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Pobl iahed With The New York Times and The Washington Post 



T¥ ^Sj^ PARIS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1985 


essional Leaders 
• Public Wants Trade 



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ESTABLISHED 1887 


Wen V. Roberts 

Timet Service 

^WASHINGTON — Congresao- 
w™*w.finqi both major periiti- 
Miparbes have warned that rising 
j.-BBhfic: alarm over jobs lost to inn 
Pfrs&o U cause Congress to defy 
'-.° Ptjcs irieat Ronald ' Reagan's veto 
mwafTand adopt restrictive trade 
hgudatioB tins fall 
'^"There’s going to be some kind 
,Ci: ttade-bm," said Thomas P. 

Jt, the speaker of the 
■nnjaStiSQS Representatives, at a 
ja*ws conference Wednesday as the 
House, xetoroed from its summer 
-break.--- 

.< Representative Dick Cheney of 
-. Wyoming, a member of the Repub- 
lican leadership, agreed with Mr. 
GTsfeflfc a Massachusetts Demo- 
crat,’ saying; “I think members are 
-aim ing back with strong feelings 
Wat ifis.jjeople out there are de- 
rSfewEng actum on the trade defi- 
cit" 

f - While trade problems dommaiffd 
the discusaon Wednesday on Capi- 
tbJ iiiO, returning lawmakers « dd 
that Confess seemed headed for a 
confrontation with the White 
Jiousean several critical issues, 
ranging from tax revision to mili- 
tary speadmg to farm prices, 
f Afr. Cheney, a warm supporter 
of Mr. Reagan, warned the admin- 
istration that it was increasingly 



[Mr. Speakes cited Gallup Poll 
data showing that Mr. Reagan's 
popularity has risen to 65 percent 
from 62 percent in January, com- 
pared to an average 13-point drop 
over the same period for four for- 
mer presidents who won re-election 
since World War II. 

[“He didn’t get to 65 points with 
a song, a dance and nice smile," 
Mr. Speakes said. “He got there 
because cumulative acceptance of 
his program is deep and wide- 
spread. 1 ' 

Mr. Reagan has denounced most 
proposals to restrict imports and 
threatened to veto any of them that 
reach his desk. He argues that they 
amount to “protectionist" legisla- 
tion that would backfire against 
America’s economy by inviting re- 
taliation from U.S. trading part- 
ners. 

But with the trade deficit threat- 
ening to reach $160 billion this 
year, many members of Congress 
say that the president’s position is 
large agrees with the administra- increasingly unpopular with their 
tiotfs priorities." mnsrttiwnt*. 


Violence Spreads 
To White Areas 
In South Africa 


Police in an armored rehide examining a burning track in a suburb of Cape Towel The 
truck was set on fire by angry youths after they attended a rally at a high school. 


Cam Pimi 

Thomas P. O’Neill Jr. 


Representative Byron L. Dor- 
gan, a Democrat of North Dakota 
said, “People like the president, but 
they don't like what be stands for." 

[Larry Speakes, the White House 
spokesman, stressed Mr. Reagan’s 
personal popularity in opinion 


constituents. 

“They don't like the attitude of 
the president of the United States," 
Mr. O'Neill said. ‘They’re upset 
because the president doesn't give a 
damn.” 

Senator Robert J. Dole, the ma- 
jority leader, expects some form of 
trade legislation to be offered as an 


- __ polls to make a case that congres- . - 

«»tof stop with Congress. T think sional Republicans will profit more amendment later this month when 
itjwoald be a mistake,” he said, “for politically by following Mr. Rea- ^ debates a bill raising the 
Stem to assume that the enormous gan than by challenging him. The national debt limit, 
popularity of die president is some- Washington Post reported Dale Tate, Mr. Dole's spokes- 
how a reflection that thecountiy at Wednesday. (Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 

ff.S. Will Reuse Questions in Geneva 
To Explore New Gorbachev Proposals 


By Walter Pirtois 

Washington Pott Service 

WASHINGTON— UR negoti- 
ators will return to the Geneva 
arms talks this month to explore 
Jthe promise by Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev of “radical proposals" to re- 
duce strategic nudear arms in re-' 
turn for limits cm President Ronald 
Ragan's Strategic Defense Initia- ' pHng it to a limit on total explosive 

*:■“ — —*if : nffieinlc T^av ^ife- — -J***— — *- 


talked about reductions of up to 25 
percent, but it has refused to elabo- 
rate. Soviet officials also have hint- 
ed, but left uncertain, that they 
would apply the tinrits to warheads 
as well as launchers. 

. The United States has renewed 
an earlier proposal to reduce strate- 
gic warheads by 33 percent, cou- 


When the talks reconvene Sept 
19, the iXS. negotiators will have 
questions about two areas brought 
up by the Soviet leader in his Time 
magazine -interview published .this 
week and at a meeting Tuesday in 
Moscow with eight U.S. senators': 

• What types of reductions in 
strategic weapons? 

^ • Would the reductions amply 
both to launchers and warheads? 

Until now. the Kremlin has 


power pernritted, -.either side in 
'hod-based miaaleKThiyproptKal 
» designed to prevent one side 
from having the ability to destroy 
the other's - missile force. 

■" Another question is to determine 
what exactly Mr. Gorbachev meant 
when he said he would agree to 
permit “fundamental science" re- 
search on space technology up to, 
but not including, the design stage 
when “models or mockups or test 
samples” of weapons are tested in 
the field. 


Businessman Is on Trial 
In Duping of CIA Agents 

By Robot lindsey ■ Rewaid not only mesmerized inves- 
■New fork 7 liner Service tore with promises of a 26-percem 

HONOLULU t— -A retired offi- annual return on their mvatmems 
oer of the US. Central Intelligence «»* also deceived the CIA and 
Agency’s clandestine service has many of its officers, 
told, in tears, how he persuaded his 
86-year-old mother, who was blind 
and disabled, to invest most of her 
savings in the business ventures of 
Ronald R. Rewald. 

Mr. Rewald, a 41 -year-old Ho- 
nolulu businessman, is being tried 
in U.S. District Court here on 98 
Jijunts of fraud, pajury and tax money. 

Mr. Rewald’ s lawyers assert that 


At least five and perhaps as 
many as a dozen intelligence offi- 
cers appear to have invested and 
lost hundreds of thousands of dol- 
lars with Mr. Rewald, and thepros- 
ecutors contend that he exploited a 
connection with the agency to per- 
suade other investors to give him 


evaaoa. •« p 

- T don't want to appear as if rm 

a patsy," John G Kindsdu, the 
former CIA agent, testified this 
week, acknowledging that his 
mother had lost more than 
$100,000 after giving her savings to 
Mr. Rewald. “But sometimes the 
head follows the heart.” 

-Prosecutors say. that Mr. 
Rewald, described by one of ms 


he never intended to defraud any- 
one and that be was a patriot who 
was used and abandoned by the 
CIA — “a spy left our in the cold," 
in (he wards of one of Us lawyers. 

The jury trial began Aug. 7 and is 
expected to last two more months. 

Following is an outline of the 
case the government has presented 


In a study released in April, the 
Pentagon said it believed that the 
1972 treaty limiting anti-ballistic 
missiles would nevertheless permit 
field tests of “experimental devices 
to demonstrate technical feasibility 
and gather data prior to reaching 
the stage of prototype.” 

UiL officials continue to warn 
that Mr. Gorbachev’s statements 
are only propaganda until they are 
presented in a serious form. They 
also say that the Soviet Union is 
using the American press to present 
its case while refusing Mr. Reagan 
and other UJL officials access to 
the Soviet press. 

“What’s needed is for the Soviets 
to translate their many public 
statements into actual negotiating 
proposals in Geneva," said a State 
Department spokesman, Charles 
E. Redman. 

Mr. Redman said that Mr. Gor- 
bachev’s statements could be inter- 
preted to mean that the proposals 
for reductions of strategic weapons 
would come only after U.S. agree- 
mcnl to Hunt research into a space- 
based missile defense system, 
meaning conditions before negotia- 
tion. 

Until Mr. Gorbachev made his 
statements, the Soviet negotiators 
had maintained at Geneva that 
they wanted to bar all activity lead- 
ing to a space-based missile defense 
system. 

By leaving open testing until a 
country created “models and 
mockups” of weapons, be “leaves a 
lot of room for wiggle" for both 
sides to test outside the laboratory, 
an official said Wednesday. Anoth- 
er official pointed out that the Sovi- 
et Union probably wanted some 
leeway for its own space program. 

U.S. officials also want details 
on the Soviet proposal for reduc- 
tions in strategic weapons. 

At the last round of the Geneva 
talks, the Soviet delegates floated 
the idea of a percentage limit for 
each type of strategic delivery sys- 
tem: bombs, submarine missiles 
and land-bared missiles. 

“If the offer is sweet enough," an 
official said of Mr. Gorbachev’s 
“the question 



A fireman leaving the offices of Renault, France's state-owned auto maker, Thursday after 
four bomb attacks in Paris aimed at companies that have had dealings with South Africa. 


The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG — Black 
and mixed-race youths burled gas- 
oline bombs and stones at homes of 
whites in the suburbs of Cape 
Town and East London, police said 
Thursday. 

It marked the first time this year 
that racial unrest spread to white 
areas. Two youths were injured 
when someone inside one of the 
bouses opened fire, police said. 

[In Washington, President Ron- 
ald Reagan was scheduled to meet 
with advisers Thursday for a review 
of administration policy toward 
South Africa. Officials are seeking 
alternatives to a potentially damag- 
ing confrontation with Congress 
over economic sanctions, adminis- 
tration officials told The Washing- 
ton Post.] 

The Stale Department accused 
the South African police Thursday 
of using “excessive force” to main- 
tain order. 

“The use of excessive violence 
has contributed to the increased 
level of violence, said Bernard 
Kalb, a spokesman. “Violence in 
South Africa is at such a stage that 
use of force is unfortunately more 
and more common. These acts 
must stop." 

The South African government Kxffipc 

said Thursday that any economic JyUoCtj 

sanctions imposed agstinsl South 
Africa would retard reforms aimed 
at moving away from apartheid 
and hurt neighboring black na- 
tions. 

“The choice is between sanctions 
on the one hand and political, so- 
cial and economic progress on the 
other," Louis M. Net a deputy for- 
eign minister, said at a press con- 
ference in Pretoria. 

T want to point out to you and 
to produce incontrovertible evi- 


dence that it is impossible for the 
United States to impose punitive 
measures against South Africa 
only. They will be imposing these 
measures against the whole of 
southern Africa," Mr. Nel said. 

Many of South Africa's neigh- 
bors trade openly with the white- 
run nation while attacking apart- 
heid. 

In the latest developments in the 
violence, about 60 youths of mixed 
race shattered windows of a home 
in the white Windsor Park district 
of Cape Town late Wednesday, and 
at least one person opened fire 
from behind shattered windows. 
Two youths were wounded, police 
said. 

Police said two homes were dam- 
aged in an attack by about 50 
blacks in Amaiinda, a white suburb 
of East London, 550 miles (890 
kilometers) from Cape Town. 

The leader of the white Conser- 

(Coo tinned on Page 2, CoL 3) 


Report Says 
U.S. May Use 


Guatemala 
Agrees to 
Price Freeze 


By Stephen Kinzer 

Weir York Timet Sernee 

GUATEMALA CITY — After a 
week of intensifying street violence, 
the Guatemalan government has 
agreed to freeze prices of basic 
goods and to rescind an unpopular 
increase in bus fares. 

The chief of state, General Oscar 
Humberto Mejia Victores, an- 
nounced the decision Wednesday 
after a cabinet meeting. He said be 
also would raise the salaries of pub- 
lic employees and urge private em- 
ployers to follow suit. 

The campus of Guatemala's na- 
tional university remained sealed 
off and police officers guarded at 
least two high schools Wednesday 
after all public primary and sec- 
ondary schools were dosed. A po- 
lice spokesman said the officers 
had been ordered to prevent stu- 
dents from barricading themselves 
inside the buildings. 

General Mejia Victores declared 
that violence and political tension 
would not change the government’s 
plan to hold national elections in 
November. “The electoral process 
will culminate on Jan. 14 of next 
year with the inauguration of a gov- 
ernment chosen in completely free 
elections." he said. 

Guatemala City remained tense 
after the government decided to 
rescind the bus fare increase, but 
violence appeared to have subsided 
somewhat. 

In recent days, mobs bave 
burned cars and buses, destroyed 



.ess 


To Resume Regional Peace Talks 


By Karen DeYoung 

Washington Peat Service 

LUANDA Angola — President 
Jos* Eduardo dos Santos of Angola 
has accused the United States of 
helping to sabotage regional peace 
efforts, but he appeared to leave 
the door open for a resumption of 
talks with Washington and Pretoria 
on security in southern Africa. 

In a carefully worded address to 
delegates of the Noaaligned Move- 
ment meeting, Mr. dos Santos criti- 
cized South Africa on Wednesday 
for not giving practical sign s" of a 
serious intent to negotiate a region- 
al peace settlement 

At the same time, the Marxist 
leader called on U.S. public opin- 
ion to oppose the recent congres- 
sional action lifting a ban on Amer- 
ican aid to Angolan guerrillas 
battling his government 

Mr. dos Samos’s comments fol- 
lowed similar statements Monday 
by Vice Foreign Minister Vanando 
die Moura that ended nearly two 
months of official Angolan silence 
on the issue. Luanda broke off (he 
talks with Washington and Pretoria 
to protest (he July 9 vote in Con- 
gress. 

The statements were interpreted 
by diplomats and others as an indi- 
cation that Angola would like to 
revive the peace process provided a 
way could be found for the United 
States and South Africa to accept 
responsibility for the breakdown. 

According to a noaaligned diplo- 
mat, the Angolans “really don’t 
have much 



IWWBiUt . uiv AVAnraifl^RMAtC “the mieStlOtl UU1UWU wuo uiu u uau, uvauum 

lawyers as someone who b as the ^ based on court documents , whether the president is stores and other businesses and 
-abffity to crarvw sincerity, swm- ^ testimony: ureoared tolbandon P his baby," Juried stones at policemen. On 

died hundreds of investors out or Mr. Rewald, a native of Wiscon- JneHSig the space-based missile Monday and Tuesday, crowds 


S22 million. 

. The prosecutors charge that Mr. 


(Continued on Page 3, CoL 1) defense system. 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


Cxvrvr a Prta 

Jos & Eduardo dos Santos 

The diplomat and others also 
noted that Mr. dos Samos had de- 
parted in his speech from his stan- 
dard pro-Soviet formulation on 
several foreign policy issues. 

Although theoretically neutral, 
Cuba and Vietnam have strong 
military and foreign policy ties to 
the Soviet Union. There had been 
curiosity as to how Mr. dos San- 
tos’s speech would deal with such 
subjects as Af ghanistan and Cam- 
bodia. 

On the Soviet occupation of Al- 
ice” other than to ghanistan, for example, be merely 
seek some face-saving way out of noted “the outstanding mediation 
the impasse that has brought re- role by the United Nations secre- 
gjonal peace efforts virtually back tary-general warranting continued 
to where they were when they be- confidence" with “the view to find- 
gan in 1981. mg a just and equitable solution." 


The move away from Soviet po- 
sitions coincides with an apparent 
desire by the currently dominant 
■ {action in the Angolan govern- 
ment, led by Mir. doe Santos, to 
address major economic and mili- 
tary problems by broadening its 
range of contacts. 

Participation in the UJS.-led re- 
gional peace talks were seen as pan 
of that effort. 

For four a half years, the Reagan 
administration has tried to negoti- 
ate a comprehensive agreement 
that would lead to the withdrawal 
of an estimated 25,000 Cuban 
troops in Angola, along with inde- 
pendence of neighboring South- 
West Africa, also known as Namib- 
ia, from South African control 
A breakthrough in the talks 
came last year, when Angola and 
Smith Africa agreed to form a joint 
military commission that would 
monitor the withdrawal of Pre- 


By Bernard Gwen zm an 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Saudi Ara- 
bia has said it will allow U.S. mili- 
tary forces to use iu bases in the 
event of Soviet “aggression" or if it 
is unable to handle a Gulf crisis on 
its own, according to a confidential 
.Reagan administration report. 

The disclosure came in a 17-page 
summary of a policy study on arms 
sales to Middle Eastern countries. 
The summary, classified as secret, 
has been conveyed to members of 
Congress in recent weeks by Rich- 
ard W. Murphy, assistant secretary 
of state for Near Eastern and South 
Asian affairs. 

The White House ordered the 
policy study last winter to justify 
the expected sale of advanced mili- 
tary equipment to Saudi Arabia 
and Jordan this fall, according to 
Reagan administration officials. 
The report which was assembled 
largely by the State Department 
was approved by President Ronald 
Reagan in early July, the officials 
said. 

The summary was made avail- 
able to The New York Tunes by a 
congressional source who is critical 
of the administration’s policy. 

The United States has been urg- 
ing Saudi Arabia for several years 
to allow American use of their in- 
stallations for training and other 
purposes, but the Saudis have re- 
fused. 

The policy summary marks the 
first time that the Reagan adminis- 
tration has disclosed Saudi Ara- 
bia's willingness to have its bases 
used against the Russians or in case 
of a major flare-up in the Gulf, a 
State Department official said. But 
the Saudis still refuse to plan joint- 
ly with the United Stales for such 


toria's troops from southern Ango- 
la. The South Africans have staged contingencies, officials said, 
frequent raids into Angola, arguing * n — - 

they were In pursuit of Namibian 
guerrillas of the South-West Afri- 
can People’s Organization. 

Last fall, further progress was 
seen when Angola proposed a time- 
table for Cuban withdrawal that 
the United States described as 
flawed, but a step forward. 

Angola’s position is that since 
that time it has been badly used by 
both the United States mid South 
Africa. The South African with- 
drawal scheduled last year to be 
completed within 30 days, was not 
accomplished until last April. 

Then, in May, Angolan forces 
killed two South African comman- 
dos in the northern province of 

(Continued mi Page 2, CoL 6) 


A State Department official said 
that the Saudis first conveyed their 
willingness to allow use of the bases 
last year, when Iran threatened to 
attack Saudi oil fields in retaliation 
for Iraqi raids ou Iranian-bound oil 
tankers. The Saudis have never ac- 
knowledged the decision publicly. 

Israel and its supporters in Con- 
gress have opposed arms sales to 
Jordan and Saudi Arabia in the 
absence of new peace negotiations. 
The White House requested the 
study to show that such sales were 
vital to U.S. security interests. 

The administration is reviewing 
its Middle East policy in order to 
decide whether to go ahead with 
the sales and whether to offer a new 

(Gootinued on Pbge 4, CoL 7) 


THE U.S. AIDS EPIDEMIC 


TOTAL NUMBER INFECTED 


CASES AND DEATHS 


P. 


1OA0O 


12.736 AIDS 
as of Aug. 26, 1985 

About 120.000 
AIDS- related 
compitx cases 


9,000 




m 


8.000 


7,000 


6.000 


Estimates represent ttw upp« ranges 
of COCs protect"*' 15 ' 


5.000 


4.000 


3.000 


TflO 


1 1 1 ill 


Tte Wiub esWnfa* 


2,000 

~ T" ?h .i ii. i u,,i II. ,i i» T 

‘■ST’ '84 ’85 '86 

; Number el'new cases m the halt-year 
■ Number of dead among cases 
$ Estimated ^rure cases 

Deaths ace included w the same 
lime period m which the disease was 
diaffiosed, and not necessarily when 
Hie victim died. 


AIDS Spreading Slowly From Primary Risk Groups 


By Boyce Rcnsberger 
and Crisrinc Russell 

Wathingion Peat Service 

WASHINGTON — The disease AIDS 
has breached the confines at the few risk 
groups most often associated with it — male 
homosexuals, drug abusers and those infect- 
ed by contaminated blood or blood prod- 
ucts. 

There are now nearly a thousand AIDS 
victims in the United states alone who be- 
long to none of the chief risk groups, of the 
more than 12,000 cases known there to dato 

New research suggests that acquired im- 
mune deficiency syndrome may be transmit- 
ted in more ways than originally bdieved, 
and that it may infect more tissues in the 
body than previously realized. 

Moreover, earlier assumptions that only 
about 10 percent of those exposed to the 
AIDS virus would contract the fatal disease 
are now being questioned. Some researches 
now talk of an AIDS “time bomb,” citing 
worries that a substantially higher propor- 


tion of those exposed could become ill in 
later years. 

There is some good news from the labora- 
tories where AIDS is being studied, however. 
Researchers are testing on monkeys a proto- 
type vaccine for which they have high hopes; 


can homosexual men, whose sexual activities 
encouraged rapid spread. For them, a New 
York physician said, it is already a “catastro- 
phe” that will decimate their numbers. But 
they were never the only victims. 

Now it is clear that in other countries. 


'Given enough time and heterosexual contact, this virus 
will move gradually into all parts of the population if we 
don t do Something. National Cancer Institute researcher 


if ultimately successful in humans, it could 
prevent future infections of AIDS virus, 
though tt will do no good for the hundreds of 
.thousands already infected. 

One thing is dear, researchers say: AIDS 
is not just a disease of male homosexuals. It 
is essentially a sexually transmitted disease, 
the only one that is almost invariably fatal 
that can be caught and passed on by persons 
of either sex. 

AIDS was first identified among Ameri- 


chiefly in Africa, it is a heterosexual disease; 
about half the victims are women. In several 
African nations it appears to be spreading 
rapidly, as it is in the United States, although 
precise figures are not known. Contact with 
prostitutes is a common factor in many Afri- 
can cases. 

In the United States and Europe, the num- 
ber of cases of AIDS is doubling each year. 
US. government experts expea this rate of 
growth to continue, which would mqyn 


about 17,000 new American cases in 1986, 
bringing the U.S. total to about 35JOOO by the 
end of next year. 

In Europe, the World Health Organization 
reported in August, 178 new cases were re- 
ported in 17 countries during the first three 
months of this year, bringing the number of 
known cases there to 940. 

But those suffering from AIDS itself are 
only pari of the picture. For every victim, 
ibere are five to 10 more people who suffer 
from a less severe form of the disease that is 
not fatal and 50 to 100 others who have been 
infected with the AIDS virus but show no 
symptoms — 600,000 to 1.2 million in the 
United States by some calculations. 

No one knows how far or fast the epidemic 
will spread. 

Dr. Robert Gallo, a National Cancer In- 
stitute researcher who was a discoverer of the 
AIDS virus, said: “I think that, given enough 
time and enough heterosexual contact with 
infected people, that this virus is going to 
move gradually and steadily into all parts of 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 


INSIDE 

■ The UJL labor movement 
averted a split over the issue of 
state funds for ballots. Page 3. 

■ Comparable worth suffered a 
setback in a U.S. court. Page 3. 

■ Honduran sokfiers opened 
fire in a UN refugee earn 
ing two persons. 

■ Kim Dae Jintg is watched 

closely by government agents in 
South Korea. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Elders KL LUL, an Austra- 
lian company, is seeking part- 
ners to help it buy Allied-Lyons 
PLC. for $2J billion. Page 13. 

WEEKEND 

■ The Susan behind “Desper- 
ately Seeking Susan,” a new 
film, is neither desperate nor 

seeking . 






1 

i 







Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1985 






U.K. Labor 
Movement 
Averts Split 
Over Funds 




Roam 

BLACKPOOL, England — The 
British labor movement readied a 
compromise Thursday and averted 
what threatened to be the worst 
split in its ! 17-year history. The 
dispute involved government funds 
for union ballots. 

The Trades Union Congress, or 
the TUC,. which groups 10 million 
unionists, announced the agree- 
ment after a day of emergency 
meetings Wednesday. The dispute 
had come to a head over the threat- 
ened expulsion of the engineers 
itni'nn, which has a milli on mem- 
bers. 

It was headed off when TUC 
chiefs agreed to delay until Novem- 
ber any move to expel the engineers 



Kuwaiti Ship Seized by Iran; 
Cargo for Iraq Is Confiscated 


WORLD BJUErs 


TEHRAN — Iran reported on news agency reported Thursday. 
Wednesday the seizure of a Kn- The carp? was not described 


wait! ship near the Strait of Hor- Iraq is an owner of the United 


muz and the confiscation of cargo Arab Shipping Co. with the govem- 
bo und for Iraq, its enemy in the ments_ of Kuwait, Saudi A rabi a, 


liiiiii 


five-year Gulf war. Bahrain, Qatar and me united 

Iran's state new agency quoted Arab Emirates, 
a maritime official as saying that Hie company spokesman said 
the container ship Al-Wattyah, that the Al-Wattyah was on a 
which has a Japanese crew, was scheduled nm from the eastern sea- 


cargo is rafeen ashore, the Iranian raids on Iran’s ofl facility at FTharg 
news agency reported Thursday. Island, The Washington Post 
The cargo was not described quoted U.S. nffiriaic as saying. \ 
Iraq is an owner of the United [Iraq sad ^ p^nes bombed 
Arab Shipping Co. with the govern- Khar g Tclon,* apm, T TihttAw Rrtl- 
ments of Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, tetsreperted from Baghdad. AmD- 
Babram, Qatar and the United itary spokesman said the objective 


Sakharovs Absent From Gorki Home 

SAaiagagattsaes*? 

has lived in West Gennany smcetBefeiMt l^n 
wittobwilS dtoririp in 1981, saidThfltMr.Sakhamv^ta^ehad 
for more than three . w e da irad t hat-tebome- 


Bj 


1<U —to 


Arao emirates. was to h i nder Iranian efforts to . 

Hie company spokesman said repair dam age and extinguish 
that the AJ-Wattyah was on a fires.] 


and deserted. He said that Ms 

Sble sources but would not elaborate. HeaJsosaid that aSowttga^ ; 


boarded by the Iranian Navy late board of the United States to the 


Tfe Washington Post article said 
that the Iraqi planes came in so 


QATAR \ 




Wednesday and diverted to Iran. It Gulf with a load of 444 containers, high and fast in two recent raids 
was the third Kuwaiti-registered Its last call was the Sandi Arabian that their bombs apparently fell 
vessel seized by Iran in intonation- port of Jeddah on the Red Sea, he into the water, 
al waters in 14 months. said, and it was bound for Dubai in The cautious bomb runs came in 

In Kuwait, a spokesman far the the United Arab Emirates, Dam- contrast to the raids Aug. 15 and 
United Arab Shipping Co. said that man in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Ang. 25, officials said, when about 
the co mpany’s step was carrying a Bahrain. a dozen bombers flew in low and 

normal commercial cargo, and fur- -j^e Al-Muharraq and its virtually destroyed a T-shaped a3- 
ther asserted that it carried no car- 35^0 crew, seized in June, were pumping complex cm the eastern 
go related to the Iran-lraq war. bdd at Iran’s port of Bandar Abbas side of KhanLlhat failed to reduce 


Norman Willis 


The cautious bomb runs came m 


union had givm ground after defy- 
ing tile TUC by accepting govern- 
ment funds for union ballots. 


The general-secretary of the 
TUC, Norman Willis, said any 
move to suspend or expel the engi- 
neers for cooperating with the la- 
bor taws of Prime Minister Marga- 
ret Thatcher's Conservative 


SAUDI 

ARABIA 

EM RATES 


UWftD'-'A 


^usually stood across thestreet fcpm the Jim 

**5* Sakharov, 64* was bamshaLta Gorki in. I980 tgr thc-SaVieJ 
authorities. Video film that rcacbed the West in July ‘showed^fc ■ 

^ • « * -A-J hmAi hffwr iMlflnfr A ifVi ‘(ntrain 


man in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Ang. 25, said, when about 

Bahrain. a dozen bombas flew in low and 


[ em rates , ,S SSTZA k- nnderooine medical treatment Mo Kopdcv akasaid^t^^fe: 

1 * wr Bonner's mother, Ruth, who fives in Boston and ceJe^edfire^r 

birthday on Aug. 1$, had not rccdvcdabi^^ 

ea route to China, Reuters repeated daughter for the first time m several years..; ^ 




15 and en route tc 
i about Thursday. 


The Al-Muharraq and its virtually destroyed a T-shaped cal- 
3 5-man crew, seized in June, were pumping complex cm the eastern 


Panama Workers Protest Austaftf 


p' 


- , - -r-» — held at Iran’s port of Bandar Abbas side of Kharg. That failed to reduce — --- . . . 

TheqmtemansffldtiKsbipwas for 23 days. Iran said that the red Iran's exports because another Iranian town of Unma whai Iram- 
boarded 30 mile 5 (50 kflometers) was carrying arms and amimmi t i rai pumping station on a small island an air traffic controllers ordered 
outside the Strait of Hormuz at the » nr Iran The shnmms Hue denied still was tn nnim mrmrii cal. the plane bade to Turkey. 


Embassy in Tehran said 
ish Air Force DC-8 ca 

Gonzilez was near the 


PANAMA CITY (AP) — Htmdredsof workers! diced fbrirw^into 
the legislative palace Wednesday to protest tbe errveriniient's proposed 
econo mic austerity measures and agreements with ihe WraM femVfof 


union for accepting funds under government bad been put off until 


the Conservative government’s la- 
bor laws. 

The TUC had ordered noncoop- 
eration with the laws. 

The Amalgamated Union of En- 
gineering Workers, Britain’s sec- 
ond largest unio n, faced suspen- 
sion or expulsion from the TUC at 
its annual conference in this north- 
ern resort for accepting govern- 
ment funds for union ballots. 

The engineers union described 
the deal with chiefs of the TUC as 
“a victory for unity.” 

But there was no sign that the 


a further ballot of their members. 

Hie members voted by a margin 
of 12 to 1 in February to accept 
£1.2 million ($1.7 million) in gov- 
ernment funds to finance internal 
union ballots. 

Several other rightist unions, in- 
cluding the 355,000-member elec- 
tricians union, had been poised to 
follow the engineers in a break- 
away from the TUC, conference 
sources said. 


outside the Strait of Honnnz at the for Iraq. The shipping line denied 
entrance to the Gulf. The action this, and said the Iranians had im- 
came near where the Iranian Navy pounded only sted rails, madrinexy 


line denied still was able to pomp enough oil, 
ms bad im- U.S. offy-i*!* said. 


seized another ship in June belong- and dredging equipment. 

‘V2E5ZS3L.O- ■ Raids CaBed Incffec 
are well and the ship win be re- Iraqi warplanes appea 
leased as soon as the confiscated missed the targets in tbet 


■ Alert Delays Gonz&ez 
An air-raid alert in Iran on Tucs- 


tnepiane oaoc to imxcy. 

Tne Iranian Foreign Ministry 
said in a statement that an Iraqi air 
raid was expected. 

When the alert was over; Iran 


_ /i_n j T.. i» .» . Jwau-iajuiuaiiiiiiBuuu iuw trueu llu. » — — 

■ Knuis caaea UMnec&ve day caused a nine-hour delay in the offered a fighter escort but Mr. 


ship win be re- Iraqi warplanes appear to have travel of the spanif h prime nuns- Qonz&Iez took a southern route 
the confiscated missed the targets in toe two recent ter, Felipe Gonz&lez, while he was ova Oman. 


International Monetary Fund.; : "■ : A 

The d em onstration aitbej^datryeMnl&^fcflcwed-ajaaxdiaaoagb 
the central area by about4^ptr«atas,T>ey called for amorafccai^, 
cm payments of the nation’s fras^defet of $3.7-KIKOT imtiI t&!^r; 

other Latin American nations but is among the hipest per rajnteToci’ 
country of hardy two imTfirin.^jgftoaina faces iacreasing S 

meeting its interest oMigarions jaf $400^mfllkjn a yeas, ndi qtoapttv 
equivalent to appraktmatdyjtS poicarit tif Its eqxfft aarmUigl: ' 






Bat the quarrel was palched_up 


in seven hours of emergency tanr& 


U.S. Bill on Trade Expected 


Violence Spreads to White Suburbs Angola Hints p ay off Tvid Resumes m Bona 

official ga i/t Peace Talks two forma . economics ; ministers 

_ _ .. „ and a West Ghnnan-indns&xafiBt 

Other officials said Mr. Regan -«-■ on conuptioD diarges resamed 

and Robert C McFariane, Prea- J\0SU1116 Thur^afta a^^sadfbfe 

dent Reagan snanonal security ad- J to consider a itida' 






(Continued from Page 1) 


(Coudnued from Page 1) 
man , said tiie Kansas Republi- 
can favored free trade “in the best 
of all possible worlds.” However, 
Mr. Tale added, “be also under- 
stands what his colleagues are hear- 


government should act more finnly 
in dealing with unrest. 

“The white backlash has started 
already,” he said. ’Ton haven't 
seen much of it bat I have warned 
the government that yon cannot 
take notice of threats of blade revo- 
lution and think there would be no 


would j»y more. lution and think there wod 

Mr Reagan told students at ^,,0^ from the whites.” 

North Caroima State Umvosrty, Asked what ^ poKce should do, 
“One of the first pnonues of our be said: “In cert^Ses IthS 
tax overhaul is to make sure that u ; 


um.- . . . . . real bullets would do the job and 

ing and feding - — that just talking wwJd hnmediatdy suppress the 

>bout it isn't lood enough.- ^ ^ 


I Reagan Attacks Taxes 
Mr. Reagan campaigned Thnrs- 


your wallets, not in Unde Sam’s 
pockets.” 


South Africa’s currency, the 


Tf™ - , rand, recovered slightly to 39.85 

He remved somt; negative reac- u s ^ Tte ^ np tan 


Lf " | r _ .• _ jl _ vCilLo- ■ WOO Uil n r^pni 

day for his tax revision plan, adver- J. 00 ?“ P^P 053 ). fr0 “ N “th Wednesday’s dose of 38 c«ats, and 

tiring the proposal as a tax cut for above^ecord low of 34.80 cents 

most Amencans, The Washington JeMe Helms. Mr. ^ A 2 7. That perfonnance 

Post reported from Raleigh, North 55?? hi promptod the govenimmt to ros- 

°*?T; . . riL^S^s^fcr ^ding in the cunency for day that the Bank of England had 

The Reagan plan would elimi- tax reform in North Carolina, and ^ ruled out giving financial support 

nate many popular deductions in that most of his mail on the subject 

return for Iowa tax rates; some has been noative. tral bank. GraarddeKodc, was m 

1 ^ London on Thmsday for further 



official said. 

Other officials said Mr. Regan 
and Robert C McFarlane, Presi- 
dent Reagan’s national security ad- 
visa, were seeking options to avoid 
a major presidential defeat on 
South Africa legislation, which is 
yJieHnl^d to be considered next 
week. 




W ■' , - - V 
■ 


(Coathmed £n» Page 1) 
Cabinda and captured a third who 


mrn t to conrioa a delesnse |dea 
that puhhchy'had denied :.tfaan .g 
fair hearing. • ' •- 1 . 

Lawyers for (Mto Lambsdorff, 


« ■ 


Hi *®-*. 


Mr. Reagan was to be given a full 
review of the situation in Sooth 
Africa and was expected to discuss 
the next steps in administiatian po- 
lity Thursday at a White House 
meeting. 

Officials reiterated Wednesday 
that Mr. Reagan has not made a 
final decision on the Legislation. 


said the three were oq a sabotage economics' ^ mjafeter inUfl. tasbyear, 1 
missKHi. In June, Smith AfnKm aa d ^ p^tocesso^ JLind tiE* 


f races re-entered southern Angola, idhs. and thefoiraa^auiral maw- . 
, In July came the U& congressio- agaaftheHidccoiicerD^Ebcriiard. 





*a* l! 


nal vote repealing legislation ™ Branchitach, withd^w their 
which, since 2976, has {sohibited oMections'to.'tsw>''l^''ra^gistiates' 


U^L aid to South African-backed hut, wpnwi w pwi^nte' that tiv» 
guerrillas sedring to overthrow the court was not competent to hear 


ia* 'f 

Ur 

fr c: 


Angolan governmcjiL 
The Reagan administratiai did 
not oppose the vote, and Angola 


the case. - 

The prosecution cfca-ges that 
Mr. Lambsdoiff.aad Mr. Frida- 


in Paris 


broke off negotiations, issS a accepted bribes for the Free 

declaration that Pretoria and Demo^^Par^ from^Mr. vrai 


Cerfun) de Kock ^ bombs npkxird Tb^sdsy y^hii ^m ^w bdda gi o gaher 


’ZZttEBsrr. 

reported. A French extremist In his speech Wednesday, Mr. ^ jfMisteat publicity, 

gnxip. Direct Action, claimed re- dos Samos charged that Sooth Af- 3 ■ ■ V7- ****** *3 

spcmribiKty for tbe attacks. rica has “continued to tnCltmtw 'o " -%r 

The blasts, all at about 2 AiL enraznous quantities of military D€M dtf6S868 XOH 
were at the offices of Renault the .materiel, not only on our counn/s bwiSva/rriwi-l' tv— v: 


argued that tbe qn^strates would 


ruled out 


The head of South Africa’s ran- B “ ££ SSS^ 
tral bank, Gerhard deKodt, was in Afnca “m presmt canim- 

Lraidon oc Thmsday fra further D cu_a. 

talks on his country’s moratorium ® Rea ga n to Study Options 
on debt repayment David Hoffman of The Washing- 


FI Cl h 0 I Cl Prst-d-rQrfcr 
Seer er-b?’ 7, 6, 9 & 10 from 10 an. to S p.m. non-stop. 

Note,' Gec'ae-V. 31 Ave. G»rge-V, Pcis-8®. Sc'cn Ngpo'eon. 

Tel. (1) 723 yi'CO c-* fo r cppoin?rr-sr*s (•) 2d5.96.7i, 265.96214. 

Each evening at 7 p.m. N AH ALA will offer a glimp** of her couturv 
“Spirit for Oiildron" with a mini pr««ntat>on. 


m 

W 

" li 


n« 


jfcimff 

Mr. • 

sdfi i*' -• 

■Taa&r' “■ ' 


Mr. de Kock flew to London ton Post reported earlier from Wash- 
born New York, where he said be ington; 


had assured American bankers that 


White House chief of staff. 


they would not have problems with Donald T. Regan, “is looking to see 


loans to Sooth Africa. 


if there is any way out” of other a 


spcmsibility for tbe attacks. 

Hie blasts, all at about 2 AiL, 
were at tbe offices of Renault, the 
automaker; Pechiney, a metals 
conglomerate; tbe construction 
company of Spie-Batignolles; and 
Association de rimportatkm Char- 
bonnihre, a coal import company. 


Otto Lambsdovff V'l- > 


luxSxi: 

HU EA' *-' :i 


KiU 1 - ■‘i 


southern brada.but also penetrat BEIJING (UPQ ^Deng Xiaoping, tbe paramramt CJrinese leader, fcn 
ingbyairandsivaydeSSde conqiletod a saite^f prfiticafly souative leadersfaq) changes m wiad- 
7m- n-ttirmni iPrnrftnrv * yocng tcdmocxats have been placed tn leading posts throughout da % 

our national mmtory. country,. tbe PeopleVDafly said ' HtoradayT^ *.* 


our national territory.” 

Armed conflict between bis gov- 


ojramt and ©Maifflasorthe South dvihanandimlrtaryposmons woe mndi lower than before the redmffle?; 

. Sp<Ae ^ sad th at two Afnca-backed National Union fra raflecting Mr. Deng%^ desire to rid his government of^agmgleftists wto- 
people were sfigfatiy ngured by fty- tbe Total Indqwndenoe of Angola, may oppose BsS wannc reforms. . T rav- 
ing glass and that there was.exten- said Mr. dos Santos, is not a civil «r, f, i MlrnM 4 fhat nf i~ui~chm.iT. »ri w J- 


leYDaOy said Thursday. 

said the average ages af high-rankuig officials in boft. 


Prime Minister Margaret veto of l^islation calling for sanc- 
Thatcha of Britain said Wednes- dons ora subsequent veto ovenide 


s ive damage. 


said hfr. dos Smto^is not a cjvfl “Itu learned that the readjustment of Jeadershipm all 29 province* 


war “Tmt multi-faceied external ag- and autonranouS regions has finished,” the papa wid /T^ provincba 

pnwnnn nlnftwl hir-l1u> Warkmn. . , .n . . ‘r 1 . . 


On Wednesday night. Prime gres^n plotted by ihe Washing- govenwraahdComiiiuiiist Party secretaries who are unda 60ySraofage! 
Mimster Laurent Fabins of France ton- Pretoria axis. • - - .... - 




now make Hp74paoeat of thetotal, and those who are unda 50 years of ■ 


French Commny 


said that a spofl through the streets Mr. dos Santos blamed both Pre- age account fra T5i5 -percent’? - - \ 

r\f Pone m l/ev tmtli •_ _ « nv - . . m r _ ", • — * lT> 


of Paris in May with fiish(^> Des- tana and Washingto n fra repres- 
toond Tutu of South Africa in- son erf the black m aj orit y in Sooth 


spired a French dedsion to declare Africa and said that *1n onr view” 


Handbook I 98S 


sanctions against Pretoria. 

Dniing a television interview, 
Mr. Fabms said he had been op- 
posed to sanctions bat had been 
convinced of their necessity during 
a walk with tbe bishop, who was in 
Phris to attend a human rights oon- 
feraoce. 


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Africa and said that *in onr view” Liberal Leader Elected in AnstraliaS 

the abolition of apartheid “would CANBERRA, Australia (AJ) John Howard was elected Thwpby 1 1 
necessarily enlafl the appfication of to replace Andrew Peacock as leader of the opporitiau Liberal Part* MfcV 
mandatory economic sanctions Peacock resigned after Mr. Hbwsnd defeated Wm Moore, Mr. Pfeacw****! '* 
against South Africa. hand-picked candidate, far tbe deputy leadership. . .. 

However, Mr. dos Santos then Mir. HowanT.was the .treasurer m the government beaded by Mtican^ - 
said that tbe Cuban withdrawal Frasra that was defeated by Bob Hawke’s Australian T .abor Party in!98L' 
proposals made last November are Mr. Peacock is a framer foreign minister. His defeat resulted franrA 
“stiD valid and germane” He said miscalculated demand that Mr. Howard, 46, be replaced as dandy feader l' 
that “no talks or negotiations can because of Mr, Howard’srefusal to make a oonmntaeat not chaflragefor/ 
have any meaning unless they take the leadership m the future. 

place in a dimate of relative confi- Mr. Howard said he^ wanted to remain deputy leader and would toyjillyC- 

deuce, with seriousness and in a support Mr. Peacock, but Mr. Peacock forced the issue to a vqte.-^-.-*V j 
construction spirit." : ^ V 

~ Generic Valium to G»st Less in UiSl W 

British Seise Kashmir Group WASHINGTON (AP) - Tie OS. Food and Dreg AArimtanoi 

D— nrmmiwl Ivvhicm WAtfnMrrf air ftn* ! T_ _ ’ i — • 


\.kj. ,, f 


PACnC WESTBN UMVBOTY 

600 N. Sepulveda BhttL 
Los Aruwtes, CalHamla 
90049 , Dept. 2X USA 


LONDON — Anti-tenorist po-‘ VCT ^ an5 the txanquilner Valium, which will cal its root : •;.• 

[lice arrested six members of a production <rf dia z e pa m , the generic name, will end.ar22ryeat 

9 Huns- monopoly by Hoffinaa-La Roche Incx, whore patem an ; Vimnm . 

northern expired this year. • 

rid. 1116 licenses were anno i mced by Margaret M. HecHer, secretaiy it. 

health and human services, who dismissed suggestions that lower prices 

nugbtMabuse of the drag. In 1975, its peak year, doctera'wQteSSitt 
61 million valium prescriptions, m akin g it the xixirt-prescribediiseificBtt' 
in the United States. . . .• 


Kariimrr s^taratist group T 
day in raids in central and nor 
E n gl and , the authorities said. 


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AEROSPATIALE 
AR FRANCE 
ALSTHOMATLANTXaUE 

AVIONS MARCH DASSAIAT- 
BREGUET AVIATION 
AXA (MLmjBIS UMES- 
DROUan 

banquer®qsuez 

8 ANQUE NABONALE DEPARS- 
BNP 

BteHWSAY 
BCStMANN 
BONGRAIM SA. 

BOUYGUES 

BSN 

CAMPB40N BERNARD 
CGS ALSTHOM 
OGM GROUP 

CHARBONNAGES DE FRANCE 
(CDF) 

CHARGEURSSA. 
oments franqms 
OTALCATa 
CUJBMfefTBOtANft 
COGEMA 

CQMPAGNE DU MO 
OOMPAGNE FRANCASE DES 
P&ROIE5 -TOTAL 
COMPAGNeGfiNStAlE 
tmECIHOT£(CGE) 
COMPAGNC G&t&lAlE DES 
EAUX 

COMPAQ'S LA H&4N 

CR&XT AGRtCOlE 

CRforrCOMMOClALDE 
FRANCE (CCF) 
CRfcfTDUNORD 
CRfcfr NATIONAL 
CROUZET 
DARTY 
DUMEZ 

BKTR0NX3UESSGE 
DASSAULT 
flf AQUTAINE 
fffeAflailRANDFAURE 
ESSB.OR 
HVES4JLLE 
FRAMATOME 


FRAN^AISE HOCCHST 
G&t&tALEBtscurT 
GROUPEVJCTOKE 
IMETAL 

JEUMONTSCHNBDBt 
l'or£al 
louisvurnDN 
LYONNASE DES EAUX 
MATRA 
MB3DB4 
MBOJNGBSN 
AUCHBR4 
MOEr-t&fNESS'f 

PARKAS 

PQNOD R1CARD 
raJGEOT 
POUET 

PWNTEMPS GROUP 
PROMOD& 

QUBim 
la redoute 

RB'tAULT 
RH0NBPOUlB< 
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SAQLOR 
SAKT-GOBAN 
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SB GROUP 
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soo£t£ G&H&ALE 
DBffitffBSESSWNRAPT 
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SODEXHO 
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SPE BATTGNOllES 
TBEMECANfQUE 
THOMSON 
TKQMSONCSF 
UNK3N DES ASSURANCES 
DEPAHS(UAP) 

USMOR 

UTA 

YALEO 

VALLOUREC 


Hcralhcrife.Sribunr 

FRENCH COMPANY HANDBOOK 1985 
Pubfehed by 


An Invitation 

toQxfotd 


For die Record 


2Blam< 


[ Rita M. Lavefie, fenner afeunstratar of the UA program to t*arit»; 
toxic waste, has been released from a fmson in Paiifnmia af^- 8CT w^ w ^ , ‘ ' 
but three weeks of a Hx-mcmthsenteuce for perfurv ' ^Spr 1 

pe trial in Grenada of l9 framer government and army Jndte'v 
aroused m the rillmg <rf Pnme Mimster Maurice Birimphas-ban^ 




Pubfehed by 

bifomationcd Business Development 
whh the 

Int ern atio na l Herald Tribune 


The International Herald Tribune and Oxford Analytics 
present a Special Conference on 
Tne International Business Outlook. 

Christ Qoirch, Oxford, 

September 19-21, 1985. 


| postponed by a chief justice until Oct I at the earikst 


Correction 



Sanind Group- 



Prices Frozen in Guatemala 


Inte rnational Herald Tribune, Book Division 
181 avenue Qxries-deGauSe, 92S21 Newly Cedex, France. 

Please send me copies of French Gompcny Haidbook 1985. 


■am. 




(Continued from Plage 1) 




sasa-r- 


D Enclosed is my payment. (Payment may be made in 
convertible European currency of your choice at current 




wh f “““Oon have substantial^- 
«Jere residents erected barricades lowered the standard 3 

burned tires and other debris, many people. — 




□ Plecsedwgetomycred&oardiVBAn OhOsD A/uCXD 


"■ ■ :4r.vttV ! S‘' 


CARD NUMB. 


ana ourned tires and other debris, 
the police used tear gas to break op 

protest actions. Shots reportedly the oconomirrairiri^i^ 

Camed ^ « coStiSfof^ 

At least 225 pecmle have been tea; a drm • 

arrested this weekTthc police arid, commti^nonr : 

Tbe number of arrests wX TS SSL - 

pro tests began is bdieved to ocesd , 

|«st two persons were kffled du^ UxsT^i tlri« » «?agR mir . 
repons aymg aght « to CJrutemab OtjrtTSS ! 


9 GNAJJJRE 

boKTlboi 




^noorr fcr oA aid 




NAME fHMNM). 








{News agencies re por ted that at 
feast two persons were killed dur- 
iag the disturbances after earlier 


economic planners. 


POSffiON. 


»*'-• V-. . 


xh % n 


j th ech; 

! 01 the 


COMRANY. 


AD08SS. 


OIY/CX9UNIXT. 


Bt.1911 : 

M teu the caxi driver "sank roo doenoo' 
■ 5 Knc Daunou, PARIS 7 

* Falhenturm Set. 9 , MUNICH- . --5 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1985 




Page 3 


U.s. Court Strikes Down 
ion That Backed 



„/- J a y Machews 

sS^Ssass 

staSr^ wbo work f°? the 

ZL°f Washmgioo was over- 

jwned on appeal Wednesday deal- 

Se ^ blow ,£> *« issueof 
comparable worth. 

di^,S r ^ iud8e P»“* of the 
grant Court of Appeals in San 
Francisco rukd that the 1964 Civil 
5S 1 * does not obligate the 
hfIS.' 0f Was *nngton to eliminate 
T ges m jobs held predonti! 
nanUy by women. 

The principle of equal pay for 


different jobs that require the sarnie 
amount of preparation and respon- 
sibility, or comparable worth, has 
become a major feminist issue of 
the 1980s. Critics of comparable. ' 
wrath fear that the principle might 
eventually be forced' oh~ private 
businesses through some formula 
other than supply demand. 

- Judge Anthony Kennedy, who 
wrote Wednesday's dgefriop, ap- 
peared to agree with the critics. 
“Neither law nor logic de*™* the ' 
free market a suspect enterprise," 

. he said. 

In language certain to be cited by 
comparable-worth critics battling 



Eleanor C Smeal 


Businessman on Trial 



/ (Continued from Page 1) 
sin* was an ambitious, athletic 
men who has said thai as a 
college student in the 1960s he 
vided information to the v, 
about student anti-war activists! 

In 1977 he moved to Hawaii a£- 
ter pleading no contest to a- petty 
»jpcft charge brought against him in 
-■Wisconsin. The authorities said he 
bad violated state laws-whBe trying 
i£sen franchises for a chain tjf 
sporting goods stores he had 
opened. 

In Hawaii be established a finan- 
cial consulting company, the Con- 
solidated Mutual Investment Corn, 
hr 1978 he visited the Honolulu 
office: of- the CIA. He introduced 
himself to its director, Ew ym* J. 
W.elch, and volunteered to do 
Whatever he could for the agency 
/Mr. Wdcb later 'suggested to 
agency officials that Mr. 


Asked at the trial bow he knew 
this, Mr. Kindschi answered, “He 
told me." 

Subsequently Mr. Rewald 
opened other companies, naming 
than Bishop Baldwin Rewald Dil- 
lingham Sc Wong, H&H Enter- 
prises and Canadian . .Far East 
Trading. 

. Court documents indicate that 
tbe.CIA used the companies to pro- 
vide cover for a dozen or more 
agents. But Mr. Mason and agency 
officials have emphasized Mr. 
Rewald had no other ties to the 
agency and received only $2,800 in 
expense money. 

Prosecutors say that Mr. Kinds- 
chi, who upon his retirement from 
theagmeyin 1980 went to work for 
one of Mr. Rewakfs companies, 
was not the only person impressed 
by Mr. Rewald 

Promises of high returns on their 

I^ewald could be . bdpfid.in report- investments, which were sometimes 
iflfc on intelligence matters while fulfilled, had lured many profes- 


traveling abroad " or , by providing 
“corporate cover” to intelfigcDoe 
officers need ing to. conceal their 
identities. - 

; j/Mr. Welch introduced Mr. 
,^»wald to his successor, Mr. 
lyndsdri, and they became friends. 
..Testimony by QA officers has 
indicated that the. agency has a 
branch that makes agreements with 
bona fide businesses to create the 
illusion that its agents are employ-, 
ees of the companies. 

Under such an arrangement the 
companies fictitiously list the 
agents on their payrolls, issue them 
business cards antLstatioaeiy, and 
agree to confirm their employment 
to any callers. 

^JolmRMasQn^n member of the 
corporate cover branchinthe late 
1970s, testffi«I that r after a xaio- 
hpur meeting with Mr.-Rewald in 
1978, he reoreitedlmn to provide 
cover for a CIA operative who 
needed an alias for a planned at- 
tempt to reenrit an unidentified 
foreign national as asjpy. 

Although a check by the agency’s 
Office of Security uncovered Mr. 
Rewald’s conviction in Wisconsin, 
Mr. Mason said he recommended 
^gainst a full investigation became 
' Mr. Rewald had complained that 
interviews with bis neighbors ought 
qeate “unfavorable .attention and 
possibly publicity."- . 

Mr. Rewald, Mr. Mason wrote to 
the agency, had made a “good im- 
pression, appears very patriotic 
and pro-agency.” 

The next year Mr. Kindschi 
wrote an appraisal of Mr. Rewald 
for the Office of Security. He called 
him a champion sprinter, a former 
professional football player, a pi- 
lot, a devout church-goer and a 
hugely successful businessman 
whose business associates included 
members of some of Hawaii's old- 
est families, as wed as Hvis Presley 
afld other Hollywood stars. 


skmal people in Hawaii and on the 
U.S. mainland to -give money to 
Mr. Rewald. One CIA official was 
dismissed for inducing other agents 
to invest with Mr. Rewald. 

According to the prosecution 
Mr. Rewald was using money from 
later, investors to pay high interest 
rates to early investors, which in 
turn lured new investors. 

•. h$r! Rewald had a fleet of expen- 
sive cars, an oceahfront home and 
. two, ranches. He bought the Hawaii 
Pofo-Otih and ' a string of polo 
ponies and spent lavishly on wom- 
en; the prosecutors say. 

In 1982, according to court re- 
cords, Joseph Camplone, an agent 
of the Internal Revenue Service 
who lived not far from Mr. Rewald. 
became puzzled by . his apparent 
wealth.,^ \X . 

Court documents say -that Mien 
Mr. Camplone discovered that Mr. 
Rewald had reported receiving no 
income in the previous two years, 
he opened an investigation. 

When Mr. Rewald’s bank ac^ 
counts were checked for $22 mil- 
lion in investors’ money, only 
5300,000 could be found. Mr. 
Rewald said he had spent much of 
the money to finance a high-flying 
style demanded by the CIA. 

. Mr. Kindschi. 58, who spent 
more than 20 years in the agency 
and who said he had lost more than 
$100,000 of his own money with 
Mr. Rewald, testified that he had 
regarded Mr. Rewald as “an all- 
American boy." He said that he 
andiris wife had become so dose to 
Mr. Rewald’s five children that 
they “looked on us almost as 
grandparents." 

“I came from a small agricultural 
community,” the former overseas 
operative said. “We all knew each 
other, trusted one another. I be- 
lieved I could read people quite 
wdl I thought I oould teO the good 
guys from the bad guys." 


2 Blamed in New Jersey Fire 


, The .Associated Press 

* PASSAIC New Jersey — Two 
b6ys have been charged with juve- 
nile delinquency after admitting 
they started a fire in a trash bin that 
ca used an estimated $400 million in 
damage to a neighborhood of fac- 
tories and hemes here, according to 
Mayor Joseph Lipari. 

Tbe fire burned for 10 hours be- 
fore being contained Tuesday. 

Mr. Lipaii has estimated that up 
to. 25 percent of the industrial base 
oi iheaty -was destroyed in the fire. 
Passaic has been trymg lo recover 
from the exodus of reside n ts and 
businesses that pushed jobless rates 
to 25 percent in the 1970s. 

The charges ag ain st the boys 
specify counts of arson, cr im i n al 


metal trash bin. Officials have said 
that the flames then spread to a 
wooden loading dock and up six 
stories to the eaves of a factory, 
where the sprinkler system failed 


mischief, and causing widespread 
fthmaa a , Mr. Upan said- A court 
hearing scheduled for Friday wifl 
determine if the boys, ages 12 and 
13, will be tried as adults. 

According to the police, the boys 
used matches to start the fire in a 


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in courts and legislatures across the 
country. Judge Kennedy said that 
even a public employer can follow 
prevailing private-market wages in 
setting salaries, whether this under- 
pays workers in jobs held predomi- 
nantly by women or not 

■ A 1983 decision by Judge Jack 
Tanner of the U3. District Court 
ordered comparable pay for secre- 
taries and track drivers employed 
by the state of Washington. It has 
been followed by union agreements 
based on the principle in major 
cities such as Los Angeles. 

In his 1 983 ruling. Judge Tanner 
cited a study commissioned by the 
state government showing a 20-per- 
cent salary gap between workers in 
predominantly female and pre- 
dominantly male jobs involving 
similar skills, intelligence, responsi- 
bility and working conditions. 

Judge Tanner's decision would 
have provided as much as $1 billion 
in damages to 15,500 workers. 

President Ronald Reagan was 
quoted this summer as calling the 
idea “cocfcamantie,'’ and earlier in 
the year the U3. Civil Rights Com- 
mission c hairman . Clarence M. 


Clarence M. Pendleton Jr. 


Pendleton Jr., said it was “probably 
the looniest idea since ‘Looney 
Tones' came on the screen.” 

The attorney general of Wash- 
ington, Ken Eikenberry, said 
Wednesday that he had assured the 
state legislature that the decision 
would be overturned and he re- 
mained confident that the U.S. Su- 
preme Court would reject any ap- 
peal 

Eleanor C Smeal, president of 
the National Organization for 
Women, noted Wednesday that her 
organization and its allies already 
had persuaded the Washington 
Legislature to appropriate 542 mil- 
lion to hdp narrow some wage 
gaps. 

Britain passed a law in 1984 
mandating equal pay for work of 
equal value. According to Helen 
Holden of the Equal Opportunities 
Commission in London, four wom- 
en have successfully won claims so 
far. 

She gave the example of a cook 
working in a shipyard who com- 
pared her training and responsibil- 
ities to that of a painter, a joiner 
and a beating engineer. The cock 
won the case: 


U.S. Planes 
Will Fight 

Paper Battle 
For Contract 


New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The Penta- 
gon has ordered the stir force to 
arrange a one-time “paper compe- 
tition” between Nonhrop’s F-20 
Tigers hark and the General Dy- 
namics F-16 Falcon fra a role in 
defending the United States 
against bomber attack, Pentagon 
officials said Wednesday. 

Pentagon officials and industry 
sources said the contest would be 
on paper rather than an actual fly- 
off because Northrop did not have 
enough F-20s to stage an aerial 
competition. The company has 
made three prototypes, two of 
which were destroyed in crashes. 

The decision guarantees Nor- 
throp a long-awaited chance to in- 
troduce its new fighter plane into 
the U.S. military inventory, with 
the prospect of a substantial export 
market if it succeeds. 

But the competition falls far 
short of wbnl Northrop bad been 
seeking, which was a running com- 
petition with General Dynamics 
for a variety of air force roles; with 
both companies guaranteed part of 
the market 


2 Bombs Found in France 

Reuters 

BAYONNE, France — Two 
bombs fitted with advanced elec- 
tronic devices have been found in a 
truck near here, the police said 
Thursday. It was the first tune such 
bombs were found in the troubled 
Basque region of France. 


Perez de Cuellar Urges 
Major Reform at the UN 


The Associated Pros 

UNITED NATIONS. New 
York — The secretary-general of 
the United Nations warned Thurs- 
day that the organization weald 
degenerate into a “rambling, con- 
tentious slum” unless it was used to 
build “the international system of 
the future.” 

In his annual report to the forth- 
coming 40th-axmiversaiy session of 
the General Assembly. Javier Pfrrez 
de Cu&liar said «h?u mankind’s 
“most urgent challenge” was to de- 
vise “a working international polit- 
ical system in which all partici- 
pate." 

He said that would be a system 
that “will not only guarantee sur- 
vival and order, but will make our 


Air Ticket Error 
Lands 2 in Storm 

The Associated Press 

PANAMA CITY, Florida — 
John and Kathleen Kelly intended 
to fiy to Panama City, Panama, but 
a mistake on their airline tickets 
sent them to this Florida town of 
the same name just in time for the 
onslaught of this week’s hurricane. 

The British couple landed at the 
airport Saturday, expecting to be 
greeted by their relatives, who live 
m Central America. “It's been 
quite an experience," Mr. Kelly 
said, after be and his wife spent 
Sunday night sleeping on the hard- 
wood floors at an emergency evac- 
uation shelter. “We don’t have 
storms jilce that in England.” 

The Kellys caught an afternoon 
flight to Atlanta on Monday for a 
connecting flight to the other Pana- 
ma Gry. 


planet run more evenly in the inter- 
ests of all of its inhabitants.” 

But UN member nations must 
decide “if they wish to cooperate in 
building on this foundation a use- 
ful, coherent, effective institution” 
or to follow their own narrow inter- 
ests. 

“In that case.” he said, “the 
promising foundations established 
with so much thought and hard 
work, will end up surmounted by a 
rambling and contentious slum, the 
breeding ground of endless new 
troubles and disasters." 

Mr. Pfcrez de Cuellar said that 
the world body “has to become a 
more effective institution” and, on 
the international level, fill “a great 
vacuum of legitimacy and respect- 
ed authority.” 

As a means of enhancing the 
authority of the 15-nation Security 
Council, Mr. Pferez de CuiUar sug- 
gested that the superpowers begin 
by making ibe council “more the 
guardian of peace it was set up to 
be and less the- battleground on 
which to fight out political and 
ideological differences." 

Then, be proposed that the coun- 
cil “should, in the near future, 
make a deliberate and concerted 
effort to solve one or two of the 
major problems before it by mak- 
ing fuller use of the measures avail- 
able to it under the charter." 

The major issues that the council 
has dealt with in the recent years 
include the Iran-Iraq war, southern 
Africa, the Middle East and Cy- 
prus. 

Under the secretary-general’s 
suggestion, the council presumably 
would pick out an issue most prom- 
ising of a solution and then concen- 
trate its energy and charter powers 
to reach a settlement 

The charter provides that the Se- 



Javier Pfcrez de Cu£Uar 

entity Counri] can call upon the 
adversaries to “seek a solution by 
negotiation, inquiry, mediation, 
conciliation, arbitration, judicial 
settlement resort to regional agen- 
cies or arrangements, or other 
peaceful means of their choice." 

If all else fails, the council “may 
take such action by air, sea or land 
forces as may be necessary to main- 
tain or restore international peace 
and security” Member nations 
would be called on to provide 
troops, equipment and facilities to 
a UN command. 

To date, the Security Council has 
made only limited use of its sanc- 
tion powers. It did agree in 1977 to 
impose an arms embargo on South - 
Africa, but U.S., British and 
French vetoes have prevented the 
council from adopting wider sanc- 
tions against the Pretoria govem- 
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** 



French Kidnap Victim Is Taken to Beirut Home to See Wife 


JAMES 

GORDON 

BENNETT 

BALLOON 

RACE 


Geneva, 

September 28/29, 1985 

The world's most prestigious 
bdloon race was created in 1906 by 
James Gordon Bennett, Jr., founder of the 
International Herald Tribune. 

That year, a quarter of a million 
spectators watched sixteen gas-filled 
balloons from 6 countries rise from the 
Tuileries Gardens in Paris. The object of 
the race: fly the furthest distance before 
landing. 

The rules haven't changed over the 
years, and the departure of the 1985 
Gordon Bennett Balloon Race from 
Geneva will be equally spectacular: an 
illuminated night take-off. 

Eighteen balloons from 11 
countries will participate. Held at the 
Centre Sportif in Vessy, just outside 
Geneva, the Saturday night takeoff will 
be the highlight of a weekend of 
aeronautic events. 

Admission: F.5. 10 valid for both 
days. For additional information, contact 
the International Herald Tribune in Paris, 
Tel 747 1265, ext. 4566, or Patrick 
Kearley in Geneva, Tel. 983 862. 

Program 

Friday, September 27 - Fireworks 

10 pm - Fireworks launched from a hot-dr 
balloon, Parc des Eaux-Vives. 

Saturday, September 28 - Gordon Bennett 
Bafloon Race Take-off 

1 1 am. - Opening ceremony. Veteran Car 
Club Pcrade. 

12 - 6 pm - Inflation of gas bd loons for the 
Gordon Bennett Race. Tethered hat-dr and 
gas bafloon flights for the public Flight 
denronstrations. 

8-10 pm - Illuminated takeoff of the 1985 
Gordon Bennett Bdloon Race. 

Sunday, September 29 - Gordon Bennett 
Flight Fiesta 

8-30 am and 4 pm - Mass ascension of hat- 
dr balloons. 

9 am - 6 pm - Flight demonstrations: replica 
of fiie first hot-dr bdloon flown in 1783, hat- 
dr airship, hang gliders launched from a hot- 
dr batfoon, stunt flying, miniature hot-dr 
bd toons, dipfcme and helicopter models, 
gliders. Martini acrobatic team. Tethered hot- 
dr balloon flights for the public 

6 pm. Closing ceremony. 


•Reuters 

BEIRUT — Michel Seurai, one 
of four Frenchmen held by kidnap- 
pers in Lebanon, was allowed to 
visit his home in mainly Moslem 
West Beirut last week, his wife said 
Thursday. 

Mary Seurat, who is Syrian- 
born. said she believed that her 
husband and a French journalist, 
Jean- Paul Kauffmann, would be 
released when Israel frees the last 
of 1.200 Lebanese and Palestinians 
who were transferred to its Atlil 
prison from southern Lebanon last 
April. 

Meanwhile, former President Su- 
leiman Franjiefa unveiled a consti- 
tutional reform plan aimed at 
breaking Moslem-Christian politi- 
cal deadlock. But his program fell 
short of Moslem demands for more 
say in the running of Lebanon. 


Of her husband's visit Mrs. Seu- 
rat said: "It was surreal. I knew 24 
hours before, but didn't know 
where the visit would take place till 

the last minute.” 

She said that an official of the 
Shiite Moslem militia Amal came 
to her home on Friday evening and 
made a telephone call. An unarmed 
guard then brought her husband, a 
37-year-old academic who was 
seized by gunmen near Beirut in- 
ternational Airport with Mr. 
Kauffmann on May 22. 

"Michel came in looking ex- 
hausted and very nervous," she 
said. “He had not'been told he was 
going to be freed.” 

"Then he started discussing poli- 
tics and the Shiite movement,” she 
added. “He stayed from 9:30 to 
10:45 P.M. Before leaving, he 
picked up a dozen books on Islam 
and a radio from his study.” 


She said her husband told her he 
was being held in the same place as 
Mr. Kauffmann, who he said was 
in good health. 

The other French hostages are 
diplomats, Marcel Fontaine and 
Marcel Carton. They were abduct- 
ed in West Beirut in March. Seven 
Americans and a Briton also have 
been kidnapped in Lebanon over 
the past 18 months. 

A spokesman for Prime Minister 
Shimon Peres of Israel said 
Wednesday that the last 219 Adit 

R risoners would be released sbon- 
-■ 

Presenting his reform plan for 
Lebanon, Mr. Franjieh, a powerful 
Maronite Christian leader, said 
that the post of president should 
stUl go to a Maronite, that of prime 
minister to a S unni Moslem, and 
that of parliamentary speaker to a 
Shiite Moslem. 


Speaking at 
Ehden 


his summer resi- 
dence in Ehdea, in northern Leba- 
non. Mr. Franjieh dismissed a call 
by the Shiite leader. Justice Minis- 
ter Nabih Bern, for the presidency 
to be routed among six sects. 


tine Liberation Organization in 
Jordan. He said that King Hussein 
should dose them down. Reuters 
reported from Tel Aviv. 

“If he does not stop this activi- 


«routeo among ax sects. w " Mr. Rabin said oi sute tdevi- 

j^Lctoonb.go^dbyon. 

He called for equal Moslem-Cfa- p«U not emjoy inmiunity be- 
represenution in pariia- cause they are m Jordan. 


nsnan representation in 
meat, where Christians currently 
are allotted six of every 1 1 seats. 
Except for the top three govern- 
ment posts, Lebanon's system of 
distributing political, military and 
other positions on confessional 
lines should be abolished, he said. 

■ Rabin Warns Hussein 
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
said Wednesday that Israel could 
attack command posts of the Pales- 


The defense minister’s remarks 
followed an upsurge in anti-Israeli 
violence in the occupied West 
Rank. Mr. Rabin asserted that Pal- 
estinian guerrillas in the area were 
receiving instructions from PLO 
officials in Jordan. 

[An Israeli truck driver was 
stabbed and seriously wounded in 
the Gaza Strip on Thursday in 
what appeared to be spreading 


wave of assaults in Israeli -occupied * 
tern lory. The Associated Press re- 
ported. 

[The incident came two days af- 
ter an Israeli soldier was stabbed to 
death and another was scnously 
injured in the West Bank city oF 
Hebron, south of Jerusalem. At 
least 13 Israelis have been lolled in 
attacks in the occupied territories 
in the last year.) 

