Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats


PARIS, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER ! 1,1985 


Twtar tx ecus 

«v ua£ ASDOA 

US.MB.lfar4-.Sa8i 
170 K. ymeMm — a«a 


ESTABLISHED 1887 




Edhefc 

^iicdsfc 

aioaife 

*fc»ps 

■Sicifflt 

e-Awtk 

aiwlaf, 
^ualafr 
still 2 fc 
:fcR\saC 
1 Ji ckr: 
i>:vc. 


3JCJIK 

Jwrajue 

»*.“» &T 
■'* rirtn 


jirWBfcS 
:: Ti.'M* 

■e» 

-.!.2sfc® 



The buroed-oat post office in SM^nni's Handsworth district after rioting by youths. 

Rioting in Britain’s 2d-Largest City 


>j r ~ 

-rr 

* i. • 
/Vi « ■> 

"55S^t 


ms*?* 


. : ' T TheAnocvnnd Preq ’ 

BIRM^GHAM -- AtTeast two 
persons_ ware ToBed, and 32 woe 
injured® ovcrtugbt rfoting iii JEfrit- 
aini 

WOTSfrobtovraiaram tinfecftan^y- 
mfour years, poBce said Tuesday. 

- Anpy yts^peUedHomc Sec- ; 
retary Poiuigas Tfardwith stones 
andboofcswheabetoqnsdtbe riot 
areaas^iokiKei^tinjKdT^ 
afternoon. . ; ' ... 

Two bodes were found in a 
bumed-out post office. ' 

Mr. . . Hindi die countiyVcbief 
law enfocoonentoffioer, anwed to 
inspect The smoldering damage tm 
Tra&u Road. He was pelted with 
bottles and stones when he tried to 
speak to a crowd of Wad: youths. 

Police hurried him away in a po- 
lice van. The crowd then stoned 
two other police vans, overturned 
one of them and set it ablaze as the 
other raced, away. Two other cats 
also were, overturned as the. ram- 
page continued. ' 

Neither Mr. Hurd nor Geoffrey 
Dear, the West Midlands chief con- 
stable accompanying him, was in- 
jured. A television c amer aman ran 
from the scene, his bead bleeding 


after he was struck by a thrown 


:-UV)WU . • T" . % » (i 

- Twenty-three police officers and 
six ffpefigblers were injured in the 
mcfee,rione stfiQas&f, a spokesman 
;&Fthe West MUSahdspcMce said. 
A bus driver "was. hurt when his 
vehicle wasattadeed and two other 
people woe wounded, the spokes- 
man said.' . 

Police said the rampage was the 
.worst urban violence since 1981, 
when riots broke out in slum areas 
of Liverpool arid London. 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcber, on a tour of Scotland, 
called die riots “utterly appalling” 
and demanded action by police and 
community leaders to prevent fur- 
ther violence. 

- * More than 50 buildings in the 
district were burned out. Mr. Dear 
s a id- He said that most of the riot- 
ers were members of the black im- 
migrant community from the Ca- 
ribbean. 

• - Ray NewiH, a police spokesman, 
said the •violraice b^an Monday 
afternoon when a police twicer 
stepped a blade motorist to ques- 
tion him about the tax .sticker on 

hie windshield. 


As he tried to arrest him, the 
officer was surrounded by about a 
hundred black youths, and a sec- 
ond officer arriving on the scene 
was knocked off bis motorcycle, 
Mr. Xewffl.»id. As more police 
arrival, the violence spread. 

■ Witnesses said that g an g s of 
blade and white youths carried 
goods away from s m ashed shops in 
shopping carts and cars. 

Birmingham and the surround- 
ing West Midlands area, the heart 
of Britain's industrial district, have 
borne the brunt of Mrs. Thatcher's 
tough fiscal measures and the chal- 
lenges from growing foreign indus- 
tries, especially the auto industry. 

Unemployment is 20 percent, 
seven points above the national av- 
erage, and 29.9 percent in the poor 
inner dty areas hit by Monday's 
rioting. 

The opposition Labor Party con- 
demned the violence but said that 
high unemployment and diriBu- 
si eminent among the young were to 
blame. 

“I think we have got to commit 
ourselves to renewal of opportuni- 
ties for youngsters,” said Neil Kin- 
nock, the Labor Party leader. 


Rightists 
Win Vote 
In Norway 

Coalition Holds 
One-Seat Edge 
In Parliament 


. By Stephen H. Miller 

The Associated Press 

OSLO — Prime Minister Kaare 
Willoch’s three-party coalition 
edged its way to a one-seat victory 
Tuesday in the closest general elec- 
tions in Norway since World War 
IL 

Mr. Willoch, who campaigned 
cm promises to protect Norwegians 
from higher taxes and inflation, 
thus becomes the first Conservative 
in this century to win a second term 
as prime minister. 

Officials said that with 99.9 per- 
cent of the three million ballots 
counted, Mr. Willoch’s coalition 
had won 78 seats and the socialist 
opposition, led by the Labor Party, 
had won 77 seats in the Storting, 
the Norwegian parliament. 

“The Labor Party has come back 
‘ with new strength and the govern- 
ment is weaker.” said Gro Harlem 
Brundtland, the leader of the so- 
cialist coalition, who appeared with 
Mr. Willoch on television. 

Labor. Norway’s largest single 
party, gained five seats for a total 
of 71. Its supporting Socialist Left 
Party, which opposes the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization, held six 
for an increase of two. 

The email Liberal Party, which 
backed Mrs. Brundtland. lost its 
two seats and had to forfeit its 
representation in the Storting for 
the first time in its 101-year history. 

Mr. Willoch’s. Conservative Par- 
ty won 50 seats, three fewer than it 
formerly held. The allied Christian 
People’s Party gained a seat for a 
total of 16. while the Center Party 
also gained a seat and now holds 
12. 

The result left the small anti-tax 
Progress Party, whose extreme con- 
servatism is outside the main- 
stream of Norwegian politics, theo- 
retically able to block coalition 
legislation with its two seats. 

Bui the party leader, Carl l. Ha- 
gen, a 41 -year-old business consul- 
tant, promised during his campaign 
that it would not topple the Wil- 
loch coalition, even if the election 
outcome permitted it. ' 

Before the election, Mr. W3- 
ioeb’s coalition had controlled 79 
seats, the socialist group 72 and the 
Progress Party the remaining Tour. 
Two new seats were added for 
Monday’s elections to reflect popu- 
lation growth near Oslo. 

Mr. Willoch, 56, a former trade 
minister, had campaigned largely 
on economic issues, telling Norwe- 
gians that his coalition had put the 
country “on the right course" after 
what he called Labor mismanage- 
ment. 

Mrs. Brundtland. 46, a medical 
doctor who served nine months as 
Norway’s prime minister in 1981. 
promised to triple government 
spending on health and social wel- 
fare programs. 




?C- 


rf5» 




V- jS-lv 

ssl 

J . 






Japan Posts Another Big Monthly Trade Surplus 


■ The Associated Prats 

TOKYO — Japan posted a 
wS3J3-bfflion trade, surplus in Au- 
.Vgjist as its exports continued to 
increase and its imports Jwpt de- 
dining, the finance Mixnstty re- 
ported Tuesday. ■ " 

The surplus was down man Ja ~ 
pan’s record monthly surplus of 
$5.02 hilli bn in June and from 
$4.60 btDicxt in July; " 

But the 15J-percew decline in 
imparts, couqMued With August 
1984. mme at. a time when Japan 
was under pressure from Ss trading 
partners to buy more foreign goods 
to hdp cut the continued trade sur r 

Pb £5ons totaled S10J3 biffion. 


while exports grew by 4.1 percent 
from August 1984 to $13^6 raBion. 

For the first eight mouths of the 
year, Japan’s surplus amounted to 
S25.8 dollars, less that the $17.8 
hiltirm recorded from January to 
August 1984. The surplus for aB cf 
last year amounted to $33,6 bEOioa. 

Under pressure from the United 
Stales, the Japanese government is 
working out a series of measures to 
expand domestic demand, increase 
imnorts and brine trade closer to a 


This . follows a recently an- 
nounced “action program” aimed 
at opening Japan’s market wider to 


r. President Ronald 


Reagan said that he had derided to 
carry out countermeasures against 
Japan if it not did not stop “unfair 
trade practices" regarding ciga- 
rettes, leather and leather shoes. 

But Japanese officials said that it 
would be extremely difficult for Ja- 
pan to meet Mr. Reagan’s demands 
because of politics and Japanese 
tax law. 

Meanwhile, the Kyodo News 
Service reported that Prime Minis- 
ter Yasuhiro Nakasone had sum- 
moned senior officials of the gov- 
ernment and his ruling liberal 
Democratic Party to start a series 
of meetings on how to improve 
rapidly deteriorating trade rela- 
tions with the Unitea Sates. 




' </ 


’firs 1 ’i ? 

' -fir 

: ^ 

* ' ■s* y * j 

; . ' y , 

r.'S 

/> 

ft*,**' 


INSIDE 

■ fsraeTs release of 129 Arabs 
means frealom may come soon 

for two Frenchmen. PageZ 

■ John BdnshPs last days wise 

marked by heavy drag t^wtt- 
nesses said.. P*8P 3 - 

■ The Titanic’s discovery was a 
by-product of U-S. N aty^ re - 
searxh. 

■ iWlent to 

sununit meeting with Mflthaas. 
Gorbachev could be “a starting 

point for progjress-T- Hage 4 
business/finance 
m Cons afe AB, a Swedish ofl- 
industiy- supplier, sought pro- 
taction from creditors. Page 9- 

■ The doDar fell agamst most 

currencies. Pa&ti- 

tomorrow 

The bank, for control of the 
U.S. Senate in 1986 has begun 
to take on a new look. 


ZJ.S. h Likely to Deny F- 15s to Saudis 


By David B. Qnaway 

Washington Post Scrvkx 

. WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration is expected to drop 
{dans to include 40 additional F-Ij 
combat aircraft in the new anns 
sales pwekng e tor Saudi Ara b ia that 
Congress will soon consider, ac- 
cording to congressional and State 
Department sources. 

US. officials said the decision 
reflected moon ting congressional 
opposition to the admimstration’s 
plan for major sales to Joidan and 
Saudi Arabia. . 

Together with two squadrons of 
F-16 or F-20 fighter jets and mobile 
surface-to-air 1-Hawk missScs for 
Jordan, the F-15s for Saudi Arabia 
are the most controversial items in 
two packages. 

According to an official , “As of 
now we have made a derision not 
to advance any Saudi request for 

aircraft.” ‘ . 

A denial of the long-standing 


Saiwti request for more F-15 air- 
craft would constitute the first time 
Washington, long the principal 
arms provider to the Saudi king- 
dom, has spumed King Fabd on a 
major weapons item. 

The United States has already 
sold the Saudi Air Farce 62 F-15 
aircraft, more than 100 F-5s and 
five Airborne Wanting and Control 
System aircraft. 

The derision could have adverse 
repercussions an the UJS. -Saudi 
military relationship, resulting in 
the Saudis buying either the 
French-made Mirage- 2000 or the 

Tornado made by Britain, Italy and 
West Germany. Both France and 
the consortium have been cam- 
paigning hard in the kingdom for 
the sale of their warplanes. 

: Larry Spettkes, the White House 
spokesman, insisted Friday that no 
final derision has been reached “in 
regard to the specifics on arms 
sales” to either Jordan or Saudi 
Arabia. 







Prime Minister Kaare Wflloch, left, is congratulated by Gro Harlem Brundtland- 

Reagan Sanctions, New Language 
Seem to Signal Major Shift in Policy 


By Bernard Gwertzman 

Nr*' York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan made his derision 
to impose limited sanctions against 
South Africa in order to avoid for- 
eign policy disarray abroad and po- 
litical humiliation at home, admin- 
istration officials say. 

They acknowledged that in 
adopting for the first time a set of 
modest punitive steps to press 
South Africa to renounce apart- 
heid, Mr. Reagan was shifting away 
from his oft-declared policy of 
“constructive engagement" to a 
new approach he called “active en- 
gagement.” 

Behind the change in language 
lay what appears to be a significant 
shift. in policy. With a straightfor- 
ward siaternem Monday from the 
president, the administration ap- 
peared to be switching from a po- 
licy of passive, sympathetic encour- 
agement toward one of active 
pressure on Pretoria. 

With this shift, Mr. Reagan al- 
tered views he has held for his en- 
tire presidency and, indeed, 
throughout his political career. But 


senior advisers said lhat any ap- 
pearance of indeciaveness that 
□tight be created by Monday’s ac- 
tions was the least damaging of the 
alternatives that were offered the 
president during the behind-the- 
scenes discussions last week. 

In describing the administration 
discussions, the officials said that if 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Mr. Reagan had held to to previ- 
ous policy and vetoed the pending 
legislation, the Congress would 
have overridden the veto, leaving 
the impression of an ineffective 
president. 

It would also have sent contra- 
dictory messages abroad, with nei- 
ther the South African whites nor 
blacks certain what was the intent 
of U.S. policy. 

The impression inevitably would 
have been created that Mr. Reagan 
supported the apartheid policy, of- 
ficials said, even though the admin- 
istration had repeatedly spoken out 
against the racial separation laws. 

The administration also decided 
against a blanket acceptance of the 


pending legislation. The officials 
said that doing that would have 
been viewed in Washington as a 
capitulation by Mr. Reagan and 
raised questions abroad about who 
was directing American foreign po- 
licy, the Congress or the White 
House. 

Bius last Friday, the decision 
was made by Mr. Reagan to accept 
a consensus proposal that was 
backed by Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz, Robert C. 
McFariane, the national security 
adviser, and Donald T. Regan, the 
White House chief of stall, that he 
accept most of the pending legisla- 
tion, making modifications in some 
cases, and accompany this with a 
firm statement pressing South Afri- 
ca to end its apartheid policy. 

By doing tins, the advisers told 
him. there was a good chance that 
the Republican leadership in the 
Senate would not push the sanc- 
tions bill to a vote, allowing Mr. 
Reagan to emerge stronger politi- 
cally and be seen abroad as in 
charge of foreign policy. 

The immediate strategy worked. 

(Continued on Page 2, Cot 7) 


EC Bid 

For Curbs 
Blocked 

U.K. Prevents 
Unified Stand 
On South Africa 

By Steven J. Dry den 

International Herald Tribune 

LUXEMBOURG — European 
Comm un ity foreign ministers at- 
tempted Tuesday to impose a limit- 
ed package of sanctions on South 
Africa, but unanimous agreement 
was blocked by Britain, EC offi- 
cials said. 

Britain objected to several mea- 
sures accepted by the other nine 
member nations, including the 
withdrawal of military attaches 
from South Africa, said Malcolm 
L. Rifldnd, the British minister of 
state for foreign affairs. 

Mr. Rifldnd said that more time 
was needed to study the implica- 
tions of a number of the sanctions. 
He rejected suggestions that Brit- 
ain's move would send the “wrong 
signals” to the Sooth African gov- 
ernment. He said that Britain was 
•already applying several sanctions 
against Pretoria. 

White Britain’s opposition pre- 
vented an agreement, the nine oth- 
er member nations — plus repre- 
sentatives of Spain and Portugal — 
said they would implement puni- 
tive actions and hoped Britain 
would change its mind. 

The sanctions agreed to by nine 
EC foreign ministers included a 
ban on domestic oQ sales to South 
Africa, new nuclear cooperation 
agreements, transfers of arms to 
paramilitary forces, the sale of elec- 
tronic equipment such as comput- 
ers for military purposes, and the 
discouragement of certain EC sci- 
entific and cultural activities in 
South Africa. 

The ministers did not disgn^s im- 
posing fuB-scale economic sanc- 
tions, such as halting aU bank loans 
or severing all trade, according to 
officials from several delegations. 

Hans-Dietrich Genscher. the 
West German foreign minister, 
said after the meeting that his 
country, which has opposed impo- 
sition. of extensive sanctions 
against South Africa, wfll abrogate 
its cultural agreements with Pre- 
toria and enforce stricter controls 
on ams sales to paramilitary forces. 

The proposed oil embargo was 
not expected to have much effect 
on South Africa, officials said. 
Only a small amount of oil that is 

(Contmoed on Page 3, CoL 5) 


China Takes New Approach to Filling Ranks 


In trade with the European 
Community, Japanese exports rose 
5J percent in August to $1 .58 bil- 
lion while imports declined 0.8 per- 
cent to $SIZ25 million, leaving a 
Japanese surplus of $767.84 mil- 
lion, down from $87920 million in 
Jnly. 

Exports to the Middle East woe 
up 23 percent to $966 million but 
imports dropped 29.6 percent to 
2.10 billion, leaving Japan with a 
$1.14 billion deficit. 

Japan ran a $509.64 mBHon 
trade surplus with China, down 
from $648.42 million in July. Ex- 
ports to China rose 85.9 percent to 
$1.06 billion. 


But two administration officials 
who briefed Senate staff members 
last week cm the results of an inter- 
agency study on U.S. anns transfer 
to the Middle East and Golf report- 
edly promised that the forthcoming 
arms package fra SandL Arabia 
would not include combat aircraft, 
according to one aide. 

A State Department official said 
it was still posable the Sandi F-15 
request would proceed as a sepa- 
rate item after Congress has re- 
solved the Jordanian aims issue 
and dealt with the less controver- 
sial sate of more Sidewinder air-to- 
air missies. Stinger ground-to-air 
missiles and other nuitaiy equip- 
ment to the Saudis. 

The Saudis have interpreted a 
letter delivered to King Fabd last 
Dec. 6 by Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger, pledging 
strong support for Sandi security, 

as a promise that the United States 

(Continued on Fs^e 2, CoL 4) 


By Daniel Southerland 

Workington Ptot Service 

SHENYANG, China — Chi- 
na’s leader, Deng Xiaoping, is 
looking to men half to age for 
leadership and new ideas. 

Li Changchun, 41, the Com- 
munist Party chief in the north- 

Deng’s China 

The New Communists 

Second of three articles 

eastern city of Shenyang, repre- 
sents the new type of leader 
whom Mr. Deng and to col- 
leagues in Beijing are trying to 
promote. 

In Shenyang's Communist Par- 
ty headquarters, Mr. Li's aides 
use an Apple computer to keep 
track of proposed candidates for 
party and government jobs. The 
party, Mr. Li said, is experiment- 
ing with new methods of selecting 
such candidates. 

The fact that Mr. Li wiD even 
discuss the party's methods of se- 
lecting such candidates and its 
use of a U.S-made computer rep- 
resents a new approach. A few 
years ago, party secretaries were 
not in the habit of talking with 
foreign reporters. Senior party of- 
ficials in Bering recently declined 
to be interviewed. 

Mr. Li became the Communist 
Party chief of Shenyang in ApriL 
He took over a party committee 
whose 13 other members each av- 
erage about 47 years old. Most cf 
them have college-level educa- 
tions. 

The new appointments were 
pan of a nationwide series of pro- 
motions aimed at bringing youn- 
ger, better educated officials into 
leadership positions. -The aim of 
the party was to retire by mid- 
summer older leading officials in 
Beijing and the provinces to a 
levd where 70 patent of such 
officials were under the age of 60. 

In keeping with its more youth- 
ful image, the party is also en- 
couraging people outside the par- 
ty to propose their own 
candidates for dty jobs. 

Personnel departments in vari- 
ous units have been adeed to sub- 
mil names for consideration. At 
the same time, the dty of Shen- 
yang advertised far qualified can- 
didates in local newspapers Ap- 



Ut W emhk tf ai Pott 

Li Changchun: The New Generation 


In Shenyang’s C ommunis t Party 
headquarters, Li Changchun’s aides use an 
Apple computer to keep track of proposed 
candidates for party and government jobs. 


plicants were given a basic 
knowledge test and another one 
in their field of expertise. The dty 
then named 44 young leaders to 
senior dty jobs. 

An official national weekly 
magarine. Outlook, praised the 
dty fra this effort In the past 
Outlook said, many dty govern- 
ment bureau chiefs and depart- 
ment heads rose to their positions 
amply because they were next in 
line for promotion. 

Or, it said, the dty party chirfs, 
whose job it is to select leaders, 
nominated these people for their 
jobs not because of their compe- 
tence but because of their politi- 
cal reliability and willingness to 
obey instructions. 

The magazine might also have 
added that promotions came to 
some officials because they were 
well connected personally with 
higher-ranking officials. 

Despite its image as a dty in 
the forefront of the country’s eco- 
nomic reforms, Shenyang faces 
some of the same problems that 
have traditionally plagued Chi- 


nese governments, both Commu- 
nist and Don-Communist One of 
those problems is corruption, 
which seems to be less rampant 
here than in the south or in the 
coastal cities but which is never- 
theless a problem. 

According to Mr. Li, one as- 
pect of that problem has been 
party and government officials 
who in 70 cases since the end of 
last year dedded to make the 
most of the more liberal econom- 
ic atmosphere created by the re- 
forms and go into business fra 
themselves. 

With no assets other than their 
briefcases, these cadres ended up 
interfering with the reforms in 
their efforts to make privateprof- 
irs, Mr. U said, and their “brief- 
case companies" had to be shut 
down. 

None of the experimentation 
in Shenyang means lhat the Com- 
munist Party is deliberately loos- 
ening its grip on power either in 
Shenyang or elsewhere. The par- 
ty’s power, either to make ap- 
pointments or to influence them. 


is one of the last it would ever 
give up. 

In Shenyang, most of the newly 
appointed officials are Commu- 
nist Party members. Of six depu- 
ty mayors, only one was not a 
party member, Mr. U said. 

During an hour-long interview, 
Mr. Li displayed a relaxed self- 
confidence. He answered ques- 
tions concerning his own career 
and methods used to recruit and 
promote officials. 

When it came to sensitive ques- 
tions such as the disciplining of 
party officials who had engaged 
m illegal activities or the promi- 
nent military region commander 
whom Beging has recently re- 
placed in us job. Mr. Li answered 
smoothly and without hesitation. 

Shenyang is clearly not an easy 
place to govern, A grim city full 
of smokestacks, it is overcrowded 
and frozen half the year. 

Perhaps because of the harsh 
climate, the people, who have a 
reputation for being hard work- 
ers. do not take easily to change 
or to reforms proposed by Beij- 
ing. The idea of giving up the old 
guaranteed subsistence system of 
wages for one based more on 
profits, incentives and productiv- 
ity does not appeal to everyone. 

Mr. Ii denial that corruption 
was a major problem among 
Communist Party officials in 
Shenyang, but he listed a number 
of “unhealthy tendencies" that 
needed to be fought at the end of 
last year. These activities were 
similar to those that seem to be in 
evidence elsewhere in the coun- 
try. 

to addition to those cadres who 
illegally opened private business- 
es, Mr. Li said, some other offi- 
cials engaged in “bureaucratism.” 
Two cadres had been removed 
from their positions last year, he 
said, for causing “great losses to 
the state.” He did not elaborate 
on how the two had damaged the 
state. 

The approach to corruption 
among Communist Party offi- 
cials seems to be a matter in 
Shenyang, as elsewhere in the 
country, of discipline being han- 
dled within the party itself. 

Some foreign observers, in- 
cluding diplomats, argue that 
corruption is less serious a prob- 
lem here than it is in some other 

parts of Asia. But some argue that 

unless it is better controlled, cor- 
ruption mil do great damage. 






Pi 




**■ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11,1985 


Plot Shows Thailand’s Fragility 

BittSoUdarity of Military Helped to Doom Coup Attempt 


By Barbara Crosscttc 

New York Times Service 

BANGKOK — Only last week, 
die Thai Foreign Ministry brought 
together a group of local reporters 
and foreign correspondents at a re- 
sort on the Gulf of Siam to talk 
about the country’s image. 

T hailan d the officials said, was a 
developing country struggling to- 
ward democracy. It was a country 
menaced cut the east by the Viet- 
namese war n«chipg in Cambodia. 
Its economy was being battered by 
falling commodify prices and rising 
protectionism abroad. Its evolving 
| civilian government was under con- 
stant pressure from an entrenched 
military establishment. 

, In short, Thailand needed sym- 
pathy and unders tan di ng from 
those who reported on it, the jour- 
nalists were told. 

On Monday morning, one of 
those correspondents died m a 
burst of shrapnel in central Bang- 
kok, one of the victims of an at- 
tempted military coup. The dam- 
age to the country's carefully 
nurtured image was sdf-ffiflicted. 

“We can never really be sure 
about Thailand,” a Malaysian 
scholar said recently. “It is our line 
of defense against the Vietnamese, 

] but its military officers seem to be 
more interested in politics.’' 

It may not be known for some 


time what really happened on tional and academic class has fre- 
Monday, or how deep the roots of quently expressed concern that the 
this coup attempt go into the histo- steady movement toward a civilian 
ty of mihtaiy dictatorship in Thai- government over at least five years 
land. The country has had 16 coups was sooner or later bound to pro- 
or attempted coups since a mflitary vote a response from a military 


government replaced the absolute 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


monarchy in 1932, and the at- 
tempted takeover Monday bore 
hallmarks of former seizures of 
powc. The movement toward a ci- 
vilian political system is recent. 

But it is possible that Monday's 
abortive takeover of the govern- 
ment of Prime Minister Prem Tm- 
sulanonda was a last gasp of a dis- 
affected officer class that was also 
thwarted in an attempt to grab 
power four years ago. Certainly mi 
Monday the solidarity of the coun- 
try’s military command structure 
was a major factor in the rapid 
defeat of the plotters. 

Another factor was the sdf -con- 


fident, almost casual way the 

spokesmen for the mflitary dealt 

with the public, reassuring the Thai never expressed doubts about the' 
people all day on television and prime minister's commitment to 


establishment, or factions of it, that 
sensed its power was being whittled 
away. 

But those fears might have been 
reduced, politicians and commen- 
tators say, had the government 
been stronger and more combative 
intheface of the military challenge. 
Last autumn, when rumors of an 
impending coop circulated with 
some regularity, Mr. Prem fell ill 
and spent several weeks away from 
his duties. 

His absence prompted Kukri t 
Pramqj, T hailand ’s elder statesman 
and Mr. Prem’s strongest civilian 
political supporter, to suggest in an 
interview that the head of govern- 
ment might be “too sensitive to be a 
really Hashing p rime minis ter" 

“He worts very hard, but I don’t 
think he can tolerate criticism,” 
Mr. Kukrit said. But be. like others. 


radio that everything was under 
control, and chiding the coup plot- 
ters for their inappropriate way of 
dealing with the acknowledged 
problems of this country. 

Thailand’s expanding profes- 


seeing the democratic process 
through. 

“If we can get through the next 
election, in 1987.” Mr. Kukrit said, 
“then I believe democracy will 
come to stay.” 



WORLD BRIEFS 


Metal Fatigue Found inJAL Bulkhead^ 


TOKYO (AP) — < 

. fatigue in a pressure waB on the., 
into a Tnfwmtam Ang. 12 kflfing 520 ) 

£■& PM*™ 

cause of the crash, which four persons survived. .He new spaper -said- 
imretigni xs from tte Aircraft Acddent &v^ Mo ^ro ^ 
found beadr marks, or traces of metal deterioration, an a dupm^oftbe 

tH T^pkstmduplicate was molded 

investigators could begin laboratory cxsfflinatio&s baffle twoociBg/ji. . 
bulkhead, which is strn althca^ste 


Grenade Attach Kills 9 in Nicaragua 


y wiaffe ij iiown mto a crowd-" ' 
has killed nine persons' 


MANAGUA (UH)-r- A i 

ed discotheque in northern Nicaragua, has killed mne persq na' an a ,-fc - 
wounded 25 m an attack that the authorities said might have be«r earned ffj 

the rify of Ocotal lSnOs 1 (213 Hlomewis) north of Managwi. <fae 

Nicaraguan soldier .was reported among those ktQed. . - j ' ' ‘ 

The authorities said they gttspectodtfaai the attack had be en ear ned out 
by the Nteaiaguan Demooatfr U.& SUppOTVThe 

group, which is seeking to overthrow the leftist Saxuinist government,, 
recently said, that' its fighters were “acting in. several cities and nave 
missions: to. caxxy out sabotage directly against the Saadhust Dflfejge- 
Committees.” . -• 


Vatican Attacks Use of PopeVCohimn 


Relatives of a Shiite freed Tuesday hoisted him to their shoulders in Tyre. 



Thai Honors Israel Releases Last 119 Lebanese; 
Said to Flee; Freeing of 2 Frenchmen Seen Likelj 


VATICAN CITY. (Renters) ^ The. .Vatican dondeameiLan Tuesday, 
the manner in which news syndicates owded by Rupert- Murdoch had- ; 
handled a column based cmpronouncements by Pope John PanZ H. 

The colonra, which is conyiledfromtfacpopdsceriDons. specchesnad 
messages, was first distributed, last week lfy thje 'Gmes of London and. ' 
News America syndicates. When the first ootonm^ rifled ‘TJn Afladthad,"' ' .. 
a ppe ared Saturday in the Madridne wspaper ABC,i t earned Adfemk j. 
copyright of the syndicates andtbe bymie “John Paul H”-m bold-face ff- 




It is inadmissible tfcttthe name afflK: Holy Falhercoold be used as a 
journalistic byline and involved in commac& 
gnor GxnlioNicolini, a deputyspokesitgan for the Vatican, All rng diamay 


Probe Begins 


hum 


Prime Minister Prem TmsidaiKHida, right, and General 
Plchitr Kuflaranijaya touring a Bangkok hospital where 
some wounded were taken after Monday's coup attempt 



UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

For life. Acadanic & Work Experience 

Dooraos for people who want to b« mom effective 

and secure In their Jobs or Professions. 


As you know 
npaoeftcaaiiiiiihs 
tmutwetet 
DulDooren 
operdoork 


£«n ■ BACHELOR’S. MASTER’S w DOCTORATE Degr« 
**l ullum, toui Ms inil «oi* xajMmmce. toliagr mimaWm 
C'oSUdrvgirtn Iqt yztjt fub nlittifcoiH[HiirtT«aw^ intSusl'tj] 
cqurem.Mnni<iSisa<ilMsin*u«>pene<Kas IM> acetrr couegn 
crvdn* no nurter «*,■■< tsfcan No raLjoncv ttkjuh od 
Our piadiiaies lecofiniSKl tor ineiroctiwvemsntsin twangs 

jno industry Wa Mia aja&i you - 1 eomptaing rOvr degree 
■eouiromnn Mitmil formal daSMS arunwin «i your onm poev 
anarvns. 


Sara defied iosuiiM on wort M* and ocaOamtfea penance lor 4 
no cost waiuafion 


Pacific Western University 

600 Mnooidvads Bhxt Los AngMoa. Ceflfomta 90049 . Oopt. 59 . USA. 


J 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Times Service 

BANGKOK — The leaders of 
Monday’s unsuccessful military 
coup in Thailand were reported 
Tuesday to have left the country, 
while the Thai government set up a 
committee of pohee officers to in- 
vestigate the incident 
The supreme military command- 
er, General Arthit Kamlang-ek, 
who returned abruptly Tuesday 
from a European tour, deflected 
questions about why no military 
officers were involved in the inves- 
tigation. 

It was repotted Tuesday that the 
accused leaders of the coop, a dis- 
missed army colonel and his broth- 
er, a former air force officer, had 
been allowed to flee the country in 
return for their surrender and the 
release of the head of the Thai Air 
Force, whom they were said to be 
holding at gunpoint 
The former officer named as the 
instigator of the coup attempt 
Manoon Roopkachom, was report- 
ed by mflitary officials to have been 
flown to Singapore with bis brother 
cm Monday evening on a Thai Air 
Force plane, following Ins surren- 
der at midafternoon. 

The escape was reported to have 
been arranged through negotia- 
tions sanctioned by the king, who is 
always a silent power behind politi- 
cal developments in Thailand. Ci- 
vilian politicians have begun to 
raise questions about why Colonel 
Manoon was not arrested. 

[Three leaders of the coup at- 
tempt are in Singapore and have 
asked fra political asylum in the 
United States. The Associated 
Press in Washington reported the 
State Department as announcing 
Tuesday. Bernard Kalb, the de- 
partment spokesman, said that the 
Reagan administration was review- 
ing their applications. He did not 
identify the three leaders.] 

In addition to conducting a for- 
mal inquiry, the government of 
Prime Minister Prem Tinsolanonda 
is allowing the Bangkok press to 
pursue its own investigative report- 
ing of the incident, free of censor- 
ship. Reporters say this macks a 
significant change from other peri- 
ods Of national emergency. 


United Press International 

BEIRUT — Israel released its 
last !19 Lebanese prisoners from 
the Atlit prison on Tuesday, and 
the Shiite Moslem militia Amal 
said it had cleared the way for two 
Frenchmen kidnapped in Beirut to 
go free “soon." 

Wearing jogging suits issued by 
their captors, tne prisoners crossed 
into Lebanon at the border check- 
point of Rosh Hamkrah, where 
they were met by Red Crass offi- 
cials. 

The group, which inducted Pal- 
estinians, were among the more 
than 700 whose freedom was de- 
manded in June by the hijackers of 
a Trans World Airlines jet. 

“The 119 released today were the 
last prisoners the ICRC visited in 
Atlit,” said a spokesman for the 
International Committee of the 
Red Cross in Beirut. “We will 
doubtless inform the Amal move- 
ment of this facL” 

Some reports had said that three 
prisoners would remain in Israel 

The former detainees rode 
through the villages of southern 
Lebanon in a column as residents 
tossed rice. Some Shiite militiamen 
thrust weapons into the captives 


hands while others fired into the 
air. 

“If these are the last Lebanese 
prisoners, Amal understands that 
the two Frendunen will be released 


dais said they were not part of the 
“arrangement” 

Mr. flamdan said Tuesday that 
Amal did not know winch group 
was bolding Mr. Kauffmans and 


use dm icahinm, he said, mid that . “ahaoftrtrfy ^ ? 
the part of mfybpdy, -.of esdusrre rights.” /- 


WASHINGTON 
on Tuesday to rinse 


(AP) ~The Reagan a dminist ration asked Congress 
the n&tkjnaTdebt finnt above Si triHkMi, saying that 


soon,” said AK Ham dan, an Amal ' Mr. Seurat; bat had agreed in Jane vititoat new borrowing authority die Treasury wooldbe broke by Get 

— 1 - that they Wcatid be freed whenlsra- 15. ; .-I /• '-i.. 

d released the last of 1,000 Ldba- J °bn J. Niefaenke, acting assistant TreaRary secretary for domestic 
nese prisoners. finance, told a^ Smalt subcommittee: that ; the increase in the debt fimit 

Amal sources have said the Mo»- was ‘"merely a recognition” (^ obligations ahxady m&de by the j 
lem fundamentalist Hezhallah merit Heasked that the Senateapproyo, withoutj 


The Am a I spokesman refused to 
provide more details, but sources in 
the militia smd they would be re- 
leased within 48 hours. 

Jean-Panl Kauffmans, 41, a cor- 
respondent for the Freaich news 
weekly L'Evenement de Jeudi, and 
Michd Seurat, 37, a researcher at 
Beirut’s Institute for Middle East 


Affairs, were kidnapped May 22 as 
they drove from Beirut Interna- 


tional Airport. 

ry Seurat, Mr. Seurat’s wife, 


Mary 

said that an Amal official had told 
her that her husband would not be 
released Tuesday, but “in the next 
two days.” 

Nabih Beni the Amal leader, 
contacted the French Embassy in 
Beirut while the release was under 
way, but officials declined to give 
any details of tbe talks. An embas- 
sy spokesman said he had no infor- 
mation about tbe two Frenchmen. 

Two French diplomats, seven 
Americans and a Briton also . are 
missing in Lebanon, but Amal offi~ 


movement was holding the two 
men, but officials of the pro-Irani? 
an movement refused comment On 
the reports. 

Israel transferred about 1,00(1 
detainees to the AtSt.prison near 
Haifa as it was withdrawing from 
Lebanon in April The United 
States and the Red Doss protested 
the move as a violation of an inter- 
national agreement - 

Israel has gradually released the 
prisoners over the last two months, 
maintaining that no deals were 
made with the United Stales or 
with the miHtifltwwi who hijacked 
the TWA plane to Beirut. 

Meanwhile, Syrian observers 
tried to patch together a cease-fire 
in the Palestinian refugee camp 
Buij al-Brajneb in southern Beirut, 
where sniper fire, continued 
throughout the day. 


J. 


.1986 


bodgeton 

' Iairy Speakes, tbe White House spokesman, said the adminirtratkffl 
has contingency plans to shut down gov errimiMt ag encies pnd “woakfbe 
to do so if therewas not congressional action to rinse the * ’ * 


Beirut Shiites Meet With Palestinians 


New York Times Service 

BEIRUT — Lebanese Shiite and 
Palestinian leaders met here Tues- 
day in a new effort to end a week of 
fighting around a Palestinian camp 
in southern Beirut. 

Nabih Beni leader of the Shiite 
Moslem mflitin Amal held >-tTks 
with delegates from the Palestine 
National Salvation Front who 
came from Damascus to try to end 
violence at the Bur} al-Brajneh 
c amp in which 40 persons have 
died and 130 have been injured. 

Amal fighters and the Palestin- 
ian defenders of the camp, which 
has a population of about 35,000. 


Amal and the Palestinian front 
provided 10 observers each, and 
one Syrian Army officer was de- 
ployed in each outpost 

The Damascus-based front con- 
asts of six guerrilla factions op- 
posed to the Palestine liberation 
Organization chairman, Yasser 
Arafat. In June, the group reached 
agreement with Amal on measures 
that ended almost a month of artQ- 
loy and rocket exchanges in and 
around Beirut's three Palestinian 
camps — Sabra, Chatfla and Bur j 
al-Brajneh. 

Syria, which backs the front 


were still observing the provisions 
of that agreement 


Tuesday's accord, the fourth 
truce arranged near Borj al-Braj- 
neb in a week, was broken almost 
immediately. 

Much of the friction has been 
attributed to a war of words be- 
tween Amal and the Palestinians. 
In statements to the media, each 
side has accused the other of re- 
sponsibility for the continuing vio- 
lence. 

Amal maintained that pro-Ara- 
fat dements in Burj al-Brajneb 
were keeping tensions high, while 


PARIS (NYT) — The president - 
of the French national railroad sys- 
tem resigned Tuesday, taking fall , 
responsibility for a series of recent 
acadents in wirich 83 peopIe have 
been killed. . ; : 

Audit Chadeau, 58, bead of the 
Sodfcte National des Chemins de 
Per Francois, or SNCF, handed. a/ 
letter of resignation to Transport : 
Minister Paul Qmfis-. He. wrote: ■ 
“As chairman of the SNCF board, i: 
( most : objectively bear the re^xm- 
ability fra tbese acwdentSL” . V .. L- 

Mr Ghadeau .is a professional' 
civil servant who had previously ■ 
been chief government officer ra 
three different departments of 
France. He resigned from the 
SNCF as the company was starting 
a major inquiry into , operational 
and safety procedures used by the 
state-owned railroad system. Initial 
investigations indicated that hu- 
man error was a^ factor in at least 
three crashes. , - . 



