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• WASHINGTON — After an in- 
tense weekend of meetings that be- 
gan amid lafle that tja^ev&oo 
would be scooted, tna^jHi of 4he 
Braise Ways and Means -Conanh- 
we said that they had ferofc^ die 
stalemate and would be able to 
produce a bK this year, 

"lam more confi dmt feyji -'diiy 
that , we can produce 'a&8 dial 1 win 

come very dose to tfe raewferfs 
.made," ; Represqiiate£^Ros. 
lenkowsld. Democrat rqfc JIIbxhs 


Dan Rostenkowski 


: ^bSS'Cfflar 

nrepentant , 
trtideSays 

• ' ’'-li? _ v 

", By James M. Markham 

u Net *■ York Times Service 

30NN — A West German mag- 
,r ^fr-eiaajr 0 * Monday that it had in* 

' * e Gim -Mewed and photographed Aids 
- ■-' i^lr^-Tinner. 73 , a fanner SS officer 
-■u Tit wo is held responsiblef or depon- 
mo re than 120,000 Austrian, 

- :'r iii^ Tman. French, Stovaldan and 
•d eek Jews to Nari death camps. 

. fhe interview with Bunte, a Mu- 
L h weekly magazine, took place 
Syria, where Mr. Bnmaer has 
: ' i.^tjobnedly been living in exile for 

• *•: '■'"■■>af*jee decades. 

-• the article, which wiH be the 

-■i'j sun t 51 °*' a scries, Mr. Bnmner is 
■ T ' “ saying, he .has “no. bad 
iscience” for Ids acknowledged 
organizing the ronnitep and 
r, mffl JSspon of European Jews to 

__^schwitz and other death camps. 

[KKCThe magazine also reported Mr. 

_ rtflraWlmn w making an ap pim-nfly i jy. 

*52snu Seal offer to face an inieroatvao-' 

" '^I^vjribunaL _ •. r 

•".-cTwOiily Israel win never get me,"- 
' ;ft: . Brunner reportedly,. sauL ^I 

™* become -4 

c-rixiBinn-" • -■ ; * 

r- s .Bnicro demonstrate that he would 
allow himsdf to be kidnapped' 

• c-p- vc. a $ was Adolf Eidimami by- 

X"D<ca.H«aeli agents in I960, Mr. Brunner 
r^ied 2 poison capsule from jifa 
,' “j.T/?ast pocket, *Tve taken eare," 
v-m _ t magazine said he declared. . 
scr 1 laamSface the apparent confirmation 
; ‘^^lier this year of the death in- 
V^sfiazil in 1979 of Josef Moogde. the 
3<^s>iNweu5cbwitz SS pbysiqan, Mr.Brun- 
< j r : £r has figured at the top of many 
formal most-wanted lists of Nazi 
criminals. The former SS- 
•'- t ? " -^J fcp ts mnnf uhrer was a onetime 
ZHAjtM^Jghmami aide. -• 

' - its issue that win appear 
•cj« » ^tursday. Berate- carries color pho- 
jii-^^r^phs of Mr. BrnnOCT, who it 
- tW !®^t?ons lost an eye and the fingers 
' J — ’ his left hand because of two 
ter bombs. 

- — -^■^The magazine suggests the 
Kjss.^mbs were sent by Israeli agents. 

photx^raph shows Mr. Bnm- 
pQ^jjr accompanied by Syrian b<xiy- 

■ ‘Ja&Boih Austria and West Germany 
^ve formally demanded Mr. Brun- 
— ^JgVs extradition from Damascus. 
*^^r.- : rria has adamantly maintained 
^r£“at the Austiian-bom Naa does 
'-■£*}$* reside in the country. 

West German Foreign Minis* 
spokesman said the magazine's 
■ disclosure win “make us push for 
*$Js extradition even harder." ■ 

Last snmmer, the Munich »«dc- 

• published a series of articles 
' .Massed on the diaries and other writ- 

Dr- Mengde, who per- 
ginned scientific experiments on 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 8) 


Smwiay. 

Representative John J;.f>tHicfin 
o fTen nessee. the sand’s waiting 
■Republican, shared, thadhaamaa’s 
- confidence, although Mr. Duncan' 
said he was not stirel^ penmaSty 
would support the Je^ation. n 
defin i tel y mink'weean have a bill 
but of hoe tins year," Mr. Duncan 
said. . ‘ r . - 

The House Democratic leader- 
ship has set aside the first week in 
December for a u*x debate by the 
full House at Representatives. Mr. 
Rostenkowski said h& expected to 

meet that riwtHtin* 

' The Samtewfflnot acl on taxes 
tins year,(bst- Senate' leaders have 
promised to oonsider the issue in 
1 986 if the House sends them a bill 
this year. 



Hi]ssfeM,iii Showdown, 
Has Talks With Arafat 


Police Minister Halm Bar-Lev congratulated Prime Minister Shimon Peres after Mr. 
Pone s told die pa r li am ent Monday that be stood by an offer to Jordan for peace talks 
without preconditions. Trade Minister Ariel Sharon, who opposes it, is in die foreground. 


Peres Repeats 
Offer of Talks 

By William Claiborne 

U<.’Sfl.'ngli*i Pm t Stn-.'.v 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minis- 
ter Shimon Peres urged King Hus- 
sein of Jordan on Monday not to 
miss ra oppominit> for peace pre- 
sented by a “dynamic situation" 
created by recent events in the 
Middle East. 

While continuing to rule out par- 
ticipation by the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization in Jordanian-Is- 
raeii peace tatlev Mr. Peres, in a 
speech :c the Knesset, repeated his 
offer of a "limited international fo. 
rum” to begin negotiations with a 
delegation of Jordanians and mod- 
erate Palestinians. 

After threats by the rightist Li- 
kud faction of his fragile coalition 
to precipitate a cabinet crisis over 
his peace initiative, Mr. Peres defi- 
antly said that he stood by “every 



Yasser Arafat 


word” that he had said before the sized that while the permanent liman moves. 


Ultimatum 
To PLO Seen 

By John Kifncr 

Net*’ York Times Senwe 

AMMAN — King Hussein and ' 
Yasser Arafat met Monday night in 
a confrontation that could deter- 
mine the future of Middle East 
peace efforts. 

Increasingly irritated by a senes 
of Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion misadventures, ranging from 
the AchiBe Lauro cruise liner hi- 
jacking to the collapse of a meeting 
between PLO representatives and 
British officials in London, the 
king was determined. Western 
sources said, to deliver an ultima- 
tum to tite PLO leader. 

A Jordanian statement after the 
meeting said: “Both sides reviewed 
the latest developments and mode 
an objective evaluation of the re- 
cent developments and of their im- 
pact on the joint Jordanian-PJes- 


“They also discussed means to 


onrised to consider the issue in Opposition Gatherings Are Banned 

In Tightening of Cape Town Curbs 


administration would Hke to see 
: House passage of a tax measure, 
whatever us provisions, in the.be- 


a»q>&b? Our 5utf Frvm Dupiudta Bans cm meetings were already in Sunday paper that has good Peres’s peace offers had violated talks, which he said “automatically 

JOHANNESBURG — The effect in the other areas. * sources’ inside the eoveramenL said tite agreement that led to the for- excludes” the PLO. 


lief that damage to thepre^dem’s ” \* c 

ptocouSSwoj^^in 


the Senate. 


onANNtSBURv — The effect tn the other areas. sources inside the goserantent, said the agreement that led to the for* 

ith African governnjent has There were these other develop- police believed that foreiss corre- mation of the bipartisan National 
itened restrictions on the Cape meats: spoadems were presenting a “faise Unity government last year. 

m area, banning 102 Of^oritkm • The beads of some of the larg- image” of South Africa. When members voted Monday 


United Nations General Asse mbly members of the UN Secuniy Coun- “They also discussed means to 
last week. In that speech, be offered cil could be invited to “support the neutralize the negative effects of 
direct peace talks with Jordan with- initiation of these negotiations.” no the recent developments and to 
out prior conditions. international forum could replace avoid the repetition of similar inri- 

Leaders of the Likud bloc, who direct negotiations between Israel dents in the future . . 
met with the prime minister earlier ^ Jordan or a Jordanian-Pales- Mr. .Arafat said without elabora- 
Mondav, said they would not op- tinian delegation. tion that the meeting was “success- 

pose a motion supponiac Mr. Per- Mr. Peres also said that “only ful constructive." 
es’s report to the parliament. The representatives who support King Hussein said last week that, 
Likud had complained that Mr. P 63 **" could participate ir,‘ the in this meeting, he would “proba- 
Peres’s peace offers had violated talks, which he said “automatically bly have the chance to have a very, 
the agreement that led to the for- excludes” the PLO. * very frank discussion with Arafat." 

mation of the bipartisan National Mr. Peres said a new “dynamic According to Western diplo- 


out prior conditions. international forum could replace 

Leaders of the Likud bloc, who d ^ re c f negotiations between Israel 
met with the prime minister earlier Jordan or a Jordanian-Pales- 
Monday, said they would not op- tinian delegation, 
pose a motion supporting Mr. Per- Mr. Peres also said that “only 
es’s report to the parliament. The representatives who support 
Likud had complained that Mr. peace" could participate in the 


Mr. Peres said a new “dvnamic 


Tw-, - Pji _ ^ 1lu Town area, banning 102 opposition • The heads of some of the larg- 

??. u P s . fTO ” ^^8 meetings «t U5. oarponuions. including 


groups fre® holding meetings est US. corporations, including #Tbe home affairs minister nighL 6E voted to endorse Mr. Per- mg points: 

without poKce permission and Exxon and IBM, have placed a full- Sioffd Botha, announced that he « r s speech. 10 voLed against and 10 • 'Hussein had publicly declared 

malrin 8 11 jflcgal for students to be page advertisement in South Afn- would block a etoud of seven der- Ruined ^ hc was read > 10 reassess his 

<m die streets during school hours, ran newspapers supporting a call jSitSSSn^SSi^ A no-confidence motion submit- Policy* 

W STS? Policc ' aid iw p last_ month by 91 South African SzSibia to ^J?wiStadere‘of :ed by the fi ^member Tehiya Par- • France had announoed_ that it 


mn n„. i,- _r__ i— a: tuui., uui muu m u\ 71 juuui mnam Lo Zambia LO meei wi?h rS in d> uKinmocniDcr iciuya rsi- - wiumhuu uuk » 

mote people were killed in anti- business leaders for an end to siani- the .African National Congress, the t>, woicn opposes any negotiations would reconsider its relationship 
Jic^siespoiHe lo it sflerad gaierany ^arihdd rioting h« Sunday and nay rana discriminadon and for ffioa on ihe ocJJpS wir Bant and PLO. 

LUKCWiUm, • H/rnirlmr in Pnvui furamM' •«< P _ . _ _ . w C* .... OS / A TT C rvffin-iTc PT H 


iU ^^ na . " Monday in Cape provmce: other major changes. 

tne^seiae --of -progress resulted The gbvernnani measures, an- The advertisemeou placed by the 
not so m«b fiom the actual votes uounccd Sunday mgfat. affect local' U.S. Corporate Council on South 
the anmcmftec took over the week- affiliates of the United Democratic Africa, was signed by W. Michael 
and as from a perception by com-- Front, a multiracial anti-apartheid Blumemhal, chairman of the Bur- 
mittec membere thai political deals coalition, and numerous black con- roughs Coro, and a former secre- 
had Bom cuton die tcmghestttSuesL sdousiiess groups. tary of the U^. Treasury, and bv 

ifiese uuanafr tne dwtocti bmty of They also make it a crime to Rc«er B. Smith, chairman of Gen- 


otber major changes. rilla movements fighting white mi- 

The advertisement, placed by the no rity rule. 


Gaza Strip, was defeated. S6-6, # U. 

with three abstentions. bad ra 

In a concili 2 lor\’ tone directed at ations. 


situation" in the Middle East had mats, and Jordanian and Pales tin - 
been created because of the follow- ion sources, the king was so irritat- 
ing points: ed that he was considering 

• Hussein had publicly declared threatening to drop the PLG from 

that he was ready to reassess his his initiative to force Mr. Arafat to 
policy. make a flat statement renouncing 

• France had announced that it violence and recognizing Israel, 

would reconsider its relationship The sources said, however, that 
with the PLO- they believed the king’s peace ini- 

• UJS. officials had said the PLO tialive would lack authentic Pales- 
had removed itself from the negoti- tinian representation if the PLO 


v- These inr lod e- the dednctibSty of 


— ^ S3SC^ in a container or ealMolors. It bore the names of ” ^ «H on Kine Hussein that we dela > ed ® Congr^s to permit Other wave of wolence fa a region 

b TOgg ^tiie^tetfOT gphon >t from cars. Gyotor 52 U3. business leaders whose cor* ggS t3 rSS, SSirx^? continue working together not to ihe opening of peace negotiations, already racked by terrorism. 


. r auuin mnean uuzn 

and a former secre- date with an enemy. 
LS. Treasury, and by , , . ^ „ 


taty of the U^. Treasury, and by 
Roger B. Smith, chairmmi of Gen- 


In'i cM.rtnmt Umk.. In 3 conciliator tone directed at aborts. were excluded and that it would be 

in PreiSTlM? "\o lhe Jordanian monarch. Mr. Peres •The PLO chairman, Yasser difficult to find other Palestinian 

SL„iT promised that Israel “will listen to Arafat, was denied an oppominitv representatives who could make a 
^ SSy Jordanian proposal- Ld lospeak atihe UN Genml Assern- daim .0 Intimacy. 

would open negouAtiSis without Wv. _ ,.. a . tobM 


A delegation of white business- ^Mons 


y. Further, they said they believed 

• A U.S. arms package to Jordan that such a move could set off an- 


.. 

tee Stutd&j-, 

T*U4t^ed»rSei Reagan’s pro- 
pos^. 4 iu ooimraies be allowe " 
beginnmg.ih ^ 987 , . to. deduct 

(CbutHnedTctD Page 4 , CoL 7 ) 


- » — , ' ", ownwi- J ■ <■ ■ i WIIUUUC WUI lutcuici uuitu — — c — r— — - e— 

bombs ‘W been used frequently porations hare interests in South miss -Jk opportunity that has been .. HtJSSeui said he will not car- 

bjr proterteas to attack pdfce and Africa: - " Uctooer. ignoring ..caoti- - ^ p er ci doc’ -re;* -I Ut.“P»Wn ? we talks outside of an 

other rehides. • • ' • A leading Afrikaans-language PJ™. 1 P rotes,ls that they were “dis- ^ or _ lhc Pa]esiinians not lo mtematicaul fcnim. or without the 


*2SS5- ' other rebides. ■■ ' • A leading Afrikaans-language m™ mat rney were dis- 

t -Rsagan’s pro- The govemmem last week added newspaper reported that the gov- 

lies be allowed, eight -Cape districts to 30 other at- eminent might take “strict action” The government revoked the 
»; deduct 10 ies and towns covered by the enter- against foreign journalists during P a s$pons of eight white university 
'age 4, CoL 7) gffley decree announced in July, the next few weeks. Rapport, a (Continued on Page 4, CoL 4) 


Hussein has said he will not par- “This is the real crunch point, 
ticipnw fa n -cce talk*, outside of an" said a Western diplomat Monday 


led astray by the glitter of terror- 
ism, and to seize the chance for a 
fair and realistic solution.” 

Bui the prime minister empha- 


aid a Western diplomat Monday. 
Both sides are seeing it as that : 
After more than two hours oi 


Although Mr. Peres's speech discussions with King Hussein, Mr. 
closely followed what he said at the Arafat went to the Intercontinental 
(Continued on Page 4, CoL 8) Holel for conferences with his ass o- 



8 Leave in!6 Months as Rigorous Schedule Takes Toll 


By Thomas O'Toole “A person can only continue to prime of their careers whose com- 

- Washington Pea Service be an astronaut a certain length of bined spaceflight experience cov- 

WASHINGTON —When John time and that’s it,* Colonel Fabian, ered 12 of the 21 shuttle missions 
\f Fabian » veteran astronaut, *“ fotoe officer and seven-year flown. 

won has third, assignment aboard veteran of (he astronaut corps, said James M. Beggs, administrator 
the space ^ shuttle five months ago, m an interview. “So I came home of the National Aeronautics and 
he was ecstatic. .He would be one night and told my wife, ‘I put Space Administration, asked if he 
aboard the first -sfmqle carrying a the j°b Gist for 24 years and I'm found the resignations troubling, 
cargo destined, for ;another planet, not- doing it anymore. I quit-' ” said: “Yes, especially the younger 
Jupiter; in May l986. "There’s a. payoff to astronauts ones Kkc Allen and Fabian who 

Bat two months later, Coiand working 16-haur days, six or seven still have a lot of tread left on 
Fabian gave up his mission and days a week, and that is they get to them.” Colonel Fabian is 44 and 
resigned from the astronaut corps, fly in space,” Colonel Fabian said, and Mr. Allen, 45. 

The job, he said,, was putting too “Their families don’t get that pay- Mr. Beggs said: “We’ve now be- 
much pressure on has family Kfe. off. All they see are the missed gun to lose the guys we’ve educated 
Colonel Fabian was tbe eighth dinners and the trips out of town to and trained to do the most difficult 
astronaut to resign in 16 months, a Cape Canaveral or some comrac- things we do. like spacewalks. And 

■ - - _ . - _V1 t> fAr’e fer^nrw in PeKfnmia ^ if thie f na n et r<r.#«p 4 a ■ ■> .. n !•*/■ 





rm 




sign that perhaps not all is wdl at 
tbe pinnade of the UA space pro- 


tor’s factory in California.' 


if this trend starts to increase, it’s 


The eight resignations are con- going to disturb me.’ 


gram. At the least, die eight reag-' sidered a wave in the astronaut Colonel Fabian, explaining his 
nations suggest that the workaholic corps, where one resignation a year family pressures, said his sot just 
way cf life of an astronaut may has been the average for 20 years, graduated from the Air Force 
havebegun to dimmish some of its Besides Colonel Fabian, the Academy and his daughter started 
glamour. v. . ' space agency in ibe last 16 months college this fall in upstate New 

.. Colonel Fabian’s resignation • las lost Joseph P. Allen, Teny J. York, leaving his wife home alone 







was so unexpected- thu it shocked Hart, William Lenoir. Jack for the fust time in years, 
the entire astronaut coups, whose I/n«m» Thomas K. Mattingly, He said: “1 came home one night 

spirit and solidarity is said to be : Donald Peterson and Richard R and my wife told me, Tm ready to 
second to none? Truly. All eight were veterans in the (Continued on Page 4, CoL I) 


IMPASSE OVER SOVIET SAILOR — US. officials met with a Soviet sailor who. 
reportedly wants to defect, but they stiff have not won Soviet permission to interview die 
man privately, the State Department said Monday. A Soviet official, foreground, was 
taken to tbe sailor's ship, in background, on the Mississippi off Belle Chasse. Louisiana, 
to speak with tbe sailor. The man jumped ship Friday and U-S. officials sent him back. 


Hotel for conferences with his asso- 
ciates. 

On his recent visits lo Amman, 
Mr. Arafat has had the use of the 
official guest house and a series of 
heavily guarded Palestinian safe 
houses. 

Diplomatic speculation on the. 
outcome of the Hussein-Arafat 
meeting here ranged from dropping 
Mr. Arafat and the PLO from the 
king's peace process to the possibil- 
ity of a vague statement that would 
disguise differences between Mr. 
Arafat and King Hussein. 

To varying degrees, the king and 
tbe PLO noaJ each other in the 
peace initiative, diplomats. noLed. 

They said that the essen ual ques- 
tion in showdown was: who would 
blink first? 

Asked what would happen if Mr. 
Arafat refused to accept the com- 
mitments tbe king was seeking a 
key’ Jordanian adviser said, refer- 
ring to Mr. Arafat: 

“In this case, he is announcing be 
cannot go along with the peace pro- 
cess and then tbe Palestinians 
themselves would have to choose a 
new leader. 

“If he wants to do something he 
can do it,” the adviser continued, 
dismissing, the rationale of Mr. 
Arafat’s problems with a divided 
PLO. 

Bui, he added pointedly, “No- 
body is indispensable.” 

The tension between the king 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 7) 



INSIDE 


■ The nine paintings stolen 
from the Marin ouan Museum 
in Paris, valued at S10 milli on, 
were uninsured Page! 

■ Jean-Marie Le Pen has prov- 

es bis durability as leader of the 
far right in France. Page 2. 

■ A Skffian prosecutor found 
no grounds to investigate the air 
base confrontation between 
U.S. and Italian troops. Page 4. 

■ Tbe Soviet and US. navies 

areoompetmgfor dominance in 
the Pacific. Page 5. 

■ An Argentine court reversed 

rulings by civilian judges free- 
ing three detainees. Page & 

■ Shootings in Panjab marred 

peacenaking efforts in the Indi- 
an state. Page 6. 


Young and Poor: A Growing Class in U.S. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Chrysler said its third-quar- 
ter earnings rose 21 percent, set- 
ting a quarterly record. Page 9. 

■ Minebea Co. of Japan plans 
to merge with a subsidiary to 
ward off a takeover bid by'rwo 
foreign companies. Page 9. 


By Andrew H. Malcolm 

■Vn 1 Ytjrk Tmxi Service 

NEW YORK —Complex social 
economic and political factors are 
combining to create a vast new 
class of poor Americans who are 
much younger, less educated asd 
more likely to give birth sooner 
than recent generations of the poor. 

The development of a growing 
mass of politically siient, poor 
youth in an affluent nation that is 
experiencing continued economic 
expansion is described by some ex- 
perts as a virtual social revolution 
with unpredictable financial and 
political ramifications. 

But the phenomenon, which 
touches every state and racial 
group to varying degrees, has re- 
ceived little serious political notice 
in comparison to the attention giv- 
en to providing for the elderly and 
curtailing domestic spending. 

Senator Daniel Patrick Movni- 
han. Democrat of New York, said: 
“The U.S. today may be the first 
society in history where children 
are much worse off than adults. It 
is time we realized we have a prob- 
lem of significant social change fa 
this country unlike anything we 


have experienced in the past And 
we are completely ignoring it.” 

For decades, aid for the poor has 
received intermit lent attention in 
Washington. Now, some govern- 
ment expert* and many private an- 
alyse are expressing concern about 
the wide implications of creating 
new generations of poor youths. 

Tbe reasons are many and com- 


fines the poverty level for a family 
of four this year as an income of 
$10,650. 

• Poor white children outnum- 
ber poor black children two to one. 
but while blacks comprise only 15 
percent of all children, they equal 
32 percent of all poor children. 

• Children living with a mother 
in a single-parent home were four 


f We may be the first society in history where 
children are much worse off than adults/ 

Senator Daniel Patrick Movnihan 


plex and, according to a number of 
experts, are tied to certain govern- 
ment policies and deep social 
changes that spending will not easi- 
ly cure. 

Some oi the factors are shown in 
statistics from a variety of govern- 
ment and private social agencies: 

• Aboui 13.8 million Americans 
under the age of 18 lhe fa poverty; 
this is 22 percent, up from 14.3 
percent in 1969-70. Forty-eight 
percent of all black children' live in 
poverty, up from 39.6 percent in 
1969. The federal government de- 


times more likely to be poor than 
those in two-parent homes, but re- 
cent child poverty rates actually 
grew more rapidly in two-parent 
homes. Of the 790,000 families who 
fell into poverty from 19S1 to 19$3, 
430,000 of them were in households 
with two parents. 

• One-sixth of all children below 
the government poverty level, 
about 2.5 million, are living in pov- 
erty despite the fact that at least 
one adult in the family holds a full- 
time job. 

• While government programs 


and considerable spending have 

significantly reduced poverty 
among elderly Americans, the 
number of poor American children 
has increased by more than three 
million since 1968 while govern- 
ment spending on their problems, 
when the effects of inflation are 
taken into account, has declined. 
Taxes paid by many poor people 
have increased. 

• Only 22 percent of all Ameri- 
can children live in families headed 
by women, but more than half of ail 
poor children live fa such house- 
holds. This is twice the 1959 rate. 

• With parents’ marital status 
possibly a key determinant of a 
child's poverty, both the number 
and rate of births to unmarried 
teen-agers have been increasing. 
The biggest increase has been in the 
District of Columbia, where 8b per- 
cent of all teen-age mothers in 19S2 
were unwed, virtually guaranteeing 
mother and child a long experience 
with poverty. 

These and other developments 
take on particular meaning in con- 
trast lo the number of elderly 
Americans considered to be impov- 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 3) 


“.rsTr?sarsiwr- i 


>■ 










Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1985 


Le Pen: France’s Durable Extremist 

J 

Rightist leader Rebounds After a Rash of Accusations 


By Michael Dobbs 

H'asftt'rgio* Past Service 

PARIS — By normal political 
standards, it should have been a 
disastrous siring of events for Jean- 
Marie Le Pen. leader of the Nation- 
al Front, an extreme-right nation- 
alist party that has challenged the 
mold of French politics. 

In rapid succession, ihe 56-year- 
old former paratrooper was ac- 
cused by his onetime best friend of 
racism, torture and benefiting from 
a multimillion -dollar inheritance 
swindle. He landed in trouble with 
the tax authorities. And he was 
barred from appearing on France's 
leading radio station because of al- 
legedly insulting remarks about 
four journalists of Jewish origin. 

To cap it alL he got divorced last 
week from the woman to whom he 
had been married for 25 years. Pier- 
rette Le Pen depicted her former 
husband as a stingy liar who hated 
women. 

Perhaps the most remarkable as- 
pect of all this is that, so far at least, 
it does not seem to have damaged 
the National Front leader in the 
eyes of his supporters. With five 
months to go before legislative 
elections, polls consistently give his 
party around! 10 percent of the 
vote'. 

Mr. Le Pen's electoral platform 
is based on vitriolic opposition to 
immigration, a strong sense of 
French chauvinism and calls for 
law and order. He seems to thrive 
on controversy. A large part of his 
success derives from his skill in 
presenting himself as a victim of a 
conspiracy of establishment politi- 
cians ancf the news media. 

“How does one deal with Jean- 
Marie Le Pen?" asked the Paris 
newspaper Le Monde, a question 
echoed by an increasing number of 
his political opponents. “Attack 
him and he appears as a martyr for 
a pan of public opinion. Ignore 



Jean-Marie Le Pen 

him and he continues, quietly but 
sorely, on his path." 

Mr. Le Pen is aiming to win up to 
50 seats in elections for ihe Nation- 
al Assembly on March 16. Such an 
outcome could leave the moderate 
rightist parties with the choice of 
governing with the support of ex- 
tremists or striking a deal with the 
Socialists. 

Regarded a few years ago as a 
marginal grouping of several thou- 
sand political activists, the Nation- 
al From wou nearly 1 1 percent of 
the vote in elections’for die Europe- 
an Parliament in June 1984. Ibis 
unexpected performance pm it al- 
most even with the traditionally 
much stronger Communist Party. 

Mr. Le Pen's continuing elector- 
al appeal was illustrated by a recent 
television appearance that was 
watched by an estimated 14 million 
viewers, a quarter of the popula- 
tion. just a day after a slashing 
attack on bis integrity by his former 
political confidant. "Jean-Maurice 
Demarquet. 

In an interview in Le Monde, 
Mr. Demarquet depicted the Na- 
tional From as “a planet of the 


T 10 PEP E 

The natural aperitif. 

Very Dry Sherry 


apes" headed bv a “paranoid pa- 
sha.” Mr. Le Pen responded in the 
television talk show by describing 
Mr. Demarquet. who until recently 
was his personal doctor, as a “noto- 
rious lunatic.” 

The Demarquet interview re- 
vived old allegations that Mr. Le 
Pen had personally tortured sus- 
pected members of the Algerian 
National Liberation Front during 
France's last colonial war. His most 
sensational accusations, however, 
concerned the murky circum- 
stances in which Mr. Le Pen inher- 
ited a chateau outside Paris from a 
cement tycoon, Hubert Lambert, in 
1976. 

Mr. Demarquet told Le Monde 
that he had been asked by Mr- Le 
Pen to treat Mr. Lambert, a politi- 
cal sympathizer, for alcoholism and 
drug abuse. Alleging that his for- 
mer" patient had been “completely 
manipulated" by Mr. Le Pen. tie 
said it was “strange” that Mr. Lam- 
bert had died shortly after altering 
his will in favor of the National 
From leader. 

.Asked if he was implying that 
Mr. Le Pen was directly responsi- 
ble for Mr. Lambert's death. Mr. 
Demarquet said, “There is no crime 
more perfect than making a termi- 
nal alcoholic drink.” 

In his television appearance, Mr. 
Le Pen said that he intended to sue 
Mr. Demarquet and Le Monde for 
slander. Reacting to his former 
friend's catalogue of allegations, he 
joked: “And what about the Mexi- 
can earthquake? 1 suppose I was 
responsible for that, too." 

Part of Mr. Le Pen's success as a 
politician, according to French 
commentators, has stemmed from 
the way he has been able to mask 
extremist positions on such issues 
as race relations and immigration 
by a jovial, good-natured appear- 
ance. 

Polls conducted immediately af- 
ter Mr. Le Pen's appearance on 
“L’Heure de Verite," or the "Hour 
of Truth,” France's most popular 
political television show, indicated 
that there was still considerable 
support for some of his ideas. 

About 48 percent of those polled 
w’ere reported to approve his util 
for a referendum on helping immi- 
grants return to their home coun- 
tries. 



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fled expression of concern, about 
“treaty violations reported by the 
United States," the sources said. 

Mr. Weinberger stepped up his 
campaign last wreck by accusing the 
Soviet Union of deploying a new 
intercontinental missile, the. SS-25, 
in violation of the 1979 SALT-2 
strategic arms accord, which the 
U.S. Senate never ratified. The 
Kremlin has denied that the de- 
ployment was a violation. 

NATO has never directly ac- 
cused the Soviet Union of breaking 
arms control treaties, although 
communiques have referred to such 
charges by the United States. 

Officials expect Mr. Weinberger 
to bring evidence about the SS-25, 
a mobile, single- warhead rocket 
that Washington says is new but 
Soviet officials say is a modem ver- 
sion of the S5-13. 

West German sources said that 
Washington fears that the SS-25 
could carry multiple warheads. 

The Brussels meeting will also 
provide the last NATO tally of So- 
viet SS -20 medium-range missiles 
before the Dutch government de- 
cides on Friday whether to accept 
48 US. cruise missiles. 

■ Pullback of Atomic Mums 

NATO has decided to withdraw 
all of its 300 atomic land mines 
from Europe, The Associated Press 
quoted West German Defense 
Ministry officials in Bonn as saying 
Monday. The removal is expected 
to be announced at the Brussels 
meeting starting Tuesday. 

By withdrawing the 300 mines, 
officially called “atomic demoli- 
tion munitions,” NATO wiH be fol- 
lowing through on a 1982 decision 
to remove 1,400 tactical unclear 
warheads from Europe. 


Peace Pad 


WORLD BRIEFS 


For Lebanon 2 pj^ Guilty in U.S. Navy Spy Case 

r* Sunnnrl Baltimore (upi) - Mm a. wanm Jr.. <<*. pw* Moo . 

UVIo ijUPPUl l dav jo espionage and will face life m prison as part of a plea-hare^ 
IT JT axreement with the federal government. Minutes later his son. 

rYf 22. pleaded guilty and wffl f«ea25-«ar sentence on snmUr dung*. 

UinStiailS iJe father is expected to weave the maximum torn for peacetime 
spying. But according to his deaf with the government his son will receive 
R€Wen a lighter sentence. Under terms approved by District Judge Ak under 

BEIRUT — Two key Christian Hanley 2d, the father pleaded gufoy to passing secrets to the Russia 

from 1968 to 1985. The son pleaded guilty to separate counts. 

IeadCTS ex P r ^ scd The agreement provides for the father to coop erate unh c prosecution 

day for a peace accord at ^ ^^^^^berof the no* ferry A. fontwork 

k LdSrnS? brother, ArtfaS, 50. already has been convicted and is ; wailing tentenc- 

rSSL miititg TnMnwHile. in %. John A. Walker Jr.’s lawyer sard ins cheat would be eligible f w a 

p£ok h=aimg in 10 years ami the y^ager Waite in flghl yars. 

withdraw from Beirut’s Green Line ■ _ • # 

SSS British Spy Trial Ends m 7 Acquittals 

the agreement, negotiated in Da- LONDON (Reuters) — The longest and costEestrapknage trial in 
mascus, have not ton published. British history ended Monday when a jury acquitted all seven defend^ 


Thu ABOOatod Frau 

The Greens delegate, Joseph Fischer, right, is hugged at 
the special congress by Daniel Cohn-Bendit, leader of 
the May 1968 student uprising in Paris. Mr. Fischer will 
become the first Greens minister in West Germany. 

Greens Will Join Coalition 
In Hesse State Government 

Sr*-' York Times Service 

NEU ISENBURG, West Germany —The Hesse state chapter of 
the anti-nuclear Greens Party has voted in favor of entering a 
governing coalition with the Social Democratic Party, the fust of its 
kind in West Germany. 

At a special congress on Sunday in Neu Isenburg, a Frankfurt 
suburb, a majority of about 3,000 delegates approved a coalition 
agreement that would give Hesse a Greens environment minister, 
Joseph fJoschkaj Fischer, 37. 

“Our decision today will decade the future of the entire Green 
movement," predicted Hubert Kleinert, a Green member of the state 
legislature and a coalition propooenL The vote was confirmation of a 
derision earlier this month to form such a coalition. 

With other delegates, Mr. Kleinert warned the congress that the 
alternative was the collapse of Hesse's Social Democratic minority 
government and new elections in which the Greens would be blamed 
for making the state ungovernable. 

The prospect of a coalition between the Social Democrats and the 
Greens been criticized by Chancellor Helmut Kohl's Christian Demo- 
crats and prompted threats from industrialists to freeze investments 
in Hesse. 


NATO Support Is Sought 
On U.S. Arms Allegation 

when he opens a two-day meeting 
BRUSSELS — The U.S. defense of the nuclear planning group at 
secretary, Caspar W. Weinberger, NATO headquarters here, 
will press other NATO defense The issue is central to a debate 
ministers Tuesday to endorse within the Reagan administration 
American charges that the Soviet over positions for the U-S.-Soviet 
Union is violating arms control summit meeting in Geneva three 
agreements, sources within the weeks from now. 

North Atlantic Treaty Organize- The NATO allies are likely to 
tion said Monday. balk at anything more than a quali- 

j Mr. Weinberger is expected to ficd cx P rcssion of concern about 
present evidence of his allegations 
I of widespread Soviet violations 


the agreement, negotiated in Da- LONDON (Reuters) — The longest and costliest espionage trial in 
mascus, have not ton published British history ended Monday when a jury acquitted all seven defend™* 
The Christian leaders who had on all charges. * setback for Prime Minister Margaret ThauberWa^ 
earlier voiced reservations about officials. - - 

the accord, former President Ca- The jury at the Old Bailey d eared the last two._mduding the alleged 
mille Chamoun and President ringleader, Geoffrey Jones, on the 1 19th day of a trial dial is estimated lc 
Amin Gemayd, met, and Mr. Cba- have cost £5 million (S7. million ). Prosecutors had accused- the seven 
moun said that they had agreed servicemen of passing secrets to Soviet agents while serving in Cyprus 
that it was “in the interest of Leba- after being blackmailed over homosexual ocgjes. 
non and the Lebanese people." Mrs. Thatcher and her law chiefs, beaded by Attorney General Sir 
Two weeks ago, Mr. Chamoun Michael Havers, now face attack in Parliament over what critics called 
denounced the proposed abolition the fiasco of a prosecution based on flimsy evidence and forced confes- 
of the country’s sectarian power- sjons. The case will also revive demands far the repeal of the 191 1 Official 
sharing system that ensures Chris- Secrets Act under which the men were prosecuted. Iris the second tine 
tian domination. this year that a major prosecution under the act has failed. In February a 

The small but influential pro- senior rivO servant was cleared even though he admitted passing conQ- 
Syrian Arab Ba’ath Party an- dential documents to a newspaper, 
nounced that the ab-Assad Brigade, 

Sakharov’s Wife Reportedly . Gels Visa 

fronts Christian forces. The force is HAMBURG(AP) — Soviet authorities reportedly have told Yelena G. 


Two weeks ago. 


fronts Christian forces. The force is 


named after President Hafez al-As- 0 f ^ Soviet dissident Andrea D. Sakharov, that die can 

sadof Syna. leave for the West “immediately’’ to get medical treatment, a newspaptr 

The withdrawal of the force ws report Monday. The report's accuracy could not be confirmed in fc. 
“the beginning of the settlement pendently. 

phase, to freeze the situation arid ^ mass-circulation daily Bild. quoting sources in Moscow, said Mn. 
reopen the confrontation tines, ^ oaa g Tt go. was told by the Soviet police a few days ago that she could 
»id the Baathist leader, Assem “fly immediately to wherever she wants." Bad quoted its Moscow sources 
K*” 0 - ... as saying Mr. Sakhar ov and Mrs. Bonaer were '‘overiqyed at the sudden 

The Ba attests were not repre- ex | t perant." 

sented at the Damascus talks, but ^ Sakharov, a physicist who was the Nobel Peace Prize laureate in 
their announcement cameras the 1975 ^ gone ^ several hunger strikes to win a visa for his wife, who 
main Cnratiaii, Druzeana Moslem reportedly has an eye ailment that amid blind her. Bild said he wason 
Sbnte mpxtiBS that negotiated the fast when permission came for the visa. Mr. Sakharov and his 

accord began frying to persuade wife were seat to inter^exfie in dtedtod city <rf Gorki in January 1980. 
doubters m their communities to ... - 

Naboi Beni, chief of the mais. Sudanese Rebels Urged to Negotiate 

stream Shine militia AmaL said O CJ 

that the next step was a national CAIRO (Reuters) — General 
conference “which represents the Abdul Rahm an Swareddahab, the 
real framework and guarantee, un- Sudanese leader, said Monday he 


der Syrian auspices, for implement- could not wait long foe the sooth- 
ing what has been agreed upon.” era rebel leader, Colonel John Gar- 
He said the conference should ang. to discuss an end to threoun- 
indude all pro-Syrian Moslem and try's two-year-long bush war. 
leftist parties as well as the Maro- At a news conference ending a 
nice Christian Lebanese Forces mi- three-day visit to Egypt Genoa! 
litia and independent figures from Swareddahab said: “We have invit- 
all factions and religious sects. ed Garang to come and start peace 
Mr. Chamoun's backing for the talks. If he does not, weeannot wait 
Damascus agreement came after a long for him. Other parties in the 
representative of the Lebanese south are interested in finding a 
Forces chief. Hie Hobetka, briefed solution fen 1 the southern problem," 
him on the accord. he said without naming than. 

Mr. Chamoun, who was exdud- His remarks followed reported 
ed from the Damascus talks along attacks by Colonel Garartg’s Sada- 
with Mr. Gemayd, appeared to nese People's Liboarion Array de- 
withdraw his earlier opposition to spite a two-week trace announced - 
the abolition of sectarian power- Oct 19. In. the latest incident, ihe 



withdraw his earlier opposition to spite a two-week trace announced 
the abolition of sectarian power- Oct: 19. In. toe 'latest incident, the 
sharing, which has given the Chris- government said 14 soldiers died in 
tians a dominant political role since an ambush. , 
independence in 1943. 

Hurricane Batters 

cautious of any possible mistake," NEW IBE3UA,lxraisiana (AF) — 
he said. of the Gulf of Meritfi with winric n 



Abdul. Rabman Swareddahab I 


di^eTbeSS^e toroid Humcane Batters die U.S. Gulf Coast 

cautious of any possible mistake," NEW IBERIA.'Louiaaiia (A?) —A hurricane battered the US. was 

die Gulf of Mexico with winds of 85 mph (about 136 kpb) Monday, 
1 be proposed change has caused throwing offshore wl rig workers into heavy seas and toppling a ri& 
ferment among Christians, but Mr. Rescuers cm helicopters tried to save the workers, but nine of them we* 
Hobetka has said that Lebanon missing. • 

must have a secular system. He ' Thousands of people were forced from their homes by the late-seasoo 
accord is beheyed to propose a storm, designated as Juan, which grew quickly and tot* residents by 
mree-year transition. surprise. Hundreds more were stranded. Eighty rig workers were fleeing 

in escape capsules, special 30-foot (1 1-mcter) fiberglass shell hfebrats. 

when one ng collapsed onto another. In addition, a boat with nine 

Increased Safety 

tt j * J Two deatlw were bl^cm thestonn. A Coast Guard spokemmscui 

Urged at Meeting . , “* nu5Sm 8 mduded ^ workers Who were aboard the toppled ofl rig. 

Of World Airlines Uganda Offers Rebels Role in Council 

„ A . m ■ NAmOBI (R«U«s) — Uganda’s military government has offered the 

HAMBURG —The world’s ma- »bej National Reastance Army equal representation on the ruling 
jor airlines, reviewing one of the MSblai^Coondl, ■ demand^ that haTbeen a main stickma point in peace 
worst years on record for accidents, negotiations. Radio Uganda said Monday 6 

opened a meeting Monday by con- official rafio, monitored in Nairobi, said the offer was made al 
sidenng calls for stneter measures P^f* titiksresumed Monday in Nairobi after a three-week recess. The 


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But some delegates to the three- “ &eQ counc “ on which the present rulers also would have sewn 
cfey annual conference rf the Inter- ^-r 

national Air Transport Assoda- -u the govemmem had offered the vice chairman- ! 

tion, which groups major carriers, “Jf J*® 1 ** to toe rebels. It was not known if the rebels had i 

said steps to improve safety and acte P le a toe offers. 

combat the risk of guerrilla attacks - j 

^Wu^seoostsandresuUin For the RfeCOrd '* I 

About 1,500 people have died ™ niste '^ Kriangsak Ommamm, 67, and seven ; 

this year in airline disasters or in nuuteiy officers and labor leaders pleaded not guilty ; 

attacks by gwariflas on aircraft. to charges of conspiring to overthrow the govern - 1 

Other increasing costs were cited m ^ flst to^to s abortive coup. (UPI ) ; 

at the meeting. The chief executive ^** n * or Mario ML Cnomo has ordered officials in New York Gty to ! 

of the British Airways, Colin Mar- start clMicg homosexual bathhouses in a campaign to curb the spread of , 
shah, said find prices at Heathrow act l t dred im mune, deficiency syndrome. (UPI) 

imposed “a burden on our cost “ ~ — — — — ! 

a™**™ ** f ™ b** “ Correction j 

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y i'amtmgs stolen m Paris 




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By Judith Miller 

Nw York Tuna Sertice 

PARIS — France started a 
worldwide search Monday for sine 
celebrated Impressionist paintings 
stolen from the Marmottan Muse- 
um in Paris. 

Meanwhile, police and museum 
rcpresenfefives said that none of 
the paintings was insured. 

■ P°hce .spokesmen said, that an 
alert and a description of the stolen 

paintings had -been issued to all 

Frau* bonder police, easterns offi- 
and foreign police faces. 

Five gunmen held up guards and 
mriseBm viators, canyme out the 
toef tin broad dayii^tt in about five 
minutes Sunday morning. .. • . 

The works' stolen included 
Pierre-August Readies “The Bath- 
ers" and Oaude Mona’s “Impres- 
! stont Stmrise" which gave the Im- 
pressionist movement ns name; . 

At a news conference, Jean-. 

Claude Vincent, chief of the poGce 
diVtstou tlm spetaalires' Ta 'ari 


woymweum 

toefts, noted that sudr theflsJ 


zr were extremely w 1 
there had only been three sudJ 
cases in France since 196?,hcs!ui 

“Only rarely do art thieves work 
Jor collectors," Mr. Vincent said 
: Most of the thefts are to blacking 
tostefauce'ooriqj^ these efforts 
have usually failed in France." 

. Sane officials at Interpol, if* 
to^^ohtional police organization. 
Mid they believed that recent art 
toefts.werc contracted by pditicsl 
Foito seddng priceless art works 
to- exchange should a member of 
toeir organization be apprehend*! 
or another emergency occur. 

fr0ffl toe status of the in- 
yestigauaa, questions about wttf 
toe psSntmgg wgfe uninsured doraijl 
nated accoantein the French press? 

^ not tf 
oe idemified estimated that the 
' would have to spend a* 
fea st, $75 0,000 a year in insurant 
prenuums to cover its collection. 






© © 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1985 


Page 8 


; iryr- “-7 * 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1985 




Tough Regimen Takes Toll 
Among Astronauts in U.S. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
move out of Houston this year and 
I hope you are ready to move with 
me.’ I got die message." 

Mr. Alien has a s imil ar story, 
though he stayed on in Houston io 
work with a firm called Space In- 
dustries. lac. when he left the astro- 
naut service six months ago. 

“My wife kept saying one thing 
to me. over and over again: ‘Joe. 
when are you going to get a real 
jobT " 

Astronaut service, stripped of its 
glamour, is demanding work that 
keeps its members away from 
home. A woman astronaut who just 
began training for a flight she will 
make late next year says she h3S 
seen her husband twice 'in the last 
two months. 

“The last rime it was for 12 
hours." she says, “and for six of 
those we were both asleep." 

Astronaut tr aining covers every- 
thing from the physics and biology 
of space flight to parachute jumps 
to threir-day survival visits to the 
Panamanian jungle. Hours spent in 
the classroom match the time doc- 
toral candidates spend studying. 
Physical fitness is a must, but astro- 
nauts do not get time off to exer- 


cise: they maintain fitness on their 
own time. 

Once an astronaut gets a mission 
assignment, the training pace steps 
up. At the Johnson and Kennedy 
space centers, computer simula- 
tions of astronaut tasks and poten- 
tial problems in space are run 
around the clock. 

There are trips to other NASA 
centers and contractors' factories 

to familiarize the crews with the 
equipment they will use on Lheir 
missions in space. 

“1 remember finishing my last 
flight in June and starting training 
for my next flight the next day. 
Colonel Fabian said. “Our Hist as- 
signment was a trip to California to 
be briefed on the Galileo spacecraft 
we were going to cany on the shut- 
tle.'’ 

