad at the 
moment” and that the US. action 
‘“makes bad relations waise.” 

That official, who asked not to 
be further identified, noted that in 
September Mr. Resgan had de- 


manded a se tt lement in the _UA- 
EC dispute over the ECs aid to 
q- ftflnra t fruit manufacturers. 

The Reagan administration 
“needed somcthic® big” to showhs 
intention to reduce the trade defi- 
cit, ra the r fhao a “tidbit for Coa- 
gress" like the canned fruit issue, 
the commission official said. 

“What could be. bigger than 
wheai?” 

The administration, opening' an 
offensive against what it considers 
the comnmntty’s unfair trading 
practices, a S2-btiuon 

prog r a m last spring to subsidize 
American farm exports. U.S. offi- 
cials have acknowledged that the 
special program, which uses sur- 
plus farm products as a bonus to 
attract sales, has bad only limited 
success. 

The United States has offered 
wheat to Algeria, North Yemen, 
"Morocco and Egypt under the spe- 
cial pl aT>, but only Egypt has re- 
sponded with bl commitment to 
buy. according to an official of the 
U.S. mission to the community in 
Brussels. 

In response to the U^. program, 

the community m September raised 

atkiifag allowed to exports, of 
wheat to the Mediterranean region. 
The move was followed by a sub- 
stantial community sale of wheat to 


In a related development, (he 
commission said h would ask the 
EC C ouncil of Ministers to bring 
forward by one year, to Jan. 1, 
198$ an across-the-board tariff oat 
agreed trader the Tokyo GATT 
round. The move is important to 
developing countries, who bebevt 
the redaction should accompany 
preparations to a new round of 
muttihiteral trade negotiations. . 

The other main trade issues now 
complicating US.-EC relations 
concern community exports of 
sted and wine to the United States 
and the EC policy ca ritrus-htut 
exports from its Mediterranean 
trading partners. 

The United Stales has threat- 
ened unilateral anrirap to Emit EC 
stedemortsif an ag r ee m e nt is not. 
readied on the issue by OcL 3L 


United Technologies 
To Close Mostek Unit 


United Pros International 

HARTFORD, Connecticut — 
United Technologies Corp- said 
Thursday that it planned to termi- 
nate the operation of its Mostek 
semiconductor subsidiary and sell 
its telecommunication business, re- 
sulting in after-tax loss provisions 
of $423.7 million. 

The loss provisions, partially off- 
set by a nonoperating gain from the 
previously announced sale of In- 
mont Corp., resulted in a net loss at 
$45.6 mQlioa for the third quarter 
of 1985. 

That compares with net income 
of $192.7 million, or $1.48 a share, 
for the third quarter of 1984. 

“Satisfactory results from our 
core businesses during the first nine 
months were overshadowed by 
losses in Mostek and our telecom- 
munications business,” said Harry 
J. Gray, chairman and chief execu- 
tive officer of UTC. 

“The actions we are taking are 
4ifficult and unpleasant, but abso- 
lutely essential to end the drain on 
earnings,” he said. 

The after-tax effect or the In- 
raont gain and the loss provisions 
for the Mostek and telecommuni- 
cations businesses, along with the 
after-tax operating results or those 
businesses, are classified as discon- 
tinued operations. 

UTC said its continuing opera- 
tions were profitable in the third 
quarter, with after-tax earning s of 
$147.5 million. Restated to exclude 
discontinued operations, after-tax 
earnings to the third quarter in 
1984 were $189.9 mfllioo, including 
a $44.6-millicm nonrecurring tax 
credit. 

Earnings from continuing opera- 
tions for the third quarter of 1985 
were $1.08 per share, compared 
with $1.46 a share in the third peri- 
od last year. 

Sales from continuing opera- 
tions for the third quarter of 1985 
totaled S3.4 billion, compared with 
$3-5 billion for the continuing op- 
erations a year earlier. 


Mostek has been struggling to 
hold on to its market in recent 
months in the face of mounting 
problems of its own and generally 
depressed conditions in the U.S. 
semiconductor industry brought on 
chiefly by tough Japanese competi- 
tion. 

The company, situated in the 
Dallas suburb of Carrollton, has 
been drastically cutting its work 
force at home and overseas. 

Last month, Mostek Laid off 
about 1,250 of the 1,9Q0 workers at 
its semiconductor assembly and 
test facility in Penang Malaysia. 

Six hundred other workers were 
laid off at the Penang facility last 
April Company officials cited the 
“continued lack of demand and se- 
vere price eroriou” in the dynamic 
random access memory market for 
its action. 

Dynamic random access memo- 
ry, or DRAM, is Mostek's major 
drip product. 

The trimming operations had 
been expected since UTC named 
James Fiebiger, former Motorola 
executive, to president and chief 
executive officer or Mostek in Au- 
gust 

Industry experts estimate that 
Mostek’s losses were running as 
high as $200 million so far this 
year. The parent company does not 
give a breakdown of its subsidiar- 
ies. 

Thursday's action is expected to 
affect about 3,700 re maining em- 
ployees. 

Stanley A. Balter, semiconductor 
industry analyst for Herzfdd & 
Stem Inc. of Paramus, New Jersey, 
said UTC might seek a buyer for 
Mostek, which be said has some 
attractive equipment and qualified 
personnel 

Mr. Balter said the situation at 
Mostek showed “there is too much 
capacity in the semiconductor in- 
dustry." 








WIM 





cl W-fj 

L ! fijfc 

i 

m 







For the man with exceptionalgoals, 
a new dimension in ntiwate^ bankim 


i 

Airline Reform in Europe Sought , 
But Critics Want Broader Changes 

The Associated Pros 

BRUSSELS — The Association or European Airlines called Thurs- 
day for limited liberalization of European air transport, where at the 
same time the benefits of interline cooperation would be maintained 

The proposals by the association, an umbrella group composed 
mostly of national air carriers, already have been criticized by some 
members seeking faster action to open up Europe's airlines to more 
competition and less regulation. 

British Caledonian plans to withdraw from a committee that 
prepared the proposals on the grounds that they do not go far enough. 

The association called for el imina ting the strict 50-50 sharing ol 
routes, and fora limited number of discount tariffs that do not require 
prior government approval 

The proposals came is reply to a 1984 European Commission paper 
urging a limited opening of the airline industry to competition. The 
commission's proposals have not yet been endorsed by all of the EC 
nations. 


W 'hat makes TDB exceptional? 

To start with, there is our 
traditional policy of concentrating 
on things we do unusually well 
For example, foreign exchange, 
precious metals - and, very im- 
portantly, private banking. 

Today, as part of American 
Express Bank Ltd., we offer you 
private banking with a totally new 
dimension. This includes access to 
the broad range of asset manage- 
ment services and global invest- 
ment opportunities provided by 
the American Express family bf 
companies. And for certain clients. 


we also offer such valuable “extras" 
as Gold Card® privileges and the 
exclusive Premier Services,*” for 
rou nd-th e-dock personal and travel- 
assistance. 

While we move with the times, 
our traditional policies do not 
change. At the heart of our business- 
is the maintenance of a strong and 
diversified deposit base. Our portfo- 
lio of assets is also well-diversified, - 
and it is a point of principle with us 
to keep a conservative ratio of capi- 
tal to deposits and a higji degree of 
liquidity — sensible strategies in 
these uncertain times. 


If TDB soutids Jike ±e swt of 

hank that meets your requirements, 
visit us on your next trip to Switzer- 
land. Or telephone: in Geneva, 
022/37 21 11; in Chiasso, 091/44 19 9L 

TDB officer in Geneva, London, Paris, 
Luxembourg, Chiasso, Monte Carte, . 
Nassau, Zurich, Buenos Aires. Sdo 
Paulo. ■ ’ 

TDB, the 6th largest commercial bank 
in Switzerland, is a member of the 

American Express Company which 

has assets of US$693 biUiori ahd ' 
shareholders' equity of US$ 4.9 billion. 



ii. The Trade Develo, 
[ at 96r9R rue du 1 


mg m Geneva, : 

' An American 
















Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1985 


Thursdays 


MSE 


Closing 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing an Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


liManm 

Highly* stock 


Wv. YT4 PE 


SO. 

lfltoHhhUw 


Close 

Qua*. OfM 


(Continued from Page 10) 


551% 

671% 

T7V4 

18% 

319% 

33 

17V. 

171% 

771% 

78 

«% 

539: 

19 

605. 
45 V. 
30' a 
18 
15% 
47 
Sl% 
37 
40 

43 

it., 

411% 

4T% 

SM 

501% 

14%% 

40%. 

25%. 

55%% 

35 

4711 

Til 

%2 


US 11.9 

6.10 izz 

Ala xa 
7_7= 12.1 
IJ5612X 
.12 .9 

34M 11.0 


34 NIoMol 

42 NioMuf 
2&<4 NkaMcrf 
53 NiaMof 
141% NfegStl 
1141 Nicaiet 

25V; NICOR 

» NlCOpi 150 6.7 
17!% NoDlAI .I2D .9 

101% MOTORS 
541% NorffcSO 3X8 40 
81- Norfln 

32ft NorWr 140 42 

43 Norstr of 4.1% ?x 

131% Nartofc JJS S 
46'S NACoal l.io 1.9 
311% WAPhll 3.1 

13*% NEurO lJ2e 9.1 
131% NooSfUf IAS 9.9 

91% NlndPS \M ISO 
411% NIPS Of 4.14e 89 
404. NoSIPv. 153 7 A 
28 Vs NSPw pi 350 10X 
32 NSPw Pi 4X8 10J 
33Vi NSPp! 4.16 181 
69 NSPw of 8X0 11J) 
31 Nortel AO 
j Nimnia 
314% Nonna ijo u 
41 NwCP Pl 4.94s 9 J 
8 NnStW 
3!'% Norton 
21'/% Norwst 
48% Nwslof 

TO 7 * NovO 

28'. Nucor 
3 NuiriS 


721 

43 

27 

600 

96 


2X0 5-4 
1X0 7X 
iAjelCU 
Jte IX 
AO .9 

xai 


60*. NYNEX 4X0 7.9 


10«Qz40%. 40 
500x50 50 

254 28% 28% 
at «4 64 

63 151% 1475 
147 134% 13 
308 79 27%% 

3 281% 284% 
385 14'* 137% 
370 14<% 131% 
68'% 681% 
9 

46 <5V 

53 V: 53 '-3 
141% 14V] 
SA 56*% 
154 321% 37% 
22 189% 18% 
810 16 15*. 

923 104% 10% 
630 46*% 46*6 
96 46ft 46'— 
2402 34 34 

202 39 38 

20z 41 41 

12te 81 BOV. 
688 33V, 33*6 
36 3 2'% 

2833 44% 44 
2 50ft SO 
16 I3'4 121% 
91 271% 36 Va 
677 24%. 23*6 
190 52 51*a 

590 27i 26*% 
177 44V, 47% 
19 3f» 3ft 

1507 82 v% 81 


40*. + V 

SO -Vt. 
2S%— U 
64 

14% — '4. 
13V.— 1% 
Z7*i— 116 
38*%— *% 
IMS — <« 
13V.— ft 
60** + V% 
9*% + *% 
46 + V. 

53% + % 
la’ll + V. 
56*%— *6 
32% + ft 
181% + '% 
16 + % 
lift, + Vs 
46*6 + ft 
46 V] 4- 1% 
34 + V, 

38 + VS 

41 

80 'u + U 
J2ft + ft 

r% — ’.% 

44 V] + 2% 

50*6 +1V. 
12'<« — ft 
36*6 

24ft + ft 
52 +4% 

271% + *% 
43Va — ft 

73% 

81V;— ft 


Dlv.YW.PE UteNtfiiaw 


no w 1031% 
28*% 20 
36'A 26*% 
16*% 12*% 

36 2814 

4796 53*6 
29V* 22*6 
319% 23% 
14V. 13 V. 
70 54 

73 77 

16*a 10% 
70 56*% 

21*% 17 
26*6 211% 
916 7V, 
38% 28*% 
10% 5% 
17*% 12 
33*- 264* 
26 221% 
12*% 73- 
28*2 20 
25’* 23 
12% 6V% 
9*6 6VS 
33*% 74 
311% 19*% 
36% 23*% 
19 13 

37 29% 
51*% 38*6 
14V% 10V% 


Oca pt 14X2 
ODECO 1.00 
Ogden 1X0 
OWoEd ua 

Oh Ed of 4XD 

OhEdpI SJO 
□nEdpf 350 
OtiEdpr 3X2 
OhEdnf 1X0 
OhEdnf L84 
OhEpt \CJ6 
OhMafr AO 
OOP Of &OI 
OhPofG 227 
OfcloGE 2X0 

OkloCpt m 
oim lxo 

Omncn 
Oneida X0 
ONEOK 254 
OranRfc lM 
Orange 531 
Orion C J6 
Orton C pfl-13 
Orion P 

Orion of -5 
Orion pt 275 
OuHSdM 54 
OvmTr -7? 
OvShfp 50 
OwenC I A0 
Owenlli 1X0 
Oxford .44 


135 
4X 17 
6X 17 
119 6 
119 
13J2 
1ZX 
112 
12X 
117 

m 

35 15 
11.2 
105 

ax io 

9X 

45 13 


5 3 40 
8 3 10 
U 9 
6.1 16 
U 
8-7 


75 
102 
25 13 
ZX 14 
3A 11 
4.1 8 

3J 10 
15 27 


644 108?* 
300 21*6 
292 30VS 
1360 1416 
Site 34 
Ittz 62% 

7 27% 
12 29% 

8 1SV6 
540: 68 

7310: 88*3 
88 UV> 
57308 71ft 
42 21 
330 23% 
4002 8Vl 
539 33*2 
254 4V% 

114 13ft 
99 70*% 

63 2SV% 

64 8% 
20 24*6 

2 24% 
10W 9ft 
Id 7ft 
262 2714 
298 23% 
53S 35ft 
131 144% 
330 34% 
743 49% 
70 13ft 


108ft lOBtt— ft 
20% 2016— ft 
30ft 30% 

1416 14*6— ft 
34 34 

a'A «%— i* 
27ft Sft — ft 
2946 29ft t ft 
IS 15 — ft 

66 60 4-lft 
87ft 88 — ft 
11*% IF* 

67 71ft +3% 

20 'A 21 + ft 

23 23ft— ft 

Bft 8ft— % 
3216 33 +16 
5ft 6ft + 46 
134* 13ft + ft 
784* 28ft— 1% 

’tft’Sft 

23ft 24ft 
24% 24% 

9% 9%— ft 
7 7ft 
27 27 

23 2316— ft 

05*2 15ft— ft 
14ft 14*6— ft 
34 34 

48% 49 — % 
12ft 12ft 


37V. 23ft PHH 1X0 2.9 14 
47ft 31ft PPG 1.76 19 10 
31ft 164* PSA M 25 IB 
23 Va 131* PSA dpi 1.90 9-2 
14% 11% POCAS 154 11A 
20V, 14** PocGE 1X4 103 7 

4ff%. 34% Pod. fg 148 8A 1? 
41ft 34ft PcLum 
10 5ft PacRes 


38 351% 341% 35 +16 

947 454% 45ft 45ft + ft 

351 24ft 24 24*6— ft 

36 20% 20ft 20% + % 

21 14 13% 14 + ft 

1390 18ft 17% 17ft— ft 

- . 133 42 4146 41ft— ft 

1X0 31 2510676 39% 384% 39 —4% 

XSe 5 12 25 816 8% 8% 


4*% i'.% oakina 

34% 25% OakltoP 152 
35V. 23'% OcclPet 250 
14ft 9i* OcclPwl 
54'“ 41ft OcDP Pt 2.16 4X 
24ft 20ft OcciP of 250 13.7 
57 48ft OcrfpPl 6X5 113 
113 105% OCCiP Pfl 5.50 145 


4X 12 
75 10 


951 

11 

1285 

5 
1 

6 
169 


lft 1ft 1ft— ft 
32ft 32*6 32*6— VS 
34ft 33ft 33ft— ft 
144% 14ft 14ft— ft 
53ft 53ft 53ft- ft 
22% 22ft 22ft — ft 
55ft 55ft 55*. — ft 


542 107*% 107 107ft + ft 


Company Results 


Revenue and profits or losses, in m (//torts, or* to local 
currencies unless alhentisc Indicated. 


Louisiana- Pacific 


Rainier Bancorp 


3rd Quar. 

Revenue 

Net Inc. 

Per Shore 

7 Months 

Revenue 

Mel Inc. 

Per Share 


I98S 

332A 

ItA 

0-32 

1985 


19*4 

312.7 

?X 

0X0 

1964 


9413 9465 

1(7 40X 


3rd Quar. 

Net inc. 

Per Share 

9 Months 

Net me. 

Per Shore— 


I98S 1984 

1536 I7.M 
0X7 0X9 

198S 1984 

47.16 45X7 

2X7 Z35 


053 1.14 


1985 1984 

ZO20. 2X40. 


195 

1985 


79X 

1984 


LTV 

3rd Quar. 

Revenue 

Net Loss _ 

9 Months 

Revenue 

Net Loss 

e-month nets Include 
Charge of SOO million vs tax 
credit at SMI mutton, teas 
nets criso include vain at SSS 
million In auarterandet UOJ 
million In 9 months. 


6.13a 5X30. 

648X 1315 


Reynolds i 
3rd Quar. 
Revenue _ 

Net Inc 

Per Share 

9 Months 

Revenue 

Net Inc 

Per Share 


Ind. 

1984 

1/Wfl 

229X 

876 

1*84 

9AXL 

i.i3c 

1.91 


Manuftrs. Hanover 


3rd Quar. 

Nel Inc 

Per Share 

9 Months 

Net Inc 

Per Shore 


1985 1984 

1005 886 

2.10 159 

1985 1984 

299.1 346J 

6X6 4.98 


Society for Savings 

1985 1984 

4A2 2X2 

0X4 060 

1985 1984 

10X8 075 

£26 1X7 


3rd Quar. 

Net Inc 

Per 5hare_. 
9 Months 

Net inc 

Per 5hor»_ 


legs quarter net Include 
gain of SI/S million. 


State Street Boston 

1985 1914 

13A 11J 

071 063 

1989 1984 


Mercantile Bancorp 


3rd Quar. 

Nel Inc 

Per Share 

9 Months 
Net Inc - - 
Per Share 


2.15 



Meridian Bancorp 


3rd Quar. 

Net inc _ 
Per Share. 

9 Months 

Net Inc 

Per Share — 


1985 1984 

16.1 12A 

1.17 1.12 

1985 1984 

41X 275 

3X2 259 


Sund strand 
3rd Quar. 

Revenue 

Net Inc _ 

Per Sham — 

7 Months 

Revenue 

Net inc 

Per Share 


1985 1914 

317.4 2S7X 


19.1 

1X3 

1985 


17A 

055 


9098 734.9 

SIX 45X 


279 251 


Tordimarit 


Per share results aaiusted 
tor 3-far - 7 sol It In June. 


Norstar 

3rd Quar. 1985 1984 

Net Inc 23X6 21A5 

Per Share 1X6 1X4 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Net inc 6855 5654 

Per Shore — 171 353 


3rd Quar. 1985 

Oner Net — 422 

Oner Share— 055 
9 Months 1985 

Oper Net I17X 

Goer Share— 155 


1984 

33X 


1984 

929 

1.11 


1984 


Pacific Telesis 

3rd Quar. 

Revenue 

Nel inc 

Per Share — 

9 Months 

Revenue 

Net inc 

Per Share — 


Utd Banks Colorado 

3rd Quar. 

Net Inc 

Per Share — 

9 Months 

Net Inc 

Per Share — 


1985 

1U 04 
1X9 082 

1985 1984 

26X 284 

254 222 


1985 1984 

2.150 2X10 
2535 2118 

251 2X3 

1985 1914 

6X30 5X20 

720.9 6Z7J 
7.16 6AS 


msnets Include gain ot JSJ 
million from sale ot property 
and charge of SM million. 


Parker Hannifin 

1st Qoer, 1986 1985 

Revenue 367X 351 X 

Nel Inc 165 

Per Share 040 


Valiev Mattonal 

3rd Quar. 1985 1984 

Net inc 19.7 

Per Share — 1.18 

9 Months 1985 

Not Inc 567 

Pot Shore 139 


1SX 

094 

1984 


282 


19.1 

070 


1985 1984 

■42VX 307.7 


124 

089 

1914 

7401 

33J 

245 


Pennwalt 

3rd Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 236-2 2417 

Net Inc (a>14.7 

Per Share—. — 

9 Months 1985 

Revenue 755X 

Net Inc 4X7 

Per Share — — 

a: loss 

Philip Morris 

1985 1984 

3430 3470. 

394X 3214 

130 242 

1985 1984 

10470. 1OS20. 
9711 784X 

8.10 6X9 


VF Carp. 

3rd Quar. 

Revenue. 

Net Inc 43X 

Per Share — 141 

9 Months 1985 

Revenue— 1X70 
Net Inc — - 995 

Per Share — 121 

IfSf nets include provision 
far toss ot 333 million. 


353 

1.15 

1984 

8629 

915 

291 


3rd Quar. 

Revenue 

Nel Inc 

Per Share 

9 Months 
Revenue. 
Net me _ 
Per Share 


Yellow Frelant Svs. 

1985 1984 

396.1 3554 

1947 11X8 

04* 040 

1985 1984 

1.140 1X20 

42X3 3145 

148 1.11 


3rd Quar. 

Revenue 

Net inc 

Per Share— 
9 Months 

Revenue 

Nel Inc ....... 

Per Share — 


Per share results adlustad 
for 3-for-l split In Auo. 


8% 


19% 1 3ft PocRspilOO 11.1 20 18ft 18 18 

17ft 12** PacSd .40 3X 10 35 13** 13ft 13% + ft 

STii 62% PocTete 072 ax 8 2537 72ft 71 71% — ft 

314* 23V* Pod ten 240 OS 8 181 2BW. 28 28ft 

36 304* Poclf pf 4X7 122 II 34 33*. 33%—% 

43ft 26ft PuinWb 40 22 M 1828 27^% 27*6 27% — % 

34ft 25ft PohiW pf 225 85 91 26*6 26ft 26*6 + % 

39 32ft Palm Be 1X0 34 33 611 35 34ft 34ft— ft 

40ft 20% PartABk X It I 30 38*6 38ft 38*% + ft 

12572 Bft 8% 8VS + ft 
249 3ft 3% 3% — ft 

15 19 47 1316 13ft 13ft— ft 
64 11 1583 J6ft 15% 35%— ft 
28 1769 fift 5% 6ft + ft 
15 607 181% 18ft 18ft 

290 7ft 7% 7ft— V* 

X3e X 11 57 13 13 13 — ft 

.08 IX 301 4ft 4U 4ft 

1.12 35 10 205 33 32ft 32V»— *6 
521 24 31 3332 22ft 21V% 21ft + ft 

2 57 2% 2ft 2% 

44 5J 13 ' 

.16 1.1 14 
X0 17 29 


401 


2X6 4.9 
256 102 


PonAm 
1% PonAwt 
21 13ft Pandekrt X0 
41ft }2ft PanhEC 2X0 
8 3ft PanlPr 
19ft 13ft Posrdt 
18*6 7 Pardvn 

19 lift ParkEl 
7ft 4 PorkDrl 

39ft 28% Par*H 
2ift 14ft ParkPn 
2ft lft PatPIrl 
16% lift PavNP 
23ft 13% PayCsh 
12 6% Peabdv 

1% f% Peneo 
5Bft 43% PenCen 
55A 44ft Pennev 

27ft 23ft PaPL 

40ft 32 PoPLPt 450 115 
29ft =5*6 PoPLdp/142 117 
27ft 21% PaPL dc«2-70 11.1 
74 50ft PaPL DT 040 1 IX 
28ft 24% PaPL dorSXS 115 
31% 26ft PaPL 001075 12X 
95 77 PoPLpf 9X4 95 

103ft 88% PaPL prl 1X0 107 
109 99 POPLW13X0 124 

7D% 55 PaPL or 8X0 121 
41ft 34 Penwh 2.20 5.9 12 
6? 51ft Penwpf 250 
25*% 20 Penwpt 1iX 
50 32% Penraol 2X0 

91 76 Pen: ofB 8X0 

189* 13% PeooEn 1X0 
24ft 14'., PeaBys XD 
64% 3996 PepsiCo 178 
30ft 21ft PerkEi 56 __ 

9ft 7*6 Prmtan 1.1 28 1 45 6 
16*6 10% PeryDS 
44 31 Petrie 140 3X 16 

2a*% =4*6 PetRs 3-72el4X 
17 14 PetRspf 157 95 

6 2% Ptrlnv 70e26J 

53% 34ft Pfber 148 
24 12*6 PhelPD 


S 34 
46% 29 


Phetoor 5X0 
PHtbrS 54 


124 12% T2 12ft + ft 

712 15 14% 10ft + ft 

395 11% 1t*6 lift + ft 

ITS S ft ft 

12 420 49ft 48% 49ft— % 
9 3361 48ft 47ft 48% + ft 
8 1578 25% 24% 25 + % 

200: 38 38 38 

35 29% 28% 29% + ft 

105 26% 26ft 26ft— ft 
410: 71% 70 71% + % 

77 28ft 28ft 28ft— ft 
20 30ft 30% 30ft 
30: 94 94 94 

Slid 02% 102ft 1 02ft — 1 
2DdD5 105 105 +1 

1QZ 66 66 66 — ft 

117 37ft 36ft 37ft + ft 
2 55 55 55 —ft 

S7 23 23 23 

279 47 46 46ft— % 

900:101% 101% 101% +13 
792 15ft 15% 15% 

.. .. 70 23ft 23ft 23ft— ft 

2X 11 2782 63ft 6=% &=%— ft 
23 13 969 24% 24ft 24ft 
88 7ft 7ft 7ft 

863 15ft 15ft 15ft 
544 44 42% 43% +1% 

36 36ft 26% 26ft + *6 
H 16ft 16ft 16ft— ft 

_ 14 3ft 3ft lft 

3J 13 8608 46 44ft 44ft— 1ft 
306 21% 20ft 20ft— % 


45 
7X 

47 19 
7 3 

73 6 
.9 19 


16ft 13% PhllaEI 2X0 145 . 
32 24ft phllEpf 3X0 713 
35 26ft Phi IE ot 4X0 119 
37ft 30 PhilEPt 448 142 
69 54% PMIE pf ITS 118 

lift 9% PhJIE pt 141 116 
10ft 8ft PhllEpf 1X3 ill 
10ft 8ft PhllEpf 1X8 118 
126 104 PtlllOf 17.12 U6 

74 59 PhiJEBf 9-50 135 

61 50 PhilEPt 7X0 13X 

23% 15% PhllSuh 1X2 64 12 
9SVa 72 PhllMr 1D0 U 9 
26% 14ft Phllpln 40 25 13 
18% 11% PhllPts 1X0 7.9 8 
25% 22% Phi Pi pf 1X4o 4.1 
28ft 20ft PhiiVH M ' 

35ft 23% PiedAs X8 
34 25% PieNG 

2SV. 14ft Ptori 
63ft 38% Pllsbry 
34 21ft Pioneer 
26% 13ft PionrEl 

45ft 31 PltovB 

90 61ft PitnBpI 2-13 
14ft 9ft PIHsht 
17 PkuiPtn 
9ft PtanRs 
7 Ptantm 
7% Ptaybov 
lift PogoPd 
37% 14% Potorkt 
16ft 10ft Pondrs 
21ft 15% PopTol 
22% 14ft Porlec 
2lft 15ft PortGE 


9X 3 51% 51% 51% 

15 20 5172 38ft 37ft 37ft— % 


2X2 


21 

IB 

11 % 

13ft 

a 


24ft 19ft PorGpf 260 11X 


7790 15% 14ft 15ft + % 
1401 29 2Bft 28ft + ft 
520: 32 31 31 — ft 

200: 33 33 33 —1 

1950: 64 63 63ft— lft 

73 10ft 10ft 10ft— ft 
103 10ft 9ft 10ft + ft 
216 9ft 9% 9% — ft 
350:118 117ft 117ft— tft 
430: 70ft 69ft 70ft 
50x58% 57% 58% — ft 
182 20% 19% 20% + ft 
6206 76% 74ft 75ft— ft 
367 23% 23ft 23ft— ft 
Z3» 12% 12ft 12ft 
102 2Sft 25 25ft + ft 
15 13 1551 27% 26ft 27% + ft 
-9 7 259 31 30ft 30ft 
75 11 5 31ft 30ft 31ft + ft 

15 52 23 22ft 23 

28 14 887 61% 61 61ft + % 

5X 5 249 24ft 23ft 23ft — ft 
15ft ir 
41% 4 
4 81ft a 

546 13ft li 

7 18ft II 

19 17ft 18 

10% 10ft - 

8% 8ft 

28139 2493 37ft 36ft 34% —lft 
X 33 812 15 14ft 14% 

65 18 17% 17ft + ft 

w j!2 m + * 

2 23ft 

BS& 

180 35% 

228 30 _ 

640: 39ft 39 


1X2 

ljj __ _ _ 

X6e 5 40 

1X0 73 II 1301 
25 


15ft + ft 
41% + % 
81ft +2ft 


20 1.1 20 

.UhlX lj 

50 5.1 27 
1X0 
A0 

xo 

150 9 3 


598 

136 




3S% 30% PorGpt 440 , 

34ft 30ft PorGpf 4X2 132 

38ft 28 Potltdl 156 44 

34 23% PohnEI 216 7 X 

41% 32% Pot El pf 4X4 104 

50% 42% PotEI Pf 4X3 aj 

25ft 18ft Prwnls X6 15 19 24 , 

41% 31ft Prtmrk 120 SX 8 23 41ft 

20% 14ft PrtmeC 13 1942 16% 

36% 16ft PrhnMS X* X 29 368 37 
59ft 50ft PrOCfG 160 44 15 4801 59 
15 8 PrdRse 23 250 

4T4 35ft P rotor 140 16 15 71 

2% 2 PruRCn 159 

Oft 8 PruRI n 99 

24% 17ft PSvCoI 2X0 95 8 508 

70 S3V. PS Co I pf 7.15 10J IBS 

21% 16ft PSColpf 110 104 8 

10ft «ft PSInd 1X0 U5 10 
1X8 135 
852 145 
950 14.1 



i— % 


422 48ft 48ft 48ft + ft 


8ft 

63 

70 

8% 

16ft 

17% 


3 

271 


PSinpf 
PSInpf 
56 PSinpf 
3ft PSvNH 
Bft PSNHpf 
8ft PNHpfB 
24ft II PNHpfC 
22 lift PNHofD 
22 VI 11% PNHofE 
19ft 9% PNHpfF 
20ft 10% PNH rtG 
=9ft 22% PSvNM 2X8 103 
32ft 24ft PSvEG 2X4 104 
PSEGrt 

10% PSEGpr 140 101 
30% PSEGpf 4X8 109 
30ft PSEGpf 4.18 115 
39 PSEGpf 5X8 T1X . 