(itfl 








j- 


* 3 .] 


/ft- 




fw -1 








•H.., :tv 


,<** - .i - 

*.fiV 

.1 

V: 

- . ^ i--— • 
- . 


o-- 



i^jrtTskP 


isfricp J 


3* 


v-" 


tariSK- :v 


iVL- 




6Ss^ - 







* :i?A - 
td-". 


Andr6 Chariean 




-- -v 




Japan to Expand Anti-Sub Air Fleet 


TOKYO (AP) — : Japan notified the United States on Tuesday of plans 
to expand its fleet of P-3C Orion anti-submarine patrol planes from the 
present 45 to 75 in the next few years. 

The Japanese military has purchased seven Lockheed-built P-3Cs and 
built 38 under license since 1981. The notification was given in notes 
exchanged between Foreign Minster Shintaro Abe and the U.S. ambas- 
sador, Mike Mansfield. 




ag a in st Mr. Arafat, sponsored the 

coo tmued^to cccfaan accor ^ ^ sent a number of army Palestinian "statements “asserted flip Rpnnrrl 

officers to Brim, to wpgvhe ig that Ami .« comtorng , » J 1 or tne ttecord 

new cease-fire implemeniation. ^ ^ ^ paign to force the Palestmians to AnatoB Karpov and his chaflcsger for the world doss 

-r. .. . . A mernbtt- of the delegation. Fa- flee the camps so (hat do Palestra- Gary Kasparov, drew the thindgaine of their tide rematch after amoves 

. The two sides posted observers del Shroura, said after ihe meeting tens wouldr^i^ in Bonn’s most- TnesdwmMoscbw. a ucrcmaicnaner grooves 

m five outposts around the camp, with Mr. Bern that the Palestinians Iy Shiite southern suburbs. iw. imu. j— * * ... . „ 


fit 




•ra-.r 11 - 

if:- -*t 


“r 




In London 

there's a friendly hotel. 
You'll call it your club. 


THEPOKTMAN 
INTER • CONTINENTAL 



THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL 4 


mJNTER- continental hotels 



22 Portman Square. (441) 486-5844, Telex: 261526 
For reservations calk Paris: |0D 742-07-92, 
Frankfurh (069)230561, .Amsterdam: (020) 262021 



U.S. Expected to Deny F-15 Jete to Saudis 


< *®**8 Der 60, was in critical amditionTues- 

after faffing down a flight of ^ stairs over the weekend, a spokesman for 
bertortiles and intraior decoration company said in London. (Reuters) 

01 Cbae ^ leaded emergency powerafor 
mothra six mtmths on Tuesday, according to a decree in the nffiriki 


(Continued from Page 1) 
would sell the additional F-15 air- 
craft . 

Saudi sources said that the ad- 
ministration subsequently had in- 
formed them of a delay because of 
the Middle East arms review begun 
in January, but assured them that 
the aircraft would be suppilied 
eventually. 

A briefing on the study given to 
three House committees in July ar- 
gued strongly in lavra of continued 
arms sales to the Sandis because 
!*5audj Arabia is the only country 
in the Gulf region which is both 
friendly to U.S. interests and capa- 
ble of playing an important ration- 
al role.” 

When the Carter administration 


first proposed selling 62 F-15 : 
ers to Saudi Arabia in the 
1970s, brad and its supporters in 
Congress strongly opposed the 
sale. They argued that the sophisti- 
cated jet would be a serious poten- 
tial threat to the Jewish state in the 
event of another Arab-Isradi war. 

The original deal was approved, 
55-44. by the Senate after acrimo- 
nious debate. 

A condition for congressional 
approval of the first F-15s was a 
Saudi promise not to base them at 
Tabuk, in the northwestern comer 
of the kingdom and within easy 

range of IsraeL 

The Saudis are known to be 
shopping for an advanced aircraft 
to station at Tabuk to replace their 


obsolete, British-made Li ghtning 
aircraft now based than. Both the 
British and French have tbe advan- 
tageover 
to offer an 

could be based at Tabuk. 

U.S. proponents of the F-15 sate 


gazette. 


fReutenf jfr . 

— .... Sji ' * 7 — 

- *-i-M _ 


mSsdSiE Bolicy Shift on South Africa 

*be.taffthe Sh aath,. 

dons. 


-i ~ 


• 


A— 


latfeue 
and dfaeaa 


• a complete ant} penonaiBM chedc-ufT 
■ an tnamtnuaiieeti creaonenr used on 
the very latest 'n«J*cai L l un g own ilt 
tecnrwques 

■ a magrariceni setting on me snores of Laine 
Geneva at Motweux. ettmaac nson 
Specially indicated foi. 

stress, general pnednes. deoeaxe m pnyUeaf and 
mental actrvrty. loss d memory and concentration, 
obesity, metaboic diiorderj, organic dbews. 
general revnaluaeon. 


m 


For further Information, ptww Wntaa 
Zl. rut de Bon-Pon 
CH- 1820 HADNTREUX 
•feu 021 /M ST« we* 4 S 3 1 U exlo cn 


WB& Qinique Bon Port 


MU 


Montreux-Switzerland 


ued to buy UiL aircraft because 
Washington would have more le- 
verage over their use and basing in 
the kingdom. 

A French company, Dassanlt- 
Breguet Aviation, was reported in 
the European press last spring to be 
dose to arranging the sale of 46 
Miiagc-2000s in return for Saudi 
ofl. But tbe oil barter deal has never 
been concluded, partly because die 
to accept only 





The sincerity of Mr. Reagan's South Africa’s, apartheid reforms 
new policy was immediately dial- and gave the. impression that he 


company was 
roughly 50 percent tit the cost is cfl 
and warned tbe rest in cash. 

British Aerospace, with strong 
help from the British government, 
has been trying to persuade the 
Saadis to purchase 20 Tornado jets 
and 26 Hawk tramer-fighters. 


lenged by some of his critics. 

Several House Democrats, in- 
cluding Speaker Thomas P. O'Neill 
of Massachusetts, reacted negative- 
ly- But the net result of the an- 
nouncement made Monday by Mr! 
Reagan was to bring the admhiis- 
tration's South African policy 
mud) closer to tire American main- 
stream, as expressed by Congress, 
which had been poised to vote only 
slightly more onerous sanctions 
than those chosen by Mr. Reagan. 

The main difference between the 
Sanctions announced by Mr. Rea. 


was idafivdy^ uncritical of the i 
emmem of President Keter W. Bo- 
tha. 

Monday's moves once agamun- 
denecned what has been apparent 
for some tune — the wflHngness of 
Mr. Reagan, to modify or reverse a 
policy when faced with , imposing 


| 4LtV r, '~ 

ini P*t>fr * *■?* 


Hr- T - W- 


Mr : 

struck to 

site than later, when he warper- ' jo 
suaded they did riot have wide sup-' *» ' 
port. ; 

The administration’s switch on ■ 





U.S. Rejects N.Y. Atom Baa 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The federal 
Department of Transportation re- 
fused Monday to block the truck- 
ing of spent nuclear fuel through 
New York City. It was the first 
ruling on a request from a local 
government 
and routes set 
fra shipping hazardous material 


and those that were in the MB ^onth Africa was relatively snddeaL 
that had cleared the House and is Of fluently as Thursday, the-, State 
awaiting action by rite Senate, is P^^fi^tspttosmmTOsassert- 
that the bill calls for Mr. Reagan to sanctions would be “counr 

rmpose additional sanctions if pro- ter P r °*tetive” and only haribi ti* 
gress toward ending apartheid is atutndc ti» Sooth African n^ 
ooi recorded in a year. 

The bill also mandates an iim^ ^Bra in an intentiew, Chestcr A- 
dtate ban on the inmort rf gold assistant secwtaiyjdf 

president fra African affairs, said that 




we 




Krugerrands, while - _ T _ m ^ 

to bypass regulations railed fra consultations with allies 

«t by the department &st to sec if it was not a violation i va ? ab J e ^^cniatives, chose-to take 
ra the General Agreement On Tar- tend aunffiedmessaff 

iffs and Trade. w all South Africans about ^nw> 


A 


y* 


•= 


■WELOMitfT^oocfonnf 

MMIJWGflfE UHiNffaSeuBfliKai) 


« orx Mqu nm hKs 
ywmicKiSH^.SM^ 
liSll* f« M Ctta 

fltoo 

WlMnBW. 

gso awffrafe causa app 


Tl 


osl committee omrlar jq 


“wise men” groups h$ had created irmSw bec ^ lsc h ^ viewed** 
on Central AmSS and on SeMX to alto tire pen^ leg- 

rmswt^ in MWMrt. . tslatirai to fit what Me, shwhi 

vented. Bat more important, 

toarmearSL 


K¥r, 


ntifBe in previous years, to seek 
wider poetical support for 
SouthAfrican policy. 

ti» substantive conces-' 









*1 

N 


! vit 


3®a 




% 




Brr 

*e- 18 


/. 


t 


r.^.vt v M-iffMyFK»a . 


** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11- 1985 



Page 3 


* 


P*n* 

tofciW 
al 


'*** 

•“nafae 

'flaisiisg < . 


crease 

*«iC£*s 

to*eh(j 

aed«ifc 
*>y Beg* 
aLfeSf 
'■teasdj 

~^3nas2. 
and ‘ant 

‘'raisiii. 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


> 8 . Prison: 


ives 

experts, say Georgia 
prohaNyias the most advanced 
program of “calibrate! senteno- 
.wg’ m the United States, giving 
Np alternatives to prison o? 
probation. The "Washington Post 
reports. - 

One. aich alternative is ‘imen- 
probation,”: during which 
the probation officer m»w>g at 
least Eve unannounced visits a 
week at home or work, as com^ 
pared to the usual maximum of 
once a week Probationers are 
subject, to curfew and to root 
tests for drags or alcohol, and 
can be put behind bars without 
reditapie. The cost is about S5 a 
day, , compared to about S25 a 
day for prison inmates, and is 
boroe. entirely -by fees charged 
the probationer. 

-Another alternative is “shock 
incarceration,” 90 days in a com- 


... inevex 

> m pnsonbefore. Regiment- 
ed by guards who are all former 
nuHtary personnel, the young 
felons, h ea d s shaved, rise at 5:30 
A.M. for a long day of back- 
breaking Geld WOlk, marriiinfl 
and cahstharics. The i dea is to 
gjve them a short, intense taste of 
prison life without its permanent 
scars, enough to discourage them 

from risking a return, engage- 
ment When released, they go on 
probation, usually intensive. 

Although Georgia’s program 
is tOO hew to have flnwwrmlatwl 
meaningful statistics, prelum- 
nary results indicate that about 
one in four intensive probation- 
ers commits hew nim«, com- 
pared to roughly (me in two ex- 
convicts. So far, only one in 36 
young men given shock incarcer- 
ation has come back for more 


Short Takes 

Americans fast year threw 
away 99 billion paper and plastic 
dishes bonis and nds, 16 
diapers, 2 billion razors 
and razor blades, 1.6 thQiaa pens 
and 348 Bullion lighters, accord- 
ing to Waste Age, a magazine for 
the landfill industry. 

Providence, Rhode Island; is 
putting the pavedover juncture 
of the Woonasqtiatscket and 
Moshassuck Rivera, which form 
the Provider River, out in the 
open and putting the 
tracks; which currently cht 
the State House from downtown, 
underground. The cost to thie 



■/. . BMMvUn 

THIS IS FUN? — Mtchefle Bowman, 6, seems to doubt 
the enjoyment of riding down a watersEde in Chester- 
field, Virginia, with Penny Groome, of Richmond. 


taxpayers of transfanmng the 
heart of the city is estimated at 
S145 million in state and federal 
funds. 

Shorter Takes: U.S. fanners 
grew about 20 percent more po- 
tatoes this year than they usually 
sell, and the result is a glut which 
is expected to drive the price of a 
10-pound (45-kflogram) bag of 
spods, which was 70 cents or 
morelast year and has reached as 
high as 81 JO, down as Sow as 22 
cents. . . . Ten states now have 
Made judges on their supreme 
courts — Alabama, California, 
Florida, Maryland, Mississippi, 
North Carolina, New York, 
Pennsylvania, South Carolina 
and Vir ginia — compared to five 
states in 1980. ... The federal 
government's General Account- 
ing Office says that on the aver- 
age, while federal workers have 
higher, pensions and longer 
leaves than private-sector em- 
ployees, overall benefits are su- 
perior oulsde erf government be- 


cause of 10 to 18 percent higher 
pay. 


Chiseling on Words 
Engraved on Manorial 

Washington's Jefferson Me- 
morial has parts of the second 
and last paragraphs of the Decla- 
ration of Independence engraved 
on a wall, but five of the original 
words are mksmg . The word 
“that” before the list of unalien- 
able rights was dropped, “Unit- 
ed Colonies” became “Colonies” 
and “pledge to each other our 
lives” was cut down to “pledge 
our lives.” 

“The architects took some po- 
etic license," says Sandra Alley, a 
spokeswoman for the National 
Park Service. *Tve also heard 
that the cha nges were *n«Hi» to 
save space.” 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


John F. Enders, a Virologist, Dies; 
Research Paved die Way lor Vaccines 


By Lawrence K. Altman 

Nine York Tima Service 

NEW YORK Dr. John R 
Enders, 88 , a virologist whose dis- 
coveries paved the way for vaccines 
against poKo, measles, German 
measles and. mumps as wefl as to 


medicine in 1972, was killed Satur- died Saturday in Palo Alto, CaB- 
day in an automobile accident in ' forma. He suffered a stroke earlier 
Winchester, England, police in this summer. 


Britain said. 

Dr. Porter, who was to have re- 
tired in October, received the No- 
bel prize Jointly with Dr. Gmald 
Maurice Fridman of the RockefeL 


Ctudea 

kirFl^ 

. T-- Ci' ii- 

p/M-BSf 


X r M- 




■ 

. .Inf ,Jl> 
- & 


SiSSfi toUriS? in N. Yodc a„. 

Connecticut. He was the recipient . 

of a Now prize in mt&ine in bodydcttcls «hcn hvmg cbemca] 

, 0-4 r systems. 

Sdoailft credited to discover- - lie wo men described the spo- 



ies, which were made at Harvard 
University, as being among the 
most important in anting medi- 
cine in the 2 Qtb century. 

Dr. Enders was a basic research- 
er who was perhaps best known for 
the modem techniques of tissue 
culture. The method, in which cells 
are grown in test tubes, was first 
developed by other researchers at 
Yale University in 1907, according 
to medical historians. 

Scientists had long sought ways 
to grow polio vims in test tubes, 
and some had limi ted success. Dr. 
Enders is credited with developing 
, techniq ues that made h possible to 
j>‘ grow not only the poho virus, but 
also many other viruses. 

He did it by examining through a 
microscope human cells grown in 


dfic chemical, called an immune 
globulin, that does the detecting. It 
is the major component of gamma 
globulin, the part of blood that 
contains the chemicals tha t defend 
the body against invading germs. 

The chemical is a protein mole- 
cule made up of thousands of at- 
oms strung together in dusters that 
somewhat resemble grapes and in 
chains of amino acids, lie beads in 
a necklace. 

Jofamiy Desmond, 65, 

Singer With Glenn MDler 

LOS ANGELES (LAT) — John- 
ny Desmond, 65, an actor and sing- 
er who rose to fame during the Big 
Band era as a lead vocalist for the 
Glenn Miller Orchestra, died of 
cancer Friday in Los Angete. 

Mr. Desmond, bom Giovanni 




lest tubes pd then recogmzmg that Alfredo de Simone in Detroit, 
viruses injured .cells in distinctive feme during World War Q, 

ways. By studying the patterns of r ecording a number of hits with the 
such ceU injury, he could distin- Miller hand, and was called a “En- 
guish one virus from another. ropean Tokyo Rose” because of his 

Ultimately the t e ch n iques tod to performances that were aired 
advances in growing tumor viruses worldwide. 






and to the recognition that cancer 
cells formed clumps, a phenome- 
non called focus formation. 

A paper that be published in 
1 949 with Dr. Fred C. Robbins and 
Dr. Thomas H_. Writer,’ then his 
students, described the growth of 
polio viruses in embryonic tissue. 


His manager, and producer, Lou 
Reda, said: “He sang an the popu- 
lar songs in German and French 
and Italian and it was broadcast 
out so the enemy could tune it ia 
He was the other Frank Sinatra.” 

Although Mr. Desmond’s early 
fame faded after the war ended, he 


Meese Urges BelushVs Drug-Filled Lost Days Described 

Congress 
To Overhaul 
Aliens Laws 


In addition to a prodigious out- 
put of more than 250 papers, in 
1945 Mr. Polya wrote “How to 
Solve It," which explains in non- 
technical terms how to think about 
invention, discovery, creativity and 
analysis. 

His tingle most important work 
was “Problems and Theorems in 
Analysis,” co-authored with Gabor 
Szegp and published in 192$. 

Mr. Polya made contributions in 
a variety of mathematical fields. 
Probability theory contains a “Po- 
lya criterion;" complex function 
theory contains “Polya peaks,” 
“the Polya representation” and the 
“Polya gap theorem;" combinator- 
ics contains the “Polya enumera- 
tion theorem” arid the Polya Prize 
in Combinatorial Theory and Its 
Applications, given by the Society 
for Industrial and Applied Mathe- 
matics. 

■ Other deaths: 

Hermann J. Weigaad, 92, a re- 
nowned scholar and critic of Ger- 
man literature and a professor 
emeritus at Yale University, where 
be had taught for 32 years, died 
Tuesday in Branford, Connecticut 

Paul P. Evnrid, 97, who played a 
key role in development of the X- 
ray analysis of crystal structure 
now widely used in chemistry and 
physics, died Aug. 22 at his home in 
Ithaca, New York, after a long 21- 
ness. 

George W. MacRae, 57, acting 
dean of the Harvard Divinity 
School, died Friday, apparently of 
a heart attack, in Brighton, Massa- 
chusetts. 


By Robert Pear 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Attorney 
General Edwin Meese 3d has urged 
Congress to overhaul U.S. immi- 
gration laws, while strongly object- 
ing to key features of a bill pro- 
posed by Representative Peter W. 
Rodino Jr., chairman of the Judi- 
ciary Committee. 

Mr. Meese said Monday that he 
and President Ronald Reagan were 
“committed to comprehensive im- 
migration reform,” including pen- 
alties again s i employers who know- 
ingly hire Illegal aliens. 

But Mr. Meese criticized the biH 
drafted by Mr. Rodino, a New Jer- 
sey Democrat, oo the ground that it 
was too generous in offering legal 
«atn « ? to illegal aliens who are al- 
ready in the United States. 

Mr. Rodino’s measure would au- 
thorize the attorney general to offer 
l«» g?) status to illegal "lien s who 
entered the United States before 
Jan. 1, 1982, and have lived in the 
United States continuously “in an 
unlawful status" since that time. 

The attorney general, who testi- 
fied before the House Judiciary 
Subcommittee on Immigration, 
said that the cutoff date should be 
putiied back to Jan. 1, 1980. to 
assure that the legalization pro- 
gram was open only to aliens who 
had set down “roots” in the United 
States. 

The 1982 eligibility date, he said, 
would be “unfair to those persons 
who have respected the legal immi- 
gration system” and “would serve 
to attract even more illegal mi- 
grants." 

Comprehensive legislation to 
curb the influx of illegal aliens has 
been passed twice by the Senate 
and once by the House of Repre- 
sentatives since 1982, bnt the bills 
ultimately died in Congress. In 
July, che Senate Judiciary Commit- 
tee approved another version of the 
legislation, which includes the 1980 
eligibility date for illegal 
seeking legal status. 

Mr. Meese also criticized provi- 
sions of the Rodino lull that would 
establish a special office in the Jus- 
tice Department to investigate 
complaints of employment dis- 
crimination against legal aliens and 
refugees. Hispanic groups warn 
that such discrimination might in- 
crease because of the bill’s ban on 
hiring illegal aliens. 

“We endorse the spirit of those 
provisions, but not the specific 
mechanisms.” Mr. Meese said. He 
said the anti-discrimination mech- 
anisms in the Rodino bin might 
eventually lead to a presidential 
veto. 

The administration, Mr. Meese 
said, also would insist that any im- 
migration bill indude provisions 
making it easier for fanners to 
bring in aliens as legal temporary 
workers, to offset the expected toss 
of illegal alien labor. 

“Permanent and temporary 
guest worker programs are neces- 
sary,” Mr. Meese said, for both 
economic and political reasons. On 
this issue, he said, the administra- 
tion is trying to negotiate a com- 
promise acceptable to farm worker 
unions and to fruit and vegetable 
growers who have depended on il- 
legal aliens to pick crops. 


Draft Register 
Given Probation 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — David 
Wayte, a draft rests ter whose 
conviction was upheld by the 
VS. Supreme Court, was sen- 
tenced Tuesday to six months 
of “house arrest” at his grand- 
mother's home and barred from 
doing community service. 

U.S. District Judge Terry 
Hatter said the unusual ban on 
community service during Mr. 
W ayte’s probation would be a 
grave punishment for a socially 
conscious activist. 

Mr. Wayte, 24, who works at 
a school for disabled adults and 
at a shelter for the homeless in 
Pasadena, contended be was 

prosecuted only because be ac- 
tively protested the draft. Al- 
though about 500,000 men 
failed to comply with renewed 
draft registration in 1980, only 
12 woe prosecuted. 


The paper, which appeared in t he remained popular as a ballad smg- 
. ~ ■ — <* malting <t nrens of radio and 


S#s\ 


JjV-' 


er, 

television appearances. 

George Polya, 97, 
Researcher in Mathematics 
LOS ANGELES (LAT)— 
George Polya, 97, a mathematician 
who made fundamental coatribtt- 





", r 




journal Science, is conridered a 
■l andmar k in virologfcal research. 

It also led the three men to share 
a Nobel prize in 1954. 

In c on t inuing that research. Dr. 

Enders and other scientists found 
ways not only to grow thepoBo and 

other viruses but also to tame them . . 

^Ttbcy could be used as safe and Irons to a wide range of topia and 
rffSSewSdnes. j to the theory of problem solvmg, 

The vaccines that were derived 
from Dr. Endec’s research ted to 
the virtual eradication of poliomy- 
elitis and measles in developed 
countries. , 

The ceU culture techniques also 
allowed others to make fimd amen - 
tal advances in biok®r, bjodmms- 
■try and genetics. Those genetic en- 
gineering techniques that rwy on 
tissue culture to produce biologi- 
cally active substances are based on 

work done by Dr. Enders and his 
■team. 

Rodney R. Porter, 67, 

Biochemist at Oxford 
NEW YORK (NYT) -- Profes- 
sor Rodney R. Porter, 67, of Ox- 
ford University, a biochemist who 
was awarded the Nobel pnze m 


***** 

HOTEL METROPOLE 
GENEVE • 

A PRIVILEGED PLACE 
The only Grand Hold looted In 
the heart of Geneva’s business 
and shopping center 

54 Qaat CMnl Gtdttn . 
1211 Geaeva-3 - - 

TeU <02/211.1344 . 
TeJoc 42LS50 




MIS 1st 

Mftsxa* 

VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT 

UAi art. odor. Men vroefa* l»di SO t. Evemg 
80 F A 120 F - eptn 12 to KUO pm. d Sunday. 
I’Aite* * SouWt, t* r. ti> Jw. 2 JJZW. 

PRUNffiR TRAKT7R 

16 Am. tfeorttugo, 75116. 50089.12. 

Oomd Mcnfc* end Tuediy. 

A nedaon cl quote sacdood tar • gemmae, 
ten fa- to W2S« men* 3SM80 ff. 

MBC4* 

mmiY+isme 

JO GOLDENBBtG 

7. Be dot toman. 88720.14 or 8PJ03? totamU 
» ears kMfi tu In er g royis* tee 
Jen* emK aned bnt. patron*. *Ad arp, 
mtod admen. Ktatond C*n> en»y cfay. 

IE CHAMBORD 

17. n* WOtnaa Tab 7/77117. 
ScutoWmt alfamca eirrHtim Qnaebrowrer. 

LEMANOIR 

Ntont 

4. nm da TE^H. Tdi 62X0441. 
dns nuai QL Sc*. Open Sundry lunch. 


LA PETITE CHAISE 

TTtnoii cuisine of rt* efcktf wbuM hi fara. 

Mn M*ja Mr » mius. 


IOBCNSW1 


iio*uwHui*fa.i*ga n i — w w w 

■I 3<uk L*h l Onm. I M**— e. M l Raqn 
Spnta Mm F IB bn. ■d.G'ACMfc 


METHUSELAH’S BRASSERIE 

mlMni bo-. 37 Haano Snn. Mam Sum 

t«L 222 D«24. "A alar Ml ef w«i. a VWhh, U 
ai rdm.- Monlii end Sunday Ink 


VfMU 


PASTS a* 


LA CALAVADOS 

40 An finra-Iw-drSaitiiB. 73H1-39. Op* 
d t*f. M 4* pan J* Tumor. Trodaand Cum. 


KStVANSARAY 

TwWi L M ip ioda i. Id* bar. bar wtioed 
m«Ma4 WI».IUMr.«.TdiSaMA 
rn dtewd Opm Noo»3pm. & bps, 
1 am, urnafS Suday. Opm hdh±vL 


By Robert W. Stewart 

Las Angc/a Tima Sewn* 

LOS ANGELES — In the days 
before be died, a drawn and tired 
John Behi&hi repeatedly accepted 
drug injections from his accused 
murderer, Cathy Evelyn Smith, and 
encouraged his friends to join him. 
two of Mr. Belushi's companions 
have testified. 

On the first day of Miss Smith's 
long-delayed preliminary hearing 
on Monday. Leslie Maiks-Moritz, 
28, a former clothing store clerk, 
and Nelson Lyon, 46, an advertis- 
ing and television writer, provided 
new details of Mr. Belushi’s unre- 
lenting use of drugs the week be- 
fore he died of a heroin and cocaine 
overdose on March 5, 1982. 

Miss Smith, 38, a former singer, 
is being prosecuted for second-de- 
gree murder and 13 counts of fur- 
nishing heroin and cocaine to Mr. 
BelushL a television and film star 
who was 33 when be died. The 
bearing is to determine whether 
there is sufficient evidence to try 
her on the charges. 

Responding to questions from 
Deputy District Attorney Michael 
J. Montagna, Miss Marks-Moritz 
and Mr. Lyon testified that, al- 
though Mr. Belushi personally sup- 
plied or paid for the drugs that he 
and his friends used, they never saw 
him Inject himself with a needle. 
That task always fell to Miss Smith, 
they said. 

Mr. Lyon, who testified under a 
grant of immunity, said that he left 
the comedian's S 200 -a-day bunga- 



John Belushi 

low at the Chateau Mannont hotel 
in West Hollywood about 3:30 
A.M. on March 5. following a day 
in which Miss Smith injected both 
Mr. Lyon and Mr. Belushi at least 
seven times with a drug that Mr. 
Lyon believed was cocaine. 

However, Mr. Lyon said that the 
last injection Miss Smith gave him, 
about 1 A.M. that day, produced a 
dramatically different effect than 
the earlier injections. “1 felt in- 
tensely numb, intensely stoned; it 
was a very upsetting numbness, 
very disorienting," Mr. Lyon said. 
He testified that he and Mr. Bdu- 
shi had vomited a few minutes lai- 


Miss Marks- Momz. who said 
she was introduced to Mr. Belushi 
by a friend in early February, said 
that she first tried heroin, sniffing it 
through her nose, at Mr. Belushi's 
request sometime between Feb. 1 1 
and Feb. 22. 1982. 

On a later occasion. Miss Marks- 
Moritz said, she allowed Miss 
Smith to inject her with a cocaine 
solution while Miss Smith repeat- 
edly administered speed balls, mix- 
tures of heroin and cocaine, to Mr. 
Belushi and at least two of his ac- 
quaintances. 

At one point. Miss Marks-Mo- 
ritz said. Miss Smith “told me it 
could be dangerous giving me an 
injection; something to the effect 
of. if she didn’t do it right, she 
could kill me.” 

Miss Marks-Moritz described 
the comedian's final days as spent 
searching for drugs, borrowing 
money' to buy drugs or getting high. 

She said that two days before be 
died. Mr. Belushi arrival at her Los 
Angeles apartment at 7:30 AX., 
“distraught and exhausted.” When 
she returned from work that after- 
noon. she sad. Mr. Belushi was 
asleep on her bed. his arms ex- 
posed. 

“They had a lot of what looked 
like red splotches in the crook of his 
arm, where he had been injected,” 
she testified. “Over a dozen, at 
least.” 

Outside the courtroom. Miss 
Smith’s attorney, Howard L. 
Wertzman. said that he was not 


surprised by testimony of Mr. Lyon 
and Miss Marks-Moritz. 

“We all knew that type of testi- 
mony was going to come out,” 
said. “I don't believe it has any 
effect on our theory of the case.” 

Mr. Wdizman said that he be- 
lieves that Miss Smith was acting 
only at Mr. Belushi's direction and 
is not guilty of murder. “I’ve said 
all along this is not a murder case.” 
he said. 


U.K, Stops EC Curbs on South Africa 


(Continued from Page 1) 
under the control of EC govern- 
ments is now exported by member 
nations, officials said. 

In addition, the impact of several 
of the other curbs under consider- 
ation would not be great because of 
existing international sanctions 
such as the embargo on arms trade 
with South Africa. 

An EC fact-finding mission re- 
turned at the beginning of lhi5 
month from South Africa and re- 
ported that harsh sanctions would 
not effective in increasing pressure 
on the white government and 
would economically hurt the black 
population 

Earlier Tuesday. Jacques Poos, 
the Luxembourg foreign minister, 
and Willy De Clerq, the EC com- 
missioner for external relations, 
met with two representatives of the 
outlawed African National Con- 
gress, the chief black guerrilla 
group in South Africa. It was the 
first such high-level meeting be- 
tween EC officials and members of 
the African National Congress, of- 
ficials said. 

U.S. Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz, meanwhile, sent a letter to 
the community in which he out- 
lined the U.S. measures announced 
Monday by President Ronald Rea- 
gan, and asked for a common 
Western policy toward Sooth Afri- 
ca, EC officials said. 

■ U.S. Impact Called Limited - 

Peter T. Kilbom of The New York 
Times reported earlier from Wash- 
ington: 

By themselves, the U.S. sanc- 
tions against South Africa that Mr. 
Reagan adopted on Monday will 
have a negligible impact, according 
to experts in international trade. 

But the analysts said that the 
president’s decision might 
strengthen the resolve of other gov- 
ernments to expand their own 
sanctions. Such measures, com- 
bined with the American actions, 
could eventually hurt South Afri- 
ca’s economy, they added. 

Some analysts speculated that 
South Africa could respond in a 
way that would work against Mr. 
Reagan’s commitment to the mo- 
ment, as he put it on Monday, 
“when apartheid will be no more ” 
The sanctions could encourage the 
country to redouble its effort to 
build a self-supporting economy, 
teaying it free to puisue its segrega- 
tionist policies, these experts said. 

The sanctions that Mr. Reagan 
ordered involve all computers, 
computer equipment and computer 
software used by South African 
public agencies to enforce apart- 
heid; nuclear equipment, which 
could be used for military pur- 
poses; and U.S. bank tending to 
South Africa. 

Mr. Reagan also threatened a 
ban on sate of gold Krugerrand 
coins, which, like other South Afri- 
can exports, provide a source of 


foreign currency the country needs 
to buy the goods it imports. 

But in all those areas, economists 
said, the sanctions will have only 
negligible effects. In pan, this is 
because they only validate changes 
already in effect American lending 
to South Africa, for example, has 
all but dried up this year, primarily 
because of the banks’ concern that 
the turmoil there would jeopardize 
the repayment of loans. 

South Africa earlier this month 
froze interest payments on its inter- 
national borrowings. 

In the case of the Krugerrands, 
Mr. Reagan said that before ban- 
ning imports of the coins, be would 
consult with the General Agree- 
ment on Tariffs and Trade, the as- 
sociation of 91 nations that over- 
sees international trade, to 
ascertain whether the ban would 
violate free-trade regulations. 

In the case of computers, Ameri- 
can companies already deny sales 
to apartheid-enforcement agencies, 
and all sales of American computer 
equipment there has been falling 
sharply this year. 

■ Japan Considers Curbs 

Japan wants to discuss economic 
curbs against South Africa with the 
United Stales and other countries. 
Foreign Minister Shin taro Abe said 
Tuesday, Reuters reported from 
Tokyo. Mr. Abe said that bis gov- 
ernment is studying whether to 
strengthen its existing sanctions 
'against South Africa, with which it 
has only consular-level relations. 

■ US. Envoy Returns 

The U.S. ambassador to South 
Africa relumed to Johannesburg 
on Tuesday after a three-month re- 
call and said that injustices in the 
name of apartheid had gone on too 


long and must end. Reuters report- 
•ed. 

Herman Nickel, who was called 
hack to Washington for consulta- 
tions amid mounting international 
protests over Pretoria’s policies, 
said: “We have gotten beyond 
where mere statements of intent are 
adequate. Things have got to be 
seen to be happening.” 


y _ 0 >_ " 

Baume & Mercier 



EDWARD 

JEWELS 

The Jeweler 
you should not miss.. 

Via V. VeneTo 187 
Tel. 49 38 09 
Roma 




CIAO 



WORLDWIDE 

ENTERTAINMENT 


ZURICH'S BEST 



BURLESQUE 1 

* London’s Piernei GerttemcreCMa 
*Con*njousccfiareM I ODptn- 

2 X 0 om 

* Wang aid daneng eonwm 
14-16 Brufon Place, W1 

^409-0630 409 213) 


JHors an* penis 


ONE OF THE BEST 
5UMOT 7KRACE5 
HOT Ntt RSH 
SPECUUES 

Mel. otmesph. - S20J2J3 
a ml Dataert IPassv), 7nu Pom. 
Doll* until i run. Cl. Sunday, mm 






MANUFACTURERS... 

Mold ibehjgb cost o! establishing or expanding your fidd services organtadon. 

Signode Corporation maintains one of the finest and most extensive 
service organizations hr industrial machinery and etjmpmem, and w can put 
this expertise and experience to work hr you. 

'Ve provide competent, dependable service fit virtually every service 
area, including mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, electrical and so on 

with no direct investment on your part, we offer the flexibility to design 
i service program to meet tour needs. 

Fur information contact- Chris Hawkins □ Ringway House. Kelvin Road 
Newbury. Berkshire □ RG13 2BD, England 
Phone: tOb.«i *W87 □ Uex: 849185 


IMSIGNO0E 



TcL 01/219 81 U 


The folly integrated business services in the center 
of Zorich 

offers 

Offices/Conference Rooms, Secretarial/Translarion, 
coropl Telecom-Systems, Company Formarion/Rdudary 
Transactions 

Executive Business Services ag 

Usteristrasse 23 (Lowenplatz) CH-8001 Zurich 


INTERNATIONAL 

GEMMOLOQICAL 

IN S T I T U TE 

CERTIFICATES ACCEPTED AND 
RECOGNIZED ALL OVER thE VJORlCi 



ONE WEEK INTENSIVE 
DIAMOND AND COLORED 
STONES COURSES. 

F or mcew iflitrrngtiCrfi 

ScMtttarf 1/7 - 201 B Antwerp 
T«L; 03/232:07.58 Mgkim 


SUCCESSFULL? 

YOUR BUSINESS IN WEST GERMANY 

We nuke your busiaew prow by 

— acquisition 

— distriimfor 

— loini vodiut 

— licensing programs 

Wo dro recommend, if neceuoy, legd 
advisors. 

Contact: 

Hassemer ft Partner 
Busanttt Expandon Sooth Concuhanti 
Goetfwstrasre 4 - 8 
D-6000 Frankfurt a M- Watt Gemwiy 
Tot. (069] 292902 
Tote*: 4185276 HAPAD 


MAJOR INVESTORS 

My personal inveslmant profits 
on antemofiond exchanges n 
1882, 1983 and 19B4 were 
52%, 41% and 43%, respec- 
tively. 

I am not c onnected with any brokor. 1 
am, however, a wed educated Dan- 
ish businessman who for own ao 
count has established results and 
daft* whkfo 1 am wflfing to shore with 
other investors to mutual benefit 

Mease contact: 

S ta nford Advisors Limited, 

22 Gilbert Street, London W1 
TeLs 01 408 0880. Tl* 295878. 


AGQfT/MASTER DISTRIBUTOR 

Oik company a one o I the larges* AAA-1 
raied OEM outlets lor products in the 
following mdustnes: water pump and wa- 
ter well s u p pi es . swannng pool, rogation, 
industrial on d pkmbiig wapty eqtfpmenf. 
We carry in Sock over 60 mJion item in 
245 categories. If you hove a market n 
your country for these products. And d 
you are seriously mteresled. send us O 
deposit of 150.00 (or our 4 head bound 
catalogs covering our four dvoions. The 
SSiXQowiR be oecttad to the first order 
youplooe. We now do busmess with oner 
4,000 distributors w North America and 
c*e seeking to esJabfeh markets overseas. 
Please write m detail of you- company's 
capabilities tft 

The Americas Granby Company, 
1111 Vine Street, Uvwpoat, 
New York 1308S, USA, Attention: 

Ml Stfcermerhom. 


lf= BUY AMERICA = 

IN SMALL SLICES 

A new investment opportunity in 
the development of American real 
estate with high offshore capital 
pim and guaranteed return-. 

For details cnmutl 

Building Ground Developments 
International Lid., 

96 Chiswick Kgh Road, 
London W4 JSH, England. 
Brokers enquiries irefrome. 


INTERNATIONAL 

/BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Appears ererv 

WEDNESDAY 





’age 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1985 


Finding of Titanic: A Navy By-Product 


By William J. Broad 

New York Tima Serna 

WOODS HOLE, Massachusetts 
— The triumphant researchers who 
found the ocean liner Titanic have 
returned to their home port here, 
greeted by cheering crowds, bal- 
loons and the blare of sirens. 

" Two helicopters and a flotilla of 
small craft followed the navy re- 
search vessel Knorr to her landin g. 

‘Tm glad it’s over,” Robert D. 
Ballard, leader of the research team 
and a senior scientist at the Woods 
Hole Oceanographic Institution, 
shouted from the deck as the 245- 
foot (75-meter) Knorr pulled up to 
the institution's wharf. 

The first man to shake Mr. Bal- 
lard’s hand was Rear Admiral J.B. 
Mooney Jr., chief of U.S. naval 
research. The navy financed the de- 
velopment of the underwater robot 
sled Argo, which Last week took 
mote than 12,000 photos of the 
finer. 

Hie Titanic sank 73 years ago 
with the loss of more than 1,500 
lives. The navy wants to use the 
Argo for top-secret military mis- 
sions. according to naval sources 
and scientists who work for the 
government. 