NASA officials say there is noth- 
ing they can do to slow down the 
training pace, mainly because they 
believe it is the reason the United 
States has never suffered a fatal 
accident in space. Mr. Beggs indi- 
cated the way to keep astronauts 
happy and in the corps is to keep 
them busy and assigned to a mis- 
sion. 


Count Begins 

For a Shuttle 

Hired by Bonn 

United Press Inienutional 

CAPECANAVERAL. Flori- 
da — The countdown began 
Monday for Wednesday’s 
launch of the Challenger space 
shuttle on a mission chartered 
by West Germany. 

The Spacelab flight, the first 
paid for and nut n aged by an- 
other nation, is the most logisti- 
cally complex shuttle voyage 
yet attempted. 

Challenger will be controlled 
from the Johnson Space Center 
in Houston, but experiments in 
materials processing and life 
science will be managed by sci- 
entists in OberpfaXfenhofen, 
about 15 miles (25 kilometers) 
from Munich. 

Challenger is scheduled lo lift 
off at noon Wednesday for a 
seven-day stay in space. The 
landing is scheduled for Nov. 6 
at Edwards Air Force Base. 
California. 



BtunvOK’l 


Dr. Ernst Messersdumd speaks to a gathering at Cape Canaveral on behalf of the c rew 
of Cha llenger, due to lift off Wednesday. Other crewmembers, left to right, are Henry’ 
Hartsfield, Gtdon Bhiford, Janies F. Bucidi, Bonnie Dunbar, Steven Nagel, Dr- 
Rein hard Furrer and Dr. Wubbo Ocfcels. It is to be the largest crew ever m orbit. 


U.S. Panel Pledges Bill 

On Taxation This Year 


A 



THE BEST OF ALL POSSIBLE WORLDS 

DOLDER GRAND HOTEL, 
ZURICH 

Raoul tie Gendre, Dir. Kuihausstraise 65, CH-8032 Zurich 
Telephone: 01/251 62 31. Telex: 816416 grand ch 


U.S. Creating a New Class Amo ng Young, Poor 


(Continued from Page 1) 
erished, which declined from 35.2 
percent or those over 65 years old 
in 1959 to 12.4 percent last year. 

Much of this is attributed by 
social scientists and government 
officials to the political power the 
elderly have exhibited in lobbying 
for such things as increasing Social 
Security benefits in step with infla- 
tion. 

Wendell E. Primus, a staff econ- 
omist for the House Ways and 
Means Committee, noted that the 
poverty rate for children has grown 
since 1969 while the value of pay- 
ments from the main welfare pro- 
gram, Aid to Families with Depen- 
dent Children, has fallen by a third. 

“If welfare payments had just 


kepi up with inflation," Mr. Primus 
said, “we*d be spending S6 billion 
to $7 billion more per year.” 

But increasing welfare payments 
is politically unpopular, he said, at 
a time of mounting budget deficits. 
Precise comparisons are difficult, 
but according to some estimates 
more than 30 percent of the federal 
budget involves spending for older 
Americans while only 3 to 5 per- 
cent is spent on children. 

One of the more striking chang e ' 
has been the increase m young 
mothers who do not many, a deci- 
sion now widely accepted socially 
but one that halves the number of 
potential family earners. 

Typically, the mother drops out 
of school One of every six Ameri- 


can students fails to complete high 
school one in four does not gradu- 
ate by the age of 18. This further 
narrows future job options. 

Given the links in American so- 
ciety between employment and 
health insurance, the unemployed 
mother and her child, frequently 
boro underweight for lack of pre- 
natal care, tend to remain outside 
the usual health care system, ac- 
cording to Sara Rosenbaum, health 
director for the Children's Defense 
Fond in Washington. 

They become sicker more often 
and place more financial strains on 
treatment facilities. 

Without prenatal care, Ms. Ro- 
senbaum said, poor infants are 
three times more likely to die in 


their first year of life, especially due 
to low birth weight The 1983 in- 
fant mortality rate was 11 2 per 
1.000 live births for all Americans 
and 19 2 to Macks. While the in- 
fant mortality rate has declined 
dramatically for many years, the 
de cline has slowed recently. 

Government policies also appear 
to have contributed to the problem. 
Tax policies, for instance. We not 
been adjusted to account for infla- 
tion, so taxes now consume about 
10 percent of a poor family’s in- 
come, up from the 1 percent to 3 
percent level of the early 1970s. 

Congressional sources estimate 
that paving federal taxes pushed 
2.8 million Americans below the 
poverty level last year. 


(Continued from Page W 
percent of the cost of dividends. 
However, the panel decided to put 
the 10 percent deduction m effect 
gradually, at the rale of one per- 
centage point a year, so that it 
would not be fully effective until 
1997. 

• It agreed to repeal beginning 
next year, the ability of individuals 
to exclude from their income for 
tax purposes SlOO worth (on joint 
returns. $200 wrath) of dividend 
payments. 

• It voted to restrict the ability 
of parents to shelter their income 
from taxation by giving it to their 
children or by placing it in trusts 
for their children. 

• It decided to make it less at- 
tractive for companies to set up 
Employee Stock Ownership Plans 
to give their employees a long-term 
financial interest in the companies. 

• It agreed to limi t the ability of 
companies to buy other companies 
to lake advantage of their tax 
losses-. 

Mr. Rostenkowski called the 
weekend meetings after several 
weeks without progress had led to 
reports that tax legislation was 
close to death. 

Before the we e ken d, several law- 
makers and members of Mr. Ros- 
tenkowskfs staff said the week- 
end’s developments could be 
decisive to the prospects for tax 
revision. 

The tone was much different 
Sunday from what it had been be- 
fore. “It’s unbelievable what's been 
happening," said Representative 
Robert T. Matstri, a Democrat of 
California as Sunday’s session be- 
gan. “A week ago people were say- 
ing tax reform was dad. Now its 
completely shifted.” 

An important administration of- 
ficial who asked identified, said, 
“What we're most concerned about 
is the idea of a deal an state and 
local taxes." 


If deductions are main- 
tained in the committee's bilL'tw 
rates will almost certainly have tc M 
be higher than the levels of IS per- * 
cent to 35 percent that Mr. Reagan 
proposed. 

The administration position has 

frrm that Mr. Reagan was deter- 
mined that the top level of federal 
income rax be r e d uc ed to 35 per- 
cent. from 50 percent. 

Ex-SS Officer 
blnteruiewed 

(Continued from Page 1} jfr 
his prisoners at Auschwitz. A body 
later officially determined to be 
that of Dr. Mcogele was exhumed 
from a grave in Brazil in June. 

The Mcngdc materials, which 
were supplied to Bunte by the war 
criminal’s son Rolf, were deter- 
mined to be authentic by a number 
of hand willing experts and au- 
thorities on the Third Reich. 

Norbert Sakowski, deputy editor 
in chief of Bunte, said that his team 
bad found evidence that Mr. Brun- 
ner was until recently a “dose secu- 
rity adviser" to Rifaat al-Assad, the 
brother of President Hafez al-As- 
sad of Syria. Rifaat ai -Assad bad 
commanded an elite praetorian 
guard charged with protecting the 
government but. in recent years 
slipped from favor and last year 
was briefly banished abroad. J$f. 

Mr. Sakowski said the Syrian au- 
thorities were not aware that Mr. 
Brimner bad consented to speak to 
reporters. 

“I think his impresson was that 
be was speaking for background 
and not fora hard news story," said 
Mr. Sakowski “He might have 
been under the imp ress ion that his 
anti-Semitic enthusiasms would be 
printed by Bunte." 


Sicilian Prosecutor Finds No Grounds 
For Probe of Air Base Confrontation 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Times Service 


ROME — A SdHan. prosecutor 
said Monday that no grounds exist- 


were Seized at the SigoneUa air 
base. 

The Reagan administration 
wanted, to seize the Patestmians 




tying arms and ' explosives. An 
American passenga was daiw in 
the hijacking. 

^aju iYionaay taai no grounds east- . competing for atten- warned. m seize me raiestmians 

ed for a formal investigation of die Don Genoa, a veteran dipio- gboard the plane and take them to 
behavior of United States soldiers mat said of the Sicilian magistrates- the United Stales for triaL The Ilal- 
foUowmg the interception of an Mr. Abbas, a member of thePal- ians insisted that the hijackers be 

Egyptian plane carrying the hijack- estine Liberation Organization’s 
ers of the Italian cruise ship AdriHe executive c ommitte e, helped nego- 
Lauro tiate the end of the two-day iqaek- 

Sicilian prosecutors Jet it be ■ , 

known over the weekend that they A five-judge Ita lian court that 
were lo otring into possible crimes decides such matters Is expected to - Giuseppe De Lacca, a criminal 
committed by U.S. military forces rok ^ week whether the Genoa law professor at Rome University, 
during a dispute at the ^onefla air °r Syracuse magistrates have juris- said that by Italian criminal proce- 
*• ~ - diction. Genoa claims the case be- -dure, jurisdiction would likely fall 
cause the Achijle Lauro. departed to Genoa, (be port city from which 
from that northern Italian pint the AdriHe Lauro departed before 
dty.Syxacusebecansethehqadros the hijacking. 


kept in their custody. 

The SidEan decision to issue the 
arrest warrant fra Mr. Abbas sur- 
prised magistrates in Genoa. 


_ idispi 

base near Catania. Sicily, between 
Italian and American soldiers over 
who would take control of the 
Egyptian plane. 

But Doldno Favi, the assistant 
prosecutor in Syracuse, said that a 
study of a police account of the 22 
hours the Egyptian plane was on 
the ground at Srgonefia revealed no 
grounds fra a further investigation. 

“Nothing emerged that would 


Hussein Meets With Arafat 


(Continued from Page 1) 





government fell OcL 17, began a Minister Shimon Peres. The plan 
series of meetings Monday to re- includes some de m ents supported 
build the coalition that collapsed by the king. But one, an mtema- 
Aarille tional peace conference under 
United Nations auspices, has Ian- 


over his handling of the 
Lauro hijacking 


that had their effect, mainly that 
event in London.” 




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The PLO official added tha t he 

Italian prosecutors enjoy a large guage that effectively, if not explic- bewSS mu 
degree of independence from polite BlyTipeais to exdide the H&. 8 ““I 

ical forces, Shave often <£- ^Israelis have also been Al- 
iassed political leaders in the past mounting a public campaign to ex- r v !; * a 

by theirtoasions. ^ dudeS?PIDfrom thlpScepro- ^ * * e 

The statement from Sicily cess. ^ 

seemed a dear step back from the “The prime minister said that he pi n between t 

posability of an investigation that now discerns a dramatic chanpw in ^ Jordanians and t 

startled government leaders here the international situation oftoael . ^pbasizmg commit 

and threatened to reopen wounds and a prospect for rejecting the 
in Italy’s relations with the United PLO and opening negotiations for 
States. The Achiifc Lauro hijacking peace between Israel and a Jorda- 
chapter had been carefully closed nian-Palestiman delegation." an Is- 
by leaders of both countries in re- radi government statement said, 
cent days. - Hot the Jordanian government 

The Sicilians, in an action on issued a statement Sunday after- 
Saturday, issued an arrest warrant noon saying that Jordan refuses 
for Mo h a mm ed Abbas, the Pales- separate negotiations with Israel 
tine Liberation Front leader who is- U.S. officials said they believed 
accused of masterminding the hi- that, with Mr. Arafat increasingly 
jacking and who was with the four isolated internationally and within 
hijackers on the Egyptian airliner the Arab world, the tiny- was ripe 
when US. warplanes forced it to to pressure him into the explicit 
land madly. statements he has thus far been 

Mr. Craxi allowed Mr. Abbas to able to avoid, 
leave Italy, claiming no legal PLO officials based in Jordan 
grounds existed to hold him, de- and committed to King Hussein’s 

roite US. demands for his deten- Feb. 11 peace initiative with the ~~ — lureB new elections. 
no ?l ... __ J 1 - 0 * re&rd the affiance with Jot- Tb«y added that Mr. Peres’s dabo- 

..■TrtJrS? aeency v AGI l ^ an . 1 “ «tal to thdr survivaL There ration in his Knesset speech that no 
Mr. Abbas was charged is, however, a strong PLO faction -international forum could reblace 
by the Sicilians with murder, multi- opposed to the agreement. direct negotiations was enomrfi n/a 

pie kidnapping, hgaddng and car- ^e haven’t any choice dccept to gesture to satisfy Mr PeSSiharo- 

est critics. Trade Minister ArS 

Sharon and Deputy Prime Minister 


the 


ment to the Feb. 1 1 agreement. 

Peres Repeats 
Call to Jordan 

(Continued from Page 1) 

UN — the UN speech had pro- 
voked a storm of criticism bom 
Likud that he had exceeded his 
authority —the Likud members in 
me Knesset sat impassively as Mr.. 
Pttes defended his peace propos- 

Likud sources said that- both 
ades sought to avoid a showdown 
that could force new elections 


Cape Town Curbs Tightened; 
Opposition Meetings Banned 


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Germany is one of the most industri- 
ous nations. And WestLB one of its 
major banks. As a universal bank 
we offer made-to-measure financial 
services to all kinds of industries. 

This is just one example of our 
ability to provide solutions tailored 
to specific needs. Of course, sophis- 


i services depend on tangible i * # +| D 

The vast resources of inter- VVSSTLlD 


ticated 
assets: 

national banking. Plus an imaginative The Westdeutsche Landesbank. 
and innovative approach to financing. 

That, in a nutshell, is WestLB's 
simple yet universal business con- 
cept. You can bank on it whereveryou 

do business. Head Office Dusseldorf 


David Levy. 

Mr. Sharon and Mr. Levy, antiti- 
, i • Ti i pating the December convention of 

tttmgs Banned ^ S 

. . peered to challenge Foreign Mims- 

jusuce docs nor take place in meet- ** Yiahsk Shamir’s leadership, A 
mgs only, and they are now forcing to be sedring the ^S- V 

us to adopt other ways ."(AT. XJPI) a crias atmosphere 

■ Maratefa Statae Unveiled ’ ^ Stem* into' 

officers would be added to the oa- Oliver Tambn «r n. . c P™? rtable position of sid- 

^«^ 45 ' <raioMp SiifM 5 £ 3 ? 5 a*: - 

• toSwaojUwewieBpwtt rntne d Ndion 

200 Iranians Kxecnted 

youths to try to keep commuters •■■■ rn, w " W1WU 

from going to work Monday. Pdice . ■ t a ceremony unvefling the AffiS Monthu Exilfis Sav 
reportedly used tear gas and batons j'ropze bust bought by the Greater . / ' ^ 


(Continued from Page 1) 

students two weeks ago to block 
another visit. 

> Police announced that 11,000 
officers would be added to the oa- 



[ jn the Cape Town area, (bepublfo- 

ty secretary for the United Demo- „ ^ ^uum so aa- 

cratic Front, NasiegJaffer, said the dress a British parHamentarv cbm- 
restriction “once — -n .- . 


sai?thft?^ S_b ^ 5d or Saaizauon 

60 .P*ww 

were ececuted m GohardneiTpris. 


Mr. Tam bo is in r^nrion »n a H_ 

gJaffer, raid the dn^ a ftrit^ ^rHameirtary com- on to S' tS*** 11 pT t 

again indicates miHee.TheBotidigoveniiiieuthas . m(>aober^JXfV^7^ 

(he brutal arrogance of the stated’ reused to speak tTlmn until the tesTm 
He added: “The UDF warns ^ nationalist group renodnees vio- buried - P2^ti ca] i prisoners were 
that our struggle fra freedom. and^lmce. . . . cemetery S BehfislrZahra 


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■INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1985 


Pape 5 


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Circle W arily in Pacific 
In Quest for Donxiziaiice 

By Seth Mydans America's naval base m Subic Bay 

New York Timet Service in the PhffippmeS.' 

ABOARD THE BLUE Rlt>GE, AcconKag to Pruoug Soonsiri, 

ou the Philippines — As they ma- s«waiy<geoei^<rfTlimiid’sNa- 

neuver thdr navies la a widening booalSerarity Coraol, Cain Ranh 
competition for dominance in the ®*y a ricm ™ Soviet Union's big 




'it* Vi 






*.-r 


Pacific, the Russians and Ameri- 
ca 11 * keep a constant wary eye on 
each other's movements. 

Here aboard the flagship oF the 
Seventh Fleet, an amphibious com- 
mand ship crowned by a tiara of 
antennae, satellite receiving 

radar, an intdHgeaice officer 
• 'ir'l; pointed on a map to the precise 
. .1; locations of dements of the Soviet 

• . ' “itr.Ck. Pacific Fleet. 

For example, in Cam Ranh Bay 
the former U.S. base in Vietnam 
that has become the bub of Soviet 
operations in Southeast Asia, 24 

vessels OK docked, inrfririfpg two 

submarines, a gtrided-missile cruis- 
er and four light frigates. 

On the base's runways, from 
which American planes once took 
off for bombing runs over North 
Vie tnam , satellites detected what 
(he intelligence officer said were 
“more than a half dozen” long- 
range Bear surveillance and anti- 
submarine aircraft, a dm**) fta/W f 
bombers and several swing- wing 
MiG-23 supersonic interceptors. 

Their latest training and recon- 
naissance flights are plotted on the 
map in large loops that sweep out 
across the South China Sea. On 


■ -r 

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'.--SwJSr 

- - .-.-a.' 


gen overseas naval installation. He 
told die Bangkok newspaper The 
Nation that a sixth floating dock 
had been added Jo the bate and 
that a new storage Unit for bomber 
fad had been bmlt. 

; At Subic Bay the other day, Phil- 
rppine ami U.S. mechanics worked 
on Or gjhded-missik eraser Ster- 
eo, which is undergoing three 
months of repair and moderniza- 
tion, snd the frigate Francis Ham- 
mond, which is tiring the base for 
training exercises and tests of its 
armaments, after an overbad. 

_ A nuclear attack submarine and 
six smaller vessels are also berthed 
at Subic Bay, the mtdEgeace offi- 
cer said. 

The Sterett is the arily vessel in 
the fleet far which Subic Bay is a 
home port. But most of the 75 to 80 
ships in the Seventh Fleet, which 
patrols the twftw Ocean *wt the 
western half of the Pacific, rdy on 
it for servicing and supply. 

Aboard the Blue Ridge, tbe stra- 
tegic batence in the. Plaafic is plot- 
ted carefully each day m darkened 
communications rooms with glow- 
ing radar screens and scrambler 
telephones. ■ 

Tnemoveme^ploned the other 
day reflected the two navies' differ- 


Commune’s header Held I 
On Immigration Charges 


W&*i 


Compiled hr {hr Staft From Dispat l hn 

CHARLOTTE, North Caroli- 
na — Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. 
the leader of a religious com- 
mune in Oregon, was arrested on 
immigration charges Monday 
aboard a plane in which he and 
several followers were trying to 
flee the country, officials said. 

U.S.' Customs Sendee officials 
surrounded two planes carrying 
Mr. Rajneesh, nine followers and 
four Crew members when they 
landed at Chariotte-Dougiass 
International Airport after a 
flight from Oregon, authorities 
said. 

“They were going to change 
planes and charter another two 
planes to fly to Bermuda.” said 

U.S. Marshal Ray Abrams. 

Mr. Rajoeeg] was placed in a 
bolding cefl pending his arraign- 
ment later Monday on charges of 
conspiracy to make false state- 
ments to federal immigration of- 
ficers and with harboring aliens 
(finally in tbe United States. 

Carl Houseman, regional di- 
rector of the U.S. Immigration 
and Naturalization Service, said 
Mr. Rajneesh was namgri in in- 
dictments returned Thursday by 
a federal grand jury in Portland, 
Oregon. 

Documents filed in UJS. Dis- 
trict Court in Portland said an 


investigation of Mr. Rajneesh’s 
activities involved "suspected 
patterns of marriage fraud 
among Rajneeshees." as mem- 
bers of the commune arc known, 
"as well as allegations that indi- 
vidual marriages have been en- 
tered into for the purpose of se- 
curing immigration benefits or 
evading immigration laws.” 

A spokeswoman at the com- 
mune. Ma Prern Isabel, said 
three attorneys had been sent to 
Charlotte to try to secure Mr. 
Rajneesh's release. 

“Our main concern is to get 
him out of jaii.” she said. "1 am 
worried about what this is going 
to do to bis health. He is always 
extremely allergic. He has a to- 
tally bad back and has juvenile 
diabetes.” 

Mr. Rajneesh, 53. is the spiri- 
tual leader of a sea that claims 
up to 500,000 adherents, mainly 
in the United States. Western 
Europe and Australia. 

His commune has been in tur- 
moil for more than a month, 
since the guru’s secretary, Ma 
Anand Sheela, split with him and 
fled to Europe with other top 
aides. 

A self-proclaimed guru of the 
rich, Mr. Rajneesh left India to 
establish a heavily fortified com- 
mune and meditation center in a 



Track 29: One Hour Behind Time 

U.S. Trains Make Annual Halt to Let Winter Catch Up 


Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh 

remote pan of central Oregon 
four years ago. 

Hiscommune includes the city 
of Rajneeshpuram. with about 
1.500 permanent residents and a 
similar number of visitors. Tbe 
town has its owe airport, hotel, 
shopping mail and meditation 
college. 

Followers of the Bhagwan. 
which means "blessed one.” also 
bought property :r. die town of 
Antelope. 19 miles i30 kilome- 
ters I away, which they renamed 
Rajneesh after taking control of 
tbe city government 

!AP. L'PIj 


By Maureen Dowd 

Stw 1 nrk Times Semte 

NEW YORK — At 10;30 Satur- 
day night. Train No. 66 left Union 
Station in Washington for what 
seemed to be a routine run to Bos- 
ton. But at 2: 12 A.M, the 10S pas- 
sengers aboard the Night Owl en- 
tered another dimension of time 
and space. 

.As Amuak's R. Clifford BJack. 
the railroad's manager of corporate 
communications in Washington, 
pul it. “After Trenton — next stop. 
Twilight Zone.” 

At Metro Park. New Jersey, a 
station 23 miles (37 kilometers) 
southwest of New York City, the 
train stopped in its tracks for near- 
ly an hour to allow the clock to 
catch up to the printed schedule. 

Tbe engineer. Robert Ulis, sat in 
his cab reading the Book of Revela- 
tions, and the four conductors pa- 
tiently tried to explain the confus- 
ing schedule change to mutinous 
passengers who had not realized 
that they would have to relive the 
hour between 1 and 2 all over again 
in a dark, shut-down station. 

Between 1:45 and 2:50 AM. 
Sunday, 45 Axntrak trains went 
into a state of suspended animation 
to let Daylight Time become Stan- 
dard Time. Every October this pro- 


cedure. followed by Amtrak since it 
began operations in 1971. creates a 
startling time warp, as trains cross 
both the time change and Eastern. 
Central. Mountain and Pacific time 
zones. 

"This is right up there on the 
silliest- ihings-l’ve-ever-heard list, 
and Ini asking ’why’ with all capi- 
tals and an exclamation point," 
said Houstoun Demere, a televi- 
sion director from New York who 
suddenly discovered that j trip that 
was to lake an hour and 53 minutes 
from Philadelphia to Pennsylvania 
Station in New York had stretched 
to nearly three hours. 

Al Naccaraio. a seasoned assis- 
tant conductor, took such ha- 
rangues calmly. 

“In the spring, when time moves 
forward, the train can’t catch up to 
the clock." Mr. Naccarato told Mr. 
Demere. "Bui in the fall, when time 
moves back, the train has to wait 
for the clock to catch up. That's it 
in a nutshell.'’ 

W. Graham Clavior Jr., the pres- 
ident of Amtrak. explained that the 
procedure was necessary to ensure 
the safety of Amtrak’s web of 
trains, as it might be dangerous to 
have trains operating according to 
two different clocks.” 

Further, he said the delav was 


necessary' so that passengers who 
had changed over to standard time 
were not stranded. 

For example: If a passenger who 
had switched his watch to Eastern 
Standard Time arrived at the New- 
ark station to catch the Nish: Owl 
at 2:35 Sunday morning, and the 
train had continued operating on 
Daylight Time all night, it would 
have left New York an hour before: 


BENNETON 

Engraver-Herald ist 

firm founded in -880 


VISITING CARDS 
HEADED WRITING 
PAPER 

INVITATION CARDS 
WEDDING 
INVITATIONS 
SICMET RINGS 

75, bd Malesherbes 
Pfcris 8* tel 43.87.5739 



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Wednesday, the map shows, two 
Bear reconnaissance aircraft flew 
over Hong Kong where an am- irig concepts of deployment, 
phibious American “ready group" ' **«• 'PoXF 

was on shore leave after exercises 
with the aircraft carrier Midway 
and the Aust ralian Navy. 

Tbe deployments the other day 
at the base, where the Russians 
have added three oew piers to the 
three left behind by the Americans, 
are about average,* according to an 
intelligence officer, who gave only 
his first name and asked rtmt even 
that not be published. 

The base has grown steadily 
since the Soviet Union signed a 
friendship treaty with Vietnam in 
1979, and it his »aVwi on pdderf 
significance as concern has grown 
in Washington over the future of 


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Swiss Ri^itists 
Win 16 Seats in 
Lausanne Election 


Reuters 

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — 

Swiss rightists who want tough 
curbs on immigration have scored a 
major victory in municipal elec- 
tions in Lausanne. 

. ..The National Action Party cap- 1 Navy. 
tured 16 seats in weekend polling to 
become the ihird-strongest party in 
tbe Lausanne's 100-member dty 
couned, acconting to incomplete 
results published Monday. = - . 

National Action had argued that 
an influx of migrants and "false 
refugees” was aggravating housing 
shortages and threatening jobs. 

The party, which has not been rq>- 
resentedon Lausanne’s d ty council 
since 1978, made its gains at the 
expense of traditional middle-class 
and leftist parties. Another rightist 
group made similar gains in elec- 
tions two weeks ago in Geneva- 


Much of die Sonet Pacific sur- 
face fleet was anchored at its home 
port of Vladivostok, with other ves- 
sels at Petropavlovsk cm the Kam- 
chatka Peninsula or at Cam Ranh 
Bay. 

Tbe Soviet Navy tends to bring 
its ships out of port only for large, 
weD-prepared maneuvers, thehxtd- 
ligence officer said. The US. Navy, 
by contrast, keeps at least half its 
fleet at sea ana constant round of 
maneuvers and part calls. 

The Americans now expect to see 
Soviet exercises resume in the Sea 
of Japan, where man e uv ers were 
recently interrupted by a typhoon, 
and in the Gulf of Aden, where the 
turtle cruiser Kirov is now sailing 
in the company of two destroyers. 
Tire American carrier Kitty Hawk 
is not far away, «*«»"""£ off the 
coast of Oman with its own battle 
group. 

The United Slates sees the pri- 
mary threat in the region as coming 
from the Soviet Pacific Fleet’s 126 
submarines, half of which are mi- 
dear powered. Thesewatch Ameri- 
can movements and patrol straits 
that are vital to^ Western supplies of 
oil and to the ocean access of the 


Dos Santos Warns A gains t Renewal 
Of U.S. Support for Angolan Rebels 


The Rhsaans . also keep scores of 
smaller vessels, which the Ameri- 
cans call “tattletale ships,” watch- 


By Jim Hoagland 

Washington Post Semite 

NEW YORK — President Jose 
Eduardo dos Santos of Angola has 
warned that a renewal of U.S. sup- 
port for tbe rebd movement led by 
Jonas Ssvimbi would pose direct 
dangers for American economic in- 
terests in his country and gravely 
damage prospects for a regional 
peace settlement in southern Afri- 
ca. 

Mr. dos Santos predicted that 
Mr. Savimbi would use U.S. aid to 
intensif y sabotage eampnign< by 
his group, the National Union for 
the Total Independence of Angola, 
or UNITA, gg^irra U.S. companies 
and citizens working in Angola. 

"If this aid is given to UNITA. 
the war situation in Angola would 
be more dangerous,” Mr. dos San- 
tos said Thursday. 

He said that such a move would 
“contradict” and undermine the 
policies that tbe Reagan adminis- 
tration has said it was following in 
seeking a Cuban withdrawal from 
Angola as part of a regional peace 
settlement m southern Africa. 

Mr. dos Santos’s Marxist gov- 
ernment controls one of the five 


The U.S. State Department has 
said it opposes such aid. and U.S. 
officials apparently repeated this 
opposition last week in talks with 
Mr. dos Samos. 

Providing aid to Mr. Savimbi. 
Mr. dos Samos said, would be “an 
act of solidarity by the United 
States” with the white minority 
government of South Africa, which 
provides extensive aid to UNITA. 

Mr. dos Santos also indicated 
that South Africa’s attacks on his 


province of Cabinda attempting to 
sabotage a Chevron Ccrp." oiTin- 
(tallatioo. Oil from Cabinda pro- 
vides the .Angolan government with 
more than Si) percent of its foreign j 
exchange earnings. 

In talks »ith U.S. offi cials and 
businessmen. Mr. dos Santos has 
emphasized that he wanted to ex- { 
pand the economic ties that have j 
made Angola the fourtb-iargest 
trading partner for ±e United 
States in sub-Saharan .Africa, de- 


country this year and its stepped- spite the absence of formal diplo- 
up help for the rebels have not only marie relations between the two 
justified, but in fan have deepened, countries. 

Angola's reliance on the Cuban "It is our desire that .American 
force that has been in the country businesses use their influence to 
since 1 975. * avoid U.S. aid to UNITA," Mr. dos 

But Mr. dos Santos also dis- Santos continued. “It is better to do 
closed that .Angola and the United business in a climate of peace and 
Slates have reopened diplomatic stability, and helping UNITA 
contacts that were broken off this would undermine that stability', 
summer. The State Department That would threaten the interests 
confirmed Thursday reports that of the United States.” 
the undersecretary of state for po- If the Cabinda raid had suceeed- 

litical affairs, Michael H. Anna- ed. he said: “American and Ango- 
cost, and tbe assistant secretary of lan citizens would have been killed, 
state for African affairs, Chester A. The Chevron installation would 
Crocker, met with Mr. dos Samos have been damaged. Is that in the 
on Tuesday in New York. interests of the United States?" 

The Reagan administration has Concerning government-to-gov- 
sought for four years to mediate an ^ * e . -^Solan presi- 


de and listen™ in the areas of a^ttmai'bT^een'&juth Africa JjMjaid ihal dapitt congressional 

prime Uifnaval activity — the Reagan on Thursday at the and Angola that would lead to a miFWi ^ ^ 

Lw. r~Uo« *!„. United Nations for being “at war Cuban troop withdrawal from An- 

with their own people." gola in return for a South African *“*. ITEr™ 3^* 

withdrawal from South-West Afri- admimstrauon “in 

ca, or Namibia, and an agreement ei ?? s d2 ^ 0 ^ ue - 


5 Shevardnadze Visits Cuba 

Agence Fraaee-Pmse 

HAVANA — The Soviet foreign 
minister. Eduard A Shevardnadze, 
in Havana for a 48-hour visit, was 
expected to meet' with President 
Fidel Castro and Foreign Minister 
lsodoro Mahrriexca. 


northwest Indian Ocean near the 
Middle East, the northwest Pacific 
around Japan, and Korea, and the 
straits erf Southeast Asia. 

They also ply the waters around 
the Indian Ocean island of Diego 
Garda, where (he United States 
keeps about 16 vessels to support 
its rapid-deplaymestt force for tbe 
Middle East 

In the South Pacific, the Soviet 
Navy has sent : mostly research 
drips unit gihm«rin « on whs! ap- 
pear to be mapping missions. 

If it holds true to. form, though, 


The Angolan leader’s remarks 
provided a strong counterpoint for 
the Reagan speech, which linked 
responsibility for instability in Af- 
rica and Aria to the presence of 
Soviet and Cuban, troops and ad- 
visers, and which described insur- 
gent movements like UNTTA as 
“democratic resistance forces." 

The contrasting comments from 
the two leaders appeared certain to 
intensify a struggle within tbe Rea- 
gan- administration and in Con- 


on independence for Namibia un- 


Mr. dos Samos also said he still 


such missio ns may be the gist step gress over proposals to provide di- 


toward regular naval enuring. 

“We’re seeing the beginnings of 
perhaps a new Soviet move into the 
South Pacific,” tbe intelligence of- 
ficer said. 


reel backing for Mr. Savimbi’s 
forces. UNITA failed to win con- 
trol of Angola, a former Portuguese 
colony, when it was granted inde- 
pendence in 1975. 


der UN auspices. was prepared to negotiate a phased 

, withdrawal of most of the Cuban 
But the U.S. effort appeared to uoops, a proposal he made a year 
have collapsed after Congress vot- ago in the context of the U.S. medi- 
ed this summer to repeal a law a u 0 Q effort, 
banning covert U.S. aid toUNITA. Then, be said, he had proposed 

ThaL law was enacted in 1976. after w keep i O ,000 to 12.000 Cuban 
an unsuccessful attempt by the re- soldiers in Cabinda and around 
bels, with bac king from South Ain- Luanda, the Ansoian capital for 
ca and the U.S. Central Intelligence ^ indefinite period after the 
Agency, to remove the leftist gov- phased withdrawal of 20,000 Cu- 
eroment of the Popular Movement bans from southern Angola. But 
for the Liberation of Angola. he said, “conditions have altered” 

The U.S. effort already had been since that proposal, 
setback in May of this year, when a In his speech Thursday. Mr. 

South African commando unit was Reagan said that there were’ 35,000 
caught in the northern Angolan Cuban troops in Ange la 



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I iNTEKIV ATIOIV AL, HERALD TRIB L IVE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1985 


Argentine Court Backs Alfonsin, 
Reverses Ruling on Freed Rightists 


Raul Alfonsin 


The Asset bUcJ Press 

BUENOS AIRES — An appeals 
court ruled Monday that a state of 
siege decreed by President Raul Al- 
fonsin of Argentina allowed him to 

order the detention of suspected 
rightist subversives. 

The ruling, from a three-judge 
panel of the National Criminal and 
Correctional Court of Appeals, re- 
versed a decision by civihanjudges 
that freed three of seven suspects 
over the weekend. The appeals 
court was stilt deliberating whether 
to reverse decisions freeing another 
four. 

The seven men freed, as well as 
five still at large, are accused of 
involvement in a violent campaign 
to undermine die elected centei^left 
government. 

The court's decision Monday 


Agca C&un 

tuf. 


Turk HeM m Swiss Jail 


By John Tagliabue 

Sew York Times Scn.n 

ROME — The court try :ns >even 
men accused of conspiring to kill 
Pope John Paul II in 19S 1 traveled 
:•-! Switzerland lost week on the first 
of several trips in Europe to ques- 
tion defendants and witnesses 
thought capable of testing the con- 
tentions of the court's chief wit- 
ness, Mehmet Ali Agca. 

An extreme rightist Turk, serv- 
ing a jail sentence in Switzerland 
for drug trafficking, testified to the 
court, calling Mr. Agca “a big liar" 
and contesting his account of the 
assassination attempt. 

The Turk Mehmet Sener. 29. has 
been accused by other Turks, in- 
cluding Mr. Agca. of having bought 
the gun used To shoot the pope, of 
accompanying Mr. Agca to Swit- 
zerland on his way to Italy, and of 
knowing in advance of Mr. Agca’s 
: mention to kill the pope. 

According to an official who at- 
tended the hearings last week. Mr. 
Sener denied having helped pur- 
chase the gun. and said he knew 
nothing of Mr. Agca's intentions. 
But Mr. Senefs testimony depans 
significantly from the account he 
gave Judge llario Manella. the 
magistrate whose investigation led 
to the trial. 

Mr. Agca claimed at fust that he 
had acted alone and was sentenced 
to life in prison. But he later turned 
state’s evidence, saying the shoot- 
ing was an international conspira- 
cy. As a result, seven persons were 
indicted and are now being tried. 


The testimony the court seeks 
has assumed added significance 
since the death in a Turkish jail this 
month of one of the original defen- 
dants. Bekir Celenk. a purported 
Turkish racketeer who Mr. Agca 
say s was his link with the Bulgarian 
secret service. 

Mr. Celenk, on trial in Turkey on 
charges of drug and arms smug- 
gling when he died of a heart attack 
Oct." 14. denied complicity in the 
plot. And in two days of question- 
ing by Chief Judge Severino Santia- 
pichi. Mr. Sener also denied Mr. 
Celenk was involved, and reported- 
ly agreed to face Mr. Agca in court. 

The public prosecutor. .Antonio 
Marini, said the court sought to 
travel to Turkey on Nov. 1 1 to hear 
testimony from Abuzer Ugurlu, an- 
other purported Turkish racketeer. 
Mr. Agca has said Mr. Ugurlu was 
one of his contacts in Bulgaria. 

The prosecutor said the court 
wanted to visit Bulgaria Nov. 21 to 
question Major Zhelyo K. Vasilev, 
the former deputy military attache 
at the Bulgarian Embassy In Rome, 
and Todor S. Aivasov. a’ Bulgarian 
diploma L Mr. Agca has implicated 
both men. but both have denied 
any wrongdoing. 

The seven defendants are Sergei 
I. .Antonov, the former head of the 
Rome office of the Bulgarian air- 
line and the only Bulgarian in Ital- 
ian custody: Mr. Aivasov: Major 
Vasilev: and four Turks — Mr. 
Agca. Musa Serdar Celebi. Omar 
Bagri and Oral Celik. 


was announced by Lhe Interior 
Ministry in a brief communique. 

The previous ruling had under- 
cut the state of siege declared last 
week and had placed the country's 
judiciary in open confrontation 
with the executive branch. 

Two civilian judges. Luis Velaso 
and Victor Pettigjani. had ruled 
that Mr. Alfonsin's order that the 
suspects be held for 60 days was 
invalid because no evidence was 
presented 

They freed five army officers and 
two civilians, who along with the 
other suspects have strong links to 
the rightist military regime that 
ruled the country before Mr. Al- 
fonsin assumed office in December 
1983. 

But the government contended 
that under a state of siege no evi- 
dence had to be presented to keep 
the suspects in jail. 

’'If that proof did exist, the ar- 
rests by virtue of a state of siege 
would ’ be unnecessary because 
there would have been grounds for 
ordinary penal prosecution," the 
appeal said. 

Carlos Alconda Aramburu. the 
mini ster of education and justice, 
said Sunday the judges’ decision to 
release the suspects was “prevent- 
ing the government from stifling 
the disturbances." 

Mr. Alfonsin first ordered the 
arrests Iasi Tuesday, saying the 
government had uncovered a coor- 
dinated campaign of subversion 
that included more than a dozen 
bombings and telephone threats to 
public officials. 

In ordering the arrests, he cited 
special powers under the clause 
that allowed him to declare a state 
of siege. However, since he had 
made no such declaration, a judge 
said Thursday the detentions were 

ill egal 

In a bid to settle the legal dis- 
pute. Mr. Alfonsin declared a stale 
of siege Friday and again ordered 
the arrests. He said that “constitu- 
tional rights and guarantees will 
remain in effect” except for the 
suspects, and that next Sunday's 
elections for national, provincial 
and municipal legislators would be 
held as scheduled. 

■ Dance School Bombed 

A bomb has destroyed a dance 
school run by the director of a 
gymnastic television show, Maria 
Amuchastegui, United Press Inter- 
national reported Monday. 

About 15 bombings since Sept 
1 7 have killed one person and dam- 
aged homes of loyalist military offi- 
cers, schools, shops and political 
offices. 

Government officials say the at- 
tacks are part of a rightist plot to 
disrupt Sunday’s elections. 


Shootings Mar Peace Effort in Punjab 

ky Util 


By Steven R. Wctsman of shootings, bombings and other finding bombs in 

Sen- York Time, Sfrnce killings involving bflth militants de- ports of ^police "S 

AMRITSAR, India — Sporadic sanding that the state secede from different parts of the 

shooting incidents, apparently car- ^dia. Police officK— 

ried out by Sikh radicals, have re- An accord on Sikh demands be- of the receni violence mi gb 

turned to the Punjab and are creat- tween Sikh moderates and the na- been causea ovfactors ~ ^ concerns jxw *iub ui i»ir. 

ing problems for the newly elected lional government of Prime Minis- Sikh terrorism. They sugges Bamala’s policies have for the most 

state government of Sikh moder- . — — part muted public criticism. 


rom carrying guns in public 

places. 

Generally, the new- government 
, ■ of Suriil Sineh Baraaia. the chief 

PohceofficudswiJ^tJ^; so ^ • miDiH j fB has *o n praise from ». 

eral quarters. Those who say they 
have concerns about some of Mr. 


Suijit Singh Barnala 


Despite the incidents, the new 
government is stepping tip the re- 
lease of young Sikhs from prison 
and offering them rehabilitation 
programs and jobs in the hope that 
this will turn them away from vio- 
lence. 

In another effort to restore a nor- 
mal life to the Punjab, thousands of 
paramilitary policemen who were 
brought into the state last month to 
patrol during the elections are be- 
ing withdrawn. 

Some politicians here and in 
New Delhi have expressed concern 
about the new Sikh government's 
policy of releasing prisoners. But 
others say it had little choice be- 
cause many were being held on 
little evidence. 

For several years, the northern 
state of Punjab has seen hundreds 


The government has decried violence, hut 
promises reconciliation with Sikh activists. 


ter Rajiv Gandhi cleared the way 
for an election last month. Sikh 
moderates of the Akali Dal Party 
won. defeating Mr. Gandhi's Con- 
gress Party, and now the problem 
of curbing violence has fallen to 
them. 

But the optimism surrounding 
the installation of the Sikh moder- 
ates has recently been damag ed 
somewhat by scattered violence. ' 

Among the victims was a leader 
of the Congress Party in the town 
of Tarn Taran. who was shot dead 
in mid-October. Two days later, 
another Congress Party' leader was 
killed with two other people in his 
shop north of here. 


even shootings involving persona, 
quarrels were being called political 
crimes. 

Nevertheless, the Punjab govern- 
ment last week responded to the 
violence by banning the use of large 
motorcycles. The government also 
banned men from riding side-sad- 
dle as passengers on motor scoot- 
ers. Many shootings hare been car- 
ried out by people riding in this 
way. 

The police authorities in certain 
sensitive areas have also ordered 
the evening closing of liquor stores, 
gas stations and film theaters. Ci- 
vilians have also been prohibited 


Taiwan Jolted by Scandals; Regime Cracks Down 


By Marvine Howe 

Sew York Times Service 

TAIPEI — A series of scandals 
that began in January has pro- 
voked widespread controversy in 
Taiwan and led some analysts to 
talk about a crisis of confidence in 
the Nationalist government 

The troubles began in January 
when the head of military intelli- 
gence, Vice Admiral Wang Hsi- 
ling, was implicated in the murder 
of a Chinese- American writer, 
Henry Liu, in California, and was 
sentenced to life in prison. 

That was followed by a major 
financial scandal and ah incident 
involving a newspaper publisher. 

The most recent problem in- 
volved a group of business officials 
accused of having reprocessed gar- 
bage and sold it as cooking oil to 
restaurants and roadside food 
stands. There was an angry outcry, 
with people demanding new sanita- 
tion legislation with harsh sanc- 
tions. A score of arrests were made. 

The succession of troubles has 
led to tighter political restraints. 
There has been an increase in cen- 
sorship of the opposition press. Op- 
position legislators have protested 
that security personnel search 
homes without warrants on the pre- 
text of seeking firearms. 

Prime Minister Yu Kuo-bua re- 
cently said that there was no “con- 
fidence crisis” but acknowledged 


that several “abnormal incidents” 
had damaged Taiwan. 

The prime minister was respond- 
ing to assertions in the National 
Assembly and the press that the 
ruling Nationalist government was 
facing its most serious crisis since 


would reduce the value of Taiwan's 
textile exports by about SI billion 
and mean the loss of 75,000 jobs, he 
said. 

Senator Robert J. Dole, Republi- 
can of Kansas, headed a delegation 
to Taipei in August and issued a 


Lhe country was expelled from the warning that Taiwan must take 


United Nations in 1972 and re- 
placed by Beijing. 

But many observers agree that 
the basic cause of the uneasiness is 
Taiwan's relations with the United 
States, an ally and a leading trading 
partner. Officials are especially 
worried about the protectionist 
mood in the U.S. Congress. 

“It's a serious situation," said 
Vincent Siew. director of the Board 
of Foreign Trade. “American pro- 
tectionism has never been so strong 
and emotional, and we will be bad- 
ly hun." 

Legislation pending in Congress 


drastic steps to cut its trade surplus 
with the United States. 

Taiwan suffered a serious blow- 
in 1 979 when the United States and 
other countries broke off diplomat- 
ic relations as a condition of estab- 
lishing ties with C hina. Taiwan has 
formal diplomatic ties with only 23 
nations, but it has trade relations 
with 120 countries. 

Despite its diplomatic isolation. 
Taiwan’s economy has nourished 
in recent years, with a growth rate 
of nearly 12 percent in 1984. Per- 
capita income, at S3.000. is among 
the highest in Asia. 


In the f inancial scandal, which 
followed the Liu murder, there 
were runs on several banks and it 
was discovered that some senior 
officials had taken bribes. Two 
cabinet ministers resigned and the 
government took control of the in- 
stitution. Cathay Bank, the coun- 
try’s largest 

Then there was the affair of Li 
Ya-ping, which also sparked a na- 
tional controversy. Mrs. Li. a citi- 
zen of Taiwan and publisher of The 
Los Angeles International Daily 
News, was arrested SepL 17 in Tat- 
wan on charges of sedition. 

She was accused of promoting 
peace talks between Taiwan and 
China through her paper and of 
having secret contacts with Chinese, 
officials in the United States. She 
was released after a protest by the 
State Department in Washington 
and after she publicly expressed 
regret for her action. 


Peres, SnLmikaLmderDismssReiiewed Ties 


The Associated Press 

TEL AVIV — Prime Minister 
Shimon Peres of Israel met in Paris 
last week with President Junius R~ 
Jayawardene of Sri Lanka to dis- 
cuss renewing diplomatic ties, Isra- 
el Radio reported Monday. 