58 PSEGpf 8X8 llA 1 Ota 66 

2% PuWIcfc 42) 7ft 

Puhtekrt 226 ft 

9% Pueblo .16 IX 10 157 13 

11% PupetP 1X6 T1X 8 403 15 

11 PulWHm .12 1.1 12 1471 
Sift 16% Pu rotaf 541 35 
10% 6ft Pvro 



15 

39 

39 

49% 

73 

4 £ 

15V. 

17 

2W. 


24% 26ft' 

41ft 41ft— ft 
16% 16% . .. 

ay 58W 5S*1— % 
14ft 14ft 14ft + ft 
39 38ft 39 + ft 
2ft 2 2 

■ft J 8 

t Sft « 

lOOz jS* 5§ft 58ft— ft 
100: 68 68 68 +lft 

1384 7ft Tft 7ft 

750: 15 IS 15 — ft 
1 15ft 15ft 15ft— % 
48 22ft 22% 2Zft + % 
8 19% 19% 19% 

16 20H 2Dft 20% + % 
‘ 17% 17% 17%— % 

18% 18% 18% + ft 

Z7% 27% 27ft 
7 4564x27% 27ft Z7%— ft 
4X12 % % + 

3 13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
1002 37ft 37ft 37ft +lft 
100: 36% 36% 36% 

100: 47 47 47 + % 

68 68 — 1 % 
2% 2£ + % 

12ft 13 +ft 
U% 14ft— ft 
11% 10ft 10ft— % 
113 17ft 16% 16%—% 
7 345 6ft 6% 6%— ft 


63 33 QiMkOs 150 24 15 862 59% 58 58% — ft 
105 91 QudOPt 956 »X 860Qd02% 102ft 102%— % 
0% 16ft QuofcSO 50 35 21 812 23 21ft 23ft + ft 

10ft 5% Quarvex It 564 i 5% 5%— ft 

34% 27 Questar 150 54 11 67 29% 29 29% + % 

26ft 14ft QfcReil 3*a LI 14 232 21% 21% 21% + ft 


nMontn 
HtohUw Stock 


pf*. YkL pfi 


9% 6ft RBtnd 
40ft 34 RCA 
40 29% RCA pf 
112 ea rca pf 

38ft 33% RCA pf 
9% 6% RLC 
4% 2ft RPC 
19% 12% RTE 
14% 8% Radtoe 
47% 31ft RatePur 1X0 
•ft 5ft Ronftfl 
21% 16ft Ranca X4 
6% 2ft RonerO 
78ft 51% Raven 
77ft 9ft Ravmk 
53ft 36% Ravthn 
10% 9ft RaodBt 
Zlft 14% RaBatpt2.1 


X4I J 
1X4 2X 
350 9X 
4X0 3 3 
355 95 

20 2.9 


« <ns 45ft 44** 44?t— % 
100:38 X 38 + % 

10 103% im% 183% + ft 
10 38ft 38ft 38ft + % 

" 256 6% 6H 6% 


56 3X 


fl K» » 

69 18% 18% 18% + ft 


2X 


54 4 


160 


XO 3J 


1X4 3X 


.11 ItUDtnpiA.1. 

24ft 16% RdBal Pf XltelBX 
16% II RIIRef lJ3e 95 
17% 8% RecnEq 

12% 7 Redmn 

12% 8U. Reece 

1% S Regal 
43ft 27% RwdtC t0 2X 

10% 4ft PapAlr 

3 VA ReoAwt 

12% 5ft RpGypj XO 3J 

49% 36 ReoNY 154 3J 
22ft 17% RNYpf 212 95 
34ft 34% Repdk 164 54 
30 23ft RepBkpf2« 75 
103 86% RepBfc orflXle 75 

24% 15ft REhCot XZ 14 
30% 22ft Revco XO 19 
17% 10** Rovere 
95% 32ft Revlon 
98% 93 RvInpfB 
74% 17% Raxhm X0 11 
16% 11% Rexnrd 44 3X 
32ft 25ft Revnins 1AD 94 
50 4Tft Revlnpf 4.1D ax 
130% 123% RerlnpfliW 10.1 
41% 28% ReVMtl 1X0 3.1 
26% toft RevMpf 2X0 86 

68% 26ft RchVck 1^8 22 
33ft 21ft RitOAld 50 21 
7% 2ft RvrOkn 
36% 28ft Rotohw 1X0 36 
41% 25ft Robfsn 160 6X 
34% 5ft vIRobins 

toft 16% Roch & 2X0 108 
42ft 31 RochTl 244 65 
20% 18% RckCtrn 
41% 27% Rockwl 1.12 3X 
72 55% RohmH 2X0 3X 

n 40 Rohrln 
27% 14 RolnOn 40 15 
18% 5ft RollnEs 

8% Rollins 46 4X 


12 % 

3ft 

19 

47 

lift 

64ft 

17 


11 ROBOT 64 45 

24 Rorer 1.12 Z7 

7% Rowan .12 15 

46 RovID 3X9e SlI 

10ft Rovhtts 
28% 19ft Rutjmds 
at 14% RussBr 
20% 15% RusTog 
31% 20% RyoiH 
30% 22 Ryders 
39 18ft Rvtand 
=0ft 8ft Rymar 
13% 11% Rymerpfl.17 102 


J6 18 
1X0 17 
60 21 
66 3X 


9 .. _ _ 

10 434 14% lift 14% 

19 1170 65% 45ft 45%—% 
55 1881 7% Tft 7% 

• 4 16% 16% 16% 

157 3% 3ft 3ft- ft 

24 208 »V> 69% 69ft + ft 

18 10 10 10 

11 1426 49% 48% 49% + ft 

443 6ft 6% 6ft — ft 

26 15 14% IS 

15 16% 16% 16ft— ft 
10 49 13% 13ft 13ft + ft 

14 112 9% 9 9% + ft 

15 142 8ft 0 Bft + ft 

34 49 lift 11 11 

79 . — 

12 a 34ft to }«% + v* 

5 2211 9% 9ft 9% — ft 

is n n Va 

9 37 8% Bft Eft— ft 

8 272 47ft 46ft 46ft 
2 22% 22% 22% 

6 36 30% » 30% + ft 

S 26ft 26ft 28ft + ft 
50 lOTn 102ft 102ft + % 
478 23% =3% 23ft— ft 

31 8374 39ft 26% 28 +1% 

2 298 16% 15% 15% 

18 2V43 5Sft 55ft 55% + ft 
12 97V4 97 97 

15 19 ZTV] 22% 22ft + % 

10 486 14ft 14% 14ft 

6 40=4 =6% 25% 25ft — % 

7 49% 49 49ft— ft 

800 T2SUM28 125% + % 
8 302 33 32% 32% 

91 26 25% 26 + % 

29 623 <«% *Bft 6BVI 

15 1765 24% 23ft 24% + % 

18 19 3 2ft 3 + ft 

8 63 33% 33ft 33% + ft 
72 26% 26% 26ft— ft 

389 9ft » 9 

5 191 20ft 20% 20% 

9 36 36% 36% 36% + % 

1220 18ft 18% 18% — ft 

9 1186 35ft 35 35 — % 

11 118 46% 66 66 

10 1 34 60 % 59% 59% — ft 

32 124 Z7 26% 26%— ft 

21 BS7 lift 10% 11 + % 

17 337 11% lift lift— ft 

170 13ft 13 13 +% 

20 1279 47% 41% 41*4—1 

63 273 7% 7ft 7ft 

7 2729 64% 64V* 64% — ft 

16 206 13ft 13% 13ft + ft 

19 270 aft Z7% 28ft + ft 

11 37 17ft 17 17 

10 523 19ft 19*4 19% + % 

11 407 27% 27ft 27ft— % 

11 830 28ft 27% 38% + ft 

10 272 22 21ft 21% . 

4 62 16% 15% 15*4—1 

41 lift 11% lift— ft 


D*V- YM. PE 


sts. - dose 

100» High Lew OuecOito 


14 

45% 

34% 

51ft 

71% 

6% 

89 

21 % 

19% 

6% 

99 

11 % 

56% 

110% 

49ft 

lift 

7% 


22 

48ft 

17% 

22% 

39% 

lift 

66ft 

40ft 


10 SlkVCef 

38 * StoneW 

to Starnc 

MU.Slw.ShP 
16ft StOTEQ 
I- vIStorT 

39 ML Merer 

17 StrtMfn 
14ft StrtdRt 
3%f5uav9t 
28% SunCh 
<*feSunE1 
43% 5unCo 
90% SunCnf 

40 Sundsrr 
5ft SunMn 
7 SunMPf 

31 - SunTrst 
14ft SuaVare 

16ft Svtaran 
30% Syhmpf 
10% SymsCp 
45%fVmt*x 
30% Svsco 


1X0 13 
W U 
M 13 

bB » 


40 S 
He IS 
X iS 


2X5 21 
1X0 4 2 


1.19 15J 
1X0 .35 


48 1.1 
48 35 
1X8 52 
240 7X 


152 25 
40 IX 


100:12% 
15 42ft 
107 26 

ft* 

212' 7 
574 oe 
36 18% 
195 17% 
71 4% 

09 34% 
49 0% 

369 51% 
5 106 
11 260 44% 

120 ift 
286 7ft 
10 3S1 34*4 
17 487 21 
13 ' 210 44ft 
20 2 13ft 

13 49» 21ft 

9 34% 

14 4 lift 

14 -2295 57ft 
17 195 40ft 


11 


12% 12ft 
42 42ft 
25% 25% 
34% 34% 

tSts 
88 % 88 % 
IB 1B% 
17ft 17ft 
4ft 4% 
34ft 34ft 
to* 9*4 
51% 51% 
106 106 
43% 43% 

6ft Bft 
7ft 7ft 
33% to 
204* 20*4 
.43% 43% 
13ft 13ft 
28ft 20% 
33V4 34% 
11 lift 
66% 67% 
39% 39% 


— % 
+ ft 
— Vt 


+ % 


- % 

— ft 

— % 
+ ft 


— 1% 
— 1 


+ ft 
— U 
+ % 


—ift 
— % 
+ u 
+ ft 


ixn 

52 _ 
1X2 84 
1X8 108 


45 9 


74U 40ft SCM 2X0 2X 17 
12% 9** SLInd 22b 15 ID 

32% 19ft SPSTec X0 =4 15 

19 15 Sabine X4 X 36 

21% 16 SobriRy UlettX 

70% 12% StodBf X0 IX 16 

12% 5% StodSc 36 

2ft IU StodSwt 
38% 23V, So Kin 6 40 IX 22 

34ft 25% Safewy _ 

35 20% Saga 

23 17ft StJoLP 

11% 9% SPOUI 

8ft 3ft vISalant 
35% 24ft SollleM 
28ft 20ft SDteGs 
9% 6% SJucnB 

44 31 Sandr 

25ft .80 SAjilfRt 1.96 

35ft 23ft SFeSaP 1X0 LI 14 1810 33% 32U 32ft— ft 
46% 31% Sara Lee 144 3X 13 8066 46ft 45% 45ft + % 

S*<n 50% SarnL pf 3L91e 7X 1 51 51 51 

3Sft 29ft Sgtwel 1.40 4.1 IS 3 34% 34% 34% 

19ft 15% Soul PE XO 1.1 48 7 18% 18% 10% + % 

22U 17% SavElP 1-60 11 7 57 20 19ft 19ft 


613 72% 77% 77ft— ft 
19 17U lift 17 + % 

76 31ft 30ft 30%— V* 
1 15ft 15ft 15ft 
99 17% 17ft 17ft + % 
15? 17ft 17% 17% — V* 
88 9% 9 9% + % 

10 2 2 2 

134 34% 33ft 33% — 1% 
3652 35% 34 34% + U 

23 12 1068 23 22 23 +1 

7 4 20% 20% 2D% + % 

45 10ft 10 10 

66 6% 6% 6% 

897 33ft 32% 32ft- ft 
1140 26 25% 25% 

264 Bft 8% Bft + W 

299 34% 33% 34 -ft 
50 =4% 24% 24% 


.16 5 14 
2X4 IX 9 
AOelOA 10 
M IX 18 
73 13 


.12 

.761 


xoe 15 io 


42 IX 9 


5 Savin 

13% 8ft Savin of 1.121 
28% 21% SCAN A 216 
52% 34ft SchrPlo 148 
4Sft 33% Schlinb 1X0 
14ft 8 SclAtl 
33 23ft Scot Ind 
61% 53 ScotFet 
44% 29ft ScattP 
16ft 12% Sen ttys 
" 24ft Sea CM ._ _ 
13 10ft SeaCtpf 146 1)5 
16ft 13ft SeaCpfBLIO 13X 
16ft 13ft SeoCpfCLIO 13X 
27% 17ft SeoLnd 48 25 
5% 3% Sec Co 
44ft 35ft Seogrm 
71% 15% Seooul 

S U 22% SealAIr 
ft 22ft SealPw 
39% 30 Sears 
31ft 34ft SecPocs 1X4 
40ft 36ft SvcCpS AS 
16% lift ShaXlee 
26ft 16 shawm 
40% 29% SheirT 
30% 21 ShelGio 
40 25% SHrwtn 

::: s% shoehwi 

15% 12 Sheetot 

r MBS?* , _ 

33ft 20% sinorpf 350 105 

» 1— - - — 


87 8 

34 14 

35 • 
IX 17 

13 


189 5ft 5% 5U— % 

76 8ft Oft 8% — U 

97 25% 24ft 24ft— V* 
844 49*4 49ft 49% — % 
6195 34ft 33ft 33ft— 1% 
420 12% lift 12 + ft 

BOO 32% 37ft 32% + % 
29 56% 56 56 

1X4 29 10 1911 43ft 43ft 43% 

52 42 M 2(5 12ft 12ft 12% — ft 
* * 75 34 33ft 33ft — % 

1 12 % 12 % 12 %— % 

6 15ft 15ft 15ft— ft 

69 16 15ft 15ft— % 
1465 19% 18ft 19% 

486 4% 4% 4%— % 

m 41% 41 41% - % 


1X0 

1X6 


1.9 13 
20 
1J 19 
4.1 7 


5X 9 


50 2X 
245-6, 

.92 



197 18ft 17% 
73 34% 33ft 

» i5 « 4^ 3K 

5.1 22 166 14% 14% 

7 14 21ft 21% 

8 1815 40% — 

6 22S 26 

R ifii r- 

4X 13 302 13ft 
9X 9 113 17ft 

IX 8 344 35ft 
9 33 


li 


hvllne 4B 3J 73 101 13% 13 

lottery AOe 15 18 2 24% 24% 

mlttiin X2 4X 501 7ft 7ft 



32ft 22ft SooUn 


B 2X0 4X 11 
Itnudtr 1X0 15 19 

1.16 L3 12 1, 
Snyder 2X0 114 15 f 
M U 8 11 
-I5e 3 14 35 






38 24 


40% 33% Source 3X0 86 
23% 18ft SreCppf 240 187 


30% 24% SoJerln 243 9X 12 _ 

49% 38% Soudwn IXOa ZX 11 430 46% 



24ft SoetBk 1X0 3J 10 1373 32% 30ft 32% +Tft 


X4b JX 
.13 5 


1X4 

600 

52 

1X0 

52 


7X 

7X 


9% 6% SoefPS 2131 334 
27ft 21% SCal Ed 216 VX 
21% 17% SoufhCo 204 103 

26ft 20% SclnGsslXO 75 

31ft SNET1 2X2 7X 
39% 32% SoNEpf 3X2 1CX 
31 24% SoUnCo 1X2 66 

39% 24ft Sartlnd 1X0 26 
54% 49% Souttd Pf 4X0 74 
16ft 11% SoRoy .12 3 

Oft 5ft Sovmrit 
31 17% SwAIrt 

17ft 11% SwtFar 
18% 12 SwtGas 
88% 43ft SwBefl 
29 19ft SwEnr 
ZSft 20 SwtPS 
17ft 11% Spartan 
27ft 15% SoectP 
59 35ft Sperry 
38% 30ft Springs 
43ft 35*1i SwiarO 
77ft 46 Squibb 
23ft 17*6 Staley 
23ft 17ft SIBPnt 
18% 10% StMotr 

50ft 39ft StdOOh 

74 71ft SOOhPf 3X5 
23ft 10 StPocCs 40 
16*4 12% Stondex 52 
31ft 23ft StanWk ‘ 

37% 26ft Stamm 
11% 9ft SfaMSe 
3ft 2% Sleego 
20% 15ft Sterdd 
1316 9ft StrlBcp 
37ft 26% SterlDg 
26 15ft StovnJ 


LI 10 
7X 9 
34384 


1X4 

1X6 

50 

56 

X2 

2X0 


16 6% 6ft 6% 

7 3112 24% 23ft 24 

6 5346 19ft 19% 19ft + % 

1 1A lfll Bh li + V* 

io 205 38 37ft 37ft + W 

1 38% 30% 38% — ft 

49 26ft 24% 26% — % 

M 2750 39% 38% 38% + % 
1X0 54ft 54% 54% 

14 722 13% 13% 13ft 

5 1174 8% 0 8 + % 

16 915 24% 24 34% + % 

475 12ft 12% 12% — % 

8 184 18 17% 17ft— %• 

‘ 1089 77% 76ft 76ft— ft 

75 29 24ft 25 — % 
209 24 23ft 24 
7 15% 15% 15ft + % 
156 21 20% =0%— ft 

2806 48ft <7% 47% — 1% 
77 36% 35 35 —1% 

442 36% 36 36ft + ft 
727 70ft 70% 70%— ft 
200 21ft 21 21ft + ft 
165 20% 19ft 20 + % 

64 1116 11% 11% 

3672 47% 47 47% + % 

60: 71ft 71ft 71ft 
176 16ft 16% 16ft + % 
T7 13ft 13ft 13% 

5B7 29ft 28ft 29 — % 
11 37% J7% 37% 

7 10% 10% 10%— % 
10 3 2ft 3 

36 19% 19ft 19ft— % 
74 lift lift lift— % 
35 14 6223 34ft 33ft 3f%— ft 
4 3 903 25% 24% 24ft— ft 


50% 3 Oft 
36ft 27% 
12ft 7ft 
21ft 12ft 
369* 18% 
13% 66 
171% 151 
6% 1% 
87% 52% 
21 % 12 % 
23% 15 
81 56ft 
36 23% 

15*4 13ft 
68% 47ft 
5% 2% 

278ft 227 
34 12ft 
48% 30ft 
40ft 31V* 
45% 33% 
104% 94 
84ft 72 
32ft 17% 

15 Bft 
=7% 20ft 
40% 32ft 
37ft 2B% 
44ft 27ft 
39 26ft 
58% 52 
34ft 25 

133% B6U 
4ft 1 
21ft 14% 

35% 28ft 

31ft 25V* 

4ft 2 

59% 31 
65 34 

11% 5ft 
23 10 

43% 30% 
l»ft 15 
18ft 13% 

22ft 18V* 

to i3ft 
10% 5ft 
61ft 40 
23% 14ft 
58% 36*6 
57ft 45% 
9U 4ft 
lift Bft 
39ft 26ft 
21% 15ft 
21% 16ft 
29ft 24ft 
30% 14% 
28 23ft 
33ft 37ft 
20ft 15*6 
10ft 15ft 
30 Bft 
53ft 26 
26ft 14% 
18 10ft 
5 1 

17% 7% 

10% 4ft 
41% 25% 
29% 17 
23 (ft 

16 13 
34Vi 18% 

32ft 24ft 

71ft 17% 

14 11% 

71% 17% 
57*6 44 
66% S3 
25ft 19% 
13% 5ft 
102 82 
TSft 22 
13ft 8% 
47% 29% 

41% 28% 

23ft 12% 
34ft 26ft 
17ft 15ft 
49% 34% 

30 Zlft 
21% 7ft 
34ft 23 
49% 29% 
6ft 4 
8 5ft 
18ft 12% 
29to 14ft 

17 9ft 
43ft 31ft 
16% 9ft 
20% 16 

X 
13ft 


X7e X 
2X6 7S 


TDK 
TECO 
TGIF 
TNP 1X5 tx 
TRE 1X0.34 
TRW. 3X0 17 
TRW pf 440 25 
vlTocBI 

TaftSrd Lit 14 
Talley .15g X 
Talley pt 1X0.45 
Tombed 130 15 
Tandy 
Tnarcfi 

Tektnrx 1X0 2X 
Telcetn 

rSlroto A2 ZX 
Telex 

Tetri pin M IX 
Tenneo 2X2 7 J 
Tencnr 11X0 10X 
Tenepr 740 8X 
Terdvn 

Tesaro A0 LB 
Tesorpf L16 9X 
Texaco 3X0 73 
TxABC 1X2 SJ 
Tex Cm 156 15 
Tex Eat L28 6J 
TxET pf 6X4-186 
Taxied job 26 
Texlrst 2X0 LI 
Texint 

Tex DCs .18 IX 
TxPoc 40 TA 
Tex Util 252 94 
Ttxfl in 

Textron 1X0 LB 
Textrpf 2X1 4.1 
Thoc* 

TtirmEs 
ThmBet 136 LI 
Thomln 58b LB 
ThmMed 40 V 
Thrifty 50 3.1 
Tldwtr 30 58 
Tiger In 

Time ixo 1 J 
Timplx 

TlmeM 1J6 28 
Timken IXOa 4X 
.THon 

Tttonpf 1X0 10X 
TodShP 1X2 -44 
Tokhms 48 27 
ToiEdls 252 128 
To/Ed Pt 372 1L1 
ToiEOPf 3J75 12.9 
TofEdpf 347 13X 
Tot Ed Pt 4X8 13X 
Tot Ed pf 2X6 12A 
TolEd pf 2X1 125 
Tankas .10 A 
ToolRoJ 48b TX 
Trehms 50 25 
ToroCo 40 22 
Tosco 
Towle 

Towle pf 44 9X 
ToyRUs 

Trocrs X2 17 
TWA 

TWA Pf 2X5 144 
TWA PtB 2X5 6.7 
Tronsm 148 19 
Tran Inc 2X2 10X 
TARfty 1X0 83 
TmCdanl.12 63 
Tronsco LI 6b 44 


+1 

J+ % 

i— % 

h— % 


+ % 
+ % 
+ ft 
— 1 


7 545 
9 1664 


116 57% 57 
II 66 80% 30 


— % 
+ % 
— % 
+3ft 
+ % 
— % 
+ % 

— Ur 
+ ft 
+1 
+ ft 

— ft 

— ft 
+ % 

— ft 

— ft 
+1% 


+ % 
.— ft 


55 39 38ft 39 

9 535 31ft 31ft 31ft 

11 23 7ft 7ft 7ft 

9 23 13% 18% 18ft 

28 775 28** 27 Z7ft 

II 1323 81% 00% SO** 

I 175 175 175 

28 lft lft lft 

16 370 80% W*i 60% 

14 859 18% IB 18% 

36 20% =0% 20% 

14 429 80 79 79 

17 6075 35ft 34% 35 

14 48 14*6 14% 14ft 

13 1522 51% 50% 50*6 

8 II 2ft Z% 2ft 

9 383 244 237ft 241 

19 4SB 13ft 13% 13ft 

11 826 44ft 44ft 44ft 

10 115 36% 36 36% 

13 1374 38% 37ft 37% 

12 103ft 103 Vi HOft 
46 B3ft 83% 83% 

11 1103 30 19ft 19ft 
513 11 TO** 10ft 

50 22% 22 =2% 

34 3115 3Sft 38 38% 

9 33 28ft 2Zft 2Sft 

_ * 28 279* =7ft 

36 34ft 36 
57ft 

„ 30% 

13 1194 96 93% 94% 

526 3ft 3** 3ft 
1218434 18ft 17ft IB 
16 15 29% 29% 29% 

6 1575 27% 26% toft 
2ft 7ft 2ft 
47% 46% <7** 

51 51 51 

9ft 9% 9% 

25 179 20ft 20% 20ft 

16 237 3Sft 35% 3S% 

10 25 18% 18 15% 

12 569 IS 14ft 14% 

12 440 19% 19 19** 

505 15% 15% 15% 

833 Bft 7ft 8 

17 1050 57ft 56ft 57% 

18 397 19ft 19ft 19ft 

- — 48ft 48% 48ft 

46** 65% 45% 

7% 6ft 7% 

10 10 10 
30% 30 30% 

18 17ft 18 
20 1 9ft 19ft— % 

28ft 28% 28% + ft 
16 29% 28ft 29 + ft 

13 26ft 26ft 26ft 

3 32ft 32ft 32ft 
7 19 18% 19 

3 17ft 17ft m* 

68 26ft 25 25% 

~ 50ft 48ft 50 
~ 23 

.. .. 18ft 

3ft 3ft ~ 

7ft 7ft 7ft 
4ft 4ft 4ft 
35 33ft 34% 

15% 18ft 18% 


10 


93 


267 

941 

2 

9 


+ % 
+ % 
V— ft 
1— % 
+ ft 


+ ft 

— ft 

— ft 


161 
21 86 
301 
3 

7 0 

11 55 

S 379 
33 


i— ft 
— ft 
ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 

i— ft 

+ ft 


+ % 


II 3157 23% 23 
11 186 18% 18 


60S 
26 
2 

26 5850 
12 321 


+ ft 
+ % 
% 
+lft 
— ft 
+ ft 
. + ft 

i— % 


Tmecpf 187 64 
TranEx 


2X6 114 

Traneai 

TrGpt 10X2 104 
TrGP pt 230 ICO 
Trrtson 

Tronwy 1X0 4X 
Trmiw 48 IX 
TwtdwtA 
Twtdpf 2X0 6.1 
Twldpf 150 1 0-7 


Trovler 2X4 48 


Trovpf Alt 
Tricon lAteT3X 
TrtCnpf 250 95 
Triatns 


2101 22ft 23% 22% 

B3 15% 15ft 15% 

65 33% 33% 33% 

15 1144 2B% 28ft 21% 

24 21ft 21% 21ft 

56 4 12ft 12 12 

7 29 17ft T7ft 17ft 

10 US 49 48 48ft 

287 5Bft 57% 50ft 

431 20ft 20% 20% 

6 173 7ft 6ft Tft 
110:99% 99% 99% 
3 25 25 25 

12 8 10ft 10ft 10ft 

13 1107 45ft 44% 44% 

12 1630 37ft 37ft 37ft 

25 20% 30 20% 

1 33 33 33 

2 17ft 17ft 17ft 


+ ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 
+ ft 


+ ft 
+ % 


10 3741 
217 


17*4 


TiitEPf 1.10 6X 
TuaEP 3X0 78 
TulltX 48 33 
TwtaDs .W) *3 
Tyco Lb JO LI 
TV tors 40 28 



57ft 39ft 
36ft 27ft 


UAL 
UAL pf 


1X0 

240 


a™ 


772 50ft 49ft 49ft 
257 31ft Jlft 31ft 


+2 


12 Moran 
HtohLcx Sto* 


Dlv. YM. 


PE Mm mrai Law a5ftChtoe 


17ft 

38 

toft 

iiu 

14 

30% 

44ft 

19ft 

63 

110 % 

41* 

57% 

tft 

19*6 


4A 


22D 

148 44 

xo-u 

2.128 14 
Z72e 25 

s* s| 


40ft 
59ft 
to % 


72 


32 

20ft 

36ft 

72 

24 

52*6 

115ft 

70 

5*6 

23% 

11 

33ft 

4Zft 

toft 

»% 


te 


31% 

Uft 

25 

43ft 

35 

17ft 

31* 

38ft 

Bft 

40% 

33 

56** 

33 

39ft 

M% 

13 

45 

39*6 

25 

31 

21 

32ft 

20ft 


23% 

S3 

122ft 

43 

34% 

Wft 


10ft UCCEL 
2» UDCfl .158 X 

18ft UGi 204 94 
>% UNCftes 
10% URS 40 16 
aft USFG 
26% USG8 
12% UnlFrst 
48 Uniivr 
82ft UnINV 
33% UCamp _ . 