In Jerusalem, the Supreme Court 
delayed the expulsion of two Pales- 
tinians from the West Bank on 
Thursday pending a ruling on a 
petition they have filed to remain. 

The army issued military expul- 
sion orders a week ago to Amin 
Makbul and Walid Nazel asserting j 
that they were involved in “subver- * 
sive political activity.” Both men _ 
have served prison terms for guer- 
rilla activities. 



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President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt, left, with AH Lotfi, -Hie new prune minister. 

New Prime Minister Names Cabinet, 
Says Egypt’s Economy Is Top Priority 


Reuters 

CAIRO — Egypt’s new prune 
minister, Ali Lotfi, named his cabi- 
net Thursday, farming in eight new 
ministers and keeping most of his 
predecessor's team. 

The men in charge of four major 
areas — foreign affairs, defense, 
economic planning and agriculture 
— kept their jobs and were named 
deputy prime ministers. 

Mr. Lotfi. an economist, was ap- 
pointed Wednesday by President 
Hosni Mubarak, who told him to 
work for stable economic growth. 
He replaced Kamal Hassan Ali, 
who had headed the government 
for 14 months. 

Mr. Lotfi. 49, said he would con- 
centrate on solving Egypt's eco- 
nomic problems. 

He put new ministers in charge 



of housing, tourism, cultural af- 
fairs, immigration, health, educa- 
tion and higher education and 
named an extra minister for parlia- 
mentary affairs. 

Mr. Lotfi named as deputy 
prime ministers Field Marshal Mu- 
hammad Abdul Halim Abu Gbaza- 
lah, defense minister; Ismat Abdel 
Meguid, foreign minister; Youssef 
Anna Wali, agriculture minister; 
and Kamal Ahmad. al-Ganzuri, 
planning and international cooper- 
ation minister. 

Foreign economists said that the 
new prime minister faced consider- 
able problems. 

They said concern was growing 
in the West over complex difficul- 
ties faced by Egypt, a major U.S. 
aid recipient whose hard-currency 
earnings mainly from oil and re- 
mittances from workers abroad, 
have suffered this year. 

■ Domestic Issues Cited 

Earlier, Michael Hass <4 (he, Los 
Angeles Times reported from Cairo : 

Mr. Hassan Ali announced the 
resignation of his government after 
cabinet ministers met Wednesday 
night. 

Sources said that Mr. Mubarak 
was displeased with the handling of 
a number of domestic issues, in- 
cluding the failure of the Egyptian 
security forces to find the murder- 


ers of an Israeli diplomat who was 
killed in Cairo on Aug. 21. 

“There were also a number of 
problems, economic and social, 
that Ali seemed to be too weak to 
deal with,” an Egyptian source /./ 
said. “There was a feeling that 
thing s were getting out of hand and . 
that something had to be done 
about it quickly.” 

Mr. Hassan Alt’s health also was 
cited as a reason for his replace- 
ment. He is said to suffer from ■ 
severe arthritis requiring regular 
trips to Switzerland for treatment 

Mr. Mubarak, m a letter naming 
Mr. Lotfi prime minister-designate, 
listed eight areas in which he said 
the government needed to improve 
its performance. They include the ' 
economy, education, public ser- 
vices, planning and tourism. 

“Mubarak feels that things are '. 
not moving fast enough in these' 
areas and that there is a need for a . 
younger and more dynamic leader- 
ship to make them move," a gov- 
ernment official said. 

An International Monetary 
Fund report issued in June estimat- 
ed that Egypt’s foreign debt has ; 
mushroomed to S31 billion. It not- 
ed tfaai Mr. Mubarak has tried to- {) 
contain the debt by reducing some 
subsidies and limiting imports. But 
it said there was “urgent need" for 
stiff cr austerity measures. 


Saudis Would Allow U.S. Use 
Of Bases in Crisis, Study Says 


The Benson & Hedges 
low tar cigarette 


(Continued from Page 1) 
initiative to break the current dip- 
lomatic deadlock. 

The Saudis have been seeking 40 
more F-1S fighters to add to the 40 
they now possess. They also have 
requested additional Stinger anti- 
aircraft missiles and advanced 
Sidewinder air-to-air missiles. The 
Jordanians are seeking F-16 fight- 
ers and advanced anti-aircraft mis- 
siles. 

State Department officials said 
they expected the arms sales pack- 
age to go to Congress for approval 
in the next week or so. They said 
they doubted, however, that any 
aircraft would be included because 
of opposition in Congress. 

The study concluded that Israel’s 
military power was so great that it 
would not be endangered by the 
arms sales. It also said that while 
sales to Jordan and Saudi Arabia 
could not guarantee those coun- 
tries' support for UJ5. policies, fail- 
ure to provide the arms could dam- 
U.S. interests in the region. 

“Our willingness to meet Saudi 
or other Arab requests for arms 
strengthens the perception of bal- 
ance in our approach to the peace 
process and our standing as a reli- 
able friend," the study said. 

“At the same time,” it said, “Sau- 
di confidence in their ability to pro- 
tect themselves from external 
threats or pressure is essential to 
greater flexibility and support for 
the peace process." 

The Saudis are concerned that 
they may be dragged into the five- 
year war between Iran and Iraq, 
State Department officials said, 
particularly by an attack from Iran. 

The study added that any large- 
scale US. military operation in the 
Gulf and Southwest Asia would 
likely depend on Saudi cooperation 
and support- 

"Although the Sandls have 
steadfastly resisted formal access 
agreements,” it said, “they have 
stated that access will be forthcom- 
ing for United States forces as nec- 
essary to counter Soviet aggression 
or b regional crises they cannot 
manage on their own." 

In rebutting those who would 
limit arms sales to Israd. the review 
said that U.S. support was crucial 


to Israel’s “confidence" in seeking 
a negotiated peace settlement. 

The study added that Israeli co- 
operation “would be helpful in the 
event of U.S. intervention in the 
eastern Mediterranean to counter a 
Soviet threat.” 

Syria was portrayed b the review 
as the prime threat to Middle East 
nations that are friendly to the 
United States, including Israel and 
Jordan. 

The report devoted considerable 
attention to Jordan because of the 
diplomatic initiative launched by 
K i n g Hussein. The Jordanian lead- 
er has offered a plan for peace talk* 
with Israel under the umbrella of 
an international conference, but 
disagreements on procedure ap- 
pear to have stalled the effort 

The review said that Jordan's 
stability was “very important” to 
U.S. interests in the Middle East 
and that military aid would bolster 
the country’s wOUngness to “par- 
ticipate b the peace process." 

It cautioned, however, that U.S. 
military aid “cannot guarantee that 
participation or determine its mode 
or timing." 

Resolutions have been intro- 
duced b Congress to bar advanced 
military sales to Jordan until it 
agrees to direct peace talks with 
Israel The administration has op- 
posed the resolutions. 

The report asserted that previous 
U.S. efforts to withhold arms to 
Jordan or to link sales to participa- 
tion b peace negotiations “have 
weakened our leverage” and led 
Jordan to turn to other suppliers, 
including the Soviet Union. 

“Jordan plays a pivotal role b 
containing Soviet power and influ- 
ence, in providing U.S. strategic 
and political access to the region, 
and b its growing support for U.S. 
military initiatives such as exercises - 
and pre-positioning." the study 
said. 

The study also said that Egypt, 
ubich receives the largest amount 
of US. mflitaiy aid after Israel was 1 
key to American strategy in *y. e 
region. i 

■ While Egypt remains wary of a 
huge U.S. presence, the tepoh said, 
it has allowed combined military 
exerases and provided “informal 
guarantees on facilities access in 
certain contingencies." 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1985 



Page 5 


AIDS Is Spreading Slowly, and inNew Ways, Beyond the Primary Risk Groups 


<£FS??*Zi2!SiL* 

anmJbr * lL 1 bdieve vt *Y 


i -JjS*. at the Pasteur 


HOW THE AIDS VIRUS INFECTS CELLS 


virus as ^ * “*"* isaiueA 

SSr^WTS 

5j’2J*5 n g™n*" said Dr. AnthS 
head °f the Naiional ln. 

n£S Lf AUei ®' *° d 


•*. ':-- '•'••* :'•'•■ EjVfrusmakes contact with 

.V/ •'• ■ . ESracvptoron key cell of im mun* 

:.-; ■- ;• 2 t'r-;^ • j ,-■ system, t h«'T4 white Mood cell. ,~ . . 

■Wains • .* ■ 


a The viTO. is affowed to enter 

h> M» *4m TA MlPe 


l^l because it fits ttw T4 cell's 
receptors, wtiidi ate urtito those 
of other caB*. . 


Si^SS®® 00 * 8 “Egbert risk, 
^us already as serious and d*v5 

^toga scouigc as I can name in 
S2J* > W “You couldn’t 
^Jgn a varus more diabolical than 
5ms one. Dr. Fauci said. “It 
““•“[“off the very ceils that are 
supposed to protect you from it” 

“»•? “* consider 
it a terrible threat. It*® a staggering 
problem for society.” She has 
called AIDS the No. 1 US. publjc- 
health problem. 


can 


be made, medical researchers 

mud) more about the nature, 
behavior and cause of acquired iib- 
mune deficiency syndrome. - 

Scientists are unsure of the oripm 
or the AIDS virus, how it w orks, 
why it targets the white blood cells, 
known as T4 lymphocytes, that are 
the one indispensable dement of 
.the body’s immune system. Ulti- 
rlhately, a victim of AIDS is left 
vulnerable to an array of life- 
threatening infections and cancers. 

Further complicating the search 
are recent findings that AIDS may 

sometimes show itself first as a dis- 
ease attacking the brain and . ner- 
vous system, p erhap s even damag- 
ing the brains of unborn babies 
who become infected. The virus has 
now been found in brain wJU. 

New molecular probes have al so 
found it in the epithelial cells that 
line the eyes and eyelids. Some fear 
the vims, known primarily for its 
highly targeted attack on the im- 
mune system, may eventually play 
a role in other diseases &awdL .- 

Although spread of the virus is 
most often linked to intimate con- 
tact involving transfer of Mood or 
semen — anal intercourse is be- 
Ueved the most efficient mode of 
transmission — it is now dear the 
virus is present in safiva, tears and 
urine. No one knows how often its 
presence in these fluids lead to hu- 
man. infection. .. — 

Far now, experts can only reas- 
sure unaffected individuals, that 
they are unfikdy to get' the virus 
through casual' transmission — a 
sneeze, handshake <g through prox- 
imity. These assurances are based 
on American studies of health 
workers and family members who 
care for or hye with AIDS, victims. 

The disease does noryet seem to 
have spread* to the general . U.S. 
population in 8 significant way. In- 
stead, those most blcdy to be infec- 
tious are still qverwhdnringly hi the 
few wdMefined risk groups who 
have tibe far more mtiwuitri contact 
that spreads the AIDS virus: 



n«vu«fni rod 


•Homosexual men account for 
73 percent of U.S. adult cases. 
AIDS is the leading killer ol angle 
men between 25 and 44 years of age 
inNew York Gty and San Francis- 


co. 


Blood samples frozen in 1978 
and later checked for antibodies to 
die AIDS virus show that only 4.S 
percent of the homosexual men vis- 
iting a San Francisco venereal dis- 
ease fJmic had been infected. This 
means they had been exposed to 
the virus and developed antibodies 
but had not necessarily contracted 
the disease itself. By 1984, about 
two-thirds had been infected, most 
without symptoms. 

A rtcent study done in the San 
Francisco gay community showed, 
one- third are infected. Other cities 
report 20 percent or more of homo- 
sexual men. are infected. 

• Intravenous drug abusers ac- 


count for 17 percent of adult cases. 
Blood tests or addicts in New York 
and New Jersey show 80 to 90 per- 
cent are infected. 

• Blood-transfusion recipients 
compose nearly 2 percent of adult 
cases. A new blood test that can 
screen for signs of infection by the 
AIDS virus should eliminate this 
means of transmitting the 

But many people who have already 
received transfusions of infected 
Mood will develop AIDS in years 
to come. 

• Hemophiliacs: Almost 1 per- 
cent of adult cases. The blood test 
and a heat treatment for blood 
products used by hemophiliacs 
should stop further transmission, 
but '80 to 90 percent of severe he- 
mophiliacs are already infected. 

• Heterosexual men and wom- 
en: About 1 percent of adult cases. 
Probably contracted by sexual con- 


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tact with infected bisexuals and 
heroin addicts. 

• Children: Tallied separately 
from adults are about 180 children, 
70 percent of whom were born with 
AIDS or were infected with it as 
newborns by their mothers. Anoth- 
er 20 percent received the virus in 
blood products. 

• Other: About 6 percent of 
adult cases and 10 percent of child- 
hood cases are in people who fit 
none of the known risk groups. 

Much of the current concent fo- 
cuses on heterosexual transmission 
in the (Jailed States, but research- 
ers caution that it may take several 
years for a dear trend to emerge. A 
key link may be prostitutes, who 
are often drug abusers and there- 
fore at risk for AIDS. 

Nearly one-thud of a sample of 
about 80 male AIDS patients clas- 
sified as being in the “no known 



risk" group admitted to prostitute 
contact. Studies at Walter Reed 
Army Institute of Research of US. 
military per so nnel with AIDS also 
implicate prostitutes, as do studies 
of African and Haitian AIDS pa- 
tients. 

At the same time, some believe 
the threat to the heterosexual popu- 
lation is being overdramarized for 
political reasons. “A lot of Funding 
decisions are bang made based on 
risk to the straight world,” said a 
government Official- 

Many experts say the risk to the 
heterosexual population will in- 
crease over the next five to 10 years, 
with those who have many sexual 
partners in greatest danger. 

A study by Dr. Charles Rabkin 
of the New York Gty Health De- 
partment found that 3 percent of 
heterosexual men going to a vene- 
real-disease clinic were infected 
with the AIDS virus. These people 
presumably were very active sexu- 
ally in a city where AIDS is rela- 
tively widespread. 

This may not sound high, but it 
is dose to the level found among 
homosexual men in San Francisco 
in blood samples taken in 1978; 
this was at an early stage of the 
AIDS epidemic, before the disease 
bad been formally identified. 

The virus may spread next to 
other sexually active populations, 
such as college students, perhaps 
infecting, as a researcher put iL, 
“the Ivy League college girl whose 
boyfriend has had sex with a prosti- 
tute two years earlier.” 

The Cist cases of AIDS were 
recognized in the spring of 1981 
among homosexual men in Los An- 
geles. Soon, doctors began asking 
whether AIDS was a new disease or 
one that had existed all along in 
another form or another place. 
Only recently, however, have pieces 
of an answer begun to fit together. 

The most popular hypothesis 
now is that AIDS is indeed a fairly 
new disease, and that the AIDS 
virus originated during the 1960s in 
central Africa as an evolutionary 
descendant of a monkey virus. 

Belgian scientists have found 
many cases of AIDS among the 
people of Zaire and nearby Rwan- 
da mid Burundi, as weQ as in Ugan- 
da, Tanzania and Kenya. 

Two Harvard scientists. Max Es- 
sex and Phyllis J. Kanin, have 
found that a species known as the 
African green monkey, which lives 
in the same region as people who 
have since contracted the disease, 
carries a virus very similar to the 
AIDS virus. 

Tests of its molecular structure 
show that it (Offers only slightly 
from the AIDS virus, named 
HTLV-3 by Dr. Gallo of the Na- 
tional Cancer Institute and LAV by 
French researchers. 

It is not known whether the virus 
makes these African monkeys rick, 
but the same virus has been found 
in several species of monkeys in 
primate research colonies in the 
United States, sometimes causing 
an AIDS-like disease. It is called 
SAIDS, for simian, or monkey. 
AIDS. 

Reports from Zaire indicate that 
some people there kOl and eat mon- 
keys. Contact with monkey blood, 
some speculate, may have been the 
first infection of human beings. 

The monkey virus and AIDS vi- 
rus are so similar it may have re- 
quired only a minor mutation to 
produce one from the other, mak- 
ing it capable of invading human 
cells. 

Il is thought the mutation may 
have happened during the 1960s 
because frozen blood specimens 
taken from 7 pi mans a round 1970 
indicated exposure to AIDS. Simi- 
lar samples from around 1960 show 
no evidence of AIDS. 

Whenever the AIDS virus arose, 
it has clearly been spreading in Af- 
rica longer than in the United 
States. The vims appears to have 
infected a far larger percentage of 
Africans than Americans. Reports 
from Zaire suggest it is transmitted 
primarily through heterosexual 
contact among people who have 
many sex partners. 

AIDS is also thought to have 
appeared in Haiti before reaching 
the United States, and many epide- 
miologists suspect that American 
homosexuals picked up AIDS 
while vacationing in Haiti, long a 
favored resort for gay men. Despite 
the speculation, they still cannot 
show how AIDS might have trav- 
eled from Africa to the Caribbean. 

Researchers at the U.S. Centers 
for Disease Control say it appears 
that the first infections of homo- 
sexual men in the United States 
occurred in the mid-1970s. But un- 
like many other deadly infectious 
diseases, which strike quickly and 
ldD within hours or weeks, the 
AIDS vims attacked slowly, imper- 
ceptibly at first, with symptoms not 
evident for years. 

While the first cases were not 
recognized until 1981, doctors have 
since traced cases back to 1978, 
mainly in New York City. The 
roughly 200 cases reported in 1981 
had mushroomed to 12,736 cases 
last month. 

Epidemiologists tracking AIDS 
found that while it spread more 
slowly than the fearsome plagues of 
the past, it is much menu deadly. 
Bubonic plague and cholera killed 
about half their untreated victims. 


smallpox as many as 40^ercaaL^ 


A 


sharing hypodermic needles, trans- 
fusion of blood products or to an 
unborn child during gestation or 
just after birth. 

In contrast, the great plagues of 
the past swept indiscriminately 
through whole populations, spread 
by air, water, insects and poor sani- 
tation. 

But the slower pace of the AIDS 
epidemic is offset by a potentially 
more frightening uncertainty about 
who is infected and what may hap- 
pen to them. 

The U.S. government’s best esti- 
mates suggest that 5 to 10 percent 
of those infected will come down 
with AIDS in five years. 

About 25 percent will get a syn- 
drome, also over a five-year period, 
known as ARC or AIDS-related 
complex, which causes vague 
symptoms such as fatigue, low- 
grade fever, swollen lymph nodes, 
diarrhea and weight loss. 

More limited follow-up suggests 
that anywhere from 5 to 20 percent 
of ARC cases may go on to get 
AIDS, but for the rest the symp- 
toms of ARC persist, according to 

okigy of the Cotters for^Disease 
Control’s AIDS branch. 

Because AIDS is so new, re- 
searchers have also tended to un- 
derestimate its incubation period. 
Blood-transfusion cases now aver- 
age about two and a half years from 
exposure to development of dis- 
ease, but some ran tafce more than 
five years. 

A mathgmaiir«i model devel- 
oped by (be center that lakes into 
account slower-developing cases 
projects that the average incuba- 
tion may lengthen to more than five 
years, with some lasting beyond 12 
years. 

And becaase the virus may insert 
itself into the host’s own genes, the 
effects of the dormant AIDS virus, 
some experts speculate, may not 
show up for decades, perhaps not 
until old age when the immune sys- 
tem normally weakens. 

“One of tbe most disturbing 
things about it is that you don’t 
know someone is ever safe once 
they have been infected,” Dr. Jaffe 
says. “You could develop AIDS at 
any time from now on. We have to 
assume that anybody who is truly 
positive'’ on the blood test “is po- 
tentially infectious to others.” 

But the deciding factor as to who 
may be vulnerable to the disease 
may be a person's state of health, 
says Dr. Fauci. 

Most people in the hardest hit 
groups already have infections 
from other sexually transmitted vi- 
ruses, such as hepatitis B virus and 
the Epstein-Rarr vims that causes 
mononucleosis. 

These groups include not only 
homosexual men and heroin ad- 
dicts who share needles but the 
African victims as wed. The rela- 
tive absence of these other infec- 
tions among heterosexual Ameri- 
cans may put them at much lower 
risk of getting AIDS. 

Experiments in Dr. Gallo's lab 
have shown that AIDS-infected T4 
cells growing in a test tube can five 
indefinitely, dying only when ex- 
posed to some unrelated foreign 
protein that stimulates them into 
action. Dr. Gallo says it is possible 
that a human infected with the vi- 
rus could at least postpone the on- 
set of AIDS if he avoided ordinary 
infections. 


The death rate for all U_S. AIDS 
cases to date is SO perce n t — 6,376 
deaths. But the disease takes years 
to Iritl its victims. Among those 
discovered during the early years of 
reporting, the death rate approach- 
es 100 percent. No one has been 
cured. 

“Once you get the disease it is 
essentially, uniformly fatal," said 
Dr. Fauci. “That’s unprecedent- 
ed.” 

Officials at the Centers for Dis- 
ease Control woe alarmed at tbe 
rapid spread, but reassured, at least 
at first, that the disease appeared to 
be transmitted only through sexual 
transfer of semen or blood, through 


Many healthy but infected 
pie may still be contagious, 
ding viruses into their blood and 
virtually all other bodily fluids. No 
one knows how easily viruses in 
such Quids can infect other people 
but both Dr. GaHo and Dr. Fauci 
say that intimate trigging, in which 
saliva is exchanged, could well 
transmit the disease if the uninfect- 
ed person has any cuts, sores or 
hlf^riing gums in the mouth. 

One of the more puzzling new 
findings suggests such access routes 
to the bloodstream may not be nec- 
essary. Dr. Gallo’s lab’s finding 
that AIDS virus can infect epitheli- 
al cells fining the eyes raises the 
possibility that tire AIDS virus may 
also be able to infect similar cells 
that tine most surfaces of the body. 
But there is no evidence that the 
virus can enter tbe body through 
such cells. These findings were dis- 
cussed at a recent scientific meeting 
but their significance is not fully 
understood. 

In the meantime, better under- 
standing of the virus is helping sci- 
entists design drugs to intmerc 
with its survival and, ultimately, a 
vaccine that would protect those 
not yet exposed. 

Researchers from three centers 
in the United States and others in 
Sweden and Scotland are collabo- 
rating on a prototype vaccine that 
has been given to rhesus monkeys 
at Duke University. Tbe monkeys, 
which produced antibodies after 
receiving the vaccine, have recently 
been infected with the AIDS virus 
and researchers are waiting to see 
whether the antibodies prevent the 
virus from invading monkey cells. 

Earlier experiments showed that 
while tbe AIDS virus does not 
cause disease in the monkeys, it 
does reproduce in their cells, which 
then dump quantities of new vims 
into the blood. If the vaccine 
works, it should prevent this viral 
replication. 

One potential problem is the fact 
that the AIDS virus exists in many 
slightly different forms, the result 
of minor mutations that altered die 
precise molecular structure of the 
virus’s protein coaL It has just been 
found, however, that one part of 
the protein-coat molecule is the 
same in all forms. Researchers 
hope that antibodies to this non- 
variabk part will be enough to pre- 
vent all forms of the virus from 
infecting cells. 

The prototype vaccine is made 
from a specially engineered version 
of the coat proton containing the 
nonvariable part Monkeys immu- 
nized with the vaccine are bong 
deliberately infected with widely 
different variants of AIDS virus. 


“If this works, well have the 
start of a vaccine that could be 
purified and tested for toxicity be- 
fore we can use it on people.” says 
Dani Bolognesz. of Duke’s cancer 
research center. “By the turn of the 
year, we may know whether we 
have something.” 

In tbe mean tune, health officials 
urge the public to reduce the risk of 
spread by changing sexual behav- 
ior, particularly by avoiding multi- 
ple sexual partners. 

“I t hink that we have to look at 


the scientific advances in two 
ways,” says Dr. Jaffe. “We have to 
marvel at how quickly the cause 
was found and how quiddy a blood 
test was developed. All of that 
rnftV** us optimistic 
“But,” he adds, “looking at the 
practical problems ahead, we can’t 
count on a vaccine or an effective 
drug in the next several years. De- ; 
spite the remarkable accomplish- 
ments in AIDS, science isn’t going 
to save us at this point. We have to 
save ourselves.” 



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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1985 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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1 rang pool m □ huge, exotic. weU- 
eered ter garden, tor sale from prv 
vale. US$330,000. Please reply to HI 
• Box 2683, LKT, Fnednchsfr. 15, 6000 
.Frankfurt/Main 

WEA VILLA 4 nan. wtA beach, 5 min. 
drive boat harbor. VBa 3 bedrooms, 2 
bctfh*. fireplace. FuSy Fumahed, jpo- 
aous bedroom & bath area, covered 

■ n open ton aces, pool, esabfc sh ed 

E den, USS 100,000. Townhouse 2 
booms, 2 balm, general descrip- 
tion simitar la vffla IJSSfflJDOC). + 
rentals aba avertable fee viDo&town- 

houseLCrJ to pJ71 1330269. 
MINORCA- OWNB SHIS tfirect 7W 
sqm. land, owtooking San Bou 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

GREAT BRITAIN 


beoete. Price: 5F60.000. inducing 
texMna permit & villa drawee Teh 

508 OmiTit 216235 


SWITZERLAND 




Tour Grite 
21/2526)1 


_ ZURICH 

New 200 sqjn. lake view house, 30 


km n«w nouse, ju 
nxmites from Zurich, for sale to foreign. 
era. Please rmjly to Bax 2180, IKT.. 
Fnedndatr. 15, D-6000 Frankfurt/ Man 


USA GENERAL 




USA RESIDENTIAL 

PALM BEACH FLORIDA- New. world 
renowned Breakers HcjJeJ C un d omir s- 
ixxL Private sab by owmer: Inti, bv- 
srnesswtxnen/ art collector wJ sell her 
exclusive 3500+ square fool, 3*ed- 
roam with oceai view terraces apat- 
ment with oir-cordSiioned beachfront 
cabana Indudes complete hotel & 
dubs ammenties. Gxnpbtion June 
1986. Hie only 3 bedroom avalable; 
uraque to dis opartment: spacious, 
'private, garden patios for entertcnn- 
ment, overlooEm golf dub. 
$1,3/8^00. Prinmfe only contact: 


Robert Larson, 10250 Coins Avenue, 
Bd Harbour, Honda 33154 USA. Tefc 
305 861-90& 

NYC 43£tory CONDO 

Dag Hammarslqdd Tower 

240 EAST 47th ST. 

1 Bock To United Nations 
-SPECTACULAR- 

1. 2, 3, & 4 Bedroom Apartments 
tmrnrcSate Occupancy 
New Full Service Budding With 
Swimming Pool. Health Oub end 
Housekeeping Services AvaUtie 
RENTAL* APAKTMEN15 
ARE ALSO AVAILABLE 
For lido CoD 212-7398844 
■ Sat, Sun 11-4; Mon to Fri 9-5 


CAMBRBGE, MASSACHUSETTS 
New luxury condomnums on Tha 
Charles River in Harvard Square. Am- 
menities include health dub. Allaid and 
room service avalable from the 
Charles, adjacent new inti, das hotel 
Abo a few wits avalable for rankA 
CoS or write Ate, Cwone, Charles 
Square Associates. 124 ML Auburn 5L, 
Cambridge. MA 02138 (617) 491-6790- 

DALLAS PENTHOUSE • 2 story, 3/4 
1/2 with unsureassed view of Dalasi 
Total scanty & privacy inducing per- 
sonal elevator. Valet parking, swim- 
ming, •amis ft poly room. Sad com- 
plete with Art Deco / Contemporary 
Fu rni s hi ngs. $1 <800,000. Contact: 
Arita Artstdn. 6021 Berkshire Lane, 
Dallas Texas 75225. Jan Nobel Red- 

tori 214 369-6200 

TRUMP TOWERS Condo Apartment; 
on fifth Av. m N.Y.C Spacious one 
bedroom-one aid a naif marble 
bahs. Decorator furnished. Southern 
& Western Gly views. Month Mointe- 
nanefc 5605. Price 57 50 000. Phone 
012) 486-1617 or write Mr. dark 721 
fifth A*. N.Y.C. 10022 


•enna 6 party ri 
with Art Deco / 


NYC - Sunny, qwet comer epatment, 1 
Large becroom & 1 smdl bedroom or 
rfcxnfl area 24 hoa doormen. 116 
beths. Great dose! space. Modem 
burking Greiner cy Park Area 
S22S.MM T efc (212) 4754204; M. Mor- 
tefl, 521 fifth Awl, NY, NY 10017 

PARK AVB4UE A 58TH STREET. De- 
luxe corner q aartmem. 2 bedrooms, 2 
baths with separate maid's room & 
bath. Completely refurbished, new 
baths, new kitchen. Asking S800.000: 
Pnndpdv Bax 2684, Her3d Triune, 
92521 NeuiRy Cedar, France, 

NORTHEAST FLORIDA. Luxurious 
home bu3t 1981, 6800 square ft. (630 
rajrv) J480.000 .For detab ad 904 
3JSJ365 or write M. Mtabo«fc Route 5 
Bax 430, Watkg Florida 32077 Bo- 
ken Welcome. 

DARIEN A NEW CANAAN GoraacS- 
cut. Executive type homes for rent & 
sale. Pleasort N.Y. Gly suburb. 
French spoken. Natexiwide connec- 
tions. GaMTiabam RE. 2034557724. 

equity for Paris mortment. Write D. 
Greenwood, 1ST So^SepiAeda 


BIvcL Los Anodes, CA9002S. 

UNK3UE HOUSE OUahqma Gty. Pri- 
vate golf & terns dub ft* attached. 
1 oafwood VduT^OOjmCtack 
sole $299^1IM. Tefc Geneva 280075 

PARK AVENUE CO-OP. High Root, 
fabulous view, eomdrwy renovated. 
5239 JJOO. Owner 212 6864516 

USA 

COMMERCIAL 
St INDUSTRIAL 



REAL ESTATE 
TIMESHARING 

HEAUJOLAIS CHATEAU. WcxAJ you 
51* to be the owiter for Ete of a 
urique time sharing prajed for less 
then 55000 ri heart at France a 
srane'i throw From tha famous Bur- 
gundy vinyards. For further detai 
tend name aixkadrkms to Dor. Pore 
da la Cbdenefle, 122 rue du Com. 
Rodand. 1300BMaraeiHe. 

REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

con D'AZUR - VOICE 
Beautiful 9,500 sq.fr. basftde with 
p a n o rami c tea view 
B bedrooms, 5 bates, tagg heeled 
pod, I acre garden. FaLOOCv monte. 
For details please apply: 

JOHN TAYLOR SJC 
Route de Sard Pod 
06480 La Cole Sur Lotto 
Teh (93) 32 B3 40 

GREAT BRITAIN 



8,000 sqjn. park. pier. Unob s tructed 
view, paaL Summer & Winter salons. 
5 betkooms, 3 bdhs. Tek (3) 975 65 93 
/ 43» 95S 72 CM. 


UNIQUE IN PARIS 

To rent Seek 15 - Nov. 30 
Saped) HOUSEBOAT ideal for 
Jadutts- SGT 770 20 32 

SHORT TERM STAY. Advantages of a 
hotel without inconveniences, fed or 
home in mce studos, one bedroom 
and mare in Park. SORBJMi 80 rue 
de rUdversirt. Paris 7th; 544 39 40 
SHOW R04TALW PAMS. Studkss 8.2 
rooms, (Ml, central, recently deco- 
rated- Week or month. Tel evenings: 
PI 916 32 19 


< PAMS LA D TOISt Hicte dan 6-7 
roam. 2 baths, term, rl 5,000 net. 


roam. 2 baths, term rl 5,000 net 
Tek pi) 64 24 28 or 774 76 25, 

NEAR MONTPARNASSE. Lag* 
beautiful otafier, deeps Igor den. Tek 
3257833/ 542 4? Bd/MIQom- llore. 

FffiAR BASTILLE Independent roam m 
private Hat, for 1 month or more. AI 
comforts. No Agents. Tel 370 08 98. 


MONCEAU. 10 TO 22 SOT. A rice 
stusfa, 55 sqjn. Terrific view, terraces. 

622*016. 

MONTMARTRE Sumtyside. equipped ! 
duplex sluefo. RlOOO/monm. No 1 
agent. Tek 226 74 08 Sunday, noon . 


duplex sluefo. RlOOO/monm. No 1 
agent. Tek 226 74 08 Sunday, noon 
ST. CTLMA1N DES PRES. Luxurious 
beaut&Jy appointed itixfio apart- 
mete. 1 bedroom, fate 326 87 g 
LOVH.Y DUPLEX SORBONNE area, 
1300 ft. My equipped, Oct-June. Tefc 


SHORT TBM in Latin Quarter. ! 
No agents. Tefc 329 38 81 I 


MARA IS. Lux urious 3 room, tunny, 
qriet, F7200 owner. Tefc 857 9921 
5TH SORBONNE 3 bedroom, sut 
pcofassor. F850a Tefc 621 32 71 

I PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


ETANG-LA-VILLE 

MODBEN HOUSE, reception. 6 bed 
roams, 3 bates, in 2400 sqjn parte + 
heated swimnwig paaL R/.OG0 
EMBASSY SHSftf563 68M 



CENTRAL LONDON ■ Exsscute* ser 
vice t tau rtmen te “* new buWKigt 
comfortably furnished and W 


Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 
Hotel Suite 
Residence 

offering 

pre-opening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

featuring 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 

Executive Services Available 

Model Suites 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE B.V. 

Detune remote. VaienuKtr. 174, 
Amsterdam. 020421234 or 623222 


PETER BRUIN MAKBAARDU 
krtY Homing Servic e R onf n te 
Anuta, dan. Teh 020-768022. 


ROME, ELEGANT, spacious, Sumy, 
fully furnished representative 7th 
Hoar (rir-concttionea c uar tmert with 
2 double bedrooms, 2 bathe, fuBy 
equipped kitchen, reception, dning 
room, various buft-in cupboards & 
storerooms. Largely terraced, over- 
looking Monte Mono, dose to river & 
dty center. Free imnwetafety. Phone 

Rome 870496 office hours. 

ROME VIA MARGUTTA (off Piazza <£ 
Spagna) in prestigious cowiyard wite 
private perkina redecorated and fur- 
nished or parnafiy furnished luxury 
150 sqjn flat, 2 bedrooms, 1 bcXh. 
targe recaXtaa maamuai 1 year. IT. 
Lffic 3SD0JXX) monthly not negotia- 
bta. Cofl 063507P8 office hounT 
MILAN RJRMSfSD APAWMBH » 
let S90Q monthly. Monaco 30 52 39. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

SBVES-MRJDON. ftesidGntial apart- 
ment. 3 bedroom s , double Eving, 
equipped kitchen. Bathrooms, ter- 
races, cefar. Gtvages plus parking. 
Walking distance la Olyimxc pool. 
hofMraSng, int'L school, SI. Uoud 
park & train Vorion. Free for rent 
6.500 F funxshed. charges mckxtad. 
For sale now 1,180,000 fr by owner. 
26 tan Binefles. Tel: oanderge 534 46 
67. Serves or Owner, Houston Texas 
713 464-1907 

74 CHAMPS-RYSEES 8tfi 

Studio, 2 or 3-room aptxlmenL 
One month or more. 

IE OAJBDGE 359 67 97. 


IRELAND 

THATCHD COTTAGE Ireland. South 
Coast fishing vdtage. Peaceful sw 
ronmene. ffigOO/mbteh 053-29644, 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

SECOND HOME/ FRANCE- New 
Yah couple seeking hotart hAy re- 
stored, modest sxed second home in 
the Lore River Valley not more than a 
3 hour drive from Charles De Gudta. 
Airport. Chateau has ample bad, 
modern conveniences and eady ate 
sertee mdnhmed wite no more than 
8 roams. AO repies should be in En- 
afah, prompt action assured. Box 
2654. ftrald Tribune, 92521 Neuffly 

Cedar. France 

WANTS) FOR K3UOD 20th Dec - 4th 
Jan. a family dialer in the French or 
Swiss Alps, irinemmi 4 bedrooms & aS 
usual services. Top references avo3- 
able. Please reply « Bax 41621, 
LH.T.. 63 Long Ace, London. WGHL 


GERMAN ROFESSOR rioting Sor- 
borxie Uraveruty is looking for a cmuI 
sSudta From Nov. 1. 1985 to Jan. 31 
1986. Write Bax 2192. IH.T. Frieder- 
idep-. 15, D-6000 Fiankfurt/Maa 
VSMCEr WANTH3 preferably on 
Grand Canal, historical tedding, 1 or 
2 bedrooms, sdan. bathroom, Ix4a> 
ny. Quick setflemertt. TeL Sydney Aus- 

trafia 102) 32 34 12 


SSONG MADM5 APARTMBfT. 
N.Y. couple needs 1 year fumiteed, 2 
betkoom near Foawdel Retire. 
Starting Octobet I S. 01217244264. 

EMPLOYMENT 

EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 

TECHNICAL EXPERT. Intensive expert- 
era (aw 20 yarns) in tH phases of 
apparel produdtan operation), quaS- 
ty control matogra. supervising new 
program in imdevelopea fadoria. 40 
yean old. mulffingual. wstfog to tan 
an estabtahed company wfxdi nas 
production in Eastern Europe. At pre- 
sent tune employed in Mdde East. 
Reply to BaxB6362 WWD, 7 - E 12 
5treel. New York, NY 10003 
BUSNSS EXECUTIVE 36. British 
Chartered Aoakrtx (rCA), multna- 
txnd backgroimd. Slanguages, pres- 

v^'^mps^ioni^^SHftase. Has 
lime avniUile for 1 or 2 new dtants 
on asstanment boss / IK representa- 
tion efc Bax 41624, LH.T., 63 Lang 
A an, London WC26 9JH, UX 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 

TRAVa COMPAMON- SopNsfiaded 
Canadian professonal tody seeks eth- 
ical wed eshtelished travel compan- 
ion. Address, photo & p hon e to- Bax 
2677. Herald Tribune. 92521 NeuAy 
Codex, France 

GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 

VETERAN AMERICAN NEWSMAN. 

Well grounded n eckting, production. 


graphics; estaUshed , „ 

& foreign corre sp ondent far major US 
newsprperi strong on geo-pofctia and 
the Third World. Conuder aiy locu- 
tion with challenging tab. Bax 2648, 
Hertid Triune, 92571 NeullyCedax. 
France 

ENGUSH CHMJFFHIR t Persond As- 
stetant, 46, seeks fufl time pouttan. 
Rok Royai certteaHe. Member of 
Institute of Advanced Motorists, etc 
Tefc London pH 907 1034 

MULTILIN GUAL AD MINISTRA TIVE 
(mutant, 39, brood educotionm back- 
ground, efficiency, seeks post Storting 
17 Sept. Cab and u tportmerls the 
weekend, fan 554 04 II. 


MCE H4TH1JG04T HOSTESS, 24, 
don. 11pm. 

GOMAN FASHION MODEL Wei- 
educated, mukiingual. looks for inter- 
wting potation. Laidon 2450080. 

IVY LEAGUE GRADUATE- seeks post 
m London in business with opportunity 
for growth. Enc USA 212 348-7808 


for growth. Eria USA 21 2 3487808 

SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

MIMEDVK SEBCS for AMB0CAN 
FRMS in PAHS, 

EngSsh. Beldan, Dutch or German 
seaehvies, knowledge of French re- 
quired, English shorthand. B&igud 
tefaxntv wrile or phono: 138 Avenue 
Viaor Hugo, 75116 Paris, fiance. Tefc 
727 61 ST 


Don’t mae 
NIBNATIONAL 
SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

in tfao IHT QaonSod Section. 

EDUCATIONAL 

posrnoNS available 



DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

AU PAIR - MANHATTAN 

fa 4 year old gH. light housekeeping. 
Immcaaie. Forward detailed latter ft. 
photo to B. Budthcftz, 450 Ave. of the 
Americas. N.Y., N.Y. 10011 USA 

DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 



AUTOMOBILES 



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AUTO SHIPPING 

IU. IMPORTER of European automo- 
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AUTOS TAX FREE 


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AUTO EXPORT TO: 

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4- Worldwide delivery of new and 
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-I- Worldwide Export of spare ports 
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Armoured cars and Emousews 
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World wide deivery 
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D.O.T. & EJA. 


Switterlcnd-UK-W. Germany 

BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
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AND SAVE 

WRITE FOR ms CATALOG OR 
FRS BUY-BACK FOLDS TO: 
5HVSIDE B.V., P.O Bax 7568, 1 HBZH : 
Anuterdon Airport, The Netherlands. 
Phone (020)152fw3. Tekne 12568 

SHIPSIDE Inc, 576 fifth Avem. 

7th Hoar, New Vork, N.Y. 10036, US* 


SHIPSIDE Inc, 576 fifth Avenue. 
7th Roar, New York. N.Y. KXBdJjSA. 
Phone rflJ) 869-4484. Teknu 427965 

SHP5DE SA, QiauHca de Wavre 

Fh^S JSm^90 


ASTON MARTIN 

One of a kind. New, Vantage/Vatonte 
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Now in showroom at 

US 

AUTOMOBILES 

EXTRAORD1NA1RES 

MONTE CARLO 

TeL (93 25 74 79, 

Thu 479550 Auto MC 
TESTAROSSA orrivmg n 2 months 


NEW AMBUCAN CARS 

If you widi to purchase a new American 
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We gel and service the Fufl range of 
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Ford/ Lincoln, Chester & American Mo- 

S i n dwing Gatom4hdt Limousines 
Recreahond Vetedei. 

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Col or telex 
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MONTE CARLO 
Tefcjra25 74 32. 

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Place Your G ossified Ad Qufddy and EadHy 

in the 

INTBUNATIONAL HRALD TRIBUNE 

By Phone: CoS your bed IHT representative with your text. You 
w9 be iirf or m ed of the cost fcnmeiSoSety, and ana prepayment is 
mode your od vriB appear within 48 hours. 

CcMh The banc rate is $9130 per Ene per day + bod ttnus. There are 
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CzwdB Ccnh American Express, Diner's Ckib, Eurocard, Master 
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_ SWISS IMMIGRATION 
Obion residency in Switzerland. 
News 2nd Primari-Report 

IMMOSBtVKXCH-MIl Cixoilmil I 
Tefc CH 9T/68 78 87. Tbc 73726 


SHUNG OAUCUM 1878. 41 x 28. 
Siied. FSOOjOOO. Paris 223 64 62. 

EDUCATION 



HEAD OFFICE 

Pane [Far dauified onlyf- 
747J64XL 


AmstodaoK 26-36-15. 
Athens: 361-8397/36G242I. 
BnxndK 343-1899. 
C open h age ro pi) 329440. 
Frankfurt: (069) 72-67-55. 
LcHHanne: 29-58-94. 

Usboru 67-27-93/66-25-44. 
London: pi) 8364802. 
Madrid: 455-2891/455-3306. 
Mflare (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (02) 41 29 53. 
Room: 679-3437. 

Swede n: (OB) 7569229. 

Tel Aviv: 03-455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 

UNITED STATES 

New York: pi 2) 752-3890. 
West Coash (415) 362-8339. 

SOUTH AFRICA 

Bfywnlun: 421599. 


LATIN AMERICA 

Baenoe Airec 41 40 31 
Pept 312] 

Crxuun. 33 1454 
GaayaBil:51 4505 
lima: 417 052 
Panama: 69 05 11 
San Jaeec 22-1055 
Santiago: 6961 555 
Saa Paata: 852 1893 

MIDDLE EAST 

Bahrain: 246303. 

Kuwait: 5614485. 
Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
Qatar: 416535. 

Saudi Arabia: 

Joddah: 667-1500. 
UAL Dobd 224161. 

FAR EAST 



AUSTRALIA 

Melbourne: 690 B233. 
*^9**39,957 43 20 













LML SA 

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DEALER FOR BELGIUM 

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rue MDDELBOURG 7482 
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ENGUSH EXPERTS 

We speak the language of Tax-free 




University students set up barricades in Santiago, the C h ilea n capi tal - 

3 Are Killed and 10 Wounded in (Me 
As Thousands Protest Against Regime 


PORSOO. BMW, 8 ROLLS ROYCE 

LH/RH drive. New & Pre-Owned. 

B years experience in Inport/Expon. 
Documentation, sbppmg etc 
USA our sieadty. 

Taka Lxl v untug a of our experience. 

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aouiiimoulh, b wlad 
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10 YEARS 

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TRANSCO 

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Td 323/542 62 4a tCmDF TRANS B 


The Associated Press 

SANTIAGO — Police reported 
that three persons died and 10 were 
wounded by gunfire as thousands 
of fTiilanns took 10 the Streets 

Wednesday in the largest anti-gov* 
eminent demonstrations of the 
year. 

The protests and a strike by 
some transport workers paralyzed 
parts of Santiago, Concepddn and 
Valparaiso, Chile's major cities. 

Meanwhile, political leaders 
opened a nationwide petition cam- 
paign to end militar y rule. 

Police said two persons in their 
20s were shot to death in incidents 
after dark during disorders in sepa- 
rate slum districts of Santiago. A 
16-year-old youth died of a bullet 
wound in the abdomen in what 
police called a “confusing inci- 


dent” as 100 demonstrators at- 
tacked a community center in the 
eastern slum district of Penalolen. 

Police reported 314 arrests in six 
cities, and 30 stores looted in Santi- 
ago. Sixteen bombs exploded be- 
fore dawn in Santiago and at least 
eight commuters were injured as 
gangs threw rocks and firebombs at 
buses, police said. 

■ Petition for Gvffian Rule 

The plan for a petition campaign 
to end militar y rule was drawn up 
last week by 11 opposition parties, 
including the moderately leftist 
Democratic Action coalition as 
weQ as rightist groups according to 
a New York Times report from 
Santiago. 

Democratic Action, which con- 
sists of six parties, called on Chil- 
eans to protest peacefully Wednes- 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, for im mofl uta deSvory 

FROM STOCK 

Bart mvTtt, rtii ppi o fe iimx omo, 
bond, co n v uni o u in USA 

RUTE INC. 

TAUNUSSTR. 52,6000 FRANKFURT 

W Germ., tel (0)0-232351, At 411559 


OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 

Sore 1 972, axpaienesd cor trader fbr 
Mercedw. Panda, BMW Jaguar, ku- 
mexfiate deSvery. knporl/Bxpbrt, LL5. 
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By Clyde Habennan 

New York Timet Service 

TOKYO — The United 
States, Japan and Panama have 
agreed to study the feasibility of 
widening the Panama Canal or 
perhaps replacing it with a new 
sea-level waterway to connect 
the Atlantic and Pacific 
Oceans. 

For several years, Japan and 
Panama have expressed interest 
in digging a second canal, a pro- 
ject whose costs were estimated 
at $20 billion six years ago and 
probably would tie higher now. 

Hie current canal, completed 
in 1914, is too narrow and shal- 
low to accommodate modem, 
bulk-cargo carriers and super- 
tankers. Ships are limited to a 
maximum of 65,000 tons, and it 
usually takes them 20 hours or 
more to make the crossing. 

The most widely discussed 
plan — as well as the most ex- 
pensive — would be a sea-level 
canal, essentially a straight- 
away ditch to connect the two 
oceans and replace the existing 
system of stepped locks that 
raise and lower ships along a 
50-mile (81 -kilometer) route. 

Japanese business leaders 
have pressed especially hard for 
a new canal project because 
they regard major construction 
programs overseas as a way to 
offset a decline in dramatic new 
projects at home. 

“It would benefit Japan very 
much,” a Foreign Ministry offi- 
cial said, noting that a new ca- 
nal also might reduce shipping 
costs for Japanese companies 


im p ortin g coal, oil and grain 
from South America and the 
eastern United States. 

A report published here last 
year said that about 30 percent 
of the cargo ships passing 
through the present canal are 
Japanese flag carriers. 

According to an American 
official, the agreement, readied 
this summer, does not commit 
the three countries to a particu- 
lar plan or even to any action at 
alL The feasibility study is ex- 
pected to take four years, start- 
ing in 1986, with the S20 million 
in estimated expenses to be 
shared equally. 

Three baric possibilities will 
be examined — enlarging the 
existing canal, building a new 
one, or improving rail, highway 
and pipeline links across the 

Panamanian i<rthmnc 

A Japanese national newspa- 
per, Yomiuri Shimbun, report- 
ed this week that tbe agreement 
would be signed formally in 
New York later this month by 
Secretary of State George P- 
Shultz and by Foreign Minis- 
ters Shrmaro Abe of Japan and 
Jorge Abadia Arias of Panama. 
But the Japanese Foreign Min- 
istry official said that details 
had not been settled. 

Under a treaty signed by the 
two countries in 1977 and rati- 
fied by the U.S. Senate tbe fol- 
lowing year, Washington is sm?- 
posed to yield full control of the 
canal to Panama on Dec. 31, 
1999. The treaty also guaran- 
tees that American money will 
be available for the sort of feasi- 
bility study about to begin. 


day bv the agreement and 

returning to their homes. 

The demonstrations that dis- 
rupted activity in the central area 
of Santiago were led by a Marxist 
coalition that has not signed the 
agreement, according to sponsors 
of the petition. 

“I consider today a success in 
every sense,” Ricardo Lagos, the 
vice president of Democratic Ac- 
tion, said Wednesday. 

The petition agreement, readied 
with the help of die Roman Catho- 
lic Church, calls for a direct elec- 
tion of a president and a congress 
in 1989. 

Tbe government’s plan calls for 
thefonr-memberjunta to nominate 
a single presidential candidate for 
approval m a referendum in 1989 
and for congressional elections a 
year later. 


PandQueries 
U.S. Officer’s 
Ties to Rebels 


New York Timet Service 

WASHINGTON — The chair- 
man of the House Select Commit- 
tee on Intelligence said that the 
involvement of a ranking member 
of the National Security Council 
with the rebels fi g htin g to over- 
throw the Nicaraguan government 
may have violated the law. 

Representative Lee H. Hamil- 
ton, an Indiana Democrat, also 
said Wednesday that the intelli- 
gence committee would begin hear- 
ings Sept. 17 to investigate tbe rela- 
tionship between the rebels and the 
security council, a White House 
agency. 

Mr. Hanriltou said the hearings 
also would examine how the Rea- 
gan administration plans to Spend 
the S27 million in nonnriHtary aid 
to the guerrillas that was approved 
by Congress in July. 

Reagan administration officials 
have admowdedged that the Na- 
tional Security Council official. 
Lieutenant Colonel Oliver L. 
North, has been involved in rebel 
activities and assisted in private 
fund raising, including using a gov- 
ernment plane in Central America 
and elsewhere. 

A senior U.S. official also has 
said that Colonel North gave mili- 
tary advice to the Nicaraguan 
Denxjcratic Force, the largest rebel 
group. 

Since the reports of Colonel 
North's involvement. President 
Ranald Reagan and U.S. officials 
have said that he neither broke the 
law nor violated its spirit. 


Troops Fired 
On Refugees f . 
Id Honduras, 
Killing 2 

By James LeMoyne 

New York Timer Service 

COLOMONCAGUA. Hondu- 
ras — Eighty Honduran Army sol- 
diere entered a United Nations 
camp for Salvadoran refugees here 
last Week and killed two refugees, 
wounded 13 and beat 25 others, 
according to officials of four inter- 
national relief organizations that 
work in tbe camp. 

The attack was thought to be the £ 
first in which the anny of a host 
country had IriDed and wounded 
refugees in a UN camp in Latin 
America. 

Honduras and the UJS. Embassy 
have asserted that the camp, six 
miles (10 kilometers) from the Sal- 
vadoran border, is used as a rest 
area by Salvadoran guerrillas. The 
army said in a statement that it had 
entered the camp seeking guerril- 
las. 

During the attack last Thursday, 
Gloria No6mie Blanco, 2 months 
old, was kicked to death by a sol- 
dier, according to five relief offi- 
cials, including those belonging to 
the Office of the UN High Com- 
mi cti nner for Refugees. The five 
spoke in separate interviews. 

Of those wounded by bullets, <r- 
they said, two were 4-year-olds: 
Juan Pfcrcz and Elias V&squez. Ma- 
ria del Carmen Salazar, 19, also 
was shot, as was Santiago Hernan- 
dez, 70; a deaf mate, according to a 
list of victims collected by relief 

nffirowls. 

“The camp looked like a battle- 
1 fidd,” a relief official said. “The 
refugees are terrorized.'' He said 
the shooting lasted 45 minutes, and 
several hundred bullets were fired 

Roman Catholic Church offi- 
cials in Honduras have condemned 
the attack, as has the UN refugee 
office. 

The Colomoncagua camp houses 
at least 9,200 refugees who fled 
Salvadoran Army repression in 
1980 and 1981. 

Four, relief officials said die 
Honduran soldiers entered thet^f 
camp last wed: shooting that the 
refugees were Salvadorans who did 
not belong in Honduras and that 
they should leave or be lolled Re- 
lief workers said they thought the 
attack had been designed to force 
the refugees out of the camp. 

The Honduran Army said that 
troops had entered the camp to 
arrest Salvadoran guerrillas who a 

government informer had said were 

hiding there, posing as refugees. 
The soldiers killed one person sus- 
pected of bang a guerrilla, who had 
tried to seize a soldier's gun, tbe 
army said. 

Then, it said, the troops fought 
their way out of tbe camp and one 
soldier was slightly injured. Ten 
refugees who the army said were 
Salvadoran guerrilla commanders 
were taken for interrogation. 

All 10 hdd UN identity cards 
giving them official refuse status, 
a UN official said. . 

It is not dear why troops fired ^ 
several hundred bullets to protect 
themselves against unarmed refu- 
gees and why, if there was resis- 
tance, more soldiers were not in- 
jured. The attack was commanded 
by Major Miguel Ramirez of the 
10th Battalion in the town of Mar- 
cala, the major said in an interview. 

The Honduran Army is trained 
and closely advised by the United 
Stales. Michael O’Brien, a UJS. 
Embassy spokesman, said that the 
embassy “ess enti ally supports” the 
Honduran Army account of what 


las had provoked the army opera- 
tion by using the camp, he said 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6» 1985 




Page 7 


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me Hearts and Minds in China 


By John F. Bums 

y0r * 77/7,0 Sen-fa- 

Rkhard M- Nixon vis- 
llM a Qanese college campus this week.it 
j^POTmseent of his best moments on the 
trail, with people' 

■ 'lll^ Tftr ~ 1 ... 


• ine lormer president, beaming, had to wait ' 
whDe accompanying Chinese cttfuaals cleared 
a iMtti for him out of an aoditoiiiim where he 
addressed several hundred students 
taoilty members. 

“Tdank you, t han k you, thank you very 
^uch, he said as he disappeared a 
Red Hag Umousine of the kind commonly 
used by China’s senior leaders. 

. Mr. Nixon, 72, is on his fourth visit here as 
a priv ate ai lzttu, but it is for Ms first visits as. 
president in 1972, that he is appreciated by 
Chinese. The visit ended more thaw two de- 
cades of estrangement between China and the 
United Stales and Launched a relationship 
that has been carefully fostered by both sides.' 

PlnTMM I tT 1.J 


ultimately forced Mr. Nixon .to resign the 
presidency in 1974. Although the Communist 
period in power in. China is rife with exam- 
ples of leaders who have been purged or 
assigned to m enial tasks , the errors for which 
they have been stripped of power almost 
invariably have been political, not legal or 
constitutional. 

.. Besides, the Chinese tradition places a high 
premium on loyalty to old friends, and Chi- 
nese officials have made dear that no foreign- 
er ranks higher than Mr. Nixon in this regard. 


Brforete^«chal ti«^Umy*asit^ of In- 
ternational Business and Economics on 
Wednesday, there was an ovation when Shi 

Wpcaw; VK* mesident of the university, de- 
scribed Mr Nixon as “an oldfriend of Cm- 
na"snd M a jnah vriJh “the boldness of vision 
'esf : an outstanding .statesman." - 
• The fanner. president, who is on a 25-day 
tour of 10 nations, mainly in Asa, has re- 
ceived courtesies reserved for China s most 
priVfltoed gdests- sine* arriving in Beqmg 
from Tokyo on Toesday. Hc was met at the 
'■nponby Zbu Qizben, a deputy foreign mra- 
isioTand is staying at the Dvaoyutax state 
guesthouse, where he and Henry A. Kissinger 
a^otiated the Shanghai Communique with 
Thn 11 Ealai in 1972. 

■ Thr off W«t Chine se news aycrury. Xinhua, 
reporting bn-a. banquet given for Mr. Nixon 
by the foreign miiuster, Wu Xueqian, took 
the unusuid stop of saying that he was expect- 
ed to meet with Puna's top three leaders. 
Deng Xiaoping, Hu Yaobang and Zhao 
Zayang. Such meetings almost never are an- 
nounced beforehand, and it is generally only 
serving heads of state and government lead- 
ers who meet aD three men. 

in ah his vials asa private citizen the 
former president has been entertained in Chi- 
na, but the affection for him has not been so 
plainly on display previously. In part, this 
appears to reflect a Chinese judgment that 
Mr. Nixon has regained some of his standing 
with the American public, and can thus be 
honored without risk of offending opinion in 

the United Slates. 

Also, the political relaxation fostered by 


thal wouftl brJebeea IrownetPon only three 
years ago, when Mr. Nixon was last in China. 

The scene in the college auditorium was char- 
acteristic of this. Only recently would Chi- 
nese students have dared to mob a visiting 
dignitary and thrust forward copies of his 
books, as they did Wednesday. 

In his speech, Mr. Nixon traced the strides 
that rtitwa and the United States have made 
in their relations since 1972, and struck 
themes that seemed to go down well with 
high-ranking Chinese who attended. 

Ins tred of applauding Mr. Deng’s adop- 
tion of capitalist economic techniques, a pos- 
ture common enough among recent visitors 
to discomfort many Chinese officials, Mr. 
Nixon adopted a more allusive approach. 

“It is not for me, or for others in America, 
to tdQ China wbatits economic system should 
be," he said. “What the people of China want 
will not be in all respects the same as what the 
people of the United States would want. But 
m some respects it will be the same. The 
bottom line test of any economic system, as 
you know better than f, is whether it works. 

He answered questions from the students 
and won his strongest applause with a refer- 
ence to a remar k that he said had been made 
about fhin* by Napoleon. 

Mr. Nixon said: “He said, ‘China, there's a 
sleeping giant, don’t awaken her because 
when you do she will move the world.’ Well, 
Ortna is awake today, China is alive, and 
with the help of your generation China wiD 
move the world in the paths of peace and 
progress for all people." 





Kim, Under South Korean Watch, Treads Warily Ererything’s right here in the Philippines. 


By Sam Jameson 

Lot Angela Times Serna 
SEOUL 1 — Almost seven months 
after returning from exile in the 
United States, the dissident leader 
'Kim Dae Jung still is watched 
closely by government agents and 
‘feels unable to meet with ordinary 
South Koreans. 

Mr. Kim, who returned to South 
.Korea on Feb. 8, is aware that 
President Chon Dob Hwan can re- 
impose at any time a suspended .20- 
year prison sentence for sedition. 
Tbe 1980 conviction prevents Mr. 
-Kim from joining a political party 
or running for office.' - 
In a recent interview, Mr. Kim 
.said that the government had dam- 
-aged his image through, “dirty 
„ tricks," such as ordering the press 
. to misreport his actions. - 
•, Yet the 61 -year-old opposition 
’ figure has managed id.regam a po- 
tation of pr ominenc e,* fact that -is 
underscored byrMr. 'Chun’s refusal 
to grant him amnesty from Iris con- 
viction oh what the U-S- State De- 
'Partment has called “farfetched 
.charges,” 

WhOe the only official restric- 
tions on Mr. Kim are political, he 
noted that about lOOpoliceoffiazB 
.were deployed in thendghbbdibpd' 
'around iris honle. . ■ . 



Kim Dae Jung 

He said that every time he leaves 
Ms bouse, he is followed by three 
cars— r one from the internal secu- 
rity agency of the armed forces, one 
from the Korean foreign intelli- 
gence agency and another dis- 
patched by the police. 

' “In reality,” Mr: Kim said, “I 
can’t meet even one average par- 
son, becanse to do so would be an 

imposition on any such person.”' 

Mr Kim came dose to being 


elected president as the opposition 
candidate in 1971, the last year 
South Korea held free elections. He 
was kept under house arrest or 
jailed for most of the last seven 
years of President Chung Hee 
Park's rule. 

He was freed after Mr. Park was 
assassina ted in 1979,. only to be 
arrested »g»m on sedition charges 
after Mr. Chun seized power in 
1980. Mr. Kim was condemned to 
rir-ath j but intervention by U.S. ad- 
ministrations resulted in a reduced 
20-year sentence. 

For 13 years, Mr. Kim said, he 
has been unable to visit Ms birth- 
place in the southwestern city of 
Mokpo. 

He said that if he viated Kwang- 
ju, the provincial capital, “several 
hundreds of thousands of people 
would gather immediately." Nearly 
200 people were killed in Kwangju 
in 1980 during an insurrection to 
protest Mr. Kim’s arrest 

Any visit that aroused a public 
demonstration would give the gov- 
ernment an excuse to accuse Mm of 
“instigation,” the opposition leader 
said. 

Mr. Kim said he believes that z 
popular demand far democratic 
rule is eroding Mr. Chun’s power, 
giving the president only two 


choices: to revise the constitution 
to allow a direct presidential vote 
in 1988, or to keep the mflilaiy- 
backed government in power 
through suppression. 

He described the first option as a 
“common-sense" approach to solv- 
ing South Korea's political prob- 
lems. 

If the constitution were amend- 
ed, Mr. Kim said, the opposition 
would promise not to seek revenge 
agains t Mr. Chtm and his adminis- 
tration if democratic forces 
achieved victory. If the opposition 
lost the election, he added, it would 
accept defeat 

Mr. Kim called on the United 
States to obtain assurances from 
the Chun regime that the military 
will not interfere in politics in 1988. 

The United States maintains 
40,000 combat troops in South Ko- 
rea. In addition, a four-star US. 
general heads the UN Command, 
which controls the 625,000 men in 
South Korea's aimed forces. 

“The greatest damage that can 
occur to security is for the military 
to participate in politics," Mr. Kim 
said. “Therefore, for the sake of 
security, not for the sake of Korean 
politics, the U.S. commander must 
continually insist that the military 
not participate in politics." 


% 


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Plants have fed the world 
and cured its ills since life began. 

Now we’re destroying their principal habitat 
at the rate of 50 acres every minute. 






Mr. 





W e live on this planet by courtesy 
of the earth’s green covet Hants 
protect fragile soils from erosion, 
regulate tbe atmosphere, maintain 
water supplies for agriculture and 
prevent formation of deserts. Without 
plants man could not survive. 

Yet, knowing this, we are destroying 
our own life-support system at such an 

alarming rate that it has already become 
a crisis— a crisis for ourselves and an 

even bigger one for our children. 

The figures alone should tdl the story 

- we destroy a tropical rain forest three 
Kmw the gfae of Switzerland every year; 
within 9J5 vears onlv fragments of the 


vast Malaysian and Indonesian forests 
will remain. 




>• 

' •> 


-y£, 1 


Photo: Cauite»y of Rkliwd Evans Sdunlus 


ur. nicruuu cwna uuwmh. -J 

Botanical Museum at Harvard Unxoemty, has 
spenttt years in Ae Amazon jungle coBedmg 
die 'magic' plants of myth and legend and 
making them available to Vtestem methane 
and science. ^ drugs of tte future!' he says, 
groto in the primeval jungle!’ 

What we are destroying 
Much of the food, medicines and 
materials we use every day of our lives 
is derived from the wild speoes which 
grow in the tropics. Yet only a tiny 
fraction of the world’s flowering plants 
have been studied for possible use. 
Horrifyingly, some 25,000 of all 
flowering species are on the verge of 
extinction. 

Once the plants go, they are gone 
forever: Once the forests go only 
wastelands remain. 


Photo; Marfc J. PioUrin 
Crthnninikus roseus. Many of the world’s 
dddTenatohaoesufferrtfrmle^^ 
turn alive due to dm properties discovered in 
die rosy pernoinkle, zokiai originated tn 
Madagascar inhere 90% of die forests are 
already destroyed. 

Who is the villain? 

There is no villain - except ignorance 
and short-sightedness. The desperately 
poor people who live in the forests have 
to dear areas for crops and fuel, but 
they are doing this in such a way that 
they are destroying their ^ very Kvelihood. 

Add to this the way in which the 
heart is being ripped ont of the forests 
to meet the demand for tropical 
timbers and we have a recipe for 
disaster. 



domestic varieties, ensure that Ireland mill 


What can be done about it? 

The problem seems so vast that there is 
a tendency to shrug and say “What can 

I do?" But there is an answer There is 7 . 

something that each and every one of 
us can do. 

the WWF Plant 
Conservation Programme 
The World Conservation Strategy, 
published in 1980, is a programme for _ 
conserving the worlds natural resources 
whilst managing them for hu man 
needs. A practical, international plant 
conservation programme has been pre- ■ 
pared based on W CS principles ana is 
now well under way all around the workl. 



The Vavilov Centres. Named after the Russian 
scientist who identified them. These are the 
regions in which our major crop plants were 
first domesticated. Many of these regions 
contain tcild or semi-domesticated rdatrivs of 
commercial species which can be cross-bred with 
crop plants in increase yield and resistance to 
pests and diseases. 

Von can become part of it 
The WWF Plant Conservation 
Programme is a plan for survival which 
you can help make a reality. Join the 
World WilalifeFund now. We need 
your voice and your financial support. - 

Get in touch with your local WWF 
office for membership details, or send 
your contribution direct to the World 
Wildlife Fund at: WWF International, 
Membership Secretary, World Conser- 
vation Centre, 1196 Gland, Switzerland. . 


p: WWF/H.Junghc' 


imped out its entire crop, leaving a million 
people to die of starvation. 


& 


Save the plants 
that save us. 


WWF FOR WORLD CONSERVATION: 


Photo: (Fore*) Bruce Cofcman/Briin Cwrfei 








I 


Page8 


Ueralb 



PnUbbnl With Thf Vx York Time, rod IV lFaddupoe Pom 


(tribune. 


Obsessed With the Deficit 


You can already hear the question: Why 
worry so much about the budget deficit? The 
U.S. economy is adjusting to it, the suggestion 
goes, and things are running smoothly, so set 
aside your petty obsession with government 
bookkeeping and try to enjoy prosperity like 
everyone else. For 40 years, according to one 
view, the deficit has been an indispensable 
stabilizerfor the economy; it is an old friend. 

It is true that inflation rales came down 
while the deficit went up tn the years 1980-82. 
There were two recessions in that period, of 
which the second pushed unemployment to its 
highest postwar level. We have argued that if 
the nation had gone into those recessions with 
lower deficits, it would have come through 
them with lower interest rates and less p ain. 

It is also true that interest rates can some- 
times fall while the deficit rises. That hap- 
pened most spectacularly in the summer and 
fall of 1982, and the reason was, once again, 
that the recession was approaching its trough. 
The rising deficit, in classic fashion, then 
pulled the economy into a rapid recovery. But 



explain why long- 

over 10 percent a year, at a time when inflation 


is down to 4 percent If the deficit were lower, 
interest rates would be lower. But American 
interest rates have to remain high enough to 
draw in foreign money to finance current bor- 
rowing. both public and private. Americans do 
not save enough to finance it themselves. 

There are three good reasons to keep worry- 
ing about the deficit First: Interest on the 
federal debt is taking a large, rapidly increas- 
ing share of the budget, pre-empting public 
.resources far better spent on public services. 

Second: It is burdening the country with a 
large foreign debt Paying interest on it will 
adversely affect American living standards. 

Third: If the country goes into the next 
recession until a big deficit, it cannot risk 
letting the deficit expand in the normal fashion 
to generate a recovery. The United States went 
into the 1980-82 recessions with a deficit less 
than 2 percent of gross national product, and 
came out with a deficit over 6 percent. If it goes 
into the next one with the deficit at 6 percent 
of GNT\ would any president dare let it swdl 
to 10 percent? That threatens uncontrollable 
inflation. But not to let it expand would mean 
enduring a recession far worse than the one 
in 1982. Not to worry, you say? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Offshore Ofls Take the Risk 


Occasionally someone accuses the U.S. Inte- 
rior Department of selling out to special inter- 
ests; but this time, the charges are especially 
intriguing. The “special interests*’ now are 
environmental groups, and the cries of sellout 
come from the energy industry, angered by 
Secretary Donald HodeTs tentative decision to 
dose most of California’s offshore waters to 
oQ exploration for the rest of the century. 

Mr. Hodel’s apparent motive is honorable. 
He wants to negotiate an end to the long, bitter 
dispute over the disposition of some of Ameri- 
ca's richest potential oil reserves. But a look at 
his proposed agreement suggests that both the 
industry and the public have reason to object 

Most of the oil yet to be discovered in the 
lower 48 states probably lies under the shallow 
waters of the outer continental shelf, and much 
of that is off the California coast. But since the 
big oil spill in the Santa Barbara channel in 
1969, residents along this magnificent coast- 
line have lobbied effectively against develop- 
ment. The deal that Mr. Hodel negotiated with 
environmental groups and their friends in 
Congress would open 150 tracts for leasing. 
But barring a national emergency, the remain- 
ing 98 percent of offshore oil properties would 
be closed to exploration until the year 2000. 

