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No * 31,89a 


INTERNAT10IVAL 



Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 



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South Africa Mine Strike Ends 


S-.». 




^ Blacks E 




% Glenn Frankd 

tSffiHS&sa- 

S^cSS^*^* ^ 

rpr** caue Q off its strike at thw*. 

tSS, 

* MtaewSSf ? atioMl Un »n 

^2^ Character ^ thft 

a temporary suspension erf 

5nr£™ * ^^nusang striking 
^^frs. But analysts said toattoe 

5 S""* «o be cutting hs 
losses and was unlikely to resume 



tissals 


toe three companies where union 
membership has been lowest. On 
Monday, the union said that 28400 
workers had heeded its strike call 
wt the number dwindled sharply 

Tuesday. 

A mine official, who to 


Related arttct.es 


toes trike after the court ruling. 




Tie suspension leaves uncertain 
Sf_£? of more than 7,000 mine 
s who ***”*& out a wildcat 
tupjwrt the legal strike 
hf, d r f «d dismissal. The union said 
7 ; had recaved assurances from the 
companies that they would not 
owet workers from mine property, 
and the union general secretary, 
j-ynl Ramaphosa, said he believed 
toat most of the miners would be 
allowed to resume work. 

ton the strike suspension ap- 
peared to leave management a free 


■ In a year of unrest, black atti- 
tudes have hardened. Page 5. 

■ The black uaners' leader is 

fighting strong odds to bring 
about change. page 5 . 

■ The dollar advanced 
while gold plunged. 


that led to violence and one report- 
ed death Tuesday. 

Workers at the Dedkraal mine 
west of Johannesburg said that a 
miner was struck by a police van 
and died during a confrontation 
Tuesday, morning in which police 
private security guards used tear 
gas, rubber bullets and plastic 
whips to break up a crowd of s Hik- 
ers- 

Helene Mendes, a spokeswoman 
for Gold Fields, owner of the mine, 
confirmed that an incident had oc- 
curred but said the police acted 
after some union members at- 
tempted to intimidate other work- 
ers into joining the walkout She 
was unable to confirm or deny the 


be idemifiwt >haf higivwipan y 

was “encouraged to leam toe union 
has decided to call off the strike;” 


reported death. 
Violent 


Mnnoko Nchwe, a union spokes- 
woman, denied that the end of the 
strike was an admission of defeat 


“The mining atfnpni^ partly 

broke our strike and partly «mghi 
us unawares," she said. “But it’s 
also a victory for us because it has 
shown the determination rtf our 


, . 4 . members in spite of all kinds of 

hand to dismiss strike leaders and intimidation." 

other participants, and it may set The halt may defuse increasingly 

oack efforts to organize workers at volatile tensions in several mm** 


"Hi .-■ 


New President Has Peru 
Feeling Optimistic Again | 


By Alan Riding 

New York Timer Service 




A-"M; 




LIMA — After barely one 
month in office, Peru's new presi- 
dent, AJan Garcia Pteez, has shak- 
en. tins country oat of a prolonged 
mood of pessimism with a burst of 
reformist zeal unseen here in years. 

Exuding self-confidence, the 36- 
year-old president has taken an a 
vast array of pro Weans that had 
long appeared msolnble, including 
inflation, corruption, arms spend- 
ing, narcotics trafficking, leftist ter- 
rorism wnrt a seemingly unpayable 
$14-biQim foreign debt . 

At the same aBe, : udng^spopa-~ 
larity to atmiffifeit* tor political 
hand, Mr. Gardahas restored what' 
he calls the “authority” of govern- 
ment and ended , toe . vacuum of 
power through which the country 
had been drifting under the former 
president, Fernando Bdafinde Ter- . 


?/■ 





“Who can deny that Alan Garcia 
, has exhibited veritable prowess 
i during his first 30 days in office 1 ?” 
the independent Lima weekly 
newspaper Caretas rioted in an arti- 
cle entitled “Dedatm, Persever- 
ance and Daring.” It was echoing a 
view widely expressed even by 
those who opposed Mr. Garcia’s 
bid for the presidency. 

He only concerns voiced so far 
are that power is enormously cen- 
tralized in the president, with nei- 
ther his cabinet nor Congress serv- 
ing as a counterweight, mid that 
changes might be moving too 
quickly. “I don’t think things are 
moving fast enough," Mr. Garcia 
has retorted. 



idence also was reported at 
Transvaal Navigation Collieries, a 
coal mine. Workers there said that 
the police had opened fire with tear 
gas and rubber bullets outside a 
black hostel an company property. 

Deelkraal officials gave notice to 
5,000 miners Tuesday that they 
were bring dismissed for failing to 
report to work for two consecutive 
days. Workers said that the mine’s 
white hostel manag er told them 
ova- a loudspeaker that they would 
be issued bade pay on Wednesday 
and then be required to leave the 
miiw premises. 

Officials at three Gencor mines, 
the Marievale gold mine and 
Transvaal Navigation and Blink- 
pan coal mines, said they had be- 
gun “disciplinary hearings” for 
more than L 00 O workers to deter- 
mine whether they too should be 
dismissed. 

De Sock Saw Vokker 
Gerhard de Kocfc, bead of South 
Africa's central bank, briefed Paul 

A Volcker, chairman of the U.S. 

Federal Reserve Board, about Pre- 
toria's derision to make only par- 
tial debt repayments, Agence 
France-Presse reported from 
Washington. 

Mr, & Sock met in New York 
on Tuesday with E. Gerald Corri- 
gan, president of toe Federal Re- 
serve Bank of New York, United 
Press International reported. 

■ Boot Suspends Guarantees 
A West German Economics 
Ministry spokesman said that the 
government is delaying processing 
ap plies firms for credit guarantees 
on exports to South Africa follow- 
ing the Pretoria government's deci- 
sion to freeze foreign loan repay- 
ments until the end of the year, 
Reuters reported from Bonn. 



U.S. Promises 
'Serious’ Effort 
In Geneva Talks 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Pott Service 


WASHINGTON — Responding 
to criticism from Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, toe Soviet leader, of super- 
power tensions before toe Novem- 
ber summit meeting, a White 
House spokesman said Tuesday 
that President Ronald Reagan “is 
taking a serious approach” and 
pledged that Mr. Reagan would try 
to “meet toe Soviets halfway in an 
effort to solve problems.” 


In Moscow, Senator Robert C. 
Byrd. Democrat of West Virginia, 
who headed a U.S. Senate delega- 
tion (hat met with the Soviet leader, 
said that be felt “a little more opti- 
mistic” about the U.S.-Soviet sum- 
mit meeting in Geneva. 


tnm iihittii iihj fYasA 

Senator Robert C Byrd, left, and Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, meet for talks 
Behind them are Vadim Zagjadi n , right, a Central Committee official, and an interpreter. 


The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes, read a statement, in 
response to an interview with Mr. 
Gorbachev in Time ma nuring, that 
criticized tbe Russians for using toe 
U.S. media while refusing Mr. Rea- 
gan access to toe Soviet Mr. 
Speak es charged that the Russians 
had ignored a U-S. request for Mr. 


Gorbachev: A New Image for the Kremlin 


By Gary Lee 

Washington Past Service 

MOSCOW — With his vigorous interview in 
this week’s Time magazine, Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, the Soviet leader, presented toe unusual 
image of a Kremlin leader possessed of a keen 
wit and a detailed grasp of American political 
metaphor. 

He displayed a knowledge of U.S. political 
issues and personalities reflecting far more than 
a surface study. 

He referred to policy speeches made by Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan in 1983 and 1984. He gave 
a concise but thorough analysis of a speech by 
Robert C. McFariane, toe national security af- 
fairs adviser. He noted a report by a former 
Texas senator, John Tower, and an undersecre- 
tary of state, Michael H. Armacost 

He even mentioned a Washington Post col- 
umnist, Mary McGrory. by name, although in 
Rnssiaifso heavy that the ruuiK. was Ouiy recog- 
nizable after toe translator said it, according to a 
source present during the interview. 

While Mr. Gorbachev may have had some 


difficulty with the columnist's name, the point 
that be sought to make, which was underscored 
throughout the interview, accentuated tbe posi- 
tive. 

In response to a question about his view of 
Mr. Reagan. Mr. Gorbachev turned immediate- 
ly to the forthcoming summit meeting and said 
that toe Soviet Union had agreed to toe Geneva 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


meeting “because we thought we could do a lot 
by trying to meet each other halfway.” 

He continued: “That, ag ain , is why we have 
reacted so sharply to some of the statements 
being made these days in connection with the 
summit. 

“So we see that there are some who want to 
generate a situation to persuade the UJ>. and the 
American public that, as Mary McGrory put it, 
even if toe only thing to come out of the summit 
was an agicerueut-io exchange ballet troupes, 
toes even so, people would be gleeful and hap- 
py” 

G corgi Arbatov, 62, the head of tbe UiLA.- 


Canada Institute in Moscow since 1967, flanked 
Mr. Gorbachev during tbe interview. Leonid 
Zamyatin, 63, chief of the Information Depart- 
ment, also was at toe table, along with his 
assistant. 

Andrei Alexandrov-Agentov sat in. He is a 
Kremlin foreign policy adviser dating back to 
the days of Leonid I. Brezhnev. Viktor Sukbo- 
drev. a K remlin ajj e since the time of Nikita S. 
Khrushchev, translated consecutively for Mr. 
Gorbacbev. who showed no bint of a knowledge 
of English, according to a source present 

Mr. Gorbachev was witty, telling one Tune 
editor, when banding him a green envelope 
holding answers to six written questions: “Not 
even a him of export of revolution.” 

He was anecdotal when comparing a forma 
Soviet finance ministers knee-jerk rejections to 
those he said were shown by the Reagan admin- 
istration. Tbe Soviet official, said Mr. Gorba- 
chev. was . tn old man who dozed off during 
meetings of toe Council cm Ministers: 

“Whenever you would wake him, he would 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6 ) 


Reagan to speak on Soviet televi- 
sion. 

He also said that tbe United 
States was prepared to discuss lim- 
its on space weapons but reiterated 
that Mr. Reagan’s Strategic De- 
fense Initiative was not a “bargain- 
ing chip" that could be traded in 
aims negotiations. 

In toe Time interview, Mr. Gor- 
bachev said that the Reagan ad- 
ministration appeared to be plan- 
ning on a summit confrontation 
between “some kind of political 
‘supergladiators' " aimed at win- 
ning points instead of reaching 
agreements. 

Mr. Gorbacbev said that the 
Russians “shall be prepared to sub- 
mit some very serious proposals” in 
toe Geneva meeting. 

Mr. Speakes said that tbe United 
States welcomed Mr. Gorbachev’s 
promise to present serious propos- 
als. “For the United States, the 
president is caking a serious ap- 
proach in the relationship and he is. 
willing to meet the Soviets halfway, 
in an effort to solve problems.” 

“Tbe president hopes that the 
meeting in Geneva will Lay the 
groundwork to address the issues! 
that face our two nations,” Mr. 
Speakes said. “Our views of the 
causes of present U.S.-Soviei ten- 
sions are quite different from that* 
presented by Mr. Gorbachev ” 

This was a reference to Mr. Gor- 
bachev’s statement in toe interview 
that Washington was responsible 
for the deteriorating superpower 
relationship. 

In criticizing Mr. Gorbacbev for 
using media channels that he said 
were blocked io Mr. Reagan in toe' 
Soviet Union, Mr.. Speakes said: 

“We are pleased that Mr. Gorba- 
chev was able to present his views' 
to toe America public The inter- 
view is a prime example of the 
openness of the American system 
and toe access the Soviets enjoy to 
the American media. 

“If President Reagan had a com- 
parable opportunity to present his 
views to the Soviet people, through 
toe Soviet media. thU would doubt- 
less improve our dialogue and indi- 
cate Soviet willingness to accept a 
degree of reciprocity in an impor- 

(Con tinned on Page 2. CoL 6 ) 


Alan Garda PSrez 


" Reagan and the Reshaping of Politics 








Certainly, such problems as ter- 
rorism and the foreign debt defy 
rapid solution, but in other areas 
some results already are apparent. 

A price freeze has slowed tbe infla- 
tion that had been heading for the 






200 percent mark by year’s end. A 
- police 


crackdown on police corruption 
khas brought the dismissal of 37 
police generals. An order of Mirage 
fighter planes from France has 
been halved, from 26 to 13, to save 


v. 1 r 


money. 

Sensing that toe young Soaal 
Democrat is inspired name by ide- 
alism than ideology, the United 
Left coalition, toe conn try s second 
political force, and the conservative 
private sector have applauded 


these and other measures. No less 
the armed forces, 
governed Peru from 1968 to 
198IX so far have accepted the reas- 
sextion. of civilian control 

. Yet' perhaps toe most striking 
feature of Mr. Gaidars first weeks 
in. office has been his populist style 
of governing. He has adopted mea- 
sures that immediately touch , toe 
lives of Penmans, such as reducing 
the cost of some basic foods and 
medicines. 

Further, almost as if he stifl were 
campaigning, he has found a way 
of engaging in a direct “dialogue” 
with tbe people. 

On six occasions he has appeared 
on a balcony of the Presidential 
Palace, which overlooks a busy 
street, and, to the concern of seenri- 
ty agents always fearful of a terror- 
ist attack, has engaged in a lively 
give-and-take with toe enthusiastic 
crowds that immediately gathered 
below. 

He also has used the balcony to 
make announcements with certain 
popular appeaL 

A favorite target has been the 
privileged life of past senior offi- 
cials. On Aug. 22, far example, he 


Analysts See a Realignment of 1/.S. Parties, Electorate 


(Continued on Page 3, CoL 1) 


By David S. Broder 

Washington Pan Service 

NEW ORLEANS — Slowly and 
cautiously, those who teach and 
study American politics are begin- 
ning to say that President Ronald 
Reagan has ushered in a major 
change, and perhaps a new era, is 
UiL government and politics. 

Their tom for the changes is 
“realignment," a whispered word 
foar years ago among a minority of 
political scientists, and now a sub- 
ject of open debate and growing 
consensus. 

Most of the major papers on re- 
alignment presented at the annual 
meeting of toe American Political 
Science Association here found 
strong dements of fundamental 
change at work in the 1980 and 
1984 elections. The changes resem- 
bled many of the pattens of toe 
Franklin D. Roosevelt elections of 
1932 and 1936. Roosevelt's New 
Deal coalition stayed in power for 
20 years and perasts in part even 
today, many scholars think. 

Republican gains in voter identi- 
fication, Mr. Reagan's support 
among young and first-time voters, 
tbe emergence of the South and 


Mountain West as Republican 
rather than Democratic bastions 
and the persistent support for 
many conservative policies a Q sug- 
gest a shift that may last beyond 
Mr. Reagan’s time, the pro-realign- 
ment analysts contend. 

They hedge their judgment with 
many qualifiers, and thar views are 
rejected by a minority of skeptics. 

But within toe profession, tbe 
tide has clearly changed from tbe 
1981 meeting, when James Stimson 
of Florida State University ex- 
pressed toe prevailing sentiment: 
“I’m strode by toe lack of evidence 
of the realignment everyone talks 
about on the news. There just 
seems to be nothing out there.” 

This year, more than a 
papers explored tbe evidence in the 
National Election Studies of the 
University of Michigan and news- 
paper polls. 

The skeptics included Walter 
Dean Burnham of the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology and 
Martin P. Wallenberg of the Uni- 
versity of California at Irvine, who 
argued that voters’ party loyalties 
have become so weak, in an era of 
personality and television politics. 


that the reported Republican gains 
may not mean much. 

Mr. Burnham said he felt the 
only way that a stable Republican 
ascendancy could be sustained 
would be “if the policy counterrev- 
olution of 1981 and later was asso- 
ciated with our climbing back to- 
ward the world hegemony, 
especially economic hegemoay, 
which we once took as a matter of 
course.” On that count, be argued, 
toe evidence is “all toe other way." 

Mr. Wallenberg termed it "the 
hollow realignment,” arguing that 
“even if toe Republican surge is a 
long-lasting one, it will be of limit- 
ed importance as long as partisan- 
ship in tbe electorate continues to 
decline.” 

But other scholars are impressed 
by toe shifts they see in key voting 
blocs, which they say add up to a 
pattern of politics fundamentally 
different from the New Deal era. 

Three University of Rochester 
writers, Harold W. Stanley, Wil- 
liam T. Bianco and Richard G. 
NietnL cited evidence that such 
shifts have been under way since 
toe 1964-68 period, linking them to 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 



Kasparov Strikes Swiftly 
In World Chess Match 


Anatoli Karpov 


Compiled by Our Staff From DupaicHa 

MOSCOW — The rematch for 
the world chess championship be- 
gan Tuesday with Gary Kasparov, 
toe challenger, quickly fulfi l lin g 
predictions that he would take tbe 
initiative against the champion, 
Anatoli Karpov. 

Mr. Kasparov, playing white, 
opened with toe advance of his 
queen's pawn two squares. But on 
move three be allowed a Nimzo-In- 
dian defense, an opening that did 
not occur in any of toe 48 games 
that the two Soviet grandmasters 
played in their first title match, 
which was abandoned in February. 

Mr. Karpov appeared to become 
uncomfortable and apprehensive 
as he was confronted with a rarely 
played variation and soon fell far 
behind on the dock. 

After malting his 12th move, Mr. 
Kasparov, now nearly an hour 
ahead, strolled quietly around toe 
stage looking relaxed and confi- 
dent. 

The game was adjourned when 
toe challenger sealed his 42d move. 
He was one pawn ahead and, ac- 
cording to experts watching, held a 
winning position if be continued to 


play well when the march is re- 
sumed Wednesday. 

Each player has two and a half 
hours to make his first 40 moves. 
Failure to meet this deadline would 
result in a loss. 

Both arrived for tbe match’s start 
with just a few minutes to spare, 
despite traffic having been cor- 
doned off to allow them easy access 
to the Tchaikovsky Concert HalL 

Mr. Kasparov appeared first, 
with two of his top aides, followed 
by a second car bearing his mother, 
Klara. She has been a source of 
moral support and has attended all 
her son’s important matches. 

Mr. Kasparov strode onto the 
stage confidently, receiving an ova- 
tion that rivaled that of the champi- 
on. From all indications, it was not 
a partisan Karpov crowd, as the 
challenger and many of his sup- 
porters had feared. 

The 24-game-limit match win be 
played on Tuesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays. Mr. Karpov will re- 
tain his title if toe match ends in a 
12-12 tie, and has the right to an 
early rematch if he loses.' 

(Reuters, AP) 


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INSIDE 


■ West Genztanfs ojmoalion 
demanded the dismiss al of Inte- 
rior Minister Zimmerman over 

the latest spy scaudaL Page 2. 


m US. organic farmers have es- 
caped some of agriatltur£sa»- 
aomic hardships. Page a 


tictans in new ^ence^Sa 
Lanka. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


■ WestGaraafl.nKhf^^ 

puitoseaprcms^^P^- 
eroment reported. P a » ey * 


■ Hanson Trust PLCt ^^ 5 

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* Doctor Behind the Microphone 9 : An Israeli Voice Heard in the Arab World 


By Thomas X. Friedman 

New York. Timet Service 

JERUSALEM — Rani Basri is not a household name in 
IsraeL In fact, few Israelis have heard of her. 

. But Mrs. Basri, 54, has become one of the most widely 
fetened-io Israeli vetoes in the Arab world. Sk probably 
gets ra t* * mail from such places as Saudi Arabia and Syria 
than anyone else in Israel . _ 

«ince 1971 Mrs. Basri has had a program on toe Israeli 
radio’s Arabic service tailed “DoctorleKwl ^ 

phone,” and it has become a vehicle for Arab-isracn coopci- 

at r£ice a week Mrs. Basri, an Iraqi Jew wto crate to toad 
in 1950, interviews Jewish and Arab doctors m land about 
the latest advances in treatments and medical tcchndogy m 
Israeli hospitals. After the Interviews, Mr&Bam mwtes her 
HstcncraS>ugto at the Arab world to wnte to her -—at a 
port office box in Geneva or by any other rente —with their 
medical problems. . . 

Each month, 300 letters from Arab Ksteoers find mar way 
to Mrs Basrfs office: Sic translates them mto Hebrew and 
refersthetn to specialists at Hadassah Hospital m Jerusalem 
or other Israeli medical cotters. . 

The socdalists answer toe nodical queries with whatever 

ii^ld^ispossiWe, wWchMrs. 

Arabic and broadcasts on her 30-mmute prograrm Some- 
ptnfs they ask a listener to send more mofical records m 

Isradi specialist to be treatable, are invited by Mrs. Basn ou 
toe air to come to Israel, at : 

Mrs. 


or Ministry and accompanies everyone who comes to the 
hospital Every year dozens of Arabs, including Kuwaitis, 
Qataris. Sandi Arabians, Libyans and Syrians, are getting 
treatment in Isradi hospitals as a result of her program. 

“Diseases don't know any boundaries,” Mrs. Basri said, 
“and - 1 don’t feel that treatments should either ” 

Her efforts have won praise from Isradi doctors. “She is 
doing a remarkable job in improving relations between us 
and tbe Arabs,” said Dr. Yaacov Shanoa of Biker Holim 
Hospital in Jerusalem, who has treated scores of Arab 
patients referred by Mrs. Basri. 

‘There is a new generation of very good young doctors in 
the Arab world, but not everyone has access to them,” he 
said. “The esses that are coming to us are usually the most 
difficult ones from both a diagnostic and a therapeutic point 
of view.” . 

Because of the problems involved for a Kuwaiti or a 
Syrian in traveling to Israel, a country with winch their 
governments are technically at war, Mrs. Basri is discreet in 
her responses. Most listeners do not sign their letters to hff 

by name but use todr ini dais or a code came related to their 

.Alness.. 


Assad of Syria and Amin Gemayd of Lebanon are said to be 
regular listeners. 


Every morning Mrs. Basri opens envelopes rent through 


Geneva or some other European capital or delivered 
Arabs who have crossed the bridge from Jordan to toe West 
Bank. There is no maB service between Israel and any Arab 
country except Egypt. 

The letters often are desperate tales of disease, most of 


them eye, torn and fertility problems. Many writers send 
” ' st results, dental charts and X- 


On toe air. Mis. Basi may reply: “To tbe bird without 
ys he thii 


wings in Kuwait, the doctor says he thinks he can treat you 
here. Please send me your passport details.” Or “To Aik in 
Sandi Arabia, yoff visa his been approved by the Interior 
Ministry. You can pick it up at the Afleaby Bridge on the 
Jordan River betwess Ang, 15 and SepL L Tbe visa is good 
for one month. Call me on arrival in Jerusalem, and I will 


iake you to the doctor.” 

Israel's Arabic service readies listeners from Morocco to 


, It is an open secret that it is tuned in at coffeehouse 
in taxis in every Arab capital, and Presidents Hafez al- 


electrocardiograms. Wood test 
rays. 

A typical letter came recently from a 48-year-old Syrian 
woman. The letter, mailed in London, begins: “Dear Doctor 
Behind toe Microphone: Salaam, and good health to you. I 
am paralyzed in my legs. ] have been getting physical 
therapy, but I still have very bad pains. I heard you sp eaking 
about achi evements in rehabilitation in Israel, and 1 want to 
know if 1 can be treated in your hospital. Please bring my 
letter to a doctor in Israel I am ready to come." 

F-arh year, according to Foreign Ministry sources, hun- 
dreds of Arabs go to Isradi embassies in Europe and ask for 
visas to fly to Israel for trea tm e nt . 

Mrs. Basri got the idea for the program 14 years ago while 
lying in a heart-care unit in an Israeli hospital and noticing 
fxjw ttmi-h of toe mcdkal equipment was marked “Made in 
Israd.” At dm time, toe was a secretary at the Arabic service. 
She eventually convinced officials of the potential for such a 
radio program, and toe files in her office bulging with 
handwritten Arabic letters are testimony to her intuition. 

“But even I never thought the program would end up 
being such a live bridge that Arabs would use to cross into 
Israel,” she said. 



ThaNwYaiTn 

Oani Basri with pOes of letters from Arab listeners. 


I ! 


■ ^ - j 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1985 


Fierce Fighting Is Reported 
On Afghan-Pakistan Border 


By James Rupert 

Washington Pen Service 

■ PESHAWAR, Pakistan — Sovi- 
et-led forces and Afghan Mujahi- 
din guerrillas are fighting increas- 
ingly fierce battles in eastern 
Afghanistan for control of impor- 
tant rebel sopply routes from 
neighboring Pakistan. 

‘ Afghan resistance leaders based 
here and independent Western ob- 
servers said over the weekend that 
fighting in Paktia and Nangarhar 
provinces, which border Pakistan, 
has intensified and moved doser to 
Pakistan during the last two weeks. 
Also, the number of wounded Mu- 


:• ~KWj 

if' A 


jahidin being admitted to the Red cy, or district, that forms the “par- 
Cross hospital here — an indicator rot’s beak.” 


of the degree of fighting across the 
border — is at its highest levels. 


~ '.‘TjA pcdl them up out of their emplace- 

SOVIET 4 - ’• . n 

union j j iV - nicnts. 

v \js Spokesmen fa- theYanusKhalis 

*~| JTl rtfrfy faction and the Jasriat-i Isla n d 
. .JX % V , group said that they, too, had re- 

j J '• ’ j£. - fKabuK " ceived reports that the new heticop- 

Lh« w* taken Mujahidin guns 
r / ; v j''kwjw *■ from their positions. 

) -AFGHANISTAN^ fflsSS dhashakas cannot harm 

k-. ” ' j them,'’ said a Jamiat-i Islamt 

y Kandatwf y— P akistan j spokesman. Rasul Tarshy. 

/ J ; “Our commander in Logar prov- 

V s — — - — j‘ -\ ince,” south of Kabul, “sent a re- 

. / s — C55~»o / port saying they could only shoot 

■* c ~z one down with a grenade when it 

came low to take a dhashaka,” Mr. 
y, or district, that forms the “par- Taishy said. “After it crashed, they 
9t*s beak.” found many other dhashakas. 

Mujahidin leaders and Western which the helicopter had taken, in 
iplomats said incursions by Af- the wreckage-” 
han and Soviet forces into Paid- The intensity and proximity of 


border — is at its highest levels. diplomats said incursions by Af- “c wreckage- 
Mujahidin leaders and Western ghan and Soviet forces into Paid- The intensity and proximity of 
diplomats in Islamabad have re- stan normally increase just before the fighting has dramatically in- 
ported that helicopters and con- each round of UN-sponsored talks creased the flow of injured to the 
voys of Soviet trucks have been on the Afghan problem, such as hospital operated in Peshawar by 
ferrying troops and weapons into those held last week in Geneva. the International Committee of tire 
the border region during the last “Moscow and Kabul seem to use Red Cross. The 100-bed hospital 
two weeks. Mujahidin spokesmen these incursions as a tactic to pres- had 160 inpatients over the week- 
in Peshawar said that Soviet planes sure Pakistan toward making can- end, and the staff hastily erected 
and artillery have heavily bom- cessions” in the taTlr^ a Western tents on adjacent land to shelter the 
barded resi s ta n ce forces besieging diplomat is Islamabad said last wounded, 
the Paktia town of Khost, about 25 week. Michel Moidasini, the Swiss di- 



WORLD BRILLS 



Paper Says Kulikov Still Heads Part t 

MMCOWfiRflitm)— 


and has not been 
of staff. 




resents. 


A^Md^topa^steatromors in Joty, s 

KuSkov, 64, as head of th&Eastrbloc mtay aDumoe., . . 


i**- - 


Interior Minister Friedrich Znmnennaim, F< 
Chancellor Helmut Sold, from left, during 


Tt» Aooocaod FVma 

Minister Hans-Dieirich Genscher and 
mentary debate in Bonn on Tuesday. 


Engineers’ Union CondcnHioiJ in l^Sl^ 

BLACKPOOL, England (AF) — Britain’s Trades UnkJ^^^reaj nL/ 
two key votes Tuesday, staunchly backed 
gfriVe and condemn ed the e ngi n ee rs far alleged collabotauott 

timitmg union activities. . . . ■ 1 ~ 

The votes came as a victory for hardliners at the amnHffl Ctm teeroe rf ' 
the congress, which includes almost -100 maims. Tlte Amugraated^ 
Umoaof Engineering Wattes is Britain’s sccopd dyg^mnt^^: .; 

The resolution. backing the miners called on any rotnre 
□rent to halt mine closures, wording opposed brbofli 
wfao beads the Trades Union Confess, and Nefl Knmoc^Th^Iiba^ 
Party leader. Mir. WIIHs said the wortfiogcookl tml^be^an.fl^cto^ 
liability for Labor. 




Parliament Backs Kohl in Spy Case ca^Bomber Attad» Christian Mahs* 


miles (40 kilometers) from the bor- Three Migahidin groups died re- hospital, said more 

der. ports fromtheir commanders in the ^ ^ 5,™^ t^, m 

“The Russians are trying to seal four eastern Afghan provinces as ^ being flown in to treat the 
the border in this area to close off saying that a type of Soviet belicop- injured, 
our routes into Afghanistan," said ter heretofore unseen in the war has , . , 

Isak Gaflani, a leader of the Na- been deployed in the last 20 days. . last months have been ivoy 

tional Islamic Front of Afghani- Mujahidin spokesmen said the hch- busy for ns, with about 200 admis- 
stan. copters, amtored on the underside, sons eadi month -ax or sewu 

The Mujahidin groups said that are smaller and faster than the Mi- j Saturday. But 

Soviet and Afghan government 24 assault heli co pters that have y^^day we had 15 admissions, 
forces failed last week to push to- been the mainstay of Soviet air- “d we ve had nine by noon today, 
ward Khost from the west and now borne operations in Afghanistan. iV, wor king 


" guters ay of a top counterintelligence 

BONN — West Germany’s op- ^genL 
position parties failed Tuesday in “It would be an impertinence to 
an effort to remove Interior Minis- the German public and to thfc par- 


ter Friedrich Zimmennann. The liam e nt to leave Mr. Zhnmermann 
decision came after a stormy par- in office,” the ' Rnriai Democratic 


“The last mouths have been very 
busy fra 1 us, with about 200 admis- 


liamentary debate on the country’s leader, Haas-Jochen Vogei, de- 
spy scandal Chancellor Helmut dared. 


Kohl hati rejected the demand for 
Mr. Zimmemumn’s removal. 


Repeatedly interrupted by heck- 
ling, Chancellor Kohl replied that 


the Free Democrats, joined him in BEIRUT (AT) - A sqjdd&^xnnber exploded h is car It a Oiqjahi ^ 
omhrfftmg Mr 7tmmMmann mili tia hase in the Israeli security zone in southern Lcbapon onTucsday.- 

the A pro-Syrian Moslem ftetion, the Ba’ath Party 

=T£SrS.*5S Lebanon end Bein^ 

Tt^ge's problems with alcohol and 

Mr.Tiedge,wfaowasincfaargeof 


aerations against East German es- 


north of the Israeli border. 
But die state-run BrirutR 




— pionage in 

The resolution submitted by the Neither sttlion g»ve eepecfic MB. 


Voice of the Nation, arid that many mffiliuncr. were kffled« ««KietW 


Isisst'* 6 ^ 


and we’ve had nine by noon today. 
. . . Our surgical teams are working 


Soaa^ Democrat* was defeated ^ cooaie ^ tdSgpix 

. “ separate move ^ ^ ^Z, Tt^aad 
aeamst Mr^Zimmmaann ly the Si atay in Ua post ^ 
oppoauon Greens was turned back Mr 


for the de- 


*■ mJv ouu uvv WftUV UlAtlOLiVliO 111 ” , , 

are attacking from the north, much “These helicopters are armed 12 15 hours each day. 


closer to the “parrot’s beak” of Pa- with guns and rodkets and come in Most of the wounded were 
kistani territory that serves as a very quickly, firing on our dhasha- young men in their teens or 20s, 
major sanctuary for the guerrillas, kas" or heavy machine guns. Isak many of them amputees. They lay 
A spokesman for the Hezb-i Is- Gaflani said. “They also have a bandaged and splinted, almost ev- 
lami group led by Mcrwlavi Yunus hook or daw which they lower ay one with a worried relative 
K haiis one of the main guerrilla down on the abandoned guns and keeping watch by the bed. 


277-33. 

The Social Democrats chal- 


Mr. Kohl said that if he were to 
react to the defection by removing 
a m i n ister it would e&ectivdy play 


leuged Mr. Zimmermann’s asser- into the hnnH« of the East German 
tion that he had not known in ad- spy service to which Mr. Tied^ has 


vance of the central element of the crossed over. 


factions engaged in Paktia, said 
that the fighting now is centered 
near the town of Jaji, less than 10 
miles from the border. 

At the Kacfaa Gari refugee camp 
in Peshawar, Afghan men said 
large numbers of resistance fighters 
were leaving to join the fighting. 
The mountainous terrain on the 
Afghan side of the border is la orri 
with supply routes that are the Mu- 
jahidin's most direct links with Ka- 
bul, the Afghan capital. 

Both Pakistani and Mujahidin 
sources have reported numerous 
bombardments of P akistani vil- 
lages by Afghan government artil- 
lery and aircraft. Last Thursday, 
the P akistani government formally 
protested to Kabul over the shell- 
ing of a village in the Kurram agen- 


affair. the defection to East Genoa- The chancellor’s coalition 


weeks ago and later wrote to Bonn 
saying that he had fled because of 
his “hopeless” personal situation. 

In Dflssektacf on Tuesday, Yev- 
geni Semiyakov, 39, a member of 
the Soviet trade' mission to West 
Germany, went on trial accused of 
industrial espionage for the KGB, 
the Soviet secret police and intelli- 
gence ago icy. He has no diplomat- 
, ic immunity. 


Tories Name-Novelist to Party Post 




■r •: ' , . 

**■ T .-. r 
'*'z+s***-*' 



Libyan Mutiny Reported U.S. Replies 
To Stop Tunisia Invasion To Moscow’s 


:W V "’*. - 


\waporan; 



By Christopher Dickey 

WaMnpan Post Service 

CAIRO — The Egyptian press 
has published assertions that a 
planned Libyan invasion of Tuni- 
sia was aborted by a last-minute 
mutiny of Moamer Qadhafi's offi- 
cers. 

Western journalists in Tripoli 
were unable to co nfirm any details 
of the allegations mad* Monday in 
Cairo’s semi -official daily newspa- 
per aJ-Ahram. Al-Ahram gave no 
indication of the sources of the alle- 
gations. 

But independently the Tunisian 
government lodged an “energetic 
protest” with Libya for repeated 
violations of Tunisian airspace by 
combat aircraft. 

The aJ-Ahram report said that a 
serious mutiny took place among 


would pay dearly for its expulsion § 
of Egyptian, Tunisian and other L/f 
foreign workers and warned 
A gains t any Libyan mditaiy action (Continued from Page 1) . 
against Tunisia. tant aspect of ingnoving our ida- 

“I pray to God that Libya does tions.” 
not think of starting any combat ■ Prospects for Gen 
action against Tunisia.” Mr. Mu- u . ^ 

barak «ad!^t will be the gravest 
mistake Qadhafi ever committed.” anH 


,y to God that Libya does tions.” 
k of starting my combat ■ Prospects for Geneva 


LONDON (Reatecs) ■— Jeffrey 
Archer, a mflKanaire novelist, was 
named dqmtjr rfi««‘rnyw of. Brit- 
ain’s ruling Ccmservatrae'Bffty on 
Tuesday in a bod to enliven its im- 
age. ' . 

Mr. Archer, 45, is a former mem- 
ber of Parti amen t and haswodted 
m public rdations. Neman Tcb- 
bit, the former secretary Of trade 
and industry wrio was granted 
party chairman in Prinfc Minister 
Margaret Thatcher’s cabinet .re- 
shuffle on Monday, said that Mr. 
Archer would “bnng a touch of 
dash and s^le to tia-psitf.” ■ ' 
‘Mr. Archer left Farfumeat in 
1974 under a cloud of impending 
bankruptcy after investing/in a 

co m pa n y that latw collapsed. He 

turned to writing nowds. to pay off 
his debts. The latest, “Enst Amcmg 
Equals,” tdls of ambdtion' and in- 
trigue in the House Commons. 



JeffreyArcber 


UCfE*' .- 

ixsi-'r . 

‘“s' 

biai a -' f :. 
&zr-'- ■ .* 
b \L«:..--: r - 
icsi*- - *" 

Sk 

it? -r" " 

getaj ib” 

ilsr-r-' : 
BSis? •• ”■ 1 

S3T2j:£i - :^ 


Mr. Gorbachev is ready for“rad- 
kaT (tffera to cat strategic weapcais 
and may concede that some'basc 
research on space weapons is per- 


2 Israeli Soldiers 
Stabbed on West 
BankfOneDies 


research on spare weapons is per- BEUING (NYT)— -Thereparted retirement af Pol Pot as commander 
nutted under existing agreements, of fee Khmer Rouge has been greeted with skepticism by Prince Nero-. 
UR senators who met the Soviet domShanouk,hmd(^tite|>ditical alliance framed by the KSuncrRobge. 
leader said Tuesday, The Assodat- arid two other. Cambodian guerrilla groups. 

ed Press reported from Moscow. In an interview with the Milan newspaper Corriere della Sera, Prinoe 
c — *nrSamNi — ^ * ~ r m - — *- 1,1 - 1 - - "■ — ^ _ j / • 


t Cb.-i: •• 
fc'.'r-'xr *c 
db-^L- 
zsrzi-:- 

isr Ccxr. >. ■ 
• * 

tGr.;-; '■ 


ed Press nmorted from Moscow. In an interview with, the Milan newspaper Corriere della Sera, Prinoe - 
Senator sun Nunn, Democrat of Sihanouk mid that as be&d of the altianne fighfmg the.yietnam-badced 
Georgia,' said that Mr. Gorbachev government oTCambodialte was “obBged^to bdieve the awmnmirwnenf' 
made very dear that -fundamental But as as an iifttividnal with ipip erienne de ali ng w ith 6ig un inifft/wg^ he' - 




made very dear that fundamental 


Washington Post Semen 

JFRTWAT FM Twn T m -i; ve E J ? 1 ’ .. . ^ Ihelorroer L^mbodiau ruler, who makes his home for part erf the year 

soldiers war nabbed, one fataUv ^ Sma^Nunnsaid, in Be^in^ has madeno secret of Ins loathing fw Mr. Pol Pc£ head of the.' 

TiSv^ti^wSt bS d w that Mr. Gorbachev bdievra basic r^me whose ragn of terror fram l975 to 1979 killed hundreds at 
E y ^ ^SdinTa h2u2 ^ thousands of Chmbodiank-^ 

that has become tbefoccu of a drive TrLti? 72 Anb " Ball,stlc Missile for fte deaths of five of his children and 1* 

ireary. grandchildren who disappeared. • ■ 1 


space weapons research cannot be said, he r^arded it as a rose. 


verified. 


The former Cambodian ruler, whq makes ins home for part erftheyea^ 


Colonel Qadhafi's air and land Tuesday in the West Bank city of 
forces at dawn Saturday. It named Hebron while guarding a house 


the leaders as Colonel Mohammed that has become the focus of a drive 
el-Barghash, commander of the El by Jewish settlers to move into ex- 


■2SK -.7 
rczivri 7.: 
fes-,; -in 
etccc- ;• r 
ws’rr: :• : 

S3SV. 


D« Asodtfed Proa 


Wabia air base near the Tunisian 
bolder, and Colonel Khalifa Khidr. 


dusiveiy Arab neighborhoods. 
Hebron was declared a “dosed 


WOfried Martens, Belgium's prime uumster, on Tuesday. 


AVENUE IOUISE 
INTERIM 


207. flMjnuelDUtK- 1050 Brus5Ct 


King Dissolves Assembly 
bi Belgium After Dispute 


Tbe officers were said to have military area” and the central Arab 
rebelled, even attempting to bomb marketplace was placed under 


Senator Byrd said that Mr. Gor- 

positive approach to the Geneva U.S. Gulf Coast Assesses Storm’s M 

minnritv BILOXI,. Mississqrpi (AP) - Pofice and Natural Guard t ’ 

oultid £ panoDed areas of the coast of the Gulf of Mexico on Tuesday usd» | 

authorities and residents began adding up the damage kfety the i 
hnmcane de rigiat e d Elena. Tongntial rnnsmd tharv wi - ! 


grandchildren who disappeared. 


Colond Qadhafi’s residence, rather strict anfew as Jewish settlers 
than prepare to invade Tunisia as forced their way into the narrow 


ordered. A total of 43 officers were alleys of tbe area, seeking retalia-. 


said to have been arrested. 


tkm. However, army sources at the 


While Egypt is reputed to have scene said there was no rioting. 


an extensive intelligence network The army command said the two 


istTakes 


^ wiB h^Iimnthel^et side 
the most radical proposals on stra- coast, especially same of the areas 1 


WORLDWIDE 

ENTERTAINMENT 


12. av. gcorgtr V til.723 . 3Z . 32 

PARIS - FRANCE 



Ptutm ground (hat their more populous 

BRUSSELS — King Bandouin region suffers from the present di- 
of Belgium has granted a govan- vision of funds, 
ment request for the immediate dis- Tbe social affairs minister. Jean- 

solution of parliament -Luc Dehaenc, a leading figure in 

A dispute over education policy Mr Martens’ Flemish Social Chris- 
on Monday split tbe ruling four- Party, said that the French- 
party coalition, whose mandate speaking party bore heavy respon- 
runs until national elections on sibility for creating what be called a 


in Ubya, there was no independent soldiers, both reservists, were 
confirmation of any aspect of the stabbed while on guard duty adja- 


ground (hat their more populous report. Egypt’s desire to discredit cent to a house from which seven 
region suffers from the present di- Colond Qadhafi, however, is no rightist members of tbe Knesset 

Vision of ftillds. secret. m^Mnrfpdnn Ana Tfl Tlw> rinlit. 


tegic arms and intermediate-range 
weapons." 


rafepper inf is 

fcLr.-c'iLJ.;;,- 
23 .fc - 


lt . were evicted on Aug. 20. Tbe right- 

Tbe United Stat^ was con- ists had occiqjied the bouse for four 


-Luc Dehaenc. a leading figure in ceraed enoogh about Libyan troop days to press their demand for gov- 
Mr. Martens’ Flemish Social Chris- movements last week to issue a onment-spaiisared Jewish sertle- 
tian Party, said that the French- strong statement reiterating its sup- ment in the center of Hebron, 
speaking party bore heavy respon- .... Troops posilioned on the roofs 


Gorbachev 

Interview 


roast, espeaauy some of the areas like Pascagoula, Gulfport and Afcori: 
uowntown the business areas are wiped out” 

Tie «pnn strode the coast Monday after five days of rigzaniu 
through tte gulf. Ihe storm forced more than a million people famSea 
hom« m Flonda, Louisiana, Mississipiri and Alabama. Three deaths iff 
rlonda were blamed on the humcatm. 


® ip » 

fK'ZX&i 

a:.. 

ft r 


For the Record 


Oct 13. 

The atmosphere among the part- 
ners in Prime Minister Wflfried 


Tbetoarions are real, even if the hou^s 


dangerous institutional situation rhetoric surrounding them is exag- opened fire into the alley, wotmd- 
But Interior Minister Charles- gerated. - — 


West^ German ^ Leftist groiqj. churned respos^ 

(Continued from Page I) $ib flity Tu esday for bomb attacks Monday against computer 
always say, 74o money; there’s no 5 L^rtmund and Hamburg, police said. The group said i computersTrere 
money,’ ” Mr. Gorbachev said. instruments of suppression used by the militaiy and police." - (JP) 

terview 4 a ^[ogua. But ha ^ ‘ 


ners in Prime Minister Wflfried -FerdinamL Nothomb of the Social The root of the problem, howev- ^kL 

Martens’s center-right team was Party rq«ncd the criti- a - , is not so much a Libyan plan to 

described by party officials as very c ¥ m - “3^ education send troops against its nagbbors as 

had. plans offered none of tbe safe- ll K Colonel Qadhafi’s insistence 


mg two Arabs, militaiy sources 


ResenunenL i, dueled uuudy ZSSSS^ ““ 


against the small French-* 
Social Christian Party, wii 


8 fonns. 


Although Colonel Qadhafi was 


Grenades Hurt 19 
At Greek Resort 


Jt*F*** 


“instruments of suppression nsed bv the ndlhaty md jW ^ 


* r- — — — m mm WHI, » .V inUjn ^ 

m Stodchdm after suffering a stroked He 




wasted no time with small talk and, 
in a typical Russian style, cut deq>- 


shl ? t *5 Di » COT «7 retained to Earth at Edwards Air- Force 


Guy Sphaels. president of the sc® 0 35 2 dangerous troublemaker 


ly on a variety of issues, including Basem(Mfonria Tuesday afta a mission during whirih launched three 
the Reagan administration's Stra- satellites and repaired a disabled ct anmupi^a tio Tts - - (AP) 


tn - paniamentary scats. Party French-speaking opposition So- by many governments in the re- . -T-r^-^ro" _ ing tbe economy and arms caolroL *"■ ““ ,on ner u^>. president, arrived m Banna on 

jjta cmlist Party, described the outcome gion, his rich and underpopulated Dc^ite Mr. Gorbachev’s success ^ c ®? ntI ^5 ea J? r s and a tour of four dtie?§eis 

the next adnumstra- ^ ^ dispute as “a pitiful deba- country of 3 million people has werc T ^ sd ^ y °9j° in updating tbe Western public’s sjeader, Drag Xiaoping, befran leaving for a tour 


United Press Iniemationtd 




to empower the next admimstra- ^ , 
lion to hand over education policy ^ 
to tbe Flemish-speaking r^ton of « 


j ^Presi 

'ARareF 


CRfiZY HORSE 


A 8 ovenirneDl that thought it u ‘ uiousanos or foreign — * 06 03X1 maKai **r. Reagan as a . rrenen staoiera tore proi op a search fa mgmhrrr nf , mf, . _ ir ,- - fc, 

wfiw;a CfaSpeafe ^ 8 was 10 stay in office for ever w °rkcrs whose countries sordy “great communicator” is open w was lost on the Zaire River last montiLFraSh I 

it^onofWalloma. has Sw been K.b.’d for the second needed the cash that the worked An hour after the bli«, a woman W sridTuesday m I 


provided jobs, until recently, for i “re Z 

hundreds of thousands of foreign 19 _.*^^ tol ^ sts ’ 


he can match Mr. Rragan as a French sokfiers hare ^toi i 


" far and away 
the best nude revue 
in the world 


region of wallonia. 

