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INTERNATIONAL 



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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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withVice Rreadect Atodd Halim 


■* 0 , ■ •». „ Jk - Ti* SMia Em- ' SSuS Bd£ Mb 

St. bassy personnel kidnapped ~ ~ !J “ “ — *-* ‘ 


awnih ago have been. released mi- 

ln- ' ■& k. MnviaJ _ 4 . _ . - 


^ armw ^ an embassy 
® '■ said Wednesday. 


spokesman 


said. Renter* reportedfrom Beam. 

Syrixh-soeroes to Damascus said 
Mri Satan w*s‘ seeking details ;<jf a 
. . u . - : seena agreecie M ‘re ac hed dn^flair- 

1 M.p^, ^nejrrcafl free and mrdadvriy dayby Modan^ ChrisdaonHE- 

; r - S 0045 *“d the spokes- tias to end Lebanon's IO-yeax dvil 

°f S 2 ? man * wbo damned to be identified, war.- - - 

,a «-Tk7,Sj ,. Tb ? embassy spokesman de- 

■•*1 'iS'ch'i-,^ ^ tSa> Bew cimc °- to pve any details erf the 
■•■i -::-2 -J* '****$ release Tuesday of the three cap- 

i _ , f mh/i L«iJ L. • ■— «L— - . * -*l- 


;hr dves who had b«n threatened with. 

" n " death since they were kidnapped 
Sept 30. ■ - • 1 


lu flS Ji 

-.-EsaSt 


attache Valery M 
mercial attach*; 
• .vAiSfrfi? Svirdty, the emhas! 




■*§ _ 

The three are CHe^ Spain, a press 
irikov, a oom- 
and Nikolai 

.rj** the embassy doctor. 

' . Th« were seized by gunmen in 

Nj-fr. ,fc.2? > 4 J^est Beirut, the first East-bloc na 1 
^’ enc )aty %ionals abducted in the Lebanese 
0 capital since Islamic extremists be- 

?::c Lina, . , „ SP 1 kidnaping foragnerfin Jann- 

r: ' 30 ,9S4 - 

- f a:ce aj - a r^k,- a fourth man abducted the same 

■"■‘‘ed jh |g mSPs day, Arkadi Katkov, 32, a consular 
,• rcil c>n attach^ was killed by the kidnap- 

'/■ ^ n -' tvereq P 615 - ®* body was found two daya 
Rijviiinn aca j n j«'t; after the abduction on a gazba^ 
■ dump outside the Gt£Sportive sta- 
dium in south Beirut 
It 


Beirut Radio said Mr. Salem 
traded Mr. KhaS^m oojsIr. Ge- 
mayeTs visit liit wedf to the Unit- 
ed Nations m.New YorLMr. Sa- 
lem. retumed to Bonn after , the 
taftsjit added, r- jt*-' *' ‘ - * 

Mr. Gcinayd piiyed t» pan in 
the morrtMraig ages between Shi- 
iuCDmze aad (ffisfiai VniTiAi< [ 
witichwezesaid^iayepro^ceda 
draftaccord on feformsihal would 
deprive" Lebshotfs Ghnstian mi- 
uoiijyof its dourisma ^tane in gpv- 
emment. ■ : 

Pt^tical sources say Mr. Go- 
mayd has reservaiioiB on reported 
" to ^ 
the 



U.S., Britain 
Agree on SDI 
Research Plan 


Caspar W. Weinberger, left, and Michael Heseftine Hank Lord Carringtoo, the NATO secretary-generaL 

Arafat Pledges Good Conduct, Aide Says 


fpresdomy. 

Lebanese Mm EWuo*f 


' •/•: '*:°PPing baJ: 

— ^edb.S 


Kifner 

New York Tuna Service 

AMMAN, Jordan ■— The Pales- 
de power of tine Liberation Organization has 
given a good conduct pledge to 
King Hussein to avoid such embar- 
rassing incidents as the AcHDe 
Lauro hijacking, Palestinian and 
Jordanian sources said Wednesday. 
■*We agreed we shouldn't cany- 


power 

was instrumental in securing , the 


. Mndwt gjcBCd a 

Lebanese m ap accused of coQabo- 

was not immetfiaidy dear wSesdayin drewu^^fwitof kbld^ 

whether intervenuon by Syria, the Shtot; United Press International £*■ ” *| f 

main power broker in L^bon, rq>o*ted.&oiB Bdrat ^A^tl^cb^ 

aftc two days of crndal meetings 
here. Mr. Hassan was referring to 
the accord between Jordan and the 
designed to lead to a Middle 
East peace settlement 
The promise — somewhat tenu- 
ous. gjven the volatile nature of the 
Middle But and the rather amor- 
phous character of the Palestinian 



tided with inter- 


■ j frfflchpnjfo^j the Islamic Liberation Organiza- onlookm. 

••/rusteibeai^j^ tion, believed to be' made up of The move 
" r Himbiib in 2 Sunni Moslem fundamentalists. ntiuent between 

PilictcnSdak; Telephone callers cl aiming to aQ 4 Moslem nafitiamen an the 
D 01 ■ represent the group initially de- Greep . Use. and sporadic ex- 


fat and the Jordanian monarch. 

The Jordanian-PLO alliance 
thus appeared to have survived 
King Hussein’s irritation at the Pal- 
estinian organization over the 
AchiDc Lauro hijacking and the 
breakdown of a London meeting 
between Palestinian representa- 
tives and the British foreign secre- 
tary. Sr Geoffrey Howe, which 
precipitated what had been seen as 
a showdown meeting here. 

The bottom line, both Arab 
sources and Western diplomats 
said, was that neither side at this 
point was able to risk scuttling the 
alliance. Thus tire uneasy relation- 
ship would continue. 

The results also appeared to rule 
out any acceptance fay King Hus- 
sein of the offer of separate peace 
talks made by the Israeli prime 
minister, Shimon Peres. The Israe- 


manded that Moscow pressure Syr- «*anges af machine gnn fire in the movement— appears to be the sole lis have mounted a strong cam- 
ia to call off an offensive by leftist mountains overiodentg the Leba- concrete achievement of the vaunt- paign in recent weeks to isolate the 
nese capital '.'••• ed confrontation between Mr. Ara- PLO ft 


_ ^ITOSfll Bt militias against Moslem fundamen- 
awrou»r«i^7 talists in the northern Lebanon 
' ‘ : v.Tv,3i^^^ort of TripolL . ' 

, " ' The offensive was called off the 

. Jl22Li^isv day after Mr. Katkov was slain. ’ 

* But the hostages were not freed. 

Callers daiming to represent the 

J ...1 i^cwaiKtECe*^: Islamic liberation Organization 

called radio stations, demanding 
■■ - .7 ' that Moscow .dgs &its 

’ussy 


from any negotiations. 


There was scant mention in the 
meetings, according :c both Pales- 
tinian and Jordanian sources, of 
any attempt by the king 10 wring 
commitments from Mr. Arafat to 
such American conditions for entry 
to tire negotiating process as recog- 
nition of Israel or renunciation e? 
violence, Palestinian and Jordani- 
an sources said. 

Instead, these sources said, much 
of the discussion focused on tbs 
need to tighten up responsibility in 
Mr. Arafat’s unwieldy apparatus. 

The result was a relief for Mr. 
.Arafat and his aides, who had ar- 
rived here prepared for a major 
confrontation and fearful they 
would be thrown out of their bases 
in Jordan and , indeed, out of tire 
peace efforts that hate giten them 
a measure of respectability. 

“This is a success for the PLO." 
Ahmed AhduJ Rahman, tire PLO 
spokesman, sa i d . 



Yasser Arafat 


ExpertsSee World Push for Curbs on Currency Rates 


\IT0 COMTES? States to ea d - Jri aa Bo n^ yi yrateofr^ 
. . civil war. . 



By Peter T, Kilbom 

■■. JtouXtjtfdTlma Service ■ •• 

S^SHaJGTDN — Woddwide concern 

th^PjtdnBilr unit 

tore! Dn'tfe fivjdi- 


^hood-of-aH cotjaares nas Started a multina- 
Tt,. Trrrirm mmrfrfoittoriainpose Arect goverament 

££S£&sa& SSSSSST*- “ “ 


» SUBEBB- ' uc aovier utnon evaefi 

about two-thirds of itsT50 atigffis 

611 H 11111 w wM ^ gojrjt qq OcL 4 amid ftram _ . • , . 

,£t5S ttal its embassy would be Worn ta s 

*«:•« a0v^!rjs 

was a mqor embarrassment to Syr- 
ia at a time it was sponsoring peace 
talks between Lebanon’s three 
main Christian .and Moslem nwK - 
tjas to end the decade-old dial war. 


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^1 Genteel Sends Emissary 
President AnanGemayd of Leb- 
anon sent former Foreign Minister 
Elie Salem to Damascus, on 
-Wednesday where be had talks 


From that^ meeting will come a report for 
the seven-nation economic summit confer- 
ence to beheld late next spring in Tokyo. 
That, .in turn, could lead to tire first interna- 
tional Conference on currency rates since the 
onehdd in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, 
in 194A 

Governments, and in particular the U.S. 
government, now see political opportunity in 
regulating exchange rates. 


The Reagan administration, once an in- 
tractable foe of government intrusion in cur- 
rency markets, has come 10 recognize tire 
value of at least occasional intervention to 
. deal with tire effects of i is S200-billion feder- 
al budget deficits and such other pressing 
economic issues as protectionist attitudes in 
Congress and the developing world's debts 
to Western banks. 

Other industrial nations have been disen- 
chanted for several years with, the current 
system, in which currencies are left to vie for 
themselves in an often volatile marketplace. 
The change in American altitudes is encour- 
aging these nations to step up their efforts 
for change. 

The prospect of revising the currency sys- 
tem has cap rivaled some congressmen as 
wefl. Two men who are often mentioned as 
possible presidential candidates. Represen- 
tative Jade Kemp, Republican of New York, 
and Senator Bill Bradley, Democrat of New 
Jersey, have joined in sponsoring next 
month's monetary conference. 


“We hope to focus attention on the prob- 
lem of exchange rales," Mr. Bradley said. 
“The present system isn’t working as it was 
supposed to work, or we wouldn't have SI 20- 
billkm trade deficits," 


“I personally believe in stable, fixed ex- 
change rates and possibly a gold-backed role 
for the dollar." Mr. Kemp said. 


Governments are vitally concerned with 
the values of their currencies because they 
Some economists and political leaders in affect virtually every facet of an economy — 


the United States and abroad back a return 
to the system of tight supervision of curren- 
cy-exchange rates that was established 41 
%ears axo at the conference in Bretton 
Woods. “ 

That system, in which the dollar's value 
was pegged to gold and then the other cur- 
rencies were tied to the dollar, crumbled with 
rising world inflation at the sian of the 
1970s. Most of those now advocating change 
want a less rigid system, but a system, never- 
theless, to curb tile volatility of an unsuper- 
vised marketplace. 

A senior Reagan administration official, 
who declined to be named, said. “My person- 
al opinion is that we have to reform the 
system." 


the prices of imports and exports, the invest- 
ments that countries make outride their bor- 
ders, their inflation and employment 

In the case erf the United States, the rela- 
tively expensive dollar has been an impor- 
tant factor in the loss of jobs to foreign 
competition, to tire recession in agriculture 
and to the boom in Amen can travel abroad. 
At the same time, the high prices that debtor 
nations have 10 pay for dollars to make 
payments c-n their loans to .American banks 
is responsible in pari for their difficulties in 
making those payments. 

During the Bretton Woods era of “fixed" 
exchange rates, countries complained that 
the rates often undermined their economies, 
(Coo tinned on Page 4 , CoL 8 ) 


By James M. Markham 

.Vm > i<v. Tine- Stn-xt 

BRUSSELS — Abandoning a 
demand for a guaranteed stake in 
the U.S. Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive. Britain announced Wednes- 
day that difficulties blocking full 
British participation in the research 
program had been overcome. 

At the conclusion of a two-day 
meeting of NATO's Nuclear Plan- 
ning Group. Michael HeseJtine. the 
British defense secretary, made 
dear that in a discussion with Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger, the U.S. de- 
fense secretary , he had withdrawn a 
demand that British companies be 
assured a Sl.S-biilion share m the 
research program. 

The announcement u. as welcome 
trews for the Reagan administra- 
tion, which has been keen to have 
visible allied support for the pro- 
gram. 

In 2 statement issued Wednes- 
day. the NATO defense ministers 
declared that President Ronald 
Reagan will go to Geneva with the 
full support and solidarity of the 
alliance. 

Allied concern over SDI was ap- 
parent in the statement. At a meet- 
ing last March of the Nuclear Plan- 
ning Group in Luxembourg, tire 
ministers had expressed support 
for the American research pro- 
gram. which they said was aimed at 
enhancing stability and deterrence 
at reduced level of offensive nucle- 
ar forces. 

By contrast, the statement 
Wednesday addressed the issue in a 
section on the Soviet -American 
arms talks in Geneva and voiced 
strong support for U.S. positions 
concerning intermediate, strategic 
and space systems. 

This formulation — which did 
not specify which U.S. positions 
were bang supported — was pro- 
posed to Mr. Weinberger on Mon- 
day by Norway’s defense minister, 
Anders C. Sjaastad, to avoid an 
open split in Brussels just before 
the summit meeting, according to 
various delegation sources. 

“i think it was very important for 
the alliance that we could really 
have a unanimous support for the 
negotiation paragraph," said Mr. 
Sjaastad. who acknowledged that 
he had anticipated reservations of 
several other NATO members in 
diluting the Luxembourg language. 

“It means that this time we are 
concentrated on giving strong sup- 
port for the United States at Gene- 
va — and. of course, we hope and 
we expea that we will see eventual- 
ly results in all three areas of inter- 
est for the negotiations." 

“There was no way in which I 
could negotiate a contract that said 
‘X’ sura to *Y’ company on a specif- 


ic date." said Mr. Heseliine. who 
suggested that the likely large scale 
of involvement by British firms 
would generate lucrative contracts 
in research to develop ac ami-bal- 
listic missile shield. 

Mr. Heseliine. who announced 
the breakthrough after Mr. Wein- 
berger had left North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization headquarters 
to return to the United Sure;, said 
that both sides would submit what 
he called an outline of an agree- 
ment to their governments for ap- 
proval. 

He said that he did not know if 
an accord would be formally 
reached before the meeting be- 
tween President Ror-iiJ Reagan 
and Mikhail S. Gorbachev next 
month in Geneva. 

The prospect of a British- Ameri- 
can accord will make it easier for 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl to move 
forward with his plans for a similar 
arrangement covering the partici- 
pation uf West German industry in 
the projected S26-billion research 
undertaking Mr. Kohl and his ad- 
visers are known to be concerned 
that other NATO countries partici- 
pate in the SDI program. 

Id another delicately balanced 
sentence of the statement, the latest 
Soviet proposals for 50-percent 
cuts in offensive nuclear systems 
were characterized as one-sided 
and self-serving But the hope was 
expressed that the proposals were 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 5j 



U.S. Researchers Question Claim 
By French Team on AIDS Treatment 


The Associated Pros , 

BETHESDA, Maryland — 
Leading American, researchers 
have reacted with surprise and 

^fp^ench medical team that it had 
successfully prevented the progres- 
sion of the AIDS virus with a drug 
commonly used to prevent the re- 
jection of transplanted organs. - \ 

A researcher m acquired immune 
deficiency syndrome at the Nation- 
al Institutes of Health in Bethesda, 
Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, q ue stion e d 
Tuesday how the French research- 
ers could have announced the re- 
sults after only a week rf testing. 

Dr. Samuel Broder. cf die Na- 
tional Cancer Institute, said 
Wednesday that no AIDS patient 
should think he was being deprived 
of a curative therapy because the 


■:V„: 


■ts# 


* 








Technique Cuts 
Coronary Death# 

Reuters . . ; 

BOSTON — Dutch resdtidir 
era, in a report published 
Wednesday; said tbey had dis-' 
covered a teefinique that was 

said to dramatically reduce the 
number of deaths among heart 
attack victims. 

The technique, reported in 
the New England Journal of 
Medicine, calk for immediate 
injection by bystanders or par*- 
medics of the ‘drug Kdocaine 
into ‘ the shoulder muscles of 
suspected victims of heart at- 
tacks, The researchers said this 
cuts die likelihood of irregular 
heartbeat, a contributory cause* 
of death, six times. 

Dr. Bernard Lown of the 
Harvard University School of 
PubSc Health said the recom- 
.mendatxqo, if carried, out, “win 
save many of those who would 
otherwise die." . 


' drug was not available for treat- 
ment, ■ 

The French: researchers said 
Tuesday m Paris tbaicydospcrine- 
A, a drag used to preyem rejection 
of transplanted organs, could halt 
the growth of the AIDS virus and 
allow dw_body’s<femagedixDimme 
system to rebuild itself. 

The researchers said their treat- 
ment was not a cure for AIDS, 
which has been fatal in most cases, 

American cities and states are 
attempting to battle^AIDS with 
legal restetfies- Plage 3. .- 

butdouldhdp main tan AIDS vic- 
tims until a drug is found to elimi- 
nate the virus. 

The doctors, Philippe Even, 
Jean-Marie Andrieu, and Alain 
Vepet, said they had witnessed 
what they called spectacular Im- 
provements m two ^patients who 
had been given cydospbrine-A for 
Eve days. Ope of the patients was 
close to death, they said. 

They said that in both cases there 
was ft marked resurgence -of the 
immune ■ system as- measured ■ in 
heightened lends of the critical T-4 
lymphocyte cells that are destroyed 
byibe AIDS virus. 


Everett Koop, said on NBCs “To- 
day" show Wednesday that “there 
doesn’t seem much new to me." 

The French research team ac- 
knowledged it was highly unusual 
to announce results before months 
of confirming research. 

■ Drag Maker Comments 

In Basel, Switz er la nd , an immu- 
nology specialist at Sandaz Lab- 
oratories, which manufactures cy- 
closporine- A, said the company 
had not collaborated with die phy- 
sicians and did not know they 
would announce their findings 
publidy. Renters reported. 

Jorg Schaedelin. who is responsi- 
ble for immunology research at the 
company, said, “There is a danger 
of giving too many hopes," be said. 
“Everyone suffering from the dis- 
ease will expect a one" 


INSIDE 


■ Prosecutors in Genoa will 

handle the AchiHe Lauro hi- 
jacking case. Page 2. 

■ The U.S. space shuttle Chal- 

lenger was launched to carry 
out research sponsored by West 
Germany. Page 3. 

■ A Soviet seaman derided to 

return to his ship in the Missis- 
sippi River. Page 3. 

■ South Korea's prime minister 

said that almost a year of talks 
with North Korea have been 
discouraging. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ European Community indus- 
try ministers voted to end EC 
steel industry subsidies. Page 9. 

SCIENCE 


■ Comet-watchir 
part of Edmond 1 
tific activity. . 


was only 
ley’s srieh- 
Page 7. 


U.S. Navy Chief Assails Plea Bargain 
For Spy as 'Wrong Message to Nation’ 


By Ruth Marcus 
and George C Wilson 

Wasting ion Pcs: Scr.hre 

WASHINGTON — Navy Secre- 
tary John F. Lehman Jr. has as- 
sailed the government' * plea agree- 
ment with a retired navy 
communications expert. John An- 
thony Walker Jr., for sending “the 
wrong message to the cation and to 
the fleet." 

Mr. Lehman said John Walker's 
promise to divulge details about his 
espionage activities was not worth 
the price. 

The secretary said Tuesday he 
had objected to the arrangement 
under which Mr. Walker pleaded 
guilty to espionage and conspiracy 
Monday to gain lenient treatment 
his for son, Seaman Michael Lance 
Walker, who also pleaded guilty. 


John Walker will be sentenced to 
life in prison while Michael Walker 
will receive a 25-year sentence. 

Under the agreement, Michael 
Walker wiD be eligible for parole 
after serving one-third of his sen- 
tence, or eight years and four 
months. John Walker, 47, will be- 
come eligible for parole after serv- 
ing 10 years. 

.Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael 
Schatzow. who prosecuted the fa- 
ther and son. reacted angrily 10 Mr. 
Lehman’s comments. “If the secre- 
tary of the navy actually said that, 
you have to wonder why it is that 
people who are superior to him 
j-uthorized this agreement if he is 
right." 

“1 think it is worth it, and the 
people I have spoken to who have 

(Continued 00 Page 3. CoL 3) 



John F. Lehman Jr. 


After a Year of Rajiv, Indira Is f Almost Forgotten 5 


By Steven R. Weisman obtain high technology equipment for possi- 

New York Tima Service hie milhaiy use. 

NEW DELHI — The assassination of India's often uneasy relations with its 
Prime Minis ter Indira Gandhi a year ago neighbors have improved, although tensions 
Four other patients are under Thursday — Oct. 31, 1984 r- stunned India with Pakistan remain. But in Sri Lanka, 
treatment with cyclosporine- A at and raised the question of wbat life would be where leaders trace accused Indira Gandhi of 

like without the woman who dominated na- fomenting civil war, India has become a 
tiooal politics for nearly two decades. trusted mediator to end the fighting 
»• The answer, to thesorprise of many critics Perhaps most striking, Mr. Gandhi, 4], 

and supporters at the Gandhi family, is that has shown a new style of cooperation with 
Rjqiv Gandhi, her son and successor as the people his mother had opposed or tried 
prime mmisicr, has put such a strong person- to remove from power. The new attitude has 
al stamp on the government that the memory led to peace accords in the troubled states of 
of Mrs. Gandhi has receded. Punjab and Assam, and an atmosphere of 

In tire economic area, Rajiv Gandhi has political harmony generally, 
sharply increased tire role of private enter- “Think of the change we have seen.” said 


the Laemtec Hospital in Paris* but 
tire researchers said it was too eariy 
to give results, in their cases. ' ‘ 

Dr. Broder said,* 1 ! think on the 
basis of tire evidence presented 
thus 'far in scientific journals, no 
patient need fed that he is faring 
deprived 'of a curative therapy by 

not Laving access to cyclosporine 
at the present tune. 1- 


inefficiency, alleviating poverty and malnu- 
trition. improving die schools and curbing 
population growth. 

The critics also say that Mr. Gandhi has 
centralized too much power in his office and 
displayed a casual attitude toward preserv- 
ing civil hbenies. 

For example, be has allowed some politi- 
cal opponents to be deported or arrested, 
and thousands of Sikhs have been seized as 
suspected troublemakers and held in preven- 
tive detention. 

Opposition leaders charge that Mr. Gan- 
dhi’s program of tax breaks and fewer gov- 
ernment regulations benefits the upper-class 


society in which he moves. They say he has 

Dr. Fauci was even sharper in his ' prise and cut back on government reguk- Karan Singh, a former cabinet minister and yet to show he can manage the last' govera- 

reactioa: “There is not a scientist I dons, moving tire nation away from the so- of Indira Gandhi “A year ago Punjab mem machinery or use his high position to 

know wbo would give something rialist philosophy that had guided it since was m flames, and there was a genonl feeling educate the people. 

for one week lo sqt patients and Independence. we were caught in a net of conflicts. Rajiv - 1Tl ~ 

. . ^ fpjgjgg polity die change has been less has restored hope and faith in the political 

dramatic. While ho has shifted India’s orien- process." 

tad on more toward the West, he has main- But. Mr. Gandhi and his team of young 
tained ckse ties with the Soviet Union. A managers have many cri tics. Even many sup- 
brcakthroagb came this year when the Unit- porters agree they Save made minimal pro- 
ed States allowed India for the first time to gress in reducing government corruption and 


make an announcement in tire 
press. If you want to talk about 
ethics, you want to make., sure 
cmwthing works before, you. an- 
nounce it” 

Tire US. sargeon goreraL Dr. C. 


The country has almost forgotten Indira 
Gandhi, and there's a kind of relief that her 
style of politics is no more." said Romesh 
Thapar. a political scientist and severe critic 
of the law prime minister. 

But Mr. Thapar asserted that Indira Gan- 
dhi, in her first years in office after 1966. 


“was exactly like this — open, receptive, a 
breath of fresh air." He added that “many of 
us worry that this chap is subject to pressure, 
that he can go either way." 

Mr. Gandhi's rise is a remarkable chapter 
in modern Indian history because of the low 
expectations that man) people had for him. 

Although he grew up in an intensely politi- 
cal environment, Mr. Gandhi was never 
known for his political acumen or inclina- 
tions. Jawaharla! Nehru, Mr. Gandhi's 
grandfather and India's first prime minister, 
had relied on his daughter, Indira, for politi- 
cal advice. 

When Indira Gandhi looked to the next 
generation for similar help, it was not to 
Rajiv, but to her younger son, Sanjay, who 
was regarded as the heir to the family's 
political instincts. 

.Ml but proclaimed an amateur, Rajiv 
Gandhi stayed on the sidelines and became a 
commercial airline pilot. It was only after 
Sanjay Gandhi died while stum-flying a 
small airplane in 1980 that Mrs. Gandhi 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 3) 


Craxi to Lead 
Same Italian 
Coalition 

By Loren Jenkins 

M-osAntgiMi Pos: Sen-lit 

ROME— Prime Minister-desig- 
nate Bettiao Craxi succeeded 
Wednesday in reconstituting the 
same five-party coalition govern- 
ment that collapsed two weeks ago 
in the wake of the Achille Lauro 
ship hijacking. 

After meeting for three hours 
with leaders of the five parties that 
formed his previous Government. 
Mr. Craxi announced that “the cri- 
sis has been overcome." 

Mr. Craxi said the agreement en- 
visaged using a rare constitutional 
formula that, in effect, would re- 
verse his resignation Oct. 17 and 
submit his original government and 
mandate to a parliamentary vote of 
confidence next week. A positive 
vote has already been assured in 
the negotiations with party lejders. 

Mr. Craxi’s derision to allow a 
Palestinian leader, Mohammed 
Abbas, to leave Italy despke U.S. 
demands that he be arrested and 
held for extradition as the master- 
mind of the Achille Lauro hijack- 
ing led lo his government’s col- 
lapse. Defense Minister Giovanni 
Spadolini. the pro-American leader 
of the Republican Party, decided to 
pull his party's three ministers out 
of the coalition to protest Mr. Ab- 
bas’ release. 

Mr. Spadolini apparently was 
persuaded to rejoin the government 
Wednesday when Mr. Craxi agreed 
to Republican demands for more 
consultation within the governing 
coalition in the future and resulted 
Italy's commitment lo oppose in- 
ternational terrorism and stand by 
its Atlantic alliance partners, espe- 
cially the United Stales. 

Although Mr. Spadolini said 
there were no “victors and no ios- 
ers," Italian political commenta- 
tors said the Republican-created 
government crisis had left the party 
dangerously isolated, threatened 
new parliamentary elections, and 
endangered pending financial and 
government reforms dear to the 
pany. They said Mr. Spadolini had 
no choice but to rq'oin the coalition 
after proper face-saving accords 
were approved. 

Mr. Craxi said that once the 
leaderships of the various coalition 
parties approved the decision to 
resume the government, he would 
see President Francesco Cossiaa 
and withdraw his resignation sub- 
mitted OcL 17. 

That would open the door for 
Mr. Craxi to simply put his contin- 
uation as prime minister before a 
vole of confidence in Parliament 
next week after a debate on the 
Achille Lauro issue. 

The formula of returning to Par- 
liament was urged on Mr. Craxi by 
Mr. Cossiga over the weekend as a 
means of speeding up the forma- 
tion of a new government so it 
could get on with the pending fi- 
nancial legislation. Not to have 
done so would have risked having 
the government crisis bog down in 
interminable imrapam” haggling 
over new policies and new Cabinet 

portfolio allocations. 


'-'-'V-Wr 1 ; 












Page 2 


United Press International 

LONDON — The British gov- 
ernment announced Tuesday it was 
conducting an independent inquiry 
into allegations that eight young 
airmen were bullied by military in- 
vestigators into making false con- 
fessions that they had passed se- 
crets to the Soviet Union. 

Their trial ended Monday with a 
jury rejecting the prosecution's ar- 
gument that the men. based at Brit- 
ain's communications listening 
post in Cyprus, had engaged in 
homosexual orgies and had been 
blackmailed into passing sensitive 
information to Soviet agents for 
nearlv two vears until February 
1984.' 

One of the eight airmen acquit- 
ted, Christopher Payne, said he had 
made a false confession because of 
the psychological pressure of ques- 
tioning sessions of up'io 10 hours. 

“After six weeks of being inter- 
rogated by those thugs and being in 
a cell.” he said. “I was in no condi- 
tion to trust anyone.” 

John Stanley, minister of state 
for the armed forces, tokl the 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1985 


U.K. Probing Charges 
Of Coercion in Spy Case 


House of Commons that a senior 
attorney. David Calculi, would 
conduct an inquiry “into whether 
the investigation carried out by the 
Royal Air Force provost marshal 
branch and the army's special in- 
vestigation branch? was done “in 
accordance with lawful and proper 
procedures.” 

Mr. Stanley said Mr. Calcutt was 
to report “with all practical speed” 
because “while these allegations re- 
main on the table it is very damag- 
ing for the service police.” 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher also told the Commons 
that she had referred the case to the 
Security Commission, a watchdog 
body which advises the government 
on spy matters. She said rite would 
“now consult the chairman of the 
Security Commission and report to 
the home in due course.” 

Denzil Davies, the opposition 
Labor Party spokesman on de- 
fense, said in the Commons debate 
that the case against the airmen 
was “full of boles” and had been 
“based on concessions extracted at 
best by dubious means and at worst 
by barbaric means.” 

The prosecution's case against 
the airmen was based solely on 
confessions which they later repu- 
diated, news reports said. Most of 
the 1 19-day trial, Britain’s longest 
and most costly concerning state 
secrets, was conducted in private 
for security reasons. 

Mr. Stanley said Defease Secre- 
tary Michael Heseliine had ordered 
the original investigation into units 
on Cyprus because of “reported 
breaches of security” there. 


Ransom Is Paid; 
Kidnappers Free 
Italian Aristocrat 




United P re ss International 


ROME — An Italian aristo- 
crat held by kidnappers for four 
months was reunited with her 
family Wednesday, two weeks 
after relatives paid a ransom. 

Acting on an anonymous 
telephone tip, police found 
Marchesa Isabella Guglidmi 
Grarioli della Rcrvere. 37, on 
Tuesday night beside a highway 
on the outskirts of Sena, 44 
miles (71 kilometers) south of 
Florence. Her hands and feet 
were bound. 

The police took her to her 
country estate in Menial to IX 
Castro, 78 miles northwest of 
Rome, and reunited with her 
family. 

Hooded men armed with 
submachine guns and pistols 
abducted the marchesa June 27 
as she drove borne from a horse 
race. Her family left a ransom 
of about 2 billion lire ($1.13 
million) at a prearranged loca- 
tion in the town of San vivenzio 
two weeks ago, police sources 
said. 



Isabella GugUebni 


Soviet Official Believes 
Sakharov’s Wife Will 
Be Allowed to Leave 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Airlines Call for Tougher ^ ^ 


The Associated Press 

BONN — The Soviet ambassa- 
dor to West Germany said 
Wednesday that he believed the 
wife of Andrei D. Sakharov, the 
Soviet dissident has official per- 
mission to travel to the West for 
medical care. 

Ambassador Vladimir Semyon- 
ov’s comments were the first public 
remarks made by any Soviet offi- 
cial about reports this week that 
Yelena G. Bonner wiQ be allowed 
to leave the Soviet Union for treat- 
ment of an eye ailment 

Mr. Semyonov said he thought 
Mrs. Bonner. 60. would be allowed 
to leave the Soviet Union. 

“I have read that she intends to 
do it, but I don't know when she 
plans to go or where,” Mr. Se- 
myonov said. Asked if she has offi- 
cial permission to leave, he replied. 
“I believe so.” 

Mis. Bonner’s son, Alexei Se- 
myonov. said Wednesday in a tele- 
phone interview from his home in 
Newtown, Massachusetts: “It 


Protestants Urge Thatcher to Hold 
Referendum on Any Ulster Accord 


Reuters 


LONDON — Two leaders of 
Northern Ireland’s Protestant ma- 
jority met with Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher on Wednesday 
and later said they had urged her to 
hold a referendum on any agree- 
ment giving the Irish Republic a 
say in the affairs of the Britisb- 
-luled province. 

The Reverend Ian Paisley and 
James Molyneaux, leaders of 
unionist parties favoring direct rule 
from London, warned of serious 
disorder if such an agreement were 
pushed through against the wishes 
of the majority in Northern Ire- 
land. 

The Sunday Press newspaper in 
Dublin had reported that officials 
of Mrs. Thatcher’s government and 
the Dublin government of Prime 
Minister Garret FitzGerald had 
reached agreement on an accord 
for Northern Ireland. 

The paper said that just a few 
days erf negotiations remained to 
complete an agreement that would 
give the British and Irish govern- 
ments joint a dminis tration in Ul- 
ster. 

Mr. Paisley and Mr. Molyneaux 


said Mrs. Thatcher had told them 
there had as yet been no agreement 

“We said: 'Let the ballot speak 
before the bomb and bullet 
speak.' ” Mr. Paisley said. 

He said that “the Northern Ire- 
land people should have the veto” 
on any plan, and that only an inter- 
nal settlement could solve the prov- 
ince’s problems. 

Both leaders said they would use 
their positions to attempt to reduce 
violence. But they said they would 
have little influence with paramili- 
tary groups if Mrs. Thatcher did 
not listen now. 


Mr. Paisley said unionists saw a 
British agreement with Ireland as a 
move toward a united Ireland. “We 
are not suckers,” he said. “The one 
question people are asking is: ‘Are 
we going to be sold out by Maggie 
Thatcher?’ ” 


seems like especially now it’s tree; 
especially after this comment by 
the ambassador.” 

He said Mrs. Bonner’s relatives 
in Massachusetts have heard noth- 
ing from either Mrs. Bonner or any 
Soviet officials, bnt the family had 
tried to place a caD to Gorki. 250 
miles (400 kilometers) east of Mos- 
cow, where the couple live in exile. 
“For the last two years all the calls 
have not gone through, maybe to- 
day this one wiH go through.” he 
said. 

On Monday, the West German 
newspaper Bild said Mrs. Bonner 
had received permission to travel to 
the West, and a day later Victor 
Louis, a usually weB-inf onned So- 
viet journalist, appeared to confirm 
BBd's report, and said the United 
States was a likely destination. 

BOd said Mrs. Bonner would be 
allowed, to spend two or three 
months in the West, and then re- 
turn to job her husband. 

Analysts have linked such a 
move by the Soviet Union to ma- 
neuvering before next month's 
U 5. -Soviet summit meeting be- 
tween President Ronald Reagan 
and Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 

Ambassador Semyonov spoke 
after a news conference with offi- 
cials of the West German Commu- 
nist Party in Bonn. 

When asked if Mr. Sakharov, the 
Soviet Union’s most prominent hu- 
man rights advocate; would also be 
allowed to leave, Mr. Semyonov 
replied: “That is another question 
that I cannot answer.” 

Mrs. Bonner is believed to suffer 
from glaucoma, an eye aibnent that 
threatens her vision. 


^iSflfaternational Air Transport **“5*2^*^^ bad 
era. said at the end of the group s Montreal security 

SMS made public. 


adopted a security resolution that will now go id w Delegate* 

o£2* for final appnrtL Ite 
wn pfmVar#^ ihai a final decision for action rests 


govern- 


i im i a a *** ** * 

^Affibe representatives said budga?a*S 

security and rising fuel costs wot profits this \ear 

increase faxes. The association said it expectedmOTbers P™ indliiin 

to fafl w $100 million from $500 nulhcnm 1984. Next >ear- 

expects losses. 




lui 


U.S. Farm Banks Seek $6-Biflion Loan 

WASHINGTON (AF) —The Farm Credit System 
Wednesday for $6 biliion to baD out the agency over the nex ycara, 

saying it had “no other choke." . . ^ ^ coupled with 

ized internal struc ture . 




Ray - 

system’s lobbying engamza- 


the radical transition under way in 
chairman of the Farm Cretfil Council, tne system 
tion, said at a House Agriculture Comnntree heanng. The 
is the largest farm lender in the United Stales, with 570 billion m loans 
It lost $57-7- mitlww in die bird quarts. 


Sweden Plays Down CoUkaon of Ships 

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) — The Swedish government sought Wednes- 
day to play down an incident in the Baltic Sea on Tuesday m " 


Soviet minesweeper was involved in a collision with a Swedish intelligen- 
ce-gathering vessel. 

PrimeMmister OloC Palme said that the collision, in international 
waters, had not been serious. “There is no reason to dramatize tne 
incident,” he said. .... *** . J 

The Hffwna- staff said that the collision occurred while the LStXMon 
Swedish vessel Orion was engaged in routine monitoring of Soviet naval 
maneuvers southeast of the Swedish island of Gotland. ‘Tne Soria 
minesw ee per and Orion hart been maneuvering near each other for 
several hours when die collision occurred," h said. The Orion suffered 
minor damage mid there woe no injuries. 


slut 


Official sources have said Britain 
and Ireland, which has traditional 
ties with die Roman Catholic mi- 
nority in Northern Ireland, are 
dose to agreeing on a treaty to help 
end 16 years of sectarian violence 
that has claimed 2^00 lives. 


The talks have reportedly cen- 
tered on a consultative role for Ire- 
land in governing the province. 

Mr. Paisley’s Democratic 
Unionist Party and Mr. Molyn- 
eaux’s Ulster Unionist Party are 
the two biggest in Northern Ire- 
land. 





THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION 


invites applications for the post of 

MEDICAL OFFICER 

IN THE PARASITIC DISEASES PROGRAMME 


which will become vacant in July 1986 

IVtfar As the Senior Medical Officer to the Unit of filarial Infections within 
the fteasitic Diseases Pr ogramme the incumbent wiH advise and cooperate 
with WHO Regional Offices and nationd health services on the technical 
aspects of fitariasis control programmes, associated field studies, and the 
integration of these activities into Primary Health Care Systems. The infections 
covered in this programme ere the lymphatic Warioses, onchocerciasis, loose 
and draoontiasis- The incumbent should furthermore be capable of initiating 
and coord noting research in this area, providing epidemiological i n format i on 
on the pubic health and socioeconomic importance of the filarial in f ectio n s, 
gyving advice and guidance on control methods, acting as Secretary to the 
WHO Expert Avisory Pond on parasitic Diseases (Filarial Infection), and also 
serving as Secretory of the Scientific Working Group on filariasb of the 
UNDP/Wodd Bank/WHO Specid Programme far Research and Training in 
Tropical Diseases. 

Quafificatians: Medical degree from a recognized University. A post- 
graduate degree or equivdent in tropical medicine or public health would be 
an asset At least five years' experience in the design and administration of 
resecxdi and control programmes on parasitic diseases. Tropical field and 
laboratory experience in research and control of filarial diseases would be 
highly desirable, including practical knowledge of medical entomology. 
Excellent knowledge of English or French with a good working knowledge of 
the Other. 


The safcxy sofa ranges from US $51,746 [single) end from US $ 5 6.035 (**th dependents) 
net of tax per smunt 

Aft lif utue ore invited from candidates of other sex - oppicsfioni from women ore 
encouraged. QuoSfiod conddotes should sand their de co ded eumadum vitae not later 
#wn 28 February 1 980 quoting F1L/86 Kr. 


Personnel (MPR) 
World Health Organization 
CH- 1211 Geneva 27 


Only those c ori d x lu te s under serious cooxder d ton will be conta cted 


Reagan to Give 
Anlnteruiew 


To Soviet Press 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan will be in- 
terviewed by four Soviet jour- 
nalists in the Oval Office on 
Thursday in what the White 
House said it hoped was “a sign 
of a new and more open infor- 
mation policy on the part of the 
Soviet Union.” 


The last American president 
interviewed by Soviet journal- 
ists was John F. Kennedy on 
Nov. 21, 196L in Hyannisport, 
Massachusetts. 

The White House also an- 
nounced that Mr. Reagan will 
address a joint session of Con- 


gress on the evening of Nov. 21, 
> upon his return to 


immediately upon 
Washington from his meeting 
in Geneva with the Soviet lead- 
er, Milchail S. Gorbachev. 


The four Soviet journalists 
include representatives from 
Tass. Pravda, Izvestia, and an- 
other Soviet news service. No- 
voslL 


■ Israelis Reported in Moscow 
Western diplomats said Wednes- 
day that two Israelis visited Mos- 
cow recently, raising tbcpossibfliry 
that a major increase in the number 
of Soviet Jews allowed to emigrate 
might be imminent. United Press 
International reported from Mos- 
cow. 

One of the Israeli visitors report- 
edly was representing the country's 
national amine, El AL The other 
was reported to be a specialist in 
property claims. 

In Jerusalem, El A1 denied that 
any of its representatives had visit- 
ed Moscow. Spokesmen at the 
i minister's office and Foreign 
said they “know nothing 

about iL' 

A Western diplomat in Moscow 
said, “The rumors are growing in 
the presummit hothouse atmo- 
sphere.” He said a dramatic move 
by the Kremlin could not be ruled 
out. 


Nakasone Yo>vstoIiinftMilita^ Fund 


TOKYO (Reuters) — Prime; 
Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone 
promised Wednesday to keq> Ja- 
pan's military spending within 1 
percent of the. country's gross na- 
tional product, at least for caw year. 

Opposition parties in the Did, 
Japan’s pxrEamem, extracted the 
pledge at a session of the budget 

The r/u n LTirf^ee tfru 

cussing a five-year program of nriE- 
tary spending, winch begins in 
April and had seemed likely to 
breach the I percent raling im- 
posed in 1976. 


prime mil 
Ministry : 


Under pressure from the United 
States, Mr. Nakasone had been 
seeking to push nriHtxi y spending 
above the bunt 



Yftsahtro Nakasone 


Botha Party Loses Seat in By-Election 


U.S. Army Accepts Hardier 

United Press International 

DETROIT — Allen Pepke, 18, 
who marched S35 miles (867 kilo- 
meters) from his hone near Detroit 
to Washington to prove he was fit 
for the army, has been sworn into 
the service. 


JOHANNESBURG (Combined Dispatches) — A hard-fine South 
African party defeated the rating National Party on Wednesday in onejrf 
five by-elections that were being viewed as a test of President Pieter W. 
Botha’s racial policies, election officials said. 

- 77m ajtrarigmHastigteNaaanaleftrty defeated the National Party 
in the Sasolburg constituency by 367 votes to win its first parliamentary • 
seat. In the town of Springs the rightist Conservative Party came within 
-749 votes of upsetting the National Party candidate. In 1981, the 
National Party won the Springs seat by 2,481 votes. The National Arty 
retained its Port Natal constituency by 2^205 votes. 

The by-elections were being held in five towns to SI vacancies in the 
all-white chamber of South Africa's tricamend, segregated Parliament 
The National Party had held all five seats. (Beaten, UP1 ) 


U.S. Foresees 'Shutdown’ 


H Budget Proposal Fails 


Compiled bp Oar Staff Pram Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan 
administration said Wednesday 
that the U.S. government would 
not honor its checks after Nov. 14if 
House and Senate negotiators 
could not agree on a legislation to 
balance the federal budget. 

An official said the situation 
threatened to force a “shutdown of 
the entire government." 

A House-Senate conference 
committee continued work 
Wednesday on a plan, already 
passed by the Senate, to force a 
balanced budget by 1991. 

The measure is attached to a bill 
to inc reas* the nati onal debt limit 
from $1,824 trillion to more than 
S2 trillion. 

Wittout the increase in borrow- 
ing authority, government officials 
say they will have to sell assets in 
the Social Security trust fund to get 
the cash to pay recipients Friday, 
and will run out of all financial 

maneuvering room by mid-Novem- 

ber. But there was no sign there 
would be quick action on the plan. 


House Democrats are seeking 
changes to increase die effect of die 
plan in its first year, and to exempt 
poverty programs from automatic 
spending cuts that the proposal 
might set off. 

Republicans in the Senate have 
indicated they will resist such 
rhang ec, making it unclear whether 
a compromise version of the plan 
can be drafted. 

On Wednesday. James C Miller 
3d, the director of the Office of 
Management and Budget, ap- 
peared in the White House briefing 
room to say that “if some action is 
not forthcoming immediately, the 
president may be forced to take 
specific, responsible action to mini- 
mize the adverse impact of this in- 
ordinate delay." 

Although Mr. Miller said Pres- 
dent Ronald Reagan has not decid- 
ed on specific actions, be empha- 
sized that “the government would 
have to dose down.” (AP, UPl) 


Professor in Busing Stotfy Resigns 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — A University of Chicago professor, who 
was a ( member of a committee monitoring a fedenil study of school 
desegregation, has resigned, charging that the study was technical 
flawed and biased against busing. • / 

The professor, Gary Orfidd, urg ed the U. JL Commission an Civil 
Rights cm Tuesday to prevent what he described as “die further waste of 
public money” by “skating down fins misbegotten study” at once. The 


determine which techniques have been most .effective in promoting 
contact across radal and ethnic groups. . 