! His willingness to give ground is under- 
standable. For four years the House, by a slim 
majority, has blocked all development, and 
prospects for overriding House opposition are 
poor. So any concession from environmental- 
ists could be interpreted as a victory for devel- 


opment. But the oil companies disagree. They 
argue that the tracts to be opened probably 
contain only a tiny fraction of the 5 billion to 
10 billion bands potentially recoverable. They 
want the secretary to negotiate a more favor- 
able deal. If be cannot, they would prefer to 
take their chances with the next Congress. 

Which policy best serves the public? There is 
a strong case for accelerated development. Oil 
is now in glut worldwide, but within a decade 
the market will almost certainly tighten. Un- 
less more oil is found to replace diminishing 
domestic reserves, imports are likely to grow 
from about a third of consumption to a half by 
the end of the century. Without California’s 
offshore petroleum, the search will be far more 
costly — or fruitless. 

There is always some risk of a major oil spQL 
But that risk should be taken in perspective. 
Regulation was tightened after the Santa Bar- 
bara accident; the record of drfllere in Ameri- 
can waters has been excellent since. In fact, 
acquiring more offshore oil probably reduces 
environmental risks; oil that is piped from 
offshore wells is (ess likely to spill and pollute 
beadles than is oil imported by tanker. 

One price of a high living standard is poten- 
tial risk to the environment. Often that risk is 
not worth bearing — but tt is in this case. 
Secretary Hodd is holding public hearings on 
the offshore drilling and plans to make a final 
decision this month. He should hold out for 
more rapid development. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


For a Self-Policing Press 

At the core of recent signs of public hostility 
to the press is the feeling that it gets away with 
being arrogant, cruel biased and contemptu- 
ous of everyone’s privacy but its own because 
it never has to suffer for its sins, except in libel 
suits, and only the rich can afford to bring 
them. Otherwise, many people seem to feel 
while newspapers and television gleefully ex- 
pose all kinds of wrongdoing by public offi- 
cials. hardly anyone continually exposes jour- 
nalistic malpractice. 

If, however, newspapers and broadcast sta- 
tions were seriously to regard the failures of 
the press as a vital pan of the news, investiga- 
tory press criticism could finally flourish in the 
land. The current low credibility of the press 
would rise because readers and viewers would 
see that the remote, imperious Fourth Estate is 
not immune from accountability. And the ac- 
curacy of the press would improve: No jour- 
nalist wants to be publidy humiliated for play- 
ing a story like a bush leaguer. 

— Nat Hentoff in The Washington Post 

Don’t Circumvent GATT 

While rejecting quotas on shoe imports, 
President Reagan also announced an initiative 
to use the powers of his office to go in hot 
pursuit of unfair trading practices by other 
nations. He wiU invoke Section 301 of the 1974 
Trade Act to bring, on behalf of the govern- 
ment, complaints against practices deemed un- 
fair by trading partners of the United States. 

That section of the law had been the prov- 
ince for industries to bring grievances against 
other nations. The government of the United 
States then adjudicated the controversy. The 


new proposal would convert the executive into 
both prosecutor and judge. 

There is room for aggressive trade advocacy 
on the part of the U.S. government. Such a 
posture would reassure congressmen trying to 
respond sympathetically to constituents heavi- 
ly battered by imports and struggling to break 
into tight export markets. But the better route 
for that advocacy is the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade — however glacial its re- 
sponse. however slothful the role of allies. 

— The Los Angeles Times. 

Moscow Looks to Siberia 

A recent Politburo derision to pour more 
resources into West Siberia is dosdy connect- 
ed with the Soviet need to earn foreign curren- 
cy for grain imports. As the dismal perfor- 
mance of Soviet agriculture shows, capital 
investment is not enough. Because of Siberia’s 
climate and lack of communications. Soviet 
specialists calculate that it costs three times 
more to raise output by one ton and transport 
it to the consumer than it would to save a ion 
through economies. But it is not easy to make 
Soviet workers economize state property. 

— The Tunes (London). 

Pulling the Plug on the Rand 

Last month's failure by President Pieter 
Botha to deliver even minimalist reforms- that 
would have assuaged white business criticism 
has led to the plug bring pulled on the rand by 
investors around the world. Until Mr. Botha 
starts to enfranchise the black community in 
his country. South Africa is likely to remain 
something of a financial leper. 

— The Guardian (London). 


FROM OUR SEPT. 6 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910; A Palace Intrigne in Peking 
PEKING — The daily conferences between 
the Viceroys Yui Cheng Hsi Liang and Chang 
Yen Omen and the members of the Govern- 
ment, at which the proposed recall of Yan Shih 
Kai to office has been the chief subject of 
discussion, are proceeding. Palace intrigues 
are apparently exercising a powerful influence, 
and Yan Shih KaTs prospects are dedining 
owing to the obstruction of the Empress Dow- 
ager’s party, winch is striving for mastery. The 
scheme now in the forefront provides for the 
Empress Dowager supplanting the Regent as 
nominal head while a council of three, consist- 
ing of two princes and a Manchu Minister, 
would direct affairs. This is regarded as a futile 
and probably final effort to restore a reaction- 
ary government under female control. 


1935; Borfesqae Girfs on Strike in U.S. 
NEW YORK — Dancers and chorines from 
the burlesque circuits of the East joined the 
ranks of strikers today, charging that their art 
had been reduced to the status of “coolie 
labor.” The strike is reported to be followed in 
all Eastern dries. The New York girfs refused 
to appear lac the matinee. Instead they gath- 
ered in front of the burlesque houses along 42d 
Street, telling passersby they were forced to 
work 84 hours a week for a pay as low as 521. 
The unannounced strike has thrown conster- 
nation among the managers, who have profit- 
ed from the large number of dancers and 
chorus girls out of work to fill up their casts 
with unemployed workers on their own terms. 
Many of the42d Street bouses run continuous- 
ly from early morning till after midnight 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n 1 92 S- 1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. PuNuher 

Extaafa Editor REHt BONDY Damn Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor RICH ARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

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France. Tel.: (t) 747-1265. Teton 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 

Director de la publication: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters, T4-34 Hetmessy Rd, Hong Kang. TeL 5-285618. Tdex 61 170. 
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U.S. subscription: 5:22 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Long Island dip, N.Y. 1II0I. 

C 1985, Inurmuumal Herald Tribune. AS rigfas reserved. 



The New Summitry: 
A Path for Reagan 


By William S afire 


W ASHINGTON — In the new 
summitry, the media are the 
sherpas. Having foolishly begged 
for a meeting with the new Soviet 
Leader. Ronald Reagan has been 
rocked back on his beds by the 
Gorbachevian response: a beauti- 
fully orchestrated barrage of public- 
ity aimed at raising hopes for a 
dramatic American concession. 

Americans are now saying to the 
world. “Don’t expen much, while 
the Russians say, “Expect plenty — 
and if nothing comes of lie meet- 
ing, it’s all the Americans' fault.” 

How should the president adapt 
to the new summitry? He should 
recognize that the drum beating in 
the foothills means his long-sought 
qinrmit meeting has already begun. 
And he should make these points: 

1. “Star wars" is already a bril- 
liant success because it has induced 
the Russians to talk of arms reduc- 
tions. The American deriders of the 
feasibility of a space-based missile 
defense were shown to be mistaken 
when the Russians treated it as a 
real threat to their long reach for 
superiority. Senator Robert Byrd, 
the West Virginia Democrat, re- 
ports from Moscow that Mikhail 
Gorbachev is prepared to “put for- 
ward the most radical proposals on 
strategic arms," but not until Mr. 
Reagan agrees “to prohibit the mili- 
tarization of space." 

The Russians, of course; do not 
really expect the Americans to 
abandon the one idea that has 
brought them back to the table in 
return for a pig in a poke. !□ the 
early 1970s, the United States gave 
up anti-ballistic missile defense in 
the hope of limiting offensive build- 
ups, but dial did not work; it surely 
will not be duped that way again. 


Mr. Reagan should point out pub- 
licly that any new limit on a defense 
shield must be accompanied by seri- 
ous reductions in existing warheads. 
No package, no deal. 

Nor should America buy the So- 
viet “arms race in space" rhetoric; 
space is “militarized!” by an inter- 
continental ballistic missile travel- 
ing through it, not by a shield to 
stop that missile. A nation that al- 
ready has deployed a system to kill 
satellites can hardly complain, as 
Mr. Gorbachev does, of a Second- 
generation’' anti-satellite system. 

2. Why do the Russians insist on 
warhead superiority? They have 
7,900, the United States has 7,500; 
U.S. delegates have proposed in Ge- 
neva that both sides cut down to 
5,000. Thai is a constructive propos- 
al but the Russians refuse to give 
up their edge; instead they talk of 
limiting launchers, as if launchers 
kill people, and doubling the num- 
ber of warheads in each launcher. 
How many people know that it is 
Mr. Gorbachev, not Mr. Reagan, 
who blocks cuts in warheads? 

3. The United States is prepared 
to call the Soviet leader’s bluff on 
verificatioo-“We are interested in 
reliable verification of any agree- 
ment as much as they are," Mr. 
Gorbachev told the editors of Time 
magazine. Great But satellites can- 
not verify everything: Mr. Reagan 
should start pressing now, publicly, 
for on-site inspection, which the 
Russians cannot reasonably refuse 
if they are “serious” — then: favor- 
ite word — about arms control 
How many people know that Mr. 
Gorbachev turned down an invita- 
tion to view a U5. test for fear of 
setting aprecedent that might apply 
to one of his tests? 



4. Do not let the Russians limit 
the agenda to backing America off 
on nussfle defenses; linkage lives. 
Neither the junketing senators nor 
Time’s editors apparently troubled 
Mr. Gorbachev with questions 
about his crackdown on dissidents 
in Gorlti, his pouring of aims into 
Syria and Libya and other sponsors 
of terrorism, his Central American 
ventures or his new slaughter in 
Afghanistan. If he gets testy about 
those subjects, so be it 

5. Pick up on his hints at openings 
rather than wait until formal pro- 
posals are made. Moscow’s official 

ition at Geneva (forbidding all 


research into space defense) 
has been ally — both sides win 
continue such resean± and both 
rides know it. Mr. Gorbachev has 
now acknowledged this, which calls 




for a response from Mr. Reagan, 
who should not be the one standing 
on ceremony. An American propos- 
al to share a certain type of defense 
research is one possibility. 

Similarly, General Edward L. 
Rowny’s ears perked up at the unex- 
pected Russian use of the word zar- 
adyi — “explosive charge” — which 
could indicate a willingness to dis- 
cuss warhead reduction. The next 
Gorbachev intern ewer should try 
probing there. 

If there is to be a superpower 
agreement its outline is no secret: 
verifiable warhead parity and non- 
aggressive Soviet behavior in return 
for a limit on testing space defenses. 
Unlikely, but a good deal all 
around; if it comes about hats will 
be off to the Dew summitry. 

The New York Times. 


Time for America to Talk With Black South Africa 


S AN FRANCISCO — Except for 
the white right in South Africa, 
everyone seems to recognize that po- 
litical power-sharing, if not outright 
majority rule, is inevitable. What is 
not inevitable is an American policy 
of diplomatic segregation that puts 
the United States in the unenviable 
position of bring on both the wrong 
side, and the losing side, of South 
Africa’s incipient civil war. 

If President Reagan is really inter- 
ested in “constructive engagement," 
then he should integrate his policy by 
constructively engaging South Afri- 
ca's credible leaders, black and white. 

Recent initiatives by the State De- 
partment offer at least a glimmer of 
foresight and flexibility. Last Friday 
the adminis tration called on Pretoria 
to include the outlawed African Na- 
tional Congress in any future negoti- 
ations and to release the rebel group’s 
jailed leader. Nelson Mandela. 

Earlier this summer the adminis- 
tration approached third parties 
about the possibility of opening talks 
with the African National Congress, 
according to Johnny Makatinl ANC 
director of imernanonal affairs. This 
would be a significant departure 
from earlier refusals to have any offi- 
cial contact with the group. 

“We are talking about talking," 
Mr. Makatini said during an inter- 
view last month ai the United Na- 
tions. He warned, however, that be- 
cause some U.S. officials have 
repeated Pretoria’s claim that the 
ANC is a “terrorist organization” 
and Soviet-influenced, the talks 
would have to be held publidy. 

One rationale for talks with black 
South Africa is that the minority gov- 
ernment does not even assert that it 


By Michael Calabrese 


represents the interests of the black 
majority. It calls them citizens not of 
South Africa, but of the 10 uibal 
“homelands.” Washington’s diplo- 
macy should be consistent with its 
stated policy calling for power-shar- 
ing between blacks and whites. 

Another reason is that long-term 
American interests in the region no 
longer coincide with those of Pre- 
toria. If unrest can be suppressed, 
Pretoria will once again put off fun- 


toria may some day be forced, by 
events or by the pressure of sanc- 
tions, to join. If the United States can 
set itself up as an “honest broker," as 
Britain did in Rhodesia (now Zimba- 
bwe), maybe it can prevent a blood- 
bath by locking relatively moderate 
black and white leaders into a peace 


r-line dements. 

To accomplish this, the United 
States must open talks with credible 


The United States may be able to prevent a 
bloodbathby locking modentieblackand white 
leaden into talks before radicals supplant them. 


damental reforms. But each cycle of 
unrest and repression produces a new 
generation of black leaders more mil- 
itant, and less prone Co compromise, 
than their elders. 

2 found black and progressive 
white leaders to be increasingly anti- 
American and accepting of the no- 
tion that apartheid rests on white 
racism and Weston capitalism. The 
perception of U.S. complicity in 
propping up apartheid strengthens 
the position of radkab bent on estab- 
lishing a one-party state modeled 
along Soviet lines. 

The longer apartheid persists, the 
more likely it is that a Communist 
regime will emerge from the final 
chaos and align itself with the Soviet- 
bloc nations that now supply aims to 
the African National Congress. 

Talking to both sides can serve as a 
framework for negotiations that Pre- 


blade leaders — not exdutivdy with 
the African National Congress, but 
also not exclusively with men such as 
Chief Gatsha Butnelezi, chief minis- 
ter of the KwaZulu homeland, who 
most blacks see as serving the inter- 
ests of the Botha regime. 

One obstade is that white 
sion and black division make it i 
cult to assess which of several feuding 
factions must be indnded to ensure 
that any compromise meets with 
widespread acceptance. 

The most intractable split is be- 
tween Wades such as Grief Buthelezl 
who administer the homelands and 
townships on behalf of the govern- 
ment, and the resistance groups who 
view them as puppets. Urbanized 
Wades, who represent half the non- 
white population and virtually all the 
activists, despise the homeland lead- 
ers and township administrators. 


The black resistance is itself divid- 
ed ideologically between so-called 
Charterist and Black Consciousness 
groups. The ANC and most of the 
more than 600 community and youth 
groups affiliated with the United 
Democratic Front, the nation's larg- 
est anti-apartheid alliance, endorse 
the Freedom Charter. The 30-year- 
old charter is a declaration of inde- 
pendence from apartheid that calls 
for a multiracial democracy based on 
a vaguely defined form of socialism. 

The Black Consciousness Alliance, 
led by the Azanian People’s Organi- 
zation, embraces a more communal 
socialism and rejects any white role in 
ruling Azapi^as it : calls the c ountry 

er than^at of Che M- mfl/t nn mem- 
ber United Democratic Front. 

This lack of a unified black leader- 
ship magnifies the importance of Mr. 
Mandela as the only individual with 


itiate on behalf of all blades. 

Even a May survey by Qanga, the 
ZaJo-langoage newspaper, found 
that 50 percent of the blacks in Kwa- 
Zulu homeland consider Mr. Man- 
dela their political leader. Chief 
. Buthelezi and Bishop Desmond Torn 
placed a distant second and third, 
with 28 and 12 pereenl respectively. 

In areas populated by other ethnic 
groups, the African National Con- 
gress president, Oliver Tambo. Bish- 
op Tutu and the Reverend Allan Boe- 
sak, a co-founder of the United 
Democratic Front, would follow Mr. 
Mandela in popularity today. 

With Mr. Mandela in jail and 
United Democratic Front leaders on 
trial for treason, access remains die 
second obstade to talks with credible 
black leaders. It wQI undoubtedly 
hasten tfadr release, however, if the 
United States opens talks with the 


An Island 
Of Change 
In China? 

By Anthony Lewis 

X IAMEN. China — Yves Bind is 
a boat-builder who could have 
stepped out of a French film: *8 
years old. with a luxuriant mustache 
and a large straw hat. He used to 
build boats in Taiwan. Now he makes 
luxury vadus in the People's Repub- 
lic of China, 48-foot fiberglass sloops 
and ketches that sell in the United 
Stales for 5} 35.000. 

Mr. Binet is one of four foreigners 
ar the Celestial Yacht Co„ a Chinese- 
American joint venture. It prorides a 
small example of how work incen- 
tives and other new economic ideas 
arc supposed to be introduced in Chi- 
na's four special economic zones. 

“The bonus system has revolution- 
ized the yard." Mr. Binet said. “We 
give bonuses for quality of work, 
quantity and efficient use of materi- 
als — all agreed with the Chinese 
managers. It was hard at first for 
people to understand that if they 
worked harder and better, they'd get 
more. Now everyone wants iu" 
Xiamen (pronounced SHAH -men) 
is a small aty on China's southeast 
coast across from Taiwan. It is actu- 
ally an island, linked to the mainland 
by a causeway. The old town is won- 
derfully picturesque, with arcaded- 
streets and wooded hills. One can see 
it used to be a backwater, but now 
construction is everywhere. 

The deputy mayor. Jiang Ping, ex- 
plains that Xiame n decided to im- 
prove its infrastructure first in order 
to appeal to foreign investors. It built 
an airport, a new railroad station, a 
deep-water port. It has a computer- 
ized telephone system that allows di- 
rect diauag to other countries: not 
exactly the usual tiring in China. 

The city has also started its own 
airline, because it was not satisfied 
with the national airline's service to 
Hong Kong and elsewhere. It has 
bought two Boeing 737s; pilots and 
cabin crew are now tr ainin g in the 
United States, and flights are due 
to start in November. 

Foreign investors in the special 
economic zone get many advantages. 
Mr. Jiang said they can bring in raw 
materials and equipment without 
duty, and can import items for per- 
sonal use. such as appliances, without 
duly or restrictions. The corporate 
tax is IS percent, half the usual rate; 
tax holidays may be negotiated 
The most surprising thing Mr. 
Jiang said was that Xiamen has bro- 
ken away from the work assignment 
system. For three decades everyone 
in China has been assigned to a work 
unit — a tire company, say, or a 
newspaper — and has had to stay 
there unless transferred. The worker 
had no choice, nor did the employer. 

“Instead of assigning everyone," 
Mr. Jiang said, “we advertise some 
johs. If people want them, they sign a 
contract that says they'll be fired if 
they don't do good work." 

Were the things described by Mr. 
Jiang really happening? In China, 
where so much goes on unchanged 
despite plans and promises, skepti- 
cism is necessary. I asked at one 
of the new enterprises in Xiamen: 
Xoceco, an electronics joint venture 
with a Hong Kong company. 

Xoceco occupies live brand-new 
biddings, 700,000 square feet (65,000 
square meters) altogether, in what 
Americans would can an industrial 
park. It started production early this 
year and is now up to 3 daily level of 
1,000 television sets and 3,000 radio- 
cassette players of all sizes. It will pay 
no taxes for five years. 

Young women wearing white 
gloves work on the assembly line. 
And yes, they were not assigned but 
recruited, as they graduated from 
high school or in some cases junior 
hi^h; they applied for jobs and took a 
written exam. The 7,000 workers 
punch in and oat on a time dock, and 
they get a bonus if the 


• XI -,T XW J* ml T \T • XT* • Umted States opens talks with the they get a bonus if they are on time 

Drawing Battle Plans for the Next famine d — 

In his last speech before he was At the Celestial Yacht Co„ Mr. 


L ONDON — As so often happens 
/ in war, the battle against the 
latest African famine is getting the 
full complement of needed resources 
just as the adversary is being over- 
come with the seemingly inadequate 
means already on hand. 

Maurice Strong, the energetic exec- 
utive director of the United Nations 
Office for Emergency Operations in 
Africa, made this point recently after 
reluming from 10 days in Sudan. The 
best rains in nine years had arrived, 
the peasants, near exhaustion, had 
planted seed in the country’s inhospi- 
table soils, and green was appearing 
all over. Morale, the key element in 
any battle, had been lifted. 

Although Mr. Strong is cautious 
about it, he believes the worst is over. 
The prediction his office made less 
than two months ago of 100,000 
deaths in Sudan — then called an 
“optimistic” estimate — will merci- 
fully not be realized. As in so many 
earlier famines, outsiders did not 
count on the peasants’ vitality and 
ideci- 
I hab- 
its. living off roots and berries. 

This is not to deride the interna- 
tional relief operation. Despite its 
slow start, mainly because Western 
governments refused to art on the 
early warnings, it has moved fairly 
rapidly and on the whole successful- 
ly. Even the Ethiopian rebel prov- 
inces of Eritrea and Tigre, once 
thought beyond the reach of the relief 
agencies because of the intransigence 
of the central government, ended up 
receiving substantial food aid 
Mistakes, such as the early U.S. 
decision to rely on rail transportation 
in Sudan, have been remedied: More 
trucks were brought in. 

Nevertheless, errors were made 
that should not be repeated Western 
governments must bad the UN early 
warning system being set up. Wealth- 
ier countries should be quicker in 
times of famine to give cash rather 
than grain — in many drought-hit 
countries locally grown food was 
available in some areas but the 
hungry had no way to purchase iL 


Bj Jonathan Power 


And donated grain must not be al- 
lowed to destroy local markets, as 
could happen with the harvest due in 
coming mouths. Western govern- 
ments should allocate funds to build 
storage silos in vulnerable African 
countries so today’s surplus grain will 
be available when famine returns. 

Even the organizers of the “Live 
Aid" operation made their share of 
mistakes. When what was needed in 
Africa was ready cash, winch they 
had to plug boles in existing pro- 
grams — to provide communications 
equipment, seed and trucks — they 
undertook the laborious task of start- 
ingtheir own projects. 

The Africans, as Mr. Strong ob- 
served, need “not a storm erf help, but 
lots of showers.” 

Now that consciousness has been 
raised the question is how to (urn it 
into the kind of steady, long-term 
help needed Droughts recur. In too 
many parts of the continent too many 
people are stretching natural re- 
sources too far. But there is room for 
maneuver if governments can pro- 
duce an environment in which devel- 
opment can take place. Some govern- 
ments have made it difficult for 
peasants to realize their potential, 
lumbering them with clumsy bureau- 
cracies and inadequate pricing poli- 
cies. Western aid agencies must foster 
institutional change that encourages 
farmers and removes disincentives. 

More money must go into research. 
While no “green revolution" is in 
sight for Afnca. the scientific battle 
must go on. Research centers such as 
the International Institute for Tropi- 


cal Agriculture in Ibadan, Nigeria, 
are beginning to make some impor- 
tant breakthroughs, particularly in 
cassava and cowpeas. 

In the end it wfll be a long slog 
coward gradual solutions. As Mr. 
Strong said: “We need to be patient, 
approaching Africa with a sense erf 
modesty, because we’ve been wrong 
so often in the past Some countries 
will continue to fall into the abyss 
and some money wiU go into the 
quicksands. But there wffl be centers 
of hope and these we have to recog- 
nize and reinforce. We must support 
African strength when it appears.” 

Above aD we must renew our faith 
in the African farmer. His resilience 
and ingenuity, his understanding of 
the environment must never be un- 
derestimated What he needs is 
steady encouragement by way of 
credit, help with pest control and 
steps to assure markets. Without that 
no improvement is possible: 

International Herald Tribune 
All Higher Referred. 


1 st speech 
sentenced to life in prison in 1964, 
Mr. Mandela expressed his admira- 
tion for Western political institu- 
tions. He noted, however, that “for 
many decades Communists were the 
only political group prepared to work 
with the Africans tor the attainment 
of political rights and a stake in soci- 
ety. Because of this there are many 
Africans who, today, tend to equate 
freedom with communism." 

Mr. Maadda rejected that 
lion, but a growing number i 
traied young blacks do riot. More 
moderate black leaders want to buDd 
a multiracial South Africa combining 
the best principles erf Western demo- 
cratic rights and Eastern distribu- 
tional justice. They should be treated 
as equals, not ignored. 

The writer, an attorney in San Fran- 
cisco , returned in August from three 
months working on human rights law 


Binet said organizing the work force 
had been a delicate business — and 
some foreign technicians who lacked 
(he needed patience had gone home. 
But now workers were willing to ac- 
cept new ideas, he said. The yard was 
turning out three yachts a month and 
starting to make money. 

“I can tell you it’s easier to build 
boats here than in Taiwan,” be said. 


y,:i 


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* . a 


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latious — once they wouldn’t let us 
install a radio. Here they let you 
bring anything in. It’s much easier to 
deal with the authorities." 

In other special economic zones > 
there have been reports of corruption ; 
and waste. Perhaps Xiamen will .- 
avoid the worst It has a long history ; 
of international trade; the tea for the ! 
Boston Tea Party came from this har- •* 
bor. It has a noted university, and a 1 
musical tradition. The skeptics have * 
reason for wondering whether C hina 


cases at the Center for Applied Legal can really change, but in this beauti-J 
Studies in Johannesburg tie contrib- ful place there is a feeling of hope. \ 
uted this view to The New York Times. . 


The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed "Letters to the 
Editor ” and must contain the writ- 
er’s signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
msohdud manuscripts. 


Reasons to Retract 

Regarding the opinion column “ In- 
adequate Libel Laws Put U.S. Justice 
in Jeopardy" (Aug 31): 

While Judge Irving R. Kaufman 
argues effectively for alternatives to 
libel suits such as statutory rights of 
reply and retraction, I believe it is 
wrong to say that such alternatives 
are not mandated by the Constitu- 
tion. The argument for finding a First 
Amendment right of reply or retrac- 
tion follows from the acknowledg- 
ment ibat the fundamental purpose 
of the First Amendment is to achieve 
the greatest (fiversity of views. It was 
thought by the authors of the Consti- 
tution that this would strengthen the 
nation by creating an informed and 
enlightened population. 

The recent concentration of power 
in the communications industry hns, 
however, defeated this objective; In- 
creasingly the voices heard in tire me- 


dia represent the views of a narrow trading and eventually dying frour 
and homogenous segment of Amen- hmg cancer due to inhaling the smoke! 
ran society. Given this change, the of one’s neighbors’ cigarettes. 1 




vS;V 


First Amendment mandates the indi- 
vidual right of reply or retraction. It 
is only through sod] a right that the 
underlying purposes of the Fust 
Amendment may be achieved. 

MICHAEL DAVID RIPS. 

Paris. 

Smoking and Flying 

. In the report “U.S. Passengers 
Choosing Seats in Rear of Airliners" 
(Aug. 16), which appeared before the 
disaster in Manchester, England, a 
man says that although he is a non- 
smoker he fdt compelled to sUin the 
rear of die plane, the section usually 
reserved for smokers. Let me point 
out that despite the recent major 
crashes, the likelihood of dying in a 
commercial airplane accident is sub- 
stantially inferior to the risk of con- 


cigarettes. 

OTTO H. NOWOTNY. ■ s 

Basel, Switzerland. ! ! 

Diplomats Oat to Pasture) i 

Regarding the report “U.S. Save - 
KGB Uses Chemicals on Diplomats’'} 
(Aug 22) by Don Oberdorfer: t ; 

_ 50 bold as to suggest to • i 

the KGB a new monitoring device ? ! 

that would not be a hazard' 1 The ? 
Soviet secret police should consider i ( 
attaching Swiss cowbells to ah for- 1 ! 
agn diplomats in Moscow. The citv f > 
would certainly be more pleasant / '■ 
sounding and tourism would likelv - 
pick up. KGB police could be freed , i 
tram then- tracking assignments to 
work on the next five-year plan. \ 

LENITA ROBBINS. '/ 

Founex, Switzerland. 



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Page 9 


Ballet P artnerships: 

Wliy the Famous Pairings 


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by Diane Solway 

C horeography, Mauria Be- 

n dance for two, that the heart of the balle? 

1>rp«gh the interplay of body and body, 
«: partners in apas dedenx evoke the S 
f human involvement, their art concealing 
rt to reveal onstage the illusion of effortless 
cpresstoo. Since ballet Dartnerinz reouires 


there was certain .repertory 2 couldn’t do 
with Margot Fonteyn-'’ 

New artistic director of the Paris Opera 
Ballet, and still a sought-after guest artist. 
. Nureyev says: “There is something impeding 
and cumbersome in running a company 
based on partnerships. If dancers want to 
grow, they have to split up." 

Though- Erik Bruhn describes his seven- 
year partnership with- Carla Freed in the 
1960s as “a love affair without scars, one 
consummated cm the stage," he admits its 


ngs are marked not only by technical mas- 
jay, mutual sympathy and good timing, but 
yy a snared alchemy that convinces the audi- 
fnce that the partners' energy emanaigy from 
a single source. . 

The annals of ballet are filia l with such 
lustrous couplings: Karsavina and Nijinsky, 
Pavlova ana Monfldn, Markova and DoUn, 
Alonso and Youskevitch. Danilova and 


triumphed over the challenges of partnering 
and left indelible impressions of its poten- 
tial- Each has danced with many others, but 
together they possess an overwhelming sym- 
metry. “A true partnership," says Antoinette 
Sibley of ballet mathematics, "is like the 
work of three stars." 

Today, however, the ranks erf the major 
ballet companies boast no apparent heirs to 
these celebrated partnerships: The tradition 
seems to have been usurped by practicality 
and by the ever evolving needs of dancers 
and companies. In its spring season at the 
Metropolitan Opera House, American Ballet 
Theater introduced its new production of 
Kenneth MacMillan’s “Romeo and Juliet" 
to New York with seven different pairs of 
dancers in the title roles in various perfor- 
mances. And in its return to the Met for two 
weeks, the company is presenting four pairs 
in the five scheduled “Romeo and Juliet" 
performances. This hardly suggests that one 
partnership is seen as emxedmg allothezs in 
star quality or box-office appeal 
Indeed, under Mikhail Baryshnikov's ar- 
tistic directioti. ABT has eschewed the trap- 
pings of a. star system add given increasingly 
more focus to its young dancers — no doubt 
in an effort to . maintain a -continuity of 
succession. Robert La Fosse, anABT princi- 
pal dancer who hasbenefi red fiom Baryshni- 
kov’s grooming, says flatly: 

•• “Th$r dance worid has changed. Today, 
the stare' are 'the choreographed 1 think 
people are coming'tb seethe ballets, they're 
not coming to see a particular dancer. It’s the 
ballet that counts. Companies have broken 
with the tradition copartnerships. Our reper- 
tory is so diverse, and dancers who are 
ma tched in one ballet may not look good 
together in another. You can’t ran around 
doing the same roles just because your part- 
ner isn't suited for a particular wort I 
wouldn’t want to dance every ballet with the 
same person. That kind of partnership 
would become stale." 

I N any case, Baryshmkov fears the loss 
of individuality that comes when two 
dancers fuse their talents: "One always 
tries to put two people together who look 
good together and who have an affinity that 
is interesting or a dissimilarity that is pro- 
vocative," he says. “But from a practical 
point of view, it is not necessarily the best - 
idea to keep two dancers together all the 
time. They become dependent on each other 
and sometimes the public becomes depen- 
dent oh a partnership rather than on the 
individual gifts of each dancer" . 

Rudolf Nureyev, whose liaison with Mar- 
got Fonteyn in the 1960s is almost legendary, 
believes dancers today want to be free to 
move around from partner to partner and 
repertory to repertory. “If you are knovm as 
a couple,” he says, "by yourself you ran t do 
anything. Dancing with Margot Fonteyn 
was a great moment in my life — it ^ * 
celebration when we danced together, luce a 
birthday. But this partnership kept me from 
partidpaing in different repertories, differ- 
ent companies and styles of dance. hi order 
to enlarge your carter, you have to sacrifice 
something. I had to go my own way. I knew 


mem in 1971, Bruhn • — now director of the 
National Ballet of Canada — acknowledges: 
“Cfcria bdieved than belonged to her and 
not to anyone else. I could have had some- 
thing special with Natasha but not simulta- 
neously with Carla." 

As a principal dancer with the New York 
City Ballet — where despite the success of 
such pairings as Patricia McBride and Ed- 
ward villella and Suzanne Farrell and Peter 
Martins, partnerships have never been pro- 
moted or advertised —Sean Lavety thinks 
ibe regular interchange erf partners safe- 
guards against a singular approach. "Since 
there are so many good dancers,” he says, 
“we don’t need one or two to call our own. 1 
end up dancing with everybody. It’s more 
interesting because each dancer brings out 
different aspects of your dancing." 

For several years, the ABT ballerina Cyn- 
thia Gregory voiced her. concern about her 
difficulty in securing a single partner (rising 
U> six feet on poinze, her height posed a 
special problem). “I worried for years, “Will I 
ever find the perfect partner?* she says. "But 
I’ve danced with every meat male dancer of 
my time and to me that s more exciting than 
having had one partner She singles out 
Fernando Bujones, of late her frequent part- 
ner at ABT and one with whom she enjoys 
considerable popularity in their perfor- 
mances of “Swan Lake" and “Giselle." 

In former days, pzima ballerinas such as 
AHcia Markova and Margot Fonteyn could 
demand their own partners and, late in their 

Continued on page 10 







Carla Fracci and Erik Bruhn. 


Growing Up With Indian Art 


by Santha Rama Rau 


W ’HEN the nationwide celebra- 
tion that is the Festival of India 
arrives in New York City Satur- 
day, it will provide a wider and 
more intense' exposure to India's cultural 
history than any but the most privileged 
Indians could hope for in a lifetime. 

The festival offerings in New York, which 
will continue through 1986, begin with seven 
programs of dance and song at Alice Tuiiy 
Hall in Lincoln Center and will include an 
exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of 
Indian art dating from me 14th through the 
19th century — sculpture, painting, jewels, 
wall hangings, and a spectacular 17th-centu- 
ry red-and-gold imperial tent. There will also 
be concerts of Indian music, with Indian 
soloists such as the sitarist Ravi Shankar, 
conducted by Zubin Mehta, at Avery Fisher 
HaJL The American Museum of Natural 
History will mount two photographic exhib- 
its, including one on Indian wildlife; the 
Brooklyn Museum will display 4,000 years 
of terra cotta an. the Museum or Modem 
An will offer 49 classic and contemporary 
Indian films, the Cooper- Hewitt Museum 
will exhibit contemporary designs created in 
cooperation with Indian craftsmen, and the 
Asia Society will display Rushan sculpture 
and art from the court of the 16 th-century 
emperor Akbar. 

The acquaintance of Indians with their 
arts — from the terra cotta works to the 
sculpture to the photography — is a rather 
oblique matter, dol until very recently, a 
deliberately engineered cultural experience. 
To begin with, most Indians do not travel to 
sightsee. Although tourism is rapidly becom- 
ing more popular among Indians, the major 
incentives for travel remain the demands of 
work, the visits to relatives — often for such 
family gatherings as weddings — and, most 
important, pilgrimages. 

The usual introduction to the immense 
range and diverse manifestations of Indian 
arts begins in the home. I remember, as a 
child hearing through a mist of sleep the 
hymns that my grandmother sang at sunrise 
in her prayer room where, before she began 
the routine of the day. she made offerings of 
fruit, flowers and incense sticks to the three 
images of Hindu deities set on the shelf in 
front of her. Later, I was encouraged to listen 
in on the lessons that my musically gifted 
cousin received three times a week from her 
guru, to increase my understanding of music. 

Since all Indian classical an is religious in 
origin and devotional in execution, the cen- 
ter for its expression is. understandably, the 
temple. It was in the casual, jostling, gossipy 
and deeply serious atmosphere of the temple 
that one heard fine music, saw splendid 
sculpture, learned from the chanting of 
priests and holy raeu the great heritage of 
Indian epics. Some of India's best known 
musicians began their careers playing anon- 
ymously in temples and accepting in pay- 
ment whatever the worshipers gave them. 


Manta Swap* 

New York. City Ballet's 
Suzanne Farrell Peter Martins. 


> v-v r 



Detail of 18th-century watered or. 

can still recall the pleasure and excitement 
we felt when our grandmother summoned us 
to sit around her in the courtyard on the light 
rope-webbed beds while she opened her huge 
dog-eared copy of the Ramayana. Then sne 
would read us stories about the dazzling 
virtue and courage of King Rama and of his 
campaign, assisted by the splendid and infi- 
nitely amusing Lord Hanuman, leader of an 
army of monkeys, to rescue his queen, Sita, 
from the demon king of Lanka. In a very 
Indian tradition. she embroidered the stories 
with asides and adapted them to appeal to 
the individual tastes of her grandchildren. 

Most Indians are introduced to their clas- 
sics in a similar way. In a country that is 


W “ HEN I lived in my grandparents' 
bouse in a provincial north Indian 
town, it never occurred to me — or 
to my many cousins growing up in that 
extended family — that we should expect 
any outside entertainment. None of us had 
been to a concert, a dance recital or a muse- 
um, although we knew people who, for in- 
stance. collected Mogul miniatures or Kan- 
i gra paintings and would bring them out for 
the pleasure of guests in the course of a social 
evening. We had never been to a theater or 
even to a movie, which our elders though 1 & 
rather raffish sort of pastime. We bad no 
, radio, and television bad not yet been in- 
vented — in any case our house had no 
1 electricity or running water. Although we 
were, by Indian standards, more privileged 
than most, much of village India, about 
three-quarters of the nation, still lives largely 
the same way, without access to the cultural 
outlets of cities or big towns. 

Apart from the games that we children 
played among ourselves, our chief sources of 
entertainment were provided by f riends and 
our own family. On some evenings music 
students from neighboring families would 
come, with their instruments, to join my 
cousin in giving an informal concert Our 
, elders would listen critically and apprecia- 
tively, commenting on what progress the 
1 young people had made. More often, when 
the children were back from school or col- 
lege, homework done, household chores ac- 
complished, our grandparents would 
tell us stories. 

Indians love telling and hearing stories. I 




Ravi Shankar. 


Hanging Out With an Undesperate Susan Seidelman 


largely illiterate (which is not the same as' 
being uneducated) there is a strong tradition 
of the oral transmission of learning and or 
the cultural heritage. Any Indian village has 
either its own storyteller or the regular visits^ 
of itinerants. 

During the Festival of India celebration in 1 
Washington, just such a storyteller per-' 1 
formed. He had several narratives tn bis J 
repertory, illustrated with a long, fold-out' 1 
chain of his own paintings. One was an*' 
account of the life of Lord Krishna, from his 
mischievous childhood (stealing butter, teas- ,J 
ing the village maidens) to his eventual spin- : 
tual enlightenment and his transformation 1 
into an avatar of Lord Vishnu. '■> 

But the storyteller was working on a new r 
and secular theme; his journey from India tot 
the United States and his impressions and- 1 
experiences in Washington. He had already 1 
completed some of the illustrations — tbej 
Air India jet at the New Delhi airport, the:- 
interior of the cabin in mid-flight with noth- 
ing to see outside the windows except clouds 
and sky, the arrival in Washington, the Capi- 
tol the Washington Monument, the Indian 
mela. or festival, held on the Mall which had 
attracted huge crowds reproducing, unex- 
pectedly, all the dust, heat, good humor and 
exhilaration of a real Indian mela. 1 

My grandfather was a passionate enthusi-; 
ast of Persian and Urdu poetry. Between! 
puffs on his gently bubbling hookah, he too 1 
told us stories, though often they were only;* 
prefaces to the recitation of poetry. One oft 
his favorites concerned an ancestor of ours* 
who was deplored by his family and laughed; 
at by his friends because he preferred to 
write poetry rather than work. However, one! 
day when a poetry competition was held at., 
the court of the Grant! Mogul our family** 
wastrel decided to enter it, ignoring the scoral 
of the Moslem courtiers who were certain i 
that no Hindu could aspire to enter the great 

Continued on page 1 F 




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Marionn* Bof catena 



P ARIS — The film is called “Desperately Seeking Susan," but 
Susan Seidelman, its director, is neither desperate nor in 
search. She has arrived. A New York Times article about the 
dilemma of young American creative artists of the 1980s 
cited her for approaching contemporary status-conscious life 
through satire, and her film, which is just opening in Europe, has 
earned $30 million at U. S. box offices for a SS-million investment (it 
is just about to come out in video cassettes, which will add largely to 
the kitty). 

20th Century-Fox has put her in a suite at the Plaza Atheu&e (not a 


the kitty). 
20th Cen 


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Mary Blume 



huge suite but still a sign of respect to someone who last year might 
have been dismissed as a fringe filmmaker) and, after a late night in 





Susan Seidelman. 


She is comfortable, collected and. at fiveTeet nothing, certainly the 
shortest director around. Now 3Z she attended New York Universi- 
ty's film school and became a filmmaker, which for most of her 
classmates meant becoming a waitress or taxi driver. But she had 
won a prize for her first satiric short, “And You Act Like One. Too,” 
which, led to grants for two more shorts. Her first feature film. 
"Smithereens," was shown at the Cannes Festival, h had been 
intended for one of the more modest side events, but the festival's 
director liked it so much that he insisted it be put into competition. 
So the official U. SL entries for the 1982 festival were; 

“Missing'’ (director Costa-Gavras) 

"Shoot the Moon" (director: Alan Parker) 

"Hammett" (director Wim Wenders) 

“Smithereens” (director Susan Seidelman) 

Yes, she says, of course people said, “Susan who?” 

Clearly, she is doing something right but she doesn't want to think 
about it too much.. “When I do, I gel nervous. I never thought of 
success before. When you do, you can lose the gut feeling you had 


before and try to second-guess yourself. I’m trying hard not to think 
about iL" 

She was bom in Philadelphia, had no interest in film until she was 
in her 20s and lives in SoHo in New York. Her two feature films have 
dealt comically with the impact of New York’s counterculture on a 
New Jersey housewife. “New Jersey is a metaphor for Philadelphia." 
she says. Although she hangs out in the East Village, she does not 
take sides: In “Desperately Seeking Susan, her anarchic 
puckish heroine is just as materialistic in Her way as her middle-class 
counterpart Seidelman works in a comic-ironic vein, with a narra- 
tive line so strong that she sometimes ties her amiable offbeat humor 
into knots. 

She doesn’t write her own scripts (the character Susan was so 
named by the screenwriter long before she came on the scene) and 
she urgently resists attempts to categorize her work as belonging to 
the youth market 

"Most comedy is geared to 12- year-olds, so you have a lot of 
throwing-up jokes, she says. " ‘Smithereens’ and ‘Susan’ are not 
youth films. I think my style is young and the look is young, but 
‘Smithereens' is a tough film. ‘Susan’ is a happier film, but they both 
have irony and humor." 

What has catapulted "Susan” into the big bucks marketplace is the 
presence of Madonna in her screen debuL "Madonna is not the star, 
she’s the co-star,” Seidelman valiantly argues, but Rosanna Arquette 
as the New Jersey housewife disappears into the gleaming when 
faced by the self-styled “boy toy’’ who makes Bette Midler seem like 
the Queen Mother and whose clothes have been described as "a 
wrestling match between knitwear and lingerie, with major damage 
sustained on both sides." 

Seidelman had seen Madonna around while both were hanging 
out in the East Village. “When I first cast her she was known in New 
York music circles. She was moving up in the charts but at that point 
it didn't mean anything because out of the top 50 on the chans, 49 
don’t succeed. 

"On Madonna's first day. we were shooting in the street. She 


wasn't mobbed, she could still walk down the street and hang out. 
One month into filming, her album ‘Like a Virgin' came out. By the 
time of the opening in Los Angeles, she had an entourage of three 1 
huge bodyguards. It became quite apparent that this person couldn't 
go out without causing a major riot. She is unbelievably famous." * 
Seidelman maintains that Madonna’s presence did not alter the 1 
balance of the film. "It did alter the press reaction to the film," she* 
says. "Madonna is the Michael Jackson of this year." The operative 
words are, of course, this year, although Seidelman thinirg Mad onna’ 
may stay the course longer. < 

“She’s funny. She does have an ironical sensitivity, a wonderful 1 
Mae West scandalous sense of humor.” 

Before attending film school, Seidelman studied fashion design iri 
Philadelphia. "I learned that I absolutely hated tailoring and sewing,- 1 


rruiaaeipnia. 1 1 earned mat i ansomteiy dated tailoring a _ _ _____ 

I started cutting classes and going to films. I’d never even seen a 
foreign film, I had seen Natalie Wood and Doris Day.” T 


S HE is essentially urban and always carries a pencil and pad 
while hanging out. The idea of an ancient Italian immigranc 
who never learned English Bring next to a punkhead with a 
purple Mohawk haircut still tickles her although she worries about) 
her part of New York becoming, as she puts it, “too chicafied.” She; 
detests Los Angeles. ■. 

“I don’t like Los Angeles because I like street life and it has none. 1 . 
It has a kind of homogenized effect on people.” - 

She doesn't think she will set her third feature in the East Village* 
— “I’m not sure what 1 have to say about it that's new and exciting” 
— and is thinking of southern Florida, which she sees as a mixture of 
retired Jewish people and Cubans, of Hockneyish Los Angeles gloss! 
and decrepit American kitsch. I 

Since she does not write or work, regularly with one writer, she 
waiting now to see what will come up next. A lot of scripts get shoved; 
under her door. She just got one for a pirate movie set m Shanghai in- 
1932. She was astonished, not Interested, but very pleased “1 was so 1 
glad I wasn't getting typecast,” she said. 





Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6,1985 



TRAVEL 


Lament for a French Road Sign 


by Haas Komng 


W ’ HEN I conjure up the first time 
ever I set eyes cm t he Mediterra- 
nean, as a young man in an army- 
surplus jeep, there is among my 
imps of the shiny sea and green hlQs the 
image of a road sign, the town signpost of 
Cannes. It appeared on the coast road just 
before that road narrowed at a squat little 
brick tower, a kind of fortress long smcc tom 
down. 

I had seen similar signs before, of course, 
but that particular one opened my eyes to 
their beauty. The name “Cannes” itself bad a 
glamorous, poetic glow; it was spelled out in 
dark blue letters on an off-white, or let assay 
for this occasion, oyster-white background 
with a border of a lighter blue, as bright as 
the sea beside it I thought that it embodied 
the very essence of French aesthetics: colors, 
tbe typography of the letters, wee in harmo- 
ny and m harmony with their setting. And 
then I found this to be true for all of them, at 


Tbe above is past tense. Ywis ago there 
first appeared, mostly on the autoroutes, 
flnnttw tri-mt of town sign in a hideous 
brown. Wherever some authority had decid- 
ed there was a “sight” for tourists, the brown 
pointed the way. Such a sign would for 
instance read, “Antibes. Nos sites, nos res- 
taurants.’' Now there is tins to be said about 
tourist sights in Fiance: Tbe purely commer- 
cial ones, mostly new, manmad e monoliths, 
deserve no such postings or even if they did, 
it's not the role of any government to point 
them out; the real ernes don’t need it. They 
have been posted by history or by art Tour- 
isty extolling them only cheapen diem. 
(European visitors used to smile at tbe 
American “Scenic View” posted at spots 
where you woe supposed to stop and snap a 
picture, and rightly so; now the European 
adman was ma tching up with his American 


tank- 1 could visualize the pedantic commit- 
tee of officials who in their wisdom had ruled 

that aO town posts in the European Commu- 
nity had to be uniform, and here was their 
choice. 


colleagues). 
The ugly 


j ugiy browns with their cutesy texts 
were by their very purpose thinly sown. 
When you drive.by, it is posable to blink, 
close your eyes, and forget them. Not so with 
the next change, in the works now fix' three 
years. This one is more drastic: universal, 
nationwide. Those fine town and village sign 
posts in blues and creamy white axe being 
taken down and replaced with new ones, ana 
this change is proceeding apace, pic new 
oat the nam e of a place in angry 


every entrance to a French town or village: 

'en chic 


Hie blues gave a kind of light and even 
to every surrounding they were in, to rows of 
trees or houses, to Odds, even to gas stations. 

These metal rectangles, caUcdpanneauxde 
localisation in the ministerial traffic guide- 
lines, demonstrated a feel for form and color 
no other nation possessed, and they showed 
up the reds and blades in neighboring Bel- 
gium and Germany as dreary and aggressive. 
(Tbe Italians used blue too, but then: letters 
and shapes were just that much off). Com- 
bined with the charm of most French place 

of art. Toeing advantage of the statute of 
limitations, I can confess that when I once 
came upon one knocked off its post, I stole 
iL It hung for years in my study and was as 
much admired as an original painting. 



, on dead-white, with a red bor- 
der. Here is a color combination so jarring, it 
if had appeared at the entrance roads to 
Barbizon a century ago, it might single- 
handedly have strangled the blossoming of 
French 19th-century painting. 

There is, at least to me, something basical- 
ly Central European aboGt them. They are of 
course in tbe old kmserlkhes Schwarz-Wdss- 
Rot beloved of Bismarck and those who 
came on his heels, and it seemed obvious that 
they must be the product of a Brussels think 


N OT so. I was doing the EC a gross 
iqustice. Ibis black-whirred is the 
work of the French Directorate of 
Road and Traffic Safety, which is housed at 
2 44 Boulevard Saint-Germain in Paris, as 
dose as any address to die heart of French 
culture. “Studies and experiments,” the engi- 
neer in charge of Ponts et Giauss&s (the 
department running France's roads since 

al^he use of black on white, instead ofdeep 
blue, presents a better readability ... the 
red border i mp ro v es nighttime readability 
and safety in general, because the color red 

can be made retro-reflective (r&rorifUdus- 

sanie) which dark blue cannot.” 

Thus France is once more being steeped in 
black-on-white signs, this time with a red 
danger border, as it was forty-five years ago. 
A new army of occupation has taken up its 
positions in the country: an army of tech- 
nologists, armed with light meters and with- 
out so much as a by-your-leave, which 
doubts our ability to read two-feet high let- 
ters in blue. Presumably Fonts et Chaussfes 
means weO. They just assume that people 
drive around like half-blind bats, tp*t the 
lovely roads erf France are just tunnels from 
here to there on winch automobilists expe- 
dite themselves with one eye on the speed- 
ometer and one on the asphalt ahead, to be 


jolted out of their stupor only by “retro- 
reflective” attacks on their senses. I c 


hope they are wrong there. 


[can only 


Hans Koning is a Dutch-bom American 
writer. His latest navels are “ DeWitt’s War " 
and " America Made Me ” 


Ballet Partnerships 


Continued from page 9 


careers, both chose partners 20 years their 
junior: Markova wanted Erik Bruhn and 
Fonteyn picked Rudolf Nureyev. 

As the 22-year-old ABT principal Susan 
Ja/fe notes, however, today’s ballerinas have 
different expectations. “A ballerina today 
doesn’t have the same aura she once did,” 
she says. 

With injuries a perpetual casting concern, 
companies are often wary of promoting one 
particular partnership. Kenneth MacMillan, 
long tbe Royal Ballet’s resident choreogra- 
pher and ABTs recently named associate 
artistic director, says he would prefer to pair 
tbe same dancers together, but concedes that 
injuries necessitate flexibility. 

One plus one does not necessarily a part- 
nership make, points out Igor Youskevitch, 
who sees the lack of established partnerships 
as an artistic, not an administrative concern. 
Youskevitch. a former leading classic dancer 
with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo mid 
Ballet Theater says: “Every pas de deux has 
a love overtone no matter now diluted or 
abstract Tbe younger dancers don’t convey 
this because they don't make any effort to 
achieve togetherness on stage. They’re in 
competition with one another and concen- 
trate more on their own presentation than on 
their partner.” 

Recalling his own historic partnership 
with Alicia Alonso at Ballet Theater in the 
1940s, Youskevitch believes the key to their 


rapport was their intuitive ability to adapt to 
eadi other’s spontaneity and to maintain a 
give-and-take relationship. “Chi stage, we 
were equals,” be says. On those infrequent 
occasions when Alonso attempted to upstage 
him by bolding an arabesque too long. Yous- 
kevitch knew how to re-establish the bal- 
ance. “I would push her — not noticeably — 
but enough so that she’d lose her balance 
and have to go on to the next step.” 


Genuine rapport and ease come from con- 
tinuity and repetition, says Fernando Bu- 
jones, who believes his performance is defi- 
nitely enhanced Mien he dances with a 


favorite partner. *Tve had special nelation- 
itn many ballerinas, but not one that 


Alexandra Danilova calls a partner “a 
stage husband.” Now a teacher at the School 
of American Ballet, she says, “A new partner 
is so busy with himself, he can't help yon. It's 
not easy to meet someone who understands 


you and has the same approach to the art- 
little threat 


thread that con- 


Understanding is the 
meets you. Many times, 
er who hate each other.’ This never wo 


I DEAL partnerships, advises Erik 
Bruhn, rest party on the dancers’ ability 
to balance their onstage and offstage 
relationships. “You must declare your love 
for each other onstage and then control iL 
We all believed Gelsey Kirkland and Misha 
Baryshnikov would become the next great 
partnership. We had glimpses of iL Bui their 
personal conflicts interfered with their pro- 
fessional life. As Balanchine said, a pas de 
deux should be a conversation — not a bad 
argument” 


ships wii 

could be called the particular one of my 
career. When 1 dance with Cynthia Gregory, 
my performances are a little more special 
and magical.” 

Alessandro Fern, who has just joined ABT 
after five years with tbe Royal Ballet, recalls 
that her frequent pairing with the Royal’s 
Wayne Eagling lent a particular authority to 
her performance. “Since l trusted him so 
much I hardly ever got nervous because I 
knew he'd save me." 

Her career still a faint outline. Ferri, 22, 
confesses her disappointment at her post- 
poned debut with the injured Baryshnikov, 
with whom she senses a kinship. “The era of 
partnerships was almost finished when I 
joined the Royal BalleL It’s a shame. So 
many dancers today go on stage and don’t 
even look at their partner.” 

“1 would love to have a partnership.” she 


says wistfully. “Of course if it could with 


sba it would be a dream.” 


Diane Sohvav, who writes frequently about 
ballet, wrote this article for The New York 
Times. 


Behind London's Street Names 


by Walter Goodman 


I ONDON. — Mincing Lana Old Jewry. 
Crutched Friars. Intriguing street 
names have drawn of 

■* visitors to the older , sections, of 
London, m roughly the same spirit,! imag- 
ine, that . drew Marcel Proust to the place 
nnmes of Ins Cotnbray and Balbec. . . : 

One dindy monring, in search of. item 
past mid equipped with a “Dictionary of 
Gty of Londoa Names,” by A1 Smith (Arc©, 
19701 “The Streets of London,” by & Bur- 
Odd ( MaranilUm . London, 1983) and Chris- 
wpher Hzbbcrt’s “London: The Biography ‘ 
of a City” (Pengnin, 1980), I tookthe LM^ 
groniui east to Aldgate (from either thc&cx- 
e g/dm eanmg old, or ael-mjte, open. to aD), 
Geoffrey. Chaucer lived above tins oldest 
gate w the chy, but since 1761 there hasbem 
no gate there to five above. However, die 
Aldgate Pump, on the site of a communal 
well, is a. London landmark. 

A few steps from Aldgate is Hrmnrfniftf’ft 
Much, accenting to John Stew’s 1598 “Sur- 
ety of London, served as a repository far 
dead dogs. However, Mrs. FaimckI points 
out that. “every ditch in medieval 
must have been similar ly abused” miH sug- 
gestethat hunting Ay mr* fp foe 

vicinity. These days, no dogs roam Hoonds- 
ditch; its main features are a department 
store and a parking lot' 

Tourists are drawn down here mainly on 
Sunday mornings, when the nearby Petticoat 
Lane market is m full cry. Trade along Petti- 
coat Lane — its real mim is Middlesex 
Street — is largely in Jewish hands, and sure 
e no t iy h. than, between Haunds ditch and the 
Aldgate Pump stands Jewry Street, formerly 
known as Poor Jewry Lane to distinguish it 
from wealthier Jewish neighborhoods. 

The poor Jews mowed in with the permis- 
sion of Oliver Cromwell in tbe 17th century. 

It was quite an occasion, since Jews had been 
banned from altering the scepterid isle for 
the previous 350 years. The earlier immi- 
grants, who first came over from Rouen at 
the invitation of William the Conqueror af- 
ter 1066, aettkd in Old Jewry, the rite of a 
Saxon settlement of Jews, dose to where tbe 
Bank of En gland stands today on Thread- 
needle Street. 

On tbe ecumenical corner where Crntched 
Friars (named for a 13th-century convent 
later dissolved by Henry VIII) jams Jewry 
Street stands a section of the Roman wall, m 
an office building called, info rmati vely the 
Roman Wall Budding. There is no use trying 
to persuade the building’s commissioiiane to 
let you in for a look, however, the most heTL 
do is direct you to a more accessible section a 
few streets to tbe sooth, near the Tower of 
London. 

Moving westward along Aldgate, the 
stroller can choose between LcaderihaH 
Street (named for a lead-roofed townhouse 
built in 1309 and subsequently turned into a 
market offering the best leather, doth, pahs 
and tools) and F enrfnnr fi Street Leaden- 
haii, now a center of international financial 
establishments such as the Banlr Bunriputva , 
Malaysia Bczhad and the Svnostenski Ban- 
ka, is a hard looking street, softened only by 
the St Katharine Cree Guild Church to 
Commerce, Jhdustcy and Finance where, 
presumably, the denizens of Cunard House 
oh one side and the brokerage firm erf Dean 
Witter Reynolds on the other receive solace 
or pay penance for the way they make their 
livings. 

The word fen is derived from the Latin 
fenum, or hay, and Smith suggests that Fen- 



Seafood stall in Petticoat Lane. 


church took its name either from the hay 
once sold there or froma nearby stream that 

■■ 1 ■ I r Tl 


made theground xnoor-ish, or fenny. The 
Foochnrdi Street, says Fanfidd, 


original KWMUUVU 

meant “fhestteet pari the church on marshy 
ground.” 'Unable to resist a word like fenny, 
I embarked on Fendxurch, only to find that 
it looks today about as much luce a moor as 
Manhattan’s Sixth Avenue. 


P ASSING Nottimmberiaud Alky, one 
crania to BQliter Street, tire name of 
winch. Smith writes, is a variation of 
Bdzetezfane, so-called in toe early 13th cot- 
tony when beketos, or bell founders, lived 
there. Hecommeais, “As there were over 200 
churches in the city at tins time, tbe befi 
founders had plenty to do.” 

A bit farther on is Minting lane, named 
for the minehma , — not the tittle folk from 
“The Wizard of Oz,” but the nuns who lived 
<m the street in medieval times. Today Miner 
mg Lane is dominated by Plantation House, 
a sotidly unattractive s tr u c tu re dedicated to 
trade in coffee, tea, rubber and spices and 
nostalgia far lost empire.. 

A left onto Rood Lane (rood, indispens- 
able for makos.and workers of cross w o r d 
puzzles, is Old English for a cross used in 
crndfixirai), brings one to FH<tch«ip The 
Anglo-Saxon c«ap, tosdl or barter, designat- 
ed, as you might deduce, markets. The mar- 
ket of surpassing interest to its residents 
today is the stockinaiket •" 

A right turn along Eastcheap lakes us past 
Philpot Lane (named for a wealtiw grocer 
who became London’s lord mayorm 1378), 
then Lovat Lane (traced by Fairfidd to Love 
Lane, perhaps a comrotion of dm medieval 
Lucas. Lane, named for the JancTs owner; . 
Smith says the shea is named for Lord 

thgla^ wum En gland; fta 

lost his head in 1747 for his invoJvemoot in ■ 
the feckless 1745 attempt by Bonnie .Prince 
Charlie to capture the throne for the Stuart 
line). Next is Botofah Lane (named for the 
church of St Botdph Billingsgate, which 
stood there until the Great FireSL Bofofoh-. 


was a patron of travelers, explains F 
and churches situated near docks, like 
one, were som etime s dedicatedjDhi mj. - 
It was on Pudding Lane, oft Ea st ene ag :- 
that the Great Fire started at % A-M. .ofc: 
Sunday, SepL 2, 1666, in the house of WSr . 
Ham Fanycer, the Jong’s baker. If thestrteUV 
Mmft cans up the luscious aromas of typ 
bakeshop, best disregard Stowes “Survey of. 
London/’ The 16 th-century chronicler xpr 
parted that the street was commonly called 
Pudding Lane “because the butebas of East?- 
cheap have their scalding; house for ' 


rfUIltC 
-.fltfc 1 ) 


w arsK ,| * a 


0* 

aciiceflfc# 


there p udding s [innards], with 

er filth of beasts, are voided down that waj- 
to their <hmg boots on the Thames.” : 

Hastily on then to fish Street MU, which 
rate may safety assume had something to do 
with the purveying of fish, just as nearby 
MBk Street (where Sir Thomas More was 
bom in 147$ and Poultry bad to da with 
their respective comestibles. Smit h is mot 


certain about Wood StreO. Although wood 
was sold in the vicinity, the street may hafle 


Mafia.-** 

letfC* 32 /' 
adust? »** 

rfcreal to ft* 1 


winnraj T— 


of London, who lived there in 1491,mrfor. 
the wooden houses that were built along the 
street three centuries ear&er, in the time of 
Richard L Take your pick and knock wood* 

I n ffrt matte an obligatory pansemt the 
Monument, erected in 1670 to commemo- 
rate tbe Great Fire. Its height (202 foeft is 
said to be the distance frbiti its base ;fo the 
house where the conflagration began. lt you I 
have a weakness for this soft of flung andihe. ? 
strength to indulge it, you can c&rto a stoic- ] 
case of 311 steps to get a view of London^- t 


cards issued w 

In ibe Initcc 
flebaersicii 
afiveoldi^ 
ja more 
ioaui-saris! 
■mil 'as ^ 
i {7401)00 is I s 
|V Card wnp* 
1 odsaboot she 
^ey use 10 CO 
joil rf scran 

foroff Sco'lit 
aeoduu is c- 
A&n-frauo : 

pfaaih2ied '!j 

cuds, ailfc i 
mame. such 
phones m cure 
D randan iTK 
behavior (the i 


By now toe pubs were qpen, so I wad into 
the Square Rigger; -an King Wfiliafli Streep 
for a half pint or lager, over .which I reflected 
on aQ those distal lives artd-4ive£hb6& 
evoked by tbe naiOes tbat dmgindestnmti- 
Wy ^ to London’s streeti Wefl, not Quite inde- 
structibly. I was not ahk^o 
Lane ~ covered ovrai. I ' 
asphalt ofjhogress 
«sty.;r 


i ■ 


cbenit Ac ef 




cites neper* 



Stinking 
, by the 
ofprppri- 


vanh Last vs 
£900.000 in' :t 
1000 arrets. 

• Scams ranee 
nan waspxkK 
ikaacev'f^: 
dd vuh a id 
aught when it 
tic relative!) ■£ 
mal order 1 
■wihippftJi- 




OPERA — Sept. 7: “Lohengrin” 


VIENNA, BOsendorfer Hall (tel:. 
63.66.Sl). 

CONCERTS — SepL 9-11: Vienna 
Jess Trio (Chopin, Brahms, Rachman- 
inof, Schubert] 




•Kunsilwhaus(iri: 57 .96 A3). 

IONS— To Sept 30:' 
l to 2000.” 


1984 


EXHIBITS 
— Looking Ahead 

To Oct. 6: “Vienna 1870-1930 Dream 
and Reality. The greatest names erf the 
Viennese nn-de-srtcle.” 

•Theater an der Wien (tel: 57.96.32). 
MUSICAL —Through SepL: “Cars” 
(Lloyd Webber). 

•Staatsmer (id. 53240). 

BALLET — SepL II: “Raymonda” 
(Glazunov). 


; “Tnrandot” fPnccmi). 

SepL 9: “CavaDcria Rnsticana” (Ma- 
scagni). 

SqpL 10 and 13: “La Bohfane” (Pocri- 

Sem. 12: “Coo fan rule” (Mozart), 
•VolksoperQd: 53240). 

OPERETTA — SepL 7 and 9: “The 
B^gar Student” (hCUOdcer). 

SepL 8 and 11: “The Land of Smiles” 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


Orchestra, Paavo Berglund conductor 
(Beethoven, Si betius) 

•Prehistoric Museum (teL 27 J4J3L 
EXHIBITION — To SepL 30: ‘The 
American Dream.” 


Slig 


cm Masters from the 
nrigaooBecrion: Curot. 
so.” - 1 • ' 


Maurice 


12: “DerWnidshfltz”(Lortzin^. 


ARHUS, Festival (teL 13.43.44J 
CONCERT — SepL 12: Radio Ti ght 



restaurants 


AN INDIAN ISLAND OF GOURMET ADVENTURE 


MOORED ON THE SEINE 


.% LE LOTUS, v.here delightful mysteries of 

a “thali" unfold. 

JARDIN DE SHALIMAR. ‘The Garden 
ILEDE ! of Romance”, where you can feast, on a 
KASHMIR j buffet at lunch and dine a la carte. 

^ | Qua: Dehiily. er* face -Ju :Z. av oe New- York. 

/ J Paris 16 ". 

Telephone: 723. 77 .7S/ 723.50.9? - Parking 


Ore.n * tiass the •A-Mk Ik: brar. unJ c-.nasT. t..'--.: v-r-J.-r : ! : z r:. 


ESPLANADE DE LA D&»ISE' 


FONTAINE AGAM 

BROADWAY HOLLYWOOD 

BALLET D’EAU 


Created b y Yves PBW and Thierry ARNAUD 
FREE ENTRANCE 

EVBtY TODAY AND SATIWDAY AT 900 PJ*L INFORMATION: (1) 796 2555. 


by but. train, RB6 nation "L o Defem*". 

By can Boulevard Gratara {Ring Roo^ La Mfrae 4, Centrd P o ddng. 


SIGHT SEEING BOATS , 



BATEAUX-MOUCHEShb! 


PARIS RIVER BOATS 


225,96.10 

RIGHT BANK 359JQJO 

•»«A 


SHOPS 


IPaMRIIN HOOK 


Perfumes - Cosmetics - Leather Goods 
Fashion Accessories 

DUTY FREE -40* 

13 Avenue de TOpera PARIS 1st 
297.43.88 



WEEKEND 

appears every 
Friday 

For information 
call Dominique Bouvet 
in Paris 
on 747.12.65 


LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
638.41.41). 

CONCERTS — SepL 6: Royal PM- 
hannook Orchestra, James Judd con- 
ductor, Cristina Ortiz piano (Handel, 
R a ri x manin oO. 

EXHIBITION —To SepL 29: “Paint- 
ings of Traditional British Sporting 
Even la.” 


DIJON, Musie National 
Magmn(td: 67.1 1.10). 
EJOIIBrnON —To Nov. 18: “XIX 
Century French Portraits. ” 
HONFLEUR. Musfce Eugene Boudin 
rid: 89.16.47). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 30: “Alex- 
ander Dubourg.” 

NICE, Gallery of Contemporary Art 


•MuseeCamavnletrid: 27221.1: 
EXHIBITION— ToOct 27: The) 
Boulevards of Paris.” 

•Musie d’Art Moderne (tel: 
723.6im 

EXHIBrnON —To SepL 8: “Robert 
and Sonia Delaunay." 

•Mus6e de f Assistance Publiqoe (id: 


OPERA — SepL8:“Loda<fiLamnttr- 
moor” fDonizettil. 

FRANKFURT, AlteCteor(tel: 13400). 

CONCERTS —SepL 6: Frdburg Vo- K ™ ( Rossn 4). 
cal Ensemble, Wougang Schafer coa- 


“Artistor in Madrid, . __ 

Artcrf Gnalrnata “lost 

Juan Ea^anfia. and JEduardo Vkeb- 
MILAN, Tcatro aUa Scala (tel: v" . . -7 

80^1 IS). • • •; -V - c ,fMn*Bo&minoLdeArteCQntempd^ 

OTERA — ScpL9and I1:T1 Viasgioa ^ 

«*“ — ” 'o — —■' Claudio Abliado EXHtBlTION —To SepL 15: Tans 


oeala cash cuff 


repened it 

arv i-.'i — — it. 


^ opioyee aiut! 


n- - 1 


doctor (Liszt). 

f: Joachim Quartet (Beethoven. 


633.01.43). 

ilTION — T oOcl 31: “Salva- 


EXHIB 
dor Dali.” 
iMuste 


(td: 62J7.H1 
“ ION— 

Beo. 


265.99.48). 

