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The Globa] Newspaper 

Edited in Paris. . 
Printed Simultaneously . • 

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ESTABLISHED 1887 


ishington Post 


43/85. 


SSs»fe“ 


PAKIS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 






U.S.toAct 


OnTrade 



• ::s;fr 

.<■4 

- ir^w' 


Grants Would 


Subsidise Sales 
Of Equipment 


By Oswald Johnsron 

las Angeles Times Semce 

WASHINGTON —Tbe Reagan 
administration has stepped op its 
policy of retaliating against trading 


IMMIM 


• with sales contracts to Thin! Worid 

• ‘ ^ W' : countries that buy ILS. equipment 
'tli’ The Export-Import Bank said 
'^sih ^ .Wednesday it would offer the aid 
■ -grants in conjunction with six 
- •, transactions valued at 5250 ndflion 

. * m 12^ • in potential sales. 

__ “■*** #f"Thc transactions involve heavy 
- *1^ [uj- [“transportation equipment, electric 
ftnib?* power generators and computers 
that have been offered for sale to 
"h.ijsVT “identified cotmmes in Africa, 
■Jii- r^' fe; Asia and Latin America. 

' ■ ' Officials of the bank, winch aids 

1 •“ finan cin g the export <rf XJ.S. 

" •• '■•« k T(C S°°ds and seryice^ said the grants 
-r 7 , ^ were designed primarily to retaliate 
- - ‘CS? against similar practices by France, 






Reagan 

Calls on 

Moscow 

To With 

idraw Su 

pportto 


Conflicts in Third World 


By David Hoffman partiiion and distrust must give 
Washington Past Semce way to greater communication for 
UNITED NATIONS. New an open world." 

York — President Ronald Reagan, As Mr. Reagan spoke, the Soviet 
calling for a "fresh start" in super- forei SQ minister, Eduard A. She- 
power relations, challenged the So- «rdnadze, listened quietly. He was 


viet Union on Thursday to disen- 10 «?* Mr. Reagan later, af- 

gage from five regional conflicts in » Jeering an address of his own 
Asia, Africa and Central Ame rica the Genera] Assembly. 

In an address to the United Na- 111 0013 1X251 » his election-year 
lions General Assembly designed *P®«h 10 *e United Nations last 
10 Mum Soviet emphasis on arms October, which took a conciliatory 


control before his November meet- 
ing with Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the 
SovieTkader, Mr. Reagan sharply 
criticized Soviet expansionism in 
Afghanistan, Angola, Nicaragua, 
Ethiopia and Cambodia. 


The chief U.S. arms adviser ex 


pressed interest in tbe Soviet bid 
for a missile freeze. Page 4. 


tone toward Moscow, Mr. Reagan 


„ °° Thursday returned to the criti 

He proposed a. reponal pace ^ of ^ npensionism tha 


process" w resolve 'dispmk in “ m °' S°™ ex peosiooisiri thai 
rh^na lions but also3ed that mosl 01 te “ 

iSSSie 5 * difn “ 11 f" "S ■» under- 

S^shall nor cease.” Hie Uuit- ^ ■ lhc P r ™i« dial 

ed Sales o suppl>m S aid .0 such bS' 


mAnetndhM 


forces in Nicaragua and Afghani- ^ - W e cannot accommo 
sian and u consuTering aid for them ^ ^ ^ ^ 


.■•.-•eailit a 

I 


Edu^ AJ^h^Yardnadze, tiie Soviet foreign minister, hand, tbe United Nations, fisrened Friday as President Ronald 
oacinfjBid^gA Troyanovsky, t he Soviet dd^ate to Reagan addressed tbe UN General Assembly in New York. 


in Angola. 


‘ : o • ' Those nations have been resist- 

U-S- rfforts to win agreement 
— .■’•..f among industrial countries to rc- 
‘w. dues the practice of giving aid in 

• ~ -return fra* sales contracts, which the 


HtcbH^ aml CNeg A. ltoyanovsky, tbe soviet delegate to Reagan addressed tbe UN General Assembly in New Y ork. While the Soviet Union has de- J^ ^adi ofTotalitariaa- 

: ■ -- - voted extensive attention to arms 

rfm ' ATM* 1 I o •. control issues in advance of the Mr. R^gan cited Soviet military 

UiS., Allies Discuss Gorbachev Summit SHfflJMaai 

_ ■ - . ' .... onl> limited focus in his address. “Soviet- backed Vietnamese sol- 

,v Kaam . tbe treaty by hard-line members of on the arms question, even if Mas- ian friendship and the alliance have He described the recent Soviet din*- occupying Cambodia. 

NEW YORK — President Ron- the Reagan administration who cow’s latest proposals were more of never been called into question and proposal for a 50-percent cut in “All of these conflicts, some of 
cMteagan arid the heads of five want to push ahead with the pro- style than of substance. that while there mnv have been nuclear weapons as including mjder wav for a decade" he 

^6r allied nations met Thursday gram:- Other European allies, facing differences at no time did it throw “seeds which we should nurture." -winaie in local disputes 


teas] J TTT-7T - ww, ivM. — rresiaem kod- me K eagan aamimstranon wno cows latest prcmosais we 

islik .aldrlte^in arid the heads of five want to push ahead with the pro- style than of substance: 

I0 KS!S!2 , 2a« . nu^ocalfiedTiaiiOTs met Thursday gram: Other European allies, facing 

^rid-'agns of #vuarai over the is- The talks in New York were at- strong disarmament lobbies at 
“ coimtnes Jr 3 * ^ sues that he should bring up at his tended by the leaders of Britain, home, have also made it dear that 


“Our nrnnnspH imiivu ™ ... , iinunuj uuia uuu^wui <ujiq. ijuu^ uiuncoi» iu au ume ma u uu 

of ^yiMon over the is- The talks in New Ycffk were at- strong disarmament lobbies at the relationship into a shade." He delivered an appeal Tor his Stra- but they share a common cliarac- et Union was proposing 

r " r . 4?' sues that he should bring up at his tended by the leaders of Britain, home, have also made it dear that Relations between the United tegic Defense Initiative in which he teristic: They are the consequences “A world without weapons in 

, i,bS. November srimnut meetnag with West Germany, Italy, Japan and thej- warn a powerful Western re- States and Italy were strained bv quoted Alexei Kosygin, a former 0 f an ideology- imposed from with- space, a world where nuclear arms 

•••.. 4he Soviet tender, Mikhail S. Gor- Canada. sponse to Mr. Gorbachev 10 neu- Italy's decision to release Moham- Soviet prime minister, assaying 18 out. dividing nations and creatine would be radically reduced and 


seeds which we should nurture, said, “originaLe in local disputes 
He delivered an appeal for his Sira- they share a common charac- 


Mr. Reagan called for a three- 
ty to greater communication for stage regional peace process that 
i open world." would include negotiations among 

As Mr. Reagan spoke, the Soviet waning parties, U.S.-Soviet talks 
reign minister, Eduard A. She- aimed at eliminating foreign mlli- 
rdnadze, listened quietly. He was tary-presence and arms flows and, 
meet with Mr. Reagan later, af- finally, economic aid. 

' ,L ‘ WTiite House officials said they 

expected a strong Soviet rejection 

In contrast to his election-year of the proposal. But they said it 

eech to the United Nations last would prove valuable as a way to 

:tober, which took a conciliatory blunt the Soviet propaganda drive 

before the summit and expressed 
the hope that it would also have an 
impact upon the arms control talks 
in Geneva, prodding the Russians 

to bargain seriously on redurin 

nuclear weapons. 

Mr. Reagan’s address came amid 
ceremonies marking the 40th airni 
versary of the founding of the Uni 
ed Nations. 

, He hailed UN successes but said 
tnd the ideological premise that there had been disappointments 
rce is an acceptable way to^ex- suc h as a failure to deal with “real 

security issues" and the “politici2a 
, , , , lion of too manv agencies, the mis 

te ourselves to the use of force ^ of t00 many resources” 

and subversion to consolidate and _ . j , . . 

pand the reach or totalitarian- ■ Shevardnadze Address 
a.” Mr. Shevardnadze, in his address 

Mr. Reagan cited Soviet military to the General Assembly, warned 
.'olvemeni in Afghanistan, Ethio- Thursday that the arms race was 
i. .Angola. Nicaragua and the taking the world nearer “the edge 
oviet-backed Vietnamese sol- of an abyss" and called for aban- 
irs" occupying Cambodia. donment of the Strategic Defense 

“All of these conflicts, some of Initiative, Reuters reported from 
:m under way for a decade," he New York, 
d. “originate in local disnutes Mr. Shevardnadze said the Sovi- 


pand a political system," Mr. Rea 


1 these pi^ttnrypractioes,^^ baefcev. 1 


• H. Draper 3d, chairman of the Ex- 

Im Bank, said Wednesday. 


The Soviet and U.S. differences tralize the effect of his initiatives on med Abbas, the leader of a faction years ago that defenses against bal- regimes that are. almost from the 


out, dividing nations and creating would be radically reduced and 


, Thor talks followed a speech by over priorities for the Geneva sum- public opinion in Western Europe, in the Palestine Liberation Organi- lisiic missiles “preserve human foy [hey take power, at war with 

-• :v — Mr TVsrvrr inlH a RimV ^ Reagan to the United Nations mit meeting were underlined by tbe Officials said the Europeans had zation. The United States has ac- lives.” their own people. 

i ‘ " mwhichlie concentrated era Soviet speeches delivered at the UN .by closely consulted in advance of cased Mr. Abbas of planning the Mr. Reagan also declared that he “And in each case," Mr. Reagan 

aktcb* in regional conflicts Mr. Reagan and Foreign Minister Thursday's meeting and had taken hijacking. would discuss with Mr. Gorbachev said, “Marxism-Leninism's war 


■X]~ ■ - f .| ■ ■ . ••• UiTU!»niWll Ul ICgKMUU bUUUlLU wu. nui^ui ouu ivibju nuuoiu luuituj 3 luttuug ouu tuu (4M11 luj^uiag. WOU1U UiitUib WILil JVII. VJU 

fl'i i iM ' andtotuied only briefly on unclear Ednard A. Shevardnadze of the So- a unified line on the need to avoid Mr. Craxi’s government fell Ocl the division of Europe. 

_!7. arms control, the major preoccupa- viet Union. tampering with the ABM treaty. 16 after Defense hfinister Giovanni “Peace based on nartiti 


suppliers or make it “cost the com-' 


arms control, the major preoccupa- 
tkm of the Western European al- 




' While the US. leader made Mos- 
cow's behavior throughout the 


They also wanted to pin down Spadohni withdrew his Republican not be true peace." he said. “Put acting a staggering 
Mr. Reagan on how far he was Parly from the governing coalition, rimplv: nothing can justify the con- threaten to spni ; 


division of Europe. with the people becomes war with 

Peace based on partition can- their neighbors. These wars are ex- 
be true peace." he said. “Put acting a staggering human toll and 
plv: nothmecan justify the con- threaten to spill across national 


But officials said -the. allies were world a central issue, Mr. Shevard- ready to discuss tbe Strategic De- rating the government's handling of uniting and permanent division of boundaries and trigger dangerous 


rnrvrl> . .. DUIVU1U1U3 SOU lflE aiJICS TOC WOT1U O. VXaiUill UxMlC, 1VU. OUCVM1U- W SUJVUM ijjv nuau-s*. iss.- 

determined to amcentraie on arms nadze dealt mainly with arms con- fense Initiative when he meets with 
la Sr^^^ Ste aiflrir meeting and troL - Mr. Gorbachev. 

istrS^it w^.de^Os of how Mr. Reagan Mr, Shevardnadze outlined two West German sources said that if 

15 trati on sent congress a paefcage u ^ Soviet concessioos. He said lb< F c ««« ?° answers on these 


£ iarscnals. Moscow was ready for the first pom^ at their mernng they ;«mdd 

S. OffiSKfth?S^S‘ ynfb Mr^Grabachev - time to discuss limits on medium- benused«*n ai a dinner given by 

*M 20-' . ■ -range missiles based in Asia and -Mr. Reagan in the evening. 


the hijacking. 


the European continent. Walls of confrontations." 


then e limina ted altogether and a 
world where the U5.S.R. and the 
United States would set an exam- 
ple for other nuclear powers by 
stopping any nuclear explosions." 

He also said that the Soviet 
Union wanted “a world where the 
UJS.S.R. and the United States 
would renounce the development 
of new nuclear weapons, freeze 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 5) 


THEM 

•i5ES 


hSSwid^teacnS^^ GffH?ak smffrimt 'thh &no- ‘ wonft also ^consider n«B ways of 

v^fotureUS-Smnetarms 

vEAuSAjMSA^m 


-range misoi^ based in Asa «r*d Mr. Reagan in the evening, 
mid abo consider new ways of ■ Reagan and Craxi Meet 
rifying a future US-Soviel arms ■ Mr. Reagan and Bettino Craxi of 
i cement Italy, who clashed over the ban- 

Allied officials said their leaders dling of the hijacking of the Achifle 


of protectionist lauslatiOT in Con- Strate S» c would press Mr. Reagan, to respond Lauro cruise ship, met Thursday to 

<m£s fufminmrstinn nmnosal. program mlo space-tased to Moscow's arms control offras discuss their differences, according 


*c»=! Sit 


gress. The admimstfation proposal, 
which also includes a request for Anri _^ 
!aw^ against dumping of gootb pro- ~~"° 8 


into space-based to Moscow's aims control offers discuss their differences, according 
and on the 1972 and retrieve the initiative by inak- to a senior U.S. official quoted by 
Missile Treaty. ing new proposals of his own. The Associated Press. 

ils have said they . Italian and Canadian spokesmen The official said the general 


laws dumping of goods pro- AnUrUattstic Missile treaty. mg new proposals of his own. The Associated Press, 

duced"' abroad, represents an at- Western officials have said they .. Italian and Canad i a n spokesmen The official said the general 

tempt to head offnew tariffs and aretkqilyconcexned about a new said it was vital for the United theme of Mr. Craxi. the prime min- 
qyata^ mid wider interpretation given to States to match Soviet movement istcr-designaie, “was that UJL-ltal- 

4. The administration has also 


JL The administration has also 

- . ’moved to reduce the value of the ; ->— ■ y jrS T ‘ITB IT* 1 

re^xmsible for the growth of the meress Is Keported lmtated 




•>-. i 


212) 3/^ 


trade deficu. 

In recent years, the United States 
has negotiated limits on the prac- 
tice of subsidizing exports in (he 
guise of credits tied to aid. The 
most recent success came in April, 
when the Export Credit Committee 
of the Organization for Economic 


By Steven T, Dryden proposals had to be 

International Uertdi Tribune down” to allay what he 
BRUSSELS Rdnctance by ized as allied suspicions, 
some West European allies to join . The . official warned that Con- 


proposals had to be ‘‘watered are judged insuffidenl, and Mr. 
down" to allay what be character- Nunn were to introduce a similar 
ized as allied suspicions. bill next year, the legislation would 

.The. official warned thm Con- easily pass. 





•*? 


equipment and to reqmre tn«me ^iTmfliuiiy^jn the htoS * Europe urd^lbTam« watching very, very carefully" what ” r 

^tkntic Treaty ^garaztition, a demonstrated their seriousness acuon ithe Biropean allies tak^ 

U^. official warned Thursday. • aborit helping strengthen NATO’s Although European matching vn, 71 a rar« A « 

%?S£* ]aap * amt °' m. -*.!>.» 2sS ita ISPS GandturZia Agree to rsegotiation 

Jte&E^dSHB Seek to Reassure Each Other on Nuclear Programs 

v be resoJvcd at one stroke, bul there tetemrtkM 

aJSrzTZSZJl <h.vT« twv™ me ames earea tnai me Spcaai UNITED NATIONS, New was very positive movement. deal with. 


ueu oi m at , to uoost me rcquucu — , \L _r 
aid component to 50 percent, a meats directors. 


eats directors. Servnas Committee, introduced a 

At the meeting, European partic- bill in 1984 that would have with- 




level high enough to make it im- At the meenng, European panic- bill m 1984 that would have wnn- ^ ^ 

profitable to disguise trade subsi- ipants reportedly reacted uneathu- drawn one-third of the U.S. troops 
dies, as foreign aid. siastieally to proposals that would in Europe if the alhes did not in- 

got the French, ba cked by Bd- increase alliance cooperation in de- crease defease spending. The bill 
gjum and Italy, have dedined to veloping conventional weapons, was narrowly defe a ted, 
negotiate further limits to. the “gm- The proposals, are pan Of a US. the US. official at the meeting 
demon’s agreement" that governs effort to save funds 'and standard- • Thur sday in Brussels said congres- 
what export subsidies OECD conn- ize Western weaprauy. • - sional leaders have told him that if 


New York Tunes Semce be resolved at one stroke, but 1 

UNITED NATIONS, New was very positive movement." 


Daughter 
Of Duarte 
Is Released 

The AssuciaieJ Prm 

SAN SALVADOR — Guerrillas 
have freed the kidnapped daughter 
of President Jose Napoleon Duarte 
on Thursday after more Lhan six 
weeks of captivity, the president's 
chief spokesman said. 

The communications and culture 
minister, Julio Rey Prendes. said 
the release of the president’s 
daughter. lues Guadalupe Duane 
Durrin, was the first step in a com- 
plicated exchange of prisoners. 

The government was releasing 
118 jailed or wounded guerrillas, 
while the rebels freed Ana Cecilia 
Villeda, 23. a friend of the presi- 
dent’s daughter, and were also to 
free 38 kidnapped municipal offi- 
cials - 

Prime Minister Gandhi of India, left, talked Thursday with President Zia of Pakistan, release that Mri.lSimte Durdn, 3? 

was freed in Teoancingo, 24 miles 

y-[ -m-m m TV* A TLT • • (39 kilometers) northeast of the 

Gandhi, Zm Agree to rSegotiations M ta 

^ ^ Michapa, 18 miles northeast of San 

ach Other on Nuclear Programs 

be resolved at one stroke, but there hatchet with. Let’s say he's easv to Salvador where she met her father 
was vwv positive movement" deal with." ' and her three cluldren . 


and her three children. 

Mr. Rey Prendes said the prison- 


aasticafly to proposals that would in Europe if tbe allies did not iii- ~ of India and Mr Gandm and Mr. Zia, whose Specifically, the two leaders er exchange begam at 6 a!m with 

increase nDianceo^^ttion in de- crease drfense spending. TbcbiD w Pabstan have agreed to sun nego- countries have fought three wars agreed ibat their Foreign Ministry Se RoS She Chureh the 

_i ? .■ i - - and would not encourage UK pur- natinns to heln reasaire each ruhpr since ihev became indenendent m “icixonianv.duioucv.uuicn.uic 


il wn.ni 1 !! agreement" 1 that 
what export subsidies OEC 
tries are allowed to offer. ' 


^nanowhTdefSl^ and wouw not encourage toe pur- nations to help reassure each othei 

K narrowly defeated. chare of European weapons by the about the peaceful nature of their 

The .U^. official at the meeting United Stales. nuclear nrOvntmfi accnrrfitK* tn 


WJH 


f Western weaponry. . sional leaders have told him that if . allies were concerned about pro- 

A U.S. official at NATO said the the allies" contributions to NATO mnting their own military indus- 
'• • . tries, they should recognize that 


tiations to help reassure each other since the>' became independent in secretaries would immediately be- in j ^ 

about the peaceful nature of their 1947, have had exceptionally kind gin la i ifc 0 n how to seal their bor- *9 , ^ rna, '? naJ Kec ^r°? s i 013 1116 

fOT “* ^ th “ dCT lo ummsts and smugglers and .o- 


nuclear programs, according to words for each other during their der to terrorists and smugglers and 

Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of how to increase trade. 

Intfia. No timetable for the talks Chirm says its nuclear coopera- ■ The two leaders met for 35 min- 


The official said that while the prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of 
lies were concerned about pro- fnriia No timetable for the talks 
a ting their own military Indus- was set. 

es, they should recognize that Mr. Gandhi said Wednesday af- 


day," he said. 

Just before noon. 22 prisoners 


ton is with Pakistan, not Iran, as utes Wednesday in Mr. Zia's hotel held on political charges were tak- 


wiiW cooperation tiT^searcfa a U.S. critic charged. Page 2. suite at the president’s request. e n from Marions prison and 

and devdopfoent, they would al- ofpSLlS to?t They hornet tw|ce before atthe boarded a bus. The 22 included two 

■-P * SSLi ISSiS'S Z ^h^as pan of S ™ : . Ni di ? ^ 

U.S. defease industry. agreed to begin talks on how to marking the 4h anniversary of U Cter- 

il ££ in^rov«s f uri Iy oo <hai border, rheU^ed Nodoo, SSE? lb &“de, Eu?Ae 

Tta Tl mm3X SCOn<,m,C ^ Z** praaed , “r. Gandhi on ^ Wednad*,' “mrked , big Romero Benavkhs. a radio ,uiio a 





m. 


REYKJAVIK, Icelana - 

President Vigdis Hnnboggdot- 
tir joined thousands of other 
. women Thursday in a 24-boor 
strikefor wesnens' limits. Al ihC 
same time; she rekotod under 
p re s sur e from her govemmait 
and signed a bffl to end a strike 
' by Icdandair stewardesses. 

. Inthe mcsping, as the protest 
opened, groups ^of xtien crowded 
into hotds afer thw wives re- 
fused .to COpk bpcakfasi for. 
them. Most of Ice fand 1 * tdc- 
phone swuLbboards 'were left 
unstaffed. 

Women make up' more than, 
half d Iceland’s pranilation of 
240,000, and 80 percental them 

■ work. They generally ram 40 
percent less than men, although 

■ they areentitled by Uw to equal 

pay (or the same job. Women . 
axe virtually excluded from top 


Vigdis Fmnbogftdtittir 


The president raid she would 
stay away from her office as a 
sigjj °f solidarity with the strik- 
ers. : ' ■' ' 

Offioats said she at first re- 
fused td approve emergency 


legislation designed to hair a 
stnke by the country’s 160 
stewardesses, saying the mea- 
sure applied to a typically fe- 
male job and was presented to' 
her on a day when Icelandic 
women were demonstrating in 
support erf their rights. Howev- 
er, other members or the gov- 
ernment persuaded her to sign 
the ML 

The stewardesses, whose 
strike on Wednesday stranded 
half the country’s airliners at 
foreign airports, said they 
would defy an. order to return to 
work and would attend a wom- 
en's rally is the. capital later 
Thursday. Hie slogan for the 
tally was. “We dare, weean, we 
wOL" 

After thousands of women 
who work in supermarkets 
failed io show up; their employ- 
ers broadcast radio announce- 
ments that tokl aflemplqyees to 
-take the day off. 

. There were no official orga- 
nizers behind Thursday's stnke 
and no strike warnings had 
been issued, making the protest 
illegal mvler the iaatuTs labor 
laws. 


it is neccssaiy for*-ihe allies tobe an( j increase economic coopera- 
responsive, the official said. The uon. 


first is action to follow through on Foreign Minister Sahabzada Ya- the Nonaligned Movement, and af- ■' Mr Yaaub Khan saidT ''K™ 

commitments made by NATO m qub Khan of Pakistan said the ter Wednesday’s meeting Mr. Ya- , q “ Mr. Rey Prendes said some oi 

the past year to improve ammuni- Meeting was "cordial and subs tan- qub Khan said of the Indian lead- ^ Gandhi, referring to the ne- the political prisoners would leave 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 4) tial." He added, “Problems cannot er: “Here is a man to bury the (Continued on Page 4, CoL I) (Continued on Page 4, CoL 7} 


Tuesday for his role as chairman of 


step forward after the last (wo resorted 


Mubarak and Hussein Review Proposals by Peres 

Compiled by Our Suff From Disparehes peace process, We need the process and a U.S. operation on Oct. 10 to peace talks was “probably a posi- 
CAIRO— President Hosni Mu- now much more thin before. It is force down an Egyptian aircraft live contribution." Hussein also 


barak of Egypt reviewed the state very important to move forward trying to take the four hijackers to 
of tbe Middle East with King Hus- toe peace process." Tunis. 

srin erf Jordan bn pfsdav ^ Mr Mubarak said th^- were Diplomats in Cairo said he wam- 
said afterward they had agreed to studying proposals made by Prime ed speedy efforts by Washington to 
continue working for peace. Minister Snmon Peres of Israel ai 


trying to take the four hijackers to condemned a U.S. Senate move to 


ae a SI.9 billion arms sale to 


^ ZZZ f T ttunm ui nuu* ed speedy efforts by Washington to Later Thursday, the U.S. Senate, 

intmue working for peace. Sumon Pots of Israri ai revive the peace process to prove its m a sham defeat for President 

It was the first meeting between ““ H m *“ Nauo “ [ or direct talks comnnlmenl to Middle East peace. Ronald Reagan, banned toe arms 

” Eg>pt is the only Arab stale that ^ Jordan^do^es to 

this month by -Israel’s air raid on we have reservations about some 01 meL P eace a 8reenienL Hussein said Thursday of such a 

Palestine Liberation Organization others," he said. Prior to the meeting, Hussein condition: “One wouldn’t like to 

headquarters in Tunis and the hi- Hussein has said he had serious said he planned to meet soon with use the word blackmail, but it's 
jacking by P alestinians of the Ital- problems with Mr. Peres’s prows- PLO’s chairman, Yasser Ara- totally unacceptable. Obviously it's 

ian cruise ship AcbiHe Laiuo. at “bur I certainly applaud' the f?L "to reassess toe entire situa- Q oi a way to deal with problems 

Returning from a five-hour visit spiriL” rion *” among friends." 

to Amman. Jordan, Mr. Mubarak The Egyptian leader has called Before Mr. Mubarak arrived in The vote in the Republican -con- 
id:- for more vigorous pursuit of peace Amman, Hussein said that an offer trolled Senate was 97-1. 


“We discussed prospects for the after toe Achille Lauro hijacking by Mr. Peres to go to Jordan for 


t Reuters, AP) 


INSIDE 

■ One of the hijackers of toe 
Achille Lauro reportedly told' 
investigators that Mohammed 
Abbas led the operation-Page 2- 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 
M The bod}> that governs lead- 
ing tin traders said it could no 
longer afford to support sag- 
ging prices. Page 15. 

SPORTS 

■ Sl Louis, behind John Tu- 
dor’s five-hit pitching, beat 
Kansas City to take a 3-1 lead 
in the World Series. Page 23. 

SPECIAL REPORT 

■ Austria's economy continues 

to stabilize as currency move- 
ments and expanded' invest- 
ments buoy trade. Page 7. 


t«tr- •■rr'Bs-tr 

















P Pai 


.1 in 


Page 2 


Lange Plans to Submil 
Bill to Formalize Ban 
On U.S. Nuclear Ships 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 

Achille Lauro Hijacker Accuses Abbas 
In Statement to Police, Reports Say 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Jim Hoagland 
and Don Oberdorfer 

U'asAMjliM rail Semi* 


the legislation affecting U.S. war- 
ships back for nearly a year in 
hopes of reaching a compromise 


JS? wriimi.er with the United Slates, but efforts 
NEW > ORK Prune Minister lQ j Q M ^ failed. 

David Lange of New Zealand has „ oredicled lhal t h e law would 


i^a.iu He predicted that the law wouia 

said that he willmtroduce legtsla- ha £, ^ aacIed bv next sum- 
uon by early December formally 

banning U.S. warships carping nu- Emphasizing that New Zealand 
clear weapons from Msmng his ? nonaiimed" and wants to 


clear weapons Trom waiting his ^ ^ and wants to 

. . . . . , continue to play a role with con- 

U5. officials have asserted dial venlioaa] ror ^s1 n Western defense 
such a step would sharpen the chal- tfae Mr . Lange praised 

leage that they believe New Zea- . n^. administration for its 


lenge that they believe New zea- ^ R „ administration for its 
land s pokey poses for the Rea^n .. hon <££f e disciplined'’ aui- 
adminisirauon m managing alii- mde in out economic sane- 

ances around the world. „ c h;< . uinnd nation. 


1 ni • T ’• By John Tagliabue 

I Pill* stilus York Tones Seme* 

ILiW. Ullipo r ■ * GENOA — One of four hijack- 

/ ’■ | . ■ . ■ ers of the Achille Lauro is reported 

•*-- « rr <■"" 1 1 « u.-.,r. j ! ' to have told Italian investigators 

that a radical Palestinian leader. 
Mohammed Abbas, was the mill-, 
tary bead of the operation. _ 

Justice Ministry officials in Gen- 
oa and in Rome refused to confirm 
the reports. 

The reports, earned Wednesday 
in Italian newspapers, were s imil ar 
to charges raised this week by a 

r - j, - bmm,! senior Palestine Liberation Organi- 

venuonal forces in Western defense n .. ,_ no ~ ration official in Tunis that the 

of the Pacific. Mr. Lange praised uav,a Lan S e four hijackers were acting on the 

the Reagan administration for its orders of Mr. Abbas. 

"honorable and disciplined'’ atu- But those polls also show strong m appeamj u 

tude in ruling out economic sane- public support for the defense u« c _. Iulv's caretaker prime mil- 
lions against his island nation. to the United States embodied in [***: - m£V * : _ Q priHr>v with 


antes aruuuu uic _ -ji»amst his island nation. to the United Mates emoouieu in ; ; 

New Zealand’s policy excludes u “ SSw. iedee d. however, that the ANZUS defense treaty, which New 

nuclear weapons and nuclear- ^ ihe“ United Stales to links Australia, New Zealand and P re ? dcnt Ronald Reagan ,n N 

powered ships from the country, cooperation on intelligence the United States. _ m 

Enshrining that policy in law ^ l[ers to halt joint military “ANZUS was not a nuclear alii- The reports said 



ANZUS was not a nuclear alli- 


Mohammed Abbas 


— i — ■ — > mailers ana 10 nan juim muuoi y ■ uww. — - * . ... . ■ 

would trigger a further reassess- aerdses had forcai New Zealand ance.” Mr. Lange said, noting that collaborating with Ita 
ment of military relations .between bui j d up stockpiles of ammuni- New Zealand “had no pan of a trales investigating me 
the two nations, these officials said. ^ ,h a > etmrhirp" « m#*m- said he had been separa 1 


Italian magis- 
the cast They 


ing an interview on his desire to fense ^ vear . 

continue strong defense ues to the ^ a Me thodist minister "a convenuonai wiense ro.c. build Mr. Craxfs Gve-party gov- 

United States. who Ie Jh^La bor Pany to victory Mr. Lange said that the United twrassmg for Mr. Craxi. who is ^ mmenU which collapsedlast 

Our anu-nu..lear poliev is not ^ elections in July 1984. appeared States and New Zealand had a seeking u> smooth relations with ■ - h -,nHim P at ite hjiaddne 
i anti -Amen can policy, he said. w„ n „hi;n /minion nntk that cood woridna relationship for 150 the United Slates. Relations were . iwJ.utmn llu ivImcp nf Ur 


Organization and that New Zea- prison m norms... * ^ cou]<J ^ u . 

land accepts under ANZUS only questioning. dSult negotiations to re- 

“a conventional defense" role. The reports are poteonaUy em- cm * ^^aegoDau^to 


Lange, a Methodist minister -a conventional^' wSgSPEZ. 
ao led his Labor Party to victory Mr. Lange said that the United harassing for Mr . Cnawaoa emmenu which collapse. 


the hijacking 
release of Mr. 


-uur smu-nuvicn puuwj « m elections - m j^y 1984. appeared States and New Zealand had a seating to smoou. j. hanrf i inp ^ ^ fri^pp 

— — -**■ 

J s^KSSi re - c:? or ■ soven,D, “ 1 s & 5 iSr.ywB^ ^ « 

But he insisted that public senu- • 


ment in New Zealand dictated that 
these ties had to be on a nonnuclear 
basis. 

Referring to the confrontation 
with France over the sinking of the 
Greenpeace environmental group's 
ship Rainbow’ Warrior by French 

^ *4 V --.I J .La. 


China Says Nudear Link h With Pakistan, Not Iran 

# tv . • .jj .1 i 


o!iSS^SS3tSR Pie Associated /"rtaj Reacting to a claim bv Senator /The Chinese ^veroment has Haq <* Nta udd ^ UniKd 

ship Sbow Warrior by French BEIJING — China denied Alan Cranston of California! and repeatcdlysrated jhatCbna i 

secret agents, Mr. Lange said that Thursday lhal it had provided nu- congressional experts that China P olber neitherScapability nor the desire 

Lhe episode, if anything, seemed to dear technology to Iran and said mighL help Iran and other nations proliferatton^niordoes ’ . *P devdon nuS weapons.” 

have hardened France's insistence dial its nudear cooperation with acquire nuclear weapons capabili- countries ^develop hv^Ae Mr Cransum. a Democrat, said 

6n continued nuclear testing in the Pakistan and other countries was ties. the Cbinese Foragn Ministry on*^ a s^temeo M^day^ TwShin^^aiiiia 

for peaceful purposes only. called the charge groundless. mirustry -«± to provide; 


Pacific. 

The French government he said, 
has whipped up ’‘military national- 
istic fervor" in lhe face of New 
Zealand's criticism of nuclear test- 
ing in general. Mr. Lange said ne- 


French Communist-led Union Strikes, 


UUI1UUJ 3diu- w—j — rr J - j 

The statement confirmed that has provided, or offered to provide, 
China does have nuclear links with assistance to “nuclear outlaw" na- 


Pakistan. 


lions, which be said were Iran, Bra- 


“Our cooperation in the field of al Argentina, Pakistan and South 
nudear energy with other coun- .Africa. 


LCdliUlU b uiuumu vi — — i- , A frir»i 

^tiiu^ l co N iiSo^d Cuts Train Service but Not Electricity JZEStS* ZSZSSt 

be resumed bewai ^ w> TheAuonucJ Pns* Elevators in some buildings car- ^^^Stan^^Japanf whether promises held up the U.S.-China 

U0 ^Tpri^^iS?Swasin PARIS — A_24-hour ^general ^ed warning signs ^ emogaicy ^^ d er diSon. serves n^c^titmag^^mi- 


nudear energy with other coun- .*viriui. .... 

tries, such as Franc?, Federal West Concerns over China s wtllmg- 
Germany, the United States. Bra- ness to abide by nonproWeration 

_ . .•* . « i _ .1 Mwwiir-ue Vwalri n«v InP 1 1 S.f hlTlA 


public transport Thursday, but had morning that the stnxe was insig- ^ ' * The agreement, which was 

no apparent effect on the produc- nificanf and that no special mea- . n0 relationship sign** 1 m July remains under at- 

tion of dectridty, the main target sures were needed to ensure output “J«e r hina and wck b y Mr- Cranston and other 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


lion of dectridty, the main target sures were needed to ensure output 
of the strike. w critical areas. 

, „ , . . The strike cut mLo rush hour rail 

The General Confederation of ^ state-run railroad 

t J. r/TT Uorl rain thpir . . . « n • 


iDercis no anuiarrciauuusuip ^ A „ 

or cooperation between China and 


Iran." it said. 

Hashemi Rafsanjani, the speaker 


senators on the ground that its lan- 
guage is vague and would allow 


BACHELORS ■MASTERS* DOCTORATE 

For Work, Acod-nic, Uf» Exp»ri«n«- 

Send detailed resume 
for free evaluation. 

PACSHC WISTBaa UNIVERSITY 

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Los Angeles. California 
90049, Dept. 23, UAA. 


The °[ traffic, and the state-run railroad ^ Hashemi Rafsanj aru , the sp«ucK ^ technology or 

Workers, or CGT, had said their aut i, or j tv said some suburban Paris of s parhamen t, yia^ai reprocessed fuel to other countries, 

“day of action would begin t^n traffic was reduced to 50 to 60 in June. Western diplomats said nildear pact enable U.S. 
Wednraday nigt at the state-run pe[mila f n ormaL Trains were run- that the purchase of Chinese weap- u^u/adurers to bid for nuclear 
Elecinciife de France with power • at 40 to 50 oercem normal on ons ““Y bave h** 0 , on his agenda, ___ n-nJaru in China. 


. , nerccniui duiuuu. lituiu wEiviuu- r man ux aciurcrs tu oiu iui uuu™ 

Electrratfe de France with power ^ al 40 w 50 percent normal on on* may have been °n his agrada^ ^ prqecLs in China, 

cuts of at least 30 percent. lints to other pans of France. although China denies selling arms Cranston accused the Rea- 

The strike was part of a new In Paris, two persons were in- to either Iran or Iraq. ... gan administration of a cover-up in 
militancy by the union, which has jured when a motorist drove her car Pakistan rqects claims bymaia ^y^olding information about 
U^w. Ku artier uninrn in t.i n emuAot strikers at the Place and other nations that it is working nik-lftsr trade and aliened 


when the Republican Party with- , 
drew its three ministers. The Re- , 
publicans and their leader, Gio- 
vanni Spadolini, the former | 
defense minister, opposed Mr. Ab- 
bas's release. 1 

Mr. Craxi has failed to bridge , 
differences with the Republican ( 
leadership on policy, including the | 

S ues tion of Italy’s role in the Mid- , 
leEasL 

The government has sought to 
cultivate warmer relations with the 
Arab world, including the PLO and - 
its leader, Yasser Arafat. But the 
Republican leaders have argued 
that the Achille Lauro hijacking 
underscores the need for evaxhand- 
edness with all parties in the Mid- 
dle East conflict 
Before leaving Rome, Mr. Craxi 
yiiH his talks with President Rea- 
gan would include a discussion of 
the "tumultuous events" surround- 
ing the hijacking "and the tensions 
that arose between ns and the 
American govermnenL” 

According to the news reports, 
the Palestinian who has declared 
his willingness to cooperate with 
magistrates also confessed to hav- 
ing killed an American tourist, 
Leon KJinghoffer. 69, of New 
York. He was shot and his body 
thrown overboard on the second 
day of the hijacking. 

Italian television reported 
Wednesday night that the hijacker, 
who has not been identified, was 
transferred from a prison near Spo- 
Icto, in central Italy, where the four 
Palestinians were being held, to a 
maximum-security prison near 
Genoa. 

According to the accounts, the 
hijacker said he and his accom- 
plices acted on orders from Mr. 
Abbas, who was described as the 
military leader of their guerrilla 
group." 

The Palestinian reportedly told 
Italian magistrates that Mr. Abbas 
promised him and his accomplices 
that his organization would carry 
out assassinations and hijackings 
to force their liberation. The prom- 
ise reportedly was made after the 
men were arrested when an Egyp- 
tian airliner carrying than from 
Egypt was forced to land in SkOy. 

‘ ■ U.S. Is Criticized 
; Hie European Parliament called 
- Thursday for a Palestinian home- 
r lnntf and condemned the United 
■ States for responding to “illegal sea 
r piracy with illegal air piracy” in the 
r the Achille Lauro incident, Reuters 
■ reported from Strasbourg. France. 

In a special motion, the otgani- 
r zation also condemned members of 
the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
- tion for hijacking the ship. 


U.S. Denies Article on Nggf ! 

United States is prepared » 1 -—rfwwl dove 1 

of new strategic defensive 


and would give 


Si^cow five ro seven y*a£noncc b«ore i^ort in r 
The White House added lhal there -j 

Wednesday’s Post was “made “P ^ S^DepartmoU spdk^ 5 ^ ; 
-was obviously misunderstandmg. -thoroughly 1 

RAtmaiL said that if the information r^mHotion. 1 


cSTKSn, said 

» tte^niarionai Herald Tn- 

bune.] m 

French Seize Protest Boat, Test Device 

PARIS (Reuters) — France said Tta^daY^i^ Several 

successful nuclear test at Mururoa Atc^jnjb^ScntihP^^^g^ ■ 

hams before the exploacm, .Frm* - tod£v& 
yachL the Vega, as it sailed toward the aloll m an attempt to oisru^ 

site. In London, a Greenpeace spakesm^sain__ imtiL * I 

the blast was not immediately known. 

New York Gets Anti-AIDS Proposal, j' 

ALBANY, New York (UPI) Governor I ! 

Yoik on Thursday proposed outlawing sexual . . : 

ai l 

He also boan a program to educate the pubte; aoout f 

acqtriied in^« syndrome. “We knowtiiai oalam 

S3SS can be fatal," M^&omo .sag. h 

establishments which jaofit frran . „ _2 jj « f 

ease." The nroposed ramtotton would affect hetaoseanai as weu I 
^^>sexual P SabShments. Offenders wradd be' subject to a 6ne^4 j 
imprisonment i 

Iranian Cabinet list Wins Approval; | 


TEHRAN (Reuters) — Prime 
Minis ter Mir Hussein Moussavi 
has west President AH Khamen ei's . 
approval to appoint two radical 
mmistmtottek^pcrifcfeis ttfoB 
and the interior, the Iranian press 
agency reported Thursday. 

It said Mr. Moussavi notifie d lhe 
speaks 1 of parliament, Hasheun 
Rafsanjani, that each of the 24 
names, including seven new candi- 
dates, in his proposed cabin et iww 
awaited the approval of parlia- 
ment, which has in the pas t been 
reluctant to support Mr. Moussa- 
vfs pro-public sector policies. . 

Tbe newspaper Kayhan Interna- 
tional noted that the list “ does not 
differ much from the one.Premier 
Moussavi proposed to the prest- 

dent althe beginning this week. 

Diplomatic sources said the list 
showed that Mr. Mous savi was 

gr inning a Struggle Wltltiil theMoE- 





r* 

Mk Hussem Moossari 


km dergy-domtnated government 
to detenmne whether the Islamic 
rcpobfic should be rim by stai^.pr 
private entoprise. 


Kasparov Signals l^-Ganw V wfeay i 

. An' \ tT^mamr muL ■ AwMtU*. DRfii 


militancy by the union, which has jured when a motorist drove her car Pakistan rqects claims oy tnaia ^ Voiding information about 
been condemned by ether unions into a crowd of strikers at the Place and other nations that it is working China's nuclear trade and allied 
as provocative and not in keeping de la Ripublique and then fled, on a nuclear weapon, aided by uni- ^ f^, ina provided Pakistan 
with legitimate protest tactics. witnesses said ^ President Mohammed Zia ul- sophisticated warhead de- 

— nipns- China has bedt an atomic 

- — ’ " ~ power once 1964. ■ 

Vice President George Bush, 
who visited Beijing last week, coun- 
tered Tuesday: “We’re not cover- 
ing up any information. We 
wouldn’t enter into any agreement 
that we think would increase prolif- 
eration of nuclear weapons.” 








Israeli Teachers Go on Sink® 

The Assoataed Press 

TEL AVIV — About 300,000 
Israeli high school students stayed 
home Thursday when 16,000 teach- 
ers went on strike in a pay dispute. 


U.K. Air Force Center 
Badly Damaged by Fire 

The Associated Press 

BRAMPTON, England — A 
major fire has destroyed a large 
part of the British Air Force’s Sup- 
port Command headquarters at 
Brampton 60 miles (96 kilometers) 
north of London, the Defense Min- 
istiy said Thursday. 

Tbe fireat the base near the town 
of Huntingdon in Cambridgeshire 
started late Wednesday and burned 
for several hours, leaving much of 
the extensive three-story headquar- 
ters building a smoldering ruin. 
The • minis try said that the fire 
would not affect immediate com- 
bat capability. 


MOSCOW (Reuters) — Gary Kasparov made a dramatic p»J 
Thursday as the 19th game of the world dte» tide xeuateh wa* f 
joumed, revealing his sealed 42d moveand thm indica t in g thathewa. |\ 
the verge of victory in the game. - • „ > .. . . 3 l 

A win for Mr. Kasparov, the rfiaflengtt. would gwe hnna two-pc ( ; 
jrari . 10%-to-KVi, whh five games lo go. Tbfrcocksi^ gestere brough - . • 
full house of more than .1,000 spectators to Jheir fert. No one! 
Tchaikovsky. Hall could recall a sirmtorinddeot happeaaag at w| 
championship levd. • , . . J sZ 

By playing the sealed move, Mr~ Kasparov enectivriy mo je atw^w) 
Anatoli Karpov, the champion, that Mr. Karpov could only itsip mins 
position. The ganv. is to resume Fridty. Mr. Karpov qqieaied to face 
heavy loss of m at e rial . 


U.S. 


WORLDWIDE ENTERTAINMENT 


WASHINGTON (AP) — Tbe House ApprapriaA»is Committee vot 
ed Thni^ay to reject President Ronald Reagan’s request for money ti 
build new US. chenaefl weapons, btd refused to cat deeply into dh 
research for a space-based defease against Soviet nudear missiles. { * 
Tbe votes came as the committee worked its way through ti. . efi 
appropriating money for the Defense Department forthe current fisca 
year. The bS, approved and sent to the House floor on a voice vote 
contains most of tbe proposed $292-M3£on Pe nt a gon budget. 

Representative John E Porter, RqmbHcan of DHnois, won approval 
26-24, fra his motion to kill the requ»t.fra$163J nriIlioQ to bufld ndv- 
gas ar tiller y shdls and bombs for the first time ance the UjS. progran 
was 5tiq?ettoedin 1969. The vote cany in a ckyed session that Mr. Porte 


Engfish wrann (Rwich subtitles) UGC BIARRITZ LES FORUMS 
1 mr nnFUJSi (mpranosl 


WOO JlWJiWWVUAUlW. sav m mm nme w — . 7 ~ 

requested to present new, classified information m support of his axgn 

mem that no new U A weapons were needed to t^iset the Sow* chemrea 


arsenaL 








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Correction 


Because of an error by The Associated Press, KL Natwar Singh, an 
Indian minister of state, was incorrectly identified as Indonesia's foreign 
minister in a photograph that appeared in Thursday editions. 


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. New York Times Service 

BEIRUT — Pro-Syrian mflitia- 
rnen conducted a house-to-house 
search in Moslem West Beirut and 
the southern suburbs Thursday 
looking fra three Soviet Embassy 
of fidals who were kidnapped Sept. 
30. A owiflur search was mounted 
m the southern port of Sidon. 

Police said units of the Shiite 
Antal movement and the mostly 
Drnze .Progressive Socialist Party. 
were involwd in iheBeirut search. 

About 70 persons werereported 
to have been rounded up fra qnesr 
tioniog, but the search has pro- 
duced no apparent dues as to 
where tbeRusaans were bang held' 
or inf ormatiou leading to the iden- 
tity of tbeir abductors. 

Four Russians were abducted at 
gunpoint in West Beirut, on SepL 
30. The body of Arkadi Katkov, a 
Soviet consular secretary, was 
found two days later. The other 
three missing embassy employees 
were identified as Oleg Spain, a 
press' attachfc; Valery Minkov, a 
commercial attach^; and Nikolai 
Svirsky, the embassy doctor. 

■ A faction calling itself the Islam- 
ic Liberation Organization claimed 


responsibility fra the kidnappings 
and for killing Mr. Katkov. 

There was speculation that the 
three Rnssians may have, been 
smujE^erl out ci Lebanon from Si- 
donby sea. A Lcbanesepolice offi- 
cer who asked for anonymity said it 
is bdieved' the' Soviet personnel 
were being held ai the Pal estinian 
camp of Chatila in southern Beirut; 
Pahstmian factions have denied in- 
vofvemeatm the affair. - 
- In another devdopment' Thurs- 
day, the most powerful Christian 
mffitia, the Lebanese Forees, shut 
the East Beirut newspapra al-Amal. 


said the daily paper, the organ*# 
Lebanon’s principal Christian 
group, the Phalangist Party of Pres- 
ident Amin Gemayd, had printed 
seditious articles designed to sow 
discoid in. Chris tian rankf 

Radio stations said militiamen 
raided .al-Amal offices in Christian 
Easr Bcarut and too* away the edi- 
tor, Joseph Aba Khalil. 

. In acoounentaiy Wednesday, al- 
Amal said that Syria was trying to 
use the Christian militia to irflu- 
ence Mr. Gemayd into mairinp 

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IRLO 

„ 

sArti^if. , 


1 




EVTERN ATION AU HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1985 


Page 3 


t-nav . 

* -srrxi 


.w.aa 




»Pr 


f| U*st 


’‘Si 




- -A !*. }*; 



Critic Says 
Aged Planes 
Hurt Drug 
FidrtinU.S. 

o 


High Tech Intruding on U.S. Privacy Laws 


By Juan Williams 

Washington Part Servxc 


without any legal protection new electronic surveil lan ce appli- menl is tuneless its application has 
against unauthorized tapping of cations," it continued. “The Fourth not kept abreast of current technol- 


WASHINGTON Privacy pb° ne calls made on cellular or Amendment — which protects ‘the ogres.” 

taws have failed tokeep pace »ilh “^less phono, as well as daia right of the people to be secure in 
computer and telephone techno!- transfer bet™ computers and that persons, houses, papers and 

ogy, leaving Amenean indnsrries ^ transmission of video and effects against unreasonable gSuSS md 

5 r .i. : i eranhic times. cearrhes and seizures — was WOt- uons omy. iw. ivasiciunaer ana 


unprotected from unauthorized 
surveillance fay competitors and 


graphic images. 


The Associated Pros .~TT 

, u , ■ _ ... nzed investigations, according to a 

WASHINGTON — ■ The U.S. repon Thursdav bv the congressio- 
Customs Service s air fleet, mtend- ^ office fedmotogy Assess- 
ed to light airborne drug smug- mcflL 


rized investigations, accoramg to a 1 nc slu ^ r 

report Thursdav bv the congressio- ^ about 25 pacent of fedend 
nal Office of Technology Assess - agencies said they used or planned 

to use potentially vulnerable cotn- 


the government, it said, could be ten at a rime when people conduci- 
dri^^roiecicd"from unamh^ a victim of the current gaps in the ed their affairs in a simple, direct ™ 


Senator Patrick 1 Leahy, a Ver- 
mont Democrat, have introduced 


“Telephones, credit cards, com- tend “protection against intercep- 


^iSr blmS ’ a The report also said that of 142 

^!?£rvice’s 70-plane flat in- { ****} The' report, tilled “Electronic 

chides only 15 sophisticated air- Men" Sun,efllance and Civil Liberties," 

Baft, said Representative Glenn E“,f is to be given to Representative 
ighsh. Democrat of Oklahoma- J*:? «!!JS»u£LrGour ao- Roben w - Kasienmeier. Democrat 
Ten other planes are of limited of Wisconsin and chairman of the 

- j .h. ■ a .i__ proved wiretaps ana otner eiec- e„, 


the repon said. “Although the ap- virtually 
puter systems for law enforcement, y ^ f ^ Fourth Amend- tions" 

investigations and intelligence. H uutia - 


tion from voice transmissions to 
virtually all electronic communica- 


EngEsCS dev, 35 citber use or plan to use 


use, and the remainder of the air 
force is “the junk," said Mr. En- 
glish. a principal backer of increas- 
ing the force. “Many can't even 
fly." 


proved wiretaps ana other elec- 
tronic surveillance were at a record 
high last year, it said. 

The agency said 36 of the agen- 
cies already use a total of 85 com- 


Hw*NxiMBc(itou 


Anti. 


Halley's Comet, through n telescope mt Whipple Observatory inArizona on Sept 15. 


He said the force's three two- pb Prized record systems for inves- 
TTiqTi Cobra helicopters are useful tigative or intelligence purposes, 
only “if vou're willing to risk the and maintain 288 million fLes on 


*JSK 

"= .! 

. 

•• 

..7>£ ■ 


’sComet Beckons 


said a demonstration of the Cobras The report said it is “technically and' related technologies have 
showed it would take too long for feasible" for these files to be linked greatly increased the technical op- 
the crew to exit with smugglers’ into a single network that could lions for surveillance activities, 
guns trained on them. track untold numbers of citizens “The existing statutory frame-i 

Largely at the initiative of Con- without good reason. work and judicial interpretation 

gress, the service’s air division con- The study said .Americans are thereof do not adequately cover 


House Judiciary Subcommittee on 
Courts, Civil Liberties and the Ad- 
ministration of Justice. 

“In the last 20 years," the report 
said, “there has been a virtual revo- 
lution in the technology relevant to 
electronic surveillance. Advances 
in electronics, semiconductors, 
computers, imaging, data bases 
and related technologies have 


mu** 


By Thomas O'Toole froni Barth in December In northern latitudes, the 

Washington Pott Service - best viewing month willbe next March. The come: 

. MOUNT P ALOMAR, California — Through 'wjffi.re&cjh its maximum brightness in early April, 
the eye of one of the world’s most powerful teto-7 but'by then it will be visible only from the South- 
scopes, the 60-inch (152-centimeter) behemoth a£>. ^ -e^ Bcmi^here and the extreme soathern parts of 
the Mount Palomar Observatory, Haney’s Comet! . ’the Northern Hemisphere. - 
stood om like a giant ghostly beacon asi-it sped "7 “We’re predicting the tail win grow about 10 to 
toward Earth outside the orbit of Mars, 124.ns3- i-^16 degrees across the sky," Mr. Gibson said, 
bon miles away. '.-..rC .“That’s less than half the length of the tail when 


CD 

il&jiiluo 

3COTQU5 


Ladies Boutique Men’s and Ladies 

Boutique 


It dominated its portion of the sky m fee viewing^ die comet last appeared in 1910, but yon have to 



early Wednesday, dwarfing every star behind it as 
it raced toward .fee environs of Earth for the 30th. 
time in recorded history. . ■' 

. “It’s extraordinarily bright, much brighter than 
we expected it would be at this distance,? aid 
James Gibson, an astronomer at the JetProptriaan 


remember that in 1910 the comet was so close that 
fee bead could be seen -in the evening slcy at tbe 
same time the tail was viable in the morning sky.” 

Donald K. Yeomans of fee Jet Propulsion Lab- 
. oratory said that astronomers using radio tele- 
scopes have measured fee equivalent of a ton of 


Laboratory in P asadena , California. “As it - now water being boiled off the comet every second that 


stands, that camefs gas and dust cloud measures 
90,000 miles across," or 146,208 ldlometea. That 
means it’s grown seven times since 1 last observed 
it three months ago.” 

Mr. Gibson paused, then said, “In away, I don’t 
believe h. But 1 guess I have to believe it." 

Halley’s Comet’s appearance in the rides of 
Earth this time may not be fee best it has ever 
made, but it will not be fee worst, either - - . 

The comet is expected to first become visible 


it comes closer to Earth. While this may seem as if 
Halley’s Comet is burning itself out. its estimated 
lifetime is another 200,000 years. 

Tire rocky core of Halley now appears to be 
three ItilomMers across, the. size of Manhattan 
Island, " Mr. Yeomans said. “1/ you calculate that 
it loses roughly one meter of surface each time it 
aides the son every 76 years, then theoretically it 
could make another 260 appearances before it 
buns itself out.” 


guns trained on them. 

Largely at fee initiative of Con- 
gress. fee sendee's air division con- 
tinues to expand, wife a budget last 
fiscal year of S55.4 million. Eight 
aircraft feat can track smugglers 
from long distances are under con- 
struction, and two flying detection 
platforms are being modified. 

The Customs Service is fanning 
air units wife planes to detect, in- 
tercept and track air smugglers, 
and then swoop down after them in 
helicopters when they land. 

William Rosenblatt, the Cus- 
toms Service's assistant commis- 
sioner for enforcement, said that 
fee service has airplanes and radar 
stret chin g “from the East Coast to 
fee West Coast.'’ While the agen- 
cy's resources address “fee various 
threats,” he said, Tm not going to 
tell you it’s sufficient, no way." 

Mr. Rosenblatt would not dis- 
cuss specifics about Customs’ air 
division. However: 

• Customs officials told congres- 
sional staff members SepL 5 that 


160 New Bond Street, 
London Wl. 

Tel: 493 2698 


173/174 Sloane Srreer, 
London SWl. 

Tel: 235 5855 


Individal Donors Declining 
In U.S. Politics, Study Says 


Washington Pcs: Senm.* 


“PACs are displacing individ- 


WaSHJNGTON — For fee first uals as fee primary source of cam- 
time, incumbent House Democrats paign funds," fee study conduded. 
in the United States received more It said fee decline of small contrib- 
campaign money last year from po- utors “cannot help but have a pro- 
Jjtical action committees than from found influence on Congress — es~ 
individual donors, according to a perially when grass roots-based 
study by fee Democratic Study funding is replaced by funds from 
Group. interests outside of fee member's 

The dependence of House Dan- district.'* 
ocmic incumbents on conzribn- _ ^ ~ 0 ... — „ 

tions from political action commit- 

tees, or PACs, was significant Jberal reform organization^ ; called 
higher than it was fortocumben’i for legislation gaming a 00-per- 


Hiasai^ 


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The Associated Press 

CHICAGO— Philip Win Jr 4 79, 
ft) co-founder of one of the nation’s 
' top architectural firms and a mqor 
influence on the design of many 
Chicago bufldings. died Tnesday in 
. Venice, Florida. 

Mr. Will's death was announced 
by his company, Perkins & Will . 

Under his tutelage, Perkins & 
Will won 26 national 'awards, in- 
cluding the 25-year award of the 


C-12s, a mainstay of the air fleet. 

Thl ■*WT»H Amt • A 1 •« • T\ • *A Customs Service five-year 

Philip Will, Chicago Architect, Dies 

. smugglers can avoid detection and 

American Institute of Architects emigrant who was a ballet dancer, that problems are even more evi- 
for a design of enduring signifi- big game hunter, distiller and hole- dent over fee western half of the 
cance. Mr. Will saved as national her, in Katmandu. Nepal where he southern border, because of “the 
president of the institute for two lived for half a century and earned present thinness" of radar, air- 
tennSr. the nickname Boris of Katmandu, nlnn** rmw 


terms. 

He left behind his personal resi- 


MT. Kosenoiaii wouia not ms- ^ u ^ for incumbent ,ur 

cuss specifics about Customs air Rrouhiicans. c™ 1 tax credit for poliucal conin-1 

division. However ^ ^*^ 0 ^ die smdv showed butions up w a total of S 100 a year. I 

^^sm^coptribuuir.feedcw The Democratic-controlled 
^ l6S? ^ SlC3ddy House Ways and Means Commit- 

SffiSSS disappeanng. tee, however, moved last week in 

Donation 0 f under S100 ac- fee opposite direction. It voted to 
C-12s, a mainstay of the an fleet, counted for 46 percent of total kill fee current 50-percent tax cred- 
• A Customs Service five-year House contributions in 1974 but 19 it on political contributions, up to 
plan acknowledges that there are percent in 1984, while falling from an annual credit ceiling of $50. 

radar gaps in fee Gulf Coast where 38 to 23 percent for Senate candi- 

smugglers can avoid detection and data over fee same period. Even 

that problems are even more evi- when inflation is taken into ac- . _.. n , . _ . 

dent ova fee western half of the count, cn™n contributions have de- Uonsol Killed m Guatemala 
southern border, because of “the dined bv 17 percent from 1980 to The Associated Pkss 

present thinness" of radar, air- 1984. ' GUATEMALA CITY — Nor- 



dence in fee Chicago suburb of . *? Le6 fJ 0 T as ; ° f VAlcni . dscu ^’ 

Fvatmnn « ^ ««r the National Bank of Cuba for fee fee Treasury Department, has giv- 


Evanston as one of ms most prized 


present thinness" of radar, air- 
planes and crews. 