Education is currently a national 
responsibility. The two Flemish 
parties in the government have 
been poshing fear tbe transfer on tbe 


has now been K.O.’d for the second needed the cash that the workers 
time in two months,” he said, refer- scnl home. 


An hour after the blast, a woman 
called an Athens newspaper and 


question. 


oi borne . ” m ‘ Many observers in Moscow won- ^^o^«(4,0(X)ititenet^)^£^ an ^^ 1 ^ 

11,13 ^ “sJaZ t* 4 ***.."* ““ wb0 as the Congo River. ■' S 


ring to the government crisis over 


tiie Heysd stadium soccer riot that strapped by dropping oil prices, the 


resulted in 39 deaths in May. workers have left by tbe tens of 


Black < 
ens on 




scvi prejj 


nave len oy me tens or — -r — - ^ ~r « lime wru transmit aswettnveon to the United ToZ. 

thousands. Sometimes they have “2?. “ 1101 xl ^ television. M«e important, Mr. i9 to 

hem exneiieH Tr^ur.^ u..» (rffiaal news agency, reported. Po- kar --|j u: _ir __ii a B enc y rc P°rted Tuesday. 


at the t>ar only 250 frs 
+ 15-': service charge 


} iHingOt. 


LASSERRE 

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VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT 


1 7 Ave. Franklin-Rooseveif 
Tel.: 359.53.43 & 67^45 


M* art afa. fadan tparxMm. bnh 50 f- Ew«u 
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LVUbra ft SsaMt IS, r. do Jour. TS13/M 


LECHAMBORD 


17. nm ftwiO <M<. Td- 7477317. 
ScMb Wee of Fiona tpwrfto. Cum bf owner 


been expelled fordbiy. but mare «riaai n^s age* 
often they simply have gone home J* 

when their contracts were not re- ^ 

newed or their wages evapOTated. “Vf? 0 ^ 

A year ago. \si(X)0 oian «ti- “ AU>qis,ub ^ Aulhoaties said 

mated 800,000 foreign workers in £ 

Libya were reported to have left. - 
Last month, an estimated 25 000 ™ sa £ or ’ ^ 

Tunisian workers were pushed’out 111 Tacs ^f^ s atti 
of Libya. V two grenades, oni 

Intermediaries from Morocco 
and Kuwait have been trying to “ “5 

unrir a wttiFm*ni winch is near a L 


SSiftSK ha lmsyatoddivcronhispdi. 


= ya to d.1™ on hiv pdi- 

Mr. Gorbadiev said that tbe So- 

they suspected that be was an a 

miRuvn Jovm rh- CODC F elC proposal at the StaUmt 


. ( Reuters ) 

1 make an. official visit i 
tKqntfS national news ’ 
. (Reuters ) , 


migeinn to ltiD the Jordanian am- 
bassador. 

In Tuesday’s attack, a man threw 


concrete proposals at the summit 

meeting, but as yet he has not given 
a hint of those proposals. Some of 


The Reshaping of U.S. Politics 


(Continued from Page 1) 


I < 

i 

i 

i 

! J^4eS' Ci :-1e io 

i it***** 


the policies Mr. Gorbachev has issue and 


two grenades, one wrapped in a “ pubKcans matte in 

towel, into the swimming pool area .** P IO P osod . ^ the 


ft Slors oui Jlcitid 


•y. ONEOf THE BEST 

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mrMBFi» 
s sreULTES 

MK BtnWSA. ■ S30J2J2 
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JOGOU3B4BB(G LE MANOR 

7. Bn do Rbim. 887.2Q.16 <* 8W7Q39. faskarai ,, , ■ » rt^TeLSSay 1 ■ 

gm L*di Un <x frwr, o. S a. Open 5 ib»Jd> 

Wi t pBOtftiai. rnnad barf, potaxra. exfod corn 
«nftW Eofano, te ho i ti Open 1U7. 


work a settlement. 

■ Mubarak Issues Wanting 


towel, into me swimming pool area f n _ c r 
and garden of the GtyfedaHoteL S5S 
which is near a UJ5. air base at g^. ^ 
Hdlinikoc. In February, a bomb _ 
explosion in a Glyfads bar injured 


forms for the Soviet economy, have ^ “southern strategy, 
not shown originality. But they cautioned 


shift of conservative- 


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A Cocfeon of qdynfnd far i gmttor*. 
bm fw St 1925c nuj 2SQTXD f?. 


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I To Spain Leader’s Plane BoSS'SSttfy'fi j Njfenw 

WA U'MPrenfnernnm't “increased polarization between boldest predictita'came’ ! JS? ?0 Fu^V 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1985 


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TALLEST SAND CASTLE — The “CameJot >85; 
Sleeping Beauty’s Castle” rises 40 feet above the shore 
off the Pacific Ocean in San Diego. Perched on a base of 
15,000 tons of piled sand, it took nearly a week to build. 

Judges to Collared 
By law’s Long Arm 

From state judges in Chicago 
to county judges in Maryland. 


more jurists than ever are com- 
ing before the bar to face 
charges. The New York Times 
reports. In June, a Partington, 
Wisconsin, judge was charged, 
with first-degree murder after a 
lawyer was slabbed to death. In 
August, a judge in Hammond, 
Indiana, was- sentenced to 15 
years in prison for pegury. 

In Mississippi last week, a 
federal district judge, Walter L. 
Nixon Jr., 56, was indicted on 
charges of- accepting oil- well 
royalties as a bribe, and lying to 
a federal grand jury about his 
influence in a drug case! He was 
the third sitting federal judge in 
UJL history to be indicted far 
activities related to his judicial 
duties. 

In Chicago, “Operation 
Greylord,” the Federal Bureau 
off Investigation's undercover 
investigation of the Cook 
County Circuit Court, resulted 
in the conviction of four judges. 

An American Judicature So 
tidy official reports a doubting 
of the cas&mit lt has moni- 
tored 

The mSfcai^is Hf mTw yu o -tar. 
creased activism by judicial 
conduct boards<aa&grealer en- 
thusiasm among law -enforce- 
ment agencies for using under- 
cover methods to fight 
corruption. 




Short Takes 

Grasshopper infestations in 
the West and Middle West were 
the worst this year since 1933 
devastating crops in parts of 13 
states. After spending 535 mil- 
lion for aerial spraying, the Ag- 
riculture Department now says 
that up to 95 percent of the 
insects were killed- But nriflicHis 
of acres went untreated, and a 
recurrence appears likely next 

year. Q 

Tax amnesties —giving indi- 
viduals and businesses a dial 

to pay overdue taxes .wifout 
penalty —have been tried by 12 
States in an effort to collect mil- 
lions of dollars in unpaid reve- 
nue. So far these programs, ex- 
pected to be copied by six other 
ST- Colorado, Louisiana, 


New Mexico, New York, South 
Carolina and Wisconsin — by 
year’s end, have brought in 
about 5378 millio n- The federal 
government is said to be study- 
ing a similar program. 

□ 

When a 14-ton ship’s anchor 
arrived at Fort Carson, Colora- 
do, instead of a $6 lamp, the 
U.S. Army said, “Anchor's 
away.” The 528,500 anchor 
showed up after a clerk in the 
704th Maintenance Battalion 
zmscopied the lamp requisition 
number on an order form. The 
anchor was sent — by slow 
boat, presumably — back to the 
Naval Supply Center in Nor- 
folk, Virginia. 


Bonn, With Eye on ’87 V ote, 
Adopts Cautious Stand on SDI 

. .. ...... , -LI. .. L-!J “»» nilltl K!( 


. By James M Maxkham m »“•" “ & £' “ffi“SS&£5 

"7 Y " k J^Jr% i , ^ar S^eagan'smitiativeon GeruSer. whose doubts have be- 
BONN — Chancellor Helmut ___ a^aixms has not shown <ig»« come pronounced. Mr. Gensdter is 

===——. 

"* ■ * * ' - - aF nMAA unMfiAltC 


space weapons. The tactic is de- 
signed to keep the issue from mov- 
ing to the center of West Germa- 
ny's political debate, according to a 
hijgh-’rankmg official. 

One of Mr. Kohl’s senior securi- 
ty advisers, who is a member of the 

- 30-man delegation (hat will exam- 
ine the Reagan administration’s 
space weapons program in the 
United Stales later this week, wel- 
comed what he said was a more 

• dispassi onate discussion of the 
question on both sides of the Atlan- 
tic 

"We want to lake the emotion 
away from the thing,” said the ad- 
viser, who requested anonymity. 
"The discussion has become more 
factual. In the United States, too, 

- there is not so much talk about *the 
vison' — a shield covering the 
whole country and so on.” 

Led by Horst Tdtschik, Mr. 
Kohl's national security adviser, 
the delegation to the United States 
wifl include officials from the min- 
istries of defense, foreign affairs 
and research as well as representa- 
tives of West German industries 
that are interested in participating 
in. the projected 526-billion re- 
search program. 

The delegation was to arrive in 


oi its criticism of space weapons 
research as the campaign nears. 

At a Munich rally on Sunday 
marking the anniversary of the out- 
break of World War U, a former 
chancellor and the leader of the 
■gn^ni Democrats, Willy Brandt, 
called on Mr. Kohl to use his influ- 
ence to prevent the mflitarizaiion 
of space. He asked the anti-war 
movement “not to lose its orienta- 
tion or fall into resignation.” 

The Kohl government faces par- 
allel pressures from East Germa- 
ny’s leader. Erich Honccker, who 
has lately stressed that relations 
with Bonn will be conditioned by 
its attitude toward the Strategic 
Defense Initiative. Western ana- 
lysts say that the Soviet Union has 
assigned Mr. Honccker a rote simi- 
lar to the one played for the Krem- 
lin in trying to dissuade Bonn from 
accepting Pershing-2 missiles. 

By adopting a somewhat skepti- 
cal approach to a space-based de- 
fense system. Mr. Kohl has been 


in Geneva. 

Mr. Kohl has been able to patch 
up a rift with France that opened at 
the May summit meeting m Bonn 
when President Francois Mitter- 
rand announced that his govern- 
ment would not participate in the 
US. program. Since then, Mr. 
Kohl has lent support to the 
French notion of a European high- 
tech pooling organization named 
Eureka, conceived as a counter- 
weight to Japan and the United 
States. 

Mr. Kohl and his advisers have 
not abandoned their support for 
the research phase of Mr. Reagan’s 
initiative, and a consensus among a 
number of officials is that there 
probably will be what one called 
"moderate participation in certain 
ventures” by selected West Ger- 
man industries. 

Mr. Kohl hopes to confer with 
Mr. Reagan in Washington in No- 
vember before the summit meeting 
in Geneva with Mi if hail S- Gorba- 
chev, the Soviet leader. 



businesses were burned, and a fireman died of a heart attack while fighting the blaze. 


Hard Times Bypass Organic Farmers 

m • 


Manure, Crop Rotation Replace Expensive Chemicals 

— By Ward Sinclair estimate that 20.000 to 40,000 nrin«tration is dealin* with. 

The likelihood of a government- hLhhr** Pax Sen* American farmers work organical- 

to^governmaii agreement wtD e- wilUaMSFIELD, Ohio — ly. But, he added, “more are joining 

tfinf-sus ijsigisss&u ifsasasa* 

MSSSSSKKS 5 ■SBSgsSSt JSBSBtfBS. 

„r the pa. me farmers straggle to make end! 


In Historic Savannah, 
Hies Don’t Wash 

Savannah, Georgia, a coastal 
dty with hundreds of painstak- 
ingly preserved historic build- 
ings, is embroiled in a fight with 
the federal government over the 
exterior ofa new office b u i ldin g 

that a mayoral aide says looks 

like a bathroom waH 

The three' hnildmgs in the 
$2-l-inflHbn' JuHetie Gordon 
office, dflmple* sit 

on Telfair, Square, ope;of torn 

squares in a dty plan deydoped 
in the 1600s. Local officials and 
historic preservation organiza- 
tions negotiated an ag ree m e n t 
on the design of the complex 
with the General Services Ad- 
mixustration to make it fit the 
historic character of the dty. 
But when construction crews 
bffgan putting up tiles on the' 
federal budding, officials were 
aghast. 

Mayor John Ronsakis said 
that the tiles are not those origi- 
nally selected. His assistant, 
Mike Baquer, said: “It doesn’t 
just look like a bathroom wall. 
It looks like an institutional 
bathroom walL It’s a sin.” 

Mr. Ronsakis has written the 
GSA and Congress to ask for 
hdp on getting the tile changed, 
but has received no assurances. 
Mr. Baquer said that a local 
architect offered dty fathers 
this advice: “Don’t pass judg- 
ment yet — wail until they get 
through and hang the shower 
curtains.” 

— Compiled by 
BRIAN KNOWLTON 


called”" the architecture of the re- ing fanners straggle to make ends 

meet this year, he will make a profit 
on his com and soybeans. 

The reason is simple: Mr. Pash- 
ley farms organically. He fertilizes 
with, manure from his milk cows; 
maintains strict CTOp rotations tO 
increase fertility, control erosion, 
subdue insects and weeds; and me- 
chanically cultivates to remove the 
weeds that survive. 

Mr. Pashlev’s crop yields are the 
same or better, but his costs are 
much lower than his neigh bore’ be- 
cause he uses none of the expensive 

chemical pesticides and herbicides 

A Modern- Jazz 

DIoc Yet Mr. Pashley and a handful of 

urommer, -LflcS other farmers who follow the same 

cultivation practices in northeast- 
ern Ohio are gping against the grain 

of most U5. farming, which relies 
on chemicals and petroleum-based 

. .r ikiu, nn 


search program” envisioned by the 
Reagan adminis tration. 

With the deployment of U.S. me- 
dium-range missiles, the Kohl gov- 
ernment is eager to prevent the 
space-based program from polariz- 
ing the country and becoming a 
central issue in the campaign lead- 
ing up to general elections in 1987. 

"One could end up having a de- 

Philly Joe Jones, 
Modem-Jazz 
Dies 


UUUtUiW »**«■» 

USDA's organic specialist, also 
noted that agricultural scientists 
and land-grant colleges are show- 
ing new interest in organic tech- 
niques. . . . 

A few schools, such as the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, Iowa Stat e. 
Michigan State, Maine, University 
of California at Davis. Washington 
State, Montana State and North 
Carolina State, have begun serious 
programs in organic research, but 
the center for such activity still is 
the Rodale Research Center, an 
arm of the Rodale publishing em- 
pire in Ftnmaiis. Pennsylvania. 

George DeVault, editor of Ro- 
dale’s “New Farm” magazine for 
organic farmers, said he believes 
that “economics are the big thing” 


minis tration is dealing with, trying 
to reduce surpluses and cut the cost 
of farm programs. It wouldn't hurt 
a rhing if yields came down a bit” 
Mr. Youngberg said most farm- 
ers stick with traditional methods 
because of the difficult and costly 
t ransi tion period to organic farm- 
ing when crops must be diversified 
and markets found for the new 
crops. Some farmers say they feel 
there is a lack of reliable informa- 
tion on organic farming, particular- 
ly on how to control weeds and 
provide plant nutrients. 

Rodale’s New Farm magazine 
and the Regenerative Agriculture 
Association that supports it have 
set up a nationwide telephone net- 
work to provide hdp to organic 
fanners with problems. More than 
1,000 fanners have agreed to offer 
counseling at no cost 
Lying beneath all this is some- 
thing more than economics: a be- 
lief that chemical fanning takes 



ihai “economics are tne mg uung ^ i .CT;, TT.,; 

in nersuadine conventional farmers more from the soil than it puts 
SlSS^amc techniques. “Our back, depleting agricultures most 
magazine concentrates on the com- va to*M*® s ®® L , 

mnn cniv cosi-cffectivcQcss of Mr. Pishlcy, who abafldoood 

figESKu*-** 

Mr. Jones was best known a rv-_ fanners manv times lei 


New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Philly Joe 
Janes, 62, a leading modem-jazz 
drummer, died of a heart attack 


Mr. Jones was best known a 
member of the Miles Davis Quintet 
in, the mid-1950s, with Mr. Davis 
playing trumpet, Paul Chambers 

on bass. Red Garland on piano and 
John Cdtrane on saxophone. 

In tire 1980s, Mr. Jones was the 
leader of Demeronia, a repertory 
group that recreated Tadd Damer- 
on’s small-band bebop arrange- 
ments. He also appeared recently 
on albums by Bobby Hutcherson 
and the Manhattan Transfer, and 
made albums with his own quintet 
for the Milestone recording labeL 
He lived in Europe from 1967 
until 1972 and tangfat drums with 


d year. 

Spurred by the Agriculture De- 
partment with a campaign to re- 
duce sail erosion, thousands of 
fanners are switching to no-tiUor 
minimum -tin agriculture, _ which 
^mphawres less soil cultivation but 
which requires huge amounts of 
powerful herbicides to control 
weeds. 

The tradeoff has stirred concern 
among fanners and conservation- 
ists about the detrimental impact 
of these highly toxic che mi ca ls on 
soil structure, water quality and 
public health in general Little re- 
search is conducted on long-term 


“The bottom une is uun n . 

Fanners many times less to produce coming to the end of agriculture as 
comparable crops, and the organic we know it. besaid. 

Srmer’s financS needs are less "Man and tedmology are de> 
than those of the chemical farmer,” straying gjebasej thto l we hve on, 
Mr. DeVault said. “This really is he said. DesttoyUfe m the son, 
the answer to (he problem the ad- you destroy life above the soiL 


Aldebert 

PARIS' 16 place Vendome 1, bd de la Madeleine 
70, fg Saint-Honore Palais des Congres, Porte Maillot 

CANNES: 19. La Croisette 


StS effects of increased b^ddc * 

returned to Pbfladdphia in 1972 ^ p M p n administration, 

and resumed his U-S. career. reversintt a trend begun in the Car- 

J °® 5ph ter administration, has strongly re- 

the name Philly Joe to sisted efforts to involve the USDA 

hm^thcp^ccmgj^*™- deeply in studying 


President Is Giving Pt 
A Rare Feeling 


(Continued from Page f ) 
had been earning as much 

^OMreachos. “From now ^ 

™p“ XSdidMi. Belaunde 
amyaLNotowy ^.collapse of 


TO the vision Of a 

hope by ^J?^?resultsvmdicat- 
ditfercntPer^ ^ Apr fl 14 
ed his message. __ than 

elections, he w® 1 

the eight his par ty, 

bined m*lg*£* Re volan«^ 


■> as a read 1 AHson, 

i ejward Ida" 1 ' no ackno®- 



renovation is the fact that APRA, 
which was blocked from j»wer on 
at least two previous occasions, has 
taken office for the first time smee 
its foundation in 1924. 

Mr. Garda, although only a few 
weeks into his five-year tom, ap- 
pears to view his role m tastoimal 
terms, promising a revolution that 
will bring “the true democracy of 
freedom and bread” for afl Peruvi- 
ans- 

He also has promised fundamen- 
tal changes in the way Peru has 
hw *n governed for several genera- 
tions, specifically by deantralizmg 
power and redirecting resourcra 
Say&an Lima towardlMlolg. 
neglected Indian population of the 
Andean sierra. _ 

lfhcij!UCCCS S fol.^liWf“°' 
different parties exmiade, he cotdd 
S a cri& roh; in Penman poh- 

ncs for several decades. Peru s con- 
stitution forbids immediaie^ rejec- 
tion but, theorencaBy^- 

could run for office agam m 1995. 

Senior govanment officials rec- 
ognize that the honeymoon prota- 
K end when the oaggerated 
S^tions of widdy diverse » 
the population are not 

quickly satisfied- 

With per capita income now 

Konom ic recession poses 
at challenge. Einergswy 
have temporanly ended .the ■ heettc 
speculation^ prices and doUar «- 

Socrates, but only one ; m three 
^Kdults has a full-time job, 
wSle industry is working al 50 per- 
cent capacity. 


20 Seized In West Bank 
In New Israeli Operation 

The Jtuockued Prat 

TEL AVIV — Israeli security 
forces rounded up 20 Palestinians 
in the occupied West Bank on 
Monday night and jailed them 
without trial as the government 
sought to enforce a new ana- terror- 
ism campaign, military sources said 
Tuesday. 

The Israeli military co m man d er 
of the West Bank, Major General 
Anmon Sbabak, ordered the ar- 
rests, the sources said. 


menu One of the Reagan adminis- 
tration’ s early actions was to dis- 
miss the only full-time organic 
fanning specialist in the depart- 
ment. , 

Secretary John R. Block set the 
tone when he caD«i organic re- 
search a “dead end.” 

No one is certain how many of 
the country’s commercial fanners 
are plying their trade organically, 
but there are many indications that 
the number is growing as fanners 
seek ways to cut costs and reduce 
environmental risks. 

Garth Youngberg, director of 
the instit ute f OT Alternative Agri- 
culture, in Greenbeh, Maryland, 
said he continues to use the USDA 


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•Page 4 


WEDNESDAY* SEPTEMBER 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


PubGftbed With Hk New York Time* and The WnUngun Port 


Sribimc. r Apartheid: The EC Edges Toward Sanctions 

* ! _ A.fiaw thnf anil HpCtfl 1 


Good News From Ethiopia 


' The sdiool children who donated their pen- 
nies, the rock stan who gave their talents, the 
people who wrote checks to relief agencies — 
all can take pride in the news from Ethiopia. 

**1110 skeleton-like people, the kids with 
bloated bellies, you hardly see that now” says 
M. Peter McPherson, administrator o£ theU-S. 
Agency for International Development, after a 
visit to Ethiopia. “There are still people dying, 
of course, but the contrast is dramatic" 

He estimates that more than five million of 
the qgftt minion Ethio pians at risk of starva- 
tion are now receiving food. The worst hunger 
remains in the regions of Ttgre and Eritrea in 
northern Ethiopia, where civil war still ham- 
pas relief. Congested pais, which die Ethio- 
pian government seems unable or unwilling to 
dear, also are a hindrance. 

Nevertheless, what once seemed a disaster 


life With the New Plague 


Should schools admit children with AIDS? 
Need the Pentagon test recruits for exposure to 
the acquired immune deficiency syndrome vi- 
rus? These are just the latest of the social 
problems raised by the deadly new disease. 

The AIDS virus will IdQ man, woman or 
child if a sufficient dose gets into the blood- 
stream. No vaccine or treatment is available. 
The number of cases of this new plague dou- 
bles every year. That is reason enough far fear 
in principle. But there are strong grounds for 
most people to be reassured in practice 
AIDS is transmitted when blood or semen 
carrying the vims is passed from one person 
into the bloodstream of another. That happens 
in two main ways: by drug abusers snaring 
unclean needles or by homosexual relations. In 
New York, 30 percent of AIDS victims are 
drug addicts, 59 permit are homosexuals. 
There are other, less common ways of get- 

S AIDS. Hemophiliacs used to be at risk 
a test was developed for screening blood 
donations. Infants can acquire the disease 
from ibeir mothers in the womb or at birth. 
AIDS can be transmitted by heterosexual in- 
tercourse, but only very rarely. The evidence 
is abundant that the disease is not spread 
by casual contact 

Is the genera] population at risk? Not really. 
New cases overwhelmingly affect drug abuses 


and homosexuals. The number of cases among 
the rest of the public is growing, but remains at 
1 percent of the total 
What should be done about AIDS children 
now reaching school age? Thoughtful deci- 
sions will depend on age and other circum- 
stances. In New York City, a special pond of 
health experts, an educator and a parent mil 
screen each child with AIDS to deter mine 
whether they should be taught in the class- 
room or at home. AIDS children will not be 
segregated on the basis of fear. 

The reco mmendatio n of the federal Centers 
for Disease Control is (hat most AIDS chil- 
dren be allowed lo attend school. It cautiously 
suggests that preschoolers, those who bite or 
have open lesions, be cared for in ways that 
reduce possible exposure of other children. 

Americans live in an unseen ocean of peril- 
ous viruses and bacteria. In New York and 
other large cities, that microbial ocean proba- 
bly includes AIDS viruses — although they 
cannot live long outride the body. The body’s 
defenses are remarkably successful in keeping 
invaders at bay. Ordinary contact with an 
AIDS victim evidently makes little difference. 

AIDS is frightening because of what it does 
to its victims. They have enough tragedy to 
deal with; there is no need to ostracize them. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Full Plate lor Congress 


The reconvening Congress has an enormous 
amount of serious work to do by the end of the 
year. It will also have to disuse of some showy 
ride issues on which members of both parties 
may be tempted to grandstand. The less of this 
the better. Time is shorter than it seems. 

The agenda is being driven partly by the 
government calendar. The current fiscal year 
ends Sept. 30, and a lot of existing authority — 
to spend, to regulate in certain ways, even to 
tax — is scheduled to expire with it It took 
Congress the full seven months before it went 
home for vacation Aug. 1 to adopt a budget 
dedaring its fiscal intentions for the year 
ahead. Now come the bills to cany out these 
intentions. Only two of the regular 13 appro- 
priations bills for next fiscal year have got as 
far as House-Senate conference. Six others 
have passed only in the House. All must be 


enacted by Ocl lor Congress, as in every year 
since 1973, will have to adopt a continuing 
resolution to sustain unfunded agencies. White 
House officials have indicated that President 
Reagan may use the veto to brush tip his 
crede n tials on the spending issue. 

The two houses have also committed them- 
selves to pass reconciliation bills, wrapping up 
the spending cats envisioned in the budget 
resolution, in such politically difficult and 
technically complex areas as college student 
aid, veterans' health benefits, Medicare, and 
Amtrak and other transportation subsidies. 

In theory Congress must then also act by 
Oct I on a new agriculture bill (which is 
intertwined with the budget resolution) mid an 
extension of the expiring Superfimd program 


to clean up buried toxic wastes. The House 
must act on the defense authorization bill, the 
Senate on the bfll imposing sanctions on South 
Africa. Trade legislation is simmering in both 
bouses. Also to be dealt with are the annual 
housing authorization bill immigration re- 
form, the year's major civil rights bill (revers- 
ing the Supreme Court’s 1984 Grove City 
decision on the reach of ctvd rights laws) and a 
Dec. 31 deadline to fashion a new retirement 
program for the civi] service. 

The side issues win likely entail further ef- 
forts by members to distance themselves from 
the deficit. There continues to be pressure, 
chiefly from the president and in the Senate, to 
vote on a balanced budget amendment to the 
Constitution. There may be the usual postur- 
ing in the Senate over raising the debt c eiling . 
Continuing resolutions almost always tempt 
some legislators to indulge in b rinkmanship 
and threaten to shut down the government. 

The White House also continues to press 
ahead with the president' s tax reform propos- 
al whidi aides still describe as his first priority 
for the remainder of the year. Anything can 
happen in Congress. But so much time has 
elapsed and so many other issues remain that it 
is no longer dear that Congress can effectively 
take up this crushing subject ibis year. Com- 
prehensive tax reform would powerfully affect 
the entire economy; the bill cannot be flipped 
through quickly. In his earlier years in office 
the president pretty much kept control of Con- 
gress's agenda, and kept it mostly simple and 
dean. This year is more complicated. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Hie Investors’ Sanctions 


South Africa's suspension of payment on 
foreign audits, announced with brutal sud- 
denness, shows dearly that the most effective 
sanctions against a country are not those half- 
heartedly recommended by a tribunal of divid- 
ed nations, but rather those measures taken 
by separate economic agents acting in their 
own interests and out nf fear of a worsen- 
ing of their financial and commercial risks. 

— Le Monde (Paris). 


Approaching the Summit 


With two months to go it seems that the 
superpowers are approaching their summit 
meeting with good intentions and low expecta- 
tions. The expectations were one thing that 
worried Mikhail Gorbachev in his Time maga- 
zine interview. Clearly, though, from his re- 
marks and the manner of (heir delivery, the 
Soviet leader is approaching the summit seri- 
ously and consdenliously. 

— The Guardian ( London , ) 


FROM OUR SEPT. 4 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Cretans’ Status ImtatesTorkey 
CONSTANTINOPLE — Although limited 
credence is to be attached to the rumors on (he 
imminence of a Gnxo-Turidsh conflict, one 
cannot help observing that the situation in the 
Balkans is becoming very confused. The Turk- 
ish Government is showing a certain irritation 
in connection with the validation of the Cretan 
Ottoman subjects elected to the Hellenic Na- 
tional Assembly. It recently made representa- 
tions on this subject to the Powers, which have 
accepted its view while recommending it to 
show patience and moderation. But the Greek 
Government does not seem disposed to fariti- 
tate an accord with Tnrkqy by bringing pres- 
sure on the political parties of its country. It 
seems ready to leave the Assembly a full and 
consequently dangerous liberty in the valida- 
tion of the Cretans who have been elected. 


1935: A Composer’s Search lor Roots 
NEW YORK — Leopold Godowsky, Rus- 
sian-born American composer and pianist, be- 
lieves he is 64. But his 4,000-mile quest for 
birth records, from New York to his native 
town, was unsuccessful “It's bad enough," he 
complained, “lo go all that distance and then 
not to find your registration. It’s worse when 
you can't even find the town." He waved bis 
arm and asked: “Was 1 bom or wasn’t 1? 
According to citizens of Vilna, I couldn’t have 
been because the town I thought I was bom in 
doesn't exist. At least they told me that it 
either didn’t exist or was in Lith uania, which 
means about the same thing to them. Further- 
more, they wanted to know what 1 meant 
coming around asking for a birth certificate in 
a time of war. Did yon know there was a state 
of war between Poland and Lithuania?" 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 19581982 


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Co-Chairmen 


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0 1985, Imematkmd Herald Tribune. AU rijjfai reserved. iBSElBB 


B RUSSELS — The search has 
begun in earnest for a Europe- 
an formula on sanctions that would 
help black South Africa without 
harming the Europeans themselves. 
For almost a decade the European 
Community has managed to side- 
step the issue of apartheid. But now 
it appears the Community will have 
to define its attitude, at the very 
least, and possibly even lake steps 
against South African trade. 

Three EC foreign ministers — 
those from Italy, Luxembourg and 
the Netherlands — have just com- 
pleted an information-gathering 
tour in South Africa, and they arc to 
report bad: with recommendations 
when the EC Council of Ministers 
meets on Monday. The EC govern- 
ments then are to attempt toiashion 
a concerted response to the situa- 
tion in South Africa- 
West European governments, like 
governments elsewhere, are deeply 
divided over the principle and the 
practice of sanctions- France urges 


beyond imagining is not The tragedy of fam- 
ine has been alleviated for many victims. 
Somewhat normal rainfall seems to have re- 
turned and a crop harvest is in sight- Substan- 
tial food aid will be needed at least through 
next year, Mr. McPherson says. But the relief 
effort has succeeded so well that development 
officials can now focus on rebuilding Ethio- 
pia’s agriculture. 

Rarely do even the best intentions produce 
the results we hope for. This is one of the 
happy exceptions — happy for Ethiopia and 
happy fear those who responded to its plight In 
the pictures of “skeleton-like people and 
“Kids with bloated beffies” wc discerned 
a message: “We are the world." In feeding 
Ethiopia’s hungry, wc satisfy another kind 
erf hunger in ourselves. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


By Giles Merritt 


and declared a -freeze on invest- would cost Britain alone an estimat- 
men l But West Ge rmany long has ed 180,000 to 250,000 jobs has 10 be 
detested interference with trade. It wrighed against the very uncertain 
opposes the use of sanctionsagainst impact those sanctions might nave 
South Africa, just as it did against on South Africa, 
the Soviet Union and Poland. • Weighing such imponderables 


the Soviet Union and Poland. • Weighing such imponderables 

The Netherlands, - rejecting .its would be easier if the anti-aparthaa 
historical links with the Afrikaners, militants were agreed on the usefui- 

is ready to join most other EC coun- • ness of sanctions. Bur they too are 
tries in favoring some sort of sane- split Some arc impatient for any 
lions. But Britma stubbtHnly re- measures that would further desta- 
fuses even to contemplate their use, \nSas South Africa, even at the nsk 
The belief within the British gov- of a bloodbath, while others argue 

eminent that sanctions would ag- that sanctions would hurt the blades 
gravale the crisis in South Africa more than thw would the whites, 
mav be eenuinelvhdd-Biif the env- The voices favoring sanctions are 


their use, and has already with- 
to Pretoria 


drawn its ambassador 


may be genuinely hcLLBu L the gov- 
ernment’s position also reflects the 
fact that Britons have invested 
about $15- bQliou, or one-tenth of 
all Britain's foreign investments, 
in South Africa. 

But the pressure is now on Euro- 
pean governments to do what is 
right. And that is where the real 
confusion arises. The moral choices 
are Tar from clear-cut: The likeli- 
hood that full economic sanctions 


The voices favoring sanctions arc 
the loadesL They include the multi- 
racial United Democratic Front 
and carry the endorsement of such 
moderate leaders as Bishop Des- 
mond Turn. Yet nobody can doubt 
the integrity of people such as Hel- 
en Suzman of the Progressive Liber- 
al Party or of the author Alan Pa- 
ton; they oppose sanctions on the 
theory that it is the blacks* acceler- 
ating trade unionization and eco- 



nomic power that will destroy 
apartheid. Sanctions,; they 'say, 
would slow this trend, letting. Fre-v 
toria off the hook. V ■■■<' 

As the HC governments wrestle , 
with these arguments, , they areuo-. 
easily aware that sanctions could; 
seriously harm Europe. Full eoo-.r 
nomic sanctions leading to a disrup- 
tion of raw material s^pSes from. 
South Africa could cnpple some 
European industries overnight. 

South Africa - is (he principal: 
world supplier not just of -gold hot. 
of many strategic minerals. The fist 
is beaded by chromium, manganese, !. 
phosphate rock and -phttinum-- 
group metals, and includes aqtimo-_ 
ny, coball molybdenum^ mckd . m- 
objimi, titanium and vanadium; 

The vulnerability of the West to 
an interruption of the supply of. . 
these minerals is illustrated by the 
case of West Germany, which Kke, 
other EC countries is now more 
reliant on Smith Africa than ever. 

A study by Bonn calculated that 
if chromium imports were reduced - 
by 30 percent for a year the West 
German gross national product 
would fall by 25 percent. Another 
analysis reckoned that chromium 1 
■disruption for two veare would cost 
the country 700,000 jobs. Mean-. 

wb3e, South Africa’s share of West 
German chromium imports, has,, 
gone from 48 percent In the lace - 
1970s, when the Bonn study was 
done, to more than 55 percent 

The South African institute of ■ 
International Affairs recently' 
summed up the Botha governments 
smug assessment of this strangle- 
hold: “Pretoria argues," the insti- 
tute reported, “that South Africais^ 
the ‘Persian Gulf of minerals’ and -' - 
the key to the continued economic,;'.. ; 
and by extension, political well-, J 
bang of the West, and should ire* .. 
edve all possible assistance fnrai 
her Western allies." ' . ' . 

South African diplomats in Bros- - 
sds, meanwhile, say they will: be 
surprised il the EC does not cot for. 
some level of sanctions, even if ody '■ 
comparatively mild measures such: 
as an embargo on buying South . 
African sted and fruits. Thai-coukiL-. 
turn out to be a shrewd assessment: ' 

International Herald Tribune. 


Terra-Cotta 



By Anthony 


;^£IAN, 1 

221^0; when Qia 
Shihuflugcli ,oost(uercd;d®a: sates'; 

■ damp Qin^pio fl ouncedjC^BR^E^ 
glish. gave, us the wOTdCfcm&Qm - 

- fthitmang di also teft;Cme'rftl^indSt J 
extraordinary memorials ijti dearth: ; 
theterrarcptta arorj^ ^ V: . 


'ageof 14i,’ Efe’ 

~ laborers to work an : a c^pfex that 
' covers 22 : s fo iai t 


life-size terarO^^diewandhms- 
es and chflricfts: his ffitinffiahs after 
death. Apeasantdigging awell Found/ 
one in 1974: There are estimated to 
be 7,999 others . -} ;-V. 

Seeing: ' those -scriptural 'figures 


electrifying way- what history maos 
m China: Tfistoty aaiiarl for the' . 
figures are ‘amazing woiispf ag; M2 
differehlan mdivk laa J^of many te- ^ 
Maal «nd body typts; jri.. s/xa^msaA \ 

. Hi ftp rffgrcricc; toh ■ 

and qn AUff ffl risI ;■ 


die terra-cotta army an; tbe oaidriits ^ 
of Xian fry thethousands erayday re Jr 
see thefr past. But' it te notjust, an- . 

. dcre histoytbat is <m wewiitt : - . 
Therearerefics of recemhistoiy. that v " ; 


America? a Bystander, Must Do r , 


W ASHINGTON — Americans are used to 
having policies. A policy is an opinion 


W having policies. A policy is an opinion 
harnessed to a program to achieve some purpose. 
It is recognizable by its teeth and bite. Other 
countries are used to having opinions. Indonesia 
may have an opinion on the Falklands, as Niger 
may on Zionism. Such opinions are on display at 
the United Nations General Assembly, where, 


Charles K ranthamm ^r 


added up on a big board, they change nothing 
Real business is conducted in the Security Coun- 
cil by the great powers and, most significantly, by 
the superpowers- Superpowers have policies. 

The air of unreality surrounding the U.S. de- 
bate on South Africa derives largely from the fact 
that for once Americans find themselves debat- 
ing not policy but opinion. Constructive engage- 
ment, says the administration. Sanctions, says 
the Congress. The hard truth is that neither 
“policy” will greatly affect South African histo-' 
ry. America is. to a large extent, irrelevant. 

South Africa, like the Soviet Union (to use 
today’s favorite analogy), is a great country: vast, 
advanced and insular. Its internal dynamics re- 
veal an awesome collection of immovable objects 
and irresistible forces: a politically conscious and 
disenfranchised black population; a sophisticat- 
ed revolutionary vanguard (the African National 
Congress and the loosely aligned United Demo- 
cratic Front); an independent Zulu movement, 
one million strong (inkatha); a dominant Afrika- 
ner tribe with a strong military and nowhere to 
go; and Anglos, Indians and people of mixed 
race in varying degrees of opposition and discon- 
tent. To bdieve dial the whispers of constructive 
engagement or the slap of sanctions will affect 
South Africa’s unraveling is an illusion. 


the-schoolhouse-door speech left moderates po- 
litically marooned, the bishop said South Africa 
was “oh the brink of disasia- unless a miracle 
intervenes.” The miracle? “A decisive interven- 
tion by (be international community." 

If Bishop Tutu occasionally invites a foreign- 
made miracle, it is because he has little else to 
hold onto. Men of his Gandhian nobility know 


Sanctions, of course, do 
not ivork. But that is not a 
reason to abjure them. 


that South Africa's future does not belong to 
them. In Durban, rioters attacked the Phoenix 
Gandhi Settlement and burned the Mahatma 


Gandhi Center to the ground. The irony was 
unintended, the message unmistakable Bishop 


It is an illusion with some appeal. Even Bishop 
Esmond Tutu occasionally gives it a wistful 


Desmond Tutu occasionally gives it a wistful 
glance. After President Pieter Botha’s recent bar- 


unintended, the message unmistakable: Bishop 
Tutu threatened to leave South Africa if black- 
on-black violence did not cease. He then noted 
that radicals were welcoming him to go, so they 
can “get on with the revolution without him." 

They are certainly getting on without America. 
Being able to do so Tittle, what should Americans 
do? The right thing. Impose sanctions. 

Sanctions, of course, do not work. That is as 
dose to an axiom as one finds in international 
relations. But that is not a reason to abjure them. 
The United States was morally obligated, for 
example, to put Poland in default after the crush- 
ing of Solidarity — not because it would change 
General Wqjdech Jamzelski, but simply because 
Americans should not be subsidizing him. Sanc- 


tions are most valuable for their didactic, not: 
thdr diplomatic, effects. . f 
- . Call it moral hygiene if you wiltLbutcleanh- 
ness is important And in South Africa. Amerf_ ; 
ca’s lack of influence makes the rnoraldKHCcaS 
the easier. The United States does.not have to 
agonize long, calculating the reverberating - ef- 
fects of its actions. There will be effects, bnt they, 
wiB be margmaL Sanctions wffl malre the lot of. 
blacks somewhat more difiiciilLThey yrin ^ \“bzh 
nriserate the masses” and “heighten the contra-; 
dictions," as Marx liked to say; and perhaps: 
hasten revolution by a month or two. - • - 

A subsidiary effect win be to make the whites. 
fed their isolation more iteqriy: Western sane-, 
tions can depress the rand ana perhaps add a bit .' 
to the pamebeing fdt by whites. WHlthal indnee 
them to reform, as the left says, ortai resist more:: 
desperately, as the right pretends? Both tides are 
being disingenuous: No one knows. And, in 
either case, sanctions win hardly be decisive: - 
That is certainly true of die sanctions biH • 
passed by the House, soon to be passed.by the ; 
Senate, and grandly entitled The Anti-Apartheid 
Action Act of 1985. It bans the sale trf Kruger- 
rands in the Uniied States, new bank loans tothe 
government of South Africa (most American 
banks stopped lending seven years agoX and the. 
sate of computers to certain South African gow- 
eminent agencies. No more nuclear ^ ^todmraogy 
either. And it threatens to get stem if things do 
notget better in 12 months. 

This is opinion, not policy. Yet even the stran- 
gest policy would only minimally affect South 
Africa. And on something as unambiguously evil 
as racial oppression, it is important for a country 
to have opinions. Countries, too, have to be able 
to look themsdves in die mirror. 

The Washington Post Writers Group. 


carry significant messages^ v. .. <• • ■ 
v In Xian in 1936 two arOnaaig Kair i> - : 
jghek’s own. commanders^- turned. - . . 

; against him because he wan fighsinc 

; ftu» ef 

jhe invaders. Hewasataresoa hoe;' 
and: he fled up i nearby rnpunJam;---.: 

. . where ha was caught and CTcntuaBy 
agreed; to a united front n oprnsr tite - 
. Japanese: The site of the Xian fixa- * 

' dentins it is called, isam^orChmese'^ 
rtdiirist attraction. • V • ' 

' Even more mesmerizing- for 1 Qn-‘ •• 
.'nese viators is a shabby bifidinglhaL'-. 
housed an important office ra- the 1 ' 
Communists from 1936 to 1946. It is. 
the Sghth JRoute Army office; now a - 
; museum. Zhou -Enlafs spartan bed- . 
room is on view, with his books on-a - 
.shelf. Deng Xiaoping was here, too 

and there is a striking picture of the 
leader, now 81, as a yotmg man. A : 

1 939 Chevrolet used for trips tp Cdm-j 
mrnm t headquar ters m Yanain is'rin ' 
show. You can have yourincfarc tak- • 

- t^- n il a »>- - - 


Black 


KAL Plus 2: Shooting Down the Official Version 


N EW YORK — Two years after 
the shooting down of Korean 


1 'V the shooting down of Korean 
Air Lines Flight 007 on SepL 1. 1983, 
it seems dearer than ever that the 
truth of this terrible event, in which 
269 lives were lost, has not been told 
Facts keep turning up that will not fit 
the generally accepted version or that 
raise serious and unanswered ques- 
tions about iu 

That version, assiduously fostered 
by the Reagan administration and 
apparently supported by a report of 
the International Civil Aviation Or- 
ganization, or ICAO, is (hat the air- 
liner innocently strayed off course on 
its flight across the Pacific, inadver- 
tently flew over Soviet territory, and 
was wantonly shot down by Soviet air 
defense forces. The only tiling certain 
about this is that the Russians did 
shoot down Flight 007; but so widely 
accepted is the rest of it that ques- 
tioners are accused of being paranoid 
perpetrators of a conspiracy theory 
or even servants of Soviet interests. 

Nevertheless, the conventional the- 
ory is inherently implausible and may 
be disintegrating. An affidavit by a 
former air traffic controller asserted 
that the words “we should warn him" 


By Tom Wicker 


tracks of part of (he airliner’s course 
had beat destroyed. Such tapes are 
normally “recycled" 30 hours after 
being recorded; but the fate of Flight 
007 was known in less than 30 hours 
after the tapes were made. In view of 
the importance of the incident, how 
could mere tapes have been “routine- 
ly” destroyed, as claimed? 

In May, Prime Minister Yasuhiro 
Nakasone of Japan released follow- 
ing a parliamentary request, data 
from Japanese Defense Agency mon- 
itors that tracked Flight 007 as it 
entered and flew over Soviet territo- 
ry. The data detailed signi fica n t 
changes of altitude and speed by the 
Korean plane while radio Lransmis- 


a half — not only suggests that as 

■ m 


they flew over Sakhalin, the pilots 
were taking evasive action white de- 
ceiving air traffic controllers. Il di- 
rectly contradicts both the admin is . 
(ration’s version of events and the 
ICAO report on which that version 
heavily relies. Both claim that the 
pilots, not knowing they were enter- 
ing Soviet territory, maintained their 
assigned altitude until shot down. 

The State Department, queried by 
The Nation magazine — which pub- 
lished in its Aug. 17-24 issue an ac- 
count of new developments in the 
Flight 007 case — said the ICAO had 
been given the Japanese Defease 
Agency data and had considered it in 
its nqporc Bui “a member of the orga- 
nization's inquiry team" told The 
Nation that the ICAO had never seen 
the altitude and speed data. 


sions, ostensibly from its pilots, de- 
scribed Quite different maneuvers. 


scribed quite different maneuvers. 

This new information — withheld 
from (he public for nearly a year and 


On the very day Flight 007 was 
destroyed, the Japanese Defense 
Agency issued a map describing the 
airliner's course as a broad arc over 
S akhal in island, a total turn of about 
20 degrees. But to arrive over Sakha- 
lin at the pomt of interception by a 
Soviet fighter. Flight 007 must fust 
have made a northward turn from the 
course on which it departed Anchor- 
age, Alaska. 

These two toms, which from data 
now available seem indisputable, not 
only belie President Reagan’s state- 
ment that when intercepted the plane 
had been flying “a straight-line 
course" for two and a half hours; 
togetber with the newly released 
speed and altitude changes recorded 
by the Japanese Defense Agency, the 
toms suggest that r he pilots knew 
where ibey were and deliberately flew 
over Soviet territory. 

The New York Tunes. 


' To seetbat bxxIMaiig is to under--, 
stand a premise of this society. Pofiti- . 
cal legitimacy rests on tberevbhrtianl 
Not even the years of murderous ' - 

- Maoist excesses have shaken that ; 
premise, as far as I can.see. Even . 
diose who would like China to adopt 

'Western ideasof inteBectnalfreedom 
— at least those WfaomT have met— . 
rio not challenge the revolution or 
its symbols. It is as, much a part of - 
IifeT assumptions , as George Wash- 
ington\& Col arc for .Americans. 