BITION — 


de l'Orangerie (tel: 


SepL 7 
Zemlinskyi 

SepL 8: The Koenig Ensemble Lon- 
don, Jan Latham-Koenig ccmductra 
(Poulenc, Satie), Frankfurt Chamber 
Choms, Hans Michad Beuede ctm- 


- condnetor, 
PESARO, 
OPERA 
Egitto . 

SepL 8 and 10: 
(Rossini). 


Tomasdlo.' 

CSARO, TeatroRosiiin (teL6971). SSfrfiS 

3ERA — Sept 7, 9, II: “Mosi.m ToOet 15: “hfiqiri 

itto” (Rossini).. : . . . . Barcelfi. * 

nf a in- *>11 . 


t«nnamhCT>. 
IW may 

tarn cash disp 
jwffraiflerfti] 

Modaato^g C 


Signor Btusdrino’ 


EXHTBITK 


Through December: “Matthew 
Smith. 


To SepL 22: “Tout 
•Mu96e de Terra Amata (tet: 


EXHIBITION — Through 
“Jean Walter and Paul Guillaame 
lection.' 


L: 


doctor (Offenbach). 

12: Masaa-VrvaEnsanHe, Wulf 


STRESA. Festival (td: 31095). 

^ London Roy- ; ; 


THEATER — SepL 6, 7, 11, 12: 
“Love's Labour’s Lost” (Shake- 
speare). 

SepL 9 and 10: “Richard ffl" (Shake- 
speare). 


5559^31 

JfnON — To SepL 30: “Ex- 


•Mus6e du Louvre rid: 2603926). 
EXHIBITIONS —To Sept 9: “XVID 


EXHIB1 

perimcntal Prehistoric Pottery.” 
PARIS, Goitre Georges Pompidou 


(id: 277.1233). 
EXHIBI 


•British Museum riel: 6 36. 15.55). 

” — ^To3aal986:“Bnd- 


IITTON — To SepL 30: “Jean 
DubuffeL” 


EXHIBITION 
dhism: Art and Faith.” 


•OaureMandapa(td'. 589.01^0). 

Jodi- 


•London Coliseum riel: 836.01.11) 
OPERA — SepL7. 10. 12: “Orpheus in 


DANCE — SepL 8: Traditional , 
an Dance. 


"o SepL 9; 

Century French Pastels, “Drawings 
in Genoa: XVI -XVII Century.” OiszLRihm). 

ToSepL 30: “Inge* Portraits.” iS(Sk 25621 ). 

•McsbednPctil Palaisftd : 265. 12.73). OPERA— Sent 7- “Ai 
EXIffBmON — ToSepL 29: “Gus- SeoL8U“Fiffi^Vv« 
txveDort.” 

•Musie Renan -Scheffer (tel: 

874.9538). 


SepL 12 

KonoM con du cto r (Poulenc, Ravdl. 
RECITALS —SepL 8: Saschko Gaw- 
riloffvip!m.SegEnedPa]moello^Bni- 

r^ rai>hy>j MMrRilnii <w -hiimann \ 

SepL 9:^ Bonard Warn bach piano 


CONCERTS—; 
al Phahanwmkr 


w riHi i umimm c urewun, Vladumr CTMpVA MneS. A- pajil.*. 
Ashtemzy conductor/ piano (Beetho- Mnsie de TAthioic (td: 

EXHIBmbN— ToSepL 29: “Cji 

Calder Tapestoes and EnKraviiun?” 


TALS — SepL 7: Marid Ddfi 
Fonti piano (Ddrassy, Scarlatti) 

SepL 10: Son Dang Thai piano (Cho- 
pin, Profikkv). 



SepL 7: “Aida” (Venfi). 
SepL 8: “Falstaff" (VerdiT 
SepL 12: “Eugene OnegmfTdiajkov- 


JAPAN 


EXHIBITION — Through SepL: 
“AdriHe Deveria." 


the Underworld” (Offenbach). 

SepL 6, 9, 1 1: “Rigoletto" (Verdi). 
•Hayward Gallery (^: 928 37.08). 
EXHIBITIONS —To SepL 29: “Ed- 
ward Burra." 

•National Portrait Gallery (tel: 
930.1552). 

EXHIBITIONS —To SepL 8: “How- 
ard Coster.” 


To Ocl 13: “Charlie Chaplin 1889- 
1977." 


•National Theatre (id: 9283252X 

Real 


THEATER — SepL 7-13: “The 
Inspector Homur (Stoppard), 


“Tbe 


Cniic” ( Sheridan ). 

SepL 7. 1 1, 12: “Sw: Stoops to Coo- 
* (Goldsmith). 

13: “Annual Farm” (OrweD). 
ate Gallery (td: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS —To SepL 8: “I 
Mdean.” 


“Bruce 


SepL 1 1-Nov. 10: “Pound’s Artists.” 
•Victoria 


ictoria and Albert Muaeum (td: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Sepi. 15: 
“Louis Vurttrau A Journey through 
Time.” 


To Ocl 6: “Julia Margaret Cameron 
18IS-1979." 


OF SPECIAL INTEREST 


INTERNATIONAL CONTEMPORARY MUSIC FESTIVAL 


VENICE — The 42nd Con te mpor a ry Music Festival runs from SepL 
12 to Ocl 1. Events include: 

CONCERTS — SepL 12: Pro Cantione Antiqua, Edward Tan Brass 
Ensemble (Gabrieli). 

SepL 15: Gtuppo Bernardo e Paride Dua (Bassano, Croce). 

SepL 18: Turin Radio Television Orchestra, Jan Latham Docnig 
conductor (Gasser, Ttwari). 

SepL 19: Accademia Vocale Stromentale “La Fcmtegara” (Donato, 
Penssone). 

SqpL 21: Orchestra del Teatro la Femce, Luciano Berio/George 
Mester conductors, Kim Wheeler soprano (Berio, Stockhausen). 
SepL 23: Southwest German Radio Orchestra, Michael Gi den/ Pierre 
Boulez ccmductors, Georg Mflnch vkrfin (Boulez, NonoJ 
SqpL 24: Ensemble fotexcontenmorain, Pierre Boulez conductor 
(Beno, Boulez). 

RECITAL — SepL 16: Guido Morini organ, Lurwr Tannnmga organ 
(Gabrieli, Merulo). 


For further information tel: 71.01.61. 


O^RETTA — SepL 9 and 11: “The 
Gypsy Baron” (J. Sirauss). 
HAMBURG, Staatsopex (tel: 
35.1555). 

OPERA — Sept 7: “Tbe Escap e from 
the Seraglio” (Mozart). 

SepL 7, 8, *«■ 


TOKYO, National Museum of Mod- 
em Art rid: 2143551). 
EXHIBITION — To SepL 29: “Modi- 
gtiani Exhibithm.” 

•Zdl Photo Salon (td: 246.13.70). 
EXHIBITION — ToSepL 16: 4*u- 
kubaGty.” 


0: “Der Lkbestrank” 


11: “Boris Godunov” (Mus- 
sorefa*). 

Sq>L 13: “LaTraviata.” 

MUNICH, Artcurial GaBery (td: 
29.4131). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 8: “EccJe 
de Paris ‘LesNaifs*." 

•Sta a tagaierie xnoderner Konst (td: 


AMSTERDAM, Amsterdam Muse- 
□mofHisu 
EXHIRITI 


•Pare LuUm (tet 74.10.1 
EXHIBrnON— To SroL8: “Prome- 
nades.” ’ ■ .. • T 

•Petit Pda»(ld: 46.1433). 
EXHIBrnON— ToStoL 30: “Mcnf- 
pazsasse *Befle Epoqo?: From 
gaOtoBuffeL" 

LAUSANNE, HernntageFo nnda tintt 
GaDoy(td:2030J)ir^ 
EXHmrnoN— toOcl 
aomsts in toe Fi 
Collections.” 

UJOSN&j Festival (td: 2335.62)J 
CONCERTS — SeipL 6: Wr”' 1 
National Symphony Ordwst 
law Rostropowiisii condnetor. 
3tpt.7aiMi SrRoyalPlnHjannctfucO^ 
ches^a. Vla&nir Aritkenaty oondno - 


- 20 ; 


§: 


aon i 
(on. 
^badludid 
Swidf/her « 
•lofavesr 
joifcde- 
“atrfu] fui T 

_ r 
p 13 ul 

Ihe hi 


tor. 


omof Histray (tet 253K22L 


2937.1 

ION —To SepL 15: “Ger- 
man Art since 1 960." 


European protest movements in Ok ri^ ^TT.r^ 

eersr Vi,,a f avor >t« 



243638: 

exhib: 


ftlON— 


ToSepL 8: “French 


. - To Oct 15*V«6 

MBrteqneces from the Museums 


ATHENS, Festival (td: 322.1439). 
CONCERT— SepL «h Greet Radio 


and Television Symphony Orchestra, 
Hoist Newmann condnetor. Fesenz 
Ranto s pian o. 

THEATER — SepL 7 and8: “Lucrece 
Borgia" (Hugo). 


lands.’ 

•Matexi Descartes (let 223134). 
EXHIBITION —To SepL 27: “Des- 
cartes and TheNdhedand a.” 
•Rutsmusenm (td: 733IJ21). 

.3: “Rdn- 


iCH, . 
OPERA—, 
(Verdi). 
SepL 8: 

*0* 


(td: 251393 
7,11,13: 


BffnON— ToSepL: 
brandy dr&wizip. 

•Westertetk (tefc 24.7736). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 15: *Tlie 
World of Anne Frank, 1SQ9-1945." 


uJ&. 


gssSS 

5?5Sj 

■ssswii 

Jtsverei 


NBJYYC«K, American 
Natural 



fftntheci 


To October 22: “Textiles From the 
Wellcome Collection 
modem textiles from 

and Peru. 

STRATFORD-opon-AVON. Royal 


SS&SSS35S& 

RECITALS — SepL 7-10: Reynold KiriUL" 


ITALY 


— ToOcl. 15;* 


Parrot oboe. 


Alain 


~>i i^iii i a ii iTTniiiif ii 1 -■y : r chord (Perwseae. Vivaldi) 


Reynald 

Ffcvre harpsi- To SepL 30: “Rodin Wests by Five 


ddl’Acca- 



r” (Shakespeare), 
realus and Crcstida” 


(td; 52331 Al) 
and 7: Monty AJexan- 


‘As You Like It” 


•New! 

JAZZ — SepL! 
der Trio. 

Soil 9 and 10: Dave Holland Qumtet 
•Zenith (Kd: 208.60.00). 

CONCERT — SepL 10: Kid Creole 
and the Coconuts. 




HELSINKI, Festival (id: 65.96J 
BALLET — SepL 7 and 8: "Sl ; 
thew Pasaon" (Ncumricr, Bach). 
•Finlandia Hah (tel: 40241). 
CONCERT — SepL 12: Helsinki Riil- 
hannciric Orchestra, OkkoKamu con- 
ductor. Satan Oramo vidin. Anssi 
Karttunencdk) (Beethoven, Chenibi- 
m). 


JAZZ— SepL 6-15: MarimSaiir y nnri 
his orchestra. 

•H6td de Vflfc (tel: 276.40361 

—To Ota. 5: “Via or 
Hugo and Paris. 

•La ViHctie(td: 533.7430). 

EXHIBITION — SepL 11-15: “das- 
sbal Music.” 

•Le Louvre des 
29737.00). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 29: “Per- BERLIN, 
fume: XVI-XIX Centiuw,” 341.44.49). 

OPERA — SepL 6 and II: “Aida’ 


BOLOGNA Aula 
demiadi Bdle Arti 
OPERA— SepL 1 
Hon" (Rousseau). 

•Chiesa di S. Antonio di Padova (td: 
2229.99). 

CONCERTS— SepL 12:P*aauePhil- 
hannouie Choir. Ijihomir Mail cqn- 




Antiquaires (id: 


GOMANT 


OfOnDOTM.” — 

?35W“ nMu,OT,ofA «^ 
•Museum of Medahi*'^ 

22?S T -4 t7iSa «“»*-' SSm Sg ^ 

bonalChtkestralNeeineJflrviooftdis- • 




Modern Artftd: 5563931) 
SOffBniON — To SepL 8: “SJ. 

«dU:-«*— w9SZ WUtmr 


fc E3^!3 re Ssio 

Va^ers.st 

f “Klongsi 




’/Sr 


Deutsche Oper (tel: 


•Le Petit Opporttn (id: 236.0136). OPERA 

JAZZ— SepL 1 1-17: Claude Guilnot £Y«d>)- „ 

and Georges Aivanits. ^L8andI0:“LaB«rfiein^ , (Puceim). 

SepL 9: “The Flying Dutchman” 
(Wegner). 


‘Maine du ler anxanhsicoeni (td: 
26038.01). 


EXHIBITION— To Smi 29: “Four COLOGNE. Oper der Sudt 
Centimes of Ballet in Paris." 213531V 


(td: 


•Galleria d’Arte Moderoa (tel: 

50 2839). , 

EXOTmON -To Sept30: “Mor- anArt 

andi m GaBeria.” djV - - Tr ■ EXHIB 

FLOWWCE, Mus» Arcbedogico 33U234V. 

(td:2l32.70L OPERETTA— StoL7. }0,12r ^aVfc 

EXHIBITION — To OCL 20: The Panscnne (OffenbachJ . 

Eire scan Gvflhatfoa.” ■■ — • 

•Nad tad library, (teL - 28.7048V Oam 

EXHIBITION —ToSepL 30: “Rabe- ' ' 

lais: Dhistratioos/romlne I6thCentu- ■ — 

m Ibe ^ sau -" , .9— '«« o** 


•MazzoPiti(td: 2134.4®. (td : 329 19 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 29: “Mod- EXF^moSs — 


Ceattuy 

13 : 

“Bring Rguro,r 
enonTSma”’ ■ * 


Tte** SepL: 






1 <f .-•• 

Vf .■i'-Tt • 










* r J -■ ■ ' ■ ’ 

* • ' :<S m * 


* r -* ■; .-yiv , r j.- 


rJ\.*a} 

V 2 ** i 

\'W| . 

-aroaKler'j. 


SJ*?.*® . 

7«! 

■'-'’Hitia 
:*^ is 'can 

"■J Mar i 

; kasha a 

' ,v,, xcidei '& 
•?WLrt “ 
z r^'.iaaj 
r. z bcaai 

-"CtixiR 

pjiwai 

i; £ cae 

pi-ZEfc: 

31 .Sat 3! 
i-Tbar.Ei 
i. ?. ‘“'-r -j» 

^.7L± 

■rn wisK 
£ \*Tcsfa 
•aasisis 
-ai 3 eb 
i^asas 
." c.n.jsa 

7: frii^ 

■iipr-rst. r.: 
':r'^c:rr 


-..; -isssV 


fXlRiJ U® 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1985 




Page 11 


. - Q1 FUINI AND profit 

Card Fraud Heads 
Toward Epidemic Levels 


fry Roger Cdis 
Oy VE W entraining a Clls . 


spnaj details, number idi 
makccoonterfeit cardsH 
-rionally, right down i i 


security devices. Unis cj rds are actually 
tost or stole n, few pede t sink about them 
being misappropriate* 

Worried? Join the iub. It*s called Para* 
acids Anonymous Ml las a worldwide 
membership of travcrsjwith subliminal 
Anxiety about fraud cry tme they pay with 
plastic. 

11 In fact, credit cardrauJ is threatening to 
become an epidenriespe dally in thel/nrc- 
ed States. Accordxoflo S encer NHson, the 
Los Angeles-based pbbs er of a credit card 
industry newsletter $7 6 A ntOHon was 
charged to fraud in ?84 i the United States 
(which acooonts forimot 80 percent of tire 
estimated 625 miTn n [edit and charge 
cards issued worldvdc). )n an average day 
in the United Statemon than 10.000 cards 


are lost or stolen imlvh 
in five of them is usd f 3 
«n, more than 
Hon) a year is lost ifeas 
ingat Visa banks wdtft 
$740,000 in 1981 t$3H 
*; Card companieare J 
tails about the ertat oft 
they use to combi it, i 
head of security 's An® 
former Scotland 'ardh 
intendant is evidoce a , 
• Anti-fraud mesureh 


l jredit and charge 
:).pn an average day 
3D than 10,000 cards 
ii ; 5,000 people. One 
fnudulcntly. In Brit- 
Upn (about $55 mil- 
i L Card counted eit- 
ide has grown from 
1 million. 

ductant to give do- 

t ymri an<? means 

mt flic fact that the 
pc in the Britain is a 
border squad super- 
growing concern, 
range from die so- 
tology and “smart" 

1 microchip) to the 


phisticated (lasctediology and “smart" 
cards, with a pwerfl macrochm) to die 
routine, such » instiling authorization 
phones in maj or ntlei varying credit limits 
at randan and neeng on signatures and 
behavior (the nfiscrimatc or last-miniite 
client). An eff dive lactic is offering re- 
wards. Last yeaiAcc s paid out more than 
£ 500,000 in iwtad looney, winch led to 
AOOCKanestsJ’ > 1 -• ■> ; • . • ■ • 

-:Scamsrangeiom e ridiculous (an Irish- 
man was pickecup i Engjandwith cards in 
|he name of Wag H Fung and an 18-year- 
old with a liatenit cotoneTs card was 
-caught when Is fti < mnstadie fefl. off) to 
she rdarivriy sohisi ated fl Bunching a pho- 
ny mail orxter.bsm4s and hilling foe goods 
never dripped)An < ?edaHy dirty trick is to 
steal a cam cad an call tbe victhn —who 
has reported ttki — posing as a tank 
employee wharecd the personal ide nt i fic a- 
tion number si as > “make a check.” The 
firief may ha? serial days to get money 
from cash dispose before the tank's com- 
puter registerthe and. . . . . 

Moderated goof news is that the banks 
and the card om* tries invariably bear the 
costof fraudrom retime the cam has been 


t rediOfydutytrickisto 
j call tire victim —who 
t — posing as a tank 
the personal identificar 
} “make a check” The 
ral days to get money 
before the tank's com- 


Art* if India 

Persian tradion f poetry. Of course he won 
. :ihe competion. n 

“He bad tndi l the music of the birds, 
my gnmdfiher sed to teU u& He had 
-listened to averfn his trees, and had beard 
the fall of te de . His poetry was far more 
beautiful tan lything the Mogul court 
could writ,” I ‘ Emperor rewarded him 
with gold oins id the royal mantle, telling 
him he wathe iah of poets. 

%' ‘ My grarifatb r took us to one of our vwy 
fewoutsidentt tinments, a mutimra. This 
k an occaon Aen poets assemble^rh 
having btjA giv t a subjectraate tnepoems 
they haveomt sed to the judges and audi- 
ence. NotiietolatJds at these events, a 

^^ OT ofetle^ Va of phrase or 

North ttia, I r example, was deeply rnlju 
ics of Moslem rate. an£ tos 
is evidet in te architecture, the pamong 
S^?t£ reular aspects of ^ 
saiool t dan ng. Not untili waspowm up 
j j—.uj extensively in India did 1 

£££. 5S«ES**riof— *k>*“ 

nandpreaits w familiar. 

Ana froi the classical, religious art, _m- 
str ig and vibrant hiMoproff^ 
and trial e* ression of secuiar arL Po«e^ 


hy, Indios* t 
lobeEntedl 
North Idia, 
enced hcenl 
is evidet in 
^Snd evil the 
sdiool (dan 
.and traded I 
fliscovcthe a 
grandprraitsj 


wetland hand the 

Y^^and the bai, ^ Sj™ 

- • ^Zed ta r S Irn 11 ^ it " our card. 

^^osasofSwis bk 

(k^ One you signed, tl other he signed, 
after; havmg practiced w si gnature and 

m nxmstxoas sum 
than,tbeone you thmk yi paid. Back home 
m2S^you*re going. fiave a hard time 
apltinmg to the card enpany’s computer 
^you were ripped c m Manhattan; a 
talCTfluch should put ycr crcdibflitv — and 

- yp ttr ac count — ttnder^e. 

at cwdd have been urse. Thieves trften 
rale through trash car behind shops and 
restaurants for the cacti 


«pcrs between 
, they take per- 
irafcon date, to 
do (his pnrfes- 
exact type of 
rams and other 
Is are actually 
ok about them 


TRAVEL 


Ruins of an Ancient American Civilization 


reported lost or stolen. But what if you don’t 
realize you've lost your card? This to 
be a gray area. “I think we have to take each 
case as it happens,” Amcx says. “If you 
report it early, we’d look favorably on that.” 

Try to be sure it’s not you who picks up 
the tab by following these elementary pre- 
cautions: 

• Only take the cards you really need on a 
trip. Always keep »ta»n separate from cash, 
checkbook and trams of identity, especially 


But elementary 
care can control 
vulnerability 

passport and driving license. A thief can rent 
a car at your expense if be has both charge 
card and license. 


card and license. 

• Memorize your personal Identification 
number for withdrawing cash at the auto- 
matic dispenser. Guard it as you would your 
Swiss bank account number. At least, don’t 
write it in an obvious place, and never on the 
tack of your tank card. 

• Never put your card number on a post- 
card, or the outride of an envelope; never 
give it over the phone unless you are making 
the transaction with an organization that 
you know and has been properly identified. 

• Be waxy about giving your card number 
and its expiration date when ordering goods 
by mail aider. 

• Hotels and car rental companies often 


arrive in order to establish your credit. This 
is sometimes unavoidable, nit nyjust show- 
ing yonr card. And never, in any circum- 
stances, sign a blank imprint. 

• Give the impression in a store or restau- 
rant that you’re watching your card as you 
hand it over. Always draw a line through any 
blank spaces above the total when you rign 
and make sure the box at the bottom is 
totaled up. Do not leave the cardholder’s 
copy of the charge slip on the table. Destroy 
the carbon paper between receipts. Make 
sure the card returned to you is your own 
and not someone rise's or a dummy. 

• Don’t rejoice if you don’t receive your 
monthly statement on time. Call to ask the 
reason for the delay. It may be that someone 

dse maA* a franHnl^nf rhnng* nf addwc 

in order to prevent you from seeing your 
statement Check carefully for anomalies 
and notify the card company p romp tly. Give 
plenty of notice if you change an address. 

• Keep a list of your cardnumbos along 
with phone numbers to call if you need to 
report a loss. Remember, you can be held 
responsible for fraudulent use of a card until 
tins has been done. But matins & dozen or 
more calls can be a major hassle, if not 
impossible, if you are halfway around the 
wold on a baseness trip. It makes sense to 
subscribe to rare of the credit-card registra- 
tion services Springing up in many countries^ 
For ammal dues of around $15 they will ! 
record details of all your cards (as well as 
valuables and docoments) on then comput- 
ers. If you lose them, you simply make a 
angle collect call from anywhere in the 
wodd (sometimes a local number) and they 
will undertake to notify the card companies. 
They also provide a change of address and 
emergency cash service (usuaHy np to S300 a 
claim) as wril as helping to expedite tire 
replacement of cards. 

Two recommended card registration ser- 
vices are the CPP Card Protection Han, td: 
London 938-1017, and the Credit Card Sen- 
tinal (Los Angeles based); tel; London 686- 
8666 . ■. 


Continued from page 9 

growing at crops, villagers have developed 
all kinds of skills, using the local materials. 
In Mysore, fra example, sandalwood is 
carved into screens, boxes and ornaments; 
its ral is extracted to make soap. Kashmir 
shawls and carpets are famous; so are the 
papier-m&dte bowls, lamps, trays, boxes lac- 
quered with local designs. The days and 
dyes of Rajasthan are used to produce the 
characteristic blue-and-white ceramics. Cot- 
tons and s3ks from various parts of India are 
easily identified by regional weaves, colors 
or designs.^ There is scarcely a village that has 
no local an or craft. 

The other regular occasions for Indians to 
see and demonstrate their arts are provided 
by the festivals that dapple the Indian calen- 
dar. Of course, Indians can make a festive 
affair out of any event even slightly out of 
the ordinary. An innate sense of pageantry 
and a delight in display and decoration can 
turn the most prosaic of local elections into 
an excuse for villagers to decorate their carts 
with flowers and tinsel, garland their oxen 
and dress in their finest clothes to go to the 
polls in magnificent procession. 

P ERHAPS tire most spectacular festi- 
val that 1 have seen m India was the' 
celebration of Dussera in Mysore. 
Sometime in late Septembers early October 
the city of Mysore used to celebrate the 10 
days or fi ghting recorded in the Ramayana 
and its happy conclusion in the victory of 
King Rama over the forces of evil The heart 
of the festival was tire royal palace, where for 
10 days the maharajah held durbars for the 
nobles of his realm. Seated on a jewd-en- 


by Jim Robbins 

T HEIR ruins are scattered through- 
out the brushy, sandstone canyons 
of the Southwest, buflt on boulders 
and cliffs and nicked into crevices, 
the remains of one of the most advanced 
civilizations of prehistoric America. 

The mysterious people who built these 
villages are the Anasazts. a Navaho word 
that means tire ancient ones, and their civili- 
zation fimirnthfirf for several hundred years 
up to the 13th century in the Four Corners 
region — southern Utah, southwestern Col- 
orado, northwestern New Mexico and north- 
eastern Arizona. 

There are tens of thousands of Anasazi 
rites in the Sou th west-Tbe structures are 
made of sandstone, mortared together with 
iwnH, which in some cases contains the fin- 
gerprints of the Indian builder. 

Many of the ruins have fallen victim to 
vandals, the weather and other dements and 
have tumbled from their original bright to 
ifuKariti g i ri dtihl c of rubble. But 

where the Anasazis built on bedrock or in a 
protected crevice, their structures have re- 
mained intact. This is expedally true of 
Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern 
Colorado, Canyon de CbeBy National Mon- 
ument in Arizona and Chaco Culture Na- 
tional Historical Park in New Mexico. 

One of the most intriguing of the Anasazi 
sites is at Hovenweep National Monument 
in southwestern Colorado and southeastern 
Utah, perhaps the most inaccessible compo- 
nent of the national park system in the 
Lower 48. Hovenweep, known primarily for 
the many towers constructed there, is actual- 
ly six groups of rains totaling 784 acres (316 
hectares) scattered over 700 square miles 
(about 1,800-square kilometers). 

The rains, built from AJ>. 900 to 1 100, are 
not so dramatic or large as many of the cliff 
dwellings at Mesa Verde or so well preserved 
or complex as the dwellings in Chaco. What 
is unusual is the remoteness, the openness, 
tire s tillness and the absence of 20th-century 
appurtenances to detract from the experi- 
ence. Hovenweep has retained a primitive 
atmosphere similar to what must have exist- 
ed when the region was occupied by the 
ancient ones. 

The reason is simple: The last 16 utiles of 
road to the monument is dirt — muddy in 
winter and spring, dusty and ragged in sum- 
mer. There are few services along the way, 
and none at all at the monument. There is no 
grocery store, no laundry facilities, no traf- 
fic, no snack bar, no gas station, no ropes to 
keep observers away from the mins and only 
a crude visitor center. The monument has a 
staff of two, including the superintendent 
“The dirt road acts as a filter," says Bob 
Hart, the park ranger. “I don’t have to wear a 
gun here. People who come here, come here 
to see the rums.” 

Hovenweep is a Ute word that means 
deserted valley, an apt description. The land 
is as fiat and open as a billiar d table and in 
spring when rams bring the sagebush to life 
as g r e en, too — for as far as the eye can see. 

Here, as in most other places, the Anasazis 
built their villages near a small spring in a 
canyonhead, tire precious oasis of the South- 
west Cottonwood and hackbmiy trees, a 
rarity in tire desert, grow on tire canyon 
floor, providing shade. The multistory 
homes and kivas — round ceremonial rooms 
set in the ground — are scattered the length 
of the canyon and blend with tire surround- 
ings. Several are built on the northern bp of 
tire canyon. There arc petroglyphs at various 
spots and a cluster of small handprints on a 
rode waS at the Hackbeny Canyon Group. 

A walk through the stillness of the shallow 
canyon is a walk through time Even in early 
spring the son is strong and is reflected back 
harshly from the yellow rocks of the canyon. 
The creamy aromatic flowers of tire cliff 
roads are just beggaring to bloom. A slight, 
steady breeze blows. Small lizards flit tike 
nervous shadows across the rocks. Pinonj'ays 
call from tire pine trees. 


crusted throne, he received the obeisance of 
his nobles in an astonishing audience room, 
open on one side to a courtyard. There he 
could see the feats of horsemanship, or ar- 
chers, jugglers and acrobats that were all 
pari of the festivities. 

Villagers used to walk a hundred miles to 
be in Mysore for the Dussera celebration 
and the exhibition that brought to the capital 
all the best dancers, musicians, sculptors, 
painters, puppeteers and storyteflers of the 
district. 

Even though the Princes, in an indepen- 
dent and democratic India, can no longer 
afford such lavish celebrations, the idea that 
adisplay of local artistic skills is appropriate 
— indeed necessaay — for any festival, con- 
tinues. In Bombay, singing and dancing ac- 
company the processions carrying images of 
the fat and protective little elephant-beaded 
god, Ganesha, down to the beach. There they 
immerse him in the ocean, imploring his 
intercession in the proper functioning of the 
monsoon. In Banaras, the whole Ramayana 
must be beautifully recited and its story 
acted out annually. 

Whether in the city or the village, India’s 
arts are so entwined in the fabric of daily 
Irving that one can scarcely separate (he 
strands. Tire complex texture of art and 
religion, of craft and utilitarianism, of per- 
sonal contact and performance, provides for 
most Indians, in the midst of a poor living, a 
rich life. ■ 

Stmlha Rama Rau is an Indian writer 
whose books include '‘Home to India ” and 
“ East of Home.” This article was written for 
The New York Tones. 


istsk 

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fjO/WAUX W&&S ALONG 


CFHXJ. I 


GREAT SECURITY, HUH? 

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UHQ NE&SAPOORMAN* 
COHEW IN ANPOSOC 

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Anasazi tower in Hovenweep National Monument. 


In Mesa Verde and Canyon de Chelly 
visitors must be accompanied by a ranger 
and travel with a group of other visitors— a 
necessity where at tendanc e and vandalism 
are high — but visitors at Hovenweep are left 
to theor own devices. The annual visitation is 

14.000 while Mesa Verde receives about 

600.000 viators a year. 

Hovenweep has several self-guided walk- 
ing tours, which wind through the structures 
and in and out of the canyon. The dirt paths 
— packed by tire feet of the natives who trod 
there hundreds of years ago — winds along 
the rains on the canyon Up and then dips 
down, through other rains, boulders and 
waist-high grasses. On some of the rock walls 
along the trail the petroglyphs. including a 


THE 


OVER 



S5*-"» 


gests they were multiple-use dwellings — for 
living, storage, astronomy and perhaps for 
signaling.” , 

The Anasazis were a curious people wno 
are nnly b eginning to be understood. While 
the Hams Indians were living primitive lives 
as humere and gatherers, the Anasazis were 
b uilding sophisticated homes and tilling the 
soil. They also built small check dams to 
catch die fine soil washed sway during rain- 
storms — to be used in farming. And they 
had apparently incorporated an astronomi- 
cal rahmdar into the structure of their 
hones. During the spring and summer sol- 
stice the sunlight shone directly through 
holes in the waC, indicating appropriate 
timp* for ceremonies as well as for planting 
and harvesting. 

But their advanced society, combined with 
a 25-year drought, may have forced them to 
abandon the region — sometime in the late 
1200s or early 1300s Archaeological evi- 
dence shows that during the beginning of the 
occupation they ate cottontail rabbits and 
other forest animals. Toward the end of their 
stay, in the mid- 1200s, they were eatmg jack 
rabbits and other plains wildlife, which indi- 
cates that the environment had been altered 
from a forest to a desert econogy. Sometime 
after the 1300s the Anasazis abandoned 
most of the Four Comers region and re- 
mained only in northeastern Arizona and 
central New Mexico. 


spiral, several birds and what appears to be a 
serpent, are viable. 

Walking through the canyon in the heat, 
tire clumps of cottonwood trees near the 
spring become welcome, and one gets a feel- 
ing of how important these pockets of for- 
giveness amid a harsh, expansive desert were 
to the Anasazis. 

As a visitor reaches high points in the trail, 
tire canyon opens up in its entirety. Yet the 
houses and other structures are so much a 
part of their environment that they are bare- 
ly discernible. 

The square towers in the houses should be 
entered, crawled through carefully, to be 
experienced. “The large number of towers 
are unusual,” Hart says. “The evidence sug- 


J.JL. to plant their crops. When it rained 
the soil was washed away and when the 
problems were compounded by the drought, 
they were unable to continue farming and 
moved on. The Hopi and Taos Indians are 
believed to be their present-day descendants. 

Because of continuing investigation into 
ruin sites, new facts about the Anasazis con- 
stantly emerge. There is evidence to suggest, 
for example, that they may have practiced 
cannibalism. Skulls with the brain removed 
and h uman bones, apparently with the mar- 
row chewed out, have been discovered. 

In spite of the research, however, Anasazi 
ruins and the information they contain are 
disappearing at an alarming rate. Vandal- 
ism, for profit or other reasons, is epidemic, 
and experts estimate that 80 percent of the 
sites show evidence of vandalism. In addi- 
tion. on the Dolores River in southwestern 
Colorado, a new dam is slowly flooding 
some of the richest sites, and researchers are 
racing against the rising river to claim the 
artifacts. 

Visitors and energy development may deal 
Anasazi rites, especially in the Hovenweep 
area, the most serious blow. Large reservoirs 
of carbon dioxide, used in oil and gas explo- 
ration, and coal have been discovered near 
Hovenweep. Officials are concerned that 
blasting and heavy trad: traffic may destabi- 
lize the perishable ruins. And now there is a 
proposal to pave the last few mfles of dirt 
road to tire monument, which Hart and oth- 
ers say would increase visitation and inevita- 
bly alter the nature of Hovenweep. ■ 

Jim Robbins, of Helena, Montana, wrote 
this article for The New York Tunes. 








Photos by. Bischof, Bum, Capa, Cartier-Bresson, Erwitt, Hass, and other Magnum photographers. 

From the archives of Magnum Photos, a photographic recoixf of Europe 
in the immediate postwar years — striking images of a continent shaking 
off the debris of destruction and coming to life. 

Mary Bhime, the International Herald Tribune’s distinguished 
feature journalist, sets the postwar scene and interviews many of the 
photographers in her introduction. The LILT, is pleased to present this 
unique volume that captures a decisive epoch and commemorates the 
work of some of the 20th century’s master photqjoumalists. 

Here you’ll find some of the most famous images and faces of our ^H^^^^^Hardcovex, 

time . Once you open its pages, you will want to spend hours poring over 200 pages, 

this magnificently produced collection. Truly this is a book to treasure for 168 duotone illustrations, 
yourself, and a beautiful gift as wed 32x26cm (12.5x10.25 in.) 

Available from the International Herald Tribune. Order today. ^ ^ 

AFTER THE WAR WAS OVER 

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Page 12 


INTERNATIONA L HERALD TRIBUNE, FRID AY, SEPTEMBER 6* 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Thursday 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


Open High Low Lest Qa. 


Indus 132431 133100 131806 132583 — 089 

Trm 677 JO 6 t? ja uu snx— 7.w 

UHI 1 S&W 15908 15BJ4 I5PJ7 + U1 

Comp 549.15 55U7 04SJW 50.17— 107 


Composite 

Industrials 

Tramp. 

U mines 

Finance 


High LOW Close Ch’ge 
18164 10801 IO&55-O06 
I5L33 12402 12421 —006 
107.14 10477 107 ill —072 
57.53 57.42 57.4? Uncfi 
11002 11288 11293 -081 


NYSE Diaries 


dan w. 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

UtllHEes 

Industrials 


Advanesd 
Declined 
Undianged 
Total issues 
New Hfehs 
New Lows 
Volume up 
Volume down 


& S3 

SZ3 535 

1981 2027 

» 26 

22 *4 

373XUJ70 

40L392B30 


Buy Sales -SflTt 



-ciote Pnv. 


Advanced 
Ondlnad 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New HlsM 
New Low* ' \ 
Volume up 
V oiuinedown 


Flnence 
Insurance 
Utilities . 
Barts 
Tramp. 


week 
c Ch'ge Abo 
8— 030 27731 
3—033 386A6 
i_S 2 38284 
1 +1.11 M7.W 
7-1A8 2 

i— 03i mig 
i— 004 27433 


23 % 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


Sept 4 145355 434474 

St 3 . 140365 434340 

116-945 391703 

Aus 3? ~ 140387 391216 

£%■» ~ 14ft7*7 393394 

'Included In the sales figures 


11+945 391703 10568 
140387 391216 1300 


Tobies indude me nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wad Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 
Via The Associated Press . 


Industrials 

Trarrso. 

utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


won low ctoM-av* 

20M3 30734 208.14 —034 
17332 17032 171.13-109' 
8432 8436 8430 - 032 
2131 2135 2138 +031 
18732 18639- T8737-0.1S 



ft stock Index, 


Close CS-ge 

ywix +03S 


23!™. 


TSH 16 AAR 36 23 14 1M Mft 23*6 24 + *6 

174* 94* AGS 12 36 ISft 154* 154* 

3110 13 AMF 351 96 409 1»6 13ft 13 to 

5041 249* AMR 7 4338 43* J3 — ft 

33V* IBM AMR of 118 93 6 23*6 23V. 2316 — ft 

25* 23 ANRpf 1*7 1IJ 1 »» ( 

1416 7% APL It ft ft « +JO 


NYSE Prices Decline Slightly 


The Associated Press 


14% 7*6 APL 19 

61 <4 344* ASA 230 53 1215 

27 I2VS AVX 32 25 IB *07 

28l« 18ft AZP 172 1U 7 1320 

*0 3*4* AbtLoh 150 15 14 539 


259* 20 ArartWf* 50 13 17 

24% 12Va AomeC A0 18 _ _ 

IQto 74* ACiTWE 32b 43 11 58 746 7H 7*6- V* 

19 15V* Ada Ex 1.72c 109 32 17* 17V* 174* 

20 13% Adnuvu 32 13 7 44 14% 14 14% + % 

18% Bto AOvSys 5M 45 19 177 12V* Uto lift- ft 

40ft 23ft AMD 1* 2793 26% 25ft 2* — ft 

12ft 6ft Advert .12 13 20 S3 9ft 9ft 9ft - ft 

15ft 9ft Aerflex 12 246 137* 13ft 13*6— J* 

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158 25 14 539 57ft 56*6 56ft— » I 

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3) 25 » 141* 14 14ft + ft 

32b 43 11 SB 74* ,7ft .7ft— ft 


NEW YORK — Investors’ post-holiday wa- j|fj ffi$eS $2,4 Billion 

■-iMA <v*i*iiniiar1 TWiiivHov anth rvAnon Iho *» 


vering continued Thursday with prices on the 
New York Stock Exchange finishin g slightly 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The nation’s basic money 


3ft 2ft Alleen 


AlrPrd 150 23 13 127D 524* 52ft 53ft + V* 


57 42 AlrPrd 150 23 12 

24ft 15 AlrbFrf 50 25 13 184 23 

2V* IV* AIMoOS .10* 53 8 2 

29ft 23ft AtoPpf Z74e 95 10 28 

334* 27ft AlaP PfA 192 III 
BV* 6ft AlaPdPf 57 1 1.1 
82 63ft AJaPpf 950 115 

MA% 94 AlOPpf 1130 107 

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3*4* lift AlskAIr .1* 5 B 

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16 30ft 30 30 — ft 

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3001 7744 77ft 77ft + ft 
20x102% 102ft 102ft— 1 
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0 3299 21» 20ft 21 + % 

19 95 24W 241* 24ft + ft 


Trading volume picked up a bit. however, supply measurement, M-l, rose S14 billion in 
with the help of some major block trades. late August, the Federal Reserve Board reporl- 
Airiine and other transportation issues pep- ed Thursday, 
pered the list of losers, as did several computer it was the sixth consecutive weekly increase 
and retail stocks. But oil stocks moved ahead, in the aggregate, leaving the money supply wefl 
The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials above me growth targets set by the Fed in its 
slipped 0.89 to 1,325.83 — its fourth consecu- attempt to provide enough money to keep the 
live loss of less than 5 points — despite an economy growing without reviving inflation, 
upturn by one of its leading components, IBM, M-l, representing money readily available 
which climbed lVfc to 12SH. for spending, includes cash in circulation, de- 

The Dow Jones transportation average skid- posts in checking accounts and nonbank trav- 
eled 7. 14 to 67152, while its utility index gained elers checks. 

0.31 to 159.37. 


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lift 47 Holnfpt 425 85 
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197 77** 764* 774* + ft 
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187 2Dft 20ft MVS— ** | 

4 184* 18ft 18ft 
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Declines overall outpaced advances by about 
7 to 6. 

The New York Stock Exchange's composite 
index edged down 0.06 to 108.55. 

Big Board volume swelled to 94.48 million 


the market could keep drifting lower until the 
economic outlook becomes more focused. 

“A lot of people are just plain wailing and 
still hoping that we get some kind of economic 


34ft 26ft AlrtlPw 170 17 9 1301 30ft 30ft XHh + W. 

23ft 15ft AltenG 50b 25 15 42 22ft 22ft 22ft + ft 

46ft 32ft A1MC0 150 45 8 2117 41ft 414* 41ft + ft 

66 57ft AldCppf tJA 105 3S 63*6 63ft 63ft + V* 

115ft l(Bft AldCo pf!250 105 20 112 lllftlltft— ft 

105ft 100ft AIOC pi 1157*114 2S2 101V* 101ft 101V* 

23ft 15ft AlldPtl 12 23 t74* 17ft 174* 

60ft 45ft AlldSrr 112 37 8 632 564* Sfift 5*4* + ft 


shares from 85.51 million in the previous ses- upturn that isn’t going to boost interest rates," 
sion. said Eldon A. Grunm. senior vice president of 


lift 4Vt AIINOl 
34ft 34 AlIsC pi 
29ft 21ft ALLTL 154 65 
Mft 28*6 ALLTol 256 55 
39*4 29ft Alcoa 150 35 
22 13** A max .101 


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2816— *6 , 


There were expectations among some ana- , 

iysts that once Labor Day and the summer On me econom 
vacation season were mostly behind the market, fK 5 theircoml 
trading volume would swell and prices might percent above 
attempt a sustained advance. Financing agreem 

Instead, trading re mains sluggish and inves- Auto stocks me 
tors continue to show the lack ofconviction that General Motors 
dominated August's activity, leaving the market Motor moved up 
with no sense of direction. changed at 37%. 

The main reason cited for the apathy is Wall In the weakeni 


Birr. Wilson & Co. 

On the economic front, major U.S. automak- 
ers said their combined Late-August sales soared 
71 percent above a year ago dunks to cut-rate 
financing agreements currently being offered. 
Auto stocks mostly rose following the report. 


Z20 35 36 151 

156 BJ) B 4531 

38 “T g 

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350 135 354 

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65ft— ft 
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14ft + 16 

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26% 

12ft • ' 

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18% 

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35ft 21% tcind L44 45 
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152 TU . -3* 17ft 17ft- 17ft 

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W ITT.Cp T5Q it 9t*SD7 30* 32*6-32*6—1% 


42ft— ft 
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35*6 + % 
21 * Mi 

18% — ft 
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28*6 + 4* 
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50 123 8 4% 4ft 4ft 

651*195 46 34*6 34% 34ft + ft 

56 5% 5ft Sft + 16 

50 42 U 461 79ft 18*6 79 + ft 

58 25 9 46 Mft 24ft 349*+ ft 

140 4J 8 566 38% 38 38% 

150.35 14 70 33 32% 33 

150 25 12 342 389* 38V. 38*6— ft 
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g* ITTpfK 450 45 . A 62*6 62*6. *2*6— ft 

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27ft 19% inPowr 254 115 4 2106 24ft, 2316 24 , , 

M 14V6 1[PavKp< 254 1V3 Stole li ' 1* - - I 
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3?% UPmrpf 450 11J . IB 35% 35 35ft + ft 

JOft 26, I TW 72.25 12 <25 29 Z7ft' 2n* — 96 

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12 4ft ImpICp , . II. 101 r 

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66 49*6 IndlMpf 774 IU XOOz 6T 

706%. 91 % IndfM pf!250 nj 50d 03 
m* 14% inflMpr ns iu i ic 

20% 15% IndlMpf 2JS IU 31 20 

30V6 24*6 IndlMpf 353 125 3 291 

g* l?ft IndlGsa 254 85 7 19 231 

109* 4ft I rates 57] 32S 5* 


a:- 690 ,37ft :37 .. 57ft— ft 
II 101 M Bft 8ft — ft 


4932 14V* 13% 13**—% 
302 60 60 : 

3000*6716 6716 *716 +1% 
50x109 103 703 +1% 

I 18ft 15ft 18ft— ft 
31 20 - 19ft 19% + ft 
3 29% 22ft 29% ■ 

19 23ft 23ft 23% + ft 
32S 5*6 5ft 5ft 


Street's uncertainty about the U.S. economy's 
strength, and some brokers are suggesting that 


2 % m AmAgr _ iw _i*6 ift ift with no sense of direction. 

21% 16 ABcfcr 8 29 70ft 204* 20ft — , • « , ■ , ■ 

70 58ft a Brand 370 65 b 668 59% 59% s»*6 + v* The mam reason cited for the apathy is 

30% 25ft ABrdPl 275 95 4 29 28ft 29 + ft — ■ 1 1 c 

70 % 59V. ABnipf 2*7 45 9 60 ft 6oft 60 V* — % Street s uncertainty about the U.S. econo 

115% 56% AEVdcst 1-60 15 18 510 115ft 115% 115% rt i y i i ofh onA c/tmp oav> ciiooMltno 

sot* 19 % abmm 56 u 14 4 26 % 26 % 2 *%— % sirengtn, ana some DroKers are suggesting 

60% 45% AmCon Z90 4.9 II 479 59% 59 Mft + *6 

25ft 22 AOmpf 250 115 2 24% 21% 24% 

52% 40ft A Con pf 350 55 8 51% 50% 51% +1 

20% 17% ACopBd 220 115 51 20ft 19*4 20 — ft "M Ontti sa OOP 

30% 25ft ACapCv 251e 9J 14 27 26*6 27 HWi Lax 5teci CUv. YkL PE 1085 Hh*l Low Quot 

II 6% ACantC 166 8 6% 6% 6H— ft 

57ft 44% ACvan 17Q 34 14 2657 54 53ft 53% 32*6 21% 

27ft 18ft ADT 72 37 23 134 23ft 23ft 23% 2Bft 22 

24*fc 17% AElPw 2J6O10A 8 930 21% 21*6 21ft— V* S% 1% 

49% 31% Am Exp 1J8 3.1 14 6505 41ft 41% 4114 28 16ft 

25% 12% AFamlB 41 11 IS 89 23% 23% 23% — % 41 29% 

36ft 27% AGflCp 110 U 9 1816 30% Mft 30% + % 3716 30% 


General Motors gamed % to 6m and Ford 
Motor moved up Vs to 44%. Chrysler was un- 
changed at 37ft. 

In the weakening airline sector, UAL tum- 
bled I ft to 52, AMR fell ft to 43 and Delta Air 
lost ft to 44. 


RMOPttl 

HtahLPM Slock 


lOBHUiLow QuoLChto HttiUm Sl«* 


Sts. Clue 

DJv. YW.PE 1005 HkSi Low OttAOlT* 


16 6% AGnrwf 

56ft 51% AGnl pfA5L87el05 
96% 62*6 ACftlPfBSTOe 68 
71*6 « AGn pfO 254 45 238 61% 60% 61 + % 

36% 25ft AHerlt 1 JO 35 10 5 35% 35% 35ft— % 

13% 7% A Holst 47 lift 11% lift— % 

66% 46ft A Home 2.90 55 12 2970 58ft 58 58% — % 

47 26ft AH asp 1.12 25 15 3034 47 46% 47 + ft , 

97% 72 Amrtch 650 72 9 1858 92% 91% 92 + ft 1 

9016 62 AlnGrp 54 J 22 795 85ft 84% 85 + U 


AGnrwf 427 12% 12% 12% 

AGnl PfA Sj87el04 104 5Sft 55% 55ft — % 

AGnl pfBSTOe 68 39 81ft 80% 81ft + ft 


9016 62 AlnGrp 54 J 22 

28% 18% AMI 72 35 II 

4% 2% AmMol 
29 16% APresds 70 25 5 

13% 5 ASLFIa 11 

18% 12ft ASLF/pfi19 145 
16 11% AShlp 50 57 10 

35% »ft AmSfd 140 U f 


54 J 22 795 85ft 84% 85 + ft 

72 35 II 1747 2416 23% 24% + % 

1318 3ft 3 3ft + % 

JD 25 5 129 19% 19% 19ft— % I 

11 42 6% 6% 6% 

219 145 45 15% 15% 15% 

O 57 W W 13ft 13% 13% + V* 1 

150 SJ 9 1705 2916 28ft 29ft + ft 


67% 35% AmStar M 1.1 10 SSI 56% 56ft 56ft— ft 


32ft 21% 
28ft 22 
5% 1% 

28 16*6 
41 29% 

37ft 30% 
26ft 14% 
32ft 23% 
56 32ft 
40ft 28ft 
40ft W 
19% 15% 
20 15% 

21% 14ft 
30ft 24 
68% 44% 
7% 6% 
52 46% 

18ft 11 
66% 50% 
20% 14 
6*6 1 % 
14ft 3% 


170e 56 8 97 32 31% 31% 

I 61 0 23 87 27ft 27 27 — % 

256 2 1ft 1ft— % 
1J2 SO 22 56 26% 25ft 26% + % 

112 7.9 8 37 40 3f% 3f%— ft 

X95 11J 22 35 34% 35 

70 78 A 22% 22ft 22Vy + ft 

U6 44 20 43B 30*6 30ft 30*6 
156 2.1 77 577 53 52% 52% — ft 

150 29 8 870 34ft 34% 34ft— % 

-52 16 IS 68 33% 32*4 33ft + % 

50 46 B 4 17% 17% 17%— ft 

116 11J U 18*- 18% 18ft + ft 

12 98 17ft 17% 17% + % 

164 65 485 27*6 27% 27ft— Ml 

1+0 2J 8 1850 61ft 60*6 60*6— % 
-55 85 4 6% 6% 6ft— ft 

5L33O106 46 50% 50ft 50** 

64 37 19 45 lift 11% lift— V* 

260 4.1 12 71*6 64ft 63ft 64 — ft 

JS 12 102 12 16ft 14% l*ft + ft 

. _ 21 2 1ft 2 + % 

1551 33 3ft 3% 3ft— % 


39% 24% ConAas 5 U U Sit 38ft 3m Mft + % 

20 14% ConnE 160 9.1 10 14 IS 17% T7%— ft 

31 21% CnnNG 26086 9 4730ft30V.30ft + ft 

15% 12% Conroe 60 27 6 81 13% 13% 13ft + % 

38 26% ColUEd 260 75 8 1646 34ft 34 J4V6 + ft 


68b 33 8 27S 
112 56 8 SB 
ISO SI 8 460 

31 U 10 110 

19 11 

148 

262 9J 29 
176 72 IS 78 
58 36 10 334 

1 JO 45> 9 N 
150 26 25 

5Se 6 19 

152 36 9 59 

64 23 9 1995 
150 26 13 154 
161 125 13 

.16 6 21 355 

19 36 

.160 6 U 26 
2.14 85 9 3230 

60 23 15 55 


64 ZS 16 213 
60 26 126 
220 42 11 2 


150 U 8 
J2 16 IS 
50 46 I 
216 IU 

12 

164 65 


47ft 36% C0I1E pf 46S 106 lOte 44ft 44ft 44ft— ft 

50 39 CanE pf 550 1IL3 13 41% 48ft 40% + % 

36 23 ClWFrf 1,10 25 11 233 32* 31ft 31ft— % 

47ft 35ft CnsNG 233 57 I 93 40*6 40% 40% 


240 » 3 4505 
U6 107 52 

154 26 17 703 
64 15 12 190 

68 57 12 31 

154 45 76 82 


Bft 4% ConSPw 

56 32ft CnP PfG 776 145 

31% 15% CnP DCV 440 147 

25ft 13ft CnPprll 360 146 

28% 14ft CnPpTT 378 146 

28ft 14ft CnPprR 450 146 

28ft Mft CnP orP 198 147 

28ft 14% CnPprN 365 14.1 

18% 9% CnPprM2JD 137 

17 Bft CnPprL 2J3 137 

~ 15 CnFPrS 452 147 

9% CflPprK 363 14.1 


CntlCp 260 63 20 898 42ft 42 


448 7% 7% 7% + % 

BOOz SYi 55% 55% + % 
136 29% 29% 29% — % 
38 25ft Mft 25 + ft 

33 26 2» 25% 

9 Z7% 27V* 27% + % 
24 27V* 27 27 + ft 

19 27ft 27V* 27ft + % 
4 18 18 18 + % 

10 M 15% 16 + ft 

49 27% 27 27% + % 

10 17ft 16% 17ft + % 


60 U 14 409 
60 13 30 46 

70 J 6 313 
250 67 31 

60 16 8 1211 


Bft 

23% + ft 
57*1— ft 
48*6 + % 
9ft— V* 


33% 39 fngerfl 260 55 17 1K7 S3 51*6 51ft— % 

37% 26 IngRpf Z35 &5 ■ - 34 36ft 36 36 

1?* lf »X BC ■** 36 27 . 6 Mft 14 14ft ■+ ft 

26 iminWSfl. JO " 28 248 25ft. 25 25 + V* 

48ft 38% inldStpf 475 105 49 47ft 47ft 47% — % 

21ft 16% I nrt Ico 150b 56 10 303 18% 17ft 17% % 


•• T% 3% IrapR* 195 5% 5 5 ' 

«• .3*%.ll%-|ntoRsc 8 167 19% 18% 1516—% 

ft « 19 IntDRpf-im lil : 23 25ft 2S 25 —ft 

SiTif* « IntaRPI 6J10ULI • 10 45ft 45ft 45ft— ft 

Si 1 S ^ X* ,nf B R Ff 4JS HI 52 32ft 32% 32%— ft 

+ S .?* 7% Jnftaan 4151 9 8% 8%— V* 

?5%-- ft Mft 8 IniRFn 6 33 10% 10ft 10ft— ft 

115 + % !?* 1«* I reps* ilBall.1 ■ *4 19% 19 19 

K%— % 72ft 55ft Intereb” 358 42 M 3742 73% 72 72*4 + % 

19%— ft 156 121% Infer pf 775 47 B 158 156 I5B +3 

SL «% 9% inirHr jo 55 6 244x 11 10% 11 +% 

lf%— % 53% 41 Infrlk .160 56 7 11 46ft 46% 4fi%— % 

«%+% 13% 0% Inhnad . 165 1IH 11 lift 

ft 24% 1»* intAta 72 3.9 9 1 18% 18*6 18% + % 

« — % 1MW.116 IBM C40 36 13 9870 BZ84* 127 13% +1% 

+ ft gft 16% IntOrf 60 1 J 10 58 27*6 27ft 27% 

33 24 .falFlav M2 37 17 1506 58 29% 29% + I* 

lift 6% fatHorv 812 8% 8% 8% + Vfc 

7% 3% IfltHrwt 229 5% 5ft 5% + ft 

60 28% llrtHpfC . 7 52ft 52 52ft + ft 

42 23 IntHpfA 1 32ft 32ft 32ft— % 

34ft 19 InfHpfD 41 56% 24% 26% + ft 

44 34 InfMn 260 ,65 9 9795 42ft 41% 41%— *6 

» 23%-lafMuir 17+ 5J 11 81 33ft 33% 33*6— ft 

57ft 47ft Intpapr 260 55 56 2482 48% 48% 48% 

16ft 9ft I nines - 606 40 12ft 13 17%— ft 

5446 35% irrmrtb _26B 54 M 234 43 42% 43%—. ft 

in 90 tonmpmojo iu 90 % wp* vb%— % 

<3ft 30% IntptoGp 158 27 13 270 40 39%40+*6 
19*6. 13% IntBakr 13 ■ 25 19% 19V. 19*6 + V6 

22ft 16% IntstPW lb M t 3* 20V6 28 20V* + 36 

22 17ft InPwpl 228 IU . Site JOft 20*6 2Q%— ft 
13% 10%-IMSacn 11 123 11% lift lift— ft 

21ft 15*6 I own El 150 97 10 94 21 20% 20% + ft 

35 24ft lowlKV 274 RB 7 51 31% 30% 31V* + ft 

37% 26ft JowaRs, 858 93 9 55 34ft 33ft 34ft + ft 

40 2916 I Data) 354'87 9 182x35% 34*6 34% — ft 

13ft 9ft IpcaCa ' 74 26 13 44 12% 12 T2 . 

40% 36% IrvBnk L96 5J 7 172 37% 37% 37% + ft 


12% — ft 
26*6 + ft 
32% — ft 
40 — % 
26% + ft 
17% + V* 


17% + % 
16ft— ft | 
52*6 


12ft 

77ft 

13% — ft 

12 


34ft— ft 1 

20ft + ft 

im-M 

25**— ft 

SS + “ 

30% + ft 


78 46ft ASfrplA 4JB 66 
57% 51 AStrpfB 650 122 
24% 17% AT&T 1JD 57 16 
41% 32*4 AT&T pt 1*4 93 
42 33*4 AT&T pf 374 92 

27*4 16*6 AWatr s 150 37 8 
13ft 10 AWatpf 1J5 10J 
13ft 10 AWOSpf US 102 
28% 17ft AmHott 260 133 7 
72ft 59% ATrPr 564 &l 
B9ft 66% ATrUn 564 63 
40% 26% Ameran 160 <2 ■ 
50 24% AmesD JO 6 21 

29% 22% AjnefeJc 50 3J 12 
28% 10% Amfac 
1* 5*4 Amfesc 4 

49 50ft Amoco 330b 5.1 0 

37% 28% AMP 72 26 21 
25% 11% Ampco JO 15 16 

23*6 12% Am reo s 11 

36 22*4 AmSIti 14) U 1 

45ft W Amsfed 160 36 16 
4ft 1*6 Anaomp 

24% Mft Antoo 22 

27*6 19ft Anchor 168 6.1 

46ft »% AnCtOY 132 13 30 

13% 9*4 AndrCr JO 16 15 

27ft 17 AihmUc 60 26 14 
34*6 21% Anheuss 50 2J 12 


4-38 66 101 67 66% 66%—% 

650 122 26 55% 55% Bft 

1-20 57 1610364 21% 21% 21% 

364 93 14 39% 39 39% + % 

374 97 6 40% 40ft 40% 

1.00 37 8 150 27% 27 27 

1-25 10J 400z 12% 12ft 12ft— ft 

1JS 10J BQz 12ft 12ft 12ft— % 

260 03 7 109 18% 17ft 18 + % 


31ft 20% CBI In 16DO 66 
125 68ft CHS 350 26 
8% 4*6 CCX 
12 9 CCXpf US 116 


160O66 199 21% 21% 21% + ft 

350 26 20 5881 116% 115*611616— % 
9 171 4X6 4% 4ft— V6 

US 116 l(b 10% 10% 10% + ft 


10% 4ft Conti II 
4ft *« Cantu rf 
51% 27% OltM pf 
4% ftClUHdn 
12 4% Oiflnfa 

24ft 19% Control 150 76 


Bte 12ft 12ft 12ft— % I 

10 Z W% 69ft *S% t ft i 
Sft gft + * 


4m» 34% CIGNA 260 47 35 7646 55 


36ft 21 CtOata 72 35 
40% 33% CnDtPf 4.50 115 


71% <8% Anhevpf 360 56 


19ft 13% Anlxtr JB 17 
16% 9 Anthem .04 J 
15% 10ft Anttmy JUb JO 
12% 9ft Apache jb 2J 
2 % Apcjip wt 

19ft 15% AnchPunZlO 11.1 
74ft 55% AoPwpf 8.12 116 
26 21% ApPwpl 265 106 

34*6 29 AoPwpf 4.18 135 
31% 26% ApPw pf 350 126 


4J 8 3 17% 37ft 37ft 

6 21 235 45% 44% 44ft- % 

15,2 £gg*i£2a+a 

4 149 6 5ft 6 
JOb 5.1 8 1066 64ft 64ft 64ft— % 

72 26 21 1001 X% 30ft 30ft- ft 
JO 15 16 105 12 11% 12 — % 

11 60 20% 20% 20ft + ft 

4J B 445 32% 31ft 32% +1 
36 16 72 44 43ft Oft- % 

_ 3753 3ft 3 3 — % 

22 208 22% 21% 21%— ft 

6.1 212 24ft 24% 24ft + V* 

13 30 23 40V. 40ft 40% 

16 15 19 12% 12% 12ft + % 

24 14 38 25 24ft 25 

25 12 922 32% 32% 32ft 

£4 70 67% 66% 67% + % 

17 18 460 16% 16 16% + % 

J 20 7 14 13ft 13ft— % 

JD 9 17 14ft M% Mft— ft 

25 11 65 lift 11% 11% 

216 1% 1ft 1% 

1.1 260 18ft 18% TBft + 1* 

16 60x70% 70ft 70% 

06 5 2S% 25ft 25ft + *6 

lil 13 32% 32ft 32ft— ft 

26 _ 2 30ft 30ft 38ft— % 


32% 2<ft CIGpf 275 8.9 54 

53% 49% CIGpf A 10 85 102 

7ft 2% CLC • 1 

59ft 26% CNA Fn 11 97 

9ft CNAI 1J4 11.1 11 11% 

29% 16% CNW 273 19ft 

46ft Kft CPC inf 2J0 SO 12 624 44ft 

26 15V* CP Nil 160 DO 9 50 23 ft 

22% 19% CRJIMI 2J7e 97 121 21ft 

26ft 21% CSX 1.16 46 9 4717 25ft 

166% 130 CSXpf 750 45 7 

40ft 2«fc CTS 150 3-1 111 

12% 7ft C 3 l(K 444 43 

33% 24ft Cabot 52 15 9 33 24% 

1«W ,8% Caesar 14 IBM 16% 

2Sft lift Cal Fed 60 2J 5 194 21% 

54ft 35ft Cal Fd Pf 4»9J 72 50ft 

21_ 13% CalBin J5b 1 J 62 19% 


54 31ft 30% 30% — % 
102 51ft 51ft 51% + % 
1 2% 2% 2ft— ft 

97 55% 55 56 

11 11 % 11 11 % 

273 19% 1? 19 - % 

is sag* 

7 156 154 154 —4% 


33% CnDtpf 4.50 115 
26% Conmf 1.10 3.1 13 
1 vlCookU 


898 42ft 42 42ft + ft 
85 7ft 7 7 —ft 
142 1% 1% 1% 

194 49% 49 4 9&— % 

223 ft % % 

37 11% lift lift 

660 23% 23ft 23ft + ft 

2111 24 23% 23ft— ft 

100x 38% 38% 38% 

12 3S*h 35ft 35ft 

1 1% ift 1% + ft 


JD 6 II 709 35ft 341* 35ft +1% ! 

UO 41 13 46 29ft 29% 29ft + % ] 

ID 165 14ft 14ft 14ft— ft 

150 IJ 10 123 69ft 68% 68ft— ft 

113 3ft J% 3V4— ft 
10 Sft 5% 5% 

3.16 75 ■ 1935 41 40ft 4C%— ft 

2.5B 4J 4 36ft 36ft 36% + % 

M8ia4 - + 

158 25 IV 2498 56% 56% 56% 

S, ,J £ 

^ M ,S 2S -f# *9% 

50# 13 17D 11% lift lift + ft 

UOb 13 58 261 46% 45% 45%— ft 

1.63c 9.4 36 17ft 17% 17% 

150 15 11 33 56% 56 56% + ft 

40 1J 18 91 32 31ft 32 + % 

13 87 12 11% lift— ft 

1-00 U 9 947 79 77% 78% +1% 

220 3L7 12 <286 60ft 59% 60% 

2J0 11 12 1342 80 79% » 


39ft 23 ApIDta 1761 77 22 243 23% 22% 22*4— ft 


15ft 8 AppIMs 
24% 16% Arch Da 


30% 25ft ArIPpf 3J8 122 

24% 14 ArtBrt M 15 9 

24% 16, ArVla 158 60 24 

% % ArlnRt 

15ft lift Armada 
12ft 6% Armen 
72ft 15ft Armcnf 210 105 

24ft 14% ArmaRfa 0 U I 
39ft 26% ArmWIn IX U V 
34ft 31% AinCp 1J0 43 7 

a 12ft ArewE JO U 16 
30% 16 Artro 72 7146 

» IS Arvln* 50 35 9 

27ft 17% Asa IXO 
37 23ft ArtilOII 150 47 
45ft 34% AshlOpf 4J0 105 
44% 34ft AahlOpf 376 9J 


14 13ft 13ft 13% — ft 
5229 20% 20% 20ft— % I 
7 29ft 29% 29% — ft 
52 34% 23% 24% + % 
817 18 17£17*-ft 

1 12ft 12ft 12ft 

872 9% 9ft 9ft + % 

4 20 20 20 — ft 


15% 12 Co mm I .12 5119 1538 Mft 14% 

26 15% CRLkB M 641 23% 22% 

,25 2? £?■■*■ 42 2ft 2% 

m ft m*cpRpf*2ai 12 vov, io 

40% 30ft ComSps 12 177 37% 37ft 

Jin? “ Po S-* -SI 1*5 12ft 12% 

22% ,]«* CcxiPEb 50 38 19ft 19ft 

CTft 150% CopCife 20 258 216 214ft 

Z COBHd* dft 36 9 881 21% 21% 

13ft 10 CartaCB M V 10% 10*6 

JEJ Corn*le 100 3J 9 60 31ft 30% 

2g» 18 CaraFf AO 10 11 7 22ft 22% 

30% 21% Carpw 2-60 97 7 2605 26ft 26% 

S* 355 9 3 ^ pf JS ,aj M 25% 25ft 

^ £ arT * c 2-1“ H M 37 39ft 39 

lift 6^ Canal 07 10 10 46 7% 7ft 

IT* .-5? 10 J 89 20% 19% 

^ 21% CartHw 1-22 46 23 55 26% 26ft 

46% 22 CartWI 52 15 12 117 36ft 35 

UO 75 7 32 16% 15% 

16ft _?% CofllCk 270 11% 11% 


16*6 M% Mft + % 
21% 20% 21ft + % 
50% 49ft 50% + % 

ssi aro=s 


41% 31 Coop I pf 2.90 74 

20% Mft CoprTr M 26 

27 15 Cooovhl M 17 

18% 9 Copwta J2I 

34ft 19% Cpwtdpf 248 12J 

27% 17V* ConJuro 54 3J 15 

15ft II Coreln 56 48 11 

48% 30% CortlGp 1-28 27 19 

49% 26ft COT Bill 100 11 

10ft 4% Crate 15 

39ft 32 crane 140b 43 11 

52ft 23 CravR* 


1J2 42 15 38V 36% 36 


32 38 37ft 38 

7 97 15ft 15ft 15ft 

16 209 23% 23ft 231* + % 

22 9% 9 9 — % 

3 20% 20% 20% + ft 

IS 2B 23ft 23% 23% 

11 52 lift 11% lift— % 

19 1730 <7ft 46% 47 

13 48% 48% 40% + % 

15 2 9% 9% 9% — % 

11 47 37ft J7ft 37% + ft 


19% 171* 
52ft 49ft 
34 18% 

70 40% 


CrCkN pf 218 11 J 
CrckN pf 243e 50 


M 1215 49% 48% 


U0 50 12 36 23ft 23% 

14 370 67ft 67% 


1 18ft 15ft ISft— ft 

2 52% 52% 52% 

36 23ft 23% 23ft + % 

170 67ft 67% 67% 




ijV IT SJ. 