Mr. Peres was in Paris for meet- 
ings with French leaders as he was 
reluming from Washington. 


Mr. Jayawardene stopped on his 
way back from the Commonwealth 
meeting in the Bahamas, the report 
said. 

Sri Lanka severed ties with Israel 
in .1970 under pressure from Egypt, 
when Egypt and Israel were at war. 

There are reports that Israeli se- 
cret service agents recently advised 
the Sri Lankan authorities on coun- 


terinsurgency tactics against Tamil 
guerrillas. 

Israel opened a special interest 
section in the U.S. Embassy in Co- 
lombo last year.. 


One step that has aroused con- 
troversy. iwwever. was Mr. Bama- 
la's withdrawal of orders for the 
detention of 224 people bring hekl 
on charges of sedition under the 
National Security - Act. 

Onlv a fraction of these people 
have been released because many 
of them are being hdd on other 
charges, such as making war 
against the government. But among 
those freed were people whom 
newspapers [inked with extremist gg* 
organizations. . 

Mr. Barnala also set up a special 


ianel to review the cases against 
people jailed on various 


2.000 people jailed 
charges. The panel has made a pre- 
liminary recommendation that 
most be released, according to 
newspaper reports. 

.Another controversy arose when 
Mr. Barnala said that from now on. 
the police in the Punjab would not 
be permitted to enter Sikh shrines. 

This brought demands for expla- 
nation from Mr. Bamala's political 
foes in the state legislature. They 
suggested that Sikh radicals might 
again use temples as arms depots 
and sanctuaries from which to car- 
ry out violence. 

’ Mr. Barnala then said he would 
not tolerate the use of -temples as 
bases for breaking the law. He has 
many times denounced violence, 
but has also promised reconcilia- 
tion with Sikh activists. 

The new chief minister, a former 
agriculture minister in New Delhi, 
has emphasized the need for eco- 
nomic development in a state long 
known for its prosperity: 

The slate is reporting record 
grain harvests this year, but other 
economic activities are believed to 
have lagged because of the vio- 
lence. Hotels catering to tourists 
have suffered because of the con- 
tinuing ban on travel by foreigners, 
except for reporters. 

Prime Minister Gandhi: has 
pledged to help Mr. Barnala over- 
come the problem of terrorism, and 
he has stepped up the central gov- 
ernment's security efforts 

Mr. Gandhi's main action was 
appointing a close confidant and 
cousin, Arun Nehru, as a new min- 
ister of stale for internal security, 
with a mandate to upgrade the 
training of the police. 

In addition, the Gandhi govern- 


ment announced that ithad con- 
It also has three agricultural ex- chided important new accords with 
perts there advising on tapping wa- Canada and Britain attending ex- 
ter resources and on other fanning ■ tradition and anti-terrorist laws 
projects. there to cover Sikh extremists. 


illlilr 


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Page 7 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY* OCTOBER 29, 1985 


AKTS/LEISURE 


By Rica Reif 

New York Tuna Strike 

' 1 1 BE passion for collecting doo 
. •••; ^ i orative am — Louis XVfumi- 
J®®* Tiffany lamps, Ming vases. 
Geor ?inu stiver, Peruvian feather 
capes and Egyptian jewelry — is 
changing the look of Axoeticaxi Bv- 


- r ^‘ 
■■ V.. l v 

-JS o » 
~Ctj ; 

k 


*S 


_ v i revi- 

sions and expansions m U- S. mu- 
seums. 

T}e decorative arts, which in- 
ciude virtually everything being 
■-■iji,- collected today other than nabt! 

: sculpture, prints and photo- 

■ : r * 6. S^bs, were long treated in piofes- 

- flonaJ an circles as a stcpchai 

according to David A. Hanks, a 
decorative arts consultant. 

‘'Time was when people and nm- 




-... - ,r '< :■ 


ai museum 
.... mar- 

kets an^at^apm. 

Daniei “WWt fiSO^eawrid pht* 
to^rapl^4eaitt l -Jor example, has 
in jost seven yearenmassed a major 
poty <rf-.3Mwaitoy American 


leedem of sucfijwaces. Heowns 
about 60 samples by Frank Lloyd 
Wright; Green"* Green, Georc 
Hajer aad CharioRohlfs. He has 
given a Wright dajr to.the Metres 
pbfitan. 

jMjbeogh most of his toQecdon 
is in storage, ins Manhattan apart* 
mentis funnsbed with WVi gM fur- 
mtnreand Mayer lamps. He is cer-' 
tain Ire wffl mow on to a^ect later 




II 


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scums collecied a little bit of a lot periods. ”1 rcsBy arhniit the 1940s 
of ihmgs. Hanks said. “What we and 395&dattnsorftuil hfcCribh 


see happening today is mdhrkbak 
and museums ta ming io tbedeco- 
rauve arts to form major collec- 
tions." 

Private decorative arts coDectora 
are playing significant roles m mu- 
seum expansions — either by do- 
nating objects or by -providing 
money for agqiridfyyyj and KnilA . 
ing the galleries and wings to 
them. And with the prospect of 
more space, museums are aggres- 
sively recaganizzag and restoring 
their existing decorative arts collec- 
tions. 

“One is bom a collector,” said 
Marsha]] Field 5th, vice chairman 
and treasurer of the Art Institute of 
C hica g o, who gave, with the family 
of the late Roger McCormick, $3.5 
million toward the Fidd-McCor- 
mick wing of American Art, which 


and 3 950s designs ofPaul McCobb 
add Russel Wngln^ he said, “and 
yo»i can sriB boy Russd Wright 
feigns! w qiffl almwinitm fnr.WD w 

^Onr «rftoctkm req«as our per- 
sonal, tastes,” sad Joiette Kahn, 
39, the* president aiul pubHAcr cC 
DC Comics. She andter husband,. 
Mart Hnk, ine an offbeat 
assemblage, of 1950s furniture, 
1930s. RakeKte radios and 1920s 
Clarice Cliff ptxteiy. 

The cofipj4^3x*an collecting 
1950s |7?piisa^4h 19K\after they - 
bought a .Ojaxlis &aMS screen. 
“We aipped"ont:~*t changed our 
eyes ahd ftlot<of bur feelings about 
furmtnrp,^ Kahu said. “And we de- 
cided we <ftedd afford to buy mas- 
teiwprics.-<tf.;tbe 1950s — they’re 
available and not prohibitive.’’ 

Hie new interest in decorative 
arts, is duffy seen in five major 



Daniel Wolf fives with Frank Lloyd Wrigjit fnrnittne. 


mewing >»ij surrounding hirnse lf 
with ornamentation. He wants that 
with which he lives to be as attrac- 
tive as possible.” 

The new wing at the An Institute 
of Oucagp, winch will cost a total 
of S21 mflUon, is scheduled to open 
in -1987. A major portion of the 
wing will be devoted to the perma- 


Field made his first art purchase at 
18 — a horse painting by Andrew 
Wyeth. Five years later he began 
seriously pursuing 18tb-centmy 
American furniture. 

Pioneer coQeciors today are ex- 
ploring various areas at 20th-ceii- 
airy decorative arts, such as Frank 
Lloyd Wright furniture, 1950s 
lamps and 1930s Bakelite plastic 
radios dial were virtually unknown 
a decade ago. 

These collectors are frequently 
wefl ahead, of museums in acquir- 
ing lesser-known works — some- 
times at bargain prices. Thqr-«re 
also intent on learning more about 
the objects they admire. They have 
increased the sales of collecting 


_ . j 3 _. neat, installation of American and 

will house the museum’s expanding' museums,#!! of which have built or European decorative arts, 
holdings of art and decorative arts, are budding new whags for their ; The Virginia Museum of Fine 

coUeetignsL " Arts in Richmond has added a 522- 

Thereis also a distinct change in million wing for the 39th- and 
toe my many pieces arc being d& 20th-century decorative arts, con- 
played in museums Period form- temporary paintings of Sydney and 
tore is mtMc Hkdy to be isolated 
and ritown as art than (o be inoof- 
porated into a-zoore setting. 

The Metropolitan. Museum of 
Art winch added the American 


Frances Lewis and the fine an and 
jewelry of Paul and Rachel Mellon. 
The wing is to open on Dec. 3. 

The Dallas Museum of An is 
-venturing for the first time into 


Wing in 1980, is building a $35- decorative arts- with its new $5- 


milhon glass-enclosed court to 
house its Emopean decorative arts 
aad sculpture. Construction of the 
100,000-sqnare-foot (9300 square- 
meter) wing is to begin in 1386. 

Gammemingbn the craTcnt col- 
lecting surge, Rtilippe de Monte- 
bdlo, the museum’s director, said: 
“Man has a natural need for oma- 


nuDion Decorative Arts Wing, 
which opens Nov. 29. A rooftop 
addition, it will house the collec- 
tions of Emery and Wendy Reves 
— $25 million worth of Gauguins, 
Cizannes, van Goghs and a Monet, 
as well as more than $5 million 
worth of antique furniture and oth- 
er objects. 


Colonial Williamsburg has also 
expanded: its new SI 7-million 
DeWiti Wallace gallery opened in 
June, to display English and Amer- 
ican decorative arts. In an innova- 
tion for Williamsburg, which has 
concentrated primarily on period 
interiors, the pieces are presented 
as singular an objects. 

The Sl Louis Museum of An has 
commissioned the architect 
Charles Moore to redesign its West 
Wing, which will cost $15 mini on 
and house both art and decorative 
arts collections. 

When the Carnegie Institute’s 
Museum of Art in Pittsburgh re- 
opened its Sarah Scaife Gallery a 
year ago, something new had been 
added: decorative arts, dramatical- 
ly enhancing the chronological dis 
plays of paintings and sculpture. 

At the High Museum in Atlanta, 
the laigesse of Virginia Carroll 
Crawford created the collection of 
American decorative arts from 
1825 to 1917. It was created in 
1983, when the High, opened in its 
Stunning S20 milli on installatio n, 
designed by Richard Meier. 


Suzanne Vega: Songs of 'Small Blue Things’ 


*-■ «r<v«oc 


By Mark Hunter 

P I ARIS — Suzanne Vega bears 
little resemblance to Marlene 
Dietrich, though both have aJaknt 
for ironic understatement. But not 
long ago Vega found herself wear- 
ing what she described as “a black 
velvet dress eta to here,” playing 
Dietrich and herself in a video dip 
of her song, “Marlene on the 
Wall,” which became Vega’s first 
hit in the United States, England 
and Holland, and inspired critical 
raves comparingher to Joni Mitch- 
ell and Astrud Gflberto, 

T take it with a box of salt,” said 
Vega in her hold, the day altar a 
sold-oat concert at the Rex Club in 
Paris. “Having been unknown for 
so long” — at 26 she is a 10-year 
veteran of the New Yodc dub scene 
— T don’t think my head is swivel- 
ing My kind of music hasn’t been 
encouraged fora long dune, so it 



moved there at the age of 2 with her recalled. “Until then, I thought I 
parents from Los Angeles, retain- was the only one, writing alone in 
mg no trace of the West hut a my room. I was used to feeling left 


Suzanne Vega 

motored in theater — T was always 
tiddf had a peat lyric quafity. that 


distinctly Californian accent (T 
don’t know how that came about,” 
die laughed). “I have a definitely 
New York kind of humor,” she 
said, “and a resignation that comes 
from having so much suffering in 
your face all the time: You want to 
help people, but sometimes yon 
have to step over them to get to 
work. Plus,” she added, “there's a 
certain compassion that develops 
from seeing so much pam.” It is 
evident in her song “Luca,” about 
an abused child who shrugs off his 
anguish with the line, “You just 
don’t argue” 

Vega's confidence in her ap- 
proach gained when, at the age of 
• 17, dm discovered “a whole scene 
of singer-songwriters, supporting 
each outer in their efforts to write 


out and isolated. 

“There's an imbalance in the cur- 
rent pop scene,” she said. “There’s 
Madonna, Tina Turner, and 
Prince, but Fm writing a different 
kind at song. There'll always be the 
people who want to get up and 
dance, but there'll also be people 
who want to be quiet and reflective. 

“Most people see me as a new 
face,” she added, “but I’ve always 
seen myself in terms of longevity. 
You know, I’ve been doing this 
since I was 14T 

Suzanne Vega will perform at the 
University of Aix-en-Provence on 
Oct 29, ana at the University of 
Grenoble on Oct 30. 


-A 




seems like something new — the., j be ffm»mga ndgniceful, but 
idea that ^.Ustening to someontfs. ‘ 


songs, yon get a' glimpse of that 
person, and what their world is 
about” 

The world ^ Vega presented in h» 
current European lour and debut 
album (“Suzanne Vega,” A&M) is 


that it was difficult for me to be 

percussive:” 

Given that timi cation, the weight 
of Vega's material relics on her ex- 
pressive abilities. Though she ac- 
knowledged that die and MilcheH 
— the obvious point of reference 


songs outside ihc Top 40 style,” she rope. 


Mark Hunter is a journalist who 
writes about cultural affairs in Eu- 


DOONESBURY 


'TtM 


a compound of sadness, hnmerand for oomemporary women smger-. 

a vulnerable strength: - , X-jSH?S22' -S 0 ? 

tried so hard to resist / When you Monde, .Jhm and pale, she noted 


SOUMTYOUSOr 
TDSMWdiOURr 
, SBU;vW«?>©W, 

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II D&&CR5QMB- 
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THAT 
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that “we’re not at all aBke vocally. 
She has a more classical approach, 
a lot of vibrato, and I don’t have 
any. I always fifed voces that had 
no vibrato ~r an unaffected style. 7 
remember thinking P eggy Lee had 




held trie in your handsome fist J 
And reminded me of the night we 
kissed / Arid why I shoold be leav- 
ing,” runs, a verse from “Marlene 
cm the Wall." Her song structures 
are unusual in pop music, in that 
she steers away from the 
refrains common to the. 

format.- Instead, she constructs ,, „ . 

simple but atmospheric guitar, style allows VqgR to escape the 
chord patterns, ovoW with con- maudhn m suj lm^ “Today I 
rise narratives delivered ina sharp- g** 

alto voice. c ? ma ' “P“ « *“**• „ But * 8150 

^wouldn't say I write a. lot 
upbeat songs,” Vega sauL “Tem- 




0H.Y5AH? 
WHAT DO 
YOUHMT? 

\ 


NOTHING. ifHUST 
NXGTOSEGGOMG- 
GN&GETRGAUY 
OUT OF HAND 
YOUR ACT ISTDWlr 
Of RADICAL, MAN. 

Y 



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peramen tally, Tm more suited to 
ballads. When I was studying 
dance” — at Barnard College, 
where she majored in English and 


s 








of her best: 

Lines,” where sneaescn&cs a wom- 
an cutting her hair as “cold racial 
too dose to the bone” an, image 
that has evoked suicide for some 
hsuaed^she said- 
Tn my own life, ! I've gone 
through periods ^of monastic aus- 
terity, she noted. “1 cut my hair, 


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suicide, she’s just alorie, striping 
her life down to almost nothing. 

“New York strongly influenced 
my personality,” said Vega, who 



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In E. B. While’s Web 'a Truth Discerning’ 


By Herbert Mkgang 

.Vi*!* VoriL Tjna £*n:v 

B LUE HILL Msm — The life 
and language of E B. V,7uie, 
the revered Americar. essayist and 
stylist who died in Maine at age S6 
on Oct. 1 . were edebreitd here Sat- 
urday by frier. ds and family, read- 
ers and” strangers who had been 
touched by bh> words. 

From near and cisiant places, 
□dtdtbon from North Brooklin 
acd city folk from tcany miles 
away. 300 men and women and 
children gathered to honor the au- 
thor of books that ranged from 
“One Man’s Meat” to “STuan Ut- 
ile” and “Charlotte's Web.” They 
sat on hand-heftn benches below 
the pale rosettes on the ceiling as 
the sun illuminated the stained- 

glass windows of the white- steepled 
Blue Hills Coogre^ctiosa! Church, 
founded a few years before the 
Revolution. 

“Andy White would never have 
approval of the whole thing,” said 
J. Russel) Wiggms. sr. old friend, 
who is editor of a weekly. The Ells- 
worth American, in a eulogy. *~He 
wouldn't allow it if he were alive 
and he wouldn’t now. I think he 
enjoyed public approval but he did 
not have whai James Madison 
called a canine appetite for popu- 
larity. He did have the two chief 
qualities of a writer he had some- 
thing to say and he knew bow to 
say it. He spoke for cities and that 
made him the voice cf The New 
Yorker and. with equal authority, 
he spoke for rural America." 

Outside the church on slate-gray 
and shining-white Main Street, 
above the nacreous waters of Blue 
Hill Bay. some said they came be- 
cause they guessed < correctly) that 
the afternoon would include the 
poems and sketches, the humor and 
compassion that marked his writ- 


ings. White did not attend this or 
any other church; the family's invi- 
tation carefully called this event a 
gathering, not a service. But in the 
democratic spirit of the man. the 
card noted. “Everyone is wel- 
come." 

Inside the doorway to the church 
lay a simple wreath, with 1 1 white 
daisies and some green leaves. It 
was signed; “Fellow members of 
the American Academy and Insti- 
tute of Arts and Letters." 

The gathering for White turned 
out to be a literary occasion — 
surely the first ever to include a 
lesson or two in the graceful style 
that characterized his prose in The 

Friends and family, 
readers and strangers 
who had been touched 
bv his words celebrated 

wt 

his life and language. 

New Yorker for more than half a 
century. Between the right words 
came music, played on the organ by 
Mary Cheyney Gould. White was 3 
Benny Goodman fan. but jazz was 
deemed not quite right for the occa- 
sion. Instead, the music included 
selections from Handel's "Water 
Music.” Bach's “Fugue in G" and 
— those present found its title a 
comment on White himself — the 
early American folk melody. 
“Amazing Grace.” 

White had often said, “Words 
still count with me.” His words 
emerged in talks by Wiggins; John 
Wilson, editor of the Brooklin- 
based magazine. Wooden Boat, 
recognizing his sailing years here; 
and by his two stepchildren, Roger 
AngelL The New Yorker writer and 
editor, and Nancy Stableford, a 


teacher, from his marriage to Kath- 
arine Sergeant Angell. the New 
Yorker editor, who died in 1977. 

Silting in the front of the church, 
listening to them, were While's son. 
Joel, a naval architect, and his wife, 
Altaic, who had arranged the gath- 
ering with the Reverend Curtis 
Beach, retired Blue Hills minister, 
and 3 row of grandchildren and 
great-grandchildren. 

Wilson read a poem, called 
“Natural Hisiory," that had echoes 
of White's fictional Charlotte but 
was written long before the chil- 
dren’s book as a love letter to Kath- 
arine: 

The spider, dropping Jonn from 
ntig. 

Unwinds a thread of her devising: 

A thin, premeditated rig 
To use in rising. 

And all the journey down through 
space. 

In cool descent, and loyal -hearted 
She builds a ladder to the place 
From which she started. 

Thus 1, gone forth, as spiders do. 

In spider's web a truth discerning. 
Attach one silken strand to you 
For my reluming. 

.Angell. who had just flown here 
from covering the World Series, 
talked of a youthful lesson he had 
learned about finding hi* own style 
as a writer: 

•‘It was White who set me 
straight. I stopped imitating other 
wmers (even E. B. While), and 
tried instead to be clear, the way he 
was. if I could do only that — bow 
hard it turned out to be! — I might 
have a voice of my own after all, 
and perhaps even a style in the end. 
too, for I would simply be myself: 
my one and only. I dunk that is 
White's special gift to us all. Al- 
most without our noticing it, he 
seemed to take down the fences of 


manner and propriety and pom- 
posity in writing." 

Angell read a letter written in 
1955 about coming home 10 Maine 
before Thanksgiving that appears 
in “Essays ofLfi. White." He also 
read an essay from “Poems and 
Sketches" that begins. “Up early 
this day, trying to deride whether 
or not to bequeath my brain (0 my 
alma mater, which is making a col- 
lection oF such stuff.” An3, in a 
surprise, he read an excerpt that 
sounded just like White tinciudins 
the line, "Nothing is better than 
simplicity”!, then revealed that the 
author was Walt Whitman. 

“I don’t think these sd-setrors 
necessarily represent the best of 
E. B. White." Angell said. “What 
we have 15 the all of E. B. White. 
You can always find him m his 
works." 


NORMAN J. LAWRENCE 


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Pajre 8 


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1985 


Hera lb 


INTERNATIONAL 


Srtfmtte AIMed With Democracy — Not With Marcos 


PublWwd With T\» Vw \ork Time* and The ■ft ashingloo Post 


Hope for Europe’s Jobless? 


As its unemployment lines lengthen, Eu- 
rope casts envious glances at the Great 
American Job Machine. This may surprise 
inhabitants of the Great Lakes area, where 
factories are rusting and unemployment 
benefits are running oul But the fact re- 
mains that over the past 1 5 years the number 
of jobs in the United States has risen by 34 
percent while the number in Europe has' not 
changed. .Are the older countries really start- 
ing to show their age? 

On closer inspection, the record is some- 
what kinder to Europe. The acid test is the 
extent to which jobs have kept up with 
population growth. In the 1970s. unemploy- 
ment doubled both in America and in Eu- 
rope. Only since 1980 has the record really 
diverged, with America’s jobless rate rough- 
ly stable but Europe's nearly doubling. 

To a large extent this divergence may be 
transient. Economic growth in the past few 
years has been much higher in the United 
States than in Europe because the United 
States has pumped up demand through a 
highly expansionary budget policy, while 
Europe has pursued the austerity line to 
bring down inflation. American superiority 
in job-creation may well fade along with the 
soft options on the federal budget. 

But if Europe is to fight unemployment by 
creating jobs faster than its work force 
grows, changes in social attitudes will be 
necessary. High minim um wages and legal 
obstacles to temporary layoffs make Euro- 
pean employers more reluctant than their 
American counterparts to expand their 
staffs. So do the burdens of the welfare state 
— the charges employers have to pay to 
finance long vacations and insurance 
agains t unemployment and sickness. The 
difficulty in Europe of obtaining funds to 


A cloud of doubt continues to hang over the 
nuclear cooperation agreement signed last 
summer between the United States and China. 
Congress has the power to reject the agree- 
ment. but should not do so. China has had 
nuclear weapons for two decades, and if it 
chose could greatly increase the risks to the 
world's security by disseminating this technol- 
ogy to countries that seek it. In the past China 
bos occasionally seemed inclined to do thaL 
But more recently it has taken several steps 
indicating support of the regimen in which 
most of the world's governments have joined 
to prevent proliferation of these weapons. The 
agreement between the United States and Chi- 
na could strongly reinforce that commicmenL 
The agreement is a bargain. The United 
States is to give the Chinese access to its 
reactor technology for peaceful purposes, al- 
lowing American companies to sell the Chi- 
nese equipment, fuel and engineering advice. 
China, for its part, has agreed'io divert none of 
this technology to its own military uses and to 
give no further assistance to any other coun- 
try’s attempts to build weapons. The questions 
about the agreement begin with the absence of 
provisions for verification and extend to sever- 
al areas of ambiguity on other points. But it is 
not a subject to be left to vague good wilL 
Senator John Glenn, an Ohio Democrat, 
pointed out recently that twice this year U.S. 
authorities have intercepted advanced elec- 
tronic equipment that evidently was being 
smuggled to China- Last week. Senator Alan 
Cranston, a California Democrat, charged that 


China had recently held nuclear trade talks 
with, or sent nuclear exports to. rive nations 
with nuclear ambitions: Argentina, Brazil 
Iran, Pakistan and South Africa. 

The history of this agreement is similarly 
troubling. It was First initialed a year and a half 
ago. during President Reagan’s trip to China. 
But instead of forwarding it routinely to Con- 
gress. the administration put it in the deep 
freeze. Although the reason was never publidy 
stated, there had been intelligence reports of 
Chinese technicians working at a ur anium en- 
richment plant in Pakistan. The agreement 
was finally signed last July. The State Depart- 
ment, secretive throughout (his process, has 
not persuaded many senators that its current 
information is adequate to support the assur- 
ances it is giving them. 

Mr. Glenn has drafted an ingenious remedy. 
He does not want to see the agreement reject- 
ed. But he has introduced a bill providing that, 
before America licenses any nuclear exports to 
China, the president would have to certify that 
the key questions have been settled with the 
Chinese. The State Department opposes the 


Glenn bill arguing that it demands a degree of 
legalistic detail to which the Chinese will never 


legalistic detail to winch the Chinese will never 
consent. But that is a decision for the Chin ese 
to make; not the Stale Department. 

This U.S. technology has an immense capac- 
ity for good or, unfortunately, evfl. Mr. Glenn 
and the growing number of senators of both 
parties who join him are right to want a more 
precise agreement on China’s intentions. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Finland’s Communist Split 


Though the Finnish government has made it 
clear that its foreign policy, with special refer- 
ence to the Soviet Union, will not change, the 
recent split in the country's Communist Party 
is bound to have internal repercussions, at 
least in the 1987 elections. Of die 27 Commu- 
nists in the Helsinki parliament, nine belong to 
the dogmatic Moscow-oriented wing that has 
now been expelled. The party is at its weakest 
point ever. In 1958, Communists accounted 
for a good quarter of all deputies: they are now 
little more than on eighth. 

— Neue Zurcher Zeilung (Zurich). 


uproot the patronage system that has become 
his political power base. Considering the dan- 
gerous prospects, friendly advice from the 
United States should not be rejected. Reforms 
are needed. To deny this is to deny the Philip- 
pines a prosperous and democratic future. 

— The Japan Times (Tokyo). 


Botha Shouldn’t Snub the ANC 


Advice lor the Philippines 


What is wrong with the Philippines? Just 
abou t everything. The economy is going down- 
hill. [There is] corruption, stagnation and re- 
sentment. But it is doubtful that pressure from 
Washington could convince Mr. Marcos to 


President Botha persists in denying himself 
the opportunity of hearing the African Nation- 
al Congress view on die ground that the orga- 
nization refuses to renounce violence. It will be 
most helpful if Mr. Botha sets an example by 
renouncing violence himseU. 

It will not be long before [the ANC leaders 
Oliver Tambo and Nelson Mandela] come to 
be regarded as moderates. All the lessons of 
history teach that the next generation will be 
much harder to deal with. 

— The Guardian (London). 


FROM OUR OCT. 29 PAGES, 75 AM) 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: China Awaits Major U.S. Loan 
PARIS — The practical conclusion of an 
agreement with an American group of finan- 
ciers for a loan of fifty million dollars is proof 
of China's desire to deal on a solid basis with 
the nation whom she regards as the most 
dependable of those interested in her develop- 
ment. The Herald related that the loan negoti- 
ations had received the Regent’s approval, and 
that Lhe signing of the agreement was looked 
for [on Oct 28], With this loan China proposes 
to perfect her currency reform and promote 
industrial development. Considered in con- 
nection with recent events in China which have 
revealed the progress of the people toward 
representative government, these negotiations 
assume an importance which can scarcely be 
overlooked in any comprehensive view of the 
future possibilities in the Far East 


1935: Nazt-Vatican Ties Improve 

ROME — The marked improvement in rela- 
tions between the Holy See and the Nazi 
Reich, which bad been noted both here and in 
Germany during the last few days, were con- 
firmed by favorable comments on the recent 
speeches of General Goering and Dr. Kerri, 
the Reach Minister of Cults, in the Vatican 
organ “L’Osservalore Ro man o” [on Ocl 28]. 
The passage in Goering’ s recent speech in 
which the Prussian Premier declared that Na- 
tional-Socialism must believe in God, because 
“God blesses the gigantic task undertaken by 
the National-Socialist party.” has given partic- 
ular satisfaction to Vatican circles, since it 
disavows attempts to revive paganism in Ger- 
many. The speech of Dr. Kent glorifying 
liberty of conscience, is also interpreted as a 
gesture of reconciliation towards Catholicism. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

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£> 1985. International Herald Tribune. AB rights reserved. 


W ASHINGTON — There is a consensus here 
about what is wrong in the Philippines. But 


launch new companies or to expand small 
businesses is another factor. And the ability 
of workers to move to where the jobs are is 
often limited because housing policies, par- 
ticularly rent control, reduce mobility. 

But at bottom, Europe’s inferior record 
reflects two factors. First, the gap between 
wages paid by the less profitable industries 
and by the expanding industries is small 
when compared to America. This puts a 
drag on modernization efforts by the older 
businesses and gives labor little incentive to 
move into high-growth sectors. And when 
the huge rise in oil prices hit the industrial- 
ized world. European workers continued 
stubbornly to press their claims for a belter 
standard of living. The squeezed profits that 
resulted made employers acutely aware of 
the need to trim their bloated work forces. 

These rigidities are easing. If this reflects 
more than temporary restraint by labor in 
the face of hard limes. Europe's future wiD 
be less bleak than irans-Atlantic compari- 
sons suggest today. America is thought to 
have the edge because less than a fifth of its 
labor is unionized. What matters, however, 
is not the size of unions, but how they think. 

Pessimism is compounded by the fear on 
both sides of the Atlantic that technological 
advance has brought an end to full employ- 
menu The argument is suspect Techniques 
that raise productivity either make goods 
cheaper or potential profits higher. Either 
way, if tax policy distributes income proper- 
ly, real income rises and so does demand — 
and jobs. The world may be a long way from 
the hopes of the 1960s. But its current fears 
of poverty and unemployment are probably 
exaggerated .As a Victorian poet put it, if 
hopes were dupes, fears may be liars. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


W about what is wrong in the Philippines. But 
there is a kind of paralysis about wfaat to do. 

First, everyone agree that President Ferdinand 
E Marcos has presided over the unchecked spread 
of a nationwide Communist insurgency. Second, 
no one disputes that Mr. Marcos has stubbornly 


By B01 Bradley 


The writer is a Democratic senator from New Jersey. 


rejected warnings that unless he undertakes major 
reforms soon, the opportunity to revive democra- 


cy, regain prosperity and restore security will be 
lost Third, policy-makers even agree on specific 
reforms he must make to ensure fair elections, free 
the economy from the monopolistic grip of his 
cronies and revitalize the aimed forces. 

As Senator Paul Laxolt of Nevada told Mr. 
Marcos during a recent visit to the Philippines, 
important American interests are at stake. If the 
Communist insurgents take over, the United States 


cal and economic foundation of his regime, per- 
haps even jeopardizing his life. 

Indeed, Mr. Marcos may lad: the capacity to 
carry out the necessary reforms. It is unlikely, for 
example, that he wifi confront the power and 
wealth of many of his corrupt erodes to restore 
genuine competition to the marketplace. At most, 
he might be able to deliver free and fair elections 
— if he devotes himself wholeheartedly to the task. 

In due course, America wdl probably have to 
choose between supporting Mr. Marcos or sup- 
porting the democratic process. The future U.S. 


position in the Philippines rests not with a dictator 
but with democracy, which alone gives people 


is virtually certain to lose its military access to the hope of a better society without revolution, 
bases at Clark Field and Subic Bay. The Filipino Most Filipinos retain respect and affection for 
people would lose any chance for 3 democratic the United States. These feelings are a major 


future. Worst of alL a ruthless Communist regime 
is likely to turn the Philippines into a brutalized, 
stagnant society, like Vietnam and Cambodia, and 
would allow the Soviet Union to replace the Unit- 
ed States as its military partner. 

What is so frustrating about this consensus is its 
failure to produce a solution. High-level warnings 
to Mr. Marcos have fallen on deaf ears. The reason 
is that the reforms he must make to turn the tide 
against the insurgency will also remove the politi- 


source of strength that America must now openly 
use or lose. It must sever the symbolic link the 


use or lose. It must sever the symbolic link the 
Communists are forging with their rallying cry of a 
“U.S.-Marcos dictatorship.” It mnstput Mr. Mar- 
cos on notice that U.S. interests in Fuipmo democ- 


co5 on notice that U.S. interests in Fuipmo democ- 
racy will no longer be held hostage to a rigged 
election. The Ltaiied States must let the Filipino 
people know it will no longer acquiesce in his 
continued abuses of power. 

The United States may have to establish a time- 


table for electoral reform if Mr. Marcos Ijdstfie 
will or capacity. To ease his resignation, America 
should offer him and Iris family safe md 

sanctuary for his retirement. It must also be pre- 
pared to provide a worthy successor to Mr. Marcos 
with the additional security assistance needed to 
restore democracy —not, as Mr. Marcos has used 
it. to prop up his loyalists. 

President Reagan believes there is still ume to 
persuade Mr. Marcos of the error of his ways aid 

set his regime on a new course. But ume isrnnnmg 

ouL The administration temporizes, transfixed by 
the ghosts of old friends in Cuba, Vietnam and 
Iran. These are false, hence dangerous, parallels. 
Breaking with Mr. Marcos is not a signal ttot 
America is abandoning the Philippines to the 
Communists. On the contrary, it signals a commit- 
ment to seeing democracy restored. The sure way 
to betray that good will and bring about tne 
Communist victory the United States is eager to 
thwart is to slig ht the democratic option. Then the 
tide of revolution will sweep away not only the 
dictator but also future U.S. influence. 

It is rime to speak publidy to the Philippine 
people, pledging U.S. support for the democratic 
process. Only by giving Mr. Marcos this tod of 
ul timat um can the wav be opened for the free and 
fair elections upon winch any successful counterin- 
surgency must be based and upon which the future 
of the Philippines depends. 

The New York Times. 


A Murder 
That Left 
Much Unsaid 




By Philip Geyelin F 

W ashington— “ ft oiighi. to r 
go without saying that the* 
murder of Alex Odeh was as heinous 
as that of Leon Kimgnoffer. . “ — , 

From the “Notebook" ■ section of.. 
New Republic ma gazrire. 

No identification was n eeded for 
the American tourist savapdy slain 
by the hijackers of an I Laban cruise 
ship. But the New Republicdid think; " 
identification was needed Tor Akxi \ 
Odeh, the West Coast regional direc-: 
tor of the American- Arab Anti-Dis--- 
crimination Committee, or ADC* 

Mr. Odeh died when a bomb explod- 
ed as he entered his office in Santa, fop 
Ana. California, cm Oct II. at- the ^ ' 
h eig ht of the Arhdle Lauro crisis. 

Liles of terror against two Amen- - 
can citizens — ones Jew, the other ar 
Palestinian Arab born.. to Roman . 
CatboSc parents on what * now the" 
Israeli-occupied West Bank. . Two ' 




(!i |;ll‘ in 


equally heinous crimes, “it ought to 
eo without saying." And yet the New . 
Republic saw a need to say it ; almost' 
nobody else had. 

Why? Fart of it bad to do with the ~ 
drama of the hijacking The dating 
of Mr. Klinj^ofier also fit a familiar . . 
patient: violence in far-off {daces di-! ■ 
rented against Americans caught up ~ 
in the Arab-Isradi conflict, * 

Mr. Odeh’s mnnter. atr lhe other '- 
hand, had the look of an isolated 
‘‘ psygaaTtwri onr* by s omeone inflamed • 
by Mr. Odeh’s sympathy with the - 
Pales tinian cause. Bat talks with- 7 * 
ADC representatives ami mhos in ^ 
the Santa Ana area suggest there is a 
“Terror Double Standard,* as. the- - 
New Republic capstried its ctamtoenL:’ 

Mr. Oddi may not have been cho- . 
sen at random for cold-blooded kill- 
ing, as Mr. KBnghofler was. But he ; 
was no less a random victim. - . 

For the fast two months the tt?-. 


The Finns: 
Gutsy, but 
Underarmed 


LAYING rroN A 
LITTLE THICfC, AREN T 
WE, tAELGOR&ACHEV?„ 


By John Ausland 


O SLO —Several years ago Gener- 
al Bernard Rogers, the NATO 


al Bernard Rogers, the NATO 
commander, angered many Finns: In 
an interview with a Finnish journal- 
ist, he expressed doubt about the 
F inns * w illingness to defend their 
country. The story provoked a storm 
of protest; President Mauno Koivisto 
called General Rogers “impertinent.” 
The general later backed off. After 
seeing the reaction to his earlier state- 
menu he said, he had a better appre- 
ciation for Finnish combativeness. 

The Finns are still sore about the 
original commenu some of them (old 
me during a recent visit to Helsinki 
But while the general’s doubts about 
F innis h eagerness to fight may have 
been Qi-informed, he would have 



33 ^ 


been justified, I believe, in raising 
questions about the effectiveness of 


questions about the effectiveness of 
the F innish military. 

During World War II the Finns 
suffered terrible casualties, but they- 
emerged with great confidence in 
their fighting ability. They had 
fought the Red Army to a standstill 
twice, first during the 1939-1940 
Winter War, then during what the 
Finns call the War of Continuation. 
In 1944 they drove their erstwhile 
German allies out of Finland. This 
was a part of the price the Finns paid 
for peace with the Soviet Union. 

The 1947 treaty with the Allied 
powers limits the size and equipment 
of Finland’s armed forces. For exam- 
ple. the air force can have only 60 
fighter planes and no bombers. The 
navy can have no submarines. 

In 1948, Finland concluded a 
friendship treaty with the Soviet 
Union. The key provision requires 
the Finns to consult with Moscow in 
the event of a European crisis. Osten- 
sibly. these consultations would be 
held to determine how best to defend 
Finland. Nikita Khrushchev sought 
to invoke this clause during the 1961 
Berlin crisis, but President Llhro 
Kekkonen talked him out of iL 

Today, Finland has an air force 
with more than 50 Soviet and Swed- 
ish fighters. It also has a modest navy. 
But the backbone of the armed forces 
is the army. Though the army is limit- 
ed by the 1947 treaty to 34,400 
troops, the Finns have managed to 
create a substantial system of trained 
reserves. Finnish authorities claim 
that, when fully mobilized, the three 
services would be 700,000 strong. 

But the defense budget is not large 
enough to support such sizable forces 
for any long period. A 1981 report by 
a defense commission concluded: 
“An invader’ s advance can be slowed 
down and losses inflicted upon him, 
but the capability of the army is 
weakening in a way that threatens 
our ability to contain and defeat the 
invader even in the most vital areas.” 

As a result of this report, the gov- 
ernment decided to concentrate on 
training and equipping “fast deploy- 
ment forces” of about 250,000 men. 
It also decided to make yearly in- 
creases in the military' budget Even 
so, the defense budget amounts to 
only 1.5 percent to 2 percent of the 
gross national product The Finnish 
military is playing a losing game. 


cot a a 

Deadline for Pretoria’s Bankrupt Leaders »£ 

J X • mtervw 


B OSTON — A white South Afri- 
can. a man who has not been at 


U can, a man who has not been at 
all involved in politics, spoke on the 
telephone from Cape Town the other 
day. “Why can’t we get past this?" he 
asked in anguish. “Why can’t we do 
what we hare to do?” 

His questions gp to the heart of the 
crisis in South Africa. That wonder- 
ful country, so rich in physical and 
human resources, has to make the 
transition to a nonracist society. But 
an essential ingredient is missing. 
That is leadership. 


B j Anthony Lewis 


The white political leadership that 
as held power since 1948 is bank- 


has held power since 1948 is bank- 
rupt in the most profound sense; un- 
able to contemplate change. Presi- 
dent Pieter W. Botha and his 
government make plain by their ac- 
tions every day that they are not 
going to lead their people through the 
necessary transition. Their policy is 
only to hold on to power bv force. 

The government is not only unwill- 
ing to lead the country away from 
racism itself: it is determined to crush 
all others who are willing, black and 
white. Hundreds of black leaders 
have been swept into detention. 
Whites making the most modest at- 
tempt to reach across the racial di- 
vide hare met official rebuke. Eight 
students at Stellenbosch University, 
the leading Afrikaans-language uni- 
versity, planned to go to Zambia to 
meet young members of the African 
National Congress. Mr. Botha with- 
drew their passports. 

A Boston Globe correspondent, 
Ben Bradlee Jr„ interviewed those 
students. Their words said a lot about 
what might be possible in South Afri- 
ca with the needed leadership. 

“It’s an infamous lie that all blacks 
in this country hate whites and vioe 


versa," said Hennie Bester, a law stu- 
dent “You can only get through this 
myth if yon get together and talk. 
Dialogue is the only way we can get 
out of this mess, and to hare that 
stopped is sad.” 

Sad: the exact word. That a will- 
ingness to talk and adapt has sur- 
vived apartheid's cruelties is a mir- 
acle of hope, one to be treasured, not 
met with prison and hate. • . 

Miss Bester said also that “90 per- 
cent of the people in Soweto support 
the ANC It doesn’t help to deny they 
exist-" But the government last week 
closed Soweto to all journalists, for- 


eign and domestic. It does not want will not operate in such conditions, 
anyone to know what Soweto feels, or Universities also have.a response 
what it is doing there. bflhy. More American univenitic 


office at m eariy hour bad fatten to 
Hind Baki a staff member who was 
g bom in Syria, immigrated to the; 

— m • United Stares in 1976, and became a : . 

naturalized arizen m toe. Only aff • 
IggyKISERIiliiP' ! earlier than usual appointment 

brought Mr. Odeh to the-booby— 
trapped office door oti the morning' 
of OcL II instead of Mr. Baki. 

Thus do the anxnnstaooesacder- 
cot another theory of the case: that 

* f - 1 Mr: Odeh had been singled out for-. 

l77//)r I /yj/lKrS killing in retahatioo for a televised 

intemew the night before m which he - 

rafiffd for greater of the. ~ 

many South Africans who had deter- Palestine Liberation Organization 
minedly closed their eyes to k • . and its chairman, Yasser Arafat. 

Western banks are now negotiating Ttoson oftalk isanafluamLtoaloi,. 
with. South Africa, and tiny coaid of people. But it ishanfly ground for /*. 
again make a great tfifferenpe: That terOT-bambing. Mr. *WR widely, 
would be by saying, for strong rear . described «s having been a gentle 
sons of sdf-interest, that there will be Miow, a part-time poet as weU asa 
no new loans unless Pretoria releases scholar, he had apparently de- , 
imprisoned leaders and commits h- nonneed’ the slnp hijacking in partic- 
sdi to change through aeg oti a h om niar «nH . tereonsn in gpn n al in a - 
American companies operating in segment nn> 

South Africa can also have an impact. Inanv case, there is enough evi- 

W of them hare had h^ul mo- ^ t^^ was the^!, and ' ; 
grams focWack employees. Bfct those inTmndkucsi the aim. A bomb was 
employees must go home to, town- removed last summer from ADCs 
ships now occupied by^annyand po- Boston office: Hind Baki tells or a 
lice unconstrained by law. The tone rash of bomb threats against the San- 
for ameliorative measures has pased. m Ana ADC office, the church where 
It is tune to say that U.S. business Mr. Oddi’s funeral was held, the - 
win not operate m such coadmons. Arab Connmmity Center m Los An- - 


In the absence of leadership from 
the white rulers, the hope for dia- 
logue and transition has to be nur- 
tured from outride. The United 
States should be showing the way, 
because its voice counts the most in 
Pretoria. But here, too, political lead- 
ership is wanting. 

The president of the United States 


Universities also have.a response gdes, and the Islamic Center of 
bflhy. More American universities southern CaHonria. 


( rim-fir 


have recently chosen to sell thSr 
shares in companies doing business 
in South Africa. Others continue to 
rqect divestiture; among them the 
key figure is die president of Harvard 
Univerarty. Derek Bok. ; 

Mr. Bok leads an admirable pro- 
gram to bring more black South Afri- 
cans to the United States to study. 


has had nothing to say about the There is no doubt of his moral con- 
mourning official savagery in South cem, or his good faith in opposing 


Africa in recent weeks. Nothing 
about the blacks killed and impris- 
oned by the police. (Would he nave 
been sflaxt if they were white?) Noth-. 


divestiture. But the crisis in South 
Africa has taker so menacing a turn 
that I think more is required 
There is a course open to Mr. Bok 


mg even wheat he spoke to the United and others that would be immediate- 


Nations about the world’s wr< 
But in democratic societies 


Iy useful: to call on tire companies in 
which tiie universities hold shares to 


can act when politicians fail That start putting out of South Africa un- 
was made powerfully ckar by Ameri- Jess there is a real oonumtinest to 


can bankers last summer. They re- 
fused to renew loans with a South 
Africa with such a clouded future; 
Their action brought reality home to 


ch a nge by Jan. 1, the deadline in the 
bank talks. That may be a last chance 
to save South Africa from tragedy. 
The New York Times 


Nakasone: The Cowboy Boots Fit Fine 


Costs, especially for equipment, are 
rising faster than the defense budget. 

Within the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization, the main question 
asked about the Finnish military is 
whether it could prevent the Soviet 
Army from crossing northern Inn- 
land to attack Norway. Finnish offi- 
cials say that Pentagon and NATO 
military leaders do not understand 
conditions in northern Finland. Nor, 
they say, do outsiders understand 
Finnish tactics. 

To generate the needed forces in a 
crisis. Finland would have to mobi- 


N EW YORK — In Japan, P rime 
Minuter Yasuhiro Nakasone is 
considered to be a politician with a 
difference. That has both compli- 
mentary and uncomplimentary con- 
notations. His opponents sometimes 
refer to him as a “weather vane,” 
charging that he shifts with the pre- 
vailing political winds. ' 

But his supporters note that he has 
staked out a more positive, even ag- 
gressive, role for Japan in interna- 
tional affairs, gaining Japan some of 
the respect it deserves within the 
Western allianc e 

Pointedly, he included hims elf and 
his country as part of “the West” as 
he talked during an interview here 
last week about the Reagan-Gorba- 
chev summit meeting, and about his 


By Hobart Bowen 


Mr. Nakasone’s dose rdationshi 
with Mr. Reagan has stood him we 


valued dollar, than trade . barriers. 