At a news conference, Mr. Bal- 
lard said the graves te of the Ti- 
tanic was quiet and peaceful, “a 
fitting place for the remains of this 
greatest of sea tragedies to rest,” 

He added that the Argo and its 
cousins under development at 
Woods Hole represented “a com- 
plete revolution” in underwater ex- 
ploration . 

, “It’s the beginning of telepre- 
sence, of being able to project your 
spirit to the bottom, your eyes, 
your mind, and being able to leave 
your body b ehin d,” Mr. Ballard 
said. “We were able to stay sub- 
merged for days on end, something 
I’ve never been able to do in little 
submarines. With the Argo system 
you can sit in comfort and watch 
die bottom go by, mile after mile 
after mile. This test program clear- 
ly demonstrates that we’ve entered 
a new era in underseas explora- 
tion.” 

. The Argo, about the size of an i 
automobile, was built by Mr. Bal- < 
lard and his team at Woods Hole, t 
This was its maiden voyage. From < 
the navy’s point of view, the search 
for the Titanic was incidental I 
■ The most critical test we could 1 
imagine was to find something that f 



magazine. A photographer from 
the magazine was aboard the 
Knorr, and the National Geo- 
graphic Soriety has a long history 
of joint projects with Woods Hole. 

The luxury liner sank 73 years 


cousins can roam across miles of 
territory and stay under water for 
weeks at a time while scientists 
monitor data aboard the mother 


development of the Argo 


ago. According to scientists, gov- was financed by the Office of Na- 
enunent officials and His torians, its val Research as part of a $15 nril- 


discovay and what lies in store for 
its wreckage is a tale full of twists 
and irony. 

The scientists tried to keep the 
site hidden from treasure hunters 


lion Woods Hole program to build 
advanced robot vessels, according 
to navy and Woods Hole officials. 
It will be tested for the next two 
years. When testing is completed, it 


by refusing to give the exact loca- will belong to the navy. 


tion in stop-to-sbore interviews. Some of the work of these sub- 



But soon their precautions were meisibles wffl be scientific. Bui oth- 
shattered as an unidentified private er jobs, perhaps most of Algo's 


plane dieted overhead for more 


will involve secret navy pro- 


than an hour, “nailing down the jecis- 

poation,” one of the discoverers “They are very interested in tech- 


said. 

In a final twist, historians say 
there may be little of value on the 
purportedly treasure-laden vessel 
This news, however, has not slowed 
treasure hunters from dedaring 
they want to mine the luxury liner 
for fabulous riches. 

The precise location of the 
45,000-ton Titanic had been a mys- 
tery since April 14, 1912, when, at 
11:45 PM1, she strode an iceberg 


oology they can apply to. their own 
kinds of problems,'’ said W in tan 
Marque L, senim’ en gin eer at' the 
Woods Hole Deep Submergence 
Laboratory. 

The Argo is only the first stage of 
what will be a more sophisticated 
system involving a still smaller ve- 
hicle, the Jason, which wifi be sent 
out from the Argo for closer exami- 
nations of the ocean floor. 

“Underwater technology is of 


while steaming through the waters § rea * Interest militarily,’' said WD- 


of the North Atlantia 
With a double-bottom hull and 
reinforced bulkheads, the ship had 


been dubbed umankabla But that 
night, several hundred mfies south 
of Newfoundland, Cj inada, it went 


Iiam Nierenberg, director of the 
Scripps Oceonographic Institute 
on the West Coast, which makes 
data available to the Pentagon. 

He said scientific knowledge of 
the deep seabeds was essential for 



Reagan Says Summit 


]foi 


For 






United Press International. 

WASHINGTON — PresHeui 
Ronald Reagan said Tuesday that 
his November summit meeting 


sues m aims control, rqgSmaTprtfc 
lems. bilateral relations and human 
rights, the presidwt- -Imped* the 
summit conference Would f chart a 


4 .• _ .i-J 


his November summit meeting summit conference Would, chart a 
with Mikhail S. Gorbachev could couise and th^ mdoftl.ideirtifya 
be “a starting point for progress” process of probfen>solvnig. ,, L V . 


but that Western security would . •. In reference to the Sowct- mafia 


not be enhanced by MoscowVcampaign, the WhltcHouse 
“wishful t hinking or public- ids- spokesman, Lany Speafcev said' 


vm 

• j- 


tions campaigns.**. •' V. that- the Kre mli n ha s .beea' ; issuing. 

Mr. Reagan used the state visit “propaganda for .propaganda’s, 
of P rimp Minister Poul ScfcJuter of v sake” tai that none of tire often 
Denmark, a leader who has no dif- . has bero made at the Geneva arias : 
ferences with the United-States* to-, talks. 

promise “a century. of pwee" and v' Mr/Spe&es s^l^Tfieredtavr l?:. 
respond to a Soviet media Witz be- /been , amr number ;; of proposals 
fore the Geneva summit doaferisnide^^ floated - oat haveuctbeela backed 
with the Russian leader. . ■ up by serious proppsals ai Geom. - 

The Nov. 1^-20 meeting wi5 put Ouritatjenaente tavc the basteof r 
Mr. Reagan face to face -with a serious approach. 1 * ~ ; Sy V ' I 
Soviet leader for the. first time in - ■ Gnrhadttv ivitif IFm . 




■AW-s. 




almost five years in' office. ‘ 
Reading to ' a series of Soviet 


■ Gorbachev Meets With Rmt 
- Mr. Gorbachev met- for -two 


■Sy - 

i 




interviews, speeches- -and official; 
newspaper artidesoa “star wars,” 


i«w -ncsRarcand toldhira thatMoscow 
the name oven to Mr. Reagans - .i?7 t: 

^Tveloc^.aEu^-zone 


space-based Strategic Defense-Im- 
dative, and anti-satellite research, -fa? 3" 


down with 10 mUfionaires aboard. *3 acth ?i? 33 “tisubmarioe 
including the rZSZE- warfare_and the navjgauon of sub- 


including the American financier ™. are “ a “1 
John Jamb Astor, the industrialist 


Maninll Drew, 81, of Westerly, Rhode Island, who sur- 
vived the sinking of the Titanic, was on hand in port this 
week to greet the scientists who have found the ship. 


uauve, auu uui-miicuiu: loraim. - ^ u- i 

Mr. Reagan said that. the United ; ?“ **!"!*?*. 


Robert D. Ballard 


Benjamin Guggenheim and Isidor 
Straus of Macy’s. In alt, more di^n 
1^00 people lost their fives. 


1,500 people lost their lives. . _. . , 

_ . , , .. Items of military interest m the 

The Titanic s actual discovery ocean include the U.S. nuclear sub- 
awaited the creation of sophisticat- marine Thresher, which sank in the 


that,” Mr. Nierenberg said, “is the Woods Hole asked the mditaiy if it and tell their story at the same weapons 
whole question of retrieving ob- would be all right to search for the time.” the level 

jecta.” Titanic, It was the French, he said, who Mr. Rea; 


oorafiioiis, and wc will cootmiu^o 

tious in strategic andint en ne d iate ^ 

weapons as wefi^ a lo^ 'crf' ^^ 






Mr. Rotom “Wp. Tnnt f«r. ywTyy East Gennan offiaals 


nobody else could find," «idio^ awaited the creation of sophistical- 

H. Steele, director of the Woods ed robots to explore the inky Atlantic in 1963, an American hy- 
Hole msutution, when asked how depths <rf the ocean bottom, in par- drogen bomb lost off the coast of 
the search had begun. m ticular, the Argo. Its designer was Spain in 1966, a Soviet submarine 


Htania It was the French, hesaid, who Mr. Reagan said. “We look for- 

“They said, “Do you have any began the search early this summer ward to the coining meetinginGe-. Ty, . ~ ~ 

objectiOTS if we test in the area of and who, according to him, did the neva. not for an end of all that has ’ 


" ^ • 
rfC- e.-r 

it 5 :'.*.’ rJ 


the TitanicT ** recalled f-i piain balk of the work. 


been wrong between East 1 and 


Jifr.Rau 
to lead the 


the search had begun. ticular, the Argo. Its was 

Asked about growing calls to Mr. Ballard, leader of the tpam of 
raise the Titanic, Mr. Steele said: American and French scientists 
“We do not want to see anything who found the Htania Woods 


Brent Baker, a navy spokesman at Led by Jean-Louis Michel of the West, but a beginning point -foe 

fhi> l^nionn, "H/a/IMii'tmM Th* Frpnrh TnRlifnfP fnr n*lH hotter s rfiitmo hm'nl-f/ir Hjr 5 1 ’O / tacL-UUlLS, was in me oOVI- 


into West 




Mr. Ballard, leader of the team of that exploded and sank between 
American and French scientists Hawaii and Midway Mand in 1968 


there touched. It’s a tremendous Hole is a private, nonprofit oceano- 
way to test out our technology, but graphic laboratory. 


and the U.S. nuclear submarine 
Scorpion, which sank off the 
Azoresin 1968. 

In addition to investigating items 


we don't want to scar the ship it- The Argo is a robot craft In addition roinvestigatinRitems 

searchlights and of military import, the navy wants 
The navy is now looking upon television and still cameras that can research robo£to heip explore the 
the tedmology as the perfect way survive the crushmg pressure of the possibility of basingmissiies on the 
to begin searches for lost subma- ocean s weight and pierce the dark- ocean bottom, 
nnw and weapons and also to help ness miles under water. It is lowed ^ interviews, Mr. Ballari has 
develop anu-submanne warfare. from a mother ship. oftcn arffue d that the fut.irP 


develop anti-submarine warfare. 

A detailed news conference on 
the discovery was to be held 


In interviews, Mr. Ballard has 
often argued that Lhe future 


the Pentagon. “We didn’t care. The French Institute for Research and better relations, a starting pomtfor 7^ r /. ° 
point was to see if this new system Exploration of the Sea aboard the progress.” . . . -ff.n™ 0 ”, r^T^T- 

worked.” research vessel Le Suroit, the While making the remarks, Mr.- S 

Assorted adventorers and at French expedition covered 80 per- Reagan appeared healthy and codL 
least one insurance company have cent of the planned search area in the muggy morning heat of the - p*«fwr- 

laid claims to the steamship, while before tbe Knorr even arrived on capital, and said, “We can, must • - " • r 

Woods Hole researchers and many tbe scene. and will have, not just four decades • _ _ ' ' 

people associa t ed with tbe sinking “Imagine if you’d been on Le of peace, but a century of peace, a Wf/i/iL fl/mn 
say they want tbe wreck left un- Suroit,” Mr. Ballard said. “They more stable peace,” mat “will not L/M/LiwH/Hfl 
touched. left us 20 percent and we fo und it” be secured by wishful thinking or . ’ ■ •’ 

Experts also say that treasure pubfic relations campaigns:” .. /invni/wi 

seekers who want to mine tbe ship Mr. Schluter said he hoped that H/Ill 


, 1 ‘ ^ 


V 

tPr*’ ■ 


and will have, not just four decades : 
of peace, but a century of peace, a 
more stable peace," that “will not 


left us 20 percent and we found it” be secured by wishful dunking or 
^ pubfic relations campaigns!" ■ 


Stockholm 


Unlike tiny submersibles that su^ngth of the navy rests in large 


for valuables may be in for a let- Mitterrand Will Tiavd 
down. 


Wednesday at the Washington of- der water for a few hours at most, imoroved familiaritv with the vi c * wm “ 

fices of The National Geographic the Argo and its high-technology {£or. The proIonSd debate on T3tamc Historical Society. “There 


take one or two scientists deep un- measure on taking advantage S 


The stories of great wealth are To Nlldear Test Site 
fantasies,” said Mr. Eaton of the - 4 ~-.__.-v 


The Associated Pms 
PARIS — President Franqms 


Mr. Schluter said heboped that 
the summit meeting “will lead to 

the be ginning of a' mpre mnrtnin. : 

tive East-West relationship, bene- - 
filing the United States, ibo Soviet 
Union, tbe alliance and die worid." 
In their private talks, a senior 

■■jej.i; -a- 


ermce 


Resumes 


' 






i-r-r •• • '• 


iiuiu »upiiK urn a, wuiu un id- , ~ nroa aiou to preride over a meet- por 

!«■ lift « wTS property. I ^.Goordimr- mg 


portancerif allied unity in adri ey- 
ing success with the Soviet Union. 


After 30 years 

IN EUROPE WE KNOW 
OUR BUSINESS. 


I . . , : a loss ol life as well as m tmert v I ° “"y wwaitu vwiuiur uumu. 

missile-baring submarines in can- Relieve the only value ofSwro:lc tion Committee for the South The official, who asked not to he 

yons on the ocean bottom. “ nuufc «*P of am- identified, said the president told 

According to scientists and ofti- that is salvageable.” ^ ^ bassadora and French avfl and mil- the prime mimstcr that he was 

aals at Woods Hole, the Argos p. f itaiy authorities, the government lookmg forward to the meeting, 

work on this mission was stnctlv ■ treierence to French .nnnnuwi k* 


work on this mission was strictly 
scientific. “There was nothing clas- 
sified,” said Robert Spindd, bead 
of tbe Woods Hole Ocean Engi- 
neering Department. 


announced Tuesday. 


that he was convinced it would be 


Mr. Ballard cut short tbe Mon- The president will stop in French productive and that “if the Soviets 


day news conference, Ken Ringle Guiana en route to watch the are wiffing to meet us halfway, they 
of The Washington Post reported, launching of two communication would certainly find us willing to 


in deference to French colleagues satellites from Kourou by the Eu- meet theissues halfway. 1 


And that means kn< A\ ini» vours. F< ir 
the must up- to- the minute business 


sion Tuesday in what Westem 
delegates called a. positive atmo- 
sphtte, but no new initiatives seem 
likdy before, a UR-Soyiet s ummit 
meeting Noy. ,19 and 20. 

James EGoodby, the UA dele- 
gate, said that Unpolitical wih now 
existed for progress in the central 
task of agreeing on oonfidence- 
-buDding ^ measures to reduce die 
risk of war, .V.’ - ' , 

: -Proposals by the lvforth Atlantic 


\z?u.w 


- • ■ 
t: »•: • 


In planning for the sea trial of on the expedition. Mr. Ballardsaid ropean Space Agency’s Ariane Tbe official said rather than ex- w .i. tlT ii a.t " J 

the Argo, oceanographers at they “deserve a chance to go home rocket, the announcement said. — peering resohition oHong-tenn is- 

V tion conference are 'centered cm ex- 




and nerst >nal .services \\ hi II find — 
ve il keen vou on schedule amluv’l 


we ll keep you on schedule and we 
keep you in style. 


Soviet Poet Joins Effort to Galvanize Bureaucrats 


AMSTERDAM 

ATHENS 

BRUSSELS 

CYPRUS 

DUSSELDORF 

GENEVA 

ISTANBUL 

LONDON 

MILAN 

MUNICH 

PARIS 

ROME 

TEL AVIV 

VIENNA 



Changes of military information 
and observers, while Moscow has 
proposed broader political me a- 
sures based on a treaty outlawing 
the osc of force. 


By Serge Schniemarm 

Sew York Times Sana 


pais as they block initiative or . 
innovation. ! 




mh 


MOSCOW — Apparently 
jumping on the Gorbachev 
bandwagon, the poet Yevgeny 
Yevtushenko has published a 
poem assailing timid bureau- 
crats who oppose innovation. 

Tbe poem appeared Monday 
on tbe normally staid pays of 
the Co mm u n ist Party newspa- . 
per Pravda. The title of the 
poem is *‘But-Whal-If-Ii- 
Doesn’t-Work-ists." 


m 



• « • . • - 


Th* Nfw YbHf Tirr 


Neither Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, the Soviet leader, nor Ins 
economic program is directly 
mentioned in the poem. Bat 
there is little mistaking the par- 
allel between tbe poem's targets 
and the Soviet leader’s central 
campaign to kick the stale bu- 
reaucracy into action. 


Yevgeny Yevtushenko at a poetry reading. 


'■b V-'j l* tr liven ’at ions, call 

P yanr/rurd cqpnt.anv 
Hilton International 
Hotel or Hilton 
Resen ’at it m Sen • ice — 
in Copen /.kitten, 
sk Frankfurt. London. 
Madrid. Milan, Oslo, 


Paris or Stockholm. 


Hilton International 


WHERE THE WORLD IS AT HOME 


Excerpts from the poem "But-Wbat-If-It-Doesn’l-Wcxk-ists,'’ by 
Yevgeny Yevtushenko: 

“Bui what if ii doesn ’r work ...7” — and they jammed sticks 
In the wheels of the first locomotive 
T 9 make sure it wouldn’t work. 

And the quacks seized the surgeon’s knife 

With their fingers 

When he first cut into the heart 

To save a life 

"But what if it doesn’t work . . . 7” — smug and sated. 

They grumbled at the airplane. 

At electric light. 

“But what if it doesn’t work . . . . r ’ — and you and I read 
“The Master and Margarita” 

Twenty years loo tote 


Writing in tbe choppy, dra- 
matic lines that Vladnnrr Maya- 
kovsky popularized in his pae- 
ans to tbe Bolshevik revolution, 
Mr. Yevtushenko inveighs 
against the frightened bureau- 
crats of Stalin's era. 


He attacks those who, forex- 
ample, held up publication of 
Mikhail Bulgakov’s satirical 
novel “Tbe buster and Marga- 
rita” for 20 years, or who im- 
peded the study of cybernetics. 


The refrain throughout is 
“But what if it doesn’t work . . . 
T (“Kaby cbevo ne yyshlo . . . 
the plaintive cry of bureaa- 


RefJecting Mr. Gorbachev’s 
emphasis on agricuknre and 
automation, Mr. Yevtushenko 
also criticizes . Stahn-era bu- 
reaucrats for the policies that 
set back Soviet fanning: 

He took a veiled swipe at cot- 
ketivization and an open one at 
Trofim D. Lysenko, the biolo- 
gist who imposed ins shaky 
ideas on Soviet agriculture and 
gave his name to the notion of 
political control over science. 

Mr. Yevtushenko's poem 
stays well within die borders of 
sanctioned criticism and steers 
clear of direct attacks on the 
Communist Party. To 
bureaucrats for collectivization, 
or Lyseakoism is to evade the 
central poim: The policies were 
imposed by the parly, and their - 
opponents were ruthlessly sup- 
pressed. 

Mr. Yevtushenko, 52, be- 
came something of a popular 
idol in both the Soviet Union 
and in the West in the early 
1960s with poems like “Babi 
Yar ” about the Nazi massacre 
of Ukrainian Jews. 

He has alternated string then - 
between original works, such as 
his 1982 novel “Berry Patches” 
or the autobiographical film 
“Kindergarten,” and poetry 
praising truck plants, the Olym- 
pic Games in Moscow or the 
Chilean leader Salvador AHen- 
de, who died in a coop in 1973. 


Mr. Goodby said after theopen- 
ing. plenary session that talks in - 
Geneva between President Ronald 
Reaganand MDchafiS. Gorbachev, 4 
the Soviet leader, could give impe- ' 
tus to the Stockholm conference^ 
which began in January 1984. Its 
official name is the Conference on 
Confidence and Security-Building 
Measures and Disarm ament in Eu- 
rope. 

The Soviet ambassador, ' Oleg 
Grinevsky, told delegates that the 

fmw* one rind fnr nn._>. 


time was ripe for concrete negotia- 
tions in Stockholm, bat warned 


- turns in Stockholm, bat warned 
that some countries were creating 
artificial delays and seeking unilat- 
eral advantages. 

A turn for the better is possible 
m Europe," hesaid, “where dfeteate 
was bora and where it has deep 
roots." ■ 

The main interest of this session 
focuses on plans by nine neutral 
and nonafigbed countries to pre- 
sent detailed proposals that could 
help to break the East-West dead- 
lode. 

Neutral delegates said their pro- iA 
posal would include provisions on 
the nonuse of force, the key Soviet 
proposal, and on exchanges of in- 
fwination about military activities, 

the corneretone of the NATO posi- 


Reports Earthquake 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — An earthquake 
rocked the Soviet republic of Ta- 
dzhikistan on Tuesday but no 
“ariis were reported, the Tass 
flews agency said. 


Delta Flies Notist 

iv-N AtufOtiTb 




— lb Atlanta. 

.Cities. W 




From New York toTexas, 6om service from the New York and Boston Or call Delta in London on (01 ) 
Honda to California, Delta flies you gateways to dries across the U.S. A. 668-0935. Or call Delta in Frankfurt 
just about anywhere in the U.S.A. You can also fly Delta nonstop on 069 25 60 30. 

Catch Delta s nonstop from Paris from London to Atlanta, from Frank- Delta Ticket Offices are at 24 

to AdantEL where you can make easy furt to Atlanta and from Frankfurt to Boulevard des Capudnes Paris at 
Delta-to-Delta corrections to 100 Dalks^Ft.Worth. 140 Regent Street, London W1R 6AT 

cities across the U SA. Call your Travel Agent. Or call and Friedensstrasse 7, 6000 

Delta also has frequent daily Delta in Paris at 1-335-4080. Frankfurt/Main. r.cf Paris b 3 ji 443 705 . 

‘ Delta GetsVbo There^g^™ s& ”" . 


v 




*n£- 


fiDilaSs 
*“> *!S|,4 

*i*i 


— Tcf Sa 
3 & 8 tp« 
ii : ir.-ani, 
Vie 

poasi»t s 

tniimiiaa 
: -Siam or 
r.J> 

’ ice lit 
x^ad«3c 
*■ :ac 
■ Ji irtlfe 
» '-•:> ssci. 

s .Vra.t; 
or. uiih 
e «r.Masics 

s r irJiEE; 

is::* Mass: 
r pctaa: 
:;rai> .-ate 

j. iVirft 

-. ad i 

:j. > UCTC 

h -'a ;rJ=- 

,L- !3*> £-• 
>.• i';r-r^ 


• T _ *.; C 

••;. Sf’rJr 
•„-- £, 




j 4). 
- -. •&*■ 


- 








INTERNATIO NAL HEm LDTOIBUNE , WEDNESDAY. SEPTE MBER 11. 1985 -|| 

ABTS / LEISURE 



tAf&iceinihe Wilderness: Israeli Singer Protests 


r '7’EMAH ^ ^ three years in Lebanon, Hanoch’s is the first its refrain goes: “Messiah doesn't come, Mes- 

X . g imrthrri?r..‘~'i an eerie green protest musk to emerge. sioh doesn't call. The stock market crashed, 

1 e n ™ ec l ^ fi*o and sang: “I think maybethings aren't had enough to Messiah jumped and was killed... The public is 

lion: ^^ Vt ^ OCIU ^ tl * lim and destruo- ■ generate such songs. If we had a really crppres- dumb and therefore it pays. . . It counts the 

The anaMt t tu ®v° maybe It would happen.” said Ha- money il doesn't have." 

^M®.»Wte,d*y S i. ra ddo n otog,"»M 

ssSjS&sssstsssi a sSSSSSSPS 

-SEJitfja 

SK»°f i^anon. . jskJeTwto Was until now and try to change ^dependence struggle before 1948. 

rianoch, 39. considered Israef s foremost rock things. That's what Tm. uying to do in a gentle “The audience which likes those songs is 
prw- t i composer and singer, usually sznes pemmxal way. I fed I have some impact. People listen and looking for nostalgia. It finds it hard to handle 

^bmvl # sOT^andbalkds.Bui bis new show and latest relate." the shattering of a dream. I never had a dream. 


three years in Lebanon, Hanoch’s is the first 


^uaF -1 ■“—A 

“1 don’t nrindif peonlc inimim A* «»» m 


““** about snare®,” therock star said laier, 
refemng to former Defense Minister Arid Shar- 
m, v *0 tmstenmnded brad’s June 3982 inva- 
sion Of Leh anrwi 


Why “Messiah"? “Israelis always think things 
will work out, the Messiah will come and rescue 
them. Meanwhile, they sit and do nothing," said 
Hanoch. 

Hanoch’s success is limited to a younger audi- 
ence that did not grow up on the musical fare 


album include several anti-war and soda] pro- Another subject he addresses is last year's All I thought is that I have to advance with my 
ret songs, an vnusoal- phenomenon in Israel, stock market cash, in winch thousands of Israe- ® uo ' c - to & ow U P " «■** Hanoch. 

Han 9* ro c luded, are often Us lost their fife saving when bank shares plum- The influence of Western pop and rock music 
1 ! r ?_ ia r ^°y entertainmeht troupes. meted. His song attacks the economic prosperi- has made itself felt, but Israeli composers and 
j", Lebanon invasion shattered the ry Israelis enjoyed under the seven-year Likud singers have not attained die popularity or their 
^ f ware generated government of Prune Minister Menachem Be- American or British counterparts. 

aad nostalgia rather than gin, when living standards went up and the “Israelis always think imports are better. It 
protest After the Israeli' Army’s controversial national treasury ran dry. has to do with low self-esteem,” said Hanoch. 


“Israelis always think imports are better. It 
has to do with low self-esteem," said Hanoch. 



Dutch Group Carves the Cake 
Of Subsidies to Jazz Musicians 


Shalom Hanoch 


American Cop-Show Plot Proves Too Thin in 'Split Second’ 


.. By Sheridan Morley- 

/ nienumonal H eraltl Tribune 

L ONDON — The theory that 
_ * American television is rub- 
bish,' though generally still defena- 
ble, has always bad to cope with the 
* equally undeniable fact that the av- 
erage episode of “Lou Grant" or 
“Hul .Sum Blues" is actually bet- 
ter written and better acted not 

THE LONDON STAGE 

only than anything on British 
prime-lime television but also 
most of vriiaL is on the British stage. 
Ii ought therefore to be possible to 
welcome Dennis McIntyre’s “Spfif 
Second” to the Lyric Hummer , 
smith Studio on the grounds that it 
is a rare attempt by an American 
playwright to do on stage what the 
best American cop shows have 
been doing on television since ICo- ■ 
jak lost his hair.. 

The problem is, however, that 
what vrorks for 60 minutes .(less 
commercial breaks) on tekyisiaiiis 
■i apt to took a little overstretched 
• across two hours in a theater. The 
play follows all tile roles of anti-es- 
tablishment cop shbws: We start 
on 1 1th Avenue and 28th Street in 

Cannes Casiiio Renovatfon’ 

Agen ee France-P/ase. '. 
CANNES — The casino here, 
which has been kxdng money for 
four seasons, U reportedly to be- 
renovated with almost S2 million • 
from two Lebanese busmcssmoi, 
Nasser el-DHis arid his brother 
Mounir, who used to nm the Teh- 
ran casino and a casmo m Bdrot. 


New York late one long, hot July 4 
nighL A black cop has arrested, 
after a long chase, a whitecar thief 
who is now handcuffed and dis- 
armed. The thief has not, however, 
been silenced, and about 10 min- 
utes into the play, after letting forth 
a tirade of Tacist remarks about the 
general nndesirabilhy of blacks in 
uniform, he is shot dead, at 
point-blank range, by the cop. 

The rest of the play takes the 
form of a series of duotogpes in 
which the cop discusses with his 
wife, his father, his best friend and 
his police raperinteudeni what he 
should do. dearly he has a choice: 
He tells the truth, pleads guilty to 
manslaughter if not murder, and 
goes behind bare for 20 years; or he 
lies, claims that the chief was still 
armed and that he therefore was 
shot in self-defense. 

We are not told, until the very 
last moments, which option he is to 
go fra, although McIntyre has con- 
structed his play so samplistically 
that it is not difficult to guess. 

The cop, i m pr e ss i vely played by 
Hugh Quarsbie, has survived a year 
in Vietnam without bloodshed, but 
has come home to a world in which 
he believes blacks are still getting 
an impossibly raw deal. What we 
therefore get, for the last nine- 
tenths of “Split Second," is a static 
debate about the nature of bong 
black and a Hack cop in a white 
society, and though McIntyre has 
neatly ranged the cop’s wife on one 
side of the argument (“Shot up and 
stay .out of jar) and his father on 
the other (“Own 19 and prove 
you’re not a liaO, it gets no farther 
than first base: ’ 


Fra though he has managed to 
write on acidly funny monologue 
fra the doomed white car thief, one 
that embraces a loathing of h uman - 
ity worthy of Archie Bunker, McIn- 
tyre is oddly unable to write for an 
otherwise all-black cast with the 
same sense of rage and freedom. As 
a result, the play bogs down into 
portentous truism about guilt, re- 
venge, confession and absolution, 
which appear to have been added 
to a police instruction manual of 
the mid-1950s. 

All of this is a pity, because the 
director, Hugh Woldridge, has 
brought together a tough and intel- 
ligent cast (Michael Mdia as the 
car thief. Tommy Eytle as the cop’s 
father, Jenni George as his wife, 
Elvis Payne as his trigger-happy 
friend and Joseph Marcdl as the 
station superintendent) that plays 
“Split Second" as though some- 
where in it there might be a very 
good play. If it were the first epi- 
sode of a new cop show on televi- 
sion I'd have the video recorder on 
for the second episode, if only to 
see what happened to them all af- 
terward. A play does not let you do 

that, and McIntyre seems to have 

failed to grasp the essential differ- 
ence The sooner be starts scripting 
“Hill Street Blues,” the better. 


As the curtain-raiser to an im- 
pressive new season that will fea- 
ture plays about Judy Garland and 
Guy Burgess as well as the first 
London revival in half a century of 
S-N. Behrman’s “Biography,” the 
Greenwich Theatre is playing host 
to a New Vic production of Phil 


Woods's “Buddy Holly at the Re- 
gat" Though the title might suggest 
yet another evening of rock necro- 
philia, Woods is not trying to do for 
(or against) Buddy Holly what 
Alan Bleasdale is attempting at the 
Phoenix on Elvis Presley’s behalf in 
“Are You Lonesome Tonight?" 

Indeed, Woods has only the most 
fractional interest in Buddy; for the 
purposes of this play he might as 
well be Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix 
or, fra Lhat matter, Nellie Melba. 
We are in fan territory: The central 
character is not a dead superstar 
but a fairly live coffee-bar waiter, 
Derek Duckworth, whose ambition 
iris to meet Holly and to get to look 
and sound as much like him as 
possible. 

To remind us what this entails, 
we have a Holly look-alike (Pikey 
Butler) and a couple of attendant 
guitarists on a raised platform 
above the stage to belt out a few 
Holly hits during scene changes. 
But all the action lakes place in the 
cavern below, at least until the final 
and awful 'moment when Duck- 
worth, having won a “Meet Buddy" 
contest, actually does so and has 
his life ruined in the process. 

Quite bow, it would be unfair to 
divulge. What is intriguing about 
Woods (new to me as a writer 
though an old hand at putting to- 
gether musicals for the New Vic on 
tour) is the way he has perfectly 
remembered the awful gulf that lay 
between American rock stars of the 
late 1950s and their British fans — 
a gulf not just of the Atlantic but erf' 
money, style, everything. Where 
Holly seems literally to gutter with 


COME TO 




ATTEND A CONFERENCE THAT COULD 
TRANSFORM YOUR OUTLOOK ON WORLD BUSINESS. 

It is the annual International Business Outlook 
conference sponsored by Oxford Analytica and the International 
Herald Tribune to be held September 19-21 at Christ Church 
College, Oxford. 

In three cbaHeogmg days, key senior executives will be 
briefed on the world’s politics, economics, and business prospects, 
region by region, in intimate delegate groups, by leading academic 
authorities. 

Each briefing team comprises senior academic 
contributors to Oxford Analytical Daily Brief and country studies 
for governments and major international companies. 

Each delegate’s specific interests will be covered in 
extensive question and answer sessions. 

Spouses may attend free, and there will be an 
extensive social and atitnral program culminating in a banquet at 
Blenheim Palace, where the guest speaker will be The Right 
Honourable Dr. David Owen M.P., Leader of the Social 
Democratic Party, United Kingdom. 

Finally, in addition to the published introductory 
report, delegates wffl receive a comprehensive summary report. 

This conference provides senior executives with a 
unique opportunity for reflection, learning, and refreshment in the 
tranquil beauty erf a great university. 

If you attend no other conference this year, this should 

be the one. 

Places are strictly limited and you are urged to apply 

now. 

— Attach business card or fill in — 


Hcralb^^Sribunc. 



OXFORD 

ANALYTICA 


| Please send me details and registration form. 

J Name 

I Address — . — 


11-9-85 


1 ' To: International Herald Tribune Conference Office, 

I 181 Ate. Gterifisnio-Gaulle, 92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. 
I Telephone-- (33-1) 747 1686. 


success, Duckworth is already de- 
feated and ancient in his teens, 
doomed by clothes and accent and 
parentage and job opportunities to 
a failure from which only a lucky 
few escaped, and then not by imi- 
tating Buddy Holly. 

The play is something very much 
closer to the early David Essex 
movies than to the Etas shows: a 
grainy, depressed, angry little soap 
opera about Lhe nature of regional 
British teen-age life at a time before 
it was fashionable to be under 40. 
Ian Watt-Smith's production is a 
little sketchy at times, but two very 
well-judged central turns come 
from David Thewlis as Duckworth 
and Colin Starkey as the etemaQy 
cheerful coffee-bar proprietor, who 
also acts as nanaior. Insofar as we 
have had an English reply to the 
“Officer Krupke number in “West 
Side Story/ this is iL 

DOONESBURY 

ON 06HALFOF k USA I 1 
fiORSOUlH/VKMTI .U 
. tWTTOmCOMEYOU wd 
I TOmVMtT-AFRB- X\\ 
t - m epmsesaM 

5 fleR ^ 


By Michael Zwerin 

Inienuriiuwl Herald Tribune 

A MSTERDAM — The Dutch Improvising Musi- 
cians Association. B1M. is fortunate to have its 
headquarters between Waterlooplein and Nieuw- 
markt, where the flea market, “heroin city” and the 
garbage- barge terminal once were. A new city hall, or 
Stadhuis, and an opera are under construction in this 
central district, now called “Si opera.” With new lodgr 
mgs, cafes and boutiques, it is being compared to the 
Marais in Paris. 

BIM received a renovation grant of 500.000 guilders 
(about $150,000) from the city to upgrade its head- 
quarters, the Bimhuis. along with the neighborhood. 
In addition, the Bimhuis. a combination union hall 
rehearsal studio, bar and concert halL is supported by 
a 15-million-guilder yearly subsidy funneled through 
a complex structure of state, municipal and cultural 
entities. A committee or musicians chooses the recipi- 
ents. “It’s not a nice position to be in. musicians 
judging other musicians," said the managing director, 
Huub van RieL “But it's better than some government 
functionary doing it." 

When BIM was formed in 1974. Dixieland jazz was 
excluded far lack of improvisation and self-supporting 
commercial] sy. A more subtle problem arose in the 
1980s when the first students emerged from the new 
Dutch jazz schools. Many of them play “clone" or 
“third-generation" bebop, imitating, for example, 
such tenor saxophonists as Eddie Daniels, who Imi- 
tates John Coltrane. Judged not to be improvising, 
they are frequently refused subsidies. 

Because of the one central source of money, and the 
public ]>olicy decisions required to disburse it, the 
Dutch situation provides an enlightening focus on a 
condition general in jazz worldwide. Stylistic defini- 
tions are no longer clear. Dixieland can be creative 
once more. Is salsa jazz? BI\rs co-founder, Hans 
Duller, was recently refused a grant because he was 
judged to be playing rock. 

The Netherlands is one place where it can be said, 
without irony: “Tm a jazz musician but I’m only in it 
for the money." Minimum sale for a BIM member is 
250 guilders a nighL Duller says he cannot afford to 
pay his young rock rhythm section more than about 
half thaL “They don't get a subsidy,” be said, laugh- 
ing. “But most rock musicians hate the BIM scene. 
They think it's a museum. They don’t even want the 
money if they could get it." 

Dulfer, one of the best-known Dutch musicians, 
sent a barrage of bitter letters to the press, and 


“They said my music was no longer jazz. It’s an old 
story. The Dixi danders said swing wasn’t jazz, the 
swing players said it about bebop, bebop about free 
jazz and then the free players about fusion. You know, 
revolutionaries always become conservatives for the 
following generation." He hesitated. “Except Miles 
[Davis] ana me. I don't want to compare myself 
musically with Miles, but we are thinking in the same 
direction. 

“Take these young beboppers. Sure, they play from 
books. Most of it isn't that creative: But they’re 20 
years old. they just got out of school, they don't know 
anything else. So the BIM turns them down because 
they supposedly don't bring anything new. But I think 
it's wonderful that these young guys are keeping the 
tradition alive. Some of them just need the opportuni- 
ty to learn how to express what they have to say. They 
should be asked in, not kept oul In my opinion the 
committee that distributes money should act like a 
traffic policeman. But they think they’re the FBI." 

The controversy has had some posi live effect — the 
BIM committee has recently broadened definitions. In 
any case, out of 429 requests for subsidies in 1984; 
only 67. 16 permit, were denied. These applications 
cover individual engagements Tor which a promoter of 
club owner must pay at least 50 percent — the subsidy 
makes up the difference. 

“There are three criteria," van Riel said. “First, is 
the music improvised? Then we keep track of the 
places that hire the bands. If a club can afford An 
Slakey the week before, they probably don’t need as 
big a subsidy as some smaller club. And the group 
itself should be together for musical not purely com- 
mercial. reasons. There are no dear boundaries,' and in 
a way it's shameful to have to make such distinction^ 
but by definition we must recognize certain 
limitations." 

In 10 years, the subsidy has gone up sixfold from an 
original 250,000 guilders. The BIM club will produce 
about 160 concerts in 1985, preserving a balance 
between Dutch and foreign musicians, and between 
styles. This month the program indudes an avanij- 
garde English saxophonist. Evan Parker (Sept 12), an 
old-timer American pianist. Art Hodes (SepL 20j r a 
young French Gypsy guitarist Bireli Lagrene {Sept 
27 ) and a bebop trumpeter, Ack van Rooyen (Sept 28)'. 

Van Rid pointed out that since BIMTs renovation 
was completed late last year, average attendance had 
gone from about 90 to 150 per concert- “We consider 
the BIM a success.” 



BeFORBUemUNDBir 
WY, I BEUEVE TUB . 
PRSsvmmjwum 11 
7D SAY A FEW WORDS. 




Yes.fhmK'mJsm. 
rjusrmesD'fDSM * 
TmiFiNP/mm&p* 

MORALLY REPUGNANT! 


7MWC1BK5R MTAtmJIR 
WElLTZ/TO MmeiMTS 
FfTTHATNim TOO STRONG. HOUl 
UNER. NOTES. ABOUT MUM 
I. REPU6MNT? 




m : _i_ i n i _i n _ 

rresjoenr Koncxi KCQQon. 


Colonel Moaner QadhafL 






% ! 

' r \ r 


. • t 

'■ . < .-V, 


* * 

#.•».»> v-.-, 

. , 



• '• v -' ;vv ■ 



Do you follow world leaders? Get twice as many for your 
money. Take advantage of our special rates for new subscribers 
and we’ll give you an extra month of Tribs fee with a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand price 
in most European countries! Twice as many world leaders and 
lots, lots more in the International Herald Tribune, the global 
newspaper. 


