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INTERNATIONAL 





Published With Hie New Yoi^Jliiies and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7-8, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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Says Crisis Affects 



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not only tbe South. African econo- 
my but also those of neighboring 
countries. 

Mr. de Kodc said at a press con- 
ference that his country would sut- 
ler higher inflation and interest, 
rates if foreigners continued to 
withdraw thefr capital 

“There is no way you can destroy 
the economy of South Africa with- 
out destroying the whole of sub- 
S ah a ra n Africa,” he added. 

A deputy foreign minis ter, Louis 
M. Nd, issued a omitar warning 
Thursday in Pretoria. 

' Mr. de Kock later flew to Frank- 


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. : By Bob Hs 

International Herald Tribune 

heax?Jrf?p 1 'fcT ? ertlard de Kock, 

{££ 1:?“ .African cenS 
bM^naterated Fnday his govem- 
that a continued 
*™al by foreign banks to lend 

money to the country would batter 

454 Schools 
AreGosedto 

“r% J YT furt for talks with officials of West 

-tala Unrest at 

ed to vish banks in Switzerland 
over ihe weekend before rttunriag 
to Johannesburg. 

As governor of the South African 
Reserve Bank, Mr. de Kock was 
completing more than a week of 
what he described as “shuttle di- 
plomacy.” During the mission he 
tried to explain to U.S. and Euro- 
pean bankers his country’s re- 
sponse to its financial crisis. 

South Africa announced Sunday 
a four-month suspension on repay- 
ments of principal on most foreign 
loans as part of an attempt to stop a 
phmgein its currency, the rand. 

After a -sharp drop in morning 
tradmg'in London, the rand ended 
little changed Friday from Thurs- 





The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG - The 
South African government dosed 
454 schools for mixed-race stu- 
dents around Cape Town until fur- 
ther notice Friday after 10 days of 
persistent unrest. 

Carte - Ebrahun, minister of edu- 
cation and culture in the chamber 
of Parliament for die mixed-race 
minority, said that normal school- 
ing could not continue and that 
studenisafety could not be guaran- 
teed because of “the disruptive sc- 



The South African financial cn- 


,..r 



an organized minority. 

Mr. Ebrahim said in Cape Town 
that abcsrt 360,000 students wive 

J — — “ 

The strike by black Sooth Afri- 
can miners fafled, but ft chal- 
lenged labor polfcies. Page 2. 


affected in six-sdidol.di5tricts.-He 
also ordered teachos’ training col- 
leges and technical scfcrids dosed. 
Mr. Ebrahim called an parents to 
persuade dnldren to .stop the nn- 
rest so the schools could reopen, 
but hesetnodale.. 7 ’ 

The closure affects more, tiwn 
half of (he 904 schools for students 
of mixedr'race in the Cape Town 
areaahdpaarf and^bic^te^hr- 
hdd;idwifis. ,_. .... . i t; 

MeamrtrfeNelson Man 
the imprisoned! leader- of the Afri- 
can NstioaBl Confess, imdetwent 
a medical eaanmeation Thnriday, 
the Prisons Service said Friday. 

The service said only that Mi. 
Mandela had^ undergone an exann- 



Shiites Fight Palestinians in Beirut 

A U3.-built M-48 tank manned by tbe Lebanese Shiite Moslem Axoal nriHtia fired at the 
Burj al-Br^neb Palestinian refugee canq> Friday in the fourth day of fi ghting to control the 
area. A Palestinian faction accused the Shiites of the massacre of 44 civilians. In another 
battle, Atrial fougfrt a theoretical ally, the main Druze Moslem militia, in West Beirut Page 2. 


sis blew up when seme big U.S. 
banks, alarmed about racial vio- 
lence in South Africa, began de- 
manding immediate repayment of 
Short-term loans instead of renew- 
ing them automatically as usuaL 

Because the country cannot af- 
ford to repay at once all of its $12 
billion in shot-term loanvMr. de A 
Kock said, it needed breathing Al TOfl r lflllfi 
space to wok out a plan to re- 
schedule payments. 

-But the suspension is already in- 
terfering with South Africa's ability 
refinance foreign trade, a vital part 
of its economy. 

.Bankers -m Johannesburg said 
dial some fcmagnjianlcs this week 


U.S. Jobless Rate 
Declines to 7%, 
A 5-Year Low 


U.S. Of f icud May Meet With Palestinians 

Israel Assails 




mV** 


blit Affican compayfiSy appsz- 
epfly in retaKaikm. against the 5os- 
pension. While the amounts in 
quesdeo woe fairiy-small, a banker 
said, such signs of breakdown in 
trade flows are “very worrying.” 

^ 1 Mr. de Kodc pledged Thursday 

nation by a uroiogm and that, he full government support for Ned- 
wasback in prison. Ismmt Ayob, a . bank Ltd., South Africa's third- 
• Mje-. largest bank,, to persuade U.S. au- 

thorities that the bank's New York 
branc h should be allowed to re- 
open. The U^. officials wanted . to 
be sure that the branch could meet 
its obligations. 

. Some Nedbank foreign 1 units 
have ^suffered liquidity problems 
because a number of books around 
the world, have seized funds 
channeled to Nedbank after 
Africa's freeze on capital repay- 
ments. . 

The problem of financing trade 
come as the white-minority govern- 
ment is strogglrog to encourage ex- 
ports and Toster an economic re- 
covery that would create jobs. Such 
a recovery presumably would help 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 


attW- 

; -i.- rwW 

: ',-i \;Jsi ta lawyer for- Mr. Mandela's, wife, 
'■ Winnie, 'said that she was not. satis- 
Bed with tbcoffirial statemenl and 
■- •- wanted her husband examined by a 

famfly doctor. 

:r-' f ? Id Durban, riot patrols used 

birdsbot, rubber bullets, tear gas 
and whips Friday Against cpawdsrf 
.* ’?■ youths throwing rocks, police said. 
;■ An uneasy peace had.ptrevhiled in 

Durtwn since about 70 people were 
killed in unrest a month ago. 

Near CapeTown, police guards 
drove off. attackers hying to fire- 
bomb tbe heme of a mixed-race 
member of Parliament as sporadic 
unrest petssted overnight. Seven- 
ty- six peronns were arrested in -die 
Cape Town unrest, with police 

(Continued an Page 2, CoL 1) 


Stir Congress 

By David B. Ottaway 

Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration plans to propose 
major hew armssafeszo Jordan and 
Saudi Arabia that promise to trig- 
ger an acrimonious battle in Con- 
gress over Middle East policy. 

White House and State Depart- 
ment spokesmen Thursday con- 
finned the administration's intent 
to submit the requests to sell jet 
fighters and missiles, and o fficials 
told Senate staff aides to expect the 
proposals in “the next 10 days or 
two weeks.” • 

Senator Richard G. Lugar, an 
Indiana Republican who is chair- 
man of the Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee, warned Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz on Wednesday 
that a fight over tbe proposed sales 
would be “counterproductive^” 
with little hope for approval of the 
Jordanian arms package. 

He asked Mr. Shultz to advise 
President Ronald Reagan “not to 
expend political capital” on the is- 
sue of arms sales given the other 
contentious probtens faring the 
adminis tration in Congress this 
fall, according to a Senate aide. 

Mr. Lugar reportedly told Mr. 



Richard G. Lugar 

Shultz: “Why shoot yourself in the 
foot?” 

It was also disclosed Thursday 
that the administration was consid- 
ering a meeting between Assistant 
Secretary of State Richard W. Mar- 
aud a lOT danifln -P^l fStinam 
_ itioa, which would include at 
least erne delegate widely regarded 
as a member of the Palestine Liber- 
ation Organization. 

That possibility and the pro- 

( Condoned on Page 2, CoL 5) 


The Proposal 

By John M. Goshko 

Washington Past Service 

" WASHINGTON — The admin- 
istration js considering sending As- 
sistant Secretary of Slate Richard 
W. Murphy to meet with a Jordani- 
an- Palestinian delegation that 
would include at least one person 
widely regarded as a member of the 
Palestine Liberation Organization. 

The proposal drew vehement 
protests Thursday from Israel. It 
also prompted U.S. officials to 
deny that they would abandon a 
longstanding commitment not to 
deal with the PLO until it accepted 
United Nations Security Council 
resolutions that acknowledge Isra- 
el's right to exist. 

But the denials contained a dis- 
claimer about tbe difficulty of de- that such a meeting was tbe only 
faring what constitutes PLO mem- way to break tbe deadlock imped- 





Richard W. Murphy 


bershtp. Specifically, the officials 
said it might be posable to argue 
that Nabil Shaat, one of four Pales- 
tinians proposed for tbe delegation, 
was not a PLO member, although 
be has been a close personal adviser 
to the PLO’s chairman, Yasser 
Arafat. 

While emphasizing that no deci- 
sion on sending Mr. Murphy has 
been made, administration sources 
said many policy-makers believed 


iag direct peace talks between Isra- 
el and Jordan. 

Jordan's King Hussein proposed 
the meeting after White House 
talks with President Ronald Rea- 
gan in May. 

Despite Israeli objections, the 
United States said it was willing to 
honor Hussein's request if the joint 
delegation did not include PLO 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON —The U.S. ci- 
vilian unemployment rate, which 
had been stagnant for six months, 
fell 0J percentage point in August, 
to 7 percent, the government said 
Friday. It was the lowest jobless 
rate in more than five years. 

Tbe Labor Department said that 
about 310.000 jobs were created 
last month and that jobless rates 
feQ in every major population 
group except that of adult women. 

The report confounded private 
analysts, who had expected little if 
any improvement in a rate that had 
been stagnant for six months. 

But President Ronald Reagan 
said the new report serves as “proof 
: America's economy is packing new 
power." 

However, much of the overall 
decline in unemployment came in 
the volatile teen-age category, 
which, even with seasonal adjust- 

A record percentage of the U-S. 
unemployed are no longer re- 
ceiving benefits. Page 3. 

mem, is prone to skew the overall 
calculation at the beginning and 
end of the school year. 

Because of that, analysts cau- 
tioned that overall job gains may 
not be as dramatic as they appear. 

Indeed, August's drop in unem- 
ployment was concentrated among 
those aged 16 to 24. The rate for 
teen-agers fell 2.2 percentage 
prints, to 17J percent, while the 
rate for black teen-agers, consid- 
ered the most volatile of all, 
dropped more than 5 percentage 
points, to 34.5 percent. 

Janet L. Norwood, the commis- 
sioner of labor statistics, told a 
joint congressional committee »h«i. 
because of the volatility of the 
black teen-age rate, “additional 
data are needed to determine 
whether the August decline will be 
sustained.” 

Edward Yardeni, chief econo- 
mist at Pnidential-Bache Securi- 
ties. said after the figures were re- 
leased diet. “I'll wait another 
month to see whether this is for 
real, or just a statistical aberra- 
tion.” 

He said that be was not yet revis- 
ing upward his forecast that the 
economy would expand at an an- 
nual rate of just 1 percent in the 
third quarter. 

Mr. Yardeni pointed out that in- 
terest rates are up and that the 
dollar, reacting to rising U.S. auto 
sales, hit its highest level in two 
months on Friday against major 
foreign currencies. 

A strong dollar is likely to wors- 
en tbe U.S. trade deficit and higher 
interest rales would be a drag on 
the economy, he noted. 

Tbe report, however, contained 
some encouraging, substantive 
signs of economic growth. 

Manufacturing employment rose 
for tbe first time in 1985 and was 
up 37,000, the report showed. 
Through the first seven months of 
tbe year, the economy had lost 
more than 200,000 manufacturing 
jobs, many in industries hard hit by 
foreign competition. 

About 25,000 of the new manu- 




With Help, Angola Entertains Nonaligned Group 



By Karen DeYoung 

Washington Post Service ‘ 

LUANDA, Angola — East Ger- 
many gave 20 tracks . arid 10,000 
plastic bags. China donated two 
photocopy machines, the Soviet 
Union 200 automobiles and India 
8,000 pencils. Egypt sent towels 
and sheets, and Yugoslavia two 
garbage tracks and an a mbnkwra i. 
With quite a bit of help from its 


dia. More than 150 reporters are gaL In fact, visible security here has 
estimated to have been, granted vi- been remarkably light, 
sas to cover the event, many of The government dearly feels the 
them from the Western media Jong effort at openness is worth the risk. 
Udd in low esteem by a Marxist ■ Burdened by 10 yean; of war since 
Angolan government suspicious of independence, and beholden to the 


»n A even from mere ac- 
£SnS Angola has managed 
2rSusTand eSeriam high-kve! ed by highly visible security, m 

delegations from more than i 100 
nations attending this wedds Non- 
aligned Movement ministerial 


their motives and perspectives. 

So far, there has bom only one 
visible and embarrassing hitch. A 
journalist from- Agence Fraxtce- 
Presse was arrested Wednesday 
and expelled from the country after 
that Luanda was bkriket- 
in- 

duding ranks stationed at strategic 
prints. 



meeting here. ■ 

Luanda’s maiden foray mto the 
world of international entertammg 
is np tr^ by an unprecedented 
openness to the international me- 


Ffis report apparently was based 
on a late-night drive from the air- 
port during which he spotted two 
immobile tanks that were left in the 
city's main square as a monument 
to the war of liberation from Porto- 


Soviet Union and Cuba both by 
ideology and military necessity, the 
Communist Party leadership of 
President Jost Eduardo dos Santos 
appears to have embarked on a 
halting effort to broaden its inter- 
national associations. 

Holding an international confer- 
ence is somewhat akin to being the 
father of tbe bride. Tbe host knows 
his guests will judge his status and 
character by the land of spread he 
lays out. 

When it was decided last year 
tha t Angola would be the ate of 
this meeting, some nonaligned gov- 


ernments groaned. One Asian dele- 
gate said his foreign minister was 
afraid of drinking the water and 
sent a lower-level colleague in his 
place. 

In addition to its reputation for 
wreaking havoc on tender stom- 
achs from more developed coun- 
tries, Angola, to put it gently, has 
some money problems. Catering to 
simultaneous needs of hordes of 
high-powered visitors is a difficult 
and expensive proposition for a 
country painfully short of every- 
thing from telephones to transport 
to towels. 

Yet, as they drifted into Luanda 
over the past week, the visitors have 
seemed relatively pleased with 
what they found. The Coban state 
construction company had turned 

(Continued on Frige 5, CoL 5) 


vK 


l-l# 


INSIDE 

■ The Catholic and Anglican 
churches are close to an agree- 
ment on the spiritual m eans of 
attaining salvation. Pag® 

■ Three bombs destroyed U5- 

radar equipment in WestCte- 
maay. Page a. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Spot oil pri«s 

sharply. * 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ Buddhism in all its aspects is 
the subject of an exhibition at 
the British Museum. Page 9 - 

MONDAY 

Investors are showing great in- 
terest m West German stocks, 
in Personal Investing. 



SEOUL RALLY — About 500 students held an overnight sit-in at a university in Seoul 
to demand that democracy be restored in Sooth Korea. A student doused bis dotfaes 
with gasoline and threatened to set himself on fire if police tried to arrest trim, but be 
was overpowered Friday after officers used tear gas to disperse an afternoon rally. 


Amid Rising Costs, Scandals, US. Seeks Ways to Curb Medical Incompetence 


By Joel Brinkley 

New Yark-TUnas Service 

WASHINGTON — After dcc ^tsofliKl e ^ac pan, 
teve hi ^n a^wattack cm the problenTof medical 

malpractice and incompetence. - 

Despite the general high quality of American medi- 
cal care, some physicians are drunken, addicted to 
drugs, senile, poorly trained, di s ho nest, infirm, men- 
tally ill* of otherwise incompetent. That b true for any 

Ull < t - 1 ** m L ■hiinnn inmrll 


Gmcem over the ever-riang expense of U.S. medi- 
cal care, now estimated at more «nan $1 billion a day, 
has forced attention on the problem because incompe- 
tence can also be very expensive. 

As a result, programs have been launched across tbe 
nation to help steer patients away from incompetent 
physicians and to rehabilitate or remove from practice 
doctors who should not be treating patients. 

Spearheading the efforts are die federal govern- 
ment, major corporations, insurance companies, hos- 


Recent disclosures of substandard care in milhaiy talking about enlarging their role in licensing doctors 
hospitals and questions about the appropriateness of because they believe that local and state agencies are 
President Ronald Reagan's medical treatment in July doing an inadequate job. 


professional group, but the (Efferent* between medi- puls, state medical boards, the American Medical 
Sue and most other professions is that a doctor’s Association and other medical groups, 
mistakes can kxIL Interviews with dozens ofgovenunent health offi- 

Varions medical groups have estimated that at any rials, medical association officers, and other experts 
riven time. 5 percent to 15 percent of the nation's have shows that allowing incompetent doctors to 
phvcj rinns ate incompetent or impaired and should continue practicing adds btHions of dollars to U.S. 
not be treating patients. In 1984. however^the medical health-care bilk Mistakes lead to longer hospital 
leasing boards in the 50 states and tbe District of stays, re-admissions, expensive additional surgery or 
Columbia together revoked only 255 licenses, one for other treatments, as well as malpractice- suit settle- 
every 1,701 practicing physicians. meats that run into millions of dollars. . 


A 


have given the issue even greater prominence. 

At the heart of tbe problem is the disjointed system 
of medical discipline that has grown up over the last 
century. Hospitals, medical societies^, state l i c e n sin g 
boards, and federal peer review organizations all regu- 
late doctors who fall within their jurisdiction. 

Each tries with varying effectiveness to protect its 
own t mi lory, usually ignoring outride problems. An 


“The licensing of phyridans is exclusively a state 
responsibility,” said Donald Foster, deputy chief of 
the Justice Department's fraud section, “and medical 
societies are supposed to police their own.” 

“But all this falls apart so often that you come to the 
print where you realize something has to be done, and 
maybe there is a federal role,” he said. 

Mr. Foster and others print to tbe disclosure last 


incompetent physician may move from hospital to year that several thousand people who never attended 


>ital or state to state as problems are discovered by 
agency, and no one oversees the entire system, 
according to officials. 

As a result, there are numerous instances of poor 
treatment that ultima tely drive up the costs of Medi- 
care and the Medicaid, tbe federal health care pro- 

grains for the aged and the needy. 

Now, for tbe first time, some federal officials are 


medical schools had bought fake medical degrees and 
were working as physicians. None of the phony doc- 
tors were discovered by tbe nation's medical licensing 
entities; the U.S. Postal Service uncovered the 
practice: 

According to David Cyr, the Postal Service investi- 
gator who headed the inquiry, the phony physicians 
(Continued on Page 3, CoL I) 


Dollar Gains 
In U.S., Europe 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
soared to a two-month high Fri- 
day in Europe, but activity 
slowed later in the United 
States with a late bout of profit- 
taking. 

The dollar ended the day in 
the United States below its 
Highs against most currencies as 
traders sold dollars to cash in 
on the sharp gains and to re- 
duce their exposure to changes 
in sentiment that might occur 
over the weekend. Page 15. 


factoring jobs were in the auto in- 
dustry. 

At the same time, the manufac- 
turing workweek rose to 403 hours, 
its highest rate of tbe year. Mean- 
■ while, the pool of workers without 
jobs but seeking them fell by 
324.000, the year’s biggest drop, to 

8.1 milli on 

Service industries showed anoth- 
er solid gain, adding 235.000 jobs. - 

Not since June 1984 has the 
overall jobless rate fallen so sharp- 
ly. And the overall rate has not 
been at tbe 7-percent mark since 
April 1980. when Jimmy Carter 
was president. 


Panel Urges 
CanadarU.S. 
Free Trade 


By Herbert H. Denton 

Washington Peal Service 

TORONTO — A prestigious Ca- 
nadian commission has strongly 
urged negotiations with the United 
Stales for a free trade agreement, 
saying that it is the best way for 
Canada to avoid becoming a target 
of protectionist U.S. legislation. 

The report, issued Thursday by 
tbe Royal Commission on the Eco- 
nomic Union and Development 
Prospects of Canada, said secure 
access to the giani American mar- 
ket would be essential if Canadian 
manufacturers were to survive in 
the competitive world trade envi- 
ronment 

Free trade involves the abolition 
of tariffs and other trade barriers. 

The commission noted that Can- 
ada conducts more than three- 
fourths of its trade with the United 
States. “One of the factors which 
brings home the degree of our vul- 
nerability,” it said, “is the protec- 
tionist legislation prised for pas- 
sage in Congress." 

“Even where we are not the prin T 
opal target, we risk being the major 
victim of a spate of protectionist 
legislation,” the report said. 

The trade relationship between 
the United States and Canada is 
the most extensive in the world. 
The volume of trade between the 
two nations totaled more than $120 
billion (90.9 bQlion Canadian dol- 
lars) last year, according to the U-S. 
Commercr Department 

The balance has tilted heavily in 
Canada's favor during the past five 
years, with a surplus for Canada 
last year of roughly $16 billion, 
according to U.S. and Canadian 
analysts. 

That surplus, which is expected 
to increase marginally this year, is 
largely the result of increased auto 
exports to the United States by the 
Canadian subsidiaries of American 
car manufacturers. 

Under enwing multilateral trade 
agreements, roughly 80 percent of 
Canadian exports to the United 
States are duty-free, as are about 60 
percent of American goods export- 
ed to Canada 

The principal tariff barriers im- 
posed by Canada average about 9 
percent, but can run as high as 21 
percent and have been imposed 
largely to protect Canada's fledg- 
ling furniture, textile and consumer 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


30 Feared Dead 
In U.S. Jet Crash 

The .Associated Press 

MILWAUKEE — A DC-9 jet- 
liner crashed and burned Friday 
shortly after takeoff from Mitchell 
Field. Fire Department and sher- 
iffs officials said there were no 
signs of survivors. Federal officials 
in Chicago said 30 persons were 
believed aboard. 

Witnesses said the Midwest Ex- . 
pressplane, bound for Atlanta, 
seemed to barrel-roll twice, then 
headed nose-first into the ground 
and burst into flames. 

Officials said (he pilot told the 
tower that he had an emergmey, 
but the plane crashed before he 
could give details. 



i !-»'*■ ..to-pr ; 




W o-f* -K 









Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HEBA tP TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7-8, 1985 


• ■ 'i'*- i'-. ■ 




Union Power Tested by Aborted South Africa Strike 


By Sheila Rule 

New York Times Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Minutes before 
members of the National Union of Mine 
Workers went on mike against three min- 
ing companies Sunday, the union's general 
secretary said he expected employers to use 
the almost absolute power they wield over 
the workers and quickly cripple the work 
stoppage. 

On Wednesday, the labor leader. Cyril 
Ramaphosa, and other executives of the 
union announced that the strike had been 
suspended. 

They s*id that the action was aimed at 
protecting miners from threatened dismiss- 
als and evictions from the hostels where 
almost all are required to live. The union 
leaders arired South Africa’s industrial 
court to rule on the protection of workers 
who participate in a legal strike. 

The question of what the strike accom- 
plished ts in dispute. In the view of many, 
the strike was a failure. The union did not 
caO strikes at some of the mines where it 
legally could have. The union, regarded as 
the country’s strongest black labor group, 
had said that it expected 62,000 miners to 
strike. 

By the union’s estimates, 28,000 mine 
workers went on strike; manage ment in- 
sists that only half that number participat- 
ed. 


“Ramaphosa was not ready this year for 
a full-scale confrontation,’' a labor expert 
said, adding th«r pr essur e from militant 
dements of his union had forced him to 
take, a stronger public stand on the strike. 
This expert also said that the poor showing 
by strikers was probably due to intimida- 
tion. 

“He had too much to riskT the labor 
expert said. “If he had gone into a fnll- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

blown strike with all his members and it 
had been unsuccessful, it would have led to 
disenchantment by all the workers, and it 
would have seriously harmed his credibility 
as the man emerging as the single most 
impor tant black trade union leader in the 
country.” 

“He said last week that If the mine own- 
ers used harsh tactics, which they did. he 
would call a solidarity strike of his mem- 
bers,” the expert went on. “He did not do 
that because he did not want to ruin his 
relationship with Anglo American, winch 
employs most of his members. So he has 
used pragmatism, taken his lumps, cut his 
losses and is prepar in g for next year or the 
next." 

The Anglo American Corp. is South Af- 
rica's largest mining company. 


Solidari ty among members appeared to 
be a vague notion. Mine companies, which 

cned C d^missal5 and began carrying them 
out That forced Mr. Ramapbosa into the 
face-saving device of a suspension, accord- 
ing to analysis. 

These authorities said that chances of a 
successful walkout deteriorated after the 
itni on allowed the overwhelming majority 
of its members to accept an improved wage 
offer while calling for the rest to strike. 

In addition, political commentators 
point to the fact that many of the workers 
are, in effect, outsiders. By Sooth African 
law, 97 percent of all blade mine workers 
must be migrants; they live in angle-sex 
hostels in mine compounds while they 
work on one-year contracts. 

Of the migrants, 40 percent are from 
neighboring countries such as Lesotho, 
Swaziland and Mozambique, and the rest 
axe from the so-called homelands within 
the nation’s traditional frontiers. 

If there men are expelled to another 
country or to a homeland, they face long- 
term unemployment and a loss of the in- 
come that supports their families and the 
economies of their countries. Given de- 
pressed economic conditions and a scarcity 
of jobs in their borne areas, they are vulner- 
able to such retaliation by the mine owners 
and more willing to ignore strike calls. 

“At some point, management win have 


to allow black mine workers to bring their 
families to live with them,” said an expert 
on labor in the southern African region. 

That will be a force for stability. One 
reason a strike can be so volatile is that 
these men are lonely and frustrated. They 
can’t go borne to their families at night.” 

Yet other analysts say that is only part of 
the picture and that, in, fact, Mr. Rama- 
pbosa was able to make the bat of a bad 
situation. 

■ In cautious and pragmatic negotiations, 
he was able to split the powerfmChamber 
of Mines into two camps and accept im- 
proved pay offers from those mine owners 
who employ the overwhelming majority of 
the union’s members. 

Anglo American Corp., which has some 
of the biggest mines in the world, offered a 
wage package dose to the onion’s demand 
for a 22-percent increase, and it was soon 
joined by two other major mining con- 
cerns. 

The union said that three other, more 
nriHumt companies — Gold Fields Mines, 
Gencor and Anglo- vaal — were now- the 
enemies of the mine workers. 

By going before the industrial court, Mr. 
Raznaphosa, a lawyer, can publicize the 
inequities of a system that allows mine 
owners to dismiss and evict workers en- 
gaged in a legal strike and force a court 
decision that could have far-reaching im- 
plications for the protection of workers. 


Shiites Fight 
Palestinians, 
Dnizein 
West Beirut 


By Nora Bousrany 

Washington Post Service 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Bonn Jails Soviet Aide for Spying ; 

DUESSELDORF (Reuters) — A member of the Soviet trade: raatfea 
to WaTCmnany vis sentenced Friday to three years m prison on 

found guilty by a D^gorf comferf ■ 
and electronic tebcoamum^ 

IS? Some of the equipment had military applications and was barad 


fr °Mr e S^o^S°e^^ had worked at ^ 
mission since December 1983 but does not have 


BEIRUT — Clashes around Bei- he 

raft Bug al-Brajneh Palestinian Sf. Sf&vakri vSa fuD-toneMit for Soviet intelligence 

refugee ramp deteriorated Friday m * IheZrof il meetop^K 

employee of a West i 


into heavy rocket and mortar duels. 
Officials of the Shiite Moslem 
Amu! militia admitted that Pales- 
tinian civilians in a Moslem suburb 
of Beirut had been murdered. 

Amal militia men battled with 
Palestinian fighters in the densely 
populated shantytown of Burj al- 
Brajneh for the fourth consecutive 
day as street fighting continued be- 
tween the Amal P n 1 ” militias 
in West Beirut. 


and equipment- 


Three Mile Island Cancer Rate Normal # 

HARRISBURG, Pennsylvania (UPI) — There is no evirimee tha^. > 
radiation from the United State’s v^ nurto power 
caused cancer in residents near the Three Mile Idand plant, according to . . 
the first government health study of the accident- . - _• - 7 

But Pennsylvania's health secretary, Dr. H. Arnold Muller, cautioned ; 

- - . .i #- * l * i a l i iin nirt ti nrrfrm f r m T l Tn In 


Gtasan Seblani, a member of Thursday tot ti* 


the Amal politburo, said that an 
iratp Shiite gunman, enraged by the 
Thursday of his brother, an 


a cancer-causing agent might not develop the disease for.’ 

OT Tbe report on. the cancer rate was the first of its kind by a. government . 

- .L- T r of Thwip Milff TfilffUil QOK ffArnflvM. 


born* of Palestinians livin S in the mi '¥£ 

five-year period beginning Jan. 1, 1979. 


454 Schools Are Closed 
Over Cape Town Unrest 


(Continued from Page 1) 
battiling youths in seven mixed- 
race townships, police headquar- 
ters in Pretoria said. No deaths 
were reported. 

In a year of turmoil over apart- 
heid, South Africa's racial separa- 
tion system, more than 650 people 
have been killed. 

Law and Order Minis ter Louis 
Le Grange said Friday that be 
planned new measures to quell the 
violence around Cape Town. He 
visited the area Thursday with De- 
fease Minister Magnus Malan. 

Police said that in Durban on 
Thursday they found the body of a 
black union organizer and activist 
of the United Democratic Front, 
the largest anti-apartheid organiza- 
tion. 

South Africa 
Warns Banks 

(Continued from Page lj 
relieve anger among the country’s 
black majority, suffering from an 
unemployment rate estimated by 
some economists at 20 to 25 per- 
cent 

The country is in the fourth year 
■ of a recession brought on largely by 
drought and lower prices far gold, 
other metals and diamonds. Econo- 
mists say that recovery will be de- 
layed by the refusal of some U.S. 
and other foreign banks to contin- 
ue lending to South Africa. 

With foreign sources of credit 
drying up, companies are expected 
to turn to local lenders and thus put 
upward pressure on local interest 
rates, reducing the government's 
scope for stimulating the economy. 

Unless foreign banks regain con- 
fidence in South Africa, the coun- 
try will have to become much more 
sdf-rdiant and inward-looking in 
trade, said Bernard Shuttieworth, 
an economist at Standard Bank In- 
vestment Corp., the country’s sec- 
ond-largest bank. The result, he 
said, would be lower living stan- 
dards. 

South Africa has exempted from 
the suspension government-guar- 
anteed export credits granted by 
other nations. Pretoria also seems 
to be hoping that other countries’ 
eagerness to sell goods to South 
Africa will overcome their moral 
scruples about apartheid and fears 
about unrest 

Even so, many bankers and busi- 
nessmen argue that more than time 
is required to appease the foreign 
money lenders. 

“We must give some concrete 
signs of political change,” Mr. 
Shuttieworth said. “If we can’t do 
that, then Tm afraid the outlook is 
gloomy.” 


CHURCH SERVICES 


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Cathodes is now at St Genevieve's Qmrdi, 
24 rue Claude Lorain, 75016 Para. M* Exsl 
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1iL30 raid on Sunday at 10. CO, 11.30 end 
18.30. Catodnm after tm 10X10 Mass dur- 
ing the school year. Bapfrsmi mi marriages 
by ap po i nt neat The priests, Pother Marius 
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at 18, nie Claude terrain. Tefaphane 52705 
OP. 


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(Only English Language dwrdi here.) 


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Mr. Le Grange said Thursday 
that a state of emergency declared 
July 21 in 36 cities and towns had 
sharply curtailed unrest in those 
districts. 

At least 32 people, all blacks and 
mixed-race, have been killed 
around Cape Town in the recent 
unrest Cape Town is not in the 
emergency area. In Durban and 
East London, both of which are 
outside the emergency areas, nearly 
100 people have been killed since 
July 21 in outbreaks of violence. 

The Gape Times newspaper re- 
ported a 70-percent increase in gun 
and ammunition sales to whites 
since the violence broke ant 

However, a police spokesman 
said that there was no indication of 
a white backlash or of full-scale 
hostilities between blacks and 
whites. 

Police had reported Thursday 
that crowds of blade and mixed- 
race youths attacked two homes in 
a white Windsor Park neighbor- 
hood near Cape Town and two 
homes in Amahnda near East Lon- 
don. 

Initially, police said that some- 
one inside one of the homes in 
Windsor Park had fired bade, but a 
senior police spokesman said Fri- 
day that the report turned out to be 
untrue. ■ 

He said the only incident in Cape 
Town of a white firing on blade 
attackers occurred when a motorist 
fired shots at rock- throwers. 

In Amalinda, two homeowners 
fired to ward off attackers, but ap- 
parently hit no one, the spokesman 
said. 

■ Reagan Resets Statement 

President Ronald Reagan said 
Friday that he was sorry that he 
“carelessly gave the impression" 
that racial segregation bad been 
eliminated in South Africa in a ra- 
dio interview last month. The Asso- 
ciated Press reported from Wash- 
ington. 

In a telephone interview during 
his August vacation, Mr. Reagan 
told a radio station in Atlanta that 
South Africans “have eliminated 
the segregation that we mice had in 
our own country — the type of 
thing where holds and restaurants 
and places of entertainment and so 
forth were segregated — that has 
all been eliminated." 

During an impromptu question- 
and-answer session with reporters 
Friday at the White House. Mr. 
Reagan said: 

“1 was not nearly as Ql-infonned 
as many of you have made it out 
that I was. I may have been artless 
with my language in that one thing, 
but I was talking about improve- 
ments that actually do exist there 
and have been made. But, as I say, I 
know that segregation has not been 
eliminated totally in some areas 
and there’s been no improvement 
But there has been a great improve- 
ment over what has ever existed 
before." 



Iran Halts 



Brian Mnfroney 


Panel Urges 
CanadarU.S. 
Free Trade 

(Continued from Page 1) 
goods man ufacturers. U.S. duties 
on Canadian goods average slightly 
less than 5 percent. 

The royal commission report was 
the product of nearly three years of 
study. Last month a special parlia- 
mentary committee 
that Canada take a cautious ap- 
proach to developing free trade 
with the United States. 

Prime Minis ter Brian Mulroney, 
a Progressive Conservative, has 
said that he favors “enhanced" 
trade with the United States with- 
out precisely tiffining what that 
would mean. 

The Reagan administration has 
encouraged Mr. Mulroney. sug- 
gesting that an agreement between 
the two countries could serve as a 
model for talks on world trade in 
the future. 

Most of the protectionist pro- 
posals in the U.S. Congress have 
been directed largely at Japan. But 
Canadians are alarmed by a bill, 
backed by Democratic leaders, that 
would impose a 25-percent sur- 
charge on imports from countries 
that run a luge surplus in their 
trade with the United States. 

Protectionist sentiment has been 
running high in Congress and 
throughout die United States amid 
predictions that the overall U.&. 
trade deficit could reach 5160 bil- 
lion this year. 

The commission recommended 
that any trade agreement with the 
United States be applied gradually, 
perhaps over a decade, to minimize 
the disruptions to ranaHian manu- 
facturing. 

Il also suggested that the govern- 
ment create a S3-billion fund to 
retrain dislocated workers and to 
assist industries that suffer from 
such an accord. 


To See Cargo 

By Christopher Dickey 

Washington Post Service 

CAIRO — Iranian troops, trans- 
boarded an 
Saudi Arabian 
: "riday and searched it for 
five hours in what shipping indus- 
try sources see as a new phase of 
the stalemated Iran-Iraq war. 

The search of the Italian contain- 
er ship Mercado Bri tannia was ap- 
parently part of a broader Iranian 
response to the bombing of its 
Khaig Island oQ depot over the last 
three weeks. 

President Ah Khamenei of Iran 
Friday that his country’s 
jet fighters bombed ofi installations 
inside Iraq at Ayn Zalah, close to 
the Turkish and Syrian borders. 

Iraq’s attacks on Kharg Island 
are aimad at cutting off the oil 
revenues that Iran needs to contin- 
ue the five-year-old war. 

Syria said Aug. 15 that the termi- 
nal had been destroyed and repeal- 
ed the same assertion after a fol- 
low-up raid on Aug. 30. 

*The Iranians said it was land of 
superficial Ha mage and the Iraqis 
sail heavy," said a shipping exper t 
at (Lloyd's of London. “But it is 
believed that tankers are still going 
in and out" 

In the past, Iran has repeatedly 
threatened to retaliate for such at- 
tacks by shutting off the entrance 
to the Gulf at the Strait of Hormuz. 



President Ati Khamenei 

The United States and other coun- 
tries have warned that this could 
lead to a major escalation of die 
conflict 

In comparison with its threats, 
the measures taken so far by Iran 
are not drastic. 

The seizure of the Italian freight- 
er cgfw when it was in the middl e 
of the Gulf, less than a day out of 
port on what its owners considered 
a dear route to KuwaiL 

Iran reportedly seized and 
searched another ship, the Kuwaiti 
freighter Al-Wattyah, on Wednes- 
day nigh t 

With their extensive searches, 
the Iranians appeared less interest- 
ed in deterring traffic than in pre- 
venting arms and other supplies 
from reaching Iraq. 


U.S. Official May Confer 
With a Palestinian Group 


Dutch, South Africans 
To Discuss Fugitive 

Renters 

THE HAGUE — A pond of 
Dutch and South African legal ex- 
perts will meet in Geneva next 
week to discuss the case of a Dutch 
fugitive who has taken refuge in the 
Dutch Embassy in Pretoria, the 
Foreign Ministry said Friday. 

Kiaas de Jonge, 47, has been in 
the embassy since July 20 avoiding 
South African security police, who 
want him to face charges of setting 
up guerrilla arms caches. The Neth- 
erlands has refused to hand over 
Mr. de Jonge to the police while 
South Africa has refused to grant 
him safe conduct to leave the em- 
bassy. 


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■ Trade Complaint Expected 

President Ronald Reagan is like- 
ly to issue complaints accusing Ja- 
pan, Brazil, South Korea and the 
Common Market of unfair trade 
practices against U.S. products, ad- 
ministration officials said Friday, 
The Associated Press reported 
from Washington. 

Mr. Reagan said possible trade 
sanctions were still “under discus- 
sion." 

“As quickly as we have some- 
thing to report, we will," Mr. Rea- 
gan said. 

But officials who spoke on con- 
dition of anonymity said that de- 
spite a delay in the announcement, 
the president was ready to unveil as 
many as five separate trade actions. 

The actions would ah seek to 
open more foreign markets to U.S. 
products, rather than directly help- 
ing U^. manufacturers, the sources 
said. 


Mexican 

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TOMMS-W 


(Continued from Page 1) 
members and if the meeting gave 
hope of leading to direct Isradi- 
Jordartian negotiations on the fu- 
ture of Israeli-occupied Arab terri- 
tories. 

Mr. Murphy, assistant secretary 
for Near Eastern and South Asian 
affairs, visited the region last 
month but refrained from meeting 
with a joint delegation after be was 
not given assurances that the direct 
talks with Israel would result. 

According to the sources, Mr. 
Murphy then told Secretary of 
Stale George P Shultz that there 
was no chance of movement unW<t 
the United Stales met with a dele- 
gation tentatively scheduled to in- 
clude Mr. Shaat; Hanna Seniors, 
editor of an East Jerusalem news- 
paper, Faiz Abu Rahmefa, a Pales- 
tinian lawyer from the Gaza Strip; 
and Henry Kattan, a Palestinian 
historian living in Europe. 

Mr. Murphy is understood to 
have told Mr. Shultz that, if the 
meeting is held, he believes that the 
PLO then would recognize the UN 
resolutions dealing with Israel's 
right to exist 

His recommendation that the 
United States test the PLO's inten- 
tions reportedly bat been backed 
stroogtyty several important State 
Department officials, including 
Michael H. Armacost, undersecre- 
tary for political affairs. 

However, Mr. Shultz is under- 
stood to be uncertain about wheth- 
er to accept Mr. Murphy's recom- 
mendation, and the plan has been 
referred to the White House for 
further consideration. 

Underscoring the proposal's 
controversial nature is the pro- 
posed inclusion of Mr. Shaat. a 
Cairo resident who has been a dose 
Arafat adviser on political strategy. 
He has represented the PLO at in- 
ternational meetings. 

Despite his background, admin- 
istration officials said Thursday 
that, because the PLO is an umbrel- 
la organization of several Palestin- 
ian groups and “doesn't issue mem- 
bership cards," it is possible to 
make different interpretations 
about what constitutes member- 
ship. 

Referring to Mr. Shaat, an offi- 
cial said: “He’s not on the PLO 


executive committee, he’s not head 
of any of its factions, he doesn't 
have an official title. He might weD 
fall within the parameters we’ve set 
for defining a nonmember." 

However, the same official, while 
emphasizing that be does not know 
what decision will be made about a 
meeting, said: “Whatever is dome 
will be something that Israel can 
live with. The object is to get direct 
negotiations," which Prime Minis- 
ter Shimon Peres of Israel wants. 
“We’re not seeking a back-door 
recognition of the PLO." 


vine in 

Hard Hntik suburb and kffled be- 
tween seven and 14 people. 

“We have to admit that it was 
done,” Mr. Seblani said. “The man 
who did it is not a member of 
Amal, but the severest punishment 
will be taken against him." 

“His actions were against Pales- 
tinian civilians, not fighters, and it 
is our responsibility to protect 
them.” Mr. Seblani added. 

As Amal pounded Burj al-Brq- 
neh. the Marxist-oriented Demo- 
cratic Front for the Liberation of 
Palestine accused the Shiite militia 
of storming a number of b u ildi ng s 
and liquidating “Palestinians living 
there in one batch, then dumping 
them in the streeL" 

The latest round of Shiite-Pales- 
riniati fighting, in its fourth day. 
has raised fears of a second chapter 
of a cam p war in May and June 
that pitted Amal against guerrillas 
TiHv-nrKivi in the camps around 
Beirut. 

The first round claimed over 650 
lives and wounded 2^500. It ended 
with a Syrian-sponsored cease-fire 
and brought Syrian military ob- 
servers to Beirut as part of a multi- 
party coordination committee to 
supervise the truce. 

Mr. Seblani said Amal had de- 
cided Friday to enforce a cease-fire 
and to send some of its members to 
help pot it into effect on die 
ground. 

On Thursday, Druze fighters of 
the Progressive Socialist Party bat- 
tled with Amal militia mm follow- 
ing an argument over gasoline ra- 
tions and die right of way in a 
Moslem neighborhood. 

The clashes spread as Moslem 
gunmen poured into the streets and 
fought with rocket-propelled gre- 
nades and machine grnic from al- 
leyways and rooftops of residential 
buddings. < 

■ Explosion in Jerusalem . 

A bomb exploded Friday near a 
crowded marketplace in Jerusalem 
and injured an Arab who was ap- 
parently planting the device, Unit- 
ed Press International reported. It 
was the third attack against Jews in 
a week. 

Dozens erf angry people were 
held back by police when they tried 
to attack the wounded suspect as 
an ambulance crew gave faun first 
aid. Witnesses said they saw the 
Arab bending over the bomb near a 
parked car when the charge explod- 
ed and injured him in the face, aim 
and leg. 

On Tuesday, two soldiers were 
stabbed, one fatally, in the West 
Bank town of Hebron as they 
guarded an empty apartment to 
keep out Jewish squatters. An Is- 
raeli truck driver was seriously 
wounded Thursday in a stabbing in 
Gaza. 



Afghan Rebels QaimRos^iari Retreats 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reuters) — Afghan guerrillas saU Aad$£ . : 
that their counteroffensive against a Soviet thrustin Af g hani s ta n' s Paktia^ ■ .- r 
province, which borders Pakistan, had forced Scrviet tro<^ torctteatiiiai: £ 
least one sector. • . -‘V 

Soviet forces had retreated in the Jqi area m the north and fierce; 
fighting was now going on in die Khost area of e as t ern Paktia, a gaexriHa 
spokesman said. • ' ' ' : '' 

The spokesman for the Hezb-i Island guerrilla faction, smd the soviet 
troops, seeking to sod guerrilla supply routes from Pakistan, bad-atj^ r 
vanced to within 1 .8 miles (3 kilometers) ofthepakistan bohlerinlheJtgi - 
area. But he said the coontero£fensh«by aboiJl 5,000 veteran MtgahkSu - 
fighters pushed them back.about 4 mite to the gafrisbo of Cte^anL, 

Greek Admits He Cast 11 Into Sea 

ATHENS (Rentetsj^- A Greek 
sea captain admitted Friday that he 
had forced II African stowaways 
into the Indian Ocean lastyear, but', 
be said faedid so ooty after they had 
rebelled. 

Antonis Ptytzanopoulos, on dial 
with eight other Greek and three 
Pakistani seamen over the incideut 
off Somalia in . Mardr 1984, also 
said that he had threatened the 
stowaways with rifle and had 
struck one of them dining a fight 
Mr. Pfytzanopoulos^ captain of the 
9,778-tan Garifalii C, told five 
judges that the fieri stowaway ap- 
peared cm March 715, a few horns 
after the ship left Mombasa, Ke- 
nya. 

Mr. Plytzanopoulos said he had 
decided to send the stowaways to- 
ward shore in lifeboats, but be said 
that they rebelled on March 17. He 
said he then gave orders to turn 
toward shore. and tried to reason 1 
With the stowaways: They an- 
Swopd with insults, he srid, adding 
that he decided to cast than over- 
board armd “strong protests from - 
the crew." Fori erf the Africans 
were said to have survived Antonis Plyt 

Death ToD Rises to 10 in Chile Protests 

SANTIAGO (AP) — Hundreds of shim-dwellers rioted daring the' ' 
night and four persons were lolled, bringing to 10 the n amber who haw^ .r ^ 
died in anti-govemiqent'protestS and disorders, officials said Friday. ^ ‘ 

Soldiers fired automatic rifles in the air to scatter 200 people who were, 1 
ransacking a supermarket Thursday in a Santiago shun, and riot pofice . ' 
surrounded another poor neighborhood and fired tear gas at demunrira- ' 
tors. Demonstrations bc^an Wednesday calling for a return to democtacty; ■'« 
after 12 years of military rule. * 

Two ol die latest victims were killed “in confusing circumstances* that 
are still being investigated, police said. News rroorts indicated illey were . 
shot in separate modems when police repelled mobs trying to loot two V.. 
stores. A third man died Friday morning at the Santiago Neurotay - ■ 
Institute, officials said. He had been admitted last night with a bulw. ; 
wound to the bead. News rqxxts indicated he was shot tinrfrtp demon- ' " 
strations in a suburban area. 


U.S. Is Planning Arms Sale 
To Jordan and Saudi Arabia 


■ (Contained from Page I) 
posed arms sales, both of which 
provoked protests from Israel, re- 
flect administration concern that 
the Middle East peace process is 
stalled and needs to be pushed. 

Senator John Heinz, a Pennsyl- 
vania Republican and sponsor of a 
resolution supported by 72 other 
senators who oppose new arms 
sales to Jordan, said through an 
aide (hat be would urge the admin- 
istration to drop the arms request. 

A White House official said the 
administration was anxious to go 
ahead with the arms requests be- 
cause of commitments to King 
Hussein of Jordan and King Fahd 
of Saudi Arabia, and a desire to act 
before Congress adjourns in late 
November. Congress requires a 50- 
day notification period by the ad- 
ministration before a major arms 
sale is concluded. 

Despite tbe lack of progress in 
administration efforts to get Jorda- 
man-Isradi peace talks under way, 
the official insisted that “nothing is 
dead, nothing has failed’' and that 
“it continues to move forward." 

U.S. officials and other sources 
said the administration was plan- 
ning to submit separate requests 
for approval of arms sales to Saudi 
Arabia and Jordan. 

The package for Saudi Arabia 
reportedly indudes Sidewinder air- 
to-air missiles and Stinger ground- 
to-air missiles. M-l tanks and ar- 


Nicaragua Rebel AM Legal, U.S. Says 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — President Ronald Reagan's nariomd secu- 
rity adviser, Robert G McFariane, told the leaders of the Senate mteffi- 7 

gence committee Thursday that no one on the National Security Crimcfl : 

had violated tbe law by assisting anti-government rebels in Nicaragua. ’ 
The committee chairman. Senator David F. Durenbuigei; a Minnesota -• 
Republican, said he saw no need for bearings on the matter, although he 
raid he had serious concerns about the couodTs mvoIveorenL The 
diairmaa of the House intelligence committee has sch ednlM besings iii - 
begin Sept. 17. . .. - “-i ■ V 

Administration officials have acknowledged that » rank™ 
the National Security Council, Lieutenant Colonel Oliver 1: North, *- 
mored vehicles. It exdudes, for the “ C ^P C< * raise funds for the rebels. - 7 ':C r 7 

present, the 40 additional F-I5 . -V 

fighters and “smart" bombs the Fnr RaaoWI 

Saudis have requested. U U1CXU5COTO 

For Jordan, the package is be- _ Tj^ f ec otdgaae in the world chess title contest axi Moscow ended * 
Ueved to indude two squadrons of r ^ aa 3 r ™ 8 draw, leaving Gaty Kasparov, the challenger, with a 1&46-&. - 1 
F-20 cr F- 16 fighter jets, advanced adva ntage over Anatoli Karpov, tbe world champion, -fjtcutenf ' 

mobile surface-to-air J-Hawk mas- Sridrera returned Guatemala’s main unfri endly to avffian control after ! 
riles, armored vehicles and TOW occupying the Guatemala City campus fra two days to quell violent arifiL 
anti- tank missiles. government protests. 

The total cost of the two arms 00,1 

packages was not known, but one 

source estimated tbe request for ? mc YEa* refrain from donating blood. f'-rfPj- 

Jordan alone would probably ex- i wo Au sf raami teen-agers who slaughtered 64 mimak at AA.-fafr fa- 

cced SI billion, with tbe admmis- were each imprisoned for three years on Friday. 
tratioti seeking congressional ap- Tteee members of an Eari German orchestra, the Staat&abeBe DreS 
proval for credits to finance den, failed to return to East Germany after appearr-" •» - 
roughly $750 million and Saudi m Lucerne, Switzerland, festival oiganizere sa*dE 


(NTT) 

of AIDS, has rexwmmewTed that any^i w£ 
another man m the pasteigfrt years refrain from donatimblooi fAPI~ 


Arabia picking up the remainder of NATO has announced die appointment, which was 
the Jordanian tab. U& Admiral Arthur S. Moreau Jr. as command 


at a music 

(ReuUfif 


fective Thuraday,-: 


n a h a I a 

Scptenber 7, c. 9 S 1C f r cn ;0 a.rrr. -o S p.m. ncrvslcp. 