. Henas'doe veneration far the Pjg jh rh " . 

- Route Army office. 

To say that is to realize how fornii- - 
dable.a task Deng Xiaoping has nn- 
. dertaken. He is making changes that 
j iwcmld^shaic the_jKychoIogy erf any * 

Under t^aom> of “sdf-rdianQe,” 

. for example. Mao essentially seated 
China off from the outside worklfbr 
years. That was perhaps understand- 
able in a country that had been so 
often invaded and -exploited. The re 7 ■ ' 
suit, in any event, was isolation. - ; . 

The motio remains setf-rcfetQce tb- . - 
day. But it is said now. that; China 
must have foreign investment and 
foreign expertise in order to bixdriie 
self-reliant. The phrase has 'been: 
stood on its bead. 

In the last six months, IJZ millio n 
foreigners have entered China^- 39. 
percent marc than in the same period 
of last year. Xian has a glossy hew- \ 
American-owned hotel — tneTrokfcn 
Flower — and other Westemhbtels ... 
are on the way. For anyone who was 
in the Peoples Repubfic even s few" 
years ago, such things arc; of a 
Iweathtaiang strangeness. 

The authorities here plan sbori^to. ' 
excavate what they rhinir istiffiacntBl- i •. 
tomb of Qin Shlhuangdi, under an 

enormous mound near me terra-cotto' 

warriors. Historians of 2,000 years 
ago said the tomb contained astene- 
rdief map with the rivers (rf CfcLia 
flowing in mercury. ArdUBMrfonas ' 
probed the moond recently 
tronic sensors, and found 'mercury ■ 
levels 280_ times the nor mal fcveL 
The evidence of change in Chimt . 
should not mislead the visitor, qua 
•Kpecting tiansfqmatiimL History^ 
modem and ancient, has too many ’ 
“aims on the people and the institu- 
tions of the country. It is larnnerfirng 
that Americans, ahistbrical and fitted • . 
with optimism, find hard- to under- 
stand. History, with afi its beauty and 
pam, is everywhere in China: 

The New York Times. *- ■ -■ ' " 


h- r 
?-r. y m ' 'J, 


E*x_- V. 


scr-r: 

r-ri' . 


Gsi. 

ks » 
V-it -jLt 

V. j: 

SWt’ - . -'v 


| foLan 
i Sm To 

i * 

I fareK 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


(rtf erring to the Smith Korean pilot) 
could be heard on a recording of U.S. 
radar operators, made several hours 
before the plane was shot down over 
Sakhalin island. The affidavit was 
filed last week as evidence in a civil 
lawsuit against the U.S. government 
and KAL by surviving relatives of 
those who died aboard 007. 


The federal judge conducting the 
ial will hear the tape and rule as to 


trial wiD hear ibe tape and rule as to 
whether these words can, in fact, be 
heard. If they can, they contradict the 
Reagan administration’s claim that 
no American knew that Flight 007 
was in trouble during more than five 
hours when it flew off course by hun- 
dreds of miles across skies in which 
the United States deploys a vast array 
of electronic sentinels. 

That claim was considerably tar- 
nished when, in the same trial, the 
government disclosed m February 
that air force tape recordings of radar 


Rosita’s Message 

Regarding the cartoon “You Can 
Help Make Rosila an Orphan, or You 
Can Turn the Page” (Aug. 26): 

l usually appreciate your editorial- 
page cartoons, but tins one was insen- 
sitive. To use the well-known pleas of 
relief organizations that try to help 
orphans, in order to depict 3 Central 
American scenario where the ulterior 
motive is to creole orphans, is un- 
pleasant even for commentary's sake- 
Every reader must indeed have 
"turned the page” in dismay. 

ERIC SCHALLENBERG. 

Geneva. 


can remember. If more of your read- 
ers, and more of my American com- 
patriots, could be made to see the 
horrors of this and every war, per- 
haps some semblance of sanity would 
return to U.S. foreign policy. 

JOHN M. COCHRAN 3d 
• Paris. 


be a wanting to anyone who thinks 
Bering's proposals to Taiwan for 
peaceful reunification and regional 
autonomy could ever be realized. Af- 
ter agreeing to such a proposal, Tai- 
wan would undoubtedly also become 


TEbe^s Lesson to Taiwan 


Regarding die column *77te Vast 
Sea of Chinese Threatens to Swamp 
Tibet " (Aug. 10) by the Dalai Lama: 


Someone should idl the cartoonist 
that Nicaragua's Sandinisi leaders 
have done more than thdr share in 
the manufacture of orphans. 

JAMES £ WARRING. 

Herriiberg. West Germany. 


Sieve Sack's cartoon is surely one 
of the most striking and powerful T 


The tragedy of Tibet is a lesson 
that deserves constant releaching. 
The Communist mainland’s propos- 
als to Taiwan for peaceful reunifica- 
tion and regional autonomy are prac- 
tically the same proposals the 
Ounese made to the Tibetans before 
they invaded They have been occu- 
pying Tibet ever since, resulting in 
many deaths and the destruction of a 
rich and unique culture. 

The Dalai Lana's message should 


tk» and untold destruction and 
death. The 19 williftn Chinese on 
Taiwan do not deserve such a fate. 
What toey do deserve is the support 
of an free nations so as not toncqni- 
esce under Beijing’s pressure. 

benjamen shao. 

Taipei. 


have suffered for centuries in other 
parts of the world If those who have 
beat the victims of persecution tors 
voaad and do the same to others 
there is htlle hope of ending 'die 

■““S? “Jjgf WjJriig so-prwaleai; 
m our enlightened* times.^ v. 

• JHwifer Feldman. % 

’■ " • ; Paujs, : v 


TTie Right Gaz .! ’ ' r - 

f°^red (kgan to Go on Display' 


S No End to Racism? 

- fording the report “Kdkani *** • 


r c . » — 6 report “Kahane 

-Mflssttssfis; 


France. 


«w»dhythc%o£ 
company called Li 


x.Yimnaise oes « 
Smx. It tsstMrate and mdepeafcnfr r 
from Gaz de France. . . 

MARGARET bt AHE/WN.- v 

. DnLL.n i .1. V. 


’V Vf-fc 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER U 1985 



PageS 



After a Year of South African Violence 9 Experts Detect a More Radical Black Mood 


>lh, 


'*^1 m. 

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rv^se-'^c 

Slv* Vft-t 

- ^ > 
n. > 

,“■<5?? I 
* 

■V'. 

Jj? .35^- 

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authorities sought (b implant the 
new consiitutiQO, which allowed 
people of mixed nod fn/fem facial 


African acadcm- 
siuft oLmonH b£. J ? KMs . a 
black cntYiin ■ . 0Vena ^ cn many 
than PfopeOing 
radicalism and hard? 


tactics. 

By this 


won a vioteo « has Township activism 

becom<^~^ Je&Urnacy, and has analysts and commen 


iv 


rrr 

"’ ■’o 


®yA^nCowri] 

johSSS--"-, 

y«y Since unW ’ — . 2n *e r~r .»—**» ■«— - 

town shins SnmLi?. 1001 m black descent to sit in a segregated thirt- 
ies and othfT « ^7“° academ- chatabdr ParharnenL 
shift oLnuJJ ^? eciaIs st5 assert, a The black majority of 23 paSjm 

was exdoded. from v the arrange* 
mrat, and that' 05tracutn sow 
and harsh Sfi cms urh&ue returned to haunt the 
country,. 

.since then. 

lemrM - - — j. — u» — ., — — commentators said, 
rected th-HT* Ult p nst: and more di- has cast the African National Con- 
overtK.*, 3 * 1 ber ° Te toward the S'* 5 ® » a new rote, transforming 
^^- whrtemIe -- Ute outlawed organization into 

white rE5? blacks with the “ora °f a spiritual inspiration and 
said. ?** academic rallying point of protest than u di- 

si b kZ^ eC ° me Annually impos- rector or controller of day-to-day 
* , taj a,,??? 115 * °f Sequent and bru- events. This assessment, however. 
'■ °F. ^ose deemed to be “ disputed by some of the organi- 

~°6ss of white authority zaiirniVniM • 

^SJSSSf!tS£^ 

S2SSHSES 

^5 and influential, white, English- . - 

“Pf^ung business groups seeking difficult to destroy simply by de- 
ih»Ir if 31 ?, ' ac * al transformation taining its leading figures. 

«* Afrikaner authorities have 
°«n prepared to offer. 

. Jne assessments were made in 
interviews on the eve of. a Weak 
anniversary; On Sept. 3 last year, a 
protest over rent increases in the 


ration's- exiled leaders. 

At die same time, and in contrast 
to the events when violence erupted 
in 'Soweto in 1976. nantvfche resis- 
tance has' become * decentralized 
into- a diverse movement that is 



?T y - m 5it 


If there is a gap in black resis- 
tance, some academics said, it lies 
in the absence of sustained political 
action by [be trade union move- 
ment Until the mine 'workers' 

— — strike that ended Tuesday, the 

iownsiup of SharpeviDc erupted unions. h*ri mobilized black eco- 
imo violence that claimed 29 lives nomic power only twice — in Jo- 


Policemen with some of the 69 blacks who were killed in 
SharpeviQe in 1960. On March 21, the 25th anniversary of 


Unwd Prau iiaa ' im myrri. ;$40 

the deaths, the police killed 20 blacks in Langa, in the worst 
of a series of incidents in die past year in South Africa. 








there and in nearby settlements 
as Sebokeng arid Evalon.The 
date is regarded as . die start of 
oouth Africa's newest paroxysm of 
unrest. 

The anniversary- has another 
portent, too. SepL3. 1984, was die 
day on which the South African 


bannesbuig and Port Elizabeth 

with- great local impact that has not 

been mirrored across the country. 

What has been equally absent in 
the past year, some commentators 
said, is the kind of sabotage and 
aimed conflict that marked the Af- 
rican National Congress' activities 


before its infiltration routes into 
South Africa were severed by South 
Africa's nonaggression treaties 
with neighboring Mozambique and 
Swaziland. 

In turn, some analysts said, the 
treaties helped persuade blacks 
that there would be do salvation 
from beyond their borders. 

These views have emerged after a 
year of discontent and upheaval 
dial has claimed more than 670 
lives, forced the government to im- 


pose a state of emergency in 36 
magisterial districts and brought 
the South Af rican rand to its lowest 
levels ever against the U.S. dollar. 

The government has declared a 
four-month freeze on the repay- 
ment of its foreign debt. Exchange 
controls have been reintroduced 
and unrest does not seem to be 
going away. 

The unrest started last year in 
areas around Johannesburg, first in 
what is called the VaaJ Triangle of 


industrial plants and black town- 
ships south of the city, then spread 
to closer townships, such as 
Tembisa and Katiehong. 

Soweto, Johannesburg's sprawl- 
ing black satellite, has not been 
touched by widespread violence 
like that which claimed hundreds 
of lives there in 1976. One reason, 
some activists say they believe, is 
widespread infiltration of the place 
by police informers since 1976. 

Last February, political activists 


began disclosing evidence and 
claims of police brutality in (he 
Eastern Cape, a traditional focus of 
support for the African National 
Congress, and an area where the 
Xhosa-speaking people pride 
themselves on the strength of their 
resistance to while domination. 

On March 21, the 25th anniver- 
sary of the killing by the police of 
69 black protesters in Sharpevilie. 
the police shot 20 blacks to death in 
Langa, outside the Eastern Cape 


Black Mine Workers’ Leader Seeks to Change an Unpromising Reality 


7. 


r . \_ r; • 


--S, _"r - \ 




By Sheila Rule ' 

Nett Ycrjc TmesSarice 

JOHANNESBURG r_ Cyril 
Ramapbosa, the leader of the larg- 
est black mine workers’ union- in 
South Africa, recalled a time when 
he was a boy walking to school and 
a soldier in uniform and big bools 
kicked him into a ditch without 
provocation. 

He said he did not cry. He stared 
at the soldier, picked up bis ■mwTl 
briefcase and continued on to class. 

That was in 1960 and a state of 
emergency had been imposed in the 
turmoil that followed- the shooting 
deaths by the police of 69 blacks at 
SharpeviHe, south of Johannes- 
burg. White soldiers and policemen 
were stationed in' Mr. Ramaphasa?s 
township of Western Native near 
Johannesburg, and the boy did not 
understand. 

“I went to my mother-and asked 
why," said Mr. Ramapbosa, now 
32 years old and the general secre- 
tary of the National Union- of 
Mineworkers. • 1 • * 

“She told'ttie that die govern- * 
mem had decided tb> take over the - 
township beuuise b£ic£p&bplt! arid. ' 1 
the African.- Nationail,Cong^s .. 
were putting pressure pn me gov-, 
ernmerit,” he said Sunday at his 
office on the fringe of Johannesr 
burg's city center. “After being 
kicked like that, I felt bitter against 
white people, which took me a long 
time to overcome. But I began, to 
realize that it was the reality' of die 
South African situation.” 

Now Mr. Ramaphosa is trying to 
fashion a different South African 
reality, one that, among other 
changes, would narrow the gap be- 
tweeu what blacks and whites are 
paid for doing the same job! . 



f After being kicked 
- like that, I felt 

L 

bitter against white 


people, which took 
me a long time to 


overcome. But I 

«fr%- ■■ . 

began to realize that 


it was the reality of 
the South African 


| situation.’ 

Cyril Ramaphosa 



M 



For two days, he led a strike 
against seven gold and coal mines. 
IBs union, regarded as the coun- 
try's strongest black labor group, 
says it has a paid membership of 
1 50,000 among 550,000 black mine 
^workers. But it says it could mobi- 
Hze 230,000. 

Although the workers had struck 
over pay, they had demands that 


represented a political challenge to 
the government of President Pieter 
W. Botha. 

They wanted the authorities to 
lift the state erf emergency imposed 
in 36 magisterial districts in July 
and to take bade a threat to repatri- 
ate foreign black workers in rtpri- 
sal for any international sanctions 
against South Africa. In trying to 


win on these issues, the miners also 
had boycotted white-owned shops 
in mining towns. 

But Mr. Ramaphosa, a bearded 
man with a gen tie manner that dis- 
guises what associates say is a 
strong determination, faced reali- 
ties that hold little promise. 

Even before it ended Tuesday 
night, he said he expected the strike 
to buckle under the force of power 
and intimidation. Some mine own- 
ers bad threatened to shut off water 
supplies and to refuse to feed the 
miners, who live in all-male hostels 
in mine compounds while they 
work out one-year contracts. 

In addition, the union, begun 
three years ago, had no strike fund. 

“The mine workers are like cap- 
tive labor,” Mr. Ramapbosa said 
softly, lighting a cigarette. 

“Their situation is such that they 
can be manipulated completely by 
the mine owners," he said. “We’ve 
already said that if they use force, 
we are going to pull out our entire 
membership in the mines.” 

“But we don't foresee the work- 
ers holding out for -too long” he- 
continued in the interview, which 
look place two days before the 
strike ended. “They could be 
shipped out to the ‘homelands' and 
die law allows the owners to do jnst 
that. But taking strike action is the 
last weapon we have at this point.” 

Mr. Ramaphosa is a lawyer 
whose education was interrupted 
by arrests and detention. While at- 
tending the University of the 
North, he was chairman of the 
South African Students Organiza- 
tion, a militant group that gave 
birth to virtually all other student 
groups now working for change. 


He was arrested for his political 
activities and held in solitary con- 
finement for 11 months. His orga- 
nization is banned now. 

When he was released in 1975, he 
was refused re-entry to the univer- 
sity. Mr. Ramaphosa was arrested 
again in 1976 in the uprising that 
centered on the vast black town- 
ship of Soweto and detained for six 
months. After that be enrolled ai 
the University of Sooth Africa and 
gained his law degree in 1980. 

But ihis grandson of a diamond 
mine worker — one of his biggest 
regrets, he says, is that he had never 
worked in the mines — decided 
against practicing law. 

He said he came to realize that 
while he would be able to serve the 
people, he would be serving only 
those who could afford to pay. He 
chose not to become, in his words, 
“a mercenary." 

The trade union movement was 
about the only available vehicle for 
Mr. Ramapbosa 's commitment. 


The Council of Unions of South 
Africa gave him a job as their legal 
adviser and then asked him to head 
the organizing committee to start 
the National Union of 
Mineworkers in 1982. At the new 
union's first conference, he was 
elected general secretary. 

Since then, there has been no 
time for bobbies. Mr. Ramaphosa. 
who is divorced and has no chil- 
dren. begins bis day by 7 A.M. 
Negotiations with employers or 
meetings with members rake a large 
portion of his time, and when he 
returns to his home in Soweto, he 
eats a meal and works into the late 
hours. 

But, he said, he had no regrets. 

“I have no time for anything 
else; 1 am bong honest.” Mr. Ra- 
mapbosa said. “Somebody wrote 
an article in the Sowelan newspa- 
per and put it rather crudely. They 
said: ‘He was married but the mar- 
riage did not work. He is now mar- 
ried to the union and (hat seems to 
be working.' Yes. it is working." 


automotive center of Uitenhage. tfl 
the worst tingle incident of the 
year. The killings seemed to be a 
turning point. 

After the shootings, seven blacks 
deemed to be stooges of white rule 
were killed and burned to death in 
the nearby township of Kwano- 
buhle, seeming to make into an 
institution the form of retribution 
that has become known in black 
townships as a “Kentucky,” after 
the fried chicken of that name. 

The Eastern Cape has continued 
to be an area of profound unrest. 
Be ginning in May, 3nd until a state 
of emergency was imposed on July 
21. the focus seemed to shift to the 
East Rand, an area of white mining 
towns and black townships in the 
gold area east of Johannesburg. 

“The unrest." said Professor 
Tom Lodge of the University -of 
Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, 
“has seen the expression of very 
violent feelings and these feelings 
being accorded a degree of popular 
legitimacy." 

“This round of unrest is different 
to Soweto in 1976, which happened 
in a virtual political vacuum.” he 
said, discussing the role of the Afri- 
can National Congress. “This un- 
rest happened after seven or eight 
years of political development, mo- 
bilization. the development of po- 
litical organizations and the expan- 
sion of the role of the ANC in the 
townships.” 

Mr. Lodge, who is regarded as 
South Africa's leading academic 
expert on the African National 
Congress, said violence may start 
because of “local events.” 

“But very quickly political move- 
ments come in and play a leading 
role.” Mr. Lodge said. Those move- 
ments. he said, had “given a kind of 
purpose and a long-term agenda.” 

He said that “in some ways the 
unrest has taken the ANC by sur- 
prise. and they are certainly not in 
control of it or in any position to be 
able to control it” 

He did not. however, suggest 
that the organization's influence 
had been eclipsed. When black pro- 
testers fought the police, he said, 
they were “responding to a long- 
term vision of a society in which 


they will be free and in which injus- 
tice will no longer be a feature of 
their lives, and in which Mandela 
will be the president." 

Nelson Mandela, the leader of 
the African National Congress, has 
been in prison for more than 2D 
years on sabotage charges. \ 

The view was disputed by Pro- 
fessor Robert Schrire of the Uni- 
versity of Cape Town, who sard 
that, while the African National 
Congress represented “the symbol 
erf what the protest is about, epito- 
mizing the values” of the protest- 
ers, it was in danger of being left 
behind by the growth of the radical 
movement in the townships. 

Over the past year, Mr. Schrire 
said, “two things have manifested 
themselves: a historical increase in 
the intensity of violence" and nun 
increase in violence that had “be- 
come far more political." 

Mr. Schrire said many black 
groups still sought a peaceful settle- 
ment. But, be added, in the absence 
of any change, “probably more ex- 
treme groups" would arise. 

What the authorities were facing, 
be said, was “a degree of mass dis- 
content that is unique” and a “po- 
litical decentralization” that meant 
“there is no political head that you 
can just nip off." 

Since the state of emergency be- 
gan, the authorities have detained 
more than 2,000 people, the bulk of 
them members of the United Dem- 
ocratic Front, the country's biggest 
nonpar li amenta ry organization, 
which c laims a following of 1.5 mil- 
lion people. 

One of its most active affiliates is 
the Congress of South African Stu- 
dents, an organization of radical 
high school students, many of 
whom have been detained. Since 
unrest took root, older township 
residents have said that, increasing- 
ly, their children are at the fore- 
front of protest. 

Mr. Schrire said that, despite the 
detention of leaders and “the in- 
creasing heavy-handedness of the 
police,” the ’“organizations^ are 
there, the passions are there.’' He 
added. “The arrests of the leader- 
ship will either have no effect or it 
may make violence worse.” 


MAIRJE DE PARIS 


EXPOSITION 

TROIS ETOILES 
DE NEW YORK 

KITTAY 
CENEDELLA 
LAMBRTNOS 
TRIANON DE BAGATELLE / JUSQU'AU 29 SEPTEMBRE 



Sri Lanka 



HaveKUled 9 


Reuters 

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka —Tamil 
separatist guerrillas lolled seven 
policemen and two top Tamil poli- 
ticians in a upsurge of violence in 
Sri Lanka, a government spokes- 
man said Tuesday. 

The attacks came a day before 
the cabinet was due to discuss a 
oeace plan to resolve the conflict 
between the island’s Snhalesema- 
jority and Taiml ntmom^fag 
on the island has left about 2,000 
people dead in the past two years. 

The government spokesman said 
that about 150 ^erriHasfired «i a 
police station at Eravur.mtberast 
Si part of the country, on Mouday 
night with rocket 
ISdes, mortars, bombs and ma- 
chine guns. Seven pojaneii i «« 
killed, 12 were wounded and one 
was abducted. 

In separate raids, guerrillas 
lulled two former Tamil mem here 
of parliament after seizing them 
from their homes m the northern 

Jaffna district on Monday night, 

[HtWuSS'iaSaS 

thefflioorilyaMUnumV. 

bsutideram aw , to 

front, a ^ wt h tht 

participate m said. 


-red from max 

“SgbL'ntetwow^ 

i S. Yogeswaran and K- 

the two murders, but 
^ said that** 

ration Tigers of Tamil 
main guerrilla group 
^separate state for 
£7the 

e autonomous reg* 00 - 


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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Dutch Artist-Writer 
Subject of Musical 


By Michael Zwcrin 

International Herald Tribune 

A msterdam — The jacket 

copy on the autobiography “I, 
Jan Cram"" bragged that the book 
was written “to shock and make the 
author a lot of money.” It sold 
more than six million copies. 

A rods opera version with the 
same name that opened Aug. 10 in 
Groningen moved to Rotterdam 
Saturday for a two-week run; it 
cost 12 million Dutch guilders 
($628,930). According to the local 
press, it is the most expensive 
Dutch theater production of all 
time. 

The bode was first published in 
Dutch in 1964, back when mention 
of the Netherlands was often pref- 
aced by “staid.” After Cremer, the 
adjective became “permissive” 
with a boost from the crowds of 
stoned hippies playing guitars on 
Dam Square and camping in the 
Voudelpark. 

To the extent that he pul sexually 
explicit and violent experiences 
into language that until then had 
been limited mainly lo locker 
rooms and brothels, Cremer can be 
compared to Lenny Bruce. His in- 
fluence on youth, literary merit 
aside, was dol unlike that of Jade 
Kerouac. The book described juve- 
nile adventures as a wanderer, a 
brawler, a smuggler, a sailor, an 
artist and a Foreign Legionnaire. 

Mounting the nxk opera took 
“15 years of endless arguments,” 
the magazine Nieuwe Revu said; 


the Leidsepltin, around the corner 
from “my girlfriend's house. I'm a 
working class hero, Walters, fann- 
ers, policeman — these are my fans. 
Most of the people who bought my 
book had never been in a bookshop 
before." 

He was in Amster dam to get 
ready for the musical and an open- 
ing of an exhibition of what he 
describes as his “action paintings'' 
in an upscale gallery on the Pnn- 
sengracht. He was leaving in four 
days for New York, where he 
would stay in a hoteL He lives “no- 
where. I'm a nomad. I get nervous 
after three weeks in one place.” 

He needed a shave. He was wear- 
ing a Saxon leather jacket over a 
flowered tropical shirt. He seemed 
hung over, with his tattooed fore- 
arm and husky build, hue resembles 
a longshoreman. 

"This week we sold the 750,000th 
Dutch copy of my book. Man, in 
Dutch, 5,000 copies is a best seller. 
Fm selling 40,000 a year.” The 
book tells of exploits that would 
provoke envy on the part of Henry 
Miller and the Marquis de Sade. 
Asked if they were all true, he 
leaned back with an enigmatic 
smile: “What should I say?” 

Somebody once described a hus- 
tle, as a person who knows you 
need something he is pushing, 
though you may not know you 
need it yourself. You get the feeung 
Cremer would not object to being 
so defined. Exaggeration is organic 
to a bustle; when asked to confirm. 


" « •, : , V. ■" •; 

; \ •- * 



fir™* GoaMi 

Jan Cremer: “One of the roughest and toughest.” 

Cremer was bom “on the eve of spends several months a year in 
World War IF in the factory town Budapest, which he called “a com- 
of Enschede near the German bor- bination of Barcelona, Vienna and 


X!L3Sled Swe^over a der. His father who died in 1941 prewar Paris. It’s the most cdorfnl 

il.-- MinistnT of pul ' ^ Cremer doe f was Dutch and his mother Hungar- aty I know. 

m^fdcted^DriSteStdh wd- ***■ 50 daBceis ' acto p- and fan. Because of her accent, the Ger- Although he had script approval 

lure aaoeo to private uuicnana musicians onstage, plus 200 hands rh» n ««, 

backstage, he nodded: 


Belgian (Inancmg. The critics have backs tage, he nodded- “Y< 
been mostly positive, and the pro- ^ 

duction is scheduled to open SepL The acmal numbers are 


^ £° k 0, “". s r nsjach= r dismtrated abom 

17 for two week* in Amsterdam'* 1 * *? m nutnoerc are J* on Dutch with German disapunar- the production, other than hustling 
preSeiSS^tMat^ stage and 10 backstage. Chajt the jans. Cremer spent a lot of time in it: “It’s in the tradition of 'Ha? 

prestigious ^nre neater. hyperbole “P to a facet of the juvenile prisons: “I was one of the and ‘West Side Story.’ ” 

“The waiter just told me all his Duich character that tends to com- roughest and toughest of all the The Nieuwe Rewi describes a 

fnends are coming to the Carr* and 

the run is already sold out," Cre- 
mer said in a seafood restaurant on 


pensate for small territory by bif 
numbers, as wefl as frequent anc 
distant travel 


Juilliard to Mark 80th Year 

Thr Associated Prc* Center in 1969, w01 be the theme of 

NEW YORK — The Juilliard a two-hour “Live from Lincoln 
School will present the soprano Center" special Oct 5. 

Leontyne Price, one of its most Price will sing the death aria 
famous graduates, and current stu- from Barber's “Antony and Qeo- 
dents on a public television special patra.” The Juilliard Quartet will 
next month marking its 80th anni - be joined by two students to play 
versaiy. Brahms’s “Sextet in B Flat." Dance 

The institution, named the Juil- students will perform “Cloven 
liard School of Music before it Kingdom" choreographed by Paul 
moved to a new building in Lincoln Taylor, a Juilliard graduate. 


roughest and toughest of all the The Nieuwe Revu describes a 
lot.” scene: “A brothel with undulating 

Late in 1964, with his first royal- navels and limbs and ladies wear- 
ty check, he bought a “one-way ing abbreviated lingerie. One wom- 
uckei to New York," took over an playing a sadomasochistic rede 
Larry Rivers's studio in the Chelsea wearing a tight leather suit wieldin g 
Hold, became an abstract expires- a red whip.” The poster features a 
sionisi painter mid stayed there 12 Hells Angel type on a motorcycle, 
years. After writing several other The music is mark by a load, 
books, which did less well, be now young, technologically state-of- 
supports himself mainly bv paint- the-axt En g lish and Dutch rock 


ing ($9,000 for a big work, he said). 

He likes to visit the Soviet 
Union, and says he was one of the 


band. Cremer says he prefers lis- 
tening to Bill Haley records. 

He has “chosen after all to stay 


first journalists admitted to the European. I use New York to 
People's Republic of Mongolia. 14 charge up my battery, but f prefer 
years ago. He has published articles the earth in Europe. You can smell 
and photographs in Playboy and the blood, sweat and tears of the 
other m a gazin es. Feeling at home ages. In America the earth is all 
with his Hungarian ancestry, he loose ends.” 


Shawn Rambles in 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — . Whoa they come to write the 
4 history of the modem Americas theater, 
they are going to have a problem with Wallace 
Shawn. . A writer of rambling conversation 
pieces like “My Dinner With Andr&T he fits 
into no convatient theory of the new drama 

THE LONDON STAGE ~ 

and, indeed, seems to piece together his scripts 
on a curious axis of did movies and late-night 
radio phone-ins by philosophic insomniac 
cranks. 

His latest play, written for the London/New 
York exchange program being operated by the 
Royal Court and Joe Papp's Public Theatre, is 
“Aimt Dan and Lemon.” 

Watching a preview, it seemed to me that 
Max Stafford-uark’s immensely strong produc- 
tion, while failing to bridge one or two severe 
cracks in the structure, yet comes as farther 
proof that the shows that travel from the Court 
to the Public, as this me soon wiJL are soil a lot 
stronger than, the ones that come in the apposite 
direction. 

True, “Aunt Dan” starts somewhere in mid- 
Atlantic. Shawn is, of course, American, but is 
writing here of English experience and for an 
British-Americau-Anstralian cast led by the Os- 
car winner Tinda Hunt 
Shawn has taken over from John Heard in 
rehearsal four of the ma 1 « redes, ranking the 
whole affair as ranch of an evening with Wally 
as was his dinner with Audit. 

Essentially, we again have here a debate be- 
tween two characters: The rate in “Audit" was 
about the difference between achievers and non- 
achievers; the one in “Aunt Dan” is about the 
morality of power and the rights of the individ- 
ual to detennine governmental behavior. Cen- 
tral to this, and to the play, is a prolonged 
argument about whether Henry Kissinger was, 
as they used'to ask in “1066 and All That,” on 
balance a Good Thing or a Bad Thing. 

This is the kind of argument that you can still 
hear at American dinner parties ana find in the 
columns of small-circulation maga7in«6 occa- 
sionally financed by the CIA, but it tends to lack 
a certain dr ama. Action is not, however, a main 
interest of Shawn, instead he writes eccentric, 
languid, stream-of-constiousness monologues. 


which then gradually overiap > expect. Wright's thesis is essentially that - the 

kind of acad em i c gdru wn . ® ; wfl j ni s|.ih l ‘ Germans and Italians but mnn- - 


*mu wi wrets of the uni- ■ only agamsime Germans ana Italians retmore 


VPIVHS rnwtlv involved WauRh’s^Swbrdof Honour” thotigfa thSemisa’ 


central di&erence here in that where Waugh 
rSnr tothe Sit of Hunt as Amt thought British dass strucmrcswere^bfc to be 

** ^ Wpfld War. n. Wrigte 

omSterest whflewoAing tatotfeevicw tot Ihe^TCremprovri hy it; 
tofrroytoougti sutotaes that would be the Jfis OTind figiffeB ColondSw,te^iia! 
mvy of Ktotnaff himself. . “to*fippo" 

Notoidydcra Shawn bdoM to no reogto- smmpy'' - one rfthcMflc mawho, Jfe 
able school of drama, the ooene is budding for Mmj^.wmtomhmtthcearthooalliey 


himcpif is still evidently under construction and had disinherited the old .officer dass. ‘ 
irHinnl to fall apart around the edges. Yet for ^ Geoffrey Hutchings’ marvdously sweaty, 

m . . . ■_ J>An!u iWWimMlVfia - ■. J-- 1 - - - — •* - 


alvuit hfe m»rage in asCTmtng tnat an Bumcncc ^ Hippo, 
wishes to eavesdrop on a debate, rather than natives (“I hah 
attend a spectacle or a coherent plot. Ana when more 

he appears on stage, a puckish, baldingin no ce nt bastards from ] 
abroad, stationed somewhere halfway- from ^ defeated 
Andy Hardy to Woody Allen, you begnto. 
believe that p erhaps there mi gh t be somet h i n g wi 

actually happening here after afl, though I sus- Ba | J j e j^briot i 
pcct he has yet to work out quite what it is. soars to heighi 

P Hippo is ramp; 

At the Court’s Theatre Upstairs, and as part t he unw iBmgs> 
of the same Anglo-American exchange, we have destroy rnfiis cr 
the Public Theatre’s production of Tracers,” a an intriguing sc 
series of blackout sketches perfOTmed by the all Hollywood 


Vietnam Veterans Ensemble. Though the eve- ous. 1 


of the Hippo r bitterly opposeC to the. local 
natives (“I hate wipgs who deny their wogness") 
but still more nmosed to t&.pom^oeaded 
bastards from public schools who he feds have' 
to be defeated even before thc Nazis. 

The readt is a bladk comedy ^ btihmd-tfae- 
lines society^ whddb suffers ftrari ahe^iitqxne- 
trable subplot about resistance maneuvers but ■ . 
soars to heights of splendid satire- 'whatever 
Hippo is rampant. Peter Eyre.lotfers paldy as 
the unvnllm^ symbol of all thal Hippo is tint to : 
destroy in his own mess, while Cecfle Padr does ' 

all Ho^Sod 


nin g has not been nearly so carefully or success- Bat in the aid, and i msn i p r i^ingty , J£ppo ■ ■ 
fully put together as Michael Hen's “Despatch- overtakes arid ajjpgat md suppre ss es t he •’ 
es” at the N ational in 1979, this collage of limbs . until we areleft with a single corpse amid the' - 
and limbo is given its strength by the fact that nunsof tfaeplot that beandnis author haye&st^ 
several of its participants were in Saigon and are laid, and then dy namited fmm wi thin. . At-ftin' - .' 
now here to recall and re-enact that particular yay feast he now deserves tebe brought bade to.- 
American nightma re. It mak es for an eene com- Hfc for bi&cwn tdeviaon ariae of fnrther mis- . 
panion piece to Shawn’s cerebral mus i n gs on the adventures*-' . • 

nature of cruelty on the stage below.- y ■ - r - - : ' "■ . 

D ' . (' 

Other aspects of an altogether other warr Into Q t nw ftyTAg Designs to Ruis Show - 
the Barbican Pit from Stratford has conic Nkh- Aganx Fnmce-Prrae 

alas Wright's “The Desert Air,” a curious come- HEUING — China will participate for the . 

dy of Worid War n, mostly set in Caoro during first time id the international Ready-to-Wear - 
1942-43 and suggested by a secret-service histo- fashion show next month in Paris, Xinhua news - 
ry of that confused time. . agency has announced: 


DOONESBURY 

~ AND MY omm>. Ip 

wtFBwm swyoute 

TO BE NEAR. TALKING 5AST 
\THBGAU£Rr VUASE.WO 
; 825 M SOHO. YEARS AGO, 

° NOPfVBLM 


fom, fm crush is on. 

ALLimvupsmrriN, • r^- 
BUTTHE AREAS STILL & 
!NFES7B> mi OLPN&GH- 
BORHOOP TYPES WHO JUST £ 
jfZuNONT BUDGE! 

dim, 


SOYOU AVAILABLE? HEKYOU 

DOftmm. &WRLEDTOFOKB 
THEF&S ANRimXJEWGH 
ANHH1NG ORBLACKCOUPtE 
A mtARJE ? OUT OF, THE/PS-'- 
W ABMMB ter.^1 ; 

'-bMB&.'.-VSSGs; 


BBJEV&ME, 

IT Cm TAKE 
MONTHS! MEAN- 
wms, KXJGom 
FIND ANOTHER. 
)-PtACETDLM5! 













"Relations between our two 
countries are continuing to 
deteriorate, the arms race is 


at is not 

subsiding. . .Surely, God on high has not 
refused to give us enough wisdom to 
find ways to bring us an improvement 
in our relations.” 

—From an extraordinary two-hour interview 
with Mikhail Gorbachev in this week’s issue, 
the first meeting held by the new Soviet leader 
with any Western publication . 








Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Tuesdays 




NASDAQ Index 


Indus 133347 1337.14 132200 US. 19— 4JJ 

Trans *8847 «9M3 6B0SJ 68656— 4.W 

utii 15943 isms is&34 isaas— os 2 

coma 55370 S5S3 S48.7S 551 M— £49 


Composite 

industrials 

Tronw. 

Utilities 
F manse 


Htob uw am am 
109.17 10041 10091 —IMO 
24.9* 13441 13447 — HB 

mri iom 7 iBiM —in 

5743 5725 5749 —0.14 
11177 11130 I13J0-0J5 


nisi; 


Closing 



Qua 

Pre*. 


191 

276 


35* 

-227 


229 

M2 

Total 


745 

NOW H tolls 



New Lows 

10 

7fi 

Volume ue 
Vohimeown 




composite 

Industrials 

Fin ance 

insurance 


cion a» 

39156 — 1-10 
303.16 — 1.95 
J8195 +115 
347.24-8^ 
3742— 149 


37X10 -T44 27544 27844 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Close Fra*. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 
Utilities 
Industrial a 


Advanced 

Declined 

UnctianoBd 

Total issues 
New H tofts 
New Lom 
Volume up 
VMume down 


510 740 

1033 700 

450 500 

3013 less 

32 44 

15 9 

22479.190 
4&92OT0 


-included m me sales flouna 


Bur Soles «Sim 
114945 391703 11568 
141687 391716 1400 

141767 39X594 737 

MW 390486 1416 

133M 380224 1418 


VoLat4PJW- SUJUW 

PrtY.4PJl8.VOl 8142*0* 

PmcMuoHdatBddoK 91619,340 


Standard & Poor's Index 


AMEX Sales 



Tables Include the nationwide prices 
op to the cli»ln« on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

.Via The Associated Press 


Industrials 

Tramp. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


HU Low OOM Ck*ee 


20949 «« 20645—054 
17444 17251 17441 -OSS 
8*2 KM 84.19 —0.10 
2178 2140 2144 —0.14 
18843 107JB 187.91 -072 



6,140/100 

4 pj% voiunw 

Prev.4PJVl.vo1mne 

Pr«y.can£vahin)e 

SJMMO 



NYSE Prices Ease in Slow Trade 


23*6 16 AAR 46 14 15 159 23 22V6Z3 +96 

im 9% ACS 13 at 15ft 15* 15% 

16% 996 AMCA 1 1146 1146 1146 

TIM 13 AMF J2SI 96 530 1346 13M 13ta 

50*4 tO> AMR 7 9198 4416 4396 44 

25% 23 AMR pi 247 114 I 2396 2346 2346 

22 IV ANRpf 2.12 105 1 20U 20% 20U 

MU 766 APL IA 946 946 946 

Alta 3446 ASA 100 £4 1012 371A MV. 37V6 +1 

27 12ta AVX 32 24 18 308 1316 Hta 1244— Hi 

28V6 I8ta AZP Z72 11J 7 1540 24ta 24U 3446 

*0 36% AMLM3 140 2.4 16 1234 5796 SAW 5746— V6 

2546 20 ACCOWUs £3 23 17 142 22% 22V, 22% 

24% 12V. ACtneC A0 LB 76 Hta 14 141* 

ID V>3 746 ActneE 32b 40 11 23 3 7% 8 + ta 


IDta 746 AcmeE J2b 40 

19 I5ta Ado Ex 1J3»1U 

20 13VS A dm Ml 32 IS 

18V. m AdvSyn 531 44 

4046 2216 AMD 

1216 646 Advest .12 U 

ISA 9V6 Aerflex 


A0 U 76 14M 14 141* 

32b 40 II 23 3 7W 3 + V6 

.WnllS 101 1746 1746 1746 + 16 

32 IS 7 22 1446 1646 1 646 + V, 

S3> 44 >9 156 1» 12 12ta— U 

16 3837 27 26U 2646— ta 

.12 U 21 85 » 916 946 — 46 


1216 646 Advest .12 U 31 85 944 916 946 — 46 

1516 9ta Acrflen 19 234 141% 13% 11% + 46 

49% 32*6 A*mu 264 41 15 7000 4446 431% 43ta— 16 

5716 S2%A0tLPf 5J9BHL2 553 57 56% 56%—% 

3746 13% Annins 13) 17 I 411 3246 3146 3216— 46 

346 Zte Allecn 30 3% 31* 316 

57 49 A Li- Prd 120 23 12 1061 S3ta 246 52% — 46 

2446 15 AirbFrt AO 24 13 45 2246 2246 2246— 16 

216 ltaAJMoaa .10* 3d 10 2 1* 2 


346 Zte Allecn 

57 49 Air Prd 120 23 12 

2446 15 AirbFrt 40 24 13 

216 116 AJMM3 .10* 5J3 
S9’& 2346 AtaPpf 224a 9JB 
3341 2 7U AlaPpf A £92 117 
316 6% AlaPdPf JO ID 

82 A3ta AldP Pf *9.00 11J 

104% 96 AlaP of 1123 1U 

86 69% AlaPpf 944 11J 

75 57 AlaPpf 828 112 

>616 1146 Almncp 1JM 72 10 

2646 1IW AISkAJr .16 2 8 

25 1146 AMHlOS 28 12 19 

3TA 2646 Albtsns 26 17 II 

311% 23% Alcan 120 42 29 

3841 2716 Alcostd 120 14 12 

32 20% AtexAlX 1J» 32 

25ta 2046 AJexdr 33 

89ta 79% AltoCo 1241 10 
26% 24 Vi AWCC pt 226 102 
38% 20% Ahllnl 1.40 62 

20% 1646 Atoll pf 3.19 122 

98 85 AJ 9 I PfC112S 132 

34% 36% AlWPw UI U! 9 

Z3VS 15% AJUnG Mb 23 15 

46% 3246 AlldCp 120 44 i 

66 S7V6 AJdCBPf 624 I0L7 

105% 100% AldCpt lUtallA 
Zita 15% AlkfPd 12 

6016 4546 AJIdSIr 112 32 7 

llta 4% Altnai 
34% 24 Alls C of 

99% 21% MJLTL 126 63 9 

3Bta 28% ALLTPf 106 £7 


2.74o 92 100 27% 2716 27% + 46 

192 117 17 31 30% 30% — % 

27 11J 26 8 7% 744 — ta 

P. 00 11.7 Mi 77 77 77 

120 142 KcMJtamtalUta 

9.44 11.7 IWh 8044 80% B0%— % 

828 11 7 12Qz 70ta A9ta JW 9 +1 

124 73 10 IV 14% 1416 14% + )6 

.16 2 8 2051 21ta 2016 21 — Vi 

28 12 19 27 S4U 24% 2416—46 

36 17 11 361 2816 374k 2BV6 + 16 

120 42 29 6300 28ta 28ta 28% — 46 

120 32 13 24 35% 35% 3546— % 

720 32 1511 2BI6 27% 2716— 16 

23 18 24% 2416 2446— % 

1247 10 237 76% 7646 76% + % 

226 102 14 26ta 26ta 2616 

1.40 62 37 9146 2116 21% 

119 110 6 13% 18% 18% 

125 110 2 93V6 93ta 9316 + % 

£H> £8 9 SM 3044 30ta 30% 

20b 17 15 40 22% 21% 22% 

120 42 8 910 4146 41% 4146— U 

£74 1017 41 43% 63 63 — 46 

1 27*112 90 10146 101461014)1 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Slock Exchange drifted lower Tuesday as the 
slow activity of August reached into September. 
Trading was light. 

The market opened lower and the Dow Jones 
industrial average had declined neatly 10 points 
by midaf ternoon. In late trading, it trimmed its 
losses with the Dow industrial average closing 
down 4.82 to 1,329.19. 

Declines outnumbered advances by a 2-1 
ratio. Volume totaled 812 million shares, down 
slightly from 81.6 million on Friday. The mar- 
ket was dosed Monday for Labor Day. 

"The market was weak all day,” said Alfred 
Goldman, stock market strategist for A.G. Ed- 
wards in Sl Louis. 

“Not only did the Dow industrial average 
decline, but it took the transportation and utili- 
ty issues down with it,” he said. 

“The market has been acting poorly for the 
last month and even the rallies have been feeble 


■ • II W r* IJ __ JJ J MAT UKUbVI lw6 3UMLAAI Ul UH# t V - 1 |JVU %1UI 

and unimpressive. Mr. Goldman added. A I- a week or two," he said “At that level the 

2 ^^ money managers on vacation, woi be so oversold that we wiQ see the 

the full audience is back. They area t too tin- m of ^ ^ 


E ressed and their have good reason not to be,” 
: said. 


Louis Salero of Drexel Burnham Lambert 
said the expectation that the market would 


Travelers Corp. was the most actively traded 
issue, losing Mi to 41ft. Union Carbide was 
second, down 1% to 55ft. SCM Corp. was third. 
The session's biggest gainer, it jumped 5 to 72. 


si ia% i7% it% — vi 1 move higher as soon as people relumed from Hanson Trust, a British concern, said it was 

53 5646 5616 5616 — 1* ( ■ ....... ** ■ l, " - - ■ , * . . . . .. . 


39% 29% Alcoa 
22 1346 Armn 


453 5646 5616 56ta— W 

271 446 416 4% — ta 

17 30% 30 30 — % 

64 17% an* Ota— ta 

I 36% 36% 36% 


120 32 32 435 35% 3546 3Sta— V6 


1100 15% 15M 1516— W 


22% AmHes 1.10 U 23 1311 29 2046 2846—46 


140ta 9B!6 AHsspf 350 22 
9% 1% A/nAsr 

21ta 16 ABokr 


2 124 124 124 +4 

629 1% 146 1% 

22 2046 3096 2046— 16 


58% A Brand 353 £5 8 2068 60V6 S9ta 5996— I* 


vacation was “a joke.” 

With economists divided between those who 
see signs of an economic revival and those who 
see no signs of improvement for the rest of Lhe 
year, investors are uncertain, he said. 

“Everything has to be re-analyzed and it will 


increasing its pending cash tend a offer for 
SCM common stock to $72 a share. 

General Motors declined ft to 67ft. The Envi- 
ronmental Protection Agency said GM is rec&D- 
ing about 434,000 of its 1981 cars to correct 
problems with anti-pollution equipment. 