So after years in which Japan dung 
to a philosophy of “export or die,” 
Mr. Nakasone is trying to lead it 
slowly into a new stage of devd<$>- 


in Japan, a country that dotes on meat in which imports are a crucial 
things American despite the current demenLTbis, he says, will force the 
unpleasantness over Japan’s embar- country “to chanae ihf. pmririm ir 


So we are not talking about one ... 
case. We are taltog about a climate ' 'bn 
erf hare. Its ugly, inflammatory nature.. 

• is best captured in the statenent by.*-. * * 

Irv Rubin, a leader of the extremist" ■ ^ 
Jewish Defense League, which is rou-^ ( yfe 
tinely suspected of having a band in- s? . 
anti-Arab violence but which denied:' " 
a hand in this case. “I have no tears .. 
for Mr. Oddi.” Mr. Rubin said. “He. . ■; V 

got exactly what he deserves.” ~ * 

Which brings up something else ‘ L 

that ought to go without saying; The; . 

ADC is a respectable organization, . - " 

headed by a fonner U^. senator of . ^ . ‘ 

Lebanese descent, James Abourezk ^ 

of Sourii Dakota, and dedicated tiCl * 
improving American public under- .. * V ^ 

. standing of American interests in the"? '. , - . 
Middle East,,asAJDC sees them. If i£“ - ‘ 
no different from the American-Is-^ ir =^- 

raefi Public Affairs Committee, but^ ' ^ 

with far less powerful a constituency.?,^ •; 

The issue here is not the rights and .- * 4 '—u 
wrongs of the argument, out ihef a " 
wrongs when the argument is canied.- . 
to brutal extremes — by other side- Afr-. -.y* 
That is what happened tcrAJex Odeh'" / 

as it did to Leoit KJmghcff er. Thai it r» ' 

can happen in California as wdl as I; - 
on a ermse ship in theMcditemuKaik^ (It 
is answer enough to those who woul^ 
wish away the Arab-Isradi conflict 
with “beni gn neglect.” • 

Washington Past Writers Creep. 




unpleasantness over Japan's embar- country “to change the economic and 
rassmgty lafge trade surplus. social fabric or structure so that H 


lize. The timing would depend partly own new approach to a more fruitful 
on the outcome of any consultations relationship with the Soviet Union. 


How is it that he and President 
Reagan hit it off so wdl? The re- 
sponse, this time through an inter- 
preter “We bad the same vibes.” 

Mr. Nakasone said be admires Mr. 
Reagan because die president re- 
minds him of John Wayne. It would 
appear that Mr. Nakasone sees not 
only Mr. Reagan but himself as ex- 
emplifying the decisiveness of the he- 
roic movie character. 


will be a harmonious one with the 
world.” Anti quitted systems of distri- 
bution and outer im p e diments to im- 
ports will have to be whittled away. 

It will not be easy, largely because 
the Japanese instinct is to save rather . 
than spend. The current sarins rate 


ra&OTK* XSCSS': ^ 

iphfying toe decisiveness of the he- ume low 2 percent in the. United board could not bensedaramsthnn? ■ VT 

l 5 f mc ^ c , character - - States. That means there is a low and that President Ferdinand Mar- 

Mr - N v ^ s ^ e PCTsonal standard of living in Japan, «* would use rite roHire “to advance 

V'W; t* had favored a pradaual cornered to the nafiotfTmdS Ws home-pown oSy." 

[her than a parliamentary form of weaflh end power, as people save™ neco^ctnwtfSeiilingoflhe- - i 
vemmMt for Jman, so thai its oft- Aar effldren's educS and their highest coon of our IsirfwBrayi. ' ' 
ascould enjoy the direct election of own old-age needs. be debated es™Sv^««!!iSStlv 'L 

sir chief of state. “That would Mr. Nalra«nn» i - - — j - esp^rjaijy by people J X 


LETTERS 

Manila’s Miranda Rule 

The editorial “ Manila Mocks U.S. ' 
Law” (Ocl 8) is unfair to die Pfaffip--"- 
pine government and the FffiphKr^ 
people. It holds that the Philippine* ~2 
Supreme Court cried in ruling that 


under the 1948 Soviet-Fmnish treaty. 
The uncertainties this would generate 
would add to the doubts about the 


There was a time when Japanese 
prime ministers sought to avoid at- 
tention at international conferences. 


capabilities of Finnish forces. NA- Not Mr. Nakasone, who is as adept 
TO’s concerns about a Soviet attack as Margaret Thatcher at elbowing for 


across northern Finland are, to this a spot next to President Reagan at 


degree. 

Why 


understandable. 


picture-taking sessions during eco- 


ty do Lhe Finns not spend more nomic summit conferences. 


on defense? In Helsinki I heard many During the interview, Mr. Naka- 


answers to this question. The most sone abandoned Japanese formalities 
persuasive was that the fragile con- and got down to shirt-sleeves in an 


sensus among the political parties uncomfortably warm hotel room, 
barely supports the modest increases Overriding a press aide's warning to 
L, i 04 i ir ik, l. _i.. : 


the war, he had favored a presidential compared to the e 
rather than a parliamentary form of wealth and power . 
government for Japan, so that its dti- their children’s edi 
zens could enjoy the direct election of own old-age needs, 
their chief of state. “That would Mr. Nakasone, w 

people, nesaxo.. teem that ends m November 1986 determined on tire hasU nf other- - 

Of course, toe parij amm taryf onn Underdo roles of his Liberal-Demo^ countries’ laws. Suffice it to say that" 
(rf^vero^rat was chosen, pstiy so maticPany, there is a twoWlfr^ : tending 

there would be no rival to the earner- But such rules can Kp _ TT rotnepga*. : 

or. But Mr. Nakasone said faeto- ' Smffinriy^SS^ 
ducts business “by appealing directly about “this dedicate question.” wS vised 
to the people” because that is the besr is one of the h«aeS% 

way to serve ibrir needs. He added, “lam not a dictator.^^Kff^ v ’ 

however, that.whfle his approach Was His political oroonem* if 

actte-Ammon ^ternTie sayheiftoo pfo-aSScS K w'SSy 15 a blow m 

was getting some jealousy from tojunro at Mr. Reagan’s biddino tw . 

some factions in my jSrty." Mr. Nakasone hSvLiKS?^ cfoT Sfi?' ^ 

Recently Mi. *ak£»ae has been of the John 
uiging the Janatiese toput asidethdr the average dfa^who KL ft 


agreed on in 1981. If the government me to stick only to “light” issues over 
sought id spend much more, the con- lunch, Mr. Nakasone invito! ques- 


sensus would collapse, leaving Presi- tions about the upcoming Reagan- 
dent Koivisio’s Social Democratic Gorbachev meeting and volunteered 


Party deeply divided. 

In the end, Finland, like most West 


uaroachev meeting and volunteered 
thaL “on the record is O.KL” 

He is considered the Japanese poli- 


European countries, proceeds on the tician most like American politicians. 


rountries’ laws. Suffice it to say that ; . ; 
the ruling gave more teeth totheoghCi 
against self-incrimination guaranteed 
in our constitution, which, when re--- 1 ! 
vised in 1973, adopted America's/!;- 
Miranda rule. Even the opposition nt-- - 


assumption that nothing will happen Is this a fair comparison? “Yes," he 
to test its military forces. Let us hope said, answering in English. U I think 


this assumption is correct. 

International Herald Tribune. 


said, answering in English. “I think 
so. My way of talking is somehow like 
the American way.” .... 


trade surplus won tne umtea Mates Nakasone show the Japanese flao 
has dimbed ro an unsustainable levrf when summit Icaden m^ahroarL 
even if the cause is mme-anovei-/: - The Washington 


GREGORIO S! CENDAnX, 


of 

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U-S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 


'WlWSMBOHioiii 


Page 9 




X '-i '.X ' 

•i 



ECUGr^s 

sue in U S. 


Bj JAMES STERNGOLD 

N York Times Service ' ‘ : 

“^ The Znn^CaiTi^mtk attract- 

S=ssa?jg 

•;• -^£ l i£SE£ 2 S? 22 ^^ »»««. 


" '"•w'l - a P^ce of pro: calledan 


. . ihat-onecan 
savings accotmis, trade 


' r. a, • 1 St,L 1 \ * piece OI pj 

•. “■_■ 'rah iX m a w ®D e L but there are __ 

vSuTSJt^ r® 1 - < ? B * t v cardfi towmhafcd'm ECU& Its 
■ ..:. -T mi V?.- °? a weighted basket of 10 Buopdm ameades. 

_. . '■'■■*.''* I cunraUy stands at about 84 


: ^-j’ cents. 

1 j ^ 6x51 b°zid to be 

t ■■ ^ denominated in ECUs was of- 




— —i^iA/uswasoi- • • ■ « •. .» 

.... fered m the Euromarket in C Otllimagi on argued 

• ** W* 1 hfe Ap I^ i®** '^hat broke the ice, - *1*4 t u rfjr _ 
Euromarket offerings 


an index of sorts. 


-Mfe-T* 1 f“ u "“'onxarKet offerings 
• ' J *fc;. have smee picked up, with al- 

$8 billion worth fcy ur d . 

The distinct advantage' of 

1 X: Omj* is xhal &*!•** insuiaied fiomthe 

7 !hc S-wV 1 * sharp swings that might hit one currency because of pofitkal or 


Minebea 
To Merge 
With Unit 

Takeover Offer 
Led to Decision 

Agmcv Fmce-Prme ■ 
TOKYO — Minebea Co, _ 
leading manufacturer of bail bear- 
ings, announced Monday that it 

was merging with a subsidiary 
clothing sides company to ward off 
a joint takeover bid by two foreign 
companies. 

Mmcbea's president. Takami 
T akahashi . said ax a news confer- 
ence that die merger with Kanc- 
mori Col, effective April 1, would 
raise Minebea’s capital to about 17 
billion yen ($79 million ) Both 

companies signed the agreement on 


"f - „ —■£> » * * «**< wuiACUVY DOCOUSC 

v- 7 - b;*** eC ^^l^Z e l° P ^ n J S - **“» have ajartefbuift-in hedge 

• >J =>' £** ■ .v » deve3o P*d some appeal to fim.juy.1 rAxym 

" a States ‘J? e fim ECU bonds to be issued mSe 

'■=■• .tiat t u “!“ States were offered last November. Since S58S 
.. ’--Xa b “ Q * old » *«»o«Jnig to Bear. Storms &Co. 

• Ibey have had particular appeal in the Unitod States because 

. mvcst o^aad companies are seekAngjat^eniative to the 
' - h “J Peaked in wS^after its five-, 

: «iw for l®!> Su f? c r TT» diverse base of the ECU thus makes it an 
A ve ^ e wt ? which to hedge against a faffing dollar: 


’ traoKfL^ 1 is: VT — ~ ~ « ns«n i » t « tailing oouar. . 

•• -• sj?* Where tins cash market goes, tlm fbxnzes and options markets 

Sf S'? 1 ^ U f* 110 sooncr ww* ^ ECU bonds trading 

^ trcet 111411 *h B otdianges developed contracts an the 


•’ 7 ECU. 

— --urli hori^j 

.'*• - '!«f rtX,; ^ I T JJREE applications have been matte. The Phgadcfahia 
; 'X imite' I Stock Exdmige, which aheady trades a lu>^ of currency 
in x - a - options, has proposed an option on the ECU; the Chicago 
'•' a jp, Exchange wants to tr^le an ECU future, ami die New 

uiui] &- Cotton Exchange has proposed m ECU future, too. 

! { : 04a tV. these contracts are Hkdy to be quite successful” 

•“* <i«r on t. William Byers, director of futures research at Bate, Steams. 

‘ 15 *fcidafiui J nve stois m tins country usually bet for or against die dollar. 


suite Tt. V , , IU1 M Against me uuuu. 

■y. .inato;, i t5 ^y don i care what the other currency is. Now, they wlQ have a 
; '£skt. rfj! ; safer vehicle." - • • 

"jc hca sa Mr. Byers added, though, that the contracts were hot expected 
' Sr® 'fw so™® time. - 

• - ‘-'i -jot nfc.!: A regulatory issue has arisen in regard to the Philadelphia 
r:X rraa exchan g c * apphealion to trade the ECU option. AH of its otfcer 
currencv ootions are under thr. imioiiotinn nt tii* T«r...;i:.. 


. M i nn a x in niny u aminv 

cfis*EL ? * UI1 - WBr " a °“ im 1WS1 mat ended the turf battle they had been 
7- \j ; (VjTk^firng over the plethora of new financial products and who 
.. - i.tj regulate them. - 

• : 'i"--3n7?oeis* -l? i i til S^J u T Iv ^ whcn ^e cxcfaange ffled its application 
• uc 2 KC ^*7 ^ Commodity Futures Trading Commission 

~ • mi.tfei- objected, arguing that the ECU. was not a currency bnt an mdex 

- r-rsm™ 80x15 11141 ^ samequaKttestrfn commodity, and thnsin^it 
” ' lVk, oe better regulated by the futures trading cn mrnkqrm 
■ :mee„ “It’s not like a dollar that you can hold in your hands,” Endda 

•'/ ss fc-r Rosa ’. director of optkms regulation at the SBC, agreed; “But to 

- ::..* S “*» WI “ ®1I Pre^Tt looks,|ike a co&epcyjiWf^re ar gmug 
■rjng; jj i semantics here.” She said the is»ie would ^come- before dm* 

.. ••". y,‘j£ i £Commissumin.Novemberforadeciaon. . 

- :1l iza: Even Wltil 4 res dhition then, it is expected that none of the 

'J (hf4s> - . (Contfamed on Page 15, CoL 3) 



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Turn IMS 4SMSX 2XO VMI? 3J21 177** 

2UM 3M4* H42 7U0 "lUt* 7UP VtM • mg 

X14U XM» DM* 3*J»* - 0.1214 •_ 72425* 40W* UBS* 

- ■ MrSasi 1 ECU m*® uw: inw am iiai* non 4«jn un ituk 

” SDR UWM aW5B 211 •*. U' XMB S7.TH7 - 2JBM HIM 

' '7 CJofJnas In London ontJ Zurich, flxlnas In other Eurm»aa ctotmn. Nut Yar*njHstit4 PM. 


Mr. Takahashi w id the 
plan had been considered “for 
some time’’ but the takeciver bid by 
Trafalgar Holdings Tjt H of the 
United States, headed by Charles 
and Britain’s Cleo Intema- 
— had prompted the decision. 
Trafalgar and Gten Intanatkm- 
al announced Friday that they had 
jointly offered 308 billion yen to 
buy all Minebea shares, inducing 
those reserved fear the conversion of 
warrants and convertible bonds. 
They said that they would go ahead 
with .a tender offer if Mmebea’s 
executive board failed to accept the 
offer by Nov. 4. 

Executives of the two foreign 
companies were to arrive in Japan 
Tuesday, but Mr. Takahashi reaf- 
firmed that Minebea would “in no 
way* respond to the bid, which, he 
said, would not be compatible with 
Japanese practices. 

When the takeover hid became 
apparent last month, Minebea 
made a 16-billion-yen issue of 
bonds, convertible into 20 million 
ordinary shares. Of that am, 6 
billion yen was reserved for Japa- 
nese financial institutions and the 
remaining 10 billion yen for Mr. 
Takahashi and his 
Trafalgar and Glen Internation- 
al earlier announced they had 
bought more than 30 percent of 
Mmebea’s issue stock. 

The Tokyo Slock Exchange sus- 
pended trading in Minebea and 
kanemori during the day Monday. 

Under the agreement, Minebea 
would absorb Kanemori and re- 
build Into an enterprise with a com- 
bined work force of about 5,500. 
The agreement values 10 shares in . 
Minebea as worth 18 in Kanemori. 

” Mr. Takahashi said Monday that 
there was ho need for him to meet 
the negotiators from Trafalgar and 
.Gten International 
“We have not even received a 
request for a meeting. They can go 
ahead and file an application with 
the Finance Ministry if they want 
to make a takeover bid in Japan.” 

The Finance Ministry can op- 
pose foreign takeover of a company 
working for Japanese national de- 
fense efforts. 


By Caroline E. Mayer 

Wtvkmgun Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Luciano Benetton once 
joked that the only competition to his Italian 
clothing boutiques came from fast-food chains, “if 
people are too busy eating hamburgers, they can- 
not buy my clothes," be said. 

But Mr. Benetton, whore 20-year-ok! company 
sdls sweaters, jeans and other casual apparel in 53 
countries, in fact befieves that the two of 
products appeal to a similar clientele that can 
afford both. 

‘The same Idds that are eating and consuming 
hamburgers are the same kids buying our rlnthin? 
They are the consuming generation,*’ he said while 
in Was hin g t on car her this month on one of Ins 
frequent US. trips to tour his stores: 

Last year, Benetton’s 3,000 shops sold about 39 
millio n garments. Benetton has become both the 
world’s largest consumer of wool and maker of 
knitwear, with revenues of 5350 milli on a year. 

Benetton came to the United States five years 
ago. The company already has more than 250 U.S. 
shops, with at lest one boutique in each of the 50 
sates. In Manhattan alone; there are a d oro i 
Benetton shops within five utiles (about 8 kilome- 
ters) of one another. Within the next three years, 
Benetton hopes to quadruple the mimber of its 
shops in the United States. 

_ Toe shops, with their distinctive kelly gre en 
signs, are distinguished from roost efathiwg stores 
by their sparse furnishings. Only a handful of 
clothes are displayed on racks; the rest are folded 
neatly and stacker! colorfully on modern shelving 
that lines the walls all the way up to the cwKmp 
"Y ou are seeing a company that is sweeping 
America,” noted Knn Barnard, president ofBar- 
nartTs Retail Marketing Report. “The company 
has emexgod as a powerful competitor in the Amer- 
ican retail marketplace. Their formula of offering a 
very narrow but deep selection of clothing is work- 
ing very beautifully for them,” Mr. Barnard add^t 
Some financial analysis wonder whether Benet- 
ton is a mere fad that wiD exp eri ence a slump just 
as Levi Strauss A Co. and other denim enmpaniet 
did in the 1970s. But Luciano Benetton is confi- 
dent the chain is here to say. 

“We have a lot of European experience anH we 
have a European virion of fashion that gives us a 
teg to stand on. Four times each year we create a 
fashion collection. That means we have to stay 
with the masses and know what the market is ail 
about,” be said. 

For Alan Pennington, president of a New York 
retail consulting firm, Pennington Associates, Ben- 
etton represents a “fantastic success story.” 

“Like most companies I'm aware of that have 
done extraordinarily well, Benetton has thrown 
out die rule book and done thing s conventional 
wisdom said couldn’t be done,” he said. 

For example, Mr. Pennington said, Benetton has 
“set up 250 stores in no time at aD.” Additionally, 
“they have taken a relatively limited line and a 
highly focused line” of clothing and have succeed- 
ed in attracting a continuing stream of customers 
to the stores. 

Perhaps even more significant, Benetton “has 
m a naged to cross cultures and succeed, which is 
almost unheard of In marketing. It’s hard enough 
to sell the same toothpaste to both European and 
American c o nsumers,” Mr. Pennington said. 

Throughout the worid, Benetton has followed a 
ample formula: It bypasses department stores and 
sdls its manufactured goods duectiy to consumers 
in its own boutiques, which are licensed to local 
businesses under a type of franchise system. 

“As far as we’re concerned, h would be corrup- 
tion" to sdl Benetton in a department store, the 
50-y ear-old Mr. Benetton said through an inter- 
preter. “Benetton is a winning product," he said. 


Benetton Boutiques * Sweep A 

Austere Formula 
Sells Sportswear 


BENETTON 
RETAIL GROWTH 
BY COUNTRY 

-3,000 

Outlets 


■2,500 <: .t Av v y,:d 


:2;000ft-'.5BK>. 


1,500' 


OTHER 


NORTH 

AMERICA 

UNITED 

KINGDOM 

GERMANY 


ICHWNSS 

FRANCE 



^ 1,000 


Chrysler Net Up 
21 % in Period; 
AMC Posts Loss 


“It’s not possible to deliver through a department 
store because hs effect would be diluted; people 
would be selling it in different ways” than what 
Benetton's formula dictates. 

The licensed bootiques are the simplest and 
fastest way to give the client an item right off the 
factory line at a good price, Benetton officials 
contend. 

One of Benetton’s Innovations was to produce 
its garments in unbleached wool Thus, when a 
store owner places a rush order of 200 pink gar- 
ments, the factory' can dye the wool — and make 
sure the colons are exactly the same by using the 
same dye batch — and deliver them to the store 
faster than another manufacturer, starting from 
scratch, could deliver a batch of sweaters to a 
department store. 

As a result of this system, Benetton does not 
have to make a large batch of dothing in advance 
(Contmned on Page 13, Col 1) 


The AisuaaieJ Press 

HIGHLAND PARK, Michigan 
— Chrysler Corp„ despile heavy- 
spending on sales incentives and a 
big tax bill, said Monday that its 

third -quarter earnings rose 21 per- 
cent from a year earlier, to a record. 

Completing the third-quarter 
earnings reports of the U.S. auto- 
makers, however, tiny American 
Motors Corp. said later Monday 
that it had a loss in the period 
compared with a profit a year earli- 
er. 

Chrysler, the third -largest U.S. 
automaker, said net income rose to 
S3 16.2 million, or S2.75 a share, 
from S261.6 million, or SI. 88 a 
share, in 1984’s third quarter. Sales 
rose 9.8 percent, to S4j billion, 
from S4.I billion, Chrysl'rr said. 

“ T think the numbers ieU the sto- 
ry,” Lee A lacocca. Chrysler's 
chairman, said at a news confer- 
enc ■. “We're on a roll here.” 

The third quarter usually is the 
cos best period Tor the automakers 
because of retooling for new mod- 
el l However, Chrysler’s next wave 
new cars and trucks will not be 
educed until next year, shifting 
tuose costs to later quarters. 

“We've got to be doing some- 
thing right because GM’s auto 
business was down and Ford's was 
down and we set records," Mr. la- 
cocca said. 

Last week. General Motors 
’■up., the world's largest car mak- 
reponed a third-quarter profit 
5517 million. However, GM re- 
ported an operating loss of S20.Q 
million on its primary business, 
making and selling cars. 

Ford Motor Co. reported third- 
quarter net income of S313.1 mil- 
lion, placing it in the rare position 
of trailing Chrysler in the profit 
category. 

American Motors Corp-, the 
fifth largest U.S. automaker and a 
46-peroent owned unit of France's 
Renault, said Monday that it bad a 
loss of $19.1 million in the third 
quarter versus a profit of S2.5 mil- 
lion a year earlier. Sales were flat, 
at Sl-03 billion versus SI.02 billion 
in the 1984 quarter. 


Ford Thtinderhird-Mereur, C:u- 
gar cars are made. 

The latest report marks the 
eighth consecutive lime that Cfcr.«- 
ler has reported record profit ir z 
particular quarter. 

However. Mr. lacocca said he 
expects the string “to break" in the 
fourth quarter because of the 0:t. 
16 strikes in Lhe United States and 
Canada. Chrysler’s 70.000 l’.< 
autoworkers returned to their jobs 
Monday after ratifying a new con- 
tract. The 10,000 striking Canadi- 
ans went back a week earlier. 

The strikes probably will c •.* 
Chrysler S150 million to S200 imi- 
lion against fourth-quarter profit-, 
Mr. lacocca said. Chrysler has esti- 
mated that the settlements will aid 
more than SI billion to its co-ts 
over the next three years. 

In the first nine months, Cor.y 
ler said it earned S 1 .4 billion, or S 1 2 
a share, down from 51.8 biiJion. or 
SI 3.97 a share, a year earlier. Reve- 
nue rose to S15.S billion from S14.2 
billion a year earlier. 


Tin-Trading 
Suspension 
Is Continued 


“Chrysler 'looked a good deal 
better than GM or Ford," said Da- 
vid Healy, who follows the industry 
for Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. 
in New York. “Chrysler's profit 
margins now are well over twice 
GM’s. It’s the worid turned upside 
down.” 

Mr. lacocca said sales incentives 
during the quarter, including a six- 
week rebate and cut-rate financing 
war, cost the automaker "in the 
5150-million range." However, he 
said the actual costs were lower 
because of the extra business gener- 
ated by the incentives. 

GM and Ford each said the fi- 
nancing specials cut into profits, 
and Ford suffered a local strike at 
the Ohio plant were its high-profit 


.... lijJlXortd! 

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BIS Issues Warning 
On Changes in Lending 

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5 S 
Tk 413/14 
1% 7VU 


Baums: Reuters. Cammrnmoat, Crimt 
Lvomah. Banker Token. 


StarUM 

4Hr4tb ' 1MMW . «r«b 
2 months IMP. 444XW ' 4-flb im-irw 9W-9H 

ji' 3 months 8W-SW. Mb-5 4M»X4b tlWr-71 <W -9 <i/U»etk 

4 months .KM. SM*. . 4tw-4bfc Ulft-llfb Mfc-nth 
Iwor SIMM 4«r4 <M. llWl! K 11411* 

_ I Sources: Maroon Guaranty itSoUar, dm. SF. Pound. FF): Uoya* Dank IBCU); temper* 
(SDR I. Rates aooftcabte In totorhmlt rt w ntt of SI mltnonmMmim {pr ooafvalonfj. ' 

1 lIb Key Mwey Brtra Oa. as 

!? A.Mir^ • 

v f; Brokur Loon Rote 
. ComPtaterfft-mttm 
' >•' Kmotti Traosonr BHl* 

■■ $•' ,-sS tmontt Tnasucy Bills 

ansHtrnm 

' . - 'J |y .• cin 4IM1 dan 


2 months 
2 months 


BX.-6* 
8 h-ts 
IM -Mb 
614 -Mb 
lYtmr . BU-Bl* 
Source: Reuters. 


'■Oct: 28 


1LS. MfeoRey Merket 

. .... .Oa.28 

Morrill LTWEti Reartr Aatts . 
JOdavoveroac vteld: 730 

Totarai* iMMrar Rate Indose 73TL 

Source: MnrriB Lvnch. Tolondo. 


By Carl Gcwirrz 

rmemadoaaJ Herald Tribute 

PARIS — A radical shift in the 
l e nding practices of international 
banks drew a warning from the 
Bank of ffitemationalSettlements 
Monday that these developments 
“may contain the seeds of future 
problems.” 

The innovation in leading prac- 
tices, which emerged as a result of 
the debt crisis that began in 1982, 
has seen direct bank leading re- 
placed by securhies-backed opera-, 
tions. The report says that for the 
first time, credits arranged under 
thesenew facilities outpaced classic 
syndicated bank lending by a ratio 
ci almost 2-1 in the first six 
m onmths of tbeis year. 

BIS, based in Basel, Switzerland, 
the so-called central bankers’ cen- 
tral bank, reported that medium- 
term facilities obtained by borrow- 
ers from banks for the issue of 
short-term securities totaled 522.4 
billion during the. first half of this 
year, nearly double the 512^5 bil- 
lion of syndicated bank loans. 

Using the second-quarter pa 
its refere n ce, the BIS said that the 
amount of note-issuance farifities 
is now running at an amnia! rate of 
556 billion. The volume of NIFs 
outstanding at midyear was esti- 
mated at 548 billion. 

The BIS warning about the 
growth of NIFs is no surprise. The 
Bank of England, and to a lesser 
degree the U.S. Federal Reserve 


Board and the Bundesbank, have 
already voiced concern about com- 
mercial banks’ substitution of di- 
rect loans that appear cm their bal- 
ance sheets with commitments that 
do not. 

Whereas the supervisory au- 
thorities have expressed concern 
about the accounting of these off- 
balance-sheet commitments, the 
BIS is worried that the banks are 
crowding themselves out of their 
primary and highly lucrative source 
of income. 

- The major concern of the BIS is 
twofold: that the banks are only 
being asked to lend directly to the 
weak, higher-risk credits, and that 
their underwriting obligations for 
the highest -quality borr o wers are 
only likely to be activated when the 
credit standing of those borrowers 
has deteriorated. 

The BIS notes that while the in- 

(Continued on Page B, CoL 4) 


Renter: 

LONDON — The London Met- 
al Exchange said Monday that it 
would extend through Wednesday 
a suspension in tin trading. The 
exchange first suspended trading 
last Thursday after the Internation- 
al Tin Council withdrew price sup- 
ports for the metal. 

Mike Brown, the LME’s chief 
executive, said that senior officers 
of LME-listed companies would 
meet with exchange directors late 
Monday to discuss the suspension. 
The exchange also has called for 
members to divulge their tin-trad- 
ing positions at a meeting sched- 
uled for Tuesday morning. 

The trading halt was called when 
the metal fell to £8,140 (SI 2.012) 
per metric ton and the ITC ran out 
of funds to prop the price. 

The ITC represents tin produc- 
ers and consumers, and tries to sta- 
bilize prices by buying the metal 
when the price is low and selling it 
when the price is high. 

Meanwhile, the U.S. General 
Sendees Administration said Mon- 
day that it would not quote a tin 
price or offer surplus tin for sale to 
ferro alloy contract holders. 

The agency said it is continuing 
its suspension of prices and offers 
because of the continued uncer- 
tainty in worid tin markets. 

The GSA will continue to make 
daily announcements on the status 
of its tin slocks, a spokesman said. 


Trade futures 

$1 ft round -turn 
^ AO commission 

Now you on trade forwes contracts wiii America’s largest fu lures 
cuaxtnt firm tor only 518 round-turn commission. This low rale even 
allows you to place yonr orders directly io our Chicago Trading Center 
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that you are our customer. Normal (mures rates never niyrrf S34.) 

In addition to low co mmi ssions we offer you pn / m imai and attentive 
service. For exanple, our Trading Center is open 24 hours so you can 
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Said your name to Hans Schulz. Hauptstr. 23. D-7120 Bieiigheim, West 
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Phone. 



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LI N D-WALDOCK I 

I 




Heap KMP 3Z7JS 
Uw a ttaw 8U0 
Ports (M5.4IM. SMI 
ZurteB .32425 



mw Yarn 

Luxembourg, Part* amt London offlcMAe- 
■ loot: Hon Ken ondJbrkh oceaha and 
dotting price*.' New York Comactamant 
contract A8 Price* RttXS. Seer 
Source: Reuters. 


Markets Closed 


Financial markets were closed Monday in Greece, Ireland. India and 
New Zealand because of holidays. . 


ARGENTINE 

REPUBLIC 

EXTERNAL IL5. % BONDS 

AND 

SONOS NOMlNATfVOS 

THE WESTON 
GROUP 

JEn^uznes /or 

CH-1003 LAUSANNE 
2 Roe de la Palx. 
Telex: 25869. 

TeU 021/20 17 41. 


AU of tht'W uicuniiet hare btren sold This announcement 
appears as a matter of record onh. 


1,760,000 Shares 

7 r In Vitro 
Care, Inc. 

Class B Non -Voting Common Stock 


Ocluher. J9N? 


Baer & Company 

Incorporated 



Have all the advantages 
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booklet containing detailed information about banking 
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The BCC Group has offices in 70 countries, its Capital 
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you to makefull use of the unique advantages offered in 
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4. Luxembourg is a stable, 
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Personal Banking in Luxembourg' to 

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INTERNATIONAL S.A. lu x^lmbourg 3 i£a uj 














Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1985 



Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Ulilllh* 

Industrial, 


Dow Jones Averages 


Own Hkm Law Lost ChO. 

Indus 13532$ 1J64J2 mm US9J9 + 147 

Trans 64742 *5139 64045 64S40 — 3-99 

Util 159,94 1S9JB 1S748 15926 + 0.10 

Camp SUM 55186 S45J4 550.10 — 0-03 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unc h on aed 
Toial Issuas 
Mew HWa 
New Lows 
Volume ua 
Volume dawn 


711 $58 

810 915 

39 34 

30 3D 

43JJS9J10 
39349720 


NYSE Index 


HUH LOW Close Wge 
Comeasim lawn io&» 10042 +u» 

Industrials 1J4-S2 12*85 12453 +008 

Tranw. 1025s (0120 702.12 — 075 

Utilities 5041 5U2 5041 + OJH 

Finance ii4ja n«J3 ivuo +005 


msEsmmsi 


Bar Seles 'son 

Oct. 25 142587 362,908 11082 

Oct- 24 161574 400,344 17,0*1 

Oct. 23 162.734 441,929 28573 

Dct.22 _— 154469 431194 11504 

Ocl 51 . 145.903 410107 14477 

■Included In it» sale, (laures 


Mondws 

MSE 


Closing 


vat. at 4 PMi nmm 

Prev.4PJH.val. 101,180800 

PnvcamslWaiedctose nrjsMW 


Tobies include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street end 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

( ia The Associated Press 



Standard & Poor's Index 


IncHntrlats 

Transit. 

ummes 

Finance 

Camomile 


High Law dam area 
20092 207.97 20092 +019 
16040 167-23 167.71 —049 
BSSJ3 824? 8133 +006 
TUB 2153 32-63 +006 
1SJJ6 186.93 18756 +024 


NASDAQ Index 


Composite 

indinhKUS 

Finance 

limroncg 

utmttcs 

Banks 

Tramp. 


eaj— atf 

■raw 

dote Ctrta Age 
289.10 — 031 207.71 
29063—043 M9J1 
732.5*— '014 379.15 
34646-039 3*346 
27145 — 080 .27146 
31263 +065 310.M 
36026—011 261.77 


AAAEX Sales 


4 P.M. volume 

Prev.JPJM. MoiMPP 
Prev. cam. vpVm>e 


1464 

list «*» 


AMEXStockJndex 




Prices Close Mixed on NYSE 


'-TtV 4/J 


Cm red Press ImematuwJt 

NEW YORK — Prices finished mixed Mon- 
day on the New York Stock Exchange in mod- 
erate trading after a last-hour blue chip rally 
pushed the Dow Jones industrial average into 
plus territory. 

The industrial average closed up 3.47 points 
at 1 359.99. The New York Stock Exchange 
index rose 0.06 to 108.42. The price of an 
average share rose two cents. 

Declines outpaced advances by an 8-7 ratio. 
Volume totaled 97.9 million, down from 101.2 
milli on Friday. 

Marvin Katz of Sanford C. Bernstein said the 
late buying was the result of weakness in the 
bond market and to investors' re aliza tion that 
equities, especially blue chips, are undervalued 
Sanford C. Bernstein has been Forecasting 
strong U.S. economic growth Tor the fourth 
quarter. Mr. Katz said the Dow would dimb 
above the 1,400 level before the end of the year. 

Other analysts have been concerned about 
the divergence between the Dow's performance 
and that of the broader market. 

“The blue-chip Dow industrial index is just a 
few points below its all-time high, but the 
broader market indexes are quite a bit bdow 
their respective peaks,” said Ralph Acampora 
of Kidder Peabody. 

The relative strength in the blue-chip issues 
has not filtered out into the broader market. Mr. 
Acampora said. Until it does, the sustainability 
of any rally is in question, he said 

Monte Cordon, director of research at Drey- 
fus Corp- said no trend has developed that is 
important enough to boost the market out of its 
trading range. 

“Economic signals are still mixed” Mr. Gor- 
don said “We've avoided a recession, but noth- 


ing has occurred that will have a significant 
bearing on the outlook for corporate earnings-'* 

Consolidated Edison was the most active 
NYSE-listed issue, unchanged at 35%. Southern 
Company followed up % to 20%. 

Texas Oil & Gas was third down 1 to 18. U.S. 
Steel Corp. said it expects to conclude talks with 
Texas Oil & Gas Corp. about a merger early this 
week. U-S- Steel was up Vi to 28%. 

UAL Inc., the parent of United Airlines, fell 
11k to 45%. It reported third-quarter earnings of 
46 cents, down from S1.75 in the year-earlier 
quarter. 

Among technology issues, IBM added 1% to 
129%. Digital Equipment rose 1% to 111%. 
Sony increased % to 18% and Control Data 
added % to 18%. Control Data reported a ihird- 
quarter loss. 

Texas Instruments dropped 2% to to 90%. 
After the market closed Friday, the comp an v 
reported a third-quarter loss and said it will 
dismiss 2J.00 workers. 

Honeywell eased % to 59%. It said its electro- 
optics division will cut its work force by about 
180 employees by the end of the year. 

Phibro- Salomon lost 'A to 36%. It announced 
a repositioning program for its non energy com- 
modities trading subsidiary Philipp Brothers 
Inc. that will result in the dismissal of about 600 
employees. 

Warner Lambert fell 1 to 35%. It has tempo- 
rarily suspended sales of its anti-arthritis drug 
Isoktcam. 

Monsanto dropped 1% to 42% after a finan- 
cial journal focused on lawsuits related to GJ3. 
Searle & Co.’s Copper-7 intrauterine device. 
Monsanto bought G.D. Searie & Co. in July. 


21 * 17* 
35 26V* 

tv-. zn 
2Z* 14V. 
30* 2SVa 
SO* 32 V* 
17 8* 

14* 16b 
24* 13* 
24* IS 
28 15 

25* 14* 
6 I* 
9* 1* 

ir* jk 
43* S3te 
17V, 14* 
54 Vi 42* 


Entekln 106 7 B 
Equfxs 1.14 34 

iamkpt 2J1 123 

lamas' 1.72 4.1 
Eajifec .16 1.7 
Erbnuit JO 12 
EssBus 44 21 
EsexCs .70 3J 
Estrlna 12 44 
EttlYl 5 40 24 

vlEvonP 


vlEvnptB 
ExCWa 172 42 
EzcMsr 146*109 
Exxon 340 62 


19* 19* 
32 31* 

§ 3* 
18* 
29* 29* 
42* 42* 
9* 9* 

13* 13* 
20 * 20 * 
19* tm 

IS* 16 

XPA 2» 
1* 1* 
Z* 1* 
3* 29k 
41 40* 

17 17 

54* S3* 


If* 

31*— * 
3*—* 
1876 + * 
79V. + Vi 

42*—* 
9*— * 
13* + * 
20 *—* 
19* 

16* 

22 *— * 

1* 

2* + * 
2 *— * 
■92* + * 
17 

S4* + * 


17 Month 
mao Law Slock 


to. Close 12 North 

IDEs Waft Lew OurLCKwl HWjLow SMCA 




40 2J 10 
.92 54 13 
26 14 14 


12 7J 13 
JO U 

10 

120 72 8 
450 91 
JO 34 11 
546 54 

120 2J 11 
240 44 5 
2-D40 18 
MS U 7 
1.12 4.1 a 
JO 5J 
AJlelZl 
2J8 

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MUM 

ifi U if 

40 3.4 14 
M U H 

240 8.1 20 
180 3.1 12 

iS s 9 

44 33103 
120 22 14 


£ 21 ” 
S3 74 9 

22 14 25 
IB U I 
J5B 13 24 
120 26 12 
200 44 10 
430 11-5 
450 115 
250 11.1 
1J9 72 
J71 

24 13 57 

5JQ 127 
250 125 
40 12 16 
JO 34 17 

44 32 17 
1« SJ 9 

\£ SB 

aa; 

.18 3 29 

US 34 25 
J6 44.1 

nap 8 

146 107 . 
22 32 9 
140 U 12 




26* 15* 
24* 19* 


JJ® 4J 9 109 



53* 31* 
27* 7* 



77 * 77 * 



& K 


65 

3J 14 
1102 
1440 9.1 
56 26 13 
46 34 20 
40 22 23 
IJO 12 16 
46 17 20 
22 

340 117 
40 11 13 
48 14 15 

1-29 42 m 
128 18 10 
140 104 11 
172 73 9 

406 4.1 6 

40 1.9 12 
22 22 37 
21 

.730 35 

28 22 
20 12 
48 25 12 
40 14 15 

18 

26 1.9 27 
140 44 13 
841 35 

140 10 1J 


22 7 15 

40 23 15 
50 24 B 
.17 14 9 
54 23 13 
180 27 14 
J4a 10 
UO 15 11 
IJO 12 33 
25 
7 


— * 
— * 
— % 
28* + * 
19* + * 





17* 14* 
18* It* 


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24* 24 

S 22 

J 5 
?SW 



»„+£ 23* IS WACOM 26 14 17 TO mt I «k»* * 

rJ* 10 So?* a i 3 ? Cl h 1 » lrtfc+ 51 


+ S 38 28* MOU 212 ™ 9 ™>» S5 ' KW 

-s a sb 35 


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■!■■£* •pSfg’&P if.-rir-rr f 



— “ ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS .(Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) 


Oct. 28, 1985 


Mot MW yoUx ou o la Hono art «o w ll >d by tto Foaa» m»trf wftti ttw ■xeagtlon of maw aaott bomd on Haoo prtco. 
TtMnMM-olnoi cymbals MIOMt Imuncy a* boa totkm* lumnti i Ml -da ay; TO-M- m omhWi in-mokcly; u) -tmoutorlv. 



The AsSOCiuleiJ Fra: 

CARACAS — Venezuela is prepared 10 re- 
> quest an additional 90-day moratorium on ibe 
repayment of the principal of its S35 billion 
foreign debt, according to Finance Minister 
Manuel Azpurua. 

The new postponement, which would last 
through Jan. 31, would allow the completion of 
hundreds of contracts with the nation’s creditor 
banks. It also would include a “contingency 
clause" that Venezuela requested to be linked to 
its ability to repay $21.2 billion over liie next !2 
years. 

The last postponement of the repayment of 
Venezuela's debt began July 31 and expires 
■t | Thursday. It was expected to be the last delay 
^(before the nation ended a refinancing process 
| under terms agreed upon late last year. 

However, reviewing individual contracts with 
over 4S0 banks and the incorporation of the 
contingency clause apparently delayed the be- 
ginning of repayments. 

The new refinancing agreement would cover 
most of the public sector's S27 billion foreign 
debt and would commit the country to repay 
between S3.5 billion and S5 billion annually 
through 1997. 



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29-10-85 


This announcement appear* as a matter ot record only. 


October 23. 1*85 




COMMERZBANK OVERSEAS FINANCE N.V. 

(Incorporated with limited liability in the Netherlands Antilles! 

DM 500,000,000 

Floating Rate Notes of 1985/1995 

guaranteed by 

COMMERZBANK AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT 

Frankfurt/Mam 

Issue Price: 100% • Interest LIBOR + per cent p.a.. payable semi-annually in arrears in April and October, maximum interest rate 8' -% 
p. i. minimum interest rate: none ■ Final Maturity: October 1995 ■ Denomination: DM 10,000 and DM 250,000 ■ Security: unconditional and 
irrevocable guarantee of Commerzbank Aktiengeselischaft Frankfurt/Main. Negative pledge • listing: Frankfurt ‘Main 


Commerzbank Aktiengeselischaft 

Credit Lyonnais CSFB-Effectenbank AG 

Deutsche Bank Aktiengeselischaft Dresdner Bank Aktiengeselischaft 

Goldman Sachs International Corp. Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 

Morgan Guaranty GmbH Morgan Stanley International 

Salomon Brothers International Limited Shearson Lehman Brothers International 

Swiss Bank Corporation International Limited Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) Limited 

S.G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. 


Banco Hispano Americano, S A 
Bankers Trust GmbH 
Bank Brussel Lambert N.V. 

Banque Paribas Capital Markets 
Berliner Handels- und Frankfurter Bank 

OBC Limited 

Copenhagen Handelsbank A/S 
Credit Commercial de France 


Banco di Roma 
BankAmerica Capital Markets Group 
Banque Internationale a Luxembourg SA. 
Bayerische Vereinsbank Aktiengeselischaft 
Chemical Bank International Group 
Citibank Aktiengeselischaft 
County Bank Limited 
Generate Bank 


Girozentrale und Bank der osterreichischen Sparkassen 
Aktiengeselischaft 

Hill Samuel & Co. Limited Industriebank von 

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Lloyds Merchant Bank Limited 
Samuel Montagu & Co. Limited 
Orion Royal Bank Limited 
Societe GfrteraJe 
Westdeutsche Landes bank Girozentrale 


Yamaichi International (Deutschland) GmbH 






































business roundup 


Arco Reports Gains 
For Quarter, After Loss 


liSi Futures 


Untied Press Iwemanonul ening in naiu 

LOS ANGELES — Atlantic continued wea 
Richfield Co. reported on Monday chemical mark 
third-quarter ggnvny of S403 mil - Earnings on 
lion, compared with a S5 19-million gas operations 
loss a year earlier. §300 million i 

Third-quarter revenues slipped S286 million a 

8.6 percent to $5 JO billion from “g, *** ■»* 
S6.02 billion. 482 percent tt 

Net earnings in the third quarter 
last year 3d have beeJ S317 raJ ? oa OT ** 
mil li on , or SI .23 a share, if the Traasportat 
company had not ha*i unusual percent to S' 
items and losses on discontinued Aroa had a lov 
operations totaling $836 million, of the Trans , 
Arco said. The company reported a ““ 

SI. 1-billion deficit in the second down 14 petes 
quarter this year, resulting from a For the firs 
decision to streamline its business, had a net loss i 

Aroo’s president, Lodwrick M. pared with a p 
Cook, said the unproved earnings or S1.Q9 a shr 
reflected hi ghe r profit margins on mOTtteof 19$ 
petrol cam products, reduced ex- 8 parent to 
plorarion expenses and a drop in 518.59 billion. 

operating costs as a result of the 

company’s restructuring program. 

By the end of the third quarter Swe*«™ 
Arco already had spent about S2.2 The As 

billion of a projected S4 billion to STQCKHC 


ening in naiural-gas markets and 
continued weakness in commodity 
chemical markets.*' 

Earnings on worldwide oil and 
gas operations rose 5 percent to 
§300 million in the quarter from 
$286 million a year earlier. Refin- 
ing and markets profits were up 
482 percent to $99 million, while 
coal earnings rose 60 percent to $24 
million on higher coal shipments. 

Transportation earnings fell 12 
percent to S90 million because 
Arco had a lower tariff for its share 
of the Trans Alaska Pipeline Sys- 
tem and chemical profits were 
down 14 percent to $30 million. 

For the first nine months Arco 
had a net loss of S344 million com- 
pared with a profit of $282 milli on, 
or $1.09 a snare, in the first nine 


Meniu lynch I Control Data 
Shorn Decline in Reports LOSS 
3 d-Quarter Net For Quarter 

The Associated Prat W- 




Od.28 

HtBti 

Low 

Open Htch Low Close 09. 