32% UnCerb 340 
4% unlravC 
13% UnEiec 1X4 97 
27 UnElpf 4X0 UX 
30 UnEI af HU 12X 
43ft UnElpf 640 llj 
26*6 UnEI pfMUn 1L0 
9Dft UElPfL axo 120 
20% unEi pf LM 4 

15 UnBief 113 UX 
21% UnElpf 272 104 
52ft UEIOfK 8X0 124 
73 UnExpn 

37ft UnPoc 1X0 37 
87*6 UnPcpf 7-25 67 
SO UnrylPt 0X0 12.1 
3 Unitor 
Wft UnBcnd 
9% UBrdpf 
17ft UCbTVS .10 J 
22% UnEftTB 248 SX 
13% U Ilium 2X0 84 
23% UIUUP1 3.97 14.1 
13% Ulllupr 2X0 11.9 
aftuuiupf 4xo us 
lift Ulliupf 1.90 116 
15% Unihnd 40 2 £ 
35% Unitlnn 22 X 
20% UJerB * 1.16 34 
lift UtdMM -■ 

2 UPkMn 
27 UsotrG 
5ft USHom 

24% usstioe __ _ 

22*6 USSteet 1X0 33 
49*6 USStlPf 6X4*1 IX 
24% uesttpf 225 7X 
29ft USTob 1X2 55 
64ft USWest 572 75 
6H UnStck - 
34 UnTeeh T40 
31% UTchpf 2J5 
20ft UnTTel 1.92 
25 UniT2pf 150 
15*4 UWR 1X8 
!?% Unttrde ' 

16 Untvor 
21*6 UnivFd 
18ft UnLeof 
=6% Unocal 
53% Upfohn 
30 USD FE 1X4 
38% USLF Pf L33 


.12 


72 24 


3A 
7X 
8X 
57 
7.1 
X0 1.1 

xa tx 

L12 43 
1X0 47 
IXOb 43 
2X0 23 
23 
93 


27% 

28ft 

23% 

27 

24*6 

3Sft 


9 UstfeFd lX8aT07 
21 LttaPL 232 95 
22*6 UtPLOt 2X0 10X 
23% UtPLpf L90 IDS 
19- UtPLpf 236 104 
17ft UtlllCo lAOb 65 
20% Uti(CoprL61 11.1 
30% Utncspf A12 1L0 


17 114 15-5 T3» 15ft- 

!7 48 Z4*8 24 ~ “ 

1 60 ZUb Zlft 2«»— « 

I. S KintlS-;; 

* ™ 29^ 37ft 38ft- 2 

l 5 I g* 8* Pf* 

T4 4776 57% Sfkk 

g »=A 

^ juiRssk-* 

2 26% 26ft 26ft 
Ite 64ft 64ft 64ft + ft 
90 23% 231* 23% 

12 2092 49% <8% 4S*»— % 

419 no 108% 100*6— % 

17 °f 1ft 1ft 3ft 

$ % » 3% 

- >2 §s* sa B-,* 

37 3 Oh *Lft— g 

11 1398 34ft 33% 34ft + *6 

S 16ft 15*6 16% + % 

6 9M 29% to** toft — % 
14 *210 39% 3^ 39 — ft 

59 ^ £$9£& =JS 

10 311* ^ + ^ 

8 1624 76% 75% 75% 

12 58 7** 7ft 7ft — ft 

0 12896 40% 38ft *££ +lft 

1006 36 34 35ft +1 

9 1332 21** 21% 21*6 + ft 
2 26% 26ft 26% + ft 

n 18 17% 18 

*28 19ft in* 18% — % 
52 20% W* 

31 26 259* 26 + ft 

61 21% 21% 27%- J* 
2278 28ft 28ft =8ft— ft 
17S5 1£ftim?iaW + % 
602 38ft 37U 38% + % 
J Kft 33ft 33ft + ft 
a 10% 10ft 10ft 
475 24% 24ft 24% + % 
13 Z5% =5% 25% + ft 
79 26% 26ft 26ft— U 
2 22% 22% 22*4 + % 
49 21% 7V/2 Zlft + ft 
7 23% ZSft 23ft— ft 
a 34ft toft toft + % 


45ft 

14*6 

2S% 

3ft 

2816 

4*6 

12% 

42% 

13*6 

25% 

12 

11% 

13% 

59 

91*6 

27ft 

56*6 

85 


22% VFGorp 
5ft Valero 
14 Valerp! 
2% votavfn 
19 VanDm 
2V> Vorco 
6% Vorco of 
22ft Vorian 
9*t Voro 
13 Veeco 
3% Veodo 
9% Vests* 
13 Veslm n 
79*6 Viacom 
73 VoEPpf 
13ft Vhhay s 
33ft Vornad 
66ft VidaiM 


1XB 28 11 
344 14X 
U» 4J 7 


X6 1.1 IS 
A0 13 34 
40 27 ^ 

1X00107 


48 X Z7 
975 UX 

25 

L80 34 13 


1960 47*6 
607 10ft 
17 24 
40 2ft 
39 23% 
. 62 4% 

14 12% 
595 23*6 
60 17% 
148 15% 
97 10V: 
217 11% 
5256 13ft 
5887 60ft 
450: 87 
93 27% 
64 55*6 
57 83*4 


45ft 46 + ft 

10% 10%— ft 
23% to + % 
2% 2ft 
23% 23ft— % 
4% 4% 

12% 12% + % 
23ft 23ft— % 
12 % 12 % 

14ft 14*4— % 
10% 10ft— ft 
lift lift 
13 13ft + ft 
57% 59*6 +1% 
87 07 —1*4 

27 27 + % 

55 55ft +>A 
83% 83ft + % 


W 


toft 


2Sft 

10*6 

20% 

30% 


39% 

39% 

52 

26ft 

35ft 

46ft 

23ft 

28% 

toft 

66ft 


12ft 

26 

12ft 

23ft 

20ft 

35% 

62% 

29% 

19ft 

27% 

43 

9% 

3 

26ft 

Bft 

51 

20 

8% 

14*6 

47 

17*6 

39% 

41*4 

34 


Sift 

22 

38 


25ft WICOR 243 85 
25ft Wochnv 1X0 3.1 
Mft Wbcfcht X0 24 
6ft Wairoc 
18ft WIMrts 
19 Walom s X0 IX 
17ft WkHRsglAO 
39 Wales* 45 U 
77 WaJUm 140 4X 
36 WaltJpt 1X0 34 
17*4 Women X8 37 
19ft WroCm 
31 WOntrL 148 4.1 
17ft VtfusiiGs 1X6 84 
20% WjhNat 1X8 4J 
17ft WshWT LAS 114 
40ft Waste 37 IX 
20% WatkJn X6 IX 
Bft WavGas X0 L3 
19ft WovG pf 1X0 77 
3ft WeonU 
16ft WebbO JO U 
19 WelnRn2OX0tO3X 
22 WefeMs X0 14 
43 Wells F 240 43 
23ft WeSFW. HO UX 
12 Wendv* XI IX 
17 WcstCa 40 17 
35 wstPtP 2X0 5X 
3% WhAlrL 
ft WtAirwt 
10*6 W Air of 2X0 77 
2ft WCNA 

23ft WCNApf7XS 322 
5*4 WUnVan . 

2% WnU PfS 
Aft WnU pfE 
2) WUTIot 
5ft WUTIpiA 
to WstSE 1X0 3X 
toft Wastvc 1X2 3X 
26 Weycrft 130 49 
36ft Weyrpf 2X0 73 
44% wevrpr 4X0 »x 
6ft vfWhPIt 
14ft VfWPlf pfB 


9 S 28ft 
• 979 32% 
98 25ft 
6B 7ft 
2758 27ft 
17 2266 26ft 
188 22% 
17 «H 36ft 
7 1614 3Sft 
6 46ft 
13 40 23ft 

13801 36ft 

12 2465 36ft 
S 67 20 

7 99 24ft 

8 3to Zlft 

19 1661 41ft 

11 273 34ft 

9 16 8ft 

1 20ft 
39 5ft 

9 215 IB 

4 19ft 

20 42 35*4 

7 367 55% 

10 50 34ft 

16 2889 16ft 

13 Til 25% 

14 213 37% 
517654 9% 

IZ78 3% 
163 26ft 
1646 2% 
- . 14 23ft 
. 383 lift 
138 6ft 
. 77 11%. 
1 35 
52 12*4 

12 12985 40% 
9 SB 36% 

22 1022 27ft 
166 30ft 
0 0 
36 9 
200:20ft 


28ft 28ft— % 
toft 32% + ft 
24ft 25ft + ft 
6ft 6% — ft 
26ft 27 — ft 
24ft 26 +lft 
22ft 22ft— ft 
25 toft +lft 
34ft 3/ft + % 
46ft 46ft + ft 
23% 23*4— ft 
34% 35*4 +1% 
36ft 36% — ft 
19ft 19*4— ft 
24ft 24% + ft 
Zlft Zlft'+ ft 
60ft 61 - + ft 
24ft 24ft + ft 

Bft a% 

20% 20ft 
5% Sft .. 
17ft 17ft + % 
19% 19ft + ft 
35% Bft + % 
55 55ft +1 
24% 24%— ft 
15ft 16ft +1 
25ft toft . 
3JU 39ft + ft 
8% 5ft— % 

2*4 r 

25ft to -T- ft 
2 2ft— ft 
22ft 27ft— Tft 
11 11 — % 
6ft . 6% 


10ft. !fft— ft 


35 35 + 

12% T2U 
39ft 39*4 
36% 36% — ft 
26ft toft— ft 
38% 35ft— ft 
4#ft 4* + ft 

jft Jt 

20*6 70ft— % 


K 


ente nazionaleper 
L’ENERGIA elettrica 
$US 400.000.600 

floating rate 

DEBENTURES DGE 1987 



For the six moa&s, October 9,' 1985 
to April 8, 1986. the rale of interest 
been fixed at 8 5/8 % P.A. r 


The interest due on Aprfl 9,- 1986 
against coupon nr 12 will be 
5US 218,02 and bus been^ computed 
oa the actual number of days elapsed 
(182) divkted by 360., 


THE PRINCIPAL : : 
PAYING AGENT 
SOCIETEGENERALE 
ALSACIENNE . 
DEBANQUE 
IS, Avenne Etnile Reuter 
LUXEMBOURG . 


iZMomti 
High Law 


"Sh. . date 

p*v. YM. PE ah MW) Low Bui. OTo« 


»ft 

50*6 


34*« 

toft 


®5ft 

Tft 

38ft 

20ft 

8*6 

8% 

40ft 

92ft 

SOft 

40ft 

39% 

40ft 

14 

50ft 

71% 

4% 

84*4 

4*6 

2 ft 


.10 


3X 

W 

■3. 5 


10ft viWtlPtt Pf 
40ft WWriPl 2X0 U 9 
25ft WWtC . 1X0 4J • 
34*6 WMECPfOOO M 
19% WhBWH 10 

ISft Wbltrok XO 28 11 
6ft WMM 
8 WMrcd 

7ft WlltarG . . . 

7S' u YtiiUom - 1A8 £5 U 
2 WfimEl 
Sft WHshrO -.TO- IX 
30 VWnDlx 174 5X13 
Bft Wtantw 3D 11 I 
5ft Winner 200 

3*4 winter J 

30% WtacEP -LA ■ Aft- 8 
72*6 WhEpf *90 9jk 
63% Wls£of 775 .VX 
28% WttcPL 276:77 9 
29% WttcPS 284 7J * 
30ft Wlhta . 7X8. At 9 
9ft WotvrW ■ 24 - IS 
34% Wolwth 2XQ 4X n 
50 Wohvpf 230 XT 
2*6 WUdAr 
54*6 Wrigfy. 

Zft WuHtzr 
10*6 WvleLb 
15% Wynns 


LB0O22 14 


23 73 to 

J0 U 8 


20: U 
4048 43% 
1766 31% 
1 39*6 
IK 34ft 
68 21*6 
759 17% 
91 .11% 

. 13 11*6 
$747 32ft 
M» 3*4 
23 6% 

84 J4% 
496 946 

S I ft 
7% 

. 205 36% 
20: 92% 
902 SI 
XI 36*6 
.21 30k 
<71 36 
120 12% 
194# 50% 
1 77*4 
28 3% 
to 80ft 
122 3% 
• 52 lift 
11 .18% 


16 16 . 

43 43%— ft 

«SS-.^ 

ftkSttt 

1»T7% + ft 
11% 11% 

11% Tl*4 . 
30% 31% + % 
3% 3% . ■ 

6 - 6% + ft 

£4- ft 
6% 7ft + % 
JMWA + ft 
97ft 72ft— 1 
SI B1 + ft 
36 36 

36*6 34% 

05 .36 +% 
12% 12% +-% 
50% 50*6+ ft 
71*4.71% + » 
3% Sft— ft 
79*6 IOft + % 


£ 


3%. '3*6 + ft 
10ft lift 


18*4 m+'ft 


55% 

29 


35*6 Xerox LOB A1 13 
47ft XmwcpfXXS 9J9” 
19% XTRA X4 28 12 


-■ 14 2316 


48% 49ft 
55 55 +>6 

23 23ft + ft 


30ft- 2«%2a%Cp 
18*6 7*6 ZaPOfS 
57*6 32*6 Zavr»3 
27 16ft ZmWiE 
21ft 15ft Zero* 
37*4 23*6 ZumtfT 


1X2 47 18 
72 1J 58 
AS 


23 IX . 
1X2 LB 13 


23 SB 27ft 38 
«C 8ft 8 4ft 
' 34ft 55ft- lb 
17*4 16% 17% + ft 
^ 19% 19% W%- ft 
2» 35% 34 35 +ft 


** a & 

X to 13 1? 


i N\SE 


MEW HIGHS 73 


Am Baker 

AhRkhfSd 

BkB«fOtflpf 

saltBgrtdc 

Chubb eA 

Oonakboa 

Gaploc 

Haridncp 

IndtM 27Spf 

OhP^Wtof 

PrlawMafs 

SvceGp* 

srorrott - 

VFCorp 

WstAlrlwt 

WOoiwfhpf 


AmFainDYS 

At1Rb380pt 

BrohlcB . 

CPC Inti 

□arm Co 

□avroevSL 

Guttanlnd . 

ITTCppU 

lnle)og)c«M 

KwtMobm 

UmcS(bt53 

NatEdoc 

ParicarPan 

Rubermdj' 


Syntax 

VUtrenir 

WestghEI 


Amman 

AVEBACO 

BaatC330pf 

ChcrabgP 

Colon Penn 

Dnryfus - 

HBtiCrPrit 

fTTCPnfK 

intMOintd 

KeystCoft 

MaoicOwf 

NalGrasums 

PetmlpfB 

Xofoway. . 

Smudwrs 

TRE Coro ' 

Vhxwn 

WIsEf77SPf 


ArkansBat 

Avon Prod 

BiOCkHRs 

Cbryslgr 

CornsGI t 

FgrroCP 

HwnooCmB 

ITTCppH 

JahnCnpf 

KbnbCiark ' 

Morton 

NwOlPiD*«fl 

PlnnRgsrch 

SardLgg 

SouttUndpf . 

ToroCo • .- | 

WamrCom ■ 
Woohwrth 


arson Ri^tu 
iKtfluce In 


■EW LOWS 19 


AHRB Inc ‘ 
Croce Co - 
NarthaatoB 
Rym*rpf 
Unffrodo - 


BocorWstn QaroTodi vIEvunPdof 

IntarotSKO LeorPrtcvp Mbslonlnt 

PuHcHRW PyroLnaY Ravallntl 

Savin 15ft»f SCOttYSlnc TGI Frf 

wstCoNA WWCdNApf 


Fkmting-Raie Notes 


Ocs 17 


Dollar 


1X2 XX 8 
132 4X 20 
5.1 12 
23 18 
37 73 

g ■ 

li iS 

1X4 3X 11 
1X8 19 11 
ixoaUA 
.n *m 
76 L9 10 
76 45 9 
1X0 
1X0 


33*6 25% StwWm 1X8 S7 19 30 29*4 29*6 2%6 + % 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Oct. 17, 1985 


Not asset value quotations are Emptied by the Fends listed with the exce pt io n of some quotes based an Issue price. 

The marginal symbols Indicate frequency of quotations sapplied.-(d> -daily; <w) -weekly; (h)-bMnontbly; tr) -remtarty; Cl -Irregularly. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
-<w) A 1-Mo l Trust. LA- 


BANK JULIUS BAER A CO. Ltd. 


S 174.17 


-< d } Baerbond- 

-C a 1 Confxjr. 


-I d 1 Eaulboer America- 


-t d I Eaulboer Europe. 
-I a I Eaulboer Pacinc- 
-I d > Grooar. 


■tdl Stockbar. 


BNP INTERFUNDS 

-I w) Inlerbond Fund 

-Iw) later currency USS. 


SF 899X0 
SF 1232X0 
. S 1144X00 
SF 1303X00 
SF 121100 
. SF 992X0 
SF 1S7QX0 


-iwl Intercurrency DM. 


. S 125A8 
. S 10.10 
DM 3038 
. r 10.14 
S 11X1 
S 10X0 


-iwl Intarcurrencv Sterling 

-Iw) Interequltv Pacific Offer 

-|w) intereaulfy N. Amer. Offer 

BANQUE INDOSUEZ 

-( d ) Aslan Growth Fund S | mu 

-Iwl Diveroond— sf B 6.10 

-lw> FIF-Amerleu 5 1495 

-Iw) FIF-6unadO— S 14X3 

■iu.1 FIF-FocHW S 19 AS 

-Id) Indasuez Mulflbonds A S 10465 

-la) Indosue: Mumnonde B S 177J0 

-Id) rndosuez USD (MJM.F) S 1033X9 


BRITANNI APOB v\. St. Hdicr, Jersey 
Iwl Brlt.DnUnr Income s 

I w V Bril A fAonog.Curr 5 


d ) Bril. Infix Managjwrtf- 
d I Brit. Inllj Wunag.Porrt. 
w) Bril. Am. inc A Fd Ltd- 
Awl Brlt.Gola Fund. 


iw) Brt»jnanap.Currency____ 

-1 d 1 Bril. Japan Dir Pert. Fa 

-<wl Brit Jersey Gilt Fund 

-I d I Brit. Work) Leis. Fund- 

-I d ) Brit. World Techn. Fund.^ 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
-Iwl Capital Infl Fund - 
-I w I Capital If alio SA_ 


10X8 

1.119 

1144 

1.103 

0735* 

14X9* 

1.154 

0X24 

1.163 

0714 


4U2 

17X5 


CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 

-l a l Acllans Sulises SF 429X0 

-(d) Bond Valor Swi ______ sp 108X0 

-( 0 1 Bond Valor D-mark DM iijm 

-I a I Bond Valor US-DOLLAR_ 5 1 23X0 

-Id) Bond Valor Yen-, Yen 11016X0 

-Id) Convert Valor Swt__- sf 121AO 
-id I Convert Vdkir US-DOLLAR. S 12430 
.f d 1 fnmnw . CC eAinn 

-( d J C3 Tands-Bonds SF 78X5 

-id ) CS Fonds-lnn. ... SP J14JS 

-tdl CS Money Mortal Fund 51094X0 

-I d ) CS Money Market Fund DM 1057X0 

-I d ) C5 Money Market Fund 1 1035X0 

■( d ) Energle-valor . .... SF 14L5Q 

-( d ) U*s*e SF 801X0 

■td) Europo-Valor SF 17XS0 

-( d I Pacific -Valor SF 16L2S 


DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
Winchester ho u » 77 Lond on wall 
LONDON ECS (01 92097971 

-(w) Flnsburv Group LM t 13456 

-(ml Winchester Diversified— — S 19X6 
-lm) Winchester Financial Ltd.— i 9x9 

-im) Winchester Frontier S 10020 

.(w> winchester Holdings. FF 10574 

h im 5 1L43 

.iw) vvorldwtse Securities s om 

-I w) Worldwide Special - — 4168463 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
-H a J Cdhcemro 


DM 


32A7 

09X1 


■SS) I^worta r^\Tr6 S730M "' 




TRADED £ ^^f,5 C ^D.14*Ofter ST0A8S* 

g 1* PS: p?fl * UX2 Otter *11.97* 

:!5l8aSB-»- SaSg =: . 
S!i5S?SS?iS3r— » s w 


S 2L09 


-Iw) F&C Atlantic. 


-iwl FAC European. 
■Iw) FAC Oriental. 


S 11X7 
S 14X0 
S 29X3 


FIDELITY POB 574 Hamilton Bermuda 
•<m) American Values Common.- * 9WS 
■iml Amer Values Cum-Pref— . * ito.17 
-I d 1 Fidelity Amer. Assets— 5 71.15 

-Id) FUlelltv Australia Fund S 11-93 

-1 d ) Fidelity Discnverv Fund S ,10A8 

-Id) Fidelity Dir. Svns.Tr S 

■Id) Fidelity For East Fund S 23AS 

Hd) Fidelity I nTL Fund — S 68X9 

-id) Fidelity Orient Fund S 3IA4 

.( d ) Fidelity Frontier Fund S 13X3 

-fdl FWeuty pacific Fund 51S2JS 

-Id) Fidelity SncL Growth Fd. S 1411 

fdl Fidelity World Fund S 3SX) 


FORBES PO B8S7 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Agent 01-839^013 

•Iw) Dollar Income S 7X0 

-I w) Forbes High >nc.GIKFd £ ^6 

-iw) GoM Income-.—— S &31 

-iw) GoM Appreciation s fto 

-Iml Strategic Trading — S 1X8 


GEFINOR FUNDS. 

-iw) East investment Fund. 
-IwlScattbh World Fund — 
(w) State St. American . 


London: 01 -471 4230. Geneva :4) -22355530 


S 384X6 
£ 119X2 
S 16406 


GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 
PB 119, SIT - ~ 


Peter Purl. Guernsey. 048+28715 

-Iw) FuturGAM&A 5 M77 

Iw) GAM ArtHtraBe Inc S 135.17 

Iw) GAMeriCO Inc S 13410 

-It.) GAM Australia Inc. S 103X6 

-Iwl gam Boston Inc J 10412 

-Iw) GAM Ermltaue » ,]A13 

-iw) GAM Franc-val SF llftto 

w) GAM Hong Itong Inc. S W-J 

w ) GAM Int e rnational inc. % J2B71 

w) GAM Japan Inc.. S 114X4 

-iw) GAM North America Inc. — S 107X3 


•I w Gam N. America Unit Trust- llPto p 
wj 0AM Pacific InC— * W»X7 


fw) GAM Pens. & Char. WOrtow— 100X0 P 
Iwl GAM Pen4 & Chor. UJC. Fd._ JMOp 
fw; GAMrlnt S 119X8 


-iw) GAM Slnaapore/Matay Inc— S. 9L33 
-I w I GAM Start & inn Unit Trust— 141 JO 9 P 

-jet) GAM Systems inc, — - S 101 M 

-fw) GAM wor idwtde inc 5 17DJ3 

-fvrl GAM Trche SA. CRCH A 5 112X7 

G.T. MANAGEMENT CUK) Ltd. „ 

-Idi BarrvPbc. Fd. Ltd. 5 1077 

-K r ) G.T. Applied Science S 1121 

-Id) G.T.AMtm HJLGwtiLFd S 1249 

■Id) aT. Asia Fund S 4X1* 

-( d ) G.T. Australia Fund ... ... S 28X7 

■I 0JG.T. Europe Fund 5 1234 

-I w) G.T. Euro. Small Coe. Fund 5 14X5 

-I r)G.T. Dollar Fund « 14^ 

-I d J G.T. Bond Fund s llto 

-I d ) G.T. Global Tecftntgy Fd S 

■ d ) G.T. Honshu Pathfinder S 27X3 

-fa I G.T. Investment Fund S 19X8 

-j w ) G.T. Janon Small Co. Fund— S -Q.13 

•Jr I O.T. Technology Fund * 314* 

-id) G.T. South China Fund S 1AH 


SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT, I NIL. LA. 
Jersey, PQ. Bob 4L Tel OSH 76029 
Beroft P.O. Box 262L TO 41to 224051 „ ln „ 

-I a i Crossbow 1 Far East) SP ku? 

-fd) «F(B<aancKi)___ SF VJa 

-id intnl. Band Fund—— * 1 <M3 

-f d 1 lm lUrrwvn* S 2467 

-{fi| {Tf Fd(TncnnoioBy)— -- — J 1JSJ 
■‘ ^JiTSea* Fd (N. AMERICA) __ s 28J4 


JARDINE FLEMING, POB 7* GPO HP 
f Currancy&Bcnd— — . * 13X5 

frlLFHona Kang Trust * 

-j r J Podtlc Income Trust — Y 75M 
-f r 1 J.F Japan Trust——— Y 4720 
‘i r l J .-E J«»an Taainaiam Y 1BJM 

: f . r Jj^ PocH1cS,,cA ' |Acc5 — 5 IP 3 

LLOYDS BANK INTL, POB «A GeneVO 11 

,-* w) Uovda inri Dollar — S '}TJ0 

Win Europe. SF 

-Hw| Lloyds Inn Growth. SF 17M0 

-+ w Uaydeinrt Income SF «Jf0 

-+ w) Uovoi Inri N. America — _ * J0410 
-Hw) Ugyds inti Pacific— SF 1JIX0 


^ L S' nr, - Sm0lWr 

-<digassA_ 

' 1 Class B- 


OBLIFLEX Lli 
wi AituhiewTency 


-UX. 


)On^C- Japon- 
MlTED 


-3 8112 
—5 97X2 
_$ 9278 


w) Dollar Medium Term- 
w) Dollar Long Term—. 
*1 Ja p anes e Yen. 


-fw) Pound SierDna. 
‘wi Deutsche Mark. 

wj Dutch Florin 

w) Swiss Franc. 


J 12.10 
_i 11x2 
_s 11 

.» 1191 
iav7 


.DM 1073 
_FL 10X7 
-SF KUM 


S 3070 


S B8X3 


ORANGE NASSAU 9ROUP 
PB 8357*. The Hague 1070) 469670 
■(d) Bever Bci*gglngen++_— 

PARIS BAS-GROUP 

-( d 1 Cortexo Intrrnotlonal 

•fd) ECUPAR ECU 101459 

-(W)OBLI-OM DM 1238-12 

Hwl OBUGESTION SF 9SJ0 

-Iwl OB L (-DOLLAR *1711X0 

WJOBLI-YEN Y 105018X0 

WlOBLl-GULDEN FL 1117X5 

. d) PAROIL-FUNO S 9410 

,-(d j PAREUROPE GROWTH 510X7 

5 d I PARINTER FUND S 119.11 

dlPARINTER BOND FUND STO22 


-idJPARUSTreas.Bond'CLr. 5 U3LB 
ROYAL B.CANAOA^>OB 24LGUERNSEY 
-+f wi rbc Canadian Fund Ltd.. S 10.98* 
■Hwi RBC For EastAPocfflc Fd_ S 12X9 

-Hwl RBC Inri Capita) Fd S 2413 

-Hw) rbc inn income Fd. S 11X3 

-Hd RBC Mon.Currency Pd * 2421 

-+(w) RBC North Amer. Fd. S 9X6 

5 KAN D I FOND INTL FUND (44*4362781 

-Cwllnc.: Bid S 5X6 Otter S 6X5 

-iwl ACC.: BW S 5.99 Offer S 438 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

17 Devonshire Sa4ondan41-377-80« 

-€ r 1 SHB Bond Fund S 2376 

- w SHB Inti Growth Fund 1 33X6 


SWISS BANK COUP. (ISSUE PRICES) 

-Id 1 America- Vo tar SF 49000 

•fOGMortc Bond Selection — DM 12262 

-C d ) Dollar Bond Selection * 136X3 

-Id) Florin Bond SetacflaP FL 127X7 

-{dj Interval or SF 8375 

~d) Japan Portfolio SF 89K5D 

d ) Sterling Bend Selection t 106X1 


. d 1 Swiss Foreign Bond Sel SF 11 444 

rid ) Swlssvolor Kew Series— SF 349X5 

rid) UnNertoi Bond Select SF 83J5 

rid) Universal Fund — . SF 11471 

-I d ) Yra Band tetoetton — Y M548X0 


-1 u , in turn. mv7wi ■, i . . . ..■■■i . 

UNION BANK OP SWITZERLAND^^^H 
-id 1 Amca UA sh. 3F 3400 


tdj Bond-lnv, 


rid) Foma Swiss SH. 

-I d ) JapofFlmaN. 


-(d) Soflt South Afr.Sh.. 