In a letter to the commission chairman, Clarence M. Fendkton Jr„ Mr. 
Orfidd said that “die study has been foensed on a very limited set 
research questions, showing so concern for the effects of desegregation 
on blade and Hispanic duUdraa” while foenriug almost exclusively on die 
departure of white chfldrea from the poWic schools. 


For the Record 


^cmesdotis progress” was made at peace talks in Nairobi on Wednes- 
day between the Ugandan ntifitaiy government and the main rebdgronp. 

President Danid AiapMoi of Kenya-said without elaboratin g (Iteutersl 
The remains of nine mote US. s ervicemen who had been — — ■ 


Indochina were delivered late Tuesday to US. mifitaiy officers at Tra 
Air Fence Base in California /ioi 

The Luted Bermuda Party strengthened its 17-year hold oa the island’s 
government Tuesday by winning a record 31 of 40 seats in the House of 
Assembly with 62 percent of the vote. , /UP/1 

Harry W. SUandeman, US. spedd envoy for Central AnKfica, met 
with Ambassador Carlos Tmmennan of Nicaragua in Washington on 
Tuesday in the first senior-levdcontaaancceariy this year. US. officials 
said there was no narrowing of differences. (WP) 


An international organization operating a computerized worldwide 
system for processing financial transactions between banks, located 
in Brussels, Belgium, has an immediate opening for an 



(m/f-ref. IHT135) 


The position involves: 

□ accurate market assessment for the area and use of the proper means in order 
to reach the target objectives defined; 

□ responsibility for the area budget, with proper planning of resources and 
control of expenses incurred; 

□ day to day running of the area office and regular preparation of status reports; 

□ the provision of adequate support to client banks. 


The ideal candidate 

□ 


□ 



and 45. 


mprenenseve mtemanonai banking Background 
: of automation and communication environments; 


□ 


a solid 

knowiedg 

has a high level of personality, with a flexibility enabling him to work at all 
levels in The customer environments, and is willing to travel extensively; 
is an excellent communicator with a demonstrated ability to perform adequate 
presentations in a public forum. 


If the challenge of this 
opportunity appeals to 
you, please send a detai- 
led curriculum vitae and 
photo to: 

Jerry RUBIN, 
Personnel Consultant, 
chaussee de La Hulpe 1 85 
1170 Brussels. 


All applications will be 
lied with absolute 


applii 
handled 
discretion and all appli- 
cants will receive a reply. 




United Press Inientothmal 

ROME — Prosecutors in Genoa 
will handle the Achille Lanr o hi- 
jacking case, but a Sicilian arrest 
warrant for the Palestine Libera- 
tion Front leader, Mohammed Ab- 
bas, remains in force, an Italian 
court ruled Wednesday. 

In addition, the coart ruled that 
parallel investigations already con- 
ducted by Sicilian magistrates must 
be considered valid. 

The decision means that, even 
though Genoa prosecutors have 
said they found no evidence that 
Mr. Abbas was involved in the hi- 
jacking, the arrest warrant remains 
in effect. 

Sicilian magistrates issued the 
warrant during the weekend, charg- 
ing Mr. Abbas with complidty to 
commit homicide, kidnapping and 
hijacking. He also faces charges of 
belonging to a terrorist group, and 


possessing and transporting weap- 
ons and explosives. 

Mr. Abbas has been the key fig- 
ure in the hijacking Investigation 
since Prime Minister Bertino Craxx 
ignored a UJL request that Mr. 
Abbas be arrested and allowed him 
to leave for Yugoslavia. The deci- 
sion strained UJS.-Ita0an relations 
and led to the collapse of Mr. 
Crax?s five-party coaEtxm. 


said shortly after he heard of the 
court ruling: “We cannot but be 
pleased by the dec i si o n. From this 
moment on, we win do our best to 
ascertain, the whole truth of the 
case.” 

Mr. Cadi HecJmrd to comment 
on the court’s decision to reject a 
Rome stale prosecutor's motion 
that the Abbas arrest warrant be 
quashed for lack of evidence. 

The men already in custody may 


stand trial within two weeks on the 
amplest charges they face. A Gen- 

SrtrS^’i. Francesco Mc ^® n L 

said Tuesday he was considering 

requesting a trial granted in spedad 

cases to cut through red tape. 

„ £afcs seek to circumvent 
Italy's often-riow Judicial proce- 
wtained a quick 
Oral m 1982 for the Red BriLtot 
mban guerrillas who IriduabS 

S^^Sf casebcca ^*fi 

enuae ship s home port is Genoa. 
J* 11 ? 03 * asked jurisdi^^L 

afcRsSfeSS 

had negotiated their surraSt- * 10 


i 


Austrians Find More Chemicals in Wine 


Reuters 


VIENNA — A new scandal 
came to light Wednesday in the 
Austrian urine industry when it was 

disclosed that three toxic cheminib 

bad been found in test3 on wine 


during the past three weeks. 

An Agriculture Ministry spokes- 


man said the chemicals were added 

as preservatives to wines from Bur- 
genland province in the southeast 
and included sodium azide, which 
is used as an additive to detonators. 
Wine preservatives are illegal in 
Austria. The ^xdeesman said, there 
was ho indication that any of the 
wines had boen exported. He said 


SSS ^ - 

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B.y 'Boyce Rensbergcx 

WathuigraH Post Semct 

CAffi OlNaVERaL, Florida 
— The Ui space ship ChaHra ger, 
on a scientific mission chartereobv 
me West German space aaenev 
was launched Wednesday, f<£S£ 
aght astronauts and scientists and 
a research laboratoryinto oriwt 201 
miles above Earth. 

TJ® “gk passengers were a re- 

cord number ioorHi in one vdnde 

m space. It was the nimh fSght by 
^250-ton shuttle ChaSengex 
and the 22d space shuttle rnkg^tt 
- Onty one problem; reported to 
be minor, clouded the shuttle’s 
flight: One of- the craft's three fnri- 
cells that supply electricity mal- 
functioned, suggesting that it might 
produce less power than planned. 

• The shuttle flight, the first one 

- entirely charteredby one customer, 
•Mil be devoted to scientific experi- 
mrats by three scientists, two West 
German and one Dutch. ■ 

The shuttle’s cargo contain* a 
1 7-foot-long (5. ! 5-meter) laborato- 
ry in which the scientists- will -cany 
.out 76 experiments during the 
planned seven-day flight. The car- 
go bay normahv accommodates 
satellites. 

American astronauts win fly the 
. shuttle while the Europeans, assist- 
ed by three of the live Amer ican* 
aboard, do the experiments. 

To accommodate a crew of this 
‘ size, NASA engineer initalkd an 
extra “sleep station,” bringing the 
. total' to four. Work in the laborato- 
ry will conducted in shifts around 
the dock. 

. Ground control of the scientific 

- operations will be in another coun- 
try for the first time, at the West 

- German space agency’s center in 
'OberpfaJTenbofen, near. Munich. 

. Ground control remains at the 
-Houston’s Johnson Space Center: 

“This particular - flight is very 
.pleasing to NASA,” said Jesse 
-Moore, associate administrator for 
r space flight for the National Aero- 

- namics and Space Administration. 




- ; j * 7 ' T " •' ' 

“The Xknnea^ahd NASA have 

Wejt Oennan -space officials 
edwed mnch; idse- same sentiment 
shoot tbcjcocoeraiiaxL West Ger- 


— m -afflm (odor- 
terthedai^;-^ . 

Since qidb ^ sboreiof West Ger- 
man s cjqblj^ ftad^engineera have 

butiemg GeaSui' in even move 

common lapgjiftgf iVyy than it m s 

more thari : 2&ye*tt ago when Wer- 
ner von Brann other German 
scientists for fewHle formed the 
. nucleus of (he Infant VS. space 
program. \ ( '. . . 

■The laboratory, eaflod Spacelab 
and bnSi by. the European Space 

Agency, an intcrnmionai consor- 
tium, consms rtf a roan lined with 
rads of scientific equipment, 
pKoe spedaDy inrik to -c*tryoai 
one experiment. 

■Most of the exper im ents were 
designed by German -researchers 
bat e nnmber are. from France, 
Spain, Indy, Britain, the Nether- 
lands, Be&nm, Switzerland and 
the United States. All are intended 
to take advantage of the essentially 
we ight l es s cop&ioBS of space to 
study various processes that are 
nonnafiy aETeosed by gravity- 

The largest dtexs of experiments 
is in m at eri als science, where one 
goal t$ to dtrodkn lighter and stron- 
ger . metals boo other materials. 
When- molten metal cools and 
hardens* gravity alters its crystal 
structure. Without gravity, some 
s ci entis ts believe, such substances 
may crystallize with a more perfect 
arrangement of atoms. 

The crew wfl) be led by Henry W. 
Hartsfidd, die co mman der, and 
Steven EL h^el, the pikx. In addi- 
tion there winbe three UJS. mission 
specialists, Bonnie J. Dunbar, 
James F. Buchli and fimnn s. Bin-, 
ford Jr. 

The German scientists are Ernst 
Messcxsdnmd and Reinbard Fur- 
rer. Wiibbo J. Odtds is the Dutch 
scientist. 



* r „• U.S. Is Satisfied on Soviet Seaman 

After Interview, State Dept. Says He Doesn’t Want Asylum 


An FBI copy of one of die pbotographs used in die UJS. case against John A. Walker for 
^jymg. ft is said to show a drop-off point be employed for passing secrets to Soviet agents. 

Navy Assails Plea Bargain for Spy 


(Continued from Page 1) 
spent. ibdr entire careers doing in-, 
lelligence work feel that very 
strongly, too,” Mr. Schaizow said. 

He said he understood (hat the 
plea agreements were approved by 
Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger and Attorney General 
Edwin Meese 3d. 

The ptea-bargain agreement in- 
cluded John Walker’s promise to 
tdl the government exactly what he 
furnished the Soviet Umcm so that 
officials can uke necessary action 
to ease the damage. 

During much of the Vietnam 
War, Mr. Lehman said, the Soviet 
Union was decoding US. messages 
on what ships were gong where, 
what troops could and could not do 
on the ground and the Hants placed 
on VS. bombers. 

“We have to assume," Mr. Leh- 
man srid,-tbat Moscow passed to 
iheNonh Vietnamese at least some 
of the secret messages it intercept- 
ed about U5. military movements 
and tactics. 

In response to a question, Mr. 


Lehman said the Walker ring's es- 
pionage “very well could have" led 
to U S. deaths in Vietnam “if we 
are able to establish that compro- 
mises and operational informa- 
tion’' bad been passed to Hanoi. 

Mr. Lehman said that “we in the 
navy are disappointed at (he plea 


bargain." 
He sai 


le said “it continues a tradition 
in the Justice Department of treat- 
ing espionage as just another white- 
collar crime, and we think that it 
should be m a very different cate- 
gory." Michael Walker should have 
received “the maximum sentence 
allowable under the law." he said. 

“Here’s a guy at the age of con- 
sent who was out on a carrier with 
5.500 other kids risking their lives, 
and be was prepared to compro- 
mise all of his shipmates, not to 
mention his whole country, here he 
was turning over documents know- 
ingly to the Soviet Union ” Mr. 
I^hman said 

“One can have a human sympa- 
thy for his family situation and . . . 
his father leading him astray," the 


Fear of AIDS Prompts Legal Moves in U.S. 


secretary said “bu: nevertheless a 
human being is responsible for his 
acts, and the acts were traitorous 
acts and ought to be treated differ- 
ently than insider tradiag." 

Mr. Schatzow said Monday that 
the government agreed to the 
lighter sentence for Michael Walk- 
er. who also faced the possibility of 
life in prison, because it was “ es- 
sential’ ’ to learr. precisely what se- 
crets John Walker hzc passed to 
the Soviet Union is IS years of 
espionage. 

Mr. Lehman said however, that 
while the details are “nice to 
know," investigators already 
“know the bounds of the problem, 
we know what he had to and 
whai he almost certainly compro- 
mised. and so we’re not going to 
save any monev hv what he tells 
us." 

The “only possible payoff." Mr. 
Lehman said “is if he reveals addi- 
tional spies. But short of doing 
that, 1 don’t see anything he can 
provide us with is worth ... the 

mfrwage th a t jc SCCL" 


ilip SI 

•V*m Yvri Times Smite 

WASHINGTON — A Soviet 
seaman who was captured after 
lumping from his ship into the Mis- 
sissippi River has assured US. offi- 
cials that he does not want political 
asyium and will be aflowed to re- 
turn to the Soviet Union, according 
to the State Department. 

The announcement Tuesday 
came after extensive discussions 
between the seaman and American 
officials. The State Department 
said that the seaman. Miroslav 
Medvid. had satisfied U.S. officials 
that he wanted to return to the 
Soviet Union and was now back 
aboard bis ship near New Orleans. 

The decision averted a potential- 
ly divisive incident three weeks be- 
fore the Geneva summit meeting 
between President Ronald Reagan 
and the Soviet leader, Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev. 

U.S. officials had refused to let 
the seaman's ship, the M.V. Mar- 
shal Konyev, leave its anchorage 
while diplomats were determining 
Mr. Medvufs intentions. 

The State Department said that 
Mr. Medvid had signed a Russian- 
language statement late Tuesday 
afternoon confirming his wishes to 
return to the Soviet Union. 

“He was alert and was deter- 
mined by VS. medical, legal and 
other representatives to be compe- 
tent to make a decision concerning 
w hether he wanted to remain in the 
VS.” the State Department said. 
“Seaman Medvid reaffirmed his re- 
peated statements that he wished to 
return to the U.S.S.R." 

“Seaman Medvid signed this 
statement," it said. “We then re- 
leased Seaman Medvid" for return 
to the ship “in accordance with his 
wishes. The United States govern- 
ment considers this matter dosed.” 

The incident began when Mr. 
Medvid jumped from the moving 
freighter into the Mississippi River 
and was caught by U.S. authorities. 
Within hours, U.S. Border Patrol 
agents decided to return the sea- 
man to the vessel despile his pro- 
tests. A witness said Mr. Medvid 
was kicking and screaming as he 


was forced to rebcurd the freighter. 

The State Department, which is 
usually involved in asylum cases, 
said that it did not learn of the 
incident until 3:40 P.M. Friday, 
nearly half a day after Mr. Medvid 
bad been returned to the ship. 

On Monday. Soviet representa- 
tives allowed the seaman to be re- 
moved from lhe freighter for an 
interview with a State Department 
official who speaks Russian 

The Sure Department said that 
several others were present at the 
interview aboard a U.S. Coast 
Guard cutter, including an Ameri- 
can military doctor, a" representa- 
tive from the Immigration and 
Naturalization Sen ice. two officers 
from the Soviet Embassy, a Soviet 
doctor and the freighter's skipper. 


ing events of the past few days, he 
repeatedly said that he wanted to 
return to the Soviet Union." ac- 
cording to the State Department's 
statement. 

“Because we wanted to be abso- 
lutely certain that Seaman Medvid 
understood he had a dear choice, 
and con ridering his sickness earlier 
that afternoon, the Department of 
State decided that Seaman Medvid 
should be given an opportunity to 
get a good night's sleep on shore.” 
He had suffered from nausea earli- 
er in the day. 

He was given a phwcai exami- 
nation and a one-hour psychologi- 
cal evaluation at a nearby navy 
facility, the State Department ^:d". 
Mr. Medvid was given another ex- 


“ Although Medvid did not re- animation Tuesday morning oy an 
spend to some questions concent- air force psychiatrist. 


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i;i Kii^irisr Study Rcs^ 

■ .- Onapirir 

rz i fedad 

• -■ ■. • * Lhc jiudv *z ti’* 


■ By E. R. Shipp casl^ toudicd off a contro v ersy last 

New. York Tima Smce week. Louie Wdch, the Republican 
NEW YORK — States and cities chaflengcr -to the Democratic in- 
across the United States are enact- c unt bent, Kathyrn 3. Whitmire, 
ing numerous proposals prompted said that one of his plans for com- 
by public concern about AIDS. bating AIDS was to “shoot the 

• From town halls to the halk of queers.”- 

Congress, laws and gpiddines con- The remark was made as Mr. 

• nected with the emeigence of ac- Wdch was preparing to be inter- 

qnired immune deficiency syn- ’ 
drome have been adopted or 
proposed to: f „... ' .: ' ' . ; ’ 

■'•Ban 'the opaatitjn~bf Mflt- 
houses that are havens of homosex- 
ual activity. Tlus week, (Sovotot 
M ario M. Cuomo ordered officials 
in New Yoric Qty to close estab- 
lishments permitting “high-risk 
sexual activities.” . ' 

• Require that certain workers ® * local news program, 

take a test that detects the presence H^ be did mit know his micro- 
of the AIDS antibody in the blood, pbfMiewason. 


New York Ovil Liberties Union, 
said: “We are getting the political 
short-circuit response to problems: 
Throw out a platform as fast as 
possible, satisfy some constiments 
and get some publicity.'' 

A nugor area of debate concerns 
a test that determines if a person 
has been infected with the AIDS 


It is a matter of debate whether the spate of 
lawmaking is meant to curtail the spread of 
AIDS or to appease a fearful public. 


virus. Scientists believe that the 
presence of (he antibody usually 


health cards if they are free of in- 
fectious disease. A similar ordi- 
nance was enacted in Miami last 
month over the objections of local 
health officials. 

On Wednesday, Colorado be- 
came the first state in the nation to 
require that the names and address- 
es of those found to have the AIDS 
antibody be reported on a confi- 
dential basis to the state health de- 
partment 

Health officials have argued that 
the reporting requirement is neces- 
sary to track the disease. They also 
poin t to their long record of confi- 
dential handling of reports on ve- 
nereal disease victims. But those 
opposed to it, including Dr. John 
A. Zbarbaro, Denver’s director of 


r.l 


■: 1." 5- Commas 

: r . J-T as “the 

r* •■-rsi-iiaisudy & 
fiaxpsaaa* 6 

- : dTerriwuF 

A-caeM. PQ^ 

- 

_ - -v- effsettd^ 
v . -jilnffli 0 ^ 

. • 0'»k- 


. ..» 3 reiaRif | n , ' to *lll 


a sign Of probable infection with 
the virus. ' 

• Require that those «du3se tests 
for AIDS antibodies are positive be 
identified to state health officials. 

• Quarantine AIDS victims. 

• Make it a felony for homosex- 
uals and intravenous drug users to 


In San Frandsoo, the Board of 
Supervisora is considering a pro- 
posal, to protect those with AIDS 
from discrimination in' employ- 
ment, housing and public accom- 
modations. A armlar measure be- 
came law in Los Angeles in August. 

It is a matter of debaie whether 
the spate of lawmaking is meant to 


. public health, say the regulation 

indicates the steady presence of the could have “an adverse effect on 
virus, for which no good direct test disease control in Colorado.” 

—a a “More than likely," Dr. Zbar- 

baro said “people will go out of the 
state Tor the test." 

' Mr. Stoddard, of the civil liber- 
ties union, said: “The nightmare is 
that those lists will be used for 
purposes other than health and will 
lead to a loss of jobs, a loss of 
housing, a loss of services because 
it will be assumed that one is gay if 
one is on the list and is not a 


exists, and the possible ability to 
spread the virus to others. 

Federal researchers now esti- 
mate, that from 700,000 to 1.4 mil- 
lion Americans are carrying the vi- 
rus in their bodies. Only between 5 
percent and 10 percent of infected 
individuals have developed AIDS 
within the first five years. 

The lest has been a boon to 
blood banks, wind) have used it 


. donate blood. .. , , 

In at least two mayoral races, in curta ^ OT 10 

. New York and Houston, candi- PPj ** 10 - / . 

dates have made an issue of the . • — 

disease in their canmakns, offering wuumn t.^liannemeyCT, Kepubti- suice last spring to efaminatepoien- member of one of the other risk 
plans for combating it through lo- tiaLty contaminated Wood from the groups.” 

■ cal laws. Mnon for le gi slati ve action. “Con- supply for transfusions, but it is 

AIDS is a fatal condition caused ** niagnitude of the now being proposed as mandatory 

by a virus that weakens the body’s ** stanng in the for certain workers. The miliuiy 

defenses against infection. There is fa “* he said, “if thrae is an error recently announced plans to test all 


no known cure. At least 14,28$ 
cases have been diagnosed in the 
United States since 1979, with 
7,253 resulting in death. 

In the U rated States, the syri- 


to 


en listed personnel as well as 
screen recruits. 

Houston is one of the latest cities 
to consider an ordinance requiring 
that food-service employees be 


Another area of some debate has 
been the use of quarantines. 
Though there has been much gener- 
al discussion among politicians, re- 
ligious leaders and some medical 
professionals, the Texas Board of 
Health has a proposal before it to 
add AIDS to the list of communi- 
cable diseases for which quaran- 


-.ervu 


m;,-, 

- c jS'jtW* 


et 



ffijacktoS 

J ..„,itun p 


to be made, h should be made on 
the side of the people of this coun- 
try, the 95 percent of us who follow 
a heterosexual hf e-style." 

^ ^ In rebuttaL Thomas B. Stod- r __^ 

- drome prim^ly^h^^fected dand, thelegidative director for the tested twice yearly and be issued tines arc available. 

- homosexuals, intravenous drug us- 
ere who dime needles and hezno- 

' phi lines and others who have re- 
ceived contaminated blood 
"products. Scientists say the virus 
has only been known to spread 
"through intimate sexual contact 
'and transfers of blood. 

-. In several major American cities, 
attempts to curb the spread of 
AIDS have focused on homosexual 
bathhouses, where men gather to 
engage in sex with multiple part- 
ners. 


John Davis Lodge, Diplomat, Is Dead 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — John Davis 
Lodge, 82, U JS. ' ambassador to 
Switzerland from 1983 until this 
year and who had been a congress- 
man and the governor of Connecti- 
cut, died Tuesday of a heart attack. 

He served as ambassador to 
Switzerland until last spring, when 


■■ “ i.-ajiWv, 

■s : sgte.. 


But in San Frandsoo, despite be was 

court-imposed restrictions on sexu- Faith R. Whittlesey. He also served throw its business to the fastest. 
‘ al conduct at homosexual bath- as anri»ssador to Argentina from most comfortable plane. More than 


world's leading maker of commer- 
cial jet planes, has died after a long 
illness. 

Mr. Allen is said to have “bet the 
company" and risk SI 6 million on a 
new design for a prototype of a 
commercial jetliner. The result was 

the 707, the first of a long line of __ 

passenger aircraft. He said be deep- Reich. Florida, 
fy felt the flying public would 

^ ■ . - - Robert Edward ChambSss, 81. 

who was convicted of lolling four 


who worked as a bodyguard for 
Trotsky and as a merchant marine. 
Sunday after a heart attack in Los 
Angeles. 

Ruby Hart Phillips 82. a corre- 
spondent for The New York Times 
who covered the rise of Fidel Cas- 
tro in Cuba. Monday in Cocoa 


houses, the city's yearlong- legal 
"battle ro cuib “unsafe sex" at these 
'establishments has had only limit- 
ed success, according to legal and 
^health officials. 

' The bathhouse issue bias spilled 
over into the New York mayoral 
’race. Diane McGrath, the Republi- 
can-Conservative candidate, has _ 
called for dosing not only bath- Senator Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. 

houses but also bookstores, tars wHBarn ML ABen. 85, 
and movie theaters protect ^ 

.‘.these people from themselves." 

_' AIDS is also an issue in the may- 
oral race in Houston, where a rc- 
mark that was inadvertently broad- 


1969 to 1974 and Spain from 1955 
to 1961. 

Mr. Lodge was a Republican 
congressman from Connecticut, 
from 1946 to 1950. He was elected 
governor in -L9SQ and served one 
four-year term. 

He was the grandson of Senator 
Henry Cabot Lodge and brother of 


Headed Boeing 23 Years 
- SEATTLE (AP) — Wffliam M. 
Allen, 85, who in 23 years as presi- 
dent of Boeing Co. built it into the 


200 -airlines around the world use 
Boeing planes today. 

After TA. Wilson became presi- 
dent In 1968, Mr. Allen was named 
chairman and chief executive offi- 
cer, a post be held until his retire- 
ment in 1972. 

■ Other deaths: 

DeWitt John, 70, former editor 
at The Christian Science Monitor 
who guided it to three Pulitzer 
Prizes in the 1960$. last week while 
touring Portugal, the newspaper 
said. 

. Bernard Wolfe, 70, an author 


black girls in a 1963 church bomb- 
ing in Birmingham, Alabama, that 
became a landmark for the civil 
rights movement in the Deep 
Smith, Tuesday at Sl Clair prism 
in OdenviDe. Alabama. 

Kirty Grant, 73, who starred as a 
wealthy rancher-pilot in the 1950s 
American television series “Sky 
King," on Wednesday in a traffic 
accident in Titusville, Florida while 
on his way to watch a space shuttle 
launch. In the 1953-54 series. Mr. 
Grant portrayed tire Arizona pilot 
of The Songbird, a twin-engine 
Cessna be flew on his adventures. 







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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1985 


DOOjVESBURY 


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After a Year of Rajiv, Indira Is 'Almost Forgotten’ 




(Continued from Page 1) 
recruited her other son into poli- 
tics. 


ing that period and had allowed ru was too trusting. They never said achieve Ugh growth in the mdustri- 


excesses to occur. 


that about his daughter. People say al sector, generating tax revenues 


Associates say that in becoming Rajiv is more like Nehru.” that can be used for health, educa- 

• . . • • . .. jt- tu. ■ j. jj i . „__i ir „ .c .1 


prime minister. Mr. Gandhi was The prime minister’s defenders tion and welfare of the disadvan- 


ln hie hrijif innr^nrirjxhln iinitj.- P«me mmlSICT, JYlr. V/anaiU was iub yiuuc uuuisua a ucicuuua 

bi^^^S^diSiSteto jolted into a m^coocffiaory atti- ^beUessenriallyaprobl^olv- 


devdop an independeni identity, tude becau« of his rnoA^s aasas- 6- 

After toe assawtoatinr, whm the ^ch many Indians be- world view. 


a coherent philosophy or 


After the assassination, when the 


Numerous other problems face 
the prime minister. 

Faun production has increased 



Experts See 
Push to Girb 
Currencies 




(Continued: from Page 1) 

particularly when the levels of in- 
flation varied from country to 


weak and uncertain. 


I think after Ins mother was Arun Shourie, a journalist and au- mains. Vast numbers of Indians are 


In the subsequent parliamentary he felt his back was against tbor who was one of Indira Gan- too 


election c amp aign. Mr. Gandhi in- jjj C wait/ - said Amitabb Bacbchan. dhi's harshest critics. 



furiated his opponents by question- a scar _ member of Parliament “We have to straighten oat our and storage bins. 

IrtO thMr/vtmrnirmMl tnln^ian rl 4- ■ ■ » m > • a m m f* * _ m ■ . T_ t — ^ . 


poor to get enough t oeai, while 
rlus grain lies rotting in fields 


ing their commitment to Indian na- gn H longtime friend of Rajiv Gas- police and intelligence forces, sup- la education, Mr. Gandhi and 
tionaJ unity. In December, the dhl “When your back is against the ply safe d rinking water and dear his aides acknowledge that India’s 

11 .1 I 1 ........J im iha In m JnMni " lu> cl>1lAvJc on* lift* tl 31111110 rVOTTlfo in 


coimuy. ■ 

Yet. few countries are happy 
with the oonsyswsn that they set- 
tled upon in the early 1970$. They 
then decided to let currencies 
“Soar” in the market, permitting 


Congress (I ! Party won 80 percent wall, there's only one way to go and up the bottlenecks in industry,” be schools are not training people in 


bankers, business executives, gov- 
ernments, international travelers 
and speculators to determine cx- 
at change rales through buying and 

Gandhi 

has lost faith in the policy, in pan A 

The visit led to an accord penmtr because of the str e ng th of the dol- 
ting India to receive sophisticated \ar. which in the last four years bag 
technology, much of it with mQi- risen more than 40 percent above 
tary application, that the Amen- ^ average of other major ctttrcn- 
cans had been reluctant to give out 

for fear h would end up with the United Stales can make or break 
Soviet Union. any worldwide move towards eur- 

India’s pohey toward the Soviet rency revision. The first hint of a 
Union has under gone no snbsian- change in Washington came last 


Mr. Gandhi said he shifted says, Tm not the brightest or best, ulation control, he saystbat current 


ITH0U6HTI 
M&TmONUf 
ONE WHO 

NOTICED. 


SAMEHERB. 
YOU GOT A 
NAME? 


YEAH. BUT 
IDONT 

usett. 

\ 


OUTRAGEOUS! 

MBN&THBZ! 


of the seats in Parliament, an im- th ,r « forward." said. "Now we have a ruler who the skills the society needs. In pop- 

paralleled sweep. Mr. Gandhi said he shifted says, Tm not the brightest or best, ulation control, he saystbat current 

Perhaps because the Congress (T) course for two reasons. First, he but let me just try to do these programs are not working. 

Party won only 49 percent of the said, political opponents “survived things.’" Many experts say the biggest 

actual vote. Mr. Gandhi took a on a confrontation" with his moth- The prime minister’s economic problem India, faces is revit alizing 
more conciliatory approach almost et. But second, he said “the real aim program is widely seen as an exam- government institutions. The prime 

nPt*r th» fllni'h'nn .. ... mniiM n nt^ nf ih* in'miar 4iu1 nirFalli nf Ilk mmitlPT flf'tnilwTnlffK that arm 


Rajiv Gandhi 


immediately after the election, is, we’ve got to run the country.' 


Then he signaled his willingness to People to the Gandhi fam- 


break from the past by removing ily feel to ar the prime minister's 
most of his mother’s bey advisers style is rooted in personality. 


pie of the virtues and pitfalls of his minister acknowledges that ac- 
p ragmans m. Many people say Mr. countability in the sprawling gov- 


Gandhi is not so much committed eminent bureaucracy has rotted 
to free-market theories as be is ea- away. 


from his inner circle. Whereas Indira Gandhi was mer- ger to try something that might In foreign policy. Mi 

In a recent interview. Mr. Gan- curial and loved the sport of out- work. has shifted course, bat v 

u offered his first public criticism maneuvering her enemies. Rajiv Business executives, meanwhile, tangible results, 
the national emergency that his Gandhi is seen as more simple and say that if the economy does not India and Pakistan, w 
other imposed from 197S to 1977, straightforward. expand briskly, they could easily fought three wars since 

ring which civil liberties were “Mrs. Gandhi could be reticent, imagine Mr. Gandhi backtracking dence in 1947, have sa 


dbi offered his first public criticism maneuvering her enemies. Rajiv 
of the national emergency that his Gandhi is seen as more simple and 


In foreign policy, Mr. Gandhi 
has shifted course, bat with fewer 


technology, much of it with mQi- 
tary application, that the Ameri- 
cans had been reluctant to give out 
for fear it would end up with the 
Soviet Union. 

India’s pohey toward the Soviet 


mother imposed from 1975 to 1977. straightforward. 

Citrine* nrhi/4t rttril liKAftiAC 


during which civil liberties were “Mrs. Gandhi could be reticent. 


suspended and many politicians and then act with a force several on his economic changes. 


were jailed. 


times more than what was needed.” 


□gible results. Union has undergone no snbsian- rfamy In Washington came last 

India and Pakistan, which have rial c han ge. But some analysts say April, when U_S. Treasury Secxe- 
pght three wars since indepea- they have detected that Mr. Gan- tary James A Baker 3d tofcf finance 
nee in 1947, have stepped up dhi may have become more willing ministers from major industrial na- 
their talks, and new cultural and to criticize the Soviet Union for is tions that the United States would 




Mr. Gandhi said that “a lot of said H.Y. Sharada Prasad, press 
things" had gone wrong because adviser to both mother and son. 


The philosophy behind his eco- communications accords were move into Afghanistan. “The “consider the possibility" of hold- 
nomic program is that there is a qgned But there seems to have phraseology, tbe wording, the em- ing a monetary conference. 


sfrth 


his mother had “lost control" dur- “You know, they always said Neh- er and industrial products, but that 
1 production is being strangled by 


On Sept. 22. with the U A trade 
deficit fading protectionist moves 


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92521 Needy Ctdu, Ftteee. 
TeL: 4747.1245. Telec 61 


prouucoou U, doub sunupcu experts by playing a con- 

strurtwSTmiiSitlKdfe- 
ing requirements. ntileVwtwMn tbe onvemrae&t. of Sri 


huge pem-up demand for consum- been Kttlc casing of tensions. pfcaas has changed,** said Kuldip On Sept. 22. with tbe Ui. trade 

er and industrial products, but that Meanwhile, tndia has startled Nsyar, a leading coimtmist. deficit fading protectionist moves 

-oducuon is bang strayed by g—j, by pkying a con- In this area, as in so many (^x«. in Cougn^ Mr. Bakcrlooka ma- 

gh taxes, regulauons and hcens- is m£tS the dis- ^changes may be ofstyie as jor sup toward a more managed 

5 requirements. pule between the government of Sri much as of substance, aatdunges currency market by agreeing with 

Mr. Gandhi said in the interview tanira and the Tamil insurgents °* “V to twtpwe re- four other m%or industrial powers 
at he wanted to change the sys- wh 0 are an independent P«incal experts note. — Japan, West Germany, France 


that he wanted to change the sys- who ^ oaring an independent potirical «pens note. — Japan, West Gefma 

tem “overnight.” But he added that state ; n the north and easL Generally, because of tbe or- and Britain —dm the 


tan “overnight.” But he added that 

“if we do it overnight, the present _ , . , . . ... — — . ^ mu 

industry will be in very deep trou- , 0ne of foreign policy office a year ago. Mr. Gandhi has they "Hand ready” to force the 

ble." changes brought by Mr. 9?°^ had to serve as an apostle of both Uiaateray down and since then 

He said be was concerned that ^ rations ,with tire continuity and cfaangeL His mother the dollar bas faflen 6 percent 

z, new and efficient factories United Stata. U.S. and Indian of- used to say that she presided o«r agafflaa an average ofl 5 mfflorcur- 
uld be built, wiping out the old ^ cials a y a “ a govenmient that woks.” Mr. nodes, 

es and throwing people out of Ifoidstarted by Indira Gandm, but Gandhi likes to say that his is a Ji is possible that the audmmistra^ 
>rk. that riwti>ne of tiie relationship has government that “woris faster " aon may go no farther than its 


cn m st a n c es in which he came to too high. The said that 


"stand ready” to force the 
OBStocy down and since then 


ne saiG ne was concern ea max “ r jr~ e 

big. new and efficient factories United State. U S. and fadianof- 
could be built, wiping out the old ^bas built on* 


1 ones and throwing people out of 
work. 

I “We’ve got to give a son of inier- 
' mediary period where our cunent 


a qualitative difference. 

Officials said, for example, that 


renoes. 

Ji is possible that the admmstrai 
lion may go no farther than its 


But toe prime n&mster empha- Sqn. 22 couamtmenL Some critics 
sized that the changes be seeks of the “benign neglect” policy say 

mnM fa Irm a rfmr—tAe nr cn j... * - ..r_ j . # > . * 


industry can adapt and become the visit to New Delhi last spring could take a decade or so. tfrai a simple cndo p cme n t of joint 

u.. c i o TT.i * "? ntir .. j. .ti f *■ ■ : J . _ 


more competitive.” he said. by Fred G fide, undersecretary of “We can try to do things faster,” i nt e r v e nti on when a currency faHt 

Mr r» Amf r 11 - JL t. -.A UD_. J t . . - J ar- _• . - 


Mr. GandhTs defenders assert defense far policy, marirwi a tarn- be said. “But we don’t want to snap out .of fine is sufficient to hundln 


that in the long run, his policies will ingpoinL 


the system.” 


the problem. 


U.S.. Britain Reach Accord on SDI ResearchPtan 


(Continued from Page 1) 
evidence erf Soviet willingness to 
reach verifiable and equitable arms 
control agreements. 


first indication of a specific propos- it.” he added “But if only oneofus Russians on strategic defense. He 
31 does, then why don’t we, instead of added, bowero, that “I think there 

Mr. Reag an said, however, that using it as an offensive means of can be an understanding when they 
the United States would share its having a first strike against anyone hear w hm we have in mind” 
technology only if both nations else in the world, why don’t we use w. 

agretdu reduce off^n.dear htomamthatthrre won't Ik any 


■ BBC Interviews Reagan agreed to reduce offensive nudear it to ensure that there v 
President Renpan said in ? Rrit- arms. He predicted the superpow- nuclear stnkesT 
ish Broadca^fcorp. interfiew defense msread Mr. Reagan aid. he 

n/~A. i l ...i j or oiiense. to neennate on his orot 


Wednesday that he would propose t , 
in Geneva that the United States Tl i.' 
and the Soviet Union agree to share oa r ^? 
technology for missile defenses, ' 
Tbe Washington Post reported. been i 
Tbe president first mentioned thing lc 


He compared the idea of state- 

Mr. Reagan aid he was wfflmg “afi nations outlawed poison gas. ji 
u.n^gonMerahspopoal-railK bat idr f£ “ 

nf e onu np’ tn an acnwnmt . . _ 3 * “ ° 


Hiviiis ^ Lfi * 


In the interview, conducted sense of coming to an a greement, 
tesday in Washington. Mr. Rea- which we arc bound in tbe future maags ~ 
n said, “I would like to say to the for whenever that weapon ha ppen* ■ 


m. 


Soviet Union, *We know you’ve — bound to this matter of world- 
been researching for this same wide sharing.” 


thing longer than we have. We wish Mr. Reagan acknowledged that Rntm 

y°2JJ* en -’ , there progress “probably not” can- TOKYO — Tokyo had 

^nere couldn’t be anything bet- not be made in Geneva without a 1 1,903^56 people as of Oct. 1, met- 
ter than if both of us came up with common understaxvfing with toe ropofitanoffk^ said Wednesday. 


the idea of sharing technology on you welL’ 

strategic defense last year but his “There couldn’t be anything bet- 


remarks to the BBC provided the 


1 1.9 Mpion People in Tokyo 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Tokyo had 


!S: v- 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


PORTUGAL 




7 DAYS WdUSIV* TOUtS 

FROM PARIS TO: 

992JQQ 








































so 


vr* l ! ! ?^ , ‘ ‘• ' o r-4 -.- o, . . 


ECTEHNATiONAL HERAUP TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1985 


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President Suharto, left, meets with Yakov P. Ryabw, Che Soviet deputy prime monster. 

Suharto Rejects $ 180 -MUlion Soviet Loan 


JAKARTA — Inrinww^ h*< 
refused a Soviet offer of a $180- 
million loan to build three hospi- 
tals, the economy minister, AU 
Wardhana, said Wednesday. 

He made the comments after a 
meeting between the Soviet d» 
uty prune minisier, Yakov P. 
Ryabov, azul President Suharto. 


Mr. Wan&am^fid that Indo- 
nesia could IKK itgree to the loan 
terms Moscowhad offered, but 
he dedioed to give -details. The 
Soviet minister said- he and Mr. 
Suharto had held ionp talks 
Wednesday on ways of increas- 
ing trade and ©cooonac coopera- 
tion. 

Mr. Ryabov, here on afive- 
rday visit, a the most senior So- 


viet official to travel to Indonesia 
since President Soharto rose to 
power after suppressing a Com- 
munist-hacked coup attempt 20 
years ago. 

Mr. wardhana said the Soviet 
Union sooght to buy Indonesian 
coffee, tea, cocoa, palm od and 
tapioca. However, be said, Mos- 
cow had insisted on a barter sys- 
tem not favored by Indonesia! 




I Research PI® 


- araepc4k 

- "**«. ihti*fc 

-'’.cinLuwfastfe, 

"" ■‘ehaieni^-’ 

- :r -.'Ttpunediheido^ 

- ihedndf 

••• •- L: ^fierWotldWvIc 

' ■.'■.< Zs 

-; :"- vdv kep fe ™ 


Million PwjJeiTik 

^rum 

— Tobo it 
■''■r-.vrleapffttLE 
" jlssaJiefca: 


By Don Oberdorfcr 

Washington Pott Servtce . 

. WASHINGTON — Prime Min- 
ister Lbo Shin Yong of South Ko- 
rea. declaring that the nearly year- 
long dialogue between, the two 
Koreas has been discouraging, said 
it seemed that North Korea was 
“not interested in producing any 
tangible results out of the talks.” 

Mr. Lbo, in Washington to con- 
fer with Vice President George 
Bosh. Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz and other officials, said 
Tuesday that despite a lack of pro- 
gress, “there is no other way but to 
talk” with North Korea. He 
pledged that South Korea “will be 
patient.* ' 

Further meetings of. South- 
North committees on economic af- 
fairs and humanit arian issues are 
scheduled for late November. The. 
dialogue between the two govern- 
ments on the divided peninsula re- 
sumed Nov. IS after a four-year 

break, ... . . 


. Mr. Lbo. a career diplomat who 
served as foreign minister and chief 
of the national intejtigence agency 
before becoming prime minister is 
February, said North Korea had 
five objectives in. reaming The 
In^kxmffltdjdcgiie; 

• Recovering from the “very big 
blow* to Noth Korea's reputation 
from the terrorist explosion that 
killed 17 South Korean officials in 
Rangoon, Burma, in October 1983. 
North Korea Jus dezned responsi- 
bility for the explosion. 

• Attracting foreign capital to 
cope with “chronic economic diffi- 
culties.” 

• Convincing Washington of its 
peaceful intentions to encourage 
the withdrawal of U.S. military 
forces from the South. 

• Relaxing the anti-Communisl 
posture of South Korea. - 

• Placating China’s demands for 
relaxation of tension on the penin- 
sula 


Amid Fanfare, 45 Philippine Rebels Surrender 


By Abby Tan 

U 'asJtmgion Pea Semce 

DIPOLOG, Philippines — The 
sleepy city of Dipolog. capital of 
Zamboanga Dd Norte province in 
western Mindanao, woke up 
Wednesday when 45 rebels of the 
Communist New People’s Army 
and more than 3,000 former sym- 
pathizers converged for a public 
surrender to government forces. 

It was pan of a recently an- 
nounced public relations campaign 
intended to persuade the united 
States and others that the govern- 
ment is in control of the insurgency 
situation. 

The official Philippine News 
Agency said that the rally consti- 
tuted the biggest Communist sur- 
render on Mindanao tins year, “vir- 
tually confirming” a government 
announcement several days ago 
that the rebels were “surrendering 
in droves." 

The assertion contrasted sharp- 
ly. however, with a recent state- 
ment by the acting Philippine mili- 
tary chief of staff, Lieutenant 
General Fidel V. Ramos, who said 

that the rcbd force had grown to as 
many as 1L500. This number ex- 
ceeded recent estimates by Mr. 
Marcos. 

In Manila, meanwhile. President 
Ferdinand £. Marcos raised the 
need to define the obligations of 
ibe Uni Led States under its military 
bases agreement with the Philip- 
pines. And in Moscow, his wife; 
Imetda, announced the opening of 
a new era of friendship and mutual 
cooperation with the Soviet Union. 

At the surrender ceremony, the 
Communist rebels, including 10 
women, gave up 80 rifles, carbines. 


The prime minister said his 
country had carefully noted the 
State Department’s permission for 
two North Korean scholars. Choc 
Jin! Hyok and Kim Chang IL, to 
.attend an Asian studies conference 
in Washington last weekend. 

The Reagan administration ex- 
plained that granting visas to 
North Korean scholars, which had 
not been done before, “has nothing 
lo do. with official and direct con- 
tact between Pyongyang and 
Washington,” Mr. Lbo said. 

Nonetheless, he expressed con- 
cern that North Korea would see 
the action as “a small hole in the 
door of the United States* that 
could substitute for the pursuit of 
accords with the South. . 

Mr. Lho had a brief encounter 
last week at a diplomatic dinner in 
New York with the North Korean 
vice president, Pak Sung Chul, 
without substantive results. . 

Mr. Lho denied a North Korean 


charge that be had rebuffed a bid 
for a full-scale meeting with Mr. 
Pak, saying that a session had been 
persistently proposed by Pyong- 
yang's representatives for a' time 
that could not be fit into his sched- 
ule during his visit to the United 
Nations. 

Mr. Lho was tad turn when 
asked about press reports of an 
exchange of high-level secret visits 
involving Ho Dam, a former North 
Korean foreign minister, and 
Oung Se Doug, the South Korean 
intelligence chief. “My government 
has denied it and North Korea has 
denied it,” Mr. Lho said. 

■ Seoul Arrests 26 Dissidents 

The South Korean authorities, 
extending a crackdown cm political 
dissidents, have announced the ar- 
rest of 26 persons accused of mat- 
ing and -government protests by 
students and workers. The New 
York Times reported T oesday from 
Tokyo 


shotguns and rusty pistols. Other 
paraphernalia associated with the 
rebels are! put on public display 
were notebooks on fighting strate- 
gy, knapsacks, binoculars and tw o 
baOot boxes they had taken from a 
previous election exercise. 

The former sympathizers, who 
had provided food, money and 
comfort to the rebels, came from 
seven nearby municipalities. On 
Wednesday, in front of the town 
haD in Polanco, a few minutes drive 
from Dipolog. they raised their 
hands to pledge ther allegiance to 
the Marcos government. 