• The service’s parent agency. 


jfociona P“ l 12 Y* 81 * » member of en contradictory pubh'c testimony 

cuta ' 5 ^ ^ ^ ? M ,0 T 

Committee, Thursday in Havana of engine turboprops, the state-of- 
■ Other deaths: . a heart attack. He was in his early fee-art flying detection platforms 


rounder of Perkins &WHL ■ gjJJ 

■ Other deaths:. a he 

Borisl^saanevitch,80,a Russian 50s. 


flying detection platforms 
modified for fee drug war. 


dined bv 17 percent from 1980 to The Associated Press 

1984. ■ GUATEMALA CITY — Nor- 

According to fee study. House man Linds, Norway’s honorary 
Democratic incumbents in 1984 re- consul in Guatemala, and three 
ceived an average of S151.202 from other persons were killed Wednes- 
PACs and 5144,868 from individ- day when their private airplane ex- 
uals. Republican incumbents re- ploded after touching off a mine as 
ceived an average of S 128,474 from fee plane landed at a coffee planta- 

ft a /<• m te.-i-ta «nn t • J! OA Z1 /1*»A 1*1 


Aldebert 


PARIS: 16. place Vendome 1, bd de la Madeleine 
70, fg Saint-Honore Palais des Congres, Porte Maillot 
CANNES: 19, La Croisette 


PACs, and 5174,402 from individ 
uals. 


lion 80 miles (130 kilometers.) 
southwest of Guatemala. 


sea and air transportation networks, die new Amsterdam 
World Ttade Center is a striking example of modem 
1 ■ ' 1 ’ 1 !leni r i J. building technology. Inside and out 

3 : Architecturally, its multi-tower blue-glass exterior 

■ reflects a truly prestigious commercial complex. 
vjgg Inside the Center, many ofWTC’s building services 

- . ; r S are designed to enhance business efficiency. . . . thanks to a 
■§: little bit ofhelp from Philips. 

In the form of microprocessor control of office 

' lighting, security and audio/video services. 

Computerized lighting means that office walls 
' and layout can be changed without having to rearrange 
'f the lighting scheme. Simply reprogramme it for the 

Militia?^ i^ew situation. 


't.-C -i. 


V/ v .'i. ^ ^ s? • ' : ’ : ■ ■*' : • 
















&&&< f . -t 


i.-t Dipl<^ 


- .- I.**" 

’ 3 s? *L 

•• :r:^% 

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Moreover, any light can be switched personally 
by remote control, or automatically by computer 
programme. 

To avoid unauthorized entry, special office keys 
supplied to each tenant must be identified by an electronic 
access system before the lock is released. 

We also supplied CCTV for building security, 
sound distributionformusic, paging and all-stations alarm, 
and a cable network for EM, TV Video and Teletext. 

The WTC will be officially opened by H.R.H. QueenBeatrix 
today, the 25th October. Philips congratulates WTCs 
owners, architects, builders and contractors, and extends 
a warm welcome to WTCs many international tenants. 

Philips. The sure sig n of expertise worldwide. 

m PHILIPS 








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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 


Violence Erupts in Cape Town; 
Special Rules Lifted in 6 Areas 


Bv Aliister Sparks 

ttashintlon Post Servin' 

JOHANNESBURG — Racial 
violence erupted Thursday in the 
center of a major South ’.African 
city for the second lime in a week 
when police clashed with demon- 
strators in central Cape Town. 

Separately. President Pieter W. 
Botha announced a lifting of emer- 
gency regulations in six of the 36 
towns and cities where they were 
imposed three months ago, claim- 
ing the stringent measures bad 
been effective tn restoring order. 

Another two blacks were tailed 
in clasbes with the police in the 
Crossroads squatter camp outside 
Cape Town, bringing the death toll 
in that region over the past two 
months to 63 and the total killed in 
South Africa since racial violence 
began in September last year to 
nearly 800. 

Young blacks hurled rocks and 
gasoline bombs at automobiles 
driving along a major highway to 
Cape Town airport for the third 
consecutive day. and police advised 
motorists in that city to wear crash 
helmets. 

No one was seriously injured in 
the violence in Cape Town, when 
police used a water cannon and 
whips to disperse a large crowd of 
black and mixed-race demonstra- 
tors who gathered in the city's main 
thoroughfare. Adderley Street. 

Whites and blacks scattered as 
police in riot helmets lashed at 
them with whips, knocking some 
down, and a water cannon fired 


purple dye at the crowd, staining 
buildings and splashing into some 
stores. 

While police sealed off central 
city streets to traffic, an officer 
with a bullhorn ordered shop assis- 
tants to return to their shops and 
other people to leave the downtown 
area. 

“All people who don’L work here, 
move.” he ordered, adding: "This is 
valid for whites as well.” 

The violence in central Cape 
Town followed rioting Friday in 
central Johannesburg, when blacks 
rampaged through six city blocks 
attacking whites and smashing 
shop windows after a memorial ser- 
vice for a supporter of the black 
underground who was hanged for 
shooting a policeman. 

According to press agency re- 
ports. Thursday's police action be- 
gan when a busload of black wom- 
en arrived in Adderley Street to 
hold a demonstration demanding 
the withdrawal of troops fiom the 
segregated black and mixed-race 
townships outside Cape Town, 
where there have been bloody 
clashes between local inhabitants 
and the security forces over the 
past two months. 

A second crowd of blacks gath- 
ered at the same time outside a 
nearby courthouse, where three 
mixed-race men were appearing on 
a charge of murdering a policeman 
during a black funeral rally in the 
townships in March. 

Showing a hesitancy in the face 
of the targe number of whites min- 


gling in the crowd that contrasted 
with the precipitate action police 
have taken in the ghetto townships. 
officers pleaded with the crowd to 
disperse. 

“You are going to give me laryn- 
gitis. my throat won’t take it, please 
people.’ disperse, otherwise we will 
have to lake action.” an officer said 
at one point. 

The six (owns where the emer- 
gency' regulations have been lifted, 
four In the Eastern Cape and two in 
Transvaal, are all on the periphery 
of the main areas of unrest. 

The assessment of observers was 
that the level of racial violence in 
the country has increased since the 
partial state of emergency was de- 
clared July 20. 

The violence has tended to shift 
to new areas, such as Cape Town. 
Natal and the north-eastern Cape, 
while continuing to simmer in most 
of the areas where it originally 
erupted. 

Overall, the daily casualty rate 
has more than doubled and the 
level of black anger appears to have 
intensified. 

The police in Cape Town and 
adjoining townships arrested 14 
news reporters, including four for- 
eign television cameramen, and 
four others claimed they were as- 
saulted by police, according to 
news agency reports. 

The foreign TV crewmembers 
were held in a police truck, then 
token to a police station for ques- 
tioning. They were later released 
without charges. 


India, Pakistan to Confer on Nuclear Projects 


(Continued from Page If 
got i at ions to reassure each other 
about the peaceful nature of their 
nuclear program, said. “"We haven't 
discussed how they are going to 
progress." 

Niaz Naik. Pakistan’s secretary 
of foreign affairs, said that it had 
been “agreed to initiate the process 
of technical discussions between 
India and Pakistan on the question 
of nuclear nonproliferation.'' 

He added. “We are leaving it up 
to the technical people to decide 
what is the best modality to reas- 
sure each other that both sides are 
pursuing peaceful programs.” 

Nuclear development remains 
the main source of tension between 
the two countries. Both deny that 
they have programs to make nucle- 
ar arras, but India has recently 


TCMTBNAHONAL 

MANAGER 

AWfflQyOUOE51 SH0SY BUCHANAN 
WHJNESDM HTWHT 


stepped up allegations that Paki- 
stan is developing a weapon. 

.An Indian general recently as- 
serted that Pakistan was preparing 
to conduct a nuclear lest ou the 
Chinese border, and Mr. Gandhi 
and other top Indian officials have 
said that Pakistan has the ability to 
produce as many as five bombs and 
is being helped by other powers. 

“We talked about the problem of 
their nuclear program, and he sa id 
they are not doing it," Mr. Gandhi 
said after his meeting with General 
Zia on Wednesday, “but we are not 
fully convinced.” 

But, in a conciliatory tone, he 
added, “Somehow, we have to work 
together to see how to solve the 
problem.” 

General Zia has repeatedly de- 
nied India's charge. In his speech 
Wednesday before the General As- 
sembly, he said: “Pakistan is pre- 
pared to enter into any agreement 
or arrangement with India on the 
basis of sovereignty and reciprocity 


to keep our area free of nuclear 
weapons. 

“We would welcome any ideas, 
participate in any consultations, at- 
tend any conference in order to 
achieve this objective.” 


French Police Arrest 
Suspected Terrorist 

Reuters 

PARIS — A suspected member 
of a leftist French guerrilla group 
sought in connection with a bank 
robbery has been caught, police 
sources said Thursday. 

They said Meyer Azerouhald, 26, 
thought by police to be one of the 
founders of the group Direct Ac- 
tion. was arrested Sunday. He was 
sentenced to life imprisonment in 
absentia last year for his involve- 
ment in a Paris bank attack in 1 980 
in which a man died and another 
was seriously injured. 



Sam Nunn 


Soviet Missile Proposal 
Has Merit, Nitze Says 

By Bernard G'wertzman Mi. Niue said the Soviet propos- 

iVfH- York Times Service al Oh medium -range m ka les was 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan nevertheless unacceptable because 


Allies Balk 
At U.S. Offer 

(Continued from Page Ij 

tion stocks, logistical support and 
other measures of conventional 
military strength. 

The official said some nations, 
notably West Germany, had al- 
ready shown willingness to fund 
improvements in this area. But the 
commitment of several smaller 
NATO allies was not as certain. 

The second area of improvement 
concerns the response to a special 
S250-million fund approved by 
Congress this year to support coop- 
eration of the United Slates and 
European allies in developing new 
armament systems. 

Mr. Nunn, encouraged by the 
NATO commitments to improve 
defenses, had sponsored a bill pro- 
viding $200 million for the fund. 
He promoted the legislation as a 
“carrot" approach to the problem 
instead of reimroducinz his 1984 
bill. 

The U.S. official said the Euro- 
pean reaction to the special fund 
bas been characterized by suspi- 
cion of U.S. intentions and hesita- 
tion about designating matching 
money. The matching funds are not 
required by the legislation, but Mr. 
Nunn expects the allies to make 
significant financial contributions. 

The United States may have spe- 
cific cooperative programs to pro- 
pose Nov. 15, when NATO deputy 
defense ministers hold a special 
meeting in Brussels, the official 
said. 

The United States sees greater 
cooperation on arms araong the al- 
lies as important because of the 
increasing cost of developing new 
weapons systems. The duplication 
of effort by the allies is one reason 
why the alliance cannot match die 
Warsaw Pact in the output of con- 
ventional arms. U.S. officials say. 


administration's senior aims con- 
trol adviser has expressed interest 
in a Soviet proposal for an interim 
agreement on medium-range mis- 
siles that would freeze the number 
of U5. and Soviet missiles in Eu- 
rope and Asia. 

Paul H. Nitze, who advises Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan and Secretary 
of State George P. Shultz, repeated 
the overall U_S_ criticism of the 
proposals outlined by Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, in 
Paris this month and later ampli- 
fied at the Geneva negotiations. 

But Mr. Nitze noted Wednesday 
that the Soviet Union had offered 
to separate the talks on medium- 
range weapons from the two other 
parts of the Geneva negotiations, 
on strategic, or long-range, weap- 
ons, and on space-based defenses. 

The United States has Tong 
sought to separate the issues be- 
cause Moscow was Uniting progress 
in the strategic and medium-range 
talks to an end of the American 
space-based program. 

Mr. Gorbachev's initial propos- 
als, which included a 50-percent 
cut in strategic delivery sys tem* , 
raised questions among' U.S. offi- 
cials when he proposed a freeze on 
medium-range SS-20 missiles in 
Europe at 243. It was uncertain to 
them at the time what the Soviet 
side intended to do about the 200 
SS-20 missiles in Asia. 

Mr. Nitze said that the Soviet 
plan for an interim freeze called for 
a freeze on SS-20s in Asia as wdL 
Other American officials said this 
became dear in the Geneva talks 
recently. 

In the U.S. view, the Soviet 
Union, by proposing an interim 
freeze on medium-range missiles, 
seemed, in effect, to acknowledge 
thaL the United States could retain 
the Pershing-2 and cruise missiles 
installed in Western Europe since 
late 1983. Previously, Soviet pro- 
posals insisted on a dismantling of 
the new American missiles. 


the Russians would still have a sig- 
nificant advantage in numbers. 

Moreover, he said, the Soviet 
Union still wanted the U.S. force 
reduced after the interim freeze and 
wanted the Soviet force to be bal- 
anced by the number of British and 
French missiles, something unac- 
ceptable to NATO.- 

Mr. Nitze said that the Soviet 
proposals contained “an infinite 
number of hookers" but that they 
also contained useful ideas. 

He said Mr. Reagan and Mr. 
Gorbachev could mot possibly set- 
tle “the immensely complex and 
varied issues” in arms control when 
they meet in Geneva on Nov. 19 
and 20. 

Arms talks between the United 
States and the Soviet Union broke 
down in 1983 when die Soviet side 
walked out when the first of 572 
planned American missiles were 
deployed in Europe to counter the 
SS-20s. 

■ Thatcber, Reagan Meet 

Prime Minister Margaret 

Thatcher of Britain, warning that 
Mr. Gorbachev was winning the 
propaganda battle in advance of 
next month’s Geneva meeting, 
urged Mr. Reagan on Wednesday 
to seize the initiative by stressing 
his commitment to arms reduction, 
the Los Angeles Times reported 
from New York. 

Mr. Thatcher and Mr. Reagan, 
in New York for the 40th anniver- 
sary of the United Nations, dis- 
cussed issues of the summit meet- 
ing during a half-hour session. 

■ Dutch Approve Accord 

The Dutch parliament approved 
Thursday a draft accord with 
Washington on deploying enrise 
missiles in the Netherlands, Reu- 
ters reported from the Hague. 

Approval of the outline, which 
covers arrangements for siting and 
control of the missiles, is a further 
step toward the government’s final 



President Duarte h» gv his daughter, lues, and her friend. 
Ana Cecilia Vflleda, after their release on Thursday.; 

Duarte’s Daughter Released 
In Prisoner Swap With Rebels 

(Continued from Page 1) . - The agreement, reached Tue^ 

the country and others would re- day. would end more than six 
main in E Salvador. weeks of tension that started when 

The government also was assist- - Mrs. Duarte Duran and her friend j 
ing in the evacuation of 96 wound-' were abducted as they arrived for 


ed guerrillas to other countries for 
medical treatment The wounded 
rebels presumably had been in 
guerrilla hospitals. 

The wounded prisoners were to 
be turned over to the Red Cross in 
Jucuaran. 70 miles southeast of the 
capital for transfer to other cram- 
tries. A Panamanian Air Force 
plane was waiting at the capital's 
airport. 

Mr. Rey Prendes said Wednes- 
day that details of the exchange 
were worked out in three day s of 
long meetings between representa- 
tives of the government and the 
Farabundo Marti National Libera- 


decision next month on whether to tion Front, the main rebel military 
accept the weapons. organization, in Panama. . 


Reagan Challenges Moscow to a r Fresh Start ’ 


(Continued from Page 1) 
their arsenals and ban and destroy 
anti-satellite systems.” 

Mr. Shevardnadze noted that 
Moscow had proposed solutions to 
the question of medium-range nu- 
clear weapons in Europe and had 
removed some medium-range mis- 
siles from that area. 

"If an appropriate agreement is 
reached," he said, “we shall not 
increase the number of such mis- 


Lry as well provided there is no 
substantial change in the strategic 
situation there." 

He said radical steps in nod ear 
disarmament should be combined 
with measures aimed at easing nrili- 
lary tensions and building confi- 
dence. 

“All this should be done under 
strict and reliable control" be said 
“Where verification with national 
technical means may be inadequate 


sties in the Asian part of our count ' to provide the necessary- degree of 


confidence, we are ready to supple- 
ment it with additional mutually 
agreed procedures.” 

He said, “We state this very em- 
phatically, because there are those 
who would like to make world pub- 
lic opinion believe that the Soviet 
Union is against verification. We 
ask them: Are you ready, as wears, 
to scrap hundreds of- missiles and 
aircraft, thousands of nuclear 
charges? Say ’yes’ and we shall be 
able to agree on verification.” 


classes at a private cdDege in San - 
-Salvador on Sept. 10. One body:' . 
guard was Tolled and one was! 
wounded in the abduction. 

The abduction and subsequent - 
negotiations had preoccupied offi- 
cials of Mr. Duarte’s government, 
which, in addition to the six-year 
war with leftist insurgents, faces ' - 
deep economic and social prob-, 
Jems. 

The original guerrilla demands - 
were for two prisoners and an ex- . 
plantation of what had happened to 
a number of others presumed cap- 
tured. The demands grew to nine 
prisoners, and eventually to 34. 

The government had released 
three of the 34- previously. The 22 it - 
agreed to release left nine the govv 
eminent said it could not account 
for. 

Mr. Duarte won the approval of 
the country’s powerful military es- 
tablishment to negotiate the pris- - 
oner exchange. But the deal never- - 
tbeless generated strong criticism 4 
of the president fiom the political * - 

right- ' 

Advertisements paid for this ; 
week by the Nationalist Republi- '* 
can Alliance, coffee growers and 
other groups asked how the govern-. - 
meat could explain the exchange to 
soldiers in the field who would have - 
to fight against the released guerril- 
las. 



12600000 kW 


At Itaipii, on the border between Brazil 
and Paraguay, the waters of the Rio 
Paran£ are being harnessed in the 
biggest hydroelectric power project 
on earth. When completed, the plant’s 
18 generators, the biggest of their kind 
in the world, will be capable of produc- 
ing 12600000 kW of electricity. 

Brown Boveri are the main suppliers of 
electrical equipment and systems. 

Equipment that includes nine of the 
700 MW generators, each 20 m in dia- 
meter. 11 m high and weighing 3400 1 
Each able to produce sufficient elec- 
tricity to supply an industrial city of half 
a million inhabitants. 

Systems that include the entire solid 
state excitation. Together with 18 com- 
plete motor control centres. And 38 
single-phase transformers for volt- 
ages as high as 765000 V and rat- 
ings up to 550000 kVA. And 3 three- 
phase transformers of 375000 kVA. 


525000 V. And 79 high-voltage out- 
door circuit-breakers for voltages of 
362000 and 550000 V. And an SF 6 
gas-insulated switching substation of 
52 bays— the world’s largest metal- 
clad installation for 550000 V. And 
that’s only part of BBC’s contribution 
to the itaipii project Working in part- 
nership on the grand scale. 

Brown Boveri play a vital role in provid- 
ing the world with facilities for generat- 
ing, distributing and utilizing electric- 
ity. Whether as main contractor, as 
head of a consortium or as consortium 
member, Brown Boveri are there. Ac- 
cepting the challenge of the different, 
the complex and the new-every day 
and everywhere. 

Busily engaged in committing their 
worldwide resources to the attain- 
ment of technical excellence in joint 
enterprise with others, Brown Boveri 
make good partners. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 






swidilwReL. 

••• “d ^ 


r By Hebe Dorsey 

: ' lmemu *^ HaaUTrihine- 
r — The Paris coUectioos 

'ended Thursday with the a warding 
of the first Oscars to French ready- 
to-wrar deagm, The ceremony 
was bdd in the grandiose TOpdra 
de Pans, radered brill by Napo- 
leon IB and opened in 1875. T 
Die show, attended hy about 

PARIS FASHION 

1,200 people, was televised in 
France, Japan and the United 
States to an audience estimated at 
250 million, which gw* soma idea 
how much fashion has evolved into 
.asaga of mcgatalenis, megabucks 

fad mega-intrigues. 

Everything was red in this opu- 
lent setting, from the grand stair- 
way and balconies, draped whh red 

flowers, to the (firmer tables cov- 
ered with red tablecloths. The or- 
chestra was buried in ride a square, 
red-draped podium. At the . an- 
nouncement of the Oscars, a zed 
curtain was lifted and 200 models, 
dressed in shades of red by the 
designers attending, stood cm a 
huge colonnaded stairway — the 
Opera’s set for “IphigAaie en Taur- 
ide.” 

As Gene Pressman, president of ' 
Barneys, New York, put it: *Td 
rather be watddng the Super Bowl, 
but this is very impressive." ■ 
Pier-Lnigj Pfen, tbe Italian op- 

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era director, who coordinated 

.show with the French television, 
r^ew, had the fdicitous idea of 
filming the arrival of the designers . 
on the Op£ra grand stairway and 
following them into the orchestra. 
Most of them arrived with glamor- 
ous escorts: Alala with Cher, .Yves 
Saint Laurent with Catherine Den- 
euve, Emanuel Ungaro with Anouk' 
Aimfie and Valentino whh Fanny 
Aidant. 

The evening bad a distinctly in- 
stitutional edge, thanks to Jack 
Lang, France’s culture minister, 
whose idea it was, and who has 
given his support to prompting 
French fashion. He was there, as 
well as* Danielle Mitterrand, the 
president's wife, and Edith Cres- 
son, the minister of industry and 
foreign trade. Frtdiric Mitterrand, 
a nephew of the president who 
knows a lot about movies but hot 
much about fashion, was the emcee 
for the event. 

While all the designers' sat side 
by side in two orchestra rows. Saint 
Laurent's business partner, Pierre 

ftftf fashion strings, sat on^tihe 
right of Mrs. Mitterrand. ' . * . 

Nine Oscars were presented, 7 ^ 
of them awarded by a jury selected 
by Jacques Mouc&er. head of the 
French Chambre. Syndicate. The 
other three were voted on by 2Q0 
fashion journalists,, under die su- 
pervision of IFOP, a Frepch poll- 
mg organization^ - 

The hero of the evening was Az- 



OaitaCM 


Azze<fine AIaSa; t!ie Tunisian-born designer, at awards ceremony for Paris fashion 
deagD^s TImcs^ry with Imam, tbe fashion model, and Grace Jones, the actress and singer. 

The hero of the evening was Azzedine Aiaia, the diminutive 
Tunisian designer, who won two Oscars and who is responsible for 
re-eayjiafiiwng the body, bringing back shape to fashion. 


Alata 1 the itimmm fw* Tuni- 
sian designer^ who won two Oscars 
and is who responsible for re-em- 
phasizing the, body, bringing back 
shape to fashion. 

Die Oscars voted by the jury 
vent to five couturiers. Tbe awards 
voted by the journalists were pre- 
sented toT2 ready-to-wear desgn- 
ea. 

The jury awarded two Oscars 
jointly io-Atfia and Soma RylrieL 
While tbe naming of the first win- 
ner was greeted with deafening ap- 
plause, the .second named winner 
had: people wondering — Rykiel 
being known- u a designer of nice 
knits. The idea, apparently, was to 
Jhavea.woman derig^r on the po- 
dium. AMa won the second Oscar 
Bs' jhe journalists dunce for de- 
snghb^tiieyBw'.;.; .. 

• ’ Other ,ynnuas^ wre.&erre Car- 
din; Issey Miyakej Saint Laurent 


and. Claude Montana. Montana's 
award was for the best collection 
this season. 

. John Bl Fair y hi id , chairman of 
Women’s Wear Daily and a man 
who has packed a lot of excitement 
into fashion, received the Oscar 
from Paloma Picasso for “spread- 
ing French fashion in the world.” 
Hd&ne Lazareff, who founded the 
magazine EUe and helped estab- 
lished a French fashion ima ge in 
the world, was also a winner. 

There , were special tributes to 
Grand, Balenciaga and Madame 
Gris, who presided the event and 
got the biggest ovation. 

Asa gesture to the boose of Dior, 
which was not on either of the two 
lists of noxEtinations, the orga niz ers 
brought onstage Marc Bohan, 
Dior's couture designer, along with 
200 seamstresses dressed in white. 
Audrey Hepburn, who attended 


the ceremony with Hubert de Gi- 
venchy. her favorite couturier, also 
received a special mention. 

Some people felt that Kail La- 
gerfeld should have been given spe- 
cial attention, both in connection 
with the house of Chanel and be- 
cause he invented deluxe ready- to- 
wearat Chloi. 

Valentino, also missing from the 
list of winners, was a good sport: he 
stayed to the end and was host of a 
table for bis whole crew, which in- 
cluded the mother of his partner, 
-Giancario GiammeuL 

It was a highly charged evening 
and a feat of sons to capture so 
many designers in one place. As 
short films of each designer were 
shown, along with their designs, it 
was also as if a page of French 
fashion was being turned, herald- 
ing the beginning of the new and 
the end of the old. 


All Phone 
Numbers 
To Change 
In France 

hui'miutoaul Her tifc Tribune 

PARIS — The entire telephone 
dialing system of France will 
change Friday at II P-M. 

At that hour, the country will be 
divided into two phoning areas: the 
Paris region — Paris and its sub- 
urbs, including Versailles and 
Fouhlaineblcau — and the rest of 
France. 

All numbers in France will have 
eight digits, instead erf the six or 
seven digits used until now. Out- 
side the Paris region, where six dig- 
its have been customary , area codes 
used previously will become pan of 
subscribers’ telephone numbers. 

Tbe switch, according to officials 
of tbe state-owned Post and Tele- 
communications, or PTT. wiQ not 
mean any interruption to service, 
even to calls in progress. 

But it will double the capacity of 
the telephone network, now near 
saturation in Paris and other areas, 
making 50 million numbers avail- 
able to meet demand well past the 
year 2000. It will also help in devel- 
opment of new services such as 
radio telephones, telecopiers and 
toll free numbers, according to 
PTT. 

For Paris itself, all local numbers 
will remain unchanged except that 
they will start with a 4. 

At the International Herald Tri- 
bune, for example, the phone num- 
ber 747-1265 will become 4747- 
1265. 

Elsewhere in the Paris region, the 
prefix 3 wifi be added to numbers 
in the Val d'Oise and Yvelines de- 
partments. including Versailles and 
Sl Gennain-en-Laye, and the pre- 
fix 6 will be added for the Esso one 
and the Seine-et-Mame, including 
Evry and Fontainebleau 

Calling from abroad will change 
only lor the Paris region. Before the 
change, a caller to a number in 
Paris would have dialed from 
abroad: 33 (country code for 
France), then 1 (city code for Par- 
is), then the seven-digit local num- 
ber. 

After 11 P.M. Friday, a caller 
from abroad must dial 33, then 1. 
then the new eight-digit number 
beginning with the prefix 4. Simi- 
larly, to call someone in Versailles, 
a caller will dial 33, then 1, then the 
prefix 3 before the previous local 
number. 

Beginning Friday night, callers 
from the Paris region to the rest of 
the country will dial 16, the inter- 
France code for the provinces, then 
the new eight-digit number that be- 
gins with the old area code. 

Those calling the Paris region 
from elsewhere in France must dial 


Brazil’s Children of the Streets 

Crime by Minors Has Surged as Millions Fight for Survival 


By Alan Riding 

NV» York Timet Service 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Small, 
barefoot and about 12 years old, 
the boy reached through a car win- 
dow and snatched a woman's neck- 
lace. Her scream alerted four pass- 
ing men, who grabbed the youth 
and began beating his face and ribs. 
Eventually, a police car arrived and 
officers took away the badly 
bruised child. 

The modem itself was not un- 
usual. Street crime committed by 
minors, often carrying guns, has 
surged here in recent years. With it 
has come rising public pressure on 
the police to get tough. Angry 
crowds hare occasionally caught 
young muggers and lynched them. 

Yet the 10-minule scene acted 
out one recent Sunday morning in 
the elegant Ipanema neighborhood 
reflected a larger drama — that of 
millions of abandoned and Deedy 
Brazilian children who are growing 
up as illiterate, alienated and un- 
employable outcasts. 

Forced onto the streets in order 
to survive, they are to be seen in 
any city at any time begging or 
shining shoes or s elling chewing 
gum at traffic lights or bus termi- 
nals. 

Statistics show that relatively 
few of these street children become 
involved in crime. But this is not 
the perception of the alarmed mid- 
dle classes. Because many people 
tend to view the poor youths as 
potential assailan ts rather than vic- 
tims, Brazil has been slew to ad- 
dress the problem of mass child 
poverty. 

According to government fig- 
ures, 36 mini on Brazilians under 
the age of 1 8, or about 60 percent of 
the total are “needy," and seven 
million of these have lost all or 
most links with their families and 
hare been “abandoned or margina- 
lized.” 

One-third of aQ children be- 
tween 7 and 14 — about eight mil- 
lion — do not attend school and 
more than half the children under 6 
years old are undernourished. 

Now, in the more open climate 
brought by the recent return of 
civilian government to Brazil after 
21 years of military rule, concerned 
officials, sociologists and church 
workers express hope that greater 
attention can be given to the issue. 

“My first job is to denounce this 
situation as loudly as possible," 
said Nelson A guiar the new head 
of Funabem, as the Foundation for 
the Welfare of Minors is known. 
“This is a political problem. A 
country that has the world's eighth 
largest capitalist economy cannot 
say it lacks the resources to rescue 
its dearest patrimony from mis- 
ery " 

Thft nmhlem nf ahanrinnftri and 


many sociologists say social and 
family disintegration are most seri- 
ous in Brazil. They attribute this to 
a legacy of slavery, which was abol- 
ished in 18SS. and a function of 
large-scale peasant migration from 
the impoverished northeast to ur- 
ban slums in the south. 

Mr. Aguiar said: “We work with 
the consequences of the failure of 
land, agricultural educational la- 
bor and health policies. We are just 
the visible tip of a failed social 
system." 

Funabem, which was set up by 
tbe military regime in 1964, has 
427,000 minors living in its institu- 
tions. About 150,000 have been 
placed under its protection by fam- 
ily courts, although only 14,000 of 
these have committed crimes. 

“For lack of financial, technical 
and human resources," Mr. Aguiar 
said, “we are attending to less than 
6 percent of those whom we have 
an institutional obligation to help." 

In most of Brazil, the organiza- 
tion works through state welfare 
offices, but in Rio de Janeiro. Fun- 
abem is directly in charge of "pro- 
tection homes" and reform schools 
for almost 4,000 minors. Its main 
“campus” for abandoned children, 
in the suburb of Quintino. illus- 
trates tbe problems faced around 
the country. 

Thalita Vieira Lima, who runs 
one house at Quintino that has 22 
deaf mutes among its 25 1 students, 
said: “We have a large percentage 
of children with mental or physical 
problems. We try to reintegrate 
them into their families, but so 
many are from broken families, 
and fen - mothers can cope." 

Those who “graduate" from 
Funabem carry the stigma of hav- 
ing been in the institution and then 
face the problem or finding work. 

tnsii-ad of building more institu- 
tions for destitute children, Funa- 
bem’s new team has decided to de- 
centralize, specifically by trying to 
persuade local groups to assume 
responsibility for their own chil- 
dren. 

More complex is the problem of 
juvenile delinquents, who in many 
cases are handled roughly by the 
police and then sent to overcrowd- 
ed detention centers where hard- 
ened teen-age c riminals, including 
murderers, mix freely with minor 
offenders. 

Gilberio Dantas. who is in 
charge of the Police Precinct for the 


Protection of Minors in a crum- 
bling building in central Rio de 
Janeiro, said that 70 percent of 
those arrested were repeat offend- 
ers. 

“But many of the kids just need a 
job," he said. “This is not a prob- 
lem that can be handled by the 
police." 

Mr. Aguiar believes that unless 
Brazil changes its treatment erf 
needy children, the problem of ju- 
venile crime will inevitably grow. 

“The child has a legitimate right 
to defend himself against a hostile 
society ” he said. “At first, the 
hungry child holds out his hand in 
innocence. After that, he begins to 
steal surreptitiously. Finally, he 
takes what he needs bv force!" 


West German Fighter Crashes 

Rental 

LONDON — A West German 
Tornado jet fighter crashed Thurs- 
day in northern England, killing 
two crew members, the British De- 
fense Ministry said. The aircraft 

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Thanks to its enduring commit- 
ment to research, Bayer looks to 
the future with confidence. Re- 
search and development activi- 
ties are the bridge to success in 
the years ahead, and even into 
the next century. In fact, these 
activities are crucial for the very 
future of the company, and thus 
for the jobs it provides. 
Research is also expensive. For 
example: it can take as long as 
ten years for a new pharmaceuti- 
cal product to be fully tested 


and officially approved. On aver- 
age, only one in every 10,000 
substances investigated ever 
reaches the market As a result, 
total R& D costs for a new prod- 
uct amount to more than DM 
150 million. 

Today, 40 per cent of Bayer’s 
overall turnover is accounted for 
by products which were devel- 
oped overthe pastl5years in the 
company’s own research facili- 
ties. 

Bayer is engaged in research in 
many sectors of the chemical 
industry. Unceasing efforts are 
being made in search of new and 
better quality products to help 
improve the quality of life and 
health standards, as well as se- 
cure future food supplies. 

Every year; Bayer allocates DM 
2 billion for research - an 
amount which is rather difficult 
to conceive, but it represents 
our investment in the future. 


HIGHLIGHTS 
1985 During the first six months, 
Bayer World turnover grew by 12.3 
per cent to DM 24.6 billion. Profit 
before tax rose by 16.0 per cent to 
DM 1,725 million. 

Bayer AG turnover increased by 8.9 
per cent to DM 9.4 billion. Profit 
before tax rose by 25.8 per cent, 

reaching DM 830 million. 

1984 Turnover Bayer World: DM 
43.0 billion. Share of production 
abroad and exports: 79 per cent. 
Turnover Bayer AG: DM 16.2 billion. 

Export share: 65.5 per cent 

Bayer World capital investment: DM 
1.8 billion, of which DM 915 million 

in West Germany. 

After-tax profits: Bayer World DM 1.2 
billion; Bayer AG DM 660 million. 

Dividend 1984: DM 9 per share of 
DM 50 nominal. 

Total payout: DM 460 million on 
paid-up capital of DM 2.6 billion to 
some 350,000 shareholders. 

For further information on Bayer, please contact 
Bayer AG, Public Relations Department, 

D-5090 Leverkusen, West Germany or 
Bayer U.K. Ltd., Public Relations Department, 
Strawberry Hill, Newbury/Berkshire RG13 1JA, 
Great Britain. 


Bayer 

Aktiengeseilschaft 

Leverkusen 







wiS'*: "S&li. '*'v‘ 




-» 






Page 6 


P* Pa i 


gc 

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Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


Srtbunc. 


ftihlkhri 1'iA TV New YoA Tmw ind TV Waghingtow Port 

The UN: Three Times Yes 


Do we need the United Nations? If it bad 
not been around for 40 years, would the world 
now invent it? Can a case be made, without 
humbug, for an organization that thrives on 
humbug? The answer is three times yes. 

The UN Charter, which came into effect 40 
years ago Thursday, did not outlaw wars or 
create a world government. It spoke instead of 
establishing “conditions under which justice 
and respect for obligations arising from trea- 
ties and other sources of international taw can 
be maintained " The UN has improved condi- 
tions for ending or containing violent quarrels 
between its members. They may sometimes 
scorn its appeals and spnm the good offices of 
the secretary-general, as in the Iran-lraq war. 
But the record is otherwise in most flash-lire 
conflicts. Belligerents willing to be rescued can 
find face-saving salvation in appeals by the 
Security Council for cease-fires. 

That was the case in successive Arab- Israeli 
wars, and in clashes between India and Paki- 
stan. Without a United Nations, Turkey’s in- 
vasion of Cyprus could have ended in a war 
with Greece instead of a cold truce monitored 
by UN peacekeepers. When swords are drawn, 
the United Nations can blunt the edges of 
conflict and slow the rush to calamity. 

It did so most memorably in the 1962 Cuban 
missile crisis, providing the open forum at 
which Soviet and American diplomats argued, 
as well as backstage facilities for vital sound- 
ings. When the secretary-general called on 
Moscow and Washington to avert a confronta- 
tion at sea, both found it expedient to comply. 


The shot that was not fired echoed around the 
world as a gasp of relief. 

Those who deplore the United Nations be- 
cause it provides a stage for nations hostile to 
the United States miss the point. The organiza- 
tion's strength is its universality. It reflects the 
real world. If it did not exist, something like it 
would be devised to curb quarrels among in- 
terdependent stales. Because everyone be- 
longs. no one can afford to ignore it. 

The benefits of belonging are uneven. Poor- 
er nations gain more. They pay token dues, 
reap the most from UN development pro- 
grams and can combine their votes to agitate 
for special causes. And yes, the Communist 
bloc also gains from the stature conferred by 
membership in tbe United Nations. 

But U.S. interests are also served. How oth- 
erwise expose tbe failures of Marxist dogmas, 
or the designs of Soviet diplomacy? There is a 
useful lesson in what happened when Moscow 
angrily boycotted the Security Council in 
1950. The council promptly bestowed the flag 
of the United Nations on the U.S.-Ied armies 
opposing Communis l aggression in Korea. 

The UN is often ungainly and inefficient 
and its rostrum used by scoundrels no less than 
sages. It is debased by hypocrisy, especially on 
human rights, and deadened by prolixity. It is 
a meager substitute for what its founders 
wanted and what it pretends to be — an 
assembly of nations truly striving for a fairer, 
safer world. StilL the United Nations remains 
as valid, and as necessary, as that aspiration. 

— THE NEK' YORK TIMES. 


Choices on the U.S. Deficit 


President Reagan and the Congress have 
spent all year debating deficit reduction, and 
only now are they down to the specifics — the 
“reconciliation" and appropriations bills that 
will actually do the job. These are the bills to 
carry out the broad policy contained in the 
budget resolution finally adopted in August- 
Budget resolutions settle only some issues; 
they leave a lot of blanks to be filled in. The 
fights over implementation are turning out to 
be as slurp and in many ways as important as 
the loftier deliberations that preceded them. 

Thus the White House chief of staff, Donald 
Regan, warned last Friday that the administra- 
tion opposes the Senate reconciliation bill in 
its current form, in pan because of powerful 
policy consequences it could have for taxes. In 
lowering the deficit, the bill would levy two 
new taxes, neither large but each with the 
capacity for talcing the government into a new 
realm of taxation. One would apply to most 
manufactured goods, to pay for the cleaning 
up of leaky chemical dumps, the other to 
imports, to finance a new program for workers 
who have lost jobs to foreign competition. The 
bill would also perpetuate, at 16 cents a pack, 
the U.S. excise tax on cigarettes, which other- 
wise will revert to 8 cents. 

Its sponsors estimate that the reconciliation 
legislation would reduce the deficit by $21.6 
btflioa this year, and the taxes are an impor- 
tant pan of that — but Mr. Regan said the 
president’s advisers would urge him to veto the 
bill unless the tax provisions and some others 


(involving Medicare and offshore oil revenues 
in particular) are cut out. And what of the 
deficit if a veto were sustained? That presum- 
ably would be the next day's problem. 

The Senate has been working through a 
similar set of choices, in action on appropria- 
tions bills. In 1984, it look the Senate about a 
quarter of an hour to pass the appropriations 
bill for the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development and 17 independent agencies: 
last week it took two days. Much of the debate 
involved a weighing of the budget resolution 
against cuts proposed in general revenue shar- 
ing and health programs for veterans. Hie 
Senate finally compromised, sticking to its 
budget targets but fudging just a little on the 
cuts; it found some money elsewhere, includ- 
ing in the favorite secret drawer of all budget- 
cutters, administrative expenses. 

These efforts to fine-tune the year's results 
are, of course, all unassailable. The president, 
his aides and members of Congress are sup- 
posed to fight about which programs to cut — 
and the administration is right in some of its 
objections to the reconciliation bill, particular- 
ly to the clean-up tax (which smells like a 
regressive value-added tax) and to the shell 
game that would be played with oil revenues. 
But for five years the deficit problem has been 
regularly subordinated to policy preferences 
on taxes, defense and social programs. Thai is 
what is continuing to happen, and at some 
point the finessing has to stop. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


The UN: In Fashion Again? 

Where, in the middle of Paris’s crisis with 
Wellington and Canberra, was [External Rela- 
tions Minister] Roland Dumay'able to meet 
constructively and discreetly 'with his New 
Zealand and Australian colleagues? At the 
United Nations. Where is Secretary of State 
George Shultz preparing the Reagan-Gorba- 
cbev summit meeting with his Soviet counter- 
pan, Eduard Shevardnadze? They meet Friday 
at the UN. Where do representatives of Alge- 
ria and Morocco, of Greece and Turkey, of 
Israel and Arab countries, of El Salvador and 
Nicara g ua, even of Iran and Iraq, find it possi- 
ble to open or renew discreet negotiations? In 
the famous glass building on the East River. 

It has again become fashionable to show 
oneself in this lofty place; the will to save the 
system is now almost unanimous. This alone is 
not enough to assure peace in the world, but it 
most certainly was necessary. 

— Le Monde (Paris). 

Our shrinking planet is sitting on a pile of 
explosive problems: a growing arsenal of nu- 
clear weapons, population problems, a fragile 
world monetary system overdependent on the 
U.S. dollar, global pollution, trade protection- 
ism, and many others. Clearly, there is no 
cause for complacency on celebrating die 
UN's 40th anniversary. 

— The Jakarta Post. 


Of Government and the Law 

At home and abroad, the Reagan adminis- 
tration has made clear that it will not be 
inconvenienced by mere laws; it will do as it 
likes. But government under law is no mere 
game that we can quit whenever we do not like 
the rules. By stalking out of the World Court, 
tbe administration derailed progress toward a 
world in which nations are governed by some- 
thing other than the law of the jungle. In 
treating the Constitution and laws of the Unit- 
ed States with the same cavalier contempt, the 
president and bis advisers do great harm. 

When Ronald Reagan was inaugurated, he 
swore not to do whatever he could get away 
with, but to “support and defend the Constitu- 
tion.'' And that document’s aspiration is pre- 
cisely to replace the ethic of “ mi g h t makes 
right" with a regime in which all parties, in- 
cluding the government, abide by and stand 
equal before an impartial standard of justice. 

The Constitution binds the president and 
his administration just as surely as it binds the 
rest of the American people. 

Balzac once described law as a spiderweb 
that snags trifling little flies, but surely cannot 
hold a hawk. Even the most affable of presi- 
dents should not be allowed to make that 
cynical metaphor into his code of conduct 
— Laurence H. Tribe. Tyler Professor of 

Constitutional Law at Harvard University, 
writing in the Los Angeles Times. 


FROM OUR OCT. 25 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Will Britain Protect Holland? 
LONDON — Germany and the integrity of 
the Netherlands are discussed. The Daily Ex- 
press says: “A German annexation of Holland 
is impossible so far as British policy is con- 
cerned. We cannot and must not afford to 
allow the integrity of the Netherlands to be 
impaired. The independence of Holland and 
Belgium must be a cardinal feature of all 
British policy. That has been well understood 
all over the world, and in Holland the possibil- 
ity of German annexation was always put 
aside on tbe assumption that England would 
not permit such a rearrangement of the bal- 
ance of power. But now, it appears, this confi- 
dence in British determination and in British 
power is being undermined. It is being under- 
mined because England is allowing Germany 
to wrest from her the supremacy of the seas." 


1935: Dutch Schultz Dies in Gang War 
NEW YORK — Arthur Flegenbeimer, known 
as Dutch Schultz, Bronx “beer baron" and 
king of the billion-dollar Harlem numbers 
racket, died [on OcL 24] from a fusillade of 
submachine-gun bullets that cut him down 
with three of his lieutenants in a Newark 
tavern [on Oct. 23]. Police believe the shooting 
marks the outbreak of the most bitter under- 
world war in the city's history and which is 
expected to continue until all of Schultz’s 
henchmen are dead or in flight. Informers told 
police the Schultz gang of Brooklyn and the 
Brownsville section have been engaged in a 
war of extinction. Seventy-eight persons have 
been killed in the racket wars since the repeal 
of Prohibition ended rum-running. The terror 
of gang warfare hangs over the city's under- 
world as it awaits almost certain reprisals. 


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JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PAUEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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Editor 
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Asaxutie E&tor 


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near of Advertising Sales 

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© 1985. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved 


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 


With a New AUy, 
Volcker Sits High 

By Hobart Rowen 

W ASHINGTON — Few men in public life enjoy 
the prestige and public acclaim accorded Paul A. 
Volcker. chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. It is 
said, and it is probably a measure of bis influence, that 
be is the second most powerful person in America. 

Just a few weeks ago. while Mr. Volcker was in Seoul 
at the annual meetings of the World Bank and Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund, financial markets plunged on 
the rumor that he would resign bis job because he was 
angry over upcoming appointments to the Federal 
Reserve Board, which has seven members, of two men 
whose economic philosophies differed from his. 

Then, when he put an end to rumors that he might 
leave tbe Fed to replace A.W. Clausen as president of 
the World Bank, the markets, and his opposite num- 
bers in Foreign countries, responded with cheers. 

Mr. Volcker is seen around the world as a man of the 
highest integrity, dedicated to public service rather 
ilyin a ccum ulation of personal wealth. He has about 
two years to go on his second four-year term as 
chair man. The view expressed in Seoul was that while it 
would be a coup Tor the World Bank if he chase to 
become its president, it would be an overall loss to the 
world financial community if he left the Fed early. 

It has become dear in recent weeks that because of 
thejob shuffle between Donald T. Regan and James A 

Treasury Secretary James Baker, 
with Volcker’s close cooperation, 
has sharply altered America's 
international economic policies. 

Baker 3d, Mr. Volcker’s power has been enhanced. Mr. 
Regan, as Treasury secretary, fought with Mr. Volcker, 
attempting to influence monetary policy. 

But the Reagan administration has made sensible 
accommodations to the real world. Mr. Baker, as 
Treasury secretary, has made a sharp policy turn on 
international economic policies, seeking and receiving 
Mr. Volcker's close cooperation. Thus, as Mr. Baker 
said OcL 13. “I think we've been able to work together 
to accomplish some thing s for the United States that 
are important. We could never have done what we did 
at the Plaza Hold vis-a-vis the dollar without the active 
cooperation of the Federal Reserve." 

Mr. Baker’s reference was to his initiation of a move 
to devalue the dollar through coordinated intervention 
by the five major currency countries. It was an effort to 
devalue the dollar in order to blunt the congressional 
drive toward trade protectionism. 

Mr. Volcker had long favored a moderate policy of 
intervention so as to prevent market speculators from 
enjoying a one-way bet on currency values. But during 
his first term, Mr. Reagan favored a hands-off polio/. 

With Mr. Volcker’s help, Mr. Baker has also evolved 
a new strategy to deal with the growing crisis in Third 
World debt. It involves calling on the big banks to 
make additional new loans to the developing countries, 





By Sira Mnttw —Th, Wcrfwtfoo Pott 

and on the multilateral development banks such as the 
World Rank to loosen their purse strings. 

This is a new approach for the Reagan administra- 
tion, which sees more trouble brewing for Mexico and 
other major borrowers as oil and other commodity 
prices p lunge. The shift in White House strategy puts 
tbe Treasury in parallel with tbe Federal Reserve 
instead of oc. a collision coarse. 

Mr. Volcker will now have an important role in 
convincing private hawks that Mr. Bake’s pitch to 
them to boost Loans to Third World nations by $20 
billion over the next three years is crucial to the kind of 
economic growth — as opposed to the austerity de- 
mands made in the past — that will enable debtor 
nations to pay their debts. 

There are differences, to be sure. Mr. Volcker is also 
a bit worried, though he was ahead of the administra- 
tion on the need to poll down an overvalued dollar, 
that the process can go too far, too fast. 

He said at an American Stock Exchange conference 
that so long as the United States faces a large budget 
deficit, the Federal Reserve must avoid a plunge in the 
dollar that would discourage foreigners from buying 
Treasury bills and notes. 

A conversation on Mr. Baker’s plane to Seoul under- 
scored his worry about the “tricky business" of talking 
the dollar down. “I'm just as worried about the dollar 
falling too far as I am about it's being too high,” he 
said. Once a nation starts pushing its own currency 
down, he believes, it cannot be sure of keeping control. 

But Mr. Volcker s *** ns to have as much confidence 
in Mr. Baker's pragmatic conservatism as Mr. Baker 
has in him. The Fed chairman might have chosen two 
different board members than the supply-siders hand- 
ed him by the White House. But the commanding force 
of his personality is such that he is likely to dominate 
the Federal Reserve System as long as he is there — 
especially since he has a friend at the Treasury. 

The Washington Post. 


For the ’Nonaligned,’ 
Time for Re alignm ent: 

By Pranay Gupte 

YORK —These are cami- mal" West. Sonic of item prqcct a 
N Sdays at the United Nations. 

a time for self-congratulation that the ed of them bythetr 
organization is still on its feet for its ££- 

40th birthday. But amid the ceiebrai- thetr dam* of m 

mg, it behooves the members of the S5S 

159-nation body to consider the fu- wnisfamgy often with the =o«e 
rare of one of the Third World's basic Union. The sad thmg jJI of ites 

articles of faith, nonalignment. obtains for the nw>tmteni LilUe Oc 

As both a concept and a course of yond continued resratmem and 
action, noaalignment is at its nadir. It scorn on the part oftne »«t. 
enjovs little credibility in either the Surely there is a be uer a ay W^ 
Third World or the West. It has been nonaligned nations to meet thnrpec* 
unable to offer imaginative and prac- pies* coapnc^ pd tKgffU »«*«« 
deal solutions to global problems of — the Third World 
war and peace. Its political rhetoric is debt, the poor industrial production 
predictable, and its leadens seem be- in most developing countries 
set by intellectual confusion. . their inefficient food-distribution 

It may not. however, be doomed to systems. What the movement ougnt 
a permanent breakdown. It is still to be looking for is a aeather ana less 
posable for moderate Third World rhetorical relationship wtm the West- 
leaders to guide the movement away . era industrial nations. Only this way 
from its self-righteous rhetoric. and can the movement hope to begin to 
political posturing toward a more solve its looming problems. __ 
pragmatic course that would genu- A revised, and more effective, doi- 

mely hdp tbe people of the develop- ration of " n on afignm eni" might be 
inp r ramn-Tfg By ewtriw off ideologi- cooperation, not confrontation, with 
cal blindera and anti-West reflexes, the west and ctwaisttoce with, not 
Third World leaders can <riR a co-option by, the Soviet bloc, 
useful contribution on global issues Nonaligned leaders should be dc- 
such as the debt crisis, population vdoping ties with sympathetic West-, 
growth and development. enters, forming a common constitn- 

TTift a waited no naligned countries escy to tackle questions such as 
have put on a particularly shabby . racism, apartheid, the debt crisis, 
performance in recent tins: Led tty narcotics trafficking, illegal migra- 
India, several broke a United Nar don and refugee problems. Thqr^ 
dons gentleman’s agreement by pro- should recognize that their countries? 
poring to invite Yasser Arafat, the economic problems are likely to be 
chair man of the Palestine Liberation solved most quickly and effectively 
Organization, to address the General through some farm of capitalism ana 
Assembly. Some supporters of this market-oriented economic policies, 
resolution persisted despite the hi- It is tempting to write off the non- 

jacking of the AchiHe Laura and the aligned movement as obsolete and 
murder of an aged hostage. The cpi- worthless But this would be unfair to 
sode pointed to the nonaligned emerging moderate leaders such as 
countries' nenchant for brinkman- Prime Ministers Rauv Gandhi of In- 


coun tries’ penchant for brinkman- Prime Ministers I 
ship and confrontation, along with dia, Ranasmghe. 


Gandhi of In- 
aadasa of Sri 


their determined abuse of IsraeLThe Lanka and Mohammed Math of Tu- 


resohttion was eventually 


njgg Their reading of the Third 


but only under strong pressure from World’s future is more pragmatic 


President Reagan. 


than ideological, and they scemcon- 


The nonaligned movement was vinced that democracy and faith in 
conceived more than 30 years ago to the marketplace, as unf a s hio na ble as 
help the countries of the Third World they may be, are better bets than 
voice their economic aspirations confrontational spdattsm. Can such 
while steering dear of East- West cotir men summon the strength to rope m 
fron ration. But it has expanded to their- feBow leaders •_ of the Third 
include so many countries (more than World? The fixture of aoea ti g nment 


100) of so many different persuasions depends an their success. 

that die movement now finds it diffi- 

cult to define its larger interests. The writer's works include “Ven- 

Some of its leaders still fed that the geance: Liuba After tkeAssassmation 
only way to get recogiition is to ea- of Indira GandkL‘ , He Contributed tfds 
gage in confrontation with the "ado- comment to The Hew York Times. } 


A Dangerous Celebration MHJJ 
Of American Unilateralism 




By Richard J. Barnet 


W ASHINGTON — “We did this 
all by our little selves said 
President Reagan as he announced 
proudly that U.S. Navy fighters had 
forced an Egyptian plane to land in 
Italy without prior consultation with 
either country. In the administra- 
tion’s view, the widespread American 
applause for this use of military force 
against an ally and major aid recipi- 
ent plainly outweighed the cost in 
injured relationships with Italy and 
EgypL Indeed, the action was a clas- 
sic example of the administration’s 
unilateral approach to world affairs. 

No administration since the war 
has celebrated unilateralism as this 
one has. In national security, eco- 
nomic policy and diplomacy, Wash- 
ington prefers to advance U.S. inter- 
ests through its own initiatives and 
power rather than the mechanisms of 
international cooperation. 

Upon taking office, the adminis- 
. tration withdrew from the Law of the 
Sea Treaty. It has consistently de- 
nounced the United Nations and re- 
fused to be bound by judgments of 
the World CourL Ii has pursued eco- 
nomic recovery through deficit 
spending, high interest rates and an 
overvalued dollar, thus sucking up 
needed capital from Europe and tbe 
Third World without regard to the 
devastating effects of these policies 
on other countries. 

In Soviet- American relations, the 
United States has signaled its inten- 
tion to dash rather than build a rela- 
tionship based on mutual interest. In 
Washington’s view, the Soviet adver- 
sary is to be managed by steadily 
increasing the threat to it. Indeed, the 
administration appears to deny that 
Americans have any interest in com- 
mon with “the evil empire." The ap- 
proach to negotiation has been 


tie the conflict through negotiation. 

Perhaps tbe most dramatic symbol 
of unilateralism is the Strategic De- 
fense Initiative. This imaginary tech- 
nological shield is intended to pre- 
vent America's destruction by relying 
on its machines — rather than Mos- 
cow’s self-interest — to prevent war. 

Unfortunately, this reliance on 
unilateralism comes at the wrong his- 
torical moment: “Ram bo" national- 
ism has no place in a world of nudear 
weapons and more than 160 coun- 
tries. Even the most powerful country 
has lost considerable control over its 
own economy. The United States has 
never been so dependent on world 
trade, and more than a trillion dollars 
of unregulated Eurodollars are be- 
yond the reach of the UJS. Treasury. 
There is the danger of a trade war 
reminiscent of the 1930s, Meanwhile, 
tbe world debt crisis continues un- 
abated, threatening the collapse of 
tbe banking system. None of these 
problems can be solved by the United 
States acting alone or laying down 
the law to other nations. 

In the field of national security, the 
United States remains totally vulner- 




'ReaBy brightens up the old place, doesn’t ft? .v .* 


In Moscow, 


able, despite the myth of tbe nudear ■ 
Maginot Line in the sky. The pursuit 
of security through building ever 
more weapons has failed, as ever 
more weapons are in turn aimed at 
America, increasing the risks of war 
through miscalculation. 

The United States is a strong na- 
tion, considerably stronger economi- 
cally and militarily than any other 


country, including the Soviet Union. 
But its power to create a world envi- 
ronment in which Americans can be 


alner- There was ease in Karpov’s manner 
id car As he stepped into his place, 

ursuit There was pride in Karpov’s bearing, 
ever And a smile on Karpov’s face; 
ever And when, responding to the cheers, 
ted at His opponent he ignored 
f war Grancbnasters of the chess world knew 

T was Karpov at the board 
$ Forget the World Series. Super- 

mini- bowLschmuperbowL The big tension 
other in the sports world today is the match 


By William S afire 


being played at Tchaikovsky Hall in 
Moscow between Anatoli Karpov, 
34, world chess champ, and his dial- 


secure and prosperous is limited by leuger, Gary Kasparov, 22. 


the strange new world in which we 
live. New forms of international co- 
operation are badly needed; existing 


grudging. The administration has, for international institutions must be im- 


example. cut off negotiations on the 
nearly completed Comprehensive 


proved or replaced. No nation has as 


The match has grudge written all 
over it, and for good reason. Mr. 
Karpov is the darting of the Soviet 
chess establishment, having defeated 
the previous challenger', Viktor 


cow these days, and he tends to shoot And the a 

off his mouth about favoritism shown But a scar 
to the nervous champ. . And the a 

In their first match earlier this Theysawi 
year, the champ started off by beat . they moe 
ing the kid handily But in game after ' When Run 

game, the kid's innovative gambits There was 
began to get to tbe aging grandmas- Chess-pis 
ter's Nimzo-Jndian daenses, and Mr. over asked: 
Karpov froze. Stalemate; one draw . tantly cheat 
after the other. Mr. Karpov was them from 
ahead. 3 to l. with 6 needed to win, treaty with 


draft the challengers chief second 
into the Red Army. 

*FrardT cried the maddmed thousands, 
And the echo answered ‘Fraud!’ 

