Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats




Hie Global Newspaper ' 
Edited in Pals - 
Printed Simultaneously 1 

in Paris^ London, Zori(i, . 

Hoig Kong, Sinrapore, 
l ne Hague and Marseille 




' 's.TbW — 

! -'vr^ e; •' f WEATl ® DATA APPEAR On page u 

"■‘ r -U^V 


INTERNATIONAL 




»- ‘frirrr 


** *i- :■ . 
IS& vr-. 

jfi* w-,- . 

STM : 

# ; 

»• 

rffi* - - 

••• 

iSrSti*?':. 
fot :sr-.; . 

"■ j “ 

8rf‘ U 

* *V~ 

K , 

"'Cf ■ . 

•t 

t.i-T 



s No. 31,938 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


r ,. 1 ^ « > - v. 

"*!' 6‘ , . & ' A 

: 

— 6 5C *.-^od_-TA]7KM 

tr*, IJSOUe 

.-.04410. tataB .SFo 

ift®* KJB T« ** SOSO 

niflo 

Ut^_LO«ClS 

_7a)FM 

aOO* 155 Ek 

r .150 DM Wfl P ft ... S Cwtt 

l M 55 f Morten .450 th. 

flOfr. Nfa)*»1on*„a75n. 

— IISU Ngou 170 A 


Ow — 07301* 
ftw-gJ ■ -Wfa. 

0» UCfeK 

b<I>iM- 70P. 
SwSAAs.UlIt 
'■tar- :iC*s 

S-osct — roc Ui 

iwtnrtsW-Zaifc 

: JObB _ OM Id! 

TdJt*f ridx 

UA±. E»+. 
Ui Mi (Ew j-SCfiS 
Vvgxbya MS 


43/85 




** 


PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26-27, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


r^U.S. Plan 
On Deficit 
| Is Voted 

House Seeks Cuts 


■' r ' v w*> 

?l3* 


,‘Jt 


■ r «4ll 


y*e* 


V 


^ ^ $60 BWion 

Arllte: 

By Jonathan Fuerbringer 

A'ki - ViwA Times Serrtt* 

WASHINGTON — The House 
of Representatives has approved a 
package of spending cuts that 
would reduce the federal budget 
deficit by about S60 billion over 
three years. ' 

The package, approved Thurs- 
day by a vote of 228 to 199, in- 
Q dudes major cuts in rural and pub- 

-:\r p housing, reductions in veterans' 
v .£!_[% |( programs, cuts in student loans, and 
a one-year freeze in pay for civilian 
v^'^^yi^federal workers. 


IK. 

• - • V s ty.7 

■Ssss 



* 


• ‘ rL* %■ 


rt 5. 


The Senate bogged down Thurs- 
day on its own deficit-reducing 
package because of a dispute over 
attaching a measure to curb textile 
imports. The Reagan administra- 
tion has threatened to veto both the 
House and Senate proposals. 

[In fiscal 1985, the federal gov- 
ernment rah a deficit of S211.9 bil- 
lion, which, though a record, was 
less than had been expected, ac- 
cording to Treasury Department 
figures released Friday and report- 
~ : ' ,r 'W*' “ b y The Associated Press. The 
— < previous record of $207.8 billion 
was set for fiscal 1983. In fiscal 
1984. the deficit was SI 85 J billion. 

[The new deficit total was $600 
mflli rtn less than . an *AnTniicmitlr»n 
projection. made in August, and 


.. pWfci 
,- s .^ 


Q 




Dan Rosterfcewski - 

was almost 5 perceat kss than than 
a February estimate a $ 222 .? 
billion denaz. Ofikuds attributed 
this todedines in sourest rates and 
reduced militaiyspendtng-] 

‘ ^Ina sqparatedevdtnmfcntinihe 
effort.- to reduce hndget deficits, 
members of. House and Senate con- 
ference c omrnmctecra ressed opti- 
mism that xhiqt would be able to 
reach a cooiprMhise on le^skhon 
to mandate a- balanced budget by 
1991. , , 7 . -j v ■ - 
An analysis of the plan by the 
staff of. thcHohse Anncd Services 
Committee found that it was lBcely 
to result in drastic automatic cuts 
in spending for-nhffitary personnel 
and tximpmept, contrary to sop- 
poriers' asserdons that the budget 
could be balanced vrithout inter- 
rupting the xfinMan don's mili- 
tary budthip. . JL ■ , 

The . patia^es ^ appiowsd in die 
House arid being worked on in the 
Senate are dcsiehed to achieve a 
inqctf portion of tl^dieSefa.iednc- 
tion promised in the .1988. budget 
plan. 

In addition to saraigs tit S55J5 

(Coated on Page 5; CoL 1) 



US. Curb 
On Trade 
Advances 

Senate, in Vote, 
Ignores Threat 
Of Reagan Veto 

By Steven V. Roberts 

Nr* York Tunes Server 

WASHINGTON - The Senate 
has ignored threats of a presiden- 
tial veto and warnings of economic 
disaster and strongly signaled, its 
approval of a severe finst on textile 
and footwear imports. 

The measure survived a key test 
vote Thursday, 54-42. But Senate 
leaden then set H aade before a 
final vote could- be taken. 

To head off a filibuster by the 
trade bill's opponents, the sponsors 
are trying io attach it as an amend- 
ment to a catch-all bin that carries 
out : deficit reduction : measures 
mandated by the congressional 
budget, resolution, for 1986. That 
kindof measure, known as a recon- 
ciliation bill, comes to the floor 
under special rules that limit de- 
bate and prohibit a filibuster. 

the vote was the first step in a 
two-stage parliamentary voting 
process necesnry to attach the 
trade measure to the reconciliation 
ML It indicated that the Senate 
was likely to agree to the final step 
when and if it got the chance to 
vole again. But Senate leaders are 
trying to head off that vote by find- 
ing another way of considering the 
textile proposal. 

The sponsors of the trade bill 
bebeve that attaching it to the bud- 
get legislation would help shield it 
from a veto. But Senator Robert J. 
Dole, a Republican of Kansas and 
the majority leader, warned the 
Senate that President Ronald Rea- 
gan was prepared to veto the entire 
reconciliation bill if it contained 
the import curbs. 

: Senator Ernest F. Honings, 
Democrat of South Carolina, 
scoffed at the veto threat and said 
Mr. Reagan woold eventually bow 
to political pressure. 

^You don’t worry about Ronald 
Reagan when it conies to the textile 
bill ui the Sun Belt," Senator Hol- 
rfiaj& s&L “TCfTiisr thETbfr” - • 

Lawmakers from Eastern and 
Southeastern states, which contain 
most of the textile and shoe indus- 
tries, voted heavily for the move- 
Westem legislators, who worry that 
the measure win undercut trade 
with Pacific nations, generally op- 
posed the measure. 

Senator Daniel J. Evans, a Wash- 
ington Republican, said the bill 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 4) 



Shultz Plans 
Moscow Sessions 
Before Summit 


As Secretary of Stale George P. Shultz, left and Eduard A. Shevardnadze, the Soviet 
foreign minister, met Friday, each masted that his counterpart be seated first 

Moscow Attacks Reagan UN Speech, 
Says It Ignores Arms Control Issue 


Conpded br 0$r Staff Fit** Dispauha 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 
said Friday that a caQ by President 
Ronald Reagan for u a fresh start" 
in U^.-Soviet relations amounted 
to a rehash of Washington's “bank- 
rupt foreign policy directives." 

In a speech to mark the United 
Nations' 40th anniversary in New 
York on Thursday, Mr. Reagan 
said he was looking for a new baas 
for relations when he and Mikhail 
S. Gorbachev meet Nov. 19 in Ge- 
neva. 

He outlined a plan for peace 
mile* between warring groups in 
Afghanistan, Angola, Cambodia, 
Ethiopia and Nicaragua, where he 
said the Soviet .Union or, its allies 
were trying to impose their wHL 

Tass press agency accused Mr. 
Reagan of tiying to divert attention 
from new Soviet arms proposals 
and of distorting reality in Soviet- 
backed nations. 

In a dispatch from New Yoik, 
Tass said the Reagan speech con- 
tained nothing constructive. 

"In reality," it said, “it boiled 
down to the rehashing of Washing- 
ton’s well-known bankrupt foreign 


policy directives, the attempts to 
present in a more attractive pack- 
age' its nonconstructive policy of 
the refusal to take real measures for 
disarmament, its policy of state ter- 
rorism and interference in internal 
affairs of sovereign peoples." 

Tass said the main focus of the 
speech “was paid not at all to the 
most burning problems of nudear 
disarmament, but to other mat- 
ters.” 

“And he flagrantly misrepresent- 
ed the state of affairs in Nicaragua, 
Afghanistan, Cambodia and a 
number of other countries," it said. 

Moscow’s reaction to Mr. Rea- 
gan’s speech seemed to underline 
its growing impatience with the 
1>JS. approach 10 the Geneva con- 
ference. 

Mr. Reagan's statement that re- 
gional disputes should top the 
agenda at his meeting with Mr. 
Gorbachev was in stark contrast to 
the Kremlin position that arms 
control must be the focus of the 
meeting. 

Mr. Gorbachev restated that po- 
sition in a speech Thursday in the 
Bulgarian capital of Sofia. 


Diplomats said that the Soviet 
Uni on would place the president’s 
speech in the context of other re- 
cent U.S. actions that Moscow has 
criticized and described as proof 
that the United States was not pre- 
paring seriously for the summit 
conference. 

These include the testing of an 
anti-satellite weapon, a U.S. refusal 
tojoin Moscow in a moratorium on 
nuclear tests and, above aU, Mr. 
Reagan's insistence on continuing 
with research into a space-based 
missile defense system. 

The Tass commentary said: 
“Reagan, passing on to concrete 
issues of U.S.-Soviet relations, alto- 
gether forgot a new start. The main 
attention in the was pT_ 
□ot at all to the most bunting prob- 
lems of nuclear disarmament.” 

Mr. Gorbachev’s views on the 
summit meeting were endorsed at a 
Warsaw Pact meeting in Sofia this 
week where a communique listed 
Soviet proposals on nuclear and 
space weapons, conventional 
forces, chemical arms and other is- 
sues. 

(Reuters, AP) 


By Bernard Gwerrzman 

Vrw Yfirk Times Si n-tLe 

UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — Secretary of Slate George 
P. Shultz announced Friday that he 
would confer in Moscow with Sovi- 
et leaders Nov. 4 and 5 to intensify 

preparations for the meeting be- 
tween President Ronald Reagan 
and Mikhail S. Gorbachev next 
month in Geneva. 

The session in Moscow, which 
would mark the first time an Amer- 
ican secretary of state has traveled 
to the Soviet capital since 1978, 
would in effect decide the scope of 
the agreements that might emerge 
from the Reagan meeting with the 
Soviet leader in Geneva on Nov. 19 
and 20, administration officials 
said. 1 

Mr. Shultz, emerging from a 
two-hour meeting with Foreign 
Minister Eduard A Shevardnadze 
of the Soviet Union, said he would 
meet in Moscow not only with Mr. 
Shevardnadze, but with’ Mr. Gor- 
bachev as well. 

Among the ideas under active 
discussion for possible agreement 
at Geneva is a statement of princi- 
ples to govern the arms control 
negotiations. It will be impossible 
to achieve an accord on specific 
nuclear and space issues by the 

time of the Reagan -Gorbachev 
meeting, a senior administration 
official said. 

Another proposal under discus- 
sion, cited by Mr. Shultz mi Friday, 
was for the two sides to work out 
“an agenda for the future to have a 
sense of direction of where we 
think, and they think, this relation- 
ship should go, not only between 
the United States and the Soviet 
Union but between. East and 
West." 

A State Department official said 
Mr. Shultz, in his talks in Moscow 
with Mr. Gorbachev and Mr. She- 
vardnadze, might be able to clear . 
away the remaining obstacles hold- 
ing up such accords as a new cul- 
tural technical and scientific ex- 
.. change agreement. 

“The trip to Moscow is vital to 
shake up each side’s bureaucracy," 
a State Department official said' 
“This way, both sides have a dead- 
line of about 10 days to work out 
areas of possible compromise so 
that in Moscow there can be a good 
i dea on what is possible and what is 
not possible at the summit two 
■weeks later." 

Mr. Shultz and Mr. Shevard- 


nadze met for more than two hours 
Friday morning at a working 
breakfast at the United States Mis- 
sion to the UN. 

Mr. Shultz said they discussed, 
“in one way or another, all of the 
subjects that will be on the agenda 
in the president's meeting with 
General Secretary Gorbachev ic 
Geneva." 

These include arms control nego- 
tiations, regional disputes, Soviet- 
American bilateral matters, and 
human rights, an administration 
official said. The Soviet side, when 
it lists the agenda, omits human 


RELATED ARTICLES 

■ Allies criticized Ronald Rea- 
gan's UN speech. Page 1 

■ UJS. arms control officials 

are worrying about disunity in 
their ranks. Page 3. 

■ Pentagon to buy emigre's 
writings on Gorbachev. Page 3. 


rights, which it regards OS Ameri- 
can interference in its affairs. 

■ Reagan, Allies to Meet 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl of 
West Germany says President Rea- 
gan has agreed 10 meet European 
leaders after his summit conference 
next month with Mr. Gorbachev, 
The New York Times reported. 

In a conversation with German 
journalists Thursday night, Mr. 
Kohl said that he and several other 
European politicians had pressed 
the president to agree to such a 
meeting and that Mr. Reagan had 
agreed. 

The meeting will probably be 
held in Brussels on Nov. 21, after 
the Reagan-Gorbacbev talks have 
ended in Geneva. Mr. Kohl said. 

A U.S. official said that the pres- 
ident was “working on the notion." 

The request for a presidential 
briefing was one sign of ths interest 
in the summit conference on the 
part of western European leaders. 

Another was the pressure that 
they applied in New York this week 
for a fresh statement by Mr. Rea- 
gan on arms control before the 
summit conference begins Nov. 19 
— pressure applied more or less 
publidy by Prime Minister Marga- 
ret Thatcher of Britain and more 
privately by Mr. Kohl and others. 


France Explode& a Nuclear Device, 
Reaffirms Commitment to Testing 





SOUTO AF1UCA EMERGENCY — President Botha, 
In a rally in Springs, attacked en Friday those who have 
met with the Africa^ National Congress. Meanwhile, 
emergency rule W& 5. 

Tough Times for Yakuza 

^fcBut Japan Gangs Weajher Crackdown 



By John Burgess 

Washington Pat/ Sertice .. G 

OSAKA, Japan — Times are 
tough for the yakuza, as members 
of Japan’s resilient underworld are 
known. ... 

An right-month gang war has 
caused a wave of arrestf and upset, 
the gangsters.’ money-making rou- 
tine. 

But there is no sign of distress on 
the face of a cropped-haired gentle- 
man in a brown double-breasted 
suit as two visitors are shown into 
the room where he is sitting. He 
stands, smiles cordially and reaches 
for his calling card. 

It is a rather elaborate boe. done 
in traditional brush calligraphy. It 
identifies him as assistant deputy 
chief of the Takumi-gumi, one of 


in Japan. But police statistics show 
^thai at the md of 1984, there were 
2^78 organized c riminal gangs in 
friost^ace, with 93,910 members. 

; Japan’s overall crime rates are 
tiny when compared with those in 
the United States. But the yakuza 
manage io do a 'mammoth busi- 
ness, about $5 billion m 1981, ac- 
cording to police estimates, in such 
traditional preserves of organized 
crime as drug-dealing, - prostitution, 
extortion, bookmaking and por- 
nography. - 

The Yakuza have definite ideas 
of how gangsters should look; that 
look is generally drawn from 1930s 
Hollywood On the streets of Osa- 
ka, they can be picked out by ihdr 
cropped heads, striped suite- and 
diamond tie-clasps. The top mat 


Reiners 

MURUROA, French Polynesia 
— France has exploded a nuclear 
device in the South Pacific and re- 
affirmed its commitment to nudear 
testing. 

It was apparently preparing an- 
other test after an unsuccessful at- 
tempt by environmentalist protest- 
era to disrupt the blasts. 

The pledge was made Thursday 
by Prime Minister Laurent Fabius 
after he had attended the Gist of a 
new series of underground blasts at 
Mururoa in the South Pacific. 

“The sovereignty of France is 
not open to discussion," he told 
military personnel and atomic sci- 
entists at the base. “The nuclear 
tests are necessary to us. We will 
conduct them as other countries 
do." .. 

He added: “We do not seek to 
conceal any risks, for a simple rea- 
son — the experiments are totally 
innocuous.” • 

Mr. Fabius said the latest test 
had demonstrated an exceptional 
mastery of complex technology and 
rigorous security measures. 

After the blast, Defense Minister 
Paul Quiles and staff officers dem- 


onstrated confidence in the test's 
safety by swimming in the lagoon. 

Luden Michaud, assistant direc- 
tor of France’s Atomic Energy 
Commission, expressed satisfac- 
tion with the explosion but said it 
was too early to gauge whether it 
had been a success. 

Mr. Michaud would not specify 
the power of the bomb, which had 
little apparent impact on the sur- 
face of the remote alofl, although 
he said it was “relatively weak." 

In New Zealand, scientists said 
the blast had a yield of only five 
kOotons, equivalent to 5,000 tons 
of TNT, compared with a 150-kilo- 
ton explosion in May. 

A barge carrying measuring ap- 
paratus was plaited close 10 a tower 
used for lowering nudear devices 
into explosion chambers beneath 
the lagoon, indicating that a further 
test could be staged soon. 

On Thursday, ecologists of the 
environmental movement Green- 
peace sailed toward Mururoa a few 
hours before the test. 

The two men and two women 
aboard the yacht Vega were inter- 
cepted by French marine comman- 
dos two miles (3.2 kilometers) in- 


side a 12-mile forbidden zone - 
around the atoll. 

They were taken to a military 
supply base on the distant island of 
Hoa and were expected to be ex- 
pelled from Polynesia within 48 
hours. 

The Vega's seizure reduced the 
Greenpeace presence off Mururoa 
10 a single yacht, the Varangian 

The flagship of the protest flotil- 
la, an ocean-going tug called 
Greenpeace, returned to New Zea- 
land last week after its main power 
generator broke down. 

The Greenpeace had been hasti- 
ly brought in as the flagship for the 
protesters after the organization's 
converted trawler. Rainbow War- 
rior, was sabotaged by French se- 
cret agents in July. 

The sinking ; of the Rainbow 
Warrior in Auckland harbor em- 
barrassed the French government. 

At the test site, French officials 
were at pains to demonstrate the 
safety of their test program. 

Haroun Tazieff, secretary of 
state for disaster prevention, said 
fears the blast would destroy the 
atoll “were totally without founda- 
tion." 



-^operating here in Japan’s third- usually- Mercedes-Benzes 


largest city. Address and phone 






&: 



number of gang headquarters are 

provided on Lhe bade. 

He has taken wot from gang 
duties to explain the yakuza life- 
style and the feudal code of honor 
[Hal they say governs their exis- 
tence. 

“1 joined this world at the age of 
16 " he said with visiWepride. He is 
now 42. “My life is here, and I have 
no regrets." 

He was asked how he lost half of 
his left little finger. He wiggled 


The whole point is to be recog- 
nized. In Japan, self-respect and 
community respect come from be- 
ing part of ait organization, and 
society's down-and-outs seek- it 
through the gangs. 

The gangs function remarkably 
like the big companies ro which- 
mUEons of Japanese devote their 
lives. 

They maintain offices with . lhe 
gang emblem displayed proudly in 
front- They .provi de lifetime ero- 
. They orga 


-■» SUwj™ 

Unewtthyakuza tradition, he cut h jj er - s ■wedding,- sending out 


organize Cdcbra- 


-i 

o * ■ 


^ „*r 



off. in 19 $2 and delivered it to the 
man who headed the' gang he be- 
longed to then; He needed to dem- 
onstrate remorse for leading the 
defectioa of 1 1 members to another 
group, . . . .. .... 

“! wanted to take responsibil- 
ity,’' he recalled, adding. "It was 
sufficient payment." . . \ . 

The lorjc burglar or street-corner . 
holdup man is virtually unknown 


embossed invitations. 

A muscular 24-ycar-oId who be-., 
came a yakuza member eight years 
ago after running away fratn home, . 
said, “The yakuza world has some- 


thing warm teiC 


you have no career or school 

credentials, yoohe seen as Iowa: 
class ,* 1 he said. "Grille graduates 
(Coodsuedoo 5, CoL 1 ) 



SERIES LOSER — Whitey Herzog, center, the Cardi- 
nals’ manager, lost an argument and die game. Page 15. 


INSIDE 

■ The UN's 40th birthday was 
marred by a feud on a state- 
ment of purpose. Page 2. 

BA US. official visited Am- 
man tins week to encourage Is- 
rael and Jordan toward peace 
talks. Page 3. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ Peggy Guggenheim's collec- 

tion, a treasury of 20th-century 
art, has been painstakingly cat- 
aloged. Paged 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

B A U.S.- British group 
launched the first-ever un- 
friendly takeover bid for a Jap- 
anese company. Page 9. 

TIME CHANGE 

Codes will be turned back one 
hour at 2 A.M. Sunday when 
the United States and Britain 
return to standard time. 


ItaMumdhn 

The French defense minister, Paul Quiles, talks to a 
journalist during a dip after the nuclear test at Mururoa. 


In 19th Game, Kasparov 
Shows Scorn for Karpov 


By Cclestine Bohlen 

tt'itsfiHignm Pimj Service 

MOSCOW — It all came out in 
the open Thursday night — the 
tension, the emotion, the festering 
rivalry between two great chess 
players, now locked in their second 
battle for the world title. 

Until then, the champion, Ana- 
toli Karpov and the challenger. 
Gary JCasparov, had stuck to a 
script of cool perhaps frosty, cor- 
rectness. At least three nights a 
week for the past two months, the 
two have taken their places in the 
.giant Tchaikovsky Hajl and silently 
played out their antagonism on a 
board with 16 pieces each. 

But Thursday night, Mr. Ka- 
sparov, 22, toot a derisive lead in 
game 19, a game that may go down 
in chess history as the one that 


made him the youngesL world 
champion ever. 

Friday morning, faced by inev- 
itable defeat. Mr. Karpov resigned 
the game, which means thaf Mr. 

Kasparov now leads ]0 , 'i-8 1 '!, with 
five games remaining. 

Not only did Mr. Kasparov 1 have 
Mr. Karpov in a comer Thursday 
night, but he put him there with a 
grand and defiant gesture. 

According to experts, both play- 
ers got caught in a time scramble 1 
after more than four hours of play, 
and in the ensuing war of nerves, 
Mr. Karpov blundered. Faced with 
what many considered to be an 
overwhelming disadvantage, lhe 
champion refused to resign, an in- 
transigence considered by some to 
be a breach of chess protocol. 

Visibly exasperaied. at the end of 

(Coatimed on Page 5, CoL 1) 


State of Siege 
Declared in 
Argentina 

Reuters 

BUENOS AIRES — President 
Raul Alfonsin of Argentina de- 
clared a state of siege Friday for a 
period of 60 days to curb violence 
linked to next month's congressio- 
nal elections. Interior Minister An- 
tonio Trbccoli announced. 

Mr. Troccoli said in a radio 
broadcast that the measure would 
not afreet the Nov. 3 elections but 
was necessary to detain without tri- 
al Lhose the 'government suspected 
of responsibility for a wave of 
bombings. 

The measure suspends many in- 
dividual rights and gives security 
forces wide powers to arrest and 
imprison people without trial. 

The announcement came after a 
judge ruled that the government's 
use of emergenej 1 powers this week 
to order the arrest of 12 people was 
unconstitutional because no state 
of siege had been declared. 

Mr. TrOccoli said a new decree 
had now been issued ordering the 
arrest of the 12 — ^six military offi- 
cers and six civilians. 

A state of siege was Iasi in force 
in Argentina between 1974 and 
1983. It was lifted for the presiden- 
tial elections that brought Mr. Al- 
fonsin to power, ending almost 
eight years of military rule. 

Mr. Troccoli said a separate de- 
cree had been issued, besides that 

ordering the state of siege, in which 
the government set down rules to 
ensure fair elections, 
fl Explosion at Official's Home 

Lydia Chavez of The New York- 
Times reported from Buenos Aires: 

A bomb exploded early Thurs- 
day at the weekend home of Mr. 
Troccoli. 

Police said the explosion at the 
suburban farm of Ibe interior min- 
ister damaged the facade of the 
house and shattered windows. No 
one was injured, but the incident 
and new bombing threats at public 
schools indicated that the govern- 
ment bad failed to hall the surge in 
violence that began nearly a month 
ago. 

Mr. Troccoli has been chief 
spokesman for President Alfonsin 
on his decision Tuesday to use spe- 
cial executive powers to detain six 
civilians and six military officers. 

(Continued 00 Page 5, Col 3) 




V 





Page 2 


USTEKWATIOINAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUBDAY-SUMDAY, OCTOBER 26-27, 1985 


UN’s Birthday Is Marred 
By Feud on 'Declaration’ 

Wording on Pidestiman Issue Blocks 

Agreement on a Statement of Purpose 


By Elaine Sciolino 

Sew r«i Times Sen-tit 
UNITED NATIONS. New 
Yorlc — The United Nations 
turned 40 this week, but the historic 
birthday party was marred by the 
failure of member nations to agree 
on a universal declaration of pur- 
pose. 

The predictable sticking point, 
one that has tormented the United 
Nations for most of its existence, 
was the Palestinian issue. 

The secretary-general. Javier Pe- 
rez de Cuellar, opened Lhe anniver- 
sary ceremonv on Thursday in the 
General Assembly hall, while die 
Preparatory Committee for the 
40lh Anniversary worked furiously 
— and unsuccessfully — two floors 
below in a v.indowless basement 
room on what was to be a “Decla- 
ration on the Occasion of the 40th 
Anniversary 

As the meeting broke up. a West- 
ern diplomat said. “This is the UN. 
Back io reality." 

■Another diplomat called the at- 
mosphere "testy." and a Soviet del- 
egate told a colleague. "This was no 
way to mark the anniversary." 

the only issue that was regarded 
as insoluble was a paragraph in the 
five-page draft declaration, pro- 
posed by the United Nations' 21 
.Arab members, that expressed con- 
cern that "the question of Pales- 
tine'’ remained unresolved. 

The paragraph called for affir- 
mation of a commitment to work 
toward “a just, comprehensive and 
lasting settlement of Lhe Middle 
East problem in all its aspects." 

Tile draft mentioned the righL to 
self-determination of the Palestin- 
ian people, the rejection of acquisi- 
tion of territory bv force and an 
end to the occupation of the occu- 
pied territories, according to West- 
ern diplomats. 

The United States submitted a 
more general paragraph calling 
simply for a “comprehensive and 
lasting settlement of the Middle 
East problem in all its aspects.” It 
has consistently opposed refer- 
ences to a “just" settlement 
The United States has also op- 
posed calls for an end to the Israeli 
occupation of the West Bank and 
Gaza, as well as a resolution of the 
Middle East problem under LIN 
auspices on the ground that this 
would involve tlTe Soviet Union 
and would be time-consuming. 


Mr. Feldman said the United 
States had given ground on other 
issues and that agreement bad been 
reached on another thorny subject 
— the question of a New'lnterna- 
lional Economic Order. 

"The meetings were marred by 
East-West and North-South ten- 
sions." he said. “ and. in particular, 
by the Middle Eastern questions." 

Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of 
India, whose delegation supported 
the Arab draft said: 

“It certainly won’t be good for 
the UN. It really backs up what I 
said — that certain countries are 
not willing to work together to pro- 
duce a result Lhat is acceptable to 
everyone." 

Despite the failure of agreement 
on the declaration, the anniversary 
was regarded as a success. 

Since the General Assembly 
opened six weeks ago. more than 
200 speakers, among them presi- 
dents and prime ministers, kings 
and colonels, sultans and special 
envoys, have spoken. They have 
uttered more than a million words 
about regional conflicts and global 
crises, about history and destiny in 
what can be described as a vast 
State of the World message. 

As he looked out from the Gen- 
eral Assembly podium to a gather- 
ing of world "leaders on Thursday. 
Mr. Perez de Cuellar said. "This is 
a solemn moment. Leaders of all 
nations are assembled here and be- 
hind them is the single, collective 
constituency of the human race." 

Earlier in the day, representa- 
tives of the five permanent mem- 
bers of the Security Council — 
President Ronald Reagan. Prime 
Ministers Zhao Ziyang of China 
and Margaret Thatcher of Britain. 
Foreign Ministers Eduard A. She- 
vardnadze of the Soviet Union and 
Roland Dumas of France — as well 
as Prime Minister David Lange of 
New Zealand and Mr. Gandhi 
stepped up to the podium. 

in a speech to the assembly. Mr. 
Reagan urged the Soviet Union to 
help resolve five regional conflicts 
in .Afghanistan. Cambodia, Ethio- 
pia. Angola and Nicaragua as a 
step toward easing tensions with 
the United States. 

Mr. Shevardnadze reiterated the 
Soviet Union's “star peace" pro- 
posal saying: "The heaviest bur- 
den on mankind's shoulders is the 
arms race, which is inexorablv 





El Sal vador and the Middle East and other 
areas of conflict where the United States is 
heavily engaged, but the Soviet Union is not. 
were not on Mr. Reagan's list In a briefing 
before the president's speech, a senior ad- 


for a new American initiative on arms con- 
trol, were dissatisfied with Mr. s a f" 

preach, describing so one-sided 


spouses to U.S. initiatives, ^tftey see^ f (M % . 
as 2 specialist's distinction, <**&*&. tyidfo ..." 

:he senera". public. ii 


the o enera"- public. ... _ 

Ii'may be that the president wifi- aosw^? 




By R..W. Apple jr. .. 

Sew York Times Service 

UNITED NATIONS. New York - Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s speech to the United 

Nations constituted a clear attempt to wrest me prmu«ua ygen. a semur au- auuu uj me -r — « .- o««iaos r or iresu toots on arms ■ 

the propaganda initiative from die Soviet ministration official said that El Salvador mats said the speech appeared to haw been • ^ ' , 

Union a month before his meeting in Geneva — designed noi to meet their concern* bu t £ io arte •SSrSJ ‘ - 

with Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 

In the view of some American officials, 
and nearly all of die allied leaders whom the 
president met Thursday afternoon, Mr. Gor- 
bachev has succeeded in makin g his country 


ation by the RussianS- 
mat$ said the speech ap 

designed not to S^SsScDoUri- hhnseif promised to make “mqor mw p£ 

most enundy for purposes of domesuc pdii. ^ ore j^ring fw Geneva. •• ■ 

«t nnhbc relations. . .u . • 


acem more eager than the United States to 
achieve a relaxation in international ten- 
sions. The allies have been presang Wash- 
ington to correct this impression as a matter 
of urgency. 

Mr. Reagan chose to undertake that task 
in a surprising Way — not by responding 
directly to Mr. Gorbachev’s proposal for a 
50-percent reduction in ballistic missQes but 
by discussing a wholly different aspect of 
East- West conflict in doing so. senior While 
House officials said, be hoped to redefine the 
terms of the Geneva talks. 


NEWS ANALYSIS - . L1 . — . 

? . cal public relations. ^ ^jjj or administration official added fa ■ 

was missing because it was not so pressing a 5°®? shared "you can expect annscoutrol tobefafa 

case and lhat the Nfiddle East might “at maintaining bridges to the Europeans Seated from a platform ihst will make 

some point involve a Soviet rote” but' not at . “Sf view. _ r triA£ ^ audience available** 10 Mr. 


once. 


But the fact that Mr.1 


The president-proposed, in effect, that (he 
oviet Union and the United States accept 


President Ronald Reagan 
after delivering his address 
to the United Nations. 


Soviet 

joint responsibility for fostering peace in five 
countries in widely scattered parts of the 
world: Ethiopia, Angola. Afghanistan, Cam- 
.bodia and Nicaragua. They have in common 
the presence of Soviet or Soviet-backed 
troops whom the United States wants out. 


The leaders of many allied countries have 

Although the president did not make the managed, *55 ^'control when h£spt*rmS£ 
point so strongly, the senior official said that dampen »j_ suggested to many of the world 

unless progress was posable in defusing h^r £?♦ ancUbe Sedai the United Nations that the. Ubr^ 

what the axhmnistmion calls “regional con- uae progress once the United States ana inc era . • 

flicis,” ii would be very difficult to make Soviet Union starred talking again, 
progress with the Soviet Union in other ar- They do not expect any decisive break- 
eas. . through at Geneva, but they are counting, as 

Mr. Reagan adopted his most graedilo- a Gennan official «id, “on a lot niore*jUx 

quentlv patriotic tone in speaking of the role pictures of Mis. Reagan and Mrs. uoroa- 
of the United States in the modem world. He chev holding hands, and their husbands get- 
ting acquainted.” 

For the pre-American Europeans, the 
worst thing that could happen would be a 
failure at Geneva in an atmosphere like that 


held up his country as a model for the other 
members of the United Nations, as a nati on 
that occupies no land abroad except that 
“beneath the graves where our heroes rest,” 
rather than more dipl omatically picturing it 


States may pot have derided precisely hd^ 
should reply to the Soviet tea datives in that 
area. 

In much of rhe world, t fee Genwn'niqanJ ’ 
is seen not as an opportunity forafresh start 
as the president described it,- terras Sfr, 
Reagan’s last real chance to make a break 
through with the Soviet Union. 

Soon, foreign leaders Twhcve, the ap- 
proach of another presidential election canj- 


as one member of the famiW of nations, with 
frustrations like aQ others. 


problems and 

British and West German officials, who 
have been sending messages to Washington 
for more than a month emphasizing the need 


which exists today, with fresh Russian pro- paign will undercut bis aut hority , if fljhegffi 
posals on the table and earlier .American does not sap his s t a mina . Thjxe- ppsstbQttici 
proposals afl but forgotten. make them even more anxious to see flu 

They concede the point, emphasized United States recapture the high. '.ground an 
Thursday by Mr. Reagan, that Mr. Gorba- arms limitation in the four weeks before the 
bhev's new proposals are in fact only re- conference. -- 


I - 

i 


Ortega Stocks Up on Bulletproof Designer Eyewear WORLD BRIEFS 


By Maureen Dowd 

Sew York Times Service 

UNITED NATIONS. New 
York — .After Daniel Ortega Saa- 
vedra jogged through Central Park, 
his aides joked that the Nicaraguan 
president needed to stay in shape 
because, if the Reagan administra- 
tion got its wish, the Sandinists 
might have to resume the rough life 
of guerrillas some day. 

If the revolutionary leader does 
return to the hills, be will do so with 
a full supply of designer eyewear. 

His motorcade of 17 cars pulled 
up to the Cohen’s Fashion Optical 
store on the Upper East Side of 
New York the other morning. The 
store’s manager. Noel Cottington, 
said he helped Mr. Ortega pick out 
something sophisticated and yet 
simple, lightweight and bullet- 
proof. 

After an eye examination, the 
Sandinist leader bought six pairs, 
at S300 each, of Silhouette frames 
with lenses made of polycarbonate. 

That is a sturdy plastic that is 
familiar to New Yorkers as the ma- 
terial used for many of the panels 
that protect taxi drivers and pas- 
sengers from each other. 

It’s indestructible, so it must be 



to a Harlem 


him to arrange a 
shelter for the I 
The 25-year-old prince and his 
bodyguard, a Belgian Army colo- 
nel, drove up to l5Sth Street in 


Spain, U.S. to Continue Talks on Bases^ 

^ w ^ MADRID (API — Spain and the United Stales have agreed^ 

their limousine and toured the shd- continue talks on the future of U.S. military personnel Stationed in Sprin 
ter with William £ Gould, a Hu- following initial discussions this week. A joint stalemenUs^Fafay 
man Resources A dminist ration indicated that both sides would study the contribution, of the other to 
deputy administrator. Mr. Gould “European and Western security.* 7 ’ ^ 

confessed that he was quite nervous Spain had been lobbying for the talks, wttidi be^ Weonesd^, ana 
during the tour. before President Ronald Reagan s visit to Madrid last May. •• , .. 

“It was my first time meeting The statement made no direct reference to the reduction of the 12545 
foreign royalty, and we Americans U-S. troops and 1,669 civilian personnel stationed at fjwriaa-we 
don't always know how' to act or military bases and six communications centers in Spain. But both 
what to say.” he said. Spanish and U.S. sources have indicated privately that tfiscuama d 

D troop reduction, requested by the Spaniards, is the central theme of fie 

Other dignitaries visiting the talks- A second round of discussions is scheduled for December 
United Nations also moved beyond 


,, _ , . , - . , . . , , . , - bulletproof." Mr. Cottington said, 

Harvey Feldman, the American bringing us closer to the edge of an 3 dding that the dark, conservative 
delegate on the drafting committee, abyss. It is our duty to slop and glasses gave Mr. Ortega “the usual 
said. “A number of nations used then to reverse it. to prevent it from Wall Street look." 
the declaration as a point-scoring spreading to space." Rosario Murillo, Mr. Ortega’s 

exercise. We were disappointed After the speeches, the General wife, chose three pairs of Gucd 
that we could not reach a co risen- Assembly declared 1986 to be the frames, as well as three Fiorucci 
5UV “Year of Peace." frames for the couple’s daughter. 


Tht Aoooatod Pmu 

President Daniel Ortega Saavedra of Nicaragua shaking 
hands with President Ronald Reagan at a reception for 
leaders at the anniversary session of the United Nations. 


The bill was more than S3, 500. 
Mr. Ortega paid with a Diner's 
Club card from the Nicaraguan 
Mission. 


At a cockrailj party Tburaday 


night at the Waldorf-Astoria, Mr. 
Ortega also received some fashion 
advice from the mayor of New 
York. Surveying Mr. Ortega’s 
black suit. Mayor Edward I. Koch 
said: “You look belter in civilian 
clothes than you did in your uni- 
form. You look more peaceful.” 

□ 

Harlem holds a fascination for 


the usual visits to museums and 
theaters and couturiers to seek out 
New York’s less glamorous side. 

A group of Danish officials were 
eager to compare their country’s 
social services with those available 
in New York. They asked Mr. Ster- 
ling to arrange tours of Rikers Is- 
land jail, police headquarters, the 
Spofford Youth Center in the 
South Bronx, and a Times Square 
center for troubled youth. They 
also explored on their own. 

Taking a stroll on East 53d Street 
one night, Tage Nielsen, the head 
of the Danish Youth Council, sur- 
prised a young male prostitute 
when he began asking him about 
his motivations. 

“Do you know what kind of a 


Suspect In Aquino Killing Iden 


risk^you run with AIDS and all 


that?” the diplomat demanded. 

“I tiy to protect myself, bin I 
need the money". the. lS-yearvdld 
replied. 

Touring Times Square one after- 
noon. Mr. Nielsen walked up 42d 
Street past the erotic movie the- 
aters. drug paraphernalia shops 


MANILA (AP) Prosecutors 
investigating the assassination of 
Benigno S. Aquino Ir. on Friday 
named for the first time the soldier 
they believe shot tile opposition 
leader. 

Prosecutors identified the gun- 
man as Rogriio Moreno, who they 
say shot Mr. Aquino m the bade of 
the head as soldiers escorted the 
opposition leads' off a plane on 
Aug. 21, 1983. Mr. Aquino was 
returning to the Philippines after 
three yean of seif-exile in the Unit- 
ed States. Mr. Moreno was a mem- 
ber of the Philippine Constabulary 
Metropolitan Command in. Ma- 
nila. - ... 

In a 90-page summary, thepros- 
ccutionalso asked for conviction of 
General Eabjan G Ver. the aimed 
fOTceschidt2Bd25otbers charged ; 
in connection with the lolling..-' 


Rogefia Moreno 

U.S., Vietnam to Search Site forMTAs 



GET RICH 


m my of lhe European dignitaries andtagfSlisiivA.HeraniiAeda (R^tnrs) ~ Umttd Stales said Fndry thar 

visilinn New vjl the Dm man S a pink feather in his hair tad aperftothcffcrtjoml U^.-ViemamBesearth of a B-52cmJ 

ringing in a falsetto find e<X * 1446 


SOUTH GERMAN STATE LOTTERY 


The biggest prize money ever 

262 MILLION 

Deutschmarks to be won! 



The best odds ever: Almost 

EVERY 2nd 


Number is a winner! 


There was never 
a chance like this! 

Due to the enormous popularity of the 
South German State Lottery 
("Suddeutsche Klassenlotterie") we 
have had to issue more tickets 
and thus increase the total prize money 
by 37 million German marks to 
DM 262.970.000! A total of 700.000 
tickets will be in the 78th Big Money 
Game. And - believe it or not - 
340.178 of them will be winners! 

What’s more, it's all guaranteed by the 
German Government 


Just see 
what you can win! 


2 x 

2.0 million DM 

2 x 

1.5 million DM 

2 x 

1.0 million DM 

4x 

750.000 DM 

9 x 

500.000 DM 

19 x 

250.000 DM 

28 x 

100.000 DM 

12 x 

8O.0OODM-- 

20 x 

60.000 DM 

24 x 

50.000 DM 

28 x 

40.000 DM 

32 x 

25.000 DM 

384 X 

10.000 DM 

1.092 x 

5.000 DM 


Plus - 338.520 other prizes 
totalling DM 224.280.000! 


How to play 
the Big Money Game: 

Each game runs over a period of 
26 weeks and is divided into six classes. 
Each class is drawn at least four times 
in weekly draws. In the sixth class 
there are six weekly draws! Order your 
ticket and you'll be in the game to get 
rich quick. And whether you buy a full 
ticket, a 1/2 ticket or a 1/4 ticket, your 
chances of winning are the same. But, 
of course, the bigger the stake, the 
Bigger the win. The draw is held in 
public - under government supervision 
- in Munich (West Germany). 

Your chances increase - 
class by class. 

Because the number of winners 
increases from one class to the next 
And the number of tickets in the game 
gets smaller. That really improves the 
chances of those left in the game. 

Why wait? - Join in now! 


Order your ticket on the coupon 
below. Within days you’ll receive the 


ticket together with a personal state- 
ment of account and the official 
schedule of draws, as well as all the 
relevant rules and regulations. Include 
payment with your order. Or you pay 
after receiving your statement of 
account by personal cheque, traveller's 
cheque, bank transfer or in cash via 
registered air mail (at your own risk). 


Worldwide service! 

Every month we’il send you the latest 
official winning list, together with your 
ticket for the next class and your 
personal statement of account And - 
if you're a winner - we'll inform 
you personally. Notification is in 
str. : c*9st confidence - you just have to 
tell us how you want the money 
paid out! 


E. Gehle 


BoppstraOe 20-24 
D-6500 Mainz 
W-Germany 



NOW! 


Don't miss this fantastic chance! 

78th lottery of the "Suddeutsche Klassen- 
lotterie" beginning November 9th, 1985! 
Please fill in number of tickets you want to order 




DM 

US s* 

£* 


'.-ticket 

747.00 

276.70 

191.50 


’^ticket 

387.00 

143.40 

99.20 


'•i ticket 

207.00 

76.70 

53.10 


Return 
coupon to: 

E. Gehle 


Please write in • German □ English □ 


78/85 Mr.D Mrs.Q MissD Please print in block letters. 


Prices cover all 6 classes and include charges for 
airmail postage and the official winning Km. 
There are no additional charges. 

*Pr,ces in US Dollar and £ (sterling) are variable 
due to changes in the rate of exchange. 



Boppstr. 20-24 
D-6500 Mainz 
W-Germany 


I VALID ONLY WHBIE L£GAL "NOT AVAILABLE TO RESIDENTS OF SINGAPORE” 


visiting 

“They want to know if the Cot- daac? 'S'bf S< cSSn<^e N ’ri h 

ton Club still exists, and about seg- smoked marijuana. Commodore James Cossey of tbe US. Navy said tie agreement was I 

regation and poverty in tbe area," “This is worse than I expected,' 5 ^ that .Vietnam wanted to fulfill its prauae to 

said Adam Sterling of New York Mr. Nielsen said of the aeonlS- *Kf w** ^ °^^^ SSiaS “ a ? U0D V < £ MIA * ? xtIon two 3*®^ * 
City's Commission for the United’ borhood. “I thought at least there Han01 had agrecd excavatlon crash ate near Hand woolfl 
Nations and for the Consular were some rules, but there aren’t rw, 

COT*. There’s a lot of un-behavior, people taSH&ST 

fighting, taking dregs. ItrookTfike * “ Ajaan 


sey, a deputy assistant defense secretary spcrialmitffi 
Pacific affairs, also released the identities of .thp 


But even Mr. Sterling was sur- it hhmj mcc - ■ , .. ■ — 

prised when Prince Philippe Leo- you could be shot there without W Americans turned over by Hanoi on Aug. 14. One of them 

pold Louis Marie of Belgium asked anyone taVinp care of it” 1 a civilian who returned to Vietnam after the war and who died ins 

3 ^re-education campm 1976. . ^ . 


Jose Ladislao Biro, Inventor 
Of Ball Point Pen, Dies at 68 


The AssociaiaJ Press 

BUENOS AIRES —Jos* Ladis- 
lao Biro. 68, who has been ac- 
knowledged as the inventor of the 
common ball point pen, died 
Thursday after a brief illness. 

Bore in Hungary, he emigrated 
to Argentina in 1940 at the invita- 
tion of a former president. General 
Agustm P. Justo, who had spotted 


Mr. Biro using a strange type of 


pen at a resort hotel in Yugoslavia 
where both men were vacationing. 

Mr. Biro said he sold the patent 
for tbe pen to the U.S.-based 
Parker Co. in 1948. It later became 
the most common ink-writing uten- 
sil in tbe workL 


He emigrated with a specially 
provided visa and settled in Buenos 


iy 

uenos 

Aires, where he perfected the pen's 
design in 1942 and formed a com- 
pany to produce it for sale to the 
public. It first sold for the equiva- 
lent of S40. 

According to the Information 

Please Almanac, it was tbe first bah 

point pen produced for handwrit- 
ing. 

A U.S. citizen, John H. Loud, 


had invented in 1888 a ball point 
for marking rough surfaces. 

Mr. Biro's reputation 3Q in * 
ventor was well established before 
be arrived in Argentina. He was 
made an honorary member of Hnn- 
'gary*s Royal Academy of Sciences 
in 1938, and at 17 he had Dm 
received money for his design of a 
hand-operated clothes washer. 

He was credited with more than 
30 successful inventions, including 
a beat-proof tile for which patent 
rights were purchased by an Austri- 
an company. 

Before his death, Mr. Biro was 
working in the garage of his home, 
in the residential neighborhood of 
Belgrano. on a gas- separation pro- 
cess to enrich uranium for Argenti- 
na's National Atomic Energy Com- 
misson. 

Mr. Biro also wrote and painted. 
Some of- his p aintings are held by 
tbe Fine Arts Museum of Buda- 
pest 


Iran Warns U.S. Over Iraqi Attacks . 

NICOSIA (AP) — Further Iraqi attacks on Iran’s oil export facilities 
. could jeopardize US. interests in the Gulf, the Iranian pressaiency stai 
Fnday, quoting an Iranian mflitarv leader. * 

The lRNA agency, monitored ii Nicosia, quoted Colonel AE SayyaS 
ShirazL commander of Iran’s ground forces, as saying that if Iraq 
continued its efforts to block Iran's oil exports, “no one will be capable^ 
protecting U.S. interests in the region.” . ‘ 

IRNA also said that Iranian forces had captured 70 Iraqi sofcfiereasc# 
Thmsday m two days of fighting in marshes north of the Iraqi atyt? 
^^btJ aSenCy 1185 sported more than 310 deaths among Iraqi forces 


Warsaw May Free Political Prisoners: ** 

WARSAW fUPT) — The Polish OAWmrrtPnf ■»*-- 1 


fc.*i 


A.MER 


: . . 


iw watra, vrenerai wqjoecn Jar 

conridff the release of about 300 ponocai prisoners . 

The 78 percent turnout in the Oct 13 elections, which the outlaw^ 
bohdanty tn£e muon urged . voters to boycott, was the lowest offidaDS 
rewrded m Poland since 1948. Bat the government spokesman, Jens 
Urban, said it indicated a “high degree of stabiKiy of th^state- ' 
? ta, * ncnt „<» 1 Thursday on possible amnesty came* 
^ releaseS^liti^^Dasand 
-™ 100 “ ahve.and well Lech Walesa, the founder df 


For lhe Record 


CHliRCH SERVICES 


muas 


CB4TXAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 13 Rue du 
ViwK-Cotemfaleiv 73003 Par«. Metro 5 l 
Sdpktt. Sunday wenfrtp m Engfah 9*45 
aJTU, tor. A. Sgnwwrnlte. T*Lt <XS7£7J32. 


nuBssu»im 

gMMANua Baptist church, 56 Ro* dM 

Bons-toisint, RMiLMalnaiion. English 
igtaiuns. ffvongdknl, all dMOminafiom. 
S£. 9^5; V/onhipt 10A5. Ortyrr octi*W 
Coll Dr. B.C Thomas, Paster. 749.15.29. 


STOCKHOLM 
WMAimB. CHURCH near city 
Trierxffy didstion Wlo-sNp. Sunday 1 1 00. 
W.: (08) 316051, 151225. 


Ta place an adverthematt 
- in this section 


' please contact: 

Tib EHxabeih HER WOOD 
101 Are, Ch.-«le-GaiiIte, 
92521 NeniHv Cedes, France, 
TcL; (1) 47:47.12.65. 


Thailand Charges 
40 With Sedition 


The Associaltd Pros 
BANGKOK —The Thai public 
prosecutor charged 40 people, in- 
cluding some semor military offi- 
taals, with sedrtitm on Friday Tor 
their alleged role in an abortive 
coup last month. / 

None of the 32 persons present 
in court replied when the three- 
judge panel asked if any were will- 
ing to confess, aTegal source said 
Eight other suspects, including a 
former prime minister and aimed 
forces commander/ Kriangsak 
Chamanand, ere to appear before 


deSfi? inDocent Tlwsday to darns that he nraf- 

piS “ O* -raote.Wd. Iowa ot KnoctS^' 


PopeJolm Paul [Ts visit to 



Source for 


the court on Mond^f. 

The 19-page list of diarges. the 
result of a nmthlong polias inves- 
tigation, said that the 40 had been 
involved in the coup attempt. Five 
persons were lotted and 60 irg'ored 
in the uprising, which loyalist 
foroespul down withmafew hours. 

The legal source, who spoke on 
the condition of not being farther' 
identified, sakf thefirst hearing whs 
set f« Dec, 4. ■ • V. 



I. ' 




“.t 







r - 


V' :V - 




•fc v 
Wafa. 

,-v 




» :,r 

- f 'hi ". 
5T 7 •’. ._ 
> * *v -. 



Xu ( ■ 


fl] 


^iiii 


. ' j^afc. 
' • *- ^lyA-iT? 

: - • . :r- 

JSOSJSjjjp, 

ri4j Killing Idgjjj 


"‘.■i, f;u,V ’ • >«* Tintn Sen-Ire 

iV ‘ WASHINGTON — Wiih a- 

l- JJ wunS between President Ronald - 

• , Re agan and Mikhail S- Gorbachev 
. T®a ^ 0Ur weeks away, admin- 

• p i . J ^ istration officials say they have bo* 

ep** 1 ® coacemed about disunity in 
- . ranks on arms control. ‘ 

^ \y% - The officials, who are involved in . 

preparations for the summit ineet- 
’• * Sijfc ' in & speat of divisions on almos t - 
" V every issue; how to characterize the • 
■ ' 7i . " Soviet arms proposals, how fa in- 

terpret existing treaty obligations, 
mucb P ubUc LO give 

>«■ ■* '}? purported Soviet violations and, 

finally, the all-impoitant question 
V- ' of what U.S. goals should be. 
‘■-r^'K ■■ VW ^ lament what they call 
: s^pus failings in White House co- 

ordination of public statements. 
* _:r '5c.T'. -; “That makes us look even more 
“ divided than’ we are.” an official 

said. 

• As these officials see it, the disar- 
ray is caused mainly by the fact 
that Mr. Reagan has not yet dead-, 
ed on his own general approach fa 
ihe meeting, lei alone on the specif- . 
ics. Nor has be provided mmipfr 
authority fa Robert G McFariane, 
his national security adviser, or 
anyone else to co ntain the centrifu- 
gal forces that have characterized 
his aims control team. 

"V The upshot has been three weeks 
. public statements by officials 
from the White House, the State 
. Department and the Pentagon, all r 

■■‘■“.' 05 ^ pulling in separate directions. 

. j. •• Nor, according to the officials, 
i/ y^Stfc did Mr. Reagan’s speech to the 
l&Ujt United Nations General Assembly 
do much to. darify the situation. 

•» Some said that his tone had. been 


IB Ri5s 

Sn '*T*„ 



„ ^ l-thathe 

had chaiacrcrizcd ihe Spinet, pro- 
posal for aSp^petpmr^in nucle- 
ar arsenals ast cxprtaimng - “reeds 
which we 

By ah accounts, noofikial seems 
to be diedphg^s statements be- 
forehand with^he. others. This lack 
of aKHdmiRWU^is-been an. alflio 
lion of theaQtter.and Reagan ad- 

mrni^nrtinftc'njwt -j« nmmi^ Only 

because ^ persists so dose to a 
snmnnt-m eeiw g .•■•■. 

These rjxroH ems emerged this 
wedras. fad H, NStze, the State 


s » 



ScsBotfoni 

art'll Nteforl 

vis ad B; 

- -.Vesaa 

!-• ttat 
... : -Zi fi&i 

^-fjSgefi 
■•. *r is as 
-.-eras & ■ 

(k 

- ; J3BPP * 

- .jjsi®' 


r Iraqi-- 


. rtf ? 


. ..** 
. •’■’3 


_ ■ *.'• :hs*® 
• .~.£& 




- 

- ■* 

. .#**1 

■■ ■ ■ 

•*. us 1 :. 


, ::4 

■m 

S ' • . 



Sandy Rhkman surveys^ the remains of wrecked borne. 

AMERICAN TOPICS 


Spouse Gets Revenge 
Using a Bulldozer . 

Angry with his wife for filing 
for divorce, Raymond Kirkman 
wrecked their new 585,000, 
house in Enumdaw, Washing- 
ton, with a bulldozer while she 
was out of town. 

Police said there may be no . 
case against. Mr. Kirkman be- 
cause he paid SI 1-50 for a'de>- 
molitkm permit at dty hall be- 
fore going into action. 

A police officer, Fred Eaton,, 
said, “When I got the call over 
the radio, I thought it was the 
usual domestic case where the' 
husband is tearing tip the house, 
you know, throwing things 
around. When I got there, I 
made him stop for a minute.” 
But Mr. Kirkman produced his 
permit and continued bulldoz- 
ing. ' 


U.S. Education: More, 

H Perhaps Not Better 
The American, people are 
“the most educated in ! the 
world,” a recent U.S. Census 
Bureau study said, .but. added 
that the quality of American 
schools has sagged. ; ' 

It died surveys showing that 
in 1980-81 almost 32 percent of 
Americans 25 or older had at 
least some college education, 
compared, for example, with 
173 percent of East Germans. 
17.2 percent of Canadians, 153 
percent of Swedes and 14 5 per- 
cent of Japanese. 

But the study went op to cite . 
socierideiKeasScIiolasticAi>- 
ritude Test scares, which steadi- 
ly declined from 1963 before 
picking up slig htly this year, to 
support its conclusion that “the . 
quaJity of schooling has de- 
clined, especially during the 
1970s." •■.■■■■• 


Short Takes 

How (fid St Lous ahd.KaiH 
sas City make it an aD-Missouri 
Worid Series? George Vecsey, a 
sports columnist for Hie New. 
York Times, saying that “the 
answer 'was in the heavens,'” . 
noted that Mark Twain was 
bom in 1835, whim: Halley’s 
Comet was closest to Earth, 
died in 1910,. the next year Ha^. 
ley's was visible: “This; y«uv 
Halley's Comet flashes againj 


and Mark Twain’s native state 
has soaggai: life entire - Wodd 
Series.”. _ 

Winegrowers in Calffomia’s 
Napa Valley are conoenied that 
a growing flood of tourists — 
. two mfl&ai came last year and 
spent 5135 mUBon — and a 
growing number of bontii 
and resumzants fa serve 
are skewtng the economy so 
that Napa’s earth may someday 
betoooqiensiyetofann. A 17- 
year-old Napa. County ordi- 
nance has confined develop- 
ment to already-established 
cities, but this could be ended 
by a 3-2 vote of ihe- county 
board of supervisors." 

A hatf-centnry «f tndUoa 
was cleared away with the dish- 
es tins mouth when the First 
Congregational Church in 
Middlefield, Massachusetts, 

S ve its final Coon - 
embers of the dmrdt's ' 

Aid Sociecy {aid they have 
baked ti»r last raccoon. Helen 
Crick, 78, said, **Ihe problem is, 
the girls in the kitchen, aren’t 
getting any younger, aid the 
tendency of ihe younger women 
does not He in the directkm <jf 
epem suppers.” • - - 

Deaths of. drunk, drivers ■ 
dropped. 24 percent between 
1980 and 1984, from whip than 
14,000 to 11,000, acetuding to 
U.S. govexfiment figures- Thc 
percentage of druoJrea jnotop- 
ists among all fatalities involv- 
ing drivers during Che sajae pe- 
riod dropped frmn 50 percent' 
to 43 peroenLTliis would sug^ 


agamst driving vdifleun^rJhe. 
influence' of alcohol are suc- 
ceeding. .. 

Shorter Tikes:; “Stage- 
coach,” the motb-revived 1935 
classic thatmade John Waynea 
star of the first magnitude and 
had a remake in 1964 datvras 
quickly forgo tien, k to he re- 
made again.. .This time Kri* 
Krisioffeson win star in the 
Wayne rolerif the Ringa Kid. 
... The WtdHfiffia Prist noted 
in an. editorial that the -number 
of U3. wild-turkey hunters 
now equals the munper of wild 
turkeys: two nuffioo. To furtitei 
even things Tbc Tosi sug- 
gested. "It is .time to arin; the 

turiteyis.” - 

r JrrCompikH'bv 


Department's arms control adviser, 
pm a Soviet proposal 49a medium- 
range nncJear forces in a somewhat 
favorable light the day after De- 
fense Secretary Caspar W. Wein- 
berger suggested that, purported 
. Soviet violation cast doubt era the 
" value of anas conotti generally. 

. The U3. trffidals say they see 
die Russians flgiliog about, loo. to 
some degree, as Soviet leaders cry 
!! to establish their own bearings, 
. Three months ago, Soviet arms ne- 
gotiators in Geneva talked about a 
te m por a ry hah on medium-range 
missile deployment by the Sovtk 
U nion ana the United Sates, im- 
plying an acceptance of current 
■ UjS. deployments. 

Three weeks ago in finis, Mr. 
Gorbachev also suggested separate 
talks with France and Britain about 
their missile arsenals. This seemed 
to cast a shadow over the Soviet- 
American nlks and had the efTect 
of putting American medium- 
? range forces in the same negotiat- 
ing pot as American intercontinen- 
tal-range weapons. 

Then, last week in Geneva, the 
Russians came bade to their sug- 
gestion of three months ago ana 
pro po se d a freeze on Sonet and 
UJS. medium-range missHc deploy- 
. menL 

This is what Mr. Nice was refer- 
ring to Wednesday when be said 
that the Soviet Union seemed ready 
to accept some of the new U.S. 
medium -range missiles. The Unit- 
ed States now has more than 200 
such missiles in Europe. 

Slate Department offidals said 
they, had no fo r e w ar nin g that Mr. 
Weinberger was about to revive the 
issue of the SS-25, an interconti- 
nental ballistic missile. 

The United States contends that 
the SS-25 is the Soviet Union's sec- 
ond new type of 1CBM even 
though the 1979 treaty on strategic 
aims limitation allows the flight - 
; testing and deployment of only one 
new type. The Russians contend 
that their new type is the SS-24, 
and that the SS-25 is amply a mod- 
ification of an earlier missile, 
known as the SS-13. 

As far as State Department offi- 
cials are concerned, Mr. Weinber- 
ger’s motive in bringing up the mat- 
ter again could only have been his 
desire to cast a pall over the summit 
meeting. Mr. Weinberger's aides 
said that he simply wanted to call 
attention to the fact that the SS-25 
had now become operational. 

Only two weeks ago, the admin- 
istration went through a similar 
round of public pushing and pull- 
ing over what kind of testing was, 
and was not, allowed by the 1972 
anti-ballistic missile pact 
- At. that tune, Mr. McFariane 
went on television and, without 
warning fa his colleagues, gave a 
bipad interpretation of the treaty. 

Days later. Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz, after taking the 
matter fa the president, said that 
Mr. McFarlane’s interpretation 
was correct but that the United 
States would nevertheless abide by 
a . narrower one. 


n» ftuoamdi 

Some of tfae 118 prisoners and wounded rebels freed by E2 Salvador in a Red Cross 
truck. In return, rebels released President Duarte’s kidnapped daughter and a friend. 

El Salvador Gunfight Kills One, Hurts 10 


AW York Tones Service 

SAN SALVADOR — A gunfight Friday in 
front of the presidential palace in San Salvador 
killed one person and left 10 wounded. The shoot- 
ing occurred at noon, as Preskkm Josi NapoIeOn 
Duarte was preparing to leave for a speech at the 
National Assembly. 

The incident occurred amid the tension that 
surrounded Thursday’s release of the president's 
kidnapped daughter in an exchange of prisoners 
with guerrillas. 


A presidential spokesman said there was an 
attack at midday on the two main entrances of the 
pal a c e , and soldiers guarding the palace returned 
the fire. The spokesman said that Mr. Duane 
remained safely inside the budding complex. 

But witnesses said the shooting began as police 
detectives opened fire on a car they were chasing 
close to the white colonial palace in the south of 
the city. Suspecting an attack, soldiers at the bar- 
racks next to the palace opened fire on a passing 
bus. wounding at least seven passengers. 


U.S. Says Official Visited 
Jordan This Week to 
Encourage Peace Talks 


Pentagon to Buy Study of Gorbachev 


By Charles R. Babcock 

Waskuigran Pass Servue 

WASHINGTON — The U3. 
Defense Department plans to 
spend -op to 5100,000 for a study 
entitled “ Mikhail - Gorbachev — 
The Formative Years,” based on 
the rccoUoctioos of an 6migr6 who 
has not seen the Soviet leader for 
nearly 30 years. 

The idea for the unclassified 
study came from Gerald Guens- 
berg, head of Delphic Associates of . 
Fans Church, Virginia, who hires 
Soviet fenigris to write reports that 
he tries to sell to government agen- 
cies. 

Several months ago, Mr. Guens- 
bet£ said, he noticed that one of the 
fanigrfes, Fridrikh Neznansky, had 
attended ihe Moscow Law Institute 
from 1950 to 1954, the same years 
as Mr. Gorbachev, and worked in 
the same dty after graduation. 

“Did they know each other? Yes. 
Were they close friends? No,” said 
Mr. Guensberg, who said he retired 
from the Central Intelligence 
Agency in 1979 after years as an 
interrogator of German scientists 
who had been in toe Soviet Union. 

Mr. Guensberg said he then ap- 
proached the Pentagon. At the 
same time, he realized that Mr. 
Neznansky’s material was dated 
and might not be entirely accurate. 

“He knew Gorbachev. 1 also 
know there was a danger. He 


doesn't have a license to practice 
psychiatry," Mr. Guensberg said. 

• The study is for the Defense De- 
pamnem’s net assessment office, 
which is nesponsble for calculating 
the balance of forces between the 
Soviet Union and the United 
States. 

Mr. Guensberg said he went to 
the net assessment office, rather 
than the State Department or the 
CIA, because he knew Andrew 
Marshall, its director, and knew 
that Mr. Marshall’s office had 
money. 

Mr. Marshall could not be 
reached for co mm ent, but Lieuten- 
ant Colon d Thomas Gladstone, his 
military assistant, said the office 
wants to fund the study about Mr. 
Gorbachev in hope of learning 
“some insights about this man, 
what makes this guy tick, how he 
might react” 

Colonel Gladstone would not 
say bow much the study might cost 
“It’s a fairly small amount," he 
said. “Just say it’s less than 
S 100,000." 

The Pentagon announced its in- 
tention to negotiate with Mr. 
Guensberg’s company in the Ocl 
1 1 Commerce Business Daily, 
which lists many government con- 
tracts. 

The announcement said the 
study “will focus on what may have 
been unique about Gorbachev that 


led to his eventual rise to the high- 
est party level. This research will 
provide defense policy makers with 
insights ... which could directly 
impact on US. national policy con- 
cerns toward the Soviet Union." 

Mr. Guensberg said that Mr. 
Marshal] “deserves a medal for re- 
alizing the potential in this." 

He added: “It's not a study of 
why birds flap their right wing. 
This is serious. They need every 
scrap they can collect.” 

Mr. Guensberg declined to say 
bow much of the proposed contract 
award he will share with Mr. Nez- 
nansky, who left the Soviet Union 
in 1978 and now resides in Germa- 
ny where be works for an &migr& 
publishing house. 

Mr. Guensberg said that Mr. 
Neznansky last saw Mr. Gorba- 
chev in the mid-1950s when the two 
were both working near Stavropol. 
Mr. Neznansky was a prosecutor 
and Mr. Gorbachev was an official 
in tire Young Communist League. 

To help Mr. Neznansky recall 
those days, Mr. Guensberg said he 
gathered Soviet scholars from 
George Washington, Harvard, Co- 
lumbia and Stanford universities 
and had them debrief Mr. Nez- 
nansky during a series of meetings 
in September. 

“In my opinion it has merit,” 
Mr. Guensberg said, adding: “Ob- 
viously I have a vested interest.” 


Jarvik Heart 
Implanted in 
U.S. Invalid 

. United Press International 

PITTSBURGH — A 47-year- 
old man who was given less than 24 
hours to live without a new heart 
has received a Jarvik 7 mechanical 
heart fa keep Km alive until a hu- 
man heart transplant can be made. 

Surgeons at Presfayterian-Uni- 
versity Hospital implanted the 
pump Thursday night into the 
chest of Thomas Gaidash as “an 
interim life-saving measure," a hos- 
pital spokesman said. 

Mr. Gaidosh, who had to quit his 
job as a lo adin g-dock worker after 
he was disabled by heart disease 
two and a half years ago, was re- 
ported in critical condition after 
the six-hour operation. Doctors 
said his condition was normal after 
an implant 

- Dr. Bartley Griffith, leader of 
the surgical team, decided to im- 
plant the Jarvik heart because Mr. 
Gaidosh “was not expected to sur- 
vive 24 hours" without it, the 
spokesman said. Mr. Gaidosh had 
been on “acute status" awaiting a 
human heart transplant for about 
two and a half weeks. 

Dr. Griffith, 36, was given per- 
mission in August by the Food and 
Drug Administration to use the 
Jarvik 7 for temporary implants. 
He was assisted in the surgery by 
Robert Hardesty and Alfredo 
Trento. 

The Jarvik 7 is designed to re- 
place the main pumping chambers 
of the bean 'll was the first artifi- 
cial heart approved by the FDA for 
n« in humans. 

Mr. Gaidosh is the world’s sev- 
enth Jarvik 7 patient and (he 11th 
artificial bean redpient- 
. He also is the second artificial 
heart recipient in Pennsylvania in a 
week. Anthony Mantua, 44, of 
Philadelphia, received a Penn Stale 
heart last Friday at the Hershey 
Medical Center. He is also awaiting 
a human heart transplant. 

William J. Schroeder, 52. of Jas- 
per, Indiana, is the world's longest- 
living artificial heart recipient. Mr. 
Schroeder had a Jarvik 7 implanted 
Nov. 25, 1984, b Louisville, Ken- 
tucky. 


NASA Says a Journalist Wittily 
Aboard Shuttle, Perhaps Next Fall 

By Philip M. Boffey 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The National Aeronautics and Space Admin- 
istration has announced that a journalist will be chosen to fly aboard 
the space shuttle, probably on a flight next falL 

A teacher has already biwn chosen as the first citizen passenger to 
fly into space. She is Sharon Christa McAuliffe, a high school tocher 
from Concord, New Hampshire. She and a backup teacher are 
training at the Johnson Space Center in Houston for a flight in 
January. 

The goal of the program is to send men and women into space who 
can co mm unicate tbdr experience more effectively than the astro- 
nauts, who are often tene b describing space and space flight. 

- Some journalists and educators said they were uneasy about the 
plan to send a journalist bto space, and called the move essentially a 
public relations program for the space agency. Stub statements were 
discounted by the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass 
Education, which is coordinating the nationwide selection process. 

Roy M. Fisher, former editor in chief of the Chicago Dally News, 
which ceased publication b 1978, and framer dean of the journalism 
school at the University of Missouri, called the choice of a journalist 
“good to the degree that it acknowledges the importance of journal- 
ism to public unders tanding " 

But Mr. Fisher said “it makes me uneasy" whenever “a journalist is 
used as a tool to promote any special interest, even one as worthy as 
the space program.” 


4 Die, 26 Hurt 
As Mortar Fire 
Hits West Beirut 

United Press International 

BEIRUT — Four persons woe 
killed and at least 26 were wounded 
Friday in a surprise mortar bom- 
bardment that briefly engulfed 
mostly Moslem West Beirut, catch- 
ing thousands of shoppers, workers 
and schoolchildren on the streets, 
witnesses and hospital sources re- 
ported. 

The source of the barrage, which 
consisted of dozens of shells, re- 
mained uncertain, but militia and 
Lebanese Army sources privately 
said the light mortars were appar- 
ently fired by rival gunmen during 
a brief gun battle in the Hamra area 
of West Beirut 

“They were small caliber mortars 
with a maximum range of one kilo- 
meter,” an official at the four- 
member Central Security Commit- 
tee said. 


JAL Remembers Victims of Crash 


By Susan China 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — The president of Ja- 
pan Air Lines faced the relatives of 
victims of (he world's worst single- 
plane disaster and bowed low and 
long. 

He turned to a wall covered with 
wooden tablets bearing the victims’ 
names. He bowed again Then, in a 
voice that sometimes quavered, Ya- 
stimoio Takagi asked for forgive- 
ness and accepted responsibility. 

The ceremony Thursday marked 
the final memorial service spon- 
sored by Lhe airlinc for the 520 
who died b the Japan Air 
crash on Aug. 11 

On Tuesday. 3J71 people at- 
tended a service b Osaka. On 
Thursday, about 1,400 people, 700 
of them family members, 693 of 
them airline employees and other 
-tests, crowded into Hibiya Public 


guests 

Hail 


3 Swedish Iron Miners KiBed 

Reuters 

KIRUNA, Sweden — Three 
miners were found dead Friday in a 
mine shaft in an iron ore district b 
northern Sweden, possibly killed 
by gas from rock busts, the police 
said. 


One by one, the black-clad fig- 
ures walked up to the altar, left a 
chrysanthemum for remembrance, 
bowed and turned away. For more 
than an hour, to the organ strains 
of Tchaikovsky and Beethoven, 
families, dignitaries and airline em- 
ployees filed by, pausing in front of 
the altar to pray, wipe away a tear 
or stand silently. 

For Mr. Takagi and his employ- 
ees, the service marked the culmi- 
nation of a two-monih exercise in 
accountability. Since the night of 
Aug. 12, the airline has mobilized 
its staff, from the president on 
down, to offer the gestures of apol- 



ogy and regret that Japanese re- 
quire at such times. 

In the days after the accident, 
-when family members had to travel 
to a small mountain village to iden- 
tify the bodies, airline staff stayed 
with them, paying all expenses, 
bringing them food, drink and 
dean clothes, even arranging for 
portable air conditioners to cool 
them while they waited in stuffy 
rooms. 