Polanco is « the center of area of 
the province that is heavily infil- 
trated by rebels. The former sym- 
pathizers carried placards reading: 
“Let’s fight the NP.A* Others 
urged the military to stay on to 
eradicate the Communists.' 

T/val nffirtaU elamwt th? i re- 
pressive taxes imposed on the peas- 
ants by the rebels had led many 
sympathizers to switch their alle- 
giance in the government. 

One of those who surrendered 
was Bennie Fajenie, 22. known as 
Commands Ugaya. After leading 
27 of her men to the ceremony, she 
said in a public address: “Do not 
believe the NPA. So many civilians 
have been kiljed without sufficaeat 
reason. The SPA has misled and 
confused the people.” 

Commander Ligaya fan*T said 
that she joined the rebels ax the age 
of 12 and began military training at 
19. Asked how many people she 
killed in ambushes, she looked 
to the ground and whispered: 
‘Twenty-four* 

During her visit to Tblisi in the 
Soviet Union, Mrs. Marcos was 


quoted as saying to Pavel Gilash- 
vili. chairman of the Georgian So- 
viet Socialist Republic, that “these 
cordial and warm relations be- 
tween the Philippines and the Sovi- 
et union serve as an important an- 
chor of peace and stability in the 
Southeast Asian region.” 

The palace statement quoted Mr. 
Gilasbvili as saying that* the Geor- 
gian republic “is ready to do any- 
thing our friends from the Philip- 
pines want.” 

In a meeting with American 


business executives, Mr. Marcos 
said there was consensus among 
both Filipino and I’.S. military of- 
ficials that “we define more accu- 
rately what exactly are the obliga- 
tions of each country with respect 
io the military facilities.” 

This clarification, he added, 
should address this question: “Is it 
obligatory on the pail of the Unit- 
ed States to give that compensation 
package which calls for S9G0 mil- 
lion and if so, in what form?’' 

Under terms of a five-year agree- 


ment that expires in 19$9. the Unit- 
ed States pays Manila $M0 minion, 
of which S475 is economic aid and 
$425 is military aid. 

There have "been frequent con- 
flicts between Washington *nd 
Manila about whether the compen- 
sation is rent for uie bases or is 
foreign aid Whether the U S. Con- 
gress has ihe right to determine 
annually die amount of compensa- 
tion also has been disputed. 

Mr. Marcos said the Philippines 
considers the payments obligatory. 


Tories Lead Labor Party 
By a Point in IX PoD 

The Aaoszaud Prat 

LONDON — An opinion poll 
published here gives Britain’s rul- 
ing Conservative Party a one-point 
edge over the opposition Labor 
Party, the second poll in three days 
to put Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher’s party in from. 

The po4L carried out by Market 
and Opinion Research Internation- 
al for London's Standard Newspa- 
per and published Tuesday, gave 
the Tories 37 percent. Labor 36 
percent and the alliance of Liberals 
and Social Democrats 25 percent. 
Other parties got 2 percent. 


Prosecutor Indicted in U.S. 

The Atsoctaed Press 

BOSTON — A former prosecu- 
tor with the New England Orga- 
nized Crime Strike Force, David P. 
Twomey. has been indicted for sell- 
ing drug dealers information about 
investigative plans and pending in- 
dictments. 


You’ll always be recognised by your taste in Scotch. 

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Page 6 


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1985 


Ueralb 


I NTER1N ATIONAL 

w. 




Publuhrd With TV New York Time* and The Woahingjnn PoM 


A Few Hostages Benefit 


The Kremlin's customary pre-summit light- 
ening on human rights is on view. Evidently 
Andrei Sakharovs wife will soon be allowed tl* 
go abroad for the medical treatment that she 
has been seeking through her years of internal 

exile. Meanwhile. Moscow moved expeditious- 
ly to keep the fate of the Soviet sailor who 
jumped ship in New Orleans from becoming 
an inflamed public issue. On the eve of the last 
summit the Soviets exchanged five political 
prisoners for two convicted spies held in the 
United States. This is the pattern. 

It is a pattern bound to trouble many people 
in the West. The evident purpose is to deflate 
human rights as a summit issue. This is easy to 
do: Moscow need only wave its wand over the 
likes of Mrs. Sakharov, wife of the dissident 
physicist and Miroslav Medvid. who became a 
chance celebrity by jumping a grain ship. The 
Kremlin looks like a kindly godfather, and a 
few flesh-and-blood individuals benefiL 

Mrs. Sakharov may soon leave: it is implicit 
that her husband may later follow. Mr. Med- 
vid got the opportunity to say. in a setting that 
an attentive Reagan ad minis tration found 
conducive to free choice, whether he wanted to 
stay or go home. It is a good thing, by the way, 
that the administration intervened firmly to 


ensure his choice after the Border Patrol twice 
returned him to his ship without having reli- 
ably determined his circumstances and views. 

The sad fact remains that, in the arbitrary 
Soviet system, no relief is available for Soviet 
citizens other than by Kremlin calculation. 
People who have felt that Soviet society would 
eventually mature in this direction have been 
repeatedly disappointed. The arbitrariness 
that allows Moscow to make a gesture now is 
the quality that has allowed it for years to deny 
Western human rights appeals as alleged inter- 
ference in an internal Soviet matter. 

The new Soviet leader. Mikhail Gorbachev, 
apparently would like to be known as a re- 
former. But he come up as a protege of veteran 
KGB chief Yuri Andropov, and reform in the 
Soviet context has more to do with discipline 
than with individual rights. President Reagan 
cannoL disdain gestures, especially gestures 
that help real people. Nor can he appear satis- 
fied by gestures to a token few. His test is to 
convey the widespread .American conviction, 
which amounts to a political fact of life, that 
the way Soviet citizens are treated inevitably 
affects the readiness of Americans to improve 
relations with the Soviet government. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Let Both Sinners Repent 


America buys 540 billion more from Japan 
than it sells there, but that. Japanese policy- 
makers say. has little to do with protectionism. 
The real cause is the torrent of foreign capital 
being sucked into the American economy. 

They are right. Even if Japan eliminated 
every restraint on imports, the U.S. trade defi- 
cit would narrow by no more than $5 billion. 
But uy telling that to hard-pressed American 
manufacturers of computer chips, tractors or 
machine tools. They are not likely to be molli- 
fied by abstraction. They want relief in the 
form of tariff or quota barriers, an approach 
that would be ruinous for both economies. 

The sound alternative is a combination of 
American fiscal constraint and expansion of 
the Japanese economy. The United States, 
however, is dithering: and Japan, to judge by 
the measures it has just announced, is not 
much closer to doing what needs to be done. 

Japan is. like the United States, a trade 
sinner. America protects sugar, clothing and 
steeL Japan protects beef, air travel and ply- 
wood. Japan is slowly yielding to foreign pres- 
sure to reduce trade barriers, even as America 
is yielding to domestic pressure to raise them. 
But, as practically everybody agrees, Japan's 
trade surplus will not melt quickly. 

Common sense suggests that the big Japa- 
nese trade surplus should automatically self- 
destruct. Either the Japanese would spend the 
dollars they are accumulating, everting out the 
trade flow; or they would become increasingly 
reluctant to accumulate still more dollars, 
making Japanese goods more expensive to 
American consumers. But common sense ig- 
nores the role of thrifty Japanese savers. They 
are not spending their dollars but investing 
them in .American assets. Hence the dollar 
remains strong despite the trade deficit 

One way to impede this return flow of dol- 


lars is to maie America 3 less attractive place 
in which ro invest surplus savings. A recession 
or a nasty bout of inflation would probably do 
the trick. A more constructive way would be to 
cut the federal budget deficit, reducing Unde 
Sam's need to borrow and allowing interest 
rates to fall. When will that obvious necessity 
occur" Don't hold your breath. 

Another way would be for Japan to increase 
internal demand, diverting purchasing power 
from foreign securities. That is the nominal 
goal of Prime Minister Nakasone. who has 
announced yet another plan to stimulate in- 
vestment in public works, housing and auto 
purchases. But the impact is likely to be very 
modest, merely a new gesture to American 
critics like his earlier plea to buy American. 

It is easy to understand why Americans are 
unwilling to tighten their belts, but what ex- 
plains Japan's reluctance to spend more and 
uve better? The only effective short-term way 
to stimulate demand is to cm taxes or raise 
public spending, increasing the budget deficit 
to politically unacceptable levels. Another rea- 
son may be the difficulty of managing any 
rapid change in a culture that operates on 
consensus. A more important reason is proba- 
bly the perception among Japanese that they' 
are being asked to bear the responsibility for 
other countries' weaknesses. They do not work 
too hard: others work too little. They are not 
excessively thrifty; others are profligate. The 
polite face of diplomatic Japan masks a grow- 
ing resentment of foreign criticism. 

The Japanese have a~ case. But in an inter- 
dependent world economy, neither country 
can afford the luxury of a debate over who 
holds the high moral ground. If both do not do 
a much better job of coordinating domestic 
economic policies, both will be the losers. 

— THE SEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


The Kremlin Postpones Utopia 


Utopia is postponed. That is official. The 
Soviet Communist Party says as much in its 
draft party program, which" admits that the 
road to true communism is rockier than it 
earlier thought, and that capitalism is not the 
pushover it once hoped. In sum. the new p pro- 
gram shows the eastern superpower’s ruling 
elite to be more realistic, and possibly there- 
fore easier for the rest of the world to handle. 

The 1980s so far have seen little SovieL 
expansionism. One factor in this is the Soviet 
party’s view that capitalism, by which it means 
the West, is “still strong and dangerous" and. 
though historically doomed (of course), has 
bought time for itself “by constantly maneu- 
vering to adjust to the changing situation." 
This may be a backhanded admission that the 
West has, for all its problems of unemploy- 
ment and inflation, launched its economy into 
a new industrial era in which the Soviet Union 
is finding it hard to compete. 

— 77it? Financial Times (London). 


Prime Minister Nakasone [has] said that free 
trade is bound to give some pain to domestic 
industries in many countries. To protect free 
trade. Japan must bear its share of pain. 

— The Afainichi Daily News (Tokyo). 


Aged 50 and Worth Reviving 


Top Priority to a Stronger Yen 


We repeat our requests that the U.S. govern- 
ment and Congress continue their efforts to 
reduce the fiscal deficit, which prompted the 
strong dollar, and that the Japanese govern- 
ment give top priority to realizing a stronger 
yen through fiscal and monetary policies. 
There is no room for optimism For Japan, 
which must further step up efforts to expand 
its market, in addition to a stronger-yen policy. 


Happy birthday to the Volkswagen beetle, 
50 years old this month. Shrewd marketing 
and engineering made the ugly little bug the 
most popular car ever produced. It was cheap 
to buy and service, fun to drive and easy on 
gas. In the America of the 1950s it became the 
thinking person >•”' a demonstration of inde- 
pendence from size, tail fins and horsepower. 
In the ’60s it was everyone's sensible car. 
Volkswagen has manufactured more than 20 
million bugs: indeed, they are still rolling off 
assembly lines in Mexico and Brazil 

The basic beetle disappeared from Ameri- 
can showrooms in 1975 because. Volkswagen 
says, it was no longer cheap and the little air- 
cooled engine in the rear was not adaptable to 
emission controls. As a product of the 1930s 
the beetle also faced growing competition 
from Japanese cars designed for the 1970s. 
Sales in Western Europe are jusL now coming 
to an end. but Volkswagen plans to continue 
production for Third World consumers. 

We suspect that a lot of wistful demand 
remains in at least one industrial country. To 
recapture America, let VW address the emis- 
sions problem and reissue the bug, painted 
Coca-Cola red, and call it die Gassic. 

— The New York Times. 


FROM out OCT. 31 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Labor Unrest Grows in Britain 
LONDON — There are renewed symptoms at 
present of the unrest analyzed by Sir Edward 
Grey, the foreign minister, as due to a world- 
wide movement for economic equality. The 
troubled areas, says the “Morning Leader." 
are the South Wales cool field, where 25,000 
men threaten to strike owing to a dispute 
between a mine manager and a miners’ agent: 
the shipbuilding centres, where a lockout has 
been in force for several weeks and an effort to 
bring the employers and men together is about 
to be made, with doubtful results; and the 
Great Eastern Railway, where there is a dis- 
puted interpretation of an arbitrator's award. 


1935: Bovs Rule on Halloween Night 
PARIS — Tonight is Halloween, and although 
bats and cats, witches and hobgoblins no long- 
er drive the good folk to bar their doors and 
creep closer to the fireside, hundreds of s mall 
demons in short pants will substitute for their 
supernatural counterparts and roam the conn- 
tryside. inflicting mischief and leaving havoc 
JO their wake. For Halloween in America has 
long lost jis religious significance and become 
the national holiday of the small boy. On 
October 3 1 all America not yet out of knicker- 
bockers considers that it has carte blanche to 
turn loose its instinct for minor mayhem. For 
One night, America is in a state of siege. 


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~>vac; . 


A Joint Appeal to Reagan and Gorbachev 


This joint statement is addressed to Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev. It was drafted 
this year, completed in New York last week and made available to The New York Times by e 
Swedish government. The statement was signed by President Raul Alfonsm of Argentina^Presidenf 
Miguel de la Madrid of Mexico, Prime Minister Oiof Palme of Sweden, Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi 
of India, President Julius Nyerere of Tanzania and Prime Minister Andreas Papandreou of Greece. 


T HE world’s highest expectations are 
focused on your meeting in Geneva next 
month. All peoples and governments hope that 
you will be able to stop the deepening of 
tensions of the last years, opening an era of 
peace and security for humanity. 

You know, as we do. that the growing 
stockpiles of nuclear weapons, if used, even 
though by accident or by miscalculation, will 


during the present year your governments have 
initialed in Geneva negotiations covering both 
space and nuclear arms to be considered in their 
interrelationship. We are concerned that such 


negotiations have not yet produced results. We 

'*Li 


engulf us all in complete destruction- No 
this ti 


fed, however, that various recent proposals and 
developments seem to offer new hope that both 
deep cuts in the arsenals of nuclear weapons 
and effective measures for the prevention of an 


interest con justify this threat to present and 
future generations. Hence, the prevention of 
nuclear war is a key issue not only for your 
peoples and their destinies but for all people on 
every continent. Since the citizens of all nations 
are equally threatened by the consequences of 
nuclear war, it is of utmost importance to us 
also that your meeting should create 
appropriate conditions and produce concrete 
steps toward disarmament and peace. 

The tragedy of our lime is that, mainly due to 
mutual distrust, so far it has been impossible to 
end the nuclear arms race. For your own 
security and that of all nations and human 
beings and in order to ensure the preservation of 
the planet we all share, it is of paramount 
importance to build mutual confidence. 

Your meeting offers a historic opportunity to 
step boldly out of the vicious circle of the 
escalating arms race. We hope that through the 
demonstration of will to establish mutual 
confidence by overcoming differences, new 
impetus will be imparted to your bilateral 
negotiations and also to multilateral 
negotiations in Geneva. Stockholm and Vienna. 

We recognize as a positive development that 


'We propose that you suspend 
all nudear tests for a period : of 
12 months . Such a suspension 
could be extended — ’ 


arms race in outer space will now be seriously 
considered in the bilateral negotiations in 
Geneva in conformity with the conclusions we 
expect you to reach at your meeting. 

In our Delhi declaration of January this year, 
we called for a complete halt in the testing, 
production and deployment of nuclear weapons 
and delivery vehicles, and of space weapons, to 
be immediately followed by substantial 
reductions in nuclear f races. This would 
facilitate the task of preventing an arms race in 
space and terminating it on Earth, ultimately 
eliminating nuclear arms everywhere. 

Since January, some of us have had the 
privilege of discussing our proposals with yon in 
person, as well as with the leaders of the other 
nuclear weapon states. One suggestion which we 


particularly emphasized in our message from 
Delhi was for a halt to ail nudear weapons 
testing and the early conclusion of a 
comprehensive test ban treaty. In the ugbi 
of these valuable discussions, we have decided 
to put forward some ideas for considers non 
at your meeting in Geneva. 

We propose that you suspend all nudear tests 
for a period of 12 months. Such a suspension 
could be extended or made permanent- We 
expect that the other nudear weapon states also 
should take corresponding action. 

We believe that this would improve greatly 
the prospects For substantive agreements and 
would restrain the development of new, faster 
and more accurate weapons, which continues 
unabated even as negotiations are under way. 

The problems of verifying the suspension we 
propose are difficult, but not insurmountable. 
We believe that you yourselves could find a 
solution satisfactory to both. 

If you would consider it helpful, we are ready 
to offer our good offices in order to facilitate the 
establishment of effective verification 
arrangements. Third party verification could 
provide a high degree of certainty that testing 
programs have erased. We propose to establish 
verification mec hanis ms on our territories to 
achieve this objective. 

The responsibility entrusted to you is indeed 
awesome. We are convinced that the 
international community will support you in 
your endeavors. For our part, we reiterate our 
readiness to work together with you for the 
common security ana survival of humanity. 

The New York Times: 


The Soviets 
Gin Hardly 
'Start Over’ 




By George F. Will 


W ashington — u is para- 
doxical but true. The task of 
conservatives is to pull a conservative 
president, and U.S. diplomacy gener- 
ally, out of the 19th century and into 
the 20th. This conclusion is com- 
pelled by President Reagan’s peculiar 
and opaque rhetoric about a “fresh 
start" in U.S.-Soviet relations. 

This conclusion is paradoxical be- 
cause conservatives have a retrospec- 
tive cast of mind. Their cardinal vir- 
tue. prudence, involves raining the 
past for instructive precedents and 


proven institutions and procedures. 


urthermore, the greatest figures of 
— Metter- 


19th century diplomacy 
nich. Wellington. Bismarck, Disraeli 
—are in the conservatives' pantheon. 

Nevertheless, the conservatives* 
problem today is that President Rea- 
gan, although a definer of contempo- 
rary conservatism, subscribes to a 
model of diplomacy that reflects the 
18th century liberal mind. This is so 
even though the model was adopted 
by those 19th century conservatives. 

The problem is the radical newness 
of a kind of 20th centuiy regime, and 
the depressing oldness of rhetoric 
about a “fresh start." 

What did President Reagan mean 
by that? Indeed, what could he mean? 

He is painfully fond of the least- 
conservative sen time nL conceivable, a 
statement taken from an anti-conser- 
vative. Thomas Paine: “We have it in 
our power to begin the world over 
again." Any lime, any place, that is 
nonsense. But that may have been 
how things looked in I8tb century 
America, on the thinly populated 



fringe of an unexplored continent, 
or in revolutionary France, in the 
first flush of upheaval. 

Many people then believed in 
“fresh starts,” either because society 
was not yet planted thick with insti- 
tutions or because old institutions 
suddenly seemed fragile. They be- 
lieved that people everywhere were 
similar, essentially good and easily 
edu cable. “The present age," said 
Paine, “will hereafter merit to be 
called the Age of Reason, and the 


present generation will appear to die 


iture as the Adam of a new world.’ 

Some also believed, with Paine, 
that the “science of government” is 
“of all th ings the least mysterious and 
the most easy to be understood,” for 
“men have but to think and they will 
neither act wrong nor be misled.” 

Mr. Reagan has repeatedly used 
Paine’s words about beginning the 


world “over again” concerning do- 
mestic policy. One result of tris sin- 
cere belief m “fresh starts" is the 
budget deficit. The theory was that 
America would cut taxes and then 
compensate for the lost revenues by 
cutting spending. It would start “over 
again,” making a “fresh start” in de- 
fining federal social roles, as if the 
New Deal and the Great Society had 
never happened. But it is, it seems, 
impossible to start over again at even, 
say. 1965 levels of social spending. It 
is not even possible to make a “fresh 
stan” without Amtrak. 

Applied to domestic policy, the 
idea of a “fresh start” has produced 
fiscal problems. Applied to foreign 
policy, it can produce disaster. 

Americans believe in “fresh 
starts,” meaning limitless possibility, 
because they think that all people, 
and all regimes, think “economical- 


This 'Reagan Doctrine’ Is Only Words 


W ASHINGTON — President 
Reagan's address to the Unit- 


By Philip Geyelin 


with — “only enough to die with” 
Yet successful r "~ 


ed Nations General Assembly was a 
political document, calculated to get 
the United States off die arms control 
defensive and onto a “broader" agen- 
da for the Geneva summit. But to see 
it as a summit game plan is to suggest 
that it is not also authentic Reagan 
policy. There is the pity. As a tactical 
stroke the speech made a certain 
sense. As policy for the real world, it 
makes almost no sense at alL 

The more you examine the speech, 
the more apparent it is that this was 
vintage Reagan policy. What was 
heard in the General Assembly was a 
Reagan doctrine for foreign policy. 

That is not the kindest thing to say 
when you consider the shelf life of 
presidential doctrines: Truman’s. Ei- 
senhower's, Nixon's, Carter’s. But I 
am only picking up on what has been 
said by such as Jeane Kirkpatrick and 
the crowd at The Heritage Founda- 
tion, a conservative think tank which 
is a bom as close to the ideological 
hard core of the Reagan White House 
as you can get without being in iL 

Heritage had a symposium not 
long ago on “Reagan doctrine." Rep- 
resentative JackKemp called on Mrs. 
Kirkpatrick to present what she 
called her “formulation of the opera- 
tional code that I believe to be pre- 
sent in the president's views and poli- 
cies of the last four and one-half 
years.” Her statement was subse- 
quently put out in a pamphlet with 
the title. “The Reagan Doctrine and 
US. Foreign Policy.” 

“The point of departure of Reagan 
doctrine," Mrs. Kirkpatrick said, “is 
the idea of freedom." At the “core" of 
his world view, Mr, Reagan now says, 
is “an wi-mal truth: Freedom works." 

Mrs. Kirkpatrick said. “The presi- 
dent’s response to imperial growth of 
the UiLS.R. has been to clearly af- 
firm American solidarity with people 
struggling to prevent their incorpora- 
tion into the Soviet empire or to re- 
gain their freedom.” That is what Mr. 
Reagan told the United Nations. 

Kirkpatrick found her Rea- 


Afghanistan to Nicaragua, to defy 
Soviet-supported aggression and se- 
cure rights which have been ours 
from birth. Support for freedom 
fighters is self-defense " 

Last week Mr. Reagan said almost 
the same thing. If his proposals for a 
negotiated settlement of anti-Co m- 
■ ■’ ■■ in Afghanistan. 


U.S. support for anti- 
Commimist insurgency seems to have 
been the centerpiece of the Reagan 
administration's approach to East- 
West relations for at least two years. 
The president wasnot talking summit 
tactics when he laid down in 1984 
what his ideological soul mates have 
seized upon as a Reagan doctrine. 

So you have to believe that the 
president meant it when he said last 


.ly," rationally calculating how to en- 
hance essentially similar interests. 

That assumption would be true, or 
true enough, were the woddas Paine 
thought it was. Hie said there were 
just two types of government: those 
“by election and representation" and 
those “by hereditary succession-” He 
predicted that all governments would 
soon be representative. Then “na- 
tions will become acquainted, and 
prejudices fomentedby the intrigues 
and artifices of courts will cease.. 

The 19th century was not that se- 
rene, but it was relatively tranmuL 
Irving Krisiol, writing in “The Na- 
tional Interest,” a new foreign policy 
quarterly of conservative bent, says 
that 1 9th centuiy diplomats repre- 
sented regimes that regarded doe an- 
other as permanent presences- They 
defined - national interests in limited 
and familiar ways that allowed con- 
flicts to be resolved by spiriting dif- - 
ferences. Sometimes the splitting was 
done after wars, but they were limited 
wars. Governments' maneuvered to 
alter, but not obliterate, the “equilib- 
rium” among powers. The rules of 
that game of nations allowed ? for 
time-outs, and for fired; starts. ’ 

The rides changed radically with 
the eruptionin this century of total]- 


Deadlines 
Hei| 

A Drama 



ten 


* 



By Flora Lewis 

, aRIS — A lmost all players in the 


AK 1.7 ALTOM dii Mi ure 

L endless Middle East drama are in 
motion again. Whether that myriad- 
signals mean that at lass there is a real 
chance for peace negotiations or 
whether it is just another torn of the 
mem-go-round remains to be seen. 

The Israeli pri m e minister. Shimon 
Peres, talks repeatedly of getting 
started before the end of this year, for 
good reason. He has only until next 
October in office before Ik must Step 
down in favor of Likud's Yitzhak 
Shamir, under the agreement that 
created the coalition government. 
Engagement in talks serious enough 
to convince the Israeli pub l ic that 
there is a fair prospect of peace is 
probably the sole ground on winch be 
could successfully break the deal. 

Ironically, the “rotation" accord, 
which looked like a grave weakness 
when it was made a year ago. has 
strengthened Mr. Peres's hand con- 
siderably. It is a powerful (feadlin e 
for Jordan, because Mr. Shamjrand 
his party have node ho secret of their 
desire to annex occupied lands and; 
refuse any territorial concessions. 

There is a double deadline, a£ : 
though the second one is 


a iprccis^- 
Ii is The growing weakness of Pres*, 
dent Hosni Mubarak in the face of 


domestic unrest. Israel has no doubts' ^ 


about his loyalty to their peace treaty, - 
but if he should fall before the treaty 
is broadened to Jordan, a new leader 
in Cairo might not hold firm. 

The two deadlines are-presang in- 
various ways rat all who are involved. 
King Hussein still seems to hope that 
Yasser Arafat will finally carry out 
the conditions that Mr. Arafat ac- 
cepted last spring so that Jordan can 
negotiate on behalf of the PLO. . 

To Syria's evident satisfaction, Mr. 
Arafat has weakened himself so bad- 
ly that his choke may be only to" 
support King Hnssein or fade into 
aience on the sidelines. His base 7 
unis is shaky, and if he has to 


in 


move once again, to Iraq, his com* 
mandos will snB be practically out of 
striking distance from Israel. 

Syria, as usual, is a crucial enigma. 
But its newly wanning relations with 
Jordan are not wotrymg Mr. Feres. 
President Hafez al- Assad may be 
owning to prefer playing a role m an 
international peace process, without 
Mr. Arafat, to trying to break it up 
and risk being left out. 

Shifts in Soviet policy are of spe- 
cial importance. Mikhail G o r bachev 
has said be wtil noi decide before his 
sumrail meeting with President Rea- 
gan. But he is sending messages that 
he is prepared to move dramatically 
on Jewish emigration and li mited re- 
lations 'with brad if the U-S.-Soviet 
dimarc isfavorabk. The French offer 
to airlift Jewish emigrants directly, 
from the Soviet Union to Tel Aviv & 
based an private exchanges that 
make that a real possibility. 

The Russians have tola Western 
diplomats that they made a mistake 


8MP&NY HO' 




’•a. 


masting in the past that the pecrale. 

eother 


they let out must go somewhere o: 
than Israel first, became then large 
'numbers went to America instead. 
That undermined the claim that the 
movement was only reuniting fam- 


ilies, not a special exit privilege for 
rtberdtize 


Jews that is denied to outer citizens. 

The Ru ss i an s are aware that under 
Israeli law, arriving Jews immediately' 
and automatically receive Israeli citi- 
zenship- Under American law they 
would then have to apply for Ameri- 
can visas in the Israeli quota rather 
than under the far more generous 


¥ 


■\ (I *■/(_./ 

krti, y..v h 

Uus 




It is not at all dear what Mr. Gor- 
bachev will ask from Mr. Reagan. 
Large-scale emigration would be a . 
brilliant success for thepresident’s 
human rights program. That should 
be an additional incentive to make - 
the summit conference work well. 

The urgent Soviet desire to partici- 
pate in an international conference 
that would provide an umbrella foe 
Israeli - J ordanian negotiations shows 




me enipupn in ims cranny of touui- that Moscow now lakestheno^bffi- 

ty. of talks ■ectaJS^STSdS^ 


reflertdomestic atrang^ents resting mined not to be IrftW R^tiy^a 


inumsi msurgenaes m mgaamsian, presiuou meant u wuen nc saiu lasi 
Cambodia, Ethiopia. Angola and week that “the promise of the future 
Nicaragua did not result in “defini- Lies not in measures of military de- 

44 A citnnArf 


doctrine in a passage in the presi- 
de Union message 


dent's- State of the 
back in January 1984: “We must not 
break faith with those who arc risking 
their lives on every continent, from 


tive” progress, “America s support 
for struggling democratic resistance 
forces must not and shall not cease." 

Mrs. Kirkpatrick is not alone in 
her tub-thumping for a “Reagan doc- 
trine.” Richard Nixon used the term 
in a recent article in Foreign Affairs 
magazine offering guidance in the 
administration's approach to Gene- 
va. But both he and Mrs. Kirkpatrick, 
put their finger, by design or inadver- 
tence. on the reason why this Reagan 
doctrine makes so little sense. 

Mr. Nixon conceded that one can- 
not expect the Soviets to stop being 
“dedicated to expanding Communist 
influence and domination in the 
world.” President Reagan also spoke 
(twice) of “deep and abiding differ- 
ences" between the United States and 
the Soviet Union that put the two 
countries “into natural conflict and 
competition with each other.” But 
then he turned around and asked the 
Soviets to help promote negotiated 
settlements of the five conflicts in the 
world where the ideological lines are 
most sharply drawn. .And he gave no 
sign that he would accept anything 
short of a “democratic recondiia- 
tion" of Communist regimes in aB 
those countries “with their people.” 

G early, negotiations “among the 
warring parties in each .country" 
hardly look promising. And yet the 
Reagan doctrine, according to Mis. 
Kirkpatrick, has strict Hrniis: “It 
should be emphasized that the sym- 
pathy, solidarity- and assistance of- 
fered by Reagan doctrine do not in- 
clude U.S. participation in combat" 

If she has it right what the^critics 
are saying about UiS. “covert” assis- 
tance to the Afghan rebels becomes 
sadly appropriate: The level of LLS.. 
aid gives the rebels too little to win 


feme or the control of weapons, but 
in the expansion. of individual free- 
dom and human rights." And if that 
is the agenda for the Geneva summit 
you also have to wonder whether its 
epitaph wQl be any cheerier than 
John Kennedy’s for the Vienna sum- 
mit in 1961. “It's going to be a cold 
winter,” he told NQtita Khrushchev. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


century ideal of “equilibrium. 

Today’s synonym for “eqiriKbri-, 
um”is “stability." We seek a “stable” 
relationship in strategic arms, and 

-r» 


on lies and terror. Regimes that de- 7 “*v, , . 

rive their daims to legitimacy from StS f™. repeated, # 

ideologies that iegtinra liSess vi- [h e ^ 

oleuce are sot-interested in the 19th f mistake lo bSS&f ■ 

rael after the 1967 war. 

Mr. Reagan's surprising omission" 
of . the Middle East from the list of-' 
regional trouble spots in his United - 
Nations speech is a sign that diplo-’ 
macy on this issue may be too prom- v 
istng to durtprb with futile rhetoric. 

ButbnUbut ... There are bound 
to be attempts to blow up this deb- 
dance to the peace tabie. If the • 
{teadhnes are missed, it could take a : 
long tune to line up another chance. ; 

The New York Tones. 


"stability’’ in regional conflicts. The 
wet Unit 


Soviet Union derides stability in the- 
ory and assails it In practice, 
America is a nation of poko* play- 
ers. Poker is a game of fresh starts — 
play a hand, shuffle the deck, deal 
again. The Soviet Union plays chess 
and pursues endgame. G . . 

Washington Post Writers Grotqi. 


0 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A Peres Offer to Take Up 

It is hard to follow WiTliam PfaffV 
logic in “Behind Peres’s Offer, a Note 
of Desperation” (Oct 26). Israel has 
made proposals. “Why should Jor- 
dan cooperate?” asks Mr. Pfaff. Why 
should it not? Israel has offered to 
negotiate within the context of an 
international forum and to do so with 
Palestinians. The aim of the talks is to 
terminate the state of war and define 
permanent boundaries. Nothing has 
been determined in advance, so why 
not talk? Israel withdrew totally from 
the Sinai hr exchange for a peace 
treaty. The West Bank is a more com- 
plex affair, but until the parties b egin 
talking, nothing will be solved, 

BARRY SHENKER, 
London. 


Good and Bod Murder? 


The reams you gave us about the 
Achflle Laura andLeon Klinghoffer 
contrast sharply with your brief in- 
side-page treatment of the brutal 
bombing death jn Los Angdes of an 
official of the Arab- American Anti- 
Discrimmation League, Aloe Odefa 
FBomb Kills Arab-American Activ- 
ist,” Oct J2j.Areyou.tmng to tdl us 
that Mr. Klmghoffer’s brutal sla ying 
was front-page news because it came 


often identified with McDonald’s^- 


blue jeans, DMSuffSOT. 

not necessarily degantordS . 
Tje venerable Herald Tnbwie is in a : f 

timS? ^ one hopes' 

“at Ucl 5 was nija a 


1 was just a lapse. 
TIMOTHY PROUT. 
Aarhus, Denmark. 

Freedom in Europe, Too 

The New 


What Times editorial 

at the hands .of Palestinian terrorists, 26) takes President ^9% • 

while the Los Angeles kjfibg/otwt fa SPniStiS £S& 
ously.the work of pro-feiidi terror- he said that - 

ins, was of secondary importance be- * not ihesole- 


Neither Elegant Nor Chic 

1 was disappointed toseeyour Oct. 


God's childtan." = 
NotYohTt-®’ 11 ’ thm ' should -The' 

^opeans whose 


man 

more 


cause it involved air Arab? Are there 
“good" lenorists? ■. 

JAMES V.. GROTTY. 

■ Parade^ Portugal 

Shimon Peres may be desperate, as 
Mr. Pfaff would have it, but at least 
he is doing something and not merely " 
retrenching behind hate-filled memo- 
ries. He is a new-thinkme. fresh tvue 

segw^-SSSSEi gg sLtgff B 

PIERRETTE KOMAREH. - tfw t ga y, Arts A. r-aoiT^ • . We applaud hun fOTJL: 

Thotry, FranceL Americans Kvmg abroad are too _ ’ • lONRATTU- '- ' 

r 2enna tL Switzerland. ‘ 


whose freedom and hu-' 
are flouted mconmarably 
“°se in South Africa? . 


-page coverage to m rastigat^hT^S^T^J^ 
style. of. dress — the nrSS-SLSff* ^ ai “ fe: 




.y _ - :i p> - 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. OCTOBER 31, 1985 


Page 7 


SCIENCE 


+4-‘' 




*» _ J 

*..->* - 





: 'The Man Orbits Forever in the Shadow of the Unmatched Newton 9 


rpublis. 

.based) 


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report, based on his observations of 
Jupiter and Saturn. At 20, he estab- 
lished his reputation as a profes- 
sional astronomer cm an expedition 
to the South Atlantic, where he 


’VT;. 

lr 


not livp cm tt £71 ^ J>wsc t w ™usy- ms 

ve to see if his calculnfiom mm* is forever assocated with 




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pr«--ajam- P® 1 : 

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.“. -.wi desot»F: 

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v . •> r 1 '* uk*?. 


By John Noble Wllford proved » be oorzea. But he ex- comets — although often mispro- 

T ^. ‘ Tlmes S^ct - pressed the hope that "“candid pos- nounced fit is Ha$v as in “alley”), 
rr S2? ^ ^ *us long tcriiy wffl to acStnowl- HaScycfid tmtifijcowr Ins comet: 

me, Edmond Halky was writ- . “fee diat thfe’wM fust discovered His eonmbmiog w to determine 
that the eomet byanEnj^sfaowv" • - ihat comets do not travel straight 

wWM return “* "^Candidpostoity” has been, in &nes ^ parabohe othits, but in d- 
“ 1 /59 - «? !®ew he would one geocrets to Halley. His HptM orbits, in a swt of sq uash e d compiled thefirst authontative cat- 

■_ — ■ -■-■ — ~ J - a« — alog of the southern skies. 

In 1680, the young astronomer 
made his first attempt to plot the 
course of a comet, and be made a 
bash of it. The fault lay not in 
Halley’s mathematics, but in the 
conventional scientific wisdom 
about comets. It was wrong. 

The Polish scholar Nicolas Co- 
pernicus had in 1S43 exposed the 
notion of an Earth-centered uni- 
verse as nothing but a human con 
cat. The Sun did not move around 
a fixed Earth: the Earth moved 
around the Sim. Johannes Kepler, 
the Gennan who inherited the me- 
ticulous observations of Tycho 
Brahe; the Danish astronomer, de 
remaned that the orbh of a planet 
was not areolar, as had been as- 
sumed, but was an ellipse with the 
Sun at one focus. Meanwhile, Gali- 
leo Gahlei in 1609 had peered 
through the first telescope at Jupi- 
ter and see n for the first time the 
four large satellites orbiting the gj 
ant planet. This microcosm of the 
planetary system confirmed Coper- 
mean theory. 

Siil], astronomers hardly knew 
what to of comets. Tycho 
Brahe bad deiemrised that they 
were not, as Aristotle had declared, 
atmospheric phenomena. But Kep- 
ler did not believe they obeyed his 
own laws of planetary motion. 
Comets, he said, traveled roughly 
in a straight line. They might fall 
into the Sim and be destroyed. Or, 
missing the Sun, they might swin g 
around it and return to outer space. 
They would not. it was supposed, 
ever return again. 

Stung by the failure with the 
1680 comet, Halley made even 
more careful observations of the 
comet he saw through his home 
telescope in November 1681 This 
was the object that would someday 
be known as Halley’s comet 

THE comet set him to thinking 
about the problem that was very 
much on the mind* of many scien- 
tists of the day. Kepler had de- 
scribed the elliptical orbits of plan- 
ets, but did not know why this was 
so. What was the force accounting 
for the motions of the planets and 
other bodies like comets? 

In 1684, Halley met with Robert 
Hooke, a physicist, and Christo- 
pher Wren, the architect, at a Lon 
don coffeehouse, and fell into a 
long discussion of the problem that 
prompted him to pay a visit to 
Newton in Cambridge. Newton 
told bis visitor that he had solved 
the problem some years earlier and 
then laid aside the calculations. 


Edmond Halley didn’t (fiscora 1 Iris comet. 


IN BRIEF 


'. ' r ^i uU. 

thaisTf 

■ • r ' s ? nD ?»ikai£ — 

: MuifS: 

TDefensins’ May Help Fight Disease 

'■’tale 


LOS ANGEI.ES (NYT) — Scientists have discovered natural sub- 
stances in human white blood cells that attack a wide range of germs, 
according to reports in the Journal of rimica! Investigation: The sub- 
stances attack staphylococci and E. cob bacteria as well as some disease- 
causing fungi and viruses. The scientists at University pf California at Los 
Angeles have named the substances “defensins.” 

They said that further analysis may make itpossible to design artificial 
defensins superior to those that exist natuiany and that tbar discovery 
may improve understanding of (he body’s means of (easting infections. 
The knowledge will eventually lead to improved treatment, they said. 

The substances were found in the most common type of defensive 
white blood cells, neutrophils. Such cells are attracted to sites of infec- 
tion, where they destroy invading microbes. The defensins are thought to 
be important in the process of destruction. The scientists found six 
varieties in rabbits’ cyH« =, and later identified three others in human 
neutrophils. 


jj 4 -' 1 m dcodehar Wind Shifts Simulated in Laboratory 

‘ CAMBRIDGE. England (NYT) — Researchers at Cambridge Univer- 

sity in England have developed a laboratory simulation of the sadden 
wind shifts known as mkrobuists that often plague aircraft m landing s 
and takeoffs; ' . • 

A microburst, with gusts up to 80 miles an hour (130 kph). was 
implicated in the fatal crash of & jet airliner at the Dallas-Fort Worth 
airport in August :The winds are producedwheneoldnaralindi altitudes 
sinks to the ground; where it is diverted horizontally and results is 
dangerous Dows of sbort-lived, high-speed winds. Better understanding 
of how such winds develop may help prevent future di s as ters. 

Dr. P. F. Linden and Dr. J. E. Simpson of the department of applied 
mathematics and theoretical physics developed a model of this event, 
described in Nature magazine, by muting watere of different dentines. A 
dense Quid, saline water, was poured into a less dense liquid, producing a 
crenplex horizontal vortex at the leading edge of the saline outflow. The 
scientists observed an increase in circulation of the vortex as it moved 
away from the source. They say this strong drenlation is likely to be one 
of the main hazards of nticrobursts. 


code, thus miking periodic visits 
to the timer solar system. By plot- 
ting with can; the characteristics of 
their orbits, he concluded that it 
was possible to predict their many 
returns, as he did withTus?* comet. 

On Christmas night is 1758, al- 
most 17 years after Halley's doth, 
the ctmet was seal again as be had 
predicted. And sdQ faithful to his 
calculations, thecoma that last ap- 
peared in 1910 is back again this 
year, now about 100 suHwa utiles 
- (160 kilometers) away and travel- 
ing 66,000 stiles an hour. It will 
make its closest inbound ap pro a ch 
to E»th cm Nov. 27, pasting within 
58 million mites. By the end of the 
year the comet should be visible 
with ordinary binoculars and small 
telescopes. Then next March, after 
the cornet has swung around the 
Sun. it win be observed up dose for 
the first time by an intematiooa] 
armada of s p a cec ra ft. 

P OSTER1TY has been less than 
generous to Halley in ignoring his 
other contributions to science. He 
was an innovative cartographer, 
student of geomagnetism, inventor 
of a deep-sea diving befl, author of 
the first actuarial mortality tables 
and captain of a bold seagoing sci- 
entific expedition. As a mathemati- 
cian and astr o nomer, his primary 
calling. Halley was a pivotal figure 
in the scientific revolution set in 
motion by Copernicus a century 
earlier and advanced by the in- 
creasing use of telescopes in ob- 
serving the workings of the uni- 
verse. 

But Halley was edipsed in histo- 
ry, because one of his contemporar- 
ies was Isaac Newton. The two men 
were a study in contrasts, as Philip 
Morrison, a physicist at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, 
writes in the November issue of 
Scientific American: “H alley the 
man orbits forever in the shadow of 
the unmatched Newton, but he was 
a gifted, original, versatile and pro- 
ductive scientist, and a human be- 
ing as adventuresome, generous, 
loving and sweet as Newton was 
retiring, cold, solitary and austere.” 

Yet they became colleagues. It 
was Halley who encouraged the re- 
tiring Newton to write down the 
principles of gravitation he had de- 
veloped after years of thought sup- 
posedly inspired by the legendary 
falling apple: Newton recognized 
that gravity on Earth represented 
the same law of force as that affect- 
ing the modem of planets around 
the Sun. Halley edited the mann- 

~ * gene®*, of Newton’s 


Pollution Gould Heat Climate by 2030 

GENEVA (UP1).-— Temperatures could rise as much as AS degrees 
Centigrade (8 degrees Fahrenheit) as early as the 2030s because of 
atmospheric pollution, a United Nations soentific conference warned. 

Such an increase “could have profound effects on global ecosystems, 
agriculture, water resources and sea ice,” a conference st a te ment said. 
Unless a cmospheric pollution is reduced, it sa£d, the first half of the next 
century will see “a nse of global mean temperature greater than any in 
man’s history.” In the past 100 years, the global mean leaqxraturc 
increased an estimated 0J3 to 0.7 degrees Centigrade, the statement said. 

The coolcrence called for action by governments to reduce coal and oil 
carbon dioxide emissions as well as other pollutants known as greenhouse 
gases and aerosols. • 


great bode, “The Mathematical 
Principles of Natural Philosophy.” 

Halley’s encouragement of New- 
ton was perhaps his greatest contri- 
bution to science, according to 
Alan Cook, a professor of natural 
philosophy at Cambridge Universi- 
ty in England. But in applying 
Newton’s laws of gravitation in 
making ins comet prediction, Hal- 
ley went an important step farther. 
His correct prediction turned oat 
to be the first direct confirmation 
erf Newton’s theories. 

HaLLEY was bom near Lon- 
don on Nov. 8, 1656, into a wdl-to- 
do mercantile family. His father 


universal laws of gravitation and of 
Halley’s collaboration in having 
them published. 

HaUey, preoccupied by his other 
scientific interests, seems to have 
taken his time applying Newtonian 
principles to comets. 

In 1686, he had drawn what is 
considered the first meteorological 
chart, which iHusiraied the direc- 
tions of prevailing winds over the 
oceans. This was the beginning of 
what is known as thematic maps, 
maps that illustrate the geographic 
distribution of information about 
climate, vegetation, population, 
wealth and just about any physical 
or abstract fact. 

Similariy, on a sailing expedition 


recognized early the “promising ge- he commanded, Halley plotted the 
nius” of young Edmond and saw to variations of the Earth’s magnetism 
it that he was provided with books and produced a map illustrating 
and the “canons apparatus” [or the variations as an aid to naviga- 
observing the planets and stars, tors using magnetic compasses. For 
While a student at Oxford Univer- the chan Halley introduced anoth- 


Lasers Used in Tropics for Research on Climate, Pollution 


By Eric Schmitt 

New York Times Service 


riss discussed the 1 0-year project, 
which began in 1983, ana died 
XTAMPTON. Virginia — Using some preliminary . observations 
'• 'IllL # ■ -tl a new laser tool that is fired gleaned from an expedition in July 
toward earth from an airplane, sri- to tne central Amazon. Kiver basm. 
enlists here are measuring more p«. samtmts from the United 
precisely the levels of gases and States and Brazil torn: 


V. -wed. 

; or" war- 

■ . iw* £ 



particles above tropical oceans and 
rain forests in an effort to under- 
stand the complex exchange of 
chemical elements between the 
earth and the lowest layer erf its 
atmosphere. 