Hotel Gcarae-V, 3’ Ave. G®erae-V, Pcri-cA ic’or N'cpc>*on. 

Te' {!] 7235403 c ?e- ccco«nr-nc~*i (!) 265-56-7’ : 265.S4.2A 

Ecxb *v«nir>g at 7 p.m. NAHALA wcl offer a flfimp*# of hoc covtura 
"Spirit for Chr5dr#n" with a mini praMfrtatian. 


Congress, in recent amendments 
and resolutions, has shown its op- 
position to the sale of sophisticated 
arms, especially to Jordon, unless 
Hussein indicates his readiness to 
begin direct talks with Israel. 

Amendments to the new foreign 
rid bill, signed into law Aug. 8, and 
a S25Q- million supplemental aid 
package for Jordan approved in 
June, bar the sale of advanced US. 
weapons to Jordan unless Mr. Rea- 
gan certifies to Congress that Hus- 
sein is “publicly committed to the 
recognition of Israel and to negoti- 
ate promptly and directly with Is- 
rael." 

The Israeli ambassador, Meier 
Roscnne. met Thursday with Un- 
dersecretary of State Michael R 
Annacost mid reportedly reiterated 
Israel's “very strong objections” to 
the proposed Saudi and Jordanian 
arms sales, since they would alter 
tbe Middle East arms ha la nr * aQd 

{ ilace heavy financial demands on 
srad. 


President Hostu Mubaak of Egypt will aHHifm ^ 
said Friday in Strasbourg, France. 


Improper Bulkhead Repair Cited 




The repairs were made to the 

main passenger cabin after the 



double line of rivets 
The 


. 1 were made by a team sent to ’ 

bmWer of thejtunbo jet. A central issue, accord™ 





in the rear of ife 
in 1978 that wa*. 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7-8, 1985 


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AMERICAN TOPICS 

^ Growing Force 
In Politics: Buppies 


™8 phenomenon in American 
** 103 Angeles Times 
"TOte- With tile doubfin* of 

“SS 8 ' graduates MAnril- 
from half a millio n 
they are the sms and 
£»»>«« not only of doctors. 

and teachers, Hwthe 
previoos generation of black 
leaders, but of factoiy hands, 
^frjnea and domestics. 

. . ^~ ore dian one of every eight 
SSSf*®* 25 to 34 hai com- 
S** four years of college. com- 
pareavkuth one m five whites. 
Acrordmg to a University of 
Jpougan survey, 56 percent of 
“on belong to blade organiza- 
wws, twice the rale for other 
o^cks. They are twice as likely as 
other blacks to have attended 
protest meetings. 

“While most of us can be !a- 
beled buppies, we all wince at 
that, said Helene Colvin Wal- 
lace, 30, a Smith College gradn- 
ate who runs the advisory com- 
mission on women’s affairs for 
Mayor Harold Washington, of 

Chicago and worked on hig ami . 

paign committee. Buppies also 
helped non election for Mayor 
W. Wilson Goode in Fhiladet- 

phifl. 

William Lucas, 57, the chief 
executive of Wayne County, 
Michigan, which encompasses 
Detroit, switched from Demo- 
crat to Republican this year. He 
says young black professionals 
today “are thinking for them- 
selves. They’re are mostly Demo- 
crats now because their parents 
were,” but “it’s just a matter of 
evolution before we see mote 
young blacks taking lead ership 
in both parties.'’ 



Spanish Firm 
Sent Moscow 
Electronics 
FromU.S. 




Short Takes ■ 

Miami pofice say a crackdown 
has curbed “smash- ynrf grab" 
robbers on Interstate' 95. More 
than - 100 motorists have been 
robbed on die road mace Janu- 
ary, but only three such incidents 
occurred in a recent two-week 
period.. 

Only $7 percent of today's col- 
lege enrollment comes from the 
1 8-to-24-year-old age . group, 
down from 68 percent , two de- 


cades ago, according to the 
American Association of State 
Colleges and Universities. It says 
nearly half of college students 
today are working men or wom- 
en seeking a two-year certificate, 
a bachelor’s degree missed earli- 
er in life or an advanced degree 
to enhanc e earning power or 
meet career requirements. 

U.S. District Judge Edward 
Garda in Sacramento, Califor- 
nia, baa harmed r^ictr hunting in 
parts of California, Illinois. Mis- 
souri, Oklahoma and Oregon 
when: bald eagles dwell untQ 

ed by th^sU^^Lead 1 ^^ has 
been blamed for poisoning the 
national bird, which is classified 
as a protected species. The eagks 
eat the r emains of migratory 
birds that have beat shot but left 
behind by hunters. 

John F. Kennedy’s home state 
of Massachusetts is planning its 
first official memorial to Mm. A 
statue or bust, and perhaps a 
scholarship fund, have been 
mentioned. Even without an offi- 


cial Massachusetts tribute, the 
late president hardly lacks for 
memorials in his home state: 
more than 1,000 flagpoles, 
schools, streets, airports, and a 
performing arts center have been 
named after him. 

Kathryn Pearson, 17, a 
st raigh t- A honors student, track 
star and concert violinist, chose 
to enroll at Stanford University, 
over offers from Harvard. 
Princeton and the University of 
California at Berkeley, after 
Stanford said it would let her 
practice on its Stradivari us vio- 
lin. 

When George Nunes. 26, of 
Watsonville, California, found a 
parking ticket on his pickup 
truck, he started arguing with the 
Santa Cruz county deputy sheriff 
who had issued iL When the dep- 
uty remained unmoved. Mr. 
Nunes tore up the ticket and 
tossed it into the air. The officer 
then wrote another citation, for 
littering 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


U.S. Is Taking Aim at Inept Doctors 


(CoBthmed from Plage J) r three rimes as many medical mal- The AMA has maintained a mas- 

df.n hi lirirrirmtt practice suits today as they did a ter file of licensing and related in- 

decade ago. formation for every US. doctor 

l Tie American Medical Aasoda- »n« 1907. But only Am Deccm- 

raM^r-j n^sna upg.-. . . fipn fe making a major effort' to ber has" the association begun 

d^-SSSSJSS improve the medical community’s checking that file each time a state 

every 1 00- physicians, oogbt to be ( jj 8C jpii riar y programs, said Dr. revokes a physician’s license, 
temporarily^ or permanmtty re- ■ Summons, its executive If the me shows that the doctor 

moved from practice^ is. .based cm vjee president holds a license in other stales, as is 

smtisucson the prewlajce ofj»- new, federally financed Profes- often the case, the association now 

riond Review OtganWlou bepn wrilcs_ “sutc dm” fctu® to d« 


revokes a physician’s license. 

If the file shows that the doctor 
holds a license in other states, as is 
often the case, the association now 


ported to Cuba and Russia.” 

He added that “the most sensi- 
tive, state-of-the-art semiconductor 
manufacturing equipment went to 
the Soviet Union," after first bang 


1 nriwT nmtv wuuiu Mvguu w ““ LUC iJUVICI U1UUU, niiw 

operating in every state at the end other boards so that they, too, can shipped to Switzerland. 


■.kkutnMi** 

whole. Episodes around the coon- J 


whole. Episodes around the coun- 
try bdp Uhistrate the estimate. 

In Indiana not long ago, a doctor 
was sentenced to prison for, among 
other charges, lirebombing . a 
plumbing supply store, conspiring 
to dynamite another store, paying 
two patients with drugs, money, 
and free medical care to attempt to 
murder two other doctors, and in- 
ducing two patients to bum a medi- 
cal clinic. He was later barred from 
practice. 

In Illinois, a doctor who bad al- 
ready been sued for malpractice at 
least 13 times was ordered by a jury 
to pay a woman S9 million. She had 
been left a quadriplegic^ unable 
even to talk, after he performed 
plastic surgery on her nose. He has 
not been barred from practice. 

While few licenses are revoked 
by medical boards in each state; 
lesser punishments are also rare. 
Nationally, the boards disciplined 


It IS estimated that such letters a month. 

*TTie quality of care and skill of 
petween 5 percent physicians has never been higher,” 
- according to Dr. Joseph F. Boyle, 

and 15 percent of the outgoing AMA president. 

^Nevertheless," he said, “in the 
doctors are past six months, headlines from 

coast to coast detailed at least three 
incompetent or truly devastating tragedies that ab- 

r golutdy should not have occurred." 

impaired. In the first case, an AMA 

r • spokesman said, a Californian died 

■— ~ ~ r— — — — — after he underwent surgery for re- 
treatment given to Medicare pa- moval of a nonfonctioning kidney, 
bents, who make up 40 percent of The surgeon had removed the 


decide whether to revoke the doc- Mr. Creed said that the material 
ton’s license. So far this year, the shipped to Cuba, and additional 
AMA has been sending about 40 equipment the Cubans were unable 


all hospital patients. 


wrong one, “leaving the num with- 


The organizations, called PROs, out any kidneys.” 


to obtain, “would have given them 
(be capability to produce semicon- 
ductors and integrated circuits.” 

“As far as we know, the plant 
didn't get into production,” he 
said. “They didn't get everything 
they needed.” 

However, according to the agree- 
ment accepted by Piher, Cuba al- 
ready has a semiconductor manu- 
facturing facility in Pinar dd Rio. 

The indictment said that two se- 
nior officers of the Spanish compa- 
ny, Jos£ Puig Alabern and 
Francesco Sole y Planas, reached 
agreements with Soviet and Cuban 
trade organizations to obtain the 


are refusing to pay for treatment jq the second case, in Florida, a equipment from U.S. manufactur- 
es! they consider unnecessary or physician accidentally injected era. The two are believed to be in 

7 Tern or svwnntilflriTAfl ? u.i _ - — »- _£. H l ft—! .j a — ..L „r tic* 


incompetent. Using computerized 
records of doctors’ and hospitals’ 
performances, the agencies have 


formaldehyde into a man’s spinal Spain and out of reach of U.S. law 
eohmrm, killing him. enforcement officials. 

In the thud, in New York, a t^ indictment says that Mr. 


H BM WI B.V , * ■ - . .1 - * ■- . >UC UAUHUKUL 9(173 UUU WJU. 

only one physiaan out of every 318 picked out proce dure s that are ot- pregnant woman was injected with fw reached an agreement with 
in 1984. ten performed poorly or uimeces- ^ wrong drug, sending her into a Tm«in » rnhan fnreion trade nr- 


■ in 1984. ten pciitmucu pouuy or uniKwa- 

More than half of the disdplin- sarfiy. 
ary actions were reprimands or ad- UnderaWl that has passrf the 
mutistrative actions that had Utile House and is expectcd to be ap- 
ex no effect on a physidan’s right proved by the Senate this M, the 


Imexin, a Cuban foreign trade or- 


to treat patients. 


federal government would be al- 


Tbosc cases illustrate a central 
dilemma in medical discipline. One 


factoring fatality" 
million. 

It said that Mr. 


Counting only disctylmary ao- towed to chai the private fflrs of mistake, even a fatal one, is randy « ““ ““ 

-Tz.- Piter* no state medical hcenanK boards for nffinmi to nmw. that * nhvsidan ^ ole ’ w “° eventually 


and Mr. 
the com- 


tionswithtbe most direct effect on state medipl^smgb^for sufSdent to prove that a physician W^cS 

a physician’s license — revoca- mstanocs m which they failed to * incompetent Before a medical 

rion« y susnenaems, ot probations prosecate mcompetent doctras. board or other agency can act P ro ® 1 P or f. a lweap trade 

-the nation’s aMlSSS &***™*£ againftaphyriciaiuhSminnbea E?S 


dplined only one phystdan om of bills of more than 25 percent of the demonstrated pattern of significant 
^ ■ — ■ - nation s population through cctpty errors, but that can mean more in- 


W TSher^Smy proim.port, a Soviet f«*gi trade 

he a organization, to sell to the Soviet I 
highly _sophriricaled 


medicine to take steps is the enor- 

mous increase in malpractice smts Corporations have begun hmng 
Sdconsequeutlyrthe high price of consu ltants to stady the mimrance- 
SSSSurance for doctors, d*™ of 

Premiums can run up to S 100,000 a 

- . identified those with the lowest 


warfor some specialties.- mentmeo mose wim me .owesi 

In sane srateTtbe rates are in- mortality and competition rates, 
o.SSby^than SOpercetrta employ given mcentrves to 
year. Americans file more than use them first 


juries or deaths. 

Another problem central to the 


U.S.-origm integrated rircuit man- 1 
ufacturing systems." 

U.S. officials and information in 


issue, the heads of numerous medi- the indictment said that U-S. offi- 
cal boards said, is that a doctor, oals in ^nin, checking at Piher 
once is never tested again facilities, were shown fake equip- 

on the rapidly changing develop- meat intended to resemble that ex- 
ments in me field. ported by Piher. 



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By James Gecscenzang 

Lot Angela Tima Service 
WASHINGTON — The Soviet 
Union has illegally obtained more 
staie-of-the-art U.S. equipment 
that could help it dose the gap 
between its weapons and highly so- 
phisticated U.S. weapons, accord- 
ing to a Department of Commerce 
official and an indictment 
Additional highly sensitive 
equipment has reached Cuba, the 
official said. 

Details of the case, which in- 
volves efforts by the Soviet bloc to 
obtain equipment crudal to the 
production of computer semicon- 
ductors and integrated circuits, 
emerged Thursday when a Spanish 
company that maintains offices in 
the No*, yoa Tiwt Illinois agreed to pay a fine of SI 
A PORT IN A STORM — Kathy Scfttweinsberg, an million for Illegally exporting high- 

employee of Marine life, an aquarium in Gulfyort, technology equipment between 

Mississippi, feeding a dolphin in fire swimming pod! of 1579 and 1982. 
the city’s Holiday Inn. The dolphin was one of 21 placed UR. Attorney Joseph E. diGen- 
in three hotel pools to escape Hurricane Elena, which SSSmL t Sv 0 KLr a S 

battered the South and severely damaged the aquarium. ? UC toiS S. ot BarcdSaT was 

“one of the most significant in the 
dal Massachusetts tribute, the area of United Stales higb-iechnol- 

late president hardly lacks for ogy transfer." 

memorials in his home state: Under an agreement between the 

more than 1,000 flagpoles. Department of Justice and Piher, 
schools, streets, airports, and a the company pleaded guilty to two 
performing arts center have been felony counts, waived indictment 
named after him. by a grand jury and agreed to pay 

the fine. The company, which has 
Kathryn Pearson, 17, a already been barred for two and a 
st raigh t- A honors student, track half years from exporting U.S.- 
star and concert violinist, chose made products, will remain barred 
to enroll at Stanford University, for an additional nine months, 
over offers from Harvard, Equipment valued at $2.4 mD- 
Princeion and the University of lion was shipped to the Soviet 

California at Berkeley, after Union and Ctioa, but other highly 

Stanford said it would let her sensitive items did not get through, 

practice on its Stradivari us via- according to Pentagon and Coro- 

lin. merce Department officials famil- 

iar with the case. 

Wines George Nones, 26, of Those officials described the lot 
Watsonville, California, found a ^ at the top of the Soviets’ 

parking ticket on his pickup list of material needed to belp them 

I truck, he started aiguingwth the move into the age of highly sophis- 

Santa Cruz county deputy sheriff ucated, computer-dependent 

who had issued it When the dep- weapons, 

uty remained unmoved, Mr. Officials said that the Soviet 
Nunes tore up the ticket and Unioi , which m the past has tried 

tossed it into (he air. The officer ^ obtain semiconductors and inte- 

then wrote another citation, for grated circuits produced in the 

littering. West, had recently shifted its em- 

a mnSmrsm phMis to obtainiflg ^ ^pmem 

ak i liUK HKj&cJ!, needed to make the circuitry. 

—I “Such equipment is among the 

Soviet bloc’s most highly sought 
jrv American high-technology goods 

nf f ln/ 1 f/)|*e needed for expanding and hnprov- 

ing the bloc’s la gg in g nticroproces- 
* sor and semiconductor production 

The AMA has maintained a mas- capability," said Donald Creed, a 

ter file of licensing and related in- Department of Commerce spokes- 

formation for every VS. doctor man 

since 1907. But only since Decern- tie ^ that departmental docu- 
ber has' the association begun meats “confirm that $2.4 rnfflion of 
checking that file each time a state these goods were illegally re-ex- 





Hand Press > il ei iuliu ii u l 


Pope John Paid n with Archbishop Robert Runde in 1982. 

Catholics, Anglicans Near 
Pact on Spiritual Issue 


By Joseph Berger 

New York Tima Service 

GARRISON, New York — In 
an important step toward recondH- 
ation between the Anglican and 
Roman Catholic Churches, a com- 
mission of theologians said that it 
was close to an agreement on the 
spirituad means of attaining salva- 
tion. 

The issue is among those that 
have divided the churches since the 
Reformation in the 16th century. 

A principal source of conflict 
since the Reformation has been the 
question of "justification” — 
whether salvation in heaven can be 
attained by simple faith, as many 
Protestants assert, or whether it de- 
pends on a believer’s good works, 
as Catholics hold. 

An eventual accord on the issue, 
according to members of an Angli- 
can-Roman Catholic commission, 
would recognize that salvation de- 
pended on faith and the “grace of 
God,” but that its attainment was 
helped by personal conduct. 

Membeis of the commission, 
who were meeting at a Franciscan 
monastery here, emphasized 
Thursday that the two churches did 
not differ greatly over the theology 
of salvation, and that groups within 
each church had perceived a sharp- 
er split than in fact existed. 


The panel, the Second Anglican- 
Roman Catholic International 
Commission, was established in 
1982 by Pope John Paul II and the 
Most Reverend Robert Runde, the 
archbishop of Canterbury, the titu- 
lar leader of the world's 63 million 
Anglicans. 

The panel met at the Catholic 
monastery of Graymoor, 55 miles 
(90 kilometers) north of New York. 

Anglicans and Catholics are aim- 
ing not so much toward a single 
church, but rather toward two bod- 
ies that can recognize the legitima- 
cy of each other's clergy, the valid- 
ity of each other’s rituals and the 
privilege of members to worship 
fully at each other’s churches. 

Yet with issues such as the ordi- 
nation of women, abortion and the 
scope of papal power dividing the 
two churches, members of the com- 
mi«mn indicated that they had no 
illusions that such recognition 
could be achieved soon. 

Some Anglican brandies, such as 
the Episcopal Church, ordain 
women and respect the right of 
women to choose abortions. The 
Catholic Church refuses to ordain 
women and prohibits abortion. 

The commission said it expected 
to complete a document rtf agree- 
ment on justification next year 
when it meets near Cardiff, Wales. 


Photos May Give dues 
On Titanic’s Final Hours 


By Walter Sullivan 

New York 7 Into Service 

NEW YORK — Researchers 
who found the wreckage of the Ti- 
tanic headed home Thursday to 
Massachusetts with more than 
12,000 color photographs ot the 
ship. Scientists said they might pro- 
vide does about the Titanic’s final 
hours before it sank in the North 
Atlantic 73 years agp. 

The pictures show luggage, cargo 
and personal effects spread over 
the ocean floor by an explosion 
amidships, possibly of the lltamc’s 
boilers, a spokesman for the re- 
search team said. 

Robert D. Ballard, chief scientist 
of the project, said via ship-to- 
shore radio that the views of empty 
davits that had held lifeboats were 
particularly touching. The photo- 
graphs shew them hanging over the 
side of the Titanic as they did after 
the boats were launched, leaving 
most of the passengers and crew 
behind. After the ship struck an 
iceberg 1,513 people perished and 
711 survived. 


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Only 34% of U.S. Jobless 
Got Benefits in 1985 


By Peter Perl 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Although 
unemployment has hit its lowest 
percentage since the start of the 
Reagan administration, a record 
high percentage of the UJS. unem- 
ployed are no longer receiving any 
unemployment compensation 
benefits. 

According to government data 
and unemployment experts, nearly 
two of every three unemployed 
workers have been cut off from 
eligibility, mostly because they 
have exhausted their maximum 26- 
week allotment or because of cut- 
backs enacted by the Reagan ad- 
ministration. Congress and most 
state governments. 

The drop in the number of un- 
employed people collecting bene- 
fits represents a sharp shift in cov- 
erage in the past decade. During 
the 1 975-76 recession, more than 65 
percent of the jobless received un- 
employment insurance for as long 
as 65 weeks, but a fairly steady 
decline in coverage has left only 34 
percent of the unemployed coQecl- 
rng benefits this year. 

Of the 8.1 million unemployed in 
August, 2.4 million were collecting 
benefits from the state unemploy- 
ment systems that pay an average 
$120.60 a week, according to the 
Labor Department. 

More rhan 2J* mini on jobless 
have exhausted benefits in the past 
year, according to the department, 
while the remainder were disquali- 
fied for various reasons, including 
stricter eligibility requirements im- 
posed by more than 40 states since 
1980. 

“There has been quite a huge 
drop” in the percentage of jobless 
receiving benefits, said Gary Burt- 


less, senior fellow at the Brookings 
Institution, who studied the issue 
for the Labor Department. He said 
studies point to no single major 
cause, but rather a combination of 
federal benefit cuts, state cats 
a i m ed at salvaging debt-ridden un- 
employment insurance systems, 
and changes in the national econo- 
my that have created more long- 
term joblessness. 

“The bottom line is that a minor- 
ity of the pirople who need benefits 
are receiving it, and we think that is 
bad,” «id James EUenberger, an 
on employment specialist for the la- 
bor organization AFL-CIO. “The 
system has become much more re- 
strictive.” ! 

Critics of the Reagan adminis- 
tration contend that the cutbacks 
in the unemployment insurance 
system have forced increasing 
□umbers of workers into poverty, 
welfare and homelessness. But oth- 
ers contend that the system has 
been too generous, and that tighter 
eligibility has weeded out those 
who were abusing the program and 
not aggressively seeking work. 

“I think there is a positive ride to 
this cutting back,” said Marvin 
Rosters, a former Nixon adminis- 
tration labor economist now at the 
American Enterprise Institute. He 
said he believes that reduced-tern: 
benefits provides a strong incentive 
for the unemployed to seek and 
find jobs. 

During the recessions of the late 
1970s and early 1980s, high- unem- 
ployment states were- also eligible 
for' as much as 39 extra weeks of 
federal-state extended and supple- 
mental benefits enacted by Con- 
gress. 


Enough close-up photographs of 
(he bridge area were obtained to 
create a detailed mosaic of how it 
looks resting on the sea floor, ac- 
cording to a Woods Hole Oceano- 
graphic Institution spokesman. 

The research ship is due to arrive 
Monday at Woods Hole, but some 
film has already been returned 
from the ship by helicopter, and 
another helicopter trip is planned 
to pick up additional rootage. 

The photographs show luggage, 
dinner plates, five cases of wine, 
chamber pots, a pile of coal and 
personal effects, some apparently 
ejected from the crew’s berths. 

The precise location of the wreck 
has been kept secret, scientists said, 
to safeguard it from possible sal- 
vage operations. Aircraft have been 
reported observing the research 
ship, although no salvage attempts 
have been announced. 

However, the Commercial 
Union insurance company in Lon- 
don said Tuesday that H owns the 
hull and would be willing to listen 
to proposals for salvaging the ship. 


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I 




mi 


Page 4 


SATUBDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7-8,1985 


Heralit 


*'i4 The New York Time* aod Tb* Washington Port 


tribune. W^ en Debt Begets Disillusion: The Real Latin Threat 


•--v 


A Rude Winter for France 


France faces a rude winter after a cool 
rain-swept summer. With the parliamentary 
elections onJy six months away, much can 
still go wrong for the Socialist government, 
including events in New Caledonia and the 
Greenpeace affair. But economic problems 
seem the most intractable. 

There is no scope for a give-away budget 
in the attempt to woo disaffected Itftist 
voters. The budget in preparation shows 
every sip of being austere. Even so, it prob- 
ably will not bring the deficit down from the 
uncomfortably high level (3 percent of gross 
national product) at which it has lingered for 
most of the Mitterrand years. 

The bitter truth is that France must per- 
form a perilous re-balancing act on the eco- 
nomic tightrope, with an uncertain safety 
net beneath. Although the inflation rate has 
been cut to 6.5 percent, this has beat done 
largely through price controls and official 
pressure to restrict wage increases, neither of 
which can succeed indefinitely. Since West 
German inflation is now close to 2 percent, a 
new devaluation of the franc, pushing 
French prices up faster, cannot be ruled out. 
The fordgn balance is still precarious; ex- 
change controls, though they have been 
eased, are still thought necessary. 

The government has acted to reduce these 
imbalances, despite criticism from its erst- 
while Communist partners. But as Laurent 
Fabius, the technocrat turned prime minis- 
ter, has made clear, its most painful problem 
today concerns the jobless. Unemployment, 
now at 10.5 percent of the labor force, may 
top 1 1 percent next year. The tragedy is 
compounded by the concentration of job- 


lessness among the young and the female 
and by the rise in long-tom unemployment 

Joblessness is high partly because the 
problems of inflation and the foreign bal- 
ance ’impel the government to keep public 
and private spending on a tight leash. But it 
also reflects a sad lack of flexibility in the 
labor market that makes companies more 
interested in economizing on labor than on 
recruiting it Managers fear the difficulty of 
laying off workers temporarily when sales 
slacken, as they fear the costs of applying the 
39-hour workweek. Pay scales are too rigid. 
And France is only starting to break down 
the wagp-price indexation system that com- 
presses profits and thus makes it hard for 
companies to expand. 

These are the enemies of growth that Mr. 
Fabius, or his successor, must attack. The 
labor unions have been less than helpful 
France's new voting system may prove a 
drag if it produces a parliament where party 
loyalties are less clear-cut and shifting alli- 
ances — the enemy of good policy —replace 
the relative order that has characterized the 
Fifth Republic. Jostling Tor position within 
the major parties ahead of the 1988 presi- 
dential election may not help. 

France, simply put suffers from an accu- 
mulation of errors. Labor market rigidity 
was fostered by governments long before the 
Socialists. It would be easier to break it 
down now if more expansionary macroeco- 
nomic policies could be introduced. But the 
Socialists pre-empted that by their ill-judged 
dash for growth in 1981. The economy can 
be put together again, but it may take time. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


Peru’s Bold New Leader 


Immediately after taking office, Peru's re- 
form-minded new president. Alan Garda Pfc- 
rez, look bold steps to stabilize his country's 
reeling economy. He temporarily limited re- 
payments to foreign creditors, froze prices and 
cut bade arms purchases. Now he is showing 
what may be comparable boldness in another 
area — mobilizing his government against 
a booming cocaine economy. 

That puts Mr. Garda’s reputation on the 
line even more than did the declarations on 
debt for repayments bad already been re- 
duced in practice by Pern’s economic straits. 
Anti-narcotics measures have so far been 
blocked by official corruption. If Mr. Garcia 
cannot eliminate that corruption. Ins govern- 
ment risks becoming caught up in iL 

In the last two decades cocaine has become 
Peru's largest single export mostly because of 


North American demand. The trade pumps 
more than $500 million a year into a desperate- 
ly impoverished economy. It thrives in remote 
jungle regions where it is extremely difficult to 
control the coven transport of contraband. 

. To fight the drug trade is to take on another 
war in a country already beset by guerrilla 


terrorism. Mr. Garcia was apparently shocked 
of how much the 


into action by evidence 
cocaine trade had corrupted the government 

manders and high officials of ihe* previous 
government Even the armed forces generally 
declined to participate in modest official anti- 
narcotics campaigns. Anti-narcotics programs 
promoted by the U.S. yielded few results. 

If Mr, Garcia follows through with his cam- 
paign. better results should soon be apparent 
— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Vietnam and the MIAs 


For the two years before and the 10 years 
since the final U.S. withdrawal from Vi i mam, 
the Communist victors in Hanoi have toyed 
with one of the few Vietnamese matters still of 
deep interest to a broad American public: the 
fate of the 1.000 or more U.S. servicemen 
believed to be missing or unaccounted for in 
Vietnam, and the lesser number lost elsewhere 
in Vietnam -con trolled Indochina. 

Since 1973, with elaborate and grotesque 
calculation, the Vietnamese have doled out the 
remains of 99 American servicemen. Their 
evident purpose has been to bargain for aid. 
diplomatic relations and generally a full return 
to international society. They seem to have 
thought that by thus playing cynically on the 
sentiments of the American people, they could 
win concessions otherwise beyond their grasp. 

Butthey have failed. Vietnam remains large- 
ly an international pariah for reasons includ- 
ing its treatment of the MIAs and its sponsor- 
ship of a harsh occupying regj^ m Cambodia. 

Therein lies the possible importance of an 
agreement Vietnam has just reached with the 
United States to take the necessary steps to 
resolve the MIA issue within two years. The 


agreement was readied without any of Hanoi's 
usual Imkagff of the MIAs to economic and 
political questions, it is reported, and it was 
accompanied by release of what Vietnam says 
are the remains of 14 American servicemen, 
the largest number repatriated at one time. 

Has Hand made a fresh judgment of the 
worth of improving relations with the United 
States? Its delivery on the MIA issue win 
provide a telling part of the answer, as will its 
response to the diplomatic initiative on Cam- 
bodia bring taken, with American approval, 
by the friendly nations of Southeast Asia. 

From, among other things, the testimony of 
a Vietnamese mortician who fled in 1979, 
American officials believe that Hanoi has 
stockpiled the remains of hundreds of U.S. 
military personnel killed in the war. Such re- 
pom underline the burden on Vietnam to 
meet considerably higher standards of disclo- 
sure than dosed Communist societies custom- 
arily allow. If Hanoi hopes to get the full 
benefits of cooperation on this issue, however, 
it will have to address the range of American 
suspicions that its past conduct has stirred. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


The Spreading Unrest in Chile 


The six deaths, countless injured and more 
than 600 arrests during anti-goveraraent dem- 
onstrations in Chile on Wednesday were an 
unhappy reminder of General [Augusto] Pino- 
chet’s ruthless determination to ride out pro- 
test While Genoa! Pinochet may draw satis- 
faction from having survived much longer 
than his critics predicted, his authoritarian 
regime now looks increasingly isolated at 
home and out of step with the trend toward 
democracy in Latin America. 


For almost a decade General Pinochet was 
able to boast of having restored a sense of 
stability to Chile, albeit at the cost of political 
liberty, and to have presided over an unprece- 
dented economic boom. Yet the protest move- 
ment, which has grown up in the past two 
years and refused to be cowed by repression, 
has put an end to this stability. At the same 
time, Chile’s experiment in free market eco- 
nomics has gone sour through a mix of world 
recession, falling copper prices, over-borrow- 
ing and poor management. 

— The Financial Times (London). 


FROM OUR SEPT. 7 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Mental Science Fails on a Horse 
LOS ANGELES — Christian Science and the 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Ani- 
mals locked horns (on SepL 6] when the society 
called for the arrest of Martin Brians on 
a charge of cruelty to an animal because Ba- 
kins tried the Christian Science treatment on a 
horse. The horse died of colic. The trial was set 
for SepL 27. *Tm doing all I can for this 
horse,” said Brians, when an officer called on 
him. *Tm treating it with mental science. I did 
not employ a Christian Scientist for the pur- 
pose of neglecting the horse as has beat 
charged, but because I wanted to give the 
animal every bit as good treatment as I would 
want for myself or one of my children.” 


1935: life man Eritrean Turgatory’ 
MASS AW A, Eritrea — Writhing from the 
plateau to this sea coast, where the tempera- 
ture stands at 120 degrees and no breath of 
wind stirs, the very rivers curl up and die. 
There is no life in tins smoking sand except the 
Italian stevedores and laborers who will win or 
lose the war against Abyssinia. As the port of 
debarkation of all troops and supplies Musso- 
lini sends from Italy, Massawa is the purgatory 
of Fascism and the place to see why Italy 
cannot stop for any League of Nations. No 
man could work in such a bell if he were not 
certain that die Duce wil) lead him on soon to 
the green uplands stretching between Asmara 
and Addis Ababa, to empire and tidies. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chat™ 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISEE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 

CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Pubbsker 
Exramie EtStor RENE BONDY 

Mtar ALAIN LECOUR 

Deputy Hoar RICHARD H. MORGAN 

Deputy Edna STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Direaor 6[ Oradanm 


Deputy PvbEsker 
Associate Publisher 
Associate Pubfoker 
Cfrector • 


KRANEPUHL Dvtcac of Atbetiang Sates 

International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charies-de-Gaulle; 92200 Nenflly-snr-Sdne, 

France. TeL (1)747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: CB944051 
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C 1985, International Herald Tribune. AH rights reserved 



"v T EW YORK — The United States should 
JN be concentrating its attention on the Latin 
American debt crisis, not onfee arming of 
“contras" against Nicaragua. The price nots in 
the Dominican Republic, the invasion of super- 
markets in Rio de Janeiro, and the waves of 
strikes everywhere in Latin America pose a far 


By Carlos Fnentes 

from the Third World to the industrialized run the gravest risk of bring 


world declined by S42 biffion last year. The 
disruption erf trade also hits the industrialized 
to La ™ 1 America fell from 
538 billion in 1981 to $20 billion in 1983. His 


-mater threat to U.S. security than do the cost the U.S. economy 300,000 fobs. 

rn: — Not onl” **■“ * i — j «... 


only the United States, but also the 
worm,; ’ • - - 


politics of three million Nicaraguans. 

Over the past 40 years, Latin America has whole world, and 

to expand economically and extend what the economist Eliot ianeway has called 

certain lirmled benefits of health, bousing and 

education to its people. The present crisis en- 


We should be listening to men like Maya 
Andrew Young of Atlanta. Felix mwp ot 
New Yorit, Pedro-Pablo Kuaynsta of Fernand 
Lord Lever of Britain when they ague for a 
new Bretton Woods — a new set of monetary 
and t rade ar rang ements that, instead of perpet- 
ually rescheduling debt, would seek to 
the nature of that debL In the Lever 


indastrializtti * wrid ^ £ 

- ovate 


f# 

p* 


i 


tier 




HP 



?> 




>s£ 


m£SSv 


nations- 


dangers even those modest gains. 
Per-capita production fell by V 


r bv9 percent last 

year bringing ns back to the level of 1977 — 
eight years wiped oat in one! Prices rose by 163 
patent in 1984. The region’s foreign debt is 
more than $350 bifiioa, yet our export earnings 
have decreased to $95 billion a year. Latin 
America is scheduled to pay more than $45 
billion in annual interest That means we have 
become a net exporter of capital to industrial- 
ized nations exactly at the moment when we 
need capital most. It also means there is very 
little capital left for economic development, 
and even less for basic social programs. 

Meanwhile, the middle classes are restlessly 
undergoing a revolution of lost expectations. 

The rural areas are growing increasingly poorer 

as prices for agricultural products dedme. For- 
eign trade continues its downhill ride: Exports 


of ttebonwriftT ; 

the sfaoS«pff ^ -i fei menaced ^ middle ^ , •' 
r5?Ama£ The debt ensishas pamttefc 
Latin Ama^n **?*§■" 

^i^teniraw^toymuxismtespl^^; 

operas on Radio Marti 
and economic 


the poor fester in Tost dties. 9 Latin Americacould explode. 


financial Pearl Harbor.” The millions erf urban 
m a r gi n a l s in Latin America’s great cities are 
depoli dazed, with nothing to lose, festering in 
the ciu dades perdidas, the lost dties, preparing 
their assault on the citadels erf privilege. 

Latin America could explode with almost 
medieval resonance. Bereft of political struc- 
ture, movements would be qu 
messianic demagogues who v 



plait our traditions of religion and violence. 
These traditions arc J — *- ’ 1 ' 


this would be done by defesringOTienx interest 

for the sake of future profit through new zoo- 
interest securities that would transfonn sbort- 
term debt into medium- and long-term instru- 
ments to finance productive investmenL 
We should also be listening to the voices of 
two men from opposing ends of the pobtical 
ted by spectrum: Hemy.A. Kissinger and Fidel Cas- 
io ex- tro. We most listen to Mr. Kissinger when he 


7. jl 1- 




iP 


ItfF i 









-do-nej^jjk’ 
to a region where the bywc*d%v > ; 
ve been political anthontanar^. , 
* -fliahst whan*'- 
of capitalism. Tfe ; ; : 
the United**’: 


warns that the Latin democracies might not 
survive “in the face of dramatically f a ll i n g stan- 

„ wr dands of living that appear to be imposed from 

trends, if unchecked, will strengthen another the outride.” We must listen to Mr. Castro 
Latin American tradition — the anthoritar- when he wants that Latin America is “financing 
ian use of power. Our political institutions the wwn’wq; and development of the richest 


xadhioas are deeply ingrained; they do 
not have to be taughL And in the end, present 


come na 

for centuries, 

fom, archaic 

p ntmh -lifting from the 1 
future of Latin America, and _ 

States, depends on economic solutions, not ed*,; 
spy booklets on neutralizing the Sanduusts,-^ • 

This article was adapted by The 
runes from, a speech by Mr. Fuentes, , the 
can novelist -• ” 


Cl 1 


rsi; 


America’s 
Poor Are 
Still There 


■we »»»«*• 


By Michael Harrington 

N EW YORK — The White 
House euphoria over the drop 
in the poverty rate to 14.4 percent in 
1984 is deeply disturbing. In cele- 
brating a statistical “triumph,” 
President Reagan and his staff have 
obscured a larger injustice. 

Any reduction in the number of 
the poor is, of course, a reason to 
rqmce. And that is true even though 
the event is hardly a surprise. Every 
expert predicted the 19& decline in 
poverty because real economic 
growth of almost 6 percent in that 
year would inevitably help some 
people at the bottom of the ladder. 

But the administration's simplis- 
tic and ideological response to the 
new numbers — they prove, in Mr. 
Reagan’s view, the superiority of 
free enterprise — blindly ignores 
the fact that the poverty rate is now 
higher than it has been in any year 
since 196S, with the exception of 
1982 and 1983. A one-year improve- 
ment. from 1983 to 1984, is said to 
vindicate U.S. economic policies. 
But there is no comment on the fact 
that the United States has “ad- 
vanced” to levels of poverty it 
reached 20 years ago. 

This willful shortsi ghtedness is 
not new. Shoddy interpretations of 
statistics have regularly provided a 
basis for moral indifference and po- 
litical complacency. 

For instance, unemployment 
went from a recession high of al- 
most 1 1 percent in 1982 to 7 J per- 
cent in October 1984. In the 1984 
election campaign, this trend was 
cited as a measure of the adminis- 
tration's economic success, and one 
was constantly reminded of the mfl- 



Kennedy targeted a ^percent un- 
it rate, or that the Re- 


lions of jobs generated by the recov- 
ery. Few remembered that John F. 


publican Party was savaged by the 
electorate in the 1970 congressional 
elections because joblessness had 
soared to 4.8 percenL 

So eight ano a half million people 
out of work, and millions driven 
from the labor market who are 
forced to take part-time jobs, are 
just a fact of .social life these days. 
The most dynamic recovery in 30 
years, as the president calls it. has 
an employment rate which, in the 
antediluvian age of a decade ago, 
would have been associated with 
a deep recession. 

Another example. In 1981, the 
Congressional Budget Office tdls 
us, the Reagan tax cuts increased 
the disposable income of house- 
holds with over $80,000 a year by 


$8,930 and decreased that of house- 
holds with less than $10,000 a year 
by $440. That reactionary govern- 
mental redistribution of income was 
partly the result of deductions that 
discriminated in favor of the rich. 

By law, the Treasury is required 
to itemize those deductions in a “tax 
expenditure budget.” How does one 
deal with such scandalous num- 
bers? The administration simply re- 
defined tax expenditures to make 


This new callousness, however, 
does not amply corrupt American 
values. It muddies understanding as 
welL There is growing evidence that 
economic growth in the 1980s is 
much less effective in rfiinhrating 
than it was in the 1960s, 


poverty than it was m the 1960s, 
that the reshaping of the occupa- 
tional structure, the technological 


them go down on gper even as they 


went op in real fife: America was 
turned into a fairer society by a 
stroke of the pen. 

And now there is the jubilation 
that there were only 33.7 milli on 
poor people in 1984 — which is 
higher than the number of poor in 
1964, when President Lyndon John- 
son declared his war on poverty. 


revolution, and the intcmarional- 
ization of -the economy are creating 
an environment in which poverty is 
all the more tenadons. And that is a 
threat, notjost to the poor but to all 
Americans, a fact that ctrneat igno- 
rant celebration utterly obscures: ' 


The wriler, asdhor of "The New 
American Poverty,” and co-duarman 
of the Democratic Socialists of Amer- 
ica, contributed this comment to . The 
HewYaicTanesii ' , Ji V - 


■ iL-v ' 


These Rights 




Are 








By Grades Krautharnme*' 


st* 


WASHINGTON — If yon - 


W American' and thought 


i bar 


Sr-** 


SV;; 

i 

OOP 0 ’ 

iw®*? 
4 Ik*® 4 * 

dirt rtf- 1 * 

frjBttf- 

IB***,*- 

duns 


Foam 


Fathers had blessed yq* 
with all the rights you neexLyou afey- /• 
wrong. I bring good news. The first 
10 amendments and the next-16 ha$f 


not filled your quota. That is. notify 
you live in my neighborhood and. ' : . ’ 
shop at ray supermarket whose wa^£-v. ; 
are graced with a poster proclai m ing^ 
die “Consumer Bui of Rights.”- : -V 

There, I discovered, you are c fcU 
dowed with certain unalienabteg^ 
rights, among which are the.rigfrt ra&v.I 
“be heard” (above the Muzak?), a nS? ' 
“to choose” (and what faced wife 
varieties erf noodle, was I entitled 
before the Bill?). These are yours 
waBting in fee door. No social o 
tract hero No need to^^^c^^g^ 

RightsTuwe becn°basting out ~ 
over and I have. started collecting. T 
them. A couple of months ago feuihg. 
a hospital stay, I discovered that 
was the beneficiary of a “Patient’s r 
Bill at Rights*” promising all fee-* 


Ate* 

BvMc 


Greenpeace: France Pays the Price of Its Ambitions 


P ARIS — Not since the days of de 
Gaulle has French foreign behav- 
ior attracted such passionate and 
negative criticism from abroad. The 
sound and fury stem not from a rous- 
ing speech or a spectacular decision, 
but from an intelligence flap that 
reads like a James Bond movie inter- 
preted by Monty Python. 

The July 10 sinking in Auckland of 
a Greenpeace ship that left one man 
dead, the subsequent arrest of a pair 
of French agents, and the issuing of 
warrants against three other French 
agents have created a major crisis 
between France and New Zealand. 

The French government has ac- 
knowledged that it sent agents to spy 
on the ship but has denial responsi- 
bility for sinking it; this was support- 
ed by a controversial report ordered 
by President Francois Mitterrand 
and written by Bernard Tricot, a re- 
spected former aide to de Gaulle. 

Beyond the confusing details of the 
affair, what is at stake is the French 
image in the world and French inter- 
ests in the South Pacific. Nothing 
better symbolizes the event than the 
contrast between fordgn and French 
reactions. Whereas France has been 
widely criticized abroad, domestic 
criticism has been surprisingly weak. 

It is worth remembering that most 
French saw fee Watergate affair as a 
petty matter that should not have led 
to the fall of a U-S. president. In the 
flurry of recent spy scandals, the 
French, unlike the West Germans, 
have largely rallied behind their se- 
cret service: an attitude best exempli- 
fied by former President VaKrv dis- 
card d’Estaing’s statement.' “My 
country, right or wrong." 

Politically, both the opposition 
parties and the Socialist majority felt 
constrained in their ability to con- 
demn the handling of the affair. The 
right, which has uttle sympathy for 
environmentalists, could only criti- 
cize the manner in which the secret 
sendee carried out its assignment — 
not the logic erf its very involvement. 
Rightists bad little room, after accus- 
ing fee government of leniency to- 
ward pro-independence forces in 
New Caledonia, to condemn it for 
seeming to defend French interests 
against a campaign for a nuclear-free 
South Pacific. The French left, tradi- 
tionally doser to internationalist and 
moralist stances than to the cold logic 
of raison d’etre, showed its embar- 
rassment But party loyalty and elec- 
toral considerations limited its show 
of condemnation. Legislative elec- 
tions are due next spring, and the 
Socialists are hardly the favorites. 

Only the Communists — because 
they are no longer in the government. 


By Dominique Moisi 


and, some would say. because their 
concerns are not primarily French — 
could firmly condemn the action. 

There is an additional consider- 
ation: a French consensus an the 
□eed to maintain a presence in fee 
South Pacific In its claim to be a 
middle-sized power, France points 
out that it has an independent nucle- 
ar force and that it maintains a pres- 
ence in the world from Africa to the 


Pacific. The South Pacific c ombines 
these points: It has been France’s 
nuclear testing ground since 1966. 

In a time of growing competition 
between the superpowers and erf tech- 
nological revolutions in nuclear 


weaponry, uudear testing is deemed 
vital by rr 


strategic importance can 
With its dahn to South raanc is- 
lands and their territorial waters, 
France can control access to under- 
sea wealth and a surface 14 times the 
size of its awn national territory. It 
has no intention erf allowing these 
islands — indndhig New Caledonia 


nance's government 
The Mururoa atoll testing ground 
is also seen as a natural aircraft carri- 
er in a region whose economic and 






...ANfflwe * 
....SIIKJNGOJ 5 ^ 
iTSrtlR FRAMES? 


NCfW«&. 

V 



— to fall into Soviet hands. 

But these reasons are difficult to 
convey to others. The rise in New 
Zealand of an anti-nuclear-minded 
leader. Prime Mmistir David Lange, 
and the nuisance value of an interna- 
tionally popular environmental orga- 
nization, Greenpeace, contrasts with 
the weakness of France’s own envi- 
ronmental movement — and explains 
why the Greenpeace affair has ech- 
oed far beyond Auckland harbor. 

It will be increasingly costly in in- 
ternational political terms for France 
to continue nuclear testing on Mur- 
uroa. (The tests, always open to inter- 
national scrutiny, have proved to be 
safe for fee smaH loon population, 
according to an intonatitmal scien- 
tific commission. Bat fee panel’s 
findings are not accepted by all) 

From Africa to the Pacific, the 
costs of a high French profile will 
continue to increase. Behind fee 
Auckland episode tie fee dements of 
an important debate on the future of 
France's foreign policy and status. - 


dungs one has just Teamed to lrve:^ 
without in hospitals. ‘v . 

The first thing you notice abootthe. j * 
“right to every consideration of ’ 
privacy” and the “right to expect that ? -;/ 
within Its capacity ^ sl hospital must 17 
make reasonable response to fee re- -*>, 
quest of a patient for services” is the j /• 
clever dinning: These rights are de*> • 
^ signed for nonatforccmoit. ; . - . .. •/I? 
. . ; I’m not complaining, of course; \ 
about fee lack of rights, out about the v v 

pretense. A hospital is aplace to get 
vwSL and if you want to.benefit frmh^^ 
fee wonders of modern sdentifiefim---: ^ ’! 
personal) medicine, you have to OL-*iu- 
pea that your rights, like your 
sets, will be left at fee door. w! 

The proliferation of rights always • v 
signals fee loss of the individaius ." . ; 
powers and prerogatives. It is precise- 
ly because hospitals have become so v , 
stark and impersonal that the^bdt^’; 
soul marooned an a bedpan and ring- -7 ' 
ing frantically for a nurse is supposed •:/ 
to make do with paper rights. > 

All this rights-talk is^ undoabtedty.' ^ 
part of fee mania for seeing everts 
tiring in legal, adversarial tenns.lt is •„ '• 
evidence, too, of fee fallen state~of . : - r 
pohhcal l a ngu a ge . Rights once meant V • 
the claims of fee individual against 
fee state. In the postwar era, the rio-> V . 
tion has been stretched to iadfidfe V 
benefits demanded fronuhe states;*--'.^ - 
job, medical care, “welfare rights.” ] 

Thus stretched, the idea aFrigfris " :! 
tirins. It would be in betta.shap&i^ . 7 *- 
for example, the United Nations Tin, - 
its 1967 Covenant on Economic, :•* ; 
dal and Cultural Rights)', anti this” - 
American Catholic bishops fur feeo! 

1984 draft pastoral letter j oh the U& 
economy) did not insist on calfirig 
economic seeds “rights.” . A \ v •£. 

Nevertheless, work, medicine, eve a 
welfare are legitimate demands: Caff 
them supplementary rights pebap5. 

In contrast, what you find On display 
at fee supermarket or hospital, act' 
junk rights. As wife junk bonds arid 


p* 

VEtt Pf 

fnppas j 1 
booed 
on Kisftr 

ffcwcffct 
The cur 
ffarnwr tst*’ 

gar. the pre 
feen u 
soots sate 

d»OKL?v 
'OCOMEti 
Recent a 
have led tc > 
and ptwfcss 
m ari oil 
The Teles; 
Ttaaivth; 

dbdnarpa 
rsedpfe : 
tax sac th 
(mid. 


the 


hosvever.'is.iwf^i 
J ^ toIiticaT language to be (ter .- 
based. Raids on the lexicon of'dftfV: 
mocracy are not new. Take the very-" 
word “democratic.” The most nnfrtri 
its will not let theirt 


The writer, associate director of the 
inter - 


9M*mteKM.mxue**s- 


fnstitvt Francos des Relations 

Rationales, contributed tins comment 
to the Los Angeles Times. 


nounce the word. At __ 

the TV announcer Jim McKay wffi, 
^sp^tfnlly say German Democratic* 
Kepubtic when he mmiw Eas t Gef 1 , 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


On file Use of the Bomb 

Regarding the opinion column “ Ho , 
He Had Other Options" (Aug. S): 

Gar Alperovitz refers to Secretary 
of State James Byrnes as Mr. Tru- 
man’s “most important adviser” 
which, in (he conduct of the war, he 
was dol As general of the armies, 
George G Marshall was. Mr Alpero 
vitz also contends that “American 
leaders rejected the most obvious op- 
tion — amply wailing for the Red 


Female Circumcision 

Regarding the report "Female Cir- 
cumcision: A Horn in Africa" (July 
29) by Blaine Harden: 

Circumcision is too euphemistic a 
term to describe the operation usual- 
ly performed and to indicate the ir- 
reparable physical and psychological 
harm it causes in females. 