But a scornful look fnxn Karpov, 

And the ateSence was awed 
Vyy saw Ms face grow stem and cold, A, 
They watched his nusdes card 
When Russia lost to Fischer, 

There was no Kaipov at the board. ■. * 
Chess-playing pundits the workL- 
over asked: “If the Russians so bJa-- 
tantly cheat at chess, what’s to stop' 
them from cheating on the ABM* . 


trot? with that battfo-maxtagjement- 
and they played 40 draws. Then Mr. u KrasnoyarakT^^^ 

Kaqm m fan seooiid, and bs Soviet chess credibility took a fur-' 


Test Ban Treaty: Washington evi- international anarchy. 


much to lose as the United States by Korchnoi, who was a 


dently prefers to rely on its techno- The coun 
logical edge and economic power. cannot be st 
Hie administration would rather uonaiism, ho 
wage a “covert" war against Nicara- may fed. At 
gua than support Latin American ef- secure their 
forts to negotiate the conflict. In Af- acting alone, 
ghanistan, the administration 
supports the “freedom fighters" re- The write 


The country's national interest 
cannot be served by outmoded na- 
tionalism, however good the rhetoric 
may fed. Americans can no longer 
secure their most vital interests by 


ay Mr. Karpov’s towel-carrying psy- dared the match to be over. The chose^^miaiiov 
cbologist,Dr. Vladimir Zukhar, satin president of the International Chess Sicilian Drfmw'fwWw 
the front row and hypnotized Mr. federation, said he jnst decided thai iL^ k 

Korchnoi, but that is unproved. Afl day that everybody was too tired — opponent with Imeeean. 

we know for certain is that afl grand- but Tass happened to have put out tdriy coonti 

masters’ names begin with K.) the stay the night before. - Variation: 

His new opponent, like Mr. Kar- That little ploy by the- 'Moscow the kid’s d' 
pcrv a Soviet citizen, has the manners chess bosses left Mr. Karpov as Queen 4 o 


supports the “freedom fighters" re- The write : a senior fellow of the of tennis’s John McEnroe, and is 
sisucg the Soviet Army and barely Institute for Policy Studies, a public called in Russian a smtnoseyets. Mr. 
gives lip service to tbe efforts of the policy organisation, contributed this Kasparov is tbe sou of an Armeni an. 
European allies and others to set- comment to The New York Times. and a Jew, hardly a pedigree in Mos- 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


SOI Is Old Hat 

Regarding the news item ", Laser 
Tracked Missile in Test. Weinberger 
Says " (Oct. 4): 

Readers should be aware that the 
United Stales has been using ground- 
based lasers to track artificial satel- 
lites since 1962; so the recent Lest was 
not a first, despite the Defense De- 
partment’s claims. 


The SepL 6, 1985, test in wh ich a 
pressurized Titan booster structure 
was perforated by a laser beam in a 
ground Lest was no different from 
what industrial users of lasers have 
been doing for years, except for the 
“bang" caused by released pressure. 

The Sept 13. 1985, destruction of a 
“defunct" satellite was a repeat of a 
1959 test that used an Orion rocket 
launched from a B-47 bomber. 

In short, the U-S- Strategic De- 
fense Initiative is largely a repackag- 


N early 15 years ago, the United In short, the Uj. Stra tegic Do- 
States received on Earth signals from fense Initiative is largely a repackag- 
a ground-based laser beam reflected mg of 20- and 30 -year-old programs 
off ihe Moon. Tracking objects in — some of which were abandoned 
space with beams from ground-based years ago for good reason, 
lasers has never been a problem. The ROGER P. MAIN, 

only real challenge is to maintain a Darmstadt, West Germany, 

sufficiently intense beam. 

Take Geneva Seriously 

flowing for such research projects. Several recent commentaries in the 

There are other examples: International Herald Tribune have 


likened the coming Reagan-Gorba- . 
chev meeting to a game of chess or 
poker or tennis. Others speak of pub- 
lic relations advantages and media 
images as if the meeting were a beau- 
ty contest or a popularity poll _ 

But for most people, the summit 
meeting is deadly serious. We most 
call on these two men to defuse tbe 
tension that poisons the international 
atmosphere. We expect them to reach 
an under* landing that arms control is 
essential and that the militarization 
of space must be prevented. We want 
them to begin the work of disarma- 
ment so the funds thus released can 
be used to feed the hungry, cure die 
sick, house the homeless, teach the 
illiterate and boost the world econo- 
my. People wfl] judge these men by 
their actions, not their images. 

JANET BRUIN. 

Zurich. 


to move 


J iJrv “TT ping by the Mafia), Mr. lUroov fool- 

S2^SSS i bSo!S wp ““ rt 

That little ploy by the Moscow way for 

chess bosses left Mr. Karpov as ■S™5 J ? 

Kasparov — st£0 fresh and eager to .* 3 . . , 

play — out in tbe cokL En passant, tensc3 

tbe So™, bureaucracy .Warf to 

faflea be hind. Gary Kasparov, the 

... Wtk: the magic nmnVr . 

Two-Way Recognition ??**** ”£**?• No Eager can the 
J ° champ tm by merely playing to 

Some well-meaning columnists draw; he Is in a stale of what Gmuan 
have returned to the proposition that ptayera caSLzugrivang, forced to move 
the Palestine liberation Organize- but doomed by moving. For the first 
tion must r eco gni z e Israel if it wants . time, the glowering Mr Karpov has 
to keep the “peace; process” alive. to play catch-up chess. 

But -with IsraeTs constant pursuit . watch out Lot Evil-Eye Zukha r in 
of military objectives, one must won- the front row. Gary. The world holds, 
der what the consequences would-be its breath as the Jod rears and 
of such a unilateral dedaratioo- The ffingam frts next gambit. Perhaps Mr 
Israelis could simply say ^thanks" . Karpoywifl rally; perhaps tiieiEix wiii 
and then rit back to watch the inzmifl- be put m; or perhaps wc win soon be 

a led and demoralized Palestinian writing (A the happy endgame ‘ 

movement rip itsdf to shreds. Ofcj m this snom, land 

Any mcb^taoti.musLbe a two.. > The sun is shining bright.'* 
way sheet, and it does not have lb .. The band plays Shostakovich. 
come at tbe begmnhig of the pedee ' Apparatchik hearts are UtftL 
process. -It can comeatihe-.md^as ^ . And somewhere dtildrmlEL 
visible proof of success an the pan And Gorbachev's smile J 
of both parties. 

JOHN SHELLEY. ; Might? &a pov has resigned 

Barcelona. The New York Tunes. 


doomed by moving. For the first 
7 Uw glowering Mr. Karpov has 
to rilay catch-up chess. - 
. Watch out for Evil-Eye Zukhar in 


JAesiiniii 
The bands 


in this snowy land 
*ng bright. 


: SLffL* fo 


soviet 


j that -fze : 
Jtion any 
bold give ’ 

* them. 

'sport in ±=' 
bat there 
xkesntan. 
oronghly 
trillion.* 
raid Tri- 


mce 

id out a 



Said the 
the. test 
ad four 

irraani 

agtbof 


! + 

[5+ v* 

/ 

* V 







S~\ 


iW 


I 









. ... 


HeralbSSribunc. 

rijurf*^*--*-'- 1 * -■*. ~~ " i - 


rMmib 


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%5?;.a^“r::i •':'<?■* *v!g~7. 


AUSTRIA 


v - :-■ 


"v. •• 
fv. y •• ., 

*4-1-. • 
ft- - 


. ■-:/$ 


A SPECIAL ECONOMIC REPORT 




FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 


Page 7 


....At 

SIS 


? Alpine 


•«i 


^Dollar’ 




P ■■•'■: 


i<*r ft/ 


By David Hermges 

. '^Sb^ VIENNA — No opportunity is 
■■■’ lost in Austria to celebrate an amtir 
' ;: ‘’-^iri?- versaay, even if the occasion is not 
’’-'■'•s ; necessarily a nice “round” affair. 

There is an agglomeration of »>»■*«* . 
odd birthdays in 1985. 

. R “ now 15 years since the So- 

aalist Party took over leadership of 
- 1 'ia&r* th* Eovernment, first with a parha- 
• "•■ v-^ ^.^entaiy minority, then alone and, 
•■thtk ^ ^ 1Jore recently, in coalition with the 

- • -Vcj. A 1 : small Freedom Party. Thirty years 

a^o, the country regained its sover- 
: 'v-. r: 1 eignty with the signing of theStaxe 
Treaty; which came just 10 years 
* ?.<• i;V, K *-t after the beginning of the occupa- 
' ~ tion of the country by the wartime 

Allies. And 60 years have elapsed 
since the currency reform that re-. 

. placed the krone with the schilling, 

r- ’ •7’!?'^ A R is this “alpine dollar” that has 

t come, for most Austrians, to sym- 
bolize the stability of the ecomomy.J 
..\T’' 3ai fe* The Organization for Economic 
... Cooperation and Development, in 

its 1985 Economic Survey of Aus- 
. \ tria, summarized; “The overall per- 

: fonnance has remained satisfao- 
toiy; The growth rate of GDP 
... , ^ f ti [gross domestic product], anem- 
-"-"dan^ plqyment rates, productivity in- 
' — i»aa creases, inflation and the strength 
— - of the national currency continue 

' * ’ to compare favoraMy with those m 
- most other European countries.” 

- j- tf-'ranj; This has been achieved through a 

- '* lortft variety of circumstances, especially 
u* determination among Austrians 
both sides of the political fence 
to get the country running again 
after decades of neglect : 

By: the 1970s, the Austrian. So-' 
dahstshad largely abandoned dog- 
ma and were seeking pragmatic so- 
lutions. Consensus, became, the- : 
watchword, exemplified ip. asys-,’ 
ton erf . “social parmadmt’’;' : 
TheTjasic stabifity qf the .econo- * 

tmisaod reasbna% w^fe this, it 
was certainly assisted by its geo- . 
graphical-location in die heart of 
Europe with strong historical ties 
to Eastern Europe. The inherent - 
disadvantages for trade of being a 
landlocke d country are increasing- 
ly becoming a thing of the past An 
almost completed expressway link ' 
to Trieste inspired the agning eailir 
ex this month ofa treaty making the 
Adriatic pent once again^as m the 
" days of the monarchy, Austria’s 
' prime outlet to the sea. And (be 
completion of the Rtfinje-Mapt- ' 
Danube ' canal* witL put Austria, 
astride a freight waterway Imlripg.; 
the North Sea. directly with the 
Black Sea. T . . ' ' * 

This east-west, north-sooth role 
has come into prominence recently 
with the emergence, during the 
1980s, of major trading houses. In- 
tertrading, a Voest-Alpine subsid- 
iary, and Merx, owned by Cbemie 

(Continued on Next Page) 



Neutrality Is Central Feature 
In Strong National Consensus 


By Henry Tanner 

VIENNA — Austria's neutrality wiE be 30 
years old tomorrow. It was proclaimed on Oct 
26. 1955. as pan of the constitution for the 
Second Republic after the ’art Soviet and West- 
can occupation troops had withdrawn from 
Austrian soil h was imposed by the Big Four in 
the Sme Treaty, in which the victorious powers 
bad presented the Austrians with the unexpect- 
ed gift of independence and sovereignty in May 
of that year. 

At the time, neutrality was regarded with 
suspicion by many Austrians. To accept it at the 
hands of foreigners was sees as a price that had 
to be paid for freedom, a smart but vaguely 
humiliating act of practical politics that seemed 
less than honorable and might not be perma- 
nent. 

Today, according to all accounts, neutrality is 
regarded as the permanent central feature of the 
Austrian state by all but a tiny minority. 

“Neutrality is' the most interesting and most 
important phenomenon of our postwar histo- 
ry,” Gerd Bacher. director-general of the Austri- 
an Radio and Television network, said. “No- 
body could have expected that the concept, 
which was imposed by the big powers, would 
take such deep roots so quickly in a nation 
which in its thousand years of history had never 
been neutral for a day cr a minute.” 

The broadcasting network exercises what Mr. 
Bacher calls “active" neutrality. Its programs 
are followed regularly by several millions in 
Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and oth- 
er nearby Communist countries. Bui it makes a 
point of broadcasting the same news, commen- 
taries and cultural programs to Eastern Europe 
as it airs for its Austrian audience. 

“We are not in the business of propaganda. 


we provide serious objective information, and 
this is why we have unusual credibility,” Mr. 
Bacher said. Journalistically, his network towers 
above the country's written press, which, with 
few exceptions, consists of racy tabloids dis- 
pensing sex, crime and local color. 

Neutrality has been a key factor in helping 
Austrians adjust to their new postwar status as a 
small nation and to overcome their nostalgia for 
the monarchy or Greater Germany. Austrian 
politicians say. 

The first republic, which succeeded the em- 
pire in 1918 and ended with the Anschluss, the 
annexation that made Austria a pan of Hitler’s 
Germany, was known as “the state that nobody 
wanted,” one politician said. Until well into the 
1930s, the programs of all the major parties 
called for unity with Germany, be said. 

Today, no-dne thinks of the republic as an 
unwanted state, and “the German question no 
longer exists,” he added. 

Joseph Taus, a banker who has twice been the 
conservative People's Party’s candidate for 
chancellor, said that today’s national consensus 
“is as strong as if it had existed for hundreds of 
years” instead of little more than a generation. 
His remark was echoed by leading Socialist 
politicians. 

Yet the third candidate in the current cam- 
paign for the presidential election next May is a 
politician who argues that Ausiria is not a na- 
tion but culturally, if not politically, pan of the 
German nation. 

He is Otto Scrinzi, a physician from the 
southern city of Graz, who is seeking to mobilize 
the extreme right and to harness nostalgia for 
Austria's Ger man past 

On a television program last week be did not 
object to being described as a man who does not 
reco gnize the existence of an Austrian nation. 


and he declared that he saw no contradiction 
between this stand and his desire to become 
president. 

Mr. Serinri is a member of the small rightist 
Freedom Party, which is the Socialists' junior 
partner in ihe govemment coalition. The party 
is split between moderates and a loosely orga- 
nized extreme right wing of vocal nationalists 
Mr. Scrinzi concedes that he has no chance of 
being elected but hopes that he will do well 
enough, with 2 percent to 3 percent of the vote, 
to stake out a position for the parliamentary 
election of 1987. 

Kurt Waldheim . the former United Nations 
secretary-general, for the People’s Party, and 
Kurt Steyrer. the minister of health and the 
environment, for the Socialists, arc the main 
candidates in the presidential race. 

Mr. Waldheim has been given a slight edge in 
recent opinion polls. But many politicians pre- 
dict that, in the end, Mr. Steyrer will he carried 
to victory by his party's greater numerical 

(Continued on Page 9) 


INSIDE 

Some multinationals arc wondering if they 
are still welcome in Austria. Page 9. 

Tourism, on the grand scaie. remains the 
u neon tested export earner. Page 10. 

Agriculture and forestry employ one-fifth 
of Lhe population. Page 10. 

Banking: The competition is fierce, profit 
margins are low. Page 9. 


Offsetting Imports by Trade With East and West 


By Vivian Lewis 

VIENNA " 7 - Austria is an inveterate and imaginative 
seller of its wares, to communisi and capitalist countries 
alike, fit periods when its partners to the West are in 
recession, .and dopand for Austrian goods lags, Austria's 
trade, wimCaroecan countries, much, of it financed by 
iruei^qwronnqitlmes of credit, helps to offset the country’s 
imparts. . - , ■ \ • . 


Lralbank, said. “Interest is in line with market rates and 
usually tends to be higher now- for longer-term capital goods 
trade.” that is. five to 10 years. 

The level of Austria's Coxnecoo trade is not surprising, 
given proximity, the fact that Austria is neutral and the long 
economic association under the Hapsburg Empire. But the 
overall export finance institution, the ControUbank, requires 
that importing countries agree to sign a statement that the 
material is not for military use. 

Meanwhile, the Chamber of Commerce is trying to pene- 
trate new markets, most notably the United Slates, now 
Austria’s fourth trading partner. One of the chamber’s 


hath Coinecon; the East bloc trade group, is in a relative 
decline for most trading partners. But Austria is trying to 
limit Comecon sides to about 12 percent of total exports. 

And to further cut (he risk of what is seen as excessive 
dependence on East bloc trade, lhe Austrians are seeking to 
diversify their trade within the communist world. Austria’s 
communist markets, in order, are the Soviet Union, Czecho- 
slovakia, Bulgaria, East Germany and Hungary. 

Recently, the Austrians, with subsidies half from the 
government and half from farmers’ groups, put together a 
sale of 100,000 tons of wheat to Poland, a country that 
frequently has difficulty borrowing these days. A few weeks 
before, Aukria provided a S344-mtIlion general credit to the 
Bank of China, again at bdow-maricet rates, to finance 
xonstructioa of 27 hydroelectric plantS- Crediianstalt, the 
country’s largest bans, was lead manager. - 
- According to Aostrian bank sources, the subsidies in the 

r avoid tevingto tavea ^-supply. poli ? . 

SSSSSS£ro^V^bankS;Havi^ pani« across all sectors," he said. Led by makers oflpden has never varied by t 


The level of lhe Comecon trade is not 
surprising, given proximity, Austria’s 
neutrality and the long association 
under the Hapsburg Empire. 


specialists, Josef E Schwa! d, noted that a high dollar makes 
Austrian goods cheaper, but also said that the chamber 
deserves some of the credit “Many of our people have 


theB* 


a finance _ 

Comecon are under previously agreed 
most cases today, no subsidy is needed. 

“There synptyis no need to encourage 
extremely kwrcost financing with Eastern 
PftspOlt senior vice president of ~ 


A tax of 03 percent on ail imports and exports is used for 
trade promotion by the chamber, enabling Austria, a coun- 
try of just 755 million people, to participate in 120 trade 
shows and send abroad 50 trade missions a year. Foreign 
trade missions also visit the country, most recently groups 
from China and Saudi .Arabia. 

Some markets remain frustrating to Austrian trade spe- 
cialists. “We cannot penetrate the French market,” Mr. 
Schwald said, “and in the first half of 1985, we actually sold 
more to China than to Japan, where we cannot find the 
door." 

Overall, Austria ran a trade deficit in 1984, with unports at 
392.1 billion schillings (about $21 billion) exceeding exports 
of 3145 billion sc hillin gs. West Germany is the main prob- 
lem, since it accounts for 40 percent of Austrian imports and 
only 30 percent of its exports. About half of Austria's trade 
gap' with West Germany is accounted for by nearby Bavaria. 
Exports and imports are largely of consumer goods, followed 
by capital goods and semi-finished goods. Ausiria is a net 
importer of food and energy. 

But the country’s earnings from tourism more than cover 
its trade gap. 

Because of the importance of trade with West Germany, 
Austria has to peg the schilling to the Deutsche mark. 
Herbert Roller, rice president at the central bank, explained 
how this policy works. “Ausiria operates on exchange-rate 
targeting, not monetary-mass targeting. We keep our interest 
rate always a little bit higher than in Germany. That way we 

" ." He said 
_ more than 

t from the mark. 


n-t nvoiMU uhum. ajuiraug puiuMi umwv — — •« . j» , 

is- important: 80 percent of sales to and Tyrolean-style suits, more than 50 companies are show- ^Aperrent trom w 

reed lmes of credit. But in ing in the New York Garment Show this month. While Austria is required to ran general economic and 


ina . 

The chamber is in a special situation in helping to promote 
trade in Western countries. Instead of a diplomat, as is usual, 
a member of the chamber represents Austria on trade 
matters in most Western posts. 


price policies to control inflation, exchange-rate targeting 
gives it a certain leeway, for example in financing exports 
without having to worry unduly about the effect on money 
supply. 



L/c-nO HeimffK 


Steyr-Daimler-Puch have one Europe's most modem spot- 
welding machines in its vehicle plant outside Graz. 






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Wine Labels Have Sobered Up 
Since the Summer’s Panic 


Vineyard and gravel works. Ini Lower Austria. 


SALZBURG — Anew sombemess prevails in the 
wine section of Salzburg Airport’s duty-free shop. 

tnciead of brightly colored labels playing on wine; 
women and song, the emphasis now is on chemistry. 
Bottlers are outdoing each oibcivnot in special promo- 
tions, but in rigorous laboratory analyses of their 
vintages. 

This is one of the side effects of the Austrian wine 
vandal of June and July, when it was disclosed that 
some bottlers and wine dealers had added diethylene- 
glycol to their brew. The product, which can cause 
brain and kidney damage if absorbed in large doses; is 
normally used in vehicle antifreeze. A number of 
grower^ traders and chemists have been arrested in 
.tbescandaL 

Adding the chemical to the wine helped achieve a 
higher grading, and higher prices, for inferior wine, by 
increasing the volume of snfflrfree extracts. A “quality 
wine,” under current Austrian law, must have 18 
grams (pi ounces) of such extracts. Otherwise, ii is 
graded as “ordinary wine.” The scandal began to 
break when German bottlers, who import Austrian 
wine in balk to add to their own batches, discovered 
the chemical. 

“Our learning of the extent of the scandal,” Josef 
Weisbdck. general manager of the Lower Austrian 
Vintner’s Association, said, “was like a stone falling 
from heaven.” Like other professionals, this coopera- 
tive winegrower and bottler admits he “suspected bui 
did not know that chicanery was going on. I saw 
people getting rich oo poor land.” 

Mr. WdsbOd; estimates that this year a million 
hectoliters (more than 26 million gallons) of wine 
sales, half outside Austria, have been lost because of 
the revelations. The panic led to ^drop in sales of all 
Austrian wines and, in Japan, people even boycotted 
Australian urines. Total annual wine production in 
Austria is 35 million hectoliters. 

Cooperatives in Lower Austria and Bnrgenland, 
where most of the doctored wine came from, and in 
Styria were untouched by any accusations. But (he 
cooperatives, which have about 20 percent of the 
. domestic market and about 30 percent of the export 
. market, now have to rebuild consumer coofidence. 

The cooperatives’ target is to increase domestic 
rumoYff 25 percent from midsummer panic levels by 
the end of this year, helped by a 7-percent price 
increase that was allowed after the relatively poor 



A vineyard near Grinding. 

1984 vintage. They feel that buyers may be reassured 
by the new labels saying “Officially ControUed" and 
by the bottle’s unusual shape, which is more like 3 port 
bottle than the normal modeL 
Shelved for the moment are plans, made before (he 
troubles, to promote Austrian cooperatives’ wines 
abroad. McCann-Ericson, the advertising agency that 
was planning it. advised the vintners to wait a while 
before launching their "Amerika campaign,” initially 
scheduled for 1986. Importers specializing in Austrian 
coop wines, like Select Wines of Dallas and Bacchus 
Imports of Seattle, were instrumental in gelling the 
U.S. Treasury to lift its ban on all Austrian wines this 

The Austrian parliament was called back m special 
session in August to pass strict new wine laws. Those 
laws have since been voted down by the opposirion- 
conirolled upper house, but the upper house is liiriy 
to be overridden bv the lower house. Experts like Mr. 
Wdsbooc are irritated that they were not consulted in 
drafting the new law. He said that a strong law already 
existed, and if en/oreement of (he new law “is no 
better than that of the old. it is not worth priming," 

— VIVIAN LEWIS 


BANK WINTER & CO. K.G. 

S. MOSKOYICS 
The Bank 

with reliable connections 
for international transactions 

EAST and WEST 


Barter and A-Forfait-Gold and Silver 


Vienna 1010, Singerstrasse 2 
Telephone: 525604 Telex: 12662 










Page 8 



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A SPECIAL REPORT ON AUSTRIA 


- 'i ! 


Austria’s f Alpine Dollar’ Equals Stability 


(Continued From Previous Page) 
Linz. are doing a high turnover in 

counwnrade operations, and pre- 
sumably making a tidy profit, al- 
though exact figures are hard to 
come by. 

Austria's gross domestic product 
was a real IS percent higher in the 
first ha]/ of 19S5 than during the 
same period last year and is expect- 
ed to re3ch 3 percent, the OECD 
average, for the whole of 1955. Un- 
employment is high by Austrian 
standards, at around 4.7 percent, 
but is sull way below that of most 
other countries. Inflation, which 
was at 5.6 percent a year ago. looks 
like it will fall for 1 985 as a whole to 


around 3.S percent. The forecast 
for 1986 is that it will decline still 

Timber to 3.3 percent. 

The balance of trade, however, 
continues to give cause for concern 
and is likely to touch 80 billion 
schillings <54.3 billion) in 1985. All 
in all. the “package" of financial 
measures introduced in 1983-1984 
to consolidate the budget seems to 
have paid off. .Although there have 
been no reductions in direct taxes, 
the Austrians can still cling to their 
complicated network of lax-de- 
ductible allowances. 

There will be an important addi- 
tion to this network next year. As 
from Jan. I. it will be possible to 


offset the purchase of up to 40.000 
schillings a person of new share 
issues against taxes. In addition, 

shareholders will only be liable for 
half the income tax on dividend 
payments. Karl Pale, president of 
the Vienna Stock Exchange, is jubi- 
lant about this important step to- 
ward revival of the equity market. 


bond issues are routinely oversub- 
scribed. and dividend rights certifi- 
cates consistently bring high re- 
turns. 


In the first half of 1985. the Vien- 
na Slock. Exchange outdid New 
York. Tokyo, London and Paris in 
comparative performance. “We 
succeeded in increasing the turn- 
over by more than. 350 percent over 
last year’s figure," Mr. Pale said. 

in the Austrian capital market. 


Despite these favorable indica- 
tions, Helmut Kramer, head of the 
Austrian Institute for Economic 
Research, has warned against un- 
due optimism. In his view, “the 
Austrian economy shows serious 
symptoms of a structural crisis.” 
He said that at the end of 1984, the 
proportion of Austrian goods on 
world markets continued to sink, 
whereas imports went on rising. 




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Mr. Kramer argues that, rather 
than bemoan unfavorable ex- 
change rates, it would be better to 
examine what changes in Austria’s 
economic structure and economic 
policy would lead to a higher de- 
gree of autonomy. Together with 
other analysts, he comes to the con- 
clusion that a more international 
approach should be introduced 
into the economy, possibly by at- 
tracting more large industrial and 
service enterprises from abroad, 
and not solely from the European 
Community with which Austria, al- 
though not a member, has a trade 
agreement. 



DondHmgp 


Hie Vienna International Center, home to several Umted NatioiB organizations. 


Difficulties and Diversity Mark Industrial Scene 


VIENNA — Austria’s industrial image is compounded of 
dynamic diversity and deep difficulty, on the one hand, a 
well-balanced spread of manufacturing enterprises, but on 
the other, chrome deficits in key sectors and a reluctance to 
implement changes that would restore the balance. 

In many instances, concern for the environment has been 
cited as the reason for slowing presumed progress. The 
mothballing of the country's only nuclear power plant before 
it went into operation and the indefinite postponement of 
plans to build a giant hydroelectric generating station in the 
middle of a primeval Danube riverside forest were chalked 
up as justified successes for the Greens movement The latest 
hindrance is less convincing. 


The small town of Raaba on the outskirts of the country’s 
second-largest city, Graz, decided not to allow the construc- 
tion within its boundaries of a manufacturing plan t for 
microchips. The decision stunned the initiator of the project. 


needed, and Austrians are skeptical that technology alone 
can do the trick. 

All the same, since the early 1980s important advances in 
high technology have been made. 

Voest-AJpine has entered into production arrangements 
with IBM and American Microsystems Inc. for semiconduc- 
tors and customized chips, and Siemens- Aus tria is ope rating 
its own plant for Integrated circuits; near VHJach. 

However, a glance at the statistics shows that Austria has a 
long way to go lo catch up with countries such as the United 
States, Japan. West Germany and even Sweden. 

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Devel- 
opment, in its latest economic survey of Austria, pinpoints 
the need for innovation but pants out that tins is closely 
related to the size of research and development spending. 

In the late 1960s, when productivity was flou rishing , with 


ture 


Right down to earth are plans to reorganize and resiruc- 
re thei 


product mix of Austria’s nationalized industries. 

After years of favorable relative performance in the 1970s, 
these came under strong press u re, especially as regards iron 
and steel production, when worldwide recession set ia 
Voest-AJpine alone has needed 6 billion schillings (about 
S324 mi£on) in state subsidies since 1981 (7-5 billion schil- 
lings if capital enhancement is included] tokeepitsdfotrtof 
the red: The director general of Voest-Alpme, Heriberl 
Apfallex, aimshowever to achieve a pori rive balance sheet by 
1987. . 


the nationalized Voest-AJpine AG, which had planned the 
th OKI Electric Industry Co. LftL, 


imported capital equipment and licenses from abroad. 

f 0 A percent of gross domestic product. 


work as a joint venture wii 
of Tokyo. The Japanese partners immediately let it be 
known that they had no intention of abandoning Austria, 
and the search started for an alternative ate. 


“Alpine troglodytes" was the least offensive description 
accorded in the Austrian press to the 1,500 inhabitants of 
Raaba for putting consideration of life-style ahead of the 
supposed benefits of technological progress. The secretary of 
the Association of Austrian Industrialists, Herbert Kxejd, 
could only bring himself to comment laconically: “the 
Austrian is at heart an anti-industrial type-" 


He was overstating the case: The average Austrian is 
rather proud of the country’s industrial achievements and 
accepts with apparent equanimity the large sums that are 
poured into keeping state enterprises going to protect em- 
ployment. It is clear, though, that fresh industrial impulse is 


spending was only 1 
which is the country’s total output of goods and sendees 
minus income from operations abroad. That spending rose 
rapidly in the 1970s to 0.8 percent of GDP. 

But “this ratio is still among the lowest third of OEGD 
countries and seems to have dropped more recently,” ac- 
cording to the OECD. ’ 

There are clear indications in another Odd, though, that 
major structural changes are ahead Austria’s Hnks with the 
European Space Agency are soon to be formalized, after five 
years of associate membership, thus enmrmg a flow of 
industrial contracts for “intelligent" products to domestic 
enterprises. The “viewports,” or windows, built here for 
Spacdab are a typical example. 


The large share of nationalized industries in Austria’s 
industrial structure becomes even larger when the enter- 
prises controUed by state-owned banks arc indnded. - 
Together they then account for approximately one-fourth 
of the whole, employing one-fifth of the country's labor 
force. 


. Apart from the rights and wrongs of banks dabbling in 
non-monetaiy matters, Austrians, if they were not so com- 
placent about ihefinanrial sbortcominp of their state enter- 
prises, should have been alarmed by the news recently that 
Creditanstall-Bankverem had turned to the Ministry of 
Finance for an allocation of 12 bdfion schillings and, on 
certain candmons, was gping to get it 

Out of a total “market-stand" of 16 enterprises ooverii^ 
Qtetal working marking making lwrtifa; paper, 

chemicals, construction, brewing and luxury hotels, three 
companies, Had, Arabia and Steyr-Daimler-Pudi, were in 
serious financial difficulties There has been little resistance, 
exceptin tbeprcssyto the proposed grant. . . 


Austria has already expressed a keen interest in entering 
the joint European Eureka technology project, although this 
is seen in some quarters as possibly endangering more 


lucrative work for the US. space program. 


Whether the country's long-tenn interesis wonJd not bet- 
ter be served by plowing die money into more innovative, 
forward-kxriarig industrial projects only the! future will tell 

‘ — DAVID HERMGES 


SWAROVSKI 


An entrepreneur family 
Several industrial enterprises 
Many production sectors 
Quality products 


SWAROVSKI 




tyBQitt 



SWAROVSKI 


SCHLEIFMITTELWERKE 
SWAROVSKI K. G. 


AUSTRIAN TRADE COMMISSIONERS 
## %% MAKE YOUR BUSINESS 

THER — ~ 


D. Swarovski & Co., 
A-6T12Wattens/ Tyrol 
Postfach 15 


Swarovski Optik K.G. 
. Absam 

"A-6060-Hall in Tyrol 


Tyrolit SchleifmUtelwerke 
Swarovski K. G. 

A-6130 Schwaz;'Tyrol 


Cut glass stones and pearls 
Imitation pearls .. 

»StrassV 

chandelier pendants 
Trimmings ; ' V 

.Genuine and synthetic: 
jewelry stones 

»Swareflex«-ref1ectors 
Gift-, souvenir- and 
promotion articles of full- 
lead crystal 

Exquisite costume jewelry 
Technical articles made of 
glass 

»Swaromed« — 
ECG-electrodes - 


HABJCHT-binoculars 
HABICHT-telescopic sights 
HABtCHT-extendable 
telescopes 

Special optical instruments 

Special binoculars for 
navigation 


Aluminium oxide and 
silicon carbide 
abrasive products 
Diamond and CBN 
abrasive products 
Elastic abrasive products 



Austria offers a vast range of 
products noted for quality and 
value. Products ranging from 
consumer goods, through light 
and heavy engineering to the 
capital sector. Just about 
everything you could wish to 
buy. The price is right too, . 
because Austria has a stable 
economy and a rate of inflation 
that is very low by world 
standards. Productivity is high, 
with workers and management 
cooperating to introduce new 
technology and ideas. Labour 
unrest is almost unknown, so 
you can be confident the things 
you order from Austria will 
arrive when you need them. 
Austria — the small country 
that can mean big business. See 
your nearest Austrian Trade 
Commissioner in one of the 
following countries : 



•_ l 


Algeria e Angola P.R. # Argentina • Australia * Belgium • Brazil • Bulaorin r 
Chile • China, P.-R. . Colombia • CSSR .Cuba •Denmark* Ecuador * aTS 
Federal Republic of Germany • Finland • France • GDR * Greece • u" 

. r ™* ,a • M <>ng Kong 


r 

i 

•j- 

• r. 


Philippj nes 

>re 


Poland a Portugal • Rumania • Saudi Arabia • Sweden • Switzerland • S* * ' 

South Africa, Rep. « Spain • Sudan • Syria • Taiwan • Thailand • Tunisia t’j 
U nited Arab Bnirates • USA • USSR • Venezuela * Yugoslavia • Zaire Re W J ey 

r "®r* • Zimbabwe 

or write directly to 
Federal Economic Chamber 
Wiedner Haupts trass* 63 ’ 

A- 1045 Vienna/ Austria ’ 



t 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 






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Borse 

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VIENNA — Tie Austrian stock 
market is An “undeveloped conn- 
try,” according to Herbert KracL- 
general secretary of the Union of 
/wstrian Industrialists, the coun- 
3W s Association /or i op managers 
In the private-sector industry. 

In facCone reason so much of 

Austrian industry remains, directly 
or indirectly, in the state secies' 
whidi employs one-quarter of Aus^ 
txian industml workers, may be 
that there is no functioning ' 
market yet to enable these i 
‘ to besold off. 

■ -^According to Guido Schmidt- 
_Qnari; deputy chairman of- Aus- 
tria’s leading bank, Creditanstalt,' 
“the first major new company in- 
troduced on the stock exchange in 
decades was brought to market by 
-us in September." The company, 
Jongbunzlaner, is a major world 
producer of citric add. The new 
issue was 18 times- oversubscribed. 

Helping the stock market dong 
feis a series of new incentives Site the 
program, starting next year, to cut 
the double taxation of dividends by 
allowing stockholders a tax credit 
against taxes already paid by the 
corporation. Another program en- 
courages individuals to invest up to 
40,000 schillings ($2,160) a year (to 
be raised to 100,000 s chilling s is 
1986) in capita] increases by listed 
companies by ending all taxes an 
dividends np to 30,000 schillings & 
year. 

Chancellor Fred Sinowatz <p»H 
“We are moving in the direction of 
a Monory Plan 1 " — a French plan 
that allowed investment in French 
listed firms to be deducted from 
' taxable income. He would give no 
further details. 

Not surprisingly, with these in- 
centives, the Austrian B&se is 
booming. The index, after stagnat- 
ing for 25 years, doubled in the year 
to August 1985. 

Yet so far, foreigners are not 
placing much money in Austrian 
listed shares, if only because there 
rare onfy SO in alL Bemd Erd/af 
Portfolio Management, an invest- 
ment advisory group in Munich, 
said, “There is too much capital 
charing too few situations in Aus- 
tria. Right now. we are riot recom- 
mending that German investors 
join in. Vienna for us is practically 
irrdevanL w ' ■' 

—VIVIAN LEWIS 



Foreign Investment: Clouds 
On Multinational Horizon 


Banking: Fierce Competition at Low Margins 


VIENNA— This is an eventful 
rime, but not necessarily a happy 
time, for Austria’s banks. 

The unhappiest bank is probably 
the country's largest, the Creditan- 
stalt, whose first half deposits this 
year (up 20 percent) came to 346 J 
billion schillings (about 518.7 bil- 
lion). This montit, the Austrian 
parliament is doe to vote 7.2 billion 
schillings in new funding for CA, to 
save its industrial subsidiaries. 

Creditanstalt’s troubles have lit- 
tle to do with the bank, which is 
flourishing, and much to do with its 
control of important chunks of 
Austrian indnstiy for a variety of 
historical reasons. These include 
the need to bail out and protect 
companies after the post- World 
War I breakup of the Austro-Hun- 
garian Empire and during the De- 
pression as well as Airing the peri- 
od of the 1945-1955 occupation of 
Austria after World War IL 

. As a result, Creditanstalt has al- 
most total control of three troubled 
companies: Andritz. a heavy-ma- 
chinery maker. 90-percent owned 
by G\, which is to get 3.875 billion 
schillings of the new fnnding; 
Steyr-Daiml er-Puch, an industrial 
g^oup, more than 50-percent CA 


owned, to receive 2.638 billion 
schillings; and- lathe-maker Held, 
80 percent owned by CA, which 
mil get 550 milli on schillings. 

Creditanstalt’s deputy chairman, 
’Guido Schmidt-Guari. said that 
“political interference" blocked a 
Steyr sale of tanks to Chile, while 
Andritz took losses in an Iraqi in- 
dustrial project. 

- Mr. Schmidi-Chiari is happier 
about other develop merits in Aus- 
trian banking, particularly a pro- 
posed banking-law revision, which 
will be finalized in 1986. In the 
interval; he applauded the so-called 
“gentlemen's agreement 1 ' reached 
in March among Austrian banks, 
whereby they agreed to set a floor 
on loan charges and a criling on the 
interest they pay depositors. 

_ Austrian banks, m the view of 
experts, compete excessively and 
earn veiy low margins. One study 
has shown that Austria has more 
banks per capita than any nation in 
Europe. A study last year of large 
banks in the Organization for Eco- 
nomic Cooperation and Develop- 
ment showed that Austrian banks 
have the second lowest gross oper- 
ating margins of comparable banks 
in any of the 23 member countries. 


except Japan, and that they are 
falling. la July, The Banker, a Brit- 
ish publication, presented data 
showing that Austrian bank profit- 
ability (pretax profits as a percent- 
age of assets) is the lowest in the 
world, save that of Indix 

To cut their competition, the 
banks have created what Mr. 
Schmidt-Chiari called “a cartel, 
which may be a dirty word for 
Americans' but which’ is legal in 
Austria.'' The rate agreement, in 
fact, is unenforceable by law. and it 
will take a lot of “gentlemanlike 
behavior and rationality" if it is to 
survive for long, according to Vice 
President Herbert Roller of the 
Austrian National Bank (the cen- 
tral bank). 

The new banking law will set 
higher capital requirements on 
Austrian banks and to meet them 
the banks will have to raise their 
margins while cutting costs. It will 
require that Austrian banks bring 
their equity levels up to 4 percent of 
their liabilities from current levels 
of more like 2_5 percent during the 
remainder of the 1980s. Half of all 
off-balance sheet risks will have to 
be covered in the same proportion. 

Then too, the long-standing 


ESSiONERS 

business 

:SS 



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VOEST-ALPINE : a byword for hi-tech products. 


v. 


VOESTALPINE AG 
Postfach 2 
Ar4010 Unz/Austria 

Tek (0732) 585. 

Telex 2207-449 va a 



VOEST-ALPINE 

AUSTRIA 


anomaly whereby Austrian banks 
put their own capital on the liabil- 
ities side of their balance sheet will 
be ended. 

In addition, the new hanking law 
will allow Austrian banks, includ- 
ing those 60 percent owned by the 
state like Creditanstalt and Lan- 
der bank. to issue capital-participa- 
tion shares, which win earn interest 
varying with results (up to a ceil- 
ing) and whose face value can be 
reduced if the bank loses money’. 
Holders will not have the right to 
vote at the annual meeting like 
shareholders but they will have in- 
formation rights. This new bank 
equity will be perpetual and subor- 
dinated, and will be counted in 
deiennmmg the ratios. The Austri- 
an authorities opted not to allow 
subordinated perpetual debentures 
(as in Britain) or participatory 
shares (as in France) so as to keep 
capital scarce for Austrian banks 
— and force them to restrain their 
lending. 

—VIVIAN LEWIS 


VIENNA — One out of every 
four Austrian industrial workers is 
employed by a foreign -owned com- 
pany. Bui some foreign multina- 
tional corporations may be won- 
dering if they are still welcome in 
Austria. 

One reason was the vote last 
month by the town council of 
Raaba. near Graz, to ban a pro- 
posed chip-making joint venture of 
OR1 of Japan and Voest-Aipine, 
the Austrian state industrial giant. 

The Greens, or ecologists, of 
Raaba. which has 1.500 inhabit- 
ants. blocked the venture, which 
would have created 1,000 jobs, with 
a price tag of 6 billion schillings 
(more than S324 million). 

Chancellor Fred Sinowatz insist- 
ed that “OKI is still very interested 
in keeping this project in Austria — 
and we also favor investment in 
high technology here. ... We found 
the vote shocking, too. It shows 
that it is easier to create obstacles 
than to advance." 

Another cloud over foreign in- 
vestment is the government's axing 
of an incentive 'program that used 
to give foreign investors an ad- 
vance of 40 percent of the cost of 
new plants in Austria against fu- 
ture tax receipts. Bui this is being 
replaced by what Mr. Sinowatz 
calls “a palette of new measures." 

Among them, apart from the 
usual job-creation grams, subsi- 
dized loans and tax deductions, 
Austria is offering a unique free- 
leasing program. Under this plan, 
the foreign investor takes delivery 
of a custom-built plant without in- 
curring debt or any effect on 
equity. During the initial term, the 
government pays for up to 30 per- 
cent of the cost of the lease. 

Furthermore, there are special 
programs, open also to Austrian 
companies, for research, innova- 
tion and export promotion. Addi- 
tional support is being given to 
companies investing in microelec- 
tronics, computer-aided design and 
manufacturing, biotechnology and 
genetic engineering, funded at 250 
milli ng schillings. 

This program is now being ex- 
tended to cover software. Mr. 
Sinowatz said next year’s budget 
includes 1 5 billion schillings for in- 
vestment incentives. 

At last count, two dozen Austri- 
an communes had applied for the 
chips plant to Voest- Alpine's par- 
ent company, Osterreichische In- 
dus uieverwahung AG (OIAG), ac- 


cording to Oskar Gruoewald, its 
chairman. 

And foreign investors are still 
thinking hard about Austria, too, 
according to Robert F. Karl a 
manager at one of OLAG’s subsid- 
iaries, Industrial Cooperation and 
Development CO., established in 
1982 try' OIAG and the Austrian 
government. 


The free-leasing program, estab- 
lished in June, has found no takers 
yet, but talks are going on with 
several foreign companies. 

“Most foreign countries stoned 
to get new investments earlier,” 
Mr. Karl said, “because they had 
unemployment problems earlier.” 

— VIVIAN LEWIS 


Neutrality Central Feature 
In the National Consensus 


{Continued From Page 7) 
strength. The Socialists have won 
all presidential elections since the 
war. The Austrian presidem is 
largely a figurehead. But a conser- 
vative' victory would be a major 
upset that would spell trouble for 
the ruling Socialists and their chan- 
cellor, Fred Sinowatz, in the subse- 
quent parliamentary elections. 

The two main political parties 
have dominated the scene more 
completely than is the case in most 
countries. 

Party membership is uncom- 
monly high. About 1.5 million rat- 
ers, more than one in every four, 
are party members. The Socialists 
alone have around 750,000 mem- 
bers, and the People's Party, 
600,000. 

Bui in spite of the preponder- 
ance of the parties, or perhaps be- 
cause of it, the country has gone 
through a period of crises. a pro- 
longed midlife crisis, as one writer 
put it. 

There have been scandals. This 
summer’s wine scandal received the 
widest international attention. 

In addition, there was the case of 
Friedhdm Frischenschlager, the 
justice minister who saw fit to wel- 
come personally a Nazi war crimi- 
nal. SS Major Walter Reder, who 
was released by Italy early this year 
after 40 years in jail. The minister, a 
member of the Freedom Party, was 
admonished by Chancellor 
Sinowatz but is stiU in office. There 
have been a number of cases of 
corruption in high places and a 
former finance minister, Hannes 
Androsch. has been accused of 
conflict of interest and may have to 
face trial. 

Many Austrians have become 
disenchanted with their parties, 
politicians on both sides say. 


Both the government and the op- 
position have leadership problems. 
Headlines in different publications 
last week called the Socialists 
“split" and the People’s Party lead- 
ership “gutted.” 

The Socialists, though in power 
since 1970, are suffering from the 
facL that in 1983, the last parlia- 
mentary election, they lost their ab- 
solute majority and have been 
forced to enter into a coalition with 
a politically and ideologically in- 
compatible partner, the Freedom 
Party. They are still suffering also 
from the acme letdown that fol- 
lowed the retirement two years ago 
of their longtime chancellor, Bruno 
Krdsky. and his replacement by 
Mr. Sinowatz. 

Mr. Kreisky, with his highly per- 
sonal style and his well-publicized 
excursions into world politics in the 
Middle East and the Socialist Inter- 
national. commanded extraordi- 
nary attention at home and abroad. 

Mr. Sinowatz, by contrast, seems 
a plodding, well-intentioned and 
modest figure without the slightest 
pretense of charisma. 

As for the leaders of the People’s 
Party, they could have made their 
impaa as Mr. Sinowatz struggled 
through his difficult first two years, 
but they failed to seize their chance. 

The environment has become a 
prominent new issue, and several 
ecological groups have sprung up 
but failed to coalesce into a politi- 
cal movement. The leading parties 
have cranked up their own pro- 
grams for the environment as a 
result. 

There has been an erosion of 
public support for the parties in 
both camps according to all ac- 
counts, and many Austrians com- 
plain of a feeling of drift. 


Ybu are standing facing the much-praised work of art on display which is made up of 3cm diameter rods 
welded one on top ot another. What point ol the structure is nearest you In the vertical plane ? 



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A SPECIAL REPORT ON AUSTRIA 




y / 

■■ ‘V. .*■ 




%r- 9S'* ~ 


The Scfalosshotel on the Fuschlsee near Salzburg. 


Tourist Trade Is King-Size 


FUSCHL — The Schlosshmel 
on the Fuschlsee, 16 miles from 
Salzburg, represents the ultimate in 
Austrian tourism. 

The best of the rooms in the 
Sc hi css Fuschl, built in 1450 as a 
hunting lodge for the archbishops 
of Salzburg, give you a lakeside 
view, 19th-century Austrian an- 
tiques and a king-size bed. 

The hotel has 90 double rooms 
with a top rate in the high season of 

4.000 schillings ($216) a person per 
night 

Alternatively, you could stay at a 
farmhouse or chalet on the castle 
road bearing what is almost an 
Austrian national tourist slogan: 
“Zimmer FreT (room available). 

From the Tyrol to the city of 
Vienna, from the Grossglockner 
pass to the Czech border, about 

400.000 beds in private homes and 
farmhouses are offered to tourists. 

Licensed hotels offer a shade 
fewer than 700,000 more. 

Tourism in Austria is big busi- 
ness. Thus, here on Lake FuschL, as 
on every other lake inAustria, mo- 
torboats are banned lest they dis- 
turb the quiet of guests. 

The Austrian government pro- 
motes tourism and provides grants 
and subsidized loans to hotels and 
private householders for creating 
or improving facilities. 

Then, too, the government helps 
promote the country and vaunt its 
charms internationally. No less 
than 80 percent of Austria's tour- 
ists come from outside the country. 

Around two-thirds of tourism 
nights in Austria are bought by 
Germans, who lend to duster at the 
cheaper end of the market, to a 
growing degree, in campsites. 
Dutch and other West European 
visitors account for another 20 per- 
cent 


But the sixth-ranked country of 
origin for tourists is the United 
States; and, according to Helmut 
Zolles, director of the Austrian Na- 
tional Tourism Office, 14 American 
tourists come from the upper or 
upper-middle classes and spend far 
more money.” 

Tourism is Austria's biggest ex- 
port earner, ahead of the steel In- 
dustry or forest products in turn- 
over or balance-of-trade 
contributions. In 1984, according 
to Mr. Zolles, net tourism receipts 
(after deducting what Austrians 
spent outside their country) came 
to 48 billion schillings. 

Tourism, for Mr. Zolles, “is a 
stable part of the economy.” In the 
1985 summer season, the number 
of nights foreigners spent m Aus- 
tria fell by 15 percent and foreign 


exchange receipts by 5 percent 
Uns came after a fall of 4 percent 
in nights and 2 percent in foreign 
exchange receipts for tbe 1984 sum- 
mer season. But what enabled Aus- 
tria to keep up its position as one of 
the world's most successful tourism 


Mechanization Brings 
Agricultural Success 


**585< 


VIENNA — Despite Industrial 
expansion, Austria has remained 
predominantly a farming country, 
and agriculture and forestry be- 
tween them employ one-fifth of the 
working population. Although 
there is a continuing drift of labor 
away from the countryside, Austria 
can still provide more than all the 
food needs of the population, large' 
ly thqnlcs to mechanization. 

A glance at a map shows that tins 
cannot be taken for granted. Two- 
thirds of (he country is mountain- 
ous; 45 percent is wooded. In Eu- 
rope, only Finland and Sweden 
have a higher percentage of forest 
coverage. With Austria’s reforesta- 
tion since the end of World War II 
now virtually completed, the alarm 
was raised when ecologists pointed 
to the disastrous spread of “dying 
woods.” Austria became the first 
country to introduce legal mea- 
sures to protect forests against en- 
vironmental pollution and to initi- 
ate research into other possible 
ravagers. 

In addition, measures to combat 
pollutant emissions have been in- 
troduced. As from this month, reg- 
ular-grade gasoline is available 
only in unleaded form in Austria. 
From 1987, for cars with an engine 
capacity of mare than 1500cc, and 
from 1988, for cars with smaller 
engines, new gasoline-driven vehi- 
cles will have to befitted with cata- _ 
lytic converters. I 


gions is something that necessi- 
tates, and gets, public expenditure. 

Electrification and road im- 
provement programs are bring in- 
tensified, and telephone installa- 
tion costs for bouses in inaccessible 
spots are subsidized by up to 50 
percent AH the same, the drift of 
• labor down to the valleys cannot be 
stopped. In an increasing number 
of places, only tourism, particularly 
for winter sports, keeps the moun- 
tains alive, at the expense of un- 
sightly cableways and scam left in 
the landscape by ski runs. 

Small in scale, but significant in 
quality, is the Austrian horse- 
breeding program, mainly draft an- 
imals such as Noriker and Ha- 
flinger, the latter popular in other 
mountainous regions, such as tire 
Himalayas, but also (he legendary 
Lipizzaners. These are the descen- 
dants of an Arab breed introduced 
to the Hapsburg Court four centu- 
ries ago and still used for those 
elegant antics in the Baroque Span- 
ish Riding School . • r - 

Tbe Lipizzancr Stud, at Pibcrin 
the province of Styria, was recently 
renovated extensively and, with, 
fresh blood brought in fro m his tnr- 
ic Lipizzancr studs in Hungary, 
Czechoslovakia and Yugoriavia, is 
surely one of tbe least worrisome 
concerns of the minister of agricul- 
ture. 

— DAVID HERMGES 




/ ' 






i 'w 




countries was a rise in city, and 
winter tourism. 


City tourism has born vastly 
helped by the fact, dted by Mr. 
Zolles, that Vienna is “in.” Recent 
books and exhibitions have focused 
interest on the city during its intel- 
lectual heyday at the turn of the 
century. 


Winter tourism receipts grew by 
38 percent in 1984, and if the eco- 
nomic recovery gets going in neigh- 
boring countries, tins could be just 
the beginning, according to Mr. 
Zolles. 



j>,l and 
aif Bat* 


Here at Schloss Fuschl where in 
earlier years the hotel was dosed in 
the winter, a 1985-1986 winter sea- 
son is planned. Ice-skating on the 
frozen lake, sleigh rides, cross- 
country skiing and downhill skiing 
at. nearby Gaissau-Hintersee may 
draw enough full-rate guests. If 
not, travel agents are being encour- 
aged to offer special package tours 
at 1,000 schillings a person per 
nigfrl over the Christmas holiday. 

— VIVIAN LEWIS 


Waiting for the performance at the Vienna Opera. 


COMfflBVTORS 


DAVID HERMGES, a Vienna-based journalist and broadcaster 
for Radio Austria Iritenratiohal specializes in Austria and Eastern 
Europe. ■. 


VIVIAN LEWIS is a Paris-biased financial journalist. She is a 
regular contributor to Tbe Banker, Asiabanldng and Tbe Internation- 
al Organizations Monitoring Service. ■ ■ ■ 


HENRY TANNER is a staff correspondent for the International 
Herald Tribune. 


The best start ofholitkys.and business 
in die Tyrol - is a direct flight to Innsbruck 
■ with Tyrolean scheduled services. 


Zurich— Innsbruck v.v. 
Frankfort— Innsbruck v.v. 


With ideaL international connections 1 


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Everv Saturday from 21 Dec 85^29 Nov 86 


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Punctual and reliable with Tyrolean hospitality 
- • on board 


roleari 






From January next year, newly 
registered diesel vehicles will also 
have to conform with the stringent 
U.S. emissions standards. At the 
same time, executive orders have 
been appended to existing legisla- 
tion covering industrial furnace 
emissions so as to -reduce tbe per- 
missible limits of sulfur dioxide 
and other emissions. 


Austria can already point to the 
successful conclusion of a cam- 
paign, started in the early 1970s, to 
dean up the country’s lakes, which 
are now said to have almost drink- 
ing-water purity. Hie next step is to 
tackle river pollution, which in 
some instances, such as the Mur, . 
Ager and parts of the Danube, is j 
serious. i 


GZB-VIENNA 


Genossenschaftliche Zentralbank AG 

A- 1010 Vienna, Herrengasse]-3,1j? 6662 -0* 
Telex : 136 989, Swift - code ; ZENT AT WW 


Member of 


UNI GO 

banking group 


‘ It is along both odes of the Dan- 
ube, as well as in regions berth of 
the Alps and on the Marchfeld 
plain near the eastern border that 
Austria's principal agricultural ar- 
eas are located Arable land, or- * 
efaards and vineyards abound, with 
weD over half of all the concerns 

being small-scale enterprises of 1 to 

JO hectares (2J to 24 acres). Farms 
are almost exclusively in family 
hands. 

Thanks to increasing mechaniza- 
tion, productivity is high and grow- 
ing. Although 1984 statistics show 
Austria producing slightly more 
than its own overall food require- 
ments, there are certain shortages, 
such os cooking ails and. some sorts 
of. fruit. Cattle-breeding, always 
Strong, particularly in mountain ar- 
eas, has been causing coocenrre- 
centiy since it has led to an over- 
abundance of subsidized dairy 
products at a time when indigenous 
m3k consumption is declining. 

Everyone is agreed- on the desir- 
ability at maintaining well-lended q 
forms in UK mountains and keep- 
ing the tree bdtstablc The growing 
danger of soil erosion leading to ^ 
landslides mid avalanches is a con- h 
slant threat to the economy; The. -2 
cost rif keeping farmers and forest-' 
ess m the. often bleak Aipme re- • 



*T love the Austrian way of life.’ 


^Raul 


iieiiuiy aiso means 
a warm welcome. 


Hu 


m r 

of Austria. And what is more out 

you board our planes: with 

excellent wnes delicious food and our 

famous cordial hospitality A . • - 

Our reputation as the friendly airline" &. SrSxtiM 

certainly has something to do with the .ftririMMBH 

Austrian way of life. - 


• ]& 


At home in beautiful Austria 










October 25,- 1585 



AT70NAL 



tribune. 





Page H 



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; '?' . 

4 



Maguy Marin's company in “May B.”/ 




V./ 



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a*-*? lfT .. 


:he\i 


by Anna Kisselgoff 


*J?nm tops 



rr'nk* 


■ 7 "r^i, 

'• = -'iTneiq^ 





v ' • - ^ :>.d s^nicK. 

daily 

-Innsbruckix 

Innshruckm 


X oer week 


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li— I n nsbruclt v.v. 

» t X per week * 
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HW YORK — The human condi- 
tion — or an feraminarinri tR*-r >»nf 

— is badcin.vogiwm«ODteaaqpOH 
rary dance, and nowhere is man’s 
fate being considered more intensely by cho- 
reographers than in West Germany, France 
and Japan. 

. Ten years ago. the idea that these com*- . 
tries would provide the leading new and 
unexpected dance currents that have begun 
spilling over to these shores -would have 
seemed inconceivable. Modern 
peared to be an American preserve, 
farmed out abroad but unable to t« y ff root 
even in Western- Europe before the 1970s. 
And then it was apparently based upon 
American models. 

And so it may have come as a jolt to 
Americans watching Pma Bausch’s powerful 
German “dance theater” or the highly origi- 
nal Japanese Bntofa groups to realize that 
_ completely new directions in dance could 
demerge from unlikely places in a compara- 
tively short time. 

The new innovators use’ formal devices 
but not formalism itself. That is, thes«. de- 
vices are a means to express emotion. Angst 
has been out of style in dance for some tima 
It is no longer so. . 

Social ills as defined - through personal 
traumas that anyone can. recognize make up 
the leitmotifs of Rausch’s, wori^ &4£for the 
French, alienation — often 
etic terms — is a consisteht tlicme. 
Japanese Butoh groups —who nariied their 
genre after an archaic ritualistic dance form 
— offer a more cosmic image. They place 
man is a universe that must be destroyed 
before it can be created anew. 

There is great diversity amongthese com- 
panies even within the same countries and 
within the sarnie generalized pattern. This 
was obvious at the recent Festival Interna- 
tional de Noovefle Danse in Montreal that 
featured 14 experimental companies from 
North America and elsewhere. 

New York will be seeing some of these 
troupes this season. The Brooklyn Academy 
of Music’s Next Wave festival includes, for 
example^ women choreographers from West 
Germany who typify the new expressionist 
current there. In addition to. Bausch arid her 
Wuppertal Tanzrheater, there will be New 
York: debuts for Remhild Hof fm a n n with 
her production, of “Callas” by. the Bre men 
Tanztheater and for Susanna Linlcc in a 
program of solos. 

IrTp ke studied with Mary. Wigman, the. ; 
pioneering figure in Germany’s own mod- 
ern-dance movement that went into decline 
after World War IL Linke is also. Eke 
Bausch and Hoffmann, a product of the 
Folkwang School's dance department, once , 
beaded by Kurt Jooss, in Essen. . 

Though these choreographers may seem to ' 
have roots in the German danceFxpresarm- 
ism of the 1920s, the French have less of a 
tradition to call their own. 