By scouring the troposphere, the 
blanket of air most important to 
living creatures, scientists from the 
Langley Research Center of the 
National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration say they can pro- 
vide important information to po- 
licy makers concerned about add 

ram, sir pollution and global ch- 
matic conditions. 

The researchers conduct thdr ex- 
periments in the tropics, whoe 
steamy jungles and balmy seas dis- 
'■’otgaaic 


from , the lower pert of the tropo- 
sphere, the first 6 to 7 miles (9 to 1 1 
kilometers) of atmosphere, to 
gauge the effects of deforestation in 
the region. 

The expedition, a joint venture 
by NASA and the Brazilian space 
agency, the Institute National de 


enger molecules that cleanse 
pollutants from the air, Mr. Harriss 
said. 

In daily flights over die Amazon 
last summer, and in flights in 1984 
over Guyana and the Atlantic 
Ocean east of Barbados, scientists 
Used the new laser and other sens- 
ing devices. 

The laser is fired toward the 
earth. When the laser beam hits 
solid airborne panicles such as dust 
and pollen, it is reflected back to 
the plane. Instruments on board 


electronically measure the altitude 
and physical characteristics of the 
particles. The measurements are 
translated into color ptemres that 
show the horizontal and vertical 
distribution of the particles cner 
the test area. 

If a large cloud of particles is 
identified, the plane dips to that 
altitude and flies through the 
cloud, while another set of instru- 
ments analyzes the panicles more 
closely and render clues to the 
cloud’s origin. 


th Mdf : . . o— - 

.-.-j wy'ijiP Qfehaige huge quantities of otg&fl 

■ ■ rvi«y!d compounds into the atmosphere. 

“We want to know if there ai 
■ ’ certain ch emicals that originate in 

the tropical rain forest environ- 
ment in sufficient quantities to in- 
fluence' the chemistry of the global 


.. & 

■ 

inE^> 


- T 

■ - a*?* 4 

■•••s'/SrfS* 

... - . ir-* 1 






7£^ il 


Pesqmsas Espadais, undertook the 
■first large-scale meas ur ement • of 
gases produced . by a forest in an 
effort to learn whether such gases 
may be key elements in the earth's 
overall atmospheric chemistry, and 
if so, to determine their origin. 

“By patting our data through 
theoretical models, M Mr. Hamss 
said, “we’ll be able to predict what 
effects deforestation would have ca 
the climate and air-quality were it 
to continue at various levels. 

From the Brazilian e x pe rim e n ts 
and others, more is being learned 
about bow natural sources of such 
gases as carbon (Soxide, carbon 
monoxide and ai irons oxide inter- 

— _ act with man-made pollutants. The 

atmosphere,” said Robert C. Har- prqjcpt jg afcQ monitoring a possi- 
riss. senior project director M ble decline in the atnKisphericcon- 
NASA’s Global Tropo^ihenc Ex- ceniratioa of hydroxyls, small scav- 
perimenL , 

-The lasc provides information 
on the exact altitudes and dimen- 
sions of dust clouds from Africa, 
giving scientists better ac ce ss to 
flo ating treasure troves of solid 
particles and inert gases. 

While , there have been several 
studies of the atmosphere in .urban 
areas, Mr. Harriss said the NASA 
project is one of. the. first designed 
io examine remote regions free 
from man-made pollutants, where 
s cieniitf^ can observe the ipccha it- 
ics of atmospheric conditions and 
establish a point of reference to 
assess man's impact elsewhere. 

In a recent interview, Mr. Har- 


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er of his cartographic innovations, 
the isolines. These are lines on a 
map connecting points of equal 
value, the most familiar of orach 
today are the contour lines on topo- 
graphic maps that trace zones of 
equal deration. 

But HaUey had r.c: forgotten the 
comet of 1682, .After ar. analysts of 


tical orbit — - not a parabolic orbit, 
as Newton had believed. If it was 
an ellipse, and other comets trav- 
eled similar courses. Halley- real- 
ized that it was indeed possible for 
the same comets to re- appear many 
times. 

In 1705. Hailey firs* published 
his calculations and his prediction. 


historical accounts, he became cen- “Many considerations incline me 


vinced that comets seen is 152s 
and 1607 were the same as the 16S2 
object. They followed wha; ap- 
peared to be the same course. He 
had, moreover, re-examined his 
data on the 1680 comet and deter- 
mined that it was traveling an eSip- 


to believe the Comet of 1531 ob- 
served by Apianus to have been the 
same as that described by Kepler 
and Longomomanus in 160 7 and 
which I again observed when it 
returned in 1682. All the elements 
agree. Whence I would venture 


confidently to predict ns reium. 
namely in the year 1758." 

One uncertainty had troubled 
Halley. The intervals of time be- 
tween the visitations were noi pre- 
cisely the same, being off by a year 
or so. Recalling research he ’had 
done much earlier on Jupiter and 
Saturn. Halley suspected that grav- 
itauona! perturbations from the gi- 
ant planets could throw the comet 
off its course and timing. Newton, 
asked to ponder this, came up with 
gravitational calculations by which 
Halley was able to refine his pre- 
dictions. 

In his latter vears Haiiev was 


honored by being named the 
tronomer royal. He remained 
enthusiastic scientific observer. 
Professor Cook of Cambridge 
pointed out. Halley at the age of 67 
planned a series of lunar observa- 
tions to last for !8 years — and he 
lived to complete the project. 

Halley' was sitting in his chair at 
the Greenwich Observatory when 
the end came on Jan. 14. 1742. in 
the 86th year of his life. He poured 
himself a glass of wine, took a long 
drink and then quietly passed 
away. His comet was still far away, 
but on course, as Halley had pre- 
dicted. 


3n ®3)e %isb Court of Justice (Cnalanb) 

Chancery Division 
Mr. Registrar Bradbum 
IN THE MATTER of 

CENTAUR INTERNATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

IN THE MATTER of 

THE CONCORD REINSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

INTOE MATTER of 

MARBARCH INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

IN THE MATTER of 

SHASTA REINSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

IN THE MATTER of 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 

and 

3n tEije Supreme Court of ISermu&a 

Sir James Astwood Chief Justice 
IN THE MATTER of 

CENTAUR INTERNATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

IN THE MATTER of 

THE CONCORD REINSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

IN THE MATTER of 

MARBARCH INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

IN THE MATTER of 

SHASTA REINSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

IN THE MATTER of 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1981 


N:- 006i'^c! ‘?c5 


tio C0£ Vjft. 


Nc 005260 -ic- 


fio G06262 c? 133: 


:S35 N'j 22* 


1986 No 924 


19e5 No. 336 


T986- No 332 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that by Orders all dated the 1 1th October 1985 made in the High Court of Justice (England! 
Chancery Division in the matter of the above-named Companies ("the Scheme Companies") and in the matter of the 
Companies Act. 1985 and by Orders all dated the 16 th October 1985 made in the Supreme Court of Bermuda in the 
matter of the Scheme Companies and in the matter of the Companies Act. 1981 the said Courts have directed 
separate Meetings to be convened of 

(1) Centaur International Scheme Creditors; 

(2) Concord Scheme Creditors; 

(3) Marbarch Scheme Creditors; and 

(4) Shasta Scheme Creditors; 

being creditors of Scheme Companies in respect of claims outstanding on 29th March 1985 or arising out of 
obligations assumed by Scheme Companies prior to 29th March 1985 other ihan Excluded Claims (as defined in the 
Scheme of Arrangement hereinafter mentioned) for the purpose of considering, and. if thought fit, approving (with or 
without modification) a Scheme of Arrangement proposed to be made between the Scheme Companies and their 
respective Scheme Creditors and that such Meetings will be held at Great Eastern Hotel at the comer of Bishopsgate 
and Liverpool Street, London EC2M 7QN, England on Wednesday the 4th December 1985 at the respective times 
below mentioned namefy:- 

(1) The Meeting of Centaur International Scheme Creditors at 10.00 a.m.; 

(2) The Meeting of Concord Scheme Creditors at 1 0. 1 5 a. m. or so soon thereafter as the preceding Meeting shall 
have been concluded or adjourned; 

(3) The Meeting of Marbarch Scheme Creditors at 10.30 a.m. or so soon thereafter as the preceding Meeting shall 
have been concluded or adjourned; and 

(4) The Meeting of Shasta Scheme Creditors at 1 0.45 a.m. or so soon thereafter as the preceding Meeting shall have 
been concluded or adjourned. 

Any creditor of one or more of the Scheme Companies who is or believes that he may be entitled to attend any of the 
said Meetings can obtain copies of the said Scheme of Arrangement. Forms of Proxy, and copies of the Statement 
required to be furnished pursuant to Section 426 of the Companies Act. 1985 and Section 1 00 of the Companies Act. 
1981:- 

(i) from Clrfford-Tumer, Blackfriars House, 19 New Bridge Street. London EC4V 6BY, England, or 

(ii) from Conyers. Dill & Pearman. Clarendon House, Church Street, Hamilton 5-31 Bermuda; 

during usual business hours on any day (other than a Saturday or a Sunday) prior to the day appointed for the said 
Meetings. 

The said Scheme Creditors may vote in person at such of the said Meetings as they are entitled to attend or 
they may appoint another person, whether a Scheme Creditor or not, as their proxy to attend and vote in their 
place. 

h is requested that the form appointing proxies be lodged with Neville Russell at 246 Bishopsgate, London 
EC2M 4P5. England not less than 48 hours before the time appointed for the Meetings, but if forms are not so 
lodged, they may be handed to the Chairman at the Meeting at which they are to be used. 

By the said Orders the Courts have appointed Maurice R. Lawrence or failing him. Brian A. Udell to act as Chairman at 
each of the said Meetings of Scheme Creditors and have directed the Chairman to report the results thereof to the 
respective Courts. 

The said Scheme of Arrangement will be subject to the subsequent approval of each of the respective Courts. 

DATED the 28th day of October 1 985. 

Linklaters& Paines 
Barrington House 
59-67 Gresham Street 
London EC2V7JA 

Solicitors for Centaur International Insurance Company Limited 

Titmuss, Sainer& Webb 
2 Serjeants' Inn 
London EC4Y 1 LT 

Solicitors for The Concord Reinsurance Company Limited and Marbarch Insurance Company Limited 

D.J. Freeman & Co. 

43 Fetter Lane 

London EC4A 1 NA 

Solicitors for Shasta Reinsurance Company limited 






NYSE Most Actives 


m Lost Oa I 

26% 

— 9ft 

16'] 

—1% 

<1% 

+ % 


— IU 

2S% 

+ % 

30% 

— % 





33% 

— % 

6% 

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40 

+ % 

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♦ 1 


+1 

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+ U 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Hl|k LAW Lost Oil 

Indus 137103 133463 136141 1X7X57 + 644 

Tram 4szz7 ui 75 A4M1 uui + lc 

Util 16085 162.14 159.62 161.16 + 0.92 

COfflA 55545 561.17 5SL26 45747 4- 611 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE Index 


Hlflb Law Close Cfa*w 
Composite 10949 169.24 10949 +040 

industrials 12570 12SJ2 124.70 +048 

T reran. 10341 10257 10341 +0.90 

Ut I Ilf Irs 5738 5733 57 JC + Q2I 

FklBiea 11641 11631 11691 +142 


VWnesdajs 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 
urmttas 
ifWi u f i k ilo 


Clou Oi-aa 

80.17 + 045 

77.75 + 067 

8260 +B4t 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New H mils 
New Laws 
Volume un 
Volume dawn 


Clou Prev. 

980 999 

582 558 

465 446 

2027 2023 

ss a 

26 » 

60431,120 
38438410 


mai 



Buy 

Sate* 


00.29 

10656 

409708 

7.983 

Oct. 28 

145811 

377848 

8633 

Oct- 25 

142687 

34X908 

13882 

Oct. 24 — 

— 143874 

400J4.' 

17861 

00-23 

16X734 

441,929 

2X473 

"Included m me satas wire* 



Qosn^s 


VoLaf 4 PJA 

Prev.4PM.vol 

Prev consolidated dose 

12X368808 

11X600800 

13X714830 



Cornposlle 

Industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

UHlHIes 

Banks 

TransA. 


dose aw Ape 
29236 +1.U 28941 
39345 +042 29234 
28646 +245 381-23 
3SU3 +277 346.17 
27548 — 047 272.19 
31245 + 005 J1VM 
36649 +100 26620 


Tables include tbe nationwide prices 
up to tb* dosing an Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Standard & Poor's Index 


High Lew Cion dree 
Industrials 21142 210.12 211.14 + 072 

Trwrsn. 17043 14033 17031 +240 

Utilities 8430 8617 8651 +034 

Finance 2244 2242 2244 +032 

Composite 19049 189.14 19007 +084 



4 Pjvl volume 
Prev. 4 P 46 volume 
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United Pros International 

NEW YORK — Shares on the New York 
Slock Exchange rallied Wednesday to a record 
high closing in active trading. 

Analysts said the gains were spurred by ex- 
pectations of lower interest rates. 

The Dow Jones industrial average added 6.84 
to 1.375-57. surpassing its previous record of 
1.36929. set Oct. 17. 

Broader market indicators advanced. Tbe 
New York Stock Exchange index rose 0.50 to 
109.69. Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index 
climbed 0.84 to 190.07. The price of an average 
share increased 15 cents. 

Advancing stocks outpaced declining ones by 
a 5-3 ratio. Volume totaled 1 20.4 million shares, 
up from 1 10.6 milli on Tuesday. 

When interest rates fall, it lowers business's 
cost of borrowing money. 

“Investors are perceiving that a more accom- 
modative interest rate environment is ahead,” 
said Eugene Peroni Jr, chief technical analyst at 
Bateman Eichler Hill Richards: 

Mr. Petoni said a leadership shift from “ru- 
mor stocks” to interest rate-sensitive utility and 
financial issues gave the market a stronger un- 
derlying tone. 

Money made in recent takeover situations is 
being recycled bade into the market and will 
help propel the Dow into tbe 1.400 area, Mr. 
Peroni said. 

But he said the key to the markets ability to 
move higher will be bow much fresh cash equi- 
ties can attract. The direction of interest rates 
will determine that, he said. 

Remarks Monday by the Federal Reserve 
Board chairman, Paul A. Volcker, and those 
Wednesday by the Fed vice chairman. Preston 


Martin, indicate that an environment of lower 
interest rates — including a possible discount- 
rate cut — will prevail, Mr. Peroni said. 

Mr. Martin termed the UJ5. economic expan- 
sion “sluggish" and said there was “some likeli- 
hood of a recession in I9S6.” 

U.S. Steel was the most active NYSE-listed 
issue, losing % to 2634. U.S. Steel and Texas Oil 
& Gas announced a definitive merger pact on 
Wednesday. 

Texas Oil & Gas was second, falling 13* to 
1616. 

Wesiioghouse Electric was third, adding *4 to 
437s. 

Beatrice Cos. continued to lose ground, drop- 
ping 1 to 42!4. KohlbeTg Kravis Roberts & Co. 
has made an unsolicited offer of S47 a share for 
Beatrice. 

Bethlehem Steel fell |7t to 1314. It reported 
third-quarter losses of $76.8 million and omit- 
ted its quarterly dividend. The company also 
said it expects a fourth-quarter loss. 

Chesebrough-Pond’s dropped 24 to 40^. It 
told the Securities and Exchange Commission 
that it has not and is not holding discussions 
regarding a merger or takeover of the company. 
Unilever, which recently has been rumored to 
be interested in buying Chesebrougb-Pond's, 
rose 2ft to 119%. 

Some inlerest-rate-sensidve utility issues 
gained. Commonwealth Edison added ft to 
28%. Ohio Edison rose % to 15%, Consolidated 
Edison edged up W to 36 and Boston Edison 
added % to 39%. 

In the financial sector, American Express 
advanced 1% to 45?«. Phibro Salomon Bros, 
added 1 to 38% and Merrill Lynch rose 1 to 
29%. 


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Cln Bell X12 64 8 36 489* 

ClflGE X16 118 6 1085 1BV, 

CInG pf 9J0 128 lQt 74 

ana pi 7*4 12 J 2Cab ai, 

CInG pf 988 126 11001 741] 


hrreir 180 25 3 11099 40t* 
hubus 13 216 501* 


CInG pf 980 128 lQt 74 

ana pi 7X4 12-7 MKr 5Ji, 

CInG pf 988 126 llOOl 741] 

ClnGpf 952 126 75Vi 

CnMIl 82 47 20 358 15V, 
O relic s 283 22H 

OrO ty .10 A 12 364 224* 

Circus 13 39 254 

CJIIcrp 286 XI 6 5165 <4Vi 
atlcppf 785* 9.1 89 77V] 

OlCP pfB782e 78 100 1004 

Clobir 82 108 5 157 7 

Clairs s 24 189 12*. 

ClarkE 1.10 61 28 417 2796 

CtavHs 11 306 124 

180 X9 10 47 

P4 280 108 50 

I 264 118 6 

Pf 140 1X1 
k 801 
Pf 1.11 
Pf 82 1 

186 38 13 
80* 16 17 
160 28 18 
160 <5 
40 U U 
60 18 12 
183 X4 
286 41 14 


199* 199* 

108 113V* +49* 
44 + 4 
5BV* +9* 
314 

514 + 4 
14 + 4 
56 V. + 96 
II 

1796 + 4 
474 
2S4 
204 

254 + 4 
284 + 4 
84 

254— 4 
J4J6 + 4 
224 + 4 
504 +14 

20 V. + 4 

13 +4 

224— 4 

24 

404— 4 
114— 4 
194 

1934 +14 
23 

94 + 4 
284 
244 

274 + 4 
25 

34V*— 1 
7 +4 

23VS— 4 
284 

<5 +14 
164 + 4 
124— 4 

26— 4 

U4 + 4 
354 + 4 
254 + 4 
130 +24 

434 + 4 

94 + 4 
<24 
234 

254+4 
264 + 4 
<14 + 4 
194 + 4 
2M 
354 

124— 4 
191]— 4 
44 + 4 
114 

18 +4 

21 

294 — 4 
22 +4 

23V* + 4 
51 +4 

74 

24— 4 
4— 4 
24— V* 
584 + 94 
48 +9* 

5496 + 9* 
534 + 4 
224 

284— 4 
39 

384 + 4 
544 + 4 
349* 

<09*— 296 
39—4 
1304 +24 
454 + 4 
204 

74— 4 
S4 +9* 
119* + 4 
144 + 4 
624 +14 
<0 +4 

504 + 4 
634 + 4 
164— 4 
254 + 4 
484 + 4 
184— 'A 
7< 

5894 + M 
734— 4 
754 

154 + 4 
22*. — 'U 
2296 — 4 
254— ’A 
4414+9* 
794— 4 
1004 + 4 
7 

12 — V, 

27— 96 
124 + 4 


3994 241] 
20 14 

31 224 

ISVa 12V. 

38 27V, 

4714 364 
“ 404 

25 

479* 389* 
896 44 
334 194 
39% 274 
549* 324 
56 324 

314 154 
259* 14 
2B4 144 
284 144 
2014 t<4 
204 144 
184 104 
17 94 

154 
104 
474 314 
10V* 49* 

4V4 9* 

2496 2096 
384 154 
19* 4 

39 274 
4114 3114 
906* 1496 

274 174 

IS* 11 - 

04 304 
50*4 244 
10V. 5V. 

11 4 

394 32 
554 23 
194 174 
5396 494 
24 184 

724 434 
444 284 
504 44 
65*. 504 
339* 13 
884 584 
104 14 

3R6 XT* 
524 334 


ConAsr 180 73 14 
ConnE 160 *J) 12 
CnnNG 260 EJ 9 
Conroe M 2.9 17 
ConsSti 2A0 48 8 
ConEpf 465 1(U 
ConEpf 580 1H7 
CnsFrl 1.10 08 12 
CnsNG X32 14 9 
ConsPw 

CnP pfB 450 110 
CnPpfC 452 11.7 
CnP pTO 785 144 
CnP pfG 776 149 
CnPprV 440 1X4 
CnP prU 380 1XT 
CnPprT 378 144 
CnPprR 400 1X8 
CnPprP X98 1X2 
CnPprN 385 149 
CnP prM 2_50 149 
CnPprL 273 146 
CnPprS 402 146 
CnPorK 283 147 
OitICP 280 40 20 


criiHW 

Cntlnfo 9 

ContTel 180 77 8 
CtDotO 72 43 
vICookU 

Coopr 1.52 41 15 
Coopl pf 190 7 A 
CopfTr AO U 9 
Coorart* A0 18 14 
Copwld 721 
CpwW pf X48 11? 
Cor dura 84 38 14 
Cor* In 86 48 11 

IS R 22 

CntCrd -24T 27 15 
Cruta 13 

Cron* 180b 45 11 
CravR* 27 

CrckNptZlB 1U 
CrcJcN pf 283e 58 
CrmpK 170 57 12 
CrwnCk 13 

CrwZel 180 XS 
CrZelpf 483 98 
CrZal pfC450 78 
Cull nets IS 

CumEn X20 X4 4 
Currinc I.i0al08 
CbrtW 170 16 M 
Cvdops 1.10 13 I 


122 37 
38 18V. 
10 30 
IK 139* 
1)9) 3*14 
120Qr 44Vi 
7 4696 
1657 36V. 
138 <3 
1613 79* 
102 30 
lOOz 38V] 
lOOz 51 
30Z52 
25 239* 
41 24Vz 
25 3614 

15 2696 

115 26V. 
28 259* 
10 1696 
3 1S<4 
25 279* 

15 16V. 
1018 <396 

159 79* 
<23 2V* 
6 57V* 
423 
107 llta 

6U5 ^ 

8W 37V6 
137 39V] 
22 17V] 
2180 25V] 

13 9K 
10 iV* 

175 2496 
28 1194 
1065 52V. 
219 50V. 
ID 81* 
27 99* 

2<1 ssn 

1279 55 

14 1914 
611 52V* 

13 23V* 
72 74V6 
383 <0 

41 48V. 
568 5996 

309 14W 
255 649* 

16 109* 
J 339* 

42 


361* 37 + i* 

1796 1796 — 5* 
299i 2 99* + <8 
139* 13V, 

36 36te + 9* 
43 4<Vi +1 
469* 4696 
35V] 36U + 96 
42V. 4796 
7V6 79* + 14 

30 30 —1 

38V: 38V] + V] 

51 51 

52 S2 
31] 289* 

239* 239* 

25 V* 24'i +1 , 
26V* 269* + 9* 
259* 26’A — Vl 
259* 255* + VS 
1696 1696 + Vi 
15V* 1SV6 + V. 
26V* 279* + 1* 
169* 16V] + 16 
a 43V. + V* 
7V> 796 

2 2V* 

= ,. = - W 
9i 96 

119* 1191— ** 
23V] 23V,— V* 
16VJ 169* 

1 I 

3696 37U + Vi 
38V] 39V. — V* 
169* 169* 

2416 2SV* +1 
9V. 916 
179* 179* + V* 
249* 2<9i + V* 
119* 1196 
51V] 5196 + Vs 
50 50 - 1] 

89* 89* + 9* 
»V, 9V,— V* 

359* 1596— V* 
V* 55 + ’A 

19 19'6 — V* 

52 52V. + '4 

72V, 74V6 +lt* 
3996 399* 

479* 4816 + <6 
39V, 591]— V. 
13V. 139*— 1 
639* 64 — V* 
109* 10V* 

339* 339*— 1* 
481] 4s«] 


28V] im FrvaBk 88 38 18 1 

359* 19V* FtWhsc 130 38 8 1 

41 23S* Flschb 1-00 <7 

13 8V, FhhFd 85* 8171 

<3 2696 FtfFnGs 184 37 8 

2896 17V, FVeefEn 84 X3 9 

39% 319* Flgning 180 28 13 

139* 11* FlexlS Ul 125 
2996 20 FlotltSIS .96 7 1? 1 


496 + 16 <816 38*6 InidStPf 473 1 LI 5 <79* 429* 4296 

2716 + 16 2196 169* InsOco 180b 57 10 206 17 161* 169*— 1* 1 

27» 6V* 39* InspRS 2D 4ft 49] «fft— 9k 


259* + «* 261* 118* IntsRsc 


241* 237* 239*— 96 1 491* 42 


40 12 1186 12 

i08 389] 379* m + 96 

>32 19V] 1916 199* + 9* 

74 3616 359* 36*. 


357* 25V. IntaRpf 
99* TV* Ini logo 
99* 99* I rtf lag Pf 

1416 S IrtfRFn 


intgR pf 383 118 
intgR Pf X31eK8 
InfgRPf 475 127 


35 15V. Float Pt 18 

459] 31V] FkiEC .14a A 13 

29V* 229* FlaPrg XI 6 78 8 

189* 11 9* FlaStl 80 15 14 

64* 316 FlwGrai 

21 14<A Rower 86 22 19 

20V* 14(6 Fluor 80 29 

59 47V. FoateC 270 4.1 11 


129* 129* 12th + H 197* 17 ItcpSe 
23V* 23 23 — ta 734* 57V* Intarco 


51V. 40V* FordM 280 XO 3 4032 47 
13V. 11 Ftoeor 176 108 u » 
43 28'- FJHOWS 

15V, 1096 FosdWh 84 38 12 

13V* 796 Fox Phot 68 S3 13 37 W 

329* 249* Foxbro 184 <8 76 

27 22 Foxmvr 15 

229* 1BVS FMEPn 1.10* 58 
1396 9V] FMGCl) 130 

109* 8V* FMOG 284*20.1 5 .. 

22V] 141] F rot Me 80 XI 11 1391 1*9 

329* 22 Frjgtrn 80 11 36 135 2D 

2896 2116 Fruehf 70 11 6 1071 

32 V] 261] Fruhfpf 280 77 49 

369* 2S9* Fuqua 80 17 f 280 3U 


253 31V, 31 3116 + V6 121] 9 Intrfat 

14 3894 3816 3896 + Va 537* 41 !l)Mk 

.16 78 8 5743 2SV] 281* 2B9* + Vi 121] SI* tntaned 

80 15 14 137 157* 1596 159* TAVz 154* IntAIu 

69 59* 51] 5M 138 V, 116 IBM 

8622 19 392 2116 204*21 +96 2916 16V, IreCtri 
80 29 3466 UYi 16 14 — th 34V* 25 IrtlFlav 

70 4.1 11 Cl 54V* 54 54 — 86 1116 M* IniHorv 

88 68 3 6032 47 46 47 +1 7V» 37* IntHrwt 

64 13 1296 121* 396 2V. IntHwtB 

43V, 429* 43V* + 1* 40 299* InTHptC 


119* lit* 1116 + Ml 3496 19 


InfHpfD 

IntMln 


37 12% 1296 177* 

“ 25?* 25V] 2516 + H 

239] 23 23 + 1* mem mm 

II 19V* 1SV 1876 — M 5796 44V6 Int Poor 280 57 


2> 4ft 4V| 4V,— te 8 • * 4 /-BS3 

9 80 21 29*] Tan— » # ■ . 2S2S 

X03 118 9 269* 26V, 2«s + V* S ***** 

631*148 3 45 45 <5 — Vi M-\ 

473 127 4 34% 3416 34V] + 9* 4.’ 

8 109 816 I 816 X ■ .. r * ■’v". ,4i . »' 

150 167 27 916 916 916— Mi 3 

26 VTA ID 101] + 9* •- ' - ' 

xntalto 42 m* 196* 19» + V* . . .. - ■ - ■ 

388 47 13 214 6516 45 65V* 6wMIM#WI«IJp* 

80 58 11 1211 109* 18 W9* + 9* Cbopadl & O* SJL.X.M*iia1tarrM- GM4y+BZZt2 T7 17 

280 55 9 5 471* 475* 471* + V6 7 

391 «R IV] *96— Ml ■ ■ 

72 47 B 7 178 17 n : ■ 1 

480 38 13146*1 1319*13016 131 + Vz 

80 15 10 232 258 34V* 259* +196 U Month 

LW 37 19 765 35 3396 3416— 16 WghLow aodc Ota. YM. PE 

2921 T A| a 1 -- - r 

37 416 41* <ft- 1* 119* 119* MGMGr 84 25 36 

5M5 29* 2 216 T3?* 109* MGMGr ptM 38 - 

8 48 4796 4796— 16 27 W MGMUa 70* 8 

157 2H* 2T9* 219* + 9* 

280 47 11 BS1 389* 38 389* + 9* 


m. ' aw 

Ota YU. PC lMitSRta Ls» OutaC 


39V, 32 InfMnpf 480 KL9 100 3M* 3696 369k— 19* 119* W* 6AL men 
<316 2496 InlMult 174 44 11 162 30] 3716 38 + 96 2216 iS MB Lip 


47 179* 1796 178* + 1* 

2 13 .13 13 

03 »* 25V. 259* + 9 * V8 
95 W 98* 10 + M ww 

ft 7K U 7U ” 


is.® 


280 31V] Til* 


4216 23Va GAF X 5 

37V, 2796 GAT X 1-20 <8 


ICO 180 13 11 


2416 GTE at X00 78 
209* GTE Pi 281 1X4 



169] 8 lidRc* 1536 89* 

, 549* 3716 IntNrtll 24 68 » B7 41ft 

191* + I* 4396 32V, InlPbGp 188 28 13 143 399* 

14V] InfBakr 13 K 2116 

. ^ Eg£S « “ i5 3 !58 

T1V*- 9*| 2196 U9* (PWOE. tJO M10 BOB 

_ 237s iowoRs 388 9 8 8 60 339* 

■ 40 3)1* I pal ao 384 85 9 2497 359* 

41V*— 9* 1396 996 IpenCp 3 U I 63 11 

2996 + 1] 409* 28 IrvBok 18* 51 7 177 9 

JMi-lfc 539* 43)6 IrvBICPf 474* 90 59 53V* 


"I 40 311* (pale 

4 TV*— 9 * 1396 996 I PCD I 


. j 

5 

3 

18 2248 56 
33 642 43 4196 

23 169 71] 714 


M— 16* 

1S-V* 

Itis 

ai,s 


27 IX MGMUa 70* 8 «3 »* 25V, 259* + 9* 

2V* MGMuwt 95 K> 95* 10 + W 

49* MLCoaun2De 27 21 .79] 79* 79* 

TM ML lac n . 173 119] 1H* 111] + 9* 

77)6 MB Lis J8» 4 PV, 131] 13V, 

2016 Maonf* 55 17 U 390 UVk 3216 3296 + 9* 

-9* 65 385* Mac* 1.14 18 T7 205 oS 4296 43 + 9* 

56V, 34 Macvpl 475 78 330(57 54 36 — Vi 

17V, NH6 MadRn <5 189* M96 MR* + ta 

5316 31V. Mosfa U12* M 9 728 509*. 49 5096 +V* 

I 2796 1)6 MstAst UL00C M M M Mb + Ml 

+ th 179* MM ManMn 2D 15 27 U9* 13 1316 + V* 

19V. 10V. MaarCs J1 8 22 2326 U 1796 m 

+ I* 1 4216 309* MVrHaa 378X1 5 U6I MV3WM + K 


65 3D 
4IV, + Vk 5M] 36 
39— 9b 


7796 MB LI S JV 4 1 

2016 Maonls 55 17 » 390 : 
3Wt Moat 1.14 18 T7 205 l 
36 Macvp* 47S 78 330r! 


+ lb ' 4216 309* MfrHan 371 XI 
— 9k 529* 41 Mfrf+sf 583*1X3 
+ * Mk 5A vtManwf- ; - 

+ 9* ' 3(1* -Mb 25 


3596 231k JWT * 1JX 37 17 134 30 299* 297* + Vk 39= 

16 37 2396 J River 56 17 11 373 33* 3296 3396 + 96 IV 

V* 28V* 14 Jammy .12 8 10 196 ITW 187* 1ST* — Vi 17= 

1396 KJ96 JapnF 183*122 183 1194 119* 1196 + Vk TOO 

16 47V] 34 JefffTl 1-52 U 7 1949 469* 451* 449% +96 751 
9k 77 6<R] JarCpf 986 12 5 W6zB, H » 44 

46 527* JerCpf XI 2 128 7Bl 65V, 65V, 65V, +1» 14 

V* 106 9196 JerCpf 1X50 127 50zM5 MB 105 — ^ 1 36 

, 1896 1496 JerCpf 111 m _ ZJ 111 78 II +M il 

ik 1496 6« Jewfcr _ 33 3 IM ISM ISM 


17 11 373 33* 3296 33H + 96 1196 
8 10 196 19% 187k 1ST* — V, 179* 


56 X3 10 203 17 


55M 

SR_ 

Sta 7Vj Gnbato " 
iiv, 10V, GnOevn 
JV, 216 Gooevwt 
84 421] GflC 

6516 S3 G*fl_ _ 

120 53 GnFds 250 XI 

996 496 GAHRN 
1816 1116 GhtostS 50 17 
127k (Hr GnHous 54 24 
23V] 129i Grilnst 55 17 
6516 4796 GfiMJIb 224 34 


547* 54 54 

18 17% 18 


- 1496 1496— V* 106 9196 JerCrt 

% 9% 10 , 1896 1496 JerCpf 

Vi Iltt III) + % 1696 6% Jewter 


M»i75 75 75 44 

71b 45V, 65V, 65Vt+ll] 14 
50x105 MB MB —1 34 

2J 18 7* II + V* *] 

3 IM ISM 11% 


26 18 17% 18 , 

» 559* 58W 581* 5496 907* JfaoCpf 475 77 20 54 54 54 

393 35V] 3<96 3516 + 96 2796 217* JflTWI 180 48 It 3 Z37k 235* 23> 

128 9% 9% 97* + Vi 26V] 19 Jcslert* 88 35 14 118 2516 25 251 

lim TtW. 1DV6— 96 27V] 2196 JoyMta 180 48 M 579 2214 Z17* 22 

Mh 2w 2 Vj Vs m 


— % <9Vi 3216 JafanJn 1J0 27 15 43C <791 46% 4796 +H* 

<614 38% JohnCn 18to 48 9 125 43 4296 4296— % 

5496 306* JboCpf 475 78 20 54 . 54 54 


1% V, MaraJa 
38V, 25% Mar MM 180 52 7 
53V, a MorMpf <87* 92 
2M 1* Mariana 88 7 34 

■96. MarkC . 82 30 
13% Mark of 180 75 
70 Marftot 54 5 14 
75% 50% Mrnm 27B xt n 
26% MartMs UD0 'XI » 
0% ManrK- M 14 
2596 Mass 56 U 17 
. 7% MaiayF 

30% 22% Masco XU WS 
129k 10V] Mai I IK U2 U0 
6514 48V, MdiaE Jfr JTO 
17Vk W6 Mattel 17 


381X1 5 1261 39V, 39% 39% + 16 
583*118 .A 40 40 — % 

- 2 -540 5% -5% M+ % 

r • - Z49 14% U% 1M)+J% 

100 2* * TW 34% 34%tHP •* 
tt 366 3% 3% 

ITT % % %— % 

180 S2 7 m M* 34 »k+B 

LEso 


35 M 110 2514 25 


3 23ft 239* 23%—% 13% CH MaMtet 


220 18 11 4413 59% 


6396 + %l 
58%— % | 


GnFd* 250 XI 18 356 120 11914120 +% 

7 15 4% 496 496— % I 


10 79* KOI 

209* 11% KLM 


17V, 17% — % 41V, 30% K mart 180 48 10 2791 34 


23V] 15V] 
14% 9% 
309* 2214 
%* 5% 
IS «% 
40 24% 

74 31 

5% 4 

ID* 496 

22 1414 

45% 299* 
20% 1496 
40% 94% 
33% 24 W, 
24% 20V* 
52% 34'4 
10 416 

449* 24% 
28 V. 21 
37% 31(6 
177* 14 
80 44 

47% 53 
44% 51 

S' 23 

27% 21% 
27% 22(4 
25% 21% 
2914 74 
29% 14% 
33% 28 
34% 29 
114% 107 
20% 16% 
24 18% 

18% 11% 
33V* 23% 

21 Ml* 
36% 34% 

22 20% 

571] 31% 
125% B5V6 
95 56(6 

2BW 16% 

6% 4% 

10% 69* 
34% 3696 

23 16% 

61% 43% 
35% 23’- 
42% 32% 
37% 27 
50 34’6 

32% 8% 

15% II 
34% 17% 
21% 16% 
69% 344c 
619* 46% 
40 31% 

50 40 

35% 27% 
BS% 68% 
80% 64% 
27 22% 

35% 30% 
83% 60 
17% 14% 
16% 1594 
16% 1214 
17% 13% 
18 1496 

18 149* 

20% 1594 
25% 23 
62% 50 
27 20% 


Dallas 54 <0 
DamaoC 30 18 
DanaCp 188 55 

Dancrhr 

Daniel .18b U 
DartKr S 156 38 

DaloGn 

Dalptn 

DfoDSO 84 \3 
Davco -24 1.4 
DaytHd 82 XI 
DarlPL 200 HO 
DeanFd 56 15 
Deere 1O0 40 
DelmP 182 7 A 
Delta Ar 180 X6 
Del Iona 
DlxChs 184 
DensMf 180 _ 

Do So Id 1.40 48 
Del Ed 186 11.1 
DetE pf 982 1X5 
DefEpf 788 118 
DetE Pf 786 118 
DEprP X24 r* 
DEptQ X13 I 
DEpfP 112 1 
DE PlB 175 U_ 
DEpfO 140 1X4 
OEpfM 142 1X3 
DE prL 4.00 1X7 
DE pfK 4.12 1X6 
DE PfJ 1586 138 
DetE pr 228 V*" 
Dexter 80 
DiGlor „ _ 

DIGIOPf X25 75 
DlamS 157rI0J) 
DtaShpf 400 11.1 
DiaSOfn 180 b 65 
Dleblds 180 73 
Digital 

Disney 180 U 
DEI ( 18) 63 

Dlvrsln 
Dome a .12 
DomRs 272 85 
Donald 86 XI 
Donley 1.16 XI 
Dorsey 180 38 
Dover 88 25 
DowCh l -SO 4.9 
DowJn J* 11 
Downey 80e IX 
Drava JO 4,0 
Drew 80 *A 
DroxB 2JJ0 10.4 
Dreyfus 80a .9 
duPofU 100 4.9 
duPntPf 350 15 
duPntpf 450 95 
DukeP 280 75 
Duke pf 8-70 108 
□ukepf 8-20 105 
Duka pf 289 10.1 
Dukepf 385 1D.9 
DunBrd 220 19 
DuqLI X06 13-2 
DuOPtA 210 118 
Duo pf 187 125 
Duqpl 200 125 
DuqpfG X10 1X5 
DuqprK X10 1X2 
Duqpr 131 1X3 
Duo pr 275 108 
DM Pf 730 1X2 
DynAm 30 8 


30 162 16% 16% 16% 
419 14% 13% 1416 

7 1481 21% 23% 23V4 

I 38 I 79i 79*- 

146 8% ■% 8% 

13 7733 40% 39% 39*> 
18 2434 <2% 40V* 41% - 

933 5% 5% 5% 

B 79 7% 7% 7% - 

9 44 1716 17 17% 

17 2234 39(6 38% 39% 

8 429 18% 18% 18% - 

18 137 3M 38% 3B<6- 
38 1310 25% 251* 25% 

9 404 25% 23 25% 

7 2635 38% 37% 38% ■ 

235 79* 7 7% - 

17 70S 40 39% 39% 

12 83 22% 22 22 • 

10 54 22% 32 32 

7 2984 15% 15 15% 

300z 74% 74% 74% 
440z 65 65 65 ' 

74to 42% 42 421* ■ 

34 26% 26(6 26% 
2B 2S% 25% 25% 
12 25% 25% 25%- 

2 25% 2S% 25% 
442 27% 279* 27% 
195 27% 27V, 2796 • 

9 31% 30% 31% ■ 

31 37% 32V. 12% 

6 114 113% 114 ■ 

3 19% 19 19 

12 294 71% 31 21 

97 1 30 Mte 14% 16%' 

6 30 29% 29% 

1414 15% 159* 156* 

32 36% 35% 36% ■ 

285 21 9k 219k 21% 

14 365 37% 36% 37% ■ 

18 4460 1131* 1129k 113% • 

48 403 B9% 88% 89 

6 98 20% 20% 20% 

3 22 5% 5% 5% 

170 a% 8% s%- 

9 6388 32% 319k 32% 

10 252 21% 21% 21%. 

15 431 55% 55 33% • 

13 199 35 34% 35 ■ 

13 4271 35% 341* 35 - 

15 5595 36% 36% 36% ■ 

18 739 37% J7V. 37% - 

3 335 33 31% 32% - 

99 12% 12% 129* 

16 834 19% I8'6 18% - 

41 19'6 19 19V* ■ 

15 841 699* 67% (8% ■ 

16 7147 61% 59% 61 ■ 

3 37% 37 37 - 

10 47’- 46% 47V* ■ 

9 1546 34% 349* 34% ■ 
39ttz 84 83 L. 84 

lOOz 773* 77V1 77^. 

4 26% 26% 26% 4 

30 35'-. 35 35'- 

20 594 75V. 74% 75V* 

7 854 15% 15% 15% - 

500, IP. 18% 18% . 
JOr 15 IS 15 - 
200J 16 16 16 - 

100, ltrV. 16% 16V. 
121 17(6 16% 17V* 4 
40 m 189* 18% 18% - 
100, 25% 25% 25% - 

4960, 59% 59% 59*.*- 
12 13 25% 25% ».*. 


85 64(6 GMol 5JXlr 78 6 

44% 14V* GMtr E 851 .1 
<396 36 _ GMotpf 335 9 A 
58(6 47% GMolpf 580 98 
8% 3% GNC .16 38 14 

15% 10 % gpu a 


.48 uni m m— v* 
964 15% 14% 15 
4750 63% 62 62V6 — V* 


77 14V6 KNEnn 

189* 12% KoksrAI .IS 
44 49V. Kol 64pf 635 


31 25 II » «% » 

81* 73 7- 747 1796 171] 1796 + V* 
80 42 10 2791 34 33% 33V,— % 


14 ^ 

T7dS 

sn* OT*— % 

. SV6 13 19% + n 

. 84 119* 11 11—16 

4 20 13 rev* 1299 — l* 

11 2349 57V* 54 56% + 96 

12 Ml 4416 43U 6316— % 

31 23% 22% 21% + Vi 

I 25V* 25% 251* — K 
. 1482 19 mi If + % 
_ 43 3V6 3% 316 + % 


5JJCT 78 6 6503 67% 66(6 47 + 99 20(6 14(6 KolsCe 


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THURSDAY, OCTOBE& 3 jL, }9BS t 


BUSINESS/ FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


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** 


Page 9 


WALL STREET WATCH 



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b! methods of investing have 
failed them.” 

He noted that for three 
straight years more than TO 
percent of equity managers 
have underperformed the Standard & Pool's 500 stock index: 
While professional fund managers generally go* comfortably 
ahewl of the game in the first half of 1985, Mr. LeFrere called the 
third quarter a “disaster for them, with mother year of under- 
ormance threatening unless stocks mow broadly to new 
■ris in the fourth quarter. 

With passive techniques such as index funds gr na i ii g Jn popu- 
larity that promise no more — or no less —than what the overall 

market does, he said that investment manager * am. -* ta 1 rmg «rto r? 
risks and the strategy is h adrfiring on them.” 

Forecasting earnings of companies has been the conventional 
method for analysts to separate Wall Screens winners from losers, 
but Mr. LeFrere asserted: “If there's one lesson I've yamm! its - 
not to believe in eamingg projections.” ' 

He sighted the example of IBM. Last May the company was 
assuring the investment community and apparently itself that the 
1985 profit picture was bright But in the second quartet; it 
reported a loss and said that it feared mote problems' ah«*ad. 

. “Everybody seems to agree that IBM is the best managed 
company in America,” Mr. LeFrere said. “If they can’t predict 
what’s ahead for the bottom tine, how can it be expected of the 
others? Even the big retailers like Sears and JjC. Penne y appar- 
ently can’t predict anymore what kind of a Christmas they’re 
going to have.” 

H E SAID he believes that this inabiKty to provide investors 
with confidence about future earnmy and dividends of 
companies is largely responsible Tar the new focus on 
picking merger candidates as a way to make money in stocks. 

However, this does not mean that all investors are condemned 
to a short ran on Wall Street. “There are great opportunities to 
make money — greater than everbefore,” he asserted. . 

Mr. LeFrere's fund has been up 30 percent a yearin the 1980s. 
Essential to that kind -of successful investing, he said, is under- 
standing that “the stock market now is totally institutionalized,’’ 
with computer-driven buy-and-sell programs dictating more arid 
more the market's movements. 

He estimates that now only half the volume on the New York 
Stock Exchang e is “real investmen t,” with the balance npresent- 
. mg the so-called passive trades involving futures and other 
instruments in which the largest 200 to 300 companies are often 
traded in“basketsT by. 