SF 67X5 
SF 159X0 
SF 935X0 
SF 332X9 
SF 21450 


-id) Sima (Stock price) 

UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

-Id ) unlnnta — DM 4330 

ridl Unlfonds DM 29X0 

-fd) Unlrak DM 81X0 

rid) UNIZINS DM 1)480 


Other Funds 


(w) Ad I bonds Inv estm ents Fund. S 2443 
Actives! run....... .... * 1174 

Allied Lid 5 475 

Aaulio laiernatJonal Fund — S W371 

Arab Finance I.F - — * 928X2 

Artane 1 1852*0 


lm 


ir 


Trust cor inti Fd. (AEIF) % ,1031 

Bandsefex-issue Pr. SF 137.U 

Caxxw Gtd-Moriacae Fd S 9X3 

. Caoltol Preserv. Fd. l"H * HX3 

) Citadel Fund *1X2 

....j Cleveland OHdagre F d *210166 

Iw) Columbia Securities FL 9469 

r ) COMETE — * 8}1XB 

w) Convert. Fd. IwH A Certs S 10D 

.w) Convert Fd. i gri B Certs, 5 3L33 

iw) Dolwe Japan Fvnd^- Y 10344 

(W1D.GX. J.J5S 

rid) DOilOPBaer bond Fd— — s JBT7X0 
-fd) Dmwrk-Boer Bond Fd — DM1BMX0 


The EswoiUJiment Trust 5 1.19 

Europe ODOsotlans Ecu 62X6 

First Eagle Fund S 17X9131 

. . Fifty stars Ltd S BS66 

,w) Fixed Income Trans S 1038 

w) Fonseie* issue Pr„ 5F 19830 

wl Forevfuitd— S 129 

w) Formula Selection Fd.__ SF 61X3 

" Fondltorlo S 37M 

Gevernm. Sec Fund* ___ S *7X7 


D. Witter Wkf Wide Ivt TsL_ 5 12X3 

□rokkar lnvastJ=ond N.V S 112406 

Dreyfus Arnerico Fund % 9X6 

Dreyfus Fund InlX. S 39X1 

Dreyfus Int er c mil lnent s 33.15 


Fronk+Trust Inlerrins DM 4434 

Hoassmcm Hides. N.V__ S 122X0 

HesMoFunto s 1D166 

Hor bon Fund S 1289X6 

IBEX Holdings Lid SF 112*5 

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PM - Deutsche 

P/V S10 to S’ *•' “"‘t i 

HodempF Price- Ek-Cw* 0 " 



TO THE HOLDERS OF 


THE EUROPEAN RANKING TRADED 
CURRENCY FUND LIMITED 


INCOME SHARES IN CONTINENTAL 
DEPOSITARY RECEIPT FORM 


The Directors of the above fund have declared the 
following interim dividend per share for the financial 
period ended 30th September, 1985, payable on 
31 st October, 1985 in respect of shares in issue on " 
30th September, 1985:— 


US Dollars 0.3572 per share against coupon No. 3. • 

Shareholders should send their coupons to 
Amsterdam Depositary Company N.V., Spuistraat 
172, 1012 VT, Amsterdam. 


BC Trust Company (Jersey) Limited . 



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■ INTERN AltONAJL HERALD ^ElUBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1985 


Page 13 


>-W :r. 




“■'iL 1 ! 




PEOPLE 


f 32% Rfee in 



saaS*- 


*' NEWYOR? /W *?““ ,a ” a/ : farm the quarter while net loan 

^JL rL* ORK “T Amencan Ex- write-offs wefcS»inffiba. 

ported Thursday that favestmofr^^ 
^^^eani^ioseMper- De«ffltgatatap«^to$36i^ 
^°° s ? bs ? antial gams m. its tra- from S30mHficra v --- fee fix* fall 
dibonal businesses and m newer quarter r eflecting *h# Acmw? 

Ldunana^StaS 
■ A rL^fn J^Scptemher quarter visay,awam^aidmve 

b^nweroeswesiga 

^s?^-! 1 - 08 **?“*> ^ *"» JyhfcEx.; , - 

jlSS- Z mil lion, or 85 cents a share, InsnranceHBexvice wmi^ 


Lehman Brottera. frvescmexu ad- 
Twoty, commi&onand investment 


ly higher- 

Insurancft-service earnings ad- 







^jZZS*q£SEZ 

I 1 ™ PP banco, fau, in whfcfe American Express 

z In the first mne months of 1985 wffl sefl its 50-percent a&c to 
E p r ^Vprofil was up, WanKx. Comnat&oas. record- 
percrai to J537.0 million, or ed a profit - 
J2J6 a share, from 5440.1 miTlir^ 

SfeD^Anton^Orfos 

pcrcrai to S1T.06 bfllion from 

$9-40 billion. - MUNICH — Stamens: AG -said 

Travehdaied services h«H a'lQL. Thursday drat mcoantag orders for 
percent advance in profit, to S140 production automation and 
million in fee quarter from $118 automation systems .division - rose 
million a year earlier. Card-charge Percent to 2 bffian; Deutsche 


Siemens AntomarionOrders 

. . .'''jtlKtiW 

MUNICH — Stamens : AjG - said 


British Telecom 
PlamtoTrim 
4,()00 Jobs in ’85 

"Rouen ' 

LONDON — Aspokesman 
for British Tdecommrajcatious 
PLC said the company is plan* 
tang to cut 4,000 jobs tins year 
from its 197,000-pcrsan local 
communications services divi- 
sion. 

The proposal was outlined in 
a confidential internal memo, 
which was reported in Thurs- 
i day's editions of fee Financial 
Times. The tt wi t q »aW« manag- 
ers to “'examine gristing ar- 
rangements wife unions, both 
local and national, and change 
practices which are no longer 
consistent wife running fee 
business excellently” the news- 


Coca-Cola Earnings Increase Kuwait Banker Moves to Bahrain 
As Classic Outsells New Coke I ™ “77 71 . 


Camptkd by Oir Staff From Dispatcher C. Goizueta, chi 

ATLANTA — The Coca-Cola executive officer. 
Ox reported qn Thursday a per- Goldina 

share earnings increase of 10.4 per- v : nv ____. f 
oent toSpS in fee third ouarter j„ c w 

and noted stron g growth ra the do- is when do 

mes ne sugar-cola sector and in is- q^c?" 
teroational operations. 

The company also confirmed s Ri 


ells INew Loke 

. LONDON — Scraj Al Baker, 

G Goizueta, chairman and chief one of Kuwait's highest-flying 


To Our Readers 


Coca-Cola executive officer. young bankers, has moved to Bah- 

David Goldman, an analyst with 10 “P * e . 
of 10.4 per- fa invesiment om, vruter assistant to fee president of Arab 

hh.SJrE Reynolds Inc^ said, “fee real ques- 

fa rathe do- uon is when do they kill fee new Mr. Al Baker, 34. will report to 
r and in in- Offer* Abdulla A. Saudi, who is president, 

' deputy chairman and chief exccu- 

-oonflnned 1 Coc<hColas ntt wcome for fee tive of fee Bahrain-based bank. 


tne company also confirmed . . , — uvc uic uu^ 

feat is oraselling SHSZisnftSw 

new Coke in the United States, and ?£ U’ 6 £ J Dhabi. 

feat fee introductian of new Coke for *“ s*®* P" 1 ® 1 “« >“■ Mr. A! Baker was dqraty general 


Please send information about personnel changes to: 

Business People 

International Herald Tribune 

Room 501-S, Bracken House 

10 Cannon Street 

London EC4P 4BY 

England 

Telex 262009 (IHTLON) 


on fee in ternati ratal market has 
been ddayed until next spring. 


N« income to * qmjncc « SS 
ll.o percent to S196 million. For F 


1 same penod last year. Mr. Al Baker was dqraty general bon of pharmaceuticals. Novo In- trading in its Eurobond division. 

Ns income for fee fust nine manager of Kuwait International dusiri is Danish biotechnology and Previously, he was head of trading 

months was S532.9 million com- Investment Co., where he was re- pharmaceuticals concern. at Drexc! Burnham Lambert Sccu- 

ired wife S498.4 million, an in- sponsible for syndications and Kaistadt AG said it has proposed rilies Ltd. in London, 

ease nf 6 4 nmm i banking. Those duties have passed naming to its board BemaHebber- National Westminster BankPLC 


sponsible for syndications and Karstadt AG said it has i 


banking. Those duties have passed naming to its board Bern a Hebber- 


. _ .to Abdulla Al Muneefu formerly ing. managing board chairman of said David Harris has been ap- 

fee first nine months of 1 985, e arn- Increases m net income ana manager of fee credit department, rival department store chain, Hor- pointed a deputy general manager 

mgs per share rose 8 percent to earnings per share in fee third who has been named an assistant ten AG. A statement said Kar- of its management services divi- 

54.06. and net income increased 6.9 quarter resu lted from higher non- general manager. siadi's supervisory board will vote si on. He succeeds Ben Morris, who 

percent to S533 million. operating income and a reduction Mr. Al Baker declined to say on the proposed appointment Oct. becomes general manager of fee 

“The success of the Coca-Cda in the company's effective tax rate, what his responsibilities would be 28. If approved, Mr. Hebbering division upon fee retirement of 


volume increased 19 percent to E ? ar ^ s (S746 m2Ec8?)in ihe £man- 
$14.1 bdlion. cial year ended in September. . 

American Express said third- 

quarter earnings benefited from a /^DC T «. T 
$10 increase in the annual fee far LDj iTWltSS JuO 
the U5. personal card that went 

into effect in J nne. By Mkhad A Hilczik 

Sales of traveler’ s checks were up Los a ngeia Tbms Serncr 

7.8 percent to $5.6 biffian in the NEW YORK— Moving to erect 

Iat S15 l ^f r - ‘ a meanmgful bam*x against more 

• a hostik takeover attempts, CBS said 


The spokesman said feat BT 
hoped to reduce its work force 
through attrition. The company 
has trimmed its weak force by 
1 5,000 jobs during fee hst three 
years to about 24(1000. 


percent to SS33 million. 

“The success of the Coca-Cola 
megftbnmd strategy is demonstrat- 
ed by total UJ5. soft drink unit 


ten AG. A statement said Kar- of its management services divi- 
siadi’5 supervisory board wiU vote sion. He succeeds Ben Morris, who 


fee statement said. 

ed'by total UJSTsofl drink unit Operating declined 3 *he bank in recent years has ac- chairman of Karstadt, responsible was a senior executive of 

volume growth to 8 percent in the percent as a result of costs assodat- jpired units in West Germany, for the buying of textiles, in addi- NatWest’s related banking services 
quarter, wife fee largest ccsnpo- ed wife the distribution or Coca- Spain and Hong Kong and is estab- lion to other responsibilities in the division. 

nent — su gar colas — growng Cola Classic and Cherry Coke, an- lishing a securities department to new posL Butterfield- Harvey PLC said 

more than 9 percent/* said Roberto other new product. (AP. UPIj match its large syndicated-loans A me talc o Ltd. in London said Harry G. Cress man, direct or-gen- 


what his responsibilities would be 28. If approved, Mr. Hebbering division upon fee retirement of 
at ABC. Established five years ago, will become deputy managing Gordon Reeve Oct. 31. Mr. Harris 
fee bank in recent years has ac- chairman of Karstadt, responsible was a senior executive of 


CBS Invites Loews to Raise Stake in Network 


By Michael A. Hilczik crease Us CBS stake to 25 percent 
LasAnpdct Timex Service from 11 3 percent, a bolding that 
NEW YORK — Moving to erect already makes it the largest sharc- 
a meaningful barrier " gonwt more holder.- 

j^atowaaaag^CBSnM “I, b mutual love rffar," aid 


crease Us CBS stake to 25 percent percent of its own shares on July 
from 11 3 percent, a bolding that 31. 

already makes it fee largest share- This is dearly a very friendly 
holder. invitation for [Mr. Tisch] to go rat 

“Tr k a imitimi irwp the b oard," said David Londoner, a 


it £^ DC ^ subsidiary, posted a 40- it reached an agreement wife wan™ p^ tjiw 3d. CB&'sanar broadcasting analyst for fee New 

j.AtoJC»3to. ouri,, ^“ ion -” 

» year comply aid jPfi'SSf'AJS! “ W Smet and ta income from cigarettes, hotels 

sttongraults from Treasury opera- Lniheed Wedn^tev CBS sources characterized fee and insurance; is managed by Mr. 

-tlOIlS and forem-exehanop W DiCM aU|Bau *’‘ la nMnom mith T ma c m a Ih* 


•tions and foreign-exchange services 
were partially offset by “interest 


mj. . agreement with Loews as a positive Tisch and his brother, Pnaton 

Tne agreement gives CBS a rig- one for fee network, which has Robert Tisch. 


ilidTw 


not recognized on nonaccruing rufi e wn t takeover defense feat has been the victim of takeover specu- 
loans, primarily in Latin America." t^pxwjoustybeenmittarsqial: a lation ance Ted Turner, the Atlan- 
It received 58 million of past-due l aT 8P block of its stock in friendly ia television ma gnate, began his 
interest from Argentina dwrmg the bands. abortive at temp t to take over the 

quarter. Loews was expected Thursday to company last spring. Mr. Turner's 

American Express said the pro- tdl fee Securities and Exchange campaign was defeated when CBS 
.vision for loan losses was $22 mQ- Commission feat it intends to in- completed fee repurchase of 25 


Announcement of fee Loews 


ng. Mr. Turner's 
eared when CBS 


Wednesday. CBS stock fell 5175 
per share Thursday to dose at 
SI 14.75. Loews closed at $46.75, up 


Commission that it intends to in- completed fee repurchase of 25 51.125 from Wednesday. 


Aramco to Cut 
Its Work Force 

Tie Associated Pros 

DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia 
— Aramco, Saudi Arabia’s oil 
production company, plans to 
cut its work force by 7,000 be- 
fore the end of 1986, company 
officials were quoted Thursday 
assaying. 

The officials, in fee interview 
wife the En gl i' A -lan gnagp Sau- 
di Gazette, said the cutbacks 
were necessary because reduc- 
tions in oil production had cut 
revenues. Aramco this year is 
expe cte d to show a deficit of 
alxiut 2J>2 billion riyals (S800 
million), the paper said. 


business. Christopher J. Bristow has been era! of the American Chamber of 

As of June 30, it had assets of appointed resident manager of Commerce in London, has been 
SI 1.8 billion, malting it one of the Ametalco's Hong Kong office, appointed to Butterfield- Harvey's 
largest Arab-owned banks. which will open early next year, board. Butterfield-Harvey is a unit 

PbiEps NV, the Dutch electron- Mr. Bristow currently Is a precious- of Technology Inc. of' Dayton, 
ics group, said a proposal that Gen metals trader specializing in plati- Ohio. 

Lorenz should be appointed a nun, palladium and bullion in the Rolls-Royce Ltd, the British en- 
raember of its board of manage- London office of Ametalco. which glne maker, has appointed .Alan 
mem will be putto fee annual gen- is a unit of Amax Inc„ fee U.S.- D.F. Smith president and chief op- 
era! meeting to be held April 22. He based energy and mining company, era ting officer of Rolls-Royce Inc., 
is chairman of the management of Degussa Pacific Ltd of Hong its U.S. unit, effective Jan. 1. Mr. 
Philips Komm limitations Industrie Kong, a subsidiary of the West Smith, currently commercial direc- 
AG of Nuremberg, West Germany, German metals, chemicals and tor of fee civil-engine group of fee 
and a member of the senior man* pharmaceuticals group. Degussa parent, will succeed S.L. Higgin- 
agement committee of Aligemrine AG, has opened an office in Seoul, bottom, chairman and president, 
Deutsche Philips Industrie GmbH Hanns Joachim Sohn has been ap- who is to retire as president Jan. 1 . 
in Hamburg. pointed to head the new office. He wiD continue as ^airman 


in Hamburg. pointed to head the new office. He wiD continue as chairman. 

British Telecommanications which is the fourth opened by De- State Street London Ltd said 
PLC has appointed David Scholey gussa in Asia in the past 10 months. Michael J. Laughlin has been ap- 
as a nonexecutive director. Mr. Fluor (Great Britain! Ltd, has ap- pointed a director and as market- 
Scholey has been joint chairman of pointed Dennis Bemhart, formerly mg director. He will be responsible 
S.G. Warburg & Go. since 1980. He vice president, sales, as managing for developing markets in Britain, 
is also chairman of Warburg’s par- director, succeeding Gordon Dib- Europe and fee Middle East for 
eni companies. Mercury Securities ble after Dec. 1. Mr. Dibble will be State Street's expanding securities 
PLC and Mercury International transferred to fee Irvine, Calinor- custody and portfolio record-kcqj- 
Gronp PLG and a director of fee nia, bead office of Fluor Engineers, ing businesses. Previously he was a 


i c .:;. ^ 

g 

.‘«af i? 
- : ir* 

-=»‘ 5: 

■JCjn TS. 
*Vi u- 


Ijnvmn Restates Commitment 
To Reduce Inflation in U.K. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Bank of England. Both are units of Fluor Corp„ a 

Deutsche Bank AG said Lutz U.S. energy and natural resources 
Mdlinger has joined Manfred ten concern. 


nia, bead office of Fluor Engineers, ing businesses. Previously, he was a 
Both are units of Fluor Corp„ a vice president in Slate Street's asset 
U.S. energy and natural resources management and mutual funds di- 


Brink as general manager of its ITT Europe Inc. in Brussels has 
London branch. Mr. Mdlinger sue- appointed Ronald E Casey and 


5 * 


. S e.- 

-■z-t :.: tr 
■ • -;J< fc 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Nigel Lawson, 
chancellor of the exchequer, . sought 
Thursday night to convince a skep- 
tical financial community that the 
British government remains firmly 
committed to reducing inflation. 

In an eagerly awaited speech be- 


plant in Guangdong province. It milli on in convertible bonds it held 
-k,™ „ will take a 2-miIlion-Anstralian- in the Japanese automaker. GM 

Sffto w^^SSaty policy d f 1 Sif 11 ? 1 ? 115 ^ wasdready the largest of Isanzn’s 

rti^tenooghfoSStS &**:*%« otto output vnMx sh^feddm. 

m Chma. Kraftwerk Union AG has won an 

Deutsche Babcock AG has order for the construction of a nu- 
agnaed 10 license Chmai to build dear-fud plant in Taqon, South 
rtdBng m i l ls for coal-processing Korea. It was the first nuclear con- 
ofmonetary ease or stringency, he plants. Its Austrian subsidiary Leo- tract awarded by South Korea to a 
QOlca ' bersdorfer Maschinenfabrik AG West German company. 


bonds ithdd banking house of London. 


vestment and banking unit of GambeDo is director of industrial 


Shell Coal International Ltd. has Deutsche Bank, in New York Jan. and employee relations for fee 


withdrawn from a S300-mfflion . , . . . A . , 

joint venture that planned to devd- N®*' » Industn A/S has named Glaxo Pharmaceuticals said John 

op a coal mine in China. The open- Claus Kuhl vice president, wife re- V. Burke is to become managing 
nit mine had been emoted tonro- sponsibility for medical and drug director from Nov. 1. He succeeds 


— wiuuuuiuu ui auu- v_j _ sponsi Dmiy tor meat cat ana aiug director irom inov. i. n 

amwd to hcense Chma to build dear-fad plant inTaq’aD, South Si£S S^toiy'affaira. a newly created Bernard D. Taylor, who 

roDmg tmUs for coal-proce«ang Korea. It was the fhst nudear con- ^ post within fee phannaceutical di- chairman of Glaxo Ph 

dants. Its Austrian snhfddiflrv Leo- mui nmnM hv Knnrh Ynm m » ““ 3*“ tor use m power , . ... . . - , 


ncenL visions. State Street Bank & Trust 

ITT Europe Inc. in Brussels has Co. is based in Boston, 
pointed Ronald E Casey and Bank of America has named 
ichad F. GambeDo vice presi- Ramzi F. Asfour vice president and 
a is. Mr. Case y is director, per- senior account officer in fee Lon- 
nnel, for ITT Europe, and Mr. don private h ankin g office. He has 
imbeDo is director of industrial special responsibility for fee Mid- 
id employee relations for fee die East. He was vice president and 
company. Middle East zepresentative for 

Glaxo Pharmaceuticals said John Paine Webber Inc. 

Burke is to become managing Freshfields, a London-based law 
rector from Nov. 1. He succeeds firm, has opened an office in Hong 
rmard D. Taylor, who remains as Kong Mark Freeman, who was 
airman of Glaxo Pharmaceuti- head of fee finance group in Lon- 


fore bank ers and brokers, he ar- Mir. Lawson stressed fee need for has awarded a license to China for MatsusMta Electric Cotp. of Sheraton wfll operate a luxury since 1981 and manager and chief mgs PLC in Februrary. Mr. Burke litigation partner in London, wil 
rated that recent bulRK in the man-' in following monetary “ c qonsttuchon of compressor Ammcawffls^lyootorteleviBon hold in Sh a nghai , its second in physician since 1981 In his new was managing director of Merck join the Hong Kong office in Janu- 

L • guidelines. Tt is. I recognize, all JMmttused m drilling, sets built in Franklin Part New China. The Hua Tina hotel which Dost, his initial task will be to estab- Shame & Dohme U.K. arv. and Ruth Markland. a com' 


duceup to 4 million metric tons of nrguiatory anaire, a newly createa Bernard u. I ayior, wno remains as Kong. Mark Freeman, who was 
coal year for use in power P°? 1 within fee pharmaceutical di- chairman of Glaxo Pharmaceuti- head of fee finance group in Lon- 
datinn^ ^ vision. Dr. Kuhl has been chief cals and who wQl become chief ex- don, is fee senior partner in Hong 

physician at Hvidore Hospital ecutive of the parent, Glaxo Hold- Kong; Hugh Stubbs, a commercial - 
Sheraton will operate a luxury since 1981 and manager and chief tags PLC in Februrary. Mr. Burke litigation partner in London, wil] 


otto btaicaroi^^tat^ toa foflWuHy annoytag ftirfee ybuhg . Sf** 1 ?- ** P laM ^ to ' Jersey, to General Hectric Co. The wiU have 1,000 room* is scheduled Ssh^an organization for medical Bache Securities (UK.) Inc. has 

uwl UU1 “ uiuiudiuiapuuucu Tmlrv mvcst 63 rminfm Sinejmnrr. Hnllnn: oor^mpnt mile fnr K»vm*»n a«^ 41 : « j j * j.i ' j i j _ e 


Turks who write the brokers’ arcu- mvest 63 nrilHon Singapore doBars agreement calls for between to open in ApriL 
lars,” he said, alluding to fee state- ( s3 ° aMoa) to upgrade its four 200,000 and 300,000 sets in the first. 


further drop ta lunmng orweere cucu- 

r, rn , , T™ *,"** lars, be said, aUudtaaio the state- v»30 million) to upgrade its four 

at -£ 9 ^ pe ^f nL ^ ‘ man. of a fo^Labor Singapore plants. About 18.2 mil- 

rqectfti calls to cut interest rates SSJL toSisof the new investment 


12 months, starting early in 1986, 

-*-* «- «-rvit eAA jT%T? 'J. I 


~ -.dt. 


$ I 


“ R VI ? 

\ 


: j 7^ sharpy and raise -government.. 
H ::i l spending in an attenrot to create 
::r more jobs, even though unemploy- 

r ; meat stands at a politically urqjal- 

■j arable 13 percent. 

* He reiterated his forecast that 

v? inflation would fall below 4 percent 
£ by mid-1986. But, he said, fee gov- 
v i:jr eminent is prepared to push . up 
li -:s ^ short-term interest rates if that ap- 
'■ ^5 ^ pears necessary to damp down in- 
'■ flationary pressures, 

s “Let there be no doubt about 

jjjsr this," Mr. Lawson said. 
r. s-1 Nonetheless, some leading ana- 
y-5 lysLs remained doubtful. “He’s not 
r- r[% convinced me, and I don’t think 
r- he's going to convince fee maiket 
!; C ; * feat he has a dearty defined strata- 
’■ 0 for dealing with monetary po- 

7' hey,” said Stephen Lewis, chief 

' ^ rconomist at fee stockbrokerage of 
: Phillips & Drew. 

tilhe government is trying to 
£ VS avoid another loss of confidence ta 

“• “5 its anti-inflation resolve, such as 
^ *:$ fee one feaL helped predpitale a 
I ^ plunge in the pound in January arid 
. Jfa’t February. To halt that slide, fee 

'•ro.lir government had to push up interest 
rf ’ rates by 4J5 paxxntage points with- 
JJtfjl ta weeks. British rates remain 
5^ about six points above those, of 
West Germany, undedytag vromes 

* feat the pound will fall against the 
Deutsche mark and otter mqor 
airrendes. 

' Both Mr. Lewis and Richard Jef- 
f«y, an economist at Hoare Goyett 
'jtfi Ltd, expressed anxiety feat the 
government would try to reduce, 
interest rates too rapidly and fens 
prompt another sharp drop in -the 
.; pound’s value. 

■ }?& Already, many economists are 
anxious about fee growth of ster- 
l- x ling M-3, fee most clotaly watched 
money-supply measure, which 
$ comprises notes and coins hdd by 

j£ thepublic as weD as pound-denotn- 

.f.0 1 mated bank deposits, including 

' r^'- : certificates of deposit, held by the 

* !m u , British private sector. Sterling M-3 
I>' p has grown al an annual rate of 18 J 
.!«•*■’ -percent in the past rix months, far 
" v‘ above the government’s - target 

y j yttage of 5 to 9 percent. 

/ * Some eoonomisls have taken this 

^overshooting’’ as evidence feat the 
-govenmient is buckling under po- 
litical pressure and trying quietly to 
'reflate the economy. Mr. Lawson 
insisted feat the essence of fee gov- 
>£| f ’eminent's policy is uncha n ged. 

* In retrospect, he said, fee target 
.jd -range was set low. M-3 has grown 

r tso fast partly because companies 

land people are bolding , a mgter 
iproportion of their savings ta liquid 
tmstrumenis. such as bank deposits 
Jjjj ^and CDs, Mr. Lawsb n said . This 
| • '.kind of money-supply growth does 
T taot suggest a desire to go' on an 
i-j : inflatianary spending spree. 

' Mr. Lewis conceded that point 

’• Trat argued that the government 

^should still be worried about rapid 
^growth of bank lending. 

■ h Because M-3 has become less re- 

iiabte, Mr. Lawson confirmed, she 
J authorities are ptafetg gtwMcc 


chancellor, Doris Healey, that he d °Q ars °f die new investment tiring to 500,000. GE plans towith- 
would not allow Iris pohey to be ^ be used for equipment used ta draw from oolor-tdevision prodne- 
dictatcd by “young who write pl®uw to make semiconductor tion. 

brokets’ circulars.” products. _ Pariter Pan Ox, experiencing 


rodnets. Fnker Pen Col, experiencing 

General Motors Carp, has tar sluggish sales ta recent years, is 


services and clinical documents- named Peter Add. and as head of 


ary. and Ruth Markland. a com- 
mercial partner, will be transferred 
from fee Singapore office. 


NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS 
REPUBLIC HOLDING S. A., LUXEMBOURG 

(Formally TRADE DEVELOPMENT BANK HOLDING S.A.) 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN feat ah Extraordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of Republic 
Holding SLA. (TUT) wffl be held at 1 Ho tel le Royal, 12 Boulevard Royal, Luxembourg, 

on October 29, 1985, al 2.30 p-m. 

for fee propose of considering and voting on fee following matters 

1. Decision to put Republic Holding SJL in liquidation. 

2. Appointment of Measis. Jean Hoaa, Roger Junod, C.G. Rodney Leach and Walter H. Weiner as 
Laquidatora of Republic Holding S.A., each of them acting severally and individually. 

3. Approval of the Lupridation Plan submitted by the Board of Directors. 

4b Decision id maintain fee Statutory Auditors' appointment in order to report on the Company’s 1985 
accounts to fee Shareholders meeting to which fee 1985 F in a nci al Sta t e m e nt s trill be submitted for 


By order of the Board 
Edmond J. Safra 

QniT T H i m 


...world oil suppty...demand... 
inventories... economic growth 
...prices...OPEC... 


NOTESa- 


Any shareholder whose shares iue inbeaiOTfonn and who wishes to mend the Extraordinary General Meeting muM 


receipt at tne reQstereo otnee of KH at id Bonievani ae la rmre, unemiNnin; not rater mail uctoterZB, ivt»ai 
5 pjn.Tbeahai 3 iokV-rmay obtain the depositary receipt and it reepurod, the lormof proxy, from any nl fee banks 
listed below by lodging hie share cardBcalea at their office or by arranging for the bank by whom his certificate* are 
held to notify any of the banks listed that shares are » held. 

Any whose shares are registered will receive a notice of the Extraordinary General Meeti ng at his 

address on the register, together with a Dons of proxy for use at the meeting. The proxy should be lodged at RITs 
oSice-in accordance with me above instructions. 

The reminance of ihefom of proxy will not preclude a shareholder from aMcnding ta person and voting at the 
meeting if he. so desires. 

The resolution concerning’ item L of the agenda, reguuea a majority of at least two thirds of the votes of the 
alpieholdeis jpsesent or represented, provided there a a quorum of at least fifty percent of issued share capital. 
There is do as to the number of shares for which any shareholder or proxy may cast votes. 


Investment conditions can be greatly 
influenced by the global energy situation. 

And as an investor, you need to be 
informed. 

Bache Securities’ Energy Special pro- 
vides a detailed, comprehensive assessment of 
current developments in the energy sector, 
as well as our outlook for 1986. 

Researched and produced by our team 
of analysts, the report includes separate 
sections on the US and OPEC, and a review of 
energy trends throughout the free world. 

To receive your free copy of the Energy 
Special, simply complete and return the 
coupon, today. 


aider or proxy may cast votes. 