35% 20ft JWT* 
37 23% J River 


1.12 U IS 122 32ft 32 32% 
it 17 .11' 593 34 33ft 33% 


28% 16 Jamswy J2- 4 ,11 150 20 


3SK 29 
-56 25 is 


13% 10% JapflF 1436127 
47ft 31% JeffPH 1.52 JJ 
6* so JerCpf 8.12 120 
49 - JerCpf 751124 
11% 14 JerCpf 2.U 122 
12% 6ft jBWtd* 


232 lift lift lift— ft 
523 47 45% 46% + ft 
100x 63% 63ft 63ft 
50x62% 63% 62%—,% 
117ft 17ft 17ft • " 
.20 11%.11%11%+ ft- 


’• AD* 

31% 21 n 81 ft— .ft 

,35ft ’34% 35 -+% 

! V ^S i 

i 69 

137% ' 

1.13ft ' 

31% : 

r I4ft ,1 
' 29ft. ] 


iyjjin? ct me 

‘prhfil ;o the 

I’filaiccereri 


<9% 30% joheun lio. 27 IS -3860 ,47ft 47V* 47% 


40# 35 
1.50b 13 50 
143c 94 
100 15 11 
i 40 1J 10 


46% 3m JOfmCn 106a 44 9 • ■ 61 to 

27% 21ft- Jorgen 100 4.1 II 15 3* 

25ft 17% Jaefene .50 12 u 28 3C 

27ft 22% JayMfg 140 S3 IS 352 34 


68 42% 42% ' 42*6* 

15 2ffh 24ft. 24ft •_ 

28 34ft 34% 34%+> 
B2 3* 23ft 23ft— *8 ~ 


44% 27ft CrwZel 108 24 11 359 38% 38ft 38ft— % 


18 

^ + ft 

12ft 


50ft 43% CrZel Pf 443 105 
65% 50% CrZel PIC450 77 
35% 22% Cufero 58 24 


33% 16ft Cull rats 


36 46% 45% 46% — % 
3 59 58ft 58ft— % 
31 30% 30ft 30ft + ft 


15ft 89 
26% 149 

LB 


19ft 19ft — ft 
258 316 214ft 2T4ft — 1% 
881 21% 21% 31% + ft 
9 10% 10% 10% 

M 31ft 30% 311* + ft 
7 22ft 22% 22% — ft 
2685 26ft 26% 26% 

14 25% 25ft 25ft 
37 39ft 39 39ft + ft 

46 7% 7ft 7% 

89 20% 19% 19% — ft 
55 26% 36ft 26% + ft 
117 36ft 35 3S%— ft 

32 Mft 15% 16% + % 
270 11% 11% 11% 

29 26 25% 25% + % 

47 14 13ft 13ft— V* 
792 35% 35% 35% + ft 

36 25 24% 25 + ft 


■ft 58% CumEn 2.20 35 


20 973 14% 15% 15%—% 


5 ^ 


28% CdfrpT 
.27% 19% Coca 


-90 4J 

JO 14 
76 30 11 


8% CuTTlnc 1.10al04 
38% 30% Curtw UO 3J 16 
52% 33% Cycfaps 1.10 2J 8 


157 63ft 63ft 43ft— % 
14 10% 10% IIP* 

2 36% 36% 36% + % 
21 44% 44% 44ft 


2? E* iiE S ’SJ? Sf* CeJOM*. f40 35 11 331 117%114%117% — 


34% 24ft AsdDG* 140 4J II 572 33 


781 34 23ft 34 + ft 

3 27% 27% 27% — ft 
332 13ft Mft 13ft— ft 
20 24% 24% 24% — % 
110 23% 23% 23% 

171 22 21% 21%— ft 

295 34% 34 34 — U 

1 45 45 45 + ft 

7 42% <2% 42% + % 


44% 35 Cehxtpf 4J0 107 
15 7% Cengy n .Me 4 25 

45 34% Cental 2J8 57 9 


1 42% <2% <2% 

252 ift 9% 9%— ft 
263 41% 41% 41% +% 


Cenfexn J5 1.1 10 266 23 22% 22% — ft 

27 CcnSoW 3SQ 75 S 4074 25% 25% Sft + ft 


20ft OHud Of 2-87 B 10-5 400 27% 27% 27% % SS! l£ Jt 

46 36 CnILtpf 450 103 350x 43ft <3 43ft +2% JSft 

21ft 16 CnllPS M4 84 II V290 19% lift 19V,— u. 77ft 29% 

29% 19% Cn La El 208 11 7 H » Sft ££ * ™ 13ft 

^ SS£'!S w ’-S 105 1M 248 13 12% M + ft ^ 

Mft m SZ&t 150 ” 6 ^ *1 ^ ffia Sft 

12% 7% CntTVTI 50 65 8 74 lift lift i?2 + * 25ft 71% 

S iia^un 8 &!R2iL&tzZ 

S I 5SSPSP *40 47 16 337 flft 8ft ei~ 

4ft 1 vIChrfC 104 2 Vj 2ft tvm .3*% 27ft 

4ft ]Z 7^: 2ft Jft ^ 

S^^g^pf^ « 5 + ?B% 10% 


23ft 16 V* 
15 9V 
30% 22 
,9ft SM 
15 ft) 
30% 25*1 
76 31 

5ft 4 
12% Bft 
22 14V. 

45% 29R 

20 ** 1 » 

65 48 

66 51 

40% 2<ft 
33ft 2 M 
26% 20 
52% 31% 
10 4% 

44% 34ft 
28ft 22 


SJ 1 Iff? £££2? M II 7 19% 19ft 19% + % 

29% 21% ATCyEI 250 94 10 136 27ft 27 27ft + % 

,64% 42 AMRia 400 67 4562 60% 59» 60 

IS 535 MS®®! 135 17 1400X101 101 101 

’S.. ’Off" AI RFP* 250 20 1 143% 143*6143% 


18ft 10ft AJIasCn 
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S Jf* IK JW— ftl 50 33% Combln il* 50 


3 25X6 2SX6 25% — ft 
380K4SW 46ft 45ft— 1% 
1S7 23ft 22% 73ft + % 
59 23ft 23*6 23*6 + % 
57 29% 29*6 29*6— % 
171 62ft 62ft 62% 

1251 33*6 33 3316 + ft 

2 50ft 50ft 50ft— to 
1 46 46 46 + ft 

B Sift 51ft 51ft 
1 26ft Mft 26X6 
398 43ft 43ft 43ft + ft 


12% 7*6 Harnish 23 

2 m 34W Horn of B 340 IU 
29% 24ft HampfCill 80 _ 
23% 13 HraRw» 17 

35 24ft HorrlS 08 30 13 
15*4 10 ft Bcr-Grn $ 

38% 21*6 Horses 1JB 44 10 
39ft 24*6 Hortmx IJS 30 10 
®*6 16ft HawEI 104 70 9 
13*6 9W HaveiA 40e 4.7 I 
Mft 22ft Hazfetn 40 10 15 


38 27 26ft 26ft— ft 
19 15ft 18ft IMS 
»] 25ft 25ft 25ft 
33 15ft 15 U — % 
40 29ft » 29% + ft 

163 33% 33*6 32ft + ft 
921 21*6 21% *1*6 + % 
63 9*6 9% 9% + ft 

S 27% 27 27 — 16 

IS 12ft 12% 13% 

« 22ft 22 32 — % 

B7 21X6 21% 21% 

82 16*6 16ft 16% + *6 
T> 15ft 13*6 13*6— % 
Ml 16X6 16ft 16ft — *6 


13*6 9ft HOZLOb JS IS 34 


29 13% HllhArn 

ZJft 21 HltCrPn .IBe 0 

22ft 10ft H1IUSA 

15ft 10% Hades JS 11 


JfW 10 % Echllns 12 367 12*6 72% 12*6+5 

2? ?0 Edvard 104 34 M 4752 30% 30 % xn% — ft 

£% 26% EdlsBr 100 50 13 12 S% BS4 + % 

Eoword JBO 24 14 S3 Mw, x t* 

2S? £PG dpf 235 94 11 2CH t 74Va 243% + Vo 

»ft 27*6 EPGpf 375 1X4 6 M M " 5™ f 2 

IS' 1 ' , ff! k §r r ° r O Otm J 17 150 lift 18 


18 % 13 % HectaM JS U 


52ft 4SV6 LanaS pf 5J7 701 22 53% 53 J - " 

9ft 5ft LILCo 2 929 7ft 7% 

79 17ft LIL pfE 4790z 26 Mft 

B 30V6 LlLpfK 6100x41 & 47 —1ft 

2J% IJft LILPfX 148 20 19% »' + ft 

73* 13V6 ULPfW » 19ft 7996 79*6 

2Jft 12% LIL pH/ V 2D 79*6 79*6 — 

27 % 16 LILpflf 30 23ft 22% 22% + 

21% IJft UL«r 4 1«% wt 18% 

16% 10 ULPtP 1 14% M% Mft 

19*6 10% LJLpfO 5 16 lift It + 

31ft 19*6 LongDs 33 V U M 27ft 26% 24%— 

W% 23ft LPpI 02 10 19 2213 35*6 35ft 35*6 + 

13% 10% LoGad 07 S.1 9 22 11*6 .lift lift—, 

a 26*6 La Land 100 30 10 2007 33% 32*6 33 + 

Mft 15*6 LnPoe 00b 4.1 42 514 19*6 19% 19% + 

33ft 25% LdPLpf 400 150 92 30ft 30*6 30*6 + 

706 17*6 La PL pf X14 140 ' IK 2? 21% 33 ;T : . 

32% 73* LOUVG* 204 84 I 80S 29ft 28% -29 + ft 

99% 37% LPWBt 200 JJ ID 2U 61% 5*ft 41% +2% , lln 

21ft 19% Lowes 06 10 M 463 24 23ft Zlft— *k { J3to 

05% 19*6 Lutm 1.16 50 13 577 71*6 77 21 . —ft [ 39 

37% US * 6 Lttbrs 00 1,7 B 69 25ft 35 ' 35% + % } 44 

23% 14ft LudnrS 1.16 S2 71 1401 22% 22% 32*6—%! 29ft 

16 W% Lvfcera 08 U IS 35 14 ft l»- ft .S 3 ! 


10% LJLpfO 
19*6 LongDs 


Iff* 12^ “ % 37% 28 OnbEn 104 «J II 33» 29ft 28% » 


23 35ft 35 35 —ft 

172 21ft 20% 20% 


99% 39ft BIcfcHR 200 4.1 *3 244 57% 57ft 57X6 


50ft 33% Boeings 108 22 15 6288 48% 47% 48% +1*6 32ft Mft CrnwE 


19ft 8 Camdis J0 10 10 2171 20*6 19ft 30 + ft 
1896 lift CamMUl Jt LI 15 IT 17% 17 17 
33*6 8% Camdre 7 727 9*6 9*6 .9% 


ra B% El car 
5ft 2% EleeAs 
30% 19*6 Efctspc 
J* »ft Elgin 

2*6 3% ElSdld 


•36 42 

J8 J 3 
00 50 14 


31 +ft, 

18 — ft I 


W 8ft Sft Sft— % 


Mft Hcrmrtn 


64 5 4% 5 

» ?9ft 29ft— % I 
_ » ’J* lfft Mft + % 
,360 3ft 3% 3X6— ft 


51 36% BalseC 100 41 20 447 47 46*6 46*6- ft 18 % IJftCwEof ISO IU 

»l 48 BoNaCpr&OO 85 2B 59 58% 38%- % 78% 14V6CwErt 200 IU 

30*6 18*6 BaliBer .10 J 30 29 30 29% 29ft — ft 76% 57 CwEpf 8J8 IU 

X2ft 28ft Bordens 107 40 10 223 38ft 37% 37% — ft 24*6 18*6 CwEpf 237 90 

24ft 19ft Barg Wo .92 4J 11 1372 21ft 21% 21ft + ft 26% 21ft CwEpf 207 100 

** aaramt 15 9 8*6 Sft Sft— % 74% H CwEpf &40 tU 

44ft Mft Based 334 OJ 8 291 39% 39ft 39ft— 16 30*6 20 C0D1E5 202 80 

lift 9% BnEpr 1.17 105 16 lift 11 lift 38*6 ' 

14% Il BasE pr 106 110 16 13ft 13% 13% 35*4 _ ... 

25% 19% Bawatr J2 il 9 477 23% 23 23 — % 3S% 25 Camper 00 U 


lift 9% BnEpr 1.17 105 16 lift 11 lift 

14% II BosE pr 106 110 16 13ft 13% 13% 

25% 19% Bawatr J2 11 9 477 23% 23 23— % 

?ISS 0*1 851 100 50 13 121 29*6 29ft 29ft— ft 

66ft 43*6 BrlalM 186 3J 14 2358 $8% 58*6 58ft— U 


9 8% Sft Bft- % 74% SB CwEaf 040 tU 
291 39% 39ft 39ft— 16 1 Mb 20 C0RIE5 202 80 


7 727 9*6 9*6 9*6 

UO M 7 2004 31 30*6 30% 

L90 IU 14 17% 17 17 — % 

200 IU 7 18 18 II 

8J8 IU 35Bz 71ft 71ft 71ft 

137 90 10 24*4 24% 24% + ft 

207 100 49 2616 Mft Mft— ft 

UO tU Sta 72 72 72 — % 

202 80 6 26 28% 28% 28*4 + *6 


7B%- 45*6 EmrsEI 140 17 13 342B 70ft 49ft 7&Z— ft 

l*ft g6 Em Rod .941 90 11 *17 10 9ft 9*6— ft 

§% m2 iS, JS 1 S E* 12* ,7Vi - 

Jt% Emnort 100b 50 9 2SS 28% 27*4 a % 

23ft 15ft EmoDs U6 80 7 a 21*6 71ft 21% + ft 

ft EnExc 45Q u, 


%* conisat U0 15 10 424 34 MV6 34 + ft 
% CPwc JS 10 20 83527*4OT62ta + % 


35*4 _ ._ 

35% 35 Camper 00 U 
24% 13% CampSc 
45*6 lift Cpfvsn 


8 34 24 25to 25*4—16 

12 793 WVi 23ft 24 + ft 

UTS 13*6 13% 13%-% 


£.? Emflurt 100b 50 9 2SS MO 27*4 M — % 

22ft 15ft EmnDS 1J6 80 7 a 21*6 71ft 21% + ft 

ft EnExc 450 ft 

5* 24*6 EnglCe 72 2.9 10 662 2SU 24% uu, — ft 

1»6 EH0X9 0 1.9 13 28 18% Mft 5!ft= ft 

M6 17X6 Enserch 100 70191 490 22X6 22ft 22*6 + % 

5Mb S2Vi EnsA pi i.lSall.1 alOOOx 56 55ft 35ft _ ft 

21*6 17% EnsExn 00# 19 U Mft m Sft + ft 
,2% 1% fnsree a 21# 2% 2 2 — ft 

13*6 9V6 Enfera 213 12*6 12*6 13ft— ft 

i?*6 15% EntexE 25O01SJ 49 Mft 16ft 1M 

5^ IZ?* I"*® 1 " J*? 4 7J 11 64 19 18% lfft 

35 19% Eouhcs I-U j0 14 1M 33ft 32ft 32ft— *6 


23X6 14% HBilmn 08 20 12 HI 19ft 1W> Wfc— ft 

X% 16*6 MWIte 00 10 *4 2«6 Mft W6 + ft 

56% 39 HUInx 108 V M WU Sft Mft Sflb- % 

30 12% HefnaC 18 99 1B% IS 18% + % 

24*6 IS HalmP 06 1.9 27 397 19% W% 1916 + ft 

40% 3016 Her U 100 40 IT 3481 ^ » H%— ft 

19*6 10ft Home 1 041 36 M0 W6 18 ISft — ft 

21 Mft Hormnn 16 ™ + % 

49*6 30% H0TWIY 100 il 72 W Mft 44ft 44ft— ft 
40*6 31% HrwiPk J2 0 16 7409 34*4 M M — ft 

33% 24 Hexed 00 1.9 17 m 31 30H Jl + ft 

23X6 Mft HI Sheer 00 20 9 30 2gJ Mft Mft 

13ft *% HIVoll .17 10 J * 1 55 2 v.T S* 

16ft 18ft Hllnbrd 04 il M . 36 2W6 25ft 2Sft + ft 

73ft 49*6 HIHon 180 30 13 «W 60ft 40ft ft 

37*4 26*6 Hitachi JJe 1 J 9 1U3 ^ + 5 

57*6 35% HOlhJOV 100 20 12 JS g* % 

n% 65 HolIrS 100 10 29 _n 7»4 72% 72ft 


4JV6 Wft LdPOC 
33» 25% LOPLp 
25ft 17*6 La PL P 
32% 33% LvxivGs 
99% 37% towel 
lift 19% Lawn 
2596 19*6 Lubrt 
37*6 26% LttbW 


19%—4& 

^* + ift 


33% 24 HexCtl 00 1.9 

23X6 Mft HI Sheer JO 20 

13ft *% HIVoll .17 10 
16ft 18ft Hllnbrd 04 il 

73ft 4946 Hilton 1 80 30 

37*4 36*6 Hitachi JJe IJ 
57*6 35% Holiday 100 20 

83% 65 HallrS 100 \A 


aft 15% MACOM 34 u JB K33 Wft lift life- ft 


60% 38% MCA 81 10 37 1346 45ft Oft 63% —1% 

24X6 1V% AACorp UO 60 7 2224 Sft 21ft 22 

Mft 8*6 MDC Jl ISO m U D6 ™ + 

38 26% MDU in 70 » <5 U% 34% 36% _ 2 

«Vi 34 M?L _ 40 U If ■ 88 Mb JM 3M- % 


38 26% MDU 

42ft 34 MCI 


38*6 10ft Korwp 26 J1E 11*6 11% 11*6 

27V% 15V% HftlFSD 5 507 20 30 

9ft 7 HmeG pi 1.10 IU _ « m „«6 9%- ft 

Mb 2DV6 Himfka JD ^ S3 7|J W4. — 1% 

IB ID HjrotFn 8 U i M 14*6 14 14 — *6 

63% 46ft HddO 3, " 9 251 5SX6 55% 55ft— ft 

67ft n% mnratl 200 12 I3 2573 62% 61% 61ft— ft 

SS W? K I0U11 » 3«6 34ft 34ft + ft 

6*6 3*6 Horizon 344 5% 5ft 5% + ft 

52% 36ft HCA 0B U 12 2S20 Uh 4£6 44% + % 


42ft 34 ME I 00 u If H 3816 3H 38%— ft 

™ ^«GMOr ^4 20 40 157.™ St! Hft- ft 
13ft 946 MGMGr pC44 33 5 |H Mft 

26% 10 MGMUe J0e J 2711M2M63M + S6. 
lift 2J6 MOMu wf ' aa ™ « m£ I aT 

7*6 ML Coma 

lift MLlneit 


2 13% «% IJft 
.VII 26ft 26ft 34%.+ ft. 
225 11% IT 11X6 + % 
IQS 7*4 7ft 7ft— % 
297 lift 11% 11«— ft 


Hotel in 200 88 M 129to29ft29ft + ft 


lift lift ML Inch 297 lift n% u«_ft 

30%. U86 MOOMi 05 U 11 594 nft SM 31ft + ft 

»ft Maw 1.14 20 12 WIxSu Sft Sft +!ft 

IB im MaeOn • • 64 u%‘ ii% 11% 

46ft 38ft Mogicr 100 2J a 5 wl 44ft 44% 

29% 1% MefAst 1800c 311 2ft »L » 

19*6 1M Manhln 00b « 5 IJto 1^- % 


44 
29ft 
24% 

17% 

Uft. 

33% 

» 

72ft 53% 
28ft 8*6 
<8*6 38% 
19 12% 

60% 45% 
45% 33ft 

TV 

R-B* 

41ft 31% 
4% 3 
56X6-30% 
26% *9ft 










































. Eomtaas reports pic 

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P.17 

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technology 


BUSINE S S / FINANCE 



U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 12 


Page 13 



iiacu. 

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cial Turf: The Grass 
9s Greener for Athletes 

By ERIC N. BERG 

rpw» vnntr 7?,wa Service 

season b^jnning'2?s^rf^ aC,<maI Footban League 
and fans will aoiL, ^“day, tram owners, trainers 
success. And as critical for 


fflfficml to* **“» d =P^ in 

meats tn a &° nc 


many technological 


-Jr .. make it safer. 

*n recent years and has 
wor |dwide, with . mLirl divided 


DE SIX mam conmanies CneTu ^ w *“ » mancci Oivioea 

Bftf ss 

** Houston Astrodome m 1975, about 550 iffaSaS 


Designers have 
been working 
to produce safer, 
springier surfaces. 


is* id k 
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- .tr, '• *™ municipalities in 
^. united States have in- 
(dar&Bdal turf, for foot- 
’ toroall or tennis. 

- Y-. .,f»u«acss_has spread over- 

■ : Western Europe 

Jgtoeftjipccer is played onarti- 
jSjuakpd, and Asia, where the 
‘Sportis field hockey. Mon- 
'sanlo-aays about 40 percent of ~ 

are o^aaOc the United States. 
artlfi£ ?, al *wf docs not have to be seeded, watered 
^BmeraUyamnot be uprooted by players' cleats or 
■ bands. And it does not have the craters or 
'-&SSL rOL ^? e ban ? of groundskeepers. Proponents of 

'artmcal turf say that makes their products far less costly and 
;tnne-ojnsuming to main tain than grass. 

;• .^Bo^tnany experts say that artificial turf is a leading cause of 
J u 9 llr y- So™c say man-made surfaces increase the speed of 
rthe_o»ntestants, and that leads to more sprains. 

• K^ start and stop so fast,’' said Robert L. Davis, director of 
.gromds at the 92,000-seat Neyland Stadium at the University erf 

- (Temessee. 

■/ • • J 

i ' ■ J- 

THER critics say that the “grass” in artificial turf is often 
I so short and tightly woven — like bristles on a toothbrush 
— that players who make a quick tum nm get caught, 
^ Sealing , to twisting falls and knee injuries. 
r . i)f bigger concern, such surfaces can' become hard as cement 
; ovrr tune, creating perilous conditions for a player crashing or 
“" to the: 


it we see are two more injuries per week on artificial 
. suf aces than on natural surfaces,** said Gt&e Upshaw, executive 
. (Sector of the National Footban League Flairs Association. 
“Ticy are too hard, and they don’t grve.” 
jk - Designers of artificial turf have been working to produce what 
thy say are safer surfaces. Of the two pioneers in the field, 
Monsanto and Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Co., only 
Nonsanto remains. Biit several smaller companies have entered 
'tie fray, and have produced three-layer “systems” in which a 
• tSck pad is i^aced over asphalt or gravd then a two-part carpet, 
c onsisting of the “grass” attached to a plastic sheet called a pile, is 
atnehed to. the underiying pad. The total thidmess is 2 inches 
(5J8 centhneters). 

iany first-generation surfaces became hard when oxygen 
■ “cOs” inside thor underlying pads collapsed from . players’ 
related pounding. A company called All-Pro Athletic Surfaces 
Irx of Oklah oma City, however, has come up with a man-made 
)Twi 


pd for its All-Pro Tuif that h says does not require omen to 
siy soft In Buffalo, New York, Sportec International toe. has 
fc^m marketing a lOO-perceot rubber pad for its Qmmtuxf 
giificial surfat^ iixatii says is natnially bouncy. . 

Equally important, many companies have begun using poly- 
yt^jylene instead of nylrat to make artificial grassitsdf . Polypro- 
iylcne is believed by materials experts to be more flexible and 
tuzrible. — although Monsanto says its latest version of Astroturf 

(Crwfianed.on Page 17, CoL 4) 


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TMartne I* teres* Rato index; 72*9 
Source: Merritt Lyntte Taterate. 


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32500 

32SJS 

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holidays. 


U.S. Auto 
Sales Up 
Sharply 

7 1 %-Gain Laid 
To Incentives 


Tie Associated Pros 

DETROIT — The cut-rate fi- 
nancing war among U.S. domestic 
automakers pushed car sales in l«if* 
August to 7] percent above the rale 
for a year ago, shattering all re- 
cords for the period, according to 
company reports Thursday . 

The Big Three reported spectac- 
ular gains over last year's Aug. 21- 
31 performance, with Ford Motor 
Co.'s sales up 79.6 percent. General 
Motors Corp.’s up 73.6 percent and 
Chrysler Corp.’s up 76 . 1 percent. 

“They’re a boomer,” said Gary 
Glaser, an automotive industry an- 
alyst with First Boston Corp. in 
New York. “I don’t think anybody 
was predicting this. It’s amazing.” 

The performance pushed sales 
for August 23.4 percent ahead oT a 
year earlier. 

Showroom traffic had been fall- 
ing this summer and a strike by 
Teamsters Union car haulers cut 
deliveries to dealers for three 
weeks. But on Aug. 15, GM offered 
a fixed 7.7-percent interest rate an 
leftover 1985 models, sparking a 
cat-rate financing war. 

Ford matched that interest rate 
and threw in rebates. Chrysler 
[ought bade with rebates and a 7.5- 
percent interest rale. 

The domestic car makers said 
they sold 405,080 cars in the Aug. 
21-31 selling period, up 71 percent 
from 237,078 a year ago. 

There were 10 official selling 
days in the period, putting sales per 
day at 40,080, shattering the old 
record for the Aug. 21-31 period of 
31,811 sales a day in 1978. The 
r ecord for any lOrilay period was 
53,959 set in the thud reporting 
period of September 1972. 

Among the small-car producers, 
American Honda Motor Co. Inc. 
sales were up 1.1 percent for the 
final period and down 18J percent 
for the month. American Motors 
Corp- sales were down 18 percent 
for late August and 34.6 percent For 
the month, and Volkswagen of 
America Inc. sales were up 5.7 per- 
cent in the final period and 25 
percent for the month. 


Activity on the Vancouver Stock Exchange 


Rising Exchange Prices 

Month (w closing value ol the Va 


Ol the Vancouver Stock Exchange Index 


1.300 



_ J 

1.200 



1 .100 


r ■ 

1.000 


J . . 

soo 



BOO 


Elders Seeking Partners 
To Acquire ALHed-Lyons 


JFMAMJJ ASONDJFMAMJJ 

Trading Volume 

Average monthly volume. In miflrorm ol shares 



J FMAMJJ A SO NQJ 
Source; Moncouvsr Stock E* change 


IT* Nr* Tori Tirrw 


In Vancouver , Traders 
Still Recall ' Black Friday 9 

By Douglas Martin 

New York Times Service 

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Last Ocl 19 is still remembered 
as Black Friday on the Vancouver Slock Exchange, which is Canada's 
penny stock market The bottom fell out of the market, investors suffered 
the equivalent oT more than $30 million in losses and the exchange's 
already shaky reputation teetered a bit more. 

Blade Friday was caused by investors, using highly leveraged margin 
accounts, who bid the price of Beauford Resources Ltd. and five related 
stocks far beyond then true value. When a rumor swept through the 
exchange that major investors were bailing out, Beauford. an oil -explora- 
tion company, dropped the equivalent of from S8.33 to 74 cents (6.09 
Canadian dollars to 54 cents at current rates) in one trading session. 

That, along with a plunge in prices erf minerals and other resources, 
sent the value of shares traded on the exchange down 44 percent in 1984. 
Although the exchange has shown substantial improvement this year, it 
has srilllagged b ehin d the other three Canadian exrhangpc — in Toronto, 
Montreal and Alberta. 

Now, regulators, member brokers and exchange officials are sifting 
through the wreckage, trying to put their tattered house in order. 

Two stock promoters nil] be put on trial for theft and fraud this month. 
A federal investigation into market manipulation is proceeding. Provin- 
cial penalties for violations of securities laws are being increased from a 
maximum of six months in prison and a $2,000 tine to five years and 
$100,000. 

Moreover, the exchange has tightened computer monitoring proce- 
dures, requirements for new listings and rules for disclosing trading 
violations. 

“We’ve been trying to improve things in every way, shape or form," 
Donald J. Hudson, president ol the exchange; said. Bat be and others 
acknowledged that it was not always easy, in a market geared to 
promoting speculation on new, undercapitalized companies. 

“In a speculative market, you do attract a lot of people that are on the 

(Gontmued on Page 15, CoL 1) 


By Bob Hagcrry 

Inrenuutiuud lierM Tnhunc 

LONDON — Elders 1XL Ltd., 
an ambitious Australian conglom- 
erate. said Thursday that it is seek- 
ing partners to help it buy Allied- 
Lyons PLC for at least £1.67 billion 
(52.3 billion), or 2 50 pence a share. 

The bid for the London-based 
beer, wines, spirits and food com- 
pany would be by far the largest 
ever in Britain. 'But Allied dis- 
missed the proposed terms as “lu- 
dicrously inadequate" and said the 
uncertainly treated by the an- 
nouncement is “reprehensible.” 

Allied shares surged Thursday to 
286 pence, up 26 pence from 
Wednesday and 58 pence over the 
past eight days, as some analysts 
suggested that a successful bidder 
would have to pay weQ over 300 
pence a share. At me current prioe. 
Allied is valued at about £1.92 bil- 
lion. 

By conlrast, the Australian 
brewing, wool and financial ser- 
vices company has a stock market 
value equivalent to just £450 mil- 
lion. 

John Elliott, chief executive of 
Elders, said the company has built 
up a 6-percent stake in Allied since 
last February and has nearly lined 
up conditional loan commitments 
from a group of banks led by Citi- 
corp. He also said Elders is seeking 
one or two partners to help pay for 
Allied and already is holding talks 
with several candidates. 

Mr. Elliott declined to discuss 
how Allied might be carved up, but 
he said Elders is more interested in 
Affied’s drinks businesses than the 
food operations. The 43-year-old 
executive called Allied’s drink 
brands u a bit tired" but added: U I 
think with belter management we 
can do a good job." 

Some analysts accused the heavi- 
ly indebted Elders of overreaching 
itself, and others said the company 
might be seeking only to make a 
profit by selling its Allied shares to 
a third parly. “We doubt at this 
stage that they're actually serious 
about going ahead with the bid." 
said David Garrard of Ord Mtnnen 
L(d„ a Sydney-based brokerage. 

Mr. Elliou replied that Elders 
bad won all 12 takeover bids it had 
made since 1972, including the De- 
cember 1983 acquisition of Carlton 
ft United Breweries LuL, the Aus- 
tralian brewer of Foster’s lager, a 
company that was far larger than 


Elders. He also noted that in the 
past 12 months Elders had cut its 
net debt nearly in half to 600 mil- 
lion Australian dollars (5408 mil- 
lion). which compares with equity 
of 700 million dollars. 

Elders IXL — whose initials are 
an abbreviation for the mono “I 
will excel" —-has grown at a hectic 
pace since Mr. Effiott acquired its 
forerunner, a tiny food -processing 
company, in 1972. Elders now is 
the largest beer, wines and spirits 
concern in Australia and is in- 
volved in sheep shearing and live- 
stock sales. 

It also has a worldwide trading 
operation in wool, meat and other 
agricultural products. The compa- 
ny’s financial services activities in 
eight countries include merchant 
banking, property finance and in- 
vestment management 


Allied. Britain's second-biggest 
brewer, also produces wines, spir- 
its. coffee, tea. bread and other 
baked goods. In the United States. 
Allied owns Baskin-Robbins Ice 
Cream Co. and ocher food compa- 
nies. h also has substantial food 
and drink operations in continental 
Europe and East Africa. 

But the company has been a lag- 
gard in the British drinks industry, 
particularly in the fast-growing la- 
terally sluggish 


ger section erf the gene 
beer market. Last January. Allied 
installed new management in its 
brewing division, and the company 
has been trying to cut costs in its 
low-profit wines and spirits busi- 
ness. 

Even so. doubts remain about 
Allied’s management, led by Sir 
(Continued on Page 15, CoL 6) 


Lloyd’s of London Profit 
At 15-Year Low in ’82 

By Bob Hagerry 

ter/urtionai Herald Trihu 


InienutionaJ Herald Tribune 

LONDON —Lloyd's of London 
reported Thursday that its overall 
market profit sank to a 15-year low 
of £57 million in 1982, the latest 
year for which results are complete. 

That compared with a profit of 
£151.9 million recorded by the in- 
surance exchange for 1981. Under 
the Lloyd’s system of accounting, 
the books are kepi open for three 
years to allow time to determine the 
level of claims. 

For 1982, Lloyd's had a total 
underwriting loss of a record £188 
. million, compared with an under- 
writing loss of £435 million in 
1981. but investment returns were 
again sufficient to keep the market 
narrowly in the black. 

Peter Miller, chairman of 
Lloyd’s, asserted that the nearly 
400 syndicates that sell insurance 
at the market generally had “done 
jolly well” in comparison with in- 
surance companies in the U ruled 
States and Britain, many of which 
have reported sizable losses recent- 
ly. 

The overall results do not neces- 
sarily reflect the profits and losses 
of the 26.000 individuals who are 
members of Lloyd's and pledge 


their wealth to back insurance poli- 
cies sold at the market A members 
return depends on which syndi- 
cates that ne belongs to. 

Many of the syndicates suffered 
huge losses for 1982. As a result 
more than 400 members of Lloyd’s 
have failed this year to pass the 
solvency test required for them to 
continue underwriting insurance at 
the market 

Total premium income at 
Lloyd’s grew to £Z89 billion in 
1982 from the year-earlier £226 
billion. 

The bulk erf the underwriting 
losses arose in syndicates selling 
“general liability policies, which 
include such items as product and 
professional liability. U.S. claims 
in these areas have been particular- 
ly high. 

Mr. Miller said many Lloyd's 
syndicates probably would have to 
stop covering such risks as medical 
malpractice in the United States 
unless more state legislatures put 
limits on insurers' liabilities. 

Accident and health syndicates 
also showed an overall loss. Profits 
shrank in the motor-vehicle and 
property-damage categories but 
rose for aircraft, ships and life in- 
surance. 


Farm-Lending Agency 
Calls U.S. Aid Crucial 


While many are unaware of the 
extent to which the system is tied 
into America’s financial network, 
Mr. Wilkinson said, many institu- 
tions — including banks and insur- 
ance companies — are major hold- 
ers of Farm Credit securities. . 

He declined to specify the size of 
the federal aid that will be needed, 
but said it will be “multibillions of 
dollars." Members of Congress fa- 
miliar with farm lending have put 
. . , the potential cost to taxpayers at $5 

said increased losses in the wnem s biflton to $20 billion. 

, The Farm Credit System, found- 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Farm 
Credit System, the largest farm 
lender in the United States, is fac- 
ing its most severe crisis since the 
Depression and could be forced to 
begin liquidation within two years 
unless the federal government 
comes to the rescue, the system’s 
top regulatory official said Thurs- 
day. 

Donald E Wilkinson, governor 
of the Farm Credit Administration, 


e 37-bank, 


this year in the first 
since the 1930s for 
574-billion system. 

Mr. Wflkmson said at a news 
conference he will begot exploring 
with Congress and the Reagan ad- 
ministration ways in which the gov- 
ernment can help the system sur- 
vive a severe crunch expected to hit 
within 18 to 24 months. 

“If we are unsuccessful ... we 


ed early this century to make easier 
credit available to agriculture, is 
cooperatively owned by its farmer- 
borrowers and raises money 
through bond sales. Since it paid 
off the last federal seed money in 
the 1960s, the system has used no 
government funds. 

The loose confederation of re- 
gional banks and their local 
branches is regulated by the Farm 
Credit Administration, an indepen- 


will begin to face the necessity of 

posable liquidation of portions of 

the Farm Credit System including ■ dent federal regulatory body, 
some of its regional banks, Mr. 

Wilkinson said. “This, I think, 
would be a very unfortunate situa- 
tion to permit to happen.” 


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Britain Witt Sell 
Last C&W Stake 

Reuters 

LONDON — The British 
government said Thursday that, 
as expected, it planned to sell its 
nanaming 23-percenl interest in 
Cable & Wireless PLC during 
the current financial year, 
which ends next March 31. 

The chancellor of the exche- 
quer, Nigel Lawson, said the 
sale, which would be subject to 
stock market conditions, was 
part of the government's con- 
tinuing program of privatiza- 
tion and was in line with its 
policy of selling government 
minority holdings in private 
companies. Government 
sources said last month that die 
delay in privatization of British 
Airways nad increased the like- 
lihood that the government 
would soon sell shares in C&W. 
' Merchant bankers and stock 
brokers were invited to offer 
their services in the sale of the 
stake; which amounts to 102£ 
million ordinary shares, Mr. 
Lawson said. The sale would 
follow two previous public of- 
ferings of C&W shares. C&W 
shares were trading at S55 
pence ($7 JO) late Thursday on 
the London Stock E xchange, 
down from 565 pence Wednes- 
day. 


While it is exploring possible av- 
enues for federal aid, Mr. Wilkin- 
son said, the system will operate 
under an emergency rule that en- 
ables money to be shifted between 
various banks in the system to meet 
operating losses that have been 
concentrated in areas hardest hit 
by a farm depression. 

Bonds sold to provide farm loan 
money are backed by the entire 
system. Although it has in place a 
loss-sharing arrangement, that pro- 
cess has been too cumbersome to 
help in many cases, he said. Eleven 
production credit associations, the 
local conduits for sborr-term oper- 
ating loans, have been forced mto 
liquidation over (he past two years. 

The system's board of directors 
approved the expedited loss-shar- 
ing procedure on Wednesday. It 
will, in effect, override the objec- 
tions local farm aedit banks may 
have to shifting system funds and is 
likely to anger some local credit 
officials who have guarded their 
administrative powers and object 
to centralizing the system. 

Bur Mr. Wilkinson said the move 
was necessary to aDow quick re- 
sponse to problems and to demon- 
strate that the system is doing ev- 
erything it can internally before 
going to the federal government Tor 
help. 

Among possible long-term reme- 
dies for the system’s iDs are in- 
creased regulatory authority for the 
Farm Credit Administration, gov- 
ernment guarantees for Farm 
Credit bonds and loans, creation of 
an institution to takeover bad farm 
debt, a direct infusion of federal 
cash and a so-called buydown of 
interest rates, Mr. WHkmson said. 



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Spanish Shoe Firm 
Seeks Protection | 

Reuters V 

MADRID — Spanish footwear nanufaAir- 
er Festival International, faced with dedinhe 
sales and mounting debt, filed for ■eceiversfip 
Thursday after failing to agree with unions oia 
plan to lay off nearly half its 677 workek- 
Festival, owned by the U.S. compmv Euroit 
(S6-6 million) h 

debL In 1984. Festival nested a nf irh. 


A spokesman for the companv aid « had 
asked for protection from chiton; undo f- 
oparn s suspension -of- paymen is law. 

Under the law, similar to the Chapter If 
bankniptcy provision in the UnuedSmes. ^ 
reaiwr is appointed to establish a setedute fori 
debt repayment while the company daws ud a‘ 

restructuring plan. v ’ t 





















































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1985 


Page 15 


business roundup 


Hutton to Punish 15 for Overdrafts 


United Press fniemanemat 

Washington — An internal 

investigation of excessive bank 
overdrafLing by executives of EP. 
Huuon & Co., published Thurs- 
day. exonerated the company's 
chairman and its former president 
but recommended 15 other execu- 
, lives be punished. 

The investigation headed by 
.Griffin B. BeQ, a former U.S. attor- 
ney general, directed the harshest 
recommendations against six 
. branch managers in whose regions 
pyerdrofting of bank accounts was 
“so excessive and egregious as to 
warrant sanctions." 

„ These measures included person - 
'\i fines ranging from $25,000 to 
>50,000, but Mr. Belt at a news 
conference, said the six would not 
have to pay if they resigned. 

•'He said, “We "tried to link the 
high officials at Hutton with the 
wrongdoing that the Justice De- 
partment found. We were never 
able to do that." 

In May, Hutton pleaded guilty 
to 2,000 counts of mail and wire 


Hongkong Land 
Profit Up 10% 

Reuiers 

HONG KONG — Hong- 
kong Land Co. said Thursday 
that net income in the first six 
months of 1985 rose I0J per- 
cent from a year earlier, to 193 
million Hong Kong dollars 
(S24.7 million) from 175 mil- 
lion, on the strength of im- 
proved occupancy rates for its 
commercial properties. 

The company said its office 
space, including the newly com- 
pleted Exchange Square m cen- 
tral Hong Kong, is 87 percent 
occupied, compared with 75 
. percent at the end of last year. 
It said food and hotel opera- 
tions helped profits, but added 
-that Australian operations were 
hurt by the weaker Australian 
dollar. 

It said that interest on its 
debt, estimated by analysts at 
^between 11 billion and 12 bil- 
lion dollars, fell 100 million dol- 
lars from the year-earlier peri- 
od. but gave no other figures. 


fraud involving overdrafts between 
July 1980 and February 1982 at 
many erf the 400 banks where it had 
accounts. The federal government 
did not. however, prosecute any 
Hutton officials. 

The practice allowed the compa- 
ny to nave the interest-free use of 
hundreds of millions of dollars on 
certain days by drawing down bank 
accounts in excess of expected de- 
posits. 

The Bell report cleared George 
L. Ball, who was president of Hut- 
ton at the time, and Robert M. 
Fomon. the current chairman and 
chief executive officer, who hired 
Mr. Bell to make the investigation. 

Bui Mr. Bell directed punish- 
ment of five corporate officials, in- 
cluding Thomas Rae, vice presi- 
dent and general counsel, who 
plans to retire by the end of the 
year. 

Thomas J. Lynch, the firm’s 
chief Financial officer during the 
period in question, was stripped of 
all corporate duties. 

The report said that Thomas F. 


Morley, the firm's cash manager, 
should be removed from any re- 
sponsibility involving money man- 
agement and the company said he 
is leaving Hutton. 

The report blamed three regional 
operations managers and one act- 
ing regional sales manager as being 
“directly responsible or account- 
able for the overdrafting excesses." 

Mr. Bell’s 183-page report was 
the result of a three-month investi- 
gation during which his team of 
lawyers interviewed more than 300 
Hutton employees and others. The 
report did find fault with top man- 
agement because it “failed to im- 
plement an adequate system of in- 
ternal accounting controls to 
safeguard against the possible mis- 
use of overdrafts.” 

Hutton's board of directors vot- 
ed Wednesday to endorse his rec- 
ommendations. 

Mr. Bell specifically recom- 
mended stepping up audit proce- 
dures and bringing m outside peo- 
ple to sit on the board of directors. 


Continental Unveils Its Plan 
For Repayment of Creditors 


The Associated Press 

HOUSTON — Continental Air- 
lines. which two years ago shut 
down for three days filed for bank- 
ruptcy protection, unveiled on 
Thursday a plan to fully repay 
□early $900 million owed to its 
crediicrs. 

Under the plan submitted to fed- 
eral court, the airline will repay 
almost all of its debts over five to 
10 years once the plan is approved 
by the court. 

Creditors accounting for 92 per- 
cent of the $897. 1-million debt 
have agreed lo the repayment plan, 
Frank Lorenzo, the airline's chair- 
man, said. The remaining 8 percent 
continues to be negotiated, he said. 

Phil Bakes. Continental's presi- 
dent. said the plan includes more 
than $80 million in employee 
claims. 

He said the airline would imme- 
diately pay $20 milli on erf the em- 
ployee cl aims upon court confirma- 
tion. Another $60 million would be 
paid over five years. 


The airline, once the nation’s 
seventh -largest. Tiled for reorgani- 
zation on Sept. 24, 1983. After 
shutting its operations for three 
days, it returned to the skies as a 
low-cost, full-service carrier. It also 
slashed salaries by as mud) as 50 
percent and trimmed its work force 
by two-thirds. 

Since then, it has rebuilt its route 
structure and now has 40 percent 
more traffic than it had prior to the 
bankruptcy filing, Mr. Bakes said. 
The work force, which dropped 
from 12,000 to 4,200 two years ago, 
is now at 12,800, he said. 

Continental posted losses of 
$77 2 million in the third quarter erf 
1983 and $57.1 million in the 


fourth quarter of the year. But in 
the third quarter of 1984, profit was 
$30.3 million, then the highest 
quarterly profit in the airlin e's 51- 
year history. Earnings for the entire 
year were $503 million. 

This year. Continental earned 
another record, $35.4 million in the 
second quarter. 



Japanese Chip Makers Join Victims of Slump 


Warren M. Anderson 

Carbide Rides Out 
Takeover Through 
Stock ' Greenmail 9 

Afar York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Union Carbide 
Corp., the subject of hostile take- 
over rumors, has ruled out any 
form of “greenmail,” including at- 
tempts by a large stockholder to 
exchange shares for one or more of 
Carbide’s best businesses. 

“We don’t want to get into nego- 
tiations with one individual — the 
holder of a large block of shares — 
that would be detrimental to other 
shareholders,” Warren M. Ander- 
son, Union Carbide's chairman, 
said Wednesday. 

Union Carbide, as part of a cor- 
porate restructuring announced 
last week, plans to invest $220 mil- 
lion for improved safety at its 
plants and to sharply reduce the 
number of employees at its head- 
quarters in Danbury, Connecticut 

Although Carbide called a meet- 
ing Wednesday to discuss its re- 
structuring, many of the questions 
centered on the takeover specula- 
tion, which has been mounting on 
Wall Street since GAF Corp. dis- 
closed last week that it had ac- 
quired 9.9 percent of Carbide's 
shares. 

Mr. Anderson said Carbide was 
not seeking a more friendly bidder 
for its shares, or a “white knight” in 
case GAF attempted a takeover. 

He said there had not been any 
discussions with GAF concerning a 
merger or the sale of assets. 


By Donald Wourac 

Los Angeles Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — The world- 
wide stump in the semiconductor 
industry is be ginning to take its toll 
on Japanese manufacturers, who 
have been forced to cut back on 
capital spending for the first time 
since they entered the chip business 
in the early 1970s. 

Despite their recent market suc- 
cess against U.S. companies, the 
Japanese semiconductor makers 
will slash spending on chip-related 
property, plants and equipment by 
23 percent this year, down to S2.7 
billion, according to Dataquest, a 
market research firm in San Jose, 
California. 

In 1984, chip-related spending 
by those companies totaled $33 
bi lli on as they came to dominate 
markets for key categories or high- 
volume semiconductors. 

One of the major Japanese com- 
panies, Hitachi LfcL, said that its 
earlier forecast of a 20-percent de- 
crease in semiconductor spending 


COMPANY NOTES 


BASF AG said it would integrate 
two U.S. subsidiaries, Glasurit 
America Inc. and Umbacfaer Paint 
& Colorworks Lux, into the car 
paint section of Tnmnnt Corp„ 
which it bought in May. 

Cadbury-SchweppesPLC report- 
ed a fust-half pretax profit of £33.8 
million ($46.4 million), down near- 
ly 15 percent from £39.7 million in 
the same period last year. 

EPIC Mortgage Inc* the trou- 
bled mortgage- banking company 
based in Falls Church, Virginia, 
has been ordered by a federal court 
to give a full accounting of its fi- 
nances and to set aside in escrow 
any mortgage payments it receives 
until further rulings by the court. 

Ford Aerospace & Comnrarica- 
tious Corp. said it would layoff 600 
employees at facilities in Orange 
County, California, who were as- 
signed to the canceled Sergeant 
York anti-aircraft gun program. 

Guinness* the Irish brewing com- 
pany, said it had acquired control 
of Hediard, the French wine and 
food company, for £5 million ($63 
million) in cash. 


might have been too optimistic and 
that its reduction might be closer to 
30 percent. The company said the 
spending cutbacks will not affect 
its recent pledge to increase U.S. 
investments and jobs, a step in- 
tended to ease protectionist pres- 
sure. 

The cutbacks mean that most of 
the Japanese companies will not be 
expanding their manufacturing ca- 
pacity as much as they intended 
this year. Japan's pell-mell spend- 
ing on plants despite [he poor mar- 
ket has been a major complaint of 
U.S. semiconductor companies, 
who blame the resulting overcapac- 
ity for plummeting prices. 

However, analysts said the cut- 
backs were apparently in response 
to die bleak semiconductor market 
rather than to recent U.S- political 
pressure. And Dataquest said the 
Japanese companies collectively 
still will outspeud the independent 
U3. semiconductor companies this 
year by more than $300 million. 

“I don't think this represents any 


Genex Corp. of Rockville, Mary- 
land, a bio technology firm, said it 
was phasing out production of its 
major product, the amino arid 
phenylalanine, and laying off 
about 25 percent of its work force. 
It said the derision came after G J3. 
Searie & Co. said it would not re- 
new Genex’s contract to produce 
phenylalanine, a key ingredient in 
the sweetener aspartane. 

Hanson Tins! PLC of Britain 
said the U3. Federal Trade Com- 
mission had granted it an exemp- 
tion to an antitrust waiting period 
regarding its tender offer for SCM 
Corp. 

Lucas Industries PLC said its 
pretax profits in fiscal 1985-86 and 
1986-87 should rise by about £20 
million ($273 million) each year 
because of a recent derision to tem- 
porarily halt contributions to its 
pension funds, which have in- 
creased in value beyond their obh- 


moderation in their overall strategy 
at all,” said Thomas D. Hmkdman, 

president of the Semiconductor In- 
dustry Association, a U3. industry 
group that has registered com- 
plaints about trade practices of 
Japanese competitors. 

The retrenchment comes amid a 
persistent global weakness in de- 
mand and prices for semiconduc- 
tors. largely becaus e of reduced 
growth m sales of computers, a 
major chip user. 

Dataquest also said it was fur- 
ther reducing its forecast for U3. 
consumption of semiconductors 
this year to $9.14 billion, a 31 per- 
cent falloff from 1984. Earlier. Da- 
taquest had foreseen a 20 percent 
decline, assuming 2 second-naif im- 
provement that has not material- 
ized. 

The cutbacks in spending by the 
Japanese range from a 47 percent 


Luossavaara- Kiinmfivaara AB, 
the state-owned Swedish ore com- 
pany, has reportedly signed a con- 
tract to sell 43 million tons of iron 
ore to a consortium of five Japa- 


Two companies, Sanyo and Sharp, 


nese steel mills over the next four 
and a half years. 

Malaysia Shipyard & Engineer- 
ing said it bad signed a two-year 
contract to repair ships for Iran's 
National Shipping Corp. 

Monsanto Co: said it expected its 
1985 earnings to increase oy about 
$55 million, or 71 cents a share, 
from the sale of its Seal Sands 
chemical manufacturing facility in 
Britain to BASF AG. 

Pacffic Tdesis Group Inc. of San 
Francisco said it would explore 
business development opportuni- 
ties in the telecommunications area 
in India with Intrfliynt Communi- 
cations Networks Inc. 

United Airlines smd it expected 
to spend up to $350 million to help 
plan, design and bufld a new air- 
port in Denver. 

Wotnudd International Ltd, the 
Australian fire-protection and so- 
entity group, sam hs net profit for, 
the fust six months rose 19 percent, 
to 25.13 mininn Australian dollars 
($17.1 million), from 21 .07 million 
dollars in the same period a year 
earlier. 


plan increases of 25 percent and 35 
percent, respectively, according to 
Dataquest. 

Hitachi's semiconductor division 

was cited by analyst George Haiou- 
lakos of Cable, Howse & Ragen. as 
the main reason he believed that 
Hitachi earnings this year will fall 
by 25 percent. 

A Hitachi internal directive to 
undercut competitors’ prices has 
touched ofT a Department of Jus- 
tice investigation and fueled pro- 
tectionist sentiment in Congress. 

Hitachi officials said their reduc- 
tion in capital spending would be 
confined to cheap, high-vohime 
chips where supply is greatest and 
prices weakest. 

Texas, semiconductor assembly 
plant would phase out production 
of 64K chips (capable of holding 
64,000 bits of information) later 
rhic year and replace it with in- 
creased production of more power- 
ful and expensive 256K chips at the 
planL 


Taiwan Rescues 
Trust Company 

Reusers 

TAIPEI — The governmen- 
t-owned United World Chinese 
Commercial Wank has taken 
over the financially troubled 
Overseas Trust Corp„ a Fi- 
nance Ministry spokesman said 
Thursday. 

He said the central bank 
would rive an emergency $40- 
nuJEon loan to the Wank. Over- 
seas Trust, with assets of more 
titan $250 miDion, had suffered 
cash-flow problems over the 
past few months because of 
$125 millio n in overdue loans 
made to Taiwanese companies, 
he said 

Overseas Trust is 70-percent 
owned by Hong Kong and Phil- 
ippine businessmen but is not 
connected with the Overseas 
Trust Bank Ltd. of Hong Kong, 
which was taken over by the 
colony’s government last June, 
a spokesman said. He said there 
were no runs on the bank, but 
that withdrawals by depositors 
had increased in tire past few 
weeks. 


i . l 


Vancouver Exchange Struggles Back From 'Black Friday 9 


Elders Unveils 
Purchase Plan 


(Continued from Page 9) speculation is involved these sorts amount is still far below the 33 to find sufficient evidence to indi- anything is possible, participants l UTV.ll/lS P X 1X121 

fringes, so to speak,” said Ruoen ^ go^g 10 happen." million traded on Jan. 17, 1983, cate that Mr. Dion or his friends say. One is the institution of a new 

Bullock. British Columbia's top ea- To [ts supporters, the worth of which is the record. engaged in “wash trading" — the computerized surveillance system (Continued from Page 9) 

forcer of securities law the exchange was more than proved What led to Black Friday, in es- term tor increasing prices artificial- to extend exammanons beyond one Derick Holden-Brown, the chair- 

Recent history would seem to “ the glory days of 1982, after the sence, was the bidding up of the Kf by giving the appearance of a day's trading Exchange officials man. “Is the chap just too nice to 

prove his point. In 1984 a stock announcement of an enormous price of Beauford to what later broader market. say this would likely have detected ^ dedaonST a leading 

promoter, Dennis Johnstone, was gold find in Hemlo. Ontario, on the seemed absurdly high levels, inves- But there is less doubt in the “e oH*ptu>nal me of Beauford brewing analyst asked Thursday, 
convicted of bribing an exchange north shore of Lake Superior, sail ugators and brokers said. How authorities’ minds about what ^ lts stocks. ^ August, Allied raised £150 


official Chris Caulton. In 1983, 
Gunter Allman was sentenced to 
15 months for manipulating a stock 
called Grand Prix Resources Ltd. 
An example of the market's 


mmy Vancouver shares soaring. In high was apparent in a press release sparked the crash. In July, they Another has been to raise the million by selling its 25-percent 

1983, Vancouver traded 4.1 btlbon issued by the company on Aug. 9, charged two Canadians, Erich standards for new listings. So far stake in Castlaname Tooheys Ltd, 

shares, second only to the New valuing Beauford s oilfields at Brurmhuber and Engelbert Roo- this year, the prospectuses of a doz- Australia's second-largest brewer, 
York Stock Exchange in terms of about $ 1230 a share. sen, with defrauding West German en companies have been examined to Bond Corp. Holdings erf Austra- 

vninrrv» North Ami™-.* <**- The exchange rejected that re- investors by making unrealistic by a pand of expert mining engi- lia. 

lease, and after discussions with the promises about investments in neere. Two have been nqected In the year ended last March 2, 


high was apparent in a press release sparked the crash. In July, they i 
issued by the company on Aug. 9, charged two Canadians, Erich sta 


problems came when Wiliroy changes. 

Mines Ltd. filed a $ 153-million The current unrest in South Afri- 

suit in Ontario in 1981 and in Brit- ca is starting to have an effect simi- 
ish Columbia last year against New lar to the big 1982 find. “That will 
l CSnch Uranium Ltd. and the ex- help, decidedly," Mr. Hudson said. 
' change, alleging that the exchange Disruption in South Africa has 


volume on North American ex- The exchange rejected that re- investors 


unrealistic by a pand of expert mining engi- lia. 


company it finally accepted a re- Beauford and two related compa- The exchange has also chopped Allied had net profit of £1 10.3 mil- 
vtsed value of only 75 cents a share, uies and then not using the money commissions for underwriting new lion on sales of £3.17 billion. El- 
But in the 1 1 months preceding to buy stock. mtn paniw to 10 to 15 percent, deis, for its year ended last June 30, 

Black Friday the price of Beauford Had the two men instead invest- from 15 to 25 percent to divert » ' «P«ted to report net profit of 


suits were made public. But the sun i ms. m turn, nas neipea u 
was settled earlier this summer, guered Vancouver market 
with the exchange paying $275,000 Local brokers say big 
-as part of the settlement. among the 900-plus gold si 

The sort of cowboy capitalism the exchange are likely to 


ucip, ucwucuij, mi. nuuwu *uu. uiacx rnaay tnepnee ot Beautora u-d ^ ^ ; ngt „d mvesi- from 15 to 25 percent to divert “ expected to report net protit or 

rose stwdily to $833 a share, from ^ ^ moneyi ^ aShorities sug- more interest tT^Stmg issues fbout 100 million Australian dd- 

caused the price of gdd to increase, $1.85. It and five related resource gcst ^ ^ aaAtt ^ rarher than new high fliers. After lars on sales of 63 billion dollars. 

raising shares m gold compamra. companies were being propelled by ^ broader, and the price of first fighting the release of the 

This, m turn, has helped ithe belea- continuing purchases from a small Beauford and the Star stocks names of those who break ex- ‘ e 

guered Vancouver market group of investors led by Robert ^ been sustained longer, change rules, the Vancouver ex- OPEC Meeting Is Set 

Sr™" Ross P"®; who promotes new v* rumor IxMod the crash £as change fmallv adopted tongherdis- v ^ « .7^. 

among the 900-plus gold stocks on companies that want to go public. ^ ^ proraiscd froin closure standards than hs Toronto ForUCt. 6 in Vienna 

the exchange are likely to mdude He ^t^thera served as offiois German investors was not ot the counterpart Rwm 

aHS.S’EBaSSS for R^ufoid and on interlocking ^ Bn t Mr. Hudson concedes that VIENNA- Oil ministers from 


Company ResuMs 

Revenue and profits or tosses. In millions, art In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated. 


Australia 


• Months 

Profit 

Per Star* _ 


Worm old Inn p « rsw»_ 3M 

rear WB l«4 _ __ _ 

Ravenna ftum m3 a HanflEKaaft 

Profits 23.13 7JJP 

n-lroln Honykoov Urn* 

" r ***“ l 1st Half INS 

Cadbanr-SdnNWPs pff awro— w 

1st Half ms ISM 

SSSKfe; "Si MMMIm 

Per Short 0339 0 J68 

_ _ Best Products 

Canada mqmt. ms 

Revenue 441 J 

Canadian Imp. Bk Net Lora — us 

MQmt. IMS 1JM Tj* Half 19*5 

Profits 9178 MJ2 Bevenua MM 

Par Sharo — 139 IjTO Mef La** — _ W21 


1984 

Rohr Ind. 


1*447 

4th Qoar. 

1*85 

1*84 

Jiff 

Revenue 

1534 

1485 


Not lnc. 

126 

1047 


Per Share, — 

US 

1J3 

d 

Year 

ms 

1*84 

mji 

Revenug^~. 

607.1 

611* 

Net lnc. _ — -. 

4741 

3736 

ITU 

0482 

Per Share _ 

iss 

450 

1 

Ta-iW« 




Zambia Consol. 


1984 

irt Goar. 

198S 

1984 

4404 

Revenue 

6695 

3925 

041 

Pretax Not— 

(0)174 

281 


19M a; loss, full nama at compa- 
*56-3 nr fa Zambia ConsoUdatod 
X33 Cooper Mines. 


U.K. Trade Moves Into a Surplus 


The sort of cowboy capitalism the exchange are likely to include He and the others served as officers 
'that these charges imply is an al- two Hemlo companies, Goliath for Beauford and on interlocking 
most expected byproduct of listing Gold Mines Ltd. and Golden Seep- boards. 

upstart new companies. Vancouver ire Resources Ltd. Another con- “Fifty percent of the shares that ^ 


upstart new companies. Vancouver ire Resources Ltd. Another con- 
‘became the penny slock capital of cem. Breakwater Resources, which 
Canada after a 1964 stock-man tpu- has an interesting find in the state 
lation scandal spurred the Toronto of Washington, is also moving 
Stock Exchange to banish penny along nicely, 
stocks. Vancouver welcomed them. Bui memories of Black Friday 
“It is a speculative exchange and still seem to be inhibiting investors, 
investors recognize it as such.” J. Although the number erf shares 
Anthony Hepburn, president of the traded on a normal day this year 
Vancouver securities firm of Od- has risen to 10 million, from 6 mil- 
ium Brown Lt(L said. “Where high lion to 7 million in 1984, that 


mid have been sustained longer, crange nues, me Vancouver ex- ui rtxceuug mb jci Raam measure of a country’s trade per- 

le rumor behind the crash was For Od. 3 in Vienna LONDON - Britain posted a fonnance. It includes trade in 

at the promised money from closure standards than ns Toronto neuiw seasonally adjusted surplus on cur- goods and nomnerchandise items, 

erman investors was not on the counterpart Rwm rent account of £1.18 bfflkm ($1.62 The Central Statistical Office 

*y- Bat Mr. Hudson concedes that VIENNA — Oil ministers from billion) in the second quarter, after said that in the second quarter, the 

The two men are scheduled lo ^ regulatory effort may the Organization of Petroleum Ex- a first-quarter deficit of £535 mfl- balance ou T wnnw»rchflndisft items 
md trial this month, and could °? 1 be enough to forestall a repeal porting Countries will meet in Vi- 1km, according to government sta- was in surplus by £1.41 biUioc, 


.>ug iuwi). Canadian Business magazine in estimate at “several hundred thou . . .... . .... ~ - 

But memories of Black Friday May. “The only other shareholders sand dollars." Their lawyer do- ™ dunb m “ e pncc with the issue of production quo- lion. 


meeting is expected 


tistics pubbshed Thursday. 'Hie while goods trade was in deficit by 
second-quarter surplus had orim- £222 million. In the first quarter, 
□ally been es timate d at £138 bu- . the nomnerchandise surplus was 


still seem to be inhibiting investors, were me and my friends.” dined to comment. 

Although the number of shares The market was thus precarious- Several exchange revisions since 
traded on a normal day this year ly thin, and hence more vulnerable Black Friday would appear to 
has risen to 10 million, from 6 mil- to manipulation. But so far. investi- make a recurrence less likely, al- 
lion to 7 million in 1984, that gators say, they have been unable though on a speculative market 


of Beauford. 


ou- £748 million while the mcrchan- 

Current account .is the broadest dise-trade deficit was £138 bdlion. 


Hoiriing-Rate Notes 


isxuer/Maf. 

Allied irhn95 
Allied irisnn 
Allied irim 87 
Allied IrlMi Pera 
Arab Bka Coro n/9* 
Atlantic Fin 89/94 
Airtoaimstt 
Sea Coaim I ral 94 
Bro Wax Lavuro 91 
Bcq OI Rama 8*191 
Baa Ol Roman 
Bco Santo Sdlrtto 91 
Bangkok Bk«HMltilvl 
Boa Coro 97 imiNyJ 
Bk Boston 00 (Can) 

BU Greece 91 79* 

Bk Greece 93797 
Bk Ireland 89 
Bk l re land 72 
Bk Montreal JO 
Bk Maalreaf M 

Bk Montreal 91 
Bk New York W 
Bk Haro Scat ta 88/93 
a* No»o ScoltaW 
Bk Tokyo 93 
» Tokyo a _ 

Bk Tokyo FeMB/91 
Bk Tokyo Wlffl 
Bonkamarlca OIS 96 

, Bonkers Trust M 

I JVasMn Trust 94 
S.TI Capitol 96 
■aafl Fin 17/91 
BoD 97 
BUIM9S 
BMIM99 
BM lill 93 IMHHv) 

Ba Inctosmv? 

Bo* 99 

BlceWtCopi 

9 Ft* Del 88 
Bice Jan£i 
Bice 99 

BaliKfnsus97(Ca>l 

Bn# 95 

Biu>97 ICoPl 

BOD8&78B 

ana M/96 

Bun 99 

BflaH/91 
BnoJuW* 
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BaPoriMsPtrp 
Bo Worm* 89/97 

BarckmBk Peronew 
Barclays 075 95 
Barclays 0/5 Pere 
Bar Cloys 0750* 
Belgium Perp 
Betel um DecWWMth 
Betolum 00 (MBOr) 
Befelum 00/05 (MHll 
BoWum JiiUS 
JCereenBk 807*1 
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BkWumOaW/M 
Ci«9J 
C teeBS 
Caen 90/95 
onto 
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Cbc9S7«S IMMv) 

One 2087 
QKMIWMv! 

C*c w 

Carteret 5+LW 


SepL 5 'ww/m or. 

1 Central Ini 97700 

Po'lar 1 SSSSSSI. 

Chase Moi Carp Oo 

Coupon Next Bid Askd Chemical 96 1 Hlktyl 
TV. 10-17 99.93 10083 Cnrtittonla Bk 91 
9H, 17-10 lO0.T61OB.2i CMMIonla Bk 94 


VU 08-01 99.96 10006 
30-11*607 97J7 
10H. 1809 79-53 7763 
IS 28-11 10UJM1DOJO 
9N 07-11 99J] tin 
8 06-17 lOOJ31iaO.il 

91* 38-10 100J1IHU1 
7PL 09.72 9979 9909 
8037537-09 9966 9976 
Ok. 39-11 9914 99 
PV 11-11 9805 
8 V. 09-12 9978 99 
12-03 9907 
81k W-10 9*60 
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Ok 29-11 1000510070 
Bkk 2741 9975 10050 
Tkk 20-12 100.1810023 
M. 29-10 1HLH1101J0 
91% 31-10 101 JB10L.il 
7kv 15.10 WL00100.W 
»*. 31-10 100741 0084 
81k 1341 1007210083 

9y. 24-10 1003010055 

nt 2941 llS.B51fi8.15 

8 % 0642 10032100C 
85k 13-12 1001010020 
81% 3049 9988 99' 
7*k 1149 99JS 9985 
7ft 2549 1002010070 

iv. is-ii iootzuoj; 

10*. 3049 9963 100.12 
Kk 0143 9725 9775 
h 1M2 100461B056 
9ft 11-10 1003110051 
8ft 17.10 9975 9915 
10ft 2149 1009710147 
7ft 2M9 *970 10005 
8ft 18-11 99.45 9955 
9ft 30-10 1001510025 
6ft 2341 H0B61D016 
10ft 1349 1003710037 
Ely 18-11 99.65 99.75 
8%. #447 I0U71SIA2 
8ft IB-10 99A1 99J1 
8ft 31-18 100.1010020 
tft 13-Q 1004110051 
7ft 05-13 99.95 10005 
Bft 12-11 1003010040 
BW 0*43 101J01DI40 
Bft 2341 1000^17 
VU 17-10 9962 
Tft 1149 
Bft 0647 10008100 
tft 0341 99.78 9988 
8ft 3141 I017010IJ0 
9 ft oi-n looMioam 

8 ft 8647 1003710037 
BW 13-83 1001610076 
8 ft 13-12 1001310033 
1ft 2143 I0OD4M0.14 
8 ft 27-H 9953 9*63 
(ft 1741 9960 99.70 
Bft 18 -M nxunioo.u 
8 ft 0947 100187“ *> 

w. n-toi : 

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tft 244i looooiaaio 

8*, JO- II 9880 98.95 

Bft 2141 10053)0063 
Bft 1911 99.98 IBMM 


Cnrtrttoilo Bkfl 

Christiania 89 94 

Clllcwp AuaW(WMr) 
Ollcarp 5es96 
OhcsroRtpoH 
Ollcarp 97 
C7t leoro M 
□ llcorp Perp 
Cincorp Plop 97 
Comer lea 97 
Cammenok FeSB* 
CcmmenOfc No*89 
Comm UrbMantreoJ*l 

Como Fbi Oc 97(MHH 
Council Of Eureee93 
CdBb/98 
Ccf 90/95 
Cd *7 tMttihr) 

Ceome 97/92 

Cr Fonder 08/93 
Cr For Expert 9? 
CrLvanndi 93/96 

Cr Lvannals 87 
Cr Lyoano Is 90/*7 
CrLrennobBf/94 
Cr Lyonnab 91/95 
Cr Lyonnais 99 
Cr Lvaneols Jan92/96 
CrLvonnals 97 iCapl 
Cr Lvannals 00 
Cr Lvannals Jun92/fi 
Cr NailanolSa 
Cr Nanonai 90/94 
Cr katlanal 00 
Credlltnstalt94 
Credltanstatt 96 
Cr imlianoTT 
OalkM KanovoW 
Dang *6/99 (AMIltyl 
Den Norske Nov*o 
Den Hardee DecJO 
Denmark JanBB/98 
Denmark Od 88/90 

Danmark 99/6. 