One of the most talented new choreogra- 
phers, Maguy Marin, will show her work for 
thefirst time in New Y«k when she presents 
“May B,” a dance-theater pta* inspired by 
Samuel Beckett’s plays that proved so im- 
pressive at fhe American "Dance Festival two 
ydars ago- Marin, whose company performs 
at the City Center in February, was trained 
in classical ballet in Toalouse and was a 
member of Maurice Bfcfarfs Ballet of the 


20th.^€oitary. But certainly the movement 
vocabulary she now employs is a far cry .from 
her antecedents. 

jAs- tor theBotah style, the Mutdri-Sha 
group' wiB be succeeded by Kazoo Ohno, a 
wonder of Botch, who will share a week at 
die Joyce Theater in November with a yono- 
gear dancer, Ksirnko kiamnlti 
. .. How do these choreographers differ essen- 
tially from Americans? Are; there several 
‘ factoCS that rnigiht serve to explain the form 
their work has taken? It is important to note 
that the seminal figures in both contempo- 
rary baBet and modern dance have been 
working in the United States in the last 50 
years. And, whether they acknowledge it or 
not, American dancers and choreographers 
arestiQ p ri rig Martha Graham, George Bal- 
anchine, Merce fbitminghatn, the Judson 
Dance Theater of the 1960s and other major 
figures as reference points. 

.Interestingly, Antony Tudor was the only 
ikeyfigpre in American dance who did not 
loom high in the consciousness of the experi- 
mentalists of the ’60s and *70*. Perhaps the 
current trends from abroad should be enti- 
tled ‘TtidoTs Revenge.” For he is certainly a 
mentor acknowledged by Bausch and fci 
Kyhan, leaders of the Expressionist wave in 
Europe. . 

: In the United States, movement for move- 
ment's sake has been the overriding principle 
for choreographers seeking new directions. 
•And they have increasingly borrowed ideas 
’from die nummaEst aesthetic-in the visual 
arts and in music. • 

- The situation has been different else- 
where. Entire stages in the development of 
modern dance — and even of ballet (.as in 
Balanchine’s puna-dance emphasis) — have 
been skipped abroad. Thus die formalist 
phase still coloring American dance is of 
fitOb interest to foreign choreographers. Un- 
like Americans, the younger European cho- 
reographers have not felt a need to rebel 
against psychological themes. 


non of self-taught cho- 
s nas sprung up in experi- 


AN entire 
/I reog 

-L mental work abroad, and this is an 
entirely new phenomenon. At the Montreal 
festival, it was not nnusual to learn that the 
choreographer practicing “dance theater” 
had started out as a filmmaker, painter or 
teacher of literature. As a new buzzword, 
“dance theater” can cover a multitude of 
sins. . 

Yet it is a perfectly descriptive term for the 
kind of innovative spectacles that the Butoh 
groups, and highly trained dancers such as 
Maim and Bausch, have chosen as a frame- 
work. Conventional dance movement — bal- 
let or modem — is perceived only occasion- 
ally in such pieces. “Dance theater” opts 
rather for natural movement and stylized 
gestures to convey emotional content or hu- 
man relationships. 

Form, as underpinning, is very important 
to the best of the new work abroad. Bausch’s 
fondness for repetition of the same gestures 
in different contexts is now well known. 
When asked if (the could be attracted to 
wodtiqg; with pufe form and without a need 
to express feeding, Bausch replies, “It’s not 
posable to have' one without the other." 

This is a far cry from Merce Cunning- 
ham’s view that movemen t in time and space 
carries no specific meaning. Perhaps there 
could be no stranger experience for an 
American daaccgoer than to attend the 


Montreal festival in the wake of the Cun- 
ningham company’s performances. Incredi- 
bly, the troupe had not danced there since 
the early 1960s. Suddenly. Cunningham's 
work appeared as both a bafflement and a 
revelation again, just as it had 25 years ago. 

One realized how the Cunningham revolu- 
tion could have passed an entire corner of 
the world by when a member of the audience 
was heard to explain to another that be 
should look for “pure line” rather than any- 
thing outride the movement itsdf. 

Much in the burgeoning new dance scene 
in Montreal and in France seems predicated 
upon the idea that ignorance of previous 
dance history is a spur to creativity. None- 
theless, one finds Montreal choreographers 
such as Gineue Laurin, who uses highly 
physical and risky movement for both move- 
ment studies and metaphorical relation- 
ships, more sophisticated than choreogra- 
phers new to dance who see “dance theater” 
as a projection of dramatic images they sel- 
dom deepen. 

T HE current trends themselves should 
not be viewed from an ahistarical per- 
spective. Theatrical dance has tradi- 
tionally gone through cycles that 
pure movement or expressive values. The 
formalist phase is now again yielding to the 
expre ss ive. This is seen even in the United 
States to some degree. Yet when the Ameri- 
can Dance Festival introduced the first ma- 
jor Butoh group, Dai Ralmda. Kan,, to this 
country in 1982 and then, in 1983, selected 
five French experimental troupes for a U. S. 
debut, it was dear that a highly theatrical 
aesthetic had sprung up outside the Ameri- 
can context. 

Bausch and her German colleagues have 
roots in Central European modern dance, 
which flourished between the two World 
Wars. But there is no question that she has 
altered that baric body-language aesthetic to 
fit contemporary terms. The violence men 
and women inflict upon another, the fears 
and happiness that everyone experiences — 
these themes are distilled by her in an Ex- 
pressionist manner. 

The illusion of realism, paradoxically, de- 
fines Bansch’s work. Dressed in real clothes 
and perceived as real people, the performers 
seem like us. But it is no surprise that the 
new dance trends in France find their con- 
text in a poetic Surrealism or the Theater of 
the AbstmL 

The Butoh groups are certainly not with- 
out humor, usually dark, but they cannot be 
separated from the world that emerged after 
Hiroshima. Mutcki-Sha, a two-woman 
group beaded by Natsu Nakajima, has even 
taken its name from the foghorn of a ship 
that evacuated Miss Nakajima from her 
home during World War IL In her medita- 
tion on life, “Niwa,” she universalizes that 
personal trauma. The dancers are trans- 
formed from grotesque frightened children 
to aging women. Butoh remains significantly 
Japanese — as in Haiku, it offers a remote 
rather than a literal image to convey the 
message at hand. 

A detemuznst could say that the sprawling 
free spirit of current French dance has its 
roots in the student upheavals of 1968 while 
tire German and Japanese variants have 
emerged from the legacy of World War H. 
Unlike most American dance, this new 
dance from abroad can make us uneasy. ■ 

© I98S The New York Times 


Doctorow’s Invented World 


by Bruce Weber 


iWENTY-FIVE years after the pub- 
lication of his* first novel, “Wei* 


T 

| come to Hard Times.” E. L Doc- 
torow is reminiscing about a letter 
from one of its readers. Set in the Dakota 
Territory in the latter half of the 19th centu- 
ry, the novel takes the form of journals 
written by the mayor of a tiny frontier town 
called Hud Times. It's a dark fable, a liter- 
ary western by a serious young writer, that 
employs the town’s tribulations — and the 
mayor’s attempts to record them — to ex- 
plore grand themes: the nature of American 
culture, the mortality of men and their civili- 
zation, the etemalness of an. 

“The letter was from Texas.” Doctorow 
says, “and obviously from an elderly woman, 
written in a shaky hand. She wrote. 'Young 
man, when you said that Jenks enjoyed for 
his dinner the roasted haunch of a prairie 
dog. I knew you'd never been west of the 
Hudson. Becaus e the haunch of a prairie dog 
wouldn’t fill a teaspoon.' " 

Doctorow pauses and grins, the profes- 
sional storyteller timing a punch line: “She 
had me. I'd never seen a prairie dog. So I did 
the only thing I could do. I wrote back and I 
said. That’s true of prairie dogs today. Mad- 
am, but in the 1870s . . .* ” 

A small story, but it Illustrates nicely the 
audacity Doctorow presumes as a novelist, 
his unconcerned subordination of fact to 
invention, his belief that the novelist’s imagi- 
nation is autonomous. 

Edgar Lawrence Doctorow is 54, and on 
almost anyone’s list he is counted among the 
lading dozen serious American novelists 
today. Although he is not simply a writer of 
HnwiammwiH his hooks sell widely, and 
three — “Ragtime,'’ “The Bod: of Demid” 
and “Wdoome to Hard Times” — have been 
made into movies. Readers, some critics ex- 
cepted, have come to relish the blending of 
fact and fiction that marks his odd scrutiny 
of the American past. H is seventh book, 
“World's Fair,” will be published next 
month, and in it he turns his historically 
inventive method on himself, drawing heavi- 
ly on material gleaned from his 1930s boy- 
hood. “Growing up in the Bronx, without 
the egg cream” is the author’s flip descrip- 
tion, but he has also called it “a portrait of 
the artist as a very young boy,” and that is 
perhaps closer to what he nas attempted. 
Although ontwardly his quietest novel, 
“World's Fair” uses the Bronx, much as 
Joyce did Dublin, as a window through 
which to witness the tremors of a whole 
society. 

Doctorow' s diverse and unpredictable fic- 
tion is known for its juxtaposition of familiar 
cultural, political and historical markers 
with prominent fabrications. But it is 
marked by a narrative style that is forthright, 
declarative and presumptuous of ve risimili - 
tude. In “Ragtime,” his chronicle of America 
hurtling toward World War L Doctorow 
embellished his narrative with depictions of 
unlikely occurrences in the lives of famous 
people: secret meetings between Henry Ford 
and J. Pierpont Morgan; Freud and Jung 
visiting Coney Island and boating together 
through the Tunned of Love; Harry Houdi- 
ni’s encounter with the Archduke Francis 
Ferdinand. . 

The magic of “Ragtime’s” invention was 
persuasive enough to win for Doctorow the 
National Book Critics Circle Award for fic- 
tion. And the novel garnered enough notori- 
ety to sell more than 200,000 copies in hard 
cover its first year, paperback reprint rights 
were purchased by Bantam Books for 
51,850,000, then a record figure. 

D OCTOROW’S subject, to speak 
broadly, has been the evolution of the 
American perspective. He is interest- 
ed in how our past is responsible for us as we 
are now. His novels shed their most provoca- 
tive light on the contemporary world, and 
thus none of them could aptly be described 
as historical fiction in the conventional 
sense. “I have this concept of history as 
imagery,” he says, “and therefore as a re- 
source for writing This is a very volatile 
society, constantly changing, enormous. Ev- 
ery few years, there's a great infusion of 
immigrants, immigrant cultures. And so it’s 
extremely difficult to find whatever commu- 
nity there needs to be for a writer and read- 
ers to exist together. Somehow-, I must have 
perceived that what we have in common is 
this country’s history.” 

This is a good time for Doctorow to reflect 
on his craft. He has just completed “World’s 
Fair,” for which Random House has sched- 
uled an initial printing of 100,000. the largest 
for any Doctorow novel. Its main narrative 
takes the form of a memoir, beginning with 
the narrator's earliest recollections of his 



E. L. Doctorow. 

infancy and concluding before his 10th 
birthday with two forward-looking visits to 
the futuristic World’s Fair of 1939. Doctor- 
ow’s sixth novel, it follows a year afLer 
“Lives of the Poets,” a collection of six 
stories and the tide novella, the latter osten- 
sibly an examination of the mind of the man 
who has written the stories. In his new book, 
he has named the protagonist after himself, 
the members of the boy's family after those 
of his own. He sees the "novel and the novella 
as connected, portrayals of the writer's life 
from the two chronological ends of it he 
knows, but be says quickly that though the 
Eves of his most recent protagonists superfi- 
cially resemble his own. they are, at bottom, 
invented. 

Doctorow’s novels have, it would seem, 
been largely intuited. Until recendy, his life 
has been sparsely evident in his fiction. The 
book before “Lives of the Poets” was “Loon 
Lake” (1980), the story of an enterprising 
drifter during the Depression. Before “Rag- 
-time” came “The Book of Darn’d” (1971). 
which had at its center the Rosenberg con- 
spiracy trial of 1951. 

By any standard, it is a strong output: 
experimental fiction that resists categoriz- 
ing. “Daniel" with its exploration of Ameri- 
can radicalism, “Loon Lake.” with much of 
its focus on 1930s labor issues, and “Rag- 
time," with its indictment of a complacent 
upper class and its portrayal of scabrous 
capitalists, have caused Doctorow to be seen 
as ideologically allied with the political left 
and identified by some critics as a political 
novelist. He has, in fact, given time to several 
liberal causes, speaking recendy in New 
York against apartheid and at a rally oppos- 
ing further nuclear-arms proliferation in 
Chicago. 

Doctorow was educated at Bronx High 
School of Science and Kenyon College in 
Gambier, Ohio, where he was a student of 
the critic John Crowe Ransom and a class- 
mate of the late poet James Wright. He spent 
a year in the graduate program in drama at 
Columbia, where he met his wife, the novel- 
ist Helen Henslee, before serving in the mili- 
tary from 1953 to 1955. Jenny, the first of 
their two daughters, was bom in an army 
hospital in Frankfurt. He had hoped, on 
returning to civilian life, to support his fam- 
ily on his mustermg-out pay, while he wrote 
a novel. The plan proved unrealistic and he 
had to seek steady work, first as a reserva- 
tions clerk at La Guardia Airport, and then 
as a reader for CBS Television and Columbia 
Pictures. 

“1 was reading a book a day and writing a 
synopsis,” he says. “It’s actually not a bad 
apprenticeship for a writer. You can't help 
but develop an editorial capability, doing 
that kind of work on a daily basis. It's also 
good for young writers to see bow much bad 
stuff is published. It's very encouraging.” 

He wrote “Welcome to Hard Times” in 
response, be says, to all the dreadful genre 
novels be was exposed to, and shortly after 


Kcrfh Meyer,. The Nc— lot 


completing it, he went into publishing as an 
editor, first at New American Library, sub- 
sequently as a precocious 33-year-old editor 
in chief at Dial Press, and eventually the 
publisher there as welL “There was a won- 
derful sense of indeterminacy floating 
through that place,” Doctorow says. “It was 
a 60-hour-a-week job. easy. And I found 
myself dealing with formidable literary per- 
sonages — Jimmy Baldwin, Mailer. Vance 
Bouijaily, Tom Berger — but it was a very 
small, unbusinesslike place.” 

B Y the ti™ he had decided to leave 
Dial in 1968. he was at work on what 
would become his third novel “The 
Book of Daniel” It was a decision he made 
with initial misgivings. “Big as Life” (1966) 
had been received coolly, and he was strug- 
gling with the new book. He withdrew from 
Dial by increments, first with a three-month 
leave of absence with pay, then with a second 
three-month leave, which he subsidized him- 
self. By that time, he had been offered his 
first teaching post, at the University of Cali- 
fornia at Irvine, and he took it 
“World’s Fair" reconstructs the early life 
of Edgar Altschuler, now a middle-aged man 
attempting to put straight for himself the 
seminal events of his past. Edgar's chrono- 
logically ordered remembrance is the novel’s 
central body, and it is concerned with funda- 
mental things: first and foremost, a child’s 
home and family; second, his initial ventur- 
ings away from them. This is augmented by 
the commentary from Edgar’s family mem- 
bers. We hear from several of them, the 
prominent exception being Edgar's father, 
who at the time of the memoir has been dead 
for years. 

TBe narrator’s voice shares qualities with 
the author’s spoken one. They have the same 
quietude, the same insistent, exploratory 
hue. Then, too, his memoir has technique, 
which is to mimic in its quality of observa- 
tion and deduction the maturation of a 
child’s mind. As the yonng Edgar's engage- 
ment with the world at large grows, his 
personal revelations are informed by it with 
increasing frequency. Thus, his parents' 
squabbling over practical matters is seen in 
clearer tight as the boy begins to perceive the 
cruel economics of the Depression. By the 
time the novel ends, he’s aware of life’s 
enormous dimensions. Earnest, baffled and 
healthy, he’s about to be spilled into his 
future. 

“I wrote the book on the presumption — 
which I realized after I started — that a 
child's life is morally complex.” Doctorow 
says, “and that a child is a perception ma- 
chine. A child’s job is to perceive, that's his 
business. So the novel is the sentimental 
education of a kid, which simply stops at the 
age of 10. And I had material at hand. 1 grew 
up in the Bronx. Jt is true that 1 have an older 
brother Donald, a mother named Rose. We 


Continued on page 13 


In Raul Ruiz’s Cinematic Labyrinth 



ontf' 


ARIS Raul Ruiz is 44 years old, a 
| Oijirjm who lives in Pans and who 
' since 1967 — orperhaps it was 1 960, 

it depends on how you count and 

who is counting — has made so many film s 

that no one can reach a Hkeiy total including 
Ruiz. ' 

Last year he was in Portugal Tor -ughting 
tests for his fust relatively big-budget pic- 

Mary Blume 



lure, “Treasure Island,” and while doing the 
tests he made three other films as well as a 
three-part chSdren’s tale. While sitting m a 
room m a’ Los Angeles Holiday Inn wamng 
to audition actors for 'Treasure island, be 
wrote the scenario for another film. If sheer 
quantity suggests that .his filths are m-madc 
Of casually tossed off, this is not true. If it 
sugges ts tha t they are not always easy- to 
follow, this is certain. ‘ 

His latest film, which opened to politely 
baffled reviews last month m 
movie houses, is called “L'Eveilte du FffljUje 
1’ Alma.” and it contains several Ru« themes 
— dreams amd awakenings, the 
personalities, magic .and Oms 


auu, "“‘TTvI . 7 . l.j-v a* 

enjoyed working with - Ririz but harm t the 

slightest idea what it was all about since he 


was.givemio script but scraps of dialogue 
each day, which Ruiz then shot or not. 

_ “He wrote scenes in order to get a stray, 
the opposite of the usual way” says Chantal 
Poupaiid, whose 13-year-old son, Mdvti, has 
plajNsd in five Rxtiz films in. a relationship 
reminiscent of Francois Truffaut and Jean- 
HereL6aud. 

Metvil plays Jim Hawkins in “Treasure 
. Island.” So does Jcan-Kerre Leaud. who is 
now 41, The film includes an undisclosed 
numb er of Jims and the pirates have become 
■ mercenaries, It was shot in-French and in 
. English, which Ruiz does not speak, and it 
was op-financed by Cannon Films, thelsrae- 
li busdecs now making a dash toward artistic 
q uality (they also financ ed Robert Altman’s 
“Fod for Love"j at a relatively low cost. 

Ruiz sometimes makes a film for S5.000 
and says having a kn more money made no 
difference except that he had to use Ameri- 
can acton such as the TV veterans Martin 
Landau and Vic Tayback. whom he came to 
like a great deaL 

“American actors can be capricious, 
though,” hesays. “They actually want chairs 
. tQrit in between 1 ritots.” 

-Ruiz is amiable, round-faced and married 
to another Chilean filmmaker , Valeria Sar- 
: . nricn6a"Ifis conversation, like his films* 
veers in unexpected way s ("The Assumption. 


of the Virgin only became dogma in 1950. 
Eight years before Sputnik went up, she 
did," he remarks over a plate of couscous, 
piously prying upwards), and his work is 
Hied with un traceable allusions. 

Widely unknown, he is deeply respected. 
Both Cahicrs du Cinema and Posirif, 
France’s leading film magazines, have given 
him special issues and he has had retrospec- 
tives in London, Rotterdam, Avignon and 
Madrid. “Three Crowns of the Sailor” was 
the talk of the 1984 New York Film Festival 
“He is a wonderful man, totally original” 
says Michel Ciment, a Poritif editor. “He’s 
one of the few people who always avoid 
dichi and whose approach is somehow par- 
allel to Our own.” . 


O N the commercial circuit he is pretty 
much a flop. “None of my films does 
weti,” he says calmly. “There is a 
logic to them, but it drives people mad. 1 
have a small public but it’s always the same 
public, and half of them are professors of 
film.” The First Ruiz film one sees makes no 
sense; after a few, one stops seeking a sense 
and suspends disbelief, the other day be 
held a marathon screening of the eight Sms 
he made in the year 1984. One of them was 
“Richard HI.” 

“It’s pure Shakespeare.” he said during 


the lunch break. “Except that I’ve given it a 
happy end." 

The word labyrinthine is often used of his 
work, but this suggests a linear approach, 
however cockeyed. Ruiz describes his world 
better during lunch by outlining a rectangle 
on the tablecloth and'quickly tracing diago- 
nals and aborted little tracks within it. “He 
draws on all sorts of references, whatever he 
has in Us head at ihe time,” says Pierre 
Hodgson, who worked on the script for 
“Treasure Island" from Ruiz’s outline. 

Hodgson noted references to Herman 
Melville's “Benito Cerena” in ‘‘Treasure Is- 
land.” Ruiz also dies an Iranian novel and 
G. K. Chesterton, whom he loves (“the more 
you read Chesterton, the more you like 
Ruiz's films, and vice versa,” says Cahiers du 
Cinema). In essence, says Hodgson, in an 
understandable cop-out. “Treasure Island” 
is a tribute to Robert Louis Stevenson. “You 
can see copies of the book lying about. The 
characters are playing a game around Ste- 
venson.” 

In Chile, Ruiz studied law, cinema and 
theology. A supporter of Salvador Abends, 
be was also accused of tightest views when 
he criticized aspects of the Abend e regime. 
After Allende’s murder, he fled to France, 
having received death threats, and his life in 
Fans was at first complicated by the fact that 
a Brazilian director chum, when high on 



Raul Ruiz. 


drugs, used to cab the police and state that 
Ruiz was in fact the terrorist Carlos. 

Like many Latin American artists, Ruiz is 
greatly influenced by British and American 
literature. “Faulkner and Henry James have 
the widest influence on Latin Americans. It 
is a way of escaping from Spanish culture 
which is so narrow, so realistic — there is 
nothing more ami-magical." 

The frame of reference he brings to his 
work is too wide to permit the tracing oi 


allusions. A short documentary on the Loire 
chateau of Chambord included studies of the 
chdteau as seen through the eyes of a medi- 
eval Thomist and the German philosopher 
Fichte, His inspirations range from Max 
Beerbohm's “Enoch Soames" to Margaret 
Mead. His technical virtuosity is stunning. 

In Paris, he feds the pain of exile but also 
he warns erf its dangers. Contrary’ to what 
Brecht said, exile inspires forgetfulness of 

Continued on page 13 







Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, £RIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 


TRAVEL 


Restoring Timeless Istanbul 


by Henry Kamm 

I STANBUL — The Bosporus continues 
to flow between green hills studded 
with mansions, separating not only the 
halves of a city but also two conti- 
nents.. This gives, as it has done for genera- 
tions of travelers on its powerful currents, an 
altogether exceptional sense of immersion in 
the civilizations that have crossed back and 
forth between Europe and Asia, altering and 
enriching one another. 

The timdess splendors of the churches of 
St. Sophia and St. Saviour in Chora, the Blue 
Mosque, the Mosque of Suleiman the Mag- 
nificent and Topkapi Palace are what they 
always were, each the goal of countless visi- 
tors through the centuries. This great city, 
akin to Jeruselum and Rome, enfolds the 
foreigner with a consciousness of the conti- 
nuity of a singular history that has deeply 
marked the shape of our world. 

It is as though nothing essential^ has 
changed in Istanbul, and yet this huge city of 
undefined boundaries grows constantly, the 
quality of its life declining as it spreads. For 
those who have bemoaned the sprawl of 
uncontrolled industry, which has turned the 
fabled Golden Horn into a cesspool and 
made the city painfully overcrowded and too 
often ramshackle, there is cheer in an unusu- 
al restoration project conducted by the 
Touring and Automobile Association, a 
semi-public body with the goal of bringing 
back beauty gone to seed. 

For the tourist, the project — a brainchild 
of the association's director general. Celik 


Gulersoy — provides a variety of sights that 
enhance' a visit to Istanbul and make it more 
'pleasurable by adding comfort where there 
was none. It offers such material benefits as 
an exceptionally beautiful hotel and several 
pleasant places for a bite to eat or to rest 
sightseers' feet before continuing the con- 
quest of the city. 

The Church of St. Saviour in Chora, along 
with St. Sophia the finest flower of Byzanti- 
um surviving in Istanbul, is a veritable muse- 
um of late Byzantine art. Its remarkably 
well-preserved mosaics and frescoes, uncov- 
ered and restored by the Byzantine Institute 
of the United States in the 1950s. dates from 
the early I4th century. 

Since the Touring .Association began its 
restorations in the late 1970s. the section in 
which the church is situated has become by 
itself worth a visit. The Ottoman residential 
houses surrounding the church, known to 
taxi drivers by its Turkish name of Kariye 
(Tamil have been beautifully renovated and 
repainted in pastel colors, and continue to be 
inhabited by their original tenants. 

A ground-floor shop in the house directly 
opposite the church entrance has been made 
into a coffee, tea and pastry shop called the 
Pudding House. The equivalent of about 75 
cents buys a sweet Turkish milk pudding; for 
about SI one can have coffee or tea with it. 
The square in front of the church has been 
closed to traffic and a garden terrace in- 
stalled, where in the shade of trees the shop's 
specialties can be sampled. The yard behind 
the church has been converted into an idyllic 
garden, where one can rest after being sated 
by the brilliance of the church's interior. 


Mosaics dazzingly depict the lives of Christ 
and the Virgin, particularly Lhe majestic 
Christ Pamocrator directly over the door 
that leads from the outer to the inner nar- 
thex. And there is a strength and tenderness 
in the marvelous frescoes, which are in a 
burial chapel on the extreme right of the 
church. The church is open from 9:30 A.M. 
until 4;30 P.M., but closed Tuesday. 

St. Sophia, which does not celebrate a 
woman but Divine Wisdom, in Greek, has 
been restored many times but remains large- 
ly what it was in 537. when it was dedicated. 
Its enormous volume, sustained by buttress- 
es added in the 14th century, and marked by 
minarets added at each comer after the Byz- 
antine church became a mosque in 1453, 
awes even after repeated visits. The 14th- 
century mosaic of Christ flanked by the 
Virgin Maiy and Sl John the Baptist in the 
right-hand gallery can be seen many times 
and still be moving. 

The Mosque of Suleiman fl557) and the 
Blue Mosque ( 1616) — the latter’s formal 
name is the Mosque of Sultan Ahmet I — are 
the most famous of the imperial mosques. 
Both are magnificent, but if a visitor has time 
for only one, Suleiman would be a good 
choice. 'for the splendor of its courtyard 
setting. The Topkapi Palace Museum gives a 
sense of the grandeur in which the Ottoman 
sultans lived. But for me, the palace’s princi- 
pal attractions are its collections of Chinese 
porcelains and Persian and Turkish minia- 
tures. 


ULfi. 



^ ° 


R IGHT off the Bosporus Bridge, atop 
Camlica Hill, the Touring Associa- 
tion has brought to new life a former- 
ly popular excursion spot that had fallen into 
neglect and disuse. Starting with thousands 
of tons of soil brought from elsewhere, plant- 
ing hundreds of trees, acres of lawn and 
flower beds, Gulersoy’s team of architects, 
planners and landscapers created a pleasure 
park that recalls an era when Istanbul people 
came to the hill for a rustic outing. 

Horse and bullock carts rebuilt in the style 
of the last century are available for leisurely 
rides along a path that presents marvelous 
views of the Bosporus and its ever-flowing 
varied traffic of Soviet. Romanian and Bul- 
garian freighters and occasional naval ves- 
sels, sometimes incongruously sailing past 
the modest boat owned by the U. S. Consul- 
ate General Turkish fishing boats and plea- 
sure craft, water-skiers and swimmers. 

Two restaurants serve light meals and re- 
freshments, and seven kiosks are scattered 
about offering snacks and drinks. The same 
simple menus and modest prices as at the 
other Touring Association projects prevail 
A little farther up the Asian shore, the asso- 
ciation has restored the magnificent Art 
Nouveau s umme r palace of the last khedive 
and installed a restaurant and some hotel 
rooms. 

The great Covered Bazaar is on every 
tourist itinerary, and it deserves such atten- 
tion for its animated atmosphere, which 
groves that commerce is a form of civiliza- 
tion. and for the richness of temptations in 
carpets and kilims, copper and brassware, 
bangles and baubles. 

But no place in Istanbul is livelier and 
more unrestored — may Gulersoy never 
think of it! — than the bazaar known to 
Turks as Misir Carsisi or the Egyptian Mar- 
ket, and to tourists as the Spice Market. 
Spice it sells, and in great quantity, but that 
is only the beginning One can also buy 
everything that needs to be spiced, including 
the original Turkish version of what New 
Yorkers somehow believe to be a Romanian 
Jewish specialty. Pastrami, or as the original 
Turkish nam e has ii t pastirma, is in fact a 
spiced meat that the Turks brought to Ro- 
mania when thq' ruled that country and 
Romanian Jews contributed to American 
gastronomy when they immigrated. 

Meats and cakes, honey and pistachios. 





Inside Sr. Sophia. 




Brwo Bcrbty, Mew*" 


Street scene on Istiklal Caddesi. 


in a section dominated by the New Mosque, 
which dates from the 17th century. 

In fact, the entire neighborhood is a bus- 
tling and noisy market, quarter devoted to 
getting and spending which rewards a stroll 
with many smiles directed at foreigners, jok- 
ing invitations to buy thin gs that tourists 
don’t use and offers to sample the wares. 

The atmosphere is authentic, there is sur- 
prisingly little jostling and there is no better 
way of taking the pulse of the city. 


A BOVE the entrance to the Spice Mar- 
f\ ket. Pandelli Restaurant serves excel- 
J— JL lent traditional Turkish cuisine, but 
only lunch. Sea bass in parchment is a spe- 
cialty, and the choice of baklava and other 
sticky Turkish desserts, with names less 
known to Westerners, is impressive. (Count 
about S35 for two; tel: 527.3909). 

Excellent fish dishes, as well as . fish and 


candied fruit anil every oLher form of Turk- 
ish delighL are neatly stored in tiny shops 
that each contain more than they seem capa- 
ble of bolding without bursting The sellers 
are happy to explain, in scraps of foreign 
longues amplified by sign language, the 
sometimes mysterious contents of their bins 
and jars, or to mix on request, specific herb 
medicines for anything that might ail the 
customer. 

The market is remarkably free of the. three 
scourges that have marred many visits. to 
Middle Eastern marketplaces — dirt, dis- 
honesty and aggressively dinging sellers. Ev- 
erything is relatively inexpensive, and spend- 
ing $5 can provide a morning or afternoon 
on fun, along with a few packages to take 
home. 

The Spice Market is at the Stamboul did 
of the Galata Bridge over the Golden Horn, 
vegetable bor d’oeuvres, are traditional in 



■- Th» Nrw YoHrTInw . 


*<*<»<( Kotor. MV**, 


the waterside row of restaurants at Amavmf 
key, on the European side of the Bosporus. 

The atmosphere, including violin and pi- 
ano music, is nice at Antik (tel 163.6627; - 1 ’ 
reserve for a table- an ^the 'terrace on the 
water). Dinner for two wiH run about S30, as 
if will at the pleasant BebekNotel restaurant. : 
(163.300), where the sunken dining , rooip 
puts the timer roughly at water level Ths£. ; ■ 
■ terrace is a traditional meeting place fbr.a 
drink. 

The Had Baba (49 Istiklal Caddesi, tdl 
144.1886),iii tbeTaksim district, where megt 
of the best modem hotels are situated, serves 
a great variety of weil-prepared traditional 
Ottoman dishes. Entrees : — eggplant add 
lamb are particularly recommended — are ^ 
chosen by sight without benefit of menu; the -r 
tab can run as low as SIS- far two. The . 
pleasant garden of an Orthodox church, od : - 
which the restaurant's terrace faces.' is an r- 
added benefit in a noisy downtown district 
, The association’s most direct contribution . - 
to tourism is the Konak Hotel (Sultanahmet; -■ 
tel: 528.6764; 51.150 or 51.151; $32 single. 

$43 or 555 double}, a luxurious conversion of c. 
a 19th-ccatury wooden mansion into a styl- 
ishly furnished hotcL The greea-and-white 
mansio n stands wi thin easy walking distance - 
of Sl Sophia and the Bhte Mosque. Break- 
fast and drixdcs are served in a shady rear ? 
garden ceatmagon a marble fountain trails- - 
Ferred from a palace in Yiidiz Park. 

. The Istanbul iffilton (Cumhuriyet Catf- - 
desl let 146.7050) is one of the best in the 
chain. Half of its rooms face the Bosporus, 
arid their balconies provide one of the most 
stimulating views anywhere. A double cost*?*/!' 
$77 to 5100. ‘ 

The Sheraton (TaJcsim Parki, tel: 
148.9000) offers similar oonrfort in the same 
neighborhood but farther from the Bosppr 
rus. Doables are $80 to $1 10. The nighttime 
view from its terrace over the illuminated 
mosques and palaces is splendid. 

Jte.Xfaan (Cumhuriyet Caddesi, -tel: 
146j4020> b -also in the same districL Dou- 
tilcs.ra£DOi^$3jrto$62,.. . .. - 

The Macka Hofei (35'Eytiuri Caddesi, td: 
140.1053) is modem, hot far from the Bospo- 
rus and charges $38 for ’a doable. ‘ * 

Traditionalists prefer the Pera Palas, onoe 
the most fashionable hotel of Istanbul; it ~ 
was recently renovated and it is downtown, 
next '-to die U. S. Consulate General at 98 
. Mesrutiyet Caddesi (tel: 145.2230). A dou- 
ble costs $35. 

ThdTqtnmg. Assodatioa has published a 
brochure that can be obtained by writing to 
364 SisB Meydaai, IstanbuL ■ 

©yftS5 The Nm.Yark Times . . : £ 


AUSTRIA 


VIENNA. BOsendorfer Hall (tel: 
65.66.51). 

REICTALS — Ocl 28: Sylvia Sag- 
meister piano (Beethoven, Ravel). 
Ocl. 29: Pier Luigi Corona guitar ( Al- 
beniz, Pa&mini). 

•Konzertnaus del: 72.12.11). 
CONCERTS— Obl 26 and 27: Vien- 
na Symphony Orchestra. Wolfgang 
Sawallisch conductor (Schumann, 
Strauss), Vienna Chamber Orchestra, 
Phiilipr Emremont conductor, JosA 
Feghaii piano(Haydn, Mozart). 

Ocl 29: The Chamber Orchestra of 


Europe, Heinz Holliger conductor 
(Berg). 

Ocl 31: London Symphony Orches- 
tra, Claudio Abbado conductor, Maria 
Ewing soprano (Mahler, Berg). 

Nov. 1; ORF Symphony Orchestra, 
Andrew Davis conductor. Julia Var- 
ady soprano (Britten), London Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Pierre Boulez con- 
ductor. Hanna Schwarz alto 
(Schbnbcrg). 

RECITAL — Ocl 27: Kate Wittiich, 
Piano (Berg). 

•Musflcvereiaftel: 65.81.90). 
CONCERTS — Ocl 26: Vienna Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra, Leonard Bern- 
stein conductor (Schumann). 

Ocl 27: Tonkflnsler Orchestra, Rolf 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


WEEKEND 


RESTAURANTS 


AN INDIAN ISLAND OF GOURMET ADVENTURE 
f MOORED ON THE SEINE 

LE LOTUS, where delightful mysteries of 
a “thaii" unfold. 

JARDIN DE SHaLIMAR, "The Garden 
of Romance", where you can feast, on a 
KASHMIR | buffet at lunch and dine a la carte, 

® j Q uai Debilly, en face da 32. av. de New- York,. 
; Paris 

Telephone- 723.77.7S/ 725.50.97 - Parking 

Open Jays oi :he week for lunch -inJ dinr.er. I.lwj order-. ! ; p en 



Reiner conductor (Mahler, Schu- 
mann). 

Ocl 28: 1 Solisti Veneti, Claudio Sd- 
mone conductor (Rossini. Vivaldi ). 
Oct. 30: KOchl Quartet, Helmut 
Deulsch piano ( Brahms, Schumann). 
•Staatsoper (tel. 53240). 

BALLET — Ocl 30: “Daphnis and 
Chloe" (Fokin c. Ravel). 

OPERA — Ocl 25: “Lohengrin" 
("Wagner). 

Ocl 26 and 29: “Don Giovanni" (Mo- 
zart). 

Ocl 31: “The Knights of the Rose" 
(Strauss). 

BELGIUM 


BRUSSELS, Mu&ce de Costumes el 
DenteUe fid: 5 1 1.27.42). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 1: “Opera 
Costumes from 1 959 to the PresenL" 
•Palais des Beaux A rts (tel: 5 1 2.50.45). 
EXHIBITION —To Dec. 22: “Span- 
ish Splenders and Belgian Villages, 
1500-1700." 

•Musics Royaux des Beaux-Arts de 
Belgique (tel: 5 13.55.46). 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: 
“Goya." 

• Musses Rovaux tT Art el tTHisloire 
(tei: 733.96.10). 

EXHIBITION —To Dec. 22: “Los 

Ibex os.” 

ENGLAND 


Ocl 30: “Orpheus in the Underworld" 
(Offenbach). 

•National Theatre {tel: 633.08.80). 
THEATER —Ocl 28-30: “The Real 
Inspector Hound" (Tom Stoppard) 
and “The Critic" (Richard Brinsley 
Sheridan). 

Ocl 31 and Nov. 1: “Pravda" (Bren- 
ton. Hare). 

•Royal Opera House (id: 240.10.66). 
CONCERT — Ocl 27: Orchestra of 
the Royal Opera House, Sir Charles 
Mackerras conductor, “Handel's Mes- 
siah." 

•Tate Gallery (id: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 10: 
“Pound’s Artists." 

To Dec. 1: “Howard Hodgkin: Prints 
from 1977-1983." 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (tel: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 17: 
“Browne Muggs: English Brown Salt- 
Glazed Stoneware.” 

To Jan. 19: “Shots of Style: Great 
Fashion Photographs Chosen by Da- 
vid Bailey." 

To Jan. 26: “Hats from India." 


•Musfe Carnavalet Ytd :42.72^ 1.1 3). 
EXHIBITION — To Ocl 27: “Lea 
Grands Boulevards de Paris." 
•Music du Grand Palais (tel: 
42,6134.10). 

EXHIBITIONS —To Nov. 3: “Salon 
D'Automne." 

To Dec. 16: “Sir Joshua Reynolds: 
1723-1792." 

To Jan. 6: “La Gloirede Victor Hugo." 
•Music du Louvre (td: 42.60.39.26). 
EXHIBITION— To Jan. 6: “LeBrun 
a Versailles." 

•Opera (teh 742J7 JO). 

BALLET— Ocl 28. 30, Nov. I : “Swan 
Lake" (Bourmrister, Tchaikovsky). 
OPERA— Ocl 26. 29.31: "Iphigfinie 
en Tauride" (Gluck). 

•Salle Pleyet (td: 45.63.07.96). 
CONCERT — Ocl 30: Orchestic de 
Paris. Zubin Mehta conductor (Schu- 
bert, Shankar). 

•TbtAue de la ViBe (tel: 42.74.22.77). 
JAZZ — Oct. 29: MemphisSIim, Jean- 
Paul Amouroux. Dave Brabeck Quar- 
tet. 

•Tbfeatre du Rond-Point 


(ld:42-56.70.80). 
RECITAL — Ocl 


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On display: lovely knitwear, 
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selection of gifts. 

Tax free 

33, r. de Longchamp. Paris 16*. 

M* Itna/BoHdere. 

TeL: (1)70185 22. 


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(Lint in (JW/W 
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MANCHESTER. Palace Theatre(td: 
236.99.22). 

OPERA — Ocl. 29 and Nov. 1: “Car- 
men" (Bizet). 

Ocl 30: "Idomcneo" (Mozart). 

Ocl 31: “A Midsummer Night’s 
Dream" (Britten). 

LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
638.41.41). 

CONCERTS — London Symphony 
Orchestra — Ocl 26: Claudio Abbado 
conductor. Rudolf Serkin piano (Bee- 
thoven, Mozart). 

Sept 28: Gerard Schwarz conductor. 
Pierre Amoyal violin (Stravinsky). 
Ocl 27: Royal Philharmonic Orches- 
tra. Sir Charles Groves conductor. 
Ramzi Yassa piano (Tchaikovsky. 
Dvorak). 

EXHIBITIONS— To Nov. 3: "Egyp- 
tian Landscapes: Weaving from the 
School of Ramses Wissa WasseT,” 
"Rod eric O’Concr." “Vera Cunning- 
ham and Matthew Smith." “Gwen 
John." 

JAZZ — Ocl 30: Dave Bruheck. 

TH PATER —To Obl 3 1 : "Les Miser- 
ohles" (Hugo. Musical Adaption: 
Bnuhil and Schrinhurg). 

•British Museum (wl; 636.15,55). 
EXHIBITION — ^ ToJan. 19«*:“Bud- 
dhism: Art and Fuilh." 

•London Coliseum (tel: 836.01. 1 1 ). 

( >PERA — Ocl 25. 28. 3 1 : “Don Car- 
los," (Verdi). 

Ocl 26: “RigoUrim" (Verdi). 

Ocl 29: “Faust" (Gounod).- 


FRANCE 

PARIS. American Center (tel: 
43.35.2] .50). 

EXHIBITION — To Nov. 30: “Wil- 
liam T. Wiley: California L” 

•Centre Culture! ChaiBot-Galllera 
(tel: 47^20.71^0). 

EXHIBITION — To Nov. 5: “Henri 
Senes and Claude VolleL" ' 
•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 
4Z77.12L33). 

EXHIBITIONS— To Nov. 11: “Ray- 
mon Mason. Jean- Michel Alberouu 
Viswanadhan. Gulham. Mohamed 
Sheikh." 

To Dec. 16: “Malta." 

ToJan. 1 : "Klee el la Musique." 
■Eglise Sl Severin (lei: 47,64.15.28). 
RECITAL — OcL 29: Andre Issdror- 
gan (Bach). 

•GalerieGuigne (id : 42.66.66.88). 
EXHIBITION— TONov. 23: “Com- 
mfcre." 

•Galerie Isy Brahot (tel: 435422,40). 
EXHIBITION —ToOcL 3 1 : “John de 
Andrea." 

•Ga lerie Lahumiere ( tel: 47.63 D3.95 ). 
EXHIBITION —To Oct. 30: "Andre 
Masson." 

•Hotel Mcridien (Lei: 47J8.12.30). 
JAZZ — Ocl 28-Nov. 16: Wild Bill 
Davis, 

•Le Petit Journal (id: 43^628^9). 
JAZZ —Ocl. 28: The Blue Doctors. 
Ocl 29: Patrick Saussios Swing Quar- 
tet. 

OcL 30: Watergate Seven + One. 

•Le Petit Opportun (id: 42J6.0I.36). 
JAZZ —TO Oct. 29: Cearius Alvixn. 
Jcan-Francois Jenny Clarke. Andre 
Ceccarelli. 

• Music d'Arl Mnderne (tel: 
47J3.6I.27). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 5: “Vera 
S«Ldy.“ “Modern Masters from the 
Thyssen - Borncnusza CoUcction." 


RECITAL — OcL 27: Antonio Men- 
eses cdk), Franz Massinger piano 
(Beethoven. Brahms). 


GERMANY 


BERLIN. Deutsche Oper (tel: 
3414449) 

Nov. I : “^ozzecfc" (Berg). 
■Philharmonic (id: 25488-0). 
CONCERT — Ocl 27: Berlin Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Borislav Iwanov. 
Tomislav/Baynov piano (Gershwin). 
JAZZ — Nov. 1: Miles Davis. 
COLOCNE. Oper der Sladt (td: 
21.25 .81). 

OPERA — OcL 26: “LaGazta Ladra" 
(Rossini). 

Ocl 27: “Lucia di Lammermoor" 
(Donizettij. 

FRANKFURT. Cafe Theater lid: 
77.74.66). 


DOONESBURY 

&L.1HB - 
QMHGO&tT gn 

ojwjoee Tun 

I APStFECT m 

1 mrrmoN. t 


THEATER — To Ocl 31: “The 
Homecoming” (Pinter). 
•AlteOper(td: 13400). 

JAZZ — Nov. 1 : Sammy Price, Arnett 
Cobb, AJ G rey, Rod Mason’s Hot Five. 
HAMBURG, Staatsoper (cel: 
35.15.55). 

BALLET — Ocl 29: “Midsummer^ 
Night Dream" (Balanchine. Mendels- 
sohn). 

OPERA —Oct 26: "Le Nozzc di Fi- 
garo" (Mozart). 

Ocl 28: “Faust" (Gounod). 

Ireland 


DUBLIN, Abbey Theatre 
(tel: 744.505). 

THEATER — Through October: 
“Semper Sullivan" (Ham). - 
•Douglas Hyde Gallery (tel:' 
77.29.41). 

EXHIBITION — To Oct. 27: 
“Sources." - ■ 

•Dublin Civic Museum (td: 77. 16.42X 
EXHIBITION — Through October: 

" 1 8th Century Popular Music in Dub- 
lin."' 

•Gate Thea ter (td: 74.40.45). 
THEATER — Through October. 
“The Mask of Mbriarty" (Leonard). 
•Hendriks GaDerv (tel: 75.60.62). 
EXHIBITION — OcL 25-Nov: 

“T.P. Flanagan." 

•Nationaf Concert Hall (tel: 
71.1533). 

CONCERT — Ocl 30: RTE Concert 
Orchestra, G aret h Hudson conductor. 
RECITAL — Ocl 3 1: Aylish Kerrigan 
soprano. SeoirseBodky piano. 

ITALY 


BOLOGNA. Galleria d'Arte Mo- 
derna(td: 503839). 

EXHIBITION —To Nov. 30: "Luigi 
Berielli." • ■ ; - 

•Tcatro dclle Celebrazioni (tel: 
2239.99); 


Htsmtsamimmotat. 
SHOUi&m^pE&Earrm, 
/WHumisurmweiN- 
FUCTEP BY TftOSe ACTING IN 
JH&MM&OFCCpt. 

: . \ 


CONCERTS — Ocl 28 and.29: Or- 
cbestra4d Tcatro Comunak di Bdo- 
gna, Roberto. Abbado conductor. 
; Paolo Bordoni piano (Schumann, Pro- 
kofief). 

•TeatroCommanak (td: 2239.99). 

. CONCERTS — OCL 27, 28. 30: Or T 
chcstra del Tcatro Comunak di Bolo- 
gna, Ralf Weikert^ conductor (Stravin- 
sky)- . 

FLORENCE, Teatrd Com unale di Fh 
renze (teh 277J2J6) 

. Ocl 31: “A Masked Ball" (Venh% 
MILAN, Teatro alia ScaFa (tel: 
80.9 L26). . ' 

CONCERT— Ocl 26. 30. 31: Prague 
Philhannomc Choir. Gerd Albrecht 
conductor, Lubomir Mail Choir con- 
ductor (Dvorak). 

MONACO 

MONTE-CARLO. Galerie d- Art Mo- 
derneLe Point (tel: 50.68.17). * 
EXHIBITION— To Ocl 19: “20 Cen- 
turyArtisis,"Balthus. MagriUeJHcas- 
s°. • _ ' ... 

•Centre de Congrs de Monte-Carlo 
«eh 50.93.00). 

CONCERT — Ocl 27: Moate-Cario 
Philharmonic Orchestra, Sergiu Co- 
juisstonacond uctorfigorOislrakh vio- 
lin (Beethoven. Rachmaninov). 

NETHERLANDS 

AMSTERDAM, Concerifljcbouw (td: . 
71.83-45}. 

CONCERTS — Concert gebouw Or- 
— Oct. 26 md 27; Bernard Hai- 
tink, conduct or. Faye Robin son sopra- 
no (Bn ties). 

Ocl - 30 and 31: Vladimir Ashkenazy 
conduaor(Debussy. Prokofiev). - - . 
Ocl 26 ; Alban Bere Quartet, Elisabeth 
Leonskaja piano (Schubert)/ '' 

Ocl 28: Sdifabcig Quartet (Berg. We- 
bern): 

“Oct ..27: Jean Philippe 
Collflrd piano (thrhussy. Ravd).OcL 
29: Joseph Swensen viola, yiy Funa- 
hashi piano (Beethoven. Brahms). 


•Rjjksmuseum(tei:73JEI^I). 
EXfUBITION — To Jan,-26: “Span- 
ish Masters" (El Greco, Murillo. Ve- 
lasquez). 


EDINBURGH, National Museum o 

557J?So)! eS ° f SC0tIaad 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 3: “I An 
^ oine: Treasures of Prina 
Charles Edward StuarL" 

Theatre Royal (tel 
“ 6c *' 26: “Oberon" (voi 

Weber). 

SPAIN 

BARCELONA, Festival (tel 
CONCERTS — Ocl 28: Bainceipni 

; Lon temporary Instumental Grpui 
(Gerg.SardiJ. 

Ocl 30: Czechoslovakian Philhdr 
monic Orchestra. Jiri Bdohlavek doo 
Dvorak) VSn ^ ans ^y piano (Qiopin 

..P 64 -. Jl: Czechoslovakian Philhar 
mot V c Orchestra. Vaclav Neuthanx 
condoctor ( Dvorak. Janacek). ' 

MADRn), Museo Espanot de Ani 

.T.Tbraugh October 
rf Holland." “XVII C«i 
mry Paintings from Naples." 

w E TH)STAT 1 S: 

^ffiWTON D.C. National Ftor 
PvL^JSy <feI:3 57-Z7.00). , :• 

*® NS - To ^ : ^- 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 


Page 13 


Page 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


^Methods of Categorizing 
Che Independent Traveler 


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by Roger ColKs 

K NOW THYSELF is the lapidary 
advice on the temple of Apollo at 
Delphi. In present day travel 
■ terms, this means deciding 
whether you are an adventurer, an elitist, a 
gray panther or a business extender. De- 
pending on where you go and what you want 
to do. you may also play the role of aspiring 
explorer, seasoned traveler or maybe even 
Survey tourist. The common demoninator is 
Vat you axe at bottom an independent trav- 
eler with contemporary values. 

If you recognize yourself, here’s good 
news. In the future, you’re likely to have 
more discriminate appeals for your travel 
dollar and find more opportunities for a 
magical mystery tour of the Europe you 
always knew was there, but were never quite 
able to discover. 

These somewhat delphic definitions are 
part of a conscious-raising program among 
U. S. travelers to Europe and the travel trade 
on both sides of the Atlantic. The idea is to 
identify opportunities for affluent, indepen- 
dent travelers to enjoy a different land of 
European vacation — away from the logjam 
of city centers in the peak season (June- 
September) to more unspoiled destinations 
in the shoulder seasons, such as the English 
Cotswolds in May and Provence in the fall, 
when the natives are likely to be less frac- 
t tious and provide better service. 

7 * The program emanates from a research 
study carried out last April by Dunham & 
Marcus, a New York consulting firm, on 
behalf of American Express. This concluded 
that while growing numbers of Americans 
are looking for new, more contemporary 
values of “fun and relaxation, self-indul- 
gence, health and discovery,” Europe is still 
communicating the more traditional benefits 
of “history, old buddings and monuments, 
education and conducted sightseeing.” 

According to Christopher Rodrigues, 
London-based American Express division 
vice-president for Europe, Middle East and 
Africa, there axe five main categories of 
“independent” travelers who share “contem- 
porary" values: 

• Special-interest travelers — people who 
go only on tours linked to a particular inter- 
est, such as food and wine. Renaissance 
paintings or archaeology. 

• Adventurers — the young (25-35) up- 
and-coming. who backpacked at college, 
Tove traveling, look for immersion in new 
cultures, “who might say, Nepal is getting 
too touristy these days." Their gold standard 
is almost to get lost in a country, “to be at the 
edge of being out of control.” In business 
terms, these would be fast-track executives 
'earning $35,000 and more. 

• Elitists — older and more affluent, who 
travel throughout the year to the less tradi- 
tional tourist centers. They enjoy the good 
life of the big cities, stay in the top business 
hotels, “but will seek out a truly splendid 
place at the weekend, of the Relals-Qbteau 
type.” They may have children out of the 
home and so be freer to bring their spouses. 

• Gray Panthers — the affluent retired. 
They have the time, money and inclination 
to take long vacations. Seasoned travelers 
who “tike to combine old world elegance 
with contemporary flair.” 

• Business Extenders — frequent business 
travelers who like to extend their trip by 
adding on a few days vacation. Typically, 
they are 40 plus, self-employed or corporate 
executives earning over $50,000, or they 
come to Europe four or five times ayear and 
take off the middle weekend of a 10-day trip 
for unstructured forays to indulge hobbies 
and interests. They have “a strong success 
1\' ethic, they believe that to work hard and to 
f play hard ban integral part of their business 
travel experience.” Thor attitude b that Eu- 
rope b a great place to do business because 


it’s easy to enjoy yourself afterward — so 
much diversity in a small area. 

If you’re undergoing an identity crisis, be 
advised that you are allowed to belong to 
more than one of these “demographic and 
altitudinal” target groups. (As an indepen- 
dent traveler, you can even build your own.) 
You can also make it more complicated by 
choosing to be a “survey tourist,” an “aspir- 
ing explorer” or a “seasoned traveler” during 
the course of a single trip. Says Rodrigues: 
“A classic example b an executive who is a 
seasoned traveler in London, with which he 
is very familiar and has the experience and 
confidence to be truly independent, an aspir- 
ing explorer in Paris, where he has been once 
or twice before, but needs an umbilical cord 
to support himself in an emergency, and a 
survey tourist in Rome, where he b going for 




Of adventurers, 
extenders and 
gray panthers 


the first time and may find that a guided bus 
tour b the best way to cover an unfamiliar 
place in a short period. The trick b to know 
which bat you’re wearing and explain that to 
the travel agent.” 

American Express provides some useful 
hdp along the way with its “Independent 
Traveler's Guide to Europe.” This features 
five city guides for London, Stockholm, Mu- 
nich. Paris and Rome and provides ample 
scope for role playing. There b plenty of 
advice on hotels, shopping and recreation 
along with a smorgasbord of ideas for short 
breaks in the provinces. For example, in 
France, there are some good itineraries for 
Alsace, Brittany and Provence; in West Ger- 
many, to Regensburg and the Berchtesgaden 
and OberaSgau monntains 

Rodrigues gives two examples of how 
business extenders have used the guide. A 
U. S. car distributor visiting a manufacturer 
in Munich found he had a free weekend, so 
he rented a car, chose a hotel and drove up to 
the OberaUg&u in the Bavarian hi ghland*. A 
woman executive who runs a research com- 
pany in New York wanted to do her own 
thing in London. The hotel where she was 
staying suggested taking a driver for a day. 
“This b not w hat the independent traveler 
wants to do, they tike to be in control of their 
own destiny,” Rodrigues says. “So she ended 
op taking British Rail from Paddington, 
found a hotel in the Cotswolds and had 
lunch in the village of Broadway.” 

Rodrigues admits that for the business 
extender, “the travel trade hasn’t quite 
caught up with you yet You may have to do 
a fair amount of legwork on your own.” One 
suggestion, if you tike a certain style of hotel 
b to ask the concierge whether there are 
similar hot«b in other destinations. The 
same applies to restaurants. Many establish- 
ments unite in affinity groups. For example, 
there b a West of England Country House 
and Hotel Association. Then that's the 
Ch&teau-Accuefl group of French country 
hotels. Another is the Romantica group in 

ally run lay the owner. Many car rentaTfirms 
offer packages where you can zoom off in a 
Porsche 91 1 for a weekend. 

The only problem seems to be that if 
American Express gives all the good ideas 
away to its cardholders, where b the scope 
for the true business extender, who is by 
definition the quintessential independent 
traveler? ■ 


TRAVEL 


Cajun, Creole and Cooking Tradition 


by Mark J. Kmiansky 


N EW IBERIA, Louisiana — Southern Louisana b 
different from the rest of the United States. In fact, it 
is different from the rest of Louisiana. Time b 
measured differently. When they speak of “the war,” 
it b as likely to mean the American Civti War as World War H 
This is the Old South, with moss swaying tike chiff on from its 
branches. The ambitious New South has passed this coiner by. 
People here seem content to attract more tourists than industri- 
alists and show off the traditions they long enjoyed. 

One erf these traditions, the cuisine, has become the hottest 
thing aTTw»ng modem American food phenomena. 

It may be a fad in New York. Washington and San Francisco, 
but here it b a deeply rooted way of life. It is the one part of the 
United States where cooks do not have a compulsion to concoct. 
Change comes through evolution and not by whim. Old tech- 
niques and recipes are revered in Lotriniana, where cooks stiQ 
stir in homes and restaurants eight-hour preparations based on 
French techniques that few French chefs care to remember. 

There are three separate cuianes — northern Cajun, southern 
Cajun and Creole. While the three are increasingly merging in 
restaurants, locals say they remain distinct in Home*. 

The Cajuns were French settlers in Nova Scotia who fled 
Canada in tire 18th century after Wolfe defeated Montcalm. 
They took with them a coastal people’s love of seafood and a 
rich gastronome tradition derived from some of the most 
celebrated regions of France. 

Those who settled to the south, by the bayous, riven, marshes 
and salt water channels, replaced lobster and other Canadian 
catch with crayfish, crabs, and oysters, which are pm in meticu- 
lously seasoned stews called fctoctffdes, rice dishes and soups., 
A type of channel bass known here as redfish ha* become in 
demand in fid stores all over America because of the populari ty 
of blackened redfish — filets in hot peppers and hens quickly 
blackened in butter on a white-hot cast iron pan. 

Another l iyal inland sal twater fiqh listed rm T rungiana mwiiw; 

as speckled trout or just trout, resembles the well known 
freshwater fish, but with a wider grain to its delicate white meat. 
Alex Pa tout, owner-chef of a restaurant here in the quiet town 
of New Iberia, bakes it wrapped in bacon. This dish, typical of a 
new generation of Cajun cooks, b a light blend not only of two 
contrasting ingredients, but one from each Cajun region. 

The northern Cajuns did not have the seafood of the Cajuns 
10 miles to the smith and continued a cuisine based ere the 


French pork charcmerie tradition of smoked hams, hog’s head, 
boudm (blood sausage) and a smoked chitteriing (pig intestine) 
sausage called andouiUe. cousin to the French sausage of the 
same name. 

With little communication, Cajun food used to be so localized 
in this remote, swampy country that food varied not only from 
north to south, but every mile. 

Because erf its reliance on very fresh products from the 
immediate vicinity. C^nn cooking can onty be commercialized 
by restaurateurs at considerable cost. Patout has five farmers 
under contract to his restaurant. 

“The biggest problem,” said the 32-year-old Patout, who 
started his restaurant with his sister Gigi in 1979. “is to compete 
against the cooking people are doing in their homes.” 

The locals are regular restaurant-goers but tough critics. 
Patout, who is acquiring a national reputation, admits. “If I do 
well it will not be from local support It will be from outsiders.” 


