Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats


AJBM — eJOSc. »tfo-u_li.i.'MCC 
70 a 

6Wr *'- — OtSODn 1«.1 F~- 

8^1X1 «»#». <*^3 yittfr! 

~ 3n * ta w-B? Karo. 

Cffn* ^XO.-i _C£33 

C*MM,!USb ' ,,, 

■ jj**?**;’— J ”' 

F*K. _ .. _4M 
GciO? I JOfc-W.- 

u-ea B>r™~ T.f Mp*sb. _ dSODf. 

Omu gbCr Nrteriaa— ITS ft 

k<n Hifaah rtgee SB*. 


rtomof .J3JM1; 

Omr CTXbt 

Parsed «£s. 

Osat <,3uJLat 

E*7 cH'MJnJ-.’CP 
&M*'XM-e3C»- 
<f= r:;p>= 

!r«ip _ ^JXt ^ 

^W*c JJCiJF. 
T^w.—.sac&r. 
V*tT — T£ out 30 

i!A£. lS> 

jS-w- _ta 
— ICC 


... 

e, 

=>"^?i5s8 

'■*-'» * Fr ajw,\j 

^ ; v .^'SJSS 






i** ill 

*£?***& 

...^-grihrS 

,:^ ft- 

. '•■'•*• ^OUMbl? 



f&amJtofatii* Domnstaxote from Mr- Arafat on 
- MMAN, j$n& '—-Yasser *“* « acceptnoce <rf key 

Arafatmet Thss^rvnjhJofdm^ V® readutioDS, a i i?ni«ic«U Ma of 
TOsOHSm^ whence m d r e cog ma oo of Israel, 

xffarttercsqac:* joint peace plan wcon fin g to Western, Jordanian 
bsL-gave do ;^Sc indicadoo fiiai «id Palestinian sources. Slid) com- 
btf WOUId t±a^p^p<ga^B>fld- iMtaents are all 11$, or Israeli pre- 
vance toeeffort forpeaoe iritolsck- cowfiriraa for newtittiiofis. 
eL • •?-■,£/-.'■-_&** -• ‘ 'Jordanians said that. (be hijack- 

ing erf toe Italjjm cruise sh^Acbffl^ 
Lauro by Palestinians from a fac- 



Pakstinc 
lashed outw tfje?' 


Suits, -tion loyal to Mr. Ari&L and other 

saying tiua if with the reaan modems ate evidence of er- 

n. 1^2 ' : a ^ - 1 --■?- - - - .t * . - 1 - - 


Patestunamand 
dn^afor 



King Hussein 


fta_ 

Wh~ArSSfctmet Mio- 

enss ’torir alliance **3 the 'prob- 
lems tirai have beset their bid for 

peace with Israel 

' 

to&cvewdedj 

Bitg- Hussem, ’HttretaEgty an- 
gered by*3«<s<rf- PfeQ moms that 
have eroded the Palestinian group’s 
support; '■* ar *3etimmried to force 





•; . ■*•* refused a-' 

; - '.laafojjf * 

toThw' 
pandect Webft 



otiotors 


- "••;>. Bod\ 

•■- ■ ■aaoi on 

r' :i K, ‘dmlrin 


United Pros InumuUmol J.wJv ConSCriprioa a padfist 

■ JOHANNESBURG firesi- movemap that advocates an end to 
dent Pieter W. Bothaliasrgtded a t&euseof oaEtary tkaftcesw fight 
proposal from the ComiboBwealta . blacks in Sqoth Afiica’s townships, 
nations to send a team erf tiEgptj^, Dr. Toms, »ito last' trade ended a 
tors to South Afrfca to tafi^^lSs 21niay fast jirotesnng xhe state of 


rfU5.cbn- raise behavior and mesponsible or- 
cISNavasi- ganization by Mr. Arafat, who they 
7 ; rjj£7y "fed has moumed vjcSem opera- 
wms while taMdg abend .peace. 
■After themeetingMatoay, there 
was no joint statement of agree- 
ment. 

Jordanian officials issned a sute- 
ment that avoided any menuon of 
agreement and failed to specifically 
cite the accord of Feb. II between 
King H ossein and Mr. Arafat on a 
joint ap pr oach to peace in the Mid - 
die East- The Palestinians had 
planned to stress their allegiance to 
the accord. 

.. There had been speculation 
among some diplomats here that 
King Hussein sought to drop Mr. 
Arafat and the PLO from the king's 
peace initiative and to find an alter-', 
native Palestinian leadership. 

“Then; will not be peace or sta- 
bility in the region if they decide to 
sidestep the PLO and the legitimate 
rights of the Palestinian people, in 
accordance with UN resolutions," 
Mr. Arafat said of the United 
States. 



Mutual Halt on 
Improved Radar 


(sen 


If they had been able to achieve 
~t without us, they wouldn't 
hesitated." 


Irina Grivnina, a Soviet dissident, and her husband, Vladi- 
mir, right, and their children are greeted by Ed Nijpek, a 
Dutch politician, cm arrival in The Netherlands Tuesday. 

Vim for Sakharov's Wife 
Is Granted, Russian Says 

Dutch politicians who took up her 


-Jiaad Eaj s, 

Duasist 



white minority gov emmiy r- aB o tfr 
radal strife, saying that only South 
Africans can solve the counters 
problems. • v-*^ 

Speaking Monday at a Natton*] 
Party by-deetkm campaig n raisin • 


21, was 


T5ASCO 


Mr. Arafat said that the PLO 
and Jordan had a^eed to form a 
permanent committee to avoid 
problems such as the collapse of a 
planned Ocl 9 meeting between 
British officials and two senior 
PLO leaders which had beat in- 
tended to ease the way for eventual 
PLO contacts with the United 
States. 



emergency declared 
released later Tuesday. 

■ Dr.TomswQdaatadmiciaihe 
Grosriro ads " set tlemen t outside 
Ctoe Town. Dooots it 'the'- clinic 
«ui y uj-accwm ouroaign rauym M ood^ that poBcx^cd on a 

*e town of Vri^i 4 : 200 W of dnh&en ih a dayground. 

(325 Mometm) aoXest * rf 

hatme^nng. Mr. Bodia Empraled.to . ™ ein t®oer ffie agtOf e^ghL 
Qtta ^ the people to stand together 'in >■ Thatcher Defends Ptetoria 
1 ' T °f difficulty/dadget and ■: ' Priinc Mmarter Margaret 

.. -v . ... ^'n^idierof declared Ttras- 
Five by-decdons art scheduted •<% iii Pariu^aen{-dut the South 
around the country on Wednesday^ % Afncsin, gowntmerii ’ has taken 
Political analysts see the elections .“very considerable st tag*, toward 
as a measure of feelings. idjcNn^ Mv described 

Botha’s prides to asjKhpulous^ 

•• peaee e#f^rt_ without duninatmg 

economy. •■ r ■: " -shouied . ' • ' ■ 

Mr. Botha that he -“Mr: Arafat stud that Kng Hus- 

the 49-naiioii Coonnonwealih plait : ‘3^a>d dn her hands,” and had • sein has not pressed him to re- 

to send a “fact-findm^* -f^ : Tnade™itom thfrlone t me n tatid n al nounce or call a halt to armed 
South Africa to cry to persuade his «f flp-WtMniiiority govern- struggle whfle seeking a political 
government to opeo.taDg, swth. the .. South Africa . settlemenL (AP, NYT) 

anti-apanheid Airiest National ~ 


: *yspes® 


N£WYQBt««e 

OKN0t2 

ranlao; 


The United States insists that it 
will not talk to the PLO until it 
recognizes Israel’s right to exist and 
.endorses two UN Security Council 
resolutions, .242 and 338, which im- 
ply the same. 

King Hussein has been trying to 
involve the United States in his 


By Roxinne Ervasri 

The AiUKUtted Pros 

MOSCOW — A Soviet journal- 
ist appeared to confirm Tuesday 
reports that the wife of Andrei D. 
Sakharov, the Soviet dissident, 
would be allowed to travel to the 
West for medical care. 

The West German newspaper 
BDd, quoting sources in Moscow, 
said Monday that Yelena G. Bon- 
ner had been told by Soviet au- 
thorities that she could "fly imme- 
diately to wherever she wants." 

The journalist, Victor Louis, who 
in the past has provided accurate 
inf carnation to Western journalists, 
said the United States is a possible 

dimiinminn 

(Irina Grivninfl, a Soviet dissi- 
dent, arrived with her family in the 
Netherlands on Tuesday after be- - 
ing allowed to leave the Soviet 
Union via Vienna on Monday. 
Renters reported from Amsterdam. 

• (Mrs. - Griyninai who spent more 
than two years in prison in the late 
1970s for her activities in an under- 
ground Moscow group that moni- 
tored abuses in psychiatry, was in- 
vited to live in the Netherlands by 


case. They also had repeatedly 
asked Soviet authorities to issue 
exit visas for her husband. Vladi- 
mir, and their two young daugh- 
ters. 

(Mrs. Grivnina, 39, a computer 
programmer, was snipped of her 
arizen ship earlier this month and 
told to leave the country before 
Nov. l.J 

Mrs. Bonner, 60. is believed to 
suffer from glaucoma, an eye ail- 
ment that threatens her vision. Sur- 
gery to correct the problem is not 
available in the Soviet Union. She 
has sought the right to receive 
treatment in the West 

Both she and her husband have 
heart conditions as welL 

Mr. Sakharov, the Soviet 
Union’s most prominent human. 
rights advocate, was sent into inter- 
nal exile in the closed dty of Gorki 
in January. 1 98.9. and his wife w as 
Mail to join him in t>«4. Thai 
plight has become a major issue for 
Western governments and human 
rights groups. 

The Soviet Union has dismissed 
Western inquiries about Mr. Sa- 



Yelena G. Bonner 


kharov and Mrs. Bonner as inter- 
ference in the Soviet Union's inter- 
na! affairs. 

Mr. Sakharov, a physicist who 
won theNobd Peace Prize in 1975, 
has gone on several hunger strikes 
in an effort to obtain an exit visa 
fiT his wife. SilJ raid he v. ^ on 
another fast when authorities 

E arned Mrs. Bonner permission to 
ive. 

Asked if he knew what Mrs. Bon- 
(Continued on Page 6, CoL 7) 


By Leslie H. Gelb 

V.-v I'.^a Time i AVrrui* 

WASHINGTON — The Soviet 
Union has offered to halt construc- 
tion on a radar in central Siberia in 
return for the United Stares forgo- 
ing plans to modernize radars in 
Britain and Greenland, according 
to U.S. and Soviet officials. 

The United States contends that 
the Soviet radar, at Abalakovo near 
Krasnoyarsk, is an early warning 
radar and violates the Anti-Ballis- 
tic Missile Treaty of 1 972. The Rus- 
sians say the radar is for space 
tracking and is allowable under the 
treaty. 

(The Reagan administration re- 
jected the Soviet offer on Tuesday. 
The State Department spokesman, 
Bernard Kalb, called the Soviet 
proposal inequitable. Reuters re- 
ported from Washington. 

{“From the U.S. perspective such 
a tradeoff is inequitable." Mr. Kalb 
said of the offer, adding that the 
Soviet radar was a clear-cut viola- 
tion of the ABM treaty because of 
its siting Inland and its ability to 
detect and track ballistic missiles.) 

Some British and American in- 
telligence experts, while not agree- 
ing with the Soviet Union, have 
said that they are not convinced 
about the U.S. position. 

Some U.S. officials interpreted 
the Soviet proposal, made about 
three weeks ago, as a move toward 
acknowledging that the Abalakovo 
radar is a violation of the 1972 
treaty. 

At' Lbe same time, these officials 
said, it is unacceptable to equate 
the Abalakovo radar with the up- 
grading of the radars at Fylingdales 
in Yorkshire and at Thule in 
Greenland, which they say is al- 
lowable. 

As described by U.S. and Soviet 
officials, the offer was made at a 
special meeting in '.he Geneva arms 
negotiations by Yuli A. Kvilsinsky, 
who heads the space-weapons 
team. Two other parallel arms dis- 
cussions in Geneva are concerned 
with medium-range nuclear weap- 
ons and strategic, or long-range, 
weapons. 

According to the sources, Mr. 
Kvtainsky said tiu if the Abala- 
Icovo radar was inconsistent with 
the ABM treaty, so were UK plans 
to upgrade Fylingdales and Thule. 

U.S. officials here said that the 
Fy lingdales and Thule radars were 


in existence ai the time the treaty 
went into force and were exempted. 

The Soviet response is that the 
exemption applied to the Tluie 
and Fylingdales radars as the> were 
in 1972 and was not intended to 
permit upgrading. Some British of- 
ficials are also said to fee! that the 
reconstruction at Fylingdales is a 
violation. 

The treaty allows the deploy- 
ment of large radars only on the 
periphery of rhe national tern tones 
as early warning devices, with their 
antennas facing out. The object is 
to prohibit radars in the interior 
that could be used to track incom- 
ing warheads and guide missiies to 
destroy them. 

Since the large radar being built 
in central Siberia is in the interior, 
the United States contend* that it 

(Continued on Page 6, CoL 8) 


Dobrynin 
Says Sailor 
Will Return 


Congress and other blade leadera. 
The proposal wasadoi«edarthe 

. Commonwealth s ummit m the Ba- 
hamas last week as a compromise 
after Britain, refused to endorse 
stranger measures,, mdodin^jnajcc 
« sanctions.' South Africa withdrew 
from the Common wealth in IStif;-* 
The president said that his gov- 
ernment was always prepared -to 
welcome visitors because it : had 
“jMthing to hide". . 

^ “But there are two thing? we caa- 
rtot accept and these are prescrip- 
tion from abroad and proposals, 
which are made as if we are. hot 


Doe Proclaimed Victor 
Disputed Liberia Poll 


^ By Blaine Harden 

v _ ... Washington Patt Service 

" MONROVIA, Liberia — Major 
General Samuel KL Doe, Liberia's 
milttaxy leader, was proclaimed the 
Winner Tuesday of a presidential 
election that he is widely believed 


able tp bdp oursdvesT Mr. Botha- ipbayc 105 !- 
said. “South Africans, and South-'' '™ anMoncawW, made dur- 
Africans alone will solve dor prob- Jpga one^iomcdento^ 

Jems and nobody else.” rovia conference center encircled 

. On Tuesday, shm.™* stwt. anri. ..by ju bil a n t armedT soldiers, was 
killed a prominent supporter erf the , Ppycottod lw. the Liberian Action 
moderate black Zulu leader, Chief Tarty, winch independent observ- 
* - ere. here say won the Ocl 15 dec- 




Gatsha Bulhdezi, in a township 
. -near Durban. At least five more 
.r Aid m persons died, one lolled by police, 
JE^ 1 4X1 poEthal violence. Security police 
*ih Cape Town arrested five promi- 
nent anti-apaiibeid activists. 

• “ Police said that a group erf blade 
•men fire-bombed the home of 
Francis Dlamini, in Kwamashn, 
then fired shotguns at him as he . 
fled the burning house. Mr. Dlap 
mint, 37, died after he was hh sever- , 
til times in the chest.' 

- He had served on the central 
committee of Chief Buthelezfs ln- 
kaxha movement, wtneb advocates 
dialogue rather than violeitoe to 
qyertHrow the white minority gov- 
ernment. 

Police in Cape Town arrested ; 
■Dr. Ivor Toms, who leads the End 



non. . 

Tbe Liljenap Acticm Party later 
issued a statemoil calling the an- 
nounced election results **a mock- 
ery of the law and erf die people of 
liberia.” . y - 

Tbe streets of Monrovia, pa- 
trolled by soldiere on foot and in 
aroftred cars, were unusually emp- 
ty and quiet on Tuesday. The Doe 
govcxnmdit had- de d tir edThe day it 
holiday, and amorning headhne in 
a govern men t-Qwpcd newspaper, 
warned: “No Jubflatkm Allowed in 
the Streets." 

; General Doe, who sdzed power 
in a military coup in l980, sat si- 
lently ai the headof d te co n faeuce 
hall whereebullienl members of his 
govenunen t applauded dection re- 


turns. They were read by Emmett 
Hannon, whom General Doe ap- 
pointed as chairman ot the Special 
Elections Commission. 

Mr. Harmon admitted there had 
been “glaring irregularities" in the 
voting, but be urged opposition 
parties to accept the results of the 
balloting as “genuine, honest and 
fair." 

Mr. Hannon announced that 
General Doe had carried 50.9 per- 
cent of the total vote, then de- 
fended the votocoummg process. 

“We feel that as a commission 
we have truly interpreted the vote 
of the people of tins country and 
have no - remorse erf conscience,” 
said Mr. Hannon, a 72-year-old 
lawyer who asserted that his vote- 
counting procedure “was. directed 
by the hand of God.” 

Liberians turned out in record 
numbers two weeks ago for what 
had been billed as the first free, 
multiparty election in the 138-year 
history of this nation founded by 
freed American slaves. In that time, 
there have been almost daily com- 
plaints of decti on-law irregular- 
ities. 

Thousands of ballots were 
burned OcL 19 beside a rural road 
north of Monrovia. Independent 

(Continued on Page 6, CoL 1) 



3 French Doctors Assert 
Treatment Inhibits AIDS 


By Judirh Miller 

Vrn York Tuna Sen ice 

PAJRJS — Three French doctors 
at the Laenneo Hospital in Paris 
said Tuesday they have discovered 
a treatment that the} 1 believe pre- 
vents the progression of tbe virus 
known as acquired immune defi- 
ciency syndrome, or AIDS. 

At a press conference, the doc- 
tors stressed that the treatment was 
not a cure, that it did not destroy 
the AIDS virus. Preliminary tests', 
however, indicated that Lhe treat-' 
meat appeared to prevent the virus 
from multiplying. 

The doctors said that the treat- 
ment, which relies on cyclosporin- 
A. a well-known drug used to pre- 
vent the rejection of transplanted 
organs, had produced what they 
termed spectacular results. 

The doctors, Jean-Marie An- 
drieu, Philippe Even and Alain 
Venet, based their conclusions on 
tests performed within the past 
eight days on wo patients at Laen- 
nec: a woman. 35. treated since 
Oct. 21, and a 38-year-old man, on 
the verge of death, treated since 
Ocl 23. 

Four other patients at the hospi- 
tal were also receiving the drug, toe 
doctors said, but not for long 


enough to draw any specific con- 
clusions. 

France's minister of social wel- 
fare, Georgina Dufoix, said in a 
separate statement issued by her 
office Tuesday that toe new treat- 
ment presented “an undeniable 
hope of progress" in efforts to dis- 
cover a cure for the disease and to 
treat those who are affected. 

“For the moment, toe effective- 
ness of toe treatment has not been 
definitely established," Mrs. Du- 
foix said, “but it has produced Tor 
the First time spectacular biological 
improvement and, therefore, seems 
to have given us some hope." 

Other scientists searching for a 
cure for AIDS reserved comment 
on toe Laennac experiments. 

Caroline Chaine, a press spokes- 
man for toe Pasteur Institute in 
Paris, one of toe pioneers of current 
research, called toe treatment “an 
interesting approach," but declined 
further comment pending addi- 
tional test results over a longer pe- 
riod involving larger numbers of 
patients. 

“We cannot make any statement 
based on two cases over eight 
days," Mrs. Chaine said. 

Dr. Jean- Paul Escande, an .AIDS 

(Continued on Pace 6. CoL 6) 


CiunpileJ tn Our Sul/ F/-,rr. jTi.i/w.v«i 

WASHINGTON - The Soviet 
ambassador to toe United States. 
Anatoli F. Dobrynin, .‘aid Tuesday 
that a Soviet sailor ubo leaped 
from a grain freighter in Louisiana 
would re turn to toe Soviet Union. 

The sailor. Miroslav Medviil 
had been toe subject of a five-day 
standoff in which toe United States 
had refused to allow toe departure 
of toe Soviet vessel until it was 
determined whether he wished to 
defect. 

State Department officials con- 
firmed that toe Mr. Medvid would 
return. Earlier Tuesday, a spokes- 
man had said that U\S. officials 
would interview toe sailor later in 
the day, but it was not dear wheth- 
er toe interview had taken place. 

“It’s settled. He's coming home," 
Mr. Dobrynin said as he left toe 
Slate Department following a 
meeting with Secretary of State 
George P. Shuttz. He said the trai- 
ler had not been discussed at toe 
meeting, but refused further com- 
ment 

The incident began late Thurs- 
day when Mr. Medvid leaped from 
toe deck of his ship, anchored in 
toe Mississippi River about 10 
miles (16 kilometers) southeast of 
New Orleans, and swam to shore. 

Agents of toe U.S. Border Patrol 
returned him to toe vessel on a 
private launch, from which he also 
jumped as it approached toe Soviet 
freighter. 

The captain of toe launch, Ray- 
mond Guthrie, had said that Mr. 
Medvid was shouting “and didn't 
want to go back" to toe freighter, 
toe M.V. Marshal Konyev. 

An official of toe Immigration 
and Naturalization Service said 
over toe weekend. “The Border Pa- 
trol didn't understand what was 
going on and didn't realize he was 
trying to defect." 

The seaman, who apparently is 
in his 20s. was taken from toe Sovi- 
et ship Monday evening and inter- 
viewed by U.S. officials on a near- 
by Coast Guard vessel, a State 
Department spokesman said. 

Soviet representatives also were 
on toe ship, toe spokesman said, 
and had agreed to toe interview. 

The spokesman said, “There was 
no resolution of his intent" in toe 
interview. “One of toe reasons was 
that he was exhausted and nauseat- 
ed. He could not coherently con- 
duct an interview." 

He said Mr. Medvid showed 
“signs of illness” during the inter- 
view and was later taken to toe 
Naval Support Activity Center 
near New Orleans. 

The spokesman had said more 
interviews were planned Tuesday 
“in order to determine his desire lb 
return voluntarily to the Soviet 
Union.’’ (UPI. WPi 


*1369* 






INSIDE 



Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W.,WMibcargBr re- 
ceived support from 
NATO ministers on 
U.S. charges. Rage 6. 


■ nations ofieredtomoni- 
tor a total ban on nuclear tests 
Tjy tbe superpowers. - Page ! 

■ An Indiana man is scheduled 

to receive « sa-oreati trans- 
plant ' ' Page 2. 

-■The widow of tide American 

rpn-n killedbyhpadcerssaid die : 

begged to ramam with her hus- 
band. Raged. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE . . 

■Tin imfasby experts. met in 
- London lor ends talks aimed at 
. averting a caUapse of the mar- 
kcL . } Pa®e lL 

■ Australia lias eased' foreign 
investment controls. . Page u. 

ARTS/LHSGRE 

■ Stanley Jordan,, a young 
American nwadan, has been 
.nicknamed ‘‘thernap who rein- 
vented the guitar.” : :JP«ge7. 


Carry-On Airplane Baggage: From Clothes to Cellos to Corpses 


By Ralph Blumenchai 

New York Times: Service 

NEW YORK — One passenger arrived with a 
counter on a long metal pole. A musician 
a cdk> on wheels. A salesman toted a comput- 
er. Virtually every traveler getting on and off planes at 
La Guardis Airport on a recent afternoon was carry- 
ing at least a garment bag and a suitcase, briefcase or 
shopping hag. 

Air passengers eager to avoid waiting and fearful of 
lost car damaged baggage arc stretching the concept of 
carry-on luggage to epic proportions, according to a 
'govmunem inspection and testimony tc the Federal 
Aviation Administration. 

Because of related safety concents, the FAA is 
considering a new rule that would for toe first time 
restrict tbe size of a carry-on bag to 20 inches by Id 
inches by. 9 inches (50 centimeters by 40 cmnnwters 
by 23 centimeters) and perhaps the number erf items 
allowed each passenger. 

A national air transportation inspection team that 
surveyed Has situation last year for toe Transportation 
Department estimated that $0 percent of all jpasseo- 
gers'eanied two bags aboard and that an additional 15 
percent carried three or more. 

. The Association of Flight Attendants cited cases in 


Crew’s Night Out in London Strands 300 Passengers 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — A Trans World .Airlines flight to 
New Y'ork had to be canceled after the co-pilot and 
flight engineer were locked in a London restaurant 
overnight, toe airline said Tuesday. 

Airline officials said that more than 300 passen- 
gers booked Sunday on TWA Flight 703 had to be 
rebooked with other airlines after toe cockpit crew 
failed to show up on time. 

The two men were among the last customers 


eating in an Indian restaurant in London late 
Saturday night. Just before leaving they derided to 
use toe loileL But when they returned to their 
seats, the lights were out and the front door was 
locked. 

They hammered cm toe door and shouted 
through toe letter box but no one came to their aid. 
Finally, they attracted toe attention of a police 
officer and were let out at about 7 A _M. 


which emergency evacuations were impeded by pas- 
sengers wtoo tried to slide down escape chutes with 
their arms full of carry-on bags, and instances when 
passengers were knocked unconscious by heavy items 
falling out of toe overhead bins. Moreover, the extra 
baggage can throw off calculations of takeoff weight 
by as much as 2500 pounds (about 1,135 kilograms). 

"The only requirement now is that cany-on items 
must be securely stowed in overhead bins or closets or 
beneath toe seat. But the restriction does not necessar- 


ily rule out a surfboard, Christmas tree, auto battery, 
stained-glass window 1 , television set, staiue. antique 
furniture, stuffed animal or 40 pounds of barbecue, all 
of which the Association of Flight Attendants says 
have been carried aboard at one time or another. 

The inspection team further noted, “Through obser- 
vations and reports during this study, garment bags 
have been found containing bicycles, typewriters, 
bowling balls, golf clubs and even an embalmed hu- 
man body.” 


Fred Farrar, a spokesman for toe FAA in Washing- 
ton, said efforts to verify toe story of toe embalmed 
body had proved futile. 

According to toe flight attendants' group, which has 
been most vocal in demanding a crackdown, toe 
airlines have been reluctant to enforce existing limita- 
tions for fear of driving passengers to a more permis- 
sive rival. 

Many airlines have seemingly encouraged passen- 
gers to carry more aloft by greatly expanding toe size 
of toe overhead compartments. 

New bearding procedures also work against close 
Supervision of carry-on luggage. Many airlines, in an 
effort to streamline procedures, assign seats and give 
out boarding passes in advance, allowing passengers 
to go directly to the departure gates if they want 

Tbe passengers have toeir own side of toe story . 

“If I can’t carry it with me, I don’t take it,” said Paul 
M JUrin, who staggered off an Eastern Air Lines jet at 
La . *" -injia with a garment bag slung over one shoul- 
der, u 4 bag over the other and a portfolio in his 
hands. 

Mr. KJCi- ■ ‘ trip toe time he would have 

wasted wai« r A sVi^ge carousels easily 
outweighed UA-iCaa on his back. 














Pi 


E 

1 

I 


Ri 

thi 

Uo 

lO! 


8.1 

S6 


la; 

m 

cc 

iti 

oi 

A 

S 

d. 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1985 


** 


6 Nations Offer to Monitor Nuclear Test Ban by Superpowers 


By Don Oberdorfer 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Six nonaligned 
leaders, seeking to prod the superpowers 
into banning all testing of nuclear weap- 
ons. have offered to monitor a compre- 
hensive ban on underground tests with 
seismic devices on their own soil and 
reportedly are willing to implant devices 
near nuclear test sites in the Soviet Union 
and the United States. 


Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of India 
and Prime Minister Oiof Palme of Swe- 
den. along with senior officials from Ar- 
gentina. Greece. Mexico and Tanzania, 
approved the plan at a meeting in New 


York last Wednesday, according to 
sources familiar with their proposal. 

Arms control advocates have argued 
that ending all nuclear tests eventually 
could halt die arms race, since the super- 
powers would be reluctant to deploy 
weapons that they had been unable to 
test 

State Department officials said Mon- 
day night that the message from the six 
nonaligned leaders is being studied with- 
in the a dmin is [ration, 

A statement containing a broad out- 
line of the proposal was presented Thurs- 
day by Foreign Minister Baliram K. B ha- 
gai of India to Secretary of State George 
P. Shultz and the Soviet foreign minis ter, 


Eduard A. Shevardnadze, the sources 
said. 

The plan is believed to have been 
among the topics discussed by Mr. Gan- 
dhi with the Soviet leader, Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, in a meeting Saturday in 
Moscow. 

The nonaligned leaders, in their latest 
appeal to the two superp ow ers, proposed 
a 12 -month suspension of all testing of 
nuclear weapons. 

In August, the Soviet Union an- 
nounced a unilateral testing moratorium 
until Jan. 1. 

The United States declined to join it, 


States has held several underground nu- 
clear tests since Moscow’s announce- 
ment 

The most unusual feature of the new 
proposal is its emphasis on verification, 
and especially the offer by the non- 
aligned states to assume a direct role in 
the monitoring process. 

The lack of a precise means for detect- 
ing and measuring underground nuclear 
tests has been a stumbling block for the 
United States in previous test-ban pro- 


gentina. Prime Minister Andreas Papan- 
dreou of Greece, Prcsjdent"Migud de la 


partly because of skepticism that such a 
prohibition could be verified. The United' 


noncompliance. 

The nonaligned leaders' statement was 
approved by Mr. Gandhi and Mr. Palme, 
and by President Radi Alfonsfn of Ar- 


Madrid of Mexico and President Julius 
Njrerere of Tanzania. 

The proposal grew out of a “five-conti- ■ 
□ent peace initiative" presented by lead- 
ers of the same countries in May ! 984, a - ■ 

meeting of the leaders in New Delhi last 
January and scientific studies of nuclear 
test monitoring undertaken by U.S. sds- . 
mic experts. 

The statement presented to the U.S; 
and Soviet, governments by the six non- 
aligned leaders conceded thar the prob- 
lems of verifying a 12 -month suspension 
of nuclear tests are “difficult, but not 
insurmountable.” 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Craxi ^C^inetl^ Be Resurrected 

RpME (AP) — Bettino Cnuri, the Socialist leader and prime minister- 


desienafe was reported Tuesday 10 nave won baste agreement to resurrect 
his five-party cabinet that had collapsed over the Aci^Laurohgadiinfr 
Mr. Cran h«W two rounds of separate talks with beads ofbs coalmen 
partners, the Christian Democrats; Republicans. Soctai Democrats and 


consul ta- 


Afierward, Mi. Craxi said the five parties would continue 1 

The centrist coalition, Italy’s 44th since World War n, fell Oct 1? over 
a. dispute regarding the release of Mohammed Abbas, an official of the 
Palestine Liberation Organization who has been accused of mastermind- 
in g tbft hi jacking of -ihc Italian cruise finer- 


Colombia Missionaries May Be Freed 


BOGOTA (UFI) — Leftist guerrillas have agreed to free three U.S. 
Protestant missionaries who were kidnapped 24 days ago in Colombia s 


Argentine Court Is Asked to Lift Siege 


Lawyers of 4 Accused of Subversion Petition Supreme Court 


The Associated Press 


BUENOS AIRES — Lawyers 
for at least four rightists accused of 
subversion have asked Argentina’s 
highest court to invalidate the state 
of siege decreed by President Raul 
Alfonnsr. 


stedpe- 


The Supreme Court accepted 
ti lions Monday on behalf of the 
men, who argued that the presi- 
dent's action was not justified by a 
recent series of bombings, tele- 


phone threats and other compare- the arrests of 12 suspects for 60 
lively minor acts of terrorism. days and in dec l a rin g the state of 
“Even though there has been a siege. The suspects were accused of 
series of cowardly attacks." lawyers involvement in a violent campaign 
for one of the suspects, army Major to undermine the democratic gov- 
Jorge Granada, said in a petition, eminent. 

“this does not constitute an inter- More than a dozen small bomb- 
nal commotion" that enables the ings, most of them occurring in the 
president to declare a state of siege, early morning and causing no inju- 
The filin g of the petitions foJ- ties, have been reported in the past 
lowed a federal appeals court ml- five weeks. The government has at- 
ing earlier Monday that Mr. Alfon- tributed them to a coordinated 
sin was within his rights in ordering campaign to spread fear and weak- 
en confidence in the administra- 



Pro-Syria Forces Leave 
Battle Area in Beirut 


eastern jungles and to tnm them over to a government peace commisson. 
a commission source said Tuesday. ^ 

The source said the kidnappers are members of the First Front of the.** 
Colombian Revolutionary Armed Forces. Three members of the commis- 
sion were to travel to the jungle to receive the m issio n aries. 

The source said the cormrrisskm knows the location of the missionaries, 
a woman and two men, but be would not reveal it- The commission was 
established to oversee a cease-fire truce signed with four rebel groups. 


Among the riches of Beverly Hills, 
a little gem of a hotel. 


The Beverly Pavilion is one of two 
small, fashionable Beverly Hills hotels 


that are run in the European style. 

or the 


under the direct supervision o : 
proprietor himself. And we offer our 
gugsts the ultimate Beverly Hills 
experience: free Hmo service to 
glorious Rodeo Drive. 


an 



Beverly Pavilion 


A Max Baril Hotel 

9360WnridreUvcL.BciKftylfflls.CA 90212. fetac No. 69 1 366. 


lion's ability to maintain order. 

[Political analysts and lawyers 
told The New York Times that 
while in the longer term, the ded- 


Rafil Alfoasln 


sion to impose a stale of siege could 
damage Mr. A 


Alfonsm’s image as a 
champion of Human rights and de- 
mocracy, the government’s failure 
to end die violence or press charges 
against specific terrorists could 
make it, and democracy, appear 
weak. 

Mr. Alfonsin first ordered the 
arrests Oct. 22. Two days later, a 
judge ruled the arrests were illegal 
because the president had not de- 
clared a state of siege. On Friday, 


Mr. Alfonsin declared the state of 
siege (or 60 days and re-ordered the 
arrests. 

The appeals ruling reversed the 
decision of two local judges who 
had freed Major Granada and six 
Others, including four other army 
officers, over the weekend on 
grounds that the government had 
not presented proof of the allega- 
tions. 

The suspects are closely linked 
with the rightist military regime 
that ruled horn the March 1976 
military coup until Mr. Alfonsin 
assumed office in December 1983. 


Untied Press international er of the Lebanese branch of the 
BEIRUT — Pro-Syrian militia- pro-Syrian Arab Ba'ath Party, « m X v-, ri i * rn. n* . l 

men pulled out of Beirut's Green The withdrawing Ba’azhist m i l l- L lTklft — 1 lilt CjfiUUted HI vJl€5SS JMRtCll 

Line battiefront Tuesday in a good- tias took with them dozens ofB-IO 
will gesture hours after Syria re- recoilless guns, light artillery, mor- 
leased 32 Christian militiamen and tars, rocket-propelled grenades and 
Vice President Abdel Halim Khad- light and heavy machine guns, 
dam of Syria pledged to help Leba- Mr. Kanso said the withdrawal 

□on get back on its feet after a was a prelude to an eventual disar- 
decade of civil war mament of all militias in Lebanon. 

But as Ifac 300 Arab Ba’ath Party 

its weapons to the authorities. _ 

Mr. Kanso warned “the oppo- ItUTta AlTPStS 0 
cents of the Damascus agreement 
and gave them two weeks to fall 

rival factions used rocket-propelled 
grenades and heavy machine guns. 

There was also sporadic fighting 
on the mountains east of Beirut 


militiamen palled out of one sec- 
tion of the Green Line, fighting 
broke out a few blocks away be- 
tween Moslem fundamentalist 

forces and Lebanese troops. The . . » ^ 

■ - - - - - into use. 

“In 13 days there wQl be a clean- 
up of the opponents of the agree- 
ment, and this does not mean the 


MOSCOW (Reuters) — Gary Kasparov called Tuesday for a tune-out 
in the world chess championships, postponing until Thursday the 21st 
game of the rematch with tbcxharnpton, Anatoli Karpov, Tass reported. 

Mr: Kasparov, the challenger, leads the 24-game series by 1 1-9. He 
needs only Ifc points frcratlK remaining four ^mes to become, at the 
age of 22 , the youngest world damjriao. 

Mr. Kaspanov has now used his three permitted timo-outs. Mr. Karpov 
has one more. 


ii;nt U-xut 


an for Spying 


between Lebanese Army troops 
loyal to President Amin Gcmayej 
and the Druze militiam en of WaJid 
Juxnblat, military sources said. 

“We decided to pull out our men 
from the confrontation lines as a 
sign-of goodwill and to prove that 
we are prepared to facilitate efforts 
toward a solution of the Lebanese 
conflict,'’ said Assem Kanso, lead- 


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



UNITED 

NATIONS 


CALL FOR EXPRESSIONS 
OF INTEREST 

FROM ARCHITECT/ ENGINEERS 
[The Unfed Ncutoro a Mdcnoaxpo ti ug 
tot Inter* ham Aid*ea/frgnen m 
eormooton with fo* fir* Pine (Cancep. 

luS Des^i) at fhe prpp m ed mmtnjoon 

of conference footed cl foe heoefowr- 
Wi of foe Brono mC C umu l ati o n for 
Afra In Adds Abafca. Ethiopia. Die 
iMnn conference rooms of 
(efoer weh foe supporT 
for United Notions corv 
focenoes. La. wnuttnaoia eaerpretafion 
system, pritfog f frifoi. end demg fo- 
d>tn cn uxi e nj in total op ^mamu tey 
50JXBiqwee metes. Etpeaiora of in- 
itre* are fowled from WatforquaSied 
firms wt»d> are cbl« to provide Integral, 
led vcheecMd tmd ranearaig ureem 
for foe fnjrocJ. It fooutf be noted foot foe 
LW*d Natem intends » retar an mde- 
pendnnf Qjcn*ty Surveyor. 

|E*P ( «*o** rf mteed droid be isneae 
land as fcnef at possWe. but staid 
Imcfede rtcaiwUon w fata** 

Nome and address of foe mtorostod 
fimumd cd proposed omoorted (mcB 
wdl at a tamen an fog qxcfc 
proups, dvnan, me. which are bong 
prcyxned to enfertate foe work. 

1 Specific project experience of foe 
firmly i.-.-L-iduefor i 
emnpwabfe bufeteg 
pojettfar gor ei n n 
id avfogenx fodtia diaing foe pceflen 
{jOI years. 


Wot nrfotedirdi 

prrfHli 

Vknd Natom and/or etpenen 
desgn md c umli uu m ii of bukfon in 
Afhoa. mfoer as p mp d or O MOrtata d 
anfoneOk. 

4. Senmory amieda tdot of key per- 
wmd, mfo x ifa i mfom i on foe teponri- 
binm of each 
mpeooly fooM tatad under item 2 and 3 
d»m. 

5. Adc fi norol ralevtjrt in fa rm at ipa 
Mich m anted finonaol statenerfo. fab 

I of wrren protects, etc 
Sutneawely addnond Wonnaeon and 
Mitnincra <mI be raquesad of ihert- 
Wd firms. 

Nedier Ihs inwJaSon nor onysubeequent 
chorelstrq of firms, eondnsw a atntroc- 
tud engagemert on foe part of foe 
United Note* end. foe Unite! Nations 
shed nor be bound ta occepr foe lowest 


or arty oHer rmdrtng from fob a 
i foe ngl 


and reserves foe n^e to 
d/ar cantraa with any firm'or Sons d 
deems eampetore to undendee foe pro- 

wcf. 


Expressions of invest, few copies in 
" foe United 


Engfcth, mu* be roamed by foe 
Ncaom not late- that 12.00 
Monday 2 December 1985 at eifoer 
addrma ghan bebw. They thsdd be 
marked "ArtKteet/&iflineers, Addis 

Abdba Consrirtion Prefer" anfoecut- 

»de of foe envelope <»d shodd be 
addressed la 

Oxer 

(Whose and Tnnpondioa 
Service 

Offioed Control Servians 


Boom 5-ZM9, Seoetuke Bukina 
k WOI? 


Undedhtexxa, New York 
USA 


Chef 

□wsonaf MninOrcdon 

Economic O o mrnr a i on hr Africa 
tan 961 PA Bn 3001] 
M en c R Avenue 
Adds Ababa Btespa 


ACCOUNTEMPS 


Accountemps provides temporary accountants, 
bookkeepers and EDP professionals for business. 


ROBERT HALF 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 


Roman House, Wood Street, London EC2. 
Tel.: 01 63 85 191 


SEARCHING 

for 

FINANCIAL 

PARTNER 

Small firm, recently established, 
disposing of sofid industrial and tocMcd 
support in the Far East, is gening ready 
to launch on foe EUROPEAN MARKET a 
SOW-BSnCATffl ELECTRONCAL 
PRODUCT benefiting from a dynamic 
sates force and having a presort 
turnover of F.F .20 .000,000 net. 

Our a mbition: 

FJ.IOOJOOOOO turnover before 1990. 

Hnancid backing is necessary. 
With exceptional profit potentiality. 
Please write lac 
Box 0127, Harcrid Tribune 
92521 Nmri&y CMu, France 


1“ AUSTRALIAN FORESTRY -| 
INVESTMENT 


Qualified agents are sought to 
represent this first dass, long 
term Australian Forestry Invest- 
ment opportunity. Capitol guar- 
antes plus substantial income 
make this a very attractive in- 
vestment to sell. The structure of 
the investment is in the form of a 
Unit Trust so intermediaries must 
be qualified. 


Home apply Bax No. 034160, IHT 63, 
Lang Acre WC2E 9JH London, UJC 


WE BELIEVE CONTAINERS 
BELONG IN YOUR 
INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO 



Tel. 01/219 81 11 


ThefulJy integrated business 
services in the center of 


Zurich - Switzerland 


offers Offices/ Conference 
Rocffls.Seeretarial/TransIatm 
compL Telecom-Systems; 
CwnpanyFoirnatioii/ 
Fiduciary T rartsactions 


Executive Business Services ag 

UtedHnucZI iLoempLul CH ■ IOOI Zbricti 


PRIMARY 
PERIOD 
5 YEARS 


INCREASE 

YOUR 

WORKING 

CAPITAL 

100 % 


GUARANTEED 


SECONDARY 
PERIOD 
10 YEARS 


RECEIVE 
EARNINGS OF 

280 % 

ON CASH 
INVESTED 


PROJECTED 


TERMINATION 
PERIOD 
15TH YEAR 


RETURN OF 
CASH 
INVESTED 

100 % 


* Containers are high earning, 
fully insured, tangible assets 
with a 15 year working life. 

* The Transco Group is the 
world's leader in producing the 
highest annual rental return 
with the lowest commercial risk, 
sfc 2000 serious investors have 
already purchased containers 
worth over US$35 million 
which are managed by the 
Transco Group. 

sfs These serious investors 
enjoy a secure US DOLLAR 
income from participation in 
international trade. 

*DO NOT MISS THIS 
EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY 
TO ADD CONTAINERS TO 
YOUR INVESTMENT 
PORTFOLIO. 

* For full details, without 
obligation, fill in our coupon 
today. 

TRANS 
CONTAINER 
MARKETING AG 

Gettert s trasse 18, 

CH-4052 Basel, Switzerland. 
Tel: (061) 4223.77 
Telex: 64446 taco ch 
MINIMUM US$12,000 INVESTMENT 


t INVESTMENT i 

Ull 


CONTAINER INVESTMENT • CONTAINER INVESTMENT 


Container Investment 


AN OPPORTUNITY THAT OFfiRS A HIGH INCOME PLAN 



Conlainefwortd sendees manage and operate a first class 
worldwide container leasing service. They offer you the opport- 
unity to earn a High Fixed income with security p&« many 
■other advantages. 

• A GUARANTEE OF RETURN OF CAPITAL UNDER-PINNED BY 
SECURITIES HELD IN TRUST • HIGH FIXED INCOME UP TO 17H. FBI 
ANNUM ON INVESTMENTS OF 15320 (six monthly terms 
available) • OWNERSHIP OF A FULLY INSURED FIXED ASSET 

• ALL PAYMENTS GROSS- NO WITHHOLDING OF TAX • MINIMUM 
INVESTMENT 12730 


For more delate of this investment opportunity, telephone our 
Zurich Office: W-693559. Telex; 52W7WKRCH. or send off . 
coupon ta 



_o a oi 

ctr* r 4 mnrtHN a M 


Green Line, but other parts of Bei- 
rut too,” he said. 

“We have set an example by 
pulling out of the Green Line,” Mr. 
Kanso said. “There may be some 
who do not want to follow the 
agreement like the Modem funda- 
mentalist forces. They are, howev- 
er, not strong enough to say no for 
long. But if they do, we have an 
answer for that, too.” 

Mr. Khad dam, the architect of 
the accord, said Syria would con- 
tinue its efforts until peace is re- 
stored. Details of the agreement 
have not been published. 

“Syria win help the vast majority 
of Lebanese who want peace and 
national ieooncQiatioii,” he said 
Monday. “It is encouraging to see 
that the negotiators me determined 
to achieve peace and end the state 
of war and thus close a painful 
chapter in the history of Lebanon.” 


NEW DELHI (AP) — A businessman based in New Delhi has been 
arrested on charges . of spying selling official documents to foreign 4 
countries, an Indian government spokesman said Tuesday. 

The spokesman said that Rama Swamp, a representative of Far East 
Trade Service, was arrested late Monday light and charged with selling 
military information to Taiwan, Israel, west Germany and other coun- 
tries, according to the United News of India. 

Authorities uncovered a spy ring in January tins year involving another 
New Defiri-hased businessman who aHegectfysoki classified documents 
to intelligence officials of the Soviet Un^ France, East Germany and 
Poland. 


SOva Is Asked to Form Lisbon Cabinet 


Words Fading, 
Yugoslavs Drop 
Anthem Search 


LISBON (Reuters) — Ardtal 
Cavaoo Silva, leader of the Social 
Democrats, accepted an invitation 
Tuesday from President Antfraio 
Ramalho Eanes to form Portugal's 
16th government since die 1974 
rcvahmoiL 

Mr. Cavaco Silva, 46, was named 
prime munster-designate after bis 
party’s victory over the Socialist 
Party of the outgoing prime nmns- 
ter, Mdrio Soares, in the Oct 6 
election. The two parties had been 
coalition partners in the prev i o u s 
government. 

The Social Democrats hold only 
88 of the 250 seats in pax&ament, 
and a minority government .would 
face a precarious future, pofitical' 
spokesmen said. 



Anforao Ramalbo Eanes 


Juror Seeking Monroe Inqaiiy Ousted 


Aeence France-Pretu 

BELGRADE — A 40-year 
search for a new national an- 
them for Yugoslavia has failed. 
The government is expected to 
announce shortly that the old 
pan-Serbian anthem in use cat 
official occasions will be for- 
mally adopted. 

On Monday, the parliamen- 
tary commission responsible 
for a national anthem proposed 
adopting the Serbian anthem, 
written m 1834 by Samo Toma- 
sic. saying it was unable to 
choose from several thousand 
other suggestions. 

Numerous attempts to find a 
□ew anthem in the past four 
decades have failed. The prob- 
lem was understood to be the 
government's insistence that 
Yugoslavia’s history, different 
ethnic groups, socialist system 
and non alignment policy be 
mentioned within the first 52 . 
syllables. 


* mm 


Mr H Herrog. Containerworid Ser^ces 
(Detrtschland) Gmbr*. S*?e<elcJs»,-c5se 62 
Posttach 460. CH-8034, 2u-ich. Switzerland 


Please send me detafls of your Container Investment Opportunity 

NAME 

ADDRESS „ 


- — j 


I Tel No f Business) (Private) t* 


GUARANTEED 



To: Trans Container Marketing AG 
Gellertstrasse 18. CH-4052 Basel, Switzerland. 
Please send me full details without obligation. 


I 


NAME:_... . 


A 5K qS: 

, v»G»« 


I 


4)&33 - 



I 




SAUDI ARABIAN 


NATIONAL CENTRE FOR SCIENCE 
AND TECHNOLOGY'! SANCST) 


would like to invite architectural /engineering pro- 
fessionals to plan and design some of its research 
laboratories and facilities. 


to contact: 


The Director General of Projects, 
SANCST FACILITIES DEVELOPMENT, SANCST, 


P.O. Box No. 6086, Riyadh 1 1442, 
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 
Tel.-. 478 8000 - Telex: 201590 


LONDON FINANCIAL 
BROKERAGE 
COMPANY 


We want 


Worldwide Agents 


To represent our company and 
develop business in futures 
and options. 


We offer 

Total Administration 
Sales Back-up 

Weekly Commission Payments 


We want 

Proven Sales Production 
Progressive Management 


Reply S.L. Wab-Lin 
6 Duke of York Street 
St. James’ 
London SWlY 6 LA 
TeL 03 -839 4456 


INTERNATIONAL 

OEMMOLOQICAL 

INS T I T U T E 


CERTIFICATES ACCEPTED AND 
RECOGNIZED ALL OVEH THE WORlD 



ANTWERP NEW YORK 

» 

ONE WEEK INTENSIVE 
DIAMOND AND COLORED 
STONES COURSES. 

For mate inimminan 
Schupdraat 1/7 - 2018 Anlvroni 
TaL: 03/232.07J8 Belgium 


LOS ANGELES (LAI) — Sam Cordova, the foreman of the Los 
Angeles County Grand Jury, was removed from his position as be was 
holding a press conference calling for a special prosecutor to investigate 
the-1962 death of Marilyn MonrOc -- 7 , ■ .. ~ * "" 

Authorities said Monday that the deaskm to replace Mr. Cordova was 
not directly sdaied to his action, fler death was officiaJly ruled a suidde. 

District Attomey lra Reiser said that Mr. Cordova had earlier been 
given the choice of resigning or being replabed as of Monday morning 
because grand jury members had complained that he was repeatedly 
malting unauthorized statements on them behalf. 


For the Record 


Two Sikhs abut and kffled a prominent Hindu, Yasb Pal, a member oT 
Prime Minister Rajiv GandhTs Congress (I) Party, and escaped on the 
victim’s motor scooter Tuesday, pence in Amritsar said. (AP) 


Orina and West Germany signed a metaorandiRn Tuesday in Beging to * 
1 — * 1 - electronics, machine tools and dectri- r 


establish long-term cooperation in 

cal products that will include major transfers of technology. (AFP) 
Indonesia selected a 32-year-old wonum, Pirathri Sndannono, to fly into 
orbit next year aboard the space shuttle Columbia and become Southeast 
Asia’s first astronaut, the government in Jakarta said Tuesday. (UPI) 
Pope Joint Paul H wffl make his third visit to France in September next 
ypar. Bishop Jean VUnet, the head of the French Bishops Conference said 
Tuesday in Lourdes. He said the pope would visit Lyra, Ars and Annecy 
on the three-day trip, . ' (AP) 

_ Lech Walesa is to appear before a state proseariw next week on charges 

of slander for allegedly giving false turnout figures for Poland's national 
electi ons, a n aide to the former Solidarity leader said Tuesday. (AP) 
Am atarfiock in Mexico CHy from last mouth’s earthquake, measuring 
5 J on the Richter scale, rumbled through Mexico CStyfor 25 seconds on 
Tuesday. At least 10 persons were treated for minor injuries, most of 

f Ad/ 


BOGOTA* Minister ^ 10 have resulted from panic. 

Zhao Ziyang of China met Monday 


with President Belisario 'Betancnr f /irrpotinn 
of Colombia shortly after arriving 

for a duee^y writ. It is the first A New Yorit Tunes dispatch in weekend editions on the United £. 
stage of a South American tour Nations 40th anniversary misstated the U.S. position on resolutions on r? 
whk* Mr; Zhao «, te MM. Eaa. ^Sohed 

BrazO, Argot tin a and Venezuela. self-detenninaboiL'” 


U.S. Man to Get 6-Organ Transplant 


pital said that Mr. Seal, 36, of pfc. 


, _ _ on a boy who 
intestines in an acri- 


The Associated Press 

PITTSBURGH — An operation 

to replace six abdominal organs si- Hver transplant, but that research dS.*^ I Sfi I I£? e l M 5 °^^" 
^tanemsly has shem i^sigkaUy 

from a University of Pittsburgh replace aU six organs at once, 
panel and wffl be performed on an The donor organs nmst come 
Lu^ana man as as a suitable fromonepeson of comparablesize 
donor is found, officials say. and htood type, accorSnvtol>o»^ 

Hie operation is to replace Her- tal officials. They sriditwasTEfc 
bert G. Seal’s liver, stomach, large cult to assess when the operation 
and small intestines, pancreas mid would t^ kr place. 

The hospital sp okesman tetri . . .. . — 1 — — - 

most o/ML.SearstoteS £rc i&l- An- 
removed f&ar yem ago becau^S ^yhfendia, first recipkiit of 

annpHcationsS^^S^ Sjfe 1 S^.devti^ alA, 

tis, -and daily intravenous feedmg S ? te Umveraty, re-^ 

Vmnnu 


spleen. 

It is believed that surgeons have 
never simultaneously transplan ted 
so many organs in approved snr- 
to a spokeswoman 
tu riEspyienan-Umvexaty Hospi- 
tal Of Pittsburgh, an aifilmie of the 
university. A spokesman at thehos- 


8 2 Get Human Hearts 

' Penfl ®ylvania men kept 

anve with mechanical hearts have 
recei ved transplanted human 
“Sns and doctors said both were 
m cotica] contfition Tuesday, The 


rVTEBNATIOMAL 

BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


Appears every 


WEDNESDAY 



HOTEL METROPOLE 
GENEVE . 


A PRIVILEGED PLACE • 

The only Grand Hotel located, in 
the heart of Geneva** business 
and sboppingeenter 


M Qm» Cintero] Otthu 

12U Gwnj 
TeL: 022/21L1144 
- Tek*s4ai5» 


He attempted it two ? 





1 




. alswton 
M you know 

• ““tech® 

ootnaooro. 


wtenoiwun^wttanijrtnw ^ ^y ^-WtkwnKoimpe- 


4 


ftoCOHfoiMuaueo. 


. 


'Omttn-vjUL 



C: . 1 ? 
f * ! 
■ 1 


4. : 

5. 


- ' I r ? 


i ' i V 


cif ■ 


• P 


; t 


!>!(,! 


li 


% -1 


U 

«ll 


) i i 

" t 


cj? 




r 




**»•>«*, U N 


• - * 


t?.-’ 



fjil ' d 'nCh«,» 


• ^’Vv^lp 


Businessman f * 

- • _ rV^fcrk 

... . „ ejjl dnJ% 


__ -.,• - — *ubi 

■'*££**: 
-:. ^O.'SCaL- 



Vnionio Ranaftofc 


: M^nme 


_ ■.'.: : -ina ol *. 
■■..“‘in'SDaufc 
.'.. r>ssssiam 


• -r-aslfe .Catos 
. fiduitoc 
«. :c -.2 hid eafe 1 * 
.-,• i d Maafor 

r; vjitensnjB: 


r! 


•i I 


BE 




,. 0 ^4 ‘ 

• •* 


an 


Transp 


■ a* 


p* 


-•-ft*' 
*...- -&*?!*&* 

••••■' V- 
-■-* -:. 


-c i .• 



-sc>4i *ir 

• ; 

V.-" 




f? 




»***,*' 


v** 






are sitting 
in the storeroom in Sweden. 



for them? 


crying 


Marketing products internationally 
is anything but child’s play. 



it' • ■ v .' . •-■*-. 
:**■■’ >■•'•* ■'■?■'• 


peratihg'hr Several countries 
demands a system that lets you 
know exactly what’s happening in 
each location. 

At all times. 


orders and review stock country 
by country - while still on the 
phone with the customer. 


Whether you’re shipping toy 
ducks, or any other product 
around the world. 


Lose track of consumer demand 
and company supply in any one 
country and you risk losing out 
on the business. 


IBS specialists can develop the 
right management systems for 
any company and its subsidiaries, 
linking each location, via mini- 
computers for example, to 
International Business Services. 


T„ 


o find out how International 
Business Services can help your 
company increase operational 
efficiency, send us the coupon 
below, or phone direct. 


International Business Services 
- from IBM - have the answer. 
Providing worldwide data systems 
that can connect all your offices, 
factories and distribution outlets. 


Making it easy for our toy 
company to know when the time is 
right to send those Swedish ducks 
south to meet rising demand on 
Swiss lakes or Spanish beaches. 


Because inefficient informa- 
tion systems may hurt your 
business. 

Which can cost you money. 


And that’s a 


W> 


And offering universal 
applications software that will 
make every market feel as familiar 
as home territory. . 


hat’s more, all company staff 
can share the same flexible 
software - Application System - 
(just one of the many products 
available from IBS), enabling 
everyone to work in his own 
national language. 


E 


or example, we can help a 
Swedish toy manufacturer send 
surplus rubber ducks winging 
across Europe towards more 
profitable southern markets. 


Production planning becomes 
more efficient, too. 

With headquarters and all 
subsidiaries using the same system, 
sharing the same information. 


crying 

shame. = 

For further details call : 

Austria 

(» 222 ) 2010 i u. 2276/2750 

Belgium 

( 02 ) 72 H- 5 I SO 

Denmark 

( 02 ) 88 35 11 ext. 5770 

Finland 

( 00 ) . 125 - 05 - 0 ! 

France 

( 1 ) 17 70 45 (5 c\l. 6751 

Germany 

( 0711 ) **> 0 - 55.17 

Italy 

( 02 ) 6702 i-\i. 40.15 

.Motherlands 

( 070)25 51 20 

Monday 

( 02 ) 11 00 70 r«i. 518/519 

Sweden 

( 08 ) 793-4567 

Switzerland 

( 01 ) 62 70 7 U**xi. 6805 

Spain 

( 01 ) 451 - 4 UOO ext. 4547 

L'nited Kingdom ( 01 ) 747-0747 

Or write to : 


1 Information Network Services - Europe. Atcnur 


~l 


1050 Brunei*, Belgium. 
Name : 


Company 
Pii-iiion : 

Address: — 


By providing aii international 
on-line order system that lets 
headquarter’s personnel book 


. All contributing to tighter 
control over stock levels and 
lower administrative costs. 


Tel.:. 


m 1 

J 


IBS offerings are provided by 
Information Network Services from IBM. 


’’TS" 


... ~j 












n 



L 

i ...... . l ... . ; •- 




* 1 Vi. = i-..-. . W - r •** 



Former Aide 
To Guru 
Is Arrested 
In Poisoning 

Complied by Our $lafi From Dispatches 

KARLSRUHE, West Germany 
— The former chief aide to Bhag- 
wan Shree Rajneesh. the leader of a 
religious commune in Oregon, has 
been arrested on a U.5. warrant 
charging her and two associates 
with twice attempting to murder 
Mr. Rajneesb's personal physician. 




Independents Changing TV* s Image 

Business Deals Boost Competition With U.S. Networks 


By Thomas B. Rosen sti el broadcast industry wiU not bring tainment Co., only days after he 

navi A r«v\V about J an immediate fourth net* had been rebuffed baa attempted 

. . , , _ _ . work," said Alfred Masini one of takeover of CBS. His Atlanta sta- 

rnc Awrcrcc ti, the new national programmers, lion. WTBS. reaches a national au- 

Makeoeace” law month Qlv few W 1 * to 00111101 programming Until now, mdependent stations 

Other than the network It opens a have survived through the concept 
^y. ho^uUy, for more people w ol fwuaar programming, showing 
LTiS w ** creative and bring something "MASH reruns, for example, 
“ ds* unfc fore.” rrhaelhenerwoSarnewssh™: 

The reduction in network dorm- or Humphrey Bogart movies while 
f’wnrtfW nance of television began in the late the networks show prime-time se- 
S!L a cro £* Jaw a bu ^?! 1970s. but gained momentum this ries. 

ronmnee between the stars of the w { ien a senes Q f billion-dol- To many, the Tribune Co.’s and 

t . , . ... lar business deals created three new Mr. Murdoch's purchases were es- 

TO those WHO work in television, rnmnnw nnn'm nedallv •araifiram twine, fhm.' 


Ma Anand Sheela 


1970s, but gained momentum this ries. 

spring when a series of bHUon-dol- To many, the Tribune Co.’s and 
lar business deals created three new Mr. Murdoch's purchases were es- 
corporate powers. pedally significant because they 


tvu.ivajnresns personal pnysician. merIv kn 0WI1 as George Meredith, corporate powers. peaaliy significant because they 

a West German prosecutor said became mvelv ill and required die riiow was a rignof an In March, American Broadcast- combined a program producer with 

Tuesday. hospital treatment after the second SSJ 01 ^. change “ e ing Cos* fearing a hostile takeover, a major group of independent sta- 

Ma Anand Sheela. 3t»: Ma •«- o,: — The weekly prune- nine senes was engineered a friendly, S3.5-billioa lions for the first tune. 


Sh M n a Anand Sheeb. 36: Ma 

s hanu Badhra, 40. an Australian. ^ l0 Mr. Bauer, 

and Ma Anand Puja, 38. an Amen- rh* nms «n.iSr said the women 


The weekly prime-time series was 
Dot broadcast on one of three na- 


takeover of itself by Capital Cities 


dona! networks, ABC, CBS or communications. 


ana wia Anana nn* an Amen- ^ proscculor said the women ™ “ 

can. were anested Monday night at hiw feared Mr Devarai was NBC - instead, it premiered on 
a Black Forest guesthouse, said the rrv : y np to ea j influence over I ? ore t * I ? n ^9 independent wlevt- 

prosecutor. Ernst Bauer of Baden- Rajneesh and suDolam Mrs *’ on sla ^ oris ^ m ^ 0T ® D 'es. 
Wurnemberg. ctaStSSSm: After 40 years of dominating the 

Mrs. Sheela was known as Sheela spokesman in 9“ networks are losing 

Bemsuel before joining the church. ^ ^ ^ai UsShorities had dominance over what gets 
Miss Badrba is the fonner Cather- 
ine Jane Elsea. and Miss Pufa the 


By using their stations in tbs. 
three major television markets as a 



rsasssrs. 


A few weeks later, Rupen Mur- base, the theory goes. Mr. Turner 
doch, the international publisher or Mr. Murdoch would have 


sion stations in major u.^. aues^ w j, 0 ^ jie sole owner of enough momentum to persuade 

After 40 years of dominating the 20th Century Fox, borrowed SI. 9 other independent stations to buy 
medium, the networks are losing bmi M t0 buy Metromedia, the na- their show, turning independent 
theu dominance over what gets tfon's largest chain of independent stations into a loosely affiliated 
aired on national television. TV statics. fourth network. 

Independent stations, which his- Ten days after the Murdoch-Me- Leading independents have been 


wuss uaarna is me tanner earner- ^ ^ women be extra- U * 2UU “*“ yy stations. f< 

me Jane Elsea, and Miss Pufa the ^ lhat ^ were j^g Independent stations, which his- Ten days after the Murdoch-Me- 
fonner Diane Onang. held pending court hearings on the toricaily have been the medium’s tromedia deal, the Chicago Tribune w 

Mr. Bauer said the guesthouse request. Mr. Bauer said the proce- second-class citizens because they Co. became the nation’s fourth- a 

was occupied by about 20 Former dure would take about two months. were nnaffiliaied with any of the largest television company in terms a; 

Rajneesh advisers who left his Ore- Mrs. Sheela is among seven se- three networks, are trying to dis- of potential audience when it w 


held pending court hirings on the toricaily have been the medium’s tromedia deal, the Chicago Tribune wary of trying to do too much, too 
request. Mr. Bauer said the proce- second-class citizens because they Co. became the nation’s fourth- soon. But the new programmers 


BAY AREA WASHOUT — Fewer than one-quarter of the 1 10 
attempted to become the largest group ever to ski a 

Sen, jaAnstraH*. 

AMERICAN TOPICS 


. _ . _ f _ ntly do intend to compete 

Rajneesh advisers who left his Ore- Mrs. Sheela is among seven se- three networks, are trying to dis- of potential audience when it where the networks’ grip is weak- 

gon commune in September after ni 0 r aides charged in the United card . program schedules that are bought KTLA (Channel 5) in Los est 

Mr. Rajneesh denounce*! them Stales on Monday together with dominated by network reruns and Angdes for a record price of $510 The Tribune Co. has launched an 

Mr. Rajneesh is the spiritual leader Mr. Rajneesh with criminal viola- oW nvovies. million. The deal gave ihe Tribune effort called Inday. a project offer- 

of a sect that claims half a million pons of U.S. immigration laws. Under powerful and innovative Co. stations in the three major TV ing independents a daily two- hour 
followers around the world. Mr. Rajneesh was arraigned new ownership, many of these sta- markets — New York, Los Angeles block of four or iginal news and 


Mr. Rajneesh is the spiritual leader Mr. Rajneesh with cr imin al viola' 
of a sect that claims half a million |j ons 0 f UA immi gration Jaws, 
followers around the world. Mr. Raineesh was arraisnec 


ins of U.S. immigration laws. under powemn ana innovative 
Mr. Rajneesh was arraigned new ownership, many of these sta- 


Mr. Bauer said the three women Monday on 35 alleged immigration dons have beat broadcasting origj- and Chicago. WGN in Chicago is a feature mii gayint* shows. Inday ai- 
fiad been sought under S U.S. war- violations. nnl nroerams and, some TV execu- “sunerstation** that readies a na- ha« cut 


nal programs and. some TV execu- “superstation*’ that reaches a na- 


if convicted of all federal tives believe, may even be inching tionwide audience over cable, 
arges, Mr. Rajneesh faces a max- toward forming a fourth national Last month, Ted Turner, an en- 


The doctor. Swai Devaraj, for- 5350.000 fine. 


Rajneesh faces a max- toward forming a fourth national 
years in prison and a network. 

(AP, Reuters) The changes occurring in the 


ready has sagned up 96 indepen- 
dent stations. 

Independents also have been 


trepneneur in cable television, bid considering weekday childr en's 
SI 3 billion for MGM-UA Enter- programming. 

Last month, four new syndicated 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

FRANCO 

BRITANNIC 

TAX FREE CARS 

ROLLS ROYCE 
BENTLEY 

JAGUAR 

ROVER 

RANGE & LAND ROVER 
European delivery 

21 Ave Kleber 
75116 PARIS 
(1) 4757 5060 
Telex: 620 420 

TRASCO 

INTERNATIONAL 

LHD. M crodn To* Ftm 
U mousmcs 36 " & M" 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

(Continued From Back Page) 


BOOKS 


AUTOS TAX FREE | LOW COST FLIGHTS 


TRANSCO 

THE UUtGEST SHOWROOM 
AND STOCK IN EUROPE 
Koaong a oaretoit stock of more than 
300 braid now can of all European + 
JcptmsB mri u H coirpatMly priced 
Tax Ini « !« ■ diip i img intm uiw. 


1CSANDAIR 
LAST MINUTE FARE 
ruervaiion authorncad vnrtwt 
3 days prior to departure 

UNIQUE PRICE 


EDUCATION 

DO YOU HAVE 
TE&IAGERS 

with 

a ipirit of adverture, who muid profit 


from a % 6 or 9month rtudy and icAng 
program in the M ufcnw wd 



SaKlWroSWtoidogM NEW YORK. WASHINGTON IBWIJ 1 H17AT TH CEWirVC 

Treraca SA 95 NaartWaan, CHICAGO or DETROIT 1 group of ygyng peryle on dyWrt- 1 HEALTH SERVICES 

2030 Antwera. Beiaiwn from Lnonbourg ^ . , 


2030 
Tel 323/M 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTLDSJVERY 

We keep o large tied* a5 
mast ear brands 
Tek 02/648 55 13 
Tefan 65658 
42 rue Lera. 

1050 BruaeJi. 

OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 

Since 1972, expernneed oar trader fer 


m way - td 
(DM499, 


Armoured cm and (moraines Mercedes fW ^ BMVV f^or. 1m- 
Coad> built core medat# deTiwery. knport/export. US. 

Other mdw & exotics DO 1 " & »^ppmq for tourist and 


DOT & EPA, dipping for tourist and 
dealer'. Ooeonwide Molars GmbH. 
TersteegeraJr. 8, 4 Oueueldorf. W. 
Germany (3J 211434646. lU 8587374. 


Over 100 units in stock 
Wodi wide delivery 
Direct from source 
D.OT. & LPA 

NEW MERCEDES 

- ... . PORSCHE FROM STOCK 

Best service, shipping in s urance. 

RUTE INC 

TAUNUSSIR. IX «X» FRANKFURT 
W Germ., tol (0)69^32351. 4x411559 


(5FR 449, FFR 1590] 

Round Trip (7-21 days) 
about USS 390 [DM 999) 
(BFR 19,980, SFR 899, fTR 3290) 

For further information end reservation 
ad IGELANDAK 
Fiankfurt 069} 29 99 78 

Brusseb (02) 218 0680 

Luxemburg 4/98 2470 

Zurich pi) 363 0000 

Parrs P) 47 42 52 26 

HOLIDAYS* TRAVEL 


PORTUGAL 

7 DAYS INCLUSIVE TOURS 

FROM LONDON TO: 


turn. For man i n formation, contact: 

Vela Dora, IkL 3228 Cody Road 
Suite 205, Columbus. GA 37904 US 
(404) 561-1178 


xi: STRESS AND TB«ON. Iboaver with 
ad the BaadentU Stress Management 
USA Pr o gramme at tranquil Entoo Hofl, 
Enioft near Godahnna. Sumy. GUB 
5AL Tet (042-879) 


Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

bifhe 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Phone: GeA your local IHT representative with your text. You 
will be i n/ onnc d of the oast immediately, and once prepayment is 
mode your ad wiB appear within 48 holn. 

Cart: The basic rate is 19.80 per See per day + loed taxes. There are 
25 letters, signs ad spaces in the first tne aid 36 in the falow t nq Enel. 
Minrmxn space is 2 Enejk. No abbreviations accepted. 

Credit Cards: American Express, Diner’s dub, Eurocord, M aster 
Card, Access and Visa. 


children's series premiered, includ- 
ing shows from the Tribune Co. 
and Group W Productions. Taft 
Broadcasting, which owns the 
World vision syndication company, 
also owns the Hanna-Barbera ani- 
mation studio. 

For five years, the Tribune Co. 
has also offered half-hour national 
news programs called Independent 
Network News. The prime-time 
version of the syndicated show is 
aired on 93 stations and a daytime 
broadcast is on 64. 

Network executives confidently 
said that independents would be 
disappointed if they try to compete 
'regularly in prime time. 

David Poltrack, vice president of 
research at CBS Broadcast Group, 
said: "Switching to direct competi- 
tion with the networks in prime 
time on a regular basis just doesn't 
make business sense. You can 
make more money with low-cost 

prog ramming" 

This requires smaller audience 
shares to break even, the strategy of 
counterprogramming. 


Middle Age Looms 
For Baby Boomers 

Sometime during the next few 
months the vanguard of lhat 
postwar phenomenon known as 
the baby boom will nun 40. As 
the Los Angeles Times put it, 
"Middle age will have come at 
last to the unwieldy bunch that 
so noisily redefined youth in the 
1960s." 

As the baby boomers climb 
toward the summit of the tradi- 
tional corporate-jobs pyramid 
from the broad base into which 
they crowded a decade ago; they 
may find promotions out of 
reach. 

The boomers have had enor- 
mous impact on evoy age brack- 
et they passed through. In the 
1950s, taxpayers had to finance 
thousands of extra classrooms. 
In the 1970s, the boomers 
flooded the labor market just as 
inflation and stagnation hit the 
economy, aggravating unem- 
ployment. 

The current restructuring of 
LLS- industry — fewer executives 
but more experts and profession- 
als, and more responsibility at 
lower levels — is expected to ease 
the boomers' lot. Even so. too 
many midlevel executives wifi be 
competing for too few high-level 
positions. 

Short Takes 

Grosstnger’s, the resort found- 
ed in 1914 in New York’s Cats- 


kill Mountains, is to be sold to a 
syndicate that says it wants to 
draw a younger crowd. It may set 
up a gourmet dining room for 
weight watchers — at a resort 
ihar js known for its enormous, 
rich meals. Said Sherman Green- 
berg, a plastics salesman from 
Parsippany, New Jersey, as be 
emerged from the customary 
five-course lunch, “They want a 
diet dinmg room — they’ll get 
about two people." 

President Ronald Reagan, 
campaigning for the pending 
deficit reduction bill in Milwau- 
kee. said it will mandate M a bal- 
anced budget by 19SQ — or 1990. 
I'm sony, 1980’s kind of Freud- 
ian with me; something hap- 
pened then, too.” 