30ta 95% ABrd pf 275 92 


11546 56ta Afteicat 120 12 17 597 1 154* 11516 1 15% 


30% 19% ABkfM 26 £2 14 
2BVj 20ta ABirSPr 24 22 14 


40 27ta 27 
7 26% 26 


27 — ta 
26 — % 


£0ta 45% AcnCon 253 50 11 430 5896 57% 5816— 46 


25% 22 A Con pf 220 112 
52% 40% ACoflPf 320 £9 
2076 1716 ACopBd 220 11.1 


? D«6 2516 ACopCv £51e 93 
1 6ta ACnntC 


57% 44ta A Cyan 
27% 18% ADT 


200 112 9 2446 2446 2446 + ta 

3.00 5.9 21 5065 XVa 50% + ta 

220 11.1 00 nt 19% 1946— % 

JJSle 93 6 27% 27 27 — 46 

166 27 66 Ih 696— % 

1.90 £5 14 616 5446 54% 5446 

-92 19 22 128 2346 23% 234*— ta 


24% 1796 AElPw £360104 8 1945 21% 21% 21% + 16 


■1946 3116 Am EXP MB XI 14 3444 41% 40*6 41 — % 

2546 12ta AFortilB M ZB II 556 24% Ota 23ta— 1 

36% 22% AGhCp 700 33 9 1089 31% 30% 3046 — 96 


14 696 AGnlwt _ 

56% 5146 AGfU pf A £87*104 171 564| 5696 5696 + 1* 

96ta 63% AGnl pfBSJOa 66 15 B4% 83% B3%— Ita 

71% 45 ACllpfDU4 A3 406 63% 6l% 6146—1% 

364« 25% AHsHI I JO £4 10 11x35% 35 35% + 16 

1346 7ta A Hot*) 34 12% 12 12% 

66% 46% AHOOM 290 £0 12 2894 58% 58% 58ta— % 

47 26% AHOSP 1.12 2A IS 1644 47 46% 4646— 16 

9716 72 Amrtch bM 73 9 500 91% 91 9146 + ta 


55 1246 19% 1246— 46 
171 564| 5696 5696 + 16 


15 B4% 83% B3%— Ita 
406 62% 61% 67% —1% 
Ux3Sta 35 35% + 16 

34 19% 12 1216 


Amftdl £60 72 9 5B0 91% 91 


90% 69 AlnGTP 44 £ 22 i-Ss 85 B4ta 84% — Vi 

150 11ZV6 AIGpPf SMS 43 9 147% 140 140 —3 

2846 IBta AMI 72 30 71 1419 34% 24 24 — % 


■496 996 AmMOt 1539 3% 3 3 

29 16W APrcwds JO 25 5 154 20% 20 20% — ta 

lOta 12% ASLFf Pf 2.19 1X8 29 1546 75% 1596 + ta 

16 llta AStHp JO £8 10 369 1446 13% 1346— 46 

35% 26% AmSM 1 AO £4 10 689 2996 29% 29ta 

6716 3S46 Amstor M 1.1 10 239 5816 5716 5716—1 
78 4616 ASlrpfA £38 £5 346 68 <7ta 67ta- Ml 

55^6 31 AStrpfB 6J01X3 49 55% SSVr 55% + ta 


38% 22% Comfot 1J0 X5 10 318 3446 33% MM— ta 

35% 23% CPiyc 28 10 20 1125 28 27% 2746— 46 

35% 25 Compor 40 2J 8 307 27 25% 25% —1% 


35% 25 Compor JO 23 
24ta I2ta ConwSc 
45% llta Cptvsn 


348 24 2346 2346— 4* 
832 14% 1396 14 — ta 


3944 24ta COTAS I J7 23 14 113 38% 3716 38 — ta 

30 14*6 COTftE 1J0 93 10 11 17% 17M 17% 

31 2146 CrmNG 230 BJ 9 15 30 29% 29% 

1516 12*6 Conroe M 23 6 50 14 13*6 13%— ta 


29% 29% 

13*6 1J%— V6 


2646 ConsEd 240 7J 8 1444 34% 3446 34% — I* 


47% 36ta ConE pf 4J5 104 

50 39 ConE pf 5J» 103 

36 23 CnsFrt 1.10 £3 11 

47% 35% CnsNG 232 £7 8 

B% 4% ConsPw 
33% 19 CnPpfB 450 1X6 

54% 3116 OiPpfD 745 14.1 

56 32% CnP pfO 7J6 14.1 

3 Ita 1546 CnPprV 440 14.9 


239 5816 
346 68 
49 55% 


SS^'% 


2S% 13% CnP orU £40 140 
38% 14% CnP prT £78 140 
55% 31% CnPpfH 7M 141 
28% 14% CnPnrR 400 140 
28% 14% CnPprP £98 147 
28% 1496 CnPprN £85 144 
18ta 9ta CnPprMXSO 115* 

17 8% CnPprL 233 14J 

29 IS CnPprS 400 14J 

18 «ta CnPprK 243 14.1 


2446 17% AT&T U0 54 16 7551 21 ta 
41% 32% AT&T Pf £64 93 139 39% 


41% 32% ATSiTPf £64 92 
42 33% AT&T Pt 3J* 93 

27% 16*6 AWotra 1J0 10 
13% 10 AWotpf 125 1«fi 
2Bta 17% AntHoH 240 134 
7Zta 59% ATrPr 544 &2 
18 6ta ATrSc 


«% + V% 
21 % 


CnffCp 240 £3 20 807 42 


189QZ 45 44 44ta — ta 

17 48ta 48% 48% + ta 
98 33% 33 33V6— % 

70S 41 40*6 4066— % 

1245 7Mi 7% 736— ta 

400Z 33 32 33 +1 

10CU 52% 52% 52*6 
1001 55 35 55 + % 

66 30 2W6 29ta 

15 24*6 24% 24*6 

28 26% 2SM 2516— Vt 
1008 5416 5416 5416 

16 27% 27 27 — 16 

9 27 36% 27 + % 

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12 Month 
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be seven to 10 business days before any major 
decisions are readied,'' Mr. Salero said. 

Mr. Goldman said data that continues to 
outline an economy that is “at best sluggish” is 
discouraging buyers. 

“Participants nave had six months of prom- 
ises that Liu economy will pick up and now they 
are taking a ‘show me’ attitude while reacting to 
the reality of a slow economy," he said. 

A purchasing managers survey said the econ- 
omy slumped, with a rise in output offset by 
lower prices and lower employment. But the 
Commerce Department later reported U-S. con- 
struction spending rose 12 percent in July. 

Mr. Goldman said the 1 300-level on the Dow 
has taken on increased psychological and tech- 
nical significance and that once support there is 
broken, the market wiD move down to the 1,200 
to 1,220 area after encountering interim support 
in the 1.260-1,270 area. 

Hany ViHec of Sutro & Co. in Palo Alto, 
California, was more optimistic. “Look for the 
market to test support in the 1,290-1,300 area 


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"Good day. Madam . F m a fi^p^t rxdiange student . ; 
working my way throiigfi M. L 7.’ Care to have your house 
spruredup with Devoepaint? 



Our Devote & Rayndds C^o. Division has been . 
painring America beauriful si nce 1754. For our 1984 
Annual Repon. wrrre: GrowChemicul Europe, N.V., 
Oudescrjut; 8 B-2630 Aartsel aa r, Belgium. Depr. G 


Awlgrip Alumfgrip, Devoe; three of (mjt wert-krwwn I brand names. 


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30 M 
137 73 
JO 43 
136 HU ff 
£80 1U 

*M 123 
430 05 
230 124 


S 126 
1J 9 


IJB 13 
236 MX 5 
29* ai 0 
232 104 
223 107 


146 3 3 
40 us 
833 MJ 
144 U M 


121 Bta 
3456 19% 

4 41% 
7048 32% 

S3 40 
1195 M 
KB Mta 
9 >7% 

m j% 

1687 2216 
10b 30% 
iflQ* asta 
ib 36 
18 U 

41 » 

183 57% 
400* 13*6 

5223x15% 

« 36% 

9 22% 

5 20*6 , 
306 14% 

• 1 37*4 . 

42 15*6 
4 10% ; 

1241 60% 


j 





















































r*“* 



Stxteiicslndex 


AMEXwtn . pyj 

AMEX htotartiwsP.ra rttung P,i 3 

NYSE »rto M +££±2* P '" 

RYsewoianwP.io p -’ 

CsraxHan-stodu P.14 Mon,!?. 01 * 3 P. ? 
C-I-W iWW P. 9 SSL*™*" "• 8 

?* SL «* 


Hcralb^fefcribmic, 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 



U.S. Slocks 
Report. Page 8 


Page 9 




By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

Ibtenuuirital HeraU Tnhune 


i ri 


■ indices, manv ex^t &loom ' Bu L according 10 several 

,-A. • self-SuSh of 11 '® «“» «Pe« dtto raiposed « 

possible worlds isSlS^ SufS^k®! va< 2f ions * The wo ? t ^ 
bade to worlL E your desk cleaned out on your fust day 

8uy coroes back vacation 
for now^He’c S B c ?? 1 *? ^ ball. There is one guy I’m waiting 
set fired hm h^P 1118 , ba . clc fr °m his vacation and he's going 
know “5"Wng about it yet," Myst. 

ssryssaii®^*™ * lkl » 

OiitnlurumtAm CZ 


IO 
'ed 
a so- 


German 
Output 
Increases 

Rise of 1.8% 
Posted for July 

Reuters 

BONN — West German indus- 
trial production, seasonally adjust- 
ed, rose a provisional 1.8 percent in 
July after rising 1.7 percent in June, 
the Economics Ministry reported 
Tuesday. 

The ministry had originally put 
the June increase at 10 percent. 

AH sectors of industry increased 
production on a year-to-year bans 
m the June- July period except con- 
struction, which registered a 73- 
percent fall. 

Bui output in the building indus- 
try, traditionally the weakest sector 

• , , of the economy, rose 13 percent in 

un balance, companies let executives have their holiday first July, 
and teU them when they get back. They feel they axe being Overall industrial production in 

^Kinder, says Leslie Robinson, of Pauline Hyde & Associates, ^ July was 3 percent higher 
^another London-based outplacement firm. than in the previous two-month pe- 

More fortunate managers who are noL on the firing line often nod^ and 9 percent higher than in 
use summer vacations to consider new job possibilities, according and July of last year, 
to executive headhunters. Mann factoring industry output 

rose 1 percent m July from the 

A CCORDING to Russell Reynolds & Associ£s, the French previous month, the ministry said. 

/ A subsidiary of the U.S. executive recruitment firm, in This side of industry raised out- 
-A_ October after the s umm er break, and in January after the put 15 percent in the laiwt wo 
Christmas vacation, there is a 10- to 15-percent increase in months from the April and May 
unsolicited resumes over the other months of the year. 

“In September, executives get the idea they want to change 
jobs. By October they have updated their r£sum£ and have salt it 
on to us,” says Marie-Annick Flambard-Guy, an associate direc- 
tor of the French concern. 


Scottish Financiers Wary of 'Fads’ 


Outplacement firms are hired 
by multinationals to help se- 
nior-level managers being 
fired or laid off to find new 
jobs. Paradoxically, giving 
you the bad news after your 
vacation comes more out of 
corporate kindness than mal- 
ice. 


Unsolicited 
resumes start 
pouring in after 
the vacation. 


»P 


r oi the breach concern. 

In 1983, Russell Reynolds received 271 unsolicited res um e s in 
January and 234 in October, compared with a low of 131 in 
August. In January 1984, unsolicited r&sum&s again increased to 
310, steadily decreasing to 161 in August, and hitting a new high 
of 326 for the year in October. This year, Russell Reynolds & 
Associ&s received 337 unsolicited ’resumes in January, 307 in 
March, 290 in May, 237 in July and 150 in August. 

Other headhunters report an increase in unsolicited rfcsumfcs 
Softer the vacation but attribute it to the summer lull rather than to 
an increase above a monthly average throughout the year. 

Another form of re-entry shock for managers is the stress of re- 
integration into organizational life after a break. One index of 
stress caused by this sharp adjustment from being an individual 
to part of a team a g ain is an increase in work-related problems 
during the first few weeks back at work. Work dissatisfaction at 
the executive level is impossible to measure because companies 
do not usually have in-house counseling for their erasunves on 
work-related problems. The one exception is Control Data Lto, 

the British subsidiary of the U.S. computer company. 

“Calls after vacation periods increase compared to me rest of 
the year,” says John Hall, director of the Employee Advisory 
Resource at Control Data in LOTuta^here are iruunber ^of 
: reasons for that Vacation is a time of reflection for vAat you are 
doing and where you-are going in ypur c amer, h e says. 

iE^UStessSBSS-ss 

life.” savs Cary Cooper, a professor at the University 
: Chester SttitatBlci Technology and an author of many books cm 

' “nTStariSe Guidance Council, a vohmti^ organiz atio n 
(Continued on Page O, CoL 6) . 


months 
period. 

All sectors shared in the increase 
except for the food, drink and to- 
bacco sector, where production was 
unchanged. 

Builders increased output by 7 
percent in the two-month period 
and capital goods producers, by 4 
percent. 

The minis try said the 9- percent 
year-to-year rise in overall industri- 
al output in June and July should 
be judged against the background 
of last year’s low production in 
June because of the seven-week 
metalworkers’ strike. 

Similarly, the ministry cau- 
tioned, output was stimulated in 
• July last year by the ending of the 
strikes. 


Managers Steer 
dear of Joining 
Conglomerates 

By Bamaby J. Fcder 

York Times Senior 
EDINBURGH — Scotland’s 
s piral has long been a provin- 
cial financial center with a twist. 
As the home of major banks, 
huge insurance companies and, 
according to local estimates, 
more in vestment funds than any 
European city outside of London 
and Zurich, Edinburgh has inev- 
itably been more caught up in 
international financial develop- 
ments than regional British cen- 
ters such as Manchester. 

However, Edinburgh’s pecu- 
liarities, ranging from its com- 

B actness to its lack of trading 
oors and exchanges, have fre- 
quently insulated it from fads 
that have swept the world of in- 
ternational finance. According 
to bankers, brokers, insurers and 
fund managers here, financial 
conglomeration is the latest fad 
and Edinburgh will do well by 
steering clear of it. 

Legendary for caution and 
canniness, Edinburgh’s finan- 
ciers assert that the advantages 
of U.S. and London “financial 
supermarkets” where a variety of 
financial services are available 
have been exaggerated and that 
the difficulties of managing them 
are underestimated. 

“The ingredients to stitch such 
institutions together are here, 
stud Angus Grossart, managing 
director of Nobel Grossart Ltd., 
Edin burgh’s largest independent 

i nwwlA 





The Scantron PuUcsxong Lti 

St. Andrews Square in Edinburgh, home of Scotland's 
biggest banks and several major insurance companies. 


Hanson 1 rust 
Raises SCM Bid 
To $907 Million 

Tj^h Hapercv mem on ** “*■ Hanson bid. But 
, SCM reported that Merrill Lynch 

/Rfrmnzana/ Herald Tnbune ^ agreed to provide US much as 

LONDON I — Hanson Tnm j 4S Q a ®2jjj m m financing for the 
PLC announced Tuesday that xi buyout and ihat Pruden- 

^ /aismg its Swanre Co. had expressed 

SCM Coro, to about 5907 minion 1L 4 llingne&5 w provide most of the 
$755 million. 


belief about job-hopping and 
salary wars in London’s financial 
community. They also are skep- 
tical about its ability to keep in- 
side information from flowing 
between the new arms of con- 
glomerates. 

“You can probably write the 
scenario for scandal and fill in 
the naiw* later,” said Grant 
Baird, economist for Royal Bank 
of Scotland, which is Scotland’s 
largest . , 

So far, the highly regarded 
brokerage firm of Wood Mac- 
Kenzie & Co., which is being 

- . j i - t r:n P .1 I ,A ih« 


Edinburgh's largest independent •> 'rV.y, . J ,r h 

roerchambank^But people here acquired by Hifl Samuel Ltd., the 
feel that continued specialization merchant bank subsidiary of jhe 


IM»I UMib 

with cooperative arrangements 
between institutions offers better 
opportunities with fewer risks.” 

From Sl Andrews Square, the 
home of Scotland's biggest 
banks and several major insur- 
ance companies, to Charlotte 
Square, a quarter of a mile 
(about 0.4 kilometers) along the 
ridge followed by Geoige Street, 
Scottish financiers talk with dis- 


uiuuuun won* 

Midland bank group, is the only 
major firm to commit itself to a 
London-based conglomerate. 

However, no one here is sug- 
gesting that the Scottish finan- 
cial sector is immune from the 
pressures that are fell in London. 
Edinburgh's financial communi- 
ty manages between $40 bilhon 
and S50 billion. 

This city's influence grew 


when 19th-century Scottish mer- 
chants piled up more wealth than 
Lhey could invest at home and 
began inventing such vehicles as 
the investment trust to channel 
their money into expanding rail- 
roads of the United States and 
properties in the Far East. 

The pressures that produce fi- 
nancial supermarkets in London 
show up in Edinburgh in various 
ways. Banks here seek to expand 
their national and international 
presence while defending their 
turf from attacks by English and 
overseas competitors. 

In 1982 the government 
blocked attempts by first Hong- 
kong & Shanghai Bank and then 
Standard Chartered Bank to ac- 
quire Royal Bank. 

“The bid for the Royal Bank 
helped galv anize the communi- 
ty,” said Archie Gibson, joint 
general manager of Bank of 
Scotland. 

Royal B ank is now putting the 
finishing touches on a merger 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 4) 


tom 5755 nnHkm ^fthe needri funds. subjeetto 

iSSSK* latest bid is con- 
rauon formed by a Mit ofhtonU dilioned ^ sCM nol granting any 

Lynch & Co. and a igroup of -lock-up” agreements or options to 

S^M execuuv^ iWn tmiud KTor ^ includ- 

offer, announced Aug 21, was SNJ ^ J ^ Menill 

WerA o tnck p,. SCM is a New York- based 
. °“ chemicals, coatings and paper- 

change, SCM shares (Awed l ues- _ roducls company^ which also pro- 
day ax $72 a share^ in>S5. P typewriters and Durkee food 

Han^s ^ dwrfy based in Lon- 

after .SCM annwmeed Tuesday ^ a con g] onKr2[e with mter- 

2^£^S , Sih a l taSSffl “ re S;U^. processins 

Lyncb-^Mg^p andwomdb^ “nanson has mushroomed into 

one of Britain's 10 largest wmpa- 
for^comn^shims. SCM^ ^ m lhe pasl lwo decades 

through a long siring of acquisi- 

te* f5 f 5 2ln- lions, mostiv involving makers of 

rgected Hanson s unnal bid as m basJc m UD gjainorou5 in- 

adequate. dustries. The British conglomerate 

Some WaD Street analysts^ said ^ na6e a spccLdtv of cutting 
the odds were against the Merrill ^ CP nin g unwanted units at 
group raising its offer to top Han- ^ compares it acquires. 

*»’ s “‘fJSi SCM would be a classic Han t )Q 

rector of Plglips & acquisition. The U.S. company has 

tional m New Yori^ smd ^e pro[il record but has 

consensus on Wall Street was tnat j bosun improvnnB us per- 
$70 was .about the n™*™**' SeT cutting Josts ^r.d 
the MernDgr^ could ^ Ae va]ues 0 f certa in 

James Wilbur an analyst at The offer for SCM Hanson s 
SnShltaroeY Harris Upfcun & biggest ever. comesjusi 15 months 
C^saidbfbeheved the Merrill after the Bnush company acquired 
t ^ 0 ‘’ s ®tL.T A» n»hr i« hid U.S. Industries Inc., an .\mencan 
P 0l ^rnB«mmn of about $75 and maker of building materials, fumi- 

Srfdmcf LX Merrill offer Hanson's 

berrised. moo** ended March a 1 came from 

immediate com- its U.S. operations. 


Saudis Said 
To Consider 
OilDiscounts 


Canadian Gold Mining Booms 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Some oil industry 
sources said Tuesday that they be- 


By Douglas Matin nddatHemlo. Onuno. i> srntin, 

Nev York TlmesServiee ^ ^ HemlO fidd is nOW 

TORONTO - In the early ™dSg and by 1990 the entire 
1980s the high pnee of gold caused ( j ( ^ ve j 0 p inenl ^ expected to in- 
Canada’s government and minmg *Q ma da's 2.6 million ounces 

industry to make sowt Jeastoos f ^ by 25 percenL 

A key indiator of the state of 

thirds. ?low, with the worid’s most Canadian 

Lm ri.Mc r~,„oht in lhe of add stocks on theToronto block 


tome oil industry fc ow , with the worid’s most ^ 

day that they be- productive gold fidds caught in the d gold slcx ^° a 

Ucvcd Saudi Arabia was preparing £^*>3 of South Africa,Xe Cana- 

Tidal prices in an dian moves are starting to seem year m the aebange s go a moa 



Cross Bates 

s 

Amctardam tai 

Bnosefti(a) 57AS7S 
Frankfort 1M# 

Lamtoa tb) U»5 

Mltai 

MewYcrkCcl 

r°two 

Cortf* US* 

I ECU 0JI32 

I SDR \SOS79 


c 

*395 

79J35 

3JU 

161I.W 
arxn ■ 

1UJ7 

32177 

US5T 

05307 

034301 


OM. 

112535* 

5014 

1903 

4*8.13 

184 

00536 

8*08 

81425* 

uxn 

29MM 


FJ=. 

34X5* 

saa 

31745* 

11.9463 

218J3 

BJ37S 

27 M 
27005 ' 
6009 
80874 


IU- 
0.1484* 
303* 
1094 X 
201000 

101 1O0 

40693 X 

1258* 
0.1235 • 
149009 
1.94649 


O Mr. 

18007 
BITS* 
400 
59*00 
3519 
1714 
7*78 
7128 * 
1509 
12731 


ILF. 

5>55** 

*938* 

7905 

33009 

5700 

15077- 

41519* 

40749* 

45.1704 

SUM 


Sept. 3 
5J=. YM 
13410 * W.19 V 
2*5925 2*133* 

12140* 1-1*15* 
3J17I 3B.155 
81103 70*5 

1358 m» 
170* 1638* 

103* 

09829* 

1030 WOK 
23914 M564 


effort to increase sales. But the ru- 
mors could not be confirmed, and 
some senior oil traders expressed 
skepticism. 

Such a move by Saudi Arabia, 
the most powerful member of the 
Organization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries, would be a tug Wow 
to OPECs efforts to prevent a fur- 
ther drop in oil prices. The Saudis 
have been almost alone among 
members of the group in refusingto 
offer hidden discounts from offi- 
cial OPEC prices. 


dian moves are starting to seem 
shrewd. 

GoM is “the one sector in the 
minin g area in Canada which, is 
cooking," Christopher Bryan, vice 


r- . , 

year in the exchange s gold index 
has come while gold stocks in Jo- 
hannesburg have fallen by 36 per- 
cenL 

With the price of gold having 



NTT 


tion. The coin — purer than the 
Krugerrand at 0.999 gold vs. 0.916 
—last year captured 27 percent of 
the new-coin market. By June of 
this year, it had surpassed the Kru- 
gerrand in ncw-coin sales in North 
America, the principal market for 
gold coins. Gold experts say it is 
likely to be the winner globally for 
the entire year. 

But surpassing the Krugerrand 
in 1985 means less than it would 
have a few years ago. In 1978 and 
1979, more than 9.3 million ounces 
of gold coins were sold; last year’s 
^r. .. . 4 — 42 uul- 


ii UrcL- pnccs. * 

Because other ofl produasrs have TjJ^Jiaple Leaf, the one-ounce 
undercut Saudi prices, the long- . ^ ^Canadian government 
dom’s production has plungedto a m 1979, is threatening 

iecu «»» — — imj von - — — 20-year kxwof 2 10 displace the South African Kru- 

) 074301 2JM94 8^4 w ^ York and 2.5 million bands adayin ^ ^ world’s premier gold 

in London xeoeot n^tbs. 5 m cSrcThe Maple lifts now the 

- " v M uZ^SmMUidisot tamNAtnot «xrt«f, NA- not available. pnbbdy that they intend to ^ ■ i5 0 rth America, even 

"2S552SS5S -wax* their sales coostderabty. SS ilhasre ceatiybeeacom- 

~ : 1 * That goal has fueled speculation B hinher once than the 

Be past two months that the 


MwrlMlarYataea 

Corraocr per UA» Carreaarwr 

B St— « 
■ s ssr—g 

5m IiroeS *b«k. I^M 
. TTr KoMcrilt dinar 03039 
Egypt poead 135 


Cummer ptr UAI 
NWW.rt ML 3484 
***."*> 3^0 

Horw. krona 8^ 
mLPMB 1J« 

Portneado 1«J» 

sows rival ^ 
Slna-t 

S. Afr.rand Z2222 


Carmey oar UAS 
S.iear.p>aa 89010 
spaap^ata 14U0 
SwwLkroaa MIS 
Taiwan t 4043 
TbaibaM 27JH5 
TarkUkOra 53335 
UAEdfkuB MU 
vancLbaOv. U40 


Other data from neuters and AP. 



\ moeth 
2nuafftE 
3 mmtbs 
*manHK 
1 rrer 


Dollar 

B VlrflH, 

BIMU 

ev»-ay* 

Bvwa^ 


D-Mark 
4W-4» 
4UHW 
4 Va-SXt 
A VtrS H* 
49WJ« 


Swiss 

From 

4WI-449 

4«V4» 

4*fc-4’W 

gSItJn 


stermw 

1178-12 

11W-11W 

1149-11* 

llUrlM 

11 Vll «■ 


French 

Franc 

9VJ-949 

10Vk-10Wi 

iow-io* 

11 «wl1 j* 
1140-12 


2 4Wr« uorts Bone team « 

-■ -- Pi IV. 


unWdSW* 

. WscoantRale 

ter 

Orator Una UM 
Con Pmw 99-177 


HoBaftTreaeanrMt* 
CD1 39-59 dart 

an *M9 dors 

MeJOtrawr 

LwabwdRflie 

OrendBMW" 

OacMeattUtertaak 
Mnaalh hdeifeBak 
taenth loJortO* 


Close 

7» 

BW 

9«r 

8W4 

7J5 

7.10 

735 

7S» 

1 S> 


550 

410 

*75 

*75 

*75 


Htterwmoo not* 
OeflMaaey 
OmhbmoK nterkaik 
HaosOb Wertaak 
Bdertatfc 

BrtW 

Bank Bar Rale 

4S£m.m 

i-rwdfc latorfwk 


9to 

9% 

9to 


TYi 

Vfi 

745 

7.16 

731 

740 

740 


550 

5* 

*70 

*70 

*70 


9to 

<FA 

9to 


91106 

to* 


im "* 

w* „ 

11 3/32 U 3/32 


imaatt 
imoattu 
3 months 
6 month 4 

lyeof 

Source: Reuters. 


Ih-I^ 

IH.-S'k 

8U.-8 3 * 

giftt-B 1 ** 


over IOC paai mw « ■» > ■■ ■—■ — — 

country would resort to some form 
of discounting. 

Recent talks between the Saudis 
and the four U.S. companies that 
are partners in Arabian-Amencan 

Ofl S. —Exxon Gap, Okwot 

Corp. Texaco Inc. and Mobil 
Coror— are believed to have in- 

various products that ran be de- 
rived from a barrel of ofl. 

Such a “netback” system of pric- 
ing probably would mart sigmfi- 
Srnt discount from official 
ecu sdr thourii it would depend <m fluctu- 

S suing market conditions. 

btuioiw 7«. officials at ibe four U.S. compa- 

nies declined to c^nmrat ou the 
minors. But some ofl traders said it 
would be a strange time far Og 
Saudis to offer discount The oil 

market has strengthened over tte 
past month because oil b&a 


3S, rism from J2I7 an OUIKC in Febru- 

Inc- a Montreal securities firm, ary to around $340 .Canadian min- 
said. “There are no long faces. Piles ing is feeling especially robust, 
and piles of money are flowing into -\V e might be going through a 

gold exploration.” whole new re-evaluation with re- 
sizable profits have also flowed tbe value of a gold mine,” 

into the pockets of investors in Ca- declared Robert McEwen, vice 
nadian jold stocks. The Toronto president of CSA Management, the 
Stock Dcchange’s index of gold Joron to-based operator of several 
shares has posted a 59-percent gain gold- investment funds, 
this vear. ^ the current enthusiasm 

over Canadian gold relates to 
events in the late 1970s and the 
early 1980s, when the metal’s price 
hit a brief peak above $800 an 
ounce. It was then that the Hernia 
fidd on the north shore of Lake 
Superior was discovered. 

Tests completed in August 1981 
indicated the presence of one mil- 
lion ions of gold ore. Since then, 
proven reserves have grown to 
more than 55 million tons, and the 


r? 

planned by the United States. Aus- 
tralia and China. 

For those seeking profits, the 
biggest Canadian gold strike this 
year has clearly been in the stock of 
mining companies. Some of the 
best-performing companies have 
found big new mines in recent 
years in the manner of the Hemlo 
companies. 

A key example is Echo Bay 
Mines Ltd., which opened a big 
operation two years ago near the 
Arctic Circle in the Northwest Ter- 
ritories. On the American Stock 
Exchange, Echo’s stock has risen 
from a 52-week low' of $7.75 to 
around $14 jO now. 


Coins Sold in Hong Kong 


worldwide sales were jnsl 4.. 

final dimensions of the find are stffl aW^ptora^a shrinking pie. 6 

^TheHemJofield is so big and lhe •• - 

mining so relatively easy that the ® , v d-wcced onld orices, but The Royal Canadian Mmt began 
still-depressed price of gold couU aSonSs 5 urSse at on Tuesday formal marketing ol ;i» 

fall to half its current level, and the SooAAfriran gold. Amer- Maple Leaf gold coins m Hon„ 

field would still be profitable. Up ^ r.anndian provinces Kong, Reuters reporter from Hon* 

until Hernia there Ms been noth- ^ S ^n u nitive tax actions Kong. JackJalien. director ol bul- 
ing in this country or the United . Kmoorands- the Bank of hon and refinery sales, >aid the 
Slates that has come anywhere ?K s<SSS’s Largest gold mint hopes to sell 100.U00 ounces 
close to the South African mmes, h» stopped selling than, of the coins over the next Lhree 

Mr. McQoskey said. .and comnetina wild coins are being months. 

Hemlo s cost of S150 an ounce 

compares with an average South 1 — - 

African cost of 5209 in 1983. the 
Iasi year for which statistics from 
Consolidated Gold Fields, a Lon- 
don gold mining concern, are avail- 

able * . , 

One mine has opened and two 
more are scheduled to begin opera-- 
tions this year at Hernia 
The success of the Maple Leaf 
coin is also starting to attract atten- 


BANQUE NATIONALE DE PARIS 

Floating rate note issue of 4-00 million 
September 1983/91 

The rate of interest applicable for the period 
September 4, 1985 and set by the reference agenl u> 8 1 c 
annual] v. 


Mr9 

8»9 


Reuters 





!SS^ a0 ' % 1M> 


Source: 


S 

*vj 

*7/14 


DbCMtol Rato 
Cat Hotel 

IHar tntort to * _______ 

Storas; Rm*r* 
lyemsKBrwkol Ts*^ 


45/14 
6 7/1* 



HO M ”gL . 3334B 
Zurich 

Lumtoh . __ 

MR**"* and Loudon otf^H *%. 

SsfSSJB 

{» nr.iw"-*- 


Tbo , 

Carlyle 

Hotel 


rt »ll«MAwwiue 
Bt76lhStra«« 

~zssssr 
»— sssrH 


12,000,000 Common Shares 

Occidental Petroleum Corporation 


Drexel Burnham Lambert 

INCORPORATED 

Donaldson, Lufkin & lenrette 

^^seoirities corporation 


Kidder, Peabody Co. 

INCORPORATED 

Sabmon Brothers Inc 

Shearson Lehman Brothers Inc. 

Swiss Bank Corporation International 

SECURITIES INC. 

Dean Witter Reynolds Inc. 


J 











Tuesday's 

NV8t’ 

Closing 


Tabte include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect lots trades elsewhere. 


It MdnUi 

would* stock 


ft*. YU RE MK Wen Law Oust One 


HWLo* Stack 


ntv. YU. PE HOlHMiLM QtwLOne 


3m 13% 
IB 12 I 
15* 10% I 
51* 39% I 
41* 3114 I 

n a \ 

SMfc 30V. I 
is% a i 

40% 32% I 
28% 21 Vi I 
55* 48 % I 
37% 20% I 
47V. B I 
8M 3 I 
92 66 *u | 


10 38 18% 1BW 
i 747 17 IMS 

1010435 11% in* 
9 <95 4SV* 47V 
644x36% 36 Vi 
S3 »> » 

11 W7 54% 53% 

» m m 

14 46 37% 37V. 

16 864 25% 25 
20 S3* S3* 
n 715 26% 25% 
13 259 47% 41% 
69 41* 4 

■ 616 84V. MV. 


law + % 
17 

ltfti— % 
48% + % 
36 Vi — U 
3% — % 
W4— % 
9%— V* 
37%- % 
25% + % 
S3% — % 
2fi% + % 
45% + % 
4 

84% 


(Continued from Page 8) 






8 42 36 

0 231 40% 

3 63 22% 

4 428 31% 
B 112 52% 

a 28% 

3 266 43% 

0 78 60 

6 832 1M 

4 66 62% 

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423 2 Vi 

B 12741 18% 
7 34 

B 112 6% 

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as x 
200Z 63 
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664 131 
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604 122 
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750 114 
1490 161 
1600 121 
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64 27% 
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409 2* 

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207 16* 
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49% 36% 
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79% 69* 
91% 73 . 
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27% 13* 
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SS* 35% Xerox JjOO 518 14 1985 52 5TH SI + % 

55% 46% Xerox pt 54S 10.1 30 54 53% 5* * 

29 1940 XTRA 34 U 12 28 34% 3*% 34% + % 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
SPECIAL REPORTS 
SECOND SEMESTER 1585 



NEW YORK — CBS Inc., which incurred 

almost SI hpdii in dd)t fidrtmg off a hosdk 

takeow. atten^t hy Ted Turner, the Atlanta 
caWeentrqaienrar, said Tuesday that it is offer- 
a TOhmJa^ rady-retirernait plan to 2,000 
ca&ayta. '. , 7 

''CBS said itmaOed the aimouncfflicat ofthelMt 
cariy retirement program Friday to 2,000 dip- *.’■ 
bte emjrfpyws who have rcax±ed the age of 55 
and who w2l have at least 10 yean of pension - 
service by Nov. 1. Employees have until Nov, I'-- ; . 
to make a- dearion on whether to participate 
and must retire by Nov. 29. 

C BS ann ounced in July an offer to buy Wif 
21 p eroent of its stock in a move aimed .at 
thwarting an unwanted takeover bid by.Mr.. 
Turner, eventually abandoned his effort.. ! . 


One sure way of getting your message use in International Herald Tribune Special 
across to over a third of a nuffica decision- Reports. The following Reports are sched- 
makers in ffwemment, business and finance tiled for 2nd semester 1985, with topics and 
in 164 countries arcund the world is to advw- dates, of couise, subject to modification. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Sept. 3 4 1985 

Th» gwrolnoHiwSoS ^toMfrwSCTtfwStaStaS S w 5w bCoSfl8« i W^SSSS? rS^tartrTSt- bragolorly. 


Auto Industry 
Japan 

Small Computers 
Banking & Finance 
in Arab Countries 
Haig Kong 
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Italy 
Ecuador 


Italian Fashion 
Space 

Banking & Finance 
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Banking & Finance 
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ivory Coast 
Fiance Economy D 
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New York 
Ruiama 
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Venezuela 
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Austrian Economy 
Banking & Finance 
in Ranee 
UR Fashkn 
Travel in Egypt 


Construction 
in Arab Countries 
Nod) American 
Real Estate 
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Euromarkets 
Travel in W. Africa 
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in Arab Countries 
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New Ten lan d 
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Each Report wifl be carried in aB ecfitkms 
of the International Herald Tribune, and a 
reprinted vsson will be available on request, 
at a nominal cost 

For information cm p lacing advertising 
in these Special Reports, or to 
receive preliminary 


editorial synopses of the topics to be covaetf 
contact- Advertising Department. Interna- 
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Telephone: 7471265. 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1985 11^ 


Page 11 



*0” Staff Fnm K 

NEW YORK — The 
vanced sharolv Tuesi:! SS 3 * «l- 


ty in Both U.S. and European Trading 


-- rammg dcvctopmenu ■ “W*, 

:■ ; J Africa's nxmelaiy and mi ® 

V ations * ^ 8M mu ^ngsiUi- 

.*r •■- Factors: tbe^Sdi^^ 10 Ulree 

calling off dSTariJ??® c ? n ^ 

of lorig [birrtnrSc^^n 


ddfi *%!! Sf re *. Md 3 resurgent 
preside, Martin McNtiL vfce 

SJ^Dwwidt & Domi- 

iJBJ*. nse, Which began 

SSS? ? Ne ^Vork befatthe 

con^S iwfl gj/^wd. 

and* Tuesday* h£ 
^■S^marieis re-opened. . 


the South African crisis would hurt 
European economies more than the 
United States,** said Daniel Hol- 
land, vice president at Discount 
Corp.of New York. 

But Mr. Holland said with U.S. 
credit markets dosed to South Af- 
rica. the country was believed to be 
borrowing Swiss francs, sterling 
and. Deutsche marks and selling 
than in the market for dollars in 
order to support the rand, increas- 


ing demand for the dollar at the 
expense of those currencies. 

A 10-cem rise in the South Afri- 
can Tand to roughly 45 U.S. cents 
Monday was thought to almost en- 
tirely reflect South African central 
bank support However, the rand 
was quoted Tuesday at 41.5 cents 
in New York. 

The British pound ended Tues- 
day in New Yak at SI J640. down 
from $1.3895 on Friday. The U.S. 


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""■■ - (Continued From Back Page) 


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unit also climbed agoiiis! the Deut- 
sche mark, ending at 2.S60Q. up 
from 2,8160, Against the French 
franc, the dollar ended at 8.7375. 
up from 8.5875. A amilar gain was 
made against the Swiss franc. The 
dollar ended at 13580 francs, up 
from 13140, 

Earlier m European trading, the 
dollar received a boost from news 
of a rise in U.S. construction 
spending. Currency dealers in Eu- 
rope said they had ettpected a small 
decline, and added that the rise 
prompted more confidence about 
the ILS, economy. 

EUROMARKETS 

Italy Issues 
7-Year Term 
ECU Floater 

By Christopher Pizzey 

Rcuien 

LONDON — The Eurobond 
market remained fairly quiet Tues- 
day despite the re-opening of U.S. 
credit markets after the Labor Day 
holiday. Dealers said dollar 
straights closed about ‘4-point 
higher in a reflection of slightly 
firmer prices in the United States! 

The highlight of the day's new 
issues was a 300-million European 
Currency Unit floating-rate note 
for Italy. The seven-year issue, pay- 
ing 1/16 point over the three- 
month London interbank offered 
rate, was led by Bankers Trust In- 
ternational. 

The issue was quoted at a dis- 
count of 15 basis points, just within 
its total fees of IS basis points. It 
had been expected that Italy might 
launch a straight ECU issue along 
with the floater, dealers said, but 
market sources said that such an 
issue was now unlikdv. 

Also in the ECU sector, a novel 
warrants issue was floated by Salo- 
mon Brothers International The 
issue comprises 150 million ECUs 
each of one-year put and call war- 
rants. which a Salomon official said 
provides investors with the ability 
to hedge against fluctuations in the 
dollar-ECU exchange rate. 

The call warrants are exercisable 
at 50.7865 and the put warrants at 
50.7765. Salomon offered the war- 
rants Tuesday at $408-20 for the 
call and $378.90 for the put, repre- 
senting premiums of 5.19 percent 
and 4.88 percent respectively. The 
spot dollar-ECU exchange rate 
closed at around $0.7810. 

In other new-issue activity. 
Credit Agricole issued a $125-rml- 
i lion, five-year, dollar straight pay- 
ing 10 percent and priced at 1004. 

I The issue, led by Shcarson Lehman 
Brothers, was trading at the close at 
a discount of about 1&, inside the 
total fees of IS percent. 

The Bank of Greece issued a £75- 
million “bulldog" bond, which will 
be priced Wednesday at around 90. 
At that price, it would yield 135 
basis points over the gross redemp- 
tion yield of the Treasury’s 134- 
percent bond due 2004/08. 


Traders added that the d ollar 
was looking very stable and could 
be set for a considerable medium- 
term recovery. 

In London, the pound ended to 
$1.3695. down from Sl.3793 on 
Monday. 


In Frankfurt, traders reported 
lively trading on growing sentiment 
that the U.S. economy may be 
showing signs or an upturn. The 
dollar ended against the Deutsche 
marie at 18449 DM. up from 
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Page 12 


INTENTIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. PHONES DAY. SEPTEMBER i. 1985 



Scoot Vawr. 
H'nh Lovv 


Oscn High Low 


TUS 54.05 Aug 56.15 ».15 55 70 51.70 

ESI.fOles :_TQC Prev. Solus 7.155 

Prev. Da j Qpw ln». 4*3*0 eU 4* 


Cron Hte-l LCi.'l 


GNMAlCBTl _ 

«« **° IS 1 S‘-.J0 ->s 7o-m 

’•.*> ».5.< Dec "5-10 75-jl ■ 

?.„i rvr'j .v.sr 

7517 5=r^ .^,r -H. 


Tuesdays 


7j.1t 

to: T->? 


AMEX 


Ooon Hipn L>' 

Groins 


WHEAT (CBT) 

SMC bu minimum, dollars par butfe! 

XnV: 1MU Sea 175 180 20*'- 2.74*. +.00'* 

3 63": 17911 Doc 187 2.92 184 2X6% — 

3 74-1 187 Mar 2.94’! 19B 3.*2d 2.93 1 -. — -OH- 

4.02 184 Mav 2.904. 194 l«-3 190 i — m 

172V! 1*3 Jut 149V. 172 2.*Hd 1-2° -«J'5 

14$ 147 Sot 17V a 

Esl. Sain Prev. Sales 10.907 

Prev. Dav Open Inl. 17.230 oh 1482 
corn t can 

5X00 bu minimum- dollars per busnel 

381 "1 125 1 . SflP 129 2J* 1 * 124 . 124H — 85Vi 

195 1144. Dec 118 1I8H IIS'; ll» - — 02 - 

3.10 ITS*. Mar 128 129 12£L 2Jg! — 

3.21'. 131 Mav 134'. 1354. 13Tu 1X7% —O''-. 

284 133 Jul 23*ft 2J*'« 2X*"» 2X7Vj 

2X6d 124% S«P SJBVs 2X0% 123 118 —81 

228*. 110'.. Dec 125V. 127 124'! 115 — XOV. 

Esf. Sales Prev. Sales 212*8 

. Prev. Day Open int.l 33.28? uo 114 


HI K Sep 5.15 S.16 SW-: Ml*. -M% 

488 SJU Nov 589 5.10’.; 5.03 ! 584 —.07% 

6.79 5.13 Jan 520 520 S.13'1 5.14 -88 

7.62 523 Mar 5 SOU 5-30’-. 525 525*. — LcN: 

7J9 3X1% Mav 588 5X9 SX4d 535 — .W 

438 SJftli Jul 5*0 5*44 539 539'i —84*. 

634 535V; Aug 5X11! 584 5X?Vs 5399- —831 

429 532 SOP 5J5V! 5X0W 5X5t , SJ8d +.OOVS 

£X2 S3 U 540H 534 534*. -.01’. 

Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 18841 

Prey. Dav Open inl. 44312 up 1303 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 Ions- dollars per Ion _ — „„ . 


COFFEE C I NY CSCE 3 
373W lbs - can Is per lb 
I SC 2D 127.00 See 

1S14Q 1293 D77 

149.75 123-50 Mar 

14830 131.00 Wa' 

143 00 13550 Jul 

14730 13175 S-ra 

, 138.00 133.00 Dec. 


i«j 1)5 43 134X0 134.90 135.75 -.10 

DC; 138.10 IM.45 1J7J? 138-29 -34 

Mar 12»^0 13*80 IJ9J0 13*50 —55 

Atai 140.10 14025 140.10 140.11 — M 


Ee*. Sales 

Pro-.. dc .-C-sciin* '-il 
CERT. DEPOSIT SIMM i 
simi'Mon-DTsc! ubbci 


Closing 


Jul 

8-70 

Dec 

Prev. Sales 


Prev. DOr Open Ini. 10.148 UP 82 
SUGARWORLD II (NYC5CE1 
1 12800 Ib5.- cents per lb. 

98! 274 Oct 481 

7.75 100 Jan *.°0 

933 334 Mar 5.18 


7.15 

44° 

0.15 

EM. Sales 


“74 Oct 481 S. 

109 Jan *.°0 5. 

334 Mar 5.18 5 . 

15! Mar 535 S. 

j-i jul 5-SS 5. 

482 Oct 584 4. 

Prev. Sales 13855 


5X4 

4X1 

5X7 

5X3 

4.»0 

5X3 

5*3 

S 1 7 

541 

5.77 

5X3 

3.74 

5.97 

5X3 

5 92 

6X8 

5X4 

631 


91 75 i i3a Mor 

31.10 M.43 J-J" 

411--. 37. i6 SCO 

90 7' SJ.74 Dec 

i ; BJ26 Alar 

E't Sales Prev.Sales 

Pret^Da « Open int. 2353 01145 
EURODOLLARS (IMMI 
SI milllon-ptsof 100 PC’ 


ej ti «7.13 92.10 92.1a —.01 

°i‘-si 55?s S!:U Ifi 


Tobies include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect tale trades elsewhere. 

I'ia The Associated Press 


‘ 9145 8457 Sop «•’* •} ff Ji'm 33 -.91 

StSS 84 >9 Si'r 0l5» 91-12 w” £8 

p» B #s rJ as :| 

ill w U jm « » s* 

Esl Sale! Prov S-Jle; **»•» 

Prev. DOv Coen lfit.131-447 uP40- 
BRITISH P2UHa<IM7Al 

ta (98 B a fi k OB aa ^ 

est Prev Saief- lyTT* 

Pro’.. Da* Oae.» ML 4'^*>S up-1* 

CANADIAN DOL1-AR OMM1 

a a i 3 

■;I .1 5Sr 3 JB =a 

Esl 5a ics prev. So'cs 1X1 

Prev. Dov Ooen ml 9A*1 uo 404 

I FRENCH l=l iANCt,M “ , . nRn M„ 

*.® onc :i3i n, " u - B ll9 .WW .11445 .11445 -1« 

■i!5w ’.nS-J SSr „ :•«« - 240 

EM. Sales Prev. Sales W 

Prev. Da% Open ini. 396 up* 

GERMAN MABKIIMWI 

Spot mark- ippInleaualsSOJKil . 