1 a «»nplf majority provided that go «mgt« 
the issued share espial or more than two 


(France) 


(W. Germany) 


There is do h>ni«atiwn «« to the number of shares for which say shareholder or proxy may cast vote 
' The resotatious concerning items 2, to 5. of the agenda may he passed by a simple majority provided tl 
shareholder or proxy may emit votes in respect of more than one fifth of the issued share capital or mi 
fifths of all shares repres e nted at the meeung. 

■ ShimhiMm msy ntvwm unpina ipif fbe Ai wmwiftiti nii Bated her wnider . 

1, This notice 

2. StotiwwtofS of Mr. FAnnml J. Sofia, Chairman of fee Board and liquidation Flan of fee company, 
3; Information statement on Republic New York Corporation 

at dm registered office and from any of fee banks at fee following addrenes- 

* ISawn f to Uw va H tm ww T JmUndl 

8 Princes Street, London EC2P 2EN ( Engl a nd ) 

* Banqnc Internationale | Luxembourg S.A. 

2 Boulevard Royal, Luxe mbo u r g ( I . remam bomg) 

* Mi n nWrn w r. H« n«WT Rank Bclginm 

■ 13 Rne de I^pe, 1000 Bnueele (Bdgiiim) 

* ManoXactarers Hanover Banque Noroiqne 

to Bae de U VtUel’Eteeiis, 7S008 fiub (Eruee) 

* Mim h rtiirM . Hanover Trust ComMztj 
Bodtesheimer lamdstrasse 51/53, Frankfor t (W. Germany) 

* Manaiaetarere Hanovar Trust Company 

40 Wall Street, New York, N.Y. 10015 (U.&A.) 

’ * Bwttblk National Bank of New York 

4JS2 Fifth Avextne, New York, N.Y. 10018 (U-SA-) 

* RepnbOc National Bank of Near York 

46 Berkeley Square, London W1X 5DB (England) 

* Rename National Bank of New York (Luxembourg) SLA. 

. 103 Grand Rue, 1661 lawnlwng (Iwsntwnrg) 

Republic Natinual Bank, of New York (France) S-A. 

20 Place Venddme, 75001 Paris (France) 

. * Trade Development Bank 

30 Mo nu m ent Street, London EC3R 8LH ( En gla nd ) 

: * Trade Devekmnent Bank (Lnoeittboaxg) &A- 
. 34 Avenue dela Porte Nenve, Laxembonrg (kn remb onrg) 

■■ Trade Development ft—fc 

96JW Bne dnIUtane, 1204 Geneva (Swicaerland) 

Trade Development Bank 

25 Gorao Sr CWerdo, 6C30 Omw> (Swftrarifond) 

* Paying Agtnt af-Sicpubfic Holding 5 L.L 


our Ene 
I joins 


rgyjM> 
the do 


Soecial 


ots. 


I London: 5 Bm^neion \ X '.l .1 \ Singapore: w mg un _ 

Ganiem, London W1X 1LE \ 3t *' C' '•* l Life Building, I5u | 

I Tel. 01-1394191. 1 1 CerilSl.Sinuapoft 1 ftlOO. ■ 

| .%ew York: lunGoUSbrcL \ ? u ~u um I 

New HM IRQ. \ ® | 

I Tel 212 791 4425 \ jfe ?*" Houm: - u , H 

■ l U) — 1 21-2M y uccni Koad S 

i Zurich: WaMcru'crkswauc IO.\ — J Ccmrdl.Hon^Kcflg. ■ 

Zundi S03S. Tel: L3bl «32 L_ Tel HS2 5 22wftl B 

I I 

I Name | 

I Address I 

I I 

I 1 

I I 

| HomeTeL No | 

| Work Tel. No. ^ 18/10 . 

International offices: Amcurfdairi Athcm Bruuck Ruennt Aires Chiuvi 

Cologne Duwcldwf Frankfurt Geneva Hamburg HangKong London 

Lugano Luxembourg .Madrid Monte Carlo Montevideo Munich New York 

Pan Rotterdam St Cron St Thomas San Juan Singapore Siunj-jn Tokvo Ztmch 
und oIBcn in all ntuor Canadian etties. AfivBates m Mefcoume ind Svdm*i 


Zurich: WisstrutrLsinHic 10. V 
Zurich 8035. Tel: 1361 4433 ] 


- r " \ S in gapott-. W iiu; On 

‘•IOl'' I LifeBuiWint 15 u 

1 CcrilSi.Sinuapoft 1 flIOfc. 
\ Tet 124 bl22 

HongKotiF^lhFIcinr. 
Shell Houm. 

1 ' \ iriuri < 

— * A Ccmrdl. Hong Kcnj;. 

— — Tel HS2S32'AIM 


(UAA.) 


IHT 18/10 












m 


riTwn! 


1 ];n srsda»s 

AMFX 



Qoeing 


Tobies include the noi taiwfde prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

I ia The Associated Press 


34* l«k 

Wi mt 
32* 13ft 
3 U 
33 

M 14 
17* 5 
26 14* 

33* 10* 
14* 4ft 
1C% 6% 


Fo/SlC A JO 1J 36 
ForstCB .IS J 24 
ForesiL 30 

Fotonrt 

Frantz 160a XS II 
FraqEl 14 

FrtasE n IS 

F risen s 22 12 It 

FrnfHd 70 

FrtAwt .171 12 

FurVIt 20 12 22 


23* 23ft- ft 
23* 23*— * 
24 24 - * 

I* 1* 

HU HU 
31* 23* + * 
B* B*— ft 
21ft 21ft— % 
23'i 23* 

14ft 14* 

11 * 11* + * 


4* 

4ft 14ft— ft 
4ft 14ft + ft 
3ft 4 

T% 79ft + ft 

7* 2* 

Oft 10ft— ft 
1ft lft— ft 
3ft 3ft — ft 
4ft Hft 
7ft 17ft— ft 
3ft 3ft— ft 
4ft 44* + * 
4ft 4ft + ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 
I* 11*— ft 
ft ft 

B4 — ft 

4ft 

8* +1 

9ft— ft 


* * 

4ft 4ft 
2ft 2ft 
lift 11* 

1* 1* 

94* 34* + * 
10 * lift— ft 
lift 12 
7H 2ft 
13* 14 

3ft 3ft + ft 
14 1414 — ft 

4* Sft + ft 
10ft 10ft— ft 
lift 11* + ft 
3ft 3ft + ft 
10 * 10*— * 
Mft 71ft + ft 
14ft 14* + ft 
Mft Mft 
ID 30ft 
3* 4 — ft 

3 2 * 

IV 29 — ft 
7* 7* 

Sft Sft— ft 
IB* 19 — * 

* + * 
10ft 10* + ft 
J3ft 34* + * 
10 20ft + * 
10ft 10ft + ft 
lift 11* + ft 
Mft Mft 
14* 34* + * 
lift II* + ft 


liS. Futures 


Season Season 

Htoh low Ophi Hiafi low Cioso On. 

47JS 24.12 Aar 4090 41.17 4040 ALSO -.45 

49 jh aua -jun ajs 4 yep 43J5 S2M — ■*» 

49.85 SS Jin 4425 44J0 o» 4J» --2 

51 JO 4035 Aua 4145 4147 4115 4115 —72 

41.10 3X07 Oct 40J0 4H^» 4UH 40.15 — -u2 

Jm 3XW S5r SS 41JS 41JS- 4U5 


Season 

Smai 

Oct 17 • 

High 

Low 

Open Hfgn Low Ck»E aw. 


ESL Softs 1306 Prev. Sales 7Mb 
Prav. Day Open bit 214*9 upU«$ 













Dec 358 115% 



+58* 

3J4U 


Mar IMU 331* 

XI 3 

3JD* 

+50% 



MOV 356 in 

X06 

X1D* 

+56* 


243 

Jul ZH XBttA 

35K 

288 

+JB* 


247 

Seo 288* 25VU 

288 

259% 

+53 







Est.Salw 


FTev.Sdos 12553 




Prev. DorOt.1 Inl. 3SJ63 up 264 




SOOO bum 

BTI 

fnlmurt 

■ do Kars oer busbnf 
Dec X19% 120 

2.18% 

219* 

+51 

257 

2J4U 

Mar 2J1U 253% 

t+U'! 









256 

233 

Jul 242 243 

241% 

242* 

+51% 


303 1 7 18 
4 

1 JSe U 


32*— ft 
24*— * 

2*— ft 
12 ft — ft 
Sft— ft 
lift— ft 
5*— ft 
49* + * 
32* -Hft 
3 — ft 
4*— ft 
414— ft 
14* 4- * 
M +1 
4*— ft 
4* + ft 
52ft— * 
*— ft 
14* 

7*— ft 
14ft + ft 
4ft + ft 
54* + * 
47* + * 
«*— ft 
2 

2* 

10 

6% 

I 

3*— ft 
5*- ft 
4ft— ft 
5* 

8 ft— ft 
30* 

9ft— ft 
12*— ft 
1 * 

13*- ft 


4ft HAL .10? 1 A 
10ft HMG -M S3 
10* HUBC JOa 2.9 13 
4ft Halifax J14e 3 
1 * Halm! 

£* Hamntl J3tH1 8 
91* Hodvmn j05e 3 1 
12* Harris d 5 JO 12 15 
20 * Hunbrs .15 A 11 
24ft Haabrof 200 12 


4ft Halifax 
1* Halml 


28* Hasting 40a 1.1 6 
12 HlthCr s 9 

sft Himai 19 

7ft HlttlEx 15 

II HeltflM M 4J 9 
Sft HetnWr 20c IS 8 
10 Hdnlck .10 J ' 
2 HeMor 


3ft Hcllant 
fit HelmS 

3* HersftO 38 

lft Hlndrl 43 

2 Hotman 

6 ft HdlvCo 3* U 6 
isft HmeGn 
20 Hmlnspf2JS 117 
14* HomH 5 54 15 13 

6 HmHaf 19 

13* Hon Ply MO 113 16 
Z* HotIPwt 
3ft HauOT 44*172 
lift HovnE 9 

16ft HubelA 5 .76 15 12 
15* HutnHB S .76 14 13 
6 * Husky a JA 12 


43 7* 

5 11* 
IS 20ft 
71 6ft 

470 2* 
54 7ft 
3® 23% 
2D 23ft 
013 34* 
73 38* 

23 ft* 
ft % 
’ft Y 

17 13* 
U 2* 
700 4* 

13 * 

148 4* 

8 7ft 
7 7* 

99 18ft 
4289 19ft 
92 71ft 
33 22 
267 6ft 
66 17* 
26 4* 

259 4* 

22 14* 

6 21 * 
Sfl 22* 

148 6* 


7*— ft 
11* + ft 
20ft 4- * 
6ft + ft 
2 % 

7ft + ft 
23ft + ft 
23ft + ft 
33ft + ft 
38*— ft 
36 — * 
15ft + ft 
8 * + ft 
7ft + * 
13 + * 

8 + ft 

13ft — U. 
2 %— ft 
4ft + ft 
* 

4ft + ft 
2ft— ft 
7* — ft 
IS — ft 
19* + ft 
21 ft + ft 
21 *— * 
6ft + ft 
17ft— ft 
4*— ft 
<* 

14* + ft 
21 * 

27ft— M 

6* 


551 

65 





5* 




1 

3* 

3* 

3*— U 











68 

Vi 

* 

V3 + % 



10 

4 

8 

8 

8 







1 Vi — >4 

53e XI 


30 

17% 

17% 

IP*— % 

3 

14% — Vk 

40b 43 




14% 



34 

1306 

46* 




36 

200X 48 

46% 

48 +2 



11 

9 

4 

3* 

4 


11 

30 

4 

3* 

3* 


25 

17 

43 

10 % 

10 

10 — * 










24 

68 

17% 

16* 

17 



10 

78 

W* 

18 

18 — * 




25 

1 % 

1 * 

1 * + * 




68 

6 % 

6 * 

6 % + * 

560 22 

10 

8 

25* 

25% 

25%— % 




126 

6 * 

6 * 

6 * + U 

JO 

15 

13 

72 

16* 

16% 

16* + % 

40 

24 

Id 

38 

25% 

25 

25% + % 


SOYBEANS ccan 
1000 DU nnmmum- dollars per bushel 
668 497ft Nov 5.01 544* 


Jan MS 5.18ft 
122ft Mar 526ft 531ft 

531* May 538 541ft 

536* Jul 545 548* 

535ft Aug 544 548 


Sea 536 538 
Nov 533 137 


574 535ft Aua 544 548 

528 532 Seo 536 538 

632 527 Nov 533 137 

163 140ft Jon 

Est. Soles Prev.soies 3DJ4I 

Prev. Dev Open lot. 70014 uo 717 
SOYBEAN MEAL(CBT1 

100 Iona- donors per ten 

180J0 17230 Oct MUM 144JD 

I84JOO 12540 Dec 141.33 14530 


Prey. Soles XJ4T 
at. 70014 up 717 


104* +64% 
117* +JMft 
131* +64* 
541ft +JB4* 
548* +J8% 
548 +-05Vx 

538 +6 4ft 

536ft +3** 
548 +64* 


3* 

22 * 

2* 

10 * 

10 ft 

ss 

“«k 

8* 

M 3* 
3* 3ft 
6 * Oft 
4* 
9ft 


3%- ft 
22* + ft 
2 *— ft 
10 *+ * 
10ft 
9* 

3*— ft 
26 
6* 

8% + % 
3* 

Sft— ft 
6* + * 
4*— ft 
9ft + ft 
* 
* 



n 9 41 

7 46 

163 31 

2 

5 32 17 

.07* 24 ^ 

• U0 , « 

7 2BS 

20 14 22 5 

8 181 

I 60 106 

,12b .9 10 

419 
139 
17 212 
.96 9.1 63 1 

35 2 


5 4* 

46 45* 

1* I* 
2 * 7 * 

7* 7U 

* 

37ft 37* 
6* 6* 
19* 19 
1 * 1 * 
11 * 11 * 
13* 13 


6* 6ft 
10ft 10ft 
4* 4* 
3* 3* 
4* 6* 
4* 4ft 
4* 4ft 

6ft 6ft 
23* 22* 
35* 35* 


5 + * 

45ft— ft 

1 * 

2* 

7* 

Tt-lh 

37* 

6ft 

19* + * 
I* + ft 
11 * 

13 

6* + ft 
TOft 
4* 

3* + * 
6* + ft 
«ft 
4ft 

6ft + ft 
23 + * 

35* + * 


17* 11* Joclvn 50b 411 10 
7* 5* Jacobs 

4* 2* JelAm 9 

1ft ft JelAwt 
9* 5ft Jetnon Jit 1Q3 12 

6ft 2* John Pd 

11* 7 JahnAm JO ■ 51 10 

11* 6 Johns™.; 4 

7* 2* JmpJkn 17 


6 12ft 12* 12*— ft 
28 5ft 5% 5* + ft 
137 4* 4* 4* + ft 

74 ft % ft 
17 7 6ft 6ft— ft 

33 3 2ft 2ft— * 

19 7* 7* 7* + Vs 

17 m m ff*— * 

38 3* 3ft 3ft + ft 


38* 15* 
33ft 12ft 


m 



39ft 31* 
4* lft 
1« 18 
13 10* 

15ft 9* 
24 IS* 
23ft 14 

4 2ft 
12* I 
7ft 2ft 
2ft ft 
4ft 2* 
4ft 3ft 
4* 3ft 

5 2ft 
5* 3ft 
3* 2 

16* ID* 
30ft 22* 


KnGspf 450 12J 
KaaokC 


KavCp JO M 7 
KflyJ n JOB 15 10 
KeorNt A0 XI 17 
Kenwln JOa 43 9 
Ketch m -65f 3,0 21 
KevCoA .159 5D 18 
Key Pit JO 2J 16 
KeyCa 6 


100x37 
161 3ft 
100 12ft 
52 12ft 
4 12* 
6 18* 
422 21ft 


Kev Pis JO 23 

KeyCa 

KevCawt 

KMdewf 

Kilem 

KMark 

Kirby 

KlIMtg 

Kleerv JJ2r 3 


KeeerC 2J2 07 76 


Hft 36ft— ft 
3* 3ft + * 
12ft 12ft + ft 
II* 12ft + ft 
12ft 12* + ft 
18ft 18* + * 
20ft 21* +1* 
3 3 

8* 8* + ft 

3 ft ^ + * 
3* 3ft + * 
3* 3*— ft 
3* 3*— ft 
2* 2* 

4* 4* 

2ft 2ft 
13* 13ft 
26* 26*— ft 


16X50 
M74D 
14750 
1*7 JB 
1A00 
•4&UC 
EsL Sales 


127JB Jan 14220 14580 
130.00 War 14350 14750 
13258 May 14458 14550 
13400 Jul 14650 14950 
13550 Aug 

13750 Sep 147J» 14950 
14050 Oct 14650 14650 
14250 Dec 14550 14850 
Prey. Safes 8706 


MOJO 14450 
14120 4510 
14158 4520 
14330 14720 
14450 4850 

14650 492D 

4830 
14750 4850 

14600 14650 
MUM 14750 



m 


Pro*. Day Open Int. 41209 


Metals 


Livestock 


6021 

4055 

55 6025 60J3 

61.18 

50 6855 6155 
.05 61J0 62JB 

30 6150 6255 
50 6240 6220 

35 6235 4325 

gi zn 

JO 6X20 6325 
.66 ID 
6445 


3ft + ft 
10* + ft 
9 + * 

II* +* 
lft 11* + * 
1* lift + * 
ft ft 
3* 13ft 
8* 9* 

9ft 
8* 

4ft 


3% — ft 
3*— ft 
19* + ft 
19* + ft 
Mft + * 
7ft— ft 
Bft + * 
ft 

9*— * 
10* 

9*— * 
lift— ft 
44% + * 
13ft— ft 
37*—* 
21* + ft 
TO*— ft 
81* + * 
84 +2 

6* 


CATTLE (CMS) 







40000 ibx- cents oer Ih. 






65.90 

5230 

on 

61 J5 

62.00 

6145 

6140 

— JH 


sum 

Dec 

6X75 

6455 

6X57 

6340 

+.10 


5455 

Frb 

4155 

6205 

6145 

6140 

6757 

5550 


6150 

61J2 

6125 

6140 

— >15 

66JS 

5425 


41-90 

6200 

61J0 

6145 

—3S 


5SJ0 


5980 

6055 

5952 

S952 

—28 

6040 

50.10 

Oct 

3X75 

5X75 

5X75 

5875 


Est. Sales 15433 Prev. Sated 7X965 
Prev. Day Open Int 53527 up 632 




FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 





44500 lbs.- cents Per lb. 





-JO 

7252 

5645 

Ort 

6500 

6570 

6500 



58,10 


£6 25 

6685 

66,10 

66.12 


7940 

6050 


6BJ0 

69.05 

6055 

6875 

+45 


6043 

Mar 

AA Rfl 

69 JO 

6657 

6X00 


71 JH 

6040 


68J0 

6840 

6745 

6040 

+.15 

7000 

60.10 

May 

6645 

66JS 

6645 



60S) 

65.75 

Aug 

6740 

6745 

6740 

6745 


Ext. Sales 

1 J17 Prev. Sales TJ35 




Prev. Day Open Int. 9,197 up 139 




HOGS (CME) 







305n.bA-«nh»wr«x 

4750 

47 JO 

4675 

4642 

—48 


*5S 

Dpt 

4640 

4640 

4555 

4542 

—40 

5047 

38.10 

Feb 

4545 

4557 

4442 

4480 

— J7 


m 


Currency Options 



2* 

2* 

2* 

— 

* 

1* 

1* 

1* 

— 

% 

18% 

» 

18 



18* 

18* 

18* 



9% 

8* 

8* 

— 

Yi 

V% 

y% 

9% 



S* 

5% 

5% 

_ 

Vk 

17* 

17* 

IT* 

+ 

% 

7* 

6* 

/% 

+ 

% 

29* 

29* 

29* 



6% 

6* 

6% 



6* 

6* 

6* 



33% 

33* 

AH* 

+ 

% 

1* 

1* 

1* 

+ 

% 

4% 

4% 

4% 

— 

% 

1* 

1* 

1% 

+ 

% 

37* 

37* 

37% 

+ 

% 

15* 

15% 

15% 

— 

* 

12 

II* 

n* 



10% 

10* 

10% 



14% 

14 

M 

— 

% 

I7U 

II* 

II* 

— 

* 


13* 6* 

11 * 6 * 
13ft 4ft 


7 

9 
28 

58 45 10 
JO LI 18 
18 
15 


30 13ft 
15 1* 

1 * 8 * 

72 9* 
161 2* 

93 8 
W 18ft 

46 * 

11 20 
43 3* 

79 17 

101 19* 
96 50 
30 19* 
79 10 

73 15ft 
188 18ft 

m 9* 

Z11 IV* 
13 5* 

3 4 
124 78 

15 21* 

47 8* 
TO X9 
42 13ft 

16 21 

457 4* 

2** 


I ■ ZB* 
735 13* 
3 Mft 
11 18 

33 IK 

7 *3* 

T 

>0 1* 

1 ? 

2 ID 


13ft 13ft 
1* I* 

8% B% 

8* Sft + ft 
2* 2* 

7* 8 

IB* 18* + » 
ft ft— ft 
19* 20 
3* 

16ft— * 
18* 

48 — 1* 
19* + ft 
18 + ft 

15* 

17ft—* 
V* 

19*— * 
Sft— ft 
4 

77ft 
21* 

8%- * 

17ft—* 
13ft— ft 
20ft + * 
4 — * 
28ft— % 
13* + * 
Mft + * 
17ft— % 
17ft- ft 
Uft + * 
2 

16ft— ft 
Oft— ft 
1* + ft 
8* 

nr* 

9ft— ft 


238 97 

4% 1* 

37* 

r 1 

11* 

bill 

14* 

6% 

5* 

2% 

6* 

4 

10% 

4* 

20 

7* 

B* 

4* 

20* 

7* 

“T 

34* 

24* 

66* 

52 

62 

48* 

9* 

Mb ’ 

15* 

2* 

r 

28* 

2J 

14 

8* 

19* 

11* 

16* 

13% ■ 

11* 

7* - 

13* 

6* 1 

6* 

3* 

10* 

3* 

4 

2% 1 

22* 

12* 

31* 

21* ' 

10 

B* 

3* 

1* • 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 



ux 

1 7 

Option A 

Strike 






Underfiring 

Price 

Calls— Loot 

Pott Last 

Nov 

Feb 

Mar 

Nay 

Feb 

Mar 



12J08 British Pouod&cBnts per wm. 




BPound 

135 

r 

« 

s 

860 

9 

9 

14143 

140 

3 JO 

I 

s 

1 JM 

s 

9 

14143 

MS 

0.95 

B 

s 

r 

9 

■ 

14143 

150 

0JS 

9 

s 

r 

9 

9 

62408 West German Marta-cants per aaH. 



□Mark 

38 

r 

s 

9 

009 

9 

S 

37.82 

37 

1J0 

9 

9 

033 

S 

9 

3742 

39 

0.26 

S 

9 

r 

8 

■ 

1 £250400 Japanese Yen-lKHtn of a cent per aML 



J Yen 

45 

r 

s 

s 

OIB 

S 

1 

4643 

46 

r 

9 

1 

043 

S 

■ 

4643 

47 

050 

S 

s 

r 

9 

9 

4643 

48 

Q74 

5 

a 

r 

9 

9 

I 62400 Swiss Francs-centx per unit. 




SFranc 

43 

r 

9 

9 

Dj06 

9 

9 

46.11 

44 

r 

s 

9 

0.17 

s 

9 

46.11 

45 

f 

s 

S 

03V 

9 

S 

Dec Mar 

Jun 

Dec Mar 

Jaa 



12400 British Pouods-ceots per unit. 




BPound 

110 

3140 

r 

S 

r 

r 

S 

14143 

115 

36.40 

r 

9 

005 

030 

9 

14143 

130 

2140 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

14143 

135 

1640 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

14143 

130 

1IJD 

1240 

r 

040 

r 

r 

14143 

135 

7.15 

r 

r 

120 

4-00 

r 

14143 

140 

3J0 

oa 

740 

ADO 

615 

7 JO 

14143 

145 

LOO 

4JB 

5J5 

r 

865 

r 

1414] 

150 

QJ8 

2M 

r 

r 

r 

r 

5BJM0 Canadian Donarvcootc per enR. 




CDollr 

73 

r 

r 

r 

017 

r 

r 

7X23 

74 

QJJ 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

62J00 West German Marks-raols per unit. 



□Mark 

31 

6.75 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

3742 

32 

r 

r 

r 

BJQ2 

r 

r 

3742 

33 

4.92 

r 

r 

003 

r 

r 

3743 

34 

X96 

r 

r 

0JJS 

r 

r 

3742 

35 

3JK 

r 

r 

oio 

038 

r 

3742 

36 

223 

215 

X3B 

021 

060 

r 

3742 

37 

1S4 

2JE 

r 

as! 

r 

r 

3742 

38 

0JW 

165 

222 

093 

134 

r 

3742 

39 

052 

1J1 

r 

1-53 

r 

r 

725400 French Francs-ieths pf a ceot per non. 



FFronc 

125 

r 

4.13 

r 

r 

r 

r 

6J5B400 Japanese YH-wottn pf a cent per naif. 



JYen 

40 

6,50 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

4643 

41 

5J2 

575 

r 

r 

r 

r 

4643 

42 

440 

r 

r 

004 

r 

r 

4643 

43 

345 

4J» 

r 

008 

r 

r 

4443 

44 

177 

A19 

r 

0.17 

r 

r 

4643 

45 

r 

•3M 

XQS 

r 

r 

r 

4643 

46 

1J« 

WO 

245 

'327 

r 

r 

4643 

48 

040 

urn 

r 

116 

r 

r 

62400 Swtxs Francs-tpnts per onJI. 





SFranc 

46.11 

43 

44 

3.40 

7 71 

r 

r 

r 

0.17 

814 

r 

r 

46.11 

45 

195 

MB 

0 

r 

B,S7 

r 

r 

46.11 

46 

liffl 

2JB 

r 

.1-00 

160 

r 

<6.11 

48 

044 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

Total coH voL 

1A35S 


CoM open lot. 11X565 

Total put vaL 

tin 


Pul opea mt. 13X751 

r— Not traded. »— No oolkm offered. 




Lost 19 premium (purchase prkxl. 





| Source: AP. 









m 


Stock Indexes 




m. 


Financial 




Commodity Indexes 


Reuters ... 

OJ. Futures — . ■ . 

Com. Research Bureau- 
Moody* base 100 : Dec. 31, 1951. 
P~ preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. T8,1931. 
Daw Jonas :'basa 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


3* 

2 USR Ind 




6 

2* 

2* 

2* 

21* 

a* Ultimo 



10 

113 

12* 

12% 

12% 

13% 

8* Untcorp 




26 

10% 

m% 

10% — * 

15% 

ii* unlcp pf 

75 

57 


2 

13* 

13* 

13* 

11% 

«% Uni mar 

144*142 


139 

10* 

10 

10* + * 

23* 

15* UAirPd 

J54b24 

M 

36 

22* 

22 

22* + * 

21 

Uft UnCosFs 60 

22 

6 

12 

21* 

21* 

21*— * 

ZW 

1% UFoadA 

M 

67 


59 

1* 

1* 

1*— * 

2% 

1% u FoodB 




1 

1% 

1% 

1%— * j 

16% 

11* utMed 



13 

4 

13% 

13* 

U% + * 

8* 

5% UniteiV 



20 

36 

7 

6* 

6*— % 1 

14* 

9* UavCm 



14 

ID 

12* 

12* 

12*- * 

8* 

6* UrrivRt 



15 

40 

6* 

6* 

6* 

15* 

H* UnvPot 




61 

11% 

10* 

11% + * . 