Sol M. Linovritz, a lawyer who 
performed several diplomatic 
missions for Democratic presi- 
dents. recounts in his memoir, 
“The Making of a Public Man,” 
that when he was on the French 
Riviera during the Johnson ad- . 
.ministration in 1966 and was 
told by his concierge that the 
White House was calling, he 
asked, “Who in the White 
House?" The reply was an icy, 
“Monsieur, when the White 
House calls, one. does not ask 
who is calling.'' Three presidents 
later, in the Carter administra- 
tion, he was with Attorney Gen- 
eral Griffin B. Bell when a mes- 
sage arrived that “the White 
House is calling.” Mr. Bell re- 
plied, “I don’t talk to buildings.*’ 


Overheard on Manhattan’s 
Madison Avenue by Philip H. 
Cohen, a reader of The New 
York Tones: Woman to bus driv- 
er: “Does this bus go to the 
Cloisters?" Driver: "Yes, 
Ma'am.” Woman : “By the way, 
what are the Cloisters?” Driver: 
“They’re where this bus goes to.” 


Hotshot Wordsmith 
Knows His Onions 

David Gurainick, editor in 
chief of Webster’s New World 
Dictionary, has accumulated a 
total of 14JJOO Americanisms. 
An Americanism, according to 
this Webster’s, is “a. word, 
phrase, or usage originating in, 
or peculiar to. American En- 
glish." 

A sampling of Mr. Gnralnick’s 

collection: 

Champ, geek, snafu, beeline, 
think tank, clipboard, movie, 
sidewalk, freight car. French 
toast, Canadian bacon, China- 
town, English muffin, chow 
mein, chicken k la king, clover- 
leaf. coffee table, pre-empt, pay- 
check, rip-roaring, teddy bem; - 
int ernal revenue, sideburns, let- 
lerman. jigsaw, barbecue, jumbo, 
baby-sitter, lacrosse, roughneck, 
floozy, Mickey Mouse; smog, 
catnap, coyote, crackerjack, cau- 
cus. 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


Trace London LhL 

6547 Park Lane, London W.l. 

Smeertond-UK-W. Garmany 


fSUUUO 

MERCEDES BBNZ - JAGUAR 
PORSCHE - ROUS-ROYCE 
BMW - VOLVO - SAAB 
CITROEN - PEUGEOT 
Now and wwd 


L* * ' rXi ?• vi 


TRADING B.V. 

Worldwide automotive exporton 

P.O. Box 4705. 6085 ZG Hom/Hatond 
Tlx 36846 Fofcn NL Fax.NL 4758-2675 
Tet Holland 4758-2777 


EUROPORT TAX 




Cat at wri* fot free affiba. 
Bn 12011 

RoMw ita n Airport, Hoflcnd 
TdtO|lW23&77 

Telex 2507) ffCAR NL 


JAGUAR, ROVBL MBtCEDB 
BMW, SAAB, VOLVO, POfiSO* 
Bert prices. Cal Haflond 

VAN LAARHOVEN B.V. 

PO Bax 2178, 5600 CD Bmfxnmn 
40-424055, Tlx: 51213 HBLA NL 




LOW COST FLIGHTS 


TO LAX/5FO daSy departure from 
Europe irtwn S489. Abo 1 w ay 8. 
other US dertitiotions. Pern 422S 9290 


HEAD OFFICE 


Prate (For dasafad adyb 
<7-4? -46-00. 

EUROPE 

A ms terdam: 26-36-15. 
AlbMW 361-8397/360-2421 . 
Brussels: 343-1899. 
Copenhagen; <01 >329440. 
Frankfurt: (069) 72-67-55. 
Lausanne: 29-58-94. 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/66-2544. 
London: (PI) 8364802. 
MaUb 4552891/4553306. 
MiW (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (02) 41 29 S3. 
Roma: 679-3437. 

Sweden: (08) 7569229. 

Tel Aviv: 03455 5W. 
Vienna: Contort Frankfurt. 

UNITBI STATES 

New Yotfc (212) 752-3890. 
Wert Coart: (415) 3628339. 

SOOTH AFRICA 

B rycxn sl m 421599. 


LATIN AMERICA 


Buenos Aim: 41 40 31 
P*pt312) 

Caracas: 33 1454 
Gvayaqafl: 51 45 05 
Uma: 417 852 
Panama: 69 05 T1 
San Jmo: 22-1055 
Santiago: 6961 555 
Sew Paulo: 852 1893 

MIPPLEEAST 

Bofcnrtre 246303. 

Kuwmk 5614485. 
lobfuton: 341 457/8/9. 
Qatar. 416535. 

SaucE Andwa: 

Jeddrfe 667-1500. 

U-Ai: Dubai 224161. 

BAR EAST 

Bangkok: 39086-57. 

Hoog Kang: 5213671. 
J deslui 510092. 

ManBta 817 07 49. 

Snook 73S 87 73. 

Ski fl opmec 222-2725. 
Taiwan: 732 44 25/9. 

Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

J Wrt h n u iiie u 6908231 
Sydney: 929 56 39, 957 43 20. 
Perth: 328 98 33. 

Paddtogton, O to e ns ti d. 

369 34 53. 


By John J. Goldman ican passengers. Mr. Klinghoffer that they contained a bomb. The 
Las Angeles Tones Sendee was left behind on a lower level Associated Press 1 reported from 
NEW YORK — Fighting back when his wife was unable to ma- Rome, 
tears, the widow of Leon Klingh- neuver his wheelchair up the stairs. La Stampa of Turin and other 

offer has broken her public silence "That was the last time I saw my newspapers repotted that die crew 

to tell how she begged Palestinian husband," Mrs. Klinghoffer said members threw slot machines, rou- 
terrorists to allow her to remain Monday at a news conference, her Iette wheels and other equipment 
alongside her husband in his wheel- first since her 69-year-dd husband worth more than S300.000 into the 
chair before he was kjficd. was shot to death on OcL 8. Mediterranean Sea off Greece on 

Fl ^dthcbOT« WCTC fosKdaf- 

Achffle L&uro with the other Amer- The gambling equipment had 

ek & - a i_-- . , , , been loaded during a stop in Cy- 

She said the hijackers had been pnis^nd was intended for use by 

Soviet Stores 

ocauto me, it could be my hus- vember to South Africa, La Stampa 
1YF band? Of course, it was.” ■ 

i T01*V"0 She said she learned her husband Crew members noticed that the 

/ was dead after the hijackers ap- 21 boxes lacked the necessary doc- 

U Q A - peared fashionably dressed and un- uments and rather than risk open- 

• \Jm Asserts ^ >oct *** *** ing them, they tossed them over- 

When I learned the terrorists were board. Room’s B Messaggero yajd . 


m- - ' W- - ; 





Soviet Stores 
Nerve Gas, 
U.S. Asserts 




ESCORTS & GUIDES ! ESCORTS & 



ESCOR1 

'S & GUIDES | 

| ESCORTS & 

SlwfU 

ESCORTS & 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SERVICE 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New Yort 
330 W. 56*1 S»„ N.Y.C 1W19 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR QtHXT CARDS AND 
O-'QO A CCEP i m 
Private Membwrshipi Avertable 

This a w u ri^w iiml ng sendee has 
been featured as iM tap A mast 
•xdusna Escort Sarvicu by 
USA A international nows mma 
fndwfiag radio and TV. 


* USA 6 TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERtCAN 


EVERYWHERE YOU ARE OR GOL- 

1-813-921-7946 

CoU free from U5 j 1800-237-0892 
Call Free from Borate 1800-2828892. 
LonreB Eurtonn wdeotnes you badd 


NEW YORK CITY 

EXCURSIONS 

ESCORT SBMCE 
EXQU51VE & EXPENSIVE 
7 DAYS - MAJOR CARDS 

[212) 517-7803 


PARLIAMENT 

ESCORT SERVICE 

New York 21 2-51 7-81 21 
Chicago 312-787-9059 

Major audit cards accepted 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort Service. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


LONDON 

P ortn wn Escort Agency 

tO CUtern Stmt, 
London W 

let 486 3724 or 486 MSB 
AJ major a«dit cards accepted 


* LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SERVICE 
402 0105 or 499 2225 


AR1STOCATS 

London Escort Sen dee 
128 Wfigmore Sr, London W.T. 
AB raojor Cradt Cads Aa espied 
Tet 437 <7 41 / 4742 
12 noon - mi cteg ht 


CAPRJCE-NY 

SCOUT SBtVKE IN NEW YORK 
TEL- 212-737 3291. 


ZURICH 

AUEXIS ESCORT SBtVKZ 
TEL: 01/47 55 82 


HEATHROW 

* London Escort Agency* 

01-609 2*70 


ZUR1CH-GENEVA 

GMOBTS ESCORT SERVICE. 
TEL: 01/ 363 08 64 -022/3441 86 


By Michael Weisskopf hospital to learn ! 

Washington Post Service there,” she Said. 

WASHINGTON — The De- anyinfonnatiaEL 
fense Department, trying to bolster She then ran U 


leaving the ship, I ran down to the No explosives were found on the 
hospital to learn he had never been ship, and the cruise ended on 
there,” she said. “I couldn't elicit schedule Monday in Genoa. 


Marilyn Klinghoffer 


DUeSSEUXNff -COLOGNE -BONN- 
Essun. Pan's Escort & travel lerviee. 
AD credit axth. 0211-39 50 66 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

GUUX 5SV1CE ten 5pm 
SOnBtDAM 10) 10-2541S 
THE HAGUE (0) 70-60 79 S 


GGNEVA + BEAUTY* 

ESCORT SBWTCt 022/29 51 30 


ZURICH 

Caroline Escort Setvko 
Tab 01/252 61 74 




ESCORT SERVICE 

10 KENSINGTON CHURCH ST, W8 
TO: 937 9136 OR 937 9133 
Ail major a u di t Cantu accepted. 



DIANA ESCORT SBW1C6 London / 
Heathrow / Gotwid. Pirate m UK 
01-381-0608. 


* JASMINE ^ 

AMSTERDAM ESCORT SERVICE 
020-36*655 


** ZURICH 558720 ** 

Ma tt Tauten Guide Sarvicu 


VIENNA ESCORT - AGENCY 
IBa 37 52 39 




fense Department, trying to bolster She then ran to the bridge. “The 

its care in Congress for a new gen- captain appeared to be waiting for Ohrfrln « T J • 

eration of chemical weapons, has me when I reached the bridge, ^TuJlUt iXufiDUC lGGCIWlt* OnJliuCUStil 

issued an intelligence report assert- where I learned the fate of my hus- r ir » j T7 ' , __ _ 

ing thai the Soviet Union has band.” IS IflGTKQCl After XOCttuY P0ZXL j€WS 

stocked nerve gas ax 32 Eastern “I believe my husband’s death u „ • J , 


European rites. 


has made a 


y husband’s death 
ference,” she said. 


New York Times Service 


The document also said that tire' 


TIm report, released Monday by “For the first time, we all realize ROME— 1 Pope John Paul D met church “deplores thehatreds^th2f‘ 
the Defense Intelligence Agency, this can happen to anyone, any- Mo “ fla y « group of Jews to persecutions and displays erf antw" 
died a 26- percent increase in Sovi- where and at any time. With this “•“’rate the 20th anniversary of a Semi Lis m directed against : the ; . 
et nerve gas depots since 1980 and realization, I appeal toallpeopleof if c f Dd , Cotmcfl doanneaL Jews,” and referred to rtetepteg 
said that Moscow was researching good will to close ranks to dimi- ravdunomzed Roman Catfao- tty’s “common patrimeary witfi the 
new chemical agents capable of nate the scomge of terr o rism from - tcac umg on Judaism. The meet- Jews.” ~-t£ 

penetrating protective gear issued our lives. It is essential all of us rag pame. anud signs of difficulty in In a coavetsatitm' 
to U.S. troops. - 4 . . become soldiers in the battle wtawo*. j the pope. Rabbi Mordecar wS?: 

Although the Reagan arimm i s - against terrorism." ^ Monday the man, the chairman of the Inteii?" 

tration bad persuaded Congress ■ Bomb Feared on Strip uonal Jewish Committee on fine* 

SSfSiSS^SSSSafe. 

don of chemical we^ons>; 16 Cathie Church’s view andiS’olutio^SJSSf 


years, the House Appropriations ^ 

Committee last week voted down a toss^ ll^es of gamWmg equip- hddi 
5164-million request to modernize meat onboard because of fears Jesus. 


MBS SCANtWAVU 
COPBWAGW E503CT SERVICE 
Tet 01-54 17 06 Go* Ccnb 


** GENEVApHRST ** 
tecort S*rvi(«. Tel: 022/32 34 18 
+ Weekend + Travel 


O&ffiVA ESCORT 
SaVKZ. Tel: 46 11 58 


*»****GMVA BEST 

ESCORT SERVICE. 022 / 86 15 95 


LONDON TOR ESCORT SERVICE 
Heathrow. American Expos. 352 8343 


GeevA-ma* escort ssivke 

Tel: 36 29 32 

NEW YORK. MIA, Renee 6 Gobnek 
Escort Service. 212-22MSU Major 
credo mrds. 


the obsolete U^. stockpile. 

A major battle on the controver- 
sial issue is expected when the ap- 
propriations bill comes up for con- 
sideration in the full House, 
possibly this week. 

The administration has argued 
that an obsolete and dangerous 
UJS. chemical arsenal leaves North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization 
troops in Europe unable to deter an 
attack by the Soviet Union, whose 
inventory is estimated to be 10 
time s laiger. The average age of the 
U.S. munitions is 26 years, and 
Pentagon authorities said only 10 
percent of die chemical arsenal was 
militarily usable. 

Congressional opponents who 
believe the U.S. inventory is suffi- 
cient to deter a Soviet attack in 
Europe said the report appeared to 
exaggerate Soviet strength in chcm- 

&COfl ^ A map of Europe displayed in 
BVTAL Gun* 5«rv*ce, Tri: 01-243 the report showed 32 Soviet chemi- 


cal weapons sites spread through- 
out the Warsaw Fact nations, with 
the heaviest concentration in East 
Germany and Czechoslovakia, 
London Gouclscoer Servk*. dose to their common borders with 
Tel: 37o 7151. West Germany. 


t en c haiactenzed by 1 both, misunt 
derstanding and peasecutKaC*.'" 



_____ . . ■ 

Douglas-Home, London Editor, Die^ S' 

LONDON — Clari^Dougbs- . fSl Sited 

Home, 48, editor of The Tunes of ogn editor before becomiiig deputy withom blocked anaiei- 

London, died Tuesday of cancer, editor in 1981. W 

Mr. Douglas-Home, nephew of During his editoridiip of The 
the former Conservative prime Times, fhe DaDer's moi 


specially for .hfr 

intinK and draw- 


Home, 48, editor of The Times of ogn editor before becomiiig deputy wi thorn u 

London, died Tuesday of cancer, editor in 1981. W 

Mr. Douglas-Home, nephew of During his editorship of The 
the former Conservative prime . Times, tiiepaper's^^^itionrose plane at td«d 

minister. Sir Alec Douglas-Home, from under 300,000 to its present - .Carf Mario ft-™' an ' If' 

became editor in 1982 after the figure of nearly 500,000. Mr.* Doug- a£w2 * 

publisher, Rupert Murdoch, dis- las-Home was also, al the helm ooraiv 

missed Harold Evans. . when The Tunes celebrated iS 

During his long illness, Mr. 200th anmversaiy last war. ' ^ '•£ 

Douglas-Home ran the newspaper • He staunchly dtfended thi- 
from his hospita! bed. He hdd edi- per* s in 

tonal conferences by interoom un- Murdoch’s ownerahro wrS: >. 

til less than two weeks ago. ‘ - - ™*** ; M*aa t 61, a m«n- 

“We always used to say that he aev^hesatote to publish T? “l???® 1 Commomst Par- 

was OK from the neck up," said “^fhe damaging to the Cettiral Committee and a top 

Sn Webb? the deputy ^ ^ 

“He was the most positive man “duave statement ^ Pr avda reported Monday. 

with a. serious, fllhesstoatlhave ■ 

ever known." > * bab T b Y.*« rihar-- fnimesa. SnriM ' 

The newspaper's staff observed . Pirtmtn .v 
onermniite’s^enee cmtbe ^ forcedtQ ' ' 

a3 floor, a ^jokesman for the paper theaffarr. ... .Jttjm-lta! fcviet Umoff; 

said, II Other deaths: . and lndcm ^a signed a protocol 

Mr, Dou^as-Home started ,1ns ’ Dr. Andreas Roland Guenttfe, ^ 

career at The Times as militaiy 46.a cardiologist at EmoInSwS and SdaSc^^^ 011 ^ 


ever known," . 

The newspaper’s staff observed 
oneinmmeVsfleaee on the editori- 
al floor, a spokesman for the paper 
said. 

Mr. Douglas-Home started .bis 
career nt The Times as military 


sgaBP"' 


r jl v , ^‘j^saoaeited Prvis 

— The Soviet Unioar 
and Indonesia signed a protocol 






















































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1985 


“.V. •> •£■ - 1 ■ 

*» - i ~ 


.zzmi 

. • ' V- ; ;~}C '■ 


Sir-*.-. • 

M :, >‘ 


OPICS 




r ‘ ? 'kird 




l«V ‘•tt 



New Assertiveness of Maoris Disturbs New ZeaUz 





President Marcos jogging Tuesday in Mstnibkl 


"tn-i.T: 





: .h rjlwiL % 

■l.'.oo 


Healthy, Despite Reports He h III . 

CompiUdby Oar Staff From Dapahba • 

WASHINGTON . — Senator Pan] Laxalt of Nevada, who visited 
‘the Philippines in midTOctober as President Ronald Reagan's person- 
.al emissary, says President Ferdinand E. Marcos appears healthy, 
•despite reports that the Hfipino leader is tenobuBy DL 

Mr. Laxalt said Meat day that Mr. Marcos acknowledged having 

be was 


. “some old war wounds and residual problems' from it," 1 
getting along just fine.** 

. “1 came in theme fully prepared to see someone who was near dead 
•and he was anything but.” Mr. Laxalt said. 

. , ?r — \ Is Manila, government television showed Mr. Marcos jogging and 

;:r‘\ Iplaying golf Tuesday. Later, breathing heavily and speaking with 

■ ls . ‘tv -effort. Kir. Marcos was shown beh^mieridewed ^. a government 
. ^ ongej.: 'reporter. ' (UP1.AP) 

- Aoniji'-. 


By Scrh Mydans 

Nfw York Tuan Srn,,/ 

' . . * WELUNGTON, New Zealand 
— The angty words arc still echo- 
ing around' New Zealand’s sur- 
prised and hurl white majority, a 
people that has prided itself on its 
policies of racial equality toward 
the indigenous Polynesian minor- 
ity, the Maori. 

“The pakcha , " said Aureta 
Poananga. a young Maori activist, 
referring to the white majority, “arc 
riffraff, the flotsam and jetsam of 
British culture.** 

They must hand leadership of 
the country back to the 12-percent 
Maori minority, she said, or “go 
back where they came from." 

Her challenge, made recently at a 
conference on colonial heritage, 
has raised the emerging debate here 
on the rote of the Maori people to a 
new pitch. It has drawn remarkably 
‘ broad support even from conserva- 
tive Maori professionals who have 
assimilated into New Zealand cul- 
ture. while arousing a bitter defense 
from while New Zealanders. • 

-- “I object strongly to bong called 
riffraff.'* L. Nelson wrote ro The 
Evening Herald. “I have no affinity 
whatever with Britain, where m\ 
ancestors came from, and strongly 
resent being told by Ms. Poananga 
where to go." 

Other letter-writers have ex- 
pressed the suddenly popular the- 
ory —strenuously denied by Maori 
scholars — that the Maori (the 
word rhymes with dowry) them- 
selves were interlopers 900 years 
ago. having massacred the oilier 
Morion inhabitants. 

Peter TapsdL a Maori who is 
New Zealand’s internal affairs 
minister, said Miss Poananga had 
voiced a truth known by many si- 
lently resentful Maori people. 

Miss Poananga said, "New Zea- 
land Europeans, and I am not say- 
ing this in a bitter way. arc peas- 
ants. That is how it is. What we 
have here is aristocratic Maoris and 
peasant Europeans. Really, that's 
the problem.'’ 


Asked about her statements, 
even Miss Poananga agreed that 
there was no likelihood of a Maori 
takeover us the short term. She 
looked to the future, pointing out 
that if current population trends 
continue the Maori will make up 
one-third of New Zealand’s popu- 
lation, now 3.2 nilbon, by the end 
of the century. 

The sharp rise in polemics is the 
latest development in what Sidney 
Moko Mead, professor of Maori 
.studies at Victoria University, calls 
a “Maori push." — an assertion of 
cultural identity and a demand for 
a broad range of rights that is tak- 
ing place today. 

The push seems to be affecting 
just about every sector of life. Mao- 
ri activists are demanding changes 
in the schools 10 include a greater 
reflection of their history and cul- 
ture. Maori students now. they say. 
must “think like a pateha," or 
white peisoa, to suoceed. 

Despite a number of success sto- 
ries and considerable integration, [ 
Maori unemployment of about 14 
percent is four times that of whites. 
The percentage of Maori srudeots 
who pass their high-school diploma 
examinations is less than half that 
of white students. 

In one of the most disturbing 
indicators. 361 of every 100,000 
.Maori people are in jail' — a rate 
more than seven times the national 
average. 

The New Zealand Maori Coun- 
cil. a government group, is de- 
manding a -share of government 
fishing levies, arguing that fishing 
grounds were traditional!) under 
tribal management. 

A rising ethnic consciousness is 
also leading to demands for more 
control over Maori arts, history 
and archeology, which activists say 
have been presented by white 
scholars as exotic and foreign, rath- 
er than as part of a living culture. 

Recent publications about the 
Maori by non-Maori writers have 
been hostSely received by activist 
groups. Even the Maori tribesmen 


who perform dance* and rituals far 
tourists have begun demanding 
more of the profits. 

The same people are criticizing 
the quality c-f such 'Mirn* souve- 
nirs as tea towels, wax figurine* 
and cushion covers, a". tr«ass-cr«> 
duoed by the paten* 

One of the most dramatic devel- 
opment* is a demand by activist 
groups for the return of some of 
their lands, which they claim under 
the 1840 treaty of Waitangi signed 
by the British. ” . 

In September, the Ansbcan 
Church ag r eed to return ic- :•*<? 
subtribes an SO-acre i 32-hectare j 
plot it had leasee fc; 2: biazkets. 
one gold sovereign, 12 ax*. lb 
adzes, 14 shirts, l-icc’.’-or. trx-sers. 
14 pounds (about 6 itiiopramsj of 
soap. 10 New TesLimer.t#. 13 pairs 
of scissors, six spaces. 17 mirrors 
20 razors, six handkerchief* and 55 
pounds of tobacco. 


The treaty of WruuiiSi. the basis 
fora century and a half e? relatively 
amicable race relations here, of- 
fered the Maori a “partnership" 
with the British. The native :nbes- 
men were promised the same rights 
and privileges a> the Eriti-sh peepfc. 
and in the years since. New Zea- 
land has seen a minimum of dis- 
crimination and a relatively cpetl 
door to Moon success :rt white sod- 

"But today's acsivUi* assert they 
Jo no: wont white scs.nsiv. which 


they say has disappointed them. 
They say they have given up some 
of their cultural values but have not 
found success among European 
New Zealanders. 

The measure of equality offered 
by New Zealand. Miss Poananga 
said in an interview, has come at 
the price of a cultural assimilation 
that she said is a form of racism. 

While 80 percent of Maori 
schoolchildren were able to speak 
their native language in 1923. fewer 
than 5 percent can today. 


**W’e arc forced to live as poke- 
has,” she said, "brown skins with 
white faces.” 

Dr. Mead described the disillu- 
sionment of the Maori people for 
whom the promise of the treaty qf 
Waitangj is fell to have faded. - 

“We’ve been colonized fur 150 
years, and we believed you. poke* 
has, when you said, give up your 
culture and you’ll have the good 
life. But then we woke up and 
found that’s not true." 


"?• 3«k. snafu, 

d'PM* 

»«£t at, f,.; 
'y-WiM haanfj. 
•".riiijjj muffa^ 
" ' ; -ra i f • 


Ethiopians Took Over Aid Tracks for Resettlement 


■“'-‘f-'ipttflBr 
">'vinng tatyfc 
- sdetart; 
~J*-Krbeau£ 

Moist z 

••• aadnjjic^ 
-U^Ss 1 

vRimimw 


licav With (k 


■ The Associated Press . !. 

". .ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — 1 
Local Ethiopian authorities com- 
qiandeered trucks from a British' 
volunteer relief agency for .a reset- 
tlement operation that apparently 
caused thousands of famine .victims 
to flee their caznp. United Nations 
officials report. • 

!. Paavo Pitkanen, a TIN official 
who inspected' the camp. at Koran, 
said Monday that two trucks of the 
Save the Children Fund were 
among five used Friday to take ' 
about 600 people from the Koran 
camp to a transit facility in the’ 
town of Dese. They were . to be . . 
resettled in southwestern Ethiopia. 


Relief officials said' rumors erf 
the impending resettlement 
prompted most of Koran's more 
than 20,000 residents to flee to the 
surrounding mountains late Thurs- 
day and early Friday.. * 

About half werebadtby Sunday, 
and relief officials k predicted that 
most of the others would retnm.in 
the next few days to the "camp, 
which is 250 miles (400 kilometers) 
north of Addis Ababa in the WoDo 
region. Local ofSaals previously 
forced residents ‘of refief camps in 
northern Ethiopia to srtuo) to their 
home areas. . ■ ’ .. 

Desmond Tayktr, awing; head of 
the UN Emergency Opezatioos Of- 


fice ip Addis Ababa, said local 
Ethiopian officials who carried out 
the resettlement operation at 
Koran had not received authoriza- 
tion from Save the Children to use 
its thicks. He said the matter was 
being discussed “on a local level." 

Save the Children’s fidd director 
in Ethiopia. David Alexander, vis- 
ited Korem on Sunday but could 
not be reached for comment. 

An official of another relief 
agency, who did not want to be 
identified, said two Save the Chil- 
dren employees were asked to drive 
the trucks and were detained brief- 
ly because they refused. 


Ethiopia's Marxist government 
has maintained that famine victims 
are cooperating voluntarily with 
the resettlement program, but crit- 
ics say the government is trying to 
reduce the peasant population in 
the north to decrease support for 
rebel movements in the area. 

Peter Sonderegger, deputy head 
of the international Committee of 
the Red Cross in Ethiopia, said his 
organization received reports that 
some people were beaten as they 
were loaded aboard the outbound 
trucks. 

Mr. Pitkanen said some of the 
people sustained bruises, but that 
there was no serious violence. 


PiageT 



IS carat sold 
Quartz 

water-resistant 



ON BUSINESS IN EGYPT... 


COME TO SHERATON. 


Come Jen minutes from the c rpc r * ‘c 
the centre of government ct 
cam:nis1rcf:on of e/hi&tcn' Corre fc z 
iuc-erO new business centre; w*tr. .vorc- 
C'ocessor one 24-hour telex Come *c 
Coiro’s ccsis of relaxation - to coerce 
ca&cncs one bars ana c dczzi.ng cr:z, 
ci fine iCocJS trerri many fencss Came to 
i he Heliopolis Shercton . where 
Egyptian hospitality com,es alive 

t.-'r’K.i 

, *\si 


The Jeweler 
you should not miss.. 

EDWARD 

JEWELS 

Via V. Veneto 187 
Tel. 49 38 09 
Roma 



(S) 


Heliopolis Sheraton 


Sheraton Hotels, Inns & Resorts Wo rldwide 

The hospitality people of ITT 

For reservations and inform, abort coil 
Cairo 665500. telex 933QCLor your nearest 
Sheraton Hotel or Reservations Office 


• «■ 




;\tu-hinsonJ^[ 

■hi 


. - " ? '-Vv -;Vi .--E- f.; ^'T* 

1 \ 

- "•>: • , r - •. 

■ Gutting b^ts WitHotit cuttir^ 
; comers is importam to success ih'^ciy 
business. But how. to achieve such a* 
goal?' ••• \ ’-Jr V ' h 

One sure way i$ to obtain a 
copy of Philips’ new publication: 
‘The Benefits of Better Lighting’. ... 

It describes how recent advan- 
ces in lighting technology can make 
■: good business sense. 

By reducing energy costs up to 
7 5%, for example, without any loss 
of light output or quality. ' ' • . 

Or cytting lamp maintenance 
costs by a faaor of five. Or how 
suitably lighted environments can 
enhance comfort, promote sales, and 
increase productivity. 


"id w. 




■ 




H'rf 




m 




Choosing the right XO is easy 
when you can afford Remy Martin. 





• r \! 












S 80* IS THE PRICE OF R »Ult- 
RIOR 10. THE PRICE OF AN XO 
COONAC MADE EJCCLL'ITVILI 
FROM DRAPES GROW* IS 
TWO BEST REGIONS - 
S<LA GRAND! AND LA fLTITF. 
CHAMPAGNE BY OFFICIAL 
btCKJLE. ONLY Sl'CH A COONAC 
MAS THE RIGHT TO BE CaLLLD A 
FINE CHAMPAGNE COGNAC. 




SS :s 


THE XO COGNAC by REMY MARTIN 

Exclusively Fine Champagne Cognac 

•\l 1.1. 1 Nil l»KI I VII PH li I IP. Till 1-1 A PH H I 1 1 I SI Will HI M.%V I HI I I K 








Ri 

thi 

lio 

lo; 


8.1 

56 


lai 

ra- 

ce 

ilt 

c*T 

A 

SI 

q> 

d< 




i'tistd Pt-js /i.-.v.-rj, 

NAIROBI — Despitr s mili lar v 
k\'up in July. Uganda ha> no; hrcr. 
able u> end its reputation as the 
Hilling fields of Africa. 

International relief agencies, 
diplomats and ihe ruling Miliiarv 
L'uunci! have reported “aire cities 
nearly every- day for die past sever- 
al weeks, including murder, rape, 
ion u re and kidnappina. 

The violence usually is carried 
i*m by bands of soldiers in the 
Ugandan .Army. aceordin 2 to the 
sources. 

Villagers disappear and human 
skeletons, often with the skulls 
showing signs of bludgeoning, have 
been found in many places 
throughout Uganda, sometimes in 
mass graves. 

“Fee uncovering of skeletons 
over the past few months tends to 
substantiate reports that there was 
a fairly high level of fallings In 
Uganda under Obote." said a 
Western diplomat based in die 
Ugandan capital of Kampala. 


President Milton Obote was 
overthrown in a military coup July 
27 by Lieutenant General Tito 
OfctfUe. 7{. now the country’s lead- 
er. Mr. Oboic is in exile in Zambia. 

"The big difference now.” the 
diplomat said. “is that the govern- 
ment is much more candid in deal- 
ing v.itl) reports of atrocities and 
has made efforts to detain soldiers 


in some cases. 


Once described by Wins ion 
Churchill as "the pearl" of .Africa." 
Uganda today is shattered after 
years of anarchy rooted in tribal, 
religious and political differences. 
Several rebel groups are involved. 
'■"J! except for the main National 
Resistance Army, the others are 
represented in General Okello’s 
ruling Military Council. 

The main war zone is in ihe 
stronghold of the National Resis- 
tance .Army, an area northwest of 
Kampala called the Lowero Trian- 
gle. 

In mid-October Jasper Moni- 


ins Mberiasi 


hi 


(Continued from Page 1) 

observers confirm opposition party 
reports that ballot" boxes were 
stuffed with votes tV r General 
Doe's party, the National Demo- 
cratic Party of Liberia. 

Mr. Hannon disqualified an 
election-night vote count made 
while observer* front the opposi- 
tion looked on. That count, inde- 
pendent observers say. gave the 
election to the Liberian Action Par- 
ty's candidate. Jackson F. Doe. 
who is no relation to the head of 
state. 

In the official count. Mr. Har- 
mon said that General Doe re- 
ceived 264.3(52 votes, or 50.° per- 
cent. Next was Jackson Doe. with 
137.270 votes, or 26.4 percent. He 
was followed by Gabriel Kpolieh 


of the Liberian Unification Pans 
with 59.965. or 11.5 percent, and 
Edward Kessetlv of the Liberian 
Unity Party with 57.443. or 11.1 
percent. 


Q Ivon Coast Vote Results 
President Felix Houphouet- 
-Boijsnv was re-elected overwhelm- 
ingly in the Ivory Coast's election 
Sunday, the Intenor Ministry said 
luesday. Reuters reported from 
Abidjan. Mr. Houphouet-Boignv 
was unopposed. 

interior Minister Leon Konan 
"Koffi said that ah but 717 of the 3.5 
million registered to vote voted for 
Mr. Hcuphouei-Boigny. and that 
those 71“ were unable "to go to ihe 
polls because they were either trav- 
eling or ill. 


mer. a correspondent of the Lon- 
don-based momhly New Africa, 
described how he first came across 
eight skeletons on a tour of Lowero 
with guerrillas. -*Of these eight, 
four were lying in a clearing. Their 
wrists were bound behind their 
backs and their skulls were cracked 
open. They had been bludgeoned 
to death, said the NRA, with ham- 
mers or stones. 

“There was something systemat- 
ic about this killing field The skele- 
tons were spread over at least half a 
mile and were in various stages of 
decay.” he reported. 

“How many 'suspected guerril- 
las' had died at this spot 50 miles 
north of Kampala,” Mr. Mortimer 
reported, “one could only guess. In 
an hour of traipsing through forest 
and swamp. I counted 82 skulls, 
but iuy search was random, and no 
doubt" the vegetation hid many 
skeletons.” 

Not long afLer the coup, the 
Uganda Star reported that more 
than 1.000 skeletons were un- 
earthed at Mpigi, about 40 miles 
(65 kilometers) southwest of Kam- 
pala. Outside the capital 30 more 
were found behind an army base. 

Amnesty International, the hu- 
man righis monitoring group based 
in London, reported in June that 
the most common forms torture 
included “crushing or pulling testi- 
cles of men” and raping women. 

In August last year. U.S. officials 
reported that killings of civilians 
under Mr. Obote were worse than 
during Idi Amin 's regime. There 
were reports that up" to 200.000 
people had been killed since 1 981. 

■ No Cease-Fire Reached 
Yoweri Museveni, the Ugandan 
rebel leader, said Tuesday night 
that the government and rebel 
troops have failed to reach a cease- 
fire agreement despite a guerrilla 
offer to stop fighting while peace 
talks take place m Nairobi. Reuters 
reported from Nairobi. 


RIDING IT OUT — A Delacroix, Lo uisiana, resident 
waited out the flood caused by a late- season hurricane, 
but three persons were killed and nine were missing as 
the storm, designated Juan, lost strength Tuesday- 


NATO Defense Ministers Back U.S. 
re of Soviet Arms Violations 


■■it"* 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Fust Sc'mcr 

BRUSSELS — la the last allied 
consultations before U.S. and Sovi- 
et leaders meet in Geneva next 
month. NATO defense ministers 
Tuesday endorsed American com- 
plaints that the Kremlin has violat- 
ed existing arms control treaties. 

The North Atlantic Treaty Orga- 
nization received a three-hour 
briefing from Secretary of Defense 
Caspar W. Weinberger and other 
UJS. officials that described in de- 
tail some of die alleged Soviet 
transgressions of the 1972 Anti- 
Ballistic Missile Treaty and the 
1979 Strategic Arms Limitation 
Treaty. 

Several European defense minis - 
ters remarked later that any linger- 
ing skepticism about the extent of 
Soviet violations had been re- 
moved, but they stressed that such 


Romanian Winter: Scarcity , Discontent 

Since ’ 82 , Foreign Debt Drive Has Been People’s Burden 


Bv Henry Kamm 

A'w York Times Service 

BUCHAREST — The first 
chestnuts have fallen from the trees 
in Europe's greenest capitaL nights 
have become nippy and Roma- 
nians’ thoughts are turning fearful- 
ly to winter. 

Last winter lingers in memories 
as the worst time this country has 
experienced since World War II. 
To this day, Romanians talk as 
though they feel in the marrow of 
their bones the record colds, aggra- 
vated by a critical shortage of fuel. 

Men, women and children re- 
turned from cold and diml y lighted 
places of work or study to unhealed 
homes, where they were told to 
light no more than one room, with 
a single bulb of low wattage. 


Wintry road conditions together make things better in the coming 
with the extreme fuel shortage season, in the general view, is a less 
made the supplies of food and oth- severe winter. Nothing else prom- 
er necessities even scarcer than usu- ises to improve. The drastic short- 
al in this country of great agricul- ages that tormented Romanians 
tural riches and chronic food lines, through last winter continue, and 
That winter has taken on a heroic Mr. Ceausescu has, if anything, in 
quality in the memories even of recent days stepped up the calls for 
diplomatic families, whose lives, his people to work harder, produce 
though lightened by privileges, more and export rather than con- 
shared some of the deprivations. sume. 

In anticipation of another season Since 1982 Mr. Ceausescu has 

of shortages, President Nicolae engaged his country in a “crash” 
Ceausescu recently put electric campaign to pay off its foreign 
power stations under military com- debt, which then stood at a peak 
mand and dismissed for “great that Romanian officials place at 
shortcomings” the deputy prime 512 billion and foreigners put as 
minister in charge of the energy high as S14 billion. By the end of 
sector and the ministers for electric last year it was down" to 57 J bfl- 
power and mining lion; a senior official of the Foreign 

But the only thing that might Trade Ministry said it now stood at 

56 billion. In many embassies in 


evidence should not be exploited to 
cast into doubt the worth of pursu- 
ing future arms-control accords. 

The mood of allied consensus 
was also enhanced by a general 
wish to project a firm display of 
alliance solidarity in the weeks be- 
fore President Ronald Reagan has 
eight hours of meetings in Geneva 
with the Soviet leader. Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev on Nov. 19 and 20. 

Mr. Weinberger illustrated his 
arguments Tuesday with recent sat- 
ellite photographs that portrayed 
three installation-!; where the Soviet 
Union has sited the mobile; inter- 
continental SS-25 missile. The U.S. 
says the SS-25 deployment breaks a 
SALT-2 treaty provision allowing 
the introduction of only one new 
strategic missile, which the Soviet 
Union claimed would be the SS-24. - 

Moscow contends that the SS-25 
is merely an upgraded version of 
the SS-13. But the photographs dis- 
played by Mr. Weinberger, accord- 
ing to defense ministers who at- 
tended Tuesday, indicated that the 
SS-25 is radically different. 

Mr. Weinberger said the Soviet 
Union also continues to thwart 
Ameri can efforts to monitor their 
missile program developments 
through the encryption of test sig- 
nals, considered to be another vio- 
lation of SALT-2- 

The presentation included a 
scale model of the pbased-airay ra- 
dar system near Krasnoyarsk that 
some Reagan administration offi- 
cials believe could become an inte- 
gral part of a nationwide missle 
defense system, m violation of the 
ABM treaty. 


“What we were shown convinces 
me that the treaty violations are not- 

k- .-Hcmi-n 1 ** c.ii.i M-uifpht 


4 * 


to be disputed,” said Manfred 
Warner, the West German defense * 
minister, but he added that neither 
the United States nor the alliance 

should draw the conclusion that 

arms control agreements should be 
aborted because of the Soviet mis- 
behavior. 

■ Discussions on SDl 

James M. Markham of The ton 
York Junes reported earlier from 
Brussels: 

Mr. Weinberger and his British 
counterpart, Michael Heseltine, 
Tuesday failed to reach agreement 
on terms that would permit Britain, 
to participate in the Reagan admin- > 
istraiion's research program For 
space-based missile defense sys- 
tem. ■ 

At a one- hour meeting at a gath- 
ering of NATO defense ministers 
here, the two did agree to assign’ 
teams of experts to address Tues- 
day night the sensitive issue of* 
technology sharing, according to 
officials in both delegations. Mr. 
Weinberger and Mr. Heseltine will 
address a news conference 
Wednesday. 

The core issue separating boiji 
sides is Britain's demand for a, 
guaranteed SI .5-billion share in" 
what the administration has pro- 
jected as a 526-billion research un- 
dertaking in the Strategic Defease 
Initiative. 


A 5 


no 




% 

. 7 * 


% 


In negotiations over the past 1 / 
months. Pentagon officials have 4 
told the British that Congress 
would balk at such a move. 


Visa for Sakharov's Wife 
Is Granted? Russian Says 


“It’s the people that make 
Lufthansa great.” 


This is an authentic passenger statement. 



Bucharest, Mr. Ceausescu’s 

minded determination to maVt» 
man i a free of debt and refuse new 
credits is termed an obsession. 

The ordinary Romanian pays a 
heavy price for this. Street lightin g 
is so sparse that wartime memories 
are evoked by viewing the city from 
a high buildmg. 

Even in summer, when fruit and 
vegetables are plentiful even for the 
Romanian consumer — exports al- 
ways enjoy priority — lints at Food 
stores begin early in the morning 
and resume at peak hours at mid- 
day and the end of the workday. 

Meat has largely disappeared 
from the Romanian table; a visitor 
saw nothing but empty butcher 
stores in 10 days of assiduous walk- 
ing about the city. Sugar, flour and 
cooking oil are rationed and in 
some areas of the countryside 
bread is also rationed. 

Car owners are allotted a tankful 
of gasoline a month. 

In enterprises that do not meet 
their export or raw material extrac- 
tion quotas, management and all 
personnel will be docked up to half 
their monthly pay. The same penal- 
ties will be imposed on the minister 
and aides responsible for the enter- 
prise and the deputy prime minister 
under whose authority the ministry 
falls. 

But no signs of stirring are evj- 


stunng i 

dent in a country in which, rightly 


or not, many of its people believe 
that a greater proportion of citizens 
work for the secret police than in 
any other Communist nation. In no 
other Communist capital are uni- 
formed police and security forces, 
patrolling the main streets with 
automatic rifles, more evident 

Protestant denominations, par- 
ticularly Baptists and Pemecostal- 
ists, have been enjoying consider- 
able increases in followers in the 
last decade, with each group now 
believed to have more than 200.000 
members. But the government con- 
tinues lo restrict religious freedom. 

In September, during an 1 I-day 
preaching tour by the Reverend 
Billy Graham, the American evan- 
gelist uniformed policemen anti se- 
cret police officers turned back 
overflow crowds who bad sought to 
listen to Mr. Graham's sermons 
over loudspeakers outside churches 
at provincial stops. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
ner’s destination might be, Mr. 
Louis said. “She has been in Italy 
before, and now she has relatives in 
the States, so it is up to her. Maybe 
she will want medical care in the 
United States.” 

He said that Mrs. Bonner's 
daughter, Tatiana Yankelevich, 
who lives in Newton, Massachu- 
setts, probably would receive infor- 
mation about her mother soon. 

After the BQd report, Mrs. Yan- 
kelevich said: “It's a likely possibil- 
ity, but still this report is not 
enough to make ns completely cer- 
tain that this is true. 1 ' 

She added: “If this report is true 
it would make sense that the Soviet 
government, particularly Mr. Gor- 
bachev, is preparing for the sum- 
mit.” 

She was referring to next 
month's meeting in Geneva be* 
tween Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the 
Soviet leader, and Resident Ron- 
ald Reagan. ... 

Bild said Mis. Bonner would .be 
allowed to spend two to three 
mmiths in the West and then return 
to rejoin her husband. 

Soviet officials refused comment 
Tuesday. 

Mrs. Bonner has been allowed to 
travel abroad previously for medi- 
cal treatment. Sbe went to Italy in 
1975, 1977 and 1979. 

In April 1984 she delivered a 
letter to U.S. diplomats in Moscow 
asking for political asylum in the 
UJS. Embassy. She then was report- 
ed arrested and sent into internal 
exile in Gorki, 250 miles (400 kilo- 
meters) east of Moscow. 

■ Passible Pte-Sunost Gesture 

Bernard Gwertzman of The New 
York Times reported from Washing- 
ton: . 

The fate of Mr. Sakharow and 
his wife, Mis. Bonner, has been a 
major international issue with 
their freedom demanded by many 
groups in Western countries. Presi- 
dent Reagan approvingly quoted 
Mr. Sakharov m a spSch to the 
United Nations last week, and US. 
officials have regularly raised their 
concern about the Sakharovs in 
meetings with Soviet officials. 

State Department officials said 
that if Mrs. Bonner was allowed to 
leave for treatment, they would re- 
gard this as a gesture by Mr. Gor- 
bachev in advance of a meeting in 


Moscow with Secretary of Stale 
George P. Shultz next week and 
with President Reagan in Geneva, 
next month. . 


Mr. Sakharov, one of the Soviet' 
Union’s most prominent midear 
physicists, has called for more de-' 
mocracy in Soviet life and has es- 
poused the cause of imprisoned 
dissidents. - 


Soviet Offers 
Radar Pact * 


(Continued from Page 1) 
violates the treaty and should be 
dismantled. The Soviet Union 
counters that the treaty permits - 
space-tracking radars anywhere, 
that the Ahalakow radar is solely ; 
for that purpose, and that its anten- 
nas are not Tangl ed low enough to 
track incoming missiles. 

The United States says the radar 
has the potential to become thehub : - 
of a land-based missile defense sys- 
tem if the Soviet Union decided lb * 
break the treaty. The United States'; 
own space-based missile defense .-j 
program ultimately envisions V 
land-based defense that could de*" 
stray missies on takeoff, in space 
and during re-entry. 

A Pentagon spokesman said" *. 
Monday that the modernization of 
the Thide radar would be templet-, r 
ed in the next year or two.and that 
upgrading of the Fylingdaies radar' 
had not yet begun. 

The United Suites uses Thule uri-> 
der a 1951 accord with Denmark^ 
which is responsible for Green** 
land’s defense. The accord grams, 
the United States naval and air, 
bases in Greenland as part of the' ; L 
Atlantic alliance. 

Two U.S. officials said the Fyf-’ . 
ingdales reconstruction was being ; ‘ 
held up because of British concerns, 
that it might be a treaty violaticnr 
A Pentagon official contended that . 

the delay was a British ploy to gam 1 
a greater share of construction con- 
tracts. " 

The radars at Thule, Fylingdaies' 
and Clear Air Force Station nr 4C, ^ 
Alaska are the mainstays erf ihe 
U.S. early warning system against 
missiles. 


French Doctors Say Treatment Inhibits AIDS 



Lufthansa 



(Continued from Page 1) 
specialist who is head of the derma- 
tology section of Tanier Hospital in 
Paris, refused to comment on the 
treatment’s effectiveness until fur- 
ther data is gathered. “I knew this 
team and they are serious people,” 
Dr. Escande said, “but the an- 
nouncement seems a little prema- 
ture.” 

Moreover, Dr. FscanHp said, cy- 
closporin was suspected of possibly 
causing cancer when administered 
on a long-term basis. “They had 
better be absolutely sure of their 
coup." he added. 

A spokesman for the Paris office 
of Sandoz Laboratories, which 
markets the drug, said that the 
company was not aware of the dis- 
covery. “This is a new line of re- 
search," the spokesman said. 

AIDS, which paralyzes tile- 
body's immune system and permits 
other diseases to infect the body, 
has already killed more 6,000 
Americans and has become a major 
cause of death among young Amer- 
icans. 

Nearly 400 cases have been re- 
‘ portal in France. 

The doctors acknowledged that 
they had departed from the tradi- 
tional method by which medical 
discovers are. announced — 
through publication . in scientific 
journals. 

Dr. Even, chief of the hospital's 
respiratory disease section, said 


they had done so to assure wide 
and immediate publication of their 
discovery so that other hospitals 
could begin to treat affected na- 
tions. 

*TTus is the first case with a posi- 
tive result obtained in the ueat- 
mrat of AIDS.” said Dr. Andrieul 
^Specifically, he noted that the 
38-year-old male patient was near 
death when he began receiving the 

. “Without this treatment, the na- 
i ?° babl y he dead to- 
day. Dr. Andneu said. 

The condition of the other pa- 
fem ? e J-' 110 was suffering 
from the early phase of the'diseas? 
had unproved, he said. 

the doctors, rie 
treatment is similar in theory to 
uang mstihn to treat diabetics: In- 
suhn mam tains sugar levels in the 

body but does not cure the disease 
raanufaciured-in 
18 a paradoxical treat- 
ment, the doctors said, in that it is 
an unmuno-dqjressive dni& M 
posed to immuno-stimitiSon fl 
which stimulates the body to 
^dusweakened immunity £ 

ftswssirag 

This. enables other 
lymphocyte ceils of the bodyviS 
muniry- system -to -reproduce D? 


Venet said that the drag acts specif- 
ically. on the T-4 cells to deactivate 
them, thereby preventing the AIDS 
virus from using the. cell mecha- 
nisms to reproduce.- ’ - , j 

Although the'T-4 cells do not act 
to protect the. h uman body whelp 
the patient was being treated with, 
the drug, Dr. Even said, the immu- 
“ty system could be built up and 
developed to be. reactivated if the 
patient develops one of the sp- 
■raHed “opportunistic infections” 
that often, prove fatal to AIDS vie* 
tim$, 

“It’s better to* have a reserve 
than ho. army at all Dr. 
Andneu said. 

. The doctors stressed that their 
conclusion that the treatment haft- 
cd the multiplication of the oefls 
was a “deduction,” be cause al- 




m 

m 






though their could count the num- 
ber of. T-ceusir 






.... in the body,' scientists 
.have not been able to measure dt 
re ^Jy the presence of the virus. ■ 
The more severely stricken pal 
nwt was given, cyclosporin Oraflyi 
within , two days, he showed a 
snarp increase in theuumberof T-3 
ccds, which rose* from none* at ad 
before the treatment to 350 on 
f^day, the doetbn said. J 
f 7™ female patient who- was snf-! 
lenngfrom swolleti-lymph glands; 

Symptom of the earty 
'£?* ^ AIDS, also reported a 
dramaucaily -increased cel! 
count and reduced glandular swell- 
ing after eight day^of treatment 



v.. 

: -jsK 








>4 1 






iritis Vj 



Page 7 


'Romeo’ 
By Delius 
Is Revived 


v\, 

s? 

. X 

■ v r« ■■ 


■= '<* i** 

v^T-: 

. S:, »- , 
-■V * r «S. 

. C->. 

- 

• ; **sj 


• ; - ^- , Jis«n s 
'•UJT, 


\ 


- < 
? 5 


i ' 'i 


Vi. 


By Andrew Chile 
D USSEUDORP- Alwaysonc 

of the more innovative and 
adventurous of the major Gentian 
opera companies, the Deotsche- 
Oper am Rhein has -chosen rf»< 
season to add to its repertoire three 
half-forgotten works from the early 
pan of this century, Tbe fim of 
these to appear at the company** 

. Dfissddorf boose is “Romeo and 
auf dem Dorfe” (“A Village 
Romeo and Juliet**) by Frederick 
Delius. Later in the season, both 
Duisburg and Dflssddocf will have 
the chance to see ^PenlbesSea" by 
the Swiss composer Othmar 
Schoeck, and “Osud" by Loos, Ja- 
nacek. 

Delius never fitted any conven- 
tional partem, either in the way he 

lived or composed. Bom in 1862 in 

Bradford, En gland into an immi- 
grant family of German wool mer- 
chants, he spent several carefree 
years as a young man in Florida, 
studied music in Leipzig and Paris, 
was a regular viator to Scandina- 
via, and then lived comparatively 
peacefully at Grea-sur-Loing near 
Fontainebleau. Increasing paraly- 
sis and blindness curtailed his ao- 
nuiy A’ a entity; and after diciating a final 
• ji . J, . gro^P of compositions to a devoted 

amanuensis. Eric Fenbv. he died in ' 
1934. 

The spread Of Deli ns’s reputa- 
tion is often attributed 
Thomas Beecham, who 
oued the composer for most of 
lifetime. After the Berlin premiere 
of “A Village Romeo and JaHet” in 
1907, it was Beecham who orga- 
nized the only three productions to 
be given in the following SO years, 
ail in England, and who made the 
recording by which subsequent 
performances have tended to be 
judged. The U. S. premiere was in 
Washington in 1972, quickly fol- 
lowed by performances at theNew. 
York City Opera and San Diego, 
and now German-language the- 
aters seem interested. 

In the German-language tale by 
tbe Swiss author Gottfried Keller, 
the two children, Sali and Vren- - 
chen, are separated by family strife 
over a piece OT disputed waste land, 
and haunted by a mysterious Dark 
.7 T) Fiddler, who is the rightful owner 
J if ifiUY mu* property. Reunited in ado- 
lescence as lovers, the pair share a 
day of happiness before drifting 
down river in a boat that gently 
sinks. The opera is divided into six 
scenes, linked by intermezzi that 
give it the character of a long sym- 
phonic poem. The most famous of 
these connecting passages , is the 
“Walk to the: Paradise Gaxdeii,*’ . 

With two excellent productions 
ai Zurich and Darmstadt still fresh- 
in the memory, the new staging, by 
the Deutsche Oper am Rhem faces 
stiff competition and leaves an inn 



The Man Who "Reinvented the Guitar' 


By Michael 

Imematiriui Herein h.w 

P IAR1S — "I lap string* like & 
pianist strikes kr.s," «>s S’jzr 
Icy Jordan, who is being sailed “the 
world's first two-hamied gui'an*:** 
and “the man who reins er.'.ri ihs 
guitar . 

He uses both hs-ids ai^u'Li- 
neouslv oa the fingerferard to p’~> 

entirely independent susui^eous 
contrapuntal voices, a tcwhr.ique 

that made him famous this \eEi at 
the age of 25. “People can rsiaie :o 
technique," he raid that 

probably has a lot :o do with why 
ray album is selling so well." iHii 
first LP, “Mask Touch." has told 
mote than 5OG.0GG copies s “A: 
least that’s the wav ::'s beta a adver- 
tised." 

A “Warning!" or. the sleeve of 
“Magic Touch’’ — which includes 
his renditions of songs by Lennon 
and McCartney, Miles Da-ris. The- 
taoious Monk’ aad Jordan — is 
followed by: "Do not be deceived 
Despite what your ears might le" 
you, there is only one guitar^: oc 
this album. And there are no auiiar 
overdubs whatsoever" 

Guitarists have been faru’iar 
with the essence of the tsJirJcus 
for a Jong time. It -is sailed “htim- 


"Tbe real innovation is reaching 
Over the Freer board and doing it 
with my tight hand a: the same 
tine.” 

By Uiing both hands to play spe- 
cific notes, the guitar can reach a 
level of complexity previously only 
possible on keyboard.-.. But you 
have !c keep track of which h»r.d is 
on what strng and you cannot play 
iwo voices on the same sinng 3i the 
same sane. Crossing hands ftum 
one to another without conflict is. 
according to Jordan, "the hard 
pan." 

“Magiv Touch" wen: as high as 
71 ec the Billboard Magazine chart 
til has bees on that chan For 23 
weeks;, unusually high for for an 
inieihacuL instrumental effon. Bui 
it is modem jaza from the tradition, 
obviously orJ\ a beginning for a 
young run who has “reinvented" 
an in.s-jTi.TiKi : . Once ycu have un- 
derstood the basic pnneiple of the 
techr.icuc and start trying to fath- 
om the musician behind if you sus- 
peas that be w ill not he ‘content 
with reinventing anything less than 
irumo itself. 

He studied classic J piano at 6. 
His mother, who teaches English at 
the University of Massachusetts,, 
told People magazine that Stanley 


mering-on." You up the strings couid sight- read a Beethoven sooa- 


A imAipie^xposare photo demonstrates Stanley Jordan’s guitar technique. 


with your left hand and they vi- 
brate against the fie: without pick- 
ing or plucking or tosemng tbe 
string at all with your right hand. 
After trilling with two fingers of his 
left hand, for example, he said: 


u a: the age of 10. He switched to 
guitar in 1471 when he was II. 
After SS keys. 6 strings seemed lim- 
iting. and he “began to work out 
this strange way of playing from 
sheer frustration." 


When he was 16. he rcruned his 
guitar into perfect fourths. By rais- 
ing the upper two .strings a half- 
step each, he con play chords with 
the same fingering ji two or three 
different places on ;he fingerboard; 
a lot less fingerings to deal with. 
"It's somewhere between a two-to- 
one and three-io-ost: ratio.'’ he 
said: “When you have hundreds of 
chords, it makes everything a lot 
simpler." 

Asked wliy all guitarists don't do 
that, he compared the standard 
string tuning to the QWERTY 
typewriter: “People don’t want to 
learn all over again. But it’s so 
much easier this way, ar.d it's really 
so easy to ieam h look me about a 
month to be as good tilth the new 
umins the old *' 

Standard chord notation then 
began to frustrate hint. At (he age 
of 16 he was listening to a lot of 
John Colirar.e and Cecil Taylor. 
Many of their chords were altered 
and had to be played in a specific 
inversions. Standard notation was 


Betty Ford to W rile Memoirs 

Tee -tSUihltcJ Phi: 

LOS ANGELES — Former first 
lady Betty Ford will write a book 
about her experiences ■= ir.ee leaving 
the White House, including her re7 
cover, from alcohol and prescrip- 
tion drug addiction, an agent said 
Monday. The book will be written 
with Chris Chase, who worked with 
Ford on her 197S biograph v. 


ar OV's | 




14 JUU 1 - . 

'The Grace of Mary Traverse The 18 th Century Through a Woman’s Eyes 


Vi? SwdBi 

Racau,; 


By Mi chad Billington 
JONDON— Suddenly the Lon- 




Mtaft- 


• ■.f’wWln- 

' •• -isw lis-' 


ism is inspired by an arch-male 
manipulator. But Wertenbaker in- 
idligaaily shows the high cost of 
knowledge in a cruel world. And, 
although the play is in no sense a 
documentary, she recreates the 
raunchy, rakehelly taffies of a van- 
ished London with swing and zest: 
Rapacious aristocrats roam the 
murky alleyways: fluffy-wigged 
fools fritter away fortunes at the 
card-tables, and the oppressed, gm- 
-soaked commoners are easily in- 
duced to fatal rebellion. 


Soviet 


Iron Pen 
- ”:.r- 2ss. 

• ' “t 

• r.zzz 


don (beater is full of new 
plays. Quality is not the same as 
quantity, but, at the same time, 
when afi the per manent jpatiin li o B a 
are severely underfunded, h is 
cheering to find firing writers bring 
given maximum exposure. 

. Timberlake Wertenbaker, a 
■young feminist dramatist who has 
previously done two excellent Ma- 
rivaux translations and a number 

THE LONDON STAGE 

of plays far fringe theaters, is mak- 
ing a splash with The Grace of 
Mary Traverse" at the Royal 
Court It is not flawless, but it s 
ambitious, full of aphoristic wit „ 

and deals, fasdnaMyT with the ^ seraed at the Court by the 
faced by women in a performances of Janet McTeer, 
man's worid, setting the action in whose Mar Y “O'** convincingly j 
the physically dissipated, poUtical- from virginal innocence to grieving 
- - experience, and of Harold Inno- 

cent, who doubles superbly as 
Mary’s haunted father mid a rad- 
dled old rout 


guage that achieves a genuine the- 
atrical poetry. 

□ 

This is Barker’s most recent sta- 
ge-play. And his progress as a writ- 
er the recently won the Prix Italia 
for radio drama) is unwittingly un- 
derlined In' “Dofroddd.” which 
dales from' 1977 and is the final 
play in the Pit season. This is a 
lurid, overwritten and somewhat 
sensationalist thriller about a ho- 
mosexual gossip-columnist discov- 
ering that a former Labor Party 
minister and his mistress 


The final message is somewhat 
muddy, and it is hard to see much 
baas for Mary’s fragile optimism. f 1 ?y c •? . ^ - .. 

But at least Wertenbaker drama- Oevoa. Not even a 

tizes the eternal question of worn- brilliant performance by lan 


pnme 

have been secreting an aristocratic 


en’s role in society in an un obvious, 
undoemnaire way. She is also very 


McDiarmi<f as the rat-like' Fleet 
Street hack nor the comic vivacity 
of Barker’s dialogue can conceal 
the stakness of the message, which 


is that England is rotter, with cor- 
ruption and that Labor leaders al- 
ways betray then- socialist princi- 
ples when in office. 


Meanwhile, the National Ccttes- 
]oe Theatre continues its festival of 
new plays with Debbie Horsfield’s 
“Command or Promise.'' a sequel 
10 an earlier piece about four young 
Manchester women making their 
way in the world with varying suc- 
cess. The common cry is that Hors- 
field is writing soap-opera, but this 
is unfair. Soap-opera depends on 
fixed characters and flat dialogue, 
□either of which this has. Through 
a lightning-quick series of scenes. 
Horsfield is in fact exploring the 
capacity of female friendstup to 
survive separation and differences 
in social status. 


This is shown most clearly in the 
way the ethers rally round when 
Beth, the unemployed no-hoper of 
the group, is driven to a near-suici- 
dal overdose, and also in the joyous 
reunion of the four women when 
the football team they adore, Man- 
chester United, achieves success in 
the Werabiey Cup. Horsfield re- 
cords the diversity of female expe- 
rience with a fresh and funny eye 
and John Burgess's nippy Cottesloe 
production is" beautifully acted by 
Lesley Sharp. Tara Shaw, Sally 
Jane Jackson and Stella Gonet as 
■J:e finallv indivisible quartet. 

□ 

The West End theater also comes 
up with a new play in Douglas 
W'atkinson's “The Dragon's Tail" 
ai the Apollo. But although this 
stars a popular television actress. 


Penelope Keith (also one of the 
show's producers! it is hard to ruse 
any son of cheer for such 2 lacklus- 
ter piece. Keith plays an ageing, 
childless lush, who. in the course of 
a camping holiday in North Woles 
with her doctor boyfriend, meets 
up with and decides ‘10 “adopt" an 
orphaned brother and sister in their 
late teens. 

Reason tells you that, in real life, 
two normal, intelligent kids would 
run 2 mile from the devouring 
clutches of such a maudlin mon- 
ster. Faced with such an impossible 
character. Keith can do nothing 
except roam around the stage in 
rubber boots looking for the occa- 
sional laugh-line. 

Michael Billington is reviewing 
London plays while Sheridan M or lev 
is on leave for three weeks. 


clumsy Sc* Jurdan began :c accu- 
mulate what he calls “catalog " 

Every possible chordal alteration 
and po-ition is listed or. graph pa- 
per in 2 loosdeaf notebook too 
thick to take on the road (though he 
does carry a "repackaged" Apple 
Macintosh computer to keep track 
of them;. He only takes the sheets 
he is practicing at :hc moment, a 
rather thick hook by itself. His sys- 
tem describes the relationship be- 
tween the notes of the chord father 
than to a tonal center. Fcr example, 
a C- major ninth chord with the 
fifth omitted car also be consid- 
ered the scale B. C. D. E: for which 
Jordan's boiie notation is "0. 1. 
5." Every inv ersion has itj own des- 
ignation. 

The composer ar.d theorist Mil- 
ton Babbitt had already taken a 
similar system for cioxsica! harmo- 
nies much further. Jordan enrolled 
in Princeton University, where 
Babbiu was teaching. .After gradu- 
ating. he busked for about 2 year in 
the streets of Manhattan. ”! usually 
did well on Wail Street." he 
laughed. Moving to Madison. Wis- 
consin. he began to buiid a cult 
following in the Midwest. 

The res: is. Jn they say. histon. 
Recent history. Last year he audi- 
tioned for the producer George 
Wei a and was a triumph a: V.’ein's 
Kool Jazz Festival in New Vorl.. he 
was the toast of the Montreux Fes- 
tival in Switzerland. 

Now the problem is “not to get 
bogged down by theory. I've oot to 
be careful aN'JUt how { use it. I 
don’t want to sound technical. Too 
much technique can clutter up the 
music. There's the thing and then 
there’s the idea about the thing. 
Sometimes I get caught up in the 
idea about the thing and I am not 
doing the thing. But 1 want to find 
out how every thing 1 do relates 10 
all possibilities." 

Stanley Jordan: Frankfurt, Oct. 
SO: Baden-Baden, CkL SI; Oslo. 
W‘v. /. Stockholm. Xoi. S: Copen- 
hagen, .Vo,. 4; Barcelona. Sow 6; 

J 'dlenau. Sow "• Madrid, Sow S. 


Concert to Promote Freud 

ftvUlirs 

VIENNA — Leonard Bernstein 
will lead the Vienna Philharmonic 
in a concert on Nov. 5 to raise 
funds and spread international in- 
terest in Sigmund Freud. Harold 
Leupold-Loewemhai. director of 
the Sigmund Freud museum, said 
that proceeds would be used to 
fund research projects. 


... 

£ - “ " * 


pressian of unfulfilled potential. 
Ruodi Barth’s decor foe the first 
four scenes, with a painted back- 
drop of very im-alpine hills, was 
rudimentary, tbe lovers’ wedding 
dream was earth bound, and there 
was too much standard operatic 
posturing. There was also some un- 
, ^ . necessary amplification of voices, 
^R.and the produces; BohumO Her- 
" r > " Gschka. watered down the ooutrast 
of the first two scenes by making do 
from the start with the two adult 
for Sah and Vrenchen, 
of the two younger voices 
that Delius «di« tor. ' 

But the last two scenes, especial- 
ly the flickering withdrawal of the 
fairground and the mirage of bhie- 
gray moonlight at the Paradise 
Garden, were theatrical Impres- 
sionism at its most captivating. 

The cast was weDkaosen- As in 
Zurich, Vrenchen was song by Ur- 
sula Retnhardt-Kiss, an attractive 
soprano with tbe ri g ht physical and 
vocal proportions for the role, but 
who looked and sounded less in- 
volved here. The Sali, Zachos Ter- 
f.i'-jc zalos, delayed a youthful, evenly- 
• . produced lyric tenor of 

• ’ ' l ’“ considerable promise. Wicus Slab- - 

bert preserved the enigmatic char- 
acter of the Dark Fiddler and sang 
with dear-cut resonant tone. The 
orchestral contribution under 
Christian Thielemann was crisp 
and polished, with plenty of detail 
picked out from the broader haze 
of Delius’s instrumental palette. 
But this kind of rniwiml scene- 
painting requires a special subtlety 
in phrasing and in the s h adi ng of 
texture, and Thielemann showed 
insufficient flexibility. It was one 
further illustration of the wok’s 
elusive qualities in the theater. 

Andrew Clark is a journalist and 
music critic based in Switzerland. 


'.aet- 
. ?.:'.sL 
. :: aiie 

- It 
..-(*»£■ 

■'.•jbti- 

- L r - 

-T.-liSJ . 


-r.a- 

V ■; tv-Tr. 

- -a**** 
"v X* : 

•• r. 3J^ ; 

- :rv.i*-' s 

, 9n^ ; 

' 

■ - UClC- - 
‘ ■ ir» 


■ ’ 


ly volatile sodety of 18th-century 
London. It is rather like a female 
version of "Faust" placed against 
the background of Hogarth’s “The 
Rake's Progress.” 

Its heroine. Mary Traverse, is the 
bookish daughter of a prosperous 
merchant who finds hersdf hired 
into London life by her fathers 
Mephistophelean housekeeper. 
Mrs. Tanptwefl. In her desire to 
experience everything, she moves 
from straightforward sex to cards, 
rockfighting, gambling, prostitu- 
tion and radical politics. She be- 
comes an impassioned woman in a 
man’s world and, preaching a Tom 
Paine-like vision of equality, incites 
tbe populace to riot. But, when the 
result is pointless slaughter, she re- 
treats to her father’s estate battered 
by her experiences and asking 
“Can yon love a worid with so 
much injustice?” The answer is ten- 
uously affirmative. - 

Tbe play’s principal defect is that 

Mary seems as mudi tbe victim of 
other people's schemes as the ini- 
tiator of bier own: even her radical- 


’ □ 

Howard Barker also uses the 
past 10 illuminate the present in 
“The Castle,” the second in a three- 
play Barker season presented by 
the Royal Shakespeare Company 
at the Barbican Pit. Barker sets his 
play in medieval England, where a 
feudal lord, back from the Cru- 
sades, commissions an Arab engi- 
neer to build him an impregnable 
castle, in the teeth of ferocious op- 
position from his liberated wife 
and her lesbian lover. Parallels with 
the present day and the anti-nucle- 
ar Greenhorn Common protesters 
are not hard to And, but what gives 
tbe play its theatrical vitality is that 
Barker admits the complexity of 
tbe situation (indeed he shows the 
women driven to kill in order to 
preserve their ideal of a pacific so- 
rieryj and that he writes in a rich, 
tart, strong, hard-consonant lan- 


DOONESBURY 


mttTHSMTm, 

emrAMimm' 

mtoupftxwin 


- -n.dn-’f'.' 
- jv*"' 

-vt-'K 
' - *: 



, T-“U 
■'V*: 


veer fieAurt.iM*m meet 
MB! A BLACK.QQCK MTU A 
MAJOR MOUTH ON HER! YOUGCfT 
A PRjaEMjAKBrruRtum 
\ THB/VMSaONS 


. ■ V s j 


■ *: 

,/>J e 
-•*' • 

' f i 
* .,.*V 
-,yK 

•• • .. ,i v - 

. . 4- 

’ 

■ . v* 

"V- ^ 

..^j f. 

A*' 


Eridwtion on Comets Opens 

, United Press International 

- WASHINGTON — An exhibi- 
tion of comet imagery through the 

ages: “Fire and Ice: A History of • 
Comets in Art,'* has opened at the 
National Air and Space Museum. 






* . 1 ” 


sr ^;v: 

if 1 - 



X tv . y-W 

WORLDWIDE 

ENTERTAINMENT 




CHOW 

room 

SrfsFfeyal 
T«MH*>y5 - 
faty B, 
WWntrfay 13 
November, 
offt30p.«, 

Different 

Programs 

KIESGEN 

Complete J 

the wort for viobnceBo - 

J.S. BACH 

6 goto peca for 
Mfanafc 

3 lonatoc wWj bapskhori 

by CARLOS 

PRIETO 

. viotonoeBo wnh a»rc 

CORNBOUP 

fAUSta 

. miSM 

VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT 

Itfi ant C*r hofo BDMaha liwfc 5BF. faim 
80 FA HO F - aptn 12 » KJ30*u*. eL Simian 
Ortw » 11 »■ Ai Jour; *13337 JO. 

RAFFAT1N •» HONORWE 

KUi Omm. TcL <15*2221. Oa «u« 
T^ml anU«» Oamd Smhr* Uatdof boor. 


MMB7m 

. --.JO GOLDBERG : 

MmmVa.W.bllmVpiahnr 
Ja^i ybafct. Hi— i **d an 

Matwi Opaa *n. -.. 

UDUMN.<il*ilKWllXbMM. 

<xn.H7o*L«*4CW BiatenUtla. 

' SckxAu Mm F!Ja* nd CwjlCaii 





Europcar. It’s like having 
a friend in every town. 


At Europcar, we are determined to take rhe discomfort 
out of business travel in a way nobody else can. 

It’s called The Worldwide Welcome. 

It’s a unique new company credo dedicated co people 
who rent cars. 

But what’s in it for you ? 

For one, there’s less worry about getting a car where 
you need it 

With nearly 3000 locations in 110 countries, we’re one of 
the largest car rental companies in the world. 

You can book a car anywhere you want through a central 
reservation system in each country. 

And you’re more likely to get the car you want, because 
Europcar has everything from sports cars to chauffeur-driven 
limousines. 

We have a full range of the latest models meticulously 
maintained by our own specialists. 


We also offer a wider choice of special rates than you can 
imagine. 

And like friends, we do our best nor to take you for granted. 

Only we have the exclusive Super Service. 

Such as music cassettes provided to entertain you while 
you drive. Or the free road maps ro help you rind your way. 

The next time you need to Tent a car, call us. Or see your 
travel agent 

The Worldwide Welcome means you’ve got a friend 
waiting for you. 


europcar 

rent a car 



Ik the U.S., Latin Amenta ami the Pacific, it’s Mational Car Rental. In Canada it i Tilden. 


(9£®. v-tifcHiyy — •.. 




Page 8 



E rib unc. 


PublUbed With The Vv York Tian wnd The Waehfogian Part 


Failure in South Africa 


Three months after imposing emergency 
rule on pans of South Africa, the minority 
while government has extended it to new 
parts. Thus are blacks and other nonwhite 
citizens being made to pay a Further price 
for the failure of white policy, 

The extension is a cruelty. It is also a confes- 
sion of failure. Nothing in the three-month 
record indicates that repression serves the cur- 
rent or long-term needs of the white communi- 
ty. Instead die period has seen, in addition to 
the deaths of hundreds of blacks, a number of 
firsts: the first riots in the white business 
districts of Johannesburg and Cape Town, the 
first white soidier killed policing a black town- 
ship. The price for whites is going up. too. 

Emergency rule produced an economic ca- 
lamity that nobody had foreseen. The emer- 
gency panicked South Africa's business-mind- 
ed foreign creditors, shredding the country’s 
credi [worthiness and creating in one swoop a 
financial crisis greater than any that critics of 
apartheid had thought they could bring about 
by the application of political pressure. Exten- 
sion of emergency rule deepens and advertises 
the uncertainty that most exercises bankers. 