Even after most of the bodies 
were identified, the airlbe assigned 
two staff members to each family 
.to attend to needs as varied as ar- 
ranging for funerals or keepbg 
away reporters. 

JAL set up a scholarship fund to 
pay for the education of children 
who had lost parents b the crash. It 
spent SI .5 million on the two elabo- 
rate memorial services. The airlbe 
dispatched executives to every vic- 
tim’s funeral although some were 
turned away. And Mr. Takagi has 
pledged to resign soon as a gesture 
of responsibility. 

The strain of tending to grieving 
relatives told on some employees. 
In the two mouths since the crash, 
two have died. Hiroo Tominaga, 
59, a maintenance engineer, killed 
himself on Sept 20, and Miyoko 
Inoue, 54, an executive who worked 
with families, died of a stroke on 
Oct. 11. 

But the airline could not have 
failed to perform acts of concilia- 
tion. To do so would have left the 
JAL open to charges of inhumanity 
and irresponsibility. And that fail- 


ure would have left families intrac- 
table in the difficult negotiations 
over compensation, which will be- 
gin b earnest now that the memori- 
al services are over. 

Compensation payments, which 
JAL wffl split with Boeing Co., are 
expected to be substantial, perhaps 
exceeding SICK) million. 

On Thursday, there was no hint 
of animosity or of the arduous talks 
ahead. The service was somber and 
formal It began with a moment of 
silence for the victims. 

As airline employees stood in 
tribute, the vice president of the 
airline approached the altar, wear- 
ing while gloves. Holdrng a list of 
victims' names with both hands, a 
Japanese mark of respect, he 
bowed deeply to the families and 
placed the list on the altar. 

Mr. Takagi then delivered a 
short eulogy. 

“We have had mucb to reflect on 
since the accident and we feel a 
deep sense of responsibility," he 
said. "To the bereaved, all we can 
do is to try our utmost to help you 
and to ease your pain as best as' we 
can. To those who were lost, I can- 
not restrain my teats of sorrow in 
saying farewell to you now." 


East German Flees to Bavaria 

The A nacnilni Press 

MUNICH — An East German 
border guard fled into Bavaria on 
Friday, local authorities said. They 
did not say how or where the guard 
had crossed the border. 


By Bernard Gweirzman 

Sts )vrk Times .Yen 

NEW YORK — The United 
States sent a high-level official to 
Jordan this week on a mission to 
encourage Israel and Jordan to- 
ward Middle East peace talks, the 
State Department said. 

The depanmem said Thursday 
the purpose of the unpublicized 
trip by Richard W. Murphy, assis- 
tant secretary of state for Near 
Eastern and South Asian affairs, 
was to "sustain momentum" that 
they said had been generated in 
recent weeks. 

The disclosure came amid an un- 
usual public exchange of concilia- 
tory statements by Prime Minister 
Shimon Peres of Israel and King 
Hussein of Jordan. 

Officials accompanying Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan and Secretary 
of State George P. Shultz to the 
United Nations in New York said 
the United States believed thai the 
prospects for moves toward peace 
had been advanced and had decid- 
ed to step up its middleman role. 

Mr. Murphy's trip to Amman 
was said to have been undertaken 
shortly after Mr. Peres completed 
talks in Washington on Oct. IS 
with U.S. officials. 

Mr. Murphy gave Hussein pri- 
vate assurance-; from Mr. Peres 
about Israel's desire for negotia- 
tions and Washington's evaluation 
that the prospects seemed favor- 
able for the early start of peace 
talks, the officials said. 

Following his talks with Mr. 
Murphy, Hussein gave an interview 
with The New York Times b which 
be praised a speech at the United 
Nations on Monday by Mr. Peres 
as “the beginning of movement b 
the right direction and reflects a 
personal concern for the fate of 
future generations and a determi- 
nation to contribute towards the 
achievement of peace in our time." 

According to senior administra- 
tion officials, Mr. Peres made a 
significant concession to Hussein 
by agreeing publicly last week to 
participate in a Middle East peace 
conference, to which the Soviet 
Union would be invited along with 
the United States and perhaps 
some other Security Council per- 
manent members. He repeated that 
offer b a speech to the United 
Nations General Assembly on 
Monday. 

Mr. Peres’s conditions were that 
Moscow agree to restore diplomat- 
ic ties with Israel and that the 
conference proceed directly to talks 
between Israel and a Jordanian- 
Palestinian group that did not con- 
lab members of the Palestine Lib- 
eration Organization. 

Mr. Murphy was supposed to 
emphasize in his talks with Hussein 
that Mr. Peres had met him more 
than half way by droppbg Israel’s 
refusal to consider an international 
conference. 

Mr. Peres is seeking a reciprocal 
concession from Hussein: to bring 
to the negotiations only Palestin- 
ians who are acceptable to Israel, 
such as the mayors of some West 


Bunk dues, and not those who are 
identified as figures in the PLO. 

According to Israeli sources, Mr. 
Peres recognizes that Hussein can- 
not break with the PLO, but his 
hope is that pressure can be 
brought on Yasser Arafat, the PLO 
leader, to allow the non-PLO Pales- 
tinians to negotiate on the future of 
the West Bank. 

As to Mr. Peres’s insistence that 
ihe Soviet Union restore diplomat- 
ic relations with Israel, the United 
States is said by Israeli sources to 
believe this is a valid propc-ial, ani 
Mr. Reagan is expected ic discuss 
ihis with Mikhail S. Gorbachev iit 
their meeting in Geneva on Nov. 19 
and 20. 

Mr. Peres met Wedaesday radi- 
al the UN with Foreign Minister 
Eduard A. Shevardnadze, and ac- 
cording to Israeli sources Mr. She- 
vardnadze was cordial but deferred 
substantive questions until “after 
the summit.” 

Israeli officials contended that 
some Arab states were pressing 
Moscow for the first time to restore 
relations with Israel. 

■ French Transport Offer 

Judith Miller of The Sent York 
Tinia reported from Parts. 

Mr. Peres said Friday afeer arriv- 
ing in Paris that France had offered 
to provide air transport to help 
Soviet Jews emigrate by flying 
them directly from the Soviet 
Union to Israel if Moscow agreed 
to permit expanded emigration and 
such flights. 

Mr. Peres disclosed France's of- 
fer after a meeting with President 
Francois Mitterrand, under whose 
government relations between Isra- 
el and France have significantly 
improved. 

His derision to discuss the offer 
publicly at this time tended to sup- 
port reports circulating in diplo- 
matic circles that the Soviet Union 
had signaled that it might be pre- 
pared to countenance such flights 
and large increases in Jewish emi- 
gration after the November summit 
meeting between President Ronald 
Reagan and Mr. Gorbachev. 

Diplomats in Paris and in Wash- 
ington said that Moscow was also 
apparently prepared to permit an 
exchange of interest sections be- 
tween the Soviet Union and Israel. 

Mr. Peres also extended to Svria 
the same offer he has made to Jor- 
dan: to terminate immediately the 
state of war between Israel and 
Syria and engage in direct talks 
without preconditions. 

“If the Syrians are ready, we are 
ready, too" Mr. Peres said. “I am 
serious. 

■ 3 Charged b Killings 

Three pro-Palestinian guerrillas 

were charged Friday with the mur- 
der of three Israelis at the Laraaca 
marina last month, The Associated 
Press reported from Lamaca. 

The men, a Briton and two Ar- 
abs, appeared in the court building 
near the marina where the three 
Israelis were shot to death Sept. 25 
aboard a small yacht. 



■ \ v r : >iC.-\7. : 

J. . 7 ; ; '' - 

Table clock “Duomo ", gold' and siU-er-plaidi 


BVLGARI 

10 VIA PEI CONDOTTI ROMA 
HOTEL PIERRE NEW YORK 
SO. RUE DU RHONE 1204 GENEVE 
AVENUE DE5 BEAUX- ARTS MONTE CARLO 
HOTEL PLAZA-ATHENEE PARIS 








Page 4 


SATURDAY-SUIVDAY, OCTOBER 26-27, 1985 


iterate 


international 



(tribune. 


Ptabiwhed WUfcTbe New YoA Time* wad The VhUb^ob Port 


What Reagan Did Not Say 


To a world eager for progress toward peace 
at Geneva, President Reagan has offered a 
combative sermon. He spoke Thursday of the 
innate goodness of Americans and the sanctity 
of freedom. He called on the Soviet Union to 
join with the United States in resolving region- 
al conflicts — but only in those regions where 
Moscow stands to lose. Mr. Reagan seemed 
less interested in diplomacy than in scoring 
debating points off Mikhail Gorbachev. 

Thus the president had little to say to the 
United Nations on its 40th anniversary about 
disarmament. He discerned “seeds which we 
should nurture" in the Soviet proposal for 
deep cuts in strategic arsenals. But be followed ~ 
with an unabashed sales pitch for his Strategic 
Defense Initiative, and bolstered it with an IS - t 
year-old Soviet testimonial for defensive sys- 
tems long rejected by UJS. presidents. 

Mr. Reagan’s approach surely was meant as 
a response to successful Soviet propaganda 
initiatives, and it has undoubted appeal to 
some domestic audiences. The pity is that he 
threw away a precious chance to bid for the 
high ground with his global audience. Detect- 
ing threats to peace, freedom and sovereignty 
only in the other fellow’s corner did little to 
enhance Ms credibility. 

“Freedom is not the sole prerogative of the 
chosen few." declared Mr. Reagan, “but the 


universal right of all God's children." But 
some of God’s children live in South Africa. 
Not once in his address did the president And 
occasion to mention apartheid. Neither did he 
voice the concern that even his own adminis- 
tration feels about the lack of political liberty 
in Chile. South Korea and the Philippines. 

He castigated the Soviet Union for its inter- 
vention in Afghanistan, its support of Viet- 
nam’s invasion of Cambodia and its military 
assistance to lef List regimes in Ethiopia, Ango- 
la and Nicaragua. To rub it in. he added to his 
advance text explicit and belligerent com- 
ments on Mandst-Leninist governments and 
figures for Soviet-bloc troops in Five countries. 

By contrast, he described the American- 
aided “centra" rebels in Nicaragua as “strug- 
gling democratic resistance forces." The dis- 
tinction will be lost on many people, 
particularly most Latin Americans. 

Mr. Reagan asks Moscow to assume joint 
responsibility for peacemaking in regional 
conflicts. In theory, that is a fine idea, worthy 
of consideration at the summit conference. 
There is no reason for the Geneva meetings to 
be restricted to issues of strategic arms control 
But neither peacemaking nor peace can be so 
selective. A sermon vulnerable to such easy 
challenge can persuade only the converted. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Consuming Interests 


American producers tnay no longer set the 
standard for the world, but when it comes to 
consuming, the United States still has no 
equal. Led by the biggest consumer of them all 
the federal government, buyers managed to 
wake the economy up a bit in the third quarter 
of the year after six months of languor. Now, 
however, forecasters are worrying that the con- 
suming public may not be up to the job of 
keeping the economy moving. 

The trouble, of course, is that the public, like 
the government, has been buying on time. Last 
month, as consumers splurged on new autos, 
personal savings hit a historic low. That one 
month would not be so disturbing had it not 
followed a near-record low for savings in Au- 
gust, and a declining trend over many months 
before. The government, meanwhile, has been 
boosting measured gross national product by 
spending more on surplus farm commodities 
and defense — again with borrowed money. 

The Reagan administration naturally pre- 
fers to highlight the positive side of this profli- 
gacy — the modest rise in personal income and 
measured output But even the government’s 
economists admit that private consumers, at 
least cannot be counted on to keep buying at 
the current pace. With savings already near 


rock bottom, economists are focusing on a new 

worry — the slim pay raises that most workers 
can expect in the coining year. 

Only a few years ago, with inflation in Mgh 
gear, wage restraint was considered a good 
sign for the economy. Now, however, with 
inflation-adjusted wages already as low or low- 
er than they were in the early 1970s — and 
with the economy dependent on high con- 
sumption for its Kiel — small pay hikes may 
lead to a stalled economy. 

One way out of the bind might be to raise 
wages. But companies cannot afford to do that 
when profits are poor and productivity gains 
abysmal. Foreign competition, made worse by 
the overvalued dollar, is part of the trouble. 
And the big budget deficit has a role to play in 
that too. Bui another big factor is thru business 
investment, apart from relatively short-lived 
items such as computers and business autos, 
has also been lackluster: Last quarter it felL 

But how did the consumer come to play so 
central a role in today's economic situation? 
And whatever happened to the supply-riders’ 
promise that, stimulated by tax incentives, 
the nation's producers, savers and investors 
would move to center stage? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Tax Reform: Last Chance? 


Some Congress-watchers have been saving 
all year that President Reagan’s tax reform 
plan does not stand a chance. It is too ambi- 
tious. H takes aim at too many special privi- 
leges; the targeted interests will pick it apart. 

This weekend could prove the doomsayers 
right Representative Dan Rostenkowslri, a 
determined reformer, has now scheduled three 
uninterrupted days of committee sessions. It is 
an opportunity, perhaps the last to rise above 
logrolling for special interests. 

The need has long been clear to restore 
fairness, simplicity arid economic efficiency to 
a lax code riddled with loopholes. Mr. Rea- 
gan’s formula is admirably comprehensive but 
as presented, unnecessarily vulnerable. For 
instance, it would cut taxes more for the very 
rich than for the middle class. 

Modifications put forth by Mr. Rostenkow- 
ski would correct such inequities, if Congress 
ever gets that far. But as woks of deliberation 
have dragged into months, every industry and 
every taxpayer group that would lose a current 
tax advantage has flexed its muscle. Reform 
proponents were stunned last week when 


banks won a bigger exemption for reserves 
they hold against losses on bad loans. Banking 
is already one of the least-taxed businesses, 
and both the Reagan and Rostenkowsld plans 
would have tightened the loan loss deduction. 

After a week of arm-twisting, the committee 
has now reversed itself on the bank tax. but 
that is hardly a victory for reform. That all but 
one of the Republican members voted against 
the president on the first vote amounts to an 
ominous warning that his crusade is in trouble: 

The same signal is conveyed by the failure of 
Mr. Reagan's barnstorming to generate public 
excitement about the personal tax cuts in his 
package. Why should politicians stick their 
necks out if the voters do not care? 

Some people argue that this is not the time 
fox reform. Priority must go to reducing the 
budget deficit — a job bard enough for one 
session of Congress. That argument simply 
accepts the tax code as it is — unfair, complex 
and inefficient. It got that way because hand- 
ing out tax favors is easy. There can never be 
an easy time to take than back. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Reagan f Could Do Better’ 

- Did [President Reagan] do enough to allay 
concern among the Western allies? The answer 
to that is probably the old examination cliche: 
“could do better." The White House needs to 
Counter Soviet proposals by at least reminding 
the world what it has offered. 

— The Tunes (London). 

Mr. Reagan's speech is a profound let- 
down. Mr. Mikhail Gorbachev has seized the 


high ground with his projection of a dynamic 
image, with the appearance of a willingness to 
engage in a new approach to East-West rela- 
tions, and with his dramatic-sounding offer of 
radical cuts in nuclear weapons. 

These appearances of hope may turn out, 
when tested, to be illusory. But the world, and 
especially the West, expected President Rea- 
gan to respond in kind, at least to regain the 
initiative. It has been disappointed. 

— The Financial Tunes (London). 


FROM OUR OCT. 26 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1935: Toward Legalized Euthanasia? 
PARIS — Although the codes of all countries 
provide for exceptional cases when homicide 
becomes legitimate, none considers the person 
who kiDs another from distress and affection. 
Two cases occurred recently. One was that of a 
woman tried [in London] for administering a 
fatal dose of poison to her mother suffering 
from a disease; the other was that of a French- 
woman accused of shooting her daughter be- 
cause she was born blind. La the fust case the 
jmy returned a verdict of not guilty; in the 
second, the woman was sentenced to two years 
but sentence was suspended. “Mercy murders" 
are not only becoming more common, but 
continued acquittals may encourage the killing 
of persons suffering from incurable diseases. 
Legalizing euthanasia would not shock this 
generation, while the unpunished practice of 
merciful killing may lead to abuses. 


CINCINNATI — At the meeting of the House 
of Bishops of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
Convention [on Oct. 18] the canon on the 
subject of marriage and divorce was changed 
to prevent the marriage erf anybody who has 
been divorced. Divorced persons, whether in- 
nocent or guilty of any of the acts which 
permit a divorce, cannot remarry in the 
Church. The rectors will be notified of this and 
win govern accordingly. This canon has been 
one of the most important matters brought 
before the convention. It has many opponents 
among the bishops and laymen of the Church. 
It was urged that innocent parties in divorces 
not be ostracized by the Church if they wished 
to remarry. Some of the churchmen say that 
ether party to a divorce should be allowed to 
many The action of the Church puts it 
in line with the rule in the Catholic Church. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1953-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 

LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 

3 HHJP M- FOISTE Exccuure Et&ior RENEBONDY Deputy Publisher 

WALTER WELLS Erhtor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

5AMUEL aBT Deputy Editor RICH ARD H. MORGAN Assoaaie Publisher 

IOBERT K. MeCABE Dtpmv EAwt STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Opcmtum 

ZARL GEWIRTZ Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Circulation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Dinar* of AJnmmg Saks 

ulema tioual Herald Tribune, 181 Avemie Chari es-do-GauDe, 92200 NemUy-sur-Sdne. 

'ranee. TeL: (1)4747-1265. Tries: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 

Direeteur de la publication: Walter N. Thayer. 

Uananm Dir. Asia Makxbn Goan. 24-34 Hemessy Rd. Hcng Kang TeL 5-28S6I& TAx 61 1 M 
i «ni*K Dir. UK : Rohm MacKkhan. 63 Lang Acre. Lantket Wd TeL 836*802 Telex 262009. 

IolMS. W. Germany: W. Laenbach. FrieMdar. 15. 6000 FwAfunthL TeL (069)726755 Tlx. 416721. 

JjL m capital de f 100.000 F. RCS Nanum B 732021126. Commission Paruaire No. 61337. 

7.5. subsmpaoru 8322 yearly. SecontUkx postage paid at Lang Island City, N. Y. 1 1101. 

Q 19S5, International Herdd Tribute. AB rigfas reserved. 






Animal Farm 


Behind Peres’s Offer , 
A Note of Desperation 

By William Plaff 

T)ARIS — Prime Minister am*® 

Fp^spix^ f«wwUN- rout. 

The Palestinian kaderetop on_tlw 
West Raw* has been silenced, cviled. 
jaflod or blown up. 

Israel wants to sente™* 
Hussein as it settled with Egypt. Thai 
would provide- seam fromwrs ^n ^ 
second side. With Syria as w riL 
has obtained de facto security for tne 


and Jordan is a shrewd, but also, 
one thicks; desperate attempt to capi- 
talize on the coDrose of the Palestine 
Liberation Organization as a political 
force. He recognizes that this is dm 
moment every Israeli government has 
awaited — when there is no one left, 
an the Palestinian side, to pose seri- 
ously the Palestine question. 

It is a desperate moment because if 
pnthing comes of 1^ initiative — 
and very likely nothing will — Israel 
almost certainly is going to annex the 
West Bank, in fact or m effect. If it 
does ♦!»*«, Israel's democracy will be 
brought into question. . 

The PLO is discredited, its Arab 


cooperated in putting toe rwr ran «■ 
It is slowly, but ruthlessly- 


UN: Its War- Weary Founders Were Hardly Utopians 


P ARIS — There are no grounds 
for argument a gains t the wide- 
spread judgment that the United Na- 
tions falls short of what it should be, 
but it is a lot better than nothing. It 
has aged 40 years. It has not matured. 

Tbere are good grounds for reject- 
ing the misty-eyed claim that its 
founders were Utopians whose vision 
was betrayed, that it was born in rosy 
innocence and despoiled by a dirty 
world. Such nostalgia falsifies the re- 
cord of how the organization was 
established and diverts responsibility 
for improving its behavior. 

The people who gathered in San 
Francisco to write the UN Charter in 
1945 had no illusions about war and 
peace. There was excitement and 
hope because World War II was end- 
ing and the aggressors were being 
vanquished. But there was clear un- 
derstanding that it would not be easy 
to keep the peace, that there were still 
pave tensions and that the tempta- 
tion to use force would persist. 

The delegates were keealy aware of 
the failure of the League of Nations 
established after World War L Their 
guiding thought was to correct its 
worst, overidealistic mistakes. They 
all understood that the UN would 
ooly really work if the major powers 
were in agreement, and that while it 
might prevent or stop small wars, it 


By Flora Lewis 


could not override disputes between 
the big powers. 

Even Wore the charter conference 
started, iL was almost derailed by a 
Soviet-American quarxcL Stalin de- 
manded three seats, in the guise of 
separate memberships for toe Uk- 
raine and Bdonissia alongside the 
Soviet Union. President Roosevelt 
had died shortly before without tell- 
ing Vice President Truman he had 
secretly agreed at Yalta to the three 
Soviet seats. Charles Bohlen, who 
had been Roosevelt’s interpreter, was 
the only living American who could 
confirm the pledge. Notes of it were 
found in Roosevelt's private papers. 

Andrei Gromyko was in San Fran- 
cisco as a young diplomat, deferring 
to the icy foreign minister, Vyaches- 
lav Molotov, and his deputy, the vitu- 
perative Andrea Vyshinsky, whose 
chief experience in diplomacy had 
been as prosecutor in the Moscow 
purge trials. Stalin made no pretense 
that the Soviet Union would be a 
helpful partner. 

The conference nearly broke down 
halfway through because he arrested 
16 Poles sent to negotiate in Moscow 
under another Yalta agreement They 
were freed, bui were rearrested a few 
years later when the Communists 


consolidated their power in Warsaw. 

In atmosphere, the people 
whose leadership and vision stood 
out were from smaller countries, men 
such as Herbert Evatt of Australia, 
Jan Masaryk of Czechoslovakia, 
Paut-Henri Spaak of Belgium, Ezo- 
quid Padilla of Mexico. 

For a time, there was an effort to 
establish a standing UN force that 
might at least be able to put out 
brushfires. It never «>mi» mtn being, 
which was probably as weflbecauseit 
might have provoked more trembles 
than it could have solved. 

True, no one then imagined the 
proliferation of states that has bloat- 
ed the UN now. They were encour- 
aged into existence by the duster's 
one-state, one-vote nue. Thirty-two 
of the organization’s members have 
fewer than a million people, and the 
total mn trih m i on of more *h*n half 
its membere amounts to only 2 per- 
cent of the UN budget 

Most of the founding delegates 
were from Europe and Latin Ameri- 
ca. One of the few others was Prince 
Faisal who later became king of Sau- 
di Arabia. He was the curried exotic 
of the conference, a great favoriie of 
San Francisco and he 

seemed bewildered by the proceed- 


annexinR Lebanon. 

Mr. Peres’s Labor Party has always 
favored trading territory on the occu- 
pied West Bank for secuntv. Labor 
would favor some kind of Palestinian 
political entity there, associated wito 
Jordan. The notion of a largely pqw* 
criess Palestinian state is attractive 
because the West Bank and its popu- 
lation would then be considered a 
nation while Israel, in com- 
bination with Jordan, could continue 
io be the ultimate supervisor of secu- 
rity in the area. , 

For Israel it is an attractive solu- 
tion. But now it is almost certainly an 
impossible one. Why should Jordan 
cooperate? Why should Palestinians 
content themselves with abridged 
so v ereignty in a client state? One may 
world, and every one of the five gay that it is more than they have j 
atomic powers has been involved in now, but this is a struggle in which 

realism W» g ago foundered in a tide 


mgs. There was no Third Worid, but 

there was a deep sense of the respon- 
sibility of the old nations. 

Since then, there has been no war 
in Europe and no uudear weapons 
have been used. But there have been 
about 150 wan in other parts of the 


fighting somewhere 

It would not have occurred to the 
waraeaiy founders to sot what 
Izndda Marcos of the Philippines 
tidd the Genera] Assembly. The 
problems confronting the worid, she 
said, “have their roots in injustice; 
intolerance, meed and dominance by 
the strong." She should know. 

They understood the conflict of 
national interests and ambitions. 
They did not aspire to remake man- 
kind, or even politics; just to find 
peaceful ways to sort oat disputes. 

As Undersecretary-General Brian 
Uxquhart said in a tribute to thelaie 
Secretaxv-General Dag Hamraar- 
slgold,'The noble words of the Char- 
ter about die primacy of die task of 
maintaining international peace and 
security were not idle rhetoric; bid 

the frm f rtf hotter n ' 

The UN has not regressed at 40, it 
just has not summoned the will to 
t wniiffwv i its difficult be g inni ngs 
The New York Times. 


Some Practical Lessons in 'Diplomatic Deception 9 


W ASHINGTON — In social fife, it is called 
etiquette. In personal life, it is called hypoc- 
risy. In political life, it is called diplomacy. 
Ameri cans tactlessly persist in calling it by its 
generic name: lying. Americans have a tolerance 
for many things. Lying is not one of them. 

Take last week. From all the handwringing, 
one could be forgiven for thinking that the worst 
transgression in the Achille Laura affair was not 
that terrorists shot an old man, or that Italy let 
the alleged ringleader go. but that for eight hours 
President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt bed about 
the whereabouts of the terrorists. For this misde- 
meanor, the Egyptian ambassador was subjected 
to a cross-examination on a late-night talk show 
of the sort not seen once some hapless witness 
decided to pequre himself before the lawyer 
Edward Bennett Williams. 

Caught in a lie, the ambassador tried to slip 
away. Alas, he could run but be could not hide. 
Mr. Mubarak, on the other hand, took the first 
opportunity to admit to “a diplomatic decep- 
tion.” Rather than regret, he evinced surprise 
that anyone should have taken much notice, let 
alone offense After all be has more important 


truth test: Such as the stability of his regime, on 
which hangs the security of 46 million people. 
Caught between Islamic fundamentalists and an- 
gry American allies, he decided that the better 
part of valor was an right-hour lie. Big deal. 

But for Americans, famous for their frankness, 
and not yet jaundiced by centuries of statecraft, 
it is a big deaL It was said in 1604 that an 
ambassador is an honest man sent abroad to lie 
for the commonwealth. Yet Americans have yet 
to get used to the idea. They have the contrary 
view that in diplomacy, truth-telling is always a 
virtue. It is a charming and expensive indulgence 
that only a young country can believe and only a 
big country can afford. 


By Charles Krau thammer 

Not that the United States has not told some 
whoppers. There was President Eisenhower’s lie 
about the U-2 spy plane. Thinking the pilot was 
dead, the State Department put out the story that 
the U-2 was an off-axirse weather plane. And 
there was Adlai Stevenson’s lie about the Bay of 
Pigs. Lied to by the Central Intelligence Agency, 
he told the Security Council that the United 
States had nothing to do with the invasion. After 

The idea that truth is always a 
virtue is a charming indulgence 
onfyabig country can afford. 

Vietnam and the Watergate affair, American 
revulsion with political lying peaked: In 1976, a 
president was elected on a platform of truth- 
telling and little else. 

But lying can be so i ndi s p ensa b le that not even 
Jimmy Carter could do without. In advance of 
(be Iran rescue mission, Jody Powell planned a 
cover story (about a possible blockade) and, 
when Jack Nelson of the Los Angeles Times got 
wind of a mission, Mr, Powell used it He cate- 
gorically denied any plans for a rescue misson. 
Even then there were some who carped that Mr. 
Powell should have issued a “no comment” rath- 
er than a denial so as not to allow a true fie to 

E ss his lips. Of course, a “no comment” would 
ve aroused suspicions and jeopardized lives. 
But for some reporters, jeopardizing credibility is 
the greater sin. They urged Mr. Powell to resign. 

Now the good news. Americans may be learn- 
ing to relax. I detect a note of maturity issuing, as 
natal from George Shultz, the Stale Department 


Earlier tins year, he was asked 
about alleged CIA involvement in a bombing m 
Beirut. “If the CIA denies something it’s de- 
nied," he reified. Note not “false,” but “de- 
nied.” Lovely. “DemecT is, a category all its own, 
hovering somewhere betwee n truth and falsity, 
and, few countries pre p are d to act in the world, 
indispensable. Whether or not Mr. Sfauhz was 
being intentionally wry, he had delivered a lesson 
in Old Worid statecraft. 

The notion of deniability, Eke Old Worid 
statecraft, is foreign to American senribSitics. 
Nevertheless, demabOity is valuable to U.& di- 
plomacy. Why, for example, is so much USu aid 
to anti-communist guerrillas “covert”? The term 
seems both ludicrous (can’t evoyrane read about 
it in Die W ashing t on Post?) and sinister (is the 
government hiding something?). - 

In fact, the mqor purpose of “secret” aid to, 
say, Afghan guerrillas is not to hide the facts 
from Americans (or Russians, for that matter 

cover to U.S. allies. Pakistan to 

the Afghan insurgents, but is too vulnerable to 
Soviet pressure to declare so openly. Moscow 
knows what is going an, of course, but for Prior 
stsn to announce it pubfidy would be nothing 
more than a provocation. Why add insult to ' 
insurgency? So all parties agree to a fiction. 

Redon is considered a high form of lite ra t u re 
but, in the United States at least, a low form of 
diplomacy. Diplomacy being a way to advance 
the interests of one's country by means short of ' 
war, it is hard to see why tins should be. . 

I concede that truth is preferable. For one 
thing it is easier to memorize. On the otter hand, 
it can be habit forming. What to do? Graham - 
Greene had it right. “He always preferred the 
truth,” be says of his hero in ‘The Human 
Factor.” “Except on really important occasions.” 

Washington Pan Writers Group. 


of dreams and passions. 

Mr. Peres bids, as well against the 

naMpo Sticd force in his own coun- 
try. The Likud Party members of his 
own government oppose him. The 
conservative and religious parties, 
which consider the West Bank part of 
BrftKral Israel and inalienable; are 
die ones fikdy. in the end. to have 
their way. If they do, it means that 
Israel pennaheatly incorporates a 
large and resentful Arab population. 

It inevi^^j ^^^iv e that popula- 

Demajpaphfc evohtiou wBI see to 
that, in a Greater Israel the Arab 
population, which has the higher 
birthrate, would in- the foreseeable 
fntineoBfEiumber the Jewish popula- 
tion, and Tsrad then would cease to 
beaiera&stste.Aith&t is inadnas- 
able to lsaefis* toerejsno acceptable 
alternative to -depnvrag fbe Arab 
pqw M oarfaMfohiiljBle; 

To do that would cause a raomen- 
toos change in the uafsre of the Israe- 
li sate itreK, and fe nn p li capoos ct/- 
this haw been much debated. -V 

What ahecnaktye exists? One either 
expels (he AraftC which is what the 
iTt tf mh frr t i wft ^ pre sen t ed by . 
Rabts Mar Knfaane and the Kadi 
party want. Or tee - installs a system ’ 
Ifatf keeps tte Arabs permanently dot 
of power. Successive generations of 
young Arabs, m those" rirentofflmces, 
maybe expected to tarn evd: more 
desperately to vkrfenpe, and the need 

■ AS r «fcexe*is thcUrdteif States in 
this? Until the Adrifle Laoro affair, it 
was keeping on, inaeBsiiigly iiaffcc- 
tnaBy, with what was meant totem* 
evea-handed policy pg fr i end s hip , for . 
“moderate” Arabs and for Israel 
raging concessions That nrither ^side 
wanted to make. Thispoficy dated to 
die. presidencies of Jimmy Crater, 
Gerald Fonf and Richard Nixon; 

- Under die Reagmadmuristratibo, 
the commitment to Israel had be- 
come so ommanccd that the policy 
bad lost credihtfity; and now it has. 
effectively collapsed. The surviving 
American role m the Middle East is 
as Israel's aSy (Israd’smasteT, wholly 
iHefar whatever Israel does, 




intbefev 


in the fevered rhetoric that dominates 
the Arab worid). Its influence among 
the conservative And> elites erf Sawn 
Arabia, the Gultl^ypt, and the Ma- 
ghreb, is weakened. - 
.• A major drift in the international 
relations of the Middle East has be- 
gun, from winch the Soviet Union 
almost inevitably will profit. 

More important is the choice for 
isra rfs ow n future that Mr. Peres 
in^jlkitly has posed. It is a derision 
from which there may be no turning 
hack. Kean, moreover, set Israel on a 
coarse that the United States wifi, in 
the end, refuse to follow. 

© 1935 William Pfaff. 


* 


Credibility Is No Reason To Aid the Angolan Rebels letters 


W ASHINGTON — The Iteagan 
administration is seriously 
considering financial support for the 
Angolan guerrilla faction led by Jo- 
nas Savimbi and backed by South 
Africa. Because the Marxist govern- 
ment of Angola is supported by Sovi- 
et military advisers and Cuban 
forces, such action is seen as a way of 
demonstrating the credibility of 
American resolve on the eve of the 
Geneva summit meeting The argu- 
ment is not a new one. When Henry 
A. Kissinger counseled intervention 
in the Angolan civil war in 1975, he 


By Robert H. Johnson 


was also preoccupied with demon- 
strating U.S. credibility. Then as 
now. it was a seriously mistaken view. 

The need to demonstrate credibil- 
ity has been the all-purpose rationale 
for U.S. engagement in Third World 
conflicts since at least the early 1960s 
in Vietnam. Thus, insignificant parts 
of the globe acquire strategic signifi- 
cance whenever the Rnssians inter- 
vene because each such intervention 
supposedly tests Ufr. resolve to re- 
spond to Soviet threats elsewhere. 


For the lucky, a Golden Time 

By Jerry Klein 

F t EORIA, Illinois — It is tha t time 
of year when small notes of sym- 
pathy should be sent from those of us 
who live in this narrow band of the 
Earth to the unfortunates in desert or 
tropical climates through which au- 
tumn passes almost unnoticed. 

They are much like beneficiaries of 
a will whose inheritance is doled out 
day by day. dollar by dollar all year 
long, whereas ours comes in such a 
spectacular, golden rush that it stag- 
gers the senses and causes the spirit to 
soar like a leaf caught up in the wind. 

The eye, the ear, the nose and even 
taste buds are filled to overflowing — 
cool nights touched with the strange- 
ly satisfying smells of wood smoke 
and burning leaves; distant barkings 
and muffled bootings; the waning 
moon riding across a sky as black as 
anthracite: pumpkins, "apple cider 

and new wine. 


It is a time erf gray days whose 
sullen sloes may split at last to spill 
long beams of sunlight across the 
wide land. Or brilliantly sunny ones 
when the world is bathed in a glori- 
ous light and it seems as if some 
Joseph's coat bad been draped across 
the wooded hills and valleys. 

The view changes slowly. Where 
there was before the solid green wall 
of summer, there are now wide fields 
and new vistas. Combines churn into 
the last of the com, tearing acres of 
suibble. Horizons widen. 

Our world too soon w31 become 
monochromatic and echoing with ap- 
parent death. Our legacy will grow 
thin. But for now, life is at its peak. 


The writer is a columnist for The 
Peoria Journal Slar. This is from a 
longer essay in The New York Times. 


The problem with the credibility 
argument is that h prevents the Unit- 
ed States from carauHy defining its 
interests in a particular situation. 
Moreover, since it is based on esti- 
mated foreign perceptions of other 
American behavior, it is a wholly 
subjective argument that is almost 
impossible to prove or disprove. 

what are America’s real interests 
in Angola? As Mr. Kissinger recog- 
nized m 1975, the country bos almost 
no independent strategic significance 
for the united States. True, Mr. Kis- 
singer did argue that the American 
failure to respond to the Soviet-Co- 
ban challenge would set oS a domi- 
no-like effect But no dominoes have 
fallen to the Russians in southern 
Africa in the decade since Congress 
prevented intervention in Angola. 

The continuing war there is one 
part of the much larger conflict over 
the future of southern Africa. That 
conflict is not primarily between East 
and West but between South Africa 
and blade snb-Sahaian Africa. If it 
ultimately affects the East-West bal- 
ance adversely — which is far From 
certain — it will be because American 
policies leave the United States on 
the South African side at the end of 
the conflict Intervention in support 
of Jonas Savimbi could contribute 
importantly to just such a result 
Intervention would be sdf-defeat- 
ing. It has been the primary U.S. goal 
in Angola to obtain the removal of 
Cuban troops and Soviet advisers. 
Those troops and advisers were invit- 
ed in the mid-1970s, as the Angolan 
fe nder-chip sought to defend itself 
against intervention by South Africa, 


Zaire, China and the United States, 
and they r ema i n p rimarily to deal 
with con tinning attacks by South Af- 
rica and by Mr. Savimbfs guerrillas. 
To intervene on Us side now would 
only farther reduce the prospects for 
Soviet and Cuban withdrawal 

Moreover, if the United States 
make s die Angolan conflict a test erf 
American resrave.it is almost dotain 
to weaken rather than anhanr^ its 
credibility. The Russians and Cubans 
have regularly demonstrated tinr 
wQEngness to respond to others’ in- 
terventions by nppmg the ante — and 
Congress is most unfikefy to go along 
with a continuous of U.S. 

involvement in Angola, notwith- 
standing its foofish decision in Joly to 
end the prohibition on intervention. 

It is a central purpose of all Third 
Worid regimes to maximize their au- 
tonomy and independence. When 
even Marxist regimes are no longer 
dependent on the Soviet Union for 
protection against internal and exter- 
nal enemies, they typically seek to 
balance their international relation- 
ships ky on opening to the West. The 
regime in Angola has demonstrated 
such te nd e n cies, but Is incapa bl e erf 
moving further because of its con- 
tinuing dependence on die Russians 
and Cubans and because the United 
States h»« be en umriffingto rfwny 
its policies as long as die Russians 
and Cubans stay. The route to. more 
favorable Angolan poficies therefore 
lies not in increasing external pres- 
sures bunn redtiang Stem. 

The writer is a yi&mg fdtaw at the 
Overseas Daekymau CouncHapufh. 
Bc-paScy organ&atfon. Be contributed 
this comment to TheHew York Tones. 


Helping the Philippines 

The report “US. Plans Improv 
meats for Bases m Philippines” (Ot 
the U.S. navy secretar 
. JotaP- Lehmann Jr., as saying: “ 
woold be a horrendoas situation wc 
* We ' to operate out < 
the Philippines.” 

The Marcos government is one < 
ttose that the former UN ambassi 
dor Jane Kirkpatrick classified t 
authoritarian rather than totafitariai 
meaning the United States coul 
safely associate with iL 

But the nature of President Feid 
uand Marcos’s “authoritarianism 
goarantees that be and his goverr 

SM 1 f 00 * to . “ ignoble r- 
and that the people’s an « * r « 

Marine ^ * 


auu Uto UCUeiSCU. 

than, and any post-Mai 



ELIZABETH 


^Regarding the editor 
tmemina m Manila" (C 
Reagan administration i 
to destabifee the Marcos 

trymg to save the Phfljm 
Communist takeover." 

george: 

Longvit 







BNTERIVATTONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26-27, 1985 



tilw Ji7i37 


yTririTiirr 


TXiTT 




|„iiilRBSsa 

S t?, - .u' 


Mfr-tHEWCT^i 


1+T) IrtB l.^l >W.' 


i M I ■ * 1 1 

Imioiu! JT 


• t i ^*1 j~mp n i r>n 






j pS pa 

rnw!^rr.n,Tmi 

mmmmmkd 


| T>w • l4d f 


JteralhSIteSribuite 


rua-w Vo* n» 'in t 


Dr *®4iiiJp©n F»H 





hvf m r^TTTi ■m 


Opening for Talks 
Is Seen in Moscow 

G MflflMM Sw VStA Pfam 
Bpit*** im 'St hm Be CmmUwd 


t Leaders Vow to Push 
Economic Recovery 


'' ; 'Hn & •' 

.•-swefck* 

,' c ”‘ : 

• a «i^4s, s 

--•- -Jtriu#^ 

’ V Ja*S S 

• :-^- 
-■“VaJSM;- 

: - ' L‘ic3t<v 

■■'’trokj^ 
:jwv 
••■-'' ^-i.t 
•v V’ r ^=' 

JiE' 

’i'.V«4l< 

as 

• iVcsae 1 

■ —■.'fflaac ' 
• c-iaii: ] 

r: ■ii.W'jt 
. urjlslaci 

■ ’ ".ztisp: 

*■.• .i-KE.'i 
: --.:• ••I IME 
■■■;■ Je. 

- nr| j* 

.,: TrwK 

' ■ / J® L 

.";L*fe 1 
: ?assjaBC 

:■■ » ;« ,fe A 

. .... M fe<-> 



Police searched tlie car of Japanesegangsters arriving for a meeting at their office in Kobe earlier this year. 

ipanese Underworld, Encountering Tough Times 

(Confined from Page 1)- out” the yakuza. Thear roots nm in providing goods «"*t services «nti have largely died out in the 
gel the goodjobs and treat yon tike too 'deep. that arc unavailable legally. modernization that began more 

din.” He has now risen to be driver- In 1984, police arrested and People come to th*^ w bay than a century ago 

£ssrr^^:Bsa®fis,ss a&as--£w "tt+'GSEsz 

PnbUchy never stops. Leaders ' were junior people.. Strong internal coDect debts or recruit day laborers JJ?J T 
occasionally give press confer loyalties , and refusal to testify for construction sites. relationship is estaDnsnea. 

ences.Jto 1981. Kobe the scjsde against one another make it next to . . Other worit . is straightforward Adorned m a ceremonial tnnono, 
of a limousine traffic jamaslPi?' impossifc^ extortion^ (^technique apparent- % recn ^- recttV ^S Ce B C wSl! 

leaders arrived from mound Japati ' limouanes, p^e say. • ly pioneaedhi J^tfSb^a * SS ™* 

for the funeral of KazuoTaoka, the Many people here say they have Iw shares in a company and then ^ 

third man to be chief of the Yama- other protection too, such as con- collect from management in return rr 111111 m 

guchi-gumi, the largest federated nections with the upp» echelons of for not <fonmtm g th<» an^ ff l shan s. ”” **"” 

gang in the country. Japanese, pcfitics or ta\s with Vocal hriWers' meeting. loos, marking them as members for 

Police statistics show that ya- police. Police and yakuza are said Yakuza do not deny that they • 
kuza nudes have declined by about to work out informal understand- commit crimes. But they say the It is said that whatever values 
half since reaching a peak of ings thatpoKce will overlook some true significance of their fraternity there were have become corrupted 
200.000 in 1963. Bat authorities illegal activities if the gangs abstain islhentual, the preservation of do- to the point that the modem ya- 

have never been able to make good from others. or-die relationships and obKga- kuza applies a local anesthetic be- 
en their periodic pledges to “stamp Much of the gangs' time is spent tkms that evolved in feudal Japan fore cutting off his Utile finger. 


out” the yakuza. Then: roots ran 
toodeep. 

In 1984, police arrested and 
prosecuted 49,519 yakuza, about 
naif of their total ranks, bnt most 
were junior peopk. Strong internal 
loyalties, and refusal to testily 


Imioosin^poBcesay. 

■Many people here say drey have 
Other protection too, such as con- 
nections with the upper echelons of 
Japanese, politics or deals with toad 
police. Pdke and yakuza are said 
to work out informal smfazsfand- 
ihgs that police will ovedopk some 
illegal activities if the gangs abstain 
from others. 

Much of the gangs’ time is spent 


in providing goods and services 
that are unavailable legally. 

People come to than to buy 
drags or to. bet on horse races. 
Sm^ri businessmen hire them to 
collect debts or recruit day laborers 
for construction sites. 

• - Other work is straightforward 
extortion^ One technique apparent- 
ly pioneered in Japan is to buy a 
few shares in a company and then 
collect from management in return 
for not disrupting the annual share- 
hetoexs' meeting. 

Yakuza do not deny that they 
commit crimes. Bui they say the 
true significance of their fraternity 
is the jntual, the preservation of do- 
or-die relationships and obliga- 
tions that evolved in feudal Japan 


Take advantage of our speaal rates 
for new subscribers and we’ll give you an 
extra month of Tribs free with a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: nearly 50% off the 
newsstand price in mast European countries! 


U.S. House Approves Plan to Trim Deficit 


;. V J r&l 

; C2 H? 
■ h db®- 


Tjffrf 

: r ,weMt 

- 

? 1 

& 

: • : . ,r & 


, '4> ; • 

• ...-VL- - 

: :&$r 

■ • r :>.tf r v 
.. 

> f v i’ v , 

,jX- 

. r-.H.-i 


-..fly- P* 


>'~4 


(CopHuned from Page 1) 
billion in the fiscal, year 1986, 
Much began Ocl 1, the plan calls 
for a deficit reduction of $276 bil- 
lion over three years. 

While the Senate bill would save 
$85.7 billion of projected spending 
over the three years, more than 
about $60 billion contained in the 
House bill, it includes many of tire 
same spending reductions. The 
Senate package also would penna- . 
neatly extend the 16-cent-a-pack 
cigarette tax; die House includes 
tins extension in separate deficit- 
reduction legislation that has not 
reached the floor. 

Major savings in the military 
budget and reductions in nomnih- 
tary programs are projected to 
achieve the rest of the savings 
promised in Congress's budget res- 
olution for 1986. 

Many of the provisions in-the 
House and Senate bills are similar; 


and it is expected that differences 
ran be worked out in a conference 
committee after a final Senate vote. 

Blit' the administration has 
threatened to veto iny extension of 
the cagaiette:tax. It also objects to 
other provisions are m both 
chamters* proposals. 

■ Talks on Tax Revision 

David E.JU>senbaum of The New 
York Times reported from Washing- 
ton: 

Representative DanJtosteakow- 
ski, chairman of the House Ways 
and Means Comma tlee, has told 
several members of his pand this 
week that he would support legisla- 
tion that would retain federal in- 
come tax deduc ti ons for state and 
local tax payments, the committee 
members said Thursday. , . 

In return, the legidators said, 
Mr.Rostenkowski, aDenrocrat of 
Illinois, asked for, and received. 


their pledges to sappon overall re- 
vision of the tax system. 

Mr. . RostenkowskTs reported 
new stand would make it lflcehy that 
if the committee af^roved a tax 
bill, the measure would main tain 
the state and local tax deductions.. 

President Reagan proposed re- 
pealing those deductions as one of 
the cornerstones of his plan to re- 
duce federal tax rates and eliminate 
many deductions and other tax 
p references. 

Administration officials have re- 
peatedly refused to say whether the 
president could support legislation 
that retained the state and local tax 
deductions. However, the adminis- 
tration position has been that Mr. 
Reagan was determined that the 
top federal income tax rate be re- 
duced to 35 percent, from 50 per- 
cent, and that the new tax system 
generate no less revenue than the 
current tax law. 


In Latest Victory, Kasparov 
Stums Contempt for Karpov 


(Continued from Page 1) 
the game's 40th move, Mr. Ka- 
sparov sealed his next move in an 

envelope, as the rules specify. But 
then (he chall enger dectcd to play 
the move publicly on the board. 
The gesture, besides showing Mr. 
Kasparov’s flair for the histrionic, 
also showed his contempt for Mr. 
Karpov's weakened position. • 

“It was a good psychological 

move,” said David Goodman, an 
International master. “It leaves Ka- 
sparov iii ail obviously do min a tin g 
position." r . 

According to those present, 
when Mr. Kasparov played out his 
final move, in .the. absence of Mr. 

Karpov wbo bad already left the 
stage, a roar of approval went up in 
the hall. 

“It was Eke a basketball game,” 
said an observer. 

An enthusiastic Kasparov sup- 
porter was even qected from the 
naH for calling out for Mr. Karoov 
to resign after the champion failed 
to announce his resignation public- 

ly. 

Utere was agreement Friday that 
the game may well be the final 
turning poini, Mr. Kasparbv who 
had already jumped ahead a point 
in the 16th game, has esta b lished a 
lead so commanding that Karpov 
supporters are now coming up with 
theories to jusrffy a.Kaspaiw win. 


“One key dement here is psy- 
chology," sakTJEduard Gufdd, a 
grandmaster, match official and 
Soviet pbess trainer. “Kasparov’s 
psychology is very good. 4 *' 

- According to Mr. Gufdd, Mr. 
Kanxrv is still recovering from see- 
ing ois lead of 5-0 in the first cham- 
pionship match dip away, only to 
be faced with a new match seven 
months later. 

At the end of that first 48^ame 
match in. February; Mr. Karpov 
still led, 5-3, but the' crucial fact 

was that he had not won any of .the 

last 21 games. The tnaiefr switched 
to a defensive dud as the' robust 

er, frailer Mr. Karpov, wbuodg 

both the 47th and the 4Sih games. 

A visibly haggard ‘Mr. Karpov 
later insisted he wanted to continue 
playing, but by then the match was 
calkd off by chess federation offi- 
aalsj for the pnbEidy stated purr 
■pose of proterting the health of 
both players. 

At' a press conference, an out- 
Taged Mr. Kasparov challenged 'the . 
che^ cstahfishnjehi to explan why 

win: This suxnnK^Se'jraye inter- 
views inYogoslav xndwest Ger- 
man' nugaripeC coming out more 
.strongly, a g ains t .what he perceived 
as the favoritism shown Mr. 


■ il«ds ■isu.'L, 


, State of Siege 
In Argentina 

(Qmtinued from Page 1) 

The suspects, eight of whom have 
been arrested, were to be hdd with- 
out specific charges for 60 days 
while a civilian court investigates 
their purported involvement in vio- 
lent activities. 

The action had set off a constitu- 
tional debate before the state of 
siege was declared. 

Jorge Mazzinghi, a lawyer in- 
volved in dvfl issues, sai± “This is 
incredible nonsense the govern- 
ment is involving itself in. It is a 
state of siege circumscribed for 
only certain people.” 

- Emilio Mignone, head of a hu- 
man rights organization, said the 

decree o r de ri n g the arrests was of 
doubtful constitutionality without 
a slate of siege. But he defended 
Mr. AifonshTs action, saying that 
the government did not have any 
active prosecutors to cany such 
cases forward. 

Even the judge hearing appeals 
by the suspects seemed confused. 
Theju^e, Marlin Irumm. granted 
the request of one suspect to leave 
the countiy as an ex2e rather than 
face the charges. Such a choice is 
granted only when there is 3 state 
* of siege, lawyers said. 

- The civilian courts upheld Mr. 
Alfonsin’5 right to order the arrests, 

. but lawyers said they would appeal 
the decision. 


Senate Votes 
On Trade 

(Continued from Page 1) 
could precipitate a “new dvfl war,* 1 
pitting East against West. 

A similar bffl has already passed 
the House. In both chambers, how- 
ever, sponsors faded to win a two- 
thirds vote, which would be neces- 
sary to override a veto. 

Thursday’s bid was the fust 
trade measure to make such a large 
gain in the Senate since members of 
Congress returned from their sum- 
mer recess and expressed growing 
alarm at the loss of jobs around the 
country to foreign competition. 

Despile the vote, the measure 
has been losing momentum oo 
Capitol H31 as lawmakers begin to 
focus on a possible backlash 
against other American industries. 

The bid approved Thursday anus 
at freezing and rolling bads: textile 
imports from 12 countries, most of 
them in Asia. The two largest ex- 
porters, South Korea and Taiwan, 
would lose 30 percent of their mar- 
kets. Hong Kong would lose 14 
percent 

The nine other countries would 
have their export levels frozen. 
They are China. Japan, Pakistan, 
Indonesia, the Philippines, Thai- 
land, India, Brazil and Singapore. 

The House bid would cut more 
heavily into China's exports, but 
the Senate altered its version under 
pressure from the State Depart- 
ment, which is deeply afraid of of- 
fending the Chinese and igniting 
retaliation that could bar American 
companies from the huge Chinese 
market 

The section of the bill relating to 
footwearwas added to attract votes 
from shoe-producing slates, such 
as Maine and Missouri. That sec- 
tion would limit shoe imports to 60 
percent of the domestic market, 
down from the present level of 
about SO percent 

Supporters of the measure main- 
tained that thousands of jobs have 
been lost in recent years became of 
rising imports. 

But opponents retorted that if 
some jobs in the textile and shoe 
industries were protected, other in- 
dustries would suffer. 

Lawmakers are particularly con- 
cerned that trading partners would 
exclude American goods, primarily 
agricultural commodities. Senator 
Max Baucus, Democrat of Mon- 
tana, said that the countries affect- 
ed by the textile bill “can easily go 
elsewhere*' to buy gram that they 
now buy from the United States. 


To: Subscription Manager, International Herald Tribune, 1 81 , avenue Charies-de-GaulIe, 
92521 Neuilly Cedex, Franca Tel- (1 ) 47 47 07 29. Telex: 61 283Z 

Please enter my subscription for: • | | 12 months | | 6 months | | 3 months 

□ /+ 1 month\ /+ 2weeks\ /+ 1 week\ 

My check is enclosed. \ free ) \ free / V free I 

Please charge my: 

American Exoress Access Diners Club Eurocard Mastercard Visa 

□ 


Mastercard Visa 


ONBBCLUB 

NTBNAHONAL 

Card oocounf number 




M54 






Well be happy to suspend delivery of the paper while you're away and extend your 
subscription accordingly. Just fill in the dates of any trips you have already planned. 


Then ask your secretary to notify us of your travel plans routinely, three weeks before your 
departure date. 



rn 

MMM 

□ 


C_] 
































Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26-27, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Paris to Send 19 th-Century Art on American Tour 



Claude Monet, Auguste 
and Pierre Bonnard. 


Renoir 


. r- ■ *• 


- •• -f* -f*'. «* 


j fc * 
»/*v . 


. "i/. „ • 

• '' •• .. • : i: 


The Associated press 

P IARIS — A selection of 19th- 
ceniUty art from the Musee 
d’Orsay in Paris, which is currently 
under construction in a former 
train station on the Seine, will tour 
the United States next year. 

About 140 Impressionist paint, 
ings. photos, drawings, etchings 
and sculpture, half of which have 
never before been displayed in the 
United States, will go on show at 
the Dallas Museum of Art from 
March 28 to May 9, and New 
York’s Brooklyn Museum from 
June 1 to Aug. 3. 

The purpose of the show, accord- 
ing to Jacques Rigaud, head of the 
5225-million Orsay project, is to 
familiarize Americans with the new 
museum and its collection of 19th- 
century art 

Speaking at a news conference. 

Rigaud said the works would be Located on the Seine opposite 
home m tune for the museum's the Tufleries gardens, the rail sta- 
tong-nraited opening in December don-hotel complex was built bv 

Victor Laloux in 1898 to house and 


“It is probably the most impor- 
tant international exhibition we 
have ever organized," said Steven 
Nash, chief curator at the Dallas 
Museum. Besides introducing the 
new museum, the show deals with 
museum architecture and the recy- 
cling of industrial sites. 

The museum, which government 
officials have often described as 
“the indispensable missing linlr of 
French museums,” is the first in- 
dustrial building in France to be 
used as a museum. 

The complex will bouse the con- 
tents of the Jeu de Paume and the 
Orangerie museums, along with . 
documents and photos that reveal 
the richness and variety of cultural 
activity in 19th-century France. 



V lr 



Onta Onpmon 


Brian Williams and one of his watercolors. 


Hie Auoooied P*eu 

ANOTHER PARIS COVER UP — While work continues on the Musee iTOrsay. 
museum officials unfurled a 1,500-square meter painting by Jean Armane to cover the 
scaffolding. The large clusters of colored rocks symbolize the continents, says Armane. 


shuttle visitors back and forth to 
the various sites of the Paris 


The items on Lite American tour 
will include one of the Orsay’s most 
prized new acquisitions: Gaude World's Fair. In the 1960s, city 
Monet’s “La Pie' 7 (The Magpie), planners wanted to tear it down. 
Also in the exhibition are works by Today, it is hailed as a gem of 
Paul Cezanne, Edgar Degas', "beaux arts" architecture. 


An American’s View of Rural Japan 


Cataloging Peggy Guggenheim’s Place in 20th-Century Art 


By John Russell 

.VVh York Times Sen-ice 

N EW YORK — Not long after 
the end of World War II it 
became known that Peggy Guggen- 
heim. a collector then widely re- 
garded as a member of the lunatic 
fringe, had bought the Palazzo 
Venier dei Leoni on the Grand Ca- 
nal in Venice and intended to fill it 
with her collection of 20th-century 
works of an. 

Feeling ran high among senior 
Venetians, many of whom saw it as 
an insult to Venice. Eager as they 
were to be invited to The house, 
they were amused, embarrassed, 
baffled or just plain disgusted by 
the an. 

If they arrived by water, they 


were offended by Marino Marini's 
“Angel of the City," an equestrian 
statue in bronze that stood at the 
top of the steps and became famous 
for the upright and detachable 
phallus that was sported by the 
euphoric-looking rider. 

If they came in off the narrow 
street and went through the garden 
to the long, low, never-finished 
house, conundrums and exaspera- 
tions met them on every hand. 
There were not many Venetians, 
and not many visitors to Venice, 
who could be relied upon to recog- 
nize. let alone to enjoy, the an of 
their own century. Picasso was bad 
enough, but El Lissitzky? 

This was for years the standard 
opinion. Nor did it change when 


Guggenheim was invited to show 
her collection at the Venice Bien- 
nale in 1948 and she was photo- 
graphed at the inauguration with 
the president of Italy. Had the 
Venetians been told in 1948 that in 
1985 the Pe ggy Guggenheim collec- 
tion would be cataloged on a scale, 
and with a rigor, that would nor- 


have laughed. 

But 5,000 copies of the catalog 
have just come off the presses in 
Japan, and it is being published in 
the United States by the Guggen- 
heim Museum in association with 
Harry N. Abrams. Inc. One of the 
heaviest books of the year, it is 842 
pages long, costs S85 in hardback 
ana was written by Angelica Zan- 


fects.” In. New York, she continued 
to buy, and by May 1942 she had 
added paintings and sculptures, 
many of them of very high quality, 
by Picasso, Colder, Duchamp, 
Kandinsky and Yves Tanguy. 

Anyone who checks the purchase 
dates of Peggy Guggenheim’s great 
Cubist and Surrealist holdings, of 


INTERNATIONAL 
EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


FRANCE 

The most renowned school for French 

INSTITUT DE FRAN^AIS 

Overlooking the Riviera 's most beautiful bay 

MAKE LEARNING FRENCH 
A WONDERFUL AND UNIQUE EXPERIENCE 

LODGING IN PRIVATE APTS. AND 2 MEALS INQUDH3. 

For adults. 6 levels from bapnner I to advanced II. 

The next available 4- week cjlday immersion program sens Oct. 3B. Nov. 25 and ol year. 

Yetrs of resocnA A a jgj arien at In the effective tmaef un g of Bench to adults. 

INSTITUT DE FRAN£AiS - J.26 

— 23 Av. Gtn.4*derc. 06 VUlBfiANCHE/ MBL T«L: 93 01 88 44.TU.-.970.989f.— 

LEARN AND LIVE THE FRENCH LANGUAGE 

ro edm and idythc surroundings near Manse Carlo. 

Cap dMo 'oar* a ~**9 range of hath and Mm 

The C0mS MtDUBWANSN DtTUDES FRANCHISES offers 33 
yeosofesperence Whatever you feveL you n*jy acqure 0 rrawy of 
French W suit »cw profesaond or cuburci needs Smal groups. 4, B Or 
12-wMh cornu storting eadi month. CraaHe tapes trrd Efartey 
ore ovofcbfe to shidens mpwvMd by a professor. 

Brochure vrth enrafoni fees, otane or noth board and lodging 

CENTRE MEDlTERRANffN D’ETUDES FRANCAISES 
06320 Cop d'AH (France). 

Tel.: 93.78.21.59 - Telex: CEMED 461 792 F 


to the point of parody, Rudenstine 
has a very good stoiy to ie!L When 
Guggenheim started collecting in 
Paris, she had $40,000 to spend. 

World War II had begun, the art 
market was at a standstill There 
were plenty of people who wanted 
to sell and nobody who wanted to 

buy. Marcel Duchamp and other ^ 

tnally be thought appropriate to pends of Guggenheim's were de- her pioneering forays into LheRus^ 
Titian and Tintoretto, they would lighted to tell her what was good sian avant-garde, or of her holdings 

and what wasn't. of Abstract Expressionism, wiO 

By the time the Germans overran soon be made giddy by the rapidity 
France in June 1940, she was the and the profusion with which these 
owner of paintings and sculptures works came into her hands. Huy 
by Arp, Balia, Brancusi Braque, de will also note the consistently high 
Chirico. Dali Ernst, Giacometti, quality of the work, which com- 
Klee. Lfcger, Lissitzky, Miro, Mon-' pares favorably with the standards 
drian, Pevsner, Picabia and Schwit- upheld since her day by many an 
ters, among others. important museum. 

When Rene Magritte was leaving Catalogs can make dry reading, 
Paris, just an hour or two ahead of but this one doesn't. Rudenstine 
the advancing German armies, he submits every item in the catalog 
met Guggenheim at Lefebvre- to exhaustive consideration: where, 
Foinet. then as now the best shop when and with what the work was 
in Paris for artists’ supplies. Des- made, how it came to enter the 
perately short of money, he had a collection, and what has been said 

E aiming under his arm. Would she about it, by the artist or by others, 
uy it? Yes, she said. For cash? Anyone who has to read a great 
Yes. she said. Then and there? Yes, deal about art will know tha t the 
she said, and walked away with quality of the discussion that is 
“The Voice of the Winds.” provoked by a work of art is a good 

When she returned to Europe in index to the quality of the art itself, 
July 1941. her collection was By that criterion, 20th-century art 
shipped from Paris, the Germans romes out very well in “The Peggy 
notwithstanding, as “household ef- Guggenheim Collection, Venice.” 


der Rudenstine, the art historian 
whose two-volume catalog of “The 
Guggenheim Museum Collection: 
Paintings 1880-1945” came out in 
1976 to much acclaim. 

“The Peggy Guggenheim Collec- 
tion. Venice” is the equal of its 
predecessor, and the publishers do 
not exaggerate when they call it “an 
essentia] reference work for all 
those interested in the field of 20th- 
century art.” 

Qui te apart from the documenta- 
tion of the individual works of art, 
which at times is thorough almost 


By Christine Chapman 

T OKYO — Brian WHHams*s 
watercolors show scenes of tu-~ 
raJ Japan that few foreigners know 
and many Japanese have forgotten. 
Williams, an American painter 
whose latest collection showed at 
the Kato Gallery this month, be- 
lieves that Japanese rural life is 
disappttring. fast. “I want to cap- 
ture u in a poetic sense,” he said, 
“before it disappears." 

Since 1972, when be arrived in 
Japan mid settled in Kyoto, Wil- 
liams, 35, has been painting the’ 
countryside in fine detail with soft, 
stark colors that evoke an atmo- 
sphere of isolation. His work varies 
in scope horn panoramic land- 
scapes to delicate miniatures, and 
from “traditional conservative im- 
ages,” as he calls the thatched-roof 
farmhouses and views of Lake 
Biwa, to a more modem concentra- 
tion on angle artifacts, a wooden 
rice bucket or a persimmon jug. 
The paintings convey abandon- 
ment, disuse, a sense of loneliness. 

Williams is much admired in Ja- 
pan. “He is one of the best,” said 
Hiroshi Ogawa, manager of the 
Kato Gallery. “And only a few Jap- 
anese artists paint in watercolor " 
Watercolor painting is a Western 
art alien to Japanese technique and 
temperament, and not much prac- 
ticed professionally. Sunday paint- 
ers along the palace moat dab with 
brush and paints, but professional 
artists such as the great and venera- 
ble landscape master, 76-yeai-dd 
Kai Higashryama, prefer ells. 

“Japanese don’t know- much 
about watercolor painting,” com- 


Sculptures 
OfPmdier 
In Geneva 


G< 


New York Times Service 

,ENEVA — In the 19th 
century, James Prather, 
whose work adorned Paris’s 
Chamber of Deputies, the Arc 
de Triomphe, the Luxembourg 
Palace and Napoleon's Tomb, 
was one ol Europe's foremost 
sculptors. 

An exhibition dedicated to 
Pradier (1790-1852), who spent 
most ofhis Me in France, is on 
show in Geneva, his native city. 
“Statues of Flesh,” which runs 
through Feb. 2 at the Museum 
of Art and History, will be 
shown at the Luxemboiirg Pal- 
ace in Paris Feb. 26-May 4. 

The 200 works, most never 
publicly displayed, have been 
lent by French, Swiss .and Brit- 
ish museums and private col- 
lectors. They include 10 life-size 
marble faeces, plaster models 
and brass and terra-cotta, stat- 
ues, Including “Pandora" 
(right) in gilt bronze, as well as 
90 drawings. 






GERMANY 


YOU WANT 
TO SFEAK GERMAN? 
...SPEAK TO US REST 



Goethe-institut 


More them 3 million itudanti in 33 yean 
146 im Mutes in 66 countries 

«.g. KARACHI, TeL 514811 ~ 

PORTO, Tel. 691408 
GUADALAJARA, Tel. 156147 

15 institutes in the Federal Republic of Germany 


For detailed information: 
G06THB4NSTTTUT 
Zentrafverwritung 
Lenbochptct x 3 
D-8000 Munchen 2 
Tel. (O) 89-5999-200 
Telex: 522940 


ILSJL 



, Santey JLKaphn 
The Smart 

MOVE! 


PREPARATION FOR: 

MCAT • FMGEMS 
FLEX - CGFNS 
NCUEX-RN • TOEFL 
ESL - MSKP 



canmim 

tot pmuMnw weoiusto wee esa 
For information regarding 
programs authorized under 

Federal ipw to enroll 
non-imnugrani alien sludenis 
m :he U S A . ptease call: 

212-977-6200 

OrWriteiDepLHT 

Stanley H. Kaplan 
Educational Center Ltd. 

131 West 56 Slreet 
New York. N.Y. 10019 
Permanent Centers in More 
Than 125 Major US Cities 
Puerto Pico A Toronto Canada 


The nett Special 

EDUCATION 

directory 

mfl be psMUhed an 
DECEMBER T, 1985* 

For information, /do 


Jnuarunional Borald Tnbtmo, 
or year nearest IfFT rep re se ntativ e. 



mettled Frances Blakemore, an ad- fied air; far he lived his first 12 
mirer of WHDams’s work and the years in the high Andes of Peru, 
author of “Who’s Who in Mtxtem Bom iit Lima in 1950, he spent his 
Japanese Prints," a 1975 grade to -dtildhood in Jfenl and northern 
graphic artists. Blakemore, > Methodist 

owns tbe F rancli Gallery in Tokyo, missionaries, directed and taught 


iWe t 


said; “Watercolor is a completely 
different way of thinking. Japanese 
Eke things smooth, and watercolors 
are apt to show the brash strokes. 
To the Japanese it’s careless-look- 
ing. They don’t see things that way. 
The nearest they have to watercolor 
issumi-e, the blade-ink painting , 
which, is a very disciplined, techni- 
cal art."- 

Like other foreign artists who 
come to Japtm to learn the tech- 
niques of Japanese art, Williams 
stndied sumi-e and woodblock and 
the martial art aikido. He found 
himself returning to his early inter- 


in schools and churches. At 16, he 
attended Redlands High School in 
Southern Calif ornia for two years, 
intending to be a marine biologist 
But he discovered an enthusiasm 
for art, and went on to stixdy paint- 
ing at the College of Creative Stud- 
ies at the University of California 
at Santa Barbara. \ 

As a painter, Williams considers 
himself a “poetic realist,” whose 
work is “not at the breaking edge of 
art. Originality is always valued, 
but it can turn into novelty and 
become shallow. But I'm very cau- 
ests In watercolor painting and ^ ous a ^ x>ut Bating trapped into 
etching. He said he was “too impa- ^P«htoB orthane.Iketq3anum- 
tienT for woodblocks: “It takes so bcr “W*®* thin 8 s gomg." 
much time to: concentrate on one Since 1978, when he had his first 
image. TJnUkemany of the expatri- major one-man show in Kobe, Wil- 
ates here, I don’t do a Japanese liamshashdd a series of successful 
discipline. I do something that’s exhibitions in Japan at private gal- 
out-and-out Western. I rely on leries and in department-store gal- 




Western pictorial devices, not ori- 
entalones.” 

However, in his paintings he em- 
ploys severai techniques he discov- 
ered in Japan: the use of a wide 
range of Japanese brashes, includ- 
ing a technique using two at a rime 
to achieve gradations in color, and 
Japanese paper, which he uses for 
etchings ana lithography (for wa- 
tercolor he prefers French and Brit- 
ish paper). He uses a Japanese 
woman’s wooden comb to create 
fine lines. ■ 

. . “What . I learned in Japan was 
not just techniques but attitudes,” 
he said. “An old Ink-painter told 
me, “One should paint the air 
around the object, not just the ob- 
ject.”? 

Williams is accustomed to rari- 


ksries. He is preparing a 1986 exhi- 
bition for Tokyo’s Takashimaya 
Nihon bashi Gallery and for his 
first American show at the Ronin 
Gallery in New Yodc. 

: Williams, his wife, Hideml and 
their, three young daughters live in 
a thatched-roof farmhouse - near 
Lake Biwa. A gregarious man, he 
takes part in village festivals, gos- 
sips with the neighbors, paint* their 
houses and old buckets and boxes. 
Then, although he is mushozoku, an 
unregistered artist' whs works out- 
ade of an established art associa- 
tion, he sells them to his mostly 
Japanese clientele. 


Christine Chapman is a Tokyo- 
based writer. . 


DOONESBURY 


SWITZERLAND 





25 years of excellence 
in American Education 
ia Europe. 

University preparatory courses 
far grades 9-1 3 
Boarding program. 
Educational & Recreational 
excursions. 

Superb sports opportunilies. 
■’Skiing at your doorstep” 

An Alpine Campus Above 
Lake Geneva. 

Contacts Leysin American School 
CH-1854 (W) LEYSIN 
Tdex: 456.312 
Tel.; (41} 25/34 13 61 


A 


New this year, the IHTs desk-top diary for 
1986. Lightweight and conveniently sized it sfips 
ecEiiy into any attach^ case — and travels with 
you everywhere. Our Portable Desk Diary 
you dl the advantages of a trcritwnal 
iary— but none of the bulk. 

Covered in luxurious siBc-grcai black 
leather, with a padded front cover, the dory 
has gilMnetd comers, gold pog&edges, French 
blue paper and an be personalized wtfh git 
initials on the cover. 

A silk ribbon marker brings a fufl week 
to view. Plus room for personal notes. 


A spedd feature is th e removable ad- 
dress book incorporated tnto the bode 
cover, which saves you rewriting the informa- 
tion each yea-. 

A handful of rorosntrafed pages con- 
tain dl the pradied information our readers _ 
have askea for with their desk efiary; worldwide 
holiday dates, international time zones and dol- 
ing co^ mrtrx; wd^ and measures 
conversions. 

The ideal desk diary for the executive on 
the move. The perfect gfft for friends, business 
contacts and associates. Order today. 


• far ©refers of five or more (rides, quantity cfecourtS are available. 


1 986 POCKET DIARY 

Our classic IHT Podoet DicryJ compact and | 
extroo ni r krf y Eghtweighfc A sflk ribbon marker 
opens to a ful week at a gbnee. Special feo- 

tweskxiKte^nietdcornert,goW 
edges, French blue poser in sewn tinting. On 
the bcdvotx'spec^TrfotidrKiedmentoriieetsJ 
[with a refil padt of sheets suppfiec^, ond a 
depart alphabetical address sedan. 

Plus intwrotiond holiday dates for over 
90 countries, time zones oid diefcg codes, met- 
ric conversion, com p arative weights, measures 
and dotting sizes, and a wine veitoge chart . 

! JicralbSkeribuneJ 


Return Order Form to: Paul Baker, Program Coordinator, Internationd Herald Tribune 
c/o Dataday House, 8 Alexandra Road, London SW19 7JZ, England. 