Computemed investment techniques. vail eventually dominate 
80 percent of Wall Street, he predicted.' 

While this may appear to squeeze oat anyone but the big 
• institutions, Mr. LeFrere sees it creating an increasing number of 
“value dislocations*' that agile traders can seize an. What’s more, - 
he said, this one-way volatility when computers command which 1 
way huge funds w31 move means smaller investors can make 
money by anticipating surges. 

“YouH be seeing $10 billion. to320ballidzi trying to get through 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 4) 



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Iii 'V alue-Dislocations 


By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

International fftrald Tnbw ' 

N EW YORK — If the stock market wasa new Broad- 
way play it would dose after one performance to a 
Uiunderous yawn. There’s just no pizazz on Wall 
Street, despite rave reviews recendy from the Dow 
Jones average, and unfortunate^ for investors ifey carmen de- 
mand tbeir money back. 

luikSg? aC * £SILa ^ e ^ boredom, is there something worse 

“Most people on WaH street are deathly afinrid, r said John M. 
LeFrere, managing partner erf • ~ " 

Delta Capital Management in wn 

New York. ‘They're beaten laepe are great 


opportBiMM to niake 
money ... greater 
than ever before.” .. 


U.S. Steel 
To Buy 
Texas Oil 

Transaction Put 
At $3.6 Billion 

The Auoaattd Pms 

PITTSBURGH —United Stales 
Sted Coro, said Wednesday that it 
has signed as agreement to acquire 
Texas Oil A Gas Ccep-, one of the 
hugest UJS. independent natural 
gas oompanks, in an fxrhange of 
stock valued at nearly S3.6 billion. 

Shareholders of Texas 03 & Gas 
would receive 06333 share of U.S. 
Sled stock for each of thdr com- 
mon shares, US. Steel said. 

No price was disclosed. But 
based oa a dosing price Wednes- 
day of $26.75 a share for UJS. Sted 
and approximately 2 10 million 
shares of Texas Ou A Gas stock 
outstanding, the transaction would 
be worth $3.55 bflGon, or about 
SI6J2 a shore. That hrwdl bdow 
earlier esthnates by analysts that 
pm a pice tag of Texas Oil & Gas 
at about $52 bSHou. 

However, UJS. Seel was granted 
several options by Texas 03 & Gas 
that would protect U-S. Sted and 
make competing bids less attrac- 
tive 

UJS. Sted was given an option to 
purchase op to 38.9 milKon shares 
of unissued Texas 03 A Gas stock 
at $17.42 a share, which would en- 
sure a profit if Texas CXI & Gas 
were acquired by another suitor at 
the $24 to $25 a share that some 
analysts haw predicted. 

Tne U.S. steelmaker also wUl be 
able to buy for $ 1 J billion all the 
capital stock of three companies 
that repr ese n t substantially all of 
Texas 03 A Gas Corp.’s natural- 
gas pipeline business. Such a “lock- 
up" option would enable U.S. Steel 
to acquire Delhi Gas Pipeline 
Corp., Tonkawa Gas Processing 
Co. and Neuces Co. 

U.S. Sted said that if succeeds, 
Texas 03 & Gas would remain a 
separate business based in Dallas, 
just as Marathon 03 Co. remained 
largely independent when the steel- 
maker purchased that company for 
S6.5~buEon in 198L 

U.S. Steel already holds 14 J mil- 
lion shares, or 6.9 percent, of Texas 
03 A Gas through the steelmaker’s 
pension trustee, U.S. Sted and Car- 
negie Pension Fund. 

—.The combination would create 
one of the hugest companies in the 
United States, with total assets of 
about $23 billion and annual reve- 
nues of approximately $21 billion. 

Earlier, U.S. Steel reported 
third-quarter net profit of $100 
million, or 62 cents a common 
share, down 35 percent from $153 
m il li on , or 51.15 a share, in the 
yeaMariier period. 


France Seeks to Export Fast Trains 


But Competition 
For U.S. Projects 
Is Heating Up 

By Paul Lewis 

Ymi York Tuna Service 

PARIS — The vineyards of 
Burgundy flash past the window 
is a long green bbr as France's 
high-speed Train A Grande Vi- 
tesse, traveling at 170 rmks an 
hour, cals up the 270 miles bo 
tween Paris and Lyon in a bare 
two hours. 

If the builders and operators 
of the world's fastest and most 
extensive high-speed rail net- 
work have their way, the bullet- 
shaped trains w31 also be streak- 
ing past some very different 
scenes in years to come: the 
countryside of New York, Flori- 
da and other U.S. states. 

In competition with train 
makers from Japan, Germany, 
Britain and Q m *d a i French rail 
companies are now pushing hard 
to sdl the TGV io state and local 
authorities in the United States. 

“No one can rival our experi- 
ence,” insists Michel Walrave, 
director of planning and re- 
search at the Sod£t£ Narionalc 
dcs Chrtwms de Fer, France's 
gpvernmentrowned railway. The 
SNCF designed and operates the 
Train 4 Grande Vitesse, which 
.means the train of great speed. 

“We have the best technology, 
so we are confident any state 
interested in high-speed rail trav- 
el will recognize the TGVs val- 
ue,” added Cullen Dwyer, a 
spokesman for TGV Co. The 



France's Train & Grande Vitesse. 


T>U New Yofi Tima} 


company, based in Washington, 
is the marker ing arm of Alstbom- 
Atlantique, a government-owned 
French engineering group that 
manufactures much of the TGV. 
and Franco RaiL a company ibai 
exports French railway techno] - 


l high-speed rail links 

in the United Stares where the 
• French and other train manufac- 
turers see potential include: 

• A line bet w een New York 
and Montreal that would pass 
through Vermont. Studies com- 
missioned by New York State. 
Vermont, Montreal and the 
Province of Quebec conclude 
that such a link would raise 
enough revenue to cover operat- 
ing costs, but not ail of the capi- 
tal costs. Last week, officials 
from the four governments held 
a first round of talks with L\S. 
and Canadian bankers to explore 
financing. 


• A service in Florida from 
Miami to Orlando and Jackson- 
ville. The slate has established a 
commission empowered to gram 
a high-speed rail franchise and 
has set next July as the target 
date for inviting firm bids. 

• A “Texas triangle” line link- 
ing Houston. San .Antonio and 
Dallas, for which West Germa- 
ny's Messerschmitt- Boiko w- 
Blohm GmbH has just complet- 
ed a feasibility study using its 
Inter-City Experimental train. 
The train is designed to reach 
speeds of 186 miles an hour 1 298 
ulometers per hour) but has not 
yet entered service. Mr. Dwyer of 
TGV says: “We would like to see 
an objective, independent study 
of this project, whjch evaluated 
the functioning TGV as well.” 

• A link between Los Angeles 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


EC Minis ters 
Agree to Reduce 
Steel Subsidies 


U.S. Studies Airbus Sales Practices 


By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Sales 
tices of Airbus Industrie, the 
pean aircraft consortium, are being 
examined at the sub-cabinet level 
in Washington and may become 
subject to investigation under Sec- 
tion 301 of the U-S. Trade Act of 
1974, said U.S. officials inter- 
viewed in Washington recently. 

A move «g«n« Airbus, which 
would be among & series of “self- 
ini dated” actions undertaken in re- 
cent months by the Reagan admin- 
istration to combat what it sees as 
unfair trade practices, would cause 
consternation among European of- 
ficials who view Airbus as one of 
Europe’s most successful cross- 
border enterprises, industry 
sources said. Airbus is a consor- 
tium of French, West German, 
British and Spanish aircraft com- 
panies, some of which are state- 
owned. 

One high-placed U.S. trade offi- 


cial said Airbus's securing of a 
S1.6S-biIIiou order from Indian 
Airlines earlier this year, canceling 
a letter of intent signed with Boeing 
Co. in 1984, has significantly raised 
the administration's concern about 
the nature of financial packages 
and other possible inducements. 
U-S. government and industry offi- 
cials have said that special induce- 
ments have abetted Airbus in its 
recent spate of major sales. 

The official, who asked not to be 
identified, said Boeing representa- 
tives have presented the Reagan 
administration with a list of “in- 
ducements'* that the French gov- 
ernment was alleged by Boeing to 
have offered the Indian govern- 
ment in return for the Airbus order. 
If this proved correct, such alleged 
inducements would violate interna- 
tional trade agreements that seek to 
insure fair trade in aviation sales 
by, among other things, barring 
nonrivS-gviatioQ inducements. 

The list, recently presented to the 
French government by U-S- offi- 


cials, includes: promises of French 
technical assistance in cleaning up 
the Ganges River; French support 
in the World Bank for securing soft 
loans for India; French support in 
the United Nations for India's aim 
of establishing a nuclear-free zone 
for the Indian Ocean, and accelera- 
tion of delivery schedules of 
French Mirage jets to India. 

An 4 \irbus spokeswoman said 
that she knew nothing of those alle- 
gations. 

In the aftermath of the Indian 
Airlines agreement, administration 
officials said, a close watch was 
being paid to the bidding war be- 
tween Boring and Airbus for a 
multi billion -dollar order, expected 
to be completed soon, from All 
Nippon Airways, the Japanese do- 
mestic carrier. Some administra- 
tion officials suggested that Airbus 
may have offered a price signifi- 
cantly below that of Boeing in the 
bidding. 

An official dose to Clayton K_ 

(Continued on Page 11, CoL 1) 


Reusers 

LUXEMBOURG — European 
Community industry ministers 
agreed Wednesday- to reduce subsi- 
dies next year fur” the group's frag- 
ile steel industry , removing a threat 
of instability hanging over the bat- 
tered community market. 

After more Lhan 12 hours of 
talks, they produced an accord set- 
tling the" pattern of controls and 
nature of subsidies to remain in 
force after existing crisis controls 
expire Dec. 31. 

The ECs industry commission- 
er, Karl -Heinz Naijes. had warned 
that failure to reach agreement this 
month could have sent steel prices 
tumbling because uncertainty over 
future trading ru!e> would cause 
buyers to delay placing orders. 

The agreement removes quotas 
from about 15 pereen; of the EC's 
70 million metric tons of produc- 
tion and bans government subsi- 
dies for company operating and 
investment costs. 

Luxembourg's economic affairs 
minister, Jacques Poos, said that 
after Jan. 1. government subsidies 
can be paid to steel companies only 
for restricted purposes; research, 
environmental protection and 
company closures. 

[Greece, poorest of the 10 EC 
nations, was exempted from the 
subsidy prohibition. Agence 
Fran ce-’P res se sdd. The aew r regu- 
lations do not apply to Spain and 
Portugal, which are due to enter the 
EC in January .] 

Diplomats said that the pact 
could strengthen the ECs hand in 
steel trade disputes with the United 
States by weakening Washington’s 
argument that heavy subsidies give 
the community an unfair competi- 
tive edge in world markets. 

Billions of dollars have been 
poured into the EC steel industry 
over the past five years as emergen- 
cy aid to help cushion it while it 
scrapped 32 million metric tons of 
excess annual capacity and cut its 
work force by a quarter. 

.Ailing companies were further 
sheltered by a system of maximum 
production quotas designed to pre- 
vent a glut of steel forcing down 
prices in a recession-hit market. 

Ministers also agreed to lift pro- 
duction quotas on Jan. 1 on two 
categories of steel — reinforced 
bars and coated sheet — which 
account for about 9 million metric 
tons erf annual output. 

■ U.S. Warns of Action 

The U.S. trade representative, 
Clayton Yeutter, has warned that 


the EC could face retaliatory action 
unless it reaches a new steel agree- 
ment with Lhe United States by 
Thursday, Reuters reported from 
Washington. 

Mr. Yeutter did not specify 
Tuesday what kind of action might 
be taken, but other U.S. officials 
have said that Washington is pre- 
pared to impose countervailing du- 
ties on many European steel im- 
ports. The existing agreements 
expire Dec. 31. but ihe United 
Slates and the EC agreed previous- 
ly to reach new terms by Oct. 31. 

[Willy de Clercq, the ECs com- 
missiotier for external relations, 
said Tuesday that talks were pro- 
gressing and that “there is same 
possibility of an agreement" by 
Thursday, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Luxembourg. 

[The United States wants an ac- 
cord that runs from January 1986 
through September 1989. The EC 
want a shorter, narrower accord 
that does not limit semi-finished 
steei.l 


aostnm >n London ana Zurich. fUtoao In other Eurotman contort. Nmo Vbrtt rotas at 4 PM. 
(a! Commercial franc Oil Amounts noododto Our onaaauntt (cJ Amounts noodod to totvano 
Dollar f) Units of too M UnUoaflMOtyl Units of ZOMfl NXLznotauoMO: HA-- natavaltaota 
(Hi To buy oat noamt: mtUM 

QtherBoDarValMS 

Orrmcr par IUX Currency par UXt 

ArwHUDOftrat 0J0 FIB. markka IMS 

AwnraLl 1-4294 creek druc. 15X75 

Aadr.KUL 18-42 Haag HOMS 7JWS 

BeJo.fln.fr. 5X30 tmopa nmoe WOO 

Brazil Cruz. M45LOO lodo. rVPtoh 1,11240 

Canadians 13441 IrMir 0J46 

Chinese yuan 33015 Israeli ttaJc. Maun 

DaoKk krone 9X725 Kawanusaar K294 

Eflwtpowiel U5 Motor, ring. L445S 

CSterltoo: 13212 Irish C ' •' 

Souraa: Bondoo Du Benelux (BruneUJjr Banco CoaunanMe ItaOana IMUorO: Jmw Ra- 
tionale Do Paris (Parts).- Boob of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMP (SDR); BAU (dinar, rival DOteml; 
GosfcOr* fru«ej. Other Dato from Routurs and AP. 


Cerrencv per UJU 
0317 
14130 
Sw od. Knew 7MS 
TtfwanS -M49 
TMMM 24445 
Tartdaaflra 55035 

ua 


Japan Wants 
Yen Up More 
Against Dollar 

The Associated Press 

. TOKYO — The Japanese 
yea must strengthen further 
against the dollar despite the 
U.S. currency’s fall of more 
than 30 yen bdow the 242-yen 
level it reached in September, 
Tomonritsu Oba, deputy minis- 
ter for financial affairs, said 
Wednesday. 

Mr. Oba said he was not sat- 
isfied with Tuesday’s Tokyo 
dosing exchange rate of 211.80 
yen to the dollar, althoogh the 
rate was thought to be the low- 
est in more than four years. On 
Wednesday, tire doflar ended at 
21 1.75 yen. 

“The yen should strengthen 
further [against tire dollar) in 
order to rectify [Japan's] cur- 
rent account surplus," Mr. Oba 
said. 

The dollar has fallen 12J 
percent from its lend before tire 
finance ministers from the 
Group of Five industrialized 
nations met in New York on 
Sept 22 and agreed to cooper- 
ate to lead the dollar lower. 


Japan Posts Wider Trade Surpluses for September 


Tin Officials 
Fail to Achieve 
Rescue Package 

Reuter. 

LONDON — The Interna- 
tional Tm Council ended a two- 
dav emergency meeting in Lon- 
don without* agreeing on a 
rescue package that would en- 
able its buffer-stock operation 
to resume price-support efforts, 
1TC officials said Wednesday. 

The meeting also failed to re- 
spond to an appeal by the Lon- 
don Metal Exchange to the ITC 
and its members to honor its 
trading commitments. The 
council is expected to meet 
again on Nov. 1 2 unless circum- 
stances require reconvening 
earlier, tire officials said. 

Tin trading on the LME will 
remain suspended for the rest 
of the week, the chief executive 
of the exchange, Michael 
Brown, said. 

Trading was originally sus- 
nded last Thursday when the 
C buffer stock ran out of 
money to support tin prices. 
But the buffer-stock manager, 
Pieter de Koning, said Wednes- 
day that be was optimistic that 
extra funds would be made 
available. 

The LME is seeking assur- 
ances from the council and its 
members that will ensure the 
survival of the exchange. Trad- 
ing has also been suspended in 
Kuala Lumpur. 


B 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Japan’s current ac- 
count surplus widened to $4.88 bil- 
lion in Sqptember from a $3.49- 
billion surplus in August, the 
Finance Ministry said Wednesday. 

The September figure compared 
with a $4.18-b31ion surplus a year 
earlier. 

The surplus on merchandise 
trade expanded to S5J27 billion in 
September from $438 billion a 
mouth earlier, and compared with 
a $5. 1 -billion surplus in September 
1984, tire ministry said. 

* The current account, tire broad- 
est measure of trade performance, 
covers trade in merchandise, bank- 
ing services, shipping fees and oth- 
er n onme r chandrse i retire. 

The governments of the United 
States, West Germany, France, 
Britain and Japan have bam acting 
jointly since Sept- 22 to depress the 
level of the dollar, particularly in 
relation to the yen, as protectionist 
sentiment builds in tire UB. Con- 
gress because of the U.S. trade defi- 
cit with Japan. 

But analysts in Tokyo expected a 
lag before a falling dollar and rising 
yen reduced Japanese exports. 

Tne dollar closed at 211.75 yen 


in Tokyo on Wednesday, and Ja- 
pan’s deputy finance minister, To- 
rn omicsu Oba, said be wanted to 
see tire yen even stronger. Over the 
past wedt the yen has risen from 
around 216 to tire dollar. 

The Finance Ministry said Ja- 
pan’s long-term capita] account 
deficit narrowed sharply to S3.1I 
billion in September from a $633- 
bOlion deficit in August. That com- 
1 with a 52.14-billion deficit in 
ptember 1984. 

The balance of payments swung 
to surplus of 51.78 biiliou in Sep- 
tember from a deficit of S3.08 bil- 


lion in August. The September 
1984 surplus was S104 billion. 

Balance of payments is a detailed 
account covering all foreign trade 
in goods and services plus the flow 
of gifts and foreign aid, capital 
loans, official settlements and re- 
serves. 

The Finance Ministry said Ja- 
pan's merchandise exports in Sep- 
tember rose to $14.61 billion from 
S13.7] billion in August and S14.34 
billion a year earlier. Imports rose 
to S9.34 billion from $933 billion 
and S9-25 billion in September 
1984. 


The merchandise- trade surplus 
in the first half of the fiscal year 
ending in March 1986 widened to 
S29.26 billion from a S22.45-billion 
surplus in the preceding six 
months. It compared with a S23. 15- 
billion surplus a year earlier. 

The narrowing' of the deficit on 
the long-term capital account was 
the result of seasonal sales of for- 
eign bond holdings by financial in- 
stitutions in the final month of the 
financial half year, the Japanese 
government's plea for reduced pur- 
chases of foreign bonds and the 
dollar's fall against the yen, bank 
economists said. 


amjuasBmmfr 

Leaned fcaJei m S tavret 

COMMISSION FREE 
BUY OR SELL 

Beecham Telecom 
Ftsons C & Wireless 

Glaxo (LEX. 

IC1 Pteuey 

Brito il Reuters 

B. Aerospace Thom 

EUROBOND DEHT WARRANTS OH REQUEST 

70 Gieal E«WmSi London ECIA 3JL En£*nj 
Toifpttmr Lorwoc 723 KiM 
TrttMiMa uarrEKorv; 



REPUBUK TUNESIEN 

MINRSTERUJM FUR VOLKS W1RTSCHAFT 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 
fflBUUTHNUL mmsm U. 3764 

DielSafaP h oep to aConyatffferiertinhdtf AhakhLha^Mie na tc l^ refg 
die \haiiaea<MeiW|S der Fhnyhwgr ubcp im Gt&riwdm <u Vaufen, zu 
imematicrauen Uefcangrfwen fflr ruchstehende Auarfetw^’ xnf: 

— 5 hrisbeivifte Lader von 1 Knhikyied (0.765 of) 
laddaemf 

—2 lufibeffgfte lader voa £ Rnhikyard (L530 rtf) 
Laddeabing 

AndiaerAxwdBeg)«jng g Be K ariem <>wJWh a fi mK^menB^ZiMui^Af 
Summe von SO Di&ar {fi»n£ng Dmai} vom Savice Canal, 9 rue da Rename de 
f Arabic Seo u dbe. Tunis RP. 

Angebote. in sochrf&cher Ausfuhrunc md ft m wl fa irliw mflam Moo- 

notf le Direeteur des Arinas de Is OKnpgme dee Fhouhaue de Gafia, 2130 
Medaom (TamsaO.qTSvremn «m 143 L 1965 um lfLOOQiriaoTgeitovorliegjen. 
Do- BUfwsrc Umaehbg itt v« Mg: » bwchattao; 

"Appel (Toffra N P 3764 
Bnpwi mild ew 

Ne pasouvriravamle 1A1L196S". 

Die Umsctdjige wenkn m 14,11.1965. vomuttae* urn 10.00 Ubc. in der 
Directim dcs Adms Depertroon in Medaoui oner Bawohnong dar Ofiemlicb- 

kaTgeOBatt. 

Nadi <#««n DWmn eingrbetide lemschrifthcbr Angebote kdnoai nicbt berQek- 


r i 


Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on Oct. 28, 1985: U.S. $144.39. 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Information: Pierson, Hddring & Pierson N.Y, 

Herengraeftt 214, 1016 BS Amsterdam. 



REPUBLIC OF TUNISIA 

MINISTRY FOR THE NATIONAL ECONOMY 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 
INTERNATIONAL INVITATION TO TINDER 
N P 3764 

The Galas Phasphaies Company invite* mlrrnjlioruJ tcuden with a view to 
g the foUowin 


the 


following mining 
mines of the GaKi 


equipment 

a Basin: 


for underground exploitation in 


— 5 tyre wheeled loaders of 1 cubic yard 
— it tvre wheeled loader*, of 2 cubic yard 


TV companies interested by this invitation to tender may obuin a schedule 
of conditions upon payment ol the sun el 50 ditun (fifty dinars), from the 
Serein General. 9 rue du Royaume de I' Arabic Scoudiie, Tunis R.P, 
Tenders in the French language, in six copies, should be forwarded to 
Monsieur le Directem-dm Achair de la Compagnie do Phosphates de Galsa. 
2130 Mcdaoui (Tunisia), before the 14/11/85 at 10 00 a.m. TTw outer 
envelope must be marked as follows: 

"Appel d*oHre» N P 3761 
Engixta sniziicre 

Ne p» onvxir avast le 14/ 11/85.” 

The on dopes will be opened in public on 14/11/85 at the Direction des 
Achats Department in Metlaoni at 10.00 a.m. 

Anv tender received bv lela or after this dale will not be considered. 



ROMULUS A mode! registered fcy Corum in 1966 
and always in fashion. Now in an ultra-slim, quartz, 
water-resistant version. Four sizes. In 18 carat gold 
or platinum. 

C«*um vv.iii.hcs jrc on view .it ihe fineit jeweller > For the 
address .it the line nearer jou or f<«r j brochure, wrijr 
or phone in: Fran. S A Michel Niarqutn. t • Bd de 
Cretcif. *‘«-l in** Saint-Vfaur. tel. I KR4 3h.7fi German). 
Austria. Holland. Helmut Tenet GmbH. Heinnah-Heine- 
Alice J. LVatoO Ouvreldorf. tel 0?l I VJU Mu Great Hriluin. Saunder, 
£i Shepherd J.td , I. Blndiitj! Heart Yard. Grcvilk- Street London 
l-CIN KSI, lei Itolv, Curum ll.tiia di Amedeo Meda- 

Fob. Via Tito Vignoli M. 2l»!«Sb Milan, tel 242.T7 ■)? Other romlrir*. 



... "1 - A® 
$ ■ pifi 1 








Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1985 




1814 

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ira 17% in* 

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Ws U'4 14% 

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Growing wim 
the need to manage 
our water resources 

Products from several Ametek 
Divisions are used to manage 
the capacity of deep wefls. *&P 
farmers reduce irrigation 
needs and provide clearer, 
better tasting drinking water. 

Write for latest repoits to: 









Dept- H, 

410 Pork Avenue, 21st Floor, 
New York. NY 10022- 




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24 177 

17 132 

10 12 

12 2S 

13 i 

16 1306 

19 a 
12 792 
54 157 

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27 11 64 

126 5 528 

127 22 

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UK UtPvS 204 KL5 
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184 

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26 

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Season 

Season 


HUH 

Low 

Open Hist, Low Close Che. 


Season Seoson 
High Low 


COFFEE C {NYCSCE1 
37300 lbs.- cents per lb. 

15V 60 12935 Dec 15025 16000 


Open High Low One Cho. 


Grains 


WHEAT CCBT1 

5800 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
3A3ft 279ft Doc 3.18% 110% 

334ft 267 Mar 124 “i 124% 

4LQ2 23* May 112 112 

172W 263 Jul 291 751% 

145 267 Sep 294 294 

IDS 294% Dec 

E sl. Salsa P rev. Soles 5680 

Prev.DavOoon Ini. 32064 off 178 
CORN (CST) 

AOOObu minimum- dollars per bushel 
295 2 Mid Dec 227 227 

297 234ft Mar 238 2JSft 

291% 231 MOV 243% 263V: 

286 233 Jul 245 245** 

270 224% Sep 232 232% 

235V, 120% Dec 226V: 227% 

274W 233 Mar 236V, 236 Vi 

Est Sales Prsv. Sales 31909 

Pr*v. Day Open lnl.135621 up 725 


115 116% —31 Id 

121 122% — -OlVi 

ubki low, -art. 

289 289 — 32 

292% 192% —30% 
105 


15635 

155.93 

15573 

15680 
156 H) 
14530 
Eat. Sales 


12150 Mar 15733 15733 
13130 MOV 157.18 157.18 
13150 Jill 157.1 D 157.10 
13275 Sep 15738 15708 
13830 Dec JS73D 15730 
14250 Mar 

P rev. Sales 5350 


15550 15769 
155.75 15733 
155.90 157.18 
15600 157.10 
15625 15738 
15780 15720 
15735 


Season 

HW) 

Season 

Low 


Oaen 

HfOlt 

Lew 

Oase 

Che. 

EURODOLLARS (IMM) 
SI mllUon-ptsof 100 pet. 
9280 8480 Dec 

9117 

92.17 

9102 

9282 

+88 

9168 

84.10 

Mcr 

9189 

8183 

81 J7 

8177 

+.1D 

91 J0 

8673 

Jun 

9155 

9155 

TIJ9 

9139 

+.10 

905! 

BUS 

Sep 

81.12 

91.16 

9161 

9161 

+89 

9055 

87 JB 

Dec 

9077 

9080 

9066 

9065 

+88 

90JS 

8764 

Mar 

9064 

9047 

9030 

9031 

+87 

89.95 

8884 

Jun 

9013 

90.15 

8958 

9000 

+86 

89 M 

89 J9 

Sen 

8986 

8888 

8972 

1973 

+86 

Est.Sales Prev. Sale# 44649 

Prev. Day Open InLl 35597 up4J16 





275% 235V: — 30% 
235% 2J6ft —31 
241 241V: — 31% 

242% 243% -31% 
230% 231% +30% 
225 276% +.00% 

234% 235% 


Pr*v. Day Open MI.13S321 up 725 
SOYBEANS (COT) 

5300 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 


4 87ft Nov £04 

679 110 Jan 5.18 218 

762 572Vd Mar SJlft 532 

779 531% MOV 562V, 542ft 

668 536% Jul 56992 550 

674 5JSV: AuO 548V, £48ft 

678 5799: Sep 533 535 

632 576W Nov £31 ft 532 

563 SJTft Jan 

Est.Sales Prev. Sales 32369 

Prey. Day Open I nt. 80374 up 299 
SOYBEAN MEAL(CBT) 

H» tons- dol tors per ton 
18430 12560 Dec M530 14670 

16U0 17730 Jan 14650 14750 

2065D 130.00 Mar 14830 14970 

16250 13250 MOV 15030 15070 

16730 13400 Jul 15130 15170 

15130 13550 Aua 15130 15130 

16730 13750 Sen 15030 15030 

14950 14030 Oct 14830 14830 

15030 14230 Dec 14950 14950 

15030 14630 Jan 14830 14830 

Est. Sales Prsv. Sales 11586 

Prev. Day Open 1 nt. 46548 aft 715 
SOYBEAN OIL(CBT) 

60300 fos- dollars per IDO Ibc. 

2955 1938 Dec 1970 1950 

2937 1978 Jan 1936 1942 

SUM 1968 Mar 19JB 2030 

2765 2007 Mav 20.15 2035 

2575 2065 Jul 205H 2067 

25.15 2050 Aua 2060 20-80 

2435 2050 Sep 2070 2075 

2230 2065 OCt 2360 2060 

2135 2035 Dec 2065 2075 


5JJ2% +jm 
£16% +30 V, 
578% +30% 
560 +30% 

567Vd 

% 

531% +38% 
543ft 


Prev. Dav Open Ini. 11.130 oH29 
SUGAR WORLD 11 (NY CSCE) 

1 12300 lbs.- cents per lb. 

773 3M JOn SS3 £60 

933 334 Mar 5-99 633 

7.15 158 May 6.15 6.15 

669 3.79 Jul 630 630 

660 474 Sep 

6.95 432 Del 661 661 

775 625 Jan 

7.16 461 Mar 7.12 7.13 

Est.Sales Prev. Sales 22.918 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 82.113 up 2315 
COCOA (NY CSCE) 

H) metric tans- 5 per ton 

2337 1945 Dec 2100 2102 

2392 19SS Mar TUB 2203 

2422 I960 May 2253 2253 

2429 1960 Jul 2288 2290 

2430 2023 Sea 2315 Z315 

2425 2055 Doc 

2385 2029 Mar 

Est. Sale* Prev. Sales 4780 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 20403 up 257 


563 566 

£81 £88 
£99 635 

6.15 671 

. 660 
6.45 651 

650 
7.10 7.11 


2078 2092 

2177 2184 

2231 2242 

2282 2279 

2315 2305 

2310 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM1 
5 per dir-1 point equals 500001 
7566 7006 Dec 73Z7 7330 7308 7310 

7504 6981 Mar .7320 .7320 7300 .7300 

7360 .7070 Jun .7308 7308 7290 .7288 

7300 7176 Sep 7303 7303 7290 7277 

Est.Sales 931 Prev. Seles 596 

Prev. Dev Open Int. 4609 


FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 


s £^^ , "'E?’.3g'’!. J = 5 .,*3 

.12400 .10985 Mar .1088 

.12180 .12130 Jun -12310 

Est.Sales 20 PTev. Sales 
Prev. Day Open lirt. 136 


Prev. Day Open Int. 20603 up 257 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

15300 On.- cents per lb. 

1B180 11125 NOV 114.75 11530 
18030 11130 Jon 11440 II 670 


11130 Jen II 
11275 Mar 11 
111.95 Mav 11 
11160 Jul U 
11180 Sep II 


Jan 11440 11670 
Mar 11450 H £50 
Mav 11450 11570 


14400 14460 +70 

145.10 14530 —.10 

14750 148.10 —JO 
149JM 14960 —70 

15070 15030 —60 

15030 15030 —70 

14930 14960 —60 

14650 14750 —50 

14730 147.00 — 250 
14 6 fl n 14630 150 


16)75 

Est.Sales 


11150 Nov 
Jan 


Mar 

Prev. Sales 


1 1410 11470 
11430 1)5.15 
11430 11495 
11430 11430 
11150 11415 
11125 11100 
11125 
11350 
11375 


GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

S pot mark- laolni equals 503001 _ 

7867 7971 Dec 7841 7850 7821 7823 

JW8 -3040 Mar 7869 7874 7345 7850 

7918 7335 Jun 7899 7899 7885 7878 

7930 7762 Sep 7910 

Est.Sales 2B.978 Prev. Sales 31736 
Prev, Day Open Int. 51597 up 6672 


8Vd 
26 
51 
1« 
10W 
32V, 

S 59 
45% 
198 17% 
139 30% 
20 12% 
35 15% 
25 15% 
212 19% 
27 4% 

BS26 43H 
149 17% 


4455 
163 
247 
97 45 

J 7 813 
33 9 32 

18 U 366 
95 7 20 

33 13 70 

33 a 

7 27 664 
£3 236 

76 9 3409 
27 15 170 

27 11 92 

37 11 244 


—70 I Prev. DayDpenlnt. 5530 oH 36 


Metal 


JAPANESE YEN ((MM) 
s per van- 1 point eauots RL000001 
.004738 383905 Dec J»<736 304753 804718 304719 

3047S8 704035 Mar .004747 JJ0476] 704726 704727 

004765 .004220 Jun 804770 804770 804755 804744 

JM4OO0 304690 Sep .004763 

304345 .004158 Dec 304787 


>304345 .004158 Dec 

Est.Sales 19741 Prev. Sales 13654 
Prev. Day Open Int. 42697 up 2700 


2850 

2765 

2575 

2£15 

24JI5 

2230 

2175 

2035 

Est Sates 


2050 Sep 
2065 OCt 


2075 Dec 
2075 Jan 


19JH 1969 +74 

1972 1961 +79 

I960 2000 +7B 

2032 2075 +74 

2060 2066 +.19 

2067 2030 +70 

2070 2073 +.18 

2055 2070 +70 

2855 2030 +.15 


Est Sates Prey. Sales, 9JW 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 47734 otf2 


CATTLE 
40000 IbS 

(CME 

cents 

U-IIL 



563! 

Fab 

6093 

62JS 

6075 

6275 

+150 

6757 

55J 


6050 

6182 

6042 

6IJEI 

+150 

6625 

5672 


6QJ0 

6177 

6030 

61.77 

+150 


563 


saw 

4085 

507D 

<005 

+150 


5751 

Oct 

*785 

5BJ95 

5780 

5850 

+180 


598 

Dec, 

5950 

4080 

5950 

60411 

+1.10 

Est. Sale 

16.12 

Prev. & 

IM 2SJ57 







E) 







per ib 

6480 

4£50 


6577 

+185 




6675 

68-25 

irsl 

6875 

+150 

7170 

406! 

Mar 

67 JO 
67 JO 

6987 

6350 

6750 

6785 

698/ 

6050 

+150 

+150 




6680 

6782 

6680 

67J2 

+150 





6750 

6675 


+150 

Est. Sale 


Prev. Sc 

des l 

MB 




Prev. Da 

'Open 







HOGS (C 

3aj)001bs 

ME) 

^ cents 

pet-lb. 







COPPER (COMEX) 
2S800 Ibv- cents per lb. 






6060 


Nov 





—70 

8475 

5050 

Dec 

42.10 

6270 

6080 

6L40 

—80 

8470 

5875 

Jan 


6120 

6115 

6155 


BftM 

5970 


42.90 

6295 

6140 

*770 

—JS 

7480 

4000 

Mav 

6110 

6115 

4280 

6110 

6245 

—.75 

7440 

6035 

Jul 

6150 

63J0 

6270 

■m 75 

7090 

60.90 


6270 

6270 

6170 

ft.tno 

—.75 

7030 

41 M 

Dec 




4160 

— J5 

7070 

6330 





6380 

—75 

67.90 

6255 





6430 

—75 

67 JO 

62.90 

May 




6455 


6670 

6375 

Jul 




6450 

Est.Sales 


Prev. Soles 7,989 




Prev. Day Open InL 77,789 ott 326 




ALUMINUM (COMEX) 








Nov 




4170 

— J5S 

7060 

4275 

Dec 

4275 

4295 

4285 

4? IK 

-84 

7650 

4470 





4240 

—85 

7340 

43195 

A4or 

4385 

4390 

4115 

41)5 

-84 

6675 

4580 

May 

4450 

4450 

4450 

4185 


6L45 

4555 

£ 

4575 

•»£4U 

4475 

4455 

52.18 

4650 




4535 

—85 

49.10 

48.96 

Dec 




4630 

—85 



Jon 




4645 

—85 



Mar 




4735 

—85 

S3J5 

4980 

Mov 




4885 

— as 

5030 

5000 

Jul 




4875 

—85 

Est.Sales 


Prev.Sales 

76 




Prev. Day Oaen im. 2803 UP 17 





SILVER! 

COME. 

K) 






5800 troy a 
6208 

i- coni 
6193 

soertn 

Nov 

JVOL 



6138 

—75 

12300 

5900 

Dec 


6219 

6165 

6173 

—77 

12158 

9958 


6278 

6278 

6218 

6215 

—78 

11938 

6078 


6338 

6368 

6205 

6295 

-ao 

10488 

6198 

Mav 

6410 

6458 

6378 

6388 

—83 

9458 

6298 

Jul 

6528 

6528 

6488 

6465 

—84 

9408 

4718 

Sen 

6468 

6648 

6588 

6565 

—BjS 

7998 

6528 

Dec 


6828 

6738 

671.1 

-85 

7898 

6788 





6763 

—98 

7708 

6708 

Mar 

6915 

4915 

6915 

6865 

—93 

7528 

6835 

May 

7015 

7015 

7015 

6074 

—94 

7468 

6998 

Jul 

7158. 

7158 

7108 

7085 

— 94 


SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

S per (rant- 1 polnl equals 508001 _ 

6728 7531 Dec 6693 6785 6671 6675 

6771 7835 Mar 6730 6740 6700 6711 


6800 6190 Jun 6777 6780 6750 

Est.Sales 21636 Prev.Sates 23704 
Open Irrt. 30781 up £9*5 


_ 75 I Prev. Day Open i nL 30781 up 


19% 20 
641* 47% 
34 34V, 

37% 38 


68% 70% 
22 22 % 
20V* 20ft 








35ft 35% xeras 330 A3 14 7034 50% -SO 50% + % 

55V, 48ft Xerox pf 565 93 7 55ft 55V* SB*- % 

29 198* XTRA 34 73 11 51 22 21% 22 


80% 26% ZaleCP 132 41 12 2 M 27% 27% 27ft + % 

18 7% Zapata .12 15-57 461 8ft- 7* 8 +% 

57ft 32% Znyres 68 J IT 471 BH «% 55 — % 

25 16% ZantthE • 844 3*7 16ft 16% 16% , 

21% «% Zeros 72 16 16 W7 19ft m* 19ft— Hi 

37% ZM Zumin 173 36 13 IBS 35% 34% 35 + % 


Commwfities 


Goi^&es 


London 

Commodities 


Cash Prices 


Currency Options 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cauls 

20085 17570 Dec 19030 19045 18970 19005 

20375 1B2J0 MaT 19155 192.10 19075 19175 

20660 183.90 Jun 19370 19150 19265 19375 

19135 1E770 Sep 19350 19180 19375 19465 

Est.Sales 64JJ74 Prev. Sales 6077V 
pr»v. Day Open Itll 6L52Q up 1666 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

Si million- otsof 100 act 
9107 B£77 Dec n« 9378 

9275 8660 Mar 9Z68 9273 

9261 8781 Jun 9250 9Z57 

9286 sun Sep 92.17 92.17 

9178 8905 DOC 9179 9163 

Est.Sales Prev. Sales 9612 

Prev. DavCoen Int, 43.125 up 1687 
» TR. TREASURY CCS 77 __ 

86-11 75-14 Mar 86-29 87-11 

85-12 74-30 Jun 85-28 86-10 

83-23 80-2 Dec 84-9 84-19 

Est.Sales Prev.Sales 16725 

Prev. Dav Open int 70635 up 727 
US TREASURY BONDS (CUT) 

(8 Dd-SmOOO-Pls & 32nds at 1 00 pd 1 
78-13 57-8 Dec 78-15 79-2 

77-29 57-2 Mar 77-4 77-21 

76-6 56-29 Jun 75-27 76-17 

75-31 56-29 5ec «-» 75-10 

74-24 56-25 Dec 73-27 7+13 

7+15 5+27 Mar 73-11 73-15 

7+26 63-12 Jun 72-8 72-14 

72-27 63-4 Sep 71-15 72-5 

72-18 63-24 Dec 71-28 71-28 

69-27 67 Mar 7D-12 70-20 

Est. Sates Prev. ScUes2S4. 138 

Prev. Day Oaen inf 30 * 893 up 10635 


92.97 92.9B 

9181 TLBS 
9266 9266 
92.17 92.10 
91J9 9164 


VALUE LINE (KCBT1 
points and cents 

£7-05 IS* 0 K* JW40 }KM 1*00 19SJ0 

I2H2 Mar 19730 197 JO 196+0 197 JO 
197J0 177.00 Jun I99J0 

200JIS 20005 Sep 2D1J0 

E£J. Sola Prey. Sales 4817 

Prev. Day Open Int. 7813 up 386 






Oct 30 




Close 



H%B 

Low 

BM 

Ask 

CITg* 

1 SUGAR 






French frames per metric tan 



Dec 

1400 

1J77 

1377 

1302 

+ 10- 

Mar 

1420 

1401 

1483 

1409 

+ 21 

, May 

1440 

1437 

1438 

1440 

+ 36 

Aug 

1481 

1477 

1475 

1481 

+ 22 

Oct 

1507 

1507 

1495 

1510 

+ 20 

Dec 

1522 

1509 

1505 

1509 

+ 10 

Est VOL: 14X 

lots ot 50 tans. Prev. actual 

sales; 1«M2 tots. Open interest: 24*710 


I COCOA 






French traacs per 100 kg 



Dec 

1,900 

1881 

1805 

UNO 

— 2 

Mar 

1,932 

1.925 

1,920 

1830 

+ 3 

MOV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1,941 

m— 

+ 10 

Jiv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1570 

— 

+ 30 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1590 

— 

+ 40 

; Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 


2805 

+ 50 

Mar 

6LT. 

N.T. 

— . 

205 

+ 55 

Est. VOt. 

: 165 lots at 10 tank Prev. actual 

soles: IS tats. Open Interest: MS 


COFFEE 






French francs per im ka 



Nov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2820 

2JB90 

+ 8 

Jan 

2.100 

2870 

1100 

1120 

+ 13 

Mar 

2.155 

1105 

1150 

1162 

+ 14 

May 

2.160 

2.160 

1175 

— 

+ 15 

Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1180 

2305 

+ 12 

Sep 

2J0D 

2300 

1220 

1260 

Uncth 

Mov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1225 


+5 

Est.vof.; 

; 71 Ws of S tons. Prev. actual sotes: 

95 lots. Open Interest: XM 



Source: Bourse du commerce. 




index Options 


07-24 87-24 
8+23 8+23 
85-25 85-25 
B+6 B+6 


NYSE COMP. INDEX (HYFE1 
paints and cents 

11720 101-20 Dec 108.95 110J1S 10895 109.75 

n £75 105-50 Mar 11085 11095 11035 11DJ0 

128.00 106.90 Jun 11190 111.90 111JS 11185 

11230 103.10 Sep 11260 

Est, Sales 0916 Prev. Sates 10780 
Prev. Day Open I nt. rjxn up 343 


Commodity Indexes 


sinks OBfrUat jwd 

Price NovncJa PMNwOkJmM 

145 — — — — — 1/16 I* — 

ITS |» |Jh mt - 1/14 104 N 9/14 

IB N » N 5 J* j'™’ U 

HO 3W«5!»«*N ^2*2 

1® U/161% 2% » J* J » 

W I/It N IN »l 71; 1% IN * 

195 1/14 - - - HI* — — “ 

SO 1774 ------- 



0a. 30 

OxoOToWty and Unit Wed Nn 

CdWe«45npfcB> VO ijt 

Pit nt c iata U.’TD 38 ft. yd — OM Mi 

Steel billets (Pitt), ton «71to <7XJ8 

irons Pdry. PMtaL ton anjm B3M 

Steel scrap No I hw Pitt- 78-76 93-91 

Lead Spot, B, _______ lB-Tf 22-24 

Copper elect- Itv - <7-7* 4364 

Tin <Stro»s NJL ZZr 

□nc. E-SL L. Boats. 0> 031 06S 

PatkxJJum,OC - - - ’ 162-1*3 148-141 

Stiver N.Y, os— *5 T?S 

Sourer: APi 


Dividends 


«7D 
692 
715 
715 
730 
722 740 

710 750 

700 
700 


■K 1MI 

M I-J7 

•jo «-w lv-ia 

M 11-27 11-13 

^ n ,S »«■ 


London Metals 


W-ll 78-15 
77-1 77-2 

7+27 75-30 
24-25 7+28 
73-27 7323 

72-30 72-31 
735 72-5 

71-14 71-14 
70-26 70-26 
70-8 70-8 


Moody’s 

Reuters .. 

DJ. Futures 

Com. Research Bureau - 


Close 
906-30 f 
1.72&60 
120-58 

224 SO 


Previous 
908-30/ 
1.718JM 
120. IB 
223.90 


TMfriCBfltMSBK U6K4 
itWanMiASUI 
Tons sat nteae iiJJN 
TeMsat oewldLSPja 


- Otter Bid YMU VMM 

3«milbla 7.18 7.16 761 764 

’+— MfcOH 727 725 . 766 7J1 

Wear We 7J4 7J4 7.92 un 


mmulO LeelM a«elBa+U7 
Source: C BOE. 


MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBTI 
SIOOOx Index-pts & 3Sidsal 100 


8+19 81-17 Dec B+I2 86-31 

85 ro-J Mar 85-30 B+2 

5+4. 79 Jun 8+23 85-1 

83-13 79-10 SOP 8+4 B4-4 

Est.Sales Prev.Sales 3J98 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 7jne up 298 


8+17 B+20 
85-18 85-20 
8+23 8+25 
8+7 B+2 


Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 ; Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


DM Futures 
Options 


W. Gemxs,Ater*-ra«Wnprtsem#,*p-a 


Market Guide 


CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI million- phot 100 pet 
92J7 8534 Dec 9250 9250 

9201 M56 Mar 97.15 92.18 

91.15 87.06 Sep 9,-77 9,-79 

9059 BUI Dec 

9035 8820 Mar 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 946 

Prev. Day Open Inf. j.7ai uv 2.759 


9231 9232 

92.11 92J36 

9173 FIJI 
9133 
90.96 
9062 


NYC5CE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NY me: 

KCBT: 

NTFE: 


Ctilcooo Board ot Trade 
dileaoo Mercantile Exctonpe 
International Mon e tary Market 
Ot CMcapo Mercantile Eschanoe 

Tor* Cocoa Suuor. cottee Exclianoe 
New York Cation Exchange 
Commodity Extaianoe. Nen York 
New York Mercantile Exchange 
Kansas City Board of Trad* 

New York Futures Exchange 


30 

strike Col a- Settle PWvSeitie 

Price Dec Mar Jim Dec Mar m 

35 NJL 251 129 003 038 857 

V 137 110 243 015 044 ON 

X 07! IN US 069 1JE 132 

ar OJl MB 159 HA 157 U3 

d M U 1.15 184 215 230 

41 OJD 047 O84 — — ■ 295 


EsnmWBd total wt 7.112 
Cnllv Tue. rot 4727 bpw lot. 35659 
Pets : Tue. vbl n jl open let. 20m 
Source; CME. 


BH Ask BM 

ALUMINUM 

Sterllns per metric toe . _ 

Spot 65250 65350 65980 

Forward 676JM 67&50 48200 

COPPER cathodes (HtebOnadel 
Sterling oer metric toe 
Soot 94200 96200 96350 

Forwrd 98450 98580 9080 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 
sterHea per metric Ian „ 

spat 94 LOO 94550 94200 

Forward 966011 96880 96780 

LEAD 

Sterilna per metric ten 
Spot 27480 27780 27000 

Forward 2815# 20200 27780 

KICKS L 

Sferflpp Per metric tan _ 

spot 274580 27S580 287Q8B : 

Forward 2795410 280500 289080 . 

SILVER 

Peace per Irey oance 
Spot <2750 42950 427 JO 

Forward 44150 44250 44150 

TIN <5tandard] 

Sterttep Per metric ten 

Spot na iw. 85*80 

Forward njq. an. B4S600 1 

21 NC 

sterikig per metric ten 

Snot 38389 30580 9MOO 

Source. AP. 


BM Otter note YlaM 
3+yete-bSDd 1098/32 MS NWS 1057 1886 

Sourer: Sohntoa BcaHmz. 


IterB Lyecti Tncsory tedoc HA. 


Sourer: Marts Ltnctt 


a 8s " 
a 87 ft 
o . .11 . 

0 JB ft 

a jo ' 

S 

Q 82 ft 

SxsS 

1 " 

Q 82 

8 M 

I - 

1 Sw 

SjdS 

Q J7ft 

2 - 12 

Q .10 ' 



Transworid Amoves Sale 21 

■ United Press International 

NEW YORK — Stockholders of 
Transworid Coip^ a food services, 
restaurants and holds company; 
approved Wednesday the sale of 
Omtoiy 21 Real Estar& Corp. to 


1 8i% ’n 

2 

I “ i 


Metropolitan . Life Insurance Co. 
for S2St!2 nuffiotz,. 




CJd \ 


































































































Page 11 



i 

EK 


*0 




y » 

T • 

' -h 

J 4 * •■=* . . 


-» >** .'tn . * 

■'" & -* : : 


n "< 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1983 


it Bethlehem Ericsson Computer Unit Can See Recovery on the Horizon 


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By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribane 

— ■ Negotiations have 
*fo*toed stage between 
United Technologies Com; ^ 
gOvermnen t-owned Thomson SA 
of France on ‘ntomson’s acquis- 
pon of MostekCorp., UxtiiaTsailr 
mg semiconductor subsidiary, ex- 
eopuves of the coinpanks said 
Wednesday. 

“We are moving very fast," said 
AJam Gomez, chairman of Thom- 
son. He said he expected final 
■ agreement could he reached within 
two to three weeks. 

Asked why Thomson was inter- 
ested in Mostdc at a time when the 
U -S. semiconductor market was de- 
pressed and faced overcapacity, 
.Mr. Gomez said he agreed with 
industry estimates that the market 
would recover at the end of 1986 
and would generate what be termed 
“strong demand” throughout 1987 . 

; Thonson, France’s largest dec- 


' choice ng, l 
, n ? 

- s haky. andffL; 
11 still !».-“?■ 


:Du Pont Net Off 
10.5% in Period 

■ United Press International 

WILMINGTON, Delaware 
■ — Du Pont Co. reported on 
Wednesday third-quarter net 
profit of $282 mfllkxn, down 
10 5 percent from $315 mm inn 
profit in. the quarter last year. 

! The company said earnings 
per share were $1.17, compared 
with S1.31 in the 1984 period. 
.Third-quarter sales were $8.65 
-bUbon, down from $8^ bilBon. 
! Third-quarter earnings were 
reduced by S88 milKon after 
•taxes by charges arising from 
the clontre of an ethylene pro- 
duction unit in Ahin, Texas, 
and from Du Font's withdrawal 
from an investment in Synaas 
Co. 


elegies 

ffouios 'ooiisw^wincb : ttn year 
oqpects to make aboni 80 percent 
oCris semiccoductorsalKin Wcst- 

a iMn^Kturir^^^aa^Mles 
force in the Uni«3 States in 1986- 
1987,'Mri Gomez sirid in an inter- 
. view. Thrmoop’s U5. semiconduo- 
tor saks pniia^y total between 
$30 mSHon S3S imBion amnt- 

afly. . - . r > 

The aimoupcmem by United 
Technologies on; Get. 17 that it 
planned to terqmune its Moaek 
Operation, Mr. Gomez said, “gave 
us the oppommiiy” to open n^oii- 
ationSb 

Neither UTC or Thomson exec- 
utives would dotioseTmantial de- 
taite the negotiations. They said 
the focal point of Thomson’s inter- 
est. vs ManeF* man uf a ctu ring 
cnexarioos in the.Oafias suburb of 
Carrollton, whose estimated net 
book vnhte is aboni $256 million, 
accoatGsg u> United Technologies 
spokesmen. . 

• i Thomson’s possible acquisition 
Of Moslem's sanioondnetor assem- 
Wy and test fac2i^ in Peaaaig, Ma- 
laysia, also is pMtcrfthe talks, exec- 
utives said. 

Mostek’j test and assembly plant 
near Dublin, which was dosed two 

axions ^nth Tb ^mn , the D< §TC 
spdeesmen added. 

Thomson “would be buying a 
very scaled-down operation, which 
has come down from 9,000 to 900 
people on the payroll,” a United 
Tedtaotogies spokesman said in 
Hanford, Connecticut. UTC arid 
Thomson ex e c uti ves said that if the 
p urchas e went through, Janies R. 
Fiebiger, Mustek’s efief executive 
officer, would head the new corn- 


net loss frmn its 
semiconductor business will drop 
slightly this year {nan last years 
level to about 300 million francs 
(S37-7. mSfionV Mr. Gomez said. 


Posts Loss of 
$76 Million 

linkers 

BETHLEHEM, Pennsylvania — 
Bethlehem Steel Coqx reported 
Wednesday a third-quarter loss of 
$76,8 safficffl. compansd with a 
S!7A-infflk» loss a year earlier. 

The loss, which included a 
charge of S35 million for the 
planned shutdown of the Lebanon. 
Pennsylvania, industrial-fastener 
operation, prompted the company 
to amii paying a dividend on cum- 
moo stock for die first time since 
1938. 

Third-quarter sales totaled $1.29 
billion, down 6 percent from $1 36 
billionl 

For the first nine months, Beth- 
lehem Steel posted a net loss of 
S118.5 million, compared with a 
loss of $48 milli on a year earlier. 
Sales totaled S3. S3 biDioa, down 9 
percent from S4J0 bfliion. 

The board declared the regular 
quarteriy dividends on all its pre- 
ferred stocks. It said it omitted the 
common dividend of 10 cents a 
share because of the significant toss 
in the lirird quarter and its expecta- 
tion of a loss for the fourth quarter. 

The company said future com- 
mon stock dividends will be deter- 
mined on die basis of attained re- 
sults and the business outlook. 

Bethlehem said it sees so signifi- 
cant improvement in prices or vol- 
ume for its products in the fourth 
qmner. 

Announcing the results. Bethle- 
hem said “sted demand remains 
flat. The heavy influx of imported 
sutti contames. Customers contin- 
ue to reduce inventories, and com- 
petition is severe.” 

The company said improved re- 
sults depend on a number of fac- 
tors, mrimfaag continued cost re- 
ductions and productivity gainc, 
the effectiveness of recently an- 
nounced sted-price increases and a 
reduction in sted imports. 




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COMPANY NOTES 


' Dayton Hudson Carp, said it 
planned to spend $4 billion ex- 
panding its retail operations from 
1986 through 1990. The plan repre- 
sents a 25-percent bqost from the 
$3.2-b3Hon projected in the UJL 
_ retailer’s previous five-year plan 
V.iei policy a <, for the period through 1989. 
jute. Mlbsl Granman Corp. is considering 
the pim±ase of Fairchild Republic 
Co., the Longltiand-based aircraft 
manufacturing subsidiary trf Fair- 
child Industries Jno, a Grumman 
spokesman said. 

Hitachi Semiconductor U.S. Inc^ 
wholly owned subadiary df Hitadri 
LttL has started building a plant in . 
irvm&Tatte, forjirocessing sihcdif 
wafers for very huge scale integrat- 
ed dxenits, a spokesman said. : 

Honda Motor Co. has started.a 
feasibility study for a second pas- 


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real passhk 
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io .\KriaE 
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.jvKii! tai p® 

jcTUJdlOidOE _. 

SJ AAmms Sales 

icJ-. recent 1c ■> 

At America k 

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«hc brads®** 
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senger car jrianf in the United 
Stares that would begin production 
of Qnmt Integra 1 .6-Hter models in 
1989, Jijx Press reported. 

Imperial Chemical Industries 
Pl£ said it had agreed to acquire 
full ownership of Gant Seed Co., a 
com- seed producer based in Iowa, 
where it bought a minority stake 
eariy this year. 

Kustadt AG said sales, exclud- 
ing its travel business, fell to 6.1 
bunon Deutsche marks (S234 bO- 
hon) in the first nine months of 
1985, a 25-percent drop from the 
1984 period. 

LrightoaHoldtags Lti’s current 
■year 1 prcrfit win belower than in the 
1984-85 fiscal year ended June 30, 
particularly in the first half, ac- 
ceding to William Pettingdl, the 
^■haiTTTMn. Lawton posted a drop 


in 1984-85 net to 13 nuflion Austra- 
lian dollars (S9.08 nuOion) from 
21.1 million in 1983414. 

Unde AG of West Germany said 
it and Voest Alpine AG of Austria 
woo a contract worth 250 million 
Deutsche marks ($95.8 million) 
with East Germany's Industriean- 
lagen-lmport to refurbish a petro- 
chemical complex at B&hkn. 

Sanofi expects its net profit per 
share to rise by IS percent from 
1984 levels of 3853 French francs 
($4.84), according to Jcan-Pierre 
Lion, the finance director. 

Stated A/S, Norway’s govern- 
ment-owned oil company, arid 
.Veba.AG of West Germany are 
discussing the' construction . of a 
plant to produce methyl teniary- 
butyl ether, an additive for lead- 
free gasoline, Staioil said. 


U.S. Weighs 
Practices in 




c: 


(Conthmed from Priee 9) 
Yeutter, the U5L trade representa- 
tive, amfinned that the prospect of 
taking action against Airbus for 
possible unfair trade practices — 
inducting indirect government sub- 
sidization on the production end 
and the offering of special induce- 
ments to customers — had been 
raised at a full cabinet meeting in 
late September. 

Although the cabinet had decid- 
ed at the time not to proceed with a 
Section 301 suit against Airbus, 
U.S. officials said, the issue has not 
been scratched from tlte agenda of 
some four to five new cases being 
considered for Section 301 action, 
which authorizes the president to 
retaliate if consultations fafl. 

“The cabinet felt .a Section 301 
case against Airbus was not ripe.” 
an official in the Office of the Spe- 
cial Trade .Representative, or 
OSTR. said. “Obviously, that deri- 
sion did not imply a definite no. 
The cabinet wants to be sure there 
is sufficient concrete evidence to 
merit a reconsideration of the Air- 
bus case, which now is being more 
thoroughly examined at the sub- 
cabinet levet” 

A round of in terviews with offi- 
cials at OSTR and the depart- 
ments of Commerce and State sug- 
gested tb*t officials there were 
t.iifing a cautious Hue on Airbus, 
with State Department officials — 
concerned about potential diplo- 
matic repercussions 1 — _ leaning 
most heavily toward finding solu- 
tions that would avoid a Section 
^301 action. Officials in the trade 


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wepreseatative’s office 
** .\a&K less sensitive to those 


no 
lomatic 

concerns, .yet note that ft 
Ronald Reagan has come out with 
a new "get lough” attitude on com- 
bating unfair trade in which Mr. 
Yen tier’s office is the cutting edge. 

“We have to handle the Airbus 
case very carefully,” the OSTR of- 
ficial added. “We’re aware of the 
political sensitivity of the Europe- 
ans on this one and also of the 
sensitivities trf US. suppliers to 
Airbus aircraft/* 

An estimated 30 percent of the 
value of Airbus planes stents from 


$'"V 

■m 

■Kefir 

. 

pans— chiefly enpnes— st^jpbed 
by US cwnpanies. including Unit- 
SVtJ, cd Technology Corp.’s Prau & 
m> Whitney, as wdl as General Elec- 

trie Co. The role of U.S. parts sup- 
11 pliers, U^. officials sru'd, compli- 
cates any derision to proceed wi th 
action aimed at protecting U-S. air- 
craft bmklers, such as Boeing and 
McDotmell Douglas Cprp^ limn 
alleged unfair trade practices by 
Airbus. - - 






; 




»■*<**•■ 


ADVERTISEMENT 

FOR GRAIN SILO CONCESSION 

The Arab Republic of Egypt 

Ministry of DEVELOPMENT 
-NEW COMMUNITIES ORGANIZATION" 

Invites Proposals: 

From . . 

Qualified GRAIN SILO Operators. 
Developers, Investors, and Enterpreneurs 
- of Any Nationality 

for the CONCESSION to 
Build, Operate, Finance and Develop A 
ONE HALF TO ONE MILLION TON GRAIN SILO 
IN THE INDUSTRIAL ZONE AT 

D AMI ETTA PORT 

and engage in aH related business activities of 
the international grain trade. 

The first stage of the new port of Danuetta is expected 
to be in operation by the end of 1985. The port is 
strategically located on tbe Mediterranean coast of 
Egypt between Alexandria and Port Said. It will be 
chiefly a transshipment center for tbe Mediterranean, 
the Red Sea and. the Middle East areas with cargo 
traffic from 6 to 16 Million Tons annually by tbe year 
2000. 

In order to insure a steady supply of grain available to 
Egypt in spite of any shortages in external supply and to 
take -advantage of favourable international market 
prices from time to time,' the Government of Egypt 
desires to provide for a strategic reserve of about 20% 
(twenty percent} of annual Egyptian grain import 
requirements. The storage* equivalent to a two to three 
month supply of grain, will require a silo capacity of 

500,000 to 1,000,000 Tons, based on the importation 
in 1982-1983 of 4250,000 Tons. 

Accordingly, the Government of Egypt proposes to 
enter into a concession arrangement with an interna- 
tionally experienced grain trader and developer or 
foreign investor, to cany out studies, finance, design, 
build, operate and engage in grain trade based in tbe 
industrial .zone of the new Port of Damietta. 

The Terms of Reference (TOR) providing complete 
details on proposal- requirements may be purchased for 
LE 135 or U.S. $ 100 from the Research & Studies 
Organization trf the Ministry of Development, 2nd 
Floor, 1 Ismail Abaza Street, Garden Gty, Cairo, where 
proposal should be submitted. 

Technical and sealed financial proposals based on the 
TOR ONLY will be receive until Thursday 30 January 
1986. • 


By Juris Kara 

imurmmuud Herald Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — Srie Ltrswn, 
managing director of Ericsson In* 
formation Systems, the office-auto- 
mation subsidiary of the L.M. 
Ericsson group, declared that tbe 
company was wdl along the way to 
solving jis major product and ad- 
ministrative problems. 

Ericsson infacmation. with sales 
of 9,29 billion kronor (SI. IS bil- 
lion) in 1984, was the second hug- 
est unit of the Ericsson group after 
Public Tclacomnjunjcauons. 

In an interview, Mr. Laisson 
forecast that Ericsson Information 
would breakeven in 1986 after nar- 
rowing its 1985 losses from the 
1984 level of 217 millio n kronor. 
According to the managing direc- 
tor, IhcEricsson subsidiary should 
return to profitability by 19S7. 

Despite such statements, the 
share price for Ericsson, Sweden's 
showcase t rieeo m mmrica H<i n ^ and 
electronics group, has been dipping 
to lows for the year on the Stock- 
holm Stock Exchange. The low in 
recent weeks was 189 kronor per 
share. Ericsson shares dosed at 205 
kronor on Tuesday. 

Analysts consider the depressed 
share price a symptom of investor 
worry about Ericsson Information 
Systems. “Swedish investors are 
certainly waiting to see how things 
develop with ElS,” said an analyst 
at a large Swedish bank, who asked 
not to be identified. 

Ericsson recently said it would 
tenmnate U.S. dealer sales of its 
personal computer, made by EIS. 
at the end of 1985. In its six-month 
interim report, it said Ericsson In- 
formation was a major factor in a 
31-percent drop in group earnings, 
to 643J3 milli on kronor from 9218 
millian for the period in 1984. 

However, Mr. Larsson said Sales 
of the Ericsson PC in Europe in 
September had been “the best for 
any one month in the past six 
months" and thnr a major Eu- 
ropean marketing campaign for the 
PC would start shortly. Computer- 
land retailers in Europe, he noted. 


had recently agreed to market the 
computer. 

Michael Willis Fleeting, a senior 
partner and specialist in Scandina- 
vian shares at London's £3. Sa- 
vory MiUn, said a lot of selling of 
Ericsson had to do with investors 
realizing tosses sear year-end to 
offset capital gains, but that the 
company’s recent performance 
could justify the sales. 

Ericsson Information's manag- 
ing director, Mr. Larsson. who took 
over a year age. said that losses at 
the imiL were the rerait of an inter- 
play of prematurely launched, 
problem-adder: products and ad- 
ministrative routines tint failed to 
detect and prevent these difficulties 
in time. Ail this, he pasted out 
occurred against the background of 
a weak market for office-automa- 
tion products worldwide, and espe- 
cially in the United States. 

For instance, toe EIS head noted 
that the new MD-! 10 digital PBX 
had been installed a: around 300 
locations in Sweden and abroad 
with "some 300 software errors." 

"We had the same type of prob- 
lem with the Ericsson 2500 mini- 
computer and have saved it," Mr. 
Larsson said, adding that two ma- 
jor banking-automation projects in 
Sweden bad also undergone revi- 
sions because the eariy phases bad 
been rushed. 

Deliveries of Ericsson Informa- 
tion's bank-automation systems to 
Skandinaviska EnsVilda * Ranten. 
Sweden's largest ccuznercial bask, 
and Spadab. data-p recessing cen- 
ter for Sweden's savings hanks, are 
said to be delayed by almost a year. 

In addition, analysis say that 
Ericsson suffered setbacks on the 
domestic banking-automation 
market when it failed Iasi spring to 
get big comracts with Ptvbanken, 
the slate-owned commercial bank, 
and the Swedish post office. AS 
Swedish post offices offer some or 
aD of PKbacken’s banking services. 

Regarding the MD-110, Mr. 
Larsson said, “We are updating the 
software at ail the installations, and 
all new deliveries are being made 


m- 



P'wwni fclr inxLtor- 


Stig Larsson 

with updated programs. The Erics- 
son 2500 is also now a good, stable 
product." 

He admitted that on the product 
side. Ericsson Information's “big- 
gest problem was that we were in a 
rush to come out with products, 
and these weren't quite worked out 
when they were launched." 

“I came in late last year and one 
of the first things 1 did was to pm in 
people to go through the whole 
product range.” be explained. “Our 
target was to finish by mid- 1985 
and we did it-” 

Mr. Renting, tbe analyst in Lon- 
don, praised the design and tech- 
nology of Ericsson’s products. 
“The Ericsson PC is a marvelous 
product, vastly advanced on the 
IBM." be said, referring to Interna- 
lionai Business Machines Corp.’s 
PC modeL But at the same lime he 
was skeptical about whether EIS 
and Ericsson as a whole had suffi- 
ciently tightened up management 
controls to prevent future products 
from coming to market with em- 
barrassing flaws. 

“Our information reveals a bad 
history here,” Mr. Fleming re- 
marked of Ericsson. “And in some 


rather recent examination, we 
didn't fed the business discipline 
was that tight compared with some 
other companies we know. In 1985, 
up against IBM, you can't afford to 
be lax." 

Tbe analyst at tbe Swedish bank 
said be regarded Ericsson Informa- 
tion Systems’ development of the 
Ericsson 2500 minicomputer as one 
of the most serious potential prob- 
lems. 

“Minicomputers have high de- 
velopment costs, especially for 
software development, and the 
Ericsson mini has its own unique 
operating system, which means 
they have to write their own soft- 
ware," the analyst said. Operating 

systems are a set of built-in instruc- 
tions that tell a computer’s mini- 
processors how to handle all other 
instructions, such as word process- 
ing or administrative programs. 

“I think they are missing the 
train here with minicomputers," 
the analyst cautioned, "and the 
question is, bow long they will keep 
trying. 1 ' The Ericsson group's pa- 
tience could run out, he suggested, 
if profitability from Public Tele- 
communications declined for some 
reason. “They made 92 percent of 
Ericsson’s profits on just over 30 
percent of sales” in 19S4, the ana- 
lyst said. 

Mr. Larsson said new products 
would be launched at slower rate in 


1986. But be stressed that there 
would be new-product introduc- 
tions in all EIS product areas dur- 
ing the year. 

Sloppy product lannches went 
undetected, Mr, Larsson said, be- 
cause Ericsson Information Sys- 
tems was, at the same time, trying 

to adminis tratively a«imilata re- 
cent acquisitions that were devel- 
opers of some of the products. 
Formed in 1981 as a subsidiary 
division, EIS acquired Datasaab. a 
maker of minicomputers and bank- 
ing systems, in 1981 In 1983, it 
acquired Pacat, a maker of office 

machine 

Mr. Larsson declined to discuss 
specific new products, but hinted 
broadly that the MD-1 10 would be 
offered with enhanced data com- 
munications capability, making it a 
true data-voice-text exchange. Us- 
ers of current model MD-I I Os need 
a modem to send data, but sources 
close to Ericsson Information said 
tbe new version would have soft- 
ware allowing the PBX to link di- 
rectly with computers and transmit 
data at high speeds of up to 64,000 
bit per second. 

Other products io be introduced 
soon, it has been said, will be a new 
printer, though not a laser printer, 
and possibly some user-friendly, 
integrated software for the Erics- 
son PC. In the medium term, a Laser 
printer under tbe Ericsson trade- 
mark was possible, a source said. 


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INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Oct. 30, 1985 

Net asset value quotations are uiwIM bv Win Fuads listed wttfi the exception of some emotes based on issue mice. 

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■f d 1 Brit. Japan Dir Pori. Fd S I.ior 

-(vvl Brit Jersey Gill Fund__ t im 

■Id) Bril. world Lets. Fund S 1.175 

-( d I Brit. World Teehn. Fund — 5 1712 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

■(w) CopMoI Inti Fund — 5 J2J8 

■Iw ) Capital Italia sa s 17.74 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 

-id» Actions SutaeS SF 442.08 

-1 d j Bond Volar 5wf. ... SF I09.1S 

-Id) Bond Valor D-mark DM 11123 

-I d 1 Band Valor US-DOLLAR S m.94 

-f d ) Bond Valor Yon vmi HWOM 

-t d > Convert Valor 5wf. SF J22J5 

-(d) Convert Valor US-DOLLAR- S 127.57 

-i d ) Cooovtc. SF 46BJW 

-Id; CS Fonds-Bonds SF 71L2S 

-Id! CS Fonds-lnfl— SF mJO 

-Id I CS Money MarViri Fund S JOW® 

-Id) CS Money Market Fund— DM 105V -00 
-Id) CS Money Market Fund— — c KC-JOS 

-Id) Erwirulp-Valor — SF 14*25 

-IdJUssoc SF tViOO 

-( d 1 Europo-Valor SF J77-5Q 

-Id) PocIBc ■Valor -. SF HOTS 

DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
Winchester House. 77 Lond on Wall 
LONDON ED «1 W0W7) , 

-Iwl FlraOury Group Ltd S t®A* 

-iml winchester Diversified— * 19JM 

-(ml Winchester Financial Lid. — * AW 

-(ml Winchester Frontier S J0O2J 

-fw) Winchester Holdlnam — — FF 10AM 

-Jwl Worldwide Securities — I - S 4AA4 

-I wt Worldwide Special 1173143 

orr INVESTMENT FFM 

-H d ) Conoentra— . — — — - DM 3424 

-Hd) mrt Renlenlond . DM 01AI 

Dann A Haroltt 6 Lloyd Georae, Brussels 

-(ml DAH Commodity Pool — JXB-M * 
-iml Currency A Gold Pool— S 14244 " 

-(ml winch. Ufa Fut. Pool 55HSII! 

-(ml Trans World Fut. Pool — _ S 73001 — 
ESC TRUST CO.f JERSEY) LTD, 

(-3 Seale Si-5t. Heihtr.nS3«-MXn 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

itfHd line.: Bid S l(L»-qfler 5TA419- 

€>( d ICan.: BhJ S ll27 0Hor_-_S12.ua 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

-( a i snort Term 'A 1 (Accumt — f uwjg 

-Id) Shorl Term 'A' (Dlstr}_ . f JAMS 

-1 a ) Short Term B 1 weaiml — * JJ]l 
-( d I Short Term B' 1D*Strl »_ A«M 

-(w) Long Term— — — * a,fl 
F SC MGJHT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1. Laurence Pounty HIM. EC*. D1-O23-4M0 


DM - Deutsche Mark; BF - Beiolum Frews; 
PA/siotuii aerunlt; NA.-NotAvaHaWe. t 
Redemol- Price- E«£mbt; •*' Formerly 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3L, 1985 




Dollar Gains mU-Si 


-• '•r-r - 


* i'i 


't 


% 

ta > ■ 

: 


■I'i -u 


r ' ^ nymrio 

•J 1 !?.*?** «hr 

gmed Wednesday in- New York 
afwr falling against most maw 
cunencMsiii Europe. 

"Hk rise in the United States Foi- 
^weo a statement by the Federal 
R«erve denying rumors that major 
mdustiialtted countries were coor- 
omaung interest-rate pobews. 

■Hie dollar began to move no - 

after the Fed’s vice chainnan. Pro- 
ton Martin, said the Fed will not 
try to target the dollar, according to 
Daniel Holland, vice president at 
Discount Corp. of New York. 

“The Fed’s denial of reports that 
ie U.S. had agreed hot to lower 
ie discount rate also generated 
some buying,” he added. 

The dollar had fallen sharply 
earlier this week and in foreign 
trading Wednesday when Japan 
and European countries pusbetfb> 
wrest rates higher, leading to spec- 
ulation the United States >ad 
agreed with the other Group of 



m, 


in Fair- 
— — — — . ttyfaig to 

^IhedoBaS^ 


rate woeMfcadi 

going to.n^.aMtfk the dollar 
down," hot be deefined to com- 
mesx on what its fjltas are. 

Mr. HoHand'flttd spectators 
who had takes dot, or seQ, posi- 
tions in the dollar on futures mar- 
kets were forced, id bay to cover cm 
Tht MiAtwiVkr frritT flyit fueled the 
advance further. , - 
Trading was “very choppy* end 
nervous, he s*id. 

The' Brib&pomid coded at 
SIAM in New York, down from 
51.4440 on Tuesday. The US. unit 
ended in New Yore at 3.632 Deut- 
sche marks. upfroniltiHS DM. 

Other New York rates were: 
8.0175 ' French ’francs, 1 jm from 
7.9625 francs; od'llu Swiss 

francs, up from 1 1 39Jjancs. 

The British pound -rose in Lon- 


don to SI .44 15 from Tuesday’s 

51.436. 

In Frankfurt, the US. currency 
was fixed in the afternoon at 16166 
DM, down from Tuesday's 16325 
DM. 

There were no reports of sales of 

rWlarc by fflnwil n»nh| rith/wgft 

the possibility of intervention con- 
tinued to h»*»g over the market. 

Currency dealers said the market 
largely ignored a US. government 
report Wednesday that single-fam- 
ily home sales feQ 2.6 percent in 
Scpmber. Anentxn was focused 
on balajjce-©f-irade and factory- 
orders statistics due out Thursday. 

. Dealers said volume was not par- 
ticularly high bui business was fair- 
ly active, parocuiariy on ponnd- 
doBar trading early Wednesday. 

In Zurich, the dollar ended 
Wednesday at 11433 Swiss francs, 
down from 11523 on Tuesday. 

In Paris, the US. currency was 
fixed at 7.974 French francs, down 
front 8.0235 on Tuesday. 

(UP I, AP, Reuters) 


THE EUROMARKETS 


1 



rsRise 



By Christopher Pizzey 

Retncn 

LONDON — The- dollar- 

stmightand floating-rate -note sec- 
tors of the Eurobond. market rose 
sharply in active trading Wednes- 
day and the firm undertone 
prompted a rush of new borrowers 
in both sectors, dealers said 
. Prices of seasoned dollar 
straights rose from l U to a full point 
as U.S. credit markets extended 
Tuesday's gains following the suc- 
cessful outcome of the first of the 
Treasury's “mini-refunding” auc- 
tions. “That auction’s prompted 
loads of activity here,” one trader 
said. Floating-rate note issues were 
generally five to 10 basis pants 
higher. 

Two British banks launched per- 
petual floating-rate notes that wQl - 
rank as primary capital un de r ’Rani? 
of England guidelines, and both 
issues were wdl received by inves- 
tors because of their gmcrous mar- ■ 
gins, dealers said. 

Lloyds Bank PLC issued a S500- 
rrrillkm perpetual note paying 3/16 


jjomtowcr die threwboudi London 
interbank offered rate, . 

The issue wu.kadHoanaged by 
Doyds Mocbmiz-Ba& Lid, trad- 
ed around its issue price through- 
out the day and ended *i 99.99. The 
fees -total 25 basis points. Market 
sources said the issue will not be 
increased. 

- Royai Bank of Scotland PLC is- 
sued a SSOO-nuBionDoaier that was 
rapidly increased to $350 motion. 
It pays U point over ihe mean of 
the six-mocth London interbank 
bid and offered rates, Limean.- 

After the increase it was still 
trading within the 10-basis-point 
selling concession, and wdl within 
the total fees of 25 basis points, at 
9932 bid. It was lead managed by 
Merrill LyndrCaphal Markets. 

Dealers noted perpetual issues 
have been in on die sec- 

ondary market recently, essentially 
because of their generous margins. 

Hie Bank of Tokyo Curacao Fi- 
nance NV issued a S00- million, 12 
year, floater paying 20 baas points 
over three-month Libor and priced 


at 100.10. It has a maximum cou- 
pon of 13 percent and was quoted 
at 99.60 md against total fees of 
62V4 basis points. Lead manager 
was Bank of Tokyo International. 

In the dotiai-stnught sector, the 
largest issue of the day was a S5G0- 
mitiion bond for Canada that deal- 
ers said was proving attractive to 
retail investors. The 10-year issue 
pays 10 percent and was priced at 
99%. One syndicate manager said, 
“we've been placing large chunks 
of it — quite easily. It's tightly 
priced, but (he quality of the bor- 
rower's name is excqwanaL" 

The issue was lead managed by 
Deutsche Bank Capital Markets 
and it finished on toe when-issued 
market at a. discount of about 1 
11/16 compared with the total fees 
of 2 percent. 

Norway's -Sng» Petroleum A/S 
issued a SlOO-rmtiion bond paying 
11V4 percent over 10 years and 
priced at par. It was quoted at 116 
percent against the 2-percent total 
fees. Lead manag er was Credit 
Suisse First Boston Ltd. 


Manager 
Pins Hope 
OnAgOity 

(Continued froa fage 9) 
a small hide," he said. “The trip 
wire is gening tighter day; by day. 
There will be volatility in major 
indexes never seen before.” 

Mr. LeFrere said be thinks that 
wild swings in the Dow average of 
50 to 100 points a session will not 
be uncommon. 

With so many btilkas of invest- 
ment dollars poised to “flip" be- 
tween stock and bonds, he said 
stocks could "explode” up 700 
points if general interest rates 
broke down two percentage points 
from their outcm kvd. 

But if rates go up a percentage 
pant or more, he said that "the 
stock market could collapse 2G to 
30 percent" 

A larger percentage of trades will 
involve fewer companies, he pre- 
dicts, "with a lot of forgotten con- 
panics created,’’ notably in the 
over-the-counter market. 

Mr. LeFrcre's fund has been par- 
ticularly successful buying "sec- 
ond-tier” airline stocks. Eastern 
Airlines has bees a big winner for 
him in 1985. 

"With enormous consolidation*’ 
ahead for the industry, he ihmks 
that Eastern, along with Western 
Airlines, will be bought and even- 
tually only three or four major car- 
riers will be left in the country. 
"After United and American you 
have to start guessing about who 
will be the survivors," he said. 
"Even Delta and Northwest might 
be taken over.” 

Wholesale Price Index 
Falls 02% in Japan 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Japan's wholesale 
price index fell 0.2 percent to 97.7 
in the second 10 days of October 
from the preceding 10 days, com- 
pared with an unchanged index in 
the like September period, the 
Bank of Japan said Wednesday. 

The interim October index was 
down 32 percent from a year earli- 
er, compared with a 1.8-percent 
year-to-year fall in the like period 
in September. 


France Seeks to Export Fast Trains 



(Genthraed from Page 9) 
and Las Vtgas for winch studies are 
now under way. 

To achieve high speeds. France 
opted fa- a tram built as a single 
unit that runs at conventional 
speeds over existing track within a 
city but switches to special high- 
speed track in the counuyside. The 
high-speed track has gender curves 
than conventional lines but steeper 
gradients, which save on expensive 
tunneling and earth cuts. 

Severer high-speed trains have 
been built or are is the planning 
stages in other countries, some em- 
ploying radically different ap- 
proaches. 


Japan's Shinkansen "bullet 
trains" are basically similar ;o the 
TGV, though they are somewhat 
slower, traveling at a top speed of 
143 miles an hour. 

Messerschmitt's train also needs 
special track to achieve its top 
speeds, but it is designed to be 
more flexible than the TGV be- 
cause its engine and coaches can be 
decoupled and the size of the train 
varied. 

West Germany and Japan are 
also working independently on a 
magnetic "hcweriram’’ that would 
glide along a monorail track sup- 
ported by magnetic forces at speeds 
of up to 310 miles an hour. But the 


Company Results 

Revenue ana profits or tosses. In millions, ore M local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated. 


Britain 

rho inn 

in hsh ins tfH 


- «*»J raw 

Proto* Net— 51.1 *53 

Pur Unarm 63*9 0223 


AStUIMtfO 

MOW. 1HS IfM 

UniM 1BOO *6.9 

Profit Mi ;o:'J7 

Par Stun 8.17 — 

IMom ins IfM 

RiMMu- 3953 2*0 

Pram 1337 to 103 

Per Snore— 0X4 — 

a: was. Rvtvtts tn US. Oct. 
tors. 

Stolen 

M Qoor. ins IfM 

Ravam* »IU MJ 

Profits 28A 958 

PorShora 033 — 

IMMW INS IfM 

Rovonuo 1,3*0. 1MX 

Pram M3 31 j 

Par Short OftC — 


Malaysia 


1985 IfM 

. SAM. ixaa 

Oper Kei mu fu 

Geer Sucre- 3X1 180 

last fmm net eacludat 
go in at sifl mfiuon. 

Amcr. General 

3rd Quor. INS IfM 

OwrancM 1X30. 1.300. 

ewertua 1DU WL3 

Ootr Share 009 Ml 

» Mcnrai ms 1«M 

Ra ve nm <JM X980. 

n ear Nsf 37*x 277J 

Oner Saom_ 2.1S 1J» 

Nrrs a*ct(rOa Investment 
oa.m at sn million vs 0.1 
million In ovarrw one otsse* 
duum vs sate million m * 
meatus. 

BetMehem Steel 

3rd Qoor. IMS IfM 

i jm. i am. 

Mot LOSS 7U 17> 

a Mmt hs ms IfM 

QOVMWC inn. XJDB. 

Nrt L04& MM 4 to 

Wf nets InctoOe ctmree at 
S3S motion. 

Borden 

3rd Qoor. IfU IW 


Malaysia Mining 
W Half ms in* 

Rowonus 33U J-.2SI 

Profits tw 

Por Share ol;i to ta 

S— ih Africa 

OK Bazaars 
1st Half ms IfM 

Bovofloo «8442 1X973 

Praffl 30* 473 

Pa- Shorn CJD (LSS7 

HallriStales 

Airborne FreieM 
3rd Qoor. IftS IfM 

Rcvaue 117 J 1047 

net me. uso 202 

PorShora Oif (Ltd 

T Months IMS IfM 

RevonoB 341.1 38*5 

Not tnc 7.17 773 

PorSharo 173 173 


Revenue. 

Net Inc. 

Per Share— 
fi 


Per Share. 


uta i.na 
S7.1 517 

1.11 on 
ms ifM 

3.420. 
115.9 
251 


133.1 

7M 


If M 
14J00. 
3420 
1O0 
IfM 
3410a 
1.100 
372 
of 


Amcr. Caa 
SrdQaar. INI 

Revalue 732* 

OwNet 275 

Oeer Share— 037 


IfM 

7B7J 


Chevron 

3rd Qnar. IMS 

Revalue U JOa 

Met Inc 7450 

Per Saara— 073 

t Ma**s ms 

Revenue 34*00. 

Net Inc 94*0 

Per Share 177 

lies nett tnctuOe 
OS million. 

Combustion Ena. 

M Otar. ins IfM 

Reverse 5*70 SH.9 

Oner Net <ol3&7 309 

Oner Share — — 153 

f Meath* INS IfM 

Revenue 1.720. 1030 

Oaer Met (a) 157 RL1 

Oner Share— — 205 

a ■ toss, mis tatetode tosses of 
S7 million vs StSMO In ovar- 
ian ond at S12M million vs 
til. I mutton in 9 months tram 
tttacontlnued aoen tl on s. 


Cummins Engine 

3rd Qoor. IMS IfM 

Revalue xja.7 5570 

Net IOC (a&47 617 

Per snore — 499 

9 Month* IMS IfM 

Revalue 14.10- 1.720. 

Net Inc 348 UU 

Per Share 1M 1173 

0: toss nets Include chorees 

of SI 0.4 million to ouarter and 

of SSO miilon tn a months vs 
Choree of SIM million. 19U 
nets otso InavOe credit of 

StS-t million. 

Dean Foods 

3rd Quor. IMS IfM 

Revenue 2549 2297 

Met tnc 771 432 

Per Shore—. 05* OX& 

9 Month* IMS IfM 

Revenue 7*73 67U 

Net Inc 2279 103* 

per Shore 1*3 174 

Du Pont 

3rd Quor. IMS IfM 

Revenue 0*50 OKU. 

Net I IK. 2020 3150 

Per snare 1.17 171 

f Moans IMS IfM 

Revenue 20580 27730 

Net Inc *140 1.120 

per snare 253 4*7 

1 995 ouarter net includes 
choree of Sift million 

Foxboro 

3rd Quor. IMS IfM 

Revenue 1387 1224 

Net Inc <a)2J2 170 

Per Snara — Oil 

f Matths IMS IfM 

Revenue 4644 3717 

Net inc (a) Ml 238 

Per Share — 023 

0: loss Nets mauae n> crcd- 
itsotSUmUUanvsSKXMiein 
ouarter and of SiWJUC vs 
sattUOO tn 9 months 

Imperial Corp. Amer. 
3rd Qoor. IMS IfM 

Net loss in u 

f Months IMS IfM 

Net Inc 874 021 

per Share — 002 001 

Kay Corp. 

3rdQaar. IMS IfM 

Revenue 131.9 1737 

NCI Lass 271 156 

9 Months |M5 IfM 

Revenue 4*35 *aoi 

Net Lou 15* 4M 


French, who abandoned this idea a 
decade ago, say ihe track would 
cost at least twice as much as a new 
TGV line, which can be built for 
about S4 millio n a mile. 

A Canadian company. Bombar- 
dier lnc„ has manufactured a high- 
speed train now operating between 
Montreal and Ottawa. Although 
designed to run at 125 miles an 
hour, the train has been plagued by 
troubles and is limited to a speed of 
about 80 miles an hour. 

Britain is striving to build a "lilt- 
ing” train that can sustain speeds 
of 125 miles an hour on existing 
track. British Rail, the nationalized 
railway, is working on a version of 
the train in which the passenger 
coaches would "lean” inward on 
fast curves to keep passengers from 
being thrown out of their seats. 

Italy is building a high-speed line 
between Rome and Florence, 
called the Dirccussima. Austria is 
considering a high-speed line be- 
tween Vienna and Salzburg, while 
Spain is planning one from Madrid 
to Barcelona. 

Compared with Europe, the 
United States is "simply not in the 
picture at all” when it comes to 
high-speed rail technology, 
SNCFs deputy director general, 
Raymond Monhet, said. 

But while that makes the United 
States appear to be a templing ex- 
port market. European manufac- 
turers of high-speed trains recog- 
nize that they must overcome 
America's preference Tor automo- 
bile travel. 

"We are still having a love affair 
with the automobile in this coun- 
try. so all our calculations are very 
conservative,” said John K. Lussi, 
director of rail marketing at the 
New York State Department of 
Transportation in .Albany, refer- 
ring to studies about the proposed 
high-speed line between New York 
and Montreal. 

Such a service, with stops in Al- 
bany and Burlington, Vermont, 
would complete the 370-mile trip in 
about three hours, hitting speeds of 
up to 160 miles an hour. Current 
service on Amirak trains takes 
eight hours. 

French engineers say that 20 to 
25 TGV trains would be needed for 
the service, costing a total of about 
S200 million. Laying special high- 
speed (rack or improving existing 
track would add SI .5 billion to S2.1 
billion to the bilL 

At least one train manufacturer 


New Home Sales 
Decline in L 7 .5. 

United Press Inten-juuutcJ 

Washington — sales of 

new’ bouses in the United States 
fell 2ii percent in September 
and the average price of a new 
bouse reached S103.600, the 
government said Wednesday. 

Home sales in the first nine 
months of 1985 were 6 percent 
ahead of 1984, according to a 
joint report from the depart- 
ments of Commerce and Hous- 
ing and Urban Development. 

The average price of a new- 
house in September rose S5.000 
above August, it said. During 
September J9S4. the average } 
cost of 2 new home was 
SIOUOQ. 

in the United States. Budd Co. of 
Troy, Michigan, has shown interest 
in the project, according to New 
York officials. 

The TGV line lost money ip. its 
first three years of limited opera- 
tion, from 1981 through 1983, but 
last year receipts covered costs and 
amortization. leaving the service 
with a profit of about S50 million. 
The SNCF expects to have paid off 
all TGV-related debt by 1994 at the 
latest. 

Last year, the French govern- 
ment decided to build a “TGV Ai- 
lamique” line linking Paris with 
Bordeaux, Names and Brest on the 
western coast. New, more luxuri- 
ous trains will reach speeds of up to 
1S5 miles an hour. 

“Now that we’ve mastered the 
technology of sustained safe high 
speed, we're going :o put the em- 
phasis on com/ on and prestige," 
says Francis Lacote, the SNCFs 
chief TGV engineer. 

But France's ambitions for the 
TGV do not stop there. Later this 
year, French, Belgian and West 
German transpon ministers will 
decide whether to build an interna- 
tional TGV link that would cut the 
train time between Paris and Brus- 
sels from two hours 30 minutes to 
one hour 30 and take a further hour 
to reach Cologne, with a possible 
branch to Amsterdam. 

And if Britain and France can 
ever agree to build a tunnel under 
the Channel the SNCF would 
want to ran a TGV line through it. 
making the trip between Paris and 
London in three hours and 15 min- 
utes. 