World opinion, the United Na- 
tions and fee World Health Organi- 
zation should put the greatest posa- 


— -out of political not blepressureon religious, medical and 
n.” This is simply not pobtical leaders of fee countries in- 


Army to f 

military concern." This is simply i~. - 

true. Toe Russians h af l been dragging wived to make them officially con- 


In attempting to convince us that 
U.S. military power commands 
worldwide respect, Mr. UOxnan men- 
tions a survey of adversaries and al- 
ura on the subject He does not 
which adversaries were 

At the same tim^ Mr. 

conveys fee brunt of a Nov. 5, 1983. 
article in The Economist That article 
dealt wuh misconceptions and confu- 
sion about fee nature of deterrence 
and ... the use. and purpose of 
Amencan power " 


their feet on entry against Japan for 
weeks and months: dates passed by 
and there was never any firm assur- 
ance until the last moment John 
Connor’s column on the same page is 
historically correct So is fee head- 
line: “Yes, It Was a Necessary Evil." 

STANLEY WOODWARD. 

Salzburg, Austria. 


demn the practice of circumcision 
and infib ulation. 

Dr. H. KESTELOOT. 
Leuven, Brigiuia 


T — «« ouuui lemen. wne 
fee roll is caffed at the United Nu 
lions, these workers’ paradises cotrie'W 
“D.” as in DcScraacKam-v' 
pD rtl ca ?° d Dcnwcratic Yemen.— 

J?* “president,” a nro word.- ’. - 
mat once had democratic implicar J /-j 
c ooes not say uons. Haiti bas>st elected itsfoxy-#'' t 
re questioned, moronic “presideni for life” by fee ,- . ! 

■ UUinan mis- comfortable marmn of more dun 2^ ' 
million to 449. Which brings od fee ‘ ■ 
state of fee word “dection^yU&aiiia^ ;■ l 
held one in 1982 and fee official taffy I 
"Jsa Communist Party victory of — ‘ 

ii hypocrisy is thehomage feat vice 3* ! 

theft is 8 ? j 
ts Day todem- r- ■ ' 


The Economist article said that fee 

pluralistic Western world is not of COT V«ment feat 
one mind on fee situations to which That is 

military 


■ — - — . w —uiwu i — • - "*“» uMiro fee' do-.^ - t 

. power has been brought to of pobtical language 1 

bear, as shown by the unending dc- di “ at o« tolerable. < 


Views on U.S. Power 

Regarding “ The World Does Not 
View the U.$. as a Weakling" (Aug 
23) by Harlan /CUllman: 6 


bate on the use of nuclear weapons 
against Japanese dties. I ask Mr. UD- 

Sto ffl “ 8aiDn!pw,&om 


GREGORY BERGLUND. 
Meyreuil, France. 


Olympic* With OrwelliarrSte-^ 
tf you wiH But at fee fiS- ! 

meat department give me peace; not ' : 
take my chances. 
ton Post Writers Group. 









j&b- 


i 



"■ • **-3 


: • • r'*7 


"Sfe'iSjisSi - -«.■ «**■« 


^ ^ ac fog a 3d Evacuation 

AW to / Wrfer Camp to Ma£e Them 
More VuJ ™*-able to Vietnamese Attack 


, PiTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATORDAY-SIXNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7-8, 1985 

THAiLAND \\ U«S* Bfldsr t n i i /i ». • /» 






Page 5 


Bangkok , 
»L«ww 


^^jontoSaa 

CAMBODIA 


consolidate all bat about 1 1,000 <rf 

ARANYAPRATHFT^. ^caviHan followers of the Khmer 

' I nD«XSLSft ,,i Peoples Naticmal tfb«*tkmVn*H 
7, a Cambodian k#£S ^ ^ S ^ cfcr ite > ” 11 »J» place 
Thailand also lau^ZT^L^^R m widim doi* jrangeofvlet- 

hadbterin to bSld^ ? ang ^°°’ *»“«* artillery. 

Tb^hadcome c - 77«w tbe Cambodiatt ci- 

• bang Jxweq°om 3 pSL- 7 ^ 73,30 * dmin *s ttatorof She7 camp, 
lame settlement L^/^v 31 ',. 3 Qncc ** <&**&, whofns consid- 
thathadamieunS^S-S^ lKxi,a ^border’s model camp di- 

^ tady wta ctad how be odd 

' tional ™oplesNa- keep op spirits. ... 

S^rif!^. 00 Fron «i one <rf tbe “lom’tsce mv future, ieifber.” he 


ZTS? 11 ™*. one of the 


pUmted vc 8®- 
wWe-patebes and started improv- 

bamboo hoS^ 

n ® ut government has 

”ow b^im moving tens ofthou- 
saads of peoDie from th.. 


consolidate all bat about I I,OQOtrf : V? 

ujeovQian followers of tbc Khmer . .^y^Tr * 

People's National Liberation. 'Front 

al one border ate, win also place S\ >? ’• / j£“ 

laem within closerangeofViet- ‘ ' I 

namesc artillery. ... raSBjgytj^' •• ■•' . 

Jhou Tboo, the Cambodian ta- ^ 

vflian administrator of She 7 camp, 
once an optimist, who was consid- 
ered the holder’s model «"np di- the inbve will alienate problems of 
rector, shrugged hisshouldeiihelp- ovoratwding at Sie 7. 
lessly when asked how be cooM The Khmer People's National 
keep up spirits. . .. . Liberation Front, one of two non- 

“I can’t see my future, either.” be Communist groups in the three- 
said. “If there is fitting this year; way guerrilla alliance that is fight- 


we cannot avoid zhesheffing." . ing toe Vietnamese, has the largest 
The followers of (be non-Com- civilian exile following, but only 
muoist 'ghmrr People’s National - about half the number of filters 
Liberation Front account for about fielded by the Communist Khmer 
half of the ??*; nop d i g r Uc ed r *™- Rouge- The third group is com- 
boefian civilians who have been grv= ■ posed of followers of Prince Noro- 


of peopJe from the security of en tempomiiy carx-mar y »fy. ■ dom S ihan o uk . 

21 “y.™* (■boot lOJcSomo- Inm. in Thailand because of the fe the atmosphere of 

terS) mSJfTR Thlilsn^ - ■_ 'lii* tliTitv nimnrr rk .. n M 


\ b '*i 
Vtn, 
16 Tk^ 

•*wi nir 

R!$ir 

• )<i It ; 

■ 

^ ras- 
? j .'id 3TZ; 

iilari;- 

W2: , .S ! ! 

Nv 

rise 

-sircjtr 


msidte TbiLmd, 

^tp fuJihtt east, within annk or 
two of the Cambodian border 
For most of the 55/100 people tq 
be evacuated, it win be theihird 
move in mry» months. 

Th is week, a reporter via ting (be 

cany saw the little bamboo houses 

bang tom down and carted away, 
. leaving behind squash vines and 
% uowers. Pieces of broken houses 

bounced and crashed on the backs 

of trucks headed over the- ratted 
am roads to the That-Cambodian 
frontia. 

Leaders of the dis pla ced Cambo- 
dians said the move, wfaich will 

Australian Killed 
By Mob in India 

The Associated Press - ; 


gating in Cambodia. 


tainty. rumors are circulating 


Thai nffiriak said the govern- among the refugees that the Viet- 
mait intends to return the evacuees Si a mes e may be pl a nning to abduct 
to Cambodian sod as soon as it is .tbem. Chea Sokha, a young man at 
. safe to do. so. But refugee leaden -**te 7. said Liberation Front spies 
and international relief workers bad returned from Cambodian 
said that such a w niay fo n j$ not . stones of a “re-educadon'" 
fikely to happen soon and that the camp being prepared to house bor- 
borfer camp, called Site 2, is itself do - people forcibly repatriated, 
vulnerable to »ftnr-v “Spies say the local Cambodian 

Steps are being lakes by (he UN people have already been told to 
Relief Operation to prepare anotb- supply food,” he said, 
er ate six or seven miles deeper The refugees at Site 7 said that 
inside Thailand m ray the area they are afraid to move not only 
around Site 2 comes under Viet- because of the Vietnamese, but also 
namese shelling, as it did repeated- because the Dang Rek Mountains 


!y earlier this year. 


harbor brigand gangs whose num- 


7 he Vietnamese, who fired into ber is increasing. 


Thailand farther south during a 
dash Thursday with Khmer Songs 
rebels, are reported by Thai nnfi- 
taiy officials to be strengthening 
thar forces north of here also. dos~ 


Kem Scran, who was coordmat- 


er to Site 2. Thai offi cials express unarmed. 


mili- tributkm of food at Ste 2, said 
amjg Tuesday: “Security is our major 
dos- problem. They have guns. We are 


Nnm/rar>irT coiffldence in thdr border security. At Site 2, tte fonner residents of 

< — AnAiatnl^i however, and wod they will not Rithisen and Site 7 will ion more 

wbo ,^ s suspectecf of fad- expose the refugees to unnecessary than 60,000 other Liberation Front 


napping a child, was beaten, then 
burned to death by a mob in north- 
ern Kashmir stale, -The- United 
News of India reported Friday. 

The man was hit with dubs and 
thrown into a lake by the mob cm 
^Wednesday, said police in Srina- 
gar, the press agency reported. He 
then was taken but in an uncon- 


danger. followers from other camps who 

Trucks began arriving early had been previously settled at the 
' Thursday morning at Site 7, a$a- border. Many of them have also 
oenl to Thailand’s refugee holding moved several rimes in the last 
center at Kbao. I Dang, 12 miles year. In addition, there is a holding 
north of Aranyaprathet They are center for Vietnamese who flee 
to move more than 3,000 displaced their country across Cambodia. 
Camb o dians and their possessions S on Sgm>, the Liberation Front 
30 mSes northeast to Site 2, a grow- president, said recently that he had 


sdous state and burned to -death, ing camp near the Dang Rek expressed his concern to the Thai 

they said- PoHce arrested 70 people mountain range. government about the risks of con- 

in counecrion with the. crime. When ' the move is completed centxatiog as man y as 120,000 peo- 

Recent reports (rf ixhiappmg^ within a month, the authorities pte in such a vulnerable place. He 
have led to violent demonstrations said, mare than 55,000 people will said he bad asked that the move be 
and protests by redden ts of Srina- have been transferred from Site 7 delayed, but the request has not 

gar and o£her parts of Kashmir: to Ste 2. ' been granted. 

The Telegraph * newspaper said - Mr. Than, die Ste 7 ad mhn st ra - Mr. Son Sann said he feared in- 
Thnrsday that nunois abort a gang tor, said an advance party of nearly discipline and lawlessness among 
of kidnappers in the statehave era- •• 10,000 residents were moved in An- his followers, who have never been 
ated pamc among parents. Police: gist, before heavy rains and other as strictly controlled as the civilian 
have said that tbe rumars arcun- proUems halted the relocation, camp followers of the Khmer 
fbunded. . . ;i''“ .. • . , The Thai government has said that Rouge. 


the rumens arc un- problems halted the relocation. 
.V .r . - The Thai government has said that 


Is Damaged 
By Bombs in 
W. Germany 

The Associated Preu 

NOHFELDEN, West Germany 
— Three bomb blasts destroyed 
radar equipment early Friday at a 
U.S. Army anti-aircraft missile site 
near this West German town, but 
caused no injuries, a U.S. military 
spokesman said. 

West German officials said they 
believed supporters of the leftist 
urban guerrilla group known as the 
Red Army Faction were responsi- 
ble for the attack. 

‘There were three blasts that de- 
stroyed three mobile radar sets 
mounted on trailers.” said Sergeant 
Bob Lentoer, a spokesman for the 
U.S. Army in Heidelberg. “It is an 
enclosed site.” He said the attack 
took place at about 6 AM. 

He said soldiers were on the site 
at the time of the blasts, but that no 
one had been injured. None of the 
surface-to-air Hawk anti-aircraft 
missiles on the site were damaged, 
he said 

Alexander Prechlel, a spokes- 
man for the chief West German 
prosecutor’s office, estimated the 
blasts damage in the “mil- 
lions of marks." or hundreds of 
thousands of dollars. 

He said investigators suspected 
that supporters of the Red Army 
Faction, which is being investigat- 
ed in connection with four attacks 
or attempted attacks in the last 
month against the U.S. military in 
West Germany, planted the bombs. 

The attack occurred near Noh- 
felden, about 30 miles (about 48 
kilometers) east of the West Ger- 
man border with Luxembourg. 

The site is part of the 32d Army 
Air Defense Command which has 
its headquarters in Darmstadt- 

On Aug. 8, a soldier was found 
killed near Wiesbaden and shortly 
afterward a bomb ripped through 
the U.S. Air Force’s Rhein-Main 
Base, killing two Americans and 
injnring 20 people. West German 
investigators said they believe the 
terrorists used the soldier’s identifi- 
cation card to enter the base. 

. Direct Action, a French extrem- 
ist group, claimed joint responsibil- 
ity for the Rhein-Main bombing 

Vietnam Official in Moecow 

The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Defense Minister 
Van Tien Dung of Vietnam arrived 
in Moscow on Friday for talks , the 
news agency Tass reported. The 
agency said he was met at Moscow 
airport by Defense Minister Mar- 
shal Sergei L. Sokolov. 


In Poland, Critic of Regime Ungagged for Vote 


By Jackson Diehl 

H'ashmgmi Past Service 

WARSAW — - Ever since Poland's military 
leadership started a broad campaign for sup- 
port in next month’s parliamentary elections, 
Mikola) Keeakiewicz has found himself sur- 
prisingly in the public spotlight and granted 
extraordinary personal rights. 

An outspoken critic of recent government 
policies, Mr. Kozakiewicz was named in Au- 
gust io the prestigious “national list” of un- 
opposed candidates for the Sqm. or parlia- 
ment. 

Since then, his attacks cm censorship, con- 
trols on education and tougher criminal laws 
have been covered by Poland’s official news 
organizations with an enthusiasm that has 
left the 61 -year-old sociologist slightly bewil- 
dered. 

Even Rzeczpospolita. the official govern- 
ment daily, granted him ample space when he 
lambasted the Movement for National Re- 
birth, known by its Polish initials, PRON, the 
Communist-controlled front that nominated 
him to the parliamentary ticket. 

“The only explanation is that I am repeat- 
ing some attitudes that are well known in the 
country.” Mr. Kozakiewicz said. “Perhaps I 
was chosen to represent these attitudes.” 

In almost any other Eastern European 
country, such a concession to dissident views 
in a parliamentary election would be almost 
inconceivable. But in the context of Poland's 
political struggle, Mr. Kozakiewicz has be- 
come less a symbol of liberalism than a token. 

For three years, he has been a leader of a 
substantial movement of moderates who be- 
lieve that a program of aggressive political 
and social reforms is needed to bridge the 
gulf between Poland's Communist authori- 
ties and a society alienated by the suppres- 
sion of the independent trade union Solidari- 
ty* 

Now Mr. Kozakiewicz says the change be 
sought has been smothered and its propo- 
nents reduced to dissidents powerless to pre- 
vent a trend toward national pokrization. 

“We are moving further from the ideals of 
1980 and 1981. rather than closer,” he said. 
“We have in Poland a split society, and the 
government is deepening this di virion.” 

In preparing for the elections. General 
Wojciecb Jaruzdski's government has ap- 


peared to prefer repression to efforts to win 
over the disaffected, Mr. Kozakiewicz and 
other critics say. 

“The government's frustration comes from 
the fact that all actions from its ride to 
increase social consensus have no effect," 
said Bronislaw Geremek, an opposition his- 
torian and adviser to Solidarity. “So what can 
they do to get national support? The only 
solution is to try to introduce the feelings of 
uncertainty and fear.” 

Weeks before the election campaign, the 


r We have in Poland a split 
society, and the 
government is deepening 
this division . 9 


Mikolaj Kozakiewicz 


government introduced measures that re- 
versed a liberalization of university govern- 
ment, toughened the penal code and dimi- 
naied the prospect of multiple unions at the 
factory leveL 

A year after a general amnesty emptied 
jails of dissidents, three top Solidarity leaders 
were given jail sentences, and the number of 
political prisoners rose to more than 230. 

The government spokesman. Jerzy Urban, 
was quoted recently as saying that such mea- 
sures were “a kind of retreat on what was a 
bold attempt to move forward.” 

In a speech to a Central Committee ple- 
num called to plan election strategy. General 
Jaruzdski conceded: “The last few months 
have brought a number of moves that were 
not easy to receive by some milieus." 

He continued: “The party does not and 
will not forget a struggle against what ham- 
pers and threatens it, a struggle first of all 
with political means, but also with means of 
protection of state order, if necessary.” 

In response, the banned Solidarity trade 
movement has called on Poles to boycott, the 
voting OcL 13. After a similar campaign by 
the union last year, the government reported 


a turnout of 75 percent in local elections, far 
below the norm for ejections in Communist 
countries. 

Both rides portray the upcoming elections 
as a major test, and many Poles seem to be 
stranded between the two sides. Official polls 
have shown that a substantial majority of the 
public disapproves of government policies. 
But Solidarity's strike efforts and other pro- 
tests this year have failed- 

It was tins disaffected mass that Mr. Kaza- 
Idewicz and other moderates in and outride 
the party hoped to reach after the declaration 
of martial law in December 1981. 

“My whole activity is directed at the search 
for a'modus vivendi between the opposition 
and the so-called establishment,” he told 
Rzeczpospolita. 

Mr. Kozakiewicz, a teacher and prolific 
author who had been a member of the offi- 
cially sanctioned Peasant Party, was one of 
the founders of PRON, an organization pro- 
moted by die government as an independent 
social movement for reform. 

“We thought and dreamed that PRON 
would be an agent of systematic change in 
Poland, a kind of not-so-aggressive form of 
Solidarity,” he said. 

Slowly, however, its original aims were 
diluted and its nominal independence proved 
Slnsoiy. As Mr. Kozakiewicz put it: “PRON 
became an dement of the system, not an 
independent ride.” 

The election has been one of the sharper 
reverses to the hopes of the moderates, who 
had hoped the authorities would allow voters 
a real choice on ballots. 

Instead, the electoral law approved by the 
outgoing Sqm provides for nominal two- 
candidate competition for 410 of the 460 
seats but leaves control of the election and 
the choice of candidates to the Communist 
amboritiesu 

After f ailing this summer to enlist a group 
of independents close to the church for the 
candidates' list, the authorities presented a 
selection that includes more nonparty “inde- 
pendents” than in the past but offers seam 
variety. The most notable independent in the 
previous Sqm, Edmond Osmanczyk, was ex- 
cluded. 

Mr. Kozakiewicz said he knew of no other 
Sqm candidate who was an open critic of 
government 


With Help, Angola Entertains Nonaligned Group 


(Continued from Page 1) 
an old theater into an elegant con- 
ference center, complete with air 
conditioning and espresso coffee 
machine. Yugoslav workers had 
r ushed so close to the deadline to 
put the finishing touches on an 
Olympic village-style bousing com- 
plex for journalists that the decora- 
tive outside foliage had not even 
had time to take tool 

Housing for the delegations had 
been renovated, and the French 
chef at the Preadente Hotel, now 
run by the Meridien chain of 
France, had imported enough pro- 
cessed meal and cheese to please 
the most discerning palate. 


Bottled water has been flown in 
from Portugal, and a large-scale 
effort — the product of much pub- 
tic exhortation by the government 
— has been made to clan up most 
of the garbage that lay knee-deep 
beside some of Luanda’s streets. 

Even the communications sys- 
tem is new. For the first time. An- 
gola has direct-dial tdephones, at 
least for international calls. The 
system, however, is doe to be dis- 
mantled once the conference is 
over, according an Angolan official 
who said the government feared 
that free-spending foreign resi- 
dents would overuse it. 

Estimates on the cost of the 


preparations, most of them unoffi- 
cial, range from $24 mflh on to hun- 
dreds of millions of dollars. 

The high cost of such a gathering 
has changed the mind of many a 
Third World country eager for the 
prestige of holding it. Similar 

S nalmg are now said to be pla guing 
re government of Zimbabwe, 
which is favored to win the upcom- 
ing three-year movement chair- 
manship that win be derided at this 
meeting. 

The battle over the chairman- 
ship, held by India since 1983, is 
the only real issue that seems to 
have captured the attention of the 
delegates at the conference. 


In addition to holding the costly 
heads-of-state meeting next year, 
the nation heading the movement 
has enormous power during its 
term in office to set the nonaligned 
jigmria AH decisions within the 
movement are taken by consensus, 
and it is the chairman who deter- 
mines, according to his country’s 
desire and policies, when any 
agreement has been reached. 

Yugoslavia, one of the Non- 
aligned Movement's founding 
members, has been at the forefront 
of a long battle to keep the move- 
ment independent from the domi- 
nance of Cuba, which it and others 
view as hopelessly aligned with the 
Soviet Union. 




iT.’ r-i‘ — 


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number ( — 1 — 


.Spvlure. 


lRAMB.REQUBflUr? 

Vfel be hqyjytompand dBfivarycfthe pcperwhfc you re owy ad extend your subscription aasnfin^y. Just 
QrifhedcdesaFanyl^zyouhokedreadypiomd 

/-y-o5 




m 








This is exceptional. An inheritance or business 
venture could never offer you such s chance! 
The NORTH- WEST-GERMAH-STATE-LOTTERY 
offers you the possibility to belong to an inter- 
national group of clever participants. Ail prizes 
are quoted and paid out In German Marks (DM). 
This is where your advantage is. The West Ger- 
man Mark has been one of the strongest curren- 
cies In the world for years. 

Each lottery runs over a period of 6 month, one 
eta as per month. There are 400.000 tickets with 
147.4B1 prizes totalling over 133 Million DM. A 
total of 242 jackpots ranging from 1 00.000.- tol 
Million DM are raffled-off plus plenty of medium 


1. Class 

O cto be r Draw i n g s *85 


MILLION DM 

T:d ~ ; r aj':l.;P-?eC 

MILLION DM or 


MILLION DM or 


MILLION DM or 


SO OOO DM 

25.000 DM 
20 000 DM 
IS OOO DM 

10.000 DM 

5.000 DM 
3 000 DM 

2.000 DM 


I.IOO* 1 000 DM 1200 * 

1 1.100 * 2*0 DM 1 1 1 200 » 


2. Class 

November- Drawl ns* '85 


MILLION DM or 

cq.jOM 

MILLION DM or 

LxtGOCOO OM 

MILLION DM or 

'3 x tOOCOD DM. 

MILLION DM or 

:0x 102.000 DM 


50.000 DM 
25 000 DM 
20 000 DM 
15000 DM 
10000 OM 
5000 DM 
3 000 DM 
2 000 DM 
1 OOO DM 
360 DM 


We offer this 
opportunity 
* 26 times 

^ 1 MILLION 
DM! 

^ANNIVERSARY 
LOTTERY: 
In addition over 
5 MILLION DM 
in prize money 
on top of 
133 MILLION DM 
at no extra cost. 


and smaller prizes, it is also possible that 10 
prizes of 100.000.- DM will be combined into a 
SUPER-JACKPOT OF 1 MILLION - determined 
in pre-drawings. That means that 24 prizes of 1 
Million DM plus 2 guaranteed prizes of 1 Million 
and 2 Million each will be drawn — 26 SUPER 
JACKPOTS « 26 MILLIONAIRES. 

Name us another game where this is possible! 
The drawings are hefd in public andsupervised 
by state auditors. All prizes are guaranteed by 
the German Government The great thing is that 
nobody will find out about your winnings, 
beca use you - asa player- remainanonymous. 

3. Class 4. Class 

Nov./Dac.-DrBWings *85 DeeJJan.-Drawf(iBS *88 


MILLION DM or 

10 X 100 000 cv 


MILLION DM or 

IOxVjO.CCu cv. 


i 

MILLION 

DM 

or 

1 

:g* ioo.coo 

DM 


1 

MILLION 

•Ox 1013 COO 

DM 

DM 

or 

i 

MILLION 

DM 

or 

1 

10 x Tj'j.uC'O 

W 



5 • 

6 « 
3 « 
3 I 

13 » 
13 » 
13 « 
130 ■ 
2300 * 
11 300 a 


25 000 DM 
20 000 DM 
1 5 OOO DM 
10 OOO DM 
5 000 DM 
3000 DM 
2 000 DM 
1 OOO DM 
4 BO OM 


MILLION DM or 

?c- * IOC 00C DM 

MILLION DM or 

MILLION DM or 

•Sx’OGOOOOK* 


50 000 DM 
25 000 DM 
20000 DM 
1 5 OOO DM 
10000 DM 
5 000 OM 
3 000 DM 
2 000 DM 
1 000 DM 
BOO DM 


•140 x 
2 400 < 
12400 x 


I HSftoparSSateN ^OLieQ 

You order your ticket on the order coupon below 
Within days you receive your ticket together with 
an invoice and the official drawing schedule with 
rules and regulations. 

PLEASE INCLUDE PAYMENT WITH YOUR ORDER! 
You can also pay for your ticket after receipt of the 
invoice. Payment can be made by personal check, 
travellers check, trank transfer (add remittance 
bank charge) or in cash via registered air mall 
(cash at your own risk). 

After each class you will receive the official win- 
ning list together with the ticket of the next class 
via air mail 

If your ticket has been drawn, you will immediately 
receive a winning notification. 

Your prize-money will be transferred to you within 
one week of your request by check. Of course, if 
you hit a jackpot you can come in person to collect 
your prize In cash. 

If you are already our customer, please do not 
order, because you receive the ticket automatical- 
ly for the next lottery. 

You can be sura you will receive fast honest and 
confidential service. Now ft is up to you, there- 
fore order and mail the coupon today. 

Lots of Luck 

Your chance to win: 1:3 

If coupon is missing, write for information. 

( 6. Class -Main draw { 
FBbTMarch-Drmrings ’S8 

v&p* ns — 

Lotterie-EJnn. Hametn B 
KuNmamstrafie 1 A 
0-3250 Hamein 
W.-Germany ■ 

Jan./Feb.-DnwIngB ’86 


MILLION DM or 

x io: co: dv 


MILLION DM or 

MILLION DM or 

MILLION DM or 

'.0 >. "0C- 00* DV 


B K 
B x 
B « 

a » 

15 A 
15 >L 
15 a 
ISO » 
2 500 i 
12500 x 


SO OOO DM 
25000 DM 
20.000 DM 
IS OOO DM 
10 000 DM 
S OOO DM 
3 000 DM 
2 000 DM 
1 000 DM 
720 DM 


14 « 
14 h 
14 h 
4 « 
14 a 
24 , 
200 x 

2 000 x 

10 OOO * 
66 000 a 


50 000 DM 

25.000 DM 
20 000 DM 
IS OOO DM 

10.000 DM 
5 000 DM 
3 000 DM 
2 000 DM 
1.000 DM 

720 DM 


l 5. 267 - **.y!50.GC0 DM 


-445 *= 620.000 DM +445 - 620.000 DM 


620.000 DM 


I try my luck and order! 

All classes (1st - 6th class) 75. Lottery, beginning 
October 4, 1985 to March 27, 1986, 
of the Nordwestdeutsche Klassenlotterie. 

Please fill in number of tickets you want to order. 


- 

DM 

or 

usr 

or 

£* 

1/1 ticket 

741.00 

• 

264.65 

• 

190.00 

1/2 ticket 

381.00 

• 

136.10 

• 

97.70 

1/4 ticket 

201.00 

• 

71.80 

• 

51.55 


-445 - 620.000 DM +445 - 620.000 DM +447 = 2.120.000 D 

sjgjce Mail coupon to: Lotterifr'Bnnahme Hameln* 5 ®* 8 *^ 
^/7 Kvv KuhlmannstraBe 1 A £ 

D-3250 Hameln W.-Germany = 

Please wri te In German □ English □ Please print in £ 

75/54 Mr.Q Mrs.O Miss CD dear letters, s 

First Name ~ 

Last Name (Mill I 


I Prica* are for all 6 classes including ah mail postage and winning Hat ^ — — — .i 1 I I I I 

attar each class. Mo additional charges. Exchange rata as ot July 1935 | 

■VALK) ONLY WHERE LEGAL -NOT AVAILABLE TO RESIDENTS OF SINGAPORE* PLEASE INCLUDE PAYMBfT. WHEN YOU ORDER AFTER OCT. 4, 19851 


Street 


n 

“I 

“ 

P. 0. Box 





City 

Country 

- 

_ 

- 










Page 6 


IIVTERJNATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNPAY, SEPTEMBER 7^, 1985 


SPECIAL EDUCATION DIHEC 


IUA 


ITALY 


EMMA WILLARD SCHOOL 

TROY, NEW YORK 

Emira Wizard is the oldest boarding school for oris in the UA It 
enrolls stodenu in grades 9-12 & a post g raduate year is available. 

SK?*“ N ‘ Y ;J* 150 miles N. of N.Y.C. Tbc school || | = 
faciutyi includes a 32j000 volume library, science laboratories, a gymna- 
« 3rl center. The college preparatory curriculum irelMes En- 
glish. history, science, mathematics, fine & performing ant & six 
foreign languages. A multi-level course is available for students whose 
second language u English. 

For further ialormabon: 

Margaret A Gat, Director of Admissions. Emma Willard School 
Peye.A.285PairBngATe^Troy,NewYwit 12180,TeL (518) 2744440. 


spHiuiiiiiiiiiiinmniniiiniiiiiraiiiiiiiunimiiuimiiiHinniiuiiiiHiiiisiiiiiiuiiiuii^ 

1 JOHN I 

i vsjdbmw i 


mum 

THE EJE.C. SCHOOL 

tv. . ,-.1 vrWint international flchOOt [hat rewa . A—gncunsiff. 





PACIFIC SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY 

9301 WJLSHIRE BOULEVARD 

LOS ANGELES, CA 90210 U.S.A. . 

EARN YOUR DECREE THRU OUR 

OVERSEAS DIRECTED 
STUDY PROGRAM 


INDEPENDENT DIRECTED STUDY. NO CLASS ATTEND- 
ANCE REQUIRED. ONE-ON-ONE STU DENT/FACULTY. EN- 
ROLL NOW FOR NEXT SEMESTER. COMPLETION IN ONE 
ACADEMIC YEAR PERMITTED. 

• Business Administration • Bachelors 

• Economics • Masters 

• Engineering -• Doctoral Programs ■ 

• Education • Marty other fields 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND TUFTON GRANTS- FINANCIAL AID 

Send a brief resume detailing your background and your 
goals. IMPROVE YOUR PROFESSIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. 

■P.S.U. >s Authorized by The California Department of Education 
•PS.U. is a Member of N.AS.AC.U.. Washington. O.C. 


= in the California Sierra Nevada welcomes international Students. = 

= Cottage-Preparatory Boarding cmd Day = 

1 • INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE WPtOMA PROGRAM = 

= • Snail classes • • Caring staff • Mumc. theater, an s 
s • Work program, including farm • Social W»icc prajocis ^ 

= Write eraoB: WKartt L Moon, Jr., PHndpql S 

= The John Woofanan School = 

= 12585 Jam* Bor BcL, Nevada CBy, Grift, 95959 U-5-A.Tef.! 916-273-3 1*3. = 
= AKhorfoftfaoReflgfauaSoefaty of Mends (QimkarJ fowndodln 1963. 5 
= AandnC tv WAS.C ■ Member. NAJS CHS. g 

^ituHHunumiiniiiBimiiianiuiuiininuiiiiiiiiniiHniinjimnninuiiiDURNniuiE 


flESe 


JOHN CABOT 
INTERNATIONAL 
COLLEGE 

ROME 


has irripresaad parents a*** □ American SectHi* 

Setwal □ Bntteh G.Cf-J* ^ * a rawortahte 




Sheridan Hills 
Christian School 

Accredited 

3751 Sheridan Street 
~ ” Hollywood, FL 33021 
ExceSenceln Education and Environment 


AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES 






LagMmate. Ineipantra, fast 
For tree Matts: Dt Join Beat 
3381 n. Hay. 1, SbM 871 
■ondodBB, CaHarala, S54S8, USA. 



ARIZONA’S VILLA-OASIS 
SCHOOL 


// An OufsEtondm Bacning School Offering Golege fV«| 

r And General Gafv*. Ft«y Aecradtod. 

Aha, A ftpgram For The Uidem tuftrated. 

• Coed • Photography • Uhtam Sports •Tennis ^ 

• Grade* 7-12 • Wk *3 Activities •Sailing • International. 

• Dev. Reading • SperioJ •Foal Student Body 

• Tutoring Interrat Projects • Fencing • Travel 

• Art • Maine Biology • Hones • Canpuhn 


School Offering Colege fV«p 
y Acoredted. 


Catalog JohnSteinbedc, Ph.D. 

Box 1218-HT, Casa Grande, Arizona 85222 
{602)466-9226 


THE ONLY AMERICAN COLLEGE IN ROME 
OFFERING A FOUR-YEAR UNDERGRADUATE 
DEGREE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND 
DEGREE PROGRAMS IN THE ARTS, HUMANITIES, 
AND SOCIAL SCIENCES. 

JOHN CABOT COLLEGE, FOUNDED IN ROME IN 
1972, IS AFFILIATED WITH HIRAM COLLEGE, 
OHIO, U.SA. OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPTS FOR ALL 
COURSE WORK AT JOHN CABOT ARE ISSUED BY 
HIRAM AND ARE RECOGNIZED BY INSTITU- 
TIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE UNTIED 
STATES AND ELSEWHERE 

ONE YEAR CREDIT IS NORMALLY GRANTED FOR 
STUDENTS IN POSSESSION OF MATURITA, BAC- 
CALAUREATE A” LEVELS. 

FALL CLASSES START. SEPTEMBER 23 


THE EJE.C. SCHOOL 


. 75 . 7 a . 2018 Anrwufp/ Bfl 1 9 lurT1 

ForWorrnatKMi and reflOtrawn«l‘ 

„ * fci ’* fc !SSSK A 

Regstrauon daily a» sianmer. 


For farther information contact: 

Mrs. Marie CehnL Director of A AwednrK 
Jolm Cabot Inte rnational College 
Via Massaua 7, 00162 Rome, Italy. 
TeL: (06) 83955.19; (06) 83L2L05. 


EDUCATIONAL COUNSELING AND P1AOQWEMT 
For ULS. Universities and Secondary Schools, by a professional staff of 
former Ivy admissions deans mxl published autbois. 

HOWARD GREENE AND ASSOCIATES 

FOUNDED 1968 

Consultants to multinational corporations 
and hundreds of international families 
-237 Post Road West 214 East 70th Street 

Westport, CT 06880, U.SA. New York, NY 10021 USA 
(203) 226-4257 (212) 737-8866 

Telex: 178285 EDUC-UT 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


BAO-HORS • MASTER'S ■ DOCTORATE 
For Work Academic; life Experience. 
Send detailed resume 
far free evaluation. 

PAOHC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 

600 N. Sepulveda BIvtL, 

Los Armies, California 
90049, Dept. 23. USA. 


*|Q MANHATTANVILLE COLLEGE 


•••in beautiful Westchester County 

north of New York City 

— courses offered at eight levels 
— TOEFL & University Prep 

— executive/tecbolcaVlndii^rial programs 

— summer youth & teacher programs 

Six starting times & dormitory rooms available throughout the year_ 
For information call or write: 

Marilyn X Rymnlak - Director - ISSC/EU 
Manhatfanvifle Coll e ge - HT 
Purchase, NY 10577. (914) 694-2200 
^wvwvTabz: 230199 SWIFT UR or Attm MVLvwws. 



THE AMERICAN 
SCHOOL 
OF FLORENCE 


Nursery through grade 12, 
college preparatory, 
international baccalaureate, 
American High School 
diploma, 

accredited 33 year. 


Via del Carota, 16, 
5001 2 Bagno a ffipofi, 
Rrenza, Hedy. 

Tel^ 055/640.033. 


Thorough CenuBn, Bar 












PREPARE FOR: 


ESL REVIEW -TOEFL 
FMGEMS-CGFNS 
FLEX 1,2,3 • MSKP 
NMB 1.2,3-NOB 
NPB-NCB1 
• GMAT-LSAT-CPA 
MCAT-DAT-VAT 
OGAT-SAT-ACT 
EXEC, SPEEDREADING 




EDUCATIONAL 
CENTER 
test nemunm si«3aijsts sce ms 

For iniormanon regarding 


programs authorized under 

Federal ia» lo enroll 
non-immlgrani alien sludenis 
m the USA. pfeaae call: 

212*977-0200 

Or Write: Dec*. HT 

Stanley H. Kaplan 
Educational Center Ltd. 

131 Wesl 56 Slreel 
New York. N.Y. 10019 
Permanent Comers In More 
Than 120 Maor US CiUes 
Puerto Rito & Toionto Canada 


french 



in New York Oty - 

• Small dasses . . 

• Native French teachers 

• Library, films, lectures 

• Open year round 


French Institute / 
Alliance Francaise 

22 E. 60th SL, N.Y. 10022 


Independent Doy School 

Grades Nursery-1 2 
- ' Large Campus and 
Extensive Sports facilities . 


g-jjjllij Advanced Placement and IB available. 
Ip pP^ I Accredited by NAIS, EOS, 

Middle Slate s Association. 

far catalog phase contac t ! ’* 

American School of M3an — AdmissJoas 
Vffloggio Mirasoie, 20090 Noverasco <fi Opwra, 
Mflrni, ITALY. -Tel.: (02) 524-1546. " 


Me IUNk hL Ifl / 21 17 77 -- 

InfamationaLBotmBng Sdtooffor Giri* 

Q Cafa 12 to 20 yram. Daiiililii llj a i ii ii t iAFlwu 
lamia court, heated mrtmming-paoL 

□ ComprcheoBhc aadaak prognm la umatl daM. Offickl oartiflorta» and 
cfiplomaa. 


D Intensive study of French and Twliili Ijtt m Mty h l w Aw 
□ FuD American Hid) Schorf PruramTG^&&12. OIFISAT, PSAT, ACH). 
TOEFL. A^wmraa Ptawmwfl. Lolhge pn&sooe. T«wlUr mbenity secox 


mbenity sccq> 


□ Secretarial and commocial «na fai French or Elfish. Wad uocsscma and 
computer science. 

□ Dnonifiad activities; art. music, ballet, coobay, xporta. Edocaoooal trips. Waiter 
vacarians in Cnas, Swiss Alps. Summer came. 



EARN AN AMERICAN 
MANAOTMENT DEGREE IN BRUSSELS 




Mssar.of Science ie 

Compeer IrfmnMmSyfflans 


Thendnatage 

lomntiBodb^e^cnaHc: 

■ CrnWrtfhmimny mncnifiairl titaaa 

• EndwwhmiiaDMlamgnaaieTBME 

■ InrWawai ftimij^ WeapBlrffanipe 1 - 

ftxxicdicd-airijrxpfraci: 

■ E* 3 SBJ dBB BI pKKtr Iffli 

jncaanadafi 

• Tine earn bqimt joauy, 

Haul jjq « ,iu tw 


• ftSdne sofae aiffiaiia 12 weft; 

par-one ia2! woks . 

• TdIdk annst^hr Skrac sodne ' •' 

Koori% ad dft at nvxfia^ ffMM 

FvfiffiktridnHiBcadaa: ■! 

BmncllsiieioyBtxsEh 

I7A Aierae de h Tdm dfti Be 19 ' 

Mffl Brassed Bripcn-Td (85 511 M‘. 


BOSTON UWVERSTY MUSSELS 

■c^Un«rBaara1M«4lya>dVi4cEM<aOri(| 


TO l£ARN FRENCH 


Ceran. a ch&tsau in the Balgian, Ardennes where you .team and five; 
in French. Small groups and private lessons, wfttr teflor-made \ 
programmes tor Individual needs, ensure real^ prbgresffi. Good food;. 

. good company, good teachers. Come and learn, and enjoy youfset. 
We, te^h private people, companies, embassies. EEC. SHAPE etc.-’ 

For complete d6cumentatibn.:send this coupon or phone 
1 amlriterested In courses tor. Q Adults □ Young People; 

Private "□ Business - 


= SCHOOL OF HOTB."ADMffdISTRAnON 
AND TOURISM CHUR 


, WHSCHDCWHJ 2 ■ CH-7000 CHUR 
. 7H.081 22707) -TX.a 864 CH 



I MOW 

Vi 

4MERK 




DUORCZE 


SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
Combining the best features of 
European and American Music 
Bkicvtkin with a vital approach 
for students of all ages, profes- 
sional* and amateurs. Outstand- 
ing artist faculty. 

REGISTER NOW 
FOR FALL OR SUMMER TERM 
“The only Deferam Teachers 
TreWng School In M America 
rnmnrlTffll hr Fmiln lequee Oeh nay 


Ml 



ROSS 
UNIVERSITY 


Tf, 


SCHOOL OF MILAN 

For day students aged 3-18 


The school offers a British-based, English medium curriculum 
and extra-curricular programme, it is a recognized G.C.E and 
C.EJLB. testing center, and offers its awn transportation and 
lunch services. The current enrollment is 600 with 37 national- 
rties represented. Boarding fadfifies are not available. 


For further details phase apply to: The f to u dhm nle r. 
Via Bazzoki 6, Milano 20153 - Tel.: 45.24.749 


Specie' courses for foreign students 
in Hotel Administrarion/Monogemenf 

and Tounsm. 


4 -vv, 7 ! k lack 's 


'eouwixyul. "osia sau>aa otce w 


3TORD? IA CADEMYi 

ONE GTUOENT. ONE MASTER n EACH CLASS I 


For bojrj USDol BMBfage w supahoi 
m u Haww: 


• wta nave aEMMmte drtctracMs 

« <*» how lost one or more y«ra oi sctnol 

• who »asMo accateran. or 

• tsralgn stuStens «Hng w amw 
AmMcan unfcwraues 


ConpWNy Hdnrtdual retmetkm 

m a srivne ctusnam (MUib. 
FWHfl wfcntstans. 

196S-1966 Doankng an a tunttm S22.MX). 

PO. DrtMsr P WeHbnxk. CT DSi«e LISA 
ATT. OflpL m 003) 309-62J7 


SCHOOL OF 


12 Groouoiing Ck&ses ■ ClMcoi 
CJwmHid Plocemenl Program 
GSL VA and Other Financial Aia 


SCHOOL OF 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 


I Graduating Clas&ei • Clinical 
Experience in me United Slates 
and Israel • GSL. VA. and Diner 
Financial Aid. 



Notre Dame totemafe.il School - Rome 

American coiiege preparatory and ehmwUaay eriiool for boys. 


pades 5-8, 34tii ouccesaftii year, 99% of graduates accepted at 
major American coUegea. Advanced Placement program* and 
preparation available to qualified student*. v ansuy and intra- 
mural athletic program. Cbaarootn Geld trip an and histon 
eluaea. ResiJrnl guidance counselor. Acerediied by Middle 
States Association. 

34th year of service to international education. 

Depl. H. 796 Via Anrefin. 00165 Rome. luh. 

Phones; 62L60JL 621.60.71. 


AK, ION 


THK HHITIMi IMf HNATION M. m IKIUI 
IN THK l-UfM ll-'WI'« \I.PK 



• 250 boys and giris, 1 1 -1 B yean of age 

• British G.C.E., Amor icon College Board 

• Excellent university preparation - USA, UK, 
Canada, Europe 

• Character building, good sports and skiing 


Study in Switzerland 


• hrtenJriv® French Courses (Alfiarice franpaise) 

• Maturity suissa - Matriculation 
•Baccafeureatlran^als - Matriculation 

• Commercial and Secretary Studies 

• Summer Courses in August and Sept 


Entamat-Extamat EcotoLdmane 
W 021001501 acfwrtndePrdvSe 

T&ex 26600 Cf +1001 Lausanne 


lemania 


For farther information and entrance rw q u irm i A i ttiappfy to; 
DC HEADMA5IBL AfOUN COO EC E, IMS OCSBCS-V1IARS, 

svnnauM). telz ( 025 ) 35 v 31 . thbl- acol ch. 


Franklin College 
via Teraereie 10 
GSOQ Lugana 
Sum Borland 

Telephone. Q91 - 328595 


Boin Schools Accepting Aaollcoliom 
for Julvontf November Semesters 


information: laternoiianal Eaucaitonai 
MmlssMos. inc. asa west 34tn si. 
New York, N.Y. 1*081, (2121 279-5540. 


EXPERIENCE COUNTS! 
NON-RESIDENTIAL 
DEGREE PROGRAMS 


po mPco d or a dondard mens. TV cast n 
maderata} the hn» far cproptebon a start- 

me at Education. StudMi vratjwde. 


CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY 
for ADVANCED STUDIES 
5chool of Professional Management 

Office of the Deem, Room HT-T 
1 00 GolG Drive. 

Novate, CA PiM7. 14151 382-1 600. 


LEARN ENGLISH 
IN NEW YORK 


Intensive Programs 
Group /Private Lessons 
Bum ness E nglish 
University Preparation 
Conversation Programs 
Nationally Accredited 

THE CENTER FOR 
engush STUDIES 

330 7th Ave.,N.Y.C 10001 

(near Penn Station) 


CENT ER FOR UNIVERSITY STUDIES 

{ -jauf\ I AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF ROME 


LICENSED DEGREES 

AA. In Humanities, Social Sciences 

A. A.S. in International Business 

B. B.A. in International Business 
(three years in Rome, one year London or U.S.) 


High school graduates: inquire into our joint enrollment 
with American University (Washington D.C.) 


For detailed information write: Via Marche 54 
00187 Rome, Italy - Phone 493.528 - Telex 612510 


FRANKUN COLLEGE SWITZERLAND 
Education for International Competence 
Accredited by Middle States Association 


M 


FranKJln College 
8BG United Naum P<«« 
New Yoifi. New Yeffc 10017 
Telephone. 212-00 7775 



Get ywr degree and 
an education too. 



EVSTITUT MONTANA ZUGERBERG 


I n temedional bays' boarding school with rigorous UJL aoHege -ij 
preparatory progran for Americans. Grades 5-12 (Separate i 
lechora for French, Germart and ItofiorvspealdnB sludem). ~i-~ 
Thorough practice of modern languages. Highly quoCfied American j/f 
faculty. Affifidte member Nafiond Association of Independent FNe pj- 
Schoab. GoBege Boards. Idealfy iocntad at 3£00 fed above seo\^v 
level, in esntral Switzerland, 45 minuta* boin Zurich and hjeeme.A> b 

sports, excellent ski fodStm. Travel Workshop during spring j 

vo c ati o n. Language Program in July and August. 


Writ* Dean of Hie A m erica n School bietftwt Mo nt ana 
6316 Zogerberg, S s ri t ieri ond 


tospeai 

•speak 




*«w«*led Iw tl 

ftifiXMban ail Fi \ 

te WirifSe' State'. 

Am,, * f 1 , 

■ ■ “«Mts LC 

nugee&schoctL. 
Tareoms nm. 

BumraLMtmis 
■cj, hoKed Sbdi 

■ratal Bronbm-T 
S, frendtMscf. 






•■t. KOf 
Ptx 

VRU 

,5 "»1frdte, 




SsS 




You warn an off-campus BA. or MA 
Oegree. twit you're concerned aoout 
the crediMJty of external programs 
Among the oldest In tno country. 
Norwich University's independent 


study programs are challenging. 

dited, and higniy-regarded. Moreover, admbaons — ™.*-nn 

they support Intellectual, professional, Call or wrtte. Adnuseians 

ano personal growth in a way mat is unt* (specify BA or M. a. ) 
quo In American higher education: Norwich university, Bra 26 

nowhere will you find wtdet iaUtude In Vermont College Cam bus 
designing your own degree progra m Montpelier. YT 0560Z 

used on your interest end goals, (802)239-0522. 

NORWICH UNIVERSITY 


“^nlwa netudency (l work weeke . 



THK AMEUCAN OVECSEAS SCHOOL W JMJtt IS 
EDUCATIONAL NONDEWHtNATIONAL S CHOOL U$ 1 NC 
AMERICAN CURR 1 CVLUM AND TEACHING METHODS AND 
IS ACCREDITED BY THE MOSOLE STATES ASSOCIA- 
TION Of COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS. 


HIGH SCHOOL 


I/& Co l leg e f 
Advtoecd 


PHptfMeiy Curriculum 
i Plac emen t Courses 


MIDDLE SCHOOL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
Program (or Ages 1113 Program for Age* 5-10 
(Grades WI) (Grade* K-5) 


■ ACTIVITIES INCLUDE.. EogMih Sencv 

SlUknprtnr FcrnlwU InKruhOiMlC AiWeira Inlnmural 
Spun, Dntnu Varted Eitracumcular hurram. Ffcld Trip* 
rad E«ur»loo» Sprm* Few. 


FOB INFORMATION TELEPHONE 38G4Ut 


3-f 1 VIA CASSIA. 0016? ROME. ITALY 



i » !> 1 if. 

1 . i • ; r » 1 1 1 


TURN TO 
PAGES 
FOR MORE 


AreY^teoIcingfar:^ 

sch °o* fef YOUft child?- 


i'.'r/fi.t.riill 



UnW sto y . prapor utet y, godes W3, 
bocning, smaB dosaes. 
Ew^ert radvetsay nrrapto . ra* . 

fadtaduollMd leadring 
in emteft Jaotajr otawphera. 