HW Low Open High Low Ctac 

Asa 3*37 otc nss 4us 4us fljs —ad 

4050 «WS Feb 4045 4CLU «U5 AU 

Est.Solee 4.171 Pnv.Solu U9 
Prw. Day Open Jnt. 33J96S ub530 


Groins 


tug 070 

4200 4252 


months of 1984. Revenues were off 
8 percent to $17.04 billion from 


Swedish Producer Ibices Rise 

The Associated Press 

STOCKHOLM — Producer 


repurchase shares of its common prices in Sweden rose QJ percent in 
stock. September from August and were 

Mr. Cook said that during the up 4 2 percent from a year earlier, 
quarter Arco “experienced a soft- the government reported Monday. 


The Associated Prat 

NEW YORK — Merrill 
Lynch & Co. on Monday re- 
ported third-quarter profit of 
S3 83 million, less than half the 
$80.0 million reported in the 
Hke period of 1984. 

The worldwide financial-ser- 
vices firm reported per-share 
earnings of 38 cents a share, 
down 87 cents from a year earli- 
er. Revenues for the quarter 
was $1.75 billion, compared 
with $1.66 trillion. 

The Sale of the One Liberty 
Plaza budding housing Merrill 
Lynch headquarters in the Wall 
Street financial district added 
$46 million to third-quarter 
1984 net income. A gain of $9 
million stemming from tax law 
changes was also added to last 
year’s third-quarter income. 

Without those one-time 
gains, Merrill Lynch wo old 
have earned $25 million, or 27 
cents a share, in the thud 1984 
quarter. 

Profit for the first nine 
months soared 146 percent, to 
$161.6 milli on, compared with 
$65.8 million a year earlier. 


The Associated Pros 

BLOOMINGTON, Minnesota 
— Control Data Corp. on Monday 
reported a third-quarter loss of 
$255.6 million, or $6.65 a share, but 
the computer and financial services 
company said more than half the 
loss came from “narrowing the 
scope” of its operations to regain 
profitability. 

The deficit compared with a net 
loss of $543 million, or $1 .41 in the 
third quarter of 1984. 

The company also reported that 
it was continuing discussions with 
its lenders to restructure its financ- 
ing agreements and said talks “are 
proceeding satisfactorily .** 

Control Data was planning to 
get $300 million in September from 
a debt offering, but withdrew the 
offering for fear that growing losses 
would scare off backers. 

“We don't have anything really 
new to report" on the company’s 
negotiations to get new credit 
terms, said a spokeswoman, Susan 
Busch. 

Control Data’s revenue for the 
quarter was 51.23 billion, almost 
unchanged from $134 billion for 
the third quarter last year. 

Dick Reid, a company spokes- 
man, said $153.8 million of the 
third-quarter loss was attributable 
to special charges associated with 
restructuring and reductions in the 
scope of business activities to re- 
verse the downward trend. 


WHEAT CCBT3 

£503 bu nr Menem- do/ ion per oashoj 
!L63ft 2J9V> Dec 120 12J> 

3J4VZ 187 MOT M6 M9V4 

4JH 184 MDT 114 115 

X72ft 243 JuJ 2.91 XV2W 

245 247 Sea 2tS 295 

103 254 Ut DM 

EsLSalas Prav. Sales 

Prav.DavOpan Ini. 3X64* off 1003 


117 117ft —02 

123V* 124 —02* 

11W. Ill -JUtt 
tjhvs ism — sn 
25» zbw -on* 
105 -hom 


S UN (CUT) 

0 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
255 1UVJ Dec 2JBJft 1241ft 

257 124V* MOT 2 JXPA UM 

251* 33l MOV 13844 242V. 

106 133 Jui 141* 24£,, 

17D 20416 Sea 128 12P» 

13SV* 22D16 Dec 123 ft 22S 

174ft 133* Mar 213 204ft 

Est.Sata* Prev. Spin 14 J&> 

Prev.DavOP9nlm.UUZ3 UP 557 
SOYBEANS CCBTJ 
54)00 bu minimum- dal ion per bushel 
6*0 457ft NOV 457ft 543* 

6J9 5.11 Jen 5.10 5.17 

742 522ft Mar 536 SJOft 

7J9 £31* MOV 535ft 5*1» 

6JS 5J4* Jui 543ft 5*0 

654 515ft AU0 544 S«* 

6JZ8 SJZTft Sep £30 £25ft 

632 £Mft NOV 127ft 532 

543 5J7ft Jflfl 542 SMVt 

Eat. Soles Prev. Sales 2 622 2 

Prov. Day Doan Int. 76862 up 2579 
SOYBEAN MEAL CCBTl 
too ton*- dot lore per ton 
15600 12540 Dec 14000 M2JB 

16100 12700 Jon 14100 MSOO 

20650 13000 Mar V44J0 WXO0 

16250 13156 MOV 14630 14950 

16700 13400 Jul 1-300 15100 

15050 135J0 Aug 14658 15000 

16700 137-50 see 14740 15000 

14950 14000 Oct 14600 14400 

15000 14200 Dec 14750 14150 

15000 14600 Jan 

Eat. Sales Prev.Sota 9JW 

Prev. Day Open Int. 44427 Up 282 
SOYBEAN OILtCBTl 
40000 lbs- do liars per 100 lbs. 

29-55 1906 Dec 1943 1940 

2907 7928 Jan 1946 19J3 

2BX0 1948 Mor 1993 2005 

2745 2007 Mav 2002 2040 

25-25 2045 Jul 2040 2075 

23-15 2050 Aus 2075 2075 

2405 2050 S4P 2075 2075 

2240 2045 Oct 2055 2040 

2105 2035 Dec 2045 2045 

■m 2135 Jan 

EsJ-Salsfl Prev. Salas 3 . 481 

Prev. Day Open Int. *7,271 up 242 
OATStCBTt 

5000 bu minimum- dollars per busf»j 
1 42ft 1.15 Dec 170ft 153V. 

14716 1.24ft Mar L2B% 141 

143 1.27ft \tav 144ft 144ft 

1 -37 1J!6 Jill 

l-2f IJ9 Sep 

EsL Sales PreVjSoies 19* 

Prev. Day Open Int 4JB6 up 30 


ole* Prev. Sales 14499 

Dav Open I m. 13X523 up 557 


s -Bv -m TBB 1 man, said aijj.o minion ui me 

Toshiba Expects Guinness Peat Makes Bid 

ri | TT/ r 1 rri t) ~w~% • • 4 restructuring and reductions in the 

safes to jveaken. I o Buy Britannia Arrow 

TOKYO -T"Sshiha Coip. *-»* may earn, from United Kingdom 

said Monday that a 30-percent LONDON — Guinness Peat Temperance & General Provident “ ", ^ 

drop in the market price of Group PLC said Monday that it iffiou and later increased its 

semiconductors would hurt the was bidding for Britannia Arrow holding through further purchases. a<m ' , manufactures and sdls 
1985-86 sales of its telecom- Holdings pfcwitb a, hare offer of TZiTprot’^wS^- 

munua^anddccaomcsd,- c<„<fc to tamta Gum- “S£3 lo 


2 J2M 4-42 
1346. 4-Jllft 
2 *0* +41 ft 
242 +X0ft 
2.2316 +J*Hv 
22 » +4816 
2131* +J»ft 


458ft —41 

5.12V. — jxn* 
S25ft — JWU 
3L36 ft —MO* 

5444i —JXRh 
544 ^»ft 

559 

541ft +40ft 


139.70 14 LTD 
14148 14340 
14620 14610 
14630 14740 
14750 14940 
14640 1*940 
1*748 1<940 
14600 14650 
14650 1*348 
14100 


1976 1948 —50 

1942 1943 —30 

19.77 1940 —.17 

20.18 20.19 —17 

2SJ5 26S —10 

2070 2070 —05 

2067 2067 
2150 2053 +70 

2055 2041 +71 

20SS +.15 


170 IJTIft +72 
178ft TJJft +7T ft 
17* 14* +J»ft 

173 +JXW. 

i7i +jm* 


SPJEKEP c «ycscEi 

1M7S 12975**^ Ok 15*40 19950 
15348 12840 Mar 15*40 15670 

15125 13140 MOV 15150 1K« 

15370 13£5B Jul 15345 155J5 

15345 13275 Sep 15258 15640 

15248 13600 Dec 15175 15600 

14600 1 42 40 Mr 

SUOARVrORLD 11 CHYC5CB1 
U 2 JM 0 lbs.- ccnls per m. 

775 UO Jan 5.10 572 

973 37* Mor £50 547 

7.15 158 Mav £66 £SJ 

6*9 179 JUl 543 558 

695 IS Od 4.14 SJO 

7 A5, 661 rtS- 640 6*0 ‘ 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 24*2 

Prev.DayOpenlnt. 77456 op260 
COCOA (NYCSCE3 

W metric tons- Sper ton - 

2337 1945 Dec 2(40 2(40 

2392 ITS MOT 2233 2235 

2422 I960 MOV 2279 2279 

3429 1960 Jul 2303 230* 

2430 2023 Sep 2321 2321 

242S 2055 MC 

2385 2B9 Mar 

Est. Soles Prey -Sales 1*» 

Prev. Day Open (rrt. 21742 UP 253 

oeanoe juic e nprap 
1 fr5o bs ' ma^ito. 11*75 ix*^ lira 

lBOjn 11138 Jan 11*50 11370 1U60 

17750 HITS MOT 11*40 1U90 

16250 HUB May n*33 11*58 



Jan 11*50 11540 113-60 
MOT n*4fl lum 11379 
May 11*35 11*50 113L75 
JdI TT3J0 TUBS 7U7D 
Sop moo 113X0 1UD0 


16175 11150 Mar 11458 11*50 1K5D 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 


t. Salem Prev.Sales 

ev. Day Open int 5438 up » 


TOKYO — Toshiba Corp. 
said Monday that a 30-percent 
drop in the market price of 
semiconductors would hurt the 
1985-86 sales oT its telecom- 
munications and electronics di- 
vision. 

Sales of semiconductors for 
the year ending March 31 are 
forecast to drop 11 percent to 
3S5 billion yen (SI.S billion) 
from (he previous year, a com- 
pany sp okesman said. Largely 
as a result of the price fall, first- 
half sales of the division rose 
only 1 percent from the year- 
earner period to 433.45 billion 
yen. 

Toshiba has already cut its 
estimate of 1985-86 parent set 
profit to 63 billion yen from 78 
billion yen. 


COMPANY NOTES 

Amphenol, a subsidiary or Al- 
lied-Bendix group, has made an of- 
fer worth 340 mwion francs ($42.1 
million) to bay Socapex, a subsid- 
iary of Thomson SA, the French 
state-owned electronics and tele- 
communications group, Reuters re- 
ported, quoting union sources at 
Thomson. 

BumI PLC said it will make an 
offer for United Parcels PLC valu- 
ing it at about £96 million ($136.6 
million). Tbe United Parcels board 
has recommended the offer. Two 
new Bunzl ordinary shares and 356 
pence nominal of 7-percent con- 
vertible unsecured loan stock 1995- 
97 are offered for every nine Unit- 
ed Parcels shares. 

Coastal Corp. said it had com- 
pleted the purchase from Texaco 
Inc. of the 50-percent interest that 
it did not already own in the Sky- 
line coai project m Utah. 

Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. 
and Japan’s science and technology 
agency have successfully tested an 
experimental 90-passenger STOL, 
or short takeoff and landing, com- 
mercial jet, a spokesman said. 

MooteBsoi] SpA’s holding com- 
pany for health care and pharma- 
ceutical interests, Erbamont NV, 
said net profit for the first nine 


row share and a cash alternative of 
130 pence a share. 


ness Mahon & Co. The company manufacture mainframes, super- 


i jupcucc a badre. estimated that its pretax profit for computers, workstations and ter- 

Tbe share (rfferraiues Bntannia year ended Sept. 30 would be min^k software and some data- 
Arrow at £212 million ($301 mfl- not than £17 million, with per- storage devices for mainframe 
lion). Guinness Peat already bolds share earnings of about 5.7 pence, computers, primarily as an original 
a 28-percent interest in the conqia- B ritannia Arrow, a fund-man- equipment manufacturer, 
ny. Guinness Peat is offering 15 of banking and insurance Mr. Reid said consolidated loss 

its ordinary shares fra every 8 Bn- 5954 pretax profit of far the first nine months of 1985 

tanmashares. £146 million, up from £10.1 mil- totaled $269.6 million, or $7.02 a 

Britannia Arrow said later m the ^^19^3 shot* 


Livestock 


CATTLI (CMC) 

w-c-arsi: ** ^ 

6JA5 5*35 Fob 6240 4250 

6757 5530 APT 62 . 00 6240 

6625 5623 JUT 6140 6140 

6540 5530 AUO 6000 6110 

6060 58.70 Oct 5940 5940 

6530 6040 Dee 60.10 60.10 

Est. Sofas Prev. Safes 71429 

Prev. Day Oo*r Int. 59205 off 7488 
FEEDER CATTLE t CM E) 

4*000 1 bs.- cants PC r Tb. 

7120 5B.70 Nov 4525 6 SJg 

7940 6040 Jon 6195 6195 

7120 *042 Mar 6930 6930 

Tire ah *r i a nr Agin Agin 

704 0 60.70 MOW 6748 6725 

6&50 653 S Aim 6740 6740 


day that its board had ngeaed the 
offer from Guinness Peat as inade- 
quate. 

In January, Guinness Peat 
bought a 23-percent interest in Bri- 
tannia, or about 34.33 million ordi- 


monlhs of 1985 rose by 90 percent 
over the period last year, to 63.5 
billion lire ($35.5 million). 

Morgan Trust Bank Ltd., the 
first wholly owned foreign bank to 
be licensed to do business in Japan, 
opened Monday in Tokyo. 

Renters Holdings PLC an- 
nounced that agreement in princi- 
ple had been reached for it to ac- 
quire an interest of up to 16.4 
percent in Instinet Corp. for $10.9 

million. 

Siemens AG is to sign a coopera- 
tion agreement with China cover- 
ing tdecommunications, energy 
and medical equipment, on Tues- 
day during a visit to Boring by 
Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich 
Genscher, West German sources 
said. 

Sumitomo Electric Industries 
said it had developed a supercon- 
ducting material far integrated cir- 
cuits. The new material, based on 
aluminum nitride, can handle 11 
times more heat than present mate- 
rials, the company said. 

Warner-Lambert Co. said it was 
suspending sale outside the United 
States of its anti-arthritis drug, 
Isoxicam, pending further scientif- 
ic review erf isolated skin re a c tio ns 
to the drug, primarily in France. 


Gwnpany Results 

Revenue and profits or losses. In millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated. 


3C4K) Ha.- c*nl» per to. 

5045 3635 D*c 4625 4435 

50*7 3X70 Fed 4530 *5*0 

4735 3672 APT *025 4023 

*945 3940 Jun 4X10 4X10 

4945 4035 Jul 4165 4X70 

5120 4023 AW 4X75 4X90 

41.10 3847 Ocf 3945 3945 


4X65 4X70 
4X73 4X90 

3943 3945 


6435 66*5 
61.10 6125 
6030 6063 
6045 6X55 
5845 5840 

5840 Hill 
9940 5940 


6435 6440 
%% %% 
Si Si 

6647 6647 


*<n i 

4*35 **« 
4025 4930 
4X55 4X65 
*3)0 4X)2 
4X53 4X78 

3925 39-57 


Canada 

Falcon bridge 

3rd Qua. 1933 19M 

Dost Net X7 X* 

Operator*— OOV 949 

9 Mwrttu 1985 1984 

ftevwnw 6673 528.9 

Op*r NOT 3X9 197 

OP«rShar«- 077 043 

Franm 


1983 1984 

49.11 64.11 


Mediobanca rmum 

YMr 1985 1984 Oo^rHrt — 

Profit 129.700 16400. Oper Share. 

a: loti IPS* 

fcases at S6J i 

Norway ter ana of r, 

months trwr, 

Elkem 

u. a a ^ 

Pfofltt sou GHf« 

United State* smovar. 

Hevonue — 

Amax — 

3rd Oust 1985 1914 op * r 5Jwr,— 

RevJSS *65,7 559J »Monm* 

ha IK. (a >882 11 *£'•*» 

\ess- iis s 

a: An HU nets tnctudo lea 

of S4J million bi quarter and Gen 

earn efSPmOAontn 9 months. 

Jrd QufiT 

Amer. Petroffnn R*v«m»« — 

3rd Qaar. 1985 19M — 

B*v*nu6 99941 56742 opw snare- 

Nat Inc. 102 141 f Manila 

Per Shan — 043 ftW Rovomie — 

9 Ma ma ion liw 

vSnKZZ Bfr ^ 

PorShora_ 24* 254 chonmafSlP. 


Chrysler 

3rd Qaar. IMS 1984 

Ravanua *48X *06X 

Nat Inc 3162 2614 

Par Share — . 27s i ji 

I Mantha 1985 1984 

Rovonua 1537X H23X 

Nat Inc li*2X 1770. 

Par Sltara 1X00 1X97 

1104 nets tncMto tor credit of 
57737 million h i auarta and 
gain of 87824 million In 9 
months. 

Compute rvlikxi 

3rd Quar. 1185 1184 

Rovonua __ 7054 137.1 

□par Nat _ (a)202 162 

Opar Short-. — 029 

9Montta 1985 1984 

Rovonua 32X9 39X3 

Opar Nat _ (a)594 3281 

Opar Short.. — (.14 

a: loss. IPS* note seclude 
hoses at S6J million At quar- 
ter and at SIB million Ur 9 
months from discontinued 
oaeronons. ItU Hnonth net 
also vjrcfodM oa/r? otSUmlh 
Hon. 

GIfferd-HIII 

3rd Quar. 1915 19M 

Ravanua IJM 770* 

Opar Hat — 1122 *.« 

Opar Short— 122 042 

Ravanua— 334.1 3l« 

Opar Nat — 122 llf M 

Ooar Shara— 143 128 

Quarter nets a ttchido losses 
of SPA mnUon a Ml mutton. 

Greyhound 

Jrd Quar. 1985 19*4 

Ravanua— B6zo 7322 
Opar Mat — 464 4X2 

Opar Short— X96 047 

» Month* 1983 1984 

Ravanua — ZAoa. ziea 
Opar Nat— 10*4 884 

a per Shorn— 115 141 

19SS quarter net excludes 
chorus of SIPS million. 


Interpublic Group Cos 

3rd Quar. 1983 1984 

Ravanua 1562 1*52 

Nat Inc X34 XII 

Par Short Ul 029 

9 Months 1985 1984 

Ravanua *85.1 4604 

Nat Inc - 224 22.7 

Par Short— 225 Xio 

Robins {AJ4.) 

3rd Quar. 19U 1984 

Ravanua 1U.9 1574 

Nat Inc. 2723 040 

Par Share— 1.13 Ul 

9 Martin 1985 1984 

Ravanua mi *617 

Nat Inc 6225 2021 

Par Share- 257 040 

Service mastdr Ind. 

S I Quar. 1985 1984 

venua — 2562 2(64 

Net Inc 723 743 

Per Share— 02* 023 

9 Month* 198S 1984 

Revenue __ 732 J 6274 
Nat Inc— 2X02 212 

Par Short— 020 045 

Par share results adlustod 
hsryforS split At Mav. 

Tens Instruments 

3rd Qaar. 1985 1N4 

Ravanua 1.120. 142X 

Nat inc Ial824 6U 

Par Short — — 3J4 

9 Moattl* 1985 1984 

Ravanua 1720. *230. 

Rtf inc — (OJ774 2374 

Par Short— — 1043 

o. 1 loss. I9SS nets Indues 
mares a 1634 minion and 
tax aims of S30.9 million in 
quarter and o! 04 million tnt 

months. 

Timken 

3rd Qaar. 1915 1984. 

Rovonua — 236.1 77B-* 

Nat Inc (a)*4f K 43 

Par Shara— - Ml 

9 Martha 1985 I9M 

Rovonua 4372 4794 

Nat Inc 7.95 *4A 

Par Short — 046 179 


Currency Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
option a sirtka 

Unoartylno Prtca Cafla—Laat Pa 

Nov Fob Mar Nov Fan Mar 
12400 Brtflrt PotmtN-cairt* per art. 

BPound 135 r a e XIO 

1*246 MO ISO 3 » 050 

<2408 weet German Mortt-certs per aoN. 
DMorfc 36 r 4 4 04* 

374* M 02* 4 a r 

3744 39 U9 4 S T 

*25040* JcaeaeaarcfrtOOfftart a esat par unit. 
jYan 65 r 4 4 X04 

*640 46 049 4 I ill 

*640 47 XU 4 ■ 049 

4X90 48 0.12 ■ 4 r 

<2400 Sarfoi Fropo-coefa par win, 

5 Franc *3 r • 1 002 

4X19 66 044 4 4 r 

6X19 67 02* 4 4 r 

Dec Mar Jus Doc Mar Joe 
1X5*0 BrtttOi Poundi^asnta par amt. 

BPound 130 r r r X15 

16246 135 7 JO r t 0J5 

14X66 140 IS) 540 r 140 

74X46 1« 1JJ uo r r 

14X66 150 025 1.90 r r 

16244 155 r US r r 

5M0Q Canadian Dcitovceatl Par wIL 
CDollr 71 r r r 825 

7177 73 r r r 0.10 

7X17 73 051 r r r 

73.17 76 0.13 r r r 

6240* Wait Garmon Morka-eont* par unit 


5 Mark 32 

374* 31 _ 

24* 3* 7-92 r om r _ r 

372* 35 3JB XJ7 r US T 062 

374* 36 123 242 T X10 T 046 

074* 37 r 1.92 r 029 X71 099 

374* 34 044 149 r 048 ■ 14* 

372* 5 ui 0 * 14 r r r 

12X000 preach Prnncuothi at e (»rtt par art*. 

FFrwtc 710 r 1*23 r r r r 

12 x 11 in r _ r r r us r 

*29X004 Japoaaoa Yan-imM 0 * a sort par anil. 

JYen 40 *77 r r r r r 

4X90 41 U7 5J0 r r r r 

*x»o 62 *20 r r r r r 

66.ro 43 XII r r r r r 

6650 ** 229 r r r r r 

66.ro as Ul im r 111 Ui r 

46.ro 46 r 1 J 8 r 044 021 r 

4XW a U* 0JD r r r r 

<1M0 Sata PramsoMta par ntfL 

5Frc»K 36 1X22 r • T T S 

6X19 34 *22 r r r r r 

*6.19 *2 r r r ojn r r 

66.19 43 162 T T 028 r T 

6*19 65 uo r r 029 021 r 

6X1* 66 129 r r X71 r 147 

6X19 rt 025 r r r r r 

Jaa Apt M Jan Apr Jut 
62SB204 Jop w aia YofMOHart a coat par imtL 
JYan 44 cut 1 » r » 1 

Total call vol. 115 Can naan lot. 1*0273 

Total Put WL M 8 PrtOPMftt (39492 

r — Not tradod. a— Na option otfarad. 

Last Is Premium tp unjiu pa prtca). 

Sourest AP. 


r 

*U r 
322 r 
223 137 


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Commwfties 




Cwrmwlfife 


London 

Commodities 


Cash Rices 


HONQ-HOM GOLD FUTURES 
Art Cl/M [ UAsparoanca 


Hfth low Btd Art Chtaa 

SUGAR 

Pnsdi francs per metric foe 
DOC 1365 1353 1M0 ljg +8 

Mor 1JJTO 1J70 13 78 1J62 +12 

Mav N.T. N.T. 1*07 1*15 +13 

AUP N.T. N.T. 1.463 1A5S +11 

Oct N.T. N.T. 1*70 1*85 +6 

Doe 1*9* 1*96 1*93 1*97 +J 

Est vet: 630 lots at 5D tons. Prev. actual 
sales: 613 tots. Open Marast: 2X917 

FnNKh francs per IM kg U-S* per ounce 

DSC 1,925 1,920 1*22 1,928 —38 m— 

Mar 1.9SS 1.9*3 1,930 1*32 —26 um, Loi sertfa 

MOV 190 1,967 1,965 1,970ft —24 fw XhJk TBJB MJ0 

JJS, N.r. N.T. i*ro » fS=ZZ nx NX mS 

SOP N.T. N.T. 1019 — — 23 Volume- 76 toned UOol. 

Dec H.T. N.T. 2010 — —15 vounne. rowimiwa- 

Mor N.T. N.T. 2X10 — —20 

Ett. vol.: 41 lets of io tons. Prev. actual 

sales: 0 lots. Open Intwesl: 346 

COPPSE 

French fraaa per 16Q kg 
Nov 2X20 1.965 1.990 2X07 +50 

Jen 2X90 2X20 2X*» 2X63 +** 

Mar 2,123 XI 5= 2,180 XI 05 +59 

MOV N.T. NX XI0S — +65 

jiy n.t. N.T. 1130 Ziea +ss 

Sop N.t. N.T. XI 45 2X10 +60 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2495 — +60 

Est. vol.: 66 totmrt 3 tans. Prev, actual sales: 

79 tots. Open Interest: 31 2 
Source: Bourse do Commerce. 



Dividends 


Oa . : 

Company Per Amt Par 

EXTRA 

HcnredOn Furniture « .12 24 

INCREASED 

Canadian Util d-B Q 32 12*1 

INITIAL 

Rail Ins EnvlronmnH Q X2 19-28 

STOCK 


Volume: o tots at 25 tans. 
Source: Reuters. 


XKMjRitures 
Options . 


ALUMINUM • M 

ysflioq par metric (eg 

£i-w gam 699X0 

1 SBbBaK** 

zzsr* -{K ssse 

gwR qp per metric ton . 

Baa- S2 S5 SIS 

jlwi top par metric ton 
55* 2MOXC 2S4SX0 2935X0 

SILVER 2^000 2S65ito 29211X0 
Peace per troy ounce 

tt 00 43X00 630X0 

Starife per roelrtc mn 
prg* -na nq |5*axo i 

Egg”* -** k SSxo! 

^Mopparmetrtcioa 

4,S “ ^ <«« 


M m 


LLStTreasuries 


Bancorp Hawaii Inc 
Brown & Sharpe Mtp 
Donahue Inc 
Fosier Whoelar Corp 
Gerber Scientific 
M ar land (John HI Co 
Henredon Purnltvra 
Hughes Tool Co 
Indiana Goa Co 
lowo Southern Util 
Mark Controls Carp 
Nicole* instrument 
NorantlQ Inc 
Pact lie Telecom _ 
Stewart -W u mer CP 
US Lanina Inti 
vartecCarp 
Wesca Find Carp 
Wpotfmd ink 


Q M 12-10 

a xs 1-2 

O .18 12-2 

Q .11 13-16 

a A3 11-29 

Q .14 12-3 

3 43 3-1 

.12 11-25 

a Jl 12-1 

Q .90 13-1 

a JI4 12-31 

Q X3 134 

a .12 ft T2-12 

O 39 12-2 

O *2 137 

Q 3D 12-2 

Q 82 11-12 


Waortwad imfc Q .15 11-2B 

a-anOMl; m-menthlv; YtuorfmSvt *s 
annual 

Source: UPI. 


Dtscoort 

Oct 

28 

pro*. 

Oftar Bid 

Yield 

YiaM 

Smooth brt 7A0 7J9 

■ 7*3 

7*6 

Smooth bill 7*9 7JB 

7J» 

7Jt 

1 -rear am 7*2 7 JO 

. 8X4 

4A5 

Prev. 

AM Offtr 

Yield 

YlaW 

30-rear bend H929/32U03IU32 

Source: Solomcn Brothers. 

1852 

18*5 

Merrffl Lr seh trsawenr hdolt? KA. 
Oaoeatoi toedafi — 

Asareea pm:-% 

Source: MarfS Lynch. 





nta be Ja m 
IS 15E - _ IT 
2 n» - 


ckA 


^ \j^Ct 





































































■ • .. Ov t 

S'-' «— 




INTEKJNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. OCTOBER 29, 1985 



5 


**&■?*■, 

'■V 


o Widens Iittfifs 
| On Yen Bond Futures 


R ewers 

jchMg said ft j£* 



‘ported at Ebb 




% ' 


ft i 





V : Reuters 

* 1 - ■■* l BANGKOK —- Thailand’s 
- -v ; ; ’t \ ^onomy is in its worst shape in 
- t . s; V-“ years and shows no signs of 
inproving in 1986. the presi- 
' Stf** of Bangkok Bank Lid, 
^r-hairi Sophonpanicb, said in 
• - internal bank circular.' 

;;^4s contributing factors, Mr. 
I", .i i ^ r.-o^ln pointed toa 14.8-percent 
■ 'i'fii 5 1 ^ 5evahia iion erf the baht last No- 
. """" a sharp decline in 

.. 1 ??Vi»ramodiiy prices this year. He 
' : 1 < $ Thailand’s deficit on.mcr- 
^ 7-handise trade widenedJo 43 9 
5 -? baht ($1.64 billion) In 

■: it 5 first seven months of 1985 

. : j f ,1 ^- 8 biHion a year earlier. . 

: : i ^ The banker said a cut erf two 

£ a; »rceniage points in the local 
’ is . •; .sank prime rate to 15j5 percent 
•: year failed to achieve its’ 
4t i * 4 subjective of spurring trade and 
J.-hvesunenL 

’ — 


three points from bqe* effective im- 
mediately. It.aajd Ac move ; was 
necessary became <* the steep fall 
u> prices on hbUrfaicnfea and ca»h 
bond markets. 

officials said the fu- 
nu was losing its function 

'cash 


ECU Options BIS Issues Warning 
Stir Interest On Changes in Lending 


(CoMhmed from Page 9) 
exchanges would begin trading 
ECU contracts. before the first 
quarter erf 1986. zi the eariiesL 


(Contused from Page 9) 
creasing volume of tins off-bal- 
ance-sheet businew was originally 



Bank df Switzerland's New York 
office, said a lack of knowledge and 
technical difficulties would make 
the market slow to develop. 

The expansion of the ‘Emit has “ h lAes * different type 

become necessary for the futures of trader to deal in ECLV* he said, 
market to catch up with the cash *** oeed to develop new 
bond price faB. they aid. software for your computers. And 

The current December position *** £uro P caflS «« not really used 
dropped thejfinh of one full point to dealing in cash futures products, 
for two consecutive days last Fri- Thm ‘ t ‘” 


Mkhad Snow, bad- of forest undertaken to improve the banks’ 
exchange and /inures n Union grofi lability, j j “is now increasingly 


There are the time differences be- 
tween Europe and here. too. So J 
think that it could take time before 
they are active." 


White Consolidated Net 


day and. Saturday, dosing at 99.63 
Saturday. The key ash bond price 
fell more than seven points in the 

same period, bond dealers said. - 

'fhe yield of the bdlwether 6.8- 
peroent.lft-year govaranent bond 

rose 10 a high o£ 6.70 percent Sanir 4Af / » r* . 

daybrfpreiallmg tordose<jf630 I^Op 49% lOT Quarter 
percent, compared with £30. 'on 
Friday.’ The yield rose ip 6.48 per- 
cent in early trading Monday, deal- 
ers said.' 

' The sudden drop m with and 
futures band prices is dne to the 


' The Assoaated Press 

CLEVELAND — White Con- 
sbhdated Industries Inc. reported 
Mondky that third-quarter profits 
plunged almost 49 percent -cem- 

. . pared with the third quarter of 

Bank of Japan’s upward guidance 1984. 

of sho rt-term yen interest rates to 7 WCI said it had net earnings of 
promote the yen against the doBar,- $7.4 miliioa, or 44 cents* share, in 
dealers said. the third quarter ended. Sept. 30, 


;ng done on very thin margins." 

It also point* out that holding 
marketable securities “might cause 
problems to the banking sector in 
the case of a general tightening of 
credit conditions." Banks would he 
obliged to mark down the value of 
those holdings to the actual market 
rate, whereas direct loans can be 
carried at full face value even when 
the borrower’s credit standing has 
deteriorated because there is no 
clear market value for those loans. 

Overall, ihc regular BIS quarter- 
ly review of the international bank- 
ing market shows that net interna- 
tional bank credit in the second 
quarter was unchanged from the 
depressed first-quarter level of SI 5 
billion. 

"Creditworthy borrowers mined 
increasingly to the securities mar- 
kets and at the same time banks 
continued to be reluctant to in- 
crease their exposure to heavily in- 
debted countries,” the report said. 

Lending to Latin America, after 
declining $800 million in the previ- 
ous (wo quarters, showed no 
c h ang e . Eastern Europe was a big 


taker of funds, amounting to S3 .5 
billion. Lending to the Midcast 
(mostly Egypt and Israeli rose SI. 3 
billion and to Asia SSOl 1 million. By 
contrast. Joans to oil-producmc 
coumries dropped Si" billion after 
the S70D-mi!i;on deriine in the first 
quarter. 

Although L'.S. banks siarpi> re- 
duced their taking of funds to S500 
million from the first-cuaner s S9S 
billion, the nor.bank sector bor- 
rowed $4.8 billion and drew dews 
deposits by $3.9 billion, resulting in 
a flow of funds to the United State* 
of S9.2 billion, compared with $7.3 
billion in the previous quarter. 

For the first half of tne year, the 
BIS estimated that credit provided 
by the international markets to- 
taled $70 billion, unchanged from 
the previous six months but below 
the SSO billion of the firs! half last 
year. 

This new calculation of total in- 
ternational finance is made up of 
$30 billion of net ir.iernational 
bank lending and 563 billion of net 
international bond fuumdng t after 
redemptions or repurchases i. mi- 
nus an estimated $23 billion of 
banks’ bond holdings included in; 
the banking data or issued bv 
banks to support their lending op- 
erations. 1 


Japan Output 
Folk by' 1.1% 

Rciam 

TOKYO — Japan's index of 
preliminary industrial output 
fell i.l percent toa seasonally 
adjusted 121.4 in September 
from 122.S in August, when ii 
was down 0.7 percent from 
July, the Ministry of Interna- 
tional Trade and Industry re- 
ported Monday. 

The year-to-year preliminary 
unadjusted rise for September 
was 3 J percent, compared with 
a 4.1-perccnt increase in Au- 
gust. The index base year is 
1980. 



U.SJ^iUUlldi'v iLy Climbed 
At 1 . 2 % Rate in 3 d Quarter 


The ■iiiixluteJ Prtu 

WASHINGTON — The pro- 
ductivity of U.S. businesse*. 
climbed at an annual rate of 1.2 
percent during the period from July 
through September, the same ad- 
vance posted in the spring, the gov- 
ernment reported Monday. 

The Labor Department said the 
third quarter gain in non/arm busi- 
ness productivity included an in- 
crease in output of 3.2 percent. 
Hours worked by employees rose 2 
percent. 

The third-quarter gain in pro- 
ductivity. the measure of output 
per hours worked, matched a 1 2- 


percent April -June increase. Both 
quarters were sharply higher than 
the figure for the firs! three re: n jhs 
of the year, when pr. viuc.:'-. :i> 
plunged as an annual ra;= of 3.1 
percent. 

The news on productivity fel- 
lows other government -.iju-tics 
that have shown that the p.; v ; of 
U.S. economic activity was acceler- 
ating. 

The overall economy gre 1 -. - at .;fi 
annual rate of 3.3 percer.: :r. ;r.e 
Juiy-Se pi ember quarter, three 
limes the pace of :ne 
months of the vear. 



_ — 

ffienetton 'Sweeps America 9 With Unorthodox Marketing Style 


F2,r-' 

r ^ 3 (Orders, allowing the 


(Continued from Page 9) ket, opening a' handful of Boutiques 

ay to under different corporate ^names. 

1 s r^P lt£ inventory and cash nods Early this, month, for example, 
■' 1 ^ £ v-.yMso, with its method of licens- Benetton opened two new boo- 
-i !] ? does not have to spend a lot tiqses in . Montgomery 


Mall in 



H “ 3 51 s *? “P Tiev st ? res an d is at little Rockville, Maryland, a” suburb of 
“ E 5..^^. a store Fails. Washington, D;G, dax is <»e of its 

: l I ’ ?l': , Vlthough Benetton has sold its best locations One store was a Sis- 
x ^ J- ^jods in Europe under a variety erf ley boutique that Mr. Benetton raid 
- ii ^ ^ names — including Benet- “will take die best of what Beuet- 
Sisley-. Tomata My Market ton created for the Benetton stores 
- t :'.d Merceria — the company ha< and make it real fashionable” 
* IJomoted its cloth esin the United through bolder, brighter colors and 
; l L‘ ^-&4tes so far only under the Benet- 
3: name. Its children’s store, for 

ifT^'imple, is called 012 Benetton 
: \ :2 stands for childrens’ sizes, 0 to 


u n 
'- £ 


■? a a-J.: 


more displays. 1 

The caher store, a shoe store 
called DiVarese, rqxresents a test to 
see how successful Benetton can be 

in sdlino shoes dirrrllv tAcnnsnm- 


proached Benetton about design- 
ing and-seffing soft goods for the 
hozne, such as linens, tablecloths 
and draperies. 

To enlarge its U.S. market, the 
company is considering setting up 
a manufacturing plant in the Unit- 
ed States in a few years, on top of 
the 10 plants it has' in Europe. 

“If we want to continue the 
American experiment, we want to 
create our product here in the Unit- 
ed States,” Mr. Benetton said. He 
said such a plant would make knits, 
but from cotton rather than wool. 
"That’s what the U-S. is known 
for.” 

A 11$ rxlnnt wroilri hdn «ov<» 


With its ambitious expansion colored sweaters. Finding the! 
plans, Benetton— a family compa- sweaters popular among their 
ay for the past 20 years — is con- friends, her elder brother started j 
sidering selling stock to the public, selling the sweaters to stores in 
“Under study is a plan to go public 1965- Eventually, their younger 
and sdl 20 percent of our stock on brothers, Giiberto and Carlo, 
the New York Stock Exchange and joined them and helped them open 
Milan Bourse in 1986 and 1987.” their first store in <968. Ten vears 


Mr. Benetton said. 

Executives familiar with the 
company attribute its success to the 
“passion of the family'' that runs 
the operation, now held by the 
holding company invep SpA_ Ben- 
etton was begun by Giuliana Ben- 
etton in the early 1960s when she 
began designing her own brilliamly 




Sttetton's products in the United 
£-;iies, the company is testing its 
, i i ropean formula in the U.S. mar- 

":j*h — : — — ^ — 

u ^iji Bant Upgrades Office 


: J . S*n 

. r ' omea rress t menial ta 

I aiiTOKYO — Fifli Bank, 


ling interest last year. 

“I want to take what Benetton 
brought to fashion and bring it to 
shoes,” Mr. Benetton said. . 

Shoes are not the only new mer- 
chandise Mr. Benetton is explor- 
ing “Five years ago we started to 



United Press Imenuuional 

. . , a mqor get proposals for perfume. We arc 

.4 ^ipanesc commercial bank, said very interested miLfy the end of 

1986 or 1987,we will dome but with 
a cosmetic fine that will include 
everything sold in a European per- 
j in. Texas, T^nri«gna 1 Arkansas firmoy hail polish, cosmetics, 
l ? :: -i jlid Oklahoma. The company said perfume,” be said. However, this 
" " 't : m b decision is designed .to meet the fine wouJd noi be sold in a Bcnet- 
• ; ^ Rites’ campaign to attract oqtpora; ton^torcora coaqiletdyjiew'bou- 
- '• “ »ns by offering prcfcrenjMinco;^ dque biff_|jiher l thrq^fi (fe»aiJr 

. es for investment. Umbranai, Tneati stores or 

lied the Houston Agency, begad stores; •• 1 .• i **■ - .■ 

y * ’••efations Monday, it said.' 1 _ Several cpmpames have also ap- 


against protectionist trade legisla- 
tion now being considered in Con- 
gress. That threat, scoffed Mr. Ben- 
etton. was “a lot of talk and no 
action.” 

Known for its up-to-date manu- 
facturing techniques, Benetton — 
already present in four East Bloc 
nations — has been invited to build 
. plants in the Soviet Union and Chi- 
na. But for the moment, the compa- 
ny has 

“In Moscow, day want us to 
open a factory and then give them 
the keys. They’d produce every- 
thing they would want to.” Mr. 
.Benepon said. “In China, they 
■' win^TiS tb opep a factory and pro- 
duce fox export — that’s not what 
we want right now.” 


In India at Record High 

Reuters 

NEW DELHI — New equity 
shares and convertible and non- 
convertible debentures with a re- 
cord value of 1.25 billion rupees 
(S 1 03.6 million) were issued be- 
tween July and September this 
year, the Economic Times research 
bureau said Monday. 

The newspaper said the amount 
was up from 1.05 billion rupees in 
(he same 1 9S4 period and compares 
with 800.5 million rupees raised be- 
tween April and June 1985. Prime 
Minister Rajiv Gandhi’s liberal 
corporate-tax policy and the open- 
ing up of the stock market have 
helped to encourage investment, 
business analysts said. 


later, the chain had 1.000 stores in 1 
Italv. 

Giuliana. 48. condcues to design ! 
the sweaters today while Lcciaro’is 
the managing director. Gdbertc. 
44. is the finanaai director Carlo, i 
42. the production manager. j 

“The success of tie company ' 
comes from the fact that there are 
three brothers acd one sister who 
always worked for Benetton, who 
are in the factory, who check every- 
thing.” said oce executive familiar 
with' the operation. “They work 
and they live for these garments.” 

Even though Benetton is now 
talking about selling stock to tee 
public, h has nopLins to iocren the 
family control. Of the 15 children, 
ages 1 to 25, in (be second genera- 
tion. some are already being 
groomed to take over the reins. 
Luciano Benetton's son is now at 
Harvard Business School, and his 
family hopes he wifi be interested 
in joining the business after he 
completes his studies. 



hi . - 

r *t. w- ;. L ; 2 i-lst^ylus pries dgieose dessigna ruffis _ . .. 

m - 2 A - 


' a.- .: -vf 3 q 





- :> •; rs:- 
.. .*:« s- 

,. -. 1 1 

. “a". 

f ? 3 l-J- 
"1 

•T&Zi 


12 



WHAT THESE WILL BE WORTH 
IN SIX M0NTHST1ME, 





YOU MAYNOT NEED 
OUR OPTIONS. 




* r* 

•< ■ 


. M 


f, 

~ *5r : 


; ;> 


Only last year the Chicago 
Mercantile Exchange launched its 
options on the Deutschemark and it 
quickly became the most actively 
exchange - traded current?/ option . 
in the world- . 

And now; with CMPs latest, 
options on the British Pound anil . 
Swiss Franc, together with an : 

interest rate option on the Eurodollar, 
corporate treasures, bankers.and 
dealers have even greater flexibility in 
managing rate uncertainty. \ 

Corporate treasurers use GME 
options as “insurance policies ; . 
against future rate fluctuations in “ 
hedging strategies, tenderer take-: ■ 
over situations and as an insulation . 
against translation exposures. . . 

Leading banks, institutions and • 
government dealers use CME options 
as an essential dealing and arbitrage 
tool to lay off foreign currency and 
interest rate risk. The high Volume of 
CME options arid the tight pnemg ; . 




which arises from the link between 
ouroptions and futures contracts has 
enabled our customers to benefit 
from an improved and even more 
sophisticated service. 

For a free copy of “Options on 
Currency Futures: An Introduction” 
and/or “Options on Eurodollar 
Futures: An Introduction” write to 
or telephone Keith Woodbridge or 
Neil McGeown at Chicago Mercantile 
Exchange, 27 Throgmorton Street 
London, EC2N2AN. 
telephone: 01 -920 0722, 

Telex: 892577 1MMLONG. 

CHICAGO 
MERCANTILE 
EXCHANGE 

International Monetary Market - Index and Option Market 

FUTURES AND OPTIONS WORLDWIDE 

27 Throgmorton Street. London EC2N 2AN Ot -92007 22 
30 South Wacker Drive. Chicago. Illinois 60606 
312/930-1000 

67 Wall Street New York 10005 2 1 2/363-7000 



. wiser 



KutiubUi PivtnwiiuHtW/. AfouOhlrui 


Hello, Christian? 

Happy Birthday! 

. . . Where am i? At the 
Ramadu Renaissance, having 
breakfast With a glass of 
champagne because you're 
ten years old! The hotel 
even put flowers on the 
table - they must've guessed 
today is special. 

. . . My room here? 

Really comfortable - feels 
like I’m at home. Big 
difference is. 1 have a 
balcony looking out over 
the sea. 

. . . Cost lots? No, don't 
worry - I'll still he able 
to buy you a present to 
bring hack. 

...\es. you're right. 

I will he staying here again 
next time. .. ! 


RAMADA 

INTERNATIONAL HOTELS 


Ramada Renaissance Hotels - 
distinctive world class hotels: 

Alexandria, Cain*. hwascMoff. fiwfcia. 
Hanibuoi. Jerusalem. Karachi Karlbnjiii- 

Ramada Hotels - a wider choice 
of excellence: .Abu I ihahi. I’d train. 
Brussels, biiafra, bhahran, Uuhai. 
Lnnsseldorf, Frankfim. Gatlienbiau, 
jnnteipin" LeverJoyeii, lac^e. 

'is Kf°*i IjjdttisJwfcit, Htadin” Tel .Aviv 


NEXT TIME, RAMADA - now in 
more than 20 countries worldwide. 


fiSCs. 