Commociities 


GommSlilies 


London 

Gmnmodities 


Cash Prices 


Oa. 17 


Oft 
7* 
m 
19* 

22ft 

12ft II* 
6ft 6ft 
2ft 2ft 
15ft 15ft 
lft 1* 
4* 4ft 

n* 9* 

7ft 7ft 
34K> 33ft 

lft 1<* 



10ft 9ft 
20 13 

27* 17* 
10 2* 
23* 16U 
6ft 3* 
13* Sft 
6% 2* 
10* 5* 
9 4ft 
4ft 1* 
IS* 12 
66 53ft 
12ft 8 
19ft 14* 
Bft 5 


VST n 55# 95 
VollvRs 140 75 13 
Valsor s 44 15 15 
vent 

VtAmC 40b 24 9 
VIRffli 

Vomit JO 24 13 

Vertple 

Vlntcch 

VI can 9 

vintae 

Vlrco 54r J 15 

voimi 

VodIbx 40 45 10 
VuIcCd 50 44 17 
Wault 9 


9ft 9* 
20 20ft 
2«* 25 
9 9 - 

16* Mft - 
4 4Vk 
8* Bft 
3* 4 
6ft 6ft- 
4* «*- 

lft lft- 
14ft 14ft ■ 
as* 65* ■ 
8* 8* ' 
18% 18% - 
6ft 6ft 


I 0 

8* 

8* 

8*— * 

i 142 

14* 

w 

14* + * 

1 54 

6* 

6* + % 

2 566 

7* 

6% 

6* 

3 7 

2% 

2% 

2% 

) 8 

20* 

20* 

20* + % 

7 12 

31* 

31* 

31% — * 

617 

135 

Tt 

12% 

* 

’*& + * 

7 26 

19* 

19 

19 

3 60 

6* 

6* 

6% 

TU 

3* 

3 

3% 

15 

11% 

11* 

11*— * 

r 4i 

5* 

5% 

5* 

63 

144 

15* 

% 


15 

% 

i IB 
14 

* 

9 

. * 

9 

Ik + * 

1 73 

IS 

14% 

M* + * 

12 

2* 

2* 

2fc— * 

’ 2 

9* 

9% 

9%— % 

1 

5* 

5% 

5* 

2 

6 

4 

6 

r 7«17 

16% 

17 + * 

53 

1% 

1 

1* 

1 3 

37 

37 

37 — * 

1 6 

29* 


27*— * 

1 108 

8* 

8% 

8* 


21* 16% 
22ft 15ft 
12 4 

16% 4ft 
19% 13* 
24% 18ft 
27* 10ft 
7ft 3ft 
7ft 4* 
2* I 
25* 16 
M% 6ft 
14* 8% 


-24 1J 
40 15 78 
J4 15 IV 


42 15 16 
52t 62 10 


JO 14 14 3205 


20ft 20 
IB 17* 
5ft 5 
Oft 6ft 
19 19 

71ft 21ft 
23* 23ft 
5 4* 

4* 4* 
lft lft 
23 22ft 
Uft 13% 
14* 14 


20ft + % 
17* + ft 
S — ft 
Aft 

19 + ft 

21ft- ft 
23ft— ft 

4ft 


lft 

22ft— * 
13ft 

14* + % 


8 % FPA 44 

16* FotJlnd 40 XI 7 

6 FalrFM 30 

1* FoirmC 

15ft Forty Pi 471 25 
3* Fkkrta 

11 FWvmB 50 67 10 
9* FsJcrps 7 

lift FISCilP -flSt 5J 19 
6ft FltcGE . ... 4 
23* FIKfE pt 450 MJ 

7 FtonEn 

28* FloBck JO ]•! I 
21 FhAa IJSt 61 9 
6ft Food mi S 

5* FOiilIC IB 

D9* FonJCnflJJM# 


125 10ft 
16 19* 
20 Mft 

5 lft 

25 Mft 

106 6* 

24 lift 
306 II* 
9 13 

26 10% 

6 a 

40 7% 
173 38 
9 22ft 
ID 12ft 
33 4 
4002104 


10ft 10ft 
19* 19* 

14ft Mft + ft 
lft lft 
16 16ft 
6ft 6ft— % 
1116 11* + ft 
10* 11* +1% 
13 13 + ft 

10 10% — ft 

27* 38 + % 

7 7 — ft 

37ft 37ft— % 
ZTft Eft + ft 
12% 13*— % 

6 6 + ft 

103 103 +1 


10ft 
10 
916 
9ft 
B* 
30ft 
28ft 
23* 
18* 
16* 
IB* 
IB* 
8% 

33 17% 

19* 14* 
20* 14ft 
IV* 14% 
21 I6U 
20% 14* 
lift 8ft 
26* 16. 
41* 31* 
43* TOft 
TO* “8 
40* 32* 
8 * Sft 
30ft 17* 
13ft 4ft 
13* 6* 

5* a* 

u* i% 

45ft 35ft 
24% 15ft 
2ft * 
26% 19* 




21 

111 2B 

3 22ft 
7 20* 
7 22ft 

IS 23 
15 10 
IB 20* 

4 17* 
2 17* 

17 12* 
7 19* 
TO 17* 
32 9* 

} £26* 
■0X40* 
16002 39* 
12500X 67* 
108 % 
170 38* 
50 6ft 
10 28* 
B 6ft 
13 10ft 
2 £ 

5 9* 

J *** 

£ “ft 

I 35 25ft 

SJ Sft 


13ft + ft 
II* 

11 —ft 
11 

n% 

33* + % 
31ft 

27*— ft 
22 % — % 
20ft + ft 

a — * 

23 + * 

9*— % 
20% — % 
17*— ft 
17* + ft 
17* 

19 — % 
9*"+ * 
+■ * 



SUGAR ^ ^ BWArtart " 

French Branco por metric Isa 

P*c JJ73 1350 1J50 1J60 -38 

“or 1JB5 1J4S 1,367 1J70 —40 

MOV 1419 1419 1J97 1405 —40 

Aug 1480 1480 1435 1445 -43 

2EL S-I- H-L '-^0 1470 —55 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1^83 1500 41 

Eg; roLMgp tots of 50la«. Prav. actual 
sales: 2487 lots. Open Interest: 2X039 
COCOA 

F ranch francs per 108 kp 
Dec 1^60 IM 1.952 1557 —5 

l.w 15W) 1,993 1,997 +3 

MPT JJ-T. N.T. 2J71D — UncfL 

Jly N.T. JLT. 2515 — Unch. 

Sep N.T. N.T. sjwn — UncfL 

Dec N.T. N.T. — mb _ io 

Mar N.T. N.T. — 2560 —10 

Est vaL: P lats p| io Ians. Prev. actual 
sales: 33 lots. Open Interasl: 581 
COFFEE 

Frendi bna per 110 ka 

isr j-as i-ss !« 1569 —5 

1.900 15»0 1,902 1.910 —4 

MOT J.«0 1.104 1.945 1554 +3 

MOV 1,984 1,975 1.972 1.783 +8 

Jly N.T. N.T. 1585 2530 +12 

Sep N.T. NT. 1( 990 — —3 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2507 — — 10 

-Eyt; vq L: u lots at a iorav Prey, actual soles; 
20 lets. Open Interest; 279 
Jounce; Bourse du Commerce. 


HONG-KOHG GOLD FUTURES 
OSS per eaece 


N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 32100 

N.T. 324.00 

N.T. 

N.T. 

n.t. moo 

N.T. 33000 

N.T. 

ivi 


Volume: 23 tats of 100 ax. 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJUperoanoi 


Pray. 

High Law Settle Settle 

OCt N.T. N.T. 32440 32550 

DOC 32740 327 JO 32740 329 JO 

Feb N.T. N.T. 33150 33440 

Volume: <9 la* of 100 ax. 

KUALA LUAIPUR RUBBER 
Mafaryfcwi cents perklla 


W5 


Dividends 


BW Aik Bid Aik i way 

NOV 18550 18650 KUO 18650 

Dec 18550 18A5Q 185J0 18650 {££. 

JOri 18850 10950 18X50 18950 

Feb 19040 I9IJ0 19000 W150 

Mar 19050 19150 19050 191.50 

Volume: 1 lots. 


. S&PlOp 
Index Onhc 


Options 


Strike CrtMjP 
Price Od her Dec Jtti 

US - 171k Tift — 

in I2ft I7>k »»k 11% 

175 7ft 7ft 8ft f*» 

IN 2ft M ft 5ft 

ns 1/16 lft 7 I'M Sft 

NO 1/16 % ft 1% 

TVS - l/» - - 

TsM OBBmhlM JB4R 
IMF cNf open Nf. 647.975 
Total pW 9rt»m« 

TkM ON Wee WL7114M 


PdHNl 

Od No» Dec JM 
1/14 1/16 ft S/16 

— ft ft 11/16 
1/14 Mi 13/MI7/1I 
1/16 lft 1% 31k 
2% lft lft 1 

7ft Hi 9ft - 

- 13% - - 


r-r 


S£ 


X 




% 




Volume: 0 tots or 2s tons. 
Source; Reute r s. 


London Metals 


DM futures 
Options 


K GermminoMttme marks aatt Per mart 


4\IE\ HS^hs-Lm^s 


6^6 63Jj6 +1% 

37* 37*— % 
6* 6U 
28* 28* + % 
£* £U 
10 10% 

4 4 + % 

m m 

35* 35*— % 

25% 25% + * 


ToMSfll 0PMNL7U4H 
Index: 

HKIitStt: Lnelttis 

Source: CBoe. 


LLS-Theasuries 


NEW HIGHS 31 


AmConl Ind 

ConqueslEji 

HonwGon 

FgSPLotD 

TcntvBk A 

WtrmEntAiri 


SmlCEiST 1 AmTrEnpr ComtedSv 


«; Kg. ffisau 

TOIeflel? B 89BA teTtn, 


BHcwm Prev. 

Offer BM Yield YleW 
3-mooftl WU 7.0 MS 741 744 

i^nonpi bill 7 JO 727 745 721 

1 -mar MU 7J8 7J6 7.9J 850 

Prav. 

BM Oder Yield YleM 

J9*earbaad Ml 25/37101 27/32 1042 1053 

Source: SoIomo/i Brothers. 


AetonCo 

SdentEsa 


tESSS/K K En0TA MlaiG «" 


Merritt Lm» Tnoowr i 

Chmtae lor the day: +026 

Ayemwywu:*^'' 

Source: Merritt Lroctt. 


m 


NYSE SesiSold for $425^)00 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Hie New York 
Stock Eycbnnge said Wednesday 
(hat one of its membership seats 
was sold 'for S425,OOCk op S15, 006 
from the last sale aa OcL 1. It said 
S3C5.000 was bid afldS450.000 was 








m 




ANDFHDWNTHEIHf 




















































































^ '-•i-' ■" f ' -•■ : ■ • ' ' • ■ •'. • ■ 


INTERNATIONAL HERAID TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1985 




j . Cim P i te by Our Stiff fiwn Dupmdia A av > 

^ hiEW^YORK -TbTfcL Frau 
; S lower Thursday daw 

m ^ or currencies, bat- 168 
wred by central bank intervention N 
; ^disappointmg. US. economic the] 

!’ said that they be- wed 

Federal Reserve twice mar 

sold smdl amounts of dollars for .Bun 
Deutsche marks and Japanese vm be e 

■ in New York trading. ^ £ 

were reports that the Fed Sept 

and the Bank of Japan were in the Unil 

! SS? «° ul . lhc ^ ^ dolls 
Darnel Holland, vice president of A 

Discount Corp. of New York. “Tfs 

: “Without the intervention the coml 

dollar oould have moved to at least “/ 

ITOagamst die matk." he said. wot 

Dealers said the Fed intervened fcet 
' ^*>6 « mm 

1 n^?Ji 1 \! ellU5ada y’ slowof said 
~-Cu90 DM, but recouped when, woul 

dealers said, the Fed again sold ernt 
dollars. Tt 

pe dollar ended at 2.641 0 DM, econ 

■ a three-pfennig fall from Wedries- 03$ 

! THE EUROMARKETS 


oriXJ,S. EconomicData 


day’s finish of ZtiTZSi-Eadfer hi 
Frankfwt, h ended a* 2:6648 DM, 
down from We dn esd ay’s dose of 
16813-0*0: 

NgwVrtrit that 

the Federal Reser v e sold a' total of 


week. ' Intervention in -foe open 
market by West Germany’s 
.Bundesbank is widely believed to 
be greater than thaL: , 

A surprising 93-percem drop in 
September hobsing starts in the- 
United States.abo lock a toll on the 
dollar. . 

A pfdimmuy estimate of .33- 
percent grow* for the U& gross 
national product in the third quar- 
ter failed to give tbedollar any 
comfort, analysts said. 

“A lot of long dollar positions 
were placed in the New York mar- 
ket yesterday after fU3. Corn- 

said be expected the GHP -estimate 
would be revised higher “ one deal- 
er noted. 

The weaker-dian-expected UjS. 
economic data, which included a 
0.3-percent drop in September ca- 


pacity ptflgatioq, combined with 
ihecentral bankintervention, con- 
firmed the dollar’s down trend, an- 
alysts emphasized. 

The British pound ended at 
SI .4170 in New York, little 
Changed hum 51.4130 an Wednes- 
day. Father in London, it had. 
firmed to $1.4145 compared with 
its Wednesday finish atSI.4085. 

Other lam dollar rates in New 
York, compared with late rates 
Wednesday, included: 11870 Swiss 
francs, down from 11530; S.Q590 
French francs, down from 8.1450, 
and 1,783.00 Italian lire, down 
from 1,803.00. 

The dollar dosed in New York at 
214.80 against the Japanese yen, 
down from Wednesday’s 216.45. 
Earlier in Tokyo, the UJL currency 
finish ed at 216.65 Japanese yen, 
down from 216.40 on Wednesday, 

In Europe, the dollar ended at 
8.094 French francs, down from 
8.173 on Wednesday; 11715 Swiss 
francs, down from 1202, and 
3.0000 Dutch guilders, down from 
3.0245. 

(Ratters, UPI) 


ASEAN Seeks 
More Access 
To EC Markets 

The Associated Press 

BANGKOK — Southeast 
Asian countries called Thurs- 
day on the European Commu- 
nity to allow their goods greater 
access toils market and to step 
Up European banking and in- 
vestment activities in this re- 
gion. 

Officials of the EC and the 
Association of Southeast Asian 
Nations, bolding their first 
meeting of economic ministers, 
said they agreed mi a wide 
range of world economic issues, 
including the stan of a new 
round of multilateral trade ne- 


U.S. Senate to Consider 
2 Appointees to the Fed 




Company Results 

Revenue and profits or losses, in minions, ore in local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated. 


Sweden Calls $ 1 -Billion FRN for Redemption 


! By Christopher Pizzcy 

Reuters 

3jl LONDON — The volume of 


and later issuing a 5250-million 
straight band, dalerrsmd. 
Trading in the 'secondary mar- 


new Eurobond issues remained ket, however, remained 
heavy Thursday. many issues showing lil 

Sweden attracted the most atten- they added, 
tion by calling for early redemption ' Sweden’s straight issu 


Swedish bankers said they un- 
derstood thu Sweden was planning 
additional issues in the market to 


)d quiet, with make up the 5750- million shortfall 
tittle change, caused by Thursday’s call of the 
floater. 

sue pays 10% Meanwhile, American Express 


S*u- 
'Is 5; 
•::: J**B tr 
■ " ;3* 4c 

-as 


# a g 
;•••: Sg- 

■ - - SK ■» 

, 22 


U «?Si?^ f ^ eai ^ redemi ? tion Sweden’s straight issue pays 10% Meanwhile, American Express 
a $ 1 -billion floatmg-rate-note issue percent a year ovTxsevenycars and OverseasoSii Corp. NV issued a 

was pri ced at par. With the 1% 50-nflBc6 CimdiiL-ddlir bond 

West Germany Reports SSSSJSbSSSRE 

Rise in Producer Prices ’f reasnrics - ager, Sbearson Lehman Brothers 

Earlier in the day, Sweden had ItirmnifMmii^ qiKyM^ 

„ called the floating-rate-note issue, the 1% percent fees, at a discount of 

WIESBADEN, West Germany which was to mature in 2003 and about Z 
— Prodi “wp rit: « i inWestGerma- which was paying ^ point over the • Also launched was the expected 
ny rose 0.2 percent in September mean of the six-month London is- SSD-nrilfion Japanese convertible 
f rom th e August level and stood 2 tetbank bid and offered rates. An bond for Yamanoucbi Phaxmaceu- 
percent higher than in September official at the Swedish National deal Co. The I5-vear issue has an 


percent higher than in September 
of last year, the Federal Statistics 
Office said Thursday. 

The price index, based on 1980, 


o ffi c i al at the Swedish National deal Co. The 15-year issue has an 
Debt Office said the loan had bo- indicated co u pon of 2% percent 
come too expensive. and was lead-managed by Nikko 

Traders noted that Sweden had Securities Co. (Europe) Ltd. The 


rose *0.122.1 from 121.9 m August, consistently been obtaining funds issue had been eagerly awaited by 

when it had fallen 02 percent below London interbank tod rates investors, and it qnicklv rose to 

against July. It was 22 percent through auctions under a $4-bQSon trade V4 point over the par issue 

higher than in Augnst 1984. facility. price, dealers said. 


i it quickly rose to 
t over the par issue 
said. 


fairer trade. But they also iden- 
tified barriers to increased Eu- 
ropean investment in ASEAN 
countries. . 

Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah, 
the Malaysian minister who 
chairs the ASEAN side, said 
that these nations had reneged 
on pledges to roll back tariff 
and non tariff barriers to trade. 
Protectionism “continues to 
rear its ugly head in even more 
sophisticated forms, ^..pre- 
vent the sustained growth or the 
developing economies,*’ be said. 

« 

Outwitting 
Auto Thieves 

(Continued from Page II) 
work without iis combination, the 
radio is just as likely to be stolen as 
any other if a thief is unaware of 
the new technology. 

“We want people to know about 
the system," said Dan Petit, a 
spokesman for Saab. “We know 
there is some kind of network out 
there, and the word gets around 
really fast. We figure even the stu- 

aradto if it won’t work”^ 

To that end, Ranh and BMW 
provide small warning decals on 
ihe windows of their cars. Mr. Shu- 
man said Mercedes also had con- 
sidered such signs, but decided not 
louse them. “We felt we would be 
targeting the cars without the signs 
for radio ripoffs,” he said. • 


Manuel Johnson 

(Continued from Page il) 

ventional economists. One liberal 
economist, Alan Blinder at the 
Brookings Institution, says, “Pm 
very disappointed to see someone 
so personally associated with sup- 
ply-side ec on omics on the Federal 
Reserve Board." 

But he and others hope that Mr. 
Johnson’s mild mannw will prove 
him to be a more flexible governor 
than might otherwise be expected, 

“Once he's pan of the Federal 
Reserve System, one would hope 
his more extreme supply-side views 
would mellow” Mr. Blinder added. 

Mr. Johnson, 36, is the highest- 
ranking economist in the Treasury. 
He has been deeply involved in 
wotting out the numbers of Mr. 
Reagan’s tax plan and is one of 
three lop officials who put together 
the administration's 
economic forecasts. 

The forecasts have often been 
derided for excessive optimism but 
have sometimes turned out to be 
more accurate than the forecasts of 
most private economists. 

On monetary matters, some of 
the economists who know Mr. 
Johnson doubt that he has refined 
his position as clearly as be has on 
fiscal policy — the' government’s 
spending and taxation. Until he 
can express his views at the Senate 
confirmation hearing, Mr. Johnson 
declines to discuss such matters. 

In an interview last month, how- 
ever, he said: “Fm recognized as a 
supply-sider, and I don't mind that 
at all if it means reliance on free- 
market p rind pies. But if ‘supply 
side* means cutting taxes will re- 
turn more revenues to the govern- 
ment" — a position some supnly- 
siders took in promoting Mr. 
Reagan’s 1981 tax cuts — “that’s 
another matter." 

Mr. Johnson was born in Troy. 
Alabama, the son of a professional 
photographer who is now retired. 
He did his undergraduate work at 
Troy State University. He then 
went to Florida State University 
for his master’s and doctor's de- 
grees and from there, in 1977, to 
George Mason University in Fair- 
fax, Virginia, where he still lives 
with his wife and two children. 


Wayne Angell 

(Continued from Page 111 
of commodities would not be per- 
mitted to increase or decrease more 
than 10 percent from a base price 
level 

His statement also said the Fed 
should focus on stabilizing the rela- 
tionship between the dollar and 
foreign currendes. 

Is his statement, Mr. Angell 
questioned the wisdom of using 
monetary policy to try to achieve a 
specific rate of real economic 
growth. “More often that not,” be 
wrote, “focusing monetary policy 
on real economic growth increases 
rather than decreases recession-ex- 
pansion cycles." 

Mr. Angell declines lo discuss his 
economic views until he testifies at 
his Senate confirmation hearing. 
But Paul H. Henson, chairman of 
United Telecommunications and 
former chairman of the Federal Re- 
serve Bank in Kansas Cuy, where 
Mr. Angell has been a director 
since 1979, said, “He is a pragmat- 
ic. nondogmatic monetarist." 

Mr. Angell has been interested in 
h anking and economics since col- 
lege. where he did so well that his 
professors urged him to study for a 
doctorate in economics. He re- 
ceived his PhD. from the Universi- 
ty of Kansas in 1957 after writing a 
dissertation on the history of com- 
mercial banking in Kansas. 

Mr. AngeD said that when be was 
14, he and his older brother Charlie 
set up a partnership to farm 12 
acres (4.8 hectares) near Plains, a 
town of 650 in western Kansas. 
Their holding has expanded into a 
3 300- acre farm that grows wheat 
and mi I n. 

He spends his summers farming 
at Plains and the other nine months 
of the year at Ottawa University 
teaching such courses as financial 
administration, macroeconomic 
analysis and money and banking. 

He has taught at Ottawa since 
1956 and was its dean from 1969 to 
1971 He was a member of the 
Kansas House of Representatives 
from 1961 to 1967. In 1978 he ran 
for the U.S. Senate and lost by a 
narrow margin to Nancy Landon 
Knssebaum in a nine-person Re- 
publican primary. 





BcwkAiTHtrica 


economies Laboratory 




3rd Quar. 1785 

1984 

ist Quar, 

1986 

1985 

Cadillac Fairvlmw 

Nut Inc 6SJ) 

912 

Revenue — 

187.1 

1442 

lit Half 

ins 

1984 

Per Share — 031 

047 

NOT me 

077 

743 

R*v*nu*_— 

238.9 

264J 

9 MMthl 198S 

1984 

PerShare — 

HAS 

025 

Profit* 

506 

38.9 

Net Inc ia)l59Ji 

Min 




Par Share— 

OJO 

(MS 

PerShare— — 

UI 

FMCICOT 



.Vetlu Anfillea 

Sctifumbenrer 
MSwr. INS 1184 

Revenue 1.540. 1420. 

Prof n 208.1 3BU 

PerShare 020 IJBA 

f Month* mS 1M4 

Revenue 4JM. 4470. 

Profit* TOJ 871 .0 

Per Shore £43 1A2 

United States 

Allied Bencstiores 

3rd Quor. 1985 1984 

Net IM. MJ 302 

Per Snare 171 07< 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Net Inc. 921 VS 

Per Share 233 214 

ItBSauorternetlneluaesim- 
vision for loa of SSLS million. 

Axner. Broadcasting 
3rd Qtjor. IMS 1984 

Revenue — 70bJ w. 

NM tnc. 2844 4 444 

Per Share __ 1.02 Ul 

9 Months IMS 1984 

Revenue — 23ea 277a 

Net Inc. 121.34 142.45 

Per Snare — 420 4.91 

Amer. Electric Pwr 

3rd Ouar. 198S 1984 

Revenue 1.1 BO. 1,250. 

Net inc. 1141 I3ia 

Per Shore 059 DM 

13 Month* 1985 1984 

Revenue 4J00. 4900 

Met Inc 4749 51 7 J 

Per Shura 250 245 

Amer. Express 
3rd door. 1985 1984 

Revenue — 3 410 . am 

Nor lr>C. 2452 1852 

Per snore UK 085 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 11.040 7.400. 

Net Inc 537 JD 440.1 

Per Share 2M 243 

Amer. Home Products 
3rd Soar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 1210 . 1 . 17 a. 

Net Inc IBM 177.1 

Per Share 122 l.U 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 3 . 530 . am. 

Net me 533.4 £002 

Per Shore 149 329 

Amerl trust 

3rd Qunr. 1985 1984 

Net rnc 2U 19.7 

Per Shore 12S 126 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Net Inc 592 528 

Per Share 117 243 

Per snare results aUiustsU 
for 2-tor- 1 spilt In April 

Arviii Industries 
ardQuar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 2040 2029 

Nef Inc 023 745 

Per Shore 022 (Ul 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 6024 571.1 

Net Inc 2448 2145 

Per Shore 206 14s 


a: lass. I«B nets include gain 
of S3I0 million from sms of 
property. 

BardfCJU 

3rd Ouar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 1116 1BLT 

Net Inc 1158 824 

Per Shore—. 170 055 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue M22 3103 

Net Inc 3)2 26.1 

Per Share 206 123 

Bell Anemic 

3rd door. 1985 19*4 

Revenue 2232 2012 

Net Inc 2849 2492 

PerShare 225 Z54 

9 Months 1985 I9M 

Revenue 6,760. 5.990. 

Net Inc — 8232 7314 


3rd Ouar. 19A5 1984 

Oper Net — 122 10.9 

Oner Snare— 057 028 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Oper Net — 3SJ 312 

Oper Share— 225 241 

Nets mlMr eftomr of szr 
million In o mant/ts vs pain of 

SIS7ML Par snore mulls cO- 

lusted tor 3-tor-) spill In Mar. 

First American 


3rd Quar. 

1985 

1984 

Net Inc — 

10.1 

021 

PerShare— 

063 

OSV 

tMontbs 

1985 

1984 

Nai Inc 

28.1 

307 

PerShare 

1.77 

IjU 

Per more results adlusted 


Per Shore 825 741 

California First Bk 
3rd Ouar. 1985 1984 

Net Inc U 0 US 

Per Snare 048 ojo 

t Months 1985 19B4 

Net me 1849 1S44 

Per Share—. 1.65 1.45 

Cameron Iran Works 
lit Ouar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 1548 1334 

Net Inc 3.90 ta)223 

PerShare— 0.13 — 

a: lass- 

Caterpillar Tractor 

3rd Ouar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 1210. 1210 

Net Inc 1312 (0)922 

Per Snare 123 — 

9 Mouths 1985 1984 

Revenue — 492B. 4720. 

Mel Inc 1112(0)1772 

PerShare— 1.14 — 

a: loss. 

Coca-Cola 

3rd Ouar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 2.170- xn7a 

Net inc 1952 17SJ 

PerShare— 128 124 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue s/m. ukl 

Net Inc 532.9 498.x 

PerShare 406 326 

Cooper Tire & Rubber 
3rd Ouar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 1444 1412 

Net inc 521 744 

PerShare 049 024 

f Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 3924 4222 

NH Inc 132 182 

Per Share— 121 120 

IMS nets metuae lax credit of 

sraum. 

Dover 

3rd Ouar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 353-7 sent 

Net Int 2077 27.95 

PerShare— OJSP 028 

9 Months 1985 19M 

Revenue UB8. «X1 

Net Inc 6922 7543 

PerShare— 1.95 2.12 

IMS nets Include pain of SSI 
million. 

Dow Chemical 


tor 3-tor-S split in Aue. 

First Pennsylvania 
3rd quar. 1985 1914 

Oper Net 463 123 

9 Months 1903 1904 

Oper Net 122 112 

198 5 nets exclude pain ct 
SS^S million. Per shore results 
after pre f erred dividends. 


FMC 

3rd Quar. 1985 198« 

Revenue 7854 7672 

Net Inc 692 57.1 

Per snare 227 227 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 2450. 1510. 

Net Inc 1572 1642 

PerShare — 625 524 

IMS nets induce lasses of 
31 cents a snore in au oner 
end of SI cents In 9 months 
from discontinued opera- 
tions. 


Gannett 


3rd Quar. 

1*15 

1984 

Revenue 

5502 

4732 

Net Inc 

SO.7 

54.9 

Per Snore— 

076 

069 

9 Months 

1985 

1984 

Revenue — 

1290. 

12*0. 

Net Inc 

1718 

149.4 

PerShare — 

2.17 

127 

Golden West Fla. 

3rd Quar. 

1*85 

1984 

Nat Inc 

53.91 

19*7 

PerShare 

Z60 

0.95 

9 Month* 

1985 

1914 

Net me 

11 501 

60.SC 

Per Share 

550 

293 


Nats Include pains of S3Z! 
million vs tsMMOO In Quarter 
ana of 3449 million vs SIX3 
million In V months from sale 
of securities. 

Great Western Fin. 

3rd Quar. I9H 1984 

Net inc 574 152 

PerShare 143 044 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Nat Inc 1347 67.9 

PerShare 326 Ul 

Insllco 

3rd Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 2092 2072 

Nei Inc — S.93 9.13 

PerShare OJO 020 

9 Months 198S 1*84 

Revenue 637.1 6062 

Ne) Inc 222 252 

PerShare— 1.15 J4i 


— — 


3rd Quar. 

1985 

1984 

3rd Quar. 

1985 

1984 

Bone one 


Revenue 

2270. 

2230 

Revenue 

2460. 

2060. 

3rd Ouar. 

1985 

1984 

Net Inc 

1072 

1572 

Net (nc 

102b 

89 b 

Net Inc 

34.W 

2826 

PerShare— 

056 

OBI 

Per share 

1-54 

126 

Per Share 

058 

050 

9 Months 

1985 

1994 

9 Months 

1985 

1984 

9 Months 

1985 

1984 

Revenue- 

caw. 

EL730. 

Revenue 

ceoa 

5570 

Net inc 

9523 

8020 

Net Inc 

37U 

475b 

Nel inc 

273J) 

235b 

PerShare 

1.43 

1X1 

Per Shore— 

175 

224 

PerShare 

4.14 

263 



Thursday^ 


I J LI 


Prices 

NASDAQ prices os or 
3 pjm. New York time.' .• 
Via The Associated Press 


7* 


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289* 1446 
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Number of Business Failures 
In France Declined in September 

Reuters 

PARIS — The number of French business 
bankruptcies, seasonally adjusted, fell in Sep- 
tember to 2,023 from Z 166 in August, the 
National Statistics Institute said Thursday. The 
figure for September 1984 was revised upward 
to 1,877. 

The total of bankruptcies in the first nine 
months of the year rose 6.1 percent to 19,784 
from 18.651 in the first nine months of 1984. 



































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER IB, 1985 


, 19313 ? 