AA sports end 

uRksdiaMdetadioura:: 


VWtos >1854 (WjUyrfn, 

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TeL.- 075/ 341 3 67 
T«taks 456 166 T01£CH 


LAS 





















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUR0AY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7-8, 1985 



SPECIAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


gWBRmun 




an international network 


London 

George Road, Kingston upon Thames. SunayKT2 7 PE, England 


§§§ ITHACA COLLEGE 


• SoanJlng and day school tor girts 

• Age range 12-18 years, Grades 7-12 

• Amarican College Preparatory Curriculum 

• International Baccate umate Programme 


TeL +44 1 948 0571 


London / New York 


offers 

I American Univaan Program in 
kwfon leading to degrees in Bostaas, 
Computer orudics. Humanities, 
p "* nm - 

I After successful 1st year, coraiune at 
Idaca, New Yod^ or transfer toother 
American tlnnetsries- 
For further infoanation please contact: 

Dr. Christie King 

Ithaca GoUcge 
35 Hamngmn Gardens 
London SW 7 4JU 
TeL: (01) 370 1166/7 

Idwa CoBege b accredited by the 
Middle States Association of CoBmt 
amdSduolt. - 


Paris 

72, Boulevard da la Seussaye, 92200 Nou% Franca 
> Day school for tfrfa and boys aged 3- 14 yearn 
• M ontessori approach In pre-K groups 
'American style curriculum in K- Grade 8 
! Strong emphaste on the teaching of French language 

TeL +331 624 1061 


‘Rome 

Via tfi VIBa Lauchfl 18a 00191 Borne. Italy 

1 Day school tor g< its (K-Grade 12) and boys (K-Gnde 6 ) 
1 BaertBng for girts aged 14 - 18 years. Grades 9*12 
American College Preparatory Curriculum 
> International Baccalaureate Programme 


TeL +39 6 3280671 



ST MARY’S GATE 

BOURNEMOUTH 

‘ (Founded 7886) 


IntirtmuJctit BoinluK dnd Dav Sr bool for Girfsr, 

8> 18 uiuv. 

hilcmaiitiiul SuninuT School for Girts, 7 • 16, and Bens 7 • 10 tears. 

Tin* M-ltonl i> iiili-niaJjoJiaJ in outlook, and ihf-rr u specialised nation jo 
IfllNi 3 Hiimd |jnjrua“> throughout l hr war. 

Tlfe staff an* hiphK i|iu[iiii-dL aud there 5$ a wide range of subjects at both A 
and O 1p\i'1». 

Sturiv bedroom* ior Sixth Forma. 

Tlie school in xiiuated near the. beach, but ntands 100 feet abow sea level. 


Full ifftuils from the Headmistress. 


Each school has Hsoam prospectus, tee schedule and admission 
procedure. More Information maybe obtained by contacting the 
8choolsdlncttyonhmughtheProvindeiCentenSOmsonParkDrive. 
Ttmytown, NY 10591. USA. 


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON 

THE OLDEST AND LARGEST COLLEGE OF 
THE FEDERAL UNIVERSITY OF LONDON 


ARCHITECTURAL ASSOCIATI ON SCHOOL 
OF ARCHITECTURE 

34-36 BEDFORD SQUARE. LONDON WC1B 3ES 
TeL: 01-636 0974 


r 

ten 


Founded in 1847, the AA,«itxuted in central London, is the Ingest and only 
independent school of architecture in. the UX. 

In addition to the 5-year recognized course leading to the AA Diploma and 
RXBA Parts 1 & 2, one year courses are avauule at any level. from 
Fou n da tio n to Postgraduate: He RIBA & AIA enjoy leriprocsJ arrange- 
ments. 


• Full degree and JYA programs in Arts, Science, 
Law, Engineering , Architecture. 

• Graduate studies in most major fields. 

Full credit recognitioa 

Details and appticatiesi fexms from: 

JL N.CF. Qewfcy, Assistant Registrar 

University College London 

Mllilill Gower Street 

hti'WiB.i London WC1E 6BT, England. 


A SMALL SCHOOL? 


WM> mi4 dna, aacdn tEodw-pupl mka 
thirty Men aonime of toeing oodi fagi as 
VI rekadwi Beteibcroudi a ffm a bafcrad 


. PenoRal mtenrfew are preferred, but portfolio* may be nuensd in 
abe en tbu Trarua^Us an tdoo ngnind. 

Prospectus and application farms are available from die Admissions Regis- 
trar at the above address. 


utj piea d iiod^ t lcpinQap^Jiaudyi'uobity 
end dwoorr. Stunted on lie ate trff mim 


. :s s. i 
- •» ---rs 


m 

:;w| 


PLACES AVAILABLE FOR 
SEPTEMBER 
JANUARY 


* AJUA.Sc. * BA. 
* MA * M.BJV. 



east cf FSynvxA, tottborough pro-adne 

* hi boordng fadries for boyi end gfr 
13-18 

* GCE eaan aepondion 

* Sbdh farm iron 1985 

* Good «udy (octal 

* CSmhwg creasing . wincbwfag. stArg o- 
ptMen. te mu b f unite a g ain* 

The HeaekmOCf a a mentor of he Weper^ 
dmt Scfcook A m cc rt i m Inctxjorawd. aid cf 
die Eureparei Good of UdBidiond SchaoA 
. For Prounam please couoct 

Mrs. Sonia Donovan, (tag*. KfT, 


O etfnw » toAdvasesd 
Shan end long caunei 
A m amwodplieii a rranged 


Sets College 


Kaeofftamd by 
The British Counaf 


Bunar, BaHaboroudh School 
Habln Devon. PL8 1JX. 


Hofceton, Devon, TO 1JX 

or Telephone 075,530 223 


6445 bang A am 
Cover* Gotten 
London WC2E9JH 
Teiophonet 01-340 3581 
Tele* 268312 Wacom Sated 


MostM 

forBu 


+ Career courses 
s, pre: Medicine, 


L’fiCOLE DE CUISINE 
FRANCAISE 


S. de ftfirtsecfc opens ap for yon the 
ever enuring m s Ar t otthe catering 


I Pharmacy, Veterinary, Dentistry 
I ana Engineering ... 




OVERSEAS STUDENTS 
Welcomed with 
High School Diptoma 
Advanced placement for A level 


ever pawing m a rta t of the catering 
bufnem in afforinge very high level 
of winching In French auane, vine, 
idle Barter and rmtanrant «w«r- 
menL. Cooking courses are pro by 
French chefs trained at the Confon 
Bleu de Alii. 


MBUDkNOBUEl 


IKE MUNICH 
INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL 




Contact 


- DIPLOMA COURSE 

Starring Sept 1985 and Feb. 1986 is 
fbDowod by a five month training in a 
fint-cUu restaurant either In 
Fiance or in En g l a nd . 

CERTIFICATE COURSE 

(10 weeks). 


AMtmiBcouaaiNonavaz 

movnuNC! 

■ limit 1 -In— rn 




8130 Percha bei Stamberg 
SchJats Budthof 
TeL- 08151/3071 or 3072 


■ AamiiUlMaai 
sesaALF&vmaBs 


Private, full-day school 
Nursery through Grad® 13 


mRNBOROUGH 

ICT-COLLEGE- 

OXFORD 

VrX OKI 5ED 


Starring Sept. 1985 or Nov. 1985. 
fS. 1986 or April 1986. 

dapham Bouse, LUUngton , 
Sussex BN265RQ. 
TeLs 0323 870 047. 
INT,: 44/ 323870047. 


• UOiMaltVmtUVk* 


SVoog c oll ag e praporolory progrt 
— Amarican rtgh School Cfpioma — 


na KX IQ vtaaOKUH •«. USA. 
icMCNounau 


OertfAmaito 
rrf Cm m tirt f 


G.C.E. “O" A ,f A” levels 

IngwiK of Mrodon: bgfirii 
Gamas and French tanpMsg* program 


TjBftN* %i 


YOU WANT 
TO SPEAK GERMAN? 
...SPEAK TO US TOST 



Goethe-lnstitut 


Mora than 3 million studanh in 33 years 
146 institutes in 66 countries 




.• re* . IF 


e. g. KOPWHAQDl T«l 133454 
POONA, TeL 60042 
PUSH 1st. 2574 

15 institutes in-theTedertd RepuUic of Germany 




For dstc&ed i infor motiom 
QOCTCdN SmUT 
ZeadwwwDaQ 
leaba(Matz3 
D-8000 MSndisn 2 
TeL (O) 89-5999-200 
Tehnc 522940 




' / 
// 


r / / / 
/ / // 


RHRMCE BOOK 85 - Bocnfing Schools 

Germany and Switzerland 


This book, contains oil types of schools existing in Germany A 
Switzerland, described In detail and selected according to Impor- 
tant criteria including useful tips and Information for parents and 
Hteir children. .^6 

To obtain this reference book, please send DM30r— to: 


Euro-lnternatsberatung 
CrfBpormnlraMe 44 MN MAncbea n, west ceranoy. 
TeL: (em/eel nez. 

Advisory sendee provided any time by orrans/eroem. 


AUSTRIA 



SEA PINES ABROAD 

A-5324 Fatstesiau bei Salzburg 


AUSTRIA 


SPAIN 




King’s College Madrid 

BriO'li l>a> and B«unJmg vhool 


An American pr epar at ory sdiad situated high In the Alps. 
Grades 9 thru 12. Go-educational. Boardmg. 

High academic standards. Skiing. Supervised travel. 

iw^^v^rvndMWF FOR CA 


• Recognised British School with international 
. Sersity entry in U.K., 


SALZBURG INTERNATIONAL 
PREPARATORY SCHOOL 


?$» 




student botty oi ow. . _ T1 ^ 

• Preparation for university entry in U.K., 

• ^mination curriculum “? cIud ^Jff lces ’ 
computer studies, economics, modem 

• departments taking 

. fiS/^ensivt grounds.. 

• New boarding accommodation opening 

September «^ndevawfas.nGotoso.Ma«hid 


A coeducational American boarding sduol in Europe's most 
beautiful city. Grades 8 to 12 plus R G. Highest academic 
standards. CoQese pteparaioiy and advanced ptacemem couises. 
Extensive navel skiing and cultural programs. 

Far catalog write: SIPS, Moosstr. 106*. A-S020Sateburg. AUSTRIA 
TH. (662144485 ft 46511 




September ^ vareias, HGoiwo.M»driA 


- '> * 




.1 

.v 




dS/mSS- - WALLOftCA-SPAIH 

.cMu°y SSiiESFSSw — 


LEARN SPANISH IN MADRID 

— Open all year round — all levels 
— Small groups — max. 5 students 
— Open to pupils of all races, 
religions and nationalities 

For (Mated Intormabon apply to: 


Cfca'»&»t I Z1-9maitaM«T«ta.43»DMa£vT« *017523 




UNIVERSE DE 
PARIS SORBONNE 


LDrerli EApanTMTIKI 

«TBtoda da lo OvAaodon 


artMvanM 


COURS DE 
CIVILISATION 
FRANCAISE 


GRADUATE COIASES 

• Univanity Courses. 

• ’'MAGfSTDS da longua at de , _ _ . 

Gvilfcofion Francoises' ' for all • French language and CMBxahan 


UNDBtGRAOUATE COURSES 

French boccokmraat faval required. 


Civilmnion rrancaf*a* tor au 
n orio na S tias (equtvolant to AAA. 
CredHU.SJC) 

• Sabonne Summer Session for 
faretyi Teoehen & Students. 


Courses. Limited number of 
inscriptions. 

Winter and Spring Sernori r s. 


• Courses far Teodwn of French 1 • Summer Courses: July, August, 


and Gvftzation. 
d trotemg courses in afl 


S ep temb er. 

• Interim Sessions: January. 


se.fr nr eha tOBip.lmy. byeeet *m CuSand seOba ef the French Ewlinwy. 

-JZta 


y— VMSWt Pi PAMS SO MO W NI 

frfre rwp i rfcn e rv o l i TBo Je de fa OrRetee Ihrafr 
modt 6 TWverste 

lim 'fill i r-tf tr r rf r i m e u mie 

and MkaNry orgondas comas baring to 

eritBatf ftatit|ea do Franpds Caramettkd o» fcamonfa 


by Mmectar or yecr indudad in the “Seraon Utheratan and AfogcMra. - 


Ml pan of the “cSpIQme sup6rieur > '. 

Students enroied in them praporolory course receive both CBt Z i u fr s 
end cfoiomas fcom the Sorbonne 
end the French Chamber of Commer ce end Indufry. 


ALLIANCE FRANCAISE 


(Private sthoal for higher education) 

101, Blvd RtBpal, 75270 Peris Cede* 06, FRANCE 
TeL 544J8J28. Tdex. 204941. Cable oddest: AUFRAN EMUS 
School open t£ yaratocndexrapf Xmaa and Eater 

A. Study of this French kmgwxgB 

4 week sesooni {except Api and December). 12 tesdani per year. Orientation last prior 
Ip fat l e ye e irirv i Bfrrsne or ii fr mi ve courses. 

1 ■ DHTMuuy, UUWllHaOTO OKI UUVIHOQ MMB 

-Sgoda 

-Piwju irion far the ate n ars u y c a rtBate of pradiocf French, lend of second 
0 fade) 

- fVapacfion far the French Ixmguoge Dipiomo (end of 3d grade). 

2 - Hgher level 

Pepe rd be far h^er cfpfamo of French modem riudei 
2 eawonfc Septenber/Jcniory and Februcey/June 
1 SunneriaiKn July and August 

B. Sported COUISOS. fttemneon awddde tgxn raqued) 

■ r Snpc r mion far Dipbma in Hgher French OutSos. 

-nonoancy LDrimccfu nx maenrg naui muoo 

- Business French prep cute an far Cerl&xfr ond Kfe(/r Dipfama ieued by thr Paris 
Omfrer of Commerce end tm Gertifioate wed by tea Alone Route. 

- Written French 

- Corwenotian dosses 
-Corapondanca courses 

- FedaQOfpccf eounas far traders of franch. 


Complement to lc«igiMC)e couvms. 

- Lmguoge lob o wrary fist &tm£ iamR 
■InguogrM wW n e [2 ad 3 bveit) Independent wort 

- U teorriory of phon et i c correOio n . 


free dba — afft n a wloMt .pan rmqimL 


WANT TO SPEAK FRENCH? 


You con, through the "TOTAL APPROACH" to Frandi, 
a unique -4 -w eefc program on the Rhriero 

COMPUTE AIUMY IMMB1WH, ONLY IN FMNCHi My BJ0- 17/50 
With 2 meali, in ernet groups. Aix&Mfcud donee, language Lc4i. Pnchce SetDons. 
DncunionlaBch, Excursion. I nifglng in ptwfr up in hirer it in doited. 

For oduAs. 6 t rvrfc from iwglnner I to odvrarced IL 

tl.rt 1 n-nfc hi— tii ii i rn.m rh»ti tqit Tf| ftrt If rent iri ]w 
Yearn et men writ ( nip wh i r l h fa d hcfn tetxHag rf t rend : te frfr 


, 23 Av*. Gfrv-Uderc. 


MSmtlT DE FRANCA15 - L7. 

>dmc, 06230 VOefrimbe/ Mar. TeL 


TeL- (93) OI-M-44 


LEARN AND LIVE THS RtNCH LANGUAGE 

in calm aid diybc sutroundngs nea Monte Grrio. 
tSSKrils Coo dM alrnethrmat cfai a rwgi efh&ek ad p tte m 

The CTOtt MfBOBHMNNf OtfoDB HMN^USS offers 33 
X Sit yntmof«Oei»noe.lM^»eryowfc<ietyoumoyoainaaiBalBryaf 
9 i S&S Frsndi to mV your profesond oratori needs. Sind groins. A ■ or 

BriMp t2 wmh courses dcHtng eodi morih. Can tee tapes tmdHury 

are ovoUfr to Sfixir* aperraed by a pufanor. 
fa* 1952 Bmdten vudi etvehmrt lew, done cr ««eh board tnd fadgng 

CNRE MlDITBtRArtei vtlllKS RANCAK5ES 

06320 Cap d’AH (Fhmce). 

.TeL: (93) 78.21.59 - Telex: CEMH) 461 792 F 




PROGRAMS 
IN PARIS 


ttnitf 

A private, nonproB coed school 
in a rural area near Cannes 


GRADES 1 to 13 


GRADUATE 6 UNDOGRADUATE 

ACADEMIC YEAR 

15 OCTOBER to 20 MAY 


□ English curriculum leading to 
CSl A GCE *©* Ms ‘A’ Levels. 


CSt A GCE ‘O’ A ‘A’ Levels. 

□ American curriculum leading 
to Cra SAT/ACH A AP. 

□ Small dosses, highly qualified 
staff. 

□ French as a second languoge 
for all Grades. 

□ English as a Foreign Language 
for notvnative speakers. 

□ Boarding possibilities with 
s ele cte d famgies. 


3 FEBRUARY to 20 MAY 


4WEBC PROGRAMS 


JANUARY - JUNE 
JULY - SEPTEMBER 


FVC ARTS - FASHK3N 
LANGUAGE- ART 
HBTOKY - NTEttOR 
DESIGN/ AROfTECTURE 


Write or telephone: 

PARIS AMBUCAN ACADEMY 
9, rue fa lfafrfa7500S fait fraMV 
TtL XBX5J09 or 325.00.91 



CAMHON SCHOOL 

ATHENS, GREECE 

NEW BOARDING HOUSE 


Campion is an international co -educational sc hod with 900 
pupils aged 3- 18,. offering preparation Tor universities world- 
wide, but particularly those in Britain and the US. 

The school admits pupils of any race, colour, ethnic origin 
or nationality and is situated in one of the safest and 
educationally most interesting cities in the world. 

The new boarding house is in a green suburb conveniently 
close to the school buildings- The resident house-mistress, 
her family and staff, together provide a home atmosphere in 
food and amenities, ranging from central heating to spacious 
common-rooms with colour TV and video. Ail boarders are 
accommodated in single or double study-bedrooms with 
private bath-rooms. 

For further information please write to the Hea dmas ter 


AJ. EGGLESTON, OJUL, MA (Ohm) 
P.O. Box 65009 
GR 154 10 PsycWco, Greece 
Telephone: 813 3883 


THE AMERICAN DEGREE 
YOU CAN’T GET IN AMERICA 


You get an American 
university B.A, or B.S. 
degree with us in a choice of 
international and traditional 
disciplines. 

But you get a lot more. A 
multicultural environment, in 
doss and out. An atmos- 
phere rich in challenge and 
stimulation. Unique opportu- 
nities to grow, to shine, to 
move ahead! 

Think about it. 

Credits transferable. 

All classes in English. 


OF ARTS AND SCIE1 


UNE FACULTE AMERICAINE 


For information contact : 

Mrs. Pfeiffer, The American 
College in Paris, B.P. 107, 
31,ave. Bosquet, 75007 Paris. 
Telephone : (1) 555.91.73 




INSTITUT FRANCO -AMERICAIN DE MANAGEMENT 


HARTFORD UNIVERSITY 
NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 


une grande 6cole entemationale 


Crdd et ddvetoppd en association avec des 
unfversitds amdricaines rdputdes Hartford U M (Conn.), 
Northeastern U., Boston (Mass.). 

3 ans de formation supgrieure & la gestion (2 ans & 
Paris, 1 an aux Etats-Unis). 

2 dipldmes : diplOme IFAM, Bachelor of Science 
in Business Administration. 


4* annfie : obtention du dipldme MBA Master 
in Business Administration.' 


adm issi on : Baccalaurtot oxlg6 + 6prauves orates 
admission pareBNe on 3* mtnbe (DEUQ, DUT_) 


=h- 


Renselgnements'-IFAM, 19, rue C 6 pr 6 , 75015 Paris. T6i.:73+3823 
Elabilssenwnt tntemaHooaJ d'Enseignemant Suptiteur Privi 

Nom : Prdnom : 

Bac: 1™langue: 

Adresse: tol: 


STUDY 
IN FLORIDA 


Become a TUNON HOSTESS hr a TUNON 


Orlando, Flot 
Epcot Center, 
Orcus World. 


la. Paid naming 1 acuities at 
Disney World. Sea World and 
Special student credit. 

23 SCHOOLS WORLWIDE. 


164, ( T H ) rue dn Fg SaM-HonorA 75008 PARIS. 3594KL0O. | 


= LEARN FRENCH = 

in CHAMPAGNE, near Paris 
with the ROTHMANS INSTITUTE 


• An intensive French course for executives aid students, 

• English, German, Spanish, Italian, 

• The method used is sponsored by the French Ministry of Industry and 
Research [AN.V-A.R.J, 

• Recreational activities (sdEng, tennis, horse-riding, etc.), 

• 1,500 executives and students have learned a kxiguage in our Institute. 


ROTHMANS INSTITUTE 

6 Avenue des Lombards, 10000 TROYES (France) 
— — Tel.; (25) 82.37.66 8 82.48.45 - 


INTENSIVE COURSES 

FOR COMPANIES 
FRENCH, Engfish, ttafiai. GERMAN 
Groups or individueds 
flexible hours. Troralations 

LANGUAGES: 

an investmeri, a necessity, a pleasure. 

UNILANGUE5 

9 plan de la Madeleine. 75008 Paris. 
TeL 265JSQ41., end La Mfarae. 


# ECOLE NICKERSON! 

t Longues Knwnus 1 

r Since 1962 1 

French ] 

Goman, ha Bm, FmgKs h, Arabic, 


329 


Intensive, extensive courses 
Group* or private tenons. 
Adah* 

ECOLE NICKERSON 

3 Ave. da Ftisdenl Wilson 

k 75116 PARIS i 
\ 5th floor J 
\ TeL: (1) 723.36.03 J 


For a detailed booklet about hms unique 
audto-caesene system, our Morins and 
nor utter services, ple as e contact: 


VF 


(VERSION FRANCAISE) 
37, Pd. ds Clmlez 
MM0 NICE - FRANCE 
TM: (93) « 90 91 


AMERICAN 

COMMUNITY SCHOOLS 
OFATHENS 


The Oldest Accredited 

AmgitoapSphoql W'ASfeens 


1125. Trained anrt.CqHtfted FhctA» 

Over 52 N &tlrx i HlIHeg Currerfly O n p lfad Pre- MtW w Qnrton 
.* throat YWMSredg 

Extanstye Acadentjfp,and Unlvanrity Testing Program 
Advanced gj j5jfiggEjjg T Bnecatauraate Diploma 
•\ K-12 ^apt^^gecy Program ~ 

Btteosito.yatg^ly^rage Couraes 

Broad OdtreajF^^tpehUHgto^ Graeca antf Abraad 
Partidp^kiby h^arngl pn Bl SpjWttog Ewre 

Co-educational B o^flhig Uott 9-1 2th Grade 


For Information & Brochure writs to: 
Office of Admissions 
129 Aghias Paraskevte 
152 34 Halan*i, Athens, Greece 
Tel: (01) 659-3200 Tbc 223355 ACS GR 







Page 8 


totoknATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7-8, 1985 


ARTS / LEISURE 


Man Who Changed Chicago Skyline Looks at Urban Problems 


By Michael Gibson 

Iniemuiiona/ Herald Tribune 


P I ARIS — Bertrand Goldberg, 
73L is 


one of the architects who 
has most contributed to shape the 
Chicago skyline. His two central 
high-nses, the Marina Gty project 
that went up on the Chicago River 
in 1962, have been dabbed the 
"Corncob Towers." The buildings 
were so novel and notorious in the 
1960s that Goldberg's children 
were known to their classmates as 
"the Corncob kids.” 

Today he is working on a $500- 
million, privately financed project 
known as River Gty, which is go- 
ing up in the Chicago's freightyard 
and in four or five years will pro- 
vide bousing for 10.000 people. 

An exhibition devoted to his 
work (some 120 projects since the 
beginning of his career) has opened 
at the Pans An Center, and Gold- 
berg was in the city for the occa- 
sion. 

"We are in gigantic trouble with 
what we call the urban problem,” 
he said. “No one knows quite what 
to do about the fact that cities are 
disintegrating throughout the in- 
dustrial world. The city is no longer 
a manufacturing center. Manage* 
men l moved out of the city and 
took the factories with them. One 
reason for the move was that the 
workers are easier to manage in the 
suburbs where union organizations 
can't reach them. This leaves the 
city as a white-collar center and the 
question arises whether there is 
enough' employment available to 
absorb the full city population.” 

Also, he said, the dty has be- 
come the center for the distribution 
of welfare. Poor people from rural 
sections have moved in to obtain 
health services and what he called 
"the goodies that the various gov- 
ernments promise.” As a result the 
dty no longer functions as an im- 
portant center for intellectual de- 
velopment. invention and maufac- 
turing, he said. 

"Meanwhile the burden of sup- 



lion presents to serious architect we 
is to build in ways that lend to- 
favor the formation of a communi- 
ty. This implies a grouping of utili- 
ties and services, and also, quite 




mm3 


simp ly, it implies taking human 
needs into account and not just the 
abstract h uman entity for which a 
Le Corbusier, For instance, so often 
appeared to be building. 

Goldberg takes obvious pride in 
the fact that the Raymond Hard 
Center, which he buOt in Chicago 
in 1966 is “the only housing for the 
poor in which the police have noL 
been required to come in and keep 
order” Why? Because, he believes 
the architecture itself is a message 
to the people who live there, and 
the message is that their humanity 
and individuality is respected by 
the architectural concept 

"You do not have to live in a box 
designed for the ‘standard poor hu- 
man being’ ” Goldberg said. 

This message is inherent in the 
overall departure from the rectilin- 
ear canons of the Bauhaus (where 
Goldberg studied under Mies van 
der Rohe in 1932), but also in varia- 
tions within each unit — variations 
in light color and the angles of the 
walls, in the way family groups and 
elderly groups are integrated as 
well as m a number of other as- 
pects. 



Bertrand Goldberg 


this scale. "We have to take into 
account the realities of the trans- 
portation systems, of collecting 
garbage, of supporting educational 
systems,” Goldberg said. “Even the 
cost of maintaining central grocery 
stores that afford you the economy 


of supermarkets requires that you 
of busini 


Goldberg’s big projects combine 
rational I 


have $250,000 of business every 
week. That. means a ipinumirm of 

2^500 families. And if you want to 
favor competition by having two 
supermarkets, you would have to 
double that Figure. Which raises the 


‘Goldberg is strongly critical of 
Post-Modem architecture, which 
in his view, “has its roots in disap- 
pointment — a disappointment in 
the premises which the modem 
movement made and failed to de- 
liver, that of an urban design which 
would favor democracy and an 
equal and better iifel As a result we 
have become rather frivolous in our 
architectural forms.” He said he 
had his own roots “in the serions 
period in Germany the Bauhaus. 
And maybe 1 am an old fogey in 
that I believe in a better social or- 
der and a better world.” 

Goldberg was directed to the 
Bauhaus as a graduate student at 
Harvard. He spent only one year in 
Berlin (the Nazis dosed the school 
in 1933). but this exp eri ence seem 
to have been decisive. . 

He also studied painting under 
Kandinsky, whom be found dog- 
matic and insufferable. Joseph Al- 
bers, oo the other hand, “taught me 
how to see,” said Goldberg. Albers 
became a close, friend. 

Goldberg does not live in a high- 
rise buOdmgs, but says he will 
move into River Gty for a few 
years while his new home (which he 
is designing) is being built. He and 
his family nave lived for more than 
30 years in an early 20th-century 
house near the center of Chicago. 


bousing, recreational facilities, of- 
fices and services (and a marina, 
when possible) in a way that had at 
one time been against the law in 
Chicago. The law had to be 
changed when he wanted to build 
his Marina Gty (the “Corncob 
Towers”) in 1962, and the U.S. gov- 
ernment also had to be persuaded 



Chicago’s Marina Gty: the “Corncob Towers’ 


porting the dty rests on much few- 
er people," Goldberg said, “which 
is why it has become a place for the 
very rich and the very poor. The 


middle class has largely moved 
away.” 

One way Goldberg hopes to 
meet the challenge that the situa- 


Thefts Are Reported in Aix, Brittany 

dty. Now the dty regulations actu- 

CorrpiieJ by Out Staff From Dapauhts 

AIX-EN-PROVENCE, France 
— A copy of a Rembrandt self- 
portrait and a painting by Robert 

f’onfin omfih aFwuit '> 55 millirm 


ally require the blending that they 
iCfty 


once forbade. Marina Gty was the 
first “mixed-use” bousing to be 
built in the United States. 

Population density in a given 
area is a fundamental concern for 
the modem architect working on 


Can tin, worth about 253 milli on 
francs ($300,000), have been stolen 
from the Granet Museum. 


SPECIAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 



Webster now also offers the MBA degree 


1 



WEBSTER UNIVERSITY 


The Kimbell: Bid for Major Leagues 


IN EUROPE 


Accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. 
Evening and Daytime Classes. 


MA Degrees in Management, Marketing, International Relations, 
Human Resources Development, Economics and 
Finance, Computer Data Management, Energy 
Economics, and Business Administration. 

BA Degrees in International Studies, Management, and Com- 
puter Studies. 


The Associated Press 

F ORT WORTH, Texas — The story of how the 
KimbeC Art Museum acquired a major painting 
by the 17th-century French artist Nicolas Poussin 
shows bow a young institution has become a major 
player in the an market. 

"It's a coup to get any Poussin. His paintings are 
extremely rare,” said W illiam Jordan, chief curator 
and deputy director. The Kimbell acquired “Venus 
and Adonis” at the end of April for about $1 milli on. 

“It's more than just an acquisition for the KimbdL 
It's a rediscovery of an early composition,” said the 
museum's director, Edmund Pillsbury. 

In May 1984, Pillsbury spotted the painting, done 
between 1625 and 1628, in a dimly lighted basement at 
Christie's in London. For years, a major Poussin had 
been on the KimbelTs wish list. 

When Pillsbury first saw “Venus and Adonis,” it 
was dirty. Furthermore, in 1966 the British art histori- 
an and Pousszn scholar Sir Anthony Blount had writ- 
ten that the painting was done by a Poussin imitator. 

Pillsbury didn't believe iL “It looked as if it was by 
Poussin," he said. The question had to be resolved, but 
inquiries of by a major buyer such as the Kimbell can 
cause a work s price to skyrocket. 


"We seldom go into the auction market. You wind 
up bidding against people who have no limits,” Pffls- 
biuy said. 

In addition, Pillsbury did not think it would be 
possible to finish researching the painting by the July 
6, 1984 sale. “So I decided that I would do what JT have 
done in several cases: I would follow the picture, I 
would track it at the sale.” 

The day after a group of dealers bought the painting 
jointly for $365,000, Pillsbury telephoned to one of 
them. “1 said to him: I want to reserve the Poussin. We 
didn't discuss the price;” Pillsbury recalled. 

He had the painting sent to the conservation labora- 
tory at the Metropolitan Museum in New York, where 
X-rays showed that the composition had been changed 
while the work was in progress. This demonstrated, 
Pillsbury said, that a “ thinking artist” had been at 
work, rather than a copyist 
Pillsbury was now sure he wanted thepamting: “So 
I basically went to the dealer and said, ‘I think I want 
to buy it. How much?’ The bargaining was 
complicated.” ' 

But the price was considered a bargain. The last 
time 3 major painting by Poussin was sold, in 1981 , the 
Getty Museum paid $3.7 million, PiDsbniy said. 


Next 8 -week term starts 

October 21 (Leiden) and October 28 (Vienna and Geneva) 


DmEMMOm POSITIONS 


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2311 EA Leiden 


Tel. (071) 144341 


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Tel. (022)742452 


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1010 Vienna 


Tel. (0222) 521136 



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The newest TASIS campus, situated 
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There is also an intensive, year-long course in Arabic 
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Summer, semester and year abroad programs enable 
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for academic year; 11,250 for summer (six credits). 
Intensive Arabic — $5,500 for academic year, $1,375 
for summer. 


Write to: 

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The American Utuvmily in Uro 
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UAA 

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Tim American UnrramilT in Cairo 

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CAIRO. EGYPT 

Telex: 92224 AUCAIDN 



#Ip% THE EUROPEAN 
Wz? PARLIAMENT 



is organizing open competitions for the recruitment of 


INTERPRETERS 


into the 7 official languages of the European Community 
from Spanish or Portuguese 


SCHILLER 

INTERNATIONAL 

UNIVERSITY 


The American University 
in Europe 


Accredited Member. AJCS. 
Washington DC. USA. 


AaeoesVe, Bacbekrr and Master degree 

Luunei in Business Admin btrm two. 

Hotel M ana g emen t. Law A Public 

Admjnirtratnm. Computer Studies, 

Pre-Ensuteerfna and Pre-Medicine, 

ach, Spanish or German in (be 


Bppnmrixl* country. Intensive 
Bogush; CoUese Preparatory Courses 
grades 10-12 at Scnilter Acadetn 


PRINCIPAL REQUIREMENTS 

- Relevant University degree or equivalent professional experience ; 

- training or experience as a conference interpreter; 

- perfect command of one official language of the European Community 
(Danish, Dutch, English, French. German. Italian.of Modern Greek) 
and thorough knowledge. of either Spanish or Portuguese plus two other 
official languages of the European Community : knowledge of a fourth 
Community official language is desirable : 

- candidates must be nationals of a Member state of the European 
Community; 

- AGE LIMIT : Not more than 40 years of age (bom after7 October 
1944) excluding exemptions detailed in the Notice of Competition. 

The issue of the Official Journal giving details of these competitions can 
be obtained from : The Recruitment Service, European Parliament, 
L-2929 LUXEMBOURG, quoting as reference the number of the 
competition concerned: . 

- PE/98/LA for danish language interpreters 

- PE/99/LA for german language interpreters 

- PE/100/LA for modem greek language interpreters 

- PE/I01/LA forenglish language interpreters 

- PE/1Q2/LA for french language interpreters 

- PE/103/LA for Italian language interpreters 

- PE/104/LA for dutch language interpreters 
Candidates should send the application forms contained in the Official 

Journal, duly completed, to the Recruitment Service, 

European Parliament. L-2929 LUXEMBOURG. 


BBA and MBA programmed ■>»" 
Rvailahlu no evening daws in 
Loudon and Paris. 


Not later than 7 October 1985. 



# i 

r pv* h 





A cutout by Catherine Schmidt, from show hi Bnlfe 


Swiss Paper Cutout Art 




question: Can people have a conve- one he did not design — “partly out 


On Display in Gruyere 


bii : 


cay store during the day? What we alone.’ 
are doing now is trying to find a Bertrand Goldberg, Paris Art 
reasonable concentration of peo- Center, 36 rue Falgid&e, through 
pie.” Oa. 5. 


Also this week, in Jossetin, near 
Rennes, items valued at more -than 

] milli on fiaOCS, inrfnding field 
glasses tised by Napoleon at Ans- 
teriitz. were stolen from the cha- 
teau of the Due de Rohan. 

(AP, Reuters) 


By Mavis Guinard ' 

B ULLE, Switzerland — The 
first Swiss- exhibit , of papa 
cutouts in the attractive museum of 
the cheesemaking region of Gru- 
yfere shows, through 90 contempo- 
rary artists and 400 d6conpages, 
that this folk art is flourishing 
The artists use tiny scissors and 
Swiss predaon to shape silhouettes 
of animals and trees, and each snip 
is tricky. 

"It can be even more difficult to 
paste down the lacy designs into 
place,” said Anne Rosat, whose na- 

chalets and ^otehTof the Gstaa<£ 
Schonreid and Chaleau-d'Oexarea 


myself into each design,” said Rb- 1 , /- :: 
sal. “I feel that the best dfexmpagtt.^J 
' reflect the life around them. I reaDy^ v ; 
admire those who are trying to re-j™“ *-C % 
new the scenes in this wot. A lady ™ • - 
from -Texas came by and showed’Ajj ' 
me what ste; was doing. I advised ”? • " - 
her to show ha own stSenes from' J5' 


the ranch rather than continue the' 


iflf 


alpine lt^Tm looking forward to * '* ’ 

seeing the results.” . 

*‘Papiers J)£coupages-Scher-f^ 
enschmit," Musde Grumen, BuBe, i _ ..c • 

Switzerland, through Soil, t5S ^ c 

-iai . — : 

□ . _ : jib "? 

Alpine cuiouis are comitry corn- 

uviivuiwviiiiu insof the elegant art of sfflwnettes/ . « " 

and were shown in an international popularin the l8th and 19thcentu-?Pj jr ': 
exhibit of the craft at the Cooper-, ^es. ' . : - 

Hewitt Museum in New York. ' ... The name came from Etienne dCjUjiL - 
Rosat likes to portray the tradi- Silhouette, a controller of French,,^ • 

finances win, lost, the long’s favor, - \^r 
when he suggested austere refoans/ . - 

-Retiring frmsgrace tofaischatean^ ,>_r.w 
at- Bxy-iuF-MAme, he had if deco-'?! V 

HlAff mif. niitk end rrtmr n£*' ^ 


tiooal mountain life of an area that, 
despite its jet-set resorts, sticks to 
local ways. Rosat became fascinat- 
ed with the works of two past mas- 
ters of the paper-cutting craft; Ja- 
cob Hauswirth and Loins Saugy. ' 

The First lived in the forests fir- 
ing charcoal. Whenever he turned 
up in the villages, be n«*l his cut- 
outs to trade for a meal, a night's intaglios, 
lodging or a-few sheets of papa 
from tlte store, 

“They say ; he would use any 
small soap he could find, pouncing 
tfor the colms he 


rated not with the gilt and roses or 

.Eff — 


the period but with black and white * 


tflCpCDCu i/Ma.wim i/wwn nun wuiiw ---j 

shadow figures. In Geneva, Jean 7 ”* Z . 
Huber Was a master of the art that' ? 
recalls figures , tm Greek vases or 10 'V. - 


: One of his favorite subjects was , «r 
Voltaire, whom he could portray or ,«j« 7 

caricature “m the dark with ahand ^in z : 
tied behind my back.” Habers;;-.*. 1 


cau^n the phy^opha er^scOTfi^^^ 


hdd his scissors by wire loops, for 
his fingers were far too thick, W he 
invented most of the scenes that are 
familiar . today: the. procession, of 
cows winding up to .high pastimes, 
.rigid cheesemaking dr' minting 
.scenes above, villages bdem' with 

Probacy inspi^^Hauswrlh, 
Louis Sai^y was an extroverted 



tiie tip of his wig to the dipper 
dangling on one foot as he clashed 
off some impertinence. The caricar 
■tores of Voltaire and otha _ 
figures were widely distributed in . 
France through pamjtiilets, but the^ 3 .v ' . 
minor art form was not recognized . 
in r^derot’s Encydop&Ee. How-\/ ..~ 

IKS 

tagefeSandfilkddSnK Wdpole .^ d fa BnluJi Myam?!-. 
with, lively- action. Where Baus- 


re 

-*:d 

•awS 


trim 


wirth's pine trees are straight and 
somber, Saugus bend to the vrind 
or the woodcutter and bear season- 
al fruit and flowers. . . 

Rosat, too, likes to describe 
scenes from her village and nse the 
motifs that appear on Swiss paint- 
ed furniture, centering on full- 
blown bouquets of stylized roses, 
carnations and tulips with a happy 
sense of color. 

Newer artists are moving away 
from these traditions somewhat 
Few go quite as far as Catherine 
Schmidt, who fashions cutonts 
with fantastic animals, or are as 
taloited as Erast Oppliger, a litho- 
grapher, who crams his swirling de- 
signs with biblical scenes or spoofs 
the sacred Swiss cow. 

A school in Winterthur is attract-, 
}ie from all walks of life to 


received his profiles of busy battk'^Wj’L,- 
scenes. • 




Otha Genevois, such, as Jao-’^ - :■ 
ques-Laurent Agasse and Mkbdj 




:. 4 ! 



fad, the cutouts’ motive profiles . 
gave way to more conqj&ated amf. 7~z- 
frivolous subjects. Sugmy scenes;^ 
and excessive detail nwuftefl thcxi 

^ -V-‘. - 

“ Silhouettes et D&oupures. Gehe^.^th 'j ‘ 
voises au I8ime et 194me.* Abode *5 2 - 

(TArt et (PHistoire, 2 me: Charier & 'r-V 
Galland, Geneva. Through Jan. 19. *^^2’ 


t ' ';•< 




Mavis Guinard is a 
based in Switzerland. 


.11.-'-.' 


mg people tram all walks of life to naci n* . « M . .T-r*. • 

the folk art Though most are an- ^^Aliwplays^paceFhotOfi/ ? -, ;r , 
lStS OT teachers, an art historian, a The Associated Press ■■ 

carpenter, a seamstress and several WASHINGTON— A coDotion 

pittuy cooks, arc enrolled at the of 140 space photographs, culled i T : -: 
school to learn the lacy an. Some from more than 175 0Q0mNASA*s'- ! - ' 

are employing tools used by graph- archives, go on exhibit Saturday at ' A-.'. 
ic artists. _ the National Air and Space Muse-. ' 1 - 

I prefer to stick to ray small urn. Most of the pktnreSveneva 1 ■ - 
scissors and put something from been displayed before, ' 


-:j.r t 

•• • v 

• -+-«i 

- LV2 

• - q 

Til 


? i-.a 


- 4r 




doonesbuhy 


1 


1 ■ . fl 

'far 

<0 S 


EXECUTIVE 

AVAILABLE 


The next Special 

EDUCATION 

DIRECTORY 

iciff be published an 

DECEMBER 7, 1985. 


For information, please contact 
Fnmfoae Qematt, 
International Hendd Tribnne. 
or your nearest itUr representative. 


Do you need a: 

SALES 

ORIENTED BUSINESSMAN 


writ* 


— «xu<8M wpofiwis in An aiiSnt and 
courier mdbdry 

—irMn^xd Engish, German onf Frtfldi 
—4 yean US. (ales expanmee 
— 43 years eld, Sv«t oMeri, ndependert, 
read / 10 travel, baud «1 Gwwvo- 
1 an luatang far a long term li xA o nginB 
iwam inl m a imriai mduifry m Europe 

ond/« USA 

Write lot 18-115372 
Pu fc Bdtra , CH.1fltt Gatova 3 





“'•-2 


"INTERMTIOm 

POSITIONS” 


appears every Thursday & Saturday 


TO PLACE AN ADVERTISEMENT contact your naarast 
International Harold Tribune rapmentative or Max Ferraro: 
181 Ave. Charles-da-Goulle, 92521 Neuilly Codex, Prance, 
Tel.i 747-12-65. Telax: 613 595. 


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i:/' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7-8, 1985 


Viry\c»V s b_ 


Page 9 




ARTS /LEISURE 


°f Buddhas 


■e 


WL M 

v /? • 


'jaiiiRe.- 


'- ' w X 1 KraHoyce 

t ^SSh** “^Whian: Art 
** *e British Mu- 

m, 
an anthU 

^ The toagm^ent exhibition is 
,r^Wfnwstfliiirefy from the tun- 

teSS'rSSS 0115 from fi“ 

XSe^odribition and catalog are 
u & jrtwed geogra phically after intro- 
“The Buddha 
f^eqa, ..winch consists chiefly of 

fcx ^ StoperfeHcfs [nm q^ & 

igfejJJ®* Scriptures and 
The ir; lra nKm i ya ons,^ a rich seke- 
bou4roaiihe library’s manuscripts 
are a late 1 8th-«ail 


■STV^T^rr ■» > MUU =^ serous or 
-Ttaks; tor Monks;" 18th-century 
Irbctan translations of a 5th-cenni- 
jy Itafian commeniaiy on the scrip- 
tares; a colorful illmtrated book 
teari-nrid-l9th century Burma, 
P“Wfng previous lives of 
pe Buddha ;andJapanese scrolls 
■ jn fine calligraphy dating from the 
itithandl /th centuries. 
.'.-Sddhartha Gautama, who lived 
■f^om about 563 to 483 B.C, was a 
rich young man of a princely family 
in flje kingdom of the Sakyas, on 
jhe borders of present-day Nraal 
and India: At age 29, he left his wife 
9 hd children in thdr palatial home 
and wandered India in search of 
mligb tenmeh r This he is said to 
hnvc achieved tinder a sacred tree 
‘ at Bodh Gaya six years later. 
Thereafter, at least m Bud dhis t 
scriptures, he is more often than 
. not referred to as the Buddha, or 
Enlightened One. 

At$amalhhe lectured to his first 
five disciples. He traveled. India 
tea c h i n g, rather than preaching, of 


i&entt; 
r o» Fnadi 
ting's favn 
•ffiRfcna' 

huciH8X ; 

bad it do- : 
aadrwd' 

ck 2nd wire ’ 
ianx Jen' 
i’iijnth. 
dk\ati[ 

iubjsSij. 

-•Icpws?:, 

kmfcfai* 

iCi " His.: 

i£ ased* 
sTtraca. 

w & i 2? 

i »i c^id* 

:e fains; 
^JbhSbI 
autos s 

fcotsI, 
i.wa H*,' 
> :i prsaeh _ 

ir.?. Has 

ndj Mkc 


i-k“ 

': ariV 
F„ I* 






the ways of EnfightenmenL When 
he died at Kasa, formerly called 
Kusinagaia, in the northern prov- 
ince of Bihar, he was cremated and 
Ins ashes divided among the right 

t|&ey were preserved in Jiupor 
(shnnes). 

From India, Buddhism spread to 
become the dominant religion in. 
Paldstan,NepaJ, Sri Lanka, Burma, 
Thailand, Java. Central Asia, Chi- 
na, .Korea and Japan. In each of 
tbescLterri tones it assumed a slight- 
ly different face; and even images 
pf the Buddha assumed a “local” 
appearance, as may be seen here. 

The .sections of -the : exhibition 
povide. an overview , of each re- 
port's ^sculptural styles. For exam- 
ple,' Tibet embraced a rather fierce 
fonabf Buddhism, inwhicb prose- 
lytifertH?^^ the 


museum 

five Jinas or conqueror Buddhas, 
one at the center, tie others at four 
corners of the earth 

The one who found the - most 
wot in Tibet was Aksobhya, the 
tastera Conqueror, who over the 
lost the Indian aspect erf his 
origins and became more typically 
Tibetan, as in a 14th-century brass 
ugure that has been remounted on 
a much later stand. 

The Deccans in the south of In- 
dia, like the Tibetans, modified the 
eariy imagery, Buddhism having 
reached that pan of India about 
200 years after its founder's death. 
Among the many southern Indian 
images in the exhibition, the most 
perfect spiritually is damaged, 
lacking the left hand and forearm, 
but this in no way lessens the seren- 
ity of this small bronze; which re- 
sembles a certain style of bronze 
sculpting going on at the same peri- 
od — the 7th and 8th centuries — 

in Byzantium 

The Chinese section has, as one 
would expect, a fine selection of 
Buddhist sculpture, but it excels in 
the ink and color paintings on silk 
dating from the 9th century. Many 
of the silk painting were round and 
brought to England by Sir Aurel 
Stein, from the Dunhuang caves in 
Gansu province, the famous 
“Caves of the Thousand Buddhas 
of Tun Huang" Of the Buddhas in 
the exhibi tion, none is more power- 
ful than Vaisravana, the guardian 
deity of the north. He is patrolling 
his domain, borne above the waves 
of the sea on a purple cloud. In his 
hands he bears his two attributes — 
in the right, the golden halberd of 
his office; in the left, encased in a 
smaller purple cloud, a stupa en- 
shrining the seated Buddha. Before 
him walks his sister Sri Devi prof- 
fering a golden bowl of flowers. 
The colors of this painting are inde- 
scribably subtle and varied. In- 
deed, it must be accounted a mas-' 
lerpiece of Tang Dynasty art 

The Japanese section is strong in 
sculpture, which need occasion no 



Objects by Faberge ' W orkmasters’ Draw Attention 


sculpture reached Japan. A large 
gflt Buddha arrived in the form erfa 
gift, from die Korean king to the 
Emperor Kmimri, in the mid-6ih 
oenruiy. 

In 593, Crown Prince Sbdtoku 
Taisin became regent of Japan. A 
devout Buddhist, he had erected a 
temple to the Heavenly Kings of 
the Cardinal Points, (tom which 
evolved the Shitteucm Temple at 
Osaka- He node the-Horymi Tem- 
ple, hot Ear from Nara -—then the-.- 


Deccan bronze from south- 
ern India, 7tb-8th century. 

capital city, founded by his aunt, 
the Empress Suiko — the center of 
early Buddhist art and architecture, 
which it has remained. 

The Buddhist component re- 
mained strong in Japanese sculp- 
ture for many centuries, as witness 
the lacquered and painted wood 
portrait sculpture (c. 1700) of a lay 
follower in Buddhist priestly guise; 
and the votive wood sculpture por- 
trait made by Miwa in 1788 of the 
artist Sesshu (1420-1506), who be- 
came a Zen Buddhist monk 
As Victor Harris observes in the 
catalog notes on Sesshu; “His ordi- 
nation as a Zen monk occurred 
when Zen Buddhism was the main 
force behind traditional schools of 
painting, poetry, fencing, the No 
theater, flower arrangement and 
the tea ceremony." 

By way of the tea ceremony, all 
civilized Japanese have ingested the 
aesthetic and philosophical values 
of Zen Buddhism. And the contem- 
porary cult of Zen has imparted a 
new worldwide significance to the 
Buddhist faith. 

“Buddhism: Art and Faith," 
Prints and Drawing? Gal/ay and! 
Oriental Gallery II. British Muse- 
um, Montague Place, London WCl, 
through Jan. 5.. 


Max IVykes- Joyce writes regular- 
ly in the IHTon London art exhibi- 
tions.' - 


Imemoncmil Herald Tribune 

L ONDON— Faber^ objects are 
/ very much in the limelight 
right now. At Buckingham Palace, 
the royal collection is the object of 
a special display in the Queen’s 
Gallery; it is a temporary exhibi- 
tion, but no closing date is given in 
the superbly produced souvenir al- 
bum. A new gallery. “Enniiagc," 

SOUREN MELIKUN 

opened at 14 Hay Hill Street in 
March. Fts director, Alexander von 
Solodkoff, is a former Christie's 
expert on Russian objets d’art who 
with his colleague G&za von Ham- 
burg staged Christie's highly suc- 
cessful Russian sales in Geneva, 
thank* , largely, to their contingents 
oT Fabergife objects. 