Pane 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29. 1985 


>k»ieSa^s 

AYIEY 

Closing: 


51: Lhnc 

W wiVi L<r» On at. Cn»o 


12 Month 
Won low Slock 


l'+S 

tjft CMorc a 

33 


23ft 


J4 



27'.-: CWtne 


10 

l.t 

rt Cordiff 


17 

15% 

Bft C.areB 



14% 

S'* Core A 

.10 .J 

16 




1.4 

Sft 

2'. Cmblon 

Jii< 24.4 

4 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to me closing on wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

J iii The .J initiated Preys, 


liuenm 

‘iish lo* Slack 


6% ii 4 ADI n 30 125 

J3_ 5ft AL Lob S .10 1.0 It 62 

B AMC 5 14 13 

S-« 2% AM Inti 

0B% 6S% ATT Fd 5S79 ij 
a 2% AcrnePr 


**■ Sh 14% CastIA .BOD S3 10 

^ K'o I5Si CcsPd 22fb 9J 

Or 33* »s Cojrd rt 

24# 2 Castlna 
Ccnll wl 

U'» 10ft Cents* l.57ell* 

onwide price, a 2.: 13 

Wall Street 4 1- cnmoH 23 

aaes el*wl,ere. g™f s -g « « 

tea rre>s 39 chimbs .10 a is 

30". 155b Chlltns .17 j 38 

?0fcH-hL o“f-k' sf 4 19'a cilFs?' IXOb 10 9 

lWh Hish Law Q'.-ot ih 9e 33^ 2 0’ - ‘‘IvGos 1X0 3.9 9 

43 3J'o Clarml l.«3e 4.5 

1 12% 6ft Clark 3 J8e 11 10 
45 2JH Clarasi JSe 13 9 


6 U'i 14% Irt — '» lltk rt FIleGE 

3 15'. 19 19'i + 104k &Vi FkxiEn 

I ;«4ft 345* IP. — <{, 431a 28 H Flo Pick 
8 t'l ^ Wl 30*8 31 Fluke USf 5J 10 

5 IJ'* 14% U%-% 14% 7 Foodrm 5 

5 14 13ft 1 Pi 10 74k FaeteM 

14 1*7 6*7 6% f lk 9«B S% FmiriG 17 

a 2% av, 2 -. ita Fordcn 44.00* 

7<IS 14% 15 + ft 24*11 ink FOTStCA JO IJ 2* 

40 24’: 25% a 1 * + % 24% 19% FcrstCB .18 £ 26 

10* 1U 1 14 + 4 324 124 ForastL 30 

32 3H 3% 3*» 2 4* Fptomt 


TOi High Low Oval. Ch'ea man Law 5nxk 

J ’22 ’Jm '217 fc. ** 1% KapWvC 

22 ™ Xt -l** ~ ?* 1 * , ‘* »0 KnvCp 

12 37ft 37Vk 374— ft 154 Wi KoorNt 


U8! 54 10 337 23* 23 23% + ft 22% 14 


3% 3% 3% 2 

9% 9Va AS 4- '.111 43ft 32 


9ft 9% + % 43ft 32 Frantz 

2'-. 13^ 2a 14 FreqEl 

1 16' a 16'.li 16’a — 'A 12% 5 FrlesEn 
m nt W 1*! » 144 Fnscfts 

1*9 Pi + % 23% 10% FmtHd 


5 ’2 ’?£ T SJ 'SS — ’•'* ®* KeyCoB .151 iA 20 17 3% 3ft 3% 

2 D gl 15* 8 K«vPti JO 25 15 09 8ta 8% 8% 

” 8 ftsaff-r 4 ^ &--?% la 

■> » »» §j* ^ «S 3 % k!^>71 32 IS 32 S B 

M *11 ^ + f* ^ 22 K,rbv 252 214 3 '- ^ 

2 7 11 ^ jIw ai?? J' S' 37k Kit M/s 13 I 4% 4% 4% 

27 11 f 5 t 5 + * 2. K, wrv JJTr J 17 W Wi ft 

tn J i£ 3 a?^ 7 liZ 1/ IO'A Knoll 15 4 15 15 15 

lil 22 5 21*k 21 % 2H? _ % Koo<!rC 2J2 as 76 TM 5*V. 361k 26% 


Sis. Close 

I4UIP6 106s HipTi Ur* OuW-Cnae 

KOPOKC 2 50 3% 3% 3% + ‘A 

KnvCp 2D li 7 112 12% Wi I2*k— '<• 

KoorNt M 33 16 2 72L. U'u 12% 

Ketdun J55t 3A 19 16 19% 19H 19%*- % 

‘ " .151 iA 20 17 JH ft ft 

JO 2J 15 09 au. 8V« 8»-B — 

6 25 3ft 3 Tt * ft 

2*0 4'i--4% 4ft— 1* 

32 It A ft ftt'i 

44 3% 3ft 3ft— ft 

252 21k 3'.7 2% 

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3% 2ft 
11% 9% 

37 29ft 

* 

11% 4% 
12ft 8'e 


13 

235 108 

22 

18 

Jtta U) 6 
17 

.12 IJ 9 
7 
20 

1J0 17.1 
80 48 V 
23 

JOe sj 9i 
1.16 1J 16 
34 13 IB 
J4I 6A 6 
.15 J 20 


A4 4A 13 
AO 1A 9 
736 109 
34 29 93 
34 1.7 29 
40 U 10 
30 1.1 17 
38 IJ 17 


30 2A 50 
13 


260 18J 
260 13J 

15 

.10 J 
.79f 4A 19 
1.05 6J 16 
1309 5A 11 


1 4% 4% 4% 

21 T% 1% 1% + % 

- 7 19% 19% 19ft— % 

64 36% 36V: 36% 

19 14% 14% 14V* - 7k 

1 ll”i 117k H'» — % 

43 10U 10% 10'. 

♦ 13% 13ft 13ft 
190 12 11% 12 — % 

10 10 9% 10 


24 13% 13% 13% 

18 lft 1% 1% 

9 8ft 8ft 8ft — Ik 

4 lft lft lft 

24 9ft 9ft 9ft— Ik 

20 2ft 2% Ift 9 % 

46 9 8% 8% — % 

57 18 17% 1 7ft + ft 
7 % % % 

10ft IMS + ft 
lift lift + % 
3% J'i — % 
15ft 15ft 
21ft 21ft 
17% 18 
S3U 54% +lft 
18% 19% + % 
SV7 5% + V* 
10'e Mft 
lift 14ft 
17ft 177a 

8% 8ft 
20% 20ft — % 
5ft 5ft 
3% 3% 

77U 77ft — ft 
20% 20% + ft 
8ft 8% + ft 
16% 16% — ft 
12ft 12ft — % 
27ft 27ft +31: 
3ft 3% 

10 10 — % 
20% 28% 

67% 67% — % 
8% 8ft 
14% 14% 

15% 15% 

17% 17% — ft 
17% 17% — % 
21ft 22 +1 

lft 2 + % 
17% 17% + % 
8% 8ft— % 
1 % 1 % + % 
0% 8% — ft 
4% 4ft + % 
lft 1%— % 


86 14 13ft 14 + % 

33 19% 18ft 18ft + % 
10 Bft 8ft 8ft— % 
291 16ft 16% TAte — % 

1 18% 10% 18% 

<8 It 15% 16 

35 22% 22% 22% + % 

833 7% 7% 7ft + ft 


22% 16ft PfltBfC 234 12.1 
34ft 30% PgtDfE 4J7 13J 
8ft 2ft PunloG 


27 32'. a 31ft 31ft— '* 
33 ift ift 4ft f % 


Bft 5% 
5W 3% 
19% 15% 
20 IS 
3% % 

14% 10% 
9ft 6% 
2% lft 
20% 16% 
4 Vi lft 
15ft 10% 
50ft 35ft 
6% 3ft 
12% 9% 

19% 8% 

30ft 17ft 
5ft 1% 
7 3% 

34 22ft 
7ft 4% 
18ft lift 
29% 16 


R 

J5i 5Jt 18 


.12 3 44 

31 C 1? 


14% 9% UrtvCm 

S% .63* UnnJZs 
19% 15% UniwRw 
15ft 10% UnvPat 


93 6% A A — ft r 

38 3% 3% 3% + ft ■ 

3 18% 10% W% + % 10% 9% VST 

95 17V* 17ft 17% + % 20% 13 Vail 

10 ft ft ft + ft 27% 17% Vail 


7 12% 12% 12% 
18 8 8 

8 Ift 1% 1% 


10 2% Verlt 

23% 16% VtAmC 
A% 3% Vttfeh 


2 17% 17% 17% + %j 13% 8% VernU 


4 2ft 2ft 2ft. 

MO 43 13 19 14ft 14% 14% — ft e 

32 256 43% 47% «%— 1 j 


10% 5% Vkrfech 
9 . 4% Vkxm 

4% lft VlntW 


30 Z0 17 
it 29 « 
.12 J 19 


30 IJ 13 
JO 2J 14 


II 5% 5 5 — % 67% 54 ValnH 

30 10% 10 10 12% 8 Vtmtec 

58 l«k 16% 16ft— % 8>k S Vvautf 
2 19 19 19 

20 2% 2 2 — % | 

134 6% 6% 6% I 

2 2*» 34% 24% — % 34V; 18ft Wattxw 


8ft 3% SFM 5 

8ft 7 SFNpiA 
39% 20% SJWS IA5 3 J 13 

5 2% SMD 

9% 5 Salem 
lft % 5Carfo 

9 Ale SDoopi -88 103 

10 7% SDoopf 1-00 HU 

68 S3% SDBOPt 730 11 J 

24% 19 SOnapf 2A7 10J 
39ft 34% SDganf 4J5 11J 
26 20% SDoopf 2J8 113 

29 21ft ScnOOte JO 2J 

5% 3ft Sonmrtc A3t 9.1 11 

11 9 J b Sound pf 130 113 

9ft 7 ScxnOn 130 1 S3 

15% lift Sbarran 15 

30% 17% Schelb J6 13 14 

74k 3ft Soft's! .10 IJ 

34% 12 ScILsg 

67 42 SbdCo 

15% 9ft SecCap .16 IJ 7 

ift 2 SdsPro 

1% % seisDIf 

0l« 3% Seias 

6 3’a SeiisAs 

ift 2ft Semtch 

11 7% Servo 

13% 6 r « Servotr J6t 7J It 

12% 9»k Selena 

2 ft Sharon 

15% 8% Shoowts 

16% 74a SierHSn 23 


a jn i ■ iV riDTS I O 'A mnvn* >■* 6V 

. S'* .*** 2»*i 15. WonaB .14 S 

i? Via/, oJ u. Ve. ft. UfraCwt 

16 2Sha 24ft 25 —ft ux* 4ft WMtHs 5 

I HO 74 W*hPU .94 J 13 
20% 14% WRIT., U7 6-5 17 
5 4% 41a 4ft lift 7ft WstacB .U 13 5 

1 8 8 8 5% 3 WtJrtrd 

Bx 39V: 39% 39% + ft 19ft 13ft WtMd pf 2J3 175 
31 3'> 3 3% + % 9% 9 wtbtnvn 

47 6 5ft 6 11 WWHawl 

4 111 3% % Weseor 

5 8% 8% 8%— % io rt Wedstn 1.10*UA 7 

2 9ft 9ft 9ft— % 12 7ft WKttCh 029 2 17 

moz 65U 6SV. 65ft Aft 4% WAtSWl .14 23 A 

0 22ft 22% 22ft 14 ffft WeMTm 12 

5 39 1 ! 39ft 37% — % 19% 4ft Weflco .4 

3 24ft 24ft 24ft + ft 2ft ft WetlAm 


3ft » T SI'T 58 *t-I « 
it T-i x« 3;v , 

8* !5»k 15'* t53r 
150 2 2 2 

13 28% Sf: 28% * a 

4 lift lift lift- « . 

Ill IS lJ% IS + ‘a 
1C lift M'S lift + '* 

9 9ft W '.a 

15 arm o 6 — 'i 

27 7% 3'jj 7~7— M 

33 12% 17ft 17% + T 
18 27% 27 27 — a, 

43 S% 0% 8% + % 

5 1% 1% I'T— 


65 \TH ir. t!"i * 'k 
13 IO*« 10% tO*« 

99 11 !0ft lO’g + 'a 
U 27.1 C 2J -.'a 
J9 21% 21% 2I'.»— ft 
24 «% T'.r 1%’ 

23 1% 1% !>•: 

12 13' i T34a IXt 

6 13ft 13ft 13ft — '« 

71 TJ* 7ft 7ft— »•* 
S I7.k irk IT a— 

7 7 A*k 6’s. 

2 LAft 16ft 16ft— % 
37 II 18% n 


63 9ft 9% 9ft 
26 77.-! 20% ZO'-i 
65 271 j 26ft 27'*— % 
19 8H 8% 8ft ■ay’ 
29x 16% lA'k 16% Jr 
8 Ift 3% 3U ~ 

X Bft 8ft Bft. 

2 6% 6% A'k— % 

T2 4ft 4% ift + Va 
S 2% 7% 2ft— '.a 
1 67 67 *7 

4Sx 8ft B'.k 8V# — 'a 
A 0% Aft Aft 


AO t.l 20 M! 36% 36% MV: + % 

.14 3 1019 18 17ft 18 + % 

4 ft ft ft— ft 

S 4 7ft 7ft 7ft— '. 

.96 J 13 17 115 114 114ft— 1 

J7 63 17 . 8 18ft. 10% 11% - ft 


VaftyRx IAS AJ 13 


1 Weblnarl 
% Wabcor 

rt Wedsfft 1.10*11 A 7 
7ft WedtCh 029 2 17 


47 6 5% 6 11 W*blqwi 

4 111 3% % WatKor 

5 W W 8ft— ft 10 rt Wedstn 

2 9ft 9ft 9ft— Ik 12 7ft WadtCh 

200z 65ft 65ft 65ft Aft 4% WAtsian 

S 22ft 22% 22ft 14 8ft WcHTm 

5 39ft 39ft 37ft— ft 19% 4ft Wcfloo 

3 244k 24ft 24ft + % 2ft % WetlAm 

5 284: 28ft 28ft— ft 4 2ft WefGrd 

7 4ft 4ft 4ft + % 35 18ft wwco 

5 10ft 10% 10ft 246 ft Wh su c p 

7 7ft 7ft 7ft Wft 5% WjrSrC 

30 Tift 11% 1I%— ft lift BftWVtrp 
37 29% 29ft 29ft— % 15% WWDM. 
69 5ft 5% 5%— ft 23ft 7ft WtHMn 
809 12% 12 12 2! ft T5ft WfRET 


21 ft 15ft WfRET IA U U 


12 

J6t 7J 18 
11 


16 6fift 66ft crt + % 13ft 6ft WstSLC M U 

140 10ft 10% 10% + % 24% >1% UUtrEa, 

12 2ft 2V. 2ft 4% 2ft Vihdaua 

24 ft ft ft 5ft 3 Wlckes 

17 ift 4ft 4ft— ft Sk ft Vftdonwt 

5 5ft 5ft 5ft 32ft 20 WkkMpeUO &8 

7 3 3 3 2V> I WMinB 

1 Oft 9ft 9ft— % 8ft 2ft WtrvE B 

3 11V: lift lift + ft 4ft 2ft WteE A 

4 11 11. 11, I 23ft 19% Wtetln 234 HU 

Z73 % fk 5k— h j 19ft lift WKWnr S3 16 

5 lift lift lift I 5ft 2ft WwkE 


5 17 Bft 8% Bft 

29 3ft Jft Pk 

7 15 15 If — 

24 9ft 9 9 — 

a a? ’ft V ’ft 

7 25 9ft 9ft 9ft 

17 71 IF* 10ft 10% + V, 

A I A A A + % 

12 9 tuft TOTt 10ft + % . 

4 S ,4 3 \ Hg- 

12 3 2% 3 

TZ 38 3Sft 3Sft 35% + % 

3 lft lft lft’ 

12 17 Aft . 6ft 5ft 

n ns lift 11% lift 
Z53 7ft 7% 7ft — * a 
17 20 17ft 17 17ft— ft 

15 61. 20% 19 20 +>£ 

4 153 12% 12ft 12% -M 


15 -100 14% I4*k 14% - r L 

jo m n 2%— % 

5 2326 4ft 4 4% 

MB 1% lft Ift— % 
693 2Sft 28ft 28% ' 


>5% 9% SlarSpn 37t 2J 24 292 10 


9% 9ft PM— ft t 22ft 


7ft 

1 WiltaB 




9 

lft 

1 

1 - H 

8V: 

2% WtnE a 



37 

5A 

7 

6% 

7 

4ft 

2% WteE A 




13 

Aft 

«*k 

4% 

23ft 

19% wtetln 

224 HU 


27 

71 

70ft 

V + % - 

19% 

lift V9RWrar 

St 

2 6 

7 

98 

20ft 

19% 

a 1 -* +i 

5Vx 

2ft WwdkE 



75 

10« 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft- % 

27% 

9 Vttxtha 

3$ 



3 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft- 

21ft 

15% Wrathr - 

JQ 

.1 

43 

1 

19 

1* 

19 • 


15% 

7% Slerert 




21 

8 

7ft 

7ft 

4 Sifco 

.101 


17 

5 

5 

4% 

5% 

3% Sltvrcsl 




13 

4 

3% 

20% 

l£Kk SmlhA 

JO 

4.1 


31 

19ft 

19% 

20 

10 SmtttB 

JO 

4.1 


34 

19% 

19% 

7PM 

24ft smlhpf 

2.12 

8.1 


ZT 

26% 

26% 

5% 

Sft Salltrcn 



20 

105 

7ft 

6% 

16% 

7 SorgPrn 



263 

16 

7ft 

7ft 


833 7ft TVS 7% + ft loft S% SCEd pt 132 ltU 

JO U 15 1691 44'i 43ft 43=4 + % T1V* 8%5CEflpt 136 93 

35r 6.9 5 5 3ft 3ft 3ft 11% 8% SCEd Pt 138 102 

32 23 I lift lift lift +% 12ft 8% SCEd Pf 1.19 1D3 

13 50 lift 14 14% + ft lift 11% SCEd of 1J5 HU 

130 8.7 11 13x16% 16ft 16% + ft 110% 99ft SCEd ef 7200 109 

IB 8 6ft 6ft ift 23% 18 SCEd pf 230 1(U 

8 2 10% 10% 10% 23% 17% SCEdpt 221 100 

18 2ft 2% 2ft + ft 75Vk SPf j SCEd Of 7J8 100 

16 32 5ft 2ft 2% 8 Sft 61 SCEd of 830 MU 

12 10". 10ft 10ft 7ft ift SpedOP 

US 123 200: 35ft 34Tk 3Sft +1% 13ft 5% Spencer 361 

10 160 3% Sft 3% + ft 11% 3% Sandhi n 200 

55 ft ft ft 23% 17% S Id Prd J4 3JB fi 

9 11 5% 5% 5% + l* 77% AS StdSfir KLOOrMJ II 

4 Bft Bft Bft - - - 


!| Sft Sft YankCo 


7 10% 10% 10%— ft Bft 3% ZfeMr 

0 10ft 10% 10ft + ft 
22 10% 10'A 10ft + ft . 

5 11% lift llVk+-ft I 7 “ 

A3 14% M 14 J a 

to 109% 109% 109% + % I ■■■ X 
11 21% 21ft 21ft 1 * * 

1A5 20% 20ft 20ft I 

65 70ft 69ft 70% + ft 
58 81% 00ft 81ft + ft 
5 (ft Aft Aft 
7 6% 6ft Sft— % 

in wu i* J}' „ AraTrExpr 

20 22ft 22 22 . + Ik Motrocar* 

3 48ft 68% ASH— ft MWOTCtn 
42 ttft IBft 18ft + ft TsWPtflri 
47 8% 5% 8%-ft ^ 

25 23ft 23 23 

42 ift in— m 

26 14ft 14 14% + ft 

97 7ft 9% ¥%— % AOf ein ' 

7 lft lft lft FfaaaoEnf 

1 4% 4% 4%— ft Jwropjock 

1 8ft 8ft lft + % Trier wt 9 

10 2% 2% 2% 

3 27ft 22ft 22ft + ft 

40 36ft 36 36% — ft 

155 1 . I 1 + S 

42 11 10ft 10ft— ft -f 
65 i5% 15% i5% lanjii 
26 ift 4% 4% japtu 

10 1 % 1 % 1 % * ' 

2I2nmwt „ i? it a 


6ft 6% Aft + ft 


735 ?’z "ft + 'i 9% 0 t: Excel 

47 1% 1*b 1': a 

II 8% Eft 3ft— 't I 

16 9ft 9ft °ft a — — '--- ' ' 

I 6'. 6ft Aft 221:1 '»* Ecblnd 
7 I2=: 13ft 12': + ft 15^4 6. poirFIn 
■si 31 31 31 * ft IS '5 3 Farlypt 


4 1’. 1 

4 37ft 37 
15 »ft « 
32 9 e 


17 37ft + ft 
9 9 — ft 
Eft 8’. 


22*. 16% Fcblnd AO 1.9 S 
IPb 6 FairFIn 31 

19 15’aFarlvPf .47129 
10ft ift Fidota 


17 Sft 5ft 5ft '0 1 ® 3i * Fidala 

IJ -ft }2% *ft PICWHl 

* ♦■, 9i. «i,_ i. 15': II FWvmB 

1 15ft 15ft 15ft + -i Psicrps 

10 Ift lft lft 15ft 11 ) FifChP 


FlCoon lJJOa Bj 
FWvmB 30 6.9 


4 20ft »ft 30%— ft 
28 lift lift lift— % 
125 16% 16 16Ve 
ICS 6ft 6% 6ft 
12 12ft 13 12 — ft 

47 lift 11% lift— % 
43 lift lift lift 
35 13% 12ft 12% 


17ft lift JOCtvn .50b IS 10 
7ft 5% Jacobs 

4% 2ft JetAm 8 

1% Va JwlAwt 
9% 5% Jelnin .71111.4 11 

6ft 2% John Pd 

lift 7 John Am JO 43 10 

11% 6 Johnlnd 3 

7ft 2% JiwnpJk 15 


39ft 31ft KnGaof 430 125 


10 6ft Aft 6ft 

101 4ft 4’k 4%— % 

16 \ ft ft- % 

43 fift 6% 6'. + % 

26 2% 2% 2% 

75 7 7a 

14 8% 7% 7%— 

32 2% 2ft 7%- 'a 


35ft 36 —ft 


24ft 16% OEA 12 

22% 15% Oakwd 38 A 11 
12 4 OdolA n 

16% ift OdefB s 
24ft 18% aiioina jo i. 9 76 
27% 10% Olsten s 3* 1.1 18 
7% 3ft OOkicn 
25% 1A OSulvn, .42 IJ 16 
lift 6% OxIrdF J2t 53 11 
14% Bft OzorkH 30 IJ 14 


57 19% 19ft 19ft— ft 


21ft lift StarrtH 
10ft aft Stofex 
23 lF.b Steoan 
2% 1% StcrtEI 
23 13ft StrtExl 


57 18 171* 17%—% n% 5% StertSft .18e IS 25 


30 IJ 14 887 14 


A 49* Pm 4% 

9 Aft 6ft Aft + ft 

2 20 % 20 % 20 % 

18 22% 22ft 22% + % 

28 4% 4% 4%— % 

IS 24% 23*4 23ft 
307 14 13% 14 — 


fc'ssvr*' 

r Jt v 

msm 

tern 



L T^., jTT" Ttr7. 1 <1 i tf oro y x c-i ?~ej » -wt 

r.’.’, ;• • 7- v V::'..'";. 

r - 7 rr-jV 1 - - r . ------ 

f ■■ ... : 

iSppp-ailil: Sll , 

- -- - - 

-• • 


15 11% PGEnfA 130 113 

lJ*i 10% PGEDfB 137 113 
12 ft 9% PGEPfO 135 113 
12": 9% PGEpfE 135 11.1 
12'.» 8% PGEpfG 130 113 

36 31% PGEpfF 434 110 

33ft 2T? PGEpfZ 436 120 
29% 24% PGEafY 330 11 J 
24% 19% PGEofW 237 11 J 
a'.k l”t PGEofV 232 11J 
24'b 1E% PGEpfT 234 1IJ 
23 17fe PGEpfR 237 1U 
19% 15% PGEpfP 2 jQ 5 II J 
20% 141k PGEPfO 2XO 11 J 
20ft 15ft PGEplK 2X4 113 
21ft 17ft PGEOlJ 232 11 J 
11% Bft PGEPfl 1X9 113 
28ft 16 PGTm 134 4J 
43% 33% PocLtpf 430 10-8 
47 30ft PocLtpf 4J5 103 
50ft 3a; : !, Padfpf 5X0 10J 
ft t» Page g 
40% 32% PallCp J8 13 
8% 5 1 *: Panlast 


38 13% 13% 13ft + V* 
4 12% 12% 12!^ + Ik 


2% lft Strutw 
^7 3% SumiTE 

8% 2% 

22 11% SunJr 

36% 21ft SuprFd 
1% % 

18% lift 
6% 3% Susaueh 
2% lft SwttEno 
28 19% Swift In 

6’b 3% Synoloy 




JB 22 13 
I Jib 12 14 

, 30 1.9 7 
36 23 10 
h 8 

g 10 

130 *5 25 


AMEX (%hs-Lcms 


HEW HIGHS 


BlcCorp 
Money Mot 
PnwEnsys 
WOcoFln 


Andrea Rod 
infligtiT Svc 

MoMsSrakl 


Cen tnlGpwf 
MoareMedn 
SttahaChm 

VAluiUUM 

nDrKntu 


BtodcEa* 

lanHvdnj 

Sbarren 


Esq Rod El 
MewProc 
SunshneJr 


Drillers" 

laiThortwn 

TediSyra 


12 11% 11 11%—% iot 6%SystEns 10 13 

34 lift 11% lift + % .iu U 

10 10ft 10ft 10ft + Vk I : 

29 33% 33% 33% — % I 

« 3U4 Ji, JVi 9ft 4ft T Bar 33t 5 J 

11 SS rf ,3 ‘* TEC ■» 23 

Wi. 5^ + Y; 101 9 4 % tie 

24 a% » 20 — ft 12% 5% Til 

’5 W? Si? 21U * TabPrd 30 13 

f ^ S' 1 ■■ 9% Aft TondBr 

1 IS 18 18 — % 17 97k Tasty JO 3J 

fi K* E* !» » Team 

® ]8_ 18_ 3% 1% TctiAm 


a ! | ‘ Japanese Steel Exports* 
sss-' Fell 4 . 5 % in September 


IfaxiiLrt'- 

ore 


[ l rir 


VM 

4ft TBar 


56 

21 

47 

Sft 

5% 5% + % 

13ft 

Aft TEC 

23 

2T 

18 

/ 

7 .7 

10% 

4% TIE 




64 1 

4% 

4ft 4% 

12ft 

5ft Til 



61 

3b 

Aft 

6% Aft 

2lft 

13ft TabPrd 

30 

IJ 

12 

II 

IS* 

15ft 15% + % 

V% 

6% TondBr 



6 

27 

8ft 

8% Sft 


15x16% Mft 16% 


The As to aore d Pmj 

.TOKYO — JmaaZs sted exports fell 45 
perocat in Scptem&er from a year earlier, to. 2.6 
million IMS. mfflnfy becansc of restrictions on 
^opziK&ts.to the IJpitBd. States, the Japan lion 


1 !?% Wa lrt + %l 227% 10% TchSvm 


40% 32% PallCp J8 13 19 

8% 5 1 -: Panlast 43 

30% 17% PartcOi 1.00 33 II 

13% 4% PolTcft 31 

lift A% PaulPt 4A 


13 7ft PEC 1 st 321 9.1 11 3001 9ft 

11% 8ft PeerTu jObAI 13 10 9ft 

45% ark Pen EM 130u 3J 12 2 35% 

24% 15% PenTr 130 43 11 42 24% 

2% % PECp -25T40X 41 % 


28 Wl 9% 9% — ft 

*5 28ft 28V. 28% . _ 

520Z 41ft 40 41ft +1% 230 
400: 45 44 45 +Zft 4 1 

75: 47 46 47 +2 38 

123 ft % ft +lk m 
14x37ft 37 37 — % 

10 Aft Aft Aft 

2 30% X 30% + V» 

77 5 rt 5 — % 

20 10 10 10 

3007 9 ft 9 9 


A 3ft TeefiTp 
2D ft 10ft Teditrt 
38 97 TeicnR 


is =% wS 2% + * and Sited Federation announced Monday. 

iT ^ T ?ft ’J 1 * - ^ S^Jtembcr was tla third consecutive m 
J !? -13% 13% 13% to nl.;4. tuJ wnnrtr /knrnvl fr/vm llw . 


4ft 

1% Tele con 




16 

38 

24ft TcJHcx 

J4 

12 

IS 

TO 

11% 

8ft TeiDta 

JO 

19 

14 

26 

11% 

fift Tetsci 



22 

04 

5% 

2ft Telwph 



474 

6% 

4 Tenner 



14 

102 

10ft 

4% Tensor 




I 


10 9ft 9% 9ft Bft 4 

2 35% 35% 35% + % arft 16 

42 24% 24% 24ft + % 7ft ^ 

41 % % % + ft 3% 1 


29% 22 TexCOB 130 
20 7% TcxAIr 3 

Bft 4% TexAE Jit 49 23 


6% TexAE BI2J7 13 7 
7k Tx9COn 


i4 4 3ft j September was the third consecutive month 

600^0^206^210’*— i in which sted exports dropped from the year- 
to 35% 3^ 35% + % ear ^ cr fevds, the group said. They slipped 4.4 
u ’lft ’’n? 'rt*— ft P«cent in A^ust and 5 J percent in July. 

m 5% 5% »! + £ Although the drop in sted exports was 4J> 
w 22 W 22^ s' 4 — ft percent overall, the decline in exports to the 
’!% ’US l Sk — ^ ^™ ted States was 24.5 percent, the group said. 
i iw ink i8% Expats to China, the largest overseas market 
iu IS iu + * for Japanese sted producers, rose 6.1 percent. 


1 IBft 18ft 10ft . 

147 lft 1% lft + % 
5 lft lft lft 


Hoating-Rato 1 ! Notes 




: y-. ■ 

si 


Dollar 










( V 


■*4r*+ 


M 




rtrf 


Wt 


ft 


Bft 
8% 2MI 
•ft flA-R 
« 15-11 
Bft 2+01 
Bft 15-01 
8% 

Bft 
Bft 
Sft 




I 






«-J. 


OffdwF*AUainp7i 

OfMmMMnBBA 

PlretlI9l/M 


Pk Sankan 88/91 








Internationally acknowledged 


unhil 

L vision I\l rii> yea 1 ork ; • 

’ ■'^m.DTOHACrO HOUSE IN T1IL WOK! 1) ‘ 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

PRICES AT 23.10.85: 
A: US. DOUAR CASH S1052 

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C!DOUAKBOM3S S11 j63 

D : MULTOJRI®<Y BOhOS S122S 
EiSTHmSASSET ' £11.21 
BjfiBGN & COLOrOAL 
MANAGEMENT (SQEY) UMITH5 
14 ML8.CASTB1 STSEETSTJ-SJByBiSEY.CJ. 
THj 053427351 TEEt4l92DS3 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1985 


How Poicfc*OKfer on Two Classes of Stock lor the Same Company 



V:iL By Gary Klotr 

• !• New YoH, Times Semce 

W. YORK— In the 1960s, a 

\>'. s igmy successful New Yoric Stock 
.xchangc advertising c ampaig n 
£ . : r - CTSuadcd millions of investors to 
•* ) shares of Amoacan companies. 

t; 1 f :«se days, the Big BoardiTS 


•A .• ^ . - 

traded ovet-tirercoaniefor on the 
American $to<±'£refcmge. While 
Such arrangement slave, been for- 


TtwMffYeffc Stock Excfttog* 
.tmtSb ka faflaiad companies 
'ton having two ctteoasof 
^toek, b^maS^SwdhM 

' ’dotayict dritafiianttatMozwi 

companies ttmtiwre wch stock 
andweonsfcfciring Jooaantofl as 
fries. . 


The National Association of 

Securities OeetersaSows two 
dosses of stock with unequal 

voting rights and has about 1 00 
companies Med wrih such 
arrangements, ta board has 
voted io study raising ks 
standards. 


The American Sock Exchange 
allows two classes o# stock with 
unequal voting ngtus, and has 
«5 such compsde* listed. Under 
its rules, the stronger voting 
shares cannot exceed l D tunes 
the voting power ol me regular 
class. 




Dollar Eases Lower in U.S. and Europe 


- ; LU 

■"<& ■ «»P0rata»s get the ***r+ 
1 ..Bats for their money. 
sY P c discrepancy, between two 
liferent classes of stock within the 
t f‘ ;i t >une company, in fact, is the »>h _ 

' ' I :* 1 4 ba ^d debate between 

- r ' congress and Wall Street that now 
'■ n ij Appears headed for a showdown — 

. V.fed will shape the future control 
, ; I nd ownecslup of many of the na- 

■ J ■: largest corporations. It stems 

. ;-'Dtn the moves in recent years by 
romlnrat companies, such as 
*; TT^s.. ' oasial Corp., Hershey Foods and 
; £ reneral Guana, that have issued a 
: ! iWmd class of stock with superior 
!■; -:, 3 tmg rights. 

; i In effect, the new dass enables a 

. ijian^ementgroi^ofshardioldtw 

if* gain voting control of the cora- 
V| i tiny even though its ownership of 
■■ : .he total shares is less than a major- 
J ‘ i ‘‘y. What bothers some members of 
: Congress is a hint of shareholder 
discrimination and they have 
’ ' ? jireaiened a legislative assault if 
i; ■ re major stock exchanges do not 
11 Jjfike steps to stop the trend. 

Such an assault is growing in~ 

: 'i j ,*:' eaangjy inevitable. Four months 
;*jter the congressional warnings 
l_ : 3;ere sounded, the exchanges are.no 
« |: oser to agreement than when they 
; fuddled for the first and last time 
• n ; ] -I June. 

” J ,j »;■ Congress's effort to preserve 
•j ] ‘ * rareholder democracy came up 
^ * 1 -jainst heated competition among. 

three major stock exchanges 
'T> J d pressure from corporations 

■ — _ ~ 1 ‘anting to consolidate manage-" 

— X^jenl control to protect against 
T^stile takeover attempts. 

_____ In most cases, shareholders, m- 
l jiTT^viced by special dividends or 
' * ^bv 0 ™^ greater long-term value . 
their stock, have generally grant- 
management's wishes to set up 
**■•< mat a ve special class. 

tea*. In the past 30 years, about 170 
gg-xnpanies have issued a second 
ir^c ass of stock with disparate voting 
‘•mu* t Most of those companies are 


Big Board is considering loosening 

its roles. . • . " , 

TSs issue came i» die surface 
mare Ami a year ago when a half- 
dozen. Kg Board companies, m r 
dwfing <reneraTMotora Corp., set 
w> a second dass of ownmoa stock. 
Fearing a loss of Ssrings to the 
Amex afld the National Assoda- 
tiem of Securities Dealers, which 
regulate the OTC market, the New 
Ymk exchange put a freeze on the 
ddisung of cou^omes that were 
in frin gi n g on the ntie« and set up 
an d^-membgc omnBt te ri to re- 
evaluate its standards. ■ 

Defenders of stqmior voting 
shares contend that they have be- 
come an essential tool io protect 
the long-tens interests of share- 
holders against the threat of a hoo- 
die takeover by arbi tr ag er s rad 
speculators who are seeking only 
short-tenn profits. 

“We've seen many companies in 
the greeting card field go under 





Matterr intervention by other major banks, francs, down from 8.0750; 11625 

NEW YORK — The dollar and led to uncertainty over whether Swiss francs, down from 2.1690, 
eased modestly lower in Ufi. and the industrial powers were attempt- and 1,78125 Italian lire, down 
European trading Monday as mar- jug a concerted effort to stabilize from 1.787.00. The British pound 
kets responded to rising interest currency rates. gained » S 1.4275 from SI. 4225. 

dealera ^ WKt ^ enUan - ' “It's much too early to decide In earlier trading in Europe, the 


from 1.787.00. The British pound 
gained to S 1.4275 from SI. 4225. 

In earlier trading in Europe, the 


-r. . „ that central banks have decided to dollar was fixed at midafternoon in 

,k 7°!L U - aS J 3n -^ ^ l^cklfi the dollar problem with in- Frankfurt at 2.6458 DM. vinualiv 

Y^rk P Jof?T 0 Ift iihr lcresl rates *" su* Palmer, unchanged from 16455 at the Fri- 

senior vice president at First Amer- dav fixing. It dosed at 213.65 ven 
i Bank^of New York. -Even in Tokyo, down from 214.90 al Fri- 

ikough die Group of Five promised day's dose. 

engineered at the end of last wed* lo . b ™gdown ihedollar.l ihinkwe i„ other European markets 
J^L Ba _i. Qf 3anan «u^ movements in shon-terra Monday. Ac dollar was fixed in 

- . _ turn inif In tv mindd^nLil (3-s^e o AASA r r ,oe. 


In other European markets 


jobp j. PMn jr n cMibm of aw 

Jf0w Yoifc Stock Exchange. 


Gorton S. ftUcUta, sreiideat of 
the National AModeOoa of 
SanritheDeelori. 


Artfaar Levitt Jr n chairman of the 
American Stock Exchange. 


tn^/f io p“h uo rathef ‘ hso “ anim! ' ei <kwo from 8.0680: at 2.9S55 Dutch 

West Gentian interest rat« bv sell- ..Aroite deakr noted that the gutlden, in An^terdam. up from 
ing dollars forward also weighed on sll^ll drop in the ddlar was wdl 19850, and a 1,785 60 Italian hre 
the Ufi. currency, which slipped to wdun ,ls currenl °° m M*?- «P frora L78S.00. 

2.6390 Deutsche marks from Acre b suU a good commer- In Zunch, tire dollar rose to 
*» 54 go ft pridav’s finish. cul demand for dollars, he said. 2. 1 668 Swiss francs from 2. 1 6:0 on 

“ In earlier trading in London, the Henoied that. “We’re aU wailing Friday. 

U.S. currenc}' slipped to 2.6420 w Ac natural demand for the The British pound, meanwhile, 
DM from 2.6445 at Friday’s close, Miliar will abate as a result of the firmed slightly on Ac back of a 
and to 213.42 yen from'Friday’s GroupMof-Rve moves against the s Ught rise in shoner-ienn D.K in- 
dose in London of 214.70. doHar.” terest rates. It closed in London at 

Dealers said the interest-rate Other dosing dollar rates in New 51.4280, nearly unchanged from 


might see movements in short-term Monday, Ac dollar was fixed in 
rates turn out to be coincidental Paris at 8.0650 French francs. 


man few tire NYSE, said the Big when asked about the prospects for 
Board would prefer to retain its a resolution. But Mr. Shad said be 
current standards, “but tire com- hoped the issue be resolved 


ectsfor Nike and Adolf Coots — one 
said be would find well-recogzuzed names 
csolved and successful products, not evi- 
petnive environment may very wD by the end of the year. dencc of management having 

make- it i m p os sible for us standing Mr. M addin, however, said be grown lazy because of Aw voting 
akxre to retain the one-share, one- did not believe that it was possible control Furthermore, he Ainrc $u- 
voteruk.” to complete the NASD study and perior voting shares can is some 

_ For his part, Jphn SJL Shad, come up with a decision before iastances bolster long-term stock 
chairman of the Securities and Ex- next year. Although be said it was values — such as in the case of 
c h a ng e Commission, pressed tits too early to predict the outcome, he newspaper companies that need to 
NASD and American Exchange to said “there is very tittle evidence ax remain in trusted, independent 
tighten their standards so that the the moment supporting" a one- ban'll 

Big Board would not fed com- share, one-vote ntie." -There are sensible economic 


ness," said Allan J. Goodfdlow, 
secretary and gpezd counsd of 
American Greetings Corp., which 
issued a second class of stock in 
1955 to insure that -tire founding 
Sapirstein family ntuntaured con- 
trol. Tin certain our company 
would have been swallowed np 
der tender offered it weren’t for the 
establishment of two dasset." 

On tire other tide of tire debate, 
the issue hosr sparked fears that 
much of the nation’s wealth and 
'resources could one day end op 
control led by entrenched manage- 
rial bureaucracies, whose majority 
voting power would allow them to 
rule their corporate kingdoms for 
generations unfettered by the 
threat of takeovers dr tire interests 
of shareholders. - 

After Studying tire issue, the 
NYSE psnd recommended that 
the exchange allow two classes of 
shares with unequal voting rights, 
provided that the plan was ap- 
proved by a two-thirds vote of 
common dniriwMwc along with 
other conditions. No final derision 
has yet been made by the board. 

Richard T or ren zaa o, a spokes- 


In Zurich, tire dollar rose to 
2.1668 Swiss francs from 2.1 650 on 


terest rates. It dosed in London at 


to loosen its own. 


Dealers said the interest-rate Other dosing dollar rates in New $1.4280, nearly unchanged from 
moves by the Japanese and West York on Monday, compared with $1.4260 ai the opening and Fri- 
Gcrroan banks were followed by Friday, included; 8.0530 French day’s close of 51.4225. 

THE EUROMARKETS 


In the search for a solution, po- reasons for these arrangements and ti • 7 9 T Tk Tk» Ct 7 7 Tkf 7 

rnday s Japanese Rate Rise Shadows Market 


In Congress, Senator AJfonseM. Bcy-makers hare turned to the aca- stockholders and managers are per- 
D ’Am a to. Republican of New dexnic community, which has con- fectly capable of deciding under 
York, and Representative John D. ducted some recent studies. But which circumstances ihev are ap- 
Pmg e O , Democrat of Michigan, opinions there are also divided. propriaxe," he said. 

submitted legislation that would Citing some mutual insurance - , 

reauire ooe-sbare. one-vote and comnanies and savines banks as . Research by Mr. DeAngoo also 


Bv Christopher Pizzev 25-year note issue for First Bank pared with the 100-basis-point to- 
Revxn ' Systems Inc., lead-managed by tal fees. 

LONDON — Secondary-market Morgan Guaranty Ltd. It pays Vs Crosslands Federal Saving & 


agree on a similar standard. University's National Law Center. Pr 00 ! L ^ rise in short-term i 

Officials from the three ex- said there was evidence that self- en * feoc ° . 113 ca5CS where man- Japan, dealers «id 

changes met once in Jane, but no perpetuating institutions did “tend a £ e f nem “f 5 “^joroy voung ron- Seasoned Eurovi 
agreement was reached and no otb- to be less efficiently run than when trol. according to ms resea rch , they shown falls stretchi 
er nreeungs are planned. there is a risk of bring taken over." typically oum at Irast a .foil points during ti 

“We hosted one hmch and we’ve In addition, he said, the stock ™anoal stake m the oomreny. Of prices tended to ret 
heard nothing constructive since was worth less vdxn voting rights com F? mlcs snuneo, ire xouoa terooon to end well , 
then," said Gtution S. Maddin, were diluted, since the chance for l ^ D in ^ :iIK:es m manag- dealers added 

president of the NASD. stockholders to receive a premium f * 5 jy «ratro> but owned Dollar straights i 

The Big Board wants the other for their shares from a takeover lcs ^ a iu-percem fmancia] nervous tin 

exchanges to raise their standards, offer was reduced if management stakt vesiors would sell ] 

Mr. Torrenzario said the NYSE had the voting power to reject all No maner what the outcome, losses incurred don 
had noplans to take i m m i ne nt ac- such offers. Robert B. Reich, professor of busi- along with news the 


bos majority voting ron- Seasoned Euroven bonds had &boul 99 - 72 - . 
rding to hxs reseuch, tbev 1 shown falls stretching toward two National Corp. issued 

own at least a 25-percent during ^ but S100 million in notes maturing m 

stake in the cot^any. Of la}ded t0 recovcr - m ^ rj. 1996 and paying 3/16 point over 


to cover points. 


turn, but would see what tire other 


>d the voting power to reject all No matter what the outcome, losses incurred domestically. This, Homestead Savings & Loan As- 
ch offers. Robert B. Reich, professor of busi- along with news the U.S. Treasury sedation issued SI 50 million in 10- 

But Harry DeAngefo, associate ness and public policy at Harvard was to sell 517.75 billion of debt year collateralized notes incorpo- 
ofessor of finance at the Gradu- Univertitv, is not worried about this week, saw prices fall by to K rating the ‘'mini-max’’ structure. 


exchanges, do “over tire next few professor or finance at tire Gradu- University, is not worried about this week, saw prices fall by to ii rating the •' mini -mat'’ structure, 

months." . ■ ate School of Management at the shareholders. Even if they lose voc- point. The issue pays 3/16 point over 

The Amex has said it would go Uxtiversity of Rochester, New ing control, be said, they' still can in the primary sector of the mar- three-month Libor and b 

along if the NASD did. But the York, said that in scanning tire list “vote" by selling their shares, km, attention centered on floating- mum coupon of 8 percent 

NASD board derided that tire issue of major companies that have is- which itself can be a powerful disci- rate notes. Issues totaling S550 mil- imum one of 13 percent 


University of Rochester, New ing control, be said, they' still can in the primary sector of the mar- three-month Libor and has a mini- 
York, said that in scanning tire list “vote" by selling their shares. Let, attention centered cm floating- mum coupon of 8 percent and max- 


required further study. sued a second class of stock — ptine on management. “The vote is lion were launched, all for U.S. 

“The balTs in MackJin’s court,” including The Washington Post moment by moment, second by financial institutions. 

Mr. Shad of the SEC said recently Crx, The New York Times Co., second.” The largest was a S200-miilion, 


vestor put options after 15 and 20 ing tfe point over uiree-montn lj- 
years. It ended on the market at bor. The 12-year notes will have a 
about 99.72. maximum coupon of 13‘A percent, 

Riggs National Corp. issued which would apply after the third 
$100 million in notes maturing in year. 

1996 and paying 3/16 point over The lead manager for the issue 
three-month Libor. The issue has a was Salomon Brothers Interna lion- 
minimum coupon of 5 percent aL The notes ended on the market 
and was quoted on the market at at 99.30. 

99.05, with total fees of 11 2*6 baas In the dollar-straight sector, 
points. Kansai Electric Power Co. issued 

Homestead Savings & Loan As- SI 00 million in bonds paying 10H 
sedation issued SI 50 million in 10- potent a year over seven years and 
year collateralized notes incorpo- priced at 101 ’4. 
rating the - mini -mat" structure. Uni Led Technologies Corp. be- 

Tbe issue pays 3/16 point over came tire second borrower in the 
three-month Libor and has a mini - recently opened Eurolira market 
mum coupon of 8 percent and max- with a 50-billion-lira bond paying 
imum one of 13 percent. 1316 percent a year over five years. 