Please check method of payment: 

□ Enclosed is my check or money order for 

$ made to the order of Internationd 

Herald Tribune, payment can be made in any asnverttbie 
Europeai currency at current exchange rate.) 

□ Please charge to □ Access QVba nAmex 

my credit card- □ Eurocord □ Diners □ Mastercard 


Please send me copies oft 

Prices indude postage in Europe. 

□ Portable Desk Diary at US. $35 pdd S7 each podase 

oubido EuropaJ 

n Pocket Diary at U.S. $20 {Add S3 each pottage 

. cytpde Europe^ 


INITIALS 


Card No. 


Exp. Date. 


Nome 

(NBUXKLETIB5* 

Address 


Signature. 


Gty/Gode/Cbontry , 


26-1085 










; -_\*f • - . &r. 1%K 


INTERNATIOKAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY. OCTOBER 26-27, 1985 


Page 





ARTS /LEISURE 




OfEzraPotmd 

_ Wykes-Jc^rcc dudes rigor % Jean Arp, 

T QNDON — Twocwntt mail VUriuir Bahnus, Liubov 
the oentenaiy of Ecca Pound's P°povs, Cdar~ Dorada, Picasso, 
birth <m Oct. 30: the kroning on .. K* 6 * Mrioly-N?©, Malevich and* 
Channd 4 television of Lawrence "nvc<>feer sect ion is a chaog- 

Pitkcthly ’ 5 masterly 90-minme film in^ooc by decadesof the gaDeries' 
“Ezra Pound ■ — American Odys- activities, with The Seventies” on* 
sey"; and the continuation ai the . ^ Nov^.23, arit.^Ebe Ei ght ies" 
Tate Gallery through Nov. 10 of from Nov. 26 to Deo. 20. 

“Pound’s Artists," which features Some mists are featured in both 
tie work of those wboro be cncxHir- ^“ades r- the. qfoiridsh narrative 
aged and championed in London. P aimer Anthony Green; thcTab-, 
from 1908 to 1920, and in 'Paris st^odorist AlanGroen; the doy- 
hom 1920 to 1924, along whh a a6ae of Op^rikcs, BridgerRflcy; 


pendant of Renaissance I talians to 
whtMe creations he advened in da 
earlier parts of his epic poem, “The 
Cantos.” 

Ch ief among the London artists 
represented are the sculptor Henri 
Gaudier-Brzeska (J891-I9I5L Per- 
cy Wyndham Lewis (1882-1957) 
and Edward Wadsworth (1889- 
1949). In Paris his particular inier- 


Sean Scully, Iiisb-bom andnow an 
American citizen. Irving and work- 
ing in>few Yoriq and the scadjMnre 
Ntgd Had and Phify King, now 
professor of sculpture ai t&e Royal 
College of Art AHMhgoilKEinqjor 
artists of “The Seventies" stci i he 
Bulgarian-horn artiSt Clrisio, with 

one of his classical drawings of a 
wrapped monument; the 


ests and friendships were the sculp- P^bnex Boer KaUdbcf. and the 
tor -Constantin Brancusi Greek ardritecL and sculptor Mi- 
(1 S76- 1 957), Francis Picabia (1879- chad Nfidiadede^ berth now living 
I953X the “arismerat of disorder” and working iir London. - 




and Jean Coctean (1889-1963). The 
slide show of Renaissance Italy ac- 
cords poorly with the other .-seg- 
ments of the exhibition. It is neve^- 
L thdess a pleasure to see some of the 
medals by Pisanello (Antonio Pisa- 
no c. 1380-1455), originally coart 
painter to the Gonzagas of Man- 
tua, who created a new art form by 

turning from painting to. *™*4ai . 
making in 1438. His first medal 
celebrated the visit of the Byzan- 
tine emperor John V Palaeologtrs to 
Ferrara, an event narrated in some 
detail in Pound's “Canto XXVL” 

“ Pound's Artists,” Tate Gallery, 
MiUbank, London SW1, through 
Nov. JO. 

□ 

In 1960 Anndy Juda, a London- 
art dealer, began a series of shows 


‘The . Eighties”, emphasi zrs the 
gaflexy’sJ^imiese.catmectiaa, with 
the lead coll ag es ofNeriyuJa Hare- 
guchi and. the scuJpjuie of Yoshi- 
shige Saito, along with the Swiss 
systems painter Gottfried Honeg- 
ger, and a rich selection of English 
sculptors. 

“Twenty Five . Years," Armely 
Judo. Fine Art t Juda Rowan Gal- 
lery, 11 Tonenhan Mews, London 
Wl through Dec. 20. 



Drouot Draws on France’s Mine of Art 


Oneiroscoptst” (1947) by Etfith Rirammgton. 


suit “Ondroscopist” is one of the 
most powerful and tefling images in 
the show. 

“fvw British Women Surreal- 
ists" Blond Fine Art, 22 Princes 
Street, London Wl, through Not. 
16. 


To coincide with the publication 
of Whitney Chadwick's book 
“Women Artists and the Surrealist 
Movement” Blond Fine Art has 
mounted a show of “Five British 
Women Snnealists." These are Ei- 
leen Agar (b. 1904) who contribut- 
ed in 1936 to the first Internationa] 


the gallery as the nucleus for such a 
show, early drawings acquired 
from the artist’s estate, and loans 
from collectors and other dealers to 
complete the 70-item exhibition. 

Particularly striking are the 
“Rectory Garden 1944” and 
□ “Wold Landscape with Figures," 

In its title, “London — New both from private collections; and 
York — Hong Kong," the Moreton the eight original ink- and- wash and 


of young avant-garde artists living Surrealist E xhibitio n is London 
and working in Britain and then in . and the memorable “Fantastic Art, 
1968 founded a gallery in her own Dada and Surrealism 


name: Anndy Juda Fine Art. 

In 1962 Alex Gregory-Hood was 
founder-director of a similar avant- 
garde gallery, the Rowan. In 1982, 
Anndy Juda and Alex Gregoiy- 
Hood combined to form the Juda . 
Rowan Gallery, and in “Twenty 
Five Years,” celebrate their qoar- 
i ter-centnry of activities. 

One section of the show, “Mas- 
terpieces of the Avant-Garde,” in- 


at the Muse- 
um of Modern Art, New York; 
Emmy Bridgewater (lx 1906), a 
dream painter; Ithell Cokpxhoun 
(b. 1906), a novelist and occultist as 
well as .painter; Grace W. Pafl- 
tharpe(1883-197I)a physician and 
research psychologist, who in 1832 
founded the first Institute for the 
Scientific Treatment of Deli-, 
queocy, and Edith Rimmxngtan (b. 
3902) whose bird figure in a diving 


Mi tab; 

' ^ Djta !«Lh- 

* •’ rift and ; 

- pang J| 

",r.\ arsntd s 

• linden 
V-J-andsHidr 

-■ : '^!i/-nua forir 
Tijamti 
1 v^aiad 
; -msfas 
•: ... 'iiyofGs 
: \ v.rjr. rff 



f A Piece of Aparllieid' 


Street Gallery names (he dries 
where the five figurative painters 
whose art is on display live and 
work. London is represented by the 
pastels of Ian Hay and the water- 
colors of Iain Robbins, both w ork- 
ing in the restrained English tradi- 
tion; New York by two articulate 
and exuberant young women — 
Pamela Kempncr Davis and Aet 
Paaro, both working in oQs, and 
Hong Kong by Cbaries Rod well, 
whose oils and watercolors are, like 
those of the Londoners, much in 
the English vein. 

“ London — New. York — Hong 
Kong," Moreton Street Gallery, 40 
Moreton Street, Pimlico, London 
SW1, to mid-November. 

’ O 

Keith Vaughan was among the 
most notable of the 1940*-50s En- 
glish Neo-Romantic Movement, 
and has never been better repre- 
sented than in the “Early Drawings 
and Gouaches (1940-1955)" at Ag- 
news. it is composed or a block of 
Neo-Romanticgouacbes bought by 


gouache drawings from which were 
lithographed eight illustrations to a 
translation of Rimbaud’s “Une 
Saison en Enfer.” 

"Keith Vaughan." Agnews. S Al- 
bemarle Street, London Wl, through 
Nov. 8. 


Max Wykcs -Joyce writes regular- 
ly in the IHT on London art exhibi- 
tions. 


QE2 Win Re Refitted 
In West German Yard 

Reuters 

LONDON — The British luxury 
liner Queen Elizabeth 2 is to have 
an £ 8 $-miUian (S112-nuIHan) refit 
at a West German shipyard that 
will give it another 20 years’ sailing, 
the ship's owners announced. 

The 67,139-ton QE2 will he out 
of service from November 1986 
and is due to sail again with new 
engines in May 1987. 


Intemaumai Herds Tribune 

P > AR1S — As the dearth of works of art 
available for sale becomes the one of the 
most pressing problems confronting interna- 
tional auction houses. France's wealth or an 
resources is beginning to gi 1 -: Drouot an irresist- 
ible attraction. 

"The Price of Art," just published by the 
French art monthly Cormaissance des Arts, 
deals with market trends in Paris, London and 

SOUREN MeUKIAN 

New Yoik during the iast season. It highlights 
the unrecorded or loag-ios: works of" an of 
major importance that save turned up in the 
Paris auction house. 

Last season, discoveries occurred in almost 
every field. One of the four or five most impor- 
tant portraits of the lSih-centurv portrait paint- 
er Elizabeth Vig&e-Lebrus, appeared in Novem- 
ber in a sale organized bv the 
Audap-Godeau-Solanet group. It represents a 
young w oman, the Duehesse de Grsmont-Ca- 
derousse, dressed as a peasant woman of the 
Dauphine province. The picture, done in 1784, 
is beautifully painted, h established a record for 
Vig£c- Lebrun ax 7,630,000 frar.es. 

Significantly, it was not acquired by an 
“American coiled or," as Connaissancc des Arts 
m ai ntains , but by Guy Stair Saimy, a New 
York-based English dealer in French masters of 
the 17tb and ISth century. Hie picture is likely 
to be sold to a museum for a substantially bigger 
price. The portrait bad not been seen since 
World War 1. 

In the same sale, one of Gustave Courbet's 
most accomplished Swiss landscapes could be 
had for 2^54,000 francs, it shows the Chateau 
de ChiUoo, an austere medieval structure stand- 
ing on Lake Geneva. The Courbet was previous- 
ly unrecorded. 

Occasionally the surprise generated by such 
discoveries sends the works shooting to extraor- 
dinary heights. Last June, the Ad er- Picard -Ta- 
jan group sold a preparatory sketch in oils for 
the portrait of the Comtesse d'HaussonviBe by 
Ingres for 3,523,940 francs. Despite its bland 
appearance, it set a world record for the artist. 

Every now and then, finds are made ejen in 
the most intensively researched fields — the 
avant-garde schools of the iate 1 9th and early 
20th century, from Impressionism to Fauvism. 

In March, the masterpiece of Charles An- 
grand, who started off as a Neo-Impressionist 
and became a founding father of the Nabi 
movement in the 1890s, turned up in a sale 
conducted by Guy Loudmer. “The Western 
Line,” as the landscape is called, was done in 
1886. Its bnishwork in short strokes whirling in 
every direction is remimscem of van Gogh, and 


its composition is strongly marked by the influ- 
ence of Japanese woodcuts. The palette of mr- 
quoise and blueish greens, with (ouches of or- 
ange, is os attractive as it is unusual. It had never 
been reproduced. The picture was snatched up 
for 2,21 1,000 francs by an .American collector 
living in London. 

Last season's biggest sensations, however, 
concern objets d'art. 

The most important bronze by ihc Dutch 
master Adriaen de Vries seen at" auction for 
years, came up in December, in a sale organized 
by the Couturier- Nicotoy group. A rearing horse 
stands on a pedestal with the artist’s name fullv 
inscribed in block letters, a rare feature. The 
object was being sold by a French aristocratic 
family in the Dauphine, one of whose ancestors 
had been ambassador to The Hague in the 17th 
century. It is believed to have been executed 
around 1620. Its mention in an inventory in 
1715 makes itprobable that it was bought b> the 
ambassador it) Holland, where he died in 1669. 
virtually guaranteeing its authenticity — a rare 
assurance concerning a Baroque bronze. 

Except for a brief exhibition in the Dauphine 
a few years ago that had gone unnoticed, no one 
knew about its existence. The price, just over 10 
million francs, easily established the horse as the 
most expensive bronze in the world. 

In June, highly important pieces came up in 
clusters at Drouot. Seven Egyptian carvings 
were auctioned by Jean Gaude Binoche in typi- 
cal Drouot style, Le. in a sale with a bit of 
everything in it. But the expert Jean -Loup Des- 
prat had done a good mailing job. A beautiful 
but small and rather late statue of a scribe, only 
12 inches (32 centimeters) high, was sold for a 
huge 1 , 324.635 francs. An exceedingly rare 
bronze statue of a lion -headed deity sealed on 
its low-backed throne was, on the other hand, 
quite reasonable at 1,087,589 francs. Neither 
carving bad been illustrated before or men- 
tioned in a publication. 

Most astonishing is the case of a collection of 
pre-Columbian art formed by a former French 
ambassador to Mexico between 1925 and 1929. 
The seller is not identified in the catalog nor in 
the Connaissanoe des Arts book, in keeping with 
the French passion for secrecy. Indeed. Eugene 
Pepin, as he is called, had gone further still. 
Although a lifelong friend of Henri Lehmann, 
the noted authority on Mexican art. Pepin, now- 
98, had never mentioned his collection to him. it 
included several pieces of a kind that had never 
been offered at auction before, such as the 
standing figure of a man in dark greenish stone 
from Teotihuacan, datable to around 500 B. C. 
This was bought for 609,860 francs by Dr. Arno 
Leof of Mexico. For a piece that any major 
museum would be proud to own, that is not a 
great deaL Here and there, marvelous pieces 
sold for much less. 


On the same day at Drouot, Jacques Tajan 
was selling a mid-J3ih-cemuiy psalter from 
Bruges with seven full-page miniatures, !2 other 
miniatures of an irregular format, and 10 illumi- 
nated initials. No one had heard about the 
manuscript until the sale. It is one of the more 
significant discoveries concerning the history of 
Flemish painting in the Gothic period, as the 
scholarly study by the expert Claude Guerin 
demonstrate;.. It established a world record for 
any Flemish manuscript, at 5.503,000 francs. 

This Season an impressive number of works of 
art in the top-level museum category are already- 
lined up. A portrait of u young" man holding a 
pipe by Georges de la Tour (1593-1652) to be 
sold on Dec. 5. has a 10- mill ion-franc estimate. 

Equally remarkable is the appearance on the 
Paris market of a collection of early illustrated 
bonks, manuscripts and engravings. Formed 
over 50 years ago. it includes German books 
illustrated in the years that followed the inven- 
tion of printing by Gutenberg, woodcuts and 
etchings by D-Qrer and Callot. and the bes: 
complete set of Goya's “Caprichos" that has 
seen on the market in the last decade — the 80 
etchings are impeccably preserved impressions 
of the first edition, mounted uutriouned in their 
19th-cemur\ binding. The rarest lot is a 16th- 
century manuscript of the Gospels with out- 
standing miniatures, executed around 1515 in 
northern France. Its two volumes have silver 
bindings with scenes in bas relief that are unique 
— marks struck by an unidentified goldsmith 
date the bindings to the second quarter of the 
ifiih century. 

Uncharacteristically for France, the fine cata- 
log came out weeks before the sale, which is to 
be held by Eric Buffetaud at Drouot on Nov. 20. 
If French auctioneers play their cards well and 
improve their marketing methods, they are now 
in a position to make a serious comeback on the 
international scene. 

■ British Ex- Arts Minister Joins Sotheby’s 

Lord Gowric. the British former arts minister. 

is to become chairman of Sotheby's Internation- 
al Inc., responsible for the firm's worldwide 
operations outside the Americas and Britain, 
the Associated Press reported from London. 

He also joins the board of the New- York- 
based parent company. Sotheby's Holdings Inc. 
Lord Gowric previously worked with the Lon- 
don picture dealer Thomas Gibson. 

He resigned his post unexpectedly in a gov- 
ernment reshuffle in September, and said at the 
time that his $46,200 official salary was not 
enough for him to iive in central London. 

■ Penguin Paperback Books Auctioned 

The first sale of Penguin paperback books by 

a major London auctioneer made £6,300 (about 
S9.000) at Phillips Thursday. The Associated 
Press reported from London. 


By Neshia Starocvic 

The Associated Pros 

F rankfurt — Gamer 

WaHraff, a best- 
Gennan author, has just 
a controversial description of the 
exploitation and prejudice he faced 
during the two years he spent dis- 
guised as an immigrant Turkish lar 
borer. 

The question of the Gastarbeiter, 

■ •jifr Nrr, or guestworirers, including no less 
> .•••■. ’< >Wk than onexnQHon Turkish residents, 
is a sensitive one in West Germany. 
To many Germans, the immigrants 
appear as a threat to their employ- . 
meat and are not easily assimilated 
into society. 

Wallraff has made his name writ- 
ing about imdexcover experiences, 
and bis books have sold more than 
three million copies. His 1977 ex-, 
pos 6 on the tabloid newspaper, 
BOd, was on the best-seHer list. BDd 
took him to court and forced the 
deletion of some passages. 

WallfrafTs “Ganz Unten,” (At 
the Very Bottom), which weal on 
sale Monday, relates the jokes and 
harassment to which Turkish work- 
ers and other immigrants are sub- 
jected. It also describes bow immi- 


' flililE 
. r-.tii. raa' : 

• jnKtidr; 

; -Jj:-. '5 ita* 

£- ;_n EL!®i' 

r.-.aa Ef* 

• • ."‘ifflilk? 
. j' -j'tihspj®! 

- . :*■ niafetf 1 



•- “'TJ fiS 1 ” - 

■ •. -W'& 

.-j^s 

. - V.- vst 



. grants are hired as seasonal 


. . \rsts 31 

'j} 01 

. .’ --It 


i $£ 


Wallraff as “AB.’ 

construction sites, as a laborer in 
steel mills and as a driver of execu 
tives’ automobiles. 

Wallraff writes of the experience 
as a saga of menial , underpaid jobs 
as a seasonal laborer with virtually 
ho rights or social benefits, of ex- 
ploitation and discrimination, of 
being a target of bigoted jokes. 

Wallraff says that as a Turk he 
felt' “abused, insulted, threatened, 
and enslaved.” He said he detected 
a “piece erf apartheid” in West Ger- 
many. He quotes a Tunisian fellow 
worker comparing treatment at a 
branch of the giant Thyssen steed 
concern to “slavery.” 

Wallraff describes how a nyin, 
allraff with, law- . whose name he. changed in. the 
book and whom he calls “a slave 
trader,” hires fora large West Ger- 
man firm foreign workers who have 
no work - permits and make no de- 
mands as long as they are given 
work. He also tells of drunken res- 
lauram patrons waiting until he 
had just swept to empty ash trays 

on the floor, and of working with- 

depicted extreme cases that “sadly out a gas mask in areas of chemical 
happen” with some frequency in companies where signs warned erf 


workers without the extensive so- 
cial benefits available to German 
workers. 

. Companies where Wallraff 
claimed to have worked described 
the book as “outrageous," ‘'scan- 
dalous'” and limited by “half- 
truths.” Two companies mentioned 
have threaied wa 
suits. . 

Prosecutors said they wwe inves- 
tigating Wallraff s allegations that 
companies broke tax and labor 
laws when hiring foreign workers. 
Iisdottc Funcke, an administra- 
tion official, reacted to the book by 
raffing for stricter controls in the 
labor market. She said his book 



West Geaaany. 

To research his latest went, 
Wallraff, 43, donned a dark wig, 
wore dark-color contact lenses and 
went in search of work. 

Wallraff assumed the personal- 
ity of “Ali Levant Simrfioglp,” a 

TWk born of a Turkish father and a 
Greek mother. He than placed an 
ad in several newspapers;. “For- 
eigner, strong, seeks work, any 
kind, heavy or dirty, also for tittle 
money.'* 

Wallraff said offers poured in. 

For the next 2Mt years, “Ali" 
moved through West Germany, 
sweeping toilets in McDonald’s 
hamburger outlets,' working on 


poisonous gases and required such 
masks. 

: At (Hie firm, an official, 
his Turkish name, com men 
“It’s not a name; it’s a. disease.” 

Yet, Wallraff wrote, when he 
presented himself as a leader of the 
extreme rightist Turkish oiganiza- 
tion “Grey Wolves,” “Ali" was in- 
vited io a political meeting of the 
Christian Socialist Union, the Ba- 
varian coalition partner of West 
Germany’s ruling conservative 
Christian Democrats. There be had 
his picture taken with Franz-Josef 
Strauss and received an autograph 
from the Bavarian state — 

“To AK, withwarm 


ANTIQUES 



23th V V - 

antique dealers fair 

in TOULOUSE France > 
from 7th to .17 tfa November 1985 
iht matt important emu in tke'antkjarr-wprkf In Europe' 
■ (Press wnirwnfj . 

y-;-. 

•3MW TOdriUSK m ajtSMf 





INTERNATIONAL 
ART EXHIBITIONS 


PARIS 


SALON DAUTOMNE 

AUX SOURCES 
DE LTMPRESSIONNISME 

(El A RKS CON I EMPORAINES 
ciu r ociobre ;iu 5 novembre Indus 
GRAND PALAIS - PARJS 


GALERiE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

. 6 , Rue Jeon-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. TeL 43^9.82.44 , 


SALON INTERNATIONAL DE PEINTURE 

October 24 - November 3 

GALERIE DE NESLE 

8, rue de Nesle, 75006 PARIS - Tel.: 43 25 25 41. 


B= WALLY FINDLAY 

Galleries Internarional 

new york - Chicago - patm beach 
beverly hffls - pans 


EXHIBITION 

IIWOflfHMtYl 

Permanent exKbftwn af 
ARDtSSONE, AUGE, BCXSTET, 
BOURRiE. CANU, CASSIGNBJl, 
CHAURAY, FABJEN, GAO. 
GANTNBt, GAVEAU, GORHT1, 
HAMBOURG, KLUGE, LE PHO, 
NBS-VALTAT. NEUOUEUAAN, 
SBBIRE, SIMBaRI, VtGNOLES. 


2 Ave. Motignon - Ports 8 th 

TUj 4ZJ57074. aaaday ta. wtanfcnr 

IOojk- to V pjn. - 2JO»7 pjn. 


Hotel George V - 47.23,54.00 
31 Ave. Georg e-V - Paris 8th 

man ■n.HLioaoam.1 

SaadavZMS-Vpn- 

Bxc mp lkrmlty, dm galhrims wdS ho 
dated en Scd. Nor. Z 


LONDON 

COLNAGHI 


14 Old Bond Su Ladon, WL 
' 01-491 7408 
and 

CLARENDON GALLERY 

S Vigo Su., London, WL . 

01-439 4S57, 

SOCIETY PORTRAITS 

1850-1939 

de Philpoi 

leva]' "Supni 

Leighton Shannon 

Ox-pen Widton 

. ; . ' e*e- 

Octobcr 30-Dfceraber 14 
L= Moa-FrL, 10-6: SatA, 10-L = 


GALERIE GUIOT ^ 


18, Av. Motignon, 75008 PAMS- 
TeL : 42.66.65.84. 

SARTHOU 


E October 23 - November 23 


OLD MASTER PAINTINGS 

Flemish and Dutch 16th and 17th 

GALERIE CROUZET 

3, AB6e Riesener (ground floor} 

L£ LOUVRE 
DES ANTIQUAIRE5 

2, Place du Patau Royal 
75001 PAHS. TeL (1} 42 97 28 37 


PAKU/MEW YORK 


ZABRISKIE 

WILLIAM KLEIN 

Photographs 
724 Fifth Ave, New York 

PHOTOS 

SURREAUSTES 

37 roe Quincampoix, Paris 


"ART EXHIBITIONS” 
"ANTIQUES” 
"AUCTION SA1ES" 


on 


AUCTION SALES 


BIG AUCTION SALE 

Hotel des Bergues - GENEVA 

November 25, 26, 27 and December l 
(Exhibition from November 21-24) 

We are selling several important collections 
from the following estates: 

—Partial collection, Josef Muller, Soleure 
—The estate of Dr. Wetzlar. Amsterdam 
—Part of the estate of Christophe Bernoulli, 
Basel 

—The estate of the “Galerie des Granges”, Ge- 
neva 

—The Aladjem estate, Geneva 
—A castle near Fribourg 
—Furniture from an Italian palace 
—Important old paintings: Breughel the youn- 
ger (from the estates of General Lederc, Abel 
Grimmer, etc) 

—More than 800 modem paintings: Anker, Bar- 
raud, Bonnard, Bosshardt, Calder, Domin- 
guez, Ernst, Fautrier, Gruber, Hervin, Picasso, 
Poliakoff, Reth, Segonzac, Tereckowitch, Val- 
lotton, Valmier, Vlaminck. Vuillard, etc 
—Old drawings: the Charles Coumault collec- 
tion, Paris 

—Silverware, XVI, XVII and XVIII century 
—Jewelry. 

Catalogue on request from: 

GALERIE ARTS ANCIENS 
Pierre- Yves Gabus S.A. 

2022 BEVAIS, Switzerland 
Tel.: 038/46 16 09 


“CHRISTIE'S — 

GENEVA 

Important Autumn Sales 

9-14 November, 1985 
at the 

Hotel Richemond, 
Geneva 
The week of sales 
will include: 

Jewellery 
Porcelain 
An Nouveau 
An Deco and 
Bookbindings 
Watches 
Silver and 
Objects of Vertu 
Gold Boxes 
Faberge and Russian 
Works of Art 
Wine 

The sales will be on 
view at the 
Hotel Richemond 
from 8 November 
10a.m. to 6p.m. 



Phillips 

FINE ART AUCTIONEERS U VALUERS SINCE I'M® 

IMPRESSIONIST & MODERN 
PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS 
& SCULPTURE 

Auction: Monday, November 11 at 6p.m. 

Exhibition opens Wednesday. November 6 

WORKS OF ART FROM THE 
CIRCLE OF MONTPARNASSE 
Including works by Modigliani , 
Chagall, Pascin, Soutine, 
Lipchitz, Zadkine & Kisling. 

Auction: Friday, November 1$ at 2p.m. 
Exhibition opens Tuesday. November 12 


Illustrated catalogues for each: S10 at the 
galleries, S12 by mail within the U.5., 
Si-i by overseas mail. 

Direct inquiries to Joachim Pissarro at (212) 
or Selina Shirley at (212) 3 70--* 8 28 

-t06 EAST ■’9th STREET. N.V., N.Y. UK121 



.-t hardsione figure of John Bull 
by Fabeige. 12on high, fwm the 
nofl 
SirClurlat 


Collection of The hue 
■ CLve. 


For catalogues and information, please contact: 


Christie's 

8 Place de la Tacnnnenc. 
12tM Geneva 
Td. (022) iS 25 4-1 
Telex: 423034 


Chrisne’s 

H King Street, St. James's 
London SWiViy^T 
Tel. (0441) 83*90W> 
Telex; Vlo42 r i 


Christie's 
17 rue de Lille. 
75007 Pans 
Tel. m 42nl 1247 
Telex: 21 340SJ 


LAURIN - GLTLLOLIX - BUFFETALID - TAJUJEUR 
Associated Auctioneers 

!Z rue Dtouch - 75009 PARIS - Tel. 42.46.61.16. Telex Drouot 642 260 

HOTEL DROUOT - PARIS 
Wednesday November 20th at 2.30 p.m. Rooms 5 & 6 

COLLECTION OF AN ART LOVER 

BIG ILLUSTRATED BOOKS OF .Wth and With CENTURIES 
PRECIOUS BOOKS OF HOURS, MANUSCRIPTS 
AND PRINTED PAPERS BOOKS ON FESTIVALS 
RARE SET OF ENGRAVINGS BY: DURER, CALLOT, GOYA 

-With Century gospel bcok in illibtr^ted volumsi nith 176 muiiaiuftt 
mremely well preiened, bound in Paris probably between 1 532 3d 1533 or 
between ISS5 ■ JSSti. the engraved trays in filled silver represent scenes from 
the New Tmaincni. 

EXPERT: 

Mme J. VI DA L-M EGRET 
154. Bid. MaJeshertvrs, 75017 PARIS - Tel. 4127,00.69 

On view 

Ai Mrs VI DA L-M EGRETs house from Friday, November Sih 
to Friday. November 15ih 

HOTEL DROUOT: roams 5 & 6, Tuesday, November 19th 

All requests concerning this sale must be sent to 
Mrs J. VIDAL-MEGRET or Maiure E BUFFETaUD 

Catalog on request S 20. 



J.-, 




4 










Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26-27, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives \ 

VoL High Ujw Lost Cht. 


mi is* 
28% a 

38* 27% 

7% Mi 
UJV. 13 
20% 30% 

43% 41% 

44 43% 

65% 64V. 

30% 20% 

46 45% 

64 63% 

43 41 

47% 471k 

28% 27% 


jsa — % 
28% + % 
a —i 
7% — % 
13% 

20 % — % 

41% + % 

ro* — % 

$8? — 1 

20% 

45% _ % 

63% + % 
41% —IV. 
47Vi — Vi 
27% — % 


Dow Jones Averages 


OKI HM Uw Loot aw. 

Indus 1300.10 136671 13SU9 135602 — £81 

Tran* 6S5J8 65836 MS83 649.58 — 648 

Util 15680 15957 157.78 150.16 + 1120 

Comp 552.19 55434 S4740 550.13— 265 


NYSE Diaries 


Cunpnlta 

Industrials 

Tramp. 

utilities 

Finance 


NYSE Index 


High Ln Close Ch’ge 
10875 10829 10836—052 
13425 12428 12404—059 
10460 102.95 102.96 — 1.17 
5644 5623 5623 — 810 
11427 11424 11433 —062 


Fridays 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


AMEX Most Actives^ 


m §e 


OOSBT^ 


Advanced 

Oocilnod 

ffiSTSK. 

Now Highs 
New Lows 
volume up 
V olume down 


251 246 

750 771 

i« K 

M W 

2207260 

1378279 


Ctxnooslte 

industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 


on ov Ago 

28949 — UH 28838 
27188 — M0 29880 
38273 4-052 37929 
34&SS — 087 34364 
27265 — 021 Z73J6 
31128 4-030 31089 
344,37—029 2(003 


Hitcri n 

Hivltapl 

NWMPn 


VOL HM* LOW 

640 ** 

f tgp 3S 

Vff* ™ 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


LDow Jones Bond Averages I 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


T2Maalti 
HWt Lae Stock 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unch an ged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 
VaHimeuP 
Volume pawn 


557 729 

913 BOB 

529 449 

1999 1986 

34 56 

30 25 

30408390 
56.175870 


Oct 24 14X574 

oa. 23 16X734 

Oct. 22 154662 

00.71 145.90J 

Oct. IB 171670 

-Included tn the soles figures 


Bey Sales -ShYf 
16X574 4008M 17861 

16X734 441829 28473 

154662 43X194 1IJW 
I4£903 41806? 14677 

171670 43S660 36655 


Vol.ot4PJ8 101,188480 

Pm. 4 PM. VOL 123,140400 

Pm centos dated dose ML9SU6B 1 


Tobias include the naHonwfde prices 
op to me dosing on Wall Street amt 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

17a The Associated Press 


WonoB 
MMU 
Klddowt 
AM inti 


WbiE B 
DatoPd 
EchoBo 


m uw 

£* 

ig bs 

1027 £* 

904 m 

901 7% 

BS9 12% 
*53 13% 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


High Low dose Chtoe 
industrials 30987 20067 20873— 1.13 

Transe. 170.77 1678 7 74069 — 165 

Utimtas 8X13 8281 B2JB— X15 

Flncmce 22. IS 2104 2187—816 

Composite 18851 18781 18752 — 088 


AMEX Sales 


wv. Yu. pe MteHahUw Say , 


34% 16 AAR 56 25 

17% 9% AGS 

50* 29% AMR 

23% 18% AMR pf X1B 95 

25% 23 ANRpf 257 118 

14 7% APL 

61% 34% ASA XDO 58 

27 ro& AVX J41 

28% IS<i AZP 282 108 


56 25 14 23 22V. 

12 118 15% 
7 381 D 391V 
LIB 95 6 23% 

87 114 38 24V. 

154 10VL 

LOO 56 147 37 

441 16 27 11% 

.72 108 7 B17 25V. 


New York Stocks Close Lower 


PN.rw.PE MhHMiuw anatom 


4 PM. volume 
Pnev. 4 PM. volume 
Prev. oga*. wDhime 


% dose I 12 Marsh 

ON. nd. PE IMiHlgnLBw QuoLOfee I Htgfi LOW 5IW 


ampx Stock index 


r«« 23577 —189 


60 38% AbtLoft- .160 25 15 441 56% 

25% 19% A=coWd 80 22 17 29 23 

24% IHteJAfcmeC ' 60 36 108 12% 

lO'.T 7%. Acme E 52b 46 II 38 7% 

19 IPi^AdaEx 182911.1 B1 17% 

20 13% A dm Ml 52 18 7 7 10% 

16% Ms AdvSys 53t 36 21 47 14* 

36% 2218 AMD 35 3101 25 

12% 6* Advest .17 16 19 155 8% 

15% 10 AerflSJi 13 103 15% 

49% 34% AeltlU 264 58 16 2674 40% 

57W 53% Aen. Pi 561c 98 20 56% 

37% 22% Abneu I JO 36 * 141 36 

3% 2% AJIeen 5 2% 


37% 22% Abmns I JO 36 * 141 36 

3% 2% AJIeen 5 2% 

57 43% Air Prd 160 27 11 1520 5411 

24% I7V-. AlrbFrt 80 ZB 12 383 21% 

2% IV. AIMod S -10e 5J 54 IT* 

33% 29U, A tap PfA 192 127 13 31% 

8% 6% AtoPduf 87 11.1 57 B 

82 AlaP pf 9JKJ 11J 180= 80Vs 

B6 70 AlaP pf 964 11J 10=63* 

75 59% AlaP pf 8J8 118 100:70 


26% 12% AlskAIr .16 0 7 1708 19% 

25 12% Albrtas J8 18 17 11 23% 

33V. 2«% Albttns J6 25 12 82 30 

31V. 23V. Alcan 100 5.1 45 4210 2«k 

33* 27% AlcoSId 1JD 38 12 46 33% 

32 2] AlexAJx IJO 15 278 28% 

30 20% Atoxdr 25 24 3 

891k 72V. AllgCp lJ4t 1.9 6 80 

28V. 20% Alalrn 1.40 SJ 176 26% 

20% 16% Alglnpt 2.19 11 J 5 18% 

98 05% Alai PFCI1J5 118 3 95 

34% 28% AllflPw 270 98 9 763 30% 

24 16% AllenG 80b 28 15 198 ZJ-'i 

23U 15% AffdPd II 23 17% 

45 42 Aktsgnn 9 2508 43% 

63 58% AWSptC 674 11J 50 50 

111 105% AJdSpfCTXM 11J 5 107"* 

61 47% AlldStr 200 17 8 1707 M 

9% 3% AlllsOi 73 4% 

34% 24 AllsCPt 1 29% 

2Wi 2TU ALLTL 180 68 9 25 28% 

38% 30 ALLTpf 2.06 58 1 37% 


57 54 1% 

27 13 31% 

1.1 57 8 

1J 100= 80* 

17 10=03% 

18 100= 70 

0 7 1788 19% 

16 17 II 23* 

28 12 82 30 


Zfffc. 20* Alalnt 1.40 57 
20% 16% Alain Pf Z19 117 
98 OS’* Alnl pfC II J5 118 
34% 28% AllflPw 270 98 


39% 29% Alena 
19% 11% Antcu 
38% 29V. 

34 22% 

140% 90% 

2% 1% 

25% 10 
70 53*. 

30% 25% 

70% 54% 

117% 56% 

30% 20% 

28% 20% 

60% 47% 

25% 22% 

52% 42 
114% 103 
20% 17% 

30% 25% 

11 5% 

- 57% 44% 

27% 18% 

24% 19% 

49% 3414 
26% 14 
36% 23% 

16 8 
71% 47% 

36% a 
13% 7% 

66% 48 
48% 26% 

97% 73 
91% 62 
151 114 
28% 16 
4% 2% 

29 13% 

13% 5 
18% 12% 

15% 11% 

78 46% 

58% 51 


170 37 30 1163 33% 
.UH 479 11% 

100 107 2 38 

1.10 38 25 4570 30% 
150 27 1 129 

in 1% 

10 43 25 

190 6.9 0 4S3 574. 

275 97 788 29% 

287 48 6 58% 

180 18 70 192117% 
86 37 14 23 2414 

84 25 13 359 25% 
250 57 10 190 55% 

280 118 8 24% 

370 67 3 48% 

1375 127 10 111% 

270 109 25 20% 

25te 97 11 26% 

30 34 5% 

170 38 14 3761 50% 
72 37 Z7 479 27% 
276O107 9 725 21% 

176 12 14 3912 43% 
88 17 15 374 25% 

170 37 9 1399 31% 





160 

12* 

12% 

204 

61 


67 

64 

63* 

IJO 

15 

10 

4 

34% 

33* 




7 

9* 

9* 

200 

52 

11 

3412 

55% 

55 

1.12 

24 

16 

8571 

47* 

47% 

660 

70 

9 

324 

91 

90* 

44 

5 

23 

709 

90 

89* 


585 19 49149% 

72 18 10 1800 19% 

70 11 6 121 16% 

11 115 TU 

Z19 148 32 15 

80 67 9 67 12% 12 


15% + V. 
39V.— % 
23% + % 
24V. +% 
10% 

36% + % 

11 % + U 
XVt — % 
56%—% 
22% — 14 
11 % + % 
TV. — *4 
17% 

18% — % 
M* + U 
24% — % 
8% + % 
15% — V. 
47% + Vi 
56% + % 
35% — % 
2% + % 
5<»— % 
21% — % 
1 % + % 
30%— % 
7%— % 
80% 
S3*— 1 
70 —1% 
18% — 1% 
23% 

29% — % 
23% — % 
334k— Vi 
20 %— % 
27%— % 
79%—% 
26% 

18% + Vi 
95 

30%— % 
23%— % 
16%— 40 
42% — % 
59% + % 
107%— % 
59% — 1% 
4% 

29% 

28% — % 
37U— % 
32% + % 

mo— % 

30 — % 
30% +1 
129 +3 

>% 

24% — % 
56% — % 
29% — % 
SB% — 'A 
117% + % 
23% — % 
25% 

55% + Vi 
24% — % 

48V. — V.. 
111% + %, 

26% + %> 
5%— It 
50%— 5* 
27% +1 
21% ! 
43% — % 
24% — % 
31 16— % 


149% + 4. 
18%— ■ % 

16% + % 
7% — % 
15 + % 

12 


22% uu. EnrnkPf 271 127 
30% 25% Eqmkpt 
50% 32 EotRes 172 XI 
17 8% EmJMc .16 18 

14 % to£ Erbmrtf to 27 
24% 13% Ess Bra 84 27 


00 M"5 JSifc iSS-T 4 «n«M Honda 


731 57% 56% 56%—' 1% 


Me* CTv. THL PE 


Un ued Press fntematUruJ tially quick rewards rather than stocks that are ££ ^ |2gE 

MFW YORK — PricK nn the New York sensei: to economic and monetary trends. ** H 

- NEW YORK. — H«xs o nline N ew Tora Jack SulUvan of Van Kasper & Co. in San H% ii% 

Stock Exchange closed lower Fnday in moder- p ranc j 5co weaker earnings reports by 1% 1% 

etosed -j-p, o< "h^is!!^ ffisrusr 

T.Silr nijSS^iniKcarnre declined The takeovw and leveraged buyout situations, has 2% 3* fmcp» 
10836. Standard & Poor’s-500 stock index de- ; c th.t ,h. 

“’s 7Ji "• **• 01 ■ * siJthSS & 

among ihe 1,99 issu« tradra. , Texas Oil & Gas was the most active NYSE- «% 31 % fwoco 

Big Board vahuuefeU to 101.8 milbon snares . . , ■ ,, ,»» nn a <Toe S2V “ 31U * f^exp 

fnw. Ill 1 mnlinn nn UStOd ISSUe, lOSlDg K tO IoTL TCXES UU & CiaS 4SYj 31% FdHmO 

Usucs oa rnd U.S. S Ml nn.ounc «l Frid J y dm |hqr « ft. ggj 

all 1 1 5 «phnnu« and nvw Hip. mitntpr at 4 “gaged in discussions concerning a possible “ f^pb 


24% 15 EsexG* 70 37 14 90 1H 18% 19% + % 42% 31% HnflhM M a 11 6 37% 37% 37% — Vi 19% IRi MonrCS -11 

28 15 Estrtrw 72 48 21 17 16% 16% 16Si— % mZ HouFob 88 37 12 363 14% 13% 14% + % «Uk 30% MtrHon 328 fj 

25% 13% Ethyl 6 80 28 13 Ig 23% 22% 23 - % jm h££h5 181 47 » IK 31 38% 38% + % «% 44% MfrHpf 6.13*11.4 


wumu v cwp cngv 

.uw jeu. 46 49% +2 

» m% iS* IS? , 

% * 3 T- 

o u a* + s 

68 12% me t^e — % 
66 17% 17% 17% . 


25% 13% Ethyl! 80 28 13 143 23% 

6 1% vIEvonP 103 1% 

9% 1% WEvimpf 54 79k 

12% 2% vIEvn pfB 3 3 

43% 33% ExC«k> 172 42 10 126 40% 

I7Vk 74% Exceisr 186*107 27 17 

54% 41 Exxon 380 68 9 3386 53% 


■% „ 58% 47M Holntpf 270 47 

1»— J* 81% 67% Hornf pf 675 7S 
1 — 'ft 29% 28% Houlnd 284 98 


172 42 10 126 40% 40% 40% + 14 .a ■ UquOR 174el8.1 
’"•’K »% 14% VSXtO> 80 28 29 

X«l *8 9 3386 53% 55% 53% + % 22% 23% Hubbrd 27S ,j 11 


1 16% 16% 16%—% 5 3.. Man* 


” 6.13rtl8 1! Sm SS SS + * 

pf 5830KL9 _ 26 49* 4 g*_ 


26 49*. 4»* ^ 

m imiflj 

ITS 35% 34% 35% + % 

A ^ ^ . 


13% 9% Huffy 
15% 12 HuohTi 




glass is half-full rather than half-empty," Mr. 27 isvk 
Sullivan said. “The perception is changing to a 15% 

1_«_ I.. I 11 IU. 


23 20% FPL GO 1 

13% 9% PobCtr 
13% 10 Focet 
20% 8% Folrchd _ 
39% 23% Fcrircpf 380 
16% 71% Failed .18 
"" FcmDls JD 


38 ST 133 64 
XB 1 79 


63% 63% | 

79 79 — %1 


7716 HusASp JB 18 12 


36% ZiWHumoi 

31% 20% HUOtMf 


86 28 13 830 2B% 21 28 — %| 11% « MortC 


41% 26% HuttEF 


JB 34) 21 37 916 9% 9% 

0 41 llVh 11% 11% 

JO 15 <71 «M in 10% — % 

L80 111 107 30 29% 29% + W 

.1* 18 V 4 11% 11% 11*— til 


19% Hydro! ZOO 


.50 IT 77 10 29% 29V4 29%— % 17* 13% M orfcpf 

80 28 11 485 33% 33 33 — % 100 70 Morrtot 

UOO 63 11 38 31% 31% 31% + % 75% 50% MnhM 


from 123.1 million on Thursday. r“Ti , 

Composite vrdume of NYSE-listed issues on 
all U.S. exchanges and over the counter at 4 “<=r=f 
PJF1 EDT totaled 116.4 million shares com- 
pared with 142.7 milli on on Thursday. 

IBM cased to 128, but weakness in General 
Motors was even more pronounced. The auto- ?". nc 
maker’s stock fell 1 to 645k, setting a 52-week 
low for the second consecutive session. Westir 

“The market’s leadership is terribly frag- bide n 
men ted,” said Eugene Ferom Jr„ chief technical p on 
analyst at Bateman Eichler, Hill Richards in ^min 
Los Angeles. persh; 

High-technology stocks, which showed some Brothe 
strength Tuesday and Wednesday, succumbed on Foi 
to selling pressure Thursday and Friday, he “selL" 
noted. Higl 

Mr. Peroni said that investors remain very analys 
nervous about prospects for an economic reviv- from 
al by early next year. As a result, they have a droppn 
stronger appetite for issues that promise poten- and Ci 


27 15% FnmDIC JB IT 27 868 2U% 19% 2B% + % mi U% CM* % T» 

19% 13% FamtaJ 80 48 11 13 13% 13% 13% 1«£ ,2 a? 

28% 15% Fan* U 41 I Z7 18% 78% 1E% •» jK CNpf 270 96 

8% FayOrs J0 2T 20 SB S% M 0% TOVklS IN Ain L92 11J 

&SSE* ,-SI 0 A ,5 V. ££ u. ttv, ji% ipnmn ixm as 

^ FedlCo 144 O 10 4 £% C% «%— % 17% 14% IRTPrs L5D 98 

31% FedEx** ® 1784 076 46% g + % 34% 25% ITT Co ?i» Z3 

48% 31% FdHm pf 184g 48 10 33 33 33 — % uu ro ITT pfK 400 6.1 

39 30% FdMOfl 140 48 10- 7 34% 34% 34% TT PfO 5JB 7J 

22% 14 FedNM .MS 1354 29% 189a 1B%— 1% 4B% 35% TT pfl4 2J5 48 

25 16% FedIPS JO 40 17 87 18 17% 17%—% S TTpfl 67 

5^ SJ HlHu U Su. S s -» lkii# laJF 80 sj 

25 13% Fed RIt 156 68 14 73 24% 24 24 — % 24% 18 JdahoP % U7 *3 

19% 13% FdSonl 80 45 13 S3 17% 17% 17% + % 77 5 J dlrcJB 


184 4.1 IS 1217 35% 35% 35% + 1* 
J8a 58 _ 57 15% U 15% 


11% 8% MarfcC M 27 
17% 13% Marts Pf UB 78 „ 
OS 70 Marrlof M 8 M 

9K8t«S.«i t * 
M AfiSff 

10% Mass/Kr J* 78 79 
3% 1% MaguyF 


HR* 10% 10%— %1 30% 22% MaeCp 100 105 


22% 14 FedNM .16 5 1354 29% IS?* 1B%— 1% «% 35% TT pfN 

25 16% FedIPS JO 40 17 87 18 17% 77% — % S TTpfl 

- .. . - , j - ED% 25% FPappf Z31 88 7 7 27 27 Z7 — % iiwfc U lnT _ _ 

business combination. U5. Sted dropped 1 to x i» Fedwt ia ui< ra »% u w — % xi% ib u%m>i 

28 in active trading. P ^ a| || \\ g 27 5 % IS zm 118 6 £S~ 

Public Service Co. of New Mexico was the g ?3 % 8 >» 3% 3S ^!=g g* ^ MS IS \IZ »l»H»nsb- 

second most active issue, adding H to 28ft. U.S. ^ SftgS^iffnA " w S& g KSfiSiij 

Sted was third. 37% 2m* nnc^pf iaseioj a b% ni* 33% 37 % » itpowS 400 iu 

Among blue chips. AT&T lost % to 204i 23% ss% Fir*Fdn 4m 28% 27% AS + % 25v£ fro* liwcnm 2lu* to 

Wotin^ouse added ft to 4IK and Union Car- {& » U f IS + S g% & » * w 

bide rose to 6014. ^ ^ g iS % SS 3 3% + % ™ g «S ?S 

Ford lost £ ^ 45^It reported third-qi^ter 2^ F*»t* i| zo . m gt SR"* *S* SR JJSBSffJS ?13 

earnmgs of $1.70 a share compared with S2.05 ”Sii!i?2u.S&±E Sro w itSim* zx iij 

per share in last year’s third quarter. A Salomon ^ « i ^ + w ^ !SJ 

Brothers analyst lowered his recommendation «£ Ftcit? PfiS4 * MJ 7 st *** ^ 3 ™ l “ * «u « 

on Ford and General Motors from “neutral” to »% igv ff*ja= , 41*25 a 473 25 


4 Z7% Z7% 27% 12% 1(H» MnUoc 

25 17% 17% 17% — % 65% 4S% MotniE 
22 21% 22 + % 17% 9% MafM 

15% 16 + Vk 13% 6% MaM Wt 

35% 35 3S%— fi 

65% 65% 65% 

8 64% 64 64 


28% 2B%— Ui 
5% 5%— %l 


'*"* s J 


imUMpf 7. 
ladIMnf 7. 


*seR»aB=R 5RR $sg£ A sr 9 i* Mhhhi s 

^SRSttSftZHRR ASSBfijS “ 

^ “SR SS5S* ’S. 1 ® S = a 

25V» U lfi 2VQ Hit 33 33V*— JJ 

Mi «SS<r X 18 79 * w% w% Ml*- » 

3% 1% *te*ryF _ 4» 2% 1% »- J* 

30% 22% MaeCp 100 105 IP* ?HS X 

101*9 ftYitify it? iu 23 HVi 11V 11^— Ji 

40% JSSSi Sr i » * S S?- % 

17% « Mattel 1* K» «* 

13% nfc MaMwt jn w ^tS 

1546 11% Hmam 4 IS £ 12% }3f» + J* 

60% 37% May LIS tr 188 13 11 m Sn SS% 

63% 43 Mavis 2J0 45 12 394 64% « g%— £ 

300 48% 48% 48% + % 31% 21 McOrpf 2JQ 9J 317 ?&} “■ 

9 67 66% 66%—% 35% 3M MeDrpf 280 102 « S 1 SJ 4 

351 11% im 11% + % 30% 16% JMcDfllf UJtU ?S *Si 1 6 • A 

243 21 29% 2B%— % 9% 2% JMdtXI wt „ 10 3% 2% M + % AT 

54k 5% 5%—% 7 oE WAVDU JO 17 15 • 9% TO **— *S 

Zl% 22% 23% 70 50 McDnld JO 18 14 1334 65% 6*% 65 —% 

17% 17% 17%—% 87 64 McOnD Ut 21 7 2MO 67% *6%—™ 

34% S2 37% McGrH 180 12 15 3130 « 4^ 44%—%. 

54 39% 25% Mdalfl 1 27% 27% 27% 

908227% 37% 37% — % 50 37 McKOta 280 5J O 200 48% 47% 47% — % 

‘ “ w, ?% W » McLean 13 7B 8% 8% BM + 

4% ^gga-%, w + 

.era .-9.-~.a6H I5%sax ’S SS ’gff^StSSrR 
»» SSSSS 80 S oiiftg g"-% 

IM 1M I 56% 4T% IMhn 288 .58 .7 + 5 


UJ 1LD 3330=34% 33 34% 52 37% 

JQ 108 1 54 54 54 39% 2541 

187 IU 908x 37% 37% 37% — % 50 37 

LOO 118 4 35 34% 35 +1 , 5 m 

J3 18 13 7 29% 29% 29% + % *5* S 

Lite £5 8 3884 37% 36% 36% — % -£j ** 

9 67D 7% 7% 7%— % SS 

S 1J 5795 11% 10% 10%— % 5JS icu 
11 J mu 99% 9% 99% -I- % ST! Sit. 
J6 U8 
LOO 113 


15 7% McLean 

6% 1% McCoawl 


29% 12% FF*dA= 80b 15 8 473 28 
60 43% FFB 1U U I 30 54% 

55% 38% Flnttfe ISO £2 7 US 49% 

34% 25% Flntst pf 237 73 16 30% 

11% 7% FIMtas J4 3J 11 597 7% 

3M* 16 FtNatnn ■ 5 30% 


Q Month 
High Low Stock 


Sis. Ckne 

10S> Hhjh Low Boot. Oi'oo 


28 18% Brcfcwv 132 45 13 74 27% 27 27% -f % 8% 4% ConsPw 

41 33% BkvUC 112 75 0 18 40% 40 40 — % 33% 19»A CnP pfB 450 1SJ 

76 20% BkUGpf 287 95 7 24% 26 24 + % 54% 32% CnP PfD 785 148 

37V. 30% BkUGpf 195 11.1 6 3S% 35% 35% 56 32% CnP pfG 7J6 148 

26V. 15 BwnSb JO J 9 3 23% 23% 23% 31% 15% CnPprV 440 154 

32% 25 BrwnGp 136 45 19 158 30 29% 30 +% 25% 14 CnP prU X60 15J 

56 33% BrwnF UH Z1 17 242 51% 50% 50%- Vk 28% 14% CnPprT 3JI 149 

40Ai 28V. Brnswk 1JJ0 Z7 fl 1076 37% 36% 37 4- Vi 28% 14% CnP prR 400 154 


High-tech issues declined. A Paine Webber u% 7 % fimus 34 32 11 597 7% 
analyst cut his 1986 earnings estimate for IBM ^ ££££" " B 36? T 4 

from S10.SO to JI040. Dipul EqmpmM » g» « „ <g £i St=S 

tcU,a54 * SJ !«i fftn? ,3 H '! b“S?{» 

and Cray Research lost 1 >2 to 52. 41 23% nsetro un 40 i* 25% 25 2s 

J 13 8% FWiFd Jt5* 8171 37 12 11% 12 

43 26% F1tFnG«l84 3J 8 251 37% 37% 37% + Vk 

28% 17% Fleet En 84 23 9 279 19 18% 18% + % 

12 Month 96. Clou 77% 31% Flomns 1.00 Z7 13 170 37V. 36% 36% — V* 

tfeftLOw SMCk Olv.YW. PE TOb High Low QuoLOite 13% lift FlOJdfrf U1 11? 10 1JPU 12% J2%— % 

29% 20 FTgWSf* .16 3 17 100 23% 23% 23% 


« w m. SS i w 20% 16 LndIMpf 235 111 

S ??£ fS2! ?S6 + * 30% 26% IWllMpf 383 125 

S* I”* „ 26 21% IndlMpf 275 105 . 

2™ ^ 28% 21% IrxBGs* 234 73 8 24 2gk 25% 25% — % 

2^ ** + £ 7% 4% Irraxco J7| 245 5% 5% 5% 

?5w. 2SS Si - 5 53% 39% InoerR Z6B 5J 15 139 50% 49% 49% — % 

3 7% 3016 InoRpf Z35 68 2 36% 36% 36% . 

“5 49% « 15% 11 IngrTcc 54 38 24 18 14% 14% 14% 4- % 

16 »U 30 30 — ^ 26 19% InJdStl 3U 1687 

7%— % 4816 38% InldStpf 4» 11.1 10 


30 — Vk 
7% — % I 


%Vns s i£“^ S i i it 1 2=i 

s a gg • 

-R6«es*^ w 8 
SRSRIS^ft i^S 15 'ISSSSS-'ClSu.is. 745 §,FJ T + * 

W* 13 !*2S«c + sZZEZb JteUS 7 te 5% 5% 5% Z ' 

“. 125 ia K IS 4% a So j%- 3%— % 

43V. 38% InldStpf 4J5 11.1 10 42% 42% 42% + ra .-ly. tgu. MIF ofG 7J8 "r 2S0QZ 41 if. «u m 

6\% J9% IrnpRs 306 44 m 4ft ift o iomo TH jfl|U| ttf 

»% 11% IntoRK S 2^- * 21% 17% MKiTri 256*28 . ? 


ray Research lost I Vi to 52_ 


38’ A, ^ A. „ 6% 3% 

160 27% 26% 26% — Vk wu 11 ah 

O 2B% 28 28% — % a o 
59 25% 24% 25% + % ge. 25% 
in M g*. 34 +16 i^7% 

16 25% 25 25 9% 9% 

3? 12 11% 12 „ 14% 8 


Hi? t £ I 19% 17 


26% 11% IntsRsc 
21 19 InigRlK 303 118 

35% 25% IntpRpf 4JS 128 
9% 7% IrrUoen 

9% 9% Inti oo pf ISO 15* 
14% 0 IntRFn 


133 21% Z1 
S3 26% 26 


4 33% 33% 33% — % 
8 1423 8% »k 8% 

901 9% 9% 9% 

17 9% 9% 9% 

6B 19% 19% 19% 


l*Mr MKrJMdiER L® Al « 
7% 4% Midi by J6 18 38 


m- S%— lb 

61% 61% 61% +2 
64% 63 64% + % 

tU 2% 2% 

21 21 21 — % 


1516 8% MuSut U3t 4 

20V. 15% MbfRco 1 JB AS 
32% 25% MWE 276 92 11 
1516 10% MlttnR 84 48 22 


13 Month 
KWlLOw SlOCk 


27% + % 8% 4% CnnkFw 

40 — % 33% 19*6 CnP PfB 450 15J 

26 + % 54% 32'8 CnP pfD 785 148 

35V: 56 32 Vi CnP PfG 7J6 148 

23VS 31% 15% CnPprV 480 158 


9k. Cloie 

WB» High Law OuaL Chile 


484 6% 6% 6% — Hi 
740x 31 30 30 -1 


1??} + $ 73% 56% Interco 2JB 48 12 544 64% 64% 64% + % 


280= 51 51 51 + % 

3S0XS2V* 52V: 52V. 

15 28% 28 V: 23 V— V* 
24 23% 23% Z3% + % 


35 15V, Float PI 

45% 31% Fla EC 


+ % 29% 22% FtaPTfl 2,16 7J 


u ’S iS£ tZVs 9 Intrfsf 

„ ,iS ]St~ “ 53% 41 Irtfrik 

II IS Sii „ 12% 8% Intmed 

’8 1® 31% 31% 3U6— f, 24V, 15% MAlll 
1? J>S» 30*- «* 13816116 IBM 


T7% 17% r7!6 + % 

18 38 277 4% 4% 4% + % 

45 10 4620 54% SZ» 52%—% 


40% 29V. BrShWl 52 1J7 14 

20 16% Bunkrtf Z16 IU 

20% 14 V. BurtnCt 11 

301>k 24% Burtlnd 154 56 

68 V: 45 BrlNta 1.40 2J 8 

7% 6% BrlNOPf 55 7.1 
23% 19% BrIN pf Z12 9J 
52 46% BrIN pf ilOe 95 „ 

18V. 9% Bumdv 84 4JJ 39 


Burrflfi 260 4J 11 1056 55% 54V: 54% —1 


180 5J 10 377 30% 29% 30% + 1% 
84 1.1 11 266 60% 60 60% + Vk 


68 52 Burrflh 240 

20% 11 Butlrln J H 
5% Vk Buttes 
13% 2 Vk Butts Pf IjOSI 


176 37% 36% 37 + V« 28% 14V: CnP prR 4.00 158 

93 3016 30 30% — % 2B16 14% CnPprP 198 158 

3 18% 18% 10%— % 28% 14% CnPprN 185 15J 

8 15% 75% 15% 18% 10% CnP DTM 3_50 152 

398 29% 39 Wk 17 9*A CnPprL 123 14.7 

345 63% 63% 63% — % 29 15% CnPprS 4J2 152 

34 7% 7% 7%— % 18 10% CnP PTK 143 15J 
1 23% 23% 23%+ % 47% 3115 CittICP ItO Al 
256 51% 51% 57% — Vo 10% 4% Conllll 
238 11% 10% 11 4U. % Contlt rt 

86 55% S4Vk 54%— 1 52% 33 Cntlllpf 


52V. I 18% 11% FtaStl 80 28 □ 
6% 3% FhwGon 

M in 24M zew t w i A 14% Flower 86 14 17 
15 25% 24% 25% + % I 20% 14% Fluor, M 7J „ 


334 27% Z7V. 27% 


2916 16Vi IntOri 


247 9% 

72 42 I 11 17 
480 38 13 7747 138% 
80 U 9 475 24 


9% 9% 9% + tfc 
15% 15% 15V. 

ftnSRftb-Vr 
3RSRS S=R 


5 26% 26 36 — % 59 47% FootaC 120 Al 11 136 54% 54 54 — 

14 26 25% 25% — % 51% 40M. FordM 180 6J 310171 44 45>A 45% — 

7 2515 25% 25'i- % 13% 10% FKteor U6 107 56 12% 12% 17% 


■31 ’S ^ + * 34Vk 25 IntFtov LI2 38 18 211 

3® ,S* 11% 6% IntHarv 1974 

,2 J5 1% ^ 7Vk 3% IntHrwJ 

$5 15? li* J* „ <0 TO IntH ptC 

136 54% 54 54 — % 47 23 IntH PfA 

”71 « 45%- » S% 19 |Sh Sm . . 


12 16% 16V. 16%— % S5Vi 54 
II 15% 15% 15% — % 4H6 41 


13% 10% FtDtor 136 107 56 12% 12% 12% I At 34 intMln 260 Af 11 239 3B% 37% 37% + %1 ST 17 -n 

05W 54V, RHMd 1J4 2J 18 5™ *0? *** t S I W% 31V, intMnpf 4J0 IU . 1 * I ■ . +1 I ?SS ?« ?SL o? 13 


80 if 11 2409 10% 9% 18% + % if" jSS MMM Sfl ij 5 tw 

280 58 8 _16 47 . 46% 404-% JSSl ZM M 8 B 

*" + ** W% 2% MImlns • 33X1 

,2 _ 1 A HU&L ■ ■ ■ 593 

» — S 34% 25% MobB 228 7.1 14 (114 

£ j-% ^ V5 WMabiH . 40 

33 + % u Muira n a 

s «“ a ^ u " a » « + » 

’!2-S»^r|SJtKSKS. , S' a g is :&a 

260 AS 11 tS 38% 37% 5%+% gj tS*fc 2J8 % n W te% §»£»-«- 


5% 5%— % 

SSJZ&S-* 

1% Mh 1% + % 


1 26% „ 

2 21% 31 


438 Al 81 

ABO IU 27 

120 59 1318695 

384 92 487 


81 73 71 

27 5B% 58% 


2*S 

27% 17 
69% 44% 

28% 14 
72% 61% 

W% 

44% 26% Ameron 180 3J I 

50 24% AmgsD JO 8 21 

23% 22% AmoOwi 

29% 19% Amotek *0 38 15 

28% 18% Anrfac 

16 4 Amfosc 


374 98 
1.00 17 8 

183 Z1 
220 13* 7 
584 8J 


71 72 + % 

58% 58% + % 
20% 2D%— V. 
39% 39% 


71 27% 27 27 — % 

BOX 69% 6916 6916 +T4 

,0 7 68% if* « - % 

- ™ l|% 12% + % 


S%-% 


12% 12% 

80% 80% 

22% 22% 
23% 22% 
22* 22% 
4% 


l» 


:lu 


80 11 
3*0 27 19 

280 46 37 
275 U 
410 7.9 


39 1416 14 14 — * 

63 1% 1% 1% 

5 3% 2% 2%— 16 


748 19% 19<A 1916— % 


4U. % Cantll rt 

5216 33 Cntlll pf 
% 0/1 HM 
11% 4 Cntlnfo 

24% 20% ContTel 1*0 77 
38% 15% CtOota 72 41 

40% 32% CnDtPf 450 113 
1% % vlCoafcU 


52 1 26% 26% 26% 

50 10 16% 1616 1616- 16 

Al 20 328 42% 42% 42% + % 

14 82 7% 7% 7%— Vk 

474 2% 1% 2 

15 52% 

399 » 

8 24 IB* 1 

77 8 479 23% 

41 638 17% .„ .... 

13 200= 33* 33 33% + % 

16 1% 1 1 — % 


10 % 


15% 10% FcstWTi 84 19 11 360 11% 11% 11% 

13% 7% Fax Phot A 58 12 10 12% 12% 12% 

33% 24% Foxhro 1*4 41 74 143 25% 25% 2K6 

27 22 F martyr 14 105 23% 22% 22% 

22% 18% FMEPll 1.10e S* 54 18* 1 
13% 9% FMGCn 130 173 10% 1 

10% B% FMOG 2*4*207 5 IBM 10% .. . . 

22% 14% FrptMc 80 11 11 349 1916 19 19% 

32* 22 Frtorm 80 21 36 371 20% 27% S 

28% 21% Frughf J0 21 6 641 22% 22% 22% 


42* + %] 43% 24% IntMutt 176 48 11 146 39 38 


57% 44V6 IrtPopr 280 52 


19% 15% MoaSI 
1 UFA 7% MONY 


UOa 95 

JRIN 


fl !S ^ ^ | 5A IntNrm 288 57 10 31 C% 4^6 + % ^ «% ModTpf 250 95 U 

> SBBB’: , a8S%!aw , a« n 3 s^s% , s% +5 ^^^H 




8% Mk + % jit 


n« 110% no*— 3% 4116 3116 COOPI pf Z90 7J 


153 41 15 BM 38% 37% 37%—% 


% 23% 32* 22 FrtuTrn 80 Z1 

16 17% + % 2846 21% Fruahf 70 11 

33* + % 32% 26% FniMpf 2*0 7J 

1 — % 36% 28 Fuqua 80 U 


30 4% 416 4% 

613 57% 56* 57 — % 
56 31% 304k 31% 

106 51% 514k 51% 

3 1% 1% 1%— % 

ISalL $: a 

“SSSS.S.7K 


20* 14% CoprTr 


Coopvls 80 18 16 1227 24% 24 


472 40% 39% 39% — % j 

59 16% 16% 16% + Hi ! 


70)6 50% Amoco 3L30b 48 9 2230 69 
37* 27% AMP 72 23 27 1369 31% 

22* 11% Amoco JO 23 15 372 12* 

23* 12% Am rep 5 li 18 22% 

36 22* AmStn 180 35 9 31 36 

45% 30 Amstad 180 35 15 182 4146 

4% 1% Anaemp 205 ^ 

24% 16% Moo 21 166 20% 

27% 19% Anchor 188 55 32 25 

46% 31* AnOav 132 19 33 47 44* 

13% 9% AndrGr J4 1* 16 4 13% 

27% 17 Anagfic 80 28 14 17 25% 

39% 23% AlihaiSS *0 13 13 4468 36% 

7B 51% AnlWUDf 380 49 167 73% 

19% 13% AnJxtr JB 17 18 14 17% 

1646 9% Anthem *4 J 24 219 13% 

15% 10* Antlmv 84b 11 ■ 85 14 


15% 10* Antlmv 84b 11 

12% 9% Apache J8 28 

2 % AochP wt 

19* 15% ApchP unZlO 11 J 

34% 30 ApPwM 418 133 


4% + * 
68*— % 

?bS 

22% + % 
36 +% 

41% + % 
3 

20% + * 
24* 

44* + % 

13% 

25% + % 
35*— * 
72% + % 
16% + * 
12 *— % 
U 

'V* 

UFA + Vk 

_ 31%—* 

31% 27% A pPwpf 3J0 127 3 30 2946 30 + U 

39% 15% ApIDta 1761 93 33 271 19% IBM 19 — % 

15% 8% AppIMg 28 S3 13 12* 13 + % 

244k 16% ArdlDn ,14b 8 12 1435 21* 21* 2146— % 

S % 26% ArIPpf 358 IU 15 30% 30% 30% — % 

% 82 ArIPpf 1DJ0 105 40X181% 101% 101%— % 

25% 14 ArkBst 80 28 9 160 25* 25% 25%— % 

24% 76 Arklo 1*8 514 26 2241 20% 79* 20 + * 

% % ArinCn 65 S — 

II* 64k Armen M2 B% a* 816 + % 

22% 15% Armed Z10 IU 24 19 18% 19 + 4fc 

24% 13% ArmsRb 88 38 8 662 14W M 14 — * 

3m 28% Arm Win IJO 37 9 386 36% 34% 35%— 1% 
38 29% ArmWpf 375 95 200z 38 37 38 + % 

34% 23U AtdCp 7.20 35 12 Ml 34* 34% 34% + % 

1816 11% ArowE JO 17 14 46 1146 114k 17% 

30% 76 Artro .23 1JJ131 18x22% 22 22%—% 

27 16% Arvtns JO 30 9 299 26% 26% 26% 

2746 16% Asorco „ 212 17% 16* 17% 

37 23% AaWOll 180 47 8 1379 34% 33* 34% 

45* 37% AshlOpf 4J0 95 1 «k 45% 45% - 


24 11 137 12 

167 1 

1J 217 18% 

33 54 31% 

27 3 30 


8% Apt* Ms 28 53 13 

16% ArcflDn ,14b 8 12 1435 21* 


PC I nt 230 45 16 1334 49% 49 49 

Ntl 150 5J 10 49 25* 25% 25* 

I1MI 226*11 J 79X 20% 20% 20% 

1.16 45 9 1640 26% 25% 2S% 

““ « 

■" M b ^ ® sa 

I Fed 88 23 4 384 20* 20% 20% 

I8%cn!a p, *£b?3 IBS SS 

12 Carrtml .12 5 40 10 12* 1246 12* 

16% CRUC0 80 354 23 22* 22* 

46% 30* CamSpi 1JS T 29 14 344 43* 43% 0& 

15* 11% CdPocs 88 353 11* 11% 11% 

22% 16% CanPE fl JO 102 19% 19% 19% 

228% 151 CapCItS JO .1 18 342 194% 1B946 190% 
27% 19% capf-ld I 77 13 9 562 23% 23* 2316 
12% V Carina O A . 3 9 9 9 

40% 27% Carlisle 1*8 38 9 275 28% 28 28% 

26% 18% CoroFl 80 18 11 394 24% 24% 2444 

30% 22% CarPW 280 98 7 2145 27% 26% 27 

2646 21 CnrPpf 287 1(L8 15 25 24% 24% 

48 3446 CarTac Z10 55 13 31 35% 35* 35* 

11% 6% Corral iff III 11 23 7 6% 6* 

24% 77% Corpus JO ZS 10 218 ZS* 23% ZJ* 

31 22% CnrtHw 1J2 4J 10 1479 28% 28V. 28% 

44% 2494 Cartwl 80 18 12 261 43Vk 42% 42% 

18% 12% CascNG IJB 72 I 20 16% 16% 1646 

16% 9% CasHCk 536 13% 13 13 

29 1546 CsttCpf lJBfc 3 Z7 26* 27 

15% 12 CstICpf .90 55 149 15% 15 15% 

38% 28% CafrpT 50 18 479 34* 34* 34* 

2746 19% Ceen JO 11 10 62 25% 25% 25% 


.5% 8% Cow Id J2J 
2346 17* Cpwtdpt 288 14.1 
27% 17% Cardura 84 38 15 

1516 11 Corrtn 56 48 11 

574* 304k CamGs IJB 25 22 

49% 26V. COTBlfc 1*0 2* 

1016 5% CntCrd J4r 3* 13 

II 6 Cralo 13 


4 9% 9% 9% 

3 77% 17% 17%— Vk 

15 28 24% 24% 24% 

11 73 12 1146 1146—% 

22 2538 J2% 49% 5044 +716 . - 
226 5016 4846 SJ* +1% 44% 

13 183 8% 7% 8 + % | 2?% 

13 4 9% 9% 946 

11 88 36% 3»% 3616 + % 


41* 23% GAF JO J 12 
37% 27% GAT X 1 JO 42 13 

54^ GE1CO 180 73 11 
3 GEO 


„ 4316 32% InfpbGP IJB 27 U 

'SS“ £ ® 14% intBakr 13 

— - f*— J* 2244 75% IntstPw IX 98 9 

3J? 12? VL. II^T 5 22 10 InPwpf 22(11.1 

+ 13% 8* intSacn » 

“fl S? SS SS ^ 21% 16* Iowa El 150 * 5 10 

,12 Hi 52? £ 35 “ mug 274 18 7 

143 31* 3046 3046— % 37*, 27% IowdRs 3*8 9.4 B 

1 40 31% I pa Ico 3*4 88 9 

13% 94* IpcoCa J6 22 8 
■BU MU. 4. 16 40% 28 IrvBnk 156 5* 7 

3S fSZ t 53% 43% IrvBkPf 454* 9* 


tis j/u, kn. 1/ umi 01* mwfi T jmm mc m w 

^ ^ *55 J2 JS U 3t iwm »fi 

gjft jK jSaTg- . akussatfisg- 

3 2 1 ™. 1 5»L 1 £u. + * S«% 36% Morgas 23B 48 « 2M4 50% 49% 47*—% 
29% MorKnd 188 38 Bl 74 43% 49k 4316 .. 