The emergency has also seen an extension 
of South .Africa’s international self-isobtion. 
Ronald Reagan, whom the regime had count- 
ed on to understand both its difficulties and its 
manner of treating them, was moved to sup- 


port the beginnings of official American sanc- 
tions. President P.W. Botha apparently feels 
misunderstood and abandoned: He has de- 
nounced Mr. Reagan by name for — are you 
ready? — “shoving [American] Indians into 
reservations." One wonders whether this ex- 
pression of pique actually represents Mr. 
Botha's understanding of the American scene. 

The regime imposed emergency rule not 
simply to keep order but ostensibly to advance 
“reform" at its own pace. President Botha has 
dangled hints of political change that, in other 
circumstances, would have drawn some atten- 
tion. at least as evidence of possible good faith. 
Police rule, however, undercut whatever bene- 
fits be might have been reaching, for. 

Mr. Botha’s hints; were denounced or ig- 
nored. Some whites Sought to force the politi- 
cal pace by meeting outside the country with 
the underground nationalist African National 
Congress, and were promptly tarred and repu- 
diated. Black opinion in the streets and the 
townships moved even further away from a 
position at which “moderate" black leaders 
fee! that they can represent it 

Perhaps President Botha, in meeting protest 
with more repression, has a method that no 
one can perceive. Otherwise, he is taking South 
Africa — blacks and whites — down a one- 
way road of tension and violence. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Exception in Argentina 


“The action was a liitie dramatic, but Ar- 
gentine society is dramatic.” So said an .Argen- 
tine scholar, and he was right on both counts. 
Raul Alfonsin. whose presidency embodies 
Argentina’s return to constitutional legality, 
has imposed a state of siege. That means 
suspending constitutional liberties, but the ac- 
tion needs to be seen in dramatic context. 

Many Latin American dictators have im- 
posed cruel martial law. but this is a state of 
siege with a difference. Mr. Al/cnsins decree 
does not aim to create another Chile, where 
last year’s crackdown allowed soldiers to 
sweep protesters off the streets and into con- 
centration camps. The .Argentine action bears 
no similarity to Nicaragua, where a Marxist- 
Leninist government earlier this month de- 
creed a state of siege so that it could shut down 
opposition political activity and protest. Nor 
does it parallel recent Argentine history, when 
generals regularly overturned elected govern- 
ments and pushed aside constitutional free- 
doms. Two years ago this week, the last such 
military state of siege ended after nine years 
and the "disappearance" of 9.000 Argentines. 

Mr. Alfonsin’s decree has just the opposite 
aim: to protect what those other states of siege 
wanted to eliminate. His goal is to open politi- 
cal debate, extend legal due process and 
strengthen constitutional rule. He will now 
have to show how well this dictator's tool can 
truly be used for democratic ends. 


How- does imposing a state of siege further 
constitutional rule? It is not such a paradox in 
.Argentina, where no elected president has 
completed his mandate in 30 years. To break 
this pattern, Mr. Alfonsin has insisted on hold- 
ing the military accountable for its deeds. 

He demanded a public trial, which has just 
completed hearing testimony, for the nine mil- 
itary officers who presided over the “dirty 
war" and its disappearances. The verdicts are 
now pending, and in recent weeks a terrorist 
bombing campaign, presumably aimed at de- 
stabilizing democracy and intimidating the 
court, has gathered force. The threat could also 
affect important midterm congressional elec- 
tions scheduled for next week. 

Mr. Alfonsin's state of siege suspends the 
rights of only 12 persons, six of them officers 
suspected of being behind the bombing cam- 
paign. Imposing it was the only way to assure 
their detention without waiting for a long 
judicial investigation, a risk he judged un- 
acceptable. The decree is also a risk. To dilute 
democracy even briefly, and even if for only a 
few. can weaken it for all. No state of siege is 
admirable; in another setting, any suspension 
of civil liberties' would rightly set off the loud- 
est alarms. But Mr. Alfonsin. a democrat, has 
acted on behalf of democracy. Freedom-lovers 
elsewhere can only hope that his dramatic 
action will be both brief and successful 


— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Aged 40, With Much Yet to Do 


Only one major colony, Namibia, remains 
in the world. evidence in itself of the effective- 
ness of the United Nations in facilitating de- 
colonization. But among the newly indepen- 
dent nations there is grievous need for the sort 
of assistance that the world organization 
uniquely provides in finance, economic devel- 
opment, political reorganization. 

LIN peacekeeping units, precluded by big- 
power unilateral initiatives, have had no role in 
Afghanistan, Vietnam, Grenada, the Domini- 
can Republic, Czechoslovakia or Hungary. 
But they have helped cool tempers and ease 
tensions in Kashmir, Cyprus and the Middle 
East, they have turned back aggression in 
Korea, they have struggled with the convul- 
sions of nationhood in the Belgian Congo and 
they still stand guard on Israel's frontiers. That 
function needs elaboration and perfection. 

Much that the organization accomplishes is 
invisible. No one can evaluate precisely the 
role played by quiet corridor diplomacy at UN 
headquarters in October 1962. when the world 
teetered close to nuclear conflict in the Cuban 
missile crisis. Each year's General Assembly, 
however truculent the rhetoric, however trou- 
bling the seemingly mindless bloc voting, is a 
switchboard for dozens of chiefs of state and 
foreign ministers, meeting as they can nowhere 
else, sometimes for jjomp alone but often for 
calculated maneuvering to defuse some of the 
scores of conflicts that plague the world. 

As there is disappointment and frustration, 
so is there a sense of progress In the way that 
the organization and its specialized agencies 


have been able to marshal global resources in 
attacking disease, malnutrition and illiteracy. 
The process has tried the patience of Western 
nations, but it has also been a triumph of sorts, 
for it is their values that the organization has 
made central in its adoption of the Universal 
Declaration of Human Rights. 

“We must be realistic about our difficulties 
and the dangers that we face," Javier Pferez de 
Cuellar asserted in his annual report. “But let 
us also resolve to find the ways by which, 
together, we can surmount them.” In 40 years, 
no one has contrived a better place for that 
effort than the United Nations. 

— The Los Angeles Times. 


The United Nations celebrated its 40th 
birthday much as it has lived all its life — 
strong on perorations, light on results. The 
commemorative session failed to agree on any 
statement at all about the Middle East, the (me 
major international problem that has been 
with the world body from its birth. 

For years now the secretary-general has 
been hinting that his emissaries were bringing 
the Afghanistan problem to the brink of a 
solution. As usual, no UN solution is in sight. 
President Reagan, in a speech that inclined 
more to image-building than reality, an- 
nounced that he will take over this subject at 
the Geneva summit This and (he other region- 
al issues he raised wiH certainly not be solved 
there next month. But an East-West summit is 
the only place where they’ might be solved. 
Entering middle age, the United Nations has 
still grown no real muscles. 

— The Sunday Telegraph (London). 


FROM OUR OCT. 30 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: £n^and Wins Aviation Cop 
PARIS — The Coupe Internationale d’ Avia- 
tion goes to England. Mr. Claude Graham 
White, in a Bliriot monoplane, won the speed 
trophy ai New York’s Belmont Park [on OcL 
29] in the sight of a vast throng gathered to 
witness Lhe crowning event of the greatest 
meeting in the history of aviation. Mr. White 
was the first of the eight qualified competitors 
to start in lhe 62-mile race against time, finish- 
ing in 1 hour 1 minute and 4 seconds. This 
victory gilds the fame of the Englishman, who 
has recently had a successful career In the 
United States. For the rest, ill luck appears to 
have lain in wait all the week while the lesser - 

events passed by, only to leap out In pursuit of 
the competitors in the big race. The accidents 
were sensational and heart-breaking, though 
not attended by loss of life or serious injury. 


1935: Italy to Resist League Boycott 
ROME — Premier Mussolini has issued orders 
to the Italian nation to reduce consumption in 
order to resist the boycott of the League of 
Nations. The era of sacrifices win begin No- 
vember 5; its duration has been set for six 
months. It was decided to reduce imports of 
beef; the production of Osh will be intensified; 
and the hunting of game is to be facilitated 
even on national reserves. State and local ex- 
penditure is reduced. The hours of work in all 
state offices will run from 8 am to 12:30 and 
from 3 to 6 pm. to curtail consumption of coal 
for beating and electric power for lighting. It is 
reported also that arrangements have been 
made between Italy and countries not apply- 
ing sanctions. Coal mil be supplied by Germa- 
ny and Poland, lignite by Austria, oil by Amer- 
ica, meat by the Argentine, wheat by Hungary. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER, PuUukcr 

PHI DP M. FOISIE Exkuim Efitor RENE BONDY thorn Pab&sfutr 

WALTER WELLS Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate PaMahfr 

SAMUEL ABT Deputy Editor RICH ARD H. MORGAN Assoame Piiilsher 

ROBERT K. McCaBE Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Dutaor of OpemaaM 

CARLGEWIRTZ AssmKM Editor FRANCOIS DESMA1SONS Director ^Ora^mon 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Dirretor of Advertising Saks 
International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Cbaries-dc-GauHe, 92200 NeuiUy-sur-Seine. 

France. Tel.: [\) 47.41.1165. Telex: fi 12718 (HeraW). Cables Herald Paris, ISSN: 0294-8051 
Directeur de la piManian: Walter N. Thayer. 

Mamma Da. Asa Mokobn Gam, 24-34 Hanessy Rd, Hong King TeL 5-285618. Tdex 61170. 

Mmame Dr. UK: Mm MacKidm 63 Long Am London M2 TeL 8364301 Telex 262009. jSSs] 
Cot Mgr. W. German: W. Lnaabock Friahidm. IS. 6000 FrmkfunJM. Td (069PW55. Tbt 41021. 

S.A. au capital de UOftOQO F. RCS Nantem B 732021 126. CmnassUm PariUan So. 61337. 

US. subscription; S322 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Lang Island City. N.Y. I110L 
-3 1985 , International Herald Tribune. AU rights reserved. 






WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 30, 1985 




For a Start, 
How About 


A Test Ban? 


Bv James Restou 



W ashington — president 
Reagan has an odd habit of 
evading things he can do and concen- 
trating on things he cannot possibly 
do H& speech at the 40th anmversa- 
iy of the United Nations is merely the 
latest evidence in poifiL 
It was well within his power, to get 
his divided administration together 
on a settled amts control policy. This 
was expected of him before he went 
to the united Nations and a month 
before his Geneva meeting with the 
Soviet leader, Mikhail Gorbachev. . 

No such policy was disclosed ai the 
United Nations Tor the simple reason 
that no such policy exists. Instead 
Mr. Reagan diverted attention from 
the arms issue to the s et tle m ent of 
regional disputes and human rights 
violations in Afghanistan. Angola, 
Cambodia. Ethiopia and Nicaragua.. 
. These is nothing wrong with Unk- 
ing the settlement of disputes to the 
control of midear weapons. In fan, 
the Charter of the United Nations 






kVsTlNiAKilJi 


Cffihr 


'Hijacked an Italian ship, murdered a Jew in a wheelchair, reinforced U.S.‘IsraeH relations — ’ 


The PLO Role: An Indispensable Peace Partner 


W ASHINGTON — Has terror- 
ism killed the Arab-Israeli 


VV ism killed the Arab-Israeli 
peace process? Or can new initia- 
tives get it going again? For all the 
deplorable violence of late, the fact 
is that the peace process will not 
succeed without the Palestine Lib- 
eration Organization. Leaders on 
both sides have to find a way to 
overcome the effects of violenoe. 

King Hussein and Prime Minis ter 
Shimon Peres have both proposed 


By Harold H. Saunders 


Both Prime Minister Peres and 
King Hussein must consider how to 
convince the other that he could 
achieve important goals by negoti- 
ating. The United States, as a full 
partner, must help build confidence 
that negotiations could work. 

To begin with, to enable Israel 
and America to move, King Hus- 
sein needs to state his readiness to 


Hussein and Arafat have to convince Israelis that 
the PLO will stop terrorism and make peace. 


negotiations with international sup- 
port, but this diplomatic movement 
guarantees nothing. The obstacles 
to negotiation are political, and pol- 
iticians must remove them by work- 
ing actively to build political sup- 
port — even pressure — for nego- 
tiation. The peace process is first 
a political process and only second 
a negotiating process. 

Leaders on both sides must de- 
cide whether the recent terrorist at- 
tacks are to be allowed to derail the 
peace process. They can point to 
continuing violence as evidence that 
lhe other side does not want peace. 
Or they can deplore the violence but 
focus on the peace process. 


negotiate in a way that compels Is- 
raeli attention, and PLO leaders 
need to endorse his offer uneqmvo- 
cably. They need to stale their 
readiness ^negotiate with Israel on 
the basis of UN Security Council 
Resolutions 242 and 33S, declare an 
end to violence by groups under 
their control and commit them- 
selves to conduct future relations 
with Israel in a peaceful manner. 

.As the United States learned the 
bard way at Camp David, those 
Palestinians still living on Pales tin- 


represent aQ Palestinians in accept- 
ing the partition of Palestine. 

Beyond this, King Hussein has 
told President Reagan and, indi- 
rectly, Prime Minister Peres that he 
cannot negotiate creatively unless 
the PLO shares decisions on com- 
promises. To cement this partner- 
ship he must help Yasser Arafat 
convince his colleagues that the Pal- 
estinians can achieve recognition 
and self-government if they stop 
terrorism and negotiate. 

But Mr. Peres must also assert 
some political leadership. On Oct. 
21 at the United Nations he chal- 
lenged Jordanians and Palestinians 
to negotiate directly with Israel He 
knows that be can best manage poli- 
tics within the Israeli governing co- 
alition when negotiations are gong 
on. But to make negotiation hap- 
pen, he also needs to help King 


support in Israel for c han gi ng the 
status of the West Bank and Gaza. 
Needless to say, he cannot begin to 


Needless to say, he cannot begin to 
do so until Kin g Hussein and Mr. 
Arafat convince Israelis that the 
PLO will stop terrorism and make a 
lasting peace with Israel 

How can Washington help? If the 
political divisions in the Israeli co- 
alition do not permit it to assure the 
Palestinians that they will eventual- 
ly be allowed to negotiate for them- 
selves, America must step in to help 
get the PLO to the table. King Hus- 
sein would prefer the Americans to 
meet directly with the PLO so as to 
symbolize UJS. recognition of the 
Palestinian people’s right to negoti- 
ate for themselves. But he would 
also be greatly relieved fay Ameri- 
can recognition of the Palestinians 1 
right to sdf-detennmation in land 
from which Israelis withdraw. 

The job now is not just to arrange 
negotiations. The job for leaden on 


Hussein and Mr. Arafat manage all sides is to create the 


their coalition politics. 

The PLO leadership knows that 
Mr. Peres heads a divided cabinet, 
half of which opposes real Palestin- 


environmeot for sincere 1 


The writer, assistant secretary of 
state for Near Eastern and South Asian 


provides a perfect justification fat 
doing so. The main principle of the; 
Charter is in Article 2, Paragraph 4: 

“All members shall refrain in their 
international relations from the 
threat or use offorce against the 
territorial integrity or political inde- 
pendence of any stare, or in any other 
manner inoonsisteai with tire par- 
poses of the United Nations." 

Instead of sticking to this sound 
principle, Mr. Reagan delivered a 
provocative sermon, glorifying the 
U.S. record and the capitalist system 
while denouncing the Soviet record 
and tile Communist system. 

In his approach to the summit 
meeting. President Reagan apparent- 
ly has two thmpi in mind; 1 

First, if hesticks to his “star wars" 
poScy and demonstrates by. testing 
that he can “hit a fly in the sky” — as 
Nilata Khrushchev used to boast 
Moscow could do — that .would force 
ooncessxxxs from Mr. Gorbachev. 

Second, by raising the issue of the 
settlement of disputes in which the 
Soviet Union is in violation of Article 
2, Paragraph 4, of the Charter, but 
not those in which the United States 
is in violation, Mr: Reagan, hopes td 
blunt the force of Mr. Gorbachev's 
tricky offer to cm selected nuclear 
weapons by 50 percent and negotiate 


urn land are not seen as fully repre- 
senting those two million exiles who 


ian self-government in the West Affairs from 1978 to 1981. is resident 
Bank and Gaza. Geariy, then, to fellow at the American Enterprise Insd- 


. a comprehensive test ban treaty. 

Ajjaujptm iv/6 to iku, a resment Thae are many experts in the nu- 
feUtM' atthe jpneriamEnurprisebisQ- ^ ^ bdieve thai a ban on 

tore and author of “The Other WaBz the testing of all weapons would be 

The PoEria of the Arab-Isrxb Peace the most effective brake on the arms 
He contnbuted this comment race, and that it would be infinitely 

to The New Yorfc Times. easier td ne gotiate an d verity than all 

tire other schemes so far proposed. * 
__ Bm Mr. Reagan has shown no ii£ 

e W/%A 71 /f o n/)// terest in a comprehensive test ban. 

A# y pitootTi His mind runs to fantastic schemes 
•/JT : that could not possibly be put in 

want peace soon and are-vriBiiig to '.* •: has finished 

compromise to achieve it. They in-. . . nissgEgnd t erm T his. ■ 1 ^3 nie ^ on ^ 
SmostPaksSSthSm- . mfortegnuffinxsbut alsoatfaome. 


seating those two million exiles who 
have lost their homes. Only the 
PLO, most Palestinians say, can 


persuade them to cooperate Mr. 
Peres must follow' his United Na- 


ture and author of 'The Other WaBs : 
The PoBtks of die Arab-Israeli Peace 


dons speech with concrete evidence Process.” He contributed this comment 
tbai he will try to build political to The Nett York Times. 


The PLO Role: A Troublemaker to Be Bypassed 


O XFORD. England — Jordan’s 
equivocal and ambiguous reac- 


V-/ equivocal and ambiguous reac- 
tion to the peace proposal put for- 
ward on Ool 21 at the United Na- 
tions by brad’s Prime Minister, 
Shimon Peres, indicates that the 
Middle East peace process is stfll 
deadlocked. King Hussein has not 
yet been able to take Mr. Peres up 
on his offer of direct negotiations, 
largely because he does not feel that 
he is authorized to pursue peace on 
bis own without the PLO. 

The only way to break this dead- 
lock — now or in the future — is to 
bold a referendum, under neutral 
auspices, among the Palestinians 
living in the occupied territories. 
They, as the party most directly 
concerned, should be asked whether 
or not they want King Hussein to 
negotiate on their behalf. This is the 
only way to refute the PLO’s claim 
that it and it alone must represent 
the Palestinian . people in negotia- 
tions about its future. 

Without such a referendum, King 
Hussein may never be able to nego- 
tiate with land for peace and terri- 
tory.' At the Arab summit confer- 
ence held in Rabat in 1974, the 
Arab states unanimously gave the 
PLO an exclusive mandate for rep- 
resenting the Palestinians. Since 
then several states hare had regrets, 
and in 1978, at Camp David, Egypt 


broke the Rabat consensus by nego- 
tiating autonomy for the occupied 
territories. Until this month. King 
Hussein has remained bound by the 
consensus, afraid to proceed toward 
peace without the PlO. 

Tacit endorsement for King Hus- 
sein exists already in the West Bank 
and Gaza. Over the years, and more 
so recently, the leading newspapers 
of the territories have prodded the 
PLO to grant the king a negotiating 
role. True, in the first years after the 
Israeli occupation in 1967 the PLO 
did give many Palestinians a sense 
of pride. However, as time went on 
fewer and fewer believed that it was 
capable of restoring them, or their 
lands, to Arab sovereignty. 

These misgivings deepened, espe- 
cially after 1977, when Israel’s set- 
tlement activity and land expropria- 
tions intensified. Most Palestinians 
in the territories now fear that all 
wiD be lost unless talks start soon. 

Aware of these anxieties, King 
Hussein suggested to the FLO, in 
Amman last November, that it 
agree to negotiate with land about 
an exchange of territory for peace, 
as stipulated in United Nations Se- 
curity Council Resolution 242 

This position contradicts the 
PLO’s principles and policies. But 


By Clinton Bailey ■- . ' want peace soon and are -wtOing to 

• J compromise to achieve jt. They ixt- 

isusbyneao- Yasser Arafat, feeling that King dude most Palestinians in theleni- 

ilia MMMiawad TJuoo ai i tV n*M«AA#ik T - - t A P i nc Tam^wi nmrn>r f 


port m the territories, subsequently 
agreed to let the king make peace 
overtures — primarily to the United 
States. He also hoped that tins 


Joroaman ana Egyptian govern- 
ments and the Israeli Labor Party. 

Advocates of the other approach 
do not want compromise and are 


Nopeacemitiatfoeuffleoergetofffa 
if it must vxi& for the extremists’ approval 


would lead to American recognition 
of the PLO without it having to 
accept Resolution 242 
Meantime, however, many Pales- 
tinians have understood that, the 
PLO’s continued refusal to re- 
nounce terrorism and accept Reso- 
lution 242 may well prevent the 
Hussem-Arafat agreement of Feb- 
ruary from leading to negotiations. 
This month, in particular, it has 
become abundantly dear that the 
PLO remains an unacceptable ne- 
gotiating partner both to Israel and 
to the major Western nations. Yet 
King Hussein alone cannot repre- 
sent the Palestinian people without 
their explicit endorsement 
There are two conflicting atti- 
tudes toward peace among Israelis 
and Arabs. Some on both sides 


He has. for example, presided over 
the largest budget deficit in Ameri- 
ca’s history, and he proposes to deal 
with it not by raising taxes and cup 
ting deeply into spending but by talk- ' 

mg endlessly about a constitutional 
a m endm e nt to compel a balanced 
budget- He will never get it 
That, however, is the way be is. He 
is not only the greatest escape artist 
since HoudinL, he is an escapist who 
prefers fantasy to reality. 

He started his UN speech by red- - - 
o impending that the dreams of the W ■ 


willing to forgo peace iodefiratdy to - ^ "T 

avoid ft. H» Arab advocates are ^ 

Syria, the PLO in all hs groupings te*mpered by a new realism. 

and the Palestinians wfaHSefai f h 5^ 0 . kn0 ^ 

Syria and lebanon..Th Israel they - ?***?& <*** *9*-!* 


and the Palestinians who live in 
Syria and JLebanan. ln Israel they 
are the parties of the right. 

These extremists may remain an 
irritant even if peace is achieved 
between Israel, Jordan and the Pal- 
estinians in the territories. But no 
peace initiative wall ever get off the 
ground if it must wait for the ex- 
tremists’ approval Mr. Feres has 
spoken. Those Palestinians who are 
interested in peace must be given a 
safe way to express their reply. - 


The writer teaches die history of 
Pcdestmian nationalism at Tel Aviv 
University. He contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


the o rga n izati o n. Those of us who 
were presenL at the creation in San 
Francisco cannot foiget that from the 
first day, members had no illusions 
that the five permanent members of 
the Security Council, with their ve- 
toes and their blocs, would agree to 
observe Article 2 Paragraph 4. . 

Mr. Reagan has never been a great 
believer in the United Nations, partly 
because the Communist and Third 
World blocs have used it to vilify 
America. He has good reasons for 
resentment But it should not be for- 
gotten that bloc voting was not in- 
vented by the Russians .but by the 
United States, and precisely during 


^ Elf* “ 


tun 


mis 


Mondale on the Deficit: Tax Revenue Has to Rise 


United States, and precisely during 

the San Francisco conference, where r ^-1 f IVi/ i 

votes- were rounded up for Washing- v ^ I * f w 

Inn k,, o. — vi.i.' •• * 


W ASHINGTON — It is almost a 
year since the roof, the stars 


VV year since the roof, the stars 
and 49 slates fell on Walter Mon- 
dale’s head. The visible scars — deep 


By David S. Broder 


TT ■ T* • ton by Adlai Stevenson, Nelson. 

Ha s TO JxlftO R< S kefd ^ r ^Thomas Finletter. 

-UMO If the 40th anniversary of the Unit- 

ed Nations was not a howling suc- 
through the House and which faces a cess, this was probably dne partly to 

WtA if SAM Ait few fha fftn* JA ” . 4L_ 


rings around the eyes, cracked voice 
— nave disappeared. The man who 


Senator Edward Kennedy, who sup- loopholes, broaden the tax base on 
ported the Gramxn-Rudman propos- corporations and individuals and 


Reagan veto if it goes on to him. the fact that number 40 is not the 


— nave disappeared. The man who 
sits behind the desk in bis Washing- 
ton law firm looks a bit plumper and 
much more rested than the candidate 


&1 and the earlier unsuccessful Re- raise more revenues 


He endorses less drastic measures happiest of birthdays. At 20 yob 
aimed at opening foreign markets to *now you can wipe out human stu- 


publican effort to give President gressive income tax. But if Mr. Rea- practices. 
Reagan line-item veto authority. gan’s veto threat prevented that, he dent gets 

i j_ rr J _ j ... m i. v a _ a 


who plowed doggedly ahead toward 
what he knew would be a bea ting. 

No one, however, recovers quickly 
from a losing presidential race. Mr. 
Mondale is honest enough to de- 
scribe his law practice as “good ther- 
apy” for his shattered ambitions. 
And he expresses genuine relief when 
a visitor says he would rather talk 
about current politics and policy than 
rehash the last campaign. 

He puts deficit reduction at the top 
of the domestic agenda, and he dis- 
agrees with ihe majority of Senate 
Democrats that the Gramm-Rudman 
“automatic cutback” mechanism is 
the right way to go after the defiriUL 

“I would have voted against it,” 
Mr. Mondale said, thus aligning with 
the 20- member minority of the Dem- 
ocratic minority. “That approach 
leaves the damage unspecified, but 


Mr. Kennedy defended both votes said, he would support a value-added 
as neoessary to strengthen the author- tax, a form of excise or sales tax used 


UJS. goods and curbing unfair trade pidity. Ai 30 you still tbiwv you can 
practices. But he said, “If the presi- do it if people will j ust get out of votir 
dent gets serious about trade policies way. Al 40 you know they will not 
ana the deficit, a lot of the protec- Maybe at the 50th or 60th. some 


ity of the presidency and to deal with in many European countries: a tax on 
deficits. Mr. Mondale said, “I don’t consumers. i4s president, I never 


it gives the president the whip hand 
... He can veto Congress’s budget. 
He can veto any tax increase. Then 
when he makes his cuts, you can't 
get a two- thirds majority to override 
him. I’m afraid ii would allow him to 
repeal wholesale the programs that 
he's attacked piecemeaL” 

Mr. Mondale's position puis him 
in agreement with his principal 1984 
adversary. Senator Gary Hart, for 
whom he has warm words of personal 
and political praise these days. It puts 
him at odds with his fellow liberal. 


accept" that rationale. 

“The line-item veto involves a 
grievous diminution of Congress's 
constitutional power, ** he said. “And 
if we gave that power to this particu- 
lar president, there is no way we 
could maintain the programs that we 
need to keep this a decent society. 

“You just look at the recisions [re- 
quests for revocation of spending 
programs] that Reagan has sent up 
[to Congress] and you know what 
he'd do. In my judgment, those who 
support such measures as the line- 
item veto are endorsing an abdication 
of congressional responsibility." 

Democrats are still on the defen- 
sive on the budget deficit issue, Mr. 
Mondale says, because “we haven't 
made the case successfully — certain- 
ly I didn’t during (he campaign — 
mat a tax increase is necessary. We 
have to face the need to pay our bills. 
We have to get the deficit down. It's 
the source a SO percent of our trade 
problems, of our agriculture prob- 
lems. of our industrial problems. 


would have accepted a value-added 
tax," he said, “but if it’s necessary to 
get us out of this radical impasse on 
the budget that Reagan's policies 
have created, I would do it" 

Despite Iris- strong rhetoric last 


tionist pressure will relax. If we^ adopt other leaders will mob ^ “fresh 
a defeatist-protectionist policy as a start" that Mr. Reagan about 
nation, we will bo the loser." Bat he did not insnire m nrh h«** >• 


On these and other topics, Mr. 
Mondale is not reticent. But he is not 
pressing, either. He made one speech 
to- a Democratic fund-raiser early itiw 
month and wffl talk to the Councfl of 
Foreign Relations in November. He 


Bat he did not inspire much hope. 
. The New York Times. 


year on the trade issue, Ml Mtmdale expects to be helping some Demo- 
is swinging back to the more liberal cratic candidates m 1986, but “noth- 


Leaen intended for publication 
should be addressed "Letters to the s \ 
EeStori’. and must contain the writ-* 


trade position he held as a Minnesota 
senator and a member of the Carta 
administration. He opposes the tex- 
tile bill, which went whooping 


mg that resembles a campaign ached- 
ule.” He has done that, and be has 
not forgotten what happened; 

The Washington Post 


ers signature, mane and full ed- \ 
dress, Letters should be. brief and. 
are subject to editing. We aumqt> 
be responsible for the return if 
unsolicited manuscripts. , 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Better Late Than Never needed com- “am***’ 


-etter Late Than Never meanuiat Uie ramify needed Com- “affies* m a- r 

. mon Market wflThttve been delayed ™ ' ■ AcjtiDe Lam© affair. 

Regarding “EC Envoys, ParBament by 25 precious years. Ztttepd has heard predoas-ht- 

'ash on Treaty Changes”:(Oa. 23): NICOLAAS GROENHART - S 

The Treaty of Rome, creating the Bnissek ~ in* 


Cash on Treaty Changes”:(Oa. 23): NICOLAAS GROENHART 

The Treaty of Rome, bearing the Brussels. 

European Community; was signed in 

1957. it ckariystipoiates that ail ob- There ^ When It Blattered 

stacks to the free movement of poo- ... •■"“W'WSfca 


tecemeaL" “I might even make a deal with the 

position puts him presi dent to accept more regressivity 
ith his principal 1984 m our tax system in order to get the 
ator Gary Hart, for deficit down," Mr. Mondale said, 
irra words of personal Ideally he would like to see the tax 
rise these days. It puts reform bill now being fashioned in 
ith his fellow liberal Lhe House used as a vehicle to close 


pie, goods, services and caprtalwilhm 
the Community should be abolished 
within a period of 12 years — that is, 
by 1969 at the latest. . . . - 
If tins goal is finally achieved by 




own terrorist problem, after the sink 
ggjrf the Rainbow Wanior by 
™ch government terrorism. Yet 
when New Zealand declines visits in 
its ports by anyone’s xmckar-annod 


rU.Z, AlBes: 
Interests'* Oa 


-W/. It takes onehand rm s^, 

in f r'i II ■ I •" n - * ■ 


Interests,** Ocl.151 It takes^ onShanS 
to ctmt the- countries wfaidi -were 

thaewto it mattered. World Wan I 


^n aBy after decades 


1992, as tSsEC Commission is now . and H, Korea and Vietnam New ^ lit ^ s ho^ at 

proposing, tbait wbuldnot"be fevoln- .Zealand was always there .as an -=• ttiend “ ips wonting out 


nonary, as ahnmenlatar Steven J. - . The United States is shocked 


not working Ou t— 


Dryden scans to think., ft wfll otriy • lack of support it has received from 


it is time to reassess your priorities. 

• G-E- SWINSONj : 


Audtiand. New Zealand- 


i 




*5? 

t-* - 


a *- 


r * 


¥ 

iAf 


U 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1985 


Page 9 


WSf^ 



INSIGHTS 


• .," SJT * ha. 

“•••-/ A 
; l- 

- v. ■' ■■v.e ;,1 . V* 

■■ .■:•'■? •4U' f 


; < ^5iSd6scope'ptecod oat him. He u Best takes' on a 
Jrifiy composure to charges that Jjf tnay be 


s.:,* 


:: i.j ..■‘Oik/*:- 


>L : :- 


n.f ” dB ’ 


®y Pete Earfey 

Washington ftw Sente * ' 

TV / ASHiNGTON 

YV ^at 85 the 

* J of Congress, is lufcjf 
rat the Florida Democrat is behind sdiedole as 
he rushes into a waiting CBS limousine. 

*S^iS5SMS?S 

hearing ads. She begins again; “One question 
“g.™ ask yon is, mo is the iypad vk^ 


, but an Eloquent Voice of the Elderly 



aH-18. 1 

Poshed, he becomes irritated, -complaining 


1 J?- 






*1 know,” says Mr. ftppetr 
= “Another question is: ‘Are there an 
betwttn the person who abases the 


Bwd 


“Any whatr Mr. Pepper interrupts. 

- “PARALLELS," she repeats, leaningdose to 
Mr. Pepper's left ear. “ANY PARALLELS BE- 
TWEEN ELDERLY ABUSE AND C HILD 
ABUSE?” 

*Twe forgotten, bat I think there is more 
elderly abuse ihan cbOd - abus e; or was h the 
other way around?” 

"‘NO she says loudly, '“THERE IS MORE 
ELDERLY ABUSE ... ITS INORJEASED 
SINCE YOU HELD HEARINGS IN 1581 BY 
4 PERCENT PER YEAR OR ABOUT 100,000 
GASES.” 

“In child abuse?" 

; “NO, ELDERLY ABUSE” : 

“Yes, when did we start?” 

“YOU HELD THE FIRST HEARINGS IN 
1981." 

“198IT V 

“1981. THATS CORRECT." 

The television studio is confusing. Conespos-' 
dent Bob Schieffer, who is in a New rock 
studio, will interview Mr. Pepper. Mr. 
Schie tier's face w31 appear on a large tdeviskw 
screen at Mn Peppers right Bat Mr. SdrieEfa’s 


r.:n 




dose to 






■ tt'S 
• :• :^85f 


T-.,- 


-5S 


: .^3* 

• JopUfc.- 

: SkrtC 

^, s < 

■ "w'iSfflM 


■i 


T do my best,” he says. "I tty loput in a frill 
day*-Henses eairiy, works late and has taken on 
a ft* agmda. Besides protecting Social Security, 
there are immediate concerns within his own 
district: Radio Marti, which broadcasts US. 
programs to Cuba, needs $3 millioaand Florida 
bankers want him to keep a branch-banking bill 
bottled up. His 1986 re-decticn campaign needs 
money. There is-an autobiography to finish. 

“So roach to do,” he sayi “So much to do. 
Fm jast too busy to get any older.” Later that 

evening hc talks of bis wife, Mildred, who 

of cancer in 1979 after 42 years of marriage. 


H f 


ER death rocked him: “I never think 
of mysdf as an old man. It sbodcs nk in 
way to think that I am. But 1 am 
actually an rild man! 'I don't believe it, 1 don't 
befieve iu It happens so gradually- No ooe wants 
to go unless you are in some terrible, terrible 
pamuYoc just don't want to go.” 

Tbe real difference between himv-W and his 
colleagues, he says quietly, is that “they have 
mdreTnne,” 

Me. Pepper, the oldest ofJdur children, grew 
uppoor tn rural Alabama. 

' . “T remember earning 65 cents per day as a 
youngster, djang plowing,” he recalls “On the 
vary home f stopped at the drugstore and bought 
& grapejttkednnk.il cost me 10 cents and. my, 
it was so defictous, cold and sweet. I remember 
thinking that I hoped I could see the day when 1 



substance. Not one, however, questioned his 
mental abilities. 

Mr. Pepper's severe hearing loss could ex- 
plain much of the criticism levied by Nlr. Gold, 
a radio personality who was miffed that Mr. 
Pepper could not remember his host’s name 
during show breaks. 

Mr. Ossofsky recalls 3 press conference dur- 
ing which Mr. Pepper seemed confused until a 
reporter repeated his question. “Then Pepper 
effectively galvanized the room b> answering it 
better than anyone else on the panel.” 

The most-ofien quoted incident of Mr. Pep- 
per seeming to be confused occurred in 1984 
during a fierce House battle over the MX mis- 
sile. So crucial was the vote that toe Reagan 
administration had dispatched Air Force jets to 
ferry back congressmen who might vote for toe 
missile. In the House itself. Mr. O'Neill, cigar in 
hand, hovered, counting votes, pressuring party 
members who wavered- In toe end. MX oppo- 
nents won toe skirmish in three votes: 199 jo 
197. 198 to 197 and 199 to 196. 

Mr. Pepper, who eventually supported build- 
ing the MX. did not vote, the next day. the 
media speculated that Mr. Pepper had avoided 
the vote as a favor to Mr. O'Neill. But Mr. 
Pepper denies that. 

“The speaker." Mr. Pepper said, “came over 
and he said, ‘If I were a man your age. I'd go 
home and go to bed.’ He said there probably 
wouldn't be any more votes and if there were 
any. they would be late at night. 1 thought about 
it awhile, and then I went home and went to 
bed” 

Mr. O'Neill's press aide declined to comment 
on Mr. Pepper's explanation, but congressional 
aides and reporters found it damaging “Either 
O'Neill hoodwinked him, which is his fault, or 
be simply didn't know what was going on,” a 
congressional aide said. 


• ... ’ " ^r- B Bat 

" • ■’•MiUilok*. 

V:-- 

S «i-. 
■;-. J 

J; > 

• disputes ■ 

. m vWajt. 

’. -if tieQ^. 
-rich 

• Mr. Rogat* 

■■.■•ft: of Jig 

* . * dntis; 

• _ r-^anjtdgj- 

-••c riMf.ciiij. 

" »qu5R; 


vote will comcfrom a floor spoate nor Mr.- S?“ *■»<«« «f JtoK *r=P< mi ay. 

Pepper’s left foot. Mr. Pepper, meanwhile, is v>wc 
told to look neither left nor right, but straight 
ahead into a camera. - 
“Rochelle?" calls Mr. Pepper, as toe "CBS 


Morning News” title appears on screen. 

“YES SIR?” 

“The hearings, were they before our full com- 
mittee?” 

“YES, SIR.” 

• “And they were in .. 

“IN 1981, SIR.” 

’ “1981, OK. OK. 1981 ” 


me another,' 1 

He paid his own room and board at toe 
Unhnendry. of Alabama by hauling coal and 
ashes every day at a power plant. Later, he 
waited tables to help finance his legal education 
Ml Harvard: 

“I shudder to think what I would have be- 
come if 1 hadn’t been able to get a good educa- 
tion.” Mr. Pepper says. 

'After graduation Mr. Pepper taught briefly 
.and then settled in Florida, where he developed 
a reputation for defending the poor and unedu- 
cased. In one case, he kept the state from execut- 


>M tVaumgron tap 

Representative Claude Pepper. “Fm just too busy to get any older." 


cal annihilation ever conducted in Southern 
politics.” 

Mr. Pepper was mercilessly attacked for his 
anti-segregation views and openness toward the 
Soviet Union. He was branded at one point as 
“Red Pepper." 


H! 


■ ' More than anyone else, Claude Denson Pep- .. ing one of his cKotk for 19 years until prosecu- 
per is perceived as the spokesman far 26 m3Eon tars gave op. 

Americans older than 65. . Hewasoected to the state legislature in 1928, 

A Time magazine cover in 1983 called him bin voted out of office after one term after he 
“Champion of toe Elderly." He is. known cm refused to s np por t a re sol ution rfmf censured 
Capitol Hill as “Mr. Social Seoirity^ because of Lou Hoover, toe wife of Herbert Hoover, for 
his dogged fights to spare it from cuts. He inviting a blade person to a White House tea. 
remains the most sought-after campaign speak- Mr. Pepper Mt rural Florida after that for 
er in toe Democratic Party because he can draw Tallahassee and took his parents with him. He 


hteiijM 5 bu S e crowds of toe aged, the segment of society cared for both of themmni] they died. 

: - TiHL • 7 0 / 1 T h fh/" h«t vnritlff rpmrH Fio)it wan Tain- Ur Pnwur niw *1 


isUke: 

-V-' auaiTrift 

vfjfreg 

-.r^jr-hijK; 

. .•.'^ratassia: 

'..'fnato 
: •■-. in: 
.-.i jfiris et 
Tfct.cre 
: bjiKia 

•• .••.jtrrltai!": 

■ ‘mpobsc 

. -efiubki- 
. .r.^rjaasc 
: .-onaiito 

. i; dsatk- 

it: 

• i.. -ciij 


Eight, years later, Mr. Pqiper was elected to 
fiD a vacant. Senate seat. He immediatdy fell 
under the spell of President Franklin D. Roo&e- 
vdL 

Mr. Paper’s loyalty to FDR prompted the 
New. Ypik Herald Tribane to write, “When the 
White House has an important balloon to send 
iq>, it invites Senator Pepper to supply toe 


with toe best voting record. 

“Clande Pepper has come to symbolize the 
elderly in this country,” says Jade Ossofsky, 
executive director of the National Council an 
toe Aging. . 

Mr. Pepper’s enthusiasm is inspiring. Al- 
though be is paunchy, hard of hearing, sBgbtl/ 

Stooped and has a | mechanical valve in tps heart 

thal bears with toe hdp oFJl patximaker.^Mnj : ■heccasaiyjorarQrical h eh'um for the ascension.” 
Pepper regularly works. 15.hpws,^day, chaiwxi 7 Tbat ieyflity. hdped' end.Mr. Pepper’s Senate 
toe powerful House Rules Committee and ttav- -careen I944,^Roo®evdt asked Mr. Pmpcr to 
els frequently, carrying his own bags. - suwon toe vetoof a rax bill favored by Edward 

. When he had his pacemaker surgically in>- B«L toe politically powerful busioessmaa who 
planted three years ago, he is said to have asked: controlled the mdtanilhoii-doUar- DuPont es- 
“How long wlD the battery in this thing last?” tale in Florida. Mr. Pepper agreed and Mr. Ball 
, “About It) years,” the doctor replied. vowed revenge. 

v “Thai you’d bettor give hie three of than Mr. Pepper made another powerful enen^ by 

now,” Mr. Pepper said. “TO comeback later far joining a movement at the 1948 Democratic 
more if I need them." - . convention to damp Harry S. Truman. Time 

: As with any person his age; it shows. Mr. ma ga zine reported that Truman summoned 
Pepper often takes afternoon naps, forgets George Smatoers, then a congressman, and 
names and retells stories. Sometimes he asks his said: ~T want yon to beat that son-of-a-bitch 
. - -i, , staff to drivehim from his congressional office Claude Pepper." 

hcross ihesireetto toe House fora^ votebecause Mr. Smatoers challenged Kfr. Pqiper in 1950, 

he is too tired to walk. waging a campaign that is described by Robert 

Mr. Pepper denies that he has lost any physi- Sherrifl in his book, “Gothic Politics in the Deep 
.cal or mental ground, and he resents the senflity Sc»th , ”m the “most elaborate crusade of polin- 


— -ra! rill*** 

rtf 


E was sound!)' defeated and returned 
home broke. In toe next eight years, be 
built a profitable law firm in Miami. He 
lost a Senate bid in 1958 but was elected in 1962 
to a newly created House seat in Dade County, 
where toe population had doubled in a single 
decade and where 80 percent of toe registered 
voters were Democrats. 

Mr. Pepper was, at first, a politician without a 
cause. But in the mid-1960s, when Miami's 
crime rate became toe highest of any large city. 
Mr. Pepper hustled a bill through Congress that 
created a joint House-Senate cnmmiurtft on 
crime. He became its airman 

In 1977, Mr. Pepper was named chairman of 
toe House Select Committee on Aging, and he 
quickly gave it national prominence. 

Mr. Pepper had a track record: a concern 
abouttoe elderly that can be traced bads, to his 
state legislature days when he sponsored a law 
that allowed persons 65 and older to fish with- 
out state licenses. . . 

Protecting Social Security from budget cuts 
soon became his goaL In 1982, Mr. Pepper 
campaigned for 70 Democratic candidates in 25 
slates and at each stop blistered President Ron- 
ald Reagan for proposing cuts in benefits. 

“1 would grab toe hand of toe Democrat thal 
I was helping, and I would raise it high and I 
would say, 'And this man or woman promises 
you that he or she will vote against cutting 
Social Security.' ” 

Nevertheless, when the Social Security pack- 
age reached the House floor in 1983, Mr. Pepper 
lost. His colleagues gave him a standing ovation, 
and then voted against his proposal. 

“I know who they are,” Mr. Pepper says of 


been an opportunity for me to do somethin g for 
them, i haven't cone it.” 

Recently, Mr. Pepper has been quietly voting 
more conservative. y because his district now has 
more Cuban Americans — 5-0 pe rcen t — than 
anywhere else in America They are not liberal. 

“Representative Pepper has grown more con- 
servative,” says Richard A. Pettigrew, chairman 
of the Dade Cottar. Democratic Executive 
Committee, "but he has remained essentially 
true to his fundamental vision of this country — 
that everyone, no matter how lowly their begin- 
nings. deserves an op p o rt u nity." 


Y: 


A“ 


ND as Mr. Pettigrew sees it, toe congress- 
man has satisfied his constituency: 
"Quite frankiy. Pepper could be re-elect- 
ed here posthumously.” 

David Gold, a radio talk-show host, was 
blunt riming a recent broadcast in Miami: “Do 
you think that Claude is playing with both oars 
in toe water?” 

Mr. Gold is harsh in his appraisal: “No one 
wants to talk about it because he is such an 
endearing man, but 1 think Pepper, at times, is 


' ET, during a recent debate on whether 
the House should cut S3 million f rom the 
budget of Radio Marti. Mr. Pepper rose 
without notes and with liule preparation deliv- 
ered a speech so eloquent that bis colleagues 
stopped talking among themselves and later 
applauded. 

“Let us not silence, let us not soften the voice 
of liberty and freedom and democracy,” Mr. 
Pepper said. “Let us put wherever we can toe 
arm of words, as we did in other days of this 
country with our Declaration of Independence, 
ideas more powerful than guns.” 

“Claude Pepper is bound to have slipped 
some with age.” says Mr. Pettigrew. “But I’d 
rather have Claude Pepper at 75 percent than 
most politicians at 1 10 percent. ” 

Claude Pepper holds a photograph of his wife 
in his hands as be sits in his apartment dining 
room. “Many people thought she was the most 
beautiful woman in Washington when we first 
came here. She was so intelligent and so witty.” 

He looks around. “Everything is exactly toe 
same here as it was when Mrs. Pepper left it,” he 
says. ”1 fed a considerable closeness to her here. 
I didn't want to disturb toe place that I’d been 
with her. 

"Her toilet articles are all in our bathroom 
and on toe shower curtain there is a little note: 


can’t live without you!’ And she never said a 
word again about il 

“1 realized later that one of the greatest ’.rage- 
dies of my life was that I never told her. we never 
talked about, how much. I. uh, but you see I 
never abandoned hope. I always thought that 
they would find some cure, and T never" wanted 
her to get down, so 1 just never tailed i.? her 
about her, uh. going. I later found out that she 
had known her condition all along. I hadn't 
hidden anything from her. I'd only cussed the 
chance to say goodbye. 

“That has caused nw much sadness, much 
sadness.” 

Mr. Pepper later spoke adamantly in Con- 
gress in favor of a bill that would have allowed 
patients suffering terminal illnesses such as can- 
cer to use heroin. 

“I told them about my wife’s suffering . . . 
about that killing, terrible pain, hut the;, were 
afraid that they’d be accused of voting fo; drugs, 
toe bunch of damn weak, spineless bastards. 1 " 

He was at her side when she uem into a c^nta 
and he was still there days later when she died. 

“At night,” he says, “when 1 20 into our 
bedroom and look at her bed next to mire. I av. 
’Hello darling, hey’ and 1 su down and thick of 
her and talk to her and that helps, but 1 still get 
very lonely for her, very lonely.” 

A stream of admirers is always there, ever, 
when he is eating. 

“You are one of this country’s greatest Amer- 
icans," says one white-haired man. 

“God bless you, Claude Pepper." says anoth- 
er. 

“My. my." s3ys Pepper, “people say the nicest 
things' to me." 

“1 have always considered politics a form of 
ministry." he says, “ft has an almost religious 
feeling to iL That's why I can’t understand this 
man Reagan. 

“1 hope I will be around in a few years wher. 
the spell of his personality wears off and seri- 
ous-minded politicians sit down and try to eval- 
uate him. Is be a down, a barker at a circus? 
Who is this man? This Ronald Reagan?" 

I NSIDE the television studio, Mr. Pepper 
sits slumped in a chair on toe small stage 
set, toe floor speaker by his foot, toe screen 
10 his right, toe camera dead ahead. He stares. 
He is tired. Earlier, he had complained: “I don’t 
know how many more of these I want to do. It’s 
too hard getting up at 5:30." He looks very old. 

“OK sir, five seconds." toe cameraman says, 
and begins the countdown on the fingers of his 
outstretched hand. As the seconds" tick off, 
Claude Pepper begins a remarkable transforma- 
tion. He shifts forward, he looks suddenly alert 
his right hand moves upward, ready to stab toe 
air to make a point 

When Mr. Schieffer asks how serious a prob- 
lem abuse of the elderly really is, Mr. Pepper is 
center stage, his voice commanding. 

“It's extremely serious, Mr. Schieffer. and it is 
growing more serious all toe time. Our commit- 
tee oo aging held its first hearing on this subject 
in 1 98 1 and we were SHOCKED to find out toe 
extent of this abuse. It has increased about 4 
percent, about 100,000 cases per year since we 
held those hearings." The timing bkween words 
and phrases is perfect, toe diction flawless. 
“Who are toe victims, congressman?" Mr. 


,7^7, ‘What you are finished vour bath, please close Schieffer asks. “And who are toe people causing 

the curTaLn.' Apparently.* I had been leaving ihe to abuse- 

curtain open so Mrs. Pepper left me to note. “Musi uf to ABUSE comes from INTI- 


staff protects him and drags him around by the 
nose.” 

Mr. Pepper's image in Washington is differ- 
ent- “He is simply brilliant.” says Christopher J. 
Matthews, administrative assistant to Represen- 
tative Thomas P. O’Netil Jr„ the Democratic 
speaker of toe House from Massachusetts. 

“I have been simplv dumbstruck by Repre- 
sentative Pepper's ability to recall details about 
his discussions with President Roosevelt, talk 
about complicated budget matters and then 
weave them together lucidly to mate a point,” 
says Dr. Robert Butler, founding director of the 
National Institute on Aging at toe National 
Institutes of Health. 

Several House members, who would not al- 
low their names to be used, criticized Mr. Pep- 


open so Mrs. Pepper ! 

It’s still up there.” 

He recalls toe first time he saw her. “She was 
wearing a bright yellow dress and when I saw 
her, I said. That’s toe prettiest girl I have ever 
seen. I’ve got to meet ha.’ " 

“They were just a delightful couple," says the 
comedian Bob Hope, a family friend. “Mildred 
had a delightful sense of humor. I know that 
Claude was really knocked out when she left." 

The Peppers spoke only once about toe possi- 


MATE family members," came the reply. “For 
example, we had a SHOCKING case where 3 
son ROBBED his mother of her monev and 
BEAT HER UP and RAPED ha." 

“What should be done?” asked Mr, Schieffer. 
Mr. Pepper doesn’t flinch. His reactions are 
as polished as Sir Laurence Olivier. 

“We must set up organizations to encourage 
and put pressure on those who have knowledge 

„ about abuse of the elderly to reportthai abuse’" 

bilily of Mildred dying after doctors diagnosed he says. “States must pass tougher laws to pre- 


the Democrats whom he helped elect and who pa, saying he engages in political demagogy 
lata voted against him. “And when there has and is more caxnfonable with generalities than 


her cancer. 

“We were having breakfast one morning in 
Miami. She was sitting across the table from me 
and suddenly, she said with considerable sad- 
ness in ha face, 'Claude. I guess we have just 
about come to toe end of toe road.’ 

“Well, I burst into tears and rushed around 
and embraced ha, and I said, ‘Don’t say that. I 


vent elderly abuse and federal funds must be 
allocated to oigpiptions that make preventing 
such abuse a priority.” 

ft has been another successful performance 
by toe master politician. Claude Pepper, toe 
poor Southern boy who at 15 dreamed of being 
president of toe United States, has been tested 
once again. He can still bring down toe house. 


Ib»* ! f 

mK 130®“ 

use 1 *? 

pirjtri*'. 


i-dN'n^ 




4' 


MV) ^ 

. -vr ** 7. 

■■■ r. 

• r 1 -r # 

- - ' i.** ^ 


UN Election 
Threatens 
Neutrality of 
Refugee Post 

r' By Lisa Schlein 

International Herald Tribune 

ENEVA — A confrontation between a 
,U.S. -backed Swiss candidate and an in- 




lan office. 

During the next few weeks, the UN General 
Assembly will elect a successor to toe present 
high commissioner. Pool Harding of De n ma r k, 
■who completes an eight-year term -at the end of 
this year. 

Traditionally, the high commissioner is elect- 
ed by consensus. But, tins year, diplomatic 
'sources say, brightened rivalry between the two 
. chief contenders for toe post — ■ Butros Bntros 
■ Ghali, 63, the Egyptian minister of state for 
. foreign affairs, and Jean-Ptene Hockfe, 47, to-- 
i rector of operations for the International Com* 
' mjttee of the Red Cross might, for the first time 
in its history, force the issue to a ■vote;- 

; “That would be a catastrophe for the 
■.UNHCR,” a diplomat remarked. “The princi- 
ple of unanimity is vital because the UNHCR 
^pust be seen as being completely impartial.” : 

He said that a vote against any particular 
candidate by a bloc of countries would compro- 
mise toe organization’s standings “The work of 
■toe UNHCR must be seen as something which 
goes beyond political concerns." 



For Many Czechoslovaks, 
Commitment Is to a Cottage 


Potd Hartfing, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, touring a Vietnamese refugee camp in Hong Kong earlier this year. 


JVw WV_t VUU mmamn 

The office was established by iheUN General 
• - *• Tifi 6 : -Assembly in 1951 to help thousands of Europe- 
‘ l s3 \,n 0 ■'an refugees displaced by World War D find new 




v.^ 


■homes. "it was thought that- the office would be 
dissolved at the.eadof its three-year man d ate . 
Lfeut refugee problems around the world have 
■kept the agency at work ever since. 

The office now cares for 10 million refugees 
-throughout the world. In the past 35 years, its 
-annual bud ge t has risen from 535 million to 

’ S500 milKn n la recognition of its humanitarian 
-service to refugees in snch countries as Indone- 
sia. Sudan, Bangladesh. Pakistan ; and Cyprus* 
ihe office was awarded the Nobd PeaceTnzein 
15*81; 


Mr. Burns Ghali has been lobbying hard for 
the position of high commissioner for more than 
ayear and is said to have lined up impressive 
Third Wodd support for his candidacy. He is 
considered 19 be a very agfle diplomat. As a 
dose associate of Egypt’s slain president, Anwar 
Sadat, Mr. Butros Ghali helped negotiate the 
Camp David Agreement wi th Israel However, 
this success is seen, as a major liability for Mr. 
Bonos GhaH’s candidacy among the radical 
Arab states that opposed the agreement. 

A potentially more serious problem lies in toe 
doubts being raised about Mr, Butros Ghaii’s 
fund-raising abilities. The organization’s critical 
financial situation has become toe pivotal issue 
in this debate. Mr. Hocke is widely seen as 
someone who can bring toe office back to finan- 
cial health. 

Diplomatic observers say these financial con- 
siderations- now probably are working in his 
favor, provided the choice is by consensus. 

" Kit the observers say that Mr. Butros Ghali 
can probably still muster a majority of toe votes 
in the Gen rial Assembly. Thus, in an effort to 
assure his dection, they say he might decide 10 
disregard the rule of consensus and call for a 
vote. ' . . . 

Such a move could seriously affect the office's 
work by politicizing what has, until now, been 
widdy regaided as a nonpdrtical office. Unlike 
many UN agencies, the office rarely has been 


criticized for being used for partisan political 
interests. 

The organization is faring a serious budgetary 
shortfall of $40 million. Mr. Harding blames toe 
high value of the dollar and a spate of emergen- 
cies in Africa for toe financial crisis. If donor 
countries do not make op this deficit, the new 
high commissioner could find himself running a 
bankrupt organization when he takes over Jan. 

Because of the financial squeeze, countries in 
Asia and Africa that maintain large refugee 
programs reportedly are lining up behind Mr. 
Hodc6. Though he is generally recognized as a 
tough negotiator and able administrator, Mr. 
Hocke’s close identification with the United 
Stales has, until recently, tended to hurt his 
can did acy. Now this identification is seen as an 
advantage in many quarters. 

T HE United States will be contributing a 
third of the organization’s S500 million 
budget for 1986. Mr. Hocke’s relation- 
ship with Western donor countries including toe 
United States, which ispushinghis candidacy 1 , is 
regarded as giving him a marked advantage in 
fund-raising. 

Mr. Hocke’s supporters rqect assertions that 
be. as high commissioner, would become toe 
servant of U.S. refugee policies. They paint out 
that when he was directing International Red 
Cross operations during toe TWA hostage crisis 


in June. Mr. Hocke resisted intense U.S. pres- 
sures to have toe Red Cross an as a go-between 
in negotiating efforts. 

He stuck firmly to his contention that media- 
tion of that kind went counter to the Red Cross 
principle that all parties involved in a hostage- 
taking situation must formally request Red 
Cross participation. Contrary to some pub- 
lished repots, neither toe United States, Israel 
nor the hijackers formally approached the Red 
Cross 10 negotiate the release of the hostages. 

Three other men are vying for toe post of high 
commissioner: Max van der Stoei, 61, former 
foreign minister of the Netherlands; Anders 
Thunborg. 51. Swedish minister of defense, and 
Tom Vraalsen. 49. Norwegian delegate to the 
UN in New York. While iheir chances are 
generally regarded as slira, they cannot be 
counted oul 

This session of the General Assembly runs 
until Christmas. If no clear winner emerges, 
then toe UN secretary -genera!, Javier Perez de 
Cudlar, will have to find 2 compromise candi- 
date. Mr. Hartling. 7 1, has ruled out any possi- 
bility of continuing in toe post. However, ob- 
servers believe he might be persuaded to 
reconsider. 

Another name that comes up periodically as a 
dark horse candidate is that of Diego Cordovez, 
a UN special envoy. He is a member of Mr. de 
Cuellar’s inner circle and chief negotiator for 
the UN-sponsored talks on Af ghanistan 


By Jackson Diehl 

H'as/Ungton Past Service 

T REBAN, Czechoslovakia — Jiri Roubek 
is a burly, 55-year-old bus driver who 
spends his workdays navigating toe con- 
gested streets of Prague and his weeknights in a 
rramped dry apartment ■ 

Every free day from April to Ociober, howev- 
er, Mr. Roubek and his wife can be found here 
in a cozy two-story cottage along toe tree-shad- 
ed bank of the Baounka River. In theory, they 
come 10 relax under their apple trees or in the 
lazy, leafy warmth of toe river bank. 

Yet Mr. Roubek says il is here that his hardest 
labor awaits. “AH I do here is work,” he said one 
recent afternoon, proudly pointing out toe new 
stairway and boiler that are his latest projects. 
He sighed with satisfaction. “Now we have to 
tend toe apple trees. If I want a real holiday, I go 
somewhere else.” 

Mr. Roubek's zest for chores is not uncom- 
mon in Treban, where 600 weekend cottages 
now surround 200 permanent houses. In fact, 
industriousness seems 10 be toe prevailing ethic 
among toe tens of thousands of Czechoslovaks 
who have made toe securing, tending and im- 
provement of weekend cottages into a kind of 
national cult 

For yean, the economy of this tightly con- 
trolled nation of 15 miluon people has been 
plagued by stagnation and low productivity. 
Political life has been frozen since toe Commu- 
nist Party’s efforts at liberalization were crushed 
by a 1968 Soviet-led invasion. 

So frustrated intellectuals, bureaucrats and 
workers seem to reserve their best ideas and 
time for country homes and private hobbies that 
have marked a whole population’s quiet with- 
drawal from formal civic life. 

“ft’s a way to live,’' a Czechoslovak journalist 
explained. “la the ary. you live in a small 
apartment in a satellite suburb. In toe country, 
you have your own place. You have your own 
garden. Sri you work like hell to fix it up and get 
the frustration out or your body.” 

Diplomats and intellectuals in Prague say 
that Czechoslovaks’ preoccupation with privacy 
las grown more pronounced with each year of 
rule by toe country’s hard-line Communist gov- 
ernment Since taking power in 1969, the leader- 
ship of the Communist Party secretary, Gustav 
Husak. has dung to the orthodox policies of the 
1950s and 1960s even as roosi other Eastern 
European nations have experimented with polit- 
ical or economic reforms. 

Here, public attitudes seem numbed by a 


penetrating sense of stagnation. “We don't have 
events in Czechoslovakia, we just have a situa- 
tion," said Jiri Dienslbier, a spokesman for toe 
dissident group Charter 77, “and it’s been toe 
same situation for toe last 17 years.” 

The by-product of this immobility ha* been a 
highly centralized, chronically sluggish econo- 
my that nevertheless has consistently offered 
Czechoslovaks relatively high living standards 
in exchange for relatively little work. 

The alienation from "formal responsibilities 
has grown so great that it has become a frequent 
subject of analysis for toe official press. The 
Communist Party newspaper Rude Pravo, for 
example, recently criticized the “formalism and 
passivity” among young Communists and com- 
plained of low attendance at party education 
courses. 

Other reports have pointed to a steep decline 
in worker productivity since J 980. A 1 VS4 study 
in toe region of Slovakia estimated that workers 
in some industries wasted up to 20 percent of 
toeir time on toe job through such practices as 
arriving late, leaving early and taking long 
breaks. 

Recently, there have been signs of a revival of 
both ideas and activism among Czechoslovak 
youth, who are said to reject both the official 
political establishment and the quiet, passive 
alienation of those scarred by toe failure of 
reform in toe 1960s. 

R OMAN Catholic church leaders report 
rising interest among toe young in reli- 
gion as an independent form of expres- 
sion. Government officials estimate that as 
many as half of toe 100.000 faithful who partici- 
pated in a church celebration of St Methodius 
in the town of Velehrad last summer were 
young. 

In Prague, interest in jazz and rock mu!>ic has 
spawned a large network of semiofficial and 
underground associations that stage small festi- 
vals on toe city’s outskirts on weekend nights 
and circulate uncensored bulletins. A growing 
number of young intellectuals are said to be 
seeking out menial jobs that allow them 10 
pursue independent research and writing. 

Yet ah these small signs of change are easily 
outweighed by phenomena such as the rush for 
cottages. On Friday evenings, Prague seems to 
empty of life as cars jam the freeways. 

“Everybody likes to joke about how you be- 
come a slave to your ‘hut,’ " said a Prague 
professional whose "cottage lies only a 40-minute 
drive from Prague. “But it’s the only place 
where you can go and sweat for yourself and not 
give a damn about anything else.” 


E*T^85'i^l’? s ’V 




Pi 

6 


1 

I 


Ri 

thi 

lio 

la 


S.< 

56 


la* 

m 

co 

itt 

01 

A 

SI 

q> 

di 




Pagre 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1985 


** 


NYSE Most Actives 1 


VOL High Low Lost Chg. 



AMR 

OWjPn 

IBM 

9EX 

EOS Air 
PocGE 
CmwE 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open High Low Lost On. 


Indus 1341.78 1377J9 1354.18 1368J3 t OJA 

I Tram 445.01 65X38 641 2} 65040 + 4J0 

Util 1S9J2 161 AJ 15049 16034 + 091 

Comp 54053 SSIM 54753 55X76 + 166 


NYSE index 


High Low Clow ctrge 


Composite 

Industrials 

Transe. 

UMiuies 

Finance 


I09J1 10048 109,19 +0.77 
125J0 IJ4JB 125J2 *■ 0 JO 
102.90 19114 102.71 +050 
37.14 3447 57 J? +048 
HUS 11450 114*9 +1JI 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonas 

Utilities 

Industrials 


dose 

79.43 

T7M 

8214 


Cn'ae 

■i- 0.19 

+ 0JD5 
+■ 0-33 


NYSE Diaries 


Clow Prev. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Hlpns 
New Lows 
volume up 
Volume down 


999 

538 

464 

2023 

67 

20 


m 

815 

487 

3014 

39 

30 


71546,100 

2A7T8JW 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. I 


Oct. 28 
Oct. 25 
Oct. 24 
Oct .23 
Oct. 22 


‘included in the sales figures 


Buy Sales 
145511 377568 
142*87 342.908 
T 63574 400044 
16X734 441,929 
154,442 433.194 


•Shit 

1*33 

12082 

17541 

20473 

11504 


1iiesda>5 


NISE 


Closing 


Vol.aM PA. 


uuouog 

97580 AM 


prev.4PJA.val.- 
Prev consolidated due 121574590 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street and 
da nat reflect late trades elsewhere. 
> ta The Associated Press 


amex Diaries 


OOW Prev, 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows ■ 
Volume up 
Volume down 


308 

223 

W 

780 

21 

12 

4502.110 

2414X440 


Standard & Poor's Index 


industrials 

Tranwr; - 

U ilium 
Finance 
Composite 


High Low Close arte 
21156 206.92 21042 +150 
16853 14758 16853 +052 
B441 84.17 +054 

2X37 2253 2X32 + 02? 
189 J8 1873* W33 + 157 





56 


218 9J 
257 11.1 


250 55 
32 25 
172 113 
1J0 24 
-50 22 
M 1J 

32) 4.4 
T.92«11.1 
J2 1-7 


.12 


244 


SAle 9.7 
UO 23 


24*9 1* AAR 
17*9 9ft AGS 
50ft 29ft AMR 
23*9 18*9 AMR at 
2i!9 23 ANRpf 
13ft 7*9 APL 
*U<6 lift ASA 
27 1019 AVX 

2BW l«'v AZP 
60 38*9 AbILaD 

2S-TS 19*9 AccoWd 
24*x II '7 AcmeC 
101: 7'A AemeE 

19 li’k AaaEx 

20 lilt; AdmMI 

15'= 0*0 AdvSvs 

36*9 22!'« AMD 
12"0 4'i Ad vest 

15*« 10 Aerflex 
J9*0 34*9 AefnLt 
57W 53ft AelLpt 
37*4 2314 Ahmns 

3*9 2'= Aiioen 

57 4J'*a Air Prd 

24*9 17*7 AirhFrt 
2% lft AIMoa •: 

3®ft 23»« AlaP p< - 
33*ii 29' * AlcP of A 3.92 1X8 
6*9 4*9 AlaP dP< 57 11.1 

74 41 AlaP of &16 115 

75 tO AlaP pf 

26*9 12'- 7 AI&LAir 
25 12*3 Albrtos 

33' * 26*9 Albtsns 
3I'A 23'.; Alcan 
3819 27*9 Alcostd 
32 21 Ale.Alx 

30 20*9 Alcxdr 

8*'7 72' 4 Alls Co 
241*4 24'= AlgCapr 254 105 
281* 20ft Alglnt I AO 5 A 
20*> 14V Alglnpt 119 115 
98 85'- Alai pfC1135 115 

36*9 28*9 AllgPw 170 8 J 


25 14 

13 


9J 2219 21*4 21*4 — ft 

_ 127 74*9 15ft 14'<4 + *3 

7 11620 39'* 38 38*4 

84 2T= 23*9 23*9 + ft 

1 26lg 24I* 24% + 'v 

10 ID ID 10 

102 3s'» 34*9 36*9— - 

156 11'-= 11 lift + V* 

7 2580* 24*4 24’i 24*. + ft 

5 754 5T= 54'= ST* + *4 

7 192 23’9 22*9 2 2ft + 

38 ITO 11*9 71% 

1 12x ?ft 7 7ft + 19 

194 17** 17*4 17**— *9 

8 73 18*4 181= 18*4 + *= 

62 14*1 14'-i 14'.*— >4 


Stock Prices Firm in New York 


United Press International 


3S 3004 24W 23ft ZP9 <6 

Bft + ft 


IA 20 113 T9 Bft 020 + ft 

13 124 iyi 14*i 14*9— *9 

55 14 2T74 46*4 47*4 48*9 + ft 


80 


& J92? 


1A8 X7 11 
50 19 12 
.I0e 5.7 
X74e «5 


254 

19 

iS 


858 11.7 
.14 3 7 

38 15 18 
.76 25 12 _ 

50 3A 45 1Z73 

150 35 12 
I/n 2-1 


1541 1.9 


25 


24 l6'-4 All end 

45 42 AldSgnn 

66 Va ta AldS pf A +12 6-S 
63 58*4 AiOSPfC 6J4 1U 

111 105'= AldSpfD12JW IIJ 

41 47*4 AiidStr 2J0 35 

9V= 3*4 AlllsCIi 
2*U 22*. ALLTL 
2Wi. AICOO 
19*« 11 '<4 Amax 


28 = 29' a Amax pf 3J>o 1X2 


36 221* AmHeS 1.10 

140'*3 W'l AHespt 150 
2*4 l*i AmAgr 
25ia 14 ABdkr 
70 53'- A Brand 2.90 

301= 25*4 ABra pi X75 

70*9 54’i ABrd Pf 257 

1171= 56 V= AB0C51 150 
3019 20 V. A Bid M 56 

-ML- 4A|_ ADI4QI 


291= 201= ABusPr 54 
60i> 47'= AmCon 2-90 


2S*. 22'. ACon Ot 250 11.4 


57*9 42 A Can at 100 43 
T0'9 lift ACODBd 220 10.7 
30ft 25*4 ACaoCv 251e 9j 


1.90 


M 


11 5*9 ACenrC 

57*9 441= ACvcn 
2ff*9 19 ADT 
34;= IA. AEIPw 
49*9 34'4 AmEiP 
26*9 14i» AFamis 
36' 4 23*i AGnCo 1.00 
16 5 AGnl wt 

56*. 52 AGnl pf A 3570105 
71*. 47*4 AGnpfD 254 4J3 
26*s 28 AHerlt 120 
13*9 71= AHOlst 

66*9 48 AHome 190 
4819 26>4 AHaso 1.12 
07 Va 73 Amrtch 6-60 
91*4 42 AlnGrp .44 
151 114 AIGppI 555 

23*9 16 AMI .72 
4*9 2*. AmMOl 
29 I3'» APresd s SO 

13’a 5 ASLFla 

181j 12‘A ASLFIP1Z19 145 
15*= U>9 AShip 50 7-7 
35*9 24*. AmSta 150 52 
*7*s 15*9 Am Si or 54 15 
78 46*9 AStr pf A 438 A1 

58*9 51 AStrpfB 450 115 
24*9 18 AT&T 120 55 
~ AT&T pf 354 *2 
AT&T Pf 3.74 9J 
AWolrs 150 32 

AmHatl 220 14.0 

554 82 


54*3 56 54 

36'= 35 34*9 +H9 

2*4 2*9 2*9 

54*9 54*i 54<<. — U 
21 31*9 20*9 — *9 

1*4 I*. 1** 

- 28'= 23*9 28’= 

13 30*i 30>9 30*9— ‘9 
?> V% 7*4 7> + '■= 
1140: 73 72 72 +1 

HOz 71 71 71 +1 

948 I8*» 17*4 18*9 — *4 
69 23' = 23 Ti 23 Ti + ^ 
623 29*r 29'. 

.. I D*-. ZTi 23*9 
32 34 33*4 14 + *4 

1100x 30*: HP* 30*9 +1 
44 2T= 27*4 27H + *9 
IS? 80 79’.= TO*. + ’* 

2 24V= 24V: 24*= 

2839 24 25*: 26 + ** 

5 l!F9 18*9 18*9— ’1 

12 9S'.= 94'-= 95V9 +1 
955 31*9 30*9 37' i + *9 

50b 25 16 148 13*9 23U 231= + <* 

3492 43*9 «2W 43V9 + *4 

3 43 631* 43 +1 

132 aJ'-i STt 601= + i-a 

13 10n= lD6'i 107 + 

1041 581. 58'.a 58'- — l 9 

235 4'- 4 41= 

77 29*. 29*i TT -: + *9 

32*9 32*i 32V9 + la 
11>.= 11'- 11*9 — 
30’= 29'.= 29*=- *9 
31*9 30 30 —2 

t 135 im 134’ 4— 9. 

730 1*9 1*9 lit + 19 

357 24*4 24'-. 24*9 + *9 

590 5» > 56*= 56*. 

24 29*9 2T-9 29*9 

1 57*i 57*9 57*9 + *9 

354 117*9 117*9 117*9 + 

217 23*- 22*4 22*.- >T 
H 25*9 25*= 25*9 

359 55 54*9 54*9- *= 

43 24*4 24*9 24*9— 

79 481= 48'-9 48*9— *9 
58 201= 20'- 20 = + *9 

21 26*1 26'-= 24T9 + *9 

4 51= 5*1 S*= + *9 

17 15 14J9 51 't 50't 50*1 + *9 

.*7 U 7 308 28*. 28 28*. + *= 

23,6010.1 9 3483 22*9 2I'« 22*9 + '= 

1J4 10 74 8564 4479 43*9 4J*i +1*9 
58 1.9 16 22S 24 M*- 2S»4 + H 

1598 31 30*9 30--9— *9 

349 12 11*. 11*3— '* 

100 56-9 56 56U + *9 


1.96 

1J0 

.101 


65 9 

17 30 12 


17 25 3971 
25 


10 
6.9 8 
9J 


75 20 
35 13 
25 13 
53 TO 


37 


16 70 


100 S6-9 56 561 J + »9 

3*0 6214 8l't 62'A + V. 