Ptewc>ditioiiadicadubia«K»[ri*riKfcd ldl .OVKUJ6 V_TlO 

Coufry Cjxrtnor lyw brren. 3we a, _ 

Aidrio ASd\ 4jQ2D Z170 l.W n^. 

Mgum air. Vjpa z«B L >2 months 

Dwwi OJfr. 1530 1 .CW gQ , , 

fttod f m. i^io 760 <14 Mycheck 

fauna Ff. 1300 6U 3» 1 m 

Gainw PM *2 *T M i 

GrertMrin E. 1 W 55 30 |E^J|| 1 U 

Gam Dr. ISiOO flAH l 402 1 Aaccss J 

Ntfrofaris R[ 550} 2981 g 

fc-lrwd ml H5l fil 3« I 

| Lumnfecura | lfa| VflPl <876j TUB [ CordoaounTnumber 

hfemwy NXr. 1^30 m C3 

fanucri Be- 13JQ0 7ASD *00 22™£ 

Scan Pte, 21300 11J0O 6300 

SKr. _JflO W5 43* Nome 

~ Sft.r <sH ZbI 127 

Ratf of EurcpB, North Africa, former French Afriu, AAtna 

USA-Fraidi Wyrwio.MiddfeE£Kt —— — — — — — 

JjLaaLiyjL-P. Qv/Cbu*y 

RM of AfrkA Canada, LA AnwwxGdfSciB 

Xgja 

5) 4421 23S| 130 Tel/Telm 


I M I 

- ^ — — Tee Sufcscripbon Maroger, InterroHond Herald Tribune, 

181 ,cwmueChart»<i 6 Cxjufe, 92 Sl NrajHlyCectex l FiraiGe,TeL: 7 ^ 0729 .Tdex: 612832 . 
iffml 3mea. Pteose enter my s ubscri ption for: 

□ lanHortterir 1 ) □ □ 3-™* 

Mychedisencbsed. | | Please charge my aedit card amount: 

*3 ga n ran ®»D[EPfflnBan 

SPI^S"ssgas»ar«=^ l S3- 


Ordacpirydote 


U-9-95 


\ 





.iWrr S’., f ':k 


Pi 


] 

f 

1 : 

u 


Page 6 


Heralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 



eribunc. 


Published Whh The New York Thou and The Waabingum Port 


Sanctions Against Pretoria 


President Reagan's switch toward selec- 
tive economic sanctions against South Afri- 
ca may simply represent a desire not to see 
Congress writing Aim off as a lame duck 
when he has more than two years left in the 
White House. Or perhaps be does not want 
to approach his November meeting with 
Mikhail Gorbachev tainted by domestic de- 
feat Whatever his motives, they matter less 
than the results his decisions will have in 
South Africa. Here the betting is pretty even 
— which may justify Mr. Reagan’s hag 
reluctance to move more actively against 
Pretoria's reprehensible two-nation policy. 

Trade sanctions, even in those cases when 


they are internationally coordinated, have 
idle 


historically been an ineffective weapon. This 
is as true of the attempt to stop Mussolini’s 
attack on Ethiopia as it is of the challenge to 
the white regime in Rhodesia. Refusal to sell 
South Africa the goods it needs is a step it 
can circumvent by rerouting trade through 
third countries. And refusal to buy Kruger- 
rands will at best prove inconvenient for 
Pretoria: The gold coins can be sold else- 
where, in different forms. 

The disruption of capital flows could 
prove more damaging. But this may not 
need action by the United States, or by any 
other nation. Banks may be reluctant for 
awhile to lend to a country whose immense 
riches can (almost literally) be undermined 


Don’t Rock the Fed’s Boat 


The While House is making an important 
mistake in dawdling over the next appoint- 
ment to tin Federal Reserve Board. In June 
one of the board’s members, Lyle E Gramley, 
said he was going to resign. He has now de- 
parted. but President Reagan has done noth- 
ing visible about a replacement. That encour- 


ages speculation that the president is waiting 
until January, when Charles 


Partee’s term ex- 
pires and another seat opens. Since Mr. Rea- 
gan has already appointed two of the board's 
seven members, the vacant seats would give 
him a majority. As the delay over the first seat 
continues, the struggle over this possible ma- 
jority is becoming increasingly polarized and 
polemical among the various deno mina tions 
of conservative economics. 

Mr. Reagan does not disguise his opinion 
that economic doctrine makes little practical 
difference one way or the other. He appoints 
people to economic policy jobs the way the 
mayors of big cities sometimes choose among 
their ethnic constituencies for seats on the 
Sanitation Board — not based on who is right, 
but rather who is entitled to recognition. It is 
one thing for the president to appoint the 
Council of Economic Advisers that way, but 
the Federal Reserve Board has actual operat- 
ing responsibilities of formidable dimensions, 
ti exercises a large day-to-day influence over 
the national economy — a larger influence 


thaq any other part of the federal government. 

it is a source of deep annoyance to the 
White House that most people in the financial 
markets, in the United States and abroad, 
credit Paul VQlcker, the chairman of the Fed- 
eral Reserve — and not the Reagan economic 
program — for the drop in the inflation rate. 
But the opinion exists, and the Reagan admin- 
istration will endanger its own interests if it 
lets people think it is trying to undermine Mr. 
Vokker by appointing his critics to the board. 
The first effect would be warnings of higher 
inflation, the second, higher interest rates. 

The course of the American economy over 
the next several years wffl depend mainly on 
international influences — the flows of capital 
and the exchange rales. The Treasury Depart- 
ment's interest and resources in the interna- 
tional Add have declined for some years, and 
its top command is now focused on a wholly 
different concern, the president's tax bilL Most 
of the government’s expertise in international 
finance is now concentrated at the Federal 
Reserve It is not a good moment to incite 
quarrels there over the fine points of supply- 
side theory versus monetarism. The next ap- 
pointees to the Federal Reserve need to be 
named promptly — people who can contribute 
to the cmdal work now being carried on there 
and nowhere else in the U.S. government. 

— THE WASHINGTON' POST. 


Other Opinion 


Gandhi’s Gamble in the Punjab On the Thai Coop Attempt 


[Prime Minister Rajiv] Gandhi is involved in 
his biggest gamble yet. the Punjab elections. 
On that issue he has staked his entire record. 
The immediate and most worrying concern is 
security. The fear is that Sikh extremists may 
seek to disrupt the elections. If terrorists do 
unleash a campaign of mass killings, much 
more than the elections mD be washed away in 
the bloodshed. They could easily provoke a 
communal backlash from angry Hindus, both 
inside and outside Punjab. If this were to 
happen Punjab would once again collapse un- 
der the weight of its own discord. 

— The Times (London}. 


Reagan and the Sanctions 


Mr. Reagan has implicitly admitted that his 
theory of “constructive engagement” toward 
Pretoria's racist regime has failed. The “pun- 
ishment” be has decided to inflict on South 
Africa seems to have been dictated by domes- 
tic political needs, not moral considerations: 
The president has defused the conflict that 
would have ensued with Congress if, as was 
expected, it had voted for tougher sanctions. 
Unlike Mr. Reagan, who is not eligible for re- 
election, many senators and congressmen are 
sensitive to the negative effects of widespread 
public opinion toward a regime that the presi- 
dent himself calls “repugnant” 

— Le Monde (Paris). 


' There was absolutely no reason to stage a 
coup d’fctaL It was a ridiculous power-play 
that caused the country a tremendous loss of 
prestige. The coalition of political parties 
forming the government has been changed 
several times and there has been an orderly 
transfer of power. Elections have been held 
fairly and without any hint of mischief. 

To us in Thailand, this is and will be known 
as a tempest in a teapot But how other coun- 
tries will view this is difficult to say, and 
foreign investors are extremely sensitive peo- 
ple who are likely to' see a molehill as a moun- 
tain. Let the attempted coup be a warning to 
those antiquated self -del uders [who think] 
they can use the military to destroy democracy 
— 77k? Nation Review (Bangkok). 

Even those suspected of being coup leaders 
should be given a fair triaL It most be clearly 
demonstrated to all that we have the conns to 
dispense justice and a parliamentary system 
through which we can express our grievances. 
Coups have become a thing of the past because 
the people will not accept an authoritarian 
government imposed on them. Despite its 
faults, the Prem Tinsulanooda cabinet has 
done well under difficult circumstances, and it 
is up to the people to unite behind this admin- 
istration against attempts to get it out of office 
by the display and use of force. 

— 77w Bangkok Post. 


FROM OUR SEPT. 11 PAGES, 75 AM) 50 YEARS AGO 


1910; Reform Urged After Torero Dies 
SAN SEBASTIAN, Spain — Letters from 
Murcia, giving details of the tragic death of the 
torero Pepete in the bullfight there, are thrill- 
ing with horror the many Spanish opponents 
of the barbarous spectacle. Although no Span- 
ish Government would dare defy the taste for 
the “corridas de toros," there is a universal cry 
for reforms announced by Senor La Cierva, 
which he was unable to carry out after the fall 
of Senor Maura's Cabinet Reforms included 
the refusal of permission to young and inexpe- 
rienced “maradores” to enter the ring. Pepete 
had only three years’ practice, which is not 
considered enough for receiving the “altema- 
tiva” title of “matador." The title is bestowed 
upon the neophyte by one of the masters, who 
hands him a sword in public. After this, he is 
considered to be “de cartel” and is entitled to 
fight bulls of the most dangerous breeds. 


1935: Ty^esh'IsKffledmLotrisiaiia 
BATON ROUGE — Senator Huey P. Long 
died at 4:10 [on Sept. 9]. His final hours were 
passed in a coma, with his attendants admit- 
ting that death was inevitable afLer the King- 
fish had bidden farewell to his family. He was 
42 years old- Several hours before the dictator 
died, the bullet-ridden body of his assassin 
Dr. Carl A. Weiss Jr, was borne through a 
drizzling rain for burial. The Louisiana King- 
fish was one of the most colorful characters 
that ever stepped upon the American political 
stage. His unusual personality, combining bru- 
tality and political chicanery with demagogic 
ideas expressed in crude but effective rhetoric 
— he sponsored the “share the wealth” pro- 
posal — won him many thousands of support- 
ers among the discontented masses and made 
it possible for him to aspire to the highest 
office in the United States. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman ! 958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOIS1E 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


Deputy PabBther 
AtSOCUUc Pubtuhrr 
Associate Pub&dwr 


LEE w. HUEBNER, Publisher 
Exmaw Editor REN£ BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

Deputy Editor RICHA RD R MORGAN 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operation 

Assdhflt Editor FRANCOIS DESMAlSONS Director of QrcuUiMn 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Advertising Sates 
International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charlcs-de-Ganfle, 92200 NeuflJy^sur-SdiK, 

France. TeL: (1)747-1265. Tdex: 6I27I8 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 

Direct ear de la pubbaston: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Hennessv RtL, Hong Kong Tel 5-283618. Teiex 61170. 

Mantling Dtr. UJL : Robin MacKkhan, '63 Lang Aat. London WC2. TeL 836-4801 Tdex 262009. 

Gen Mgr. W Germany: W. La&baAJnedricktr. 15. 6000F/addiot/M. 71 0X9)726755. 72t 416721. 

capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Natuerre B 732021126. Commission Paritaire No. 61337. 

U.S. subscription: S322 yearly. Second-dots postage paid as Lang Island City, N.Y. 11101. 

*7 1985, international Herald Tribune. All rights named. 



ii- 


WEDNESDAY,. SEPTEMBER 11, 1985 


by political instability, and they may not 
want to court unpopularity at home by lend- 
ing to an unsavory regime. But the dam age 
this can do to South Africa may again be 
limited. A country with a large trade surplus 
does not depend on external finance the way 
a poor developing country does. And the 
possibilities of loopholes through winch cap- 
ital can still come in are considerable. 

The claim that economic sanctions will 
matre life even more difficult for blacks must 
also be considered Less defensible is the 
argument that sanctions will put more 
Americans and Europeans out of work be- 
cause sales to South Africa will fad We 
suspect that world trade union solidarity 
agains t apartheid is sufficient to resist such a 
plea — and there are many ways in which 
governments could help offset job losses. 

On balance, we believe the Reagan action 
should be welcomed, and backed by the 
actions of other governments. Sanctions 
alone may not bring the South African gov- 
ernment to its knees. But they can strength- 
en the pressure that white business is alrsudy 
exerting on the Botha government. We 
would even argue that it is morally right to 
oppose a distasteful regime by all available 
means, however limit ed the impact The 
moral imperative should not be sold short, 
even in today's cynical world. 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


...IfWIVWT i 

WUCH m 





In China? 



Relaxation 


f P 


Reaganwants access to the Sometmeduu 


Gorbachev: His Dominance Is Not Complete 


p RINCETON, New Jersey — Six 


months after Mikhail Gorbachev 
became general secretary of the Com- 
munist Party, most western com- 
mentators have concluded that he is 
already the undisputed master oT So- 
viet power and policy. But the real 
situation is different, as indicated by 
articles in the Soviet press and by 
conversations with officials in Mos- 
cow. Mr. Gorbachev is secure as par- 
ty leader, but bis plans for “deep 
transformations” in the economic 
system have encountered stubborn 

S si lion even attop echelons, as he 
is. and his power to legislate 
such reforms, much less to have them 
implemented, remains limited. 

That the struggle continues should 
come as no surprise. Soviet political 
succession has always been a long 
drama, never a single acL Every new 


By Stephen F. Cohen 

was nonsense; he had been meeting lives by East European governments. 


and had already 
abroad with the Frem 


meetings 
and Amen- 


by! _ _ .. 

In Jury, the equally authoritative Soviet Union — 


former Tatyana Zaslavskaya virtual- 
ly accused suc4L^group^interes^ ,, — 

an «■ — 


can presidents. Privately, some Mos- 
; Mr. Gorbachev 


party leader has needed years of pa- 
id coercion to 


tronage, compromise anc 
extend his authority over broad po- 
licy realms. And the fundamental 
conflict over the Stalinist economic 
system is now in its fourth decade. 
Every general secretary since Stalin 
has sought major changes in the 
economy, but none has succeeded. 

Nor do the leadership changes an- 
nounced since March suggest that 
Mr. Gorbachev is as dominant as he 
is portrayed in so many Western ac- 
counts. Except for Grigori Romanov, 
his only plausible (albeit weak) rival 
for the general secretaryship, no one 
has been removed from the Politbu- 
' ro. Its 13 voting members still include 
five aged but influential survivors of 
the conservative Brezhnev era — 
among them Nikolai Tikhonov, the 
80-year-old prime minister whose 
government bureaucracy forms the 
center of opposition to reform. 

As for the other voting members, 
including four promoted under Mr. 
Gorbachev, there is no reason to as- 
sume they are merely his political 
creatures. Like Mr. Gorbachev, sev- 
eral are relatively young, reform- 
minded men who rose rapidly under 
Yuri Andropov. But once promoted, 
former loyalists often turn out to 
have different ambitions, as both Ni- 
kita Khrushchev and Leonid Brezh- 
nev discovered. 

Moreover, Andrei Gromyko’s ele- 
vation from foreign minister to presi- 
dent can hardly be interpreted as a 


cow officials say that . 
wants the powerful office of prime 
minister. If so, be will have to wage a 
major battle to repeal a secret 1964 
resolution, adopted by the Central 
Committee when it ousted Khru- 
shchev, prohibiting future party lead- 
ers from holding the post 
An upsurge of oblique polemics in 
the Soviet press provides additional 
evidence of Mr. Gorbachev’s still lim- 
ited power. As always happens when 
the top leadership is divided, long- 
standing advocates and opponents of 
change in various areas perceive new 
opportunities or dangers and thus 
redouble their own efforts. Since 
March, the press has been filled with 
conflicting positions on everything 
from the Stalinist past to today’s Chi- 
na. On June 21, Pravda published a 


Gorbachev’s. 
aMy candid speec£ June II, Mr. Gor- 
bachev dropped the customary fic- 
tion of a united Soviet leadership. 
“The ministries,” he charged, “have 
no .interest in the economic experi- 
ment.” Since the ministries have rep- 
resentatives and allies cat the Politbu- 
ro and. the Central Committee, the 
obstacles to Mr. Gorbachev’s reforms 


long commentary condemning mar- 
ndioi 


ket reforms and foreign-policy initia- 


Kommunist featured two articles .de- 
fending those developments. ... 

Mr. Gorbachev’s economic poli- 
cies are at the center of these coxir 
flicts. Hinting at more reforms to 
come; he has called fora restructur- 
ing of the entire p lanning and- man- 
agement system by 1987. Such, a re- 
structuring would sharply reduce the 
direct control exercised by Moscow 
planners and ministries over local 
firms, give managers considerably 
more freedom to operate their enter- 
prises by “economic rather than ad 1 --leadership 
ministrative methods” and cut drasti- . form only to have it 
cally the vast middle-level 
bureaucracy of mima erial agencies. 

A nationwide expansion of Andro- 
pov's limited “experiment” of 1983, it 
threatens the positions of countless 
government officials and has aroused 
strong bureaucratic opposition. 

Inittponse. Gorbachev supporters 
have stepped up their attacks on “the 
ministerial apparatus.” In an Izvestia 
interview June 1, the weB-knqwn re- 


ion e of this is mrw. Twenty-years 
ago, the fledgling Brezhney-Kosygin 
a s imilar re- 
appear in the 
government bureaucracy. Blit though 
many circumstances remain the 
same, much has changed.. Given Mr. 
Gorbachev’s youth, the lagging Sovi- 
et economy and a growing reformist 
mood among the elite, be may suc- 
ceed, but not without a long straggle. 


- The writer is a professor of politics at 
Princeton University and a frequent 
commentator on Soviet affairs. 


Regan’s Failings as 'Prime Minister’ 


T^rASHINGTON — When Presi- 


victory for Mr. Gorbachev. The view 


Mr. Gorbachev “kicked him up- 
stairs” in order to seize control of 
foreign policy assumes that Mr. Gro- 
myko had monopolized the field and 
had opposed the new general secre- 
tary. There is no evidence for either. 
Major foreign- policy derisions are 
made in the Politburo, where Mr. 
Gromyko r emains a full member. 

Most significant, Mr. Gorbachev 
himself did not get the ceremonial 
presidency, which was sought and 
won by the three preceding party 
leaders because it gave them head-of- 
state status in international affairs. 
His public explanation — that he was 
too busy with domestic problems — 


dent Reagan was in the hospi- 
tal recovering from cancer surgery, 
his chief of staff and self-styled.prime 
minister wanted i.o make the daily 
round-trip from the White House to 
Bethesda Naval Hospital by helicop- 
ter. Donald Regan dropped the idea 
after the first lady. Nancy Reagan, 
expressed doubts about it, but the 
episode expressed a symbolic truth 
about Mr. Regan’s self-importance. 

As the president heads into the 
rough waters of his second term, Mr. 
Regan is big stuff in the White 
House. He has been indisputably in 
charge since taking over from James 
A. Baker 3d in February, and has 
been virtually a deputy president 
since Mr. Reagan's surgery. 

Departing from tradition, Mr. Re- 
gan saw to it that be was introduced 
at presidential speeches. He orga- 
nized the White House in a hierarchi- 
cal fashion that he preferred to de- 
scribe as corporate, becoming the 
funnel to the president for other aides 
who might have brought unpleasant 
information. Only Vice President 
George Bush and the president’s na- 
tional security adviser, Robert 
McFariane, have independent access, 
and Mr. Regan's men have denigrat- 
ed Mr. Bush and made no secret of 
their disliking of Mr. McFariane. 

By his own account Mr. Regan 


By Lon Cannon 


Remember when things go right that 
Regan had something to do with rf, 
however little.” 

Mr.‘ Baker would never .have:pnt 


By Anthony Lewis . 

S hanghai — we were .wanting .- 
on the Bund the famous watifcy* 
front esplanade to,*ben ; 

nan came np and asked ra Enghsb, 
“Where are you froin?^ Massachfc-: 

In a min u te a dozen. other yau^ ►. 
people had crowded around • 
Joined the conversation. They had 
learned Eng&h in ■scho dj.jii co llege; 
in one case m a mining mstitutaTtagr 
knew a lot about the Unacd State. ... 
One said a university classmate oT Jus 
was at the Massachusetts Institute_of ; V ' 
Technology as a viating studenLVJ.. 

It happens aD the tone m (mini 
nowadays. People are eager to try am,: ., 
their English, and they have no tea-. > 
ration in striking up conversations oa ^, 
the street Yet just at ewyeais aw the , 
Chinese feared any contact with ftp J 
signers. The briefest.encountcr could. .. 
bring a police warning or worse, •• 

This k a relaxed country in couk - ; 
parisoo with the recentriast—andrui. ... 
comparison with the Soviet Unm. J; 
U nofficial tpjigagm es and vulgar tab- . .* 
loids are printed and sdd eveiy--.;. 
where. Copying machines, which are . ' \ . 
closely controlled in- the Soviet;"* - 
Union, are readily available; hens.-. 
there are Cppy Shops, idcntificd by^ ? 
signs in Chinese ana. English. ^ , ' ;i.‘ v 
Bur one must beware of t hinkin g' 'Jp. 
that China is a free society hi : the.. - * 
the . Western sense. It is a one-party stare 
sabotaging Mr. whose constitution condemns the use 
r . And in a remark- ." of “any means whatsoever to trader- ... ( 
mine the socialist system.” ' ■ 

Criticism of past poliries is accept- 
able, indeed eagerly offered. -But peo- ^ 
pie are ^ more guarded about: ' 
current events. Yes, oonuptian scah-' . . . 
dais are aired in the official press, md/ ? 
management of -institutions criti- *■ 

. coed. But there is no open, debater^ - 
about fimdamehtid policy- 
Americans pay less attention te .y- 
human rights questions mOunathan - 
in the Soviet Union. Thai may be-:'” 
'becaure of a tendency to romanticize ’ 
China. Or R may be that Americans 
simply do not know the Chinese Sak- >* - 
harovs. But here also there are some 
wbo yearn for greater freedom. ' 
For a brid timetbosefeeluigs wrre 
allowed expression in pqsterson Be^ d# . 
mg’s Democracy Wall The leading;- , r : 

figure in that movement, Wea Jing^ - ’ 

• sheng, called for real dcniocracy and . 
individual rights guaranteed by law; •' - 
But in 1979 the experiment- was < 
crushed and Mr. Wei sentenced to.15 
years in prison for “counterrevohi- . ’ 
tiouary” propaganda and passing 
“mflitafy secrets” to a foreigner. 

His case evidently troubled the. - 
leadership. Last year. Amnesty Inter- ■* 
national said Mr. Wei was rqiortedly : 
bang held in solitaiy confinement. * 

But current reports ray he is being . 
wdl treated, not required to work ana . 
allowed batiks and visitors. Some 


fa 




\iic 




y . m 4 ' * 


» .*5 - , 


§£* % 




r^ ; 




a * h ‘ m 




IT' 




0- 


Xi>. 

I - 

' 


■fey-* 

**-■-- 

fc**"-' 


he was overdoing the prime minister 
routine, and Mr. Regan made a point 
of staying off the speaker’s platform 
when the president resumed his tax- 
overhaul campaign. 

In an interview in the Sept. 9 issue 


think Mr. Regan has become too big - ... 

for his britches. Even some of Mr. . dpwn.the Dresden* with^this XainL tbinfche maybe released soon. . 7. . y 
Regan's aides suggested to him that . praise of himself,-" ’ ■ lirfact,jOaicial policy on -freedom 

L - — ' ' : - Mr. Regan’s aides seem more loyal- . of speechjbaswavered lately. Hu Qili, 

to him than ; to " the president One alcey figure in the party secretariat, - 
subordinate credited Mr. Regan with cahed for “freedom of literature and 
resolving the TWA bostagehrias and art” uta- speech to the Chinese Writ- > 
with congressional arortiyaTfoCibc; ere Association last January. Some- - 
production of 50 MX ais^e^ Ih’> well-lmo^ jounialisis then wrote: 

Fact, Mr. McFariane.was. the/i^t ^t ^ev profession, too, needed 
man on the hostage crisis, r whete ihle ' freedom — with legal guarantees. “ f r 
president showed skill and restraint "' But in February, the party chair- V. 
and was architect of thet MX aefcord. . .man, Hu Yaobang, said that while 
The real question in the White “there mast be complete freedom of . 
House should tie not wbo is reqjonsi- creation ip literature;” journalism 
Me- for Mr. Reagans .vic&xte '.'but,'.* must not “<X)py tins slogan.” Journal- . . . 
who is willing to Warn huzrjdf defeats : lari’s function was “very different,” 1 
that may lie ahead. On tinsSeore, Mr. he said; it was to be “the party’s y - 
Regan has beat hied , and found- mouthpiece.” That line was said to be 



is---"-' 

s: 




if— ■ 
BS-— - 


c:“'- 


IS 


-.i v- 






By Pocho far 
heCSWSyndmn 


does not desire to change the pre&- 
itead, he f 


dent’s dunking. Instead, he has urged 
Mr. Reagan not to demonstrate 
“weakness" by compromising with 
his critics. 

Many Republican officeholders 


of Business Week, Mr. Regan offered 
revealing glimpses of his thinking. 
“One of the reasons I’ve gained so 
much prominence is because of the 
blame coming my way." he said. “It’s 
kind of nice for the president to be 
able to lay off the blame and say, ‘I 
didn't- do it, it was somebody down 
the line.’ There's nothing wrong with 
that as long as it goes both ways. 


wanting. He refuses to take seriously 
the assertion of Senate Republican 
leaders that the administration is 
fleeing from its responsibility to ad- 
dress the budget deficit. He does hot 
see tt as his rede to open the president 
to a variety of options, although Mr. 
Reagan tods to shine when offered 
choices that go beyond ratification of 
hisjiraudices. 

Neither ego nor ideology is Mr. 
i’s biggest problem, however. 


My- 


iece/' That line was said 1 
by the chief party prqpai 
dist, Deng Liqun, but then in. . 
he lost his job. 

Behind the uncertainty is the fear 
that too much freedom 'wiQ lead -to . 1 
draos. It is an ancient fear in China, a - 
huge, diverse country held together- , 
by tyranny for most of its history. . 

“It win not work to take Weston 
technology without Western freedom . j 
to express individual ideas,” onc in- ...‘ 
teliectual told me. “In China, offir * 


M 


Bv I 


Tffi.vCEiL 






He has been hurt most by political oials are too used to -stating their 


*«i:sd 


Serving the Public, and the Pocketbook 


By William Safire 




W ASHINGTON — Politicians are making money 
as never before, and that is wrong. Public service 
should not be such a direct road to pnvate gain. 

David Stockman spent four years drawing a relative- 
ly low salary as head of the Office of Management and 
Budget, then swung a $2-million deal for his memoirs. 
In effect, the fame he gained in his job supplemented 
his government salary ' 

House T 

have sigm 

Patrick will get an additional SI mill i nn for lectures. 
Nothing new there: Ever since Mark Twain made it 

get out of debt 
1 especially 
ting out 

Me too. I was making $28,000 as a White House 
speech writer, and contracted for a 5250.000 book ad- 
vance when I departed. After the Nixon fall, the 
publisher reneged (watch that acceptability danse!) 
but the principle is the same: The salary of the person 
in power, or in proximity to power, most now be 
calculated by combining his public pay with his post- 
public bonus for being celebrated or spilling what he 
has learned. The formula: Real salary equals public 
payroll plus private bonus divided by years in office. 

So what’s wrong? Does the lure of memoir mega- 
bucks not increase the amount of information avail- 
able about the inner workings of government? Doesn't 
almost everyone who invests -time in government come 
out more valuable in the private sector? 

Sure, sure, and no true free-enterpriser win knock 
the auction market for enhanced talent 
But something else is afoot Book-contract bonanzas 
and media-biggie status are no longer surprise fallouts 
from public service. Thai bonus or celebrity is now 
factored into almost every political career plan. The 
altruism that used to attract good people to politics is 
passe. So is simple power lust. The whopping new 
profit in high-level politics is stripping the profession 


or what once was a noble sense of personal sacrifice. 
Idealism, shmidealism — politics pays. 

We should stop letting political figures get away with 
legal graft on the ground that public service is such a 
financial ‘burden. 

For more than four years, the presidential aide 


Michael Denver proclaimed loudly of the horrors of 

'.To 


having to live on a 560,000 salary. To soothe his psyche 
the Republican National Committee put Ms wife on its 
payroll, in effect doubling the Deaver political rake. 

Senator Paul Laxalt may not directly be gettinghis 
Senate salary supplemental from the Republican Par- 
ty, but his daughter is on the payroll as a consultant for 
a reported 55,000 a month, and her framer partner in 
public relations is making another $5,000 a month. 
Stipulate that both could earn as much outside of the 



the payroll? 

Why aren’t the Democrats, who raise only SI fra 
every 56 the Republicans raise, pointing to this as 
evidence of nepotism or ethical callousness? Why do 
they not make an issue or the payments made to 
President Reagan’s daughter for (he sort of thing that 
Margaret Truman and Julie Nixon used to do as 
volunteers? Answer: Because the Democratic National 
Committee is unwilling to ray how much it has paid 
Jimmy Carter’s son Chip so far this year. 

Both national committees have allowed themselves 
to become conduits for contributions to the families of 
the famous and powerful. Because nobody evidently 
sees this as shameful, it is likely to grow, adding to the 
gilding of the good life of politics. 

I see nothing wrong with politicians using contacts 
to get children entry-level jobs or volunteer intern- 
ships. I see plenty wrong with die backdoor financing 
of officeholders' incomes, especially when political life 
offers such a huge balloon payment at its conclusion. 

The New York Times. 


inexperience and failure to 
that politics, is a special art 
which he knows very little. It is 
doubtful that Mr. Regan, at Merrill 
Lynch, would have employed a poli- 
tician who did not know a stock op- 
tion from his elbow. Butins contempt 
for politicians and what they have to 
teach him is ifl-conceeJed. 

Mr. Regan has much to recorit- 
mend him. What he lacks in political 
understanding, be makes up for in 
directness ana candor. He has had 
the courage to attach his name to bis 


ideas and having people follow.? But 
others ray. that Western “decadence” 
must be kept out. 

One great reality may limi t retreat 


|kfea« : \ c.- 

fefis- 


from today’s relatively relaxed atmo- 
bere. That is the m 


memory of dw/.'H 
Revolution, with the brutal- j. 
tries it inflicted on so many. But even 
that is not certain in a society that has ■[' 
seen so many sharp chan©*. . \ ... 

When an editor said young people 
scorned the absurdities and honors r 
of the Cultural Revolution, I asked:*' 

o w ^ So those bad times cannot return? Hc ' V 

inions. It is certainly no mystery soswered: “It should be so, and 1 J 
ly the president likes someone who * w P e 11 will be so.” ■ 

The New York Times. f 


j i 

- (Soai a 

"Olorf*-., 


Ct-i-: 


shares his outlook, optimism, com- 
petitiveness and robust good humor 
to the degree that Mr. Regan does. ; 

But at a time when the president 
desperately needs to set aside some 
cherished fallacies — that the deficit 
will dismjpear through growth, or 
lhaL the South African government is 
“reformist” — his chief .of. staff does 
not seem up to the task. 

The Washington Past. . 


‘ic: 

?t!£^ 


Letters intended for publication 

should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor* and must contain the writ- 
eris s ignature, name and full ad y 
dress. Letters should be brief ' ami 
rme subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible far the return qf 
unsolicited manuscripts. 




Q <V-_ 


i£x“ i.. 


INTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Nndear Asymmetry AMadona^NotaChimi 

Resardine the editbrM “ 7 ** n,h~ . ... 


>S3s 

JtiiwT*** 
a 


y -2*5? 


Regarding the editorial “ The Other 
Talks in Geneva” (Aug, 3/j,- 




The distinction between mid car 
and nonnuclear weapons countries 
was not created by the Nodear Non- 
proliferation Treaty. It predates the 
treaty, whidi was meant not to cor- 
rect the asymmetry, but to prevent a 
bad situation fromgetting worse. The 
nuclear asymmetty is tolerated by an 
overwhelming majority of nations: 
But to keep U.S.-Soviet arms control 
separate from the problem of nuclear 
proliferation in the rest of the world.' 
m suggested by the editorial, may m 
the long run be impossible. As long as 
the nuclear powers act as if nucter 
weapons were politically and mffi- 
ranly useful, some nonnuclear weap- 
ons countries may fed that they too 
must obtain these advantages. ' 
JOZEF GOLDBLAT. 

Geneva. . 


AUiaer Sparks, in Ins 
tmuuon cohnm^So Botha w*^- 
Jhs Mmd and Thumbed His Nbse”-^ 
(Aug. 20). writes about Mr. Botha’s i . 
intent to draw “a semantic distinct 
t J° n -'S et 7'? 11 ‘ritiBmshro’ and 
■tionality, . iHje distinction is notjnst *: - 

lan 5 ua g c oa f . 
U5. parapom: ."Ihe Seoetm. of. i 
Stoteof the UmicdSiatesof America .X 
hereto requests all whomlt may coh^ ■ 

to pramt the citizcnfsVnatirai--- 
aUsl named H _fTrf7 . - 


iTJvii* 


% 




Tfaaooi 


MS 6 








■ 






jvi lid 

■ myself, when fining A* 

- - --r-o,~~ses or hotd cards. A f SrV 
Mbve Amencan is a UA aafidmL f s 

.citizen. So one cannot legally . 

oners national! ty.as “AmSSa"^. - i ' 
ALEXANDER S. REINHARDT^ % ", .. . 
’ Ii5braL >;<~v 






Ai 

















:: ;v' 


■•V 7; -i 

yr - - , " • 





INTEBWAT10HAL HERALD TRIBUWE . WEDNES DAY, SEPTEMBER 11.1985 

INSIGHTS ^ "' r 


Page 7 


a » Vto?' • 


r tei» 
W£22^ 

iid 


i o:.7r>.r^,- 


-C.'iJ.TA-aiV 


r. -:?:rwri 


s •_•. k*.v- 

x-i:* 
.:■;:* k 


:.-J .it 
• csr. 

:■ ••: Veras:: 

. i - - v- 






discontent 
W Yugoslavs 
Dims Tito’s 
Reputation 


By Michael Dobbs 


1*41 

'•a&fcr; 

as 


W*M*gt°* Poa 5 ^** 


J-ED-Yugoslawa ~ The historical repu- 

SSJ’SSSSSS’S 


as 

S®** 

d ■■■Vila jj 

*Gs 

**#15 
^ ■ 

^nTj- 

^Ssi’jfc^ 

St, 

?■>*&£ 
iai 5WS.fi: 

•£jC\ 

* iiiau^- 

Tast a* , 

^■-^Asaig 

BiCanesgi 


uprrnngE^amst Gennan occupation and went 

rtfrfS a M erf strength with the Sana 
“Wtator, Joseph Stalin. 

surroundings of Lah» 



Wobblies Struggle 
To Keep Union Alive 


By William A. Serrin 


Nnv York Times Sente r 



Unrfnd Pre» Inl uu ion a ) 


t>i5 CT! L™ „ surroundings of Like 

j^^^^^^o^via.’sprewar longs retreated 

reopened as a iuxury S ho^^j^stsw^to -. Tito at 86, at a nonafigned conference in 1978, two years before his death, 

through, marble halls decorated with frescoes of 

Jugoslav partisans blowing up Nazi hi resolutions or carries them out very slowly. — but there always was someone to knock their come instead a confederation. A recent study 


workl War JJ and husky women laboring to People are loang hope." 
reconstruct a devastated coontiy. Inflation has soared as the government stni 

Ssewhere in Yugoslavia, productive uses gles to pay back forage debts of more than $. 


C HICAGO — The convention got under 
way an hour late. The masking tape 
broke loose and a banner fell off the wall 
The report of the general executive board could 
not be presented. It was said to be in the mail. 
Another temporary chairman bad to be elected 
to replace the first temporary chairman, who 
also was on the luncheon committee and had to 
go out for food. 

Yet, when the Industrial Workers of the 
World gathered here late last month, it was a 
satisfying convention at that. 

Only 22 Wobblies (the group's nickname, 
some say, was derived from a mispronunciation 
of the abbreviation IWW) were on band. But 
this remnant of the famous radical union was 
committed to keeping alive the old group, which 
was dedicated to the formation of ‘'one big 
union®' and probably was the most storied orga- 
nization in the history of the .American labor 
movement. 


heads together in the event of a crisis. Now, by showed that the level of trade among the Yugo- 
contrast, Yugoslavia is suffering from a combi- slav republics has been decreasing steadily and 


nation ol excessive political interference in the now is proportionately lower, in terms of per- 


gradually are being found for the chain, of pala- billion accumulated in Tito’s last decade. Un- running of the economy and a paralyzed ded- centage of national income, than trade among 


rial residences sped 
Some have been tun 


constructed for Tito, employment is rising. Living standards are bad: son-making apparatus. 


tome have been turned into museums. Others u a b° ut 8>* levd of the mid-1960s, in the 
aye been handed over to the local authorities as opmioaof many economists. 

lllnc fnr ‘ A L_n e. - ■ TKv^#r n iw d fttn >. frrwn Tnt^maftArtnl \Xat\a. 


“The basic reasons for our economic crisis are 


different West European countries. 

For the outside world, the key question of 


political,’' insisted Vojislav Stanovric, a profes- course is whether the tensions that have sur- 


villas for diqingii^ h rd visitors- Under pressure from the International Mooe- sor of political science in Belgrade. “We can live faced in Yugoslavia over the past few years can 

The “de-Tuoizarion” nrooess muv nnj w tary Fund and Western banks, austerity has with weak government as long as the economy be contained or whether the country is headed 

l ... . .J ^ i_ : j ■ i-j « «- - j -ri u . 1 ... !». r„ m... v. i- 


beat as startling ^ nqKtif a i u nh ^avak that bem imposed. But leaders seem unable to agree docs not suffer. The problem here is that the sooner or later for an explosion. Given Yugosla- 

took place m Spam after Franco OTGnna after °n political or economic ref onns. politicians control the economy.” via’s sensitive geo-political position, any social 

Mao. But to a foreign journalist returning to a ^Tie roots of Yugoslavia’s present crisis go In retrospect, many informed Yugoslavs now upheaval here could have important conse- 

country that he knew well while Titowas afive, bade to die aftermath of World War I when the blame Tito for lack of foresight. Most of the ills quences for both East and West, 
the changes are nonetheless dramatic. country came into being as tbe kingdom of afflicting the Yugoslav economy and political There are plenty of alarmist scenarios around. 

Tito’s p olitica l hri rs hyyg d isc o vered that tfy-y Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. Uniting the South system can be traced directly to decisions made Their point of departure is the assumption that 

have inherited a potentially explosive combona- Slav (“Yugo-Slav”) states after so many ceutu- during his lifetime. the present stalemate cannot continue forever, 

lion of economic strains, popular dis co ntent n® °f separation proved a difficult task. “Tito was a great politician in the sense that Some kind of popular revolt or pre-emptive 

and nation at unresL After tbe second World War, Tito sought to he was brilliant at achieving and holding onto strike by the ruling bureaucracy to preserve its 

Tbe poBtical atmosphere is freer nourthau it • privileges cannot he ruled out 


was five years ago but, ht materia) terrene Ynon. 

siavs are much worse off. People grumble more There is a widespread mood of disillusionment and 
openly than they ever did before. There is a * 

^’ us ^* a ^ 011 9 8* if the country is sinking slowly while the 
P°*tticians argue among themselves. 