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27V* 133* ApTBIos 
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34 171ft ArMLW 

137* B Aautsir 
716 37* Arctihm 
227ft 151ft AtdoSv 
40V* 197* Ar&B 
9 6 ArM 

157ft 107ft AsdHsi 
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23 U, 1316 Atcof 
27 141ft AHAR1 

43 1A 251ft AtfntUC 
M9* 84* Atlnfd 

14 • Mb AH Fin 

IfM All ROSS 
27* AtSaATS 
144* AtwdOc 
47* AutTrT 
27* Autmtx 
41ft Aaxhxi 
37ft Avaera 
54* AvniGr 
257* 17Vft AvnMc 
20 151ft Avatar 

207* 131<i AvtatGP 
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20 1974 30 + W 

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241ft 227ft 227ft— ID* 
107* 10 107* + W 

307* 307* JOTk + W 
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127* 127* IM*— W 
127* 127* 127*— 7* 
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107* 5Yl BnctlCf 

217ft ,107ft Bomwn 
toft 3016 BetzLb U2 41 
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207* 127ft Brnbm JO IA 

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419* 277ft OrWA 
377ft 217ft. CbUtB 
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211* to* CtovtRl ZOO 12.1 
251* 47ft athtms 
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267ft 13 CObaaf 
41* 27ft CotabR 
159* m Cotooan 
59* 4 COUIns 
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4316 339* Cmorfc Z10 54 
449* 24W CmcaU 1 M 24 
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339* 23V, CmWTI ue 52 
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24 137ft CnwCds 

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1SW 516 CCTC 

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27 1376 Snte 1 240 U.1 

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541* 327ft CnPOFS 140 3J 
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317ft 311* 311* 

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177* 177k 1771 
13 119ft 11W — 9* 

209* 199* 309* + W 

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397* V 399*4-9* 
44 437ft 439* +.W 

97ft K9* 97ft +1 
307ft 307b 307* -f 9* 
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11 low nr* -4-1* 
177* 171* 179* 

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171* 17V* 171* + 7* 
37* m 37* 

6W 4W 674 — 1% 
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474 6Vl 49* f W 
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131* 13 13 —W 

46 457ft 44 + W 

37ft 37* 37* 

216 2 2 — W 

427ft 427ft 4» . 

1076 TO* 107ft + 7* 
5 47ft 476 
• 77* 71* + 9* 

129* 111* lift- Vft 

St 3W ’a-k 

17W 167* MW— W 
41 399* 40 + 9* 

71* 79* 79* 

8W 876 87ft 
28 279* 277* + 4* 

VW 17* 17a— W 

37* 39* 37* + I* 
13 111* 11V* , 

169* Ml* 149* + W 
217ft 209* HO— 19 
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207t 209* 20W— 7* 
H* 23W 2216 — J* 
T97fc IfW 197* + Vi 


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Pt*. vw. 188s HiBh 


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31W 10 EnzoBI 72 

20W *7* Eauar 784 

87h 5W Eaton JO ZB 16 

4016 23W Erlcn JSe 3J UM 

199* 11 EvnSut 147 

16V* 71* Ewivtr 543 


127* 127* 127*— 1ft 
87* n* 816 + k* 
71ft 7 TV. 

257ft 2SV* 25V*— 16 
18W 18V* UV.-MV 
14W 13V* 13W + 92 


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37* IK FamRast 
271* 10V* FaraiF 
487* 459* FrmG 

177ft 7W Flbrans 
347* 219* Fdlcrs U2 AS 
57V* 35 RttflTS IM 2J 
387ft 211* Flaato M 1J 
189ft 13V* FlUrtfc M AM 
47* 3W Final cn JO SL5 
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B 21V* FAlaBJc 1.12 X4 
32V* 239* FtAFIn JO 24 
27V* 16W FtATnS .M 
19 117* FICatF 

29JA 207ft F&mr UO S.1 
15W IM* FEsoe 
22W 89* FFCalS 

26V* U|* FFRM 

39W T3 FIFnCp 
309* lOWFIFnMl 
30V* 207ft FtFJBk 
37W 2876 FJafN 

44 2SW FMdB 

4374 227* FNIdnsUO 
4TW 257* FRBGa UM 


U6 2J 


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UO 4J 33 
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37 8 

24 55k 


31 197fc FtStfFla JO 24 

26 109* FSftCC 1.10 AS 

42W 29 FTatm 140 4.1 

447ft 311* FsKJnC 1J4 3J 


.89* 2 Ftokav 
MV* 109* Ftoxsit 
toft U PlaFdi 
41fk 279* FtoNB 
197* 77ft FloWSs 

171* 117* Fturaeb 

4W 3 . FOnarh 
189* 12W F Lion A 
1916 13 FUmB 
349* 25V* For Am ... 
347* raw Fflrasto TJ0 
23W 12V* FortnF 
37ft H* ForlnS 


83 
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124 
375 
120 

AS A3 S3 
JO 1J 219 
JO 2J 211 
49 

J8 1J 7 
43 

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47 A 60 
.94 11 47 

6.1 142 

707 
1S4 


107& 6 Forum J6b 4 20a 

77ft 41* Fastar .10 22 32 

29W MW Frermtf AS 20 389 

pw 47* Fudrafc 573 

161* Ilf* FulrHB J U 71 


87ft IW ST. -f V* 
101* 10 10 — V* 

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121* 117ft 121* + 7* 
43 4371, 627ft— 1* 

T9W toft If — w 
4<6 4 4 — V* 

16W 167* 167*— W 
297* 29V* 297*4- W 

S IftSv* + * 

*6 ^ M*“ * 
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toft 147* 147k 
32V* 32 32V* -F % 

31 3016 30 to— v* 

2S7t 251* 2576 + 1ft 
17W 16 17W +1W 

24 231* 237ft— U, 

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23 22 22VJ + V* 

21V* 21 21 — to 

Ml* 13V 149* + V* 
« 17W 18 +to 

309* 297* 301* to 7* 
37 347ft 37 to to 

53V* S3 53V* to V* 
37V* 37V* 371* 

4116 41 41W 

29 287ft 29 to to 

227* 2IV* 227* til* 
39W 39 3916 to to 

409* 407* 40W to 7* 
.29* 2 2Vt 
1174 119* 111*— 7* 
T99* 191* T91ft to to 
-SOW 43 4016 

127* 137* 127* to 1ft 
MV<* MV* 14V* 

41* 4 4 

177* 171* T77i + to 
177ft 17W 177* to V* 
311* 31 31 

147* 14 147* to Vi 

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2 IW IW- V» 
97* fto 9V* — 1* 
47* 47* 47k 

237ft 239* 237ft + 9* 
5. 47* 4W— 9* 

147* 1616 147* to w 





3Uft 179* CbrvSc 
117* 77* CdWW 
0 2W CalStvo 
4W 2Vft CaHonP 
1516 m * CatrtV 

IBTft 12 OUnlD 
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416 A 4W . 

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117ft STL 

37M 2BV* 
30W 21 Vi 
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191* Mft 
19V* Wt 
30V* 307* 
3 9k 
77* 9k 
87k 47* 

57ft -2W 
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347k 21 

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207* 12 
27 UU 
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19 97ft 
1976. 1TV* 
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raw *v* 
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DSC 

DefsvSr 

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DmnBto 

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11 11 11 
79* 79* 77*— W 

25% 2<W 347ft 
2916 V V 
47ft M 47* 

17% 17 17% to Tft 

97* 9V* fto 

St* 57* 57k— V* 

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27ft 27* 27* 

57* SW 57* 

57ft 37ft SW + W 

11 I7W II +% 

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55 3* &-k 

MW M 14W 
3% aw a*- w 
28% aw aw- w 

H 34W Mk— % 

» 207ft 2076 + W 

357* 359* 359* to W 
Ml* Uto 14W + W 

20% a MW + % 
IM 11 H 
157ft 15W 1576 to 16 
Iftto IBTft 189k 
23% 337* 2J% to % 

12 117ft 11% + J* 

Mto 10W WV*-V* 
4% 6 6 — % 

299ft 29W 299* 


7716 Mb 

IS 59* 
57ft 9* 
36% 2416 
1276 .79* 
U , 12% 
11W 67* 
07* 79* 
15 MW 

an* 4% 

M ^ 



10% UBft TO* to % 


6W 

IW 

37 

Q* 


7W 

12 

10% 


4 69* to W 

IW W . 

34% 347* 4-9* 
. .. «i lift . 
to* M to* + H 
9% 9% 99* 
_ 7 7 - W 

13 12 

9% 10 to W 

raw raw raw- w 

raw in* raw— % 

1ST* 1ST* 157* to to 
4% 3W 3% to 9* 
*W M M— to 
14 M 14 
109* 97ft *9* + % 

3 2W 3 to W 
7 6% 4W— W 

99* 87* 89*— J* 
197ft 19% 199S— % 
« 177* 18 ♦ »*. 

14 M 14 


UW 316 GTS 
MW 976 Cal Dm 
11V* 4 . GamaB 

56JS 287ft GwwtCh 
9% 5. G«MIS 
10V* lift Oanax 
25V6 89ft GaFBfc 
8 39ft GariMs 
247* U GltnGs 
aw M, GtoaTr 
177k raft Gotoai 
au iow Gen 

m* 149* GauIdP 
M low Qraco 
97ft 57* Grantre 
516 Gnwts 
4 Grnnse 
117t GWSav 
I GtSoFd 
■ Gtach 
12W Gutlfrd 


13% 

774 

a 

SS 

157ft 


7* GHBdC 15J0C 


8 

34 

.10 TJ 34 
251 

5789 

114 

1132 

M 

M U 1517 
2 
921 
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M A3 n 

At 1* 216 
34 
1 

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Mr 7 2 M 

1*6 
56 

JS* A 155 


137 


3W 316 3W 
72to 12 12 — to 

6to 6 6 — W 

4976 487ft 49 

9% 99k 97ft 

2to 2tb 2W to 9* 
249ft 347* 2476 to I* 
77* 7 n* to ft 
107* 1SW IBM — W 
MW MW U-'ft 
U% 147* to*— W 

aw a aw + w 

1616 1576 16W to H 
1776 17 17 — W 

.87* 816 8% 

13 13 13 to W 

77ft 7W 776 + W 
73 21W 22 to 76 

9% 97* 97* 

137* 139* 13% 

14 13% 1396 to W 

% 7k % 


H 


24% 15% HBO 
1196 7 HCC 

‘ 816 Hebor S 

Sto Hodco 
2 Hodson 
127* MomOll 

mm* 

576 Hothwl 
676 HowhB 
1% HHMvn 
HdwAl 
HcfcoBs 


16W 
7W 
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25** 
34W 
109* 
119* 

4% 
237* 15 
34V*. 15 


£ 


■% 37* HotaKT 

3 m- 15 Holtx 
387ft 317ft HonrdF 
34W it 
raw 9 H lot am 
12 39* HaOan 

31 10% HmFAz 

WV* 2% HitmcH 
241* ISto Henlntf 
447* 2476 Hoorn 
«W 3W Harzind 

339* MW HwBNJ 

at* 19W HunUB 
MV* 77ft HrrtOln 
24% 157* HntoBS 
29% M HvDrtlC 
14% 47ft Wyponx 
9 57ft HyiokM 


12 
17S 

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JS A 11 
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HWMCP1J00 4J ,6 

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1 JO 28 38S2 
95 
475 

Jfe J- 9 
47 

J4 27 75 

397 
4U 
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177* 17% 17% — to 
916 9% 9%— % 

MW Uto MW — W 
47* 47* 47* 

3 77ft 2% to% 
in* 18 1BW to W 
16W 1* 14 — 

30% 30 30 — % 

f 9 9 to 1* 

7VS 7 7to — W 
2% 27ft 2% to % 
1776 17Va 17%— W 
IS IS IB to W 
4% 4W 4% to % 
ItV* 18% ItW 
37 31% 31 W— % 

aw 71 71 

mbs w% iow 
7% 67* 474 — V* 
30V* 30 30% 

3% IW 316 
2SW 257h 2SW 
43% 43% 43% to % 
4% 47* 4% to 7k 

217* 38% 31W to U 
34U raw 94W 

129k 127* 127ft 
73 22VS 22W 
27% 277* 377* 

raw raw raw + w 

77ft 716 776 to % 


1076 7% ILC 
35% 147ft IMS* 
MW 7% ISC 
7% 3Vft lent 
VOW A UnWWK 
7% 27ft Inacmp 
4976 32% IndIN 

32 70 infoRx 

2596 12% intmt 

33 Vi 17 MOitw 

111* 3W lnt*em 
15 17* lntBDv 

47ft 3 IntaGan 
23V* 1014 ISSCO 
32% 207ft Into! 

98* 3. IntlSv 
37* 116 Inh-Tal 
1576 7V* intma 

I4W 4W lnWFIr 
351* 31 MBPhf 
10W 5 tntrmon 
aw 10% Intnwe 
17% • Intel to 
18% SW lOomo 
2SW 14% IntKIng 
is 77* imLSas 
la 
316 
2576 
MW 
137ft 
IT* 


.14 J 


1J0 


.14 


47* inAtoM 
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Mft IT COS 
Mft Iomega 
Tto tsamdx 
47ft IMI 


m 

S 

IM 

a 

33 V 
145 

5 


101 

200 

37 

4440 

as 

•03 

64 

7S7 

33 

99 

113 

77 

71! 

1SJ 

10*8 

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97ft 9W 97ft— 16 

33% 3316 33W- % 
Uto 179ft 137k— 7* 
67k M 4%— V* 
5% SW 57ft + V» 
34* 3W 34* 

50W 49W 504* +1% 
259* 2SW 25W— to 
U 15% TSTft— to 

21% 20 20M— 1 

4% 49* 4Vt to to 
12 1IW 1176 
4 37ft A 
14 13% 14 to to 

Xftto 25% 257ft 
316 3M 3W + W 

a% a 2 % to % 

12 • 17 12 

u 12% raw- to 

2716 »% 26% to 16 
67* 6% 67k to V6 

Of* 13% 13% + to 

119* 1096 W%— W 

n M It 

nw raw uu 

15% 157* 1ST*— % 
7W 7V. 7% 

2 1% 1% 

2216 317ft ZITta 
109* 10% IOW 

raw i2i* raw— % 

896 B7* l*t* 


nuuMm 
h on Low Stock 


Sates in 

DU. Yld UU HWi 


Lon 3 PJf~ oroe 


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107* 67* Kavtkin 139 

61W 39% Kema UO 12 M2 

41% a KvCnLf 1JQ 24 44 


SW 4W Kevu 
11 4% KoyTm 

496 296 Kimark 

21% 13 KhxSsr 
147ft 496 Kf»y 

M9« MW Kruoor 
29% (Vi Kuldce 


28 
253 
1S3 

J6 J 1517 
J06 J 97 
JA 26 MV 
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1596 1ST* 
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97* 9% 
56V. HPu 
419* 4ffto 
6 % 6 % 
9% 91k 

1 376 

17% 17 
7to 7% 
14 137* 

117* 111* 


159k— to 
1216 to W 
9to— % 
54W+1 
41 to to <6 
69* 

9to 
2% + to 
177* to 7* 
7V*— 9* 
13% 

119* to to 


.16 

JO 

JO 

61 

52 


1)W SW LO Bertie 
UW Mft LSI Loo 
23% 916 l_TX 
19% 97* La Pot* i 
4896 3276 LaZBy 160 
21% 12% LaaFm 
18% 11 LaiOtW 
17 11% Lamar 

17 14 Lanctal 

3076 3SW LonaCa 
32 22% Lemons 

44* LMOta 
8W Letner 
69* LawbP 
v* Lexicon 
196 LaxMta 
24to 17W Uetort 
7% 4% LJeCom 
20W 11% LilvTut 
38% 18% LinBrO 
3616 27W UncTel 
6% 4% UnWra 
49% 2196 UzClOS 
25% 20to LonoF 
33W 1516 Lotus 
26% 19 Lvnden 
79 8 Lvptias 


7% 

x 2* 

9% 

4 

3% 


373 
934 
92 
60 

2J 31 
3 166 
IJ 6738 
5J 3 
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45 
13 

J2 11 1567 
JO U 157 
.10 M 790 
781 
159 


a j 


to 9 


B5 

9 

294 

191 

l 

207 

101 

52 

H 


17 107k 1? + w 

12% 12% 12% 

1#% 19W 1#% 

7V. 676 69* — W 

17% 177* 17% + 

IB'.* 10 18 V* 

44 42% 43% + % 

107* 10% 10% + to 

IBto 17 IS +1 

7 721* 73 + % 

57. 5% 5% + to 

5% 5% 5%— to 

6% 6 6% 
a 28% 28% — % 

IVW 1«% 19%— V* 
8% 8 8 
14% Tft to 14% + to 

I7to 12 Uto 

2Sto 25 MV* + % 

9to 

Jto + % 

S% + % 

1%— V* 
1%— % 
21 + % 
6 — % 
7% + % 
I Mm 129»— to 
18% 18% — to 
4% 4% 

14% 16% 14% 

34% 33% 33V*— % 
38 37% 37% 

11% 18% 1BT* 

9% 9 U VW— % 
25% 2Sto 25% + to 
11 10% 107* — 

4 3% 3’.*— % 
11% 104* 11 + to 
13% 13% 13% 

19 18% 19 

5 47. S 
U% 137* 131* + % 

13 11% 11% + W 

14 13% 14 
1U6 11% 11% 

7U 2% 2% 

49 48% 49 + % 

3116 19% 31 to +176 
97* V 9% + 7* 
15% 147k 15% + 7k 
2976 29% 79% — to 
17% 17 17% — 7* 
4% 4 4% + V» 

24% 23% 24 to + Va 
ISto 18 Uto + to 
7 6% 7 + >6 

27% 77% 27W — Vk 
17% 17V* 17% 

aw a to 
7V* 7% 7% 

U% 13% 14% 

8 % 8 8 — % 
79* 77k 79* + % 
27% 37% 37% 

13% l3to 13% + Vk 
23to 23 23 — to 

327* 317k 32% fUk 
4% 4 4 

14% MW 14% ♦ to 
an 23w 23 w 


97* «% VLI 

14V* 7to VLSI 

12 4 VMX 

11% 7 VSE .1*6 1.7 

30% 6 Valid LO 

22% B<6 ValFSL 

431*. U% VOINII 1 JO 3J 

34V* 197ft ValLn M 7M 

IBTh UW VonDuS JO 2J 

15W 49* Vanzetl 
61* 2% ventre* 

287. raw Vicorp ,13a .7 

13% 7 vieaeFr J2e 3D 

MW #w vikina 

aw 139k Vlratefc 
129* 57* Voaavi 

22 1416 Vottlnf 


434 

S'* 

5% 

Uft 

11% 

Uto 

325 

4 to 

3’* 

T 

9% 

9 to 

283 

6% 

6W 

ftC4 

17% 

15-1 

283 

37** 

37% 

22 

20 to 

20 

214 

raw 

17T* 

15 

4% 

4% 

534 

5 

4% 

1647 

11 

17>4 

614 

7to 

7W 

111 

12 

12’.. 

99 

19% 

19 

282 

JW 

7to 

77 

19 

ie% 


r.t + » 
u w + % 

3“-i — 5* 
9V-J — * 

k%— 't 


4to— to 
46. — 'u 
I?",— to 
7 to 
13 

ivn + % 

T”,— '■* 
IV + to 


W 


2SW 17% WD 40 
1 * 3 -, sa waibcs 
13% 5W WikrTri 
2516 17% WshE 
26% 14% WFSLs 

16% 10% WMSB 

97ft 6 Wawetk 
14W TOW Wet* 
78V, 7% W#«Fn 

17% Sto WSfFSL 
10% 5% WMICTc 

MW 5% WtTIAs 

21% 15W WnorC 

17% 57* WstwC 5 

34 to 24 V* WBiira 
6% 3 Wlart 
13% 3 Wdcom 
4816 aw Wlllmr 
1ST* 7% WUIAL 
10% 4% WllsnF 
7% 3W Wlndmr 
34to 147k WlserO 

19% uw WDoOhd 

197* M Worthas 

97* »% wrirer 
MVj 2Vu Wvm» 

8% 19k Xebec 

13% s% Xleor 
17% lOto XhUa 


1J6 

60 


031 

JO 1# 
JO 4J 

.150 17 
X3 II 


140 

700 

37 

165 

297 

116 

3 

26 

35 

IDS 

5 

743 

177 

834 

143 

1»1 

70 

Ml 

7V 

194 

97 

a 

118 

258 

75 

*30 

179 

110 

5004 


19% 18 7 IBto + to 
12W 12 Uto 

VW 96* 9'i 

Mto 23 Sto 
3S 1 * TSht 25% + ' •« 
raw irw raw + 

7 7 7 — -.* 

Ills Tito lito— to 
17 Ikrt 14.-1— W 
14W Uto Mto— to 
7 6*. i : 4 

12 1IW 52 + ’•i 

ISto IBto 18to — Vi 
IOW lOto tow + to 
Uto 33 Uto + to 
4% 4 4% + % 

4to C% 4W— Vk 
43 42'6 4 2-T* + to 

lJTk Uw I jto 
5t* S’-k F* - ' * 

15% 15% 15% + W 

13 12% 13 + W 

17to 17 17to + to 
9 8to «■'* r % 

73'U 2V* UW — to 

2% 3!‘. 3V.- '-V 
7% 7 7 - •* 

12% 12% I26i— ’* 


23*fc MW YlowF s J4 2J 712 23% 23to 23W + % 


a% SW Zen Lbs 

13% 10% Ziegler 

439* 31 ZionUt 
11% 3% Ziywf 

ISto aw Zondvn 


JO IJ 2313 
Mo 3J 4 
1-36 U 122 
49 

081 .7 162 


24 23% 23% - 'i 

13W 13% 12% * to 

417* 41 to 41 W + to 

5% S’* Ti + '6 
11V* 107- llift v to 


Sales mures are unofficial Yearly n,sns and lows reflect 

me previous 52 weeks alusine cur rem week, nuinol metaiHi 

trodlng dm. Where a split or slock dlvlaond ameunl'na <o 35 

percent or more nas oeen pans, me veer's moMow range ana 

dividend era mown for tne new slock ontv. Unless otherwise 

noted, rotes of Oh, Wends are annual UlsBurEemenl* Based on 

the latest declaration. 

0 — d ivldend also exlrafsl. b — annual rale ol dividend Plus 
Stock dividend, c — liquidating dividend ew — called, a — 

new yeany law. e— aivlaenadeclarea orpea in orecedina U 

pvontna, g —dividend In Canadian funds, ivblect lo ISto 

non-residence las. i— dividend dec! area oner sollt-UP or 

Sloe* dlvtdand. I — dividend paid this rear, omlfted, deferred 

or no action taken of latest dividend meeting ft — dividend 

declared or paid mb year, on accumulative issue wftfi divi- 

dends In arrears, n — new Issue In the oast 52 week*. The man- 
low ronoe Begins wtin me stw» « inooma. no— nc*t dor 

delivery. P‘E — prlCOTeornlnas ratio, r — dividend declared 

or Paid In preceding 13 months, plus stock dividend, fl — Stock 

Split. Dividend scams with ante at sol it. sts — sales, t — dive 

aare Pall) in stock In pretadUvg % months, wiimated rnv. 

value on ex-awiaena or eA-disiriDuiian aaie. u — new reany 

hloh. v— Trading nailed, vi— In bankruaicyor receivership 

or feting roorgoMiod undri mo BonitrvPiev Act . or securities 

assumed w suai companies, wc — wnen aisfridviea wt— 

whan laved, ww— wlm warrants. »— e* -dividend or e«- 

rionn. »dlt — en^UsTrloutlon xw — wllnout Marrams. » — 

*«-dlvldvf*d ana sain In fvf i. yta — yield » — sales m lull 















Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1985 



PEANUTS 



BOOKS 


THE CITY OF JOY 


By Dominique Lapierre. Translated by 
Kathryn Spink. 464 pages. 517.95. 
Doubiedqy, 245 Park Avenue. New York, 
N. 7. 10167. 


[ a nWM *C IICU pr- - 

A aaad Nasar. iraaijUiec 


BLONDIE 


_TRS tS THE >NQB&T 
> PRESS^TMTON I'VE 
V . EVB 3 SEEN 


srwrEMB-rrs are 

^-55kCQW»LETa.V 

ABSURD* 


BUT, BOSS, VOU “TAUGHT 

ME EVBKVTMNS 

U- I KNOW 


>ir wa-w-BOnjAu-Y 
> rrooes we 

( ITS 60 00 

a- 1 TOtNTS *— 


Reviewed by Elisabeth Bumiller 

W ESTERN writers arc usually so horrified 
by Calcutta that they rarely get beyond 




ACROSS 

1 El ,Tex. 

5 Trickster's 
reaction 
9 Chocolate — 
cookie 

13 TV's Moran 

14 As gentle as 


16 Nothing, on the 
courts 

17 Fitzgerald or 
Raines 

18 Alegre, 

Brazil 



19 Uncork 

20 Treat 

22 Most recent 

24 Arabic letter 

25 Israel's Abba 


48 Molecule 
member 

49 Halloween 
visitor 

52 Receivers of 
treats 

56 Droughty 

57 Tex. shrine 

59 Took a cab 

60 Bagel or 
parkerhouse 

61 Caught 

62 Skip over 

63 To no avail 

64 Gets hitched 

65 Favored ones 


DOWN 



26 Font feature 

28 Rubicon 

(commit 

oneself) 

32 Trick 

34 Skiff need 

35 Ending with 
defend 

36 , ha ec, hoc 

37 Barge puller ‘ 

38 Deli bread 

39 Tricks 

44 Treats 

46 Mature 

47 Ringlet 


1 Banana 
discard 

2 Woody's son 

3 Door feature 

4 Having a spree 

5 Bring joy 

6 Reserved 

7 Tara 
instrument 

8Pt.orqt. 

9 Halloween 
visitors 

10 Well-traveled 

comedian 

11 Actor-singer 
Burl 


12 Immured 
15 Treat 


21 Contemporary 
of Bjorn 
23 Carefree life 

25 Writer Jong 

26 Raskolnikov's 
love 

27 Stage direction 

28 Natters 

29 Sum 

38 What a ghost 
might do 

31 Energy units 

32 Playwright 
Cotmelly 

33 Carapace 
'39 Plant disease 

40 For this reason 

41 Part of U.N. 

42 One of the 
Baalim 

43 Treat 
45 With 

mordancy 

48 Shah of 
Persia: 1903-25 

49 Delhi dress 

50 Exhort 

51 Runnel 

52 Treat 

53 “Tony 

Sinatra film 

54 Emulate 
Norman 
Cousins 

55 N.B.A. team 
58 Cardinal at 

Boston 


BEETLE BAILEY 



ANDY CLAPP 





r ilVEGOTTWIS 
OVSZPOWE»NG J 
>beSIR£TOG£T-< 
MESELF HOME... 


A rpSAU-RIGWT 
LAD, DON'T BAN H 
Si “ rT'U. RWSS - 


their own reactions. The city and its nriflions of 
poor are described from above, somet im es viv- 
idly and passionately, but almost always from 
a western frame of reference, in terms of 
population, rupees earned per day and causes 
of death. The descriptions often read as if the 
writer has visited a slum, collected s tati st ic s, 
then left That in rtsedf is n umb ing, which may 
be one reason why there are so few good books 
on a city that haunts and confuses nearly 
everyone it touches. Even the most complete 
study up until now, Geoffrey Moorhouse’s 
"Calcutta," treats the city’s idiosyncrasies as 
quaint, and in the process, condescends. 

“The Chy of Joy* breaks from tins tradition. 
Lapierre did not just visit the poor, he spent 
three years researching and living among the 
residents of one of the worst slams is one of the 
most impoverished cities cat earth — and he 
succeeds in describing the poor from their own 
pant of view. 

Until now, LapRsre has been the master, 
with bis co-author Larry Collins, of a heavy- 
breathing style of cot temporary history, turn- 
ing out the best-selling pa boilers “O Jerusa- 
lem,” “Is Paris Burning?" and "Freedom at 
Midnight." But now, working alone, be has 
turned away from Mahatma Gandhi, Lord 
Mountbatten and the historical figures who 
dominated the Indian fight for independence 
in “Freedom at Midnight" This book, focuses 
on heroes of another kind, the anonymous 
poor. It has also put him on the best-seller lists 
to France, Italy and Spain, and its trans la tion 
from French into English has been awaited in 
both the United States and India. 

“The Gty of Joy" makes fascinating the 
commonplace events in the lives of the poor— 
from bathing in the streets to the massaging of 
tobies to the (perhaps not as commonplace) 
the emasculation ceremony of a eunuch. Yet 


<0 JYetr Yorfc Times, edited by Eugene M alesho. 


WIZARD of ID 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



w/,mr 

OMVY&&&X 
9Z&AVL anum im 



and uncovers a nightmare of emotions and 
awful choices. 

Sclima, a desperate young mother, decides 
to sell her unborn 7-month-old fetus for use in 
a Western laboratory, even though die feds the 
abortion will be murder. “But then thine were 
other voices too *h*i haunted Sdt t na in the 
night,” writes Lapierre, “the familiar voices of 
her three other children crying out with ban- 


tu yj - j — : ; — a rcrai 

lives of the three 103x0 eb3 ? 3C A-*-ii'r and a 
a rich yoang American doctor anc a 

rations on hundreds of lepers in fo* ^ 

to find, when he comes n .that a 
carried off an arm, after 
with his family to find 
his fields hare been destroyed by drou^n J- 
Anand Nasar, three times the size of a foot f 
ball field, has “the densest. ConcOTtragonc^ 

g&.'s&V.'ISS 

makes alleys and shacks 'ntoialces of oM 
and excrement." Leprosy, tuberculosis, dysen- 
tery and hunger are rampant- 
Yet in themidst of this. Lapierre finds that 
people transcend their condition, becoming 
^models of humanity" who “know how to be 
zotaaat of affl creeds and castes, how to me 
respect to a stranger, how to show ctunty 
toward beggars, cripples, tepees and 
jn«w Here the weak were helped, not tram- 
pled upon.” . ■ 

But Lapierre sometimes owr-ramanu«zes 
foe strogoe of the poor (he continually refers 
to the dum as “foe Gty of Joy"), dummshmg 
their real pain and integrity. In one chapter, 
the priest sTrept awake at night by foe cries 
groans of a young Muslim boy dying of 
attcotubcreiitags part door. He takes the boy a 
vial of m nr p fri nft, but dairas^ find him so at 
peace — '^3'ow cotdd sucaserenity radiate t 
from that Sttfe martyred frame?" foe pnesi 

asks himself —that he decides there is n o need 

for foe painltfikr. Unless a miracle was occur- 
ring, tins sounds strange.. . 

At another point, Lapierre approvingly 
quotes the doctor's father as saying that “a 
ample smile can have as "inch value as all the 
dollars in foe worid.” One suspects the resi- 
dents of the Gty of Joy might disagree. 

Lament ha* also used tong paragraphs of 
translated interviews that are too slick and too 
dose to his own writing style to ring hue. It is 
mmsual to heir someone vino tow blood from 
the poor of Calcutta exclaim, “Holy macker- 
d P* or to hear a rickshaw paBer declare that “If 
you rf«nfc it's easy to get one' of these jalopies 
moving, you’ve gpt another think coming. 

Moreover, we are never told when the events 
m ‘The Gty of Jot" took place. There is a 
reference to foe 1976 American' Bicentennial, 
but 11Q Danes later Inffia is setting off its first 







AND YOU AGREED. 
TO IT* I CANT < 
BELIEVE YOU'D DO 
THAT TO ME' DO. 

you think i'm u 

crazy^ M 


RIGHT NOW, I'D WELCOME ) 
ANYTHING THAT WOULD J 
EXPLAIN WHAT YOU OtV 
TO OUR MARRIAGE IN THE 
LAST Few MONTHS, CLAUDt A? 



GGn □ Banna aaaa 
□DDE] HaOBB □□□□ 
Qnoo aaaaa naan 

sasaa aonaa 
ociHna □□□ aaa 
□Dan aaaaoa □□□ 
□EQnaniat3aQ3nnE33 
EES CJQBD130 3033 

oqs aaa □□□□□ 
bddbh aanaa 

nEQEaaEQQCKDaQ 

□□□□ Daman anna 
□can naane sacra 
□ebe aaaBE aaaa 


The sensation of floating between fiction 
and fact nukes die book less effective than it 
nn&d hare been. One of foe characters dies foe 
night of his daughter's wedding, after 


[^lvT'"^ r T^Uv7 : I>»*r I V.* 


■ have had more impact if the reader could be 
sure that it happened that von. ‘ 

Yet “The City of Joy” is fou of bask troths. 1 
Who can forget foe <tymg rickshaw puller sefl- 
ing his bones to a man too makes money fash 
exporting skeletons, or foe poor of Calcutta 
wadring foe body of a friend, aid weqridg 
during the riverbank cremation ceremony? 
Thu book cautains great lessons of resilience 
and dignity, and of what is realty important 
when life is pared down to its essence. .ft wiB 
make anyone a richer for having read ft. 


ESsabeA BtmdBer ft a Washington Past re* 
io/31/as porter based in New Delhi . 








--S - • 


j -asss 


i 












































:7^fM 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1985 


SPORTS 




Page 13 



At Halftime, NFL Finds Parity - With One Perfect Exception 







m 




>&***»■ 



was* 





01 i 



By Bob Oarcs 
Let Aagtia Ttma Scnm 
Lbs ANGELES — li «as ihe 
dud week of the National Football 


naii, Pittsburgh — are at 300 ox 
below. 

Ditka calk Chicago “a complete 
leant." The Los Angeles Rams are 


A lineup of the payers who have 
dominated so far this season: 


League season, and the Cfeigo 7- 1, mainly thanks to the leader* 
Bears were losu^ to the Minnesota ship of Coach John Robinson and a 


Most NFL observers are calling toward the ball before the pass gets ' *v> 

Eddie Brown. Cincinnati's wide re- there. Of course, it's still a penalty <$** 

cava, the rookie of the half-year, if he uses a hand to grab the recriv- 
At the University of Miami. Brown er at the same lime." It*s also a WaKii* £*• *• 


Wide ttemen: Dennis McKin- cavcr - UJC rootlc 01 ue Half-year, if he uses a hand to grab the recov- 
doh. Bans; Louis Lipps. Pitts- At the University of Miami, Brown er at the same lime." It*s also a 
burgh; Steve i-af g an , Seattle. and was P* 1 ^ 3 ? 5 *he most talented ath- penalty if he runs through the re- 


Vikings, 17-9, late in the third quar- 
ter. 

Quarterback Jim McMahon 
hadn’t beat seen. He had sal out 
the offensive practice during the 


big-play defense, but they're sot 
yet a complete team. 

□ 

The NFL's dominant character - 


Henry ElUrd. Rams. 

Tight end: Todd Christensen. 
Raiders. 

Offensive line: Jim Co\en, 


lete on a national championship ceivcr to uy for a deflection or 
team. He has made a fast transition interception. 


to the pros. Apart from Brown (and 
the Bears' touchdown-scoring Iine- 


The coaches of the half -v ear are 


Utic has been a balance of strength. Bears; Mike Kenn Atlanta; cLiss ' of 19g5 has ^ moM i v ^ 


man. William Pem). the rookie Duka and Robinson, Manv felt 


««*■*• rfamron To dale this season. 19 of the 28 Dwight Stephenson. MLunr. Chris aDDoiniine. 

kin.. ■ blithe how mmi^c aT HinfOA [ftaf i AnanncU- Anikei rr ^ 


Coach Mike Ditka was using mm au6s bavc paniv-range records or ninron, iMianapoiis; Anthony 

to make a potm to the ream: no 5-3. « or 3-5. ' M^Gncmaaii 

practice, no play. There are only three cellar fran- Quarterback: McMahon and 

. With litde more than a quarter ch ^ scs — Atlanta, Buffalo and O’Brien. 

left, Ditka swallowed his pride — Tam P a Bay — and only six teams Wmnmg backs: .\fcNeu; James 

the practicc-is-beamiful lesson U1lh «oord& of 6-2 or better, Wilder. Tampa Bay; Tony Doreen, 

would have to be aught another znxag them the New York Jets. Dgas, and Marcus AEen. Raiders. 

way, an t h er day — and sent his tbe ^“Prise team of the American Defensive line: Howie Long, 

truant into the mime. Conference East Raiders; Bill Maas, Kansas City; 


Robinson couldn't do it with his 
current offense: many thought 




dubs have parity-range records of Hinton, Indianapol.s; Anthony ^ do i oSod 

5-3 4-4 or 3-5 ' Mirace, Gndnnati Dieter Brock of the Rams, a CFL cwi‘d nwr do it, penoo. 

There are only three cellar fran- Quarterback: McMahon and refugee who at 34 is the oldest lad ' El 

_ Atlanta. Bnffalo and O’Brien. in the league, will be the all-rookie ues to foot bis enna. At Miam, 

Tampa Bav — and only six teams fonang bocks: McNeil; James quarterback. He's doing better doms 11 WIlh 

wTwcof* of 6-2 « baler, WiUer, Tempa Bey; Tony Dorsat, to some Boffeto to bended *e toStor aadi of ihe 


fcjR-at&u 

mj*H- ■■ 

I friap 

saw <****■ 


way, another day — and sent his 
truant into the game. 

McMahon’s rest play was a long 
pass for a touchdown. His second 
play was a long pass for a touch- 
down. 

When be threw for a third TD, 
the Bears had convened probable 
defeat into a 33-24 victory. 

Thai performance was the most 
spectacular so farm the NFL's reg- 
ular season, which is eight weeks 
old and has eight weeks Left. Since 
McMahon's big Bight, things 
haven't been the same: 

• Chicago, winner of eight in a 
row under Ditka, has jumped past 
San Francisco, Miami, Dallas and 
the Los Angeles Raiders to become 
pro football's top team. 

For the first time since the days 
of George Halas, the Bears are 
what Halas made them 50 years 
ago, the intimidating Monsters of 
the Midway. 

• McMahon Js the NFL’s new 
star. During two months of win- 
ning, the free-spirited passer has 
caught up with such notables as 
Dan Marino, Joe Montana, Walter 
Payton, Eric Dickerson and Mar- 
cus Allen. 

McMahon has dearly been the 
most valuable player of the first 
half of the season. 

• Most other teams are laboring. 
A half-dozen hopefuls for Super 
Bowl XX — ’San Francisco. Wash- 
ington, Seattle; Su Louis. Cincm- 


than some Buffalo has benched ihc 

NFL's No. 1 draft choice, defen- The dark horses for coach of the 
she end Bruce Smith. The top- ^ New Jeroy — J°« ^ 


M 


In the 1980s. no club has been Leonard Marshall, die New York 
able zo win two straight Super Giants, and Mark Gastinca u , Jets. 
Bowls. The champion San Francis- Liwhactes: Mike Singletary, 
co 49ers. 18-1 last season, are cur- Bears; Andre Trppeti, New £n- 
rentlv 4-4. gla nd ; Mark Brown. Miami - Jim 


renuy 4-4. giano; Mara Brown, mui 

“The players are about even ev- Collins, Rams; Chip Ban 
erywherc,** said Ditka. “It's the op- Clay Matthews, Clevela nd , 
port unities — the breaks — that Defensive backs Gary 


si Bffl Maas, Kansas Ciiv; drafted back, Ethan Honon. hasn't JJ" jj *** Jcls and Bai parcf,ls 01 
d Marshall the New York d 01 * much for Kansas City, nor weu’ams. 
and Mark Gastineau Jets, has his lineman counterpart, Allan- The candidates for most valu- 

wkm: Mike £ ta'sBih FraUc. * ' &[*"*. qu ?«5«f i * “ 0 

aZZI t LZZ,. n with McMahon far ahead of Man- 

nl^?** 1 **-' ** r /-v_ I w no and Denver’s John Dway, who, 

Mark Brown. Miami; Jim One major rule change made uirn ri« n »iv tv-oinnino t* rr«w 


game. “There's a lot less pass inter- na ,^ 

< " J XT' C.b..L. u _ v~*r_ 


* po^^ties - ihe brcate — thai Dde*^ tackE Gaij Grren. ference," said Norm Schachter a McNlahon remains the top-rated 9 
■- passer in the National ConSence. fj 


that’s what the difference.'* 

Is there anything dse? 

An executive of one 300 team 
gives a terse summation of the NFL 
today: “The players are equal. The 
coaches aren’t.'’ 

He contends that the playing tal- 
ent has been so evenly divided that 
most clubs have playoff potential 
They all spend S 500,000 or More in 
each «inmi draft; they all build 
with the best material in coDege 
football 

The difference each week, be 
says, comes from coaches who can 
get that talent to play with the most 
intensity and concentration. 

At halftime 1985, only three 
imitk — Dallas, Denver mn/ ^ the 
Raiders — are winning the way 
they were expected to. AJ] are 6-2. 

The only race with three winners 
is in (he AFC East, where the Jets, 
with a great runner in Freeman 
McNeil and a promising quarter- 
back in Ken O'Brien, lead Miami 
and New En gland, both 5-3. 


gland; Kenny Easley, Seattle, and likes »h»i They hated to see (he 


Wes Hopkins. Philadelphia. 



u«s mat. iney oaiea to see me bui he has also been impressive Wf ■ • 

offensive team pick, up a cheap 40 otherwise 

or 50 yards when the defensive McMahon is, above all a leader W* f? W&£^- 
back barely made contact with the ^ a fiIie a|h]e!e _ ^ V ; 

receiver. frozen shores of Lake Michigan — „• . 

“The receiver and the defensive where passing specialists often L niUmjlffliitot/ ' ' 
back both have the same right to a have trouble — that may make a * 

ball in the air this year — provided difference for the Bears for the next Ballcarrier Freeman McNeil 
lh, dtfnto back turns his beui 10 years. ... A mainstay for he Jen. 


SCOREBOARD 

Football 

Midseason National Football League Leaders 


Mew England 

Jim McMahon: The new star, ptm***** 



fttfritf - fflttftrtTif lir 





SIS, 

Vasduoi^ 


SIGHT UP THERE — Manute Bol, Wasiungton’s 7- 
foot-6 (Z29-meter) rookie, oofleaped Oeveiand center 
Mel Tdzpin to pttD down d»k second-half rebotmd 
help spark the Bullets* 97-90 NBA victory Tuesday nipht. 


“ 1 w ° 1 inOJanaoofln 

. ‘ ■' — Kamos City 

— SPORTS BRIEFS — _ Nordiques Defeat Ccuiadiens ” 

20-Kilometer Cyding Mark Reported co^m ow ^ Du/xud** — — — 1 ■ - ■■■■■'■ were Boston, los Angles, wash- 

MOSCOW (AF) — Cyclist Andrei Slepanoy set a world reemd at the _ QUpfC — It’s bad enough NHL FOCUS ington and Hartford. c*£o£ 

national cycling championships late Tuesday by a wri ri g 20 kilometers froi ° Montreal Ganadien point The Nordiques. who went ahead 

K/2.4 miles) in 24 muuites; 41.197 seconds, Tass reported. - of view to lose to provincial rival that the Nordiques are in first place on Dale Hunter’s first period pew- inotonapaifci 

T Stepanov's time bettered the mark of 24:52*3 set in April 1983, by Quel* 6 - What’s worse is knowing in the National Hockey League's er-play goal (the 16th given up bv ST* c,fv 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE ( 

TDOfll OMmm 

Vords Rum Pol* MCMOhon. CM. 
MiomJ 3041 854 31*7 Moorono, S.F. 

San DNOO 2 971 677 7394 Mnwonkl. Pull. 

Denver 2815 1038 1777 Sinum. Worn* 

Qncumotl 7773 M3 1819 Hippie, Del. 

Jet* 3713 1338 1474 Brock. Ram* 

Cleveland 2Af0 1228 1482 Lon*a*. STJ_ 

Seattle 2*44 8W 17*4 Kramer. Minn. 

Holders 3*38 944 16*2 D.Wwlt. Dali. 

New Enotond 2*34 *71 l**3 DeBera. T.E. 

PtttmuTDh 2*28 101* 1*13 Dlckev. C.B 

matanapolll 2320 1231 128* D.WIIsen. NO. 

Kansu CHv 23*7 *73 1*92 *«*wr. All. 

Buffalo 2213 735 1518 Thsfsmnn. Wsh. 

Houston 2071 813 1258 


Ovomroacia 
ATT COM YDS TD INT 
211 127 1705 12 7 

257 1*0 183* 13 * 

L 178 100 131* 8 3 

I 2*3 14* 2100 13 10 

109 98 14*0 9 7 

713 179 1514 7 10 

254 13* 1711 10 * 

l 283 1*1 1*35 12 13 

2*4 IS* 1799 9 12 

2** 149 ie55 14 1* 

19* ** 1231 10 12 

£1* 113 1531 10 13 

125 70 E34 3 8 

0. 23* 133 1351 5 13 


J [World Cup Soccer 
European Qualifying 

CROUP 1 

> T Aloanla I. Greece t 
7 Pinal SMMMM: Poland. Beloiuml; * (bo- 

* nip. Greece 4. 

3 Ptrtond advances to final*. Belgium foaio, 

10 me Nettie nano* for Nncls Derm. 

to GROUP « 

* Soviet Union I.NdrworOiSDvielunicned- 
13 vonces io llnoisj. 