11 3Ta 33*- 33*4— 19 

2*5 »*i 9*9 9*9— '9 

5.1 11 7957 56*9 55*9 561= + *9 

Z4 16 7736 47*9 47X9 4719— «9 

‘ 2070 94V> 92V: 94 +1*. 

89’4 90 




23 1561 91 


90-0 +1Vj 


10 2082 


3 ISO ISO '—! 


31 


D82 2010 19*9 ir=— *A 
775 2'» 2*6 2*4 
333 16V, 15*9 16 

‘ 7 — Va 


h* 7 
IP- ISVt 1 
11*9 IIMi 


1R- 


136* 31*4 30*9 3IF9 + *9 


27*4 17 
28't 14 


15 19584 
5 


87 4\'= KFU 61Vj + *» 

6 TV* 72 72*. + *4 

10 57*4 571= 57*4 


2B 


72'= 6IA. ATr pr 
18 61= ATr *c 

»»-. 6* ATrun SM 
441*4 26'-= Ameron 150 
50 24'= AmesD 

23-19 22*9 AmoDwi 
291= 1«t9 Arnetek 

28*9 IS 1 -! Am foe 

16 319 Amfesc 

70'u SO'*. Amoco 
3r 9 2 7 1 : AMP 
22*t ll*= Amoco 


21 20 20*. + *. 

3tf* 39’,= 39 v= 

40'-4 4019 40*« + 1= 

27*1 26*9 27*9 + t 

16U 15*9 15%4—V. 


A9 

35 

A 


8 


681= + V- 

Rtft 

44’9 + *9 


jen 


44T9 *4*9 4410 + *9 
22*. 22 V9 22H— *9 
: 24’A +1 


23** 12** Amrep 
* ‘ AmSIti 


37*9 22*1 
4S'-4 30 Amsted 
4'i l*v Anacmo 
24 '9 16'+ Anlag 
27*9 19i« Anchor 


31*9 AnClav 


5.0 
\J 17 
3 23 


9*. AndrGr 

271 1 17 Angelic 50 
39 *b 23'i Anheuss 30 
78 52 Anheu pi 350 

19's 13'= Anlxlr 28 
16*i 91= Anthem 314 

19= 107* Anihnv 54b 3J 

12'= 9>k Apocne 28 21 II 

2 1= ApchPwt 

1919 15Vb ApchPunZ.10 11J 
3»9 30 ApPwpf 4.18 13J9 

31’= 27*9 ApPw pf U60 125 

391= 15*= ApIDta 1.7M 9J 33 

151= 81= AppIMg 27 

24*6 16*9 ArchDn .14b 5 12 

3U: 26V= ArIPpf X5B 1X2 

1041= B2 ArIPpf 10J0 105 

257= 14 ArkBst 50 25 9 

24 > 16 Art la 158 55 26 

■w '+ ArinCo 

151= 11 v= Armada 

11*9 6*. Arm co 

22'= 151= Armcot 110 105 

241= 131= ArmsRt) .48 35 8 

39*. 28*. Arm Win 1 JO ' 

34»*| 23*6 AroCP 1J2D 

1 8 'A 11 'A ArowE JO 

3016 T6 A lira 33 

27 16*9 Arvins 80 

27*. 1 6*. Asarca 

37 23*1 AshlOII 150 

44V. 35 AshlOpf 3.96 

38 24<4 AsdDG S 1.40 

120 79 AsdDPt 4.75 

23’-= 18*9 AIM one 150 

19*. 22% AtCvEI X58 

66*9 *2 A II Rich 4-DO 

450 288 AtIRcpf X00 

160 100*9 At! Re pf 280 

17*6 10Va AtlasCp 

29'.= IB** Aupal 50 

54*. 351= AutaDt 58 

r.« 4 <m Avalon n ^Ke !J1 9 

34*9 171= AVEMC 50 15 14 

39*9 20 Mi Avery 58 

24*4 70 AvfalJ 

38 'A 27 Avne) 50 

'47 I7 7 0 Avon X00 

28*9 1619 Avdln 


3 
105 
165 

53 68i% sb'A 
139 13*9 12*1 
6 83V. 82>A 
31 44' 9 43*9 
21 1520 

3J IS 272 24U 

59 2219 22V. 

49 3*9 3*9 
3.30D 4J 9 4556 TD'u 699= 

.72 2J 26 232iR3l'.g 30V: 

' 24 15 11 12*4 12*9 

11 2? 0*9 221= 

126 371= 37 „ _ . _ 

65 4029 40V: 40'=— *9 
147 3 2% 3 

615 20*9 2011 20*9— Vi 
74 25V. 241= 25V0 + W 

87 45 44*9 44*9— 'u 

57 13V 13*« 13*1 

58 2R« ZS 1 * 25% + V9 


JO 


1.40 

150 


17 9 
40 15 



20 

5.9 

3.0 33 
1.7 16 
23 U 


X3 13 3701 35*9 3*% 


— V9 


54 71*fc 71*i 71*1 + V. 

168 17 16*9 16*9— *9 

514 12*9 I2'A 1214 — % 

63 14 13% 13% — 19 

IX 12 1141 11*k 

124 1 ft S 

248 18*1 1BV% 18*9 + 19 

4 32<A 3219 32% — V9 

2 29*1 29*1 29*1 

90 1B% 18*9 18% + *9 

51 12% 12% 12% 

861 22 'A 21% 22 + % 

12x 29*9 29% 29*9—1% 
20v 99 99 99 + 'A 

69 25V1 25 25% 

611 X 19% 19J* 

1 11% 111= 11% 

«n 8= 8S(J m 

54 20% 19*4 20 + % 

17 14 13% 14 

557 J7 351A 36% +1 
82 34% 34*1 34*1 
51 11*: 11% 11*9 + V9 
11 22% 22 2211 + <A 

93 26% 26*9 26% — Y9 
786 17 16% 16% + % 

9S7 36 35 35*9 + 19 

71 42*9 421= 42% + % 
865 361= 351= 3619 +1 
7 116*9113 116*9+3% 
34 19 18*9 18*9- % 

222 27*4 27*9 27*9 + % 

5937 67% 66*9 66% — % 

2455 455 455 +5 

9 16014 160 160 

6 11*1 11% 11*9— IA 
132 22% 21*9 21*1—1 
806 53% 53% 53% + *9 

II 5% 5 5 — % 

7 33% 33 33 — % 

228 34V. 33% 34 

4 34*1 24*6 24*1 

793 33% 32'* 32% + % 

7J 13 1466 26 25% 25% + <A 

15 55 IBM. 18 18 — % 


NEW YORK — Share prices climbed in 
active trading Tuesday on the New York Stock 
Exchange but pulled back from setting a new 
dosing high for the Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age. 

The Dow was up about 14 points in midafter- 
noon trading but slipped from its highs to close 
with a gain of 8.74 at 1.36S.73, just shy of its 
record finish at 1,36929, set OcL 17. 

Advances outpaced declines by a 2-1 ratio. 
Volume totaled 1 10.6 million shares, up from 
97.9 milli on Monday. 

.Analysts said statements by the Federal Re- 
serve Board chairman. Paul A. Volcker. in To- 
romo -Monday night had a positive impact on 
trading. Mr. Volcker characterized current Fed 
monetary’ policy as “relatively accommoda- 
tive.*' He also said be did not expect recent 
growth in the U.S. money supply to renew 
inflation. 

This assertion reassured the equity market 
that any Fed attempt to slow money growth will 
not be so heavy handed as to endanger econom- 
ic growth, said Hugh Johnson, head of the 
investment policy committee at First Albany. 

Mr. V Dicker's statements were well received 
in the bond market, which is facing a S 17.75- 
billion Treasury refinancing effort this week. 
The stronger bond market — when the bond 
market strengthens, prices rise and interest rates 
fall — helped interest-rate sensitive stocks, Mr. 
Johnson said. 

Ham' Viflec of Sutro & Co. in San Francisco 
said the market would surpass the 1,400-mark 
on the Dow. 

“Downside risk is limited at this point,'' Mr. 


Daw Jones Changes List 


The Associated Press 


NEW YORK — The Dow Jones industrial 
average, the widely watched measure of activity 
on the New York Stock Exchange, is being 
changed to include Philip Morris Cos., and 
McDonald's Corp., Dow Jones & Co. said 
Tuesday. The two companies will replace Gen- 
eral Foods Corp. and American Brands Inc, 
which ore on the current list of 30 industrials. 

Philip Morris, a tobacco producer, is being 
put on the list because it is acquiring General 
Foods Corp. Dow Jones said it is taking off 
American Brands, the fourtb-laigesl U.S. ciga- 
rette maker, to prevent the index from becom- 
ing too heavily weighted on the side of tobacco. 
The addition of McDonald's, the parent of the 
fast food restaurants, to the list will insen a 
services company into the index and compen- 
sate for the overweighting of packaged conve- 
nience foods companies, Dow Jones said 


12 Month 
High LOW 


Slack 


Dlu. YleL PE TflftiHtgnLowQtaLQi’ge 


21% 17*4 ErtsExn 1JO0 AjO 
249 1% Eibtu 

m Enttrt 



13*4 in’exE 2500168 


.16 

JO 


En toxin TJ6 
1% Equfxs 1.14 
E out ink 

EqmkeF 

32JA fames 1J2 
8V9 Equllec 
14*9 10*4 ErtHnnt 
24% 13% EssSuS 
24*9 15 EuxCl 
28 1$ Eshlna 

25% 16% Ethyl s 
6 1% viEvanP 

9% 1*9 vi Evan pf 

12% 2% viEvnptB 
43=9 33% ExCftlo 1J2 4J 
17% 14*4 Ex co 1ST 1J601O.9 
54 'A 42% Exxon X40 63 


JO 

J2 

456 



74 

20*9 

19*6 

19% 


24 

el 

2% 

2% 

2*0- 

- (9 


62 

TTO 

11*6 

1119 

V0 


132 

14% 

14ft 

14% 

» 

11 

BO 

19% 

19W 

19% 


19 

30 

33 

31*6 

31*6 



239 

4 

3*6 

3%+ % 


14 

29*6 

29V= 

2TO- 

ft 

9 

138 

43U 

42 

43- + % 

6 

62 

9*» 

9H 

«(i + (0 

12 

516 

14ft 

13% 

13*9 

V0 

13 

28 

2090 

2tH= 

20*9 

I- % 

14 

39 

19 

18*6 

18% - 

ft 

30 

70 

16% 

14 

T6V9- 

% 

13 

489 

23*0 

2210 

23ft + *0 


280 

1*0 

1% 

1*9 



39 

2% 

2 

Tfa 



1 

3 

3 

3 + ft, 

10 

84 

40*6 

40*9 

401= — *01 


11 

17 

16% 

17 


9 

7345 

54% 

54 

54ft + (9 


70 52 FMC 230 

86% 6SV4 FMC Pf X2S 
28 20% FPL Gp 1.96 

13*9 9% FabCtr 38 

13*4 10 Foart 
20*9 8% Fatrehd JO 


X4 32 
ZB 

7 3 8 
30 21 
7 

TJ 


30 

M 

6 

J8 AS 9 
JO 24 19 
Mg J B 

■■ <3 IB 
22 


1JB4 


Villec said. “Investors can feel some assurance 
that they will see considerably higher prices 
near-term.” 

Beatrice Cos. was the most active NYSE- 
listed issue, easing H to 4314. Kohlberg Kravis 
Roberts & Co. sweetened its offer for Beatrice 
to S47 a share. 

AT&T followed, up & to 20 7 /b. Other interest- 
sensilive telecommunication issues also ad- 
vanced. Ameritech added Hi to 94, US. West 
1 Vt to 80M», Nynex 114 to 86. Bell South 1 io41£ 
and Pacific Telesis V» to 74%. 


JO 

X54 

1J0 

1J00 

^o'llJ 


_ 10 
a 

33 17 

84 

64 15 
64 14 
35 9 
16 t9 
3J 10 


12 Month 
High Low 


Slock 


Sis. Close 

Dlv. YlcLPE lOOsHloti Low Quo). Choe 


28*4 22 BrtTSpo 51 e 23 13 

5% 1 Brock 

28 16*9 Brckwy U2 68 13 

41% 34 BkyUG 3.12 7 A 8 


26% 3PA BkUGot X47 9 A 

11.0 


37% 30*9 BfcUG Pf 3. 95 
26*4 1519 BwnSh JO 
32*9 25 BrwnGo 1J6 
56 32*4 BrwnF 1J38 

40*1 28U Brrtswk U» 

40*9 29V, BrshWI SI 
19% 16 Bundy SO 
20 16% BunkrH X16 11J 

20’+ 14% BurinO 
30U 24% Burllnd 
68% 45 BrlNIh 
23*4 19*9 BrlN pi 
S3 46% BrlN pi 
18 ' a 9*% Bumdv 
68 52 Burro h 

20*9 II Butlrln 
5*i % Buttes 

13*9 2% Buies pf 1.051 


.9 9 
4j 19 
2.1 17 
26 8 


30 27 21*. 26*, + *9 

181 1% 1 1% 

117 77% 26% 27% + % 
115 42*4 41*9 42*9 +1<A 
tx25*i 25% 25*i + *9 
18x 36% 35*4 35*. + 

71 23<A 23 23 

262 30% 29*4 30 + % 

668 52*i 51*4 51*« 

358 37% 37*9 3779 + *9 


1.64 5 S 
1.40 22 
212 9J) 
SIM 9.9 
M 61 
260 
S3 


12 


IS 13 1113 30 29% 29% — % 

64 64 50 18 18 13 

8 18% I8U 18'A 

30 16’m 15% 16’i + % 

3116x 30 28% 29<% +1% 

816 6219 62% 62*9— % 

1 23*9 23*9 23*9 

1003 51*9 51% 51 %— % 

. 388 10^9 10% 10*4 

66 II 1522 56*9 55*i 56V. + '= 

23 B6 113 13% 13% 13% + 

52 1% 1% 1% 

1 2% S?9 2% 


29 

125 68% 

8% 4% CCX 
60*9 36T9 CIGNA 


18% CBI In 
CBS 


M 
3 M 


32L. 26% CIGpI 
53% 49 CIGpI 


260 

275 

CIO 


CIG 

7% 1*9 CLC 
5919 28% CNA Fn 
11% 9*i CNA I 
28*9 )6'A CNW 
49*9 3679 CPC ini 
26 !A 16% CP Nil 
22*9 19% CRIIMI 
28% 21*9 CSX 
40% 271= CTS 
12% 7*9 C 3 Inc 

33*A 20% Cabot 
17*9 8*9 Caesar 
25*9 13*A CcIFed 
54% 37V. CalFdPl 675 
21 13% Calllin 

15% 12 Camml 


XI 

28 19 

65 77 

8J 

73 


1J4 11J 


11 


1J» 


26 15% CRLko M 

CmpR a 


220 66 16 
ISO 58 10 
226*11.1 
1.16 65 9 
35 10 
431 

16 10 
13 

22 4 
95 
3Sb 1 J 
.13 3 40 


949 19% 1911 19*9 
631 110 108*1 108*. — I 
221 4 'A 4 4'A 

301 57% 5714 57*1 + % 

17 31% 31 31% + % 

68 5179 51% 51*. 

188 1*9 1% TO— % 

100 56 “ 

34 11% 

393 17% __ 

60S 48*9 47% 47% — *i 


u= i%— n 

^^ + V1 

17% 17*9- *9 


93 



AS 


36 10 
15 12 
15 14 
12131 
10 9 


65 9 
9J 

38 13 
61 

88 10 
9J 10 
60 
J 
18 


18 22 

IJ 21 


28 14 
13 
18 30 


B 


.121 

80 28 II 
“ 58 13 
15 14 


.92 

86 


7.9 13 

12 

10 
7.7 ■ 
38 II 


28 11 
45 5 


14’A 6*4 BMC 

35'= 21 IA Balrnco 
18% 15 Bkrlntl 
24K. 18*9 Baldor 
2% *9 vIBaMU 

10 2IA viBIdU pf 
30*4 20 Balls .72 
18*9 11% BallyMI 30 
11% 7*9 BollvPk 
Z3VA 18*4 BIIGE 8 1J0 
23% 15*9 BncOns 80 

5*9 1** Ban Tex 

«2 47*, Bandog 1 JO 

S5*9 37*9 BkBos ZAO 
54% 45% BkB pfA 6918 90 
54% 49% BkBpfB .99m 18 
47% 31% BkNY 228 5 A 
X3% 20*4 Bonkva 1.12 61 
73V, 12% BakAtn 80 5J 
47 39*9 BfcAmpf 4.»1 B 1X2 

lew 13*9 BkAm pf 288 
32W 36% BkARty ZAO 
75*9 50% BankTr Xffl 
27 21 'A BkTrpf ‘ 

15*6 9% Bonner 
39% 19 Bard 
25 1PU BcmGp 
41% 25*» Barnet s 1 
2B% 16*9 BarvWr 
13*9 6IA BASIX 
35*9 24'A BauSCtl 
16% 11*4 BaxtTr 
27% 20*9 Bay Fin 
34% 25% BttVSIG 280 
BearStn 

38*. 31 IA Bearing 1.00 
47 28 Beal Co 180 

06*4 52% Beal of 3J8 
16% 12% Brew M 
58*9 36 BednD 12Q 2J 14 
7*. V* vIBeker 

11 1% wIBekrol 891 

17% 13% BeldnH A0 
37*9 22% BelHwl 82 
37 22 BelHwPl 87 

97 76*9 BellAtl 680 

33 35*9 BCE a 

26% 19% Bclllrtd 
44% 31% Boll Sou 
57 41% BeIpAH 

m*9 24 Bern Is 
— “ B«nfCp 

Benel pI 630 }J8 
Benofpf 650 IU 
Benel gf X5D 108 
19% 16*9 Beneain IJ0 73 
6% JIA BengtB JT71 
9 3% BerKey , , „ 

15 10% BctfPd 2A ]3 58 

21% 141A BethSII M .28 
49% 37U BrihSIPj5« ]17 



46 B 7% 8 + % 

281 24*9 24'* 24 'A + % 
B37x 15^9 15*9 15% + % 
5!1 20*9 20 70 — 19 

1*61 1V4 1 1—19 

129 3*9 219 Z%— 1% 

23 28% 27*4 28 
1355 17% 17 17*9 + % 

5 9% «9 9*9 

1679 22V> 31*9 32 + *9 

220 22% 22% 22% — *9 
185 2% 2 2 

58 Si V, 51 51 'A— W 

95 50V1 50 50V, + *9 

2 54*4 54*9 54*9- % 
109 54% 53*i 53*9 + % 
126 42*6 42% «2%— % 
&82 27% Z7 27% + % 
303a 14*1 13% 14 + % 

5 40*9 40% 40*9— % 
354 15*9 15% 15*6 + Vi 
70 20V. 28 20 + % 

582 63'fc 62 IA 63>A +1 
5 26 25*9 26 

122 14*9 14% 14% — IA 
813 36V. 35** 36 — % 
205 23 22% 22% 

187 38<A 38 38 — <A 

132 17*6 17VS 17*9 + % 
125 8% 8% BVs + 


28 14 1085 29% 28*6 29% + It 
28 54 15B3 13 12% 13 

3 5 22% 22% 22% + % 

XI 21 7 32 32 32 

12976 22% 21*9 22 

11 12 54 31% 31% 31% 

61 929772 4iU> 43% 43%—% 
4 J IN 82 80 80%— % 

13 103 237 13K 13% I3'A— % 


85% 28 
80 31 

40% 33 
23 IA 1B_ 



54% 54% + U 
*6 V— % 
2*6 3 + M 

13% 13IA + % 
32 32% +49 

31*i 32 + % 
91*9 92 + % 

2% 30 + % 
„ _ 23% 23*9 + Vi 
81*6 40% 41*9 +1% 
a 60% 46% — % 


126 

16 

945 

879 


24 'A 10% BethStPf 


M. 


40% 29 Beverly 
26% 19*9 BIpThr 
24% 13% Bloefin 

26% 17V, BlockD 
27Tb M!A Blair Jn _ 3 
33% ini SlkHR s 1J6 
50% MW Boelnas 188 
$1 *7 BofseC 1.90 

61 50% BoteeCefSJO 

32% 18% BaltBer .10 
44*A 28% Bardens 152 
24*9 19% BorgWa Si 
1049 4*9 BorrrtnS 
44% 32 IA BosEd 1*4 
85 67% BasE pf MS 1M 

11% 9% BasE or 1.17 1&6 
14% 11% BasE or 1A6 10J 
25% 19*i Bswotr .72 M 
31% 26 IA BrlgSt 
66% 4714 BrisIM 
4*9 3% BrftLnd 

32*4 21*9 BrllPt 


. 16 1128 
X4 18 91 

25 

3J 16 


•36 38*9 38% 3S*b + % 
159 63% 42% 43*9 

3 37*9 37% 37*9 
300z 41 40 40 + *4 

lOOr 23V. 23<A 23IA + 4. 

23 1419 16*4 16*4 

4% 4IA 4*4 + % 
7 6% 7 

U% 14% »*« + Ik 

.. . 15% 14*9 15% + % 
308 39% 39% MU. 

334 20% 1919 20 

36 33V. 33*t + la 

24 23*9 23% + hi 

71 17% 17V. 17V. — % 
436 19% 19*9 19% 

564 34% 33% 23% + % 
62 14 105 32% 32% 32%— IA 
t* 15 5240 45*9 45% 45*9 + % 
67 22 987 40*6 39% 40% + % 
13 54% 54% 54% + W 

24 31 31 31 

333 42J9 41% 4t*A — % 
839 20% M% 20*9— % 

39 9V. 9% 9IA 

101 39% 39% 39% 

220i 02% 01 82% + % 

8 11 % 11 11 — % 

34 13% 13% 13% 

399 23% 22IA 22V.— % 
78 27% 37% 27%— VA 
X4 15 5675 56 'A 55% 55* + % 
21 5 4 8 4 

1.99* 60 B 417 33*9 32% 3314 +1% 


9J 
J 29 
18 12 
67 II 
13 
U B 


180 

1.88 


.. 8 

X9 12 


1J0 11 
X5 10 
62 IB 
TA 13 
7 A 7 



6*9 2% CmpRg .141 

46% 30% Camsp s 1 J5 341 14 

1519 11% CdPacs AB 

22 VA 16% CanPE g JO 

228% 151 CapCIts 3B .1 18 

27*0 19% CaoHds J7 U I 

110% 100*4 CooH pf 9Jle 9.1 
12*9 9 Caring g AS 

40 ia Z7*4 Carlisle US IB 9 

» 18% Cara Ft A0 18 11 

30% 23 VA CarPw 160 9J 7 

26*6 21 Carp pf 167 10J 

48 04*6 CarTac X10 48 17 

11% 6% Carrol SO 

24 ia 17*4 carPIrs 80 

31 22*9 CartHw 1J2 

46% 24*4 CartWI 80 

18% 12*9 CascNG 1J0 

16% 9% CasflCk 

29 15*9 CsttCPf lJBSk 

15*4 12 CstlCpf .90 6J 

3816 28% CafroT so 1 A 

sa xi 10 

loose 4.40 15 II 
Pl 650 10J 
r . A 25 

(tel 138 58 9 

test 35 1.1 ID 

27 20*9 Coo SOW XD2 7.9 7 

31% 22*6 CenHud 236 11J 6 

46 361A CnlUpl 650 108 

21% 16% CnllPS 184 8J 10 

29% 20% CnLoEl U» 7J 7 

37 31*6 CLaElpf 4.18 11 S 

1399 9 CeMPw 180 IBS' 107 

2116 1616 CVIPS 1J0 9J 6 

11*9 25= CentrDi 

12*9 8*6 CntrvTI 

23% 17% Cenvlll 

28% 18% ert-teed 

30% 16% CessAIr ao 

25*9 19 Chmpln 82 

27% 22 Oimlpf 13) 

54% 46*9 Chml Dt 480 

9% 7*6 ChamSo 80 

4% 1 vlOirtC 

1% VA viChl wt 
4% 1% vIChrtpf 

63*9 40% OKU* 380 

46 54% Chase pf 6J5 1X1 

481= 39*6 Chase pf 53S 11.1 

56 VA 51% Chase pI &55eTX0 

56% 51 Chase pl BJQelXS 
8% 15% Chelsea 72 12 9 

32 Vi 24% Chained 182 53 12 

44% 29% ChmNY 288 68 5 

44 VA 29% CnNYpf 187 69 
56*6 51% QlNYpf 608e 78 
55% 49% ChNYpf 6078 7J 
39% 32 Cnespk U4 38 10 


80 68 
280 138 
JO X8 


8 
8 
8 

IJ 28 

24 

S3 

9.1 

5.1 14 


68 5 


25% 

20% — U 
25% + % 
27% + % 
8% B% 

81* 23*i 25% 25*A + % 
832 14% 14% 14% 

1268 21% 20% 21% + % 
172 49VA 48% 49V1 + % 
82 1919 19% 19*6 
53 12% 12% 12% 

243 23 22% 23 + % 

634 2 'A 2V9 2'A 

68* 42% 41% 41% — % 
185 12 11*6 11% 

40 19% 19% 19% + % 
149 193% 191% 192 — V6 
428 23*9 23 23 — V. 

270 108% 108% 709%- % 

46 9% 9V9 9% + % 

49 28% 28VA 28% + IA 

92 24% 24*6 24% 

881 27*6 26% 27% + % 

9 25 24*6 25 

10 35% 35 35% + % 

35 7 6% 6% 

44 24 23% 24 + % 

323 28*t 28% 28% + % 

115 43% 42% 43% +1% 
IB 16% 16% 161b— % 

895 12% 11% 12% + 'A 
3 26% 26% 26% 

57 14% 14% 14% 

1904 35% 34% 35 + >4 

32 25% 2S% 35% 

391 138 IA 126 127% +1% 

3 43 43 43 — 16 

732 9% 9% 9*9 + % 

97 43 42% 42% 

341 23% 23% 23% 

2344 25% 25% 25% + IA 
133 26% 26 26% + % 

200z41% 41V= 41% + % 
174 1B% 10% 18*4 + % 

25x 25% 25 25% + Vfa 

25 3516 35V6 35% 

206 13 12*4 12% + % 

,41 19% 1919 19% + % 

190 4% 4*9 4*9— Vi 

116 11% 11% 11*4— % 

12 18 17*. 17*6— V. 

66 23 22*6 23 + IA 

14 30 2999 30 

4004 21% 21 21% + Vi 

10 XI 2299 3X7a— % 
2$ SI 4vy a 50*6 + % 
172 8 7% 7% 

2 ^ 2 £ TUfc 

16 le*6 66*4 66*4 + % 

6 47% 47% 47% 

13 54% 54 54% + *9 

575 53% 53V. 53*9 + % 

69 22% 2216 22% + % 

flO 28% 28 28% + *9 

1179 39% 38*9 39 +*9 

2 3814 38 VA 38 k. 

950 55V4 55 55 — *9 

664 54% 54 54 

10 34*9 34% 34% 


42% 31 ChesPn 200 46 1411208 44V4 42<A 43V. +)% 
3999 29IA Chevm 240 XI 911B66 40% 39% 39% — 'A 
200 *24 CtilMIw 65 175 *29 *23% *28% 

BOIA 53% OllMIpf --- -- 

29*9 16*9 QlIPnT JM 24 7 

11*6 7*4 Oik Full J« I 33)267 


9J) 


X12 65 
X16 11J 6 
7A4 1X7 
9J8 1X5 
gj2 126 
J2 48 19 


.10 


£28 52 
J2 18 J 


UO 


58% 31 ennser 
11% 10IA ChCftpf UO 
13% 7% Chrism 

14% 9% Chroma 

63 44 IA CHrmpf 

39*9 25% Chrvslr 7 j 00 
51 'A 3Q% Chubb s 
63% 50*. Chubb pI 425 
»!A 13*6 Church 8 A4 
27IA 21 aioorp 233 
51 39% anBeil - 

19*9 13% C nGE 
61 48% CinGpf 

73% 61 anG pf 
75% 60% anG pf 

26% 15% C in Mil 

w% 19% ardKi 
31 18*9 CWCitv 

30% 15 arcus 
51% 34VA Cltlcrp 
8% 6% Cloblr 

19*A 6% Clairs s 
32% 23% CJflrkE 1.10 42 
14 8% CtarHl 

221 a 16% civcy 
31*4 19% Ctva Pf 2-OD 100 
23% 18% C lev El X64 116 

64 53 CIvElpf 760 111 
6416 54 OvElpf 766 1X2 

14% 8'A aevpfc joi 

17*6 10 ClvpkPl 1.111 
18IA e% ClvPhPl 
45% 27% Ckjrox 
26% 14*6 avbMd 
39% 25% CluetIP 
3rt% 14VA Ch«i Hi 
21V. 9*9 Cadchm 

36% 16% COOSTI s 
U 27 Cstlpf 
74% 59% Cocoa 
71% 10% Coteco 
32% 35V. Coltmn 
33% 22% ColOPal 136 
4*% 40% COIBP Pf 4JS ... 
25V. 1614 CoWlks M 2J 
16% 9 CalMss .12 S 
33*9 25*4 CelPen 160 
65*4 50 Calllnd 150 
37 26*6 Cat Gas 3.18 &6 

48% 45% CaIGspf 5.12 103 
53% 45% CaiGspf SL15e 97 
.28% 25 CSOPI X4S 
till 102% CSO Pfo 1575 142 
(114 102% C50Pfnl5JS 142 
50 34% Combln - " 

37% 23*6 CmbEn 
71% 8 comdls 
18% 15% ComMll 
27*4 8 Vi Camdre 

37% 36 CmwE 
18*9 14% CwE Pf 
18% 15 CwE Pf 
24*6 19*4 CwE pf 
65*4 S3 CwE Pf 
30% 2214 CaniES 
38*9 23*4 Comsat 
35*6 2314 CPsyC 

44% 9% Cotvsn 


593 


47 


"9 


11 

S3 TO 


UB 

•40 

>10 

U3 

196 


UO 


3 65 66 65 + V* 

46 2116 3B% 20%—% 
31 8 8 8 

44 54% 53*9 53%— % 

1 11% 11% 11% 

23 11% 10% 10%—% 
62 14% 14% 14% 

B 62 61 W 61% — l*s 

X5 3 10333 39% 3SV= 391= +1% 
U KB 50% 49% 43% + % 

67 41 6314 62% 6314 + *4 

16 14 1710 1714 *6Vi 16*4— IA 
3.9 10 18 24% 24% 24% + Vi 

809 48*0 48% 4816 
1337 1800 18*0 18% 

UXb 59 5B% 58% — % 

350z 74 73*9 74 + % 

I3M 75% 75% 75% +1% 
265 15*1 15% 1S%— IA 
792 22*9 22% 22% + % 
376 22*4 22*0 22% 

51 25*9 25% 25%—% 
43% 42% 43% +1*0 
7% 7 7 — % 

770 13*. 11*9 12>A + % 
884 20 27*4 27*4— % 

62 12*9 12% 12% — % 
16 17 16% 16%—% 

IS 20 19*0 20 

J® 22*. K% 22*6 + % 
23*0 = 6l 61 61 + % 

28Mz 61*6 61% 61*4 + IA 
237 10% 9% 9% 

36 *I2U 12% 17% + *9 
101 10% 10*9 10% + % 
839 43*4 43% 43*i + % 
1073 71*4 21% 31% + % 
HU 36*9 2SI& 35VA— 1 
72 23% 22 22 — % 

,69 10% 10% IMS— W 
747 33% 31% 33% +1% 
2 53 S3 53 +3 

4.1 14 2736 77% 71V. 72% + *k 

2486 20*4 20% SOVi + 16 
*2 19 33 28*0 77*9 28% + % 

4,7 46 1962 29% 29% 2»%- IA 

9.1 50X 46% 46% 46% — % 
9 324 25% 24*9 25% + 'A 

651 14*9 13% 14*9 + % 
C2 10 6634J3 32Tb 33 +% 

42 9 76 6016 m 60 — % 

2177 3716 36*9 V + V. 
32 4816 47V. 47<4 + IA 

6 SJV6 52% 53V. + 16 

M 27*A 27*9 27*4 + % 
110*107% 107% 107%— % 
60*387% 107% 107% 

706 4646 43% 44% + *6 
395 77*0 26% 27Vi + U 
729 20*0 20V. 20% 

53 17% 17% 17Vi — IA 
,709 9% 9% Wb + *S 
9158 29% 28 28 —1*9 

M 16% 16Vb 16% + '6 

1 17W 171A 1716 — Vi 

2 2»*0 24*9 24*0— % 
100*61% 61W 61V. 

90 27% 27*0 27% + *9 
728 Z»kc2Qbc2M6.+ *> 


37\ 

lJe 11 13 

Mi 3 18 
U0 2J 18 
45 

U 13 
U 17 
15 



12 Month 
High Low 


Stack 


>*A 24% ConAgr UO X7 13 

30 16 ConnE 140 X8 12 

31 27*0 CrmNG 160 XB 9 

15% I2IA Conroe 40 X9 17 

38 7714 ConsEd U0 07 1 

47Vi 36% CanEpf 445 1X7 

50 40*0 CanEpf 5J» 10.7 

36 25 CnsFrl 1.10 XI 12 

47% 38*9 CnsNG 2J2 54 9 
8% 4% ConsPw 

31% 18% CnPpfA 4.16 141 
33*9 19 Vi CnPpfB 450 145 
56 32% CnPpfE 7J2 ISJ) 

56 32% CnP ofG 776 145 

31% 15*9 CnPorV 4.40 114 
25% 14 CnPprU 160 111 

2S% 14% CnPprT 3JB I5JJ 

28%. 14% CnPprR 4j00 15A 

28V. 14*9 CnPprP 3J8 149 

28 Vi 14*9 CnP prN X85 157 

18% 10% CnPprM2J0 15J 
17 9V. CnPprL 2J3 147 

29 15*9 CnPprS 402 110 


3=T9 23% FalrCPf X60 1X0 
1614 1U9 Fatrfd .18 15 
27 15V4 FamOls 

19 13% Faraiet 

38% 23 FrWsfF 
26T9 15*9 Famh 
13 8% FavDro 

6% 4% Feders 
43*6 32 FedJCo 
52 IA 31 IA FedEx p 
48% 31*9 FdHm Pf lA4e 44 
39 3CRA FdAtog 150 47 
22% 14 FedNM .16 
25 16*9 FedIPB JO 

. 30% 25*A FPao pf X31 
25 19% FedRIt 156 

19*9 14 FdSgnl 
68*9 49 FedOSt 
37 22% Ferro 

35 25*4 FI deal 

II VA 5VA FlnCnA 
I 5% 4*9 FlnCppf 
1 37*9 28*4 FlnCapf X23el&4 
I 6*9 2% FnSBor 

1 2B% 25% FlreFdn 
. 22*9 16% Flrestn 

27*0 15V. FIA1I s 

58% 53 PIAlfDf 6k25elU 
43 25% FtBkSy 1.60 *2 7 

34% 22 FBkFIS 1.00 73 14 
46*9 25\A F Basts UO 25 * 
26% 19*9 Fst Chic U 57 1 
95*A 86 FChi pfC 95Sel1J 
17% 10*4 FtBTex M 5J 12 
48 35 FtBTxpf 154el5J) 

19*9 6VA FtCilV 7 

29V4 127k FFadAz 58b 25 8 

60 43*9 FFB 112 57 B 

55*9 38% Flntste 250 12 7 

34 VA 25*9 F llltst pl 237 0L§ 

1)49 7IA FIMlSS J4 24 10 

31 IA 16 FlNaiitn 8 

7*9 5% FstPd 
30*6 23*4 FstPd pf 252 97 

Wk «u, -U7N 4. s* 31% 25V. FtUnRI 200 73 14 

?S12 ?S2 + W 28% 1710 FtVcBk « 15 10 

35% 19% FtWtSC IJ M 0 

_ FWIscpf 6J5 115 
41 23*9 Fhd* l.OS 41 

13 B% FIshFd .05 b A 171 


SIS. Close 

Dlv. YkL PE lOOsHIpn Low Quoi. Chde 


18% 18% 18% __ 

S2-& SE « 


18 


47*i 31% 

W% 


10% CnP prK 243 
Cnfiq> 

4% Conllfl 


250 


414 . *0 Conlllrt 
3. Cntll 


15 


UO 

.72 


152 


a 9 
17 15 


57Vi 33 Cnilll pf 

1?% 4 -SSU 

24*9 20*9 ConlTel 
38*- 15% ODdfn 
1% % wiCookU 

39 27*4 Coopr 

4t% 3114 Coopl pf X90 
20*9 14*0 CoorTr A0 
37 15 CoopvIs 50 

15*4 8*9 CopwM 721 
23*4 17*9 Cpwklpf 148 140 
27*9 I7V9 Cordura 54 35 15 
15% 11 Core In 56 45 11 
52% 30*9 CornGs UB Z5 22 
50% 26% CorBIk 150 24) 
10Y- 5*6 CnfCrd J4r 19 14 

39% 32 Crane 150b 45 11 
55% 23 CravRs “ 

19% 1719 CrckN pf Z1B 11 J 
53*6 49% CrckN pl 253e il 
24 18*9 CrmpK UO 52 12 

72*9 43 Vi CrwnCk 
44=19 28% CrwZel U0 
50% 44 CTZelpf 453 
65% 50*9 CrZel pfC<50 
33*0 13 Cullnet* 

88% 58% CumEn 2J0 _. 

10*4 9*9 Currlnc 1.10olO5 

5216 33% C yd OPS 1.10 2J 


67 14 13% 13*4 — *0 

3363 35*A 35V. 35*- + 'A 
100X 43% 43% 43% —1 

1 46*. 46b 46*4 + 'A 
892 35% 34*0 35% +1 
437 42% 42*0 42*6 + U 

3204 7IA 6*i 7% + U. 
KKb 29% 29% 29% 

160z 31 30 31 +1 

240: 52 51*9 51*0 

3003 S2 52 52 

25 29'A 25*0 28% + Vi 
28 24*9 23*9 23%— *9 

38 26 25 25%— *0 

21 26 26 26 — % 

8 26X9 25% 26*4 + *i 

9 25% 25% 25*0 + V* 

2 16% 16% 16% — U 
11 15*4 15 IS — % 
43 26*4 26% 26*6 + % 
52 16*h 16Vb l&'A 

65 20 1884 43% 42*9 43% + *9 
7% 7% 7*6 + % 

2% 2 2% + % 

52% 52% 52% + }= 

% *4 *4— % 

12 11*0 11%+% 

rn 0 447 23*9 23V. 23*9 + % 

4J 9725 IS 16% 16*9—1*9 

4 1 1 1 — % 

4.1 15 1541 37% 36*9 37 — *9 , 

79 39% 39V. 39*0 + % J 

167 17 16% 16*9 + %l 

B45 24V. 23*9 24% + *9 1 

15 9V. 916 9IA + % 1 

1* 17*4 17*. 17*4 ! 

33 24*6 24% 2449 + % 

6 11% !l*i 11*6— %, 

1330 51*9 50 5114 +1 

120 50% 49*6 50% + Vi 
57 8V. 8 8% + Vi 

78 36% 35*9 35*9— IA 
27 1929 55 52% 54*6 +2*0 

6 19*0 19*9 19% 

100 52% 52 52 — % 

34 23'ji 23 23% + % 

B1 72*9 71*6 72*0 + *9 

298 40% 39ft 39*0— % 

39 48 47*4 48 + Vk 

5 59*4 59*6 59*4 + % 
15*9 14*9 14ft— *i • 
6416 63ft 64% + VI . 

1 10*0 10*0 10*0 
38 48% 48% 48% + >A 


58 

m 2 

188 

347 


.160 

2.16 

JO 


43 26*0 FRFnG S 1J4 3-B 

S IA 42% FIlFpf 4JI7B 73 
W 17% ReetEn M 2J 
39*4 31*9 Remng U0 28 .. 
13*9 lift Flexlpf U1 128 
29*- 20 FlghfSf s .16 J 17 

sasesa- 

6*9 3IA FheGen 
21 14>A Flower 

20% I4U. Floor 
59 47V. FooteC 

51 'A 40% FoidM xao XI 
ITA 11 FIDeor IJ6 104 
42*A 28IA FtHowj 
1S% 10*6 FosfWh M 4J1 11 
13% 7ft FoxPhol 48 S3 13 
32% 24*9 Faxhro U4 XI 75 
27 22 Foxrnyr 14 

22*9 18% FMEPn l.lOe 58 


123 64ft 63% 64*9 + ft 
2 80 SO ao +1 
3915 24ft 24*9 24*6 + % 
9 9ft 9*9 9*0— % 

16 11% 11 11 
1197 11IA um UUi + *6 
20 30% 29% 30% + % 

79 lift lift lift 

U 21 2045 20% 19*6 20 + % 

11 117 13% 13% 13% — ft 

6 38% 38ft 38ft— ft 

43x 18*9 18ft 18% + % 

102 8*6 8*0 8*9— Vi 

17 4*6 4*6 4*4 

125 43% 43V. 43*9 
1413 46ft 46 46ft 
UB 32ft 32ft 32ft— *0 
762 34% 34% 34%— *0 
5367 20ft 17% 20*6 + ft 
94 18 17ft 18 + % 

32 26*6 26% 26*6— ft 
73 24% 24% 24*9 

128 18 17% 18 + *0 

1342 65 64 66*9 + *9 

Z42 34*9 33% 33% — *9 
165 30*A 30*9 30% + ft 

257 6ft 6% 6ft — % 

7 5% 5% 5V. — ft 

16 33*0 33 ft 33% + % 

8 52 6ft 6 6 

8538 29% 27ft 29% +1% 

80 4J 14 1220 18*9 18% 1849 + ft 
MO 23 9 255 25 24% 24%—% 

80 57 56*9 57 + ft 

1675 38*6 38% 38% + % 

133 34% 34 34V. 

672 »% 38*4 39*9 + % 

778 23ft 22*S 23% + ft 

10 B5ft 85*0 85*0— % 

129 11*9 lift lift 

2 37 37 37 

14 6ft 6% 6ft 

436 26*k 26 26ft— ft 

127 54*s 53% 54ft + ft 

84 48ft 48*9 48*9 

37 30 29ft 29ft— u, 
726 7ft 7 7 — ft 

12 31% 31 31 — ft 

253 6 5ft 6 

BB 27 2649. 27 + ft 

27 28 27*6 27ft— ft 

59 25% 24ft 25 + ft 

40 34ft 33ft 34ft + ft 

21te 54 S3 54 +1 

59 24% 24 24*0 + ft. 

23 12 12 12 + % 

140 37*6 37*9 37ft + % 
100 52ft 52% £2*4 + ft 

9 1118 19% 18*6 19 + % 


13 31 36IA 36 36ft + ft 

18 12ft 12% 12ft + ft 



22* 


549 23% 23 23% 

536 31 30 31 +1 

63 38'6 38ft 38ft 

2B% 27*9 28_ + *9 

15% 15ft 1“ 

5% 5*0 5%— % 
20ft 20 20ft + ft 


14% 


43 42% 43 


14% + ft 


2% 14% FrpIMc 


JO 

2% 22 Frigtm M 
21ft Fruehf jo 
26% Fruitful 200 
28% Fuqua JO 





UO 


3.16 

250 

200 


13 
25 
95 
75 

19 3361 
14 4 57 


23% 15% Dallas M 4.1 29 112 T6ft 15% 16% + ft 

14ft 9ft DamanC 15 33 13ft 13*k 13%— ft 

30*9 22ft DanaCa 1J8 54 7 3155 23 22*9 23 

9*9 5*9 Danahr 8 155 8 7ft 8 + % 

15 6*4 Daniel .18b 2J 98 SIA 8% 8% 

40 26*6 DartKrs U6 19 13 7280 40 38ft 39ft + ft 


31 


DalaGn 
Daiptn 
6ft DtaOsg 


1J» 

1.92 


2J 17 
54 13 
4J 11 
7 


76 

54k 

lift 6ft DtoDsg 

22 14ft Davco 
45ft 29% Davmd 
20*9 14ft DaylPL XQQ WJB 

65 S3 DPLpf 748 1X2 

66 55 DPLpf 

66 52% DPL Pf 

40% 24*9 OeanFd 
33ft 24ft Deere 
26*9 20% DelmP 
52ft 36V4 DeltaAr U0 

10 4ft Deltona 

44% 24*9 DlxOl S 1JM 
28% 21 DwsMf 1JQ 
37*9 31ft Desoto 1-^0 .. 

1779 14 DetEd 148 10J 
65*9 51% DetEof 745 1Z0 
64*. 51 DelEpf 7M 12J) 
26*9 21ft DEpfF X75 106 
28*9 23 DEprR X24 123 
27*. 2146 DEPfG 3-13 124 
27% 22 IA DE p IP X12 1X2 
25% 21*9 DE PfB 2J5 10J 
29ft 24 DE pro 140 1X4 
29*9 24ft DE pfM 342 1X5 
33% 28 -DEprL 4JKJ 12? 
3449 29 DEpfiC +12 1X7 

116% 107 DE ofj 1X6B 1U 
109% « DE pf! 1X80 IU 
20% 16*9 Der§ pr 128 1X0 
sx 18% Dexter -0a 34 12 
18*6 11*0 DIGtar M 3J 92 

21 14% DkimS U7rl0i> 

38% 3«A DtoShpf 4-00 11.1 

22 20V9 DfaSOf n 140e XS 

11 6ft DianaCp J U 1 
57% 31% DiebidS U0 X7 14 

123*0 B5ft Digital 
95 56ft Disney 
28% 16% DEI S 
6ft 4% Dlvrsln 
10% ,6*9 Dome g 
34% 26ft DomRs 

23 16% Donald 
61% 43% Donley 
35ft 23ft Dorsey 
42% 32% Dower 
37% 27 DowOi 
50 36ft DawJn 
32% 8% Downey 
15ft 11 Drava 
2414 17*9 Drear 
21% loft DrexB 
49% 34ft Dreyfus 

61*9 46% duPant 

40 3lft duPntpl 3JO 94 
50 40 duPnt pf X5S 94 

35% 27*9 DufceP 160 74 
85V= 68% Duke pl BJO 104 
80% 64ft Dukepf 8J0 104 
77 61% Dukepf 740 104 

27 22> Dukepf X69 T0J 

.35*9 M% Dukepf 355 1ft? 

10tt fj DuUBfllflOltta 

93 81% DukefN 844 vj 


18 3317 42Vi 41V4 42 + ft 

,, 12S3 5% 5*0 5% + ft 

■24 3J 8 42 7% 7*9 7% + % 

24 14 9 49 17ft 17% 17ft 

82 .11 17 3*50 39*9 38 ft 37ft +1% 

B 1033XW 1B% lBVi— % 

100y 61% 61% 61V* 

7J0 IU 50V 65 65 65 +2 

727 1X1 350V 62 el 61 + *9 

A 15 II 68 38ft 38% 38*9— M 

« 38 1077 2S% 25% 2514 


U0 

140 


.12 

X72 B4 9 
46 10 10 
1.16 XI 15 
' 15 12 
2-5 13 


UO 


UO 

JB 


25 24 24*9 + ft 

3414 38ft 37% 37ft + ft 
30* 8% 7*0 7ft— ft 

192 40% 39% 39ft- ft 
98 3% 22 32ft + ft 

7 37*9 32% 32ft + 'A 

1316 15*0 15% 15*9 + % 
VWte 6214 61 62 — ft 

1990Z 61ft 61*0 61ft + % 

4 26% 26 26 — ft 

183 26*6 25ft 2616 + ft 
35 25*6 25ft 25ft — % 
n 25*9 25 25*9 + % 

2 25*9 25*9 25*9 
383 28% 27 27*9 + ft 

136 27% 2716 27*9 
25 31 30ft 31 + ft 

15 32% 32 32% + % 

2 114 113% 113%— % 

8 109% 10»% 109% + % 

7 19ft 19 19 — % 

151 21 20*4 21 

173 16% 16% 16*9— % 
2109 15% 15*4 15*9 + ft 
7 36% 35% 35*9—% 
228 21*9 21*9 21 %— Vk 
6 916 9 9ft + ft 

716 38*0 37 37 —1*9 

18 4605 113% 111% 112% +lft 
14 48 936 09 88% B8% +1 

49 20ft 20% 29%— ft 
11 5*0 5% Sft 

554 9 8*6 8*9 + % 

1033 31% 31% 31*0 + *0 
21 22ft 21ft 21%— ft 
366 55% 54ft 55% +1 
339 34 33ft 34 + ft 

836 35ft 35ft 35*0— ft 


X8 


4.9 15 3508 36% 36 36% + % 


XI 


. IB 
Me U 3 
50 4JJ 
M, AS 16 
200 10J 

3 54 

IN 


80ft 6 5 Dukepf 
8316 60 DunBn! 

17% 1416 Dun Li 
17% 13ft Duq Pf 

18*9 13ft Duapf 

18 14% DuaprK 110 1X4 

20ft 15ft Duq pr 2J1 1X7 
62% SO Duqpf 750 1X1 
27 20*9 DvnAm JO J 12 


283x 37ft 36% 37% + ft 

2% 32ft 30ft 31*9+1% 

7Bx 12ft 12% 12*9 + ft 

815 18% 18*0 18ft + *9 

24 19% 19 19 

6S0»67% fiSft 67% +ft 
5-0 H 7197 60% 59 59% + % 

2 37*9 37% 37*0— % 
46 47 45ft 47 +1 

1449 341= 33*1 34*0 + ft 
30ta84 83ft 84 
MK 77ft 76% 77ft +1% 
2930: 73ft 73ft 73ft + ft 
10 26 % 26% 26% 

16 15% 35ft 35ft— Vk 
107% 107% + V9 
94% 94% + % 
77ft 77ft + *0 
947 TW 76ft 7516 + % 

1 626 15% 15% 15*9 + % 
430: 15% 15% 15% 

30th 16% 16% 16%—% 
8 17 17 17 + ft 

2800x 18*9 18ft 18ft— *9 
9940: 5W» 59 59*9 +2*9 

19 55*9 25% 25*0 + Vk 


_ 10J 
2J0 X9 20 
X06 13^ 7 

200 126 
1X5 



41% 23% GAF 
37% 27*6 GATX 
32% 9% GCA 
78% 54 GEICO 
4ft 3 GEO 
S 3ft GFCP 
44% 38% GTE 
39% 34% GTEnf 
26% 24IA GTE pf 
24% 20*0 GTE pi 
7*9 3 GalHou 
64% 43*A Gannett U8 
40*e 20% Gap Inc JO 
14 7ft Gearht joi 
22% 1*% Galea 56 
1214 9*9 Gem II C 
12% 10 Gem 1 1 1 AB, 
55ft 31*9 GnCorp 
18% 14*9 GAinv 
58% 3140 GnBcsh 
39% 22% GCInm 
20% 7% GnData 
13% H)% GnDevn 

84 62% GnDvn 

,65ft 53 GenEI 
[120 53 GnMt 

9ft 4ft GnHme 
18ft lift GHasts 
12% 8% GnHous 
23% lift Gnlnst _ 
65ft 47ft GnMIlb 224 

85 4416 GMet 

46% 16% GMtrE 4BI 
43ft 36 GMatpf 3J5 
58ft 47% GMot pf 5 jD0 

8*9 3*9 GNC .16 


IJ 11 


X48 104 


45T 42Vi ilft 41ft + % 
1718 2916 29 29ft + ft 

2858 10*6 9 9ft— 1% 

56 75% 74ft 75V. + ft 
154 3ft 3% 3ft 
50 4 3*6 4 + Mi 

5736 40% 39% 40 + % 

4 34% 35*9 36% 

38 25ft 25*0 25*9— *9 

33 24% 23ft 23ft 

35 3*0 3ft 3ft 


« IB 1528 56 55ft 55*0— % 
32 407 41% 40% 41ft +1ft 


23 
13 10 


27 31 


1J0O . 

Iff Bn 
“ M Vo 



''Didn't you used to have your safes picture in that frame?' 



For our 1985 Annual Report, write: 

Grow Chemical Europe, N.V. Oudesmmt 8 
B-2630. Aartselaar, Belgium. DepL G 


12 Month 
High Low 


Stock 


Sis. Clew 

Ply. YM. PE TOO* High Low Quo*. Qffre 


7 2 Month 

High Low 


SX ' don 

Dfy. YU PE HBxHJgh LowQuof. Ch'ofl 


37ft 26% Hitachi J4e U 

57*0 39 Hoflddy U0 U 11 

81% 44 HBtfyA IJOt 23 

83*6 65% HallyS U0 U 34 

20*9 10V= HorneO 25 

27% 17*6 HmF5D I 

9*0 7 HmeGofl.W 11 J 
28*9 28% Hmsffce JO 3 69 1048x 
18 10 Hmslpa AO 25 4 13 


528 34% 33ft 34 —ft 
145 52 51ft Sift— % 
2 74*6 74*9 74ft— ft 1 
13 82% 81% 82% +ft 
245 11% >1% lift 
503 22 2Tft 22 + % 

27 9ft 9ft Pft+ft 
22ft 22ft + ft 
15 15ft + ft 


5 

15*6 

37% 


2% KeyGan 

12% Key lots 41 U 17 
M% KMtfe 


n 


•Sft 44% 600 61. 


3t 


43*6 44% Honda AOe 3 9 m 57*4 57% 57ft 
47ft 5414 Hoiiwefl 2X0 23 15 3153 60*0 59*6 40 + ft 

34% 22*9 H ran BO 128 34 IT 25 34 35ft 35%— ft 

21% 22 HrzBn Pf USelOJD 
4% 3*0 Horizon 

52ft 28% HCA . M l* 9 5748 3250 32 32% + 

30ft 26 ' Hotel Id 300 nj 15 4 29% 29% 29ft 

- X4 If 148 36ft 36% 34*9— ft 

33 12 47 14% 14ft 14*0—% 

45 70 1915 40 39*0 39*9 — ft 

42 . 10 59 59 57 + % 

7X 48 80*9 SO >0ft 

9J 6 2103 28 - 27ft 2719 + *0 

174117.6 21 9% 9ft 9*9 + % 

24 29 ~ 

9.1 11 
XT 35 

p 

15 12 


2S4 n% 13% 13% + % 

U0 3J W 211 JAVA- 35*9 36 

' 19 84 84 84 —1 ' 

84 42 KMpfC XB0 XI 1 82ft 8Zft 82*6 

65ft 44*9 KfmbO 2J2 U 10 777 60ft 59*6 40*0 + 

40*6 U% KngMSd JS 22 14 2525 35ft 34% 34ft + 

10*6 10ft Knago M 44 17*6 17*9 17ft 

29 24*9 Koper 250 M 47 77 25ft 24% 24% 

22ft 12% Kabnar J2 24. 345 13ft T3V= 13% 

. - __ . , 21*9 15*9 Koeerg - £0538 ■ '734 14ft 15% 14% + H 

100 27% TPtt, 27ft— % [104 Wi Koppr^ fROjOQ W3 1 97% 97% 97% -1 

W .«* .4% 4% — _%f 14 % t2*9 Korwf . J3e 13" 25 .14% 14 14 — M 


50 


U0 

X20 

xso 




30 

3A 

35 


XI 18 


216 7ft 7ft 7ft 
315 17 ISft 16%— Vi 

98 TO 9ft 10 — % ._ 
77 lift 11% 11*0 + ft 1 
445 54*9 53*6 54*9 +1 

30 18 17*9 18 + _ 

19 58ft 58. 58% + ft 

291 34*6 34ft 34% + ft 

217 9ft 9*9 9ft— % 

21 10*6 10% 1019— ft 

383 63*4 43% 43*9 + *9 

57*9 5P*9 58*0 58% + ft 

249 128 119*9 119*9— % 

28 4ft 4*4 4ft + % 

577 " - - 


42% 31ft HouohM JS 
19*6 12*6 HauFaD 48 
40% 28ft Houslnf 1 JT 
58% 47*6 Hotntpf 2J0 
81ft 47% Halntpf 6J5 
29% 20ft Hcutnd 2A4 
14*6 8 HoaOR 

20% 14% HawtCF 
2W0 n% Hubbrtf 
13 % 9ft Huffy 
15ft 12 Hugh 71 
24 17ft HuohSa 
34*6 21ft Human 
31ft 20% HuntMf 
41ft 24*9 HwHEF" 

32 20 Hydro! 


.44 • 36 Kroger-, 208* *5 Hy245DK44U -44% 44*9 + ft 

24ft 8% Kmni M 23 U 35 19ft 19% 19*0— ft 

45\A 28% Kyocer. J 2 B J 20 143 38% 37% 38ft + ft 

23*6 15*0 Kywr JS X6 7 44 19*6 19 19% 


228 

•40 

48 

J2 


50 14% 14ft 14% + *9 
3 25% 25 25*9 + % 

29 910-9*9 9*6 + % 

549 12ft 12% 12% — % 
„ „ 15 2216 22 22 — ft 

2J 12 4535 27ft 27. - 27*9— ft 
IJ 17 12 29V9 28ft 28%—% 

X4 11 BM 3414 33 33% + ft 

31% 21% 3lft— ft 


JO 

M _ .. 

2J0Q 44 TO 


SHOT 73 

■“ .1 


15*9 10*9 GPU 
92% 5816 G01P. 


1JA 


iRe 

14*6 6 GnRefr 

53*9 37 GnSIgnl UO 
4% 2ft Gensco 
left 8 GnRad .10 


24VA 19 
34 28*9 

27ft 20% 

24% 23% 

30 25*6 

30'- 25* 

3179 27 
23*9 19 
23 Vi 18% 

26% 22 
48% 55ft 
67% 54 . . .. . 

37*9 22% GerbPd 
23% 12*9 GerbSc 


O UO 
tuiPt 1.18 
'Poe JO 
iPWPf 3JM 1X1 
iPwpf 230* 82 
(PW pf 344 1X4 
iPwpf 326 12J 
Pwpf X56 112 
Pwpf X52 1X1 
Pwpf 275 1X5 
Pwpf 7J0 1X1 
Pwpf 733 1X4- 

TJ2 23 13 
.12 J 11 


177 18 17% 17ft + ft 

23 10% 9ft 10 — % 
1745 15*9 15 15 - ft 

2437 62% 6lft 42*9— % 

4 5BM 46*0 65*9 4416 + ft 
499 3816 37% 37% — ft 

¥4 2 39ft 39*6 39*6— % 

95 2 52*6 3216 5214 

25 14 74 4*6 4*k +%-r- % 

8 2389 15ft 15% 15ft + ft 

U 141 649 89% 88ft 89% + % 

5 33 Ift 8% 8%— % 

45 11 1344 40% 39% 4090 + % 

143 3ft 3 3ft + % 
U 51 322 10% 9ft 9ft— ft 

63 845 19ft 19 1916 + % 

XS 13 M3 31% 30*0 31 + Vk 

18 84 6004 2179 21 21 — ft 

241 24ft 24ft 24*4 
42 28 Z7% 28 +% 

14 28 27ft 27*6— ft 
26 29*0 29ft 29ft 
18 21% 21ft 21% + ft 
39 20ft 20*9 20ft + % 
j 26% 24% 24% — % 
44% 43*6 64% +1% 


4feg% 42% 42% —1. 


28% 1340 Geftvs .16 5395 


. .. 33ft 3414 + 16 

428 16ft 14 16ft + % 

170 28 27% Z7*k 



, III 53 
liletle X60 
lease 

J5e 

1% GtoWM .121 
5 GJabMpfIJXl 
Sft GMNug 
1*4 GUN wt 
39 18*0 G'dWF 

35 24*9 Gdrlch 

3016 24ft Goodvr 
1816 14ft GardnJ 
37*6 19 Gould 
45 35% Groce 

34% 26% Grangr i 
21% 11 GtAF-rt 
18% 14*6 GIAfPc 
62*9 33% GILkln UO 
41ft 32ft GtNNk 1J2 


xo»i 


1303 

,552 


8 7% 7*9 + ft 

17% 17% 17*9— ft 


3.9 U 1008 64% 65% 65*9 + ft 


A W 5 


30 


30 
1J4 
1J0 
52 
50 
XBO 
I M 
AB 


29ft 22% GtWFIn U0 
GMP 


1J6 


20 14% _ 

29*0 22*6 GreenT 
30*9 22 Grevh 1J2 . 

49 38 Grevh Pf X23 10J 

6% 2ft Grafter 7 

13% 916 GrewGl JO X0 15 

12% 4*6 GnibEI JU U 12 

34*0 24% Grump 3J10 14 8 

27% 2519 Grum pf 180 104 
7% 414 Grontai .16 ZA « 
27ft 20 Guillrd 58 XI U 
45ft 26ft GlfWst JO 
66 57 GllWpf 5J5 


1749 11% GuifHl 24 

14% 11*9 GWSKJt. U4 1X7 

41 31 GHSU pf X40 107 

32*9 26 GlfSUpr 185 1X8 

35% 29% GlfSUnr 440 112 

21% 14 Gultpn 40 U 10 


24 16 14 16 

241x12% 12ft 12ft + % 
714 1ft TO TO + % 

42 5 4ft 4ft— % 
315 10*0 10% 10%— % 
37 219 2 2 

>471 37 35% 37 +7ft 

103 31*9 3119 31 ft 
4611 24*0 25ft 24*9 + 09 
5 15*9 15% 15% + % 
6127 34% 33% 33ft + % 
428 37% 3400 37 +'lik 
SB 32% 31V= 32% + % 
78 18% I8IA 1849 + % 
879 T7% 17W 17*9 + 40 

25 HU 42ft 42ft 
ISO 34ft 34% 34% + ft 

2041x77 24ft 24ft + ft 
23 TBft TB% ISft + \h 
- 635 27ft 27 , 27ft + ft 

X7 10 1124 38 27% 28 + *6 

10(te 44U. 46ft 46Vi + ft 
Tie s 4ft 4ft 
.79 MIA 30 10% 

184 8 7ft 7ft + % 
854 29ft 28*9 29 + ft 

.14 27 24% 27 

122 6% 6ft 6ft + ft 

sMiuS r 

&8 __! 65% 65V= 45% +1 


J 6 
5J 

XI 7 
14 22 
X0 . 
7J 11 
XI 13 
X6 7 
7 

1-6 13 
X2 14 
17 7 
9 A 9 
6 


, 150 15*4 15» 15*9 + Vb 
4 V S1„ 1*ft 12ft 12ft + ft 
* - -X 41 40% 41 +1% 

M 30 29U 30 - ft 

, 4 33*9 33% 33ft 
139 21ft 21 21% + %. 


12 % 

5 

2?b 

22ft 

25'A 

33(6 


M 

1JM 

J2I 


43 3V EGG 
17*6 15ft EQKn 
32*6 23% E Svst 
28 ft 20 EaaleP 
2TO 12ft Easat 
ask EmtAIr 
lft EALwtO 
% EALWtA 
7ft EsAirpf 353k 
9% EAIrgfBX20k 
lift EAIrpfC 
28ft 21 % EasIGF UO 
23ft 14ft EastlTt! X0A 


M 77 227 34ft 34 34ft + ft 

XT 724 75% 15% 15% 

U 14 1109 28ft 28 28ft + ft 

X3 9 88 Wt 23% 34ft + ft 

, 111 18ft 18ft IB'A — V9 
7 9530 7% Mu 7% + ft 
315 2ft 2% 2% 

41 1% 1 1% + % 

Six 17 18!= 18 ft — % 

244x31 20 2016—1 

„ 54 25ft 2S 2516 + % 

5J „ 475 2319 23*9 23ft + ft 

42 21% 21*9 21ft + ft 


M 

W 

1x0 

28 


15ft 11% Echllhs 
32% 20 Eckerd 
32*6 24ft EdlsBr 
18*9 14ft EDO 
11 8 EdCmp 

34% 22U Edward _ 
25% 21% EPGdRf X35 
19% 9 EIToro 3M8 
5% 2ft ElecAs 
34% JSft EWsps JS 
14 11% Elgin JO 

9% 2 eisctnt 

78ft 44 EmrsEI 
14% 6*9 Em Rad 
20% 15% EmryA 
S% “% Firman 
22% 14ft EmpOs 
5% a Emppl 
5*9 4ft Emapf 
.9% 7ft Emppl ... 
14% 12 Enetgen UM 
% EnExc 


f0 , 41ft EsKods 220 11 13 Mil 43% 42ft 43ft + 0b 
40ft <9% Eaton 1.40 75 7 5S7«54*0 SJft 53ft + % 

*3 is?* m* m- % 

5JJ 13 
1.9 13 
14 


402 2BJ9 28*9 28*9— % 


JO 30 12 1431 


92 

.4 1! 

13 
24 
XI 12 


841 

140 

1 


256 18 73 
.9411 U 9 


JO 10 74 
1.40b. 




72 10 



3TO 31ft 3799 
1SW 15% 15%— % 
9% 9% 9ft— % 

26% 24ft 2416 +1’A 
W9 25% 2Sft + % 
10% 9ft 10% + ft 
Jft 4'.6 4ft 

35 20ft 20*6 20V. — ft 
4 13% 13% 13% — % 
187 2ft 2% 3>i 

804 4*00 49 49V0 

493 Bft 8% B% 

61 14ft 16% 1619 
48 2816 28 30 

12 21ft 2116 21ft 
Bfc |ft 5ft 5ft + % 

4089 5 5 5 + % 

400£ 1% 8% 

160 1?% 14ft 14*0— ',9 
lie % % + 

242 23ft am 22ft— ft 

18% 78*6 
gw. 23% + ft 
53% 53ft— *9 


■37% 22ft HcdiFB UO 
32*6 24% Hamm uo 
1% % Hdlbit M 

11*0 7V6 Hglwdpf 56 
47% 34ft HttmP * 1J4 
15% 12% HtmJS 
21% 17*6 HOnJI 
30 14ft Hdndis 
2M0 1* HondH 
21% 14% HOMO. 

48% 37*6 Hgrj&rJ 
34*0 21*9 Kd rind* 

12*4 7*0 Hdmlsh 
28*4 24% Horn PfB 140 1X7 
29*6 24ft Homotcxia U 

22ft 1516 HrpRws 50 
35 22ft Harris J8 
18*6 10*0 HdTGrp 
30*0 22 Hereof 1J8 
39*9 24*9 Herimx UB 
17*6 14*9 Halts* ' “ 

25ft iMi HgwEl 
13% 9ft HayuA 
32*6 20*6 Haxfetn 
14ft 9% HaxLafr 
25 10ft HirhAm 
ZJ% 19 HtrCrPn J3e X4 
22ft 10ft HHOSA 
15ft 10ft Hecks 
10% 13ft HeclaM 
W% lift HeUmn 
3016 14ft Heillfl 
29*6 20% Hefra 5 
2219 12*6 HejweC 

40*6 31ft Hereuls 7-40 
19% 10ft He rite 3 JM 
21 16 Henvmn 

49*9 35 Hereby iao 
10% 5ft Hrirtim 
13% 9 He*h»Pt 
38*6 28*6 HewIPk 
33*4 24 HWH 

88 'fan® 


H „ -IE 26% 24 2690— % 

7J 11 2937 25’A 2171 25 + % 
44 73 400 l'A lft Ift + % 
65 4S 8% 8ft 8*9 
__ X3 14 1500 40% 40ft ■“ 
M7ol0ul “ 

1J40 9.1 
J6 25 13 
M 14 20 
M 23 23 
U0 U 14 
J4 IJ 20 
22 


341 14% 14ft Mv 5 + U 
45 ^9 20 28ft , 
201 22*6 21% 22ft + %l 
19 18*9 18ft 18U + % 
IS 1816 18 18 — ft 

150 59% 59 59 —16 


*6 33ft 33% W%— ft 
“ 9ft 9ft 9%— ft 




19 14 


73% 54 


32 

M 

50 

.17 

St 

1J0 


AM 

24 S 
I A 9 

\ 3\i 


218 9ft 9ft 9% 

.3 24% 24% 24% 

13 27 24% 24% — ft 

T| 19ft 19ft 1916 

790 25ft 25 2S%— % 

12 JL W* 1?0— Vb 

193 30% 30ft 30ft + % 
149 33% 33ft 33% + ft 
S 17 14% 17 

122 21% 21ft 21*6— ft 
34 9*6 9*4 9*4 
1231 21% 21 + ft 

41 14*9 lift 14ft 
394 11% 11% 11% 

14 20% 20% 20% — % 
1044 15*9 13% 13% —3ft 

1 ? 12% 12*6 12*6 
.541 15% 15ft 15(9 + M 
1089 lift 18% 19 +V0 

181 30 29M 29*6 +*0 

901 28% 28*0 28% 

58 20ft 19% 20ft + % 
135 19 18% 18% 

3415 34% 36% 36% + ft 
378 18 17U T7*fc 

18 17% 17%- 

48ft 47*9 40 + *6 

.5ft -5% 5*9 + ft 
10 ft 10ft- 10ft 
31 30% 38% + % 

Z7U 24% 2716 + % 
20H 20% 20% + % 
10 % 10% 10% 

23 ft 23 23ft + ft 


14 


12 

9 

4842 

20 

59 

n 


952 66% 65% 65%— *0 


W4 XI 
J8e 5J 


72 


36*9 25 1C Ind 
19*6 14ft ICMn 
lift BU ICN 
18% 15% INAIn 152 11.1 
27*6 21ft IPTIm i» 1 J2e 65 376 

17% 14ft 1RT Pr S UO 9A 7 102 
34*6 25% ITTCP 1-00 25 10 9042 
64 50 ITTpfJ X00 m 2 

45*0 49 ITTDfK 4J0 63 . 3 

64% 49 ITTpfO 5J0 7J 
19*0 11% lUlnl JO 53 
24% 18 IdahaPf 1.72 X2 
17 5 IdealB 

»% 21*9 inPowr 354 113 
30 .15% HPawpf X04 11-4 

20*6 15% llPowpf X13 11 J 
38% 30*6 llPowpf X12 IU 
36ft 28ft llPowpf 3J8 llj 
46ft 37- llPowpf 4.14e 9.1 
54% 44 llPowpf 5J3 IU 
40*0 33 llPowpf X47 llj 
34ft 3SU ITW J2 XS 12 

40ft 31ft ImpChm X13e 5J 5 

12 7% ImpICp _ 10 

15*0 9*A INCO 50 U 

19*0 15% IndIMpf X15 115 
am 1* indlM Pf X25 11 j 
28ft 21% Indices 2JM 7J 8 

7ft 4ft Inexca 071 . 

53% 39% IngwrR XSO S3 15 

37% 30ft IngRpf 335 65 

15% 11 InorTec -54 14 24 

24 19ft inldSfl JBI 

4816 38*h Inldstpf 4L75 11.1 
21*6 15ft IlUiiCo 1 JX!b 55 11 
4ft 3% ImpRs 
2619 11% IntoRsc 9 

28 19 InfaRpf 3L03 11J 

35*9 25ft IntoRpf 435 7X5 
9ft 7% Ini loon 8 

Sft 8 Intlgwd 

9ft 9% InSCag pf 1J0 1X0 
14ft 8 IrrtRFn 

19% 17 flcpSe ZlOall.l 


35ft 34% 35% 

15% 15 15% 

10*6 10% 10*6 
17ft 17% 17ft 
21 % 21*6 21 % 

1M% 15% 14 + ft. 
35V0 34*0 3*%—% 
A 44% 46% 44% + % 

3 45 . 65 65 

8 64 43% 44 

439 11*0 11 lift— % 
9 226 21% 20ft 21 + ft 

337 6% 5*9 6ft + % 

7 5149 23*6 2316 23*9 + % 
200x17* 17*6 17% — % 
lOOOz 18% 18% 18% — *6 
MB 36 35% 36 +16 


WOl 34ft 3 m 3416 


29% 22*6 LACK ' - 

Sift 34*4 LN Ha 254* 95 ID 
17% II LLERy 33*109 
4ft I LLCCd 

13ft 5% LTV . 

19 8ft LTVA A3t 45 
54 36 LTV pf . 