T_ U. if. f-.i .. . .. • 


To be sure, his fatherly portrait continues to - 

gaze down from hundreds of thousands of office ,, , . „ , , 

V ‘Mils and his tomb in Belgrade still is a place of Yugoslavia. Preaching a slogan of 

•pilgrimage. But hia SSnSwand ? ro ?S hood ^ among the different 

mimtsnolonger seem^SSevant. Sou* Sav nation^ he set up a federal state m 

“Pe^le Sstand that Tito left behind a wbicfa^ each republic was granted a large mea- 
systero that cannot function,” remadeed AC- ^ a. 


privileges cann ot he ruled OuL 

“There are so many potential conflicts here,” 

racinnmpnf avul said a Belgrade intellectuaL “This country could 

nsionmeni ana lurn a LthaBtm a few 

* 1 .^ Yugoslavia’s very complexity, however, acts 

lg slowly while the a kind of gua rantee against dramatic political 

shifts. In a country of half a dozen different 
nationalities, and even more ethnic minorities; 

there is no such thing as a unified political class. 

Nor is there a unified political opposition. Tbe 
said Dobrica Coac, Serbia’s most rival nationalisms have a tendency to cancel 


prominent novelist. “But be did not have a clear each other out. 


wth Slav nations, he set up a federal state in strategy for leading the country into the modern “Workers in Zagreb would never unite with 
bich each republic was granted a large mea- age. He was old and conservative.” workers in Belgrade,” commented Mr. Stanov- 

re of autonomy. The economic difficulties have coincided with tic, explaining why an all- Yugoslav protest 

Tito was dubbed “the last of the Hapsbajgs” a marked resurgence of nationalism in several movement along tbe lines of Poland's Solidarity 
r the Mush historian AJJP. Taylor — not just parts of Yugoslavia in the five years since Tito’s trade union is impossible to conceive in Yugo- 
cause of his regal inclinations but also as a death. In Kosovo, an autonomous province of slavia. 

ibule to his skiD in ruling over a hodgepodge of Serbia, there have been riots by ethnic Albani- A much more likely form of protest — and 


~ ^ ^ tobutetohisskinmrulmgoverahodgeftodgeof 

To maintain the delicate balance among the 
count 

lwiHeruhm QrvI tmOertXtt Of ElVOpe. _ . . _ . 


hajlo Markovic, a dissident philosophy profes- u T??? 1 . a resurgence o nauonalism in several move 

sor at BdgraS Unhwsiv.^^OTi^his bythe Bnudi hrstrman AJ J>.Taytor —not just parts of Y ugoslavia in the five years smee Tito’s trade 

name is not mentioned or, wfaraAi^Mbody ^ “ dmal,0M 1 ** ■*» ^ ko » v °. « autonomous province of slavia 

n • 7 tribute to his skiD mruline over a hodeenodge of Serbia, there have been nots bv ethnic Albani- Ai 


A much more likely form of protest — and 


ans demanding their own republic and pressure one that already has been occurring to some 
cm Serbs to leave. This in turn has caused a extent — is tbe passive go-slow. When water 


leadership representing the' six republics and 
two autonomous regions now governs the Yugo- 


Yngosla via’s new rulers emphasize Tito’s 


enormous merit in becoming thefirst Commu 
Zj -TfjTr*:*’ -r f "-Tf* “T, msl header to stand up to tbe Sonet Union ir 


backlash of nationalist feeling among the Serbs supplies failed in tbe Serbian town of Kraljevo a 
who regard Kosovo as the heart of their medt- few weeks ago, there were no public demonstra- 


eval state. 


. j _,i_ ' jZrn,;,u f ,, ujsi leaner to stand up to toe bowet Union in , 

* 13 ahOOSt “ MC?,e fQr 194B —a historic step that resulted in Yugosla- T N Slovenia, which is Yugoslavia’s richest “Rebellions happen in limes of prosperity.” 
pc 5tV~~). . ■ •• _ vis’s expulsksi from the Ccminform. They also I republic, political conversation is dominat - said Mr. Bostovic. “These days people rebel in a 

ntranfitiw point to the unprecedented period of stability A ed by alleged economic unfairness: The wav that is tvoical of Socialist countries: Thev 

SS ™ YugpsIaviaenjoyedundCT fito. industrious Slovenes complain that their hard- 

a “ODLfKMcRl system a a young one.' said onrnd lbmga earnmey a being used tombri. 
m ■ ujvuuj' mu, Rfrjjcic, a former prime minister and dize unprofitable mdustnes m the underdevet- 

wonu ne a larce. • • Communist Party leader from Slovenia. “Bui it oped regionsofthe country. 

. has already demonstrated its strengths, particu- “Yugoslavia is no longer a single political 

T HE mood of ordinary people was cap- lariy if you compare it to tbe so-called system of community with the same issues that excite or 
lured in a plaintive letter to the Belgrade ‘real So cialism* in other East European awn- divide,” remarked Dragan Boskovic, a commen- 
weekly -Nm a couple of weds ago: “Peo- tries.” tator on the Slovenian newspaper Dek>. “Each 

pie have begin to lose confidence both in each While Tho was alive, the system seemed to republic has its own particular concerns.” 

,, other and in a political leadership which either is work well enough. The leaders of each republic Many Yugoslavs say their country has moved 
not able to cany out its own detiaons and inevitably defended their own sectional interests away from being a federation — and has be- 


tions. But production in local factories is report- 
ed to have dropped by about 30 percent. 
“Rebellions happen in times of prosperity.” 


JL ed by alleged economic unfairness: The way that is typical of Socialist countries: They 
industrious Sktanes complain that their hard- simply stop working.”.. 


I N* May 1986, the Wobblies will host in 
Chicago an international conference of m3~ 
itani unionists to discuss unemployment, 
working conditions, transnational employers 
and other labor matters. 


earned foreign currency is being used to subsi- Yugoslavia's new leaders acknowledge that 


dize unprofitable industries in the underdevel- the economic and social chmaie has worsened 


oped regions of the country. since Tito’s death. But they insist that wide- 

“ Yugoslavia is no longer a single political spread popular support for Tito’s policies of 
immunity with the same issues that excite or independence and nonalignment abroad and 
vide,” remarked Dragan Boskovic, a commen- workers’ self- management at home have helped 
tor on the Slovenian newspaper Dekx “Each maintain the country’s political stability, 
public has its own particular concerns.” “People may want to gel rid of us,” joked Mr. 


roDiDe Slovenian newspaper uekx 
iblic has its own particular concerns.’ 


republic nas its own particular concerns. People may want to gel nd of us, joked Air. 

Many Yugoslavs say their country has moved Ribicic about politicians, “but they want to 
away from being a federation — and has be- keep the system.” 


It soon will begin selling a 1986 calendar to 
mark the 1 00th anniversary of the Haymariet 
fight, in which laborers who were demanding an 
eight-hour workday demonstrated in Haymar- 
ket Square, led by a small group of radicals. 
When the police attempted to break up the 
protest, a bomb exploded and a riot ensued. 
Seven policemen and four other persons were 
killed and 100 were wounded. The eight leaders 
of the protest were tried and convicted of inrit- 


Profiling: Stalking a Criminal’s Mind 


By Bob Baker 


Las Angela Tana Service 


■ LOS ftffOELES 

Police Bulletin 


More like floatin 
you're flying| 


.1 .J to catch a man who was setting off 
bombs in movie theaters and other public places 
around the city, asked a psychiatrist, Janies A. 
Brussel, to study the letters and other evidence 
tha t the so-called “Mad Bomber” had left be- 
hind. 

Mr. Brussel’s conclusion: Tbe suspect was a 
quiet, meticuloos, paranoid East Etoopean man 
from 40 to 50 years old who lived with a maiden 
aqnt or sister in a Connecticut city, and when 


omeyu. «»ue*r*0# or roues ttmxwam. cm r or too mat*#*, c*uk*«* 

8 wn t. tiMm . OM&vf 90km v. 


% t ■ ywr 


fwm i wr , Mt Q Uit ». 


“WIGHT$TAUG£R” MURDERER 
mWmWtfQN WANTED 


wGwglfiag 




the police caught him he would be wearing a 
, , double-breasted suit Buttoned. 

J When the police arrested Geargo Metesky, of 
Waterbury, Connecticut, they found Aar. Bras- 
seTs profile was extraordinarily accurate, right 
down to the suiL _ 

It is that the episode remains tbe finest 
moment in the much-romanticized art of psy- 
chological profiling, a process m which an un- 
known suspect’s next move is predicted by the 
dues he leaves behind. 

Today, the Federal Bureau of Investigation 

maintains a vaunted computerized profiling op- 
eration in Quantico, Virginia. Portrayed as 
“mind hunters” by a wave of favorable publici- 
ty, profilers handle 300 referrals a year from 
local law enforcement agencies who are looking 
for serial IriDere or rapists. . . 

However, if past cases are any indication, the 
bureau’s descriptions contain little that leads 
the police directly to the crim i na l s . . 

The best the profile probably will do ts save 
detectives valuable time by winnowing out 
many tips that have poured in. 

-It’s not going to tefl you that’s hes a blue- 
collar worker who goes to church three times a 
t week.” said Robbie Robertson, a former Michi- 
gan state police captain experienced m serial 

murder cases. . . , . 

“Killers don’t leave that much information at 
the scene about their pewmaWes,” said Dr. 
James Alan Fox, a criminal justice professor at 
Northeastern University in Boston who coaa- 
thored a book earlier this year on mass murder- 

CI %ob Keppd, a member of tbe Wadringtan 
state attorney general’s office, sad: 
not really telling us anything new. Mr. Keppd. 
spent four years as chief detective m the search 
for Ted Bundy, a serial kilter, and^is now a 
consultant to a task force seeking the “Green 
River Killer” who has murdered numerous 
prostitutes in Seattle. “What they’re .idling us 
are things they think are most prominent m a 

^The basic advantage that the FBI’s profilers 
•t have over local investigators m correlating dues 
and behavior is experience. 

Since 1978, agents in the FBI Academy’s 
Behavioral Science Unit have been conducting 
orison interviews with murderers such as 
Charles Manson: David Berkowte, wbo isscrv- 
ing time in prison for tiw “Stffl of San murders 







*1* , 







m\i 


! Uvv ^ ’J 


V • \\ m ^ 

m 





► • 'S. i- 


' V - jjj * 




in New York; and Richard Speck, who mur- 
dered eight student nurses in Chicago in 1966. 

Nearly 50 murderers have answered a 57-page 
questionnaire that examines details such as how 
the kilter approached his victim, what he said to 
the victim and how he reacted after he killed. 

Advice given in past cases provides a glimpse 
of the areas ret which the profilers have concen- 
trated; 

• Did the killer stab the victim’s sex organs? 

The more virions that kind of mutilation, the 
greater are; the odds that tbe killer knew the 
victim. . - ■ 

• Did the ItiDer use whatever weapon was. 
available, such as an iron fireplace accessory? 
That i ndica tes that the act was impulsive, and 
should lead detectives to suspect that the kilter 
fame mi foot If the kilter brought his own 
weapon, he probably drove there. 

• Does the HDing appear to have been com- 
mitted with sudden fray? That indicates a 
youthful killer, possibly nervous and deter- 
mined to subdue his victim quickly. Si milar ly, 
the more methodical, sadistic murderer leads 
investigators to suspect a person in his 20s or 
30s. 

• Did the killer cany away an artifact, like a 
bracelet or a compact? He may be doing that so 
that be can later recreate the experience by 
himself. 

• In the case of a rape, did the attack take 
place with anyone else around? That can indi- 
cate that the suspect has a self-styled “macho” 
personality. 

• In a sla-diing j was the victim killed with a 
single slash, across the throat? That should lead 
detectives to suspect that the suspect has killed 
before. 

“It draws yon away from the suspects that are 


ire in character,” said Mr. KgspeL 

He’ said that a profile produced in 1974 by 
local authorities and psychological experts in 
the search for Mr. Bundy, a convicted loiter 
suspected of murdering as many as 40 girls and 
women mostly in the Northwest, “helped us 
pick out or choose our hundred best suspects 
out of the 3.500 that we bad. One of them was 
Bundy.” 

It is relatively rare that a profile actually leads 
police to the ItiDer. 

According to a source familiar with the profil- 
ing process, a 1981 FBI study found that of 192 
cases in which a profile was prepared, a suspect 
was arrested 88 times. Of those 88 cases, the 
profiles led to the identification of the suspect 
15 times, or 17 percent. In about three-quarters 
of the 88 cases, the profile was thought to have 
helped focus tbe investigation. 

The art of profiling has had failures as weD- 
publirized as Mr. BrusseTs success. In the early 1 
1960s, a committee of psychiatrists and psycho- 
logists was established to catch the “Boston I 
Strangler.” 

Tie experts derided that he was not one man ! 
but two. .They said that both lived alone and 
were probably schoolteachers, and that one was 
a homosexual. The person who confessed to 13 
strangulations, Albert DeSalvo, was a hetero- 
sexual construction worker with a wife and 
children. 


^Most 

loomft 


comfortable 
ce to rest your 




2 Contoured support for /*. •• 
thesmall of your back. "?:v 


v;^Spil 




mg violence. Four were later hanged in the . 
officers' deaths. 

The group also expects to issue a record of old ' 
Wobbly songs. It should be out by next May 1. a 
spokesman said. 

Ir might be expected that an outfit like the 
IWW would be in the red. Such is not the case. - 
The convention reported assets of $34,098 and 1 
liabilities of $1,48 1 for a surplus of $12,617. 

During the convention, Fred Thompson, 85, a 
sawmill and construction worker who joined the 
union in 1922, and who co-authored a book on 
the Wobblies. “The IWW: Its First 70 Years,” 
showed a visitor his red-covered IWW member- 
ship book with stamps designating payment of 


Tbe weekend media ghere was the 43d gener- 
al convention of the rWW, founded in June 
1 905 in Chicago by 1 12 resolute radicals, includ- 
ing William D. Haywood, tbe Reverend Thomas 
J. Hagerry, Lucy Parsons, Darnel de Leon and 
Eugene V. Debs. 

The union, which embraced all industries and 
aimed to abolish tbe wage system and create a 
new order, achieved its greatest vigor from 1915 
to 1918, with a membership of perhaps 30,000 
people. But it was confronted with internal 
dissension, iron-willed employers and govern- 
ment (aw enforcement agencies. Its strength 
waned after World War L leaving what Mdvyn 
Dubofsky, in his book “We Shall Be All: A 
History of the Industrial Workers of the 
World,” called an “invaluable legacy” for 
Americans wbo favor “direct action, passive 
resistance and aril disobedience.” 

The Wobblies. however, are still organizing. 
Drives are under way among apple pickers in 
Washington, education workers in Ohio, print- 
ers in Michigan and shipworkers in Alaska. The 
group represents workers in about 15 aihops, 
mostly typesetting. Membership in 36 states, 
Europe and Guam, now is 500 to 1,000, up from 
about 100 in the 1950s, according to Jon Bek- 
ken, IWW general secretary-treasurer. 

Mr. Bekken, a typesetter from San Diego who 
joined the Wobblies in 1978. said he sees a 
renaissance for the IWW. Tbe economy will 
stagnate, be said, and the IWW. with a base of 
slow, steady growth, will be the “instrument to 
launch a dramatic growth.” 

“1 just got Lane Kirkland’s Labor Day mes- 
sage.” Mr. Bekken said. “He says the labor 
movement is stronger than ever. I just don’t 
believe it.” He told the convention delegates: 
“It's quite dear at (he AFLrCIO and the busi- 
ness unionism it represents is failing.” 





The New Yorfc Tib 


monthly dues. It bore the old Wobbly message: 
“Instead of the conservative model, ‘A fair day’s 
wage for a fair days work.' We must inscribe on 
our banner a revolutionary watchword, ‘Aboli- 
tion of the wage system.' ” 

The radicals, mostly young, except for Mr. 
Thompson, wbo gathered in a hall above a 
cabaret on Chicago's North Side, seemed no less 
determined than the radicals of old. despite 
their small numbers and seeming problems with 
administration. 

Carlos Cortez, a long-haired man in a big hat, 
was elected temporary chairman, following an 
IWW tradition. If tbe general secretary-treasur- 
er acted as chairman, he might “dominate you 
or railroad you,” Mr. Bekken told tbe delegates. 

Addressing each other as “Fellow Worker,” 
reports from IWW regions, or branches, were 
quickly made. Activities were reported in rides 
around the nation. 

The recording secretary. Allan Anger, told the 
members they had to make written reports in 
addition to their oral reports. “I’m not going to 
write all this stuff down,” he said. 

Mr. Bekken, a thin, articulate man who earns 
$275 a week as general secretary-treasurer, said 
he knows tbe IWW is smalL Bui be, like other 
Wobblies, does not believe he is beating his head 
against a walL 

“It’s hard for us to organize when people are 
real scared of losing their jobs," Mr. Bekken 
said, echoing complaints of mainstream unions. 
“Capitalism is not about to collapse" because erf 
IWW activities, he added. 

‘T never died,” an old labor anthem says of 
Joe Hill, the Wobbly martyr, convicted of mur- 
der and executed by a firing squad in November 
1915 in Utah. 

Mr. Bekke n said the IWW never died either. 


when 


i ' -&K- (w 


• 8 ! 


> When you tift back - 
1 the seat cushion tilts up. 


4 Put yourfeet up - 
it's made for it 


TWA's new Ambassador Class seats are a new experience. 


No other business dass has seats like 
theseTheyVenewThe widest business 


dass seals. They’re exclusive to TVU% 747 
Ambassador Class 


Flying to and from America will never toe Atlantic F !y TWAs 747 Ambassador 

be the same a^m. You can realty relax on Class. 


Dr. Fox, tbe Boston criminal justice profes- 
sor, said that while he believes the FBI has set a 
new standard for profiling, law enforcement 
sometimes puts too much emphasis on the value 
of profiles. 

“Serial Jailers tend to be very good at what 
they do; they’re the cream of the crop,” he said. 


To sit in them is to float Perfectly relaxed 
They curve to support eveiy part of your 
bodyThertfs even a special legand foot rest 


toe fl^TtWbrlc in comfort Sleep serenely 
Of couree these seats are only six 
across. There's plenty of teg room and 
plenty of space all round 

Try the new experience cffloa&^acrass 


But you can always enjoy 6-across 
seating on aff our transatlartlic aircraft. 
VburTVAA Main Agent will tell 
you afl about it 


Leading the way to the USA ymBi 


J 



Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEPNESDAY/SEFTEMBBR 11, 1985 




NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE index 




Opon 

Hteh 

LOW 

Lost 1 

CBfc 

Indus 

1337 134655 132682 1333^5 — 

583 

Trww 

4 M 36 

mat 

67 X 46 

67673 — 

269 

Util 

15839 

15890 

1 SSM 

15598 - 

2 J 7 

Comp 

B 225 

«SJU 

54613 

549.17 — 

X 42 


ftriUMcIM 

liMuitntito 
Tronap. 
UtmtHM 
Pi non co 


High Low Clow cow 

109JDB 108X1 10»32 — OJ0 
124.93 12*31 12431 — 082 
108,13 ID 7 J 3 107.33 — (MJ 
5736 563V 5679-072 
113.17 mss 11135 — M* 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 



Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Binr Sales ■Stitt 

S«Pt. 9 154382 *20721 1875 

Seal. 6 I514B3 MUSS U48 

Sept . 5 — ■■■_ 16 & 2 S 1 370.101 7.191 

Sect. 4 M 5£$5 434474 583 

Seol.a 140845 434240 TJM 

'Included In the solas figures 


Tuesdays 

NiSE 

Closing 


VoL at 4 Pjll 1 MJ 3 M 0 B 

Prey.4PJW.vol OfiSMn 

PwreoMoridoMctoe lOMftm 


Tables include IM nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on wall street and 
do not reflect lode trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


Advancod 
Declined 
-Unchanged 
Total lawn 
New HUe 
New Lows 
vemme un 
volume down 


. Owe Prev. 

IS 38 

380 307 , 

222 342 

777 774 

V 10 

• 14 8 

2M44£fl 
5B.ws.ma 


Composite 

industrial* 

plnonar 

insurance 

Utilities 

Bonks 

Tramp. 


■ Weak Tear 

1 Ch'ga Ago Asa 

2 — L54 2WJ6 277JQ 

1 _.T.W mu’ 30353 

2 — 1.93 38255 38 J I 1 

3 — 1.18 31744 3455 * 
i — 1 D 0 2742 S JW -47 
j-030 mw-gM* 
7 + 1 A 9 273.10 27559 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Htan Law Close Orta 
Industrials aWJfl 20740 208 . 14—133 

Tronap- ' 17 X 34 171 J 1 17204 —029 

Utilities BUS m& B 2 J 3 —132 

Finance 21.73 2152 2159 — 0.11 

Composite 18826 18450 18450 —US 






AMEX Sales 


* pju. vaUxne 
prtv. 4 PJA- volume 
PTC*, carts, volume 




It 

$ 


2546 12V* 
3414 22*4 
14 4*4 

96 Vi 64 
71 % 4516 
36 % 26 % 
13% 7Vj 
66% 4Mb 
47 % 7614 
97 % 72 
mu 42 
28*4 18 % 
4 % 2 % 
29 
13 % 

18 % 

35 % 

47% 

78 

37 % , 
24*4 17 % 
22% 
33 % 
16 % 
43 


NYSE Plunges in Heavy Trading 


m 




2 . 1 * 129 
JB 55 10 
140 U I 
M U IS 
US 64 
AM 122 
1.28 14 14 
334 93 
X 74 92 
1J» 37 8 

1.43 21 
1.25 m2 
125 95 
UMU 7 
144 8.1 


S 3 * At 
140 4 J 8 

3 3 j 8 SB. 

4 5 

M 24 17 123 

I4d *3 ” 37x 

140 14 14 32 

73 S l 


rk> 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK. — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange skidded to & broad loss Tiles' 
day in the heaviest trading in nearly five weeks. 

Much of the decline came in the afternoon 
and reflected futures-related trading by several 
brokerage houses, analysts said. Last-minute 
buying lifted prices above their worst levels, 
however. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials 
dropped 5.82 to i.333.45. erasing its 3.58-point 
gain on Monday. 

Losers overall swamped gainers by more than 
2- to- 1 on the New York Stock Exchange, whose 
composite index fell 0.80 to 10832. 

Big Board volume swelled to 104.73 million 
shares from 89.85 milli on in the previous ses- 
sion. It was the first time since Aug. 8 that 
activity exceeded 100 million shares. 

The index-related trading, known as “pro- 
gram trading,*' is part of complex strategies that 
brokerage firms use to profit on the difference 
in price between various stock indexes and 
futures contracts on those indexes. 

The programs have been used increasingly 
over the past few months, and have added 
unpredictable volatility to the market, especial- 
ly when trading is otherwise quiet 

Such was the case on Monday, when the 
brokers bought the futures contracts and sold 
many of the stocks comprising the indexes in 
order to take advantage of their price spread. 

Before the programs hit the market, stock 
prices had been holding at slightly lower levels 
amid investors' continued uncertainty about the 
economy's outlook. 

“There was really nothing going on, and in 


markets like this the sell programs loom larger 
than life and there's no buying to offset tbem," 
said HUdegarde Zagorski, second vice president 
of Prudential-Bache Securities Inc. 

In the absence of economic developments, 
takeover-related and other special-situation 
stocks also continued to dominate Wail Street's 
attention. 

Richardsoa-Yicks climbed 1% to 48 after 
surging on Monday, when it rejected an 
acquisition offer from Unilever. 

General Foods, a component of the Dow 
Jones industrial average, jumped 2¥i to 90 after 
soaring 7H on Monday, when rumors resur- 
faced that Philip Morris was interested in buy- 
ing General Foods. Philip Morris rose % to 79^. 

Pan American World Airways, frequently ru- 
mored to be a takeover target, gained ^ io 8 
after a block of one million shares crossed at 
8 Wl 

Paradyne rose 1 ft to 9ft and was the NYSE’s 
biggest percentage gainer. On Monday the com- 
puter-maker setded a suit brought by the gov- 
ernment that charged Paradyne with fraud in 
winning a federal contract. Paradyne agreed to 
the settlement without admitting or denying 
any wrongdoing. 

On the downside, active losers included In- 
ternational Business Machines, off 1 % to 127%; 
McDonald's, down 1 to 66, and Martin Mariet- 
ta, which slipped 2% to 3514. 

American Standard was unchanged at 2834; 
an 8(55. 000-share block traded at 28%. 

Nationwide volume in NYSE-listed issues, 
including trades in those stocks on regional 
exchanges and in the over-the-counter market, 
totaled 127.94 million shares. 


FMC 220 
FMCPI 2 33 
FPL Gp 1M 


ft*" 




c; 


7-M- 


$ £ l 


15*4 714 
35% 22% 

19*4 is 
24% 18% 

3% H 
10 2 
41% 35% 

W% 17*4 
18% 11% 

11*4 7*4 
23% 16% 

48 38 

33% 15% 

5*4 2% 

42 44% 

S% 34% 

54% 44% 

53% 49% 

47% 28*4 
33V. 20% 

22% 14% 

<7 40 

74% 45*4 
14% 12% 

32% 26% 

75*4 47% 

27 21% 

45 35% 

13 8% 

■ 39% 19 
25 19% 

<1% 25% 

37% 17 
13% 8% 

35% 22% 

16*4 11 % 

27% 20% 

34% 24% 

38% 31% 

34% W® 

64 48% 

16% 12% 

58% 35% 

8% 2*4 : 

11 3% 

17% 12% . 

37% 22% I 
37 22 

97 74% 

33 24 

27 19% 

44% 30% 

57 41% l 

33% 22% Bern 
45% 27% I 
40 30*6 1 

19*4 17% I 
4% 3% I 
9 3*4 I 

15 1094 I 

21% 14% I 
«% 37% I 
MU 18% I 
40% 28 I 
26% 19% Big TV 
24% 13% ftlocfl n 
26% 18% BhrckD 
36% 21% BKfcHP 
29% 14U BMFrJfl 
59% 39% I 
50% 33% | 

51 36% i 

61 48 ( 

31% 18% I 
42% 28% I 
24% 19% l 
9% 4% E 
44% 28% E 
*S U 1 
11% 916 E 
14% 11 E 
25% 19% £ 

31% 36 


PTPwm 


118*6 1)914 
4*4 4*4 

££§& 
50% 50% 
2% 2% 

S 3 

JSSiSJ 


a* 












15 * 

sr-* 
18% — % 
31 —1 

71 —1 

72» — % 
20 % 

33% 

22 

38% — 1% 
44% — % 
99 + % 

716— % 
% 




88 

11 

M 


62 

7 


12 

b M 


43 

12 


17 

it 

10 

13 

10 

IS 

17 

IQS 

a 

115 


1X0 


1X1 


14 

18 

xa 

3* 

7 £ 

9 

23 

7 

24 

18 

4 » 

13 

43 

ID 

108 

72 

tW 


114 


114 


iu 


128 


118 


108 


1X1 


128 


IZ5 


1X5 


1X4 




30% JWTi M2 33 18 

23% JRlw 56 15 U 

I 16 Jammy .72 5 It 

i 10% JOPnF 153*124 

' 33% Jeffpn 1-52 3.3 7 

57% JgrCpr 956 117 

49 JerCpf 758 U5 

91% JafCp* 1350 112 

T4 JarCpf 2.18 122 

6% Under 17 

30% Jol*Un M0 25 15 

3816 JofUiCn 156a 45 9 

JOnCpf 425 84 
21% Jorotm 150 4.1 18 

17% Jastons 50 35 M 

22% JavMfe 140 is 15 


119 32% 32 32 — % 

264 34% 33% 34 — % 
158 21 30% 20%— % 

169 im.im im 
579 46% 4516 46 —46 
602 73% 73% 73% — I - 
W*63. 43 63 +.46 

lOlUiaz 1(0 102, + % 
16 17% 17% .17% + 16 
48 11% *1 11% . 

1776 47* 45% 46- — t% 
72 41% 41% 41*4 
26 J0U 50*6 50% 

9 34*6 24% 34% 

14 24% 34% 34% - ■ 

81 3416.34 34%—% 


*r 5* 


79% 77% — % 
75 75 — V. 

73 72 

26 26 — % 
34% 36% 

74% 74% 

15% 16 
17% 17% + 14 
15% 15% 

17% 17% 


43 

79 

E 

17% 

15% 


32*4 

23% 

e 

2816 

20 

E 

12% 

3% 


5 

1% 

Ej 

3% 

% 

E 

22% 

716 

□ 

25% 

6*4 


33U 

1(1 


28% 

21% 


23*4 




4116 

E 

6016 


E 

15% 

10% 

EC 


20 



2*44 


1IH 

14% 

E 

34% 

22*4 

B 

■mt 

20% 

b 

29% 

26 

E 

1916 

111% 

h 

12 

a 

bl 

5% 

2% 

El 

38% 

19% 

El 

s* 

11% 

El 

12% 

3% 

□ 

Wm 

65% 

El 

14% 

8% 

El 

20% 

15% 

EC 

33% 

36% 

El 

22% 

15% 

El 

5 

4 

bi 

% 


El 

8* 

B* 

fflS 

17% 

En 

En 

En 

54% 

52% 

El 

105% 

44 

El 

21% 

17% 

El 

TVS 

1% 



HollFB 150 12 
HaJbtfl 150 65 12 
Hcrilwd M St 17 
Hakudpf 56 U 
HomPS 156 35 14 
HenJS 1.47*162 
HanJI 15% 9.1 
Handll 56 24 14 
Herein 56 35 21 
Haw M 23 22 
HOTBrJ 150 15 IS 
HartmJa 56 13 20 
Horuljn 33 

Hamp#BX40 135 
Horn pfe 2.T3 85 

Hi*pRw» Id 

Harris 58 1* 13 
HarGrn 8 

Honoo MS 45 » 
Hartmx 158 45 9 
HoMSe 150 102 11 
HdwEI M4 75 9 
KaymA 40* X9 B 
Harlem 40 15 15 
HaxLatt 52 25 34 
HlttiAm 35 

HIKrPn .18* .9 
HltUSA 

Heaa js XI 
HtclaM 20 


Hsllrrtn 48 25 12 
Hallla 40 15 14 
Holnz 140 2.9 14 
HaintC 19 

HatmP -36 1.9 27 
HfffCub 140 45 11 
HarttCs. 541 34 

HBrttearfUO 45 

Itefir m n 14 

HersOy 140 XT 12 
Heaaton 

HawlPk 52 4 16 

Hexcof 50 20 14 
HI Show 50 24 9 
HIVoll .17 14 7 
Hlhibrd 54 20 15 
Mitten 150 M 13 
% Hitachi 53* U 9 
% Holhtay 150 25 12 
HOlIVS 150 14 29 
% HomeO 28 


400 n% 30 % 30 % + 16 
2697 28 % 28 % 28 % + % 

ass 1% 1% i% 

24 10 9 % 10 + % 

81 * 39 % 38 % 38 % + % 

63 M 4 k 14 % 14 % _ % 

101 20 % 20 2016 + % 
taB 24 V. 23*6 23*6 + % 

1827 19 % 18 % 19 — % 

105 17*6 17*6 17*6 
351 57 % 56 56 — 1 % 

98 33 32 % 32*6 

12 S 7 10 % 9 % 10 

6 25 25 25 + 1 * 

76 264 * 26 % 26 %—. % 

9 18 * 18 % 1816—16 
454 25 % 2516 2516 — % 

62 15 14 % 14 %— % 

85 27*6 39 % 29 % — %| 

50 32 % 32 % 32 % — V 6 
6 14 % %% 14 % + % 

122 22 % 21*6 21 * 6—16 
32 WUi 1016 1016 

51 27 % 27 27 % + ** 

IS 12 % 12 % 12 % 

90 31 % 31 % 21 * 8 — % 

372 21 20 20 — 1 % 

44 IH* IB 18 

41 U 13 % 1 M- % 

214 16 % 14 % 16 % 

163 1916 > 9 % 19 % 

51 2716 27 % 27 % + % 

431 55 % S 4 16 54 % — % 

42 19 % 19 19 - % 

163 1916 19 19 % + % 

JW 34 35*6 39*6 

20 18 % 17 % 17 %—% 

. 2 31*6 3116 3116—1 
141 . 19 % 1916 19 % + % 

279 45 % 45 % 45 % 

32 7 7 7 23 % 

4359 34 % 34 3416 — % 74 % 

I 6 S 30 % 30 % 30 %—% 24 % 

1 » 21 % 30 % 21 U. + % 39 % 

226 1214 11 % 12 %- % U% 
65 26*6 26 % 24 % + % 36 

is as a, - ^ «* 

748 27 % 27 V 6 271 A + % 18 

» 5 % »% S 0 %- % 13 % 

ax 71 % 71 % 71 % 37 

350 12*6 12 % 13 %—% 1 |% 



ft* 






IP 1 


*?$* *6 46 


■% +% 
116 — *6 


































































it) 


Cbii>a 




Learning to Live With the 
“Law of Value” 


In an interview with the PRC Quarterly last October, Sraw» 
GoundJo- Zhang Jingfu discussed China’s efforts to improve cbe 
performance of enterprise management, eyeriaDy in regard to 
urban reforms. For 30 years before the reforms, Chinese had been 
"earing from the same big pot,” as reformers say. This meant thar in 
pracnce no distinction was made betw e en wdJ-rnn and poedy-run 
enterprise, nor between employees who worked and those who 
just served rime: Enterprises passed losses up to die administrators 
and they responded with direct subsidies and price protection. All 
then dung to the belief that everyone earing the same gmri was 
better than improving the menu; improvements implied thar some 
would ear better than others. 

But the menu was improved. The reformers did it by giving 
enterprises mote disaetionaiy spending lending and eraployce- 
maragement powers and responsibilities. First steps were eaten to 
replace direct gove m nen t cnceiprise profit-and-loss-sharing with 
taxation. This system had the virtue of preventing entrepreneurs 
with glaring successes or failures from becoming enemies of the 
state, as they would have been in the past Sore planners also 
acknowledged bur deferred action on irrational pricing supports 
such as those on foodstuffs and exports. Councilor Zhang noted: 
"We must Use the economic leras to realize planned cargets. A 
dear understanding of the relationship between planned economy 
and the law of value is nocessary." Planned economy demands a full 
use erf die law of value.” 

A significant number of China’s 4CQffX) scare-owned enter- 
prises, countless "sideline* industries developed in townships with 
new-found rural affluence, myriad individual fcuir-sdkrs and hawk- 
ers and—mosT glaringly — fax-wheeling brokers working with 
ch<?rriari;. "briefcase’ companies" in the Spcrial Economic Zones _ 
failed to get the message Whatever the Taw of value? means to 
aare economic planners, to a lot of local entrepreneurs it meant a 
consumer-product bonanza on the domestic matter. 

Everyone who . could do so bought- or took as a work- 
incentive bonus the consumer durables he’d been dreaming of fat 
years: color tdorisoos, tape reexadets, washing machines, refrigera- 
tors, calculators, cats and small reactors. In consequence^ imports 
soared 70 patent in die first half of 1985, leading to a trade deficit 
in foctign-exchange reserves. There was also significant redirection 
erf production resources, with provincial, industrial figures shoving 
massive increases in manufacturing levels of consumer durables, as 
much as 200 percent in some cases. 

Imports were made because of barer quality, selection, status 
and the fact that some foreign goods are actually cheaper on the 
home market chan , their domestic equivalents. Local factories went 
after assembly-line equipment that enabled quick subassembly 
production of consumer products from foreign components— 
thereby redirecting financial and material resources to foreign 
suppliers. 

There were also enormous scams, tbe meet notorious being 
die purchase of almost 9QpOO motor vehicles, nearly 3 million 
ceterisions and over* quarter of a million video recorders by Spcrial 
Economic Zone authorities on Hainan Hand Using their special 
baaowing privileges with scare banks, they requested and got $1.5 


billion and bought another $570000 in American greenbacks on 
the black market. This money was ude to buy goods mosdy from 
Japanese suppliers, which were re-sold on the domestic markets at 
up to 300poosnt mark-ups. 

Pent-up demand and price controls chat keep imports less 
expensive than domestic goods have acred as 2 deterrent eo both 





_ --f 

as? ■ 1 


h . ■ \m 

1 : dmM 


... - . „ „w< 

wj3»| 





The latest in Chinese-made farm machinery displayed 
as the Canton Fair. 

homegrown quarry and exportation. Factory managers rushed 
quotas in order to earn bonuses to buy more of the goods for which 
their employees were also working "Wish list" production targets 
and capital construction projects were pursued at the cost of 
efficiency and quality. 

An unintended result of earlier reforms, which freed factory 
managers id decline the export of that goods, has been that they 
have often ceased to export. This is because export prices arc still 
fixed by the state; often at much less than what can be earned on 
die domestic market. Robert Ddfs, in the Far Eastern Economic 
Review, died the case of a stocking factrxy in Jiangsu province near 
Shanghai which has ceased exporting for the first time in 20 years 
because the state foreign-trade corporation was offering 20 percent 
kss than die factory’s ament sale price. 

The factory director told Ddfs: "This cb’dn’r manor before — 
any losses we foamed were covered by the state But now we’re 
responsible for our own losses We’re willing to export, bur only if 
die price is rigbe.” 

In March of this year China's leaders began putting on the 
brakes by freezing fordgrxxchange payments and making it harder 
fear certain transactions coger letters cf credit Consumer products 
may be hdd up indefinitely in ships off Hong Kong and Chinese 
hadbocs; die damps are expected to stay down until year's end The 
governmen t has also introduced a customs tax on consumer 

Continued on page VIII 


Hutchison Builds Its Trade Profile 


"Wlm will Hutchiron look like in 10 years* rime in China?” is a 
question its group managing director. Simon Murray, asks himself 
and ius associates in die Orina Trade Division when assessing an 
approach id business opportunities under die new open-door policy. 
Tlur division, under the leadership of Simon To since 1980, fields 
over 40 Hutchison staff members in Beijing. Guangzhou, Shanghai 
and Hong Kong 

With more than 90 percent of its activity and assets in Hong 
Kong. Hutchison has prospered aver the last few years with post- 
tax comings readring (US.) $131 million last year. Murray sees the 
recent agreements over Hong Kong’s return to mainland control 
after 1997 as the fust steps toward guidelines that will lead to what 
he calls "the next step after trading, investment in China.” 

Hutdiison's diversified brief already indudes extensive direct 
trade with China, in support of the JO oc so major fields of busness 
already undertaken in Hong Kong by che firm. "We already buy a 
| kx from China.” notes Murray, "over half a million tons of coal a 
year, textiles, foodstuffs for our supermarkets, and so on. We also 
sell a lot, for instance our Watson’s brand soft drinks and 
engineering equipment, and as representatives for products of 
international companies.” 