Von Solodkoff and von Habs- 
burg wrote what is now a standard 
reference book, “Fabergfe, Court 
Jewellers to the Tsar," published in 
1979. Last year von Solodkoff, who 
was asked to catalog the Forbes 
collection, was the main contribu- 
tor to the book published for the 
Forbes collection's exhibition in 
New York, “Masterpieces from the 
House of Fabergfi." Few people — 
except A. Kenneth Snowman of the 
Warnki gallery in London, who 
has been tackling the subject for 30 
years as a dealer, collector and 
scholar — have greater experience 
in FabcrgS and related matters. Yet 
von Soloakott admits in his latest 
book that the profile of Fabergfc art 
is elusive. 

Faberg& is the name of a firm 
begun in 1842 as a jewelry shop in 
Saint Petersburg, now Leningrad. 
The fotmder was a German of Hu- 
guenot descent whose family had 
settled in one of the Germanized 
cities of the Baltic sea, Pemau in 


Hitler's Car Unsold in Indiana 

United Press International 

AUBURN, Indiana — A 1934 
Mercedes 770K limousine once 
owned by Hitler went unsold at the 
15th annual Collector Car Auction 
here because the top bid. $50,000, 
did not meet the reserve. 


Estonia, part of the czarist empire. 
The Germanic background and the 
Baltic connection were to remain 
permanent features of the firm. 
Carl Faberak the man who turned 
to objets d T an, was baptized at a 
Protestant church in 1846 in Saint 
Petersburg, and on taking over the 
family concern in 1870 left for Ger- 
many. Switzerland and France to 
study aru As his father had done, 
he married a German woman from 
the Baltic area. And Carl’s younger 
brother Agathon was studying in 
Dresden when he decided to join 
the firm in 1882. 

The most significant feature of 
the foreign makeup of the compa- 
ny. however, is the background or 
the workmasters — the craftsmen 
who headed workshops in various 
parts of Saint Petersburg and Mos- 
cow and whose marks appear on 
precious-metal objects next to the 
firm’s mark. Out of 45 such crafts- 
men listed by Solodkoff, who gives 
short biographical details, only one 
carries a truly Russian name, Fedor 
Afanas&iev. Two have Russianized 
names — Andrej Gorianov, who 
was unimportant, and Michael Per- 
chin, who was born in Furnish ter- 
ritory. The other workmasters are 
Finns, Swedes and Germans, ex- 
cept for a Russian Jew, Julius Rap- 
poport, whose education and cul- 
tural orientation was Germanic. 

The Scandinavian contribution, 
which has been much underrated, 
is enormous. It was made by mem- 
bers of the century-old Swedish 
community in Finland and by 
Finns whose cultural allegiance 
was entirely to Sweden even after 
□early two centuries of Russian oc- 
cupation. They include many of the 
most important names in the firm. 
Johan victor Aarne (1863-1934), 
bora in Finland, was a Fabergfc 
workmaster from 1891 to 1904. 
then opened his own workshop in 
Finland. August Wilhelm Hotm- 
strdm, born in Helsingfors, as Hel- 
sinki was then called, was a senior 
member of the firm and head jewel- 
er. He made the 1892 Diamond 
Trellis Egg. 

The career of Karl Gustav Hjal- 
mar Armleldl (1873-1959}, born in 
Finland, offers a typical pattern of 


the crosscurrents at work in the 
Faberge firm. He studied at the 
German art school in Saint Peters- 
burg and at Baron Stieglitz’s school 
for applied arts. He then became 
workmaster at Faberge under the 
tutelage or Anders Nevalainen. a 
Finn, whose specialty was small 
articles in gold and silver, including 
enameled frames for photographs. 

Holrastrdm's daughter Hilma 
Alina worked as a designer for Fa- 
berge, while another daughter mar- 
ried the workmaster Knut Oskar 
PihL They were aimned to the Rus- 
sian upper class and determined to 
cuter to its lasies. These were west- 
ernized as far as decorative arts 
went, with a predominant interest 
in the French 18th century — or. 
rather. French 19lh -century inter- 
pretations of it — and a certain 
inclination toward North Europe- 
an an. At the same time intense 
nationalism, stemming partly from 
a strong inferiority complex to- 
ward, Western Europe, made it de- 
sirable so give any luxury produc- 
tion a vaguely Russian appearance. 

All marks and signatures were 
struck in the Cyrillic alphabet and 
subject matter was drawn from 
Russian life: The Orthodox custom 
of painting eggs at Easter Inspired 
Carl Faberge with a stroke of ge- 
nius — to nave eggs made of pre- 
cious materials and set with stones 
as luxurious Easier presents. 

Von Solodkoff plausibly specu- 
lates that Fabergd, who had access 
to the treasury of the Hermitage, 
got the idea when he saw an incense 
burner made in the shape of an egg 
by the French goldsmith Jean-Jac- 
ques Due for Catherine the Great 
in about 1770. Moreover, enameled 
gold and sOver-gih eggs, opening to 
reveal a jewel chicken inside, were 
traditional in Germany and Aus- 
tria in (he mid- 19th century. In any 
case, the first “imperial egg" — 
produced in 1885 and now in the 
Forbes collection — was a tremen- 
dous success. The eggs, which be- 
came ever more complicated and 
luxurious in appearance, have re- 
mained ever since the most desir- 
able type or Faberge object in the 
eyes of the handful of milli onaires 
who can afford to compete for 



• • . t » X t • is '** - 

■ 


Faberge frog capitalized on 
Russian love of nephrite. 

them. The record is held by the 
1 900 egg sold to Malcolm Forbes at 
Sotheby's in New York in June for 
$1.76 million. 

Another great success was the 
host or Russian peasant figures 
bandied in a style that, regrettably, 
owes as much to German 19th- 
century kitsch caning as it does to 
the indigenous Russian peasant 
wood carving tradition. Along with 
the Russian peasants came a whole 
menagerie of animals from the 
Russian countiyside, sows and pig- 
lets. mice, storks. Faberge capital- 
ized on the Russian love for green 
stones, such as jadeite and nephrite 


— a taste acquired from the Islamic 
Middle East, including the large 
parts oT Iran occupied by Russia in 
the 19th century. He also drew his 
inspiration from the Japanese net- 
suke. of which collections were be- 
ing formed in mid- 19th century 
Russia. 

' This resulted in a Disney-like 
wonderland of animals in semi-pre- 
cious stones, which became a third 
staple of the Fabergi firm. Last but 
not least were the thousands of 
objects in derivative Louis XV and 
Louis XVI style. 

The diversity is bewildering. To 
create a riven style was never in- 
tended. Von Solodkoff is the first 
to have emphasized the fact that 
“Faberg&'s production deferred to 
the changing fashions." He quotes 
from Fabergi’s Moscow list of 
items for sale in 1899 — “The prod- 
ucts of our firm are frequently re- 
newed due to the bizarre demands 
of fashion: new objects are offered 
for sale every day. Some of our best 
objects cannot be published be- 
cause we fear they wul be imitated 
by our competitors." 

And they were. The problem of 
authentication is often insur- 
mountable when a piece is not fully 
documented. Workmasters left the 
firm and set up on their own. After 
the 1917 revolution some set up in 
the West, and their work is no long- 
er considered authentic Fabergd. 
Imitation of an “art" that is entire- 
ly derivative is not difficult, unless 
precious materials and stones are 
involved, such as the Easter eggs, 
which are mostly documented any- 
way. The problem was acute 
enough by -the early 1930s for the 
former manager of Faberg&’s Lon- 
don branch to write an article ti- 
tled, “Particulars which will assist 
collectors to confirm the genuine- 
ness of Faberg£ pieces.” 

The pieces least open to ques- 
tion, aside from those whose histo- 
ry is closely documented, are silver 
and gpld objects with Russian 
marks from the pre-revolutionary 
days. But there is no such hide for 
the Russian peasants and flower 
sprays, nor for the Fabergft Mickey 
Mouses now so popular in the 
West 


The Shopping Bag as Museum Art Object 


United Press International 

I ON DON — An exhibition devoted entirely to the 
/ shopping bag is filling the Boilerhouse space at 
the Victoria and Albert Museum. 

The ordinary plastic or paper bags were selected 
from five cities around the world. There are towers, 
tiers, suspended walls of bags, blazing in vivid colors 
and arresting designs, some trumpeting the names of 
famous stores in big type and some showing no names 
at all. 

“We've hung about 500 bags," 3%allery spokesman 


said. “That’s almost twice as many as we intended, but 
it was just too hard to leave some of them out. 

Visitors will be asked to complete the show; One 
wall has been left vacant for them to contribute bags. 

Stephen Bayley, director of Boilerhouse, said that 
“the merchant's free hold-all" had “become an inter- 
national symbol of the consumer." 

The catalog makes an attempt to describe bow a bag 
from London or Paris differs from those from New 
York or Tokyo or Milan. 


Cinemat ic Triumphs Are Few at Venice Festival 


By. Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

\ a International Herald Tribune 

TTENICE — Alarm spread 
A \ among the guests of the Venice 
Iffl m festival at the prospect of sit- 
ting through a seven-hour screen 
transposition of . Paul Claudel’s 
play “Le Sootier de Satin" (The 
Satin Slipper), even Though the pro- 
jection was to be divided by a din- 
nerintervaL 

- In large measure, however, the 
experience was rewarding. The elo- 
quent*: of the text caresses the ear, 
and tile lavish costumes and decor, 
lending an impression of Renais- 
sanefe paintings gently a nim a t ed, 
delight the eye. 

Iir a jomt cultural venture by 
France and Portugal, the Portu- 
gnese director Manod de Oliveira 
• has: striked Gau clefs genetically 
static dramaturgy. The members of 
las' Parisian cast rarely face one 
another in conversations. Instead 
they g aze dreamily straight at the 
camera, reciting their tines as 

though inspecting the bouse. 

■The vidsritudes encountered by 
gjt da s hin g knight Don Rodngue 
take frequent geological jumps — 
from Madrid to Mogador and to 
the Balearic Wands —but his tray- 
efratefrom set to set The result is 


formed, recorded with a resolute 
aro&Jarice of the filmic. In this al- 
foost nncmematic form, the majes- 
ty; grandeur and lofty language of 
the source have been preserved. _ 
Agate Varda, a new wave pio- 
neer, returns to auteursmp witfl 
“Sans Toft oi LoT (Roofless and 
Lawless), a lament over the Tate or 
a defiant riri tramp in southern 
Fr^cTltsWMe-esque pMosopy 
and approach are those of the 
-vftrrie cmeastes of the 1960 s, 


,-^UUW I rtl ffT i TI ' - 

"dt Varda was one. 
has accomplished what she 
to do, but the film has a 

loeik, riving us y 

" s viewpoint. San- 




through mud and cold in 

‘ ‘revolt against the sys- 

iboogha 20 -rear^d 
wandered into the 1985 

ce Piaiat, who made the 
“LonLou,” with its happy. 

able pair of ne'er-do-weus, 

tf deHuere W y* 

of-a.cynical cop hunting 
. os-dealing gangs. 
s Pj* n P members are intro- 
l in the program with the sort 
serration once employ™ ™ 
W playbffls. Tie P°““- 
“Looks like a nice guy, but 

S mhdblowsiipheg^smean^d 

lend; can’t remember a bine sue 

iBy; he's sure of tiiaj. one 

srthe inclusion of the bur- 
ofee 'show aliases — Lotta 
8? Prunes and "Wffl B. Good 
lUoBofc. Gfaard Depardieu s 
. • is*.- n nice, tmv ana 


MdinaMerconri, the Gredc cul- 
ture minister, came to promote her 
country's film industry. Unfortu- 
nately, the film accompanying her 
vial — Panehs Youlgaris's “Pe- 
trina Ctamhr (Years of Stone) — 
is a bad one, an intenninable 
chronicle. of toe prison sentences 
that separated a Communist couple 
until the present regime was elect- 
ed. w 

Jerzy Skofimowskfs “The Light- 
ship” is a gripping thriller about 
terrorism. A murderous paranoiac 
and his two goons, rescued from a 
disabled motorboat by the light- 
ship's crew, threaten to take over 
command. It is exceptionally wdl 
played, with Klans Maria Ban- 
dauer as the captain, at first sus- 
pected of cowardice; Robert Du- 
vall as the ruthless maniac; Arliss 
Howard and William Forsythe as 
dim-wiued paid kilters; and Mi- 
chael Lyndon as the skippers dis- 
trusting son. 

An instance of constructive criti- 
cism may be cited in the rapid im- 
provement of the Argentine esray; 
Fernando Solan as’s ‘Tangos — B 
Exffio de Gaidd," winch retraced 
the life of Carlos Gardd, a compos- 
er of tangos, and focused on politi- 
cal exiles from Buenos Aires who 
prepare a benefit in Paris. The 
press, attending a preview, ex- 
pressed some admiration far the 
ram but mentioned that it ran on 

see it all Fortin: 
official public screening it was 
trimmed by about 10 minutes, and 
additional cutting would aid it fur- 

^From Japan has come Masaki 
Kobayashi's “Shotattakn No Nai 
le" (House Without Dinner Table), 
in which a son’s terroristic activi- 
ties brings disgrace and tragedy to 
his family. It holds a stating per- 
formance by Tatsuya Nakadm as 
the humiliated father, but it, too, is 
... . — and tends fre- 


M Boro Draskovic’s “Evot Je Lep 
Oife is Marvelous), from Yugosla- 
via, is a tantalizing puzzle. Its set- 
ting is a railroad tavern in a whis- 

tie-stop village. A drnnten sadut 
Sbthe passengers who gather 
there^and mtoefinale gtms them 
Sow*. According to the program. 
.jKriSTS an allegory. wiih the 
Sabring the world in mmia- 


scribUer plotting a scenario while 
recalling his amorous past and, evi- 


recailing his amorous past and, evi- 
dently, Fellini’s “814. The second 
is an effort to do something in the 
nature of a stark O'Neill tragedy 
with Jane Birkin as a spinster on an 
isolated South African farm who 
murders her father (Trevor How- 
ard) for his seduction of his fore- 
man's black wife, then goes mad. 

Juraj Jaknbisko's “Fran Hofle,” 
representing CZechosbvakia, is a 
pretty nursery tale, with Giutietta 
'Marina impersonating a fairy god- 
mother who guides an orphan boy 
to find love and happiness. It is 
presented in competition, but its 
proper place would be in the 
“Young Venice” department, 
which the festival's director, Gian 
Luigi Rondi, created for young 
viewers. Their diet has been prefer- 
able to the indigestible adult, fare. 

The Soviet Union’s official can- 
didates — “Tango Nasego Detstia" 
(Tango of Our Childhood) and 
“Pared Planer (Planets in Con- 
junction) — reveal that the Rus- 
sians occasionally fall into com- 
monplace moviemaking as wdl 

Paul Morrissey's “Beethoven’s 
Nephew” had its world premiere at 
a special, out-of-competition pro- 
jection. Wolfgang Retchmann stars 
as the composer and there is a re- 
served ana effective characteriza- 


tion of the nephew by Dietmar 
Prinz. The script is patchy, but the 
film is distinguished by its period 
flavor, and its powerful score. 

John Huston’s “PrizzTs Honor," 
a slick and sardonic blade comedy 
about the members of a Brooklyn 
Mafia gang double-crossing and 
triple-crossing one another, is a 
lively circus in the seasoned Holly- 
wood manner. Jack Nicholson and 
.Kathleen Turner enact its principal 

Th^bes^ffons of the Festival 
have been out of competition. Cer- 
tainly the top cinematic achieve- 
ment of tire session has been Kon 
Ichikawa's “Burma No Taiegoto," 
a remake of “The Burmese Harp," 
with TtS I Smotri" (Come and 
See), a Soviet-made film by Eletn 
Klimov, as a strong second. 

■ French film Takes Prize 

Varda’s “Sans Toil Ni Loi" was 
named winner Friday of the Gold- 
en Lion, the top prize at the Venice 
film festival according to The As- 
sociated Press. 

The festival jury awarded a spe- 
cial prize to the Argentine film 
“Tangos — H Exilio de Garde!.’’ 

Depardieu was named best actor 
for his performance in “Police." 
The 1 1-member jury decided not to 
give an award For best actress. 


INTERNATIONAL 
ART EXHIBITIONS 

PARIS 

- = DENISE BENE - " ~ 

196, Boulevard St.-Germam, PARIS 7th. TeLs 222J77.57. 

Presents 

GOOD PAINTING 

Until September 27th 


GALERIE MERMOZ 

|§ PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

- 6, Rue Jean-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel.-. 359.82.44 ___ 

MUS£E RODIN 

77 , rue de Vareme, Paris (7") - Mfifro Varenne 

Rodin/ Five Contemporary photographers 
in mms. oetm ml mm jmbkj. Bm*etomrn.*brm 2 sa. 

D afly (except Tuesday) 10 am. - 11:30 am and 2 pm - 545 pan. 

ROM MAY, 3 to SEP1EMBBI, 30 


ZLr I Tracks in the bnowj, are snu- 
nS v bewildering, wifi. “ 

S rabarel clown and ? IS 
S»n“i Ifockbroker brother 

of “U Doom 


^rZZe high ambitions. The 
Hansel, moody psychological 


ANTIQUES 

BBB M — MWHBBBBDeeeBB ■ ■rnwfxBmjTtnrrM 

THE 

BimiNGIDN 

HOUSE 

EAJR 

The Antique Dealers' Fair 

THE ROYAL ACADEMY OF ARTS 
PICCADILLY LONDON Wl 
llth-22nd SEPTEMBER, 1985 
Opening Times: 

Wednesday 31th September; 5-Spm; 
Thursday 12th-Sunday 22nd September, 
Uam-7pm daily. 

Leading British and International dealers in both Fine Art 
and Antiques will offer for sale strictly vetted pictures, 
furniture and works of art of the highest quality. 

For further information about the Burlington House Fair, 
contact Elm House 10-16 Elm Street London WClX QBE 
. Telephone (01) 278 2345 . 


— WALLY FINDLAY -i 

Galleries International 

new york - chicago - pdm beach 
beverly htfis - pans 

EXHIBITION OF 
CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS 

Yolande ARDISSON E 
Philippe AUGE 
Pierre BOUDET 
Andrfi BOURRIE 
Yvonne CANU 
Jean-Pierre CASS1GNEUL 
Jcau-Oaude CHAU RAY 
Suzanne E1SENDIECK 
Louis FABLEN 
Francois GALL 
Bernard GANTNER 
Claude GAVEAU 
GfllesGORRITI 
Andre HAMBOURG 
Fernand HERBO l 

Fred JESSUP 1 

Jean KEIME 
Constantin KLUGE 
LEPHO 

MICHEL-HENRY 
Henri MAIK 
Marie NESSI VALTAT 
Luden NEUQUELMAN 
Nicola S1MBARI 
Andre V1GNOLES 


2 Ave. Motianon - Pans 8th 

TaLi 73SJ0J*. mwfar An. May 
10 cum. I« 1 ptm. - 2£0 ta 7 p jn. 


Hotel George V - 723.54.00 
31 Ave. George-V - Peris 8th 

man. An. utf. 16 L 30 an.-I pjn-ZJO ta 9 p-m. 
Sunday 7 pa .- 9 pA. 


reasons 
fa to visit Jj 

1 LE LOUVRE \ 
DES 1 
ANTIQUAIRES 

250 ART DEALERS OPEN 
FROM TUESDAY 
THRU SATURDAY 
11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

2, PLACE DU PALAIS-ROYAL 
75001 PARIS t TEL. (1 )297 27 00 

LM SaptwdMtf 39. ExMmon 
"AJJTOUR DU PAKRJM" 
DUXWAUXWSltCLE 


LE CENTRE INTERNATIONAL 
CART CONTEMPORAIN 

27. rue Taine -75012 Pore, TeL: 307.6058 

presents 

If SALON DES NATIONS 
LEXPOSnON N18NATIONA1E 1985 
with 

its collections of French wotfcs 
1985/1986 calendar 
bom SepMifcar 9 to 19 
(iomOadnr 13 ro 72 
ham Owin' 26 ta Novanfaci 3 
from N u w w ibf' 6 la t J 
(too Novwnfem 19 It, 38 
Flam Dwmbw 1 ta 10 
hem January 6 to IS 

Sel ec tion of French, Germon, Haflan, 
English plastic orttUs. 

Dotfy From t p.m, to 7 pjn. 



"ART EXHIBITIONS” 
"ANTIQUES 11 
"AUCTION SALES 11 

appear 
on Saturday 


AUCTION SALES 

CHRISTIES — 

Autumn Sales 1985 

Our Experts 

John Lumley 

Impressionist and Modem Art 
and 

Hans Nadelhoffer 

Jewellery 

will be available to give free 
advice and valuation regarding 
entries for these sales 

at the Hotel Splendide Royal, Lugano 
on 12th and 13th of September 1985 

For appointments please contact: 

Christie’s 

8 Place de la Taconnerie, 1204 Geneva 
Tel: 4122/28 25 44 Telex: 423634 

Stein wiesplatz, 8032 Zurich 
Tel: 411/69 05 05 Telex: 56093 

9 via Borgogna, 20122 Milan 
Tel: 392/794 712 Telex: 316464 


CHRISTIES — 

MONACO 

19th and 20th Century 
Decorative Arts 
To be held on 7 and 8 December 
at the 

Hotel Loews, Monte-Carlo 

Dan Klein, Christie’s expert on Art Nouveau 
and Art Deco will be in Paris on 
17 and 18 September 

For advice and free valuations 
please contact the address below 
for an appointment 



Christie’s France SARL, 17, rue de Lille, 75007 Paris 
Tel: (01) 261 12 47 Telex: 213468 







Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7-8, 1985 



-251 


241 fc AAR 

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14* 7% APL 

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32* 3416 EnslCs 71 10 10 
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2B16 18% AZP £72 112 7 2281 34% 34 24% + % 

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40% 22% AMO 

12% 6% Advest 

15% 9% Aerftax 

49% 32% AetaLI 

57% 57% AffTLpf 

37% 18% AlMnns 

3% 5% Altaan 

57 42 AlrPrd 

24% is AlrbPrt 

2% HkAIMoai 

33% 2716 Alap pfA 3-92 177 
B% 6 * AiaPdpf XI IIJ 
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16% 11% AMBsea 144 7 A 10 

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31* 23% Alcan 140 44 28 

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32 WVi AIBxAlx 140 34 

25% 20% AMXdr 22 

09% 7216 AllsrCp lJ4f 24 

2S% 209. AW If" 140 67 

20% 16% AWInpJ £19 114 

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34 22% AmHes 1.10 

140% 98% AHPSpf £50 
2% 1% AmAor 

21% >6 ABOfcr 

70 58% A Brand 370 

70% 59% ABfd of £67 
115% 56% ABdCSt 150 
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Monsanto was the session's biggest loser, 

NEW YORK —A drop in the August jobless losing 1 % 10 49Vi after a Utah State University _ 

rate spurred a stock markeL rally Friday that study found Nuteasweei may cause brain irra- f •«» « 

erased the losses of the three previous sessions. : " * — 

Trading was moderate. 

The opened higher, consolidated its 

106. Cuflinet Software a’dded lii to 17ft, Data 


ulan ties in mice. Nutrasweet is made by G-D. ito 9% slSJra 
Searie, which has been bought by Monsanto. 21 % 17 % ImSfn uFn 10 
Technology issues strengthened. IBM added ^ 114 33 14 

gainc and embarked on a second climb in after- 

iWnre the dose, the 1U0 - cuiimei soi tware aooea Ift to 17ft, Data soft am b#k* 

tWWind^hialaver^^upmoreto ® ® ^ 

JOpomte. Electric Light & Power eased ft to 20%. Kansas 

The Dow finished the day up 9.86 to 1 ,335.69. Gas & Electric rose Vs to 15 and Middle South 
For the week, the Dow edged up 1.08 pomts. utilities added ft to 10. 

Among other actively traded stocks, Unocal 
feD Vs to 30. General Development Coip. was 
unchanged at 13ft. 


18 9 

U 9 

14 13 

15 14 

£7 1* 

3 9 23 
£4 14 2511 

34 


Broader ma ricpi indicators also moved high- 
er. The New York Stock Exchange index ad- 
vanced 0.50 to 109.05. Standard & Poor's 500- 
stock index dim b ed 031 to 188.24. The price of 
an average share jumped 16 cents. 


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| F 

Avon Products eased & to 24 after advancing n 52 fmc 220 3 a % 

Thursday when it said it wili buy back up io25 'a m e 

Advances outpaced declines by a 4-3 ratio, percent— or 20 million shares --of its common J§ « fS2i . _ „ ” 

Volume totaled 95 million shares, up slightly stoc fc ^ tf, c op^ niartfff 
from 94J million Thursday. Airline issues, which have been under pres- 

Analysts said the market was drawing san ^ recouped some losses. AMR 

strength from the unexpectedly sharp 0.3 per- Corp., the parent of American Airlines, added 1 

“mage point decline in August unemployment. to 44 . Northwest Airlines rose Vi to 5714 UAL 

They said it had given investors the first solid i nc „ parent of United Airlines, gained 1 'A to 

sign of a stronger economy m the second half of 53 %. Pan American World Airwaysedged up A 

the year. to 7!4 and Eastern Airlines increased V* to lOtf. 

Analysts said blue^hip issues attracted buy- Blue-chips were gainers. fBM added ft to 

129%, General Electric ft to 61ft, AT&T ft to 
21ft, U-S. Steel ft to 30 and American Express 
Ift to 42ft. Union Carbide advanced Ift to 55 ft. 

After reporting sharply hi gh er sales for the 
__ .... .... . . last 10 days of August, the auto companies 

„ Chemical New York was third, unchanged at moved ahead. General Motors jumped 1% to 

39 ?;„ a . . j. . . .... 69, Ford ft to 44ft and Chrysler ft to 38. 

MCA zraf ^ day ^ s big&Kt gamer chmbmg Prices were mixed and little changed in mod- 
^ a rumor wou ^ aa l uire erate trading on the American Stock Exchange. 

MCA s fihn library. Western Digital led the Amex actives, losing 

Richardson-Vicks jumped 3ft to 40 on a Ift u> 8 ft. Gulf Canady Ltd. foDowedTun- 
takeover nnnor. The company declined to com- changed at 14ft. Wang Labs Class B was third, 
ment on the stock s activity. up 14 jgft 


ing. Stronger airline issues helped lift the Dow 
transportation index 5.03 to 677.55. 

Beatrice Cos. was the most actively traded 
NYSE-listed issue, up ft to 33ft. 

Revlon Inc. followed, down ft to 43ft. 


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(Con honed on Page 12 ) 1 












• “ * • '■&' 

4 Index 

:’i**«raS— «• *222*"** p.u 

rt dWwSS frB? 

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^^AYTsEPTriiSi? 


economic SCENE 


jMcralbS&ribime. 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 




7-8, 1985 


US. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 

Page 11 


7 ^ e l 
^ | 


3 

.j 


Private DebtlPoses 
i Several U.S# Areas 

i r >. i fi y LEONARD SILK 

R ew york^t?*' w 5fmce 

ream yeS P™* dcb! & 

major sectoreoftw ns* 11 to ^ finajlciaJ health of 
aiely tSeatcxicd eco ?°“ x y- The most Immedi- 

ATijthat have lent heavily to farmers. agnculture — M<1 the banks 

v'ils prObjSn 3 SIS f* 0 n °r *“* 402 farra hanks on 
'/’riotenfial debacle tot 5"“ System is facing a 

bJow aot ^ to «*»e 

-■^System. Fanners owe their r ~^.° atIOEtaI economy and banking 

a total of S213 billion. 

- - i^P^are for what^i? adimaislration * whether to 

V "i*?!? 6 * hafloat amo unting to _ ~ ~ 

■•'^5SS : /^ Millions of dollars in. Is sgricultiire 
• Wloans, rf the depression in 
, agnculmrc continues. Omy the most 

i^md^fcoi^iajJSSty °Sd^- conspicuously 

'SSSife endangered sector? 

.; ’baaaess corporations have * 

•V &ggL thdr debts at a rapid pace. 

■i ^V j.^ ^Ty hy 5® York Stock Exchange notes that 1984 was 
.characterized by an outbreak of “mergermania” with the retire- 
- -• men of an estimated. $84 billion to $100 billion worth of equity in 
' mejger exchanges of debt or cash for equity/ 

; ^Although $12 hfflion in equities wereusued in 1984, one of the 
i :Ver ’ tbe cor Porate-equity base declined by at least 
.. yrz &imon. Mergers, or canceled mergers, last year offset all the 
/-. equity financing ot the previous half-dozen years. 

-. ■ Some economists fear that debt-financed mergers and lever- 
r apd buyouts withdraw credit from the rest of the economy. But 
. Henry C. Waihctu a member of the Federal Reserve Board, 

• aigues that such fear is misplaced, and maintain* that <at<*b 
: ' operations do no more than reshuffle as sets . The real danger, in 
- his view, is the resulting change in the balance-sheet structure of 
/• corporations, causing a deterioration of their debt-equity ratios. 

J TTENR-Y K aufm a n , executive director and chief economist 
rl of Salomon Brothers, interviewed by telephone in Lon- 
■ 1 do n , expressed his anxiety about the weakened financial 
base of corporations. 

“In the past year and a half,” he “the outstanding equity 
-- of nonfitiandal corporations shrank by $53 billion, but the debts 
/ of the same , corporations increased by more than $250 billion.” 
The Fed’s flow of funds data show a net increase of nonfinan- 
W dal corporations’ debt by $256.9 billion in 1984 alone, bringing 
• their net outstanding debt to more ton $2 trillion, more than 
- double its level in 1977- Their short-term debt has soared to 51 
- * percent of their total liabilities. - - 
* . Just how dangerous is this situatioa? Scnne economists contend 
’■ that the danger has been overblown, atoning that the traditional 
ratios of dbbt-cquity and corporate liquidity no longer hold 
- because of the internationalization of credit markets, tax laws 
that encourage debt rather than equity and financial deregnla- 
/ tian. : 

But another school ssqts that the danger is all too real, holding 
to the principle that the only, valid measure of a corporation's i 
debt capacity is whether it could sexvice its debt in a period of 
adversity// •-•.,.■// 

What can be done nbw; other than for the government to. 
prepare far huge bafldntt? One step Would be to reduce the 
^/federal budget deficit that, together with the Treasur^s-effortjo ' 
lengthen the ptiblicdebt, has pushed up long-term interest rates, 
leading, corporations to go increasingly into short-term debL 
However, the outlook now is that the federal deficits will 
rranain high and may even worsen. The effort of banks to protect 
themselves by setting variable interest rates on long-term loans 
also means greater danger for the borrowers if inflation returns. 

Another way to strengthen the corporations would be . to 
encourage greater internal financing. Here the New York Stock 
Exchange study charges that .President Ronald Reagan’s pro- 
H (Continued on Page 15, CoL 4) 


Currency Rates 



'0*89 Bales 

s 

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434? 

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Interest Bates 




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• llWrtl-fc 9«-99W 05WWI 7SS 

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30tfavare™o»y , ** d: 7 ‘ 49 

TeWtMa la»rertlW»l"-«: 7.909 

Source: Merrill l men. Fefemte. 


Gold 


•ST «* 
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C«nrTOdarti afTMn*. 


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to*.' “^Z^eZrvor* Comes current 
Source: R*oier* 


Currency per uax 
S. Kor.waa 89425 
5Paa.PMMa U825 
SwMLkraua £57 
Taiwan* 403* 
TMtatt 27.145 
TurkMiHro 54350 
UABOMam 14725 
Vnw. boHv. 1425 


Oil Prices 

Decline 

Sharply 

Dollar Recovery, 
Rumors Blamed 

Return 

ROTTERDAM — Spot crude 
oil prices dropped shanply Friday, 
partly because of the dollar's recov- 
ery and partly because of reports of 
Saudi Arabian transactions linking 
the price of its crude to its value in 
processed products, traders said. 

On the European mot market, 
Britan's North Sea Brent crude 
traded downward to $27 per barrel 
for October loading from a low of 
$27.30 Thursday, traders said. 

Dubai crude, the most actively 
traded speculative Gulf grade, 
traded in the Far East at $26.10 a 
band, down 50 cents from Thurs- 
day, and buyers were offering to 
. pay less than $26, traders said. 

The declines, traders said, were 
based partly on the dollar's sharp 
upturn, and partly on a growing 
confidence in reports that Saudi 
Arabia had concluded arrange- 
ments under which it would sell 
crude oil to two of its four Arabian 
American Oil Go. partners at prices 
linked to its value in processed 
products. 

Details on the reported Saudi 
agreements were not known, but 
these were reports that new sup- 
plies of Saudi oil were heading for 
Europe. 

There was no confirmation of 
earlier speculation that oil derived 
from the reported transactions 
would be subject to destination re- 
strictions, perhaps requiring it to 
go mainly to Europe. 

Saudi Arabia has long been the 
strongest advocate, within the Or- 
ganization of Petroleum Exporting 
. Countries of strict adherence to of- 
ficial price levels. But industry 
sources estimated that Saudi out- 
put fell in August to a 20-year low 
of 1.9 million to 2 million barrels 
per day. 

Market sources said the Saudis 
would be tempted to devise some 
form of discounting to win bade 
buyers and push Saudi output to- 
ward the Saudi quota of 4J5 mil- 
lion barrels per day. 

Tokyo Group , 
AgreestoPush 
U.S. Electronics 

United Press Fniemurional 
TOKYO — The leading 
American and Japanese elec- 
tronics industry organizations 
announced. Friday that they 
would form a committee to help 
increase imports of U-S.-made 
products to Japan. 

“We agreed to cooperate by 
setting up a special committee 
to faamaie U.S. electronics ex- 
ports to Japan,” said Afcio Mor- 
ita, chairman of Sony Com. and 
head of the Electronics Indus- 
tries Association of Japan. 

Mr. Marita and Stephen 
Levy, chairman of the Ameri- 
can Electronics Association, 
completed two days of talks cm 
Friday. 

Mr. Levy, whose organiza- 
tion represents 2,800 U.S. elec- 
tronics companies, said the 
talks should help reduce the 
growing US. trade deficit with 
Japan, which is expected to 
reach $50 billion this year, with 
$15 billion of that in dectron- 


Union Membership: The Long DecBne 


A Historical Perspective 

PerconlolKMMUS «M« loice (Ml betongs io uimom 




*35 *30 '43 *47 *51 *55 *59 63 *67 71 75 79 

Souroa- Ureon SourtoOttMC. WHS, Was! Orange. N J. 

A Breakdown by Major Sector 

ParcoMof work >orc« mat Mfonos loureonam nrewotore 

Manufacturing | Construction ,^1 Service , 4 J 


7^ 

*B4 



ShrNcto «ork Simra 
CBS poll 

What Co you think is the 
Impact ot labor unions on the 
well-being ot working people 
today? ■ 

Full-Urns Wprksrs 


46% 23% 23% 18-29 

39% 35% 20% 30-44 

30% 33% 31% 45-64 

AH Respondents 

M*k> Hurt lire AgoM 
Much 
taqpKt 

47°e 22% 22% 18-29 

41% 34% 18% 30-44 

34% 33% 22% 45-64 

29% 38% 17% 65 + 

•Beaad on i .568 tefentone 
urervwws conSuciM July 1 6-2 1 
Those w»h no opinion are not mown 


The Young Hold Back 

Percentage ot the won> force m 
unions in 1964. by age sreups 


EPIC, Key Player 
In Thrift Crisis, 
Files Chapter 11 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — Equity Pro- 
grams Investment Corp_, the real- 
estate investment arm of troubled 
Community Savings & Loan Asso- 
ciation of Bethesda. Maryland, said 
Friday that it has filed for volun- 
tary reorganization under Chapter 
1 1 of the UA bankruptcy code. 

“The action was taken to stay 
legal proceedings against EPIC,” 
the company said in a prepared 
statemeoL EPIC said it expected to 


Soirae Uoton SeureWMo* 


16-24 25-34 35-4445-5455-64 [ 


The New York Times 


U.S. Labor Is Reshaping Its Image 
In Bid to Attract Young Workers 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Times Sendee 

AUSTIN, Texas — Like many workers in the fast- 
growing health-care, high-tech and government sec- 
tors here, Paula McLain Mixson was solidly anti- 
union when she moved to this Texas boorotown. 
During her childhood in East Texas, her father often 
told her not to take a job “where some union goes 
around teQing you what to do.** 

But in her five years at the Texas Department of 
Human Services, Ms. Mixson has become a convert to 
labor's cause. A program analyst in her 30s, Ms. 
Mixson switched allegiances after management re- 
peatedly ordered sweeping job changes for ner and her 
co- workers without consulting them. “Unions are the 
only way that the liule people can have an effective say 
over rules that govern them on the job,” she now says. 

For the labor movement, signing up Ms. Mixson 
was a small but important, victory after a decade of 
Af-Hninj? union membership and particular difficulty 
in enlisting young people. Increasingly, union leaders 


are recognizing that if labor is to reverse its decline, it 
must woo more young workers. And to that end, 
American labor has embarked on a host of new 
strategies to attract the 52 million American workers 
under the age of 35. who represent half erf the nation’s 
labor force. 

Slowly, unsurely, the nation’s unions are chang in g 
their ways, adopting new methods of organizing, em- 
phasizing new issues at the bargaining table and ad- 
libbing methods of cooperating with management 
Leaders hope the new moves will reverse the dedine in 
union membership, but they are not certain how 
successful they win be. 

“Attracting more young people is the most impor- 
tant challenge unions face today," said Harry Hub- 
band. president of the Texas AFL-CIO. “They’re im- 
portant for us to survive.'’ 

To be more attractive to today’s highly mobile, 
better-educated and often white-collar young workers. 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 1) 


Bonn Finance Chief Raises ’85 Growth Forecast 


By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 

BONN — ■ West Germany’s fi- 
nance minister, Gerhard Stoltcn- 
beig. said Friday that his country’s 
economy is likely to expand 3 per- 
cent for the year, up from 2.6 per- 
cent in 1984 and a half-percentage 
point higher than the gpvernmenvs 
official projection of 2-5 percent 
made earlier this year. 

Mr. Stoltenberz who this week 
defended his policy of fiscal re- 
straint before parliament during a 
three-day budget debate, said in an 
interview that the sluggish domes- 
tic economy had picked up mark- 
edly over the past four months, 
with new domestic ordeis for capi- 
tal goods offsetting a drop in for- 
eign orders. 

He said capital -goods manufac- 
turers would increase investment 


(Starling: 1-247 Irish c 

ft-™,. lO. Benelux t Brussels) ; Bona? ComvercSale itoOana (Mtkxi); Banem no. 
V « H «*"r-r»**rttamL 

. ■ CHlier data Ifmt Reuters and AP. 


Mr. Levy said his organiza- 
tion bad set up an office to 
stimulate demand for American 
goods. 

Mr. Levy praised the Japa- 
nese government’s recent mar- 
ket-opening “action program” 
and said that 120 Japanese 
companies have listed the lands 
erf elec ironies products they 
need. 


organiza- by 12 percent in 1985, providing a 
U.S. dec- firm basis for the creation of new 
said the jobs — some 150,000 of which, he 

xince the said, are likely to have been genet- 
ifidt with afgri try the economy as a whole 
reeled to since the fourth quarter of 1984. 
year, with But Mr. Stoltenberg conceded 
electron- that the government's chief dotnes- 
tic policy dilemma is “the fact that 
employment is rising, but unem- 
office to plcyment isn’t fafling.’’ 

™ ncan Unemployment, currently at 12 

million, or 8.9 percent of tne work 
the Japa- force, has remained at record levels 
rent m ar- this year and threatens to be (he 
pragra®” government’s most vulnerable 

Japanese point during national elections 

the kinds planned for eariy 1987. 
lets they “Unemployment today is largely 

rooted in demographics — we have 


a large influx of young workers 
[from West Germany’s baby-boom 
of the 1960s] which won’t subside 
for the next few years," he said. 

He added: “TTial’s hard to ex- 
plain to German citizens. Our 
strategy is to establish the right 
fiscal and monetary conditions for 
creating jobs, which will have to 
come in the manufacturing sector 
and, to an even greater degree, in 
the service sector. Here the U.S. is a 
good modeL" 

Mr. Stoltenberg said, however, 
that the government has no plans 
to diverge from its current econom- 
ic strategy of reducing budget defi- 
cits and encouraging price stability. 

Since taking office in 1982, the 
government of Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl has reduced the federal bud- 
get deficit from some 31.5 billion 
Deutsche marks ($10.9 billion at 
current exchange rates) in 1983 to a 
projected 24 billion DM in 1985. 

Asked whether he would consid- 
er moving forward by one year the 
second stage of a planned 20-bil- 
lion-DM tax cut, to allow 9 billion 
DM in tax relief to take effect in 
1987 rather than 1988, Mr. Stolten- 
berg said: “No, the government has 
made its decision. Moving the tax 
cut forward is no longer an issue." 

Last week, the influential Asso- 
ciation of Public Banks called for 
moving the second stage of the tax 
cut forward to 1987, which was 
seen as a compromise to calls from 
many quarters, including from 
withm the government to bring the 
full reduction forward in one stage 
next year. 

Mr. Stoltenberg said the govera- 



Gerhard Stoltenberg 

matt was no less likely to succumb 
to outside pressures to reflate the 
West German economy to spur do- 
mestic demand for the goods of its 
trading partners. 

Earlier this week. Prime Minister 
Yasuhiro Nakasone of Japan said 
be has established an official task 
force to draw up measures by early 
next month geared toward expand- 
ing domestic demand in order to 
help cut his country’s expanding 
trade surplus. 

Officials say that West Germa- 
ny, which is set to post a record 
trade surplus of 70 billion to 75 
billion DM this year, is also likely 
to come under pressure from other 
nations, particularly (he United 
States, to boost its economy. 


White House Cool to Appeal for Help by Farm Credit System 


WASHINGTON — The trou- 
bled U.S. Farm Credit System has 
sufficient resources to take care of 
its own problems, the White House 
spokesman, Larry Speakes, said 
Friday. 

Mr. Speakes was responding to 
an appeal on Thursday from Don- 
ald E. Wilkinson, governor of the 
Farm Credit Administration, the 
federal agency that oversees die 
system. Mr. Wilkinson said the sys- 
tem faced its worst crisis since the 
Depression of the ]93Us and be 
urged the government to step in. 

He said, *T think the financial 
assistance package will ultimately 
require multibfllions of dollars." 

Mr. Speaker however, said: “It 
is our view there are sufficient re- 
sources within the Farm Credit 
System to take care of this prob- 
lem." , , 

He added, “If there is any ques- 
tion about whether they want fed- 
eral action we will have to wait and 
see." 

■ Why FCS Went Public 

John M. Berry of The Washington 
Post reported earlier from Washing- 
ton: 

Officials of the Farm Credit Sys- 
tem. faced with a deteriorating 


farm economy and the likelihood 
that loan losses will mount sharply, 
decided that they had to gp public 
with the system’s plight, although 
in the short run it would undermine 
investor confidence in their securi- 
ties and increase the cost erf raising 
funds in the market 

Analysts said the system was 
forced to take the risky step be- 
cause obtaining federal hdp was 
fikdy to be a difficult and lengthy 
political process that most be be- 
gun now. 

The Farm Credit System, like 
other financial institutions, lives on 
investor confidence, a confidence 
that is bong shaken by publicity 
about large potential loan losses. 

The $74-bflHon system, a decen- 
tralized network of locally con- 
trolled lending organizations fund- 
ed through a dozen Federal 
Intermediate Credit Basks, pro- 
vides more than one- third of the 
money borrowed by farmers. 

The system noses all its loan 
money by selling securities; no fed- 
eral funds are involved. 

Should investor confidence be 
shaken eno ugh, thO-system could 
find itself unable to raise money to 
pay off maturing securities, some 
financial analysts warned. 


Such a development, siEQ regard- 
ed by analysts as a remote possibili- 
ty. could produce financial chaos in 
the farm sector and huge losses for 
investors holding the system’s secu- 
rities and for farmers who. as a 
condition of getting credit, bought 
stock in the system.. 

So far, the system has absorbed 
its losses and maintained a sub- 
stantial net worth, estimated at 
more than $10 bilb on earlier this 
year in a report by the Farm Credit 
Administration. Meanwhile, divi- 
dends are still being paid on the 
stock. 

However, (he system may have 
$11 billion in uncollectible loans, 
possibly more, according to esti- 
mates by sources in the system. 

Only about $1 billion has been 
set aside to cover posable losses, 
the Farm Credit Administration’s 
report said. 

Most of the securities issued by 
the system are held by both domes- 
tic and foreign institutional inves- 
tors such as commercial banks, in- 
surance companies, savings and 
loan associations and corporations. 
Some are also held by individuals. 

The securities have no federal 
guarantees, but investors have 
treated them as if there were guar- 
antees. 


Normally, the system has raised 
money by paying only about 10 or 
15 baas points above the yield on 
regular U.S. Treasury securities of 
similar maturities. A basis point is 
one-hundredth of a percentage 
point. 

Because of looming problems, 
the spread had risen to 25 to 50 
basis points. Publication of a Wall 
Street Journal story Wednesday 
saying system officials were going 
to seek some form of direct federal 
assistance raised that spread fur- 
ther to 50 to 75 basis points and 
reduced the number of transactions 
in the securities, said one trader at a 
New York bond dealer. 

The dealer said that investors re- 
gard the system's securities as hav- 
ing a “moral obligation" type of 
government guarantee even if there 
is no legal guarantee. Foreign in- 
vestors. he added, are even more 
confident than American investors 
that the U$. government would 
not let the system collapse. 

At the moment, no one knows 
how much of a rescue package 
might be needed. 

But while the Farm Credit Sys- 
tem is facing tosses, so are many 
agricultural banks — those with 
more than one-fourth of their leans 
in agriculture — and a number 


have failed in the last two years. 
The Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corp. has more than 400 such 
banks, t nMtiy^s mafl, on its^Iist of 

Credit System wilhout^dping the 
banks, too. could be politically dif- 
ficult 

Public disclosure of the system’s 
plight will have an impact on the 
entire farm credit issue, and offi- 
cials avoided it as long as possible. 

Last month, the system chose to 
use cash on hand to pay off some 
maturing notes ratho - than make 
the disclosures that would have to 
accompany a new securities issue. 

If the present holders of the sys- 
tem’s securities were to decide to 
sell them, buyers would have to be 
round for those securities as well as 
any new ones. “It could be hard to 
find buyers, and there could be a 
liquidity problem," said one dealer. 
“It could be a real mess.” 

The Global 
Newspaper. 



statement. EPIC said it expected to 
continue negotiations on finding a 
buyer. 

Equity, a large syndicator of 
real-estate tax shelters, has missed 
a reported $15 million in payments 
on 51.4 billion in mortgages and 
mortgage securities. 

Earlier Friday, a Maryland court 
placed EPIC a ad its parent under 
conservatorship and ordered a 
45-day freeze on withdrawals. 

A court official said that the 
Maryland Deposit Insurance Fund 
was named as conservator. The or- 
der was issued at the request of the 
Maryland Board of Savings and 
Loan Commissioners and the 
state's insurance fund. 

On Wednesday, a federal district 
court in Alexandria, Virginia, or- 
dered EPIC to hold in escrow pay- 
ments received from mortgage 
loans that back certificates held by 
its investors. 

The order was issued pending 
the outcome of a suit by two banks 
that asks that a receiver be appoint- 
ed for EPIC and for the restitution 
of $1 1 million in missed payments. 

On Thursday, in fresh evidence 
that the problems of Maryland's 
thrift institutions were having a 
broader impact, Ticor Mortgage 
Insurance Co. of Los Angeles said 
that it would cease writing policies 
because of potential losses it might 
suffer from its dealings with EPIC. 

Analysts said the move by Ticor, 
the nation’s fourth-largest private 
mortgage insurer, could shrink the 
availability of mortgage insurance 
and raise premiums. 

Ticor said it would continue to 
honor insurance commitments out- 


“We're convinced that inflation- 
free growth of 3 percent is better 
than 5-perceni growth with climb- 
ing inflation,’’ Mr. Stoltenberg 
said. “Our imports are set to grow 
10 percent from last year — we 
regard this as a significant contri- 
bution to world recovery” 

But he added. “What we wfll not 
do, however, is dear embark on 
any expansive fiscal policy that 
would enlarge the federal deficit — 
that would be a bad signal for inter- 
est rate and price developments.” 

Mr. Stoltenberg said that West 
Germany’s inflation rate would fall 
to an average 2 percent this year, 
from 2.4 percent last year, “with 
the grouting prospect that the next 
few months will show a rate of 
about 1.8 percent, among the low- 
est in the industrialized world." 

The finance minister also said 
that prospects are good for a fur- 
ther cut in West Germany’s key 
interest rates, although a current 
upward trend in U.S. rates and the 
recent hardening of the dollar to 
around 2.90 DM might preclude 
immediate action by the Bundes- 
bank. 

He said: “Bundesbank President 
Karl Ouo P6hJ has said, and I 
would agree, that a further cut in 
key rates is possible under the fol- 
lowing conditions: that we see a 
trend toward falling rates, particu- 
larly in the U.S., and that long-term 
capital continues to flow into West 
Germany as we’ve seen in recent 
months." 

“As long as market expectations 

(Co n ti nued on Page 13, CoL 2) 


standing and would renew existing 
policies. But it said that as a result 
of uncertainty surrounding possi- 
ble losses from EPICs policies — 
and after discussions with the Cali- 
fornia Department of Insurance — 
it would no longer accept applica- 
tions for insurance beginning 
Wednesday. 

Ticor leads the private insurers 
that have written policies backing 
Equity Programs’ obligations. 