25*6 on LTVpfB 2J« • • 
40% 37 LTV pfC 3541 

1816 8ft LTVpfD -541 ' 

U 10% LQaint 
29ft 21% LacfGs UO 
9U 4*6 Lafarge 30 
27 21ft Lafrgpf X44 
14% 7U4jamurs 24 
4% . 7*6 LamSes 
73% 10*0 Lawtlrtt 56 
2516 10 LeorPt jo 
28>A 19ft LearPpf 2J7 
ra*6 41 LearSg 2 jOO 4J 9 
21 14*6 LeaRnls M 35 U 

34ft W1 LswvTr 1J0 AS 14 
45% 24ft LeeEnt 
lift lft LeeMos 
24*4 14% Leg Plot 

4 . 2 LeftVat 

37 24% LVInpf 

75U 13% Lefimn USelU 

15% 10% Lennar JO TJ IB 

24*6 15ft LeucNts 3 

30ft 42V6 LOF 1J2 30 7 

79% 48% LOF pf X75 65 

raw. ray= ubtyep j2 za u 

93 60% Lilly 320 

Z7ft 72ft Umltds .14 

.441= 35*6 UncNft 1J4 XI 12 


1 


91 »ft VP* raft + ft 


759 

2589 

6 

1 

181 

3 

117 


52 2J 18 
JOb IJ 14 
.52 ZO IT 


10 3040 30ft 
625 n% lift 11*6 

lft 1% lft— % 

4% 4*9 6%+ 19 
Mk 9ft 9*9 + %_ 

38% 38% 38% +1 
12*6 12% 12ft + 19 
34 35*6 35*6— ft . 

9*4 9*9 9ft + ft 

288 11*6 11% 11*6 + %.- = 
417 2516 25 25 _ 1 

19 7% 7ft 7ft— %'. . 

41 23 23 23 +ft : 

14 9*0 9ft 9*9 + %." 

W 3ft 3*6 3*6— ft. - 
87 11% 10*4 1019— ' 

590xlO»/2 10*0 10% + if'-. 

as 21 % 2 H 0 21 + **■> 

204 44% 46% 44*6 + Mi \JZ 
33 lift 14% 14% + % P 
7 31*9 31ft 31ft * r 
17 40 39*6 39*6- Mn; 

72 l«k 15*6 14ft + ft 
55 m 26% 2Mk + ft 1 1 
238 2*0 2ft 2ft 

1 32% 32% 32%- % ... 
177 14ft 14 14% 

55 11% 11(6 71% + ft * 

172 19% 18% 18ft— ft 


(urrvfbn 


‘lew 


403 44 43 44 +*»■ 

4 73 72% 72% — V. , 

__ „ 19 29*6 29% 29*6 + ft- 

15 U au 92*9 91 92ft +1%, 

-6 » 5ra? 24ft 25% 24% +1 ij * 


2441 

1 


45(6 4519 45*6 + ft 
11 54 53 53 +*0 

4270x38 34*6 38 + % 

71 28% 28% — ft 

34J0 34}A 3«9 + ft [iBlft 143ft LlncNpfXOO t7 
~ A “ 1 ray= 19(6 UncPl X240 VJ 

93% £1*6 Litton 1.50J 11 

23ft 20 Uttonpf XOQ 9JB 
M ra%Lodchd JOolJ 8 

37 ra Loctlte JO 24 15 — 

64% ank Loews 1 UOo X2 T2 1074 46*0 45ft 45ft + 46 h - 

h 0Bli 2 n -24 J 19 22 33*9 35% 35% — % 

36ft raft limFu) L40 40 12 1239 34*9 34% 34ft + ft 

29 LSSwit 144 ** 10 204 ^ 24% 26% ,, 

LornMwt. 15 3 2ft 3 

144 21 19ft 20 

4 541 3 28ft 28% — % 

„ ft 53*6 53*9 53*9— ft - 
2 3047 7ft -4ft 7% + WP- 




s 

3 


7*6 7% 7*4 + ft 

11 10*6 WJ0— V9 

18% 18V9 18ft— ft 

19ft 19 19 I 

36*0 24 24*0 + ft I 

5% 5*0 5% + % 

49*6 49 49*9 + *0 

2 34 ft 34ft 36ft — ft 

4 74ft 14*6 14ft 

115 20 19*6 19*0 

43 42U 4299 42ft— % 

234 17% 14ft 17 ‘ 

303 4ft 4% 4W_ 

357 21 20*6 21 — % 

14 26% 26*0 26*0— % 

492 34*0 SS 34% + ft 

41 0*9 8% 8ft— % 


129 44% 44% 44*0 + %’’ . 

1 177ft 177(6 177ft +2 £ - 

7 S% 23% 23%—%. • 

2404 82ft 81% 81*0 

2 22ft 22ft 22ft— -ft , 

5M 45% 44*6 45ft + »~: 

587 31% 31 31 


s ; 


4 |% 8V9 B%— ft 
«4 .9*9 9*0 — % 


57% Interu 
12% -9 intrfst 
53ft 41 tntrfk 
12% 8% litfmed 

24% 15*0 InfAhj 
138ft 116 IBM 
raft 14% intern 
34% 25 InfFIov 
lift 6% InfHorv 
7% 3ft InfHrwt 
3*6 2*0 IntHwtB 
40 , 29% Inm PfC 
34*6 19 IntHPfD . 

44 34 IrttMln £40 

43*6 24*6 Inf Man 1J£ 
57*6 44ft InfPapr ZAO 
14*9 8*6 J fit Res 
54*9 3716 litfNrth 
81ft 48% IntNfpf 
ttnft 93%. InfNf * 

43*6 32% Intpb 
22 . 14% intSakr 
22*6 18% InHJPw 
22 18 InPwpT 

13% Sft InfSeen 
21*6 14ft lawoEt 
24 lawIIG 


108 4J 
JO X0-11 
UO U 7 


53 10ft 10 10% + % 

41 19*9 18*0 19 
I? HK2 65% 44*9 65% + *6 
358 10% 10 TO 
14 47. .4Qk 44ft + % 

flu. 

U2 3J 19-1872 34%- 33ft 34% +1% 
1548 7 446 6ft 

233 4ft 4ft ift + ft 
- m 3ft 2ft 2ft— % 
II 48 48 48 

J7 MI ft 21ft 71ft- *0 
713 38% 37*6 3Bft + % 
219 38 37 37ft + ft 

2413 46 45ft 45*0— ft 


4% 2 

§ SS 67 

wt «ULg P ' U?,M 

45 50 LILpfl 

gw 14*0 ULpfX 
ra% 14ft LILptW 
M% 16% LILPfV 
3 7% 19% LILefU 
S3? “3* LILpfT 


» M! -^ 


12?6 LILpfb 
31% TTA LonoDs 

37ft 23% Loral 

12*4 1W4 La Gen I 

» 27% La Load 

ra% 1740 LaPoc _ 
ra% 2419 LaPLpf a*0| 

^9 17*6 LaPLpf X37111J 

32*6 2SW LauvGs XS 9 

44 38*0 Lows! XflO X 

31J0 2» Law« _J5 l 




22 1339 13*9 13ft + % , 

2 16U 14% 16% + *h-4f 

mi 28% 30 28 — *r 

692 33*4 33ft 33% + %.. 

7 71% Tl% lift ' 

37 3S59 37 +lft 

583 m= 19 19 - ft 

69 27*9 Z7% 27*9 r-r 
■ « 20ft 30% 20ft + %.„ . 
2« MW 27 27*9 + *9 

.7 43 42U 43 tK» 

,480 2Zft 32% 2ZW +_%-.; 





X8 11 
43 11 
5J , 


2M 


«2 |% 8 8*9- *0 | 

a 40% 41 — Tftj^ 


^ ^ f§ 3| £«: gs 

1 » JS Vi ^ raft 22% 73% + % 

10*6 Limns JB £5 14 15 13% 13*0 13*6- %" 


14 


1482 42 

4ttt 81 81 81+1 

2 102 ft 102 ft 102 ft — *0 
53 3?*9 38ft -39*9 + % 


X0 It 
BA 
103 

a 23 13 

13 

JO 95 9 
!28 1X9 
_ 1® 

.JO 9J 10 

_ . . JJt W 7 

23ft. 18 lawlllpf £31 107 . 4550QZ 71*4 - 2i - 2Tft + *6 

3790 27% lewaRs 3J8 9J 9 45 33% 32% 33*6 + ft 

40 , 3110 Ipatca 104 X7 9 240 35 34*0 35 + *6 

13*4 9*6 IpeoCa J U I if II lSf ti Z % 

40% 28 IrvBnk 1J6 5.1 7 174 3tft 38 38ft + ft 


M 


V 


mi §%«££« 


M 14 V. Jg Up T716 17ft— ***■ 
4* 2992 S2ft 49*0 50*9—110 

18%— «-l 



10 MGML- . 

2% MGMuwf 
J25 JJLpwivnJOe 37 


wu raw jwt s T.12 
37 23*6 J River 56 

16 . Jamswy .12 5 

13*6 !®*6 JaonF IJDeraj 

47% 34 JcffPU 1J1 U 
33% 24% JerCpf X00 125 


3J-17 189 29% 29*k 29*6 

U 10 47* W0 32% + % 


TJ 
11*6 

8% 

h% 10*0 ml men 
raft. *2*6 MBLIg 

1% mSS 11 * if h m m m +v.:^- 


JBt 


?? 

w +MW 

■40*6 + »¥=>: 

2Sft + ft? 
_ - 9*6 + %■». 
7W 7% + %-l. 

jg * * 




13% 


Ti 


7 5 


3H !!3^ 3?Sfc + 


tcrCpf 


44 S» 

44% 51*0 JerCpf 
51 

__ 84% 

18*6 .14*6 
15*4 Mb 
49% 32ft 
44ft 38% 


£12 1X7- 

nm 1X5 

JerCpf 7J8 12J 
lerCpf 1U00 1X9 

lerepf 2.18 iu 


JoimJn 

JohnCn 


23 


132 11*6 11% 11*0 
« «% 45*0- 

100K 32 32 32 

1 jft <4% 44 «4 

]90z 44 -44 44 — ft 

20z 61% 61% 61% 

iauq 10T in 

116 18 17*6 17% 

M 15% 15% 15%—% 


54*6 50*9 Jtmc Of 4J3 . 79 
27*0 21% Jensen U» 43 18 
24% 19 Jsswns fl 15 U 
27% 21*4 JoyMfg 1/40 X4 14 


UO XI 14 4387 47% 44*9 44%+% 
UB* A3 9 312 42% 42% 4W9 
7 M 54 54 

17 24% 23% 33%— ft 
82 25ft H 25% 

487 22ft 21% a 


gwgftSAS§& < * 

B'Ssiias«^ 

ftmms 

B3agaa““ B 

14% vjMnwipf 

i^S,J i3 7 

42 MOTMpf 4S, M - 


H 17 «ft 62% 62% +-% 


*\.r 

iS? 


740x 56% 54% 56% 


3? HFR0 10% TtFfi 


171 

77 

M 

M0 






49*6 48% 49 

.3(9 3 3 — %-ft.- v-- 

13*0 13% 13% — W, 'n 
m 73% 13%-%^,, v 
7% 17% 17%. + *bt-4f 
3 38*9 39J9 T *0->f!7 \*v 
52*0 52*9—% - lVJ* 

48% 48*9 48%-%^, 

5% 5*0 5% + vfcr: 


* .* 


19 8 


6 

ill 

1437 .. _ 

D9 35% 34*9 34*6— 

! J ^ *4 

53% mS + 

MO 37% 36% 37% +« 


21 W]5V= W- jaw 




* ■« 


MJb 37% +• 

10% 10%- % 
B N + #T-. 



10 7*9 KDI 

20% 11*9 KLM 

44 34 KMI pf 4J0 

41% 30*0 Kmal I JO 

17 14ft KN Eiin 

18*9 12% KeUrAI- 

28ft 14ft KafsCe 

lift 7*fc Kaneb ... _ 

24% 18 KOVPL 206 IU 

40 32% KCPLpf 450 11J 

20*6 15% KCPLpt UO llj 

KCSou UB XI 8 

lOta 
5 4027 
8 HU 
10 

A 

103 S *1 
iu no 
U 17 If 


l V. 




L 


244 J|*S 21% 21*9 + %| raj 
«*» y 38 .. 38 -TO 1«£ iffiiKSLy 


58*0 39*4 ■ 


14% lift KCfiOPf IjO 7J 


19*0 9% KanGE 
41*0 .32% KanPU 
9*6 18% KaPLpf 
23 ini KaPLpf 


” m 

i a y u 
a 8 


45 


Kohdn 


115 - 33% Kotypf 
KoufBr 





28 .12*9 

2t 18*6 Ktnmt 


4. 1 £ . 9 % 2% .... 

32*0 - 0 %+ ft McDkJ 

IMk 13% 13% SsL McGrH 
44 - 65% +216 40% AlteK 

-ft ^ ^ 

Kenmt JB 4J 14 319 18*4 18 la -1 S% MctMi uo 

% 8 ’ S » 


28 a 10 


354 


34% 24ft KerrMc 1.7 
31*9 21(9 Key era ir 




m i?w jdHfif ij? j m m + «|ss .g» jffi? 

32 33 2K5 34% 34ft + « **« 4J Meildn 



fj, 57*9 57% — 1 
15% 14*6 IS 
„ 1»*0 10*4 lift + 

W 13 12% -12%— 

ffi «% »9 54% + %- 
W 43% 43*6 + ISh - 
w ?>. a. .23 * 1 ^. 




4J .8 


234 2«fi 28% 11% 2 r 41 


2J 


(CmittiRied <»P!a^J2) 


,0a T WH 18ft 18% 

3% 3% 3% 

.?%. .9*9 %=+■% 

jg* 4 « 46*0+1*0 
« *8* 44% 64*9 - 

T S* 

1. 27 27 27 + ft 

*» £% 47J6 47*4 . 

■m ^ 75% -75% + % 

il S ** »-»■ 


y 

\ 


- - ‘HV 



A 
I • 







































HcralhSSSribunt. 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 



U.S. Stocks 
Report. Page 10 


Page 11 


ftjH 


[ | y ■ h 

trnrcT 






CanMeanaBacfo^ 

! By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

International Herald Tr&upe- ■ . \ . . f : 

P AWS — It has long been fashiOMhte to move abroad in 
aroer to move np in the corporate toat^fy of imtfimi- 
ttonals, and in many European nsdtmatiorailA, foreign 
assignments arestiU a pins for a career.' ■ 

JT 1 m ol her conq>anks, executives who return ip corporate 
headquarters after a foreign assignment now find that they may 
a J to *7^ ? oemotkra, makea lateral move or find another job. 
And m addition to a certain loss of status, the rctmmng executive 
usually loses the overseas . 
perks and does not always live ' mn ' i*#** * - A"# . 
as well back home. TlQfi dfedt dmntt. 

The “out-of-sigju, oat-of- At_i -t 

arind” phenomenon is one peC^MeO®CK 

problem. But the continuing . TTitflffor avniikanV Aa 
stagnation in both the French ■ , - 
and British economies means awtnM<> Wfil^ r 

that many corporate haul- 




ir- 


!n riimT 


are contracting and people that mi ght haw> l»fr tnwwma tn 

their positions.” - . 

^ That company copes with the problem by trying fpr six months 
to find an internal position for ret ur ning executives while at the 
same time giving them six months with an outplace m e nt compa- 
ny. If nothing can be found in ternally , the executive a let gp, 
hopefully to a job found by the out-placement concern. Accord- 
ing to the mining company, the majority of retaining executives 
do find comparable jobs -wi thin the concern, buithey are not 
necessarily promoted. . . . 

u People now going overseas understand rf* <* tfri« is wfaat 
happen to them," said the mfmng Compa q; **««»»«/» *it j$one 
of themany factors maVmg rtwna-ac 5>^<>gnm#s nt<Tn ^r p Arffi»-yi] r ” 

A CCORDIN G to' a recent unpublished study by the Paris- 
IJk based Inter Cultural Manag»-m«»nt AwmIw ^ all Ifl pf the 

-L A. French multinationals surveyed- said it was diffenli to 

find jobs for executives returning from foreign 

because of the scarcity of managemen t jobs-at headquarters. 

to jobs comparable to the ones held before they left. 

“More tnan sending people abroad, the difficnit rtmig is 
repatriation and getting people bade into the. company at a 
suitable level,” said Anders Sanddeus, who is in charge of 
recruitment at Volvo AB, the Swedish car group. Six years 


nicate regnlariy with executives abroad about what is going on at 
headquarters, especially with regard to job openings. 

. The program has helped Volvo executives pirn their rehnew *. 

tion into corporate headqua r ter, buy Mr. Sonddens said, “u i s 
still difficult to find a suitable position for returning executives.** 
~ Ijp Many of those retur n i n g tee the incentives they were given 
■; ^ i iff,: when sent abroad — inrTnrffng hooting subsidies, cast-of-Kving 
adjustments, salary premiums as high as 25 percent erf base salary 
: ~ SSS. ™ countries considered as difficult assignments and, for U.S. 
executives, lax-equaBzatiom 7 progr ams ^' 

“UsuaBy returning executives havebeen used to a much higher 


r ISSS 
W, RE 
T4 Iftfclrt 
' r?r„r.. 
:■ V* m- 
A rur; 
■j.' IfciSVi 

c 3 1 ;>■ 

* ri t n 


standard of living in the foreign country, so they have some 
problems adjusting,” -and JHAK-mpera; djtecgorof corporate 
staff at Philros'NV' the Qnlrfv electronics ffrtmn;. * 


2r ' ea. 


~ jj*' Aostr-icML 


• BM.lhi.fr. 53JS MtaarwM ttlW tt irerti 

■?T^r BnxtfKnn. M1CLOO info raptab 1,12200 MArtt* 

.*■ • - r* C»£*E- CowkBbb* lJM- 0*533 WH 

■' ■£ & Ctbannwi 3.1134 urariltttfc. 148U0 a A*-, rood 


-4 tf-f S' 
£ l*? if 


Traffic Through the 
St Lawrence Seaway 

Theiolal amount shipped through the , 

canal's Montreal- Lake Ontario section , 

. in mWkwsof metric tens. ^ 


0 20 0 
Mites 


ONTARIO 


QUEBEC 


72 




40 i Ouhith 


^ CANADA 

\ Sautt-Ste.- , 

/TLMaris 


UNITED 

STATES 

Chicago 


|T j 


Quebec i 


Montreal 


^ Msssena 

Lake Ontario 


Atlantic \ 
Ocean i 


Australia Eases 
Investing Rules 
For Foreigners 


Port Wider 


*75 *T7 


*77 *7* *51 ’53 M 1 

'asiimaie 

Source: St Lawrancm Seaway Authority 


ry Buffalo' 

d^Erie 

Cfevetand 


r*o« loft Tam 


Ltrickjj ^ 
Welland ( 

C * n *[! ONTARtO 
.Porta i v( 

Co&ome ^ j 


^ River I f 


/Buffalol 


Accident Worsens Seaway’s Hard Times 


By Douglas Martin 

New YcHc Tima Semce 
THOROLD, Omazio — The nunble of the 
heavy lua cfam cry goes on for 24 houn a day 
these days, as experts and woken ay, first, 
to detennine why a concrete chunk oT Lock 
No. 7 tiaimned into the side of a ship two 
weeks ago. and, second, to repair the damage. 
For the more than 70 daps backed up in or 
of the Welland the cost of the 

delay amounts to 515,000 a day. The three- 
week deeme, officials have said, will mean a 
loss of more than $3504)00 for many ships. 

But the stakes might be considerably larg- 
er, in both money and in the confidence of 
shippers. The accident here was the second 
on the Sl L a wrence Seaway in less than a 
year. Last year, a lift bridge jammed in Vat- 
{eyfidd, Quebec, causing an lS-d&y shut- 
down- and costing shippers more than $40 
mifli nn m lost business. 

This has resulted in mounting worries that 
the seaway, portions of which are more than a 
half century old, is faying at the edges be- 
cause of wwiwjiMif maintenance 


lain Angus, a member of Parhamem repre- 
senting Thunder Bay, Ontario, home of a 
huge grain port, compared the seaway to an 
old car. “You can keep the motor tuned, you 
can change the oil and rotate the tires.** he 
said, “but at some point the muffler is going 
to fall off. And then next week, it’s the motor 
or something else.” 

Answers to questions about the adequacy 
of the seaway’s upkeep will await investiga- 
tions by Canada and the United States, which 
jointly administer the seaway. 

What is pointedly dear now, however, is 
that the waterway has not lived up to the 
dreams many bad for what was once the 
biggest construction project in the world. 

Shipments through the 2300-mile (3,700- 
Idlometer). $4.4-billian waterway have been 
running at considerably less than two- thirds 
of capacity in recent years. The St. Lawrence 
Seaway Authority, the Canadian agency that 
oversees the seaway, says traffic through mid- 
October was down 25 percent from last year, 
which itself was down by more than 20 per- 
cent from 1977, the best year. 


This year, the seaway's operating deficit 
was expected to widen to 10 milli on to 12 
million Canadian dollars <$73 million to S8.7 
mfllicDk from 2.6 million dollars last year. 
The WeQacd accident seems certain to in- 
crease the loss. 

If the ranadian government carries though 
oc its threat to recoup a S57-million surplus 
the seaway accumulated in better years, the 
effect could be a fare increase as nigh as 28 
percent at a time when traffic is dwindling. 

“The seaway is becoming noncompetitive 
and any increase in costs is just going to 
exacerbate that problem," Aafd Donald S. 
RotbwdJ, president of the Great Lakes Wa- 
terways Development Association, an orga- 
nization of industries dependent on seaway 
shipments. 

A big part of the reason for this year's 
decline was last year’s poor grain harvest in 
western Canada. Canadian grain accounts 
for a third of seaway traffic, and can logically 
be expe ct ed to rebound. 

Other problems are almost certainly more 
(Confinoed oo Rage 17, CoL 5) 


MELBOURNE — The Austra- 
lian government has eased foreign- 
investment controls as part of an 
attempt to loosen its regulation of 
business. Prime Minister Bob 
Hawke said Tuesday. 

The new rules relaxing the con- 
trols took effect immediately. Mr. 
Hawke said in a speech to the Busi- 
ness Council of Australia. 

The regulations included the fol- 
lowing: 

• An increase in the minimum 
level at which foreign investment 
needs official approval, to 5 million 
Australian dollars (S3. 49 million) 
from 2 million dollars. The maxi- 
mum approval level was also 
raised, to 10 million dollars from 5 
million dollars. 

• The abolition of the so-called 
“opportunities test," which re- 
quired evidence that local compa- 
nies had had the chance to match a 
foreign joint-venture proposal. Mr. 
Hawke said this rule had been a 
chronic irritant . 

• The easing of rules governing 
acquisition of one foreign-owned 
company by another. Approval for 
such acquisitions wiD now require 
approval oily if the transaction in- 
volves more than 20 million dol- 
lars, compared with 3 million dol- 
lars before Tuesday. 

• A promise that the government 
would routinely approve proposals 
by foreigners to establish new mer- 
chant-hanking or insurance com- 
panies or to acquire interests in 
existing entities. This action effec- 
tively extended the one-year mora- 
torium on enforcement of foreign- 


-•A 


Tin Industry Experts Discuss Ways to Shore Up the Market 


• jgg: I | 

ar- * ft ■ * ••••• 

‘ • 

■j t t DM. rjF. ' IU_ OUr. ' DF. . YM 

•• : a ^ Amsterdam 29705 A2» U2J4S- 37.015 • BI47T- SSI* tDU* UVAlv 

.. L BroMdatU 5XB 7AM JBaOS ' AA4» -MBS* V3U 3025 25JU- 

- . .■• i^sSa: Frankfurt 2A32S 3373 VMS* lMt X WUOS* *MS* T2U05- I3W 

- >.vj - •; London {bj tXU IMS 714715 ZSTUX .4305 3A22S . 3MB . 3MN. 

2 V l'. Milan 177&3J 2JOJOO OS.7B 22U* — M4B 333S BUS. I» 

I .* ?RV NWfYorirtO SMB* 2tW 7M3S VO» 1SSS 5U0 M* 21110 

■- r 'ir.fr FnrB Am35 TUMS , 3MU ..ASM* 23034 ISMS* 331117715* 

- ,v I |f:gn; Tokyo 20* 30430 *45 2C*: TUi* 7l» 3*** «* 

. ^£&U*irlC3l 2-1513 10TO 0*5* Tkps* 03«S* • 71325 • AMR* U13J* 

• " :i "'ftri^BCU DJHB2 0SH7 12H -WW WUJ. 1415 ^4Aino . UTO T7A71 

. • . :g*5iS. 7SDR IMBST 03*5* HA .asm NA BB 54NM 2*4* 22737* 

~ b- ^ u Closlnm In Lai*limtBMZorkfrlbdnMtaethtfEm*ah center*. Hew YirUratM M4 PM. 

!??? to) Comr*rcie> "rmic lb} Amount* m*lwaiot*JVBt»ei*x*l1ciArtK*3ni* t tm < * ti toUrrt*m 

4? fc P- dollar Unttio/iaetx) VattaoflMO M On/froniUOOfiA; not quot*b ootmaBot*. 
Jl V * (ayntavotm Maori: MUS.\M* 

; Av^ft Oifc®r«dBw.V*i*e« • 

■ r ; * r jr Dnrwor vor UA* cmrwcy *r DU C mwnrwr.US* . Omvae* m r OU 

. ., ^ <-■ L AruM-aartral OJO Fta-nortko SM Untpao VOSC ’ taWnM UK 

s - ST'?'!.*- Aosfmf.* 1^323 . Orcnkdrac 155JB Narw.Mw • 7J02- ttui L <■ «« ■* W215 

' ' ~ S AQStr.«*)L MJ9 • WNKMf 7*H- FBU.W*. 173B 7S0S 

Be**. fta.fr. 5X75 WSan rupee OM27 Nt WB* M250 IWmhO 40.12 

1 7: 2^ S' Brazil mn. 147000 info. raoktf] T.12Z00 SBMrt** 3MS7 TholMW 26S45 

• •• Canadians 1J4S lrt*C 0*532 B*t ■ tO«5 TarthB Wn 54230 

: CUnmmfl 3.1*34 israeflitaBL 1MUD & Air. ratal 25041 UACABwn 14725 

- r : 1 v V, ? DanUh krone *345 KnwdBtaaar 03M4 S.KDr.«taB '>*230 VanMf. HS 

Ewf.POOBd CM MtaBV.rtf*. .14525 

’ •' ^ S? * Start**; IXii iii*»'t ■ • : J • ; . . • : : ‘ 

:i :■) ■. r> I Sources: Sonowf Ou Bmmrtiyx (Bruaeti); Banco CxxrmerckXa/tnUciVT fMBan): Boaaom Mo- 
j -i &L Hanoi* dr Port* (Ports); Baa* of Tokyo tTo*yo): IMP (SDK)/ BAiKatoor, rfyat. OrftanUj 
. .«!.?£?■ GoMamc(nMel.Ottmr data rromftoumo and AP. 


. By Joe Joseph 

Reuters 

LONDON — T esttinu figures 
from the world’s tin industry bepn 
two days of crisis talks in London 
Tuesday to try to prevent a market 
collapse that anud threaten pro- 
ducing nations' economies, the fi- 
nancial stability of many -dealing 
firms and London’s reputation as a 
leading metals-trading center, 
i The crisis, sparked off last week 
when the International Tin Council 
(TFQ said tiat it hsai ran out of 
carii to sujmbrt pikes above their 
freo-mazketievds, has plunged the 
London Metal Exchange (LME) 
into its worst upheaval since the 
1950s. 

Tin dealin g s on the LME, the 
world’s premier forum for metals 
trading, have been suspended since 


last Thursday while ITC officials 
and bankers struggle to patch to- 
gether a rescue package to restore 
confidence and femi further dam- 
age. 

The upheaval in the tin market 
has already spilled over into other 
trading floors on the LME, where, 
according to some estimates, busi- 
ness has dumped by almost a third. 

After meeting with bankers on 
Monday night, Pieter De Korting, 
who boys and sells tin for the ITCs 
buffer stock, said: “The banks were 
very undersiandmg and all recog- 
nize the importance of the council 
bang able to continue to operate." 

But only hours before delegates 
from the ITC's 22 producer and 
consumer member nations began 
their talks in London on Tuesday, 
officials of many major producing 


countries were saying that their 
countries would not pay more 
money for further buffer-stock op- 
erations, the ITCs key price-sup- 
port mechanism. 

Paul Leong, Malaysia's minister 
for primary industries, said in Kua- 
la Lumpur that it was no longer 
possible for the ITC to try to de- 
fend prices at current levels be- 
cause of the wrigbt of the world 
surplus. Tuesday’s meeting should 
have focused on other ways of sta- 
bilizing the market, he said. 

The decision, to halt trading was 
taken after prices had tumbled to a 
34-month low- of £8,140 (51 1,600) a 
metric ton in early trading last 
Thursday, well below the target 
floor price of £8300 that the Inter- 
nationa] Tin Council seeks to de- 
fend. 


Mr. De Kooing said (hat (he 
steep price fall had undermined the 
confidence of the ITCs bank credi- 
tors, but analysts said that matters 
were brought to a head by ITC 
producing members’ delay in pay- 
ing out the £60 million of extra 
funds for the buffer stock that they 
had pledged last month. 

Analysts believed that the two 
main options facing officials were 
the injection of a large amount of 
cash to shore up the buffer stock's 
finances or & commitment by mem- 
ber governments to underwrite all 
the ITCs financial obligations, es- 
timated by some to be about £200 
million. 

However, Mr. Leong, who 
speaks for the world’s biggest tin 
producer, said that the LME 
should consider the possibility of a 


tin market without buffer-stock in- 
tervention hr the near future. 

The ITCs expensive buying op- 
erations have left it with about 
£500 million of unwanted tin in its 
buffer stock, but many dealers esti- 
mate that, without such support, 
buying prices could fall by as much 
as ’50 percent. 

Chirayu Isarangkura Na 
Ayutha, Thailand’s industry minis- 
ter, said in Bangkok on Tuesday 
that his country would not offer 
additional funds to the buffer stock 
until other member countries help 
solve the ITCs financial problems. 

Industry sources in the Far East 
said most producer economies were 
suffering from severe recession, 
face cash-flow problems and were 
unable to support ITC market op- 
erations. 


Bob Hawke 

investment rules for merch^n: 
banking 

• A relaxation of real-estate 
rules calling for 5G-perce.it JocJ 
equity. These will apply on!;, if a 
development is worth more thar. {13 
million dollars, or if it will take 
more than five years to comple:;. 
In addition, the approval threshold 
for foreign real-estate purchases 
will be raised to 600.000 dollars 
from 350,000 dollars. 

Under the new rules. rorejgr.er=. 
will also be permuted to buy exist- 
ing mining exploration rights, but 
rules calling foT 50-percem local 
equity in a mining project will re- 
main. 

Foreign takeovers of Australian 
companies will continue to be ex- 
amined in di vidua Uv. 


Channel Tunnel 
Funding Cited 

The Asu-auto! Press 

LONDON — The British 
partners in a group of British 
and French companies seeking 
to build a tunnel under the En- 
glish Channel said Tuesday that 
they had lined up enough mon- 
ey to start building. 

Channel Tunnel Group PLC 
said the tunnel could open by 
1993. Thursday is the deadline 
for submitting bids on the pro- 
ject to the British and French 
governments. 

Channel Tunnel officials said 
the tunnel would cost about 
£2.3 billion ($3.2 billion}, or 
half as much as the bridge-tun- 
nel proposed by Euroroute. 
Channel Tunnel's mam com- 
petitors. 


Reopened 
By Malaysia 

Ageoct France -Prase 

KUALA LUMPUR — The 
Kuala. Lumpur Commodities Ex- 


SEC Rules That Hutton 
Violated Securities Laws 


• >: r jh#? 


: :7‘ £ S' 


Interest Rates 




Em • currency P c p a rt w. 


DaBar D » » ■* Front Mortta* franc . BCXJ SOU 
1 Imontti IMK 4MK 11*41* *W-M» .***«• 

:. Ijiif.lnlcrtl SlK* 4*4-4* Atwtw IlAWm WrtTW KW4 

" '' vT; ‘t*h- IlMlItn 8V»-aU> 54M *V3MW IWM« ***** MM* . fun. 

“ rrlj- fimmftts t>um SiMW AWAta. 11W-I1W 106-10* taW 

'•j 1| j>5'lw BWh«* 5W-5W A'W-A*. nwifc WTO* 

' * 5- Si Sources: Maroon Guaranty (dottar. DM. SF, Pound. PF)s UavtO took t*CO): Reuters 
j 'S* Sif. (SDRt. Rates oppUeooto to iatorOoidtdeoostt* of S)adWon minimum far oootvotootj. 

■■ 5* > i- . . ■ 

KeyM**«yR*a mmOa .39 | Art— PoBbt P qwriU 


' I' t.Ti' 

- ■ i.' 1 e» : •* 


mutmwo 

DUaMOtBota 


? U - * PrWac Rat* 

: £1 1"' Bro *tar Laao Bata 

f Cfol P*w JWT7* Oars 
{? C *S tawHiTi wum BWi 
- ' i. tv 4-nii»» Tio mw 1 BUm - 

. t\- CD'i2»«dm 

rjjsC cm** dan 

: weHOcnwaar 

! LacataardBat* 

' om&HUM 

TS Vi ODAMaata MHtxMk . 

; "J- ~X* .‘-3 c[/ia*®oom toMool 


7W 71ft 
711/14 711/M 
fJt Ml 
BWA SMPt 
? M 715 

. 7.17 7.1* 

7J2 . 7* 

1M 748 
740 7* 


: £ Jivgr: WeHOcfTncay 

1* LanbardBat* 

, Oma^tem 

. . OOSMOM tatartMM 

i ^-ji^tpi^naoWtBttrtoaa 

:t - 

.'*■ • ’ B55S 

■“! j', ?V, 

■ " : .“il Ca«*htaW 

- 1 : . OaMBBBUi Mortal 

■:£' <iC> Jmoomtatarto* 


tmoit 4-M 

ZOWOtaA ' . 4K.-IA 
3 months M-SK 

Am—ffta . SW-JM 
iraar W-W 

Source: Reuter*. 


CA M ro ey Bhriwtft 

Wtai i W LwHimftrjauB ! 

JW dor m i iww n m 724 

T rtT E ta 1*0*1 Bo* tadwe 7X23 
Source: MefTWLYOOb Tolerate. ■ ■ 


OaMBBOth Hawk 
■ i, % \ hnoomtatartaM 
; *AW*ni MtaftoM 

Sjtirta 

r'5 it*i S f- Bon Bo* Roto 

■, i 1! ft’. Can Moot* 

■l ji 

?MTM rat . 

; ■} otKBtarfBBto 

iiSlP: CaBMtaMT 


** . *w 
m f*K 
■m tie 
*w *w 

*3/14 *3/1* 


im - nu 

- IT* 121ft 
113/M 113/14 
113/14 11,3/M 


Gold 


■ * AM. 

HtMtCtai 32175 

L wmn ftMri * 1XS 
for* OUKW 3 TO* 
lipiek ■ ■ 32*45 

UJJVtaa 32KSS 


Oa.39 ' 
►j*. . ort» 

32440 —020 

— ^ : +025 

327 J* ; '. ~0SS 
22*39 , . ‘—020 

32*38 .. . -®20 


•■€ tfl 1 ' ' - ■ - — ' 

; .■» jS £ t r - Sowtost Reuters, coeamenttr*. Oiw 

Lrtwia»BcokefTehvA 

, 

A ToOur Readers 

..;i ^ 0 .a a; 


New York — 3 VM~ , _ +A40 

unnmm Paris and Lamer otttcbA Be- 
ing*: Head Kano and Zurten opening and 
Chelng priced tigK York Cm» cu rr e nt 
contract M) prices ht US-Spor auoce. 
Source: Reuters. 


ft yiwiing today, we are adding the U5. dollar exchange rate for the 


mi 

l e* ^ 


the Oats and GNMA fiiturefran.our hsings. 


under a new set of rales, after wide- 
spread defaults halted trading in 
March 1984. ■ 

The exchange, the world’s only 
futures market for palm oQ, was 
not “a casino for get-ricb-quick 
schemes,” Prime Minic tw Ma- 
hathir Mohamad said at a ceremo- 
ny to mark the new operation. 

Mr. Mahathir, in introducing a 
system of fiduciary guarantees to 
protea against a recurrence of the 
defaults, also said the govern me nt 
would allow foreigners to hold 
more than a 50-percent interest in 
brokerage groups. 

He also voiced hope that the ex- 
change would introduce other com- 
modities and BumihuI instruments 
and stock indices. 

Exchange officials said the new 
rales should ensure no repetition of 
-the chaos that resulted from the 
default of a speculator who had 
nearly cornered the maricet in palm 
oil futures. 

Hie affair frightened off traders, 
and volume, which had once ex- 
ceeded 1,000 lots of 25 metric tons 
a day, dropped to a trickle before 
trading stopped. 

Mr, Mahathir said: “An ex- 
change, however well provided 
with. laws, rules and regulations, 
has stiQ too many opportunities 
rand loopholes for the unscrupulous 
to take advantage.” 

Under the new rales, the ex- 
change will operate on a new guar- 
antee system based on a fiduciary 
chain, officials said, and Mr. Ma- 
hathir said anyone trying to tmder- 
hune market confidence would be 

punished. 

The tow rules offer guarantees 
from tbe newly established Malay- , 
tian Futures Gearing Corp. 

' Other changes in the rules in- 
cluded revamping the Commod- 
ities Trading Act, and giving the 
exchange more powers to prosecute 
market manipulators. 

Traders and refiners had mixed 
views an whether the exchange 
could n«i™i a high volume, a£- 
thongh they said producers and rt- 

fincra needed a properly function- 
ing market a 5 a place to hedge. 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion cited EF. Hutton & Co. and 
its parent firm Tuesday for securi- 
ties law violations in connection 
with cash-management practices 
that earlier resulted in the concern 
pleading guilty to wire and mail 
fraud. 

It was one of several SEC actions 
stemming from activities uncov- 
ered during a lengthy Justice De- 
partment investigation that led to 
the firm’s guilty plea to criminal 
charges involving bank overdraw- 
ing. . 

Without admitting or denying al- 
legations in the SEC civil com- 
plaint, Hutton consented to a judg- 
ment entered in U.S. District Court 
in Washington. 

The SEC said its actions were 
based cm Hutton's failure “to dis- 
close the financial effects of cash 
concentration practices.” 

Under the negotiated settlement, 
Hutton will reimburse the invest- 
ment companies it managed and 
Thor shareholders by more than Sl 
million. 

The firm also is barred from 
opening any new retail brokerage 
offices pending an examination of 
its policies and practices by an in- 
dependent consultant acceptable to 
the commission. 

The SEC said Hutton win be 
granted a further temporary ex- 
emption to a law requiring auto- 
matic termination of the right to 

act as an investment adviser for 

firms convicted of a felony; pend- 



ing hearings on Hatton's request 
for a permanent exemption. 

And, finally, the SEC said it will 
continue its investigation “with re- 
spect to Hutton's cash-manage- 
ment practices in order to deter- 
mine whether enforcement actions 
against individuals or other entities 
are a pp r op ri ate.” 

The commission complaint said 
Hutton failed to folly disclose its 
cash-management practices and 
failed to properly administer in- 
vestment company operations. 

It said the firm's annual reports 
to the SEC “were materially defi- 
cient in that they failed to disdose 
certain over drafting practices 

which gave rise to a sign if team 
component of Hatton Group’s net 
income.” 

The S 1.025 million reimburse- 
ment to some of its customers 
stems from an SEC finding that 
Hutton delayed by one day credit- 
ing dividends to certain mutual 
fund customers and that others suf- 
fered by Hutton assigning a 2 P-M. 
asset value to some investment 
shares purchased op 10 two hours 
later in the day. 


DO YOU HAVE 
FI NDS TO 
DEPOSIT? 

1 • : 

,i*l . t»H*it, or* f* rutiles) 

■ ft-. f«*l lit riri '>••11 iryitimts 

4*1 I 

nt» lirililvn hjiik » tueje* 
l nxnnln»tir» n:lc-» ul 

miilli'lt^lMMl ailvKf 
li , lcphi»ni- rjlf quuifs 


TeirptMiw or »riie roda> •{* ?jr 
iiKininer Mtvice foparrment 
for mare info.-KUitcn 


Docs Your Bank or 
Broker Charge $110 for 
1,000 Shares of IBM? 

Andrew Peck Does. 

A SAMPLE OF OUR VERY LOW COMMISSION RATES 

500 snares of any price stock $ 80 

1.000 shares 110 

5.000 shares 300 

10.000 shares 450 

20 options @ J/2 53 

50 options (S' 3 ISO 


If you live in Europe or the U.K. and you make your own investment 
decisions, Andrew Peck Associates will charge you much less in 
commission when you trade or invest in U.S. securities' markets. 

Our London office gives you che convenience of a U.S. discount 
broker to contact during your business day. Your calls are answered 
promptly and executed orders are reported immediately. And you 
can make payments and deliveries to your account without sending 
securities or funds to the United States. 

Accurate record keeping and custodial services are provided by 
Securities Settlement Corporation, one of The Travelers Companies. 
The Travelers is the third largest publicly owned insurance company 
in die U.S., and every account is protected for up to 10 million dollars. 

Our London office is ready to receive your inquiries. Please call 
us or return the coupon to receive our free brochure “SIMPLIFIED 
TRADING." We look forward to hearing from you. 


H Bd ta on A »» w i * 
a470tliStrMrt 
N«v* Vbffc 10021 
Cable The Cartyta Now York 
mtamatianMTrtH 820B92 

Telephone 212-744-1601 

A n*mb«r ef tfi* Sftfttp Cr sup 
tiutINT 



ANDREW PECK/fT) j 

ASSOCIATES, INC. • 1 ' | 

39 Bedford Square. London WClB 3EG. England fCJl iSSU-1096 Telex: 93IJI50 (Mf JLEIS 0 1 I 
32 Broadway, New Vwk. N.V. 10004 lilZi 3*3-3770 Telex: 43*4007 (STuCKKi I 

Licensed dealer in securities. I 

□ Please send me your SIMPLIFIED TRADING brochure, | 

j 

Address j 

„ 1HT-U I 

Country | 

Hta»— — i— ■ .11— — — ta-— —— — — — j 

MEMBERS NASD. SIpO. SIA 














Tobies Include the nationwide prices 
. un to t ne closing on Wall Street 
ona Oa not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


UtMamri 

Utah Lot, stock 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30. 1985 


OnonC 76 24 
Orloncpn.iz 8J 


OrlonCpn.il BJ 
OricnP 

Orion (ri 2JS 101 
OuttJdM M 24 M 
OvmTr Ji. 24 14 
OvStliB 50 3.7 11 
Ovnnc Ufi 4.1 S 
Owen I II 1 JO 3.7 9 
Oxford MUZ? 


119 26M 

776 U 

vs to 

17 Z7ft 
136 MVj 
43 KH» 
1661 13W 
475 3313 
1Z1S 486b 
40 IZrt 


Vt'U 26V + ** 
2S S 5V + V 
TV ** — ft 
27V< 77V— '* 
5HV. 746b — '> 
3S4* 36*4 + *S 
11 136b— ft 

33'j* MV + «b 
47V 486b +■ fb 
12V 13V 


14V + VB 

37% + 6b 


21 Vb 

ISV 

NAFCO 

1.DD 

63 

15 

5 

166* 

16>'4 

16V 



3Mb 

231* 

NBO* 

1J0 

45 


172 

34% 

34ft 

34ft 

+ 

ft 

30V 

lD6b 

NBI 



10 

125 

11'. 

Il'i 

I1V 

+ 


itvi 

17V* 

NCH 

.73 

3J 

13 

62 

211 

I9 7 * 

70 

_ 

V 

446b 

316b 

NCNB 

15? 

3.9 

8 

riM 

38'b 

38V 

38ft 



36 

34M 

NCR 

m 

26 

M 

3IW1 

34V 

33ft 

34ft 

+ 

ft 

136b 

9’+ 

Nl'nd 

50 

15 


799 

13ft 

13 

131k 


V 

36V 

27 


233 

7.9 

8 

* 

29*^ 

28ft 

79V 


ft 

IV 

V; 

NVF 




7D6 

Vk 

ft 

% 

+ 

<* 

59% 

356* 

NWA 

.90 

15 

27 

20 

49V 

48ft 

49ft 


V 

7H6b 

22 


1-20 

5.1 

13 

ISO 

236b 

23V 

23 ft 



29% 

736n 

Nashua 



R 

88 

24ft 

24 

24ft 

+ 


181; 

8% 

NHCmr 

36 

12 

» 

7951 

17ft 

70ft 

lift 

+ 

ft 

3Mb 

236k 

NolDfct 

220 

68 

72 

sre 

32ft 

31ft 

32V 


ft 

70 

17 

NDist pr 

135 

93 


B9 

2D 

30 

30 



20% 





18 

am 

2DV 

20ft 

20V 


V 

30V: 

73% 

NalFGs 

2J8 

S3 

7 

.55 

25% 

2ft 

Zbfe 


V 

36 

726b 

NIG VPS 



7 

284 

36' 4 

35’-k 

36 

+ 

V 

4V 

2ft 

NtHam 




229 

A 

ru 

3% 

+ 

'.* 


UK ZJ 
1J6 3.9 
JO 24 

S 9J 
110 
9J 
&2 
20 
MSo S 
3J» 10J 
JO 21 
£72 77 
JO 23 
UO U 8 flj 
407 120 n 

JO ZZ 17 IW( 
225 24 274 

150 13 34 75 

20 U 


lln 1K1- Vs 
176b m» 


23V 23V 
33V 33U 


30ft + ft 
44 Vi +1*1 


256 1110 
450 115 
115 

PaPL.dai2.90 129 
POP Lor BJO 11.9 
11J 
121 

iB 

Bf 

115 


BabHWi LWȤuS 




63 33 OuOKOs 1J0 25 IB S» 57 S6*b 56V— V 

10S 91 OuaOof 956 75 1300*10761 1026i 102V 

Wft 17 QuafcSO JO 35 20 271 2PM 29M Z4*t + V 

10% 5 anomic 17 98 5W 5ft 56b + V 

34M 27 Quetaar 1J0 5.4 10 223 295b 2? 29ft + v*. 


3<M 27 Qimtar 1J0 £4 10 221 295b 29 29ft + ft 
261b Ml* QkMI 54a 1.1 14 509 22*6 216* 22 + 6b 


436* 27ft RmchC 50 25 15 

lOfb 46b RapAlr 5 

3 lib RooA nrt 
12V 6 RPGyps 50 40 9 

49V 36 ReotJY 144 U I 

27V 23V RNYpfClU 115 
57V S26* RNYptA6J4ell5 
3410 24V RftoBk 144 54 4 
30 23 lib RepBK PfZ12 75 


23lib RepBk Pf2.12 75 


32V 326b 326b + V 
495 9 BV 9 + ft 

17 IV IV - IV— ft 
22B 76b 76b 7% 

59 48ft 47V 48V + V 
12 27V 276* 27V + ft 
5 55ft 55ft 55ft + V 
312 306b 38 30» + V 

153 26V 74 26V +1 


200 27 17 
3Bs 15 ID 
00 U 14 
04 5 39 

2J1SU5 
50 1J IS 
24 


JO 15 22 
150 4J 9 
43 U II 
1-72 tA J 

ioa 105 


.16 5 14 

234 SJ B 
JWemi w 
18 

JO 15 16 
1.94 aa 12 
loo 12 13 
1J4 3.1 13 
1JD 41 M 
30 1.1 48 
UO 8JJ 7 
A 134 U 
Pf 138 115 


50 WI2 

44 15 U 
IOO 40 » 
1.74 5.1 ID 
134 SO i 


52 5.1 21 
50 ZS 7 
UQe 6.1 8 

JO 3.1 6 

.92 25 12 


■ff* 


sc 3 




50V 3Mb TDK 
366b 271* TECO 


366b 271* TECC 
im 7 TGIF 
71» 7366 TMP 


TTtt 73V TT4P 155 7.1 

SSSTSS 

781* 151V TRW Pf 4J0 25 


4W MV 35^ 32V + J a 
96 8 TV 7*b — *• 


tTlb T7Vi 17ft — V 
»b 28U ». + *i 


8t2 156 15 

23to if" tSKp» wa SJ 
81 566b Tambrd 3J0 43 


38 217 80ft 00 BO". 
1TMM174M174V 
■7 IV IV _|V 


546b Tomtord 


36 23V Tandy 

15V 17ft TndycB 
48V 476* T««mx 150 15 


26 + V* 

376b + V 


15 1W 7Hk 71 76^ + £ 

12 447 176* l*6b 16V— * 
■ 15 WV lyib IS? — V 

M 202 79Vi 79V 7JM — w 

14 3357 34V 33V 3*1- V 

15 6 15V!» IS IS 

14 43(7 S2V 57** 52tti +■ % 


(Contained on Page 14) 


noa%fiateN«es 


ATA'Onhas 




Dollar 






\ 


-Ju 






*$ 


Wherever it is, weH find it. 


■J* 


m 






^ '• -.V.,.. 6-.' , v SsVHjS : « .• ; »“ '•'* *w-' '• . >• - •'" i -.-“i.. - 


n < - /. 



x' - 




> . 


^ ; v 

;■ vj •• . 1 


r v s ■ " • \ - i iT 


\ . L; ^ l . 

:» / v'. «. ' -/* j ' - 

/'T-. • ! ; *• - 


4. 


i •. v • *• 

\ *• 4. ’ * 


: i 


\ 


«>*... 


/ 


f 


y 


i • 


i , 


. t 


i 



' i 


: * 


-i- 




✓ 


OIL. Wherever it is. well find >L Oil 
is the primary source of energy. It is 
the power iliac moves the world and 
wili be so for many years to come. 

But, it is necessary <o be prepared 
to wrestle this treasure from the 
earth’s most secret strongholds, using 
the latest continuously evolving tech- 
nology. and to venture ituo hostile, 
inaccessible places. 

Agip, Italy's national oil company, 
took up this challenge sixty years ago. 
probing into the origins of the earth, 
experimenting with new techniques, 
and devoting to these activities 
human and economic resources that 
arc always up to the difficulties to be 
overcome. 

Wherever die possibilities of 
finding oil exist, Agip is present with 
its spirit of initiative and decades of 
experience. The results achieved, 
alone or in cooperation with leading 
oil companies, in 30 countries, on S 
continents, make Agip a reliable 
operator in any oil activity. 

Even where no-one has ever 
reached. 



•to war 
(ft 1*61 
K BMl 
4M (Ml 

.1 sss 

K 2M1 
«6* mn 


m im 
*h tan 

n n* 

8ft Ma 

n n-i) 

8ft 2*11 
•ft 3MB 
fft 5*n 
n am 
«* 2S82 
8ft 3*11 
m TUB 

■ft 2 *n 
a* wn 


«ft l*M 
•ft ma 








m 




I Mil 




r* 


6 : 




A 


/ 



Extorter imji/N 


8W 1762 
n 2663 9M8 9MV 

& SS"*”' 


’T,"7 






M 


Non Dolfor 






2 a 


~Sn\ 








ch>L 



































Page 13 




** 


business 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1985 



r , 

K 

*Va 




• i Ls 

■ Hi ':j^. 

u iifi 

m- 



b3iwa,cr 


til III Fell 28% in 3d 

. Unliat Press International ■'. l £^..-TaT^ f rjj»Tr 

$34.6 bfllk*i4rom<334i MHod a 
year <arikr, X3 rdf ',jj»eiuies were, 
first incSudedas part of Chevron 

i Qa the W^.’ yidfe , Stock Ex- 
d i a ng p. Cbevpje sJsares fe2 2S 


VS 


,siS) 


... ’ •* * 

^ diiki 
¥ it s TSgfci 

.¥. Vj :'■ J'- 1 »H‘ 
:* i: 


• :\ ;;’i 

. .: hv'fr 

i :i 4 f If: 

' -t- ■: 'I i’ 


Ci , 

.. *.Sv 

is 5' )», 


il 


a 


'Slii 

git; 


percent, primarily because ttf its 
finandal integration with GnJf Q3' 

Corp. . - 

^Analysts had estimated that 
Ow^ wlridi acquired Gulf for- 
S132 billion m 1984 in the Jan'.. 

merger in. US. history, would sbow — -~wr m 

a profit increase of about 5 percent- ***** P“ : Tneidifc. dosing- at 
in the third quarter from year-earii- ."S39-50. ... . 
feer levels. ■. • •' ***-.«. Llui 

Oievron, based in.San Francis- 
co, earned £245 mOlian, or 72 cents 
a share, in the ■ July- Sep tember 
quarter, down from $342 anflion, 
or SI a share, in the .third quarter 
last year. Revenues dropped 28 
percent to $103 billion from $143 
biffion. 

For the first trine mon th* 

1985, Chevron’s earnings were 


-as v 
« ■* ,- '} Jfci 
- 

' 7 « :: * 



*j it 


- * 4 Sj»r 


turfite \ote 


»-*« >«■ 


5.-. 


i :r ■ * 
-- •. !’:» 


tf kjo. 

!• "*v. 

V. Mr 

r Kp i 

h «E.I 
? *■£ 

» Sit: 
fc sa» 
i* k*r 

SJS 

h nm 

r, r^yi 

* nee 
F> 

!. iu- 

•> '■*cc 

■ i 

*< 0C3-'r*.i 

P. D.:r> 9 
F-. SCE 
Pi Mi- 
lt K«s: 

Pi Ktt 
h KS» 

! Mi 
Pi It 
(v K* 
t. nr: 

am 
tb KC 

?. mct 

>. HEt 
P. » 
r. ma: 
fi Bar: 

J: 3»5 
ft am 
i. wp: 
*ce». 

KEC 
f.- KiC 

r. me i 

MIH 
I. JiGl 
li *w: 

IS Kffi 
h *ar 
s war. 

* ac 

r. aa^ 

C: yl*'- 
h m% 

s. 3K; 

Fi 

USE, 
kSfii 
figs ■ 

*. w*f 

ft a 

wV 

■ 

vfi- 


Xerox Posts Lass 
qf$15MUUon 

The Associated Pros 
STAMFORD, Connecticut — 
Xerox Corp. reported Tuesday a 
third-quarter net less of $15 mffltmi 
because of two : previously an- 
nounced charges totaling $1& mil- 
lion in connection with, its insur- 
ance operations. 

" A year earlier. Xerox earned $81 
jniflion, or 72 cents a share. Third- 
quarto- revenue edged up 0.1 pa- 
aspi to $2J2 biffion from $1.9 bfl- 
lidn. For the first nine month* of. 
*1985, Xerox said total net income: 
rose 5 parent to $319 million from 
•$303 million a year earBer. Nine- 
month revenue rose 3 percent to 
S&20 billion from $6.01 bfflian. 

. Earlier this months Xerox said it 
would take a $67-miIHon rhary to 
cover the streQgtbemqg of reserves. ‘ 
sit its L.W. Biegler mqmm» unit, 
and a $97qniffioh charge for the' 
closing of its Industrial Indemnity 
Financial Corp. operation. 


M. KeDtt, " attributed tlxf drop m 
third-quarter ea rn in g* m $62 mil- 
lion in' loses from adpistmeais 
from th&cqmbmatmnuf GsK with 
Chevron, to a $13-ad31oc writeoff 
on a surjdus lanker, to $I8 m3Bon 
in forejgn exchanff- Igasesand to a 
lade <rf inventory profits.. 

The , sate-of Gab’s SwriKastcm 
r efi tH n g. ' aad m a l &d ^g-jtMeU in 
February and of Griff ^Canada in 
Aiqpm we»ie Iajgdyjiqjoasa*: for 
the downturn in tiard^jaarter reve- 
nues. Mr. Kdkr sauL^. -j 

SftUs. of assds, paroetdady die 
Gulf sale, pared the enn- 

pany’s defat by $2.7 bffioa in the 
quarter. - ‘ ' • 1^. ' 

“>Uthcn^h fiqAxmioa and pro- 
duction earnings deefined draing 
the quarter, t}M coofemed reco vay 
in- Gievum’i 'refining and market- 
ing opetatioat was OKoaramng,” 
Mr. Xefiersaid. 

U& petadenm eannngs in the 
latest wa rose to SOI million 
from ,K57 m2Hon the year, before 
on tbieitrengdi of iisreased refin- 
ing anflmasei profits 1 from Inkier 
paces. But domestic i credo joil and 
natural gas producrion dechned, in 
part bedsnsextf two tamcmes that 
struck the Gnlfof Mexico. 

. Forei gn p etrdemn earnings Jdl 
to S87.miSad from in 

the -1%4 * quarter because of re- 
dnedd pro&coon, lower' oQ pikes, 
foreign T WHudatiiwt and 

the tanker write-off. 


Phibro-Salomon Announces 
New Philipp Bros. ^iake-Up 


Ne* York Tima Serric* 
i NEW YORK — Plhbro-Salo- 
'mon Inc. has announced the sec- 
ond major shake-up in a year of its 
Philipp Bros, commodities trading 
subsidiary. 

Last year’s change and those - 
announced Monday comprise ah 
enormous pruning of Phifipp Brps,. 
winch just four years ago acquired 4 
Salomon Bros.*, WaU^Sp5&{ffnhi^- : 

est investment bank, iri-^atnimpt \ 
to create a new finandatpower- ; 
house, Phzbro-Sakmon. ■ 

.Salomon Bro&, however, is now 
by far the more powerful of the two 
and the company [dans to chang e 
its name from Phibro-Salonxm Inc. . 
to Salmnon Inc. r 

Philipp Bros^ one 'of the largest 
and most respected concems in the 
higWy secretive world of physical 
commodities dealing, will be 
slimmed down sharpty as it refo- 
cuses on its basic busmess, tradmg 
raw commodities. 

The moves will slash 600 staff 
members worldwide from Phifipp 
Bros.’ staff of about 3,000. Nearly 
ail of the reductions, according to 
Robot S. Salomon Jr4 a Pfaibro- - 
Salomon managing director, will 
come from the company’s market- 
ing and distribution operations, a 


low-margin business in which it 
largefy acts, as a nAMlimw. ft is 
also segotiatmk to scILa Breziliin 
p^-ircn manuJfflmmag operation, 
Mr. Salomon said. - 

InndditipD, there wSl be an im- 
portant management shake-up. 
Two young Ph2h^) Bros, execu- 
tiTCS who made their marks in its 
st^{-trading^pperation yiH bo- 
come.' chairman and president 
th^tmirqff-Jan. 1, 1986: 
v MflrUn'N. Kaufman,' 32, who is 
based m London, vdB be co m e 
chairman, and Henry & Sdiachar, 
31, wifl become pimideni of PK- 
BppBrgsiaijhe retirement of Aka 
Radcs,1be 'current and 

Indw^ Jessrison, an adviser and 
foriner chairman, at then end of the 

jw* 1 -’. 

Phibro-Saloxnon’s chairman, 
J(*h H-: Gutfreund, said there 
would be a charge agsinst the com- 
pany’s earnings because cf the re- 
structuring but added that it would 
probaWycomcto Jess ftan the ap- 
urcaimaieiy $50 milBcn that Phi- 
bro-Salomon would. gain from a 
previoasfy announced tertmnatmn 
of Phifipp. &o&* retirement phui. 
fa the last restnuturing, 250 jobs 
were cut 


CompanyBesute 

Revenue and profits or losses, In mllllons. are la local currencies 
uniass otherwise fnefleotad. ••• . 


Britain 


imhhh ms ism EnwRiord 

RfVfldufl 2510. 1170. Wflgiir INI INI 

K.KaSf— S5 

par Stars — 7 - OM ___ 9S0 25J 

Per Star* — US . 0i*4 

t Manns IMS T*M 


L - CIL 
SrOQaar. IMS ISM 

RSVOOUe.. 271 J} 27M 

Prollf . tad «J0 

PorSnora — a» 

? Months IMS ISM 

Revonua Ml NOJ) 

Protll 3*5 305 

Per Shorn 2.19 151 


, MarRs & Spencer 
W HaH 1S85 ISM o.-Joss. 

Ravunoe U71 l^SO. 

Pretax Not— 137J 1124 ■ ... 

Armstroittf World ImL . Meti*c.__ sis 
CrnMa artoewr. t*» ism. p»aor*_ vi7 vs* 

Revono* **&7 3»B- MW . •¥*• Js&de •wMoobaa 

Nat Inc. 2&2 XU or sUSmUUoe to T monttm 

Per San 1.17 053 and oabr of S*A mWloo In 

ms ISM 

k; Minr- ~ ~ 'nj 'n5 ' F®ewWv*ar . 

1X52 Per nan»_ 3M 3M MQaar. - IS*S - ISM 

Ravanaa 3»5 32SJ 

. Nat InC —— *50 7J9 

Arrow Electronics ParStam — KM <UO 

Manor. TSU WM » MwM . JgS tSM 

_ - Revenue 12X2 HU IPMW WHS f»*2 

Dofaseo Net Inc (0)253 25S Net tnC 22 ji 2*4 

Manor. ISM ISM PWStara— — C U* Per Shore — (UJ 072 

R*uenae 5115 *7*4 9 Monttu IMS TSM 

Prafui *05 *05 Revenue 41*4 . 5775 " ‘ iMfi Flavors, Crao. . 

Par Stare— 057 853 NetUjc (o»J3 1U — 

IMMta ISOS ISM p r Ste ?— jgffSe IS5 

Revenue 15BO 1A a: too*. IWwfe MWi ten SJJ'!']” — - - jrj 

ProfU 140* a** isetst^pfajffiuuo aint mt -pit sh L s — •-* . 1 H« ’JJJ 

Per Shore — 227 251 ter qnd.of S2J mUOaTSf * 

/Downs ’ • fMOWW - iwj 17W 

’ Du Pant Canada . K77JI?~ &i sm 

3ntQaar. INS ISM ASOTCO Par Share -150 155 

5^5“ — “K =KS MONT. ms rnt : , _ ' » 

Revenue. 2M-4 2072 KfObeg 


1X1 


HU 


MOW. 


HO ISM 


- Ravenua^— 

& Praffls 

SfTn' ji PHr Stare — . 

P* *3Ir’ 


OSO Revenue 1230 UJO. 

— Not inc. — — . 3*4 «UD 
™ -.'IS? per snare — 04« OM 


P tf?* 




ixTMiarv, 

jSMmttn ms m< t Monttu . WtS ISM Ravenue — 7M5 ata 

avenue — M73 SSM ■ rmiwi r 8500 12MO fW ioc._ ■ HW 7*j 

OperNet_ 1358 3*58 M IU« 5 5X1 »4 Per Shore — - UD UO 

Oner Share— ass X3S 1?g4 P^ tMoWr net tnctoaea PMaaier - WM ISM 

. . cMnroISJBmoaan. Revenue 2M .12*0 

1I*C0 ■ • • . _ NW lac ■ 2205 205J 

talSSi— 3M0 mo : AtlantlcRldrfJeul Pwshar.^ s* - 7sr 

riatojaia mow- MerrUI Lynch- 

““ S2»let *55 • iXj Manor. ism ISM 

9 Month* ISM ISM 

Revenue — Ilia U7B0. o ueraw ra— 
tat Inc 4** (aioia 

Ojjoes. Results h> V& dot- ‘Jg ^ Revenue — . 54 OX *400 

tors. Net inc MI2 *55 

- ■ Per Stare — .12* 032 

Placer Development . salty Maturfaeturlnu .. - • 

TMontta . ISM ISM 3 rd Qtwr. ISM ISM MurphVOlJ 

Revenue 2755 2334 Revenue — . 44X3 41M anfOear. ..TSM TSM 

fronts 20.49- 30*5 Nat Inc -T429 LJ7 Revenue 576S 5704 

Par Share — 027 <US Per Stars _ .052 024 ooerta* IU 2U 

I Mown* ISM ISM Otar Star*- -OM «2* 

Sun cor Revenue — : xohl um. » Months . isos. i*M 

MOuar. 1985 1M Wot | wc - — »» 14.M Revenue , 12*0 1260. 

. Sttfl ■ MW PorStaro — 1J2 OM 9JW gj»-- . ' : « ■ »■ 

opar Nat teiTOS 201 Ooer Start— US - %04 

Ooer Share— — 028 »8M nets imuu sobs ot 

e ■■ - , a . 1BU Bowits -■■■ stnjaoo in «wat asu a 

^htoatta ISM ISM MQoar . . ■ ]f» ISM tmjmtntmonBatntndis. 

eo^»r^ oso- 15* § gffl&S: ■ SS - SS - Paine Webber 

9 Months 1JU ISM OitiQuar. ISM ISM 

zzrzx % ’& sr 1 - is s 

oper Starr— 223 12> Pv Starts ft29 015 

. Amer. Bakeries 1S!£b3B!&V5?*E5 , £. ~ vtmr 19«S ISM 

Mtar ISIS ISM- — j Revenue 1200 '■ MSO 

Amt M 1M2 1TSJ SBftfnfWW hr Sbrtmdt „„ 

Net Inc 148 028 • 

Per Shore 022 H2i . 

SManttn isos TSM .. Control Data . PbUadefp»a Eke 

Revenue 3574 3BM M <Ma>. : ISOS 1984 M flsu. ■ ■ ' 1905 1994 

gwjne.'. 520 024. SSSSo— 1430. W Rmm-, 7905 tS* 

Per Share — . 153 144 nSTum— . sssa - US tWtnc.__.iae4--.T3Z4 

_ - ' sets ISM Per Share — 05* on 

Amer. Motors. wSSSa — ' mbo- xmo utatt ; ms wt 

WOtnr. . 1985 ISM Tint Me. — (o)2»2 U0 tmm_ 43*.. VM. 

Revenue^, 1430' UBO Per Stare— — . .401 tatjnc , 3U. BU 

Net i ne. (e)ie.i 7-i a: Jess. • . - . Par Stare— . . UM xn 


tat inc . 
Par Stare — . 


33jo . ion 
150 . M7 


SaysNetBose 

LONDON Mirks A 
Spencer PLC, Bduua’s largest 
retaBer. s* d Tuesday that pre- 
tax profit rore22 percent in the 
first haff of fecaH$S6. 

Profit m the sU-AOfith peri- 
od coding SopL 28 was £137.7 
tmffion {>196.6 mflEon) oom- 
pared with £1116 m3Hon in the 
like period last year. The results 
were henry than the £130 mii- 
Bon that analysts had expected. 
Sales m the period rose 15 per- 
cent to £1 j£ 7 btUkrn from £1.45 
billion t»q year 

Marks A Space* said that 
dodm^ vohime grew 14 per- 
caH over the previous year's 
period, foods pw 11 per ce pt 
and homeware, 20 poceoL Sdl- 
ing space in Britain was 3J- 
perceat greater, h said. 


Investment Group Raises ■ r 
Beatrice Bid to $5.1 Billion 


The Aetoatted Brta 

CHICAGO — Beatrice Cos, said 
Tuesday that a New York invest- 
ment-banking company has raised 
its offer to buy the consumer-prod- 
acts company by $2 a share to more 
than SS bdHon. 

Beatrice said Kohl berg Kravis 
Roberts & Co. raised ihe Wd to $47 
in cash and securities from $45 in a 
letter received by the US. goods 
and services company. 

The letter said Koblberg Kravis 
would pay $40 cash and $7 in pre- 
ferred stock for each share of Be- 
atrice common stock it would ac- 
quire. 

Tbe previous offer, S40 cash and 
55 in preferred stock, was rejected 
by Beatrice directors last week. 

The takeover, a leveraged 
buyout, would be the largest such 
acq u isiti o n ot> record. In a buyout. 


a group of investors take a compa-J 
ay private by borrowing money to- 
be repaid from anticipated future* 
revenue of the company. 

Trading in Beatrice stock was 
halted on the New York Stock Ex- 
change on Tuesday before the an- 
nouncement. More than 7SO.QQO 
shares changed hands, and the 
price was unchanged at $43,275 be- j 
fore trading was stopped. 

When trading resumed at mid-! 
day, the shares feU 115 cents lot 
$43.75. 

With 109 million common shares 
outstanding, the new offer would 
be worth about S5.1 bfflion. 

Slock analysis said when Kohl- 
berg Kravis made its initial offer 
that the price was too low and the 
investment-hanking concern either 
would raise (he offer or another 
bidder would make a rival bid. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Abtbora-Atbsriqoe's capital has 
risen to 64gJ miflioa francs ($80.4 
million) from 6194 nril&oa francs 
after shareholders in die govern- 
ment-owned French- engineering 
concern took advantage of stock 
options on 1984 drodends, the 
company arid. ' 

American Express be. said it will 
make a public issue in Japan of 1 
mittion shares at S43.12& each with 
Nomura Securities Co. as lead un- 
derwriter. . 

Deutsche Anlagen-Leasing 
GmbH, a West Goman leasing 
company, said in a statement that 
work em its 1984 accounts has iden- 
tified the need for farther risk pro- 
visions totaling 300 million Deut- 
sche marks ($1 13.6 million). 

Ct nm J Motors Corp. will not 
continue negotiations with the 
Spanish state-owned industrial ve- 
hicle maker Empresa National de 
Antocannooes, Enasa said. The 
companies signed a memorandum 
of understanding last year that in- 
cluded an option to take over the 
June 30, 


1985. but the deadline was later 
extended. 

HtUcfeansan Whampoa Ltd. of 
Hong Kong said it has reached an 
a g ree ment with the government on 
the proposed expansion for 2 bil- 
lion Hong Kong dollars ($256.4 
million) of a container terminal. 
Tito two sides have been negotiat- 
ing $r nc e year. 

M k s a b bM Hectric Corp. of Ja- 
pan said parent company net profit 
lefl 14.7 percent in the fiscal first 
fair Sept- 30 to 12.2S bUBon 
yen ($57.6 million) from a year ear- 
lier, while group net profit declined 
19.4 percent to 2838 billion yen. 
Sales rose 0.9 percent to 88234 
billion yen. 

Reuters Ltd. has acquired a ma- 
jority shareholding in Visnews, the 
international television trews agen- 
cy, Visnews announced m Sydney 
at its animal meeting. Renters in- 
creased its bolding from one-third 
to 55 percent by buying shares 
from the British Broadcasting 
Carp, for £2.6 million ($3.7 ntQ- 
bon). 

Scanty Pacific Corp. of the 


United States and a bank subsid- 
iary have been sued by the trustee j 
for a failed government securities’ 
deala for S477 The suit, 

filed in New Jersey, contends die 
Kunlrc contributed to dealer’s! 
downfall in ApriL 

Toshiba Corp. of Japan said its 
US. subsidiary wffl bmld a $37^- 
miTli rm plant m Arvin, California, 
to make tdecommunicarioa prod- 
ucts and electronic equip- 

ment. 

Unioa Carbide Corp. of the Unit- 
ed States said it has given Chemo-, 
petrol of Czechoslovakia permis- 
sion to double its bighAiensiiy 
polyethylene production capacity 
at Litvinov to 160,000 ions a year. 

Bougainville Copper Output 

Ream 

MELBOURNE — Bougainville 
Copper Ltd. said Tuesday that its 
production of copper in concen- 
trates fell to 127,679 tons in the 
first three quarters ended Sept. 30, 
from 133,082 a year earlier. 


Nissan Reports 
3%RiseinNet 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Nissan Motor 
Co., the Japanese automaker, 
reported Tuesday that parent 
company net profit in the fiscal 
Gist half ended Sept. 30 rose 3 
percent u> 42JJ2 trillion yen 
($200.4 million), from 41 JS9 bO- 
Ban yen in the year-earlier peri- 
od. 

■ Net profit for the group to- 

^OQ^ran BOBS bflboay^' 
on salesof 1 .939 trillion yen, op 
6.7 percent from 1.816 trillion 
yen. Nissan said it will retain its 
14-yen dividend in 1985-86. 

Nissan blamed the modest 
rise in profit oh the yen's appre- 
ciation against the dollar and 
said it expected exports to Ori- 
na to decline in the second half. 


Du Pont, Philips Announce 
Joint Optical-Disc Venture 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Du Pont Co. 
and Philips NV announced Tues- 
day plans for a joint venture aimed 
at capturing a major share of the 
market for optical discs. They said 
they expected that share to exceed 
$4 billion by 1990. 

The Dutch electronics concern 
has 35 to 40 percent of the market 
for 4ho most common optical disc, , 
die audio compact disc. All com- 
pact discs now being made use 
technology jointly developed by 
Philips and Sony Corp. of Japan. 

By 1990. Philips said, the com- 
pact disc’s share of the market for 
pre-recorded audio should grow to 
50 percent, from 4 percent at pre- 
sent 

Du Pom will bring hs high-den- 


sity information-storage disc oper- 
ations to the venture. The two com- 
panies expressed confidence rhar 
they would displace floppy discs 
and tape as the most important 
means of storing information after 
1990. 