About Iialf of Hutchison’s major business lines are already' 
tied in some way to trade with China. "I believe in dealing with 
Orina we must stick to businesses we understand and fill 
established needs,” advises Murray. In the long term, he would like 
Hutdiison’s China activity to mirror its successes in Hong Kong in 
die fields of energy (they' own 24 patent of Hong-kong Dearie 
wlridi showed a profit of $120 million in 1983 ), communications, 
retailing, food-products distribution, residential and commercial 
property development, container terminals, hotels, tourism and 
quarrying. 

"Our own major future interests in China are focusing on 
container terminals, power stations, coal mining, food processing 


and telephone systems." notes Murray'. Representing others as 
principals, Hutchison has been involved in everything from 
equipment supply to die oil industry to providing Angora breeding 
rabbits for crossbreeding with Grinese counterpans 

"The problem with most Grim trade companies is that they 
arc often too eager for early profits So chey are out from Day One 
running in different directions, often chasing rainbows," observes 
Murray. "Ours lias disciplined itself » that it concentrates on 
specific areas where we have know-how or where we are sure there 
is a product need We tdl our China trading division 'Cover vour 
costs bur work for the longer tom’ Thar is why they’ve developed 
specific target areas We minimize wasted effort.” 


i . * n , 

.* »v • 


V" t! 



Simon Murray greets China State Councilor Ji Peng Fei 
while Simon To looks on. 



F 1 w 




mm 






The marten of China have never been more important 
than they are today. 

And when you're considering their opportunities, con- 
sider this as well. 

Standard Chartered Bank has been continuously active 
there, for 125 years (longer than any other international 
bank). This gives us something of an advantage, when it 
comes to identifying business opportunities, foreseeing com- 
plica rions-and providing highly practical solutions. 

It's an advantage that’s at your service. 

As, also, are our offices in China: a full branch in 
Shanghai, plus representative offices in Beijing, Guangzhou 
Shenzhen and Xiamen -each equipped to provide up-to-the- 


minure information, introductions and advice on trading regu- 
lations, tax legislation and other matters. As well as a 
comprehensive banking service that's linked to our network 
of mote than 2000 branches in over 60 countries around 
the world. 

In fact, wherever you're based, and whatever your in- 
terest in China today, you'll find that the Standard Chartered 
service- whether its trade or projecr finance, foreign ex- 
change or international cash management, merchant banking 
fa ci lities, or simply background information and advice -can 
mate all the difference. 

And its a difference that can show up strongly on the 
bottom line. 


Standard & Chartered 


Direct banking, worldwide 

Standard Chartered Bank Head Office.- 10 Clements Lane. London EGfN 7AB. 
Hong Kong: 4-4A Des \feux Rd Central, Hong Kong 
China; Box 2135, 4th Floor, 185 Yuan Ming Yuan Lu. Shanghai. 

Suite 117 and ll9]ianguo Hotel, Jianguomenwai Dajie, Beijing. 

Room 409, China Hotel, Office 'fewer, Liu Hua Lu, Guangzhou. 

Room 207 and 208. East Block, Shenzhen International Commercial Building, Shenzhen. 
Room 403-404. Lujiang Hotel, 54 Lujiang Road, Xiamen. 







n 


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO 


From Violins to Mosquito Coils, 

China Makes It 


Germany may be die aadle of European dassical muse, but 
the man who walked away with die Gold Medal bom die fust 
intemarionaJ vidin-malang competition in Kassel, West Germany 
was no Stradivari— his name was Dai Hbnguang, production 
master erf the Beijing Violin Faoocy. 

The violin and its relatives, die viola and cdk\ have remained 
virtually unchanged since the 16th century. They are in feet among 
the prides of Western craftsmanship in wood The varnish, subtle 


w* 




variations in bridge poriricn and woods used in construction are 
some erf the variables used to produce the all-imporoint end result of 
a finely tuned violin: cone quality. 

Dai was judged the finest violin-maker among production 
masters bom 30 countries who had entered some 400 violins in the 


Mosquito 
ooi Is 


brand mosquito coils have been 

popular in more than 50 ..y ; , 

countries and regions, as an JEWT/ 

The reasons are simple. 

“Cock" brand mosquito i 

coils are made from natural fcpSrej&BBfc fa. ■ ' 

chrysanthemum' and other 
floral sources. They bum 
evenly and they repd 
mosquitos effectively. 

To find out more about famous “Cock" brand mosquito coils 


China National Native Produce & An imal By-products V£ Corp. 
Fujian Branch 

13th Fir. Fujian Foreign Trade Centre. Wu Si Road. Fuzhou. Chau. 
Cable: PROFUKIEN Tlx: 92108 NATAN CN 




Award-winning musical instruments are proof of 
top-level craftsmanship. 

Kassel compcririoa Hang Hai brand violins arc die pride of the 
Bdjing factory, aid Dai’s entry was made from "fish scale'’ white 
pine and huayan woods from trees felled on Xunganling mountain. 
Tlie woods were dried for 20 years before being shaped into an 
instrument 

Violins ate valued as works of act in their own right, in 
addition to die musical value attached to their dear, penetrating 
ernes. The Hang Hai band has, ance its spectacular showing in 
Kassel in October 1963, joined cbe ranks of wodd-standard musical 
instruments. As if to confirm the line’s quality, additional awards 
for outstanding craftsmanship woe presented to another violin- 
rraker, Dai Peng, and Wang Zhonggui, maker erf a relfo, both 
from the same Beijing Violin Factory. 


Toryfand 

There’s a different kind of playing gang on in Shanghai, 
where since 1980 the Shanghai Toys Impan/Espcfft Corporation 
has been manufacturing and tradin g in educational playthings 
marketed to about 120 countries worldwide Close links are 
maintained between the marketing and manufacturing arms in 
order to assure that the company can remain competitive in wodd 
markets in terms of both price and quality. 

Shanghai Toys works in a wide business scope tfaar indudes 
die making erf toys in metals and plastics and controlled by voice, 
light, magnets, electricity, mechanics or manual winding: Their 
range indudes hard-plastic products, inflatable plastic, wooden 
puzzles and blocks, musical toys, dolls and doll dothes, glass 
marbles and even toys of papa and straw. 

Vehicles are also made for children, including tricydes, 
pushcarts, racing cars, sleds and toddler walkers. As would be 
expected from a full-line manufacturer; Shanghai Toys also pro- 
duces toy parts, from small motors to interior gears for mechanical 
and windup toys 


Bayerische Vereinsbank 
Your international partner 
from A toZ, from Athens to Zurich, 
from New York to Tokyo ... 








(Qingdao) 


• Our representative office in Hong Kong puts you in touch with all the 
opportunities offered by this important financial and trade centre. 

• Bayerische Vereinsbank will be represented in China at the 
Technical Exhibition » Business Partner Bavaria« in Qingdao 
(Shandong Province) from October 7- 15, 1985. 

• Our Tokyo branch and representative office are experienced partners 
for trade with Japan and Korea and for financial transactions in the 
yen market. 

Our international network from A to Z: 

rrf RnirfiTn * a * v « tand . 44ll3Tohto Swings Plaza. 1801 East 9th Street. Tatac ISSOoTsSrod Cayman, Branch. 


KT*- ®»i«r Lee Anaeta^CA 90017. Agency. 707. WfeNra Boalewrt, Telex: 698357- L-2014 Luxembourg 

f 81 - Tetac 8654 ’ GjhnW. Repesentatve Office, P.0. Box 20432, Tetoe 9290 - F-20121 Mlter^ 

Ml 100 Mode™, Representative Office. CondomWo I, PortW-Via Sue 20 • New Tor*. NY 10017, Branch, 


335 Madison Avenue, Telex: 62850 -NmrYerit, ny 10017 . 


ya ag ar 1 rXk im n, ■ 381X30 » fciwstHnentoSA. CEP01013. Telex: 1113044 - Tehran, Bap regan te Uve Office. P.a Ben 

u *!? Tetoc 26351 ■ TWtyo 100, Repres e ntative Office, C.P.O. Box 1879. Telex: 26351 - CM0& Zurich, Win- 
achats- und Pnvanarw, Powach 782, Tent: 812083 - Head Office Munich, International DMslon, Kartfinel-Feulheber-Strasse 1, D-8000 MQnctan 2, Telephone (080)21324387 



BAYERISCHE 

VEREINSBANK 

AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT 




Tools of the Trade 

Shanghai has long been bulling the economy of China as a 
major industrial dty. Today- it is reported to account for onwiinth 
of the country’s entire industrial output, contributing a sixth of its 
rax revaiues- Shanghai Tods have been one of the standard-bearers 
</the city’s light industry for abour 30 vars now suppl ying die 12 
rnillion residents as well as the handymen of countries around the 
wodd. 

• There remain few places in the wodd without hand cools 
stamped with the "Shanghai, China" inscription that identifies die 
enormous variety of rods produced under the wing of the China 
Machinery Impcrc/Expcct Corporation. Modest pricing and a 
reliable and consistent quality-grading have made them a handy- 
man’s standard. 

The Cutting Edge 

The China National Light Industrial Products Import/Ex- 
pott Corporation, Shanghai branch, is the largest cf China’s 
exponas of light industrial- products and will parridpare in 
October’s FEMDMA exhibition of consumer pmrfrirre at the Ahoy 
Exhibition Cenoer in Rotterdam. 

The corporation has recently devdoped a compkre range erf 
rust-free, slimly-stykd pocket knives, alopg with a range of other 





^^TfrCircle makes ongoing improvements in their padheksj . 

Yantai has also pioneered a unique dxihbkey padlock that, 
uses a single cylinder. Most early double-key lodes were cumber-, 
some afoirs with double cylinders. These mig&isf&ntydailp' 
key padlocks are designed fat maximum soaxrity uses, requiring' 
two different keys to open thorn. . 


iSjp 


TRI-GIRCLE 

blades that indude lock knives, hunting knives, superautamaric 
Aide knives; and mulri-bbded knives Blais ate stainless seed and, 
in addition to their own manufactures, the Shang hai smiths will 
forge knives in designs and specifications to order using customer 
brand names or by processing customer-supplied materials 

Locks and Keys . 

Shangdong’s branch of the China National Tight Industrial 
Predicts Impon/Expocr Corporation has been manufacturing its 
Tri-Grde brand padlocks at the Yantai Lode Works for over 30 
years Besides ongoing improvements in their standard padlocks, 
which feature pick-resistant places and various tumhlo, pan and bar 
devices to keep out thieves with deft fingers, cbe locks have 
haidencd-sccd shackles char are said to be impervious to saws and a 
doubfebedr locking device chat can withstand pulling fortes erf 400 
to 1,000 kilograms (880 to 2^00 pounds). 

Having precluded unwanted entry by pickers, saws and 
strongmen, Yantai’s engineers ser about second-guessing duplicare- 
keymakers. Their keys use combinations of mulriskxs and notches 
that are five rimes as complicated as the average padlock, though 
simpler keys can be made rooKfcr. • 


‘‘ The Flip-flop 

The pfasric sandals of the Fujian Light. Indusiy Corporation 
have managed to cover .a loc of ground Over 60 countries now; 
import: their White Dove brand products worldwide; for. ures as 
varied as non-dip poolside and bathroom wear in homes arid herds 
to inexpensive children’s outdoor summer play wear to adult resort 
wear. _• i 

Fujian's White Dove products have long been popular for 
chdr quality of materials, long wear and wide variety cf cokxs an d 
styles. As plastic sandals and slippers continue to find wider 
acceptance and uses, demandfor new varieties grows Rx instance, 
in recent years White Dove proefoas have come to indude 
combination foam-plastic and bard-pbsric slippers and plastic-filled 
foam sandals. They’ve also developed combination rubber and 
arrifidaWeacfaer slippocs. ' \r._ -•./.* •’ \ f . 

The Gorporatfon continues to lceq? up with demand by 
applying new technologies, materi als arid skills to the manufacture 
of the world’s favorite summertime or wet-season footwear pfascic 
sandals and slippers. White Doywlippers and sandals ae also well- 
packaged with each pair padxd in plastic before being boxed for 
shipment. . . . .. 

. Insect Repellents 

Nigeria .and West Africa are among the major markets for 
the Gxk brand mosquito coils marketed by the Frijian branch of 
the China National Native Produce and Animal By-product 
faipoa/Expom GapcraricxL Over the pasc . 20 yeais the insect- 
repdlenc coils have found steady use in over 30 countries and 
unions erf the wodd 

The coils are safe for indoor and outdoor use and are made 
from a mixture of wood powder; chrysanthemum and ocher Bocal 
materials. The Cock brand cods are used for dim sakdefering and 
give off a pleasant aroma, that is harmless tchbumans: 



Traditional Chinese Confectionery — 

Direct From China 

Flavorsome egg peanut cake; delicious Foochow cake; sweet 
sesame cake. light and tasty egg peanut rolls; wholesome sesame crisps 
or sesame honey crunch... now you can buy all these fine products and 
many more varieties of traditional confectionery, direct from the 
makers in China. All of these high quality confectionery products are 
carefully packed for export. 

To obtain price lists and information contact: 

China National Cereals, Ofe & Foodstuffs Import & 

Export Corp., Fujian Branch 
10-1 lth Floor. Foreign Trade Central Bldg., 

Wusi Road. Fuzhou. China ‘>55 1 

CaWe: FOODCCT FU %T ■ 

Telex: 92103 FOODS CN 



Tough Work Gloves Get The Job Done Better 

When you have hard work In hand, wearing dependable work 
gloves maKe a big difference. 

"White Dove" work 
gloves are tough and long- 
lasting and they are available 
in a variety of designs for 
different types of work. 

Contact us tor details of our 
range of tough work gloves. 

stiff 

b> 

WHITE DOVE «hffl »T*ja g 

BRAND National Light Industrial Produ 



In Harmony With Today’s Fashions; 
Casual Sandals by “WWte Dove” 

The extensive range of colourful casual 
sandals created by “White Dove" was 
designed with today's easy-living, fashion 
styles in mind. 

From elegantly informal sandals to 
casual slipons there are “White Dove” 
sandals to suit every mood and occasion. 

Trade enquiries and individual 
purchasers are welcome. Just contact us at 
the address below. 


+a«uita2Ettn^ajt*4Mi3i 

China National Light Indus trial Products Import & Enrat r_n.-nn.m- .. e. n_ 
fiahou 

CsWe- INDUSTRY FUZHOU Tatar 92122 IDSFJ CN 
















ryy)^\-js& 



ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONA HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 1, 1985 


and are rrw , c -j^]^ 5C P®-* 3 * of China's woddwide exports 
aai* imponanc area of its international 

States, its #^f anCC> r m ^ 10 l* 8 ® 5 1CS m ^ e *** tJniced 
* 12 o kn- 0 ^ 5 ^ 5 tCxT ^ cs ^ gatmenc5 to that councry reached 

jj- WD °k TZ goods from the Beijing Textile Cbrpora- 

„j ^° me a stand^- d the wtadcTs fcagesc tactile producer, 
featured among ocher products from Beijing at a 
ngton, D.G ochibidon and trade fair where a fooml sistcr- 
bctwccn w i“* ®d Washington isexpeoed to be 
Acooning to Unicod Semes Embassy sources in Bapng 
and *e exhibition -will open on Sept. 2 d 

Qiina and the United Scans are in a dispute over a. threatened 
imposition of more restrictive textile quotas. Under a proposed 
Texnle and Appard Trade Enforcement Act of 1985, China's 
“Sports to the Unirod States would be cut by 55 percent to 58 
percent Most: Asian nations who export n-rnV* and garments 
oppeije the bill, including the six members of the Association cf 
Soudieasr Asian Nations and Hiong Kong. 

Beijing lias been building two massive synthetic fiber 
production plants chat will lave the capability to produce 1,980 
rons of material daily. That is enough oo cover the world in 
synthetic doth, but China's planners look to synthetics to provide 
demesne clothing needs so as to export mote natural-fiber produce. 
In 1963, China’s per-capita doth axisumprian for its baiion people 
was about 30 feet (10 meters) per year, already enough to meet 
basic needs. Design sophistication and better export marketing 
techniques are its industry’s most presang needs. 

M3by Way 

Shanghai's branch of the China National Textiles Impor- 
t/Export Corporation has developed a wodd market far its Milky 


Textiles Soar and Carpets Fly in Export Market 


Way Trueran fabrics based on tlxir proven ability to confcxm 
pnxfocts ro overseas requirements for color and wliitencss, accord- 
ing to company literature. Fabrics arc made from polyester and fine 
cotton in various blond percentages and a range of different designs. 
Fabric varieties include finespun, poplin, khaki, gauze, jacquards 
and yam of hemp and flax. 

Similarly, the culorfast range includes carefully dyed fabrics in 
a full range of hues and shades Trueran white fabrics are said to 
have a pure whiteness, with fine luster and clear-cut texture The 
technologies used in Milky Way Trueran fabrics include water- 


6b 


proof processing and cm incorporate features like dripdrying, non- 
ironing, oeasc- resistance, shrinkproofing, special draping and 
smoothness. 

Bedding Down 

There’s a slang business expression that refers to partners in a 
successful deal as being "in bed together." The tom applies aptly to 
the sheetrnakers of Jiangsu. Importers from over 20 countries buy 
their wares, including the United Scares, Canada. Saudi Arabia and 
Malaysia. 

The farmers of Jiangsu have mechanized production and 
their fields of cotton and silk have underpinned the growth of 
textile and garment industries here. This has been an area of textile 
towns since the I6rh century. Textiles now accounr for nearly half 





at Mai 


A Sunday outing. Chlnese-style. 



' i H 


' JtfL. ' .*** .. 

School uniforms are no longer obligatory. 



BUILD UP YOUR SALES WITH DOUBLE RHOMB 


DOUBLE RHOMB brings to you profitable and beautifully designed Stainless Steel 
Flatware, which are made of quality corrosion-resistant stainless steel. Smooth and 
shiny, easy to clean, very durable, and furthermore, they are reasonably priced. 

Various patterns and sizes to fit any home and hotel, packages to facilitate distribution. 
For details, please write or telex us today. 




■<30 


CHINA NATIONAL LIGHT INDUSTRIAL 
PRODUCTS HE CORP., 

SHANDONG BRANCH 
B Tianjin Rd^, Qingdao. China 
Telex; 32227 INDQD CN 
Cable: INDUSTRY QINGDAO 



iMte: 




QUALITY CHINESE CARPETS FOR QUALITY LIVING 


Sea Gull Carpets Stand Out For Elegance 
And Quality 

Sea Gull brings you all kinds of woollen 
carpets in a wide range of varieties to meet 
the demand of your cusromers in different 
market segments. 

We provide top-quality hand-woven woollen 
carpets with 90, 120, 140, 160, 180, 200 lines 
etc both in oriental style of Chinese 
tradition and in oriental style with Persian 
taste. Also available are goat-hair rugs and 
TA rugs. 

Our ready stock assures you of punctual 
delivery. Prices are reasonable. 

Write or telex us today for frf* catalog. 


,... vaTWINAI. NATIVE PRODUCE & ANIMAL 
IMPORT * EXPORT CORPORATION 
^VrS^AMHALBY-PRODW-TSBRANCH 

n i mi iHFl road, qingdao. china 
- 4 : byproducts oingdao 

^ L B fcX:' fi’6 NArODCN TEL: BSltfW 




j.1 r.t i'iei&l •?. 



\ Ai.. 










M&M. 






of die pravino.il exp. ns Suzhou is a silk- weaver's ore; Chardzhou. 
Nanjing and Wuxi feature LOtron-spinning. 

Jiangsu Forecast, firing and Myna slieets are traditional 
Chinese exports that turned a revenue of over $* million in 19S4. 
-.ind company forecasters expect to do better in 1983. Jiangsu is well- 
known for quality materials and workmanship. Drill, herringbone 
and wave pittems are used to crcarc sheeting with a smooth, sofr 
texture. 

There; arc several hundred Chinese and Western-style shea 
designs in stock, featuring subjects like flowers, bamboo, animals, 
optical effects, checks and various abstract patterns. They cone in a 
full color-range from pastels to bright combinations erf primary 
hues. 

Qingdao’s Flying Carpets 

Shungdmg's parr city erf Qingdao lias its own version of 
"flying carpets.” now being exported to Europe, the United Scares, 
Japan, Australia. Hong Kong. Macao and other Southeast Asian 
nations -by die Shandong brandi of the China National Native 
Produce & Animal By-products Import/Exporc Corpxation. Sea 
Gull brand carpus are an adaptation of traditional handicrafts ro a 
contemporary market. 

Fibers are: brought down from the northern provinces, 
dunme-dyed into colorfast hues and hand-knotted by' dexterous 
workers into pittems based on traditional designs in porcdain, 
bronze and lacquer ware. Tliese are redefined into standard Sea Gull 
carpet styles; Bdjing, Esthetic Sdftnne Embossed, Scenic and so on. 

Carpet production lus not relied only on cadi don, however. 
Here the Qingdao factories luve carefully kept pace with quality 
requirements of oventas buyers. For instance, knitting line qualities 
have been upgraded and expanded from 90 to options between 120 
and 500 lines. The carpets also wear well holding their 5/8-indi 
(Lcxcnrimerer) thickness even under heavy wear. 

Sea Gull carpets have kept certain traditions, like the classic 8- 
shaped knot for fastening the warp line, whidi prorects against nap 
shedding The carpets arc also still washed with chemical detergents 
processed with the world-famous waters of Qhgdao’s Laoshan 
mineral springs. 

Woolen Landscapes 

Carpets and tapestries arc also the main products of the 
Jiangsu brandi of die China National Produce and Animal By- 
products Import/ Export Corporation, based in Nanjing. Carpets in 
wool silk and vclvcreen ore dieir most popular items, and the 
Jiangsu Cloud and Mountain brand woolen carpets are famous in 
export markets worldwide. A chemical washing process is used to 
render carper colas more anractivdy and keep the carpers soft and 
resilient. 

The Gaud and Mountain brand weavers take special pride in 
a landscape series based on die scenery of Jiangsu county, a style 
dwr lias been higWv praised bj' foreign buyers ar the biannual 
Guangzhou cr.de fairs, according to company spokesmen. The 
woolen carpets arc generally -available in 70- and 90-line series, but 
can be made to buyers’ specifications in farm, design, size and pile 
thickness. 


HSU-JI" 


CHINESE GROUNDNUT 
KERNELS H.P.S. GRADED 


Kernel sizes all alike. 

Moisture content is just right. 
Years of shelf-life if you like. 
Free of aflatoxin blight. 

Analysis proves that the protein content 
of peanut protein powder extracted from 
the kernels is up to 80 %, three times 
higher than that of milk powder. With 
eight kinds of essential amino acids but 
without cholesterol, they are good for 
improving the functioning of human 
organs and building up health. . 


CHINA NATIONAL CEREALS. OILS & 
FOODSTUFFS IMPORT & EXPORT 
CORPORATION SHANDONG CEREALS & OILS 
BRANCH 

29, WUSGNG ROAD, QINGDAO, CHINA TEL: 28063 
CABLE- NACERQIL QINGDAO TELEX: 32727 COBOD CN 



1 


■ I. 


! v ■ . * 






Sophistication in design is the coming thing far 
the textiles industrv. 



Ml ’- 
•t ;• 

I ■> . 





The Canton Fair attracts international buyers. 


Crisp Dry 
White Wine 
from Tsingtao 

The city of Tsingtao 
has a history of links with 
Germany. These ties 
undoubtedly influenced 
the creation of the crisp 
dry white wine produced 
at Tsingtao. 

Tsingtao Dry 
White Wine is a dry 
light wine with a 
delicate bouquet. 



For more information about the interesting wine, contact: 
China National Cereals, Ofc ft Foodstuffs 
Import & Export Corporation, 

Shandong Footsnrffe Branch 
70. Zhongshan Road, Qngdao, China. 

Teteac 32122 FODQD CN 
Cable: “FOODSTUFFS" QINGDAO 




ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1985 



Metalworks 


Metals and chemical products arc important resources in 
China’s international trade. Production cf specialty seed and high- 
quality alleys in Shanghai now represents a high proportion of 
China's total seed output, and that capacity will grow with the 
expected opening this month of the Baoshan Iren & Steel Works. 
The new plant should add four million tons to hot-rolling and three 
million to cold-rolling capacity in Shanghai by the rime it is folly 
operational, which is expected by about 1988. The new mill has 
been under construction for six years with Japanese assistance and at 
an estimated cost of 12 billion yea 




n f is 


Anchor brand seamless steel gas cylinders are among the 
products available for export from Shanghai's mills. They are made 




. ■■ ■■m 


faTASSIUM NlTRATf 




N.W 50K<5^ 


G.W. 


- 


4*11 

MADE 


Potassium Nitrate 
Specialists 

For more than twenty years 
Shandong Chemical Import/Export 
Corporation has specialised in the 
extraction of Potassium Nitrate. 

You can depend on Shandong 
Chemical Import/Export Corporation for 
consistent high quality and reliable 
delivery of your requirements for 
Potassium Nitrate. The 50 Kg packing is 
double-packed in plastic to protect the 
contents. 

For samples and information, please 
contact: 


China National Chemical Import A Export 
Corpor ati on Shandong Branch 

82 Zhongshan Road, Qingdao. China 
Cable: “SINOCHEMAO” QINGDAO 
Telex: 32256 CHMQD CN 


of quality manganese sted in a sdiddnrwn process. Available for 
export are seamless sted gas cylinders with valves and caps for 
industrial gases: argon, hydrogen, nitrogen, helium, freon, carbon 
dioxide, liquefied ammonia, and oxygen fix medical use. They also 
export liquefied petroleum gas (IPG) cylinders and chlorine 
cylinders. 

In 1984, the repeated capacity of Shanghai’s iron and seed 
industry was 5.25 million tons of sted and 4.5 million tons of steel 
products. Their facilities include seme 50 plants, but many produce 
no sted as they are not integrated mills. Plant Na 5 is the specialty 
I sred producer and is among the largest three — the ocher two 
i being Plants Na 1 and 3. This last plans to acquire new topblown 
oxygen converters and co improve a seed-plate roller aerating toa 
report in The China Business Review of May-June 1985. They also 
report that this same mill has agreed to purchase and renovate a 
facility torn the United States, with a capacity of 500000 tons per 
year. 


Beijing Iron 

Beijing's branch of the China National Metals & Minerals 
Impott/Export Corporation has expanded its trade to include over 
30 countries since its founding in 1978. Its BC hand castings are 
made of high-quality pig iron and based upon foreign users’ 
samples and specifications, designed by staff engineers. 


and granite, arehiteoural sculpture and various 
bauxite and tungsten. 


China Blue 

• j - *, m 

On the chemical side, Shuangjing brand indigp pure powder 
pigmenr has been kcepixg the totriks d bluc-jean arid other dcriies: 
manufacturers blue since 1958, when the Beijing branch of cte. 
China National Chemicals Impcxt/Export Oaiporaoon was found-; 
ad. The powder is also used in printers inks, for d~tt manufacture of 
indigo white and indigo derivatives and related chemical agEnts.lt 
has been favorably received by end-usocs in the United Scares, Brazil, 
Japan, Hong Kong and countries in Southeast Aria.; . -!_■ 

Under the management of Wang Guobin, the Beijing 


0 


IN CHINA 


The Beijing branch of CNMM enjoys an annual turnover of 
$30 million, and has built up ongoing rekrion«3-iip* wtH a bou t 120 
overseas traders and manufacturers. The rem pa ny pnrvlnnpg 2 . 
variety of products, induing soil-pipe fittings, welded IPG 
cylinders, aluminum mill sheets in coils, nails and wires, various 
cans, hinges, wires and fasteners, construction riles in marble, skim 


company underrates unined management or me impux .mu capm 
of raw materials, plastics, resins, dyes&iffe, pigment^ prints, print-, 
ing inks, agrochemicals, rubber products and reagent cbtaiucals j 
The company trad-H with the Soviet Union and EastemEuropcav 
CDuntries from its founding in 1958. In 1973 its scope expanded to 
global trade and the promotion of joint ventures arid compensation- 
trade a r rangements in addition to processing imposts and exporting. 

Besides its management and finance departments, the compa- 
ny is divided into seven import/export sections, based upon various 
product dusters such as organic resins, inorganic safes or dyesfoffe 
and pigment products. . / • * - 


Chemical Salts 

In the waters c f the Yellow Sea sunounding the Shandong 
Peninsula in northern China, a rich algae abounds (hat is an 
important source of chemical salts. j?. r - s , 

Foe the past 20 years this algae has been coBcded and 
processed to produce a high grade cf one particular safe^^ sodium, 
alginate, an effective ingredient in many - diqnyj ’ pfo rjprre, 
including antadd preparations! . j-;'7 ? 

The sodium alginate produced at oon^aries f fine 

fluidity and stable viscosity, qualities ^at jhavc en^Ufii the 
producers to build crnridrrabfo cxjxre^alts uriffiijbc Esand na mes 1 






China’s 98 Open Cities 


ABtarelgn tteUnra to CWn»ra<y**rfa» tOwRanbacoentry. TTiemaw now 

37 idacss now toonaBy Yjpon* to (oni^ias. Howerac tfl but OwSBon this 

map require special trawl permtts. (Those tat italic are pramiHaqutred areas 
wnere the American Express Carl to accepted) 




mm 


r m 





■••••••••• ?• •; ■ ' .1* • • 

• 5 '* f - .• rs'f : Ky 

. ,* J v.v* - .. 

■' ; *v. - - ' 


..'V.- . ^vv. - v^v: 




i . ^.r»e$crv T ed for you at The Jianguo Hotel 


Hang Kong 


And you’ve got the Card 


gg3 R, **’" B \ i ^ American Express " 

' A welcomes you 

l , to The Jianguo 

I -a ?' Hotel, the most 

& * . ” rt \ respected inter- 

*- ■ j narional-st\’le 
% — " hotel in Beijing. 

The Jianguo gives you the 
finest rooms, semce and cuisine rhat 
you’ve come to expect from any hotel in The 
Peninsula Group. 

Assured Reservations 

And now, with the American Express Card, 
it's easier than ever to enjoy The Jianguo 
Hotel. Only the American Express Card lees 
you make direct reservations without a cash 
deposit. And no matter how late you arrive. 


Vour reservation is assured — your room is 
waiting for you. 1 

So let the American Express Card takfc 
vou to The Jianguo Hotel. It's all part of 
.American Express expansion in China to offer 
you more and more services and make your 
travel easier. 

For reservations and information call 
The Peninsula Group Reservations Centre 
in Hong Kong at 5-732 132 1 , A ^ 

The Jianguo Hotel at H B 

502233, telex: 22439 m 

JGHBT CN or any Cathay it ifl ft. ;S 

Pacific .Airways office. iiANCumcmi 


’&e promise of the Orient 




YouH^ got China with American Express. Don’t lea\e home without it. 



















STHlfl 


v'v »>«. 













ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER II. 1985 


Arts and Crafts Improve on Tradition 


BdjW 


Capote 

Fxv&qxxz Oapotarion. Tlxdr Bdji^ Je^ Bia«* 



izcs in ankles erf jewdry and! decoration using precious gnp^ 
Traditional materials and morifc-filigrtr, inlay, enaradware and 
• carvings erf precious metals, stones, ivory, lacquer and wood 

Qunese craftsmen have used gold and silver far jewdry for 
centuries, and they tend ro treat their major works as sculptural 
..objects rather than items for personal adornment. Bar instance; 
•-Bajmgfs two foremost gold-filigree artists in the early JSSDs, Bi 
Shang-bin and Zkax De-shou, both created rheir motsr famous 
wodo in the round K, noted for his dragons and phoenixes, earned 
his formal designation as a state artist in 1957. His Tfotbidden Gty 
Pavilion was exhibited in Hong Kong and Bmqyljt — a work of 
ornamental jewelry that is more complex than most architectural 
projects. Its walls were constructed with over 2£00 pieces cf jadf- 
its eaves woe inlaid with 850 pieces erf coral. Thai De-shou. also 
earned recognition as a formal state artist in 1957. He is famous far 
his gold filigree sculptures erf heroic figures, like "Warner,” "Pang 
BaDun Reviewing Troops" and "Noon-man.” 

History plays a large pan in Chinese jcwdiy designs, and 
objects found in archaeological sates in the Huai River valley of 
Anhwai Province have become standard models for modem 
designs. Granulation techniques arrived bier, in the Han dynasty, 
from contacts with Me di t erran ean cultures via India. The Huay 
style is marked by the shapes and motifs of hronze works. 

Beijing ddsormc, together with Chingtcdben porcelain and 
Fuzhou bodiless lacquer, arc considered the three treasures of 


contemporary Chinese arts and crafts. In fact, the best of fanrign- 
inspred crafts have traditionally emanated from Beijing, first from 
imperial workshops and today under the influence of the Beijing 
Handicrafts Research Institute. Thee are about 2jD00 artisans in 
Beijing's Jade Studios alone, continuing a tradition of excellence. 

Enamdwarcs — ddsonne, champlcvc and painted enam- 
el — arc all imported crafts, but modem artisans of Beijing have 
expanded their repertoire. For instance, they have created new wire- 
anchoring techniques for cloisonne and also increased che color 
palette from the original dozen or so when the fann was introduced 
from Rasa or Arabia in the 13 ch or 14th century by emperors of 
che Yuan (Mongol) dynasty. Today there are over 60 colors 
available. . 

Painted enamels woe popular with the Kangxi emperor of 
the eady Qlng dynasty. In the eady 18th century, Jesuit missionar- 
ies from France introduced painted enamel techniques locally called 
yang tat (foreign porcelain). It was about this time that the 
influence of Western traders in Quangzhou (Canton) began, and a 
high form of the arc developed in Beijing, associated with the 
Imperial workshops which had been in existence at least since 1680. 
There was also a less elaborate form meant for export which came 
id be called ''Canton enamel.” 

Another Western craft for which Beijing is jusdy famous is 
petit point, usually exported with designs reminiscent of 18th- 
century Europe, such as elaborate floral and landscape motifs. Today 
an ordinary handbag plate cakes an experienced Beijing seamtrcss 
about 30 working days. Were such a seamstress earning a US- 
based care of pay of US. $5 an hour, such a purse would cost about 
US. $1,200 in man-hours alone. This helps explain why petit-point 
bags and decorated silk boxes have nor ceased to be exported from 
Tongxian county since the Ming dynasty. The first factory to 
produce petit point in China is reputed to soil be operating there, 
about 25 kilometers (15 miles) firm Beijing. 

Goandong Ceramics 

Ar kast ante che founding of Macao, in the 17th century, 
Guangdong's craftsmen have been molding, painting and firing 
porcelain and ceramics ro meet the export demands of Western 
traders. The art of ceramic manufacture itself has been practiced in 
the province since the Sung dynasty. 

Modem equipment has transformed handicraft cottage indus- 


tries inco modem automated assembly lines that can meet Envers' 
spcaficaricms for 20- or -4 5- piece tea and dinner sets or the 
requirements of builders For ceramic construction materials such as 
glared riles, figurines and elegant tableware arc still produced for 
gift items, but today they range from individual works of craft to 
machinomade, low-cost items. 

One thing that has not changed in Guangdong craftsmens 


--OV.- ! -«. V 


rtpxoducrions of China’s glorious bronze sculptures and bowls are 
tied to Chinese tradition, but there is also a booming buancss in 
custom brass bedsteads in classical Western styles. Carvings in 
ivory, jade, ox horn. gilded wood and even coconut shell provide 
contemporary counterpane to traditional designs 3nd uses. 

fine machine-emhroidcries are put to use on tabledoths and 
saving linens, while bamboo is bent ro die modem shapes of porch 
furniture and trendy upholstered combinations. Oiinese fans and 
umbrellas have been formed into bmp shades; ceramic shapes and 
famous styles of celadon and bluc-cn-white into lamp buses; and 
hand beadworic and petit-point drawnwork into evening bags. 

Embroidery and Crochet 

Shanghai's handicraft and consumer-product manufacturers 
will display their wares in a Shanghai pavilion at the FEMINA 
Exhibition in Rotterdam this October. Included among exhibitors 
at this annual event, held in the Ahoy Exhibition Center, will be 
products from the Shanghai branch of the China National 
Embroidery and Drawn Work Associated Export Corporation. 

Products erf the branch are produced in Shanghai or the 




fc. 


venerable truing relations with tire West is that they can still mate 
to order whatever a customer can describe or provide a model of. 
Today's difference is in the scale, speed of reproduction and quality 
of packaging to meet customer requirements. 

Baseball Cap* 

Guangdong province’s craft products have so much become 
die expression of Chinese traditional arcs to the West that it is easy 
ro forget die)’ also produce contemporary adaptations of traditional 
materials. Tate hats: most people would think of the classic wide- 
brimmed straw ones worn by peasant fanners, but the Guangdong 
branch of the China National Arcs & Grafts Expert/'’ Import 
Corporation also does a thriving trade in baseball caps, cotton crush 
caps, caps for children and about every other kind of hat that cm be 
fashioned from cotton goods. 

Besides carrying on fine-art traditions in ceramics, Guang- 
tfong ceromitiscs mold modem dinnerware and tea sets. Brass 



adjacent Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces, which straddle the 
Yangtze river, north and south of the pat dry of Shanghai 
respectively. These have traditionally been the wealthiest areas of 
China and its tidiest sources of skilled craftspeople, and remain so. 

Hand embroideries indude artwork, £br embroidered prod- 
ucts, cross- stirch weak and woolen needlepoint tapestries. Their 
hand-plaited products indude venicc lace, crocheted and knotted 
tablecloths, crocheted blouses and crocheted caps, hats and hand- 
bags Madune-made woven products, prints and other items 
manufactured by automated processes arc also available 

From other areas of China die branch exports embroidery 
and drawnwotk erf Anhui province also astride die river ro the 
west, and from the Guangxi Zhuan autonomous region, with its 
tribal crafts. There are also batiks from Guizhou province which 
borders Vietnam. 





A German Banking Partner 


Bayetiscbe Ventinsbank AG is, 
in cams of its consolidated assets, 
the fooith-bigest private-sector 
credit institution in the Federal 
Republic of Germany- Based in 
southern Germany, it does busi- 
ness throughout the country and 
has a prominent position in the 

intmaticralbanltii^woddlnche 

past two decades it has developed 
tram a rhwal foreign trade bank 
into an institution with multina- 
tional activities. 

The representative office in 
Hong Kcng along with the 
branch and representative office in 
Tokyo have already provided asas- 
tanoc to numerous German firms 
in making contact with business 
partners in Asia. Bayerischc Ver- 
tinshank has encouraged coopera- 
tion with manufacturers, commer- 
cial firms, scare-owned enterprises 
art! foreign trade companies in the 
people's Republic xrf China. The 
Bank of China has been one of its 
correspondent banks in Asia j 
since 195& 1 

Snadiplcmaricrieswwesrab- , 

fished between Bonn and Btijmg 
in IS (72, 6k volume of “■ 

changed betvremtte two oounroes 

has increased sixfold. This is PJJ**" 
bb one of the reasons why China 
has selected Hamburg as us tor- 


eign trade cento: foe Western Eu- 
rope Baycrischc Vcieinihank’s 
Hamburg hraneb is a reliable part- 
ner in this major seaport. 