C REOLE b the grand cniane of New Orleans. It b 
cooking for restaurants oF old-fashioned elegance, 
lighter and finer than Cajun but with many erf the same 
ingredients. It was developed by blade cooks who did their own 
variations on French, Spanish, Fnglish — whichever flag was 
' flying in New Orleans at the moment 

Both Creole and Cajon have become incredible hodgepodges 
of culture that linguists and food historians may never son out 
The word for jambalaya, a northern Cajun, spicy, tomato-rice 
dish with cured and fresh meats, comes from jambon a laya, 
from the French for ham and an African term for rice. 

Green onions are called shallots and a soup based rat the 
French term court-bouillon is called kuintiem. 

A squashlike vegetable c&Ded vegetable pear in 
although raid y called anything by English-speaking 
here called nrirliton, which used to be a cream-filled 
France. The vegetable is hollowed and restuffed with a spicy 
mixture and baked. 

T.iVe the chili pepper, the vegetable pear probably came from 
Mexico, where it is a common Indian product called chayote. 
Chni peppers were introduced from the Mexican Caribbean 
state of Tabasco, where they have been a basic ingrerfiant since 
Mayan times. The five locally grown species are blended into 
most Louisiana dishes. Chilis are also aged like bourbon for five 
yean in white oak bands at Avery Island and sold around the 
world as Tabasco sauce: 


TTb vesftabte 


of all 
made by 


u 


maoe dy cooaing flour with fat. Some roox takes f®* 
cooking- Saafa blended with a stock that * cooked longer. 

Then it is cooked some more. —ci-wirant. 

Not only is such a process cosily w the modem 
but Louisiana chefs have to address the fan that heavy 
has fallen from favor. Most French chefs have opted for lighter 

“lo^Lou^^^iiianis are not ; about m djnSMg 
trendy visitors. Antoine’s, in hs crystal I 9 th-centu^<aeg«ce£ 

such a New Orleans institution. It has been owned by me^e 

family since 1840 and its fifth -generation pmpricu*. Betvara 
R_ Guste says, “If you are going to make something goodoown 
here, it always begins with a stock mid then a Kw*- 
Not that they do not invent a new dish every decade or sa in 
1889, escargots for a last-minute banquet, chef Jmes 

Alciatorc devised a peppery green herbal sauce and 
slightly heated oysters. Arbitrarily n a min g tt afw the penoa s 

xziast famous milfionaire, it become cddxaied as cysteis Rocke- 

fefler, although imhatM around the world, Anto i ne s will 

not reveal its recipe. . ... . . 

change faster than Antoine &. which m Sptte 
of its fame says that 70 percent of its cheats are local. The best 
known Cajun in America is Paul Piudhomme who Zooks for 
ways to shorten cooking, which in part accounts for the umcn- 
doos success of his cookbook. He also slips in outside dements 
from tlte South, Mexico and other places. ' - 
Ms New (Means restaurant, K-PanTs Louisiana Kit c he n , 
packs customers into a grubby formica- top diner-type setting 

for plates that start at $20. Prudhomme has become an Ameri- 
can star. . 

Patout wants to taira on bis old friend and is comma out with 

his own cookbook this spring. But many odier repOTaf chefs are 

cr eating Mr. B’s, a popular New Orleans bistro, serves small 
morsels of moist redfish fried in a spicy breading and served 
with a tightly mnstardy mayonnaise: 

But some things never change, Eke the coffee that is cut with 
chicory, an old habit of theFrmch from hard times that was 
adopted in l i-Biigana during the Civil War when coffee was 
ham to get It makes terrible coffee: Why do they stifl do it, 
Patout and several other restaurateurs woe . a s ke d? “It’s a 
tradition,” they all answered. • ■ 

Mark J. Kurlansky is a journalist basal in Miami 


Doctorow 


Continued from page 11 

actual Doctorows, including my late father, 
lived oo Eastbum Avenue/* His voice has 
taken on a mild edge. “These are all true. But 
the book is an invention. It's the illusion of a 
memoir.” 

As Doctorow speaks, it seems that what 
he’s done in the novel is still becoming dear 
to him. Only now is he realizing what his 
intentions have been all along, and he’s siz- 
ing up his achievement against them as they 
come into focus. The sections of family com- 
mentary, for example, are written as if they 
have been dialed by questions and spoken 
aloud, and they stand as a kind erf tran- 
scribed oral history in contrast to Edgar's 
crafted one: “I like the idea of composing 
oral history,” Doctorow says. “Writing the 
way people speak. Behind it is the larger idea 
of trying to break down the wall between the 
real and the written. 

The presumption of writing,” be says, “is 
that you can speak for other people, that you 
can five fives through your work that you 
have not lived, and that you can do that 
adequately and justly. Writing is an explora- 
tion. You start from nothing and learn as 
you go. If you do it right, you're coming up 


out of yourself in a way that’s not entirely 
governable by your intellect. That’s why the 
most important lesson I’ve learned is that 
planning to write is not writing. Outfitting a 
book is not writing. Researching is not writ- 
ing. Talking to people about what you're 
doing, none of that is writing. Writing is 
writing.” ■ 

Bruce Weber write frequently on literary 
subjects. This was excerpted from an article in 
The New York Tunes Magazine. 


Color-Coding the Travel Guides 


by Peter Lewis 




* I 


N EW YORK — The 1986 editions 
of many popular guidebooks are 
be ginning to appear is book- 
stores. The first to arrive each 
yea* are updated versions of the familiar 
meiL-and-potatoes directories — the Fo~ 
dor, the Frommers, the Let’s Go’s — that 
stee- first-time visitors along well-beaten 
pads. Later, as the holiday season ap- 
protches, come the coffee-table books (fiat 
stir nemories or dreams of distant countries 
though lavish ase of photography and lush 
colff reproduction. These expensive books 
are iardly meant to be tucked inside a suit- 
case and contain tittle if any day-to-day 
travi tips. 

Ir recent years a new class of paperback 
travd guide bas emerged. It combines the 
best of the practical directories with the 
supaior artwork, of the hardcover coffee- 
tabfc books at an affordable price. 

Ai outstanding example erf this new gen- 
era ton of guidebooks is the Access series, 
pubis hed by AccessPress LuL, a small corn- 
pan; that recently moved its headquarters to 
Nev York from Los Angeles. 

Tie creative force behind the Access series 
is Xjchard Saul Wurman, an architect, 
graphic designer and cartographer who is co- 
owier of AccessPress Ltd. with Frank Stan- 
ton former president of the CBS. 

Vhfle most guidebooks are divided into 
such categories as hotels, restaurants and 
museums, the Access guides view the city as 
a fabric, indivisible. “When you are some- 
place in a city.” Wurman says, “you want to 
Iww what’s around you. when I'm in a 
museum, I want to know what’s nearby, 
-wiere I can eat, where I can find an interest- 
in; Shop.” 

\ page chosen at random from the Tokyo 
Access guide, for example, presents both 
■ practical information and cultural observa- 
tjens about a tiny area of the Ginza. The 
items flow smoothly from one to the next, as 
ore would walk the streets of the area: first, 
hew to get to what the author considers the 
best private art museum in Japan (the 
Bridgestone); then, a rush-hour glimpse of 
th£ waves of commuters in sOent procession 
fram the Tokyo Station nearby (with a note 
flat the bus to Disneyland is at the Yaesu 
sat). Next, upstairs, is the Daimaru depart- 
ment store, “the ideal store for those things 
you forgot to pock for the trip,” and a 


suggestion that the store’s “fifth-floor put- 
ting green is a good place to loll time while 
waiting for a train (no charge).” Another 
short walk leads to the Library of Tourism 
and Culture and the n to the Fukuoka Mutu- 
al Finance Bank where one can see “a door 
based on a design by Marcel Duchamp." A 
sobering aside: “According to popular belief 
that Tokyo’s earthquakes run on a 69-year 
cycle, the next massive tremor is due to occur 
in 1991.” (This cycle formula failed to pro- 
diet the earthquake of Oct. 4, 1985.) 

Each brief item is color coded for quick 
identification. Gardens and parks are de- 
scribed in green type. Items on museums, 
theaters and architecture are printed in blue; 
restaurants and nightlife in pink; shops in 
red; hotels and narrative items in black. 

The books, which are about the same size 
as the popular Michelin green guides, are 
illustrated with clear, ensp and colorful 
drawings and maps, often from architects’ 
renderings, frequently using aerial perspec- 
tives that give a fresh view of familiar areas. 

The Access guides cost $9.95 to $11.95. 
Existing titles include Los Angeles, San 
Francisco, New York City, W ashingto n, 
New (Means, Las Vegas, Hawaii and Tokyo. 
Guides to London, Paris and Rome and the 
Museum of Modern Art in New York are 
planned for 1986. 

Because of the unusual structure of the 
Access books, in which landmarks are de- 
scribed side by side with often short-lived 
restaurants and boutiques, the books must 
be revised frequently to keep pace with city 
changes. Each volume is revised every 12 to 
18 months, Wurman says. Twenty-four 
pages of new listings are added to each 
revision. The volumes are completely rewrit- 
ten for every other new edition, he says. The 
Los Angeles guide is in its third edition and 
several others, including the New York City 
guide, are now in second editions. 


H IGH-QUALITY color photography 
and printing are the hallmarks of 
another series, the Insight Guides, 
produced by the German-boro designer and 
photographer Hans Hoefer and printed in 
Singapore. The artwork alone makes these 
paperback books wdl worth the $15.95 
price, but readers also get a fact-laden guide 
that incorporates thoughtful passages on the 
area’s history and culture along with the 
usual guidebook information about hotels. 


restaurants and landmarks. However, a trav- 
eler unfamiliar with the area described might 
do wdl to pick up one of the totally practical 
guides as a supplement. 

The heavy paper used for their superb 
color reproduction makes the Insight Guides 
quite hefty. While some of these books cer- 
tainty could be taken on a trip, their value is 
chiefly as reference works to be read and 
enjoyed before and after one's travels. 

The series, begun in the 1970s, now com- 
prises 23 titles, with 18 new titles set for 
release in the next year. The most recent 
books, Indonesia. Australia and Northern 
and Southern California, will be followed in 
the coming months by India. New York 
State, Puerto Rico, Britain, the Rockies, Ke- 
nya and Israel, among others. 

The first Insight Guide described Bali, 
and the South Pacific remains a particular 
strength of the series. It is hard to imagine a 
better guide than die Insight Indonesia book 
for such relatively out-of-the-way places as 
Sri lanka. Java and Burma. 

The practical travel advice contained in 
the Insight Guides is revised yearly. 

Both the Access and Insig ht guides may be 
ordered by mail from their U. S. distributor. 
Simon & Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the 
Americas, New York, N. Y. 10020. 


A NOTHER paperback series that, has 
gained acclaim in the last year for 
XA- superior color tOusirations is the Du- 
mont Guides, published by Stewart, Tabori 
& Chang of New York and printed in Spain. 

Five Dumont titles are now in the stores, 
Paris and the De de France, the Loire Valley, 
the French Riviera, Ireland and the most 
recent, on the Greek islands. 

The Dumont Guides segregate their color 
photographs in clusters of glossy pages that, 
divide sections of text. The narrative, is the 
form of an anthology of articles concentrat- 
ing on the region’s history, art and architec- 
ture, lades the fluid, breezy style of the 
Access and Insight guides and is intended 
for the most experienced travelers. A spartan 
section at the rear is devoted to practical 
travel considerations, hardly adequate for 
newcomers seeking advice on such basics as 
lodging or dining. 

The Dumont Guides cost S12.95 to $14.95 
and are available by mail from the publisher 
at 740 Broadway, New York, N, Y. 10003. ■ 

® 1985 The Near York Tima 


Raul Ruiz’s Labyrinth 


Continued from page 11 



Metvil Poupaud and Jean-Pierre Leaud in " Treasure Island. 


one's native land rather than accentuating 
memory, be says. 

“You become obsessed with small details 
in your new. place — where to eat, how to 
find a flat It cm become almost a sort of 
fascism in that you think you are different, a 
special breed devoid of responsibility. It can 
lead to a land of m&danxam*.” 

Roofs drill is officially recognized ia 
France to the point where he was recently 
appointed co-director of a government-run 
Maison de la Culture in Le-Havre. He in- 
tends to work there mostty on video, butwffl 
undoubtedly find time to make his own^tos 
' justas he <fid a f ew months ago when hfrWas : 
at the Maison de laCulture at Gxoroble. . 

“It was fantastic, they had aQ the equip- 
ment there, aft camcouM need Irmly had to 
bring in the actors.” Be made three Sms 
during Ins short stay there — a rock film, a 
.setff. and his “Rkbaid.nr’ with It 
end. 


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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 


ADVERTISEMENT 


ADVERTISEMENT 


"When a man is tired of London he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford Dr. Samuel Johnson, 20th September, 1777 


The London Property Boom is going with d Bang 

The City revolution that is attracting the world 


E VERYONE - except the experts - is 
saying it can’t last. Yet the rise in 
prime London residential property 
prices has continued upwards for three years 
and touched a swingeing 35 percent in 
1984/85. 

And there are signs that the trend is going 
on apace this autumn, according to Savills 
and the metropolis’s other glossy estate 
agents including Sturgis, Hampton & Sons, J. 
Trevor & Sons, Chestertons, Beauchamp 
Estates and Chesterfield & Co. My forecast 
is that the rate might grow steeper. 


One major reason is Big 
Bang, the City epithet for the 
revolution that from next year 
opens the Stock Exchange vir- 
tually to all comers. The 
world's financial institutions 
are flooding in for a share of 
the action, and their affluent 
executives need suitable ac- 
commodation both to rent 
and buy. 

In anticipation of Big Bang, 
established foreign banks in 
the Square Mile are racing to 
expand their activities while 
new ones are setting up shop. 
Indeed, the Square Mile itself 
is bursting at the seams and 
becoming rectangular as it 
stretches into Docklands in 
response to the distorting 
pressure. Resident bankers 
and their families need homes 
too. 

At the same time, the 
banks' commercial customers 
- the multinationals and 
conglomerates - are following 
the financial services and esta- 
blishing their headquarters 
and their senior staffs homes 
here in London, the natural 
English-speaking base for 
North Americans aiming to 
penetrate the polyglot 
Common Market. Many of 
them seek flats in which to 
accommodate and entertain 
clients and customers. 

But business is not the only 
lure. The sheikhs and Middle 
East businessmen flood in to 
avail themselves of Harley 


Street’s renowned medical 
services, and they like their 
own residential base while 
undergoing treatment. 

The elitist s tandar ds of our 
independent schools - the 
Eton factor - also attracts an 
international following. So do 
our ancient universities, the 
Oxbridge magnet. 

At the same time, the social 
calendar embracing the Der- 
by, Wimbledon, Henley and 
Ascot enjoys global status and 
the beau monde follows it 
throughout the Season. Ho- 
tels of appropriate standard, 
in what is now among the 
leading tourist centres of 
the world, cannot cope with 
demand, or they charge ex- 
cessive rates, thus putting in- 
creased pressure on the short- 
lease property market. 

The UK’s political stability 
around a universally admired 
Royal Family encourages in- 
vestment by the affluent of 


Hong Kong, Latin America, 
Malaysia . . . and they under- 
standably like to have a pad 
where their money "is. The 
gnomes of Zurich and Brus- 
sels and Strasbourg are here, 
too. 

And for all these categories, 
there is the magical quality of 
London life, its great an col- 
lections, opera house, 
theatres, symphony orches- 
tras, its culture - both classi- 
cal and pop - its nightlife and 
its pace-setting fashion indus- 
try, plus the vibrant, creative 
atmosphere engendered by 
the whole mix. No wonder 
the tax exiles are returning 
and, mixing with the dozens 
of new millionaires created 
by the Unquoted Securities 
Market, are competing to 
establish luxurious homes. 

That is why the million- 
pound barrier has long been 
penetrated in the prime cen- 
tral locations of Mayfair, Bel- 
gravia, Knightsbridge, Chel- 
sea, Kensington, the North 
West golden enclaves of St 
Johns’s Wood, Regents Park 
and Hampstead. 

David Thorley, of Chester- 
tons, recalls the first million- 
plus flat sold by his com- 
pany's Mayfair office in I9S1 . 
The sale was for £1.13 million 
for which an Australian busi- 
nessman bought a 6 -bed- 
roomed pen those with a 60-ft 
terrace overlooking Green 
Park. Chestertons now value 
the flat at £2 million. 

Owen Inskip, of Chester- 
fields, who have recently sold 






iiii 


St '••'"iVT w-ir 

, . _ -*r- -J 

IllliiSillil 


247 The Water Gardens, London W2 , a top London 
penthouse. Chestertons. 


Antumn/Winter 1985 
Over 100 cou n try, 

London residential and 
agricultural properties for 
sale within the UJL 
For your copy contact: 


V ¥ : * 7 ; W • } k 


SAVILLS 
20Grosve&orHfll 
Berkeley Square, London 
WL 01-499 8644 


URGENTLY 

required good quality properties for 
families being transferred to London 
LONG LETTINGS — GOOD CORPORATE TENANTS 


Anscombe & Ringland 


1. c. s • N'o 

’ 01 722 7101/ 01 777 7227 T SlL'/ 


HCliiATr.? jC'HW'.VfcOC: 


•'AVPSTf AC). H me.* 1 '? 


THAMES ESTUARY 
370 Acres 


Development Site plus Exceptional Deepwater 



KnigM Frank 


20 Hanover Square 
01-629 8171 




inguuiwwfivwnnww 
tcNfam ■ 01- 4S3 ISO Ub 2M07 






2 




i. . • •• . . • • : ■. 


-M J' If 

ill i^ii|§ 


. Wf : r T : HK 


67 Eaton Place, London SWl , a classic Belgravia terrace. 
Chestertons, Aylesford& De Groat Collis . 


a magnificent five-bedroomed 
house with swimming pool in 
the middle of Chelsea for 
more than the asking price of 
£1.5 million, reckons there 
are probably between 30 and 
40 properties currently on the 
market in Central London 
with price tags starting at £1 
millio n, “and any serious pur- 
chaser on the topmost end- 
must be prepared to pay in 
excess of this figure,” he says. 

What do you get at this le- 
vel? Richard Crosthwaite, of 
Knight Frank and Rutley, 
reckons on a five-bedroomed, 
five-bathroom house or flat in 
top condition in a prime area 
with a long lease (say, 60-plus 
years), or freehold. 

In Knightsbridge, Mayfair 
and Belgravia, the cost could 
work out at up to £400 a sq. 
ft; in St John’s Wood, per- 
haps half that rate. Neverthe- 
less, the seven-figure price tag 
covers only a small proportion 
. of the market and should buy 
an array of luxurious features 
such as a swimming pool, a 
jacuzzi, lifts, or a gli t te ri ng in- 
terior design like a Dynasty 
set. The property itself? Well, 
a penthouse in Mayfair is 
equivalent to a handsome 
townhouse in Chelsea, a Nash 
terrace in Regents Park, or a 
substantial detached house 
with garage and gar de n in 
Hampstead or St John’s 
Wood. 


In the Home Counties 
stockbroker belt, such as 
Wey bridge, Esher, Sunning- 
dale, Marlow and Epsom, the 
same sum buys a mini-estate. 

It’s worth while paying 
these prices for occupation 
for, say, three years upwards 
because rentals are in propor- 
tion. Savills quote for a hand- 
some two-bedroomed prime 
London flat at Thorney Court 
at £800 a week for a long lease 
(usually one year with an op- 
tion to renew). 

Because there’s virtually no 
new building land available, 
except that created by demoli- 
tion of old property or libera- 
ted from some Government or 
local authority cache, most 
prime London property for 
sale is presented as a refurbish- 
ment. A good example is 15 
Chapel Street, just off Belgra- 
via Square, where Chester- 
field & Co. and Savills jointly 
offer a 6-bedroomed house 
with a magnificent 42-foot 
drawing-room and separate 
staff flat at £650,000 for the 
56-year lease. 

For the bachelor, Chester- 
field & Co. offer an ideal pied 
it terre for the bon vivant; it’s 
a two-bedder on two floors 
with roof terrace at Draycott 
Avenue situated above a bet- 
ring shop, next to a pub and 
within 100 yards of many of 
London’s most famous res- 
taurants, including Waltons, 


Bewick’s, Le Suquet, La 
Poissonnerie, Ma Cuisine and 
Becco fines. Price: £148,000. 

John D. Woods’ portfolio 
features two good examples of 
Thar unique London pheno- 
menon, the mews. Originally 
coach houses and stables, 
these low-rise dwellings in se- 
cluded backwaters are the 
height of fashion. Now chat 
the horses have bolted, one at 
Devonshire Place Mews, close 
to Regents Park, offers four 
bedrooms, a roof terrace with 
studio and garage at 
£267,000; another in a village- 
like location in Cadogan 
Lane, bordering Belgravia 
and Knightsbridge, offers 
compact two-bedroom accom- 
modation at £230,000. With 
this latter, you also enjoy ac- 
cess to private gardens and 
tennis courts. 

Hampton & Sons also have 
a mews cottage, a bijou home 
in Eaton Mews North, Bel- 
gravia, at £310,000 for two 
beds and two baths, one en 
suite. The same agents also 
offer two character properties 
in Knightsbridge. 'One in 
Trevor Square, jointly offered 
with W.A. Ellis. This is a 
Regency house . recently 
remodelled to offer spacious 
three-bedroomed comfort and 
a pretty paved garden, at 
£475,000. Another in Sterling 
Street, is also a period proper- 
ty with four bedrooms, 
conservatory and gardm with 
easy access to Hyde Park and. 
the famous shopping facilities 
of the area. Price £435,000. , 

On the Hyde Park Estate, 
J. Trevor & Sons have sole' 
agency for four luxury apart- 
ments carved from an elegant 
period property in Hyde Park 
Square. It has been totally re- 
furbished to provide the finest 
contemporary living. Fea- 
tures include terraces, balco- 
nies and a courtyard garden 
with 97-year leases at 'prices 
ranging from £205,000 for a 
two-bedder up to £485,000 
for a three-bed, three-bath 
penthouse. J. Trevor & Sons 



Hampton & Sons 


FOR 

PRIME 


CENTRAL LONDON 

Prime Residential 
Furnished Lettings 
Long or short term. 
Houses and Apartments 


6 Arlington Street St James’s, London SW1A lRB 


Hampstead Heath London 


TVwo magnificent new luxury homes with indoor 
heated pool jacuzzi. sauna and gymnasium. 

In all or London there can be nowhere quite 
like Hampstead. Ackncwtedfled as the capitate <&«*.' 

premier focation.it combines a unique .J^x 

village atmosphere with easy access 


v i the City and West End -Just a couple 
or mile* away Bui i^rhaps Hampstead is 
best known tor us beautiful Heath: acre 


best known tor us beautiful Heath: acre 
upon acre uf picturesque couni ryside, 
hide cl miged over ;he centuries. 



WEST END 
01-449 8644 


rf Hampstead Heath ynu , _ . 

find two magnificent' ■«» — £t= — Eft- ’\T‘’ 

homes, each quite * > yT| V ‘ r. -I 

different, but both 
strikingly designed 

M make the most m 

if natural light taMME T | ft. 

and offer “Wo a -1 - 

generuusly , 
pnjporrjurted 

muniM [inftidmji.spadoiis family uccamntt.»iatkn finished 
ti i. istandani * if quality and specifeatixibejiaxl compare. w 

Wit ha choice nfeTrher nor 7 law? bedrooms- 
must with thoirrwn bathrooms -each nf those 
stunningly modem Itunics also boasts / . •/?«. 

extensive rcceptiun moms, a fully fiued and . /J /"•* T 

equtpiied kitchen, plus its own hksurecom nfcX u 
cnrrttfctewJtb saurujicuzzia iMiOTii. 

But words alone could never Priosaud gn&»i«" hrtrhftrv im_ ▼ 
the sjifendouruf these apidicrttfi>nfnM ,-*di‘!tilntgag»vttx ^ 
superli homes \ i sit * """TT'" 1 '* 

jai'fiir.viMiR.'irthelvginninrtora HfjfiP ssiMSa^ttMniaLUWDBiaQCM: 
new t*ra in luxury living 


SAVILLS 



n )sr > offer a new development 
of four luxury, houses off 
Queens Gate, Ke n s i ngton. In 
mews style, each provides 
four-bedroomed accommoda- 
tion at from £395,000 to 
£445,000. 

Another new development, 
Whittington, in Highgate, 
North London, boasts six fa- 
mily homes offering from four 
ro six bedrooms, spacious 
reception rooms, double 

garages and workshop/ Studios 

in a rustic setting adjacent to 
the green acres of Kenwood. 
Prices: ■ £335 ,000-£47 5 ,000 . 

freehold, and you can pick op 
the ' beautifully furnished 
showhouse for £395,000 from 
Anscombe & Ringland. 

The g»mg agents handle the 
spectacular Firecrest, just off 
Hampstead Heath, which has 
been arrlajmed as a master- 
piece of landscaping and inno- 
vative Italianate architecture. 
This four-acre, development 
will eventually comprise two- 
level blocks of luxury flats • 
and 18 detached family' 
houses ranging from £300,000 
to £1.4 million. Two of the 
properties feature swimming 
pool/sarma complexes. 

No 67 Eaton Place is a clas- 
sic example of an early 19th 
century Belgravia house, built 
by Thomas Cubftt. Lavishly 
restored, die property in- 
cludes specially made carpets ■ 
and cu mins and original J8th 
century chandeliers while the 
magnificent 43 ft drawing- 




-in the very heart of London. 




WlUAMSt KNtGHTSBRDGf, lONDGKTHB’HONE C01) 235 8050. 
Stanton Hotel*, tn & Bworts vtaw*fc».lha hcapdbliy poooia at IBP 


. . • ' . . r ' 


VAN CLEEF & ARPELS 

- — WORLD FAMOUS JEWELLERS — 

• : - ’ . • u/on. 

153 New Bond Street 

Exclusive Jewellery 

' London W1 

.Gift Items 

Tel: 01-491 '1405 

and 

Tlx: 266265 VLC G 

Watches 


DINING OUT 


Green's 


Champagne, oystan and. cold 
seafood to heart of St. James’s - 
now we have a new. section sen/; 
togtrodffianal hat Etvgteh dUhes.... 

. 36 Duke S; Tet 930 4S66 ' • 


. 4 . 


nSuSmu 




fTFTTi 

cH * d r f i |j>j 1 1 ii ^ g b' t ’ d 


af The Lowndes ThisWe 
Hc^ Lowndes Street, v 
SWl.TeL 01-2356020. 
Interndtond cuisine m frie 
. . heartof Belgravia. 






Defohtful' restaurant lucked away 
to St 'James's. Nouvefleciisine pkiS 
ottw fovouSes. Private. member- 
ship dub downstairs. ■ 
d Ormond Yard SWl. off EXAe ©f 
York St. Closed Saturday lurch end 
SixKtavs. Tet 9302842. .. - 






RENT A BETTER CAR 
FORLESSINTHEUK 






ISWMSW 


r-AR RFfJTAL 


AND CH Alll- FeUR DRIVE 




room -ideal for entertaining - 
boasts a. pair of exquisite - 
-Lodis XVI marble-carved 
fireplaces. ^ With a master suite - 
and five . further bedrooms 
and bathrooms, the 5^00 sq : 
ft house is priced by joint 
agents Chcstotons, Ayfesford 
and De Groot CoUis at £2.25 > 

rntBirm 

. Chestertons exclusively of- 
fer arguably the most splen- ’ 
did pendiouse in London; the 
1 6-1.7 th floors pf the Water 
Gardens, Tsear Marble Arch. 

. This five-bedder apartment 
. feamres a spaceship-like ic- 
cepoon roora and two west- r 
■feeing terraces overlooking a 
spectacular London panora- 
ma. Price: £L5 zhillion. 

In . the historic heart of 
Westminster, Sturgis' have a 
grariaus Queeti Aiine resi- 
dence within two. minutes 
walk of the Houses of Pariia- 
mem apd the Abbey. In Lord 
Noah Street, where your 
nri^ibours are more likely 
than notto be Tory MPs, this 
four-bedroomccr property 
wkh library, wine cellars and 
patk> garden is a good buy at 
£3OO,0Op. : 

. Set back 'from the i^ad, an 
impeccable modernised stuc- 
co fronted : period house at 
Thurloe Street, -South Ken- 
sington, fe offered by Quttons 
at £445,009 iodnding some- 
thing rare in this pan of Lon- 
don ~ a wefl-stocked 45 ft 
garden. 

ALEC SNOBEL 


CillTM 
























... . c^:.*#,**:* • 



'Statistics Index 

■ AMfiX prttM p.TB i 
•aMEX BWs^mP.n t 
.TjYSfi oricw P.14 C 
HYSEMglWhinP.17 i 
f'Cana&aa stocks P32 4 
SxwnncyiBta P.15 C 

I 'C BBBnoanw . p.Tj c 
ioMdmfc P .17 c 


EomlrtBi reports pm 
PITna ram natn P.i« 
Odd rmuKMs p.u 
IfWure* rafts p,y 

MfWammiiiY P.l* 
. PJ7 
0TC **»* - Par 
oitw morkots paa 


Hen»lb^.grtbunt. 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 


>AY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 — ~ 

TECHNOLOGY 


- r ** 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, M-l, Page 16. 

Page 15 




B q 


k". 



• " ’■ *-r 




• ; ^ ?'sh: 


laciueemigjioom 

. ^ - , • By ANDREW POLLACK . .. 

. ~ ■■■“ . • • No* York Tima Sente* ’• ." 

u jT i — For tfwse who have dis c overe d with 

dism^ that the vjul infonnatian they wrote oa the 
: i I blackboard was erased ove rnight by the iamtot the anr 
~ swer is at 1 hand. New hi^-tediiKdogy MadEbtiaidsewi 
make paper copies of what is written on. 

The so-called electronic boards are just one eft how 

technology is transforming even the blackboard. Indeed* 

blackboards, which might more properly be dudkboiuris, 
ere usually not even blade anymore, but gxcca or anothercolor. 
Ana chalkboards themselves are bring replaced by ^“white- 
board,” on which people write ' ■' ' 

with colored markers. ^ " vi 


. : '• •*U' Bh. •* 


Coming next are more so* Speed m. COpJBttg _ 
phisticated combinations of b „j “ 

computer, screens and black- . dUfl pnCC iUiglU : . 
boards to automate one of the 1^ fnrtjWHmititifr 
last bastions of the office: the 06 iaCTOre ?““*“ 1 » 

meeting room. thf. nwiflrrf 

Blackboards wore o riginally . • •- 

black because they were made 

from slate. But slate was expensive and heavy andtended to wear. 
As long as 30 years ago, blackboards of Sted coated with 
: porcelain came into use. Such chalkboards be made in 


tfaemartA 


' ■./■***; 

, ’ 

, ..‘•V.-f w aW, 

" f 

. Afci*y.i t 
"hat 5 

' ‘ - r< men jj 

-• 3 soedfe; 

• ‘ thenri.; 

' •' “'.jesijcij 
•- 

' ’ r --'- taftfeV 
'• •'■'trrihCfc; " 

■ pan sb 
' ■■...■rcdtdf 

UECSXOK 


see ^-eetcndg^ 

r -rrScn. 


yy i> ’ tmn i .iuui aiaitooang cornu oc i 

o) , F different colors,- and green and b rown became riopular. 

I. V t.4v^ 4. 1 ■ m — f*. 


.,-J 


Whiteboards, which began appearing 10 to 15 years ago, are* 
also made of steel and porcelain oat have a smbb&er mzface than 
chalkboards, which need a slight roughness to make the chalk tub 
off. The key to the development of the whiteboard, however, was 
the markerss which were first devdc^cdin J^jan. These markers 
use a fluid that dries quickly into a powder, which, can be wiped 
off with a doth or eraser. . 

Whiteboards have not caught on well in schools because of 
higher prices and the tendency of students to walk off with the 
markers. But in corporate offices and conference rooms, the 
screech of the chalk and the cloud . of ch*flt dust is fading into 
memory. Aside from permitting color presentations, whiteboards 
can double as prelection screens for slides or transparencies. 

T HE whiteboards that make paper copies were alro pioneer- 
ed in Japan, where they have been on sale far about a year. 
They are bring marirwiteH in the United States by, among 
others, Okidata of Mount Laurel, New Jersey; Panasonic of 
Secaucus, -New Jersey, and Eczri of San Francisco.' . 

These boards work in much the same vray •* facsimile ma- 
chines, a technology dominated by the Japanese. The im age on 
the board is scanned and the pattern of white and dark spots is 
recorded electronically. That inf carnation allows a printer to 
reproduce the image on a piece of paper. 

The Eczel Fotoboard, for instance, whidi is made by Fujitsu 
Ltd-, uses as its writing surface a long sheet of flexible white 
plastic, enough for five separate screens. When one screen is n?ed 

up, the vinyl scrolls to provide a dean Screen and the screen just 

written upon passes by the scanner, far copying. The„ Cist copy 
takes about 20 seconds and subsequent copies take 30 seconds. 

“Previously we wrote op boards, made Polaroids and gave 
those to secretaries to. type and make copies,”, said John C. 
Stevens, an For d board user ata Westinghouse n u clea r plant in 

Hanford, Washington. 

Not everyone is as pleased, however. As a publicity move, 
Eczd gave one of Its first units to the San Fr an ci s co 49ers, hoping 
that the team’s coach, B31 Walsh, would use It to diagram plays, 
then print out copies for .the players.. But *fter oa&ia 

t rniwmg r3Hwp J -l1ig'defe^dirigSqierBavddifln^OflS|aTOItbBdc. 

partly because it could not prpouce enou g h copies fast enough. 
“It was dose to meeting our heeds, but not dose enough,” a 
spokesman for the team said. 

Price might also be limiting the market The copying boards 
sell for more than $3,000, conipared with several hundred dollais 
for a middle-tech whiteboard and even less for a low-tech 
chalkboard. “We think they axe very expensive toys,” said Wil- 
liam Sprenger, moffitiatat Gtaxidge Products Inc, a Harrison, 
Aiiansas, manufacturer of chalkboards and whiteboards. 


Meted Exchange 
: Halts Trading 

‘ . Return 

LONDON— Woddtia muling 
was thrown into uncertainty Thurs- 
day when the International Tin 
Council, the governing forum of 
leading exporters and importers of 
the metal, said it could no longer 
afford to support sagging prices. 

The ITCs decision to cease buy- 
ing tin for its reserve buffer stock 
led to t h e hnm ra tiatc s ns p cnrio a of 
trading on the London Metal Ex- 
change, the biggest metals market. 

Dealers snid ihe move cast a 
doud over much of the tin business 
because a number of leading pro- 
ducers and m wA*** base prices oa 
LME rates. A spokesman for the 
exchange said no twne had been set 
for the resumption of trading 
- Pieter deKooing, manager of the 
ITCs buffer stock, has been strug- 
gling unsuccessfully to keep prices 
above an internationally agreed 
floor of £8500 ($12,180) a metric 
ton (1.1. look The ITC buys when 
prkes are weak and sells when they 
are bigh 

Mr. de Koning said Thursday 
that he had to stop supporting the 
market because of limited credit 
facilities to finance tin purchases. 

He said the effects of heavy sell- 
ing. on the LME — much of it by 
speculators hoping to buy back tin 
later al a lower price — had been 
made worse recently by rising sales 
from noo-ITC producers, which 
are not subject to the cotmdTs ju-' 
risdiction. 

as^M^a^^Thadandand^>livia 
have obeyed tight ITC export quo- 
tas since 1982, sales by non-mem- 
bers such as Brazil and China have 
risen sharply in recent months. 

Mr. de Koning said that leading 
tin producers had not yet fulfilled a 
promise made last month to make 
“significant and effective" addi- 
tional contributions to the ITC. 

Meanwhile, the U.S. General 
Services Administration suspended 

until Monday its daily price quotes 

for government surplus tin because 
of the market uncertainty. 


Star Wars Computers: Too Big a Byte: I exaCO Profit Up 

28% in Period; 
Sohio Down 3% 






Experts Question 
If the Software 
Can Be Designed 

By David E. Sanger 

JVrw York Times Struct 

CAMBRIDGE, Massachu- 
setts — Can the American com- 
puter industry design the soft- 
ware for space-based missile 
defenses, a program that is com- 
ing to be known as “Star Wais7” 

This central issue in the re- 
search surrounding President 
Ranald Reagan’s Strategic De- 
fense Initiative has emerged as 
the premi er problem facing the 
nation's top software designers. 
Already it has caused a sdusm 
among compu ter experts, both in 
industry and in the universities. 

Earlier in the week, the contro- 
versy over the proposal's feasi- 
bility came to tarnation's mecea 
of computer research, the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, 
when a two-hour debate pitted a 
pair of scientific advisers to the 
Pentagon against two scientists 
who called the project a waste of 
the software industry’s most pre- 
cious resource, its programming 
talent 

The debate was the first public 
airing of a twhnieal and political 
dispute that has dominated the 
pages of industry journals and 
served as grist for lunchtime ar- 
guments in corporate cafeterias 
from Boston’s Route 128 to. Sili- 
con Valley. 





Compiled by Our Staff From Dupcachts from the refining and sale of petro- 

NEW YORK— Texaco bio, the leum products rose. A year ago, 
third -largest U.S. oil company, said Texaco reported losses from refin- 
Tbursday that its profit rose 2$ ing and marketing in the third 
percent in the third quarter, helped quarter and first nine months, 
by bigger earnings from the sale of Texaco’s overall net profit also 
gasoline and other refined petro- jx>se for the first nine months of the 
leum products. year, climbing almost 8 percent 

But Standard Oil Co. (Ohio), from a year earlier, when earnings 
which is 55-percent owned by Brit- were hrid down by the expenses 
isb Petroleum Co. PLC, said dm associated with Texaco's SI 0.1 -bil- 
its third-quarter earnings slipped 3 lion acquisition of Getty Oil Co. 
percent, reflecting exportations of For the firei nine months, profit 
higher income taxes and lower m- ^ l0 5925 million, or S3.83 a 
vestment tax credits. share, on revenue of $35 billion. 

For most other leading oil com- from profit of S858 million, or 
ponies, rebounds in refining and S339 a share, on revenue of S35.9 
marketing during the July-Septcm- billion a year earlier, 
ber quarter were not roough 10 off- ^ ^ ^ s fll m ±e 
set the impact of fdhngworld qiiarteT feU to S346 million, or 
crude oil prices and the expense s 1.48 ashare, from $359 million, or 
associated with the restructuring of S1 .49 tte, a year earlier. 


the oil industry. 

Those were the factors died by 


.49 a share, a year earner. 
Earnin gs per share did not fall as 


Pt-nn 7 /T il Thursday in reporting much as net income because Sohio 
that its third-quarter earnings bought back some of its common 
dropped 24 percent, to S44.4 mil- stock, reducing the number of 
lion, or 94 cents a share, from $59 shares outstanding, 
million, or 51.08 a share, in the Revem* climbed 19 percent, to 
year -earlier quarter. Revenues were S3 44 moa from 52.88 billion. 


T)w Nh York Tm 

Debating the feasibility of programming Star Wars 
software were David L. Pamas, left; Michael L. Dert ou- 
zos, top center, the moderator; Danny Cohen, center; 
Charles L. Seitz, right, and Joseph Wefzenbaum, below. 

The software in question work." conceded David L. Par- 
would direct a space- and nas, one of the debaters, “But 
-ground-based system designed there will never be a day when we 


million, or 51.08 a share, in the 
year-earlier quarter. Revenues were 
down 6 percent, to $564 million 
from $599 million. 

Exxon Corp^ the world’s largest 
oQ company, said Wednesday that 
its thirdquarter profit fell 22 per- 
cent from a year ago, mostly be- 


For the first nine months, Sohio 
reported net income of S1.07 bil- 
lion, or $4.60 a share, on revenue of 
$10.13 billion, against profit of 
$1.19 billion, or $439 a share, on 


cause of the expense of dosing two revenue of S9D4 billion a year ear- 
plants in West Germany and for- Her. 


eign -exchange losses. 

Mobil Corp. on Monday report- 


Among other oil companies al- 
ready reporting third-quarter re- 


to destroy enemy missiles within will trust it, and thus we will get 


minutes of their launching. 

The Pemgon has yet to settle 
on the basic design. 'so from the 


no benefit from it." 

A professor at the University 
of Victoria in British Columbia, 


ed a SI 16- million loss for the third suits. Occidental Petroleum Corp. 
quarter as a result of a S 508- million had a 1 50-percent rise in profits, in 
charge against earnings for its at- large part because of the Sl-billion 
tempt to turn its Montgomery sale of n half interest in its rich 


outset of the MIT debate it was Mr. Pamas has become a leader 
dear there would be little agree- of the opposition to the Strategic 
ment on the jeanm*, much less the Defense Initiative. He resigned 
aoswers. in July from a Pentagon advisory 

“A simple ves-or-no answer group studying the subject, call- 
will probably not suffice,” ob- ing its efforts futile, 
served Michael L Dertouzos, di- The audience at MIT seemed 
rector of M3Ts Laboratory of partial to his view. The event 
Computer Science, who moder- drew computer experts from vir- 


Ward & Co. re tailin g unit into a 
smaller, profitable operation. 

Meanwhile, Texaco said Thurs- 
day that its profit rase to 5301 


Colombian holdings. 

Ashland Oil Inc^ which complet- 
ed its fiscal year on Sept. 30, earlier 


million, or 91 cents a sh^e. in the 2®SEET..!2A SJUHy 


SdS^tfinTlSrf *sriier when ii took a huge writeoff 
came Ste a 7 -percent dropin £<*. sales of many of its non-oil 
revenue that resulted from falling businesses. 


a ted the debate. 

“It might not be impossible to 
put something up there that will 


tnally every major high-tech 
company ringing Boston: pro- 
(Continoed on Page 20, CoL 1) 


crude oil prices. 

Revenue slipped to SI 13 billion 
from 5122 billion a year earlier. 

Because crude oil prices fell and 
prices of gasoline and other refined 
products leveled off, profit margins 


Other earlier third-quarter earn- 
ings reports included Amoco 
Cotp., down 1 8.3 percent; Shell 03 
Co„ off 183 percent: and Amerada 
Hess Corp., down 103 percent. 

(AP, UP1) 


•a- 


Currency Rales 


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On China’s Output Goal 

Untied Press inicmammal people,” it continued. “This in turn 

BEIJING — China’s goal of will depend largely on success in 
quadrupling production and neariy reforming the system of economic 
tripling per-capita income by the management,” a rt B 

year MOO is feasible but wul re- The report said there was “a 
quire “steering a difficult course,” good chance” that China would 
according to a major World Bank succeed in its goals of quadnmling 
report rdeased Thursday. the gross value of agricultural and 

Thereport, undertaken early last industrial output and boosting an- r 
year, is cautious but optimistic in rural per -capita income from $300 y 

examining critical problems that to $800 by the year 2000 , if two ^ 
China will confront in the next 20 conditions are meL sir J 

years as it strives to catch up with jt said that China must make 
the advanced industrial world. efficient investment in building its s5g 

“During the next two decades, infrastructure ax an average rate of 

there could be substantial further 30 percent of total national income, 
progress,” the report said. “The a rale comparable to past years. ^ 
foundations for rapid and equita- The country must also make “Tea- 
We growth in^ the 21st century improvements in the use fzz?- 

could also be laid. But this will ^ eneT ^ M d raw materials while 


■ ISaBUBSS; 






.1 


sonaWC unwovements m xnc use 

J^ ^^ ^irrrr^rM Amounts n eeded to bar enm pouna id Amount n — am* bur m* could also be laid. _ But this wilt ^ en^gy and raw m ate ria ls while 
oattar (•) untts of ioo (x) uniiwofiMXv) umts ot woBttoa iwrmmMrMAz bp* manat**, require steering a difficult course, ^p^ntawiing the population at the 
f-) To ton one sus-voi in both development strategy and of \2 billion at the 

Other Dollar VailuM — _ ■ - system reform.” end of the century, the bank said, 

cununcr iw iim cwww m It concludes that China must n e report anticipates major 




NG OUT 




cutnocy Per uss Cwtmcv per UM Currtwr per ILM Omw v* uu 

ZZZZJZ ^ SHSe MMwlKw. 7X545 fclfr.ue. *?* 

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BdaLfULfr. • 5170 iidtopnpit T2JOST PMLvm • 1T4P Tiipws 

BfWncfUZ. 138100 In AIWM l,m» *£ *£?** MUMRi UTJ* 

r.-_ ruUnn t l tMt Mdi *. HBP SOItfR fW 1“ . IWliin« 

CMoeyuM. X1TW HWMMUM* ^ 

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cm— «- Am, du tiurmh rr (BrurmMt Btxtco amnwcMt UoRona (MM; Mmw Mo- 

(Tokyoj: IMF tmv: BA,, 

Ottwr data tro/r\ Reuters and AP. 


in both development strategy and ^dai target of \2 billion at the 
system reform.” cod of the century, the bank said. 

a«jo A concludes that China must The report anticipates major 
itua make “ceaseless, intense efforts to structural changes in the Chinese 
raw reform economic management — economy — ■ some of which have 
7 t Aft by freeing mark ex forces to stimu- already started to emerge through 
min late efficuacy, expanding the use official statistics — in tSe next 20 




of indirect levers to regulate the 


through 
next 20 


-a on 

teaching nten^cmcn. ^ 

Better access to advanced for- • A change in the composition of 



Interest Bales 


eign technology will make rapid manufactured exports, with pro- 
growth easier, the report said, but jected slow growth in textile ex- 
ihat will not be sufficient, “norwffl ports and an expansion of metal 
the availability of energy, land and and machinery exports. 


other natural resources. 


• Rapid urbanization, as farm- 


iZZL «>UV. 4ML 4^ 11M-T1J 

auuM Mk fit flWH HIM™ 

*Z2 SSI ^ *2* '££1* . 

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Sources: Maryan GuurorUr omjf, 

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Gold 




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trtwwft Bat* td Tokyo. 


ss =s 

to mam J2SJ5 3342D -+O30 

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U/^unnourm. Paris and Louse* affkiol tix- 
MtTww JCM onttaurtco aarnnti w and 

CtooW, ptleaK .Heir Ym*-ameae currmnt 
^netAa»>rlassMUa,9»m-mmm. 


“China's economic prospects ers move increa sing ly to small 
will depend, rather, on success in towns, accompanied by increased 
mobilizing and effectively using all specialization and trade among lo- 
available resources — especially call ties. 

W.GennanCur^ mt Surplus 

Put at $1.63 Billion for September 

Reuters 

WIESBADEN, West Germany — West Germany's current ac- 
count shewed a provisional surplus of 43 billion Deutsche marks 
($1.63 billion) in September after a deficit of 800 million DM in 
August, the federal statistics office said Thursday. 

The surplus in merchandise trade, a component of the current 
account, widened to 7.4 billion DM from 33 Wlion DM in August. 
Septem be r imports totaled 36.47 billion DM, 33 percent higher than 
a year earlier and 14 percent high than in August. Exports were 43.90 
bulion DM, 82 percent higher than in September 1984 and 13 percent 
higher than m August 

If confirmed, the current-account and trade surpluses would be the 
highest ever recorded for September, a spokesmen for the office said. 
In September last year the current account showed a 100 -ndffion-DM 
. deficit, and the trade surplus was 53 billion DM. 

. The cfiicc said the large surplus in iIk current account, the broadest 

measure of a country's trade performance, was partly because of 
special factors. Payments by the European Community in connection 
wi th agriculture etna tractitional deficit on transfers to 13 billion DM 
from 2.61 bfflion DM a year eaflier, a spokesman said. 

The September figures took the cumulative surplus in the ctmxni 
account to21.1 billion DM thisyear, compared with22 billion DM in the 
first nitre months of 1984. The^ cumulative trade surplus rase to 49.6 
billion DM from 311 billion. Imports rose 8.7 percent to 349.0 billion 
DM and exports by 13 percent to 398.6 billion DM. 

. The statistics office also reported Thursday that import prices rose 
05 perce n t in September from August, but were 1.4 percent lower 
♦Ti.-m in September last year. 


For private banking in Switzerland, 
an exceptional bank. 


T hrough our offices in Switzer- 
land we offer a full range of 
sophisticated banking services, 
from foreign exchange and pre- 
cious metals - to private banking. 

And now that we are part of 
American Express Bank Ltd., our 
private banking has taken on a 
whole new dimension. Through 
this global link, we provide access 
to-the unique investment oppor- 
tunities and asser management ser- 
vices offered by the American 
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Moreover, for certain clients, we 
also provide such valuable “extras” 


as Gold Card® privileges 3nd the 
exclusive Premier Services, 5 * for 
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assistance. 

While we move with the 
times, our traditional policies do 
not change. At the heart of our 
business is the maintenance of a 
strong and diversified deposit 
base. Our portfolio ol assets is also 
well-diversified, and it is a point of 
principle with us to keep a conser- 
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and a high degree of liquidity - 
sensible strategies in these uncer- 
tain times. 


IfTDB sounds like the sort ot 
bank that meets your require- 
ments, visit us on your next trip 
to Switzerland. Or telephone: in 
Geneva, 022/3721 11; in Chiasso, 
091/44 1991. 

TDB offices in Geneva, London, Paris. 
Luxembourg, Chiasso. Monte Carlo, 
Nassau, Zurich. Buenos Aires. Sao 
Paulo. 

TDB, the 6 tb largest commtraal bank 
in Su itierlani is a number oj tlx 
American Express Company, which 
has assets of US$ ( 59-3 billion and 
shareholders' equity of V 5 $ 4 -il billion. 



Trade Development Bank 


iji The Trade Development Bank building in Geneva, 

i at 9<r9S, rue du Rb6ne. . _ 

An American Express company 






TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 


Indus 134738 137435 13S&29 136133- 443 

Tram U470 66468 65262 65546 — 5.15 

UtU 15743 15943 157.16 15396 + 1JJ3 

Camp 55442 558.15 549 49 55275- ifi 


NYSE Index 


Composite 

industrials 

Irons**. 

UHlItiSS 


Ulan Law aose cotm 
10973 10848 10848 —079 

12543 12503 12503 —042 
10508 104.13 104.13— a93 
3557 55S1 5051 +045 
11527 114.95 114.95—511 


NYSE Diaries 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Advanced 
Declined 
undimea 
Total issues 
New Hiatts 
New Laws 
Volume im " 
Volume down 


730 S7B 

B06 632 

430 5D6 

1986 SOU 

56 51 

2 « 22 


Odd-Lot T radios in N.Y. 


Bur Sales •5H*rt 

Oct. 23 162734 441.929 25*73 

Oct. 22 154662 433,194 llAM 

Oct. 21 14M03 418.107 14677 

Oct. 18 171,670 435/460 26, 655 

Del. 17 172J025 444649 4240 

'included in me soles nouns 



EX Diaries 


Advanced 

□Kilned 

Unstamped 
Total Issues 
New Hhdw 

New LOWS 
Volume uu 
Volume dawn 


Ckna Prw. 

364 pa 

267 244 

246 264 

777 786 

W 16 

10 16 



Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 
Via The Associated Press 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


H%ti low Chm am 
industrials Z11JJ7 209.76 20946 — 043 

Trunsp. 17149 16**9 16945—161 

UlWtlas 83.17 KL81 33.13 +032 

Finance 2234 22.11 22.0—006 

Composite 1*9.45 1*041 1B8JD — 059 




AAAEX Stock Index 


4 PJA. volume 
Prey. 4 P AL votunwi 
Prey. cans, volume 



2396 IdM 
2m 23 
61% 34V 
27 10H 

38% 1916 
6* 60 3896 

-rl 25IU 1996 
24V 12 
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United Frets /mentcuaemtti 

NEW YORK — The New York Stock Ex- 
change closed lower in active trading Thursday 
after a mild midafternoon upsurge in the blue 
chips faltered and brought the broader market 
down with it. 

The deteriorating performance of two bell- 
wether issues, IBM and General Motors, helped 
drag the market lower, analysts said. The paths 
of the two blue chips diverged Wednesday when 
IBM climbed and General Motors weakened. 

In late trading Thursday, IBM joined Gener- 
al Motors on its downward path, dropping IVb 
to 128%. General Motors fell % to 65$, match- 
ing its 52-week low set Aug. 15. 

The Dow Jones industrial average lost 4.82 to 
136134 

Broader market indicators also gave np 
ground. The NYSE index fell 0.29 to 108.88, 
while Standard & Poor’s- 5 00 stock index de- 
creased 0.59 to 188.50. The price of an average 
share lost nine cents. 

Among the 2.008 issues traded, declines out- 
paced advances 805 to 726. Big Board volume 
totaled 123.1 million shares, compared with 
121.7 million Wednesday. 

“The market is on a 'tr eadmill, " said Hugh 
Johnson, head of the investment policy commit- 
tee at First Albany. “Investors are waiting to get 
a much dearer view cm what the economy will 
be like in the fourth quarter.' 1 

Mr. Johnson said the market is concerned 
that the Federal Reserve is trying to slow the 
growth of money and might overdo the re- 
straints. 

Some investors worry that a weaker economic 
performance in October combined with slower 
money growth could curb the economy’s growth 
through the first quarter of 1986, analysts said. 


M-l Drops $6.8 Billion 

United Press fntemaiiandi 

NEW YORK — The broadest measure of the 
U.S. money supply, M-I, fell S6.8 billion, to 
$605.1 billion In the week ended Oct. >4, the 
Federal Reserve Board reported Thursday. 
Most analysts had expected a decline of about 
$3 .5 billion. 

Economists said the latest drop puis M-l very 
dose to the Fed’s target growth range; easing 
pressure on the central bank lo tighten policy. 

M-l comprises money available for immedi- 
ate spending, including cash, checking accounts 
and nonbank traveler’s checks. 

Bui Mr. Johnson's view is that October’s 
weakness win prove temporary. He said reacce- 
lerated money growth will accommodate a 
strong Christmas season and that the economic 
picture win remain positive through the first 
half of the new year. 

Texas Oil & Gas was the most active NYSE- 
listed issue, up IV* to 19% on a rumor that U.S. 
Steel might buy it. U.S. Steel dropped IM to 29. 

Northern Indiana Public Service followed, 
easing to 10 Vi. Rockefeller Center Properties 
was third, edging np ft to 18ft. 

Among actively traded blue chips. Westing- 
house eased Vi to 41, AT&T was off ft to 20 « 
and Union Carbide jumped 1% to 60. 

Technology issues, which gave the market a 
boost in the two prior sessions, declined. Digital 
Equipment eased ft to I1P4, Burroughs 
dropped 1 to 55)4 and Cray Research fell 1 94 to 
5315. Some semiconductor issues firmed, bow- 


uUantti 
him, Lew Stock 


Dhi. YkL PE 110? tOsti Lew QooLCMw 


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inn 142. 65 
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REGULAR QUARTEHLY 


57.5C 

per common share 
PayaHc Dece mb er 15. 1985 
Record: November 22, 1985 

Dedared: October 23, 1985 

Continuous tfividend payments 

since 1939 . 

Cyril J. Smith 

Vice President & Secretary 
P.O. Bax 1642 
Houston, Tfatas 77251-1642 


flWMAOtf BfiGTBiN 





3596 23 
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251* + V* 
9% + % 
4 % + % 
21 + % 
13% 

2% 

49VS— % 
flVi— % 
Iff!* 


140 


' 

146 

140 

7.1 

11 

T249 

48 

7.1 

11 

546 

46 

66 


24 



14 

S9M 

167O104 


1H 




57 

56 

26 

13 

406 

66 

36 

» 

80 

60 

24 

23 

241 

740 

13 

16 

27 

56 

14 

20 

293 



23 


1360 

117 


9 

2.13 

74 


6 

60 

31 

13 

48 

48 

34 

13 

1903 



9 

308 

148 

4J 

11 

603 

15* 

37 

Id 

214 

\% 

106 

79 


91 

Me 




$ 

14 

24 

13 

77 

I? 

311 



72 

804 

-18a 

9 


69 

48 

24 


■» 


14 

25 

12 

'£ 

60 

1J 

16 

179 









.36 

1.9 

27 

56 

160 

44 

13 

1131 

041 


36 

362 

140 

66 


ID 




112 

iij 

u 

mi 

mi 

Jab . ■* ® 6» ism 

44 


SI 


KSJi *S .*3 ! w ^ 46 


a 
;k 

147 

ml 


chu 


c*6 























































































r u 

U . 

| 1 A 


\ i 

i 

4 



Thursday 


«*•*"* “•SSSISSL™. 


n«onm u, _ 

***• ' — g**ra-»g 



US. Futures 


StOUft SHW1 
High Law 


Oft 24 

Ootn WM Low Close Che! 


Grains 


WHEAT (Ml 

&ore Du minimum, doner* 

U3i* vm Die 116 1» 115ft 3.17% +01 

X7<ft j«7 Mar X2I% 134% 12114 123% +.01 % 

4*2 2M May 110 113 XD9 113 +J0Itt 

173W 7JB Jut &M MB’- 286% 2M +01% 

1*S 1*7 io M W HI W +01ft 

109 1MW. Dae lOIHj +.Q0O 

Est. Solas Prev.5of*S 4J2B 


Mnrrm 

fZZM 


Open 

HIM 

Lew 

Close 

Cng. 