Denmark Pent 

Die Erjte Oat 93/94 

Dresaner Fin *3 
Dmaner PlnB» 
DmdiwFln93 
Eldorado Nik 89 
Edl 9* 

Edf *7 U/unlvl 

Enel 00/03 (MltihrJ 

tael Oa 

EaD93 

Eat 9Q 

EBC*0 

tiler lor mi 9i/9t 
Ferravle 95 IMrfilyt 
FecroHe 97/99 

Finland 90 IMIlilvl 
Fiuinh Paper tm 
Flrd Boston 91/94 
First Bk5vst 96 
Rrsi Bk Svsl 97 
First OikXtoO 97 
FlnlOiko9o93 
First CNC09094 
First Dty Te. as 9S 
First Inlrr95 
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Fortune ML 92 
Fall i nr 94/94 
Geafl nance 89/*2 
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Coupon Next BkS Askd 

L91351MI 99JS2 99.92 
8ft 3141 1003710047 
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Bft 27-11 9853 W77 
Bft 13-11 1084010052 
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TV. 1949 9936 99J6 
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7ft 15-10 99 JO 1D05B 
Bft 31-10 IOU01BU2 
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8 ft 20 -u lnuoioajo 

Wft 1849 99 JO 10085 
Bft 12-17 9961 9931 
Bft 27-10 99 J5 KBL05 
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1ft 2749 9960 9MD 

Bft 12-12 1005510045 
9ft 09- 10 100841C025 
Bft 8241 *9.97 10057 
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10ft 2349 10080 
9ft 09-10 laUSlOOtf 
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8V. 2141 1004410054 
Bft 07-11 9*J2 9962 
7% HUl 9955 10085 
■ft 16-13 100631 “ 
tft 7141 700281 
10ft 1149 100371 
1425 2042 1 00.181 pu-d 
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8ft 25-09 99J3 10083 
Bft 2(42190.1510035 
BJ7 25-10 9946 99A 
Bft 3 ( 4 i iauniaa.ii 
BW 29-119960 9935 
8ft 13-11 9938 9948 
Bft 29-17 9*36 9936 
Bft 07-11 9080 9980 
B3B751B-11 9860 9840 
Bft 21-1199.10 9930 
Bft 22-109240 9401 
4ft - 9937 9947 i 

Bft 15-11 10045100.15 
Bft 24-10 9950 1 
Ift 1541 W.'Sl 
»Vt 3H2 KB.12.tW3 
(ft 2241 httJBHWO 
Bft U-ll 100.1110031 
7H 11491006810078 
* 14-11 9850 *M0 


Orb 96 
GiroW 

G 1 Western 92/95 

Grtndlays93 
Grtndlaysf4 
Gl Western B9/94 
HNI Samuel 96 
Hill Samuel Perp 
Hlspono 91/*5 
Hang Kona Pam 
Hydro 02 INUtilv) 
Hydro 05 (MM*) 
id 91 

icaknd 93/00 
Indonesia 81/93 
IHNavBB 
r retold *6/9* 

Ireland 97 
Ireland 94 
isvalmer 90 
Itolyf* 

1101*89/94 
Hot* 05 
Cl toll 87 

JP Morgen 97 

KMFeen 

KomlroOvOS 
Kit Inwort Pm *l 
I Klelnamrt Ben 96 
Kldnwort Ben Perp 
Korea Dev Bk 16/89 
Korea Eicch Bk BS/ 8 S 
Lincoln S+L*» 
LtovdeBkPero 
Ltovasn 
Lloyds 92 
Lloyds 04 
LkbtS 
Ud >86 
LScb*2 

MatavstaM/W 
Malarsto 00/15 (Mitu 
Malaysia AbtM/ 92 
Malaysia Oec*9/*7 
Maiavs la 88/93 
Mai Han 94 
Mon Han ft IWktv) 
Mar MM 9« 

Mar Mia 09 
Mar Mid 96 
Mel ton Bk to 
midland Bk Perp 

Mulatto Bk Pam New 
Midland Inf *3 
Ml atom I rrl 89 
Midland lnl *2 
Midland im*i 
MM tondlrt99 
Mitsui Fin 97 (Cap) 
Mitsui Fin 96 
Man GnmM*4 
Mia Bk Dm 93 
Nob »7 (Cool 
Mai Bk Detrail 96 
Koi Camm Bk 89/94 
Not west Pem iai 
N al west Pern (Bl 
Nai9natFto4| 

Nat wesi Finos 
KalWniM 
Nat Wen Fbi 92 
Nanwesi Fin Pem 
HesloOyOi 
NewZtotandir 
Nj (reel Dev 93 
HHnwnCr B6 
Nordic lnt*l 
OUJB6 
OtoM 
OIDfS/99 

(HWtoroiMnbwn 
Ofb3mMbiiin86 
pfr tin ti/94 
Pne97 

Pi Benton SBm 
Queensland 1 Bal) 96 
R*JTfe91 

Reo Bk Dal bis 97 
RbcOS 
R&S 86/94 
Solfama *1/93 


Coupon Kent Bid Asfcd 

Bft 29-11 10134101.14 
8 ft 2749 IB14BWl.il 
Ift - 91319850 

Mft 3049 1803514035 
Ift 0342 7006110051 
10ft 2349 nSl 9962 
Mb 2742 99 55 10030 
8 ft 29-11 9450 96JB 
9ft 24-10 99JB 99.95 
Ift 1*42 9940 9948 
8 ft 7941 9935 9961 
Ift SMI 9948 HUM 
8 ft 1541 9935 10035 
Ift 041 9950 9960 
tft 09-10 100.1010025 
Bft 20-11 180.1070035 
18 1649 H0J21DO22 

Ift 2842100.1310033 
Bft 1(41 I 8 LIIWUD 
Bft 73-11 998! 9942 
Bft 0442 HH.U10O31 
Bft 13-17 W049700.M 
8 2749 99^7 9*57 

10ft 2349 700.1510045 

8 ft 20-11 

Bft 0343 

Wft 2(49 1 

Bft 20-11 IDOJOIOOJO 
Wft Z7-B9 1DO3D10UD 
Mk 29-11 *960 9960 
■ft 0562 9958 10050 
*ft 09-10 1008010050 
Bft 12-12 99J5 9945 
B 09-12 *941 HttOa 
tft 31-10 W082KXL*3 
Eft 86-12 WOJOWOOT 
9ft 18-W 1003210032 
Ph M-ll 10040 
Bft 77-13 9940 1HU5 
8 ft 29-11 1003210163 
7ft 10-72 9965 9945 
8 ft 15-18 9845 9935 
fib 09-M IflOJSHOJO 
Eft 65-12 99^ 10007 
8 ft 2(42 1BUU100J7 
Bft 29-11 *954 10004 
Bft 1942 9860.9133 
81k 09-10 I 

B 1M9H0. 

7ft 1949 9*40 WUXI 
Ift 2M1 miST0B3S 
81k 19-729954 9*44 
•954 9964 

Bft 2941 
Ift 24-72 

■ 08-12 — 
9h 31-101013910159 
Mb - 100.1710037 

Mb 28-18 9965 *955 
Mb 0*43 1003010031 
Bh 7341 10000100.15 
Ift 19-12 14039700 
Ift 3(41 **« 99.W 
■ft 3049 90.9S IDO 10 
7ft 22-12 9930 W30 
Bft 0947 9938 9*68 
Mb 7142 9*40 11000 
Eh 7141 1007711087 
9ft IB-11 1003510035 
tft 16-11 1003710037 
9 25-70 1013570135 

tft 1311 WL1510L2S 
Bh 2742 700.1710127 
»ft 09-18 7003510035 
Bh 24-72 100.131002] 
Bft 1641 9*48 lOOm 
9 71-11 9935 10035 

Mb 20-11 10006100.16 
(ft 29-11 1006010061 
9ft Il-W BB.15T8025 
«h 86 -n ififiSiSUO 
Sn 2341 nnml 00 .il 
8 h 3742 9930 warn 
7ft 049 9938 9961 
Ih 19-121000010030 
« 12-11 IH34WU* 

TOh 27491003510065 
Mb 20-11 9930 9*30 
8 ft - 996. 99. 

Mb TW0 100.7010020 
< 05-12 100331(063 


Coupon Meu eu Askd 


SanwolntFmH tft 2649 

Scnwo Inf Fin 96/84 Bh 2941 

5aowalarFtn92 Mb fur 

Scmfl FtoApr*3 yet 15-10 

Scandl Fbi Dec93 7ft 23-12 

Scotland lot 92 10 h 2449 

5*cPqcHlc97 Bh 21-11 

SHcwmorCon>97 Bft 07-11 

5ncf M Ift 39-10 

toot 90/7] Ift 24-12 

Sfelalff (ft 03-12 

51* Inin Bft 19-12 

Sac Gan 90/95 Ift 0643 

5oc Gen Mart/ lOh 18-M 

SacGen Ko«94 tft 07-11 

Sac Gen 97 10V, H49 

5n»*1 Bft 3-11 

Ssujn92m Bft 2742 

Sputa 05 UUUrl Bh 3049 

Sptanra/93 Bh 2842 

- » »ll 

itoto Chart 94 (to 0641 

Stand Cliarr*l Bft 20-11 

StanddknlMartO 10 ft 1749 

Stand Chan Mlsmatai Mb 0301 

S1DM Chart Perp 9V. 07-11 

Stale Bklmfla87 Bh 29-11 

SuntttaaiaTB 92/94 Ih 1342 

Sweden 00 Tft 85-12 

SMdenWIg 7ft 1(41 

Sweden *3/05 [MtMy] Ih K-U 

Swedon 19/99 Ih 29-n 

Seeden 92/83 Bft 20-11 

Sweden Perp (to 0*41 

Talvo Kohe 91 ICap) Ift 07-11 

TaWe92/0a Bft 20-11 

Tokusta 92/94 10 V. 1849 

TokalAsto 94/99 Bft 12-12 

Tonton *2 (to 1*42 

ToyoTB 92/99 8 16-72 

rwJCKM (to 09-10 

S»*ocwoy99 Bh 2142 

WeOlFaroa«7 27-0 

WensForoa97 Bto 13-11 

Westaac97iCopl Bh 1842 

VtmiGTvnt! lOh 11-09 

worMBkPem 754517*49 

world Bk»/94 755 29-11 

YotaMama 91/94 9ft 07-10 

Yokohama 97 tens] 87. U-ll 

Zrotro&Dfcos&n Ih 15-01 




Non Dollar 



lift 14-11 
12ft 2749 
lift 21-11 
lift 21-11 
i2ft lB-a 
Uh 15-11 
lift - 
13ft 2*flo 

12ft 0*- ID 
12ft 1(49 
lift 22-11 
12ft 15-10 
lift 14-11 
12ft 0649 
lift 26-11 
12 W 16-lq 
12 ft Ohio 

12 n-ii 
ilh u-ll 
lift 04-11 
J2h 24-10 
12ft 1849 
12ft 2749 



Sowrc* : Croon Safas*. First Boston UtL 


KBP UP DATE WITH 

•«e^S* ssreow 

WPEMINGE/Oi WEDNESDUT 
AND now IN THE IHT 


— ADVERTISEMENT : 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Sept. 5, 1985 

yatae hoalotlmis are sumpUtd fry ttm Fonds Itated wTIti tbw axcwrtloa of soma qautas basad oa issue Prtco. 

Thu morainal symbols Indicate froiMacr o* «wohrtk»s suroWIad: Id) -dodhr; Iw] -woafclr; {bl -bHnonHUy; {rl- r oau lm ly; CO -ImiB Uln rly. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
-!w) Al-Mol Trust, fa 
BANK JU LIUS BAER &CO.UU. 

-{ d { rnn hnr 

) Emribaer America — 


..... l-lml Amor Vcrtues OkilPtoI 
S UU 1 l-fd j FKJpmv Amor. Assets _ 
__Hdi Ftoellty AuUrolla Fund 


» linjjHw.I.aonC-JapceiZ. 
* Iobciflex limited 


-Id ) Eauibaer Europe 

-Id} EcuBwer Padflr 

-(dj Grafter : 

-Id) Stockbar 

flANQUE INDOSUEZ 
-Id Asian Growth Fund— 

-(w Dlverfaand 

FI F- America. — 

-iw FIF-Euraoe 

-Iw FIF-PodflC 

■10 Indoiooi Multiboods A- 
-4dl I ndosuaz Multibands B. 


. -(d Rdellty Australia Fund, 1 9JJ -rwl Multicurrency 

"IS Fon«£ZZ s 1063 -M Donor Mudhim Tarm- 

2£KK2 Ir 'l?!S*I r -^~ 5 V&lSt j Daaor Uxm Term 

- _ s -Cd Fidelity Far East Fund * 2002 -twl Jimnti. Yen 

SF 1274.00 -4 d Fidelity InCL Fund S *182 -iw) fto»ta^rnnolZl__ 

SF152M -id FWjlItvOrleTrtFund S 26J7 -(wIDeutac t* nSfoTZZZ. 

5F 1031-00 -ia Fidelity Frontier Fund- I 1X41 (wi Dutch Florin 

SF 1567 JO Hd F del iy Poclflc Fund — J T33.CS- -Iw) Swiss Franc 

-Id Fhtallnr SKL Growth FCL S KM ORANGI NASSAU GROUP 


-Id) IndosuezUSDJMJVLH S Itt 

BR1TAHNIA5H7B 27V St Heller. Jmr 
-Iwl Writ rtnllnr InrWM S ' 

-iw) BrttJ Monoo.Curr S 

-f d I Brit Intis MatNBMrf? s 

-Idl Bril. lntL£MaoaoJ»ortf C 

-i*l BrIL Am. Inc. & Fd Ltd— S 

-Iw) BrlLGold Fund S 

-Iw) BritManoo. Currency— . C 
-Id ) Brit. Japan Dir Perl. Fd— — S 
-Jw) BlitJaraay GDI Fund I 

d 1 Drlt. World Lelv Fund — S 

-Id) BrIL world Techn. Fund — S 
CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-iw! Capital mil Fund S 

-Iwl Capital iralla SA — . . S 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 

-Id 1 Actions Sutaouo. SF 

-Id I Band Volor Swf SF 


-3 10*9 -fd) Fidelity Worid Fund _ 
SF (540 FORMS PG BM7 GRAND 
. S 1165 London Aounl 8T-83M013 

- * JJ-!? -«w) DoHor Income 

- * not -Iw) Forbes Utah lnc. GIH 1 

S 100.03 -Iw) Gold income 

. S I***? -(w I Gold Appreciation 


S I02SJH I -(in) Strategic Trodlna 
rear Igcfinor funds. 


GKF1NOR FUNDS. 

0J73 -fwl Enel inveohnent Fund. 

958 -Iwl Scottfth World Fund 

UNO -iw) State SI. American „ 


11X5 London :01-4*l423h Geneva :41-2ZJ55530 
1494 GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORF, 
0330 PB in SI Paler Part Guanutv, 0481-28715 

U3» -iw) FuturGAM S.A S 12636 

0-954 -tw) GAMATbitroaOlne S 12968 

D322- -iw) GAMertaJ Inc I 


* 3338 PBKH7B, The Hague (WO) 46M7B 

N -£ d ) Bever Beleoolnoen++ 

. , , PARIS MAS-GROUP 

i "5 a ! Cortaxa Inlematlanal 

I 98.0 -JwjOBLI-D M 

S 867 -iw) OBL 1 GESTIOW 

1 466 -iW) OBLI-OOI I A B 

S 1.1* -iwl OBU-YEN 

-IWJOBLl -GULDEN 

J 34534 3d i PAROU.FI iwn 

! parinterfund 

*16552 -jdi PAR US Treasury Band 


— S 85.92 (d OrevfM Fond InM. S 3469! 

e! & ! 

— 5 11-12 S* S2* sujqssi 1 

— i II -2 J r FHty star* Ltd % mm3 

II-SS * Fixed Income non— S 1069 1 

o' 1 IK? J w » SF 1*938 : 

-PL 1062 (w FOroxfund % 7 33 

SF 1 BJU iw FamriaSalacftanFd. SF 6764 

(d Fondttalla S 30 lU 

« __ 55 Govetrim. Sec. Fund* % 9130 

- * 31 JO (d FrmkFTruel Interzlns dm 4463 

e «« 2 »q«P« W"l.HldBftN.V S 124J2 

- S 89-35 (W Heatta Funk.. . $ 105J14 


DM 1241.14 (w Harbsn Fund S 123236 

S £w?£r! iPF?/fS MtoB “ Ud JSF 11432 

s 121223 jr ILA-IGH — . s H141 

Y 10461100 (r ILA-IGS ~ J 10*3 

PL 111434 Id Intertimd C* | to 

■ * .9360 (w Intnnrxirkat Fievt 6 29792 

■ * ^ 15 jnfS rtnlnln* . Altai. Fd. CL*B* - S wan 

'Ty/ 17 nil Secortllaa Fund S laoo 

38NSBY Id InvestaDWS — — DM 5337 

1 ! JH5 ! r ihg^A HtaiURuei. % 865 

1 e* JIS S r Ifoltatlwl* Inn Fund SA S 1535 

* 2263“ jw Japan SotacJton Fund— S 11663 

5 11-35 J* J 0 *wn Pacific F.e iri ~ s 

1 h -tafta- Ptni. InH. Ltd 1 1 7211 57 

. 19J0* id KMwnrt Bensao Inn Fd. S Tim 

****>,„ Jw 5tal»«rT Benv Jap. Fd s 7249 

— i MS Kein9a GrOYrth Tru»t- KW&50241 

— * M 2 « au 

o. Id Udcortl Piwti — s 131 M 2 

a u.u a 

Im MmmSeidN.v — S 1M64 

H ? v ,5^ 

s 13466 Jw WAIT.. 5r iaB 

|f is v%g 

5P 816J0 (m NOSTEC Portfolio S 513102 

SP W : Un^nwmRMd | 9^ 

SF 34250 (m HSP FJ. tTTT l 

8LdH * 


S 11394 (d) IntermlnlnuMot.Fd. 
S11. J7 ir) inti Secoritto* Fund. 


ROYAL B-CANAOAJ>OBa«fiUERNSRY (dllnvosta 
■+jwl RBC Canodtan Fund Ltd.— . S 1138 I r) Invert/ 
-tl w ? 8 KP«Ei«M*«*te F d- S IMS (r> ItaHorti 


I — t 0222- -(w) GAMertaJ Inc I 143^ K i d I RBC Mar 

d — — S 7-204 -4 wj GAM Auotralla lnc__ 5 10333 -Hwl put- u~- . , M - 

imd S 0335 -jwj GAM Bo*tanlnc_ S 1103S SKANDIFOND INTLFUITD lU^XJOJV) 

IAL -iw) GAM Ermltoae S 1533 -iwllnc.: Bid S S 6 «OH*r_ S 640 

S 3840 -iw) GAM Fmiy-m] _ SF 10A3* -l»IAr.- - Rid e trtXwSr i *iS 

S 1631 -iwl GAM Hong Kang Inc. I 9U7 SV* NS KA IMTE RNAT%NM^.Td7 

PRICES) -( w) GAM Intamattannl Inc J 1M 17 Ctoyorotilro SaiandanJIMW-BMO 

.... — SF fWfira -jw) GAM Japan Inc., S 99.91 -( r 1 5HB Band ‘ 

SP 107XS -iw) GAM Mortti America Int— 1 KJ767 -(w)SHBInitG 


J 13636 -Hw) RBC Inn Capital Fd S 2261“ jw) Japan SelacIlM R 

« min *f)?l S5S i ?^ 1 I ncama Fd-.- S llj* (w) Japan Pacific Fun 

J -+tai RB C MarLCurrency Fd s 2540 (ml Jaffa* PM*. Inti LI 

i “Hwl RBC North Arner. Fd.—— 1 *40* id I Ktabwrart Bensao 1 


GAMlntaroattanallnc S 1M41 17 DeyorohJro SaJ-ondanJn 

GAM Japan lnc., .... S 99.91 -ir) 5HB Band Fund— 

GAM North America lnc.— *10767 -(w)SHB Inti Growth Fund 


-id) Band Valor D-mark DM 11442 1 -I w) GAM N. America Unit Trurt— 1005 p I SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES) 

■Id) Band Valor US-DOLLAR — — S 122SS|-jwl GAM iPodfle Inc 1 HSg |-(d) Amert^Mtog , sf* 

-id) Bund volar Yon Yon 1085840 |-fw> GAMrlnt S 11161 R d ) D-Mark BandSrtecttan ~ dm l 


-I d I Band Valor US-DOLLAR J 12295 -i wl GAM Padflc Inc — 

-id) Band valor Yon Yen 10B5SJW (w) GAMrlnt 

-id) Cocveri valor Swf SF 11840 -jw) GAM Stnaapore/Matavinc 

-(dj Convart Valor US-DOLLAR. * 12233 -jw) GAM Start 8. Inti Unit Tins 

-{dlCamnec SF 761X00 -(w) GAM Systems Inc 

-(d) CS Fonds- Bonds SF 7135 -iwl GAM Worldwide Inc 

-(dlCSFanda-lnn— — - SF 1T33S ^w) GAM TYehe S A. OOPS A . 

-id I CS Money Market Fund—. S 108540 O.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) LM. 

-i d I CS Money Market Fund— DM 1M140 -Idi BtoTY Poe. Fd. LM__ 

-I d j CS Money Market Fund C 102X00 -jr) G.T.Aopl tod Science 

■(d) Enerota-Vatar SF 1*730 -jd> G.T.AMcm HX-GwttLFd 

■id) Useec SF -id) &.T. Asia Fund 

-I d ) Eu repo- Valor — SF 163JM -jd I G.T. Australia Fund 

-t n i PeH*r -t/winr SF 15035 -Idi G.T, Euroce Fund — 

DREXRL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC -iwl G.T. CunLSmoB Cos. Fund 

winchester House. 77 London Wall -I r ) CLT. Dollar Fund— - .— 

LONDON EC2 (01 93W797] -j d > G.T. Band Fund 

-(Wl Finsbury Group Ud * 12562 -id) G.T.Gta4xd Tadnlav Fd— 

-Im) winchester DIverEHtei®® S 2265 -i d | G.T, Honshu Pottlflndor— 


miisp^a 

K- ; ~ :\t i H 

ee i i it «aB=_WH 


lid) Lei com Fund. 


— * SAM d Llomhner 

—S 2449 jw) Uildund- 

DEB (ral Moanofund N.V._ 

SF 53140 (dj MedtotaODm SeL FCL. 


SF 10942 1 jw) NA6ILF .- 
SF 34230 |(m) HSP FJ.t E... 

SF U7S I (d jPobflc Horizon InvLi 
PANCURRI Inc. 


, * 12362 ^3l£T:5tabrtf=57Fd=Z i iiS ^3| If SIS 1?IS BE^Fund s I 

ff . ** i ss «|a sg& - as \t\^^=== 

HILL «MUEL l-VS^MCMT. INTlJsi! -I d ) uwIrl Vi. — pjjjj Iw! ££££ ISHESf. * 1 ^ . J 

SSSl liBSaXSBm Other Funds H I ^ 

:l3i§9Sr„i5sei=r # 28 

HdilntnL Bond Fund — S 1043* fm) * iwi smuaov ■n u .etn [u .u - — ~ 


If H 


-(e) winchester Hoidinm - 



-<d) int. Currency U4.__ 5 2663 w 

-Id j ITF Fdj Technology)—— — . S 1348 r 
-i d J O’Seos Fd (N. AMERICA! ~ ( 2833 r 
JARDINC FLEMING, POB78GPO Ho Kg W 


r( 


i -ir) J.F Japan Ti 

-tr)Jj= Pacific S 

LLOYDS BANK 1 


/ . Y 

- Y 444 

logy Y 166 ft 

FogeSCcmUnif 


lr» t£?SlffliSiS.1Z^s^ M 31 

-Kw uavds Inti Growth - SF 176.10 r J 

— Hw IJayd* I nil Income SF 37140 wl 

-Hw UoydslnmL America s 10545 wl 

-Kw uovds mn Poeifie - sf 12*20 w) 

^twUawa Inn. smaller Caiu. * 1445 wj 

liiiMRBSri d j 

-id) Class A — * 8*32 ir) 

-(w)CImB-UA.... S 10263 id) 



*m iihto w samurai 1 Portfolio SF 

£ Sd/rech-SA Luxamaouro 1 yjn 

- wl Seven Arrows Fuiul N.V__ s ncli 

S Bank EnuHy 

fa® wl 

J1 i M 

Lfl ? ffl8a»=: inH 

S 1044 
S 2B.93 
Y 9491 . 










US.Ritures 


COFFEE CINYCSM1 
37X00 lbs.- cents per fa 
IA20 root Sm 134JD IMJJQ 



Grains 


WH£*TICBTI 

ZjSS? "■Mmrn- dollars per bushel 

J5SJ2 ^ 177 2-01* 2.74* in +JJ2 

twS Kf* 255 zm m 2.92 +JB* 

toj HI 522T 2-S 35 194,6 m*% +■»» 

g g'ig.a S»S! ts 

FSS.JffUS *” ” «“* 

Prev, Day Open Inf. J7J93 up*7| 

CORMCCST> 

bu m [nlrnum- aoi lorni per bushel 
HV'* H3u. 136 130,4 MW 230% +X5% 

5iS HS5 D« 2.17 I*? 4 * 116V. 221 +to 

131U. Hi* 4 Mor a5n6 181 *» 2J0* +X3* 

Hi'* Hj «°V 134 U7% 2X2* 2X7% +X3% 

£» 133 Jwl 2J7V5 140%. JJ6I4 240* +X3% 

J§2i? J 3414 Sap 258% 232% 227V 232 +X3* 

ealrt- 23011 p2S5 12 m +35 

Prev.Sales 22072 
Prow. Day OPWI lflt.?35X45 W> 1443 
SOYBEANS (CBT) 

Mw tau minimum- dollars per bushel 
H2 I22S ®S» 5-ii sail* 5.12% 520* +X4% 

«5 SX2% NOV 5.12V* 5.1 TVs UK S.16% +jCUV 

439 Mitt Jon 523 329 5.171* 126% +JBV 

Z5 5S r S* 539 52m* 5X7% +JM 

i"2 «« SXIVa 5371* SJB14 546% +JJ3Vr 

H5 3ul MJ &» S43% 5X2% +JM% 

f2 ft? ^ **5X1 +JM 

S S 19 MJ, w 5461* 536V* +X1% 

P 432 - . MB Now M5% 548 531 537 +02 

ESI. Soles Pm. Solus 31 X6l 


1SU0 1292S Dee 136-30 13290 

M9.75 1 2850 Mar 137X0 13210 

MSS U,J “ Mav 1 *so ’“as 

ion 13520 Jui 139.25 139:25 

M7XP 17Z75 Sep 139.90 139.90 

13200 13&00 Dee 

=3t. Soles Prav. Soles 1290 


ESI. Soles Prav.Solea 13 

Prow. Day Open Inl. 12466 up3$4 
SUGARWOR L. D II INYC3CE] 
H2JD0 tbs.- cents pw ib. 

905 UA Oct 530 


13MB 13295 
13*00 13*75 
13725 1)200 
13210 13273 
13925 13925 
13940 13925 
13900 



Closing 


905 174 Oct 530 537 

725 UD Jai 50 SO 

’33 324 Mar 52S 528 

7.15 358 Maw 5.90 593 

649 329 Jul 210 6.10 

620 424 Sep 

643 403 Oct *35 *40 

Jan 

t. Sales Prew. sates 71X1B 


668 

629 

707 

729 

658 

674 

628 

622 

Est. Sales 


Prsw. Dav Open int. 46413 off 172 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 
lOOtons- dollars per ion 

J2M !2**° *«• 125X0 12700 17420 12700 +140 

13rSS I 1230 <*• 13430 MM2 175SD 12*70 +200 

JSinS Dee 12920 moo 12580 13240 +460 

1^00 1Z7JB Jan 131X0 13500 I3TX0 13440 +270 

31*50 1WJ» Mar 134X0 13850 13450 13250 +340 

UOSO 19250 Mav 13700 14050 137X0 14050 +350 

1*700 13400 Jul 14000 14220 13950 14240 +140 

J41X0 13530 Au " ’4050 14359 140X0 14350 +250 

167X0 13750 See 14150 144XQ 1*0X0 14400 +450 

Ear. Sales Prow. Sales 20X93 

Prsw. Day Open Inl. 45,151 up659 


Est. Sales Prev. Sales 71418 

Prev. Day Open inf. 94.157 up 1*3 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric Ians- Suer tan 

3415 IMS Sep 2166 2167 

2)37 1945 Dec 330 3250 

2295 19S5 Mar 230 2292 

2315 I960 Mav 2305 2305 

2340 1460 Jul 915 2315 

2330 209 Sen 99 3330 

2335 2055 Dec 2350 2350 

Es>. Sales 2402 Prev. Sales 2489 
Prev. Dav Ooert irU. 1*045 gHS7 
0 RANGE JUICE INYCE) 

15000 R&- cents per lb. 

18200 13055 3ep 13650 13*50 

181X0 12740 Nov 12950 13000 

18000 12350 JOn 12550 125L75 

17750 12300 Mar 12355 12400 

16250 1ZL2D May 

15750 123.10 Jul 

Es<- Sales 250 Prev.Sales 184 

Prow. Day Open in*. 4574 off 8 


5l15 S29 

*28 543 

55ft 530 
*75 534 

5.95 60S 

616 
*31 *54 

625 


ToWes Irtdud* me nationwide prices 
• up to the dosing on Wall Street . 
and do not reflect late trades ebewtwre. 

Via 7 h/B Associated Press 


»l®L_Stod[ Piw.YM.PE WftMiUm sZoto 


2277 290 
2398 2299 
2310 2319 
2330 2325 
2350 2343 




13450 134*5 
T2M0 129.95 
125J0 12555 
12X95 12X95 
122*5 
122*5 



l 

52 

325 

248 

JOB V 

13 

2 

25 

Si 33 W 

31 

1 XH 


4 

4 

1 M U 

4 

14 

4X 

6 

1X6 7J 

13 . 

5 

1X0 7 S 
1425 11X 
2J4 11.4 

7 

IS 

73* 

9 

4X7 U4 


tf 

22 



2f 7» 7 

ft iss 1*5 

1* 17% 12% 
1 12% W% 
£ li« M* 
20 W 2 

i m ijM 

17 » M 

32 12% 12 
99 40 3J% 

1 S« 

16 10% 10% 
M U<A 17% 

>5 “SSI 

55 7Vt 7_ 


mmm 




61* HAL .108 15 
10% HUBC 40B 61 12 
4 HaDfex X4e J 
7M Honvtl 531122 8 
12% HonfrtJB 50 20 M 
Vt Harvey 

19 Haalirs .15 5 10 

22% HraM-pf 2X0 54 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

66N0 lbs- donors per 100 rh. 

31.18 22.06 Sep 22*0 2260 2222 2231 -26 

30X7 2 US OCI 22.19 2225 2152 22X2 —.18 

2955 7V*a Dec 21.90 21X5 71*0 21.71 — X2 

29X7 21.75 JOn 22X5 22X5 21.75 21X5 —23 

2ft*a 22X0 Mar 22XS 2238 22XS 22.1) —21 

2745 22X0 May 2245 22L55 22X5 2245 -.10 

25X5 22X0 Jul 22*5 2270 22X5 22X8 —-07 

25X5 2251 Aim 22JO 22X0 22*5 22*5 — X3 

2605 22*0 Sep 2280 22X0 2242 22*2 —.07 

22JU 22*0 Od 2245 — X3 

Esi.Sc Fes Prev.Sales 11X07 

Prev. Day Open int. 55X31 up 844 
OATS (CBT) 

5X00 tau minimum- del lars per bushel 
1.79 1.1 1% Sep 1.17V I.ISU. 1.17% 1.17V +X0V 

I^Vy 1X1 Dec 1X4% 1X6 1X4 1X5% +X1% 

1*7% 1X6% Mar 1X8% 1X0 1X8% 1X7% +J71 

1*3 1X7% Mav 1X0% +X1% 

1X0% 1X6 Jul 1X7 +XB% 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 419 

Prev. Day Open m». 3X59 up 31 


imwlra 


lift* HltftCrs 
5% HlthCh 
8% KHthEx 
11 HetttiM 
6% HeMWr 
10 HelnlcK 
2 Hetdor 


10 

SO 

IS 

44 AS 9 
X0% 25 9 
M J 8 
71 




n HeUnR 

3% HershO 33 

1% Htndrl 17 

6% HallyCP SI U U 
17% HmeGn 
SO HmirspfSXS 144 
14% Hernia 11 

7% HraHar JU A5 W 
1% HrnHwt X7I144 
13 HaflPtv 1X8 10X 16 
1% HcfllPud 
3% HouOT X9el74 
10% HovnE 10 

■% Howrlln XOe 2X 6 
16% HuMAI 12 

15% HutwIBJ 13 

6% Huakvo -34 4X 


S 8 

2 1998 
4 5% 

4 7% 
254 24% 

17 m 

633 32 
20 37 
60 HI* 
52 «* 

33 9% 

41 13 
11 S* 

18 18% 

5 2% 

31 4tt 
22 % 
1 4 

6 1 % 
19 15% 

ee> 18 
517 20% 
» 1S% 
T76 8% 

15 1% 

48 17% 
8 4% 

507 3% 

17 15% 
17 10 
79 22 
121 23 
360 7% 


8 S — % 
19% 1998— 16 

s% % 

7% 7%— % 
24 24% + Vft 

1 % 1 % 

31% 37%— % 
37 37 

16% 16M— Ml 
♦ 9% — % 

F% 9% + % 
13 13 — M 

ft. f% 

13% 13% — % 
2% 2% 

4 4% + % 

h % 

4 4 

1% lift | 
15% 15%—% 1 
77% 77% — % 
30% 28% 

18% 18%—% 
■% S% + % 
m lift 
17% 17% + % 
4% <%— V» 
4% 5% + % 
IS 15% + % 
TO IB — % 
27% 22 — % 
22 % 27% + % 
7% 7%— % 



Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 


130X00 tad. tt-Sper 1X00 tad. ft. 

197*0 1 27X0 SOP 137X0 137*0 

7 Be. 10 126*0 NOV 130X0 132X0 

7H7XC 333*0 Jan 13*00 137.10 

T9SX0 739X0 MOT 142X0 74120 

17640 145X0 MOV 147X0 1«50 

183X0 149X0 Jul 152X0 152X0 

176.00 153*0 Sep 

Est. Sales 1442 Pmv.SaJos 7X5* 
Prev. Dav Ooen Inf. 8X37 up 45 


CATTLE (CME) 

*0X00 lbs.- cents per lb. 

65.90 53*5 Oct 5655 5690 

67X5 55.15 Dec 57.15 5740 

6745 SS4S Feb 56*0 57X0 

67X7 56*5 Apr 57*6 57X5 

6*25 57X0 Jun 5850 58*5 

6540 56*0 Aus 57*0 57X0 

EsI. Sales 16*54 Prev.Sales 24.746 
Prev. Day Open int. 48,974 up 391 


54X5 5610 
5*50 56*2 
5*10 56X0 
57X0 57X5 

58X0 58X0 
57X0 57X0 


FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

46000 lbs.- cents per ibL 
7X00 5745 SOP 60X0 60X7 

72X2 57.15 Oct 59*0 59.90 

73X0 58X0 NOV 61X0 61*0 

79*0 60*0 Jen 63X0 6X40 

70*5 61.10 Mar 63X0 63X0 

70*5 *1.15 Apr 63X0 6340 

6*25 61X0 MOV 62X0 6225 

Est. Sales 1X85 P+ev. Sates 32B1 
Prev. Dav Open Inl 8X88 up 95 


59X2 59*5 
5BXO saxx 
60*0 60*5 

wn tiei 

62*5 62X0 
62X0 62X0 

61X0 61X0 


COTTON 2{MYCE) 

50000 1 b*^ - con ts per lb. 

77*0 5740 Oct 58X0 58X5 

73X0 57.75 Dec 5d44 58*8 

7*75 59.10 Mar 59*3 59.90 

70,00 5890 MOV 60X0 60.78 

70X5 59.10 Jul 6800 60.10 

. . 65*0 5*20 Oct 

3 59X5 5X15 Dec 54.12 54X0 

-5 Est. Soles 1X00 Prev.Sales 1*40 
2 | Prev. Day Open I nt. 20X69 up 740 


HOGS (CME) 

30000 lbs. -cents per lb. 

51X5 34.9) Oct 35X0 35X7 

50X5 3727 Dec 3820 3840 

5047 39X5 Fed 39X5 *025 

47X5 36*2 Apr 37X5 37X0 

49X5 39X0 Jun 41X0 47X0 

49X5 40L50 JUI 41X0 4740 

57.90 4025 AU0 41X0 41X0 

41.10 38X7 Oct 38X5 3825 

49*0 38X7 Dec 38X0 38*0 

EsI. Sales 4X12 Prev.Sales 4,738 
Prev. Day Open Int. 19,940 up 797 


35*0 35*0 
37*5 37X0 

39*0 39X7 
36X0 3*92 
40X5 40*5 

38X5 38X5 



■ \ r A- ' v ’ , 1 ' • V* \ ♦ V 








HEATING OIL(NYME) 

42X00 ya i- cents per gai 
79X5 67*5 Oct 7820 7920 

7925 68*0 NOV 7925 79*0 

8020 49.15 Dec 7920 79X5 

8025 69X0 Jan 79X0 7940 

79X5 70X0 Feta 78.15 78.15 

7*30 68X0 Mar 75X5 7525 

74X0 6*D0 APT 72*0 72*0 

TUX 68X0 Ntav TUX TUB 

Sep 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 10918 

Prev. Day Open ML 86X64 off 7) 



3 

14% 

7% 

31 
40% 

a 
15% 

4% 

2 % % 
8 % 3 % 

a a 

** a 



w e 


45% + % 
' 3% 

17 

% + % 
38% — % 
10 % + % 
19% 

1 % 

2% 

12% + % 
13% + % 
394 + % 

7M + % 

C%— % 
6% — (ft 
22 % 

34 —2% 


17% 17% Jodvn 
4% 2% JetAm 
1% % Jet A Ml 

9% 5% Jefron 
6% 3 JohnPU 

11% 1 JshnAm 
11% 6 Johnlnd 
7% 3% JmnJkn 


1 13% 13% 13%—% 


• ra 

Xlt IX 74 1 7% 7% 7% 

10 3% 3% 3% + * 

JO 42 9 154 7% 7 7— % 

4 22 8% 8 *% + * 

9 9 3% 3% 3% 


PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38X00 lbs.- cents per lb. 

76X0 5525 Feta 57X2 58X7 

7540 55*5 Mar 57X3 58X0 

75*0 57X5 May 59.40 59.40 

76X0 57X0 Jul 60X0 60X0 

7115 55*0 Aug 57X0 58.15 

Est. sales 4.199 Prev.Sales 4X88 
Prev. Dav Open ini. 6X50 up 46 


5742 57X2 
57*0 57X0 

5820 59X0 
58X0 59.10 
57X0 57X0 


Currency Options 


' t-rr^ fr r-t 

^i-rf r 1 T-f-’r 


CRUDE OIL(NYME) 

tXOObbL- dollars per bbL 
29*0 24*5 Od 28.19 28X2 

29*0 2440 Nov 27*9 2720 

29*0 23.90 oec 27X5 27X5 

29*0 74X8 JOT 27.11 27.11 

2946 24X5 Feb 26X5 2*90 

2945 24.13 MOT 2*55 2*57 

2945 2323 Apr 26X1 26X5 

27.96 23x5 May 2*01 2*02 

2*70 2178 jun 25*5 25X5 

2*14 25X0 JUI 25*0 25*5 

Est. Sates Prev. Sales 11995 

Prev. Day Open int. 58083 uo 2.905 


39% 30% 
4% 1% 
16% 10 
n . 18% 

16 94ft 
23% 13% 
16% 8 
8 3% 

4% 2% 
4% 3% 

5% 2% 

5% 3% 
3% 2 


16% 10% 
30% 22% 


KnGspf 4*0 134 
Kapok C 3 

KavCp JO .1* 7 
KayJn XOe .13 10 
KearNr 40 u 11 
Kctden *89 12 18 
KeyPh XD IX to 

Klpark 

Kirby ' 

Kit Mlg IS 

KfaerV X2r X 
KnoO 16 

KogerC 2X2 8* 79 


42 3% 3% 

37 12% 12% 
6 11 % 11 % 
1* 13% 13% 
IX 17% 17% 
274 11% 11 
5 3% 3% 
2 3% 3% 

VMM 
354 2% Ifa 

■ 4% 4% 

90 2% Z% 


209 15% 15% 
93 27% 27% 


33% 

3 %— % 
12% + % 
11 % 

73% — % 
17% + % 
11 — Mi 
3%— % 
3% + % 
3%— % 
2 % +% 
4% 

2% — V, 
15% 

27% + % 



Stock Index 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE ^ 

Option & Strike 

Underlying Price Colls— Lost Puts— Lost 

Sep Dec Mar seg Dec Mar 

IZ588 British Pounds-cents per unit. 

B Pound 120 r 1*50 r t 050 r 

135X1 125 12*0 r r r r r 

135X1 130 r 860 10X0 r 190 440 

1»X1 135 1X0 4X5 7X5 0X5 *70 f 

135X1 140 030 2.90 5X0 4X0 r r 

135X1 145 r IJ5 r r r r 

1J5X1 150 r 0X5 r r r r 

SOXM Canadian Daliars-cents per anil. 

CDoiir 73 r 0*0 r r 071 r 

7199 74 r 0.26 r r 1J4 r 

62508 West German Marks-cents per anil. 

DMork 29 570 r t f r f 

34*8 30 4.96 4.98 r r r r 

34*e 32 X15 r r r r r 

34*8 33 r 2X6 3X4 X 0X7 r 

34*8 34 0.7H 1*2 2X2 0X8 0.70 0.96 

34*8 35 0.19 1.10 1.70 045 1.12 1X» 

34*8 36 0X4 070 1X0 1X8 158 T 

34*8 37 0X1 0.42 r r » r 

3*68 38 r Djs 176 r r s 


Financial 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
paints mtd cents 

198X0 160X0 Sep 187.13 187.90 

200X5 175,70 DOC 188.70 10975 

20375 190.10 Mar 190X5 191X0 

20*50 19340 Jun 19X75 190X0 

Est. Sales 53*31 Prev.Sales 59.157 
Prev.DavOpen int. 64X77 up 4*98 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points and cents 

21120 18*75 SeP 1 97 JO 199*0 

217X5 199X0 Dec 1 99 JO 20QJQ 

207.40 204.93 Mar 202X5 702.90 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 4X19 

Prev. Day Open int 11X42 aH 458 


18*55 187X5 
188X0 10955 
19050 191*0 
193X0 19440 


196*0 197*3 
199.15 20*00 
20250 202.90 


34*0 33 r 2X6 3X4 r 0X7 X 

34*8 34 0.78 1*2 2X2 0X8 070 0.96 

34*8 35 0.1? 1.10 1.70 0*5 1.12 1J9 

34*8 36 0X4 (JJO 1X0 1X8 158 r 

34*8 37 0X1 0.42 r r 

34*8 38 r DJ5 0.76 r 

125X00 French Fnmcs-IOttis of a cent per unit. 

F Franc 1D0 15.10 15.10 r r 

113X7 US r r r 1X5 

113X7 120 r r 270 r 

6XSM00 Japanese rett- tooths of a cent per unit. 


NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFfl) 
polnls and Cents 

118X5 91J5 SeP 108*0 10*90- 

117-20 1D1J0 Dec 10955 110X0 

118X5 10950 Mar 111X5 111X5 

120X0 112X0 Jun 112X5 112X5 

Est. Soles 9X60 Prev.Sales 10474 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 10X26 oft 213 


10810 108X0 
109X0 109.95 
110X0 111X0 
11210 112*0 


2 % 2 % 

2% 2% 

4 4% 

17% 11% 

16% M% 

10% M% 

9% 9% 

22% 22% + % 
5% 5%— % 
29% 29% 

S% 5% 

6% 6% 

28 28% 

1 % 1 % 

3% 3% 

)%, 1% 

32% 32% 

17 17% 

13% 74% 


3T 

XD IX 13 
*0 27 12 


)£ 

•n 

JO U I 


*4 IX 15 


13% 13% 
12 % 12 % 


18 13% 13% 13% + 


W 1%.1%- 


Commodity Indexes 


JYen 40 r r r r 0.15 

4151 41 056 170 r 0X3 0X6 

4151 42 0X4 0J6 1.17 044 0.91 

4151 43 0X1 070 0*0 r X 

4151 44 r 810 r r r 

62500 Swiss Froocs-cents nor unit. 

S Franc 36 *60 *B5 r r r 

42.1 B 38 r r r r 0.13 

42.18 39 351 4.15 r r 0X1 


Close 

Moody's 88670 f 

Reuters 171370 

DJ. Futures 11376 

Com. Research Bureau- 219.70 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 

P ■ preliminary; f ■ final 
Reuters : base TOO : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Previous 
88870 f 
17C8.90 
11373 
21970 


40 255 3X5 3.95 

41 1X6 250 r 


42 r 170 
*3 0.12 Uft 


'S r 041 r 

x r r 1X7 

r 0X9 1.12 r 


Market Guide 


r 0.90 i*i 


0X4 DJ0 170 r 

r 0*1 1X5 292 


42.18 . +* r 0*0 

Total call vaL 4.959 1 

Total pul voL 4J81 
r — Not traded, s — No rollon offered. 
Last Is premium (purchase aricei. 
Sourer: ap. 


Call open Int. 224.937 
Put open Int 15X991 



Asian 

Gonnnodities 


i 


Conmiwlhies 


London 

Commodities 


32% 

53 
33% 

42% 

T2% 

*5 
22Vk 

6% 3% 
10% 6% 
8% 2% 
22 9 % 

12 % 1 % 
13% 6% 
17% 4% 
10% 5% 
20% 14% 
12 % 6 % 
15% 6% 

25% UW 
9% 5% 
5% 1% 
5% 
16% 
5% 
7% 
17% 
10 % 


Cash Prices 


23% 24% + 
25% 25% — 
7% 7% 

26% 27% — 1% 

»«-* 

3 3? =!* 

38 38 + % 

40 -* 

14% 14% 14% + % 
4% 44* 4% 

9% f% 9% 

7% 7% 7% + % 

20 % 20 % 20 %—% 
9% 9% 9% + % 
12% 12% 12% + % 
7% 7% 

6 % 6 % + % 
15% 14% + % 
7 7% 7V. 7% — % 

3 13% 13% 13% 

3 21 21 21 

9 

4% 

5% 

18% + % 
12% + % 
!5%— % 
TB% + % 
13 '*— % 


17 8% f% 8% + % 















18% — % 
% + K 


Xpc.3 

HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
V)5J per ounce 

Clow Prev loos 
High Low Bid Ask Bid Ask 
Sep _ N.T. N.T. 325X0 377.00 323.00 325X0 
Oct _ N.T. N.T. 327X0 329X0 324X0 326X0 
Nov _ N.T. N.T. 330X0 33200 327X0 329X0 
Dec _ 332X0 332X0 331X0 333X0 329.00 331X0 
Feb N.T. N.T. 335X0 337X0 333X0 335X0 
API _ N T. N.T. 3*0.00 342X0 330X0 340X0 
Jun _ 346X0 346X0 345X0 347X0 343X0 345X0 
Aug _. N.T. N.T. 349X0 351X0 347.00 349X0 
Volume: 23 ton trflOO oz. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJ5J per ounce 


Prev. 
High Low 

Seo N.T. N.T. 

Oct N.T. N.T. 

Dec — 332 JO 331X0 

volume. 60 lots at 100 ol 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per kilo 
Close 


Settle Settle 
326X0 324*0 

327X0 326*0 

33220 331X0 


Bid Ask 

R55 1 Sep — 164.25 164.75 


RS5 1 Oct 1*4.75 16SXC 
RSS7Sep._ 151X0 IS200 


PSS 3 Sec— 149X0 150X0 

RSS 4 Sep — , 145X0 147X0 


R5S 5 Sep— 140X0 142X0 

Source 1 Sealers. 


Prev loot 
Bid Ask 
164X0 16450 

164J0 165X0 

15050 151X0 
14*50 149X0 

144X0 14*50 

139X0 141X0 









Mmc. S 




a ate 


SUGAR 

High 

Lew 

Bid 

As k 

Chge 

French franc* Per metric tan 



OCt 

IXM 

1X00 

l/«5 

1X00 

— 30 

Dec 

\m 

1-480 

1X85 

1X95 

-22 

Mor 

1X00 

1X06 

1X09 

— 20 

Mav 


1X35 

1X35 

1X49 

— 11 

Aug 

1X00 

1X00 

1X75 

1X95 

— TO 

Oct 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1X35 

1X49 

— 13 

Est. voL 

2joo lots ot 50 tons. Prev. octuai 

saws: 1607 lots. Open interesl: 21X95 


COCOA 






French franc* per 180 fcg 



Sep 

Z1JS 

2X90 

1115 

2*125 

+ SS 

oec 

2.115 

2X85 

2.110 

2*115 

+ 41 

Mor 

Z\V 

&ir 

2,125 

2*TJ7 

+ 41 

MOV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2.135 


+ M 

Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2,140 



+ 40 

Seo 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1145 

__ 

+ 40 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1145 


+ 40 

Est vo* 

ri lota at 10 tons. Prav. oduoi 

sates: 26 lota. Open Interesl: 766 


COFFEE 






French francs per 100 kg 



S«p 

U15 

1X10 

1780 



— 30 

Nov 

1X60 

1X59 

1X58 

1X70 

— 25 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1.900 

1.948 

— 10 

MDT 

1-980 

1.975 

1.975 

1.980 

— 10 

MOY 

N.T, 

N.T. 

2X00 

2X10 

— 15 

Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2X00 

2X70 

— 5 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T, 

2X60 

1070 

+ 10 

Est.val.: 

98 lota of 5 tans, Prev. actual sale*: / 

i Iota. Open interesl: 416 




Source: Bourse du Commerce. 




S&P100 
Index Options 


i 


SrpL 5 

. _pase Previous 

sugar HWi M fls * 8<0 Ask 

Sterling per metric ton 

S2. IfS-S J252 1 3 ?-® 13a 52 ,41 - 4 ® 

Dec 142X0 140X0 141*0 142X0 143*0 143JJ0 

tS-2 ]wxn 14940 ,S1 ' a0 ,51 -“ 

•*»» JS34Q 151X0 15130 15260 154*0 1S4X0 
rw? JF-S ,57 - rD ,58 - M 159J0 J60J0 

Oct 164X0 164X0 162X0 162*0 162X0 164X0 
volume : Z*17 tats of 50 Ions. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric tan 

Sep 1,752 1.731 1,746 I J4B 1.729 1JJ0 

ggT '2E -f 00 1^79 1J80 

Mav 1X23 1J98 1X17 IX® IJ9 1 1.796 

& ]*£ !il2 If? 6 , - H3C 'J® 1 705 

^ J-SS *-8^ 1X19 1X20 
Oec MM IXM 1X32 1*48 1X20 1*35 

Volume: 7.203 lots ol 10 ions. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metric ton 

Sep 1*05 1X88 1X99 1*01 1*05 1*07 

Nov l*4j 1*23 1*30 1*39 1*44 * 

JOB 1,677 1*58 1*72 1*74 1 *M 1*80 

Mar 1.707 1*86 1 J05 1.710 1,705 1JT0 

1-725 1.735 1J-40 1JM L743 
Jlv 1J70 1,765 1.750 1J70 1 765 1.775 

Sep N.T. N.T. 1.760 1X00 IJM 1X10 

Volume; i*n lots ol 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

U* dollars per metric ion 
Sep 254X0 253.75 2S425 254X0 Bin 357x0 
OCt 24*50 246X0 246.75 247.00 749X0 249 S 
NOV 245X0 74350 243X0 243.75 245.75 24*00 
Dec 243X0 241X0 241X0 24L75 24175 244X0 
Jan 242X0 239X0 239X0 239X0 34275 24jS 
Feb 23*50 236X0 23«UJ0 237X0 24050 241J5 
Mar N.T. N T, 225J50 233X0 231M 73*no 
AM 2*6X0 223X0 223 25 323X0 22*00 239X0 
May N.T. N.T. 215X0 22350 Wang KO0C 
Volume: 1*35 lots of too ions. 

Sources: RevNrt and Lanjan Pelralevm fjr- 
change fgosdiJ. 


Commodity and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santos, lb 

Prlntdottl 64/M 38 ' 1 . yd 
Sleel billets (Pin.), ton- 
iron 2 Fdrv. Pblia. ion _ 
Steel scrap No 1 hvy Pitt 

Lead Soot, lb 

Copoer elect* tb 

Tin (Strolls), lb 

Zinc. e. Sr. L. Basis, lb _ 
Palladium, ot ______ 

Slivor N.v. 02 

Source: AP. 


Srpc 5 
rear 
Thu Ago 

1X4 1X8 

974 

471X0 473X0 

213X0 213X0 

72-73 38-89 

19-20 28-32 

6+69 66-69 

*1631 *2215 

. “-5 1 8ai 

192-104 135 

*M 7J1I 


9%— % 
84% — % 
33% — % 
14% 

12% 


90 >ftb M *%— % 

n m sir m— 8 

w 12 n« ink— % 

258 16% 16% 16% + % 
43 IW 1.1—% 
17 18% 18% IS%— % 
109 12% 11% 12: — 9ft 

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7 22 22 72 + % 

18 ». 

22 64 64 64 

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40 1ft .17%. n 

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? 22% 27% 22% + % 
14 78% 77% 77*— U 
SO 22% 22% 22* 

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22 18% 17* II — * 
22 15% 14% 15* + <% 
J8 5% S . fflft + ftft 

11 9% 9% 9% 

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Or 84% M* 84* +1* 
18% 8* 8%— % 
MM 13* 13* 0% + % 

I IT% 11% lifts + % 
0*41 41 41 + % 

9 16% UVft 16* 

7 TMk 16% 16% + % 

19 78% 17% 18% -Fifth 
5 2% 2% 2% 

4 18* 18% 18* + % 

5 9* 99ft «9ft + % 

4 19ft 1* )*— % 

1 4% 4% 4%— % 

1 13* 13* 13*— % 

4 7% 7* 7% + % 


11% 4ft6 T Eke JJf 52 2S 
I 12% TV* TEC .16 1* 21 
13% 4* TIE 

14% 6% Til 3 

21% 13% TobPra 2D U r 
15% 9* Tasty JO 27 IS 

4* 7% Team 
4% I* TdlARI 
27* 1«% TcftSym Tf 

«% 8% TechTB 'll 

20% 10% TecMrf J8 22 I 
7* 1* Techncf 21 

— J3W 

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16% 6% Tried If 

5% 2% Tries* 

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31* 2T* TurnrC 120 42 10 
Tft . rift TmEan 
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23% 15% 
2%- 1% 
14% 19% 
22* 14 
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10* 6* 
1» 10% 


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unvPat 


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548 14% 

45 11* 
220 10 % 
9 22% 
26 1% 
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24 17 
33 7* 

17 12% 

7 7% 
98 12% 


2* 3 - ‘ ^ 

13* 1396 + % J 
11% 11%— Vft 
ItHft 10% • • 

22 % 22 %— % 

1% 1%— %' ... 
15% i5* + 

16% 16%—*..' 
,7* 7*—%, 
12% 12* 

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11% 13% - . - 


iHijsss?* « ii 

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16% VTAmC 

3* VIRah 

rift vemn 
3* Vgrtpie 
S Vtatech 
5% vi am 
2% vmtpe 
8 Vopftsc 


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18* 18% ' 

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51 

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JO 4 1467 


14% M* + % 
1994 19* + % 


STOCK USS U58 

DeVoc-Holbein 

latemaboaxl nv &A 7 Vi 

Gty-Oock 

International nr 2% 3% 

Quotes as of: September 5, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gams in global stock 
markets can simply write us 2 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht-183 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)31 20 260901 
Telex: 14507 fircotll 


Sftfti CbUj-lm Pet+laa 

Pna sm Oct Nov ok sea Oct no* dk 

IS ii. i 3 " 1 Z 'T* '* 7 I‘ 

!, le S* , ' 1 * 7,19 uft 

W J 77 ILK. c, sb -, i; a lTUl-i 

“ i' !** 1H»S * 4 \l k u 8 

m ?nt 5 J!" 5* «' !? I 

a» - - i, i6 - _ _ _ _ 

Total can volume 1WS7C 
Total con oon uu $s«m< 
totaiout Him 6T4I4 
Ttfrfori SBmta1.4n.lD 
•nape: 

HOB 181X Leut «0(0 Ctaj* It I JO + fo 
Source: CBOE 


London \le<als 


D1V1 Rrtures 
Options 

w. Gereion Mtft-l2UIDaiert& cents pv Atari 


SfrHM CriJv Settle PutvSeme 

gw SW Dec jUpr Sip Dec Mv 

33 1JQ U9 2X4 - Oil 0X8 

14 071 1.61 0.01 64) 071 

15 OX] 1X7 IM 0J3 UK U 2 

» - liS JJO IJJ IE IX] 

J7 — U> US 2J) Ui Ui 

J8 - 032 840 3J0 114 It* 


Estimated total voL 7X81 
Calls: Wad. vui. 3AI9 open tal. 1S3IS 
Puts : Wed. voL UM lnt.J7XS7 
Source: CME. 


cwse Prevroos 

Bid Ask Bid ASM 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling per metric tow 
BPOt 731X0 732X0 731XC 73200 

tarmnd 7S45Q 7SSX0 751X0 754 M 

COPPER CATHODES (Higb Grade) 
Sterling Per mewe wi„, .. 

SPOt 1014X0 1015X0 1013X0 1014X0 

forward 1040X0 KM 1X0 103»X0 I04QXO 

COPPER CATHODES {Standard) 

Sterling per m etric ion 
soul *9X0 «91X0 988X0 992X0 

Forward 1 1X17X0 1018X0 1015X0 1018X0 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric ton 
ml 297X0 29735 2*9X0 300X0 

forward 298X0 298X0 300X0 300X0 

NICKEL 

Sterling Per metric log 
»oi 3405X0 3415X0 3440X0 3445X0 

forward 3458X0 3460X0 3490X0 34*4X0 

SILVER 

fte»c« per iray ounce 

SSL *40X0 441X0 439X0 440X0 

"•"""■fl 452X0 453X0 451X0 453X0 

J’N [Standard) 

sterling ner nwh-ic tan 

2*L rt 2*00 *87X0 9087X0 9 0 8 7 X0 

ZH4C ^ W51J0 9052X0 9051X0 90S2X0 

Sf|J'teg per metric hm 

^»r« 

Source: Reuters. 



23 

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96 

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125 

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6 

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173 

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57 

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9* 

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1660 

8* 

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39 

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67% 

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8 

5* 

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1BT7 

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10 

* 

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159 

14% 

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9 

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38 

29 

215 

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402 

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1X5 44 16 33 

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41 UK 1474 
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7 % 

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16* 16% 

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13* 14 + * 
16% ,«ft+% 

9* 10 +% 

2. 3% + % 


.18* 10* 

2* 2* 

4% 6% 

9 9 + % 


34% 16% 
22% 15% 

12 4 

16% 4% 

19 13* 

34% 18% 
27* 10* 
7% 3% 
7% 3% 

8 4* 

25% 16 
14* 4% 

13 8% 


OEA 

OaKwa 

Date An 

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otiArt 

OUalnd 

Oletens 

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Opperti 

OrWHA 

OSwtvne 

OrirdF 

OiaricH 


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M It 71 
34 IX 20 


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.15 3.1 
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JDt 6X 11 


2 30 30 28 — % 

37 mft 17* 18% + % 
30 5* J* 5* 

19 7% 7 7 

2 mft 18 * 18 *— % 

1 31% 21% 21% 

44 XH 24% 24%— * 

3 4% 4* 4% 

I 5% 5% 5% 

3 4% 4* 4* 

II 20* 30% 20% + % 

84 14 13* 13*— % 


JO 13 n 809 11% 11* 11% 



7% 

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15 

14% 

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6* 

6* 

6* 


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29h 

2* 

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2QVa 

20% 

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Uki 

35% 

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13% 

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22 

22 

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36% 

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% 

30 

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8 

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su 

a% 

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5% 5% 5% 

23% 23 33% 

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16% 16% 14% 

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Iriftllf II* 

WJ6 16* 17% + * 

Wft 8% |%— % 

J5 a si=s' 

JJft 1% l%— % 




N.Q. - “ 


Japan Vehlde Registrations 

Rouen 

TOKYO ^-Vehicle registrations 
in Japan rose to 217.675 in August 
from 21Z50I in Auguxi 1984, but 
the figure was down from 407.597 
in July, the Japan Automobile 
Dealers Association said Thursday. 


































































I 




Page 1' 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


Dollar Rises Sharply in U.S. on Auto Data 


fSmgnlnl tv Our Surf Fnm Dirpat, 
NEW YORK — The dollar 
closed sharply higher Thursday in 
New York, building on an advance 
dial. bad begun Sate in ihe trading 
day- in London. 

Dealers said that operators were 
reluctant to short the currency in 
advance of Fridays scheduled re- 
lease of U.S. employment data for 
August in light or the strong retail 
and auto sales figures reported 
Thursday. 

In New York, the dollar surged 
1-3 percent against the Deutsche 
mark to close at 2.8840. up 4 pfen- 
nigs- from Wednesday’s close of 
2.8460, and 121 percent against ihe 
French franc, rising to 8.8000 from 
&W25 on Wednesday. 

ir also rose to 23730 Swiss 
francs from 23430. to 1.921.00 lire 
from 1,900 and to 240.75 Japanese 
yen from 239.60. 

The British pound fell more a 
cent, to $1.3585 from $13715. 

The dollar shot up to 28850 DM 
from the interday low of 2.8350 
right after the U.S. automakers re- 
ported final 10-day and August car 


sales, which showed (he best 
monthly (oral since 1978. (Story 
Page 13.) 

“The spectacular rise in auto 
sales and the expected jump in 
money supply prompted pretty 
good buying and took the dollar up 
sharply.” said Daniel Holland, vice 
president at Discount Corn, of 
New York. 

The dollar’s prospects also were 
improved by an anticipated 524- 
billion rise in the basic money sup- 
ply figure, M-l. 

Many dealers maintain the Fed- 
eral Reserve is focusing mainly on 
the economy, but others also be- 
lieve that the ballooning money 
supply will in the very least prevent 
any further Fed easing of rates. 

In earlier trading in Europe, the 
U.S. currency closed in London at 
28600 DM. near the day’s highs 
and up 1 pfennig from Wednes- 
day’s dose of 2.S506. It rose to 
23550 Swiss francs from 23460 
Wednesday while the British 
pound slipped to $1.3660 from 
51.3725. 

Dealers said the dollar was un- 


derpinned by expectations that 
U-S. employment figures due Fri- 
day will show a rise of around 
250,000 jobs and by forecasts of a 
$27-billion rise in’ the basic M-l 
money supply figure. 

“If the dollar succeeds in estab- 
lishing itself above 28660 marks, it 
could rise quite easily to 290. its 
last high” said one U.S. dealer. 

Earlier in Europe, the dollar was 
fixed at 28395 DM in Frankfurt, 
down from 28441 at Wednesday’s 
fix: at 8.6700 French francs in Par- 
is. down from 8.6775, and at 
1,899.97 lire in Milan, down from 
1.900.85. In Zurich, the dollar 
dosed at 23473 Swiss francs, down 
from 2.3460 on Wednesday. 

Dealers noted that investors still 
were not confident about buying 
the South African rand, and the 
currency had another difficult day. 

Ihe commercial rand ended in 
London around 39.90 U.S. cents, 
virtually unchanged from Wednes- 
day’s close of 39.75. The currency is 
still being propped by support 
from South Africa's Reserve Bank, 
dealers said. (Reuters. IHT) 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Fannie Mae Offers $ 300 -MUlion Bond Issue 

By Christopher Pizzey 

k Reuters 

LONDON — Attention in the 
market centered Thursday on the 
primary sector, which saw several 
new issues being launched, the larg- 
est a $300- million bond issue for 
the Federal National Mongage As- 
sociation, usually called Fannie 
Mae. 

The secondary market tended to 
remain fairly quiet ahead of the 
U.S. M-l money-supply figure due 
out late Thursday and publication 
Friday or U.S. employment data 
for August 

Seasoned dollar-straight issues 
ended with losses of ft or ft point 
on the back of lower U.S. credit 
markets, dealers added. 

The Fannie Mae bond pays 10ft 
percent a year over seven years and 
was priced at 99 5 «. The issue is 
convertible into an existing domes- 
Uf-fannie Mae bond with the same 
terJis and was lead-managed by 
S.G. Warburg & Co. 


It came under some pressure on 
the market and at one stage was 
quoted at a discount of about 2ft. 
well outside the total fees of 1ft 
percent. 

Meanwhile, an issue for a Japa- 
nese borrower primarily aimed at 
Japanese investors emerged Thurs- 
day — an $ 50-million bond issue 
for C. Itoh & Co. The five-year 
bond pays 10ft percent a year and 
was priced at 101ft. It was lead- 
managed by Manufacturers Hano- 
ver Ltd. and was offered on the 
market at a discount of about 1ft. 

A $ 100-million bond issue with 
equity warrants for Ricoh Co. was 
officially launched by Nomura In- 
ternational Thursday. As expected, 
the issue carries an indicated cou- 
pon of 6ft percent and matures in 
1990. It was quoted on the market 
at a discount of about 1ft bid, well 
within with the 2ft percent total 
fees. 

In the floating-rate sector, a 
£200-roillion note issue was 


launched for the Nationwide 
Building Society. It pays 1/16 
pom t over the three-mon ih London 
interbank offered rate, except for 
the first coupon, which will be 1/ 16 
point over six-month Libor. 

The issue is callable after five 
years and has investor put options 
in years five and seven, ft was 
quoted on the market just inside its 
total fees of 40 basis points at 
99.63. The lead manage r was Credit 
Suisse First Boston. 

Monda/s £1 50-million floating- 
rate-note issue for the Halifax 
Building Society came under a little 
pressure following the launch of 
the nationwide note and it dropped 
a few basis points to trade at a 
discount of 37 basis points. 

Seasoned dollar floating-rale 
notes edged a few basis points high- 
er during the afternoon as profes- 
sional activity picked up. but retail 
interest remained thin, dealers said. 


EC Supports Rise 
InPriceofBeef 

Reuters 

BRUSSELS — The Europe- 
an Community bowed on 
Thursday to pressure from 
farmers and announced a set of 
measures to bolster depressed 
beef prices. Critics said ihe ac- 
tion could add 25,000 metric 
tons of meat a week to the EC's 
current surplus of 750.000 tons. 

A specially convened meet- 
ing of market experts at the 
executive commission 3 greed to 
widen a present aid plan under 
which beef can be sold into the 
community’s cold stores at 
guaranteed' minimum prices, a 
commission spokesman said. 

The present plan is limited to 
lower-quality cuts, but for the 
first three weeks of October this 
will be extended to all parts of 
the a nimal, he said. 


BUSINESS PEOPLE 


Bonn, Unions 

Dai-Ichi Kangyo Opens in Stockholm Qashat Talks 

On Job Woes 


Turf Gets 
Springier 

(Continued from Page 13) 
can last for more than eight years. 

The new surfaces being shown to 
athletic directors also nave loose 
sand fills in the polypropylene 
grass. The sand cushions the im- 
pact of players' pounding feet and 
is said to bold ersatz blades upright 
long after regular grass would have 
been flattened. Supporters say the 
surface is more likely to bend under 
pressure from a player’s foot 

“The sand acts in the same fash- 
ion as soft soil,” said Alvin L. 
Wieler, president of Sportec, a sub- 
sidiary of Tecsyn International Inc. 
of Sl Catherines, Ontario. “It 
holds up the grass yet provides 
some flexibility. 

Not everyone is convinced that 
artificial surfaces are more eco- 
nomical than real grass. “The way 
we maintain artificial grass, it take 
more time and costs more," said 
George P. Toma, the chief grounds- 
keeper of the Kansas City Chiefs. 
He adds, “After every game we 
have to have people on their hands 
and knees scrubbing off the Gator- 
ade from the artificial turf.” 


By Brenda Erdmann 
fniemaitonal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Dai-Ichi Kangyo 
Bank Lid. of Japan has extended 
its international network to include 
Scandinavia. 

The Tokyo-based bank has 
opened a representative office is 
Stockholm, with Tadanobu Hir- 
ayama as chief representative. Mr. 
Hirayama has wonted for the bank 
ai one of its domestic branches and 
in New York. 

An executive of Dai-Ichi Kangyo 
in London said the bank's move 
was prompted by the rising number 
of Scandinavian companies setting 
up units in Japan and by the in- 
creasing flow of trade between Ja- 
pan and the Nordic countries. 

Schweppes France said Francois 
de Lavalette was appointed direc- 
tor-general. succeeding Ramon 
Martin -Bus util, who continues as 
president of the Paris-based unit of 
Cadbury Schweppes PLC. Mr. de 
Lavalette was previously president 
of Miro Meccano, pan of General 
Mills Inc.'s toys and games unit. 

Hertz Europe has named Mi- 
chael J. Gardiner to the new post of 
staff vice president. North Ameri- 
can marketing. Mr. Gardiner, who 
is based near London, was in Mel- 
bourne as vice president, sales and 
marketing, for Hertz Aria- Pacific. 

Citicorp said Alan R. Gillespie 
has joined Citicorp Bank (Switzer- 
land) AG as head of the new- issues, 
corporate-finance and investment- 
management departments. His 
post is new. He moves to Geneva 
from Citicorp Investment Bank in 
London, where he was an executive 
director responsible for Euronote 
business and capital-market activi- 
ties in the United Kingdom. Ire- 
land and Scandinavia. 

Swiss Bank Corp. has appointed 
Hans Gander first vice president In 
its London branch. Mr. Gander 
will head SBCs London foreign- 
exchange and liability-manage- 
ment operations, a new post. Previ- 
ously, he was in charge of SBCs 
cash- and liability-management di- 
vision in Zurich, a post in which be 
is succeeded by Robert V. Zeltner. 