PEANUTS 


sssssa 


HAU-P/'S COMET 15 


THE NEXT TIME IT 


ACTUALLY A LAR6E CHUNK f&SSES OUR EARTH WILL 


OF PIRTY ICE... 


BE IN THE YEAR Z06Z.. 


OF COURSE, UJE J LL AU- 
BE B6HTY YEARS OLP 
WHEN THAT HAPPEN 5 „ 


books 


\( EXCEPT FOR 
u YOU, MA'AM.. 


illiailll HUH 


aaaun 



DARLENGHISSIMAs 
Letters to a Friend 


BLONDIE 


ACROSS 


43 “Happy 

lHemispheri- B , irth ^2 y L’* “"■« * 

caliv roofed playwright amusin 

6AcraT 44 As written, in 14 Kind of 

Fawcett music 17 Hogans 

12 Ridicule 45 ° use ,eeder 

13 Crane of 46 Phony : Abbr. 22 Paid to 

fiction 47 Prized family witopa 

“isr-- - 5 EF sss 

16 What the sky is 5pEE2F“ n »SSa! 

18 Globes 52 Pop out Z7 LiKea r 

19 Vmm 53 Motorized crowd 

20 Poet Merriam nops ^^reSv 

21 Half of CV1 54 Blends M SSS 

22 garde ™*wfor 

ScSSSL DOWN 31ta^° 

on^ 8 1 Hilliard- Mann 32 SjjS 

27 r ri - , ” tte ,a&ir -gf 

28 Up to here antelopes 35 Double- 

29 The Fifth 3 Father of *£llevs 

Republic since Waters . 37 Ratten 

1958 4 Enush palter again 

38 Kind of edition 38Ruark’i 

33 Monroe and 5 . r.*® 0, •• 

Fairchild 39Activiti 

34 Skipped town iSkemiSm* 40QKmet 

35 Extensive Lauder 

36 Chips in gRrSciark 22““ 

37 U.S.-Mexican 9 French Jesuit ^ 

boundary missionary- Jjj N.B_aT 

41 “Hamlet” lexicographer whistlei 

opener 10 King Heze- 50 Feathez 

42 Wimps kiah’s mother footer 

O New York Tones, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


49 Alter, asa 
district 

51 Court action 

52 Pop out 

53 Motorized 
flops 

54 Blends 


1 Hilliard- Mann 
song: 1950 

2 African 
antelopes 

3 Father of 
Waters 

4 British painter 
of birds 

5" Rosen- 

kavalier” 

6 By starts 

7 Like millions 
of backs 

8 Role for Clark 

9 French Jesuit 
missionary- 
lexicographer 


io/ia/&s 

11 Roots 

12 Wryly 
amusing 

14 Kind of mill 

17 Hogans’ 
relatives 

22 Paid to play 
with paste- 
boards 

23 Competed 

24 Shocks 

26 Comforts 

27 Like a football 
crowd 

29 Criticizes 
harshly 

30 Same story in 
new form 

31 In 

32 “Innkeeper of 
Europe” 

33 Actor Craw- 
ford, to pals 

35 Double-banked 
galleys 

37 Flatten dough 
again 

38 Ruark’s “Poor 



By Janet Flanner. Edited and with com- 
mentary by Natalia Danesi Murray. 507 
pages. S24.95. 

Random House, 201 East 50th Street, New 
York, N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by John Malcolm Brinnin 


settJssssssPSSs 

andfc introdolrito an outg«^and 

tells he/ he’d ra«w«tb an oedUou a* ,S«b% 
and presents the dark Sdhan ,s 

ding with him- Six years later. 

Katherine Axrne Porter and N*** Bou- 
langer — receives an honorary degree from 
b pmwntKV that includes an 


F OR 50 years, under the pseudonym Genet, impassioned speeca jot 1 "^T. 

Janet Flanner contributed installments of came wsmt man. now Massachusetts ju*™* 




ANDY CAPP 


10 King HezE- 
kiah’s mother 


39 Activities 

40 Cosmetician 
Lauder 

42 Tearful one 
45 Linen robes 

48 Free (of) 

49 N.BJL 
whistler 

50 Feathered six- 
footer 


IM-fYARENOU 
V. DRINKING > 

^ONVCUR 5 
OWN,ANCY?l 
>■ BILLVS -< 
O/ER THERE Y 


H/M? 

FORGET 
“7 IT r — ' 


HgQON SPDER SABlOKE 
y A BTT EFFEMINATE-^ 
( WHO ALMerS LEWES ) 
VI. WH&J HE*S . -/ 

f HAD ENOUGHS 


ma gazine. For more than 30 of those years, 
another series of letters — more intimate and 
less concerned with appearances — went to 
Natalia Danesi Murray, the woman die loved. 
“DaiimghissUna” she called Murray, and tins 
record of what Murray terms their “passionate 
friendship*' shows why. 

Murray was 38 when she met Flanner, who 
was 10 years older. Both women were once- 
married. both engaged in public careers — 
Murray was a broadcaster conveying to her 
Italian countrymen under fascism a sense of 
“the American way of life, its spirit and its 
freedom.** Planner had chosen Fans and expa- 
triation over Indianapolis and the gentle aus- 
terities of her family's Quakerism. Murray bad 
chosen New York and American citizenship 
over Mussolini’s Rome and the state of bring 
“Catholic, by tradition.” Self-exiled by choice, 
cosmopolitan by nature, they adopted one an- ~ 
other at once and for good. 

In her first letter, written in 1944, Flanner 
chides herself for dealing with “tenuous mate- 
rial idiocies” rather than “items of deep conse- 
quence.” In her Goal letter, written in 1975, she 
is troubled, equally, by the obscurities of Hen- . 
ry James’s “book on the Initiates” and Lan- 
vin’s failure to provide “any new styles for 
tailored suits.” First to last, her fleeting “mate- 
rial idiocies” give these letters a breeziness of 
address and unguarded feeling that nicely 
complement the more formal dispatches ca- 
bled from France to The New Yorker. 


right o’clock the phone rai«at JosetteJ Lazar s 
St where I was dining with hex, and Vfcuimur 
Vogey. a Petrograd aids — the 
that Cubist drawing in the Shawns Ajj.*"™ 
I gave them— and heard Josette say. Kennedy 
shot. Ob, na Not “dead" — h can’t be true. 

Her list of acquaintances omits no rneof 
any consequence anywhere; the number of 
those she counts as friends is almost as prodi- 
gious. In the security erf her relationship with 
Boulanger, she comments freely on figures 

from both lists, and, with every opportunity to 

iniliiip in gossip for its own sake, never does. 
Herjudgments of others are no more rigid than, 
those she applies to herself. Falls from grace, 
however distressing, are all too h uman and 
explicable, and yet she can also call Iter own 
shots. “Take Tennessee. His imagination is a 
dine d ramatic cesspool which fortunately spills 
onto the stage where it still shocks me, instead 
of into min d er s or destructions in bars or 
motels. But he is a real hater, seeing as aa 
idealist (true? I wander) only the haieftu side of 
life and love, in a continued ftzty . . . of dis- 
satisfaction.” 


Gttas Daflf ■*•«« Nn 

Dm fr| M«vl AvwrieJ ! 


WIZARD of ID 


But even when she lets her hair down, Plan- 
ner’s zeal to know, to underatand and to com- 
municate is apparent. Seldom have lave letters 
contained so high a quotient of political dis- 
course, or more confidently assumed that the 
beloved is as g]ad to hear (he results of a debate 
in the Chamber of Deputies as to be told that 
die is “a woman in a million in mature ele- 
gance, char m and s ensuali ty " 


Along with Gertrude Stan, she dared to say 
of F. Scott Htzcralrf: “My God. his superiority 
is an artist over Ernest Hemingway is incom- 
parable. Ernest was a recorder, Scott a novel- 
ist.” Even her friend Leonard Be rns tein did not 
escape her finely tuned ear and ready wit: “Hfc 
must have had perhaps thirty or forty curtain 
calls. It was as extravagant as his programme, 
direction and also solo playing of concertos by 
Bach, Mozart, Ravd. then Gershwin’s Hues in 
which later he missed as maw sop notes 
... as if he been Rubinstein himself.” 


- In the annals of American character; Janet 
Flanner is both eponymous and uniqne — the' 
corn-bred woman of the world who meets that 
world on its terms and yet reserves for herself a 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


V 



' v rr^AmMi 

Go\vG-wwm w, eee 

JU.WdUNK4JT$ WlU-avePITUP 

. OF-ttem?? M 




Solution to Previous Puzzle 


BEC3Q □□SOHQ 

□scans nncicasna 
Bunnnna □□□anna 
□□SECT anno aaaa 

□□SS QDQ CJ DD E 3 E 3 [3 

deed ananaaa 
□□□ESS sinnnas 

EEEGE3B3 QQQaaBQ 

Boninaa snnaaa 
asaasaa asa 
oonaca □□□ aaaa 

QBQQ Q 3 E 33 33003 

DEEnnna qsqjeibso 
□□□□□□a oBoana 
□□□□□□ Sana 


and a depth « idealism thk baffles them. The 
balance is neither delicate nor achieved, bat 
inherent. Flanner was a woman who could in 
the course of a monting write a briffiant eooop- 
sulation of the potitial turmoils of the conti- 
nent and, that afternoon, cross Paris Co make 
sure that the knefr Alice B. Tcidas, smrotmd- 
ed hy mflliont of (kdlaa worth of riamtings she 
was too proud to sell, had enough coal for her 
grate, enough tea for her breakfast. She 5ved 


f, 

f.f'-'r*:' 






































►Ks 




wc ... 

j... 

WH r ,. v ‘ 
fit- . " " 


vi ' f: »ir 


: . : '••• • . :• ':■*■ V' • 

••■• - . ••-••'■ . ;■ 

" r~; ■ * ■ --. 


PTTEBNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDA Y, OCTOBER 18, 1985 


Page 17 


SPORTS 


i'jfc-r-'Sfcv.v 



riumph to Set Up an All-Missouri World Series 

Kansas City Laughs Last 
* In Eliminating Toronto 



m 







By John Frinstein 

It ‘aihinfcian Pass Service 


command of the series. With two 
men out. Saberhagen walked 


TORONTO — It was Frank Mulliniks on four pitches. 

White, the Rovals' second base- WiIIie Upshaw then hit a one-hop 
man. who first littered the unihink- s ^ 10 * 10 l h ai smacked off 

able thought three days ago in Saberhagen s pitching hand. 
K af ^ a< . £j tv The ball ricocheted away for a 

“We’ve never had a miracle hit as Saberhagen hopped 


here,” he said. “Maybe this is the around “ P™ 1 - In Game 3. Saber- 


year. 

For the Kansas Gty Royals. 


hagen was hit on the leg with a shot 
bv Llovd Mosebv. He stated in the 


1985 is the vear and Wednesday S 3 ^ “d >’ ieIded a home nm 10 * e 
was the night next balter - Mulliniks. 

Laughed at in Toronto nine davs ™* Kvera l 

ago as a walkover for the buzzing P ,tchcs - Sabertiagen stayed. 
Blue Jays, the Rovals turned the 0n 30 °- 2 P ,tch to Oliver. tbe bd]i 
seventh game of’ihe American clearly got away from him. hitting 
League Championship Series into a ^e Toronto designated hitter on 
laugher of their own bv shocking the ankle. That loaded the bases as 
the Blue Jays. 6-2, before *2.084 the fans went into early delinum. 
spectators in Exhibition Stadium. „ But Saberhagen bung in. He got 

The victory earned the Rovals George Bell to fly to nght field and 
their second American League pen- Blue Jays, who had left 1 7 men 
nant and made them the fifLh team on base in the previous two games, 
in baseball history to overcome a 3- left three more. 


1 deficit in a postseason series. 
The World Series will take place 


They were even more unhappy in 
the second inning. With one out. 


in the state of Missouri between the Sheridan dragged a perfect bunt 
Rovals and the Sl Louis Cardinals. J 1 * 1 P* 51 Sneb 5 ,un S e ana w «I-»ny 


Jack Clark connecting in the ninth faming of Game 6 in Los Angeles. 


U* ABObatad Proa 


Tbe Royals celebrating the miracle after defeating the Bine Jays. 


• - .d 1 ?* 


Clark’s 3-Run Homer in 9th Gives St Louis 6-Game Victory Over Los Angeles ISS&3ff?£E 

By Gordon Erics . the Cardinal rdieverTodd WorrdL “How would you feeTT he said, was over, defended Lasorda’s ded- and McGee, the league batting that the Cardinal starter. Joaquin IhSKiSl 

LofABge/tsThTttSenicr had put tte Dotfeas three outs Tft just Hke the other day, when sion. champion, lined his third straight Andujar. lost in the sun and rais- 

. LOS ANGELES — Whitey Her- a ^ from . Gl !??; 7 - , _ ■ <^ektone.Its tohetoghhght “I don't think h was the wrong single. played for an error, leading to two base to set up ihe«Se?rir?iSn 

zog, angry because his teamhad to - if Lasonk madethe of my career, if that's what you choice at all,” said Sdosda, ever McGee stole second; then Nie- unearned rans in the fifth. 

wait for some marching bands to choice n> letting Niedeiifuer mean. xte loyal soldier. “I don’t think the denfuer walked Smith on a full - fr _ Brel Saberhacen. the Rfwak* 

perform when hevranted to take pitch 10 ^ c “ t lasorda, his eyes with P*^ selection was bad, either. I counL After Tom Herr tapped out o^SSfSrieS-ilEwS iS J[jh starter was forced to leave toil se 

infidd practice, refused to send Ms E*"?. ^ red and his head buried in his *mk Tom just tned to overthrow to first baseman Greg Brock, mov- S5!hLrimihen«. WrwS of an injured hand after three in- 


Andtqar. lost in the sun and rais- Pal Sheridan bunted his wav on 
played for an error leading to two base to set up the game's first run 


Guerrero had been given free 


passes all series — this was his sixth starter, was forced to leave because 
— but this time the next batter was of 30 injured hand after three in- 


-J’itiorufe They need no introduction now. tccs * but 1 what my 

..I r ir: i c. ■. «- - - 


raiajjj Just cal] them National Tretg oe On Nredenfuer's first pitch, a Bradley of Los Angdes. 


by Mayor Tom & 0 : 


: iitjj. champions. 


Two innings before, Niedenfuer 


•: t T% e 


waist-high fastball that split the «*r n , I -| 1 ■ lrt had blazed a 2-and-2 fastball past 

heart of the plate: dark sent a r . f 1 Clark, then s trade out the next bat- 


Tom Lasorda, the Los Angdes htart of ibe plaus, .dak . sent a breale^ heart,”^ Lasorda, 

DodgexS^manager, deaded not to misale halfway up the seats m the softlv miered a cnwi* 

walk Jack dark with first base left-fidd pavilion. A mission ac- ... 

.1 - .1 • , A. , - r_t. _ J f- . ^ . 1 t * “Ir'c rK# MciMt fhinn m rhm 


ttttSSsSSWs!: 

It’s the easiest tiling in the mated by Wniie McGee's two- ran 
rid to say I should have walked single off Orel Hershiser, the 
l But if he hit a deep fly to Dodger starter, and bv Smith's tri- 


be saw that the Dodders had dead- 
ed against an intentional walk. “I 8™**- 
fdi great when I saw they were .“A 11 amazing n 
going to pitch to Jack,” he said- “I thought Wl 

, , _ . both guys to load i 

Whde Lasorda s stratagem i faded work 3f *is time.” 
him. Herzog made his second bold ,, , ... 

decision in two games and came . mi ° 211 m ‘ 

out a winner bothtimL nmg^ndmg double play. 

Herzog, who pulled Bob Forech Herzog knew he was taking a 


The teams from two cities at oppo- of second baseman Damaso Gar- 
siie ends of Imeratate 70 will ton da- He easily heat u for a surpnse 
playing for tbe world champion- base hit A slow ground ball to 
ship Saturday in Kansas City third by Steve Balbom moved him 
Rovals had several heroes 10 second. That brought up Sund- 
sday night. berg, who blooped a single to right 

iundberg. the catcher, drove that scored Sheridan Tor a 1 -0 lead . 
runs, three with a sixth- In the third. Saberhagen, blow- 
triple that sent Dave Stieb. “S on his hand between pitches, 
ng pitcher, from the game. 8> w U P a one-out double to Mul- 
aieridan bunted his wav on hniks. He again escaped the inning, 
set up the game’s first run bul nc,t without controversy, 
w homered." The next hitter was Upshaw. 

Saberhagen. the Royals* who hit a high bouncer down the 
was forced to leave because first base line. The ball took one 
njured hand after three in- bounce en route to first, hopped 
But Charlie Ldbrandt and hl&h on the artificial turf and came 
uisenberrv combined on a <*o« 1 iiw Foul behind the bag. 
dief performance that shut DaJe Ford * ^ umpire, ruled that 
it normt RIim* tav>. the ball had been fair when it 


and later homer ed. 

Bret Saberhagen. the Royals" 


Bill Madlock. On his previous at- nings. But Charlie Leibrandt and ui&u °P Ld ^ ar P* lc J" cu ? a 1 - ame 
bat, Madlock had homered off An- Dan Quisenberry combined on a do ^ n J u f l ‘ou’ behind ihe bag- 
duiar, his third home run in three gritty relief performance that shut , Dale, Ford, an umpire, ruled that 
games. down tbe potent Blue Javs. th e ball had been fair when it 

sai^I romo C on'we^e^^fwas Simple: **11 <Z nevxtr had Si 


with quotes from fans talking otiL He slammed his bat to the 
about chokes and collapses. This ground in anger. Oliver then hit the 


- :: nm on loiu meaenraer mat gave “lie aw ms joo, l man t ao “ ~r ~ — “f auu , u .’ neizog, wbo pulled Bob Forsch nerzog anew ne v 

. ; ’ j.. .. the Cardinals a 7-5 victory and the mine,” the Dodger reliever said af- “u^f^d and they caught it for pic off Niedenfuer that reached the in Game 5 after a long foul ball bv chance with Madlock. 
• . / .^gifteagae playoff series, four games to toward, his back pinned to his fence on one bounce. Brock and wound up getting 5=i “Wdl. the choice wt 


" saec 


-.-■c*ssc 


iviumout ^ounooi uuo an m- was the showdown after more than 
mng^ndmg double play. seven months of work. 

Herzog knew he was taking a “These are the nights you play 
chance with Madlock. the game for." said Toronto's A1 

“Well, the choice was to take two Oliver, who played in a seven-game 
shots with a man on third to get two World Series for Pittsburgh in 


aviiw, ium w fUWVU W UU __ V f.11 1 » | «’ » M w •1U.KX WUUliU gCiUH^ JT3 n CU, U1C U1UUC W(» tu kl&c IWU vuvu, WliU lu a. jcvurgduic 

"two. - locker by a media horde, just as it •sy,** nonK11,av cwaiJteannn. Lasorda said the fact that Gark shutout innings from his bullpen, shots with a man on third to get two World Series for Pittsburgh in 

dark strode after MH» Marshall bad been in Busch Stadium two Niedenfuer said it was not bis had strode out influenced his deci- ordered Worrell to walk Pedro outs or shoot craps and hope to get 1971. “These are the games you 

put the Dodgers ahead, 5-4, with a ; days before when he gave up a decision to make. Mike Sdosda, son to pitch to him in the ninth. Guerrero with Mariano Duncan on a ground balL Worrell made a good remember.” 

home run in the eighth. Marshall’s ninth-inning home run to Qzzie the catcher who had flung his mht The inning began when the pinch- third after a triple, his third hit of pitch and we were out of the in- The first innin g provided a won- 

homer, an opposite-field drive off Smith.- • . to die dugout floor when the inning hitting Cesar CeHenn struck out the day. Duncan also hit a chopper ning.” derful chance for Toronto 10 regain 


i,K 


- x r.i-* 


Capitals Beat 
Maple Leafs 
In Overtime 

* iJ JvT United Press International 

TORONTO — Gaetan Du- 
chesne, retying on his instincts and 
J’jj experience, sowed the garae-win- 
E;si ncr 47 seconds into overtime 
' Wednesday night to rally the 
i. ^.Washington Centals to a 6-5 Na- 

jj NHL FOCUS 

koh tional Hockey League triumph 
i »«, over the Tmonto Maple Leafs.. 

, ‘ It was the Capitals' first victory 

t.H of the season after three losses. 
r*" c Few the eighth time in his career, 
w Ride Vaive scored three goals. He 
fs also registered an assist 
» Vaive kept the Leafs in. the game 

“ with bis first-period hat trick. He 
" s established an early lead for Toron- 
to and answered three goals with 
' 00 \ two of his own in l'J8. At 9:03 of 
the third period, Vaive set up what 
seemed to be the game winner. 
Tom Fergus scored the goal, giving 
i- A" Toronto a 5-4 lead.> 

X ‘T was playing loose,” Vaive 
j- Unsaid. “Evetythmg was going my 
'■ '1. ■ way. I scored three goals on four 



Portugal Shocks the Soccer World 

United Press Iniernnscmal 

. - F ?*°^ kc P Ban lifted on English National Team 

the Lisbon skies and traffic horns J ~ 


United Press International 

LONDON — Firecrackers Kt 
the Lisbon skies and traffic horns 
blared as ecstatic Portuguese cele- 
brated a piece of soccer history 
Wednesday night when Portugal 
qualified for the 1986 World Cup 
soccer finals in Mexico. 

Portugal's 1-0 victory in Stutt- 
gart was the first time any team had 
ever defeated West Germany in a 
World Cup qualifier. Carlos Ma- 
nuel’s 54th-mmute goal made Por- 
tugal the 13th team to book its 
passage to Mexico. 


The Associated Press 

VIENNA — The governing body of European soccer decided 
Thursday to allow England to take pan in the 1986-88 European 
championships. England had been banned following a riot in Brussels 
last May in which 39 people were killed. Liverpool fans were accused 
of starting the violence. 

Rudolph Rotbeobuehler, press chief of Union of European Foot- 
ball Associations, said the group's executive committee requested tbe 
E n g li sh Football Association to take adequate measures to prevent 
violence in and around stadiums where its national team will play. 


first pitch to center for the last out. 

Sheridan's home run in the 
fourth made it 2-0, but the game 
took a turn in the bottom of the 
inning. Saberhagen’s hand had 
swelled and he could not grip the 
ball properly. Howser called for 
Ldbrandt, a left-hander, who had 
pitched right shutout innings three 
days ago. 

Ldbrandt got out of the fourth 
but had trouble in the fifth. Garcia 
led off with a clean single to right 
and Moseby grounded slowly to 
second, advancing Garcia. Garth 
lorg. the right-handed half of the 
Blue Jays’ third base platoon, hit 
for Mulliniks and launched a drive 
toward the left field seats. But the 
wind, blowing left to right, kept the 
ball in the ballpark. Wilson caught 
it on the warning track. 

That catch proved important be- 
cause Upshaw followed with a dou- 
ble down the right-field line. Thai 
scored Garcia to make it 2-1 . Up 
came Cliff Johnson. 7-for-l7 in die 
series, hitting for Oliver. 

Leibrandt fell behind. 3-1. But 
he came back, striking Johnson out 
with an ouiside slider and a snap- 


England celebrated in quieter group in a two-leg playoff early in gland in London on Nov. 13, to ping curve ball that left the big man 


fashion, but also qualified in style December. reach the finals. Should England shaking his head. Oliver was visibly 

with a 5-0 roasting of Turkey in The Portuguese president. Amo- win — and Robson vowed thai angered as his teammates went out 
I p odop. nio Ramalho Eanes, and prime “there will be no presents from us” to play the sixth. 

“I’mven- proud of all the players minister. Mario Soares, set political —Romania will go through if it Moments later, Stieb, pitching 
wbo’ve got us to Mexico," said feuding aside and cabled their beats Turkey away. for the third lime in nine days, ran 

Bobby Robson, the team manager, praise to Stuttgart. Newspapers In Group Six, the only group still out of gas. With one out, he walked 
“I'm delighted and thrilled.” trumpeted Portugal’s total surprise with both places undecided. Den- BretL He then plunked Hal McRae 
Wednesday's matches brought to and joy at its first World Cup quali- mark is virtually assured of qualify- with a fastball Fernandez saved 


seven the number of European fic*non in 20 years, 

... . . .... . r . Iaii la in 


ing. A 5-1 victory over Norway put him briefly, ranging deep in the 


Frank Vercanteren, a Belgian forward, outsprinting Michel Van De Korput of Holland in 
their World Cdp qoafifying match Wednesday in Brussels. Bel^iim won the first leg, 1-0. 


SCOREBOARD 


shots.” I 

" His twniTMte Greg Texrion frit I — - ■ 
the same way until there were 17 pj—^i 
seconds left in the game, when he J 
was called for tripping Larry Mur- - - hat 
phy. • * T * LOU,s 

“I didn’t even hear the whistle,' mcgm cf 
Jet alone know that it was me,” osmah *» 
Terrion said. “He just felL" ' !££r?i b 

. With Tenion in the penalty box, vonsMcrt 
the bottom fell out for Vaive and 
the Leafs when Mike Gartner took 
advantage of the power play. His Momar p 
goal tied the score at 5, sending the 
-game into overtime. •" ctdmoen 

This set the stage for Duchesne, oaviev p 


Baseball 


Playoff Box Scores 

NATIONAL LEAOUE; OAMS «. 

ST. LOUIS LOS ANOCUU 

obrtM drill 

McGw Cf 5 2 3 2 Duncon s> ' 5 2 3 1 

OSmHh u ' 4 13 1 Lontfrx cf .4 00 0 
K#*t 2b 3 0 11 Caban Pta 1 . 0 0 O 

JCJark 1b 5 1 2.3 Gomvmr H 3 0 0 1 

VanSMcrt 5 0-0 O MadKfc 3b 4 122 

Pntftta 3b « o o 0 Arteui 3fr . 0 000 

Portor c 4 120 MarsfMl r» ..4111 
Lantt-Ri If 4 110 Orlnwrin c 3 0 10 
Amtortar p 2 11 0-8rocK lb .2 100 
Brown rti ■ '1 0 0 0 Sax 2b 4 00 0 
Worroii p oooo HmMr b 3 o I o 
Cadeno PH 1 0 0 0 Nleilnfur-P 19 0 0 
Day ley p .0 0 00 

Totals 3B TI2 7 Totals 345 0 5 


AMERICAN LEAGUE: GAME 7 
KANSAS CITY TORONTO 

abrbei abr 

L5mRti If 5 0 2 0 Gordo 2b 5 1 

LJonos H OOOOAtosobycf 50 

WOson cf 5 0 0 0 MuUnks 3b 1 0 

Brotr 3b 3 0 0 0 Gloro 3b 2 0 

McRao an 3 l o o UpsIiow ib 4 o 

Shorfdn rf 4 3 2 1 Olivn- dh 10 

BoKsonl ib 3 10 0 CJbnsn an 2 0 

Sundbro c 4 12 4 GBolf H 4 0 

White 2b fSlIWhltte 30 

ERxiefn ss 4 0 10 Burst* oh 10 

BorfloW rf 3 1 
Faraodx ss 4 0 
Totals Bill Tonis 35 2 


, Hoekey 

National Hockey League Standings 


teams to qualify for the 1986 finals. Portugal's joy was Sweden's mis- Denmark in a commanding posi- hole to cut off what would have 
Europe’s assured quota is 12, and °y- Sweden was bumped from the tion before its away match against been Sheridan's third hit and force 

Scotland would mat* ft iJ’if ft second qualifying spot in European the Republic of Ireland Nov. 13. BretL 

>v»afc the winner of the Oceania Group Two — behind West Ger- The Soviet Union, following its But then Stieb walked Balboni 

many — after losing, 2-1, in 2-0 victoiy over Ireland, needs only on a 3-2 pitch to load the bases. 
Czechoslovakia and then having one point from its Ocl 30 match at That brought up Sandberg. On a 1- 
Portugal pull off its shock victory, home with Norway to secure Lhe 0 pitch, he lofted a triple to right 

While England assured itself of second qualifying spot from the field that cleared the bases for a 5-1 

■ — i i first place in Group Three. North- group. If it loses, Switzerland — lead. 


loses, Switzerland — lead. 


tarsal WALES CONPERCMCE 

* ' * 1 Pofrlck Division 

*00® WLTPUGFGA 

10 10 N>w Jersey 3 0 0 6 13 0 

2 0 0 0 PbllodOiphla 2 10 4 13 10 

* 0 2 1 pmsbarab 1 2 i i u h 

1 0 0 0 N.Y. islanders 1 2 0 2 II 14 

2 0 0 0 H.Y. Ronanrs ' l 3 0 2 11 17 


<#,t WaStfnotan 1 3 0 2 11 17 ji); L* 

join Adams Division llJ.Stoo 

1 0 0 0 Quebec 4 0 0 5 1* S 2D-14.T2 

3 110 Basna 3 0 1 7 22 B areuck' 

J010 Buffalo 3 10 * 22 ■ BOSJon 

* 9 * * Hertford 2 10 4 14 10 voocm 

Montreal 2 2 0 4 13 H Kan 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 111 . Hoi 

NorrU DMdai Ion Br 

St. Louis 2 10 4 * 10 Preten 

Toronto 13 0 S 11 14 

Detroit 0 3 1 1 12 25 

Minnesota D 2 1 1 10 15 

CblCOOO ' 0 3 1 1 11 22 

SffivttK DMslea 

Edmonton 3 0 0 4 14 10 1 

Vancouver 2 i i 5 16 w 

CaJsarv 2 10 4 IB 7 

Wtantaeo 1 3 0 2 12 20 

Las Ansel** 1 3 0 2 IS 23 ° UFf 

. ML 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS , 

BUftaio 2 2 3-4 

Moafraal >0 0-0 

McKenna OJ. Playfair ttj, Ruff (3). Howr 1 

ley l3J.Lanpevin 2 (2). Snots aaaoat: Buffalo °° _~ 1 
ton Penney) 10-12-12—34; Montreal (on Bar- 
rosso) 13-104-01 uohiob 

WlnafPN 3 1 0-4 

Detroit _ 4 0 3—3 INDI/ 

A4aeL0an2 {2l. EUeH(2}.MuUen(niBer- 
rtfl (1), GoUant <35, OaroMcL (2). Shots oa J-f- ' 
toot: Wtantaes (an Mia. Mlcalefl 12-134—33; oaater - 


MacTavIsh <21. CoHev 2 (2). Krufhebtysfcl 
( t ), Anderson 2 (4 >; DSutter (1). Blotter (1). 
TonaUI (11. La Fontaine (2). Shot* an aoal: 
I N.Y. islanders (on Faftr) 12-13-9—34; Edmao- 
10 wn (on Hrudev) 15-04—32. 