4905 

8900 


4U0 

4*7 

4540 

4XU 


4905 

«US 


44.10 

44 J7 

44.10 

44.12 


51.90 

4X25 


42.95 

4i» 

*X»2 

*X9S 


41.10 

3807 

Ocf 



39 JS 

39 77 

— X 

49*0 

3837 


41X5 

41X5 

4135 

4140 

-as 

40*0 

4050 

Feb 

4045 

4U5 

4049 

40*5 

+j» 

EeL Sates 

4044 Prav. Sates 5048 




Prav. Dav Oagn Inf. 21*26 





PORK BELLIES (CMS) 






38000 Ibc- cents par Ih. 






76JD 

SSJS 

Feb 

64ja 

6400 

64.10 

MJ5 

+.25 

7540 

55*5 

Mar 

6445 

MM 

S4J0 

64*2 

TJS 

75*0 

5705 

Mot 

6500 

6500 

6535 

6500 

+40 

7600 

5700 

Jul 

6M0 

6545 

6520 


+38 

7X15 



6X00 

ittflA 

6X90 

6X32 

+.17 

Esi. Sola 

2*17 Prav. Sates 4006 




Prav. Dav Open lift 7*12 






Prev.Dov Opart lift 3£*06 ue»» 
CORN (CRT) 

iOMtwmlnimum^otMn Pvbusnei 
2.95 114ft Dae 131 122ft 

vn 124ft MAT 133% 2JS 

19111 131 MOV 140 241 

1*6 in JW 241% 24JU 

m 124% See 129Va 130 

235ft 120% Pae XJStt 125b 

274ft 2JS Mor 135 235 

Est SaKs Prev. Soles 77.911 

Prow. Day Open lrtt.129,98* UP 1*83 

SOYBEANS (CRT) 

1000 bu minimum- donors dot busau 
4*1 497V* Nov SJEft 3 £5 

ej» 5.11 Jan 5. IB llift 

742 122ft Mar UOft SJIft 

7J9 SJltt MOV 140% 541% 

6JB 136% JUl SAStt 549% 

4J4 SJSft AW S47 £4*-- 

&3S 532 Set. S3 534 

633 537 NOW 531 532 

SJ3 ue ft jfln £41 5 >C 

Est. 5a let Prav.Sates 23424 

Prow. DovOoac lot. 74432 L-p68 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CRT) 

100 tone- dollars par ton 
7S4JU 12540 DK 14270 U30O 


130% 221% —31 
233Va 233ft — ill 

229 239ft —31 

240% 241ft —31 

23S 220ft -31 

ZCTft 123ft —32 

233ft 231ft —31ft 


537 ■< — Jttft 

£16 -m 

SJTft — 31ft 
54014 — 01tt 
548 —31 

S46ft —31ft 
531 —JO 
539% _jn% 
£3K» 


14170 14130 
U]JD 14250 
14540 M W 
14750 14730 
14930 14950 
14X90 14U0 
14730 1020 

Mi O' Ml. Ul 

147 JU 147 jOO 
14530 


1951 +*3 

1944 — jn 

19.98 — JK 

2032 — JIB 

2045 —.10 

2070 —30 

2040 —.87 

2035 —47 

m n m 


16X00 17740 Jon 14470 14450 1435D 14150 —140 

30650 1X40 MOT 14630 14650 14540 1*540 — 1-M 

1*250 13250 May 1403 14830 14750 14750 -40 

U7J» auB Jul 15040 15050 14940 1*950 -140 

15050 USX AlH 14940 149.20 14850 U830 —IX 

147.00 11758 Sap UX5D 1*850 1*750 1*870 —130 

15040 14240 Dae 14840 14840 14650 14650 —240 

15040 1*840 Jon 14750 14750 14740 14740 —IX 

OcJ 14540 —220 

Est. Sates Prau. Solas 7305 

Prev. Day Open Int. *2.108 oH2» 

SOYBEAN OIL (CRT) 

40000 Iba- doUors Par I W Cbs. 

2955 1948 Dae 1 9 AS WAV ’.938 1951 +JO 

79X0 1928 Jen KAO 1946 1957 1944 —41 

2860 1948 Mar 1*58 2(1.70 1950 19.98 — JK 

27.45 MJ17 MOV 2038 2355 2030 2032 —48 

2525 20*5 JuT 2873 2005 2065 2045 —.10 

25.15 2050 Aug 2040 20*0 TOM TOJO —SO 

2445 2050 Sap 2065 2875 2055 2064 —47 

2135 2840 Doc 2050 2460 3035 2035 —47 

Oct 2045 2045 2035 2035 —43 

Est.5olas Prav. Soles 13.770 

Prav. Day Open Int. 47456 up 1444 

PATS (CRT! 

5400 bu minununt- doners car DulMI 
142 Vj 1.15 Dec 1.17% 1.19ft 1.17% LU% +40% 

147% 134ft MOT 136% 13BW 136U L27!t -t-40% 

143 137ft MOV 133 133 133 133 +JBft 

137 136 Jol 132% +40% 

139 139 Sep 139% +40% 

Est. Salat Prev. Solas 7a 

Pray. PavOnan lot. 4.123 uo 180 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

*0400 ths.- cants par id. 

6745 5540 Doc 6540 6545 6527 *542 

67AS 5*35 Pap 4X40 6250 62.17 6230 

6757 5530 Apr 6145 6145 6155 6147 

6635 5635 Jun 6L72 CL9S 6145 6147 

6540 55X Aue 9*45 6025 59.75 59.95 

6040 5810 Oct 5145 5U5 5870 5870 

6530 6040 Dtc <0-10 

EeL Sales 12571 Prrv.Saics 1733* 

Prav. Day Opan lot. 59336 
PEEPER CATTLE (CME) 

44400 Jbs.. can Is per la. 

7170 5810 Now 6535 6572 6490 6&13 

7940 6050 Jal 6840 69.10 6830 6845 

7170 6862 Mar 6855 6940 6835 6897 

71 JW 6860 APT 6740 6875 4740 6830 

7800 6810 MOV 6660 673S 6660 6740 

6850 6535 Aw 6732 6732 <732 6730 

EH Salas 1308 Prew. Salas 1340 
Prav. Day Open Ini. 9433 
HOPS (CME) 

X400 ms.- cents per Ul 

5085 3635 Dec 4700 47.10 4630 4645 

5847 3810 Fab 4545 46.10 4540 4547 

4735 36.12 Aar *130 4145 41X 4135 


Currency Options 


Oa.24 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option* Strike 

Undurtytna Price Calls— Last Puts— Last 

Nay Fab May Ne* Fab mot 
12400 British Poands-cants par unit. 

BPouna 145 875 s s r s 

142.12 150 815 s s r I 

142.12 155 045 s s r s 

<2400 West German Marks-ctais per naU. 

DMark 37 896 s s r s 

37-70 X 836 S S r S 

-17.70 X 812 l s r & 

6 W MW Japanese Yen-loams of a cent par ualL 
JYen 45 r s s 80S s 

46.19 46 853 S I r S 

46.19 47 819 S S r S 

42468 Swiss FraBCS-CentS Mr mtt. 

■SFrtmc 45 r * s OX S 

4640 47 033 S S r I 

Dac Mar Jun d*c Mar Jun 
U4H Bittlsb Paunas-canrs par unit. 

BPouna ix 1240 r r r r 

142.12 135 7JQ r 1005 0JB r 

1+2.12 140 345 545 6JU IX 440 

142.12 145 IX r UO U0 r 

142.12 150 OX 115 r r r 

50400 Canadian Dotlars-cents per unit. 

CDollr 74 031 r r IX r 

<24M West German Marks-cents per imll. 

DMark X 741 t t r r 

3730 32 r r 627 r r 

3730 x r r r r OX 

3730 34 192 r r 802 r 

37.H8 35 295 339 r OX t 040 

3J3B 36 285 r r 0.12 846 

3738 37 123 240 r ox r 

3770 38 048 L50 r 0*0 r 1J2 

3730 39 8J2 OX r 1M 7 37 

6 758 08 8 Japanese Yea-lOOtbsar a coat per unit. 

JYtn 40 r r US r r 

4619 43 XU r r r r 

4619 44 r r r 0.1 D 037 

4619 45 IX 240 r 032 r 884 

4619 46 880 143 r 859 r 

*619 X OX 042 r r r 

fUBO Swiss Francs-cnats par onM. 

SFranc 36 r r s r OX 

aam 37 r r r r ojm 

4640 38 r r r r 046 

J&EU 39 7.19 r r r OX 

+«J» 40 61B r 746 r r 

*6J» 41 £17 r r r r 

*600 <2 423 r r r r 

4600 43 330 r r r r 

*600 4* r r r 030 r 

*600 45 L63 ZS1 r 044 131 

46-09 46 IX r r 032 r 

4600 48 r 1.12 r r r 

Jon Apr Jol Jon Apr Jul 
62503M Japanese Yeo-tOOtns at a coat par unit. 

JYen X ox s s r s s 

Total CXI voL 82*2 Cafl open InL 182399 

Total put VOL 2390 Put Open lot. 137348 

r— Not traded, s— No oat ion ottered. 

Last is orem him laurchasaariccl. 

Sourer: ap. 



COPPER I COM EX) 

25400 ID6- cants oar id. 

6130 5845 Oct 

6860 6040 Nov 

8435 5850 Dac 6240 63X 

S438 5835 Jon 

9800 5930 - Mar 63X 6140 

74J® 6800 May 6345 <880 

7440 4835 Jut 6330 6600 

7890 6890 Saa 64.10 6430 

7030 6140 Dec 6435 6690 

7030 6X30 Jon 

67.90 6255 Mar A5L40 6540 

6730 62.90 May 

6620 6125 Jul 

Est. SMas P raw. Solas 

Prav. Day Open Int. 78175 up IX* 
ALUMINUM CCOMEXJ 
48000 ID6- cants POT ID. 

Od 

7860 4235 Dec 4X35 4X65 

7650 4430 Jan 

7X60 43.95 Mar 4640 4445 

4635 4530 May 

6X45 4530 Jul 

5X10 4690 Se» 

49.10 4895 Dac 

Jan 

53X SIX Saw *940 *940 

5830 5000 Jul 5815 5815 

Est.5aies 120 Prev.Soles 
Prev. Day Open l id. 1.941 upl 
SILVER (COMEX) 

5300 tray ol- cants per trovaz. 

6460 5983 Od <165 6193 

Nqv 

12303 5903 Dec 6203 6273 

12153 5953 Jan 6303 6380 

119X0 6073 MOT 63X5 6480 

10486 6193 May 64X0 MU* 

9*53 6293 Jul 65X5 6573 

9403 6213 SOP 6674 6674 

7993 65X0 Dec 6910 *910 

7B93 6780 Jan 

7780 £703 Mar 6910 6913 

7523 6014 Allay 

■ 7463 6993 Jul 

Est. Sales 8500 Prev. Sales 
Prev. Day Open Int. 81*87 off 365 
PLATINUM CHYME) 

50 trovoz^ donors oer trovaz. 

39330 25800 Od 33340 33440 

Dec 33800 33330 

37X40 25740 Jan 33730 33800 

25730 26*40 APT 33730 1*830 

36330 27100 Jul 34800 34X50 

36800 30150 Od 34530 3*530 


30*61530462] —29 

304631 30*638 —27 

304663J»4660 —33 

JB469G 30*685 —12 

30*720304728 —30 


37X40 25740 Jon 33730 33800 

15730 26*40 Apr 33730 1*830 

36330 27100 Jul 34800 34X50 

36800 30150 Od 3*530 34530 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales £178 

Prev. Day Open InL 1X927 up3S2 
PALLADIUM CNYME) 

100 trovoe- dollars peraz 
14140 9130 Dac 10X75 1D4JU 

12740 9 LTD Mar 10420 10530 

11430 9140 Juit 10530 10540 

11530 97 JO Sep 

10730 10430 DOC 10730 10730 

Est. Salas Prav. Solas _8*5 

Prav. Dov Open Int £095 up 67 
GOLD (COMEX) 

MO troy dollars per troy ax. 

*9X00 29730 Od 32620 32630 

324J0 328G9 NOV 

48940 30140 DOC 32850 329-20 

48540 30630 Fab 33230 33120 

49630 31-00 Apr 13720 33740 

32040 Jun 341X 34130 
42840 331X Aug 

29520 33£D0 Od 35040 35040 

39X00 34X00 D*C 

308*0 35530 APT 

39440 369JM Juil 

38530 37810 AIM 

Est- Sales 12300 Prey. Sales 
Pnev. Day Open lnf.!2*J45 off 652 


|_ Fi nancial 

US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI million- Ptsof 100 pcL 
9337 8577 Dec 9239 9239 

9X71 8440 Mar 92A3 9263 

9X36 8731 Jun 9224 92X 

9X01 88JW Sen 9139 9139 

9178 B* 35 Dec 9161 WAl 

91 A0 8948 .MCT 9170 9170 

91.16 9B40 Jun 9 LOS 9135 

90.9* 9888 Sep 9M3 OMSe. 

Est. Sales Prev. So KM BJM* 

Prev. Day Open Ini. *0816 up 385 
10 YR. TREASURY (CRT) 
SI08000prln-ptS&32nctsaf UOpd 
87-13 75-13 Dec 86-71 86-31 

86-* 75-14 Mar 85-73 8S-J3 

85-7 74-30 Jun 86-22 34-28 

mm mt-i Sep 

83-11 80-2 Dec 

Est. Sales Prav. Sales 1014 

Prav. Day Open int. 68A85 up 1377 


SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

S per (rone- 1 point eauais 500001 
*728 4531 Dec A63Q .46^ *619 *623 

*771 4835 Altar *670 *673 *658 *663 

*800 *190 Jun *710 *710 *710 *708 

Efit. Salas 10429 Prav. Solas 15709 
Prav. Dot Open Int. 30602 oft 37 

I Industrials 

LUMBER (CME) 

130300 bd. ft- £ per 1 300 Dd. tt. 

186.10 12640 Nov 14140 14X10 14060 141.10 

18730 13360 Jon 14530 146.90 1*470 1*530 

19530 13970 Mar 15890 15240 15070 15170 

176*0 14540 AtaV 15430 15530 15430 15540 

18X00 1*9-50 Jul 15930 1S960 15770 159.10 

17630 15X90 SeP 16X20 16X20 16140 16240 

18140 15&S3 Nov 16240 16X00 16238 16250 

Esi. Sales 1469 Prav. Salas 111* 

Prev. Day Open Int. 7211 
COTTON 2(NYCE) 

50300 lbs.- cents ner la 

7330 5741 Dec 6039 <0*7 6800 <047 

7675 5877 Mar 6047 6035 6047 6047 

7030 5X90 May 6045 614* 6885 6138 

7805 5840 Jul 5895 5895 5820 5852 

<540 5X30 Od 5X45 5345 52*0 S2J0 

5945 5230 Dec 5230 5231 51.15 51.40 

<675 5110 Mar 5X30 5330 5330 5X00 

Est. Saits Prev. Sales 2105 

Prev. Day Open Int. 22459 up40* 

KEATING OIL CNYME) 

4X000 aaL cents per eal 

8530 mm Nov 8540 8630 8670 8540 

B£15 <9.15 Dec 8545 8640 8*30 85*5 

8697 6930 Jon 85*0 8620 8*30 8545 

8370 7030 Fob 8*45 8660 8350 8X90 

7945 A8JM Mar 7945 79.90 7935 79*0 

7630 6830 Apr 7570 76*0 7540 7570 

7373 6830 May 7340 7350 7330 7340 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 

Prow. Dav Onon Int. 3X976 

CRUDE OILCNYME) 

1300 DbL- dollars per DbJ. 

2740 2X90 Dec 29*3 2947 2943 2975 

2940 2638 Jan 28*6 2876 28A2 2870 

29*6 2445 Fob 2777 2838 Z775 2831 

29*5 2613 Mar 27.18 Z740 27.11 27*5 

29*5 2X93 APT 2675 2735 2675 26.90 

27.96 2X65 May 26*0 2645 2o*0 26*4 

2670 2378 JW1 2630 2645 2630 2636 

9*9 n 26*5 JUl 2570 2531 25J0 2531 

2635 2690 Aug 2545 2545 2555 2549 

2730 3600 SOP 2540 2545 2540 2545 

Od 25-15 2540 2115 2540 
Est. Sales Prev.Soles 19*90 

Prav. Day Open Int. 66411 off 2455 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 

Paints and cents 

20035 17570 Dec 18830 18945 

20375 18X30 Mar 190*5 191.10 

20640 11X90 Jun 19230 19235 

19330 18730 SOP 19345 19345 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 6X763 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 61419 off 273 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 

| points and cents 

21735 18840 Dec 19*40 195.15 

209*0 19040 Mar 19640 19*70 

19770 19730 Jun 

Sep 20035 20035 
Est. Sales Prev.Soles 

Prav. Day Open Int. 7.974 
NYSE COMP. INDEX CNYFE) 
palms and cants 

11740 10140 Dec 109.10 109*0 

11875 10540 Mar 11035 11040 

12030 10690 Jun 11140 11140 

11240 10810 Sen 11X15 11X15 

Esi. Sales 84*3 Prev. Sales 9*36 
Prav. Dav Open Int. 6**9 up 118 


187.95 18810 
18945 18970 
19130 19135 
19X70 19270 


15035 19615 

1 9535 195.95 

197.95 
20035 20035 


10860 10865 
10940 109*0 
110*0 11045 
11130 11140 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody’s 905.60 f 

Reuters 1.71140 

DJ. Fulures 12043 

Com. Research Bureau- 22120 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
a - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters ; base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1974. 


Previous 

903J»f 

1.70340 

119.07 

22X90 


GmnScKties 




London 

Commodities 




ConmSwiities 



63 33- OtiokO* 1*0 24 15 1196 57% 55ft 56% + ft 

24ft 17, QuakSO 30 34 SB 756 2*ft 3*ft 74% —ft 

10ft 5ft Quoaax 17- 153 5% 5ft 5ft , „ 

34% 27 Quastor 160 ■ 5* 11 112 29% 28% »b + ft 

261b 14ft Ok Rail 44a LI 14 393 21% 21% 2T% 


9% 6ft RBInd 341 6 

*9ft 34 RCA 134 U 

• " W* RCA« 2^ || 

. 113 80 RCApf 430 33 

28ft 32% RCApf 3M 9* 

9% 6 Vi RLC 40 33 

19% im RTE- 46 33 

'-X J&BBRr 130 24 
9ft 5ft Ramad ■ . 
21ft lift RdltCO « AS 

6% 2ft RangrO ,, _ 

78ft 51% Ravan ** J 

. 17ft 9ft Raymk 

53ft 36% Raytttn L40 34 

. 10% 5% RMOBt *0 73 

. 21% 14% RdBat0fXS_]M 
. 24ft 16% RdBat of XT9el86 
16% lift RHRet IJBe 94 

. 17% 8% RccnEb _ „ 

a % 7 Radmn JO 37 

17ft 8ft Reece 

43ft 27% RelchC 30 26 

. 10ft 4ft ReoAIr 

34ft 24% ftitt '*J M 

30 23ft RaoBk pfXfl 1 3 

2 5ft 15Vi RshCot ,32 U 

' 29ft 22ft Rev® -» “ 

17ft 10ft Revere 

.57 Xjft RgykM, L84 12 

- 98ft n ftvhiPfB 

■ 7*% 17% Raxnm JO 3.1 

, 15ft lift Rewtrd ,*J J-J 

32ft 25ft RuvnlnilAB £6 
' .DOft 123ft goyinpfl«6 1U 
. 4U6 30 RryMtl W +■ 
26% 34ft ReyMpf IM « 
69 26% Rcnvdc 1*B 24 

3 aft 21ft RltaAjd SO XI- 

7% 2ft Rwotn 

36% 28ft Rnbahw 1» 3^ 

: 41% 25ft RoWsn UO *2 

24% Sft vfHoWnS 

24% -ITYb ftodjG a» 1JJ 

49ft 31 ROfSli 144 

■ 70 40 Rohr IP _ 

27% Mtt RotnCm .30 •« 

' lBtt 5ft Roj^ES „ 

121% Oft Ro lhns -46 18 . 

- 316 2 Remon .. 

19 ii gupw ,-41 H 

47 34 Rarer 1-12 7-4 

lift 7ft Rowan -12 .16 
64% 47% ROVlD 


33 6ft ne sw 

24 3023 46 *5Vk 65ft— ft 
. ,80z37ft 37ft 37ft + ft 
1 193 1B3 1W —I 
.' 24 38% 38% 38% 

12 138 6% 6% 6% + % 
„ 6 3% 3ft .3% + ft 
9 36 18ft W% 1»J- % 

^ '2SS 3S« 

* 

. 868S -lit 3ft 4ft + % 

24 284 <7 66 67 + ft 

- . M 9W 9% 9% • 

11 1017 40% 48% *8%— ft 
270 Mb 5ft 5ft— % 
44 1™ U% Wft- ft 
. 3) 16ft 16ft '16ft— ft 
11 7 14% 14 U - tt 

IS 191 9% 9ft 9% + ft 

.13 "Bft .Bft ,8ft— ft 

36 8 . 71ft 11% Hi? , 

126 --% 16 + 

14 8 31% M Xlft— ft 

5 T27B 9ft 9ft ?%- % 

187 2tt 1% 1%— tt 

9 165 7% ,7Vi 7% + ft 

B MS 48 47ft "47% 

220 56% 55% 56ft + % 

6 US 30% 30ft 30% — ft 
26 36% 2Sft 26ft -T- W 

121 2S 2<ft 24%—% 
31 1926 28% 28tt S8% — tt 
3 246 14% 18 16, - % 

1813516 Sttt 56% 56% — ft 
345 99ft Sft 99% + ■%• 

15 11 22% 22% + ft 

Jfl- 14* 14ft Mtt 14tt— tt 

6 6 MjttMk ,26ft -ft. 

1163 1»ttl® 129ft .. 

8 393 32ft 32 32 - % 

278 25tt 25 25 

11 « a 66tt «%+% 

§ lSS SftSSS%4 ft 

22 4M T2tt mrijtt— % 
17 18* 12ft U . 12 

» 

7 lm Oft *3tt 63% + % 


- By Donald Nordbcrg 

'Reuters : 

. LAUSANNE — The head of Switzerland's 
central bank said Thursday that il was consider- 
ing letting foreign hnnlrc arrange major financ- 
ing packages in Swiss francs as part of a worW- 
wide trend towards liberalizing financial 
markets.- . . 

Its presidqit, Pierre Languedn, said that the 
Swiss National Bank was weighing whether to 
allow bnnlps not domiciled in Switzerland to 
isstie Swiss: franc-denominated bonds. The 
move would end a monopoly that banks in 
Switzerland eqoy.in issuing such bonds, one of 
the moist active mftrfc pits in the world. 

It could also challenge ibe Swiss government 
to scrap one -of its key sources of revenue, a 
damp duty .worth an estimated 1-5 billion Swiss 
francs {$692 minion) a year. 

hfr. Langaeun gave no time frame for the 
posnblc'mQve, but analysts said that it would 
add to pressure on the government to e l i mina te 
ibe OJ-percent stamp duty, which has inhibited 
many potential borrowers from using the Swiss 
franc for -their needs.' 

Officials of the central bank said they wanted 
to avoid such a confrontation on the tax, but 
they werfe worried that they could not indefi- 
nitely- prevent bonds being issued in Swiss 
francs outside Switzerland. 

The restriction was originally imposed to give 
the central hank greater control over the use of 
the Swiss franc m international transactions 
and in ways which might affect the Swiss money 
supply and inflation. . 

. ..Bill Marinis: Lusser, vice-president of the 
bank said; “We no longer need this limitation 
for four mooaaiy prrfky". 


SSVj 35U Xunw X00 63 13 M93 4* 48% «8%— % 

55ft 48ft XKN Ili 5*5 ion 2 54% 54% 54% 

29 79% XTRA *4X9 7) 92W.22 22 — ft 


S0% 24% ZoieCp 732 43 12 147 27U 27 27 — tt 

18 Ttt ZaDOla .12 16 55 229 7% TV, ,7% 

57% 32% zavrai AB .9 T7 7280 55ft 54% 54%— tt 

25 16ft ZenHUE 856 1118 17tt 16ft I7ft + tt 

11% 15% Zara* 32 1* 17 183 20 19% 1?%- tt 

37% ZMZufflln 172 19 13 188 34% 34 34<6- % 



Ocl£4 

HONG- KONG GOLD FUTURES 
OJJptr ooua* 

Oaie Prevlou* 
HkJB Lour Rid Ask Bid Att 
Oct _ N.T. N.T. 32500 327 J» 72700 32900 
NOV _ N.T. N.T. 32600 328 0 0 32900 33100 
DOC - 32900 32900 32800 33000 33000 33X00 
Feb * N.T. N.T. 33300 33500 33*00 33600 
API _ N.T. N.T. 33600 3380O 33800 3*000 
Jun _ N.T. N.T. 3*100 3*300 3*300 3*500 
AUB - 34600 34600 3*500 34700 34700 3*900 
Vohimu: 2* lotto* 100 at 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UALlPcroanea 


Prav. 

_. HWl Low I 

Oct N.T. N.T. I 

w* — 359.70 329.10 : 

Fob N.T. N.T. ; 

volume: io lots of 100 ox 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Moiayxian oem per kflu 
Close 

Bid Ask 

N°v 18250 1*150 ' 

Doc 18350 18*50 ! 

Jan 18*00 1B70O ; 

f*D 18750 18850 1 

Mt* — ..... 18800 18900 1 

Volume: 4 tat* 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per Uo 
Close 

RM A|k 

RSS 1 N*rv_ 15900 15*75 1 

5551 R**- 1*1-50 14175 1 

RSS 3 Ngv_ 15200 15300 1 

RSS 3 Nov _ 15000 isuo l 

RSS* NOV _ 146JU 14800 1 

RSSSNgv. 14100 1*200 1 

p U ,S. p ol «- 

MOknnian linmltc per 25 tees 
Close 

„ BM Aik 

gOV — 670 716 

Dec 480 720 

770 750 

710 750 

M« — 710 7 tO 

*P1 710 760 

MOV 698 740 

Jh> — - 680 730 

StP ______ *00 730 

Volume: o km or 25 tan*. 
Source: Reuters. 


Sente seme 
326*0 vn jn 
329.10 33X30 
33330 31450 


Previous 
IK Ask 
18250 18150 

18350 18*50 

18600 18700 

18750 16850 

18800 18900 


Prev loin 
Bid Ask 
15875 159X5 

1*105 16175 

15X75 15X7S 

149JS 15075 
14£75 14775 

14075 14X75 


Previous 
BM Ask 

470 710 

*80 720 

710 750 

710 7M 

710 7CQ 

710 760 


Go. 24 

Close Previous 

_ Mian Law Bid Aek BM Ask 

S UG AR 

Sterling per metric ton 
Dee 13400 734*0 13600 13700 13700 13800 
«°r 1*700 1*400 146*0 1*700 14700 14700 

May 15000 14800 15000 150*0 150*0 15080 
Ana N.T. N.T. 15600 15700 156*0 15700 

Oct 16100 UTAO 161*0 16100 16200 162*0 

Volume: 1.157 lots at SO ions. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric ton 
Dec 1706 1*90 100$ 1706 1098 1700 

Mar 1749 1731 10*6 1748 1740 1741 

May 769 10SS 1763 1768 17<S 1766 

JIV 1791 1790 1787 1090 1789 17W 

Sen 1002 1095 1797 1001 1002 10OS 

Dec IJJf 1085 1785 1089 1092 1095 

Mar 1000 1797 10 W 1010 1000 1010 

Volume: 2513 lets of 10 tens. 

COFFEE 

sterling per metric ton 
NOV 1777 1*90 1760 1765 1*60 1*63 

Jan 1020 1730 1005 1006 1.703 1JTW 

Mar 1050 10*2 1033 1035 1030 1.732 

MOV 1062 1788 1050 10S5 1063 1,766 

JIv 1000 1*03 1070 1000 1075 1795 

S8P 1-222 1-M2 1098 1,900 1787 1030 

Nov 1.930 1.930 1,900 17M 1000 1060 

Volume: 9055 lets el 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

U0. dollars ner metric tea 
NOV 26X00 25705 26100 26X00 wol taw 
DOS 26003 23603 29900 29905 25405 25450 
JM 25X98 25600 2S70S 257*0 25)00 25125 
Fee 25400 259*0 25300 2S325 2*905 25000 
Mar 24700 24**0 2*425 244*0 2*2*0 

APt 2*000 237*0 237*0 23800 233*0 23575 
MOV N.T. N.T. 23X00 23150 231*0 73700 
Jun moo gJ.JKl 22800 229 JO 22X00 22900 
Jtv 2)000 22X00 22X00 22800 23X25 22&50 
Volume: 3037 Ms of 100 tens. 

Sources; KatHan ana London Pelrolevm Ex- 
change (gasoil). 


Close 

Him low Bid ASk Cb’go 

SUGAR 

France francs per metric ten 
Dec 1050 10*0 1040 1050 —3 

Mar 1045 1055 1062 1045 — I 

MOV 1085 1JW 1085 1095 —3 

Aug 1*30 1A30 1A29 1A43 —7 

Oct IASS IA55 1AS5 1AJU — 3 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1A7J 1A9S + 1 

Est. ml.: 1/00 lals ot 50 ions. Prev. actual 
sales: 1273 lots. Open Interest: 23752 
COCOA 

Frencti from ner 166 kg 
Dec N.T. N.T. 1.9*7 1.970 +3 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1.980 1.985 +8 

MOV N.T. N.T. 7010 — 4-5 

JIv N.T. N.T. 2015 — +5 

Sep N.T. N.T. 202 0 — +5 

Dec M.T. N.T. — 2050 uneti. 

Nat N.T. N.T. — 2050 UncSl. 

Ett.vol.:*iotsaf lOtonv Prev. actual sales: 

16 lets. Open Interest: S50 
COFFEE 

Frendt francs per loo kg 
Nov 1.950 1085 1.9)2 1040 +76 

Jan 1095 1.948 10*0 1.995 + 76 

Mar 2010 1.986 2010 2030 +70 

MOV 2055 XKK* 2045 2055 + 60 

Jty KJSI 2050 2070 1100 +65 

Sea N.T. N.T. 1100 XIX + 75 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2.120 1160 + 95 

Est. voL: 94 lots el 5 ions. Prev. actual sales: 

17 lots. Open Internal : 291 
Source.- flours* du Commerce. 



Oct 24 

Commodity nod Unit 

The 

Tear 

Ago 

Col lee 4 Santos, id 

138 

141 

Prlnidtoth 64/30 38 ft. vd _ 

0*1 

£79 

Steel billets (Pln.).ton 

47300 

473*0 

Iren 2 Fury. PhlkJ„ ten 

213*0 

213*6 

Steel scrap No 1 hvy pm. _ 

75-76 

99-93 

Lead Spot, lb 

1X19 

23-34 

Cooper elect, id 

<7-70 

43-49 

Tin [Straits), lb 

NLA. 

4*567 

Zinc E. St. L. Basis, lb 

038 

BAS 

Palladium, 02 

101-103 

140-143 

Silver N.Y.ez 

Source: AP. 

6.185 

738 


P 


Dividends 




US/fteasuries 


n 




London Metals 


i 


.s&piop 

Index Options 


thewofld. 

Thclntematimal HeraldTribunc. 
Bringing the Woritfs Most 

Important News to the Worid’s 

Mog l m p yr rani 




On* Previo u s 

BM ASk BM Aik 

ALUMINUM 

sterling per metric toe 

Snot 679*0 680*0 <67*0 66800 

ESSS’JS.-.-J' 0100 «tao 

COPPER CATHODES IHWi Grade) 

Sterttai per metric ton 

SDOt 99150 993*0 99100 99)00 

Fo rward _ J0WJ0 100000 100100 100200 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterling per metric ten 
Snot 97200 974D0 96700 96900 

forwwt 99300 99500 98600 98800 

LEAD 

Stesi teg per metric ton 
mm J71SD 37450 378*0 77900 

Forward 27X00 278*0 28100 7*9 nn 

NICKQIv 

stertlng per metric Ion 

SPOt 291000 291500 290000 29K0O 

silver 7K0M 289,100 

fence oar troy ounce 

Spat 43400 43400 431*0 *wiw 

FfE"Ord ,.44600 44700 44400 444*0 

tin isnnnroj 

Sterling per metric ton 

Soot na na 85*800 85(900 

Fonuord na na 8456N 846000 

ZINC 

StorHng per metric tea 

Soot 40900 41100 4340O *2500 

Source: AP. 


Oct 24 

Discount Prev. 

Otter BM Yi*U TMId 

3- atontfa bill 7 31 700 704 747 

4- fltOafe Hit 7A3 741 701 7.71 

wear HH 7*0 7.41 802 LOO 

Prev. 

BM Offer Yield Yield 

30-ypurbaad 102 3/32 HH5.32 1039 ID 3 ) 

Source: Salomon Bremen. 

Merrill Lyncb Treasury lodes: 129.97 
Chanee far the dor: —003 
Average yield: 9*1 ft 
Source: Merrill L men. 


Oct 24 

Company Per Amt Pay Rec 

INCREASED 

Etnyf Caro O .15 t-3 12-1* 

Libbev-Owens Ford O JS 12-16 11-15 

Oueslar Carp a A3 13-16 11-23 

Inter provincial PL G *0 12-1 11-7 

INITIAL 

Mine Safety Aspirin Q .13 12-10 IMS 
REDUCED 

Gri Lakes Forest Pr Q ,15 1-2 12-6 

SPECIAL 

Lamson A Sessions _ 05 12-10 11-22 

STOCK 

Peerless Tuoe - 4 pc 12-6 11-iS 

USUAL 


DIVlRitures 

Options 


■r. (tenor Mat -fSUWmp'ts eras per mars 




Strike CafleSeftte 
Price Dec Mer Jim 

39 1.95 161 117 

37 1.17 1.96 3*3 

38 159 1*8 1.97 

39 126 09* 1*2 

49 008 US 1 . 1 D 

41 DJU 00 10 

dtif mated Mel m s*i9 
Cate! wed. sal. 1078 ■pen 1 
PBfi : Wta. VOL M05 asm* 1 
Source: C ME. 


Puls- Settle 
Dee Mar jm 

<UM NA OJO 
039 ATI 102 
0*9 1.18 14) 

1 JS 171 l.w 

- — 2*3 

- — 120 


AMP Inc 
Black Hills PXL 
Ctminti & Sttiwest Co 
CamSoiCoro 
Conroe Cora 
Crawford & Co 
Eaton Cara 
Edison Brothers Sirs 
Elect rente Co Amer 
Ex-Ceil-0 Coro 
Guilford Mills 
Gulf Canada Lfd 
mails Lta 
lewo-ininoJs G8.E 
jannock Lid 
Kultlman Com 
LAMour Inc 

mb ir tea Fn 

Minnesota pal 
M itchell Enov Dev. 
Naico Cnetmcxri 
Nermeast Utilities 
Panhandle E as era 
Porker Hannllfn 
Peerless Tube 
Ptirer 

pniitas Indus 
Republic Gvpsufn 
Russell Cam 
Sealed Power com 
Sonal 

Soumern Mineral 
Sfd Pacific 
Svbron Com 
Texaco 

Trane Loulslono Qu 

UJ Tobacco 
Ua Trust Co N.Y. 
weooco 
Wisconsin Elect 
Worn Wear Com 


0 .18 IM 13-4 

Q 48 120 11-15 

O *0 ft 11-29 11-7 

O JO 12-9 114 

Q .10 13-14 M -23 

a ,ia 11-14 u -4 

□ J 5 1 1-25 11-4 

Q 40 1-6 13-18 

O J 5 11-77 Utt 

Q 43 1-2 17-6 

Q .17 10 11-8 

Q .13 IO 11-39 

a ot isos 11-15 

Q* 8 ft 12-7 11-4 

a .to 1-1 it-* 

a .10 too 12 -tt 

Q 06 TUB 17-4 

. .10 12-7 11-18 

a *9 121 IMS 

a 0s 1-3 11-12 

Q JO 12-10 11-20 

O J 9 ft 13 J 0 11-39 

O *7 ft IMS 11-22 

Q 08 1X6 11-2B 

□ .10 1-3 12-13 

a J 7 12-20 11-21 

G .15 11-21 11-6 

Q 07 ft 12-13 1 I-» 
O 07 ft IMS 11 -* 
O 35 17-10 M -22 

O SO 12-13 11-29 

0 05 1-8 IMS 

Q .10 1-17 IO 

□ J7 1 X 2 IMS 

Q 35 13-10 11-4 

a js 11-22 lus 

Q 43 1206 12-5 

Q JO 1-24 1 O 0 

a .10 12-20 12-6 

0 *2 IM 11-8 

a .13 1105 IV 4 

a-aoaripfTr; s-temt- 








































8 


Floating-Rate \otes 


Dollar 


Thursdays 


.c i r ■ 


Tobies Include the nationuride prices 
up te the dosing on Wall Street 
and da not reflect fata trades el se where- 

Via The Associated Press 


7 V Fetont 

7ft 4 to FftiHtV 217 

SB 14 FreqEl U 

low 7* Frtedni »u 13 

I» S FrfasEa U 

26 14* Frtscns 2 us 

23* HBi FmtHd 9 

14* 4* FrtAwt .171 IS 
13 Hi FurVH 21 U 14 


u m i« 15 — * 
1 «n JSP— 

alii 


XL 1 ** 


40 22* a 22 + Vi 
« EH ZM n* 


2M roe 




6ft Pen-ent i£ 2M 


INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 


a •» 
n » j* 




» Uh US 


21 r* ift 

8 it* 17ft 


u » » 
9 14* 14 
234 45* 44ft 


A Vh— ft 
IS — ft 

X 

2* + ft 
lft— ft 
17ft 

2* + 1?' 

14ft 




IDto 47ft 47ft 

M 5ft 5ft 

II 56 » 


23 4 3ft 

» Iffft Wft 


47ft + ft 
** + * 
5ft 


4 r » 


25 19 »ft 

313 ** 


M 6ft 4ft 
1 25 25 


25* Uft 


ISTS 

19 + * 

2ft 

*2* 

17ft 

25ft 


2>ft 30 — 7ft 
Uft 76* + tt 


8 »ft 

55ft » 
7ft 1ft 
3ft 2ft 


l ft 


ISkiKii 



International 
Design Center Building 


FOR SALE 


100 Second Ave. No., Minneapolis. Historic 
riverfront district Major tenant is nationally 
recognized leader in furniture retailing. 


WRITE WARREN D. BAUER 
RO. BOX 536 

NORTHF1ELD, MINNESOTA 55057 USA 
OR CALL (507) 645-7423 


* 


VnJLABS-sux'-OLLON 


iTl>, f l)TV#; T SjT; flu! 3.1 K'l 


C &&R* 


1 to 4 bedrooms, C80.000- 
£200.000. Available (or purchase 
by foreign residents. Mortgages up to 60*. 

6.5X *20 years. 

All south facing — Breathtaking views — 

Superb fully fitted accommodation, kitchens 
and bathrooms — Carpeting. 

FULLY SERVICED 

Take this opportunity, free of UK exchange control, and with full Swiss 
government permissions, to invest in the security of the Swiss franc. 
Enquiries dealt with m total confidence. Legal and technical advice 
available. Professional enquiries welcome, to: 

Mr. T. F. HORN. Solicitor. H AXB Y. JARVIS AND MALCOLM BROWN. 
4 The Quadrant. COVENTRY CVi 2EL Private calls: 0203-28498 


vaia>s — 4750' in glorious muuniam scenery. 20 minutes from lake. 90 minutes 
Geneva. Skiing, walla, nalcr sports, gr»8. tennis, riding. 


2ft ft 
40ft 30 
13ft 6 
22ft 11 
7ft 1ft 
3 2ft 
13 5ft 
15 10ft 
4ft 2ft 
Ift ft 
14ft 5ft 
4ft 1ft 
8ft A 
Ifftt 4ft 
TOTH 4ft 
23ft 13ft 


C 31 U 23 
of JSt 9.1 
B .Km J 


12 3 

3% 

440 37ft 
195 6ft 
142 19ft 


*8 ft 

6 l Sft 

15 6ft 


160 4ft 
78 23ft 


5ft 5ft + ft 

Is! 

7ft 7ft 

ft ft- 

T^-ft 

18ft 19ft 
1ft 1ft 
2ft 2ft + ft 

ttfflr* 

X X 

5ft 6 4- ft 

3ft Ift 
Aft 6ft— ft 
4H 4ft 
. 4ft 4ft + ft 
22ft 23ft + ft 


17ft lift Jodyn job 08 10 
7ft 5ft Jacobs 

4ft 2V. Jet Am f 

9ft 5ft Jefron JltlOJ 11 

6ft 2ft JahrvPd _ 

lift 7 JaftoAm JO 43 9 

Uft 6 Jotmlnd 4 

7ft 2ft JmtUkn 15 


8 13 12ft 13 + ft 

15 Aft A Aft + ft 
211 4ft Aft 4ft 4- ft 
14 a£ ■ cv. 4u. .on 


14 Aft ift AW *27 

44 3 2ft 2ft— ft 55 

134 7ft 7 7 —ft 


134 7M 7 7 

T? W L 

37 2ft 2ft 2ft 


39W 31ft KnGspf 450 


Active alpine village with all facilities. quiet residm rid atmosphere. 
Excellent cuisine. 









9' 


In the center of the town directly sold by builders 


2 ROOMS 76 sq. m. f bathroom, fully fitted kitchen, 
balcony, coder - list price S.Fr. 5 06, OCX). - 


LUXURY ACCOMMODATION 
MAYFAIR - KNIGHSTBRJDGE 

* Conrofemeijljjy airport ooUwtwn * Treed & Tbealer boofdqp 

* Maid Service * Direct Dial Teiephooe 

* Fafly-equippai Kitchens * Color T.V. 

Far brochure and infonmtHa: 

62 Park Street. Mayfair. London W1Y 3HJ 
Tel: 01-493 3335/01-493 3393. Telex: 291292 G 


Price asked S.Fr. 420,000 - 


Underground parking: S.Fr. 17,000. - View of the Lake of Geneva and 
mountains. Mortga ges available at low Swiss interest rates, free for sale 
to foreigners. These prices are valid until d ecamber 15th 1985. 


Write to: PIC 89-1 34 SWISS ADVERTISING LTD 
PO BOX 240-CH-l 820 MONTREUX L SWITZERLAND. 



<4 


Global Vision 


S.Fr. 142.000 


As the laraest full service 
real estate firm in Texas 
and the southwestern U.S., 
we provide expertise in 
property acquisitions and 
management 


Modem, 124,760 sq. ft., one-story building 
with acreage in excellent condition. 


BINSWANGER SOUTHERN 


■ f 904 N. Lamer Ave., Oxford, MS 38655 • 601-234-6500 
Philadelphia, PA* New Yferfc. NY* Chicago, IL* Atlanta. GA 

n Charlotte, NC * Greensboro, NC • Raleigh, NC 
Winston-Salem. NC • Columbia. SC • Dallas, TX 
Orlando, FL • Denver, CO 

London • Brussels • Rotterdam • Amsterdam • Paris 

COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL REAL ESTATE 
COUNSELING ■ MANAGEMENT * APPRAISALS 


Nax, Centra) Valais. 
Switzerland. 

Summer and winter resort. 

Sold directly by owner. 

2-room apartment: 1 bedroom, 
living-room, kitchen, bathroom, 
balcony, hall. 

A. CORVASCE 

CH - 3961 Vercorin 
Phone: 0041/27/55.8181 


Please note specific Interest 
in request to 





HENRY S. MILLER CO., 
REALTORS* 

David Donosky, CEO - 
Corporate Headquarters: 
2001 Bryan Tower 
Dallas, Texas 75201 
214/748-9171 Telex 732459 


The Driving Force in fees Rsa/Esam 
Partners In Service with Grubb & Ells. 


Own land in Hie great ☆ 
American West izssr 


Rye or more 
acres of 
this land can 
Here's an outstanding oppor- ■ he yours, 
tunity to acquire a sizable I Easy credit 
piece of America's ran chi and I te *™* 
at a very modest cost. “ available 

Sangre de Cristo Ranches Inc., the land de- 
velopment subsidiary of Forbes Magazine. 
the American financial publication, is now 
offering for sale scenic ranchland in Colorado's 
Rocky Mountains. Spectacular land for a 
homesite and a lifetime of appreciation. 

Minimum 5-acre ranch sites starting at $4,500 

Send today for fact kit and full color brochure 


===CAUFORNL4=== 
San Ktanefctes PeataKula 

Ocean View Estate 
497 acre oiilc with 24.000 aqJt 


16 

5 

138 ion 9 
40 15 M 


4ft 1ft KopofcC 
Aft 10 KoyCP 30 
3 10* KovJn JOB 

5ft 9ft KeorNt JO 
3ft 14 Kelthm JGt 
2ft 8 KevPTi JO 
7ft 2ft JCevGa 
4ft 2ft KHdewt 

4ft 3ft Ktnark 

4ft 2ft KJrtrv 
■5ft 3ft KltMte 
3ft 2 Kteerv JJ2r 
14ft 10ft Knot} 

30ft 22ft KooerC 232 


SBe 38 
4 3ft 

32 W* 
470 8ft 
A 3 
149 Aft 
A 3ft 
174 M 

• 4* 

177 2ft 
U 14ft 
70 28ft 


38 38 + te 

-3ft 3ft— ft 
12ft 12ft 
lift lift— ft 
mk 12ft— ft 


19ft Wft— ft 

3ft 4ft + ft 
3ft 3ft 

a a 

Mft 14ft— ft 
28ft 26 ft— ft 


13ft 13ft 13ft 
Aft Aft Aft 
Aft Aft 6ft- 
2ft 2ft 2ft 
26ft 25ft 26 
1 ft ft 
3ft 3% 3ft. 
8ft BV. 9ft- 
12ft 12ft 12ft 
16* 16* 14*- 


7ft 7ft 7ft 
1ft 1ft 1ft- 


I6ft 15ft 15ft- 
18ft 18* 18ft- 
21* 21* 
20ft 


2ft 1ft 
19ft Uft 
19ft 13* 
14ft 8ft 
Z7ft 1A* 
9ft 2ft 
31ft 18ft 
4ft 4 
34ft 9ft 
3 Ift 
2* 1ft 
33* 16ft 
39ft 27* 
19 W* 
14ft Oft 
reft 9ft 
14ft 10 
26ft Oft 
10* 8ft 


LaorPP 

LovPh 

Ltotehs 

uefturT 

UrtFPh 

LifeRst 

Loctoo 

LortCp 

Lorlmr 

LunwR 

umdrE 

Lorta 

Lydal 

LvnCSs 

LynchC 


M X4 10 
An 10 14 

300 142 “ 

at jw 


ift ift— w 
17ft 17ft — ft 
79ft 19ft + W 
9* 9ft 


If 

J» JH 
15 

18 

9 

JO 17 I 
50 20 19 


2 29* 
732 Aft 
14 33ft 
47 1ft 
18 1ft 
26 19ft 
305 37* 
32 Uft 

sg: 

57 14 


18 18ft + * 
Aft Aft— * 


Aft Aft— * 
19ft 29* — * 
A* 6*— * 
32* 32*— * 
1ft Ift 
!M 1ft— ft 


ass-? 


uft Mft . , 
12 12*— ft 

io* m*— ft 
14 W + * 
nft lift— * 
w io — * 


14* 12ft 
2ft 1* 
«ft 7ft 
1ft ft 
12ft Aft 
Aft 2ft 
15* 7ft 
19* Bft 
2* ft 
21* 10* 
15* 8* 
7ft 2ft 
17 4* 

22* 21* 
24* 15ft 
B3 12ft 
19* 10* 
22* 9ft 
2D , 8ft 
23* 15* 
18ft 8* 
26ft 13ft 
Cft 4* 
7ft 1ft 
88ft 
22ft 
10 


jMtif 

46 15ft wS 75ft +* 

M ifr lift 17 + Jt 


A ift Sft 
7* Aft Aft— ft 


14 13ft Oft 13ft— ft 
mm? tft SA- — a 

20 T* rtl Tft— J6 
221 25* 3** 3S -—ft 

AZ B» W* Mft— ft 

21 Sft -a* B*— ft 


1X2 4 M 4 

m sft J* j» — u 

:U Sft 7ft Mfc + ft 


:P Sft 7ft 8* + Tl 
5 22 * TZW 22 *— Mr 
4W It teft-IMfft 
a j . . s* . a + * 
re »4"m m + H 

7ft Ift 1ft 4* ft 
Tl ' 4 4 

lOBl 42* 62* 42ft +1 

1J8B Wit 1*£ 1^ + 31 


» 39* 28 28 

9 12ft 12 12 

W U* M« 74ft— V6 

2 ISM 13* 13* + Vt 
26 Sft 3ft 3ft— M 

5 8.6 8 — ft 

3TO 2* »S 2* — W 

291 15* T2ft 12*— ¥ 
18 27* 27* 27ft— U 
102 Sft 8ft Bft— H 

13 Ift 1ft Ift 


a* StHK. 

15ft 11 * UntCPPf . JS 55 


2* 7* U FoodB . • 

74* 71* Of Mad 13 


B* 5* UnftoTV 
Mft 9ft UnvCm 


■ft Aft UnfvRs I 
20* lM Unlvte 
15ft 18ft UnvPot 


744 12ft 

XSL 

in *5* 
22 • 1ft 
4 14 
17 7*. 
37 72ft 

8 & 

20 lift 


m at: 


10ft 10ft + u 
22* 22ft- * 
22 22 
1ft 1ft 

JP'u 1 

t* 

8* HftiS 


residence juH completed. 9 bedroom 
swles win ocean view, balconies, 
private balbs. Greplaocs. every con- 
ceivable luxury inducting 9 wtnrlpooi 
hd». Fabulous kildiefi. indoor swim- 


inrludcd, 40 min. comtal drive from 
San Francisco. Airpon 10 min. away. 
Comptetdv furnished. Immediate oc- 
cupancy, * S 1 1^50.000. Brochure 
availaUe. 


BUY A BIT OF HISTORY 


Your OWN CHATEAU n FRANCE 
Nal A DREAM A REALTTY 
We ca n lend you to ast erna l e w values 
i HISTORICAL FRENCH fUOFEKTCS 


BARR1GAN, WIEDEPiMlILLER Co. 
344 Kenny Street 
Son Fnoefto. CA 94108 
(415) 434-3600 


Covad : CSU 36. BUE DU PONT 
925® fniiv F 
T*>c EOBUBCSM 


*3 

Ift 

7ft 

Ift 

TO 

25* 

25* 

25* + * 

338 

10* 

9ft 

10* + ft 

578 

8* 

Bft 

8ft 

81 

3ft 

3* 

3* 

11 

18ft 

18ft 

If*— ft 

3 

21ft 

21ft 

27ft- * 

16® 

12* 

12 

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UJS1NESS ROUNDUP 


Page 19 


5?? 


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JVr 

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l 

J TOKYO — Hitachi Ltd. report- ^“ divjd ? ndi n 1985^6, he added 

j 64 Thursday that parent company cni hS?™?* recess5oa “ ™- 

factors, slowgnpwtfam video- 
tape-recorder sales, declines m ex- 
pons to China and the yen's 


Hitachi Ltd. 

n Profit for First Half 


Return 


<*: •. « ■- 



. £■» profit for the first six mon 
| £e 19S5-S6 year slipped . 0.9 


as--. 


iy. 

of 

r^iait from a year eariier, to* 49^1 
v ;llion yen ($2*1 million) from 
*114 MEon yen. 

^ ft Per-share earnings for the six 
; ‘jvODths ended SepL 30 were 17.73 


appreciation 

«pected to 

for the year, Mr. 


the dollar are 
ice profit and sales 
Miyaachi said. 


*% 

«. -r 

■* *k 


Io the first sbc months, semkoo- 

. . — '««■ saks fefl 21 percent to 215 

jar earlier. Saks for the period “to*® yen from a year earlier 


’ \ ^ >se 3 percent, to 1 -559 trillion yen 'bnnsag sales of mfonnation and 

r ’ lf.'om L5 14. trillion.. mrnmii.u.*;, j -j— 

Ki'A 


■U 


_ ... . — . “ntmumcatkins systems ami dec- 

‘ ^ j V^yfitach has revised downward Uomc devices to 552.1 hfflion yen, 

' :, *t IV ■ . f o !■ ^|sptofitf«ecaafor theyearend- 4 percent froma year cartier. 

1 *-l . ;t,ng March 31, 2986, to 193 billion Foragn-exchatige losses are ex- 

i ;{ % Vm, from 265 billion yen, Yasuo to total about 3 hUEon to 4 

i?i ? -fiyauchi, vice president, said at a biU ® n yen in 1985-86, if she ex- 
! ■“ ?isws conference. Profit for the c^ge rate against die dollar 
; •>, * 1384-85 year amounted to 255.9 stan< & at an aver age of 210 to 215 
"* , j.jilHon yen. wn “■ K£Z L - --■* 

Estimated sales for 1985-86 were 

^ jo revised .downward, to 3 trillion 
„ Men from an earlier estimated 3.18 
t* Ujillion yen, compared with 3.036 
« : r .THion a year earlier, he said, 
i } ; The company will retain the 9- 


ii’-i 

If! 


yen, Mr. Miyauchi said. 

VTR sales in the r- u rw-m ycar are 
“^>ected to fall about 7 percent 
from a year earlier, to 4 JO mtUmv 
sets, and semiconductor are 
gc«cd to fafl 20 percent, to 430 
i yen, he said. . 


Sperry Carp. Posts 2d’Quarter Loss 
From Salecf Farm-Equipment Unit 

. * the Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — ' Sperry Corp. said Thursday that losses from 
operations of its New Holland farm-equipment business and from the 
unit’s sale to Ford Motor Co. contributed to a loss of $187.9 million in 
lu second fiscal quarter. 

But Spcny said its two remaining operations, commercial comput- 
ers and defense and aerospace, posted a 23-percent revenue gain in 
the period. 

• Sperry, headquartered in New Yorh, said its quarterly loss contrast- 
ed with net income of $99.5 million, or Sl.80 per share, in the second 
quarter of 1984. 

Sperry said it lost SI 0.6 million after taxes on operations of New 
Holland in the second quarter and, as expected, took a S22 0 - mtD>on 
after-tax! loss on the sale of New Holland to Ford. Ford paid S3 30 
miffion in cash for New Holland and agreed to assume SI 10 million in 
liabilities. The sale agreement was signed Oct. 10. but the loss was 
recorded in Sperry’s second quarter, which ended Sept. 30. 

For its first half, Sperry said it had a loss of $136.4 million 
compared with net income of SI 19.6 million, or S2.17 a share, in the 
first sax months of 1 984. Six-month revenues were $154 billion, up 22 
potent from $2.08 bdSon in the 1984 period. 


COMPANY NOTES 


- 


i^frught-Ridder and Milk PLC 
To F orm Joint Data Venture 


w 

e 
I *?- 


Befl Canada fiooprfses Inc. wiD 
be fisted in the foreign-stock sec- 
tion of the Tokyo Stock Exchange 
in mid-November with Nomura 
Securities Co. as fisting agent. Bell 
does not plan to issue new shares 
far the Japanese market. 


employs 1,135 workers in Wichita 
and 815 in Tucson. 

International Business Machines 
Corp. has cm purchase prices for 
some models of its 3380 direct- 
access storage devices and 3880 
cache-storage controllers bv an av- 
Cathay Pacific Airways has or- erage of 10 percent, 
dered a third Boeing 747-300, to be MGM/UA Ente 


Return 


; fi-.iT.ut „ . , Ridder*s Moneycentcr business 

: ,l2' MIAMI — Kmght-Ridder ana f manrial tnfrw-mnrir m sys tem- 

Jiu. 

receive an option to acquire one- 


Thursdsy 
\iet its business information sub- 


delivered in November 1986. Ca- 
thay Pacific, based in Hong Kong, 
received its first SlOO^mllion 747- 
300 in Jane and is to receive its 
second in February. 

DomePetrolemB LuL said it was 



ket-price information from its 

if.tegussa AG Shares Soar 
=!!)n Rnmored AIDS Core Kni * hl - RBda '“ id - 

• Avene* Franee-Presse 

* FRANKFURT — Rumors that 


v Cj 


^^kgussa AG had developed a med- 
[i Ration to fight Acquired Imnurne 
; >J>efiaency Syndrome drove the 
i^fhemical company’s shares up 51 
jr-rkuiscbe marks ($1930) Thurs- 
5 :!iay, to 514 DM. 


The agreement {novides for 
Mills & Allen to provide live mar- 
ket prices on dosed-drcniL 
The first user of this feature will 
be Garbon Gflts, Mak & Alkn's 
inter-dealer broker in the British 
government securities market. 

The Moneycenter system em- 


A company spokesman con- pfoys an Americas Telephone & 
« Tdea 


3 firmed that Degussa researchers 
j | iad a substance that, after Hmirfd 
3 v.tboratary trials, appeared able to 
'IJill the AIDS virus. 


Telegraph Co. 6300 personal com- 
puter for use by subscribers and 


agreement, the company is re- 
quired to sell lOimllxm shares of 
Dome Mines by the end of 1 986. 

Fleet Aerospace Corp. has be- 
come pan of an all-Canadian con- 
sortium examining the possible 
purchase of Canada ir Ltd, from the 
government-controlled Canada 
Development Investment Corp. 
Fleet did not identify the other 
members but said they included 
private and institutional investors. 

. Giles Leaijet Corp. is consider- 
ing consolidating its aircraft and 
aerospace manufacturing opera- 
tions in either Wichita, Kansas, or 


transmit* information via satellite Tucson, Arizona, as a cost- cutting 
and leased lines. move: The aircraft manufacturer 


Entertainment Co. 
common stock holders have until 
Nov. 1 to indicate their interest in 
bolding United Artists stock after 
the acquisition of MGM/UA by 
Turner Broadcasting System Inc. 
The deadline was extended one 

' Electronics Corp. of Ja- 
sei up a car audio plant 
Cincinnati, Ohio. The plant. 

. capital investment of about 
S10 million, will start production of 
stereo players for automobiles 
from July 1986 at a rate of 10,000 
sets a month. 

Reed International PLC has 
completed the sale of the British 
operations of Budding Products 
Cjroup for £6] milli on (SS7 million} 
in cash to a newly formed company 
called Caradou Lid. 

Textron Inc. has ended efforts to 
sell its AVCO aerostruc tines divi- 
skm. Textron said it had decided 
that the division's values, major 
contracts for wings for the Bl-B 
and C-5 programs, could be real- 
ized most profitably by continuing 
to operate the division. 


; '* : »fri 


Questions Raised on Rescue 
sDf JMB by Bank of England 


International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The Bank, of En- 


■ 4 (, ’ its officials committed forgeiy as 
'l^art of efforts to revive Johnson 


irl' JMB, 


funds woe removed from the'ac- 

counts by JhflB, byrihen owned by 

- — iand has denied charges that some the Bank of England, without au- 

-- ' r j • — i — — thorizatioa and that JMB 

later tried to obtain -Mr. • Spin’s 
signatureon backdated doenmeats 
a gold dealer and bank, to authorize the action: According 
f ; ]i3s acquired by the central bank to Mr. Sedgemore, this effort was 
! Johnson Matthey PLC a year .forgery aimed at giving JMB pref- 

: JJpgo in a rescue organized after the ercnce over other creditors in the 
‘ f ,'ascovcry of loan losses totalipg liquidatiQD of Mr. Sqxa's cotnpa- 
i ; : .f;r3ore than £200 million ($286 mil- - 

II’IohJl 

. - The allegations of forgery by 
'Central bank officials were made 
. ; c \\ Tuesday by Brian Sedgemore, a Lar 
• ■' cswr Party member of Parliament, 

. ^ipho has been a leading critic of the 
"jSank of England’s handling of the 
.a fescue. The opposition party has 


The evidence came from Mr. Si- 
pra, his solid tor and certain docu- 
ments, Mr. Sedgemore said. 