Mitsubishi Electric UK Ltd. has 
appointed Takeo linuma joint 
managing director, succeeding 
Yuzo Tominaga. Mr. Tominaga 
moved to the Tokyo head office of 



Total Oil GreaT Britain Ltd. has 
named Robert JudUn, above, 
managing director and chief M- 
ecutive. He succeeds Tom Hut- 
ton. who has been appointed 
rharwnan until his reti r ement 
early next year. Mr. JudBn 
moves to London from the Paris 
headquarters of the parent. To- 
tal Compagnie Fran^atse des 
Petrol es, where he was director 
of marketing and refining for 
Europe. His successor has not 
been named. 


the parent. Mitsubishi 'Electric 
Corp., to head the marketing of 
consumer and industrial goods in 
Europe. Africa and (he Middle 
East. Mr. linuma, who serves as 
joint managing director alongside 
Yoshio Noguchi, formerly was di- 
rector responsible for electronics 
for the British unit. 

Sumitomo Trust International 
Ltd. in London has named Akira 
Adachi as its deputy managing di- 
rector. He moves to London from 
Tokyo, where he was in the interna' 


To Our Readers 

Businesses and agencies are 
invited to send notices of per- 
sonnel changes to: 

Business People 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre Road 
London WC2 
England 

Telex No. 262009 


tlonal-finance department of the 
parent. Sumitomo Trust & Banking 

Co. , 

Hyster Europe has named David 
Pollock managing director, a post 
vacated by J. Phillip Frazier, who 
became president of the Portland, 
Oregon-based parent. Hyster Co., 
in June. Mr. Pollock, who joins 
Hyster from Onon Corp., will be 
based in Hyster Europe s head of- 
fice in Basingstoke. England, and 
wfll oversee marketing operations 
in Europe. Africa, the Middle East 
and manufacturing operations in 
Scotland. Northern Ireland, Ire- 
land and the Netherlands. 

Lloyds Bank PLC in London has 
appointed Hans Dinger manager of 
the newly created Asian marketing 
uni t of its corporate-banking divi- 
sion. Mr. Dinger was with Lloyds 
R ank International in Singapore, 
where he was responsible for the 
marketing of merchant-banking 
services. 

Manuf acturers Hanover Export 

Finance LitL London, has named 
Andrew Brett to the new post of 
chief executive and deputy chair- 
man. He was with the New York- 
based parent, Manufacturers Han- 
over Trust Co., where he was 
responsible for international cor- 
porate business with U.S. corpora- 
tions in the New York- New Jersey- 
Connecticut metropolitan area. 

FeanzoD Exploration & Produc- 
tion Cot, the oil and natural-gas 
division of PennzoQ Co. of Hous- 
ton. has appointed Jacob 
Schweighauser vice president for 
international operations, succeed- 
ing Fr anklin Hopper, who has left 
the company. Most recently Mr. 
Schweighauser handled geological 
projects for the World Bank's ener- 
gy department. 

Gmnness PLC, which at the end 
of last month took over the Scotch 
whisky distiller Arthur Bell & Sons 
PLC said Raymond Nfiqud wfll 
continue as Bell's chairman and 
chief executive. Also, Guinness has 
named S.C. Dowling of Guinness 
and DAJL Harley of Bells as joint 
managing directors of Arthur Bdl 
& Sons. 

National Westminster Bank PLC 
has appointed Richard Jackson as 
head of its Mexico representative 
office. Mr. Jackson succeeds Ian 
Dimmer, who is returning to Brit- 
ain. 


Rtiitm 

BONN — The West German 
government, uade unions and em- 
ployers met Thursday for their first 
round-table talks in eight years but 
wide differences emerged over how 
best to tackle stagnating unem- 
ployment. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl, who 
invited union and employers' lead- 
ers for discussions on joint mea- 
sures to combat a jobless toll of 
over 2 million, stressed their joint 
responsibility for improving job 
prospects and appealed for broad 
co ns**™ ** to secure West Germa- 
ny's future as a modem industrial 
nation. 

But the trade union federation 
chairman. Ernst BreiL in an un- 
compromising prepared statement, 
said that only a major change in the 
economic course of Mr. Kohl's cen- 
ter-right coalition could reduce un- 
employment 

“Without government readiness 
to make a thorough correction to 
employment policy, no noticeable 
step can be made towards full em- 
ployment" Mr. Breit said. 

Mr. Kohl’s coalition has intro- 
duced limited measures to stimu- 
late employment but has repeated- 
ly rejected demands from the labor 
federation and opposition Social 
Democrats for big government-, 
-backed job-creation programs. 

Mr. Breit said he agreed with 
government estimates that the 
number of people in work was like- 
ly to rise by 100.000 this year. 

“But the catastrophic prospect 
has not changed that we are in 
danger of sliding into the next eco- 
nomic turndown with more than 2 
million out of work." be added. 

Unemployment, one of the big- 
gest political problems facing Mr. 
Kohl ahead of national elections in 
1987. stood at 222 million last 
month, equivalent to 8.9 percent or 
the work force and the highest Au- 
gust figure on record. 

Mr. Breit said the union held to 
its view that, along with economic 
growth, cutting working hours and 
strengthening the public’s spending 
power were the most promising 
ways to solve the jobs crisis. 


■■.I 


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Mb The Associated Press 



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5ft Eaton 

00 

XI 

16 

6* 

6W 

6VS— ft 

42 

25* EflcTI 

05e 30 









50 

76 

rm 

17ft— 14 

16* 

3ft Exovlr 



158 

18W 

10 % 

IOW— % 


H Month 
HiehLow Stock 


Saks In 

Dlv. YKL 1008 HWl 


Nil 

Low 3 PAL ore* 


lots s 

444 144 
22V, 13W 
601* 44 VS 
23 VS 1214 
8 4W 
17*4 7 

6* 3W 
9W SW 
1514 414 

33 2014 

32V, 23 

s* « 

Rir 

28W 10 
26 VS MW 
29% IS 
19«* lovi 

601* 2SW 

fi 

42W Z7W 
44W 294* 
8VS 3W 

« .. 

17W 10W 

«w vi 
I8W low 
19«4 10*. 
34VS 22VS 

24*4 16VS 

10*4 54* 

SW 4V6 
29*4 14*S 
15 6 

1544 11W 


Mb 1J 
JO 2.9 


FMI 219 

FcmRerf 43 

FarmF 59 

FrmG 1 J 6 25 1858 
Fed Gas 79 

Feroflu 43 

Picnnia 2 t 

Fdlcrs 152 A3 49 

FMltiTS 150 3.1 2 

W Sg 2 

■20 8 
214 

m 

66 
52 
!T 2 

13 U 8 

1.12*142 63 

1329 
495 
95 

128 
21 

244 
7 
3 
26 
131 
l2D 

FTerm 150 05 3tD 
FslUnC 1.12 29 142 

45 

M 5 

M J 742 
-80 20 451 

-21 |J 

J J M 
FUOdB 07 A 46 
ForAm Si 30 9 

FarestO 100 6.1 3 

FortnF 14 

FtrtnS 184 

Forum 06b 5 440 

Faster .10 Z 1 97 
Freirmt 58 15 336 
Futfrck 76 

FulrHB 02 20 17 


Finn 
Flnaleo 
Flngiru. 

Flnlaan 

FAJaBX 1.12 18 
FtARn 00 20 
FfAThS 
FtCotF 
FComr 
FICon t 
FDatoR 
FExee 
FFdCal 
FFF1M 
FtFnCP 
FtFnMs 
FtFIBk 54 10 
FJerN 100 A9 
FAAdB 150 30 
FN Sep JSe 
FRBGa 108 28 
FfSvFla 80 26 
FSeeC 1.10 50 



10 9*6 

24* 244 
14 13*4 

62V. 61V* 
low » 
5W SW 
17 16*4 

31 30*4 

52 52 

38 37*4 

16 159b 
5W 49* 
7VS 7 

M 13W 
29W 291* 
21 aov, 
269b 261* 
17*4 T7VS 
27 27 

79k 7V, 
35*4 35W 
13VS law 
26*4 26 
23W 23W 
21 27*4 

19W 191* 
291* 289! 
36*4 36V* 
54 54 

34W 2214 
38*4 381* 
30V4 29VS 
23 22V! 

41*4 41 W 
08*4 38VS 
3*4 3*4 
12 11VS 
219! 2114 
41V! 40V, 
IBM 18 
16W 16VS 
4 3W 

17 16*4 

17*4 17Vl 
32V, 32V. 
1694 169! 
23 21*4 

l*b 194 
,9*b t*s 
'5 49b 

24*4 249b 
79! 7*4 
IM 15*4 


2*78 

IBVs + 14 
5W + V4 
17 
31 
52 
37*4 

15W + *4 

ST” 

17*4 

27 

79b + VS 
35V, + VS 
13V! + W 
26W + 1* 
23VS 

279b + W 
1914 

29** + W 
3694 

ft* 

SI2 + » 

22Vj — 9b 
41V4— V! 
38W— V* 
3*4— V* 
UVs— V, 
2114— Vs 
40*1 + 14 
IffW— V4 
16V, 

39b 
16*4 + V4 
17*4 + 14 
32VS + « 
16W 
21*4 
19b 

9*4 + V4 
49b— V4 
24*! + 14 
7*» 

15*4 


12* 

3ft GTS 



6 

4* 

4* 

4ft— ft 

14% 

9* Galileo 



18 

11% 

11% 

11% 

11W 

6* GamnB 

.10 

10 

5421 

7W 

6* 

7W + * 

5AVS 

28* Genet ch 



41 

48* 

48 VS 

48* + % 

8* 

5 Genets 



481 

7* 

7* 

7ft— * 

12 

1* Goto 



165 

2 

1* 

2 + % 

36* 

7W GaFBk 



331 

23* 

23* 

23*— * 

10* 

4* GerMds 

08 

10 

33 

8* 

Bft 

IW— * 

24* 

15* GibJGs 

04 

10 

369 

18* 

lift 

IB* + % 

2QW 

14 GlBoTr 



1 

16ft 

16ft 

14ft +* 

16W 

izw Gotoas 



234 

13* 

IIW 

raw 

19* 

9* Gait 



174 

19* 

19% 

19 % — % 

I8W 

I4W GoutdP 

06 

40 

66 

17 

16ft 

16* 

IS* 

10% Groco 

A 4 

2J 

2S7 

ISW 

15% 

ISW + % 

9* 

5* Grentre 



5 

8 

7ft 

7ft 

13ft 

4* Grebls 



_ 59 

13* 

13W 

13*— ft 

9* 

4 GrpftSc 



2882 

7W 

7 

7 — % 

22 

9% GWSav 

JJr 2 A 

9 

20* 

19* 

19* 

15* 

8 Gtocn 



49 

14ft 

14* 

M* 

19 

13% GufWrfl 



557 

14ft 

14ft 

14ft— * 

15* 

JW GHBde 1200c 


<574 

Sft 

3* 

3* 


24* 

15* HBO 

00 

0 

662 

21% 

20* 

21% + W 

11* 

7 HCC 

06 

0 

21 

TOW 

10% 

IOW + * 

20* 

T2 Haber 



11 

20 

19ft 

20 + % 

18* 

3% Hodoo 



19 

4ft 

4 

4 

3* 

2 Hoesan 



86 

Sft 

3 

3 

1* 

W HaieSr n 



IS 

ft 

ft 

ft 

19 

12ft HamOII 

.10 

0 

508 

17W 

17* 

17W 

25* 

18% HorsGs 

04 

10 

51 

19* 

19% 

19% — % 

MK 

23W HrtOIT 

1 AO 

50 

196 

31* 

31 

31 

TOW 

5VS Hafhws 

00 

12 

17 

9* 

Bft 

9ft— % 

14 

6* HawkB 

.141 


102 

8% 

7* 

7*— % 

12W 

1* HI thin 



Ml 

2ft 

2 

2% + % 

5% 

1ft Hlfhdyn 



201 

3% 

3* 

3* 

23W 

14 HrttBAS 

.16 

0 

37 

17 

16* 

17 + % 

24ft 

14* HchflB* 

08 

0 

43 

17% 

17 

17% 

8* 

3% Helen T 



35 

3* 

3W 

3W— * 

37* 

» Hell* 



no 

20* 

20 

20 — % 

38* 

31* HenrdF 

02 

27 

36 

33* 

33% 

33* + W 

24* 

15ft HlberCp 

100,40 

11 

23 

22* 

22* 

13* 

9 Hlcfcam 



2 

10W 

10W 

TOW 

14 

3W Honan 



384 

6ft 

6% 

6% 

31 

9W HmFAz 



9 

28% 

ZB 

28* 

12W 

4 * H merit 



50 

5 

4* 

5 

25W 

15% Honlnd 

64 

26 

66 

2SW 

25 

25 — % 

30* 

22* Hoover 

100 

40 

■5 

28W 

20% 

28W + % 

28% 

12% HwBNJ 



200 

26* 

26W 

26* 

28% 

18% HunUB 

-lOe 

A 

48 

23W 

23 

23VS 

MW 

7* H/WBln 



12 

13* 

12* 

13* + ft 

36ft 

14 * H/rroB 1 

04 

3 5 

20 

23* 

raw 

23* + % 

29ft 

12% HvbrWe 



47 

25 

24* 

25 

11W 

4* Hyponx 



224 

11 

10W 

11 + % 

11% 

5* HvteVvM 



4 

7W 

7W 

7* — * 


12 Month 
Htah Low Stock 


Sales la 

Dlv. Yld 100 b HMi 


Low 3 PAL Oft* 


1714 10*4 
10W 6*4 
6114 271% 
41*4 23%. 
13 7*4 

MVS 3 
21 *S 13 
14*4 4*4 

i6*b m 
29 VS 13 


Kasler JOr 13 51 

Kartian 30 

Kemp 100 11 593 
KyCnU 100 20 59 

KeyTm 89 

Kim £>rfc 22 

Kinder 06 J 273 
Kray 06 0 IM 

K rimer 02 20 28 

Kukk« .121 0 183 


11V! 11 11 — *4 

9Vs VV4 9V, + V4 
5S*s 5814 58*4 + V% 
39 38V! 3BVS — 14 

81 % 8 vs BW 

3U 3 3V4— 14 

20*4 21 20% + Vs 

7W 714 714— W 

law 13*4 139b 4- 14 
14(s 14 14W 


154 
■W 
41 W 
27*4 
8*4 
22W 
7W 

ins 

T9 

2BU, 


9 JBRstl 
3W Jackpot 
25*! JacfeUe 
14*4 JamWtr 
4W JftMvt 
Its aerlco 
3W Jonian 
6W Josphsn 

9*% Junes 

12*4 Justin 


.16 10 6 

Ik 
74! 
23 
64 

.12 S 46M 
I 92 

137 
127 

50 2.1 15 


13* 13*4 13*4 
FW JW J*4 
33VS 32V, 32*4— w. 
18W 1814 1814 — W 
4*. 4 V, 4* ♦ s. 

33% 22 23 +1 

V% 6W «W 
7*. 71S 7*4 

18 17*4 17*s 

1894 18*4 1814— W 


MVS 13VS KLAs 
M% 4W KV Ptw 

30% Kaman Si 
2AW 13VS Korcnr 


923 

as 

77 

77 


18*. 10 18—14. 

7% 7% 7VI + w 
30* 30 3K4 

16V! T6*s 16W + 


1114 6*% 

18V, 9*4 
23V, 10 
MW 8*4 
47*6 2994 
20*4 12VS 
IBVS 11 
17 ItW 
17 14 

59W as 
32 21*4 

IOW 49b 
I5V4 814 
91b 7 
4 2J 
4*4 1*4 
24% 1714 
46*4 38W 
T3 494 
20*4 1114 
32*4 ins 
361! 2714 
49V, 21*1 
2594 20*4 
33*6 16W 
26*4 15 
29 79h 


LOBnric 
LSI Lag 
LTX 
LoPetes 
LnZBy 150 
LodFm .16 
Laldlnr 00 
LanMT 00 
Lon cast 58 
lojwCo 02 

Lawsns 02 
LteDto 
Lei ner 

LewlsP 08b 
Lexicon 
Lnxktta 
Lhtftrt 
Lflnvs 
LfeCom 
LlIvTuI 
Un Brd 
UncTU 200 
UzOQ6 05 
LonoF 108 
Lotus 
Lvnden 
Lyetios 


07 

04 


00 


M 

322 

BIO 

401 

30 7 

0 19 

LI 25 
50 44 

40 54 

1J 42 
1.1 100 
86 
3 
37 
288 
33 
J 25 
5 5 

20 

15 882 
186 
65 a 
0 3514 
55 4 

1153 
1 

373 


30 


TVS 7W 7W 

151% 14*4 1514 
131% 11V! 12V4— 1V4 
191% UVS 19 + 1! 

46V, 46V* 46V, — VS 
ms lew ins 

1114 17*4 17*4— 14 
15*4 15*4 ISM, 

16 15*4 16 + 14 

55V. 5441 S5W +1V. 
2941 29 29 — V! 

614 61b 6V% 

9U 9W 914 + W 

a a 

29b 7VS 2*4 

22V4 21*4 21*6 
46 46 46 — VS 

6V4 5*4 4VS + *% 

lri% 19*4 19V4 — VS 
2214 32 32 — W 

33VS 33 VS 33 VS 
44 41*6 «Z*i— IV. 

2ZW 22W 22W 
20*4 2014 20*4 + >4 
25 25 25 + *4 

2294 22 22V, + W 


MMoMi 
Men Low Stock 


Soto! in 

Ms. Yld. U»s Mgh 


low 3 pm. ora* 


1914 11*4 onmc 
8V4 514 Orbit 
71% 4 OrtoCo 
20 14 Ostnrm 

349% 2594 OttrTP 
1414 8 OwnMs 
6*4 *4 Oxocs 


31 

136 

267 

00 10 3 

206 19 65 

08 10 62 

60 


1814 1314 1314 
6*4 AW 4V, — 
7 6*4 6*4 

15*4 15*4 15*4 
31*4 31 3L — 
15*4 15*4 — 


16. 


W VS — 


M 


14*4 8*S MBI 

T1*b 6*4 MCI 
7VS 4 VS MIW 
31 15 MTSt 

31*4 13 MTV 
1714 9W MockTr 
2794 20 ModGE 
II 7*4 MoIRt 
1RV 7WIWalrlti 
16% BVS MafSct 
24W 17W Manttw 
77m 37VS Ml mu 
19VS 1JW Marcus 
9 3*! Margo* 

13*4 6% Merest 

37% 18VI MrMN s 
23*6 AW Mscols 
6*4 1*4 Maxtor 

KB 24 MatncS 
34*4 13 Maxcrs 
14W 8*4 Maxwsl 

6*4 3W MayPt 
4Vk 3y, MaynOI 
38V! 29*4 McOltl 
MW 109S MCFOrt 
7IW 6 Msdex 
12*4 4 MedCre 
20 Vs 10 Mentor 
30W 14W MwtfrG 
399S Z7W Merc Be 
65 37*% MrrcBk 

36% 21*4 MrdBCS 
22VS 12 Mertbi 
22% 11% MervO 
1794 894 Mftr Tli 
38*6 14W Micom 
5*4 2*4 Micro 

51% MfcrMk 
4W MtCTTty 
SW MfcrTc 
4 Micron 
3 V% MlcSail 
2W MdPcA 
17 MdSfFd 
MJdIBk 
MdwAIr 


13*% 

7W 
40 VS 
9 

6*S 
7*4 
24 
41% 24 
8 3 


27W ItW MIlIHrg 
7W 2W Million 
44 30*6 MJ1IIPT 

414 1*6 Mlabcr 

27W 1AVS Mlrator 
16*4 71% MGrnfc 

12W A MOOICB 
20W 13 Modlnej 
10*6 6 Moleclr 
3* VS 26% Motax 
22 14 MootCI 

12 7*4 MonAM 

22V5 7*6 MonoUt 
34 22% MOTRfC 

20% 14W MorPlg 
M 9 MorKo 
22W 15*% Morm 
7*% 2*4 Mosetov 
16*! 12W MotCW 
64 VS 30 MiMtnM 
26% W*oMylon» 


289 

10522 

5 

04 14 *2 

4 
300 

228 80 61 

3 

010 33 

3*3 

00 30 96 

258 30 19 

00 15 18 


100 30 322 
177 
626 

.10 0 11% 
1119 

18 

699 

7 

08 25 1854 

05 S 19 

190 

212 

M 

102 4.9 115 

150 25 223 
100 iO 97 

06 30 65 

220 

500 35 31 

450 
47 
ie 

06 10 29 

181 
S 
2 
270 

50 10 3 

1.12 XI 65 
181 

54 10 344 

11 

58 10 117 
263 
58 

010 .1 22 
47 

58 30 107 

41 

03 148 

05e 10 1 

7 
96 

150 40 47 

01 3 

.16 10 35 

58 25 120 

190 

00 u 1 

56 1.1 1141 
.10 5 3656 


11*4 11W 11*4 + % 
Bffe 0W 8*4— % 
7 7 7 

M% 1814 18% 

311s 31V4 31W + 1% 
11*6 114% 119% 

24*4 26W 26% 

19k 89% SW — W 

13 129% 129%— W 
1JVS 13% 13*6— VS 
ZT% 20W 21 

*6 45*% 66 

ITW 19*% 19% * W 
4-4 4 + % 

10% 10% 10% 

31 30W 309%— 9% 

24 23% 23*4 + % 

2V% 2*s TVS 

34 33 33*S — W 

ITW 19 ITW + % 
12% 12V, 1ZVS 
3% 5% 5W +1 
48s 494 4*k + % 
36*4 36W 36V! + *4 
11*4 11*4 1194 
10V, 10VS TOW 

6 5W 69b— W 
13% 12W 12*4— W 

14 15% 16 + *b 

39 38*6 39 

631% 62% 63*% +1% 
3694 36 36 + 94 

20W 20*4 20*4 
15% T5VS 159h + *S 
1«*i 16VS 16*4 
17% 17% 17*4 + % 
2*4 21% TVS — VS 

7 7 7 

6*4 6% 6% 

. 79! 794 7*4 
7 4*4 7 

6*s 6W «9k 

4 3W 3W 
21 21 21 

ulL nuA 

«r»» -re JOT3 M fB 

to 4% ft 
23*! 239b 23W + 94 
4 4 4 — W 

T ^7^ 

22*4 22V. 22V%— % 
10 9*6 9W— V4 

1294 119! 12 — V4 
17*4 17 17*4 + 94 

794 79% 794— W 

319% SOW 30*6—96 
19% 19% 19%— % 
9*6 91% 1*6 

1114 11 VS 1196 
33 32*4 32*%— *4 

171! 1794 1794 
13 12*6 13 + % 

2D 199! 19*4—94 
39% 316 39k 
14% 14% 14% 

62% 41*4 41W + *% 
189% ITW 189k— % 


102 45 225 
100020 986 

00 50 ^ 

s 

425 
50 40 132 
344 

t 3 

7 


248 

0 268 
* 95 


06 


32% 21% PNCs 
53% 39*4 Paccar 
15*4 7 PacFst 
IS 10*4 POCTH 
179% iow PaaoPh 
89% 6 PoocMx .13 10 
249b 1094 PantPh 
20% 12 Park Ob 
8 4 PatntM 

13*6 014 PoutHr 
13*4 AW PaulPt 
I TVS 7*4 Payeftx 
25 9*4 PeokHC 

33 20VS PeartH 
10% 5% PesGW 
35 21% PnoEn 200 

31% 20*4 Pentors 58 
15*4 7*k P*oaEx 

32VS 24*6 Petrtte 
13V 4 Phrmct 

12% 796 PSF3 

1794 14% PbllGi 

8 2% PtwucAm 

2814 17*6 PVeSav 
34% 16M, PtcCufe 
ITW 2794 PlonHI 
11% 7 PionSt 

159% 8W Pa Folk 
34*6 1646 PIcvMg 
29 21 Porsx 

39b 1% Powrll 
17*4 TVS Povrrtc* 

11*6 5% PwConv 
CT6 18*4 PrecCst 

9 4% PrDdLO 

BW 3 Priam 

16% 7*6 PrfcCm s 
66 36% PrfceCo 

22*6 9 F+tronx 

6 494 ProdOp 

C 20% ProeCs 

1584 l/9b Proof Tr 100 95 106 

1994 13*4 Previn 85 

7W 3W Pultmn 403 

26*6 1294 Port Bn 50 10 05 


05# A 1075 
L12 4.1 1030 

.108 1.1 MS 
008 30 2157 
53 

N 

50 24 34 

02 20 621 
.12 15 72 

S 

1266 

89 

219 

41 

II 

.12 5 27 

121 
129 
261 
112 
134 

.16 30 0 

.12 0 1 


SOW 30 SOW 
45% 44*6 44% — 
13*4 12*4 13% — 
1JW 13% 13VS + 
I486 149% 149% 

7*k 7VS 7V% 

2294 219b 2214 — 
13% 129% 13% + 
6% 6 A — 
119b 11% 11% 

11*6 11% 1196 + 
1796 17 171% + 

T0W 13% T39S + 
32W 3214 329b — 

9 «W 8*4 — 
349% 33*4 33% 

27 36VS 27 + W 

14 139% 139h 

2TW 27 27%— % 

69b <96 Aft + M 
994 99% TVS — W 
15*k 1SW 15*4— W 
2VS 2% 2% 

25% 25% 25% + V4 
21*6 21W 21*4 
34 33*6 33*6— % 

8*i BVS 8*4 
13W 13W 13W 
2ZVS 22 22% 

24VS 24% 24VS 
2V, 2% 2W— ft 

UW 11% 11%— % 
10*4 10% 10% + W 
32VS 32% 3Z1S + VS 
7% 694 7% + 94 
4 394 3*4— W 

10*4 10W 1094— % 
57% 57 57% 

12 % 12 12 — % 
49b 494 48b. 

39 29 39 + % 

129! 12W 12V, 

17W 17% 17% — W 
7W 7*4 7% 

2384 23W 23W + W 


NCACo 


4V% 4 VS 4W + 94 


33% 

16* IMS S 

.16 

0 





6* 

2% NMS 



82 

4ft 


4*— % 

14* 

7W ISC 




ni! 



9* 

3ft N oecns 



542 

IOW 

9% 

10W + * 


3% Icot 








18* H Bo Tex 

04 

30 

Ml 

24% 

24 

24 


4* 1 mu nex 







50* 

»W Nticty 

200 

44 

344 

46% 

45ft 

45ft— * 


2* Inocmp 









00 

10 

252 

17* 

17 

17*— * 


SOW IndIN 

1AO 

30 








34 

30 

13* 

13* 

13* 











041 

0 

46 

17W 

17% 

17W— ft 


MW Inftrn 



4 





4 W NILumb 



B 

SW 

6* 

6* 


15 InsWh* 








7* NJWcre 



4M 

JW 

2ft 

2ft— * 


3W Inteem 




s* 



9* 

4* N duals 



274 

4VS 

<W 

4* 


8W irrtoOv 







10* 

6* NetonT 

08 

30 

IS 

6* 

6* 

6* 


3 Into Gen 








6% Nelson 



17 

7W 

7% 






7003 

25VS 



9% 

SW Nw*5*C 



364 

6W 

6 


12% 












727 

MW 

24* 














3 

31W 

31 W 

31 W— W 


3* intmd 




13% 




7W NBrunS 



42 

TW 

TW 



5% inmvnn 



18 





raw NE Bus 

02 

10 

1 


27 

27 











M 


345 

29* 




22 V! imopns 



1B81 





lfft. NJNOtl 

1.12b 30 

<8 

2SW 

28* 

28VS + ft 


<W Intrmsn 








8% NwtdBk 

0 St 


37 





13* Inrmec 












22 VS 




5W intrmtr 
















JOW IntClln 







7* 


t 



2ft 

2ft 

Sft— ft 


8* IGame 









A0 

10 


12* 

12* 

raw 





111 






44 

10 

313 

46 

44* 

45 — * 





453 






021 

0 

1112 

44* 

43* 






79 



ft 





17 

6* 







3316 








7* 







14 









16* 

16ft 

16* + W 


5 Iomega 



314 





13W NwNO 

1A4 

XI 


18* 

17ft 

17ft— ft 





19 

11* 





00 

30 

56 

21* 

21% 

21% 





404 

B% 





xia 

90 

15 

22ft 

22* 


1 



— 

r- 




55ft 

7 

39* Norton 

5 NucIPh 



<38 

59 

49ft 

6 

Sft 

Sft 


15W SW QMS* 
T9! 3VS Quadrx 
32% 16*4 Q contra 
5W 294 QuestM 
13 8% Quixote 

13% 7% Quotrn 


138 

566 

666 

150 

247 

1075 


1094 IOW 10W— M 
9% 9 9% + % 

22V. 22 22 — % 

4*4 49! 494 
12*4 12% 12*6 + % 
10W 9*6 9*4— % 


16W 6*4 RAX 01* .1 93 

10*4 11*4 RPMe 06 35 159 

MVS. 894 RodSya 108 

14*6 6V. RocttnT 57 

7W 2W Rcawn 2 

33% 19*4 Rolnr j 100 30 585 

2D% 12W RayEn 04 10 4 

7*4 294 RedICr 133 

23W 15*4 R#adno 5 

10% 5VS Recotn 72 

25 % RedknL M 22 55 

12 W 3% Htn« 

7*6 59* Raevei 

20V! 11 Reals 9 
14W 4VS RHlcb 

TO 794 RPAuto 

20% 994 RpHtttl 

16*6 11*6 RretrSv 

16W 8 Reutori 
29*4 17VS ReutrH 
<3*4 29 ReyRry 104 30 
15% TV. Rhode! 04 10 

10 3W Rlbllra s 

22% 12W Rich El s 

T7W IBVS Rival 00 50 
33*4 24*4 Roods V 100 35 

13% BVS RobVsn 

2*Yi 1694 Rouse 1 

13 6VS RoyPlm 

12*4 3W RovlRs 

tbw n Rustpel 
19% 11 % RyanPs 


00 30 
.12 0 


.16 10 


.158 10 
" 10 


12 

667 


04 25 


23 

12 

68 

<9 

35 

444 

32 

18 

14 

94 

19 

261 


7 6*4 7 + % 

16W 16% 16%— W 
12V4 12 12% 

10*4 IOW 10VS 
to 4* 4VS + % 
31W 31 31W 

19 19 19 

2W 3W 2*4— W 
218! 2184 2164 + W 
ID 994 10 +14 

28*4 28 28*4 + *4 

lift 11 11 — W 

49! 4W 684 + V4 
15% 15% 15% + W 
5W 3V, 5to + W 
TW 994 9% 

13*4 13W 13% — W 
V5% 14*6 14*6 
8*4 8 B — *4 
27% 27 27 

38% 38 3816 + % 

14*4 14W 14% + w 
7W 7 7 — Vk 

21 VS 21 2194— % 

15W 15 I5W 
2S% 2S 28 
12 11*4 lift 

22% 22W 22VS 
IOW 10W IOW 
3*4 3% 3*!— W 
15% 15% 15*4— *4 
I7W 17 17% — % 


»% 

31% 

»w 

13*4 


6 NurarOx 
18% Numeric 
6% NutrIF 
1% NuMeas 


6 VS 6% 6%— VS 
30VS 30W 30VS— % 
9% 9W 9W 
10 % 10 10 


Sft 

1ft Oceener 



14 

3ft 

2ft 

2ft 

TOW 

17VS 

12 Cental 



102 

16ft 

15* 

16% + % 

21ft 

46* 

31W O 0 UG 0 

108 

2A 

41 

45 

<4* 

45 

29W 

47* 

39* OhtoCo 

208 

46 

4699 

iU* 

40* 60*— % ! 

A* 

32* 

16* Old KOI* 

100 

34 

17 

29* 

29% 

29*— W 

38* 

61* 

23 OKtRPS 

.74 

2 A 

53 

31* 

31* 

31* 

28* 

25 

10* One Ben 

098 U 

46 

24* 

24W 

24ft— ft 

91* 

9% 

3 * OnUne 



a 

8 

7* 

8 

31W 

19% 

12ft CptlcC 



181 

14* 

14* 

14*+ ft 

19% 

a* 

22W OprtcR 



456 

21* 

28% 

28* 

28% 


16 7*4 SAYInd 

17% IOW SCI 5v 
IP% TOW 5E( 

1IW 7 SFE 
23 16 SRI 

21 4V4 Safecd* 

4Mk 79 Safeco 
23 11W ScfHtth 

16 . 7% 5tJude 

7SW 39% StPaul 
6W 2% 5a I Cot 
11% a% Son Oar 
*V» 5W SateiSy 
<«VS 32*4 SavnF 
20% 10% SBkPS* 

10% 4% SconOa 

MW 1CW 5am Tr 
™ 8*4 Scherer 

25W 15% SchimA 
JW 3*4 SdMJC 
2DW 12 Sdtex 
9W 5W SeoGat 
w 4 Seoaate 
<w 2W SecTao 
2% Hb SEEQ 
38% 16 Selbei 
11% 5VS Semlcn 
10*4 4 searer 

T6W low 5vcM#r 
avs 17W Svmer* 

23 13W 5arvtco 

n 4% SvcPrct 
18 12V4 SevOak 

3f% 23W ShTMed — _ 
39V. 29% ShMTItt 108 45 
»W 12% Shelby* .16 0 

MW 79b She Id I % 

35% 24% Shoneys 
MW 10 StwnSa* 

11% 5*4 Silicon 

2T> TVS silicons 
22% 11 % silkVnl 

24VS 11% sillaix 

12% 4W siimc 
17% 11% SJmptn . 

15% 10W SIbPIr* 

24% 73*4 Staler t 
12W S% Sklaaer 
*% 2 Smith!. 

54. 31 Society 104 

^0 SoovSv 
6 Softool 


20 

314 

-Mr 15 83 

00 00 549 
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150 40 SSO 
7 

300 *2 259 
26 

0Sr 0 35 

.12 2.1 1 
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54 20 21 

78 
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X 


05 


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58 25 

02 01 
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.10 10 


271 

31 

125 

37 

189 

129 

566 

134 

372 

ITS 

12 

472 

51 

194 

44 

199 

109 

383 

66* 

34 


13% 13 13 — % 

15 14% 14% 

ISW 18% I8W + % 
79! 7 7 — % 

2D W 20% 209k— V4 
2194 2014 Z1V4 + W 
3994 3994 399k + W 
1VW 19W 19W + % 
MW 15 15W + 44 

72% 7194 72 
5% 5W 596— V4 
694 6% 6*4— W 

5*4 s% 5%— W 
«% <7*4 <7*6— W 
20% 20 20 
7W 794 7% + % 

16 15% 15%— % 
13W I2W 1294— W 
3494 24% 24% — W 

4 394 4 + W 

12% 12% 1296— % 
5W 5% SW— W 
7W 7 7 

£4 2*4 M4 + W 
2*4 2VS 294— W 
iow 18 % ms + % 
6*4 m <94— % 

SW 8% fl% 

MV, 14Vk 1<W 
21 20V, 2096 + W 

ITH 18% 70*4— 2 

4*4 4*4 494— W 
T7W 179k 1796— W 
31 30W 30*4 + % 

37*4 37W 37W 
It 189! 18*4 — % 
IJjb TW4 10*6 + W 
TP* 27% 27*6 
11*6 1194 11*6 
4W 59k * — W 

iw iiw nw— w 

U 15W 16 +2 

28 19*4 19*6— % 

5% SW 59S— % 
14W 1544 1594—94 
13*4 13W 13W 
14% 16% 16*4 + W 
109k 9*6 IOW + % 
2% ZW 2W 
46% 45% 46% + W 
19V4 18% 15% — W 
9*4 99k 9W 
16% 15W 16W + W 
20% as 28% + % 

544 4W <9k 
24% 24% 24% 

169k 1694 169k— % 
6% 69! 69! 

29% 2894 29 
17% 169! 17% + % 
23% 23 23 — % 


raiutatta 



Sotos to 

Net 

1 . ‘ 4 

High Low Store 

Dtv. YM. 

MOB 

HMI Low 3 PM. OVB9 

i ~ 

8* 

5* Speech 

06 

0 

4 

6* Aft Oft— Mi 

> : .. - \ 

16* 

13 Sttre 



86 

15 14ft 14ft + * 

: j 

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3ft StorSrs 



116 

5% 5 S —ft 

■ : 1 

9ft 

S SIOtBU 

00 

23 

SO 

7ft 7W 7ft 

. .3 

30 

19* Staodvs 

100 

X4 

76 

raw 28 28 — % 

1 

24* 

11% SUMIc 



tax 

14% 13ft 14ft— ft 

1 

27 

19 StQnhoS 

100 

54 

9 

22* 22* 22ft— Vk 


34% 

iiw siosm* 



1714 

30* 29V, 30 — W 


6ft 

3ft SfOtrG 

.15b 30 

143 

4* 4* 4* + % 


- 7ft 

4ft Sletotr 



466 

5ft 4* 5 4- ft 


Uft 

iow stewstv 



76 

16ft 16% 16* -4- W 

• n 

BW 

5% SUM 



135 

6* 6ft 6*— Vb 


raw 

7* Stratus 



976 

17* 17% 17% — % 


38ft 

26* Sfrwaa 

36 

23 

2 

34% 34% 34% + * 


171ft 

97 Subaru 

108 

10 

41 

169*168 168 — * 


« 

36% SubrB 

102 

20 

TCI 

65* 64ft 65ft +1 


5* 

2ft SdffliM 



110 

2* 2ft 2* 


14* 

2* 

7 SumtMl 
ft SmCef 

-TO 

10 

835 

38 

TO* 9ft 10%— ft 

1ft )ft IJW— ft 


raw 

6ft SunMed 



4 

9ft 9ft 9ft 

t 

TO* 

■ 5up5ky 



1 

8% 8% 8% + % 

t 

6 

3„ Swpriex 



5 

* S *=* 

: ' { 

2* 

ft vlSytel 



118 

14 

6ft svmbT 



IM 

10 9ft 10 ♦ ft 

14ft 

6% Synfech 



IBS 

12* 12* raft + % 

- 

5* 

2ft Syntnnc 



39 

3% 3Vh 3% 

■ 

18* 

lift Syscon 

08 

U 

8 

IT* 17* 17*— ft 


26% 

14% SVA90C 



35 

15% 14* 15% + % 

9 

7% 

3ft Systln 



3 

5* Sft 5* + ft 


11* 

6* Syklntg 



595 

11 10* 10* 

• 

lift 

6ft SvriGn 



35 

11* n% 11* + ft 

’ ■ 

.25ft 

1» Sxrimr 

08 

3 

12 

MW 24% 24% — % 

l 


14 SW TBC 
2SW 13 TCACb 
7W 4*4 TocVlv* 
2Mb 13W Tomtom 
8» 3W Tandoo 
22 11 Tetco 

34% 18*4 TkmA 
law •% Totpiu 
25W UW Trtecrd 
13 Teleotct 
19b TrivM 
13 Tekras 
9W Telxons 
<VS TermDt 
•VS TlibrPr 
8W TTernd* 
57*4 29% ThrdNt 1 
14W 4V4 Thortoc 
JWThOuTr 
6W TlmeEn 
8W TpMFlb 
_% Tlprery 
8 Talus 
7W TotlSy ■ 
17% 10 TrakAu 
12W 6% TrtodSy 
30% 22W TrukJo 


.n. 0 


916 

20 

I7W 

1294 

15*4 

17V, 


29VS 

16 

14 

3*4 

17* 

22 


11 
50 
5 
1776 
2071 
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t 1317 

106 

a is 374 

54 

343 

170 

46 

t 01 

tl 
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B 20 533 
281 
312 
108 
50 
339 
1891 
4BX 
34 
62 

I 15 5 


9*4 99b 
23% 23% 
5 5 

MW 14 
49b 39! 
13W 13% 
33W 33 VS 
9*4 9% 
21*4 20*4 
2694 25*4 
2% 2 
16% 16 
16% 16 
4*4 4*4 
9*4 *W 
16% 15*4 
51 SOW 
69! 694 
TW TVS 
8% 8 
13W 1Mb 

12W 11 
23 22 

12 11 % 
0*4 BVS 
MW MW 


99b + W 
23% +*b 
5 

14% + % 
49b + W 
13% 

33W + W 
9%— V4 
2M4 +! 
26W + W 
2% + V4 
16 — % 
16 — % 
4*4— % 
Mb— W 
15* 

51 + VS 

69! 

nt + w 

12 + W 

23 

12 + W 

8% 

MW,— W 


108 4.1 


24% 16W USLICs 00 24 

20% 5 Ultrev 06b 4 110 

23V, 10*4 Unemn 177 

1291 7W UnM Tin 

2T% M% UnPlntr 1091 30 41 

52* 209b UnTBcs 100 XI 1 

»W 11* UACm* 06 J 147 

11W 7% UBAisk .1ST 10 121 

2SW 19 UBCol 

II 6 UFnGfS 

22% 11* UFstFd 

17% 7*4 UGrtto 

13W 7% UPrnd 
5V4 2* US Ant 
32 21* US Bai 

■ 19k US COO 

TVS US Dot, 

33*6 11% USHCb 

5% 3% U5 5hlt 

22VS IOW USSor 

26W 17% USUn 

MW 14* UnTctav 

48% 29*4 UV0B8 

22 12*4 UnvPrn 

20Vb 9*4 UmrHIt 534 

13 5*4 UFSBk 3 

6% 3% Uacafe 01e 40 355 


1541140 


100 30 


54 
78 
96 
71 
13 
75 
146 
10 
333 

58 0 1393 

.12 30 7 

JO* 10 329 
00 10 148 

IM 

154 30 38 


23% 

9*4 

M*4 

13W 

29 

49 

23W 

10% 

26W 

7 

T7*4 

1216 

11 

5 

20% 

3W 

396 

MW 

4 

ITW 

21% 

23*4 

43 

IBVS 

15W 

10VS 

5 


23% 

9% 

MW 

raw 

29 
49 
23V. 

30 
26% 

7 

17W 

11* 

*3W 

31! 

24 

4 

19W 

20* 

23*4 

42* 

18% 

15% 

IOW 


23% + * 
FW+ W 
14*— % 
13 + % 

29 

49 —1 
23% 

10% 

26VS 
7 — % 
17V, — W 
11*— % 
11 
49! 

28% + W 
396 

3*S— Vk 
24W + V4 

4 

19W + * 
2Wk + W 
23W 

42W— W 
1894— % 
15*4— * 
10VS— * 

5 - Vb 


9* 

15% 

12* 

20* 

22* 


559- 

BOO 

227 


100 


4* VU 
7% VLSI 
«* VMX 
6Vk vaiidLo 
7% VaiPSL 
42% 26 ValNtt 
36W 19* ValLn 
18* 11% Venom 
15% 594 vanxetl 

JW 2* Vontrex 

28* 13% Vlcerp 

IS? ,5? 3*33 63 

ss tS 

22 14% Voltlnr 107 


30 498 

58 10 38 

50 20 292 
239 
•189 
09b 5 91 


6VS 5W 
12 11 * 
5W 5* 
7* 7% 
22W 21% 
389k 3BW 
21 21 
18W 17* 

% a 

239k 23* 
109k 9* 

14* 14* 
•vs a* 
18* 18* 


6* + * 
11 *— w 

5%— * 
7*— W 
21Mr— * 
3.VS-* 

18+16 

4 + % 

5 + % 

2394— * 

.9* + % 
MVS— % 
■W + W 
IBVS — % 


w 


25% 19% WD 40 
13W 5% VTOwTei 

25% 14W WUtE 
26W 11* WF5LS 
T6W 9% WMSB 
9* 5* Wovetfc 
1416 11% Wet*, 
MW 4W WUtFn 
17* 5% WktFSL 

14% 4* wrriA s 
21 * 15* wmorc 
17W 5 WsttfCs 
3«6 21 VS Wettro 
6 * 2* Wkot 

15,4 sa 

VOTnSmr 

2VS Winner, 
24% 1AW WIserO 
31* 11% woodhd 
29VS 21 W Worths 
9* 4* Writer 


17* 

ww 

BW 

BVS 


06 40 50 

130 

106 85 106 

50 24 73 

242 
43 

58 30 50 

3 
50 
16 

50 23 41 

394 

08 XI 71 
1B3 
1903 

158 30 117 
167 
10 

031 <06 

50 17 *13 

58 40 15 

54 20 49 

J5e 10 1 


19* 

10* 

21% 

24W 

MVS 

6* 

12% 

16 

16* 

13% 

17* 

12% 

31* 

4VS 

09k 

45% 

139k 

16W 

sv. 

4% 

8 

16* 

12* 

27* 

8 


19W 

IOW 

20* 

249k 

13* 

6* 

12 

16 

16V, 

13% 

17W 

11* 

31W 

4% 

8% 


19* 

10W 

2D*— V, 
24* — % 
13* — 9k 
Mb + W 

16 — % 
16* + % 
1396 
17W 

12% +* 
319b 
4* 

*k— 16 


13% 13* 

16W 16W 
5W 59b— Vk 
<W 4W— W 
7* 8 + % 

27* 27* 


0% 1* X*K 

m 5* Xkar 
7* 1096 XidkX 


133 

170 

592 


2* 2* 2* 
u ™ 


21* 1416 VTotrFe 04 20 71 20 19* 19*— * 


30 vs £14 ZgnUvs 
13* 10W Better 
716 2% zm 
m 3* Ziyod 
15* 4W ZonOvn 


. 5728 

58a 38 20 
13 

«i 4 in 


' 2* 29k 

6U 6% 

n% is + % 


3 

6 % 

13 


!\ j 
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M 




3 






Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY^ SEPTEMBER 6, 1985 


1 III M I In li 


1 10 hi ha |13 


PEANUTS 


YE5, SIR, MR. PRINCIPAL.. 
I WAS TOLP TO COME 
SEE Y0U...VES, I'M 
IN SCHOOL TOWSfr... 


THE COMPUTER 5AIP I 
u)A5 ON "THE BU5? ANP 
I NEVER 60T OFF? MV 
5I5TERANPIU)AU37 5IR 


IT WA5 A NICE M0RN1N6 
50 UJE UALKEP..THE 
COMPUTER 5AIP WE WERE 
ON THE BUS? 


NO, SIR. I*M NOT 

A troublemaker 


BOOKS 


125 ize [27 


132 133 1 34 |35 



©1SB5UITO **■»»* SuwSaSe.BC. 






THE HANDYMAN 


independence 


BLOND IE 


175 Fifth Avenue, Nev York. JV. Y. 10010. 

Reviewed by Roberta Rubinstein 


I WISH I KNEW WHATS 
CAUSING THIS SPARE 
SATIRE INSETTING 


'II? TVS THOSE AFTER- 

7 DlNNS? NAPS r 


ILL BETVOLrt2ER»fr; KNCWtNG MAKES 
— ^ PEEL. SO M UCH 

v T BETTER v V 


49 




~ 


X 

51 





a 

53 

54 





■ 

«" 





■ 

57™ 










iT 




1 

w 





5T~ 





62~ 




9 

63~ 






P I ENELOPE MORTIMER, a British con- 
temporary of Doris Lessing in age and of 
Margaret Drabble in subject, is not widely 
known in the United States, despite the s u ccess 
of her fine novel “The Pumpkin Eater* (made 
into a film starring Anne Bancroft}. Tins is a 
pity, for ha- novels — this is her ninth — detail 
with sympathy and irony women whose lives 
are dimed by marriage, motherhood, domes- 
ticity. She has been virtually the only chroni- 
cler of typical women’s experiences over the 
last four decades. 


cunrenuyaauu g^ymg nan, 

seed, she appear dodSopping shoes; . . 

what remained of hw holding a ogs* !. 
with earth; ttaougfccMK^ f 7 m|S . 


■tfl * 


witn earu, 'rr~-- i* one eye naa . 

rettein the 

become smaller and BwjJ'JJjv* nowa( jW" 


become smaller ana ^ nOTnK ja^ 

shackle house (and life) by engages 

Rprbecca recommends. 


ACROSS 

I Thrall 
6 Mince 

10 One of the Feds 

14 Fictional 
salesman 

15 Gwen Verdon 
role 

16 Rumanian 
round dance 

17 Letter-shaped 
fastener 

18 Arab garments 

19 The old sod 

20 Hugo novel, 
with ,, The” 

23 Libido 

24 Tangles 

25 Sustained, 
with "up” 

28 Aplomb 

30 Ancient 
Hebrew 
priest's garb 

31 Army supply 
center 

32 Provender for 
Spend a Buck 

36 Nun's cap 

37 Moves in 
npples 

38 Mass of Arctic 
ice 

39 Gordian 

40 Nobelist 
Wallach 

41 Lexicogra- 
pher's concern 

42 Rash 

44 Choice 

45 Tension 

QJVe iff York 


48 Immunizing 

agents 

49 Beaumont- 
Fletcher play 

55 Cartoonist 
Peter 

56" 

Monday." 
Domino song 
57 River through 
Pakistan 


58 Priming 
process, for 
short 

59 Como coin 

60 Mackerel 
fisherman’s 
need 

61 Nifty 

62 Undergrad's 
bugbear 

63 Organic 
compound 


1 Hussy 

2 Timber wolf 

3 Mine, to 
Brigitte 

4 London novel, 
with "The” 

5 Pierced 

6 Style 

7 Bindlestiff 

8 Norway's 
patron saint 

9 Napoleon and 
others 

10 Keats poem 

11 Samuel Finley 
Breese 


12 One of the 
Durants 

13 Nursemaids 

21 Gat 

22 Is afflicted by 

25 Call's 
companion 

26 Fairytale’s 
second word 

27 Where the 
Miami flows 

28 Shower, for one 

29 Site of the 
Nobel Institute 

31 Laughingstock 

33 Russian range 

34 A neighbor of 
Ghana 

35 Homophone 
for scene 

37 "But with God 
ail things are 

Mail. 

19:26 

41 Elevate 

43 Yoelson 

( A1 J olson) 

44" the 

ramparts . . ." 

45 Utter 

46 Sudden pang 

47 Nice income 

48 Exhalation 

50 Year in the 
reign of 
Clotaire l 

51 Koran chapter 

52 What 
diaskeuasts do 

53 A 1984 Him 

54 Belgian canal 
connector 


BEETLE BAILEY 


SS 


SARtSE 

IS 

COM IN© 


t/?omp 

tpomp 


Tones, edited by Eugene Molesko. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



9-6, 


'The suy atthe hamburger swnd ssvsif'iou used to 
GET THESE FOR 


WTf Tgl THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 

PlW.Pja by Henri Arrow and Bob Lee 


Unscramble those faor Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
four ordinary words. 




PROWED 


HEWPEN 


WHAT THE 
HELICOPTER 
TYCOON DECIDED TO 
©ET FOR HIMSELF. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Yesterday s I Jumbles: P**ER FRAUD SOLACE NOTIFY 

| Answer The best way to watch calories, if you want 
10 lose weight— FROM A DISTANCE 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algarve 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Barcelona 

Belgrade 

Berlin 

Brussels 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Copenhagen 

Costa Del Sol 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

MOSCOW 

Munich 

Mice 

Oslo 

Paris 

Prague 


LOW 
C F 

18 64 lr 

12 Si stl 

20 68 fr 

20 68 fr 

12 54 cl 

9 48 Cl 


12 54 el 

13 55 lr 

IQ SO a 

21 70 lr 

9 48 o 

B 46 cl 

15 59 fr 

13 55 r 

7 45 fr 

13 SS sh 

19 66 Cl 

24 75 d 

19 66 lr 

13 55 stl 

17 63 fr 

U 41 lr 

14 S7 o 

9 48 r 

19 66 lr 

* 48 Cl 

15 St r 

9 48 sh 


Bangkok 

Belling 

Hong Kono 

Manila 

Naur Delhi 

Seoul 

Shanghai 

S in gapore 

To tool 

Tokyo 


LOW 
C F 

23 73 $1 

22 72 fr 

26 70 stl 

25 77 Cl 

27 81 fr 

23 73 cl 

25 77 fr 

26 79 O 

28 82 r 

2a 79 o 


AFRICA 


Algiers 

Cairo 

Cane Town 

Casablanca 

Harare 

Lagos 

Nairobi 

Tunis 


30 86 17 63 


32 90 25 77 fr 


19 66 9 48 

27 >1 2Q 68 
37 81 16 61 


24 75 12 54 
33 91 22 72 


LATIN AMERICA 


Reykiuvlk 

6 

43 

3 

37 

cl 

Rome 

1» 

84 

19 


fr 

Slock holm 

16 

*1 

9 

48 

Cl 

Strasbourg 

18 

*4 

11 

52 

f 

Venice 

75 

77 

1/ 

63 

fr 

Vienna 

21 

70 

14 

57 

lr 

Warsaw 

16 

61 

9 

48 

cl 

Zurich 

21 

70 

11 

52 

lr 

MIDDLE EAST 

Ankara 25 77 

8 

4* 

cl 

Beirut 

* 

M 

23 

73 

lr 

Damascus 

— 


14 

57 

tr 

Jerasolem 

36 

79 

17 

63 

c! 

Tel Aviv 

28 

82 

H 

68 

d 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 

13 

55 

U 

52 

sn 

Sydney 

16 

61 

9 

48 

tr 


Buenos Aires 22 72 8 46 cl 

Caracas 27 01 20 68 r 

Lima 18 64 15 59 o 

Mexico City 24 75 10 50 Cl 

Rto do Janeiro — — _ _ ^ 

NORTH AMERICA 


Anchorage 

Atlanta 

Boston 

Chicago 


cl-cioudv; (>> foggy; fr*fair; h-hcil. 

sn-stwwers; sw-snon: St -storm?. 


Detroit 

Honolulu 

Houston 

LssAngcm 

Miami 

Minneapolis 

Montreal 

Nassau 

New York 

Son Francisco 

Seattle 

Toronto 

W ash in g t on 


o-avorcost; nc-oartiv i 


FRIDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Slightly choppy. FRANKFURT: 


Variable. Temp. 18-9 [64 — 48). LONDON: Pair. Temp. 20 — 11 (68 — 5!). 
MADRID: Fair. Temp. 31-18 188— Ml. NEW YORK: Partly cloudy. Temn. 
£9—71 184 - 701. PARIS: Fair. Temo. 22- It (73 — 521. ROME: Fair. Temp. 
» — 18 (84— Ml. TEL AVIV: NA. ZURICH: Variable. Temp. 30— 10 (68 — 501. 
BANGKOK: Thunderstorms. Temp. 32 - 25 (90 — 77). HONG KONG: 
Thunderstorms Temp 27 — 25 IB I — 77) MANILA: Thvndwslorms, Temp. 
32 - 24 (90 — 75). SEOUL: Pain. Temp. 30 — 23 (86 — 73). SINGAPORE: 
Thunderstorms. Temp. 31—36 (88 - 79). TOKYO: Foggy. Temp. 32—26 
(90 — 791. 



I CAW 
TELL By 
THE SOUND 
OF me s 
STEP rC 


L±± 

ANDY CAP P 



Her novels of the 1950s and ’60s trace the 
dOe&nxias of the emotionally dependent wom- 
en of her generation, caught between the satis- 
faction and the suffocation of domestic life. In. 
these books she presdently explored the de- 
structive consequences of “housewife's dis- 
ease'’ long More Betty Friedan diagnosed the 
condition. Mortimer’s more recent novels sur- 
vey the fallout of the “feminine mystique” as 
her female characters move into middle age: 
Children grow up and depart, parents die, 
spouses leave than (for younger women) or 
ate. These women’s struggles to achieve control 
of iheix lives are poignant object kssons in the 
nece ssi ties of female emotional and economic 
survival. 


At this point thenovd mows 

*gH r 

evenings, 1m assumes a • ’ 

STM," making oocwcod ._ 
comments and innuendoes. Takoiaqac^. . 

Phyiiis feels hdpless to diallcngchisOTpragfe* 


45 years, gradually discovers 
beneath the tranquil surface « 


EEEK! 


THIS RATES 
W BILL-/— - 


‘ 3 SS*. 



i BCTRA OVERTIME .T 




That Ahliffng p is the starting point of “The 
Handyman." Gerald Mnspratt's deajh is re- 
ported on the first page, and PhyBis, his wife of 
45 years, gradually discovers the tnms hidden 
beneath the tranquil surface of her life. First, 
her status changes: Once part of a pair, as a 
widow rite is the “extra.” who is ritber patron- 
ized or ignored. She beans to feed increasingly 
superfluous, leaningonher two grown chfldren 
as she reorients herself to life as a solitary 
woman. Eventually she tries to precipitate a 
positive change by moving to a rundown house 
in an apparently tranquil but actually mori- 
bund Fa glidi country village Tratnpri Cryck. 


Distracting the reader, as Phyllis Muspratt^ . ,i 

JSSd^toin seeing where events meyiuHyJ ., 
will lead, Mortimer skillfully prop«s . jKaffi-- 
forward with maximum tension. Boau* : . 

Phyllis is totally ; 

pared for what Fred really is: a man as effioeg^ 
at wno tional blackmail as be is at home rqpaMfa. 
The bill he is reluctant to proffer might be paiss«>. 
in sexual favors, he suggests, rather * 

Thiic does Mortimer detail a kind of emononacj ' 



crucial in the novel’s s tunnin g finale. 


bund En glish country nOage ramari < 


WIZARD of ID 


There Phyflis Mu^jratt meets the people 
who fatefully reshape not only her sense df 
herself but hex life: Her nearest neighbor, the 
colorful and eccentric Rebecca Broime, pro- 


WntAm/m&fa'Mve m | 

^ MYf&H&cX'. ji. } 

' ' i 


' A \h 

THEN 1 eoHUrTD 


MffMrry xfRgir 

mx\ 




REX MORGAN 


PiMur^i&cFP 


Solution to Prerioos Puzzle 


■5- root. 


t mm 


^OREV, JUNE— BLTT X 
WAS HELD UP LONGER 
THAN I THOUGHT I 


I FINALLY CONVINCED HER OF THE 
IMPORTANCE OF STAYING IN THE • 
HOSPITAL FOR ADDITIONAL STUDIES / 

BUT, fF SHE'S DRUG DEPENDENT 

AS I THINK SHE IS— SHE'LL INSIST ON 

-7 signing her release before 
h M[ |— to. MORNING f i~T in ' . . 



□bhc naaB naan 
□eddo anas boob 
CEB nn □□QBaaaaa 
□Daoaaaci aaaaaa 
□aaaaa aaaBa 
□cacao anoa 
□□□□□ anaa aasa 
beqc aaaan aaaa 
debd anao □□□□□ 
Baaa aanasa 
□Dana aasBaa 
BEacaa □□□aaaaa 
EEBBaaBaa aaaaa 
BEBB QQH1B aBBBa 
EEBE DBBB SaBDI 


Other charactera fiH out the stray of PhyDi^jf. 

gradual slfjyage into disilluriomnept and dir.: 
saster. Her son and daughter, each preoccor 

pied with the disarray of fis wher own affairs;. 

are hardly aware of Phyllis’s struggle to take . 
charge of her life. As in others of Mortimer’s , 
novels, the mother remains the emotional pivot : 
fra her children, who, even as adults, are mca?'- ' 
pable of seeing her as a person with needs of 
ber own. Mormner deftly develops the nibsh^ 
iary plot, as Phyllis's bamdor son “grows up" ^ 
and ter married daughter confronts her stray- . ', 
ing husband. _ t ■ 



Yet it is the nnfnlding rdaiionshh) betwcqttT 
the vulnerable Phyllis and her decmtivefjflffl 
dumping hand yman ■ — between the spider and y 
fly — that provides the mainspring of this taii£ 
tale: With a sharp eye for what is both laugh-? / 
able «nd poi gnant in human relationship^" - 
Mortimer shows us hour small ttrors — at I . 
perception, of action, of tegject — may pro-- : 
duce disprfflportionaic consequences, Catetrin^.'. 
the reader by surprise, she weaves the casoaL j 
details of evwyday life iiao a fine stray of*, 
suspense and emotional criss. ■ ;J 


I6UV „ 

this taii£ 

h laugh-* : 


Roberta Ruberatein. who teaches modem tit-** - 
erantre at American University, wrote this review , 
for The Washington Past . ; : 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Tmscott 


O N the diagramed deal, 
there were various wavs 


was likely to be misting, Tfc 
bid - seven -spades which was 


V_/ there were various ways 
for North to bid his freak two- 
suited hand and he chdse a 
direct bid of four spades over 
West’s light opening one-heart 
bid. 

South’s bid of four no- 


right in a way: The North- 
South hands offered a reason- 


trump was a gaieral move to- 
ward slam. North accepted the 


ward slam. North accepted the. 
invitation by jumping in bis 
second suit, and the preference 
to six spades might well have 
ended the bidding 
But North decided to take a 
shoL He fdt sure that his part- 
ner would not have tried for 
slam unless he held three aces, 
and it was the heart ace that 


South hands offered’a reasbn*-; 
able play fra the grand siam. 1 

Seven spades was : dteto faO 
thanks to tte bad^timr^spht,^ 
but East made- a -somewhat ; 
foolish .double. That would; 
have, given North the clnc he 
needed to make the tabled 
grand dam.'- J 

Unfortunately for North- 
South it did not occur toSoutfa 
that his partner might be void 
in hearts. He retreated to seven 
no-tnmp, ~ thinking that his 
solid dim suit woiud be valu- 
able. 

The roof fell in when West 
doubled, a ratter odd action 


and led tearl^ East-West lost 
1100 when they could faave- 
gsined 1770.- 


• NOHTIT 

, AKQU7S43 v 

O — ,* 

’.*K«765S il 

, ' WBSTXD) east > 

♦ — *J8S2_ 

VKQJ713 OAHII 

4QJ10 0 9 4- .i 

♦ SB54 * *972 . 

SOUTH - 

AAV • -i 

V834 ■- 

<> A 2 — 

♦ AKQJI0J • • 

.• East and West wore vulnerable: 

Tbe btoflag: 




West led die heart kiu^. 


W)rid Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse Sept. 5 

dosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indurated. 


ACF Holding 

AEGON 

AKZO 

Ahokl 

AMEV 

A "Dam Rubber 
Antra Bonk 
BVG 

Buettrmann T 

Cakmd HkJo 

Elsevier -NOU 

Fokker 

Gist Brocades 

Holnefcen 

Hoogaveas 

KLM 

Noarden 

Nat Netftfer 

N mil lord 

Oce V under G 

PaKhaed 

Philips 

Rottoco 

Rodomco 

ROtlOCO 

Rarento 
Royal Dutch 
Unilever 
VanOrameran 
VMF Stark 
VNU 


Hochllef 

HaetTrsI 

Hoesch 

Horten 

Hussel 

IWKA 

Kali t- Sail 

Kar^tadl 

Kaufhof 

Kiaeckner 


788 788 

215 21080 
12A50 IK 
193 191 

37ILM 3*950 
302 301 

320 JIB 
2*0 258 

292J0 288 

_2V7 288 


Kloeckner Werke 7150 6«50 


Krupo Stahl 
Unde 
Ludnartsa 
MAN 

M onn e sm ann 
Muench Rueeh 
Nixdorl 
PKi 

Porsche 

Preussog 

PWA 

RWE 

Rfietnmeiall 

Schorlng 

SEL 

Siemens 

Thvssen 

Vetoa 


120 119.10 
538 53450 
230 22350 
17X50 168 

307 20150 
1870 1380 

534 527 

650 641 

'358 1325 
279 281 

14* 14520 
19650 19450 
31B 310 

482 474 

352 356 

55X20 543 

12950 127 

236 231 


GFSA 
Harmony 
Hiveld Sleel 
Kloof 
Necltxjnv 

Pres Sievn 
Rusolal 
SA Brews 
SI Helena 
Sosoi 

Wcsl Holding 


nSO 3350 
2800 2725 
5S0 $50 

7850 1600 
1060 1110 
54S0 5200 
1740 1750 

720 725 

3300 3375 
700 700 

6225 6225 



Ctofc 

Prev. 

Shell 

721 

720 

STC 

Si 

89 


437 

437 

Sun Alliance 

461 

474 

Tate and Lyle 

465 

476 

Tosco 

258 

261 

Thorn EMI 

399 

407 


375 

376 

Trafalgar Hse 

380 

385 

THF 

139 

141 

Ultramar 

221 

W 

Uni rover c 

10 31/6410 15/32 

Unlled Biscuits 

186 

186 

Vickers 

*1 

as 

Wool worth 

488 

49S 


Com Prt». 


I F.T.30 Index : 10813* 


I F.T5.E.1CB laden : 1322A8 
I Previous: 1IKJ0 


Cold storage 

DBS 

Fraser Nears 

Mow Par 

Inchcape 

Mol Bonkrng 

OCBC 

OUB 

OUE 

StiangrMo 
Sim* Dortrv 
Sucre Land 
S-pore Pres* 
SStecmSitP 
St Trading 
Unlled Ovsrsoas 
UOB 


182 286 

& 

£? « 
555 555 
X20 8.10 

248 288 

222 223 
180 150 

U4 123 
2T0 282 

555 550 

083 aS2 
3.02 3 

154 fjg 
380 3J6 


Strath Timet Ind I 
Prevfoa* : 7S&I2 


ndex: 75X89 




London 


Vpltewoaemverk 332 323 


I index : wrxso 

| Previou* : 146080 


AN98B3 Gem Index : 221.10 
Previous : 221 jo 


ftwnols 


Arced 
Bekoert 
Cocker! 1 1 
cotoenc 
EBES 

GB-lmo-BM 

GBL 

Gevgert 

Hoboken 

Inlrrcam 

Kredletbonk 

Peirottna 

Soc General* 

Saflna 

Solway 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unerg 

viellie Maniagne 


Cut rent Stock Index 
Previous ; 248141 


Frankfort 


AE G-T eiefimken 
Allianz Vers 
Altana 
BASF 
Baver 

Bov Hvpo Bank 
Bar Vereinstjonk 
BBC 

8HF-8ank 

BMW 

Commerzbonk 
Cam Gum mi 
Dalmler-Benr 
Desussa 

Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 
□resdner Bonk 
GHH 
Harpcnor 


139.70 13&2D 
1472 

3SS 353 
21950 216 

21780 71450 

% 368 

385 380 

Md2» 25650 
31150 311 

484 JO 467 
206 20250 
*56-811 15420 
1001 96050 
370 366 

23 W 

. 573 574 

2M.90 266 

192 1845Q 
311 31750 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung k«w 
C hina Lighl 
Green Island 
Hang Seng Bank 
Henderson 
Chino Gos 
HK Electric 
HK RooTtv A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Sham Bank 
HK Telephone 
hk Youmotei 
HK Whgrf 
Hutch Whu.-npao 
Hyson 
Inn City 
Jardlne 
JardlneSec 
Kowloon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
Now world 
Orient Oversees 
SHK Praps 
Sieiux 

SwirePoeincA 
Tai Cheung 
Woh Kwong 
WheelockA 
Wing On Co 
Wbisor 
World Mil 


22.70 2220 
18.10 17 JO 
1550 1X4D 
7 7 

4450 4150 
5J0 2155 
9.75 9JS 
885 885 

10*0 10.90 
3650 3550 
6.15 6.10 

750 750 


8j40 X40 

3JB5 380 
*A5 655 
2690 26.70 
0A1 0*0 

0.90 089 
1220 11.90 
1X60 1160 
960 940 
4275 4250 
TAB 750 
SuSP. — 

1280 1250 
240 235 

2120 25J0 
180 185 

083 0J0 

SUSP. — 
1.75 1.75 

585 5.10 

2875 2 


Kang Seng index : 
Previous : 157154 


AECI 

Anglo American 

Anglo Am Gold 

Barlows 

Biyvoar 

BvHets 

Do Beers 

Drletonleln 

E tends 


760 760 

WO 3QQQ 
1S850 ISSN 
1145 1175 


1400 1375 
7291 7250 
1145 1145 
5000 4900 
1725 1720 


A A Corn SUV* 

Allied-Lvons 286 
Anglo Am Gold S71A. 