91.77 9134 

91.44 °1J3 


Sis. Close _ 

Dtv. Yld. PE IDOsHIBDLO* Ourt Ch-Qcl 


*1.07 91.14 

90*8 9037 


Pre'v.OavOocnlnl. 92391 oil 105 


COCCA (NYC5CEI 
10 metric lons-S per ion 
2415 19*3 St® 

1537 1945 Dec 

27<5 1*55 Mar 

2315 1*M Mov 

2340 1*40 Jul 

2K0 7023 Sen 

2355 2055 _ Dec. 


17930 120.40 Sep 124.10 12430 ia.» JE80 -Irf 

IBC-SQ l njQ Oct 125^0 72550 123-70 12170 — a-50 

184:00 125.40 Dec 128.70 128.70 125^0 126.M — 

16100 12780 Jan 130-50 130.50 1KLM 1ffl30 —180 

20*30 13080 Mar 13*80 134.00 132-00 13280 M 

14330 132-50 Mav 115-50 135*0 1300 1HU — «• 

1*780 13A00 Jul 13880 138 00 13780 3750 —180 

14150 13550 Aug 13980 1J9 00 13».M 1»80 - 50 

1*780 13750 S6P 13880 13980 13880 13880 —1.10 

EM. Salas Prov. Sales 10J7I 

Prev. Dov Ooen Int. 44860 off 101 
SOYBEAN OILtCBT} 

60800 Lbs- boilers per 100 lbs. 

31.10 228* Sco 2280 2285 22JS 2285 —81 

3037 21J5 Del &I0 ^25 3283 2206 -87 

2955 21.71 Dec 2185 2284 2183 2189 —.13 

2787 2185 Jan 22.02 22-18 S80 2287 —.13 

TBaO 72.00 Mar 77 JB 2285 22-25 2235 —.1. 

27.45 2230 May 2250 385 350 3252 ^86 

2585 2250 Jul 2280 385 3J0 E.70 -Al 

25.15 2251 Aug 2285 22.W gjs ZtJh +82 

2485 2280 SeP 22.90 22.90 2280 ttJM +J0 

2280 2280 OC1 22 - , ° + - ,D 

Esl. Sales Prev. Soles 9.914 

Prev. Oav Ooen inr. 54J13 Ml si*. 

OATS (CBT) 

5800 bu minimum- dollars per Duvin — , 

1J9 l.ii'u Sop l-ie i.i* !■«? “-ffif* 

K su ssHh 1 - f 

wiz s-ar , s 4 ^ ,,u 

E it. Soles Prev. Solos ,889 

Prev. Day Open Inl. 3J13 ofl 15J 


Esl. Sales 1.915 Prev. Soles 1528 
Prev. Dav Ooen Inl. 19,106 U073 
ORANGE JUICE INYCE) 

15800 IK.- cents per Jb. 

102.00 13055 S!P 134.15 134. 
1B1.C0 12780 NO. 12980 29. 

180.00 12350 Jan 12580 1JJ 

17780 12380 Mar 12*80 124, 

1*250 123-20 Mov 

15780 123-10 Jui 

EM. Sales 250 Prev. Sales 433 


2130 2138 211| 

2550 2*8 2188 2204 

2237 2252 2235 

2258 2270 2257 2270 

2295 22 BS 2CT Z2B8 

2290 CZSS 2286 
SSc 2285 2285 2213 


jur 91.70 90.77 ™-V7 

s“p »0 32 «55 JS82 

r-U, - 44 64 S*.99 J9.*3 90 07 

SS*. fr i? 8987 99 45 B9J5 

Hn 8155 e°55 8'JS e°« 

Vov s-sie; 44.21 » 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

*0800 lbs.- cents par lb. 
65.90 5385 Oct 

*785 55.15 Dec 

6785 5680 Feb 

6757 5780 Aor 

6*85 58.10 Jun 


5*.10 5 *iS 5480 54.40 —150 

5B.J5 58-45 56-72 5*u5 —187 

5780 5785 54.40 56.42 —1.18 

58.75 58.75 5750 5757 — l.M 

5980 59.40 5850 5852 —188 


Prev. Da v Onon Int 4500 oil 114 


COPPER (COMEX) 

P «.40 «.90 *0.15 *085 -J5 

SSt 6l‘55 -J5 

8425 5850 Dee 6155 el .70 6180 4180 — -25 

? a % r r 62.-0 *125 6180 tk S 

?35s ;iis t || || tg gi zl 

SS S3 STc 83 fS SJI ^ -3 

S3 S3 oSr -3 

KM 6450 r*o v 

*4.10 6380 Jul 45 ' 90 M 

^sl Sam Prev. Safes *£5? 

Prev. Dav Open int. 75*187 oH 1.1J7 
ALUMINUM (COMEXi 

dMOOIbs.-ccn^Perlb. ^ ^ |s ^ 

™ -jl 

ra*0 4J.*0 Dec 45.10 4525 45.10 — JS 

7450 4685 Jon 45*0 4580 45-50 45*0 — 35 

7380 44.35 Mar 4685 4680 4*25 4625 -.40 

46.75 53.95 Mov «-M -40 

1-385 4785 Jul ^ — « 

51,0 nM ^ S3 -3 

r r S3 =3 

nJS 5135 MOV IJit =;S 

EM - Sales Prev. Solos 270 

prev. Dav Open inl. 1J07 off 276 
SILVER [COMEX) 

5.000 trovoL Cefilsa<rlray kl 


J5I7 8521 J4« -5«5 

J54* 1553 8523 8524 

JiW JKJ4 8558 85*0 


6580 57.90 Aug 5880 5B80 5785 5785 

EM. Soles 17802 Prev. Sales 14833 
Prev. Day Open inl. 48J83 up 1842 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44^0IM.-cenwperta -18= 

72JJ2 57.15 OM itfo iOO 5*85 £»87 -MB 

73J0 5380 NOV *2.75 6*85 6180 Jl-22 -]■» 

7980 *0.40 Jan 44.00 4480 63.15 *3.15 —182 

7X5S 61.10 Mar *485 4485 62.95 *1» — 185 

7085 61.15 «4>r *4.10 *4.10 *305 43.10 -LIS 

*625 *120 May *3 40 6380 *2.15 *115 — 1.10 

Est. Sales 2800 Prev. Sales 144? 

Prev. Dov Ooen Int. 8801 oH13 
HOGS (CME) 

JO^MIbS-cenlbPerlb. ^ ^ MJ)B _ 1-M 

5085 37.90 Dec 3BF0 3X«0 37|2 S7-S| — 

ca 87 tQao Fgh 4030 40 40 39.12 39.15 —147 

Jtjs 3i» AK 37ls 3785 36S7 3*80 -187 

49 05 Sm Jun 40.40 4080 39.95 40.45 —87 

4905 4080 Jul 41.10 41.10 -J085 4175 — .«0 

IS-iS M S5o Sts ^.75 -185 

Esl. Sales 4853 Pw.Sefe* 2892 

Prev. Dav Open Inl. 19.984 oH2M 
PORK BELLIE5 (CME) 

aMgiDs-t^nwi^ ajo 5MJ ^ 

Mar 58-05 5flH 5 5*80 5620 — 280 

75*0 5785 Mav g 10 W.10 5785 5785 -280 

74.00 5780 Jul 5382 5B82 57. 7 3 57.75 — JAu 


11910 

5730 

5«p 

646.0 

*1X0 

Oct 

Nov 

1230.0 

:«0J) 

Dec 

1215.0 

595.0 

Jan 

1193.0 

407 JO 

Mar 

1048 0 

6JUJ 

May 

9*5.0 

*330 

Jul 

940X 

641.0 

See 

7»X 

6*0.0 

Dec 

739.0 

*?ao 

Jan 

770.0 

*77 0 

Mar 

752.0 

*93 0 

May 

Jui 


Nov £032 -232 

Dee *288 4308 *128 *132 -2-JO 


4S&D *582 447.0 6445 


7522 6«0 May 7138 7132 7018 4992 -2*J 

Est. Sales 21200 Prev. Stiles 1«890 
Prev. Day Open Inl. 70833 aK 3843 
PLATINUM (NYMEI 

50 trov K.-dallariper Irovai. „ — — a\ 

39X00 250.00 Oef 33i.» 3 380 3 W — £LS0 

37150 25750 Jon 330.00 33120 31580 3] 580 — 

gririfi iajia Apr 332.G0 333JM) 31f.00 317.40 — 21-50*1? 

S OT80 jff S ^50 32600 320.10 -21-50 

J40XIO 30380 Oct 33380 33380 33280 313.10 —2180 

Esl. Sales 8815 Prev. Soles 481* 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 1M°2 oH 478 
PALLADIUM (NYMEI 

'BljST -WW 8 M»8» 105-25 10280 1IC80 -2.75 


1 1 B Sixg 

J759 .3335 Jon 

■■trt 170 S^P ■ JC4 ° 

EM. So 105 Prev- Sdfts 

Prav. Day Open int. 54.96c otl *,*80 
JAPANESE YSN(IMM) 

»“ r ' w ' Hga 804170 204173 
Dec 8042W .00420* 804190 .004192 
8M0M Mr SiS* 8W715 80421 5 

Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 15.M7 

Pre-v. Dav Own Int. :s.fi9* off US 
SWISS FRANC (IMMI 

Sprr franc- 1 painitaualsSO.MOl , ,,,, 

J333 84E0 3eo A372 r^72 .4-42 -AAJ 

TjVa *x r 1 1 njr .43 u .4279 .g 

A£55 J32 S /VI cr -W) -^370 ^323 -^27 

jem J4*5 Jun .4400 .-W0 .4400 .43*5 

Esl. Sales Prov Sales 3^°’ 

Prcv.Dcv Open Inl. 35850 ad 257 


| tnciustricls I 

LUMBER rCMst 

ill ill E i iS ill 1 

{S3 SI ISS U 135 &5 ^3 

Est Soldi t.163 Pre"v. Sales 185* 

Prev. Da. Open Inl. SJ46 up 23 

COTTON 2 INYCE) 

» as SJ! sa as 

SS i : i S bj a p a 

™ us s ss a a a ^ 

| 5985 53.15 Dec 5481 *4 40 S4J0 *4-8 

Est. Sales Prev. So 'c* 1X4* 

Pr?v. DOY OPCfi InL 20.861 \jf.7r 

HEATItlGOILCNYME) 

jT.MOsd-cen^Pe'Ba 16 w -j 

^ NOV ^fo aw 7981 +183 

5l0 4*J5 Dec «3 90X8 79X5 79.77 +.72 

7985 &°.W Jon 7980 60X5 7980 7980 +85 


T. 4V ADI n 
IS 5*. ALLobs 
224'd 12 AMC .IS .9 

2Ui AM int I 

80>g 64 ATT Fd SO 7 b *8 
t r-Y AcmePr 
1U! BV> A emeu 82 38 

IS 1 * m Action 
l'Y Acton 
Ok '! Actn wt 
4+« 1(1 AdmRi 

JO''. 18‘b AdRctl .14 8 

21 'i IS 1 .. Adobe AS 1.4 


51 '4 39(! 
9S4 5V9 

12 6 
1J1* *Su 

4 ! 

108'A *5 Vs 
V'A Me 
J"S l?i 
9(1 54! 

IB*! 9J-s 
It! t* 

36 30 

28 (y I* 
lB’-a Itm 
U"» Pa 
U*! SV 
4JM 18L 
9 S’A 

11V, s*t 
8*. 444 

i9»y i2«g 
5 (! 

tfV i 3 
6T! 504! 
E'/s 6'A 
l*Vs ll'k 


31! 1^4 Amnol 86 18 9 

< 4*. Andoi IT 

7*fc 2"! AndJcb 

10'a S>h Angles 

21b ’* vlAngl v 

6i> 3Wi A ran PI _ 

7% SVs Arlevn * 

lisy 4»a Armtm 

live Armeli „ _ , ‘ } 
127* 7*! Arrow* JO 2A 11 

9L 6'<! Asmra .15 18 

12-'! i\. Astrex ■■ 

3*9 1 A si role 

IV! 9a AlisCM 
4*! 2Vj Atlas wl 

6% 2 Audialr 


28 27 54! SL. 5V.— V» 

50 OB 17(1 169! l*9l — (v 
is .9 15 85 17 149* 17 + *6 

B 1074 Te XL 3*. 

nj- *2 25 SlUi 81»b Bl»!— V* 

5 T>l 25! 2'! , 

*= « s 21* ,a iK iK + w 
128 1J >|£ Vt“ W 

10 34 )(! 39! 3(s + 

U 8 18 62 26"! 2Mb 7*»* — *! 

s -s » if ^ i is 

- 40 ,J * rl ^ ^ 

4 120 10»! 97! 10 — ft 

JO ,00 151 1» 

’y B 7>b 77!— A 

js a « is m i» 

175 ,18 2002 34V! 34 34 

40 376 24V* 24ft 24ft + 

s M ,B ^ 'K 'SS— £ 

s ij 5 5 swBasa“ ta 

23 400* 5ft 5ft 590 + ft 

10 13 Pi i(i Pi 

4 5 7ft 7ft 7ft 

w 14 44 22 15ft 15'i 151“ — ft 

■“ 241 4ft 4ft 4!b + ^ 

20 177 4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 

« « h 3 % ^ ^ 

■—»„ +ft 

“ “i? ^ s a g+v, 

1 a a 

»• i i i +«. 

s *3 a a sr w 

11 sa t *?> 6ft + ft 

_jn u 11 1 8ft 8ft Bft 

15 18 1 IB 9ft 9ft 9ft- ft 

■' 1, 7* 12ft 12ft 12*+ 

20fi 1ft 1ft 1ft— ft 

a *■ » >• 

2 3ft 3ft 3ft— ft 

B 2ft 2ft 2ft 


K Month 
HiBtl LOW Siodv 


32(4 24ft 
18’.! 7*u 
13ft •>~t 
4ft Ift 
lBft TZft 
5 2ft 
17ft M 
* S’! 

ir. «(i 

14 7V. 

12ft 8ft 
25ft lift 
20 B 
35ft 19ft 
37 23ft 

4ft 27. 
7ft J 
lft ft 
19ft 15ft 
27ft 22ft 
32 24 

11 4ft 
24ft left 

12 7ft 

15ft 10(i 
44 ft 27 
3* 17ft 
,3 5ft 
13ft Bft 
15ft 11 
34ft 23ft 
15 1 ! 6 


80 55 9 

J0 *4 12 
.10 3 W 


88 23 7 

180b X* 2. 


.7* 4.1 8 

80r 8 

X25 103 
1AT-C288 . 

M 2.1 IS 


Sk. emse 

tm-. Hr8> LlW Quot. Cll'00 


7 4W 4»B ***— "• 

*| » lift inl if* + ^ 

n 

„ ^ £ A iV + S 

. -04 * ,r *:5 

« 1 IS! 15ft 15ft + ^ 

,3 S ,?S if lift + ft 

'I 10 12ft 12ft 12ft + ft 
25 lift lift ii?* , „ 
ii -m 22ft 21 ft 22ft + ft 
U Sg “ft 14ft 14ft— 1ft ! 

7 5 27 33ft »(« u 

si ,* 295. 29 L. 29(. — ft 

1*1 3!. 3ft £- ft 

15 3ft 3ft 3ft 
b7 *4 ^ ^ 

fl ,0 19 lBVi lBft— ft 

8 5 1 itsr ifir* 

,s ^7 lift I Bft ’8ft— ft 
|§ 13 lift lift t 1 " 1 

\i 13 £ IS: =ft nft=5 


iJManih , __ vb , 

HMn low Siodi a ’+ v -^- 

4*. 2 a PetLw 

*a ft PelL n* 

Wi 6'a PeiLO Dt 185 .18 

lift 7ft PMLCPt 2-0 

17'.i 1136 Pet Lent 3 j3 218 

2ft TV. PnlILD -8e13-3 

7ft Z»Ji PkbPd 

7 2'! Pier 1 vf- 

Z 3ft PionrSv , 

5ft 4ft PHWVd 86 1C.4 JC 

12 *•! Plziain 08 153 

20'! 1*1! PlerD a JO .. .. 


SiS- 


Clc» 

CO r ClE 


l*ft 12*! PlyGm* .1* ' s 
4ft 2ft PltR A 

4ft 2'- PlvR B 

7ft 3 Pooetv o 

12»! 7ft PartSv* _ ,, S 

17ft 12ft PasJIPr JCe 14 .3 
»(. I9 1 .! ProttL .92 38 10 
Sft Aft prottRd 881 _ . 

14ft 9ft PresRA .94 *■■ 5 

lift *»“ PTWBB V* 08 £ 

4ft 3ft Pr«ld -. 3 ? 

22ft 18 pr»CT» 186 -5 « 
23ft 14'! PrvEns 1A0 7.« 7 
40 3Tft PSCol Pt *J5 115 
221! lift PBtPfC 2J4 1IA 
34'! 28V. Pgt ME 487 138 
Blu 2ft PuntaG 


7ft 7ft H* + *0 
ax. i-- Oft 


ir frj. 

76 5ft S" „ 

75 lift j|ft if??- i; 

6 15-! 'Sft IS ■ 

8 Sft SO ? 

13 J , • L. 1 - 
■>w 4 ,t ! ■; _ 

S lift is.. Zi- 1 

-? *r . *’■: 7 ;.-;o 

i? j$" lift is * + •* 

"S W‘9 19ft lli ’ ~ 

2 70*. »:* “ :z - 

S % % * r: 


— 10 3 

17 13 

44 1.1 1* 76 

12 1342 
12 4 

80b *3 10 S2 

an 1321 

M U 13 157 

85c A 24 II 


)0ft 4*“ Queb D S 


52 IK* lift lift + ?? 

1321 14’! 14ft 1436— ft 

157 33ft 33ft 33ft- ft 

II 1 2ft 12ft 12ft— ft 


R 

351 4.9 1* 


20'“ 10'“ 
6ft 4 
29ft 22ft 
231! 12ft 
2V4 ft 
39ft 19 
43 22’! 

25ft 17ft 
10ft Sft 
19ft Bft 
ISft H 
9ft 6'! 
17(1 10 
4ft 2 


39ft 28ft 
14ft 7ft 
5ft 1ft 
1916 13 
6ft 1ft 
*1! 3ft 
18ft 10ft 
13>A Bft 
23V! 16ft 
24'.! 15*1 
21ft 17ft 
10 69a 


80a I* 13 ^ 

JUR .7 10 5*« 5% 

n2 i j 37 24* 24 2* + * 

a^ 1 R a a 

& £ " -? sa 33 ?7ft- ft 

fj 10 18 25 24ft 24ft- ft 

20 141 9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 
18 255 9»! 8ft 9'! + ft 

u ii a 2 13ft 13ft 13'A 
«* II 9 4 Bft .Bft 8ft- ft 


■SL 2J 9 4 8ft Bft Sft— ft 

- “i i«n=S 

47 4"i 4ft 4 ft — ft 

243 (S S ft 
33 41 4ft 4 4 — ft 

18 61 1ft 1ft 1ft— ft 

84 15 13 24 1 5ft 15ft 15ft — ft 

441 18ft 18ft 1g“— ft 

JS 148 587 201! JSJ - ' 

M 19 11 28 3E 37ft 37ft — ft 

sja !* 4 =i a a ft + ii 

^"t. a Ab 4 s i 5 

JOe 2J) 7 5 10'“ 10ft 10ft — 16 

12 23 22ft ZZ 22ft + ft 

13 30 23ft 22ft 22ft— 1 

M 2J 14 19 I Bft 18ft 18Vs— ft 

IS 48 110 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 


1285 148 
1.08 2.9 II 


J71IA4 
180 XU 16 


9ft Sft RAI 
S'* 3ft RMS E 
18". 15ft Raven 
20 15 Ronsbo 

3ft % RalllH 

14ft 10ft Raven 

9(. 6ft PHOCT 

,7ft 16-“ RltSon 

2ft 2 HltSowt 
4ft 1ft Redlcmv 

15ft I Oft RegalB 

50ft 33ft Resrt A 

eft 3ft ResiAsc JJ 

Sft 5ft RstAKA J3 

4ft 3ft Re* Nor -10e 28 14 

12V! 9’s RXJletP JO 1.S 18 

lBft 13ft RlaAl 9 

30ft 14ft Pdtvvy J* 15 26 

,9ft 8(! RCkwv wl 

3(VV, ro'y Ropers .12 a 1- 

5it ift RoanvP 

7 jft RovPIm 

34 22ft Rudieh. 8*0 J' 19 

M(fc 22ft Rude* of 56 .J 

7ft Jft RBW 1 

18ft lie* Russell 

2JV* I S’.. Rv*o« 


351 io 3ft 3' 7 3’« . 

12 J 45 18 14ft 14ft .* 

j2 42 43 41 lTJ 1 : 17^', ,7 ‘J 4 — 

42 U 1 11 1jj» 1=^ ’S'" ••* 

B 4 Bft Bft j;® . - 

I 17 1*8 16-9 — 

SS 2ft 3ft 2’o— -7 

45 3ft 3ft 3ft— 

eOb ii 10 5* it's 'ift I*, 9 -j! 

3Q 73 JOI2 39ft 39J-— ft 

13 23* sft p* 

13 194 5ft *ft i.7 “T , 

10e 23 14 25 4ft 4'. Jft + B 

JO 18 18 i? JS 1 * 

« U 20 17ft 1 > — ,* 

J* 15 26 21 3*ft 34-a 3*(i— J- 

- 30 '■* 12 18': lBft 18':— '* 

.« a 1= iw s>, # ** =**.*,: 

rt Mi *ft 

«*o XI 10 17 27 26'! 2*1 = — l r 

* a ,3 25ft 25ft 25J- 

3 is ^ as ssa ea= 2 


80e 3JD 7 
12 
13 

M 23 U 
M 48 


SU5 <>080 gen 10SJ5 105J5 10280 UCSO -2.75 

14180 91X0 Dec 104.00 10480 1MJ5 10480 -JXS 

12780 91.70 Mar 10*00 10/80 105X0 10580 — lOs 

114^ 91J0 jun 106X0 104X0 104X0 105X5 —2-95 

111* 1050? Sen 10780 103X0 10750 10*J0 —295 

Eft. Sale* Prev. Sales Ml 


78.20 
78 j 5 
79.10 
7985 
TftJO 
7630 
7J.00 
72X0 
Esl. Sales 


Dec 7935 MJX 79J5 W.77 +.72 

Jon 7980 6025 7980 7980 +85 

Feb 79.00 79.25 78.70 79.10 +85 

rflar 75.75 7*J0 75 J 5 7630 +j0 

Aar 72X0 7141? 73.00 7385 +85 


ref 79.00 7»JS 78.70 


May 

Prev. Sales ~£22 


51*2 5882 57.73 57.75 —1X5 Prev. Day Onen Int. 7300 off 713 


Curmso' Optiosis 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

™tfng ^ Sep C< D*T IJ Ma r SlP^^r 

scrrffT; ihj 

UO 7 JO 880 r r 2.70 485 

2X5 S 70 7.15 0J5 430 AM 

140 035 3X5 T 3XC 7.15 *85 

45 8jS 1.95 385 r r r 

iso r 1X0 r r r r 

54LOCO Canadian Delia rscenHdsr unit 

CDoUr 5 088 r r r OM r 

73 0.1* 08B 085 030 0.90 r 

7* r 037 088 1.03 r r 

62830 West German Martt*<ent» per unit. 


GOLD (COMEX) 

100 troy o a- dollars per troy 0 z. 

! 1:080 31580 Sep 327X( 

473.00 297X0 Oct 3298( 


Sep 327X0 327X0 J27X0 324*0 —8*0 

Cict roS 131X0 328.00 326X0 -8M 

Nov 32E-B0 — E-80 

Dec 335X0 335X0 33080 Ml^ — |X0 

Feb 33880 339.90 335X0 335X0 — fcJJ 

Apr 3MX0 145X0 33-JXO 339.70 — »X0 

Jun 348-70 U8.70 345X0 34480 -9.^0 

Aus 351X0 35380 351X0 349.43 — 9J0 

Oct 35880 35980 35680 35JA0 —9X0 

Dee 34280 3*4 JO 3*280 357X0 -9.M 

Apr 375X0 375X0 375X0 370.10 -9x0 

lim J7S*0 — *-7C 


Esl. Seles 40X00 Prev. Sales 21*492 
. Prev. Dav Ouen Int.l 37.132 a«402 


Fincncial 


US T. BILLS (IMMI 
Si million- »ts of 100 pel. 


93X3 

93X7 

9289 

«2J8 

92X1 

91.73 

91X9 

90.75 

Est. Sales 


Sep 92.93 92.98 72.92 928* 

Dec 92X1 92X8 9288 «X* +X3 

Mar 92J6 92X3 «12S 9£33 +X5 


Jun "181 91.98 *1.90 91.9* +X6 

Sep 91X5 91X4 91X0 21X7 +.0* 

Dec 91X7 91X7 91X5 "1XB +X4 


Dee 91X7 91X7 91X5 "1X0 +X6 

Mar 91.11 91.11 91.10 91.1! +X6 

Jun 90.84 «X4 9084 9085 +X6 

Prev.Saios 9.911 


38 r u-u ujj ■ 

4,250X00 Japanese Yen-lWths ot a «nl per unit. 
'Yen 39 Z72 . r _ r r 


42 0.11 0.2| >JI 

43 r 0X8 0.7* 

44 r 0.18 080 

*2X00 Swiss Frnites-cems per unit. 
SFranc 35 ^ [ j 

39 r i-0- 485 

*0 2X0 1X0 r 

41 r 284 r 

42 0X9 1.B6 r 


88-21 

75-18 

Sea 

87-13 

75-13 

Dec 

84-2 

75-14 

Mar 

85-7 

74-30 

Jun 

84-4 

30-7 

Scp 

83-11 

80-2 

Dec 


42 0X9 1.B6 

43 0.15 1X1 

44 0X4 0X8 18 

45 0.01 0X2 1J 

Total call voL 7X07 < 

Total put vol. 5X12 

r No) Ircded. s-4lo action ottared. 

Lasl is premium | pur chase oricc) 
Source: AP. 


CofmmKlSties 


186 1X1 102 r 

1X0 r r r 

call open Int. 227X 63 
Put open Int. 153.913 


Prev. Dav Open ml. 36X05 off 174 
10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 
SlOOXOOprln-pts432ndsoMOOpct 
88-21 75-19 Sup 8*-14 86-28 86-13 86-27 


Prev. Dav Open Int. 25,731 upllB 
CRUDE OILCNYME) 

juo :9 J, 20.16 28J0 +J0 

2T80 2J.40 Nov HXB 27 92 2*jb 27X9 +-T7 

2980 2J.°0 Dec 273A 27x4 .iM 27X0 +J0 

*9X0 :-ue Jan rrxa rno 27 jo 27X6 + 

» 4e 74 M Fab 27X2 Z!2Si 27X0 27.1* 

fi'jl 24.13 Mar 26.80 27X0 26.50 2*-94 

•hy.c cr* Apr It, 1 ? 26-55 2&-74 

E’"6 MOV 2635 2*85 2*J5 268* 

2S.70 23.7 B Jtin 24.15 24.18 24.15 ; *X4 

2*11 25.70 Jul 24.M 24X0 .6.19 

27.C0 24.00 SeP ‘+5 

Dec - 51 

Est. Soles Prev. Solos, 4.930 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 53.743 oft 13* 


I Stock indexes I 

SP COMP. INDEX (CMS) 

SCP V£* «>9| ,8770 -JO 

1+170 CTOC '"O.IS 170J0 132.95 1B9X0 

ifl375 190.10 M or !I1M 191*5 ]t\M 91.»S -Xp 

70*80 r-480 Jur 194 25 194 JS !'« 19+25 —2= 

Esl. Sales *1 ~ a Prev Sales 3+l?2 

Prev. Dov Oocn Inl. 42.716 alt 2-9 
VALUE LlNEtKCBTI 

painlscndccnis ,**^5 -,W85 197.70 19785 -1X0 

217.05 20083 Dee 20220 2KX0 2M85 20080 - U0 

»9J0 204 95 AVer 2«-'0 

Est. Seles Prev. Salas 3X97 

Prev. Da«OP-:n Inl. 10*95 up*»2 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (WVFEI 

nointfi and ceno« 103J5 108.70 —.15 

117X0 I01JO DK 110X5 110X0 109X0 109^ 

,1875 10980 Mar 111X5 JJ1X5 JJ095 

120.00 112.95 Jun 113X0 113X0 113-W 112X5 — X5 

1 Esl. Sales 8.976 Prav. Sales 5X81 
Prev. Dav Ooen inl. 10X88 oH24 


40: 3^ 

25ft 15’i 
3ft lft 
15ft 10ft 
13ft Bft 
17": 7ft 

4ft Jft 
26ft 22ft 
fl 66* 
4ft Jft 
4ft 2ft 
6’! 4 

ljr* 10ft 
12 4U 
4ft ft 
32ft 20’! 
4ft 3ft 
XU- 21ft 
15ft 9ft 
24 21ft 
19 Jft 
29 14ft 
1ft % 
19ft 13ft 
19'/J 14 
23 11ft 
18'! 10ft 
10'! 9ft 
5ft 2(4 
18ft 12ft 
26ft 19'“ 
37ft 25'* 
41ft 27*1 
5 2ft 
5ft 3ft 
34ft 24ft 
13ft 7ft 




2A3e 9X 
40 46 II 


lui] 7 2094 4Ci 4^t 47» + S* 

3J ^ 2099 ^ ft 

a 27 3 2ft 2ft— W* 

9 lift lift lift— ft 
A 38 11 38 Uft lift lift - ft 

17 5 13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 

. 1 3(! 3ft 3ft + ft 

243« 9A 102 2S1! 2»o 25*. + ft 
4X 11 47 9(0 8*1 6*. — ft 

SI 3* 3ft Tn— ft 

19 l T U 

j7,w,j a ii L “ ^ a-* 

3 15 ft ft — 7* 

J2 IX 15 262 31 '4 30ft 30ft - ft 

9 4? 31 3 3 r4=W 

a as is s sa sa t + a 

17 19 1SS5& 15ft 15ft— » 

80 2J 9 J MjJ 2^ 

AS 2X B 77 16ft ,6 16 — ft 

4 15 B 10 16'4 16 1M* 

23 239 14'! 15ft 15*1— ft 

20 54 12ft lift lift— ft 

44 42 IQ 13 I0(! 10ft 10ft- ft 

17 61 5 4ft 4ft — ft 

aa 28 17 60 1714 ,7ft 17ft— ft 

lio 315 23ft 23ft 23ft- ft 

rnt 2.7 10 3 36ft 36ft 36ft 

1X0 18 11 59 40V; 40Vb 40ft— W 

2 Oft 3ft 3ft 

I 80 108 5 4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 

' M 2fl 6 9 30ft 30'4 30ft- ft 


8 6 I CEE n 12 

SSft 21ft I CHs 7 

7(9 2Va ICO 213 

OT 2V* IPM „ 

17ft ift IP.TCP 37 

jft 1ft impGp .lie 4j 

2ft 1 impind 

40ft 30 ImpOIIB 1X0 
,3'u 6ft inflaht 11 

221! 11 Instm 3 JO IX 22 
2ft 1ft InstSv B 

3 r t tnsSypf JStlOX 

13 6ft InICIYO XO 

4ft 2ft IntSknt 

1ft “V IntBKwt 
17ft 6ft InlHvd 20 

11ft Bft IIP 86 9X 63 

4*4 ,ft intProt 

10ft 6 IntThrn 30 

10ft 6 inThrpt 

3ft V* intDio 
22ft 1OT I on less 13 


12 50 6ft 6*8 84b— ft 

7 60 46ft 441! 45ft— 1ft 

13 68 Zft 2ft 2ft 

27 2ft 2ft 2ft- ft 

37 15 '2? 'I* 'la. 

10 2H 27u 2ft 
24 11! 1 1 

74 39ft 38ft 38ft— U 
11 23 lffa 10ft 10ft— ft 

22 22 19ft 19(4 19ft— ft 

8 3® 1ft lVi lft 

6 2ft 2ft 2(T 

78 lPft 12ft ,2ft— ft 
199 Sft 3ft 3ft— 1* 

29 ft ft T* 

20 3B 7ft 7ft 7ft 

63 6 IBft 10ft 10ft + ft 

28 3ft Sft £b- ft 

30 621 7ft 7 7ft— ft 

267 7ft 6ft 7 -ft 

29 ft ft ft 

13 249 27J. 22ft 22*4 

34 10 38ft 38 3B — ft 


8ft 7 SFNpIA 

39 18 SJWS " 

lift 6ft Sape J" 

10ft 5 Salem .10r IJ « 

2ft ft SCorla 
4B 51 SDsopf 7 JO lt.1 

24ft 18 S Doc Of 2X7 10* 

39ft 32V. SDSOPt +X5 110 
2* 19ft SDgo Pf 2X8 1C-7 

JO'.. 21ft sandgte XO IX 8 

51! 3ft SonmrH 3 ‘ 

11 9ft SaundPt I JO 1U 

Sa*nOn 
,5ft ,1ft SDorron 

23 17ft Schefb X8 

14V. ,0ft Schwab .48 4J 1* 

7ft 3ft SdMgt .10 1.7 

35 12ft SdLSO „ . J 

63 39ft SbdCp 80 X 6 

2V! lft 5MPOTT _ 

ISft 10ft Set Coo .16 U 8 

4ft 2ft SelsPro 

2Uk ft SelsOlt . 

Bft Sft Selas 5 

5ft 3ft SeltaAs '4 

4ft 2ft Semteh __ „„ 

15ft 9ft Srvtsco J8 17 

1 ii* tr X6.65 ; 

I 18ft 14ft setan. « 


14Va BV! Shoe rS 1.00a 8X 
2'g h Sharon 
,9V! 10ft Shopwl .1*6 ■* 


368 B /ft .4“ 9 

20 37ft 3* J *ft 

12 ' i-» ; 1 — ,* 

?5 j.. t»i + -t 

llOOz 65 *3ft 65 +1 

7 23ft 23'* 23> 

1 3Sft 38ft M-* 

2 25 25 25 , 

7 27 left .ift — ft 

4 5 4ft J J — ’a 

14 10ft 10ft 10ft 
264 9ft 9’.; 9* ■ I* 

25 14ft 14 14 '■« 

= 2Sft 2»t 25f* + •* 
11 11'* lift ''ft - . 4 
35 !R* 5ft 5*! — ft 

7 15ft ISft ISft —ft 
48 *7 *S *5 +2 

1 T! I'/s 1’! 

64 12C 17*1 S* 5 * — B 

U f J ?1 . 

11 51b Sft * ’’ 

’! JR ,R AUS 

s O’. 9(a 9 ft 

2 111! 12*! lna- ft 
1 163* 16** 16*! 

13 lift Uft II*- 3 


19V! ,0*! Shoenwl 


5 IBft 18ft ;Bft 
27 1*6 11 ID - * 10ft — 


4*! 2ft isolv JXS 26 28 136 3d 2ft 3d + ft 


iid io'SSrHSn H « J" ]™Z £ 

10 ™ ?^ n % ^ S m 1 SS % 


lid 7ft Sleren JO SJ II 

7*h 4ft SUCH .101 1' 

15ft 8d SIIMA JO 1.9 11 

6ft 3d SHvrot _ _ , 

305! 101! SmthA X0 3.1 

18ft 10 SmlhB XO 3X 

25ft 24*» Smlh Pt 2.12 88 
9'/! S’* SoUtron 18 

,6ft 10d SorpPrn « 

lid 8d SCEdot 1X6 10J 
lift Bd SCEd Pt 1X8 tax 
12ft Bft SCEd Pf 1.19 105 
14ft lift SCEdPt 1.45 10J 
23V! 17d SCEd Pf 2J1 108 
85ft 61 SCEdPt 8J0 10.7 

m 69 SCEdPt IL96 10J 

3ft 3d SwBCPn 13 

7ft ift SsedOP 
lid 6 Spencer X6i 
lid ift Spndlhn 48 

3 ft SpncMurt 
Bft 4ft SIHovn .06 U *S 
2d IdStHavwt 
23ft 17d StdPnf ,X4 3J 4 
77Vj 64ft SWShr MLOOrllX 12 
10ft 7ft 5tanwd 129 

21 'A lift StarrtH 20 

lift 6ft Staten 
3d lft SterlEI . 

23 ,1ft Sir) Ext 8 

lift 5ft SlerISft .18e U 24 
3 lft StrutW 
7 ift SumllE 
14ft lid SumtE PfIXO 1X7 
3514 20ft SuprFd X4b IX 14 
Id d SunCre _ . _ „ 
13d 4 Suplnd* JO ,J 9 
18d ltd SuuvSr X6 2J ID 
6d 4*“ Swaueh l 

2d Id SwttEng 10 

28 1 9ft Swift in 1J0 5J 23 

7tt 3d Synotov 

,«t 6ft SvftEn » .10 1 J T1 


X4 4J jB 

44 15 17 
1X0 

1J» 2.7 10 
1X0 15 11 

f X0 108 
X0 2X 6 


9ft Bft Bft + d 


20 7ft CDI* * 

12ft 5'« CM I Cp 20 

4(* lft CMXCP , „ 

17ft 13ft CRS J4 1.9 12 
IS 1 '. 9d CmiNJ IB 

8(4 4(5 CagtcA _ = 

14ft 10ft CalRE 1JB 10X 9 

28ft 18ft Calmal X0 2J 20 

6d 3d Colton n » 

10(0 7d Calprop xotiox 14 

IBft 11 Cameo X4 14 10 
18ft 13d C Marco XO 
35ft 25ft CWIne JO 

13 ift Cardiff 17 

13d * CareEn 17 

7ft 7ft CaroE wl 

6'A 3 Ca SOIan X6I20X 7 

22’! 14ft CaStIA X0b SJ 9 
32d 26ft CasFd 
131 20ft CenMpt ISO 12X 
14d !0ft CentSe '87*12J 


7 1 19d 19d l*d + d 

20 118 10ft tad 10ft 


58 lft Id lft + ft 

15 17ft 17d 17d 

176 lift 11 11 — ft I 

6 6 ft 6 ft 6 ft 


7ft 5d Jacobs 

4d 2d Jet Am a 

id (5 JetA wt 
9ft 5d Jelran JU 98 14 

Ad 3 John Pd 

11(5 7V« JohnAm JO 35 10 

lift 6 Johnlnd 4 

7(4 3'A JmpJhn 9 


39V! 30d KnGsPt 480 13J 
ift Id KacafcC 5 

16'“ 10 KavCp JO IX 7 
13 10ft KavJn JDe U 10 

16 9ft Kum-NI AS 23 19 

23ft 13ft Kelctim 8St 3J 19 

9d Sft RevCo J0e IX 25 

16V. 8 KevPh JO IX 29 

8 3('a KevCo 8 

4ft 2(4 Kjddewt 

ift 3d Kllem 30 

id 3ft KlnarA 

Sft 2d Klrbv 

5ft 3d Kit Mid 16 

3ft 2 KieerV JCr J . 

17d 10ft Knogo 18 

16ft 1B’£. Knoll 16 


"! 'ft ^ X-\ 

9 7d 7d Tfi 

131 3ft Sft Jd ,, 

40 7d 7ft 7ft— V. 

139 8ft 8(4 814 — V* 

31 3ft 3d 3d— ft 


6501 34 33. 3< + ft 

27 3ft Jft 3ft 
9 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 

21 111! ll» lift— d 

22 lid 13ft 13?!— d 

7 18V! 18ft IBft — ft 


ta 

Rd 

8% 

8U- 


lid 

10ft 



4 

Jft 

4 


3ft 

3ft 

3ft 


3ft 

3d 

3ft 

3 

3** 

3*6 

3ft 


2ft 

7*6 

2*! 



ift 


11 

7d 

7d 

2d 



lid 

17V. 


lid 

lid 

lift 

102 

27d 

aft 

27d 


Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 11104 

Prav. Dav Ooen Inl. 57X86 up 1X40 
US TREASU RY BONDS (CBT) 
{apct-51QaoaO-PtsA32ndsoflOOpcll 

79-12 57-10 Sep 76-30 77-14 76-38 77-13 

78-13 57-B Dec 75-27 76-11 75-25 76-10 

77-29 57-2 Mar 74-27 75-10 74-24 75-10 

7*-6 56-29 Jun 73-29 74-13 73-28 74-1* 

75.11 56-29 S«p 73-5 73-16 73 73-16 

7t:i Its Sc 72-16 7 m n-i* n--a 

74-1 S 56-27 Mar 71-26 7100 71-26 71-30 

74-2* *3-12 Jim 70O1 71-8 70-il 71-8 

72-37 63-4 Sep 70-10 70-20 70-10 70-20 

72-10 42 2* Dec 

*9-27 *7-5 Mar i 9 ' 1 * 

Esl. Sales Prev.SgleslSiap 

Prev. Dov Open imJ, 5.782 upS803 


1 Commodity indexes 

Close 

Moody's S/friS f 

Reuters— 

DJ. Futures 1'3.17 

Com. Research Bureau- 218JQ 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31,1931. 
p - preliminary; t- final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931- 
Dow Jones : base 1G0 : Dec. 31. 1974. 


Previous 

B90.30f 

1X79.20 

114.71 

219.70 


9d 5ft Cetec JO 2X 12 
4 2 ChmpH 16 

17'* ,2'! ChmnP J2 SJ 56 

29ft 17V! ChtlWAS .16 X 18 

27 17L* CntMBS .1* X 19 

12(4 7(J ChlOvg 

38'* IPA Chllhl S .17 x J7 

33d lift Cl radii 6 

32ft 17V. CIIFst 1X06 X5 8 

33ft 19’! CtvGas 1J0 33 9 

42d 34'! Clorml 1.93® AT 

12ft 6ft ClarfcC JBe U 9 

45 22% ciarrat X5* 2.1 10 

22"! 11 Clopay! .1* 1.1 12 

*ft 3d Ccronlrr 

10ft 6ft Cohv JO 2X 9 
8ft 2ft CalFwts 

22 7 ft Com Fob * 

12ft Sd Com Inc .16 

13ft 6ft Compo 

177» 4VS CnwCn 

20ft lid Cnctwn XO 25 12 

12'A *?! ConcdF 14 

25l! 13V! CottrCp 8 

9ft Sft Conast 91 

5d lft Cenqwt 

10. 5d CaruOG 

7« ConOG wl 

Jlft l*d CnSlorn 

15Tb Sft vIContA 4 

20 7ft vICntApf 

2*d 17'! ContMtl 7 

,4ft taft Convst n 

17ft 18ft Cap ley n 


9 49 13ft 12ft 12ft — A 

20 44x2Sft 25d 2Sft— d 
24 119 Sft 5*4 Sft 

14 2S 8 7*0 8 

10 22 Uft 16*! 16ft— V. 

56 l*(* 16ft 16V. 

TO ,4 34 34 34 

17 1 9V, 9Vb »d 

1? 9 11 10*4 10*4— ft 

10 7d 7d 7d + (» 
7 4 3d 3d 3ft 

9 20 IS 1 * 150 15ft + d 

13 30 27ft 30 + ft 

5<t 280 28ft 280 + ft 

26 12ft 12*4 120 
12 38 70 *ft 7d 


2ft IO LSE ?7 m 2ft ?ft~ d 

» 2* t }& 52 3o K- v. 

saw tar " u s %® t,s 

ta 9ft Lauren B 75^55 


If Vi lift Lndmfc X0 2X 
14ft 90 Law 
13 9ft Lauren 
6 4ft LOCKUP 
27ft 210 LeajfP 3X0 IX* 
oft 2 d LeePh 


7 ift 4ft 40— O 
14 TOO 10ft 10ft — 

9 4 3ft 3ft— *! 

5, 17ft 19d 19ft + ’ : 
18 IBft IBft IBft + -« 
94 25 25 25 

*2 a Bft Ii- 1 

25 10 O 10 ft 10 '!— ('« 
S 10 ft 10 *! 10 ft + d 
22 10 O 10 10 

8 lift tad Uft + 

| 13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
27 210 21 21 — O 

2 81 81 8 t + 1 W 

, 83 83 E3 +1 

, Jli 30 30 

10 * S'! S’.s-4-i 

8 Aft 6 ft 6 ft i 

113 Sft Sft 5ft— ■" 

20 ft ft ft 
,0 tfft 6*4 6 "e 


Sft Sft 5ft 
ft ft ft 


Id l!i Id 


33 23d 23 23 + d 

11 740 74 740 

19 * * 0—0 

46 18*4 18ft 18*4 + d 
1 9*4 9ft 9',-* — O 

1 2d 2ft 2ft — O 

5 15*4 15*4 15ft — (<• 

53 9*4 9ft 9d — O 

A 2ft 2ft 2ft 

3 ift 4ft 4ft— W 

1 13V* 130 13d + d 

6 32 ft 32 ft rft— d 
C05 lft ft I — O 

31 lift no lift ■ 

35 140 Ibd 16 ! + d 
16 5ft 50 50 

45 lft Id lft + O 

37 22Vj 220 220 + d 
,2 4 3d 4 — "4 

42 BV* Bft Bd +.!» 


JO IJ t 
J 6 2J ID 

10 


29 220 22d 22ft— d 
49 5?k Sft 50 + ft 

2 29ft 29ft 29*4—0 


XOe IX ,1 19 W% 2Bft 2R*— w 


16 128 2 d 21 ! 2 d 
56 3 13ft 13ft 13ft + d 


X 18 271 » 


24d 240 + ft 
25 25 


XO 25 12 
14 


Coinniwiies 


London a 
ConunodKes 


Cash Prices 


High Low Bid Art Ch'ge HON&-KONG GCLD FUTURES 
n't" “•* u ss per ounce 

SUGAR UXAPeriW c|OTe PravkKK, 

1J02 1X40 1X55 +58 Sep- M N?T. n!t. WM mM ^XO 

a I is aslr K: sssssasg 

U« U60 1XW 1X« Qoc I N.T. N.T. 33 JX3 341X0 341 romra 


WS 1 %. 1X40 +» 

SSI 1J73 1X20 1X61 lx*5 +51 

B 1 N S S ii ii ji 

^ll. vp|.: WOO lots « SO »hA^Pjf w - oc,uo1 
wins: 423 lute. Onen Inreresi: 22JH3 
COCOA 

French francs per 100 M 

2X40 2X35 2X3* 2XM + B 

2xS 2^ 2X55 2^9 +9 

ES; NT NJ. 2X70 2X7B + 13 

JSSy NX N.T. 2X75 — Unch. 