” 21* 2m 21% + * 23% 18% (tons JO 4* 14 41 20% 28% 20* 

iS, k2fc SS % 21 w MfaRfy TJOeUU M l» 13% 1746 17% + % ^ 

^ *25 ^ " 38 25% Mortons 50 22 8 486 tn 32 32% — % 

m 1* m iw + * 39% 29% Motorta 84 .28 33 W3 32% 31 ft 37 — % 

“ 3Sffi HS-JSfci£ 26*15 MuaM 84 .82 10 300 17 J»S 17 + * 

S + * 14% »% Muraa* 22 20 14% 14* 14* 

3L. 5s S? 31% 23% MuraO TJO 22 u 1825 3Mb 31 - 3T* + * 




45 31* 31* 37* + * 
40 33 32* 32% 

254 34% 34% 34% 

42 III* 77% 71% 

752 40 38* 38*— 1 

5 5246 246 5246— % 


31% 23% MuraO TJO 22 U 1825 3Mb 

22% 14% AfapryO 80 XI 2 11 W* 

1446 IT* MutOm 184 JUS 12 13* 

7* 1* Mmt .48 


2546 23 JWT > 1.12 38 17 24 29* 29* 29* 36* CTk NBt 

37 23% JRtver JU 17 70 232 33* 33% 33* — * w* NH 

28% 16 Januwy .12 8 10 212 18* 18* 18* M% 17% NO 

13% 1046 JapnF 183el23 39 11* 11* 1Mb— % SS CK 

47% 3* JeffPII IS U 7 859 464k 46* 46* + % 04% N& 

33% 2516 JerCPf 4*0 125 20z 31 31 31 £2* 9* Hi 1 

77 60 JarCpf 9*4 128 3Qz 74% 74% 74%— Mb S? 77 Eh, 

102 81 JgrCpf 11*0 IQJ 4«ttwa% 100% 180% Rk % NVf 

164k 14% jirCpf ZU 1Z8 S 17* 17* 17*— % EXi 


21% 15* NAFCD 180 
36* 23% NBD» 180 


20* + * 39% 32 Crane 180b 48 11 88 36* 34% 

2S%— * 0% 23 CravRS 26 1815 53* 52 

2841— * 53% 49% CrckN nf Z43e il 1 52 52 

0* + tt » 18% CjttkjK UD JJ 12 7 27* 3 

25*— % 72* 4316 CrwnCk 13 2S 7116 70* 

14*— % 44* 28* CrwZel 180 Z5 291 -SO* 39* 

2D%— * 50% 44 CrZelpf 483 9J 7 47* 47% 

48% — * 65* 50* CfZel pfC450 75 137 59* 59* 

19% — % 35* 2216 Cuibro JO IS 15 144 32% 31% 

12* 33* 13 CullMtS 20 2189 15* 15% 

22* + * SBV, 5H54 CumEa 


73 3% 72** + * 88% 58(4 CumEfl ZJ0 38 4 

» » » 10% 9 Currlnc UOalOJ 

43% <3% C3% 38* 30* CurtW IJO 38 16 

JJ* IMk— * 52* 33% CYCfaPS 1.10 13 8 

P ^Sl 

3 9 9 9 — * 23% 15% Dallas _ M 4.7 70 


26 1815 53* 52 52 — 1% 

1 52 52 52 

72 7 27% 23 23% + % 

13 2S 7116 70* 70*— % 

291 40% 39* 40 +% 

7 4746 47% 47% — * 

137 59* 59* 59* 

15 144 32% 31% 3216 + * 

20 2189 15* 1S% 15* 

4 75 44* 44 44 

a 10V. 10* 18% + % 


39% 34% GTE pf 
24* 20% GTE pf 
7* 3 GalHou 
46% 43* Gannett 


_ Gannett 188 10 11 
20% Gap Inc JB 13 31 
7* Gaartit JD» 25 
Gelco _ J* 13 10 


14% Gelco J6 13 10 
9* Gem IIC 

- * | 12* 10 Gem 1 1 I 80* 38 

f 55* 31* GrvCon* ljob ZB 30 
+ * 10* 14* GAIiW 183# 9.1 

I 58% 31* GnBati 1J0 U II 
39% 22* GOnm JO 14 71 
38 22 GQn pf J6 18 _ 


& 


im m na ml ttu. 

39 11% 11* 1Mb — % 22 3] E 
859 46* 46* 46% + % w m3 


1P||= 


132 81 JerC pf 

IB* 14% JwCpf 
16* 4* Jewtcr 
49% 31% Jahaln 
46% 38* JohnOi 
27* 21* Joroen 


IU0 I0J 
ZU IZ4 
„ 24 

UO 21 15 

ISfSi 1 


7 ^ + “ 24* NCR 

9V * NLInd 

wZ 74fl MW 7411 rll vu Kill 

w vSk %NVF 
5 17tt l/ft l/fl ■ M OBLL Mil ||WA 
24 nn 15* 15* 15* + * 2£ „ ESSi 

WSs&BM 


UO 62 15 * 14* 16% 16% + Vk 

140 4.1 7 » 34* 34* 34%—* 

10 967 11 U* 11 +.* 

-72 38 13 31 3M 2016 20*— % 

19 S I 7787 39* 38* 38k— * 
JB . 28 11 4196 34% 33% 33*— 

JB IS IM 13*13*73% + % 
232 U I 1 2SM» 29% 29%+ K 

JO U 27 m 50* 48W 4(2— T* 
U0 UH 230 23% 22% 23% + * 1 
8 92 24% 34 24 

228 70 IS ’S SI ^ "% — * 

208 XT ™ »5 25$ + ft 

7 ' 225 35 34* 35 

5«. 3* 3* 3*+% 

J5 u - Mt 25* 2Mb 25% 

J2 28 W 330* 19* 19* 19* + % 

J 8* I* + * 
1J6 3L7 U m 29 28% 29 +.% 

„ » J« n% 11 nn — % "f 

600 8J »S» ffl » — * - 




5 33* 33% 33% — * 20% .7% GnData 


« — ft 26% 19 JosJen > JB 18 14 82 24* 24% 24*—% jS? mJ 

J? 27% 22* JovMfg 180 62 14 311 23 22*5 22% — % Z& JSfS 

SM + % I ? 1 » KS?” 


34 48* 48* 48* 


194 24* 24% 24* 

145 27% 26V. 27 + * 

IS 25 24* 24*— * 

31 35% 35% 35% — % 

23 7 6* 6* 


3 9 9 9 — % 23% 75% Dallas M 4.7 10 44 14% U 74% 

175 28* 28 28% + % 14% 9% DamanC JO 18 1«5 14% Wf. 13* 

194 24* 24% 24* 30* 2214 OonaCp IJB 58 7 1377 23 22% 22*— % 

8577*9*14 27 + V. I 9* 5* DandlT 8 233 B 7* 8 + % 

IS 6* Dcrdei .I8b 2J IBS B16 8% 8*4 + % 

40 26* DortKrs 154 40 12 1755 T» 38% 38*—% _ 

76 31 DatoGn 17 3781 40 39% 39%— * 85 BJ Mgr 78 

S% A Oafafn 274 5% Stt 514 + % 44% 14% GMtrE 33 .1 

11* 6* DtaDsg J4 3J 8 49 7% 7* 7*— % *** 33* GMotpf 275 98 

S61 43* 42* 42* I 22 14* Day co J4 18 9 81 17* 17 17% 

20 16* 16% 16* + * 45* 29* DaytHd J2 Z1 16 14*2 39% 38* 38*— * 


13% 10% GnDevn 
3% 2* GnDevwt 
84 61* GnDyn 1J0 18 7 

45* a Gen El 2J0 3J 11 
719* 53 GnFds 230 Z1 78 


I— * ■ 

:+ft S* 


J4 28 17 7892 9* 
Jle ZB 8 1787 IS* 


.... ... 13* 9* 4* GflHmb _ 7 27 

13 22% 22*-% 10V6 11* GHWfl JO 17 3 314 I . 

8 7* B + % 13% B% GnHom J4 28 22 10 10 

8* 8% 8*4 + % 23% 12* Gainst JS L7 540 15* 15 15% . Ml* 

n 38% 31*- * 65* 47* GnMIlte 2J4 15 . _692 63* 62* 63*— * 34% 

- - — - 85 65* GMot 5JX7r 73 611960 65% 44* 44*— I « 


7fS=ft 


119*— % 

10 

15% 


58* 46% GMotpf 5 l0Q 98 


830 39% »» 39% + 91 20* 
3 40 3Mb 39*— * $1% 
1 52* 52* 52*—* a* 


534 13* 13 
3 27 268 

149 15% 15 


13 — * 
27 + % 

15* 


20* 14% DcrvtPL ZOO 107 
46 52* DPLPf 771 1Z1 


621 18% 18* 18*— * IS* 10* GPU 


8* 3* GNC .16 38 74 151 4* 4* 4* + % I 74% 


92% 57 Gen Re 1J6 1J141 12*9 90 
14* 4 GnRefr 5 33 B 


B 1163 15* IS* 15* 


„ .... .. _.. , 40* 24* Dean Fd 54 18 18 17S 39* 38* 38*—* 14* 6 GnRefr 5MB 8 

479 34* 34* 34*— * 33% 24* Deere TJO Z9 38 429 25% 25* 2J* + * GrtSl anl IJO 48 II 4H 40 

42 25% 25* 25% + % 26* 20% DeImP 1.91 7.9 9 1B59 24* 23* 24* + Vk 13* 10* GTFIpf 135 10J 500= 12* IT 


<»% 89%-% 41* 


131* >4* Cekjnje 480 3J 11 151 U6* 126% 724% — % 52* 3Mb DettuAr IJO 14 6 3341 3W? 37* 38. — 1* 


10% 7* Ceng 


JWe 8 23 
2J8 55 9 


9* 9* 9* 


Centgx _ ... 

20* CenSoW 202 75 7 2501 25* 25% 25% 

31* 22* CenHucI Z 96 H8 6 114 26 . ZS* 25* 

21% 14% Cnl IPS 1.64 LB 10 303 1«4 18% IB* 

0* CnLnEl 108 73 7 289 27* 27 27— % 

1* CLaElpf 4.78 iu 3 35* 35* 35* + * 


43% — ft 44* 24* DtxOl.S 1J4 Z6 17 440 «* « 


8 * 8 % 8 % — % 


13* 10% GTFIpf 1J0 104 
A* 2* Genres 
19* 8 GnRad .10 10 


J5 1.1 10 186 23% 23% 23% + * I 28% 21 DenMfs 1J0 iS 12 113 H 21% 22 + * 26* 19 Genstg 1J0 4J 77 1M4 19 19 

102 75 7 2ST1 25* 25% 25% I 37* 31* DeSotn 180 4J 11 40 21* 32* 32* + * 1 34 28* GemiPt 1.18 X7 14 1834 31* 31* 31V, 

27* 20% GcPoc " ~ 


37* 31* DeSotn 7.40 4J II 
17* 14 OciEd IM 17.7 6 
SO 63% DetE pf 9J2 1Z5 
67* 53 DetE pf 788 71J 
65* 50% DetE Pi 785 120 


CeMPw 180 110106 139 12* 12% 12* + % 64* 5 DefE.Pf 7J6 12.1 


44* 35 ASftiOpf 3J6 9J 
38 24% AscTOGs 1.40 3J 


H4J0 9J 1 «b 45* 45*— * 

3J6 9 J 7 42* 42% 42% 

S 1.40 3J 12 299 35* 35* 35% — * 

I 140 U 11 8 20 19* 20 


23% IB* At h tone 180 BO 11 8 20 19* 3) 

29* 22* AtCvEI 2S8 9J10 179 27* 27* 27* + * 


45% 42 AH Rldl 400 6.1 
154*100* AtlRcpf Z80 10 
17* 10% AltosCn 
39% 18* Al»ot 80 1J 24 
54* 35% AutaDt JB U S 
5% 4% Avaton n 05e 10 9 
34* 17% AVEMC JO U 14 
39* 28* Averv JO u 14 
24* 10 Avion n 13 

38% 27 Avne) 00 1 J 22 


100 6.1 4185 45* 64* 65* +1 

LSO 10 2 155* 154% 155*— % 

16 11* 11% 11* + * 
80 1 J 24 39 23* 23% 23%—% 

J8 U 21 170 53* 53 53% 

05# 10 9 12 SJk 5 S - % 

JO 10 14 15 33* 33 33* + % 

JO 10 14 44 34* 33* 339b— * 

13 2S6 34* 24* 24* 

00 U 22 337 32% 31% 31*— 1% 


21* 14* CVtPS 1J0 9J 

11* 2% CentrOt 

12% B* GitrVTI 00 6 J 

23% 17% Cenvji 

28% 18% CrMged JO XI 
25* 19 Qunpln 02 28 
27* 22 dim I Pf TJO 5J 
54% 44* Oiml Pi 4J0 9J 


143x19% 19% 19% 26% 71^ OEpfF Z7S 105 

594 4* 4% 4%—% 23* 23 DE prR 3J4 1Z5 

156 12 II* 12 + % { 27* CT* OEpfO 3.73 123 

4 17* 17* 17* I 27% 22 DE efP 3.12 12J 

25* 21% DE PfB 275 107 


4 IT* 17* 17* zn* 

185 23 22* 22*— % 25* 2V 
3715 21* 20* 21* + * 29% 24 


54% 44* Out! I pf 4J0 
9* 7* OtamSa 80 

4% 1 viau-tc 

1* % vlChtwt 


SJ 2 23 22* 23 

9J 24 SO 49* 50 

50 14 433 8% 8 B — % 34* Oft DE PfK 4.12 130 

434 2* 2% 2 * + % 774% 705 DEpfJ 75JS 13J 

C S \ \ 98% 74% DetE Pf 9J2 100 

203 2* 2* 2% 


27% DE PfB 275 107 
29% 24 DEpIO 140 120 
29* 24% DE pfM 382 12J 
33% ffl OEprL <00 130 
34* 2£% DE PfK 4.12 130 


40 32* 32* 32* + % 

823 15* 75 75* 

390= 74% 74% 74% 

40Z 44% 44% 44% 

30Qz 62 43 42 

720= 42 60* 60*— 1 30% 25 

40 26% 24% 24% + * 37* Z7 

5 25* 25* 25* 

3S 25* 25% 25* 

2 25% 25 25 — Vk 

55 25* 25* 25* + * 

10 27% 27% 27% 


37% 33* Go Pep! 2j4 XI 
26% 23% GoPwpf 300 1X1 
30 55% GaPwpf Z30e R4 

30% 25* GoPwpf 384 TZ3 
37* 27 GaPwpf 376 1Z8 
23* 19 GaPwpf 204 11 J 
23% 75% GaPwpf 202 7Z3 
24% 22 GflPw pf Z75 700 
68% 554 GaPwpf 700 IZ4 
47% 55V. GaPwpf 7J2 122 


405 40* 40 40% + * 23 

508= 7Z% 12% 12% 45 

10= 12% 12% 1Z% 115 

44 3* 3 3* 20 

383 10* W% 10*— % 63* 

77 19* 19 19 — % 44 

834 31* 31% 31% 7% 

.00 33 87 1945 27* 21* 77* + * 26 


27 77* Avon 200 70 13 1«6 MJ M* 25*— % 

28* 16% A yd In 15 203 18% 18 IB 


4% 1% vICTtrtpf 203 2* 2* 2% 

63* 40% Chase 300 60 S 3723x56* 55* 56 — % 
54% Chose pf 6J3 1112 1 46 66 66 +1% 

39* Chasept 525 11.1 2 47% 47% 47% 

% Chase of 605elZl 1 54 54 54 — % 

Chase pf 803B74J 2CB S3* 43% 07% , 

4* Chelsea .72 13 » 6 22% 22 22 


20% 15% OetEpr Z28 IU 
24 lb% Dexter 00 19 12 


4 30* 30* 30* 

13 31* 31% 31* 

114% 774% 714% 

30= 97 97 97 

3 19% 19% 19% + % 
55 21% 20* 20* + % 


27% — % 37* 20% GerbPd 102 33 13 348 34% 


2 37 37 37 

IB 24* 24* 34% 

15 27% 27% 27% 

13 27* 27* 27% 

18 29* 29* 29* 

2!5 21% ZHk 21* 

54 20% 20% 20% 

9 26% 26% 26% 

30= 43 63 53 — * 

50= 63% 53% 63% +7 


23% 12* GerbSc 
28* 13% Getty* 
72* 8% GIANT 
12% 5% GlbrFn 

27 17% GfffHHI 


L2 50= 63% 63% 63% +1 86 

3 13 348 34% 33% 33% —1 65* 

J 11 79 16* 14% 16*—% 40* 

J398 237 25* 27* 27*—* IB* 
15 9* 9* 9* 29 

3 327 7* 7* 7% 22% 

J 73 20 19% IB* 1**— % 21* 


18* 10* DIGIor 04 30 92 393 16* 14% 16*— % 17* 11% GJecaC 


69% 50* Gillette 280 15 11 7288 67% 44* 67 — % I 16% 


ChWTted L52 50 12 100 28*27*27* + % 


14% 6* BMC .121 

35% 21% Balracp JO 20 


18* 15 Bkrlnll 
34* 18* Bolder 
2Vi * vl BaldU, 
.0 2% vIBIdU of 

30* 19% Bal l 5 
18* 11% BallvMf 
11% 7* BallvPk 


234 8* 

115 23* 


J2 50 13 1416 16 

36 TJ 15 13 20% 

1518 1% 

60 4* 

.72 80 12 208 28 

JO 1J 769 17% 

II 125 9* 


23% 1(* BltGE s UO 73 8 1364 72 


48 38% BaltpfB 400 %3 MBr gf- 

23% 15* BnO*lS 00 30 11 » 72V 

10% 8* BncCtrn 04e 57 450 9* 

S* 1* Ban T Ox 2494 2% 

62 46* Bandog UO U 11 249 51% 

55% 37* BkBaa Z40 LB 5 314 OT* 

54% 49* BkB PfB 2046 30 I S3* 

56% 49-' B*NEdpS19e 9J 57 56U 
47% 31% BkfLY 2JB 5J 7 577 M% 

33% 20* BanfcVta . J.12 4.1 I * 2ft 

22* 12% BnbAm 00 i« 5236 14% 

47 39* BJcAm pf 4.91*120 43 41 

74% 61% BkAm pf 703el2J 16 62% 

16% 13* BkAm pf 208 107 15% 

32% 26* BfcARty ZAO BJ 12 29 25% 

75* 50* BanfcTr Z7D O 6 1199 63% 

27 21% BkTrpf 250 9-7 2 25* 

15* 9 Banner me 2 15 118 14* 

39% 19 Bard 06 IS 14 224 36* 

25 19% BarrtGp JO 35 16 t » 

41* 25* Barnet S 104 Z7 II ,54 39% 

29* 16* BorvWr JO 34 14 115 17* 

lte 6% BASIX .1® IS 11 81 8% 

35* 24% Bauach 78 D 13 540 29 

16* 11* BaxiTr J7 20 54 2665 13* 

27% 20* BovFjn JO 3 II D 

94* 25% BayStG 2J0 82 19 14 31* 

38* 31% Bearing 100 11 13, *0 32* 

47 2B BeatCb IJO 4.1 913227 44 

86* 52% Beat Pf JJS 4J 42 81% 

16% 12% Becor AS 13 103 192 13% 

SB* 36 BeatnD U0 2J 14 980 »% 

8 1 vtBeker _ 2139 1 

II 1* vlBefcrpf JVt 19 2* 

17* 12% BefdnH JO It 10 76 13* 

37* 22% BelHWI J3 1.9 II ffl W 

— 22. BelHwpf 67 XI 73 32* 

76 BeUAtl 600 70 8 6» 9K 

34 25* BCE B 2JS 149 29% 

36% 19* DelTind X 1A 25 84 

44* 31% BeUSOfl ZW 70 8 2971 

57 41% BelOAH ,00 U 24 30 

39* 23 Betnjs 100 ZJ 12 M WJ 

45% 27* BenfCa 200 4J 10 380 «* 

23* 10 eenefpf la it.J 
19% 16* BenoWn 1 JO 7.1 7x 16* 

^ iSISSJ? ■ 071 S % 

15 10* Best Pd JJ U 57 IM 14* 

21% Mlb BethStl M 17 1OT 15% 

49% 37* Beths; PJ50O 127 ID « 

24* IS* BrmSIptZSD I2J M ^ 

40% 29 Beverhr J U 17 259 3J% 

26* 19* BlflThr J U M 18 M| 

%£ ^ 1£Sd" 64 12 17 2063 IS 

36* 23% Bk*HP 102 SJ 9 B 3»b 

29 14% BtodrJn JBI 1 556 24% 

33% 19* BlkHRs 1J4 42 14 5M 32* 

50% 34% HaeflfQS 108 24 15 2277 4Mb 

51 37 BalS»C 1.90 4J 22 688 40* 

61 50% BatseC pf 5JB3 92 75 54% 

32% l*% BalfBbr .10 J » ,S 

44* 28% BortigtS 1S2 16 25 W» <0* 

24* 19% BofflWa J» 4S 11 876 21% 

10% 4* Bannns . 13 n 

44% 37% BasEli 144 87 8 1® 39% 

11% 9% BasEor 1.17 1QJ 6 11% 


14% 11% BO*epr 146 107 „ 

25* 79* Bowgfr 0 H I j» ffli 

31% W% BrtpSt 1J0 5> 12 C 77 

66% 47% BrbtM 33 75 2737 56% 

32* 21* BrltPt IJ9B U 1 l» MJ 

28* 22 BrfTTpp Jit 23 12 3543 26% 

5% 1 Brocfc 1SZ 7% 


1GD 39% 
6 11% 
24 13* 
290 22* 
33 27 


8% B% 

23V. 23* + % 
15* 15* 

20* 20* 

1* 1*— * 
4 4*— % 

27* 27*— 1 
16* 17 
9* 9*— % 

21* 21% — lb 
45* 45*— 1* 
22% 22* + % 
9% 9% 

2 2* + * 
51% S1»? + * 
49% 49%— * 
S3* S3* 

561b 56*— Ib 
42* 43 
26* 27 + lb 

13% 13*— % 
40* 40*— % 
62% 62%— % 
15% 15* 

27* Z7% 

61* 62% — 1 
25* 25*— % 
14% 14% — % 
361b 36*— V. 
22% 22* + % 
38* 38*-* 
17% 17% — % 
8 % 8 * + % 
2B* 28*— * 
13 13 — % 

22 * 22 *— % 
31% 314k + * 
32 32 — * 

43* 434k—* 
80% 8ltt— 4k 
13* 13* 

54. 54% + % 
* 1 — Vb 

2* 2* 

13 13 — * 

32 32% + * 

31* 32* + * 
90 90*— % 

29% 29%— * 
22* 23 — % 
40 40 — % 

47* 47*— % 
38 38 — * 

43% 43% — * 
22% 22% + * 
16* 16* + * 

4* 4*— % 

7% 7% 

14 14* + * 
14* If*— % 
39% 39% — % 
20 20% 

33* 33* 

34% 24% — * 
174b 17* 

IV* IV* + * 
32* 33* + * 
22* 23% —I* 
32% 32* 

45* 45*— * 
39* 40* 

54% M%— * 
30% 31 — * 

42* 42*— * 
20* 21% — % 
V* 9* 

39* 39*— Vt 
11 11 
«* TOk + * 
22 22% 

26* 27 + * 

56* 56*— * 
32% 32% 

25* 26 + * 

1 1 -% 


44Vk 29* ChmNY 3L48 65 
44* 29* CIlNYpf 107 4.9 
56* 51* OlNY pf 408B 73 
55* 49* ChNYpf 4070 70 


33% 22* DIGto Pf 2J5 70 

21 14* DtamS IJ7rlCL3 

38* 34* DiaSh pf 400 7J.I 

22 20% DioSOf n IJOe 6S 

11 6* DloncCo 30 33 


6 31 M% 30% — * 14* 7V, GtenFd 

1204 15* 15% 15* ‘ * 

24 36* 34 36 — % 

145 21* 21* 21V, + % 13% 8* GtdNug 
4 9* 9* 9* 4 1* GIdN wt 


1% GIObtM .121 
51b GfahMpfUJT 


610 38* 37* 38*— * 57% 31* Dtotold S 100 2J 14 765 40* 38* 39 —IV 


16 38% 38U 38Vk + % 125* B5V. Digital 


34% 26* DomRs U7 


61* 


16% Donold J6 Z9 10 101 22% 

43% Donlev 1.14 73 IS 812 54* 

Dorsey ljo 16 12 ffi 33* 
Dover 08 ZJ 13 1455 35% 

37% 27 DowCh 100 50 15 3378 36* 

M DowJn 71 il IB 853 37* 


* OlNY pf 408e 73 13 35 54* 54*— % 95 56% Disney 

55* 49* ChNY pf 407e 70 150 54 54 54 + Ib 28% 16% DEI * 

39% 32 Chew* 1J4 3J 10 33 34* 34* 34* + 'It 6 Ik 4% Dfvraln 

42* 31 ChesPn ZOO 50 13 5605 40* 39% 39V— 1% 10% 6* Oomeg 

39* 29V. Chevm Z40 6.1 V 4003 39* 39% J9Vi— lb _ 

200 124 ChlMtw 65 12 129 128% 128% 

3% ChlMlPf 12 65 64% 65 — lb 

6* QilPnT 309 14 7 204 21* 21* 21% + % 35* 

11* 7V, ChkFull J4» 30Z71 73 B* 8% 8%— % 

58* 31 ChrlsCr 607 48 55% 54* 54%—* 

13% 7* Chrtstn 77 11 10* 10*— Vk ^ 

14* 9* Chroma <8 622 14* 14% 14* + * 32% 8% Downey 

63 44% Chrmpf 1» 62* 63* 62* 151b 11 Drava 

39* 25* Chrvilr 100 26 ,3 3343 WVk 17* 37*— * 24* 17* Dresr 

51 Vb 30% Chubb* 13 916 49% 48* 48* + * 21% 16% DrexB 

63% 50* Chubb pf 4JS 63 196 62 62 62 + Ib “■ ~ 


r 111%110'b 1101b— IV 


1* GIdN wt 
18* GkJWF JO 
24* Gdrlch 1S6 
24V, Goodyr 1J0 


188 415 16* 16% 16%—% 46 

A 5 220 13Vk 13 13 24* 

964 1* 1% 1* 66* 

53 514 5% 5*— H 33V, 

20 394 TO* 10* 10*— V. 

ID 2% 2 2 — % I 

J 5 281 36% 25% 35*— * ■ 

50 49 32 31 31 —ft 


4.50 700 

uo +1 10 

f U 9 
U7 BJ 

z£lS 4 
400 IU 
230 IU 
233 170 
108 11 9 
100 73 
VII 90 5 
296 70 8 

Z32 res 
223 1(U 


3099 

566 15% 
189 14* 
2 16* 
U4 7* 
?t? 21* 
400= 38% 
8 19 
3 

24 52* 
20z 13 
669 12 
70 37% 
4 22% 
21 21% 
446 16* 
_ 1 43* 


— » 30% 23* NotFGl 20 U 7 

1 3i .22* NfGypg 7 

I 4* 2% NtHam 

33* 24 Nil _ 3S 10 - 

_ u. 32* 18* NMedE. 02 20 1* 
H% 7%NMln8* ... 

_ to » ZJ* NfPregf 106 33 13 
+ 2 15% l»fc MtSgmJ . „ 30 

Zi! 53% 48% HtSem pf40O 80 


I, j. 44 ion wjp aamv 1* 

15 JI* 5»* MtS*OII>r«fl0 80 __ 
U%Z S 331X 2SW NtSvcfn U0 11 H 
16*— * 13 TO Nerco ' J4 55 7 
'H 7 33% ZJ NevPw 2J4 9 J 10 
u, 73 .19* NevPpf 200 HS 

1M42* 1* 15% NevPpf US 11.1 

12% 9% TtawSvL 00 AM 7 
19*— % 4*% 35* NEnaEl 140 U 7 
* 7r *‘ 23 NEnPpfJMlOJ 

ro + ft 25 JS 41 U 9 

{?* + * 29* 20% NY5EG 2S6 704 7 
76* 62% NYSpT. 800 TZ1 

SS-vi 


«* NftCnv J6 3J 20 IMS W% J* W . 

ZJ* NatDM 228 70" 28 14* IT* 31% 3t% — * 


^ I— %'fji 

« II* ll* 11% *: 

31% 31 31 v 

200x 21* »% 21 Vb— * 

3 17% 17% 17% “ 

60 10* 10% 70% 

37 43% 43 «S- 

1 27* 27* 27* 

roSSKS^X.*--- 

ft RSK.a-*- 

36 20* 20% 70%—% • 

MS -SB fst+gj 

{SSSSzt 

JrS 51* 50 50 —1% . 

+ ft ' " 

817 15* 14% ftft— ft 
B 14% 13% 13*—*.' 
» TO* TO 75% + % . 

5 ,9* •% + *-- 

« 4 46*+ * 


n 

44 17 IS4 .19 


U0 80 _ .12 19 

1.10 3J 32 1998 33* 

UO 40 I 32 29% 

JB X7 17 31 13* 

1JD 3J 10 1853 36* 

400 4J 17 85 

400 4J 10 85 

Z32 30 10 734 61 

36 22 16 333 34% 

18 147 17* 

250 f J 48 736 27 

72 73 3 13* 

00 50529 3D 16* 
S3e 40 123 13* 

Z00 40 11 SS9 44* 

JO 20 15 61 20* 

J2e 0 19 82 35 

JS8 43 7 716 20 


| g-» RSftJrarSMJ 

Sft—Vi 59* ank Newhal J4 ij 15 
63% + ■£ 19 , 1?% Newtrir 40*0(0 5 
S2_ 2 9* 7* NwtllRs Ms 8J 9 

4m T * 46* 34* Ngwmr 108 22 36 
19 + * 3% * Nwparfc. . . 

jiv, + " 21% 10* NlaMP ZBI1J 7 
IB*— * 35% ■ 27* MoMPf IM HO 
19 + % 39 NtaMof 4.10 TU 

~ T* oa- nu. kinUnt iln m 


19 + % 39 » NJoMof 4.10 TU 200= 36% 35% 36% 

33K— % J» 43% tnaMpf 4.10 T22 - wE 51* SB SO 

S* " 103* n NIMPf T0J0 m3 100=1*3 ID -ID 
•4 _» 67% 53%_NloMpf 772 TZ0 •- 10&44* 64* 64* 
.SttZ 2 ret NloaSb V8SHZ4 . 33 15% 14% 2ft, 

Sb + ft l** II* Nfcotof .12 10 13 168 13* U% 12* 

S* 1|V33% -25% NICOR 304 105 251 » 28* 28% 

8S 45% 16% 12* NaMAf .Mb J 92 817 15* 14* 15% 

Sujrg 17% 10% NordRs 9 25 14% 13* 13* 

SSS - 723* 54% NortkSo 3J0 AM 9 1536 70* 70 7D% 

1 <b 38 ■* Mori hi 2S 9% 8% 9% 

2«4— ft 4Mb 32* Nantr .240 SJ 9 43 46* 40 46V, 

t35 4. S 33% 43 Nanlrpf A1% 80 20 52% 52% 52% 

ft 19 13% Nortek 08 0 6 1» 15% M* 15 

ft 60* 46% NACod UO If 7 W S% 88 58* 

mSTh 45* 31* NAPhH 108 30 10 27 33% 33* OTk 

ts Zt 20% 1Mb NEurO Ute 93 W 40 18* 18% ve* 

ja + % W 13% NoMtUt TS8 90 6 966 16* 16% u* 

mk— ft W J* NlndPS L56 JS4 9 269Zic 10* 10 70% 


31 — % 29% 2Mjk LACn 


1-M 1 A 48 223 89 88 V. 88*— * 30* 24V, Goodyr 1J0 6J 7 837 26% 25* 25*— * 31* 24* LN Ho 204* 9J 10 » 30* 

1 JO 63 6 7A 21% 2D* 20*— * 18* M* GordnJ S3 34 72 12x 15* 1» 15% + % 17% 1] LLE_Rv 2J3*180 375 12 . 


1 37 

1 41 

-% « 


5T* 40* NaStPwr ISt 7 A 


29 NSPwpf UO 1<L3 
32* NSPwpf 4.10 18J 
33% NSPpT 406 IU 


170 0* 5U. 5* 

332 8* Mb 8* + * 
Z78 30* 30* 30* 


37* 79 Gould 
45 37* Grace 


08 ZB 4077 33* 32* 33* + % 
200 77 11 <684 37* 35* 36% —1 


34% 26* Grongrt 61 22 7] 88 31% 31% 31% 


22*— Vk 21% T1 GtAFft 
53*— * I 18* 14% GtAtPc 


1% Downey ,40e 13 3 321 31% __ 

00 40 151 12% 12* 12% + 

. .. _ _ 00 43 16 384 18* 18% 18* + 

21% 16% DraxB ZOO IDS 5 19% 19% 19% + 

69% 34* Dreyfus 60a 0 li 185 68% 67* 67* — 


33% 33% *2* *1 

35* 35* + Vk 21% 15 
36 36*— % 41* 321 

37* 37% 29* 221 

30 30 —1 20 141 

12* 12% + % 29* 22= 
18% 18* + % 30* 22 
19% 19% + % 6% 2 


146 18% 18 
582 17* 17 


4% T LLCCP 
13V. 5Vk LTV 
19 Bib LTVA_ 


97 24% -23% 24 — % 43 33% NSPpf 4J6 IU 

54 30* 38* 47 36% NSPwpf 406 10.1 

■VS ro n* 12 +* 2^ CTjk. NSPwpf tB vu 

346 iu 7 % 1 % + % ISSy** 7 S 183 

320 6* Hk 6* + *41%31* HoCTtT 00 


18% + % 25* .8% LTV PfB 


1 62* 31 GtLklfl 100 10 13 456 62* fiZ* 62* + * 
21% 15 GNlm IJSelU T9 16* 16 16* 

41* m GfNNk 102 4.1 16 967 37V, 36* 37 

29* 22% GtWFln ISO 30 6 UD 26* 26% 26* — % 

14% GMP 1 J6 90 9 79 18* 18* 18% + % 

+ MI 29* 22* Green T _ 6 247 27 26* 27 + * 


20V. 13* Church* 04 U 14 957 16% 15* 15* + % I 61% 46% duPant 100 SI 15 10BE 59 


27* 21 Clleora Z22 80 18 188 25 

51 38% C in Bell 112 60 8 2S « 

mb 13* CfalGE Z16 110 6 887 IF 
34% 26% ClnGPf *00 121 30= n 

39% 29 ClnGPf 4J5 1X7 700= 371 

74V. 60 CfnG pf 9J0 1Z8 1011= 72= 

61 48% ClrTGpf 7J4 TZ6 140= 59 

73% 41 CfnG Of 9JB 1ZJ 60(7 73! 

75% 60% ClnGPf 902 120 200= 74 

20* IS* OhMlI »*■*»« iki 
24* 19* ardKs 

31 ig* ciraty 


188 25 34% 25 + % 

20 48* 48V, <8* — % 
887 18* 18 18% — * 

50= 33 33 33 +1 

700= 37% 37 37% + % 

100Z 72* 72* 72*—% 
140= 59 59 59 + * 


31* duPnt pf 300 93 
JO duPnt Pf 450 90 

35% 27* DubeP 2JQ 73 
85% 68% Dukepf S70 100 
80% 64VL Dukepf 8J0 100 
77 61% Duke cf 700 10J 

22% Duke pf 267 10J 


30 — 1 20 74% GMP 1J6 90 9 

12% + % ] 29* 22* GreenT . 6 

Mr ,JJ " ’I 

<7*— * 73% 9* GrcwGs 00 30 15 

58*—% 12% 6* Grub El 08 10 13 

37% + * 36* 24% Gromn 1X0 U B 

45% + % 7% 4* Gruntal .16 26 57 
33*— % 27% 20 Gulltra 08 28 II 


600= 73% 73% 73% + * ( 35% 30% Dukepf 3LS5 110 


'02 1X9 2001 74 74 74 87% 70 

J2 40 20 285 16% 75% 15%— % 80% 65 

170 27% 22% 22* 83V. 60 

.10 A 12 1032 22* 22* 22*— * -- 


Dull PfM &04 107 
Dukepf 028 10.9 


7 37% ..... 

646 45*45% + % 7% 4* Gruntal 

386 33% 3Mk 33*— % 27% 20 Gullfrt 

500= 83 K% tB + * 45* 26* GlfWsf _ 

l^TMb Wl 7S4 17% 11% GuitRj 73 

«»= 73% «* 73% M% 11% GlfSrtJt 1J4 130 

3 26* 26% 26% 55* 41 GHSU Pf 6J4411J 

76 35% J5 35 32* 26 GffSUPT 285 120 


U6 90 9 T9 18* 18% 18% + % 
6 247 27 MH 27 + * 

102 40 10 325 27* 27% Z7%— * 

8 678 5 4* 5 + % 

00 30 15 18 10* ID 10 — % 

OB 10 13 75 B 7* 8 + % 
IOO 3J B 473 29% 29% 29*—* 
.16 26 57 12 tf* 6% 6* 

JB 20 11 ZS 24% 24% 24% 


00 20 13 row 44* 43% 44% 


82%— 1% 35% 29% GtfSUPTLffl 114 


81 15% 15* 75*— % 
6 1970 12* 12* 12* + % 
50 54% 54% 54% 

3 30 30 30 — * 
< 33% 32% S%— * 


68% 31 LTVpfC 304} 13 

18% 8* LTVpfD 041 892 

15 10% LQuM 21 306 

29* 21% LodGe UD 67 8 7 

10* 6* Latarog JO 2J381 43 

27 21* LafrflPf 244 10J 11 

14% 7* Lamar* 5 20 14 64 

4% 1* LaraSes 05* 10 188 72 

13% 10* Lawtlnt S6 50 16 104 

25* 10* LeorPt JD U 1402 

XV. 19* LearPpf 207 130 17 

ST* 41 LearSo ZOO +3 9 201 

31 U* LealSjg JO 27 13 76 

34% 25% LswyTr ISO 40 14 T72 

46% 24* Lee Ed 32 23 19 5 

IB* 8* LeeMO* 00b 10 73 27 

26* 16% LeuPklf 02 20 11 58 


SS20 6* 5* 6* + * 41% 

ti ,K,a ,^75 


100 20 1 1 


S 52% 52% 52% — % .' -J. 

isro UK 15 + Vb.'-v 
> ta 58% a 58* + * -<■*, • 
0 27 OTk 33* 33% 

5 40 ink 18% 18*- K 

t JSL im* — % , 

9 3*92x10* ro 10% + Ml ’ • ••*■ 

9 »=5 £ 

60= 38 38 38 

■fi£S'-3T S i’ft “■ 

71% n*-i% > 

m ro% ro* ro* + » Y 
* T1 ? S* 




51* 34* ailcrp 236 SJ 6 8715 43 
8* 6% CtoWr J21U S 18 7 
19* 6* ClalrS s 24 519 12 


47 23% 25* 25% 

T5 43 41 41*— 1* 
18 7 7 7 + % 


ra* 60 DunBrt 22Q 29 20 12S0 76* 75% 75% — * 
17V. 14* DuqLJ 206 13S 7 3316 15* l^b 15* 


JO 20 18 150 21* 21 


18* IS* Dun PfA 210 11 J 
16% 12* Due of 107 123 
17% 13% Duapf ZOO 126 


100= 18% 18% 18% 
100=15* 15* 15* 


! 32% 22* HallFB 100 16 


773 28% 27% 27*— * 


11* 11*— * 20* 75* Duqpr 201 120 


32* 23* ClarkE 1.10 3J 31 288 29% 39 29* + * 25% 23 


14 8% CkivHs 

22* 17 ClvCIl 100 SJ 
zi* 20 ava Pf zoo mo 


11 135 12* 12* 12*— * 

100 M 18 238 17% 77 17% 

ZOO 100 217 20 19% 20 — * 


23% 18% OevEI 264 11 J 6 1491 23 22* 22%— % 


14% 8* Clem* SH 
17* 10 CivpfcPt 1.111 
18* 9% Cfvpkpf 021 

<5% 27* Oorex 106 33 13 
26* 14* ClubMd JOe 0 17 
39* 25% CloetfP 100 27 19 
24% 16* Chief pf 100 4A , 
51* 9% Coadwn 0 U U 
36* 16% Corah s M 10 11 


169 9% 9% 9% + % 

21 12% 12 12 — * 

21 10* 10* 10* 

690 44% 43 43 —1* 

102 21* 21% 21% 

775 36% 36% 36* + % 

108 23, 22% 22% — % 

88 11* 11% 11%— * 

287 31* 31% 31% — % 


62% 49 DuflPl 
27 20* DvnAm 


29 EGG 
IS* EQKn 


DUOPT 175 10.9 
DudP! 7JD 121 


50= 15* 15% 155k + * 32* 24% HoRtth 100 70 17 2326 25% 2*16 25 — * 
BOX 18* 18% 18* + 34 1 1% H Haltwd 08 7.1 11 489 1* 1% 1% 

11* 7* Halwdpf S6 bJ 


1200= !«. 18% 18* + * 
rote H* 25* 25* + * 


1 * 1 % 1 % 

8% 8% 8% 


200= 59* 59* 5V* + % 42% 26% HamPl 106 30 14 2465 41% 40* 41* + % 


JO J 12 4 25% 25% 25% 15% 12% HanJS 

— 21% 17* HanJI 

E | 30 IS* Handli 

* tf n WOTijjijM + b ££ 16% KSS? 


S % E Syst 30 10 14 7»1 29* 
EagteP 104 40 9 135 24* 


29 15% 15* 15% 


zi* 16% Hama JO 22 23 
68* 36* HcrBrJ 100 U 16 


J7QW.1 197 14% 14% 14% + lb 

J4o 90 43 20* 20 20* 

S6 26 13 384 21% 21* 21* + % 

J6 3J 20 18 18* 18* 18*—% 

JO 22 23 7 18% 18% 18% 

00 U 16 66 60% 60 60 — % 


5 25 — 34* Z1H Ho rind* St 13 2D 264 34* 33 


74* S9% Cocoa 206 40 14 987 7Mb TMb 7]V. 

21% 10% Coteco __ „ _ _ ‘ 


21% 10% Cofeco 764 20% 19* 79*— % 

32* 25* Cofemn 100 40 19 22 28* 28 28%— % 

33* 22* Cota Pal 106 4J 47 1577 30U 29% 29* — % 

25* 16* Col Aik a 04 26 8 341 24* 34* 24* 

16* 9 CuiFdSS .12 .9 198 14* 13* 13>— * 

30% 26* CofPWl IJO 42 18 3430 33* 25* f»W +3% 

6SV, SO Co Wind 2S0 4.1 9 (62 61% 60% 60*— % 

37 26* CoJGcS 3.18 80 2628 37 36* 37 

48* 45* CoiGSPf 5.12 110 20 47* 46* 46*— * 

28% 24* CSOef 3J5 7 27% Z7% TTfl + * 

21* 17% CSOpf 2J2 11J 1 28% 20% 20% 

SO 34* Comb In 216 4? .7 3«4 44_ 43% A »— % 


9 135 24* 24 Z4 — * 173b 7* Hornlkh 22 

a SSo “ ’is « a- £ 3S ia ssssjs 

™ ^ JJ ZJj— % 23* 14* HrpRws 00 11 13 

% =AL wfA 5J7 1* I* JlS— hi 2S 22* Harris JB 2A IS 

7* EsAIrpf 3S3fc 85 21* 20* 71%—* Tfli. in2 hStEto 9 

,9% EAir PfB 4J8k 127 23% 23* + % x* 22 HcrOT IJB 40 11 

JHI EAJrofC 13S 25^4 24^ 25 — 1 ynx niib 1 1 rolmt its ll ifl 

lft EastGF IJO SJ 138 577 23 27Vj TP* w5 jS 1Q7 {? 

4?S IfiKods UO U i! S2 S2 2? Site + H ^ HawEI 1 71 79 9 

41 ■mi cfiKOas 2_xT> U 12 3545 42Ui 43M 01#. ■ rote j i jl 

?»y. up u 7 «6 CT6 CT* 53% + * ^ BSSSS 5* u « 

K% 9% HazLafa 02 22 27 

3 4 °*y Sft ?£* + ' t 2 10* HlttrAm 21 

,1^5 , 23% 19 HltCrPn J3e SJ 


13% 9* HayesA 


I&»8 ^ n 1? ,?S SS R SS + 5 & *assKE 

3*l» « a ?3 » r «s + * £ 


37% 23* CmbEfi 100 Ifl 10 222 26* 26% 2«b 

21% 8 Comdls 00 10 11 234 20* 20% 20*— % 

18% 15% ComMli 06 20 16 104 17* 17* 17*— % 


29* 8* Comdre 7 387 10 9* 9*— % 

32* 36 CmwE 300 100 6 3527 29* 29V. 29% + % 

1Mb 14% CwEpf IM 11S 26 16% 16* 16% + % 

18% 14* CwE pf 200 US 12 17% 17* 17* 

76% 60 CwEpf B3B 11 J 41040=71* 71 71 

»V 19% CwE Of 2J7 9J 3 34% 24% 24% 

26% 22% CwEpf 287 110 3 26* 26 26 

30* 21% CamES 253 9.1 6 25 27* TTtl Z7* 

38* 22* Comsat 1J0 4J 9 1651 30* 28 2»— 2% 

35* ro* CPavc 08 1.1 17 2183 25% 25 25% — % 

35* 23% Compor 00 ZJ 8 56 25% 24* 24%— £ 

26* 12% CompSc 12 467 26% 25* 25*— % 

45* 9Va Cptvm S50 10% 19* ID*— % 

39* 24% ConAar 100 23 13 1 57 37% 36* 3Mk- * 
20 16 COTlE 100 80 12 33 Wk 17* lffll 

31 ZZ% CraiNG UO U f 7 7Wt 29% 29% 

15% 12% conrae JO 27 18 181 14* MH WM 

38 27% ConiEfl 240 60 8 3104 »* 35% + % 

» 40% ConEpf 500 106 14 47* 47 47% 

36 25 CWFrt 1.10 12 11 197 34* 34* Mk- * 

47* 38% CroNG 202 50 9 »4a*42%42% + Va 


26* 12% CompSc 
45% 9% CpfWl 

39* 24% ConAar 
20 16 CaoiE 


14* EDO JB 10 13 248 15* IS 15 — * g«Z inw HttUSA 
7* EdChiP 15 44 10% 9* 9*— * r Sf Jfiu uiL-M St 

22* Edward 00 22 12 870 26% 25* 25*i— ft IS -3 

21% EPGdaf 205 90 891 25% §% S% n l§i S225J? 2 

u. IJSS JW * 14 X "J S !«! H fliT M 

1» li^3 08 , li 1017 21 tT iT*~ '• Wt H2l2c 

u* isa,, * 44 12 ,s ‘a ro*- % gft ]T kk?p te 


66 EmraEI 140 17 U IS Mb «» it U.I dPA 31% Heraijs 100 40 13 1859 37* 36* V — * 
6* imm* 041110 9 SS Vi *8*“ I Iff* 35 «S 1SS U* !S -ft 


22 68 10% 9* 9*—* 

UO 130 9x24* 24* 24* + % 

LU 70 9 27* 27 Z7%— U 

00 XI 13 » 19* mb 19Vb— * 

■— 2% 25ft— r* 

__ .. - 17 17% — % 

JB 40 11 45 38% 29* 30% + * 

oa 11 10 129 34* 34 34 — * 

JO 100 11 9 17 16* 16*— * 

02 70 9 494 21* 21* 21* 

JOe 4.1 6 14 9* 9* 9* + % 

JD 10 13 91 22* 22% 22%— * 

02 20 27 52 U* UU 14% 

21 618 12% 11* 11*—% 
03a 35 44 20* 20% 20* + « 

40 15* 15 IS* + * 
08 2J 47 12* 12% 17% 

00 IJ 438 15* 15% 15%— % 

M ZS 12 978 19% 19 19 

JB I J IS 143 29* 29% 29*— « 

534 28* ZS* 28*—* 
17 46 19% 19 19% + * 

06 10 27 409 19% 18* 18*— % 


HerltCpf ISO 40 


16 Hermn n IS 

35 HenhV 100 30 13 
5% H iMj tan _ 


20% 15% EmryA a m 14 Si 17 iS2 u. 34 20 HerllCPflJD 40 10 32V. 32 32 — * 

ro% al’4 Etahqft 1A0b5% 9 92 * mSlft 21 1* Herman IS 10 18 IT* 17* 

§% its ImSS? iTu ! » “* SS SB + ^ K22, * “ 13 ?S 4 S ft 

76 % 11,4 li ,JM ,J 10 j Vt * ?4,2 + tfc sft z^sssa; * jw <s js a 

B* 22 EMlcSi JTto J 10 57! m. TO. „ 33* 24 Hexed 00 22 15 927*27 27 +% 

M in&Bus 06 19 13 sf iS ft 20* 15% HI Shear SO 2J 8 IS 28% 20% 20% — % 

3* 17* EnvyCh 100 Tl IB M m '££ SS + ft IES ,1^ SKSSw II H ,% » 

U* S'* IrnS PflO^elM ’ismS* t ft 7Wi ° HVton t£a 27 u 370 67 6S% 65% —1* 

1 % Wz? ™" 35 | T ^ a S3 !St $ I a S 3 IBS §s=s 

19% 1^ ttta^E XS0B.7S S5 h 11^ lift ~ ft wft » jn lift 11% lift- ft 

5* IS I SStf? 7 A U 2 9* At 3* h^ im itj I 3 2 « % 5 


SO 40 10 33% 32 32 — * 

_ IS 10 18 17* 17* 

JO 30 13 96 47* 47 47*— % 

_ . 22 5*5%5* + % 

02 0 15 <320 31% 30* 30*— * 

JO 22 15 927*27 27 +% 

a ZS 8 IS 20% 20% 20%—% 

-II !■* 75 10* 10% 10% 

54 ZJ 12 177 23* 45* 22*— % 

00 27 M 370 67 65% 63% — 7* 

360 10 740 33* 33% 33*— * 


IS* 13% LSimn IX Biu 

15% 10% Lennar 00 10 10 

34* 15% Leacttts 3 

50% 42% LOF U0 30 7 

“ • 

93 am uiiy 

72* 

46% 35% 

33% 19% 

93% 61* Litton 

50 39% Locfchd 

:r 27 Lodttk _ _ 

54% 38% Loews f UU 22 12 
38* 23* Leafcon 04 0 19 

36* Z7* LomFbi UO 4.1 12 
28* 19* LomMt 6 244 90 10 
4% 2 LomMwt 
20% 19* LancsMn 
29% 21% LnSfar 100 60 4 
54* 45* Lanes pf 507 100 
9* 5* LJLCo 

18 LILpfE 
23% 15% ULpfX 
22* 14* LILPfW 
23% 15* UL pfV 
27% 18* LILPfU 
21* 14% LILlrfT 
16* 11% LILpfP 
IM 12* LJLptO 
31% 21% Lana D i 

37% 23% Loral 

13 10* LoGenl _ . 

38 26* La Land 100 30 11 

25% 17* LaPdC , 

:::l 24* loploi 

25* 19* Lubrzl 1.16 5S 13 
37* 26* LubVS 
23% . . 

10* Lukenk 


U 1402 10% 10 10*— % 

U0 _ 17 OTb OTk 20* I 

(J 9 201 47% 46% 46% —1 

27 3 16 15 U* 15 jg? 

*8 14 772 JT* 31 % 31%—% *S? 

23 19 5 40% 40% 40% — % 

3 10 73 27 16% 16 M — Vk 

1110 BO 14* M% rSb 22 

IJ 10 79 11% 11% 11% + % g” 

3 14 19% 19% lf%_ % 57 

33 7 75 « - «%«* + % 3*1^ 

66 3 73% 72V, 72% — % ’IS; 

24 14 144 29* 29% 29%—* 

30 12 M 92 91* 91* +.% ?4% 

020 303 25% 25% 25* + % IS? 

izz&g: |ft 

j*^» 

25 14 34 3T* 33% 31*— % 

,2 3 i, 2 ™a jgSftSS* 14 §2 

4.1 12. .19 31% 84* 34% + % ™ 

90 10 92 26* 26% 2*%— % JS? 

66 2* 2* m— % S2 

■ 83 30 1WV IWb ,?35 

60 4 (18 29* 28* 28*— % HI Vj 

IM _ « 54 n% 53* + % 'ijLfc 

2 ^^25^2? -* H 

18 T»b 18% lS + * ** 

igsag'jsis P 

24 18* 18* 18*—% Sim. 

* ® «S 

20 14 155 XW 27* 28 — % 

10 17 1*6 33* 33 33%' + % 

U 9 25 11% 11* 11* 

18 11 2347 W 34* 35* + * SJ? 
140 31 147 19* 19% 19* 3?" 

130 106 27* 27* eft— % g 

1X0 no 20 1% 19*— % S-. 

9S B 100 27 25* 


ZOO XZ 10 m U S* £2* + % 

06 10 13 173 22% 22%—%: 

1.16 5S 13 187 Zt* 21 --211b— %i 

00 U 21 33 34% 34% 24%—% 

1.16 SI 12 041 23 2«b 206 - . 


■ tt'irfl a. s fl: 
’stf.g 

3g,B ass, hl'% 


Pf 704 1X8 
P*.706 124 
Pf 07fc 20 
pf 800 1X9 
Pf 300 128 
PT 302 1X0 
Edpf 1J0 IU 


fEfcptf X. 


liPri:- 


pfC 700 110 . 
PfG_207 1l0 
127 
127 

S lfl 




206 S TO IL. M 

JT®Ssa- 

p«.f a * 




p«-«a aa»a^. 
SB • 

uo i? S Srft 


37% 39% PKH 


H M m » 


a Sft-flftEEP ^ S « 

+ h “J i i J4 im » 6m — 


23% 15 MACOM 04 14 17 1748 17% 16* T7 + % M a* !■“ W8 7 6599 

54* 25% MCA 8 . 46 6743 54V<5ZV.a%+*.J«*3‘ M « O « 

24* 18% MCWP IJO 70 < MW W M T»— " to” 5* m, 4 1 » 

14* 10 MDC 0 10 1 1004 10* W% 1Mb Su |32 HSL-S.jJ * S3 

38 28% MDU 272 70 9 136 34* 34% Mk + * {St E2^1* ,,a S — 2 


19% 10b. EntexE X50el7S 
ZI* 17* Entexln 106 7£ 11 
35 19* Eouias 1.14 16 19 

dVk 2* EflUlmk 


’5 lift 14 T4W — » 

2 »* 17* 19% 

79 32 37* 22 + * 

907 4 . 3* I* + % 


23 81% 81% 81* + % 
211 11* 11% UH— % 
429 21* 31* 21%— % 
7 «k 9* 9*— % 


™ 9* 7 HrneGpf LtO 110 7 9* *b 9H— % 


18* 11* MGMGr 04 
13* 10* MGMGr PU4 .. 

27 10 MGMUa 00k J 

11* 2% MGMUWt 

B* rtb MLConvnateU 
ll* to* ml men 
38* mk Moomfs 3S IJ M 
66 38% Mocy 1.16 1J 17 


it at 8 

<15 25 m 24* 


17%. 12* 

31* 26* Potato, 7M 


40 U 12 
“ 9 I 


tnf n* i?% + % SS asH Pntaw pfxz S M 


cqsawH wnu 


— ~ 2ft “ +*. 

4^il=s 

*8® 10) 


i * 


.cht 












4;.^ 


^^?Wistic6 Index 

t. O’wexprfcw . p.n 

riv* . tlMPV hlntm/i a . 


. rirCi,' — -V. 


c> it‘ n vSoiwtflon Mocks p.u 

’. v ilurrencv ram p. 9 

’■v t' ; % iiommoditle* p,i# 

Xi 5» S ^.otvwwdi p.10 

2 ;t !■■ _: 

3 5 V'SATITRTi 


* % i l 


SwBtnm wm P.13 
*lta6 rtf* n fltta p.n 

Qttdqrarncn p. » 
'■Merest rein p. 9 
**«"**nMni»afy P. ( 
Ontons .- p.10 

OTC sack . p.T3 
OOmt markets p.14 

CVTKnrv 










economic sail 


^ Hatfield Says White Hcaise 
^Must Seek New Revenues 


?: V * 

- t •• * 

£■ 5? ^ 
S- ^ > 

t-5V 

r ----- 

*- 

■» w 
*■ *- - 
#.. .»■» ■. 

*.. • -a . 

*• •:•* . 
a tm 

9: . 


' ■&«; 
•- 0 isS-^ 

« 

■i n i s - 


*W; 


I Tig. tt _ . , , WW U1C UUUKCL UUU3L~ 

; i! ■ > v'; , , ****“ “ e Granun-Rudman bill far balancaiKthe>3mdjaei 

.} u -tty ft® While House support^ 

«,“f nns J lL ■ Hatfield told a conference of busane^ executives 
.i rj £ J‘ „*~? esda y * h “ onl y P rcsidc nt in to experience who rader- 
: 1 iT‘ 5j-. : sux ** national defense was _ r ■ ■ • 

;* il] JS£; Dwight D. Eisenhower. - • '••■ - \ ■* - 

* := 1 fe J: “Ike.” he said, “understood. ^KC understood that .. 

:■ * Tv. 11131 nation's security was tt e 1. ' * 

~ .. a DOt a simple function of mfli- Security W28 not 

j: 1 ... i ‘ "■ '» 

a simple function of 


ill bj?; toy speeding but of its educa- 
Jl ?$• tional system, energy, infra- 
■3 E t: structure and the overall 

:1itV efnnMl. .r .1.. 1 


3S&: structure and the overall 
S S?i strength of the national econ- 
loSi’l omy.” 

'a r! “i : Mr. HatHf-Jd amiuH ttw> 


- ^ ^ Hatfield accused the administration of doing is the mOi- 

X •; ;i ^tary area what Republicans traditionally blame the Democrats 
: : a£ c ,: 5;”® r doin g in the sodal area — “throwing mbnejrat iwoblems," in 
• : •: a false belief that “if you throw en ough money, the dollars wfll 

5 equate with security."' 

\] * ’ ^ ? f Mr. Hatfidd calls the Gramm-Rudman bid a charade. Of the 


■ military — “and the President will not accept cuts bdow that 
• n ^ rv.^f -level of nrilitaiy spending.^ 

’ Thatleft, Mr. Hatfield estimated, only 11 to 14 percent of the 

> r ■** if budget out of which all the cuts would havejto come, “if you 
■ eliminated those programs entirely,” he added, “you’d still end 
:: “p w-ith a deficit of about S150 billion." 

■-■ i>j(; He predicted that the - flr amnw l tnitmmi bifi would to 

f x X ^5,- nothing even if e n acted. The cxuigresanonal track record, he. 
asserted, had done the sayne with previous «im4i coaomitinents, 
.. S i£ ^ including one passed in the 1970s far balancing the budget by 
r 1982. The true position on elimmating the deficit now, Mr. 

j :: 2 ^ Hatfield said, was the total exenmdoa by both Congress ami die 
£) a j j White House of Social Security for political reasons. 

.... £ 2 'i *\\ IS conclusion; “We will never get control of the deficit 

■ I — I just on the spending side; we have to deal with both the 
: ‘i:*V ' -■ — revenue and the qiemfing side.** 

■ P J u 4 Tax increases remain anathema At the White House. At the fall 


.... ' j i X\ IS conclusion; “We will never get control of the deficit 

I — I .just on the spending side; we have to deal with both the 
: — »- revenue and the q>ending side.” 

SjfiaiJ Tax increases remain anathema a: the White House. At the fall 

■ ■* i?. meetings of the International Monetary Fnnd and World Bank, 

: r n V; b vTreasnry Secretary James A. Baker 3d declared that Mr. Reagan 
I ji^.^had won a “national referendum" on the tax issue by 49 states to 
. =" s.L 1, decisively overthrowing to opponent's proposal to raise taxes. 

The tax issue, Mr. Baker indicates, is dosbd. . 

! r ri, The administration has preeinpted the ground on the tax 
-j f -^1 debate this year by Mr. Reagan’s proposal to overhaul the tax 
- x ~ \ system. Mr. Hatfidd said, however, that if the tax revision were 
" ti n j ' not “revenue neutral,” but part of a stratify for dealing with the 
’ deficit, it would make sense. . . 

• : : “We are losing $95 hflEatt in revam^ because of the existing 

u tax" structtireC- he^ said,' “btlt We anf nOt proposing to use any of 

i' k. m that money that would be gained % tax reform to reduce die 

■ defidu” • 

; .1 ?; *■[ SnnpBfymg the tax laws, he said; should be secondary to 
' ■■•t ^ £» solving the debt problem, whidr lies ai' the heart of the nation’s 
; * other major problems: 

•- • High Government foreign and domestic borrowing to fr 

~ f s ]$- nance the deficit. 

r •; i *>! • Ifi^i interest rates. _ . . 

'• is ri|t • Overvaluation of the dollar and the nation’s trade deficit. 
iJf’E: • The ne«l to rescue the farmers and manu f acturing industries 

(CoutmaedoaP«gell,Cd.5) 


■ 1 11 ^1 Ckirrcocy Rates 

. J Sst Onwribtoi Oktay 

‘ ■“ * * OM- FJ=. IU_ Odr. B^. SJF. YM 

. AjirthmJam ZHS <30 I12JQ5* 37JB« 0.1*73 • 13710* UMly 

- vj.?!: Brwuhftl sua TUBS 302*35 tub IM2S* I7M — M73 HHI* 

Frankfurt iMU 17U 3J3»*. 103* tt*B* 4.W BU6* UIU* 

•? :* ij-« London (b) 1X225 " 37735 UXMI ZiOJX 4353 78355 305X0 

1 rCp? Milan 178530 U3IJM 87473 22134 . 5W30 . 3UU ; Ma 8315 

> r-gfi anwYorWcS -. 83IO» 2X48 BIDS - 17170 3W1 SUV 230 - 214X5 

. Park BJUB 1M7» XD4T6 '*521* 27333 KM»* - 377 17545* 

2 'j* (1 h Tokyo 2UJ0 30*79 8143 3*41 0.11 * • 7J35 40X18- 9974 _ 

.! *«{• Zorteli 2.145' UU 8L92- 24475* 8.1214 • 7240* 444S9 * UlM* 

5 leCl » 04358 0JS5 23MB *738" M9U4 2XM 443892 . 14111 179X14 

' £-•■?£ ,M * 1 - 0M71 0740, U40 859800 10872 11782 57J898 23072, 229577 

CHxJnsn In Loodan onaZurhA. fbdnaneotttm- euraP9onc**rt*rn.Nu*rYar*rnital4pjJL 
•’ (a) Commercial franc W Amount* n—tfldto bur txmpooaa (c) Amounts o—Mtobuy am 
£ * a ° uar r> Untt *OfH>0 M Unit* of 1000 M UnttsofVUOOHXl: no) quafdtMAJ notavaHabl*. 
<=> ToDay on* poond: fWJUX225 __ 

;r ^ J? Other Dollar Valves 

V -41?? Currency mt U44 Currency par UJLS Cnrmncy w IU4 Currency nnr U54 

5 sji* Aroen-owlrol OBO Ha. markka 54875 Matay.rkB. 245V ' S. Kor.lma 89270 

: !4£*l*K*raLt 1X347 OmktnK. 15*50 Mvlmw 43UBV. ■' IwiiNMn 'Ml JO 

r 3 :^;4Auttr.MML 18x0 Mono Kon»* ? JWB Mon*. krone 754 und-kreoa 7540 

JV BntB.lkr.fr. 53.96 indkmrmnn 12MZT PM. pan . MTS T*h*anS 4005 

: Brazil ernz. 830500 Indo- iTOk* 1,12200 PorLtnendo 14250 TMIbaU . 24J2 

r ConodJan t 15449 Irtrt C 00551 Sowllrtrol 3X5 < . TPrkU Hra 547501 

CMMsayocai 215W kRIlBMk, 1X0600 KhI . 2339 UASdblNHn 34725 

-■C'C'fB- Donuh kroon 95935 Kawvitl dkar .03954 5. Air. rand 2581 Van*. bad v. KS5 

'^r. ; EbypL pound 135 

! : ■ Sterano: iai*S irtre t 

XX tf Sources: Boncim Oo Btnotvx (Brussm*t)j Banco Convrfrc/al* Italfono (MOon)! Boom* 

i ttooata de Port* t Ports); IMF tSOfV; BAH {dinar. rival cSrtiani). Ofttm-Oata tram Kmritn axl 

SJJI • 

J? j hrierest Rates 


- 

, , Frankfurt 

2M55 

1768 


■*? Lawton C» 

1*225 

— 


H ;; i> Milan 

IJBSjM 

UVJO 

: . 

, S tlBwVurtCcJ 

.. 

l»> 

. 

,. 

8068 

11479 


2U5D 

30879 


-• 1 ‘ ! ^:**v **lch 

2.165- 

UUZ 

■ • - 

“ ' S *«•? ,ECU 

08358 

flats 

- : * 


186471 

07001 


Interest Bales 


^ XjX*r 
bl 

s <?■ '• . V 

“ .-r»5T3f 


i Zfi 

. -i J « 
* * o** i: 


• »u r- 

f 

■u . ir / 


to o emwey Pcy ritt Ouss 

. Swts* Frank 

Donor pmoiH Frw Stwltav - Prooe . KU .. son 

iBMMto IMIH am *4*k- • 1HMM6 9U^M4 8W«M T16 

2mgathl IVirlh *-*Vt lltWlli W* . * M . h 

Smooths IVMH* 4t4M 41M*t li frll Ik 9 9CXVL . IMm 7A 

6 mounts 8U08k 4 9V4W 419-4H IIKfllH IDIW-Mlfc ft 

• " W/3M" . 

23/32 7 j|i. • 

lywr .SIMM 4BfrS»l. ..4IMW 11U-11W -1M1W 8A. 

Sources: Mown Guaranty, (dollar, DM SK. Pound. FF): Liard* Bank {£COJ; #»ot*x 
(SDR). Ratos oputlcabl* la tnttrtenk OaPaalH OtSI mttlkm nilnhnueiL <ar mnoknduntl. 


Key Muncy States i 


UnatdSWdw 
Dtecouot Rote - 
Federal Rate 
Prlra» Knte 
BrMotr Loan BMn 
Om Fvw 9V-179 dan 
IraBdtb TraaMry Wfl* . 
4-month Treororr BBts 


Chon Pro. ' 

.m -m- 

■ 7H Btk 
950 . 9 JO. 
I&4 BW 
70S- 735 

771 *» 

778 7X3 




CD* ****** 

740 

agf 

West Gammy 



LonunraRnn 

&50 

u -a i . 

OrensSmbt Rote 

450 

r?£i- 

Ona JUaofli Memnnfc 

iM 

Z&tr 

J^tesaSii latarboak . 

490 

f 1 */?. 

6-nmtti Intorlmk 

■ 494 

;;-*£* 4' 

Prance 

flfc 

Inferventlea Rota 

i- -i 

CallMaaay 


!»* 2*6. 


*V» 


Mnaatoutortma 


i-v. 

IrawtO totortonk 

9VH 


AsbaMlarBepMita 

dfccxs 

Imaafli 1 Mi-IM. 

2 m oa tilt . . IK-IK . - . 

SdVMlM IM-8U 

Smontto Irtk-Wn 

lyaor 

Sauna: ff&m. 


C$.MwMyMirimt h ifa 

0O.2S 

Mama LvnCfc Kandy Anscla 
20 day amove yield: . ^ 730 - 

Tdnrota loMrast Sat* Indmc 7772 . 
Sourer: Merritt Lynch. TMarata. 



< :i - 

f;Pt, 


ii-M 

■i , ■ *frt.y 

5 ^InuSa}.’ 


Bank Bov Rota 
CollMonay 
finseiy Trenrera BUI - 
MMoIt lotertootc 


Dlsaaml Ruhr 
Cofl Moony 
48 re r intnrbopk 


ni4 . im 

HA.* 1« 

— 115/33 

- 11 J/U 


. S • 5 

*wu 

71/1* . .***•- 


j*. ■' I H 
!;§!■ * 


Jurats: Baritn CoameabanK OVtft 

LwmU. Son* of Tokyo. 


. ft* 2S: 

• ;• .-AiH -.•pMi-.-y.dfv* 

Hmtcm ' 33605 . '32630 —030. 

L mmn m n nv 32600 — K15- 

.PmSsnUkHa) 33*34 ' 33M7- .. .~0X0 

Zurich .. 338x5 32*00 _-035 
IxndOO." *. JZStf - d&tt “000. 

MwYorfc — .52670 . +120 

t-uxmnboun?- port* <xM intn otHckU Hx- 

. Ana/ Mans Kam*. ana Gotten oao n ki* and 
>'«MMnp-xr*eow-M9*n Yerk-Caam mrant 
contract. ABarkmtn tt*. fptreooc*. . . 
Soon*: RtuHrs. -j. . ‘ 


Hcraib^^^ribunc. 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


United Biscuits Profits Under Fire 

Diversification, Cookie Price War Trouble Holders 


By LEONARD SILK 

Now Yorfc Timet Service . . 

r ASHINGTON— With U.S. fiscal policy in disarray, 
some l^gtslators are wiUmg to say that witVr the 
enamor nor the emperor's men hawedofhes. Senator 

MnpL- A TV -f -1 J| .1 xn -re ■ J .* - _ 


Off 17 % 

In Period 

- New Car Costs , 
Programs Cited 

Compiled bf Old Sufi F/Vm Xtepatoke 

DETROIT — Ford Motor Co. 
reported Friday that third-quarter 
net income fell 17 percent from a 
year earlier, to S3 1 3 nnllion. or 
$1.70 a share, largely due to new 
car incentive programs and prod- 
uct development costs. 

The company earned S379.7 mil- 
lion, (x $105 a sham, in the 1984 
third quarter. 

Ford said revenue declined 2 
. percent in the latest quarter, to 
SM.6 baikm, from SI 1.8 billion, 
while operating income dropped 57 
percent in the latest quarter, to 
SI 55.2 mill io n from 5362.7 million. 

Analysts estimated the automak- 
ers incentive programs reduced 
pretax earnings by about S30 mil- 
lion and that its 53-bflKon program 
for its 1986 Taurus and Sable inter- 
mediates due out this December 
also bit heavily into results. 

But despite the lower results, in- 
dustry analysts said Ford could 
have its second best year ever with 
1985 earnings projected at about 
$2.34 billion. Last year Ford 
earned S2.91 billion. 

On the New York Stock Ex- 
change Friday, Ford shares fell 75 
cents, to dose at S45J75. 

Ford said nine-month net fell 18 
percent from a year earlier, to $ 1.80 
billion, or $9.67 a share, from S2. 19 
biflkm, or $1 1.90, a year earlier. 

' Sales totaled S38.71nIBon, down I 
percent from $38.9 bOhon. 

Ford said its U.S. operations 
earned an after-tax profit of $211 
million, a drop of S104 million 
from last year. Non-U-S. opera- 
tions posted net earnings of $102 
million, op 57 percent from $65 
million in third quarter 1984. 