Trade between China and the 
Federal Republic erf Germany 
Should continue to develop briskly 
in the coming years. This trend is 
founded not only on the various 
government agreements for techni- 
cal and economic cooperation, but 
also on around *100 contracts for 
cooperation between German 
finos and their Chinese partners. 


coHHing everything from licensing 
to joint ventures. Areas with an 
especially high growth potential 
for cooperation are high technol- 
ogy, aviation, aerospace, peaceful 
use of atomic energy and develop- 
ment of natural resources Bayer- 
iscfac Verdnsbank works dosdy 
with the important German avia- 
tion and space companies and, 
with its bonking services; backs up 
a large number of small and medi- 
um-tired firms in the electronics 
industry in Bavaria. 



Selling to 
China ? 



m s & r- — — 

V M ' S U, ? S 



; " » ! g | 

)SS| : 'a s* :• a 1 

f r Sc ; ^ f£, ' t * 




> ^ 
I 


HutduSdfl. 



WFLL BE YOL!R 
GUANGZHOU OFHCt- 
Use us for messages* 
mail. FAX. Telex, WP. 
business follow-through. 
Sullivan Business Centre. 

Garden Hotel, GuaRg^J^* 
Tel: 773388 Em jW 
FAX; Em 3121 
or Hong Kong: - — “* iU " 
SULLIVAN 
. The Neto China Hands 


We wrote the book. 

For more ten years, we have assisted manufacturers, 
Kanlts publishers, law firms, advertising and PR agencies, 
W government trade promotion organizations in their 
business with China. Our services include professional 
translation and Chinese word processing, public a tions 
or eduction, direct mail marketing, exhibitions and 
Lminais, project management and sales representation, 
^ra free copy of "Advertising and Selling to the Peoples 
Republic of China." write or telex: 

rfrimr Consultants International (HR) Ltd. 

Suit* 905. Gaanhan House, 

32 Oi Kwan Road, Happy Valley, 

Hong 

Tel: S-83321B1 
TtiU: 75368 AMRHK HX 
Cable; ENTRECHW 


CCI 



Hutchison knows that to be 
strong in China trade, you 
must be patient yet persev- 
ering. You must know the 
right people and show that 
you welcome two-way trade. 

No one understands this 
better than we do. We also 
know we cannot handle it all, 
that’s why we select only 
certain high-growth areas in 
which to operate. 

Our China Trade division 
now has offices in Beying, 

Guangzhou and Shanghai. We are helping to 
strengthen China’s coal industry with both equip- 
ment and technology . We provide logistical support 
for their offshore oil programme. Other areas of 
our growing trade include aircraft, transport and 


Two-way trade with China 
is humming and we’re 
currently buying millions of 
dollais worth of coal for 
our power plant. 


we spend millions of dollars 
on food for our supermarkets 
and coal for our power plant. 
Today, no one else has 
5 better contacts — where they 
matter — than Hutchison. 

If you want to trade with 
China, call us first. We’U tell 
you whether Hutchison can 
help promote your line of 
business. You won’t find a 
better partner. 

For our Annual Report, 
which will give you a clear 
insight into our strength, diversity and human 
resources, write to: A.C. van der Linden, 

Company Secretary, Hutchison Whampoa 

Limited, 22nd Floor, Hutchison House, C 
10 Harcourt Road, Hong Kong. It could n]l|I 


food processing. And we buy more than we sell — be the start, of a profitable partnership. LI_U 

HutchisoiL^fe mean business in Hong Kaog. 




ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO 


I 




INTERNATIONAL 



TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER II, 1985 


Tea Isn’t All in China 


While "rea" and "Giim" arc practically syrwnymous, tea is 
not the only foodstuff the country exports around the wodd 
Giinese wine and sweets also enjoy a market, as well as a normative 


item — com. 


"Nation teT is the cable address of the Sianghai Tci Brandi 
of the china National Native Produce & Animal By-products 
Import/Export Corporation, with good reason The Giina green 
tea it exports is the descendant of the firs teas known to China and 
everywhere else in die work! When Lu Yu wrote his book "The 
Tea Classic” f Ch’a Ching”) in the eighth century, tea had already 
been known by the exalted ride '’Jade Queen - ’ far at least 1,500 
years. Today there is a wodd of tea drinkers for whom Shanghai is 


consumption of over two million pounds a year, led cm a pa-capita 
basis by Britain and the Soviet Union Following sharp rises in the 
price of coffee, the United Stares has become the world's number- 
two tea buyer in total consumption According co figures released 
diis year by die Scare Statistical Bureau, China’s tea output between 
1978 and 1984 rose form 268000 tons to 414000 tons. 


Laurels for Jasmine 


GCfhOTf. ItmHNATONAL ffACnON CASTRf«»M«/LE 1-TTWKrsnOUE 
CLA.G. 


41 


"MERITB 0ACB0N CASTS 
' . W.TOUKVnqUE 


■SC* *-'*!**>■% 


- •„ . '•* j 
<.~W : J 




Though die white and yellow jasmine flowers are most 
famous for their scents in cosmetics, they also have long been used 
to mala: a fine tea. Markets in Europe and the United Stares have 
increasingly come to appreciate brews made from products of the 
Fujian Tea Branch of the China National Native Produce & 
Animal By-product Import/ Export Corporation 

Most recent among die accolades given to Fujian’s jasmine 
tea was the presentation of a Golden laurel merit award from 
France's Incemarional Gastronomic and Tourism Committee. Aro- 
ma, taste, color and body were the four fundamental qualities 
sought in the connoisseurs’ tea-casting evaluations. Fujian jasmine 
tea scared high modes in all four. 

Jasmine tea is made by a process that allows for the 
absorption of aroma from the flowers of the jasmine bush into 
liigh-grade green tea. The process requires dose controls of 
remperarure, humidity and ventilation. Fujian has become a major 
center for China’s jasmine tea production and uses the most 
advanced equipment and technology available for processing and 
hygienic packaging. 


French accolades for Fujian jasmine tea. 


Sunflower Wine 


die port of exit for dieir favorite brew. Ir is the traditional 
distribution point for China green tea. 

Using modem plantation methods and research into blend- 
ing and packaging China has regained its eminence as the mother 
of green tea. The main varieties traded by the Shanghai Tea 
Impon/Export Corporation are special chunmee, chunmee, hyson 
and young hyson, all packed in plywood or wooden cases fix long- 
distance sea transportation. 

There are roughly 40 nations erf the wodd diar can be 
considered major tea consumers, each with a total apparent 


China was also one of the world’s early producers of grape 
wines, with mention made erf wine's allure as early as the eighth 
century. It is Shandong province's special pride to have been the 
first place in China to make wine with modem technology. Its 
Giang Yu Winery, for instance, was established in Yantai almost a 
hundred years ago, and has been winning prizes ever since. In 1915 
it was awarded a gold medal at the Panama Exposition, and it was 
even highly' praised by the father of modem China, Sun Yar-sen, 
and given a axrunendarioa 

Most recendy the winery's products were included in a list of 
famous wines by- the Chinese government, and their Special Fine 


Brushes, Brushes, Brushes . . . 

of Every Description! 


Paunt brushes hair brushes, shaving brushes, shoe brushes, clothes brushes, bottle 
brushes all made of pure Chinese hog bristles, as wed as brushes ol goal hair for n! and 
watercolor painting — afl offered at very compel il we prices’ 

We have a team of over 120 technicians and a RID department which makes sure we 
keep up-to-the-minute wrth styles and (rends. 

In faci we have over 20 years' manutaciuring experience, which enables us 10 confidently 
otter our huge range of brushes, and to promise strict quality control and on-time delivery. Buyers' 
own designs, specifications, and brand names are welcome, as are buyers' own nylon bustles for 
processing 

Contaci us today for full details of our 'Butterfly' brushes 


CHINA NATIONAL NATIVE PRODUCE & ANIMAL BY-PRODUCTS 
IMP. & EXP. CORP. JIANGSU BRANCH 

50 Zhonghua Road, Nanjinq. China. 

Tel: 25106. Telex. 34108 NPANJCN. 

Cable "CHINATUHSU 1 Nanjing 



-■m 




. .. A ^ 






TW COM WMU. SHERATON HCHR- BBJN& 1004 ROOMS AND SUTES 
CffUER/ WET1NG fACXm£5 / RATES fPQM US 3*8 IOST22 


5WUWNIS / 3 LOUNGES / C*t»» / THEAIBJ / 5WMMWG POOL/ HEALTH CLUB/ TENTHS OTUTO/BlUWHDIIOOM/BSMSS 


COME TO SHERATON 


Now the hospitality of Sheraton 
awaits the business executive 
In the capital of the People's 
Republic of China, at the new 
Great Wall Sheraton Hotel Beijing. 
With 1004 elegantly furnished 
rooms and suites. A choice of 
restaurants with classic French 
to traditional Szechuan to 24- hour 
coffee shop dining. A business and 
international communications 
center. A fully-equipped health 
dub with an Indoor pool and 
tennis courts. All with the style 
and comfort of Sheraton matched 
with the gracious charm of China. 


WELCOME TO SHERATON HOTELS 
IN ASIA. AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND 



■ F QB*H» 

F. moommm 
TMBEI 


'JMANUA X 
yW MRW1N 



_ The Gi*eat Wall 

Sheraton Hotel Beijing 


BIHfiMiE 
1 W AUCKLAND 


I^UCKLANC 

jrnoiunuA 


SHERATON HOTELS. INNS & RESORTS WORLDWIDE 

NORTH OONQHUAN ROAD. BEIJING. PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 
TELEPHONE; SOSS&S TELEX; 20045 GWHBJCN 
Ins nospitokty oeotM at XU 


INSTANT RESERVATIONS WORLDWIDE 
For Instant confirmed reservations at the Great Wall Sheraton 
Hotel Beijing, call your Travel Planner or Sheraton in your city. 


1 HA)WWlW<GWOK 1 avigragH«BW ftpyq CMWy SNGAFasEC«m^RwSwiafOTSinooixiRSwakyiS»«nSn3oco»iW05j nnimMESiiMNUACsrvuvFMiSMraiw Mento 

M yMBSr*^U^I«»*l(Ol«DwalwHo'£l^^ar 0tawWW KM t ^ loldaw ai 0 n H oira 

Osoto OBWtttt Sheraton Ounowo iHowj CWKA BEL* iG S heraton Hotel fcfrig. AUflMIA SYDNEY ShwalonWiHihrarth 0BfiW«Sha^ 

VUARA Sheraton Apm Pock. ALICE SPfflNSS SteOWi Aflco (1935} DADIMN Stwauo Danvtn HEW 2EUAM) AUCXtAND Shenrcn Auckland POtQflUA Sherakxi fiwoua 


Brandy wan another gold mcdaL Chang Yu also markets a Chinese 
brandy, vermouth and Chefoo red and white wines. Qingdao Grape 
Wine Winery is another famous vintner in Shandong — a prav-. 
ince so rich in. foodstuffs it's called the land of fish and fruit” 
within China. Theirs is also a modem facility, though the company 
has a 70-year history of wine making. It is noccd fix a Qingdao 
white; dry white and red and produces champagne as well as. a - 
range of liquors like whiskey ami vodka. 

Shandong’s wines are marketed under the Sunflower brand 
by the Shandong branch of tire China National Cereals, CXls & 
Fbodsrufis Impxc/Export Corporation, which has trading ties with 
over 1,500 companies in 72 countries. The Shandong Provincial 
Foreign Track Gxporarion, which markets all goods from the 
province, has ties with about 20,000 businessmen in 140 countries, 
exporting some 700 specific items. 


bang comfcraH)- mnsfomicd for the apert with moim 

preparation and packaging methods. • . • 

Peanuts, sesame, almonds and even kumquats are- the most . 

conmxi ingrdienra used, and one is sddem offeredaftOTOon 

in China without die accompaniment of sweets from the contec- 
doners of Fujian province. The province is rapidly modernizing rcs 
agriculture and is one of die delta. zones tatgeral for 
devdopment. 


Curative Com 


By Chinese standards, com isa newcomer to the fXtpular diet. 
While die earing of rice in China is measured in millenia, cbm is an 
indirect gift of die American Indians which readied China by way 
erf Arab traders in the l6di century. Four hundred years fiuve b^i 
rime enough however, far com products to-become parr of Chinas 
daily diet 


Sweet Success 


Over 50 varieties of biscuits and sweets are exported by the 
Fujian branch erf the China National Cereals, Oils & Foodstuffs 
Impart/Expart Corporation in Fuzhou. Marketed under the Dou- 
ble Lantern brand, they are among the province's most popular 
products and offer an instance of China’s traditional culinary art 


aauy aiet. ■ 

As is -die case with many Chinese foods, com is drought to 
have medicinal properties and credited by its growers with curative 
powers over high bkwd pressure, vascular sderosis; and cancer. The 
Sliandong branch of the China National Cereals & ftxdsufc 
Import/Exporc Corporation has become an expanse of com and 
cam c»uL Cbm cal is. widely used in the United Sores for cooking 
because of its low cfKtlesrerol content and high nutrient value. 


BAC Sells Sizzle 


The Beijing Advertising Gxporaoon is one of modem 
China's earliest experiments in "selling the sizzle, jxx the steak” 
Founded in November 1979, the agency has already developed an 
extensive network of relations with overseas agencies and media 


extensive network of relations with overseas agencies and media - • - • f \ : .zj • - y-.- 

and trade representatives in larao, Western Europe, Hong Kong, - . v* a rcoarc ooofiaenq: of , the Inororirional Assoaafion of 

Macao and the United Scares 'Boancs .Ccirimunic^ 

. i ' T - ”- l j . • r • -i . 


China is reported to be in die midst of an unptcoodaired 
advertising boom, with the China Daily reporting a 25-petoent 
increase in advertiser^ expenditures by companies last May. 

Announcing its success as an advertising medium, spofres--. 
men claimed: "Two years ago, only products that were new cr hard 
co sell got advertised Now even products in constant short supply 
arc advertised such as the Hying Pigeon bike made in Tianjin or 
the Snow Flake refrigerator trade in Beijing.” 


of adveriisirig^gendesjin China axdthe opdring of the first China 
office of an iriternatiQnal public rehwibns firiay Mil and Knovidran, 
in January of thisyorc^MffkH: rcseandvprcss axfences, news 
ndeases, weekly press briefings at tfae fonagn MInisny mailing 
fists, trade sbbws, and technical sales seminars abound Thee 
contrast markedly with Giinese pdicy even as larc as 1975, when- 
die weather report and tekphcnehook listings were treared as 
co nfiden riaL . . . .7. 


The most important 
textile manufacturing 
place in China. 


China National Textile Import & Export Corporation, 
Jiangsu Branch is China’s main textile manufacturing 
corporation. 


Its main textile products include covers, towels, bath 
towels, towelling coverlets, handkerchiefs, mattress-cases, 
quilt-cases, pillow-cases, sheeting, cotton-blankets, thread- 
blankets, children's blankets and diapers. 


Over the past few decades, the company has built an 
impressive volume of business with more than 50 countries 
including the U.S.A., Japan, Australia and Singapore. 


The geographic location of Jiangsu Province makes it 
extremely convenient to transport products by sea or by land. 
Deadlines are always met and the prices are very competitive. 


For more specific information about our products, please 
contact us at: 


China National Textiles Import & Export 
Corporation Jiangsu Branch. 

50 Zhong Hua Road, Nanjing, China. 

Cable Address: CHINATEX NANJING 
Telex: 34117 TXTNJ CN 








Are you running into communication blocks in China? 
Talk to us. We speak your language, as well as Chinese 

We operate exactly the same wav as the Western aeencW 
include market research, media planning. TV production. l ' 

China T 3 *" “ “ 5 ' “ d « h — help you ft. overco TC com^Hon Week 

Please contact Miss Liu Jin Hua • ' - V 


Beijing Advertising Corporation 

190 In&rde Chao Yang Men 5lreei. Bciimj?. China 

Tel 357629.550518 

Telfl.; 22470 BFTCC CN 

Cable: ' ADVERCORP" BQHNC. 












• 

• . . > 


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1983 




Standard Chartered’ s China Connection 


■ir- • ! -st ■■# 


Chartnasd Bank Group's connections vriib 

2SSS£ **is* 

SKsSr 1 S£arj, sss t 

:.£Siw5i? ndl te ®naabioJcpene«Axte 

.. _ ooncaos in China die bank has accurauhtod 
^™«ab3e expenenoe in assisting dx^^sedetodo bbates 

vpacqgfout its odsoence in Qmw rh^ j^nrW 
&nk;has;alw2jr been known to die Chinese as "Makake’* Bank. 

1,0013 ** Shanghai brandisffi have 

5?™ m Chinese dwnam side by side with the Byname. 

-2^53??, ^O^n^arcobscurolth^ 
mar "takafoe’* is dsrived from "MadodHar,” the now** of the first 
™anagff of the Shanghai branch. Qthets contend that it was the 
namer cf the area where the ooginai pry m f yc wetc located, 
^hougb no trace of "M aka l of can be found on modem maps of 
Shar^hai. • •-, . - ; 

With the advene of China’s operkfoar polity the banks 
acovities in that ccunny have expanefed with the opening of 
representative offices in Beijing, Guangzhou and She ra to n . A 
^ 3un ^i rcpteasntative office is ay be opened in Ziamen, 
Gxxdinaririg the activities cf the Shanghai handr.and the 
wpwsentacve offices in China is the hanks China Department; 
located in Hong Kong This depa rtmen t, with itsxapkfy expand- 
ing team of specialists, also handle enquiries concerning Cfcina- 
xdated business from all over die wedd. 

In addition the bank has agreed to become a shareholder in 
North China International Leasirig Ga, a joint vmtnte to be based 




in Dalian, engaged in leasing and installment credit activities. Tie 
choice of Dalian is particularly opportune in view of its scams as 
one of the four does earmarked for a c trfcra oc ri development from 
among the 14 coastal dries. 

Dalian is situated at the southern end of the Liaodong 
Peninsula in Liaoning Province and is surrounded by the sea on 



m 



The Chartered Bank, as it was then known, circa 1923. 


AMEX to Open New Office in Beijing 


As of Nov. l, American Express Tend Service offices in 
Beijing will relocate to street-level space in the Beijing Toronto 
Hood, according to Richard Woden, vice president: of travel and 
caidtdacod services in the Ear East and Pacific regions Hared with 
. the new location, Woden notes: ’'We’re right next door to the 
; Jianguo Hood and adjacent to street4evd L offices of three major 
airlines, and seven minuses by car from Tiananmen Square.* 7 

Woden daims AMEX is looking for additional space at the 
JLicb, managed by Holiday Inn International, and the Sberaoon 
fcicat Wall as weU. "These are attended so be foD-servree offices for 
both incoming and autgpipg aavders;” Wedai adds. "We will 
cater to both expatriates inBcipng and overseas people coming in. 
We're hoping to offer thisintfatec-dties within die nextsbc to nine 
months.” • . 

American Exprcsshas been picceeringaerfe-cird servioes-in 
China, and already boasts about 270 service cstahKshrnents who 
accept the card in shout 30 dries of Oiina. 

"We’ve been targeting hotris,” notes a very satisfied Wcden, 

; who has ove ra em the addition of over 30 holds in nearly 30 dries 
; since April of thfryeac lit one memorable week in August, Woden 
notes, be had the special pleasure- of accompanying the new 
president aftravcLand cardidared sendees on his first trip to China 
in rime to agn sgreements with about half a dozen major bonds, 
many of which are managed by international groups. 

"Our new area office president, Jim Li, is AmeocanChinese 

. ■ - - • - - .. - — - « « -i 

China Consultants 
Thriving 

Tan Gccnan, whose Hong Kbngfcared company China 
Consultants Intemarional has long boar ottering Grincsc-hnguage 
conmuruarions services for overseas madders, says that anyone 
who has ever partidpared in a multilingual negotiation knows hew 
far the discussion can drift from the points intended. This is a 
sruation in which he advises the use of sldl^ axnmunkatos in 
Chinese. Gorman’s company h3s been providing various services 
built around the translation business fo^ about 10 yeas 

China Cbnsukants wades with csabEsbed spccraliKpubiisb- 
ers as consulting editas to aeatt Giinese-language edtriqns. 'Daty ( 
cranslare and develop caigec audiences in China, and the ^edalisr ^ 
publication sells the adwarriang and provides the Englisbrlanguage 
editoriaL They expect ro produce abour 10 different titles in 1585. 

Prom dais core business, they have developed into a docu- 


asd had never been to China. It was very moving to &aze the 
ocperience of it with him. It’s also nice to have gone during a week 
when we could be the first crerfir aid accepted by so many major 
hotds in China, and have our new president there to agn the 
agreements” 

Thar week, according to Wcden, agreements were sealed 
with the lido, Jianguo and Beijing Toronto holds in Beijing, the 
Shanghai Stare Guesthouse— which is the first higehotdier to sign 
on with AMEX in Shanghai, having over 200 rooms— and the 
Rong Hu Had in Guilin. There are also die Golden Rower in 
Xian and rbe Garden Hotd in Guangzhou. The Sheraton Great 
Wall had ser the precedent abour three months before by agreeing 
to rake the card, and the four American Express salespeople in 
China, under Thomas Lok, had been doing their homework in 
anticipation cf their new president’s arrival. As cf Sept 1 the 
American Express Card had a major presence in China’s hotds and 
a commanding lead in the race to become the preeminent credit 
card in China. Ac die moment, ir is die only one with a significant 
presence in the country. 

A major scanty of American Express in China has been to 
develop continuous seminars and are visits and to sponsor 
delegations from the mainland to key AMEX marketing and 
training events. Bor instance, on Sept 26, another large seminar is 
sdiedukd in Tianjing wherein kxal Bank cf China managers and 
those of service cstabli^iments will be innoduced to the concept of 
credit-card services. 

Visits bade and forth between AMEX and Chi n ese officials 
have become routine over the past year: Fa instance, during the 
week of Aug 20 AMEX welcome 10 senior Bank cf China 
managers from five different ones in China to a seminar in Hong 
Kong In April of this year, AMEX invited three Beijirg officers of 
the China International Travd Service (Cub) to the American 
Express world marketing meeting in Disneyworid, Orlando, 
Florida. They made a presentation on developments in China to 
over 500 travd salespeople. 

November will see the visit of die new president of 
American Express Gcmpany, LV. GcEStencr, who was appointed to 
the post on Aug 1. He is due to be aoconponicd by Richard 
Holbrooke, managing duetxcr of Shearson Lehman Bcodiers Inc 
and former American undaseaetary of stare in Aria. 

Holbrooke may be coming to finalize an agreement between 
the Friendship Company of the Beijing No. 1 Commercial Bureau 
and OS Imemarional Inc, the agent of Sh earso n Lehman in 




ing promotion tequfamms of rate and ahtats m Ctaa. 
Docurnenr-proossing to beromc a major bate fa Chma 

Cbnsufants. who empty * *“ Hni « *“* 

headquarters , 

TOYS THAT CHILDREN LOVE 

At the Shonghoi Toy Corporate, our business is- 
making toys that children love. 

• we specialise in cuddly plush toys wh*h hove 
proven popular with children in Asia. Euro P e °^*^. 

United States. Lmle girts and bto '/JZTJZL 

SO we make our toys in a vanety of different styles, shapes . 

and colours. 

each toy is mode from high quality plush matenal 
with a dean hygienic filling. 

For more informal ion on the toys we moke that 
children love, make contact with us today. 


fU^Jl Shanghai Toys 

Import S Export Carp. 

J65 Puort toad. Shonflb®- ° nrt3 

TeMpKor. 2*26«a 

C«*4e. CHWATOfS SHANGHAi 

We. 33TO710VSCN . - 


China National Arts & 
Crafts import & > 

Export Corporation C 
Shanghai Branch 


three rides, with the Behai gulf to the west and the Yellow Sea to 
the cast Ir enjoys a tdarivdy mild dimarc, with the sea ice-free 
throughout the year, and lies in a region with diverse agricultural 
resources. It is particularly renowned for its fruit; especially apples. 

Dalian is the principal seaport far the major industrial region 
of northeast China and is the second largest port in die entire 
country. Indusny is wdl-csoblished and diversified, with the main 
activities being madune-buikfing petrochemicals and shipbuilding. 
Textiles are also important. 

The Standard Chartered Group, which has its headquarters in 
the Gey of London, was formed by the merger of the Standard 
Bank and die Chartered Bank in 1969- Each of the constituent 
banks was founded more chan 100 years previously, with the 
Standard Bonk operating mainly in Africa and the Chartered Bank 
in Asia. 

In 1979 die group acquired Union Bank in California and 
now has a network of over 2 £00 offices in mare chan 60 countries, 
with its assets spread fairly evenly over four main operati ng areas: 
Europe (including the United Kingdom), the Middle East and 
Aria, Africa and North America. The group is also represented in 
Australia, Larin America and elsewhere. 

The group provides a full range cf financial services, 
including mail, corporate and merchant banking as wdl as avh 
activities as installment finance and fearing, insurance broking 
investment; management, bullion dealing metal broking; commod- 
ity trading, estate duty and tax planning. Merchant tanking activity 
in China is handled by Standard Chartered Asia Ltd in Hong 
Kong whose Project Finance department has acquired considerable 
experience in setting up capital projects in China. 


Beijing which has agreed to die oonsouction of a hotd and office 
apartmenr complex in that city. 

According to a report in China Economic News, the two 
parties came to the agreement at the end cf June with a letter of 
intent to an investment cf $150 million for the two projects. The 
first is m be a 23- to- 30-story five-star hotel, tentatively to be ailed 
the China- America Hotel It will be buik on the existing sate of 
Beijing’s Friendship Store on Jianguomenwai Street to total 
$80 million. 

The Bdjing-Ameiican Express BuMng is the second phase: 
30story office/ apartment complex to be built on the present rite of 
Intemarional Store in the Sanlitun district of Beijing The building 
is expected to meet international standards and is estimated to cost 
$70 million. 


China Green Tea: 
enjoyed by millions for 
thousands of years. 

China Green Tea is a light and refreshing 
natural beverage which has been an 
institution, in China for ail recorded history. 

The Chinese believe that China Green Tea 
is thirst quenching and that it lifts spirits 
when enjoying their tea. some tea-lovers 
credit China Green Tea with wonderous 
properties but we recommend it simply for 
its light refreshing qualities. 

Contact us for information today 
about China Green Tea. 

Trade enquiries and personal 
purchasers welcome. 



§r •• xi 

■***" Z’w . ' ■ 

: ' n ■ ' 1 . - 1 • •" 

' ; V 



Already a landmark in Shanghai in 1928; an arrow marks 
the Bank building. 


‘Milky Way” 


Trueran 

Fabrics 

(A BLEND OF POLVESTEWCOTTON) 


MUky Way. MBky Way 
Superior Quality 
World Ranoian 






CHINA NATIONAL TEXTILES IMP. ft 
EXP. 00RP., SIMMGWU BRANCH 

Address: 27 aiongshan Road E 1 
Snangna, Chma. 

Tatac 33055 SHTEX CN 
Cable. -TEXTILE” SHANGHAI 
Phone- 2i8*O0 


♦ ♦ ♦ 

|* ♦ ♦ 

I — .• ♦ ♦ 


china National Native Produce 8 Animal 
By-products import & Export corp., 
Shanghai Tea Branch. 

Address: 74, Oian Chi Road, Shanghai, 
cable Address.- '•nationtea*' SHANGHAI 
Telex: 33068 SHTEACN 





Business line: 

Gloves: 

Knitted gloves, Sewing gloves, Hand-made gloves. 

Hats: 

Sewing hats. Knitted woollen hats. Knitted hats of synthetic fibres. 

Shoes: 

Cloth shoes with plastic soles, Slippers, Shoes with hemp straw soles. 

Furniture: 

Wooden furniture, Steel furniture. Lacquered furniture, Carved furniture, Black-wood 
furniture, Rose-wood furniture. 

Straw, wfllow and bamboo plaited products and miscellaneous articles: 

Straw mats. Wait paper. Bamboo mats, Straw hats, Straw baskets, Straw slippers, 
Floor mats. Straw pot mats, Door mats of natural fibre. Various door curtains, Jute 
products, Willow products, Bamboo plaited products, Various umbrellas, Human 
hair products, Cotton rugs. Wooden minor frames, Chinese musical instruments, 
Ray-acting appliances. Walking sticks. Brass ware, Traditional Chinese stationery. 
Craft gifts: 

Jewelry cabinets and boxes, Bamboo Scroll paintings, Chenille articles. Oil- 
paintings, Craft boxes. Various coloured lanterns, Fans, Silk flowers. Marble 
products. Cotton thread products, Gypsum products. Souvenir for Easter & X’mas, 
Painted egg shells. Lathed wooden toys. Coloured wooden birds, Needle inserters. 
Wooden pyramid. Wooden walnut cracker, Giftware. 

Artistic handicrafts: 

Jade carvings, Ivory carvings, Stone carvings, Box woods carvings, Antiques, 
Antique lade carvings, Antique porcelain. Antique sundries, Imitation antiques, 
imitation antique porcelain. Imitation antique sundries, Gold and silver embroidered 
pieces, Chinese paintings. Jade screen with silk paintings. 

Jewelry: 

Pearls, Precious stones, Green jades and Diamonds, Polished diamonds, Freshwater 
cultured pearls, Gold and silver jewelry, Jewelry inlaid with precious stones & Semi- 
Precious stone, Jade beads, Semi-Preclous stone Necklace and pendents. 
Development Agency Department Agent ton 

Various kinds of art ware-, purchase of raw materials for processing purposes, all 
kinds of business services, utilization of foreign investment, import of advanced 
technology, joint ventures. 


Pocket Knives You Can Depend On 

If you are looking for a wide range of high quality and dependable stainless 
steel knives, ft makes good sense to deal with the people in China who rfeally 
know all about knives. 

We are the largest light industrial products import/export corporation in 
China. 

At present we manufacture over 300 different kinds of products and we sell 
them in over 140 countries and territories. 

Many of our exports are famous for quality and durability and our pocket 
knives are one example. 

Our latest range of rust-free slim pocket knives, multi-bladed knives, lock 
knives, hunting and other knives is backed by years of experience, careful 
workmanship and first-quality stainless steel. 

We take pride in working with our customers to meet their particular 
needs, and we can manufacture to order using your brand name or the process 
materials' you supply. 

For dependable pocket knives or any other high quality products, contact 
us at any time for advice or information. 

■ T. T China National Light industrial Products Import 
**“1 Export Corporation Shanghai Branch. 

209 Yuanmlngyuan Road. Shanghai. China. 

Cable address. 1NDUSTRV Shanghai 
Telex: 330M INDUS CN 




So- 


Address: 16, Zhong Shan Dong Yi Lu, Shanghai, China 
Tel: 212100 

Cable: “ARTSCRAFTS" SHANGHAI 
Telex: 33053 AfiTEX CN 




& 









ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1985 


The Great Wall Unfurls Its 
Five Stars Over Beijing 


Managed by Sheraton, the Grear Wall Hoed now offers accommo- 
dations in a residential suburb a few minutes from the central 
business district of Beijing and only 20 minutes bom the interna- 
tional airport. 

Each of the 1,037 tastefully furnished rooms has a scenic view 
as well as individual climate control, odor television with in-house 
video channels and Beijing's only 24-hour room service. 

The first computerized room status system in die People’s 
Republic of China provides an up-Kxiaie display of current roam 
availability. 

The Capital and Dynasty suites are luxuriously decorated 
with Chinese antiques, pointings and even a baby grand prana The 
suites have their awn bars and kitchenettes and arc spacious enough 
for business meetings, cocktail parties and dinners. 

The VIP and Junior suites fearurc contemporary decor 
blended with traditional Chinese art treasures. Ixxarod on the 


fourth, fifth and 18th floors of the hotel, the arises arc laige enough 
to hold business meetings in or entertain up to fair people 
comfortably. The suites also feature a spacious work area designed 
with business in mind Separate bedrooms are connected to the VIP 


With nine restaurants and lounges, the Great Wall Hotel is 
able to offer a spectrum of French, Sichuan, American and ocher 
cuisines. 

The Executive Business Center has advanced communicariOT 
equipment. Conference facili ties and function rooms with complete 
banqueting and catering service fix as few as 20 or as many as IjSOO 
arc available. 

The Great Wall Hotel has a modem health dub equipped 
with saynpg steam baths and a gymnasium. Ocher facilities in c l ude 
an indoor swimming pool with its own made bar, floodlit tennis 
courts and, fix the more sedate, a cheater and a billiard roan 



Learning to Live With the “Law of Value 1 


Continued from Page I 

durables this summer, which will make them much mote expen- 
sive when they finally do reach the domestic market 

The government has already twice this year enacted interest- 
rare raises in an effort to slow runaway production growth — 
significantly, still using marker mechanisms to reassert c e nt ral 
control over the economy. They have also created cate-raises aimed 
specifically at rural industries in the newly opened ^guided” sector 
of the economy, which is where much excess production is 
occurring. Problems here are acute: the Agricultural Bank had 
already readied its 2 billion yuan anual lending larger halfway 
through this year. 

Project approvals are also being more dosdy scrutinized in 
the four Special Economic Zones (Shenzhen, Shantou, Z h u h ai and 
Xiamen), and only four of the originally opened 14 coastal dries 
will continue to reoriw high devdbprnenr priority: Shanghai, 
Guangzhou, Dalian and Tianjin. The other 10 are now ro 
concentrate on improving their infrastructures. 

Analysts with various national trade commissions in Hong 
Kong are unanimous in the view char, chough China is undergoing 
traumatic adjustment problems after the reforms instituted last 
October, the reformers have weathered it remarkably well and have 
generally acred with sophistication and restraint. A rest of this 
hypothesis was expected ro come this month when the Gxnmunist 
Party’s Fourth Hanning Conference takes place to adopt China’s 
seventh 5-year plan for the period 1966-1990. Reformers are helped 
by the group of younger, better-educated cadres who have been 
moved to senior posts in provincial government and party offices. 
Press estimates predict that newfy-promoood provincial officials, 
who can be expected ro support the reform movement, make up 
about a third of the 1,000 dekgares to the conference. 



Eels for sale at a free market. 


While scare economic planners grapple with questions like 
"Can a cadre-run enterprise be allowed to go bankrupt?" and 
"What would bankruptcy kws be like?" overseas inrerest in China 
contiftues to grow. Early this year Hill and Knowlron opened an 
office in cbe Beijing Toronto Hoed. Arnold Tucket, their regional 
manager for North Asia, says, "We have the best kind of problem 
you can have — so many inquiries that we must make time to 
service our dienes apriority. For instance, we're very active in media 
relations. This is reflective of the decentralization process in China. 
At one time a person could visit three or four ministries; now there 
may be a thousand people ro reach. The publicity function becomes 
important.*’ 

Analysts generally share die optimism of the newcomers 
malting inquiries at Hill and Knowfoon. Besides overseas business- 
men who, trade observers say, will not be much affected by new 
controls unless they deal in consumer products intended for Chinese 
domestic markets, the Beijing public relations office receives dozens 
of resumes weddy foam overseas students fresh from Asian Studies 


Everlasting Flowers 


The creation of elegant flowers 
made from silk and other materials is a 
traditional art-form in China. 

Now you can buy artificial flowers 
direct from the largest manufacturer in 
China, China National Arts & Crafts 
Import and Export Corporation. 

You can buy existing 
types or we will be happy 
to produce new 
designs to your 
requirements 


Contact: 

CHINA NATIONAL ARTS & CRAFTS 
IMP. & EXP. CORP., 

GUANGDONG BRANCH 

2, Quio Guang Road, Guangzhou, China. 

Cable: “ARTCANTON” 

Telex: 44379 KCACB CN 



7 ^ 


g 





FOR MORE INFORMATION 
ABOUT CHINA 

Just complete this cotqxm. 


buScate below the subjects on which you would like to obtain more Informati o n {>/) 


The International Herald Tribune will be pleased to 
pass on requests for more information to the 
advertisers In this Supplement. 


i 


V'. A 


r-* V- t 

\ v -' r "\. H \ \juwi 

>. "*•< '> ijuflAig 

• 

• I J N f 

r v r'<T V ' - 

l ( f ™ 


f -« yi&HAUOMAI 




} riuAapom 


.PEUNS2HOU 
HONG KONG 


List of advertisers 

C American Express International Inc. 

□ Bayeri ache (VenrinsBsnk) 

□ Beijing Advertising Corp. 

□ China Consultants International Hong Kong Lid. 

□ China National Arts and Crafts Import/Export Corp. Beijing Jewellery Branch 

□ China National Arts and Crafts Import/Export Corp- Guangdong Branch 

□ China National Arts and Crafts Import/Export Corp. Shanghai Branch 

□ China National Cereals. Oils end Foodstuffs Import/Export Corp- Fujian Branch 

□ China National Cereals. Oils and Foodstuffs Import/Export Corp. Shangdong Cereals and Oils 
Branch 

□ China National Cereals. Oils and Foodstuffs Import/Export Corp- Shangdong Foodstuffs Branch 

□ China National Chemicals Import/Export Com- Beijing Branch 

I C China National Chemicals Import/Export Corp. Shangdong Branch 

□ China National Embroidery and Drawn Work Associated Export Corp- Shanghai Branch 
C China National Light Industry Import/Expon Corp. Beijing Branch 

G China National Light Industry Import/Export Corp. Fujian Branch 
O China National Light Industry Import/xporl Corp. Shangdong Branch 
G China National Light Industry Import/Export Corp. Shanghai Branch 

□ China National Machinery Import/Export Corp Shanghai Branch 

□ China National Metals and Minerals Import/Export Corp. Beijing Branch 
C China National Metals and Minerals Import/Export Corp. Shanghai Branch 

G China National Native Produce and Animal By-Products Import/Export Corp. Fujian Native 
Produce Branch 

G China National Native Produce and Animal Byproducts Import/Export Corp. Fujian Tea 
Branch 

G China National Native Produce and Animal By-Products Import/Export Corp. Jlngsu Branch 
G China National Native Produce and Animal By-Products Import/Export Corp. Shangdong 

Animal By-Products Branch 

G China National Native Produce and Animal By-Products Import/ Export Corp. Shanghai Tea 
Branch 

C China National Textiles Import/Export Corp. Beijing Branch 
G China National Textile Import/Export Corp. Jiar.gsu Branch 
G China NallanN Textiles Import/Export Corp. Shanghai Branch 
C The Great Wall Sheraton Hotel Beijing 
G Guangdong Ceramics Import/Export Corp. 

G Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. 

C Margaret Sullivan Secretarial Service 8 Employment Agency 
C Shanghai Toys Import/Export Corp. 

G Shorts Brothers . 