A government source, who spoke 
on the condition that he would not 
be identified, said that the transfer 
of funds was ~a perfectly normal 
and above-board transaction** be- 


. ? •' n-J frt- ouvvinAKUW UAiiMswuvnx w 

TSwJinS-Ste"*” P-. by.JMB officials before He 



^to the JMB affair. 

• *; j J A spokesman for Britain’s solid- 

■ .* : r.w general confirmed Wednesday 
; ffhat the City of London police 

5 f . vould investigate the new evidence 
> 1 j ri^rovided by Mr. Sedgemore. The 
r. I xriice last July were ordered to 
.^-—investigate whether JMB officials 
^'.•omnhtted fraud before the Bank 
England took h over in October 
= *’1984. 

' ?■" “What we are witnessing is the 
! <■ * ;Xggest financial scandal of the 
. - ./.20ih century,” said Mr. Sedgemore, 

• 1 2 :'i lawyer. **So far we have only seen 
; a^ihe first wonns crawl out of the 

i:-arL T 

. — Mr. Sedgemore repeated a call be 
2 — <^nnde last July for the resignation 
.. 1 Robin Leigh-Pembenon, gover- 

• ; V“3or of the Bank erf England - A1- 
: : V'^ough, and we must be thankful 
.. 7 n^for small mercies, Robin Leigh- 

? Pemberton is not himself a conspir- 
, [ *itor to crime, it will be impossible 
’ restore confidence until he re- 

•^_>agns,” said Mr. Sedgemore. 

The Bank of England's chief 
/spokesman, Philip Waiiand. re- 
;!■ jjrplied: “We do not believe there is 
"■ n jthe slightest truth in these allega- 
. ^Viions. They are. of course, serious 
‘ “ ■’ ' ill Rations and as such they should 
.. • j.’i-be investigated. We have no feairs 

■ : r-^bout lias, nothing to hide” - 

Mr. Sedgemore said that the 
i 2 n Bank of England, after acquiring 
. ; * • control of JMB, found $28 million 
. -’^in accounts of companies con- 

:i S!?iroDcd by Mahmud Sipra, a Paki- 
:: ^'istan-bom businessman whose B 
■: ’ leased Group was involved in com- 
: ^’iuodities. scrap iron, Gripping and 
•. ^ i movie production and is one of 
'? , IMS's triggest problem borrowers. 

’ o' 1 ;. Mr. Sedgemore said that the 


Bask of England took over. 


U.S. $ 100 , 000,000 

National Westminster 
Finance B.V.& 

(Incorporated in The Netherlands with limited liability ) 

. Guaranteed Floating Rate Capital 
Notes 1992 

Convartfole unlfl 1986 into 10 percent Guaranteed Capital Bonds 1992 

In accordance with the provisions of the Notes, notice 
is hereby given that for the sue months interest period 
from 25 October, 1 985 to 25 April, 1 986 the Notes will 
carry an Interest Rate of 8Vfe% per annum. The 
Interest payable on the relevant interest payment 
date, 25 April, 1986 against Coupon No. 11 will be 
U.S.S214.86. The Conversion Interest Amount 
applicable to Notes which have been presented for 
conversion will be U.S.S8.33 per U.S.55,000 Note 
and this will be payable on 31 October, 1 985. 

By The Chase Manhattan Bank, N.A., London 
Agent Bank 


For the latest information on 
De Voe-Holbein International nv 
and G tv-dock International nv 
please call collect 31-20^627762. 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write ns a . 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newslener 
win be sem free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
World Trade Center 
Strawinskylaan 857 
1077 XX Amszerdam. 

■The Netherlands. ' 

Telex: 14507 firco nJ 


NOTICE OF REDEMPTION 
to Holders of 

G.T.E. INTERNiOlONAl INC 

SV*% Guaranteed Bonds due 1986 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the terms and oanditinns of the above issue US$867,000 (Nominal' 
are 10 be redeemed at par oh 15th November rp85- The following bond serial numbers have been drawn for 
redemption in the presence of a notary public at a price equal to 100% erf the principal face amount. 


BONDS OF $ 1,000 EACH 



«J7 

*0373 

10666 

10934 

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12081 

1*34* 

12609 

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13363 

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12639 

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1*634 

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14586 

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rw« 


Bonds not 'fined above are nor affected by this redemption. 

Bonds so 
United Starts 
Trust Office 

payment of the redemption price of the bonds called will be node upon presentation and surrender of such bonds 
with Coupons No. 15 and subsequent Coupons attached. Coupon No. 14 should be detached and encashed in the usual 
manner. 

. Interest on the bonds drawn wilt erase cm and after 15 th November 1985 . 

G.TJL INTERNATIONAL INC 

By- Ma n u fact urer s Hanover Tmat Compan y, ... 

Paying Agents, New Yoriti ! : 


IC3 Pretax Profit Fell 26% in 3d Quarter 


Reuters 

LONDON — Imperial Chemi- 
cal Industrie* PLC reponed Thurs- 
day lhai third-quarter pretax profit 
fell 26 percent, largely because cf 
unusually low demand fer fertiliz- 
ers in Britain and seasorj] weak- 
ness in sev'eral businesses . 

Prefit for the period fell to £182 
million (S26G million) from £243 
million a year earlier. The perfor- 
mance was at the lower end c S 
market expectations and id’s 
shares eased to 647 peace curing 
trading Thursday on the Lor.tic:: 
Stock Exchange before recot eras 
to 652 pence, down 4 pence or. 
Wednesday's close. 

ICI, Britain's Urges: chemical 
company, also said tin: margins or. 
commodity chemicals is Westers 

Europe were squee z e d in the quar- 


ter. It did no! report sales for the 
period. 

Pretax profit for the first nine 
months of the year fell S percent to 
£717 million from £7gQ million in 
the Like 1984 period, the company 
said. Sales rose 1 1 percent to £S.I2 
billion from £7.2? billion. 

Tne nine- month figures reflect 
an extraordinary charge of £26 mil- 
lion related to the restructuring of 
the odors and fine chemicals busi- 
ness. ICI said. 

Third-quarter chemical sales 
rose to £2.35 billion from £2.20 
billion in 1 954. ICI said. Oil sales in 
the 19?5 third-quaner feil to £185 
million from £266 million. 

ICI said that the normal summer 

slump in third-quaner chemical 
turnover reduced sales by five per- 
cent. while the .strength of the Brit- 


ish pound against the l'i>. dollar 
reduced the overall sales value by 
seven percent. 

Chemical sales in Britain during 
the nine-month period totaled 
£1.83 billion compared with £1.76 
billion in the like period last year. 
Sales overseas edged up to £5.63 
billion from £4.73 billion. 

Oil sales in the first nine months 
were £653 million, down £13! mil- 
lion from the comparable period as 
a result of declining output from 
the North Sea Ninian field. 

Coupled with Increased oil ex- 
ploration casts, this cut nine- 
month oil profib by £37 million, to 
£46 million, after provision for pe- 
troleum revenue tax of £116 mil- 
lion, down from £ 1 27 million in the 
first nine months of 1984. 


Founder of A vis 
Bids for Return 

Reuters 

NEW YORK - Warren 
Avis, founder of Avis Rent-a- 
Car. said Thursday he and a 
group of U.S.. European and 
Middle Eastern investors are 
offering to buy Axis from Be- 
atrice Cos Inc. 

Terms were not disclosed, 
but he noted that a $400-mi|lion 
valuation has been quoted or, 
the Avis unit by Wall Street 
analysis. He said he would seek 
to expand ns operations in a 
variety of related financial 
fields. 

Mr. Avis founded the car- 
rental company in 1946 and 
sold it eight years later for “sev- 
eral million dollars.” 


REAL ESTATE EV THE SOUTH OF FRANCE 
FRENCH RIVIERA AND MONACO 




The South of France 

Provence 

A rare chance to acquire an 
estate, situated on the out- 
skirts of a picturesque 
Provencal village, lying in ^ lilRt , . 
the rolling countryside of 
the HAUT VAR. 

An offer of 1 1,250.000 Ff {approx S1.25M) is 
sought for 33 hectares of superb, fully com- 
mercialised vineyard, with approx 400M 2 of 
spacious and characterful accommodation. The 
present US owners have created the finest of 
provenpal wines for which they have won 
numerous gold medals. 

Local accommodation, with a comprehensive 
tour of the estate and tastings can be arranged 
for interested purchasers. For further details 

please contact: ^ 

M me Luce GH ITTI \ 

GHITT1MAR CONSULTANTS S.A. ' ' 

2256, Route de Bandoi 
831 1 0 SANARY-Sur-Mer 
FRANCE. Tel 94 29.86.64 
Tlx 401890F 


i2J 





^^■^USTATl^ 

CONSULT : 


AGEDI 

y. a* •* : r *SlVri„c«» chor,otte 


" «8BSSK , “ aw 



CANNES 

MANOR HOUSE 

3 reception rooms and 
4 bedroom*. Bathrooms. 
Caretaker's lodgings. 
Garden with trees. 

Deposit: F.Fr. 2.200.000 
+ credit over 10 years 
(Value F.Fr. 4.000.000p 

Matson du Viager, 

B.P. 237, CANNES 
ToL: 93.39.19.09. 


SOUTH OF FRANCE 


FOR SALE 

very beautiful Provenede Home 
High doss, never occupied 
170 sq.m. living oreo, 
decorated and fitted. 

Treed garden 
Exceptional situation 

F.Fr. 1 ,700,000 

for hn k*' irformaton 

MA1SONS SPRINT 
1, Bd Pebre- B.P. 162 
1 3268 MARSEILLE CB3EX 8 
Tel.: 91.76.00.76 


CAP FERRAT 

Beautiful proprxtv overlixAjiKi thf --rj 
& coastline towards CXP D’ANTIBES 
& the Eiaetv] mr-unlain ranse. Includ- 
ing 5 b-dmoraed lilti. Ven u)sdvrt* 
able rare taker") acc L-mraodax i cc. . ga- 
rage. forking. Healed -visaing p.“>l 
uilh ponlbome. OriscHjv & an arnaz- 
iog ven oei’ludcd park- origioj" v Ia'kJ- 
scaped fora prirvew on a plr.: .,f ai-‘,ut 
4vW0 s>|.m. 

Apply u>: 

JOHN TAYLOR S.A. 

J avenue .\lben ter 
F 06230 Si -Jean-Car- Femi 
Tel.: 910UO. 


SAINT-TROPEZ 

SeaSide 

Beautiful luxurious bouse 

450 sq.m., living space 
on 6,000 sq.m. land. 
Wonderful view on the sea. 
South exposure, swimming-pool. 

Caretaker's house, justified price. 
Also exceptional plots of land 

Agenee de La CHadelle, 
BP 1 1 1# 83990 Saint-Tropez 
Tel. 94.97.13.69. 


My address 
in Nice ? 

Dorhaine de Claireforuaine 
Bd. Tmperatrice Eugenie 


I am ac7/i c. and 1 needed calm as n ell 
or the jmmatrs of a um-tKenu* nearby. 

Rather private. I wanted In Air in a 
human azed residence surrounded hi a 
private park to enjoy the chant: and 
freshness of b*w. flowers and trees . . 

Spot tins, I needed a residence with a swim- 
ming pool, close :u the beaches. 

Roman I ic. I needed a rmi.KvuM’. eon 
apartment in which In share nr. happiness 
A dreamer. I wanted the sec for ton tor . . 
The Domain e of Claire for taw seduced me. 
those discovered the yu vet Li r. / found mvse.f 
Do hkeme... 

I rfWmilw and i«t on Ike pnoiie 
Bd. tafrraukcEaeMtr 
VICE - U; tt he la 



Le dernier carre... 

dans le ”Carre d’Or 
de Monte-Carlo 


PARK 

PALACE 


Be one of the lost privileged few to invest 
in the "Carre d’Or" of Monte-Carlo. 

At the Park Palace, only a few apartments 
are still available. 

Facing the sea, in the gardens which extend 
from the Casino, the Park Palace is expecting you 
and you are invited to visit its sumptuous apartments, 
its private interior swimming pool, its sophisticated 
security system and the luxury boutiques of its 
shopping gallery "Les Allees Lumieres”. 

The Park Palace, a new way of life 
and the joy of living in Monte-Carlo. 

information and sales. 

LEGADEL SA. 

25. avenue de la Costa - Monte-Carlo 
Tel.: (93) 50-92.86 - Telex: Legven 479276 mc 

and at Real Estate Agencies J 

in the Pnncipality of Monaco 1 

Fenced BV The Ciww Manhattan Ban* (Pans) O 
Work completion guaranies') Dy Banaue of Placemens ei *» C/MM (Monaco) 
tof in« G'oupa Co la Socifie ae Bonque Suiuci 4> _ 

Government guaranty through uie Banque Cemraif Mon egos gue oe CrMtl ^ 



South of France 
Provence 

Exclusive properties for sale 
in the beautiful 'VAR QUEST* 


Vineyards, farmhouses and villas for sale in this unknown 
coastal and country part of Provence, rich in medieval 
villages and sunny vineyards. Write now for brochure and 
property list to: 

Mme Luce GhittI . 

Ghittlmar Consultants SJL V. 

2256 Route de Bandoi ^ 

831 10 SANARY-SUR-MER 

France. Tel: 94 29.86.64. :£ : 

Telex: 401 890 F London office: phoneOI-584 6045. 


CENTER OF CANINES 

Close to Crolsetle 

Last opportunity to bur apartments of 1 or 2 bedrooms in the 

JardinN de La Croiseue. next to Carlton hotel. 

All modern comforts, fully equippped. terrace, gara^r. high security. 
Please contact side agent: 

John Tavlor S.A., 55 La Croisette - Cannes. 
Tef. 93.38.00.66. Telex 470921 


PRINCIPALITY 
OF MONACO 

In a new building overlooking 
the port: Big 5 room apart- 
ment. very nice view. 220 
sq.m., FF. ’4.400.000. 

John Taylor and Son 
20 Bd ’de* Moulin* 
Monte Carlo. 

TeL: 93 50 30 70. 

Tbc: 469 180 MC. 


NICE 

COTE D'AZUR 

Sumptuous residence cW to die 
«a. 100 *q.tn. living-room. 150 
sq.m, terrace, 11 bedmaniE. 9 
bathrooms and showerv. 25 sq.m., 
kitchen, pantry, about 1.000 
sq.m, landscaped garden, swim- 
ming-pooL caretaker's hotue, im- 
mense parage, splendid view, per. 
feci randitiun: F.Fr. 17.000.000. 

AGEMCE LAMOT 
27 . Bd. Viclor-Hugn. OhOCHJ Nice. 
TeL : 93 88 03 39 ===== 


A DREAM HOUSE 

ON THE FRENCH RIV1RA 

Exceptional example uf modern con- 
temporary architect vre b» AnJti lovog. 
Unique the world over, attended for 
the int e rnnHond efite. at Ihioule- 
Htt^Mer, one of the most proni- 
fltous cammunrtiei on the Fwidv 
Riviera. Onty mnules from Ceonet 
and Vi hour from Nice Airport. 

At preierw the house has £ bedrooms 
with emnte bathrooms, a folly fur- 
nished and equipped with oil service 
fodWes and may be extended as the 
new owner requires. There are 2 swim- 
ming pooh, a palm grow and gardens 
extending over 1U ceres. 

For further delate please contact: 

Pierre Bernard, Port-foOcMre, 
06S9O ihhele eup Mmr. France. 
TeL France: 93 75 44 70 or 
=93 75 46 12. Telex; 340-307= 


NICE CdTE D’AZUR 
VILLA 
GARIBALDI 

420 sq.m, living space 
2,500 sqjn, land 

Price: FF. 3,000,000 

MferrseRANfe 

CONSTRUCTION 

Avenue DonadeT 
06700 St-Lourent-du-Var, 
France. Tel.: 93 29.48.48 


Cap d’Ail 

{3 minutes from Monaco) 
in a superb park with swim- 
ming pool, high class, small 
new building: 3 room apart- 
ment with huge terrace. 
FF. 1,450,000. 

John Taylor and Son 

20 Bd des Moulin* 
Monte Carlo 
Tel.: 93 50 30 70 
Tlx: 469 1 80 MC 


For 

REAL ESTATE 

in the South 
of France 
& Monaco 

Please contact: 

Dominique BouveL, 
International Herald Tribune. 

181, Avc. Gutriee-de-GauIIe, 
92521 NenQIv Cedes, France. 
Tel. (I) -i7.47.12AS. 
Telexi 613 59S. 
















^ "**"**“”" u ni--—- 

Experts Are Divided (her J^L-. Citroen Changes 

„es££s£ 2 - sS.IXT « I?SSS 5 s 3 s:stA 2 s: JssrrsE ,« s=S 2 I 3 b?<S 2 

Boll, Baranek & Newman: systems . Fu ™f* jJJJL,! lo dis- Mr. Paraas drew from a seem- WO ck was Danny Cow, a F“ Bodna747s and the Apollo space- LONDON —-Citroen, region, which cowers the company * u 3ns 

designers from Digital Equipment ® { warheads from ingly endless supply of humorous sor at the IrfonnahOT Scwn^ of than have bogs." he French car manidacunrrov^i^ hdaiMl and Scandiiiam^is Pharmacia also f^noraie <k“ 

ssa sss - “ sssb E£sa&'S& 



*ZE3L** -**>*- ^^wsrs a-jrsfcsr— <* 

^3 i=:tn ' "SEsSEl— *. « 

Defense Initiative this year, with *JK “EFLuj. Aina tick when the last bug has been re- ^- ltshou id be impossible to nteet an ■“““ 


Gtroen Changes Management at jad ’ 

1 By Brenda Eidmann JigSitSk 1 

1 wSSoST^^jg SZSff&’SSRg ^£SS5A* — 

e French car manufacturer owned by JSandand Scandinavia, is beaded ??j^ c - ia also named “ 
r. the private Peugeot group, has an- ^ Ken Harris. Mr. Hams^b^al PjMJJi bead ^ oorporo“^ 
nounced top-level management g Slough, previously was ff®*™ JSSSl as a member 

in tic RrituL Austrian and obtain Gerd ScUitt, vraopo® tnan^fioncru c- 


five contractors on the Strategic ^ * lively. “One never reauy 

Defense Initiative this year, with ^Twhole thing tick when the last bug has been re- ^ it should be impossiDie to m«j .r^Tl'STtm, Strategic De- appomiean 

about S59 million committed to re- M S between 10- million moved," he advised. the computing requirements of Initiative officials use to de- ^° e ° Cars 

search. In all. il is anlidpaied that compmcr aa ml rndnl^ SDL” saiS Mi. Catoctor™ o£ design of Stougt““ 

about S26 billion would be spent ®“ . ^ ujienmce for mis- terns could be buflt — <***““?“£ the Pentagon s advisory commie overall system — that would yjeiehe iw 

on Star Wars research in the first wlh UtUe computers that backstop ojer ^ ^ ^^management system- to use conven- ^ 

five years or the program. As the Internal Revenue Semce j2 rtocr Joseph Like others, Mr. Cohen dis- donal wft^wragineering tsdi- 

JSitSX 2KK= SS“i K SSL «?• 


£ SL.'T , cH«r b56- of **«*.- ^*SSi.KSE» tSSWSEffaSBfi S5SSS?S^-“J5 

- ««=fis , =s:ssr5 °r rs?& - sCfi^ 


isss SSSSr 3 | 


he is responsible tor vaim » /~-rrzr ^ Ribbentrop. » 

dais taWest Germany, Austria «J BarUmUl ^J^dtradmfr 
and Switzerland. He «rah^* head of*wrt« - ^ to 

to be based in Munich. Thenew Mr. ™ R gSf£ a d office m 
Southern European region, which Deutsche Bangs ^ 

apprises l^^Italy.&te^ ?»*£? Deutsche 

SeK£riands,SMmandR3r^- ove. in New Yort 

eaL is headed by Jacques Rjvez, Bank Breuer.wbois 

Sd is based in Rungis, marPans. He 

Mr Rivwfs successor as finance to become a - p^tsefae 

^..7^ for Europe 1m not *?* Md gmml man»8°i ““ 

» vr.KJ «4«ph ic hMfid 111 Rani. . . • _c U«l_ 




SSESSS.WS S~S«S3l£; =&»= &”■=> — t^SfiSS^St 

^srssssx ErtSE jassaBt 1 '' - ss'MSt®S Sasaafr— 

STSfES StSSWSSKSS - c 3 s j'j— jM£S2Tld"E U-'wI—SssA’S 

SSj SSESSS Si'KSSIs ^s-“ g£?£ 9 %S 

— of -*-* "" — — ■ I AinosTAXi^: £MS£?SaE ^ “iaMMS: ittatssg 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
' USA 

COMMERCIAL 

& industrial 

FAWHHD COlfiTY. CT WA 

1 Hear Ftwn N iwYakO t 
INVESTMENT HtOPHUV 

morn ». a. offi» s**W w* 

^^ - WaRF°"| 

Other Altroctiwi AoBjrfSjgAjoHfc 

ssssifssr??!® 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

(Continued Fro m Back Page) 

nmi BCT»TB — 1 real estate i employment^ 


real ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

' ISRAEL 

wwjE®®»S 

a new ganriorri o< opofanc e- Oi m« 
MacfiMmineai, 2D mmiMJ T** 11 '• 

Aw. Fr Mhotd & to yb 

latsrssfasr*! 

hedth & beauty 
boa executive 
roaai, auefitanu 



REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 
MAA. 

Brand New. 

THE KIMBERLY - 

145 E. 50 th i 
New York 10022 

A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 

offering 

pre-opening savings on 
6 ma, 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

featuring 

Studio, 1-Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished curd oil with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 

Executive Services Available 

i Model Suites 

’ (212) 371-8866 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


DOMESTIC 

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AUTOS TAX FREE 

BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FREE AND USE OUR 
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and SAVE 

.WJSRf. 


F€s» 

sSSs-'si*-*. sswggSS 

®££?£Sk: sassaa® 

or^pr^^^ra- 


ence. 

“I ha 
modem 


modem alcbemiils,” he said, •» «>“SK53KS in the Dubfin head offiro-^ KSS NatffiBank in Bal| 

sss sasasiSS iS ^ 08 tee 01 SiKaaiSK 

phone fll2) BW-M84. Tah«= 427965 " 



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Cars of 

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advertisement ■—- “7TTT rw 94,1985 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations supplied by FuTK | s 1 ^ j 

™ ■ r T- — — \ 


AUTO SHIPPING 


ahrsaSignaji 

farm LQMOON - E*eqriy.»ar- 


«Wf>4 


r°c««o- sjriw ^*y 

F3000 net. Tefc 7209495 _ 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED /EXCHANGE 
press TO IXAUe UM « f 

ffiKSffiS.’* 

gjam'fia.iahffl: 

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VAUCRESSON 

Hon ■MeuSere', *«»?■ 


nouw "■•""■I -"L-Z ~,r n nrri*n 

ssasii'SffiES; 

irs&sss'ts'U 


rrioarion tenneo for Jw Pcra,^” 



TSHMSBP** 

vada Oy. CA 95959 IBA 


employment 


TRANS CAR 

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SFK3AUSTS 

paoic (1) 225 6* 44 

CANNES/NICE ^3 39 g 4* 

nKSwn 1*1®!,®^ 

BONN t COLOGNE Bg2ffl2l29Zl 

asjgT HR 

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HOUSTON HISmS 

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agents woeiii «M* 

Loave it to m e> bring * to you 

e??sra , w. 

nctup aR over birope -ra/rorivpv. 


* SUWCONVHtr* 

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provides oH reqiried "“^T 

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or your money bade maumnfl 

conversion a»t. 

•?ausj, , s^te!r 

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O6000 Fraridurt/Mom 


ENGLISH EXPERTS 

UvKifee. 

8 yean experma hi Import /bport 

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constant stock of mom tnoo 
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ALMALMANAGEMJEHT 

iBMMSSJVadfasBrJ ™- 

-[d ) Boerbond, — |^,S5So 

'#''* sS E£Ss& = - JSB 1 

-C d ) Ecswltmer S £fti9BX0 

-j 3 J Cduibo w Poem e SF wSS 

^dl«3Sg=: ■- SF1S«U» 

BNP INTERFUNDS WMI 1 

-twllntertxmd Pirnd.- \ 

4«l Intercutrency US* ■ * ^ 

-iwt intorcurrency PM— — D , 

-twl interojrrengr start ty- « 

-<w) Interequity 1 1IU4 

-IwJ Interequlty N- Ajnnr- Otter — * iu.» 
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4 d ) Aston Growth Fund » 

■|w) oiverbond. — 5 « T*S 

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OCEANWIDE 
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Smae 197Z wperier^ar hadM' far 


uBtUKYMMSW AWWMW5- 


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DOT & B>A. *pp^gfar tw^and 
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HEAP OFFICE 

tafa: (Far ekrrified ariyl: 
747-4600. 

EUROPE 

Ai uriei dam: 2636-15. 
Athene 361-8397/360-2421. 
Bmeels: 343-1899. 
Cepenbagen: (01) 32 9440. 
Fnsnkfart: |069) 7267^55. 
Lamcmise: 29-58-94. 

Lisbon: <7-27-93/66-2644. 
London: (Oil 8364S02. 

Madrid: 455-2891/45541306. 
Mfexc (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (02) 41 29 53. 
Romo: 6790437. 

Svrodsn: (08) 7569229. 

Tri Aviv: 03455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 

UNTIED STATES 

New Yorte (212) 752-3 890. 
West Com* [415)362-8339. 

SOUTH AFRICA 

B r yo mri otii 421599. 


LATIN AMHUCA 

Buenos Aims: 41 40 31 
(Pep- 312) 

Caracas: 33 14 54 
G ua yaquil: 51 45 05 
Lima: 417 852 
Panama: 6905 11 
San Jose: 22-1055 
Santiago: 6961 555 
Soo Paula 852 1893 

MIDDLE EAST 

Bahrain: 246303. 

Kuwait: 5614485. _ 

Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
Qatar. 416535. 

Saudi Arabia: 

Jeddah: 667-1500. 
UJLEj Dubri 224161. 

FAR EAST 

Banakric 39006-57. 

Hang Kang: 5-213691. 
J ak art a: 510092. 

Maria; 817 07 49. 

Seoul: 735 8773. 

Smgapom: 222-2725. 
Taiwan: 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925 

AUSTRALIA 

Mriboame:690K2KL 

Biggs y-T . 

P u drington. Q a ae ml an d: 

369 34 53. 



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giimin iij j 

EE 




at.ii 


ft*,- 


markets 


E^ERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 


cb®iJ 


iMr ft,.™, ■: 

# *** I*:* . . 

W* * 

SCWV 

jCtete-,' 
rfcit&tf, v 


§^ Jlar Higher in U.S., Enron 

s f&^SSHa S g *-" 

• • -3 o -!• for u» second consecutive sl *** pqd lnm ^ af 

.... moved higber in NctTyS? SS- do ? ^ * *W of' * SO- 


»ta, *-. 4 x •;. 


WflWa.T ., 
ifttr -.i , 

..... 


• !S£Sistt«is 

;.;?pSss 

- Eariier in the <%. ti* Jtandc* 

' ■'•< said bank confirmed that it bad imer- 

i'" k ^VSJ^iSSS? U * S - Federa l vened in ihe open market shortly 

" : ' ; ammmt ^ before ii sold $ 39.6 mffliralttdre 

:! V.Sfe? dollarndtdltiB ' Rjak*nt (bong. Deafers said '(hey' 
. ' -r^, .1 ^.^Il,v 8 k ., ... believed that the Wea.Gennai 

;: u ^.fJ}^I^ dcI 9 f«lmNew central bank sold S 75 mflSon in Ac 

W, ntlwcT d< T, °P CD market, which wasoonsidared 

"*. ^ SU320 - • - a small amount 

»w h «S“ i a “ ‘WST,? 1 ** m New Before. that, the Bank of Japan 
v.:r-(C^J re - 2 - 65 35 Deutsche was bettered to have iriiervnlcd 
' •*? r p from 2 -® 37 >: 8.090 modestly in. Tokyo fordgn-ex- 

- • • l,r 4 c C ^ francs, up from 8 . 039 : change tra< 5 n& . -" 

- • — ^5n!w» f r Iia, ? >fro xV 64;: A^lysts emphasized 'that inttr- 

-r ^ r Italian lire, u£ from vention can work only fora limiled 

• ■;: • • . " _ ■ '•■.’■ 


time and that Japan and West Ger- 
many would have 10 stimulate titrir 
economies for the recent interven- 
tion to haw any tong-lasting effect. 

Tri eaiirer trading in Europe, cur- 
rency dealers said corporations 
were' buying dollars to settle ac- 
counts at the end of the month and 
investors were baying dollars to ac- 
quire U. 5 . securities. 

' He dollar dosed in London at 


SubmloScm ' 
OPEC Must \ 

f 

Guard Output ; 


)Sl£ 


Page 21 


Britain 


fialloner 

3rd Oner. ms MM 
Mi? 7MJ 
PrMnNH.. 3U JIJ 

imomh ms in* 

Rnwvi— 2446 . U 9 t 
P retM «*- 072 03 


Company Results 

Revenue and profits or tosses, in millions, an In local currencies 
unless orwrwSf indicated. 


Imperial Chemical ind. 
3rd door. IMS MM 
Pretax Mei_ 1824) 2«u 


Dart*Kra« 
3 23 ardover. ms 


Lilly (Eli> A Co. 


smmiKiine Beckman 


Bv Bob Hagcrty RSftc HI ™ 

ItncmiuonaJ HrnM Tribune *****>”- “** «« 

LONDON — The Organization faaade 
itf Petroleum Eltponing Countries Omwlidated-lkitliurft 

shoaifl seek to avoid a further drop mo ear. ms i*m 

in its production raihcr than tiring 15 * 3 »9 

10 defend a rigid official price p * r5 ° or *~ ** ** 

t-j r-T--. . r f ManHn IMS IM4 


!••• StMTzr 

Pet Shora 


tMoMU 19BS MM 

R 4 WIV 4 - — ?SKl. 7 SB 0 . 

aetinc ma imj 

Per Share — 22 * 2. id 

Per J.'sonr rsnutti oa>mtea 
tor 3-tar-t stud May. 


1984 

3rd Quar. 

19E5 

1964 

3rd Qaar. 

1985 

19M 

3rd Quar, 

im 

19M 

9410. 

Revenue — 

TWA 

Tli* 

Revenue 

7M5 

705J 

Revenue 

8307 

7564 

1130 

Ne? Inc 

122.1 

1112 

Net inc _ 

win 

45« 

Net Inc. — 

13U 

1294 

177 

Persnorr 

171 

153 

Per Starr 

155 

1.97 

Per Share— 

14* 

140 

T9M 

9 (Maths 

ms 

1964 

9 Months 

1985 

19M 

fMontiu 

1985 

IfM 

7790. 

Revenue - - 

245C 

T-TB) 

Revenue — 

2420. 

IM 

Revenue — 

2J60< 

2,188. 

not 

Net Inc 

393.1 

372* 

Her (ne 

75.1 

864 

Net inc 

3848 

38+0 

2.14 

Per Shore 

559 

5D9 

Per Share 

121 

171 

per Stare 

*59 

4.71 


Per snare 

f Marita 


3*g-J Downey s & L Atut 
So ted Own-. ins 1VM 
.77“ Sevwwe — 1U K 

11M r«: inc if. 


Louisiana Lana Expi. 

, HOW. ms 1984 

* Revenue ?t£Q Mflj 

ifM Opw Nd 2U 

7LT Osar inore- C8 a OSS 


Z 6490 DM after having briefly oil minister. ? 3 Z £g TS ^ ^ ^ gg- S «*&= 

gone above 16500 DM in die cariy Subroio aid here Thursday. Ti fn ’r^__ gg J?S gZVZit: '&? w ‘MS **£«» 

afternoon. It had dosed Wednes- „ N S«l“ broiosu ® :sled ^ ^ S wiSWiwS JTfS iMSSflS sUB 1 — 


day at 16382 DM. 

-The pound ended at . 51 . 4215 , 
more than one cent bdow its dose 
of 51.4335 Wednesday. 

In other trading Thursday, the 
dollar was fixed at 16487 DM in 
Frankfurt, up from 2.6372 
Wednesday; at 8 . 0 S French francs 


Mr. Subroio suggested that the * 

13 OPEC countries continue to D _ or H,rtkv ms 
produce about 16 -miDion barrels a prwS^— ffi 
day, thdreunem self-imposed ceil- 
ing. Instead of fixing official prices owSSFL- 
for each grade of crude, he said, °** f &&+-- , H 

OPEC might establish a range. Swmh Afrtew 
The Indonesian minister, who ueobat 


™ ‘P, ter iosj Of 10U million. Per 


Jra Quor. 
RCVWUC. 


lit Mot toe. 


Duke Power 

w. IMS 

J* 751 2 

119 X 


2J1 tM rr.iliton if) auorter one et 
SIC r million in 9 monrrn from 
OtteanUnued operations. 

7I9? Lowensreln (ali 


* iauaiuii, uu ii vim *.vdu* i . , Nedbonlc Grow nmn, 

Wednesday; at 8.08 Frendi francs »®*E« »« «>f OPEC Y«r J« ™J 

in Paris, up from 8 . 0324 , and at madc tb cremarks at a conference SSsfeST iia W immai 
T , 787.00 lire in Milan, up from 3 ^°^. > the lmemationa 1 rm H*AS<MU*« KTTST. 
j 770 qa - Herald Tribune and the Oil Daily Per soon 




* -s- - .... 


UglE EUROMARKETS 

' 7 gS 

Zealand-Dol 

- „ ^ ( ‘ ; ni< 3 y Chriscophcr Pizzey ther 

- ' , , ." L fqj-j Reuters disclt 

ii ^ONDON — The secondary Th 
— ^obond market generally three 
ved a slightly easier un^rtone It wa 
i dose Thursday after a very mark 

' 1 0 ct>t day's trading, dealers said. . . total 

1 ;'^ l Brl t* he primary nmket also had a Th 

day, although some dealers fund 
surprised to see the announce-. .. three 
of two New Zealand-doDar Kr 
Thai sector has been under that ! 
y pressure recently from the geos 
■ t v’ '^£-^t of previous bonds that have Zeals 
-■‘^' ” f j gwained unsold. bly « 

: T; trader said, “1 didn’t e^qxet lairs. 

- ■« ,, 5 > 5 ^iee New Zeaiand-dollar brads ' It . 1 

ay, there must be a very good perce 
tied to the deals." Frida 

:^ , :T^ or «® n Stanley International issuec 
lead manager for one of the The t 
■SnifS *^! 9 Zealand-ddhr issues, a 50 - Wl 
: : -w^^lion-ddlar brad for Nordic In-- mflho 
12 — -hnent Bank. Morgan Stanley over t 
' r^V^^firmed that the funds were be- The i 
swapped into floating-rate pares 
'•^^^.-dtrflar bonds. However^ fur- Holdi 


K. \ 


ther details of the swap were not 
disclosed. 

The bond pays i& percent over 
three years ami was p/-ced at 1 00 * 4 . 
It was quoted on the.wben-issued 
market at a discount of 1 VL The 
total fees were lM pocaiL 

The iyg pg h as a serial sinking 
fund that will retire the ssne in 
three equal annual instaOnKnis. 

Kredietbank Inter national said 
that Kredietbank- SA ‘Lnxemboor- 
geoise is issnir^ a threeyear New 
Zealand-doHarbond, whuh proba- - 
bfy will not exceed 30 mfllion i>l- 
lars. 

It. win have a coupon of 1714 
percent and priang wiD be fixed 
Friday. It was quoted oii the when- 
issued market at a discount of ' 1 VL 
The total fees were U& percent. ' 

WMC Finance Ltd. issued a S 75 - 
millkra .bond paying 1014 peroern 
over seven years and poked at par. 
The issue was gnaraniced by the 
parent. Western Mining .Carp. . 
Holdings Ltd., and was offered on 


j 778.80 - ncraJ0 inDune ana the Uil Daily 

’ Tire ttoUar dosed at 11698 Swiss ™ d . ™ afienx^ds. He ^ ^ 

francs in Zurich, up from 11663, bis proposal and otiiere would i» 1.^ 

and at 216.00 yen in Tokyo, slightly IMCUDfi ^ t& 

up from 215 . 75 . (W. UPI) a*cdged for Dec .' 7 inGenevi hmv mjo w. 

OPECs output has been halved ^ 

■■ — — — over ibe past five years ns demand PorStoo ' 7 -- . 1S * 

has fallal and producers outside 

— - ge organization, notably Briiam, 't/SmEff* 

Norway, the Soviet Union and s * BCfc 

• r\ 1 Mexico, have increased produc- AMf L iS 

TJnfiJ) f Ip/lfPiTW ■ bon. OPECs share of oil sales in rmm’ — »u * so, 
£*" ^ non -Comm uni si countries has KrsJSr^Z ?£ 

slid to about a third from two- twhmm ims im 
Ihe when-issued market at a dis- thirds in ihe Late 1970 s. 5 S , ?~f e — 5 -£^ ’iSs 

count of 114 compared with total Mr. Subroio and some other PtrSfX3r *— 

Fees of 114 percent. The lead man- OPEC ministers fear that their Amsfcd industries 


Dynaiectron 

»«W. MSS 

Rrvenwa 1AU 

not ine. lit 

Par Store 0J3 

fMaaita ins 

Revanua 474.7 

Me* ii*t *.97 

Per Share Wi 1 


3rd Quar. 

1985 

19W 

Revenue 

Reven'je 

1310 

1*4.1 

Nel Inc 

Net Inc 

367 

54* 

Per Stare 

Per Sharp— 

348 

141 

f Mamas 

9 Means 

ires 

1984 

Revenue 

Pevenue 

4745 

46SlI 

Not rnc 

Nel Inc 

17.1 

71 J 

Per Shore 

Per Share 

4.10 

SM 



lDu ins 9- month net Includes 
oom of ill million 


Martin Marietta 


Finaadal Cp America 

ira Qaar. IRS m 

Reverie 7 su b*o. 

net inc. 1139 12 

Per Sho'e 029 


3rt Qaar. 

Revenue 

Oser Net 

MM Coer Snare- 


w-wrw*— ^ - OBerNel 

(Mcwttt 1985 19M Ocer snare- 

Revenue U S 1403. jfg, ~,f, Bt 

Nel LOM 43.’4 7JU 

Per shore resuns otter ere- 
terreaasvioenas McDanr 


9 MsmiH 1985 l«M Per Share — 2J 

Revenue 3200. TJCti. I98J nets Include u 

Coer Nel 199-5 me million in avarter or 

Op er snare— 3^7 140 million ui ? months. 

IfSt nets etciuoe choree ot 
SSsS million. Phelas On 


_ 1984 9-rmwiW nr’ includes 

Pacific Resources gain at SSJ million from sale 
WOwar, ins 19M of Outness 

Revenue 33). r 385.9 Southland 

& m ^ 

SSM* — V25& fm Per Share — 195 121 

®f Nfi 1 l£LXa 097 

pot Snore.. 09B - »Moe7M M» 7»4 

I9SJ nett at elude provision 5£IT2tT — i»3j 

V toss 01 nw million. Per {£' fe.— IJi 

are rosulis otter Pteferreo "w Stare— ^ 17i 

yidenas. Southwest Airlines 

Panhandle Eastern ® 

0 Quor, ms 19M Net inc. IM 1« 

cvenue — sue «»q Per snore-, 0453 tua 

Cl IfiC — 1152 21 3 « u M (Na IBM IM4 

fr Stare— 0J1 049 ^ 

wwtm 1985 IfM SeMne* 413 383 

M«nue 1-070 use. per snare— 1J4 1J0 

mine. B0JK 11994 

rr Share ia< 178 v Perry 

_ 2nd Ouar. IfM W»5 

Pennzoll Revenue 1300. 14M0. 

1 Ouar. |mj im* Oner Nel — 42J 973 

ivenue 544 0 598.7 Oner S*iare_ 0J5 1.77 

It inc 4439 S9i4 Id HQH 1984 1985 

n- Snore— 0.94 me Revenue L5*0. I/MJ0. 

utOnttM 198S IfM Cmer Nel — — 953 1193 

ivenur l.yio. Um. 0s * r Shore— 1.70 Z17 

H lot 154J5 17987 «9»S exclude tote M SUM 


snore results otler prefer rea * *™ r ' 
dividends. Sout 

Panhandle Eastern S2.2HS - 

3« Quw. 1985 1M4 Nel Inc. J 

Revenue SiM 5599 Per Star* 

Nel Inc 1153 313 

Per snore— 031 049 

9 Monttn 1915 IfM NeMnc J 


9 MOOSta 1983 IfM 

Revenue 4148 38U 

NM me 20 7 3M 

Per Shore I .Of 134 

IMS 9-montn net .ucfujej 
choree ot S3 million iSSeaen 

include lax credit of S7S3JU0. 
Per snare results aoiusteo 
tor S4or-t spill in mar. 

Traasomerica 

3rd Qaar. 1985 IfM 

Revenue — 1.710. I39C. 

Oner n« — isj* R50 

Qper Snare— 031 CJH 

f MOtntll lfBS 1984 

Revenue — , WHO 3SKJ 

Oper Net 833 1183 

Ooor Share— 13S I£! 

T runs world 

3rd Quor. 1985 IfM 

Revenue . — 4ZL5 4933 

Oner n« 308 m j 

Dpot Shore- 0.79 085 

9 Mwrtht ITU 1984 

Revenue 1300 1^00. 

Oaer Her 722 r.s 

door Shore— ijc 139 

IMS nets exclude gains Ot 
(4 I million in Quarter and ot 
tnj million in 9 monltis tram 
discontinued ooeroiions. 
Union Carbide 


3rd Quar. 

_ Revenue 

0 Net inc 

MM Per Snore 

l-tta 9 Month* 

Revenue 

»J7 Nel inc 

I9M Per Share 


1985 IfM 

544 0 598.7 

4439 598* 

0-94 ue 
1985 IfM 
1.710. 13*0. 

154JS 17937 


I9M Per Share 23a 134 million vs profit of SZ2 mil- 

2850. :n* nets Include loss otte .4 hon in ovarters and toss ot 
141E million in auaner ondotnxx f ISJS'ZA 

1X6 million in 9 months. StWKC in Six months from 

oe at discontinued ooerahans. 


rise Dealers 


the when-issued market at a dis- 
count of IK compared with total 
fees of 11 $ percent. The lead man- 
ager was S.G. Warburg & Co. 



198S 

1984 


3964 

4526 

Net Inc 

21.6 

495 

Par Stare— 

tL20 

Cxi- 


1985 

1984 


1220. 

1JBC 

Nel Inc — — 

■6.1 

1615 

Per Share — 




ager was 5 .G. Warburg & to. countries will continue to lose mar- 
Ge. des Machines Bull became ket share rif they try to bold [their gg ^ 

the firs [borrower to launch a Euro- P«» »bove fr^maiiet levels. ^ 19 s i 9 » 

pean-anrcncy-unilbond this week, which fiuciiiaie daily. Saudi Ara- ^ 

with a 70 -millkm-ECU issue pay- bia, OPECs biggest producer and pm-show- tm 222 

mg 9 Vi percent over seven years prcrewsly *e most faithful in up- cekmese 

and priced at par. It was led by h , oI f“>S ^ces . recently aga^ ires mm 

Banq ue Natiraale de Tbn-k nnd was ^tsned offering markei-rdaied dis- 7 S 5 310 

^iummIu. counts. PM'Snont— 173 273 


Fleming Cos 
M Quor. 1985 
Revenue— 1880 

Hri Inc 12.1 

Per Shore 034 

9 Mourns 1985 

Revenue sjki 

Net Inc 42.91 

Per snore tub 

Harris Corp. 

ID Qaar. IMS 

Revenue — 559.9 

Net me lie 

Per Shcre 037 


McDannel Douglas g ,fl Q?w- 

MfMr. 1985 19M geflffj* 

Revenue 1WO 2*60 Per Srrarm 

Net Inc 721 888 r" — 


Net Inc 72 1 88.4 — 

.’♦J* Per snare 18? 2.19 9 Months 

V Months 1985 IfM nSi’TIS!* 

5^5 Revenue BJ»0. 7A»ft SrSSrS” 

.oil MB' inc 250.’ me 

J**? Per Share «?* 582 a- mss. 


Phelps Dodge 

jrdQoor. 1985 1 984 aroQnor. 

Revenue 2101 IfcO Revenue. 

Nel me. 44 (c}2«3 Net ,rK - - 

Per Snare 012 — Per Short 


Squibb 

l«M 3ra Qaar. 1985 1984 

ITuO Revenue — 5S2J 4918 
■12*3 Net inc - — 723 634 

_ Per Share— 1 35 1.18 

1914 9 Month* 1«H M84 

1925 Revenue 1450- 13&S. 

1)502 Nel ln C 167.1 1474 

_ Per snore— 3.10 175 

Standard Oil tOhio) 

, 3rd Ouar. 1985 IfM 

lie Revenue 34*0 2880. 

148* >ie> Inc 346 0 3W-0 

X490 Per ilia re 148 149 

2210 9 Months 1985 19M 

13* Revenue 10,130. 9840 

lit’ inc 1871 1.191 

Per Stare— <40 489 


1985 19M 9 Months 

tscl 6923 Revenue 
194 (0)502 Net Inc . 
026 — Per Stari 


Moore McCormack 


Procter & Gamble 


John urn A Johnson 


taOwr. 
Revenue — 

Net inc 

1985 Per Shore— 
9 Months 

“■4 Revenue 

0A3 Net ik 

Per Star* 


1984 VU Quor. 1985 

1568 Revenue 33QC. 

7.15 Nel inc. 2503 

074 Per Starr 149 


3rd Quar. 

1985 

IfM 

Revenue 

Z3» 

24*0. 

Net inc 1 

105*36 

772 

Per snare — 

— 

1J» 

9 Moo lbs 

1985 

IfM 

Revenue 

6440. 

7,135. 

Nel Inc. 

10)371. 

J1D;Q 

Per Snare 

— 

*40 

0; toss. 



Union Electric 

3rd Quor. 

1985 

Iff* 

Pevenue 

4938 

4722 

N*l Inc 

119.9 

111.17 

Per Share 

147 

127 

9 Months 

1985 

19M 

Revenue 

1450. 

i,iBa 

Ne) me 

784.9* 

2*3 18 

Per Share 

7X1 

223 

Union Pacific 

3rd Quar. 

IMS 

IfM 

Revenue 

1.93(1 

2433 

Nel inc. 

170* 

1361 

Per Stare — 

141 

1.70 

9 Months 

19SS 

19M 

Revenue 

. 5463 

id M 

Net inc 

3663 

3e!4 

Per Stare — 

345 

ZSt 


Vulcan Materials 


3rd Quar. 

1985 

19M 

Revenue 

27*.) 

266.9 

Nel inc 

78.75 

2849 

Per Stare 

2X7 

2x7 

9 Months 

1985 

1984 

Revenue 

742 3 

72E4 

Net inc — 

5«J! 

6141 

Per Stare 

510 

S£i 


log 9 Vt percent over seven years 
and priced at par. It was led by 
Banque Natioaale de Paris and was 
quoted at a discount of rathe 
when-issued market compared 
with the total 1 % percent fees. 


Cefonese 
3rd ow. ires 
Revenue — 7sao 

Net inc 478 

Per Stare — 173 

9 Months 1989 

Revenue 27*0 


3ns Qaar. 

1985 

1984 

Revenue 

1400. 

1JOD 

Net inc — 

158J3 

137X 

Per Stare 

047 

u: 

9 Months 

1985 

1984 

Revenue 

XJ6C. 

4473. 

Net inc. 

4UJ3 

4072 

Per Share 

lot 

2.16 


when-issued market compared Mr. Subroio called the new Sail- JJJ 55 ? — * c&S. 
with the total 11 k percent fees. di policy a warning ro all oil pro- 
- . . . , , ducets that **whai others can do. 

On the secondaty markm, deal- the Saudis can do belter." Unless champion spark pi« 

Hon-OPEC producers job the or- £LS£?_ ii£ j [ffi 

dnmged to a shade easier . Retail ganizatira in restraining their out- KiSUz: ^ 

professouals ; stffl appear rdurnnt puli he warned, oil prices could f Months iws IfM 

pl ^ , ^ 
•Me the impasse over the U.S. Though OPEC bas made such *"***•— »J 4 iso 

debt ccflmg continues. warnings repeatedly, most non- Colgate-Palmolive 

Floating-rate note also OPEC producers have refused to wo«r. wo iw 

tended to edge bad; slightly, with reduce production. Norway's ener- Nwmc* «&o 529 

srare profit-taking developing in gy minister predicted Wednesday ^ 

the piorpetua] issues, which nave that his country's output would rise Rtvonue — 3400 . u*o. 

been fiim recently, dealers added, about 40 percent by 1990 . "vsiml ’fts 


Jostens 

W Quor. IfM 

RDvertoc 957 

Net inc __ 282 

Par sner« 0.T3 

Lear Stegler 

ID Qaar. 1985 

R*vtau* 5X14 

Not inc 1135 

Per Stare 042 


7984 Newmont Mining Per snare — 

VR JroQuor. 1985 IfM ?erjnorer, 

’J 7 .-? Revenue 1659 143.7 terred divide 

Oaet Nel 4.48 106 

1984 doer Share— 031 035 Reyna 

» Months 1985 1984 3rd Quor. 

«« Revenue 5078 4993 Revenue 

Oper Net IBJ 30 OuerNMTH 

Dpot Start— 040 7383 Oner StareZ 

less 0-mo rj (ft net excludes a 

1985 coin of SaS minion from sole 


eii ot unit. Recurs restated. 
012 nl industries 

manor. 1985 

Revenue 3638 

Net inc - 58 

w* Per Stare.— 08? 

me 9 Months 1985 

0^ Revenue 1855. 1 

Nel me Ic3 

Pe- Shore— GJ3 


y>ta Quaker Oats Ptr snare — 

Ml Quor. 1985 I9M Sybron 

®5f-5 ®St? 3rd Dear. 1985 

ia P^r — nii om Revenue 1288 

19 Per Share — 044 Oel oner Net (a)08 

19M Pef snare results otter ore- Oner Snore— 

’till Hrr ‘ x,a, ' flMn:,i - 9M «.»n 

ICa Onop mm 

Reynolds Metals Oper Stare- 

3rd Quar. 1985 1984 a: toss. Nets 

W Revenue 8753 940 7 SIS million i 

Oner Net 97 39 j million In era 

173 Oper snare— 041 13: ol SSJ minis 

hides a u— , , M r million in 9m 

-««* hESJ 52 _ a 2 ¥ i*S ««««««*- 

Opct Net 21*1 9ft9 

Oaer Share— 0.94 439 9 

IMS nets e > cuw charge ct ’ 1I ®“° r - 

IWJ 03 1 million. Revenue 

3413 Nel Inc 


1985 l»M 

1283 ua) 
1)08 4.17 

— 0 J 8 

1989 I9M 
140 1335 

0£2 124 


9 Moallts 1989 I9M 

Ooer Net 1*0 1335 

I Oper Share— 022 1 24 
1984 a: loss. Nets exclude gain ot 
140 7 Sis million vs loSS Ol STo.7 
39 J million In Quarter* and aain 
UC ol SSJ million vs loss ct SJO 
(9U million in 9 months from dis- 
IS! continued eporatiNt*. 


Waste Management 

3rd Quar. 1989 1984 

Revenue 424J 3413 

Net Inc— 45 £2 293i 

Per Share 092 080 

9 MantlM 1983 1984 

Revenue 1.190. «?63 

Nel Inc 124Jt 10373 

Per Snore 231 2.13 


3rd Quar. 1985 19M 

Revenue 3797 227.1 

Nel Inc CM ru 

Per Stare 044 035 

9 Months 1985 19M 

Revenue 1220 1.180. 

Net Inc 122 2.7 

Per Shorn— 120 136 


Oper Net 

Ostr Share— 


piimgc. w 

u -^ Though OPEC has made such p * rSnor * — 104 151 52 , 2 ^' JS? Nonhern states Pwr 

wrings repeatefly. most non- coioote-Paimoiive gSgfc ^ S| £8 ™ 

also OPEC producers have refused to **<*""■ wg >**• f Months ires i 984 SfLK — 4 ? 1 S V ; 7 

with reduce production. Norway's ener- Me— ‘go su ^SSmmZZ ^s 9 t^n 7 ~ 

:gin g minister predicted Wedn«day ,m .m KSEa. 2 bri«£ 5 ?^^= 

have that his coumrys output wou Id nse Revenue 3400. U40. m.ukm m euorrerlmcS ot Six Per Stare— 

ahmil 4in nonvnt ku 1000 Net Inc 1434 1424 mdlion In 9 months from dis- Per shore n 

flea, aooui 4 RJ percent Dy I«U. Per snore — 1.75 1 J 9 continued ooerutfons. terrea divktoi 


039 Shell Oil 

I9M 3rd Quar. 1985 

1,010. Pevenue 5210 

11.1 Nel Inc 3650 

°- M 9 Monttn 1985 


14.9&0 15470 

99fi.O 1,19a 


41X3 Singer 

i t-7 3rd auor. 1985 

136 Revenue — 5917 

1984 Nr' Inc. 124 

VITO Per Share. 032 

1613 9 Month* 1985 

4.90 Revenue 1300 


Per shore results otter are- Ner Inc 


4, y 

: r 


h -tVltr 


r V ^’*1 


17% 17% + IS 
M» 1SMl+-iS 


40% 23U ErlcTI 
19V. 11 EvnSut 
14% 7% Exovlr 


WH Wk 
» IKl W 
T9 18 M 
111k lOVi 10W 
174k 17 17W 

lh 316 M 
M 516 SH 
2414 23% 24V6 
9Vi 9 
7M 634 
13U. IM 
784 7YS 
» 214 
7W 69k 
1916 18W 
5V. 416 

P S 

1514 148k 
15 14V. 

1344 1316 
714 714 
47M 46 Vl 
M 3V. 

184 
4184 
1084 
486 
784 784 
llh .1184 

I & 

17V4 1684 
3914 3714 
TVs 7 Vl 
9 184 

3V3 38b 


iX4 740 2584 256* 251A— V4 1716 1016 (Cosier 251 50 

36 lB*k TO. 18*4 + Vb >084 6*4 Kaydan 42 

39S 1316 1281 IM— 8k 41V. 3994 Kemp 1J0 32 591 

1 418k 28 KvCnU lJOO 25 62 

BVi 4’.a Kevex 69 

II 686 KevTm 1177 

9U TU Kimbrk 100 

21 V. 13 Kinder M A 133? 

1486 4 « Kray M £ 213 

1684 HP* Kruger 2 u 33? 

29Vj 8V> Kulcke .121 to 1199 



terrea dividends 


1184 1184 118* + 1. J{84 2**i OlllJP 176 85 51 

U| oi. A >t . 15 8*4 OisnE*P fil 

5?? fsC 5586-. u 1686 8 OvmV.s 28 1.9 140 

S 39H n + t 5 Oxaco 21 

65* 684 684 


Sysco 

~. cl 111 Quar. 1986 1915 

Revenue 7MJ) cJ42 

Nel Inc 142 123 

Per Snare om 058 

1JM Todd Shipyards 

5J™ 2nd Quar. IfU 1985 

4*70 Revenue 1022 1286 

ii. Net Inc (aj42! 454 

5438 Stare- - 1.05 

lion 1st HaH T9M 1985 

Revenue — 1982 28*.* 

Niftlnc (C1133 6.91 

Per Shore — 2.06 

1984 a: loss. IMS nets include 

i ,352 charge oi SJO million. 

058 Trocar 

19M 3rd Quar. 1985 I9M 

l-eoo Revenue 139.7 1287 

44.9 Net me 758 895 

224 Per Stare 0M 0 AS 


Western Airlines 

3rd Quar. 1985 IfM 

Revenue 2522 3»J 

Oner Nel 15.1 130 


Oper Share— 029 8*4 

9 Mon mi hi: I9M 

Revenue 1,010 9035 

Oner Net 392 (a]23.7 

Oder Stare— 1.19 — 

o. lass. 

Western Co. Nth Am. 

3 rd Ouar. 1985 ITS* 

Pevenue 114.4 1535 

Nel Loss V0 141 

fMonftit 1985 198* 

Revenue 3794 **15 

Nat LOU 57 J> 122 

IMS nets include ra> cred- 
its at SZo million m Quarter 
and ol Sx.9 million in f 
months. I93x nets Include 
oam oi si Jl million. 


31 Vi 3)’.* 31 % 
9^ 9U 9'u 
IS 141* 14*4 
>4 h* 4 b 


9 '- Vh 9 V* + 
2S« ?U 2?»— 

17 16W 166* — 

T-1 T* 716 — 
13<<r 13V* 13'-— V* 
12 W 11 ^ 12'6 + 1 * 



9 ' 6 — 
256* + 'b 

V* * w 
12 + ».* 
11 % 

32VS— V4 
9 +% 

23 + >U 

17% + «4 
2 ± '4 

10 — U 
16!0 + % 
J >4 

»W— '4 
10 - 4 — r* 
26 ‘a + Mr 

r* 

6 % 

ru— v» 
13 -•> 
'/a + h. 
11 % + ■/* 
28 

11 + Ift 
8’2 h- % 

25% 


\LVS 6 QMS 
9»fc 3% Qua dr* 
32% 16% Quanlm 
SVi 2T* QueStM 
15% 8% Quixote 
16% 716 Quotrn 


781 7% 6% 7 + '* 

253 TS 7 V* 7*6— 14 

789 21U 2016 2? — % 

18 4Vi 4% 4V5 

859 16% 15% 16 + "s 

21870 15V. 14% try 4 % 


12% MerlB 
11% AAervG 
8 % 

11% 

1 % 

5% 

4 % 

32k 


220 

42 

JO 

36 

126 

4 a 

JO 

U 

2J80 

42 

LOO 112 

28 

25 


34V. + % 
57V4+.V9 




wr 


40 

32 

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SO 

2.9 

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2 

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48 

AX 

45* 

J 


6% 5% «4 

4 394 39k 

9* 9V4 9J6 

19W» 1* 19V4 

6 344 5% 

11 W 4 10 % 
M J l 
314b znb 2144 

ils 

^ V «’ 

IPV 4 W 4 1046 
1614 1514 
Uta 1614 .... 




12 + V. 