Ford Motor Credit Co„ its fi- 
nance unit, also posted gains with a 
record $96 million in net income, 
np 17 percent. 

A two-week strike at Ford's Lo- 
rain, Ohio, plant reduced factory 
sales 2 percent from a year ear her. 

(UPJ, AP) 

-K ACiqinres CoBipiaer Interests - 

Earlier, the New York Times re- 
ported from Detroit : 

Ford has purchased minority in- 
terests in two companies that spe- 
cialize in the development of arufi- 
rial-mi exigence computer systems. 
The automaker said Wednesday 
that it would invest up to S28 mil- 
lion for up to 10 percent equity in 
each of Inference Corp. of Los An- 
geles and Carnegie Group Inc. of 
Pittsburgh- 

Japan to Cut 
Tariffs on 
1 , 800 Items 

( haled Press International 

TOKYO — Responding to U.S. 
pressure, Japan will reduce tariffs 
an average of 21S percent on over 
1,800 hems, Japanese government 
officials sard Friday. 

The list of 1,849 items on which 
tariffs wiD be reduced or eliminated 
cm Jan. 1 includes automobile tires, 
computer equipment and related 
parts, palm oil, bananas, canned 
crab, newsprint and consumer 
goods, officials said 
Tariffs on nine computer-related 
items, including mainframe com- 
puters and ports, will be cut by 20 
percent and eventually removed 
Japan’s trade surplus with the 
United States, which has prompted 
protectionist moves in the U.S. 
Congress, was $37 billion last year 
and is expected to reach SSObmiort 
this year. 

Tariff cats on wines, which were 
sought by West European coun- 
tries, have been postponed until 
early 1987 while new rates on leath- 
er goods will be fixed toward the 
end of this year, the officials said 
Tariffs will be eliminated cm 38 
items such as palm oil, automobile 
tires and electronic switching sys- 
tems while import duties will be 
reduced by more than 20 percent 
on an additional 31 products, in- 
cluding boneless chicken and ba- 
nanas, the officials said 
The decision was said to be in 
line with a market-opening pro- 
gram announced by the govern- 
ment of Prime Minister Yasuhiro 
Nakasoae in July to ease friction 
between Japan and its trading pan- , 
nets. 

Meanwhile; in Los Angeles, it 
wa&annonnced that a poll taken in 
the United States and Japan 
showed that most Americans be- 
lieve trade with Japan is hurting the 
U.S. economy and retaliatory mea- 
sures should be taken. 

The poll, conducted by the Los 
Angdes limes and the Japanese 
daily Yonriuri Shimbtm, showed 
that one in four Japanese believe ! 
relations between the two nations : 
have worsened in the last year and ! 

a half. - ’ _ . 

, One somewhat surprising result ‘ 
of the poU is that a substantial 40 
percent. of the Japanese surveyed 1 
agreed that their nation is bong < 
fairly blamed for U.S. trade prob- I 
tens. 1 


By Bob Hagcrry 

International HeraSJ Tribune 

LONDON — Sir Hector 
Laing, chairman of United Bis- 
cuits (Holdings) PLC, called up 
his broker early Monday morn- 
ing to ask about an Eders take- 
over bid for a rival British food 
company. AUied-Lyoas PLC 
The chairman took the news 

calmlv. The audacious £] .S-bil- 
Eon (5236-bfflion) bid from H- 
ders LXL Lid. of Australia was, 
nonetheless, a sobering sign that 
even the healthier British compa- 
nies are no longer safe from 
predators. 

For almost any predator. 
United Biscuits would prove a 
tough cookie. Sir Hector, who 
has headed the company for 20 
years, is a much more formidable 
figure than his gentle voice and 
gold reading glasses suggest. He 
is an old friend of Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher and a direc- 
tor of both Exxon Corp. and the 
Bank of England. 

His company do mina tes Brit- 
ish sales of cookies and crackers 
— or biscuits, to use the all- 
embracing British term — with a 
market share of about 46 per- 
cent. Worldwide, only Nabisco 
Brands Inc. makes more biscuits. 

But a cookie price and promo- 
tion war has chomped deeply 
into profits from the company’s 
main UjS. unit, Keebler Co„ 
leaving the parent’s per-share 
earnings stagnant over the past 



Sir Hector Laing 

three years. Meanwhile, some in- 
vestors are losing patience with 
attempts to diversify into such 
areas as restaurants' and frozen 
foods. 

“We have an awful lot of capi- 
tal tied up in jam tomorrow,” 
W.P. Gunn, UB’s deputy chair- 
man, said this week. 

Some analysts, such as Julian 
T-flkfn of Scrimgeour Vickers & 
Co, predict that earnings ai 
United Biscuits will show a 
healthy gain again next year. But 
the stock market remains skepti- 
cal. and Sir Hector acknowl- 


edged in an interview that the 
company is under pressure to 
produce the jam soon. 

Should a bid come, “they are 
vulnerable,’' said another lead- 
ing food-share analyst, who did 
no! wish to be identified. 
"They’ve not given shareholders 
3 particularly good ride in recenL 
years,” 

Sir Hector has certainly taken 
note of the wave of food-indus- 
try takeovers, typified by RJ. 
Reynolds’s S4.9-'billion purchase 
last June of United Biscuits’s big 
rival, Nabisco. In a speech this 
week. Sir Hector deplored the 
growing willingness of British 
fund managers to sell control of 
companies whenever the price is 
right. 

“We should just stop and ask 
ourselves whether as sharehold- 
ers we are acting in our own or 
our country’s best long-term in- 
terest when we take every oppor- 
tunity of immediate reward,” he 
said.' 

The stock market, however, is 
obdurately focused on more 
short-term mattera, such as prof- 
its at Keebler, a Chicago-based 
maker of cookies and snacks that 
United Biscuits acquired for $50 
milli on in 1974. Long one of 
United Biscuits’s strongest per- 
formers, Keebler accounts for 
around a third of the parent’s 
annual sales of £1.75 billion. 

The trouble began in 1983 

(Continued on Page lL-CoL 5) 


Rush for Yen Causes Chaos in Tokyo 


Reuters 

TOKYO — A Bank of Japan 
announcement Friday that it would 
foster higher short -term interest 
rates triggered chaos in Japanese 
money markets and pushed the yen 
sharply higher against tire dollar. 

Bankers said it was the wont day 
in tire Japanese bond market for 40 
years. Both bond and stock prices 
fell, chalking up major losses for 
investors. 

As the day progressed, prices of 
U.S. government bonds also fell 
sharply in New York and overseas 
centers in a reaction to the Bank of 
Japan announcement. [Page 10.] 

The Bank of Japan, which nor- 
mally helps the financial system 
during December by temporarily 
distributing money until bonuses 
paid by banks to workers stream 
bade to the banks as savings and 
store receipts, said Friday it would 
not be so helpful this year. 

The central bank move forced up 
short-term interest rates. The one- 
month commercial biU discount 
rate climbed by % of a percentage 
point to 7.1875 percent and other 


short-term rates soared by li to h 
of a percentage point. 

Money market traders, fearing a 
liquidity shortage, rushed to buy 
cheap yen. but found few sellers. 
With funds denied in the short- 
term money market, operators 
turned to the commercial lull dis- 
count market but faced an absence 
of buyers, market sources said. 

So attention turned to the yen 
bond sales and prices rapidly de- 
clined. 

“The one-day drop is the worst 
in postwar history,” one pension 
fund manager said. 

The yidd on the key 6.8-percem 
10-year government bond jumped 
to 622 percent at the dose Friday 
from Thursday’s 5256 percent 

In Tokyo, tire dollar closed at 
214.95 yen, down from 216.00 on 
Thursday. In London, tire dollar 
was quoted at 214.80 yen. 

Foreign-exchange dealers said 
the bank's move was clearly aimed 
at strengthening tire yen in line 
with tire policy agreed SepL 22 by 
the Group of Five industrialized 
nations. 


Tin Trading Suspension Extended 


Cotnpiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 
LONDON — Trading in tin re- 
mained suspended Friday on the 
London Metal Exchange and offi- 
cials said there would be no busi- 
ness through Monday. 

The LMETs board and commit- 
tee met Friday, ext en ded the trade 
suspension and agreed to recon- 
vene Monday. Meanwhile, officials 
of the International Tin Council 
met to discuss the deepening crisis. 

Trading was halted Thursday on 
the metal exchange and the year- 
old market in Kuala Lumpur after 
the ITC said it no longer had the 
funds to buy tin and keep prices 
above the predetermined floor of 
£8,500 (512,180) per metric Lon. 


The 29-year-old ITC is com- 
posed of 22 tin producing and con- 
suming countries. It implements 
the 1982-87 International Tin 
Agreement to stabilize prices by 
s elling when the metal is in demand 
and, more frequently, buying when 
the metal is too plentiful. 

Traders said that in recent years 
the ITC has had to buy up produc- 
tion of non-members such as Brazil 
and China to finance tire bolding of 
massive tin stocks. 

The buffer stock currently holds 
about 60,000 metric tons, valued at 
around £500 million. 

Last month, the ITCs six export- 
ing members — Malaysia. Indone- 
sia, Thailand, Australia, Zaire and 


Nigeria — pledged an extra cash 
donation or £60 million pending 
approval of their governments. 

But Pieter de Koning, manager 
of the buffer stock, said that the 
ITC had received no funds. 

The LME asked traders to speci- 
fy their positions, fearing those 
bolding heavy stocks could face 
bankruptcy if prices slumped. 

The ITC said heads of its mem- 
ber delegations met Friday to pre- 
pare for a special session of the 
governing council Tuesday and 
Wednesday. 

It was widely speculated that 
trading in London and Kuala Lum- 
pur would not resume until after 
that session. (Reuters, API 


Analysts See Lesson in Collapse of Tin Prices 


By Richard Lander 

Reuters 

LONDON — The suspension of 
international tin trading because of 
an inability to maintain prices 
demonstrates once again how the 
laws of supply and demand can 
ruin efforts to hold commodities 
prices at artificially high levels, an- 
alysts said Friday. 

Tm prices fell shaiply in London 
on Thursday before the suspension 
of trading on tire London Metal 
Exchange, and experts say they 
could soon drop by as much as 50 
percent. Such a fieefal] would 
cause serious harm to governments, 
miners and tin companies around 
the world, especially in major pro- 
ducer nations like Malaysia, Indo- 
nesia, Thailand and Bolivia. 

Already many developing na- 
tions have been battered by tire 
effects of falling prices for primary 
commodities from sugar to copper 
and oil after enjoying prosperity as 
prices boomed in the 1970s. 

The tin emergency was triggered 
Thursday when tire International 
Tin CounriTs buffer stock manag- 
er, Pieter de Koning, announced 
that be no longer had funds to 
continue supporting the price by 
buying tin. 

Immediately after the announce- 
ment, trading was halted on tire 
LME, the world's leading forum 
for trading metals, as well as in 
Kuala Lumpur, the other main tin 
dealing center. . 

Business remained suspended 
Friday cm the London exchange as 
officials of tire ITC, which groups 
leading producers and consumers, 
looked for ways of resuming trad- 


ing without causing a price crash. 

One suggestion is that ITC mem- 
bers, particularly producers, could 
pump more money into the buffer 
stock, which already contains 
about £500 million (S760 million > 
of tin bought in a futile attempt to 
keep prices above £8.500 per metric 
ton (1.1 short ions). 

But producers have failed to fol- 
low up a promise made last month 
to inject more cash into tire buffer 
stock. In any case, many analysts 
believe this would be a futile ges- 
ture that would waste more money 
without achieving anything. 

"They have to face facts that the 
supply-demand situation will have 
to prevail," said one London trad- 
er. “Supply has exceeded demand 
for some time and the market has 
to stabilize at a realistic level" 

Few traders will do more than 
guess at what a “realistic" level 
may be without buffer-stock sup- 
port. Estimates vary between 
£4,000 and £6,500 a meuic ton. all 
well bdow tire 34-month low of 
£8,140 quoted Thursday when 
trading was baited. 

Analysts say that such a price 
drop could dose mines and severe- 
ly dent state revenues among ITC 
producers. These countries already 
have had to obey tight export quo- 
tas for the past three years while 
non-members such as Brazil and 
China have increased sales without 
restrictions. 

Malaysia's primary industries 
minister, Paul Leong. expressed 
concern Friday for tire livelihood of 
his country’s 23,000 tin miners. 
Share prices of Malaysian tin mines 


quoted on the London stock ex- 
change were marked lower. 

The analysts also warned that a 
the effects of the crisis could spread ' 
beyond the leading tin-mining na-_ 
lions. A sharp drop in prices could 
threaten historic tin operations in 
Cornwall, England, an area where 
unemployment is already high, as 
well as the financial stability of 
metals- trading companies. 


rsrrn finances et 

S MANAGEMENT 

UuLEJSjA E NEVA f- LX I '1.4 .'..Vi j 

We offer all types of financial, 
management, and lax shelter 
.services. Our strategic invest- 
ment program will offer mini- 
mum risk, with maximum 
profit, plus our bi-monihly 
New Technology for Investors 

newsletter. Both programs are 
yours at no charge or obliga- 
tion - fill in the coupon and 
mail today. 


I would like to receive the FIMA 
1 Complimentary investment 

( Service 

FIMA FINANCES ET 
I MANAGEMENT SA 
* BOtTE PO STALE 820 

1 1211 Geneva 1 
SWITZERLAND , 

| VAMP- . 


* itjrmilv.e. 1 

I ■----I 


JiyO-Lj /Y^-f 


U.S* Stocks 
Report, Page 8. 

Page 9 


Knapp, Partner 
Bid $1.4 Billion 
For Japan Firm 


The group agreed to try to weak- 
en the dollar worldwide, helping 
U.S. exports and keeping protec- 
tionist measures at bay. 

Bui fears of an eod-of-year mon- 
ey shortage persisted all day. Bank- 
ers said their institutions were wor- 
ried about having to borrow at 
punishing interest rales. 

The Tokyo stock market average 
dipped 114.09 to a closing 
12,854.99 although widespread 
confusion limited turnover. 

A trust bank fund manager said 
the bank's signal that it would not 
lend funds just as tire market start- 
ed moving towards year end tight- 
ness proved more dramatic than 
any discount rate announcement. 

It reversed any notions that the 
central bank might endorse lower 
interest rates to help stimulate do- 
mestic demand to absorb more im- 
ports and stave off foreign protec- 
tionist sentiment against Japan, he 
said. 

One senior dealer said: “The 
market is still a new bom baby and 
now is not the right time to com- 
ment on how well it is going to 
grow in future.” 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — The U.S. fi- 
nancier. Charles Knapp, and a 
London partner on Friday made an 
unsolicited, SI. 4-billion offer for a 
Japanese company in what ap- 
peared to be that nation’s first hos- 
tile takeover fighL 

If directors of - Minebea Co., 
a leading producer of miniature 
bail bearings and electronics pans, 
reject the proposal, a hostile tender 
offer will be launched, officials of 
the partnership said. 

Mr. Knapp’s Trafalgar Holdings 
Lid. and London-based Glen In- 
ternational bold about a 30- percent 
stake in Minebea. 

The financier was removed as the 
chairman and chief executive of 
Financial Corp. of America last 
summer. He now runs Trafalgar, 
his own Los Angeles-based finan- 
cial services firm. He said a month 
ago that he planned 10 bid for Min- 
ebea. 

Glen International is a London 
securities and investment concern. 

In Tokyo. Minebea's vice presi- 
dent, Iwao Ishizuka, expressed his 
company's readiness to fight the 
bid, saying Minebea would formal- 
ly respond to the offer after study- 
ing it thoroughly, Japan's Kyodo 
News Service reported. 

Takahami Takahashi. president 
of the Japanese company, has said 
previously that he would take “all 
necessary steps” to thwart Mr. 
Knapp, including issuing new stock 
to dilute the holdings of Trafalgar 
and Glen. 

At a news conference in Los An- 
geles, Trafalgar’s general counsel, 
Mark Dodge, said be had been in- 
formed by Tokyo securities dealers 
that the Japanese Finance Ministry 
had told the nation's stock dealers 


not to assist Mr. Knapp’s takeover 
bid. 

Mr. Dodge said he is scheduled 
to meet next week in Tokyo with 
the director of the foreign capital 
division of Japan's trade ministry 
to discuss his company's inten- 
tions. 

A Trafalgar spokesman, Don 
Reynolds, also said his company is 
prepared to file suit if Mr. Takaha- 
shi dilutes the company's stock. 

The SI. 4-billion Trafalgar-Glen 
offer would comprise cash, con- 
vertible debentures and U.S. gov- 
ernment bonds. 

With 342.44 mini on Minebea 
shares outstanding and reserved for 
future issuance, the offer works out 
to about S4.14 a share. That is 
slightly more than a 10-percent 
premium over the S3.74 value of 
Minebea's stock at the dose of 
business Thursday. 

When Trafalgar first announced 
its intentions, Minebea's stock was 
trading about S1.40 a share. 

Mr. Dodge said Trafalgar has 
invested about SI 25 million in try- 
ing to acquire Minebea. He said 
cone of those funds come from 
Trafalgar Partners, a subsidiary 
that so far has raised about SI bil- 
lion to finance corporate buyouts. 

The official added that Trafalgar 
believes Minebea’s earnings are too 
low and that his group would seek 
to lake control of Minebea's board, 
recapitalize the company, restruc- 
ture its finances and bring in Amer- 
ican management techniques. 

He said Trafalgar has no plans at 
this time to sell Minebea assets. But 
he said if the Japanese government 
objects to the transaction because 
about 7 percent of Minebea's sales 
are to the Japanese Defense Minis- 
try, that portion of its operations 
could be shed. 


China Imports Soar 67% 
As Exports Rise Only 2% 


Reuters 

BEUING — China’s trade situa- 
tion is continuing to worsen with 


rnodity prices and protectionism, 
according to official figures re- 
leased Friday. 

The People's Daily newspaper, 
said imports were up 67 percent in 
the first nine months from the year- 
earlier period, while exports rose 
only 13 percent The trade deficit, 
which stood at $3.16 billion at the 
end of June, widened to 54.4 billion 
at the end of September. 

“The fall in commodity prices on 
the world market in the past year 
along with the daily increase in 
protectionism has brought many 
problems for China's export 
trade," the newspaper said. 

But the Xinhua news agency 
quoted a ministry official as saying 
exports had grown quickly in the 
past three months and were expect- 
ed to pick up further in the last 
quarter of the year. 

The flood of goods which China 
has imported over the past year, 
much of it consumer supplies and 
motor vehicles, has eaten into the 
country’s foreign-exchange re- 
serves and helped cause a trade 
deficit, Xinhua said. 

The World Bank's senior vice- 
president. Ernest Si era. warned 
Friday in Beijing that the range of 
China’s export products is still" lim- 
ited, while competition from other 
exporters will increase. He was at- 
tending a meeting to mark the 
opening of the bank’s first office in 
China. 

Separately, China said Friday it 
would boost its borrowings from 
commercial banks over the next 
five years. Xinhua quoted Vice Fi- 


nance Minister Cai Haibin as tell- 
ing foreign businessmen that China 
had obtained most of its foreign 
funds from the World Bank or oth- 
er governments in the past. 

"We will use more commercial 
loans from foreign banks and ob- 
tain funds through more diversified 
channels,'' he said. 


RES IN DEP 

An Account for (he Cautious Investor 
to Protect and Increase Capital 


U.S. Dollar Denominated 
Insured by U.S. Govt. Entities 
Important Tax Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Market Yields 
No Market Ride 
Immediate Liquidity 
Absolute Confidentiality 

CHEMICAL BANK, New York 

Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 

RES IN DEP 

Case Postale 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 

Please send prospectus and 
account application to: 


Nei maUfr mAm Hw USA 


The Value Line brings you 

HARD FACTS ON v 
1700 AMERICAN STOCKS 

The Value Line Investment Survey covers more than 1700 
American stocks, which account for over 90% of all dollar 
trading volume in U.S. equity markets. With The Value Line 
Survey, you have objective evaluations — updated every 
week— of just about any American stock that’s likely to 
come to your attention. 

Every three months, on a regular schedule, Value Line 
presents a new full-page report on each stock, packed with 
vital data, including 22 series of key operating and financial 
statistics going back 15 years and estimated 3 to 5 years 
ahead. Then, tor each stock— every single week— value 
Line updates the Price, future Performance and Safety 
ranks, Appreciation Potential, Yield, and estimated Earn- 
ings ana Dividends. 

This information will enable you to assess a stock's pros- 
pects based on hard financial facts. As a special intro- 
ductory offer, you can receive 12 weeks of Value Line for 


you will also receive trie value Line s 2000-page investors 
Reference Service with the latest full-page reports on over 
1700 stocks, together with the 72-page booklet, "A Sub- 
scriber's Guide. Send payment (no cash please) along 
with name and address together with this ad to DepL si 3 f cm 

THE VALUE LINE 

711 Thini Avenue, New York. N.Y. 10017. U.S.A. 

Payment in local urranou (British C64 French fr 738 Swiss fr20& DM 283) and 
roquttcu lor taformotioit wvjuM be UlwcioH uj: Value Um. Att.: AUttMVtraUa 
Samt-ptwllt. 2 Avfl. da VlUari. 76007 Paris, rial. S51 6X69). 

Datrtbvud ay KLU Royal Oaten Autmtrs PuBbcauoa Distribution Sanrtca , 
^HoHanA Anew 4 to 6 waaki tor dtfivary M 


; • * * */ ’■ *• —y ■ .■ ' V V 7* . “ ' * 





Iridajs 

NKSE 

Closing 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to ttie dosing on Wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


{ Contained from Page 8 ) 


34 Z1M PI 
24 li 13V» pionr 
45ta 31ta Pltnvl 
90 63 PltnB 

Plttst 
Plan P1 1 
PlonRs 
Planlm 
Pi 


S2 AA 1 
74 4-» I 


17 94k TrltE Of 1.10 43 1666 lfli 17 1716 + 'A 

43* 31* TucsEP M W t 577 3» 3W , 

16ta 9* TuHex M 10 14 ® J2? If* ]££ t ft 

20 ■& 16 Twin Da .90 57 14 8 IBtt 18 ltta + ta 

41 30 TreaUt 70 10 71 103 40 »ta 3W6 — * 

17* I3ta Tviers 41 U 12 ISZ 13* 13W 13*— V. 


US. Futures 


OMn won low Ow Che. 


5190 

4025 Aim £70 4370 

4270 

4270 

—.15 

41.10 

3877 Oct 39JS AUO 

3970 

3997 

+20 

4970 

3877 Dec 4170 4170 

41 JW 

41*3 

+75 

4070 

40*5 Neb 


4075 


EAt.Tates 

6780 Prev. Sate* 4744 




Prw. Dav oaen int. 23*35 off 91 





26ta 14ta QkRell 


63 33 QuakOs 149 U 15 936 56* 56 56*—* 

105 91 QuoOpf 956 »J lOnOZta 102ta lOZta — ta 

24ta 17 QuakSO 78 14 19 304 MW 23* 23*— ta 

mvt 5ta Quanex 17 20 5* 5ta Sta — ta 

34* 27 Questar 172 59 10 53 WVi 29ta 29*— ta 

26* 14ta QkRell 74a 1.1 14 SB 21* 21* 21* 


Season Season 
Hlgn Low 


Open HWl Low Close O*. 


Gram 


WHEAT CCBTl 

&B8BSKJ minimum- dollars per OUfJwi 
303* 279* Dec 116* 3.1TO. 116* 3.W* +7M4 


Metals 


47* 23* 
14* 5* 
25* 14 
3* 2* 
20*4 19 
4* TA 
42* 22* 
13* 9* 
25* 13 


12 3* 

11* 9* 


13* 11* 
61* 29* 

8 70 

73* 
VI* 73 
73 5B 
27* 13* 
56* 33* 
BS% 66 * 


VF Com 

Valero 

Valor pf 

Vo levin 

VanDrn 

Voreo 

Vartan 

Varo 

Veeco 

Vendo 

VesfSe 

Vestrnn 

Viacom 

VaEPpf 

VoEluf 

& IW 

Vtshays 

Vomod 

VuIcnM 


128 U 11 
135 

344 13.9 


3 US 

40 ZA 12 
ITDaJOJ 


48 7 26 

040 1lJ0 
840 9J 
975 117 
772 110 

16 

26 

200 3J 13 


209 47 
1295 12* 

19 24* 
m pm 

20 27* 
53 4* 

240 26* 
62 13* 
T61 15* 
36 10* 
12 II 
280 12* 
1071 SB* 
78* 
10192 
20DZS7 
200 z 70 
220 26* 
33 57* 
5 85* 


46* 46*— * 
11* 12* + * 
24* 24* + * 
7W 2* 

23 23U + * 

4* 4* 

25* 25*—* 
13* 13* 


14* IS* + * 
1016 10* + ta 
io* ii + n 
12 * 12 * 

56* 57*— U 
7B16 78* 

92 92 —1 

87 B7 
70 ra 

a a — * 

56* 57* +1* 
84* 84*— 16 


Livestock 


2*2 

84 

TO 

170 

81 

9 

70 

2* 


70 

19 

17 

1*0 



*5 

17 

16 

1*0 

47 

7 

170 107 


178 

84 


78 

15 

13 

1*8 

47 

12 

174 

87 

8 

lJffl 

47 

7 

2*8 117 

a 

92 

17 

18 

76 

1* 

11 

20 

27 

9 

170 

81 



CATTLE <CM£1 

40000 lbs.- cents per lb. , 

67 AS 55j0Q DOC 6540 6650 

6745 5435 Feb 6275 6245 

67-57 55J30 Apr 6147 62JB 

6625 5675 JlSl 6175 6200 

6540 5570 Aua 59.00 MJO 

6040 50.10 Oct 5840 59JH 

6570 6040 Dec 

Est. Sales 17439 Prev. Sales 12571 
Prev. Day Open Int. 60793 up 737 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMEJ 
44400 lbs.- cents per Hx 
7370 58.10 NM 6577 6555 

7940 6040 Jan 6845 6845 

7170 4042 Mar 6845 6895 

71J0 6040 Apr 6870 &&M 

TOJtO 4a 10 Moy 6485 6895 

6850 6575 AUO 6695 6790 


Industrials. 


4207 6272 
6145 6175 
6150 6145 
5940 5VJ0 
5850 58.95 
60.10 


Est. Sales U41 Piev. Spies 1 JOB 
Prav.DavOnenlnL 9411 off 122 


65JOO 6575 
6820 6840 

6055 6877 
6755 6815 
6645 6487 
6695 6770 


HOGS (CME) 

30700 h»j- cents per lb. 

5055 3675 Dec 4645 4640 

33*7 38-10 Fata 4570 4575 

4775 36.12 Apr 4170 4175 

4975 3970 JlHl 4370 4350 

4955 48*5 Jui 4475 44.17 


4577 4677 
447S 4547 
4040 4090 
4370 4375 
4340 4342 


Currency Options 


Oa.25 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Ootku & Strike 

uaoerlyfno Price Colls— 4-ost Pots— LoH 

Nov Feb Mov Nov Feta Mav 
12480 British Poonds-ceoti per unit. 

BPotmd • • 140 r S l 060 S 

142.17 145 0*5 * S r S 

142.17 l® 0.10 s s r s 

14217 1S5 055 S S r S 

62400 West German Marks-ants Per unH. 

□Mark 37 095 S 9 r s 

3773 38 r s S 050 s 

6750400 Japanese ven-ioams of o coat par onu. 

JVon 45 r s s 075 s 

4657 47 073 sirs 

<2500 Ssriss Fnmcfrcoflts par unit. 

SFranc 45 r s s 810 * 

4673 46 042 S S r S 

4673 47 070 S 5 r S 

Dec MOT Joo Dec Mar J an 
12500 Brit Mb Ponnds-cnds oar wilt. 

BPound 130 r 1230 r 0.15 r 

14217 IK 7*5 r r r M 

142-17 140 3J0 570 640 175 4*5 

14217 145 175 r r r r 

615W West German MarkS-CMits per amL . 


a r r 

2 * r r 

3® r r 

31 r r 

32 5-m r 

33 453 578 

34 2»6 472 

35 295 r 

K r r 

37 172 1.95 

38 0.m 175 

39 073 896 


S 071 r 

7.16 r 073 

r w r 

r 071 807 


r (MM r 

r 814 0*3 

3773 37 172 1.95 r 05 IB 

37-73 38 on; 175 r 078 r 

3773 39 833 896 1*5 r T 

125700 Frvncfi Francs-IOttn of O cant per wilt. 

FFronc 110 13J0 r r r r 

6750700 Japanese Yen-iOMhsaf a cent per on It. 

JYen 38 170 r s r r 

4677 40 6*6 r r r r 

4677 41 5*9 r r r r 

4677 42 4*8 r r r r 

4677 43 3J8 r r r r 

4657 44 242 r r 077 r 

4657 45 176 r rrr 

.4457 46 5.88 143 t 0*5 095 

4677 48 079 076 S T r 

<2700 Swiss Francs-cenls per will. 

SFranc 40 673 T f t T 

4CMO 41 536 r r r r 

*6M 43 372 r r om r 

*L03 44 r r r 818 85V 

4673 45 145 r r 844 r 

4673 46 ITS r r 073 r 

4673 48 074 1.10 178 r r 

Jm Apr Jol Jan Apr Jut 
4738700 Ja p an e s e Yen-iMthi e> a cent per amt. 

JYen 48 o.40 % 5 f s 

Total coil voL 13750 COM open w. i 

Total put vw. 4756 Pul open let. i 

r— Not traded. 3 — No option offered. 

Last Is premium (purchase price). 

Source: AP. 


Financial 


If COMP . mOB UCMB 
palms and cents 

200*5 T75JB Dec 18770 38790 W90. 

20375 18370 Mar 18 995 18970 18875 

20670 18X90 JOB T907D 19045 19070 

19235 1BM» Sep 

Est. Sates 46741 Prev. Soles 
Pnv.Dm'OWolntRJlt 
VALUE UVIS tXCED 


W7A0 —X 

35 

192.10 —*• 


55* 35* Xerox 370 62 13 1901 48* 48% 48* 

55* 48* Xerox of 5*5 99 10 55 55 SS + % 

39 19* XTRA 44 37 11 49 22* 21* Zita-* 


Company Resuits 


30* 24* ZoleCp 172 49 12 2 27 27 27 

IB 714, Zapata .12 17 55 352 7* 7* 7* 

57* 32* Zovres 48 .9 17 557 55*4 54* 54* 

35 1W ZenlttiE B38 506 17* 16* 16*—* 

21* 15* Zeros 76 17 16 265 19* 19* 19*— ’A 


paints and cents 
OTJS lauo Dec. 19370 wn raw 

209*0 19058 Mar 19555 19550 19*73 

1WM Jun ... 

wms ' 20005 ' Sep 
EsLSates PTw.Sales 2514 

Prev. Day Open hit 75Baff«l 


HY5S CO MP.m PEXtKYFO 
POtoLfOnflOKIn * 

U770 ioijo ooc tomb nsss W79fl 
mg 10550 -Mar ions MMS 10890 
12070 10490 Jon 11075 11075 WAS 


»U5 — 90 
19455 —170 
19695 —170, 
19055 —1.10/ t 


12070 10490 Jon 11075 11025 WAS 

S^’SSp^siJg^JS 55 ™ 1 ” 

Prev. Day Open I rtf. . 6749 off 100 


ITS — JO 

’-15 -J5 


Commodity Indexes 


•' -’Clriso 

Moochrt — ; 905.10 f 

Reuters 9LA.* 

DJ. Futures 11959 

Com. Research Bureau- 22270 

Moody's : base 100: Doc. 31,1931. - 
P -praflm Inary; f- final • 

Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 13,1931. 
Dow Jones ; base liO : Dea 31, 1974. 


Prevfacs 

905509 

1,711.40 

12033- 

22 X 20 - 


Revetwe and aroflls or lasses, m millions, art lo local 
currencies unless olherwHe Indicated. 


37* 23* Zumln 152 19 13 127 34* 3< 34*- ta 


N\SE Highs-Lov^ 


Gommwlities 


Cbmmoclkies 



NEW HI OHS 94 


AmBdcst 
CbasMnti 675 
CorneGI ■ 
ITTCppfO 

OcS3«s»f 

PhITVonH 

StorerBrds 
Vomado Inc 

ADT 

Oiromallv 
CorroanB 
lndIM27Saf 
MarohvOll 
OcdP 212pf 
Pkmtnon 
TrllonEnoy 
Weston El 

Aro Care 
Colon Penn 
GrtLakelnt 
IntNtti 11SSU 
NLIndust 
OcdP230pi 
ProctGomb 
Triton En of 

BUvnuGspt 
Commit Sd 

1C indusl 

LeoaPkrtt 

OodPtwi 

PeoBovss 

RussToos 

UnlleverPIc 


NEW LOWS 30 


Acme Elect 

CT5 Carp 

GFCon* 

Inland Sfl 

NlodulCmSys 

swiders 

TexComBn 

US Home 

AmesOpt wl 
Oevecifpf 

Gan Motors 
Kennmtl 
PalneWetx- 
S vceCo wl 
Timken Co 
WstCoNA el 

vIBekerind 
Cometa Pi 
Grace Co 
Lear Petri 
RobrtsnH 
5teeooCo 
TawieMfe 

CLC Am 

F 3l Miss Co 
Haim line 
MCOHJ 
Rvmerpf 
Swank Inc 
TmCaaPloe n 


U.S. Bonds Fall 
On Japanese Move 






Oa.25 




Close 



High 

LOW 

Bid 

Ask 

ciroe 

French francs P«r metric tan 



Dec 

1770 

1740 

1750 

1740 

+ 10 

Mar 

1701 

1768 

1745 

1770 

+ 5 

Mav 

N.T. 

N.T. 

U*> 

1*05 

+8 

Aug 

1*50 

1*50 

1*35 

1*48 

+ 4 

Oct 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1*40 

1*2 

+6 

Dec 

1*90 

1*90 

1*80 

1*93 

+ 2 

l Est. vol. 

: 650 lots of 50 lens. Prev. actual 

| sales: 1751 Iota. Open Interest: 24,120 


COCOA 






Frencb francs oer 1 M kg 



Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1.945 

1.965 

+ 3 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1,970 

1905 

+ 4 

Mav 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1990 


+ 30 

JJv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1.095 

— 

+ 20 

Sop 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2700 

— 

+ 20 1 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

— 

2730 

+ 15 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

— 

1030 

+ 10 

Est. voL: 0 lots of 10 Iml Prev. actual sales: 

4 lata. Open Interest: 546 




COFFEE 






France francs per 100 kg 



Nov 

1.975 

1.945 

1940 

1.9S5 

+ 14 

Jan 

2710 

2715 

2705 

3/BQ 

+ 19 

Mar 

2740 

2720 

2735 

2050 

+ 23 

Mav 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2JM8 

<2065 

+ 4 

JIv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2 TK 

Z\\3 

+ IS 

Sen 

1145 

2,145 

1140 

■— 

+ 3S 

Nov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1140 

— 

+ 1 S 

Est. vol.: 

: 77 lots of 5 tons. Prev. actual sales: 

90 lata Open interest: 287 



Sourer: Bourse du Commerce. 




U57 per ounce 


N. T. N.T. 22W» 
N.T. N.T. 32870 


Volume: 25lononUaz. 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 


Low Seme Settle 


sue., 1 "* Era 

Stortkw per metric ten 

Dec W70 13670 12670 13670 13600 93770 

MOT 157*0 745JW MUt 14600- 744*0 M7J» 

» Mav 15040 15840 14*70 U940 15070 15060 
.NT- N.T. 15470 154*0 15600 15770 
16140 14140 M040 14040 161*0 14170 
Volume: 448 lots of 9) tora. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric tw 

2£- KH '■2 D0 I-ZB 1JM uos mm 

Mar -1734 1(742 1(743 1#744 1J46 U4S 

Mar N.T. N.X.. 1700 1710 1794 1710 

Volume: 17W lots of 78 tarts. 

COFFEE 

5ierflno per metric ten 

*tev IJ75 1728 LW« 1798 1740 17 AS 

Joe 1JED 1745 17H 1(790 1705 1706 

Mar 17« 1.785 1707 1712 1733 1739 

JAM 1710 17» 1JOS 1750 1755 
Jhr 1774 tJOO 1» 1740 1770 17*0 




14- IV 77-14- 


Dividends 


1719 1775 im 17H 1798. 1700 
l«v N.T. N.T. 1700 1*10 WOO 1790 
• volume: UI71B late a* S tom. 

GASOIL 

U5. deflars per metric tan 
NOV .3SE50 24850 24023 24270 24170 28270 
Dec KUD 25S2S 2 SU 0 W72S 3S9M 3S9JS 
M 257-73 ^BJ75 29*70 29*25 25775 25770 
Feta 2S70 25370 25425 25450 25X00 25329 
Mar 24S70 24570 24623 24650 24425 24470 
API HUS 23X00 29*23 29970 23770 P9MW 
May 5M70 23X7523225 23370 Z 12 M ZB70 
Jm 33070 22*70 22*7022*25 22&00 22* JD 
JIV 23170 2wna warm m en vwig p rwwn 
volume: ldtai Ms of KM) tons. 

Savrco3 :_ Reute rs and London PotroiBvm ex- 
•CwWp# (9080*1 i. 


3rd G 


Rove 


Nei I 
Per S 

TC. 

hor 

9 Mar 

ths 

Re vci 
Nol 1 
Per S 

title 

nc. 

hon 

Jrdo 

for. 

Revet 
Nel Ir 
Per & 

K- 

fwre 


NEW YORK — Prices of U5. government, 
bonds di piped sharply in New York and over- 
seas centers on Friday as rising interest rates in 
Japan triggered heavy sales of American bonds 
by Japanese securities firms. 

The sales follow the Bank of Japan’s move to 
engineer higher short-term rates as part of its 
efforts to boost the yen against the dollar. 

Dealers said an order to sell about S200 
million of UJS. securities in London by one of 
the major Japanese securities firms sent long- 
term bond prices down nearly a full point in 
early New York trading. 

Yen-bond prices also dropped sharply as 
yields rose, causing panic selling in what dealers 
in Tokyo described as the worst trading day (or 
about 40 years. 

“In two days, bond prices went down four 
points.” said A. Moriyama, senior wee presi- 
dent of Yamaichi Securities in New York. “This 
is very unusual — a collapsing market” 

Mr. Moriyama explained that with the rise in 
yields on yen-denominated issues, lie interest 
rate advantage offered by U.S. bonds narrowed, 
making them less attractive and causing prices 
to slump. 

Bond traders said heavy losses on yen bonds 
rorced liquidation of entire portfolios of U.S. 
securities by some Japanese 'institutions. 


DIM Futures 
Options 


IK ftmun *torM2SA»rtorta matt mr 4 


IAL 

- .18 


Mrflce Calh-SOiu 
Price Dec J*w Jm 

3ft 194 2M J-ia 

37 1.14 174 2*7 

38 077 1JJ 173 

39 13 W '7 

40 074 642 !« 

41 073 0*1 880 


PntvMtte 
DM Mb r Jin 

677 0*4 468 

028 0J7 8*8 

044 U7 1*0 

IJ4 1J0 1.90 

XII — XM 

— — XU 


EallMrted Mol «*L 5237 . 
Cans: Thur. voL 1451 mm I 
PBtt: TW.Wi.2J42 0MB I 

Source: CME. 


London Metals 




LLSftHrcasuries 


DheeBOl 


Prw. 

Offer Bid 

Yield 

Yield 

Hum bta 773 771 

7*4 

7*4 

HMMffl 7*0 778 

779 

771 

1-veorbfll 7*9 7*7 

BAS 

840 

Pier. 

BM Offer 

Yield 

Yield 

30+eer hem 10118^210119732 
Source: SaMenon Brothers. 

MU5 

MJ9 

AMrrtV Lyvct Tnamrr MVr: 12970 

OMWterttaedoT: — art 

Avwe«eyiw:964« 

Sourer: MOfTiB twxA 






Ox 

25 

Stake MUM 


PetaLod 


mm Nw Dee JM Feb 

Illflnr 

Dec 

Jen 

PM 

145 — — - - 


1A4 

W 

_ 

170 in in ii - 

1 uu 

7/14 

n 

n 

175 a w n> n 

lint va 

i% 

zn 

OO t Jli 4 « 

z 

3H 

M 

A 

IBS Till ta 1 29/V 

Wr 

» 

49k 

flfc 

198 ID* % US14 1 VU 

1 wn 

1IW 

ms 


TMflUnMC 119*29 
T9W (45 IktaWL 495J94 
TWIMNiMI TUX 
Tetelnd msMSHHl 
IoUdc 



* 


HtebWI.fi Uni KUO Oniteur— 

LU 


Scarce: CBOE. 






2 I 

§ S 

§ 5 
s M 

M 

a 3s 
g -32 ta 

S.12-S us 

1 £ 

S .iS 


m 




V* liSO 
























































:♦ V V ; I i } » Mr 'r » fc-ife ft’r • ' .. V« **'ji ft l .'; , \ r * * 







■£>. 


•y >'l I 

- "' 'If * 1 


BUSINESS ROUNpui >,r.':v;, ; 

Peugeot Reportsa 


INTESSNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26-27, 19 



•■"’ ' 1-: - 
**•:«*•• 


Ml 






j „ ■. dad to ■ The two 

V ’ -*?• ■’ * :i r, ""“j? euseot SA, the Hffks, Aai^S^s':«*mot «»d 

' Z-; *’• .. rencfa P^udy owned amomak- ADKHaoS^^nS^rtrHt 

.lV ;. : re^ecow 4 ; 7^p«wai^dl2.7- 

S if™/** 1 ' ***** rgwtill 8 a of tte year ywr- 
- ‘OSS last year. \ «auixer«^5e^psnd. 

ie* - ■■ • "’ 2 ; : - ^ group expects to break even ,‘H» iwdicrioai -^isrt-Ae group 

?■ . '] /. !iS ti^i;> 0 *985 after several years of large ^ break eyeft thisyear i$ hi line 

; *r” , : V- ? fosses at major subsidiaries, a wth a forecast Toadeij Peugeot's 

" St; ^fj'pokesmausajd. chairman," Jackies CaNct, caiikr 

:. r ; . : 'S.Av & Parent company net profit to- ^ month, j^hedsosrid that 1 

1 >- -N; ■ -‘ 5 ?;T* a 141 million francs ($17.4 mil- a &zcabk 

‘■!' s ' ' - '' ion) m the first half of. tide v*» preram 1986. •?■■ 


\ Parent company net profit to- ft “?* *!*? **4*° ^ ft 
ialed 141 million francs ($37.4 mil- '’ft a &zcabk 

'ion) m the first half of this year T*" 

Aer a loss of 406 million francTin 

te Year-earlier nerinri atrote_un« may wdlreport moth- 


point for. the whole 9019 wiD also 
depend 00 a rapid resolu tio n erf 
problems cooewning a-aoto assets- 


^ ' ' ■ ■- ; -.’• ^^ ycar ’ carGcr • ••°iS I ff35 y ffgg t « , 5± 

•$» w 86 3 P® 10 ® 11 heavy costs related to staffing cots, 

■ £• % *?“ **- 43 ^on m the first half the raroanv add.- 


Xast year, group consolidated 
net loses totaled 341 million 
francs. 

This figure included an excep- 
tional tax gsm of 775 mfllkm francs 
doe 10 a change in French tax law. 
In 1983 group losses totaled 2i9 
bSiioa francs. . 

Peugeot’s improved results have 
been largely due to the success of 
its Compact 205 model which this 
year woo the World RaDy Qiaxnp}- 


- rum 46.43 billion in 

:*.V % 5s » )f 1984. 

J ® j. •; 


■■-'■■ ls =ai, 


first half the ooiBqttny sud.- 

Howeveq, a retum to break-even 


COMPANY NOm 


■ • ^ ' Ahihom SA will supply IS diesel 

a J ‘* wcomotives to the Burma Railways 
^orp. and parts for reconditioning 
_ 16 engines. France is providing 

" S ^ 3 J lbom 555 million in credit at 5- 
.‘r w ^ 5<«srcenLimeresL 
'" j .t { Cuoard line said its liner Qneen 

■ ^ . 3lzabeth-2 win he mnHw ntT^ ^ a 

" :osl °f 302 miffion Deutsche maths 

- '~ v 114 miffion) by Lloyd Werft yard 
■2 ^Jtt Bremerhaven. The lino*s speed 
..... &dll be increased to 32J knots. 
' wj? ^riiain’s opposition Labor Party 
- : n . v ._ BUed the decision unpatriotic. 

•/-■. *i£ v Hongkong Indnstrial A ComnKT- 
••"- v * «■ Saal Bank Ltd. shareholders have 


‘ «■ g oal Bank Ltd. shareholders have 
approved the proposed rights issue 
" 135 x 408-miriion 1 0-percent nonen- 
nulative redeemable preference 
-- -lrd^tf 2 h~ , «-^jarcs of 1 Hong Kong dollar (13 
^H-^jents) each. 

j 1 :r.- ; - Impala Pacffic Coip. and Sing 

12| W 9 ; rao Newqi^jers Ltd. said they and 

•"llllr 1 ~ _ j 


■ :'• j;ri •}€ u 
v - & ^ gn 

•*■• • J a* 5 

ipi 


other r mrr ests were the^Kryerscrf a. 
prime Kowloon rite s^d at agov- 
cxnrncmlandanaion for636-mil- 
lion Hcwig Kong dollars. 

LTV CorpL will bc aflowed by the. 
U^. Iniernal Retemie Service to 
postpone SI 75 mSmn m pension 
payments into three _pltos of the 
conrony^s steel anrt. LTV had 
sought the delay in pensioa pay- 
ments to conserve Ca*h- 
Mariae Midbod Banks Inc. of 
New York has: agreed to pmebase 
Gonmnetcial Cre& Badness Loans 
Inc, the suhsidiary of a financial 
nmt of GoatroLData Chip. Terms 
wore not disclosed- 
North Broken HSnUohfings Ltd. 
net profit fell to 2533, nuEion Aus- 
tralian dollars (S 17.65 millioa) in 
the year ended Jhm 30 from 31.41 
million doDars in the previons year. 
OcddbddJB^ndann Coq». said 







The company is now pinning ics 
recovery hopes on the 309 sedan 
launched earlier this mnnifr 


its Island Creek Coal Co. unit re- 
ceived approval of a $I.02-biHion 
con trac t to supply the Tennessee 
Valley Authority’s Cumberland 
plant with up to 36 nrilHou tons 
(32,66 miUkHi metric tons). 

Panconrinenrid Mines Ltd-Said it 
has exercised an option to acquire 
(he remainmg 50 percent stake in 
the Lady Loretta silver, lead and 
zinc’ project from Elf Aquitaine 
Triako Mines Ltd. for l(L5-millioa 
Australian dollars. 

Pechiney plans to invest nearly 
$40 million at Issdre, in southeni 
France, where it will produce alu- 
mimam -n thhun afloy. 

Verbatim Carpi, a unit of East- 
man Kodak Co^ plans to transfer 
all disketie finishing, testing and 
packaging to its plants in North 
Carolina, Ireland and Mexico. 


GiftPtf* ' 

GAN 

Qta>n • 

GtAIMTH I» lorn 

««MnWIS 

Griadiown 

GrtMUnM 

CrwntnR/M 

HttSonualM 

HR] SamMl Fw 

HnmnM 

HoaaKang MO> 

MvdrnK [MtWrJ 

HvttvBIUWMvl 

wn 

IntaNfMO 

mtkmedaMvn 

1MNMM 

HNandH/fr 

Iratanaw 


Texas Oil & Gas, 
U.S. Steel Hold 
Talks on Merger 

The Ajamatad Prat 

PITTSBURGH — United 
Suites Steel Co ip. said Friday 
that it is holding discussions 
with Texas OO & Gas Corp, 
about a posable buaness com- 
bination. but no agreement has 
been readied. 

Although the talks have been 
rumored, investors reacted with 
uncertainty to the report. UJS. 
Sted closed at S28 a shore Fri- 
day on the New York Stock 
Exchange, down 51 from 
Thursday, while Texas Oil lost 

50 cents, to S18.87S a share. 

Earlier this month as rumors 

of a takeover of one erf the larg- 
est U.S. independent natural - 
gas producers circulated, ana- 
lysts at Dean Witter Reynolds 
Inc. estimated an acquisition of 
Texas Oil A Gas would require 
a bid of $20 to $21 a share, or 
about S4J billion. 

In the fiscal year ended Aug- 
31, Texas Oil A Gas profit fell 
20 percent to S277 miffion. or 

51 32 a share, from S346.2 mil- 
lion, or SI.6S a share, in the 
previous fiscal year. 

U.S. Steel acquired Mara- 
thon OO Co. in. 1981 for $6.5 
billion. Marathon, the nation's 
14 th largest oil company on ibe 
basis of assets, accounted for 
$10.2 billion of U.S. Steel’s 
S19.I billion in sales last year. 

Texas Oil & Gas is 33d larg- 
est in a ranking of oil compa- 
nies by assets, and reported its 
first annnjQ decline in earnings 
in 28 years. 


Toshiba Parent Net Rose 10% in First Half 


Reuter, 

TOKYO — Toshiba Corp„ the 
giant Japanese rieorock machin- 
ery-maker, said Friday that parent 
company net profit rote 10 percent 
in the first half ended SepL 30. 

Parent net profit rose to 58.13 
bilbon yen ($176 million) from 
34.42 bilfion yen a year earlier. To- 
shiba said. Sales rose S percent to 
1.3 trillion yen from 1.2 trillion yen. 

Toshiba said that semiconductor 
sales rose only 1 percent in rite 
period, to 433 J hilhon yen. largely 
because of an average" 30-percent 
fall in semiconductor market 
prices. 


Firsi-balT exports rose 10 380.56 
billion yen from 345.29 billion yen 
a year earlier, the company said. 
Sales to China were estimated at 70 
billion yen in 1985-86, up from 50 
billion in 1984-85. 

The company also said that it 
had lowered its forecast for parent 
company after-tax profit >0 63 bil- 
lion yen from 78 billion for the year 
ending March 31. .After-tax profit 
was 65 billion yen in the latest full 
year. 

Toshiba's sales forecast was low- 
ered 10 2.6 trillion yen from 2.8 
trillion yen. but a company spokes- 
man said that the forecast re- 


mained above last years saiers of 
2.5 trillion yen. 

He said that continued recession 
in the world semiconductor mar- 
ket. slow large plant orders and 
poor exports u> the United States 
and China were the main factors 
behind the revisiun. 

Overall 19S5-S6 capita! spending 
is expected to be 160 billion yen. 
down from the earlier estimate of 
180 billion yen. The spokesman 
said that capita) spending wo* 
189.50 billion yen in the previous 
fiscal year. 

The company said it will retain 
its dividend of eight \en dividend 
for 1985-S6. 


Price War Cuts Profits at United Biscuits 



(Continued from Page 9) 

when Procter & Gamble Co.’s 
Duncan Hines unit introduced a 
“soft” cookie designed 10 taste 

homemade. Nabisco. Keebler and 
others quickly introduced their 
own versons. "The cookie war was 
on. 

United Biscuits says Keebler has 
grabbed 32 percent of the soft- 
cookie market, but only at the cost 
of a plunge in profit. In waging the 
bank. Keebler borrowed heavily, 
farcing UB to turn to its sharehold- 
ers last March for £98 million of 
equity raised through a rights offer- 
ing of shares. 

Now the soft cookie's popularity 
is already fading, but analysts see 
no sign of respite in the fierce com- 
petition for U.S. market share. 

In Britain, Sir Hector observed, 
“our business is in very good nick 
indeed. ” Few analysts argue the 
point. But some worn- that the 
company cannot get much bigger 
in the low-growth British market 
for biscuits, potato chips and nuts. 

To avokl long-term stagnation. 
United Biscuits is counting on its 


Hatfield Seeks Added Taxes 



(Continued from Page 9) 

that have been made uncompetitive 
in world markets by the overvalued 
dollar. 

• The need to spur the invest- 
ment necessary- for the national 
economy’s real growth. 

Standing against this line is the 
supply-side position rim. despite 
everything that has occurred to 
raise the federal deficit since 1981 
and nearly double the national 
debt, the fault lies not in fiscal 
policy but in monetary policy. 

While praising the administra- 
tion for achieving growth withont 
inflation. Representative Jack F. 
Kemp, the upstate New York Re- 
publican, told the same group of 



chains of Pizzaland and Wimpy 
hamburger restaurants. In all, the 
restaurant operations are expected 
to account for 10 percent of 1985 
profiL 

For further growth, the company 
is seeking out locations where it 
will not clash with such powerful 
rivals as McDonald's Corp. In Feb- 
ruary. United Biscuits opened a 
franchise Wimpy outlet in New 
Delhi, serving lamb and vegetable 
burgers. Indonesian outlets will be 
next. Sir Hector said. 

While the restaurant business 
has developed slowly. United Bis- 
cuits has been far less successful 
with ventures into frozen food in 
Britain, biscuits in Spain and such 
items as spices, herbs, refrigerated 
salad dressings and spaghetti sauce 
in North America. Sir Hector “has 
raised a lot of money to put into a 
lot of low-yielding businesses," one 
analyst said. 

United Biscuils's latest addition 
is a California olive business ac- 
quired last month for $73 million. 
Sir Hector said the company is 


looking for further U.S. acquisi- 
tions. perhaps in convenience 
foods or restaurants. 

Even so. he conceded, “we wit! 
probably have to come to looking 
at the Third World for growth." 

Thai problem probably will be 
passed to the next generation of 
managers. Sir Hector, who is 62 
and has been in the business since 
age 6. when he began cutting out 
oatcakes at the family bakery in 
Edinburgh, earlier this month 
named Robert Clarke as chief exec- 
utive and heir apparent Tor the 
chairmanship. 

But Sir Hector is not ready to 
retire yet. “I shall remain chairman. 
God willing, for about five years." 
he said. 

Colonial, FPL Plan to Merge 

ft culm 

PHILADELPHIA — Colonial 
Penn Group Inc. said Friday that it 
and FPL Group Inc. have executed 
a merger agreement under which 
FPL will acquire Colonial at S35 a 
share in a transaction valued at 
S565 million. FPL a utility holding 
company, will acquire a "block of 
3.75 million shares, or 22 percent, 
from a major shareholder. 


Page II 


Thomson-CSF 
Reverses Loss 

fit wer: 

PARIS — Thomson-CSF. 
the French electronics and tele- 
communications group, report- 
ed Friday that consolidated net 
profit rose tu 337 million 
French francs (S4 1 .7 million) in 
the first half of the year. The 
group had a 124-milhon-frar.c 
loss a year earlier. 

Consolidated group saies 'tr- 
ialed 352 billion francs in the 
first half, up 3 percent from 
14.7 billion francs a year earlier. 
Parent company net totaled 324 
million francs after set-asides 
for depreciation and operating 
provisions of 475 million 
francs - . 

-■‘There is a good chance taal 
consolidated net profit for 

Thomson-CSF u-ill be SG0 mil- 
lion francs in 1 985." Thomson's 
chairman. Alain Gomez, said a: 
a news conference. 


Unocal Completes 
Big Refinancing 

Thr fssvriutt'J Pw. 

LOS ANGELES — Unocal 
Corp. said Friday it has completed 
one of the Urges 1 corporate refin- 
ancings in history by borrowing 
S4.S billion, most of it to redeem 
notes issued earlier this year to 
thwart a takeover hid by the Texas 
oilman, T. Boone Pickens. 

The refinancing will increase the 
company's overall debt by S6G mil- 
lion bui'uill reduce its interest pay- 
ments by 5100 million a year. 

Unocal, the parent of Los Ange- 
les-based Union Oil Co. of Califor- 
nia. is the 13th largest U.S. oil com- 
pany. Earlier this year, it issued 
three classes of notes in exchange 
for about one-third of the compa- 
ny's stock. The move increased the 
company's debt by more than 350 
percent. 


executives that it was the tight 
money policies of the Fed under 
Paul A. Volcker that had arrested 
the economy's growth and caused 
the swelling’ deficiL 
Mr. Kemp insisted that faster 
growth would bring down the defi- 
cit, and that pe gg in g to gold would 
bring down interest rates, spurring 
investment and also reducing the 
cosl of servicing the public debt, 
the fastest-growing sector of the 
budget. It would also, he said, res- 
cue Third World debtors 
Politically, the Kemps of Con- 
gress. with heavy support from Mr. 
Reagan, are likely to prevail over 
the Hatfields. Hence, without rapid 
economic growth, the high budget 
deficits are likely to persist. 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


INFORMATION / COMPUTER SERVICES 

Immediate openings for the following positions: 

Each offer? rtnrll'911 -jLuuk. full bmrfils. iDlertuliiAiiJ r nvcl uppditunin in r fal len-- 
in- con ran mens Pica*# . onion K.S.U- Ploffl lAirvior ji 202-862-19T9 m Wuhinp- 
itm. D.C and inrward mump to: 

Academy For Educational Development 
1255 23rd Street. N.W., Washington. D.C 20037, 

• IDMS/ DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR: Miu 

have proven experience in dt-vriopmcnl and nuinlenancr of large 
databases a* well aa development. Database suppon work and 

experience with IDMS i>, a must. 

• SYSTEMS PROGRAMMERS: Musi haie proven expe- 
rience in IBM main frame environment including MVS and CICS to 
support large systems production and development. 



& •, 


p; 

; 



fe ; 



; ? 

v. 

s 


*'V f 


■ *: 


1 ' 

k W?m : \ ' ^ . ■ 


























p age 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26-27, 1985 


Canada 

Beil Canada Eat. 

CLSST- I9W 1984 

— i3*a uu 

pSSis — ***+ ewjo 

•vf snare 0.9a m3 

tS*""** i*W 19M 

swpue — wjo. 7 j». 

gr yi* ■ 74t5 Mi 

f'or 5 acre jjb 7 ^ 

bc Telephone 
gBQnar. 1915 1984 

EBlfe: 297 zai 

rer SnortH— n yy 

yjS” 11 WM 1984 

!?™t w« 

Per Share l_34 i ■>*. 

Fort Motor Canada 
MQuar. 1985 1984 

52F1U9 1030. 3460. 

Oper Net 27.9 jas 

Opot Share.. 375 440 

9 Months 1985 1984 

WevrfHje r a. &7KL 

Oner Net iwj »M 

□Per Share 23X5 vi** 

Inter-provincial Pipeline 

kaQuar. 1985 1984 

S*ywue 1344 1200 

Era* inc 2770 30.12 

Per Shore 074 a-81 

9 Month* 1985 1934 

Revenue 3937 35U 

Net Inc 9549 92JJI 

Per Snare iSS 247 

France 

Thomson -CSF 
1st Halt 198S 1984 

Revenue 15.200. 14700. 

Profits 33731(0)1240 

a: toss. 

Vailed Stale* 

Aetna Life Casualty 
3rd Q oar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 4_R0. 1900. 

Oner Net 111 j lu 


Company Results 

Be venue one profits or losses, in millions, are in local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated. 


Ooer Shore— 0.90 075 

9 MOMOf 1985 1984 

Revenue 13440. 11480. 

Ooer Net JUi 1493 

Ooer Store™ 239 172 

Nets exclude (ass a/ at ffuf- 
Hon VS gain at OJ million m 
Quarters amt tosses ot S*U 
million vs JWJ million m e 
months. IMS f -month net also 
excludes gain ot so million 
from repurchase at deal. 

Arm co 

3rd Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue ws.i 1.020. 

Net IOC. 484(013727 

Pw Shore — _ 049 — 

9 Months 1985 1981 

Revenue 4840. 3JJ50. 

Net Inc. 444(0)2305 

Per Share 077 — 

a: loss. Nets Include gain ot 
11M7 million and choree of 
sna million vs charge ot S30S 
mlUlan. 

Avnet 

lit Ow. 1985 1985 

Revenue 3384 4324 

Net inc. 675 19.90 

Per Share 07* OS* 

Bis » Industries 

3M Onar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 211.1 1955 

Net Inc (o)2&5 135 

Per Shore — 074 

9 Month* 1985 1984 

Revenue *17.9 5764 

wet Inc (a >444 407 

Per Share — 170 

a: loss. I98S nets Include 

charge ot S423 million. 


Burlington Industries 

4th Oear. 1983 1984 

Revenue ttnj 7*6.1 

Net Uoss 2.92 9241 

Year 1985 1984 

Revenue 2500. 1170. 

Net IhC 1X6 624 

Per Shore 044 ziB 

Carpenter Technology 
lit Quar. 1986 1985 

Revenue 109.9 1267 

Net Inc 276 340 

Per Share — 041 

7RS4 net Includes tax eretSt ot 
s 1.9 million 

Central & South west 
1985 1984 

847.9 831.0 

1455 1305 

144 171 

1905 1984 

2i060- 2.120. 

2917 2747 

251 268 


Delta Airlines 
1st Quar. 1986 >983 

Revenue 1,120. 1410. 

Net Inc. 2955 60.17 

Per Shore 074 151 

not net includes gain of SB 
c ents pe r shore from sale Of 
OlraxdL 


3rd Quar. 

Revenue - 
Net Inc — 
Per Shore 
9 Months 
Revenue - 
Net Inc _ 
Per Shore, 


Dexter 
1985 
1577 


1984 
1640 

£S SB 

jbs sn 

21.91 2556 

173 156 


3rd Quar. 

Revenue 

Net inc 

Per Share 

9 Mourns 

Revenue 

Not inc 

Per Shore— 


Donnellev (R.RJ 


Clorox 

IstOoar. 1986 1985 

Net Inc 2674 2371 

Per Share 057 0IB 

Consumers Power 
3rd Dear. 1985 1984 

Revenue 6325 6287 

Net Inc (01495 378 

Per Share — 0JJ4 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 2770. 2340. 

Net Inc 478 145.97 

Per Share 0A5 156 


3rd Clear. 

1985 

1984 

Revenue _ 

5795 

471.1 

Net Inc. 

43.1 

39-2S 

Par Share— 

1.13 

1JJ3 

9 Motdbx 

19B5 

1984 

Revenue — 

1530. 

1270. 

Net inc - — 

102.1 

9252 

Per Share, — 

257 

253 




Eastern Gas & Fuel 

Qoar. 1985 1984 

levenue 2876 297 a 

Oper Net lo)5U 844 

Oper Shore— — 047 

9 Month! 1985 1984 

Revenue TJOoa MHO. 

Oper Net (aim 517 

Ooer Share- — 274 

o: loss. Nets ercta de toss ot 
573.6 million vs ooln at 
5102400 ft* Quarters and less 
of SJ*3 minion vs ooln of 
SIMM m 9 months from ah- 


continued operations. IMS 

nets include writedown of 
EU.l million. 

EG&G 

3rd Qoar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 3377 3707 

Net Inc — - 1353 12.90 

Per Shore 050 047 

9 Mentha 1985 1984 

Revenue 8426 7845 

Net Inc 3943 40.16 

Per Shore— 147 us 

1984 9-month net Includes 
gain at S3 million. 

Electronics Data Sy*. 
3rd Quar. 1985 1984 

921.9 2397 

51.9 207 

1985 1984 

2770. tu. 7 

132 4 576 

Ford Motor 

3rd Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 1 1600. 1170a. 

Net inc _ — 3137 379J 

Par Snare 1.70 275 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue— 38700. 38,900. 

Net me 1700. 2.190- 

Par Shore 957 1150 

Foruo Industries 

3rd Qoar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 243 a 1997 

Ooer Net 472 871 

Oner Shore— 060 079 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 6907 6329 

Oper Net 26-1 297 

Oner Shore— 252 276 



Nets include 90ms otss nw» 
» SXXLOOO In Quarters oad ol 
S3 1 9.000 vs S330.0M In f 
manna. IfSCncts also include 
oo*i of Sh I mllHon. 

GATX 
fed Qear. IMS 1984 

Net inc (a 1 706 87 

Per Shore— — 05S 

9 Mantas 1985 1984 

Net Inc (a)535 274 

Par Shore— — 178 

o: loss. 

Goodyear Tire Rubber 
3rd Qear. 1*05 1984 

Revenue 2400 2420. 

Net Inc 1545 857 

Per Share 144 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 7.190. 7M. 

Net Inc 3377 3057 

Per Share 206 268 

Nets Include gains of mi 
million vs W7 million In 
auorters and of SI 103 mllllor. 
vs S3Z4 mllHon In 9 monttn 
from discontinued opera- 
lions. 

Gulf States Util. 

3rd Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 5374 452.1 

Net inc 974 905 

Per Share— 063 06! 

Harris Graphics 


lit Quar. 

1996 

1985 

Revenue — 

115.0 


Net Inc 

251 


Per Share — 



Inletlaka 



1985 


Revenue 

2040 

21 TO 

Net Inc — 

656 


Par Share— 

1J» 

107 

9 Months 

1985 


Revenue 

6254 

6*50 

Net inc- 

2051 

2754 

Per snare 

306 

4.98 


1984 nets Include gain 01 6 
cents per share from discon- 
tinued operations. 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHAHC RENT A CABS. freshae con 

with phone; Rob Spur. Spent, fcrrori. 

Porsdte. Mercedes. Januar. BMW, 
bromines, oiuO cars. 46 r Pierre 

Oxrrroa /5003 Pens. Tel: 47303040. 

Trie* 630797 F CHAFLOC. 


AUSTRIA « EAST EUROPE USS150Q 
per day. Autofccmxa, Fronrenfanteck- 
enstr. B, A-1030 Vienna Tel: 241694. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


Worldwide Cre 
TRANSSHIP 

Bg m. Sm «fc-StT. SB/60 
280D Bremen 1 

Tet (0)421/14264 TU 2465B4 Trans D 
Be den Mrehren 91 
2000 H ambu rg II 

Td: fO|40/3737Q3 Tb: 214944 Trans D 
also DOT.'EPA + bond n USA. 
Member of A1CA, Wmhngtro 


SHIP YOUR CAR TO K FROM USA 

VIA ANTWHP AND SAVE, free ho- 

tel. Reader stsSngs. Airport deivwy. 
AMESCO. KrAfaSrca 2. Artwerp. 

Bdgjgn. Teh 231 42 39. Tbc- 71469. 


FRANKFURT/ MA1N-W. Gemwny. H 

berrarexi GmbH. Tet OfiP-U&yi. 

Pick-up afl ever Europe Wrothg. 


ab ATK. NV, Alfa™#! 2000 Art- 

warp. Belgium 03/231 1653 Tv 31535 


TRANSCAR 17 ov de Fnedkmd. 75008 
Rons. Tel 422S 6444. Nka: 9383 9531 
Antwerp 233 99B5 Comn 9339 4344 


AUTO CONVERSION 


DOT / EPA 

PB&QNAUZm £ COMPUTE 
CONVERSION SERVICE 
Hove your MKCHJES, BMW, 
PORSCHE or JAGUAR expertly erev- 
verled to US standards, or if you do not 
y«t have the car you wish to impart, we 
may already haw; the car you want. 

Out Ful services include: SALS. 
SHIPPING BONDING / CUSTOMS 
CLEARANCE. Our work a fuly 
GUARANTEED with our IS.afftates 
in every U5. pod. We are AKA mam- 
ban. Ctdl or wide tot 
KIB AUTO CONVERSION, 
P.a BOX 70 03 44, 
D-7000 STUTTGART 70. 

Tet 0)711 76 09 66 or 72 10 13, 
the 7255968 Ask for Juk. 


• SURECONVBTT ■ 

Hm wh d way la ityul a 
Eorapaai oar into Km UJ&A. 

Worldwide American insurer 
provides al I irqwed MRraice 
and guarantees your oar wl 
pass cl US- gavernmart standards 
or your money bode inducing 
conversion cast. 

Write or phone far free brochure. 
GERMANY (0) <0-7152425 or 
U 7031 / 223059 

AMERICAN INTT UNDBtWWTHtS 

Oberfendau 76-78 
D-6000 FrorUurt/Main 


H*A / DOT 

CONVERSIONS 

• Customs brokerage/ bowing service 

• PKk-up & detary anywhere in the 

Eastern U-5- & Texas 

• Professional work using only die 

bflhest qwity conrnonents 

• Guaranteed / DOT approvd 
CHAMPAGNE IMPORTS MC, 

2294 North Pwm RA. HalfWd, 
PA. 1944a USA Tefc215 B22 6852 
Takx 4971917-CHAMP 


DOT/ffA CONVERSIONS 

Shippng, boncing, inMxronce. 
Door to door service Europe 
to USA, occeptonce marartoed 
European Automotee ' t-urfionce, 
SeiftoQHUroat 117, 25U HC 
• Hogue. HoBond. 

Phone 9970-559245 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


ElIROPOKT TAX 
FREE CARS 


Cat or write for free catalog. 
Box 12011 

Rotterdam Airport, HoOartd 

Te 
Teb* : 


Airport, He 
| \MZXV7 
I EPCAE ISE. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

(Continued From Back Page)' 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


LM.L SA 

OfHClAL ROUS ROYCE 
DEALS FOR BELGRJM 

TAX FREE CARS 
ROUS ROYCE BBUTIEY 
RANGE and LANDSOVS 
SAAB 

Also Used Cm 
rue MIDDBBOURG 74-83 
1170 Bnnseh 
TH: 2-673 33 92 
TUG 20377 


FERRARI 

ME8CEDE5 BBO - JAGUAR 
PORSCHE - ROUS-ROYCE 
BMW - VOLVO - SAAB 
CITROEN - PEUGEOT 
New aid used 

FOUMEX OVERSEAS 

TRADING B.V. 

Worldwide automotwe exporters 
P.O. Bax 4705, 6085 ZG Hom/Hgfand 
Tlx 36846 Fotm NL. FmcM 4758-2675 
Tet HoBond 475842777 


TRANSCO 

THE LARGBT SHOWROOM 
AND STOCK IN EUROPE 
png a coratcnl stock of more dun 
300 brexxt new cars of cd European + 
Japanese makes cxxnpehvdy priced 
Tax free soUs-s hip pinfl bwaraiee. 
Sand for mriBoaior ban coMogua. 
Tronaco SA. 95 Noonteiocm, 
2030 Antwerp. Bakaum 
Td 323/542 6240 Tx 3520/ Tioh 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTL DELIVERY 

We keqi a large stock of 
most car branch 
Tet 02/648 55 13 
Telex 65658 
42 rue Lem, 

1050 Brussels. 


FROM STOCK 

Mercedes 500 SEL, damond (Am, 
"B5 new ax, DM86JXX) 
Porsche 928 S, automatic, block. 

65 new ax, DM89 JXXl 
other makes and roodnb upon request. 
Same day rafpstraiion powUe. 

K2K0VJTS 


>36. CH-8C27 Zunch 

Tet 01/202 76 la Tetoo 819915. 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE FROM STOCK 

Beet servica, sfaipptog, ms u raoce, 

RUTE INC 

TAUNUSSTR. 52- 6000 FRANKFURT 
W Germ., tel (0)0-232351, lb 41 1559 


PORSCHE 930 TURBO, *86 
Bbck/block, l oaded DM109.000 
PORSCHE CONVHmBU, Turbo look, 
Bbck/block, loaded DMltM.OOO 
PORSCHE C uu vei rth la, new, dork 
blue, loaded DM75JX» 

280 SL, AM.G, 4JJ00 km, loaded 
DM70,000 

A.VX. Tet Germany SR 6234 
4092 or 4621, Tbt <6498d 


EUROPE 4 USA SPECS. 

AD makes for worldwide deSray from 
stock. Send for a TAX-HS analog. 