The joint venture was an- 
nounced az simultaneous press 
conferences in New York and Lon- 
don. its ini tial capitalization 
been set at SIS) milli on. 


GENERAL! 


CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET 1984 



The General Council of Assicurazioni Generali, presided over bv Mr. Enrico Rjudnue. 
Chairman nf the Company, met to approve the Group Balance Shrel for I lie financial 
vear 1984, as follows: 


ASSETS i in ihou-^mi- of L.S. Si l*i 

Building and farm propern 
Fixed interest bearing securiiie> 
Shares (including Associates 
Mortgage and policy loans 
Deposits with Ceding Companies 
Bank deposits 

Accounts receivable and other assets 


LIABILITIES (in thousands «>f l .S. S> i’i 

Shareholders* surplus 
Provisions for insurance liabilities 
Reinsurance deposits 
Other liabilities 
Profit of the vear 


1984 

I. 760.705 
4.215.960 

529.615 

408.7&4 

269.130 

385.212 

J. 088.356 


1983 

1.502.177 

3.587.731 

457.330 

354.679 

2I6.5H9 

301.335 

931.322 


8.657.742 

7.441.583 

944.7.75 

824.076 

6,601,153 

5.664,752 

120,731 

139.115 

877.394 

742,437 

1 13.689 

71,203 

8,657.742 

7,441.563 


l“lThr liulian Lira ftpiro uflwlh IflfH and ITU Lav- t«-n lrjii>|jinl min L > (iiJI.it. n> ilr rirlunp- rjlr>J I*—- 'll. I’W. 


Thi- Bolant-e Sheri comvluiilrv 43 laMiramr 
compunirb uf-r rating in r-omr f>,rlv raarLrts. 
line listing t> Eunip Aa^isunr* rompanir*!. lti 
fmanoial. 18 propenv and 3 agnculluml com- 
panirs- uhent Cmcrali duectlv or indiprt lU hold- 
DK>ir than 50 L u of ihr tham. 

Hie t-eur shuWr, a praTiI id U.S. S 1 1X7 nullum 
t+5a.7°„,. 

Ckas premiums amount to l/.S. S 3. 1 Si 1 million 
I + J 6.5*0 1 distributed as follows: 


The | in iv ishiii. i«r niMinint-e lijlnlilie- .imnunl <>■ 
l ,S. S O.oOI. 2 rniHinn 1+ i(i.3‘ J n| 

Iriv rstmrnts total I- S. S 7..Vi‘t.l nlilitnil 
1 + If.. A- ..| and are Ht-viriLitled as follow 

I jk ", Vnii.Jjl 


Ualv 

I librr EEC tlouiifn.-s 
HeM of Europe 
Hr~t of the world 


ii.2 

:w.n 

o.u 

0.7 


« 2 .« 


T.**l 
:vt.2 
UK 
l«».n 

:ui 

»7.2 10D.V1 


( 1.(1 

14.8 

•*.l 

2.3 


lj(p X Noti-lafe ", 

Italy 10. 1 20.9 

Other EEC Countne* 13.0 27.7 

Real of Europe 4.2 

Rol of the world 0.7 


28.0 


18.0 
5.4 

72.0 


Towl-. 

31.0 

10.7 

22.2 

b.l 

100.0 


investment irw'ume amout* , -v lo U-S- S 7tl7..t 
million t-i- lfl.K u al and relate* hy f>3.5 n i. Hi filed 
iniemi xecuniu-w. by W».Vn in propenv. bv 
3.0% tu shares, bv O. I “» lu bank deposit, anil 
by 8. 1 "n iu other ini e»tmenL*. 

THr shamlioldrrw* surplus amount* (u IL>. 4 944.8 
million and 88.b“o belongs lu the Controlling 
Cumpunv. the minunty interest being l).1"a. 


Insurance since 1831 

Parent Company: Assicurazioni Generali - Head Office in Trieste (Italy) 



- REPUBLIC OF TUNISIA 

MINISTRY FOR THE NATIONAL ECONOMY 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 

WTERKATHIIU1 INYfDTION TO TBIDER 
H P 3761 

The Gala* Ph o nptate a Company invitea iotenutionzl tendm with • vkw to 
' [ mining oqmpnwai for tmdagroand explortition in 
tbfl Cana Basin: 

— S lyre wheeled loaders ol 1 cable yard 
— 2 tyre wheeled loader* of 2 cubic yard 

The companies interested by this invitation to tender may obtain a schedule 
of condhioaa upon payment of the stem of 50 dinar* (fifty dinars), (mm the 
Service General, 9 me du Royaumc de T Arable Standi te. Tunis HP. 
Tender* in the French language, in six copies, should be forwarded to 
Monsieur le Directeurdes Achats de U Compaguie dea Phosphates de Gafsa, 
2130 Method (Tunisia), before the 14/11/85 at 10.00 ajn. The outer 
envelope must be marked as tdkrws: 

"Appel d’offroa N P 3764 

Engfnn x&uderB . 

Ne pM o trrr ir avast le 14/11/85.'’ 

The envelopes will be opened in public on 14/11/85 at the Direction dea 

Achats Depamwnt in Method at 10.00 a.m- 

Any tender received by telex or after this date will not be considered. 



REPUBUK TUNESIEN 

MIN1STBUUM FUR VOLKSWIRT5CHAFT 
GAFSA PHOSPHATK COMPANY 

HiBBtsim usscaom up. 3im 

Die fhhaP hnn|tla l « »GBPyanyfcBdeM tail dreAtaiets, hw ^a ii i M-lmw Blr 
die ’U ut eraBc ench l i ea B aig dor Pho ap h at gmhm im Gafsa-becken za kaden. XU 
injengrionahn Liefetangdwgn fflr m aMa fc Atahfg anh 

— 5 luftbereific lader von 1 Enb&yard (0,765 m*) 
L a ddch t a ag. 

— 2 haftberdfie Lader von 2 Kubakyard (L530 nf) 

T A V inni^ 

An tfieRT ArwchreBtOdgintereEaerte Gesdlscbaften Kdimeo Zdikng der 

Summe rea 50 IXnar (fumre Dinar) vomSeniccGcnenl, 9iucdu Rovamnede 
' TAtalae Seowfitc, TVmis RP. 

Ai^taote, in aedatfarhw AuafiUmmg and latBoadxr S pr srta n mttwa Moo- 

oicur k Ditecton- dm Achsts de h fiann^ie des Phoepbas de Gaba, 2330 
Method (Tuema), apitjMtqgam 14.1L1965um 10.00 iStrnxagensvoriiegen. 
Der Sueeem UmseUag iM wie tolgt w betefarihos 
"Appel daftm K P3764 

Fjigrrw mini m . 

Ne pas oBvrir anm le 141L19K". 

Ke U tfwrHa g p wnda am 141L1SG5, su nni t ljp am 10X0 Uhr, in der 
ttrection dm Achats D qtanncn t in Method nmer Bawohnong der OBtaBA 
Wi i ‘ 


<£eacm Da&oa ongcbeai e fcnochriftficfie Angebote kflnnen niefat btrOdt- 


In the time it takes to read this, you could 
have the most timely and accurate advice 
on over 1,400 stocks. 





Even if you could read every financial journal 
and stock report, your research would still 
fail short of the resources of Merrill Lynch. 
And these superior resources are available to 
you in less time than it takes to read this ad. 
Just call us. 

Speaking with a Merrill Lynch Financial 

Consultant gives you immediate access to the 


latest Merrill Lynch opinion on more than 
1,400 US. and international stocks. 

Vbur Financial Consultant is connected to 
one of the world’s most sophisticated finan- 
cial communications networks. In addition to 
the U.S., Merrill Lynch maintains offices 
throughout Europe, Asia, the Middle East, 
and Latin America. So the advice you receive 
is based on understanding of global markets. 

OnW&lI Street, Merrill Lynchs research 
team has been ranked first by independent 
surveys for eight consecutive years. And we 
make that research work to your advantage. 

Tklk to us soon, because in the time it 
takes to read this, our research may have 
something new to report. 

Phone us in London at 1-382-8858, or 
return the coupon. 


Merrill Lynch 



Return this coupon to: 

Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith, Ud„ 
Attn: WS. Elliot, 26 Finsbury Square, 
London EC2A 1AQ, United Kingdom 

Name 


r 
i 
i 
I 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
1 
i 
i 
i 

i - 

ft ©83 Merrill lynch. Pierce, tamer & Smith Inc Member SI PC 


Address. 


Tfel (Home). 


IN. (Business). 


RtHnwifl 


=/- 






LL& Futures 


Season Season 
High Low 


Oseo Won low Close Chs 


75-jO 5705 MOV 417S S3J0 *2JS 62J1S +.15 

4M 57 ja jul 62J* ilin iiro {£85 -87 

7115 5550 ftuo M3) tO-55 +J 5 

Esi. Sales 3.975 Pre«.Sote5 5.955 

pr+v. DOvOo+n Ini. 7.935 uoJSS 


Season Season 

High Low 


Open Hlch Law Close Cno. 


Grains 


" COFFEE CINYCSCE1 
; 1 37 M I as.- cen (s «r lb. 


WHEAT (CBT) 

MOObu minimum- dollars oer bushel 


3.74 te _ 

1- 32 Mcv 3.I0U 1J3'* 3X9 3.11*1. +.W*-. 

3-^te 163 Jul 2.9?' i LW Z.91 -hill's 

3 147 Sen lor;, 2.94' . 1»2 Z9J +jXPe 

3-03, *W- Dec JJH IDS US US 

g^-SaiM pp#«».Soie» IOXM 

Prev. Dav Own tnl. 33262 off 384 

CORN (CBT) 

5- 000 bu minimum- dal lars per bushel 

2.M 2.1417 Dec 2JJL| 1241s 124'a 124'i +.03'i 

2.97 234'-: Mar 2J4'+ 13TM 2J5V. 137'- +02^ 

2.91 L. 137 May Ill’s H3 141 242»„ +.02 

184 133 Jul 243*.. ZU** 243 l+i'-s +0J% 

2- 70 MiVi Sep 1292+ }J1 229% 229% +.00 5 - 

235V; i20>- Dec 124*. 22i% 123% 114 +JK‘« 

W* U3 Mar 2333a Z36'. 133% U5*4 +.02 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 28.57 J 

Prev. Day Open lnl.I35X0* up 1X73 
SOYBEANS (CBT) 

5X00 ou minimum- doirorsper bushel 

4tS 4.97% Nov SX1 103li 5-00 5X2' « t.03*» 

6- 79 5.10 Jan 5.14% 516*. XI31i 5 l15*4 +.03'- 

7J.Z 522% Mar 5.27V; i29*i 526% 529% +X/J 

7.79 521 May 538% S.40% SJ8 5J9». +.03'. 

6J58 5J6I* Jul 54+U 1481- 544'-. 547'; +.0IX. 

6J4 525% Aug 547 547% SJ6 1 . 546% +.02' t 

4718 529% Sep 585 525% 523% 523% -r-DI’r 

622 526% Nov 521 522% 520 521 +JJ2 

5 A3 5J7% Jan 5.4J% +02 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 34.704 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 80X75 up 1,713 

50YBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 Ions- dollars per Ion 

1S4XD 125.40 Dec 14100 14470 14140 14440 +270 

16103 1TJJM Jan 1MJ» 14670 1&A.TO 14S53 +150 

206X0 130JXI Mar 147.90 14640 144.90 148.4) +U0 

14250 13250 May 14950 15000 14870 149.70 +1.90 

167 JKJ 134.00 Jul 751.00 151 AO 150X0 15120 +140 

15050 13550 Aug 151.00 15120 150.00 15070 +170 

147.00 13750 Sep 15200 15050 149JHJ 15OJD0 +120 

14950 14050 OCf 14750 14750 146X0 143X0 +150 

150X0 142X0 Dec 148.00 14950 14740 (4950 +1.10 

150X0 146X0 j a n 14750 —50 


Dec 1171+ 3.19'. 3.16% 219'+ +XT 
MOT 2 Z3'S 125 1 .. 322% 324'i +X0'u 


159.;0 
15650 
155.93 
155-75 
156.00 
156X0 
145X0 
Esi. Sales 


145X0 U2S0 M37 

Esi. Sales Prev Sales 28 7- 

Prc». Day Open Ini. H.15» us 220 
SUGARWORLO 11 (NYC5CE) 
112X00 IBs -cenrc uer lb „ , 

7.75 3XC Jan 52? 5, 

9X3 3XJ Mar 522 S. 1 

7.15 353 WB» i-®C *■ 

449 379 Jui 6X6 *. 

6*0 4.24 Sep 6— 6. 

6.95 4.02 CO 6X6 a 

7X5 4X5 J?h , 

7.05 4.61 MO' +<« '- 

Eel. Sales Pr Si-iS es .tf* 4 

Prev. Da v Open Ini. , 3 .798 up 1-2 

COCOA (NYC5CE) 

10 metric tans- S per ion 

2337 1945 D+C »’5 21 

7392 fJSS Mar till 2 

2422 I960 Alav 2234 H 

242« UiO jul 22"0 2; 

2430 2023 See 2^? £ 

2425 2055 Dec 2-05 E 

ZMS 201+ Mar 

E si. Soles J.76I Free Sales 6X65 
Prev. Dav Oecn int. 23-146 oil 596 
ORANGE JUICE IN YCE) 

15X00 lbs.- cenlscer IB. „ ... 

181.00 llllS now I14Xj Ilf 

180X0 113.50 jan 1U-5 I14j 


Dec 158.70 1«.7? 157X0 15154 —6.40 

Kcr 155 70 156X0 15140 1S3.C3 -3.17 

Mav 154.90 155 75 151X0 153.19 —2.75 

•ul ISa.90 155X0 ISiaO 153.1 D — 165 

Sep 1E4XD 155X5 153X0 15308 —193 

ncc 15500 155.00 15310 153X0 —ISO 

Mir 1513 -16: 


Tuesdays 

NkSE 

Closing 

Tobin Include me nationwide prices 
up to the closing on wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 



»VS 72+8 V7ISKPI P-T" r-; . 

47* 34 VFCerp 1X8 18 11 721 4dVS 45* ®1 SSfp’f 5^ %4 , 

14* S» Valero 129 183 11% 1I» 1*** — 4 S?? 2£* uSSdc 1 5 

saEff ^ as ss-ssss? 5 iS-it ? 


Ittn 2034 
2132 2168 

rm 7^7 
2265 2273 

2299 22«$ 

an 22°fl 


3» 2Vi Votovln IB Tm 

m 19 Van Dm IJ» (J 7 US 23 33% 23%— Jh 

+% 21A Veres 179 498 4* 4% + ’9 

1TO 6V4 vwcgpt 8 13% 13% 13% 

42* 23% Vartan X6 IX 16 561 25% 34% 25 + '■* 

13% 9X> Vara AO 10 38 84 13* 13% 13%— '« 

25% 13 veeea A0 26 12 193 14 15% 15% + % 

12 3% Vanda 20 6® 10% 10 IS 

11% 9* VestS* 1.20010.9 63 11 II 11 

13% 11*» Vest mn 349 1Z* 12% 12%—% 

6iw 29% Viacom AS .9 31 IU3 56 54% 54%— 1% I 

83 66 VaEPpf 8X4 11J 9nonr 78 IS 28* 78% + % SjS CSTSf 


BO 70 VaEP of 8AO 115 
93 73% VoElpf SJfi 92 

73 58% VaE Pf J 7X2 11X 

70% 57 VaEPpf 7 AS 10X 
27% 13% viuroys 
59VA 33% Varrwd 


7B* 7816 78'A 

302 W 93 93 +1 

1502 69% 69% <9% — % 

4402 70 69 69 

18 134 2fi'i 25* 25*S— % 

28 183 61* 59 61* +2% 


85 * 66% VufcnM 3X0 U U 9 84% 84% 84%— tt 


134.00 125.40 Dec 143JX) 14470 14240 144 AO +270 

163X0 127X0 Jon 144X0 14630 144.10 14S-93 4158 

206 JO 130JX) Mar 147.90 146X0 144.90 148 A0 +U0 

14250 13250 May 14950 150X0 148-TO 149.70 +1.90 

167 JKJ 134X0 Jul 751X0 151 AO 150X0 15130 +IA0 

15050 13550 Aug 151X0 151X0 150.00 15030 +13D 

167X0 13750 Sep 150.00 15050 149XU 150X0 +1X0 

14950 140X6 OCt 14750 14750 146X0 143X0 +150 

150X0 142X0 Dec 148.00 14050 I47A0 14950 +1.10 

150X0 146X0 Jan 14750 —50 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 13530 

Prev. Dav Open ml. 47363 up 2X36 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

60X00 lbs- dpi lars per 100 lbs. 

2955 19.08 Dec 1939 14J2 1°.13 19.15 —.13 

29X7 1938 Jan 19.41 19» 1«J0 19X —.11 

2850 1958 Mar 1935 19X2 l»59 I9J2 -.08 

27A5 20X7 May 2030 3132 2103 20.11 —.08 

2535 2045 Jul 2055 2058 3145 20.17 —08 

25.15 2050 Aua 7055 7056 2055 ^LftO —10 

. 24X5 2050 Sep 20.70 20.70 2055 2055 -.12 

22X0 20.45 OCt 7053 2055 2050 2050 — 05 

2135 2035 Dec 2055 3)5 5 2055 SOoS +X4 

2035 2035 Jan 3)60 +X5 

Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 10.977 

Prev. Dav Open int. 47336 up 465 


16135 
Esi. Sales 


NOV 11435 11435 11400 11433 — .7f 

J3n 11135 11455 11170 11450 —35 

Mar 1145C 114.75 113X0 11410 — xO 

May 114JQ 114.60 11350 113.95 —.10 

Jul 11405 114X5 113.40 11 J 40 — A5 

SCP 11335 11335 11325 11250 —50 

NOV 11275 —50 

jan 113 JO — 50 

,-/or 1 1335 —50 


500 Prc*. Sclrs 


Prev. Day Cpcn Int. 55» uc 135 


Metals 


i COPPER (COMER) 

25X00 lbs.- cent: per lb. 


ptJO 

60aO 

B435 

Zi2i 

SOJM 

•4.00 

74.40 

70.00 
7030 
7030 

67.00 
6730 
6630 

Esf. Sales 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40X00 IBs.- cents per lb. 

67X5 55X0 Dec 6190 64.10 6J45 6167 -.78 

67 AS 5435 Feb 60.75 ol2D M50 60-75 —50 

6757 5530 Apr 6050 40X0 403S 4032 -.33 

6635 5635 Jun 40X0 60.75 60X0 M37 -28 

65.40 5530 Al>g 58.40 59X0 5BA0 5655 -.05 

40.60 5B.00 OCI 57.95 58X0 5750 5750 —50 

6530 5950 Dec 5950 59X0 S9J0 5930 —30 

Est. Sales 22589 Prev. Sales 27-739 
Prev. Da v Open Int. 63 A21 up4.?I6 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44X00 ibs.- cenis per lb. „„ 4 „ 

7X20 58.10 Nov 6420 *4.75 6415 64^ —IS 

79X0 6050 Jan 66.90 67A5 66A0 66.75 —32 

71.70 4X42 Mar 67 AO 68X0 67.10 6.57 +.0S 

71.00 60.40 APT 66.75 67.45 66.75 67.00 -.20 

70 xa 40.10 Mav 45.90 4*30 45 80 45X2 —\5 

6850 65.75 AUB 6650 6650 o430 6*30 -57 

Esf. Sales 1.903 Prev. Sales 1X68 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 9X27 off 5 

HOGS (CME) 

3OA0O lbs.- conis per lb. 

M35 3435 [& 45J0 4S.«0 45.10 45.75 +33 

50.47 3B-10 Feb 4J35 4A92 AL07 445; +.1. 

4735 34.12 Apr JpO 4X40 39.«5 40.07 —33 

49.05 39X0 Jun 4255 42X5 -*235 4232 -33 

49X5 40 AS Jul 43.10 4335 42.75 42X2 —30 

51.90 4035 Aug 4230 42.70 <2.40 4252 —08 


Prev. Dav Ocen ini. 75,115 
ALUMINUM (COMEX) 
40X00 IBs- cenlioer ID 


ocr 6ioo ;:.c*o ei.M 6173 

Npv 4I- T £ 

Dec 6(40 6125 el. 10 6220 

Jen 6X45 

A13r 6235 63 00 11.90 o295 

MOV 6260 63.10 s230 63 JO 

Jul 6290 63 IS s235 o3.45 

Sen t2.7s 

Dec 63X5' 64 X0 63.75 M.I5 

Jon W35 

fAar 6430 *455 64.45 64.9? 

M0« 6530 

Jul 45 a5 

Prey Sales 77X40 


242 

8X 

8 

ii 


10.1 


23b 

1X0 

3.1 

9 

225x 

M 

2J 


98 




78 




1649 

SO 

IX 

17 

577 

1)40 


68 

-45 

LI 

16 

a 

140 

AO 

7 

679 

140 

3_S 


1 

xa 

13 

14 

1650 




998 

148 

4.1 

12 

7173 

146 

8.1 

9 

47 

1X8 

44 

7 

6 

250 

54 


2 

241 

n.i 

8 

585 

.92 

IX 

n 

944 

J6 

14 

n 

39 

30 

23 

9 

. 4 

140 

ax 


13 


OCt 4245 

Nov 4255 

Dec 423X 43.20 42X0 42«0 

Jan J3.2S 

Mar 44.0? 4430 44.20 44 99 


5335 

50.30 

Est. Sales 


Mav 

Jill 453 

Sea 

Oec 

jan 

Mar 

Md» 

Jut 

Prcv.5alre 


44.70 

45X5 4? 55 45 40 


^ «A8 66.75 =32 Pfev. Dav Open ini T.9*, uo» 

67 A0 68X0 67.10 67X7 +.05 SILVER (COMEX) 

66.75 67.45 66.75 67.00 —.20 5X00 irov ol- cunts eer Irry er. 


41.10 38.07 on 39.60 39 

49X0 3837 Dec 40X0 40 

40X0 40A5 Feb 

Est. Sales 7X40 Prev. Sales 6X43 
Prev. Dav Open Ini. 24,179 uo214 

PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38X00 lbs.- cents ner lb. 

7630 55 75 Feb 61X? 62 

75.40 55.65 Mar 61.72 62 


59BX Del 620.3 

Nov 623 0 620 0 il«X 620X 
5?i!X Dec 624 0 al'J 62BX 625.9 

595 0 Jan 627.0 tT-S 627 X 

607.0 Mar 637 X 63».0 633X &37X 

6190 .Mav W'.O 64~X 642X *4t3 

A29.|] j^i 656.5 iiaJj 651.0 6553 

621 0 Sea 662X 6I2X !s2.9 665.1 

652.0 Dec 6780 IXO X 67S.0 6-LC9 


39X0 39X0 39X0 39X0 — 07 
40X0 4050 40.10 4050 —75 
41JK1 +.45 


Feb dix? 62A0 61AS *1X7 
Mar 61.72 6240 61A0 61J7 


OiiTenoOptions 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option & Strike 

Underlying Price Calls— Lad P11 

Nn* Feb May Nov Feb Mav 
)Un British Pound vconls per unit. 

B Pound 145 0.95 s S r 

62500 West German Marks-cents per unit. 
□Mark 36 r s s 0X2 

3839 37 1X6 % S 0.08 

3839 38 0X4 5 s 037 

125X00 French Francs-lOUisofa cent per unit. 
FFrone 125 l.io s s r 

6-250 J 00 Japanese Yeit-IOOibs of a cent per unit. 


789X 678.1) Jan *353 +1* 

770 X *70X Mar *95.7 +1X 

“■S | 7S2X 683 X Ale* 7^X +16 

ii i 7J6X 499.0 Jul 718.1 +1.4 

— S; Esi. Soles SaXO Prev. Sales J3I52 
+ 45 [ Prev Oov Open lr>t. 83,172 oil 130 
i PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 trov 04. - dollars per trovoi. 

37X50 257X0 Jan 339X0 341.40 336.08 338X0 +20 

357X0 26AXO Apr 54X00 344X0 MQX0 34] jo +JM 

. , 0 3*3X0 273.00 JUI 344X0 3ieX0 34150 344 JO +X0 

T-J; Est. Sales Prev. Sale* 2X87 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 13A73 01(35 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

n lOO trov a;- dollars oer OZ 

141X0 91X0 Dec 104.70 101X3 7C4J5 1C5X0 +1X5 

127X0 91.70 Mar 105X0 106X0 105.03 1C4.45 +.90 

114X0 91X0 Jun IOTAS +.90 

115.00 97.70 Sep 103A5 +.90 

107X5 104X3 Dec TC9A5 +.90 

Esi. Sales Prev. Sales 590 

Prev. Dev Ooen l nl. 6.164 olf 75 
GOLD (COMEXI 
100 rravoi.- dallars per trov o:. 

493-00 297.00 Oct 327X0 32720 32x50 327.00 +.40 

324J0 32000 NOV _ 327 JO +.40 

489X0 301X0 Dec 329 60 329.70 327.90 JT>30 +.40 

485X0 306X0 Feb 334 00 334 X0 332.10 333X0 +A0 

49oX0 314.70 Apr 337.90 327.90 336X0 337AO +J0 

435.70 320X0 Jun 342X0 342.CD 340.90 341J70 +J0 

428.40 331X0 AuB 346.10 +.10 

395.70 335X0 Oct 350.00 

393X0 3+2X0 Dec 355.90 355.50 3=£.»0 ZSbAt 


JYen 44 

47.16 47 

47.16 48 

62X00 SWISS From 
S Franc <6 

46.72 47 


0X6 s 

0.19 s 

cents per unit. 
OX* S 

0X6 s 


S r 
5 0.79 

Mar Jun 


Dec Mar Jun Dec Mar Jun 
12X00 British Paunds-cenls per unit. 

B Pound 125 19.00 r r 0X5 

144.13 130 13A0 I3A0 r r IX 

144.13 135 «J» r 10X0 0X5 2J 

144.13 140 4 JO r 7.40 1X0 3J 

144.13 145 1X0 3X5 r r 

144.13 150 0X0 2J0 r r 9.) 

144.13 155 0.15 1J0 r r 

50X00 Canadian Dallarvceats per unit. 

CDnllr 74 r 0A5 r r 

*2X00 West German Marks-cents per anil. 

□Mark 30 r r s r DC 

J8X9 33 5X1 r r r 

38X9 34 05 r r 0X1 

38X9 35 326 3J2 r 0X3 

38X9 36 2A5 r r 0.05 

38X9 37 1X3 2.18 r 0.18 

38X9 38 a91 1A4 111 050 IX 

3829 39 0.45 1.12 1X3 r 

125X00 French FruacvlQttts at a cen! per wait. 
FFrone 125 2.10 r 4JS r 

6*250X00 Japanese Yen-lOOttn of a cent per unit. 
JYen «0 7.12 7.14 7.15 r 

47.16 <1 6X3 r r r 

47.16 42 5X« r r 0.01 

47.16 4j 4.19 4J3 r r 

47.16 44 2.95 r r r 

47.16 45 r H3 r 0.10 0J 

47.16 44 IX* 1.98 r 0X9 Oi 

47.16 48 0A3 0.98 r r IX 

*2X00 Swiss Francs-cents per unit. 

S Franc 36 10X3 r s r 

46X2 39 7X4 r r r 

46.72 42 r r r 0.02 OX 

46X2 44 2.94 r r 0.14 0j 

46.72 45 2.10 r r 0X7 0J 

46-72 46 1X8 2X0 r 0.60 

46.72 48 0X0 1X8 r r 

_ Jan Apr Jvi Jan Apr Jal 
6.250X00 Japanese Yen-iaoihs at a cent per unit. 
JYen 48 0X5 S S r 

Total call vol. 9.262 Call open int. 

Total pat vol 4X09 Pvt open Ini. 

r — Nai traded, s — No option altered. 

Last is premium (Purchase price). 

Source; AP. 


Est. Soles 9.000 Prev. Sales 6.171 
Prev. Oov Open lnl.133.149 otf63 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

51 million- plsal 100 act. 

9107 85.77 Dec *191 93JW 92.91 72.9a 

92.n E6.40 Alar 92X5 92X5 9145 *2X4 

*13* E7.01 Jun 9135 72.41 7135 92A0 

92X1 BS.00 Sep tjjm 710* 72X3 7JJ14 

91.70 07.05 Dec 91.73 71 J3 91 J1 91.73 

91 A0 89 XB Mar 91.45 

91.16 *0X0 Jun «1.19 9J.19 91.17 91.19 

90.94 90.83 Sep «0.94 

Est. Sales 9X50 Prev. Sales *X4i 
Prev. Dav Open Ini. 41X38 off 400 
10 YR. TREASURY (CBTt 
SI 00X00 nr In- nisirndsol 100 act 
87-13 75-13 Dec B+13 87-11 86-11 87-10 

86-4 75-14 Mar 05-1! 86-11 85-11 06-11 

85-7 7+30 Jun B4-1S 85-12 34-18 85-12 

84-4 80-7 Sep 84-16 

83-11 80-2 Dec 02-20 83-23 82-28 83-23 

Esi. Sales Prev.5ales 11X43 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 69X58 off 51 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(B pct-Sl 00.000- nl*. & 32nd-. oil 00 PCtl 


78-13 

77-29 

76-6 

75-31 

7+24 

7+15 

7+26 

72-27 

72-18 

69-27 

68-30 

Esi. Sales 


7+19 77-26 7+13 77-23 
75-fl 7+14 75-4 7+13 

7+3 7+9 7+1 7+9 

73-1 7+7 73 7+5 

72-7 73-8 72-7 73-1 

71-11 72-11 71-10 72-5 
71-17 

69-27 70-1# 69-27 70-23 
70-6 
69-20 

_ 69-4 



T8L. uu wfavr of 233 7 A . 10* J* 1 * A7% 37% — % 

I U ira 4% WtebWl il ^ i!2 iBs 'nS + S 
1 it 15% 8 Wilfred 12 JI *12* J™ - * « 




z 

-5 


+ % 15% S Wilfred _ 12 —r ^ j- 

13* 7% WUecaG 10 ■§ 5 ,21 JS 22? 

* 3J’.i 26W Wttfepff 1A0 U !• »* » »•- ^ 

SVi 2 WllmEI _ . , *S S 


7% 5%W)l8hrO -U IX *r «2 At 
38% 30 WhlDU W S3 13 «;»*■»£ JM J % 

20% ate WhwbB a»ai a w *** y* '¥* + 

8* S.\ Wmoef . ^ Z L. ” ^ 

8* 3* Winter J _ __ __ m n 7 ? * 


40% 38 U. W1SCEP 2A* *,9 S '» 

93% 92% Wist Pj «.W 9.7 ” SL. - ^ 

&1I4 w nlP of 7JT fi tm 9T11 Wft 

So% S%w5rpL 2X6 7X 8 74 * SS'E'** 

39* 29* WiKPS 3-86 7X 9 3* Wk. 37% — -a 

40% 30% WrtCO 1x8 * 4.1 9 359 . 35* 35% 35% + % 

u TE'wHww 3»-M » « liy W 

siik as* wotwin 2X0 w n *J2 n% S. +.% 

75 50% wohvpf 220 28 -1 ZB* ■+ % 

84 * 54 % wrtalY 1 jMa U H 31 RWi — h 

4 * 2 +k VYurttzY i MB Vh + Ik 

16 10% WVleU) JB U 2S « IW M. 

23% 15% WVnna +0 M 7 74 M 17. .a- —Jit 


40% 30% WrtCO IAS '4.1 9 359. 35% 

74 9te WohirW 3* zx 3« 12 

S3% asu wahvln 2XO M II *12 

75 50% WdJivpf 2X0 18 . , J 2% 


5SV i IS* Xerox MB U M M", +Mk 

48% Xerox Pf 5A5 9.9 JS 55!L 54% + 'A 

29 19% XTRA M 2S 11 IB B .30%. 22 .+1% 


COTTON 2 (NYCE) 

50X00 lbs.- cents per lb. 

73.C0 57X1 Dec 61X5 67A0 60X5 61.17 — J» 

74X5 53.77 Mar 61AI 61A7 6U8 61x0 —.02 

70.00 50.90 Mav 61.40 61X1 6U5 61-71 +X7 

70.05 58X0 Jul 59.10 5«25 59JX) 59X3 +.1B 

15XO 52.40 Oct 5100 5X00 52.90 5118 +J8 

59X5 5035 Dec 51AD 51X8 51A0 51X5 +50 

66.7? 53.00 Mar 52X5 5270 52X5 5258 +X3 

Esi. Sales 2X00 Prev. Sales 5X3« 

Prev. Dav Ooen Int. 23JM7 up 163 
HEATING OIL INYME) 

42000 gal- cents per gal 

S7A0 68X0 Nov B7J5 B8J5 B7J25 88X4 +X6 

07.90 69.15 Dec 07.70 88X0 87X0 8X4* +X2 

07X0 69X0 Jan B7A5 B8X5 07 JO 07X8 +X2 

86-00 70J» Feb 85.90 06.75 85X0 S6A1 +A6 

BUD 60X0 Mar 01X0 01X5 0090 81X8 +XI 

77 JQ 40X0 Apr 76X0 77X0 76X0 77J1 +J8 

742J 6&<W MOV 7X90 74X0 73X0 7A38 +20 

7250 72X0 Jim 7425 7425 7425 7425 +25 

7250 7250 Jul 7420 +X0 

7250 7250 Aug 7<-20 +20 

7250 7250 Son 7420 +20 

Dec X5 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 134)11 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 3X995 off 50 
CRUDE OIL (NYME) 

MHO bbl.- dollars ner bbl. 

30.19 2X«0 Dec 30.10 3025 29X8 3025 +JI8 

29X0 24 JB Jan 29.14 29 J8 29X7 7987 +.18 

2V A* 2425 Feb 28A2 28X3 3L38 28X8 +.10 

29A5 2413 Mar 77X4 28X0 27X4 27.98 +.11 

I9A5 2X93 AW 27J5 27A3 2727 27 A0 +X4 

27.96 2X65 MOV 26.90 27X0 26.90 26.98 +X7 

26.70 2X78 Jun 26A3 26X0 3XA3 26X0 +.13 

26.20 24A5 Jul 26.16 262B 26.16 2628 +.16 

2+05 24-90 Aug 26X0 26X0 2+00 26X0 +.16 

27JM 24J» Sep 25X5 23 l85 25J5 25X0 +.15 

25.38 25.15 OCI 25XC 25X5 25X0 25X5 +JT7 

Jan 2SX0 25X0 2SX0 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales iSjoj 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 64,128 up752 


Stock Indexes 


; SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
paints and cents 

200 X 5 17 X 70 Dec I 88 J 0 I 9 QA 0 188.15 189 A 5 +IJ 5 

20 X 75 1 B 2 J 0 Mar 189.95 192.10 189 X 0 191.10 +IJ 5 

2 O*X 0 18190 Jun 191.15 192.15 191.15 19155 + 1 A 5 

19 X 35 107.00 Sep 194.15 + 1 A 5 







\- 7 

• -ii 




•■Tv? 

; W- 

- 

't. 


”^LASr-f 


m I'J-M IBfAW _ JVM IFLIJ TIAJ 

•2 Est. Sales 654)47 Prev. Sales 4X923 
- 31 Prev. Dav Open int. *3X54 up 745 
VALUE UNE (KCBT) 
paints and cents 

217.05 IBB. 60 Dec 19410 195.95 193X5 19470 +1X5 

209 A0 190X0 Mar 195X0 197.15 I95J0 196-50 +UH 

197 JO 197X0 Jun 19850 +1X5 

200X5 20005 Sea 20050 +1X5 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 3X21 
Prev, Dav Open Int. 7A27 off 95 

+X8 NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 

+.12 pa Intsand cents 

+.11 11720 101.20 Dec 100X0 110X0 10865 109 A0 +35 

+X9 HB.75 105XO Mar 109 JO 110.90 ID9J0 110X5 +X0 

+X6 »20X0 106.90 Jun 111X5 111X5 110 JO 111X5 +X0 

+X6 11X20 108L10 Sen 111JD 111 JO 111J0 11X15 +X0 

+X5 Est. Sales 10J43 Prev. Sales 6X00 
+X2 Prev. Dav Open Hit. 6660 off 57 


Rttaers ■ 

WARSAW ^^3fi&^3vemmeair<7waeda)- 
lerprises wiB be abto to raise mooey by i^axng 
bonds hegpmpig aett year as part of wkkr 
plans to nstsBc&s& the ecoawny, the govera- 
nMMt ne w spa p e r Rzecqiospriita reported taefr 
day. 

Bonds may be soW to otber siato-nor con- 
cerns from Jan. L 1986, ike daBy sad. : 

■■ .Pobsfa newspapers have commented favor- 
ably on Hungary'S example where companies 
had expanded^ bmk roads and amenttks with 
funds raisedtbnx^htssmng ^lard 
Rzeczpoqwfiui mid the gpvfimnient las also 
annpleted a syaem of inedmo-tu reduedous to 
promote tcdmological progress^ exports and 
greater economy of materials ami eaagy. . 


3 Major Banks in South Africa 
Plan to Gm Prime Rale by 1 % 

. Renters . 

JOHANNESBURG —Trost BanfcofAfrica 
LtdL, Barclays National Bank Ltd. and Vdfcs- 
kaa Ltd. said Tuesday that they w& eut .dKir 
prime rate by 1 percent to 17J pace^- begin- 




; 7 :-, 

.;ps? 

: :h 


+15 
+16 
+,s 

+M Close 

+ 13 AAoOdVB 908J0 f 

Reuters 1,7T8.00 

DJ. Futures 120.18 

Com. Research Bureau. 223.90 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base loo : Sep. 18,1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 r Dec 31, 1974. 


Prev. Sales 1 77X85 


Prev. Dav Ooen lnU95X53 up 4,123 
MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBT1 
SlOOOx inde*-Dts & 32ndsot 100 net 
BA-19 01-17 Dec 8+8 96 05-6 0+30 

85 30-4 Mar 0+7 0+30 84-6 04-29 

83-30 79 Jun 83 15 84-4 8+15 0+3 

82-29 79-10 Sec 82-23 03-13 02-22 B3-10 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales uao 
Prev. Day Ocen Int. 6,708 up 391 


Commodity Indexes 


Market Guide 


Ghlcaga Board of Trade 
Chicago. Mercantile Exchange 
international Monetary Market 


Previous 
903J20 f 
1,716X0 
119X2 
222J70 


The announcement comes a: week.affexStan- 
dard Bank of Sooth Africa Ltd. sa^ ihat it 
would cut prime to 17^ percent ironrjnLS 


+13 NY CSCE: 
+11 NYCE: 
+]) COMEX: 
+31 NYME: 
KCBT: 
NYFE: 


international Monetary Mafkvl 
Of Chlcaao Mercantile Exchange 
New York Cocoa. Sugar, Coffee Exchange 
New York Cotton Exchange 
Commodltv Ex chance. New York 
Hew York Mercantile Exchange 
Kansas city Board of Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 



Oct 29 

Coremodlty and Unit 

Tue 

Year 

Ago 

Coffee 4 Santos. 

141 

US 

Prlnrclotti tArjo 38 %, vd _ 

•47 

040 

Sleet Milofs (Pitt.), tan 

47340 

473X0 

Iran 2 Fdrv. Phlltx. tan 

313X0 

313X0 

Steel scrap No 1 hvy Pitt. _ 

73-76 

93*93 

Lead Spot, lb 

1+19 

22-26 

Coooer elect- m . 

<7-70 

62-66 

Tin (Straits), lb 

NJL 

f <474 

Zinc, E. SI. I_ Basis, lb 

«JI 

IMS 

Palladium, ox 

102-103 

14+143 

Silver N.Y.oi 

6.17 

722 

Source: ap. 




CoimwSlities 


London 

Commodities 



HONG-KONC GOLD FUTURES 


dose 

HM Law Bid Ask 


P revio u s 
BM Ask 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Oct. 29/1985 

■n- y°ta« quotations ur eiuppiied by the Fund* llsled win tbo exception of seme wales based on issae price. 

The marginal ivmooli indicate frequency □! quotal Ions suppUedrfd) -dally,- Iw)-. weekly; (b) -oi-montaly: (rt-regatartr; (D-U ree cf or ty. 



API — N.T. N.T. 336JM 33BJU 337J10 339.00 Od 
Jun — N.T. N.T. 340410 342X0 341X0 343X0 Vc 
Aufi _ 346X0 346X0 345X0 347X0 346X0 348X0 - J, 

Volume: 21 lots of 100 az. COC 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 5 * W1 

U5J Per ounce 

Prev. 

rw Biff, lAfw Settle Settle 

3»X0 329 JO 329 JO 329 JO 

Fob . .. — N.T. N.T, 33X40 332X0' 

Volume: 60 lots of 100 at. 

S U fii5 LUMf, UR RUBBER 
MataTskn cents per kilo COF 

■S**** Preylous 

„ Bid Ask BM Ask Nov 

3S1 AMI 183X0 101X0 182X0 J™’ 

The Boerd of Kiectan at The Nomn VS? ]B3xo Mgr 

SeeuritM*. Co% Ltd. Announced that share- Feb 184X0 ikxo 186J0 Jly V 

balden, who will be registered in die books of - „ .1^^° 187X0 1B7J10 188X0 

tbe Company on September 30th. 1985 "■* 

(Tokyo time) "SVwSbJ to racehe a ifnapni eMsvub GA» 

2% bee dbtrlbmioa at sfaens of its ram- Close Pravtons uc. 


THE NOMURA SECURITIES CO., LTD. 

(CDR's) 


(Tokyo time) ««U be entitled to receive a 
2% bee dbtrlbmioa of sfaena of its com- 

Cnnaequemhr tbe undetMoed designated Rsl 1 DecZ 1»S isvjs 

div^p-no. to of Ifae afaa for this par- ig-g 

pose. RSS4Nav~ UVB T4AM iJSw 

The new CDRb will only be available in an R5S 5 Nav_ 139 JS I41XS - 1J9J5 1 


Close P revio u s 

. SMCAD^^^ 1 l * W ■“ Aik. BW Ask 

Preview* J} 1 ®** 

BM Ask Storting per metric tan 

22^2 2!£ 144J » 1,4M0 wmo 130x0 

if® - JS"» W-60 l£3jal 155.00 )49X0 349X0 

SSS 2 fSS !SS2 IS 00 13W0 131180 Ts w° isa*o 

wSS SH5 fi!? It!- 00 14<uo W400 ’646° 157X015X60 

SS -22 ,70iW 1MuM ,w - w ,w - w u 3 xo 

^5SS8 e »»:WM«— IID««. 

Starflnt per metric ton 

Dec 1^5 1X53 1X54 1X56 1X86 1X87 

£u£ i™ i*SE I't? xra 1 ' ra * 

’JJJY lJg 1J16 1JZJ IJZ4 V46 1J47 

& n & 1 gs gs as 

i40 33280- i3g ^ 1;^ i^S \%l 

Volume: 8A40 lots at 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

Previous Starting per metric tan 

»M Ask *k»v 1.050 1X95 V9S 1X04 itw« i w 

3-0» 182X0 J«> 1X40 IX5I5 1X58 S.S02 

780 183X0 Mgr mo 1X70 1XBO 1X90 ira 

SJ» 106X0 M“y 7X60 1X80 1,930 1.923 1X45 1X9B 

WX0 7JMO 1,910 1X30 1.925 1,955 1XM 

fj» 108X0 ^ zxm L940 1X35 1,905 1JW IJiflO 

NOV 2X40 1,970 1,950 2X19 1,950 2X50 

Volume: 17 jbo lots of S tans. 

_ , GASOIL 

Previous UX. donors per metric ton 

g" SSSfSS MO S , -»W8J0 270X0 

J75 SH5 3“^ ?®-?s ?«xg 2uxo 26SJS 


denombmian of L000 she. La Japes die 
shares were traded a- bonus as flam Septan- 
her 26 th, 1965 . 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
ArnsJadaro. 15 th October. 1985 . 


Ndwajfcrmg 

CBOT 

BOND 

FUTURES 

sag & n 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Also Futures xnd 

Fbtures Options on 
COMEX -GOLD & SILVER 
IMM -CURRENCIES 

Lw Cmtattsun Rjats 


the S*f*!fli.UMPUR PALM OIL 
Motavskm rtoggnt per 2s ions 




M 

_i^k 


ns 


■* ROUND TURN 
DAV AND 
OVERNIGHT 


DM - Deutsche Morki BF - BeMum Fnmes; fl • Dultsi Florins LF - L 
P/V 110 toll ner unit; NJL • Not AvaHaaie; N.C. - NolCwnmunkmedjB 
Redemni- Price- E*-Co*Jpon: •• - Formertv Worldwide Fund Lid: 0 - 




hr*? 


'Applies anlr la trades 
exceeding Hu wnfmas per 
atkmbtr month. First Jvi 
tr/ntraea J.’l round turn 


Call tine nf uur prufrtnnffuh- 

212 - 221-7138 

Telex: JT'ltok 


l :f H 'J 1 1 T*r*r»4^ ' 


COBPOBAllONf 

•U3 WHi *ODL NL HT UHS 
AnMNuwtf 

BopoUc Hattsaal Bad! a! Sew TUk 

\ st£BU 1 ton Curawtxxri rui* 



DKidends 


London 


ALUMINUM 
Starting p«r metrte ton 


liS-Treasuries 


Dtoeoonr Prw. 

OfNr BM VMM YJekf 

J"ta*«rwn 7 JO 7.19 7X4 7X3 

“W 7J2 7JI Jjj 7 j. 

1-WorbM W IB S 

Prev. 

_ Bid Offer TltM YMd 

S+yeor bond W7 13/32182 1dm HL34 '^52 

Source: SabmmBrman. 

MdtriN LrecSb Tiieosary ladgu N a. 

Chonsefor tkeday: — 

Average vieM:— % 

Source.- Aterrffru-neh 


pf 


^oSS 


Options 


. CaK+UMf I rvtMjnJ 
Frte Nor Bsc jot Fe« i No* dk Joe Peg 
ITU l/U vu - 
1/1* jui. int n/u 

l Wl* 
a £ k a 







EW 


SOvr O*7CAfE. 




















































<1 


Tuesdays 


ljMonm 

High LOW 5IPCL 


5IS. C1C« 

Diu. Via. PE lOOsHioULt'wQwt.Ch'M 


AMEX 

Closing 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
us to the closing on wo» Street 
and do no! reflect late trades elsewhere. 

I in Tr\t> Associated Press 


i: rAwnh 

Higti Ley. Slack 


Sis CJose 

Pi*. VIC. PE lCflsHisn Lew Q-jol. CtTfle 


3'» ACIn 

A- ^LLcbi .la 1.0 

8 AA'C s 
2*7 AM Inti 

68 J r ATT Pd 552e 4.7 

9 Acm-rU T. 3J 

Aciran 

l’> Acton 

i j Ann ivt 

1'? AdiTlPs 
22 1 - AdRt-sl .14 A 
IFj Adobe JS tA 
3*? Ae.-one 

29'fl AlilPDs JO 1J 
Pc AlrEco 
A AirCol 

»>. ArCol Of 1J0 10.9 
Ala met) 

OS’- Aim I to n 
A AlbaW 
5»i Aloha 

V'i Aloha In 05 .5 

<■ Alle« 

IP. AIsoCp 
TO'-s Amdahl 20 1.9 
P-c Amedeo .08 l.J 
ft 1 a AmBill .IS U 
37’ s AContrl 1.00 2.0 
20= . AE'Pwl 
4** AFrvcA 
4*. AFruC 9 
3>i AHHftM 
4*a Alsrael 

IK, A Mm* 52 3 A . 

'« A.MBIa 
3 AmOil 

AT-. AFetf 100 3.9 
Am Fin v 

12'. APrec Jib 1J : 

4'.. Am R I tv 
ll’s ARovIn 154elOJ 
3 ASclE 


tf 


A 

A Vn 

90 

IS^ 

is-. 

15=11 ^ 

1G 

im 3 

W T 

ll)i» + ’a 

2B0J 

4V. 

4' 3 

4^ 4. 

76 

K‘3 

(?D'J 

s: +1’.» 

3 

*4 

94 

01, 

SJ 

1P4 

124 

I3H 1- U 

7 

r-'. 

1'-? 

us— 'J 


■ o 

■ a 





3'- 






17 s ? 

17!+ 

ir : — 

29 



3-* + a 

71 

U . 



ZS 



6'J + ’j 



ot- 


Efi 

11 

10': 

n f 

31 

1 - 


1 1 — 1 j 

73 


S3'? 



6 

A 

0—3 

59 

6*3 


S'.| + ! . 

cA 

q: s 

01, 

— i : 


1 A 



&i: 


^=5 

2* i- '1 



10': 


us 


5’! 

5-4 — '3 



10': 

10‘a + 'j 


iK. 

CV 0 

49' j — 1. 



fs\\ 

3Fv +1 

220K 

5 s : 

F* 

5^ 

20W: 

*. 

5 

5 


4 



1 

v-4 


y-* 


Bfl'.-j FordCn -RDOe 
l*»b ForeCA Jo u k 
121ft Forest L 30 

Fatomt 

FreaEl 16 

r* Friedm J8b U 13 

S FrlMEn 14 

lift Frfcctra 21 IJi 72 

lO* FmtHd 9 

4V- FrtAwl .171 13 

6U Furuit JO 15 25 


10il03 
4 m 
97 27 
ISA lb 
02 21% 
2 B'.i 
113 8'A 
13 1W 
47A! 23V, 
11 14'U 

a m 


103 103 

Z31ft 23*6 
26'.? 2 Aft. 
1*1 1H 
2i*» 21*4*2- 
B'.» 8'.4 

8 8 ’/a 

31 3U-* ' 

33Vx 2m 

14''1 tJV! ' 

13 im 


2Afc ivy 
34 lb 
1 34 

1 Ota 11 ft 
144 8/1 
13 9 

274 IP- 
74 21% 
317S 18b 
64 Ah 
84 5 
344 94 
3 14 

4«i 2 Vj 
2V, 74 

33b 161% 
39*8 TTk 
19 10'/. 

144 64 

134 94 
2A4 B4 


L5B 
La Barg 
LoPnt 

LtWBnn M 11 

Laser 

Lauren 

tsar awis * 

LeMWis Jffl J 
LalsurT 


Levitt 

use ■“ « 

Lima 

tsa& 

Lorlmr 

Lumo* J» A 

LundyE 

Luria 

LvnCSs JO 1 J 


19 2W 24 

4 14 14 

9 a m 
309 194 194 
29 10 94 

1 94 94 

.47 19 184 

305 74 MS 

32? 29 . 

M 64 A4 

2 b'U 64 

44 334 334 
27 14 14 

1 44 4>A 

2 14 14 

15 194 194 

574 374 364 
66 14»u 144 
14 114 lib 
AO 1(W 10 IA 
149 124 lib 


24 + 4 
14 + 4 

\9Vt + 4 
94— 4 
9'jt. 

19 4 4 

7 4 4 

27 

6V0 

6U 

334 + 4 
14— 4 
Ab + Vh 

14 

194 + 4 
374 + 4 
144 + 4 
114 

10b + 4 
12 


Is 1A? U 
I 7 ? JH, 4*1 
16 4'j 4 

77 57 SO 
2 3 ? '-•> 
to I4S.J 14': 


14-3 + * d 
J'b 

51 *! - L -I"i 

>1— -i 

14*? 

7“ a 

15 — '« 

J'j — 1 ) 


54' « 

Axon on 




12 

54'-? 

54=-! 

S4>6 + 


JT’a 

44 A .on or 




2 

J—?, 

47-5 

47^4 — 

1 i 

■t 

5‘: A x.an sc 




13 

o’a 

c>. 

6 7 + a a 

3': 

Hi Amocl 

Jo 

3.0 

S 

58 


3 

2 



jj. Anaoi 



75 

121 

5 -t 

a 

6 


r-i 

2V« And J ca 




Tl 

:»? 

2‘ t 

: s i + 

a 

'fr!? 

Pi Angles 




17 

B ; J 

6i* 

5^: — 

'1 


An«oi wf 




11 

1 

1 

-i — 

•4 

p.. 

-« rtAngl v 




64 

I'o 

1 

1' 9 4- 

a 

«'* 

3'u ArgoP: 




43 

r- 

3 ; 

r-? — 

a 

T^, 

5' : Arley n 



3 

4! 

5^4 

5 S » 

F* + 


U': 

4>. Armel s 



• 

6 

s 

4 r a 

4'j — 

* 


7~ 3 Arro'.vA 

JO 

" i 

16 

10 

0 

3* 

e — 



4V? Aimr g 

JO 

tl 


la) 

o, . 

9‘« 

0 1 : 4 . 

8 

;jv 

«. Ajireji 



10 

| 

11!. 

IP. 

11*4 


2 

1 Aslrolc 




’4 

U4 

T. 

r. 


179-4 

7 ~ AstrstPf 

T50 

Til 


5 

i: ; 4 

13-. 

1344 T- 

g 


« AllsCM 




125 


. 

y> 



■OVta 

6*n HAL 

,10e 1 J 


10 

flit 

S'-e 

S'i — Va 

14 

10'9 HMG 

40 

55 


7 

11 

10'a 

11 

4"S 

41 0 Halifax 

IMc 

J 


54 

6|A 

5** 

n— n 

31* 

l’-. Halml 




262 


2 

2Va 

1*6 

l‘i Hoi mi wt 




20 

lii 

l'l 

1U 

10’s, 

6*-? Ham pfl 

.931 13.1 

8 

55 

7*6 

71ft 

71a — >ft 

29H, 

21V. Hndvm n 

JBa 

J 

1 

S3 

24 V* 

74 'a 

74’ft + <a 

2T* 

13'* Hanfrd s 

50 

2J 

14 

131 

23 

22% 

22 7 a 

2'g 

*u Harvey 




2 

I'. 

I'i 

1'.— Va 

J9'i 

21'i Hdi'.br s 

.15 

A 

10 

533 

34 

33 V. 

33!? + 

43 

2SA. Haserpi JUio 

5J 


6 

38*1 

38'A 

38+i + *i 

411? 

28'-« Ha-Ilns 

.400 1J 

10 

21 

30 

2 9!ft 

30 + li 

oia 

9'i. Hlfcrl n 




057 

9*6 

914 

9*6 

17V-* 

12 HllhCrs 

381 

25 

9 

12x 16 

lFlb 

15^1 — v% 

10'- 

S"s Hithcn 



20 

56 

9Vj 

9'. 

*li — *b 

lB"o 

A4« HllhEx 



15 

« 

7“ B 

7% 

7*b + U 

IP» 

ii'v Hoimm 

.44 

A. 9 

9 

5 

13 

13 

13 


6*4 Holnwr 

JOB 2 A 

8 

12 

IVi 

B'ft 

Blu + Vb 

ITVi 

10 Helnlck 

.10 

J 

8 

IS 

13*. 

12U 

13*. + "s 

4 

7 Kekror 



59 

5 

2*i 

2*6 

2*i + 1ft 

10'D 

3'k Helicni 




45 

416 

4'i 

4*6 + ig 

u? 

'4 Holm R 




178 

h 

lb 

1»- ‘ft 

S'? 

3 Mi HcrstiO 



40 

28 

4Tfl 

4+i 

4*1 — '-a 

17 

9'j Hiprron 



15 

3 

14 

14 

14 

IS'* 

6'1 HollyCp 

J4 

U 

7 

9 

IBl? 

T8V6 

18*ft — 'ft 

104, 

15": HmeG n 




4002 

20U 

lS^s 

19Vy +1 

2S*-: 

20 Hmlns Pf 2-95 

45 


268 

21V4 

21 

21 — '.i 

23 V? 

14>A Horml s 

54 

14 

13 

25 

22'- 

21 7 i 

22'- + 

12 

A HrnHar 



19 

357 

Af. 

b*V 

6*ft + 14 

3*Vi 

** HmHwt 




57 



+» 

191k 

13=1 HollPtv 

50 

9.7 

16 

38 

I8“i 

TB=ft 

18*a + ’■* 

A V: 

2*4 HotlPwf 




33 

6*9 

6' 4 

6*6 + ' a 

6V4 

3V4 H00OT 

54el8J 


349 

4*1 

4*3 

4*7— lb 

181? 

1144 HovnE 



10 

19 

141a 

14*a 

14*b + Va 

13V3 

8V* Hawlln 

J5e 25 

A 

' 5 

91l 

9*u 

9*si — 'll 

23': 

I6'i HubelA s 

JA 

35 

12 

56 

22 

21V. 

22 + Vi 

24>b 

1V-4 Hubei B 5 

J6 

3.4 

12 

19 

22Vi 

221-a 

22'J. — la 

9=4 

6'4 Husky g 

56 

5J 


27 

7 

Alft 

Alb 


74 4 SwCr* 

134 * Suoinas JO U 7 

184 lib SuprSr A U 10 

64 34 5u9QSMt> 9 

24 TW SwflErtg. 9 

28 ]Ws Swiff (ft 120 M 25 

64 34 SVDOlOV 

144 64 SvstEns .10 15 9 


90 n rob ioti ♦ 4 

3> IK 1SV? 164 + 4 
80 44 4- 4V: * 3s 

2 Vts i •: I's-+V 

H 2*4 23b 23’s- T .r 
1 }b 3b 3tt + *+ 

1 rt 41 n 




17b lib Jaclvn 500 35 10 

7b 54 Jacobs 

4b 2'A JetAm 8 

14 4 JetA wt 

94 Jetran .71110.9 11 

IMS 7 JohnAm JO AA 10 

114 6 Johnlnd 3 


7b 24 JumpJk 


3 134 13W 134 + >j 

12 6b 64 6b 

233 4b 4 4 — :% 

67 % % r«-ts 

10 64 64 6’% + 

27x 7 6b A'Th — 4 

IS B 7*s 74— 


17 2b 24 2b + 4 


1 




3b CD I 
S'. CAM Cp 
V c CiViX CC 
6*5 CS3 n 
9 Caesru 


4'? CagleA 

104 'CalPE 


19*. Ca'mal 
3's Cation n 


to 

5 

IJfi 10.1 f 
JO 1.9 14 
10 


' _■ Cater OP JOt 9.0 22 


11 * j Csir.cc A4 

I'i CCMPttl 
13b CiVcrs 8 JO 
13': Cd nO-rc j-s 
r ; : C.V.'ne 


5 21's 21'? 21’:— '» 
172 »-3 ‘4 9". +'s 

31 V: 1-t, I'.a 

ss ,r s sn sn+', 

10 ». o's o's— '» 

4 12«* 12' 2 124 + '» 
314 31': 30‘r 31 

2 5*s P. Fa + 'j 

5 9 3'l S'*- 

34 t«4 ISJi 16 '. t 4 

14 Vs 14 l’: + 't 

’3 144 14 c 144- b 
23 T9 . 19' j 19'.*- b 
49 35b 344 35 1 . + ’■= 


12*1 8b 
IS-t A 
44 lb 
1? 157s 

104 3b 
124 9‘s 
IP? 11 
134 94 

isb ir« 
114 +4 
294 234 
ay* 284 
304 21 
144 7 

10 74 

9T« 54 


r PA 44 

Fairrln 31 

FaintiC 

Forty et .4?t Z» 
Fidata 

FiConn l JOo S5 8 
FVVvmB 53 7.0 11 

Fstcrps 7 

FischP jflt 55 19 

FllcGE 4 

FilGE Of 4J0 117 
FlaRCk .70 1.9 7 

Fluke 1.38t SJ 10 

Focdrrti 5 


1 104 
20 IS 
1 2 
35 164 
11A 64 

S IK, 
35 11b 
10 114 

1 ir-*> 

27 104 


104 104 

15 1,5 +4 

16 164 

6's 64— 4 

lib 11!.— >4 

114 114— b 
11b 114 + 4 
T24 1^ 

10b 10b— b 

57b ^1- b 

wr& + '' 

73i 71, — 

S= i £7. + 4 


394 314 
44 14 

16b 10 
13 104 

IP'S 9b 
234 14 
4*4 2’S 
4 24 

12b B 


KnGspf 450 125 
KaoakC 2 

KarCn JO 15 7 
KavJn Joe 1J 10 
KearNt a 0 3J 17 
Kelctim 551 35 18 
KevCoB .151 45 19 
KevCoA .15e AM 18 
KeyPh JO 25 IS 
KcvCa 6 


74 24 

2"s vs 


44 2b 

44 24 


44 2’>i 

sb r.a 


34 2 
16b 10b 
304 22b 


KevPh 

KevCa 

KsvCa wl 

Kiddewt 

Kinark 

Kirby 

Kit Mfg 

KieerV 

Knoll 


1061 S'/. 
72 34 


20 "» 
10S 4Vs 


26 34 

383 2Vj 


2 As 
136 24 


36 36 

3b 3b— b 
124 124 
114 114 
124 124 + U 
ir*i lBWs— Vt 
3b 3b - 4 
2=1 34 + 4 
7*. 8b + Vi 
3 3—4 

4 4— Vs 

4b 44 + b 
O’J 34 + 
Z4 2's — 4 


4% 44 + 4 


KogerC 2J2 0.9 75 


2 24— b 

14b 15 

264 264— 4 



a 


TV* 4b T 
04 44 T 
2b 54 T 
14 13b Ti 
+4 AW Ti 
7 *4 Ti 

44 2b Ti 
14 Ti 
9*6 Ti 

43 r. 

34 Ti 
10b Ti 
!U> Ti 
97 Ti 
14 Ti 
24 b T, 
BW Ti 
ffU Ti 
ZU Ti 
4 ■ Tl 
22 Ti 
74 Ti 

44 Ti 

,6 ST! 




8b 34 Zlmar J5t 


68 44 4 44 + 4, 


Investors, f. renders, freveten and traders alienor fhe *crid, consult the IHT for daily currency rates. 







of reaching America s 
most influential 
executives 


[«i 




wi'i in ■ Bifi 


Do you hove a personal interest in money? Get twice as much 
financial news for your money. Take advantage of our special 
rates for new subscribers and we' 11 give you an extra month of 
l ribs free with a one-year subscription. Total savings: nearly 
50% off the newsstand price in most European countries! Twice 
as much financial news and iots, lots more in the International 
Herald Tribune, the global newspaper. 

MM H HlicralbS^Sribunc.B K IB m WS n 

To= ^ u * :scn P t ' on Manager, Intemcti'ond Herdd Tribune, 

1 81 , avenue Char!es<Je<5auile, 92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. TeU 47 47 07 29. Telex: 61 2832. 
Please enter my subscr iption for: 

Q 12mon1hs ( + J^) Q 6 months ( +2 ^ ks ) Q 3montfis ( + ^) 

| 1 My check is enclosed [ | Please charge my credit card exxount: 


A glance at the graph will tell you what a 
study by a leading' independent researcher, . 
Market Facts, Inc., told us;;That Forbes is . 
preferred reading by more corporate officers in 
1,000 of America's largest semce and Industrial 
companies. In comparison with Fortune and . 


Ma gazin es read regularly by corporate officers 
in 1,000 of America's laxgest compamesf 


Forties 

68.3% 


61.8% 


FOHTUNI 

'48.4%: 


*Market Facts, Inc. 1984 


Cost per Thousand Circulation 



Forties 

4C Page 546^9 


Biaaww WMk 

4C PageS5179 


FORTUNE 

4CPage S5639 


SWftgeS38^ gVyfage$34.7a 


Business Week, Forbes was judged to be overaU 
favorite by 44%, versus 29% for Business Week 
and 19% for Fortune. 

When regular readers were asked which of the 
' ..three reflects best the excitement of business, 

Forbes had .twice the scores of the other two ’ 

And when asked which of the three stands for 
"free enterprise" 71% named Forbes/comparcd 
with 13% for Fortune and 7% for Business Week. 

These results confirm surveys done over the 
past fifteen years showing that more officers in 
big business read Forbes regularly than either : 
Fortune or Business Week. 

- As the graphs so eloquently show, Forbes is 
. the most cost-effective business magazine for - 

reaching America's most . ~ ‘ 

effective executives. If you 
want to reach this elite 

not only is it good busi 
ness for you to put your 
advertising in Forbes, 
it's bound to be good 
; for your business. 




IllUi^.UlMHESilgEaggl 


Caxi account number 


Card empry date 


I CM ^1 IP HIP I 1 I 



. Fur further i nfomution; please contact Peter M. Schoff, Director of 
International Ad vermins.- Forbes Mj^udne, 50 Pall Mail London 
SWLY 5IQ, England. Tel: (01) 9300161/2. 


sl 322 1 1741 95 I City/' 

its ot Africa, Ccnoda lafm Amenco, Gvitf 
Asa -i vmI 


5 | 442 | 38 | 130 1 Tel/Tde* 


30 - 10-85 


v+r f <ry j. 











































«««NCr MARKETS 

Dollar Declines iii: 


H-' NEW YOrT*” -TV cm by 4^«a'o 

.*• !• i.r* f ,: i W Sv Y QRK — The dollar isakt'By the'dai 
'• && sed r ]mK ' ***** York °a Tties- falfca Id 16U& 

"4 

,. " S?j “■ N *?t Y °* said the Enfa' » j& 

:< '£ f i feSSLfk?* ^ CUTOnc y was ck*ed« £62071 
C< 1 .' ^ggered by a steep drop-i/ US. ins, r^M, 

-. .? :i!ji !i said the markets wa> n»»r f- To F bmW iwt 

"■ ': V- S5J?’rit^ ll5l *if feclofM * ter E”* 1 * 16325 
J. fc * *. west Oenaan and Japanese inter- £6458 DMoniM 

-> ie ' " rsT nonmiwAaJ & M s #« ■ ■ . _ 




IOTERNATIONAL HERALfrTRffiUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1935 


Mi 




\-34 


Page 17 


cm by thread of*? yMndeakfs in the doflar was renewed specuta- 
sam: % the dose* tlh^doflar had lion about Britain becoming a fii5 
ulwa to 2.$|QS lumber 'nuts, member of dteEaroperoMraieuiy 
trom £&»0 OMrai/Moaday’s System. 

-dose^r. /. t •.i&l-g'e&i- -y . - US. idling also pasbfld down 
Earner in -dollar the dollar, European traders said. 

ck^iMat i.fi20^£Wabiranopen- Dealers in Zurich also said spec- 


Banks Seek ^smssPtoPu ki—i ^ '~r_A 

Data on U.S. Ex-Japan Minister Named to Merrill Lynch Panel 


Debt Plan By Brenda Erdmann 

Tmm^nofaaJ Hrrskt Tntnate 

keuim LONDON — Merrill Lynch & 

WASHINGTON — Commer- Co - **» *Pf»“«d * former Japa- 
dal bankers stopped short Tuesday “ foni ? n numster to us advisory 


ing, 2A35& 0&L;‘a« .cmiiiMftid u&tion there 
wihM<nd^t#a^2j£43QuM, couni-retea 
- InFhmkfmV.tthe daBir was tart decline. 
feed at 2.&325 DM jdown from The US. 
2.6458 DM on Moodav. • 2.1523 Swis 


Dealers m Zuneh usnsud spec- of a general endorsement of the 
uIMpot thereof a possible US. dis- ILS. plan for easing the interna- 


£?■ The^wcr^SSSf i??^'- .J Some Ixndon-defleo aaid itwas francs. Lata in New Yat. it frn- 

$£]. ^ now P«»*We *« Ac ddflar .could iihidW. all 1390 francs. from 

test dtel60DM-Jb<^ ji«i week, 1I6Z5 francs. 

IS s? • ^ ^ Although one or two West Ger- 

* # Zrrrjf???* Jr?** chainnan, ■' day’s decline ; had. altered ife over- man dealers believed the Bund®- 


count-rete cut also bdped the dol- uonai debt crisis and calkd on SCTV “ XS oooeem said the former 
tar's deefine. Western governments w play a offidaL Saboro Oitita, vocU join 

The US. unit JeH in Zurich to greater rote in the strategy the ** comtcU for its first meeting m 
2.1523 Swiss francs, from 2.1658 managing director of the Institute Abi ^ «*“* has been sc h e du led for 
francs. Lata in New Yortt. it fin- for International Finance said. D® 1 - 16 and 17 in Tokyo. At that 
isbed lower, at 2.1390 Cranes, from “There is a need for more infor- A* cauadi wil discnss 


council who is a former US. sccreury of 

The >iev York-based fmandd state and senior partner in the' bw 
services oo n cem said the former firm of Rogers & Wdls; Howard 


followed that earlier Lhis month of Juan Rada as its new director. Mr. has appointed Hans Foniein as u 
Lord Weinstock, managing direc- Rada, who at 34 is the youngest managing director. He previously 
tor of General Electric Co. of Brir- man ever to hold the post, will take was the managing director of Amro 
ain. Others on council are: William over the running of the institute in International Ltd. in London. 
P. Rogers, the council's chairman, October 1986, when the current di- Also, EBC Amro named Michaci 
who is a former US. secretary of rector. Bohdan Hawrylyshyn, re- Hughes an executive director with 
sure and senior partner in the' law tires. responsibility for Eurobond sales. 


H. Baker Jr„ the former U.S. Sen- 
ate majority leader who currently is 


Mr. Rada, a Chilean, is a leading 
authority on the socio-economics 


a.c Hiajomy »wwr woo cunrauy t* tf fcgj, technology and chairs that 
masagmg pann w m thebw fim of d epanmem at the institute. He will 
tnson & Elkins; Rpga E. Birk, conl n lue to nm the newly created 


mttting, the counczi will discuss chairman emeritus of Merrill technology-management unit 

1 \Ss Jftn.qnAsA fnrU fiirinv' _tnrl LVDCh: Jean- i ves HhbCTCT. chaiT> .i 


1625 francs, nation and more study ” said the US.-Japai!ese trade frictros and Lynch; Jean-\ ves Haberer chair- 

A1 though one oe two West <3er- official Andrf de lanre, “and a measurcs si®® 1 al opening Japan’s nan and chief executive officer of 

*rad The over- man dealers believed the Bundes- wish for more involvement of cred- financial and securities markets. Banquc Panbas, and Trevor Eyton. 

• . bank, lad intervened late in the itor governments." Mr. Okiia, who is the first Japa- president of Brascan Ltd. of Toron- 

dosed in New session, most European . dealers intltfnv kncfwt * nuwtino neseduzen on the council is chair- to. 


wish for more involvement of cred- 
itor governments." 

The institute hosted a meeting 


Basque Paribas, and Trevor Eyton. 
president of Brascan Ltd. of Toron- 
to. 


Western Union Telegraph Co. 
has appointed Wallace K. Hall to 


Hughes an executive director with 
responsibility for Eurobond sales. 
He also was formerly with Amro 
International. 

NCR France, a Paris-based unit 
of the U.S. maker of computers and 
other electronic office equipment. 
NCR Corp., has appointed John 
Quinlan as president-director gen- 
eral. He succeeds Lucien Bardane. 

Tiy gg-Hansa, the Swedish insur- 
ance’ group. has appointed Bjorn 


„ 011 Monday, Eai&r mLoadon, the activity.' ..umu^MrapranaKi/wuiim. . 

^ 81 «-436. ^ fra® ‘'There was little point with the stitutions. Ib^Sng, which was Tokyo, which ihe founded a 

' trrJ!!S^^ 0d j balSpe£aila ' ' dollar going down on Hs own," one hdd behind closed doors, was He served as Japan's foreign 

S»- mtoiaCc d of a <hscounl-rate Another factor cited for the M Londondraler said. called tocftnkderthe ulspbn for » f rom November 1979 : 

>s.~ ™ 1 ‘ •-•••- - defusing the debt crisis. ,9 ®£- 

J 5;' THE EUBOMADlrrve Mr.de Latire said the banks had appmnunen: of Mr. 

'WWHUIKIlB 19 • wdeomed the plan, which was in- 

* If- . ' " •■ . • T- ' ' ■>■ — ™ — ■ troduced three weeks ago by the Qt 

Fbrst Deep-Discount TSuBdog 9 Bonds Appear S 3 SSS?* ^ n ^ eawc 


Ijrom SI-4215 -.said they had seen no ooitral bank on Monday of 58 senior bankers 11130 & Are institute for Domestic 

n (muIjvi ilia amanMi i.n y* .. . . • noit InrMngfinnal P/Oim: in 


from US.. European and Asian in- 


•; ;i Ik "■ - l 

-- 7 * * f , 


.By Chnsropbcr Pizzcy - the 1356-pacenl savennnentb^ 
ia r -- : _ „ — _ v Raaers dne 2004708. The 25-year issue was 

LONDON — The secondary e^jected to pay jmerest of 3per- 
/S Eurobond market generally ended cent in the first fire years, 3H per- 
7>. on a Gnner nous Tuesday, wb3e the • cent in the secoodlivv, 5 perceQt in 
i| «; v primary sector saw a variety of new the nod five, percent in the The 
*>'. issues, mduding the Cm ever deep- fourth five years and 8V4 percent in 
is! ^ ' discount “buDdogT bonds, dealers . . the last five. . 