E K:t: K:T: i5S = K 

°ek vai-: N «^^« : ^L Pre '' aUc ^' S: 1 340 10 33976 339:re SiS 

safes : 34 iois.Onen mleresl. 7B0 ^oiU^Te? lihof IOO01. 

Fnmch francs por 100 !0 
S-o 1X20 1X20 1J80 1«0 +20 

£ yf? ?S5 uil XV* 

fSar l^i IJ* - +8 

w ft: a?: ^ = :> 

sen. . N.T. J.T. 


Dec I n'.t! N.T. 331X0 341X0 341.00 mm 
Feb 345 00 345.00 3MX0 34* 00 344.00 348X0 
aSi “ N.X N.T. 34 8X0 350 00 moo 352X0 
Jun — 3S4X0 354X0 35100 155.00 353.00 357X0 
Aug _ N.T. N.T. 353X0 3*0X0 360X0 362X0 
Volume: Jilolsot 100 0A 


+ 9 SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 

+ 13 UJJ per ounce 


IMMT *R'N SrpL J 

*-./ * Year 

Z'lH, commodllr and Unit Toe Aw 

Close . F r ev < comes. i*j 1X4 1J50 

High Low Bin Ask 3ia prinrcJeth M.'30 38 Vr. yd - o^ 3J* 

SUGAR .., nn 5lee1 0'UclS IPItLl, Ion 471M OTXO 

Sterling per metric too , iron 2 Fdrv. Philo- Ian — 213JM 213X0 

Oct 138X0 128X0 138JD !S4S jij'fe Slecl screp Mo 1 hw Pitt. _ 72-73 Mt 

Dec ,4140 131 M 141X0 14XM 1-J JD Lead Sort, lb — — — '9-M 78^2 

Mar 149,00 138/0 148 40 148-BO 1«AW 1 j3 7® e*ec?- U 66 6 6r69 

May 152J30 I4i60 15UJ 0 1ST .60 l-ULM 141-40 |$iraitsi. lb 6.I7W 6-K72 

AM 148X0 14300 15S60 15tM 14oXfl 147X0 - jnc . e Sf . i_ BoilJ. lb Wl M8 

Ocl 15100 153X0 160X0 1*1 XC 150X0 151.03 palladium.*: ICi-tOV 

volume: 4X*5 tols of SO tons. Silver N.y„ oz 6.1S 7.1s 

i 5irjrx:AF. 


3ft 2ft CosCrn 
1 ft CosCrwt 
10(* Sft CntCrd 
1®W lft CourMd 
12(0 7V! CrstFa 

35 25ft Cross 
ITd 9d CmCP 
13ft 7ft CrCPB 
7 i}! CruwnC 

2ft tm CrutcR 
Fm lft CrvstO 
a 13d Cubic 
30ft 23"* Curtice 
3"! ft CvstEn 


20 Td 7ft 7ft— ft 
81 30d 29ft 2®ft —Id 
30 27ft 29ft 29*. 

,8 28ft 28ft 28ft + d 

3 32(6 BU. Md— d 
J 37ft 37ft 37ft— d 

17 8ft 8ft Bft— d 
2 40U 40 40 

4 15 lift ,5 + d 

5 ift 4ft 4ft 
39 9ft 9ft 9ft 

15 7d 7ft 7ft— ft 
*4 21ft 20d 30ft + d 
1* 9ft Od "Vb — (a 
*72 12ft lift ’3d — d 
207 7ft 7ft 7ft 

11 16d 16d lid — d 

W 7V! 7d 7d + d 

15 21 20ft 20ft 

737 9d Oft 9d + *6 
107 ift 4ft 4ft + d 
461 5ft 5ft 5ft + ft 

16 IBft 18ft IB*— d 

130 12d 12ft 2ft— d 

1 ,5ft 15ft IK! + d 

15 19 ISft 18*6— ft 

, 12V4 12V6 13d 

s \ 2 a 3 »- + d 


17 37 3, 2ft 3 

35 \ ft ft + d 

X0T2J17 13 Bd Bft Oft 

me 3.1 250 lft lft lft + ft 

JSe IX 9 1 9ft Oft 9ft— ft 

1X4 4 J 16 159 34ft 33ft 34 

52 10 lid 14’,! lid 

46 10 12ft 12ft ,2ft 

10 6 5ft 6 + d 

1 230 ft (! ft + ft 

247 lft lft 1*4- d 

M u || 50 22 21ft 22 

32 3J 10 17 28d 2Bft 28ft + V! 

,9 ft ft 


Prev. 

Low Settle Settle 
N.7. N.Q. 335X0 
N.T. N.Q. ST’XO 


+ 15 KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Tfi mom y Han cenis wr kilo 
+ 14 Close 


'iS? Vfr. 1XM LW5 XV* MoMys'an cen.s «r 

ij?r "*90 l-«0 WTO - +» DM 

5 ^^ ffif: n:t. ^ = li SS 

S |si vol.: 52 lots otSMni Prev. actual sales: ^ZZ 181.00 

1*9 ibis. Ooen inleresl: 414 Volume: 3" lots 

Source: Bourse e/u Ccmmercn. 


Previous 
Bid Ask 


_ 180 00 1BI.M 18200 KX0 

_ 1B025- 181.00 181X0 182M 

_ 130X0 181.00 IB 1X0 1CX0 

_ 181.30 182X0 181X0 162X0 


COCOA 

SlerUne per metric ion t 

Sep 1,716 1J05 1.712 1.714 1J02 1-04 

Dec 1.749 1J3S ,.7«0 ’.741 J34 J-73S | 

Mar 1,767 1.758 1,760 1J*1 1,75* 1.-59 . 

NUy 7K 1.770 1J76 1J77 1.7*8 1.772 j 

Jl5 1791 1JB* 1JB6 1.788 1.731 1.® 

S«K> 1X00 1X95 1X00 1X05 1.7ft 1.790 

DOC 1.795 1.754 1X01 1X05 1.789 1 ,™3 | 

Volume: 2X10 loll ol 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metric Ian 
Sep 1X20 1X75 1X10 1X20 1X83 1X25 

MOV 1*48 1X20 1X40 lX+> tX31 IXJi 

Jan 1X84 lxn 1X31 1X84 1XT 1X77 

Mar 1,7m 1X93 1.715 1.71" ' ’■ 

May ',745 1.725 1,745 1.71 

Jlr 1,755 USO 1.770 1.73 

Sop 1.775 1775 1-75 1XC 

volumn: 2X74 lots of 5 Ians. 


Ivasun' BtSl- 


3 

27d 

lft □ 
21ft D 

w 

«h 

8d 

5d D 

an 

15ft 

l=d D 

an 

15ft 

lift D 

■an 

7V! 

3ft D 

an 

29ft 

,7ft 0 

Wl 

74(a 

tad D 

Wl 

23ft 

10ft n 

tai 

7 

3ft C 

•aii 

Bft 

ISft 

3ft C 
12% C 

WB 

lei 

5% 

7 

2 C 
4 C 

tel 

SB 

10% 

7d 

•eS 

14 

lift 

9*! 

lift 

9Vl 

Sft 

lev 

vr 

Dai 

10 

5ft 

ta 

a 

Bft Dio 

3% 

1*6 Dio 


Sep J 

Prev 


76ft 35*6 Dl 
« 3d Dl 
9'! Sd Dl 
3ft id 
V] ■«. 


Sww S»'sr-fln Brvl^trs 


.Vue' ojferii& 
CBOT 


bond 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 

Slnaopote cents egrhjje Prevtoul 

Bid ASK BW Ask 
ess 1 Seo 1*1X0 1*2X0 1*2-5 1*3.25 

HSS 1 Oct — 1*2X0 16250 163J5 16375 

PSSJSepI 1J9X0 150.00 1*8X0 I49X0 

!R«3s|"n 147X0 1*0X0 14*00 147X0 

RSS 4 SeP 143 CO 145X0 142X0 144 00 

S Sec lJflXW 140X0 1I7.W 1*9X0 


GASOIL 

U5. dollars per metric im . 

Sec 25300 251X0 252JS 25250 M W5?C ! 

Oct 246.00 24435 247 25 7:7X0 2*5./ 5 : 

Nov 244X0 252X0 244J5 244^0 7+1X3 244XS | 

SS 24SX0 2*1 75 2*3X0 =43X5 2*325 541 55 ' 

Jan =44X0 24135 242.00 242. 25 5<15<i 1 

Fdb 23=S 23SL25 239.00 2*0X0 Wffl =*3X0 I 

; KW NJ. N.T. 233JW 235.00 233 M 35£" 1 

Art 9, w no 22854 ‘W9 25 22 SJ0 720 '£ ( 

May N.T. N.T .,4X0 =3000 2IO.C5 2/0.( 
volume: lA40loisol 'Wtos. 

Sources: Reuters ana London W'V.'.w E 
Chanstf (sosatil. 


Yield Yield lift 

28*! 7*b 

7X3 7J8 2*! Id 

7X5 7.70 «d IgJ 

302 8X6 1 d 

20 12 »! 

17’’* 13 
16ft 9*i 

29 IBd 


OhkSmls 


Sept. 3 

Per Amt Pay Ree 
OMITTED 


ExO & £ -^ 


AJso Futures xnd 
Futures Options on 
COMEX-GOLD & SILVER 
IMM -CURRENCIES 

Lov /.' IMJU'M Rau-' 

$ 7C* nVi’AM^' ' 

^ ..AtFSil-ltr 

- ••/if /■• rni'ii-. 

cnnWi'ij: o-Hfnn r. 

•ilhTlu'./.- Fir./.-— 
it.nl/ui IS !-( ■ ••Ill'll turn 

~ 1 jlT' « pp'fwwnal' 

2 12-221-"13» 

1 clc\. -““‘t*” 

REPUBLIC CLEARING 
CORPORATION 

45: hftft .*■*». ■-1- NT W 
AnUBau/4 

grp -til-r ftlleul Banfc of Sw 

\ *15 iMIi-in ■ l ""’ 


85 lam 

Previoas 

Ask 

910 

Age 

810 

760 

B00 

B10 

7*0 

m 

810 

TeO 

800 

803 

7S5 

795 

SCO 

750 

7ft 

600 

740 

7V0 

790 

740 

780 

7E0 

700 

770 

7E0 

005. 

no 

770 


Ijondon 


Source: Reuters 


S&PIOO 

Index Options 


Sirile CatlFLO? 1 PHvLcst 

Pna 5 cp Ort Ha/ D*e [Scs Del Nov Dec 

ira 1?'- — — 1 : •» 1. 1* J. 4 s-i* 

its **, J ■ ■>. I 1-1* ■» -4 .. 


1".5 i II ; 1: — 
- I’ll I. It - 


i* 1.16 5-16 T1* 
•'* •: 1'- 
I"1 7T’1*2(, 

, A Pi ?: 

e-. ?. >•- - 

- IT: - - 

!JL - - - 


rgMlte'i «i«/rs :inii 
I Toizlto" seer. In: 511577 

I Tcialovt iihiirs ItP.’i- 
j Txioi oei et>:n :r.t uSUll 

1 

| hut. 1J2J7 LMliiri CwH'rf— 86* 
I Source' CBQE. 


Close Previous 

Bid Ask Bid ASH 

ALUMINUM 

Slcrllng per metric ton _ 

Sooi 734 0Q 735 00 ..JJj ••5+! 1 

Far-ard 757X0 *r6w •*•— -J .-—.3 , 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grace; 

Sterling per metric I*" 

sbcl 1010X9 talixt 101053 

Forward 1037 00 1037 JC ME JC 1K7W • 
COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

5Tcf ling per metric fan 

5501 984X0 995.M «8e V. 7*7 Cu 

Forward '.012X0 IOliX-7 !)'4i0 105 53 • 

l-E fiD ... 

Sid-1 Ine per metr/e ten „ . . . ..... • 

Spot 3I1XC 2C2JC JCiltO jclX5 

Forward 201.25 301 "5 wiXC >-2 j- 

NICKEL 

SlerUne per melrlc ton • 

SCO) 347>)O0 347S.IK 34S3i: 34*0 7; • 

Forwarc 3128.00 ^43X0 257L:3 JJ3.W : 

SILVER 

Pence per trov ounce . 

Sort *150 449X8 *57 C' *52X3 • 

Forward *40XQ ft 1X0 ft-"- *5-J: • 

TIN (Standard) 

|tarrmg aor ^ 

Forword 9051.00 tCilM 9'3S0.;3 *051 0-3 , 

ZINC 


SuHscn Bo' Ztnrxs 
Crtci'Sl Inc Fs 
Cr.tr] '.lisui Sj.sr.r 

FC">ere C: 

Hsur.es '-Hi Z-s 
-or Fnierp-i^s 
Ms'er.gB Rcieerch 
5-ntc t-'r"w ScnK 
ScKr.:.ii-; Cmoh-s 
Scjr.AKl Alrt'm/s 
•/.'plat* ' J.' Zsr-. 


*3 9-23 9-6 

JQ 9-30 9-1* 
Xl 9-3(l 9-It 
Xs 9-3C 9-17 
25 UM 9-13 
.23 9-30 *■* 

.03 10-15 10-11 
.,5 10-1 9-11 

37 10-1, 9-1B 
03 ' 4 9-27 9-10 
25 10-1 "14 


o-dnii'cl: m-m*ntRlv. g-quarter!y; s-seml- 
snnuc! 


datums 

C 

24 — c- * '.vrri' .-.—j crr-ssermol 


Srpt 3 
Puts-Seitie 
Dec Mar 
&I7 OS* 

: CJ3 3X3 

I 0 74 I J3 

, ' *t l.» 

: 114 2X3 

: 2/3 3X0 


Sterling per metric tan ..... 1 ashstislc. ...c| i»e.. -.51 

5 pal S'S-CC 517XC *57.3 57 .... • Cal's: -9' :+v, --.ses ;at J-. 

Cvugrd nc na 50) (X 565 jJ F«!i . Fri. Rl.-,.S UR ml.S.K 


Far-Hard 
source. 4*. 


9ft 6ft 
left T3 
7ft 4VI 
M! 2d 
3(. 2d 
23d 17ft 
*0 31ft 
IS 1 ! 7ft 
2ft lft 
2Sd 15d 
5*4 2ft 
8*6 SV! 
13"» 10ft 
7d 2ft 
ft '■ 
10ft 4ft 
*U 2 ”! 
tad 7 
lift 5% 
9 * 

30ft IBve 
ift 1'-! 
J7"! 30V! 
9ft 6 
Oft 4ft 


12ft B'i 
22ft 
14ft * 

19 16d 

„ft 3*4. 
12ft 9'T 
lift 11 
2*ft 19ft 
15*- lift 
IS 6'! 
29 23ft 
lift 1 
43ft =8ft 
30ft 22ft 
lift Aft 
ID 7*6 
3*'! 29'! 
9’* Sd 

1 nr n 
24’* 14*6 

I 32‘! I2d 


l?»i 5 
2 d lift 
l*d 10ft 
7'i 4ft 
-.2’ * 6ft 


.131 65 * 247 2 Id 2 

J2 1J 10 20 W 74 2* 

B 7d 7ft 7ft — d 
2X0 16-3 83 12ft 12d 13d — d 

2X0 19* no 12 ,id id-}} 

6 281 «*! 41! + d 

2X0 12X 1 20ft Wft atft — ft 

3JS 16X 61 Z3V» 22*! 22*6 + '+ 

ij 4 ji yt'&zz 

24 17 4 3*6 4 + d 

1X8 1IX 9 8 lSd 15 ,5 

150 2d 2d 2d 
J3T 5X 11 13 id id 4d 

o5nl3 11 B Bft Bft Bft— d 
88 27 13d 13d 13’% — d 

jo® an 51 iod 10 10 

63 95 8ft Bft Bft + ft 

57 29 8 7ft B — ft 

■» 

31 fit 

a 40 ft ft 

56 lift 14ft 14V!— d 
3 43 23ft 22ft 23 — ft 

40 id id lft + ft 
24 40 10ft 10ft 10ft — ft 

XO M 18 »£ “i “Slg 

1 SftSi&ir'-ft 

S e H,S i§ JTvS^^-ft 


in 52 37 6 7ft 7ft 7*6 — '6 

55 ZJ » ,1 lid lift !4d + d 

18 8 6ft Ad Aft - d 

10 114 6 5ft fL— ft 

17 113 3 2ft 3 + d 

, no S.1 9 1 19ft 19ft 19ft— Va 

AJftflOX 6 2 34*6 34*6 34ft + ft 

277* lid 13ft 13"!— ft 

S3 Id I'A Id— d 

,40 tJ 11 4 22ft 22 22 ft + ft 

35 Sft 5d 5ft + d 

99 Sft 5ft 5ft— ft 

1 XO* j 4 lift lift lift + ft 

11 8 7 Af! 7 +Vk 

40 'A ft (6 + ft 

7 ,18 10 •(! 9(y 4- d 

iSelSX 20 3d 3d 3d 

9 18 9*S 9(! "ft 

4 Sd 5 ’■* S’* 

I 1X0 15-7 IS 6*9 Aft Aft— d 

So U t 5 20Vi 20'! 20d 

61 l'.t Id 1/s — d 
,73e 2X 53 7 36ft »ft 34ft 

n 25 19 4 8 77! B 

XOO 4.9 12 49 Sft B(! B'.s — W 


3*6 LBlsurT 
Bd 5 LevIN 
30". TVS LWPPh <*» M 
3d Id LlfeRst 
4 2d LlHId 
}d lft Lodge 
39ft 77'. Lorlmr 
|9 10'6 Lumea Ttt X 

,4'/! Bd LundyE 
15ft 9d Lvrla 
lift 10 Lvdai 
M'-i lid LvnCS* JO lx 


14d 12*6 
3 Id 
9ft 7ft 
lft ft 
12ft 6ft 
4d 2*6 
15V. B 
17ft 8d 
2(6 ft 
18(6 10ft 
15d 8ft 
9ft 3d 
ISft 3ft 
22d 2IW 
26d 15ft 
64V. 10 
IBft 9d 
8 ft 5 
22d 11(4 
20 8*6 
23d lift 
16ft 9ft 
26ft 13ft 
7V! 4(6 
7ft lft 
86*6 56ft 
22ft 13ft 
10 5ft 
25ft Bft 
30d 11 
25 18V! 

Bd id 
12 Sft 
33ft 16 
9V* 7d 
20ft 12ft 
13(6 9ft 
42 31ft 
17d lOte 
17d tad 
19ft 15*6 
id 2ft 
19ft I5d 

T Sd •* 


10 2 6* 

,t 19 28> 

58 V 
10 ¥ 
83 1’ 

17 310 33 

33 95 18 


Ud..«VkTBar 
13'6 7d TEC 
43ft id TIE 
Tift 67* Til 


-SB’* 


6ft 6V1 6ft + ft 
9 Bd Oft + ■» 
6 5*! F9— *! 

Bft Sft 8ft + d 


lft lft lft + d - 21ft 13*- TobPrd' 30 T.l-13- --J 1«* ^ ^ 

.«* 3*h 3ft— d 10d 616 TandBr S 3 _7V. _7d 7d + Ve 


13 

.16 IX 58 


“ 107 12 
23 

JOa 1.1 6 
17 

.12 1.1 ID 
9 


XOb 3X 10 281 22(6 

2J 10 5ft 

J0e 4X103 ,2x4V! 

1.16 IX 15 18 7816 

34 1.1 20 97 22d 

X4t 63 B g ,8ft 

.15 J 22 20 ISft 

7 79 ,4d 

30 1 19ft 


10 3ft 3ft 3ft— d 

83 lft lft Id + d 

310 33 32d 32ft 

95 18 17V. 1W6— * 

78 14ft 13ft lift f d 

115 10ft 10 10ft + ft 

1 13d 13ft 13d— d 

305 17ft 12 IT** + * 


13ft 13ft — ft , 
lft lft— d 
Bft 816 + ft . 
R I + d 
9d— d 
2ft 

12d— ft 
16ft— ft 

lid— d 
12ft— 1 
3 — ft 
15ft— d 
21ft 
19ft 

62ft— 1ft 
17ft— ft 
Sft- d 
lift— ft 
i8d— ft 
17ft— ft 
10ft— Vi 
22d + d 
Sft- d 
4d 
78ft 

22ft— ft 
Bft— ft 
lSd— ft 
14ft + ft 
19d— ft 
5d 


tad 616 TandBr 
15ft 9d Tasty 
4ft 7ft Team 
4d lft TefiAm 
22*! 14ft Tefi5vm 
77V* 39ft TechOP 
6d Jft TechTp 
20ft 10ft Teehtrl 
214*4 96 TelonR 
4ft 2 Teleeon 
34ft 24ft Teltlax 
Uft Sft TeiDta 
16ft 4d Telsd 


15 41 16 

14 15 67 

II 28 4 

JO U 1 4 13 

XOe X293 150*3 HI 


18 t«*4 14ft 14ft + ft 
5 4 4 4 

59 2ft 3ft 2ft— ft 

15 67ft 67d 67(« + ft 
28 id 4 4 — ft 

4 13ft 13d 13ft 
r 50*3 HI 179 181 +d 
77 2d 2 2 — '! 

26 34 33ft 33ft— d 


sSrSiBrn 3i,3xta S i*ft »d iod + ft 
in& aVs Telsd 20 35 7 -J* .. 

» 2dTrtSU, 157 id 4ft 4ft- d 

6ft 4.. Tenney 11 < i** >. 


1016 ift Tenor » 

3U4 22ft TeeCdo 1J0 7 

2D 6ft TaxAlr 3 3M0 

tad 4ft TexAE X41 4X 24 230 

7ft lft Twain 46 

5ft 3ft ThrO A .10 2i 17 S 

5% v, vrrwwu 4 M 

BOW 59 TolEtJ pflOXO 13.1 200: 

9ft id Tortsl 39t 8X 93 K 

15 8ft TotIPtB J4 4JI 

2ft ft TotPlwt 22 

2716 22d TatPtPf 2X8 WX 2 

,4 8ft TmsLx 335 r A 12 4 


14 8ft TmaLx J35r A 12 

19ft lift TmsTec ii 46 * 

17 13d Trmwon A l« t 

lift 7ft TrISM XOe 3X 

12ft 3ft TrWex 23 

4 2d TubMex 

22ft 16ft Turn B n » 

31ft 21ft TumrC 1J0 4X 10 

10 9ft TmEen 

3ft Id Tvlr wt s 


8 Bd 8d Bd— r: 

7 24 34 M — Jv 

3 ,320 17ft 17V* 17d — ft 

24 230 5 4ft 5 + (n 

44 2d 2 2 — 

T7 5 3ft 3ft 3ft— d 

403 1 ft *6— '! 

2007 76 d 75 76V: 

93 32 4ft 4d /ft , 

426 14ft 14ft lid— Vb 

22 2ft 2V4 2\o— ft 

2 27d 77V! 27V» 

12 6 12*6 12V! IZVi— ft 

9 100 lid 13*6 14 + ft 

7 15 1516 147* lift— '! 

25 1, 10*- 11 + V! 

23 5 7*» 7*6 7*4 + d 

8 2ft 2*6 2*6 

35 214 17d 17 17 — ft 

10 6 28*0 38d 28'6 — d 

22 9ft 9ft 9ft 

70 2 lft 2 + (* 


A* 4J 13 6 971* 9*6 9* 6 

M IX 8 4 27d 27ft 27*!— ft 

X4e 2.9 31 12 Bft BU BU „ 

2* IX 28 282 13*6 ljd 13d- d 


XO u t 
4.40 114 
-20 U 14 
X8 \3 ,6 
13 


2d 1! 
13U Oft 


17 13d 

I0U 19ft 
" (a 5V! 
Uft lift 
25 12ft 
lft ft 
23ft 14ft 
17ft lid 
21d 13 
49 (i 31 
44. 4U 
17*6 lid 
lid 12d 
17d 12 
7 Sft 
13ft 6ft 
3ft 2U 
17d lOd 
lift 9ft 
37 29ft 
5*6 2d 
lift 6d 
12ft 8Vi 


lift lift— U 
38d 381! + U 
16ft 14ft + ft 
16d 16ft + d 
ift lift lift + ft 
.. 2*6 2 ft 2 ft 

*0 lBd 18ft IBft 
196 9ft 9ft 9ft 

i & & isia 

39 5 4ft 4ft_ % 

OS* 

4 d d d 


X0 17X 42 14ft lift 14*6 

122 19ft 19d 19d— Vi 

17 7 916 9d Od 

40b 34 10 lBx lift lift lift- £ 

•™ * ^ 17 £ 1# S 

liTStt 

1X0* 5J 11 74 20ft 20ft 20ft + d 

-M ix 15 849 44U 43 4»— ft 

X5r 5.1 7 3 5 4ft 4ft — d 

X2 2X128 29 13 12*4 1»6 

123 14'6 13d 14U + ft 

X0 *X 11 5 lift ,4 16 . — Hi 


24d Bft Ultmte 11 

13d UnlcoiP 
11U Bft Unimrn lX4oia7 

23V! 15*4 UAlrPd Xtt 2X 12 

23 lift unCasF * JO 2J 4 

2 Vi Id UFoodA .10 63 

2ft lft UPoodB 

16ft lid UlMed 15 

22ft 14 USAGwt 
8d sft unltefv _ 73 
21(6 lid UrUtlln 1X0 7 A 7 

14d 9d UnvCm IS 

10ft 6ft UnjvRn 19 

21ft 15ft UnlvRu X0« 4-7 

15*e lOd UnvPat 


66 13ft 13d 13d— 'o 

20 lift lift lift + d 
191 lOd tad tad 

T6 22d 22d 22d 
23 18ft lBd 181!— V: 

21 lft Id Id 

43 Id Id Id — ft 
66 15V. 151! 15d — '! 
9 18d 17d 17d — ft 
14 B 7ft 7ft— (« 
2 21ft 21d 2116 + d 
13 12*6 12ft 12ft 
23 Tft 7d 7d— ft 
1 lift lift lift— d 
54 12ft 12d 12ft — d 


10d 9*! VSTn XOe 62 

18*6 12ft VallyR s 1X0 7X 11 

27ft 17ft VcISPTS 44 ix 14 

10 2ft Vertt 

23ft lid VtAmC XOb 2J 10 

Ad Sft VIRsh 

ft ft Verna 

lift 916 Vomit JO 3-1 15 

10*6 5 VWrtWil 

9 5d Vlcan 12 

ift 2d Vlnloe 
lBd 12 Vlrco Mr X 15 

65ft 53*! Valml ,, . 

n. id VhHiolG X0 4.1 H 

12d B Vartmc X0 4X 10 

tad lift VuIcCp XO 4X 11 


38 9*6 9*i TO 

1 IBft 18ft 18ft 5? 
9 34U 24ft 2**6 * 

,9 BV! 8'i Bd + ft 

39 17ft 17d 17d— U 

7 4*6 4ft ift— d 

4 d d — d 

76 10'A 9*. 9*« — ft 

5 8d 8 B — U 

7 Sft 5ft Sft + v* 

32 2ft 2(6 2(6 — ■« 

14 14*! 14U 14ft + ft 
1 iSft 65ft 65ft + ft 

11 7(i re 7U — 

67 Bft BU Bft — ft 

15 IS 17ft 17ft— (! 


7ft id WTC 14 103 Sd 5ft Sft 

A0 1 3 13 17 23U 22*6 23 — d 

.16 3 IS 847 17d lift 17 —ft 

21 ft % *6 

5 14 BU Bd Bd — ft 

30" 76 " VfthPst .96 X 15 <1 122d 120'! 120d— 1 
Sd ,3 WRITS 1.17 6X 14 116 17d I7U 17ft — ft 


Sift 16ft OEA _ J? 

227! I5d Oofcwd .08b X 11 

15 4 CWelA n 

lid 4d OdotBs 

24ft lBd Ollaind X0 1.9 72 
27*! 15ft CMston i J4 IX a) 
7(4 3d OOklow 
7d 3*6 OPPenh X5e X 55 
8 4*! OrtolH A .15 3X 

7ft 4*! OrlolH B JO 41 
2d 1 Ormond 

25*6 16 osulvn S X2 2-0 14 

74*. id OxIrdF X2t 5X 11 

13 Sft OwrtcH XO )X 12 


IS 10ft 
13ft 9*B 


12 5U s*6 + d 28*6 IBft Wolbor “ 

7 34 10 TO 10 +*! »U « 

IB 32 2ft 2*e 7ft 2ft 9a WmCwt 

10 78 16*! 15M 15ft— d 4ft UVIhHj 

28 lid 11 11 in 76 WihPst .96 x 15 

xs 11. B 400- Md i5ft 36d +1 Xd 13 WRITS 1.17 &X 14 

8 13 3*6 . 2*! + d lff% 7d Wolac A Jffl £2 5 

8 18 6U 6ft 4U — d lift 7*4 WdftcB .14 IX 6 

23 oft 9 9 —ft 5ft 2HWHKrd 

1 19ft 13*6 WttiMpf 2X2 15X 
9*6 9ft WobD Wl 

— - 3d 1 webcor 

12 9 20ft 20d 20d 5ft 3d Wedco 

X8b X 11 =34 19 17ft 17ft— J 17ft lift Wodten X2e .1 18 


5 Sft 5ft Sft— d 
10 7 6ft 7 +16 

10 21d 21(6 21d + d 
77 24 25 25 — 1 

103 4ft 4ft 4ft 


5* 5W SS + 2 1 29ft I7d WPseo 


4 Walman .14 23 
7 WekJTb X21 
Bft Weldtm 

4ft Welku 
2V6 WelGrd 


3 4*6 Aft 4*6— d 

3 4*6 4*6 ift 

22 Ift 1U 1(6 

5 20ft 20ft »ft . .. 


2ft ft Weiocp 
42 34*! WTex p| 4X0 108 

1BU 5*! WrtBrC 
lift 8U wslbrg JO 


49 'SS !SS + 14 I ’S'* 4*6 wDipm 


XO IX 12 2291 12ft lift 12(6 


,0 13d 13d 13d _ 

3 120! 12d 12d— ft 
5 Uft 11U 11U— d 
32 lift tad HU + U 


23ft 7U WtHIttin 18 

21(6 15ft Wl RET 1X6 8X 15 

13ft ift WStSLe .1* IJ 5 

30*6 13ft WIlEntS 20 

5ft 2>6 Wichita 
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BUSINESS R<Hin 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1985 


W y \ 


VJS& 


Page 13 


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^tfficherSeis 

Pwbfa Offering 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — FAG K.«- 
•£■*» WhA. af2; 
®wacd ball-bearing manufac- 
tm based in Schwemfurt, is 
I c«» tofi® public in early Novem- 
^ber. Toe public offering, a com- 
pany spokesman said Tuesday 
wD involve about 300,000 com- 
mon shares with a nominal val- 
ue of about 75 million Deutsche 
maria (J26J 01111100 .; 

An offi cial announcement 
concerning the public issue’s 
precise date and volume is ex- 
pected within die next few 
weeks, said Adolf I-anerWh . 
the company spok esman 

Mr. Lauerbach said that 83 
million DM of the company's 
- existing nominal capital of 165 
million DM will remain in the 
hands of the current owners, the 
Fischer family, white a “maxi- 
mum" of 82 million DM could 
be offered to the public in (he 
form of common shares. The 
I issue will be made through a 
kbank consortium led by Bayer- 
Pische Verrinshank. 


: 

Some of the facilities were ac- 
quired m the Gulf takeover. 

we XL*?! 001 *** letters to those 
wouId ** interested,'’ 
Nant-^ Chevron spokeswoman, 
Amy. She declined to Uten- 
“g: the potential bidders bat said, 

i acre were quite a few." 

f a senior vice president 
“* Chevron USA, the company's 
domestic operating unit, said a 
fcadlmeof^. 18 was imposed on 
toe bidding, adding ttwf a decision 
is expected by the end of the year. 

company notes 

„ Bo water Industries PLC said 
Hanson Trust PLC has raised its 
stake in the company to 7.48 mil- 
uon ordinary shares, or 8 percent. 

new stake represents an in- 
crease from 7 percent of the total 
shares outstanding a month ago. 

Bureon-Mantefie^ a New York- 
based public-relations firm, said it 
has set up a joint commercial pub- 
lic-relations service with China Me- 
dia Development Inn, a subsidiary 
of Xianhua, the official Chinese 
news agency. 

Compama Telefonica National 
de Espafia said it would seek to be 
listed on the Tokyo Stock Ex- 
change by SepL 18. It said it would 
place 15 million shares on the To- 
kyo bourse, which would put 13 J 
percent of its total capital in for- 
eign hands. 

CRA Ltd,, an Australian metals 
producer that is controlled by Rio 
Tin to Zinc Corp., said net income 
in the six months ended June 30 
rose to 33.7 milli on Australian dol- 
lars (S23.6 million) from 31.8 mQ- 
lkm dollars a year earlier. The re- 
sults compared with a 
23-miffion-douar loss in the sec- 
ond half of 1984. 

Bxoo International PLC said its 
first-half pretax profit rose to £49.4 
mffliod ($682 million) from £332 
million a year earlier. The company 
said in its interim report that ihe 


‘‘Prospective buyers are being 
ivised to give us their best offer," 


Financiers in Scotland 
Are Still Wary of Fads 




advised to give us their best offer," 
Mr. Price said. “There will not be 
an opportunity 10 negotiate price 
after they come in with an initial 
bid." . 

He said Chevron is retaining the 
option to hold onto the facilities if 
the bids are too lew. 

Since acquiring Gulf, Chevron 
has sold about 52 billion in assets. 

About 2.000 Chevron workers 
would be affected by sale of East- 
ern and Puerto Rican operations. 

In past divestitures, the company 
has negotiated continuing jobs or 
benefits for its workers with the 
buyer. In cases where layoffs re- 
sulted, Chevron has provided assis- 
tance in finding jobs and severance 

benefits. 


sale of its 52-pcrccni slake in Tel cr- 
ate Inc. will produce a net profit of 
about £230 million. 

FrancoraD, a joint venture of Jeu- 
roont Schneider. ANF Industrie 
and De Dietrich & Compagnie, 
said it has won a 5200-million con- 
tract to supply 225 subway cars to 
the New York Metropolitan Tran- 
sit Authority. The MTA has also 
taken an option on another 400 
cars, the company said. 

Loudon A Scottish Marine OO 
PLC said first-half pretax profit 
rose to £74.9 milli on ($103.4 mil- 
lion) from £563 million in the 1 984 
first half. 

Neptune Orient Lines said it trill 
raise 100 million Singapore dollars 
(5443 million) through an issue of 
cumulative-redeemable preference 
shares. It said the shares will be 
privately placed. 

Santos Ltd, an Adelaide-based 
energy concern, said net income in 
the fust half ended June 30 more 
than doubled from a year earlier, to 
64.61 million Australian dollars 
from 29.46 million. 

Trafalgar Housing Ltd. of Hong 
Kong sard its lenders had agreed to 
extend a moratorium ou 396 mil- 
lion Hong Kong dollars (550.8 mil- 
lion) in debt until Sept. 1,1986. The 
moratorium was first reached in 
1983 and has since been extended 
every year for one year. 


(Continued from Page 9) 
with Williams & Glyns Bank, a 
medium-sized English clearing 
bonk. This mil make Royal Bank 
the first Scottish bank with a major 
presence throughout Britain. And 
in April, despite criticism of Lon- 
don conglomeration. Royal Bank 
bought Charterhouse Japhex a 
London-based merchant bank, 
from Charterhouse J. Rothschild 
group. 

Royal Bank is also expanding 
overseas. Starting with just a 20th- 
fioor Wall Street office 15 years 
ago, it has moved into Houston. 
San Francisco, Los Angeles and 
five offices in the Far East. Wil- 
liams & Glyns also gives it a foot- 
hold on the ContinenL 

The 290-year-old Bank of Scot- 
land has alio opened new overseas 
offices, including one in Moscow. 
To widen its presence in England 
and Scotland without investing in 
new brandies, however, it also has 
arranged to market financial ser- 
vices through building societies 
(the British equivalent of U.S. sav- 
ings and loan associations) and di- 
rectly to homes and businesses 
through computer-telephone links. 

“We have a better home and of- 
fice electronic banking system than 
anything I have seen in the United 
States," Mr. Gibson said. 

His bank's Scottish character 
was enhanced this year when a 
neighbor, Standard Life Assurance 
Co.. Europe's largest mutual insur- 
ance concern, bought for about 
$210 million the 343-percem stake 


in the bank that had long been held 
by England's Barclays Bank. 

The ownership change raised 
echoes of the days when there was 
talk of Edinburgh as the home of a 
“financial mafia" in which just a 
few men sat on numerous boards, 
supposedly coordinating their busi- 
nesses. 

“Everyone knew each other but 
in the worst possible way." said Mr. 
Grossart of Nobel Grbssari mer- 
chant bank. “There were various 
camps reflecting historic fallouts 
and personalities with no cohesion 
or perception that the cake could 
be expanded outwards." 

Today, by contrast. Edinburgh 
and Scotland are embarked in the 
first effort in memory to market 
financial services as a single sector. 
Local studies have concluded that 
electronics and modem irons pan 
links have eliminated many of the 
advantages to financiers of operat- 
ing from cemers such as London 
and New York. 

"Modem technology is playing 
into Edinburgh’s hands, said 
James Gamine H, who retired as 
chairman of the investment man- 
agement firm of Ivory & Si me last 
month. "I think it’s set for a golden 
age." 

Of course, modem technology 
cuts both ways. For instance, it 
makes Edinburgh's traditionally 
solid Scottish base vulnerable to 
raiding from English and foreign 
banks. 

"Our distinctive qualities are un- 
der pressure," Mr. Baird, the Royal 
Bank economist, conceded. 


(nmpanj Results 

Revenue and profits or losses. In millions, are in local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated. 


Australia 


CRA 

1st HoH ms Ml 

Revemm igq. iaod 

Profits — . H7 31J 

Santos 

1st Half IMS 19M 

Revenue—. 242.19 10U2 

Profits— Mil 29.46 

HaagKaag 

Hyson Development 
WHOM IMS 198* 

P roll 11 8449 84.11 

Per Short. 08215 00214 


Malaysia 

Sime Darby 

Year 1985 19H 

Revenue £250. 1440. 

Pretax Hat— 2107 210 

Soaih Africa 


Anglo Amer. Gold 
let HoH IMS 19M 

Pretax Naf— MM W9J 


Sasot 

Year 1985 19M 

Revenue— 1170 122). 

Pretax Net— 0447 431.2 


United Stales 

Drown Group 

araOvar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 33** 324.7 

Oocr Net 10.44 9.70 

O ear Share— 053 DA8 

? Months IMS 1984 

Revenue — 1.03Q. IDS). 

Ooor Mol XL58 41*5 

Doer Share- 1.53 104 

I9B4 net exclude!, train of 
SBm.OOO in quarter and 
S8O4M0 in 9 months from dH- 
conUnued operations. IMI 9 
months net excludes lass ol 
SUo million from discontin- 
ued operations and a loss of 
JKJ million from disposal of 
operations. 


Italy’s Telephone 
Monopoly to SeR 
Shares to Public 

Rouen 

MILAN — SIP SpA, Italy's 
state-owned telephone compa- 
ny, will sell nearly one-third of 
its shares to the public in an 
offering aimed at raising as 
much as 900 billion lire (S473.4 
million), officials confirmed 
Tuesday. 

An official at STET, the state 
holding company that controls 
8255 percent of the tdephone 
company's stock, confirmed 
press reports that a placement 
or about 30 percent of SIP 
shares was imminent. He de- 
clined to elaborate. 

An official at SIP said the 
planned operation had been 
paniy inspired by the highly 
successful flotation last year of 
half the share capital of British 
Telecom PLC. 

If successful, the placement 
would boost the proportion of 
private capital in SIP lo more 
than 40 percent. Private inves- 
tors already hold 10.85 percent 
of the company's equity while 
Pirelli SpA holds another 3.04 
percent. 


Holiday Stress 
For Managers 

(Continued from Page 9) 
flung together for a period of time, 
we receive many more calls," says 
the council’s research director. 

Information et ConseiL the com- 
pany counseling service for execu- 
tives at Control Data SA. the 
French subsidiary of the U-S. con- 
cern, also gets more calls after va- 
cation than throughout the rest of 
the year. Compared to an average 
of 40 to 50 calls a month through- 
out the year, calls average 150 calls 
a month after the summer break. 

But Guy BertheJon, the director 
of the service, does not attribute the 
large majority of the calls to vaca- 
tion-induced stress or re-entry 
shock. T believe it's a willingness 
to take charge of your life again. 
Ninety percent of the calls I get are 
for practical problems. 


Amro Makes New Layer 
Of Senior Management 


By Brenda Erdmann 

tnrernonemj! Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Amsterdam-Rot- 
lerdam Bank NV has created a new- 
layer of management that will be in 
charge of the bank’s day-to-day op- 
erations. 

The bank said that from Jan. 1, it 
will create the top management 
post of senior executive vice presi- 
dent and that six of its current 
general managers will be promoted 
to bold the new title. They are A. 
Deknatel. G. Dirks, R. Groenink. 
Z. van Hovell tot Westerflier, W. 
van der School and R. van Tets. 

An Amro spokesman said the 
move would allow the bank's board 
of managing directors, which cur- 
rently oversees the bank's daily op- 
erations. to have more time for po- 
licy-making and other activities. 

As a result of the creation of the 
new layer of management, the 10- 
man board of managing directors 
will be reduced in size. Stepping 
down from the board when they 
reach statutory retirement age will 
be C. van Westreenen, R_ Koole, 
and G. van der Kloei. 

Essochem Europe Inc, Brussels, 
has appointed Rodney L Grandy 
Jr. as president from Oct L suc- 
ceeding David R. Clair. Mr. Clair is 
expected to become president of 
Exxon Research & Engineering Co. 
Mr. Grandy moves to Brussels 
from the Darien, Connecticut, 
head office of the parent, Exxon 
Chemical Co., where be is senior 
vice president. Exxon Research is, 
in turn, a unit of Exxon Corp. 

Salomon Brothers International, 
a London-based unit of Salomon 
Brothers Inc. has recruited Ste- 
phen Brisby as a vice president 
charged with expanding the firm's 
investment-banking business in 
Britain. Mr. Brisby was formerly a 
director of the British merchant 
bank of J. Henry Schroder Wagg & 
Co- 

Scandinavian Bank Ltd. has 
named Antoine F. Khayat to ihe 
new post of regional head for Eu- 
rope, tire Middle East and Africa, 
based in the bank’s London head 
office. Christopher C. Hart suc- 
ceeds Mr. Khayat as general man- 
ager of the Middle East branch in 


ANZIstoOpen 
Bangkok Office 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Australia and 
New Zealand Banking Group 
Ltd. said its subsidiary. Grind- 
lays Bank PLC of London, has 
received permission to open a 
representative office in Bang- 
kok. 

The office, which is sched- 
uled to open later this year, will 
be headed by Brian Human, 
currently regional coordinator 
for Grmdbys in Hong Kong. 
The move follows that of Hm 
Samuel & Co. the London- 
based merchant bank, which 
announced in early August that 
it had received permission to 
open a representative office in 
Bangkok. 

Paul Rizzo, general manager, 
international, of ANZ. said 
Thailand was previously one of 
the few countries with signifi- 
cant ties with Australia where 
the bank was not represented. 


Bahrain. Mr. Han. who formerly 
was with Bank of America in Bah- 
rain, joined Scandinavian Bank in 
April as general manager-designate 
of the Bahrain office. 

Procter & Gamble Co„ the Cin- 
cinnati-based household- and per- 
sonal-products concern, has named 
Claude Meyer as division manager, 
international, for southern Europe. 
Mr. Meyer, who will continue to be 
bared in Paris, succeeds Malcolm 
Jozoff, who returned to the head 
office. Succeeding Mr. Meyer as 
general manager of Procter & 
Gamble France is Herbert Schmitz, 
who moves to Paris from Geneva, 
where he was general manager, spe- 
cial operations, for Procter & Gam- 
ble AG. 

Banco di Roma SpA, Italy's fifth 
largest bank, has upgraded its rep- 
resentative office in Madrid to a 
branch and named Carmelo Peliin- 
ato branch manager. He also over- 
sees the bank's operations in Spain. 


-C. ) 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices as of 
3 p-m. New. York time. 

Via The Associated Press 


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Aft 
lift 
Aft 
lft 
24 
13 
3ft 
3ft 
294* 

10ft Me Fori 


[ria 

m 


2914 29ft 
32ft 32 
21ft 211* 
249k 24ft 
7ft 714 
14ft 141* 
29ft 27ft 
13ft 131* 
Aft Aft 
7ft Aft 
15ft 15ft 
31ft 31ft 
10ft 10ft 
1AJ4 15ft 


29ft + V. 
32 — ft 
211 * 

24ft— ft 
7ft— ft 
14ft — ft 
20ft -lft 
1314 
Aft 

15ft— ft 
3114 + ft 
10ft 
14 


1 9 1 



670 

1094 

101* 

101k 



245 

OTk 

91% 



9 OuakCs 

70 05 1 

11 

H 

11 + ft 



249 

22ft 

22ft 


51b 


383 

51% 

496 




52 

12ft 

12 


13ft 

7ft Qualm 

1382 





23 — ft 
4ft— ft 
141* 

4ft— Va 
10ft 

Uft— 9ft 
33ft— 1 
9ft 

20ft— ft 
25ft- ft 
2ft 

14ft— ft 
14 

5 + ft 

9ft 
15ft 

50ft— ft 
7 — ft 

10 — ft 
7ft— ft 
13ft— ft 

12ft— ft 

in* 

0ft + ft 
24ft— ft 


7Y4 Aft 
16ft KM 
12ft 12ft 
HU 10ft 
4Vk 4ft 
31ft 311* 
J» It 
Oft 2ft 
2114 21ft 
9tk 91 m 
2ffft 28 
12 lift 
Aft 4ft 
lift 15 
5H 51* 
9ft 9ft 
13ft 13ft 
1414 1414 
Oft 0 
27 2Mb 
39 37ft 
14ft 14 
7ft 7ft 
151* 149* 
28ft 28 
lift lift 
12ft lift 
2214 22V. 
Wft 101* 
3M Jta 
lift 15*k 
16ft 14ft 


4ft 

16V 4 t* 
12ft 4- ft 
10ft— 14 
4ft — ft 
31V* + ft 
19 

214— I* 
211* 

9ft— ft 
21 + ft 

lift— ft 
6ft— ft 
15ft 
5V a 

9ft + 14 
13ft — Ik 
1414 + V* 
8ft— ft 
27 +1* 

30 — ft 
14ft + ft 
7ft 
15 

20—14 
lift— ft 
lift— ft 
22ft— ft 

18ft 

3ft— I* 
15ft 

1W4- ft 


73x 

22ft 

221* 

22ft + ft 

50 

2194 

2116 

2196 + ft 

285 

91* 

99* 

9ft- ft 

129 

15ft 

15ft 

15ft 


537 

121* 

111* 

121* + 9* 

79 

29ft 

2J9. 