Acawding to Wall Street esti- 
mates, Ticor faces potential losses 
of $166 millio n on Equity Pro- 
grams' policies it has written. A loss 
of that size would come dangerous- 
ly dose to wiping out Ticor’ s esti- 
mated capital of $200 million 

Meanwhile, Maryland Governor 
Harry Hughes signed an executive 
order Friday that eased withdrawal 
restrictions at 21 state savings and 
loan associations. 

The order allows depositors to 
obtain funds to pay state, local or 
federal taxes. It also allows deposi- 
tors to withdraw money if they can 
verify that they need to complete 
construction of new homes or to 
.repay loans they obtained to pay 
taxes. 

At a news conference, Mr. 
Hughes said the current savings 
and loan crisis in the state “is a 
classic case of unbounded greed” 
by thrift owners. 

He said the slate will do every- 
thing it can to hold them legally 
accountable, including criminal 
prosecution. 

Mr. Hughes also said that “a 
major New York money-center 
bank” is dose to acquiring First 
Maryland Barings A Loan, one of 
the four large state-insured thrifts 
at which he froze withdrawals in 
June. 

He would not identity the bank, 
but he added that Chase Manhat- 
tan Corp. is dose to buying yet 
another thrift, Merritt Commercial 
Savings A Loan. He said both pur- 
chases could be formally an- 
nounced within a week. 


Russians Appear 
Less Optimistic 
On Grain Yield 

Reuters 

MOSCOW — With a third of 
the Soviet grain crop stiB in the 
field and autumn approaching, 
Moscow agriculture officials 
are less optimistic about the 
harvest than they were last 
month. Western economists , 
said Friday. 

In eariy August, Soviet offi- 1 
dais told specialists at Western ' 
embassies that a 200-million- I 
ion crop was possible, well be- I 
low the original 239- million-ton i 
target but a marked increase ' 
over last year’s 170 million tons. 

Tbc U.S. Department of Ag- 
riculture estimated that (he So- 
viet harvest would teach 190 
million ions. 

Other experts said they had 
detected less optimism in infor- 
mal exchanges with Soviet offi- 
tials and saw that as a sign of 
concern over the slow pace of 
harvesting. 

Soviet press reports said 
frosts have already nit the north 
and east and that fanners must 
significantly increase their work 
rate to b ring in their grain. 

In the 1984-85 harvest year, 
Moscow has imported a record 
55 million tons of grain, with 
two-ilfihs coming from the 
United States. The U.S. Agri- I 
culture Department predicted 
Soviet needs for the coming | 
year at about 40 million tons. 


RBlNDff 

An Amount far the Cautious Investor 
to Protect and Increase Capital 

U-S. Dollar Denominated 
Insured by U.S. Govt. Entities 
Important Tax Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Martef Yields 
No Market Risk 
Immediate Liquidity 
Absolute GorrfidentiaEty 

CHEMICAL BANK, New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND THUST 
Registrar 

RBtNDEP 

Case Postale 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 

Please send prospectus and 

account application to-. 


Address . 


Nat amfafah -vfc, USA 






2 




Friday^ 


NV 5 E 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing oa Wall Street 
owt do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


Pabiwpfus u 


IJ4 72 > 

640 7 2 B 
23 1-9 T1 
128 7 4 9 
S3 W 384 


US. Futures 


Swjn Seam 
HW Low 


Sqx. 6 

Open Htah tow aoi* a»- 


Grains 


Season Season 

High Law 

LOW 

flow 

Cho. 

7640 57 JO Jul ».10 g'M 

73,15 5XJ0 AuO 5^-6° J? -40 

Est. 5ol«* 4402 Pl«v. WM «« 
Prav.Day Ooenim. 6583 up 233 

5845 

57 40 

59 JO 
57 JO 

+40 

+.10 


WHEAT (CBTl 

SOOO bu ml fihrmm- dollars per bushel 
XHW 264ft Sep SJB 243ft 


343ft i7»yz 
IM* IS? 
US HI 

ST ^ 

Est Soles < 


Dec ism 253 
Mor 257* zsm 
«oy 251 2MU 
Jiri 233 176ft 

Prfe.SoIes 12928 


Prov.Dov Open int. 3X704 ofM237 
CORN (CBTl 

MOO bumlrUnmnv- dollar? per bushel 
321 Vi 223 Sep 229 229 

295 8.14ft Dec 2.1BW 2.19ft 


AO S 
SOe *s 
50 44 39 


41 22ft 
14ft 5ft 

as* 14 

4ft 2W 
2BW 19 
4 2W 
12 6ft 
43ft 24ft 
13ft 9ft 
25ft 17ft 
12 3ft 
lift 9ft 
53 29ft 
73W 5* 

S3 44 
91ft 73 
73 57ft 
68 S3 
27ft 13ft 
47ft 32V. 

as Mft 


VFCorp 

Valero 

Valor pf 

Valevin 

vonDm 

Vorcp 

vorcBPf 

Vorlan 

vara 

Veeco 

VenOo 

Vests* 

Vtoaxn 

VoEPp! 

VafiPpf 

VaEPPf 

VoEPfJ 

vaEPpt 

vlshay s 

Vomad 

VuienM 


26 J 20 
AO 13 33 

* M * 
IJOolOI 
M IP 21 
7.72 112 
U4 11.1 
fJS 112 
7J2 112 
720 1V4 

15 

11 

uo mz 


159 40ft 
125 10ft 

3 ft 

B 23ft 
08 3ft 

4 lift 
153 30ft 

n 12 

40 19 
IS 9ft 
23 11W 
540 47ft 
130170 

io«» 

Z000Z87 
llDOz 48ft 
5te 63ft 
22 2SW 
123 45ft 
54 82 


40H 40ft + W 
10ft 10ft + ft 
23ft 23ft— ft 
2ft 2ft + ft 
22ft 22ft 
3ft 3ft— ft 
IT* lift 
30ft Wft + ft 
lift 12 
18ft 18ft 
9W 9ft + ft 
lift lift— ft 
47ft 47ft— ft 
« » 

BO SO +T 
87 87 +ft 

48% 4BW — ft 
63ft 63ft 
25 25 — W 

44ft 45ft— ft 
(IVl (1ft— ft 


34 

13 

73 

9 


7 

IJ 

1 

15 

19 

15 

11 

23 

9 


35 34ft 34ft 
13 34ft 33ft 
134 34ft 34 
034 31 30ft 
19 23 23 

45 38ft 38ft 


17ft 
34 34ft 
57ft 58V. 
13ft 13ft 
4Bft 40ft 
2ft 2ft 
10 10ft 
21ft 21ft 
20W 20ft 
9ft 


48W 
40ft 
45W 
84ft 

ff* 

'8 1 

,8 1 5 

ft 5flft 
* 34ft 
ft 14SW 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 


«ft win 
20 WU 
5ft WU 
24 Wet 
347k 
in 

35ft 


53 33 QuafcOs 124 24 14 278 51ft 51ft 51ft + ft 

UJS Q«WiO JO 19 1? 51 20ft 30ft 20ft— W 

10ft 4ft euaim 19 93 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 

3«ft 24ft Qwestar IPO 5A 10 86 29ft 29ft 29ft— W 

26ft 14ft QfcRell 24a 1.1 14 311 23ft 23ft 22ft— W 


18ft lfft 
» Mft 
27ft 27ft 
27ft 27ft 
26ft 26ft 
32ft 32ft 
18ft 18ft 
17ft 17ft 
26W 26ft 
47 47ft 

S*S 


321ft X33 Sep 129 229 

Z-W J14ft Dec n8W Z19VS 

ilO Z24* Mar 128ft Z27VA 

U1M 231 May 2J4ft 236 

186 133 Jul 238ft 239ft 

2J6ft 234W Sep 238ft 131ft 

U9 UBW Dee 127 128ft 

E&.SQIM F+ev. Sates 36474 

Prey. Dev Open lnt.135219 off 326 
SOVB*ANS<C8T) 

SAN ixt minimum- dollars per bushel 
6.n 54CVS Sep 117 5.18 

848 5JOU Nov 5.12ft 5.14ft 

5,12ft Jan 522ft 524ft 

7jH 543 Mar S23ft 525* 

*2 531 W May SAZft 5,45 

63S 536W Jut SA8W 550 

6J4 Sgft Auo SAB JL5C 

628 522 S*e 

>32 528 Nov 5A4 545ft 

EH. Soles Prey. Sale* 34365 

Prey. Dor Open lot. 67307 ups9S 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBTl 
100 fans- dal km per ton 

17950 12040 Sep 12LOO 12840 

18040 T22J0 Oct 12750 12940 

18400 12540 Dec 13130 I1U0 

16100 12738 Jan 13330 13450 

?»20 13000 Mar 13730 13830 

162^ U2J0 MOV 139 JO 141 JO 

16730 - 13430 Jul HI JO 14330 

M3J0 135JB Aus 14100 M3J0 

15730 737 JO Sep M3J0 14150 

Est-SOte prev. Soles 2561* 

Prev. Day Open int. 45J34 up78S 

7L10 2104 Sep 2235 2235 

3037 2U3 Oct 21.92 21.94 

29-55 2142 Dec 2157 2142 

2947 2131 Jan 21.75 21.77 

2840 2100 Mar 21*7 2105 

2745 2230 May 2130 2130 

x.?* eou i jar wai 2250' 

2575 2157 Awe 2240 2150 

24J05 2150 See 2145 2170 

2180 2160 Oct 2160 2140 

EN. Sates Prev. Sates T3J03 

Prev. Day Open lnt. 5S4T7 off 414 
OATS (CBTl 

5400 be mini mum- dollars Per bosheJ 
L79 1.11ft S#P l.T7ft 1.18ft 1 

142ft 131 Dec 135 135 1 

147ft 136ft Mar 138ft 139 1 

143 137ft Mar 

130ft 136 jul 

ES. Sales . Prev. Soles 270 

Prev. Day Open Hit 3393 vs 34 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40000 IM.- cents per (b. 

6550 5345 Od 5430 5440 

6745 55.15 Dec 5640 5647 

6745 5545 Feb 5630 5645 

4757 5445 APT 5740 5730 

6635 5730 Jim 5845 5835 

6540 5650 AUS 5630 57.70 

Est. Said 15362 Prev. So [M 16468 
Prev. DOV Open Hit. 49436 us 562 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44400 re*/- ants ner M. 

7340 5745 SOP 5940 59 JO 

7232 57.15 Oct 5832 5930 

7330 5830 Now «L5C 6035 

7940 6048 Jan 6140 6190 

7DJ5 61.10 Mar 6140 6290 

7045 67.15 Apr 6240 6280 

463S 6130 May 4105 6KU 

Est. Sates 2,119 Prev. Sales 1,921 
Prev. Dav Open tnt. 8.124 up 34 
HOGS (CME) 

30000 tbA- cents per lb. 

5135 3492 Oct 3542 3590 

5035 3737 OK 3740 3840 

5047 3945 Feb 39.45 394B 

4735 3652 Apr 3645 3730 

4945 3930 Jun 4040 4090 

4945 4050 Jul 47 4 0 47.15 

57 JO 4035 AUS 4140 4140 

47.10 38JJ7 Oct 3635 3830 

4950 3637 Dec 3650 3850 

Est. Sates 1479 Prev. Sales 4jtr7 
Prev. Day Open I nt. 26482 up 542 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

36400 PM.' cents per lb. 

7630 5573 Feb 5610 5640 

7540 5545 Mdr 5605 5650 

7540 5745 Mav 5935 59/40 


277ft 263 +44 

249ft Z9ZW -hflOW 
^ft 259 -40ft 

193 196 

273 276 

279 


236 236% — JWW 

216ft 216ft — 44W 
224 Vi 226ft —44 

233ft ZU —43 Vi 
237ft 237ft — 43W 
239 239 

226 U6W — 43W 


613 —47ft 

5,10 — JB6W 

5.19ft — 46V» 
5J1W —46 
S-40W —46 

SA7 — 45W 
S4S —46 
143 —43ft 

643W —43ft 


12640 12640 +130 
1Z75B 12690 +30 

121.10 133JR +A0 

13120 13440 +.40 

13650 737 JO —40 
13940 74040 —50 

14150 14240 —A0 

14150 14350 
143J0 74350 —50 


7145 2146 —45 

7755 2157 —AS 

2133 2138 —A3 

27 AO 2147 — 38 

21 JO 21J2 —At 
7U0 SUB — A7 

77 7* Ti 

•n n 77 ^ —JO 

2256 2270 +48 

2255 2255 —.70 


L17M 1.18U +40ft 
134ft 135 -40ft 

13Bft 138ft —41 

139ft —40ft 
137 


Metals 


5340 54.10 
5635 56J2 
MJS 56.HI 
56JD 5640 
57J8 5740 
5650 56J0 


9945 60A2 
42.15 045 
47 7n (OJA 
6235 6255 

6148 0140 


3530 3SA7 
3735 37A5 

39.12 3937 
3665 3647 
4035 4047 

4045 43 .10 
40J0 40JB 
3625 3837 
3650 3 665 


5730 5645 
57 A0 5830 
5645 59/6 


Currency Options 


NYSE High s 4 xms 


844 93 

140 19 
40 IJ 

* 

1-90 105 

ZD4 

SO 

4.16 

84 

3J2S1X1 

•JO 

J 

140 

34 

44 

14 

51e 9J 

JO 

3J 

JO 

3J 

.10b 

A 

1.10 

7J 

340 

74 

44 

34 

50 

4J 

40 

24 

40 

25 


H 


19ft + ft 
49ft + W 
99 + W 

20ft-- ft 

m + w 

46ft— ft 
39W + ft 
21ft + W 
17ft + U 

40W + ft 

S 2 W— ft 
Ml 
27ft 
29ft- 
47ft 
5ft 



NEW KIOHS 31 


AARCP 
BlkHIflPw 
CnPw 360pr 
GAF Carp 
KolsrAlum 
MGM-UA Ent 
PhEI 152Spf 
SCMCorn 

AMR CP Pf 
BortSernk 
Eihftdidppf 
Gap Inc 
LomasMtgn 
MesaRovI 
Plan Resrch 
Twin Disc 

AmHatph 

Circus 

FwJRttv 

iTTCPPfO 

Lownrtsteln 

Mont Paw 

RcvereCopr 

wrtaley 

BellHowell 
Comdisco 
FfttFn adl p 
irrtqrcolnc 
MCA Inc 

Mats vet nd 
Rich Vick 


NBW LOWS 26 


Amteseo 

□ lebolds 

GanRod 

McDer 220pf 

Pansdyn* 

RlverOckn 

Tnmscnlnc 

BAS IX 
EngtlhardCp 

Hitachi 
McDermlnt 
PutteHme 
Standsx 
Zapata Cp 

OW Invest 

FalrchWot 

Koaaarspf 

Mcormint wt 

Pvrolator 

TexAmBneh 

Colllne! s * 

Geartilnd 

MB Ltd a 

NaAmPhli 

Rancalnc 

Tex Cam Bn 


AMEX Highs-Lo^>s 



NEW HIGHS 9 


Core Ent wl 
Hannctfids 
Wei lea Ent 

ElectrSad 

MePubSv 

FrannerHold 

MartlnProc 

GtanfFoods 

PennTri 


NEW LOWS 6 


CasmaCr n 
RltSauwt 

Dig Icon Inc 
RogereCp 

ElecAud Dy 

RMS Electr 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 



SepL 6 

Option & 

stmt* 







Underlying 

Price 


Calls — Last 

Pats— Last 



Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

1XS00 British Poaods-cent* per Mlt. 


BPouod 

110 

22J0 

r 

, r 

r 

r. 

r 

.1324* 

120 

r 

•1340 

r 

-• r 

140. 

X45 

132 US 

ns 

r 

940 

1X10 

r 

Z10 

r 

IT? HR 

130 

160 

6.00 

735 

0A0 

4.10 

64S 

13248 

135 

0-45 

uo 

550 

ISO 

650 

853 

132J8 

140 

045 

245 

3JD 

735 

9J5 

r 

13248 

145 

r 

1.10 

r 

r 

1450 

r 

13248 

150 

r 

HAD 

1J5 

r 

r 

r 

50000 Canadian Do Ua rs-cents per uslt. 




CDOIIr 

72 

145 

r 

r 

r 

025 

r 

7X03 

73 

020 

r 

r 

0.16 

r 

r 

7343 

74 

r 

024 

r 

r 

143 

145 

.W43 

75 

r 

r 

r 

246 

r 

r 

■7103 

76 

r 

pin 

s 

r 

r 

s 

62500 West German Marks-c*nts per unit. 



DMarit 

X 

+13 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

34.19 

31 

r 

358 

r 

r 

r 

r 

34.19 

32 

Z16 

r 

r 

r 

056 

ass 

36.19 

33 

1J8 

r 

r 

042 

0-50 

r 

34.19 

34 

0,43 

1/« 

157 

050 

093 

1.18 

34.19 

35 

049 

052 

1-53 

045 

125 

152 

34.19 

36 

041 

057 

148 

1J3 

246 

240 

34,19 

37 

041 

0J4 

0J6 

r 

s 

r 

36.19 

X 

r 

(L22 

0J4 

r 

r 

8 

»540Q Preach Fn*KS-lMbs of a cent per 
F Franc no 145 r 54 

writ. 

r 

r 

r 

+TN400 Japanese Yen-1 Both* of a coat per anil. 



JY*n 

40 

0.94 

r 

r 

042 

r 

r 

4143 

41 

033 

057 

r 

046 

042 

r 

4143 

42 

005 

0J5 

r 

an 

143 

r 

4143 

43 

r 

052 

r 

r 

r 

r 

62500 Swtts Fnmcs-ceal* per antt 





SFranc 

37 

445 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

4IA9 

38 

r 

r 

r 

041 

050 

r 

41A9 

39 

2JB 

3.18 

r 

r 

028 

r 

41A9 

40 

r 

2-50 

r 

pm 

023 

090 

41A9 

41 

0A8 

1J7 

r 

0.16 

057 

r 

41 JR 

42 

DJ4 

1J5 

158 

049 

141 

r 

61A9 

43 

046 

035 

155 

IAS 

248 

r 

41A9 

44 

r 

0A5 

1J1 

248 

240 

r 

4149 

45 

r 

0J9 

049 

r 

r 

r 

4149 

46 

r 

r 

050 

r 

r 

r 

Total call voL 

2MIS 


Can open Inf. 22+049 

Total put veL 

7,991 


P*1 open brt. 153571 

r — Not traded, s— No cotton offered. 




Last Is premium (aurchase price). 





Source: AP. 









_ Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) ‘ 
Sttllinart-aKonaOpcL . 

9333 8644 Sep 9249 9249 

93J77 S5J7- Dec 92J0 9270 

9259 MAO Mar 9222 9237 

9238 8741 Jun 91.96 9)46 

9241 8640 , Sep 9158 9158 

91 JB 89JB Dec 91.17 9L77 

9139 8956 Mar 9047 9041 

9049 9050 Jim 98L66 9056 

Ejtsale* 16491 Prev.Sate* MJSB 
Prev. Day Open Jnt 36414 
WTR. TREASURY CCBTl - 
IMC400 prtn-pt8B32nd* afllO pet 
88-71 75-16 Sep M 06 - 

67-13 75-13 Dec 8+28 85-1 

86-2 75-14 Mar *4-2 84-2 

85-7 74-30 Jun 

s£ll *K2 Dm 11-15 8M7 

Est Sales Prev.SaWe 165J1 

Prev. Day Open Int 60314 up 1 406 
OS TREASURY RONDS (CBTl 
(8pcLS100400+ts &32odsaf KB pd) 
79-12 57-10 Sep 7+9 76-14 

78-13 574 Dec 7H 754 

77-29 57-2 Mar 7+4 74A 

764 56-29 Jw IM W 

75-31 5+29 Sep 7H 73-11 

7+24 56-25 Dec 7H9 77-19 

7+15 56-27 Mar 70-25 78-35 

7+26 63-13 Jun 7+7 70-7 

72-27 cm Sep 69-21 69-21 , 

72-18 S2-04 Dec 0-17 68-17 i 

_6+27 675 Mar 

Est. Sales Piw.SaWUgJll . 

Prev. Day Open lnt2lS4W o»99i 


9248 9242 
92A6 9241 
9212 92.13 
91-77 91.71 

91A5 91/66 
9L17 91.17 
90.91 9841 
9666 9066 


85-70 BS-14 
B+« 4+15 

IM 83-17 • 
82/27 
(1-39 
81-3 IM 


75-12 75-16- 
7+5 wn- 
73-5 73-8 

728 72-10 

TV12 71-14 
70-18 70-20 
69-25 69-28 
69ft 69-6 
68-17 68-11 
67-31 6S - 
67-14 . 


rndastridB -Ll- -- 


.kUMMIKCMB 
1304001x1 fL-SperLOOObdJL. 

197 JO- 12740 3eP 736-00 139JO 13640 . .13940 +U0 

10630 12648 MOV 737 JO 135JD 13(50 13540 -V3JA “J 

U740 13140 Jan 13+31:13070 IMS -.13030. +U0 1 

»5J»' mM : -Mar HUD MUt . tflJf .' M63B 4U0> 
17640 •• 16540 -' May 149-00 14950 147.1 B ,14941 +140 

moo ' 149.50 Jul 15X50 15440 15340-45X00 -H40 

17+00 1KLS3 Sep V. 15650.. +50. 

E*tSoM* 143+ Prev.Sate* ' 14P-"- ■ m 

Prev. Day Open InL, 8A12 UP175., - .. 

COTTON ltNYCE) - - . “ > - . • ---T-. 

BW tt*t- cent* perltL 

77 JO 57 A0 Oct - 504 5 58J5, M4T 5U5 -J8' . 

. 7100 5775 -Dec 58-15 JKS S-87 5K24 — %14 

7+73- . 59.10 Mar 5955 59At 3947 5957 — J1 

- 7000 ■ - 5840 - May 5MB 3940 5941- 39* —42 
7045 J9.W- .Jvf 5945 5945 - S9A9 5940 —55 '■ ■■ 

4550 : : .5450 Oct 5140 5442- 5442 5442 -JJ C 

3935 .- -sus:-' Doc 5355 5440 5X50 SX51 —M . * 

BSt.3dB9.J408 Prm.Sole*' 7X0 J-Z - y. 

Prev. Day Openlid^2A7IO eN79 •' 4 

HEATInO Olt (NYME) - & 

B407pal-aml*peraal : 

7945 / - 67j 65 Oct 7940 40.15 7845 MU0 +1J6 

7MB 6BJ0'.- Noy 79.19'- 7941 7S40 . 79A5 +J7 ‘ 

BOS AXIS Dec 7145 7940 7*50- SJ0 AOS '. 

*025 6941 Jan 7145 -7945 .M59 TUB 

7925 7D«ff feb 77 J5 7745 3740 7740 -i2B-..»-- 

7640 6*40 . . Mar 7*30 7459 J 343D .- 7440 —30 _ 

7440 6840. Apr -7140 j 7T40 > 7140 71 Jt —40 - 

Est^afe* . •: Prev.SaM* 8442 V -.S-. ' '= 

Prev. Dory Open int’ 27,718 apl.146 ■ . ; • ••• '• 

aypi okcNYMB) 

unobbu dollars pe^Mi - - V • • - 

29-50 , 2445 ’■ Oct 2840 040 Z7TI 773^, —33 

»J0. . 2440 Nov 2745' 27AJ ! 274* 2744 — v!7 

29 JO ' 23JNF - Dec'. 3640 26J5: VJt 2+79 -03 

2950 2459 Jan -2U0 264+ 2640 - 264S —37 

2246 - "2425 Feb -2631 1. 2437 2L16 2650 — 56. 

2945 203 Mar 2810 2740 . 25.90: 

2945. 2X93 Apr 2S40. 3SM -S3s SS --^31 

V 30,. 23 AS May. 2340 3X60 25JB 25 JO — S . 

2+70 -5 179 Jun 2545 2X45 25JJ6 ' 2556 ^Ji ~ 

_ 36.14 2540 _JuL 3X30 2X30 753S 2550 -vS / ! 

Est. Safe*. JVev.SalB* 2X34* " 

Pr»v. DoyOwn I nt. 62463 m) +770 - - 


Stock Indexes 


sp/Comp. rm»X(CM» 
potnfsenfeeaf * '. ■ 

S 3 M:JST ra f B «3 

EcX Sales 48406 Prey. Sale* JWM9 : . 

Prtv. Day Open lot *9JJ4 op4467' - 


VALU E UNBQ OCBT). 
potnfj and cents 


patnti and cent* - . ' • •' . 

m»- -.18873 Sep- _ 18X70 HA50 19740 
32-8 • l??- 15 ' °«C »W0 30150 0(40 
70940. 202JD- Utor..'--'. * ■ . 

E*t.Sole*_ Prev.SaMe MB6- 
Prev. Day Openl rd. lU82_up« _ „ 

WY5E COMP. INDEX (NYFB7 
point* and cents 

IKK 91 JS ,Sep tOBJe 10(40 KBJB5 
-11740 . . 1SU0 -Dec- HlUO 1M73 110.10 
118W .109 JO Mar J1145 11U5 T11A5 

13840 . ; iliy jun ■ mu mu mis 
EuLSaJe* ilsS. P rev.Sales 702e3 
PlW-Doy Open Int _ 9481 off 363 


. . . - Commodity Indexes 


(JOW 

Moody 4 *.': ' . ‘ 888.00 f 

iteuters Lj 1J25J0 

D_f. Futures _ ■ 11333 

Com. Research Bureau- 219.10 . 

Atoody’s : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p -prelim Hiory; f-flnol 
Reuters': base 100 : Seo. 18, 1931. 
Daw Janes : base 100 : Dec 31, T974. 


Previous 
884.70 f 
1J13J0 . 
113J6 
21 9 JO 


GormiSfities 


London 

GonunodSies 


Goim&ies 


+ ft 
+ ft 
*■ % 
f- w 

- ’* . 

+ ft 14ft 

+ ft » 

+ ft I 47ft 


md 

a pi 

TV* 
nrp 2AS 62 
im IM 9A 
ipf 197 13J 
i pr 220 124 
i Of +00 134 
IPf 1.90 135 
(nd 40 25 
13 


B 




* ' 4 ’ .« *• 






37ft 
12ft 9ft 
32ft 19ft 
19 IS 
71ft 16 
20ft I2W 
12ft 5ft 
29k !W 
38ft 23W 
34ft 34ft 
35 2Jft 
23 17 

lift 9W 
Bft 3ft 
35ft 34ft 
20ft 20 
9ft 6ft 
13ft Oft 
49W 31 
35ft 20 
35ft 23ft 
46 39ft 
54ft 50ft 
\m 14ft 
33W 16ft 
23ft 17ft 
9ft 5 
I3W 9ft 
28ft 19ft 
52ft 33 
48 34ft 
16(k I 
33 22ft 
61ft 49ft 
44ft 28ft 
16ft 12ft 
45 36ft 
13 10ft 
16* lift 
16ft 13ft 
37ft 17ft 
5» 3ft 
44ft 35ft : 
21ft TSft ! 
31ft 22W i 
32ft 23ft ! 
46ft : 
29ft : 
23ft i 
lift : 
26ft ! 
lift ! 
15 ’ 

2*ft ! 
17ft ! 
TSft ! 
5W I 


3JM 22 17 8729 73 7ZW 73 + ft 

32 1.7 TO 8 lift lift lift— ft 

JO 27 14 10 30 30 30 + W 

JM 3 40 23 17 164k 17 

250*1X5 269 18ft 18ft 18ft + ft 

JO 17 16 32 18ft 18ft lift— ft 

34 76 13ft 13 12ft + ft 

133 3* 2ft 3ft 

40 1.1 25 511x37 36W 3646 + ft 

140 S3 10 1S»1 31ft 309k 31 — ft 

■52 U 73 44 37* 27 TJYl + ft 

1.72 87 7 22 20ft 199k 19ft— ft 

IM 10 3 50 10ft 10W 10ft + ft 

19 6 5* 6 

.16 J 15 1149 33W 33ft 33ft + ft 

224 84 9 375 36ft 261b 36ft 
-92el0Ll IB 672 9ft 9 9ft 

31 3 T1W T1W IIU — ft 

40 14 20 1303 37ft 36ft 37ft +1 

1-94 8.1 13 65 24ft 34 24 — ft 

LOO 30 15 6344 34ft 33ft 33ft— lft 

144 34 12 1821 43 42ft 42ft + ft 

191* 74 1 Sift 51ft 51ft 

JO 1.1 47 2 law 1BW 18W 

140 81 7 49 23ft 19ft 1946 

134 63 1 21W 21 W 21W + ft 

64 7* 7ft 7ft 

150 120 7 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 

Z16 85 9 106 25ft 25ft 25ft 

148 04 14 476 48V 47ft 48ft +1 

150 3J 9 2454 36ft 36 36ft + ft 

.12 .9 (9 SBS 14 13W 1SW 

760 24 13 360 32M 32W 3ZW 

JO* 14 10 1275 56W 55* 56 + ft 

1-24 OO 10 1332 42ft 41ft 41ft + ft 

52 35 11 121 13ft 13* 13ft + ft 

42 14 S 132 31 30W 31 +ft 

146 114 1 12ft 12ft 13ft— ft 

ZW 105 8 15ft 15ft 15ft— ft 

2.10 1X2 52 16 15ft IS* + ft 

48 2J 8 481 21ft 20ft 21 + W 

365 4ft 4ft 4ft 

40 10 11 60* 39U 39 39ft + 4k 

19 77 17 16ft 16ft 

44 14 17 167 31ft 30W 31ft +lft 

140 17 8 79 27 36* 37 +W 

140 15 IB 98 64ft 64ft 64ft 

1.76 5L0 9 3071 35 34ft 34ft + ft 

L34 4J 7 743 27* 27ft 27* + ft 

20 18 18 ia 

48 1J 18 294 38* 37ft 31ft + ft 

.72 45 22 153 15ft 14* 14*— * 

M IS 8 109 24 23ft 24 + ft 

Z37e 6JE 7 455 38* 38W 3BW— ft 

40 33 6 1 M 24ft 24 24* 

.92 IS 12 IS 37ft 37ft 37W— W 
10 496 7ft 7W 7ft + * 


Sales lloure* are unofficial. Yearly teen* and laws reflect 

Bwprevtain 52 weeksolushw current week. but not the krtest 

trading day, when* c snltt er stock dividend amountlno to m 

perannar mare has been paid, Iheyear^hleh-law ranee and 

arvtdend are shown for the new stock only. Unless otherwi 


tne latest d*cJ oration, 
a— dividend nt*o *x1rals>Jl 

b— annual rot* of dividend Plus stock dfvld*nO/l 
c— liquidating dhtWandJI 
cJd— calMdUl 
d — newveaiyiawyi 

*— iflvfdend declared or paid In preceding I2immtt*/i 
e- dtvMendin Canadian funds. siMectta 1SW nan+wldenc* 

Tax. 

! ~? v ! tfand «"*• WH-Up or stock dividend. 

nd — next day delivery. 

P/E— prio+eamlnes ratio. 

^^MftMdedored or mdd in orea-dtno 12 months, pi W 

s— stock JPflt. Dividend beofts wiiti date of spill. 

m— wes. 

t — dividend paid bi deck In Preceding 12 months, estimated 
anh value an *x -dividend ^ ex-d Wrlbutian dale. 

u— new yearly IHstv 

v— tnodl ns hotted. 

vl — In bankruptcy or ncaftershlp or being nmreonlzed un. 
der the Banknmtcv Acf.or seamH«s asaimed by such com- 
panies. 

wd — when tfistrBiuteX 
wl— when Issued, 
ww— with worr nnl s. 
x— ax-dlvJdax] or ex+tafifs. 
afla — ex-fSEtrUxrttan. 
xw — without warranto, 
v— ex^ttvfdend and eafes In ftilL 
yfd— yield, 

8— sale* In full. 


To (Mir Readers 
in the Netherlands. 

We would like to bear 
from you. 

Sines the Internationa] 
Herald Tribune began printing 
in The Hague in October 1981 
we have sought to ensure 
delivery of the paper to news- 
stands and subscribers early 
every morning throughout 
The Netherlands. 

If you are having any 
difficulty obtaining the 
International Herald Tribune 
in a timely manner, please 
contact our distributor 
Edipress International 
Bloemendaaleweg 224 
Postbus 111 
2050 AC Overveen 
Tel: 023 25 29 69 
Telex: 41833. 

Hcralbus^Eribunc 






SepL 6 




Ocse 



HJgJi 

Low 

BM 

Ask 

are* 

SUGAR 






FreaOi franc* per metric ton 



Oct 

1430 

1515 

1J17 

1/524 

+ 34 

Dec 

’•512 

1490 

1J00 

ijia 

+ 15 

Mar 

1J30 

1510 

1415 

Qw 

+ 10 

MOV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1445 

1J55 

+ 8 

Aug 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1485 

1400 

+ 8 

Oct 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1453 

1460 

+ 15 

Est. «wL: 2200 lots of SO tons. Prev. 
sales: 2A58 lots. Open Interest: 21JD2 

actual 

1 COCOA 






French francs per 100 ko 



Sep 

Z150 

Zt45 

Z13S 

2.175 

+ 35 

Dec 

Z12S 

2.10G 

2 MS 

2J93 

— 25 

tear 

2.140 

2/120 

1100 

Z120 

— 21 

Mav 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2,125 

v 

— 10 

Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Z135 

mm 

— 5 

Sea 

N.T. 

N.T. 

ZU5 

— 

Unch. 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2,155 

tons. 


— 10 

Est- «Bl. 

75 tots (H 1 

Prwv. cctual 

sales: *4 lots. Open Interest: 731 


COFFEE 






French francs per 190 ky 



Sep 

1445 

1430 

1420 

— 

+ 30 

NOV 

jon 

IfTJJ 

1475 

1.955 

i£ 

1*905 

+ 30 
+ 35 

Mor 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2400 


+ 38 

Mav 

1W5 

2445 

2fn r . 

— 

+ 35 

Jiy 

N.T. 

N.T. 

ZDX 

BM 

+ 10 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2450 

— 

— 20 

Ejt.vol.: 

67 lots of 5 tonx Prev. actual soles: 

94 lots. Open interest: 4 to 
Source: Bourse tfu commerce. 




CommodHv nod Unit , 

Stad I WH|rt+ IPItf.L tan™ 
Iran 2 Fdrv. Philo. Ion 

ggrag " 1 **"*- 

Conp*r rivcf -lfa 

Tin (Straits), )b - — . * 

Ztoc & St. LBosla. lb, 

PbtbMflum, o* . . 

Sliver N.Y- oz — — 
Source; AP. 


.. Prt Apo 

■HS 15* 

848 871 

473JS 
ZIX00 2JX8H 

5-73 rS 

1948 ' 

64-49 6+69 

«} 62138 

44? has 

1(2-184 IK 

649 747 


Treasury Bifls 


Dividends 


Company Per Amt Pay RfC 

INCREASED 

Green Mountain Pwr a 44 MO f-M 
LIQUIDATING 

Gulf Broadcasting . S340 MB +17 

STOCK 

pvsianoironlcs Inc _ 5 PC 1+29 +26 
STOCK SPLIT 

Natl Technical Svslwns — J-fcr-l 
USUAL 


16L75 ) 

15140 1 


i;i 


sources: Reuters and London Petroleum Es- 
c hanae (oosofli. 


London Metals 


tuner Standard. 
Aflontic Ory Elec 
CiabrrCbrp 
Dreyfus GNMA Pd 
Florida Public uiiis 
Malktav Caro 
Houston Oil Rovalfy 
IMS inn 
Key Phorm. 

Labtaw Companies 
Ro we Fu rniture Cp 
TrarwonlcCos 
Waminaian Nahanoi 
wovne-Gessard Cp 
Z enith Natl Insur 


Q AO KM *17 
0 44ft 10-15 9-19 
. .18 1+15 1+1 

M .129 +3 8-30 

a jo i+i +w 

a 25 IM P-M 

M 4977 +26 W6 

O 44 9-30 M3 

O 45 104 +13 

0 M 1+1 +H 

0 43 1+15 9.25 

Q .11 1+11 +26 

a 33 l+l +U 

Q 45 1+1 +17 

Q .17 1+31 1+15 


iwn»i»i.' nwnaotfiiyf q auar f art y/ *-*eml- 
annual 


MANAGB 

A WEEKLY GUIDE BY SHERRY 0UOWWM 
WSDNESOW INTH6IHT 


ALUMINUM 
SterthM P*r metric ton 


SepL 6 

Prrdowi 

BM Ask 


Comnrater Train Derails 

In France, Im uring 2 

101040 101240 98940 99140 » , 

103740 103940 UI7J0 101840 . ««llos 

tne ten PARIS — ‘A coB&soier train de- 

»24o m Sb 4 o mso Friday in eastern France af- 
ter the driver apparently failed to 
34K40 34T54D observe speed limits, and two per- 

M6040 sons were hurtj ^ 

railroad company, SNCF. arid. . 

An SNCF spokesman said three 
carriages and the locomotive. left 
the rails near the small town oT 
Neweam. More than SO people 
were on the train. The train was 
traveling between Metz and Nancy. 


TeWcaRvoteq min 

J22i«!2F , *.5gJC 
Trtolaal «Mxn* QUn 
mk+SSt 

W»1M8 Law ouo cteejna+ta 
source: CBOB. 


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>:>-• •/ 




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, - .--V — . i-'l' 


.i'WS 


MHBj teiwm 


n — ■ 

COMPANY NOTES 



Page 13 


t 


s 


UnUtoBuyAnsonaBank Salomon Inc. 

said that by the lime the deal dosed ^CCfllirC^S TJ*S« 
, oca October the ratio would be I 


" J^JbbnM. Bcodcr 

s.2&w a5i«B Rond Dealer 

LoS Ai®ei»$ajdft aerced 10 Fmv more acquisuions of Arizona barite of appreoatiou in United & sioct XHIUU 


cause or the permissive new law 
and ihe stated favorable growth 


am 


of tioS Arigplefrsaidit agreed to buy 
United BSmcorp of Arizona for 
$335 nffllion In cash. Union Bank is 
a subsidiary oTSiandard Chartered 
BankTiKWT, :the London-based 

banfcbptmxig company. 

: .Umbn Bank thus becomes ihe 
newest jday^ in the Arizona bank- 
ing >»*|iStakes,wt^^ opened in 
. Aprih , Arizona lawmakers 

pasied oneof the most liberal inter- 
staie_.barddng. laws in die United 
Slates. d£jwm§ unrestricted cross- 
bdrdef.aotpnsiuons. . 
a Three weeks ago. Security Padf- 
^ Cotp-. announced that it would 
buy Amona Bank, the state's third- 
largesthankfor $480 million. 

. . Arizoriaisseen as prime territory 
for lar^irquKjf-state banks be- 


tnore acquisitions or Arizona banks 
will occur soon. 

The Union Bonk purchase, an- 
nounced Thursday, requires the ap- 
proval of state and federal regular 
tore as well as the companies' 
shareholders. It is expected to dose 
Oct. 1. 1986. who* the new taw 
ukes effect 

"We’ve been looking at Arizona 
for a long time.'* said John F. Har- 
rington. the Union Bank chairman. 
"United Bank is an extraordinarily 
good fit for us. They have a com- 
mon culture and common market 
interest." 

He acknowledged that the pur- 
chase price of 533 a share repre- 
sented a r datively high 2.7 times 
United's current hook value. But be 


price and asset value. 

Union 7 Bank, the sixth-largcst 

California bank with S8 2 billion in NEW Y0RK “ 
^foo^m toding_.o S n S ll : en »; 


and mid-size companies and does acquire PGB 

Ijviduals. mem secunues inter-dealer broker. 


Pan Am to Offer 
Flights to Israel 


little business with individuals. 

United Bank of Arizona, the 
state's fourth-largest banking com- 
pany. with assets of $1.9 billion, 
also concentrates on lending to 
businesses rather than consumers, 
but it does offer consumer banking 
through 40 Arizona brandies. 

The agreement also includes the 
sale to Union Bank of H-S.Pickrell, 
a mortgage-banking subsidiary of 
United Bank with a morigagp-loan- 
servicing portfolio of nearly SI bil- 
lion. 


it8 


[ J 


Optimistic on ’ 85 


tourers 




ft 


uoer 


ODtsi 
;lii a; 

Tie fits 


BRUSSELS — r Soctele Gen- 
fardedeBelfflque SA, Belgium’s 
largest holding company, pre- 
dicted Friday that net profit 
would rise sibstantiaQy in 1983 
arid said that it planned an in- 
crease iii dividends. 


It said- growth in capital in 
1984, which increased the 
group's capital and reserves to 
nriarfy. 40 trillion francs (5697 
million) from 34.8 billion 
francs, had sharply cut Sodfctft 
Gtatade's financing costs. 


Kawasaki Industries Joins Group 
ProdudiigNew Jet AircraftEngine 

ndl Douglas MD-lls, Kawasaki 


Return 

TOKYO —Kawasaki Heavy In- 
dustries Ltd. of Japan said Friday 
that it had agreed to participate in 
development and production of the 
Pratt & Whitney Group FW-4000 
aircraft en gin e. 

The engine will be jointly de- 
signed andproduced by Pratt & 
Whitney. Fiat Aviazioue SpA of 
Italy, Kongsberg Vaapenfabrikkof 
Norway, Fabriquc rationale of 
Belgium and Samsung Precision 
Industries Co. of South Korea.. 

4 The engine will be designed for 
use in Airbus Industrie A-300s, 
Boeing 707s and 767s and McDon- 


said. 

Under the agreement, Kawasaki 
will design and produce engine 
components, it said. 

lt will provide I percent of the 
total cost of research and develop- 
ment and will receive 1 percent of 
sales of the engine, a spokesman 
said. He did not provide other fig- 


ures. 

. The engines will be used in 25 A- 
310/300& ordered by Pan American 
Wold Airways Inc. for ddivoy in 
1987, it added. ‘ 

The A-310/300 is capable of car- 
rying 240 to 250 passengers. 


from the investment banking firm 
Mabon, Nugent & Co. Terras of the 
accord were not disclosed. 

Thomas Strauss, Salomon’s 
managing director, said it acquired 
PGB on behalf of a number of 
industry participants. includingCi- 
lioorp, BankAmerica Corp., First 
Boston Carp., Goldman, Sachs & 
Co. and Merrill Lynch & Co. 

Mr. Strauss said one of the pri- 
mary reasons Salomon sought PGB 
is to bring down the cost of bond 
transactions. He said Salomon ex- 
pects to cut commissions on gov- 
ernment-bond transactions by as 

much as 50 percent through its 
newly acquired interest. 

Mr. Strauss said the partners had 
not yet decided whether to limit 
to PGB services to the group 
of 36 primary government dealers. 
Currently, there are three major 
bond brokers who thus far only 
clear trades for primary dealers. 

However, non-primary dealers 
have recently been pressuring the 
brokers for access to their direct- 
trading systems. 


77rr .4 inflated Prrvi 

LONDON — Pan American 
World Airways has announced 
that it will launch a scheduled 
service between the United 
Suites and Israel next month. 

Pan Am said ii a prepared 
statement that it would operate 
five flights a week beginning 
Oct. 27 to and from Ben-Gur- 
ion International Airport out- 
side Tel Aviv. Rights will origi- 
nate in New York and 
Washington, with passengers 
transferring to smaller planes in 
Paris for the trip 10 Tel Aviv. 

It quoted John Krimsiy Jr., 
Pan Am vice president for mar- 
keting. as saying the service 
would seek to take advantage of 
the winter market for flights to 
Tel Aviv. At present. Pan Am 
operates only charier services to 
Israel. Rights to Tel Aviv will 
be daily excluding Mondays 
and Tuesdays. U.S.-bound 
flights will be daily excluding 
Tuesdays and Wednesdays. 


AiMndia has invited bids for stockbroker, said it 
syndicated loans and lease finance principle to acouire a 
nr «rn million in fund th* nnr- Stake in Smith keen & Cutler for 


for S223 million to fund the pur- 
chase of six Airbus A310-300 
planes, an airline spokesman said. 
British, French ana West German' 
export credits will provide the rest 
of the funding for the airplanes, 
which will cost $443 million. 

American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. and Atari Corp. are ne- 
gotiating an arrangement for Atari 
to put the AT&T name on some of 


fine china unproved substantially, 
it said, while engineering made a 
small gain. 

Time Inc. has bought 80 percent 
of Asiaweek, a Hong Kong-basal 
regional news magazine, for $7 raii- 

5 lion, the Hong Kong Standard re- 

organ Guaranty Trust ported. Asiaweek's editor-in-chief. 
" — Michael O’Neill, however, de- 
scribed the report as premature. 


stake - _ 

an undisclosed sum. The agr 
is scheduled to gp into eff« 
spring. 


cement 
ect next 


its powerful ST personal comput- 


ers, according to sources from 
companies. 

BCC1 (Overseas) LTD. has re- 
ceived a license to operate a branch 


Bank’s value wifl be 

studiecfby 
Co.. Hong Kong’s government 
said. It said Morgan would advise 
the government on any sale of 
Hang Lung, which was taken over 
by the government in 1983 to save 
it from collapse. 

Kanebo Ltd. has developed a ny- 
lon fiber one-fifth as thick as con- 
ventional nylon thread for use in 
sportswear and women's under- 


Wang Laboratories Inc. has an- 
nounced the resignation of Jon F. 
Kropper. an executive vice presi- 
dent and one of the company s four 
top officials. Mr. Kropper will be- 
come president and chief operating 
officer of Hadco Corp. 


in the Shenzhen special economic wear, the company said in Tokyo. 

Kong, a Bank of Matra, the French group, has Heineken NY Reports 


zone near Hong 

Credit & Commerce (HK) Ltd. of- 
ficial said BCC1 (Overseas) was 
the second foreign bank allowed to 
open a branch in the zone, after 
Hongkong & Shanghai Banking 
Corp. 

Financial Corp. of America said 
it would again omit a common 
stock dividend in the current quar- 
ter but would consider the payment 
of a cash dividend next quarter. It 
last paid a dividend, of 5 cents per 
share, in January. 

W. Greenwell & Cd, the London 


been selected by Chicago for a 
$1 19- million contract to provide a 
local train system to serve O’Hare 
International Airport, Matra said. 
The train, which will stop at three 
airport terminal buildings, the 
parking lot and a car-rental area. 


A 16.7%-Rise in Profit 


shouldbe operating by 1988. 

mUi 


Pearson PLCS outlook for the 
rest of 1985 is satisfactory, al- 
though m neh depends on the sea- 
sonal information and entertain- 
ment sector, the company said. Oil 
services, merchant banking and 


Reuters 

AMSTERDAM — Heineken 
NV said Friday that profits in the 
first half of 1985 rose 16.7 percent 
from a year earlier, to 117.86 mil- 
lion guilders ($36.9 milliOQ). 

The company said sales in- 
creased to 3.25' billion guilders 
from 3.02 billion. It said it expects 
profits in the second half to also be 
higher from a year earlier. 


auto shipping INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


One non^p rimary dealer, Lazard 


Frferes & Ca, has complained to 
the U.S. Justice Department that 
the brokers are unfairly limiting 
competition in the government 
bond business. 


HOW TO IMPOST A EUROPEAN 
CAR WTO THE USA. 

This document rattans My rep 
must do to brag a wr into me US 

safely and legally. It new& 

DOT A^toommtonSdressei. a«r | AUTOS TAX FREE 1 AUTOS TAX FREE , | LOW CO ST FLIGHTS 

tom dearonce & rixpp-ig pro«di*S 1 AU 1 W I -I — 

as wrf as lead poirfs. You am sawre 
la US$1 lOOflWisn buying a Menwte. 
or BMW m Europe & importing it to me 
States. To recede dw manual, send 

I USSiaJO [odd USSl-50f» P^oge] la 

Pi, Sdundi, Ponfach 3131 
7000 SMigat 1. West Gwmaiy 


ASTON MARTIN 


TRANS AUTOMOBILE 


USA Ote WAYS inUSS: Awte 


One of a bind. New, Vaijloge/Volfirtti 
luairy. blade 


IB 

Betaum. tel: 231 42 39. Tk 7Ui9. 

| FRANKFURT/ MAM-W. GernewH- 

bermom GmbH. Tei 06M4OT71. 

Hcfc-op tJ over Europe ‘ro/rcuhps. 

| WORIOWIDC Cor shpwig & remov- 
ab ATX. NV. Ankemn 2? 2000 Anh 
wetp. Belgium. 03/231 lS3Tx 31535 


I For mam automatic transmission and 


-’■Mi 
)od g 
SM * 
dzjgfcg 


Slowly . Unsurely, U.S. labor Reshapes Its Image 

.. if . .... .m/: ... t m illi ih*hslsnn>m 


are ce- 
lieu]* 


dftai 
ixchll 
nuibit! 
yank 
octal cat 
a&W 
fdlm 

agflrti 

irofaiE 


(Continued from Page U) 
many unions are pushing for '*por- 
table” pensions and other benefits 
that workers can take from job to 
job. They are bringing in more or- 
ganizers who are young and female, 
reflecting the important role that 
women now play in the work fence. 
nd they are beginning to un- 
stand lhat although young 


workers out there," said one ana- 
lyst 

On the surface, the new genera- 
tion of workers seems ripe far the 
plucking. Ahhougfronly 14 percent 
of the nation’s under-35 workers 
are unionized, a recent Harris poll 
commissioned by the AFL-CIO 
found that about 40 percent of 
nonunion workers under. 35 said 
they would vote for a union, com- 


4?”, r*~»L„ « ta «>« of unions, and hiring more 

wrta, say tol Szers itan a. any lime in 
afll have not ?on e__ta P“ n ^ h d a ^ hy 


■ til dess serves , 

-Al makes, all modek ma2oWe| 
- BrmJ new or second bond cars 
-Shipping - EPA- DOT - insurance | 

I - Al KXItiCWlfS 
Td, 3Z2/3587702. Srd hcwd d. 
32J/35B7700. Tde* 6*587 TRANSO 1 1 

ave des mails u. 