”;■>!; . Tbe issite wos guaranteed by 


called to emutider tbe U.S plan for 
defusing tbe debt crisis. 

Mr. de La tire said tbe banks had 
welcomed the plan, which was in- 
troduced three weeks ago by the 
U.S. Treasury secretary. Janies A. 
Baker 3d, and that they had ex- 
pressed their general support. 

Bm he also said that this by no 


and International Policy Studies in 
Tokyo, which he founded in 1981. 
He served as Japan's foreign minis- 
ter from November 1979 :o Julv 
1980. 

The appointment of Mr. Old a 


Geneva Institute 
Names Director 


the new- post of area vire president 

for the Far East. He is based in c p url . S te ffan fiSecke. who will » 
Tokyo. Previously, Mr. Hall was 


.. , . tire in June. Mr. Spraneare. who 

direcior mLmuuonal Lai- is preHd ^, 0 f Ml , 0;h 

SLWi S Domajo AB P a Sarfiah pulp aud 


*»on, Dated in me company s head 

Dtanws Inrector office in Upper Saddle River. New 

The International Management Jerse >'- 
Institute in Geneva has appointed EBC Amro Bank Ltd. of London 


paper company, will join Tiygg- 
Hansa later this year and take* full 

control erf the company in June. 


On Seaway, Accident Aggravates the Hard Times 


(Continued from Page 11) 


tbe 1316-pttccat government bond Late in the day, European Amer- means represented a public com- deeply rooted. Iron ore shipments 

doe 2004/08. The 25-year issne was jean Bank issued a 5125-million mitmem to lend debtor nations $20 from Quebec and Labrador to U.S. 

expected to pay jmerest of 3 .-per- fioadna-rate-note issue paying billion in the next three years, as Great Lakes dues — the p rind pal 

— - •' -- - i- - - -nl __ mi j 1 l W. d_i l.j j ..... r ■ r 


cent in the fast fire years, 341 per- 1/16 paint over the three-month Mr. Baker bad urged. 


today. That is the principal reason the average ship pays in lolls and cy, is fighting the declining traffic 
that although the Great Lakes re- other fees to pass through the St. by insisting on no fare increases in 
gion of the United States produces Lawrence. the jointly administered portion, at 

a fourth of the country's exports. In addition, deregulation of U.S. least through I9S6. Directh taking 


basis for tbe Americans agreeing to only about 5 percent of them are railways has had the effect of creat- 


oent m the secoladllw, 5 percent in London interbank offered rate. In particular, Mr. de Lattre said, join in what is mainly a Canadian shipped through tire St. Lawrence. 


the jointly administered portion, at 
least through I9S6. Direc ih taking 
on his railway and Mississippi 


“5 *-sfc. Meanwhile, in Frankfurt, the 
' v ^X±ief bond dealer at a UJS. bank 


clast five. ■ pays total fees of 40 basis poin 

The issue.. was jgxanmieori by But h was launched too late 


issue was lead-man- the banks wanted creditor govern- waterway — Fell ic 17 million met- 
u«ro Bank Ltd. and mans to advance guarantees for nc tons (18.7 million short urns) 
of 40 basis points, expert credits to debtor countries last year, from more titan 20 mil- 


shipped through tbe St. Lawrence, ing gum “unit trains,’' that is. barge competitors, he is also mar- 
Long gone is the dream that vol- trains with one cargo and bound keting tbe seaway through new pro- 
ume in Chicago — closer to Europe for one destination. This often motion offices. European tours and 
through the seaway than New York makes it cheaper to ship wheat or trade shows. 


Safeway Stores Inc. and the lead trade actively, 
manager. Baring Brothers & Co., Deutsche Bank AG 


to through ihdr official guarantee lionnotric tons in the 1970s, as ihe is by open sea, because of the com by train to a port such as 


agencies. 

They also wanted a more posi- 


sted industry contracted. 


trade shows. 

But the government of Prime 


Earth's natural curvature — would Baltimore, and then transfer the Minister Brian Mulroncv has taken 


The substitution of plastic and surpass East Coast ports. “Clearly, grain to boats. 


described as “disastrous” news thar noted that tbe margin over tbe Brit- Dresdncr Bank AG jointly led a tivc signal from Western govern- other materials for steel in autos the seaway is more important to 
hfl-nlrc were p lanning to issue 36 ishTrcasmybcpdfor thisissne was 1 00-minion-EurQpean-cnrrency- menu that they were prepared to and other products raises the possi- Canada than it is to the United 
D eutsche mnrfr Eurobonds fa No- * owcsl seen for a private unit bond issue for the European back a general capital increase for bilily that much of this market has States.” Professor Bonson said. 

borrower in. the sector. ' '* - - .. . r.-_ . . ~ ... ... — - 


the view- that the seawjv should be 


— . ^ Deutsche mark Eurobonds fa No- 
vember, totaling 7.475 billion DM. 
i: ij r/t, About 45 bflfion in DM Euro- 
^ bonds have been issued so far this 
•, month, putting the secondary mar- 
^ ^ i,' ket mtikr heavy pressure, dealers 
’* i j noted. 


Coammnity. It pays 8ft percent a the World Bank- 


been lost forev er, regardless of steel 


Brothers also noted that the con- year over eight years and was To deal with the reluctance of industry recovery. 


dept of stepped interest { ^ o ^ __ r 

was not new, bat this is the first Traders noted that the secondary debtor countries, Mr. de La lire ping, particularly big w iflcrcasc tn Particularly for its massive grain Now, however, Washington and deficits. His government is trying 
time tim the formula had been ECU sector came under some said, participants _al the meeting ship s™* , have also hurt. “About shipments, Canada has do aliema- Ottawa appear to be marching to to make those who benefit most 

used with a deep cCscoont bond heavy selling pressme Tuesday and discussed the possbflitv of a “mu- the time the seaway was built, there tive to the seaway in shipping lo different drummers, perhaps re- from particular government ser- 

issue. consequently the tame was quoted tual fund” through which their «-as a sort of revolution in naval such European destinations as the fleeting their different stakes in the vices foot most of the bill. 


priced at par. 


smaller banks to lend more to the Technological changes in ship- through the seaway. 


the seaway is more important to The seaway has faced big firun- self-supporting as soon as possible. 
Canada than it is to the United rial problems before. In 1977, for Mr. Mulroney's first budget called 
States.” Professor Bonson said. instance, tbe two national govern- for the return of the S37 million in 
About 20 percent of all cargo mems agreed to forgive 50-year seaway surplus to the federal trea- 
sbipments in Canada move construction debts that could never sury. rather than allow it to comin- 
through tbe seaway. be repaid. ue to be used to cover operating 


Particularly for its massive grain 


Now, however, Washington and deficits. His government is trying 
Ottawa appear to be marching to to make those who benefit most 


h cal “ ldar . was mf- fa fac dollar fkming-rate-note outside the total 1ft percent fees, at loans could be channeled. 

|J £ » “ounced, Inter^Amencan De- sector, tarinuoBanamoSan Paolo a dtacoum of about 2V4. The fund, be said, coul 

9 % r ' Bank launched a 250- M Torino’s London branch issued Gibraltar Financial Coro, issued ministered bv the World B; 


f ti veiopmem Bank launched a 250- 
'i 'j »> mUBcm-DM bond issue paying 7ft 
' iV percent a year over seven years and 
$ i'i priced at par. The lead manager 
was Deutsche Bank AG. 

'i S Id the sterling market, Safeway 
; U.K. Holdings Ltd. issued a £100- 

S si ; . mil Rati no mmal “buDdog” bond 
; Hi cit‘ iVii. a -oo 


it receipts. The issue pays 1/16 straight bond issue pa 
point over the mean of the six- cent over seven yean 


offered rates. The issae was bid on total 1ft percent fees. 


tal fund through which their was a sort of revolution in naval such European destinations as the fleeting their different stakes in the vices foot most of the bill, 

ons could be channeled. architecture.” said Norman Bon- Soviet Union, which is believed to seaway. Canada, with five of seven Other proposed changes are to 

The fund, be said, could be ad- sou. an economics professor at La- have purchased four million metric locks on the pan of the seaway increase tbe required piloting fees 

di Torino's London branch issued Gibraltar Financial Crap, issued ministered by the World Bank, pqs- kehead University fa ThundeT Bay. tons of Canadian wheat just before administered jointly — that from for the Sti Lawrence River beyond 

S100 million of floating-rare depos- a SI 15-million collateralized siWy under the auspices of the in- “Ocean-going vessels became larg- the collapse of the seaway. The Montreal to Lake Ontario — col- Montreal to S4.500 from S3". 000, 

u — - i — * r *“ 1 /,£ - — — 1 : — — dilution's Multilateral Investment er and larger." United States does. lects 73 percent of the tolls and and to make shippers pay for ser- 

uaramee Agency, which insures The new larger ships were much UJS. grain once shipped via the pays that portion of costs. The vices such as ice-breaking and 

gainst possible political risks of better suited for carrying contain- Sl Lawrence has dropped to two United States, with two, collects dredging. While fees on the joint 

vesting in the Third World. ers, which could be more easily and million urns annually from as much the remaining 27 percent and foots portion of the seaway cannot be 


paying lOftper- sti ration’s Multilateral Investment 
in ana priced at Guarantee Agency, which insures 


er and larger." 

The new larger ships were much 


Linited States does. 

U.S. grain once shipped via the 


month London, interbank bid and 1007/16. Lt .was bid around the a ga i m a posable political risks of better suited for carrying contain- Sl Lawrence has dropped to two 


investing in the Third World. ers, which could be more easily and minion tons annually from as much 


iu r„ v 
* 

v v r* h 
' r£ ’ 1 ^ 

. ? Ji t r 

■i Vat 

: : f-t.; 

» <■ >i| 
- < f 1. 1 


the market at around 99.67, com- Euroyen braids ended just over a Mr. de Lattre also said the banks quickly transferred to and from as nine million a decade ago. A the bill for that portion erf costs. increased without Washington's 

*: S . million nominal ‘'bulldog” bond pared with the-total fees of 35 basis point firmer in places Tuesday, wanted more information regard- trains and trucks at ocean ports. Mississippi river barge pays only a James L Emery, administrator aquiescetice, Canada is free to raise 

•: id ££ that w31 be priced Wednesday at 38 points. The lead manager was Kfor- with some professionals feeling ing increased disbursement of Less than 6 percent of the global relatively slight energy tax, com- of Sl Lawrence Seaway Develop- fares on the Welland Canal por- 

5 4 £?. to 42 to yidd 90 basis points over gan Stanley InxernatiomiL that tbe market had bottomed-out loans by (he World Bank. container fleet can use the seaway pared with the more than S25.Q0Q ment Coq?., the U.S. seaway agen- uon. 


Tuesday’s 

ore; 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices os of 
3 pan. New York time. 

Via The Associated Press 


DMDBM 

HlaftLow Stock t 
« - CrirOc 

&.2SS? : 

nt-Carm* 

JWCjhM 

aasa 


a ** OrtPoc* 


tS Month 
High LOW Stott 


11 ADC 1 

ft 2ft 



25 7M ASK 
23 Ifi 
IV, 

11 TVS 
28 17V. A 

7V. IV* A 

» PZSSr 

17^ 13Vi AfliSl" 
23V» 15% AocyRs 
UVi Th 


^fiass* 

8V4 AlpMtC 
MW Ok Altos. 

23 1115 Afflcost 

fPk 41k AWAlrl 
17 5ft AmAdv 
141k 10% ABnkr 
14ft 10ft AlTtOBT 
9H 5ft ACootl 
32ft 17%k AFIOtCS 
37ft 28ft AGnat 
14ft 8ft AmlnU 
12ft 5ft AMoont 
2ffft 10ft AMS* 
36ft 27ft ANtlm 
7ft 2ft APIwG 
15 7V, AmSft* 

Aft S ASOIOT 
1ft ft ASurv 
44ft 26ft Amrtro 
at 17 Amrwst 
10ft 3 ft Ampen 
27ft 16ft Antske 

20>a 14ft Ampds 
15% 10 Anlosle 
15ft 8ft Anoren 
39ft 13ft AiKIrgw 
10ft 6ft AMOM 
30ft TO. ApotoC 
31ft 14ft APPfeC 
27ft 13ft ApJBUj* 
1«ft 11 ftcldCm 
36 17ft AoklMt 
13ft 8 AptdSJr 
L7ft 3ft Archive 
7GV, J5V. ArooSv 
40ft ink Arttfl 
9 6 Artrt 

15ft lllft ASdHst 
9 5ft Asrrosv 
22ft 13ft Afcor 
43ft 25ft Attrt Be 
14ft 8ft AlInFd 
14 Hft AlIRn 
30 1 9ft AN Res 1 

16ft 2ft AtSaArs 

20 14ft AlwdOc 
1241 4ft AUtTTT 

9« 2ft Autmrx 
7ft 4ft Auxton 
13V. 3ft AVOOO 

21 6 AvnfGr 

25ft 17ft Avntak 
20 15ft Avatar 
20ft 13ft AvkrtGp 

6ft 4 AXtcM 


Sift 40ft 
16 Aft 
21ft 14ft 
35 24ft 
lift Aft 
51ft 30ft 
]2Vi 8ft 
15Vk 9ft 
18ft 12ft 

10 6ft l 
26ft 6V. I 
13ft 6 I 
15ft 7 

40 31ft I 
HQVj 40 1 

V 6 I 
TOft 5ft I 
ATlft 10W I 

Srttl 

18 Oft I 
15ft 916 I 
.Pft 3ft 1 
10ft Aft I 

7ft 1 I 

10ft 6 I 

11 Sfe I 
39ft 26ft I 
23ft 15ft I 

Wft 6ft I 
27 lift I 
25ft 12ft I 
16 Ift I 
7ft 3ft 1 
4ft ft I 
16ta BV. I 
ZIft lift I 
20ft 12ft 1 
21 15 I 

27ft 21ft I 
9ft 3 I 


30 1U 2507 
M 10 4T7 


JO S3 48 
t 22 

>108 1-0 121 
36 

JS* 22 TO* 

. 44 45 481 . 
fl 
52 

m 

A IS 11 
710 

t 23 

JB X7 120 
24 
1* 

^1^ 

^ ^ S' 
21 

iran no 

79 

_76 

220 

14U <U 192 
152 
731 

mo n i« 
•" 12 iS 

51 

58 

.14 M 17 
2327 
3176. 
783 
29 
109 
1 

101 

■ • 25® 

® M £ 
.12 J 49 
140 

M 12 166 

M « m 


22 

t 16 

121 
191 
IS 
160 
280 
12 
716 

JO 46 1 



27ft ttilltA 
26ft Cfaum 


15 141k 

lift 


lft— ft 

m 

.10 . — ft 


lafatln 

UBa Wgh Low 

r 1U 31M 

345 20ft 

' 919 % 

- s ^ 

I 352 . 22V. 

t 28 ’ 21 

1291 9ft 

! 52 10 

5 & 


r, ss 

f I 

a r 


MM RAUMtl 

3PJKCWM HM. Low Steek 

2£ +w i 

56 + Vk * 

21 4- ft 

25ft + ft 

2ft— ft 

21 

«ft— ft 
10. +ft 


&-S& 

If. Wft 

k 

10ft 
12 
m 

7ft «fc 

13ft 13ft 
lift lift 
8ft 7ft 

1 8ft 10» 

lift 34ft 
3% 3ft 

■VI 

37ft 37ft 
25ft 24ft 
18ft 9ft 
30ft 29ft 

12ft 12V. 
16ft Ifft 
Wft 10 
VS* 12 

S I7ft 
23ft 

^ St 

19ft M 
39ft 39ft 

3 17ft 
Aft Aft 
SS% 38 
42 41ft 
nft im 
10 9ft 
2Aft 25ft 
12ft )2ft 
34ft 14ft 
4ft 4ft 
3ft 3M 
Aft 5ft 
W 9ft 
Aft 5ft 
20 Vk 
i/ra 17ft 
16ft- 15ft 
4ft Aft . 


flfcttt 

5ft' + ft 
10ft + ft 


31ft + ft 
10ft + ft 
6 + ft 
19ft + ft 
34ft + ft 
3ft + ft 

37ft"+ ft 
24ft— 1ft 
10ft + ft 
ao . + ft 

lift— ft 

isr+s 

rig 

12ft + ft 

M+IV 
13ft + ft 
28ft + ft 
8ft 

5ft+ ft 
19ft + ft 

am— ft 

.«*■ 

20 

41ft + ft 
lift . 
10 + ft 
26ft + ft 
12ft + ft 
14ft .. 
4ft 

Sk + ft 

S*-ft 

15ft + ft 


25ft CoILIAc IPO 3J 10 
15ft CnlrTte 2358 

w co tom ;< u » 

4ft Comors . T71 

lift Cornett • ,12 A 273 
10ft ComCKa ,16 14 323 
lft Comdkil 130 

33ft CiMrtc 110 54 261 
24ft Cirtcell U0* 24 98 

■ft OmISh 50a S3 21B 
23ft Crnttn 140 S3 15 
ft ComAm __ 72 

Mft Condnd J8 14 251 
7ft ComSys jSi J M 
13ft OnpCtfs 21* 

14ft ^SpCri J2 14 
2ft Campus 47 

5ft CCTC 518 

Wft OmpAs _ 469 

3ft * *■& 

- 5ft.CavlH . 113 

5ft CmpldD 6 

2tk CrnoSM 1270 

AftCmpPds M 

«. CmTttt 32 

44k Cmputn 199 

lft 10 

r ^ aits i 

32ft CnPop* 148 02 86 

W Consul - _ 187 

29 CRH BC 204b 44 TO 
;«A Emits 85 

- 4 Ctfjosr 98 

Aft Coowuf 9mi 

lift Own* 117 

ft CoprBto 411 

VftOwtAr 2819 

14V5 Coots B 40 23 750 
I6W Copyist 77 

-Aft Cordis 36 

20 ConfitS 4360 

.m tow* 340 

:»k am 127 

10ft CrkBtr .14 1 J 36 
10ft Cronos 51 

21ft crewrr 40 17 ion 
». CvxoBk . 22 

-15ft Cramps 20 

lift CuflnFr 94 44 117 
15ft Cntscii 40 2J 1 


46ft 45ft 
7ft '7ft 
15ft TWi 
-34ft* JPA 
99k 99k 
46 45ft 

lS£ 15V. 

r * 

17 16ft 
lift lift 
nk 8 

aft am 

“ ft 


36ft + ft 
41ft -I- ft 

30ft + ft 
23ft + ft 

16ft + ft 
16ft— ft 


45ft + ft 
Wft 

4 — ft 
31ft 

199k + ft 
17ft 

12ft— ft 
19ft + ft 
lift— ft 
2ft 

39 + ft 

43ft— ft 

aft— it 
30ft— ft 
lft 

26ft + ft 
10ft + ft 
,B > 

104k + ft 
17ft 

ra 

24 + ft 

6ft ft 
13 + ft 

K 

Aft + Vk 
18ft— ft 

5 + ft 
lft 

9ft 

6ft— ft 
15 

14ft . 

13 -ft 
7 

45ft + ft 
2ft 

42ft + ft 

’SM 

7ft + ft 
12ft + ft 

'£-A 

171m * ft 
Jfft +1ft 

3ft— ft 
lift + ft 

14 —ft 
2196 + ft 

1396 + fa 
17ft + ft 
20W— ft 
22ft— ft 


14 + ft 

lft 

11 — ft 
7ft + ft 
25ft + ft 
2fft + ft 

17ft + ft 
9ft 

5ft— ft 
23ft— ft 
2ft 

5ft— ft 
5V1 + ft 
1796 + ft 
H +te 

Z7ft 


Seta la Nn 

Dtw. via HM High Low 3 PA Cmw 


8ft 

10ft + ft 
lft— K 
12 — vs 
«ft + ft 
ifft— ft 
4ft + ft 
16ft— ft 
Wft + ft 1 
54ft- ft 
Wft— ft 
13ft 

4 + ft 

5ft 

14ft— ft 
31ft— ft 

sr* 

16 — ft 

I*'* 

14ft + ft 


RAVontn 
HrttiLOw Stott 

8ft 4ft K*««« 
11 6ft KevTm 

8ft 2ft Klcnbrk 
21ft 13 Kimwr 
14ft 496 K/UV 
16ft 1096 Kmatfr 
29ft 8ft Kukfcr 


Dry. YU IMS Hip: Lo* 3 PJK □!*> 

4 Aft Aft Aft 

249 9ft 9ft 9ft 

2 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 

XA A 1AM ITU 16ft 17 + ft 

416 J UA 7ft 7ft 7Vk 

34 2A 657 14ft 13ft 13ft + ft 

.121 1.1 432 lift lift lift— ft 


r.ft 

17ft— ft 

rts 

41ft + ft 
2* + ft 

21ft + ft 

39 + ft 

«0ft +■ Vj 
7ft 
lift 

40 — Vi 
Wft 

14ft 14ft— ft 
4 4 — ft 

17ft 17ft— U 
\Vh 17ft 
3096 31 + U 

Wft Wft + ft 
20 20 *. 

196 Tft 
*ft 9ft— ft 
4ft Aft— ft 
23 23ft + ft 
Aft 5 

16 14ft + ft 


lift SVh 
18*. 996 
23ft 9ft 
1*ft 9ft 
48ft 32ft 
21ft 124k 
Uft 11 
17 lift 
17 14 

5*ft 3596 
32 22ft 

79k Aft 
15ft 8ft 

ITS 

3lft 17V6 
Atft 39 

7ft Aft 
20ft lift 
38ft TBJk 
3AU 27ft 
A*ft 2196 
25ft 2016 
3394 15ft 
2* 8 


LDSrnfc 
LSI LOB 
UTX 
LaPtMl 
LaZBV 

LodFm 

uxkflft 

Lame. 

Lancosr 

LanaCo 

Looms 

LAADta 

LlllHT 

LcwiiP 

Lad «n 

L«xkJto 

UAfWT 

Lflmt 

LfcCwn 

LUvTiU 

LinBrd 

UncTAt 

UzCWs 

LorwF 

Lotus 

LVOtVQS 


140 X* 8 
.16 J 133 
90 u 70 
JO S3 M 
M 43 404 
92 13 2 

J2 1J 745 


3X0 43 B 

aia 

S3 

J7 J 77 
34 S 1 
304 

JO 14 385 

1413 

220 65 10 

J5 J 1453 

iau a 

2234 

173 


Aft 6 
18 17ft 
11 10ft 
17ft 179k 
48ft 48ft 
21ft 201k 
Uft U 
15ft 15ft 
16ft U 
SOU 50ft 
2SU 27ft 
59k 5ft 
10 10 
7ft 7 
2ft Vk 
2 1ft 
21 20ft 
4A 46 
64k A 
1816 IB 
36ft 35ft 
34 

45ft 43ft 
Wft WV= 
Wk njj 
lift 2Bk 


6ft + ft 
17ft + ft 
10ft— Vi 
17ft + ft. 
48ft + ft 

?£ + * 
15ft 

Wft + ft 
50ft 

27ft— 96 

Ip + ft 

Tft— Vk 

46 — ft 
69k + ft 
lift + ft 
36ft + ft 
34 — ft 
44ft + ft 
2496 
IBft +1 
Uft + ft 


UMoatn 
HtokLow Uft 

15 11 

1696 10ft 
Bft A 
249k 11 
17ft lift 
■ 4ft 
1296 5ft 
IBft 7ft 
20ft 99k 
10ft 5ft 
as 25ft 
31ft 20ft 
15ft 7ft 
30ft 23ft 
13ft 4 
12ft 7ft 
17ft UU 

28 Vs 1796 

24ft 16ft 
37ft 28 
10 7 

15 896 

3496 1 Aft 

29 21 
3ft 196 

15ft 9ft 


16ft 7ft 
66 36ft 


Sain hi Net 

D)v. Vkt 10M Hint. LAW 3 PM. Q. 9B 


12ft 3ft 
Uft Oft 

llji 6 

5Aft 2896 
*ft 5 
10ft 19k 
25V. 8ft 
■ 3ft 
24ft 16 
17ft 12ft 
22ft 10ft 
18ft 14ft 
18 10ft 
9ft 5ft 
Uft 5ft 
7ft 4 
22 1196 

12ft 8 

r 

1596 ft 


15ft HBO 
8U 
216 

2 ft 

& 

596 
696 

lft 
15 

r 

3Vk 
10ft 
2ft 
Uft 
2496 
3ft 
14ft 
1*ft 
796 

5 

5ft 


13 

44 

.10 1J 5 
1294 
73A5 
75 
1*1 
207 

J4 U 1613 
*18 

_ 105 

36 4 J 174 

AA 26 247 
84 
93 
865 

Mr 33 AZ 
169 

.rat A 1163 

ljune 10 «l 


J0 U 4734 
386 
SC 
71 
20 

.10 a n 

1.72 *7 277 

Jfl 13 70 

.141 157 

A 
154 

.14 .9 25 

ra £ 5 

24 

214 

■«2a 29 11 

1.000 43 37 

22 
275 
109 
. >3 

•64 25 318 

130 2811260 
439 
119 

JU J 319 
38 

JU 33 54 

1222 
73A 
31 


J6 J 451 

486 

151 

5A 

IS 

160 22 58 


251 

51*7 

410 

28 

240 

,16 U 737 
2153 
377 
174 
15 
1083 
13 
58 
SSI 
79 
1437 
111 
1204 
7 

401 


3ft 3ft 
17ft lift 
Aft A 
49ft 48 
m 996 
2ft 2Vk 
2496 24ft 
7ft AM 
18Vk 171ft 
lift lAft 
22ft 22 
16 T5V& 
17ft 17 
896 Sft 
13 12ft 
79k 7ft 
21ft 21 
10 99k 

13M 1 3ft 
Uft 12ft 
ft ft 


17ft IbTk 
TAft 16 
Aft 49k 

* * 
18 17ft 
30 29ft 
»’/. 8ft 
7ft 7ft 
Tft Tft 
2ft 2M 
17ft 17ft 
U 1796 
496 Aft 
IBft 1796 
32 32 

21ft 21 
11 10ft 
.Aft AVk 
30» 30 
39k 3ft 
2Aft 25ft 
43 Vs 42ft 
Aft 49k 
30ft 30ft 
24ft ZIft 
1296 129k 
27ft 22ft 
2796 27M 
Uft 13 
7ft lft 


3ft 

Uft + ft 

A 

49 

*9k — ft 
2ft- ft 
24ft + ft 
7Vk + ft 
18ft + ft 
16% + ft 
22 - ft 
16 + ft 

17ft + ft 
8ft + ft 
12ft— ft 
7ft 

21 — ft 

OTk— ft 
13ft 

Uft + ft 

ft 


17>4 + ft 
16ft + ft 
4ft + ft 
2ft— 1k 
fk + ft 
18 +16 
30 

896— ft 
79k- ft 
Tt, 

2ft 

17ft 

1796 

4ft 

IBft + ft 
32 

Tift + ft 
10ft— ft 
69» + Vk 
30ft 

39k + ft 
3A + ft 
43ft +1ft 
4VS + Vk 
3D9k 
24ft 

1296 + 9A 
22ft— ft 
2796 + ft 
13ft— ft 
Tft + ft 


395 

loom 

81* 

228 

2537 

230 85 

768 

JO 3.9 22 

Af 

JO 1J 8 


1I» 3J 170 
734 
760 

.10 J 160 

J8 2J 291 
10 

ra j 2 


15ft lift 
19ft 13ft 
2696 12Vk 


15ft 6 QMS 
*M 3ft Quadra 


a u is 

.u in 2 

M 43 34 


Jt .9 267 
2JB 6J 19 

a u is 

JOr 3 1647 
1.12 43 13 

.Ito 1.1 795 
-SOe 10 1629 

JO 29 107 
92 20 768 

.12 U 96 
50 


1B2 

18 

.16 3* .26 
.12 J lA6 
120 103 2B2 

A0 1J 129 


1316 13 
1396 Uft 
Aft Aft 
21ft 21ft 
13 Uft 
5ft S’6 
lift lift 
17ft 17ft 
13ft 13ft 
Aft 6ft 
32 32ft 
*96 26 
10ft 9ft 
26 25ft 
7ft Tft 
9ft 9 Ik 
16ft 16ft 
2696 26V. 

u- iS! 

19ft 18ft 
23ft 23 
2 1ft 
13 lift 
I Oft Wft 
3196 30ft 

6ft aft 

49k Aft 
10ft 9ft 
S5ft 55 
lift lift 
Aft 49k 
37ft 3694 
lift lift 
19ft 19ft 
24 24ft 


Uft 

13ft 

Aft— ft 
21ft— ft 
Uft— ft 
5ft 
119k 
17*6 

13ft— ft 
AM 
33 
26 

10 ♦ ft 

24 + ft 
7W 

S + ft 
+ ft 


BM— ft 
11 4- ft 

gftis: 

2 + ft 

IF* 

BM + ft 
49k + ft 
10ft + 9k 
55 + ft 
1196- ft 
4ft + ft 
37'i + ft 
lift + ft 

® + ft 
■♦■lft 


SM 2n S/ntreK 31 

18ft lift Syscon JO 1J I 

26ft 8ft SVASDC 3041 

7ft 31k Svstln ISO 

lift Aft 5yslnra 33 

25Vk Uft Svstmt M3 7 


3ft 3 s 3* . — 
18ft IBft 18ft 
9ft 9ft 9ft f ft 

5ft SVs 5M 
10ft 10ft 10ft— ft 
25*-* 25 25 — ft 




10 9ft 
341k 33M 
139k UVk 
AM 4 VS. 
5M 5M 
3M 34k 
49V» 4*16 
2SM 24*2 
IA lift 
221k 21ft 
M AM 
12 119k 

37k 3ft 
139k 139k 
24 24ft 
3ft 3ft 
2ft 2 
12ft lift 
13ft 12ft 
27ft 26ft 
Aft A 
Uft 13ft 
696 Aft 
11M Wft 
896 89k 
Uft IBft 
15ft 15ft 

ft ft 

32V* »M 
10ft 9ft 
12M Uft 
£96 8ft 


HI + M 
33M . 

Uft— ft 

Aft— ft 
5M 

4% + U 
25ft + 9* 
16 + ft 

2196- 96 
Aft + ft 

Sft + * 

13M+6 
2596 + ft 
3M + Vk 
Tft + ft 
12 + ft 
1294 + ft 
27 +1 

13M 

Aft— ft 

lift + ft 
8H 

18ft + ft 

18=5 

196 + Vk 
Sift — ft 
10ft + ft 
12ft 

89k- ft 



* 2ft 
Aft 216 
1196 4 

25ft IBM 
50ft 33 
20V. 12ft 
15V6 AM 
34 12 

7M f ft 
59k 2, 

B9k lft 
8ft AM 
1IU 5ft 
9ft «ft 
279k Wft 
Wft 2Mk 
12ft 7ft 
34 23ft 
30ft 199k 
31ft 20 
179k * 
30ft 18 
14 lft 
AM lft 
I4M AM 
21ft ISft 
S2ft 28ft 
51 Vk Z9ft 
8 Sft 
994 5 

17*k A9« 
20U 15ft 
33ft 19ft 
36ft 19M 
244k 18ft 
57M 39ft 
1 

9ft 496 
17ft 109« 
10ft *96 
13ft Aft 


ra io3 

359 1 3 71 

J3* 

MO 43 5 

.14 1J 120 
J8 Z7 219 
176 

.10 A 1513 


4 

43 

443 

-78b 3J 23 
100 «-J All 
3D 1J 51 
-44 19 205 

rai j * 


I AM + M: 
3M— ft I 
Tft 

31ft 1 
IBft— IM; 
1M 

2991 + ft! 
1791 + M 

T gr’* 

35M + Vk 
lift 

9V» + ft 
5ft 

ISM + M 
16M + ft 
34ft 

6291 + ft 
13ft— ft 
3SM+ M 
20ft 

121k— ft 
17ft 

ISft + V 
2ft + ft 
5ft 

5ft— ft 
494— ft 

7 + ft 
6ft + ft 
2ft 

22 + ft 

38 + ft 

7M + ft 
22ft + M 
3ft— 'i 

27ft + 9k 
7ft 

11M + ft 
IBM + ft 

8 + *6 
32ft ■* ft 
23ft— ft 
15ft + ft 
12ft + 96 
33ft + ft 
12 +16 
17M— ft 

_ _ 29k 

toft 1AM 


1391 * QuakCs 38 14 25 

32ft 1496 QucnUtn 453 

5ft Tft QuertM W 

16ft 8ft Quixote 554 

lift 7ft Ouotm 4089 


U 5 
IBM 12ft 
14ft BM 
14M Aft 
10ft 5ft 
7ft 2M 
33ft 21ft 
2016 12ft 
7ft lft 
23M 17V, 
10ft 5ft 
35ft 259. 
12ft 396 
796 5ft 
20 11 
HU* 7ft 
20ft 9ft 
Uft lift 
16ft 7 
2*96 19 
43ft 2 9 
16 996 

10 3ft 
229k 12M 
17ft lift 
3396 2496 
14ft 11 
13ft BVk 
25ft 1AM 
13 8 

•ft 3ft 


39s Sft 
4ft « 
109. 10 
24 23ft 
46ft 46 

tTfc 17 
ISM 15 

7*9. 1416 
5ft 516 
296 2M 
lft IM 
AM AM 
A 5ft 
5M 59k 
20ft 19ft 
31 31 

*M 9W 
26 25 

28M 28ft 
311k 31M 
Wft Wft 
20ft 20 
11M 10ft 
lft iK 
13M Uft 
IS 1 - 15ft 

•Si. 47ft 
53ft S2M 
496 6M 
7ft 79k 
1596 15ft 
17M 17M 
30ft 30ft 
22M 22M 
22ft 27ft 

St SAM 
5ft 5ft 
5 AM 
17ft 17 
*M 9M 
7ft 7 


10ft + 31 
239.— ft 
46 — ft 
i r* + ft 
15ft 

14ft + Vi 1 
516— ft 
2M— Vi 
IM— ft 
AM— ft 
A + ft 
5M- ft 

309k + ft 
31 

*ft- ft 
25 —1 
2BM 

31M + M 
Wft - ft 
ZB* 

1091—9* 

116 

Uft 

lift— 1ft 
4736 
5296 +2 
49* + ft 

71k + ft 
151k— ft 
17ft + ft 
3036 + 96 
22M 

22ft + ft 

54M-2M 

5ft 

4M— ft 
17—16 
9M 

714 + ft 


1596 

91k JBRsts . 

.16 

1 J 

17 

9VS 

•M 

9ft + Vk 

m 

Vt, Jockom 



230 

59k 

5V4 

SM 

AIM 

25ft Jock Lie 



87 

37ft 

3AM 

3AM 

21 

W96 JamWtr 



187 


1996 

20*4# + 16 

896 

4M JtfMart 



231 

51t 

5 

5 - ft 

239k 

Wft Jertco 

.12 

J 

1210 

22M 

2296 

22*-— to 

716 

3*6 Jonlcbl 

t 


29 

AM 

SM 

6ft 

HIM 

Aik Jnsnhui 



S 

7M 

7M 

7M 

19ft 

9M Junes 



104 

19 

Wft 

19 + ft 

30Vk 

13ft Jtrnfn 

JO 

U 

44 

159k 95ft 15ft- ft 


1896 1*16 + ft 
a a 

21 21M + 96 

W ISM + ft 
1196 HM + W 
99k *9fc + ft 
54M S5M + ft 
39M 41 tI 



32ft Sift PMC 5 1JS U 1» 
5314 m* Paccar Uta 10 *4 

I5M 79b POEFd 130 


30 2991 2*M— ft 

iWA 40 4014 
lift 10ft 1094— ft 


Ifft 106, 
1*M lift 


18 1DM 
20V* 1296 
1196 A 

Sm’Jm 

44M 39 
15ft 7ft 
1A 7ft 
75M 39ft 
AM 2ft 
896 5ft 

a. ,4 ?* 

20M 1TM 

10M Aft 
lAft IBM 
13*6 8M 
2£k 1596 
14ft 7 
20*6 7 

9ft 396 
89- 4 

Aft lft 
Tft IM 
»ft 14 
10ft A 
1AM 10M 
25ft 17ft 
23 UM 
7ft Aft 
18 12ft 
STM 231k 
3l*ft 29ft 
20M 129k 
Wft TM 
31*k 211k 

'R'Ws 

17lk Oft S 
20ft Uft S 
am lift s 

lift 4ft s 
17ft lift S 
15W II S 
2414 
129k 
Aft 
54 
21M 
10ft 
TIM 
30ft IBM 
27ft Wft 
AW 396 
33 20M 

2BM lAlk 
TVS Aft 
21ft 2294 
1916 10 
28ft 8ft ' 
894 5M 
to 3ft 
896 5 

30 1996 £ 

23ft lift S 
27 IP S 
Wft 1*96 S 
Aft 3M S 
7*k Aft 
lift lift 
25 17ft 
8V> 54k 
1896 Sft 
3SVk 29ft 
23ft UM 
171ft 101ft 
Uft 3*16 
496 3*k 

W*6 Tft 

»S M 

Uft 7ft 
Sft 3 ■ 
14 8 

14M Aft 



I .480 13 
-45o 2 A 


8*6 Bft 89k + *k 

Tl, AM 7V» + 9k 

XI 10ft 10W 

21 JO'k 21 

AVk Aft 4 V. 

1A ISft 15ft — ft 

Wft !3Vk 13M— Vk 


SVk 5ft— ft 
14Vk 14M + ft 
12M 12ft + ft 
Sft 916 + ft 
7ft 796 + ft 
3ft 3ft + to 
299k 29ft + ft 
19 19 

lft lft 
20ft 2fift 
BM 8M + '6 
29 29 + Vk 

9Vs 10ft + M 
SVk Sft 
14ft 14ft 
SVk 8VS — ft 
10ft 10ft + ft 
17ft 17ft 
7 7 — ft 

Z7 279k + M 
39ft 3*ft— ft 
15*6 to 
AM AM— ft 
21ft 21V; — ft 
lift 14ft 
28ft 28ft 
Uft Uft 
8M 9 + ft 

23ft 24ft +1 
10 10 — ft 

AM Aft 
10*6 I Oft 
19ft 50ft +1 


1096— ft 
T2M 

Uft + ft 
7 

17ft 

18 + Vk 
42M +IM 
10ft— Vk 
17 +Ift 
72ft + Ik 

SVk + ft 
Aft + Vk 
77ft + ft 
19M— ft 
BV* 

Wft — ft 
125k + ft 
24 Vk— Vi 
7ft + ft 
BV. 

Sft + ft 
5*4— Vk 
IVk 
196 

2Dft— ft 
7M + Vk 
UM— to 

19 + Ik 

19Vk— ft 
AVk 

TAW + ft 
34 Vk — M 
II + ft 

law + w 

9ft 

2SVk f ft 
11 + ft 

Sft- ft 
IBM + ft 
1396 
19 
5 

UM 

lift + ft 
UM— ft 
11M- W 

29k— Vk 
48ft— ft 

199k 

SW + to 
Uft + '6 

Ik 


14 8 

2596 13 
7Vk 3M 
28M 12% 
BM 2M 
12ft 5M 
22 10ft 
34ft SOW 
12ft AM 
25 Uft 
1 9ft SM 
4V. lft 
20 Bft 
X7ft 9ft 
Uft 3 
W'4 8ft 
13V. Aft 
28ft 15ft 
WVk 5*k 


Uft Aft 
30ft 20 


24ft 18 
24'* 13ft 
20ft 5 
23ft 10ft 
13M 796 
291k 14V* 
53W 239k 
25ft UM 
Uft Bft 
28ft 21V* 
IT A 
22ft lift 
14ft bft 
Uft 9ft 
A 2ft 
32 2TM 
4W ITk 
A 2ft 
33ft lift 
5Vk 3ft 
22ft 10ft 
37ft 25ft 
25ft Uft 
25 WM 
48ft 32*6 
22 Wft 
20ft Tft 
13 Aft 
AV* 3V. 


,1A 76 372 

24 
2504 
392 
1 

72 

I 2471 
403 

* U ft 
Si 

TO 

T 89 

32 
134 

A4 24 187 


17* 

225 

AO 1J 145 


JO 34 153 
244 

JA* J 222 


1j09T 4.1 5 

1J0 Z* 127 
ra J 774 
.I5r 13 104 

IM O ti 


J8 J 802 
.12 23 114 
-30e U 531 


9ft 9ft 
27 25ft 
3ft 3ft 
liM ISft 
3W 3M 
Uft lift 
1]V» 11 
33, 32ft 
BM Sft 

17ft I7M 

10'- 9ft 
UM Wft 
3ft 3W 
9M 9'» 
10ft 15ft 
27 2Aft 
7M T't 
SVk 7M 

12M 12M 

lift II** 
8lk 89k 
2dVa 24 


9ft- 't 
27 +lft 
3ft - to 
i4M + to 
3H 
Uft 
lift 

32WtM 

23ft + ft 
17ft 

2'6 + ft 
•ft 

W'k + '6 
JW 

V't 

10W— Vk 
Wft , 
79* + to 
8 * ft 

7 

UM 

lift + to 
BM- to 
2# — M 


VU 
VUSI 
VMX 
Valid Lo 
VOIFSL 
VOINTI 120 
VonDus AO 
Veruell 
Vent rex 
Vieora .12* 


PM 496 
WVk 7U 
12 4 

20ft A 
22M 8ft 
42ft 2b Vk 
18ft lift 
15ft 4M 
AVk 2M 
28ft 13ft 
UM 7 
WVk 91k 
20ft 1396 
12*k 5ft 
22 Wft 


25ft 179k 
lAft 10 
13*6 Sft 
25ft 17M 
24 Vk WVk 
lAVs 10M 
996 A 
ISVk 79k 
17*6 5ft 
10ft Sft 
Wft 5M 
21ft 15W 
I7VS 5M 
34ft 74 Vk 
AM 3 
13to 3 
48ft 30 W 
ISM 7M 
10*6 4to 
7*6 3Vk 
24ft I4M 
19ft lift 
I9%k 14 
301k 21ft 


896 IM XeOec 
Uft » Xtoar 
17ft iau xiaes 


23M Wft YlcwF k 24 275 

c: _ 

30Vk JftZenLbs A0 13 3099 

13ft TOto Zieffier .48a 39 • 

47*6 31 ZhmUl 134 3J 122 

llVk 396 Zivtsd 71 

15ft Ato Zomtvn J8I .7 2 a 


15'k 15ft 
7*6 T 6 
14 139k 

13 12M 

26ft 24*6 
52ft 57 
23ft 22*. 
9 Sft 
TAM 2*\k 
7ft 7 
I7 Vt lT'i 
7VI 4M 
U to II to 
4ft 4ft 
2bto 2b*k 
T Ik 2M 
3W Vt 
2A’.k 7 1 
4to iM 
IBM I7M 
34 35’k 

23 21ft 
24M 24M 
42M 42’k 
IBM UM 
ITVk 1TM 
10ft 10ft 
5M «to 


Sft 59* 
lift 11 
4 ft 4 'k 
Aft A'k 
ISVk 15 ft 
37M 37ft 
IBM 17ft 
5 4 M 
5M 4-1 
17M 16'k 
7ft 7Vk 
U U 
19 W 19 
7ft 7to 
IBft WVk 


7M + M 
14 + ft 

12M + ft 
2Aft— ft 
52 to + ft 
23ft +lft 
Eft — to 
24 V* 

7 - to 

1716 

Ti + to 
ITS 
4 -. 

26'* + ft 
21* + ft 
Ito + to 
24'.; ♦ to 
4 *» + v. 
IBM + ft 
to + ft 
22 + ft 
2 -iM 

42M + ft 
ISM + Vk 
12 V; + to 
10ft 

4 to— to 


5ft + v* 
11 — 6 * 
4'k 

Aft + to 
lP.k + ft 
37M + to 
17ft— to 
4ft— ft 
41* — to 
17 to +1 
7 ft 

73 + ft 

191- 

7M + V* 

lew — ft 


IBft *■ ft 
Uft + ft 
•ft — 

22 +9* 
25ft + v* 
l Ito ■*■ to 

7 + to 

17 + ft 

W'k 
7 

IIS— ft 
ISft + ft 
10ft 

Kto f ft 
4 — to 

ift + ft 
42ft — Vk 

13M 

SM + to 

a * to 

ISvt 

12ft » <4 
17V* + ft 

23 + ft 


2M JM 2M— to 
7W 4'k 7to f ft 
13 TJM Uft — ’•* 


Uft 22W 23ft + Ik 


JAW 23W Uft *1 
l?ft Uft lift — ft 
41ft 41ft 41ft— ft 
596 5V? 5W ■*■ to 
II 1096 II + ft 



bain iiaurks are unattlclal. Yean / tiietit and low: reflect 
tneareviow* Slmreksoiirt the current week. out not tnetamt 
fnjflTno My, wneito a vlll or stack dividend amounting io 25 
eorcont or more nos Been Mid. flto voor'i nioh-k>»< range ond 
dividend ore shown tor me new slock only, unless otnerwise 
noted, rales of dividends ore annual disbursements Msec on 
me latest declaration, 
a — aivKHma oisd exlrols). 
p — onrwfli ravtol dtoMond plus sloe* oWidenO 
e — llauioating dividend, 
da — coiled. 

0— new yearly low. 

e— dividend declared or paid in preceding 13 months, 
p — dividend In Canadian tunas, wbleette ISft nwi-r esidenee 

1A». 

1— dividend declared otter split-up or slack dividend. 

1 — dividend sola sub *eor, omtnea. doierreo. or no uciicn 
taken at lares dividend meeting, 
k— dividend declared or paid mis year, an accumulative 
Issue wtm dividends in arrears. 

a— new Issue tnlhc pad 52 weeks- The nign- low range Begins 
with me start oi rradlna. 
no — n**f dar deliver*. 

P/E — priewarninas ratio. 

r — dividend declared or oeva In prcccaing 12 momris, oiui 
sloe* dividend 

S — stock, spill. Dividend begins with dale of spin. 
sB — soles. 

t — dividend paid fn stock In preceding 12 momtii estimated 
caw value an er-dlvidena or ei-dlsiriautlan acte 
v — now yoariv high, 
v—traa mg boned. 

vf — In WmkrugtCY or receiverkiuaor Mtrtg roorgamrea un- 
der me Bankruptcy Act, or securliles assumed bn such com- 
panies. 

wd— when aisfriduied. 
wi— wMMttvea 
ww -- with vworrpnls. 
v — ea-dlvldend or e. -rlgbtv 
«dJs — e*-fllsirlButlon. 

wtHVAut warrants, 
v — ex-dlviopflo and sales In Ml. 
vW— yield, 
z — sales In full. 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1985 



PEANUTS 


MV SRAMfA IS A 
"FREQUENT FLIER" 50 
YESTERDAY HE WENT 
TO THE AIRPORT^ 



THE LADY BEHINP THE 
TICKET COUNTER SAIG> 
"OH. YOU'VE ALKEAPY 
FLOWN A HUN PREP 
THOUSAND MILES" 



* "YOU PONT HA/E TO 
MAKE THIS TRIG " SHE 
SAIR/MU CAN 60 HOME!" 
SO HE WENT HOME! 



VOUR WHOLE FAMILY'S 
LUHRT? MARGE.. 


BOOKS 



BLOND EE 


ACROSS 52 Critical time 

2 stuff fora matador 

5 La Opera 58Vipere 

House 60 Seer’s card 

10 Black, to Blake Pelvic bones 

14 Hawaiian port Republic, 


15 Garth in formerly 

“Middlemarch"’ M ^ renc 5 ‘ 

16 Pram pusher 63 

H 64 Sensed 

(iSttio - SgSK** 

19 Coach a thief 67 "Cogito, 

20 Daydream sum’ ’ : 

23 Watering holes Descartes 

24 

27 Like from 1 Master cook 

the blue 2 Trickier 

30 Loc. of Nigeria 3 
K Spanish wave 4 g rgeregi0n: 

33 Shankar, the E ** 

sitar player g Sin ging styles 

34 Kind of energy g Camper’s era 

37 °* 7 Hebrew letter 

Thailand 8 Autumn fallei 

38 Cause for a suit 9 “East of 

41 Ind. governor Eden” girl 

42 Annoy 10 Pass, as a bQl 

43 Acorn sources 11 King 


DOWN 

1 Master cook 

2 Trickier 

3 Half a court- 
game name 


10 / 30/86 

22 Stupor: Comb, 
form 

25 Neighbor of 
Siberia 

26 Most rational 

27 Garden spots 

28 Taxpayer’s 
garb in 

cartoons 

29 Too easy 

30 Elec, units 

31 Conifers 

34 Ishmael’s 

skipper 

35 Ripped 

36 “Son 

gun!" 

39 Amulet 

40 Start of 
evening light 

46 Code signal 
48 Red dye 



BEETLE BAILEY 


WHATfe WRONG 
WITH THE 
COMPUTER* 



ANDY CAPP 


44 gestae ■ 

45 Actor Vigoda 

46 He portrayed 
Mr. Chips 

47 Less 
trustworthy 

49 Oviedo is here 


4 Large region in 49 Basket fiber 

E Asia 50 Grace , 

5 Singing styles “Jane Eyre" 

6 Camper’s craft character 

7 Hebrew letters 51 Following 

8 Autumn faller 53 Abbreviated 

9 “East of catchall 

Eden” girl 54 Western 

0 Pass, as a bQl alliance: Abbr. 

1 King 55 Suffix with cell 

Hammurabi 56 High-pitched 


Hammurabi 56 High-pitched 
subject sound 

12 “ nation 57 Pawnee’s 

under God . . dramatic rite 

13 Writer Hentoff 58 Spanish 

21 Something to landlady 

tip 59 Unhappy 



morning, jaoc .* s 
gqgi pnt VBB, BS^UriFULr/^ 


G 4 WD,TT*S 
ARRIVED - 


( inhenM: woli® in 

> -AT OPEN IMG TWE -< 

SHE wishes rrw«s 
, CLOSINGTWE— > 


« IMS Out, MunxHmpaim. Ltd] 
out. bf N*m Ammci Syndicate | 


|l*30 


WIZARD of ID 




NOTHING HAPPENS IN 
CAHMINCROSS 

By Benedict Kiefy; $16.95; 253 pages. 
David R. Godine, 306 Dartmouth Street, 
Boston, Mass : 02116. 

Reviewed by John Gross 

C ARMINCROSS. where nothing happens, 
is a small town in Ulster. Mervyn Kivan- 
agh is a wandering son of Canmncross (Catho- 
lic as opposed to Protestant Canmncross) who 
has beat teaching in the United States^at a 
women's college in “the semi-Decp South” — a 
well-cushioned e.\Be in “a never-never land of 
dogwood and forsythia and. chipmunks and 
young people.” He has also acquired and lost 
an American wife, who has left him and gone 
to live in New York, with a boyfriend in fitful 
attendance. 

Mervyn is haunted by dark thoughts of 
bombs, rubber bullets, political murder, politi- 
cal mutilation, te r rorism and counterterrorism 
— not only in Ireland, but with the Irish 
example, naturally enough, uppermost in bis. 
mind. The year is 1973 (though as Kiely warns 
us, “the earnest student of atrocities will detect 
anachronisms” — a number of later incidents 
are mentioned) and over the previous four 
years a regular diet of violence has become part 
of the Northern Ireland scene. 

Os his journey home, Mervyn samples some 
very different responses to the new Troubles — , 
one man’s gallant freedom fighter is another 
man's fanatical yahoo. And as the arguments 
bubble away, the sense of ominous possibilities 
grows stronger. 

Even readers who know of Kjely’s comic gift 
from his previous novels may find it bard to see 
mud] scope for comedy in such material Yet 
the first thing to say about “Nothing Happens 
in Canmncross” is that it is often brilliantly " 
funny, and not just in its more boozy or hois' 
t exons episodes, that it brings a scaring wit to 
the grim events it describes 
That wit is above all to be found at wade, in 
Mervyn’s talk and thoughts, in the sudden 
leaps of his tumbling, fast-flowing stream of 
consciousness. His mind is packed with quota- 
tions, pern songs, learned aQuaoos, running 
gags, all ends of odd scraps and echoes — a 
mind where John Milton keeps company with 
Dolly Parton, where virtuoso mimicry and in- 
spired wordplay come naturally. 

He is also a master of abraave irony, whose 
mock-rhetoric acquires a rhetorical, almos t po- 
etic force of its own. A bomb has been planted 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


□Q0E3 E353CK3E3 ID3CS3 

on do Honso □□□□ 

OC0QO0d[3HnOS!3QEI 

bsd aaaaa aaasa 

□3Q3 □□□ 

BQnnaaasnaaniQa 

BCJOBB (ZJC303 □□□ 

□naa aaaoo as na 

BSD SQUID SIHDBB 
BQDoaniBQDaaQaB 
BOBU G30I33 

□Bonn aanan dob 
BE aEsnaaanaaEinD 
BOBO EJ3BH1CDC3 BOOB 

□cbs aaaoB sana 


“was not asleep ^ uansi&£ ’ k ; 

1st unit fails to phonc lhwg * 

the localpopulaltM g* that atf- 

otter unit tes.p'Uj * 141 peroctrator 

Of action: “Should one L.-ToercciEi' 

not re membe r what is not ju-.t a 

tor has recently P er P c Y^”_ comment 

merry tongue-twister. JSrudixiuacv 
on both the action itself 
the flat or eupbemisuc words « uo *- 
it in bulletins and communiques. 

But then even a word like 

rffS Shis black humor, far from di«anun| 

us from horror, is w bring ^ a Lilted 

vividly, to overcome the mildness ofay-ilicu 

response. ; / 

' John Gross is on the staff of The Se* * crk 
Times. 

BEST SELLERS 

n,VialoitT»n 

throughout ate UaiKt&aZ. Wo**«n hJ jtc tu* ikewur . 
oomc vwi wc. 


FICTION 


Ijm «<Av 
Wttk VtJJ* 


1 TEXAS, bv James A. Mkhcner ; — * 

2 LAKE WGBEGON DAYS. b> Garmon ^ 

KjdHor — t 

3 CONTACT, by Cart Saian.. ■ 1 

5 ^^T^^HARRV MIGHT. _ 

6 TOURIST" b> Anne 

7 KSs: by J*d6e Coffin — * 

8 GALAPAOM.byKsrr Von«*iii . ... - «- 

9 THE TWO MRS. GRENVILLES, by 

Doomnicfc Duane ? 

10 SKELETON CREW, bv Stephe n King .... 6 

11 THE IMMIGRANTS’ DAUGHTER, by 

Howard Fas* _ j, 

12 LONESOME DOVE, by Larry McMurtn. 10 


. react Sankra 

IS THE RED FOX. by Anibooy Hyde — .... 

NONFICTION 


MacLatne — 

3 1ACOCCA: An Amobtogiapby. by Leu 

lacocca with Wifitam Nonk 

4 YEAGER; An Awobfcvcqfty. by Chock 

Yeager and Leo Janos . - 

5 GODDESS, by Anthony Sommers .... 

6 HOUSE, by Incy Kidder : 

7 LIVING WITH THE KENNEDYS. by 

.Maids CbdEs ; — — 

8 ON THE ROAD WITH CHARLES KUR- 

ALT. by Charles Knrah . — 

9 I NEVER PLAYED THE GAME, by 
Ho w ar d Coach with Pner Bonvtnur 

10 LAST WISH, by Betty RoKa 

11 A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE, by 

Tom Pcscn — 

12 RE-INVENTING THE CORPORA- 
TION. by John NaidnU and Patricia Abac- 




GROUND, by JL Anlhooy Ln- 






MUCH, by 


5 WEBSTER'S NINTH NEW: COLLE 
10/30/85 GIATE DICTIONARY 


NORTH 

* A K Q 
OKHtl 
0 Q73X 

♦ A 7 

WEST EAST 

»!!’’* II Hit- 

0A9IS OlJf • 

*— AKQN43 

SOOTH 
*H7< 

V Si 
9 184 

4> J I 8 6 S 1 


Hie o antract of tfaree dubs 
doubled was, of coune, a df : 
master. After a spade lead, oom 
dummy. South tried tins dub 
ace. He eventually lost twi) 
tricks in each red suit and four 
tramp tricks in eadx red suit 
and four trump tricks for £ 
penalty of TOO. 


Ntiftar sMb 

w*b<H P 


mdnenbln. Tbs 


I* Pm 10 . 

DbL Pan* . Paaa 

P*as a • Pas* 

DbL 3* Pur 

DbL paw pass 

»w Rd Ow spnda aigbr. 



chvi 





































Page 19 


OOKs 




INTERNATIONAL HERAtD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1985 


- . 




SPORTS 


Jy-i-/ 




i-di 


:■-■= \S$ 

■ C^SSi 
-V. '■'£?■$ 


I 5 s;>t 




"•"-i'lrr'r;- 


■ 4:,u ^u 

>s, ini»* • 

; ‘•••■■wi.Cfc 



eWorld Cup Bandwagon The Bovah: Better Than f Best’ 

Tn^itTiQinfitcrmU Tib** scaredy to notice, and some were isn referee and was ordered behind the uanrajal teams players, may 

narwmt *■- *- . .. x -., , v 


iGMD^^T— plainly thunderstruck- - wire fencing. 

Bui the anthem plxycd on. No Opponents coming to Australia, 
st'co^fe^.#^^c-fi^dy. one, presumably, bad the presence he boasts, shock! be afraid even u> 
Tfefe^ k r am^ fftg sa boaMtlie of jmnd to pkkniifte needle frotn get offibeplaw. Stupid prattle, the 
orki<l^i4i^ragon for Mexico the record, whose ptavifig, we are more insuhmg when accompanied 
-irindp^£^cpami«Btet8eou( told, was a Eachrudan** mistake. by insensitive tochnkad en-or, 
desutjefio u^ Q. hoa-tfre Tnuds — I hope Israelis eta be&eve that. But in the sporting sense, the 
t Iktertd-f^bjinklers. I bopewehsweacs readied such man I most fed for out of this 

AiBtra^^^ped tfa most on- a point d susp*dtMsie» that a 
>iy dangef^ wedt.^ nation forged ourof the remnants _ 


never forgive a New York travel 
agent who fouled up their visit to 


of destriicfiatrict hast- the Thuds — 
ait Iktoedv^bjnnders. 


t. Stupid prattle, the The supporters, dispaarhed to 
when accompanied Saint John, New Brunswick, had to 
cchniod en-or, watch the match on TV' because it 


hoty danger tat week mukn fotgod pur of the naonanu And die game itself, which acto- 

therc m jpftfixstBM stood the of Hftks's atrocities (and still pur- Some almost doubled ally put rS mio the finals at 

teams, SOeeaDOOaxn green and gold. fixing Nazis) is prevented from ' the Hondurans’ expense, was also a 

■ __ wm>g the othtt* cheek and seeing up at the fann y side of uW tor the plavm. 

Pad -HlTriJIi'fi noming premeditated about an er- r * The Honduran team baggage 

w Mr t vUCiu roria theomhack. tbp uuwr fodAratinn’o went astray in Miami; alternative 

" I . r ~ ~ fcad is ambition eaongh in in- w wccer leaeranon 8 ^ ^ poxdased ^ ^ 

to* wuams ;1> de btoe urf ttnwSoml m utmost Arab jj^ .L Jota’i (Ncwfoundtand). and the 

' and Jew mio the nation’ ’s team. Pd uluc “AiaiaKe, Outers payers stitched their own national 

Afl werepname , ■■ tomtom wager the Iswefi player orfexed off , v _ badge onto them 

j*"?* 4boon “ "** boffing from Seemed scarcely to Still, it's not everyone who actu- 

ba»janu>gAa«etadd«andtJot . , ally fancies plaving in Mexico, 

mg ihOTromcfamTd Aw 12 days from mask echoing m Us ears. notice, and some were Bwnd Schnaer d&sh'i 

anw-, when nine playq* were Yet the drawn ma t ch ended Isra- f , , , , , On ihenight that West Germanv 

b< ^A*SS®; WH ^ l f5ff ' ' d ’l WQri 5 Cup ' . . plainly thunderstruck- surrendered in lifelong unbeaui 

The Axutxwan anthem was car* Ausirafia, provided n beau New record in World Ciro qualifiers, 

rectly obsm^ Television cameras Zealaod on Sunday, wffl go for- Schuster xfae enfant imible was at a 


earlier, ^ieu nine pj^ta> were 
booked and two were sent off. 

The Anstre&m anthem was cor* 


by insensitive technical error. watch the ™irh on TV' because it 

But in the sporting sense, the was actually played, and lost, SOO 
man I most fed for out of this miles away in Saint John's, New- 

— foundland 

c _ And die game itself, which actu- 

some almost doubled aSy put Canada mio the finals at 

the Hondurans' expense, was also a 

up at the fanny side of triaiforihepiawn. 

r J The Hondaran team baggage 

the soccer federation’s ^ “ Myrn: aitenaiive 

shirts were purchased m Saim 

litde mistake; others »«*S22&2Z 

seemed scarcely to ^““^Saj^uioacm- 

*• i ally fanchs plaving in Mexico, 

notice, and some were Bond Schuster doesn't. 

• . , , _ _ On zhe night that WesiGermany 


By Thcunas BosweU 

H-ashingtiW Pmt Senu e 

WASHINGTON — Thanks. 
We needed that. 

After drug trials and a stupid 
strike following on the tedium of 
1984. baseball was ready for the 
Kansas City Royals. We needed 
the most preposterous postsea- 


but when it comes to heroes even the Dodgers could bea; 
they're our Lind of guys. them over a long fair season? 

Whoever thought ihe nation's Sometimes it's oetter when the 
sixth-graders vk-ould be able to wara doesn't win. 
pass a spelling bee on Sabcrha- The Royals' owner doesn't 
gen, Gubicza. Quisenbeny, Lei* have himself drawn around his 
brandi md Concepcion? * ballpark on a chariot of beer 
Lei’s be honest. Could the kegs, nor does he have an odious 
Royals have won the Series if commercial jingle blaring over 
p Thai Ate St. Louis die PA system between pitches, 
broken a microscopic Royals Stadium is noi a tacky 
Vince Coleman's knee? testimonial to the glories of ped- 
e silly. Tito Landrum, dling beer. It’s a beautiful bail- 
led .360, produced only park full of water fountains, 
is in the whole Series. The Royals' manager doesn't 
i can create that many in denigrate teams before he plays 
e-riddled game. them and then deny bis cheap- 

the Royals have won shot quotes until they're played 
he fine work of Joaquin back to him on a tape recorder. 
t No way. Thev should He docs not push blame toward 
Cardinal astronaut a full his players and away from him- 
self. He doesn't accuse umps of 

Kansas Citv haw won deliberate prejudice when there’s 
Don Denkinger? Mavbe ao of it He doesn't 3av 

tavbe not, too Si. Louis 00 d* chann for ^ D3Uon ^ TV 
ike it never recovered cameras and, once he gets back 
American League um- 10 bis office, bad- mouth the team 
i call m Game 6. w hich that just beat him. 
adoff Roval reach base When Dick Howser of the 
ith inningof a 1-0 came. Royals makes a hard decision 
s Citv won 91 regular- ™ £*f second-guessed nation- 
rnes and had to soueere «? de : ^ ^ a u hl,le »]- 

m stones to do it. It had dl « * °" e 5 P° l for , an h °“ r and * 
-best record in baseball P° lnel £ humorously tells any- 

s about right. °° e * d “ 

,.r . _ . what he did and whv he d do it 

ason we like the Royals, ^nin 
on their triumph will B Z7' ... 

aseball Tans so much eagf to hke 

ough the winter than a George Bren, Frank While and 
victor- would have, is McRae the sou! of the 
re of 'the people who team since 1973 - are hard- 
o reallv carkabout ial- nosed, honest and smart. Thev 
at Lhe Blue Javs. Cardi- P la >’ hurt. And they ve swal- 

lke©,. Mets aid mavbe ^ ' 6 - 
T7, 78, 80. 81 and T54 without 

losing their confidence, drive or 
' leadership. 

Dan Quisenbeny not only is 
jdfa’ the best relief pitcher of his lime, 
but a gentleman who minimizes 
;‘;jV his importance, mounts wbenev- 
er he lets down his mates (whom 
SLg. he considers the “real players") 
p? and is a truly funny fellow* 

. ” r Some Royals have wou tough- 
* v*5 1* *-■'.* er contests than baseball games. 

* *f}f JR Willie Wilson went to jail behind 

Sf ,i: i * ' ’ a drug rap and came back a 

<%.» If -=?T |Bi« stronger man. Lonnie Smith has 

-t /* beaten 3 bad cocaine habiL 

r*igV^: ® For at least the last 10 years. 

dle Roy** 5 have concentrated as 
muc b o° building a team with 
\ c boracter as they have on amass- 

jf*- if »]*? ing talent or signing free agents. 
Ty . ej 7 *%jj| Many times, like the Bal- 
Wfasjfjt!; iWi dmo ^ c Orioles whom they re- 
fl sem b*e. they have narrowly 

failed and been told they would 
k ^ never be world champions until 

* they had more swagger, more 

\[J '. musc * c “<1 Ies ® good humor. 

'JL V^a* Too soon ihe Royals will have 

£■ 10 begin replacing some of the 
KSf 35-and-over crowd that has giv- 

jafclp* * en *be club its tone: John 
'^rtffiP r • Wathan, Greg Pryor. While, 

* *»HE JjF***). lorg, McRae, Jorge Orta. Then, 
V like the now inert Orioles, they 

*• ~ . may find how mysteriously diffi* 

-. ■> ^ ^ v ^ cult it is to build a team that is 
aL 5 i significantly better than any ob- 
. jective analysis would indicate. 

V ^ r ; Whether the Kansas City 
;■ Royals are the best team in base- 

MiwunMd Pmu iniBTTx*ond ball is a question of definition, 

amid a snowstorm But that they represent what is 
; City on Monday, best in baseball is beyond doubt. 


son in history to end in the The Tarp Thai Aie St. Louis 
crowning of the marvelous, aw- hadn't broken a microscopic 


reedy observed. Tdeviaon cameras Zealand on Sunday, wffl go ror- 
then mnned to the Smr of-David want m me # * for a ni»« 


i panned to the Star of-Daral ward to meet Scotland for a place Oceania/Israd qualifying group is secret address somewhere in Oua- 
jfc .h ad . . . rod ■ the m die finals. VenJmHen. Ionia. His family is lying low after 

ms of "Drmtadfland, Deatscfa- Were d not for the «fionc mouth- His Wodd Cup is over too, Basque terrorist threats, 

I IlMinr ATUe 7 * RTTmA amiKl L*«. a-.l. » _ t- •_ — -.i _ - .«• m aw 1 


fuL spooky, lucky Royals as win- 
ners of the World Series, 

Are they- the worst team ever 
to take the Series? Let’s hope so; 
these guys deserve to be remem- 
bered Was theirs the greatest 
never-say-die comeback perfor- 
mance in baseball history? Let's 
pretend it was. It’s a fact that no 
Series winner ever before sur- 
vived six win-or-go-home games. 

Stop that whispering out 
there. We’re trying to forget the 
'81 Dodgers, who won five must- 


bone on Vince Coleman's knee? 
Don't be silly. Tito Landrum, 
who batted J60, produced only 
three runs in the whole Series. 
Coleman can create that many in 
one havoc-riddled game. 

Could the Royals have won 
without the fine work of Joaquin 
Andujar? No way. They should 
vote the Cardinal astronaut a full 
share. 

Could Kansas City have won 
without Don Denkinger? Maybe 
so. but mavbe not, too. St. Louis 


stranw of “Deatschland, Deatsch- Were it not for the kfioric mouth- His Wodd Cup is over too, 
landueber ABes” filled, the sunlit- mgs of Frank Arok, Australia's doubtless with much relic/. Be- 
st ^bwn . ^ manager, no erne could blow the tween them, Australians, Israelis 

Young tsndi pbyois, a genera- technical fame pas oat of proper- and New Zealanders (and at odd 
£K®away£nam those whosesensi- dtm. rimes Jin Hen’s own Taiwanese de- 


win games before the Series ever looked like it never recovered 
began and then lost the first two from the American League um- 


Witiesnaisthawbeeatiidy devas- 
tated by ibeplayzag of the German 
anthem in Braefi honor, stayed 


One is tenoned to say his country 
New Zealanders (and at odd ^ hTTn.r.y.n when, aftar 
tunes Jin Hen s own Taiwanese dc- trm\ r r™- ... r .- m*! 

nut thi- Kan rv.rr hirm 1A ‘ COnnS 8°*“ ‘ OT CVOT OUC 


rigid and ttok. 
•• lhe theme w 


lhe theme went on. 

Australia's own boys, doubtless 


TIk trouble is that Arok, a Yugo- fenders) pot the ball past him 34 
Slav of Hungarian a«racliS£ dura - m average. *oon era 

poMsabcyt^g the other ado limsjnpme. guS ridS £e iirito 

trying to mtnmdate them m any And if Jin Hen returned the fall 

possible way.” guy, we should remember Chen “^L-harM 

His men, he says, are “mean and Sing-An, who scored Taiwan’s soli- laJESK-SS 

rW - w-V-nc hKnc-tf «r?o~t Hungary against the Neibcr lands 


fair-minded speuts as we vicious dogs.” He calls himself “the tary goal in 
all Aussies to be, were ffivid- biggest and dirtiest Australian Not so m 


■ „ „ f . earKcr in the tournament, simply 
the winning »s the ^ nmster the will to strive 


chanvimsL’* As a mean and vicious taking part Hondurans wiU vouch 

vniith he wm <a*nr nfT 17 tinv>« wnA fnr rtw» fOT Victory when IIS OWnqnallfica- 


:i KcV.Itfjf; 
~;i' ftvktiiMa 
ouif h 

- v auwr i 

*■'= 7 «SE 

^ hnvv \)i 

•'•iwciioire 

• V-URfafc. 

■ 1 '• J \wiiibJ, 
t - T1 V iral-f 

vMi Mlsfnu® 


BfflM Sdindw Some B dmost <toubkd up at the youth he was sent off 17 times, and for that. 

ftumy ride of' their soccer federa- this month in Td Aviv he shouted Some of them will, anyway. 
... J oo-great expectations? tion’s Bade ntis t i t far . oriiers seemed mean and vicious abuse at the Ital- Honduran soccer supporters, and 

SCOREBOARD 

Football . Baseball 

Selected U.S. (>negeG)nfemweStaiM&ig8 Worid Series Snmmaiy 


>IO TIN 

Contorenca All GamM 
WLT«»OPWLTJ>hW - - . 

■<xrt < 0 0 Ilf «4 7 0 8 382 *7 Florida 

Ohio SI. 3 I 0 180 u 8 1 0 234138 GaarWa 

lUbiois 3 I 0 123100 A 3 0 W8W Auburn 

MIcMoan 3 1 0 118 33 8 I 0 lfO 4 AISBama 

Mlramota 3 \ 0 W SS S 2 0 2M 99 ToniiMM 

Purdue 130 MBS' 3 8 0 191304 USU 

Mich. St. 1 3 0-78120 3 4 0 105153 MlntetfaxH 

Indiana 130 SS119 4 30 17019* Kantacky 

NrthwUm 130 44 110 I40Ht 109 VanderiW 

Wisconsin 0 4 0 50111 3 4 0183148 MISS. SL 

PACIFIC-10 

Conference ATI Gomes 
- WLTPtsOPWLTPtsOP 
UCLA 4 1 0 153 04 8 1 1 24Q150 Baylor 

WBStmatn 3T0 0080 430 137 T34 sf*u 

jL South- CaJ 210933033012997 Artonas 
^Ariz. Sr. 2 1 D 82 58 5 2 0 J8010S Texas ASM 

ArUona 2 1 0 52 52 5 2 0 157 02 Texas 

Oregon 2 2 0 134113 34 0 190234 Rica 

Oregon Sf. 2 2 0 44137 3 4 0 117221 - Houston 

Wash. St. 240148125 2 8 0 215317 Texas Tech 
Stanford 1 30 711» 2 5 0 188312 TCU 

CoMlomta 1 5 0 10215& 3 5 0 10*205 - 


SOUTHUASTEMM Tulsa 

CoaOSrenee Alt Games W. Tex. 51 

WLTPtsOPWLTPtsOP WleMta*. 
3 00 73 32 88 1218101 UMMto St 

- 2 1 1 W4 80 5 1 1 178108 <"*“« **■ 
2 18 02 'JPF 81 O 238113 1 '«nols 

.2 1 8.74 52 5 20 107100 OrafcO 
2 1 0 84 51 11 2 127112 1 

2 1 0 50 27 4 1 0 99 41 

- 1 20 54 97 33 1 131184 

1 20 39 55 4 3-0134110 Air Fves 

03 1 47137 2 5 T 111218 Utah 

0 3 0-50 90 53 0 107102 Brio. YD0 
SOUTHWEST Ho wall 

Conference All Gams Colo. St. 