29 H 

h 1% 

9 

50ft 

50 

50 


550 

231* 

2294 

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137 

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10 

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24 ft 

24ft 

241* H 

h 16 

30 

7ft 

7ft 

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40 

171* 

17VS 

171* + ft 

SS 

124* 

12V* 

12ft — 

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51 

lift 

11 

11 


200 

5ft 

43* 

Aft— (6 

154* 

281* 

281% 

28ft — 

- 16 

A 

3ft 

29* 

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111 

31* 

316 

31* 


1717 

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-114 

40 

4 

4 

4 


149 

194* 

19 

191% — ft 

S3 

34 

34 

34—16 

IS 

2094 

2096 

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59 

231* 

2316 

2316 


51 

42*4 

421k 

42ft— ft 

100 

>51* 

159* 

13ft— 1* 

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1116 

1116 

lift H 

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345* 

Sft 

(ft 

Aft— ft 


mi 

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17ft 10,. 
15 5ft 
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lift 5ft 

r* 

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15 W* 
9ft 411* 

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its 

isft a 
iqft 5ft 
u» 5ft 
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Oft 5ft 
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45 

101% 

IP 

5 

7 

7 

44 

lft 

lft 

45 

lift 

IS 

1441 

Mft 


54 

91* 

Ift 

17S 

lift 

lift 

477 

14ft 

14ft 

78 

tft 

8* 

24 

• Ift 

9ft 

46 

13 

TZrt 

304 

W 

9 

217 

15ft 

16 

60 

14ft 

14ft 

253 

13ft 

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137 

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NM 

91 

91* 

9ft 

372 

tft 

8ft 

456 

Tft 

7ft 


3« 

3ft 

if 

Aft 

Aft 

372 

lift 

lift 


33U. 3214 321* — 14 
12ft lift 12ft— ft 
7 Aft (ft — ft 
5« 5ft Sft + ft 
Aft 41* 41* 

42ft 42ft 4216 
271* 27V. 2716 
2114 21ft 2116 + 14 
21ft 22ft 22ft— ft 
Sft Sft .Sft— 14 


12 

T2 —ft 

3ft 

3ft— ft 

lift 

1514- H 

251* 

25V*- U 

516 

516 

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2ft- 14 

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AM 

Dft 

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141* 

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13 

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10 

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19 

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m 

Tft— « 

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231* 23rt 

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10ft- ft 

lift 

lift 


8ft 


4 — ft 
4ft- ft 
Oft + ft 
2414 + ft 
44 V.— ft 
10 
13ft 

17V.— ft 
7 

2ft 

41*— ft 
♦ft . 

716— ft 

m 

24ft- ft 
lift 

9ft- V* 
27ft 
2Bft 

28ft— ft 
1416 — ft 
2214— ft 
1214— ft 
2ft- K 
121b— ft 
1514 

45ft- ft 
4416— ft 
Aft— ft 
7ft 

lift— 1* 
18ft + ft 
30ft 

MU— ft 
22ft— ft 
SOW 

5ft— ft 
Aft— ft 
It + ft 
9ft 

10ft + ft 


14 7ft 
1914 10ft 
1914 10ft 
13ft 7 
23 1A 
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44ft 29 
23 lift 
14 7ft 
7516 39U. 
41* 2ft 
lift 4ft 
91* 5V* 
48ft 3214 
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WHS 6U 
141* 10ft 
1314 m 
75** 1514 
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2016 12 
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1216 lft 
3016 10 
1M6 4 
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251* 17V* 
23 131* 

■ft 41* 
18 12ft 
34ft 23V* 
3916 2916 
309* lift 
14V* 7ft 
3516 2416 
141* 10 
lift 5ft 
lift 9W 
22ft 1116 
24M 1114 
1216 4H 
T7ft lift 

1514 10ft 
34ft 13ft 
12ft Oft 
4ft 216 
54 31 

21ft 10 
101* 4 
21ft lift 
29V* 10ft 
27ft 14ft 


34 

4B 

15 

. 10 r 1 J 0 
M 19 693 

a « » 

1 M 40 251 
44 
243 

ZOO 42 397 

Mr J 2 
.12 15 14 

1J4 37 27 

44 ZI 4J. 

40 

32 24 775 

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2 
1 

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220 

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JD 43 4S 

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30 19 2» 

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48 1-5 63S 
1.40 44 412 
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192 

.15 J 444 

4 

70S 

445 

39 

14 

2 

JO 5.1 47 

133 
140 

JOA J A 
554 

1 J4 35 133 
124 
144 
53 

48 24 134 
450 23 41 

45? 


131* 1316 
15ft 13 
10ft 10ft 
714 7ft 
2»ft 30ft 
21 »ft 
40ft 40 
IVft 19 
15ft 15 
72 711* 

5ft 5U 
7ft 7ft 
Aft Aft 
40ft 4716 
20ft 20 
7ft 7ft 
16 lift 
13ft 13ft 
25 74ft 
41* 41* 
Oft Oft 
Oft 12ft 
5ft Sft 
7V* 71* 
21* 2ft 
216 21* 
19ft U 
Sft ,8ft 
15 1416 

21ft 20ft 
19V* 19ft 
4% 41* 
17ft 1716 
32ft 32ft 

371* 36ft 
19 18ft 
111* 101* 
28V* 27ft 
12 lift 
Aft Aft 
12 lift 
14 15U 

30V* 20 
5ft 5ft 
14 15ft 
13ft 131* 
lift 15ft 
91* 91% 
2ft Zft 
47 46ft 
19ft 19 
91* 9V% 
15V* 15ft 
281* 28 
191* 19ft 
4ft 4ft 


13V* 

151* 

18ft 

716 + 1* 
2016 + 16 
2014— 16 
40 —1% 

19 — VS 
15V* + VS 
719k + V* 
Sft 

7ft + 1* 
Aft 

4716— ft 

20 —ft 
7ft + Hi 

lift— ft 
13ft— ft 
2416- ft 
4ft + 1% 
lft 

12ft + ft 
5ft— ft 
7ft— 1* 
2ft— ft 
Sft + ft 
111* + ft 
Oft- ft 
1 416— ft 
2016— ft 
19ft— Mi 
4V*— ft 
171* + ft 
321* + ft 
36ft 

19 

101*— 1* 
27ft- 19 
1116— ft 
Aft— ft 
1116 — ft 
15ft 

20V*— ft 
5 ft 

15ft— ft 
13ft— ft 
15ft— ft 
9ft 
3ft 

46ft— ft 
19ft + ft 
9ft— ft 
15ft 

20 
19ft 
4ft 


91k 414 
15ft TV. 
121* 4ft 
2016 6VS 
22 7V. 

42ft H 
34V* 1964 
101k lift 
15ft 6 
Aft 24k 
2816 73ft 

14ft aft 

14ft 91* 
20ft 1316 
12ft Aft 
22 1416 


VLI 
VLSI 
VMX 
Valid La 
VqiFSL 

VUNH 1-20 ; 

VOIU7 A> ■ 

Vanois A : 

Vanzstl 

Ventral 

vieorp JRo 

VftdeFr 33b : 

VlWno 

Vlrafak 

Vadovi 

Vottlitl 


Aft Aft 

Wft 12 
59k 51* 

816 8 
22 201k 

38ft 38ft 
21 20 
IBft 1716 
Aft 6 
5 4ft 
24ft 23ft 
9ft 9ft 
13ft 12ft 
15 MVS 
avs aft 
19ft 19 


61* + ft 
12 — 1 % 
516 

a 

211% — V* 
38ft + V% 
21 +1 
1716— V* 
6 

4ft— ft 
23ft— ft 
»ft— ft 
1216 
15 

81k + ft 
19V. — VS 


1W6 JftXebec 
1316 5ft XJeor 
1714 10(6 XMax 


Mk 7ft TVS + ft 
8V* 01% 816 
13 12ft lift 


21* 1416 YlOwFl 54 27 


30Hi IP!* 201% + U 
















































] 


l 




Page 14 


INTERNATIOWAL HERALD TRIBUNE, VEDWlESDAY> SEPTEMBER 4,1985 


■ - tr.' - : > ■ 

- * - •• ' 




books 




J*ss' 


A STILLNESS HEARD ROUND g 

,v«* i«wer scenes that wea«ranB,- 


rr^r f * eGrMt 

War, November 1918 gSrffcA* .Vj^tv 


By Stanley Weintraub. 467 pages. Illustrat- 
ed. S 22.50. 


Zspeas of the story. 

The most diverse characters immemaxQy: 
When tbe firing dies down m the 
Meuse it seems so quiet.; thgj: 



-C-T- 


Wr ; 


K P. Dutton, 2 Park Avenue, New York, Truman' ‘feels as t 


!?*.«? - , - rt 




bottle of the brandy laid down . 

regent to celebrate the battle Watediy and 
Sit “vay musty” In a B^ttbag^ 





seemed only appropriate that u suwiuu *»«• 
: been the Ilth hour of the 11th day of the 11th 
month. It was also, for the victors at least, a 


time to rejoice. “Everybody suddenly burst out 

Sanfrinl Cacconn in » wfiU- 


ACRQSS 

1 Send off 
5 Facsimile 
10 Stanch 
14 N.L.-er 


44 They exist for 
peat's sake 

45 Father or son 

46 Pummel 
40 Strikeout 


15 Strikeout artist 50 Pop.- tax 
Ryan 

1€ Kelly's possum 
17 Start of a 


11 Hollywood's 
Franchot 

12 Like quiche 

13 Bryophyte 
18 Sartre work 
1* Gager’s- target 

23 Arm and a leg 

24 SoboTV 


BEETLE BAILEY 


Russian 

proverb 

20 Windup 

21 Bern’s river 

22 Sweetens 

23 Minstrel's 
companion 

24 City on the 
Hudson 

25 Shine 

28 Amassment 

29 Press a tort 
32 “Once upon 


shelter 
53 End of the 

"ssssy 

57 Lady of song 


58 Maugham's 

“■* — of Suez” 


58 Verse 
collection 

60 Responder to 
reveille 

61 Concerned 
with 


28 Bristles 

29 Stings 

36 Family man 
31 Anesthetic 


33 Like Pat 
Ewing 

34 Caveat word 

35 Middle of the 
proverb 

38 Some softball 
teams 

39 Breezy 

46 Mosey 

41 Apr. 15 initials 

42 Shag and 
throw 

43 Mug 


1 Soccer legend 

2 Trek power 

3 Fokker foe 

4 Rocky 
eminence 

5 “Tell it not 



singing,** wrote Siegfried Sassoon in a 
known poem of the period, though the muddy, 
messy realities of November 1918 were im- 
mensely more complicated. 

S tanley Wwntraub has set out to reconstruct 
those realities is “A Stillness Heard Round the 


John Gross is on the staff of TheNewY^g^ 
Times. 




bestsellers 




World.” a panoramic survey of the last days of 
the war pieced together From hundreds erf tndir 
vidual memoirs and eyewitness accounts. 
Along with more familiar or more readily ac- 
cessible sources, Weintraub has drawn on a 
rich harvest of recollections sent to him or 
culled from, interviews. 






ooasecntiwe. 


ncnocs 


TO 

We* 


There is no attempt to impose a single con- 
sistent thesis on this ma ss of material. Much of 
die fascination of “A Stillness Heard Ro und 
the World” lies in its variety, its demonstration 
of how many different thing s the armistice 
could mean. 


LUCKY. I 


SKELETON CREW, 
THE FOURTH “ ‘ 
rence Sanders 



THE HUN T FOR REP OCTOBER, by ; * 

ThI^TwS MRS. GRENVILLES,^ 

DoanddDuDne 


For me mao, it might mean “liberating” a 
Belgian brothel for another being sent 1_ 


toctosThouse rules, byJo5n-.^| 

ESl WOBEGON DAYS, by Gamwn.^lS 
Kcfllor 





r :«d os 


death by a commanding officer who was io hold the dream, by Barbara Tkjter-, *T" 

hungry for last-minute glory and detemnned - ^«f«^ 0RRj0W C0MES , by sStaS’’--^? 

to capture a patch of territory that was due to 11 ■ w y 

12 TOO MUCH, TOO SOON, by Jacqueline t, JJgj*. ?•?»■ 

“■■■ J?rj i?.-'. , ‘ p!»VSrS 


be surrendered a few hours later. If yon were a 
British private bong held in the prison camp in 
Czersk, in what is now Poland, the great day 
might find you lying on a straw bed, bones 
poking through your ulrin. If you were the 
Empress Eugenie, 92-year-old widow of Napo- 
leon HL, you took pleasure in a victoiy mat 
ensured the return to France of the lost prov- 
inces of Alsace and Lorraine. 


13 THE LOVER, 

14 INSIDE Or 

15 FALL FROM G! 


NONFICTION . Si. 

YEAGER: An Anlotwtgrapiiy, try Chnct 


*»*•** 


Weintraub has organized his material so that 
it forms a coherent and compelling narrative. 
A few episodes naturally stand out — the bleak 
meetings in the railway carriage in the forest of 
Compiegne that led to the actual signing of the 
armistice; the graceless abdication of the kai- . 



_ ’■■wSr ■**** 

Tom Pema end Nancy Austin — t ■ - . ..Jv'lT ^ mma! pMJ« ; 

THE MICK, by Mktey Mantle with Herb .'j&rtStr, . * r 

Gtodc . ■ -taiflt iw 


THE AMATEURS, by David Halbezstam 
MARTINA, by Martin NavntUova with " 

i Vecsev — : T-»7 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


: with 


inn aanaB saaia 
ibd qiihqo nana 
inaanaaBn □□□□ 
inanaaa aanaan 
□aaa aanaa 
□EQaa aaa aaaaa 
BcnaaQ acoan 
ebdb aaaaB aaso 
bob aaaa Enaaaa 
□Dana □□□ □□□□a 

□□□□a anna 
□□□□□a aaoaaaaa 
QECJD nanHEoaoma 
oean □□□□□ naan 
cebd canon naca 


10 HAMMER OF 


5 OF A HOOKER, by Bob i.M^j 

ivnc Noland a . a] 

K, by Sbana Alexander — ‘-4. 
GODS: The Led Zqv ■ ■ ■ f i 
Davis L-* M>. fa, 


f0 the sun. u* 
- ’ Kci- ^ 


; aju!d y' 
^w eidr ±= 


; al qt with (he 


rs; is 


11 FUNNY MONEY, byMaik Singer 11 S (he 

12 LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Bnscafr £ Uvied ! 

13 THE GRASSHOPPER TRAP, by Pankk - ^ >^-' ^'S^rvenT 

F. McManus .12. .^. jUjhfeSithe Nf» 

• , JjSDttiU rrKJSi. i 


14 THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 
Richard Bach 


IS THE DANGEROUS SUMMER, by-& 
not Hemin gway . . 


147 52 


?** 


ADVICE, HOW-TOAND MXSCELLANEOIS 


DR BERGER'S IMMUNE POWER 

DIET, by Stuart M. Berger - "-I'.'fi'" 

It’S NINTH NEW -COLL& - - •• ■ vlloeaiBRE'Of a PTi 


■fniji ggaigmtt 
'lStoanwcarp J J>- 

iaikplxs tiah. f. 
4d der jobs u> 

■-aipai 2 d n&isr. 


GIATE DICTIONARY 


\\CA 


WOMEN WHO LOVE TOO MUCH, by 
Robin Norwood , 


THE- FRUGAL jSOURMET^byrJeff 


•2 


3 


rnAs. 


Deiaarc hsi X x 
l^afilsy tmed n 


. . . ..®/4 sen. 


S.-ETTFOR UjFE. by Hiiri^ MnKxirraiid 

■ ' ■ ,uo _»» JaBBEg » -fti --.nfrspd trt=3E a; ; 

,r . ... ... i ji-s'.-.a..,!.. u-.;. :_rj; -WtcnHeasincmi 

BRIDGE ; ; 


— ^ *w{»acf 750 jJu; 


Unmwnbie thaaa four Jumbles, 
one tartar to aacrfi square, to form 
tour Oftflnaqr words. 


JEECT 


~nic 

Ll_ 


VOARS 



_U 


By Alan Txiiscott 


head for cash the last. 
When this, it 


In the 
tract' was 


. ^‘•-^fcyilE£!fcsC2to 

0 %1 .. «. . , _ trumiMMii. Ml. t UQU' W<UI UO'CStCu. aiMl ftliV jttw ■ 

N the dia^Rmed deal cashed the top -club's and Nortb-Souih team — -* aBaa 138 

South reached force. n<h pl^kthWiouad. West was poinis. 
trunip as shown, and West led -welcome to takeh&two minor 


the spade king rather the nor- sidt-winnera, but had to oan- 
mal deuce. The spade ace was cede two tricks to dummy's 
held up until the thiid round, dub ten and heart ace at the 
and mree diamond winners finish. ' 
were cashed. Hearts were dis- 

carded Grom the dummy. xb« bMdtne: r . vainmrbby 
With the dosed hand now North Em Mk 
enuyless. South had to find 'SZ' 11 
five tricks in the dummy. He 3 ^ 3 

led to the heart queai, hoping pa» pus 
to keep East from gaining; the West led tbe spate ktuf. 


WEST 

4X11 

OKI 

0 w 8 1 a 

* J732 


.ttgsasioai 

. ,v Michs we 

NORTH (D> ;■ : J 5» and acvw: 

♦ a k w 8 * Was from aj 

BAST : > ' 

* Q J »4 iS 
V J »«7 
0 384.. X 

so™*? 4 ' 

??■“ 'i 

O A K 0853 • 

*8 95 „• 


^■TxSkaHv, u's 


'ip™ ' 


JikiL' 


lor "cap! 
in. 5 pi 


RECHIP 



■ 

■ 


ASHRIP 





SOUND’S LIKE A 
F&H WHO THINKS 
HE*iS A BIKC?. 


Now wraiflB the circled tetters to 
form tbe surprise answer, as suo- 
flested by the above cartoon- 


ter* a OTH nTTTTTl 


YestercJay-s 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: TRAIT FENCE EXPOSE GARLIC 


Answer What firewood used to be— 
FREE FOR THE "AXING" 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 




Costa ml Sol 


Frankfort 


Lisbon 


Madrid 
Ml km 


RerUavtfe 


StoddiolHi 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

vann 

18 M 13 55 

u 93 a 72 

27 81 19 M 
a S3 16 61 
20 68 12 54 
II 64 13 55 
30 86 15 59 
26 79 11 53 

16 61 11 52 

26 79 18 64 

17 63 11 52 

14 57 9 48 

28 82 16 61 

17 62 12 54 

19 66 16 61 

18 64 9 48 

29 84 19 66 

30 86 21 70 

27 81 19 66 
IB 64 13 SS 
34 93 15 57 
26 79 J7 63 

20 6B 12 54 
22 72 11 52 

25 77 19 66 

14 57 7 45 

21 70 14 57 

22 73 9 48 

9 48 4 37 

28 82 17 63 

17 63 9 48 

18 64 14 57 
28 82 18 64 

26 79 13 55 

23 73 7 45 
1» 63 13 55 


Vsiiics 
Vtanm 
War sa w 
Zurich 

MIDDLE EAST 

28 82 9 48 
30 86 25 77 
25 77 10 50 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerasaleai 
Tel Aviv 


28 83 18 64 

29 84 20 68 


OCEANIA 


Audtend 

Srdkmv 


17 63 14 57 
17 63 8 46 



ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 




c 

F 

C 

F 


h- 

Bangkok 

33 

*1 

25 

77 


sh 

BaHlap 

28 

82 

17 

63 

It 

tr 

HmaKoa* 

28 

82 

26 

n 


fr 

.S£anfla 

28 

82 

25 

77 



New man 

37 

99 

25 

77 


r 

Seoul 

30 

M 

22 

77 


6tl 

Shanabal 

28 

82 

22 

72 


d 

Sfagurare 

28 

82 

Zl 

75 


d 

Talpvl 

33 

91 

24 

75 


r 

Tokyo 

» 

84 

24 

75 

D 

sh 

AFRICA 






0 

Algiers 

33 

91 

19 

66 

fr 


Cam 

22 

90 

22 

72 




18 

64 

12 

54 



Cnionkmqi 

30 

16 

18 

64 

fr 


Harare 

25 

77 

12 

54 




29 

84 

24 

75 


fr 

Neott 

19 

66 

13 

55 

d 

Hurts 

35 

95 

19 

66 

fr 

fr 

LATIN AMERICA 




Buenos Aim 

17 

63 

5 

41 

d 


CBraoas 

2/ 

81 

20 

48 

fr 


Lima 


— 

— 

— — 



Mex/cn Oly 

26 

79 

10 

50 

fr 

cl 

Rio da Janeiro 

— 


— 

— 

na 

0 




d 

Andwram 

16 

41 

4 

39 

fr 


AUaata 

31 

« 

21 

70 


cl 

Boston 

24 

7S 

14 

57 


Ortoana 

to 

91 

21 

70 



Denver 

30 

84 

15 

59 



Detroit 

31 

88 

19 

M 



Hoaahfla 

.12 

90 

34 

75 

fr 



35 

95 

22 

7? 



Los AnpEteu 

27 

81 

2D 

68 


fr 

Mksmi 

37 

90 

25 

77 



MlmKS^alls 

M 

79 

17 

63 

d 

tr 

Montreal 

M 

X 

15 

59 


fr 

Nassau 

30 

34 

24 

75 


fr 

New York 

27 

81 

18 

44 

Ir 


San Frandsca 

» 

68 

20 

48 

fr 


Seattle 

31 

70 

11 

52 


r 

Taranto 

7S 

77 

16 

61 


d 

Mtasblastan 

33 

90 

21 

70 

fr 


cl-eiotKiy; fo-toggy; lr-foir; tvhoii; o-overwst; pc -P artly doudv; r-roln; 
sh-shemerG; sw^now; st-stormv.- 


Very chappy. FRANKFURT: 


WEDNESDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL 
doudv. Tenw. 21 — 11 (70-521. LONDON: 

MADRID: Portly doudv. Temp. 32—14 191—571. MEW YORK: 

31—21 (88 — 701. PARIS: Shawsrs. Temp. 20— 14 (68 — 57). ROME: Fair. 
Temp. 39— 18 (84 — 64). TEL AVIV: Net available. ZURICH; Cloudy. Tflmp. 
- — nv. TsmA-M— 26 (91 — 7VJ_ HOWK KONO: 


19 - 32 (66 - 54). 
IRK: Fair. Temp. 


22— 12 (72—54). BANGKOK: Stormy. Tamp. 33— 26 (91 —79). MOH@ KONG: 
SlKMcn. Tempi 27 — 26 (M— 79). MANILA: Rainy. Temp. 27—24 (81 — 75). 
SEOUL: Showan. Tump. 30 — 23 (84-73). SINGAPORE: Stormy. Temp, 
29 — 25 184 — 77). TOKYO: Fogey. Tamp. 29— 24 (84—73). 


W)rid Stock Markets 


Via Agence France- Presse Sept, 3 

Qosing prices in load aurmtia unless otherwise indicated. 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

AEGON 

AKZO 

AhoW 

AMEV 

A'Dom Rubber 
Amro bonk 

BVG 

Buetirmann T 

CahmdHMa 

Elsevier-NDU 

Fakkar 

Gist Brocades 

Helnefcen 

Haotxwens 

KLM 

Noarden 

Nat Nedder 

NedJiovd 

Oce Vender G 

Pakhoed 

Philips 

Robeco 

Rodameo 

RoUneo 

Rorenta 

Royal Dutch 

Unilever 

WOmimran 

VMF Stark 

VNU 


Obm Pros. 

51150 513 

34450 242 

wsuo ura 
126J0 125.90 
24350 244 

297 A0 29X80 
855 855 

8950 90 

31550 31650 

10350 ?»«..-» 

3750 3750 

132 13150 
8150 8150 

21450 213 

14950 149.90 
6150 6350 

U2M 

48 48 

7SL40 7450 
1B1 ISO 
344.70 3.® 

6650 6470 

MIOJ 4950 

7650 7470 

13450 13450 
7020 7010 

4430 4630 
20030 19950 
341 33750 
3820 Tututi 
248 262 

22350 235 


anp.cbs oea-l Index : 22MB 
Prevkm ; 22T50 


Hochttef 
Hoechst 
Hoescti 
Horten 
Husael 
IWKA 
Kali -t- sab 
Karatadl 
Kauthof 
K loackner lio 
Kloecknar Works 
Kruop Stahl 
Unde 
Uitihcroo 
MAN 

McsmesmcBin 

Mumdi Rueck 

NUdorl 

PKI 

Porsche 

Proussao 

PWA 

rwe 

Rhrtnmetall 

lll! r,no 

Siemens 
TfivMen 
veba 


Close Prsv 
730 750 

21150 213 

124 12450 
193 193 

375 387 

305 30750 
325 32250 

250 26150 

290 293 

393 291 

715- #490 
122 119 

541 535 

230 230 

16850 168 

20250 201J0 
1945 1918 
53850 540 

Ml 65450 
1322 1334 
. 283 281 

14650 14650 
196 198 

310 313 

47850 476 

,358 352 

54820 549 

129 129 

232S0 233 


VoUjswaasnwerh 32950 33410 
WellO 621 625 


Cemmerxbcnk Index : 147550 
Previous : 146558 


Arbed 
Bakaert 
Cackemi 
Cade pa 
EBES 

GB-Inno-BM 

GBL 

Gevaerf 

Hobakan 

Intercom 

Krodletbank 

Petroflna 

Sac Genera le 

Safina 

Solway 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unerg 

Vleliie AAonloane 


1600 1585 
6250 6210 
307 205 

3385 TW; 
3015 2900 
3950 383B 
IV25 1920 
4000 407i 
5500 5450 
2275 2260 
9100 9100 
6140 6110 

1830 1790 

7390 7180 

SDOO 5030 


5110 SOSO 
1710 1695 

8160 am 


Currant Stack index ; zrui 
P rewiOW ! 238M3 


Frankftnri 


AEG-TdWwiken 14060 MUD 
At tanz Vers 1423 1398 
A llano 361 3S8 

|«F 2100 230 

BOW 214 21190 

Bay Hypo Bonk 366 36S 

Bay Verelnsbank 387 38650 
BBC 25650 252 

BHFfldnk 313 318 

BMW 472 47650 

Commerrbonk 20550 20750 
Cwt Gum ml 15430 IS7 
Oolmler-Bem 961 958J0 

gWM „ 378 367 

Deutstfie BaOcack 169 169 

Deutsche flank 57650 576 

Drtgftwr Bank 26750 269 
GHH 187 18750 

Hardener 318 318 


HnKat 


Bk Ea&i Asia 
SdSyno Kona 
Chkia Until 
Green Island 
Hgw Seng Bank 
nmdersan 
China Gas 

HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 

HESSSr 1 

ass”""”" 

Inn city 
Jansm 
JonMneSec 
KUHloon Motor 

n sraga— 
teJSJT 1 ” 

sreiux 

Sw.lni Pacific A 

S* Knona 
Wheelock a 
W hig Qn Ca 
Wlnsor 
Wbrld Inn 


060 2240 
I7JO 18 
SS^l 1 SJ 0 
7 JO 750 

44JS 45 
2.15 2J25 
.10 950 

flJB 8 J 0 
10.70 li^a 
35 j0 365 

4JJ5 425 
755 755 

855 855 

3JS 130 
.650 6JS 
2490 27-20 

061 062 
088 071 

12 1140 
13J0 1350 
950 950 
44 44 

’ 7J5 755 

SUSP, 

1250 1080 
250 258 

25.10 7SA0 
1.92 1.92 

.Mf 090 
Susp. — 
178 150 

5.15 5AS 
255 110 


Ham Sang index ; 15S621 

PwieutiiiMJ,- 


AECI 

Anglo American 

Ateja Am Gaw 

Barlows 

Blwaar 

Butfnfs 

De Beers 

DriefenteJn 

EkHids 


760 760 

3050 3000 

18800 18800 

1170 1145 
1350 1350 
7250 7275 
1140 1145 
4925 4950 
1700 I67S 


GFSA 


Hiuetd Steel 
Kloof 
NedDofifc 
PresSieyn 
Ruspkrt 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sasot 

Wed Holding 


Close, Pre* 
3300 3400 
2710 zno 
550 540 

7600 7650 

ran i27s 
5200 5150 
1740 1760 
735 730 

3200 318® 
700 700 

6100 5500 


Composite Slock lades : 112240 
Previous : HA 


AA Carp 
Aflied-Lvons 
Angle Am Gold 
Ass Brit Foods 
An Dairies 
Barclays 


IA.T. 


BICC 

Bhie Circle 
BOC Group 

Boats 

Bowater Indus 

BP. 

Bril Home St 

Bril Telecom 
Brit Aeratpoce 

Briteii 
BTR 
Burnwh 
canto Wfrefess 
Cadbury Sdn* 

Owner Cons 

Commercial u 

Coos Gold 

CMrtoulds 

balaety 

DP Beersi 

Distillers 

Drietonteln 

Flsons 

FreeStGed 

GEC 

GenAcddent 


5121k 
. 2S 2 
57014 
234 
136 
392 
S72 
330 
341 
203 
34 
503 
283 
207 
353 
STD 
301 
201 
378 
223 
356 
294 


151 

IK 

222 


sum 

243 

STOW 

232 

136 

392 

574 

326 

341 

Z18 

34 

30 

287 

203 

335 

576 

301 

205 

370 

225 

366 

297 

590 

152 

183 

223 


140 

418 

422 

350 


137 

421 

423 

356 


Glaxo i 
Grand Met 
GRE 
Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

HOWker 

ICl 

Imperial Group 

jffotior 

Land Securities 
Legal General 
Lloyds Bank 
LoMw 
Lucas 

Maries and 5o 
Metal Be* 
AUdtandBank 
NrfWestBonfc 
PandO 
phMnstan 
Piewey 
Prudential 
Race! Elect 
Rondlontefai 
Rank 
Reed Infl 
Reuters 


sib^v sim 
3H 375 

5187k Sim 
178 184 

638 

230 


1335/6473 33764 


731 

278 

860 

213 

397 

679 

185 


733 

270 

865 

212 

401 


B 

439 

153 

343 

155 


679 

298 

276 

136 

707 

ISO 


303 

729 

439 

153 
343 

154 
490 

3W 

677 

401 

278 

140 

709 

156 


sm 87SW 
406 411 

689 702 

329 .319 


Rerai Dutch c 4553/64 455/64 
RTZ J89 SB? 

Saatchl 660 660 

Sdnsburv 340 338 

HDkfinas mib 100 


Shril 

STC 

■la Chartered 

Sun At I lance 

Tate and Lyle 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
T.l. Group 
TTutataarHse 
THF 

Ultramar 
Unilever r 


Staraae 


united Biscuits 
Vick e/s 
WMtwarm 


260 Fraser Neave 
412 Haw Par 
384 1 inchcaoe 
Mat Banking 

141 [ : 

OUf 

W 17/3210 31/64 1 OUE 


&B 0 

2.10 


485 


F.T.X ledex : 1887 'JO 
prevtoes : lanjt 
F.T&EJOO latex : 133558 
PrevhHK : tsaajo 


190 ShattorHa 
292 SI me Darttv 
480 S'paine Land 
snore Press 
SSttamship 
st Trading 
United Overseas 
UOS 


NA. 
tea 
M5 «.! . 
247 249 

IX 735 
1J2 1JH 
177 1JT 
ill) 221 
568 540 

■84 046 

3 306 

144 1J1 

232 3J4 


Strait* Times lad Index : 751X6 
, Previous : 7S«jn 


DfDan 


Bunco Comm 

Csfl Irate 

CMatwiels 

Crad Itol 

Eridania 

Farralialta 

Fiat 

Generali 

IF) 

llalcemofTtl 

llamas 

llolmatlllkjrl 

MPdloUancn 

AAantedhan 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RA5 

Rjrwscentr 
SlP_ . 

SME 

5n10 

Stnado 

Stef 


23800 23600 
3325 3150 

9950 9915 


313 


mn wic AGA 
10910 10880 Alla Laval 
13300 13395 Aseo 
4250 4199 Adro 
58750 57778 Anas COPCO 
10160 9980 jpr wen 
46150 45200 Electrolux; 

ITS ITS Ericsson 

1O52SO1QSS0O E5«Mle 

124000123475 HandettemMn 
7270 2250 Pharmacia 
4800 6679 SaobJconta 
3065 3003 SondtfOt 
WM01Q2250 Skiraka 
850 848 SKF 

2689 2749 SwedWtMotCh 
1450 1465 Volvo 

i4S» Atta e/ wteridew index : Ml jo 

3505 3475 PrewlPm : 3BU8 


129 

a 

% 

282 

237 

NjO. 

180 

nS 

437 

90 






t« 


MIB current Index : M38 
PiewleusiMn 




Pauis 


Air LkiukJe 
AlstfnmAH. 
AvDassoull 
Banco! re 
B,c 

Bangrain 

sssr 

Carrefaur 

Charoeur* 

Club Med 

Dartr 

Dume* 

euwtouHalfM 

Eutwel 

Gen Eaux 

Hocbette 

LofuraeCop 

Uwrand 

Lasteur 

KWeM. 

Atoned 

Metro 

Merlin. 

MMBtBB 

MaatHaniMssv 

SSL 

Pernod Ric 

Perrier 

Peugeot 

K55» 

irr-Min 

junon 

Skis Rnsslgnol 
Tti nta c a n 
Thomson CSF 
Total 


ACI 
ANZ 
585 I BMP 

306SI jn | loooa InvIUe 


1110 


, * p Boueawvnle 

CesnemaiM 

«4 coin 

=_ Cemoicn 

7 g 1740 CRA 
778 775 C5R . 

awo Dunlop , 

23SD 2365 Elders lx! 

SS I ci Australia 
,5« ,SS Mooednn 
^ ] S5 MIM 

SS MW 

ns Nat Aust Bank 
774 774 nows Cora 

,5S* N Broken Hill 

'*** ’S* Base (don 

sn QM cogi Trim 
2142 7142 stnha 

«" Jjg TholS* Morion 
?4 J5 33*5 western MUnlne 
™ WtelPBC Bonking 

2155 2125 

I3K 1”? AH Oftde twjM jadex : 93746 
wao if7i | Previous : 93728 
BOSS MU 
737 730 

W4 1 

mil TOm 


TO 

494.90 

413 


1545 

'S 


290 , 

315 


23ZW 23U0 


Asell index :2»J04 
Prevlom:3»J8 
CAC rndrxj2&P6 
Previous: 22328 


... . Akm 
1530 [ Asohl Cnem 
1 Asohl cfon 
Bonk ol Tokyo 
Britteeslone 
Canon 
r^nVi 
Cl loti 

Dal Ntppen Print 
Dahwa Hawse 
Dotwa Sec ur Hies 
Fanuc . 

Full Bank 


28 

790 

so 

930 


1500 t5M 

.443 449 

1060 1080 

jj 8 

IX to 


Full Photo 
Fullisu 
Hitartil 
Hitachi Coble 
Hondo 

Japan Air Unes 
Kalima 

Kansol Power ' 
KtnnsaM Steel 

Kirin Brewery 

Komatsu 
Kubota 
KVocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bonk 
Mitsubishi Cham 
MltsubMd Else 

Ml tsubtabi Heavy 

MllmbbnJ Cora 
Mlhwiand Co 
MlhnjJraJhl 

Mitsumi 

NEC 

NGK insulators 
NlkkoSec 
Nippon Kooafcu 
Nippon on 
Nippon Steal 
Nippon Yusan 
Nissan 
Nomura Sac 
Olympus 
Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sharp 

Shlmoai 

Shine tsu Owmlcat 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Cnem 
Sumitomo Marina 
Sumitomo Metal 

Tobel Cara 

TaUMMarln* 

Taksdo Cham ■ 

TDK 

Tallin 

Tokta Marine 
Tokyo Eloc. Power 
Toapan Printing 
Toray Ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
VamolcM Sec 


Canadian stoats an AP 


S 564I 

T35D | 


1180 AMI Prat 
MIDOApnlca E 
laODApra ladA 
9353 Alt Enargy 
: 2000 Alto Nat 

423 AMoma st 


SOOArpusCpr 

1B0O5 Aten I f 

1378 BP Canada 

, 71615 Bank BC 

| 3 02516 Bonk NS 

79250 Barrfck o 
iao Baton A r 
IBU6 Bonmm R 
SMBratorno 
logo BrnmafaM 
350 Brando m 
, 8488BCFP 
259325 BC Res 
13448 BC Phom 
SOOBnmswk 
nWBwWCm 
8*45 CAE 
moCadFrv 
11210 CmnpeoD r 
9igc Nor West 
soocpackn 
7391 Can Trast . 
500 C Tana 
4CGE . 

467*4 Cl Bk Cara 
39013 CTT/VA* 
225 C Util B .. 
4300 Caro 


121 . 28* 21 + 3k 

« t : 

VSYt 28 20 — Vt 

SUp UK 1416 
MW 71V, 

S22 21W 21 Ilk— 3k 

SUM m IM 
SIWb 113k 113k 
«3£ 33 37W+36 

190 176 loTZ* 

17J *¥U±X 

$1© 93k 10 — r 

45» »» »» . 

SZflft 2B& ^3fc 

w-s?" BL, 

^S.raS i»+vS 
smfr 28 an+ yy 

*24 V. 2M 24 — £ 
Off, 34ft 34K+ K 
S4W 41 41W4- Vs 

SIWl 13M» 131k 
«2 « .83 -3Vb 


SWs 31ft ft 


K3h TV. 


KNOCasakaR 
I 500 Conran A 
>13*00 Ci-ovmx 
| ^gn tear Was 
■ lSTWDoonDov . 
I §460 Denison A| 


SW W4 . _ 

sink -icft ink + ft 

SMH Mft 16ft— to 

& 3* J*-* 
kt + * 
2?- » 
mg Itti lir^”^ 


list 15' 


SUle T4M 3 l it k ■ £ 

raw TOk 2»_C 

s ^ a a + » 

& !?“-* 

ssv.ai.ste 

S73k 7V. 7te— 3k 
JRH i ,7ta 7te-3k 


NBgaj/m . latex: rnaji 
Prevtaw* : 1272444 
New index : mzje 

Previo u s : WIUI 


•4AD Denison A p 

IsitoDanlsaaBf 
rueoDawton 
13849Dirtnsn Af 
WDbmne 
1*453 Dofcooa 
I 100 Donohue 
3700 Du Pont A 




C EKlfHMJ | x 


Zurich 


Adlo 

Aiusubse 
Autophort . 
Bonk Lao ■ 
Brown Bovori 


sSSE 1 — 

2300 Emoo 




.100 Fad | 
29D0FT 


SSiSB* 


cradllj. 

Elect rawatr 
HoWarttonh 
inierdluount 

Jacob Su chord 

Jaimafl 


Landis Gvr 
Moevtmptck 


eatla 

oar ftkotvB 
Roche Botov 
Sander 
ScMndlar 
Subir 
Survalilam 
Swissalr 
SBC 

..Ratowrano 
5wbs Vatksbonk 
Union Bank 


Swtsi Ratosurona ou 2410 
1870 1865 
4375 4388 
Wflnlarthur 5460 5488 

Zurich in 2N» 2530 


SBC redox: mss 
Previous 1 5ZMS 


HA: not Quoted; NJL: not 
avollobla; xd: tur-dMdetid. 


juaur 

(s^g^ssr 

SOOGtorottw 
“gsoidcoral 
“Googiw 
*oo Graft G 
«0OL ^rart 

jgcraytvid 

2542HcMiar 

MUgHayeaD 

fflSWoi 

‘"saisr 

toainuu 

BjMfir 

8450 Janrwrt 
lUKatoerH 
m Kerr Add 
2670 Lobott 

.“SSfotfCm 
lOnOLoeoM 
1375 Lotto* Co 

6440Lunwok> 

1060 MUHA 

14900 Ml CC- 
3800 Moon HA 


«23k 22ft Etk 
«t«k Mk 14ft- ft 
S83k Sft Bft 

Slfi % ^ 

Site Tte t VE> 

SIS If 18 +S 

g* U + S 

m 20 ft aow 
*13 . 22V 12 S— ft 
»4 te-wte 

|w5 mS 
^ 3 nk 3 *L + J. 

* Jts 


1+3* 


112ft 


at- 5 


„ a-B** 
% Wt Sr S 

f rpi 

js jxt 

■p r m 
iH 1 

S22 ZTK Try; _ i4L 

Sft^S 420 


»3 -3i 


1 37BM^1t , mof 
14100 Mariana E 
45700 Mobon A f 


JISOAtotaonB^ 


wSKSSS. 1 
SSSnSS? 1 

89212 Nva AHA f 
, 14« Noweca W 
10 S746N«MWBPA 
CT Oolcwood 
WWOehawaAt 
41140 Roc W Atrtn 
2235 Pamour 
~ p 



MWjSharrat 

sm' 

auss^ 

IS*- - 

meSJESSW'A 

81976 Tack Bf 
Tex Con 


38® TEJ5 90 + 

SUM U18H+ g 
SS . im ; 17 V- " s 
*3.. 28' -at 
H7ft MMftinft—ft 
nfli lttk ttfe+jS.. 
jm m «»+■» ... vi 

S2Bft » -2B;+«t ' ke 
-so. -48 ••'.49-;+-r . f -*« 

snt ' 7 ft nk- a. 

niv 30ft ' aiv+n*. 

nflh .15 • »; 

yote 23, 23teJ- ft. 

|vij 

£3 . 1* T3L -+ » 


SfeT-UtJ* 

a i*v 

be s' 3 

toff**-* 

IRTB nf ] ,■ 

ibgaxa 



to ch: 
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call 

^ wnaiioa i 
a b'Dct 


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SU 

S14ft 

fg* * 

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«a-.* 

400 40*:-. 


i ^ouiofth, 

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TSCSMhidac 


ss«8?ai 

Sa m fn 

,&SSk ft., 


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'Tus m 

sisr 

mrcS mSSL^ 

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TOM fiSra&«iiK8htete. 


totoswekladex: 


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.j-O’.l.'.l : 






































: 7 . 



Page 15 


firing divorced from .war and.pdfi- 


•. International Bmtid Tribune 
: .7;,ipNTON - Approaching tht ST 

^-tririr^ihe plaveralrro^fSf 0 * * k* 8 " - L a n 8 nH g ff pro Wans aside, there 
falOW wh “ umsi * a world of difference between 

s^sis- 


robm. 
vthey .jne-anjoadt in 
Vtwyr international 


waist up, Ardflcs nor Villa, in their ffisiinc- 
lyer, using tive ways, needed to be to 3 d to get"-, 
ite shots as "stack in.** Bahrainis are different.' 
.u • “Hay are shy," observes the 

f man agcr^ “and don't Hie calKngjor 

. jMOgKrwrth foreign ways, the balL They don’t befieve rn tai- 

Hng either, bat stand back and... 
watch the other lot play." 

Halfway through Budtiruftaw’s 
two-year, £250,000 tax-free mission 
in the Gulf, there are sigostbaiiris 


■ r uuk. motivatioiul factor 
!' 'OTfof Ins hands. That moanenl 

flUGHES 

[ ' come an Ihnzsday, when Butwam law 

\ rt^oins-its df art to tod a place in perhaps, br ibe way he intends: 
th ein^h e 3986- Wodd Cnp finals. Four players wound up hos{Hiat 
^ may be ized after one match, and- three 
r quaking inits boots; Keith Barton- national. squad players were ban- 
sawy The Englishman who man- ned for fiw. f^«* fi ghting - ' 

J- . agtes B ahrajp Football Association Bmkindiaw, honest as the day is 

I . affairs, may suspect his presence in long, is pricking the egos of arro- 
f ,;thejlrcssnig. room is somewhat in- ganf stars; a bit too straightforward 
| trusata. 7 - for some English directors, be has 

j " Strange times for a man wh o bag four m»tr 4 w« to get the bal*** 0 ^ 

■ ; coasted Newcastle United and Tot- tight surprise himself, as will 
[' teaham Hotspur to En glish and as the ftnhrafmg, by helping them 
finopeaitCiqj finals five times. His toward soccers Mecca, 
final pregmne words bade then It means prompting men to tran- 

’fe^hTbeno problem: “Get; stack scend themselves. And once file 
: jflL.-. Attack the buggers — ■ and 
. try to. do it with a bit of style." . 

In Bahrain on Thursday (and in 
. Damascus on Sept. 20 for the re- 


players cross the line onto the 
pitch, assistance has to came from 
elsewhere. 

Who knows? The major frame- 


! n 


1 1 


ft i 
II ! 


* 2 


turn leg), the message might prove work, of Muslim He, which posed 
a Ktfle harder to get across. so many obstacles to the outsider’s 

Buxionahaw, growing accus- organization, might be the guiding 
htaud to his pliers* ways, now light 

knows that he has to {nek Ins mo- If Bahrain beats Syria (at popur 

mcnJs.Gettingthementofacehim latioaodds of 32to I), Buriu nsfaaw 
and not Mecca is a matter of tim- might be among the converted, 
mg. After aD, Dave Mackay, once a 

Getting them to the field co time rousing Tottenham winghaH, has 
needs calculation and understand- - dgfct years* experience of soccer in 
ing. “They’re Muslims who -pray the desert Thc coadi of Kuwait is 
five times a day,” he «rpfan«, “so convinced that . .‘Tdamic rdigkm 
training' and- matches nave to be provid e s the lads with_a peace of 
fitted around prayers. During mind which can significantly ea- 
Ramadan, maizes were Tricking bang* their onfield performances.’ 
off at two in the morning." ' Since Syrians are also.among the 

From the start, Burkrnshaw faithful, it should prove quite a 
knew that a blunt, determined match. 

help the Bahnrinis 
catch up with the rest of the Galt 
never mind the wodd. “When 1 
arrived, they all looked, this same," 
he admits. “Now Fvesoitedoat’the 
AbduHahs from theMustaphas.” • • byOv Surf From n. pacha 

, The sorting process, and itsxich . 4 ; „ __ Af _ hulf-dav 

K^™npp^»cnm<>. 