ASS Brn Foods 232 

Ass Dairies T38 

Bo relays 3*4 

Boss 5*7 

B AT 5, 

BracJ>otn i n 

BICC 7^ 

BL 3* 

Blue Circle 505 

BOCGrouo m 

Boots 3)1 

Bonnier Indus JM 

BP 571 

S rir Home SI 294 

r ] Jeieeom iov 

or 1 1 Aerosooce 370 

Briton 3-5 

0TR 350 

Burmoh jgg 

Cablo Wireless 555 

Cpotxjrv Sctiw 135 

Owner Cons 185 

Commercial U 227 

Cons Gold 414 

Co li n Quids I45 

Oaiueiv 433 

De Beers, 430 

Distillers 360 

Drirtoniein siO'v 

F Isons 3*fl 

Fro* SI Ged SHUk 

R EC . . m 

Gen Accident 43a 

CRN 225 

Gki.o t 13 29:64 

Grand Mel 333 

671 

Guinness 287 

GUS . 855 

Hanson 51 » 

393 

Cl *77 

imoerioi Croup IBS 

Jpoixjt 270 

Land Securities 293 

LlTWI General 497 

Ltovds Bank 434 

Lenrho 153 

Lucas 345 

Marks and So 153 

Motor Bo« sin 

Midland Bank 394 

Mol West Bank 6*4 

P and O 406 

'Pltklnslon 263 

Plr«scv 132 

Prudenilal 667 

Racai Elect 138 

Randfontein *76 W 

Rank 370 

Reed inti 714 

Reuters 334 

Rovai omen c 44 47/64 45 
RT2 594 

SacFchi *75 

SainsOunr 340 

Seers Hetomgs 1H 


Banco Comm 

Cenrrole 

Ggoholels 

cred liar 

Erldanla 

Formirolla 

Ftol 

Generali 

IFI 

Itoicemenll 
its (gas 

Italmobillarl 

MedJoOanco 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnascenle 

SIP 

SME 

Snta 

srondo 

Stet 



SfocUriai 


AGA 

AHa Laval 


Astro 

Adas Copco 

Bciidon 

Efectraiux 

Ericsson 

Eseeite 

Handel iban k*o 

PhormocJo 

soob-Scanki 

Sandvlk 

Skonsko 

SKF 

SwedHhMoten 

Volvo 


Aftoersweridea I 
Previous : JELM 


M1B Current index : 16S1 
Previous : 1*38 


Air LHuLde 
AJstnom ail 
A v oossauU 
Boncolre 

BIC 

Bong rain 
Bouvaues 
BSN-GD 


Chargeurs 
CUibMed 
Dartv 
Dume* . 
Elf-AfluifPlne 
Europe l 

GenEoux 

Hochette 

LatorgoCop 

Lrarand 

Lesieur 

i-Orgai 

Martell 

Moira 

Merlin 

MJcheiln 


588 587 

301 305JD 

list Ills 

*34 636 

SIS 515 
1S95 1700 

7S5 775 

7779 7707 

2270 2295 
•99 BM 
506 510 

1435 1440 

BIO S3* 
201 201 
714 763 

648 647 

1445 1445 

523 521 

2150 2142 

623 611 

23»7 2412 
1*30 1449 

16*0 1650 

2170 21*0 ■ 
1189 1184 


ACI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Bornl 

Bougainville 

Casttemalna 

Coles 

Comutco 

CPA 

CSR 

Dunlgp 

Elders Ixl 

1 Cl Australia 

Magellan 

MIM 

Mver 

Not AustBOnk 
News Cara 
N Broken Hill 
Poseidon 
OM Coal Trust 
Santos 

Thomas Nation 
Western Mining 
westpoc Banking 
Woodsiae 


4 M 487 
786 7 SO , 


Full Ptiolo 
Fujitsu 
Hitochl 
Httoritl Coble 
Hondo 

Japan Air Linos 
Kalima 
Kansai Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewsrv 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Cium 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heaw 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mllsui and Co 
Mitsukashl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

HGK Insulators 
WlkkoSee 
Nlopon Kogaku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yuson 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 
Planner 
Ricoh 

Sharp 

Sftimazw 

Shlnotsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bonk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sum llomo Marino 
Sumitomo Motel 
Toisel Coro 
TpJsho Mortne 
TokedaCtWtn 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokto Marino 
Tokyo Elec Power 
Topo an punting 
Torav md 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

romaicM Sec 


GnatSm Sbda da AP 


Sales Stock 
600 Abtt Prco 
12970 Agnlco E 
1M Agra Ind A 
5475 Air Envoy 
1135 Alla Mot 
56AtoomaSt 
400Argctn ' 
7K»Alco I 1 
9453 BP Canada 

39388 Bank BC . 
312515 Bank N S 
2S550 Barrlcko 
49S0 Baton A f 
115327 Bonanza R 
*600Bratorne 
awBramateo 
300 Brando M 
5234 BCFP 
270680 BC Res 
67329 BC Phono 
600 Brunswk 
9675 Budd Com 
19B33CAE 
2900 Cod Frv 
6300 Campeau t 
■ 1600 C Nor west 
1S00C Packrs 
10751 Con Trust 
Too C Tgng 
187107 C 1 Bk Cam 
590*4 CTira A I 
2400 Cora 

MGJ Cetonose 
. 100 Colon 175 p 
341 10 Centri Tr 
10 CHUM 
3439 Cinepiex 
77DOCOtstbA 
6800 COIstb B f . 
13700 CTL Bonk „ 
lUCarjWOSlA 


High Law 
5209k 2M 
1191* 1BH 
MH 85* 
S19H I9VS 
H4M MW 
S20to 20VS 
S1U, Z1 

sn vps 

53316 33 

sy*. 5 


119 19 

410 395 


3100 Coseka R 
13MC«raiA 


78* 782 

3A0 340 

182 180 

4.15 4.15 
180 1JB 
£-4* SM 
3 2.92 

245 238 
110 3.11 
285 2 

3^0 21S 

158 155 

X4S X4S 
4J0 *67 

6J6 6J6 
254 248 


NikKel/D^i. index MMfl M 
Pluvious : 1JW47 
New index : 1 89178 
Previous ; HM 


S658 Denison Bf 
*500 Devatcon - 
11600 Dickma A ( 
4300 Dlcknsn B 
16015 Dofasca 
200 Donohue 
107 Du Pont A 
woopviekA 
2700E(cttmm X 
1600 Emco 


3900 Equity Svr 
... IFCAtnH 
3350 C Falcon C 
93575 Ftatbrduo 
9200 Fed Hid A 
1440 F Otv Fin 
9600 Geac Comp 
6SlS90Geocrod* 
400 GfljraTter 
10*50 Gatdcaraf 


15 112 


5M 546 
231 22S 

1M IS 
4A0 07 
I JO 1J0 


Moel HOiewssv I9M W» 

Moulinex 77J0 7885 


4U1 Ordinaries trtdm : 938J6 

Previous : flu* 


OccWentoto 

Pernod Rtc 

Perrier 

Peugeai 

PrlnlemPS 

Radfatodin 

Redoute 

Roussel uctoi 

SaneN 

SkfsRaulgnoJ 
| Telemgean 
, TnomsonCSF 
Total 


740 736 

71] 718 

47BJD 482 
*06 ill 
292 291 

308 213 

IS26 1530 
1510 1510 

671 677 

1460 14*5. 

262500364080 
561 56* 

235 73680 i 


Aggfl index: 20983 
Previous : W J8 
I c AC Index : 22250 
! Previous ; 23XW 


AkOl 

AsatuChem 

AaoMGtoss 

Bank of Tokyo 

Bridges fotw 

Canon 

Casta 

Cltoh 

Dal Nippon Print 
Daiwa House 
oaiwe 5ocurMIes 
Fanuc 
Full Bank 


3S3 U0 

772 7« 

785 790 

m 78? 
535 5(0 

907 92Q 

IS* 1480 
433 440 

1650 1650 
818 810 
910 910 

7M0 7550 
I5M HOB ' 


Adki 

AWSulSSO 

Autophon 

Bank Leu 
Brown Bowl 

Ctaa Gelgv 

Credit Suisse 

Electro watt 

HoMortMPlk 

Irrtrrdlseouttt 

Jacob Suchard 

Jeitnoii 

LDndlsGvr 

Mocvenoick 

Nestle 

Oerllkon-B 

to^cBohy 

Sandoz 

Schindler 

Sulsrr 

Surveillance 

Swhsalr 

SBC 

5wlss Reinsurance 
Swiss voiksBank 
Union Bern* 
Winterthur 
Zurich ins 




IM0 1760 
3385 3390 
2960 3800 
3390 3425 
N8 680 
27* 2756 
6825 *900 
2740 2775 
2040 
4900 4900 
7325 7180 
1580 1570 
96S0 9558 
1410 1 

* 

NA 4675 
1440 146S 
4« 460 

2300 ,2250 
1870 18* 
4290 4330 
5450 MB 
HOO 2400 . 


100 Goody our 

200 Graft G 
1800 GL Forest 

loan G4 Pod fk 

23Q0Grevnnd 
10 * H Group A 
CM Hawker 
3913 Haves D 


MQHgasUdl 

1355 H Bay Co 
96156 irraaca 
187200 Indol 
5 qo ingits 
_ 1870 1 mood Gas 
28700 inti Thom 
6646lntar Ptoo 
17200 Ipjcs 
150 ivoeo B 
*300 Jexmock ■ 
200 Kohov H 
1253 Kerr Add 
125*0 Ldbatt 
.TOO L OT co m 
lUOOLoCnna 
. nOLetMWCo 


SBC index : 511.20 
Previovs : S13J8 


N.O.: not Quoted. NA: not ■ 
wmWubie ; x«: givdivVdond. 


9700 Melon H X 
887 Maritime f- 
MD7 Mgrtond E 


2 * 225 
S34W 239k 
515 15 

5271% 26W 
JIS% 154k 
5 1216 12 W 
538 27M 

81 24 

S34Vi 34W 
54? 4J9i 
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SPORTS 



Page 19 


Shriver Brought to Open Grief by German Teenager Graf 


%■ John Beinstdn 


iSStTf 0 ™ 11 ' "i«y critd. Had. 


MES* *2 Gxaf 

wmwg shots and cries of mgnfckGnSS 



k*»un 


Steffi Gral, 16, concentrated on hit- 
ting a shot dining ha- 7-6 (7-4), 6*7 (4- 
7), 7-6 (7-4) victory in the U-S. Open. 


than three months past her 16th birthday, fin a l - 
ly won,. 7-6 (7-4). 6-7 (4-7), 7-6 fM>- ^ 

- Her dramatic victory pal her.mto a Friday 
semifinal « pwH > defending .champion Martina 
Navratilova, who continued her apparently in- 
exorable matfirfr to the final with > 6-2, 6-3 fOQt 
of ZmaGarrison- Navratilova took a quick 
shower proceeded to the Grandstand Court 
to watch Striver, her friend and doubles part- 
ner, straggle. with the blonde youngster from 
West Germany. . . 

Inthcnridrtof Boris Bectay-inaid a, the rise of 
Graf to No.. II in the women's tennis world has 
gonfc almnji imnaticwi. : Like countryman 
Becker, Graf is precocious, physically and men- 
taSy, nwt jyynfl - gestures and talks to 
herself throughout a matchT.; 

And. tike Becker, sbehasgrcatstaying power, 
something she put on display Wednesday, rally- 
ing' nfter lotting a second-set tie breaker and 
after Tailing behind, 4-1, in rite last set. 

“At 4-1 down, I thought it would be very 
tough for me to win," Graf said. “But J flunk 
Pam got a Eule tired and I just kept gong for 
shots and trying to win.” 

When Shriver finally poshed a low, reaching 
backhand just deep in the last of the three tie 
breakers, Graf let oat a shoot Shriver slowly 
gathered her weary body, graciously put herarm 
anamd her. opponent and sat in her chair, a 
towd over hex bead, weeping. 

“My effort couldn't have been airy mote than 
it was," rite said fater. “1 just think it was rate of 
the most unbelievable matches that I've been a 
part of. I don’t thmk Fve ever put in such an 
effort and still lost in my life." 

It was the first women’s match. In the 16 years 
the Open has used the tie-breaker system, to go 
the nu tiinuin 39 pnnftt Shriv er lost a match 
that kept the Grandstand Court crowd in sus- 
pense until the final shot 

But for Shriver, it was a loss, and a devastat- 
ing one. 

“It’s nice when people pat you on the bade 
and say, ‘Great match, great fight,' ” she said, 
“but that’s a very mild consolation because I 
don’t think Fve ever gone into a match wanting 
to win so touch in my life. I mean, I haven't 
played the semifinals in a major tournament in 


almost two years. At least this time I didn't fall 
short because 1 did something wrong." 

Neither player did very much wrong. The 
women’s players talk about Graf, even more 
than Gabriels Sahntim, as the neat dominating 
player. Right now, she is one-dimensional, a 
superb ground-stroker who would sooner stand 
on her head than come to the net. 

But wben she is dusting lines with those 
strokes, as she did Wednesday, Graf can play 
untb anyone in the world short of Navratilova 
and Chris Evert Lloyd. This rime, her buzzing 
forehands and borfrhnnds had Shriver lunging 

and flailing 

“When 1 was warming up this morning, my 
backhand was not too good," Graf said. “But in 
the match, I was surprised because I was hitting 
so many good shots. My father told me before 
the match to slice my backhand, and it worked 
very well fra me." 

From the beginning it was apparent that 
Graf, wbo lost a three-set match to Shriver at 
Wimbledon, was primed for an upset. She broke 
Shriver in the first game, winning it with the first 
of many sliced backhands. 

Shriver got that break back, charging the net 
at every opportunity and daring Graf to pass 
her. Often, Graf did But Shriver, using her 
bright of 6 lea (1.8 meters) and reach, gobbled 
up any ball that was not perfectly hit and kept 
the match taut throughout. 

“Some of the points out there were violent for 
me, the way she was hitting the ball," said 
Shriver, wbo afterward had trouble sitting be- 
cause <rf Ira cramps. “The points were a lot like 
at Wimbledon, only there 1 had the advantage of 
it being grass, so she didn’t get as much 
bounce.” 

Graf had a chance to win the first set when 
she broke Shriver to lead, 6-3, but lost her serve 
in a ftaccip seven-deuce gairy in which Graf 
saved six break points and Shriver saved two set 
prints. 

Shriver wear the game wben Graf netted a low 
backhand, and so they went to the first tie 
breaker. Quickly, Shriver took a 3-0 lead, bat 
Graf hit three winners to even it, took a 4-3 lead 
when Shriver netted a backhand and then hit a 
hard backhand return to lead, 5-3. At 6-4, rite 
hit a backhand on the fine and had the first set. 


“It would have been easy for me to lose bean 
after that set because it was hot and the set was 
so tough," Shriver said. “But if I had lost con- 
centration. 1 would have been down, 4-1, in a 
hurry." 

Tn«e*H , she broke Graf fra 2-1 in the second 
set, only to be broken back when serving for the 
set at 5-4. So, ygam they went to a tie bre aker . 
This time, it was Shriver who made the big 
shots, coming from 3-1 down to a 6-3 lead. At 6- 
4, she twisted a serve that Graf reached fra and 
netted and it was one set cadi. 

“I had to tell myself it was a start again, not 
the end," Graf said. “But she was volleying very 
weD then." 

Shriver quickly volleyed her way to a break at 

3- 1, causing Graf to slam a ball in frustration 
while she muttered obscenities in German, ac- 
cording to German-speaking observes. 

Graf may have been frustrated, but she was 
not finished She survived a deuce game an her 
serve in the next game and broke baric back with 
a powerful forehand. 

“Up, 4- 1, 1 was so close to having the match," 
Shriver said “But she kepi coining up with 
unbelievable shots on the big points. At d eu ce 
on 4-1, she comes up with a great serve. She 
breaks, 1 break baric. Bui she kept hitting the big 
shots." 

Shriver did break back for 5-3 and served for 

the match. Graf I hereupon played her best game 
of the match, slapping a forehand pasting shot 
and a forehand she caught in the air — her only 
volley of the match — then running down a 
drop shot to hit a cross-court winner for the 
game. 

Both women held and, for the first time in 
Open history among the women, they went to a 
third tie breaker. Graf quickly took a 3-1 lead, 
hitting a forehand return down the line that a 
lunging, grunting Shriver could barely touch. 
But Shriver won tbe next three points to go up, 

4- 3. 

“Again, I was so close,” Shriver said, hex 
voice trailing off. 

She was not close for long. Graf hit a low 
backhand that Shriver pushed wide fra 4-afl. 
Graf hit a backhand down the line that Shriver 
opted to volley — il might have gone wide — 
but netted. It was 5-4. Graf got in a first serve, 
Shriver was wide with the return. 


Match pant. One more rime, Shriver tried to 
follow a backhand in, but she tried a tittle too 
hard and the ball floated deep. Shriver stopped 
in her tracks, ghntfrnH- So did Graf. Finally, 
both players understood tbe marathon was over. 

“I am as happy to win this match as I have 
ever been," Graf said. “I haven't even thought 
about playing Martina.” 

Shriver had. 

“If I bad bung in like this last year in tbe 
quarterfinals” against Wendy Turnbull, “I'd 
have played the semifinals," she said. "At least I 
fought right to the end- Still, I wish it had been 
different" 

As Shriver left the court, she embraced hex 
longtime coach, Don Candy, and cried again. 
Several yards away. Graf found her father and 
she, too, let the tears go. 

It was only proper. Both had earned the right 
to let their emotions show. 


In the men’s quarterfinals, the heat took care 
of Anders Jarryd, who retired from his match 
against Mats Wfiander in the third set with 
W dander leading, 2-6, 6-2, 5-0. Janyd said he 
“felt good going on the court, but after a while I 
was dizzy and then hot and cold-" 

The defending champion, John McEnroe, ad- 
vanced to a match against Wfiander with a 6-1, 
6-0, 7-5 victory over a third Swede, Joakim 
Nystrom. 

After Nystrom, the No. 10 seed, fought off a 
break pant to hold serve in the second game of 
the mm eh, McEnro e went rat a 13-game tear, 
overwhelming his opponent. By then, McEnroe 
had wrapped up the first two sets and had a 2-0 
lead in the third. 

Nystrom, who beat Becker in a fourth-round 
match, had been able to win three consecutive 
points only once in the match. 

But in the third game of the third set. McEn- 
roe hit what he thought was the final shot to 
break Nystrom’s serve, then walked off court 
and sat in his chair, ready for the change-over. 

But the umpire, Sieve Winyard of England, 
heeded Nystrom’s plea and ruled that the point 
should be replayed because a basehnejudge had 
called a ball out during the rally, then corrected 
himself. 

“Why did you let me tit down?" McEnroe 



Pam Shriver, the tournament's No. 4 
seed, was most unhappy at losing the 
maryrtimi hatde in die quarterfinals. 

asked Winyaid as he testily returned to the 
court. 

Nystrom won the next three points to hold 
serve, beginning a five-game run that gave him a 
5-2 lead in the set 

McEnroe was complaining about the televi- 
sion microphone at courttide, and haranguing 
the umpire whenever he was near the chair. At 
the beginning of the fifth game, he was given a 
code of conduct warning fra verbal abase. 

Then, his temper tantrum over, McEnroe re- 
turned to tennis, zipping through tbe next five 
games to close out the victory. 

In Thursday’s first match of the remaining 
two men's quarterfinals, Ivan Lendl, the No. 2 
seed from Czechoslovakia, defeated France’s 
No. 7-ranked Yannick Noah, 6-2, 6-2, 64. In 
the second match, Jimmy Connors was to play 
Heinz Gunthanft of Switzerland. 


SCOREBOARD 



Mels’ Carter Ties Homer Mark; Yanks dose on Jays 


Wednesday’s Major League line Scores 


V' - NATIONAL LSAOUE 

IN NS MO — 11 U I 

mi asMfr-t u a 
Scott, Solano. (SI, Calhoun (8) and Ballay; 
Fontenot, Afcraoo (St. MorMHi (6), Frazier 
[7), Patterson IS), Board 19) and Dmk. W-^ 
Scan, 1 S-7. th, 7-Z HR* — Houston, 

Samar IS), Holman (l).Mtararitray Wl.CM- 
caoa Sandbars (22).' 
mnaaoMUo ■ m»w-i 7. t 

San Ft u n Uno . 88TSN KM 7 - 1 
IC.Gr0M.T0Hw (7) and Daettau Krakow, 
M. Davis tf)andBroillV.W-Al Dmts.5A.L- 
Tollvnr, 0-1. HR»~ PtModotoNa, Schmidt 
05). San Francisco, Roenlcka (1),OMT (S). 
Atlanta - NO ON MO— * 3 I 

PW tarni h • M W MMI 7 • 

Pune, Scholar IS), Camp (4), Garber (J) 
andBmdhManmlU; RnndHlaidPina. 
W— Ramchai, lt-7. L-Pora&l-f. 

CtactaMfl «■ tMazs—l 11 I 

St INK WM NH ».» 

jncGafmicni, ReMnoan (7) 'and Dtaw Kop- 
stibwDavtev m. warrants) and porter.w- 
WorreO, wt L n oM ni o* . W. HR-aneto- 
nafl. Porter {251- 
Now Tom ni zi« iN-t io- • 

sab Dtogo W) OH *10-3 7 • 

Darrttna, McDawatt m and Carton Jack- 
son. Booker CO, Lefferts (51.Ytofna («, Stan- 
dard C81, Pnttenon. I*) and Kennedy, w— 
Damns. Mi L-Jackson. *3. Hite- M aw 
York, Carter 2 {25). . 

Minimal • #1# 888 f»-0 W 1 

Loo Amato* W *l M*— 4 7 1 

«iDepeaa,StiCtalni(5),Burfco{7)awUtotarta 

^teerry (6>; WrtdvWedBnftJW CBJandSdca- 
eta. W— WHICH. *i l*-Ooeoon, M. So— Mo- 
donfuar flrt. Htte-Atartmal, Waftarti *(M). 
Los Anastas. Brack 071. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE . 

Oakland NI NMBM4 S ■ 

Bantam* m tit n»-« n • 

Sutton, Lanstord (41, C-Youm 111 ond Tstt- 
taton. O'Brien (Ml Davte and Rsrford. w— 
Davis, 9-7. Lr-SuttOO, Wi HRs-OoWeni 
Bachte (lD.Batttmoftaltavtard llD.RIokan 
171). ALYouno £20- 

Ctevotand immnmh 1 

Toronto IN W IM-4 » I 

Waddell, Von OWen M). Rutdo MLCtartcM). 
Rood £*). Easterly (D, Thompson (71 and 
wmord; Ksv, Lamp («), Hankn It) and VWfltt. 
Nicosia (9).W — dark. 2-3. Lr-HsnktaM.®*- 
-nummn (J). Hlte-Clevetan* Htaon W. 
jacoby (iA,Ayato(2).Tonmt»Moseby (il), 
BortteM 1211. 

CaHfonrin Mi MI W-i f t 

Debut! MIU *8-3 7 I 

Condotartta Macro (7) md Boons; Marrtfc 

Cory (8), OWeal It), Scharrer (8), Lopaz CM 
cmd Parrish. W— Candalorlo. *-V L Monte. 


144.5V— Moor* £3S).HRE— CaUtanda. Down- 
bn (IS). Detroit, He rndon (11). 

Sactftto . . 1NNIM-4H 8 

NOW York MS Jfl No— • 4 3 

■ LansrtoiLLazeriuiMbNunac (7) and Kear- 
ney; BordL Allan (7). SMrtey (7) aid Wvna- 
ear. W-BardL Si L— lanesterv 7-12. Sv— 
. SMrtoy n». HR— Now York. MaMnefy (2SL 
MBmakaa » MS tad-11 14 * 

Mmaaota 428 182 SN-W 12 8 

VUckovIch. Wads CD, Gibson U), Saaraea 

(8) , Ptaears (9) and Simmons; Butctwr, Lv- 

saKtar (23. Burtt (St. PKson (4) r Eofcmia (7) 
and Sohn. w— Wens, 3E. L— Bwrtt, M. Sv— 
Fbwars (T7). HRs- Mitwadcota Cooper (IX 
Stamtap CO. MSinasola. Satas Ml. 
mlcmo 181 2 M 018 8-5 M 2 

KMsdlr' 228 881 . MS 1—4 11 1 

. (10 tantnas) 

BamWor.Gteataa (7>.SPlUnar (7). Janos 

(9) -aid Ftafc; BtactaBacfewltb (5). Gataon- 
tarryCTXJtaasIWandWoBiaxW Jam, 
Jtt; l— J amas Si H R— Kanwa alv. Wothan 
O). 


» j Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Cast Division 

. . W L Pci. GB 

82 50 xn — . 

77 53 /OS TVi 

Dwtroft ' 71 O 11 

BaHlmora 47 *1 S3! 12 

43 48 481 l«h 
40 7B AO. 21 
48 84 S44 34 

Wart Division 

California 75 SB -544 — 

Kansas CHy 72 SB S54 Vh 

Oakland 48 OS Sll 7 

Qihseo 44 47 A» 10 

Mhmtsata 40 71 ASS 14 

Saottto 40 73 A51 IS 

Texas 47 82 J74 25 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East ptytston 

W L Pet, GB 


U.S. Open Results 


MEN 


Mats Wllandor (3), Swedorvdrt. Anders Ja- 
ryd (4), Swedwk 74 4154 retired. 

John McEnroe (I). US. del. JaaMm Nys- 
from MO). Sweden. 4-1. 4U 7i 
Nan Laid Q|, Czechoslovakia deL Yon- 
nick Noah (7). Franca, 44 44 44 


JcofcJm Nystrom and Mate Wltandar, Swe- 
den, doL Steve Derrton and Peter Ftenrina. 
US.44 44W 

WOMEN 

Slnrtesr Qaarterflnrts 
Stefll Graf Oil, Wart Germany, del. Pori 
S hriver W. US. 74 (7-0. 4-7 (4-7). 7-t (741. 


. Zina Garrison aid Kathy Rinaldi. US. dal. 
Cortina Bassett. Coweta, art Chris Evert 
Uavd. US. 4-X si 


Transition 


Toronto 


BASEBALL 
Anartcoi League 

BALTIMORE— Announced IWtawwn 
Eddie Mu r r a y hasstenodo W v c -vea cont i a rt 
extension, eflocrtve from 1987 thraugh 177L 
CLEVELAND— Announced first baoentai 
PalTahter will undergo kzwa surgery oaawltl 
miss the rart of the s nn io n 
TORONTO— Announced (hoy wfU nt* n- 
now the i r contract srtth Ktartai of the Cnra t l 


PHILADELPHIA— Announced outfielder 
Gres Oroesertll mtee tbe rest ol the season due 
to a broken finger. 

FOOTBALL 


St Loote ■ 

88 

SO 

.615 

— 

Now York 

SO 

52 

M6 

i 

Monfraol 

71 

61 

-538 

10 

Philadelphia 

64 

O 

jm 

UM 

Chicago 

AI 

68 

JK\ 

17V* 

Pittsburgh 42 

Weal DMSa 

88 

xn 

SB 

Las Angeles 

77 

S3 

sn 

— 

Cincinnati 

(0 

62 

£ 27 

6*4 

San Dteoo 

67 

63 

J23 

7 

Houston 

63 

68 

.481 

14VS 

Aflurta 

56 

75 

/CD 

21 Mt 

San Frandsca 

52 

77. 

xn 

25V* 


Football 


■ — 

FEJl 1984: ITic American FootbaO Conference 

FINAL STANDINGS Btemttt. Mta. 8 7 1 0 48 

Bast Daw, Mia ■ ® * 

PQJPte 1LYJ. 



M 

2 

1 New England 

7 

7 

N.Y. Jets 



S indlotmpaOs 

4 

T2 

K r Buffalo 

2 

14 


Central 

Pittsburgh 

f 

7 

Ctndraiall 



Cleveland 

5 

11 

Houston 

3 13 
West 

j- Denver 

W 

3 

(>■' y -Seattle 

12 


J,:;V y-L-A. Raiders 



Kansas ary 

San Dteoo 



7 


(y<won iwUd-cunl piovoW 


East 

W LTM. PF PA 
- 0 JOB 513 298 

0 563 362 352 ■ 

0 jo 8 332 344 Anderson. Pin. 


8 8 48 

1.8 48 


u usro u, - — - 

0 .125 258 454 Franklin. ME- 

Lowery. ILC 
0 .563 3*7 310 Breech. CIn. 

8 JOB 337 '339 
0 213 250 277 . 

0 .188 240 437 Marina. Mta. 

Eason, N.E. 

0 . J13 3B 241 Fords. SJL 
0 J50 418 282 Kriea. Son. 

8 J88 348 271 Anderson. Cln. 

0 JDO 313 324 Kewiev, K-C. 

0 A38 374 413 Moon. Hou. 

berth] Etwov.Den. 

Malone. PflL 
Rvan. N.YJ. 


PAT FG Lp Pts 
45-4J 24-32 55 in 
5841 2804 50 DO 
42-42 22-28 48 108 
3M5 2343 52704 
37-37 22-31 48 TO 
QUARTERBACKS 

ATT ' COM YDS TD I NT 


and 

it Diego 
ndmwti 
nsburph 
w EnofexxJ 
L Raiders 
v.Jrts 
nsas a tv 


team OFFENSE 

Yards Rush Pom 
4734 1718 5018 

6297 1454 4443 

5480 2179 3301 

5420 2177 3241 

5243 2032 3231 


564 

362 

5084 

48 

17 

<31 

. 259 

3228 

23 

8 

507 

317 

3740 

19 

17 

480 

276 

3671 

32 

U 

275 

ITS 

2107 

10 

12 

282 

151 

2098 

15 

10 

450 

259 

3338 

T2 

14 

380 

214 

2598 

11 

15 

272 

147 

2137 

W 

17 

285 

156 

1737 

14 

U 

282 

153 

2)51 

15 

17 

493 

271 

3472 

14 

23 

344 

171 . 

1791 

12 

.17 

274 

147 

•1707 

6 

11 


CLEVELAND— signed wide raceiverpart 
rrtumer Clarence Waothera; Placed wide ra- 
cefveruunf returner Brian Branaan on Hie 
injured reserve (lit. 

GREENBAY— Announced ttwt Greg Koch, 
offensive llnemoa. returned to the team. Ac- 
quired Mike Obravac, offensive Itoernai, 
from the Cinctnnatf Bonede. Waived Buctar 
Scribner, punter, sinned Joe Protan, aeitor. 

HOUSTON— Waived white TuCH, aaraar- 
boefc, ond AHen Lvdav, snfrtv. Claimed Au- 
drey McMIlUat. defensive bock, from Now 
England and Carl Howard, defensive back, 
from Dallas. Roatened Brian Roraam.«ier- 
terboefc; placed backup guortorttac* Oliver 
Luck on the m lured reserve list 

MIAMI— Stoned John Swotrv defensive 
badk. Placed Alex Maver.ltoBbadter.aid Joe 
Carter, ranntng back, on the Mured reserve 
Hot. 

MINNESOTA— Claimed Joy CotttHL fight 
and, on wolvers. 

NEW ORLEANS— Ptoced Doricejd Moore, 
dofandve Uneman; Bobby Fawtar. hilltioek. 
and David Rack lav. defensive bock, on In- 
lurcd reserve. Waived Brett Mmde^tetoartve 
hack, Petey Perol art David Cotter, guards. 

N.Y. GIANTS— Stoned Dad Hoteeto e dr . 
fight end. Ptorad Kenav Hill, defwwive back, 
on Mured reserve. Signed Lorry Flowers, 
defensive back. Ptoced Stacy RoWnoon, wide 
receiver, an Mured reserve 

N.Y. JETS— Waived Bob AvetUnL auarter- 
Back; Jim EHopoJos. Une b ocfceri Grea Gun- 
flier, coder; Mark Shumate, dofrafv* tack- 
le and Rich Mlana, satatv. Ptaaed Westey 
Walker, wide receiver; Bobby Humphrey, 
kick returner; Stan Watoemore, guard; Billy 
Shields, tackle, and DavHn Mutton, comer- 
bartueotal ura drosorvo. Added Greg Gunter, 
center; Mark Shumate, defensive lineman; 
Rich Mtano. safety; Jim Ellopuloe.Tln#t>ock- 
er.ana Nick Brvctarer, running beefc-recetw 
or, to the raster. 

PHILADELPHIA— Ptoced running back 
Andre Hardy on wolvers; acfivntod wide ra- 

raJuhf illlrd QuIriL 

SAN PFECO W B Ct at mRd Rnonte OHahU 
detansive bock. Stoned Rich Umphrev. cen- 
ter. Ptoced Buford McGoe. running bock, ond 
Terry Lewis, defensive back, on bilured re- 


Compiled to Our Staff From Dispatches 

SAN DIEGO — Gary Carter hit 
two more home runs Wednesday 
night, tying a major league record 
as the New Yorit Mets beat the San 
Diego Padres, 9-1 

Carter, who hit three consecutive 
homers Tuesday night, became the 
13th player to hit five in two con- 
secutive games. He now has 24 
homers titis season, eight in the last 
six games. 

When Carter homered leading 
off the second inning, that gave 
him four in his last five at-bats. 
After he strode out in the third, he 
gnglftri in a run in the fifth and in 
the seventh his bases-empty homer 
Increased the Mets’ lead to 6-1 as 
they remained a game behind St 
Louis in the National League’s 
East Division race. 

No major leaguer in history has 
produced back-to-back three- 
homer games, and in the ninth in- 
ning Carter was stopped by a walk 
from rookie pitcher Bob Patterson 
as the crowd booed. 

“Fve always been a streaky 
hoane-nm hitler, and this is pretty 
streaky” said Carter. 

The last player to hit five homers 
in two games was Dave Kingman, 
with the Chicago Cubs in 1979. 

CanKmds 4, Reds 3; In SL Louis, 
Mike Jorgensen's single capped a 
two-run nmth that beat Gnannari. 
Andy Van Slyke started the rally 
with a lead off double and scored 



Gary Carter 

when Dave Concepcion booted 
Terry Pendleton’s grounder. Pen- 
dleton scored from second on Jor- 
gensen's fait. The Reds’ player- 
manager. Pete Rose, got one hit 
and needs five to break Ty Cobb’s 
record of 4,191. 

Astros 11, Gabs &. Jerry Mumpb- 
rey drove in five runs with a three- 
run homer and a two- run double 
and Tim To ! man hit a three-run 
homer in Chicago as Houston woo 
fra the seventh time in eight games. 

Giants 4, FfcQBes 3: Rob Deer Mt 
a three-run homer with one out in 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

the bottom of the ninth as San 
Francisco ended Philadelphia's sax- 
game winning streak. 

Pirates 4, Braves 0: In Pitts- 
burgh, Rick Reuschd pitched a 
three-hitter against Atlanta, getting 
his first shutout since 1979. 

Dodgers 4, Expos 2: Mike Mar- 
shall’s double keyed a three-run 
third inning that beat Montreal in 
Los Angeles. 

■ 

Yankees 4, Mariners 3: In the 
American League, Don Mattingly 
and Andre Robertson each drove 
in two runs in Yankee Stadium to 
beat Seattle as New York won its 
fifth straight to dose to two and 
one-half games of East Division- 
leading Tomato- 

Relief pitcher Bob Shirley got 
the Mariners’ Alvin Davis to hit 
into a game-ending double play fol- 
lowing Phil Bradley’s two- run sin- 

gk 

Loser Mark Langston retired the 
first nine Yankees, but walked 
Rickey Henderson leading off the 
fourth and Mattingly homered for 
a 2-1 lead. Robertson doubled in a 
run th»i inning and rin gtrat in one 
in the sixth. 

Indians 5, Blue Jays 4: Otis Nix- 
on hit a two-run homer for Qeve- 



ninth, but after Jesse 


top of 

Barfi 


idd 


Don Mattingly 

opened Toronto’s half of the inning 
with a homer, the Blue Jays loaded 
the bases on a walk to Tony Fer- 
nandez, Damaso Garda's double 
and an intentional walk to Lloyd 
Moseby. 

Then Garth Ioig smashed a 
ground ball down the first base 
line, but right to Mike Hargrove, 
who stepped on first and threw to 
catcher Jerry Wfllntri, who tagged 
Fernandez to end the game. 

Royals 6, White Sox 5: In Kan- 
sas City, Missouri, left fidder Luis 
Salazar misjudged Pat Sheridan’s 


fly ball down the left field line with 
two out in tbe 10th, allowing Dar- 
ryl Motley to score from third and 
beat Chicago. That gave tbe Royals 
a three-game sweep and kept them 
one and one-half games behind 
first-place California in the West 

Angels 5, Tigers 2: Brian Down- 
ing's two-run homer in tbe sixth 
and Bob Boone’s seventh-inning 
sacrifice fly helped California win 
in Detroit. 

Orioles 6, A’s 1: Storm Davis 
pitched a five-hitter in Baltimore 
and Floyd Rayford, Cal Ripken 
and Mike Young homered to beat 
Seattle. 

Brewers II, Twins 10: Cecil Coo- 
per hit a two-run homer and Rick 
Manning hit a three-run shot to 
help Milwaukee win in Minneapo- 
lis. (LAT, UPI.AP) 

■ Pittsburgh Jury Selected 

After two days of trying, the 
prosecution and the defense select- 
ed ajuiy Wednesday for the trial of 
Curtis Strong, a Philadephia man 
accused of selling cocaine to base- 
ball players, The New York Times 
reported from Pittsburgh. 

The jury of nine women and 
three men was to begin hearing 
testimony Thursday before Judge 
Gustave Diamond of the U.S. Dis- 
trict Cburt Tbe first witnesses are 
expected to be Lonnie Smith of the 
Royals, Keith Hernandez of the 
Mels and Lee Lacy of tbe Orioles. 


RUSHERS 

ATT YDS AVG LG TD 


ston 

wiond 

feta 

tanapoib 


5244 

1866 

3358 

Jackson, ZD. 

2» 

1179 

40 

9. 

8. 

5U8 

2189 

2999 

Alton, Raiders 

275 

1168 

42 

52 13 

5095 

1SB7 

3568 

Winder. Den. 

296 

U53 

17 

24 


5068 

1645 

3423 

Bah. Buff. 

262 

mo 

42 

85 


4735 

2076 

209 

McNeiL N.YJ. 

227 

1070 

47 

S3 


4884 

1656 

3228 

Pollard, Pitt. 

213 

851 

40 

9 


489 

1696 

3132 

CJatnoL N.E. 

160 

790 

40 

73 


4341 

1643 

26M 

MorfcniY, Hou.' 

189 

786 

42 

51 


4132 

2825 

2107 

McMillan. Ind. 

163 

»S 

43 

31 





Hoard. K-C. 

165 

684- 

4.1 

6* 



ST.LOUIS— WatvodAriPtuntattrOltonrtvo 
toeklta 

SEATTLE— Wahrad Owan GBL running 
back. Ro^tolmod Jrtf Wash putter. 

HOCKEY 

KUttoart Hoctey LMN 

BUFFALO— Alrtoumd that Crate Ran- 
MY.torumrd.rrilradond w«l Nay on as ante- 

MINNESOTA— Stoned BUI Stewart, do- 
tew s o m an to a am year contract. 

AUTO RACING 

WILLI AMS-HONDA — Signed Natan PL 
quit to a two-year contract to raotace Kata 
Rostorg who move s to McLorarvTAG- 


ittoid 
. Raiders 
sburoh 


‘Vards Rurti P* 1 * NO YDS AVG LG TD 

4441 1745 2454 NgwiomA Ctew. 87 1001 11 J 52 5 

4*4* TW* 22 Stallworth. PHt 80 13W I7A 5111 

4714 1417 3297 0 , ri <4_ n9e n, Rotors M 1D07 125 31 7 


r England 

Smatf 

ni 

Jets 

mpotts 

ida 

sas atv 

«r 

Diego 


mNnsmira - r: 

Christensen, Rotars 80 1007 
Largaab Sea 74 1144 

Clayton. Mta. 

Oupar, Mia- 


125 38 7- 

1S7 45 12 

73 1387 I7J> 45 IS 
71 1304 1BA SO S 
PUNTERS 

NO YARDS LONG AVG 
98 4J97 - 43 447 , 

51 2281 47 447 

78 4383 72 447 

74 3212 47 434 


4714 1417 3399 

4943 1787 317 * 

5100 1804 «J4 

5357 1848 
5420 21S5 2245 

5566 2064 3582 

5577 »07 3S™ J^mold. K-C. 

5582 2104 24» Rghy. Mia 

5425 TOO »** Stark, ind. 

5687 W44 40a ruv. . 

SPSf PTMlritto*, NA 44 1004 07 420 

... , 5768 2787 3179 PONT RETURNERS 

.. . . • riousion NO YDS AVG LG TD 

SCORING Martin. Cln. 

y To wlrtuwta put 

- ' V TDRwhBKBrtPJ Den. 

AWto, DaWm 18 ” Frvar. N^. 

MO. “ ® ® wmon. Butf. 

^ \>J»msn.SJOJMw « « « ® " KICKOFF RETURNERS 

latent tea 12 0 a “ no yds avg lG TO 

“ 1 ’ ; Ia -,-natarv. N-VJ. 3* «5 3tt7 97 1 

® « 8 “ SSZfSwMdBO 24 421 25J 42 0 

f I 0 40 wi ntoat* 525 SIP 49 0 

„ , 8 0 « «■ g ^ S n 0 

} J J £ SSSSJtlOU. 30 .09 214. W 0 


COLLEGE 
IDAHO STATE— Homed Data Ntetan 
trade atodu 

LEHMAN— Nomad Steve DlMorco 
tent ba se ball caoetu 


European Soccer 


34 374 
53 854 
SB 200 
34 347 
33 W7 


1L7 55 . 0 

1X4 7# 1 

mo ss 0 
U 5 I 
M 45 1 



ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
Leicester cHv Z WUttort Z Ho 
Monchostor united X Wi Bo rt te United a 
Tottenham Hotspur 4. Chetaa 1 
Aston Vltte X Bromwidi Albion a 
WEST GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 

Fartuna DOssaldorf L Borasria Dartmundl 

Ntambora 3. Bayor Lmmrkusan 2 
Hemburo c Banasia MoondianatoAach i 

. Cetagfto X Wentor Bremen 3 
HaMiotar 1, VtB StungarT 3 
Potato: Warder Bremen 8; NuentoeiaBor- 
ussla M'Madbach 7; WaldhnriWandwhR. VfL 
Bodium. B«nter Uordlnsan 6; Hamburg, Boy- 
■ra Munich. VfB8iiittBBrt.Colgon«,eMrni2it 
Frankfurt, Kalsarstoutarn 5; BavsrLawariuP 
son. Fartana Duosseldorf 4i 5aai*nNCtan3; 
SctieiVee E4. CcnEslo Dortmund 2; Nnsie 
96 1, 


By Gary Pomerantz 

Washington Poet Set-rice 

WASHINGTON — Welcome to tbe National Football 
League’s dynamite division. Make no mistake: Tbe Amer- 
' ican Conference West was the league's most explosive 
division last season, with an aggregate .638 winning per- 
centage. 

So what is in store for 1985? It seems unlikely (hat the 
Dower Broncos (13-3) will be able to retain their division 
title without greater production from quarterback John 
Ehvay (18 touchdowns, 15 interceptions). Tbe defense did 
its share last year, allowing an AFC- best 15 points a game. 

The Broncos have a durable runner in Sammy Winder 
(1,153 yards rushing) and a should-be all-pro receiver in 
Steve Watson (69 catches). But if Elway is the quarterback 
of the future, when does the future start? 

It is hard to imagine that the Seattle Seahmfcs (12-4) 
will not match their franchise-best mark of 1984, especial- 
ly when considering that their leading rusher last season, 
David Hughes, gamed only 327 yards. 

The Seahawks have several things on their tide. First, 
Curt Warner (1,449 yards as a rookie in 1983) appears to 
have recovered from a. knee injury. Second, the defense 
topped the NFL with 38 interceptions, even scoring eight 
touchdowns. 

Quarterback Dave Roeg's 32 scoring passes rated sec- 
ond best in the league to Dan Marino's 48 for the Miami 
Dolphins, but Krieg must cut down on his 24 intercep- 
tions. If he can, a title pennant may hang in the Kingdome. 

The Los Angefes Raiders? AI Davis, their owner, loves 
the long pass, so it is not surprising that the Raidas’ top 
draft picks were receivers Jessie Hester of Florida State 
and Tim Moffett of Mississippi. The question: who will 
throw to them: Jim Plunkett, age 37, or Marc WHson? 

The Raiders have an aging offensive line: tackle Henry 
Lawrence and center Dave Dalby, both 33, are near- 
ancient fra those positions. But the defense remains as 
ornery as ever, with five all-pros: end Howie Long, line- 
backer Rod Martin and defensive backs Mike Haynes, 
Lester Hayes and Vann McElrpy. 

The Kansas Gty Chiefs’ running back, Ethan Horton, 
has a lot of pr e s s ur e resting on his shoulder pads. If his 
team (8-8) is to move into this division’s eKle, it needs an 
excellent season from the rookie from North C ar ol in a. 

The defense possesses one of the best young lines, with 
ends Ait Still (14V& quarterback sacks) and Mike Bell 
(13*4) and all-rookie nose tackle Bill Maas. 

The San Diego Chargers' star tight end, KeDen Wins- 
low, seriously injured a knee last season and is not expect- 
ed back before midseason. Quarterback Dan Fouts, 34, 
has nine games due to injuries the past two years, 

Tbe Chargers have agned Trumaine Johnson, a talented 
receiver, from the U.S. Football Leagne. Running bad: 
Earnest Jackson gained 1,179 yards in 1984. The Chargers 
also drafted five defensive hades, which indicates some- 
thing. The defense ranked 26th overall and 28th a gain st 
the pass. 

CENTRAL 

Mediocrity — even less than mediocrity — has bur- 
rowed deeply into this division, which is the late 1970$ 
and early *8Qs was ruled by guys named Mean Joe and 


NFL PREVIEW: TEE AFC 


Pluses and Minuses 
In Three Divisions 


John Elway, 
quarterback of the 
AFC West’s 
defending 
champion Denver 
Broncos: Will that 
elusive "future” 
arrive this season? 



f: ♦ w’v/V.. 'Y-./.y- 

un 


Franco from Pittsburgh, Houston’s Earl and Bum or 
CmcmnatTs cool, calm Anderson, Ross and CoHmsworth. 

How else can you explain that the P i t tsbu r gh Steekrs 
won the division Last year with a pedestrian 9-7 record and 
almost allowed a team that started 6-5, the Cincinnati 
ttwi g pl* , to steal their title in the season's final week? 

Credit the Steel ers’ Chuck Noll for coaching astutely, 
and linebacker Mike Merriweatber (15 sacks) fra blitzing 
effectively, and wide recerver-fcick returner Louis Upps 
(45 catches) for being a gem of a rookie. And credit the 
team for getting within one victory of tbe Super BowL 

But do not forger thal the Steekrs lost a three-game lead 
and nearly allowed the Bengals a remarkable reversal ra 
that the aggregate 1984 regular-season record in the AFC 
Central was 25-19 (391), worst in the NFL. 

How might the Stede r s be knocked off in 1985? Perhaps 
those same Cincinnati Bengals (8-8) have tbe best chance, 
if quarterback Ken Anderson. 36, can stay healthy; if then- 
top draft pick, wide receiver Eddie Brown, from the 
IJmvertity of Miami, can ease the double coverage on Cris 
Co Ainsworth, and if the defense can return to 1981-82 
vintage. 

Or maybe this is tbe year for the Oevdand Browns (5- 
11). Marty Sdrottenheiiner begins his fust full season as 
coach needing help on offense and a repeat by the AFCs 
top-rated defense, which allowed but 290 yards a game. 

If rookie quarterback Benzie Kosar gets his caance, 
maybe the Browns will get their chance, too. If the running 
backs ran, the offensive line blocks, the quarterbacks 
throw and if tight end Ozzie Newsome — a league-high 
402 catches over six seasons — provides his standard 
excellence, the Browns cannot help bm improve. 


The division's most expensive backfidd belongs to the 
Houston Oilers, who finished 3-13 and last in 1984. The 
quarterback is Warren Moon (12 toochdown passes, 14 
interceptions) and the running back is Mike Rosier, who 
rutiied for 1300 yards in the USFL this spring. 

Defensively, the Oilers need help, desperately, from 
their three lop draft picks: defensive ends Ray Childress 
from the University of Houston and Richard Byrd of 
Southern Missi s sip pi, and comexback Richard Johnson of 
Wisconsin. Houston rated last in the league in stopping 
the run in 1984, allowing 174 yards per game. 

EAST 

Their offense was so excellent last season that the 
Miami Dolphins (14-2) won this division by five games. It 
would seem that even a sizable slippage will not keep them 
from repeating as champions. 

While it is true that quarterback Dan Marino and big- 
play receivers Mark Clayton and Made Duper hkdy will 
not duplicate their record-making numbers, it is equally 
unKkely that the offense will be stopped, as it was by the 
San Francisco 49ers in that 38-16 Super Bowl searing . 

The New England Patriots (9-7) appear to have the most 
realistic chance of overtaking the Dolphins. It would help 
if they txnild win in Miami, where they have succeeded] ust 
race in 17 games. It also would help if running back Tony 
Collins, who gained 550 yards in 1984, can return to the 
1.049-yard breakaway threat he was in 1984. 

Quarterback Toby Eason (23 touchdowns, right inter- 
ceptions) cannot get sacked 59 times, and the defease must 
produce more than 25 takeaways while finding another 
comerback at least half as good as Ray Qaybom. 

Now that Joe Walton of the New York Jets has fired his 
coaching staff and given his team the 3-4 defense, albeit 
the last in the AFC to get it, can the Jets play as good as 
they look on paper? 

They have a high-quality running back in Freeman 
McNeil (1,070 yards), a tough, talented tight end in 
Mickey Shirk? (68 catches) and a seemingly unbreakable 
recover in top pick Al Toon, from Wisconsin. Now they 
must get one of those quarterbacks — Ren O’Brien (1-4 
last season as a starter) or Pat Ryan (6-5 as starter) — to 
produce something more than mediocrity. 

Mark Gastmean, the NFL sack leader with 22 last 
season, will do his part although a broken thumb will 
prevent him from playing in the season-opener, and rookie 
safety Lester Lyles, from Virgin i a, should hdp a second- 
ary that seems to spend as m uch injured as playing. 

Tbe Buffalo B3b (2-14) had what appears to be a 
breakthrough draft, landing defensive Bruce Smith 
from Virginia Tech, comerback Derrick Burroughs of 
Monphis State, all-America colter Made Traynowicz of 
Nebraska, wide receiver Chri<s Burkett of Jackson State 
and quarterback Frank Reich of Maryland. 

Coach Kay Stephenson also traded 12-year veteran 
quarterback Joe Ferguson and acquired quarterback 
Vince Ferragmo from the Los Angeles Rams. The Bills 
will improve, but baldly enough- 

And what about the lufianapoSs Colts (4-12)? Rookie 
coach Rod Dowhower, who helped Nefl Lomax develop as 
a quarterback at Sl Louis, starts from scratch with an 
offense thal finished last in yards, passing and points. 


-r-i-.'SKT .«*» 










MAIL TODAY* WIN TOMO 1 


Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1985 


OBSERVER 


PEOPLE 


Progress Gone Awry Violence by Fans: The Sport May Be to Blame 

J _ _ . . , ... i: r - — - - - - - - - mi rfnrino nlnv. such 2S SXCt 


By Russell Baker 


W E stand at the outermost 
frontier. Human enfiehten- 


VV frontier. H oman enlighten- 
ment is far advanced. We can now 
say “chairperson” without f eeling 
absurd. Technological progress is 
miraculous. We nave the digital 
wristwatch. 

Yet things are breaking down. 

Three weeks after I bought a roll 
of 22-cent stamps from the postal 
authorities, the stickum had damp- 
ened sufficiently to glue the entire 
roll tightly together. Stamps ripped 
apart m my hands when I struggled 
to salvage enough of one to pass the 
Postal Service's rigorous inspec- 
tion. In a temper, I hurled them out 
the window. 

“Things are breaking down,” I 
shouted. 

The splendor of our science tells 
us everything about breakdown. 
Old folks had to get by with only 
appendicitis, shingles and boils, 
but we have a stunning array of 
medical terrors. We have stress. We 
have Type A behavior. We have 
stroke induced by Insertion of arti- 
ficial hearts. 

Yet things are breaking down. 

□ 


has never been more complete. Po- 
lice squads and ingenious barri- 
cades at transportation centers and 
public buildings, combined with 
seat belts and ingeniously designed 
highways, insure an all-time stan- 
dard of safety. We have the most 
advanced weapons ever built. We 
lave the car burglar alarm. 

Yet things are breaking down. 

A relative of mine, ticketed by 
highway police for driving 10 miles 
an hour over the speed limit, re- 
cently had her insurance canceled, 
though she had 14 years of driving 
experience without ever being pre- 
viously ticketed for a moving viola- 
tion. The police miracle box had 
reported her ticket to the insurance 
industry, which had not been turn- 
ing a profit in her part of the coun- 
try. Because she snared ownership 
of the car with her husband, for 
good measure the company can- 
celed his insurance, too. 

□ 


We have psychiatrists, and poli- 
ticians to give comfort or warning. 
We have pills to distract one’s min d 
from die breakdown. The young 
can be placed in from of miracu- 
lous boxes producing incredibly 
fast-changing pictures, which leave 
their minds too incapable of sus- 
tained thought to realize that things 
are breaking down. Persons unwill- 
ing to risk chemical or electronic 
help can be persuaded to think 
happier thoughts if cautioned that 
it is unpatriotic to notice that 
things are breaking down. 

Yet thin gs are breaking down. 

Two mouths after ordering a 
washing machine for a vacation 
househe had bought, my friend 


Bob came by to weep. He had been 
to the huge national mail-order re- 
tail-house outlet that had taken his 
order. Why hadn’t the machine 
been delivered? The human robot 
manning the inquiry booth checked 
his electronic miracle box and said, 
“Because you never ordered one.” 
Bob said the miracle box was an 
imbecile. The robot said, “You can 
reorder with me now if you want, or 
buy one someplace else.” 

“Things are breaking down," 
Bob said 

Yet the machinery of efficiency 


He phoned me long distance, 
warning me to tell him, “Things are 
breaking down, boy, and the best 
thing for you to do is set your brain 
down in front of that miracle box 
with the fast -changing pictures or 
else take a pQL” 

He could not reach me. I had 
thrown the telephone wire ouL the 
window in a fury at a mechanical 
voice that had been constantly tell- 
ing me to dial my miracle calling- 
card number again because the 
miracle number I had just dialed 
was “not valid” 

It had got so that I had to dial the 
“not valid” number three or four 
times before the mechanical voice 
would say “thank you” and let the 
call go through. 

So, I told the voice, “Things are 
breaking down,” and threw the 
phone wire out the window. 

That was dul dish, because we 
stand at the outermost frontier 
where human enlightenment, far 
advanced permits us to say “chair- 
person” without feeling absurd. We 
have the digital wristwatch, we 
have stress — not just boils and 
shingles — and we nave the artifi- 
cial heart that can induce strokes. 
We have the car burglar alarm, the 
human robot, the miracle box. We 


Bv Daniel Goleman 

.Vat York Times Serriie 

R ESEARCH prompted by in- 
creased violence among 
sports fans in recent years is chal- 
lenging long-held notions about 
the link between some highly 
competitive games of aggression 
and the observers they enthrall. 

Many psychologists and sociol- 
ogists now conclude that the vio- 
lence that often occurs in physi- 
cal-contact sports has a tendency 
to spur aggression off the field 
"There is a direct psychological 
connection between violence on 
the field and violence in the 
stands." said Michael Smith of 
York University in Toronto, one 
of many researchers who are 
studying sports violence. 

That view is vigorously denied 
by sports figures, who contend 
that what they see as sporadic 
violence among fans is but a re- 
flection of an increasingly violent 
society. 

Psychologists, though, argue 
that there are factors in sports 
that make violence more likely, 
over and above the unruliness to 
which crowds of any sort are 
prone. 


They agree that sports contests 
re peaceful events for most peo- 


are peaceful events for most peo- 
ple and (hat watching them con- 
tributes to fans' enjoyment of life 
and sense of well-being. And they 
acknowledge that violence in the 
stands or on the streets after the 
game is restricted for the most 


part to a youthful minority. 
The emerging view is lha 


have couriers threatening to be 
stayed from the swift completion of 


stayed from the swift completion of 
their appointed rounds by snow. 
Yet things are breaking down. 

New York Times Service 


ine emerging view is that UK 
particularly brutal and angry’ ag- 
gression that is a virtually integral 
part of some forms of competitive 
athletics increases the likelihood 
of imitative violence. 

One theory bolds, for example, 
that anonymity and excitement 
allow fans to put aside more 
readily the inhibitions that would 
keep them from being openly ag- 
gressive in other situations. Vio- 
lence on the playing field then 
holds out to them an example 
they are more likely to follow. 
Drinking adds to that likelihood. 

This theory runs counter to the 
view proposed by Freud and oth- 
ers that aggressive competitive 
sports are a means to contain hu- 
man aggression, for both those 
who participate and those who 
watch. The notion was that harsh 
physical contact on the field tends 


to let off steam, to relieve frustra- 
tions, to defuse aggressiveness. 
On a grander scale, international 
games would serve as a substitute 
for warfare. That argument has 
been used for yean by Olympics 
officials. 

Yet psychologists who have 
done experiments to test the no- 
tion that aggressiveness is relieved 
by physical-contact sports now 
say that it does not seem to hold 
up. To Ihe contrary, combative 
sports, such as American football, 
“serve to teach and stimulate vio- 
lence," said Jeffrey Goldstein, a 
psychologist at Temple Universi- 
ty who is at the forefront of the 
new work on sports violence. 

Goldstein, in bis book “Sports 
Violence" (Springer-Yeriag), re- 
views a series of findings, ail of 
which indicate that aggressive 
sports have a role in increasing 
the aggressiveness of those who 
participate, as well as at least 
some of those who watch. 

“It is not competition per se 
that leads to an increase in hostil- 
ity,” he said, “but, apparently, the 
aggressive nature of the competi- 
tion.” 

Psychologists are unable to 
pinpoint exactly which fans are 
most likely to become violent 
The most extensive survey of 
violence among American specta- 
tors is being conducted by Jerry 
M. Lewis, a sociologist at Kent 
State University in Ohio. He is 
studying more than 300 incidents 
of violence, in which 10 or more 
people were involved, from 1962 
to 1983. 

Baseball was the sport with the 
most such incidents. Though it 
may have less built-in body con- 
tact than some other sports, it 
nevertheless has its inevitable mo- 
ments — Lhose accompanying 
bean balls, broken-up double 
plays or what might politely be 
called disagreements with the um- 
pires, for example. It is closely 
followed by football basketball, 
ice hockey and boxing. 

Lewis's study is based on ac- 
counts or fan violence from six 
regional newspapers and The 
New York Times. “The data 
shows that American sports fans 
are as prone to violence as anv 
others.” Lewis said, “though 
we've had nothing as serious as in 
England.” 

There seem to be strong differ- 
ences from culture to culture in 





during play, such as exceptional 
roughness and brutal fouls, were 
treated in telecasts of football and 
hockey games. 

They found that when excep- 
tionally rough or violent play did 


DaS Designs a Squarey; 
To Be Built m Madrid-^ ; 


not result in outright imury, an- 
nouncers often made such 
charged comments as: “Now 
that’s the way to make a halfback 
think twice before hitting the hole 


MM 

An injured soccer fan at Brussels riot, where 38 died. 


what triggers sports violence and 
what form it lakes. In Latin 
America, the most frequent vio- 
lent incidents follow a pattern in 
which infuriated fans storm the 
field to attack a referee who has 
made an unpopular decision. 

The violence at British football 
matches, in the view of experts, 
represents a case perhaps unpar- 
alleled anywhere in the world. 
The soccer match seems to offer a 
stage for the most rowdy among 
British fans to enact the ritualized 
aggression known as “aggro.” 
short for aggravation, a word die 
British broadly apply to angry 
conf rogatio ns 

Those who participate in aggro 
at soccer matches, studies nave 
found, are usually 17 to 24 years 
old They are recognizable by a 
distinctive way of dressing and 
the custom of wearing a scarf of 
the favored team tied around a 
wrist. 

Fights among these fans, who 
sometimes wear reinforced boots 
that can be used as weapons, seem 


ening chants at the opposing team 
and its fans. 

They are blamed for the 38 
deaths and 200 injuries at last 
spring's soccer match in Belgium 
between the British and the Ital- 
ians. But it is believed that the 


British fans were simply trying to 
bluff the Italians away from what 


bluff the Italians away from what 
the British regarded as their por- 
tion of the stands. The resulting 
collapse of a stadium wall and the 
injuries and deaths were regarded 
by those who reviewed the con- 
frontation as unexpected and ac- 
cidental. 

No competitive sport seems im- 
mune from the problem of fan 
violence. For example, Leon 
Mann, a social psychologist in 
Australia, said that, in his coun- 
try, cricket had “become the place 
for rowdy fans, though not the 
deliberate violence that marks the 
British soccer riots.” 

Violence in the stands takes 
place in an atmosphere that 


to acoouot for the vast majority of 
violence at the matches. But one 
thing peculiar about them is that 
their actions are ultimately more 
intent on bluff and macho postur- 
ing than any actual violence. Ag- 
gro groups spend much of the 
game shouting obscene or threat- 


places a high value on aggression, 
especially the illegal sort, behav- 


esperially the illegal sort, behav- 
ioral scientists say. Television 
coverage, some psychologists ar- 
gue. may inadvertently magnify 


the effect of violence by players 
and. by extension, the fans. DoU 


and. by extension, the fans. DoU 
Zillman and Jennings Bryant, 
psychologists at Indiana Univer- 
sity, studied how violent incidents 


again. 

Moreover, the camera lingered 
longer on players who had made 
. vici ous iftricles than oti those who 
had made otherwise spectacular, 
nonscoring-plays with no unusual 
roughness. The researchers also 
found twice as many instant re- 
plays of exceptionally rough plays 
than of those judged to be mfld. 

Some experts see in today’s fan 
violence a modern version of ag- 
gression that, except in rare peri- 
ods, has always been a part of 
sports. 

“The notion of fair play on the 
field and good behavior in the 
stands is a historical anomaly,” 
says Dr. Allen Guttmana of Am- 
herst College, who has been 
studying sports spectators^ He 
dies the classic example of fair 
play as occurring in the 1936 
Olympics when the German Lutz 
Long, leading in the long jump, 
told Jesse Owens what tie was 
doing wrong, and Owens went on 
to win. - 

Guttmann, who believes this is 
in contrast with the attitude to- 
day, said the German believed it 
was not a real victory unless his 
opponent was allowed to do his 
best That stance, in Gutixmmn’s 
view, was largely a product of 
European and Edwardian upper- 
class ideals. 

Until modern times, he said, 
there was hardly a trace through- 
am history of that concept of fair 
play. In ancient Rome, lor exam- 
ple, “almost everyone was a fan of. 
ether the Blues or the Greens, the 
two main teams of charioteers.” 
Guttmann said. Fans of the two 
sides often fought. 

The worst $u*± riot may have 
been the one in AD. 532 when 
fans of Blues and Greens joined 
forces and demanded that several 
unpopular officials step down. 

After several days of rioting, 
the crowd tried to declare a new 
emperor, but troops arrived to pm 
down the mob, resulting in a re- 
ported 30.000 deaths. 


Salvador Dali has designed a 
square to be built in Madrid’s ele- 
gant Salamanca quarter by the end' 
of next year, city officials' all 
Thursday. They said the afiujg 
81 -year-old painter dictated his', 
ideas to an engineer who 
him at his Catalan retreat A 
spokesman said Dali offered .the 
square in gratitude for a dty-spoo- •. 
sored exhibition in homage to las- 
wife. Gala, who died in 1981 . -T . 
□ " '' . . 

The ■ Australian-born .publisher 
Rupert Murdoch, 54, has become a 
U.S. citizen, clearing -the wmt-for- 
his acquisition of Metromedia; k; 

network of independent America^- 
television stations. * 

D ' 


j r $i- f 
• w- 


pre 


Ss>* 

All 


The Soviet Union has revets^ 
itself and granted a visa toBernaid 
Lerinsou, president of the Assotia-, 
don of Jewish Book Publishers-, jte 
attend the Moscow International > 
Book Fair.:No similar action wjir 
taken for two other- Americans 're- 
fused visas: Robot Beru^eriv, pres- 
ident of Random -House, ana Jed 
Labe- of the Association of Ameii* 
can Publishers; both are executives 
of the Helsinki "Watch Committee; 
a, human, rights - group. Levinso£ 
bad left histenhe in Philadelphia gfc 
drive to New York to turn over his 
fair materials to another debate; 
bis wife, Judith, hotifidd about th^ 
change in the Soviet -derision; 
ddedto have him flaggeddowtiiwr 
the highway. A laughing staie?pck? 
lice trooper responded, “So the" 
message is: Call Moscow?" ■ 

. -a 


! 

! fe 
I 


Jre£ 
fad l 


PHme. Minister Lanrent Fa&ins 
of France gave the Legion 
or medal Thursday 1 to Patrick 
Bandry and theolher astronauts of- 
the June mission of the 0. & space 
shuttle. The French astronaut’s 
companions aboard the Discovery 

— Dan ftaodeostefa, Jote O; 
Creighton, Join Fabian, Sbantyti 
Lucid and prince Sidtra Safiamt 
Abdel Aziz aFS*odofSandI Arabia 

— are touring- French aerospace . 
installations and satettitefact dries.- 


; An Oct, 15 concert in Siocfchdfe 


S.MA- - -j 

lip soii “ r ••• 
psjur.1 — 
IJftfT 

rjr/iir: • ' ’ 

j; 

2 1 

M: erJS" 
fe: jr.: ■ 




aid has been- canceled' because nS 
name appears bn a 'United Nations 
list of angers who: had performed 
in South Africa Grits so-called in- 
dependent black homelands. V. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


MOVING 


TO THE HOttraS OF SEALrs HOT 
SPRINGS HNANOAi. N.V. CURA- 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REALESTATE 

REALESTATE \ 

FORSALE ! 

" FORSALE . I 


CAO. WTIWANDS ANTILLES 
RUST MORTGAGE 7% CONVB1 


RUST MORTGAGE 7% CONVERT- 
IBLE BONDS HATH) 9/1/13, DIE 
4/ 15/ 82. 

Take nahee that the Grcuit Court of 
Montgomery County, Alabama, USA, 
hos set a deadjne at November 1, 


ALLIED 


MOVING 


VAN LINES INTL 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FDR SALE 


1985. within whkh any Haider of Ihe 
above described bonk wshna to 


avst isqo areas 

WORLDWIDE 


above described bomb wishing to 
share in the fundi held by the under, 
aisled mat surrender ine bond or 
bonds held with instruction for payment 
tot 

Charles O. Trotter 

Vice President and Senior Trust Officer 
Cenird Bank of the South 
P.O. Box 10566 - MC 600 
Birmingham, At. USX 35296 


Art CLAIMS NOT MAM BY 
NOVEMBER 1, 1985 AIS FOREVER 


CENTRAL B ANK OF THE SOUTH 

rCTmeny 

Central Bank of Montgomery 
as Successor Trustee of 
First Alabama Bor* of 
Montgomery, NA. 


USA Allied lines tail Cap 
(OIOI) 312-6814100 

O edl our Agency Biropean offices: 

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(01) 343 23 64 

^ANKFURT 

(069) 250066 

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COTE D'AZUR 


Rawly aa Ihe Mcvhef 

A substantial price asked far a nenxxt- 
i « Property oving dnwJy orto the 
i S I tf 0 'f™ 1 P r 'va*e Dating rods. Beautiful 
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AMSTERDAM: (071 ) 89.93.24 

ATHlNS: 

BARCELONA: 


CORSICA 



ALCOHOUCS ANONYMOUS «i 
Engfah.^Rans (daly) 634 » 65. Rome 


HAVE A NICE DAY? BOKH. Haw a 
ruce dayt Hotel. 


WORLDWIDE 
Nol MOVER 
FOUR WINDS INTL 



shaded laid of Does with vik amt 
annex butfnqs. 

Kff 182. ApahT 

JOHN TAYLOR SJL 
35 la Croeette 
„ 06400 Comes 

Teh (93) 38 00 66. Telex, 4709Z1F 


COTE D'AZUR, VAR. SO km hdw y 
from fstce Airport, near lake, sc^na 
vflncfcurfing, Cannes & Si. Rcphoey 
beaches, £ station, flying & ceding 
carter. Beautiful estate an a 600 m. 
over edge, 60 ha. land of which 4Q 
ha with apf/e trees, vmeycxd. aSve 
fees, vegetables & meadow, a 12 ha 
tore? H, lets of watw, beautiful 
master house with big trees, pvny 
Arts & dependences in good carat 
Son. Property would be ideal far n- 
ddfalion of o HaraL Write SJJLA.C., 
BP 68,06403 CANNES. 


COTE D’AZUR. For srte by owner. 3 
bedroom apartment, furmhod or un- 
fumahed, move« con da on. north- 
south view of sea & Rxxxrttsns, pool, 
private Oarage, storage, terns courts, 
*i high darafcig Fabron no of hfiaeu 

Please aJbtce (93) 81-97-01, [93)86- 
3582, or contact owners: Asatourian 


Began! Georgia! house, only 15 min- 
utes from hearb of London. 3 double 
bodroom^2 bathrooms, double recep- 
tion room /(firing room, luxury kitchmv 

S$oohJH£ pafo ' 8ardea 

Tel: Mr. Robson (01] 6237626 day or 
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im 17IH 

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swimming pool with lags terrace, 
cfaaxheque. independent studa, A. 
ax garage on 5.600 sqm land. For 
father detofc a* KBTH 93-38 19 19. 


ax garage on 5600 sqm land. For 
farther detofc cafl KBTH 93/38 19 19. 
S9, 47 la Grasette, 06400 CANNES. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


International Business Message Center 



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PAGE 6 

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