1640 RHODE-ST-OENSE (BHJ3ILW i 


Toronto 


S410 

roundme. Bound Ihe vwlfl trom 
Telex 14635 MoivFn 10 - 6. 


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Mercedes 190 E. Urinser 
other mokes and model* 


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Aitw»rp233W85.ConntiBflM 


AUTO CONVERSION 


unions 

enough to change their ways. 
“Unions create all sorts of ineffi- 
ciencies that could eventually nun 
a company," said Charles P. Perry 
Jr, a 24-year-old customer-service 
with Austron, an 


aggressive 
unions like the Service Employees 
International Union, the Commu- 
nications Workers of America and 
the United Food and Commercial 
Workers have sent a small army of 

in 


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iczkovtts 

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Tel 01/202 76 10. Tete» 815915. 


- Sopwor Enghtowa* 
Cintomi Oanmnce 8 Bemlng 


• Piwini Penooei Servico 

co.E 


workers care about wages, many f reoresentative with Austron, an — -r-- - 

care even more about sudi issues as p^d «th about 25 percent lor maker of computer- organizers to eohs .^orkere 

advancement, dav care, job wmkeis over 50. r nursing homes, insurance ormpa- 

: • young people’s more favorable avoune nies. secretarial pools and else- 


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CoS For Frue ConttiKabon 


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BMW 

635 CSI, 82. anthracite metotlc 
black leather 

KES CAR CQNVERSWN 
Str. 255. 


PanSSSfeSbo UaVUadt 

DMllOhOO 

Al can braid new t fal 

Fa A.VJ_ Tel: Germ 
or 4621. Ttx 


of fife in the job. - . Young peo^s more gu^ame — 
developing new skills and having atu^tqward JimtmswCTe^ computer programmer for Tracer, 
some say in how their jobs are, confirmed m & New Yotk ao u, ^ stin ^ electronics company: 


:rai fid 
“Paa* 
q. ik 
■£& 10 « 




conducted by tdepbone in July. 
Pcoole working full- 


wbere. 

Karen Nussbaum. president or 
District 925, a Service Employees 
local aimed at unionizing clerical 


HAVE YOUR BMW. MBtCEDES, 
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TRIP TO BIROPE ? . 


. HOW TO GET A BRAND NEW 
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THE MAGNIFICENT 
STELA 
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7 AND 14 DAY CRUISES 

To the Greek bfanA^Turkey, 
SaSng Ew^JSonday from Plroeui 
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THE YACHT-UKE 
STELA 
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3 AND 4 DAY CRUISES 

To ihe Greek tiendi & Turkey. Seftig 
evwy Monday & Friday from Piraeu* 

Heme «toP*y togooHrovd Agent or 

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Telex: 215621, Phone 3228883. 


documented & gucrctoteed tobe op- n«i’t Bent - Bay Direct A nd IS awejl 
proved. For can 5 ycon&olderariy in styW Purchase a Ma^HJS, 


People working full-time were 

asked what they think is the impact 
of unions on the weD-being of 
working people today Forty-sa 


s=ft-%3E5* 

ST2 reentit- fils of unions before feeling ready 


xsafc 

:ii:t 8 
‘tech 

iSf'LaK 

■i I.'fiiC- 

ti: ir asa- 

■at 

. ii :sn 
xsaat* 
:ptosp 
ssfSil® 

jbitfs-a 

■Co’ 

n ifei -US 
’ lisas* 
■ w fit: ^ 


What comp 
ment efforts is the fact that many in 
this new generation are. white-col- 
lar workers —in fieldsas diverse as 


to push for a representation ela- 
tion, an often vicious campaign be- 
tween union and management m 
of employees at a 


done. 

The United Automobile Work- 
ers, for one, has been, extremely 
inventive at the bargmmffi table 
Its Saturn agreement wito Gencaal 

Motors Cop., especially, is ism-. 1R - 5 q 

table for guarantees of job secimty .perceni 

as it is for provisions of ; flenWe 3 - iust S 

s taffing . - • '44. saia tney.neqwi, _ 

Other unionsribo^efianffng 

as they come to &ips w* the fact 

that many young woriters are sym- 

pathetic tobusiness. Many came of nns.three percentage pouus. want little mare mau u»b“ — r— — | nV aUv toen- 

Le during the oQdiocks of 1973-74 • ‘There is gr«iter job dis^nrfac- ^ sleu iy wnt And some young a^ther- 

SlW80, the recessums that non among wang woricers fed ill-disposed lu> unions Ibmra- 

foflowed, and. then the trade wars. Mr. McDonaJd of the MbW. ^ highly paid members mg six-month sUooi-out 

sa2SBassS'3wssSf3 3 S.ibsbim 

sai-sjag 3.jt?r a».u 

I's.why we have to spend so 


safety chaw are requeed. ! 1 ^ roSoif oT BMW while in' Europe, 
ad or 'JTteft*Sg« nS ^- dropoff wilh w for shprnert bade to 
AUTO CONVESStON,. BpJ uslfeip cor far percond i» or wH 
700344, D7000 STUTTGART TOW fo, proft uwWtiinp inotoEu- 
07111 #60966orW1013,lbc 7259MB ^pe. W e prande a h4 1 , 

ask for Juie. service mdutkng car, totemnhend tag* 

aid inwrance. maikei trends, conver- 
sion sources, bank Iransfan, slipping. 


IAC.T 

TAX RS CARS I TRUCKS 
NEW 1 USS) 

Col or write far our price offer 
Wnstbloak 108 . 3012 KM feneriam 


Para tek 265 80 36 
Munich tot 398 811 
Geneva tot 327 110 
Zurich let 391 36 55 


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jobs and made them, want 
that cooperate with management 
luer than confront it. . 

“Young people want a labor 
movement that makes Amenca 
work," said Charles McDonald, w- 
sistant organizing director for the 
AFL-QO. “The Key 


far lower wage rales than 

g^toyoo. Besides, there is a little c “T^ e ^ auS e so many young 
more fcaiiessness amDOgyoung mobfl^ staying 

people in toms of their willingness ^ ^ a year or two, they modi^hnK jusieduca g 

vrant to rock the boat to make worthwhile lo sup- Union hierarchies are ^so trymg 


LRD. Mercedes Tax Free 
LimawMH 36 & 

Armoured ears red Sntouones 
Coach tadt can 
Other mokes & exafics 


Keepng a constont stock of more than 
300 brred now cars, 

ing 5000 1 h«W WW**- 

End far free imtoatlre catalog. 
Trereco SA. 95 Noordeltjan. 

3 K? 7 TRANS B 


MBCHJB/ PORSCHE 
New/used tovnertofe drfrvwy. Fa AVI 
Tel: GrwmanyP) 62344092, tfa- 464986 


TRANSMUMR BHG1UM. 21 Gemfr 


Tel 323/54262- 


sebaan.B-2241 
03-384.11 


1(154 Tlx 32302 Tromm B In 

Oodt Mercedes, BMW, ASO. 


to 


rhnnppS. 

Even so, only 14 percent 


- decide a is wwbub™ t-- w ^ fl, e young 

of the P 01 ^ 1 six-month-long umoniza ^ **Nol enough inlonna- 

drive that might culminate m a tere ws^. 


Over 100 umh m stock 
World wide ddriwy 
Direct from source 
D.OJ. & LPA. 


NEW MERCEDES 

P 0 RSO 4 E, for menediate deivwy 

FROM STOCK 


BOATS & 
RECREATIONAL 
VEHICLES 


Tet London 
Telex pi) 


11 629 7779 
IRAS G. 


Beit service, duppjng, taMraicB, 
bond, um renaon to USA 


ni-- 


•Ts ilS' 
■-•s-es* 5 

. s'* 




’ ^ & 
", .yti 


labor automaucauy m»» — “ woriwrs'are taking job im Sit Harvard University. “When 

“ Many unions have takena m^ in trying to P r ^ mMotSmSS 

sss tsrrsa? ssssssvS ssj^— — 

?Sn corporate affairs. The Air a recent workshop to wtadi« their foot in the door. Then, ^ sk)W w changing 

Une Pilots Association and the In- invited an industrial many young people have moved to ^ charismatic, 

i£So3 Asodationof Madun- andaapedatirtinempfoya^riio- jobs ^ Soffedi states like Texas, Now there are a lew cnansnmuu, 

ists. for example, have helped lead j nation in managerial decisions to anti- urn on ffadiuons and 

the wav inlabor-^ 1112 ^” 11 ^ help the union’s officials und^- nght-to-work laws have created a 
aeration by working to restruo- sland “what motivatn fhgMW minefield for union organizers 
op T ra ^7._i. Airline and Pan oeneration of workers, as Morton that’s more, a new generation 

union president, de- 


Trraeo London Lid 
£547 Prek Lone, London W.t. 


RUTE INC. 

t TAUNUSSTR. 52 , 600 PJFRAMm«T 


W Gemu, tol 


, tfar 4115 S 9 


5 witserlond 4 JK-W. Germany 


45 * FBMESHOff KEKjnSft^Gap- 
kin mmtrenod, exorfert oonrSlion. 
hnmedate sato re consider Trresat- 
ktoric charter re trade far roxdre 
boat. Al reasonable offer* canid- 
ered VW 1 defivnr. Lying Sortfh From 
Tek TO 017076 . 


NEW AMBUCAN CARS 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTI DELIVERY 


IWINNEJUGG PHASAB 84 n«re 
ind of conditioned. Beflfw Irrffic 
Turbo desd dxxssdUStamce platos. 
F21 5,000. Tet (931 33 22 16 


j 6 you with to purchase a new Amenato 

car. cod ul 


We keep o b rg^stod c of 


And, 


; r - .-.’S- ■ 

•O 1 ?! f --S 

■.„ -SSL- 


tire- Eastern Airlines 
American World Airways, 
they also reoentiy played a 
S^rok while they medio ^ 
more of a say in Trans World Au 


under-40 female labor leaders. 
Miss Nussbaum, Vicki Saporta, na- 
tional organizing director for the 
Teamsters, and Linda Puchala, 
president of the Association of 
Flight Attendants, are all well- 
known for their ability to inspire a 


Wa iel red srewy the ful rrege of 
cm mreufodured by General Motors, 
Fofd/ Lincoln. Oryster & Amenrat Mo- 
tors, mdutSng CuBonvBuh Unouanes 
red to credhonol Vehdes. 


moil cre k 
Tek 02/648 M 13 
Telex 65658 
42 rue Lens, 
1050 Brussels. 


LEGAL SERVICES 



win control 


collar workers, who respmid to tra- 
ditional organizing methods, and 
woricers with more foroial ed^a- 




SSrfMcLoreozoofT^ ^hooresent 
Air, who many union leaders thmk ^ QDS ^ lar ger, second group, 
tried- to break airiiiw.tmioosj^a 








■ i: > . 


T \* 




ahr, the union jjresiaenr, oc- ^ entered the w<»-k force just as 
scribed it- manag ement has become far more _ 

• He breaks the under-35 genera- sophisticated and successful m re- _ , 

lion into two groups: younB^ue- si sting d -when 1 started as a flight atten- 

j — — muons now win just « percrai oi ^ puchala, 

hJS°l?5bs d ^d ieo^y woman to bead an interna- 

-S.- , £ , ^s=a» ^ 

S-fassas£. aMaswags -SSSsm: 

*£ that did not concern trad* studded with former attorneys ^ ^ jjdcrs. “Workers 

tjonal Wue-coDar unions. of whether young under 35 are looking for growth, 

its own ranks. In the last ocw«** *« - A i 0 i of young people arecon- 11 he _ipt“ attitudes toward imward mobflity, training m new 

fwSfiw 29 percent a defcadeago ^ labof economics at the 

tot ihm have been *n tack nmonimuoo ^gutbfc union lendm 


We deal vtoh ol fannafWes indrefcig 

and axneroon to 


European 


Fan door-ktow delivery. 

CoS w telex 
Mia EUROPE 

middle east automohies ltd 

MONTE CARLO 
Tet P31 25 74 32. 

TEt 479550 Auto MC 


1985 CLOSE OUT SALE 
Moreedei 500/380/280 models 
BMW 745/635/535 modds 

^Ttfsarssr 


i immigration a wjs;-® 5 visas 

to USA. fochordS-GoUstem, fare wil 
be ovoUde for cresutatians ml Lon- 
don from SepL 1 6 K> S^pl- ^^Crffaf 
- in London 01-2786291. 
- ,63 Wo* SC. 


oppomtmertf 

35redS.G< 


NY. NV 10005. Tet 212-9 
661199. 


Tito 


BkL ( 30 S, MjWjjjt a kite. 


AiMriore owned and apwatod 


USBJ A NEW CA^B« dwMjSajM 

g, thrrm woridwide. Mererew, 
BMW. . — 

Cheapest in tho world. 


DOMINICAN DWORCB. BcgtMBW. 
Santo Donxngo, Domrxam Refx**- 


LQW COST FUGHTS 


& postage to Frank Jonwre. my ONE WAY $lSto&«ngfay NLY. - 

4, Deorne 5, Derere 2100, Belgnim. I w Coast 5145. Para 2259290. 
it 32798 FRANK 8 


Moca Your Oassiftod Ad Quickly and Easily 

inlfw 

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By Ptoami Call your fared IHT repiwenWh* wito your text. Yo u 
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vufl be ifAxmed of ih« a«! bnmctfia» 8 *y, aid one* prapaymart i 

acuiaas ass* **«-.*-" 

25 toltan, agw red space* in Ihe first Sne and 36 m toe faBowing ln«. 
Minimum spaa to 2 Sne4. No 

CraB CtMtk: American Express, Den Chib, turoatra, n ueter 
CreeL Access retd Visa. 


HUD OFFICE 


LATIN AMERICA 


Park: {For classified only): 
747-4600. 


Abes: 41 4031 


EUROPE 


GecryaaeDi 5>4505 
Urate 417 85 


i 26-36-1 S 

: 3614097/360-2421. 
-343-1899. 
Cep en heg ero pi] 329440. 
Franhftorti P69) 7267-55. 
Lautmae: 29-58-94. 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/66-25-44. 
Lendon; pi 1 8364802. 
Madrid: 455-2891/455-3306 
Mian: p2) 7531445. 
Norway: P2J 41 2951 
Rome: 679-3437. 

Sweden: (06) 7569229. 

Tel Avhr 03455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 


17852 
; 690511 
SraJM 22-1055 
SanMog w 6961 555 
Soo PrtuJo: 852 1893 
MIDDLE EAST 


ns 246303. 

Kuwait: 5614485. 
Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
Oatan 416535. 

SaniR Antrim 
Jeddah: 667-1500. 
ILAX: Debra 224161. 


FAR EAST 


UNITS) STATES 


New York: (712) 752-3890. 

; {415) 362-8339. 


Bandkefc 390-0667. 

- [Kan® 5-213691. 
I® 81/ 0749. 

b 735 8773- 

StoaaMtoK 222-2725. 
Tahrac 752 44 25/9. 
Tekyee 504-79251 

AUSTRALIA 


SOUTH AHUCA 


: 421599. 


Me to eume - 690 m ^ _ 
SytowK 929 56 39, 9574320. 
Perth: 328 98 33. 

Pnddbvgton. Quee nd andb 
369 34 53. 


he took Continental Air Lines into 
bankruptcy reorganization. 

tabor is not only responding to 
young workers but to u^earg “ 
its aSa ranks. In the asl decade as 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 




% 


ana m pewau t u- 

Ttat dndine tas Iwn 
board, in manufacturing, construe 
tkn) and services. 

With this in mind, 1*^“^ 

workers- But labor lcadCTS 

■^-■WarSsS 

35?S?Sdfc“- ,to - 

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And management has not sa 
tn rtfTOUP- ‘'V 


gaining 

been working overtime. to try to 
address the desires of young work- 


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tem* stalunta, ^ fl* 


ers. 


(Continued from Page 11) 
1 SETS to regroup^Ac h ‘fe d ^ j! nd 


SSSrai Abakan Td. 

dsion about I^thans ^ tbe natmn TeJoraph, a fund that 

“ leara ncw 

^sasTSeSfiSs 

aatofLufthansasto^^^ they're able to advance their ca- 


TKrw, Mr. Bahr, of the Commu- 
nications Workers, boasts of the 
huge employer-sponsored educa- 
■ that his union won in 


MAXXl CREDIT CARDS AMD 
WOB ACCH TTO ^ 
Wwde Meie b ewh yi AvaflefaU 


Tbk —rad whewM xervice bra 
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more sophisticated in of 
wage arS benefit packngff 
Ve^p employees happy- Manage; 


Monetary 
lead to a 


S ! }f ^nt of the curren- 
nations, but not 


tap a meet 

—dud— Erart 'Swwce by 
USA A x iiren aftPrtd nwenuda 
ta du riin g radio id TV. 


I* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 


des of memt-.^ & ^ 5 ^ 


placement tomajaF within the company or atoth- 

rames and another ra percem 10 —J—" he said. “At AT&T, 


er companies. 


BSJS-rtsiraffjSS 


^ r th the existing 


panics 

the P*. . -w, niled rart our union and management have a 

Mr ^”^«.Cd S 0 S commiuee Uta looksal^c jota_of 


eerngr SERVICE. 
evbw^youareorgol. 

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ihe 




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companies en- the future and at developing uam* 
- 4 - — -■ — at community coi- 




S’^ifUbo? is doing 

enough to stem the Ude. to 5nte nreoe in mi e 


ih some outside agreed currarcy 


syasasas 

pan adrmnistrauon s space ue- 

2SJ£SSi-‘J3S preridem rfrijc 

reseaK «d that German flight attendants, said many female 
& as pri- workers are turning to unions be- 
“SDF to cause of their concerns about ca- 


CAPRICE 

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companies wj 


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' rSTtai ‘might ^ a ^ ,rfd -^r3 1 'Sose in Britain sup- yte v'an", agreement reer 'advancement Many women, 
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TBj 212-737 3291. 


t-j.ng off. "Labor’s pop 8 "***} ® porting such 
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a 

but the. 


'r V- 


■yj - 


move have grown . ^ \j.S. government, the she said, fed unjustly passed over 

c government h 3 * hrtw*» md foreign con- for promotion, behevuig that the 

me wore U»« ^r^daiw he* » dedaon," he said. Jl supports the mo- evaluating criteria are too subjec- 

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ifcpMjofitan.illonspf^S ^ed comp^o to 
workers and- low-level service 


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9 


i 


Page 14 


— INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUIVDAY, SEPTEMBER 7-8, 1985 ; ' ' 

The Report on Hutton Overdrafts: Chairman, Though Cleared, Hag Lost His Iron Grip 


By James Scemgold 

•Vm- y'ork Times Service 

NEW YORK — A long-awaited 
report on EF. Hutton's illegal 
cash-management practices has 
concluded, as Hutton's chairman 
and chief executive, Robert M. Fo- 
mon, has said all along, that neither 
Mr. Fomon nor any other of the 
investment company's top manage- 
ment had masterminded the plan. 
The report even exonerated Mr. 
Fomon from blame for not exercis- 
ing proper supervision over the cul- 
prits. 

Despite the clean bill of health, 
however. Mr. Fomon’s grip on EF. 
Hutton Group Inc. wm never be 
the same. The scandal, in fact, al- 
ready had set in motion a series of 
c h ang e s at the company that have 
watered down bis authority by in- 
troducing new senior officers and 
new systems beyond his control. 


The report, issued Thursday by 
Griffin B. Bell, the former Ui>. 
attorney general, called for a shift 
in the balance of power on the 
board of directors to majority rule 
by outsiders, rather than by inter- 
nal executives responsible to Mr. 
Fomon. 

At the least, the episode, one of 
Wall Street's largest scandals, has 
been a humbling experience for 
Mr. Fomon, whose leadership 
style, while domineering and aloof, 
has made Hutton generally more 
successful than its rivals. 

Mr. Fomon faces a future where, 
in the twilight years of his career, 
he will have less and less influence 
at the very company that he built 
into a Wall Street powerhouse. 

The report cleared Mr. Fomon 
entirety, saying that “it would be 
inconsistent with prudent corpo- 
rate governance and logic to hold 
Fomon responsible'’ for the fraud. 


Even so, Hutton bears the per- 
sonal stamp of the 60-year-old Mr. 
Fomon, who has commanded the 
brokerage house for 15 years. Any 
condemnation of Hutton's struc- 
ture. which Mr. lleU's report did in 
strong terms, is thus an implicit 
criticism of its chief executive's 
style. Mr. Fomon has insisted, 
though, that be would not retire 
from Hutton, the only company he 
has worked for, until he reaches 65 
in 1990. Nor has the Hutton board 
demanded his resignation. 

Thus, Mr. Fomon must contend 
with a new array of problems, in- 
cluding the fact that toe company’s 
aura ha s faded. 

The image of a securities firm is 

way much lute the Wizard of Oz — 
it's bigger than, life with lots of 
smoke,” commented Samuel L. 
Hayes 3d, a Harvard Business 
School professor. “But that image 
can collapse, deflate, when you see 


the little man behind the curtain. If 
that happens, you have to figure 
out how to pump it up again.” 

The responsibility of rebuilding 
will be shared by a number of Hut- 
ton executives, rather than just Mr. 
Fomon. 

Hutton already is being run dif- 
ferently following its guilty pleas in 
the check-kiting scheme. Mr. Fo- 
mon has brought in Robert Ritter- 
eiser from Merrill Lynch & Co. as 
Hutton's new president, an unusual 
instance where he turned to an out- 
sider to fill such a senior post Mr. 
Rittereiser. 46, had been Merrill 
Lynch's chief administrative and 
financial officer. Wall Street execu- 
tives agree that Mr. Fomon would 
not have been able to attract Mr. 
Rittereiser without giving away 
some of bis own authority. 

More outsiders will be brought 
in, too. Thomas P. Lynch resigned 
his post as chief financial officer on 


Thursday following Mr. Bdl’s re- 
port. A search for Mr. Lynch's re- 
placement has already begun out- 
side the com pany - - 

Also, the move to a board of 
directors dominated by outsiders 
win dilute Mf. Fomon’s. control 
even further than he had anticipat- 
ed. In an interview earlier this sum- 
mer, he said he would raise the 
mimber of outside directors, now 
just five of the 27 members, to 
nearly .half of the boanL But Mr. 
Bell said that outside riirpftO ES 
should constitute “a substantial 
majority” 

Duringhis tenure at Hutton, Mr. 
Fomon has been a tough, introvert- 
ed executive with rigid confidence 
in his abilities, and impatience for 
those not as sharp-minded. He is a 
private man, ana the episode has 

sutgected him painfully to the kind 
of public scrutiny that he so dis- 
likes. 


' In fact, Mr. Fomon has de- 
scribed the months since his com- 
pany pleaded guilty m May as feel- 
ing uke “15 rounds of an epic 
heavyweight fight." Indeed, he has 
looked increasingly weary over the 
past four months. Now that die 
report Is out, he plans a 20-day 
.European vacation. 

■ Mir. Fomon personally spent 
hours eveiy day on die ramifica- 
tions of the check-overdraft guilty 
pleas, to the point where he said 
that he was left with no time for his 
normal duties. 

“He worked voy hard ou this,” 
Mr. Rittereiser said “We’re all 
concerned that he gets a rest now." 

. Under Mr. Fomon’s firm con- 
trol, Hutton has grown into a pow- 
erful competitor in the retail bro- 
kerage industry. With its highly 
motivated sales force, it has gener- 
ally been very profitable. Typical 
of Mr. Fomon’s impatient style is a 


small notice leaning against the 
window of his office that reads: 1 
am not arguing , with- you. I am 
idling you.” 

However, Mr. Fomon s person- 
ality is in some ways poody suited 
to the brokerage business.. He not 
only dislikes, but privately . dis- 
dains. the kind of morale-bolster- 
ing pep mlfcs and back-slapping 
that a sales-oriented company such 
as Hutton requires. That is why the , 
loss in 1982 of George L Ball, who- 
resigned as Hutton’s president to. 
become chief executive ofPruden-’ 
tial-Bache Securities Inc, a unit of 
Prudential Insurance Co, was such _■ 
a blow — from which in someways' 
the company is stiD recovering. 

Mr. Ball, known for the Mizrahi 
of personal notes that he routinely*, 
sends to bis employees, excels at , 
this side of the business. He is spry, . . 
trim, and works at encouraging ms/ 
executives. Mr. Fomon, by can- ; 



\m 


. ^Robert M. Fomon. 

treaty has- a: curt tongue that, can ; 

He' s^h^Ml had crim®?. 
merited each .other wdL'Bur that' 
cotnammeative side Was lost when 
Mr. B^U left,' and morde suffered - 


f ridays 

AMEX 

Closing 


Tobies Include the nationwide prices 
op to Hie dosing on Wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


TV. vu ADI n a 

I* 5ft AL Lobs 1 

22ft 12 AiMC .15 3 l 

TO 2ft AM Inti I 

« ATT FtJ SJJ7c 42 
4 M* AcmePr 
lift 8ft AcmrU ja 13 27 
18'- 9ft Action U 

6ft 116 Acton 

4ft !*6 AdmRs ]| 

301- 1 8V. AdRusl .14 A 11 

21V. 1514 Adobe JB IJ 13 

TO 4 Aerate M 

5114 29ft AHIPbi M 13 21 
TO 5ft AlrEwt 

12 6 AlrCol 4 

13ft TO ArColpf I JO 93 

4 16 Mama 

10614 65ft AlmXton 9 

TO ASH AlbaW 

3ft in AtnTre 

TO TO Aloha 

■ft Ttxsr * ■ 4w 


144 5ft 5V. 514 — % 

II 15ft 1514 1544 + 46 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7-8, 1985 


mT BUSINESS PROFILE / Paub Stem of the ITC 


Page 15 


f akers Cut Ddlar’s Rise in New York 


■ • ' ?** AsBKKtted Pns 

- The dollar 
to a two-month Kgh Friday 
m ..scroetnney hectic trading in Eu- 
{SgjRSS* ^ huer in the 

Vi!!*/?* ««ted the day in the 
^Juted States below iis highs 
aggipst. p30st canencies as traders 


prad pillars to cash men the sharp 

4^ and to reduce their exposcre 
.: PMaangesm sentiment that might 
occur over the weekend. . 

Ini European trading, the surge 
pudied the dollar up by more that 
four, cents against the British 

• $, pound and by more than 7 p fennig 

7 afia^srthe West Gennan Dentate 

marie • . . 

: The dollar's gins were attribut- 
ed to reports -Thursd&y by U.S. 
anuraakere of record sales of new 
??” m 1116 August and a Labor 
Department report. Friday, on an 


unexpectedly huge decline in the 
US. unemployment rate. 

Jade BartancL a vice president - 

at GnutalA Co. in New York, said 
European currency traders have 
been nervousfy watching the eco- 
nomic indicators and befieve that 
“if the economy improves, the Fed- 
eral Reserve will take steps to push 
up interest 'rarar 
‘ Mr. Barbara! was among dealers 
who were skeptical about the 
jarengtb of the US. economy, how- . 
ever: He said the.dedtne is the 
civilian onemploytneat rate to a 
five-year low of 7j>ercent in Augnst 
from .7,3 percent the previous 
month in large part reflected sharp 
swings among teen-agers at a tiiSe 
when summer vacuous were eod- 


He said car sales exploded be- 
cause of cut-rate financing, 

Iit New-Yodc, the British pound 
tumbled to $133 from S1J5S5 


Thursday. Earlier, in London, ster- 
ling was quoted at S1.326 against 
51366 late Thursday. 

Other late dollar rates in New 
York, compared with Thursday, in- 
cluded' 2.9220 DM. up from 
2.8840; 2.41 Swiss francs, up from 
2373; 8.9123 French francs, up 
from 8.8; and 1.934 Italian lire, up 
from -1.921, and 241.83 Japanese 
yen, up from 240.75. 

Other late rates in Europe, com- 
pared with Thursday, were: 2.9105 
DM, up from 2.8395; 2.418 Swiss 
francs, up from 2.3473; 8.9775 
French francs, up from 8.67; and 
1,934.75 Italian lire, up from 
L899.97. r 

The South African rand was lit- 
tle changed from Thursday in late 
London trading, at about 48.9 UJS. 
cents. 

In Tokyo, the dollar closed at 
240.80 yen, up from 239-50 on 
Thursday. 


THE EUROMARKETS 


V.S. Jobs Data Dries Up New- Issue Activity 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Ratters 


for Chesehrough Pond’s Inc, both issues still seemed to be quite tight, 

I _r _ i -itf „r ,v. j ... i 


-t nvmni finished at a discount of about 214, in spite of the market’s weakness, 

v jv” — N ew-issue activity weD outride their total percent Bonds totaling $1.1 billion were 
w the doilar-strai^ht sector came to fees. Thursday’s $300-rmllion bond launched this week. 

• an abrupt hah Friday afternoon as for the Federal National Mortgage Floating-rate notes appeared a 


I ■ an abrupt halt Fnday afternoon as for the Federal National Mortgage 
the secondary market fell by as Association, also suffered, cfosing 
xnudi as a point after unexpected more than a point lower on the day 
mews that Uk U.Sw unezzmlovnieni at a discozint of about 3& 


■news that (he U.S. unemployment at a discount of about 3ii 
rate had fallen to 7 percent m Ad-. The Mortgage Bank of Denmark 


-gust from 73 In July, dealeresaid. 

Tn. the morning, . two ■ dollar- 
-strtight issues had been launched 
• and- more were expected if VS. 
' markets had opened firmer. But the 
. unemployment news led to active 


for the Federal National Mortgage Floating-rate notes appeared a 
Association also suffered, closing tittle more resflient to the employ- 
more than a point lower on the day mem data than the dollar-straight 
at a discount of about 3& sector, dealers added. Prices tended 

The Mortgage Bank of Denmark to show losses of 5 or 6 baas points, 
bond pays 10tt percent a year over despite a jump of as much as % 
five years and was priced at 100ft. point in some period Eurodollar 
Lead manag ed by Citicorp Invest- deposit rates. But issues coming np 
meat Bank, the bond was guaran- for refixing were underpinned by 


five years and was priced at 100ft 
Lead managed by Citicorp Invest' 


professional selling here and no had a six-year maturity, pays 10ft 
further bonds emerged. Many of percent a year and was pnoed at 


.this week's new issues are now trad- 
' mg far outside their total fees, deal- 
ers noted 

• -Most operators had expected the 
UJ5. unemployment rate to remain 
static, dealas noted Nanfarm pay- 
roll had been forecast to rise by 
J between-! 50,000 and 200,000, but 
the eventual increase was a jump of 
288,000. “The figures were an un- 

i wader at^l5^ e bal^aid.* fia ^ , 

**' Friday’s new bonds, an $85-mQ- 
lion bond for the Mortgage Bank of 


teed by-Denmark. the rises in rates, they noted 

The Chesehrough Pond’s issue The Japanese convertible market 

had a six-year maturity, pays 10ft ended lower on a combination of 
percent a year and was pnoed at the yen’s fall against a strong dollar 
99%. It was lead-managed by and the prospect of further falls in 


Sheaison Lehman Brothers. unde 

On the secondary market, deal- said. 

ers said that trading became hectic 

for a while after the UiL unem- 
ployment figures were released, 

But, they added, many operators 
werenpwiQmg to mark prices down 
too. far in case buying developed TI 
and they were left with huge short cost < 
positions to run over the weekend, to a \ 
On the week, seasoned dollar they 


underlying share prices, dealers 


Dutch Inflation Unchanged 


New Menace 

From Debt 

(Continued from Page 11) 
posed tax revisions would have a 
damaging effect by eliminating the 
accelerated cost-recovery system 
and the investment tax credit, cut- 
ting company cash flows. 

Mr. Kaufman urges increased 
federal regulation to keep the 
growth of debt under better con- 
trol. He would enhance the powers 
of the Federal Reserve System and 
set up a new board of overseers to 
supervise all institutions that create 
credit, not just commercial banks. 

. Indeed, he wants greater interna- 
tional financial oversight to cope 
with the immense and accelerating 
growth of international debt. Mr. 
Kaufman was in London this week 
pressing his case for such interna- 
tional oversight upon the Group of 
30, a body of leading financial au- 
thorities. 

He is also calling for a new offi- 
cial credit-rating system. He con- 
tends that the private rating con- 
cerns cannot get as much 
information as can the government 
to do an adequate rating job. If the 
government published such re- 
ports, he contends, such disclosure 
would push managements to take 
strong remedial actions and pre- 
ventive steps. 

Do such ideas come too late? No 
one can be sure, but remedial mea- 
sures may be crucial if they are to 
prevent what is happening in agri- 
culture from becoming a general 
condition of financial vulnerabilty. 

( Company 
Results 

«rvmw» and prcflfs or touts. In 
m/«l»n on to local currencies unless 
oHmwbe Indicated. 


Britain 


lUHrif 

Revalue 

Pretax MM. 
Per Sftont- 


Leading M*A*S*H Unit for Economic Casualties 


THE HAGUE — The Dutch 
cost of living index rose 23 percent 
to a provisional 122.6, base 1980, in 
the year ended Aug. 15. the govern- 


straigbts showed falls stretching to ment said Friday. The percentage 
well over a point in places, dealers rise was unchanged from the year 


Canada 


Revenue—. 

P roflts 

Per Shore. 


Seas ram 


By Gyde H. Famsworrh 

.Vw York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Her senior 
staff calls her “the general.” She 
calls her agency “the M*a“S*H 
unit for America's economic casu- 
alties,” referring to a popular U.S. 
television show about a medical 
unit in the Korean war. She ticks 
off numbers to show that at the 
from it is plenty hot. 

Paula Stern heads a staff of 458 
at the International Trade Com- 
mission, a federal body that hdps 
the U.S. government decide wheth- 
er to raise tariffs, set quotas or take 
other measures to protect indus- 
tries battered by foreign competi- 
tion. 

One of its recent cases involved 
shoes. Hie commission ruled that 
the UJS. shoe industry has been 
severely injured by imports and 
was entitled to quota restrictions to 
shield it from further ravages. But 
President Ronald Reagan on Aug. 
28 rejected proposals for quotas or 
tariffs on the products. 

Mr. Reagan, indeed, occasional- 
ly rejects the ITCs recommenda- 
tions. Last year the commission 
wanted to give the copper industry 
higher tariffs, but Mr. Reagan de- 
cided against any protection. He 
did. however, go along with the 
commission’s proposals to protect 
stainless sled and motorcycles. 

“We’re the first place they come 
to,” Miss Stem said. “Unfortunate- 
ly. the U.S. trade-law system is be- 
ing tested by an avalanche of re- 
quests for import relief. Our 
caseload grew by 88 percent be- 
tween 1981 and 1984, and so far 
this year is up 26 percent.” 

Miss Stem bewails the state of 
the economy that has produced 
such industrial bloodletting. 

“Yes, we’re the M*A*S*H unit. 
but we're also Sisyphus trying to 
push the rock uphiu,” she said. u U’s 
an exercise in futility because our 
trade laws simply were not meant 
to deal with the kinds of problems 
we have today, like the sky-high 
dollar, which has rendered the en- 
tire economy vulnerable to im- 
ports.” 

These viewpoints strike some 
people as somewhat strange, com- 
ing from a woman who. before she 
became chairman, had a reputation 
as one of the most ardent “free 
traders” on the ITC. More recently 


‘It’s an exercise 
in futility. Our 
trade laws’ don’t 
cover today’s 
problems’ 




jfi-r ■ 


her decisions have leaned in favor 
of protection. 

Bui Miss Stem. 40 years old. a 
soft-spoken product of the Mem- 
phis, Tennessee, public schools, 
now calls herself a “fair trader.*’ 
denies any inconsistency and adds: 
“I calls them the way I sees them.” 

Miss Stern has a doctorate in 
international affairs from the 
Fletcher School of International 
Law and Diplomacy at Tufts Uni- 
versity in Medford, Massachusetts. 

She was a freelance journalist 
and specialist on Middle East and 
Soviet studies before coming to 
Washington 10 years ago to work 
as a legislative assistant u> Senator 
Gaylord Nelson, the Wisconsin 
Democrat who is now head of the 
Wilderness Society. 

After completing the book that 
became her Fletcher doctoral dis- 
sertation and was later published. 
“Water’s Edge: Domestic Politics 
and the Malang of American For- 
eign Policy ,“ she was named to one 
of the six seats on the commission 
by President Timmy Carter in 1 978. 

In June 1985, (resident Reagan 
appointed her to a two-year term as 
chairman, winch gave her a5100-a- 
tnonth raise. The chairmanship 
pays $71,100 a year, against 
$69,900 received by the other com- 
missioners. 

She is the second woman to serve 
as chairman in the agency's 69-year 
history. Catherine Bedell, a legisla- 
tor and educator from Y akima, 
Washington, was chairman in the 
late 1970s. 

The chairman has the same vote 
as the other commissioners, about 


the same size office suite, but a 
larger staff, reflecting the heavier 
administrative duties that fall with- 
in the job's purview. 

“We’re now looking for a new 
site,” Miss Stem reported in an 
interview in her second-floor cor- 
ner suite at 701 E Street in down- 
town Washington. On the walls are 
a set of reproductions of Daumier 
prints. On pedestals near a desk 
with a stuffed in-box are terra cotta 
sculptures she made of her two 
children, Gabriel 8, and Gene- 
vieve, 4. and of her husband, Paul 
A. London, a Washington econom- 
ic oonsultanL 

“f sculpt Wednesday evenings 
and on vacation.” she said. She was 
once the youngest member of the 
Memphis Civic Ballet and still goes 
“from time to time” to do some 


Unhed Granted Time 
To Rebire Pilot Trainees 

United Pros International 

CHICAGO — A U.S. judge has 
ruled that United Air line does not 
have to immediately retire 500 pi- 
lot t rainees who were fired for re- 
fusing to cross picket lines during a 
strike by pilots that ended in June: 

U.S. District Judge Nicholas J. 
Bua, however, ordered United 
Thursday to give the trainees the 
next open 500 pilot positions. Re- 
placement pilots were properly 
faired during the strike and had a 
right to keep tbar jobs, he ruled. 



pli'es, assembl’es and pirouettes at 
the Washington School of Ballet 
She and her husband are also avid 
■earns players. 

How does she fit all that into her 
already full schedule as a mother 
and head of one of Washington's 
most active agencies? “I get up ear- 
ly in the morning.” she said with a 
shrug. 

The commission's big move will 
be from one of the oldest buildings 
In Washington — a gracious mar- 
ble building with Corinthian pil- 
lars. cantilevered staircases, lou- 
vered swinging doors and 
fcur-foot-ihick walls begun six 
years before the Civil War — to 
“somewhere between the White 
House and Capitol Hill.” 

Why the move? The Smithsonian 
Institution had its eye on the build- 
ing for another museum and was 
willing to put the money up to 
restore iL Among other things, the 
building has rats in the basement 
and cracks in the roof. 

If it has become a figurative 
M*A*S*H unit in the 1950s. it ac- 
tually was an Army hospital during 
the Civil War. according to some 
accounts, and Wall Whitman, as a 
male nurse, was reported to have 
tended some of the wounded there. 
(M*A‘S*H stands for Mobile 
Army Surgical Hospital.) 

Those who have watched “die 
general” cope with the trade casu- 
alties give Miss Stem a pretty good 
efficiency rating. 

“Fd say she's developed an in- 
depth understanding of what it 
takes to keep the commission mov- 
ing,” said Bill Alberger, a former 
chair man and now a Washington 
trade lawyer. “From everything 
I’ve seen the trains are running on 
time.” 

Michael H. Stein, another trade 
lawyer who served as general coun- 
sel of die commission from 1977 to 
1984, said of Miss Stem: “She does 
her homework. She’s continued the 
process of upgrading the commis- 
sion and making it effective.” 

Miss Stern's parents, Lloyd and 
Fan Stem, ran a furniture store on 
Thomas Street in Memphis, which 
is where she says she developed her 
sense of bittiness and fascination 
with both domestic and interna- 
tional trade. 

“They loved commerce, and I 
guess some of it rubbed off on me,” 
she said 


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234 

910 

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3 
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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, SEPTEMBER 7-8, 1985 




ACROSS 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


1 Please 
8 S. A. Indian 
13Card4cor 

19 Composer 
Saint-Saens 

20 “Moonlight” 
or 

“WaMstein” 

21 Uses the oven 

22 Pucdni 
cowhand? 

25 "Lord, is 

?”: Matt. 

26:22 

26 Virtue; valor 

27 European 
thrush 

28 Like a bairn 
30 German 

appellations 
32 Enroll 

35 Coin of Iran 

36 Waxed 

37 Principle 
39 Former D.C. 

nine 

41 Brain-wave 
reading, for 
short 

42 Finance abbi. 

43 Cautious 

44 Extent 


49 Turkish coin, 
to a Londoner 

50 Esoteric 

51 Like new bills 

52 Part of G. I. 

53 Remnant 

54 Synthetic 
fabric 


Operatic Operations byalfiomicci 


peanuts 


TBUriorZug — 

80 “Dead Souls" 1 

author ri 

81 One kind 19 

82 Violinist Bull 

83 Yesterday, to 

Pierre ■ 

84 Muscle ■ 


M |i |2 |3 |4 15 IB 17 


rs Is Jio 111 fl2^*T3 114 1 15 JIB 1 17 [18 


MB', CHUCK. I HEAKP 
THEM TALKING ABOUT 
WV AT SCHOOL • 
YESTERPAY_ 


THE COMPUTER 5AIP 1 
YOU WERE SUPPOSE? 
TO BE ON OUR . 
SCHOOL BU5-. 


THAT'S RIPICUL0U5-' 
I DON'T EVEN 60 
TO YOUR SCHOOLi. 1 


UJHATARE YOU, CHUCK 
SOME KlNP OF 
TROUBLEMAKER 


46 Campaigner’s 
concern 
48 Cry of 
satisfaction 


55 Mascagni flirt 

56 Lotto's kin 

57 Father of 
Diomedesof 
Thrace- . 

58 Secular 

59 Discernible 

61 Noted Korean 

63 Precollege 
test, for short 

65 Washington’s 
pursuer 

67 Show patience 

68 Disentangled, 
as fibers 

71 Ending for 
cash or front 

72 Iowa campus 
town 

73 Indistinct 

74 Elgar’s" 

Variations” 

75 Wagnerian 
hero 

77 Covers a bet 

78 Lear’s eldest 

daughter 


85 Norwegian 
king 

87Tuileries 



occupants. fer 
88 "Travesties” 


playwright ST 

91 Cremona 

craftsman so 

92“ Loser,” 

Beatles song .$* 

93 “You can h 

horse to water \m 


BLQNDIE 


I NEED A 
PHRASE I 


I WHKriS THE VI 
CLUE? c->| 


rr means j-n-tAris easv; what 1 Solb>jg doctor 

HAPPINESS, TW-v MOW © IT ? 

s&xjRrry Vjgvl 


i THtN K w ^LrrTue gt 
* is GODWINS UP/- 


94 Inspected the 
joint 7i 

96 Cumberland, 

e.g. 75 

98 Prokofiev’s 

saucy opus? 79 


166 Unruffled [55 

107 SOS signals 

108 John or Jill B as 

109 King and 

Mason HhSttj 

110 Dickens’s 

Drood 198 199 1100 

111 Oats container I I 

1106 1 1 


BEETLE BAILEY 


[103 1104 11051 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


1 Time-zone 

abbr. 

2 Music to an 
athlete’s ears 

3 Soul, in Savoie 

4 Of a leg bone 

5 Ait 

6 Wagner's 
Parisian pilot? 

7 River in SW 
England 

8 Producer 
Alexander 

9 French 
violinist: 18th 
century 

10 Storm 

11 Japanese 
admiral: 1843- 
1914 


12 Nonsense 

13 Musically 
increase in vol. 

14 Barber, at 
times 

15 Author of “The 
Sojourner” 

16 Verb ending 

17 Rockies, e.g. 

18 Erhard’s 
therapy 

20 Disseminate 

23 TV series 

24 Sprinkle 

28 Mountainous 
region 

29 What Fountain 
plays in a 
Mozart opus? 

31 Host 


32 Dictator’s 
phrase 

33 Stableboy in a 
Smetana opus? 

34 Always, 
poetically 

35 Do upholster- 
ing 

37 Leh&ropus 
about a lady in 
despair? 

38 Wyatt of the 
West 

40 Pips 

42 Asian capital 

43 Hot pepper 

44 Unhappy 
outcome of a 
Mozart opus? 


Q New York Times, edited by Eugme Maleska. 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


45 Nosh 

47 Revolutionist 
in 1789 

48 Treasure 

49 Atop, for short 

51 Yam units 

52 World’s richest 
man 

56 Heals 

57 Eagle’s perch 
60 De Kooning 

prop 

62 Political boss 
in McKinley's 
day 


63 Intonation 

64 Sultans’ 
palaces 

66 Wine: Comb, 
form 


80 Zoo attraction 


84 Old radio’s 
“Vic and— 


69 Iago’s wife 

70 Pastoral spots 

72 From Z 


85 Hebrew 
measures 

86 Burden 

87 Undulation 
89 Garden bloom 


97 Uncouth 
fellows 

98 Cooking abbr. 

99 " Haw,” 

TV variety 
show 

100 Fumble 


73 Conjurer 

76 Folding 
carriage 

77 Affectionate 


78 Assault 


90 Does road 
work 

91 Wan 

94 Crow’s crop 

95 Longfellow’s 
bell town 


101 Long in the 
tooth 


102 A, in Aachen 

103 Chem. room 

104 Bambi’s aunt 

105 Surface on a 
bldg, wall 



WIZARD of 111 





REPRISE: The Extraordinary Revival of 
Early Music 

By Joel Cohen and Herb Snitzer. 227 pages. 
$25. 

Little, Brown, 34 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 
02106. 

Reviewed by Robert Aubiy Davis 


BOOKS 


reach across boundaries and fill the whole cosmos 
with the sounds of renewal and rebirth.” 


People still write like that. In fact, these words, 
from the introduction to “Reprise,” were written by 
the performer and conductor Joel Cohen, who, as 
one might surmise, is from the ’60s. The book is half 
his words and half Herb Sni tiers pictures of the 
players who have embraced long-dead music and 
breathed oew life into iL 

Like any instant history, “Reprise” is anecdotal 
and casual, witty and frustrating. There is satisfac- 
tion that lacunae are bein g filled, min gled with the 
nagging realization that this can't be, the whole 
story. The sense of lost opportunity is not dimin- 
ished by the fact that Cohen is one 01 the best people 
in the eariy-music field, musically and intellectually. 

The rebirth of early music owes a great deal to 
Arnold Doknetsch, bom in 18S8. In his eight de- 
cades, his impact was enormous, not only on the 
generation of Dame Sybil Thorndike, Joyce and 
Shaw, who were all affected by Dolmetsch concerts. 


but on the generations whose influence lives today. 
Cohen recognizes that Dolmetsdi lived 10 see his 
work seem hopelessly old-fashioned. Yet he goes 
shows that each performer, each group added in 
some way to a kind of accumulated knowledge of 
what must r emain forever impossible: to sing and 
play exactly as they did in 1385, or even 1785. 


TH£ me W 

UKB&ANPP l£WFg£ > 


D URING the 1960s, when a fantasy chronicle 
by an established medievalist named J. R_ R. 
Tolkein achieved the status of scripture, albums 
hegan appearin g mixing folk and Renaiss ance musi- 
cal idioms. The guitarist John Renboum introduced 


many to the splendors of ancient dance music. Judy 
Coll ins recorded a work by the 14th-century com- 


Collins recorded a work by the I4th-centuiy com- 
poser Francesco LandinL Even Grace Slick played 
the recorder on the Jefferson Airplane’s “Surrealis- 
tic Pillow.’ And people wrote like this: 

“In a world that seems to grow more and more 
indifferent to human need, a world where destruc- 
tion seems to outpace creation, early music per- 
formers create music for anyone interested in enjoy- 
ing, hearing and growing from the experience 
... to make our little field of specialized activity 


zl 

n 


-m 

■ VHP 




II 


wrong all these yean, sparks began to fly. Using 
gambas instead of cellos and bolding your bow a 
funny way, though now generally accepted, remains 
the hottest issue in this rebirth: “the challenge to 




established ways of performing late baroque and 
p re-classical music was by far the most coutrover- 


p re-classical music was by far the most coutr 
sial part of the whole early music movement.” 

Which leads finally to that unanswerable ques- 
tion: Is it authentic? We can never have “just one 
scratchy 78-ipm disk from the 16th century” or 
“just one battered cylinder recording of the 12th- 
century troubadour Marcabni/' From incomplete 
manuscripts, sometimes from the notational equiva- 
lent of chicken scratches, we must intuit the ait of 
an age. Cohen reminds us that in the early 1950s 
whitejazzmen tried to make an authentic revival of 
the New Orleans jazz of the 1920s; even with 78s, 
even with living practitioners to copy, the attempt 
was completely inadequate. 

But a revival is not a return. In the most impor- 
tant and vita] section of the book. Cohen asks, *Do 
we strive above all for objective knowledge about 
the music we play, or do we seek to create its inner 
experience?” Though he observes that “the duld- 
mer-stnimming flower children have been overtak- 
en by a newer generation of train edprofesaouals,” 
it is clear where his sympathies lie. The hyperacade- 
mic approach robs us of any perception of art 
behind the notes. 

“We need the music of our ancestors," Cohen 
argues. “We need its calm and its passion. Us sensu- 
ality and its grace. We need the opportunity this 
music affords us to come face to face with remote 
yet vitally important parts of our own selves.” 