WLTPtsOPWLTPtsOP SaDteg 5L 
500 1«1 50 7 1 0 214 91 Tx- Cl Paso 
.-310 15101 420 191120 New Mas. 

3 10 141 49 8 i 0214 31 Wyoming 
'3 1 8 139 9T 5 202X5141 

2 10 73 73 42013»UO 
2 20 107141 3 40 173278 

04 0 77181 T8O 183348 p^, 

040 81113 34 fl 142173 ftorvom 
04 0 40174 3 4 0 118221 prtowto. 


MISSOURI V ALLAY WT^J 1 

Conference AM Gomes *T UTID 
W L T PS OP W LT PfsOP 
2 00 75 41 3 5 0 M#287 

2 I 1 100 121 4 3 1 18S 193 
.2 10 M 88 350 143203 

1 1 1 39 53 4 22 153130 ■>«»* P**4* 

1 1 0 44 39 3 4 0 143177 !f rB "*! 

1 20 81-48 4 4 0 370 180 ”**“ 

111 8157 450 184 182 Wn *°° ** 

WH5TERN ATHLATIC 

. Cooferenoe All Gomes 
WLTPWOPWLT PtsOP n r , „, 7. 1tL 
30 0218 59 800 323 98 
4 10 175 1® 82 0 288228 

3 1 0 131 51 8 3 D 248121 - - 

2 1 0 80 84 3 4 1 178178 

. 3 3 0 185196 3 5 0 118338 

1 20 15 *0 3 4 0213309 tZXlIZ T' 
1 3 0 73*40 1 60 139380 ShmdTo 
.0 4 0 8B 188 1 8 0 123263 ZiZZ ~ 

0 4 0 84143 I 60 130230 SSSa"^ 
wathan gh 
Be ck wif l ii a 


BATTING 

abr i ftriH aeg eo ■ a 
2 0 2 0 0 887 4 D D 
tore pn 2 0 1 0 2 JD0 0 0 0 

Bran 3a zt s u o i jin ic i* l 

WIMoa Cl 30 2 11 0 3 J87 19 1 0 

Motley rf n 1 4 i j j*4 a o o 

LSmtfn » 37 4 9 0 4 J33 7 2 0 

Orta Mi 30100.333000 

Bottom lb 352303230703 
Bkmcokma ssT82S0227l830 
White 3b 28 4 71 4 250 10 28 
Sundberg c » I « g l jflo i 

5h4ridan 4 h1 18 0 4 0 1 ZB- 4 0 

Sabemooen n 71880JMD0 
Jaduan p 8 0 0 8 0 JW 8 4 
Latbnmdf e 40008X0012 


IVY LAAGUA 
Conference AO Gomes 


i o o o o jm i 2 

1 0 0 0 0 MOO 0 0 
1 0 0 0 0 J»0 0 0 
OOOOOJWOO 


m College Top 20s 

■ TM top 2> teams in' The Assariafed Pmse CMmeon 
coDeao foaftwH Mil t fU«mkit-4. vo* es brpa-. "Go., Tech 
reotheses, settsan reairds, total pafads based r^CamUna 
on 30-19-1& etc* and las* week’s raMias: NjCamSL 
Reauu Pis . Pvs Duke 

■ l.'lowa 1581 7-0-0 1440 1 WtcFarast 

1 Florida 84-1 1440 2 

1 Penn Stan 7-44 UOS 3 

A Mlcftlaan 8-14 9M 4 

. S. Nebraska 8-14 90 ‘ 5 nebrosto 

^ J 

7, Air Farce 84H1 784 8 catonOu 

i -fl. OWo State 8-14 482 9 

9. Oklahoma A14 455 M 

’ 10.' Florida Slate 0-14 592 11 \~L. „ 

. 11. Miami (FlaJ 8-14 548 IS Kama . « 

12. OUahoma State 5-14 539 12 

IV Baylor 7-14 337 O • 

M. Arkansas . 6-MI 488 U 

. M. UCLA 8*1-1 3« 17 

4| 18, LSU 4-14 287 18 

^17. Brigtxun Young 844 142 7 

13. Georgia 5-M 113 

19. Tennessee 3-14 81 18 

30. SOL Methncflst 444 77 

The United Press Intwnaflonal h>P4i rat- 
ings (arst-otace votes, rocoras to s aw to- 
ses; toted potots, based on 15 points far fbil, M 
tor second, etc. and last ween rankings): 

L Iowa (42) 174) 830 -1 

z Penn state (74) SB 2 . 

1 Nebraska (8-1) . 508 3 

4. Mlcfalgan ISA) 494 4 

5. Auburn. (8-1) 45* 5 

6. Air Force (34) 3M * 

X. Ohio Stole (8-1) 321 3 

V Oklahoma (4-1) 304 10 

“9. Florida State 18-1) 251 9 

In. Barter 17-1) 227 II 

n. Arkansas (8-1) 205 13 

1Z Miami (Fia.1 (8-1) 193 14 

iV Oklahoma State (5-1) *•< 12 

1A UCLA (8-1-D 143 15 

15. LooWana Stnte (4-1) 53 it "J: 

16. Brigham Young (8-2) 44 7 

17. Georgia 0-1-1) 14 t 

IV Tennessee .13-1-2) T2 « 

. • j*. Texas A8JM (5-2) 10 e 

fK20. Alabama 02) « * 

"* (z-unrankea W*f week! - 

(Note: By unmnmrnt wan Ihe Airterhsn. 

Football Coaches Association, teams on 
NCAA or conference probation are ineligible ■ 
tor top 20 and national ctxmmioashlp consid- 
eration ay UPI. Currently on probation are 
Florida and Southern MemodaL - 


ATLANTIC COAST 

Conference All Games 


Princeton 

Yale 

Brawn 


WLTPtsOPWLTPtsOP Concpot or-ss 01080400 0 2 
400 *8 41 5 I 0 114 82 PriW 3b SOOODJ00OO1 

3 1 0 93 52 4 2 0 lit 76 Ootoenberry » 0 0 0 0 0 J00 1 1 
310 5228 330 149 W Totots 338 1848 3)8 JBtlM 80 

2 10 « 44 3 2 0 80113 SL Leals 

abrntu-rWovgpoa 
8 1111 JUS 12 1 


: -in s h 


. Altai 

p Y. OXlQ 

■ .JBArfeto- 10,' Flor, 
• -VierjTjilB- 11- Mtor 

■■>.. sutNt SS5 

. M ; iTienliUlrt r- M. Arfct 

■ - :."A> inad*^||7. ^ 

r miM Hit- IB. Gear 

• . .! "w z T jr. 


N QV& W 

pis? I * , 

» ; 

;* PH : 

t* ph : 

-» w 

_j fr -3“* ^ 


WLTPtsOPWLTPtsOP- Dartmouth 
JJA.^ 30 52 0 174 83- Columbia 
3 13 IDS 73 4 3 0 188132- CarnoU 
3 t4- 90- 57- -4.441 130 ]» - ‘ 

- 4S.-4SI 130 85 -I . .. 

21 0-55 59 430150138 Prmo s[ 

1 4 0 79138 I 7 0 123235 . 

030 3198 250 133174 - utol.mn 
040 52100 3 5 0 185175 

HO IWHT SJHiss. 

.Conference AU Games W.Vlrgtnla 
WLTPtsOPWLTPtsOP Pittsburgh 
300 19 51 81-03*5100 S-CoroHlW 
20 0 100 20 4 10141 61 Cincinnati 
.2 10 85 30 5 2 0 158108 Tamale 
111 4l*f 5 1 0153 93 Syracuse 
..1 2 0.89 48 5 30 345143 NatreOome 
1 20 -42120 3 40 93217 SW La. 
120 33 98 188 81188 Navy 
030 44 88 -078 133209 W. Tech 


230 8237 321 114 74 
7 2 0 30 44 ISO 79138 Landrum If 


33 1 2 0 0 487 10 U 
5 0 0 0 1 J00 23 1 


040 43154 0 80 53U7 Pendtofan 3D 333403 481 6M 
04 0 4072 080 83110 McGoe Cf 27 2 7 1 3 45* 15 0 

iNDS PENDENTS ... ? i 2 i "^S 2 

. ; - . uu . T to. iw Clarlc 1b 25 1 8 0 4 240 49 4 

7 0 0 151 Herr 3b 38 2 * 0 D .15* H 13 

6 1 0 281 122 Cedenorf 15 1 2 0 I .133 9 0 

I 1 n ™ Porter c IS 0 2 0 0 .139 38 4 

1 I n « VonSlyketovrl 11 0 1 0 a 4*1 I 0 

: I „ ” 02ml1h ss 33 1 2 O 0 487 ID U 

4 2 1 m m MW " C s o 0 O I 408 23 1 

i S S Tudor a 5 0 0 0 0 400 0 3 

1 ,ra S coxa 4 0 O 0 0 400 1 2 

k a a its er. Jw«to»enph 3 0 0 0 0 400 1 0 

I 4 o k w P 1 0 8 0 0 400 0 1 

s 1 a lm m Brawl ah 1 0 0 8 0 400 0 0 

3 a 0 M W D * J(M|lh 1 0 0 O 0 400 0 0 

4 4 a “ J. Horten » 1 0 0 0 0 400 2 0 

3 4 MU W W1PTH1P 1 8 0 0 0 400 0 I 

3 S a u! Campbell a 0 0 0 0 0 400 1 0 
D<ri ley a 0000040000 

Forsch a 0000040000 

Lahti p 0800040000 

Lawless or 0000040000 

Trials 216 a 40 3 13 J8SU46I 



304 18 
251 9 
227 II 
205 13 
193 14 
134 12 
141 15 

53 13 l 

44 7 
14 3 
12 13 
10 Z 
I Z 


NFL Standings 



Tudor a 50000400030 

cna 40000400120 

Jorgensen ph 30000400108 

Andular a 1 0 8 0 0 ~M0 0 1 0 

Braun ah 10080400000 

DeJesut ph 10000400000 

Horton p 1 0 0 0 0 400 2 0 0 

Warren p l 0 a a o 400 a 1 0 

Campbell p 08000400100 

Day ley p 00000400000 

Forsch p 00000400000 

LahH p 08000400000 

Lawless pr 00000400000 

Trials 216 13 40 3 13 JBWMI 

PITCHING 
Kansas City 

g to I nrMHn 

Beckwith 12 I 0 0 0 3 040 

Sabrtjgn. M 218 11 11110050 

Jackson. 1-1 2 16 9 1 3 5 12 149 

Oulsnberry. 1-044 1-3 51133248 
Ltribrandt, 0-1 2 U 1G 10 S 5 4 10 228- 
Block, 0-1 25 1G 43354 547 

Totals 783 40 13 13 II *2 149 

1L Leris 

a to h r er W so era 
Day ley. |4I 46 10035 040 

Cox 2 14 1422413 129 

Campbell 1 4 4 1 1 2 5 225 

Tudor. 2-1 3 18 ' 15 6 8 7 14 340 

warren, 0-1 342-342226346 

Horton 34 4 3 3 5 5 eOS 

Annular, 0-1 2 4 ID 4 4 4 3 940 

Forsch. 0-1 23 64413 1240 

Lahti 3 3 2-3 H 6 5 0 2 1228 

Totals 781 1-3 8828272858 3J6 


than was assured. 

Perhaps we are naive to expea 
that the modem professional 
should be proud enough, dutiful 
enough, determined enough 10 earn 
his pay by summoning up effort 
and spirit at every moment m every 
game. 

Franz Beckenbauer deflected 
thoughts that night by publidy 
mentioning he would try one more 
time to persuade Schuster io func- 
tion alongside Kari-Heiuz Rum- 

mE pig yimdeT iVteTiiift nna! bann er. 

A midfield so unimaginative 
against Portugal (although so ram- 
pant everywhere dse) needed vi- 
sion. 

Schuster came out of hiding, and 
apparently off the treatment table, 
to ax>re stupendously for Barcelo- 
na in ihe European Cup toorna- 
ment last Wednesday. And then to 
score points off Beckenbauer. 

He told the magazine Der Spie- 
gel chat he would not play in Mexi- 
co and that was final. 

‘‘The expectations for my return 
were too great.’* be was quoted as 
saying. M 1 alone can't bring about 
wondra.” 

Would not even try? 

Where is the man’s ambition? 
Where his patriotism? 

In West Germany, cone the final 
selection. 'Beckenbauer may weD 
have to try a g ain , down on one 
knee and with words only for 
Schuster. The player's rebuttal, af- 
ter aH comes at Halloween, the last 
romp of evil spirit before All 
Saints' day. 

Down under in Aussie, and over 
on the plains of Honduras, they 
may not know too much of Ail 
Hallows’ Eve. 

But they’ll know the game's the 
thing so kmg as its played in the 
right spun. 


to the New York Yankees. 

La's not let the fans gel in the 
way of a faiiy-iale ending Just 
for today, la’s ignore about 10 
teams that accomplished come- 
backs so outlandish it's almost 
impossible to compare degrees of 
difficulty. (In recent times, give 
me ihe ”78 Yankees any day.) 

Give Kansas City its due. No 
team ever did more with less, or 
had to dig out of deeper holes to 
doit, than the 1985 Royals. La's 
hear it for a loaf of Brat, a slice 
of Biancalana and a pound of 
Balboni. We don't even know 
Danyl Motley and Dane lorg. 


W. 

*?,/ 
. -Tl 




:jt'- 

gjuiSmi'i 



\ 

5 *r. ; . 





Rwmt>Uvna P»«u Intomaftond 

About 300,000 fans hailed the Royals amid a snowstorm 
of confetti during a parade in Kansas City on Monday. 


pire's bad cal! m Game 6. which 
lei the leadoff Royal reach base 
in lhe ninth inning of a 1-0 game. 

Kansas City won 91 regular- 
season games and had io squeeze 
blood from siones to do ii. it had 
the sixih-besi record in baseball 
and that’s about right. 

The reason we like the Royals, 
the reason their triumph will 
warm baseball fans so much 
more through the wimer than a 
Cardinal victory would have, is 
the nature of the people who 
won. Who really cares about tal- 
ent — that Lhe Blue Jays. Cardi- 
nals. Yankees. Meis and maybe 


- 


VP? 

* J- *• 

t. tl 


Block, 0-1 
Totals 


SPORTS BRIEFS Oilers Nip Over-Eager Flames 


Piggott Bides His Final Race in Britain 


The Associated Press 


CALGARY, AJbena — Glenn go-ahead goal. 


Mark Messier a perfect pass for Lhe 


AMERICAN COMFEREHCB 


C' 'j? 


w 

L 

T Pet. PF- 

PA 

•• ,n' II = 

N.Y. J9« 

6 

2 

a 

750 173 

118 

^ Si 

SfcJ 

Miami 

5 

3 

D 

.515 207 

177 

New Ena land 

5 

3 

0 

-825 158 

143 

Indianapolis 

3 

5 

0 

J75.155 

189 

;4 1 5 * 

iir- J. 

Buffalo 

1 

7 

0 

.125 104 

rw 

Cleveland 

Central 

4 4 

0 

joe i4i 

122 

; -.. 4 i;i" 

Cincinnati 

3 

S 

0 

.375 237 

281 

1 - .. . T U> *ih 

Houston 

3 

5 

0 

375129 

185 

Pittsburgh 

3 

5 

8 

an -m 

144 

■ Cl < 

i ■; 

Denver 

west 
» 2 

9 

.750 209 

151 

. ■ ■ .. i- yi 

LA. Roktars 

6 

2 

0 

750 193 

154 

• • : <£ z ? 

Seattle 

4 

4 

0 

JOO 188 

199 

- - jp** 

San Dtogo 

3 

5 

0 

375 190 

221 

r j'"Ji '• 

- ‘ i*. 

Kansu Citv 

3 

5 

0 

JJ3 151 

HI 


Ha Aanxxtod Pnaa> 

id pass in the end 
the Los Angeles 


Transition 


&?•: 
£?’ S V. 
i- I-:-' 
C - & 

*■' y 


•jr* ) i 
■i, 

- a * 

•I' fl i 
,:&? * 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


ff*3ollas 
^fc.Y. Giants . 

East 

4 2 

0 

J» w 

125 

5. 

3 

fi- 

A2S 181 

in 

PMIadetoMa 

4 

4- 

ll 

J00 123 

121 

Washington 

4 

4 

0 

JOQ TM 

158 

SL Louis 

3 

5 

0 

JWU5 

206 


Central 




Chlcaoo 

B 

0 

0 

UM 339 

114 

Detroit 

5 

3 

0 

425 157 

180 

Minnesota 

4 

4 

0 

'.SOO 187 

M7 

Green Bay 

3 

-s 

D 

775 154 

200 

Tampa Bay 

0 

» 

0 

W M4 

250 


west 




’ LA Rem 

~7 

.1 

8 

ATS 183 

1T7 

‘ San Frandtco 

4 

4 

0 

-S» »4 

134 

New Orleans 

3 

5 

-0- 

■ J7S 143 

207 

Atlanta 

1 • 

7 

0 

.125 141 

M0 


TEXAS — Mamto Tim Featwrt buM cspck, 
joaFoTOTjafulugauJ ranch and Tom Rotacrt 
buttoan coaeb. 

TORONTO— Namaa Jotoi McLoran tnW-. 
oas» coocfi. 

BASKETBALL 

' NpftoHf BcntaHtMS AnoclatlOH 


Hocked 

L___ d 

NHL Standings 


DOVlOV. 1-0 4 6 1 0 

Go* 2 14 14 2 

Comobell 3 4 4 1 

Todor, 2-1 3 18 ’ 15 i 

WBrrtn. 0-1 3 4 2-3 4 3 

Horton 3 4 4 3 

Airitoor, 0-1 2 4 10 4 

Fonxh. 0-1 2 3 6 4 

Loilll 3 1HH I 

Totals 7 81 1-3 88 28 

Save*— worr»ii, uoatL 

FIELDING 
Kamos atr 

Jar** 

lora 

Broil 

wnson 

MoHay 

Smith 

Orta 

Balbanl 

Blndna 

Whit* 

SuncbMra 

Shrldn 

SbrtHM 

Jackson 

LriXTKH 

Black 

McRa* 

Wathan 

Beckwith 


Looarwn 

pndltn 

McG«* 



<UU " Anderson had already scored With right seconds left in ihe 
NOTTINGHAM England (API twice, and when the Edmonton Oil- gsme, Anderson scored an empty- 
-LSaK^BriS^^S ^.^pshooter made a threatening reacr to complete his hat trick as 
; t, h . r ,i third-pen od dash ud ice in a tie the Oilers won the latest round of 


jockey for more than three decades, 
rode competitively for the last time 
on British sod here Tuesday, finish- 
ing second on S-to-2 shot Wind 


thud-period dash up ice in a tie 

NHL FOCUS 


the “Battle of Alberta,'’ 6-4. 

Al Maclnnis gave Calgary a 1-0 
lead at 1:06 of the second period. 


From lhe West in the final race of a Same' Calgary’s Steve Bozek wasn’t but the Oilers struck for three goals 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Dtvtstaa 


PhUaarioMa 
NY ftangart 
NY Mancten 


LEAGUES- Samndad coactiat Sion AF. I tow Jerwv 
■KfcafCHlaMtoanBCMKkDaivafDatTalttor PlftoOurah 
in*gam*{ara«iewlnglndMntoaBOef.38 WMMmtan 
«m«. Plo*0 Aftri* *1400 and Paty m 
SAN ANTONIO— SWkt*d Johnny Moor*. OiWbK 


ii: ; iP 

* y, 

e* 5 f f 
^ - 

rr** *a 

SS > 


M on dar V BtauB 
LA. Rakters 34. San Dteoa Zl 

.May. 3 

CHIcaaa « Grwa Bay - 
Cincinnati at Buffalo 
Ctovtiand or Pirtaflurah . 
Dotfolt at Mbnesota 
Kansas Cirv at Houston 
Mlaml M now EiMkma 
Tampa Bay 1 at N.Y. Giants 
Wastiington at Atlamo 
LA. RoftfefS or 5*attlff 
u*w Orleans at t-A. Rort* 
N.Y. Jris at Im fl anoprito 
PhlladripMcrat Sura P r pwc U to 

o«**r at San D i toa 

Nov.4 

Dallas at St Louis . 


font Carton, forward, on lalvrad nwrve. Buffalo 

SEATTLE— 5WWdAl*x SI tvrtM.*srvw3ra. Hartford 

‘ FOOTBALL 

Noseoal FeMboB LHfV* ' 

M.Y. GIANTS— ACtfvatod Mark HavMfc Mtanaeot, 
conmtudL Waived Jos Atklmon. klcktr. » , 


tanHKnaa to. Near Hawn ef Rw Amartcxm 
Hodw tUta . 


soedol asstoomrtit scsuL Catoorv 

N.Y, ISLANDERS — Antgaad Data H*nrv# tM Ana** 
jgftVrtfKb and Gerald OMu0 and Gum tMn- * 


Pl» 

GF GA 

Smith ~ 

10 14 


0 

12 

38 

21 

Nieto 

33 1 


0 

W 

31 

27 

Tudor 

0 3 


1 

9 

29 

27 

Cox 

I 3 


0 

S 

29 

» 

Jnmsn 

1 0 


2 

1 

31 

33 

ArtOuFar 

0 1 


2 

8 

30 

31 

Braun 

o e 


an 




Dejesus 

0 0 


1 

M 

37 

22 

Norton 

2 0 


1 

11 

38 

W 

women 

.0 1 


1 

11 

37 

25 

Catnpb«| 

1 A 



CAMPBELL CONFORENCK 
Nanis DtrtslM 


Minnesota 

3 

4 

2 

B 

41 

39 

SL Louis 

3 

3 

1 

7 

23 

27 

Chicago 

J 

s 

1 

7 

38 

39 

Taranto 


7 

0 

2 

27 

36 

Detroit 

0 

8 

1 

1 

32 

sa 


Sanme DMstafl 
6 1 9 

12 

35 

2* 

Winnipeg 

5 

3 

1 

It 

45 

41 


4 

4 

9 

19 

99 

M 

Cetaorv 

4 

4 

0 

■ 

40 

32 

LMAnHW 1 

• 

9 

2 

Sf 

51 

BBhwiob 

caioorv 

MONDAY'S RESULT 

• 42-4 

• 11-* 


35 Oeyfev 
»• Fendt 
Lrirfl 
Lawless 
39 Totals 


rode a record 29 winners in the 
Classics. 

In his 37-year career he had 
19,806 mounts, 4,349 victories, 
| 2,964 seconds arid 2^90 thirds. 

On Wednesday, Piggou is to 
leave for New York, where he has a 
six-day engagement at the Acque- 
ducL 

After Christmas he may ride in 
" » “ tmmn Western Australia before returning 

,20 Lester Piggott to Brhaui to start training horses. 

! j S U.S. TV Paid Bndd, Decker $200,000 

oso LONDON (AF) — UJS. television paid British teenager Zola Budd 
, , o $125,000 and American Mary Decker Slaney S75.000 for competing in a 
iM oi 3 race here last July, it was confirmed Tuesday. Decker won the 3,000- 
wutwi r contest and Budd fhdshed third. 

n t° o Enormous interest had centered on what was billed as a rematch of 
6 14 i their 1984 Olympic dash, in which Decker fell after a tangle with Budd 
'ooo an< * frfed to finish. 

49 4 o Mike Turner, treasurer of lhe British Amateur Athletics Board, dis- 
n n a dosed the figures at the European Athletics Union Congress in Oslo. 
£ “ J Derek Johnson, treasurer of the International Athletes Club, confirmed 
too that the Amateur Athletics Association had been told of the deaL 
io i* i Rudd’s cut was paid into a trust fund. 

23 1 0 

j > ; Becker Hans to Skip Australian Open 

ooo MELBOURNE (AP) — Wimbledon titlist Boris Becker plans to miss 
b o o the Australian Open tennis tournament, which begins late next month, 
>00 the Lawn Tennis Association of Australia announced Tuesday. 

J J J But the LTAA said il had agreed to a request by Becker's manager. Ion 
oos Tuiac, to reserve 2 wild card for the 17-year-old West German m case he 
ooo changes his mind. Ttriac said that West Germany’s reaching the Davis 
ooo Cop final had been the main reason for the change in Becker’s plans. 

N 2 The Davis Cup final against Sweden will be played in West Germany 
Dec. 20-22. The Australian Open, the year's final grand-slam event, will 
! 2 run from Nov. 25 through Dec. 8. 


low-key provincial meeting. aboul 10 s ! t aroun ? ^ , watch him in a 2:07 span, Jan Kuni tying the 

PiggptL who will turn 50 next score a £ 3m - He lea P“ over the game and Anderson scoring twice 
weefcwas the country’s top rider 1 1 IO “»«ceP l Anderson even within 37 seconds to make it 3- 1 . 

times between i960 -*nri 19JP and though teammate Jamie Macoun Gino Cavallini and Gretzky ex- 
S was already skating in wait. _ changed goals before Bozek scored 


was already skating in wait. changed goals before Bozek scored 

Referee Dave Newell called Cal- late in the period to leave the 
gaiy Tor having too many men on Flames trailing. 4-3. CaJgary finally 
Lhe ice, and a little more than a drew even early in die third period 
minute later Wayne Gretzky fed on Cavallini's power-play goal. 


Blanc paiN 



wing, from PH»u<«M tar Mura caraktof ■ Kwn 15 ), Aiutamn 3 1101 , GraMcv ( 5 ), WHran 12 ], McO ra, L 4 mHti ( 21 . BnrtL 
rttant • • . . MiMtar (S)i Moeiimtt m, Caraiunl I (SL T»*r, i^lbrran^r fit, Sutortwran. Ntarro, 

TORONTO— Sant ttara ThamoL toft rarino. BbmIc ( 51 . *»ol* on OBol: Ednwntan (m L»- wHm. HO P — Ms Ro c Tutar. P »— 01 

orta Wait Paddubnv. eoattayta st. Catbartn** m*lto>».I 5 - 10 -M;Co*owy (ooMoaal U- 17 - torarPortor.tlC— Hartcxvwr— Qubeabe 

al ttic.AHU ‘ 


39 Ganw.lf SL Lout* 3. K«raw City 1 v ■ V e T" * * 

36 com* j: ». Lout* 4 , KoAMo chv 2 11111 from Nov. 25 through Doe. 8. 

SB DOM 3: Ktnuat City 8, SL LOuis 1 M _ 

» SSL- Nixon Raises Umps Playoff Pay 40% 

4T Gam* «: Kona* arv 2, SL Lout* 1 A. * ¥ 

M Gam* r: Konat cit« it. st. loun o NEW YORK (AP) — Fonncr President Richard M. Nixon, acting as a 

* st ldm * C0W ** in 815-13 bindin S arbitrator, decided Monday that major-league umpires wfll 
kwh aty w3 4*o 70—29 receive a 40 percent pay increase for working additional baseball games 

- 4 w— st lmm v. Koran ciiv a. u»-si. in the two divisional champi onshtp series. 
m! Nixon said in a stmemem:“BecaDM the champitmshqj series have been 


A: masterpiece of Swiss watchmaking 



(00*01 Citv 783 400113— 38 

DP— St LOUH 9. Keraas CBy 1 LOD-St. 


ion. Trad*,-, Lratbnm^r w. sotoHwiwi. nm. o j- ctcpanded by a factor of 40 percent, the working umpires are entitled to a 

*VT T"*- Tuoor. 40ptmxminaea^ whichamotmis to S4,000per umpire, or a total of 

Vl£S)0per year fee the 12 umpires for tbcrais 198^ md 1 986." 


... GARRARD 

The Grown Jewellers. 

Ilf puriJT STP*rr LONDON -WIAUJ 


1 






Pi 

i 


i 


Ri 

ihi 

lici 

lo: 


8 .( 
Sb 


Uu 

nr 

cc 

in 

°F 

A 

SI 


Page 20 


INTERIVATIQ2NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30,1935 


OBSERVER 


Follow Those Truckers 


Bv Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — I had never 
eaten where the truck drivers 
eaL^“Eai where the track drivers 
eat" is one of the first maxims every 
American learns when he first takes 
to the road, but I had never done iL 

Maybe I was scared. Truck driv- 
ers are mythic he-men in American 


Sure enough- pretty soon, over 
the mountain rises this huge sign 
telling of the easy availability of 
diesel fuel and home-cooked food. 

“Were going W eat where the 
truck driven eaC I told my wife. 

“If it’s as bad as last nights din- 
ner" she said. “I'm going to bring 
mine outside and pour it in their 


- — - J MV UlhU Ui ■ UiiVI # 

lore. They might not like having S 35 taCKS - 
their restaurants invaded by the Inside was full of bis men. Big, 


kind of man who wears a waiennd- 
on-colored sports shirt and drives a 
six-cylinder sedan with an auto- 
matic transmission. 

Yes, that was it. In mv mental 
picture file, truck driven looked 
very much like a character named 
Bluio in the old Popeve comic strip, 
and Bluto looked as if be could play 
the entire offensive line for the Chi- 
cago Bears. 

“Any man driving an automatic 
transmission," he would say, “has 
to beat me at arm-wrestling' before 
he can eat where the truck drivers 
eat." 

□ 


Well not to make too much of 
my cowardice, I have eaten some 
incredibly bad food at franchised 
highway restaurants, solely because 
they seemed hospitable to' the kind 
of people who wear watermelon- 
colored shirts. Which is to say. the 
kind of people who don't make a 
fuss when their veal scaloppini ar- 
rives looking as if it could be either 
beef stew under water or — well 
never mind; I am strug glin g to de- 
scribe my dinn er recently af a fran- 
chised restaurant near Scranton, 
Pennsylvania, and thinking about 
it is making me queasy. 

The next morning, with Scranton 
far behind. 1 resolved to eat break- 
fast in a place where the truck driv- 
ers eaL I had recently discovered a 
cousin who was a truck driver. He 
looked no more like Bluto than I 
do. The average place where the 
truck drivers eaL I figured, proba- 
bly has a lot of truck drivers inside 
who are no better at arm-wrestling 
than I am. 

Besides. 1 had recently seen 
something on television suggesting 
that (ruck drivers are devout 
church-going people. Though it 
was bard squaring this information 
with tales I'd heard about the 
Teamsters union, a Sunday morn- 
ing seemed like the most propitious 
time to try eating where the track 
drivers eaL 


big men. Several ran well over JOG 
pounds and caught your attention 
right away because of the intensity 
with which they were taking aboard 
eggs, mingled with slabs of ham, 
bacon and sausage, and (he hero- 
ism with which the chairs support- 
ing them refused to collapse. 

There were a few women, too. 
Although all were in the heavy- 
weight class. 190 pounds and up. 
since they were not tattooed I as- 
sumed they weren't truck drivers. 
There were a few men. pretty obvi- 
ously drivers, who were lean, but 
packing down breakfast like men 
who didn't expect to eat again in 
the present lifetime. 

Not a soul among them showed 
any interest In a stranger wearing a 
watermelon-colored sport shirt. 
Menus arrived. I hadn't seen menus 
like that ever, at any time, at any 
places on any road, in aH the years I 
have passed up chances to eat 
where the truck drivers eaL 
□ 

Here were people who had never 
heard of cholesteroL or who. if they 
had. bad said. “Life c too short to 
spend eating lettuce when you can 
get two biscuits covered with sau- 
sage gravy, topped by two farm- 
fresh eggs sunny side up. and 
flanked by a quarter-pound of 
home-fried potatoes." 

“Even the home fries taste real” 
said my wife. 

I was deep in a stack of pancakes 
with butter and maple syrup, 
topped by three eggs, over easy, 
and four slices of bacon with four 
pieces of toast drenched in real 
butter, so hadn't the energy for 
conversation. 

That's all there is to say. I finally 
ate where the track driven eaL and 
eaL and eaL I have probably eaten 
several hours right off my life, but 
it was worth it, and I'd like to do it 
again some time if my appetite re- 
turns. Since Sunday's breakfast I 
haven't felt the need to eat a bite. 


jVew York Tima Service 



f Eleni’: A Movie Enshrines 
A Mother’s Love for Family 


By Nina Damron 

N EW YORK — The small 
snapshot shows several peo- 
ple sitting around a wooden pic- 
nic table in a Greek town. The sun 
is brighL and the vines and lush 
Mediterranean vegetation give 
the sense of an arbor in the garden 
behind. There are several Greek 
women, their hair tied in scarves, 
their faces weathered and lined, 
and two apparent tourists, a man 
and a striking young woman with 
short blond hair. 

The man »s Nicholas Gage, 
whose book “Eleni" chronicles 
the torture and murder of his 
mother in 1948 by Communist 
guerrillas during the Greek civil 
war. and his return to Greece 30 
years later to search for his moth- 
er's killers. Some of the village 
women are his relatives, peasants 
who sLill live in the village of Lia. 
The blond woman is Kate Nelli- 
gan, who plays the woman who 
gave her life so that her children 
might escape, in the film version 
of Gage's book. “Eleni" in which 
John Malkovich co-stars as Gage, 
opens in New York Friday. 

The photograph was taken a 
few months before the film was 
shot. Gage brought Nelligan to 
Lia. where he was born and raised 
until the age of 9. “Nick brought 
me to the spot where his mother 
was executed." Nelligan said, 
“and he just left me there and 
walked away. 1 stood exactly 
where she had fallen, and a wom- 
an came by herding her animals I 
watched her, and it was as though 
time had frozen somehow. I 
walked from the trial site to the 
spot where she died. I took that 
same last walk she took, and of 
course I was deeply moved and 
upset. But when 1 played the part, 

I never felt sorry for ha- because 
she never felt sorry for herself. 
She had lived to get ha children 
out of that crashing!}' difficult 
and backward life, and Lhai is 
what she achieved. That is what 
my story in the film is about — 
ha ultimate triumph.” 

The story of Eleni Gatzoyian- 
ms unfolded during the bitter 
days of World War II and the 
Greek civil war. From 1940 until 
1949. Greek peasants like Gage’s 
mother suffered invasion, occu- 


pation, starvation and brutality at 
the hands of ideologues: fascist. 
Communist and nationalist 
Beni’s husband was working in 
the United States, and she 
dreamed of joining him with their 
three daughters and young son, 
Nikola. Ha duty as a wife was 
made dear to her: to stay to pro- 
tect their home as best die could 
from occupying soldiers. But after 
the Communist guerrillas entered 
the village, it became apparent 
that her children, the focal point 
of ha life and energy, were in 
danger. When the guerrillas 
forced parents to send their young 
children to be educated in East- 
ern-bloc countries. Eleni decided 
she had to act to protect ha fam- 


ily. and arranged their escape 
this 


from the village. It was for 
that she was tortured and execut- 
ed. 

The wounds of the civil war 
have not yet healed in Greece. 
When Gage and Nelligan arrived 
in Lia, some outraged residents 
Gage's story anti -Communist 
propaganda. 

“There is a son of policy of 
national amnesia,” said Nelligan. 
“When people do talk about it, 
they stan fighting. In the village, 
one man came to fight with Nick. 
He had been on the Communist 
side and he said Nick had lied, 
that those things never happened. 
He said the nationalists also com- 
mitted many horrors and that 
Nick was unfairly indulging in 
ami-Communist propaganda. 
Nick answered that his mother 
was killed, not by Eskimos but by 
Grades.” 

The film was shot in Spain. 
Gage said they had considered 
filming in Lia. but that they 
feared the Communist-dominat- 
ed film union would disrupt pro- 
duction. 

“Greece is trying to shake loose 
from a conflict that characterized 
its postwar history," said Gage, 
who worked in Greece as a corre- 
spondent for The New York 
Times before publishing his book. 
“Everyone was encouraged to for- 
get the past to bury it" he said 
“Then along came this book, 
which presents a strong point of 
view. It has shaken things up. 1 ’ 

The book was a best sella in 


Greece in hardback, embraced by 
some and reviled by others. It 
inspired a rebuttal, tilled “The 
Other Hem,” by Vasilis Ka- 

vathas, a journalist who claimed 
that Beni's execution was justi- 
fied and accused ha of passing 
information to die enemy. 

The film is less ideological than 
the book, singling out Kalis, 
Beni’s chid 1 torturer, and the 
man who order e d ha execution, 
as the villain. “In the book it is 
demonstrated that all these execu- 
tions were ordered and approved 
by the central Communist organi- 
zation," said Gage. But be hopes 
that the film and book do some- 
thing beyond merely encouraging 
a hardening of partisan positions, 
each side listing the atrocities 
committed by the other. 

“Wounds like thic never heal 
completely," said Gage. “Endings 
exist only io books and movies. 
But all my life I searched for ways 
to repay my mother — of course 
you can never pay someone for 
dying for you — but I wanted to 
do something. The bode and the 
film are a land of memorial to ha. 
To kill Katis would have focused 
on my act of revenge and his 
death rather on her act of courage 
and sacrifice, and h would have 
perverted what she wanted for 
me. Besides, she was the forma- 
tive influence on my life. She 
didn't raise me to be a murderer." 

T am convinced that she did 
what she had to do and never felt 
any regret,” said Nelligan. T 
talked to some women who had 
seen ha at the end, and they all 
had a strong sense that she did not 
want to die. No part of ha want- 
ed to be a martyr, and she tried to 
save herself. She wanted to live, 
but even more, she wanted ha 
family to be safe." 

Gage agreed. “My mother was 
one of those people who’d try to 
find eveiy way to survive,” he 
said, “but who also had standards 
beyond which she couldn't re- 
treat There are people like this, 
and most of them are not famous. 
My mother wasn't Thomas More, 
or Raoul Wallenberg. But oeoote 
like her keep civilization 



Kate Neffigan as Eleni. 


Nina Damian is a free-lance 
writer. She wrote this article for 
The New York Times. 



Nicholas Gage with las mother. 


PEOPLE 


Prince Makes a Splash 
As Media Debate Roger 


The architect Rod Hackney, a 
adviser to Prince duafes. said i& 
Manchester Evening News, wfuc' 
qaored him last week on th 
prince's views on Britain's de- 
pressed inner cities, hadpubfahtf' 
“an unprofessional and poorly * 
searched proa rcpan." The new;, 
papa lata issued a statement 
mg: “We are satisfied iha! 
interview with Dr. Rod Ha&n| 
accurately re fle cted his account c 



Prince Charles's concern 


problems of inner dries." A 
jngfemi Palace spokesma n irav^ 
ing with the royal couple in Austra. T ’ ,, 
lia said the royal family was, \ I f 
result, “seriously considering scU 1 
inviting to future royal media 
cep lions those publications thj 
had broken the long-standio 
off-the-record media reception to ' 
dition." Meanwhile, in Mriboum . - 
on Tuesday. Prince Claries setiviu 
ed a fountain' and showered^ 
group Of journalists and camoj’ 
men with water, to the d&gbt c 
Duma, Princess of Wafas, 
a 



L M. Pei has been named bom* 
ary professor of Shanghai's Tooj 
University, the Xmbuancw&agee 
cy said. The Chues^-boai AmeS 
can architect received a certiffcrf 
nartimg him as honorary profes^ 
from the umvenity’s presided 
Jiang JiugHug, the agency safc 
Pei, whose projects include a hc$ 

headquarters in Hong Kosgoftt' 
Bank of China, has established 
$100,000 scholarship fund te d 
Chinese students m the Uaiie ' 
States, the agency added. 

□ 


The former U. S, president Jfa 
my Garter was desorbed by a Sha 
pa guide as **a stronggujr after li 
cSmbed an 1 8^00-toot {5,760-nt 
ter) peak on the sofrtbcm tide c 
Mount Everest Carta's wifi 
Rosdyna, accompanying hhn on 
trip to Nepal racked 15,000 fec- 
bdorc stopping because the alt - 
tude bothered her. guides said. - . 

•• - b- 


* .i 


Ahfat Karanm, 75 , win becair 
the first Japanese fihn director t 
receive Japan's Order of Cultm* 
Kurosawa, who recently teams 
with a French producer for “Raii- 
wiU receive the award from Empti- 
er jFfirobito in a ceremony ax d 
perial Palace on Sunday, Japan - 
ItxoeDay. . 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 

REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 


COBRATE 

SWITZERLAND 

HAUOWTOJ 

IN PARIS 

AT TW KING OPBIA 

Come join the fun Oct 31 '85. ftOOpm 
3£KJanv. "tnek or treat', red HaBaween 
atimphere. funky casumet. pumpkin 
pie, American anne, Sve minic. horny 
video. Further information phone: 

42 60 9«> 89. at the 

KING OPERA, 21 Roe Dauimi, 
Pane 2nd. Metro: Opera 

Brand New 

THE EXCELSIOR 

A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 

WteMM 

featuring 

1-, 2-, and 3- 
Bedroom Suites 

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS to 
jtfaM4634 »65. Rome 

All Magnificently 

IE CORDON BLEU cooking raunei in 
English, Weds. 7-9pmOcL 3043ec. 18. 
TefcParh 45 55 42 98. 

Furnished With Luxuriously 
Appointed Kitchens & Baths 

PORTUGAL SS 

Hobdays 8 Travel 



Offering 

Reriding far Foreignen 

Ffeasf Advantage* 

Unique Setting 

PERSONALS 

HAVE A MCE DAYI BOKEL. Have c 
nice dayl BokeL 

MODREAD 13931 . URGB4T Vector. 
Contort Henry's nn Cror 

Environment far 

Sport* end lain ire 

MOVING 

Swimming Pod 

FOUR WINDS 

24 Boor AtecSod Auatun 

INTERNATIONAL 

Executive Service* AvoleMe 

WHY USE AGENTS? 

Model Suite* 

Tfal Bmf Service from Ufa 
laynf Worfdwtda Mater 
CALL PARIS (1) 3 036 63 11 
U3NDON (bl) 578 66 11 

SWITZERLAND (211 63-51-04 

HE BON PORT 

1830 MONTREUX 

Cdl far appuintment 

m 

BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Tt* FINANCIAL TIMB 
EUROPE'S BUSWESS NEWSPAPBi 
operates a special defivery service in 
(tie Central Athens area af Greece and 
m the fallowing arias in Spam 

Madid - Barcelona - Baboo 

For farther driods, please cortodi 

John fbley, F.T. FrreAfurt. Id: 75980 
M Bayatas, tel-. Alters 7223469 a 
tod Press Service, Madid, tet 7339548 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


CANADA 


TORONTO, CANADA - LUXURY. 

equipped 1 & 2 


FuOyfamnhad aid equippi 
bedroom suite*. Superior 

Shon/looq term rentals. Mur 

80 Front St. 


-Marter Suras 

East, Sfe. 222, Toronto 
MSE IT4 Canada, (416) 862-1096 


VANCOUVER, executive flat. 2 bed- 
roorro. 2 bads, furnished for duration 

af 1986 Fair m Vancouver, prime loca- 
tion. France 93 66 33 56. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 

8 Avi. dv Mini ne 
75008 Pork 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
4562-7899 


CANNES MOUGfNS, 200 m. from golf 

course 500 m. frcxn Anglo-American 

Sdioal, kncurxxs modem house, 5 
bedrooms, 5 brtto, pool 5#S0 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDON. Far the best furnished fiats 
and houses. Consult the Spednh$& 
Ph*ps, Itav and Lowe. Tet South af 
Pa* 352 4m. North of Part 722 
5135. Tcfex 27846 RESCE G. 


BKB4HAM OH W LUXURY HATS / 

houses to let 'far sale in London. Teh 
01 -431 3197. Tefae 8952387 G. 


C HBSEA . LOVELY 3 berfroqm flat, 2 
bathrooms, c " 
wreak. Phone 


bathrooms, d appliances. £350 per 
“ [lonoon) 930 2241. 


HOLLAND 


Renthouse International 
020448751 (4 lines) 

Nederhown 19-21, Amsterdam 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


AT HOME M PAHS 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENTS FOR RENT or SALE 

4563 2560 


25 Ave Hoctie 
75006 Pans 


ShrfOj2 «Sroo« apartmert. 
One HMrth or more. 

L£ CLARfDGE 4359 5797. 


ecf, ffreptea*. 
mochmes, 2 batfn, 
10 or 43 57 79 67 


sigh'd 


hotel without i 


de I'Untyptete. Paris 7th; 4544 3940 


SHORT TBtM STAY. From 1 weak. 

FuOy equipped stucSa* and 2 rooms, 
up to 4 persons. Champs Bysees. Latin 

Quarter and Montpunusse. Mad »er. 

Mr Georgei 43 22 82 50 


6 TH ST GOMAN D€5 PRES, chore.- 


PCfllLY: Unary, triple reception, 2 

te*gp«£_2 both* teTTora.Fl 2,800. 


Tel: 47 20 94 95 


SHORT TERM M LATIN QUARTER 

No agents. Teh 4329 3883. 


OWNERS DUPLEX opatment. far- 
rushed, {grope. No opent. 4257 Q414 


NEUILY, high doss 2 rooms, bichan. 

■ F640Q; 4524 7675. 


both, on garden I 


9TH MAGMRCENT 4 roorra,deeera 
ed, scam. FSO0O. Tel: 46 33 91 17 


BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE ft UK 
LTD COMPANIES 


j near Iteration mid manogemen^reUKj 


bJe of Mai, Turfa. AnguiBa, 

blonds, Panama, Liberia, Gfarattcr and 
most other offshore areas. 

• Co n fidential advice 

• liuuaduta aveSabSfy 

• Nominee services 

• Beat#' Shares 

• Bool registi Lilian] 

• Accounting a odnhlrttQlfon 

• Mao. telephone & telex 
booklet from: 


Ml PI 


SERVICES LTD 

Hoad Office 
Dough* fete af Mai 


Pleasant, Uougtca, aw at In 
Tat Douglas (06241 23718 
Tefax 628554 SELECT 0 


London Representative 
ndSf., London W1 


2-5 CM Bond 

Tel 01 -493 4244, 7K 28247 SCSLDN G 


DC YOU REALIZE PROFITS ON 
FUTURES MARKER OURING THE 
LAST YEARS? 

If not, coraider speculative investments 
on futures umbra : portfaios managed 
b y a highly uufeuiand brofaroa 
company which a a member of UJ 
and UX. exchanges. 

ANNUALIZED AVERAGE PROFIT 
OVER THE LAST TWO YEARS: 21% 
Track record audted by a weB known 
intemationBl audit cenfxmy. Ne mar- 
gut Cats up fa initial investment. 

Accounts My legregrtad. 
far further mt omtohon cdt 
GOLD HU. 

London, T«± 00441/930 49 84 
Louxww, Tel: 004121/20 58 31. 
Buena Ares. Teh 00541/313 el 44 
To naive a brochure free af charge. 
Write: GOLD HILL GROUP 
Rue du lion Dor 4 
1003 Lausanne, Switzerland. 

Broker enyut ie s verted 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 

trocadero 

Superb double Ivina 2 bedrooms, 
parking. FflTOa 45 63 68 38 

HARIHH) HOUSE HUNTERS, fa us do 
your faotvra riu Cai CSU tee No. 1 
refaction lenrira far the Para area & 
Western suburbs. Tet 4758 1110 

USA 

WC PARK AVE, 80S, prawar 2 
bedroom apartment, coop sublet, 
sunny. No fees. 53500. 71 2-877-2340 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

CANADA 

MOTrtREAL LUXURY CONDO- 
prtithouse Z*00 *qit. pfa* terrace 

1 am) JqA. views on river and diy, 8 
rooms inducing 3 baths. 5 minutes 
from dowfewn. 155390000. Cbfl 
Ms. Viviane, Manfred 761-1914 

or tefae Mflcn 320461 Masson L 

CORSICA 

IBS 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

NEAR CANNES, new vilo. superb 
jnew of sea and mountdns, 3 bed, 3 
oaths, spodoes 90 tqjn. !olooo, oo- 
rpge, tenro, swiming poaLTS^A 
GS KeHh cn 93 38 30 4a 71*. 46142S. 

PENTHOUSE NTL 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANNH. A 10 minute wale ham the 
beach. Sea view from dl 7 rooms erf 
•hri 3 Sorey via. Room for a pool in 
the 1300 sgjn. go d e n . Arealbuyfor 
F1 /OT,00a Phone MABC at «3 S»19 
19. S5»47LoCroi»rtte, 064QQ Comae. 


COTE D’AZUR, SAINT AYQULF, Su- 
perb construction ute. Staffing tea 
view, from F400JXXL Promotion Mo- 
zart, “1* RuH", 1 Pr o menade des 
Anglos, 06000 PSra. Tot 93 88 37 37 
Tux IMMOZAR 461235. 


Angtai Superb 3 roams 105 vqja, 
Bving 35 terrace, p a noro i e c 
Ma view. Fl^OOflOO. Promotion 
Mozart, Hotel Men <fen 06000 hfioe. 
Ttk 93 81 48 80. Tefae 461235. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


UNIQUE BWBfTMM: Property 


the benefit of a Maks 


Cbyeno^lecee 35 yooo with 5 go- 

enreo 


reviews. New warehouse & 

block, H 2,000 sq.fr, just outside Bel- 
fast. Corent name £221,500 
annum w ith some assert pote 
Estimated income otter review in Au- 


JAK 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


XVlth ON THE PARK 


OCT, not dass decoration 6 fittings, 
ir<D*iit>oned, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2 
, 2 mads* rooms. 2 
buRcSng, day 


BATON 47 04 55 55 

TELEX BATON 430855 F. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


AVENUE MONTAIGNE 


In 

very 


boikfag, 110 saia. 


f 1 


VA.GJ. 47 66 03 26 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 


TAKE GENEVA AND 
_ . MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Foreteners con buy lovely t^xsrtmenft 


SFIZLOOQ. Mortgages up to 65% at 


. interest. 

GLOBE PLAN SJL 
Av Mon Repot 24, 

TA@72 l £ i 12%, S »BMRfi 

FrtrtiR e hnl Sfara T97Q 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/ EXCHANGE 


APAJUMB4T WANTH). 2 rooms, far. 
ashed or unfurnished, with Attwrian 
Udwi in Marob or amtrrt fob. CrA 
A4r.MftcfaR47471265oa.456a 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


FINANCIAL. CONSULTANT, 37. UK 

(Chartered Acaxrtort FCAJ, muMSo- 


Bft"* 


roptraertafion. 

63 Loog Acre, London, 


LKT. 

9JH. 


GENERAL 

positions wanted 


lake GSEVA + UfGANOt Mat- 
hew, Gstaod region, Lou* no, etc. 
Foreignen cai buy roognificenl i 
apartmerti/chtJetSi'viBas. Big chc 
Sms residency panibla. H sal_ 
SA_ Tour Grise 6, CH 1007 tnunme 
21/252611, Lugano office 91487648 


WEST INDIES 


MUSTXX*, WJ_ Choice 34 aae fat 
vflSties, airport, beach- 


by owner, aft i 

O. ex^teete y — 

Contort: Newhal Agency i 
Ltd, 21 Benrwte 
SW-Tefc UK 021- 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


FRB4CHMAN 22, seeks femiy to Sw- 
ift from Januay/Moy 86, to Study at 
the Manhuttm Institute of Maxige- 
*, downtown New York, au par 
, — sfcfaDhJuin 77ntedesPha£m- 
pins, 59200 TOURCOtNG. Frame. 


YOUNG FRENCHMAN, faEnguak En- 
glish. German, inti banaess school, 
understands A rob mertrfty, pre- 
pared to trowel anywhere weeks a 
Ml Ty^ es Longtoys. 
90, fa Gorbemne, 38330 Somt knier. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


VICT MBKstNT Enpeai head- 

-quaten aitl cdmpaiy, Paris 16&, 

se^s execufive secretay. EnaCsh 
rmtfar tongue, faert ior French. Uni- 
vefaly degree or odvaiced eeaetori- 

sw, mrtiuiivi, Qood o wmwiu 
ondpeoicztf pmoaafty.Sand&v. to 
2217, fCraW Triune, 92521 
Netdty Odo, Frcroi 


Pa st mfce •*“' 
WT aHATMNAL ’ 
skretajoal posittons 

TUKDAYS 

m Rw KT OraiW ed Secfieo. 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


LOOONG FOR TOP BRMGUAL f 


eorewiT Cal the aeertt GR 1NTB§WL 
4WBteOPoris . . 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC . 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


NONemafcmg mature woman. F ren dt 

fesr 

max* on -i cr rcss. mr> 
9aiMoon472Q95M 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


tbdam 


B4GUSH NANMErwjHs-cat&Dle in 
. genera , nursing & 
encat it s quote fames wflp 
from hath Upward^ a *qm 
eetfi a kiat oaring pminlx. Bw 
now: fay Slrt CoraufartL? Htft SI, 
AUenhat Harts Ufc 0252 ^ 
UKianed 


COteUAMlKE 

few, mad, Sevang. VASOtJES, Tv. 
Apgucs twee, 4. 1200 Lisfanfaxtu- 
goCTtf 68^9, 


D'HOTHjcfauf- 
no. VAMCJ5, 


BR0USHNA4MES A otatfan* helps 
t4a*v Agency, S3 Owreh “ 


YOUNG A MOB CAN seeks works _ 
bousebqy in France, un e fa re li y Cote 
d'Azur. Tet Paris 42 7267 89. 


ALTOMOWLES 


RACING DffiVSL I 

Inhmana'i 


et pur- 


<hwn type* of BMW. Lehmanns, 
Mow£ Tel 08^7891 695 Tlx 521 39W 


AUTO RENTALS 


can 


OMRC IKMT A CARS . 

fS£rs^“j^: f ss5: 

— smdl cas. A6 r Herr* 




AUTO SHIPPING 


IMoridwUoCrt 
TRANSSHIP < 

Bg«n^mi*Slr. 58/60 
_ • 2800 Bremen 1 

Tel: JP)<21/3«64 Tfa 246584- Trwe D 
Bade n Meeh ran 91 

Trans D 

o to DOT/ EPA. + bond m IISa. 
Mmfar of.AICA, Washington 


TRAI«CAR17bvdeFriedaid.^0te 

Porii. Tel 4225 6444. Nfat9383 
Artwap 2339985 Cnm 


AUTOSHIPPING^ 


SHffi Yput CAR TO A FROM 


VIA ANTWW ANO SAVE, Free! 
teLRgxArKAng^ AeportdiW 

AM»Sr IWb»i3rnrtT Mm 

Befafen.td.231 4237. Tfc 7140 


rankturt/mam-w. 

hennono GmbH Tet 

Howto oflawT JEorape *ro/nxfa . 


E 


vKMmaonox _ 

<ds AIR, NV, AnkerrS 

wrtft OV23I T« 


A< 
2000 A 
Tx315 


J 


AUTO CONVERSION 


• I 

■<4ti 

.'-a 


» KRKONVBIT . 
1fenlrtwe|rl> fapofe 
CuteMrt «v fete tfa lLSA 
Worldwide Americoi ranr . 
|>™rides a* required mwnanraf- 


Q"d axToitesi ye or ay wi ; " 
pats fl* US. goren ‘ 


gov w inert fenders, 
or ywr mawy bade indwfag" 

. , canvaraan cart.' 

phone for free brodxM - 
G«MANYjm 69-7152425 a / 
TO! /.223059 . 

IW1 UNDBfWWT^ . 
„ Oberfcdw 767B 7. 

W000 Frankfart/Mah 


AMBBoSl 


H»A / DOT ; 

. COWBIHONS f 
Customs brakaroge/bonding tart* 

* PSdwip & defivery anywhere st-l • 

Eastern US. & Tmu» \ 

* Fmnoacrf-Uterii using only fa. 


■aiAMPAorc Wiport 

■2294 North Pm 
M- 19440k USA Teh 215 823 
^■Tefex 4971917-CHAMP 


PAGE 4 
FOR MORE 

CLASSIFIEDS 


International Business Message Center 


MONEY TREES? 


UFET1ME SECURITY 
J™ k» one f* America's mart 

**"9 te rtton fa gl B rt brefawdH 

n the nut industry. Over 30,000 nut 
trees platted in 1984. Projected annual 

5 UWTHJ. 

Matend „ rflnUe „ Enofah, French, 
2358, Herald Tribune. 
92521 Neirily Cedes, Fravce 


JtoWUWlONAL OFFSHORE 
COMPAWINCORPORATIONS 
ROM £TT0 

C o mp r e h ensive Adfa m i t nfan. 
Nominee nrvwn. Powers of Attonwy. 


Re ® i8 * n!d "Mtene, 

mail farwardno, 

Uend R e e eure er 
Bc*errie Housa 
S unmerha, 

We of Men. 

TeLJKM 28020-20240-28 
loex £28352 Wand G. 


HERDBiey 'IMMIGRATION 
NATURALIZATION 

Govemmert authorized inwWiww 
DfOflratra sopedfiodfa dwoned 
far person sraking Ml arizBtfvp 
Mid or now homeland. 


„M® WTRNATKJNAl 
P.O. Bar 261 P.O. Ban S3 

London NIDU MarbeCa (Mafapj) 

IMd r e “ 

Teli . 

Tefee 


1771702 


LONDON 
fftkarey 6 fart Servian | Compony 
fannrtwm&dcmdaiwn I faternatkn- 
al fa* I Bank accounts established I 
Gemrrt bufeess advira & aBrtBice | 


JPCS, 17 Widagrta St, London 81 7HP 
Tel: 01 377 1474. Tbc. 893911 G 


BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 


nc UK AS A TAX HAVEN. An in- 

creating number of mrfh-rabonals 
«« (recovering the substantirt beres 
fits to be derived by unrig the UX as a 
ksc navan. The Stoni ly Davit ar gan>- 
Whon a rec egnbed as the leodng 
rapeit Bl lfa spearrfizsd held. As ai 
introduoion to our Services well be 
pleased to send you, without obtgo 

to or cat. our tfireepart reports The 
y? ° '5“ Hovea Why not contort 

Tofc 01 & sslwls 
DAVIS G. 


INmtNATWNAl^PI 


ONAl OPPORTUNTTY 


To develop a quality sola 
nwrvetwp ai eakirive fmrfaal 
pradurt rtemabondly. we seek 


Experienced Marketing Menage 
Send CV aid 


fa ranfidencB lo 

, 63 

London, WC2E 


Bo* 41982. CKT,_63, Usr^ Acre. 


WVBTMRJTS 
SS OUR AD ON 
PAGE 2 

TRANS CONTAINER 
MARKETING AG 


COMPUTH PORTRAITS. 

T-SHIRT FOTOS 
u NOWMRU COLOR 

. lh 4 c ff *». 


SSflOO - SIOOQO / mantft. New & vied 


6000. 


pfffVtam. The 412713 


Gerrnany. T 
13713 mife 


Tdb 


WANTS: 

EXPBHHKH) LIFE AGB4T5 
fatobfahed US nsurana ax offers 
competitive axnmimMs and produc 
far expertnindi highly mohvoted 
agents to set to mStory personnel 


Europe. If wsu how, mrapfand track 
tfiserea, pleaH respond to 


record In f _ , ^ 

B« 2220, Herald THfarw, 
9S21 Nealy Cede* France 


BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 


AN ASIAN DBCS4DANT, now en- 
gaged in bwness in Mkk£e East lock. 
uv for oppartw*iei far favratment of 
US$1 rrwfan or more in commerdal / 
indusinol fields in USA / Europe, with 
seared and attractive returns. Inter- 


ested parte may contort Mr. J. Kn^ 


PO Box 6955, Dammam 37452, 

Arabia with detoBed business [dan. 
tupportmg documents aid other evi- 
dences. 


roue own company in 

SWITZERLAND 

ZURICH - ZUG - LUZERN 
from SF500 per anmm, up, 
Zaofldesq. Ba c r a s fr. 36, 0+6X0 Zug. 

Tet 004142 21 32 88. Tk 864 9T3T 

A Present For Your Son 


OLAS5 PROrecnON 
German e om pcn», spedafet in tee pro- 
tection of das* from West or oHuJ ts 
endari erdnary gkss sheuter-pnsaf. 
5eeb aaerft worldwide. 


agKTrt world 

S u eflber gs treppe 3, D2000HaitourgS5 
Tbc71641to INGO P. Tefr 494MS%42 


OFFSHORE A UK COMPAME5 
Rduoary and trort senriam. donadSo- 
Ban, ccntpaiy formation, mternutiand 
lax, yacht regferaiian. bade cccawtt 
beshed, accounting ired and teles* 
services etc. Whttngtan SwyioslAL 
23 Goflege ta London EC4R 2D. 
7^0l5s«02. Tfa 884587 G 


f€AUH8£SOR7-SPA EstoUafad Eu- 
ropean flavor, ZH faun NYC 155 
acres, htfe, gordene, nxert, SO ^jats, 
5 guest houses. Indoor & ouboor 
pooL 5afartim. An EsHOpesn body 


Ir e ahnenf faeftws, yogo-^nnjaong. 


g re enho u ses & mare. 

equipped. Ready to eontfaw business, 
fatce-breefare an request. Bov 534, 
Neverstek. NY 1Z765. 


ROSS DRIED R82 ROSE5 (buds / 

petals) eve cvcJode far export from 
Pdafea Prime qocfity, amen) crop 
hnaoefete j hip nfe * MinoMa 3 tan 
aankiiter. Price, US*2 per Ha FOB. 
L/C far CQK wrfua fniteTt pared* at 
dertinotien. AZAD & CO. 61-A, Karim 

Centre. Salt* fevodti ffdostor^ 

Tet 610(91. Tbc 23035 or 23038 PCO 

KR PK Ante Ecees > 970. 


BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 


YOUR AGENT M MOROCCO 


SCHAMASCH MAROC SA 


Wrflec 42, Ave Hasscn 5eghrr 
Casobhym 01, Morocco 
Cet 272604, Z72652, 222221 
Tho 22901 


US C O RPORAT WW FOR SAIf. Mon- 
uwJUiw pnediHji covopontnti 
the tahcenBsanicueons indes- 


*erving _ 

try. 5T3jmScn+ revenue, 34%^rra 


profit. 23% operaifag profit. $5 mfl- 
*on+ baddoa. 20% amuerf prate his- 

S '- Prfadpdb only. Reply to Bm 
I, Her3d Tribune, ? 2 S 2 \ NeuBy 
Ceewx, Frond 


AMBBCAN SALES COMPANY look- 

ing far unique product* made in Eu- 
rope far tadirev* *tr4suton in 
America. We can act fast to put 
guefily itentf m up to 50£00 outlets. 
Subnet by mail mfarm uriu n/Eterature- 
/saracie/efc- Mr. Tupler, Actktei kit, 
SyiML>nn*uble A. 9lh 
1 Paris. Tefal 649157 F. 


66 

floor, 7: 


PANAMA COMPANY with 

Directors and n fide rtiel Sens _ 
Luxembourg bank account farmed in 

48 horn, $wfa branch office opened 
far kse-Bee trading. Anonymous term 


deposits. Foreign egdwge & Men 


dealers. Atone*, . 

Janes's, London SW1. Tet 408 


BUSBCS5 FOR SALE • M4, heart of 

Haute fatw e nra . wry old "bartida" 

' lHhea- 

a» 
& 


naute rro w nce . wry oh 

ore gorosn port- / oaerc 

candorts. Rertara* 40 not 


sapafo view. In auida bocks. Irtte- 
ri ,200,000. fames 


nrtkred dentek. 
9276 45 95 


R0WRANDT AVIATION NY offers 
Lbo- Jets, KatfrAns & other high quci 
ity business oncroft. Lai ZEhAANDT 
help yw find the akordt taflored For 


your raecffic neeck Gd flab Hatter 
NOW at 21 


0032 91. 


712-333-3602) Men 5101 


COMPUTERS for busmen « personal 

ig e. Conait c rt service^ sofa , 
O qt cxnzed provaRmng. 
brmdb * lowest pnras. Any t 
Export p o ssU e. Mr. Irawena. Fans 

]fc jajaw m 4563 2989 / n) 
434830QQ 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SWITZBtLAND + ABROAD. We 
have more titan 25 rtenesting compa- 
nies (fbetorite + trading + retoR + 
service} far sole. Turnover up to SF30 
mSan 5whs residency potefele. Cog- 
toefa H SfflOU) Sj»l,W Grise 6, 
CH-1007 Lqremne.Tek 21/25 26 n 


MARXETMG CONSULTANTS. Sales 
& purchasing services worldwide. E*. 


perienaed penonnd salve ]«w sofa 


or cat 408624-0999. 


AMBOCAN IMPORT A EXPORT com- 
pany loofeiT faf buyer omrt in Eu- 
rope for general fTfadiop dfa- Pte ase 
send currmAmi vfrae to Kat&nuh btw 
Inc, 142 Wfat 49lh St, 
A. NY, NY 10019. 


I HAVE C0NCBVB) a qube new A 
reuohriianqry surfpcei device far au- 
tofcung of Wrijrosthesii, & an seek- 
ing flneneid inwsonent for worldwide 
sae. Bax 2896. Herald Tribune. 92S21 


NeuBy Cedra, France. 


B4QUSH BOOKSTORE. 15 
operation, located 
verriry wvm serious btsnes apgor- 

aftSeS 

13100 Act en Prownce, Frax* 


FOR SAIL UMOUE BOUTKXffi „ 
GaSery an the Chon^a Bysees. 
GoodwB, stock & monagemere carw 
troct period aasiible far smoadi tram 
ritioa S130J00. Tel 4256-0233 
4745-2853 Park. 



SPACE SAVMG DEVKB. Storage 
braefats far stifr and fans racqueb, 
Mode in USA. Seeking importer far 
6 ropeaietartat” 


amfensg” 


Ncnfa90 
', NY 11797. 


NEW UNi OP COSMETICS ovoiabte 

far Hack women. Territories avafafcfe 
weridwide. faterested primtoats-en- 
qoew Prari dent BBC toe. 310 frood- 
w W LBwrenee.Nn.Yai'15gUSA 



BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


Mn. FASMON DESIGNER, Pdris/NY 
sefc sketches of her latest exduriw 
aWJHam WO practora IS tnodrt. 
Abo top advisor. Garienat T4 Bd. 
&elmora.75016PtarisTel«2«8064. 


DBAWARE, PANAMA, Ifaerfa Car- 


.. 2024a Tefae 5283521 
G.(yic UKL 


SHUNS CHEMICALS, Srtwnts & ksb- 
ortfeiy eqcripnwrt. LWveraed Cherie- 




605a Tbc: 


DBAWARE USA CORPORATK3N- 
|FrOT-USJ400HRH50153verade«,| 


yafatoton Dfi 1 9809. Teb 302 79£ 
740a TSbc 757674. 


NOW HfflffiB A CLUS DOING Inter- 
ncrane* Business with eMcetent profit 


(LS. REAL ESTATE 13 JO20 X return 


pass^e - iw rt o f-6 aroker inquiries 
Sfed. SE Sendees; 100 Brash Creek 
fcj Santo fag CA. 954Q4, USA. 


HOW TO REUSE MON1S ON fu. 
tones cnofceb? No martin aft. Write 
to Mr. Dufeud, 2 Squaw laigevfa, 
7B19PTrappas. France. 


PORTUGAL For real estate A busnwts 
notch Seemed mecSator/nil staff. 
UW/FortugoL Apatodo'lT. 2766 Es. 
tori Tte *287 firm P. Tek 2842545 


-DWWCRD, 

_..5CSd 

Tek (1)4730 3Q56, tbc, 641 


10. r»* Mono*.. 921 10 Odi^lWe. 


LOW COST REsowcrs.-- 
in find bavaiL Apply far fel 
k> P.O. Bca 85 , Oou^n, We of Man. 


RESTAURANT- MCE. Seats 36, Sw 

S ii&S££5Slft 


SOUTH AFRICANS, we con 
CGticXT C W CBflti & 
London 529 2326 


rate- 

Tek 


2ND 

26 


35 cowAsk. GMC 
106 76 Athens Greece 


FOR EXPO R TER S , 
r fife. PO Beer 2EQ4. 


MADOD UMO SERVICE 24 boon 
MuhSnguaL pi-1) 4793268^120572. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


PANAMA.OOMPAMB FORMS by 
pro fe wtoo fa - 3650 - deal drea 


8a* 




BUSINESS SERVICES 


«n . 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPIf 

UNUAtTTHJ MC 
U^A. t WORLDWIDE 


A conflate ptrsanal & burintss . 
profaftig a unique aAecfion of 
wfarted, wsahte & mufti 
toYrijoh for al social 
ptomaSonal o cc rai o n* . 


212-765-7793 

212-765-7794 

330 W. 5(A St, N.YX. 10019 
Sennra Re 
• - . Needed 1 


■m IUV 


PAN AMAUBA N ypaeftiora provide 

toeadvantoBB rfoon^ confiden. 

wfr. zero in kdxSty & US doScv 
onren cyewrira renert. Wetrffarqxn- 
paiy termofon *vat an a fad, 
reedbie and eompetitive bens. Con- 
tort tl L Darimgian, POB 1327, Pona- 

55 ^ 3,21 FG 

Tel 234)834 / 23-481 9 jeve. 236779} 


SKLWTY TECHNOLOGKT. Spedai- 
gjn analyfe dmfaopSSrf 

d^jn^SrtSoo e rf^S , 2S 

jjrewfurt/Mran or 1^2164)00 


^»»yKBU«B«OUIW 

/wowtotg / Cortipeny Fanadns 6 
Kn^ liU * p0 ? ^ i 

lwW * CIOf 9- W 3S2/49 ^tL 12^ 



■sjBrassfEa 

tojamabaworfl^ 4. HOIS* n £7 


flwhtete Sortro, 480 Fuhcm rS? 
SWL TefcOhMl 1292 .”^. Koai 


BUSINESS SERVICES 



Narcht 


’ * v a 


HOW TO 


f^Atod PASSPORT, 


rgort^lZeourtriei 


, . WtoA, .. 
5wte 5B. Central, 


rol, HonQKony. 


Terrace, 




FINANCIAL 

investments 


*"S5SK15gg ! * w 

Offer: T lX ner Pa + j 

«**> US55DQQ mZ 
“a*- AI tronfartunx'lhn»U, —ht. 


tfOOhJcUom "throuafi 
wsawtar*. Anty purm 


EtSflde Patmira 
.. _ teVrt 
*dfatq Spain 

AMT RAGE 


Se. RrteeVeN., 

*»Tel (71 J MtM«a 






diamonds 


diamonds 

ri , . . .Your beet buy. . 

FJgwmteee. 

‘ZJZL’TSU’-!?' 


928 


•.fMaandrod 62. fl-2018 Adwn 
’ - Teh 02 3) ai 

^ b. Atthe Omanj CHJ. 
^ Artwarp Ktme<faifajhy 


OFFICE SERVICES 


SWIfiSiLAND 

yourohke 

b e otw efai vrith eeoi tori te. 

3 &-SSi l c&SSSS4* 
.'W.AramgrSf & 


« tag €6 17 SrLcn 


5S; 


OFFICE SERVICES?^ 


YOUR INSTANT OFFICE 

FRANKFURT/ MAIN * 


Telra. leletex, FAX. KX 
Conference rooms- .. 
AH offirafadtiaL 
Own poriongptocn. 

WORUVW1DE 


BUSINESS CENTRES 


H«*ur»er Alee*- 10 


■v 

- -'-ra 


■ Trade 5bow Center. 

J firmAfart/M. 90 : 

_ Tet 0-69-770641/2 
The 4185297 WWBCD 


l: 


-sj: 


NEWMMADRD 
LOCATED M 5 STAR 
HMOHMDMG HOTEL 


• ftBy 'cqafaped offices an d&l \ 
trophy or p emwnet* ba» 

' t e rteta rid jeryioi 


• Modem office 
EURO “ 
Motel™ 

Tel 


flUimerW . 
il.Tbt 22548 


OtiQ, 




F ^BOfl E PLACE. 

i.rawnanKBi 


Jjg$aSsa$.-: 

IW46 2298 98Tbttfr4W^;. ' 


MUSSELS 

517 » faSFSe 



Y0UfcOWICE«SAOWWW« 
oB fadErfiu. Am. Faufeto 1754 
Td 11.251 57 33, TV {Dll] 3«ra* 


offices for: 


MONTE CARLO 

****a*AUTY OF 

Office* far rant re row tfakfaft-' 
rooifon& Near renter, - 

-- Tefaa 469477