MIX 

1644 — 14 
34% + 16 
1816 + H 
1414 + 14 
1M4 + % 
714— U 
11 % 

9 % + 

im + 

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ISM 

4V2— 6Vi 
7 
14 

944— % 
2%— 14 
7 

Sh-Vs 

l«k +116 
1BJ4 +■% 
UU + *b 
lMfc + U 
8% + % 
7 + U 


15% VKJBftst* ,16 1.7 2435 
BY* 344 Jackpot 289 

4116 35% JackLte 374 

37% M% JamWtr 47 

8U 426 JefMart 277 

23% Ul£ Jwlca .12 j 3348 

7U 3% JtotlCtt t 44 

18% tffi Jnsoran 10 

19U 994 Junes 1077 

20% 13% Justin 40 25 34 


S3 30% Kotnaii 

Si6 13% Korcnr 


9VStU9Vt 
5% 5V4 5% + U 

37 35% 36% +1'* 

19% I9Vt 19% 

5% 5% 5% 

231b 27% 23 + % 

6 5 % 6 + 16 

8 8 8 

10% 15% 18% 

15% 15% 15% 


I9K> 1 see lyVj + M 

#U 8 8U> 

31% 31U 31% + % 
15% ISVi 151k- Ik 


315 

3% 

2% 

I'm. 



4 

4 

20 

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«3u 

Vti 

73 

25 

74ft 


21 

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17% 

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ir* 

4V3 

14% 

14K 

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9 

15li 

14ft 

1F'6 

U 

5% 

r.c 

5ft 

403 

2% 

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7^» 

108 

2 

1% 

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18 

6ft 


6ft 

17 

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41 

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Wl 

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18-1 

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<7 

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2 

2517 

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158 

29 

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W£ 

14ft 

IA*. 

16ft 

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m 

398 


lift 

ii5* 

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l.u 

W- 

356 

14% 

13% 

12% 





43 

49ft 

48% 

4t'% 

279 

49 ft 

49 

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71 


Wb 

6ft 

2V 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft 

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IMs 

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106 

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70 

30% 

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30 

533 

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22*6 

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77ft 

7TS 

77ft 

107 

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139 

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3 7% 7ft 7% 


6 % 1 % 
17V? 10 
46% 32V« 
67% 39V* 
32% 199* 
41% 23 
23 L. 19% 
26% 12ft 
7 % 3 % 
19U 19% 
48% 2310 
1916 12% 
si* sy* 

8 4 V. 

20 IM 


OcBcner 

OQUOS 

OolTGD 1X8 U 
OtiiaCa 208 4S 

oxntms M» 14 
OWRas Jr* za 
OldSofCOri 120 
One Sep J3a 20 


QoticR 

orBane 

SStp 

Oshmn 20 1 A 


Mk 2 ft 
11 Wft 
40 391* 

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31% 91% 
25ft 35ft 
6 ft 6 ft 
13 % 13 % 

T7Vj 36VD> 

13% 13ft 
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m 


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10% + 16 
39W— li 
tin + 1 % 

27% 30 

30% + % O' 
91% — % 77 
25% + V* 34 
ift + ft 6 ' 
13ft 7 

27% + 4, 25 

13% + ft 8' 
6ft 14 

6 + ft 38 
12ft 23 : 




1381 

10ft 

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118* 


13ft 

17%— ft 



331 

19ft 

19 

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■10r 1^ 

7 

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7 

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4.4 

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18<4 

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18% + % 



9*3 




140 

3.9 

231 

41ft 

41 

41% — % 




17ft 





13 

Uft 

14% 


340 

S3 

521 

7?ft 

70% 

71ft + ft 



36 

5ft 

5% 

5% 




5ft 


5ft 



73 

30 

29 


M 








59 

8ft 

8 




45 

15V: 

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22 

25 

60 

12ft 

12% 

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Mb U 

415 

74ft 

74% 

74% 4 % 




4 

3% 




Ail 

8ft 

e% 

8% 



401 

4ft 

4 % 

4ft 



1495 

5% 

s% 




7 

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4*4 


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l*hi 4 Vj 

40 

3.9 

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20ft 

28 ft 

20% 4 % 



30 

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45 

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3415 

7% 

7 Vi 

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2897 

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17% 

13 





left 

18ft 4 ft 

t 


16 

19% 

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I A 

in 

179 

16% 

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M 

u 

765 

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34% 

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48 

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37% 

37ft 

37ft- ft 

.16 

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180 

13% 

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lfift 



125 




.15 

J 

817 

25ft 

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17 

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1331 

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W 

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15 

13% 

13ft 

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85 

lfl 

19 

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40 

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13% 

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19 

lift 

11 

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304 

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336 

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10ft 

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60 

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49 

4A% 

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253 

20ft 

19% 

19% — % 









145 

15 

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48a 22 

113 

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29ft 4 ft 

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17ft 

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224 

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22 

342 

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298 

17% 

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146* 

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toft 

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310 

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17 

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144 

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21ft— ft 

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7% 4 ft 



1 

14% 

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87 

tft 

6% 

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48 

2.7 



7ft 


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12% 

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40 

54 

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33ft 

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31 

30ft 

31 4 % 

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IA 

41k 

4ft 

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2 

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23 

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6ft 

6% 

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24 

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37ft 

37 

37% 4 ft 



76 

23 

22ft 

22ft— ft 


9ft 

4% VLI 



368 

5ft 

5ft 

5ft 4 % 

l4'-B 

7ft VLSI 



610 

lift 

16% 

11 

17 

4 V* VMX 



211 

4ft 

4ft 

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20% 

6 valid Lg 



215 

71-4 

7 

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22ft 

8ft ValFSL 



TV 

15% 

15ft 

15ft 

42ft 

Uft VaiNU 

1 20 

U 

312 

38ft 

37ft 

37ft— ft 

34ft 

19% VaILn 

.40 

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70 

20ft 

20 

30 

18% 

lift VanDus 

JO 

u 

12 

lBft 

17ft 

18 — ft 

15ft 

4% Vonzell 



43 

S 

4ft 

4ft— ft 

£ft 

7% Vent rex 



437 

A 

5ft 

5ft — ft 

28% 

13V. VI corp 

■1> 

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17 

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16% — % 

14 

7% VleaaFr 

239 39 

37 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft 4 ft 

14ft 

9ft Viking 



21 

13% 

12ft 

?2"i— ft 

2Dft 

13% VlraMk 



3* 

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19 

14 — ft 

13V* 

5% Voacvi 



273 

7ft 

7% 

T.’i * % j 

23 

14ft Voltl rtf 



148 

1£% 

18 

18% 4 % 



9% 

1 ft Xebec 

S3fl 

SW 

Vtt 

Jft- Vi* 

13% 

5% Xtoer 

726 

7% 

6 % 

I'll 4 ft 

17% 

10% Xidek 

2906 

13ft 

13 

13% 4 ft 


2314 I4U YtowF a 54 13 1866 23ft 23ft 2Z'A + 1* 


30ft 5U Zen Lbs 
13% 10ft Ziegler 
■eft 31 ZiaftUl 
6% 2% Zltef 

lift 3% Zlvgd 
15U 6ft Zonavn 


40M 

48a 3.9 8 

1J6 3J IIS 
331 
3 

061 O 103 


24'4 23 23ft — % 
12ft 12ft 17ft + '<* 
*3 * 1 % 41 % — ft 

2 % 2 % 2 % + ft 

5% 5ft 5ft— ii 

11 10 % 10 % — ft 


Soles figures ore unofficial. Veorlv n>gns and ia»s r«ie« 
the previous 52 week s plus me current mm. bu! not me lores! 
f roahto dav. Where a split or Mock dividend amaunflra la 25 
eercenl or mare has neon paid, ino year's nigrwow range and 
divrfiond ore shown far Ihe new slock only. Unless otherwise 
naied. raies ot diuiaends or* onnuoi d«Burs*menis him on 
me lalew oecJoranan. 

a — dividend also e»lral s». 0 — annual role of dividend plus 
slocfc dividend, c — iiauldorlna alvldena eld — called, d — 
new yearly low. a— divlaend declared or paid In preceding 13 
mourns, a —dividend ■» Canadian funds. suMeel to lift 
non-rmaener lax. i — dividend declared alter spHthip ar 
sleek dividend. I — dividend paid this year, emitted, deferred, 
er ne solan teem at Infest dividend meeting, k — dividend 
declared tt paid ltds year, on accumulative Issue with divi- 
dends in arrears, n — new Issue in rhe past 52 wee**. Tne Man- 
■aw ranoe beams with the start of (realm, nd — ne»i aav 
delivery. P/C — price-earninss ratio, r —dividend declared 
or pa lam preceding 12 mowtrs. plus stock aivioww. s — siecs 
spin. dvWena engine vain dom of spill, sis — sales, t —divi- 
dend paid In slack in precedim 12 Months, estimated cash 
value on ex-dividend ar e*-disf ribuilon dole, u — new yearly 
high, v— iroding nolle* vl — in bankruptcy qr receivership 
or being rearpenluid under tne BpAJrruerev Aef. Of leCurilles 
axsumM ov such companies, mi — when cnsrrloutea wl — 
when issued, ww— with warrants, x — ex-divi aena ex e»- 
ripnfs. van— e«-dh!rltail«i. *w-ryvlitaui warrants v — 
ex-dividend and soles In lull. Wd — yleia. 2 — sales in full. 


! !SSK 





































Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 


HERE'S THE *L0NE BEAfiLE* 
BACK HOME AFTER HIS 
HISTORIC FLIGHT FROM 
NEW YORK TO PARIS... 


PIPING THROUGH THE CITY, 
HE 15 6REETEP pf CHEERING 
THRONGS IN A HUGE 
TICKER TAPE FARAPE... 


■I HI !!■■■■ HHHHHH 



CITIES & PEOPLE: 

A Social and Architectural History 


By Mark Girouard. 397 pages. $29.95. 
Yale University Press, 302 Temple Street, 
New Haven, Conn. 06520. 


<ic dtv service *»= muteraim. AW*SUl* 
creatiOT of 


BLONDIE 


WE HAVE AN S 
OUTSTANDING 
tv STAFF /v . 


a TIWI- 

TZ 


I THAT’S WNSWOOD 
I BUAASTEAIP r- «' 


HE’S A GeNIUS AT 

what he ooes r 


laur who knows what 

THE HECK JT IS ■? r— - 



ACROSS 


1 “ the 

music!” 

5 Derby Downs 

H Challenge 

14 Aircraft-related 

15 P. Bailey’s 
mom? 

ISHyaiite 

17 Persia, today 

18 About 

19 State bird of 
Hawaii 

29 Something 
auld 

22 Intellectual 

24 Object of a 
springtime 
hunt 


46 Something 
burrowed 

47 Conifers 

49 Something 
bleu 

52 Certain 
Georgians 

56 Chromo- 
lithograph 

57 See 34 Across 

59 Goo 

50 Wedding coken 

61 Kind of bean 

62 What many a 
bride changes 

93 Specks 

64 Impudent 

65 Third-day 
creation 


10/2S.6S 

12 Rajah’s wife 

13 Realm of 
amps. 

21 Rational 

23 Gula 

25 Carry on 

26 First Hebrew 
letter 

27 Proportion 

28 Sacred song 

30 Dr. Seuss’s 
Thidwick 

31 When Arbor 
Day comes 

32 Signs of a sort 

34 Further 

36 "As you !" 


BEETLE BADLEY 


r'M Boiue to 

RUM A PEW LAPS, 
OTTO. TAKE MY / 
HELMETTOMVyig 
LOCKER A T 


J ^ 

'iS 


26 Quebec land 
measures 
29 "...delight 
such as only 

may 

know": 

M orison 

33 Colleens 

34 Something gnu 

35 Seventh Greek 
letter 

36 Its soul is 
brevity 

37 El Dorado’s 
treasure 

38 Propped up 
42 Has a 

connection 
45 Vassal 


1 Jamie Green, 
e-g- 

2 Trillio n: 
Comb, form 

3 Algerian port 

4 Chinese silk 
fabrics 

5 Capsulizes 

6 Emulates 
Seurat 

7 Rocky debris 

8 Grampus 

9 Most small- 
minded 

10 Northernmost 
Irish county 

11 In 

(sulking) 


39 Chihuahuas , 
e.g. 

49 Exchange rate 

41 Milk curdlers 

42 Graceful 
child's 
birthday 

43 Chemical 
suffixes 

44 Banners 

46 Boxer’s garb 

48 Across: Prefix 

49 Sennit 

50 Potpourri 

51 Lease 

53 Wings for 
angeli 

54 City on Seward 
Peninsula 

55 Went like sixty 

58 Chilean river 



noiaJ 

.WHAT* 


( t r ( 



ANDY CAPP 


Ifd5 Qmi m*idt Ltd 

! Pot tty H«w* S|nac«l« 



HE'S THE OTHER LOT. S 
DEAR — 'NOTHING LEFT 1 


WHAT'S HE? 


Reviewed by Jonarhan Yardlcy 

I N his previous books, Mark Girouard. the 
emin ent British arristectural historian, has 
concentrated much of bis attention — not to 
mention his wit, erudition and stylistic ele- 
gance — on the country dwelling places of the 
pr os p er ous aru * powerful, but in "Cities & 
People” he casts a far wider net. This generous- 
ly illustrated book “is concerned with. Western 
ones from the Middle Ages up to the 20th 
century, in terms of who did what, why, where 
and when," and as such amounts to an infor- 
mal histoiy of the modem city. 

Those who hate or fear cities must be warned 
at the outset that Girouard is an ardent parti- 
san of urban life. He loves "the sense of drama 
in its widest sense: the sense that many variet- 
ies of human life are concentrated on one 
stage,” and he most loves those cities which 
have welcomed and harbored the greatest di- 
versity: Rome in the 16th and 17th centuries, 
where "it was possible to live the life one 
chose”; Paris in the 1 9th century, “the epitome 
of aU the modem city had to offer”; Chicago 
and New York in the same century, both of 
them dynamic and capacious. Consider by 
contrast the city of tin Middle Ages: 

"It b hard for us to get any concept of the 
atmosphere of a medieval town. The lifestyle 
was essentially orthodox; there was as little 
room for dissent as in any town under a strict 
Communist or Islamic regime today. It was 
generally accepted that there were right beliefs 
and right ways of behaving, and that any 
deviation from these was punishable, often by 
flogging, mutilation or death.” 

Yet m these h ermeti c, claustrophobic places 
the seeds of the modern city were planted. As 
Europe emerged from the Dark Ages, as trade 
revived and people began to awaken from the 
long slumber, aides arose — the greatest of 
them, "the biggest, richest and most sophisti- . 
cated city in the world,” was Constantinople — 
and, within them, ludunentary institutions 
took shape: markets gradually tamed into 
shops, centers of financial activity formalized 
themselves into hanks, separate business rand 
trade districts evolved, hospitals were con- 
structed, academic activity intensified, and ba- 


ing of quays and the provision of cranes. 
K and the building of walls 

don? —almost aD of which,. m 

another, have been the obligations of cit> gov 
eminent ever since. . 


eminent ever since. . u- 

rn which soectade was 


Men to be an essential put of Bfc 




seen to be an essential pari of Oft one ™ 

Sher these caties parade thn^Chnw^s 

account Rome, Antwerp. Gdansk. Arg«f 
dam, Paris, London, an d at s 

Washington, "arguably the most brilhant tom* 

pta^^cH^Thoughlhea:ati«tmd- 

ever imagined, ami there was also vasl 5LS^ f 
er diversity and sophistication. In a 
chapter called “The Uses of Leisure, Gu- 
ouaid argues that in the modem city a cruoai 
influence appeared: 

“The crowds of fashionable people prome- 
nading in coaches on the Corns la Reinc or 
walking in the Tcdleries gardens represented a 
new development in the European city. They 
formed what was later to be called ‘society, 
but to begin with to be referred to as 

‘polite society,' the *beau monde’ or “people of 
quality.’ .Society had no formal existence ana 


iL It was a gro u p of people who aid tbuigS' 
together, entertained each other, wore particu- 
lar clothes, and talked, walked, behaved /“‘d 
decorated their booses in a particular maim er. 
Any society had an inner ring, members of 
wb£± were informally recognized as arbiters of 
who or what was acceptable. . . . Society be- 
came an extremely important dement in aties. 

because it produced mare than coaches and 
promenades. Theaters, opera houses, pleasure 

n a nk i n a«*mhhrrvvwnc ntmff iin iBL coffee- 


t 


WIZARD of ID 


© New York Tones, edited by Eugene Malesko. 

DENNIS THE MENACE " 



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'-TO TALK WITH HER' SHE KNOCKED 
k THE ORAL MEDICATION OUT OF 


* OF ALL SORTS OF THINGS , DR.1 WOULDN’T 


CLAUDIA IS ACCUSING MS 


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UNFAITHFUL AND THAT YOU 
I ARE PART OF 


THINK THAT ‘ 
IF YOU 
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houses, shops, e n ti r e neighborhoods and ulti- 
mately entire towns grew op to cater for it." 

As society came to proameoce, outside the 
dries there was a reaction against its excesses, 
as wtfl as those of the urban lower orders: 
“Babylon was in the air. The modem Babylon’ 
became .a familiar nickname or journalistic 
diche for Loudon, and, inevitably, as Paris 
grew, it too began to be called Babylon.” For 
many these modem dries were loo large, too 
dirty, too dangerous, too steeped infaxmy and 
wickedness. “The betirf that the country is 
basically good and rim city haacaBy wicked 
can be traced deep into the past," Girouard 
writes, “but its particular, modem form stems 
from the reaction against die many and unden- 
iable horrors of big 19th-century dtiesT* 

For those of- ns. who love the old. 19th- 
centmy city, the possible dominance of the Los 

Ai^gcks style is Hot especially happy news, but 
perhaps the central lesson weleara from *l£8- 
les A People” is that tile nature of ckieaLu 
forever changing and that the fnrtmMS of indi- 

vidual dries rise and fall due to htflaences 
beyond our control. ■ 


> : 


* I HAVE TO T316 A HOLE . OTHERWISE 
THERE WON'T BE ONE HERE ! ’ 



Jonathan Yar/Beyisouthestaffqflhe Wash- 
io/as/85 . .ingfonPasL 


BRIDGE 


GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMSLB) WORD GAME 
9 by Henri Arnold and Bob Lse 


Unscramble Vwm kxr Jwnbies. 
one totter to such square, to tam 
fow ordi na ry *ortte. 


PEBID 




WHAT TO 
DO WHeN YOU 
HAVE THE FEEUN© 
YOU WANT TO 
6PENC7 MORE THAN 
YOU CAN AFFORD. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
term the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Wbrfld Stock Markets 


Via Agence France- Presse Oct. 24 

dosing prices in load cairmdes unless otherwise indicated. 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow] 

Jumbles: SQUAB TWICE MAINLY FABRIC 
Answer That snobbish skunk was unpopular 

because he was always putting on this— 
SUCH AWFUL "AIRS’* 


WEATHER 



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.gjTEKSATIOXAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25. 1985 


SPORTS 



Page 23 


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s, Giving Cardinals 3-1 Lead in World Series 

Years of Competence 


■ ^nJnto Landrum was greeted by Cesar 
. . w j ^WfCartlMW first hit in game, a home 


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SCOREBOARD 


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Baseball 


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O R Kama aty A SL Louis 5. S-RMa, 
■Smith. WP— Quteenberry. . 
to-struck out for Blade to Mb: M HM M lor 
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tenwjnL wOI .Ml«f RW (IrU tlx tootaM 
of lha MOMibKaaM OfM tafurv ta Ms toft 
Dr 

OALLAS— Placed Chortle SHton. hraom 
on In turn nans 

IND I A N A Aqo u IipQ CUm t Ochor Oton, 
award, from PhUadellWiki tar two future ■*& 
ond-rotmd drofi satadtora. 

SEATTLE— Troded Jan SunavaM. Board, 
To San Aatoalatar al9M secowfr-oand draft 
choice. Placed Jeff Croat, center, an Injured 
reserve, . 

. POOT BALL . 

Moitoaal Fooftau Loam 

ATLANTA— PJocad Stava BartkOMkl 
ouorterback. an me Inland reserve list. - 

BUFFALO— Wotyed Bustor Barnett. Kohl 
and. : 

. CLEVELAND— Actfvatoa Codv Riston. □<■ 
fansfvo Daemon. Ratoassd DlD. Howard, cor- 
■wrtwcfci 

DALLAS— Adivntad Howard Richards, of- 
7tawdvii tackto. Ptacod Crawtard Knr, Board, 
an tha Murad reserve list. 

'. DEMVER-rWotvod flrtaon Motor, ttotao- 
slva ana mi Don' JamaSi nosa taefcto. 

. KANSAS CITY— Stoned Mnce PruHL ruo- 
rrfntr bocfc. 

; NEW ENGtANpr^Wolvad Dow Rogers. . 
defemhw and. 

opwtoa. " to ne- ■ 


backer; Stava August. Offensive locUa. and 
Ooub Ho ward and Dove Pacelta, gu ar ds. 


By Ken Denlinger 

WeshngHM Patt S*tyite 

• Tao lxndrum, 5t Lends Cardi- 
nals: a I never /beamed Pd be / day- 
ing as big a rote as I am now. " 

• Frank White . ; Kansas City 
Raytds: “The game sometimes can 
ffnyou Jneatmcd" 

■ ST, LOUIS — They share the 
virtwsthaiwouM 
if baseball, like its hats, had a 
trademark- They are separated by 
the experiences that make baseball 
plosc to unique among sports. 

For the day-to-day competence 
that makes a career satisfying, ’Hlo 
Landrum might wish he were 
Frank White; for the brief and 
stunning moments that make a ca- 
reer complete, Frank While might 
like to be Uro Landrum. 

In Landrum’s four-phis seasons 
in the mqors, he has only a few 
more at bats than White usually 
gets in one season. Yet Landrum 
' seems destined for his third World 
Series ring, perhaps as most valu- 
able player. 

Landrum's lock is to be with the 
proper team at the proper moment 
of the proper season, then to be 
able to hit a ball to win a game or to 
throw it into the catcher’s mitt 
from afar to save another. 

As pan of one of those curious 
baseball -trades friends make with 
friends, Landrum found hinx^lf 
with Baltimore far the final month 
of the 1983 season. 

He batted S3 times for the Ori- 
oles but won the American League 
pennant for them with a IOth-in- 
ning- homer off Britt Bums in 
Game 4 of the league playoff with 
the Chicago White Sox. 

That was a season after Lan- 
drum was a pan of the Cardinals 
■ team that won the World Series, 
though he was repromoted from 
: the minor leagues loo late for any 
r of the playoffs. 

Last week Landrum happened to 
be standing out of harm’s way 
when Vince Coleman was not. Be- 
cause of that bizarre bom with the 
mechanical tarpaulin in Busch Sta- 
- dram, Coteman will miss the World 
Series. 

And one of the St Louis stars 
has been Coleman’s caddy. Terry 
Lee Landrum, -who is called Tito 
because of his resemblance to one 
of. the Jackson five of pop muse 
fame. 

In six National League playoff 
games, Landrum was 6 for 14, with 
2 nnis scored, 4 batted in and a 
stolen base; in four World Series 
games be is 6 for IS, with 3 runs 
scored, a home run and an impor- 
taut assist from left 

Pe rhaps the baseball gods whis- 
'per ro Landrum: “For a lot of rea- 



Landrunu McGee Homer in. 3-0 Victory 


By Joseph Durso 

V,% York Times Service 

ST. LOUIS — John Tudor, the 
precise left-hander who pitched 10 
shutouts this season, pitched an- 
other Wednesday nighL It was a 
five-hit 3-0 beauty over the Kansas 
City Royals that moved the Sl 
L ouis Cardinals within one victory 
of wiiming their second World Se- 
ries in four seasons. 

Tudor's second triumph of the 
Series was generated by two cre- 
ative shots on offense: a home run 
in the second inning by Uto Lan- 
drum, the supersub for the injured 
Vince Coleman, and a home run in 
the third inning by Willie McGee. 
It was spiced by one daring stroke 
of strategy by the Cardinals’ man- 
ager, Whitey Herzog: a squeeze 
bum by Tom Nieto on a J-and-2 
count in the fifth inning. 

The Cardinals can win the cham- 
pionship Thursday night in Busch 
Stadium with their senior man 
pitching, 36-year-old Bob Forsch, a 
late replacement for Danny Cox 
and his Lender elbow. The Royals 
will slan Danny Jackson and hope 
that lightning 'will strike again: 
They were down 3 games io 1 to the 
Toronto Blue Jays in the .American 
League playoff but swept the next 
three and won the pennant. 

“I wish we could doit some other 
way," said Dan Quisenberry, the 
Royals’ ace relief pitcher and fam- 
ily wit. “But we’ve done it this way 
ail year, so what’s new? If we’re 
going to win it, I guess this would 
be an appropriate way to end the 
season." 

It would be hard to pilch any 
better than Tudor did this season, 
his first with the Cardinals after 
being traded from the Pittsburgh 
Pirates. He lost seven of his first 
eight decisions, then made a sensa- 
tional comeback starting on Me- 
morial Day. winning 23 of his next 
25 decisions. The only team that 
beat him was the Los .Angeles 
Dodgers, twice: on July 20, and on 
Ocl 9 in the playoff. 

His relations with the Royals 
also have improved dramatically. 
When he was pitching for the Bos- 


John Todor, the ace of the Cardinals’ pitching staff, dealt die Royals a five-hit, 3-0 setback. 
His 1 1th shutout this season pot St. Louis one game away from winning the World Series. 


ri^ht-field line, where the ball 
supped over the fence uot far from 
the foul pole. 

It was the Cardinals’ first home 
run of the Series and the first off 
the Royals' pitchers in 68 innings, 
going back to the Americas League 
playoff. But it gave Landrum 12 
hits in 27 at bats, an average of .462 
since be got into the lineup the 
night Coleman's leg was caught un- 
der the rolling tarpaulin, ending his 
rookie season with a bone chip on 
the left knee. 

In the third, Tudor burned into a 
double play and the inning ap- 
peared to be over as Black went to 
one ball and two strikes on McGee. 
Then be threw a slider that McGee 
golfed far beyond the fence in left 
field. The Cardinals led by two. 

They went to the fifth and Her- 
zog went to his strategy. With one 

Say Bey , WUtieMays^ 

Is That a Series Fact? 

The Would You Believe h 
Depuneni: Willie Mays, whose 
660 home runs in the major 
leagues help put him in the hall 
of fame, played in four World 
Series ana never hit a homer. 
He does hold one Series record: 
most double plays grounded 
into, one game; he hit into three 
in the 1951 Series for the New 
York Giants. <L4Ti 


out, Terry Pendleton shot a hard 
grounder into left-center, where the 
ball carried to the wall for a triple. 

Up came Nieto, the reserve 
catcher making his World Series 
debut as a substitute for the left- 
handed hitting Darrell Porter. The 
infield played in tight, sensing a 
squeeze bum. They got it on the 
first pitch, but the ball curled foul. 

The infield stayed close, and the 
count rose to 3 and 2. Then Herzog 
did it again: Nieto bunted back to 
the mound as Pendleton raced in 
from third. Black fielded the ball 
and fired home, where the ball and 
the runner arrived almost simulta- 
neously. But the throw was to the 
left of the plate and got past catch- 
er Jim Sundbera as Pendleton 


entb had been on a considerably 
tighter line. 

Correctly, Landrum had thought 
bis postseason role would be 
“watching, with maybe some 
pinch-hit ting and time in the out- 
as field for defense.” 
e’re An uncommon amount of good 


n 7tti: d-nakSefl tar Bloncolena la 7Hi; 




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sons, you haven’t gotten to . 
much as your talent merits, 
hoping tins makes up for the down fortune allowed Landrum to rise to 
times.’' 


■J 


voe e>* 1 

tee W * 

‘as :* : 
» * 

K ; 
is <* ; 
vt =B 


WORLD SERIES SCHEDULE 
Onc*. b 

St. Loiris a Kansu City 1 

OeL 2* . . - 
SL Loata 4. Kansas' City 2 ■ 

OeL 22 • 

Kansas CWv 6. SI. Laub 1 
OeL 2j 

St. Louis X Kansas CKy 0 

Oct M . . 

Kansas aty (Jackson 1*-12> at SL Louis 
(Forsch Ml - 

•• oct as 



X * ■•91. Louis at Kansas CHv 
act. n 

*-5L Lotas at Kansas Cttv 
a=e jlx-H nscassarv) 


CHAMPIONS' CUP 

- (Second. Round. First Las) 
Vatona X tawihellwWr) 0 
IFK Gatabara 4, Femrtxtaca 0 
Amtortaeht L Omonta fl- 
Baysrn Munich 4, Austria Vienna 2 
.Satvafta X ASerdaan.il ' - . 

Barcelona X Porto 0 

CUP WINNERS’ COP 
I Second RaaoA Flrsr Lra) 

Rocld Vienna X From Reykjavik 0 
Lyngby X Rad Star Batorada 2 
Boyar uanflnaan X-Gotatasaroy 0 . 
Bonften x SamoaSHta 0 

• . UEFA CUP 

• (Second Round, First Lee) 

LASK Un L Intarnoztanate 0 
Hommartiy X SI. wunen 3 
Dundee Unltod X Vontar Skeeta ■ 

FC Cologne A- Bohemians Prague S 
Soarta Rottnfcn-i, Bar MoendmgMbeh 1 
Milan X Lokomottv’.Laipztg 0 
-.Torino X HaldUk SMU 1 ... 
waregam X Osasuna a . L 

PSV Eindhoven X Dnepr Daapropatrovsfc 2 
Root Modrld -{holder}- 2. Chernmrts Odsa 1 
Liege X Athletic Bilbao l 


Landrum senses something ex- 
traordinary. 

Tm Uessed,” he said. “Yes.” 

The tip-of-tho-bat double that 
continued the Cardinals’ ninth-in- 
ning rally for victory in Game 2 on 
Sunday was as. homely as they 
come, staying fair by a foot or so. 

* Landrum's throw to nip Buddy 
Brancalana at the plate in the sev- 


the big leagues at all. As be inter- 
vened in a domestic squabble nine 
years ago, his right elbow went 
through a plate-glass window. 

“It severed all the muscles under 
my right aim." he recalled “My life 
passed in front of me. 1 asked the 
doctor if be could repair my arm so 


White has been blessed in a way 
Landrum might aw. There was 
nobody skilled enough to keep him 
mired in the minors for the Royals 
in the eariy 1970s. 

' | Like Landrum, While attended a 
high school that did not field a 
baseball team. At a Royals acade- 
my designed to mold exceptional 
athletes into baseball players, he 
was the first to be invited to train. 

In 12 years White has won six 
Gold Gloves and hit everywhere in 
the lineup, top of the order to the 
bottom. 

“Whatever works,” be has said 
shrugging. “Bum. Hit-and-run. I 


that I could throw again, and he just play the game. We don't have 
said he could As I said, Tve been any special spots in our lineup after 
blessed from day one." one-two- three. After (George) 


ton Red Sox, he won two games 
. s „, . and lost five against Kansas City. 

With the Cardinals, he is 2^0 - 

against his onetime tormentors. He scored. 

*■ ' ■"* '* beat the Royals, 3-1, in Saturday's Now the Cardinals led by 3-0, 

opening game of the Series. And he - 
beat them again Wednesday night 
by throwing just 106 pitches': 78 for 
strikes, S for third strikes and 5 that 
were hit for singles. 

“It was one of those games where 
everything worked for me,” he said. 

“It’s a fact of life: I have to keep 
people off stride. If they sit on ray 
fast ball, (hey’U kill me." 

It appeared to be a pitching mis- 
match at the start, and it was. Tu- 
dor, who won 21 games and lost 8 
in the regular season, was opposed 
by the left-handed Bud Black, who 
won 10 and lost 15. And after five 
innings. Black was gone and Tudor 
was buzzing along with a 3-0 lead. 

The Cardinals were hitting only 
.198 in the Series when Landrum 
fired the first shot, in the second 
inning. Black bad struck out Jack 
Clark, [hen went to 3 and 2 on 
Landrum, a right-handed hitter. He 
drove the next pitch down the 


Brett, it’s grab-bag. pull a name out 
of the hat." 

White has been an All-Star four 
times. Wiih a .545 average, I 
homer, 3 RBI and 3 runs scored, he 
was the most valuable player of the 
1980 American League playoffs. 

But he does not have a World 
Series ring. Six times his Royals 
have been to tbe playoffs; only 
twice have they advanced to the 
Series. They lost to the Phillies in 
1980, with White going 2 for 25. 

Maybe the baseball gods tell 
While: “We've favored you over 
the long hauL It's time others were 
touched, just once." 

White accepts whatever happens 
with a veteran's patience. “I’ve still 
been very fortunate." he said. 


with Tudor pitching one of his clas- 
sics. 

“It wasn't much of a gamble," 
Herzog said with an air of inno- 
cence. “He’s a good burner. And 
they stopped thinking squeeze on 3* 
and 2." 

The Royals* one good shot at 
Tudor came in the seventh. George 
Brett opened with a single, Frank 
White filed out to deep center and 
Sundberg singled. Tudor got Dar- 
ryl Motley on a fly to left, but 
walked Steve Balboni and the 
Royals had the bases loaded. 

Hal McRae, customarily the des- 
ignated hitter, pinch-hit for Buddy 
Biancalana. Herzog, after consider- 
ing a switch to Todd Worrell, let 
Tudor solve the problem. 

He did, on one pitch. McRae 
bounced the ball to third base, 
where Pendleton grabbed it and 
beat Brett to the bag. The Royals 
were gone. 


=? pjiNHL Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Dtvtfoa 
W l T Pfe. 


GFGA 


^'■PWlactolplita 
b,i Now Jersey 

4 

2 

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34 

17 

3 

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20 

21 

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3 

4 

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24 

24 

P Washington 

2 

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19 

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S CAMPBELL CONFBBBNCE 



Norris Division 




r 5L Louis 

3 

2 

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7 

21 

22 

L Minnesota 

2 

3 

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32 

31 

%'■ Chicago 

2 

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i-i. Toronto 

1 

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?; Detroit 

0 

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44 


Fraser 2 (51. Owort HI). Record «1 : Gavin 
f», SQfonen jz). Start* or goal: Hartford (on 
Saavg) THl-tt-di; CMcaga (on LJafl TSA- 
IS— XL 

Washington 11 *-2 

Calgary 11 -3-4 

Quinn 14). CatfaltM O), Bazsk I4),witsaa 
(2); Gustatasoa 13L Carpenter (3t. Shots an 
goal: Washington (oa LetatOnl WMWJ; 
Calgary (an Jensen} 10AM-32. - 


New York Gets Its Own Arms Race 

Los Angela Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Runners competing in Sunday’s New York Mara- 
thon will face some unusual competition; five Ghurka soldiers. 

The soldiers are stationed in Hong Kong, where, during working 
hours, they chase down illegal immigrants trying to enter the British 
crown colony from China. 

The Ghuitas, sturdy Nepalese mountain men, have served in the 
British Army since the mid- 19th century, and have fought enemies of 
the eomire from Afghanistan to the Falkland Islands. 

Sunday’s entrants have competed annually in a race near the China 
border, running up and down a 1.700-foot (518-meter) mountain. 

The muting event originated in the 1800s when the Ghurkas 
fought Pa than tribesmen on India’s mountainous Northwest Fron- 
tier. While the main body of troops marched through a valley, picket 
parties of right men would run along the high ground to oust snipers, 
then race the rival party cm the other side of the valley. 

Which sounds Eke perfect practice for Central Part 


Oilers’ Vaunted Offense Backfires Against Jets 


The Associated Pros 

WINNIPEG, Manitoba — In 
two games the Winnipeg Jets have 
servo! notice they wfl] be neither 
iutimidaied nor outscored by their 
two toughest rivals in the Smyihe 
Division of tbe National Hockey 
IxMgjne. 

Winnipeg took cm the league’s 
most celebrated offense Wednes- 
day night and beat it at its own 
game, crushing the Edmonton Oil- 
ers, 9-3. 

The ram, inspired by left wing 
Perry Turnbull's three goals, com- 
plemented Sunday's 8-5 drubbing 
of the Calgary Flames. 


NHL FOCUS 


ELsefrhere, the New York Rang- 
ers beat New Jersey, 5-1; Vancou- 
ver beat Detroit, 5-0; Montreal es- 
caped Buffalo. 5-4; Pittsburgh 
edged Toronto, 5-4; Minnesota 
and Sl Louis tied, 4-4; Chicago 
routed Hanford, 9-2, and Calgary 
beat Washington, 4-1 
“I think Winnipeg is a great 
hockey team," said the Oilers' coa- 
ch. Glen Sather. “I said the last 
time we played that these are the 
best two teams in the league. 

“I guess tonighL wasn't a great 


night m the chapter of the Edmon- 
ton Oilers. We didn’t play with the 
kind of intensity and enthusiasm 
we lend to play with." 

1/ Sather was lamenting, Winni- 
peg's .coach, Barry Long, was 
pleased. 

“We just capitalized on Lheir 
mistakes, something that they nor- 
mally do to us," Long said. “We 
forechecked well, broke up a lot of 
Lheir plays at their blue line and put 
the puck in the net when we got our 
opportunities." 

Turnbull had numerous chances 
to fatten his point total, and the 
score would have been even more 


lopsided had be scored on them all. 
Seven games into the season, he has 
five goals and three assists. 

“I missed on a couple of pretty- 
good chances,” he said, adding “I 
guess 1 was lucky tonighL Even a 
blind hog finds ah acorn.” 

Right wing Paul MacLeaa 
scored twice as the Jets made a 
smooth transition from aggressive 
forechecking in the first period to 
all-out offense later in the game. 

The Jets' fourth victory this sea- 
son, coupled with Vancouver’s 5-0 
defeat of the struggling Detroit 
Red Wings, put Winnipeg in sec- 
ond place in the Smyihe Division. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Bass Wins Japanese Baseball Crown 

TOKYO (AP) — Randy Bass became the second American player to 


Breeders’ Cup Catches Europe’s Eye 

Top Thoroughbreds Being Sent to U.S. for Rich Turf Races 



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By Andrew Beyer 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Horae rac- 
ing people on both sides of the 
Atlantic have been fend of criticiz- 
ing the Breeders’ Cup, but when 
entries for the Nov. 2 event were 
announced this week, this was 
dear: tbe Breeders' Cup, in izs sec- 
ond year, is becoming a true inter- 
national championship series or 
races. 

The one-day series consists of 
seven races, one worth S3 million, 
one worth Sl million and the other 
five offering purses of Sl million 
PARIS (AP> — Temhs star Jobo McEnroe has asked a French chef to each, 
prepares ^jedal30-phu»dinner in mid-November in southern Calif or- Almost all of the top European 

nia, leading to ffleemarion: it will be to celebrate his marriage to the 
actress Tamm O'Neal. 

Between tins year's French Open and Wimbledon tournaments, McEn- 
roe and O’Neal reportedly stayed for two days at the Moulin dn Roc hotel 
in Chatnpagnac-do-Bdair . Thursday, one of tbe owners of the hotel said 
that McEnroe had asked him lo plan for the dinner in Matibn, California, 
but did not teti him why the dinner was planned. 


but he ended up erne short 
thej 


winJi. 

of the home run record as he was walked four rimes during we game m 
which his Hanshin Tigers, the. Central T-aagiie champions, beat the 
Yomhm Giants, 10-— 

The Giants' manager, Sadaharu Oh/set the home run record in a 140- 
game season in 1964. Theiapanese season now is 130 games. Spectators 
booed as Yomiuri pi tchers eadi rime walked Bass on four straight pitches. 
He singled his only other al baL 

With an average of 350, 134 runs batted in and 54 homers, Bass, 31, 
■who formerly played with the Tern Rangers and the Minnesota Twins, 
became the sixth player to win the tripe crown, and the first in the 
r CeatraI League since Oh 1 1 years ago. Greg^ Wells of the Hankyu Braves, 
a former Minnesoxa Twin, last year became the first American to win iL 

McEnroe Plans Dinner, Feeds Rumor 


stables are sending top horses to 
the United States for the S2 million 
turf race at one and one-half miles 
and the Sl million mile race on the 
grass at Aqueduct in New York. 
Although they traditionally have 
been reluctant to jeopardize tbe 
reputations of well-established 
stars, European horsemen had to 
be encouraged by the 1984 victory 
Gay Bnariges and crewman Greg Gardiner defeated the defending of Lashkan — wfao had been somc- 
phampihnc, D«n Blatdhford and Tom Woods, to give Australia a 1-2 thing of a second-rated horse in 
finish iii theSOS-dass Worid Yachting Championships near Tokyo. The France — in the rich Breeders’ Cup 
British .yacht was third, tb-elLS, entry fifth. (UFI) 


For tbe Record 


ropeans m tbe 14-horse lineup for nominee, but figured that he could 
the Breeders' Cup Turf. win the horse-of-the-year title by 

RousiUon, a French-raced colt adding the Gassic to his victory in 
owned by Prince Khaled Abdullah, the Jockey Club Gold Cup. 
might be a standout in the Breed- The other horses in the Classic 
era' Cup MUe. The winner of four field are Proud Truth, Imperial 
graded stakes, he is considered the Dancer. Turkoman, Bounding 
best toiler cm the cominem. The Basque and Strawberry Road II. 

the latter a good European horse 

who has done all his previous rac- 
ing on the grass. 

In the other Breeders’ Cup 
events: 

• Fourteen 2-year-o!d colts, 
none a standout, will contest UieSl 
million Juvenile. The race became 
wide open when undefeated, highly 
promising Ogygian was sidelined 
by an injury. 

• A field of 12 has been entered 
in tbe SI million Juvenile Fillies, 
and there is no dear leader of the 
group. Family Style, Fm Sweets 
and Twilight Ridge are among the 
strongest entrants. 

• The Breeders' Cup Sprint 


A 1984 victory by 
France’s Lashkari 
bag encouraged 
the European 
horsemen. 


Quotable 


five foreign entries are expected to 
dominate here, too. 

The rwo turf races, with their 
strong international flavor, actual- 
ly look more interesting than the 
nominal centerpiece of the pro- ought prove to be the most comen- 
gram, the S3 million Breeders’ Cup tipus of all. with Fighting FiL Ml 
C lassic. Thai race has drawn a field Livermore and Precisionist among 
of nine, but it essentially is another the 14 speedsters in the lineup, 
rematch of the boraes* who look •Trainer Wayne Lukas, who is 
turns beating each other in New strongly represented in other Cup 
York’s major stakes this fall: races, has a virtual lock on the one 
Chiefs Crown, Gate Dancer. Track and one-quaner mile Distaff. His 
Barron and Vanlandingham. filly, Lady’s Secret, has won her 


Classic. 

'Numerous first-stringers are 
coming this vear. Pebbles, Sheik 

Mohammed al Mat toum’s brilliant a 

pMch-Bran Phiffips of Jbe NFL’s New Orleans Saints after passing a 4-year-old filly, who beat colts in The Loblolly Stable had to pay a hist eight starts, and if she needs 
;phyrieal ^i»mnarioy ^ Idrop de^ tomorrow, at kast FD knowl died two Grade I English stakes this S600.000 fee to make its colt. Van- help. Lukas also has Life's Magic 
m gppd heakb-’V : . • • • ' year, heads a conutgsit of six Eu- landingham, a supplementary' Alabama Nana in the lineup. 


— 



A: masterpiece of Swiss watchmaking 



GARRARD 

The Crown Jewellers 

MX OC4CMT *T*«C¥ vONOON • Wl« 






- 


Page 24 


Hi- 

fi 


OBSERVER 

Alphabetic ConfmMn 


\ , INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1985 

Edwin Reischauer’s 'Rice Paddies’ Net 


PEOPLE 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK —Our house cur- 
rent is AC. not DC, hut with 
AC we can get both AM and 
PM on the radio. The radio also 
^orfes without the AC if you put in 
O batteries. The TV is different. 

First you plug the TV into the 
AC and it gives you the VHF. 
Sometimes you get the UHF, too. 
The VHF brings you ABC, CBS 
and NBC but unless you live in a 
Wg city you probably can’t get PBS 
without UHF. 

With the VHF brin g in g you 
ABC, CBS and NBC you leant a 
lot about GE, GM. IBM and TRW. 
Also, of course you can find out 
what's happening with the USSR, 
the AFL-CIO, the UN, the UAW, 
the OAS, NATO. NASA and the 
Oakland A’s. 

. That's all right, but for a little 
more variety you need CATV, 
■which you can also supplement 
with a VCR. With a VCR you can 
enjoy the best from LA without 
intemiptioa- 

What’s more, you can have your 
choice of G, PG, PG-13. R or X. 


The VCR comes in two alpha- 
bets: VHS. which is English, or 
Beta, which is Greek as in Phi Beta 
Kappa. 

The VCR at our house is VHS. I 
installed it myself by detaching the 
CATV wire from the TV and at- 
taching it to the VCR at the VHF 
recep table, then running a VCR 
wire from the other VHF recep ta- 
ble to the TV'. 

It sounds easier than it is. but 
never mind because everything 
came out OK. As soon as I plugged 
the whole tangle of wires into the 
old AC. we were able to see an 
uninterrupted movie about space 
people who said, “A-OK." 

The movie was just B-OK. It 
included newsreel fUm of JFK but 
had an actor playing LBJ as a 
clown with a whine. Another actor 
played Ike, who was never known 
as DDE. though be initialed his 
papas “DDE” Neither HST nor 
FDR appeared in old newsreel film 
or courtesy of professional actors. 

It was a PG but would be an 
MTL if the movie industry expand- 
ed its alphabetic horizon to provide 
for such practical information as 
MTL (much loo long), EOP (egre- 
giously overpriced) and ODODE 
(outrageous display of directorial 
ego). 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SUBSCRIBE 
to Hie 

INTERNATIONAL 


Alphabet aficionados, inciden- 
tally, are not called AA. A normal 
percentage joins AA of course, just 
as a normal percentage joins the 
AAA 1 am not an alphabet aficio- 
nado. but it’s hard for anybody to 
understand anything that's said 
anymore without first mastering al- 
phabetic English. 

If you doubt it, try to imagine 
Thomas Jefferson silting around in 
his BVDs minding his P*s and Q’s 
while reading a communication 
from the VFW about scandalous 
doings in the VA 

Imagine George Washington be- 
ing told that by adding CATV to 
his TV he trill be able to escape all 
those BBD&O commercials, and 
also to pick up a lot more of the 
NFL, NBA and NHL than he can 
get on his standard VHF hookup. 
□ 

The trend that is reducing En- 
glish to an alphabetic breeze seems 
fairly modern. There are two possi- 
ble explanations. 

One is that expansive technol- 
ogy. science and government have 
overloaded the language with so 
many big. hard-to-remember, 
hard- Lo- pronounce words that the 
substitution of a shorthand lan- 
guage is inevitable. 

Who wants to spend all night 
pronouncing “Deoxyribonucleic 
acid” when you can say “DNA” 
and get home to bed? Who wants to 
wait for somebody to say “ultra 
high frequency” when “UHF" is so 
temptingly available? Does any- 
body even know what OSHA 
stands for? 

So maybe the spread of alphabet 
English is a desperate makeshift 
attempt to keep communication 
open when the increasingly incom- 
prehensible nature of formal En- 
glish threatens to shut it down. The 
other possibility is that there is a 
mischievous impulse afoot among 
the eggheads, who create most of 
this alphabet talk, to resist the cal- 
cification of the language by keep- 
ing it as breezy as a tabloid head- 
line. 

Whatever the explanation, the 
old mother tongue is anything but 
A-OK and getting murkier every 
day. Yet. with the right maps and a 
little luck, you can still use it to get 
a VCR h ummin g without electro- 
cuting yourself. 


Note York Timet Seniee 


By Michael Keman 

Washington Post Service 

W ASHINGTON — Edwin O. Ros- 
chauer has been so deeply involved with 
Japan in so many ways for so many years that 
what amounts to an old boy network has 
arisen around him. 

Most of it seemed to be on hand recently to 
celebrate his 75th birthday by opening die 
Edwin O. Rdschauer Center for East Asian 
Studies at the Johns Hopkins University 
School of Advanced Internationa] Studies 
here. The center on Massachusetts Avenue 
has been operating for more than a year, but 
it became official with a symposium on U. S. 
relations with Japan. 

Reischauer, who has been called one of the 
best ambassadors the United States ever had, 
went to Japan in 1961, just after the anti- 
Eisenhower riots and the helicopter escape of 






press secretary James Hagerty from a Tokyo 
mob. When the ambassador left in 1966, the 
situation bad been turned completely around. 

The scholar-diplomat flew in from his 
home in Belmont, Massachusetts, with his 
wife, the former Ham Matsukata, to be feted 
by Fulbrights and Achesons. Rockefellers 
and Mondales, Kennedys and Koreans. 
They were just a few of the thousands, includ- 
ing die Harvard undergraduates who took the 
social science course hie gave with the China 
specialist John K. Fairbank, known to gener- 
ations as “Rice Paddies,” and others who 
went on to graduate studies under him. His 
Harvard tenure lasted from 1939, with signif- 
icant breaks for intelligence and diplomatic 
service until his retirement in 1981. 

“He changed my life,” said West Virginia's 
Senator John D. Rockefeller IV. “I took the 
baric course at Harvard but I wanted more, 
and I went to him at the end of my junior year 
— my family had known him for years — and 
said! wanted to go somewhere, do something 
si gnifican t. He said, *Why not go to Japan? 
He sent me to the International Christian 
University outside Tokyo, and I was a stu- 
dent there three years, taught some English 
but mainly I mastered the Japanese language. 
It was a fabulous three years. I came back, 
finished Harvard, went on to Yale for Chi- 
nese and then the Peace Corps, VISTA and 
West Virginia. But that talk with him was a 
total changing point in my life.” 

“He was the best teacher I've ever known,” 
said George R. Packard, dean of SAIS and 
Reischauer’s special assistant at the embassy 
in Japan. “He taught me the most outride the 
classroom: just watching him work as ambas- 
sador. His main role, l think, was as a link to 

X in the Americans and Japanese to each 
, especially in what he taughL his fellow 
Americans.** 

Reischauer’s greatest achievement, per- 
haps, was to persuade the U. S. military to 
give up jurisdiction over Okinawa, Packard 
said. “The military was pledged never to let 
go of the island, where they had lost so many 



BWadi DnWTh, WoMngkm U 

Edwin O. Reaschauer 

men in the war. Reischauer explained very 
quietly that our bases wouldn't be worth a 
damn because the surrounding population 
would make them un viable. There’d be a lot 
of hostility in a crisis, people lying down on 
the runways and all that. Somehow he talked 
them into it without loss of race.” 

In 1969 President Richard M. Nixon 
signed an agreement with the Japanese under 
which the United States would keep its Oki- 
nawa bases, but without nuclear weapons. 
The island formally reverted to Japan in 
1972. 

Though of course there have been periods 
and regimes that did not welcome Reis- 
chauer’s strong and definite opinions, it 
would be virtually impossible today to deal 
with Japan academically or politically with- 
out feeling his influence: “No way could you 
avoid it, even if you didn't study with him,” 
commented Professor Nathaniel B. Thayer, 
director of East Asian studies at SAIS. anoth- 
er veteran of the Tokyo embassy days and 
sometime fellow teacher with Reischauer at 
Harvard. “He was one of the few who were 
able to many successful academic and public 
careers. He was in and out of the government 
all his life: in the war, as ambassador and 
later on a kH of temporary assignments.” 

Thayer places the Reischauer network in 
three general groups: the Harvard under- 
graduates who took his “Rice Paddies,” those 
who also took various history and govern- 
ment classes with Mm, and the graduate stu- 
dents. “Sooner or later everybody goes to 
Harvard for some reason,” Thayer said, “and 
if you were interested in Japan you saw Reis- 
chauer ” The essential Reischauer message, 
be added, is this: “Neva never never be 
anything but wildly optimistic about Japan, 
about its capabilities, about what's going to 
happen next. And remember that our two 
countries are very very close." 


Reischauer himself says he bad three baric 
gn^ l s in bis teaching: to malfg his students 
aware that they ready needed to know more 
about the Far East ("that was enough of a 

goal for the first quarter century”); to estab- 
lish a world system built on international 
cooperation; to find ways to expand this 
system to the other two-thirds of the worid. 

When President John F. Kennedy called 
on him in 1961, he says, “the job had never 
remotely occurred to me. I was a specialist in 
the ninth century, on the travels of a Japanese 
monk Fnnin in Tang China. My wife 
was horrified. But I saw I was being asked to 
put up or shut up, after I'd been ceding 
everybody what was wrong in Southeast Aria. 
1 started out with great trepidation.” 

He shouldn't have been too astounded. He 
was born in Tokyo to missionary parents, 
soon became fluent in Asian languages, and 
by Kennedy's time was widely known as a 
pioneer in introducing East Asia to Ameri- 
cans. His students fanned out over the United 
States, spreading his influence throughout 
academia and beyond to the political world. 

As ambassador, one thing be realized that 
most Americans did not was that Japan, for 
all its reputation as a feudal state; had been 
learning democracy since 1880, when local 
elections were first held there. Its first parlia- 
ment was decreed in 1889. Furthermore, feu- 
dalism had long since developed into a gov- 
ernment by committee under figurehead 
leaders, preparing the people for action by 
group tlffo 5io*i 

As for the much-discussed social hierarchy 
of Japan, “the country is light-years ahead of 
Britain as to class. It’s virtually a classless 
society. Even the United States has a vastly 
more dictatorial society than they. Oh yes, 
they do honor the elderly — which Fm begin- 
ning to thmk is a pretty good idea.” 

He sees no reason for Americans to panic 
over today’s economic differences with Ja- 
pan. “It’s not remotely like what it was before 
the war. What we see now is nothing more 
than friction between two highly developed 
and integrated economies.” 

As the Japanese population grows older, 
the increasingly independent- minded young 
are qol exactly rushing to fill their jobs on the 
assembly lines or re-enact their conformist 
lives, he says. As a result, Japan will not put 
as much pressure on the world economy in 
the future. “They’re still not really ready to 
join the world. They still fed themselves very 
separate. They r ealize it intellectually, but 
they still need to make that step.” 

When they do, he predicts. East and West 
will form what he calls the First World. “And 
it wfll only be a First World because Japan is 
in it." 

“If I had time for a third career,” Reis- 
chauer says, “it would be to bdp spread this 
out beyond the Emits of race and culture to 
become a one-world concept. The great part- 
nership of America and Japan is the model” 


GcJdaf Blasts EC r Waste 

.KKSSBSSS 


uoj* vjwouuit 1*— 7 ' « ^ to> 

12-day trip to famine-stricken re- asleep — 
gions of Africa, told a meeting of moments m India, 
members of the European Pariia- q 

meat in Strasbourg. France, that it . _ . ... 

was “preposterous” that the com- Samantha Snath of 
m unity was “wallowing” in moun- visited the Soviet Union _ 


Hi unity was uiv»— VDUCU ^ r , : 

rains of surplus food, while people guest of the Sovi^ e ^^ r ‘ « .1 
in the Sabd region were dying of awarded a posthumous Peace »- 5 
hunger. “The disgusting and perris- grim Prize at the United Nations in • 
tent anomaly bftbe grain moun- New York Wednesday. Smith ohms 
rafn , the wheat nwumtain, the bat- in a plane crash in Mai ne m au- j 
ter mnimTain and the wine lakes,” mist, and the award was present™ , 
he said, is the result “of one of the to her mother. Jayne SmitlMiunrig , 
crowning idiocies of die JEC, and the 40th- anniversary edebrau'fly* ) 
that’s the Common Agricultural of the United Nations. The award J 


uvmiuue mikiuwo vn ***** uiv • I 

that’s the Common Agricultural of the United Nations. The awara j 
Policy ” He attacked the communi- was given by tbe Peace Pilgrims, on j 
ty as a “thing of the past,” calling it American women’s organization, j 
a vast bureaucracy designed to pro- f 

tect the national interests of its LI ■ 

members. “This place needs a laxa- coaceaed that Bishop Desmond- 
live” to relieve it of its chronic _ . little attention in 

bureaucracy” Gddof said. Wffly teethe 19841 

de Ctarcq, the European Conrans- v|obd Peace Prize, a group or 
sioner responsible for external rda- c^,„ h Af ^ n artists has produced; 
dons. the farm policy. 

saymg that without it there would p,™* and African pop | 

notbe surplus food to be givento jaaz landed “Give Praise 
African countries. In irmly to Gd- Sphere Praise Is Deserved.” It will 
doPs proposal that theEC create a SaSSunSuSi States 
10-membcr crisis task force to deal mnceeds win go lo 

with famine, de Oercq srnd the ** 


staff who operate independently of 
the bureaucracy. 


The anger Peggy Lee, who un- 
derwent open-heart surgery on 0®. 
8, was operated on again to drain 
Watts Polovchak, the youth who . an infection that developed within 
triggered a long court battle by re- die mason , a spokeswoman al 
fusing to return lo the Soviet Union Touro Infirmary in New Orleans 
with his parents, has registered said Tuesday. Lee, 65, was m satis- 
with the Selective Service System, factory condiram, the spokeswom- 
Potovcfaak, who became a U.S-dt an -said, but would not be released 
gar! on Oct. 8, live days after his from the hospital for two weeks. 
18th birthday, signed up Wednes- Lee. a Grammy-award-win ra ng 
day at a post off**, saying he singer and songwriter, was hospi- 
would serve in the tmhtary if neces- taBzed dining an engage m e n t in 
sary, but “right now, 1 have to think New Orleans, 
about continuing my education." □ 

n MkhwlGatoe, 52, who Wednes- 

day begpn fdmmg *The Whistle 
President RouaM Reagan says he Blower,” a S3^m2Eoa political in- 
wants to visit India — this trigne thriller, m London with Sir 


time when he’s awake. In an inter- J®ta Cid goi, says he is homesick 
view with The Times of India, Rea- for Britain and will move back 
mn was asked if he would accept there in two years' tame. The actor. 
Prime Minster Rajrr Garetti’s iim- who .was bom m London, has 
ration to visit his country. “If we bought a 300-year-old farmhouse 
can work out a schedule to do that, in the village of North Stoke, 
we would like it very much,” he northwest of London. He is having 
said. “My only experience in yonr it renovated and saysit will become 


country was one in which i wasn’t his permanent home when he 
even aware of it” Reagan’s plane leaves the United States. . ... 


HERALD 



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1ST researches and develops private and collective 
satellite equipment plus video muhistandard equip- 
ments video tope recorder, TV set, video projector— 

1ST; 64, rue du IP Janvier - 92380 Gorehes 
TeL- (1) '47.41 SQ.90 - Telex 201642F LST 


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