It was quoted on the market by The par-priced issue was lead-man- 
tbe lead manager. Credit Suisse aged by Banca Comm erri ale Ita- 


Tbe largest was a S200-miilion, First Boston Ltd., at 99.27, com- 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1985 


■ 

m 

■ 

a 

m 

■ 

■ 

■ 

H 

■ 

■ 

■ 

m 

■ 

■ 



PEANUTS 



BOOKS 


CHAMPION: Joe Louis, Black Hero 
in While America 


By Chris Mead. 330 pages. $18.95. 
Charles Scribner’s Sons, 597 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N.Y. 10017. 


Reviewed by Robert W. Creamer 

W HEN Joe Louis began fighting profes- 
sionally in 1934, three years before he 
won the heavyweight championship, there 
were almost no black athletes prominent in 
American sports. There were no blacks in ma- 
jor league baseball, none in pro football and 
only a few in college football. A handful of 
blacks played college basketball, but the pro- 
fessional game as we know it did not exist. A 


round of their famous rematch in June. I93SJ. 

He defended his championship 19 limes in the 
first four vena after he won il and 25 times in 
all before V abdicated in I94S. 

. The United Stares loves a winner, and it }► 
particularly loves a gracious winner. Louis was 
that, rime after time exhibiting toward defeat- 
ed opponents his innate sense of decency. He 
was a gracious loser, too, on the rare occasions 
. when that happened. Even his disastrous 
comeback, which ended when a youthful 
Rocky Marciano knocked him out, 17 years 
after Louis's first pro fight, did not dim the 
esteem in which lie was held. 


few blacks had won Olympic gold m edals (riot 
! Owens, whose Berlin Olympics 


1 Autumnal 
foliage hues 
5 Tunes 

10 Trunk in a 
forest 

14 Author W'iesel 

15 The Hunter 

16 Consumer 

17 Beautiful 
tamaracks 

20 Omaha Beach 
craft 

21 and dined 

22 Czar's edict 

23 Wampum 

24 Compass pt. 

25 Autumnal 
beauty 

32 Stock-market 
item 

33 Les Etats 

34 Diamond fig. 

35 Autumnal 
color 

36 Walled, in a 
way 

38 Off Broadway 
prize 

39 Superlative 
suffix • 

40 Spores 

41 Beam 

42 Nut-bearing 
beauties 

46 Neighbor of 
Air. 

47 “ . 

Nanette" 

48 Open courts 

£ jYeir York 


51 Tropical 
mammal 

53 Autumn color 

56 Tall, erect 
sylvan beauty 

59 Every's 
partner 

60 sea rum 

(scatterbrain) 

62 Battle site: 
1813 

62 Inspires with 
fear 

63 Type of type 

64 Young sow 


DOWN 


1 Actual 

2 Desirable 
plants? 

3 Count calories 

4 Sun. talk 

5 Companion- 
able 

G Autumnal 
color 

7 Prime time 

8 Autumnal 
color 

9 Snow, in Ayr 

10 Scoop on a 
steam shovel 

11 River in the 
Urals 

12 Sediment 

13 Celtic 

18 “If a Rich 

Man" 

19 Certain breads 
or cakes 


27 poplar, 

Tenn. state 
tree 

28 Single 

29 Cube-game 
inventor 

38 Jannings and 
Ludwig 

31 Fencer's 
weapon 

32 Blueprint 
datum, for 
short 

36 Trip 

37 Gershwin or 
Eaker 

38 Hawaiian 
thrush 

40 Pigeon 

41 Kind of boom 

43 Whinnies 

44 “Love 

. . Keats 

45 Ln 

(instantly) 

48 On the China 

49 Melt 

50 Speed 

51 Tor feature 

52 Podded plant 

53 Anchor rings 

54 Seed coat 

55 No. in Moscow 

57 "I see!" 

58 Beer container 


ANDY G4PP 


0.M U,H«wl JUwte»Sr«I.CJI» 


, POOR LASS, 9TTN5 
AT HOME, WAITING 
• R3ff\CU...WHYNOi 
GET BACK EARLY 

For ao-wnGtE-t 



SHE'LL BE OVER 
>THE/WOON,LAt> ' 
y „./VtAKE5Y3U . 
^ FEELGOOD-.-, 



WHAT ARE 
^\OU Coins ^ 

HOME? 

ms ONLV 

NINE 
O* CLOCK 



SOME HOS&VO CATCH UP MTHYOUPJ 
‘BEEN FIGHTING AGAIN ? ,, 

EXD YOU GET CHUCKED OUT? 
fcEO NOU FEB. ALL RIGHT-?/ 



WIZARD of ID 


including Jesse Owens, whose . . 

triumphs were st£D in the future), but track and 
field remained predominantly white, and even 
in boxing, blacks were not in great evidence. 

Since the introduction of the Marquis of 
Queens berry rules in the 1870s, there had been 
only one black heavyweight champion — the 
controversial Jack Johnson. In the other weight 
divisions there had been more than 100 cham- 
pions, but only eight had been black, and late 
m 1934 there were none. 

J /mis came into the corruption and medioc- 
rity of boxing in the mid- 1 930s like a fresh 
breeze. The prestigious heavyweight crown bad 
bumbled its way in five years from Max 
Qr4iTtv.ling to Jack Sharkey to Primo Camera 
to Max Baer to Jimmy Braddock, fighters un- 
able or unwilling to win consistently. Louis 
(whose career began by happy coincidence on 
the Fourth of July) entered (his largely white 
world and in 18 months captured (he imagina- 
tion of the United Slates by winning 27 
straight fights, 23 of them by knockouts. Be- 
fore and after his stunning loss to Schmelmg in 
June, 1936 — one of the most startling upsets 
in boxing history — he swept away die detritus 
of former champions by knocking out all five 
of his predecessors (SchmeEng in the first 


land Rice, a renowned columnist of the day. 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


□ □□□□ 


Tuna, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



/a eomAwWAnot wtirfano 

^tTIN j 

rt u&r!^ 

(Mum! 

mueower. 

Y..MNUMVHl^Y irfusnsOT ^1 

1 )&O0EfiO N&fA. BWt M 

\\ 

WjfM 





Mead argues that Louis's accomplishments in 
the ring and his admired behavior out of it 
farced white America to “took 1 ' at the no 
longer invisible blade man ami to praise what it 
saw. If one black could command such recog- 
nition and. respect from whites, that others 
could too. Ergo, the Federal Employment 
Practices Commission, Jackie Robinson, 
Brown vs. Board of Education, Rosa Parks, Dr. 
King, equal opportunity. The fight goes on, 
but, according to Mead. Louis got il going. 

His account of Louis’s career and personal- 

. i.. n.. i- .*• ,. r , ... 


ity draws heavily on earlier, livelier books 
about the fighter, but 


Mead’s research, notably 
sports 


a detailed analysis of the racial bias in _ r 

journalism SO years ago, adds much to the 
stray. 


10/29/85 


Robert W. Creamer is the author of “Babe: 
The Legend Comes, to Ufe w and "Stengel: His 
Life and Times.” He wrote this review for The 
Washington Past. 


Unscramble those tour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to farm 
tour onSnary worts. 


CALLI 


znz 


□ 


ADDEJ 


1 — 1 

r 

rn 

ri 

1 1 

1 — LJ 

LJ 

LJ 


TERIAP 


rr 

□ 

sJw 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


* Know what? That bow tie avikes 
T0U LOOK GIFT-WRAPPED/ 


r p HE 15th gams of the world 

A championship chess match 
between Anatoly Karpov and 
Gary Kasparov was the first 
time that Karpov had used the 
symmetrical Petrov Defense in 
this series. 

When Karpov played 
7 . . . B-KN5 (in place of the 
normal move order with 
7 . . . B-K2) in die 28th game 
of their previous title match, 
Kasparov had played 8 R-Kl, 
B-K2: 9 P-B4, N-B3 with an 
eventual draw. Now, seeing it 
again the challenger varied 
with the immediate 8 P-B4. 
This was not vulnerable to ex- 
ploitation by 8 . . . NxQP? 
because 9 BxN!, PxB; 10 QxN 
costs Black a piece. Meanwhile, 
the threat was 9 PxP, QxP; 10 
BxN, QxB; 1 1 R-Kl, winning 
(he queen. 

After 8 . . . N-B3, White 
could play carefully with 9 B- 
K3, although this would lade 
punch. He could also try 9. PxP, 


except that in similar positions 
Black has obtained a comfort- 
able game by 9 . . . BxN; 10 
QxB, QxP. 




The challenger, true to him- 
self, took up the gageand chose 
a gambit with 9 N-B3L, BxN; 
10 WxB»NxP. After 11 R-Kkfa, 
B-K2; 12 Q-Ql, it would have 
been risky for Black to day 

12 ... PXP, 13 BxBP, mice 

13 . . , O-O? allows 14 RxBl, 

while 13 . . .. N-B3 allows 14 
RxB!, while 13 . . ..N-R3 al- 
lows 14 Q-N3. - - ' 



MMKWMOI 

Final poskian 


After 22 . . . N-Q5, the 
game would ha ve become dead 
Karpov, true to himself, level with 23 BxN, RxR; 24 
handed back the pawn with RxR, RxB, so the players 
I2...N-K3; I3PxP, NxP: agreed to a draw. 


14 B-N5cb, P-B3; 15 NxN, 
PxB; 16Q-N3, O-O; lTNxBch, 
QxN; 18 QxP, thns obtainign 
an equal game. An attempt to 
keep the material such as 
•16 . . . Q-Q2?; 17 B-K3, fol- 
rlowed by 18 QR-Q1, would 
have been too risky, as would 
16 . . . P-QR3; 17 P-QR4, 
PxP?; ISQxNP. 


mitov DEFENSE 


2 N-J3J 

3 tM> 

I 

9 

• 

J OO B4C JO 

jES S3? 

U-CHa NOES 


S&3 


13 PUP 
M B+Bcli 
U NxN 
M 0*0 
D MxBcb 
IS OxP 
U 
30 


NiP 

P-KJ 


n 


oo 

KR4H 

TKP 


VINTER 


Ltt~ 



HE FELT THE ONLY 
WAY TO MULTIPLY 

happiness 

WAS THIS. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
tonn the surmise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


fflhlanswsrhere: TO til I I J 1H1H 


Yesterday's 


(Answers lomonow) 
Jumbles: BOOTY FORAY METRIC IMPEND 
Answer What some musical performances sound 
like someone s having— AN ■■OPERA-TION” 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algarve 

AmderOam 

Athens 

Barcelona 

Betgrade 

Benin 

Brussels 

■iidwraef 

Budaml 

CMenhoven 


HIGH 
C F 
23 73 
ID 50 
17 43 
17 b3 
* 30 


LOW 

C F 
14 57 


ASIA 


7 34 

8 44 
13 SS 


5 41 


Bangkok 

Beilins 

Nang Kong 

Manila 

N«w Delhi 

Seoul 

Shanghai 

Singapore 

Taipei 

Tokyo 


HIGH 
C F c 
30 84 U 
16 41 


LOW 

F 

79 


7 48 


? 82 24 75 
31 88 25 


30 84 14 57 
a 72 u 


23 73 

30 84 _ .. 
29 84 23 73 


54 
18 64 
25 


Costa Del Sol 

24 

75 

10 

SO 

fr 

DuUUn 

12 

54 

7 

45 

o 

Edinburgh 

10 

50 


43 

0 

Florence 

19 

66 

7 

4i 

Cl 

Frankfort 

4 


■ 1 

JO 

a 

Geneva 

10 

so 

1 

34 

a 

Helsinki 

3 

37 

-1 

34 

cl 

Istanbul 

14 

Sr 

6 

43 

tr 

Las Polinas 

24 

15 

» 

88 

cl 

Lisbon 

20 

68 

18 

81 

lr 

London 

10 

60 

B 

46 

□ 

Madrid 

IS 

SJ 

n 

46 

lr 

Milan 

14 

57 

3 

38 

tr 

Moscow 

1 

34 

• 1 

3U 

tr 

Munich 

4 

49 

-d 

25 

to 

NIC! 

20 

68 

IS 

5V 

o 

Oslo 

S 

41 

0 

32 

a 

Paris 

9 

48 

3 

37 

lr 

Prague 

1 

34 

-1 

30 

0 

Reykjavik 

10 

50 

8 

43 

r 

Rome 

19 

68 

14 

57 

r 

Stockholm 

5 

41 

0 

X! 

cl 

Strasbourg 

3 

37 

-1 

30 

to 

Venice 

14 

y 

4 

3V 

H- 

Vienna 

8 

43 

2 

38 

e) 

Warsaw 

3 

37 

1 

34 

a 

Zurich 

b 

43 

3 

37 

0 

MIDDLE EAST 




Ankara 

10 

SO 

■2 

28 

h 

Beirut 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 

Damascus 

20 

68 

4 

39 

fr 

Jerusalem 

17 

83 

7 

45 

fr 

Tel Aviv 

a 

H 

IS 

5« 

C> 

OCEANIA 






Auckland 







— 

na 

Sydney 

20 

88 

14 

57 

cl 


19 44 11 57 cl 


AFRICA 


Algiers 

Cairo 

Cape Town 

Casablanca 

Harare 

Logos 

Nairobi 

Toni* 


23 73 10 50 
is 77 14 57 


24 75 11 


52 

= n 13 SS 
55 77 IS » 


24 79 24 75 
24 75 13 55 
22 73 17 43 


LATIN AMERICA 


BBflMKAJnK 22 73 IS 54 

Caracas 27 81 lv 44 

Lima 2} 73 M 57 

Mexico CHy 23 73 5 4i 

Riado Janeiro — — — — 


NORTH AMERICA 


Anch o rage 

Atlanta 

Boston 

Chicago 

Denver 

Detroit 

Honolulu 

Horn ton 

Lot Angeles 

Miami 

Minneapolis 

Montreal 
Nassau 
New York 
5an Francisco 
Seattle 


cl-cioudv; Io-Imov; ir-lalr; h-holl; 
stvsnowers; sw-snaw; st-staraiv. 


Washington 


21 -13 
M 14 


84 24 
7J 16 


77 17 
84 25 


61 1 
57 8 

84 23 


73 PC 
45 fr 


64 10 

64 


52 
41 
40 PS 


o-overeast; ne-partly cloud v: 


39 to 
r-raln; 


TUESDAY'S FORECA5T — CHANNEL: SljBlHIy ChOMW. FRANKFURT; 
Foggy. Temp. 3 — 2 (37-2BJ. LONDON; Cloudy. Temp. 8-5 (46-411. 
MADRID; CMuav. Temp. 14 — 9 ( 57 — 481. NEW YORK: Fair. Temo. 13 — 3 
(SS — 371. PARIS: Cloudy. Temp. 9 — 4 148 — 391. ROME: Shower*. Temp. 
17 — 1) (43 — 52). TEL AVIV: Na ZURICH: Foggy. Temp. 4 — 0 (39 — 32). 
BANGKOK: Tnundei-Morms. Temp. 31 — 25 (6 8 — 77) HONG ICONS; Cloudy. 
Temp. 27 — 3S(Bl — 77). MANILA: Fair. SEOUL; Rain. 

Tomo. 22 — 12 ( 72 — 12). SINGAPOP; — - 

(88 — 75). TOKYO: Foggy. Tott*p. 19—1 


i 


W>rid Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Oct. 28 

Closing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Amsterdam 


Cloee Prwr. 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

AEGON 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

ATtam Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

BuehrmonnT 
Calona HWs 
Eisevier-NDU 
Fakfcer 

SiVnSiST" 

Noarden 
Nat Neddor 
Nedlloyd 
Ow Vander G 
Pali hoed 
Philips 
Rooeco 
Rodamco 
No! Inca 
Rorenio 
Royal Dutch 
Unilever 
yan Om merer. 

Wu FS,wk 


538 527 J8 
244 245 

9? 

126 127.10 
277 JO 273JU 
75J0 7SJO 
9 JO 8J5 
PU70 nm 
224 222 

110 10BJ0 
28JD 28J0 
144 144 

81.80 SO JO 
237 238 

IB1J0 181 JO 
44J0 <&30 
5Z80 B30 

50 JO 50 
74.10 74J0 

184 in 

343J0 343 

7Z1D 72 
49^0 4970 

78 78 

13570 13570 
7070 7OJ0 
46J0 46J0 

188 1M.70 
342J0 339 JO 
26JM 2480 
34*70 

236 23450 


ANP.CBS Gem index : 234J0 
Previous : ihjm 




Anied 
B«kaon 
Cockerlii 

EBE5 

gg-Jnno-BM 

Geuiert 
Hoboken 
*"1er com 

£-wi«tr,ank 

^mranno 

iofiw n ® ro,e 

Solway 

uS ,tenEl « 

Unerg 

VlettlPMonlQBiw 


2670 2540 
7300 7200 
205 223 

4495 4600 
3570 3435 
4960 5070 
2450 S20 
4480 4770 
5750 5900 
2635 2790 

loon loan 

6410 4580 
2280 2290 
8380 8500 
5680 S870 
4400 4750 
9450 5600 
2BJ5 2125 
6670 6980 




Close Pr*«. 


Harpemr 

Hochtief 

Hoec tat 

Borsch 

Horten 

Hussei 

IWKA 

Kail + Sale 

KorsSmrf 

KauHiof 

Kloeckner H-D 

Kloeckner Wertce 

Kruap Stahl 

Undo 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Mannewmann 
Muanch Ruecft 
Nlxdorf 
PK1 

Porsche 

Preussog 

PWA 

RWE 

RtMtfaimetati 

Scherlna 

SEL 

Siemens 

Thvssen 

vetw 

Valkswogenwerk 

Walla 


355 354 

BIS 821.50 

as* an 2S8JB 

16030 15M0 
214 214 

361 370 

3)3 317-50 
36S373J0 
288 287 

122 329 

312 315 

B8J0 8670 
143 156 

598 598J0 
220 321 

197 195J0 
2S5 260 

2200 2100 
573 571 JO 
TM) TTO 
1343 1349 
290 27450 
1514015300 
210 208 
430 430 

450 625 

353 353 

635 656.10 
164.70 168J0 
27070 275J0 
3A4J0 368 

447 645 


Commerzbank index : T7U7J9 
Previous : 170570 




fttthlnrt 

Anianl vS**" 1 2S7 2*1 J0 

Aliena 17*4 1800 

BASF 458 445 

Bower 3*7 270 

BOW Hypo Bani, -J 57 JS9.90 

43 ^' 4 ®“9 

BBC „«9 424 

BHF-Bank 28 VS » 

BMW M7 38? 

Cammemxjftk fj* 513 
Cdnl Gumrni . 26) 

DnlifiJer-Bertz liHi'S 50 

Degu™ 

Deutsche Bobcno SK <94 
DeuiKheBS?"^^ , 

ffingS! 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kong 
China Light 
Groan island 
Hong Seng Bank 
Henderson 
CninoGos 
HK Eloetrlc 
HK Real tv A 

HK hotels 
HK Land 
HK snang Bank 
HK Tetegnonc 
HK Youmotei 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hyson 
mnaty 
Jantinc 
jart&ng 5ec 
Kowloon Mohr 
Miramar Hotel 
New World 
SHK Props 
SfgUM 

Swire Pacific A 
TaJ Cheung 
Wall Kwang 
Wing On Co 
Wlnsor 

world mil 


2280 

1970 

1670 

870 

45J5 

275 

1170 

870 

12 

34 

6J0 

770 

9 

378 

7.10 

2670 

061 

0.97 

12A0 

14.90 

1070 

4550 

8 

1370 

Z42S 

2770 

1.95 

(LBS 

143 

OS 

2775 


23.10 

I960 

n.io 
8 -« 
46 
2775 
11 JO 

3575 

645 

745 

9 

JJS 

975 

2640 


0. 98 
1240 
14.«0 

1040 

6450 

8.10 

1130 

245 

2770 

1.99 

DJ5S 

1, 


4^ 
2 XS 


Hang Sang index : 169175 
Previous : 167173 


Mi 


AECI . 

Anglo American 
Anglo Am GoM 
Bar laws 
Bivvgor 
Buffo Is 
De Beers, 
Dtiehmleln 
Elands 


810 

3400 

186M 

1090 

1525 

7650 

1415 

4933 

1715 


800 

3400 

18600 

1075 


1405 

4950 

1715 


Close Prpv 


GFSA 

Harmonv 

Hive w Steal 
Kloof 
Nedbonk 
Pres steyn 
Rinatot 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sasol 

West Holding 


3300 3500 
2910 29OT 
570 SBO 
2275 2270 
SS 995 

4700 4700 
2375 2350 
680 480 

3700 3700 
BOO 800 
8050 8090 


Composite Stack Index : 1 199JS 
Previous : 12HLS0 


London 


AACorp 

AlHod-Lvons _ 

Anglo Am Gold sssu sss^. 
Ass Bril Foods 260 258 


•ML 

270 


271 

31B 

228 

30 

586 

292 

209 

316 

646 

305 

187 

441 

SIS 

380 

30s 

UH 

166 

211 

249 

467 

1ST 

4HJ 

415 

441 


Ass Dairies 
Barclays 
Bass 
BAT. 

B eecham 
BICC 
BL 

Blue Circle 
boc Group 
Boots 

Bawatar Indus 

Brlf Home 51 
Bril Telecom 
Brit Aarosoaca 
Brltoll 
BTR 
Burmati 
Cable wireless 
CadDurySOnr 
Charter Cons 
Commercial U 
Cans Gold 
Courtowuis 
Daloetv 
Oe Beers* 

Distillers 
Dnetantetoi 
Ftaons 
FreestGM 
GEC 

Gan Accfdetil 
GKN 
Glaxo £ 

Grand Mel 
GRE 
Guinness 
GU5 
Hanson 
Hawker 
ICI 

Imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Land securities 
Legal General 
LJovds Bonk 
Uxirho 
Lucas 

Marks and Sp 
Mela) Bax 
Midland Bank 
Nal Wat Bank 
PandO 
PHKIngton 
Pleseay 
Prudential 
fiscal Elect 
Rondtoaleta 
Rank 
Peed Inti 

Reuters 

Rural Dutch c 44 13/64 

RTZ 544 

Saotdil 490 

SobisOury 350 

Sears Holdings 108W 


142 

417 

639 

270 

3211 

228 

30 

530 

292 

210 

313 

543 

307 

184 

441 

210 

371 

305 

S9S 

147 

213 

252 


426 

443 


Sif* *14* 


KKk S20» 
160 140 

SSI « 

550 249 

1327/321329/33 
3sa 363 


708 

308 

910 

207 

409 

642 

zia 

304 

316 

7W 


140 

433 

165 

528 

419 

497 

431 

27B 

132 

7J9 

123 


711 

304 

925 

207 

409 

657 

211 

307 

316 

709 

*47 

ISO 

423 

170 

518 

417 

694 

433 

m 

136 

744 

126 


J46VS 866% 
465 450 


679 

318 


<84 

3(6 

44VT 

2E2 

695 

350 

109 


Shell 

STC 

Sid Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tate and Lyle 
Tesco 
Thom EMI 
t.i. Group 
Trafalgar Hse 
THF 

Ulfrmnar 
Unilever c 
united Biscuits 
Vickers 
WOolworth 


F.T. So index : iMug 
Previous : ltSOJO 
F.TXE.IH Index : 1347 as 
Previous : 13(7 JO 


} MBan 


24410 24100 

Centra la 

3498 3410 

Clgatiotol* 

12290 1199C 

Cred Ital 

3220 3185 

Erl don la 

10700 10825 

Farm Italia 

12805 12510 

Flat 

4545 4471 


63510 82950 

IFI 

11225 11000 


47300 4*520 


2020 2011 

I faJmublllorl 

131550130300 

Mediobanca 

127400128000 

Mon tod Ison 

2480 2340 

Olivetti 

7350 7299 

Pirelli 

3U* 3050 

RAS 

109800105600 



SIP 

2*55 2*50 

5ME 

1350 1311 

Sola 

4023 3905 



Slat 

3673 3875 

MiB current Index : 1782 

Previous : 1735 


_*”*» 1 


Air Liquids 
Altthom ail 

Aw Dassault 

Bertcalre 
BIC. 
grain 


auygues 

SN-GO 


jrgeun 

ubMed 


Clubfl 

party 


jnw 
I f- Aouita) ne 
uroael 
Gen Eaui 
Hachette 
Lfltaroe Cea 
Lcgrand 
LMtaur 
rorgal 

Martell 

nntra 

Merlin 

Mi die) in 

MoeiHennessv 

Moulinex 

Oeeldantale 

Pernod Rlc 

Perrier 

Peugeot 

prlntemns 

Rodin teetm 

Redauta 
Roussel uevrf 
sanatt 

5kURexiigMl 
Tetamecon 
Thomson C5F 
Total 


542 

545 

314 

317 

1197 

1100 

697 

890 

484 

483 

1445 

1480 

717 

723 

2303 

2300 

2984 

2185 

725 

706 

447 442J0 

1555 

1580 

789 

740 

184 

184 

835 

827 

853 

*55 

1374 

1375 

581 

535 

203* 

2030 

700 

710 

2356 

2369 

1309 

1389 

1485 

1500 

2120 

2D68 

1119 

11R) 

1941 

1935- 

57 

5*40 

854 

*54 

707 

701 

438 

420 

792 

389 

mss 28 UQ 

341 

344 

1580 

1580 

1470 

1895 

599 

383 

12*8 

VS* 

2540 

2530 

580 

582 

271 

383 


CAC index : 218A0 

Pr ev ious : 217JB 


1 

CtoM 

Prev. 

[ | ‘‘jjnjt—Mftc ! 

[ Gold Slonigg 

3.10 

545 

118 

580 

1 Fraser Nsawe 

SJ5 

*40 

■ Haw Par 

1T7 


i Inch com 

NjQ. 

2.15 

Mai Banking 

6 


i OCBC 

8+0 


OUB 

176 

279 

OUE 

N.Q. 

129 

i StiangrWo 

NA 


SI me Darby 

IB) 

187 

l S’poro Land 

248 


5 'par* Press 

840 


S steamship 

Ol83 


St Trading 

3jOB 


United Ownmas 

141 

186 

UOB 

184 

388 

1 Straits Time* tad Index : 

mm 

Previous : 78SA2 


il SMhheini |, 


149 

148 


227 

219 

Amo 

301 

303 

Astra 


435 


137 

136 

Boliden 

196 

197 

Electrolux 

167 

180 


207 

204 


' 380 


HomdetsbmUien 

193 

J¥0 


178 

172 

Soafo-Soanto 

Sandvfk 

42S 

500 

425 

495 


92 


5KF 

258 

2S3 

SwedlstUVlatcn 

218 

218 

Volvo 

225 

222 

1 ANtuu iiioerMea index : 39731 1 

Previous : 3»ja 



r -jgfcpy 11 

ACI 

110 

388 

ANZ 

5418 

5.10 

BHP 

BJJ2 

*88 

Baral 

345 

.340 

Bougainville 

2 

208 

GasNemaliM 

8.10 

8 

Cato*. 

438 

489 


145 


CHA 

574 

570 

C5R 

158 

'383 


ZJ0 

272 


188 

384 


222 

225 

Magellan 

2 A 

240 

MIM 

288 

270 

MW 

3lS0 

380 


4.95 

5 

Nevus Cora 

870 

880 

N Broken Hill 

288 

285 


275 

125 

Qld Coal Trust 

185 

184 

Santos 

5J 8 

580 

Thomas Nation 

248 

241 

wsaternMinfaa 

384 

186 

WOsteac Bonfttog 

5.1 D 

&20 

Woods We 

140 

141 

AJi Ordl none* index :M«5M 1 

PreyMus : 10323* 



1 II 

Akal _ 

.410 

40* 

Asahl Cheat 

- 784 

788 


880 


Bonk gt Tokyo 

784 

769 

Bridgestone 

580 

582 

Conan 

1230 

1210 

Casio 

1 *80 

1*10 

Cl toh 

416 

416 

Dal Ninnen Print 

1120 

1110 


831 

885 

Oaiwg Securities 

822 

876 

Fanuc 

nm 

’37D 

Full Bank • 

1580 

UXI 


Full Photo 
Fulltsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 

Japan Air Lines 
Kollma 
Kama i Power 
Kawasata Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Qiem 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
MllsubtfilCorp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mitsukashl 
Mitsumi 
NEC • 

NGK Insulators 
Nik ko Sec 
Nippon Koaaku 
Nippon CHI 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan _ 

Nomura Sec 
Olympus 


2120 2120 
999 1020 
740 730 

650 430 

1230 13*0 
6010 5680 
495 
1890 1900 
143 146 

765 780 

515 525 

380 3M 
4030 3600 
1230 1220 
895 890 

1460 1480 
3)7- 
357 
389 393 

593 602 


-Ricoh 


Shlmazu . 

Shlnetsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sunn tomo Bank 

Sum Homo Chom 
Sumitomo Marine . 
Sumitomo Metal 
TOM Cora 
Tolsho Marine 
Takeda Ghent 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tofcfa Marine 
Tokyo Elec. PW w 
Toopan Printing 
Toray Ind 
Toshiba 

YamolcM Sec 


730 ... 

1200 1160 
875 879 

780 795 

900 894 

751 751 

163 167 

3*1 330 

608 598 

1110 1170 
HOC 1030 
1700 1660 
imw rasa- 
882 856 

822 an 

815 761 

4050 3870 
1700 1680 
363 266 

729 709 

148 149 

33T 340 

570 566 

895 887 

4290 4080 
510 .513 
9*1 - 901 
2320 2290 
098 8*2 

5 H 

1140 1100 
70S 713 


Nikkal/DJ. index : 12937 M 
Previous ; . 

New index : inojs 
Previous: U1A36 


Zoriefa 


AJusulsse 


Bank Leu 
Brown Bavtri 


Eleetrawaft 
HaJdertxmk 1 
■hterdtacaunt . 


Landis Gvr 
iBtCk 


Nestle 


Ruche BaBY 

iStar 


4350 4395 
685. 688 
6575 6500 
3850 3900 
. 1740 1760 
3375 3480 
3160 3380 
3450 *470 
7LQ. — 
33W 3430 
S® 7850 
3410 *430 
2280 3225 
5000 5000 
7600 7730 
. T4I0 1580 
10450 10775 
1528 1513 
4500 4508 
448 44| 
4730 4<75 
1565 . 1540 
• 509 SU 
2380 2360 
2160 2230 
ms 4750 
5390 5325 
3410 2 430 


Oct 23 


Canadian stocks via .4P 


Soles 5 tack 
900AM1PYM 
1150 Aon k»e 
5400 Agra indA 
8496 Alt Energy 
14206 Alta Nat 
' 1595 AJgornd St 
CSOAtcol t - 

3S25BPCanoda 

13141 Bank BC 
53309 Bank N 5 
119821 Barrtdco 
200 Baton A ( 
8134 Bonanza R 
OTBroionw 
320D Bramc lea 
200 Brenda M 
47428 8CFP • 
71645 BC Res 
3*569 BC Phone 
100 Brunswfc 

4365 Budd COD 

87575 CAE 
1144CCL A 
3434CCLBf 
059 Cod Fry 

17000 C Nor West 

2600C Packl* 

753 Can Trust. - 
1400 C Tang 
14547 Cl Bk Cam 
52288 CTIrsAf 

uoo c uin b 
725 Cara 
1183 Cell 


1183 Cel anew - 
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The ooslaoghi of World War II added to his 
luster. He joined the army a month after Pearl 
Harbor arid ftas hailed as a prime example of 
American unity and patriotism. Black Ameri- 
cans loved him because of the vicarious satis- 
faction he gave in standing up to and defeating 
the white man again and again (few of Louis'^ 
opponents were black), and white American# 
put him on a pedestal More than Paul Robe- 
son, Marian Anderson, A_ Philip Randolph, 
Louis came to represent the Negro in white 
eyes. The often lurid white press in the begin- 
ning had described Louis as though he were an 
animal that had dropped from a tree. (Grant- 


called hhn “a bush master,” “a brown cobra/ 
and referred to him as having “the speed erf the 
jungle, (he instinctive speed of the wild. 17 ) Now 
it patronized him, overlooking his faults and 
dwelling on his dignity and his good deeds: ‘ 

“There never has been a heavyweight cham- 
pion who has behaved better," wrote the "The 
Chicago Tribune.*' “There are those who say he 
iai’t very bright, but he has had enough educa- 
tion and he is bright enough to know where his 
duty lies.” 

Some black intellectuals resented white 
America’s choke of a boxer as the symbol of 
his race wh3e ignoring those better able tr^. 


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ATIONAL HERAI4)TRJBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1985 


■m, ■ 

;»lt s a 


SPORTS 


Ay-Lj A 


Page 17 






: • •• . " it 


% Gordon Edes 

IttAmdaThnexSani* 


' A T^f^ r : 

4«Sl@rfBfte: 


m 


: Royals Win the World Series, 1 1-0 


4’S .{£ 21 kawiWjHXfiB strewn 


team in the . i ■ Andujar, a 20-game winner each of (he last 
mot average two seasons but reduced to a mop-ttp rote Sun- 
day 'night, was unrepentant for bis actions, 
said Herzog, winch came when DenJdnger called baBson two 
j^caca” straigitf pitches to Jim Sandberg, (he last on a 3- 

h hnwny that and-2 cfltmL 


arms around Andrgar and pulled him from the 23 of his fast 25 decisions —including mo in the Cardinals and finished with a 0 JO earncd-nin 
field. Series and one in the National League plavoff average in mo complete games in the Series. 

Andujar was one of five pitchers Herzog usd — was his earliest this year. Toe Mets "had While others whined. Saberhagen just won. 
in the futh inning, when the Royals scored six chased him after three innin gs on April 22. but "I would have been upset- too. if 1 wasn’t 
tunes on seven hits, one walk and a wild pitch, that was when he was still mortal, losing seven getting my share of calls.*' he said “But you 
The Royals had chased Tudor out of the game of his first eight decisions. can’t lei it get to you. Joaquin let it gei to him.” 

by the third inning when they took a 5-0 lead on ‘There's nothing superhuman about me.* 1 he The Cardinals now have a winter to face the 
Darryl Motley’s two-run home run and Steve said. T just go out there and throw- strikes, and reality of not only losing, but of unraveling 
Balbonf s two-nm single. ^ let those guys." his teammates, “go out and play, before millions. 

Shortly thereafter, the Cardinals* ace was on I didn’t do that tonight- I walked guvs and I “We saw things coming apart at the seams." 


“j '-W.immrt nr-rFr.. i tT stumiuvosMU sale a ocuc» game ana duiy fwarnn in ux 

" ''■■"i’ i'll 3? : .i C ^ ance by Bret SaberhagetuHe, ^cafi as finSt" base in the bottom of the ninth Yankees in 1976. and the first, period, in a 

, y°™g»t to wra the Series’.'OT&ig Satmdayosghi tbaL toishl have kept the seventh game. 

* t®^*** 1 ?®* f Gardmak from waning die Series in Game 6. T went oot to keep Joaquin Iron being 

r -> , L '• Sene * after k®*®® die fir* two “Ihaiwas the biggest disgrace I’ve ever seen,* locked out," said Herzog. T didn't mind leav- 

- /J* ^'SolySo’ *" * s ^ ldoEDe Canfirals, who reqoested ano- mg. Td seen enough.*’ 


his way to the hospital for sdichtt in his pitch- gave up a home run. 


ing hand, having punched an dectric fan in the 

dugouL For me, it came down to one ball game, and it Can the RcsyalsT he asked, “say the same ifcir.g 

T made a stupid mistake and cot myself — was a complete disaster. Call it a choke, call i! wouldn't have happened to them?” 
that's my personal business.” said Tudor, who whatever you want, but I didn’t come through The Royals, however, have to answer to nu 
had returned u> the clubhouse by the end of the when we needed it," cme. They are the champions. They showed 

game and stood there with a towel wrapped While the Cardinals were gradually turoiag them all:' the California Angels, whom they 
around his left hand, answering questions far from scarlet to crimson, Sabcrhagen was a rhap- overlook for the AL West Division title: the 
longer than be bad pitched. sody in blue, throwing just 93 pitches while Toronto Blue Jays, whom they overtook for the 

Tudor’s cm, in a season in which he had won allowing just five hits. He retired the Iasi eight league pennant: and, finally, ev en the Cardinals. 


“This game was lost when we got down early, only human beings. 


“We saw things coining apart at the seams." 
said their left fielder, Tuo Landrum. “And we’re 


Can the Royals, he asked, “say the same thing 


4 M S -^ rst w a Senes after losing the ffot two 


mind leav- 


■* ; ■ ■-“■-'t , <■ ptory also will record that the Cardinals -nynnty, 

— :' TT ‘‘ -^i J 1151 ®di team to lose a Series after tdobo 

' ’*£%** by three games u> on* _ ... Jongw i . nr . __ _ 

^ bat by itself is embaj rassment enough. So is jon’ie'ddwo IGQ'-yoo donh argne cab. 

•• ‘ • 


nvmity, after. Anthem bad made a nationally 
ragge d speoadepf hhnsrif by chiigba: De«- 
lodger twice arid btnapzng Jam occeT^When 


Andrgar was gone on the next pitch and had 
to be restrained by teammate Tory Pendleton 
.and a coach, Nick Leyva. Mike Roarte, the 
Cardinals' pjirhfng cna*ih L finally wrapped his 


^or Royals, 
■■^Ig Hearts, 



■ .?$$ood Tunes 

By Malcolm Moran 

JWfi* York Tima Service 

’■ ..-jH- KANSAS CITY. Missouri — So 
to describe the Kansas City 

- a>, «5 !l ..fais’ first Wrald Series champi- 

• ^ ship? Startling? 

Hal McRae ..said, and 
. 1 * bs «c^?ed. “Bui it’s onbdkvable.” 
yot how could this group over- 
. . ;.? 5 in T^ie two cmjsecotive three-game* 

. . ' ^'‘Oiasjuj^ine disadvantages? A »nv. of 
.- - - ( Wposc? A sense of fear? A reseni- 

. *«« % it from a feeling of bdng over- 

Ft^.ted? All of those things? .. 

. j. clubhouse filled with screeches 

' - - ' sdwaau^ champagne abowets is usually 
. . "’.-riii*, ^7 the place to seek perspective, 

1 ' !; 4 a sense of pospective is one of 
•-.j qualities (hat helped win a 

-V • rhampirvrKMp 

V^SWe didn’t want to go home,” 

. P 31 Sieridan. “We won six 

■ . (U ^ when if we didn't win, we'd - 

^ to go home. The heart in these . 

s is double-fisted. ” 

It comes from us, I guess,” said 

idy Biancalana. “We jnst tried 

stay relaxed, tried not to put 
• j tt ssure on ourselves. There’s 
P resfiUre - When you’re 
sm, no one expects yon to win, 

- it’s easier to play. I don’t Jmow : 
it it is. If you ask any pitcher, I 

. always easier to pitch if you’re a 



j 


George Br^t T theRoyab ? third baseman, was the first to congrariilate Bret Saberiragen on 
he five-hit pttcbhig afto- file final oot gsve Aeir team its first Wodd Series championship. 


tried to make sure W got lo the lie Uabrandt, the 


— — ~ * — — B“‘ — — . *— - * — ««— wh> — pi t c her , “L Ui Awuig > i mm, aoiu Did M- r , , - t r 

baBparic safely. It <fidn*t nuttier positive; all iqibeaL It’s die land of berhagen, the benefidary Sunday . “ 10 a nearby hospital for 
who was nitchiflp. One of die hesr team I like to nla? for Thev «n niohr SQtcbes. 


“Scoring 1 1 runs,” said Bret Sa- 


Cardinals 
Are Calmer 
In Defeat 


By John Fcmsrein 

Wathmgtan Post Srt:a 

KANSAS CITY, Missomi — 
They were angrier on Saturday 
night. Then, they felt they had been 
robbed. Sunday night, they were 
simply crushed. 

And so, in the quiet of the St. 
Louis Cardinals’ clubhouse there 
were few tears and fewer excuses. 
In victory, this has often been a 
suriy team. In the wake of that 
awful, 11-0 defeat to the Kansas 
Cijy Royals in a memorable sev- 
enth game of the World Series, they 
were almost gradous. 

“Even if we had won tonight, Tm 
not sore I could honestly say we 
were a better dob,” said John Tu- 
dor. the first of the Cardinals’ sev en 
pitchers in this game. “There’s no 
sense making excuses. It came 
down to one game and it was a 
complete disaster. The twni need- 
ed me tonight and I didn't produce. 
It’s tough to take.” 

It was so tough for Tudor, who 
had won 23 of Ins previous 25 deci- 
sions, that when he came out of the 
game in the third inning be 

- qnnghari hi< left ban d into a nvial 
fan in the dugout and had to be 



The Asucnoe W«r.-. 


Joaquin Andujar, one of five pitchers the Cardinals used in die fifth inning, was restrained 
by tearmnates after being ejected from the game by the (date umpire, Don Denkinger. 


.1 can t explain il was pitching. He shut us out the didn’t sec 

t the end, after the struggle to last rime. It didn’t matter who was we found 
rcome the California Angels to pltdring.” ' When I 


night 

“Pitching.* 


I did a dumb, stupid thing.” he season we had, I never thought it shouldn’t be here tonight anyway,” dearly missed leadoff hitter Vince 


G u COrg , e J? retl said. T hurt myself and I shouldn’t would end this way.' 


the American League West " The co nfidence was a resui 
tpionship, the three stra ight remarkable stretch of pitching 
iff victories to overtake To- the leadership of the older players 
i for the pennant and the and (bedireclioa provided by DSdc 


" The confidence whs a resah of a nms in the ninth inning of Game 2, 
remarkable stretch of pitching phis aD Howser said to him was that be 


™ I SCOT IO gw coununn imui screamed above the clubhouse uZZ 

: found oursdves in that bole.” L.J LjLT* but u s my bu siness . 

Wtcn Labrandt ^krwed die two ”■> Buddy Ban- Asted if h. had tvtr don. any 

ns in the ninth inning of Game 2, thing similar in his baseball career. 

I Howser said to him was that he B“* P«haps Danny Jackson had Tudor said simply, “No.” 

mid have another chance to **“ answcr - Hc was the winning As be spoke, as patient in defea: 
tch. pitcher in the fifth game of both the as he had been impatient after vie- 


Herzog said. “He blew the call at Coleman, who stole 1 10 bases dur- 


It ended, once and for aQ in the first base Saturday. If he calls ing the regular season but hurt his 


would have another chan ce to 
pitch. 


not before his manager. Whitey people. But he's a good umpire. I’m “When you lose that speed, it can’t 


Eheback to force a seventh game Howser, the manager. Tfc showed The' catcher, Jim Sundberg, Payoff and th* Series, and provid- lories in the past, his teammates Herzog. By the time the debacle ticked off about the call but it hap- be replaced. 1 can’t replace it. no 

'•inst SL Louis, the Royals were confidence,” said 'White, amember could rembnber only two brief pe- ^ The start of each comeback. Sun- quietly walked around the locker was over, both men were in street pened. one can. We had guys who tried, 

l ost puzzled by the sense of can- of the ream ancel 973. “Hcdidn’t nods when rhe Royals’ pitches “S 1 * 1 he *** among the more room, shaking hands, h u ggin g, la- dothes and making no apologies “I was kind of glad to get out of but in the end. we may have tried to 

i nee they felt before the- game ■ criticize uswhen weweren*thkting; were inconsistent. Tire second one, ag *“* sive ctam P a £ ne shooters, men ting. . — for what had happened. That the there because I was tired of it all” do too much.” 

j day night. ■ - Hekept saying we had gpod patch- he said, atded with about a we* to roaming the dubhouse, looking fw Tommy Hot, who drove in 110 incident involved the umpire, Don Herzog said of the qeebon. “I went Herzog made no excuses. Bui he 

i jWhen we got even,” Frank m&The key to a gpocLcregaruzarion go in the regular season. “When unsus P cctin g victims. in ^ repilar season but not Denkinger, who made the ninth- out there because Joaquin thought could not resist a few shots a: the 

i ite said, “we were going to take - is you don’t nrtidrr. your drib. He they «mw» back the last week,” When he found one of the many, o ne in the Series, sax way back in csll that may have turned he threw a strike. That was what I Royals. 


in street pened. one can. We had guys who tried, 

apologies “I was kind of glad to get out of but in the end, we may have tried to 
That the there because I was tired of it all" do too much.” 


. . . * JWhen we got even,” Rank mg. The key to a gpotLargannation go in the regular season. “When unsus P cc tmg victims. 

p . i ite said, “we were going to take is you don’t criticize your dub. He they came back the last week,” When he found one of the many, 


- yiWe knew we were going to win criticize him.” 
b j ighC Biancalana said. rWejust “This coaching staff,” said Char- 


doesn't c riricrz e us, and we. don’t Sundberg said, “1 knew we were in his voice shrieked as he struck. his locker stall, his head against the 

km ’* » “W. .k. ..J r, k. U I- .»_■ 


business.” 

So what was the difference? 