Soviet compatriot Mikhail Sveshmkov. 


5“JS PGA ^ Up » $2 MOhm Bonus Pool 


Adams Division while the proud Montreal ihic season), doublet! 


wm'***# 






Pa"> on Vdfjsfc NEW YORK (AP) — An annual S2 nuDidn bonus pool for PGA tour 

; a icsi o( Prarii golfers highlights a package announced late Tuesday. ' 

: The Vantage Cup will offei'a pool of 12 nnffion for the tcy 25 finishers 

-. dei'ratedtteJiBiB “a bonuvpomtscorapetiri(raat40seJectedtbm-eve3itr r prizes'wfflnB^ 
its fintpsfc S500-v00 for the overall winner to $10,000 for the 25th man. __ 

," ■'lKTvjmtPsrrz: The PGA also announced a companion program , the Nabisco Chal- 

p,-.. c^idulat h E l ra SC. in which the tour and thc company will donate SI nuUion each to 

' vota. ITuKac ' (X ^ charities that benefit from the 40 sdected tounmneuts. Those 
4 ^ Vantage Cup events will sdect five^naa teams to represent them on the 
*'• tour - Gtalknge awards to tomnament charities vnU be based on the 

■' -.I, j. ittmndfc bonus poinis accumulated by eadt of the teams.' 

,fe Pitcher Andajar Suspended 10 Days 

it iidvRraOf NEW YORK (AP) — Sl Louis CanEnal pitcher Joaquin Andqarwill 
“ Ltl U > miss the first 10 dags of the 1986 season under a suspension imposed late 

- Guos' psk Tuesday by Commissioner Peter UAerroth for the ri^it-hander’s out- 
— ■ - j federal saif ■ ^*ursi against American League umpire Don Derikroger in Sunday’s 
... ,f ,j. e yeventh game of ihe Worid Saies. 

f “Such actions are damaging to the game and cannot be tolerated,'* said 
. Hj it fpjjjusc: Udierroth in annotmiring that he was fining Amfagar $500, the maximum 
^ 4 as “ihefB* 1 “nowrt.be inqxMe. Andujarwfll not be paid while under su^enrion. 


^tudyltap 


i ■ s. Cobb®**' 


Tyx Andvgar was ejected in the fifth inning erf Sunday’s game m Kansas 
: T ^ ty ” won ^ the Royals 11-0, after he charged Denkmger to argue over 

“ .'•itoMfkP the umpire's baD and strike calls. 




L effeWSp ujg umpire d dou oziu auiab um 

, ^ . eM pafc Injured Soviet Gymnast Ontfor a Year P 

m 1 MONTREAL (UPI) — Dmitri Bilozerchev, the Soviet Union’s top 

- • : die dlew** male gymnast, will be out of competitive action for ckse to a year after . 

breakmg his left leg, a Soviet official said Tuesday. Bflpzadwv, 18, was 
- Hnoek injured in an automobile accident near Moscow an OdL 13. 

Bilozerchev, who won the all-round world title two yens ago and is the 
1985 European champion, had been the Russians’ main hope for the 
world championships, which begin in Montreal on Monday. 



Canadiens are last. 


their lead at 2:05 of the second Miami 


During the regular season last when rookie Mike Eagles broke in ^Smaa 
year, the Canadiens lost only one with Brent Ashton on a two-on-one sm encod 
game to the Nordiques, winning six break and beat Penney on a high 
• and tying one. The teams have met slapshot from the faceoff circle. a 

twice so far this year, and the Nor- Goulet tallied 44 seconds later, EWfaoa Clrv 

- diques-have won both games. and then Paul. GLULs picked up his Four*, s n 
Michel Goulet, who missed most ^ rdmumi and flipped it past 
of the preseason and the first five iWy-wbo failed to smother the 


Tun Defence 

Yarn* Rumh Pau 
217* 808 13*8 
2252 712 1540 
2297 798 1499 
2313 835 1478 
2317 930 1387 
2447 89* 154* 
2589 *81 1*08 
2*23 *44 1*79 
2*99 974 1725 
2735 1208 1577 
2*10 1172 1788 
3*74 12*4 1710 
309* *1* 2180 
3178 1081 2097 


RHMn 

ATT YDS AVG LG TD 


Basketball 
NBA S tanding s 


Riees, Ail. 

ITS 

759 

43 

33 

3 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 


Dor ten. Dali. 

151 

747 

49 

60 

4 


Atlantic Division 




wilder, Ta. 

18* 

735 

3.9 

24 

5 


W 

L PCI. 

GB 

Pavtan. Oil. 

134 

*52 

4.9 

2* 

* 

Washington 

2 

0 

1800 

_ 

Tvter. S.F. 

10* 

55* 

S3 

3* 

2 

Boston 

1 

1 

300 

1 

Riggins, win. 

130 

£53 

43 

51 

6 

Philadelphia t 

1 

300 

1 

Andersn. 5t.l_ 

IBS 

48* 

44 

38 

4 

New Jersey 

I 

2 

333 

!•- 

Crolo. S.P. 

99 

45* 

u 

*3 

« 

New York 

D 

3 

300 

2 

Morris. Giants 

115 

441 

JJ 

17 

5 


Central Division 




£ Jack six. phi. 

128 

437 

34 

2* 

0 

Chicago 

1 

0 

1300 




Roeehrors 




Indiana 

1 

0 

1300 

1 


NO YDS AVG 

LG 

TD 

Detroit 

2 

1 

4*7 

1 

Hill. DalL 

47 

*70 

143 

4* 

4 

Milwaukee 

3 

t 

467 

1 

Craig. SJF. 

44 

590 

12JI 

73 

5 

Atlanta 

1 

7 

333 

3 

Loftaa GJB. 

48 

£21 

153 

34 

2 

Cleveland 

0 

3 

300 

3 


Quarterback* 


BJohrtson, ah. 
J.BOIk T.B. 
Jordan, Minn. 


ATT COM YDS TD INT Casble. Dolt 


40 508 12J 

3* 4*0 1IJ 

39 44* 1M 

37 44* 1X1 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Dlvbion 

Denver 3 0 UM 

Houston 7 I j6t 


games of the current campaign be- 
cause of a contract squabble, led 


initial shot 


UiG Way UCXw X UCaU&y UlgUL, UCiUllg n j- 

his fifth and sixth goals of the year Perron. Our goal lending 
as Quebec subdued Montreal 64. basnt been up to par tins season. 


never been away. *Tm happy with 
my play,” he said. "I think I'm 
starting to skate better. On my 
goals 1 had good opportunities and 
I made the right snots. 


y with state and deflected past goalie 
ik I'm Mario Gosselin. 


my way of heUping the team," said year for a 5-1 lead. S^kToSl 6 

Goulet, who has scored at least 50 After Goulet made it 6-1 just IS winder, d«u 
goals for the past three seasons, seconds into the third period, the PoJlcir0 - pm - 
“It's fun to be back. And scoring Canadiens stormed back on goals 
fifty goals is certainly an objective from Serge Boisvert, Tom Kurvers Rfl 

agmn." ' and Guy Carbcwmeau wilhin an 1 1- siaowrm.pi 

Goulet’s first tally cam: in the minute span. b*h, b«h. 

midst of the Nordiques' four-goal Goal tender Gossdin. who had sIS. 

outburst in the second period. He an assist on Eagles's score, remains cmnon. mio. 
picked up a loose puck in from of unbeaten with a 6-0-1 record. £*"«■ ^ 
the Montreal net, and with goal- But the victory wasn't without New30 ^*^ 1 | 
tender Sieve Penney off balance, cost: Quebec right wing WUf Paie- Nj*oor*. mid 
backhanded a shot off the far goal- meat sustained a kidney injury late sc 

post in the second period and will miss 


Esktson. Cln. 

214 

127 

1571 

14 

7 

Spagnota Phlt. 


34 438 122 

35 3 

Dallas ! 1 J00 lVt 

Fouls. SJ3. 

183 

105 

14*3 

12 

7 

Wilder. T.B. 


34 220 4,1 

17 0 

Son Antonio 1 I SCO I'.g 

Herrmann, SJ3. 

126 

85 

1048 

* 

7 

Monk, Warn. 


35 300 85 

31 

1 0 

Sacramento 0 2 JXX3 2te 

□ ‘Brian. Jets 

222 

731 

1*29 

8 

5 

Scaring (Touchdowns) 



Utah 0 3 000 2'.s 

Danielson, Clev. 

139 

85 

1034 

* 

5 



TO Rush Rec Ret Pi* 

Pacific Division 

Mortno. Mid. 

301 

100 

2098 

13 

10 

Crala, S.F. 


11 

t 5 

0 

M 

L-A. Clippers 3 0 1JKM — 

Kenney. K.C 

231 

119 

1707 

10 

7 

Payton. Chi. 


8 

4 2 

0 

48 

l~A. Lakers 2 0 1.000 'a 

Krleo. Sea. 

2*» 

147 

1887 

17 

13 

McKinnon. Oil. 


7 

0 7 

0 

42 

Portland 2 I a*7 1 

Malone. Pitt. 

220 

114 

1411 

13 

7 

Dickerson. Rams 


« 

t 0 

o 

3* 

Phoenir 0 1 JXH 2!t 

Elwoy. Den. 

2*0 

152 

1900 

12 

9 

Dorset), DalL 


* 

4 7 

0 

3* 

Seattle 0 2 JK0 21a 

Moon. Hou. 

1*0 

101 

130* 

7 

* 

J-Jones. Der. 


* 

4 2 

0 

M 

Goiaen Store 0 3 mo 3 

Wilson, Raider* 

152 

72 

1053 

5 

5 

Riggins, Wash. 


4 

* 0 

0 

3* 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 

Panel, tna. 

203 

100 

1202 

6 

8 

Brown, Minn, 


5 

3 2 

0 

30 

New York 21 23 21 22— 87 

Eason. N.E. 

174 

8* 

1144 

4 

11 

CoHman, GB. 


5 

0 5 

0 

30 

Atlanta 27 30 24 21—102 

Perrogam. BH. 

2*4 

142 

150 

5 

1* 

Giles. T.B. 


5 

0 5 

0 

30 

D.WlIklns 8-2* to 22. wlnman 7-11 1-2 15; 


Rushers 




Scaring (Kkklrol 



walker 11-2) &-9 28. Ewing 4-15 7-10 19. Re- 


ATT YDS 

AVG LG 

TD 



PAT 

FG 

LO PTS 

bounds: New York 44 f Ewing 101. Atlanta *0 

McNeil, jets 

156 

79* 

5.1 

69 

2 

Butler. Chi. 


27-27 

14-20 

40 

75 

{D.WlIklns 13). assWi: New York 15 (Spar- 

Allen. Raiders 

174 

708 

4.1 

20 

7 

Andersen, NX). 


1*-17 

15-18 

£5 

*1 

row 7). Atlanta 21 (Williams 0). 

Warner. Sea 

143 

*32 

A4 

23 

5 

Sent len. Doll. 


23-23 

12-20 

53 

59 

Washington 24 23 2* 27—97 

Mack. Clev. 

119 

5*3 

43 

61 

4 

Lucknurst, AH. 


16-1* 

14-1* 

S3 

58 

Cleveland 22 24 13 31—90 

Bell. BuK. 

141 

537 

3.1 

IB 

4 

Murray, Dei. 


le-17 

13-1* 

50 

55 

will terns 8-13 1-0 17. Rovnuftefd 7-10 3-3 17. 

Byner. Clev. 

123 

484 

3.9 

36 

5 

McFoddcn. Pull. 


12-12 

13-15 

52 

51 

Ruland 3-4-8-11 14. Vcilone 6-152-2 14; Free8-1E 

CJames. N.E. 

105 

484 

4* 

AS 

3 

Atkinson. Giants 


14-15 

10-15 

49 

50 

7-824. Hinson 0.151-213. Rebounds: Washing- 

Brooks. Cln. 

10* 

471 

4A 

33 

5 

igwcoulice. TJl. 


17-18 

11-15 

51 

SO 

ton *3 (Rulond 13). Cleveland 50 (Hinson 12). 

winder. Den. 

122 

471 

19 

42 

0 

Lons tor a. Roms 


19-19 

10-13 

52 

49 

Assists: Washington 34 (Ruland*I.Cievelond 

Pollard, pm. 

101 

449 

44 

19 

1 

OTtenoWHie. SU_ 


19-19 

10.11 

4* 

49 

22 (Davtl 8). 







Punters 




1—A. Lakers 78 10 3* 30—133 

Receivers 





NO YDS LONG AVG 

DoUos 34 35 3t 15— IIS 


NO YDS 

AVG LG 

TD 

Buford. Chi. 


3* 

1553 

*9 

457 

worthy 9-12 3-4 21, AaoukJcObar 9-14J.J 2C . 

Chrlirrrtn. Ran 

48 

581 

12.1 

48 

3 

Lonoeta. Giants 


35 

1593 

48 

455 

Aguirre 11-22 34 25. NlmohlusO-14 4-7 20. Re- 

Stallworth. Pin. 

43 

493 

115 

27 

3 

Saxon, DalL 


3* 

1497 

57 

44 J) 

bounds; Los Angeles 78 l Green id). Dallas 43 

Ball, BuH. 

43 

350 

8.1 

28 

1 

Colemon. MUm. 


3* 

1574 

*2 

417 

(Nlmphius81. Assists: Los Angetes 35 1 Coo- 

Nathan. Mia. 

41 

410 

KM 

73 

0 

Block. Dei. 


37 

1*0* 

57 

43A 

per id, Delias 29 iDavIs *). 

Largenl, Sea. 

29 

585 

150 

40 

4 

Punt Returners 



PBUodelPOIa 10 38 23 28-117 

Clarion. Mia. 

3* 

S» 

11* 

45 

1 

NO 

YDS 

AVG 

LG 

TO 

Milwaukee 12 31 21 25—119 

James. &0. 

3* 

457 

11J 

*0 

2 

El lard. Rams 

15 

250 

IA2 

80 

1 

Pnessev 12-I* 4-e 28, Moncrie* *-I3 5-e 73. 

Snuler. jets 

37 

414 

11J 

29 

1 

Jenkins, wsh. 

12 

IH 

125 

28 

0 

Malone 8-135-721. Barkley 9-1*2-721, E rving fe- 

Newsome. Clew. 

35 

373 

107 

33 

3 

Mangier. Del. 

IS 

233 

!U 

*3 

1 

ll 7-7 19. Rebounds: Philadelphia *4 (Barkley 

N Moore. Mia 

34 

431 

12.7 

W 

4 

J .Smith. St.L. 

14 

1*1 

1L5 

31 

0 

12), Milwaukee 3* 1 Cum minus 10>. Assists: 

Scaring fTovcbdownsl 



Stanley, G.B. 

It 

118 

107 

15 

0 

Philadelphia 2* i Cheeks 81. Milwaukee 32 


Goulet: ‘It’s fun to be back.' O ther winners Tuesday night at least one game. 


ft rff* M* V- 


zsISES', ■ 


(AP. UPI) Allen, Raiders 
Brook*. CM. 


Vijay Amritraj: India’s Once and Future Tennis Hope 




. ■ t»„ tT-ih Gimie “You have to be a member cf a dub or a school 

Ttefs v*y it’s very diffioxlt for us tocompeit" 
NEW YOWC-^tdd^^ur ^i^th^an^^ 

_ resigned as captam of the United States Daws Cup 

“am, Indian tennis star Vijay Amriing just shook his 14 w* AnanH 


» a . wepioreaju Doysunaerineageoi we./uiaiKi 

V:; "‘ , . ' _ „ . - ■ . . and m^df, played with all of them, then picked the 

* can t imdastand it, said Amptrg, refeiT^g to best eight— three from Bombay, one from New Delhi, 


icking' 


the U.S. Davis Cap squad, not to Ashe s resig nat ion. one from Hyderabad i 
“How can you not have your best players piaymg for “Basically we’ve ta 
yourcountiyT moved them’tp Madia 

- With John McEnroe and Timmy Connors - Amen- two Americans and o 
ca's top players —not on the team, the United States Amritny s’ hometown. 


“We picked 30 boys under the age of!4. We, Anand 
and my^df, played with all of than, then picked the 
best eight — three from Bombay, one from New Delhi, 
one from Hyderabad and three from Madras. 

“Basically, we’ve taken over their entire lives. We 
moved them to Madras, where we have three coaches, 
two Americans and one Indian." Madras also is the 


. «(i*? was dinunaied bv West Germany in this year’s Davis The hopefuls are boused, and their diets and physi- 
. • —j: * tl,nin l Li-fl* 1 Cup quarterfinals. cal training are watched as closely as their tennis. 

. “It's sudi an hewor to play for your eodntty," said “Most important, their education is nw being neglect- 

o:.sr.."J ri ' r -f Amritnd, the captain of India's Davis Cup team and a cd ^_^™ itr ^ 531 „ . . . _ , 

Unlike the UnilKiSl^s. India fllwaysijeldsjK best 

:-■* ent-and those it does have are ^getting older. I4^nd-under players because it 

..... This year. India's Davis Cup squad was made up of them three years to get ready for the junior 

- v: r u ( ’ ffi! “ Amrilraj, who will lam 32 in December: his brother {tournament for boys at] Wimbledon. Their only com- 
Anand. 33; Shashi Menon, 33, and Ramerii Krishnan, 
i “ |,L te® the youngest at 24 and ranked 31st in the world. 

:v ■' VJ rU l1i ip With Vijay and Anand Amritrq on tbe ieam, India 
•• ' i # W T*** 1 the cup final in 1974, defeating the Soviet 
Lrtrerv:- Union and Australia, But India boycotted the final 



Pal Be, Jet* 
Turner. Sea. 
Broer. Ciev. 
Mack. Clev. 
winder. Den. 
Ben, BuH. 
Hill. Hou. 


K arils. Den. 
Revel*. Mia 
Breecn, Cln. 
Leahy. Jets 
La»*rv. ICC. 
2endelas. Hou. 
Anaersan. Pin. 
Franklin. N.E. 
Aileare. ina 
Bahr, RoWers 


TD Rush Rec Rer Pis 

* 0 8 1 54 

S 8 7 1 0 48 

■ I 3 0 48 

8 A 2 0 48 

8 0 8 0 48 

* 5 10 3* 

* 4 2 0 36 

* * 0 0 3* 

S 4 1 0 30 

5 0 5 0 30 

Scoring (Kkkktgl 

PAT FG La Pis 
20-23 17-74 48 71 

24-S4 13-15 43 *3 

2A-27 12-14 53 63 

18-19 13-11 S3 57 
1*-1* 13-15 58 55 

L 13-14 14-18 50 55 

t. 20-30 11-19 48 53 

17-17 11-14 SO 50 
17-18 10-16 41 47 

I 23-24 8-14 41 47 


Kickoff Returners 
NO YDS AVG 


ecu It, Oil. 
Rhymes. Mna 
Martin. NX>. 
Austin, AIL 
Monroe. S.F. 


384 29J 

5*3 Tab 
298 248 

433 74.1 

423 23J 


Hockei 

8 

NHL Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T Pts GF GA 


» PhiioaeMhia 
S3 NY Rargers 
*3 Washington 
47 ny islanders 
47 New Jersey 



Poolers 




PinsDuron 

3 

4 

2 

8 

34 

37 


NO YARDS LONG 

AVG 


Adams Division 




Stork, tnd. 


35 

1*25 

*8 

4*4 

Quebec 

8 

t 

1 

17 

43 

28 

Roby. Mia. 


29 

1771 

*3 

454 

Boston 

* 

2 

I 

IS 

42 

22 

Camarilla, kje. 


51 

22*3 

75 

44 A 

Buffalo 

5 

3 

1 

» 

37 

35 

MClnalty. Cln. 


33 

1447 

55 

417 

Horn are 

5 

4 

8 

10 

38 

38 

Norman, Den. 


45 

19*4 

*1 

414 

Montreal 

4 

s 

0 

8 

35 

45 

Pnl Returners 



CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 



NO 

YDS 

AVG 

LG 

TD 


Norris Division 




LKxtt, Pin. 

13 

189 

IAS 

*2 

1 

Minnesota 

3 

4 

2 

B 

41 

3* 

Walker. Rodrs 

23 

28* 

1X4 

3* 

0 

St. LMIs 

3 

4 

1 

7 

2* 

03 

Frvar, n^. 

21 

235 

11J 

85 

1 

Chicago 

3 

5 

1 

7 

3* 

39 

Wllinlte. Den. 

13 

139 

10.7 

18 

0 

Toronto 

J 

7 

0 

2 

27 

3* 

Springs, Jets 

13 

137 

10.5 

40 

0 

Detroit 

0 

1 

1 

1 

22 

58 

KteKoH Returmrs 




Satvtbe Division 





NO 

YDS 

AVG 

LG 

TD 

Edmonton 

7 

1 

0 

14 

41 

33 

Tasker. Hou. 

17 

447 

3*J 

52 

0 

Winnipeg 

5 

3 

t 

11 

45 

41 

Martin, Cln. 

24 

588 

MS 

42 

0 

Vancouver 

4 

4 

2 

10 

39 

3* 

V Johnsn. Dn. 

12 

293 

24 A 

3* 

0 

Caloarv 

4 

5 

0 

8 

44 

31 

Stamna N.E. 

21 

400 

213 

53 

D 

La* Angeles 

e 

8 

a 

4 

31 

53 

D. Wilson, Bit 

10 

231 

23.1 

32 

0 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 




IPressev 12). 

G LG TD Seattle IS 27 17 37— 99 

LS 99 1 Houston 2* 29 3* 20—111 

J 55 0 Samasan 8- 138-10 24, Llovo 7-7 3-4 17 ; Cnam ■ 

18 49 o tiers 8-17 4-5 21, McDaniel 8-15 4< 20 Be- 
ll 94 I bounds: Seattle 31 (Cnamaers 10). Houston 14 

L5 40 0 [Sampson. Olajuwan 12). Assists: Seottte 21 

(Slkma 5), Houston 36 (Lucas 7) 

, Offltl 28 29 24 31—112 

Son Antonio 13 33 2* 33—124 

Robertson 9-17 5-5 23. MUChell 9-22 4-4 22; 
Dantiev 11-18 8-10 30. Bailoy 8-1* 5-5 21 Re- 
boaottl : Ulafi 37 (Oonller Sl, 5on Anlwuo 57 
(Greenwood 20). Assists : Utah ?7 i Hansen 61. 
San Antonie 2* (Swndvald *). 

New Jersey 39 27 30 21—107 

CK Detroit 35 27 30 32—124 

Tnoucka 8-1* 11-13 27. Laimaeer 8-14 8-1 1 2 a 
IS GF GA Long 8-12 8-8 24. Birdsong 17-21 2 4 27. Wll- 

12 36 21 110ms *-14 7-10 19. Reaoandi: New jersev 49 

10 31 2r (wlllloim 131. Detroit *1 lLalmeeer. CwrelOfl 
10 34 * HI- Assists: New Jersey 22 tRicnardson 8>. 

9 31 30 Do! roll 25 (Thomas 101. 

> 33 35 Denver 43 31 43 26—142 

8 34 37 Phoenix 18 44 12 23—127 

English 11-74 13-1* 34. Evans 9-17 4-4 73. 
17 43 28 Nance 8-136-1 322. JOfiet 7-8 5-6 19 Redound*: 

13 42 23 Denver 70 1 Rasmussen *1. Pneent, J9 I Land - 


Portland 30 31 23 29—113 

I— A. Clippers 71 29 12 37—119 

Smith 13-30 4-328. Edwards 7- 1 7 3-3 17. Bow- 
ie 10-183-4 23, vanaeweg ne 6-174-s i*. Drenlcr 
7-18 2-2 1 A Rebounds: Portlond 57 (Bowie III. 
Los Angeles 56 < Donaldson I3i Assists: Port- 
land 34 1 Dresler 10), Los Angeles 35 1 Edwards 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


. 

il? 

.si’ 

*• 

V 


Anand, 33; Shashi Menon, 33, and Ramedi Kri^mn, tnitment to us is that if they become good enough, they 
the youngest at 24 and ranked 31st in the worid. must play Davis Cup for India." 

With Vijay and Anand Amritraj on tbe ieam, India In orferfor BAT — Britannia Amritraj Tennis — to 
did reach the cup final in 1974, defeating the Soviet become a reality, the Indian government also had to 
Union and Australia. Bill India boycotted the final give its approval, since the boyswill be admitted to ihe 

against South Africa because of the Smith African -oentral school in Madras. 

government's apartheid racial policy. " . “They will ;be studying what they want to achieve 

In 1986, India ^ain wHl be-inthe 16-nation worid and what their parents want them to achieve," Amn- 
group, which comprises' the only countries actually traj said. “Wc will give them all the opportunity. They 
competing for the cup. wfll be in special classes, and instead of attending 

“Whenever I play wdi. I figure the future of India's games periods m the school they wfll be coming bade 
Davis Cup team is in good shape," Amrilraj said., early to the foundation to play tennis for at least three 
“Then, when I lose a match I should'have won* or lofourliours in the afternoon." 


w hen I play poorly. I worry about the future of the Known Tot his gentlemanly behavior on and off the 

team." • ’ court, Amritraj hopes to instill the same attributes in 

■ h was that worry that led Amrilraj andhis brothers, bis charges. . * 

Anand and Ashok, to form a tennis training academy "Weare emphasizing the importance of berngm the • 

hi Madras, India. . . public eye. When I walk out on the court, evnyone ? 

“1 started to dnnlc about rq>ladng tnysdf on. the knows Tm from India. What I do, and the way l act. 
tp^r n w Raid Amritraj, who once was ranked in the 1 PP‘ reflccti on tS\ Indians." • > 

20 woridvwde. “There are no public, tennis courts in - Hence, court deportment wiH be stressed as much as .4 

India — nothing available for’ the average person to go tennis strokes. "And,” Amrirr^ said, "they will not be 
lo pla^. allowed to have long hair or to put on torn jeans.” 




S .*-.,4# -.?* 


Vijay Amritraj, gentleman and teacher. 



Teem OHense 
Yards 

Rush 

Dallas 

3123 

977 

Chicago 

30*5 

127* 

Giants 

!®48 

1038 

San Franaseo 

2867 

1171 

St. Louis 

2710 

104* 

Tampg Bey 

2535 

790 

Green Bov 

2530 

10*2 

Atlanta 

2310 

105* 

Minnesota 

200 

*58 

Wash Ionian 

2491 

130* 

New Orleans 

2429 

•24 

Philadelphia 

2357 

800 

Rams 

2314 

1000 

Detroit 

2251 

799 


Team Dtteaw 
Ygrds 

Rush 

Giants 

2045 

751 

washi notan 

2213 

824 

Ram 

239* 

7*5 

PtiiBdelpnlo 

2380 

1072 

Chicogo 

2445 

*39 

□anas 

3523 

772 

San Francisco 

2*0* 

1015 

81. Louis 

9713 

1319 

Minnesota 

2771 

1101 

Green Bov 

2844 

1077 

New Orleans 

2907 

TM1 

Tanrao Bov 

2932 

1092 

Detroit 

3434 

1379 

Atlanta 

3123 

909 


Hartford 2 0 1—4 

Pittsburgh 3 0 P—3 

Pass Govln (2J,TlpMtt (4),MviMyn {1J, Front it 
2126 t*li Hdnoan ttt. CunnayworWi til. Kuv 
181* LOvnkl (41. Shots on eecrt; Harilard (on Me- 
1*10 loehel 8-*-*— 2*: Pittsburgh Ian weeks) 12-3- 
la« *-rt. 

1*64 St. LOUIS 1 8 3—3 

1745 Washington 3 3 1—5 


micros 28 23 38 33— III 

Mden State IP 3* 32 23—105 

WoarrhJsK 16-25 7-8 27. Banks 7-8 4-4 18; 


5* I Carroll 131. Assists: Chicago 34 (woo 17). 
Golden Slate 27 (Fiovn 7| 


Transition 


BASKETBALL 

Notional BdiKetuii AssaciatlM 
ATLANTA— Signed tree agent Eddie John- 


CnrlsTlan (2), Anderuen 1 1), Conner 3 (9), son. guard, to o I wo- veer cant rod and otoeed 


1454 Haworth (31; Poslowski (ZI.Mu'hfl (51. Gil- n ' m Of HOddilOollnarv susoertMn 
1842 mour (21. Sbgti gci goal: St. Louis Con Jensen) PHOENIX— Reached a conlroct ggree- 

1182 *-5-13—25; Wosnlngfon Ion Movl *-8-0-21 mentwim Lorry Nance, forward. Placed fler- 

i w Boston l 1 4—* nara TnurtHon. ouora on inluret) reserve 

1557 New Jane* 2 1 1—4 FOOTBALL 

1314 L lineman 431. Simmer til). Tnelven 171, Notional Football League 

1453 Mark wort 3 12). NlentiulS t«l: Broten It), Ct MCI NN ATI— Signed Sam WeMilnolon. 

Muller [51, Higgins (21. Sulllman r4).SMtSBd cornertsock. 

Mat: Boston (an RrtCfll 7-12-*— 21; New Jer- 5T. LOUIS-WervM N«H O'Donoflflur. 

sev (on Keans) 13-7-7—2*. place kicker. Claimed Jess Atkinson, pioce- 

Matitrrol 8 I 3—4 kicker, on waivers from tna n.y. Giants. 

Quebec 1 4 1— « TAMPA Bay— S igned wall* Kcrsicn, el- 


129* sev (on Keans) 13-7-7—2*. olaceklcker. Claimed Jess Atkinson, pioce- 

1389 Montreal 8 I 3—4 kicker, on waivers from tna n.y. Giants. 

1574 Quebec 1 4 1— * TAMPA BAY— Sfgned Wall* Kcrsicn, el- 

1308 Hunter (3). Eogies (3). Goulet 2 (*), giiiis tensive tackle. Placed George Varna, elten- 
1806 (4), Marais (l). Roane* |1). Boisvert (2), «« tockle, on infured reserve. 


1751 Kurvers (2). Coroomrcu <lj. 5 Dots an ooel: 
tS*l Montreal Ion GuseUni B-10-I1 — 39; Quebec 
1501 ion Penney) 11-13-4—30. 

1478 Los AAOeftK 1 1 1—3 


HOCKEY 

National Hotkey League 
DETROIT— Retailed Joe Koeur- riow 
wine- tron> AdlrgnaaOi ol nie Amerlean Hee*- 


17*7 N.Y. isla n ders 


j s o—l evleroue. Sent Bruce E ok in. center. wvlIiiKJr 


1B4* MocLelton (4), TovMt 1 (3). Galley l5)iTo«v 
1840 till 2 (4). Shots on goal; Los Angeles (an 
ISe3 Smith) 17-10-*— 33; New Yor* (on Eliot) 11-7- 
2214 7-25. 


IWeRae. left wing, id Adlrgndack- 
HARTFORO— Suspended Mark Fvs<o. lor- 
ward, for refusing lorenert la Blnghamlonof 
'he ahl 




' % -Sls ‘ 


Si’.rC- J--*., -• ^ 










Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


Rahim Campaign Funds Kent Gabert > J a P an ’ 8 Best-Known Gaijin 

O JL <J R„ Twm Tni rrn ■vZZteM Soon after, he was invited to appear on 



YtfASHINGTON — A friend I 
. YV know, who earns a living try- 
ing to persuade Congress to help 
protect the singles bar industry, 
told me that political fund-raising 
is getting out of hand on the HilL 

He said. “Senator Doublechin 
called last week and asked me to 
contribute to his election cam- 
paign. 1 sent 
over a check by 
messenger. This 
morning he 
phoned again 
and wanted 
more money. 

Enough's 

"Is it passible 
he forgot he 

Us ' Badmald 

“He didn't forget. He’s holding 
me up because he thinks I need 
him.” 

“Do your 

“Perhaps. But he doesn't have to 
be greedy about it. I have other 
senators to feed os well” 

“Suppose you don't send him 
any more money? What then?” 

“He won’t answer ray calls.” 

“Would that be so bad?” 


“It isn’t just the calls. It means 
that he won't see me, and if he 
refuses to let me in his office how 
can I persuade him the government 
has to subsidize singles bars? When 
you donate money to politicians 
you’re not buying' their votes — 
you’re purchasing access to power 
so you can lav out vour case.” he 


Ashanti Throne 
Returns to Ghana 

Agence Frame-Press* 

A CCRA. G hana — A ceremoni- 
al Ashanti stool more than a 
century old. taken by the British as 
part of the spoils of victory in 1874. 
has been returned to the Ashanti 
tribe after negotiations between 
Britain and Ghana. 

The stool and other traditional 
regalia were looted by a British 
punitive force that sacked the 
Ashanti capital of Kumasi in 1874. 

The stool was sent back to En- 
gland by a Captain Jackson, whose 
descendants returned it this year. It . 
was presented to the leader of an 
Ashan ti delegation Tuesday. 


said. “How does a senator know- 
how to vote when I can’t tell MmT 

“He this to see you? You’re a 
U. S. citizen.” 

□ 

“Senators and congressmen can 
only talk to so many people a day. 
They have no choice but to see the 
people who gave to their cam- 
paigns. as opposed to those who 
didn’t.” 

“It sounds reasonable. But you 
told me that you already gave to 
Doublechin’s 'election. Would he 
punish you because you didn’t give 
twice?”' 

“That isn't the way Doublechin 
sees it. He chums he's in a aeek- 
and-neck fight, and if I want to 
protect mv First investment I have 
to give again. He intimated that if I 
didn’t he would lose and then the 
singles bar industry would never 
have a friend in the Senate again.” 

“Did you send the money over?” 

“I was about to when Congress- 
man Jingo called and asked me to 
make a donation to his campaign.” 

“When it comes to giving politi- 
cal money doesn’t a senator out- 
rank a congressman?” I asked. 

“No. sir. Congressman Jingo is 
chairman of the House subcommit- 
tee on singles bars.” 

“Does he till toward your indus- 
try?” 

“Not yet But the fact he called 
and asked for such a heavy contri- 
bution indicates he’s not tilting the 
other way. I sent him the check 
without fear or favor.” 


“It’s hard to believe our system 
of government depends on senators 
and congressmen stooping to plead 
for money over the phone.” 

“I’ve taken 250 calls this year. 
What happens is the legislator sets 
aside four hours a day and goes 
down a list his aides give Him of 
every potential donor. They always 
call me because I control a political 
action committee fund. The singles 
bar owners forward the political 
action committee money to me and 
1 dispense it to our friends.’ ” 
“Don’t you feel bad about sub- 
verting the democratic process?” 

“Not really. There wouldn't be a 
democratic process if we special 
interests didn't fund iL Every elect- 
ed official I gee out of the hole 
swears to uphold the Constitution 
of the United States, as well as say 
a few nice words about singles 
bars.” 


By Terry Trucco 

T OKYO — He is hardly an international 
celebrity, but in a recent recognition sur- 
vey given high-school students throughout 
Japan. 95 percent identified the name and 
face of a boyish American attorney nam ed 
Kent Gilbert. 

When Kento. as be is known here, walks 
into a department store, people crowd 
around, whispering, pointing and waving pa- 
pers for trim to autograph. When he takes an 
afternoon run at Tokyo’s National Stadium, 
passers-by stare and shriek. Fans deluge him 
with mail, presents, even clothes. “I don’t 
want it to come to the point where I have 
black glass on the car and get whisked from 
place to place, but there axe some places I 
won’t go now because I know it’s not going to 
be fun for me.” he admitted recently. 

It is the typical treatment for a big-time 
entertainer here, and with almost two years of 
frequent guest appearances on Japanese tele- 
vision's most popular shows, Gilbert, 33, has 
joined the ranks of the nation’s pop stars. 

Unlike his peers, however, his fame stems 
from the fact that he is a foreigner, with 
sandy hair, hazel eyes and a facility for Japa- 
nese. Gilbert is the most successful and un- 
usual exponent of the gaijin talenio, or for- 
eign talent, who becomes famous not because 
he can sing, dance or play baseball but be- 
cause be can speak Japanese. 

“Professional foreigners,” as some call 
them, have been a staple of Japanese show 
business for years, turning up on talk shows 
and quiz programs. Last year, however, the 
genre took a new turn. No game show seemed 
complete without a gaijin or two. Entire pro- 
grams were built around foreigners chatter- 
ing in Japanese, sampling Japanese cuisine, 
even singing traditional Japanese songs. 

Reasons for peppering Japanese airwaves 
with foreigners vary, but most here agree the 
fad could flourish only in a nation- as insular 
and homogeneous as Japan. In pan the rea- 
son is simple curiosity. In certain areas here. 
Western faces are rarely seen, and foreigners 
fluent in Japanese are still considered an 
oddity. An appearance by an occasional Jap- 
anese-speaking foreigner also adds what 
some term a pleasantly international touch, 
providing a sense that Japan is part of the 
world community. 

There are also a number of darker connota- 
tions. Many of last season’s gaijin programs 
used foreigners as unwitting buffoons or 
“trained monkeys.” as one observer here put 
iL Others reflected the feelings of national 
superiority that have blossomed with Japan's 
economy. 

Television's fascination with foreigners has 
coded somewhat this season, but Kent Gil- 
bert is as ubiquitous as ever, popping up 
regularly on the game and variety-snow cir- 
cuit He currently appears in a weekly drama 
series, delivers speeches before large groups 
and hosts a noontime radio show in Tokyo. 





vV£y 





1 


“Kento” Gilbert 

He also does commerdaJs for five different 
products. 

“1 think the gaijin boom is over, but I also 
think there's always the need for a few good 
gaijin, " he said, seated in a conference room 
at the Tokyo law firm where he has worked 
for five years. “The Japanese will always 
want someone who can give them a perspec- 
tive on themselves, who can tell them how 
they look. Bm they don’t want just any old 
opinion. They want one or two gaijin in the 
media they can trust.” 

Gilbert thmlcs he has won that trust by 
carefully selecting the programs on which he 
appears “What I do now is much like what a 
normal Japanese celebrity would do,” be 
said. “I'm on programs with Japanese and 
answer the same questions as Japanese, but 
because I’m a gaijin, I have a different per- 
spective and give people an opportunity to 
see how a gaijin approaches a situation.” 

It is hardly the life of the average Tokyo 
lawyer, American or otherwise, and Gilbert 
admits that as his popularity has risen, he has 
CUt back his duties at his internati onal law 
firm. “If 1 thought it would get this big, I 
might not have done it,” he says. 

His career in entertainmen t certainly did 
not start big While appearing in a foreigners' 
amateur production here of “The Imaginar y 
Invalid” two years ago, he learned that a 
Japanese videocassette company needed a 
foreigner to make an Fn gHsh - lang ua g g dem- 
onstration tape. He took the job, stepped 
onto the lowest rung of the talenio ladder and 
before long landed a bit part in a television 
dr ama “I was on for 20 seconds and was 
filmed in shadow. Everyone in my office 
watched, and no one could tell it was me.” 


Soon after, he was invited to appear on a 
popular game show on which celebrities guess 
the price of sucb one-of-a-kind exotica as 
African tribal masks and Indian headdresses. 

Rccruited at the last minute when another 
foreigner had to cancel Gilbert was a hit. 
playful and personable, with a good com- 
mand of Japanese. His well -scrubbed all- 
American looks also fil the traditional Japa- 
nese image of the foreigner, successful gaijin 
taiemos are rarely burly he-man types — mid 
almost never other Asians. Kento was asked 
back. “The first time I figured I'd just be 
speaking Japanese and mating a link mon- 
ey” he said. “But the second time I was out to 
prove something.” 

Speaking Japanese was the easy part. 
Though he loathed languages as a high- 
school student in Utah, that changed when be 
took a crash course in Japanese in Hawaii in 
preparation for a two-year stint as a Mormon 
missionary in Japan. He continued his Japa- 
nese studies when he enrolled in Brigham 
Young University. “I wanted to work in a law 
firm on the West Coast, but the people with 
the most money have e xp e ri ence in Japan. 
My wife and I had two tittle kids and no 
assets. We were leaving nothing. And when I 
looked at my resume it said Japan, Japan, 
Japan.” 

Law and enter tainment are not all that 
different, he added. “With both you try to 
persuade people. In law you're trying to per- 
suade a judge or a regulatory authority, and 
chat can be satisfying. But it’s also satisfying 
to make 3j000 people laugh at something that 
really was quite dever.” 

The law career also lends Mm added credi- 
bility, even in a land wary of lawyers. “I Eke 
the fact that he’s not a full-time talenio, “said 
a Japanese fan. 

Being a top-ranked talemo cam also be 
profitable; Each spring after tax payments, 
the government releases names of the na- 
tion’s highest paid. With an estimated income 
last year of more than 55 milli on yen (about 
5260,000), Gilbert earned a respectable spot 
in Japan’s pantheon of celebrities. 

How long he will stick with the talenio 
trade is the big question. "If I only go by law 
practice, I should gp bade to tire States. 
There's nothing to learn after five years,” he 
said. But can be give up show b usiness ? 
Gilbert admitted he has an agent in the Unit- 
ed States, but doubted he would be as suc- 
cessful there. “When I was in high school I 
thought a career in theater would be ftm. but 
I didn't think I had the talent, and I still 
don’t,” he said. 

In the meantime, he is considering all the 
options, not just the money, but “growth, 
family, happiness, experiences.” And while 
he is doing that. Kent Gilbert can be seen 
almost nightly on television, the most famous 
foreigner in Japan. 

Terry Trucco is a joumahsl based in Tokyo. 


people 

Relighting liberty ^ Torch 

. President Ronald Reagan will re- SOiO^ tp*^^^*-**?* 
light the torch of the newly restored of weekly raifiau 
Statue of Liberty at a centounal pets. 

edebratioa next July 3. according >- 

to Lee lacocca, chairman of ihe Kaufman Asusi-! Saw*'* 

rhnrdM- Outv who also beads the _ ™ - has named one 


rounuauvu. ioumm — - m Haves anC ner 

four-day event wffl be “heard and MacArdWr 

seen around the world.” Reagan s wan ted w be co-surra, 

fcdared 1986 The CemennM If ^^£cArth:it“ Hs>n 
Year of Liberty in the United wtb cere- 

States,” on Monday. The 15 Moot is an American 

(45-meter) statue, given as a gift to an 

the United States by. France m Mmfamk & ** go 

1886. has been undergoing a main- yjj George 5s 

million dollar restoration, and is g gl f thg nim sft*? 

now encased in 300 tons of alinm- fo* rf t* gs of the fi»^ ! 1 
com scaffolding. Its old torch was pjuta R*» 

removed 15 months ago. Also on s “?J£j^L f .,r*>fcert. MacArthur 
July 3, OhJ Justice Warren Bur- ^^Slfl«l 56 pSuccd several 
ger win swear in 5,000 new citizens J ^Astoria studio, 

on Ellis Island, the immigration Without Pas- 

center dosed in 1954, which is also raIudS« and - 0ntl . 

bong restored, and 20,000 people P 00 * He also was the 

will simultaneously take tire oath « a u-ebtof “Tire 

across the United States, lacocca coin- 

said. On July 4. there wffl be an go* 

Internationa] Naval Review in oded with HMs 


George Btaus doesn’t plan art 
needing the services of the Motion 


the U.S. Atlantic Fleet- S hip s from 
as many as 141 nations wffl be on 
parade in a Parade of Sails that 
may surpass the march of tall ships 


« ^BicentennialcdAra- Television Hospital ia 

Los Angeles for some time buL 
to* 5 yflf, be lynched from 30 mesawti ^ dedicated us new 
SSRS*®- h*tor andthe New ^ owwlian 

had donated SI million for the nctf 
four-bed unit, which wffl mom nr/ 
heart attack victims and other pa- 
New Jetsqf s liberty Stare Park. 24-hour care. 1 

The July 6 fiaafc at the Meadow- ahreahze that I intend to 

Ja ^L!5L5 mre hangaremnd until I’m the last per- 
fireworks and another concert, m- ^ ' - 


-f7T~r pi *» left in show business,” be said. 

Buns, who turns 90 on Jan. 20. 
dae, Kenny Rogera and WUBeNd- }mfM p!aque _ bear- 


ing his c 
which wffl 


smoking likeness. 
t at the entrance of 


The late Axd Springer has left .the ™it The ceremony attracted 
his entire estate to Ms West Ger- about 200 members of the enter- 
man media enmire far the next 30 tairunent industry, 
years, BerabudServatius, tire chief q 

executor of Ms wifl, said Wednes- 
day. Springer, who died last month Pre sid en t Ronald Reagan ap- 
aged 73, had ordered that Ms assets pointed Carolyn J. Dearer, wife of 
be hdd back from family heirs unffl tire former White House deputy 
the year 2015 and be used in the chief of stirff Michael K. Denver, as 
meantime to ensure the survival' a ******* of the federal Commis- 
and independence of his publishing sion on Fine Arts on Tuesday. Mrs. 
house. The sum involved was not Dearer is a consultant to a public 
disdosed. Springer, a conservative, relations firm. Her husband, one of 
founded Ms publishing house after tire president's closest confidants, 
Worid War DL It dominates the: openedhis own consulting firm this 
West Goman news market, with year after nearly two decades of 
the popular daily Kid, the more service with Reagan. 


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