BMW - MERCEDES - PORSCHE 
VW - SAAB - VOLVO - PEUGEOT 

mROPE AUTO BROKERS tec. 
PC* 214, 3430 AR hfieuwegmn Holland 
Tot ft 340241346. 71* 7«68 EAB M 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


CLASSIC AUFOMOGOE 
Your oddrC M ff you are looking for a 
new or used European oar. we e4so 
aremge^ stepping and dcfiwry 

(Tune W. Gannxiy « 2104/15400 
Telex.- 8581 123 CABS D 


RG TEAM 

Offers tax Area oara , exona and 
dassKs. al mokes. New & used 
PO Bax 2050. 4800 CB. BSEDA / 
Hal laid. Tel (D) 76451550 Tka 74282 


YOUR CAR CONSULTANT FOR 
MOST EUROPEAN MODELS 

Export + DOT/EPA 

drTharut INTT. 

Box 120433. D-530O Bom. 

Tet P| 228-234006. llx B85S94 


20 YEARS AUTOGRANER 
POB 2022, 7900 Utai, W. Germany 
Mafab Gwmai cor deder offers new 
Mercedes, BMW, Porsche. Ferrari. Tet 
(0) 731-60033, lb 712861 AUTEX 


MBKHB/ PORSCHE 
New/used. InvmcSale ikAvary. Fa AVL 
Td: Germany (0) 62344092, Ifae 464986 


MJL 300 S, 500 SC 500 SK, new 
Rafa Royce SiW Spint 35. 7,000 bn., 
Lamborghini Countodi new, Ferrari 
306 GlB new. P.CT. Belnum Tet 
03/231.59.00. 


TAX Free oars, al makes & models. 
ATK. NV. Anketrui 22 2000 Artwerp, 
BdguiL Td 03^1 16 53 Tx 3105 


HEALTH SERVICES 


AMERICAN DANCER gives aerobics 
doases for lodes, in your home. 
Fraice (1)3099 4310. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


US IMMIGRATION vix* Atlys. Spfe> 
& Rodney, 1925 Brickdl Av, Mkxni H 
33129. let 1305) 6439600. lx 441469. 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


$415 RETURN FROM AMSTERDAM: 
Houston, DaBas, Mami. Aflonto. 
MdbllL Oanrak 30, Aireterdan / 
Holand (0) 20-274Q41. Telex 14635 
TO IAX/SFO do3y departure from 
Europe return S4®. Abo 1 w ay & 
olfwr US destinaliore. Paris 4225 V290 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


PORTUGAL 

7 DAYS INCLUSIVE TOURS 

FROM PARIS TO: 

LISBON FF2700 

ESTORIl/CASCAIS FF2810 

COSTA VBtDE (OPORTO). FP2461 

ALGARVE FF2810 

MAUBKA FP2980 

Phase Contact: 
toil Tab 4742 5557, Ibc 220550 


FROM MILAN TO: 

USBON. 


1740,000 

ESTORIL/CASCAIS 1740,000 

COSTA VBK (OPOKTO)L845,000 

ALGARVE L598J300 

MADBRA 1640,000 

Haree Contact: 

Mien Tab 4750659/4223214 
The 321280/ FEXPOR 

For other progr am and dekiled 
mfarinaaon, ask yox 

TRAVR AGENT 


HELLAS YACHTING. Yacht Oxxterv 
Accxfeneai 28. Artxire 10671, G raa c a. 


HOTELS 


SWITZERLAND 


GENEVA 

RESOBKE DE FRANCE 

4 Ave. de Franco, CH-1202 Geneva 
Tek 0041 22/31 14 79 
Beautiful, lint dam, ar-oomfiionod. 
readerdal furnished up arfana nh and 
studtoL Fully equipped latchon, 
daily maid service. 

Weedy and monthly rales. 
EinwBent location. 


VSJL 


TUDOR HOIB, 304 East 42nd Sr.. 

New York Gty. In fashionable. East 

Side Manhattan. 1/2 block from UK 


FOR SALE & WANTED 


NEW G&tTLBAAN WATCH & others 
(never worn) Yachrron. Gold case 
l9J9gramtiurroundedbysmalda- 
mends 047 d. Strap cracodle. Vdum 
F38700. Sde price F15JD0. Tab Pmis 
4757 1197 or 4757 2B50. 


ARTS 

FOR SALE "A MAWS HEAD” kwisjw 
Fraroa Pioabiaemed & dated 1932. 
61x46. Tet 4561 9600 ext. 4647 Para. 

ANTIQUES 

UNKMIE NORTHAMPTONSHIRE oak 

refactary table and set af 10 matching 
haiequin chain, superb erompfe of 
tracHnnal crafamarehipL Tet UK 
0733 64267. 

ANTIQUE REPRODUCTION farratixe. 
tpecnksng in Georgan Pyle urikl 
mahogany ctrvng tables & chavs. Tel: 
London 0 1-446 1<S?3 or 985 6674. 

COLLECTORS 


BOOKS 

BRITtSH BOOKSHOP, FRANKFURT 
alien a wide selection af Britah / 
Area neon bcxAa (obo chStken's), Brrt- 
bh tourist pubfccnora. Mt>1 order ser- 
vice-Gerniany only. Te! (J69 280492, 
Boersenstr 17. 6000 FrenlArt/MI 

• EDUCATION 

HSBNCH Write gives private French 
individual leisam. Para 43 25 29 52 

PENPALS 


GHUS AM) GUYS ol contmwits wont 

e n pds. DdoJs free Hermes V«rl 
x 110660/M, D-1000 Berlin lT. 
West Germany. 


Plan Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

In tfsa 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


By Hmxw: Call your local IHT representative with your text. You 
will be informed af the cost immed i ately, and once prepayment is 
made your ad will appea- within 48 hours. 

Coeb The bosk rote b $950 par Ima per day + local taxes. There are 
25 letters, signs and spaces in Ihe first foe and 36 in the fallowing Enes. 
Minimum space it 21nes. No ab bre vi a t iu re accept e d. 

Credit Omkc American Express, Diner's Oub, Eurocord, Master 
Cord, Access and Visa. 


HEAP OFFICE 

Paris: (For classified only): 
47-47-4640. 

EUROPE 

Amsterdam: 26-36-15. 
Athens: 361-8397/360-2421 . 
Br uss e ls. 343-T899. 
Coprahog en: (01) 32 944a 
Frankfurt: (069) 72-67-55. 
Lausanna: 29-58-94. 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/662544. 
London: pi) 6364802. 
Madrid: 455-2891 /455-3306. 
MRrei; (02)7531445. 
Norway: (02) 41 29 51 
Romo: 679-3437. 

Sweden (08) 7569229. 

Tel Aviv. 03455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 


warm states 

New Yorlc (21 2) 752-3890. 
West Coast: (415) 362-8339. 

SOUTH ABUCA 

421599. 


LATIN AMBUCA 

Bueno* Abes: 4! 40 31 
(Dep». 312) 

Caracas: 33 14 54 
Guayaquil: 51 45 05 
Lima: 417 85? 

Panama: 69 05 1 1 
Son Jawr. 22-1055 
Sreitiaga: 6961 555 
Sao Paula: 852 1893 

MIDDLE EAST 

Bfdwnxi: 246303. 

Kuwait: 5614485. 

Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
Oaks: 416535. 

Said Anhia 
Jeddrfe 667-1500. 

U-Ai: Dubai 224161. 

FAR EAST 

Bmghok: 3908657. 

Hang Kangp 5-213671. 
Jtdmrta: 510092 
Mreiila: 817 07 49. 

Seoul: 735 S7 73. 

Singapore: 222-2725. 
Tidwai: 752 44 25/9. 

Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Me lb ourn e: 690 8233. 
Sydney: 929 56 39, 957 43 20. 
Perth: 32898 32 
Paddington, Quee nsl and: 
369 34 S3. 


ftmfays 




Closing 


Tables hidude the nationwide prices 
up la the dosing an wall street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The .4ssodaied Press 


sb. aw . 

WOsHtehLuw Ouaf.Qrgv 


IB 

14te 

5% 

saw 

1114 

lSUi 

h 

41* 

XU 

2m 

8 

51 Vi 
9V0 
13 

15k. 

3% 

loau. 

9b 

14V1 

IS 

3a 

38'4i 

18^ 

1US 

13V* 

«'A 

43» 

9 

9 

HFh 

BU 

ITVb 

lan. 

51* 

5"i 

avi 

1548 

81* 

lain 

6 

54 '4 
478b 
7 

3V2 
6V* 
5te 
19to 
1»b 
2M 
&<A 
7%. 
98b 
111? 
131* 
984 
1316 
3 Vo 
I73t 
lVx 
19’* 


.16 


34 

1J0 19 
14 
9 

S52e 4.9 __ 
JQ 13 27 
11 


9 

.16 A IS 
JH 14 13 

M 13 20 

10 


X2r 5 

175 1U 


4<e ADin 
58* AL Labs 
8 AMCs 
7Vb AM inti 
688* ATT Pd 
PH AcmeU 
98« Action 
ivx Acton 
v* Adnwt 
lVb AdsnRa 
22 'ib Ad RusJ 
15V. Adobe 
31e Aeronc 
39V* AftlPbs 
5ta AirExn 
6 AlrCal 
98i ArCalpI 
VS Ala men 
65V2 Almltan 
58b Aloha 
993 Al chain 
<* Altex 
30 Alcoa of 
17V. Alsa CP 
28u Are Bril 
Iffte Amdahl 
5V% Amedeo 
6tfa AmBUt 

70UV AEwat 
44k APrvcA 
APrucB 
38* AHIthM 
41* A Israel 
11% AMxeA 
12Mj AMzeB 
'4 AMBM 
3 AroCHI 
47-* APett 
12V. APrec 
VM AreRttv 
lib ARovIn 
3 ASdE 
494* Axon un 
44 Axanor 
5Vi A xonsc 
13t Amoai 
48k AlWal 
IV. AndJcb 
58k Angles 
*■ Ansel wt 
8b vlAnalv 
3Wi ArooPt 
5V2 Anevn 
4Ui Arm fro 
488 Armal s 
77b ArrowA 
6tb Asrerg 
98t Astrex 
1 Astrofc 
rn Astrofpf (JO m 
fe AtlsCM 

llte A venal M U 


38 414 
138 154* 
M 104% 
1091 48* 

59 ante 

is m 

14 108% 
iaa 18% 

22 

s« ra 

54 684 

S -iBS 

22 vs 
92 M 
5 81b 

11 98% 

67 


48% 

158% 

108% 

4t% 

B0 

94% 

108* 

IV. 

1% 

31% 

241% 

l7Va 

38% 

ttVi 

41% 

BVS 

108% 

to 


4to 
15to * M 
108% 

48% 

KM + V. 
98% + 1% 
108% 

Ito + V. 
to 
3to 
248% 

174% 

31% 

48*3— (A 

68% + tt 
8to— to 
108% + to 
to 

90 + Ik 
Bte— to 
M%— to 
to 


joa m 

.15 I A 


16 

154*103 


JM M 


JO 2.1 


16000c 

m 


32* 

41 

16V 

F31 

25*— 86 

26 

12 

2* 

2* 

Z* 

IS 

MM 

11 

Wto 

lOte— to 


15 

5* 

58% 

58%— to 

5 

50 

un 

KIM 

lOte — te 

18 

17 


68% 

68% + 86 


310 


3286 

Bto — te 

21 

6000: 

58* 

486 

Sto + to 

19 

6500: 

4* 

486 

486— to 



4 

386 

3* 

4 

2 

68b 

68% 

48%— 8% 

43 

17 

13 

14 

148%— to 

41 

22 

1386 

13* 


1B3 

48% 

486 

4* 

» 

106 

486 

A 

44% — to 

30 

14 

51* 

5086 

50te — IM 

21 

3 

14te 

Wto 

144% + 4b 

4 

3 

7fk 

vt* 

7ft 


201 

154% 

14* 

15 

29 

1 



48% 


2 

5386 

5386 

5386 


2 

47to 

47V? 

478% + te 


2 

6* 

6* 

6to + 4% 

B 

3 

2 

1* 

lte— ft 

75 

31 


6 

A 


50 

2to 

286 

28% + to 


17 

686 

Ate 

686— to 


16 


1 

1 


93 

Ito 

1 

1 


32 

386 

38b 

38% 

B 

2 

58% 

58* 

Sto— to 


11 

4<* 

48% 

4V%— Vb 

B 

60 

486 

486 

486 

15 

9 

986 

Bto 

Bte 


904 

94% 

94* 

98% + te 

10 

2 

11* 

1186 

1186— to 


416 

lte 

ite 

lte 


. 1 

13* 


13* 


34 

4% 

■1 

8% 

13 

U 

15 

15 

15—86 


PE3 

3U BAT In 

.15*3.9 


1(H) 

3* 

3to 

3* + to 

Pri 

Wte BDMs 
186 BUT 



75 

31 

77* 

27to 

228% 

Sto 



8 

3 

786 

78% 

286 + 84 

Jte 

158% 

3 BSD n 

9to BSN 




2 

68 

3 

ITto 

3 

lift 

3 

12 +8% 

Wto 


M 

U 

13 

7 

KM 

108% 

108% + M 

1046 

Bto BqldwS 

52a X6 


1 

9 

9 

9—84 

48% 

2 BalvMwt 



2 

3 

3 

3 

7684 

22 te BcmFd 

143e 9 J 


5 

268% 

Wte 

268% + 86 

78% 

9V, 

48% Banstrg 
68% BnkBId 

.40 

45 

W 

1 

4 

68% 

Bte 

68% 

Bte 

6to 

Bto— to 

48*1 





5 

3* 

38% 

31% — to 

4to 




16 

17 

386 

38% 

3V. 

9to 

68* Bonwi 

JO 

35 


37 

68% 

Aft 







67 

48% 

4te 

4te— 84 

12 





6 

108% 

9* 

9ft— 84 


108% Beta Bib 

150 165 

7 

23 

6 

"* 

■ve 

'Vt 

■iw’W 

208% BergBr 

32 

1.1 

13 

355 

79 

77* 

27ft— 86 

48% 


A2T14A 


5 

3 

2* 

3 + te 

36ft 

218% BicCp 

J2 

20 

11 

43 

ft* 

36 

368% + to 

VCTb 

9Vt BkgV 

M 

2 3 

16 

3 

15 

15 

768% 

214% BlnhMt 

un 

IB 

IT 

1.1 

368% 

268% 

W86 + to 

19V* 

9te BtaRBs 



13 

1 

1586 

1586 

1586— to 

19 




13 

4 

158% 

158% 

154% 

31Va 


A0 

20 

10 

21 

3M4 

30 


18% 

to BtoCkE 




48 

8% 

flft 

1981 

11 BlountA 

AS 

23 

13 

16 

171% 

Wte 

1286- to 

19V, 

lift BlountB 

AD 

3J 

U 

1 

128% 

12* 

12% 

S3 

•P- 

llte BcriorPs 
2 to Bowmr 




ISO 


rjy 

14ft— 86 



14 

719 

48% 

pi 

4—8% 

Wto 


AA 

25 

14 

393 

1686 

r2 

1686 + M 

Wte 


150 



31 

7386 


23ft 

37to 

26te BrnFA 

1J» 

10 

9 

2 

338% 


331% + W 

414% 

28to BrnFB 
3te BmFpf 

1JW 

27 

10 

5 

36* 


36* 

4to 

50 

97 


7 

4to 

4te 

4to 

5 

24% BucfclMi 




34 

38% 

3 

3to . 

581 

Jte Buckhpi 

50 

105 


5R 

486 

4% 

486— % 


24te Buell 

50 

20 

6 

1 

30 

30 

30 — to 

%M*1 

6Va Bustin 



6 

14 

786 

78% 

786 — te 


Caimat 



214k 214% 218%— V% 
9* 9to 9to— V* 

15to 15te 15V% + to 
884 84b 88% + to 

984 984 984 

6te 6 V. 6to + to 


. - ^jreEB 
68% CareE A 
2te Casbhsi AAS26A 
254% CosFd 220a 15 

4% casPdrt 

2 C-sjtlnd 
48b Catffwf 


108% cents* 
OrvE 


B'% 

5-% 

32»% 

78% 

74b 

9 to 

!4V% 

19 148b ClrvBu 

9V* 58% Catec 
4 Ito ChmpH 
17te I TVS ChmpP 
298b 169% ChtMA s 
29 178% ChtMBS 

31V, 16to ChlRv 
109% 48* ChfDvg 
3814 158% Oilltns 
33to 131% Citadel 


lJ7e!24 

JO 3J 

J2 4J 
.16 S 
.16 A 
lJOa 60 



.17 


j a 
4 


16V4 14to 161% + te 
18to 18 IHto— V* 
208% 708% 308% — to. 
20 30 30 — 1% 

7fk 79b 79k — to 

319% 319% 319% — te 


25 268% 268% 268% + to 


ESCORTS A GUIDES 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SBtVKI 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New York 

330 W. 56 Ih SL, N.Y.C. 10019 USA 

21 2-765-7896 

21 2-765-7754 

MAJOR CRHXT CARDS AND 
CHECKS ACCHTH3 
frivol* Mambvefcfee Awleirf* 

LONDON 

Portman Escort Agency 

67 ChBera Street, 

London W) 

Tet 486 3734 or 486 1158 

Al major credit card* ocreplxd 

ZURICH-GENEVA 

GMGBTS ESCORT SBtVICE. 
THz01/363 0864-022/34 41 86 

* JASMINE * 

AMSTERDAM ESCORT 5BIV1CT 
020-366655 


* LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE BCCKT SRVKE 
402 010S or 499 2225 

MADRID INT'L 

ESCORT SERVICE 

TEL: 2456548. CRHXT CARDS 


Thfa umud -whining mnriee hoc 
been featured ax the tap I mart 
exchmre Excart Service by 

LSA £ intarnallerwd newx media 
iotfadwg radio and TV. 

ARISTOCATS 

London Excart Sanrice 

128 WigeMra Si., London W.l. 

Af major Oodtt Cards Acoeptad 

Tet 437 47 41 / 4742 

12 noon ■ midnight 

ZURICH 

ALEXIS ESCORT SBtVICE 

TEL: 01/47 55 82 

* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

BCORT SERVICE. 1 

EVBtTWFOIE YOU ARE OR GOL_ | 

1-813-921-7946 

Grit free from Ui. 1 -8D0-237 8»92 
Coll free from Hondo: I-aoaM2-0892. ! 
Lowel Eastern wetaotnes you badd | 

IPANEMA 

ESCORT SBtVICE IN NEW YORK 
212-421-4567, 371-2713 

HEATHROW 

* London Escort Agency* 

01-609 2*70 

MADRID SHADOWS 

Tefc 2509603 •>■«.* 
ESCORT SBtVICE. CRHXT CARDS 

LA VENTURA 

NEW YORK ESCORT SERVICE 
212-888-1666 

PARLIAMENT j 

ESCORT SERVICE 

New York 2 12-5 17-81 21 
Chicago 312-787-9059 

Mejar areifit amlf aeamted 

• AMSTERDAM > 

CLUB ROSE - ESCORT SERVICE 
STADHOUDBtSKADE 125 

Teh 030-768606 

CAPRICE-NY 

ESCORT SBtVICE IN NEW YORK 
TEL: 212-737 3291. 

ROME CUB EUROPE BCORT 
& Guide SeraceJeti 06/589 2604- 589 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 pm) 

LONDON 

KENSINGTON 

BCORT SERVICE . _ 

10 KENSINGTON CHURCH ST, W8 
TH: 937 9136 OR 937 9133 

Afl major aedtt axrdx axqM. 

GENEVA * BEAUTY* 

ESCORT SERVICE. 022/29 51 30 

ZURICH 

Cara&ne Excart Service 

Tet 01/252 61 74 

aCUBA ESCORT SBtVICE. 

51 Beaudanp Place. London 5W3. 
Tet 01 584 6613/2749 (4-12 pm) 

LONDON 

B&GRAV1A 

Ewart Servk*. 

Tel: 736 5877. 

ZURICH 

* AMSTERDAM SHE * 

BCORT 6 GUIDES- 020-227837 

Tafc 01/57 7S96 

LONDON VBtONQUE Exert Ser- 
«e.Trt 01-225 2335 

FRANKFURT £ AREA Fnnxria & mcJe 
facori ServuM. 62 B8 OS. OeflC(>6 

FRANKFURT 4 AREA. SreonexEaort 
Service Crwfl Cards. Tet 62 84 32 


** GENEVA-FIRST »* 

Exeert Serviee. Tel: 022/32 34 18 
+ Weekend + Travel 

GENEVA ESCORT 

SBtVICE. Tet 46 11 58 

******geneva best 

ESCORT SBtVICE 022 / 86 15 95. 

LONDON TOP ESCORT SBW1CE 
Heathrow. American Bcpreix. 3S2 8343 

FRANKFURT. + SURROUNDINGS 

Caroline's Escort + Travel Service. 
Enafah, French, German, Sum nil spo- 
ten. Tet 069] 43 57 63. 

NEW YORK. MIA, Renee S Gabriele 
Escort Service. 212-2234)870. Major 
aredt Conk. 

AMSTERDAM BERNADETTE MALE 
and Female Excort Service. (0) 20- 
329716 

VBMA 5TUDENT ESCORT Mrace. 
Contact: 83 63 04. CrecCt cards ac. 
oegted. 

MILANO + LUGANO ESCORT, guide 
axl travel twice. Tefc (Man 
02/685035 

VBMA YOUNG ESCORT Sena. 
Contact: 8333 71 

MAHDD IMPACT mean and guda 
service. MuttiEngjdL 261 4142 

LONDON THUDS ESCORT Sennas. 
TeL- 01-373 8849. 

ATHENS ESCORT AND GUIDE Ser. 
vox. Teh 8086194. 

IOMX3N OtSCERNBriG ESCORT Ser. 
vice. (01)961 0154. 

TBLAVtV DAVFS Escort Service. Tefc 
03377911/998754. 

LONDON AUIANCZ Escort Service. 
T«L 381 6653 

CAMEO BCORT SBtVICE Landcxi 
Tefc 01-6079669/609 4/BI 

FRANKFURT - PETRA Escort & Trove) 
Servica. TaL 069/ 68 24 05 

LONDON BLONDE ESCORT Serviee 
Tet 01-225 0368 

GENEVJUAMA Female & Me rerort 
servm. MuH3ngwri. 022/342955. 

EDEN Escort Agency, Secitcnd T*fc 031 
225 949? re Wl 553 3036 evenings 


FRANKFURT -EVA'S ESCORT &trav. 
ei service. Ttk 049/447775 


ESCORTS & GUIDES - 


NEW Y0RK4OS ANGELS. Renee's 
Escort Service. 213J153899. 


ZURICH LORM BCORT SERVICE. 
Tet 01/69 58 71 


FRANKFURT “TOP IBP' Exert Ser- 
vice. CW/5P6G-5Z 


HONG KONG EUROPEAN ESCORT 
Service: Kowloon 6O84XV660569 


MUMCH - BIONDY 6 TANJA Escort 
Service. Tat 311 79 00 or 311 79 36 


BRUSSaS. ANTWERP NATASCHA 

Escort Service. Tel: 02/7317641. 


AMSTERDAM FOUR ROSES Eicon 
Service (0) 2096437O 


FRAtflCFURT, SUSANNFS BCORT 

Td: 069/84 48 75. 


FRANKFURT/ MUMCH Mole Exon 

Service. 069/386441 & 087/3518226, 

LONDON ORIENTAL GUIDE Serwce. 
Tet 01-243 14«2 


VIENNA DESIREE PRIVATE ESCORT 

service. Tet 32-29-16. 


fSANKHJRT + AREA Gvnbna Es c ort 
Service. Off/364656. Gedit Cords 


LONOON PARK LAI* Esran Swvxe. 
Tet 01-821 0283 


AMSTERDAM JEANET Escort Swvice 
TeH020) 326420 or 3401 IQ. 


HAMBURG - SABRINA Exart Ser- 
' Tet 040/58 65 35. 


ESCORT Servxa. 

Td: 089/4486038 


“USSgS-awnAL BCORT Sw- 
wee: Td- 02/520 23 65 


COPBWAGEN EXCLUSIVE ESCORT 
Servo:. Tet 01-31 39 59 


BCORT SBtVICE. London 
01-245 9002. 


don. Td: 01-328 8459. 


AMSTBffiWMKJM SUE Escort Sera 
Tet 020-953892 


SBWKE Td. 


HAMBURG - MADEMOISELLE Escort 
Agency. 04Q.SS 32 914. 

*X&U >OmBSBUCaU3GM 


Ennfah Escort Swvxp 0711 '38 31 41 


ternat. M9.'5S72-10. Gmfit cmxfc. 


Apencv. Tel: 311 11 Ot- 


BCORT 


Guide Service. Tet 91 23T4 


MUNIOt - - WHCOME BCORT Sw- 
wet Td- 91 84 59 


3 14% DWG ABt 4* 

37to 72Vr DaleEn 33 13 10 

Bto 5 Vj DomnC 

158% 78% DamEA ZD0 193 

158* 6to DareEB 330 254 

584 38* Damson 5 

24to lWj Dares Pt 3JS 173 

208% 108b DataPd .16 13 

7 3to Datarm 5 

68* 38% Deaots 

16 128* DdVal 134 113 9 

4 18% Delmed 


312 

IS 

4 

240 

384 

239 


18% 14% 
25to S5to 
64% 64% 

Wto 10 
9 04% 

3J» Jto 


. 2 21to 218% 

859 ITto- 128% 

4 6 59% 

2 39% 184 

9 15to 158% 158b— to 

473 18% 14% 186 + 1% 


18% 

2Sto 
64% 

104% 

9 +4% 

3to 

314b— 8% 
12to 
6 




J3I 5.1 

13 

5 

4* 

4to 

4to— to 

9to 

7to DeGanl 



12 

27 

Bto 

Sto 

Bto 


lOto Devi CP 



87 

2 

ia 

w 

13 

m% 


150 125 


23 

9te 

fto 

m— v. 


5* D(agA 



54 

1 

7i% 

7to 

7to + ft 


5* Dina B 



46 


<te 

Aft 

«%— % 


6 Dicaiti 5 



15 

66 

25 

23* 

23te— lte 

3U 

lte Dlgicai 




32 

ito 

Ito 

IM H 






to 





JO 

5 

16 

10 

Mto 

66 

66 — te 


2ft Dkstes 



10 

19 

% 

3 

3te + yy 






2334 

1ft 



12 Dcretrs 

JB 




i3to 

ISto 


34ft 

23 Du com 

M 

12 

15 

181 

»te 

l 

“ft 

“ft 

20 Vx 

12ft Duplex s 

AA 

25 

11 

11 

17ft 

17ft 

17ft 

lato 

12 DurTst 

-400 25 

16 


Mto 

13ft 




370 20 



Uto 

Ute 


29te 

18V. Dvneer 

50 

25 

12 

4 

27ft 

zn% 

27ft 



6ft EAC 

AO 

47 

40 

2 

Bto 

Bto 

Bto + ft 



33 

11 

26 

10 

15 

14* 

15 + te 





15 

37 

6ft 

6* 

6*— te 


2to ESI 



10 

21 

6te 

6* 



2te EoglCI 



13 

212 

Zte 

Zte 




150 

S3 

10 

1 

19* 

Wft 




6.960217 

7 

1 

32ft 

azte 

32V* 

I5U 

7te EchoBO 

.12 



BS3 

88 

Wte 

ft 

12* 

to 

Ufl + ft 



1A0 

65 

9 

so 

22 

714% 

21 to— ft 

61% 

2te ESacSd 



42 

7 

6te 

6ft 

Sto 

Bte 





469 

3 

2* 

.2* . 

Wto 

101% EmMdn 

JJ3e 

3 


6 

n 

11* 

11*— Mi 

TV* 




7 

11 

5* 

5* 



12Vi EgryDvln .831 




16ft 

“ft 

16ft + fcU 













7 

44 

9* 

9te 

9* + te 


I0te ESDfl 

AOs 23 

10 

It 

M 

14 

M 


2to Enstref 

.48*167 


2 

2* 

2* 

2ft— ft 








9ft 



5ft EsVevpf 15 3 


■ 

6ft 

6ft 

6ft + ft 

an 

,4 ftHs?r. 

AO 

25 

7 

289 

28 

17ft 

IS* 

ft 

16 — H% 
1 



.110 

A 

3B 

12 

2 9to 

291% 

29ft— ft 



.10 

1.1 

33 

16 

9ft 

9te 

9te — te 



70 

22 

33 


9ft 

9te 


9ft 

6to Excel 

JOn 45 



9 

Bft 

B!%— ft 


138* 

238% 

151* 

19 

104* 

128* 

ISVj 

in* 

IFto 

13V* 

39 

UP* 

437* 

304* 

99% 

112 

Mto 

7T» 


88'* FPA 44 11 10to 10V% lOto 

161* Fablnd A U I 17 31 208% 21 +8% 

6 FairPbi 31 10 IS 15 15 

(Tt Fartvof .47! 23 140 14H 14 14*% 

38% Fldata 52 48* 64% 68% 

94* FtConn 1J00O 82 § 0 138% 12J% 12te + V% 

11 FWvmB 30 63 10 12 114% 114% 118% 

98% Fstcras 7 32 llte llto 11*. 

llto RschP Ml 55 19 70 128% 12to 128% + to, 

6to FltcGE 5 21 104% lOto lOto 

234% FitGE pf 4J30 13J 129to39to29to + to 

7 FlonEn 7 7 69% 68% — to 

288* FlaRck JO 1.9 7 21 37te 37to 378% 4- 8*1 

21 Fluke 1381 6J» 9 48 23 229* 22lb— to) 

54% FttilllG 17 45 58% 58b 58b— to) 

B9to FardCndUOa 1 00x104 to lotto TO4te 

194% ForstC A JO 1J 26 1 EPSs ms + tel 

llto ForvstL 33 2U 268% 268% 26to ^ 

8% Fotom! 44 18% 11% 

4te FrdHIv 213 7 Oh 68% 



UMonffl 

High Low Stock 


26 14 Fi-enHt 

134% 5 FrtaE a 
26 I4to Frisch* 
»S 1086 FrotHd 
14to 4to FrtAwt 
13 614 FwrVJt 


■a 

2 us 

9 

.171 12 
JO U 24 


75 32 31 te 718%— VS 

“ n*aS to 
stsi^ + to 

79 I2to 12Vi 1» 


48% 4Vb 
48% 1»* 

158% 

21% Ito 

ss« 

44% zv% 
llte 134% 
5 34% 

178% 13 
* 28b 

159b 9to 
4te 18b 
124% BVb 
24M 13to 
20 I 

358% aoto 

37 338% 

48% 38% 
78% 3 

lte 4% 
14 7 

11 Ete 
248% 14ta 

12 78% 

158% 94% 

441% 37 
36 1386 

118% 5te 
15te 11 
Uto 8 


GRI 

SataxC 8 

GalxyO 25 

Goran U0 4A 13 
GatUt 
Oena 

GDefns A U 1 
GnEfTTO JO 7jD 11 
GriSucr .10 J 12 
Genisco 

CenvOr J9 19 t 
GtoRwt 

Esr. -1 * B 13 

Gtatflt° J8 27 11 
G hirer lJOOb 33 21 
GJotoNR 

Graham Jt| 
GranMe lJ0e22J S 
GrodAu M 7J0 13 
Great 12 

GrTedl IS 

OrtLkC A Mil 
Granms 12 

Grehwr jret SA u 
GlfCdg S3 
Gall JB* A 16 


36 48% 

3 1 !* 

S in 
27to 
» W8% 
223 I4to 


3 

IM 

5to 

into 

lib 


AM* 

Ml 15 

31% 

191 4 


104 to 
19 71% 

132 6 

3B 198% 
66 98% 
5 W% 
456 » 
S3 228% 
7 118% 
139 148% 
30 13 


4te 4te 
18% .1* 

11 11 
Ito T to— to 

mu sm + v. 

Wte Wto + to 
2te 74* 

14 M 
29b 29b— to 
14 Mi Uto— te 
486 5 + 16 

tote 108% 

3te 3te— to 
into m + v. 
ZIto 318% + 8% 
144% IS + to 
328% 33 —lte 
308% 3086 + to 
4 4 

3te Ste— to 

.8% 8* + K 

68% 6to— 9% 
59b 6 4- U 

1945 194% + to 
9to 9V2 
1086 108% 

348% 341b— 1 
331* 22to— to 
M8* 118% 

144% 144% 

118% llto 


JBI 2 A 


JOe U 
.10 J 


101% 48% HAL .109 U 

211% 1086 HUBC jAOOSjO 13 

6to 4to Halltax JM# J 

3M lib Hal ml 

18% ito Halmlwt 

109% 64% Hamptl JOtOJ > 

294* 318% Hndymn .I0o A 1 

37te 13 HanfRfB JO 13 U 
39to 21 Ms Haxbrs .15 J 9 

43 3Ste Haflbrpt 200 SA 

GV% 3816 Hasting -40a U 5 

Hltcrln 
171% 13 HtthCrs 
Wte sw HlthCh 
19te 64* Him EX 
1546 11 HatthM 
94% 68% HetnWr 

I7to 10 He bride 
lOto 3te He: loot 

Ito te HelmR 

59% 38% HarshO 

4te 18* Hlnctrl 

17 9te Hlptron 

4to 2 Hofman 

188% 6to HodvCp A U 7 

19to ISto HirwGn 
25to 20 HmlaspfZSS 13J 
22 Vi 1416 Hormls -54 25 13 

12 6„ HrnHOT IS 

38% 8b HmHwt 

198% 1384 HotlPty 1J0 98 16 

4ta 28* HattPwf 

6to 3to HouOT J4el7J 

18to 118% HovnE 9 

23to 16«> HuMAl 76 U 

24 Vb 159% HubelBS J6 3-4 12 

63to 42 Habblpf 206 16 
41% 6to Husky g J6 Al 


■to Bto 8to + to 
20V, am 2046— 8% 
61% 61% Sto— to 
2V% 2 3M 
Ito 116 lte 
7% 71% 7V% 


I 


1* 2386 234% W1+ 8U 

79 23to 22to 2Zte 

830 33U 3 Ito 32 —Ito 

16 3716 3686 3686— to 

35 29to 29to 299b— 1% 

6453 94% 916 98* 

26 168% 16to Wte— to 

227 94% 89% 9to + toj 

m 08% Mb 08% +183 

82 1386 U Wte 

2 8W Sto 8M , 

19 1J*% IM 13}% + 16) 

47* 41% 4 416— W 

92 8% to S 1 

99 496 44% 49% + to} 

27 21% Mb Tto— 4%j 

10 Wto 128k Uto 

20 3 3 3_, 

IS ' 


K2I 

lr.1 

19* + 16 

21ft 

21ft 

21* + * 

22ft 

Zlft 

Zlft— * 

Cft 

Ate 

6ft 

ft 

ft 

ft— te 

isto 

IBft 

IBft— ft 

6ft 

A 

Alb + ft 

4ft 

4 * 

4* — te 

14* 

Uto 

14ft— M 


21ft 

21*— U 


21* 

ZZte + te 

58 

58 

SB 

7 

6ft 

7 


f fern* jw ” 

T to Zto Ptenj^y 
Sto 49% PHWVO 
1Mb into PITCSHI 
Iffte 696 Pizsoin 
2OT4 l5Eplert>g 


I 13 
92 2 

* 

1C 44. 


as 


SAW 9 
9 vnm 
M 1A » 


PoauSC UOO 43 


JO 


14 u 


10 


48% 2te 

^8% 'l** FOWCv 
17to 

2SS 1^^ 

1 K £gS£ « g 2 

794* 7 PmRB JM W J 

16* Pgf gtG 234 «L2 

349b aoto WoK i? Si 

3416 178* P«t 
8te 286 — 


ZM 1BJJ 


47 S’* % 

1 l & 

-- % 'l 

2 1 

4% + ® 

» it’s U r*-* 

Tq r. s ^ ^ 

1*'- £**- 
S ir.i 18 s 

S »i U- 4* + ■ 

1 llte llte IJte-J- 
4 it** ij! - 
4 Tft A: 3'5 

13 It* Wto rwi . - 

41 

4 33*6 Kto SJ»“ l* 

5 237% Wj. aato— 

14 4to *8% 4to 


108% 5 Qoetog* 


20 Ste 


Bte 8’-— to 

^3 


9 546 RAJ 

igS^tBSg 

2^ lte W&BW t 

159% lOto MMB 


JB* SA 19 




itC 


48b 3te R(WNer 
9to RMatP 


J0B+2U 

9 
8 

.We 26 II 

SO 20 W 

188% M4* RtaAlS AO 36 

191* Bib Rdcwvs M 2* 24 

3086 1716 RMBTS .12 A If 

586 18% RooravP 

3* J6o 22 9 

3114 2716 Ruodknf J» U 

Wto llto JO 18 W 

2916 86 Ryfcoff 40 24 M 


V* 


Ate 4 Ate 

,? * £ S'- ^ 

17 fto «% 

4 1 14 148% + te 

% 7 1 

i r £'£^ 

wl ^£^£^ + 3 

*M 2SV* 249* 25te— 4% 


Vi 


17 U 
13 


B 38% 

5516 29 

m iaa 

38% 24% 
9 3U. 

5 ft 

JSao* 

Wte 6 
2216 11 
28% 186 
13 68% 

15 lOto 
486 28% 

Ito 86 
1446 58% 
llto 9to 
416 Ito 
88* 6 
101% 4 to 

1086 48% 

23V, 1316 
41 2086 


10 

IM 


ICEEn 
ICH* 

ICO 
I PM 

IRTCPS „ 34 

ISS .12 25 
ImpGp JOB 23 
Implnd 
limriMla 150 
lntfaht 6 

Insfrn ■ JO 1.1 22 
instSy ■ 

intOya 50 
Intmk .12b S 
IntBknt 
IntBkwt 

intHyd 16 

IIP 56 9JI «3 
InfPnrf 
IrriSaow 

Inlflirn It 

InThrpf 

I on las 14 

IroqBrd 33 


U 58% 586 
110 47 4616 

32 18% 19* 

23 28% 2to 

71 7% 76 
6 411 /to 

^ 

W 37te 378% 
217 g% 546 
50 !«% 19 
2U 18% 18k 

78 12 llto 
10 138% 13% 

s » » 

48 A 586 
.7 io«s mb 
6 31% 38% 

1 68b 69b 

MI 48% 41% 
32 48% 416 

26 2216 228% 

2 35 35 



% % 


ms“2 


48% 

£ 

6to 


1786 llte Jadvn 
78% 54% Jacaos 
Zte Jet Am 
4% JetAwt 
58% Jetroa 
28% John Pd 
7 JahnAm 
6 jtfmlnd 
21% JmpJkn 


50b 38 10 


-7HTL6 10 

JO 42 10 
4 
IS 


6 n 13 13 

5 616 68% 616 + 

ISS 4to 44% 

10 to to to 

32 68% 61% 

15 2to 286 28% 

76 7V% 7 71% + 

6 0 8 8 

7 28% 28% 28% 


Mb— 9%) 1+1% llto SCEdpf 155 1^5 


394% Site KnGB.pl 450 17J 


... lfci KapokC 
1616 10 KavO> 

23to 14 Ketciim 
486 2to KeyCOB 
2U KevCoA 
8^ KerPti 

2te KkMewt 
38% Kltern 
38% Klnarfc 
21% Kkbv 
3to KUMfo 
... 2 KleerV 
1686 1016 Knoll _ 

308% 228% KaserC 2J2 


4 

1286 

78% 

48% 

4to 

48% 

48% 

58% 

38% 


2 

JO 15 7 
55f 13 19 
.151 45 
.15a 5J) 

JO 24 

A 


jar 5 
88 76 


59 
15 
11 
636 
1 

1332 
31 1, 

13 

A3 


■WTS 


200X 37to 36to 364%— TV: 
12 Sto 38% 38% — V. 
f 1Z« 128% 128% + 8%: 
208% 

3te 28% 3 
84% .816 88% 

3 3 3 + 8% 

48% 4to 48% + to 
38h 38% 38% 

% a sr* 

48% 48% 486—1% 
2to 286 S% + to 
157 U Uto 15 + to 
77 269% 268% 268% 


24% 11% 
Sto 186 
78% 38% 
194% 134% 
148% 84% 
13 9 

2786 1686 
98% 24% 
31to 184% 
69% 4 

348% 9to 
3 14% 

48% 28% 
28% 18% 
398% 2786 
19 1086 

Uto Sto 
138% 94% 
148% 10 
26V* Uto 
I0» 88% 


LS8 
La Bars 
LaPnt 
Lndmk 


Lauren 

LearPP IDO 16J 
LssPb 

Lehigh s M J 
ihwrT 


LalaurT 

LhtFMl 

Ute Hit 

LftfU 

Lodge 

Lurunr 

Lumex 

LundyE 

Lorta 

Lydal 

LynCSs 

LvnebC 


50 


M A 


JO 

JO 



10 

2 

Tto 


25 

1* 

1* 


1 

3ft 

3* 

14 

16 

19* 

19* 

33 

165 

KM 

10 

32 

5 

9ft 

91% 


35 

18* 

Wto 

12 

100 

6* 

61% 

10 

6 

29ft 

29ft 

B 

2 

6* 

6ft 

11 

4 

32to 

321% 


57 

1 * 

1ft 


9 

4ft 



3 

Ito 

1ft 

19 

275 

36* 

36ft 

Z7 

15 

78 

68 

14* 

12ft 

tt 

10 

in 

10* 

Ute 

9 

2 

13* 

n* 

12 

171 

Ute 

u* 

T9 

IZ 

10 

10 



M 


14to 128% MCOHd 
28% 14% MCORs 
Tib MSA 
to MSA wt 
686 MSI Dt 
2to MSR 
78% MacGrg 
88% MocSctl 


98% 

18% 

128% 

44% 

1586 

19to 


.16 


S 60 


134% Uto Wto 
48% Ito Ito 
88% 88% Sto 
186 IM lte 
98% 916 9to+ 1% 
24% Zto-28% + 8% 
98% Bto 88%— 8% 
174% T786 1TV% + 


as 

19ft CltFst 

1.00b 35 

9 

125 

33ft 

32ft 

33 + te 

2* 

ft Macrod 



43 

pc; 

unl 

» + Ik 

33* 

an* ctvGos 

130 

35 

9 

5 

31* 

31* 

31* 

214% 

TO* TWtaPS 

551 15 

3 

39 

IL. ’ 

IBft + to 

4J 

|-fT« 

1330 AS 


« 

42ft 

424% 

421% + ft 

15* 

81% Mntarta 

70a 


11 

lift 

lift 

lift— W 

Y' ^ 1 


.16 

1.1 

12 

2 

Mto 

Mto 

Mto 

31* 

10* Monad 



2 

12 

12 

12 — te 

(ElJ 


JO 

2J 

9 

21 

Sto 

8ft 

Bto— to 

7ft 

21% MrthOf 



5 

31% 

31% 

Sto + to 

■ - j 

ite coif wts 



21 

4ft 

4ft 

41% — 1% 

17 

44% MrklVs 


U 

30 

16* 

■i-.J 

15ft— to 





A 

14 

21ft 

21* 

211% 

22* 

21* Manmpf 255 185 


1 


21* 

11?% 


.16 



167 

Bte 

B* 

nfc— * 

26to 



22 

65 

■ [ ; r 1 

tm 

TO —to 

13* 

6to Comsta 




43 

lift 

lift 

llto— to 

B3 



IB 

65 


r'l 

5Zte— Mi 

11* 

6* ComoO 




I0» 

10* 

10 

TO 

19ft 


Jlta 1.1 

6 

6 

L.J 

IBS— te 

Wte 





68 

6* 

6ft 

6ft— * 

Bte 

5 Matoe 


17 

4 

5V% 

5to 

54% 

Kite 

51% CmpFct 
14* cnrtim 



14 

14 

7Wi 

6te 

7to + ft 

221% 


.12 U 

9 

25 

10ft 

IB* 

10* 

20te 

40 

23 

IJ 

10 

17ft 

l/to 

17ft + te 

20 

8ft MatScn 


7 

86 

14te 

ffH 

!**— !» 

i?te 

6* ConCdF 



15 

5 

8 

8 

B + to 


15ft Matrix s 


20 

44 

l/» 

174b + * 

IS* 

6ft COnnly 



9 

W 

15* 

15 

Uto + ft 


Bte MavEng 150 17.1 


39 

0& 

Bf J 

8ft 

25to 

13ft ConrCP 



7 

5 

IB 

17ft 

17ft— te 


13ft Mavflw 

50 23 

9 

39 

L'n 

Cilj 


Vte 

5ft Cooqst 



89 

189 

Bte 

Bto 

Bte + * 



780 55 

*1 

10 

p- , 

pp ~ J 

ite 





J5 

4to 

4to 

4to— ft 



7.M 15 

76 

26 

f/J- 

§r/j 

77» 

IU 

4ft CoraOG 




IB 

5te 

5* 

54%— to 


141% Media 

34 12 

18 

253 

k--. 

20 

20* 

23te 

16ft CnStarn 



22 

IM 

22* 

221% 

22ft + 1% 


5ft MercSL 

5*t 65 

5 

IS 

Bte 

lte 


lift 




4 

96 

13ft 

131% 

131%— to 


Mb MetPro 

AS 3 

20 

23 

its*. 

16ft 

2D 

9te VlCntA Pf 



II 

164% 

I6to 

16ft 

y ~ |j*| 

11 Mntaxs 


6 

IU 

w 

12V% 

12ft— to 

26ft 

17ft ContMil 



7 

12 

fit 

20* 

20ft + te 




37 

7 

23* 

23te 

23* + ft 


10* Cnnvsl n 

150 164 


7 

11 

11 




7 

342 

4to 

3ft 

3to 

19* 





SI 

IB 

IV* 

17te— * 


17 Mhflnd 

AO 14 

9 

8 

ZBft 

XVr 2M% + ft 


CosCrn 



23 

65 

3 

V-* 

J , l 

711% MtaPpf 

UO IM 


Z10Z82 

81* 

BI* +* 

1 




63 

ft 

ISto 

12ft MtChlE 

24 17 

29 

123 

14ft 

Ute 

Uto + * 

9to 

9ft OrtrMn 




48 

9ft 

91% 

9* 

15* 

9ft Manfi^a 

50 45 

10 

2 

151% 

15 

Uto + to 

35 

25ft Craso 

144 

44 

15 

3 

32* 

32ft 

32ft— te 

42 

32to Monppf 440 114 


10Z Wto 

r.iij 

3Sto— to 

4B'A 

26te CrowIM 

UOOa 27 

9 

2 

36* 

36* 

36ft + te 

| i 1 

lOto MooaB 

20 1.1 

W 

7 

TO 

li.l 

17ft — |% 

17ft 

9ft CrnCP 



54 

30 

15V. 

15* 

Uto— ft 

ll.'] 


78 14 

IB 

47 

17* 

li.'l 

17* + to 

13* 

7ft CrCPB 



43 

14 

121% 

12 

12 + te 




17 

567 

21 

20 

21 + to 

234% 

171% CwCPpt 

1.92 

<7 


12 

221% 

221% 

2Zto— to 

4ft 

1ft MtaRtvF 



23 

2 

Ift 

1ft— to 

7te 




30 

7ft 


I9ft 

16ft MlgGttl 

156 95 

7 

HO 

171% 

17* 

T7te— U 


b CrutcR 



1 

390 

% 

10 

1 MtgPIn 

JOt 23 


58 

flrft 

Bto 

«* + te 

Sft 





I24B 

* 

ft- 1% 

2to 

i Mortrn 



5 

Ito 

Ito 

1ft 


13* Cubic 

J9 

15 

11 

30 

21* 

21* 

21*— to 

6ft 

2ft HHMed 


13 

5T 

4ft 

4ft 


31 te 

23ft Curtlee 
tv CustEn 

72 

35 

10 

20 

ZB 

27* 

77ft- Jfc 

9ft 

4ft Mavtai. 



4 

ito 

7to 

3 




22 

* 

* 

ft + s 

5* 

1 

1ft Murpln 

S Muaewt 



22 




3 


17 134% NRMn 250 1BJ 

204% 188* NRMPt 250 14.1 . 

9V% 54% Mantck _ 15 

148% llte NfGsO 50b 13 10 

211% 128% NtPatrd .10 A . 

238% 148% NMxAT J9t <A 14 
178* 12V, NPUlRt 1JH 46 16 
218b 13 NProc IJBb 55 11 

NWMPn 3074 

49te 314% NYTlmes 50 15 15 478 

6to 34% NewbE ZrU 5 32 

178% 118% Newaar 33 25 zs 

Wto llte NBwLsn.^ 11 

17te 13 NwpEI 150 BJ 11 


NwpEI I 
■ Nlcnln a 
68b N kiwis 
gb 


1^ 1^ 
138b 138% 


-14% 


78% 

T38% 

28% 

llto 

37 298% NIPS pt 435 125 

584 

§ 

128% 


NCdOBB 
_ . NIPS Pt * 
Ito NllHn 
n NuHrwt 
48% NUCJOt 
83* Numnc 


51 I486 Wto Wto— te 
245 198% Uto Wto— 8% 
2 Sto Sto S9% + 4% 

20 12 a 12 

403 WH MU Wto— 8% 
7 1886 18M 184%— 8% 
75 U 16 16 

48 724% ZIto 22 +4% 

4S3B4&-1 

” “ 

1 f % » C** 

50 104% W86 Wto— te 

” iSS 1 Sr 

350x 35 MU 3486 -r- to 
45 38% JM 316 — U, 

5 to 8% 86 

23 58% 5 5 

29 Bto 88% Bte— 1% 


24M 1686 OEA 
22to 154% Oakwd 
U 4 OdetAn 
Wto 44% OdatB-S 
Wte 13to OhArt 
2486 108% OUalnd 
278% 108b Olsten 1 
71% 44% OrMHB 

28% 1 Ormond 
2S86 16 OSuhms 
I486 68% OxfniF 

Wte Bte OzarfcH 


JIB 5 12 


U 

15 76 

V. W 


52 15 
jm S5 
J0 15 


3 20 20 20 — 8% 

19 IB T78% IB + te 

31 5 48% 4M + to 

2 6 -6 6 — 4 % 

1 Uto Uto Uto— 4% 

1 208% 208% 208%— to 

200 228% 228% 228%— to 

4 48% 44% 44% 

43 23to 234?! tSS + U 

S 148% 14 144% 

659. I486 138% 138%— to 




IS llto PGEpfA 150 115 
138% 108% PGEpfB 157 11.1 
T»% 9to PGE^C !.» 105 
1286 9to PGEPfD 1JS 11.1 

SMSSFggsay 

29% 241% PGQafY 120 115 
2*9% J91* PGE pm 257 115 
224% 174% PGipfV «2 115 
244% ISto PSepfT 2J4 115 
24te 1986 PGE PS 253 115 
11 B4% PGEPfH LI2 1U 

23 178% PGEpfR 257 1U 

js^^psig g 

198% I486 PGEptM 15* 115 
Mte JmS 254 tjj 

268% to PGrTm , U* 45 
4186 328b POCLltf 4M 11.1 
Gto 329% PodJpf AM 11.1 
47 38W PacUef 4J5 1U 

329* p3£5. 50 15 

Ol* Prailu S* 

1 j 00 35 


17 138% U Wto . 

4 121% Wto nib— 4* 
M 118% 11 IM + te 
127 llto 11 . life + to 
3 llto 114% llto— to 
61 1084 108% Uto 
t 338b 338% 338b + 4% 
3B 318% 314% Site . 

38 3S8% 278% 2786— U 

2 224% 221%. 228% — to 

20 20to 2086 986— 4% 

30 2ZU 2216 2216— to 

3 2284 2186 2286— M 



4.1 U 
4 9 11 


13V* <86 Pot Tcti 

1384 3% POVlPt 

« asxs?,5« 

2 » ,s s?r2 ib 

2684 198% POflRisSTjjo *5 10 
IB 786 Panril 30 17369 
T& TC-POMmv- _• 

X 244% Public 58 M 
131% 11 PeriWJ 50 3j 30 
12* 986 PtrMpn.10 til ■- 


6B9 2BVi 2786 04% +146 
100X5986 XV. MS + 86 

Site 

12 68% 686 686.+ 8% 

4* ^ *5* 3 5to + Jtf 

7 10 986 W +4T 

i a 

20 2*16 2^6 3^— to 

7 124*124% 139% 


Bte 34% SFM 
Bte 7 SFNpIA 
39to 3N4 SJWB 155 
5 28% 

10M - 

53to SOgdPf 750 TU 
241% 19 SDeoPt 257 MS 

3986 331% SOgOpt 455 115 

26 aVteSDOOPf 250 14.1 
37 2186 SondDfe 50 21 

58% 386 Sonmrk AH 93 11 

7 4Vb Sound B 5 U I 

14 98% Sound Pt un Ilf . 

(te 7 SaxnOH 1J0 15J 

Uto llto S&atTon 15 

Sto 31% Sceptrn 
30M T7to Sch O 56 If 14 
71% 386 SdMat .10 15 

as iz SdLag 7 

4086 33 SCXKU JA U 10 

20 1246 Scurfln 

% r w * u 7 

18% teSdaott 
686 286 SemMi 

15 9% Srvtsoo Jf 25 

11 7to Sen a TJ 

13%% m servatr JO 75 IB 

Wto 98% Solans II 

Wto 88% ShaarS 150a LA 7 

2 to Sharon 
154% Bto Shaped* 

161* 74% SJerKS n 34 

ISto 94% StorSpn Jn 28 23 

158* 7to Slarea 5H 

1586 84% SRMBA JO 20 U 

59% TVs SHVTCSt • 

20to Wto SmthA JO 4.1 

20 10 Smttlll JM Al 

2786 2486 SmMpt 2.42 84 „ 

94% 586 somron » 

1686 7 Sorgpra 20 

14% to SoTik 

im stoscEdpr un «7 

HVb Bte SCEdpf 106 MJ 

12to Bto seed Pt U9 105 

51V. 384* SCEdpf 452 95 

I486 llto SCEdpf 

9246 49(6 SCEdpf 


23M 17V, XU WL8 

738% 39 SCEdpf 751 W 
37% zte Swflcpn 9 

786 48% SpedOP 
1346 Sto Speacar JM 
llto 3% Spndthn 280 

3 M Spndtwt 

231% ITto SMPTtf 54 35 A 

Zlte I486 StWTtH 30 

lOto Ate StatBX 

2Zte 15to Stem 58 35 W 

586 486 StffCre, 

3 tto starter 

23 1386 Slrffixf 25 15 7 

118% Sto StetStt JBe 15 7f> 

31% lte 51FUIW 

7 34% SumttE 

* to XtoSonSL . . 

22 11to 3«mJr 58 22 D 
368% 2116 SunrFd 54b U U 
18% 1% SopCro 

«iun B is j 

5 iS UR 

Uto 6tosWa»* .ra 15 9 


5 44% «* 64* 

” 394% 3% 3*to+ »% 

9 34% Sto 34* 

108 8 7te B 

44 A 58% 6 

35 1 1 1 

MOBrISte 6516 ASIA— te 

4 22* 229i 22te + te 

4 am arte am + * 

3 206 218% 2<te 

7 & 39 29 + 8% 

B m% 48% 4H j* 

IB 58b 586 5te + 

8 MM W% Mto ^ „ 

22 7te 781 79% + te 

32 Tlte 118* 118%— V% 
37 Sto 34% 3to— 4% 

M 2986 294% 2986 + 86 
7S 58b 54% 586 

US 124% 12 12 — to 

39 3384 334% 338*- 86 

2 Uto 148% Mto 

97 Wte 108% + to 
12 284 J86 Zte + S 

15 8% 8% 8%— W 

S M 3 3—86 

.W 11 11 +to 

15 986 94% 9to— 8% 

N llte 1186 118% + 86 

2 11M llte 1186— M 

9 Tito TIM llto 

- *3 Hto ,TWb llto- te 

M fto 98* 9to 

30* M fa N 

2 I 8. I 

15 KM 91% 104% + to 
3A 3* ' Sto 3te 
17*19* 198% Wto ' 
41x194% 194% im 

*z? c2 7te *7tk 3 m— 8% 

1 -X ** 

■23 imu U8h 104% • 

N Wto Wto Wto 
a iw% uto iite— to 
-23b 4686 458% 4AM + 86 
- 59 W16 14 14 

MS Rite 948% toto + 8% 
24 214% m% ZIto 
7 388% am 208%— te 
13 494% «n% mi 
4 Sto 3 3 —to 

I 714 M Ate— to 
20 4to 44% 64%+ 8% 

4 4 4.4'- 

-s »to 2nb ffll' + i* 
43 Wte 178% Uto + to 
5 SM, 8t% 89% 

29 23 22(6 23 +M*_ 

2 * j.- s -P 

13 2 18% 2 

6 14to MM I486 

fto 

to 




« T *$ "*+ '* 

SlLaUtel* 

31 4to 48% 4» 

389 944% 




<to 


384 

68 % 


av £rJJ 

.W 23 21 


+3 


986 4* T Hor 

Wte 686 TEC 

Wto 41% TIE 

1286 58% Til 

2lte Ute TobPrd JO U 
94% 686 TondSr 
17 n% TOBlY 50 BP W 
316 18* TdiAm 

2Zte 128% TchSvm 10 

77V, 41 TachOp 759*1X3 W 

6 Jte TochTp 11 

2086 Wte TecMrt JO 22 0 

J* J'M-io 

^2^$* 54 U 15 

8(6 TvffJta J UH 

Ate rated . 23 

I* 

VBS? ‘ 14 

A* TmrAE JM0 49 » 
to Txsoan 

TfllEdpf 8J2 123 
TaiEd pflSjn 


5te 581 JM— '4 
7to 7 7 +te 

4to 4ft .01%— to 
Ate Ate CM 
WM ISM 1546 _ 

”** 88% Bte 


25 W86 Mto MM— to 
33 2 2to 2to ■ 

4Z7 121% Wto 11 -48% 
I 594% SBte 5B46 . 

- 4 4. .v4 


5 




ii8% 

14 
Sto 
Aft 
Wte 
20 
88 % 

786 
468% 54 
801% 64. 


986 28% Torttl JR _ 

154% Bte TottPta J4 
28% Jt TotPtwt 
2SVr 2384 TdtPtpf 2 88 187 
U n* TttmLx JOt 17 '12. 
Wto IT* Tm»TBC M 43 9 
Wto Ute Tranmo 54 35 7 
118% 7te TrffiM JUG 
Ate 386 TrtHnta 8 

98% 3M Trldwc. , , IS 
4 m TuttMax 
228% 1086 TurnBn 35 

W m% TmEan J5B.15 
38% 14% TYIrwtB 


32 

8B0XZ14 2M ZTT — S 
5 H% JM H% - 
37 - 3 - 7 /Ti 35 334% + to 

m wv. low H4% 

25 Bte 7ft 78b— 8% 
02 -4- ' m 3ft— .ft. 

3 S 3 s +2 

573 Wte Wte 1886 — 4%. 

tOfefZto Alte AZto— 4 ‘ 
38x764% TRft TIft 
7 34% 3to 31% . 

S ^ % U- to 

121 15 M86 141% + 8% 

12 14ft 144% 14ft + te 

‘ J 2! £ &7S 

s ss s a** 

m w !m 124%- %» 

52 886 Sto. Ito— to 

144 Ito Ito- I* 


u 


4 Ito UNA .. ■ 
20 B)l IMM 
Wto Bte unban 
158% 1)4% UiriCPPf 


M 


JS 54 


llte B86 UMmor 144*134 
23 Wto UnGOBFS JO 33 1 A 
286 lte UFoodA JO 6J 
286 146 UFoodB ' 

1686 Ute UiMMl- 13' 

224% 124% USAGwt 
18b Ste-UoHBlV 23 

144% 98% UrtVCm - -14 
BIM Ate UnhrRs 15 

2046 Ute.UnlvRu. 50a AT. 
Ute IBM UnvRot 


» Wto ra% TZte-ft 
199 II. M86 1086 
9 W -14 14 +M 

127 11 TOM icte 
S «te 2Jte 2T8b— te 
31 lte 11% Ito— 4% 

T2B W** J3M JM— Mi 

. I] « a 1 S%' f * 

« n Hfali 


Wto 94b, VST O .95* 9T 

2SB& W , VtaflyRa 150 65 13 
274% 17to.4tabpr% 64 15 16 
10 TteVprtf _ 


37 986 94% 9te + te 

S 2® m aoto-v% 


wS ^ vanrir 


2 


'STL-* 


ute 

|9| 


48% Vkxn 




986 

72to 

BMr 


.... Vdlntl 
ito VSsoMG 
» Voptex 
5 vrant 


28 23 1, ,S ^ S 

•10 4« AM Ate * * 

50035 9 W 74% 74% 7ft 

50 4S W IB A 086 Bte +.4% 

8 B 68% 686 686— 1% 


Mr 5 14 


W 


50 

-it 

lit 

3 


5 16 
65 17 
29 4 
19 5 


7ft 386 WTC 
364% Wte Mfti Mar 
39te is wanes 

29 1« Wane 

286 1C WrnCwt 

188* m WbtlHb 

^30 » W*hP*t 

208% Wte WRJTI 1 
un m wane a 
11* 786 waive B 
fto 34% Wttrird 
1986 imWlMdPl 252 175 
Wablavn 

Web In wt 
5to 8% Wabcar 

S .«WS. , jn iJ 

6* 4te WWmcm .14 24 6 

9* 7 WekfTb Jn ■ 

14 B9% Wafibr n u 

I9to 4* WaQca 4 

2* IS w*HAm . 

4- 386 WaiGrd 

B Wto Waaco 

286 te WMa 

Wte 54% WStBrC 12 

1186 Bte WxttJTB 30 13 

154* 646- WDP^ 


Waaca 42 15 12 


- 17 47 4to 4to 4* 

M » -jm 3«% 

* , 1 ?SK 

Pk & 

» WM WM + te 

l f ^ 





Wte+J% 


Tto- .. 
pto + te 
12% + 4% 


f S 

I 


S8: 41 »' 

Mto llto 

51% Zte wtatma 

% WES* 

D* 20 WIc%e*pCL5D U 
134% 1086 Wl *n*rn 50 13" 9 

•to - 37 $ JS § ‘^ES 

w m* 

31 4 3¥t m 

s’JiH C+* 

« 68 % 

W 41% . 4 iu. 


44* 24% WklE A - 
334% 198% Wtatln 254 109 
;_.j 8 W ddnn 50 45 34 
1*4% -Uto WHMBar g 33 T 
Sto » WwdaE 78 

g% wSwMMgjflL* 12J) 

Bte Sto Yankee 




-2S 


10 


986 34% ZnttaT JBI 


A^H^hsiobs 


i 


"■W HMBHS 


BieOorp 
FrontA wt 
New Free 


M 


SBgBgrf FlfaMoGEp 
affSig P n LrottSal p 
GSMEWbwt 


Amdahl 
eapBY MI g 
GrUNmCp 
Tadisym . 


NEW um 14 


btH 


■ RWf 
Horn Her wt 

vonmrtuin 


IS g w B llnfl 


Sue 




« 


t 






f 7W ■ 


EvV&a- s&i- &: 


• • f.' ’,,■•••. '/ : -'. .. \ J-- . 


JytD 


'L-C-* 


)4a 


^ •.. 1 „ ; CSTERNATH)!VAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -S 17ND A Y, OCTOBER 26-27, 1985 WL— / 

•• ^ ~ Y • ~ “ ~ . r , ■■■■■■ BUSINESS PROFILE / Francois Herai^Baubl^S 


r s j; : ; 

ts i' .> 

- » mi ■*. 


fc*r. *t;.: ^ . ' IJ-* new" vnpr" J,r,w ^ up T^ i9» -l«ciioiii« aeniimeitts'in'ClDnerw. 

r; , v* , -+■" ;■ - ♦ ■; < loosed toverivU !7 ■ **“? stiin^ pf xoroqrite demand to Europe, deafen; said that the 

*:5-. 44 Jg ^ J P° n yg'^P^tto^Thm^y dollar roscin the morning on ihc 

*_"» «* , "■•. ;* 3 ^,*W r in quiet, direo- by titcaHtedSks. ' ■ sueaatii <rf dollar DurcfcKabvihe 

** t jvS ■:-» \ * *1 * :\S < S n wSf ?“ li des !* r * said -.. .4225a SoSnUdoa aJwttEttttm 

•*> : t- * ■ ■ •;• : j* t : ;< < | continued cennL| b ft 0 2*®“ ** European countries. But the doHar 

M .;J r i;i The IJ act ^ 3 ?- W.4215;to^ate^esry<Jdttra(fe% declined when ibebuyn® stopped. 
S-.l: ’ :•:•■ • SrS The phases ap^dv^tre 

* Vr --’. .'■■■• : f 5i2i?N Stef 1 !? e ? s<d H 8 ™ *“• ^ d »nged fran5L4220lhe day made to take advanSgeof the dol- 

,, V— — i£ JL • • Jar’s refeth-dybwpricecariy in the 

■■' * r ll ; * -^^JsL^ihe” la^^2^ feUs t lplya8aiim Fens *om: easior prices day. 

:C ' ^ x \'Ncnonrf?ff fl f Se **?* however, re- wea k e ning lhc British currency ap- \ Dealers said dial tteewts no 


1 ■ i/I ^WttWCYMARIgiS^ 

, ; 'Dollar Off in Quiet U.S., European Trading 

\P new^ vnp rTO ^ w ^ r «1 toe dptfefs ropery Friday on iectionta sentnwnts in Congress. 
ii i SHosed lmw p\* . doQai ' ^ sbo^th of coroortte<temaiid to Eurqpe, deafen said that th< 

jf^-SSS^s^jsf **—**■—*•* 


age 13 


“—j-V “&«UJL iwua «mu cop OU HKO OBy. 

v Wur ^f 86 however, re- weakening toe Brirish currepcy ap- '. Dealers said that there was no 

ifLf shar P ««wase in peared^td haVomoeded byThc end xnigor centra] bank httervaiiion 
'.Japanese short-term j j.t- . _ «• _ •■ , 


v-» 

* 3k. 


el: ^ •: : 

\ * * . w~ ■ -'•’ .'-• : sfe '■' e f s<d H 8 ™ h«- h^ changed fran5L4220lhe day made to take advanSgeof toe i 


ififfT* “ t ,Bra 1>cw rort trading, it 
e :Vfefhed at 214.45 yen, doiS^Sin 
{ i ,fS6.55. 

•J ! i ■ The dollar closed in New York at 


had failed to produce hew mosrien- Japan sold a modest number of 
mm . dollars in Asian trading. 

They jaid that the matket re-. Uter in New Yoric, the dollai's 
roamed focused on toe constant fetes, compared with Thursday's, 
threat of central bank intervention included: &0750 French francs, 
under the terms of their Sol 22 down from 8J0900; 116% Swiss 
' accord to" Seek a fewer value for toe francs, down from 11750, and 


• Malaysia Forecasts 6% Rise in GDP 
Due to Increased (hide (HI Output 

confuted hf Our Surf From Aaj mtfits 

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — - Malaysia's gross domestic prod- 
uct will grow 6 percent in 1986 compared with a forecast 5.2-percem 
increase this year, toe finance ministry announced Friday. 

The mmistiy said toe rise in GDP. which measures the total value ol 
goods and services excluding income from foreign investments, is due. 
to an expected increase in 1986 crude ofl output to 510,000 barrels 2 
i day from 430,000 this year. 

However, foreign and domestic demand for Malaysian products 
will remain sluggish, toe ministry warned. While the projected rise in 
crude output is expected to push up mining sector output 14.3 percent 
next year, ah other sectors are expected to record slower to modenue 
growth rates. 

Next year's current account deficit is expected to narrow to 42 
billion ringgits ($1.71 billion) from a 53-btllion-ringgit shortfall in 
1985, toe report said. The current account measures trade in goods 
and services as. well as interest, dividends and certain transfers' 

But an economic analy st in Kuala Lumpur said that the govern- 
ment was overly optimistic in its growth forecasts. He warned that 
unemployment, currently running at 7 percent, would become a 
serious problem due to closures of manufacturing plants and a cut in 
agricultural commodities. (/(eiders, UP!) 


A 10-Year-Old Newcomer to French Jewelry 




‘ TV.W j .. . , . «wiuiosa»*HwavajiKioriaB ««», ouwb inm i-i ijv, ana 

? g . IS ^ ^UL. b ^ Energy Secretary Says U.S. 

-<j j si!*™ euromarkets ■■.■ ••:•. : • - May Increase Oil Stockpile 

'^^Prtces in Euroyen Sector Jkdime Sharply £t££Z2L, AWSZSfl 

-t * LONDON — The United States '®fe some small comfor, to OF 


Even so, bis observation about 
posable oil purchases could pro- 


LONDON — The United States ™k small comltt to OPEC " h He ^JrwJ 

■ V. 1 -1 : : nwmhM anrf rtihtfr «i! wnrintfn COUian ‘ . care _*»■ _ ne ’ Iarlea 


By Shcrrt' Buch;inan 

ln:m^:iunul lU-r^U Tnhun,- 

PARIS — Francois HeraiL 3S. 

president of Poiray, the high-fash- . ' aft 

ion French jewelry company, " ,j T 

peered out of his shop on Rue de "la •■'m^sSL- 

Pais. “See that man looking in the 
window, that's a man from Car- ^ 

tier's across toe street coming to see mg 

what he can steal from my new | 5^, 

collcciion,” he said laughing! 

Mr. Herai! is the new kid on the 
biock. Although Poiray has been 
around since 1975. 10 years is 
young in toe high-fashion' jeu dry 
business where the Cartiers, the 
Maubussons and the Bnucherons 
have been in business for 100 years. 

Like any new kid on the block. 

Mr. Herail had to fight to get where 
be is. and he has had tofight to stav 
there. A year ago, he decided to 
rest run ure to company and ob- 
tained more capital through new 
investments from British banks. 

Officials of toe privately held 
company Mould not. however, pro- 
vide specific performance figures. 

“Because I'm creative. I have a Franco! 

survival instinct, nothing bothers 

me or gets me down,*'" he said, opened Poirav in Paris and in 1 9S2. 
“Money problems don i bother me he opened a store in New York, 
because 1 started with nothing, I -j\e been woridns since I'm 


,r *■ .'••_• 

■.sm 



Francois H^rail 


stones in inventory is high, espe- 
cially when soles ore down. 

“Right now toe market is very 


a'f J^?€'2:'''SaSS^53' s gSSffl!S s^^aggssaow S&SSS SSSfSS 

ii ,1 f ; Eurobond market ended “Thai’s got tobepuioobt now," be fees of 45 hiHrfg points. wry, said here Friday. The strategic reserve contains 

'i t i ?t Friday sbowmgdeclines of as much said. .• "■ t rtiao M«n^ mn> p Cw p issued a Mr. Herrin gi on. in London for a 489 million barrels of oii. equiva- 

z J 5 PoJ»ia i in reaction to sharp The bulk of toelosses seen in toe 12-year floater paying *A point over conference sponsored by toe Inter- lent to about 1 16 days of L 5. im- 

• i £;$o$ses on the Japanese bemd mar- Euroyen sector occraxed daring toe the three- month Lon don infi ^pv national Herald Tribune and the ports, and could be increased to 

i ; u i, £ .‘kel^dealers said. -monnhg Friday, dealers said. In offered rate. It has a nwwmiim Oil Daily, made the comment after 750 million barrels. Mr. Herrington 

'• ia declines m Tokyo came after fact, many houses were not pie- coupon of 13W percent, which will a brief, impromptu meeting with said. 