14 N.Y. Rappers 2 0 V— 1 

M Los Aopetes 2 I 1—4 

17 Dianna (2).MoeLel1an <11, Taylor <2). Welts 


era Ir elan d reopened the battle for which entertains Norway on Nov. The Blue Jays could manage 
the second qualifying spot with 3 I- 13 — will be back in with a chance, only a single run in the ninth before 
0 victory over Romania in Bucba- Belgium, fighting Holland in a bringing their season to an unhap- 
rest The result was almost as unex- playoff, won the first leg Wednes- py end. 

pected as the Portuguese victory, day, 1-0. Holland, which bolds the 

and it was due largely to a brilliant return leg in Rotterdam Nov. 20, r Retains f mwn 
performance by goalkeeper Pat played for most of the match with w wjvaneiaim, ^rown 
Jennings- 10 men af ter striker Wim Kief t was i'mied Pros international 

" ** *“ “ EBOLI. Italy — Ciro De Le^a of 


They were all magnificent, sent off. 


coons atv in tot ooo- 

roroaf* OH 010 on- 

Qa an Wtalna RBI — Sundborp (1). 


NFL Rejects Use 
Of InsUmtReplay 


i 34 5 B 5 Oaaw Whnba RBI — Sandbar? II). 

007 0M 20)— 7 E T o m o nd oL pt*— Toronto 1. LOP— Koo- St. Louis 
1H no BW— 5. SOS atv S, Toronto 0. 2E— MuiiWks. CBall, Toronto 
dark O). > Upshaw, FomarNtex. SB— Sundbara. HR— Dotnolt 




’ i\’ ^ The Associated Press 

* V; NEW YORK — National Foot- 

ball League owners narrowly d<s 

C feaicd a proposal that woukl ha\« ovaw sj __' 
authorized the use of instant reptoy 
to oversee officials’ derisions dur- 
- ^ r mg this seasem’s playoffs. 

.i> Sixteen of 25 teams present at 
, A the league’s fall meetigs voted 
Wednesday for the use of the re- 
f plays, bul that was three sbori-of 
the ihree^iuarter majority needed 
^ for approvaL 

%'r, ' Instant replay was tested in the 

p preseason in nationally televised 
£. ^ gfVnuwt and generally was cosskl- 
fj- 'I iered a success by league offirials. 

[y jp During the experiment, an official 

in the press box reviewed the times 

ijj p | of controversial plays and notified 
r t the officials oil lbs field that be was 
$ . checking the tapes: 

Of Uk. 28 . plays examined, only 
Jr one call wBs;xevereed: A fumWe 
jh was changed to an inoonqjleie pass 
because the pass receive did not 

'jp, have two feet on the ground when 
^•>2 the ball came loose. 


Los Amtes m no bib- s kj* atv s, to 

Ooron Win Id* RBI — J/Sark <t). > Up*haw, Fair 

. E— Andulor.DP— StLoatoLLOB— StXoui* Sheridan I2J. 
7, Loo Angelas 7.2B— OuaoavAnaii|ar. 3E— 
OSniWuPvmaitH R A te dl ocfctM.MontaBI Kanat air 
(1), JjCtarfc (1}.SB— Otmcaa(1),McG«e (2). s**rt*n 

sn-Gaemera. ... W. 1-2 

IP H ft ER IB SO Oubnbrv 
SLLooh ’ Toronto 

Anduiar - . ; ’* - a 4 2 2 3 **teo Ul-l 

WorreO W.1-0 ■ .2 .2 1-. 1. 2 .2 ^ckor 

DtryteY SJ ' *7 1 0 0 0 .0 2 HBP-Oftvw 


H ft Eft BB SO 


Stteb Ul-l SH 4 4 4 2 4 

Acker 31-3 2 0 0 0 3 

hbp— oflvw by sobornoBtfl, JVKftae by 
Stteb. T — 2; 49. A— 32.MC 


Henhtoar 6M t 

Niacbituor Uo-2 . . m a 
T— 3:32. A-SSJOa.- 


Soccer 


Playoff Results 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
(SL Louis wins series, 4-2) 
Oet. »; Los Anodes A Sl. Louis 1 
Oct. Ifc Lorn Angeles A St. Louie 2 
OcL 12: Sl Louts A Los Angelos 2 
ocr. 13: sl Lams n. Loo Amies 3 
Oct. 14: SL Laois X Las Angelos 2 


West Genrionv & Portugal 1' " ? l“ t" 9 *!** I 

Potato; West Oemxery ii; Portugal W; ° c3 ' 14 ‘ Sf ’ 7 , Loo A neoloj 5 

Zvjcotft 7; Malta i. American i 

OMkAlrtlAR AUfCtMi: Now. !7 f W£«*WWV 
vLCMd^ta-aWj^vLSu^ • 

rmrinnrt - oa. 9: Toronto 6. Kansas atir 5 

ounOtetai Pfcwoif OCL 11: Kansas env A Toronto 5 
oeL W:. Toronto X Kansas C1IV 1 
Balelutn 1, Houona-o oeL 13: Kanos Of* 2. Toronto 0 

Oet. JSs Kanos aiv L Toronto 3 
oa. Ii: Kansas City L Toronto 7 


17 (1); Led yard (1). Sandstrom (2). SJtatrrck 


(l). Shots oa aoal: N.Y.Ranaersfon Jonecyk) about his team. 


20-14-12— 44; LOS AlHHUOS (OH Vorbles- 
breuck) 0 - 1 1-4—24. 

Boston 1 2 0 0-3 

vonco u w 1 2 0 0—3 

Kasper (1). Nlehuls (21, Simmer (5); Smvl 
(11. HoU (4).Tant1 (31. Shots on oaal: Boston 
Ion Brodeur) 10-7-7-0— !4; Vancouver (on 
Peetersj 7-444—21 


Transition 


bloody marvellous,” Northern Ire- “I think it is fantastic that we Italy retained his European ban- 
land manager Billy Bingham said stood up so well ” said the Dutch lamweigbi boxing title Wednesday 
about his f*nm coach, Leo Beenhakker. “For the night for the fifth lime in less than a 


Northern Ireland needs a draw first time in my career l am satis- year by stopping Alain Limcrola of 


from its last match against En- (led with a defeaL’ 


France in a 12-round decision. 


IOC Looking Again at Eligibility Issue 


The Associated Press that would allow North Korea to asked to submit a recommendation 

LISBON — The International organize some preliminary phases for eligibility at the 1988 Seoul 
Olympic Committee is attempting of the Games. He said there could Games, 
to take another look at the eligibil- also be special arrangements for He said the board had agreed 


border crossings during ihe Games, tentatively to a recommendation 
Delegates from the two Koreas by the Internationa] Football Fed- 


lo w h o ltanal mendt r 
www a Hungary 3 : 

Yugoslavia 3, Austria 0 . . 

Scot lend Bast Germany 0 


Basketball 


IfMOOBO 108, OilNW KM 




WORLD SCRIES SCHEDULE 
Oct. 10: a* ABMrteoa Leoaut 
_ oa.2 0: at American Lea g ue 
' Oct. 22: or Nationat League 
OeL 23:- at National League 
x-Oef. 24: At NAHanW Loogut 
rOd 24: al American League 
w-CcL 27: at Aaiertcon League 
tx-lf n ec ew aryt 


Detroit ton Hovwrtl 9-6-1—24. 
Washington 3 111-4 

Toronto 3 I 1 0—5 

Carp N ite r (1L Louoftlln 2 (2), Steven* (11. 
Gartner rt). Dueneone (11; Valve 3 (It. Tor- 
non (1). Fergus (2). shot* on gea H Washing- 
ton (On BenttwrtftJ 14-13-7-2-31; Toronto (an 
Jensen) IB-7-^4— 22. 

Ptttshurgii 2 0 3 0—5 

emcoao 12 2 *— s 

LemTeux2i2],UndsirDnit1).5neoaen (2). 
Snabat (2); Sutter (21. B.wtlcon ML Larmer 
P), Gardner (1), Savard (3). Shots oa geal: 
Pittsburgh (on B an ner - man) M-9-2— 24; Chi- 
cago (an Romano) 11-14-11-4 — 42. 

SL Louis • 1 1—2 

Cft if m i | | | [ i 

Hunter (1). Nattress 01; PeglinshJ (11. 
Shots on goal: SI. Louis (on Lemelta) 19-4-6— 
2»: Calgary (an Wamtieyj B13-7— 2S. 

N.Y. tsiaasm 0 4 0-4 

SOatotoaa 3 I 3-4 


football 10 rake another look at the eligibil- also be special arrangements for He said the board had agreed 

Notional Football uom ity issue, an IOC official says. border crossings during ihe Games, tentatively to a recommendation 
buffalo— W aived uhrsMs Non-fa. rtoii “For 75 years we attempted Delegates from the two Koreas by the Internationa] Football Fed- 
"ciNcihNATi— Troooo Dan Ross, uom end wilhoul success to define what is an met in Lausanne this month under era lion (FIFA) that the 1 984 iout- 
io swnita tor o future droit cMu. amateur,” said Dick Pound, a Ca- IOC auspices to consider the North nament rules should be retained for 
Den ver— A ctivated Han dy RoBWftA nadian member of tbe IOC ex ecu- Korean proposals. Discussions are Seoul. This would throw the com- 
satetrAPtoaidDBirren Comeaux, iinrtocker. ^ jjQ^ “l 0 recent years we’ve due to continue in January. petition open io all professionals 

Detroit— Traded jama McDonald, tried, equally without success, to Pound said tbe general question under 23. provided they had not 
Stelwd **** ° a " nl define what is a professional. of eligibility was bring dealt with in played for European or South 
Indianapolis— R otfwd Frank Mud!*- **No^ we’re looking at a third anew “Athletes’ Code” now under American i earns in the World Cup 

nn, naming Back. possibility, which is to develop an consideration. finals. 

la. RAMs-woived Jim Loushun, una- ethical code for athletes. This may A decision on the code, which . , * 

^iabu— R otoowd atmon srnwr, nn*. ^ ^ solution to one of the most will incorporate most of the present ■ Anchorage vying for Games 
bodrw. difficult problems affecting the rules on digibiiity, advertising and An American delegation seeking 

**^*55! y? "' Olympic movement ” fair play, will be made bv the board to have Anchorage, .Alaska, chosen 

bitaadb r * Separately, a South Korean offi- in December in Lausanne. as the sire for the 1992 Winrer 

n.y. fiiANTs— fiignoo Mary Hama, cor- rial said that his country bad reject- Pound said Olympic officials are Olympics is in Europe this week to 
^prrreHuRGH— stewi D*mis wiaswi, ^ a Noth Korean demand to co seeking new hockey standards to look at the competition and meet 
iinooocktf. >0 o fwo-yoar confreeL plows sponsor the 1988 Games in Seoul avoid another feud like that which with the IOC, United Press Inter- 
dwovow woodruff. comeraodLeniMiaiurM but might agree to joint organiza- disrupted the 1984 Winter Olym- national reported from .Anchorage. 

Ftoocfiwaiefi vine* B*an. wide of rome preliminary events. pio m Sarajevo. Yugoslavia. Anchora^ was selected in June 

recetverond Robert cwTy.oefertstvewcici*. Lee Ha Woo, secieiary-gencral Confusion over the eligibility by the U.S. Olympic Committee to 
■** werter- of the Seoul Olympic Organizing rules resulted in five players being be the U.S. candidate for the 1992 
mol Reposed Baoe usufmsora. Quarter- Qaanwuee, said' that joint or gani - banned on the eve of the Olympic winter Olympics. Other cities vying 
Seattle— ptocm mdw Tioe, uom end on zation of the Games with North Gome because they had signed for tbe selection are Albertville. 

imorod nramro. Korea would be ag ainst the priori- profess oaal contracts with the Na- France; Berchtesgaden, West Ger- 


MIAAU— Rotaased aanaare 
bodtor. 


fullback. 

N.Y. filANTS— Slgnod Mark Karnes, cor- 
n ei tod L 

PITTSBURGH— Stoned Dennis winsRn, 


resonte Ust 

ST. LOUIS— Roactluatei! vine* Boon, wide 

receiver cod RMet Cutty, flefenstve ncxie. 


Intored reacrire. 

HOCKEY 

HaUoaai woa a r lcobm 
Philadelphia— S tones douo Cress- 
man. do f o oso mat v to a muitLvosr eaateoet. 


pies of the Olympic Charter. 

But Ha Woo said it might be 


tional Hockey League. 


many; Falun. Sweden; LiUeham- 


Pound also said the Interaation- mer, Norway; Sofia, Bulgaria, and 


possible to reach an understanding aJ Tennis Federation had be>.u Cortina d’Ampezzo. Italy. 









Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIRUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18. 1985 


OBSERVER 


Right Man for the Role J® 31111 ® Moreau: Her Broadway Days of the Iguana 


By Russell Baker 
XT BW YORK — ■ When people 
" Oltioze President Reagan I 
say, “Name a movie actor you’d 
'? ther bxvc in the White House 
Rpnald Reagan." Oh sure, 
*“ ne b°dy always says, “Jimmy 
Stewart — I thi n k; Jimmy Stewart 
would be a lot better president than 
R^gan.” And that is so irrelevant. 

Irrelevant because Jimmy Stew- 
art would never have the job 

Louis B. Mayer, the boss of MGM, 
knew this when he told the Warner 
Brothers at a sitdown in a neutral 
studio that “Jimmy would never 
acoqn the job because the country 
will always need him to lend a 
friendly hand to all presidents, re- 
gardless of party, when they mew s 
op and to persuade them not to 
give up when the world situation 


That assurance must have made 
the Warner Brothers breathe more 
easily, for hitherto secret studio 
documents now circulating in Bev- 
erly Hnis reveal they had a candi- 
date of their own. This was Allen 
Jenkins, a Warner Brothers charac- 
ter actor whose film roles, accord- 
ing to “Movie Trivia Mania” “gen- 
erally fell into the half-witted 
criminal category.” 

When Lous B. Mayer ques- 
tioned whether this was the imaw» 
Hollywood wanted to put in the 
White House, the Warner Brothers 
noted that J enkins also played 
mugs, policemen, cab drivers and 
bartenders, and was a good friend 
of Jimmy Cagruy and Spencer Tra- 
cy. “Come off it, vou guys!" Mayer 
is said to have yelled at the Warner 
Brothers. “We’re talking about an 
actor who can go up against Frank- 
lin Roosevelt at the polls; Allen 
Jenkins couldn't beat Herbert 
Hoover." 


The upshot seems to have been a 
compromise under which Louis B. 
Mayer agreed to support the 
Warners in making Pax O’Brien the 
first movie an or president if the 
Warners would cast O'Brien in a 
few starring roles to display the 
quality of his presidential timber. 

The first of these vehicles was 
“China Clipper” mad* in 1936. 1 
recently assembled a small group of 
persons who constantly carp at 
President Reagan, darkened the 
room and gave them a dose of what 
might have been: Pat O'Brien as 
chief executive — not of the United 


States, to be sure, but of an Ameri- 
can company pioneering a trans- 
pacific air route to China. 

When the lights went up again, 
they agreed they had been lucky to 

get Ronald Reagan for their first 

movie actor president. Life in the 
United States under a Pat O’Brien 
a dminis tration would have been 
heavy going. 

For one thing in “China Clip- 
per” O'Brien never spoke to any- 
one but always barked, the way a 
quarterback barks signals to a foot- 
ball team. Say this for President 
Reagan: He never addresses the 
nation as if it were six tons of beef 
granting over a pigskin. 

Then there was old “Dad.” You 
and 1 watching the movie can see 
that old “Dad" (Henry B. Walthall) 
is desperately sick and ought to be 
furloughed. Pat O'Brien could not 
see that He drove old “Dad" to his 
death from overwork: designing a 
wing to satisfy outrageously finicky 
government air-safety bureaucrats. 

A man with the slightest knot of 
presidential timber would have put 
old “Dad” in a soft job requiring 
lots of slow travel in the coconut 
belt and got the finicky bureaucrats 
replaced by sensible bureaucrats 
who don’t think it is the govern- 
ment’s job to hamstring business. 


The worst count against O'Brien 
as potential president or the United 
States, though, was bis inab ility to 
surround hims elf with competent 
people. Skill ax identifying quality 
help is essential to presidential suc- 
cess. Poor O’Brien's lack of it was 
ludicrously obvious. 

Right under his nose, playing a 
medium-size supporting role, was 
Humphrey Bogan. Admittedly it 
was only 1936 and few people that 
year could have guessed how stun- 
ningly competent Bogart was. But 
then, in 1980, how many of us knew 
about Ed Meese? Ronald Reagan 
had the presidential knack of spot- 
ting the supporting player needed 
to do the job. 

Five years later, Warner Broth- 
ers gave O’Brien another shot at the 
big job by starring him in “Knute 
Rockne, All-American.” Once 
again he barked tirelessly, this time 
about winning one for the Gipper. 
The man playing the Gipper aidn't 
bark. The rest is Hollywood histo- 
ry. 

New York Timet Service 


By David Richards 

Washington Post Service 

N EW YORK — -We are all 
eunuch.” says the French ac- 
tress Jeanne Moreau. “You are 
eunuch. 1 am eunuch. Farh hu- 
man being is eunuch." 

The musical voice is so lulling 
that you nod dumbly in agree- 
ment. It doesn’t occur to yon right 
off that what Moreau is really 
saying in her sandpaper hush is 
“unique.” We are “unique.” 

“We are all part of this world. 
Speak to any physicist,” she coo- 
tin aes. “This cup is alive. This 
tablecloth is alive. Yes, when you 
look at it through a microscope, 
it’s alive. Nothing is dead. Not 
even a stone.” 

Apparently, all around Jeanne 
Moreau, cells are interreacting — 
here with the cup's and the cup’s 
with the tablecloth's and the ta- 
blecloth's with the journalist’s. 
“And that is why we are pre- 
cious," she concludes trium- 
phantly. “We are all part of the 
continuous movements of the 
world.” 

An international star since the 
late 19S0s, Moreau is preparing 
for her Broadway debut in Ten-, 
nessee Williams’s “The Night of 
the Iguana,” the first time she has 
acted on the stage in Fjiglish. The 
play is scheduled to open Nov. 21 
at the Virginia theater. 

“It is a big responsibility and I 
cannot allow myself to be scared, 
to lose energy through fear,” she 
said “Fear is so bad It confuses 
the mind And these people need 
me to be dear-minded Anyway, I 
have never thought of my life in 
terms of career. I’ve always 
thought of it in terms of experi- 
ence.” 

Moreau is immaculately 
groomed not a hair out of place, 
nails polished to a high gloss. The 
bruised sexiness she brought to 
such films as “The Bride Wore 
Black,” “La None,” “The Diary 
of a Chambermaid” and “Jules 
and Jim” is not so apparent now. 
At 57, she is less sultry than she is 
pretty, delicate, fastidious even. 

Everyone naturally assumes 
that she will be playing the role of 
Maxine, the flashy proprietress of 
a ramshackle Mexican resort in 
Williams’ 1961 play. It was, after 
all, the role that Bette Davis creat- 
ed on Broadway — a brash, nym- 
phomaniacal older woman who's 


it- 



‘I always took life, human beings, vary seriously.* 


been around “Ah, that may seem 
logical,” Moreau says, “but one 
has to beware of logical things. 
Maxine is too American for me, 
too octroverted. I can be maybe 
an introverted American, but 
Maxine is a true Texas- American 
lady. The way strong American 
women move about, the way they 
express themselves, no. no, no, I 
cannot dp that.” 

Instead she has taken the role 
of Hannah, the withdrawn Nan- 
tucket spinster, who stumbles into 
the Lawdiy inn with her 97-year- 
old grandfather in tow. 

_ “Hannah is much more myste- 
rious,” Moreau explains. “I know 
I can do it much better. People 
think because she is a spinster, she 
is a virgin. WeU, maybe she is, 
maybe she isn't. To me, she is 
someone who has an instinctive 
drive toward a higher level of exis- 
tence. She has great tolerance and 
she can see what is behind the 
surface of things. That is the part 
I have been living myself these 
last 10 years." 

Moreau, it becomes quickly ap- 
parent, is given to waxing philo- 
sophical. She says things like “To 
be an actress is to be alive.” Or: 
“An interview is not an interview; 
it is a gift you give me to talk 


about myself." Or this: “We are 
made of all the people we’ve met 
and the relationships we’ve had 
with them.” 

Ask her to talk about those who 
influenced her career. You might 
expea her to name Francois Truf- 
faut or Luis Bud ad or Orson 
Welles, who directed some of her 
best movies, or even Peter Brook, 
who staged the smoldering 1957 
Paris production of “Cat on a Hot 
Tin Roof” which first brought 
her to the attention of the New 
Wave filmmakers. 

Bui no. “There was a lady, a 
widow, who worked very hard in 
this little village, who sometimes 
took me for the holidays,” she 
says instead looking as pensive as 
a Rodin statue. “She taught me a 
lot about bong disciplined, about 
how important it is never to let 


yourself go, about how you must 
always behave as if all the eyes are 
upon you. I think it is important 
for a person to appear always at 
one’s best The way you present 
yourself has a lot to do with feel- 
ing dean and attractive inside.” 

Appearances (and philosophy) 
notwithstanding, Moreau is only 
half French. Her mother was an 
English beauty from Lancashire 


who danced ax the Foiies-Bcrg&re 
as part of the Tiller Girls. Her 
father came from French farming 
stock and during Moreau’s youth 
ran a restaurant in Montmartre 
popular with artists and show- 
folk. World War II threw the fam- 
ily into disarray and her parents 
split up. By that time , hoWever, 
Moreau h«ri found her siting. 

At 18. she auditioned for the 
Conservatoire d’Art Dramatique, 
was accepted and then, barely a 
year later, while stiH a student, 
was searched out by the ComMie 
Fianfaise to play a part in Turge- 
nev’s “A Month in (he Country.” 
She stayed with the company for 
four years, and finally asserted 
her independence “on the boule- 
vard,” which is what the French 
call their commercial theater. 
When her oostar in “The Dazzling 
Hour” fell ill two days before 
opening night, Moreau took over 
the part in addition, to her own, 
playing both the wife and the mis- 
tress of the same man — atourde 
force that now seems prophetic 
and symbolic. 

But it was her passionate per- 
formance as Maggie, La Chatte, 
in “Cax on a Hot Tin Roof” that 
opened the doors far her movie 
career. “All the young directors of 
the New Wave came to see me." 
she says. “That’s when I met 
Louis [Malle] and Francois [Truf- 
faut]. Everything started up for 
me in 1958.” Malle starred her in 
“Les Amants,” whose torrid love- 
making (for its tune), as well as 
Moreau's romantic involvement 
with Malle, helped establish her 
worldwide as the intelligentsia's 
Brigitte Bardot. 

The image of whax one critic 
called “the totally erogenous 
woman” stiH dings to her, fueled 
by her various affairs and by two 
tempestuous marriages (an early 
one to the French actor Jean- 
Lonis Richard, two days before 
the birth of their son; a late (me to 
American film director William 
Friedkin). Moreau is not comfort- 
able with that image and the im- 
plication that she might be emo- 
tionally reckless. 

■ “You cannot take love lightly,” 
she says, with a trace of snippi- 
ness. “You cannot Yon cannot 
have an affair just to have an 
affair. I wouldn’t do a thing like 
that People know about my rela- 
tionship with Louis Malle or my 


relationship with Pierre Cardin. 
But they were not publicized. 
They were what they wert I trav- 
eled with Pierre, I lived with 
Pierre; So? And I have just been 
through a-very fascinating, pun- 
ful, violent relationship with Wil- 
liam Friedkin. It was hard, but it 
was rewarding. And now it’s over. 
I'm not the same person I was. - 
Tm toon secure, richer inside. 

“Maybe I’ve always been fear- 
less. Some people, when they've 
been through hard moments in , 
life; they say, * 0000000 ! Lex’s be 
careful now. Let’s at back and 
take dungs easy.’ I never did that. 

I always took life, human beings, 
very seriously.” 

When Moreau was in India a 
while bade, serving on the jury of 
the New Delhi Him Festival, she 
met a Tibetan astrologjst, who 
pnesdribed the three rings she’s 
wearing: “He told toe what stones 
I should have, how big they ought 
to be, whether they should be set 
in silver or gold, and whichhand I 
must wear than on. It's supposed 
to keep balance and harmony in- 
side the body and "give you 
strength and energy ” 

The rings seem to be wadting. 
What Moreau radiates this morn- 
ing is anything but buried pain 
and lingering hurt. Sieis swathed 
in composure. 

She claims not to know bow 
otheis see her. But it is dear she 
sees beesdf as an. international 
woman, allowed by virtue of her 
f a m e and talent to pursue a spe- 
cial destiny. Her possessions, are 
few. She maintains an apa rt mwn 
in Paris, but sold her coantry es- 
tate in Provence a few years ago 
to Laura Ashley, who died last 
month. “I don’t own anything,” 
she says. “I dissipated every thing 
I was not very serious about mon- 
ey. Not at alL In life, yon have to 
learn about your weaknesses and 
I learned it’s not good not lb be 
smart about money. 

“Life is so strong,” she says, “so 
powerful It is something that 
gpes on and on and 00 until 
death. That is what people do not 
realize. They think when they lose 
something, or someone, there is a 
hole; They don’t beheve that oth- 
er people will come to them. It is 
terrible. But life does go on. And 
it £ves you things all the time. 
You gain and you lose. You gam 
and you lose. It is Eke the tide.** 


PEOPLE 

film on Mother Teresa 
To Premiere at UN Hall 

The premiere of a filra byihC|. 
British director Rfetad AaenborJ 

o^on the Nobel Fcaaftmflau- | 

nnie Mother Teresa of Calcutta 
Sfflbe fadd in the Uraied Natrons 
General Assembly taH in New 

York on Oct. 26. It win be the first 
timea movie has been screened in 
the hall, a UN spokesman saif He 
said Mother Teresa had beaxinm- 
ed to the premiere but did not , 
know whether she will attend. . 4 

D • ’ 

Former U. S. Preadeni Jimmy 
Carter and bis wife, Rosafyiu, an; 
in Nepal for a two-week trek 
through the Annapurna sanctuary, 
and the Mount Everest regiar 
. . . Mkk Jogger* lead anger of 

the Rolling Stones, is visiting, India 
on a two-wedc. “intensely pnvate j 
vaca ti on. f 1 

D M 

Nancy Rea g an , 64, underwent a 1 
colonoscopy, an exammanoatodd- 
tea colon cancer, at the Betbesda . j 
Naval Hospital An aide to the first 
lady desaibed the procedure as 
“the final part” of a gencralpfaysi- 
cal examination begun earlier at 
the While House. Mrs. Reagan was 
■ given “a bill of health,” said •, . 
Brine Crispen, the fixst lady's mess 
secretary. “She’s just fine.” 

□ 

Sylvester Stallone’s xwp / 
“Rarnbo” movies have taken the I 
apple out of American apple pic. J 
according to Literary Gazette, th4 j 
Soviet magazine. “Sylvester Stid-' , 
lone is happy.” it said in a dispatch 
from New York, “he has hit the 
bull's-eye of the public mood.” The 
magazine’s correspondent attended I 
erne of the “Rambo” movies. “Each V 
tima Rambo killed another so- 1 
called red monster, the spectators f 1 

.1 m tmmv owl raicwl ih»l 


“The hall was roaring TJ.S. KJ 
U.-&A* U.S.AV and I Mt tenif 
fied.” 

a • • 

Mike Reid, the fanner Qnaa- » 
uatiBag&lsaB-pro defensive tad$- ( 
le, was voted songwriter of the yeaa^ 1 
Wednesday by the American Sodf 
cty of Composers, Authors, ar A 
Publishers. Reid, who has bees Vi 
writing songs professionally for Y 
about five years, co-wrote five top / 
songs; “I Never Quite Got Bad: V 
(From Loving You),” “Prisoner ® } 
thoHigfrwire” rShow Her,’’ “St3 
Losing Yar aud ^To Me;” . ; J 


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