REX MORGAN 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 



anno maaaaa aaaaa □□□□ 
□□□an □□□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□ 
□□□□noaaaaaaninaaaa atma 
□□□□□□ □□□ □□□□□ aunna 

□aaa Bonn auaaa □□bedd 
□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□□ 
□nnanuananaanaa 
□aa □□□□ oh 3 aaaaa anon 
uananauupaaaau □□□ □□□□ 
□□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□ anoou 
□aaa □□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□□ 

□odd □□□□□an aaaa 
aaaacD □□□□□ oaaa □□□□ 
□□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□ 
□□□□ Ena □□□□□□□□□□□□□□ 
ujgj uaaaa ana aaaa ana 

□□□□DUO □□□□□□□□□□□□□□□ 

noBona Gnaan aaaa 
□□□□□□ annaa aaaa aono 
□anao □□□an ana aaanaB 
□ana □□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□ 
aaaa □□□□□ naaaaa nanoa 
□□□a Douaa □□□□□□ □□□□ 


I LL HAVE A SALAD WITH J 
HOUSE DRESSING. A 4 
FILET MIGNON, MEDIUM 
RARE, A BAKED POTATO. 
WITH EVERYTHING ON 
BBC* IT--- 


f YOU WEREN’T 1 
KIDDING WHEN I 
YOU SAID YOU M 
WERE STARVING, 
LWERE YOU. jrrd 

Jim 


: CLAUDIA 8i$hop/iookJI 
iN THE HOSPITAL '.--If 
FOR A CHeCKUPr-*W* *J| 
'.LEFT m SUPPLY AT ^ Jlj 
h HOME ' COULD >OU 
BRING : IN ATCOUPLE. OF-H 
GRAMS* 1-1ZL PAY..2 
IL VOU NEYT WEEK t JM 




GARFIELD 


OH NO/MV BLANKET'S NOT HERE / 
HOW AM I GOING TO BE THE 
CAPEP AVENGER TOPAV ? _ 


MAVBE JON'S 
GOT SOMETHING 


I SOMEHOW tPDNT THINK THE^ 
h'RftlSLEV AVENG£R”I6 GOING j 
TO CUT IT” ’ i 


Robert Aubry Davis, a medalist in early music, 
wrote this review for The Washington Post 


‘DO 'IOU SAY A PRAYER ’DOtfr MVETO.MY 
BEFORE YOU EAT?* AfcM'S A GOOD COOK-" 






















ly 



Page 17 



SPORTS 


cates 


Less 


L By Murray Chass 

Sector 

-PITTSBURGH i an „-„ 
the firet ^sebail player to 
the fodera! tridL 
^qu«d .drag dealer. Thursday 

named Joaqum Andttfar, Keith 



ers 


3£?!2L , ^2“7 **“*«* as 


& 


involved in'«v 
«one use with him when he was 
wtft the Philadelphia Phflfies and 
[ Sl Lous f*' 


a* 

in 

6<4 


2=1 
2 to 

can 


- -his four hoars on the witness 
gand. Snath also identified Dickie 
Ndes and_Didc_Davis as fellow 
psere. and said Davis, a former ma- 
W ^tier.nqw playing in Ja 


fr jjjjj* 10 Curtis Strong, the Phila. 



Seurry, Ai Holland and Dale Berra 
also are on a -list of prospective 
witnesses, but Ross' exclusion of 
them from Ins list was taken to 
mean they would not testify or that 
they did not buy cocaine from 


m 

iajh 

nik 


®ocooc distribution, 
was one of seven men in- 


Lonnie Smith 


piay- 


eat 

^ciife 


of «ffing coeame to 
crs|m Pittsburgh- 
‘ Smith, an ontfidder for the Kan- 
City Royals, said he was intro- 

rtlllMM T m—lm- «■ m 


[Hernandez, the first baseman 
for the New York Mets and the 
leadoff witness Friday, testified 
that he began using cocaine in the 
middle of the 1980 season and had 


Ross -mid that “major league 
baseball is not on trial here; Curtis 
Strong is.” But the primary alien - 
: don was focused on Smith's testi- 
mony about the players wilh whom 
he said he used cocaine or for 
whom he said he bought it or from 
whom he said he received it. 

A spokesman for the Cardinals, 
Jim Toatney, said Thursday night 
that Andujor had indicated he 
would not comment on Smith’s tes- 
timony and that dub offidals 
would not comment. The Chicago 
Cobs did not return calls placed m 
an effort to reach Matthews, an 
outfidder. 

Besides the five players he 
named. Smith talked about some 


StAfcv 

adit! 

iheJL» 

wkb. 


5-1.TS«;^K bright some tram Strong. The As- 
ideaii0ed as bis St Unis cocaine TKKEf ft. 

1 980s “ the romance years of baD- phiffics’ first baseman, during a 
players and cocaine" and said the ^nflonrad cross-e xamina tion 
use of “it was pretty prevalent" He - - - 

said he used the drug heavily for 
the rest of the 1980 season. 

[Hernandez said he met Strang 
through. Smith, in a hotel room. 

[“Theywere doing cocaine. 1 saw 
a transaction made. 1 was in- 
volved," Hernandez said.) 

In his opening statement Thurs- 
day, James Ross, the assistant U.S. 
attorney, stud the U.S. District 
Court jwy would hear testimony 
from Smith, Enos Cabell, Dave 
Parker; John MDncr, Jeff Leonard 
and Hernandez. Lee Lacy, Rod 


Loms cocaine 
sofpBcr, m 1982 through Andujar, 
that dm top pitcher fear the World 
Series champion Cardinals. 
J^fertmez pleaded guilty to two 
counts of- cocaine distribution last 
year and is in federal prison serving 
«Hhroe-year sentence, according to 
Charles Shaw, an assistant U.S. at- 
torney in Sl Louis. Shaw said Mar- 
tinez worked for Andujar by nm- 
qmg errands. 

Smith, 29, spebtso much time on 
the witness stand — 1 hour and 45 
mimites for direct examination,! 2 
hours and 20 miniitq for cross- 
examination — : that no other play- 
er was called to testify. 


Alexander Pitches 2-Hitter 
For Jays; Yanks Also Win 


I ty Oir Sbd J From Dispardua 

JRONTO — Doyle Alexander 
pitched a two-bitter, Lloyd Moseby 
hit a home nm and drove in three 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


a oponks 


rMs 


- Royals 4, Brewers 1: In Kansas 
runs, and the Toronto Bine Jays QOV Missouri, Omar Moreno hit 
beat the Minnesota Twins,7-Q, a11 insido-tbe-park homer and tri- 
Thursday night But they couldriot ' P^d to drive in three runs against 
pull away from (he New York Yah-- Milwaukee as the Royals dosed to 
keesi 1 ; one game of the West Dmsion 

AB the triumph did was enable kadowtile CaEfarnia. • 

the first place Blue Jays to maintain' ■ -WW® Sw RRuigenf: Harold 
their 2ft-game lead iti the Amen- Baines W* *«»<* Chicago’s 16 hits 
can League East because thoYan- .*™ fonr » Admgton, Texas. 

Icees con tinu ed w inning. "' ' ■ ■■ So* 13-5, radi a ns -6-9: 

.Alexander struck ootfive 

walked one en route to his-: thud ." iSwi«St 

JW _Betwrwi^ J982 andJSJ seasons, 
tfinc double and Giee Ganitfs t *P _rraJ T ^® ler “4 pmcfr* Snath said;. Strong seutcocameto 
inS^aS ■-**** v:hittV Tony BeraazarrTs bases- him at his. home in Spartanburg, 

loaded doable. South Carolina, by express maiL 

■ Smith testified that he met 

-CaiAiab 6, Cuhs 1: In the Na- 
tional League, Tito . Landrum hit a 
throo TQp homer in SL Louis and 
Wmie McGee and Cesar Gedeno 
each got three hits while Danny 


Renfroe asked Smith about 
members of the Phillies who used 
cocaine. After Smith named Davis, 
Matthews, Noles and himself, Ren- 
froe asked about Schmidt, for a 
long time the Phillies’ all-star third 
baseman. J. Alan Johnson, the US. 
attorney, objected and Judge Gus- 
tave Diamond asked Renfroe, “Do 
you Tiave a reasonable basts far 
bringing Mike Schmidt into it?" 

Renfroe replied that he did and 
Diamond summoned the lawyers 
to the side of the bench for a con- 
ference. But after a 17-minute re- 
cess the judge told the jury, M A 
question was asked that implied 
certain individuals used drugs. The 
court is satisfied there is no ade- 
quate basis for that question and 
you are to disregard it” 

Smith, in reply to a question 
from Renfroe during cross-exami- 
nation, named Bake McBride and 
Nino Espinosa as Phillies who he 
said he knew used “greenies." An- 
swering a question about a 1980 
case involving the Phillies and 
“greenies", he said ha “believed" 
the players involved were Pete 
Rose, Larry Bowa, Greg Luzinski 
and Randy Loch. Those names 
had surfaced at the time. 

Testifying about his own cocaine 
purchases. Smith, who had been 
granted immunity from prosecu- 
tion, said he bought the drag from 
Srong at least three times in 1981 
in Ffnlarfeplria, twice in 1982 and 
once early in 1983 in Pittsburgh- 



Connors Gains Open Semifinal; 
Noah Wilts in Losing to Lendl 


R«u*mrt-UPi 


Yannick Noah had difficulty figuring out why be played so 
poorly in losing to Ivan Lendl in U.S. Open quarterfinals. 


By John Feinscein 

Wea hmgim p m t Srmcr 

NEW YORK — Yannick Noah 
gave himself the choke sign, 
dropped his racket in disgust and 
sarcastically applauded himself ou 
a rare good shot. For slightly more 
than two hours Thursday after- 
noon, he flopped around the Stadi- 
um Court of the National Tennis 
Center, looking helpless. 

“I just couldn't compete the way 
I wanted to," Noah said. “I don’t 
even, feel as if I played. I'm not even 
that tired." 

He had tittle reason to be tired 
after his 6-2, 6-2, 6-4 quarterfinal 
loss in the U.S. Open to No. 2- 
Sceded Ivan Lendl 

Neither did Heinz Gunthardt of 
Switzerland, who looked just as 
meek Thursday night in losing, 6-2, 
6-2, 6-4, to No. 4 seed Jimmy Con- 
nors. Those rapid-fire victories put 
Lendl and Connors into Saturday’s 
semifinals, where they will resume 
their old and bitter rivalry. 

Tin looking forward to it,” said 
Connors, who is seeking a sixth 
Open title. *T like to compete." 

He gained his 12th straight Open 
semifinal because Gunthardt sim- 
ply was not up to the occasion. 
Connors broke service in the first 
game of their match and ran off the 
first four games oath the total loss 
of four points. 

Gunthardt tried. He wailed at 
several tine calls. He rallied with 
Connors at length. He tried to 
come in, but was sent ducking for 
cover because Connors had his 
ground strokes zeroed in. 

Even at 33, Connors does not 
lose to players ranked No. 47 in the 
world. Not here, not on the one 
court cm which he must be given a 
legitimate shot at beating LendL 
even though Lendl has won their 
last six meetings, several of them 
overwhelmingly. 

“It is always tough for me to play 
Connors here,” Lendl said. The 
crowd seems to enjoy giving me a 
hard time and he somehow gets 
them turned on for him. I don’t 
know why it is.” 

ll is not hard to explain. Thurs- 
day night, Connors entertained the 
crowd despite the onesidedness erf 
the match. He used his racket as a 
cane after missing an easy volley, 
waved down booing fans to check a 
line after a shot by Gunthardt was 
called ont and crushed several re- 
turns in old-style Connors fashion. 

The victory was the last of a 


Navratilova Easily Beats Graf 


The Associated Priest 

NEW YORK — Two-time defending champion Martina Navrati- 
lova, her serve at peak form, defeated West German teenager Steffi 
Graf. 6-2, 6-3, Friday and advanced to the women's singles final. 

Navratilova, seeded No. 2. needed just 52 minutes to brush aside 
Graf, 16, who got to the semifinals by outlasting Navratilova's 
doubles partner. No. 4 seed Pam Shriver, in a marathon Thursday. 

“I was thinking really well out there." Navratilova said. "When 
you're serving well, you can do that, you can play with your serve 
more." 

The wind, she added, “was swirling around and I was seeing which 
way it was blowing and deciding whether to hit it at her or away from 
her, depending on which way it was going. 

“I felt like a pitcher out there: ‘Okay, nl go to the slider now, then 
the fast balL* It was fun, and it worked because I had the rhythm with 
my serve, even with the wind.” 

Graf, the No. 1 1 seed, who had never gotten as far as a semifinal in 
any Grand 9am tournament, broke Navratilova's serve only once, in 
the eighth game of the second set. It brought a cheer from the crowd in 
the half-filled stadium court at the National Tennis Center. 

“I felt that I really broke myself when I lost my serve," Navratilova 
said. “It was a lack of concentration because I was really winning so 
easily, easier than I thought I would be.” She then broke right back to 
take the match. 

When the match was over, Graf almost sprinted off the court 

“I was trying to tell her she had a great tournament but she walked 
away before I had a chance," Navratilova said “I guess she was 
disappointed but she really shouldn't be. I think she went a lot further 
than she expected to." 


quarterfinal round that may have' 
been the most desultory in Open 
history. Anders Jarryd' retired is 
the third set against Mats Wi- 
lander; Joakim Nystrom was rout- 


ed by John McEnroe, and Lendl 
and Const 


ore embarrassed their op- 
ponents. Only Jarryd won so wmr.li 
as a set in losing. 

Lendl said he thought Noah, 
seeded No. 7, had tried to pace 
himself in the afternoon’s oppres- 
sive heat “from the very first point. 
I started out to do that but after 
three or four games I realized I 
could go all out and 1 wasn't going 
to get that tired. If be had kicked in 
and I had gotten tired, I might have 
been in trouble. But he never did." 

At his best, Noah is one of the 
most graceful play ers in the game; a 
superb athlete who can hit spectac- 
ular shots. But he double-faulted in 
the match's third game to give 
Lendl his first break, and netted an 
easy volley for the second one. He 
walked around as if the heat was 
bothering him terribly. He was dis- 
gusted with himself and, at times, 
appeared embarrassed by his play. 

Did the heat bother him? 


“No.” 

Was he embarrassed? 

“No." 

Thro what happened? 

“I was tight starting out," said 
Noah, who had claimed two days 
earlier that the pressure was on the 
higher-seeded LendL “I thought I 
could win, that I would win and I 
was already thinking about the 
semifinals and the final" 

Noah, the French Open champi- 
on in 1983, has never gotten past 
the quarterfinals in any other major 
tournament- LendL who has been 
the losing U.S. Open finalist the 
past three years, made certain No- 
ah's record remained intacL He hit 
the ball hard from the start, kept 
Noah pinned at the base line and 
was helped by Noah getting only 50 
percent of his first serves into play. 

“1 lose a lot of confidence in my 
game if I am not serving wdL” 
Noah said. “I really wanted to play 
a great match but I never got start- 
ed. It was never a dose match. I 
had one break point" in the third 
set “and when I didn't get that my 
one chance was gone. 1 didn't give 
everything I could. I didn’t even 
compete." 


Grant May Get Painful Welcome asNFLSeason Opens 


snrth- mnrng 

- .Moseby doubled and-hit a sacri- 
fice fiy in addition to his hornet 
while WflHe Upshaw got three hits, 
aoeahomer.-/ 

Yankees 7, A’s 3: In New York, 
• jCTjt; Wiffie Randolph hit two- home 


w runs, for the fiat time in lOyeaxsin 
Ih.Vmajars, to hefy> defeat Oakland. 
^ -j&z Don Baylor’s homer gave the Yan- 
Jjb-.sc; kees a 3-0 lead inthe first 

The umpires threatened to leave 


inl981 in Davis’ ho td room 
m miadelpbia. Matthews, he said, 
also was there. “We were waiting to 
purchase cocaine," Smith said, 
meaning btmsdf, Matthews and 


Compiled by Ov Staff From Dupoicha their first game under a new coach, 

MINNEAPOLIS — A capacity Leeman BennetL Chicago opened 
crowd of more than 62,000 Sunday season with a 38-14 victory 
at the Metrodome will cheer the- OVcr Tam P a Bay ^ route to their 


NFL ROUNDUP 


Cox htrnted Chicago to two hits. 

Tire Cardinals, winning then- 
third straight, improved their lead 
to ltt games in the NL East over 
the idle New York Mets. McGee 
■ i j esc- the fieldin' the sixth noting because improved his major-league leading 
spectators had begun throwing average to 368. 

things at them-. Two scoreboard re- Astros 4, Pirates 3: In Houston, ^ 

^5<r plays bad showed a call that, ap- Jerry Mumphrey and CHeon Davis and his two teammates. 
ft. jr patently erroneously, went against each drove in two runs against Asked by Johnson how he got 


trass- 


Dam. 

Smith, traded to the Cardinals 
before the 1982 season, said be con- 
tinued his cocaine rise with Andn- 
jar and Hernandez. During the 
Cardinals' visit to Pittsburgh that 
September, he testified, he bought 
cocaine from Strong for himsdf 


... - V*E *5 
• v£ 2 si 


together with them after he mind* 


return of Bod Grant to the Minne- 
sota Vikings, but might reserve a 
few boos for (be National Football 
League schedule-makers. 

After a one-year absence, Grant 
returns to coaching as professional 
football begins its 1985 season. But 
the Vikings face perhaps the NFL’s 
toughest team, the Super Bowl 
champion San Francisco 49ers. 

Grant, who coached the Vikings 
for 17 seasons before retiring, said 
be is not worried. 

“Whai happened last year really 


ampionship of any kind in 
s. (Bears by 7 p ‘ 


the purchase, Smith said, “I would has no bearing on what will happen 


j 


SCOREBOARD 


AS* 


Baseball 


. lines*; 
* yw ;:5! ! 
!ess?i? 

•r S&Sr. 


llnireday’s Major League line Scores 


AMERICAN UBAOUE 

fW.Qbw . 

jm im in- 1 -a i 

Boston 20* *61 llw— 13 IS 4 

Hasten Oak (4). Thoduoaon M), Romani 


Baines 1171, HuMt M». Tama. Stoutrttf («, 
MeOowall (17). 


’■if. c« one Banda, wmwd WJi. Bovi Ctoor (V) 

1 WjdGed man. W — Bovd, 12-1 1.L— Hooted B-K. 
'j’L-tS' 1 HRaHBasten, Event 2 (21), BOOM 16). 
S,jra» x, . Socotid Own* 

GM**on6 2»* to* 3*0— » M ■ 

. bosM M M IB-4 ll 1 

'i-'r -T v\ Easterly , RuMa Road OB and Willard; 

' L ' oleda, MTchall (6). Woodward (» and Sulli- 
van. W — Easterly, 4-0. L-Oteda, M. Sv— 
Reed <4 >.h Rs— Ctevoland. Otwnten (14). Ba»- 


NATIONAL LEA CUE 
Plttstaarata 211 MM ON— 3 t 0 

Howton m 0M oon— 4 3 6 

wane, Owimms (61 and Pena; Known 1 , 
Smith (*) and BaUev.W— Knapper, 12-10. L- 
Walk. 1-2. Sv— Smith (232. 

Cucm IN m 666—1- 2 6 

St. LOOK Ml IM NX—* 13 6 

Snoot, Sorensen (*> and Davie; Cox and 
KMo, Porter 17). W-Cax, UHL L— EnaeLK 
HR— SL Louis. Landrum («). 


Ion, 5ulllvOfl (2). 
Minnesota 


2 I 

Slt-no Ota— 7 W 0 
. Blvtaven. Seftrotn IS) and Sola*. Read (7 Ij 
, . & Alexander and wwn.W-Atexandir.T4* L— 

Rlvlsvpn 13-14. HR* — Minnesota. Mnebv 
jy-,«12). Upshaw (14). 

*■ V MHl— Md . ON -ON 616—1 7 I 

Kansas (Mr - tRNta-t « * 

Haas and Stfiroedir; LaRifondt and 
....• .VP^wnttua W— Loftmndt. 1*7. L l ln ai . 07. 
HR— Kansas CHv, Marana (2). 
...^'Oakland 4°* •“* W-*. • ] 

Ml 661 2lN— 7 7 1 


Tennis 


U.S. Open Results 


WOMEN 
StavteSi SemHteals 

Martina Navratilova (2). UA. duL Steffi 
Grot (11), West Oermanv. 67. 6-X 


call them in their room or they 
would call me to see if I purchased 
it for them.” 

Johnson: Did yon use cocaine 
with Keith Hernandez? 

Smith: Yes. 

Johnson: Did you use cocaine 
with Joaquin Andtq'ar? 

Smith-. Yes. 

Renfroe repeatedly tried to 
shake Smith's testimony, painting 
him as a wealthy player who bad 
received immunity from prosecu- 
tion and was using it to save him- 
self by implicating Strong. Howev- 
er, Smith was cool precise and 
articulate through his four hours on 
the stand. At one point, Renfroe 
asked Smith about how be knew 
the substance he received from 
Strong was cocaine. Smith said 
Strong told him it was cocaine, at 
which paint Renfroe said, “Yon 
hearsay.” 

“No," Smith responded. “I mean 
his say." 


Sunday," he sakL 

San Francisco quarterback Joe 
Montana appears fully recovered 
from an inflamed disc in his lower 
back, an injury that sidelined him 
through much of the prescason. 

Harrah’s Reno Race & Sports 
Book has made the 49ers 12-point 
favorites. 

Previews of Sunday’s other 


Miami Dolphins at Houston 03- 
ers — Miami quarterback Dan Ma- 


rino, who ended his 37-dayholdout 
hr will 


last weekend, probably will start 

“Dan bad another good day of 
practice and if he works weU and 
feds good about everything on Sat- 
urday, then he'll probably start,’' 
said Coach Don Smila said. 

Don Strode will start if Marino is 
not ready. (Dolphins by TA points.) 

Chicago Bears at Tampa Bay 
Buccaneers — The Bears make 
their debut as NFC Central Divi- 
sion champions and the Bucs have 


first chami 

21 years. (Bears by 7 points.). 

New York Jets at Los Angles 
Raiders — The Jets’ defensive end, 
Mark Gastineau, who led the NFL 
in sacks last year, will miss the 
game with a broken thumb. 

The Raiders’ quarterback, Jim 
Plunkett, has the pleasant choke of 
throwing to either speedster Jessie 
Hester, the chib’s No. 1 pick, or 
veteran Jim Smith, a former Pitts- 
burgh Steder who played well in 
the U.S. Football League the last 
few years. (Raiders by 9VL) 

Seattle Seahawks at Cincinnati 
Beagak — Seattle will come well 
armed with a recovered Curt 
'Warner at running back and a de- 
fensive unit led by NFL defensive 
player of the year Kenny Easley. 

Both teams have improved on 
offense, the Bengals fry adding 
rookie wide receiver Eddie Brown, 
and the Seahawks with the return 
of Warner. (Seahawks by 3ft.) 

St Loms Cardinals at Cleveland 
Browns — The Sl Louis defense, 
anchored by all-pro middle line- 
backer EJ. Junior, can almost 
match (he Cleveland defense, but 
the Browns have fewer weapons on 
offense. 

The Cards feature r unnin g backs 
Ottis Anderson and Stump Mitch- 
ell, all-pro wide receiver Roy Green 
and quarterback Neil Lomax, 
whose 4,614 passing yards last year 
were the fourth best single-season 
total in NFL history. 

Cleveland wifi have a new quar- 


terback, Gary Danielson, obtained 
from Detroit in the offseason. 
Highly paid rookie Benue Kosar 
wifi watch at first from the bench, 
as will last year's starter, Paul Mc- 
Donald. (Cardinals by 2ft.) 

Great Bay Packers at New En- 
gland Patriots — Raymond Berry, 
who took over the Patriots from 
Ron Meyer the same wed: Schot- 
tenhrimer got ins job, also begins 
his first full season. 

Berry has installed a two-back 
offense this year with Tony Collins 
and Craig James the find-string 
runners. 

Green Bay may be without quar- 
terback Lynn Dickey, who is 
doubtful with a back injury, leaving 
Randy Wright as Lhe possible start- 
er. He will operate behind a make- 
shift offensive line that includes 
two rookies. (Patriots by 4.) 

Detroit lions at Atlanta Falcons 
— Darryl Rogers, former coach at 
Arizona State and Michigan State, 
gets his baptism of fire in the NFL. 
The Falcons’ quarterback Steve 
Bartkowski who missed five games 
last season because of a knee inju- 
ry, has had two consecutive out- 
standing performances against the 
lions — passing for 366 yards and 
three touchdowns in 1983 and con- 
necting on a dub record 24 of 28 
passes for 299 yards and two scores 
last year. 


quired from the Philadelphia Ea- 
gles, as their main running back. 
(Falcons by 2ft.) 

Kansas City Chiefs at New Or- 
leans Saints — Dave Wilson steps 
out of the shadows of Archie Man- 
ning. Ken Stabler and Richard 
Todd, drawing his first opening- 
game starting assignment as quar- 
terback for the Saints. 

The Chiefs’ coach, John Macko- 
vic, said his team is much improved 
over last season. “If we played the 
Chiefs of last year, we’d beat them 
hands down.” (Game rated even.) 

Phaaddptai Eagtes at New York 
Giants — The Giants wifi be with- 
out unsigned veterans Mark 
Haynes and Casey Merrill and sev- 
eral injured players they were 


The Steelers's fullback Frank 
Pollard has a broken hand and 
halfback Rich Ensnberg a tendon 
injuiy. but both are expected to 
pIay.(Stoelersby 10.) 

San Diego Chargers at Buff do 
MBs — Half of the players on the 
Bills’ 50-man roster at the end of 
last season are gone, and the coach, 
Kay Stephenson, said it was not 
change for change's sake. 

Vince Ferragamo has beaten out 
Joe Dufek at quarterback and 
Brace Smith, the fust overall draft 
choice in the NFL this season, wifi 
start at right defensive end. 

There has also been significant 
turnover on the Charger*. But 
quarterback Dan Fouts, despite 


counting on, such as offensive tack- Hiring the last preseason game 
le Bill Roberts, tight end Zeke w*? a slight .injury, will play. 


Mowatt and center Kevin Belcher. 

The Eagles are still missing three 
holdouts: linebackers Jerry Robin- 
son and Joel Williams and defen- 
sive end Dennis Harrison. (Giants 
by 6ft.) 

Indianapolis Cote at Pittsburgh 
Steders — Several key Colts are 
hobbled by injuries. Running back 
Curtis Dickey is questionable with 
a knee injury, nickel back George 
Radachowsky is questionable with 
an ankle injury and starters Don- 
nell Thompson, at linebacker, and 
Nesby Glasgow, at safely, are 
probable: 


(Chargers by 4ft.) 

Denver Broncos at Los Angeles 
Rams — Even without Eric Dicker- 
sou. who is bolding out for a guar- 
anteed contract extension, (he 
Rams will be r unnin g the football 
often. But the passing game has 
been rebuilt around a new quarter- 
back, Dieter Brock. 

The Broncos will hoping that 
quarterback John El way finally, 
will live up to promise while con- 
tinuing to put a lot of trust in a 
defense that allowed but 15 points 
a game last season. (Rams by 1.) 

(AP, UPI, LAT) 


For the Lions, Eric Hippie has 
won the quarterback battle with 
Joe Ferguson, acquired from the 
Buffalo Bills. The Lions are expect- 
ed to use Wilbert. Montgomery, ac- 


i;: 


- — 


BMoofcMtira Ql. ABwrten tO, C. Voona (7) 


Martina NavroMtowa and Pam Shrtw.UA, 
art. GtBJ FOrnandBE, Puerto Mco: and Rabtn 
White. UJL. 6-3. HJ. 

Hana MandlDcava Czechoslovakia, and 
Wendy TumbulL Australia, art. Catarina 


■*; ^and Tatlteten, HaaBi (61i Whlteon, RWMtH 

- 4 (7). Fltfw W) and Wyneaor. W— Whitson. 9-7. LM „ yM . swedm.and Joakm RusulLUX 
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TtfCMOKte 


; :iC^<l^Alhariate *7. HR*— Ootdana. 

•> : ;V n?).N*w Yorti. Bavlw (21). Randolph 2 15). 
' 64& 666 «lfr-n U 6 


Davis. UMi nw l wr (*). Aaosto W> amt 
■ - SWnner; RusartL Note* (31. Woteh Ul, 

; - ' ^.scteiudi m <md amwftft pmm i»- 

„ .fr^’Davl*. 2-2. L— •teasel l. W. HRs— Ottawa. 




C^V^jor League Standings 


Steals*. Quarterfinal* 

jimmy Canter* (4). as- drf. Hrtru Gunth- 
arOL Switzerland. 4-2, 67. 64. 

OouMs*. Ssm lf te al i 

Hsnrf Leconte and Yannick Noah, Franca, 
grt. Joakim Nystram and Mats Wliandcr, 
Sweden, u 7-3 (67). M. 



■S' 


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East Dtetetea 

W- L PCL CB 

'roronto 63 SB JBA — 

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wrott rt fl J® rtW • 

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ortite i S - « JL. 

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NATIONAL LEAOUE 

East NiWn 

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Transition 


BASEBALL 


BOSTON— Annmaicad nritei pUrtwr Bob 
Slontey wlU how mtoor wracry on nis rtau 
index ttnoar and will miss tea rest of tea 


not 



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N.Y. YANKEES— Racedted Mika Arm- 

rtrana and Jbn DartkdOA pHcmt*, from C» 

lufflbin of tea International Laowa. Pramot- 
ad Brad Arrataraond Dam DrabrtLPitrtiara. 

from Albonv of «• Eortom Looaoa to Cotem- 
blVL 

TEXAS— RAcofted Jasa Cuwnan. pHcfar. 

train CHOohomoClly of B» Amtftoan AmocL 

a«on. 

BASKET BALL 

NaKonal BartutMN Aesockrtlon 

Lvcox tar- 

word. to a mum-year centred- 

MILWAUKEE— stoned Jerrv RevnoWs. 

fW w artf’floted, to o tour-year comraeL 
FOOTBALL 

Hattend PoottaO uw w 
GREEN BAV— ■AoauMW »» riBBl* » 
Matey Cade, defensive bat*. Irani tea San 

Dtevo OwfWfi <«■ o ^ ^ 

pick wd 6 eondfliooal W draft choice. ^ and 

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Bodu Wtewed 0#4d Croudta. defenelvt^ fcadt. 

PHI LADE LPHIAf— Placed Andre Hartv, 
cyan tag back, on waivers. 


Slimmer Track Season Was a Record-Breaker 


By Robert Lohrer 
and Ed Niddas 

• Washington Pam Serna 

WASHINGTON — Mary Decker Slaney 
of the United States, Morocco’s Said Aouita 
and Britain's Steve Gram have dominated 
this summer’s 15-meet IAAF Mobil Grand 
Prix track and field dremt, which, ends with 
Saturday’s meet in Rome. 

Decker seems to have recaptured the lime- 
Kgfat that eluded her a year ago. In Zurich, she 
. regained the world record for the women’s 
mile, finishing is 4 minutes 16.72 seconds 
while defeating Markka Puica and Zola 
Bndd Slaney has won 12 consecutive races 
and leads the women’s point standings. 

Aouita and Cram each set two world re- 
cords this summer. At the Bislett meet in Oslo 
on July 28, Cram took 1.02 seconds off Olym- 
pic champion Sebastian Coe's 4-year-old mile 
record of 3:4733. Aouita, the Olympic cham- 
pion in the 5,000, recorded a world-record 
13:00.40 in that event 

At the same remarkable meet, Norway’s 
Ingrid Kristiansen ran the 10,000 meters in 
30:39.42, taking 1436 off the old record. 

Less than two weeks before the Oslo meet. 
Cram, running in Nice, set a world record in 
■ die 1,500 when be ran 3:29.67, taking 1.10 
seconds off the old marie. On Aug. 4, m 
Budapest, he set a world record in the 2,000 


meters. But his record in the 1300 did not last 
long. On Aug. 23, in Berlin, Aouita, running 
with a bad hamstring, was timed in 3:29.45, 
bis second world record in less than a month. 

Aouita leads the men’s points standings, 
with only Sydney Maree of the United States 
having an outride eha««» of catching him. 
Aouita has said he plans to ran in Saturday 
itighi’s 1,500 meters, despite reixguring his 
tender thigh while beating Maree in a 2,000- 
meter race Wednesday in nearby RietL 

The summer has not gone as smoothly for 
the U.S. quadruple Olympic champion, Carl 
Lewis. He missed two months of the season 
when hepulled his right hamstring. Although 
he has finished fourth in Zurich in the 100 
meters and fourth in the 200 in Beilin since 
his return to competition in late August, he 
says his “his legs are craning back.” 

Kristiansen, who set the women’s mara- 
thon world record of 2:21.06 in April became 
the first woman to break 31 minutes in the 
10,000,1 eclipsing 31:13.78 set by the Soviet 
Union's Olga Bondarenko in June 1984. 

Slaney, who failed 10 break the women's 
world record in the nuke Aug. 2 in London, 
dramatically took the record away from 
Puica three weeks later in Zurich. It was 
Puica's time of 4:17.44 that broke Skney’s 
record in 1981, Running against Puica and 
Bndd for the first time since the 1984 Olym- 
pics, Slaney won in 4c 16.71. Puica’s second- 


place time of 4:17.33 set Romanian and Eu- 
ropean records. Budd, craning in third in 
4:17.52, broke the British record. 

When the three runners met again Aug. 30 
in Brussels, Slaney won her I2lh straight race. 
Again, they were separated by seconds. Sidn- 
ey's 3:57.24 was a world best this year. 

Despite several disappointing losses earlier 
in the summer and harassment from anti- 
apartheid protestors in Britain since she 
moved there last year from South Africa, 
Budd had won three straight races before 
that, setting the women’s 5, 000-meter world 
record Aug. 26 in London. 

She secretly entered the London meet and 
broke Kristiansen’s record by more than 10 
seconds, timed in 14:48.07. Although Kris- 
tiansen also bettered her mark of 14:58.89, 
finishing in 14:57.43, she was far b ehin d 
Budd. 

While Budd is finishingthe summer's com- 
petition on a high note. Petra FpEke of East 
Germany began the season the same way, 
becoming the first female javelin thrower and 
second person ever to set two world records 
in the same series. Chi June 4, at Schwerin, 
East Germany, hex throw of 246 feet 11 in the 
second round broke the record of 245-3 set by 
Finland's Tuna LiTlak in 1983. But Felke was 
not finished. In the fourth round, she in- 
creased the mark to 247-4. 






Page 18 


INTEKNATI0NA1. HERAID TRIBUNE, SATORDAY-SUINPAY, SEPTEMBER 7-8, 1985 




NEW YORK POSTCARD 

Road Workers 9 Woes 


people 

Country Stan WjflCo . . 


By William E. Grist 

Me* York Tinm Semce 

N EW YORK — Sometimes 
they run you down and some- 
times they ask you oul So it goes in 
the life of a flagperson on a summer 
road-construction project, accord- 
ing to Yvonne, the self-described 
flaglady of First Avenue. 

Motorists moving past painstak- 
ingly slowly wi 11 occasionally ask 
her out for dinner and dancing. 
You can get to know someone quite 
well at one tire rotation per minute. 
Did she ever accept such- an invita- 
tion? “You’ve got to be kidding!" 
she answered, waving traffic by 
with her orange flag. “Go out with 
a motorist? No way!" 

Why? “One of them purposely 
ran me down," she said. “They get 
craw at this time of year." 

This is the season of the orange 
traffic cooes, those annuals now 
blossoming on seemingly every 
thoroughfare, slowing traffic to a 
glacial pace and driving already be- 
leaguered New York motorists to 
new levels of frustration. 

They tend to take it out on the 
road workers. After breathing ex- 
haust fumes, listening to jackham- 
mers and watching radiators boil 
over, they glare, shout their favorite 
profanities, make obscene gestures 
and throw things at the crews. 

Sometimes the motorists are so 
angry that they want to fight. 
Yvonne said she knows of flagper- 
sons who have been assaulted 
“You can’t lay down your life,” 
said Timothy Robinson, a flagman 
working on a construction project 
at the comer of ]02d Street and 
Third Avenue. “I tell them the 
street is closed and when they say 
they don’t care, I stand back and 
watch the cones fly." 

Yvonne, an employee of Eden- 
wald Contracting Co. of New York 
City, which, on this particular day, 
is installing water mains beneath 
upper First Avenue, would not di- 
vulge her last name for fear of 
crank telephone calls from motor- 
ists. 

She was dressed in an orange 
hard hat, dark sunglasses, orange 
vest, jeans and work boots, and she 
spoke matter of factly of motorists 
cursing and spitting and throwing 
cigarette butts and soda cans at her 
as they drove by. 

“New Yorkers complain about 
the streets and want them fixed" 
said Tony Fasulo, a City Bureau of 


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Highway Operations supervisor, 
“but they don't want to suffer one 
ounce of inconvenience." 

The very sight of an orange cone 
sends Steve DeNiro into a rage, he 
said, as he drove his Porsche past 
some cones at a construction site 
on First Avenue. By this point of 
the construction season, it is as if a 
red flag were being waved in front 
of a bull, he said 
Mark Wilkes, a motorist eating 
lunch in his car on First Avenue, 
said he got a fiendish delight driv- 
ing over the cones and squishing 
them under his tires. 

“I'll tell you how bad it is,” said 
Bill Jenkinson, who was reading a 
1, 100-page novel in a traffic back- 
up caused by repairs on the Henry 
Hudson Parkway. “There have 
been people at some of the bad 
construction sites hawking food 
and drink to drivers, just like at the 
tunnels." 

“It is absolutely amazing that we 
can get anything done in Manhat- 
tan." said Fasulo of the highway 
bureau, who was watching over the 
resurfacing project on 102d Street. 
‘There is continuous traffic day 
and night." 

He said that 800,000 vehicles 
flowed into Manhattan each work- 
day and that traffic began racing 
over the fresh asphalt when it was 
still warm. “There are hundreds 
and hundreds of festivals and par 
rades and marathons and bike-a- 
thons and demonstrations every 
year in New York." Fasulo said. 
“We start paving and a band comes 
marching up the street." 

Brown added, “There are so 
many pedestrians that normal peo- 
ple just walk right into the cement 
or apshalL" New York City, he 
said, “has a lot, I mean a whole lot, 
of nut cases, who jump in the ce- 
ment on purpose and dance. We 
extract them, wash them off and 
send them on their way." 

“Sometimes we find ourselves in 
the middle of drug busts or robber- 
ies," he said “We often have to 
stop work and let the police come 
through, especially if they have 
their guns drawn. 

The crews often have to wait for 
asphalt trucks caught in traffic. 
When the tracks were late return- 
ing from the asphalt plant, one of 
the workers said “rrobably ran 
into a road repair backup." 

Art Buchwald is an vacation. 


MOVING 


By Elaine Attias 

L ONDON — Whether in the 
/ downstairs snack bar at Liv- 
I erpod's Everyman Theatre or in 
the offices of the chairman of the 
Royal Opera, Covent Garden, the 
aits community of Britain is filled 
with fear, anger and occasionally, 
despair. The worry is that the 
Thatcher government's stern 
monetarist economic policies are 
eroding the country's postwar 
cultural renaissance. 

"Evetylhing that we have 
painstakingly built up over 30 
years is being destroyed" said Pe- 
ter Hall in the South Bank offices 
where be directs the National 
Theatre. In the lobby, citizens 
sign petitions protesting funding - 
cuts that Hall said forced him to 
close down the Cottesloe, the Na- 
tional’s experimental theater, 
where “Glengarry Glen Ross” 
and Sam Sbepanfs “True West" 
first played 

The Thatcher government is 
blamed for not providing an ade- 
quate level of subsidy, on which 
the arts have come to depend 
since the end of World War II. It 
is charged that policies of re- 
trenchment and privatization, ap- 
plied to (hearts, are on the way to 
wrecking the country’s one big 
postwar success story. 

In addition. Lord Alexander 
Hore-Tuthven, the Earl of Gow- 
rie, was removed this week as arts 
minister in a reorganization of the 
Thatcher cabinet, leaving open 
the question of which direction 
Richard Luce, who has assumed 
Gowrie’s responsibilities, will 
take. 

Gowrie’s policies were criti- 
cized by some in the arts commu- 
nity. Hall said “At the Standard 
awards dinne r this year, I heard 
Lord Gowrie get up and say, ‘I am 
proud to be able to say (hat the 
west End theater is flourishing 
without a penny of subsidy.’ On 
that very day. of the 40 shows in 
the West End 19 had originated 
in the subsidized theater, to say 
nothing of the actors, writers, de- 
signers. lighting experts. Unfortu- 
nately we call it subsidy. If we 
called it investment, they might 
consider the whole matter differ- < 
ently." 

The plight of the Royal Court 
Theatre, where the playwrights < 
John Osborne, David Storey, i 
Tom Stoppard and Harold Pinter i 
saw their earliest works per- < 


Ian McKellen onstage: 

“A strange turnabout” 

formed is symptomatic of the 
problem. Deep cuts in its subsidy 
from the Arts Council has forced 
the company to less than half its 
normal production. 

The Arts Council is the quasi- 
independent body that allocates 
most of the government arts fund- 
ing. Museums and libraries are 
funded directly. 

Regional repertoiy companies 
that were once innovative are also 
suffering. 

Last year Willy Russell, author 
of “Educating Rita," with its eco- 
nomical cast of two, was Britain’s 
most widely produced play- 
wright; it was the first time in 
memory that the honor had not 
gpne to Shakespeare. 

Ian McKellen, alternating in 
leads in the National Theatre's 
“Coriolanus" and “Wild Honey,” 
said of subsidized companies: 
“Nicol Williamson, Glenda Jack- 
son, Derek Jacobi, Edward Peth- 
erb ridge, Judi Dench — this is 
where we all learned to act The 
new thinking is that if something 
doesn’t immediately make money 
it is either worthless, or suspect, 
or somehow immoral A strange 
turnabout for a country that used 


to believe if you made money you 
were .somehow all those things." 

Michael Alroyd, writing in the 
Times Literary Supplement de- 
scribed the Arts Council's deci- 
sion this year tb cut the total grant 
to literature in half as “utter 
wreckage." 

“It is the beginning of a loboto- 
my that must take Britain out of 
the ranks of nations enjoying high 
culture," said John Older, who 
runs a distinguished small pub- 
A shing house out of a tiny office 
jp.&ha Theodor Adorno. Wil- 
liam Burroughs and Hairy MUIer 
arejust a few of the writers Calder 
■ introduced to Britain- This year 
the Arts Coital cut his grant by 
28 percent. Next year he has been, 
told He will get nothing. 

The atmosphere seems far dif- 
ferent from the spirit that animat- 
ed the nation after World War II, 
when the Arts Council was born. 
‘The arts are an integral . part of 
civilized life," wrote Lord Arnold 
Goodman, an early Arts Council 
cha irm an. "A civilized govern- 
ment must support than. If it 
does not, it is falling short of its 
dnty not only to present but to 
future generations as well" 
Successive Labor and Conser- 
vative governments continued to 
increase arts funding modestly, 
but subsidies in Britain rarely 
contributed more than a small 
portion of the total costs. Enough 
money was committed, however, 
to nurture fledgling groups and ' 
artists, to allow for continuity and 
growth and to keep ticket prices 
low so that the average Briton 
could afford to attend. 

The result was a veritable cul- 
tural explosion that spawned a 
whole generation of gifted writ- 
ers, directors and actors. 

Today, the arts community is 
worried that the people man 
whom it needs support — the arts 
minister and the chairman of the 
Arts Council — are ideologically 
in the enemy camp. 

Before he was removed from 
his post, Gowrie said the govern- 
ment had reached a “plateau” in 
am funding. “It’s not that the 
party is over, it’s just that the 
lizmtff of hospitality have been 
reached." 

The Arts Council, headed by 
Sir William Rees-Mogg, a former 
editor of The Times, u supposed 
to hold itself at arm’s length from 
the government; Rees-Mogg is 


perceived by his critics as too 
dose. 

T-am not someone who starts 
out with (he assumption that the 
government is good for the arts," 
said Rees-Mogg. “I start out with 
the assumptiOQ'they are likely to 
be bad." • • 

He does, however, believe the 
Thatcher government made a 
mistake in denying the Arts 
Council’s request ibis year for 
£120 million ($168 mini on) to 
keep pace with inflation. The 
counci received £105 million. 

Many view the idea of seeking 
help from the private sector with 
skepticism. Britain does not pro- 
vide effective tax incentives for 
individual or corporate gifts. Pri- 
vate business sponsorship is run- 
ning at less than £17 million an- 
nually. 

Claus Moser; chairman of the 
Royal Opera, Govern Garden, 
said, “Tbe Royal Opera is just the 
kind of place private businesses 
like to support. But with all our 
advantages and afl our efforts 
over many years, we are now able 
to raise from tbe private sector 
something in the order of between 
four and six percent of our costs. 
If we are cut again next year be- 
low inflation, Coveni Garden as it 
exists cannot continue." 

The Tate Gallery recently hdd 
a packed public debate on “What 
Price Arts Sponsorship?" In the 
end, there seemed to bea consen- 
sus that corporate sponsorship, if 
not accompanied py adequate 
subsidy, provides few answers. 
Whenever the problem of arts 

» in Britain is addressed 
ys, inevitably the United 




Peter Hall: Unity-year 
effort “being destroyed." 


States’s model of tax incentives 

comes up. . . . 

Simon Jenkins, political editor 
of Tbe Economist, raentiy came 
out in favor of a modified version 
of the American system for Brit- 
ain. His proposal is for public 
subsidy, considerably larger than 
that in the United States, accom- 
panied by .tax incentives and 
pound-for-pound matching 
grants. ■ , 

But there remains a powerful 
reluctance to forgo the subsidy 
system that until recently had 

proved so successful 

“It's sheer nonsense to - think 
the American system is the pana- 
cea," said Alan Bowness, director 
of the Tate GaDeiy. T believe in 
state funding. 1 don't think it .s 
possible — I don’t even Think it s 
desirable — for the arts to be left 
to the private sector." 

Opinion polls and recent by- 
elections show that the Conserva- 
tives running behind both Labor 
and the Liberal-Social Democrat- 
ic alliance. With elections still 
more t han two years away, the 
question of arts funding and the 
stand the new arts minister mil 
mitt* have become important po- 
litical issues. 

Nathan Buchan, the Labor Par- 
ty’s. shadow arts minister, has 
pledged to double the govern- 
ment’s arts budget within a year 
of taking office. 

Under the Conservatives, the 
really substantial cuts,' it is said, 
will come in 1986, when the' arts 
will lose the grants normally pro-, 
vided by the Greater London 
Council and the six other regional 
metropolitan councils, a tier of 
local government that the Conser- 
vatives, largely for political rea- 
sons, have voted to eliminate. 

WOl Thatcher, as some are be- 
ginning to hope, relent? Skeptics 
seem to outnumber the optimists. 
Virtually the whole British arts 
community is banding together in 
the newly formed National Cam- 
paign for the Arts to fight back on 
the political leveL 

“More people in London go to 
the theater man go to football 
matches," Peter Hall said. 

“ . . . We're going to mobilize 


ElainAttiat, a Los Angeles writ- 
er specializing in the arts, wrote ; 
this article for The Washington 
Past. 


Mate Haggard and otiietcot&h , ;,j 
try performers win begin a week - ^ 
long wbisite^op * • S 

chartered tram Sept. 16 m Bakers- “> . 

field, California, to dramatize fit / 
plight of American farmers, 

Sun will arrive in nimoson Sept. - , 

22 and Haggard wffl jom .WlSe- ...| 
Neboi^Bobl^NeaX^aaf '.[ 
other stars in the Fann Aid benefit 
concert. Along the way%tiaiq' .; 
will pick up country arnsfc jachsi. ; - J . 
ipgf> imy Wynette, Laqy^ ■ 

too, Hank Snow and Jawe FScte 

■ □: - 

princess Ira von Fwteeafon^ • 
strongly denied Friday V 

she and Prince 

planned to marry soon. Hus Weefc ^ : ; 
she fled the Venice . 

escape paparazzi eager f OT.shqtt ef^ £■ 

ter, Princess CaroHde. 

. D 

There may not be any reaJJlap. - = 

pa ports onstage during the Broad- , 
way productirrn ’Tm Not' Rappa- , .; ^ 
port,* but next Thursday 
audience win' more than make up, 
forit. Every one of the 327 teats at . 

the American Place The fa^jfiff :-- ■ |. r .. : 

SfWawSffi Jersey, jpSE5§v : ‘ t 
a food service (xmipairy. ^eat ; og r --i: *g. 
letters to all R^paports . in td&i_ - : 
phone directories within ISO ; H E 
of Hew York and resent, thp^ijl'-.-, 
ater for a Rappaport-Ojtiy ^vEa^;^ 
Ticket requests hayerccme eq,&ota. ?-j 
as far away as California, - v;-; 

Bitty Graham will 

services in the Romanian distnctjtf. ■>; f 
Transylvania, where Bapt^cot; / : *‘ 

. gregations have . been ' thriving; jg 
spiteof strict state coimc^ «xonl;'-v : jjg 
ing to Ed Ploughman, a spdtiatnk^ * •• Era 
for the Southern Baptist , Sp, 

Graham begins a IS-day-lfcKafqf^,; 
Ronaania and; Hungaty jpg 

A Swedish artist and her Soviet H 
fiance havebeen reumtedmStoefc- - J 
holm after, tee went on a, bungee. 1 ST- 
strike for three weeks to pressure - 
Soviet authorities to lei him out d£' 
the country.- MarierAmte FaM^ 

30, had not stopped her fasl wO 
Valentin Varov’s plane landed: *! 
dare not believe it until 1 see him." 
tee said shortly before Yurov^'33, a - 
journalist, arrived at the aaport. 

The couple met last year. ; v. ; 7 


. / .• % 

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6SS Herd Avenue 
_ New York, NY 1QQ17 
EQUAL OFPCRRMTY 6MPLOYK 


ON BAHNHORTRASSE 52 
YOUR OFFICE AWAY FROM HOME 

• Office/Managment Services 

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FROM SWITZERLAND 
BttdMH Service* CemuR Cap. 
Bahnhafstrasse 5ZCH8D22 Zundt. 
Tet 01/211 9207. Ht 813 062 


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PAGE 13 - 
FORMORE 
ClASSiHEDS 


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