* e; 5 toe Bank of Japan sought to engi- pared to make marketsalaa daring take effect after toe third year. Snbrota Indonesia’s oil minister The secretarv also said LhatPre&- 

' ! 5 m i t r-r nJ ^ MSC ‘b^y. they noted-. The issue was iratially for S150 and presideni of the Organization jdenL ^nSdReagan would veto 

c ■; ; - wl iT SSI . toe dealers said. In toe pranaiy maribau it was toe million but was later raised to SI75 °f Petroleum Exporting Countries. ^ bUJ Congress passes to impose 

~ ,, 5 *? W . toner- floating-rate-note sector that was million Try toe lead manager, Shear- The U.S. secretary rejected sng- fees on imports of oiTproduns! He 

■'o i c ^Ivoikums m other sectors m Lon- toe Dealer of attention, wuh four son L e hm an Brothers Intemation- gestions that the purchases would declined to d redid whether Con- 


laboui $24,750 at current exchange when life is difficult you give the tomorrow." 
rates ). best of yourself. If you are" a fils a The jewelry business is also one 

But the high-fashion French jew- papa , (a son who goes into toe sue- that is run with cash on delivery . 
eliy business has recognized that ccssfui family business), you don’t “There are no crooks in the jev 
the kid has created a clean, new make it.” " elry business." said Mr. Herai 


I . • .^uuwui lunyuuuwaucr 

3 * ci l the Bank of Japan sought to engi- 
: « §;Tieer a rise In short-term Japanese 
1 5. ; interest rates, toe dealers said. 

Ms n.*. ■ r. . ■ 


my booses were not pro- coupon of 13% percent, which will a brief, impromptu meeting with said. 

make markpts al aS during take effect after the third year. Snbrota Indonesia’s oil minister The secretary also said that Pres- 

they noted.. The issue was iratially for S150 P«s«ientof toe Organization idenl Ronajd ^ wouid veIO 

pranarymarka.it was toe million but was later raised to SI75 of Pelroletim Exporting Countries, any bill Congress passes to impose 
rate-note sector that was nriffionby the lead manager, Shear- The US. secretary rejected sng- fees on imports of oi! products. He 


style, the Poiray style, that they He has found that being a arc- 
hive new begun to incorporate in alive entrepreneur in France is a 
iheir own collections. Poi ray's difficult and hazardous occupa- 
tradenurk is a simple line that tion. 


ssfui family business), you don’t “There are no crooks in the jew 
akeiu" " elry business.” said Mr. Herail. 

He has found that being a ere- “You can't afford to say I can't pay 


idem Ronaid Reagan wowd veto mixes precious stones with ordi- “I love New York. You’re forced 
any bill Congress passes to impose nary or semi-precious materials, to get yourself in gear.” he said, 
fees on imports of oil products. He such as mother of pearl — the an- “The great difference between toe 


if. . - w ^TT • — “ “ • wmiw imwi woa tuwu t«ua^u uiiu luv 4ujvwuuv uivuua rnaui - — - 

is i.strajgni trader said, “the mood’s 50-year floater paying 22i4 basis to S125 mHtion by toe lead manag- ance against shortages, such as the “““B . S ov eramern revenue and 

<! fl.Sjbeen mtensdy nervous throughout points gw theono-moato Lmidwt er, Salomon Brothers Intonation- one fostered by the 1973 Arab oil Protecting US. ail refiners from 

s fii iheafteraooiL’’ intebantbid rare. It was quoted aL The 12-year. coDatoalized note embargo. fora Bn com P eutwn - 

a i i Douar-slraight traders were con- on the when-issued market at 99.70 pays 44 pram over three-month Li- u r Herd run™ *Tca rer—»ieH Mr. Herrington said he did not 


^ ^ E ii'. Dollar-straigh t traders were con- on the when-issued market at 99.70 
* J cerned that the rise in interest rates bid against toe total fees of 37% 
r in Japan, and the subsequent losses basis pomir The lead manager was 
^-(‘suffered by t^ierators in the bond Merml Lynch Cuatal Markets. 

!« .'I mnrVu IJ .1 II. SB*.. L _-l . » . 


gestions that the purchases would declined to predict whether Con- ti thesis of the Christmas tree or United States and France is that 

be an attempt to brake a preapi- gress would be able to override toe chandelier look. there, there are no jealousies When 

tons iwiceslidthtsiead, he argued veto. Mr. Herail started working when you sun something new. people 

ihai they would be merely a good <^y.h iwi t | a iin« Kic r.wo.ii ^-i'-iii. he was in his teens as a window a! wavs encourage vou. In France, 

mvsanl ui .napoiave o,l and dres«r a! An Primtmps, d>e big people .ill al»a>. «ll von von arc 

that ihc stoclcpdc provides insur- gPP ” Pari, dapanmam .hw, gang .0 fail." ' ' 

pnneninTl-'-S. od reTmers from Al :0. he opened La Pone Bleue. Mr. Herail is pessimistic aboul 
one fostered by the 1973 Arab oil j ore j competition. 40 interior design store, that, toe future of entrepreneurship in 

embargo. among other things, rented exotic France. "It isn't a country made for 

Mr. Herrington also repeated , .. Hemngion said he did not ajunaig f or commercial photo- free enterprise "he said. “Financial 


This issue also had a 


'■u market there, would prevent the Merrill Lynch alsoled a note for 13'A percent coming into effect af- 
: ^ Japanese from buying in toe U^. Manufacturers Hanover Crap, that ter the third year. The lead manag- 
° ^ markets. was soon raised to S20B million er quoted the issue at 99.55, com- 

i\i- One trader noted that the Japa- from the initia] $150 nriffion. fortoMy inside the total fees of 75 
. r; nese had been expected to beactive The 12-year isaxe pays - 3/16 basis points. 

t & 

4 Is I I . 1 I nMooWi SEdHln Mat I DMoofli 

. - . T I.HWiLOw Stock Dh.m Hb HM Im 3PJH.CM*I MUm Stoc 


influences,” he said, welcoming Some U.S. officials have suggest- establishment— as artistic director normal." 

OPECs drift away from trying to ed that such exports to Japan for Cartier — he created Les Must The high-fashion jewelry busi- 
adhere strictly to fixed, official’ should be allowed as a means of de Cartier, a new line of lower- ness is expensive to run. The' cost of 
prices. reducing the U.S. trade deficit. priced gifts and jewelry. In 1975, he holding precious and semi-precious 


you. 

A successful newcomer needs toe 
right mixture of creative and com- 
mercial instincts, a difficult thing 
for any one person to achieve — os 
Mr. Herail said he is well aware. 

“What I created yesterday 
doesn't interest me anymore." he 
said. “But in order to keep creating 
I have to keep making money. It's 
like Monopoly. If you don't have 
any money, you can’t play. If I 
don't sell, Ilf go under, so l need 
the public.” 

Mr. Herail is clear about what 
makes him tick. “I work for toe 
glory. It is fun to think that a him- 


aontn u- Mr. Herrington also repeated , ; ncmngion saia ac me not ^mais f or commercial photo- free enterprise." he said. “Financial makes him tick. “I work for toe 

U.S. opposition to any formal dia- ®“ ieve epp 113 9® persuad- g ra phs. After that, he started institutions and fiscal laws are such glory- 1* is fun to think that a hun- 

“ddayed Jogue with OPEC aimed at prop- “ t® repeal a law barring exports Anemone, a franchise of costume that if you make it in France, peo- dred years from now somebody 
^P° c of ping up prices. “I would like to see Irom Alaska s giant North jeivelry shops. pie assume that you've dc*ne some- will say that's a Poiray. 1 want to 

effect af- the market work without artificial Slope oil Geld. During a stint with the jewelry thing wrong to get there. It's not leave a name, that's my kind of 


megalomania." he said. "All I 
know is that i will only stop when 
I'm dead. Nothing can stop me 
while I’m alive." 


.. : m 

'.■it: 

- •: W k;i' 
S t\ I, 

» i s»a 
< x * 


Friday^ 

OTC 


Ofc.YML WB« Hl» law 3 PAL Chtof I MWiUib Stock 

?? *1 —I I 1M 7Vt ELxovtr 


Sol** in iM 

Dhf. YU. iDai Hton Loo 3PJM.CVM 


12 Month 
Hrt*i Lxn- Stock 


Pill, VM. ljfc HWi Lem 3 PM. Cl»W H«h Low Stock 


Sons m Net 

DtoYM. loth High Low 3 PM- Cfl'M 


1! Month 
High Low Stoc* 


Prices 


NASDAQ Prices os of. 

2 pjn. Naw York time. • 

Via The Associated Bros 


1M SJ 3B6 
7U 

TJBb3* ra 
J4 U 


Sam In Net 

ltwa High low 3 PAL Oi~ge 


•y * lIMootn 
•j r. 1 hJphLow Stock 
1 ■ — 1 

:t r. i. |T ! 

" K fr " 

j : 3 I9»» 11 adc ti 

Cfii l«Va raw AEI. 
i Sf, 23’4 Ifl* AFG 
m i B 7H ASK 


Safc»ki 

Dto. m Mth ffiah Low 


- IJ ' S5:F 


: M » 
• - »*' 7 


c ; 23 T4 AomRf 
Vi 12W 214 Acodln 

n - 11 7VS Aarfiin 
it i 28 37V. AcuRov 


wm 


- . I, | 28 171* AcuRov 

• -:«'!• 7W IWAdocU] 

r *-c; 10?* Adoo* 

: ^ a r IlS 5 Advar 

- i 5W 3 Aeautm 

^ k i 17% 13V4 AflBsh 

1 i Si 2*«> 15% AscyR* 

. -:£r:,14tfi AlrMW 

- a ^ AfcWBc 

- i r 30%I AtexB 

MKi IBS A^W* 

? ?ji ! w 6 Ssa!!3«c m 

: J Mia Uk Altos M 

• ?J.J,.2S 11%. AmcwN M IS 22 

• cm AWAbl .7 a 

i 2 17 5M. AmAdv 

i ? h .1 UK ins ABnkr 
S 5 !i ”, V4Vb lOto AmCotr 


M IJ 41* 

SS7 

M 

jo 5J -m 

t 63 

.iob ld m 

MO 3J 130 


.15# J ■ 
M 22 11 
* « T 


; ' X «s AWAbl . 763 

I ? 17 5Vi AmAdv I 33? 

' i .’ V l«k Iff* ABnkr 60 U US 

s S ft ”, MW 10»S AmCorr Jffi 

:• ?’i. -W* S% A Conti 6< 

iU D ", T7Vi 13 AFdSL A U 15 

•• :r- M sh vm AmFnit t 10 

:« A * 32l» 1716 A Rules JO 25 22 

37Vj 2816 A Greet 50 M 979 
- ' i4u m Am mu ao 3j hi 

-12V6 SW AMOBflt J 

aw 10A1 AMSS 7 

. i IS?. 366k 27Vi ANIlm 1JM 10 20 

.» |l • ■ 71* 2VS APhvG _ _ 143 

I -J • 34 VB 1616 AmSec M2 IS 66 

- ?! 15 7Jfc AmStts m 

-. 5«r* SW ASolor — -*■ 792 

‘ j * - 1*5 » ASUTB 123 

"f .441* 263* Amrtrs MO A3 265 

. j 26 17 AfnnMp 39 

■3 ■- •■,:>■ in* 3% Amgen 5M 

i n \ 2 W* 16to AmskB 1J» 3J 91 

- .. !< 206. I4V6 Anwd S <40 22 12 

•i ; > f 15R* 10 Anion h: S2 

•; •; r t-, 1SW m Alia ran 21 

1 * P|39«k. i3Ht Andrew 154 

* «* ApOMf .14 -L4 44 

— • — f 30*4 9U. ApoIoC M 

v ” " 319* 1416 AppieC 2572 

- — 27** 13** AoIBbs ■ 194 

-. 19V. 11 ABldCm 79 

•: ■ >.!■ 34 1716 ApkWU IW 

. r Vi V 716 3» ArdriVB 42 

:> Si 22*6 1516 ArpoSy __ 318 

: :* ^ -• 4DM9 im ArizB ” 

j •" 9 6 Art* 

JtS 1 15*6 10*6 AatfHst 
• ‘S p . 9 5** Aatroay 

‘ f., 22^. 1316 Atcor 

C ‘1 V 27 1616 AHAm AO 12 1 

: J8*V 4316 25lb AttntBc .90 22 10 

. :: S*,: '. 149k M* AtJnFd 96 

1 I i. V 14 aw AH Fin 57 

■ 1 III- ‘30 T94* AHRCSS 116 

: rf 2 -161* 2% AISBArs 145 

; ! I* ' 20 14** AhMOOC , J 

! 12*6 4** AuiTrT 

— v M4 29k Autmtx 

7*6 4W AuKIoa 
1316 0*6 AvOCTB 

* w¥: 21 6 AvntGr 

'ij***! 251* 17V* Avntofc 

l- 20 1516 Avatar 400 

• L *i an* 13V* AvtatGp . 96 

! « *? 6*3 4 Ait cM 20 45 t71 


-T / ''j; 

- '?2?i 


i "&f> 

i HU 


h!7\.'?1516 
'< ' 40 


5m 40*6 BBDO 220 «J 341 
21V* 14*6 BoncoM JO SJ a 

35 23K BcsHw U6 43 6 

12 SW Bonctoc „ 56 

11* 61* BonH JO U J 

51U 30V* BKNE ■ 2J0 &A 96 

12W m BkMAm LOO 11J3 96 

161* 9Vi Bwilcvt 27 . 

1816 12** Barelas .34 25 478 

TO B, BaranO « 

dot* 4% Borrlss 23W' 

t 316 6 BxTdA .... 14 

I5W 7 BosAtn 1JM13J a 

40 3116 BsatF M a 2J 31 

409* 391* BayBks 2AOa 4.1 n 


: r<: 9 6 Bayty 

■■ m* svt Bncitcr 

i** - 21*6 1(F* Beotian 

3SW 3016 Betz Lb IX 42 958* 
P(, 20 KHkBtgB 58 

.■*J5 II 9W BtoBear O 

05V* 9W Blndlv s 33 

9** 3*k Bto-RM ™ 

* 10V* 416 Blagen 

; u5 Tfi 1 BkHTC 

Hv 10VS & BioteR lS 

■ii 11 5W Blrdlnc U 

39*6 26W Roatnn 1 50. 45 3T7 

w?. 73V. in* Boofv JObM 134 

Ill, 1016 6V> BoITTC .16 25 31 

•. t' 27 11V, BostBc a M.M 

13 4V. BltnDIO _ .. 

<6?. 2SVt 12 BSblFC JOBlJ 1M 

«6 M 8*6 SroeCP _ . . » 

Zv 7W 314 Branco .72 34 05 

•-*■ ^ ,t6 12 392 

20 IJ 1674 

» 






«*'A* 


169* M Brunos 
219* 114* BtHIdTl 
209* 12*6 

21 is Bwrar 

9V, 3 Busin W 


09* 5*6 C COR 
1016 34* CFRhb 
11% 6V> CML 
21 14 CPI 

9** 43* CPT 
12W 6 CSP 
4W 21* CACI 
21 W 171* COiVSc 
11** 796 CM MIC 
6 29* CCASIVB 

416 3W CoflonP 
1514 81* Calnv 
24W MW CononG 
29* ft OwCrti 


19W—W 


94k 916 9V*— t* 

& ™ 1^-5 

®SM 30 — 9* 
1096 » KB* + 9* 
U Hfc 121* — 1* 
38 3716 3716 — *6 

If - WV* 19 +16 

4}k 64* 64* + 9* 
2146-21- *116— V* 
18V* 17*4 UR* + 4k 
19 MB* 189* 

396 3 3 — 1* 

516 5 514 + 9* 

111* MM 70*6— V* 
121* 12 - 129* + 9* 
B* 9 — V* 
796 7 7 

13*6 .13**' T3*4 + 4k 
119* 1196 1T9* . 

n ■ * — vt 

U 73*4 14 + 9* 
78* 78* 78k— 4* 
31 304* 31 

am am ai** 

H9* 109* KHfc— 4*. 
56 » 56 

30 20 30 

3SKt 3596 359* + 96 
346 34* 3**— 4* 
29 289* 29 

VS VI 

374* 3716 374* + Vk 
25*6 259* 25V* 

MM 98k 10 

S^-ft 

12 114* T146 — V* 

139* 13 13 

16*6 U 16** 

MM 99k 94*— 14 

1144 ii. n*k— « 
184* 178* 18 —4* 
231* 224* 22**— *6 
1396 UK 1394 + 94 
204* 2094 20*4 
544 59* 51* — 4* 

1» TO* 19 + W 

391k 394k 394k— I* 
69* 696 61* 

13 1244 13 

69* 694 69* + 94 

20ft 20 209* + 94 

2316 2396 2316 — 94 
4194 4194 4194 
1144 111* 1194 
fib 91* 944 + 1* 
2416 2SW 36 
ra? “44 1246 + 94 
14*4 1446 149k 
44b 48b 48* + 96 
34* 39* 394 
6 5*4 6 +94 

MM 94b 10 + 94 . 

Mb 6*6 6*6 - I 

2114 31 21 — 14 ■ 

174* 171* 179*— 96 

IS 149* 144* — V* 

4ft 4V* 496 


44 Vk 4694 4614— h 
154* 15*4 15*4— 4* 
32 32 32 — 14 

99* 9 994—4* , 

94* 884 94* 

«1* 454* 4SW— 94 
94* 9- • 994 — 9* 
1596 141b 1394 +14 
1A6 1496 149* + 94 
9 BVl 846 + V, 
168* 16W 169* +** i 
111*. 711* 119* 
a** a e —ft i 

35 3494 35 +1* 

SBW 5746 5B + 46 
646 . 61* 61*— 96 
91*. 91*. 9!* 
lift MM 11 —9* 
.329* 318* 31V- I* 
1496 ISM DM— 9* 
17 169* 161*— « 

WH UM 109* 

68h as. 69*— 9* 
MM 101* 109* ‘ 

aft g* a* + H 

7ft 8 

a* . 884 M* - 

— — V6 

2Mk— W 

69+ 6*6 6ft + 16 
3416 <M 2414 + 9* 
4ft «i <9* 

4S 24ft 2S +1* 

. lift lift TTft + 1* 
3ft 34* 3ft . 
194 VM— ft 

20Vi 3w ft 

149* 13 1346 + ft 

17 17 17 + 96 . 

6ft Oft ^ft— tt 



156 45 23 

<40 41 TO 
JMUM 47 
J> a» J4 
208 1L8 32 

43 

a 

J6a L2 987 
19 
197 


8 

U» 11 65 

Tl/ 

74 42 44 

378 

.12 Jk 106 
J6 14 .9* 

3« 

110 S4 232 

150 54 36 

Ji X4 m 
SB* J 2 . 

11M 

■“ w sr 

-■ 
Ol Jk 33 
157 
129 

12 u sd 

453 

» 

54 

18 

76 

T2S 

240 160 516 
T-68al1-6 71 

2.16 141 212 

148 X2 IB® 
j> u ft 

149 

234b 44 32 


=40 24 1M1 

£ 

081 

637 

U 

,a 14? 
JO 34 733 

114 

74 43 33 

JO 23 a 
27 


M u m 

- » 

70 L2 IJ* 
3224 

32 26 134 

99 

222 

ism 


4 

• 4S 

£ IS IS 
•« 

93 


ft 22ft— ft 


34 —ft 


131* 12ft 12ft + 14 1 aw 13ft Knrctir 
I7W 1016 Rosier 


-srii 

2414 24ft— W 
18%' lift - 

4Sft M*— 96 

MV* 14ft— 9k 
4 4 —ft 

1216 12ft— ft 

32 14 + 94 

gBi$&=8 

19 19—94 

IB* lift— 9* 

» 2ft— ft 
aft 38ft + m 
43ft 44 —ft 
9 . 916 
29ft 29ft— ft 
1ft 1ft + ft 
26U 26ft— 96 
91b 9ft + 96 
17V* 18 
HO* 10V* 

17 1716- 9* 

3ft 3ft— ft 
5ft 4ft+lft I 

24 24 — 96 ■ 

9 m- 9b 12*6 n# 
6ft 6ft 1696 9ft 

l» ^ + }* lift 69* 
m 24 + 1* 56ft 28ft 
214 294 9ft 5 

,L, + J* ,0 ft 1ft 

18ft W*— W 25W (ft 
4ft 414 10ft 494 
1ft lft— ft 24ft 14 
9ft W* + J6 Sft 14 
6ft ,6ft— W 1796 129* 
15 IS — 16 2296 TOW 
M 14ft— 9* Uft 141* 
13ft 13ft— ft 18 1094 

42* ^+1 

St 5 

,at raft 33 ft 


10ft 10ft 
4ft 5 +96 

7ft 7ft 
lift 12ft „ 
194 jft+lk 
,3ft yr— ft 

169* tH — 96 
35ft 3796—1 
79* 7ft 
■®w aw 
27 27 — ft 

lft lft + K 
3ft 3ft 
1116 1196 
16ft 1696— ft 
22 22ft— 9b 

1396 1314 
17 1796 

21ft 23ft 
22ft 22ft 
199* 191* + 96 


13ft + ft 
2ft— ft 
11 —ft 
7ft 

24 —ft 
39 — 9* 
6ft + ft 
16ft + ft 
9ft- 9* 
4ft 

^S*IS 

5ft + ft 
59* 

12—9* 
lift— ft 
27ft + ft 


37 

>1 

43 

•4 

176 20 253 
50 
167 

a 

172 44 203k 
U0 21 93 

M tJS 20 
40 U 100 
-20 57 25 

5M 
158 

1.12 15 173 
JO 2* 9 

M 37 135 

170 S.1 44 

1O0B14J 4 

1 

567 
1239 
.40b W ,77 

00 57 157 

<44 U 130 

1 JO 49 131 

U0 30 14 

S <40 3-7 1 

IOB 3* 71 

JO 2J J 
L10 5.1 242 

1-40 Al 7 
174 3J 194 

116 

A 40 2 


09 J 57 
07 A 292 
.9* 11 41 

OO 62 410 
186 
107 

06b J 1662 
.10 22 SB 
48 24 127 


141 

62A 

.10 IJ 10 
438 
9401 
333 
50 

OB S 113 
24 U 537 

3876 

224 

76 . 47 893 
M 20 4» 

29 

4 

. 633 
<48r 2J 140 
705 
» 

05# A 713 
1500c a 


20 U 081 
06 A 44 



10ft Mb Kovtkn 
6116 39ft Kemp 1J0 37 
896 41ft a KvCnLf 1-00 15 
1BA + £k 8ft 41* Kiwi 
1ft— ft II 4ft K«vTm 
lift 9V» 2ft Klmbrk 

6181—9* an* 13 Kinder 06 <4 

18ft 14ft 4W Krov 06 J 

4 — 9b 16ft 10ft Kruser 
16ft— 16 299* 8V* KufcJte 

j*** l ~ 

139* — ft 11W 5W 

3ft 18ft 9ft 

59*— V* 231* 916 

14ft— .96 199* 8ft 

32 «W 32 


70 

251 270 

36 

1O0 17 321 
1O0 15 2 

i 

2898 

147 

06 <4 1020 

06 J 158 
22 14 52 

.12] lO 307 


32 a 1 

30W 20 

259* IP 

14V* + 9* 17 

23ft + ft 17 



37ft . 
211* + 96 

189* + 16 


aft 12 ft 
189* 11 
17 119* 

17 14 

59ft 35ft 
32 2216 

7ft 4ft 
15ft 816 
98* 6ft 



7ft— ft 
14—16 
29k 
141* 

3ft— I* 
2794- 9* 
349*- V* 
20ft + ft 
73ft + ft 
14ft 

2096 + ft 
10 —9* 
9Sft- W 
18ft— V* 
231* 

lift— ft 
10ft 

5ft— 9* 
29V*— ft 


.901 42 352 
' 26 

.16 U 32. 
. 318 

; . aiv 


6ft 6 6 —ft -f 

4ft 31* 4 2S 

10 9ft 10 + ft -w 

^ » 1 5ft~ W 

7 15£ a 

2196 21ft 2199- I* U 
1M 1M IBM . V V 

4ft, 4ft +'ft. -tn 

2ft 2ft m - 36 

13ft 131* 13ft- ft 19 


1796. Bft.ECJ TW. . 46 

15 • 5ft JEfP .12 U 2 

iSt JS ISl ok - ^ 

35ft 3696 EeooLb T04 30 81 

12 ft 79* HOSc - 8 

16 13ft UPn UailO 621 

m* 44* emmi ra 

St SSgS^Se - ..4 

289* 9ft * teams •• 187. 

-19ft 7 . £MUd 248 

Ml* 12ft EtcRnt . . 15 

1596 -494 EIctMfs 7721 

13ft Oft BImpCI 307 

14ft nt EmnAJr ■ 312 

*■*»-' ■ ‘5 

17ft «ft enaou " am 

36 ISft EA0CAV •:. • 86 


.92 25 46 

UOOb 40 386 

18 
79 
78 
181 

M 25 85 

1-20 2J 1544 
33 

JO. J 7§ 

98 

3 


.16 JS 358 
850 
411 
202 

U0 32 73 

243 

621 

142 

49 

10 

. M91 

‘ 336 

2 
79 

.16 12 49 

2364 
757 
210 
15 

■ 237 
• • 450 
119 
164 
926 
547 

4685 


S3 — ft 
37ft- W 

28W- W 


2to 

m* + w 

1916— W 
40W + ’6 

49k 

17ft 

17ft + 9* 
3116 + ft 
16ft + ft 

M z 

9ft— ft 
4ft + ft 
2J9»— ft 
516 + ft 
16 — ft 


3ft 3ft 3ft— 1* 
lift til* lift + ft 
6ft 6ft 6ft— W 
50 49 49ft 

S 9ft 9% + V* 
216 lft 

24"k 241* 34W— ft 

» ft » 

II 17ft 17ft 
1416 14ft 14(6— ft 
17ft 16ft 1796 + ft 
22k. 22 22 

ISft 1596 151* + ft 
179* 16ft left— ft 
lft lft 8W 
121* 121* 13ft + ft 
7ft 7ft 716 — ft 
21 209* 21 + 9* 

10ft 9 9ft— ft 
13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
13 >296 12ft— 9k 

ft % ft 


187* 18 18 —ft 

9ft 996 ?>6 — ft 

1616 14 16ft 
41* 4ft 4ft + ft 

2ft Eft 2ft . 

ft ft ft + ft 

18 17ft 17ft 

1*9* 16ft 16ft 

30V» 29ft 30 — ft 
8ft BW 8W + W 

7ft 7ft 7ft + W 

216 296 2W + ft 

3 2ft 2ft— ft 
17ft 17ft 17ft + 14 

If 17ft 17ft 

4ft 4ft 4ft 
1BW 18V* UP*— ft 
32ft 32 32ft 
21 20ft 21 1- ft 

UK 101* WW 
6ft 5ft 6 
30ft 29ft 29ft— ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft— W 
25ft 25 25V.— (6 

479* 42ft 42V6 
6ft PM 4ft 
3#& 30ft 30ft 
24V* 24 34 + 9* 

1796 13ft 12ft 
23 229* 229* 

27ft 27ft 27ft 


2496 1716 
+ W 44ft 35ft 
-9* 7ft 4ft 


1596 15 15 — <6 

12 lift lift 
Vi V* 816— Vb 
55ft 54 "1 55V.— ft 
40 39ft « 

6ft Aft 6ft 
9>6 9 9 

21b 2ft 2ft 
l&ft loft loft— W 
7ft 71* 7ft + ft 
13ft 13ft 13ft + ft 
12 lift lift— ft 


Aft «ft 6 ft — ft 

1896 17ft 17ft— ft 
II 10"* 109*— ft 
17ft 17ft 17ft 
48ft aw 48ft + ft 
21 20ft 21 +ft 
Mft M 149* 

15ft 15ft 15ft + 96 
96ft 14 Mft + Vb 
52ft SO 509*— IV* 
289* 2BU MW— ft 
596 5ft 5Vb— ft 
10 10 10 + 9* 

2ft 5fi. + fc 

ZVb 2 2ft + ft 
21 201* 201* 

46ft 46ft 46ft 
6 5ft 5ft + ft 


B OwnMs a 2J> 
ft Oxoco 


14ft 14ft U'4 — ft 72 


MW SubrB 
2ft Sum mo 


lift 

LJfyTuI 30 

1 J 

464 

181* 

17to 

I7to 

VB(* 

LJnBrd 


1238 

36 

3SW 

35ft 

Z7W 

LincTef 230 

ts 

5 

34 

34 

34 

2154 

Liz Das 35 

J 

542 

♦4ft 

44 

44 

XV4 

LonoF UB 

5.1 

434 

2SW 

24 

25 

I5W 



1541 

U 

raw 

17ft 

19 



2 

22W 

22ft 

22to 

79b 

Lvubos 


463 

24 

23ft 

2Jto 


1-32 45 144 

120a 2.9 316 
16 

JO 62 7 

a 

,13 20 115 


JOS .9 393 
720 4J S 
A8 2A 64 
SOr J 582 
1,13 44 149 

418 

.10s M 1476 
J0e 3JJ 2153 

JO 29 m 

9 B I 

jva 

68 

14 

1 

76 

.12 A 74 

95 
155 

S 200 

595 
33 

.16 17 205 

.12 J 4 


4ft 2ft Sum mo 
14ft 7W SumtHI 
2 ft *b SunCrJ 

10ft 7ft SupSkv 
5ft 3 Suprtex 
14 I SvfflbT 
14ft aW Svntscti 
5ft 2ft S/ntrer 
lBft ill* Syscon 
2616 9ft SvAsoc 
7W 3ft Svilln 
lift 6ft Syslntg 
251* Mft Svstmt 


1.92 2J 104 
315 

.10 12 m 


9 5ft 
6ft 2*4 
lift 3ft 
2Sft 18ft 
soft 309* 


13ft 121 * 12ft— ft] aw 129* 


716 796 7W 


14ft Aft 
3* 12 

7ft 41* 
5ft 2 
9 lft 
09* 6Vh 


4-SWC JM 22 


sift 99* Caseys s 


V ■ am* 17V5 ' IV*EnBPftl - JG ’15 30® 

* J £ • K - 4 

SaEB* SbSi| 

,16ft MW 169* +;9* H9* tl . EvrtSbf 81 


13 1196.1196- ft 

AJ 6 4^6 4ft+ft 

18 9ft ■ 9ft— ft 
361b 349* 34ft 
109* M 109* . 

W XPk 1S9» 

109* TOW 1896 
79* 716 7ft 

9tk 996. 9ft— ft 

1316 1296 12ft + ft I j 

18ft T7H 189b + 9* ■ — W — ■ 

1SH WW ISft- ft JJV, 8 ft JBRctS .14 U 64 

S K* 3. —19* 419* 25ft JocfeUb 11? 

7. m 7 27ft Mft JamWtr .13 

V £&.%=% ^ "t S3 4 

» ,m* JJk + 96 toft fifejnnSn W 

19ft- 191* 19ft J996 9ft Jmi 56 

'lft 'JM JTft—IW OT* Wft Jufltn JO 26 254 

14 1W 1W-*- ft m ■ ■ ■ ' " 

lift uv» lift + ft I K 

■ M B MIL 8 ^^^— ■ ■ 1 ■ ■ ■■■ ■ ‘ 

.7 7 7 — Hh 34K W* KUA« 238* 

29ta 2M 2M + hm ^ W KV Phf 13 

mb Sw ro*~ W 33 20 ft Roman J 6 Zi 81 


10ft TOft 10ft + 91 9 lft 

Mft 33ft 33ft— Tk 09* 6 Vb 

1496 13ft 13ft— W 11W 59* 

6ft 6V* 6ft- ft 916 4ft 

5ft 59* SM 27ft 14ft 

3ft 3ft 3ft 129b 79* 

49ft 4996 49W 34 239* 

L5ft 159* ISft TO’* 19ft 

25 239* 2316—194 ttW 30 

4ft 4 4W + W 17ft 9 

12 TU* lift— '« 30(6 18 

4 3ft 3ft— W 14 lft 

139* 13ft 139*-',* 19* 

25ft Mft 25 -9b Mft bft 
3ft 39* 3<6— ft 219* 15ft 

lft lft lft— w 521* 28 U, 

IU* 11 lift — >6 49ft » 

raft 12 V* 12 ft — ft 8 59* 

2BW 25ft 2Sft— lft 10W 5 
6 ft 69* 6 ft + ft 17ft 6 *h 
ISft 1396 13ft + ft Mft 1516 
6 ft 69* 696 + M Mft 19ft 

II 10ft 10ft + ft Ml* 19ft 
9 8 ft 8 ft— 96 Mft Ml* 

181* 18(6 law 55ft 3*ft 

15ft m ISft 7 4ft 

- — - 5(6 4ft 

17 10 


79* 7ft 79*— Mi 

1H tl* lft + ft 17 10 

2294 21ft 21ft — 9* 109* eft 
Wk 18ft 90S* — ft 13ft Aft 

TTft 13ft 121* 1 

Fb 8 ft 896 + ft 1. 


445 

6364 

65 

24 TJ 3 

75? 
702 

2J8 9J 42 

IBS 

JO U 49 

421 
10 
52 

LOO U 119 

12 S 
1274 

.10 J 17 
601 
5 
78 
310 

ja 15 zm 

30 

as A 6 
20 

377 
2200 

152 U U 
148 2J TOO 
136 

1J0 5.1 16? 

JS3S % 

Mb 34 78 

378 

31 
1 

M ID 112 
684 
76 
230 
145 

<40 U 72 
124 U 83 
764 

M 2j0 443 
13 

At U 654 
500 
2S» 

JIB .1 64 

359 

, Al 17 157 

101 

JO 357 

Me IJ 2 
697 
b» 

MO 43 II 
.16 M 3 
JO 37 MS 
736 

30 U 16 
.10 J 1271 


13 

59 

53 

JOB 13 129 

zm as ti3 
JO 1.1 31 

<44 U 1125 
JMI J S 
27 
304 
395 

JO XI 8 
ID 
31 
3671 
422 

S3 M 59 
JD U 1M 
X!2bX7 a 
.lb i 21 
JA X 413 
1210 
1 446 

JO 12 -581 
46 40 6 

<44 J 334 
72) J 43 


152 84 77, 

48 SJ 72 

JO 15 444 

2.TO 9J TO 

1A 20 267 

43 

5 

1.12 67 210 
96 


9 ( | 

Pm— ft 
1BW— W 
32ft 
10ft 


39ft 29ft 29ft— W SW 3 

41ft 40ft 40ft— 1 M g 

lift 10ft It 14ft AW 

13 13 13 — ft 5ft 2V* 

6ft Aft Aft 2416 9t* 

22ft 22 25 — Vb 7W 3ft 

13W 13 13 — ft lift AW 

tfiS if^JS u * 

179* 17 IT 1 * + to I 

lift 13ft 13ft + to ■ 

Aft A'* 6ft— ft 14 8 

33W 3ZW «W 25ft U 

27 Mft Mft— to 7ft 3ft 

10lb 9ft 10 28ft 12ft 

26W 5«< % 8ft 2ft 

7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 12 5ft 
9ft »ft 9ft— to 22 10ft 
14ft T69* 16ft + Vb 34W 20ft 
24ft Mft 2M»- ft TTft 4ft 
21ft -m* Xfr- ft 25 139* 

33w aw raw - raft iw 

,8ft Bft 8ft— ft 4W lft 

10ft 109* 10ft 20 8ft 

19to lift 18ft- ft 171* 9ft 
23ft 23 23W + '* 11'* 3 

lft lft 1ft Mft IV* 

119* lift lift + W 139* 6(6 

lift 91 11 - ft 28ft 15V» 

32 319* K 14Vb 5ft 

8ft 8, 8ft aft 5V* 

*W 4Jb 4V* 15W Aft 

10 9ft 10 + ft 14 BW 

5SW 55 55 — W 7W V6 

lift raw lift 17 ft a 

4ft 4ft 4ft x a 

36ft 34to 3Ato — to 17W 10 
12ft 12 12 — ft 12ft Ato 

19 18ft lBft Xto 20 

23to 23 23to 


U 8 

*7ft '3ft 

28ft IZft 
8W 2ft 
12 5ft 
=2 10% 


*—W 25 13V* 

•— I l»ft Bft 
k— ft 4to lft 
T 20 8ft 

s — w T71* 9W 

i + to ii to 3 

> _ „ Mft IV* 

l + to 139* 616 

— ft »ft 15ft 

14ft 5ft 
• Mft 5V* 

> ^ „ 15to 6ft 
+ ft 14 IW 

— to 7W to 

■ IT?* a 
» x a 
i — to 17W 10 

— ft !2ft Ato 

l Xto 20 


.14 4 1 

17 
14652 
1221 
33 
13 

I 765 
386 

JJ 14 Mi 


151* 6 QMS 

99* 3ft Quadra 


2SW + to 32to 16W Quantm 

■ft Sto 2ft QuestM 

9ft 16 ft Bto Quixote 

“to- to lAto 716 Quoirn 

396— ft I 

9 — to I 

31to— ft 13ft 5 


20to— to ]Bft lift 
Ito + ft 16W 8ft 


29ft— 1 
17ft— 9b 

fS 

4ft— ft 
35 1 m 
116 


14W Ato 
7ft 2ft 
33to 21ft 
20 W 129* 
7>6 1ft 
23ft 17to 
lOto Sft 


9—9* 35W 25W 
5ft— ft 12W 3W 
1316— W 7W 5Vb 
ISto— to Mto 11 
37 +9* ljft 3ft 

A2W + ft 109* 7ft 
13 + ft 20to *ft 

35 — ft 11(6 lift 


23V, -f to I 

'2ft . : 


149* 7 

aw ns* 


16ft— ft 43to T9 
1416— 9* U 9to 
2to 10 3H 

Sft Mft 12ft 

4 17ft lift 

*W Bto 24to 

Ato— W Mft n 
AW + ft 1396 Bft 
3 + ft aw lAft 

21ft + ft 13 8 


37ft + to 
7ft . 


9W 3ft 
18ft 11 


S s 2 a 

4J 101 IB 
15H 
91 
48 

1J0 3J 3SO 
2* IJ 7 

10 
1 
5 

M U 13 
♦39 

JI u SO 

.12 J 13 

33 

.16 1.9 X 

327 
32 

,15e XI a 

J 6 e 1 J3 27 

1J4 11 12 

33 20 » 

454 
2 

SO AS 29 

LOO X5 285 

J 6 5 3 


— — . 2416 18 

I Ato 7ft + ft 2416 10ft 

7ft Aft 7 — ft 2QW s 

21 20W 2Qto — to 231* 10W 

49* 4 to 4(6 — ft 13ft 796 

I AW 14 16 — to 29ft MW 

15to 14ft 15 — ft S3’* 22ft 

B 25ft lift 

I lift 8 ft 

— — — " aft 219b 

5to 59* 5W 11 A 


5to 59* 5W 11 A 

149* 14 U >6 + to 2296 lift 

12ft 12'* 12V* — W 14 ft eft 
lOto VI* £*— to 13^ 7*. 

3W 3ft 331 5ft 7ft 

» 291* Mft— to 32 216* 

199* 19 19 V* 4ft lft 

227 a 2 W 

M’S. MW 20 to — to 33ft lift 
8 ft Sft Bft . 5ft 3to 

2Sto a 28W + to 22V* 10ft 
101* 10 10 — ft 37ft 3SV. 
5W 59* Sft — Ml ato 17to 
14W Uto 14to + '* 25 14ft 

3to 3ft 3ft — W 4au 32W 

BW Bft Bft— to 22 Mto 

lift I Oft 10ft- ft »ft Vto 
18 17ft 17"* + to |3 Ato 

7ft 7ft 79b — ft Ato 3W 

ZI lift 2PM _ 

J9W aw 3VW + ft I 

15ft ISto 15ft ■ 


JO X3 124 
347 

Jto J 542 
ism 

371 

1J91 4.1 229 
1-S0 2 9 7 

M3 142 
.1ST IJ 67 
1JS 4J IX 
43 

Jib 3 U 

144T2X4 99 

10 
41 

LOO XI 227 
36 

a 

JJ8 3 749 

.12 27 525 

-3tH* 1.7 374 

1JD X4 3A4 
JO .9 274 
54 

1+4 39 loo 
92 
134 

J7e J 24 
-28 5J a 


72ft 71ft 72ft +■ ft 
29k 2% 2ft + ft 
Bft Eft lft— ft 
1 ft lft lft + ft 
Bft Bft 8 ft— to 
3ft 39* r* 

W* 9ft 9ft 
lft 9ft 9ft- ft 
3to 3ft 3ft 

taw raw lew— '* 
io ?to 9to— w 
Sft 5ft 5ft 
IBto 10ft 10ft 
ox's. 2s aw * '.4 


91* 9ft 9ft + to 
25W ISto 25to + ft 
3to 3to 3W + ft 
14ft 15ft 16 — ft 
3W 3ft 3ft— W 
12W lift lift — W 
lift llto llto— 14 
xr<* 32ft. 32ft + ft 
99* 8 V ? 
a 22W 23 + to 
17ft 17ft 17to 
2 lft 2 
10W 9W Vto — ft 
14ft IAU 161* + to 
3to 3ft T* 

Sft 9ft 99*— ft 

ioft mft loft— to 

27 2A9* 24ft + ft 

7ft 7ft 7ft— V* 
7ft 6 ft 7to + ft 
7ft Ato 7 — to 
139b 12ft lift + ft 
ft .* to— to 
llto llto lift— ft 
299* a a + •* 
lift lff>, IBto — to 
Bft Bft Bft — ft 
Z7to 259, 279* +lto 


3A Mft 74 
141* 14W 14ft 
BVb 7ft 7ft — ft 
lift llto 13ft— V* 
12ft 12ft 12ft— to 
27W aw Uto 
52 51 51 — f- 

22ft 21 to 21 to — to 
9 Bft Bft 
25 Mft Mft + ft 
7to 7ft 7ft 
179* 17to ITto — ft 
7V: 7 7 — ft 

24ft aw Mft + ft 
3 2ft 2ft 
Eft 214 3ft— ft 
27 2SW a — to 
4ft 4to 4ft + r. 
179. 17V* 17ft 
3Sto 359* 35ft 
2!to 21 to 2Tto + ft 
Mft 24ft 24ft— to 
42ft 41ft «to + ft 
19 18ft 1? + to 

17ft 13ft 12ft— ft 
10W 10ft 10ft— ft 
Sft 5 to 5to— ft 


229* + ft ]9W llto 
3ft— % 

?Z- n I 

Mft — to 
7V*— ft 


7to LAY ind 
, . 10W3CISV 
like— to I aw lift SEl 
T 8 to— ft jliw A SFE 
7to— ftl 23 14.. SRI 


7W SAYlnd 51 

git 

103 

,10r M 99 

7W — ft 23 14 SRI • J 44 2S 

31ft— to 20ft iS- Salecdi Mb 1.1 49 

23to— to 44 ft 29 Safeco 140 1? 3M 

14ft— ft ISto 7ft Lot Hit S 184 

lift— to 16 7V. SUudo 36 

32ft 75ft Mto LI Paul XDO 4J 770 

111 *— ft Oft 2 W SalQri 175 

18 + ft 10ft 4ft San&ar 1 

Ito — ft 30 16ft SawnF S 10 

17 20ft 111* SBkPS i JJ 23 41 

14 — ft IOW Ato SconOO 14 

I Mto 10ft ScanTr _ 29S 

13W Bft Scherer J7 24 47 

256k 159. SOU m A 40b 14 63 

6W 3W SdMte 35 

4ft * la I 15 7 SaSH 

9W— ft SOW 7 Sell ax 

7ft 3W Sea Gal ..88 

BW 4 SeoBate 1012 

49* n* Sec Tag 5 

7W 1ft SEEQ 61 

»9b 5ft Semien _ 28 

Sft . MOW 4 Senior jM J 268 


Aft 

Aft 

AW— ft 

9ft 




43 



Sft + 


22 

22 

22 

14ft 

7to VLSI 



1342 

1194 

11 

11 — 

to 




12 

4ft VMX 



589 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft — 


2V 

281* 

289*— W 

20 W 




404 

7 


6 to— 

ft 

12 ft 

17ft 

12 ft— ft 

22 ft 

BW VolFSL 



128 

15ft 

I5W 

15W — 

to 




erw 

2 Aft VaiNII 

UO 

X2 

540 

38ft 

37W 

37ft + 

'•| 




34 ft 

1 VW ValLn 

<40 

XO 

45 

20 

a 

30 



9ft 


18W 


JO 

23 

10 

17ft 


17ft 



4ft 


15W 




3 

5 


5 


lift 

lift 


Aft 




274 

sto 


Sft 



raw 

IV 

28W 

I3W Vlcorp 

, 12 e 

3 

378 

raw 

I 6 ft 

16ft — 

'j 




14 

7ft VJedeFr 

JEe xo 

86 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft — 

'14 



1 

Mft 

Vft Vlklna 



35 

13 

13to 

raw 





















589 



79* 













■4 







— 







3ft 3W 31* W AW 

4ft 4 4ft + I* IS 

Vto 9 Vto— ft 20W 

3A’-T 24 24 — to 9ft 

46ft 45ft 44ft + W 
ITto m* 17W + ft 
I4to 149* 14W + to 
IS IS IS + to 
51* J* Sft 10W 


18 18 18 ■ 

17ft 17ft 17ft + ft 2SW 17ft 
419, Al 41 to lAto 10 

12 llto 12 I3to Jto 

15 14ft 15 + W »W 1JW 

7I'6 71 71’* + Vb aft Ml* 

5ft »k 5ft 16ft 10ft 

59* 59* S'* Vto 4 

TVto »to 2V4 — ft MW 10ft 
19ft 19ft 19ft + to 18ft 7ft 
aft B 8 ITto 516 

lAto ISto 14 + ft TOW 5to 

12>» 17ft 17ft— ft 1416 5 

25 Ml* 241* 71 to 15V* 

3W 3to 3W 17V* 59* 

7 7 7 — to 34W MW 

gw 8 ft Bto Aft 3 

Ato 4ft 4(6 139* 3 

5to 5ft 5ft— ft aw Mft 


lft lft lft 


2, lft lft— ft 10W Aft 

6 \b 6 6 — ft 7ft 3ft 

7ft 7ft 7ft— ft WW 14ft 

13 17ft 12ft— ft 3116 11 >6 


3 29* 7ft— ft left 10 ft SvcMfr M i m 

2 , lto 5ft + ft | 2SV* 17V* Svmsts JO 4J 722 

139* Service > 4 

AW Sto 5to— to TB 1216 SevOolc .1* IJ T27 

jto £ft ,5ft + ft 37ft 23V* ShrMsd 48 14 68 V 

20-Ji 19W 19ft— ft 39W 29W Shwmt 148 45 144 

9ft 9V* 9 ft + V. 20ft 12ft ShHbV 5 .16 .9 16 

a 2 a + !* MV* 7ft SheMI s 30 

aft W« ZBft 31ft EVft Stoners .15 4 1778 

30ft 2VW 30ft 4- ft 15ft 10 5honSO S 73 


17ft 12ft— ft 2116 lift 
18ft 1BW 18V* 29V* 211* 

19to lOW IVto Vto AW 

17 14ft 16W— ft Ml* 2lto 

35Va 34«k 34 **- ft 

37W 37to 37to— ft I 

IBto lift 18ft— ft ■ ' 

Vto 9W vto— w 9W lft xebec 

25 24W 24ft— Vs 13W 5W Xlcor 

ll ioft ii I 7 W low xloex 

41* 4ft 4ft 

10W 109* 101* 1 

1316 IT* 1316 + 96 1 . " ' 1 

19ft 19 19 — ft 23ft 14W YIowF s 

5 4to 5 + >6 30** 5W Zen Lb s 

13ft 13ft 13ft + to 109* Mr 


16ft 16ft 16ft 


TOW 4W Silicon 


ITto ll.ft llto u 
I?* t:-* tv*- h 
12ft 13ft 134S— W 
16V* 149* 16V* 

48w aw aw — ft 

SO 49ft so + to 
Ato 4ft Oto 
7ft 7ft 7ft— V* 
169* ISto ISto — ft 
17ft 17ft 17to— ft 
MW 38 30 

ZS 22to 23=9. + tb 
22ft 22ft 221*- ft 
5*9* 52W 54 flft 
5ft S‘.b Sft — Vb 
Sft SW Sft— ft 
174 16ft ) 6 to 
9ft 9ft 9ft 
7W 79* 7ft 


20 ft + W 17ft Sft Sll loons 


u 23ft llto Silicvol B 

- n 24ft llto Slllcnx 

■“ * llto 4ft Slltec 123 

_ u, I7to liw simpin JO 5J 1ft 

"S aw n Sfppins 101 

T 18W 9ft S letter s 276 

w i, 12ft Sto Skipoer J8 J 7*3 

Z to 4I * ”8 SmlttU, 177 

_ 2 54 32to Sodotv 1J4 3J 1M 
^ 211b llto SoctvSw 47 

* >* I?W 6ft SoHedi 45 

Z 2 3iw lift sotheA . ra 

Mft 18W SonocPs 48o 24 273 


.96 XI 210 
24 20 2 

77 

1J6 XI 11 
M 24 50 

IB 
174 

JO XS 17 
10 
31 
2 

BA 

AO 12 174 
158 

.98 X0 11 
9744 
81 

U5 18 717 


J3I .. 774 
10 11 96 

AO 5J) 55 

J4 24 268 
.Ito 1 J 74 
M 38 213 


9W sw— to Sto ito Xebec 
24 W 34ft— ft 1314 SW Xlcor 
low ii I7W low xlaex 


lift 11 II 
14 13ft 14 


47to 31 ZJanUt 
Ato 2to ZJtel 


1370 

J&a xv lv 
U 6 33 106 

1 

125 

M\ .7 52 


IBto 181* ISto V Km 
129* 12W 12V. + to 
Vft Vto Vto — to 
2116 21 to 51 W 
25V, 24to 259b 
1314 13 r3to 
79* 7 T6 — v, 

lift II lift * ft 
179i !7to I7W 
14ft 149* 14’* — ft 
7 7 7 

13ft 12 12 ft ■*■ ft 
III* ITto 18 
low Vto Vto— •* 
32ft 32ft 32ft— ft 
416 3ft 4 + ft 

4ft 4ft 4ft + '* 
441* 44 a — ft 
1346 13to 13ft— ft 
A Sto Sto — to 
4 3ft 3% — ft 
15W 15ft 15ft 
129* 12 12 - U 

25<u 3S » — to 
v gw * + w 

21 to »W 21 W— to 


2ft 2ft Tto + ft 
7ft Aft 1 
I Jto 13 13 — to 


23W 22to 22ft— W 

23W 229* 22V*— to 
12ft I2to 12W— ft 
41ft 41 to 41to 
Jft 7ft 2ft 
5ft Sft 5**— ft 
10ft 10ft 10ft 


27V* MW Sorer ftl 
6Vb Jto SoHpss 
33 20 ft SlMFn 
28 ft left souirsi 
9ft Aft Sovran 


JSB 2A 18 

lie 

S2 12 393 
JO 34 121 

.10 IJ 253 


12 lift lift f ft til* 3to Zlrod IK 5ft Sft VM— ft 

3 2to 2ft >5V* 6ft Zondvn m .7 52 10ft 10ft 10?b 

49 48ft aft— ft 

17^, 19ft— 'b 

8V6 lib 8W HOures are unoMlcftl. Yeorlr nfehv and lovn reflect 

149* MW 141*— W me previous 23 week i plusine current iMek. bm neMM lofe«l 
29ft Kto 28to — ft troainfl dov. Wtiereo will or atockdlvlaend amDunllm raa 
17ft 17W 17ft— ft pcrceni w more nos been paid, me year's hiahJow ronp# and 
4ft 4 4ft + ft dividend ore shown tar rhe new Mock only. Unless owerwfie 
til* 2} 3ft + to noled. rates oteuvlaends ore orinucrt disbursements based on 
in* tn* 17ft meinieiiideciaraiton. 

AW oft Al*— 9* o — dividend alwcjitrpi si. D— annual rale alar idena p<ui 


31ft 22to Spvrmi L28 43 STS ETA Mto 27to + ftl yoc * dividend, e — havdoling dividend, eld — called, a — 


«l Me 9ft 
36ft Mft 36ft— Vb 
19ft |9ft Wto 
514 SW SI* — W 
23 23*6 Xto — V* 

6 6 6 + ft 



30 

BW 

8 

B 


56 

IBW 

18V* 

revs— to 

1 26 

254 

15% 

15* 

15ft 

K 11 


2386 


19 

1* — w 


13 

894 

8 

8. — y. 

XI 

81 

31ft 

31 W 

31V* 4 W 


Ob lft Qceoner 267 

17V* 10 Oefiloc S7i 

46ft 33ft OollGO UB U 230 
67ft 39ft OhioCo 100 SA m 
32ft 196* OTOKAtl LOO 34 la 
41ft 23 QtdRsi 34 24 <0 

22 to l5v* OiaSpfC 2 J 0 111 7 

26ft 12 ft oneecs sm ZB 212 
W4 3ft OnLlnv <09 

19W 12ft OctlcC SO 

48ft 22ft Optlcft 143 

1994 12ft OrtKHK a 

8 V* Sto Orbit 7S 

8 4 W OrteCo — . ra* 

ao IB* dstmm .jo U a 
34ft »ft OttrTP 176 8.9 la 
15 8 W OvrExp 19 


I 19W to Specdr ia 

28W Bto Spcirore in 

21 * 2 to 2 W— W Bft 5ft SoecCII JD7 IJ 10? 

MW lOto 11 16ft 13ft Spire a 

a 38to 38to-l 16 3V* StorSr* 1T1 

MU 67ft 6 4to +lft 9W 5 SMBId JO 2.7 1A3 

=Sto 2SW 2 V W— W 30 1VW Stand* LM 3J 135 

31 TO. 31 -(-to 22W llto StdMW 330 


I7to 17 17(6 new yearly Idw. e— olvUXmd aeciorocl or paid in pracerema 17 

21ft W/a 20M — 1 monltM.o — dividend In Canadian fvmfcwblect to ISto 

7W Aft 7Vb— W "on-rcsldenoe ra*. I — dividend declared offer spHI-ub or 
Ml* 14V* levs— to si vdc dividend. I — dividend Paid mil year, omitted, arierrefl. 
7 Ato 7 or no action taken at IaImI dividend me* litre. V — dividend 

7ft 7V* 7V* declared or pota mis veor. an accumulative Issue wWidivL 


31ft 711* El 9* 


Stanho s 1J0 SJ 


261b 25ft 261* + to 34W 19ft $K£!B9 All IJ 768 


4ft A 6 
131* 1394 13W — ft 


6ft Sft stateO 

7ft 4Vb Sleliwr 


27V* n 27 — ft 18Vb 11 lb StfwSIV 
1Mb 13to 13ft + ft 25 17V* Stwinf 


.150 3J 101 
32 


♦ft Aft Aft— ft 6 ft Sft SrKel — 

6 H6 4 V* ft 18ft ato strntub Wl 

13 T79* 13 4ft Ml* 291* SirwCJA JUS 

31ft 31ft 31ft— W SI* UKrSfrvfcrs 73 

Sft 9to 99* + W 171V* IDAto Subaru 2J8 14 367 


38 27ft 3fl + ft dondi inorreori n — new Issue ml hr do;' fTweclv Thehtan- 
1354 139* 139* ft* renpe Dealnv wlm lie siort of Irodino. nd — «e*f day 
MW 23 W 22W artlvery. PrE — DrlcTHKjrnlnas ratio, r — aivldeea fleelorea 

3lft 31 31ft + to or paid in precedi no 12 monms, plus week dividend, 5 — 5TOCL 
4ft 4 4 win. Dividend beam* wfin date of vplii, sis — win. t — an* 

Sto jvb sw + ft a * A0 WTO JivcK In preceding 12 montm. tsllmaled cov. 
141* uw MW value on exHUvMtend or ex-distribution dote, u— new yearly 
a IS 23 hlsb. v— irodino nciled. vf— in bankruptcy or recelveruiip 

Aft 6ft Aft— ft v Vdnp reoreooiMtt under ftw bankruptcy Act. or tecunile* 
IBW 17ft 17ft— ft auumed M wen compankec. we— mho anyrtbutMt- wf — 
34 37to 87ft— ft wh®n lyawed. ww — with mrranb n — eivdlvldend or «*- 
Sto 22 22 — ft r ionic. «dtt— ei-aictrlbulltm. *w — wilhoul warranre. v — 

107ft 160 161 +1 ds-dividend and sales In TOIL vld — yield, 7 — sales in TOU 




l-J&sS<sr.- :■ •z.'rrvzvzrf. ir -.v-— 






Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SAT&RDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26-27, 1985 


ACROSS 

l Ella's forte 
5 Exhorts 
19 Celebratory 
M Cicatrix 

18 Alley Oop’s 
companion 

IS Del .town 

in Colo. 

28 TV role for 
Shirley Booth 
21 Private eye 
23 Halloween 
visitors 
28 Fairbanks's 
river 

27 "Casablanca” 
pianist 

28 Ornamental 
herb 

23 Singer from 
Birmingham 
38 Men of Matrab 
31 Indian tobacco 

33 Job Jim 
Farley held: 
Abbr. 

34 Halloween 
visitors 

38 Meat cut 

37 “1 cannot tell 

38" Shook 

Up": Presley 
hit 

39 With 92, 99 and 
117 Across, 
Scottish frights 


DOWN 

1 Gilts 

2 Reef buildup 

3 Crockett’s last 
stand 

4 Randy’s rink 
partner 

5 In an impious 
way 

6 "Semiramide" 
composer 

7 Persona 

non 

8 Sight from 
Taormina 

9 But, to Brutus 

19 Plucky 

11 Quicksilver 

12 Slow, to Solti 

13 Kentucky 
Derby runner- 
up: 1942 


ACROSS 

50 Cornucopia's 
contents 

51 Bonkers 

52 Strong snuff 

53 Heartburn 
causer, to an 
M.D. 

54 Precedes 

55 Ruinations 

56 Dairy-case 
grouping 

57 Winter cap 

58 Respecting 

59 Painters, e.g. 

GO Potash source 

61 Andes denizen 

62 Tampa’s time 

63 River isles 

64 Rata, for one 

65 Forin of 
bigotry 

66 Halloween 
visitors 

72 Of the nostrils 

74 Fliers: Abbr. 

75 do - well 

76 Belief 

79 Soap plants 

80 Misdeed 

81 Former 
German coin - 

83 Place for Zeno 

84 Polynesian 
images of 
ancestors 

85 Shape: Comb, 
form 


ACROSS 

86 Cura grano 

87 Scoops up 
water in a boat 

88 Arabian Sea 
gulf 

89 Door 

crosspiece 

96 Big leaguers 

91 Dialect 

92 See 39 Across 

96 Hosiery shade 

97 Poreena 

98 Man of ken 

99 See 39 Across 
196 Orel’s river 
107 Victors in 1066 
110 Emulate John 

McGraw 
1X1 Punk for 
lighting 
113 Column 
foundation 
114 — -devie 
(brandy) 

116 Cossack chief 

117 See 39 Across 
126 Forty 

followers 

121 City On the 
Rh6ne 

122 Monk parrots 

123 Bo or tl 

124 Wimp’s cousin 

125 Tape bolder 

126 Aquarian totes 

127 Cassatt 
medium 


Tricksters by wiujam uttwiwak 


DOWN 

14 Walk clumsily 

15 Sight at 
Buzzards Bay 

16 *T never met 

didn’t 

like”: Will 
Rogers 

17 Altercation 

20 Played it safe 

21 Fink 

22 Effrontery 

24 On (at 

loggerheads) 

25 Masquerade 
wear 

32 Monroe was 
one 

33 Lod 

35 Early winner 
at Saratoga 

37 Unisonally 


DOWN 

39 Secluded 
valleys 

48 Emotionally 
shattered 

41 Pass, as time 

42 Basis 

43 Compounds 
used for 
bromides 

44 Unfold 

45 Make out 

46 Sci-fi craft 

47 Gain 

48 Some are 
proper 

49 Imagine 

50 Ballet exercise 

55 The pair 

57 Blake subject 

59 Bullish times 

60 Because 



© New York Times, edited by Eugene Maleshn. 


DOWN 

61 Man of the 
Haus 

63 Mearaand 
Jackson 

64 In unkind style 

67 Not in the pink 

68 Card game 

69 Bit of toasted 
bread 

79 Join up 

71 Franklin notes 

72 Seaport of 
Brazil 

73 yellow E 

(a dye) 

77 Reliable 


DOWN 

78 Large-scale 
80 Protracted 

81 " Boom - 

De-RS” 

82 At 

(puzzled) 

83 Cloth of India 

85 Strength 

86 Assert oneself 

87 Diamond 
figures 

89 Lets up 
91 Nonpareil 
93 Slow person 


DOWN 

94 Flourishes 

95 Weather-map 
line 

99 D.C. agent 

190 band 

(humbly) 

101 Empty 

102 Identifier 

103 Object of 
Sarah’s 
jealousy 

104 Luigi’s love 

105 Postpone 


DOWN 

107 Dame 

108 Polaofthe 


109 Arid region of 
Africa 

112 Go one-on-one 

113 TV woe 
115 All-purpose 

vehicles, for 
short 

118 O'Neill play 

119 "Quincy” co- 
star 


PEANUTS 

THERE GOBS YOU R 
UTTLE BROTHER (UPtNG 
ON THE BACK OF 
YOUR MOM‘5 BICYCLE 


1 SEE HE'S FINALLY 

wearing A helmet... 


BUT I M NOT SURE 
w HE UKB5 rr_ V 


PEOPLE CONFUSE MS 
WITH WAYNE GRETZKY . 








BLOND IE 


NOT NOW, 
I'M SUSY 1 


1 BUT THIS *> 
£ WILL ONLY 
5 TAKE A 
f MOMENT ) 


SO WILL 

, TWIS...r 



S ME wujgr SETAMNg 
HUSBAND - 


'-SSSSfr; 

e Tto-zb' 


BEETLE BAILEY 



THERE ARE T\MD 
GROUPS X NEVER 
SAY "PLEASE "TD 



ANDY CAPP 

ClH5IMyVinacNmpmn.ua. 
ONI »rNaniA>nMlBa»T**caM 


TCH.' BROKE- 
AGAIN— J 


rriSNousE.xve. 

► JUST OOTID 1 

► HflWEMOKE 4 

.POCKET /*ON£Y..-i 


' LCOK.ACVX 

yss&sj 

f MONEY J 

>E VERVjY> 

f WEEK-.' 1L 


PRIDE TJ C hero of Bernard Malamud’s “The NatnraT — never 

By William WhartorL 288 pages. SI 6.95. 15UU1V3 »* i, fan d* l^ser-lMe dbmsion, of 

Alfred A. Knopf, 201 East 40th Street, New . — Sture starts out as a golden boy — he can bicycle 

York. N Y 100 7 2 30 miles to school read all the bodes in the library 

they never come together into an organic whole, and in a matter of weeks, repair anything that breaks. 
Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani “Pride” reads like two separate novellas. He becomes a war hero and a famous race-car 

“THERE is all kinds of pride, Dickie,” says a The first novella is narrated by Dickie Kettleson, W 

1 character in William Wharton’s new noveL a 10-year-old boy who sounds a lot like a young 

“There's real pride, like being proud of good work, Holden Caulfield — smart, observant, sensitive and ^aS of ^^^100 w Sms h? SffidS 
like when we do a eood iob budding a porch. Then disaffected. He hates school doesn t get on well ... , - . e a 


tutewnen weaoa gooajOD Duuainga porcn. men aixuictisu. ™ muo u:. tnfUiint WmRHdirii^ *nd 

there’s false pride like when you think you're better with the mean kids on his block and regards his seemVmCTow more restless. 

than somebody else for no good reason; that's the younger sister as his best friend, as bis parents ^ , _ _ 

sin one. Then there’s the lion’s pride, his family.” struggle to make it through the Depression. His Wharton tries to bring the story biureand 
Those definitions pretty much summarize what the father, a union steward, has been threatened by Turfy together with the story of Dicue K.ettteston 

book is about, and they are also about the only thing managem ent “goons,” and is faced with a decision and nis family through a senes of eventsthat take 

(hat ties its jumpy, hodgepodge narrative together. to quit the union and surrender his pride; or eadan- place, one weekend, at the Jersey shore. The narra- 

Told from shifuimpomts of view. “Pride” ad- ger his happy little family. five movement should not be as difficult to pull off 

i - 7®- . j • .l _ n.. i:. .1 « thp rrwnnlPY strMm-nf-cnnmnnaiPSS rtnnlnvttl 


dresses issues examined in the pseudonymous In flat literal prose, Dickie's story delineates as roe complex stream-of -consciousness employed 
Wharton’s previous novels, l ike “Birdy,” it wants lower-middle-class life in the town of Stonehurst m “Birdy, but itnonetheless fails to engage our full 

to create an idiosyncratic portrait of adolescence in Hills, with plenty of naturalistic detail — we are sympathy — mainly, one suspects, because Whar- 

A™*™’*, using nnimals (in this case, piade not only to see the streets, rowhouses strung ton seems unsure what be wants to accomplish, 

lions) to create a strange, dreamlike fable. Like together with laundry lines, but also to experience a .His attempts to stitch the two stones together 
“Dad,” it wants to examine the mysteries and com- world in which suits are reserved for Sunday church, with verbal embroidery often feel perfunctory and 

forts of the f amily . And like “A Midnight Gear,” it in which a restaurant dinner is a rare treat. In strained — the portentous comparisons between 

wants to look at the effects that war — and the constrast, the second novella in “Pride” is more of a Ttiffy ^ Didoes pet kitten amount to 

peacetime pitfalls of poverty and bad luck — can reverse Horatio Alger tale, painted in the primary hltle more than a red herring, and the repeated 

have on young men raised on the promises of the colors and bold strokes of an old-fashioned allego- references to the pride that both Diche s father and 
American Dream. Yet while each of these themes ry. The story of Sture Modig. a farm boy gifted with Store lake in thor woAfeel Lke forced allusions to 

are ririmented with a homey, folk-art sort of charm. magical talents — not unlike those possessed by the the book s title. Worse, Wharton s homespun prose 

: has a way of coagulating into sappv aphorisms and 

. „ Solution Last Week's Puzzle 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


lions) to create a strange, dreamlike fable. Like 
“Dad,” it wants to examine the mysteries and com- 
forts of the family. And like “A Midnight Gear,” it 
wants to look at the effects that war — and the 


f0-2*» 






I apaaQ □□□□ □□an □□□□□ 
□□□an □□□□ anna □□□□□ 
□□aanoaaaaaoaaa □□□□□ 
□aaaEQ aaaaa anaaan 
_ ana □□□□an □□□□□□ 
laaaaau nnana naao 
[□caua □□□□a auauEaanD 
□□aaa □□□ aaaa □□□□□ 
[□□□□□□a □□□□□□aa □□□□ 
ana dqqqq ddqdqd 
□□□□□ a □□□□□ □□□□ua 
aaaaaG aaaaa □□□ 
aaaa □□□□□aaa aaaoQaQ 
aaaaa aaaa aaa aaaaa 
aoaaaaaaa aaaaa dqddd 
□□□□ aaaaa □□□□□□ 
□□□□□□ aaaaaa aaa 
□□□□□□ aaaaa aaaaaa 
□□aaa aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa 
aaaaa □□□□ aaaa naaaa 
□□aaa aaaa aaaa DQaaa 


cliches — “any fool can break a window but very 
few people can put one back in” — and his nostalgia 
for the 1930s seems sentimental in light of the 
unpretty consequences that the Depression has on 
his characters' lives. 

Oddly enough, such weaknesses never prevent the 
reader from wanting to finish “Pride" — so engaged 
do we become in the story of Dickie’s family. As he 
demonstrated in “Dad." Wharton has a special gift 
for portraying filial relationships, and his portrait of 
Dickie and Ins father — building porches together 
in the late summer afternoons, fishing together on 
an abandoned pier, sharing whispered secrets dur- 
ing a walk along the beach — possesses a sweetness 
and felt emotion that leaves a warm, pleasant after- 
glow in our minds. 

Michiko Kokuimi is on the staff of The New York 
Times. 


Ja> 




World Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse Oct. 25 

Qosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


* Is THIS THE TW GOO TURNS OFF THE 
LIGHT AN HOUR BARKER ?* 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Cotta DH Sol 

IMMn 

EdbUMirqli 

Florae* 

FranMVrt 

Genova 

HOMOfcl 

Istanbul 

Las Palma* 


HIGH LOW 
C F C P 

25 77 — — fr Bangkok 

g 48 — — fr Boiling 

11 41 — — O Hm K0OB 

— — — — no Manila 

Ml 50 — — tr HowDOtkl 

7 SS — — o Seoul 

12 54 — — tr Sfeonstwl 

n S4 - - si Singapore 

13 SS ft TWpol 

5 II el Tokyo 

«2:: S AFRICA 

12 54 — — o dialers 

n _ ~ fr Mn 

I* $2 — ~ “ Crux Town 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

31 M Cl 

27 n a 

— — 26 79 d 

29 ik fr 

IS 57 — — fr 

— — — — r*a 

— — — — na 

— — — — no 


AFRICA 

Algiers — — — — na 

Cairo 2* 82 fr 

Capo Town — — — — «a 


tt ra — ■ — fr rutuhiipM ■! — — — v 


ABN 

ACFMoiiflne 
AEGON 
AKZO 
Abc/0 
AMEV 

A 'Dam Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

Buctn uicmii T 
: Caksnd HMo 
Elsevter^iDU 
Fofcker 
Gist Brocades 
Hdneken 
Hooaovem 
I KLM 
Naardon 
Not Nedder 
Hcdltoyd 
Oco VOnderG 
pofchoed 
Philips 

RoOeco 
Rodamco 
Rollnqa 
Roronfo 
Ravat Dutch 
Unilever 
Van Otnmeron 
VMF Stork 
VNU 

ANPXBS Goal index : mM 
Previous : 2Z33D 


I Ho rponor 
Hochllrt 
Hoochsl 
HOf-Ktl 
VA Horten 

1S*S! IWKA 

Kail + Sab 
7^5 ICarstacn 
B Koulhot 
J KioecknerH^S 
jZ-g Kioeciawr worke 

n 

21 

Manneimorm 
fJTS Muenctt RuocM 

Nlxdart 

«Se PKI 

Porsche 

nS ^X * 100 

1B3J0 Swp 

Fmdnmerail 

^ ISSens 

Thvuen 

VetK ‘ 

teg Vjrtkwrcoermertt 


Close Prev 

154 GFSA 

BOO Harrrranv 

25R.7D Hlwek) Steel 
1S4S0 KlOOl 
217J0 Nodbwik 
387 Pres Stem 
31930 RusMat 
174 SA Brews 
28? Sf Helena 
32? Sosol 
317 West Holding 
97 JO _ „ . 


Shell 

STC 

Std Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tale end Lvie 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
T.L Group 
T ratal wer Hse 
THF 
Ultramar 
Unilever e 
U nited Blsculfs 
VI deers 


WIZARD of ID 


mm&t 

canter . 


m&te 

l 


NC?-..T^tCXW? 
9&A fMir 


flj t&tevm 


REX MORGAN 

P®®****^ IF BRADY WERE TO 
take you home, it wouldn’t help, 
CLAUDIA l I'M OOING TO HAVE THE ** 


1 WON’T MAKE ANY 
PROMISES f WE'U DISCUSS 


CLAUDIA l I’M OOING TO HAVE THE < n IT WHEN I SEE YOU IN 
NURSE GIVE YOU ‘SOME MEDICATION * ITT THE MORNING/ i 
t — 


EIGHT NCW,I*THIN»C > 
: WE ALL NEED A GOOD 
NIGHTS SLEEP--YOU. - 
, ‘BRADY AM> ME A 


EtiMblNj 


\Li 


(-3 


GARFIELD 





WHY 15 IT WHEN THEV SAYAN 
APULT HAS THE ^AUNP OF A 
CHILP/’THtV LOCK HIM UP? ^ 


WHILE OW-DREN ARE 


I-JZm 


(S7«pUntt«lFrave9*niScttBjnc. 