Nystrom Surprises 


By John Feinsccin 

Washington Pori Service 

NEW YORK. — There will be a 
ri fwc for Boris Becker and John 
McEnroe, but it won't be at the 
1985 U.S. Open tennis champion- 

dream match dissolved 
Monday night when Joakim Ny- 
strean, who twice served for the 
match against Becker at Wimble- 
don only to lose in five sets, 
knocked the West German out of 
the open, 6-3, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4. 

In Tuesday's early play, Yannick 
Noah, the No. 7 seed, moved into 
the men's quarterfinals and Hana 
Mandlikova. seeded third, gained 
the women's semifinals. 

Noah defeated Jay Berger, a 
wild-card amateur, 6-7, 6-2, 6-3 6-1. 
Mandlikova, a runner-up here in 
1980 and 1982, downed No. 7 Hel- 
ena Sokova, 7-6 (7-4). 

Nystrom's stunning, three-hour 
victory could hardly have been 
more dramatic. In the final two 
garnet, be had six match points. In 


the court. The last two sets I played 
much better, but it was not good 
enough-” 

Nystrom advanced to a Wednes- 
day quarterfinal match against the 
top-seeded McEnroe, who defeated 
Tomas Smid, 6-3, 7-5, 6-2. in a 
match notable only because McEn- 
roe was as tempestuous as he has 
been all year. 

Monday’s other men's winners 
were Swales Anders Jarryd and 
Mats Wilander. The sixth-seeded 
Jarryd saved three set points in the 

U.S. OPEN TENNIS 

first set and five in the second be- 
fore batting No. 13 Ttm Mayotte, 
7-6 (7-2), 7-6 (7-2). 6-4. Wilander, 
seeded third, overcame a 1-5 deficit 
in a Fust-set tie breaker and saved 
two set points in the third set in 
de featin g Greg Holmes, 7-6 (7-5), 


about. If I play my best, I don't 
expect to lose.'" The next-match 
reference was to Becker. 

But Becker, dearly nervous at 
the start, knew it would be tough: 
Nystrom, 22, returns serve about as 
wdl as anyone in the game. _ 

Nystrom broke Becker in the 
match's second game and served 
out to win the set. The second set 
was similar to the first, but this 
tiiw Nystrom's break came late. 
With Becker serving at 4-5, Ny- 
strom slammed a backhand winner 
to get to set point. Becker then 
watched helplessly as yet another 
hard two-hander flew past him. 

Becker lost his first service of the 
third set, and it seemed Nystrom 
would end the match quickly. But 
Becker immediately broke back — 
at love — and slowly climbed back. 

Rfdrffr broke again in the set's 
10th game, when Nystrom, leading 
40-15, made two errors for deuce 


a day. No. 2 Martina Navratilova 

thc last game, the eighth-seeded (who had lost only six games in the 
had Nystrom, (M0 — with first three rounds) had a 90- minute 


'JJ __ 

Some of the top women seeds and Becker snapped a backhand 
were finally being tested. On Mon- volley for set pomt. On set pomt. 


three chances to even the set But 
be couldn't convert 
Finally, on his sixth chance, Nys- 
trom did. The No. 10 seed hit a 
topspin forehand that landed on 
thebasdine. 


struggle in eliminating No. 13 Ca- 
tarina Lindqvist, 6-4, 7-5. 

In other fourth-round match 


Becker came in behind a backhand 
and Nystrom netted a b ac kh and. 

Opening the fourth set, Becker 
again lost ms serve, and this time he 
never caught up. There were 
chances. Alter Becker saved three 


MandHkova dropped a set before ®°re 
beating unseated Kathy Jordan, break point m lhe thnti game. But 
and both Sukova and fifth-sMded ^ newrf atadd^nd^nMd 
Claudia Kohde-Kilscb survived Nystrom b f|^ 


hit the line, Becker/who had been ingNo.^ 12 Wendy Turnbull, 5-7, 7- 

fighting back tears for much of the 5, 6-2, and Sukova defeating No. 15 as he began servmgthe inext game. 

set, dropped his racket in Carting Bassett, 4-6, 7-6, 7-5. Yet^ even m MabugD. 

Si Advancing in straight sets were ScrvinB^ 3-5, he facoi four mauh 

The usually placid Nystrom Nal Chris Evert Lloyd, No. 4 points. He 
leaped in the air and shook his fist Pam Shriver and No. 7 Zina Gam- one with an ^ trao *™ 1 J ai J r 
^Wimbledon, I played the best son. w backhand volley that Nystrom 

But all that was ridesbow. Mon- 
day was the day McEnroe and 
Becker were to be formally paired. 

McEnroe’s tennis was hot — he 
shot to a 4-0 lead over Smid — and 



the best 

grass-court «i»t4h of my life and be 
still beat me,” Nystrom said. “Be- 
cause of that, this really feels great. 
1 think Boris felt the pressure. It 


s ss aa mmi wmm 

for much of the matdi, vras a truly he W l U.o c^t) a 

After roliingpast Smid, McEn- forehand and got it back, but 


couldn't run down. 

When he came up with two ser- 
vice winners to take the game , the 
crowd was screaming in amaze- 
ment. Moments later, when Becker 


“You have to say well done to ~ ... 

Joaky" said the Wimbledon cham- roe said: Trn glad to get to the 
pion. “He played gpod tennis. For point where my next match is the 

Boris Becker, 17: Playing in anguish, fighting back tears, the first two sets, I wasn’t even on one everyone has been g 


Th* taocksod flora 


couldn't scramble to his feet in time 
to run down Nystrom’s volley. 
Soil was match point No. 5; this 


Joakim Nystrom 

‘. . . This really feels great * 


time Becker slapped a reaching 
backhand valley for a winner. Nys- 
trom shook his head. 

Nystrom got a sixth match point 
with a backhand volley that hit the 
net and rolled in for a winner. Then 
he hit the forehand to the baseline; 
Becker stared and the crowd 
groaned for a second before rising 
to applaud the efforts of both men. 


Hernandez Leads Mets in Rout 

he said. “That shows great burgh. Mike Brown hit a three-run 


SCOREBOARD 


Tennis 


Transition 


Baseball 


ny. Bahraini scores jdayers ate am- . 
atcnis who place Allah, family rita-* 
at and their jobs as ^stt^epts, 
coastguards and customs o ffici a l s ■ 


form, and ifs no coincidence that 
the New York Mets are, too. 

" “WhenVyour No. 3 hittcrldis, rbI in the ninth. 

before the pursuit of arooind leath- yoa nsmffly wul Whm he doesn t, Beds 4 Canfinab 1: In Sl Louis, 
ec windbag. Dave Pinker hit a two-run homer in 

er Dave Johnspn^ after Hernandez ^ ^ ^ and doubled and 

********* 

aSi’, ™ saarwih a tald 

basebmxbophdup 

He had, to tweak payers ®w*y. two-run heme run, Ray Knight hit 
fi^even^didi trmnii^ andae . ^ thie&nm homer and had four 
stunned the small Bahraini, soccer runs batted in and Darryl Straw- 


up, ne said, mar suows g»csii mnpi, mue diwu ur a uu«-.uu 

movement when you can do that all homer, his first for the Pirates since L.5« UpCD lieSflllS 
night long. There was only one he bang acquired in a trade from the 
was unsuccessful with and that was California Angels, and Steve Kemp 
Gang Nettles, and he's a high-ball went 3-for-4 and drove in a run to 
hitter anyway." Nettles had two help defeat Atlanta. Brown’s home 
. . nm capped a four-run first off Rick 

Mahler. 


BASEBALL 


Tim 


Royals 3, White Sox h In the 
. “ Kansas Qty, 

I lhr r ar di Tom Mwsouri, Hal McRae and Geoige 
downed the . Brett hit bases-empty home runs to 

^tite^Sf^Chkago-Win- 
SSs WMaA Gubicza pitched out of 

out at LOUIS un bases-loaded situations m the the 


MKN 

SlMlBA Foorlli Raand 
Anders Jarryd 16), Swadon, 

Mayotte 1131. U.S- 7-4 (7-M. 7-4 (7-B. 4-4. 

joakim Nystrom {101. Sweden, drt. Boris 
Becker (SI. west Germany. M.M.HW 
Mots wnander (3), Sweden, do I. Gtao 
Holmes. U3L WHWM- 
Yannick Nooti C7). Franco. def.Jov Berner, 
UA 6-7. 4-X W 4-1. 

DeoMes O f In Pu ata 
ion Finch. and Robert Seauss. U A doL, 
Mictioot Mortonson. Denmark, and Hens Si- 
tnonssofv S w eden , 6-4. 7-5. 6-2. 


third and sixth, and Dan Quisen- 


shnt 

McGee homered with two outs in 

the sewotkPele Rage ™t 0-fo r3 ^ rKordcd ^ 31a ,]« 

fig 31 STSSng th= last four outs. 

Cijy is 


jsesamis. 

Wodd Qm matches ware then a 
full year off, and anyway, what 
chance had Bahrain, with a popular 


run 


with one out in the 11th as Los 
Angeles broke a four-game losing 
streak. 


as 

iif 

•H 

V« 




,0** 


rt 

it 


fraternity (altof 750 adult parties- berry had three RBIs. 
pants) by axing the national c^>- The Mets now trail St Louis by a 

Hernandez had driven iii cwly 
two runs in 19 games until Sin- 
day’s contest in San Francisco. He 

.... „ began that (me cm the bench but • . r , armWi* uritb capp*» uk upimug <» ^ 

tmdeni? “Logically, °°» pmch-hil a game- winning home asco, Lms Tmq Folev crushed the Tigers. With his 

sbsssss *=!.•£- * 2-5J2 

hard for it.” - V. „ “The break helped nm more 
the nwtMgre (or captain, as than physically,” Heraan- 

Balnradni players hmst m calling ^ said “It’s a Irag year. Tve gotta 
Hm)TO prepared to set the exam- believe the off-day hriped me. It 
pie. With RoNn Stepney, a reseave your head. When you hit the 

trainer from Tottenham, and ball like yen know you should, you 
George McAIfister, a physiothera- ^ (bat feefing back and it all falls 
piat, -- Burkirishaw began from 5^ place.” 
scratch, to fonri youth, junior and \Vmner Sid Fernandez gave up 
■fenioir squads. . <mjy five hits in his iirat oanq Mctc 

- He drew up a plan for a proper pine tins season, walking four bat- 
» stricture of 16gam«a».- tears and striking out ax. He™ 

He persuaded the Bahrain FA struck : out 145 batters m 130 m- 
zwifrh ; from, artificial . to grass . riinss this vear. 


without starters WDHe Wilsrai (cen- 
ter field), Frank White (second 
base) and Jim Sandberg (catcher). 

Angels 11, Tigers 1: In Detroit, 
Jack Howefl’s two-run single trig- 
gered a nine-run fourth and George 

two qualifiers from 35 Asian con- bSam'that one on the bench but ■ . 5 ^nS/wiSi capped the uprising as California 

Danefl Evans became the seventh 
straight vjet^^tajtCT bi mmor-league history to 

Eit 30 or S for three different 
the disabled |«d teams. Evans hU 41 with Atlanta in 

'fnsrsrirsss; 1973 *** 30 f ° r ^ Fnmdsc ° m 

of the hits off the four-time w .qb^. u_ ABen, Bobby 

YoragAwarf wjmffwreWoop- 

os and erne of the three runs was mA Frank 


WOMANS SINGLES 
Fourth Round 

Pom Sfarivcr «). UJS- dri. Alyelo Moultan. 
UA. 6-1 4-4. 

Hana Mandlikova (3). CxndKnkwakla. dot 
Kathy Jordan, UA- 7-6. 3-4. 4-L 
Zina Garrison (4). US.6H. Kata GomoarT. 
U JL 41 4-1 _ 

Helena Suhova (7). CwcJwlovakla. dal. 
Carlins Bassett l IS], Canada, 4^7-4 14-41. 7-5. 

Chris Evert Lloyd (1), U*. dal. RuUn 
Whits. US. 41 44. 

Staff! Graf til). WWt Germany, dsf. I*en- 
ueta Maleeva (8). Bulgaria. 41 41 


Mandlikova dot Sukova. 7-4 t7-4), 7-5. 


Golf 


PGA Leaders 


s* ted l«t nric u. Cleveland this 


switch from artificial 

pftthei' He sap^it to — . - J 

approaw- He ^ O-for-3, was hy 

aJBt ^feAlEsterwrated^ like nawms Fernandez. “He threw rastballs tqi 
.bp - wbatt Tie called “the and got guys to miss and pop them 
worst injury situation I have ever 

. Bahrain gave him a budget of ■ £! 
ipiffion ($L38 ntiffion) — dneto 
feedrn the Gulf, where the Saudis, 
the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait 
ind even Qatar sink Wffion* «Jp 
theroort: Bahrain’s annual budget, 
for example, is equal to the sum 
Kuwait lawrims on eaA cfob. 

"But Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and 
Qatar are already out of the Wodd 

UAE is Hkriy to be Bah- 

om’s.final quaBfying oK>onent if 
itrfTmrnatesSyria. - . 

That contest -is one-of a.ne^f 
Hiesastiblfr force ag^t tte obdu- 

rate object,, for -T* 3 * MgE 

' goals, Syria’s tactic «>pears 

'ttSS*.. 

based an Bahrain s 7-4 
i-away triumph over 

South Yemen , and Syria s i-v 
— - 1 — : two 


cars and 

unearned. . „ . 

Astros 7, Cubs 2: In Chicago, 

Eric Bullock drove in two runs wi th 
his first major-league hit, a tie- 

breajdj^ double in the i fifoh_to ^ ^ ^ seventh to 

^ark Houstrai to ltsffithtm^g keep Toronto four games atop the 
m “ JWJSfKiAiS Easton Division. Dave Stieb, who 


Jackson, Dave Kingman and Frank 
Robinson. 

Blue Jays 3, Imfians 2: In Toron- 
to, Lloyd Moseby went 2-fcff-4 and 
drove in the winniiig run with a 


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-- 1 •jf 
a.-.- 


A 


dock in 
{bars was 
writ, bend 

iw 2 Wodd pq> 

LuS of the draw also 
^atoam when Iriui, mi ea^er ap- 
poomt; forfeited ralher Aan^ 

cot FIFA’s dictate to play hrane 
uwrfdhfw outside its war »». 
^Smg of war, BurkmslJ^ 
EtfiLfarogn adventure crate ogjj* 

S®sago, when be 

te SaMo ArdDes 

«ibTatteribwn*-fdtes^ 

with.. them despite the Falkland 

War. : - 

-'Sower, to Burionsbaw, is 



Triple- A affiliate in Tteson, Amo- ^ saa ^ eA to stid) 

S. 4: m n» Sgjzr*** 1 - 3 *™ 

Yankees 8, Mariners 7: In New 
Yoik, Dave Winfidd drove in four 
runs, three with a homer, as the 
Yankees raced to a 7-0 lead and 
ttum hung on to beat Seattle. Win- 
field's 22d home nm of the year put 
the Hd an a four-run first and Ken 
Griffey's two-run single sparked a 
three-run second. Bat against Ron 
Guidry, the Mariners sowed twice 
in the fourth (on Dave Henderson’s 
11th homer of the season), once in 
the fifth and chased Guidry with 
three sixth-inning runs that made it 
7-6. Dave Righetti gave up an RBI 
angle to Bob Kearney in the ninth 
before striking out Jack Perconte to 
end the game. 

Orioles 12, A’s 4: In Baltimore, 
Cal Ripken, who had gone 15 
gnmi-s without hitting a home run, 
hit two of them and drove in six 
r rmc as the Orioles pounded Oak- 
land. Ripken, who had not ho- 
rnered in 15 games, hit a t hreo-n m 
glin t amid a seven- run outburst in 
the second inning and added a two- 
run h»mer in the eighth. 

Red Sox It Rangers 2: In Ar- 
lington, Texas, Mike Easier hit his 
ynvifl grand-slam home run in 
three days and BQl Buckner drove 
in three runs with f oar hits to key a 
that buried Texas. 


EARNINGS 

1. Curtis Str aw 

2. Roy Floyd 

3. Loony Wodklns 

4. Colvin Pacta 
A Corny Pavln 

6. Robot MaltMo 

7. Marie CMoora 

8. Hal Sutton 
*. Crato Stadior 
W. Bamhard Umocr 
11. Joay SJndolar 
1Z Tom Klto 
U. Fuzzy ZoaMr 

SCORING 

1. Ray Floyd. 78JZ Z Caray Pavln, 7058. 3. 

Don Poolov,7U4Z 4. Larry Mb*,70ja S, Lormy 

wodkktfl. 7075. 6. Calvtn P^te,7070.7.Roa*r 
Maltblo.7lL818.Jatin Mahofloy.7aJ».*.Cn>M 
Slodter, 71JHL 111. Scott Simpson. 71IU. 
AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 
1. Andy Bean. 279.0. 2. Grag Norman. 277^1 
Prod Couples, 3744. 4 Mac CGradv. 37SA 5. 
Joey Sfndelar. 275A 6. Tom Watson. 27A4. 7. 
Bill Gtassoa. 3740. A Grao TwIbob. 3717. 9. 
Sandy Lvta. 273A 10. Dm PotiL 27X1. 
DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
1, Oalvtn Peats, J0LZ David Edwards, 3W. 

SrJacfc nwmar, J58.4,MIka Raid, -753.5. Lorry 

Nelson. J48. 6. DouB Tawtb J43. 7, Hula I ndn 
and David Frost 779.9. AtUn MHier._738. 10, 
Two ned wtm JR 

GREENS IN REGULATION 
1. Bruce Lletzke. J1 A Z Jack Nkddaue. JW. 
i Catvtn Potto. JD4. 4, Jolm Mohanav. 702. 5. 
Coray Pavln. JOL 4. Dow TowrtL Don Pobl 
and Robot M altbla. Mf. 9. Andy Boon. JK. lft 

Two lied with 4H. 

AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND 
1, Bobby damson. 3USL Z Croto Stadior. 
2&70L X Frank Connor. 28J71..A Roy Flovd, 
7877.5. Mlko Done kt.MBX A Morris Hot oNky . 
28JL 7. Gears* Bums. 28SA X Ken Grson. 
29JB1. ». while Wood. 2SJI7. W. Throo Hod wllti 
39J09. 

PERCENTAGE OF SUB-PAR HOLES 
1, Crais Stadior. J13. Z Laimv Wodklns. JOB. 
3, Tom Watson and Ray Floyd. 306. X Tea- 
Chum Own. 302.6, Larry Natan and Mac 
OTSrody. 300. A Hol Sutton. .188. 7. Andy Boon 

and Bamhard Longor. .177. 

EAGLES 

1 , Corny Pavta. 12. Z Jooy Slndoiar and Phil- 
ip BkKkmor, IL A Lomr Rlnkorond David 
Graham It 4. 51* Hod with 9. 

BIRDIES 

1 , jow SlmMor. 344. Z Hal Sutton. 32L Z 
Wcytio Grady. 323. A Roy Floyd. 314. & Roaor 
MottMe. 311. A Lnrrv Mta and Brett Upper, 
300.1 CmlB Slodlorond Corov Pavln, 790. 1Z 
Scott Simpson, 29V 


LOS ANGELES— RBCDllod GHborio Roves, 
cotcher ; SM Broom, first uea amarHOUtflaM- 
er, and Frwiklln Stubbs and Ralph Bryant. 

outfloldarfc from Albuauorauo otlha Poetflc 

Coast LeoBuo. Recalled Jas4 Gannlaz. out- 
flchter, from 5ai Antonio of Itto Texas 
Lean ue. Purchased lha contract ol Sh» Podar- 
sm outtMder. from Albuauoniue. 

PITTSBURGH— Obtained RJ. Reynolds, 
outfielder, on waivers from Los Angeles as 
am of the three players to be named In the 
trade tor InfloMer Blit Madtock. 

- FOOTBALL - 
Notional Football Lame 
ATLANTA- W a iv ed Bob Hotly, nuorter- 
hack; Emile Harry, wide receiver; Wendell 
Cason, defensive back, and Sylvester stamps, 
running back. Ptacod Joe PeHasrbd. centor- 
fluant Oh the Murad reserve list 
BUFFALO— Waived Tom Multadv. tight 
end. Placed Bo Ham* and Jomee Soowrietit, 
Hncbodcerb on Mured reserved. 

CHICAGO— Waived Bob Thomas. Ptace- 
Mcfcer; Jim Morrisey, llnebockor; Anthony 

Hutchison, running back, ond HonryWadilar. 
defensive tackle. 

Cl NON NAT I— Waived Steve AWddlow. 
nnebocker; Pete Koch, detenstveend; Lee 
Davis and Sean Thomas, eomerbock*. and 
Keith Lester, tuht end. 

CLEVELAND — Waived Mike Pruitt, run- 
nme bock; DvrtBM Walker, wide receiver; 
Aaron Brown. Itnebocker.- DJL Hoooard. <U- 
leralve back, and Scott Botan. offensive line- 

"'oALJLAS— Waived Ron Springs, running 
back; DurM Harris and Ron Jenklno. wide 
receivers; Scott Strastwroor, llitaacker.and 
Carl Howard and Ricky Easman, comer- 
hncKt 

DENVER— Cut Scott stnnkavage. quarter- 
back,- Jamas Kevhm. otfensWo tackle; Dor- 
ron Comeaux, linebacker; RogerJackeen.de- 
fwypvebodwmd Chris Brewer, running back. 

DETROIT— Waived Ken Jenkins. ixiiF 
bock; John Wttkowiki, auarterbock. and 
Larry Lee. guard. Placed william FrtzmU. 
safety, and James Johnson Rnobockar, on 
htlurod reeerve. 

GREEN BAY— waived Ray Crouse, iw 
nine back, Eric Wilson. HnAariutr. aM Ken 
Stills, defensive back. Signed Buford Jordcn. 
running back. 

HOUSTON— Placed Dwavne CratchneM. 
running back, and Steve Bryant, wide receiv- 
er. on m lured reserve. Waived Tod d S*a - 
bough. Unebacker. and Jemma Foriw.dofon- 
Uve and. 

INDIANAPOLIS— Waived Tracy Portm- 
end Waddell Smith, wfde receivers; Steve 
Hatnowav, linebacker; Ricky Smith, defen- 
sive bock; Dallas Cameron, nose toefct*. and 

Ellis Gardner, offensive lineman. Placed 
Mark Klrehner. offensive tackle, on Mured 


Monday’s line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Omndeod 110 MO 80S— 4 18 ■ 

Toronto I" 1*> w *~ 1 *2 

Wordle. RuMe (81 mid Willard; Slfeb, Henke 
(B) and Whitt. W— Sttob, 1Z». Lr-Wordfe.44. 
Sv — Henke («. HR— Toronto, lorg 14). 
CoHfomla «1 7W 181—11 M 1 

Detroit 088 108 1M- 1 If 

Slaton. Moore (M and Boone; To nano, 1^- 
pax (4), Cory (51. O’Neal IS). Hernando* 1*) 

and Parrish. Castilla C71. W — Slaton.S-'Hl.L— 
T»iana.7-lX HRs— Callfornhv. Hendrick 12), 

Grich (f). Detroit, Evans (30). 

Mottle lee HI 801—7 M 0 

taw York 438 M0 io*— * n i 

wills. Mlrabetlo (2). Lamriui (7). Vonde 
Bora (7). Nunez (8) and Kgamev; Guldnr, 
Allen (4). Fisher (4). Righetti (Bland HassW. 
W— Guidry. T7-5L Lr— writs, 47. S«— Righetti. 
(24). HRs— Seattle. PJfewtterson (11). taw 
York, Winfield (22). 

Pfi lf fnod 018 JOB 080 4 0 2 

Bolt (more 178 MB Mu— 13 11 • 

John, McCarty raj.Athorfen (4). Kaiser II) 
and Tettleton; McGregor. Dixon (4) and Ray- 
ford. w— McGregor, 1WZ L— John. 44. Sv- 

Major League St andin gs 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet- GB 

Toronto 82 49 .626 — 

N«* Yort 71 52 fH 

Detroit 70 m liS 

Baltimore 68 60 -5TJ 12VV 

Boston 42 68 .477 WW 

Milwaukee 57 67 .441 Hb 

Cl ev Blond 47 84 059 35 

West Division 

California 74 57 Jj65 — 

Kansas City 70 58 -547 2V> 

Oakland 47 *4 JH 7 

Chicago 44 45 .494 7 

Seattle M Tl 458 M 

Minnesota 59 ” 

Texes 49 81 J77 24W 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pci. GB 

si. Louis 2 S -tS ■; 

New York 71 52 MO 1 

Montreal 71 51 ■*** ® 

Chicago 43 46 M 15W 

Phtlodetphla 43 66 MB 15W 


KANSAS CITY— waived Ken Kiwnor.nose 
tackle; Sandy OstackL quarterbodc; Scott 
AueGoffensIro nnemanand OirtsSmltti. full- 


Pittsburah 

w 

Los Angeles 

Cincinnati 
San Dingo 
Houston 
Atlanta 
San Francisco 


41 87 -320 37 


□bum (II. HRs — Oakland, Murphy 2 (18), 
Henderson (2). Baltimore, R token 2 (20). 
MHwatakee MOMOMl-1 7 0 

Minnesota 811 BM 12»— 4 M 1 

Coca nower.McClura (B) and Moare; Smith- 

son. Davis (8) and Salas. Loudmr m. w— 
Smrtthson, 13-11. L— Coconowor. 44. Sv-Do- 
uH (19), HRs— Minnesota. Teufel (8). Brun- 
araky (22). 

Bwttm 2M 1M 08—11 19 • 

Texas M2BMM0— 2 3 • 

Lollar, Clear (9) and Gadman,Sull1vim (9) ; 
Stewart, Welsh O). tales (4). Schmidt (9) and 
S knight, Brwmtner (9). W— Lollar. W L — 

S lewart. 0-4. HRs— Boston, Rico (23), Btuhrr 
116). Texas. McDowell (15). 

Chicago 001 DM 818—8 5 8 

Kansas City 810 2M 00*-3 7 0 

Neteon, Wshrmalsler (5) and Fisk; Gw 
bias, Outeenberry (8) and Qufak. W—Gu- 
Uao, 11-7. L— Nelson. 49. Sv— Outanhorry 
(31). HRs— Chicago, Walker (18). Kansas 
City. McRae 02). Brett (23). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Atlanta 200 HO 100-4 6 1’ 

F tt fe b o r gh 4H 0M Oita— S 12 8 

Mahler, Smith (7). Shlefcfe (0) and Bene- 
dict; Turned. Guanlc (7) and Pena. W— Tixv 
nelli 7-9. L-MMtter. 17-13. Sv— Gaoofe (3). 
HRs— Attantn. Washington 112). Pittsburgh. 
Brawn U). 

HOastan 828 8M 300-7 f 0 

fMfwg- 200 808 000—2 8 1 

Ryan, Dawtey IT). Karfeld (5). Smith (9) 
and Bailey; Bailor. Mm Id Ith IS). Brusriar (6). 
Sorensen (7), Frador (8) and Lake. J Davis 
(8). W-Dawtay. 3-Z L— Bailor. 04 HR— 
Houston, GJtavfs 112). 
pelladelpMa 821 8M 8M 1-9 « 8 

Sim Francisco oil 9SS 008 8 — * 6 2 

Caritan. Toliver (4), Tekutvo (7). Corman 

(8) . Shlpanofl (181 «md Virgin Blue, Minton 

(9) , Jeffcoat (101 and Brenty, Trovtno (9). W— 

Comm, 7-4. L-Jalfcoot. 0-Z Sv— SNpanoff 
Ol.HRs— Philadelphia, vtnrtl (17>,Schu (7). 
Cincinnati 881 802 818—4 9 8 

SL Loots 0M 880 184-1 0 0 

Browning. Franco 17) end Dlac: Andular. 
Worrell 17). Campbell (9) ond Nleta. W— 
Browning. 15-9. b— Andular. 204. Sv— Franco 
|9). HRs — Cincinnati, Parker 134). SL Louis. 
McGee 18). 

MCW York «8 BM 420-12 18 • 

so. Dleao IN BN 281-4 5 • 

Fernandas and carter ; Thurmond, DeLeon 
tU.Walter 14). Patterson (7).Oasaogo (91 and 
Kennedy. W— Fernando*. 44 L— Thurmond. 
44 HRs— San Dleao, Gwvm 15). taw York. 
Knight (6), Hernandez (10). 

3M 000 9«1 88-4 11 1 


75 

53 

J84 

_ 

LBS Aooefes 828 ON 0M ST— s 11 i 

49 

40 

535 

6W 

Schatzeder. Burke (A), Lucas (8). RMirdoa 

49 

61 

£31 

7 

(9) and Flteoeretd, Butero (9); Castfl la How- 

61 

48 

An 

14W 

ell (6},Nledanfuer 173. D to (ID) and Selosda. 

55 

74 

J26 

Wi 

W — Diaz. 4- 2. L— Reardon. 2-7. H R — Montreal. 

51 

78 

J95 

54V, 

Davison (15). 


UA. RAIDERS— Placed Sfefon Adorn*, de- 
fensive botfc on Mured reserve. Waived Dan 

Reeder, running back; Dwight Wheeler. <rt- 
tonsive Itoeman. and Gordon Jones, wkto re- 


Football 


siisss 

tSm* JS^iBiCiSSS 


19-hit attack _ 

With three hits, Wade Boggs raised CFL Standings 
his league-leading batting average 

^Twnis 6, Brewers 1: In Mmne- 
apoHs, Urn Teuf d drove in three 
runs with a angle and a home run 
and Tran Bnmansky added a two- 
run shot io power Minnesota past 
Milwaukee. The Brewers’ Ride 


Montreal 

Ottawa 

Toronto 

Hamilton 


Eastern Dtvtsloa 
W L 
5 3 
4 4 
3 5 
2 6 


Brit Omb 
Winnipeg 

Manning, celebrating his 31st Sl 
birthday, went 4-foc-4 with two cokwry 
doubles, in c l u di n g an RBI double 
in the ninth. (AT, UP!) 


T 

PF 

PA 

PIS 

o 

176 

150 

10 

» 

154 

213 

8 

a 

193 

2M 

6 

0 147 
Isln 

202 

4 


248 

124 

14 


232 

138 

12 


219 

-239 

■ 


m 

187 

• 


us 

248 

2 


MONDAY'S RESULTS 
Edmonton 34. Calaary 28 
Hamilton 19. Montreal 14 


MIAMI— Placed Joe Ptsardk. uucotw^ 
back, on the walvod-Murad lift. Waived John 
Chaslev, tight and; Vinca Heflin, wide receiv- 
er; Eddla HIIL running back, and Tom Taylor, 
offensive lineman. 

MINNESOTA— Cut Fred McNeill and Den- 
nis Fowlkes, lineba cke rs; Chortle Johnson, 
nose tackle; Tommy Hannon, safety; Rickey 
Young, running back; John Swobv earner- 
bade. <md Bob Brow, lloht end. Rnefened 
Cart Lee. eomerbo ck . 

NEW ENGLAND— Waived Audrey McMIf- 
llan. safety, and Ornanoe Weathers, wide re- 
ceiver. Placed Lester Williams, earn t ncklo; 
Ernest Glbeon,conierbacfc.and Ba Rablnsen, 
Hght end. an Inlurod reserve. 

N.v. GIANTS— waived Joe McLaughlin. 

nnebocker; Lorry Fleweri. safety.and Frank 

WHOM, defenstva toekto. Plaaed Lea Rouson. 
running back, end Damien Johnsarb offensive 
tackle, an Inland reserve. 

PHILADELPHIA— WoJvod Tran Arm- 
strong. Tony Woodruff. Rodney Goosbv and 
Its mart Harris, wide receiver*; Jeff Chris- 
tensen. Q ua rterback; Jan KlmmeL llnebotft- 
er; Steva Rogers, tackle, tout Lawrence Som- 
pleton. tight end. 

ST. LOUIS— Stoned Luis Sharpe, offensive 
tackle, to a four-year contract. Walvod Loo 
Nefsoa eafetv; Ramsey Dardar, defensive 
tackle; John Geode. I Mtt end; James Wed, 
Hnobnrfcrwvand Ricky Anderson, placeklekor, 

SAN FRANCISCO— Cut Dan Banz and Jeff 
Metier. Ilnebocfcers. ond MBceMormkl, Quar- 
terback. Pieced Allen Kennodv, romlne 
back, aid Tom Hobnoa, defensive back, on 
Inlury reserve. 

SAN DIEGO— Traded Earnest Jackson, 
running bock, to Philadelphia tar undtoctosed 
future draft choices. Traded Bobby Duck- 
worth, wide receiver, to the LA. Rams lor 
Gory KawaMdi offensive tackle, and an un- 
disclosed 1986 draft choice. Waived Broca 
MBtbtan.auarfertiack.and Kan Oaltoflar.of- 
fenstve lineman. Placed Shcaw Nelson, line- 
backer. and BUI Seananr, Offensive lineman, 
on Murod reserve. 

WASHINGTON— Tradtad Tory Ntxon, cop 
netback, to San FronCtoCO tor an uflAsdaud 

draft dtolcg. Traded Lorry KubkhUnobdCkor. 
to Buttato tar an undlsdoacd draff choice. 
Waived Bob# L a uf anoera , a u ortortxKk; ml 
choel Morton, runnfno badk. end Joe PtffllkiK 
wide receiver. 









’v J 


—Vi 







OBSERVER 

Roofer’s Comeuppance 


Accent Revolution: How Americans Tuck’ Today 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK - Roger the 
lOofer couldn’t believe it was 
happening. 

'Toss your roofing tools into the. 
bask of my car, then get in there 
and lie face down on the seat,” said 
Mr. Bulmer, pressing the gun 
against the roofer’s ribs to empha- 
size his seriousness. “We’re going 
for a little ride.” 

Climbing into the car, the roofer 
saw a body face down on due floor. 
“Ye gods and leaky shingles!" be 
cried. “You've got a body m here." 

That’s not a body,” said Mr. 
Bulmer. “That’s Palumbo the 
plumber” 

Feeling thoroughly kidnapped, 
the roofer and plumber could only 
lie silent, listening to the pounding 
of each other’s hearts as well as the 
pounding of a third heart, which 
seemed to come from behind the 
back sear. 


ton the mason at Mortarboard In- 
stitute. 

His marriage proposal had not 
sounded romantic. Tteba.” he had 
said, “don’t gel the idea I love 

you." 

T fed the same way, Roger " she 
had said, “buLlvejusi got to have a 
man I can answer the telephone for 
when people call up mad as hornets 
to ask if he's ever going to cock 
and finish that roofing job, or the 
plumbing, or the concrete miring.” 

“So you promise you'll always 
tdl them HI call them back?” 

“Only when you’ve got no inten- 
tion of raffing them bade." 

□ 


By William K. Stevens 

. New York Tima Soviet 
1 HILADELPHIA — It is 


“It's me, Milton the mason," 
said a muffled voice. “He’s got me 
locked in the trunk with my ma- 
son’s tools.” 

“He's going to kill us all” said 
Roger. 

“Worse than that,” said die 
plumber. Tve got a feeling he’s 
gang to make us finish the jobs we 
started at his bouse.” 


This dread sentence drew groans 
of despair from the roofer and the 
mason. Roger’s entire life passed 
before his eyes, and he could cot 
choke back a sob as he remembered 
his youthful triumphs at Roofing 
A&M. where he had taken honors 
in Leaving the Job Unfinished 101. 

He thought too of his wife, Reba, 
and of bow proud she was, when 
someone asked, “Just who do you 
think you are?” to reply, “I am 
Reba. wife to Roger the roofer.” 

He thought of the awe in the 
voices of strangers when they 
gasped, “Not that Roger the roofer 
who has roofed these 20 years past 


Now, captured by this madman 
Bulmer and borne relentlessly to- 
ward the Bulmer household, Roger 
the roofer saw no way to escape the 
ignominy of being forced to finish 
repairing Buhners leaky chimney 
flashing, a job be had started eight 
months ago. Could Reba have be- 
trayed him? 

Bulmer would have phoned, as 
usual in a rage, demanding as usu- 
al to know if Roger was “afraid to 
stand up and roof like a man.” 

Reba was supposed to reply, “He 
bad to go to Washington. Mr. 
Bulmer, for a big reroofing job on 
the Capitol dome ” But suppose 
there had been treachery in her 
heart. Might she not have told 
Bulmer the truth? “The only way 
you’re ever going to get that flash- 
ing fixed is if you get over here at 
dawn and take him at gunpoint." 

Reba couldn’t have done that. It 
was unlikely that Reba and Melva, 
the wife of Milton the mason, and 
Pearl, the wife of Palumbo the 
plumber, had sold their husbands 
out at the same time. 


a certain city on Chesapeake Bay 
call their hometown “BALLruh- 
mer.” Or that to Philadelphians 
their home state is “Fcnn-suh- 
VAY-nyub." 

Bostonians, of course, still 
pahk their lcahs in HAH-vehd 
Yahd. And some older New 
Yorkers stfll caD it TOY-tcc 
TOYD Street” 

Distinctive as such traditional 
shibboleths may be, however, lin- 
guists say they are being ugsti^ed 
by radical new variations in pro- 
nunciation that are causing the 
urban accents of the Northeast to 
become stronger and more diver- 
gent from one another. 

Soriolinguists, who examine 
the interaction between social 
processes and language, have 
been studying the evolution of 
such accents over the last 20 
years. Some of than suspect that 


lingu ists who are analyzing them 
by dectrraricaDy dissecting tape 
recordings of spontaneous 
speech. 

Recognized as a leader in this 
research is William Labov, a pro- 
fessor of linguistics at the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania who has con- 
ducted extensive studies in New 
York and Philadelphia. 

“The sound changes we are de- 
scribing can be very extreme,” 
Labov said, “but people don’t 


. ‘ Northern urban blacks, accord- 
ing to a number of studies, have 
developed a vernacular essential- 
ly uniform m all dries and sepa- 
rate from the local while speech 
patterns. 

Members of all ethnic and ra- 
cial groups, as they move out of 
thar local communities and rise 

adopt what Labov 

sion. network" or “standard" 

American English, commonly 


horn, metropolitan New York. 
Prinzivafli was acquitted. 

The New York City accent re- 
gion is particularly compact and 
concentrated, Labov said, and 
pronunciation there is evolving 
rapidly. Rarely, he said, do lin- 
guists hear young New Yorkers 
ay “TOY-tee TOYD” presum- 
ably because such pronunciation 
has bees so stigt"”!””! Labov 
said it might be expected that oth- 
er features of New York speech 


New York Gty and in northern 
and eastern New En g l and . 

The New York and Boston ac- 
cent s have historically diverged in 

adjusting the sound of the vowel 


beforeihe dumped R. For exam- 
ple, “nuclear* is pronounced 
NOO-klee-eh in Boston, but 
NOO-kke-uh in New York. . 

Now, say soriolinguists, a te- 
ther, extensive modification of 
vowd sounds is takingpIaceL lin- 
guists say it could presage A 
rha rip* in vowel pronunciation 
that may be as extreme as the one 
fhat took place in English from 
the late 15th to early 19th centu- 
ries, when the pronuncatian of 
“sane,” for example; changed 
from 8an to sen to sane. 

In the band of Northern cities 
stretching from Albany, New 
York, through 

has been a snnflar^evo^LtLoii, the 
studies have shown. 

“Locks.” for example, is be- 
coming lacks. “ Lunch” has 
evolved to launch, “talk” to tuck, 
“bit” to bet and “Debbie” to 
Dubbie. 

The short A has picked np a 
long E before it, a shift that has 
been adopted in every large 
Northeastern city to some extent. - 
The Boston accent uses it in every 
instance; in New York and Phila- 
delphia, it is used only with some 
words. In New Ymk, the A in cat, 
pack and bang is pronomiobd in 
the standard way, while 'cab is 
KEE-ab and bad is BEE-ad. ' 

“Fight” in Philndriphiahflg be- 
come FUH-eet, very dose- to the 
way it would be pronounced on . 
Neath Carolina’s Outer Banks. In 
Baltimore it is FAT,- as in the 

inlgnrl S mith In both 
Labov detects a Sonthem mflu- 
ence. ... - - ’ 

In mother si gnifican t develop- 
ment, the vowel sounds in cot and 
caught have merged in Boston 
and Pittsburgh, though not else- 
where in the region* to a sound 
somewhere in between. ■ 


Hie Diff e r e nce is Proto— i ce d 


A sample for present-day pronundatlona commonly heard in the white vernacular tfialects of 
each dty. Hyphenated words shook! be pronounced rapkfty and smoothly to reproduce as 
dosety 88 possftie the real sound. s 


Maw Yarik C8y 


the changes are part of a historic 
realignment in the pronunciation 
of Fn gHch 

The new accents are so strong 
that it is possible to hear a sen- 
tence like this in Philadelphia: 

“He left his HAY-us in North- 
east FuI-UFF-yuh and got into 
ins core to GEH-oh DAY-un to 
Sbpring GOR-den Shtreet tike he 


— BEE-Jb Beer- — BE£-dti . . PMwfafeMa — FuHfFF-yub Down— DAY-on 

*r— NOOWeMh Npcfaf— MO OW u m W Balance — Bounce Shorn — Sun 

-Kah Car— Km •: Ahmya— Oya Food — Feud 

— BEY-eh Fade — Pa*k ‘ Start — SMraat RgW — Fat 

-Pal* Una — Loin' Gtad — GLE&ad ; BrtWnora— BALL-rtwner 

I— Gahd Bag — 8S« • • Care— Kour 

-BO£-ed Crt) — KEE-rt> Car — Kore . j—-. ■ 

. — . ■ Com— CAH-nl Down — DAY-un _ / •■•««». 1 « 

iW'l ■ P«a— Ftehg Go— QEH^h .*Vr | V J £X 

\ On— Aim House— HAV-w A V / fiJJH 



pys does. Buz on the way he got 
into a FUH-eet with another driv- 
er. It was BEE-ad.” 

Translation: “He left his house 
in Northeast Philadelphia and got 
into his car to go down to Spring 
Garden Street like he always 
does. But on the way begot into a 
fight with another driver. It was 
bad.” 

New Ycakets have developed 
some pronunciations so peculiar 
to their city that only people who 
grow up with chon can get them 
right every time. What outsider, 
for example, would know that 
that “frog" is frahg, but “dog” is 
doo-AWG; that “on" is ahn , but 
“off” is oo-AWF? 


without once finishing a roof job?” 
Of course he couldn’t have done 


Of course he couldn't have done 
it without Reba. Theirs had not 
been a love match. He had needed a 
wife to answer the telephone when 
people called about some roof 
work. The need for such a wife had 
been impressed upon him in his 
early education, just as it had been 
impressed upon Palumbo the 
plumber at the United States 
Plumbing Academy and upon MD- 


The truth was known that eve- 
ning after the three workmen were 
forced to finish their jobs at 
Buhner’s, and then were tarred, 
feathered and ridden home on a 
rail by fellow workmen who felt 
their trades had been disgraced. At 
home, the three found the notes 
their wives had left. 

Reba’s, like the other two. said, 
“After that crazy Bulmer threat- 
ened to get me convicted for tele- 
phone peijury, I figured the fun 
was all over, so why not go some- 
place new and start looting far 
love?” 


Sowar: Unh/avttrotPannsttnaU Ungulate, ut-vmeiy 


really recognize how extreme they 

are because we only use phonetics 
in part to understand meaning." 


spoken in the West by while 
members of all social classes. 


Tha r-hw Yc*t Thi 


In other words, said Roger 
Shay, a Georgetown University 
linguist, people tend to concen- 
trate on content rather than pro- 
nunciation. 


Snce colonial days, the Norlh- 
st has presented the United Sta- 


cast has presented the United Sta- 
tes’s tidiest variety of accents. 
Variations tend to wash out the 
farther west one goes. 


Investigators have found that 
the diangps begin in the white 
lower middle class and are usually 


adopted first by women ana 
young people. Labov said be be- 
lieved that young people who 
stayed in their rammumnn. tend- 
ed to intensify the local accent as 
a way of reinforcing local identity 
and a sense of belonging. Shuy 
said women were more sensitive 
to social interaction generally and 
therefore to nuances of pronunci- 
ation. 


New York Tuna Service 


Many of these pronunciations, 
like some in Philadelphia, are be- 
lieved to have o riginated after 
World War H. The differences are 
perceived subtly or not at all in 
day-to-day life, the linguists say. 
But they are often startling to 


In May, Labov was a witness at 
the trial of a Long native 
who was charged with telephon- 
ing bomb threats to the Pan 
American World Airways office 
in Los Angeles. Some of the 
threats were recorded and a clerk 
in the office identified the defen- 
dant, Paul Prinzivalll a Pan Am 
cargo handler, as the caller. La- 
bov, testifying for the defense, 
said the taped voice’s accent 
could be traced to an area within 
a 75-mQe radius of Boston. The 
defendant’s accent, he said, came 


might wither away, too, juft as 
traditional rural dialects have di- 
minished in the face of the mass 
media and “standard” speech. 

“But. nothing could be farther 
from the case; -he wrote in a pa- 
per. The New York City dialect 
is moving further along its evolu- 
tionary path with undimmished 
vigor; and tins is true tor any 
number of metropolitan dia- 
lects.” . 

Most of these, he said, occur in 
the Northeast and Middle West 
Labov said similar rfinngK ap- 
peared to be taking place ixi the 
South but had not been extensive- 
ly studied. 




Many traditional features of 
white Northeastern accents,' im- 
planted in the colonial period, are 
familiar. Chief may 

be the dropping of terminal R’s in 


Ibis merger, which has also 
spread to the West, has tended to 
cause canfoson. One researcher 
said a woman told him that her 
unde stocked, or perhaps stalked, 
pheasants. He had to ask which 
she meant 


probably been „ _ _ 
ever since.” Once tagged by jour 
nalisls as the haughtiest and; few 
popular member of ^the.royalfitn- 
Sy, the princess has since earned*: 
reputation for hard workasheadirf 
the Save the Children Fkm& 
BBC said that during the S: 
program, 3,000 people tried 
phone in, 202 questions were: 
logged and the princess had time it* 
answer 25. ' - 


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