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Baseball 


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NFL Standings 


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“We shocked the world,” Jack- wall and fought back tears. “It’s “W 00 comadence. 

son screamed, and no one argued, hard to believe,” be said. “After the “1 did say to him that v 

PinieUa Becomes . A | f n 

"| Yankees 9 Manager 49erS rUld the Ka HIS 

lS S till to Their Ticking 

pered hitler, stepped into the Yaa- ™ 

“ kees’ managerial lava pit S unday , 

14 by becoming the 14th manager in By Michael Janofskv vrr prtTTVrMTP 

w George Stdnbrenner's 13 years as Nrw y ' vk T,ma Semce ArL. KUlixULir 

70 owner of the team. ANAHEIM, California— In re- The 48 ers a Uo sot a biz asm 


way back in inning call that may have aimed he threw a strike. That was what I Royals, 
d against the 1116 Sc™ 3 around on Saturday told him, it was a strike.” “We were lucky to win three 

i tears. “It’s was no coincidence. Andujar. who had claimed be games the way we hit the ball/' he 

d. “After the “1 did say to him that we had been “squeezed,” while getting said. “Thirteen runs in seven games 

- badly beaten in Game 3. came on is almost a disgrace. Their pitching 

with the score 9-0. He gave up a hit isn’t that good. If it was they would 
no -« i -w~w to Frank White, reached 2-2 on Tim have won 130 games. As ic was, 

H lYirl thp rnOTYlfi Sundberg. then ran amok when they struggled in a weak division. I 
L JJLAUL lAJ-fZ/ XACllXlo Denkinger called the next two don’t think they would have won 

• pitches balls. our division or the American 

n|ffl • *■“ • i « “Pm not sorry for what I did,” he League East. 

I m A|f» I iaIt-i ry said. “The guy makes bad calk and “But they're world champions. I 
A JJ.C/JJ. ■ JMI yi% 1 1 I shouldn’t get mad? I don’t care tip my cap to them." 


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NBA Standings 


14 by becoming the 14th manager in By Michael Janofskv vrr dattvattp 

w George Stdnbrenner’s 13 years as Nrw y ' vk T,ma Semce ArL. KUlixULir 

70 owner of the team. ANAHEIM, California —In re- The 49ers also got a big assist 

24 A m^or league player for 16 crat seasons the San Francisco from Roger Craig, one of the most 
« years and the team’s hitting coach 49ers have always found the Los versatile running backs in the NFL, 
“ since he retired on June 17, 1984, Angeles Rams to be a therapeutic md three interceptions on consecu- 
4 HnidJa agreed to a one-year con- opponmit. especially in games dve ^ ^ ^ period 
tract after “certain oomprourises.” played Tom. And the way the pre- Craig scored the 49ers‘ first and 
It was believed that one was a com- sen 1 National Football Le agu e sea- ^ touchdowns, on a 14-yard run 
rmtraent from Steinbrenner to re- sou was unfolding, the 49ers were and a 35 -yard pass play. He rushed 
~| firain from interfering with the new in greater need of help. for 63 on I4 


what the score is, we could still 
comeback." 


And Tudor, whom the Cardinals 
counted on once too often, could 


When Andujar charged off the only stare straight ahead and, like 
mound after tell four — Herzog everyone else, try to block out a 


The 49ers also got a big assist ted departed after tell three — the memory that will not go away soon . 
am Roger Craig, one of the most third baseman, Terry Pendleton, “1 never did what I did ail year, 
xsanle running backs in the NFL, grabbed the pitcher in a bear hug let the guys behind me play," he 
id three interceptions on consecu- and wrestled him away. “1 wasn’t said. “If I bad been nervous and 


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- - SI, Porttana 34 (votontlne el. 


■e drives in the third period. going to hit him or anything,” An- couldn't throw strikes. I could un- 
Craig scored the 49ers‘ first and dujar said. “1 don't warn to get derstand. Bui 1 wasn't nervous. I 
it touchdowns, on a 14-yard run thrown out of baseball Bui your hope in a few days we can put this 
d a 35-yard pass play. He rushed teammates, they never know.” behind us and think about what 
r 63 yards on 14 carries and “I was jusi making sure,” Pen- happened before tonight rather 


team’s on-field operation. So, with disregard for the Rams’ caught 6 passes for \ 32 vards in his dleton said. “The 2-2 pitch was than tonight. 

“1 know. it’s a tough job,” Pin- 7-0 record — their best start max ^ esi all-round game this season. - - - - 

iefla said from New York in a con- — ami fine defense, the49ers 49 ^ scores came on 
ference call with reporters. “But my scored four touchdowns in the first of p yards to Wendell 

;• BBwJmiiNf) Lapa half SvrmHav qnH o/rw IfLld iJ * r M ■ 


behind us and think about what 
happened before tonigbi rather 


God, it wasn’t easy playing here.” 
Clyde King, the general manag- 


half Sunday and won, 28-14. 


down the middle, the 3-2 was close. “I wish 1 could explain what hap- 
But that guy had us last night and pened bui I can’t. 1 gave up a home 
we were frustrated. 1 doubt if he run,” to Darryl Motley for the 


Joe Montana, who has not quite Dwight Clark. 


Tyler and 8 to the wide receiver made a right call all year long. It Royals’ first two runs, “on a high 


er. who was not fond of the dis- resembled a Super Bowl quarter- With that, the 49ers had defeated 

missed Bffly Martin or his style of back this season, threw for 306 the Rams four straight times, five 
m anagi n g, said he had not talked yards — the most given up by the straight in Anaheim Stadium, 
with Martin. Asked if anybody Rams this season — and three Bv ihe half, the 49ers were lead- 
from the Yankees' had, he replied, icnichdowns before leaving in the ing, '28-0, as the Rams’ usually reli- , 


just built to that point. Unfortu- 
nately." 


fast ball and 1 couldn't throw 
strikes. 1 don't know why it hap- 


The whole night was unfortunate pened but it did. It was one of those 
for the Cardinals. In the end, they nights. We have to live with it." 


assume somebody talked to third quarter with a sprained ster- 
cl” num. The injury was not contid- 

' ered serious. 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American League 

TORONTO— Named jfmv WUUom mon- 


NowYort T ~5‘ •'3—3 omt, Re-tEgmd CMu Gastwu Wttlno eoorti'; 

BKfc(1),Favellcfi.<5); Bourque (3).Stott John Sulilvan, bullem coach; Bl»Y Smith, 
aa goal: Boston (on wb l rt weflit 1- PI - flret^aae men. and ai Wdmar. nttcMng 


Attains DMsiea 



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>' i. CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 

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MOTtOnOl LHfH 
PHILADELPHIA — Signed o 


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phia (an Bradeuc, casks) U-KM4-44 - 
Detroit t ) *-J 

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BaKhman (7). Ma w o rc ho fc tdL.MacLaan 


BASKETBALL 

NaHpaal Ba*k*toaU Amoctoflos 
ATLANTA— Stoned Ray Williams, aoard. 
FOOTBALL 

Netloaaf FaettaH League 
SAN DiEGO— AcNuatod Mike GuenaUng, 


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Gaitenr (51. Stale on gods Detroit (on Boo- daemon, on btiorad reserve, 
chard) S5-7— 2 Cj WtnalgH {onSietoal 12^>. . SAN FRANOSCO— Activated Michael 
. 12-W. •’ Carter, nose tgcfcto. Wohrod Scolt Garoeti, 

WaaMnotM- 4 I W 'lene tackle. 

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, OuchataB 13), Torior (if, hwiM (31, Ag. . Nallenal Hockey League 

oroO) -,TAwrwr247i.Staw tag Be i :Wo*h- MINNESOTA— Scat Ba (Wafund and Mato 

lUBion lodSauvei n-Z-U— torO^COta (on Itottln. forwards. to SprinafieU a( tho AmarL 
- JenmU T3-W-14— J9, . can Mackey LnguB 



abk defense could contend neither 
with San Francisco’s short passing 
game nor Craig 

And those 28 points exceeded by 
one the n umb er the Rams had giv- 
en up in seven previous games. 

The 49ers' opening drive was 
reminiscent of the kind of offensive 
play that made them champions in 
1984. Starting from (heir 21, they 
picked up most of their yards in 
medium-sized chunks, as Montana 
completed 5 of 1 passes lor 60 
yards. The score came on the 14- 
yard run by Craig. 

After a punt, the 49ers started 
again at the 1 2. This time they went 
88 yards an 9 plays, scoring on the 
9-yard pass play to Tyler. 

By this time, Montana bad com- 
pleted 9 of 1 1 passes for 120 yards, 
and the two touchdowns were the 
first the Rams had given up all 
season in the first quarter. 

In other gomes. The Associated 
Press reported: 

Giants 21, $ain& 13: In New 
Orleans, coraerback Elvis Patter- 
son's second-quarter interception 
led to a touchdown pass for New 
York and his fourth-quarter fum- 
ble recovery led to another score. 

After Patterson’s interception, 
Phil Sunnis threw a six-yard scor- 
ing pass to Bob Johnson. Patterson 
recovered the hobbled punt at the 
Saints' 12 to set up the first of two 

touchdowns by Joe Moms. 

Beagtfs 26. Steekis 21: in Cm- 
Hnnati, Jim Breech lricfori four 


Blanc paiN 



A masterpiece of Swiss watchmaking 



Walter Abercrombie of the Steelere found it difficult to mn 

on the Bengab* defense. Gnckuad mm the game, 26-21. 


NFL, got three int e rc e ptions and 
recovered three of Pittsburgh’s sev- 
en fumbles. 


GARRARD 

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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


Gorbachev’s Image Maker 


YTTASHINGTON — Everv TV 
VV network is feverishi 


f feverishly compel- 

“\g to gei a presumnut 'interview 
with Mikhail Gorbachev. 

The person who will make the 
luiiU decision is the incomparable 
Soviet image maker, Mik Deaver- 
Mtch. It was Deavervitch who sold 
the Russian people on the fact that 
style was more 



ai/S^ 

Buchwaid 


important than 
substance. As 
Gorbachev's 
press chief dur- 
ing the recent 
Soviet elections. 

Deaverviich 
came up with 
the catchy slo- 
gan, "Vote for 
somebody who 
is red. but not 
dead.” 

So effective was Deavervitch's 
political strategy that when Kon- 
stantin Chernenko died. Gorba- 
chev was elected less than five 
hours later — in a landslide. Since 
then Deavervitch has been consult- 
ed on everything Gorbachev does. 
He was responsible for doing the 
advance work on the secretary's 
trips to London and Paris os well as 
setting up photo opportunities with 
Margaret Thatcher. Francois Mit- 
terrand and Tip O'Neill. 

Deavervitch has posed Gorba- 
chev talking to nurses in a Lenin 
hospital, listening to hardhats in a 
Lenin auto works, and shaking 
hands at a university with Lenin 
grads. 

□ 

Not only does Deavervitch serve 
Gorbachev, but he also works for 
the Soviet leader's wife. Moscow 
watchers say that Raisa Gorba- 
chev. who is the real power in the 
Kremlin, does not make a move 
without first checking it out with 
Deavervitch. 

This being the case I decided to 
pick up the phone and speak to the 
man. It was much easier than I 
thought. 

The Soviet operator put me right 


through, after saying “Thank you 
for using ST&T." 

“Mr. Deavervitch. Fra calling 
about the selection you have to 
make concerning the secretary's 
first American television appear- 
ance.” 

“We are noodling it. Goodbye." 

“Wait a minute. How will you 
arrive at your decision'?” 

“I just received the overnight rat- 
ings from our KGB man in New 
York. Daniel Rather defeated Peter 
Jennings and Thomas Brokaw. 
What kind of a man is this Rath- 
er?" 

“He's a very decent sort, but 
then again so are Jennings and Bro- 
kaw. The three are only a point 
apart.” 

□ 


Lewis Mumford: Buildings and Baggage 


“Our mole at ABC says a point 
means a million viewers. I cannot 
allow the secretary to appear in a 
vast wasteland." 

“So you’re putting your boy on 
the ’Evening News'?" 

“Not necessarily. We are also 
considering one of the morning 
shows. The secretary likes Phyllis 
George very much,” 

“Phyllis is a fine interviewer, but 
unfortunately she no longer works 
on the CBS morning show. What 
about late night 0 Ted Koppcl is hot 
right now." 

"The secretary doesn’t want to 
go head-to-head with Johnny Car- 
son. Since our leader is making 
only one TV appearance we're hop- 
ing to make the Top 10." 

□ 


Gateway- Arch, 20 Years On 

L'wttd Pros Ir.Temcrional 

S T. LOUIS. Missouri — The 
Gateway .Arch, the United Sta- 
tes’s tallest monument, designed by 
the architect Eero Saarinen, 
marked its 20th anniversary Mon- 
day. with only a bit of graffiti to 
show its age. 


‘Would Mr. Gorbachev consider 
a walk-on pan in ‘Dallas'?” 

“No. our Bulgarian agent in Hol- 
lywood reports it is full of filthy 
double-crossing capitalists. What 
other shows would you suggest?” 

“There is ‘Entertainment To- 
night.' ‘Miami Vice.’ ‘The Phil 
Donahue Show-.’ and then my fa- 
vorite. 'Wheel of Fortune.' The best 
thing about ‘Wheel of Fortune' is 
Gorbachev will not only have i 
large audience, but he can also win 
some very valuable prizes." 

“It’s not dignified. Tell me. 
Comrade, what is this Howard Co- 
sell like?" 

“He tells it like it is.” I said. 

“How do you mean ‘like it is'?" 

“Remember when Khrushchev 
look off his shoe and banged it on 
the table? WelL if Howard doesn't 
agree with the person he is talking 
to. he does the same thins." 


By Paul Goldbergcr 

AW Yerk Tinta Service 

N EW YORK — Lewis ' Mumford has 
been celebrated as a philosopher, histori- 
an, literary critic, essayist, and cultural and 
political commentator. But it is not disre- 
spectful to any of these careers io say that in 
some ways his most memorable writing has 
been on the subject of architecture. 

Mumford. who turned 90 on Ocl 19, has 
been this century's greatest architecture crit- 
ic. Infuriatingly moralistic at times, unpleas- 
antly pompous at others, he has nonetheless 
been our most consistently passionate and 
intelligent advocate of civilized buildings and 
decent cities. 

He has lived for many years in the Dut- 
chess County town of Amem'a, New York. 
Like his fellow New Yorker magazine writer 
E. B. White, who died early this month. 
Mumford parted company long ago with the 
city that gave him much of his identity and 
which for years was the focus of his criticism. 
He has viewed New York for some time with 
no small amount of bitterness; not for Mum- 
ford is the recent mood of euphoria about 
urban growth. 

He was among the first to be skeptical of 
the value of bigger and bigger buildings and 
denser and denser cities, and though his views 
are extreme — they come from the stand- 
point of one who fundamentally dislikes the 
hectic, random energy of cities — they have a 
particular urgency in an age that seems to 
equate quantity of buildings with quality of 
life. 

• Here, for example, is Mumford on the 
subject of crowding in Manhattan. The city, 
he believed, was becoming so overbuilt that 
architecture would cease to matter. 

“If it ceases to be a milieu in which people 
can exist in reasonable contentment instead 
of as prisoners perpetually plotting to escape 
a concentration camp." he wrote, “it will be 
unprofitable to discuss architectural achieve- 
ments — buildings that occasionally cause 
people to hold their breath for a stabbing 
moment or that restore them to equilibrium 
by offering them a prospect of 'space and 
form joyfully mastered.” 

That was written in 1955. when things were 
not really so bad at all. But if Mumford was 
overreacting in the mid- 1950s. hindsight 
surely bears him out. Architecture has ceased 
to matter; 50 years ago be put his finger on 
precisely the problem we face today in mid- 
town Manhattan. 

One can love density far more than Mum- 
ford does and still be appalled at the current 
state of New York. No one walking on Madi- 
son .Avenue past the AT&T and IBM build- 
ings and their neighbors can dispute that the 
architecture of our large-scale buildings is 
vastly more interesting that it was a genera- 
tion ago — but as we continue to cram 
interesting building next to interesting build- 



decision that more recent urban critics be- 
lieved dealt a damaging blow to the vitality of 
the city. But Mumford felt that it would be 
more rational to place wholesale food mar- 
kets at the edge of the city, as was eventually 
done. 


Lewis Mumford 


ing. how meaningful can this architecture be, 
and what kind of a city is it all adding up to? 

It would be unfair to thvnk of his architec- 
ture criticism only as a cry of 'protest. But 
now that the Westway project has -gone to 
final defeat, it is difficult not to recall that 
here. too. he was ahead of his time. 

In 1958. in an essay entitled “The Highway 
and the City.” Mumford argued passionately 
against running highways into urban areas, 
not least because they would divert resources 
more urgently needed for public transporta- 
tion. The result, he predicted, would be “a 
tomb of concrete roads and ramps covering 
the dead corpse of a city.” 

Indeed, had Mumford been more active in 
recent years, he might have led the fight 
against this massive project, as he fought 
many of the large-scale public works of Rob- 
ert Moses over the years. Yet it is worth 
noting that he was not simply a prophet of 
current attitudes. In many ways his views 
break sharply from the prevailing wisdom of 
our time. 


His fondness for order and his belief that 
the city can be rationally planned is strongly 
at odds with our tendency to see the city more 
as a random organism, its very heterogeneity 
to be celebrated. If Lewis Mumford was not 
Robert Moses, neither was he Jane Jacobs, 
whose approval of what Mumford called 
“higgledy-piggledy unplanned casualness” 
horrified him. 


MnmfonTs greatest contribution may not 
have been in matters of ideology, as he per- 
haps believed it to be. but in his attitude- to 
architecture criticism in general. He (fid not 
review buildings solely as aesthetic objects, 
nor solely as sociological phenomena, nor 
only as economic or political entities. To 
Mumford a building was all of these things, 
and it was the critic’s obligation to touch all 
of these bases. 

And so he evaluated the United Nations 
complex as a symbol of its institution’s val- 
ues. as a functional environment for its work- 
ers, and as an aesthetic object, producing, in a 
series of essays in his “Skyline” c ol umn in 
The New Yorker magazine, a remarkably 
thoughtful overview. 

Similarly, it was no contradiction for 
Mumford, when writing about the old Penn- 
sylvania Station, to speak at one point of the 
symbolic value of Charles MclCnn’s noble 
Roman vaults, and a paragraph or two later 
to turn to the question of how one gets 
luggage up the stairs from the trains. It is all,' 
in Mumfonl’s view, pan of the experience of 
architecture, part of the way in which build- 
ings interact with our lives. 

If words have always been, precious, almost 
sacred, objects to Mumford as he wrote about 
architecture, they are altogether disposable in 
another kind of writing about buildings, the 
advertising we see these days for new luxury 
apartment projects in New York. 

This is truly the opposite of MumforcTs 
measured prose, and it is a genre that has 
reaches new heights (or depths?) of intemper- 
ance. Is it because so many new buildings are 
being built, and their designs are so lacking in 
distinction, that their owners turn to advertis- 
ing copywriters to pul in the quality that the 
architects left out? 


While Mumford prefigured today's reac- 
tor! against the sterility of the glass box (“a 
dead end of glossy architectural boredom 
against which a reaction is obviously over- 
due,” he wrote) he still believed deeply in the 
ability of modem architects and p lann ers to 
give the city order and make it work. 

He was delighted by New York City's plan 
to remove the old Washington Market from 
the area that is now Tribeck, for example, a 


Metropolitan Tower, the tall blade-glass 
skyscraper going 'up near Carnegie Hall on 
West 57 th Street, is a sleek, arrogant intru- 
sion into the midtown streetscape, and no 
established critic of urban planning has writ- 
ten anything positive about it 
That has not stopped its promoters from 
declaring the building “An Architect oral 
Masterpiece" in one ad and a “Landmark” in 
another. No one, of course; has a patent on 
the words that have been used. But the 
developer, Harry Macklowe — who recently 
paid the dty a $2-million fine in settlement of 
the dispute that arose over the illegal demoli- 
tion of a building he owned on West 44th 
Street — seems to be taking as many liberties - 
with the English language as be is with West 
57th Street 



NEW MARIANNE — Catherine Denenve and the 
Marianne of France, selected by a jury pC French j<r 
ists and Culture Ministry officials from among 
tores modeled on Deneuve. The 
sober” by the jury, was sculpted by MnrwHe ^ 

Paris. Busts of Marianne, the syndK« of 

lie, have adorned town halls in France since 1877 
appears on coins and postage stamps, and hr a tatif-da; 
version, brandishing the tricolor, on the lOWranc flot^ 


PEOPLE 

World Pop Song Wi 


The Argentine ringer Valeria 
Lynch won a Grand Prix award and 
a most outstanding performance 
prize in the Ifith wold Popular 
Song Festival with “Rompecabe- 
zas" (Puzzle). The other Grand 
Prix award went, to the Japanese 
singer Kazuynki Ozaki and a five- 
member band. Coastal Gty, for 
Ozald's song “Yoko” The warning 
Argentine song was composed by 
Lyitth and Mario Cortes, who both 
received a prize of $13,000. Ozaki 
and Coastal City won 510,000. 

n 

Gabriel Garda Marquez will give 
the Spanish royal ties from fats latest 
novel to 70 writers, Ms literary 
agent said. The Colombian writer 
asked Ms Barcelona publishing 
house, Bruguera* to pay its 
$480,000 debt to the writers out of 
the royalties earned from “Love in 
Times of - Ire." Garcia M&nquez 
made the gesture to “lend a band to 
his colleagues,” his agent, Magda 
Ofiver, said. The first edition of his 
new novel, numbering 250,000 
copies, will be published in Spain 
in December. 

.a 

• A new program of university 
graduate fellowships, named for 
President Dwight Eisenhower and 
aimed at proving “informed lead- 
ership in the conduct of our nation- 


al life.** was launched 
the Eisenhower Weald 
statute. General Andrew fj 
paster, aide to Eisenhower^od 
msiitute’s chairman, 

$552,000 gift from 
CEffoni Roberts, a 
the president, win fund 
the fellowships. Columbia; 
shy, the University of:' 
Vanderbilt Umvetsty,ilje 
sity of Kansas and Stanford 
vershy have agrees to panicipaii 
.□ . 

Countess Rune Spencer, 
stepmother of Dunvprineta 
Wales, angrily refused to be frisks 
by security guards at Heafe® 
Airport, but gave in when she tr 
told she would not be allowed <4 
plane to Pans unless she agreed, ^ 
airport spokesman said. Toe coni 
ess twice refused to be xefinft 
and dananded of -security gutrf 
“Don’t you know whoT amT V 
cording to The Sunday Bqaa. 
The incident Wednesday was cot' 
firmed by the British Aityorts Ai.' 
thoriiy. Body searehesarceoadiE 
ed at random on 10 percent of Ti , 
passengers leaving Britain. 
countess.is the daughter of 
mance novelist Barter* Certb* . 
Her husband. .Ead.JSfccingi' 
Princess Diana's father, refusafr- 
discaas raridwn f .... 


$ 


pit/ i 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


CEU3RATE HALLOWEEN IN PARK 
AT THE KING OPERA 
Cow* [an the fun Oct 31 55, WXJpm 
AOOom.. tncfc or trees', real Hdbween 
cnwiphefe. pi*. American cwme, frit 
musk, horror videos. Further ittfonno- 
fan ohone: <2 fiO 99 S9 
AT THE KING OPERA. 21 Rim 
D aurtou, Pari* 2nd. Metro: Opera 


IF YOU CANNOT HAVE A CHILD, 

contact Nod P. Kean -Attorney -tend- 


ing Authority on Alter natives to infer 
tSty, “ 


«Wy,93Q Mason. Dearborn. Ml *8134 
USA 313SM77S. 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS m 

Encfcsh. Pans (doflyj -463J 5965. Rome 
67603 20. 


IS CORDON BLEU coofengasunes m 
Enafeh. Weds. '-9pm Ota jD-Dec. 18. 
Teh Pans 45 55 4f 93. 


PORTUGAL Sff 
HoSdavs & Travel 


PERSONALS 


HAVE A MCE DAYI BOKEL Have a 
moe dav! Bokel. 


MOVING 


J42D sqm, salon, rfninq room, study 
|ibrrey,_5 bedrooms, 5 dressings. 5 


ALLIED 

VAN UNES INTL 


OVER 1300 OFFICES 
WORLDWIDE 

USA AIBed Van Lines Int'l Carp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 


O col our Agency Europear office*; 

PARIS D ib ord** International 

(01) 43 43 23 64 

FRANKRJRT 

(069) 250066 

DU5SELDORF/ RATINGEN 

102102) 45023 I.HLS. 

MUNICH ims. 

|089) 142244 

LONDON Attwtnw 


int'l Moving 
(01) 953 3636 
Cell for Alietfs free estimate 


CONTtNEX. Snwl & medium moves, 
baggooe, cars worldwide. Cal Char- 
StPcms 4? 81 18 81 (near Opera). 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


BETWB4 NICE « CAP FStRAT 
O w fodon^ a w seo, beotfrfiH & very 

terrac e, fully nqw pped & fitted kitchen, 
pantry, rec e ption room leafing onto a 


teruce with _ private iwWnroYQjKgl 


soianum roof with (ocuzzi 
summer 1987. 

Apply te JOHN TAYLOR SJL 
Invneuble "Le MtncfcBir“ 

1 Avenue Gustave V 
F 06000 ttRCE 
Teh 93 BE 90 25 
qr 

1 Avenue Albert lor 
f 06230 SAINT JEAN CAP FERRAT 
Tot 73 01 24 V 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


PROMOTION MOZART. French 8 u- 
era Red Estate Agency. SpeaaSsts In 
beautiful ap ar tments and vtiics from 
Cannes la Menton. Nice 06003-. Place 
Morart r?3187 08 20. Hotel Mender* 

[93) si la 80. 


0. Bureau du RuHy93J I 


Telex; IMMOZAE 4412 


GREAT BRITAIN 


UNIQUE INVESTMENT; Property with 
the benefit of a Maria ft Spencer 
Cove nos. lease 35 year; with 5 year 
reviews. New warehouse & office 
Node, 112,000 MiJh. just outside BeL 
f«l. Current income £221,500 per 
“wren with some present potentwl. 
Estimated income after review its Au- 
gust 1989 £600,000 ba Price 
£5.250.0Qa Teh 01 -722 47538 (0232) 
778471. The: 9*53836 BKEOKER G. 
ref: JAK 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


AVENUE FOCH 

Modem bidding, very hnjh dais. 


! mads' rooms, 24, 


baths, 2 partings, ' 
hour guerdon. 

BATON 47 04 55 55 

TELEX BATON 630655F 


EXCEPTIONAL 
ON OUAJ OF SEME 
FACWG IIE ST LOUIS 
row ho»w. Irving, firing, 4 bedrooms. 3 
baths, office, mod's ream, 1600 sajn. 
terrace, faraasne view aver Peris, ffcgh 
price. Viflh Gvordan every dov except 
Saturday afternoon and Sundays- 16 
Ora des Celestins. 75004 Paris 


CHAMPS B.YSEE5 

Original 2 roams. 87 iqjn.. 50 sqjn 


Wiring in prestigious stone building. 

al off 


eabtt, sun, excdlwtt as professional __ 
dress. FI ,450 XXX). A12 - 43 42 30 84 


LE5 HALLES. 2 room apartment, fetch- 
en, both, WC, Brmfea. [55 sqjn.] 
newly decorated. 17th century biriid- 


jn^Pedestrian gto. No agency. 


, Tef: 4785 3108 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS 4 SIT3URBS 


WART Of LATIN OUARTBL Lar, 
studio, st 
45 43 43 


studio,^gaote kitchen & both. 


* s 


6 TH LUXEMBOURG. 4 tocmi. a£ oanv 
fert. Left Bank style, newly redone, 
sun, cherm. FI .400X00. 45 77 46 10 


AVE. tffittl MARTIN. 255 

Sumptuous. Teh 45 03 47 52. 


sqjn. 


ST GOMAffi Des PRES. Ifith cent 
penthouse, 110 iqjn. 43 29 42 94 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA 

AMBASSADOR PARK 


PARADISE FOR THE HAfVY FEW 
An exclusive Medtrerranean vdlage it 


beng biA ngH by the iws at rive mod 
i Mallorca. Ideal beo- 


6 Ht CHS CHE MIDI 2-roam deluxe 
Flat, quiet. F850D0a Tel 4544 41 79. 


SWITZERLAND 


In the charming mountain resort of 

LEY5IN: 

RESIDENCE LES FRENE5 

Overlooking a splendid Alpine panora- 
ma. 30 nun. from Montroux and Lake 
Geneva by car, 

- you can own quality residents 

veth indoor swimming pool and 
fitness fisotne* in an tdeal 
environment for leisure and sports 
Wa, gcA, etc). 

- Hnanang at low SF. rotas 

up to 


J*> mortgag e s. 

Pfwai contact: 

Residence le * Frene *. 1854 Leysin 
5WTTZHBAPD 

Tel: (025) 3411 53 TV. 456 120 RLAJCH 


SWITZERLAND 

Farotgners can buy STUDIOS/APART. 
MENvS / CHALETS, LAKE GGKEVA - 


MONTREUX or m these world famous 
tworts i CR ANS-MONTANA. IB 
DIABLKET5, VE8B1ER. VULARS, 
JURA & region of GSTAAD. From 
SFlIOJJOa Mortgages 60* at Wt. 
interest. 

REV AC SA 

52 Mortbriflant, CH-1202 GBEVA. 

Teh 022/34^540. ‘ 


Tele*. 22030 


beautiful site on 
lion, 20 mnutes from Palma. Spacious 
apaimenrs. 1 lo 3 bedrooms, al with 

stroction and finSilnfli guaranteed. 


VISIT AMBASSADOR PARK AND 
BE CONVINCED 

For information-. 

GLOBE PLAN 5A 
Av. Moo-Repos 24, 

0+1005 LAUSAN^CV Switzerland 
Tel: [2IJ 22 35 12 7T» 25185 MEUS CK 


Broker Enquiries Welcome 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


WASHINGTON D.C - Large bright 
with parking 


apartment. 2 bedroom 
m one of the most fashionable cando- 
ninwns. Price US $240,000. Contact 
London UJC 01-245 0935. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


CANADA 


TORONTO, CANADA - LUXURY. 
ru*ty fumated and equipped 1 & 2 
bedroom suites. Superior services. 
Srxxt/lonq term rentals. Market Suites 
80 Front St. East, 5te. 222, Taranto 
M5E TT4 Canada. )<161 663-1096 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANNES MOUG1NS, 200 m. from ooif 
awne, 500 m. from Anglo^menean 
5 <™al, luunous modem house, 5 
bedrooms, 5 baths, pod. 5,000 tarn 
garden. 6 oar garage Pans 4525 3829 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


53 19 35 Pans, evening. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


PNBpj, Kay and Lewis. Teh St 
Pork 352 Bill, North tri Po 
5135. Tete* 27846 RESIDE G. 


1788. Tefal 263001 FANS UK G. 


bathrooms, afl 
vreek. Phone “ 


2241. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 

8 Ave. de Massine 
75008 Porii 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
4562-7899 


HENRI MARTIN 

Modem high doss, luxurious 2 rooms 
about 60 sqjn. + terrace. 
F13D00 charges indvded 
For company 1st only 
" COCTAMBBtr 47 66 46 03 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEE5 8th 


Studio, 2 or 3-room opartmnk 
Oie month or more. 

LE CUUHDGE 4359 679 7. 


MABAJS PUCE DES VOSGES. Mag- 
oecoraT' 


nificBrt 4 roams, knuriovdy 

fireplacr, equipped feWten wjth 
mocheiH, 2 baths, 6 gh cfeas. 43 06 23 
10 or 43 57 79 67 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

- SHOE! IBM STAY. Advantage! of .a 

5 hotel wthqut inconvarMncBs, ful fa 

home in nice Wutfics. one bedroom 
and more in Paris. 50RBJM: 80 rue 
de rUnhrersite, Pori* 7th; 4544 3940 

15TH FROM MARCH 86 , 6 months. 

*h«fa. view on Seine, 
F?4,0a»for 6 months + F10JX»de- 
padt. Tet 4 577 62 45, 8 - 10 wi 
/after 7 pm. 

FOR AKOUND 1 YEAR. Very goad 
stoc*o m good part of Pans. 
F29CO/ monffi + charges. Cal 64 96 
2071 after (L00 pm. 

KBfflIY faring Bari. luxurious recap- 
fan ffa, sunny, mogrifcont- daubfe 
Fvrng. large bricony, (fining, bed- 
roocn, guest stufioR 6,000-. 3799 

16TH ON suiC Lovely apartment. 
140 tam, reception, 3 bedrooms, 2 
baths, FI 2000/ month. Cofainet Rawer 
4577 9534 

RE ST U3UB 2 rooms, baffr ttdten. ril 
comforts. Old building with diarorier. 
For 6 months or +. Teh 43 25 53 78 

NEAR, PARK MONGEAU, 3 rooms, 
fireplace, dean. F5.HXJ, 5 months to 
one yore. TeL 4326 34& 

6 TH ST GBIMA1N DES PRES, charm- 

T^:S'3«r' lh0rt,ina - H ' 200 ' 

SHORT TOM IN LATWI QUARTER 
No ageres. TeL 4329.3883. 

OWN0B DUFIOC opmlmetj. hi- 
rushed, garage. No agent *357 0414 

ALMA 1b ekes Swna bedroom fitted 
fetdwi/bath NO AGSVT 45276710 

"OWjOGNt Larely 3/4 roertts. 
R0,000 net TeL 472094 « 

IfrFr BANK, beautiful 2-room fiat, 10- . 
12 months. F6000. Tel 4336-1001 

14TH. Cohn, sremy, nrafem, renovat. 
ed 2!4 rooms. $500. TeL 43 21 56 78 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED " 




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PatHth yourbuetoma message 
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DC YOU REAUZE PROFITS ON 
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ri not, corender speculative mvestmenS 
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COTE D'AZUR 

VULEFRANCE sur MS 

Unique view, absolutely nvialam on 
Bay Viflefranche aid sea hal, entry, 
very large reception, 3 bedroom. 2 
baths, entirely e q uipped tatchen, cellar, 
garage, drouiar terrace, + 1 indepen- 
dent bedroom with bathroom giving on 
to 300 sqjn. solarium. Price- FI ,600,000. 
UNJVERSBIE 
& Ave George Oemenceou 
060® t * ce 

Tef: 93 88 44 98. 


ROQISFORT 1£S PINS. BeautiU new 
P rove nyd vfila B re athta lu na pan- 
oromc sea view from Nne to caiirwL 
Large reception, ttxary dam, 3 
large bedroom. 2 designer bath- 
room, heated peal 5400 sqjn. land- 
scaped Odrden. 20 minutes from 
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9338 19 19. SSI 47 La Gwetta. 06400 
CtfMB, F2^QQ.OOO negrfable. 


COTE D’AZUR 10 "wwi« «ppi, pan- 

atamc s «w view, Provwvd onwerel 

4 rroom vffla- 3 both*, 500 sqjn. gar- 


I sqjn. gar- 

dan, pool FI ,500,000. Promotion Mo- 


-u RtAT, 1 Promenode d« 
06000 Niefe TeL- 93 B 8 37 37 
‘^^->.461235. 


SHE D’AZUR Saint Pod da Vance, 
OOIE - 1 onaJwdl villa .. 6 tggna. 




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oppoRnnvmES 


FOR SALE IN USA 
SAN FRANCISCO 
BeaafRul ReOaurant-l 200 Sqjn. 
Seats 300 on 3 lerels. 

{fa, 2 separate latchm. 
Excellent business, center aty 
(Braves, hotel, emetetan arn) 
Good lease for other business 
Rent: S3150 per month 
Write Mr. BfTTON. 

419 O'ForreF Street 
94114 San Francisco. (41S) 776 67 17. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


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1001 Lousorme. Switzeriand 


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- - ISLAND 


28933/ 2024a Tefe* 628352 
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NOW THSE ISA OUB DOING Infer 
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OFFICES FOR RENT 


ETOfLE 

RfltNKHS} 

OFFICES 

VERY WQH.OAS5 


CQNFStaect ROOM 
SKffiTAiBAT - IBEX 
TB: PARIS (1) 47 27 15 59 


MONTE CARLO 

HMMPAinr OP MONACO 
v™» fr y, rata n new buiVhg. All 
aamtara. Near center 
Wn®M®JATeL 93 5066 84 - 
Tefac 469477 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


RANBLAGH 


befioatm, 
+ charges. 
47 64 03 17 


HARMED HOUSE HUNT«& fetus do 
your fortvroric. Co« CSU rite Na 1 
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10IH RHIMUOUE New bufldfeg, re- 
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bedrooms, Swng, American fefdwa. 
P6200 -f dicroBS.Ownen47 221559 


15TH VAUGWARD, double String, 2 
bedrqOOH, fachen, bath. Fh^OO in*. 
let 45 63 70 31 


Paris & Western suburbs. 45 51 09 45 


USA 


bedroom ap artm ent, coot 
surety. No fee*. $3500. 2124 


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WKMUK3CA710NS 
INFORMATION OFHGS 


e fi fii^ ite wsktter. feaf- 


.ptAfeifaroF 

reports and mfiar muliu n on law set* 
wban devriop ment projects. Etrelent 
and Frereh ^fe^ual pre- 

Swassajssrc 

bawd infoxiwtSjcn systems. AppGauion 
with recent photo l CV* 
WA/AIVftWessenaarsevreq 39, 

'-'Owing QOW. iNUVwnoif 13 

wofuimWi 


1986 


WTL ORGANIZATION in Paris seefa 


H^e nffffflFEEC Bax 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


ENGLISH NANNK with certSeato 


general nuntag A cMdaxnh ettperi- 
'■fates with babfet 


fared tn privae banes 

from fath opwartfc, a super nomie 
wnh a fend, carets P ersanchtf. Free 
now. Fry Staff Corwritonts, 7 
Aldershot, Hards Uft 
UKScumL 


St, 


OOURE-MAIT8E DffOTB, ehouf- 
few, maid, sewing. VASQUES, Tv. 
uas Livres, 4, T2Q0 
Tet 


UtbonTprtu- 


AUTOMOBILES 


OWNER SELLS MSBGRK 190 SL 

1959. B5DOO bn, excelent conttricm, 
-aonvertibh with hanfap, new farafasi 
geres and muffler. FI OO^OOl Tsfc Paris 
45 20 47 29 after 8 pm. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 


PARS 


THE CAR SHRP9MG 
SPECIALISTS 

(1)42 2564 44 


CANNES/MCE 
HtANKFURT ' 

BONN f COLOGNE 
STUTTGART 
MUNICH - 
BREMHHAVB'f 
NEW YORK 
HOUSTON 
LOS ANGBS 
MONTREAL 

ACHN15 . 

teave ft to w to bring it lo you 



AUTO CONVERSION 


* SUttCONVOT * 

JL* *«6e*t way to impart ■ 

* ». u-s^- 

waridwide American mww 
providB* dl required inuiionce 
fad guaranlees your car wil 
pats oDUi government ttcndardi 
or yore money bock indodrig 
conversion end. 

Write or phone for free brochure. 
GHIMANVJ) 69L7152425 or 
CT 7U3V / 223059 

AWWCAN Din. UNDBWRiratS 

Cbeffindau 7678 
D-6000 FrariArt/Maei 


H*A/ DOT 

_ CONVERSIONS 
arabrafarage/bonfing.. 

SE.‘i5Tf^r h "" 

f?pfiwaiond work uflna ody th 


the 

Wing ody the 

edA /BaFfaprovol 

otammgwimports^S^ 

2294 N»ft fan Kd, KatMd. 

PA. 79440, USA TeL 215 
Telex 4971917-CHAMP 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


MJL300 
Rob 


306 

03/231-59.00. 


G 


__= n«w. Ferrtxi, 
*w. PCX Belgium Trie! 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRASCO 

INTHNATIONAL 


. LHP. M sra ed es Tmc free 
UmoufiMs 36“ & 44“ 
Arasfaterf ore* asd Snoasbu 
Cbacfr bwb eon ■ 
Obcrotafcs* A mate- 


LOW COST FHSTB 

— i. i.- 


KHAKUUX 
LAST MNUTE CUE 

reservation authermed feefia 
3 days poor to depart** 


Jr 


UNIQUE PRKE 


Orer 100 min itutodu 
World wife d efcor y ' 

. Direcf bore soon* 
DjQX&EPA. 


Tefc londan 
Teles m 


097779 
IMS GL 


Tiwco Lfadan Ltd.. . 

65^7 Ftsklanerlo^onW.l 


SwitariahdWV. Gerawiy 


TRANSCO 


THE LAKGST 5HOWSOOM 
■ .AND HOCK IN EUROPE | 


•gjgjo rarafcmt stock of mare than 


new cars erf al European + 
£***me ffriosi at mpefivefy prifad 

5Md far &5SFE2 

IWbmw SA. 95 N ow d ri mm. 

Tel 323/54262^* Trani 


NEW AMBUCAN CARS 

Ifywi wadd B« mare rnfarreatton 
aootxhavi'ta purchaseaoy newAmeri- 

sa5 , ss3 J 'Sr ,,, ’ i,h ‘' 

France (9^ 25 63 91 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


PORTUGAL 


7 DAYS INCLUSIVE TOURS 

FROM PARIS TO: 

LISBO N leyiiwi 


mad®ia rrrSgJg 


taie Tefc 47 42 55 57, The: 220550 


FROM ZURICH TO: 


BFOm/CASCAIS. 


lOPOKTOJ-sniap 
MADWA — — SF1090 


_ .Pfeaw Contact: 

°errevo 35741 Q, Tbo 27709 KEP 


For o ther program* and defaBed 
fraraifaorv oslc your 

TRAVa AGBIT 


t«LWyAO|TWG. Y *t« CWT 
A»dMw«s28,Alhen* lOSn.Greeta. 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


TO 


t LAX/SFO 
Europe return 


from 


MEW YOKK, WA9fiNGTON(W( 
OflCAGO or DETROIT 1 
frwu Luxembourg 


One 


l« OBV-S 
DM 499. .... 
|5R 449, fFK 


USS 119 


RBI 9990) 
1590) 


. 7-21 

US* 3^0 JDM J 

(8R 19,950, 5FR 899,'m 


For farther efcnmeion and iwMS' 
at! ICOAIBAM- ' 
fi-fattirt Afin 29 99n •- 

BruMk Tna OB80 - 

Umarabarg 4798 Ml t 

Zun* pn363O0D6;;' 

Fons (T) 47 425225,; 


ACCESS USA 

One Way 
New York FI 500 

la* Angeles F24QQ 

Q«W F2390 

Afcaoe f2750 

.- F265D 

Defat F3430 f5W, 

Montreal RB90 F30K 11 

ond more de sl it x fa m - 
15% cfecounf cm Itf dan . 
PANS tefc (11 42 21 46 N' 
(Cw. lit 1502) 



HOTELS 


U&A. 


TODOK HOTEL 304 Brf 

New Yort: Gty. In fadwrobfe fa 
Side Mcriwttan- T/2 bkxihwiW 
single from STvfi doubfa frao W 
Upo n rigg ing this ad- W , 
1* 422951. Tab 2129868BD0. . . 


PREQOUS STONED" 


JEAN DEtO^ 


JEWBBt - GREAT 

FYOUafiCTOPAICI 
^OURJEWa COU. 

ra04Oj QUALfTY £ 

REASONABLE PStCES. 

SECOND HAND, ^ 

SaUNG, 5UYWG, EXCHANG&k' . 

TAX-FREE 

1 RUE DU HAVRE ft-.; 
PARIS 8TH Vi. 

FAONO OAK ST. lAZME IS 
TH; 42 94 25 SS J v. 


Page 12 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


92521 NeuByGcdex. Franca 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


FOR CQiicnr 

03»htyJu«1P86.Qi*fewiBtnplodo 
«Jrihing for you onywhere utn July 
1986. BasirilWl.LHu 63 Long Acre. 
London, V/C2E 4jH. . 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


-ANGUAffl SCHOOL oeecb experi- 
enced English teodvw tor up to 20 
bours/week. IAL 772 42 42 Forii. 


DOMESTIC . 
POSftlONS AVAILABLE 


HOUSBqaBWCHU) CAKE. Need 
a mature wwneii via need* a pemo* 
rant home, Presdenf of infl ca. do- 
gfe women seeia a faring, face 
cnorgt women who wi help «t 2 
young boyi ogw 6 fi-9. Tefae M 
charge ef New Yorfr fi Omedieut 
homes. Mad farecMdrft^ eoolfaSh 
depreift trawl & be willing toTBae 
children whh a long term oommitt- 
moft. Pfeasii wnd pfao, o fetter 
terming yore., badqyound, rtredt, 
eta, your tri. number & referehaK.- 
Sanry US SflOO pa mondL Eatpontf 
to Mrs. t MBfer 151 Wi riOd^Tw 
NT 1Q01B 212 840860 212 

838-3834 Ptarari 


NONemoiong. mature womab, French 

' Engfah tpariung,> j oe« ej for hauto- 

A iifanteoreitParii. Rriitr- 

9anvnofa 4720 9694 • 


International Secretarial Positions 


SECRETARIAL 
posrncws AVAiLAiqj: 


ogwoN of u s. 

Jg%$8SX&85g& 

seefa 


ENGUSH-FRRKH - 
JUNIOR BILINGUAL 
SECRETARY 


Weitog wdh imol graupof higfey «v 
iwmogare, 
H Mk m. the develapmM 
« our KMfifie tralramtnlemart safes. 


tratramanl export safes. 
Cip er i et K e / itfb 


Cotaspewieneo mojdy- Enjidi 
. (word pracewar), seme Jmcn*Kfa 
-in ore n i nntra rioa n^tart/ export, 

. wouU be e plus. 


The jweon ant be able to handfe ran- 
Ifae .earfc fad to RAa svkedve in order 
to earn .prafcfam_ retoted .» iafa 
o dmwBtroti o re- , „ 


ffeoea. write toi. 


MAUPOMSJL 
Service du Ifenarefa 


78882 SfatM3u wnfe*&» .Vvrfnes 

FtOnCR . 


Cedar 


Imprime par Offprint, 7$ rue de fEvattple, 75018 Paris. 


SECRET AKIAL 

posmows AVAitARTp 


SEOtETAHIAL 
POSITIONS AVi 




executive secirourr, 

■*W« to ankt tarn* __ 
wnfrofler. IfrfaefrSho&T.-, . 
"hfiftfaebsharth®??! 
f to pope wfthdqwJg L 



I Pam.1 




few. In cc afajj -reAPPS pf» 
Pfew* wrife wbh fa. m3tra_3 
2213, Harfad Tiftane, 9ZE21 NfA 
Cfa*x.frface 

SECBgrAMkSAVAILA8^ 








to Maurice H.