1500 3525 fg 

TWO 2875 Woonvorm sn 

ZOT 2200 F.T-3 0 index : 1«RL88 
795 WO Prevloos : lesi^e 
4700 6400 F.rAfcWt Index : 1MTJS 
Z3SC 2375 Previous : Uf»Je 
mo 690 

9700 3400 i— — - — — — 

m Bis i nn— 

8050 8000 I IWnl 


Cold Storage 

3.18 

IT 

DBS 

SB) 

Eraser Heave 

6 J0 

05 

How Par 

220 

230 

tnchcope 

215 

215 

580 

Mai Bonking 

6 

OCBC 

&50 

155 

OUB 

279 

m 

OUE 

229 

Shangri^a 

I *6 

165 

Sime Derby 

1J7 

*89 

SOOT* Land 

245 

2X7 

650 

Spore Prase 

450 

S Steamship 

NA 

BJt5 

St Trading 

212 

il . 

IMtea Overseas 

l- 36 

■ I’ 

UOB 

168 


Straits Tunes led Index ; 1 
Provisos : TOLU 

fSJB 


Tanmtm Oct. 25 \ 
Canadian stada viaAP 
X* High Low Close Cho. I 


■cy Mortem e 
2B757 Motion A# 


Banco Comm 

595 Pnrrloes . 1202.10 CenlraJe 

Cisoholels 

1 W [— — — — — — a— " i Cred I lal 

I iMBiaa I ErkScrrtia 

21^5 I — I Form Iloilo 

S aacotp no nou gw 

,25 Alitea-Lvons 2SS 270 ^fieroil 

Anglo Am Gold . SSSV. Stfk 

isLTo fiSKLE? - " - 55 SSr "* 1 


«I00 24100 I ^7 

3410 3413 | S*l 

11940 11940 1 

0185 3170 AGA 
10425 10400 Alfa Laval 


"itgi Dairies 

BAT. 
Beecham 
BICC 


Blue Circle 

ayo Commerzbank lode* : 170JJ0 fmoltr Indus 
Previous : 1720.18 BP 

235 Bril Home St 

Brit Telecom 

, — — Brit Aerospace 

L.»-gsg~ftZ] gr 

-a * . dif men 


sieckMm 

Slrosboora 

Venice 

Vienna 


10 so — — fr 

13 55 — ~ d 

25 77 — ~ fr 

21 70 — — d 

14 57 — — fr 

1* M — — »r 

14 41 — — fr 

8 46 — a 

10 SO — — Fr 

14 41 — — r 

7 45 — — a 

14 57 — — It 

10 SO — — tr 

11 52 — — 0 

22 72 — — fr 

Id fr 

11 52 — — fr 

14 S7 — — fr 

« 44 — — tr 

0 48 — — d 

8 46 — — Cl 


2MrttH 8 44 — — a Hanotaie 

MIDDLE EAST. CS&« 

Ankara 2D 68 — a Miami 

Beirut -- — — — no MMeaoaHs 

DamasafS — — — — no Montreal 

J era «ate w 21 70 — — na Nassau 

Tel Aviv 24 75 — — O New York 

OCEANIA 


Audctond 

Sydney 


— — 14 57 m Toronto 

_ — — — no WasMngtM 


Harare — — — — no 

Logoi — — — — no 

Nairobi — — — — no 

TM8 — — — — no 

LATIN AMERICA 

Buenos Mra 14 57 a 

Caracas — — — — na 

Umc 18 64 — — a 

Mexico CHv 2s 75 11 S2 pe 

Rla do JaMKa 25 77 — — r 

NORTH AMERICA 

Anchorage 4 21 -13 9 tr 

Atlanta 25 77 17 63 PC 

Boston 16 61 13 55 PC 

Chicago S « 5 41 tr 

Denver 2* 25 3 37 fr 

DefroH 19 66 5 41 fr 

HanoMhi 30 86 24 75 ae 

Houston 37 81 20 48 d 

LofAnpeies 20 02 16 61 fr 

Miami 30 86 24 75 PC 

MMeaoaHs 19 66 I 34 fr 

Montreal 16 61 0 46 cl 

Nassau 28 82 23 73 PC 

New York 22 72 16 61 »r 

SaaPmndsco 20 68 13 55 to 

Seattle 15 59 12 54 r 


20 48 12 54 
24 75 10 50 


d-daudv; to-toggv; Ir-tolr; tmall: oevgrad; noaartlv claudv: r-roln; 
stvstwjwors; sw-snow; st-ttor tnr. 

SATURDAY? PO RECAST — CHANNEL: Silent. FRANKPURT: Fooav.Temo. 
72_--2 («— 3B). LONDON: FosfflV. Temp. 13 — 6 IS — <31. MADRID: Cloudy. 
Ttam- M — 7 148—451. NEW YORK: Pair. Toma. 19-11 (64 - 52). PARIS: 
Ctoutfy Temp 14 — 0 (57 — 32). ROME: Cloudy. Toma. 19 —9 144 —481. TEL 

AVm MA. ZURICH: ClBUdyl Temp ll 1 IS2-30>. BANGKOK: Peggy. 

TMHA S— 25 (»1->75. HONG KONG: Claudv. Temp. 28 — 24 (82— 751. 
MAfiilA; (Slid” Temp. 31—24 (88 — 751. SEOUL: Foggy. Temp. 11 — 7 
(44 — «& SINGAPORE; Thunderstorms Temp 30-25 (86-77). tokyq; 
Fair. Tenw. 19—13 (64 — 55). 


Artwd 2540 242 

Befcoert 7200 700 

Cocfcerlll 223 

Cotepo 4400 442 

EBES 3635 370 

GB-Inno-BM 5070 51D 

GBL 2530 247 

Gevoeri 4770 477 

Hoboken 5900 590 

(ntorcom 2790 283 

Kradlethank 10000 999 

Petroflmi 6540 663 

5oe Generate 2290 22a 

SeHno B50Q B40 

Solvin' 5870 5*8 

Traction ElOC 4750 470 

UCB 5600 595 

Unero 2125 213 

VKHBe Manlaone 69U 703 

Current stock Index : 2748.12 
Prevtoac : 27(871 


| Hraghfart, ) 

AEG-T eietunkan 241 1530 
Allianz Vers 
Altana 
BASF 

Boyar 259.90 26030 

Bay Hypo BOnfc 424J0 434 

Bay vetamsbank 04 435 

283 284 


I BBC 
BHF-BanK 

BMW 

Commanbonfc 
Coni Gum ml 
COlmler-BeiR 
Deguasa 
Deutsche Me 


Bk Cart Asia 

SA 

2210 

n 

21 

Owuna Kona 

I960 


OitooLWif 

17.10 


Groen Island 

8X0 

8X0 

Hang Seng Bank 

46 

45 JS 

Henderson 

2275 

230 

China Gas 

11 JO 

1120 

HR Electric 

820 


HK Really A 

12 

12 


3525 

3S75 


656 


HKShang Bank 

7X5 

7X0 

HK TelHOhone 

9 

*.IS 

HK Yaumatel 



HK Wharf 

725 


Huiai Whamcaa 

1AM 


Hyson 



inti City 

0-90 


Jardine 

1280 


JartUneSec 

14.90 

14J0 

Kowloon Malar 



Miramar Ha (el 

4X50 


New world 

8.10 





S lei in. 

2X5 


Swire PaeHIc A 

27 JO 


Tal Cheung 

1.99 



055 


wine On Co 



Wlnsor 

4J7S 

X7S 

World imT 

2325 

2J25 

Hang Seng index : 
Prevloee : lsui 

ltn j; 

Bhnr 

1 

n 


146 I taloas 

419 ItaimoWltart 1303001 

M2 Medlabcnco 1260001 

SI Monied Ison 
315 Olivetti 
230 Pirelli 

30 PAS 1056001 

S7S Rtooscent* 

294 sra 

209 5ME 
313 

w, Stonda 
307 Slet 
TBS I 

£1 ImiB Current index : T73S 
S? previous : 1719 


WSTO 12310 A900 

4478 4420 Astra 
62950 42110 Atlas Copco 
H«0 10450 Batfdsn 
44*30 44100 E Metre km 


Japan Air Unas 
Kojfma 
Konsoi P ow er 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
MotsuEioc Works 
MltsuMstiT Bank 
IWtsubMU Cbem 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
MRsHhOsM 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK insuSatan 
; NlkkaSoc 
Nippon Kogaku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Stool' 
Nippon Yuson 
Nissan 
Nomura Sac 
Olympus 
Pioneer 


1Q560OWHS00 Stem 
920 905 SKF 

gg 


Laval 219 2U Utoson Yuswl 

» s s 

AttaS COPCO 06 135 

BoTiden 197 193 5 j3T 

Electro km 160 160 555 

_j0ll 2006 Ertcamn 204 233 

1X000136500 Esselfe 340 360 sSneSi OwOl kat 

126000125400 Hondelsborken 190 190 Lnwroar 

2340 2295 Phormoda 172 170 S5? ltomo Bank 

»»3cn |andv[k SK 430 a, mttumo Marine 

Ik? - * aS Sumitomo Metol 

- f frin.iLf jL . ij ti ^ Tatort COrp 

SwedbhMotch ^ m Tabteigdn. 

AlfOersvaoridiM index :396J( TDK 
Prevtoai :29MS 


SwWishMctcft 

Voi-o 


595 605 I Z 

147 151 | I 

213 210 1 — 

252 254 

444 442 Al r LlauUSB 

158 IS AtSttmn AIL 

483 483 Av DaackriT 

425 428 B«mcalrc 

443 430 BIC 

Sl4ke Si4*k Bonaroln 


389 39450 * 

513 507 AECI 

261 263X0 Anglo American 
16553 746 Anglo Am Gold 

107392 1070 Barlow* 

496 514 Blwoor 

701 308.10 BlrfWlS 


Deutsche Bank 67950 67&50 | Dt.Bms, 


Drasdner Bonk 
GHH 


338 340 Drietoflietn 

21450 213 | Elands 


Logoi General 


13Z5 Z-*5 Marks and SP 
1S7in Mefal Box 

J Midland Bank 

9*01 Wew Bank 
PandO 
_ PHklngton 

) Pra^noi 

ZI ' Racal Eled 

j5s gsr***" 

TH , S s» 

7«l ^ g«0' Ou.cn £ 

”« 122 Soatehl 

™ SULisbury 
1715 imo Sears Holdings 


S2IW> *21 7* BSN^JD 
140 162 Corretour 

488 480 Choroeurs 

,_249 Cub Med 

13 29/32 1J»« Dam 

363 360 Duma* 

713 7US EM-Aqultolne 

N6 MS Europe 7 

925 925 Gen Ecu* 

207 210 Hochelte 

409 409 LofcroeCap 

457 Legrand 

211 22 LeUeuf 

307 309 fOreOI 

316 315 Mariell 

709 719 MOIre 

447 449 Merlin 

159 159 MlehHIn 

«23 426 Moet Hermessv 

170 170 Moulinex 

SIS 513 Occidents ie 

417 419 PemodRic 

694 697 Perrier 

£S Peugeot 

278 278 priniemps 

136 1 38 Radtatectn 

744 752 RMowte 

154 142 Roussel uclat 

S6flto MBVj Sanofi 
fS9 US 5kto Rassionoi 

484 681 Tetenrecon 

316 316 Thomson C5F 

44V? 41 Total 

S52 547 

3» 350 CAC Index : 217X8 

109 109 Previous : 21589 


I 1 ACI 

S | ANZ 

* BHP 

Borcl 

545 548 Bougainville 

J17 305 ccsttemalne 

1180 1200 cotos 
690 495 Comalcn 

445 448 CRA 

1440 1530 CSR 

TO T& DWlloo 

250 rco Elders 1X1 
2385 2315 |C1 Australia 

704 71* MoaellCHl 

44Z3J 41! MIM 

1580 16» Mvor 

730 Nat AustBOnk 
184 NewsCorp 
827 82* N Broken Hill 

465 655 Poseidon 

1375 13*4 QtoCtXji Trust 

535 525 Sonias 

mo 2S« Thomas Nation 


710 70S w es tern Mining 346 148 13=^11 

2369 2340 vvsslpoc Bonkfna S3B 5.74 UmMsGrr 

1389 1348 WaodsWe Ml IAS {jg^^rr 

2HB 2090 AU Ordlborte lodex : TBSUO B 

l« IStS PrCVte “ :TeS1 - , ° 


' Tallin J 

TokioMdrtoa 
Tokyo Elec. Power 
Tappon Prtittlna 

} Toray Ind 
TosWba 
Tovato 

3j 0B 105 Yamakdil sec 

5.18 S.1D 

9M 9JJ4 HUUM/OJ. ustet r 12SS4JN 

w 1A6 Pravtow : 12969J8 

ZM 289 New mb: ibiam . 

B a Previous : mxs* 

4Jt 458 

1J5 1.90 

5L78 SJK 

i to jb . - ■ 

2 J 2 2jo I Twsirfc 

3194. X9S I, , 1 

IS IS SSute. *£ 4 SS 

uo is as • gs ss 

fi ss szisg?* ss ss 

Crodlt Sul» 3200 3210 

3TS 3« Electrowatt 3470 3470 

g g tKSSSv S| uS 

S E sr”"’ 3 s 

f" fl! unufisGvr 222* 2280 


5L40 52JO 
654 Odd 
701 674 

424 

— — 178 

28650 286 

344 348 

1548 1500 

1495 1483 


Schindler • 

Sutaw 

Surveiltawe 


5000 4925 
7750 7778 
1500 1515 
H075 18400 
1515 158 
45D0 4490 


Akoi 

AOOhl Ctwm 
ASCdll Gloss 
Bank of Tokyo 


585 s» Brtdgostane 
1270 1240 Canon 

2530 2500 COsIp 

5*2 551 G-ltoh 


7M £jj jStosRet nyunc o a2 ^ 

« k? SwWsVolksbank 2ZB 

S I ztfzss? . s & 

iii5 4Sc zuriciilnB 3420 3*10 

:ss :s v&i&us? 


S ^ SSS. *414 'S VtSEttSEF 

“ * ^ 'aS , 

Dorasocurwcs « -4 mgemmpVUUM*' 

Fail Bank 1530 ISO avSlnbJe.- M. ex-OvlOv**- 


*£_ _ 2 S3?S5SSS t 

^ Close Cha 

63836 Noranda 

1646 1646- tt 606 Moreen 
IBtt 18 V* — U. 80424 Nva AltAf 
19 >9Mt— tt 15309NBSWCPW 

9 tt 846 lOTU NuWW SP A 

ITtt 17tt+tt 34»Oakwood 
14 14 — tt 2770 Ckmttxn o 

IStt 15*4 IBOOshawoAf 

19V. Tttt - 4060POC WAIrlr 

946 10 + tt Tl500Pamoor 
30M 3014— tt I07W PonOm P 


tonde 385 335 335 

K*l Af *19 1B46 18tt— tt 

WtB 31946 1946 1946— 46 

ftoV S2H6 234t 2346 + tt 

h»C? I 53846 3 2846+ 46 

JWlP S14tt 1346 14 — V!t 

49 XUtt 1416 1446— tt 

AltAf 54tt 5*6 4 — to 

KOW Sl«6 1746 ITtt— X 

«*»A 37 3* 37 J . 

mod w 9 9 — W*t 

«W» 0, 290 2W 290 . 

IJOAf «tt 3246 3346 , 

WAIrto 31346 V» 1346 

S2T» *2* 


495 495 —17 

13 1»6— tt 

170 172.— 1 
17 17 

365 345 —15 

360 365 ; 

1666 1646—tt 
8 8—46 

896 816— to 

207 211 + 1 

Mtt 2466 . 
1246 UA+to. 
39tt 30 +tt 
17 17tt — tt 
15 15 — to 

1446 1416— tt 
131A 1116— tt 
24V4 3416+16 
34 24 + tt 

4466 4446+ tt 
1066 10(6+ tt 
64 66 +ltt 

37V, 37tt— tt 
9to 946 
ifltt law 


1546.1546—16 24092 Tex Cm* 

Btt n—Vt 23300 Thom NA 
-1946 igfi— to 2*913 Tor Dm Bk 

40 + tt 12300 Trader* a f 
866 9 + tt WTrrwiw 
6tt 6V6+ to ^5000 Trinity Ra> 
« * ,»K7 TruAJto UA 

10 ID 16*024 Trcon PL 

14 1«6 7JS0 Triton A 

20tt 2066 . 4327TnzecAf 

216 -216 —2 60000Tut«M 

*3 13 700UnloorpAI 

12 12—4* HOUnCmwd 

546 516-46 42S3U Entprlse 

646 . 616- tt 100 U Kern 
646 6*6+ V6 UOOVemtlAf 

p m i m 

s r -is* 


ixsxL SS-SSi# 

*PlnePotot S20Bfc 204* 2046 

n'Kss' 

M PH m + su 
.raw— 4a 

Soswre 35 4ID 490 —Til 

Scntts I S27to 27 27 —to 

S tatoTBf Bi 11 n 

SS*. sas a* 3r=a 

StoepR 240 SS Mil 

tSova s£a.?sias:£ 

*l?tt iSS iS? ** 


vs&g • 

c»o stotw a f 

23242 Southom 


CT Sulpha 
.125 Steep R 


I3V6 

Wfc 30 30 — to 

gttggfce 

365* 9to— to 

iii ■ 

Bto oto— to 

» "S 
ST 4 % 

552 SS SS+tt 


S 2 SStS ToteNrtss 

1M6 16to — 46 . r 

d kt ■ Ttt3 "“ te p ss» 

tt J6 I 

370 370 — S| -toa, , . , 

8 8 L JttMlti llil Of, or 

lu Mh+ to XJa ~ A I 

SS SE ^SIS^Mant 

g».a tS 

Ut2 11M ^.’SSCBPak 

S to » H +to ^g pwe ad oe 

£ S w _ +,fc WOmBotn 

2 a.^+.to 

JSBBur* 

JH JJS « 21 £70 Raven Bank 

29 + = 




Preeten 

164790 


now 

ills 

RSI;* 

iisk; 

*»tt 29 -1*7 S 


17 ™ ***** W1 J83 ” 

L w* 

10 tt loft— to ■ — 

21 ft 22 tt+tt 


PfovioBa 

W938 


6Vtt:"aS8SS»— ■ 


cky\. 


***-_"» . — - 'r.v :?-yi f ”8 


X-££> a 











CSITONATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26 - 27, 1983 





^ - 


re - 


2 Pitchers Tw - 
[jM Records, 2 Ways 

A ifocuxced Press 

ST LOUIS —Todd Worrell, 
me Cardinals’ relief. pitcher, 
nnd Danny Jackson, the 
Royals’ starting pitcher, each 
ar 8 Wor!d Series record 
Jr* 0 , V _ Thnrsday night. Worrell for 
■*. - V Striking out batten, Jackson for 
'.1 ; •• striking out. 

jfl-J WoiTetl, a rookie, entered the 
<meV game in the sixth inning and 

< W) s , trudc 001 Badd y Biancalana, 
aJK/ Jackson and Lonnie Smith. In 

iJJ the seventh, he struck out WaHe 

^Wnson, George Brett and 
®^rf*Frank White, making «. sbe 
“* straighL The streak ended there 

because Brian Harper pinch-hit 
for Worrell in die bottom of the 
seventh, 

Cincinnati's Horace EHer set 
.-the mark in 1919- against the 
. Chicago White Sox and Balti- 
more's Moe Drabowsky tied it 
in 1966 against Los Angeles. 

* * Jackson, who came up to die 
. \V; Royals in 1983 butbeforc the 

y " P Series had never batted in the 

K'-jSs' A l. major leagues, swung his way- 

< A v- into the record books by strik- 
y, ing out his Gist three times at 
j£ bat in the game. That gave him 
£ five consecutive strikeouts, ty- 
ing a mar k held by five players, 
the most recent being SL Louis 
outfielder Mike Shannon in the 
1964 World Series. 

Jackson was surprised when 
_ , ^ [old he had tied a record, at first 

' thinking the question referred 
' u-)® 10 bis pitching, not his hitting. 

“I set a world record with 
that?" he said. ‘'Well, at least I 
am in the record books for 
something. 1 ' 






SPOKES 



6-1, Forcing World Series to Game 6 


Durso . 

. . Jfcw Y&kY)met Sentee 

ST. LOUIS — TbeSt-Totas Cardinals were so 
forimkfipg in their home ball tins wkob that 
nobody swept three games from them there all 
summer. Only two teams wen two of three games 
in any ariesrtheNewYOfk Mels and the Cmcin- 
nati Reds. Bat Thursday night, with devilishly 
good timing, the Kansas GtyR^als did It too. 

. On ihtbiiak of losing tite World Series in five 
. games, the Royals rbseup and beat the Cardinals, 
6-1. They did it despite striking out 15 mneSt and 
did U almost without challenge, scoring foor runs 
off Bob Forsch in less than two innings, (hen 
turning over, their lead to Danny Jackson, who 
protected h with Eve-lift that further 

■ calmed the already j^add St Lomsbats. 

. As a resuli, the Cardinals Joa. most of the 
advantage they brot^ht home, after winning the 
first two games in Kansas Qw„Tt had looked Ske a 
mismatch, maybe a swop. to the' Royals, who 
survived the Ame ricNri ' T ffimyr i ff after Trail- 

ing by three games to one, wotf two of three on the 
Cardmals* turf and seat ifceSeaes bade west along 
Interstate 70. ■ 

It will be resumed Sahoiday sight in 


for the Royals. And it vriD ^e resumed with the 
Cardinals, the mostprofficcffense in baseball ibis 
season, hitting a collective 1196 for the Series. 
“It’s not DjckHowser,” said. Dick Howser, the 


• manag er erf ibe Royals. “It’s not the organization. 
It’s tire players. I don’t eve them a talk or any- 

lUnn V IL rt. mJ -a *» 




wm 



the ‘mcewSPibu 


Jim Stmdberg slid borne as the Cardinals’ Tom Nieto hinged for the tag. Royals also won game’s most controversial play. 


This was a city primed for winning the Series, a 
city that seemed emblazoned in red for its Red- 
buds. Even thie fountain- outside Busch. Stadium 
spouted water -tinted red; and thousands of fans 
inside wore red shirts or jackets, and enihlemc of 
cardinals were ewaywhere. 

Before dregame, Jack dark had expressed the 


mood along the Mississippi in almost rapturous 
words. 

“To clinch the World Series at home,” he said, 
v is ua lizin g the evening’s possibilities, “that would 
be a dream crane nuc.rve watched it on TV when 
other teams and other players did the clinchin g 
Fans on the field, people celebrating. Everything 


you did from spring training comes together in one 
magic moment for erne team.” 

But there were no magic moments for Forsch. at 
35 the senior man on the fjiriir_ak, who made a 
game comeback this season after surgery on his 
lower back. He started Thursday night to give Cox 
two extra days to rest his tender right elbow. Bui 


Fosch lasted only one and two-thirds innings, and 
by then was losing, 4-1. 

The Royals jumped in from when Lonnie Smith 
and Wilson opened the game with singles. George 
Brett fiied deep to left, deep enough to advance the 
runners to second and third. So when Frank White 
grounded out to shortstop. Smith scored. 


But the Cardinals brought tbrir partisans up 
cheering in the home half of the inning. Jackson 
got two outs before Tommy Herr looped a double 
off the right-field chalk and Clark drilled the next 
pitch to the wall in right-center for a double and a 
1-1 tie. 

The cheers did not last long, and neither did the 
tie. In the top of the second. Forsch surrendered a 
walk, a single, a double, a triple and three runs, 
and was gone, 

Jim Sundberg stoned this rally with a one-out 
double to left that Tito Landrum might have 
caught but did not. Buddy Biancalana bounced a 
single into right field and Sundberg arrived at the 
plate, sliding bead first, in a dead heat with a 
strong throw from Cesar Ccdeno. He was called 
safe after a tangle with catcher Tom Nieto and the 
argument was on. 

Although Nieto said he “thought I gut him on 
the side or waist,” John .Shulock, the umpire, said 
that “the throw was up the line. Nieto went up to 
get j u came luck, tagged Sundberg on the foot, but 
that was after he'd touched the plate with Jus 
hand.” 

So the Cardinals had lost the biggest argument 
of Lhe Series, too. 

Forsch then struck out Jackson and needed one 
out to keep things manageable. But he never got 
that, either. He walked Smith, and Wilson tripled 
to right-center, his eighth hit of the Series scoring 
two more runs for a 4-1 lead. 

Rickey Horton replaced Forsch, and the Cardi- 
nals looked for an opening. 

They seemed to get it in the third when Un- 
loaded' the bases on Willie McGee's single and two 
walks. Bui Landrum, hitting .400 in the Series as 
the star replacement for the injured Vince Cole- 
man. popped a little foul ball to Brett outside thud 
base, leaving three runners stranded. 

While the Cardinals’ offense slumbered, their 
bullpen “committee” thrived the rest of the way. 
striking out 1 3. But the pitching that counted most 
was Jackson’s. He lost the opening game by 3-1. 
but retired the leadoff batter in even,- inning 
Thursday night, struck out four batters in a row at 
one point and said; “Our pitching staff is good 
enough to come back and brat them." 


9ers, Vikings Face an Early Finish 
.ss^t the NFL Season’s Halfway Point 






By Michael Janofsky 

New York Tones Service 

NEW YORK — The National Football l-**gn* ' 
season readies its halfway point this weekend, and 
ly the San Francisco 49ers and Minneso ta VL 
arc confronted with Critical games. 

They are matched against the league’s only two 
-defeated teams, and in each case the opponent is in 
i same division and is playing at botne. Thc 49crs 
ace the Los Angeles Rams in Anaheim Stadium* and 
the Vflrings play.the Bears at Soldier Field in Chicago. 
" the tmdaeateds remain undefeated, the races in die 
ational Conference West and Central divisions, will 
j-fttiflve all but disappeared. 

G-wSDAS NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

• l-"5SiKW: San Franosco (3-4) at Los Angeles (7:9): The uigen- 
-Z’AJ&tey is more acute in tire casettf lire 49e^ tire defead^M 

^uperJBoBdydiainpirin^'i»difOMv^lo« t son cfT^frira? ■ 
of their last fdur.Fbrno apparent reason, their, 
pff erne has stagnated and, their defense, is less impos- 
ing than it was a year ago. 

Perhaps this mould not be to surprising. In 1982, : 
lhe season, shortened by the pktyexs* strike and the . 

m preview : 

following theaters’ first Super Bow! victory, a 
malaise set in and they finished out of the 
playoffs with a 3-6 record. 

Not that the Rams are a ouch to win. They have 

— ■jmade their way mi the strength of a fine defense and 

>:l£E£N Am Upt much more. Eric Dickerson, their hallowed run- 
«V. back, has rushed for more than 100 yards only 

*, c.rvfctis./ and Dieter Brock, the former Canadian Football 
League quarterback, has passed for more than 200 
yards only once. 

The Rams also have lost their last four games with 
the 49ers, and the last four played in Anaheim. The 
-Los Vegas betting line this week had the teams rated . 
.even. 

Minnesota (4-3) at Chicago (741): The Vikings’ 
(situation is exacerbated by the presence of two other 
'teams in the division — Detroit and Green Bay — who" 
^Jj^have designs on a playoff spot. 

-- L ‘ When the Vikings last played the Bears, in the third 
(Week of the season, they were leading, 17-9, in the 
^ third quarter. Then the injured Jim McMahon entered 
V the g ame for Chicago and quickly threw three touch-. 
a ]j, down passes as the Bean won. 33-24. 

[£>■ -. Four victories followed, although the last, 23-7 over 
£ ji ; the Packers, was somewhat misleading as lhe Bears , 
ft 'Tost four of seven fumbles. And McMahon -has. been 
,£>|anable to practice most of this week because erf inju- 
l ?,ries to his buttocks and an ankle, while Keith Van 
? v} Horae, the big right tackle, has a sprained ankle. 
(Bears favored by 8 points.) 

* r\ Atlanta (1-6) at Dallas (5-2): The Falcons, with their 
£ £ j new quarterback, David Archer, won for the first time 
$??' last week, defeating the Saints. A loss to the Eagles col 
£ the Cowboys’ lead in the NFC East to one game, 
j.', which means they. can HI afford' to" lose to weak 
;*•"> opponents. And the Falcons have given- up more 
points than any other NFC team except Tampa Bay. 
>i. { An added pins far the Cowboys is that Danny White, 
K* who missed the Philadelphia game with sore ribs, is 
expected back. (Cowboys by I2J6.J 
$ i New York (4-3) atNew Orleans (34): Last season, 
<•;;’! the Giants’ charge toward the playoffs was almost 
\>?i derailed when they lost a “little* game to Tampa Bay. 

"i Hus is another simh game. StQI, all signs point to the 
i* ( . Giants winning. The Saints .have lost their last two,- . 
ii’f' their defense has been erratic, especially on passing 
plays, and their rebnilt offensive line has not protected 
£ f* Dave Wilson, the qumietback, wdL (Giants by 346.) ■ 
AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
Seattle (4-3) at New York (5-2): The Jets have never 
en the Seahawks and are 0-S against them ai . 

_ jbl But if Freeman McNeD plays, the Jets have a 
better chance to control the ball and keqp Ken O’Bnen 
from having to pass more than 30 times. Oh tite other 
hand, if the Sealiawks get ahead-early, (bey have, their 
own ball -control expert in Curt Warner, who las t 
Sunday his best, game in more than a month, 
rushing for 136 yards in a 13-10 overtone loss, to ■- 
Denver.' (Jets by 3.). . :- ' 

San Diego (3-4) at Los An^cs (5-2): The Chargers 

will start Dan Fouts and Ins- two favorite receivers, 
Kdlen Winslow and Wes Chandler, for the first time 
■Monday night since Winslow hurt his knee against the 
Raider* more than ayearaao. But (be. Raidmown the 
Chargers, having won thezr last six encounters;' Tire 
■Raiders also have a four-game vanning streak and 
superb defense. (Raiders-by 6,) 

Denver (5-2) at Kansas Gty (34): TTreOuefc have 
lost three straight; the players are upset with the 
coach, John Mackovic. over intensified practices; MU 
Keimey, the quarterback, has a bad back and s sore 
Shoulder, and Todd Bladdedge, his replacement, 
thr ew six interceptions in a 16-O.ksss to the Rams. So* 
even though the Chiefs -and Broncos hove split their 
last four games, tins meeting sauas heavay-wei^tftd • 
toward the Bronc»s, ’^K^ two^osses were by Apomts. 

eadn (Broncos by .1.) - r 

Pittsburgh (34) at Cmdwtati.f^^ This game has 
to scare tire Steders for several reasons. that 


they are unaccustomed to having a losing record this 
deep into the season. The other is that tire R*n piic 
have scored more points (211) than any other team in 
: the coid'erence. But they also have given up more (240) 
than any other team in the league. Which way their 
split personality carries them will fikdy determine 
. who wins this game. The Bengals wan the last, 37-24. 
for their first victory and the first of three straight 
losses for the Stedere. (Steders by HI) 
INTERCONFERENCE 

Brfhlo (14) at PhBadelphta(34); The Bills beat the 
Cobs for their first victory, but the Eagles are on an 
emotional high- With Ron Jaworski back starting at 
quarterback, the Eagles have won twice and Jaworski 
has not thrown an interception. Worse for the Bills, 
wire havtone o{ the weakest offense in the league, the 
Eagles have one of the best defenses. Do not be 
surprised if the Eagles win in a shutout. (Eagles by 9.) 

~fterifB^(34) at: lwfonflpoBr(2-5): The Packers 
used three quarterbacks in losing to the Bears last 
Monday night. Bat the Ctdts are so weak, winning 
only once in the last four games, that any one of the 
quarterbacks could lead the Packers to a victory. 
(Packers by 2.) 

Houston (2-5) at St Lords (34): Maybe the Oilers, 
wire have so many good players, finally have turned 
dungs around with tbdr 44-27 vidoiyoverCmcinnau. 
- The Cardinals, who have won the only three times 
these teams have played, seem to be disintegrating. 
They have lost three in a row, without scoring mare 
than 10 points in any game — and the defense has not 
yet bdd an opponent to fewer than 23 points. (Cardi- 
nals by 7.) 

Miami (5-2) at Detroit (4-3): The Dolphins 
squeaked by the Buccaneers, winning by 41-38 on a 
field goal in the final seconds. But if they do not shore 
up their pass defense, the Dolphins could lose to 
, anybody, evqn the Lions. (Dolphins by 614.) 

New England (4-3) at Tampa Bay (0-7): The Bugs 
stop here, at least their losing streak does. Their 
offense is, perhaps, the best it has been in tire dub’s 
history, and the Patriots, operating with Steve Grogan, 
do not have the resources to score three touchdowns in 
one game. They have not since their victory on open- 
ing ray against the Packers. (Patriots by 214.) 

.- WasMagton (34) at Cleveland (4-3): Benue Kosar 
almost guided the Browns to a victory over tire Raid- 
ers. But he did not, and Gary Danielson, who is 
healthy again, probably wiD start against the Red- 
skins, who last lost to the Giants, 17-3. Poor Redskins. 
Their offense has gone pfffL The Browns’ defense is 
every bit as good as the Grants’, maybe better because 
of the secondary. (Browns by 214.) 



Royals Win a Game, 
But Nearly Lose Brett 


fcuwun 


George Brett, the star of the Royals, feO into the Kansas Gty dugout and was just saved 
from serious injury when Lee May, a coach, kept his head from bitting die concrete floor. 

Islanders’ Goals Foil a Goal for Nordiques 


The Assodu ed Press 

UNIONDALE, New York — 
The New York Islanders got two 
goals from Denis Botvin early in 
the game, terrific goal tending from 
Kelly Hradey late in the game, and 
beat Quebec, 6-5, Thursday night 
to foil the Nordiques’ bid to tie (he 
National Hockey League record 
for most victories at the Stan of a 
season. 

Potvin scored both bis goals 
within a 34-second span of a four- 
goal splurge in the first period. 


NHL FOCUS 


Hnidey came on for the belea- 
guered Billy Smith midway 
through the second period to nun 
back the Nordiques and hand them 
their first loss in eight games. 

Elsewhere, Chicago beat New 
Jersey, 64; Philadelphia beat Han- 
ford, 34), and Pittsburgh beat To- 
ronto, 64. 

The Islan de rs went to work ear- 
ly, with four goals on only seven 
shots, including Potvin 's second 


and third goals of the season, and 
held a 4-3 lead after one period. 
Potvin assisted on a power-play 
goal by John Tonelli at the start of 
the second period and the Islanders 
scored again on a shot by Pat La- 
Fontaine to go ahead 6-3. 

The Nordiques rallied on goals 
by John Anderson and Mike Eagles 
midway through the second period 
Then Hrudey relieved Smith, who 
had allowed five goals on 21 shots, 
and he made 17 saves while shut- 
ting out the Nordiques. 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 

Hockey 


World Series 


WORLD SERIES: 0AM B S 
Kansu* CJty . 


,* 1 
£ 

■- "5».- 


fr< 



. « 

* i 

r h 28 Jb hr rbi po 



LSmHfa II 


2 2 0 0 0 0 2 



oJoon. if 


0 B 0 -0 0 0 0 



wmon.cf 


0 2 0 1 0 2 2 



BratL 3b 


« 1 0 0 0 0 1 



O-Prynr. 3b 


0 0 8 0 D 0 0 



White. 2b 


T 0 0 0 D 1 2 



ShordofL rf 


0 2 1 0 0 1 2 



BoBxmLlb 





Sundboro, e 


2 11 0 0 0 i 



Blndono. n 


I 2 0 0 0 1 1 

s 


Jadcaon. 0 


0 0 0 0 0 0 0 

2 


TOWS 

31 

t it a t t t v « 

SLLoute 


ao -r h 2 b lb or rW bo 



McGoo.<cf 

4 




OS«rtK9 „ gt 

3 




Harr, 2 b 


1 1 1 0 0 0 2 



Oarfalb. 

a 

0 110 0 1 S 



Landrum, If 

4 

o i e o o o i 



Codono. rf 

4 




PndUo,3b 




0 

MlHc 


0 0 ft 0.0 0 w 



PondL p 

9 




Horton, p 





CometwLD 


* 0 0 -0-0 0 1 



o-D*Jsm,p3i 





Wterroll, p 





b-Haraor.M 





Lahti, p 


0 0 0 0 0 0 0 



rotate 

ar 

1 5 a ■ ■ 1 37 




Oct » 

SL Locrft 4, Kansas CiTY 2 
Oct 22 

Kansas CW» 4 St Louis 1 
00.8 

SI. Louis X Kansas atv 0 
Oct 3* 

Kansas Chv U st tools I 
Oct 21 . 

SL Louis Cox (1M) at Kansas atv ILd- 
branat tw> 

Oct 22 

*-5f. Louis at Kansas Clry 
(x-H nocosSatv) 


NHL Standings 


Transition 


PnitaMtoMa 
H.Y. tstanoon 
PlltsbuPDA 
New Jorsov 
N.Y. Ranoors 
Wash Uw ton 

Quoboc 
Boston 
Hartford 
Buffalo 
/Montreal 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T PtS OF CA 
5 2 0 10 29 17 

3 2 > 

3 3 1 

3 4 0 

3 4 0 

2 4 1 

Division 

r i o 

5 1 1 

4 3 0 

3 3 I 

3 4 0 


24 25 

73 29 

24 27 

24 24 

19 24 


14 33 

11 35 

B 

7 
4 


10 

l« 
31 » 
39 19 
26 3o 


C Mr ' . . . MBONBU-i 

St Uals ■ 100 100 000-1 

OW RHI— Blfmcnlona tl). dp— sl Louis 1. 
LOE— Kansas dfy 9, Si. Louts A SB-SmHh 
t2). 

(O4UM0U1 tar Campbell In iut;l>3l ruck out 
lor Worrell bVTUuc-ffeJded tor LSmfn in Bft: 
sMIoMoa ter 8f«tt la m.) 

. PITCHINO 

. . ..Kaaias Otr 

Ip b-rer00 » 
Joduoa w,vr .; 9 4 1 1 3 S 

SL Lotas 

IP 

Porsdi LJU •, • IMS 

Horton . - 2 1 

campoofi" iwt 

Wurrofl , . - . . 2 0 

LOW I S 

T0f«» 9 11 

ASUH. ■ ■ 


r or do so 
4 4 13 


3 4 
0 2 
0 6 
ft 1 

4 II 


WORLD MM E> SCHRXKlUB 
0CL» 

St touts X Kansas dtv I 


BASEBALL 
Notional LeodiM 

MONTREAL— Traded BUI Laskov, el/cher. 
» San Francisco for George Riley. Ditcher, 
and Alonzo Posvefl, ouHleftfor. 

BASKETBALL 

Notional Basketball Association 

GOLDEN STATE— WalWMl Otnoll WUsan 
Bid LUSMT Goodwill, wards, ond Chris 
McNealv and Grae Cavonor. tonMirds. Slonsd 
Geoff Huston. auanL ana Peter Vorhoovon 
ond Guv Wintams, lerwaras. Placed Purvis 
Short, hmwrd on susoendwl list. 

HOUSTON — Placed Lorry AMcheous. far- 
Msrd, on notvers. 

INDIANA— Released Jim Thomas, wtara. 

LA. LAKERS— Pieced nonnlo Lester, 
{ward, an Mured reserve. 

NEW YORK— Stoned Albert Kinv. forward, 
too f ras Bpontoffar sneet. Plocod BUI Corf- 
wrfaftf, center, on the Injured nsf. 

PHILADELPHIA— Wo rved VoHe WInlers, 
forward. 

PHOENIX— Ptocod Nick Vanns, center, 
and Rod Footer, ouatu an 'he iitlurws list. 
Placed Lorry Nonce ana Oaorol GWuaikew, 
torwonh. en the MSPtsaefr list 

PORTLAND— Placed Ben Coleman, for- 
ward. on ttw In lurtcf net. 

SEATTLE— Waived Aten sn vrlns. terwora. 
end Jeff Crass, senter-farwara, 

FOOTBALL 

No t ional Football League 

CINCINNATI— Waived Lee Dovks, comer- 
bow. 

DETROIT — Placed Jamas HarreU, Ifae- 
bochor.an tniurea reserve. Sigma Leon Ev- 
ans. oetenshte end. 

PITTSBURGH— Adlvoted Emil Bowes, 
offensive HnemaL WOhrtd Sam Washhsten. 
mrneraock. Steneo John S w ol n, earwoack. 
PieeM KetRiGary.aetenMveond.on uwliv 
fared reserve Ha. 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norrlf QivfelOO 

Sl. Louis 3 2 1 7 37 22 

Chicago 3 4 1 7 34 33 

Mlmesota 3 3 3 6 32 31 

Toronto 1 4 0 2 29 29 

Detroit Del I IS 44 

Smyrna Dlvisloo 
S I 0 


Edmonton 
Vancouver 4 

Wlreilpoo 4 

Country 3 

Los Angeles I 


« 30 20 

10 31 24 

fl 33 31 

« 30 33 

2 34 41 


THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
Chicago 0 4 3-4 

Mew tenor 3 3 3—4 

T. Murray 2 <si, warm (ij, Fraser (a), 
Sovord 3 (5); ariogmon 2 (3), verawfc (II. 
Driver | l).5botson goal : Oikogo (on Reich) 
9-9- WJ— M; New Jersey ion Bomwrmanl 11- 
12-11—34. 

Toronto 0 3 1—4 

Pittsburgh t 2 *— 6 

Lemleux 2 (71, Simpson (II, Buskos (!}, 
McGeough i?).Chaboi 13); Leoman (1>.Ter> 
rlon (2), Staetny (31. ituiace* ill. Shot* on 
goal: Taranto (an Mekocho! B-io-ra— 30; Pins- 
boron (on O an m orwi 3-17-0— J2. 

Hartford 0 • S— 0 

PMienHlpoto 10 3-3 

Sfalsolo 12), Howe (7), Kerr IS). Shots on 
goal: HOrtfand Ion Undborohl 5-12-7—24. 
Philadelphia (on w«okaa 12-13-10-35 
Qtwwc 3 2 

N.Y. isKmaen « 2 

Potvin 2 Ul, Bossy (5), Jonsson (1), Tonelli 
(3). LoFantoine (4); Goulet (3), Glllls (31, 
MoUar (IJ.Anderaan (D.Esgia 121. Shot* oo 
goal; Quebec (en Smith. Hrudey) 17-11-10— 
38; Now vert (en Sovwiy) 1 +-J— 7 *. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Spurs Trade Gervin to Bulls 

SAN ANTONIO. Texas (AP) — George Gervin, 
who has been one c»r the top scorers in the NBA since 
1974, was traded Thursday by the San Antonio Spurs 
to the Chicago Bulls for forward David Greenwood. 

Gervin, 33, led the league in scoring four seasons 
and seven times was on the all-siar team. His agenL 
said the Bolls had agreed to pick up the 12 months left 
on Gavin's S750,000-a-year contract, which also car- 
ries incentives up to S 300.000. 

But the 6-fooi-7 (2-meterj guard was generally lack- 
luster is the preseason. He also has been at odds with the 

Czech Skater Loves His Zzzs 

LONDON, Ontario (AP) — Josef Sabovrik of 
Czechoslovakia, the favorite, finally woke up enough 
Thursday to figure skate to the lead in the opening 
round of the Skate Canada meet 

At 6: IS he, a fire abrzn. triggered by a mechanical 
fault, woke most lodgers at the downtown motel 
housing the competitors. They filtered to the street, 
with many of the skaters trudging down stairs from the 
14lh floor. Sabovrik, 21, slept through it. 

At 7, his alarm clock woke him. hut he turned it off 
and fell asleep again, At 7:30. with skating to begin in 
a half-hour. Craig Henderson of the U.S, team finally 
got through to Sabovrik’s room with a telephone call. 

Sabovdk’s explanation: "I was tired.” 

For the Record 

Ridae Evans, 44. a nine-time NASCAR Modified 
division champion, was killed Thursday when his car 
hit a wall during a practice run for the Winn-Dixie 500 
at Martinsville Speedway in Virginia, (AP) 


The Associated Press 

ST. LOUIS — Just when the 
Kansas City Royals 1 World Series 
hopes woe rising Thursday night, 
they almost took a fall along with 
star third baseman George Brett. 

Brett tumbled into fits team's 
dugout while trying to catch a pop 
foul hit by die Cardinals’ Tom 
Nieto in the bottom of the seventh 
inning. Brett was caught by a 
Royals coach, Lee May, just as bis 
head was about to hit the carpeted 
concrete floor. 

**Lee May made the play of the 
night," the Royals’ relieved manag- 
er, Dick Howser, joked later. 

Bren ran toward the dugout, slid 
on his back on the slick AstroTurf 
at Busch Stadium and went feet 
first down the steep dugout steps. 

■‘Everybody yelled, ‘Catch 
him!' " said the designated hitter, 
Hal McRae. “Mo (May) was the 
closest one to him, and he caught 
his head just before it slammed into 
the floor of the dugout. If it hadn't 
been for Mo, I think George might 
have been hurt bad.” 

Brett said his eye was slightly 
injured, and be was treated be- 
tween innings. 

“! feel fine." he said. “Lee got a 
finger on my eye. I had a little 
trouble seeing, but it's nothing seri- 
ous." 

In fact, he singled iwo innings 
later, his only hit in four at-bais, 
and joked, “That was the best 
swing I had all night.” 

Greg Pryor replaced Brett at 
third base for the final inning. 

■ Jays Pick Williams 

The Toronto Blue Jays selected 
Jiray Williams to be their new man- 
ager on Friday, The Associated 
Press reported from Toronto. 

Williams, 42, has been the Amer- 
ican League team’s third base coa- 
ch since 19S0. He succeeds Bobby 
Cox, who resigned Tuesday after 
four years as manager and signed a 
five-year contract as general man- 
ager of the Allama Braves of the 
National League. 

Williams, who will be only the 
fourth manager the young fran- 
chise has had. was signed to a one- 


year contract. Terms were not an- 
nounced, bur he reportedly will be 
paid about 5200,000. 

Cox led the Blue Jays lo their 
first AL East Division title this 
year, but they lost to the Kansas 
City Royals in seven games in the 
best-of-seven league playoff after a 
dub record 99-61 season. 

Williams, a resident of Dunedin, 
Florida, will be managing a major 
league team for the first time. He 
was a minor league manager from 
1974 through 1979, directing the 
Triple A Salt Lake City team to a 
Pacific Coast League champion- 
ship in 1979. 

Williams was considered one of 
the front-runners for managing 
jobs with both the Oakland A’s and 
Seattle Mariners in 1984, but was 
passed over both times. 

■ Yankees Seek Fisk 

The New York Yankees have 
reached agreement on a seven- 
player trade with the Chicago 
White Sox, sources familiar with 
the deal told the New York Times 
in Sl Louis on Thursday. The trade 
is contingent on the Yankees sign- 
ing Carlton Fisk to a new contract 
and getting Don Baylor to approve 
a move to the White Sox. 

Fisk, who can declare for free 
agency the day after the World Se- 
ries ends, would join the Yankees 
with Britt Bums, a left-handed 
pitcher who won 18 games this sea- 
son, and Scon Fl etcher, who would 
be a utility infielder. The Yankees 
also may receive a lesser player to 
be named later. 

The White Sox would receive 
Baylor, the designated hiuer who 
asked to to be traded: Ron Hassey, 
the catcher who had a surprisingly 
good season hitting, and two pitch- 
ers, Joe Cowley, who was 12-6, and 
Many Bystrom, who had a 3-2 re- 
cord and on elbow problem. 

Neither (earn hot the commis- 
sioner’s office would comment on 
the deal but the sources said 
George Steinbrenner, the Yankees' 
principal owner, would quickly try 
to negotiate a contract that would 
keep Fisk out of the free-agem 
raarkeL 


-Mi 

« Quotable 


Steve Ovett of Britain on running the California 
Mile in hilly Sou Francisco: “I went through a stage of 
feding awful to a stage of feeling terrible. Once I 
started to feel terrible, F was okay.” (AP) 



ESR& 

hPWWMjJjiOTj 

PnWfiPw® 

KSUni^P|li.'nir , SS. : SCTM<j 


cai-.w-,?; ■ 

©cssr-e •••*■• 

■'•LjTy'te ta-vM 

■ . I • • C r 1 ■ 


A masterpiece, of Swiss watchmaking 



GARRARD. 

The Crown jewellers 

iii kEOCnt iruirr iombok « win »jj 









Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDA Y-SUNDA Y, OCTOBER 26 - 27 , 1985 


POSTCARD 


PEOPLE 


Turkey’s Divided Town StOH6 


e In Our Household, The Book Is God,’ Says His Editor 
And Wife as They Weigh In With Opus 28 (an Pissarro) 


Geneticists 


By Emcl Anil 

The Awsocuaed Pros 

S ARP. Turkey — When the Sovi- 
et -Turkish border was delineat- 
ed in 1921. officials thought a small 
creek would make an easy, natural 
boundary at the Black Sea coast 
comer of the 3 SO- mile frontier. 

The small fishing village of Sarp. 
caught between steep mountains 
and the sea and located on both' 
sides of the creek, was tom in two. 
Families were divided. 

“It was done overnight. One 
morning people on the other aide 
found themselves Soviet citizens." 
said a Turkish army lieutenant 
based with the border' units. 

Before 19(21. the Turkish-Rus- 
sian border kept changing, as a 
result of the many wars between 
the two countries. In World War I, 
the Russians captured part of what 
is now eastern Turkey. But they 
withdrew following the Bolshevik 
revolution, and in 1921, the two 
countries marked off their borders. 
- According to the headman of the 
village. B urban Calrir . contact with 
family members and friends on the 
Soviet side was not difficult until 
1938, when the Soviets barred 


crossings. 

The Turkish side of the village 
has a population of 509 people, and 
villagers assume a similar number 
of ethnic Turks live on the other 
side. 

The village mosque remained in 
the Turkish part, but because of its 
proximity. Cakir says, residents on 
the Soviet side bear the muezzin's 
call to Moslem prayers five times a 
day. 


French Winegrowers 
Predict Good Vintage 


PARIS — France's I9S5 vintage 
will be better, both in quantity and 
quality, than was feared after this 
winter's biting frosts, according to 
winegrowers associations. 

“It wil] be a very good year, may- 
be even an exceptional one." said 
Luden Rateau. head of the Bur- 


gundy Winegrowers Association. 
He said it was too early to make a 


He said it was too early to make a 
definite judgment but the 1985 vin- 
tage, both in whites and reds, could 
can be compared with quality' years 
such as 1978 or 1964. Vineyards 
benefited from a dry summer and 
unusually warm fall weather. 


“We do not shout across. It is 
frowned upon. But we can hear 
people talking, if they are loud, on 
the northern bank," said one villag- 
er, Necati Aksoy. 

The village is located in a mili- 
tarily restricted area, and visits by 
reporters and foreigners are by spe- 
cial permission of the general staff 
headquarters in Ankara. A group 
of reporters from the Western me- 
dia were recently allowed a visit as 
pan of a North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization tour. 

A small bridge spans the creek. 
On one side there is a Turkish 
marking stone in red and white, 
and on the Soviet side a similar one 
in red and green. 

Lieutenant Cengiz Doga nay, 
commander of the Turkish army 
platoon based in the village, said Ire 
and his Soviet counterpart meet on 
the bridge to discuss problems, 
such as ways to dean up the creek. 
“If we want to talk we raise a flag, 
and the same for the other side," he 
said, warning reporters not to walk 
on the bridge to avoid provoking a 
protest from the Soviets. 

The Soviets have installed a wire 
fence and four watchtoweis. 

Sarp is not an official border- 
crossing point. The hMdtnan said 
that every* five years villagers can 
ask the Soviet side to allow a few 
relatives to enter Turkey for a visit. 
Permission is difficult to obtain, 
and only the old people are inter- 
ested in a visit, he said. 

The few visitors have to travel 
180 miles (300 kBotneters) east 
along the border to a crossing point 
in Kars province, then double back 
an equal distance to reach the other 
side of the creek. 

*1116 last visit was in 1981, by an 
old woman. Villagers are reluctant 
to disclose how many relatives tfaay 
have on the northern bank, or give 
the identities of those who come. 

A new customs bouse is under 
construction in the village, and by 
the end of 1987 a border crossing 
post is expected to be in operation. 

Under a bilateral agreement be- 
tween Turkey and the Soviet Union 
visitors have to return after a three- 
month stay. “If they die here, their 
bodies have to be sent back." said a 
villager. 


By Grace Glueck 

,V< w York Times Service 


N EW YORK — “In our 
household. The Book is 


JL^i household. The Book is 
God." says Jean Stone, wife, chief 
editor and business manager to 
Irving Stone, the writer. She is 
not speaking of the Bible, but 
explaining that whatever book 
the couple happen to be working 
on together — be writing, she 
editing — is one they take very, 
very seriously. 

Though their collaborations 
are usually bailed less for their 
literary merit thnn their enor- 
mous research, no one can accuse 
the Stones of writer’s block or 
flagging Mies. The 27 books they 
have produced so far have sold 30 
million copies, be translated into 
about 80 languages, and made 
milli ons (how many is aot di- 
vulged) for the authors and for 
Doubleday, their devoted pub- 
lishers. 



■ v ■*':* , 




me 


K JSS 




Camille Pissarro (self-portrait about 1890); Irving Stone. 


search. They make lengthy visits 
to the places where their subjects 
lived. Working on “The Agony 
and the Ecstasy," for instance, 
Mrs. Stone studied Renaissance 
culture and Italian at UCLA. 
Then the couple sold their Bever- 
ly Hills bouse to live for an ex- 
tended period in Florence and 
Rome. 

For the Darwin book, the sci- 
entist's home in London was 
opened to them. The couple dept 
in his bedroom and Stone wotted 
in his study- “I could fed and 
hear his pen scratching on the 
paper as I sat at his desk," he 
said. And for the van Gogh book, 
the author went so far as to sleep 
in the artist's bed in a bouse at 
Auvets-sur-Oise, on the 40th an- 
niversary of van Gogh's death 
there. 


The University of Texas Board urn and to* 

of Regents honmed^nvo^N^ of^ABWjjp 

bonus to further E ain M n JL l i?« itealcwculd vu- j 


with a SI -million bonus to miner lhw . j would 

their research. Michael S. Bmmi 3** will left by 

and Joseph LGoWsre.ii, res^rch- J* Sew port philu=- 


and Joseph L. Goldstein, res«rcfa- tee a Newport philun- 1 

ers at the University of Texas Mrs. in February at 

Health Science Centa; at Dallas, *!^^Coun Judge 

were each men $100,000 checks— age 93. Superior that under the 
the first of five installments— after art paintings in 

the regents met Wednesday Tire W^S^SdtaSd.bufthe 
Nobel committee in Stockholm toi museums. 

awarded Brown and Goldstem the otbere area be given ^ 


awarded Brown and GoJdSem me ^ been in 

1985 prize in medicine, saying their ° Fe. New 

work “drastically widened our un- seclusion recent! , 


work"“ drastically widened our un- sectnswi 
demanding of the cholesterol me- Mexico, 
tabohsm and increased our possi- 
bilities to prevent and treat” 
hardening of the arteries and heart Prfna 


prince Charles paid a night i 


hardening of the artenes and Heart JVzTZSZ **-wTrrrnd*h- 

auadcs. Bob Ferfey, a spokesman msomeoTIamdonspoorwnasr 


regents, said the SI million bmhoods to see 
bonus is the first monetary award bomeless. some of wbrnn aej 
the regents have given Nobel win- boxes on the ■*A J “5“!5 


And now they have weighed in 
with their 28th, “Depths of Glo- 
ry," a “biographical novel," with 
invented dialogue, about the Im- 
pressionist painter Camille Pis- 
sarro. Tipping the scales at 2 Vi 
pounds (just over a kilo), with 653 
pages, “dory" is the Stone's 
third book about an artist since 
1934, when “Lust for Life" (the 
story of Vincent van Gogh) be- 
came a best seller and launched 
their career. In between there was 
“The Agony and the Ecstasy" 
(1961). an even more ripely titled 
success whose hero was Michae- 
langelo and which, like “Lust for 
Life," was made into a movie. 


radio. We can't make people read 
the book, but we can sure let 
them know it’s been bora." To 
this day, she said, she wraps 
whatever book she is reading in a 
“Lust for Life" jacket, and on 
seeiug a pile of Stone books lying 
flat in a bookstore, will stand a 
few of them upright so that buy- 
ers can see them better. 


work the way you fill a pot for 


soup. Add stock, vegetables, 
spices, but never let the fire under 


“We’d like Pissarro to become 
as well-known as van Gogh." said 
Stone, who at 82 is still a vigorous 
figure, soberly dressed in a suit of 
deep gray birdseye. his crinkly 
white hair bushing slightly out 
behind his ears. “But we know it 
will take a while.” The couple 
came to New York recently from 
their Beverly Hills home on a 
promotional tour, a publishing 
ritual to which they pay willing 
obeisance. 


Though as subjects go, Pissarro 
lacks the glamour of van Gogh 
and Michaelangelo, Stone has 
spared no detail that might pique 
the reader's interest. He gives a 
picture of Pissarro's travails as a 
painter and a family man (the 
artist lived with and later married 
his mother's maid, fathering a 
slew of children), and conjures up 
a Paris an world where the 
schmaltz runs deep. In a scene at 
an artist’s cafi, for instance, Pis- 
sarro encounters — assembled at 
a single table — Gustave Cour- 
bet, Honorfi Daumier, Pierre- 
Paul Proud'hon, Paul Ferdinand 
Gachet (van Gogh’s physician) 
and Charles Baudelaire, among 
other 19th-century cultural lumi- 
naries. (Who picked up the check 
is not disclosed.) 


Art Budtwald recently returned 
from a leave of absence after an 
illness. He is currently writing two 
columns a week, rather than three. 


“Our friend Robert Nathan 
used to say, ‘Isn’t it enough to 
write the bocks? Why peddle 
them?* ” said Mrs. Slone. “But in 
fact, it’s an extension of our writ- 
ing. If we can spend five years 
doing a book, we can spend two 
months on press, television and 


At ooepoint in the evening, the 
artists advise Pissarro in a " col- 
lage 1 ' of homespun sentiments. 
“Art’s a staple. Like bread or 
wine or a warm coat in winter," 
one says. “Man's spirit grows 
hungry for an in the same way his 
stomach growls for food," adds 
another. “Fill the hours with 


spices, but never let the fire under 
it go out." 

Although he did not invent the 
“biographical novel,” Stone has 
pushed it a long way. having pro- 
duced a dozen books in the genre. 
Aside from the three artists, he 
has applied what he calk his 
“dramatized fact” technique to 
such disparate subjects as Mary 
Todd Lincoln, Eugene V. Debs, 
Abigail Adams, Sigmund Freud 
and Charles Damn. The genre 
has its disparagers — one critic 
has referred to Stone as “the Bar- 
bara Cartland of biography” — 
but the Stones defend it as no less 
“authentic” than facts presented 
straight. “Historians tell us how 
accurate our work is," said Jean 
Stone. 

Her husband adds that he pre- 
fers the technique over straight 
biographies — of which be has 
written several — parity because 
it gives him a chance to use the 
“novelistic skills" he developed in 
early attempts at playwriting. 
“And also," he went on, “I know 
from experience that biographies 
have a Iterated audience. We have 
thousands of readers who love 
this form, are thrilled by it, who 
never get near a conventional bi- 
ography." 

For each book, the Stones bone 
up in libraries, hiring translators 
for foreign-language documents; 
then go on location to do re- 


“Depths of Glory” took five 
years and two months to research 
and write. During that period, the 
Stones lived in a hotel on the Left 
Bank in Paris, driving out to the 
surrounding countryside to visit 
the houses occupied by the Pis- 
sarros. At one point, they lived 
and worked in his studio at 
Eragny. The Stones have been 
partners — marital and literary 
— for 51 years, having met when 
he was trying vainly to place the 
manuscript of “Lust for Life.” A 
bora editor, according to Stone; 
she slimmed down the manu- 
script so strategically that a pub- 
lisher (Longmans Green) 
snapped it up. They got married 
on the $250 advance. “I became 
indispensable,” says Mrs. Stone. 
“It really takes two to do the job. 
And we’ve always worked togeth- 
er, even after our two children, 
came along. If I was busy typing, 
Irv ing did the diapers." 


researchers must use $50,000 a year 
for general program research 
support and $50,000 for equipment 
purchases. Goldstein and Brown 
are to receive the Nobel Prize on 
Dec. 10 in Stockholm. 

□ 


She has done one book an her 
own, “Dear Tbeo," a selection of 
Vincent van Gogh’s letters, pub- 
lished in 1937. But until recently, 
in the interest of sales, it carried 
her husband’s namn “J never 
cared about the credit until wom- 
en's lib came along," says Jean 
Stone, whose name appears as the 
editor in all of the Stone books. “I 
didn't need it — I have the inner 
satisfaction of what I’ve done. 
But the book is still in print, and I 
finally <aid Pd like my name on 
iL It's been tough to get than to 
print it in type as large as Ir- 
ving’s.” 


Lutz Rathemw, the East German 
playwright whose works have often 
been critical of the Communist re- 
gime, has received permission to 
visit West Germany for the first 
tripe, West G erman sources 58id 
Thursday. Ratheaow, 33, who had 
30 travel applications rejected in 
the past seven years, win travel to 
the West German city of Mflnster 
to attend the premieres on Nov. 1 
and 2 of his plays “Boden 411” 
(Lot 411) and “Das Spiel: Zimmer 
312” (Tire Game: Room 312). He 
wiB also take part in a symposium 
on the “Culture and Theater in 
East Germany.” Communist au- 
thorities have barred Ratirenow’s 
works from large audiences, and, so 
far, they have been staged only in 
East Goman student chibs. 

□ 


one of his aides, said Thurada*. 

Haywood said the prince has mao* 

two of his houses in London avail- 
able as overnight shelters for those 
who have nowhere else ito live. 
Buckingham Palace said Thursday 
it bad assured Prime Munster Mar- 
garet Thatcher’s office that the 
prince was not criticizing her in 
remarks on urban decay attributed 
to ten by a royal adviser this week. 
In an interview published Wednes- 
day in The Manchester Evening 
News, the royal architectural advis- 
er Rod Hackney was quoted as savr 
m g Charles was womed he migljn 
"succeed to the throne of a divider 
Britain” in which minorities in in- 
ner cities fell alienated. Hackney 
s*jrf the prince told him he wanted 
red tape cut and money pumped in. 
to help tire unemployed and racial 
noiionties. As the bar to a consii- 
flavwMii monarchy. Prince Charles 


political issues. 


A judge has barred the sale of a 
private collection of paintings by 
artist Geospa O’Keeffe until ex- 
peris determine whether the works, 
valued at $5 million, are of “muse- 
um quality.” The 15 paintings were 
bequeathed by O’Keeffe's sister, 
Anita O'Keeffe Young, to a foun- 
dation named after Young's late 
husband. The Robert R. Young 
Foundation donated one of the 
«« m tings to an unidentified mnse- 


Thc writer-director Bffly Wilder, 
79, whose fQm credits include 
“Sunset Boulevard,” “Some Like If 
Hot," and “The Apartment,” is the 
1986 winner of the American FflrW 
Institute's Lifetime Achievement 
Award. 


Ooe of Sweden’s richest men, iba 
brakSogtyCoon Fretkfk Lundberg; 
34, said Thursday he was moving tf 
Swit a crian d with kaa ■ family «t 
avoid paying death duties. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 
EngfcKPwit (drily) 4634 W65. Rome 


EASMONABIE MOUGfNS. Secluded 
Proven^ vilo on o 4800 
Kim. tan dvec p ed garden with pool. 


aonine. Wooden boom & antique 
earthenware *4e» thro u gho u t 
F3JHXMJ0Q. Ccti Mark for deltas. SSI 
47 La Crocerte. 06400 Comm. Tet 93 
3819 19 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


CANADA 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


GENERAL POSmONS 
AVAILABLE 


LE CORDON BLEU eootang courier n 


otang coureas 
Engfah. Weds. 7-9pm Ott 30-Dec. 18. 
TefcPtsn 45 55 42 98. 


PORTUGAL SEE 
Holidays 4 Travel 


PARIS PSYCHOTHERAPY Irxfrndirals, 
CoupJm, F ern fl es . Pra *3 48 90 42 


DOMINICAN DIVORCES. Box 20802. 
Santo Domingan Dominican KeputAc. 


PERSONALS 



MOVING 


ERDUWJRGH SCOTLAND, fat. 
lounge. 2 beefceara, ki t ch en, etc. Of- 
fers over £35,000. Georgian orea. 
Brodtwe detrita 031 332-5227 


ALLIED 


VAN LINES INTL 

ova 1300 OFHCES 


USA Allied Von Lines Inf! Corp 
(0101) 312-481-8100 


Or edi our Agency European afficei.- 
PAIUS Desbardea InMrrartioncd 
(1) 43 43 23 64 


FRANKFURT 



(069) 250066 PARIS 4 SUBURBS 

DUSSELDORF/RATffilGEN st germam des wes. wa 

(02102) 45023 IMS. pwUhouw, HO sqjn. 43 29 <2 94 

MUNICH UNLS. 

(089) 142244 SPAIN 


Infl Moving 


(01) 953 3636" " COSTA DO. SOL 

DDIKCaC. T- .... r , MARSEUA / GUADAIMNA 
oKUbbuJ. Ziegler SA. Spadoui home, 6ghf, 3 bedroom. 3 

(02) 425 66 14 both*, with pexo io rni c view of tea £ 

Cdf for AffecTs free estimate inuuulu en. 1,100 sgjn. piol, targe go- 




Brand New 


74 CHAMPS-H.YSEES 8th I “cutwe (41) 


GREAT BRITAIN 



THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 


Siuda, 2 or 3-room apartment. 
One month or more. 

LE OARIDGE 4359 6797. 


SOLICITOR /ATTORNEY 

Mutt5 ngud (German, Engfah, French) J To we u European cap/riff* Kao- 
ortensve E u rop u i & oevsere expen- 1 lion yri i fc for American film inobs- 


MAYTAIR, LUXURY APARTMENTS. 
Fonts- Properties. T6h London 01-620 
178& Tolar 26300) FANS UK G. 


A Unique 
Hotel Suite 
Residence 


era in inti mor to in g & sales of eon- try. to be based in London until exterv 
seDafafas& capital goods to ddributors jive Emopeai trareL Sut write & 
SHORT TERM STAY. Advankqm of a & entkisers, JiUd m generd memoge- specie fiueri German & Engtsh (IXdefi a 
hotel Mlhoitf moanverieras, feel at ment, h»gfi4evel negotiations, seefo re- strong +). and rirfy hove sane law 
homo in nice jtuefiot, one bedrotwr sponribh pconao with mil firm plov Bros or carpande rtsmalwnd e> pev 
and mare in Park. SCXS1M: BO rue »"H fo «*W*h or having already ency. Badgroundm uiMBect u d proptr- 
de rUnrverjrti, Pans 7th; 4544 3940 eMiSshed rei office m Switzerland, ty fidd re c o mm ended 
prererooty Lausanne/ Geneva area. 

Please reply toi Abase Jew/ resume to Bax *2005, 

22-115 787, Pufafcrtas. P.CX Bax, 

CH-1 003, Lausanne. I J-LT^6^Lg| Acre, 


*AQ 

Young Heefole Swiss seeks wnpioyroer* 


Renfhouse International 


rogvnm position wwi compo* 
i iron. Has good relotiar e locaSy. 
AroHc. Engfish, GeroKn- 


020448751 (4 lines] 

Nederhoven 19-21. Amsterdam 


DUTCH H0U9N0 CENTRE B.V. 

Define rentals. VcJerawtr. 174, 
Anwerdam. 020621234 o> 623722. 


pre-opening savings on 

6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases | owes oupisc wsorfme^ fu 

fecrimng 


PETBt BSLRN MAKHAARDU 
bft Hooting ienja itmlule 
Amsterdam. Tefc 020-768012. 


Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


When in Bomec 

Limjr/iSp^^hii^Sh^vshedl Executive Services Available 

Rats, ovatiafafe for I week did more [ 



Phone: 6794325, 6793450. 
Write: Via del Veiabro 16. 
001B6 Rome. 


Model Suites 


(212) 371-8866 


FOR 1>C FEATURE 

INTERNATIONAL 

POSITIONS 

TURN TO PAGE II 


I >< T'ti iji v T i : 


POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


International Business Message Center 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 





JfBKHXS bom EUROPE 
WE FEDBtAUZE CARS TO MST US. 
SAFETY STANDARDS 

D.O.T. A E.PJL 

5 YEARS BOWBCE 
1 FRANK INC. 

hKfc n j p u B i , Incfiana 317-391 -4 1 OB 


Contact J*. Roberts, 20900 W. Mae 
HWY, N. triced Beodc K 33T80 USA 
(305) 937-4500 Mon-Fri. 


PROJECT ARORTECT. Irtl aper, 
lawn Or v BotMer, OO BQ30B USA. 


buna, 92521 


FINANCIAL 

INVEJJIMENTS 


Moving with the times we announce the 
opening of our spectacular showrooms in 
Bond Street from 28th October 1985. 




WEST INDIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


DID YOU REALIZE PROFITS ON 
FUTURE5 MARKETS DURING THE 
LAST YEARS? 

K not, c p re i d er speoFotrve mvednvds 
on fotwes moriets; poftfofca raonoged 
by a hgNy prorestionol bakemoe 
company wtadt n a member of US. 
and UX admae. 

ANNUALIZED AVERAGE PROFIT 
ova THE LAST TWO YEARS; 21% 
Tree* record audited by a wel Imcmm 
interootional adi company. No mar- 
gin ccfc up to ntial virest m ei A 
Account! hdy segregated. 

For forther uifodiiuhon cal: 

gold hill 

London. Tel: 00441/930 49 84. 

Lausanne, Tel: 004121/20 58 31, 
Buenos Aires. Tel: 00541/313 61 46. 
To receive a brochure free of derg e , 
W nta GOLD MU GROUP 
Rue du Lion D'of 4 
1QQ3 Lobsarme, Switeerland. 

Broter enquiries invited 




YOU DESERVE THE BEST money man- 
ager! in USA. Earn 25-50%+. Free 
detail Good*m Aveoiwiet 400-246 

Queen St. Ottawa Canada KIP S4. 


DIAMONDS 




GERMAN BtGteSRMG OFHCE |e^ 
t^le+ed For more Ihon 30 yean) 
wfen refatte service and n Se en chln g 

for hv and competitive partners who , , _ 

«»on» to be port of a lucoessta tech- BUSINESS SERVICES 

notary rronsfm. Bndn our e»peri- — . ■ ■■■ — — - — — — ■ 

enoed bftngual team vre am offer 

b«i contact-, end a fufly eqwpped wr ‘- 

emer and storage foriffy laaatec 
onty 15 nvrvites from Frankfurt or 


RACWG DRJVBL 



REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


AUSTRIA 


port. Flame cow o ci HEV Cerrmmy 
Stolbergerwr. 1. D62D0 WieAodm. 
W- 1*9161224055 or ntetai 6122963 
HEV or taa 4182430 TOHA. 



Page 12 
FOR MORE 

classifieds 


nn 


uompanions 


Engfech-Sproduns&hif 



WLADY 

factory eotee of lease art dtareentit 


accessories 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


OFFICE SERVICES 


Ameriko-Haus Stvttgat 
BUSE^S ENGLISH 
M5IRUCTOR . 


men and women 


Required ULS. OSamrMp. 

1 A, 1-2 yerr dor 
HOMY 6 meat? GMBH 
SdM&emfr. 13. 7000 iStirtjit 
W. Germany R 711/29 4? 51 


New Bond St. London Wl,