RETURN THIS COUPON WITH YOUR BUSINESS CARD TO: 

General Manager, Asia-Pacific 

International Herald Tribune, 1005 Tal Sang Commercial Building, 

24-34 Hennessy Road, Hong Kong.- 



77ie lobby of. the Great Wad, Hotel reflects the tradition of its namesake. 


jxogams in Chinese language and culture; hoping to pamapace in 
Asia’s most exciting social experiment •. 

A key argument likely ro be raised ar this month’s txnfercnce 
is whether the reforms are bogged down because the reformers baw: 
gone 030 far, gone too fast or because they've noc gone far enough. 
Gcntnlly retained forcign-ocehange reserves went from about 
billion last October ro virtual depletion ar the end of Marcri of this 
year (excluding borrow reserves, which arc the excess of deposits 
ova loans) and locally-held reserves have also chopped dramatically. 
Foreign economists estimate that China’s inflation rare almoGt 
doubled firm 8.5 percent in 1983 to 16 percent last year. Imports are 
up almost 70 percent and exports are down for the first six: months 
of 1985 by 23 percent in visible trading, which accounts for up ro 
80 percent of the nation's foreign exchange. 



BUSINESS / FINAN CE 



JMH 


New China Hands 
Service 


Galling ha European secretaries the New China Hands, 
Margaret Sullivan has opened what she daims ro be China's first 
fully automated business center in Guangzhou's Garden Hoed. 
Sullivan, wlw operates two secretarial centers at Hong Kong 
hetdquarters as wdl, bills herself as the "China Superset." 

Sullivan is now preparing for the second of Guangzhou’s 
biannual crack: fairs (Ocl 15 to Nov. 5). She estimates an increase of 
at foist 40 percent ova die 24*00 assignments she handled for 
inttmirional businessmen during the Spring Trade Fair earlier this 
year. Sullivan is planning ro open another two business centers in 
Giina before die end of die year, which will bring to five the total 
"Superset*" outlets in die Maigarcr Sullivan stable 


you need Andmnch, much more. 

Mpnday/Eurpbonds. 
Tuesday/Fiiiires and Options. ; 
Wetfoes^y/Lifeniatiorial Manager 
Tliuisday/Wrill Street Watch. jy 
Fritky/Technology. ■ 
Satuiday/Eeonoinic Scene. . 



Shorts are proud that the Civil Aviation 
Administration of China have purchased 8 
of the world’s highly successful wide-bodied 
regional airliners winch are now in service 
in areas of new economic development and 
priority of the People’s Republic of China. 


Fuel-efficient, 

cost-effective 




SHORT BROTHERS PLC— Far East Regional Office, 2nd Floor, EHzabeth House, 250 Gloucester Road 
Causeway Bay, Hong Kong. Telephone:- 5-752 91$ Telex: 89146 
SHORT BROTHERS PLC - PO Box 241, Airport Road, Belfast ETT3 90Z, Northern Ireland 
Telephone 0232 58444. Telex 74688. 



? ,;v 


Beautiful Porcelain and Pottery from China 

For over one thousand years the area of Guangdong Province lias been 
famous in China for its porcelain and pottery. 

Guangdong Ceramics Company is a trading and manufacturing company 
which Is responsible for research, manufacturing, domestic sales and the 
export marketing. of ceramics products from Guangdong Province. 

Available for export are: ceramics for daily use: art pottery 
and porcelain: garden Items, and building as well as industrial 
porcelain products. • 

Guangdong Ceramics Company is 
also interested in the importation of Ju 

technical materials for ceramics, fuel. JJw *4 

equipment and appliances related to 
the production of ceramics. 

For more information contact: VCui\ 

GUANGDONG CERAMICS COMPANY 
No. 57. Zhanqian Road. Guangdong. China. w f\Mjr 

Cable: CERAMICO GUANGZHOU 

Telex: 44269 GDCCO CN UK, 



£ 














'. : V :-■. '■: -• ^ 

* v. • <-i fc .;y ■ 




.'.Eanvioos return — 
FHno ruts nates sm 
■»-* t P.- B. -GaM rtwrxats p - 
g’gg g-K Jrite"W r «** p’ « 

p^sa-— 

M&V? P.10' OTC stock pS 
,g— *■ ""rtrts nu 


^ESDAY, SE PTCMBEHTTT^r- 

: :fff§|; IWTE »WATIOHAL 

A,' ’i*.'; ' ^ = ^^^ ==s== 


licratb^Lfcribunc. 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 




U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8. 


Page 9 


.' A 


ar ™g Workers 
mpany Secrets 




^!;v- *y SHERRY BUCHANAN 

iVrC > ^«n M non B fff era U7/rt« w 
proposifiSrS dp 1 ?! h® » expensive 


YW Sees 

10%-Rise 
In Sales 


Three Ways to S peed Up Computers 


srj-tlttr former csccuqvcs from Hanning 


both 

apply .only 10 executives 


Hahn Predicts 
Profit Increase 


Vector Processing 

Leading supercomputer systems ike Cray Research’s cSsassembie a program 
and group sttnllaf calculations together. Thus, hundreds of addition problems 
wifi be solved first, then hundreds of muttipUcation problems; and the results are 
later reassembled. Theoretically, tremendously high speeds can be attained, but 
because most programs are not eastiy carved up, only a fraction of the 
machine's processing power » ordinarily used. 


Consafe AB Files 
For Bankruptcy 
As Rescue Fails 


T r^l w executives who have resigned or 
^ Stb enfOrce. lc Sally questionable and sometimes diffi- 


S'. 
1 o 
<£%'\ 

g;te 

•sift:; 

a\ a J 

Si 

■ J> &■■ 

Im 

k*. I*, 1 

• kVa II* m ’ 

■i&S 

•Jfe^ 

5Ssf 


k! ft 
r« S S. 

3:v -- ss. 

: « a. 

£ y- ®S‘ 
ii “i 6 

*. JV 

1£* '+* 

*.Th 


31 s 

* A* 

§* l' 1 £ 
^rCll 

fH.£ 

ii ^ v 

-A - . 

-s', x. a- 

4J S. 
H - a-: it. 
»S. J*. 


S. ill?- 
•A . 3~ 3^ 


2*i *-. A 
:■* :«■ >. 

":a 
“ ?:> 
•;*i Ji 

:*s 

:* * 


' - * >l 1 

«^5*. 

4 i‘ •- t* - 
v V 
■T« rv j s ' 


- 5. 

- r. v 

• '.t >■ ! i 


v r:>-r-' 
%— %: ■ 
v : ,j . ^ 


^ 1 #• 




•:i 




V 

r e.* ■- u 


■ J ■ ^ ’ m* 




By Warren Gerler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — VoUcsw 


AG ejects to lift group 
above SO billion. Deutsche 1 


•r some 


conditions in return. 


r Mct ; , protore, Mped^y More generous 

.. among high-tech companies, . 

- vto re strict executives from companies now are 

! W ^&Tr^ ya asking for some 

l$g&nS 35 E?£ condhions in retnm. 

nomaiioii ag r ee m e n t has been . 

,* to. some cases, executives are met by a security guard if 

r -‘ th^setipoton company property after their departure. 

?, toc^ a New York-based outplacement compa- 

• surveyed 148 U^. busi n esses to fin4 out if employers who 
^gjye xaore lucrative termination packages tend to demand more 
--of the departing employee. 

“As companies become more generous than they tised to be, 
f they are asking for some conditions in return,” said Robert L. 
» Swain, c n a irm an of Swain. & Swain. The firm jobs for an 
•* average, of 300 executives a year. 

a Twenty-two percent of the companies surveyed that they 
believed they had become more genemus. with departing employ- 
;; ees. Responding 10 another question, 41 p er c e nt said that they 
thought businesses in general “maybe” were becoming more 
'■• generous. 


T WENTY-FIVE percent of the companies surveyed require 
departing executives to give up their right to sue, 20 
percent require an agreement not to work for competitors 
and .16 percent end access to company facilities. 


Those responding to the survey included banking, insurance, 
•< pharmaceutical, oil and gas, pubushing and advertising firms. 

No similar survey has been conducted in Britain, but London- 
'.r based financial counselors find a simflar attitude toward depart- 
; mg- managers among some British companies. 

“In return for the money, the disdahner saiys that you drop all 
reclaims against the company” said Pecer-ESis, a financial counsel- 
with Douglas, peaking. Young Ltd. of London, which is 
'' retained by companies to advise departing employees on their 
termination agreements. 

“Usually that happens when the payment is greater than the 
T statutory payment stipulated for in the contract,” Mr. EQis said. 
v “The company expects it in return.” Termination papers general- 
ly are signed when the money is handed over. 


“A company mi^it or might hot require an executive to waive 
rights for unfair dismissal,” said John. Staddon, a financial 


counselor with the London-based firm of JJ 7 . Chown Ltd. 
“Where there isn't complete trust, a' company will require a 
waiver in return for payment so the executive can’t come bade 
and sue them a week later.” :. 

Non-competitive clauses can be especially difficult to enforce 
Courts is both the United States and Britain previously have 
tatr^n the view that, rf indeed it is valid for the company to 
include such _a danse in a negotiated tenriination agreement, it 
must hhve geographic and time liimts. < 

“Legally, very often a ncotcompetitive clause is invalid,” Mr. 
■Staddon said. “What the company hopes is that it will act as a 
deterrent by scaring an employee and saying ‘we'D get an injunc- 
tion against you.’ A lot of employers say it is not worth the paper 
it is written on.” 


above 50 billion Deutsche marks 

? 116.9 billion) tins year, exceeding 
984 revenue by about 10 percent, 
Carl H. Hahn, tire managing board 
chairman of West Germany's larg- 
est automaker, said Tuesday. 

Speaking on the eve on the Inter- 
national Motor Show here, Mi. 
Hahn declined to prqject 1985 
profit, but said that it would be up 
considerably from last year's earn- 
ings of 228 million DM. 

A major boost to 1985 earnings, 
he noted, should be the return to 
profitability of VWs Brazilian op- 
erations and an anticipated major 
reduction in the 348-rmDion-DM 
loss reported last year by the com- 
pany’s office- equipment subsid- 
iary. Triumph-Adler AG. 

Most analysts expect VW to in- 
crease its dividend for the current 
year to 8 DM from 5 DM in 1984, 
but VWs chief would not be drawn 
mil on the subject. 

**We expect turnover to exceed 
50 billion marks this year,” Mr. 
Hahn said in an interview. “We can 
count on a minimum of 50 bfl£o& 
DM, but bow much beyond that 
will depend on the future doDar- 
Deutsche mark exchange rate, 
which we think will stay in a range 
between 2.80 and 3 marks to the 
doQar.” 

Earlier, Mr. Hahn said that 
worldwide deliveries of VW and 
subsidiary Audi vehicles rose 11 
percent to 1.6 million in the first 
eight months of 1985. He repeated 
an earlier projection that world- 
wide vehicle sales, boosted by the 
successful debut of the Golf II 
model that continues to stretch 
VWs plant capacity, would grow 
by nearly 12 percent to more than 
2.4 million in 1985 from 2.15 mil- 
lion last year. 

On news of the increase in deliv- 
eries and the company’s favorable 
prospects. Volkswagen's share 
price climbed 5 DM Tuesday to 
dose at 345 DM on the Frankfurt 
Stock Exchange. 


Mum-Processing 

: Computers that can run several programs at once, each on a different processor. 
’ The advantage is that users need not wait as long before ttieir program reaches 
the from of the "queue.'* Usually, however, the power of the processors cannot 

. be harnessed together, meaning that multiprocessors ffl-e of httte help in 

speeding up extremely long calculations. 


By Per Isaksson 

Reuters 

STOCKHOLM — Consafe AB, 
the world's largest supplier of ser- 


Votvo officials said the compa- 


ny's chairman. Pehr Gyllenham- 
mar, was furious at Mr. Ericsson's 


mar, was furious at Mr. Ericsson's 
move and ordered the immediate 


-f ■« h* by 

for Uwofl industry, ffltd for bank- v “"o-. „ . . . „ . . _ 


ruptcy Tuesday. 


Without the backing of the pow- 
erful Volvo name, Mr. Ericsson 


Parattoi Processing 

MacHnes Hte the new AUtantcomputer carve up a single program into various 
peris, parceling them out to efifferert processors in the system. Thus, 
calculations are performed simultaneously, until one processor must stop and 
awaftresulte from another processor woridng onan earfier portion of the 
program. Again, only some types of programs are suitable, but tremendously 
high speeds can be achieved for relatively tittle cost 


The company said its debt at the enui voivo . nara^ wr. cncsson 
end oflR 2J1 billion krona, ^und that he Muld ool rsuse the 
to which should be added unreal- «**? 




million. 


vices industry worldwide. 

Under company law in Sweden. 


The Swedish offshore group <-'nucr ™ 

made the derision after Us main ^ a troubled firms boa«l of 
creditor, the state-owned ship- or itscrednors fUe for 

buflder Svenska Vaiv, refused to bankruptcy, imawte 


UUiiUU IV Tf_ H ’.L J- * 

change the terms on which it would ^ ^ ^ ^ 


T>* N«w Yerii Tot 


Foster Computers: A New Took 

Race Intensifies for Machines With Many Processors 


aukc UK. tuuu vu niuvuu WVUIU . . — . _ “f 

participate in a rescue package. CTe f llors 

Svenska Varv, which had de- ueaunent over shareholders, 
anded a new share issue to attract }» ^ S^enmvesi case, the re- 
raniial Alined to acoot an ceiver is still trying to disentangle 


manded a new share issue to attract ^ T , 

fresh capital, declined to accept an *? sUU 10 

alternative plan put forward by six its affairs and bankers behew the 


<UM4unuvb i/iau vui ivirrtuv u j ... . t « c « 

banks. S\-mska Varv said the fi- process wiU be lengthy in Consafe s 


nan ring term was too short. 


case too. although some of its assets 


The Svenska Varv proposal re- "e expected to be sold quickly. 


By David E. Sanger 

Hew York Times Service 

ACTON, Massachusetts — For two decades, 
computer scientists have wrestled periodically with 
a seemingly obvious technique for greatly speeding 
up computers: Rather than funnel a vast amount 


processing The result, industry experts say, is an 
emerging generation of computers 2 to 10 times 


tbe5ale of moai rigsracepi Six banks last week agreed to 


of data through a single processor . design a ma- 
chine in which a host of processors attacked a 


chine in which a host of processors attacked a 
problem at once. 

The result, they knew, would be like building an 
interstate highway to replace a dogged country 
lane. 

But it never proved that easy. While It was 
posable to build multiple-processor computers 
that run a number of programs independently, no 
one seemed capable of harnessing the power of 
several processors to a single task. 

They were constantly tripping over one another, 
lying idle for an eternity of milliseconds. 

Now, for the first time, a host of companies seem 
on the threshold of breaking the barrier of parallel 


emerging generation of computers 2 to 10 times 
faster than top-of-the-line minicomputers, some 
approaching the power of small supercomputers. 

“We are on tire verge of a whole new way of 
t hinking about building computers,” said Ronald 
H. GruneT, the 38-year-old chief executive of Al- 
liant Computer Systems Corp., among the most 
promising of a handful of parallel processing cmn- 


ESMte TtoTZd fontribute 75 million krona m 
the new share issue would have loans to an alternative rescue pack- 


greatly reduced the power of Con- age which wouldnot have required 
safe’s founder and managing direc- a sh ®f* 1&sue -„ Thls was the issue 
& yja, Svenska Varv considered too 


tor, Chris ter Ericsson. 


Sweden’s only major firm in the short . . 

offshore business, Consafe began . Consafe s board on Au& 29 said 


iniMiut. uuamwa. Lviuoib uvwu . .... . - ■ * 

negotiating with its aeditors last > l ^as willmg to rwign to avoid 
My after announcing that it faced tankruptcy and _ rated out a new 


panics that have to sprung up around Boston and 
Silicon Valley. 


.M^aSouredby over- share issue as wholly unrealistic. 


Silicon Valley. 

In an industry where technological revolutions 
are proclaimed weekly, Mr. Gruner’s comments 
might be easily dismissed. But academics and 
industry experts alike say that he may be right, and 
that Alii ant’s new eight-processor FX-8 computer 
may breathe life into an industry that has seen 
tittle but layoffs and losses for the past year. 

AUiant’s allure lies in the ability of its first line of 
computers to run with little modification hundreds 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


capacity in the once-booming off- 
shore business. 


At that time Mr. Ericsson said 
Consafe had only 1 million krona 


The bankruptcy does not apply left in cash compared with 200 rail- 
to a few of the firm’s subsidiaries. Hon when its problems were first 
Consafe said the bankruptcy peti- disclosed on July 18. 


'New Wave’ Trade Ideas in the U.S. 

Economists Explore Protectionism as an Extreme Solution 


non applied to the parent company 
and its offshore operating arm. 
Consafe Offshore AB. 

It is the second bankruptcy to 
strike the Swedish shipping indus- 
try in less than a year. 

Last December Saleainvest, the 
world’s largest operator of refriger- 
ator ships, filed for bankruptcy af- 
ter its creditors, including banks 
and in particular the government of 
Sweden, refused to come to its aid. 

The ruling Social Democrats in 
Sweden, faring a crucial election 
Sunday, have criticized the non-So- 


Feor of Inflation 
Fueled in [/.£ 
On M-3 Increase 


By Nicholas Kristof 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Although al- 
most ail economists remain aloof 


Georg Hoeren, analyst at West- from ^ swdiing political move- 
utsche Landes bank in Dussri- mant M oiirh imwwtc 9rP CJiKle. 


protectionism as a bargaining chip, 
are among the exceptional circum- 
stances in which the “new wave” 
economists rite. These “respect- 
able” arguments for protection in- 


iffs,” which are duties on particular cS 8 !! 5 ! pities who ruled Sweden 
imports of which the country is a from 1976 to 1982 for pouring gmr- 


deutsche Landes bank in Dussri- 
dorf, said that his conservative esti- 


roent to curb imports, there are 
some who rite the results of compli- 


' A country could use its bar- 


male would put VWs net per-share SSlSSTSSilC power, throning ,0 dose 

&mT9^r al65DMfrom ^onismmayattimesbejus- fp^Sp^^hX 

approach, according to Robert Z. 


DM in 1984. 

“Although VW appears set for 


dried. 

Dubbed “new wave,” these find- 


major buyer. The idea is that the 
importer can force down the price 
of the foreign good and save for- 
eign exchange However, this hap- 
pens only when the importing 
country can affect a product’s price 
significantly, and most studies sug- 


emment money into shipyards, 
steel producers and other a ilin g in- 
dustries. 

The bankruptcy was anticipated 
and there was no' reaction on the 
Stockholm Bourse. 

Mr. Ericsson said last month 
that the cost of a bankruptcy would 
be up to 900 mOtion Swedish krona 
($105 million). The group's main 
debt is 23 billion krona, owed to 
Svenska Varv. 

Industry analysts said Mr. Erics- 
son’s biggest mistake was probably 
when he took a minority stake in 
the Swedish distributor of Mer- 
cedes-Benz at a time when the rival 
Swedish auto manufacturer Volvo 
had a 25-percent share in Consafe. 


gesi that in any case the optimal 
tariff would be fairly low. 

• la an industry with only a few 
companies competing, a country 
could improve its Irving standard 
by imposing protection, if no one 
rise retaliated. But administration 


steady profit growth, one has to ask the u*££ nS Zx La^ a senior fdtow at the 

the question ‘What comes after the Sstricted trade is always the best Brookings Institution in Washrng- 


CiirrefMy Rates 


— - -X. Hoeren said. “VW ST But^S ^ is ** ^ ^ 8 

seems relatively fixated on me ^ ^ findines endorse orotec- ?,P d . ear dele T?l l — 

model, the new Golf, as thev were if it isn’t used. In other words, it ts 


model, the new Golf, as they were rion ism only in the most «treme « l St £2 

(Continued od Page 13, CoL 1) scenarios, and the economists re- £'L, n « a cure Mrh 


Cross Ratos 


'Aimterdam 
BnmeHta) 
Fmnkfort 
Lpotfon (b) 
Mftan 


C * • 

13065 4JH 

31M 7 MS 

1M 1U 

1313 

MSB30 2JASW 


DM. 

FJP. 

tu. 

Mr. 


SJ=. 

Vts 

11X35* 

36M* 

(USB* 

— 

5564* 

13632* 

136263 

30305 

tons 

3309* 

1738 



34515 

14083* 


3LBB* 

1S04X- 

»-M5* 

ISO’ 

Ht3<“ 

1205* 

3JM08 

117713 

156030 

43175 

7745 

3.1843 

31800 

665DD 

21K.1B 



592.15 

32314 

807J9 

806 

VMS 

93995 

135&0B 

1308 

StA 

203 

2000 

ion 


45075 X 

27141 

ISOM* 

3090 

loo- 

6U7 

27.n 

ao* 

7351 

409JO* 

10034 

- 

«U1* 

2738- 

oral* 

7139* 

40054* 

— 

loo* 

22291 

47922 

1^8343 , 

35036 

4SJ232 

1030 

181317 

238096 

9JS7S34 

137939 

3305 

60.ua 

20572 

244121 


' ctosJngs in London anti Zurich. Rxlnaslnotl^'EipaBeaiaHiNj*s.NmiiY^*r^mm 4PM. 


ZXZZZS tome 


Saudi Plan 
On Oil Prices 
Is Confirmed 

By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 


scenarios, and the economists re- a 

... ^ _ resiramts stiH is seen as a sure pain 

main loath to be seen 8 ^ inefficiency and retaliatio n, 

seal of approval to the broad calls .Til , 

. Tv - • , __ uni • m some circumstances, a 


of such apoticy might require skill- 
ful, even Machiavellian, maneuver- 


ful, even Machiavellian, maneuver- 
ing that would be difficult 10 


for protectionism on Capitol H3L 
Their work has been almost en- 
tirely ignored in the fray in Wash- 
ington over some 300 bills that 
would curtail imports of everything 
from Japanese televisions to Cana- 


counuy can apply “optimal tar- (Continued on Page 13, CoL 4) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — One of Brit- 
ain’s key economic indicators, 
the amount of money in the 
economy, rose sharply in Au- 
gust to push the annual increase 
above target, the government 
said Tuesday. 

It said that the broadly de- 
fined money supply, known as 
M-3 and including cash and 
bank deposits, rose 2 percent 
last month. The aggregate has 
dow increased 135 percent in 
the past year, well above the 
government's 5 percent to 9 
percent target range. 

The increase brought re- 
newed concern that interest 
rates may rise again in order to 
bring the money supply under 


control and stabilize sterling. 
The British pound has faJJi 


The British pound has fallen 
almost 10 cents in a week as the 
dollar strengthened and oil 
prices appeared to be lowering. 

(Reuters, UPI) 


dian logs. Those debates tend to pit 
ardent free traders against ada- 


ZZrZuntooftOOM IMXondOOfrt 
rnj n bur one pouoa: SUM JO 

Other Drilar Value* 

cumin our u JU Corroocv per USjf Corrwacv iw UJJ Omnner torUJU 

nm Fin. markka 6313 Maln.rkw. MOTS S.Kor.woa JUflB 

MOM 34000 s— tomato TOO 

%£££ oSo? satoflrtval X4S T-rteknra 5CJD 

jimiitn krone UU7 
AnptPoawd Ul 


ardent free traders against ada- 
mant protectionists, with neither 
side acknowledging the complex- 
ities of the dispute, economists say. 

“Those of us who work on ‘new 



These securities having been sold publicly : this announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


Secondary Offering 


August 1985 


LUiNLHjiN — uievron y>rp. wave theory are very leery ot pu&n- 
confirmed Tuesday that Saudi Ara- ing it too hard,” said Paul R. Krag- 
bia had proposed to sdl it oil cm a nran , professor of economics at the 


Rtl markka 6313 
GrmN rime. 14UM 
Hans Kaos S 7318 
ladOannawa 1142M 
hKfek.rwHaa M4Z34 
tftobl a.«61 


UraHIAak. 1/49UD 

KuwaHKHaar 03072 


Slns-t 33M 
S- Air. rood ISJtl 


DAEdHtan isra 
Woex-bothr. UJO 


so-called “netback” basis, a system Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
that presumably would involve big oology. “The research is very sensi- 
discounts from prices set by die tfve to precise details that are very 
Organization of retroienm Export- hard to ascertain. And you don’t 
ing Countries. want it to be used for catch-all 

Simon Lowes, a senior adviser at arguments to protect everything.” 


CDC 


Canada 

development 

corporation 


• = « sterling : ! j4a g Irish t , > iioikma uMom); aongui wa- the idea,’ but that no talks with the for protectionism, which Mr. Khig- 

■ foExafp ttfrJauau* 01 7ok ™ moyoi: imp (souls bah (dinar. nvaL cBrtxmu. Saudis had been scheduled. Chev- man said “is taking place without 


isra sunon Lowes, a senior aaviser at arguments to protect everyimng. 
100 Chevron in San Francisco, said the For the most pan, economists 
company had expressed interest in sneer at the groimdswdl of support 


$264,500,000 (Cdn.) 

23,000,000 Common Shares 


tkmaX He Porto (Ports): OanXt* 
Outer data torn Heaters and AP. 


Interest Rates 


Eiotocwreney **** sit * swii , 

-Dollar tWWnrtt Front 

: v month «VS-4to 4*+* vwlu „ — 

’kmoaifa* Bkrjto 5JJJ. tiw-int Wto-io* 

-. 3manlk* W-Pk f*** nw-ttnw lOVb-lllk ■ 

- &moMtu iWtolUk 1WW1I8 M8-9 «,*»• 

• , 1 war • ** «• . F p fu L was Bank (BCUi; Routers 


Fra no 
Ffoae 
WWVW 
9 Ur-18 *> 


iiwik awn* 

llto-llto WHlk 


ecu SDR 

Tv. 

Biwaik r« 
BUM 7Vb 
nm i ‘ 
Mk-9 


tSORJ. Rotes apptlcobt* 


Wta^ey Ratos /0 
uy HdStatoa Close Prev. 

■ ■4fwmtBnfr TUI 7W 

Fan* 711/14 7 ant 

tootar Low Rote tM W" 

CcwFawrfM7»daw MJ *g 


CDtMdm 


IAS 7JS 
733 730 

139 139 

135 751 

UR 7i0 


Aston Dollar Depostte 

Sept. 10 

lmanth f 1 *'** 

2 months •£'*£ 

Smooths Si'S 

Smooths wto-lto 

1 war 8*- 9 

Source: Reuters. 


roa lacked details on exactly bow any intellectual foundation at alL” 
the system would work, he added. He added, “If s still very hard to 
Chevron, along with Exxon, Mo- find a reputable academic econo- 
bil and Texaco, is a partner in the mist who has something good to 
Saudi state-owned Arabian Ameri- say about protectionism, 
can CHI Cou, which produces most But not impossible. Everyone 
of Saudi Arabia’s ou. agrees there are some exceptions to 

Several other major oil compa- the doctrine of free trade; the criti- 
nies are believed to be near reach- cal question is how often these ex- 
ing netback sales accords with the cepuons occur. 

Saudis, and fears that the new pric- Roger E B tinner, chief econo- 
ing system will push down oil mist of Data Resources Inc., a con- 
prices generally have depressed the suiting firm in Lexington, Massa- 
market over the past week. chusetts, is one of a minority of 

As practiced by some other economists who says protectionism 
OPEC countries, netback pricing is aright be useful today. He favors 
based on the current market value giving the president authority to 
of products that can be refined put a surcharge on imports from 
from a band of crude ofl. Japan, and his company conducted 

On the spot, or non-contract, a study showing ihkt a general im- 
markeu Saudi light crude was port surcharge eventually could 


Price: $T1.50 (Canadian) per share 

payable in two instalments of $5.75 each 
with the second instalment expected to be 
payable on September 16, 1986. 


Bums Fry limited 


Wood Gundy Inc. Dominion Securities PHfield Limited McLeod Young Weir Limited 


Richardson Greenshields of Canada limited 


Levesque, Beaubien Inc. 


Pemberton Houston Willoughby Incorporated 


Geoffrion, Lederc Inc. 


quoted Tuesday at about $2725 a raise the United Slates' national 
barrel, down 50 cents from a week income. Most other economists' 
earlier. Crude oil. futures for deliv- studies of the surcharge have come 
ery in December dosed on the New to opposite conclusions. 

York Mercantile Exchange Dies- “if anybody asked me to turn in 


SepL 10 ' 


day at 526.73 a barrel, up 30 cents my ec onomis t's card,” Mr. Brian er 
from the day before but down near- said, “I*d say, “let’s get out of de- 


'jMtonn 


j ' OwnloM Rota . 

. On* Mootb Iwtortmrt 
- Jraoat* Intortonk 

4omMi Intctkonk 


MKTfli L*W» RMff 

3B day a««a vlaW: 7J0 

Talarale WBarart ,B ** : 7sm 

Soane: Merritt Lynch- Telerate. 


from the day before but down near- aud, “Fd say, “let’s get out of de- 
fy SI from a week before. mentaxy economics, let’s go to a 

Almost aH other OPEC members level where we can talk about opti- 
have been resorting to discounts, mal tariffs and bargaining pow- 
but Saudi Arabia has been insisting er.' ” 

(Cootinned mi Page 11, CoL 1) Optimal tariffs and the use of 


Nesbitt Thomson Bongard Inc. Merrill Lynch Canada Inc 

Walwyn Stodgefl Cochran Murray Limited Bacfie Securities Inc. 

F.H. Deacon, Hodgson Jnc. Odium Brown limited Bui 

Molson Rousseau Inc. Tass€ & Associates, Limited Ant 

Brault, Guy, O'Brien Inc. Brawley Cathers limited 

Casgrain & Company Limited Davidson Partners Limited 


Midland Doherty limited 
Inc. Bell Gouinlock limited 

Buigess Graham Securities limited 
Andras Canavest Hetherington Ltd. 
Alfred Bunting & Co. Limited 
Gardiner, Watson Limited 


Franco 

1 ittcrreotiM Mb 
Con Money 

' Owm oototatoftmli 
tmooni lotcftadt . 
6 wa«M a tt 


9 to *6 

911/16 

n* 

9 11/M 

966 «6 


Gold 


• SraalB 

1 Book sou Roto 
Cod Mom ' 

Tum milt I 


Mr. Franklin Jagodnik, 
Deputy International Manager of 
Banque de PUnion Europeenne 


JlW H 
)]M> 11* 

II 7/S MW* 


S S 

616 61 3f16 
67/16 6 7/16 


.^mtes: Reuters, ConrnerdanA 
Lnmob. Bank of Tonya: 


HoouSjmu =55 

Uixembourv 

>?•«“““ gs 5S 

*2 “ Bud +“• 

bV s ’_ Hon v York Comae current 

Source: Reuters. 


b joining Republic National Bank of New York (France) ae 
Directeur GenenJ-Acfioint (executive Viee-Preudezu) of die 
French subsidiary in dnip of Iniematioaal Bonneas. 


John Graham & Company Limited Loewen, Ondaatje, McCutcheon & Company limited 

MacDougall, MacDougall & MacTier Inc. McCarthy Securities limited 

McDermid St Lawrence Limited McLean McCarthy limited McNefl, Man t ha, fnc 

Moss, Lawson & Co. limited Merit Investment Corporation Matson Placements Canada Inc. 
Osier, Wills, Bickle Limited Peters & Co. Limited Scotia Bond Company Limited 

Yoricton Securities Inc 


Mr. Franklin Ja gpdnifc, a former fullb right acholanhip redpi- 
ent, is bachelor of arto from bdoh college (Wise) and agradnaie 
bom Inetitut iTEtndes Poliliques de Parb- 



J 




£0 


E 


i 




Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
end do not reflect tote trades elsewhere. 


in 2 a* 

26W MV* 


QUMtar 140 £5 10 335 5910 291* 291ft + 16 
ax Roll MB 1.1 14 86 227% 72 72 — * 


(Continued Tram Page 8) 


« 
% 
as 
w 
w. 
* 
1 M 

3M*-W 
«*-* 
1H6 + Mi 
W* +1W 
13V*— V. 
5* + V. 
33W — V* 
20 — 1W 
2 W 
12b 

isva — w 

to 

h 
W 
b 
Vk 
Vk 
M 


47W 
30b 

ana 
39W 38W 389k 
MU MW 1«* 
29W 29W 2?Vt 
34 34 34 

a a a 

10*. 10b 10b 
10W. 10W low 
59 St 59 
10 w 9k 
22W 122VS 122W 
U 
7114 
58b 
50 


4 

2J 

n 

34 

24 

14 

32 

9 

2J 

10 

14 

£1 

57 

9 

4 

25 


3 * 

an* 

12W w* 

3414 24a 
24b UW 
34 24 

12 
45V* 

m 


2£Rk 
2DW 

swH 

aw m 


BW 7Vk BVk 
66 44 44 

» am sra 
62W 62W 62K> 
74k 7b 


37W 
34b 

33b— 1W 
43b— w 
35 W— b 
18W— W 
20 — b 
11V* 

7 b 

12W 

24W— 9* 
47W— b 
34W + V* 

i2b— a 
32b 

56b + W 
42 — W 
13b + W 
32W— b 
12b 

MW + b 
M 
b 

w 

b 


93 
9ib 
73 

b 27b 
Vi 47b 
85 


22b VFCotp 
5b Valera 
14 4 Vaiarpf 
2b Vatevin 
19 VonDm 
214 varoa 
24b Vartan 
9b Vara 
17b Veeco 
2b Vanda 
y_— ISe 
29b Vlocom 
37 VaEPpt 
46 VaEPnf 
44 VaElpf 
73 VoEP of 
S7W VaEptJ 
13b vtahays 
32b Vomad 
46b vwenM 


1.12 22 ho 


M 3 28 
80 34 31 
80 2.1 15 
19 

lXOcnax 

M 14 21 
7.72 114 
844 IIJ 
ua 9J 
925 1U 
772 117 

13 

11 

220 34 T2 


397 40b 
297 10b 

7 23b 

8 2b 

51 2H6 
90 4 

680 SOW 
21 1Tb 
MO 19 
134 9b 
£3 11W 
913 47b 
lOOz 70 
50z7BW 
20z 91 
2Qz 86 
llOz 4flb 
53 24b 
21 46b 
143 82b 


40b— W 
10b 

23 — W 
2b— b 
2314 + b 
3b + b 
30W— b 
lib 

18b— 14 
9b 

UW— b 
47W— W 
70 +1 

71b— lb 
91 —1 

84 — 1 
68b 

34b— b 
4414 + b 
81b— W , 


US, Futures 


StpL 10 

Open High Law Cow Che. 


High 

Law . 

Open- Hlob Low. 

Ctoee Chg. 

7540 

5745 May 

5*38 5885 *5740 

5X15 +89 

7640 

57X0 Jol 

58^ 5*60 5845 

5X55 +45 

73.15 

5550 Aug 


56.17 ' - 

EsL Salas 

A122 Prev. Sales 1552 _ 


Prav. Day Open inL 6467 up 183 



Grains 


WHEAT (CBT) 

5400 bu minimum- dollars par bushel 
376b 2Mb Sep 2J5b 276b 271b 274 +40K 

343b 279b Dec 2b 2JB8 243b 247 +Xrlb 

374b 257 Mar 27214 2Kb 270b 274 +41* 

4-02 244 May 2JQ 273 289b 273 +43W 

372b 243 Jul 271 276 249b 274 +45* 

345 247 Sap 278b +44W 

EV. Soles Prev.Soiet 9732 

Prev. Dow Open int. 35437 oH 176 


CORN (CRT) 

5JJOO bu minimum- (tailors per buahol 
371b 222b sec 223b 22314 270b 222b — 40V> 

275 2MW Dec 215b 216b 214b 216b +01 

110 274b Mo r 225b 277 22Cb 226b +4TW 

121b 231 MOV 232b 273b 231W 273b +-01 b 

246 243 Jut 23414 277b 22SVi 237b +41* 

284b 274b Sep 279 270b 220b 279b +Jlb 

230 220b Dec 226b 227b 27Sb 277b +JQ 

EtL Sales Prev. Sato 22704 


Prev.Doy Open lnf.134442 off 984 


London 

Commodities 


Commodities 


Gomwliities 


Cash Prices 


SOYBEANS (CBTl 

5400 bu minimum- dollars per bunef 

471 540b 5*D 546 iOOb 542W 107 +42 

448 572 Nov 544 5_U7b 571b 5 jQSW +43 

479 5.11b Jan 5.12 5.17b 5.11 5.15b +44 

742 373 Mar 574 579b 572b S27W +44b 

779 57114. MOV STJb 5JBW 572 5X7- +43W 

478 574b Jul 340b 544b 577 543b +J)3b 

474 575b- Aug 579b 5*44 579b 543 - +JO 

628 572 S«P 577b 

472 STB Nov 578b 541 574 579 +81 

EsI. Sales Prev.Sales 23777 

Prev. Dor Open Int. 46049 off 2434 


SOYBEAN MEALCCBTJ 
TOO tons- dollar* per ton 
179.50 12040 Sep 1! 


Sept. 10 

_Oose . Previous 
Htab Law Bid Aik Bid Ask 

SUGAR 

Starling par metric Ian 
Oct 14770 13<40 14540 14580 13940 13980 

Dee 14980 14140 14440 14980 14200 U240 

Mar 15780 14940 15680 15440 15080 15070 

Mar 16180 1518 139+0 16080 15380 15340 

Aug 16540 16340 16580 16540 15780 15*80 

Oct 17170 14940 17040 17180 16380 16470 

Volume: 4860 lots at 50 tans. 

COCOA 

Sterling pot metric ton 
Sep 1,735 1.715 1714 1719 1735 1740 

Oec 1780 1764 I74S 1,769 1786 1787 

Mar 1800 1783 1786 1788 1804 1805 

Mar 1816 1800 1801 1803 1827 1823 

Jhr 1831 1830 1814 1817 1832 1834 

Sep 1840 14M 1831 1832 1850 1853 

Dec 18« 1838 1820 1835 1848 1857 

Volume: 2731 lots of ID Ions. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metric tan 
Sep 1440 1422 1422 1425 1452 1453 

NOT 1479 1460 1460 1461 1491 1493 

Jan 1717 1496 1496 1499 1,721 1725 

Mar 1750 1730 1728 1730 175* 1760 

MOV 1783 1770 1740 1740 1,788 1,790 

Jlr 1,780 1700 1770 1,790 1813 1415 

Sep N.T. N.T. 1,760 1840 1800 I860 

Volume: 1,922 lots el 5 tans. 

GASOIL 

U5. dollars per metric too 
Sep 24875 24740 24640 24740 24740 24775 
Oct 24575 342.75 24540 24575 34175 24150 
NOV 24175 23850 24140 24175 237-50 237.75 
Dec 2382X1 33550 23750 23840 23475 23450 
Joa 23475 33340 23450 23475 23240 2+) t } 
Feb 23150 53040 23140 23150 22440 23340 
Mar N.T. N.T. 22040 23040 22040 22540 
Art 21875 217.50 217.75 21840 21675 2l£s0 
Mar N.T. N.T. 21050 22240 21040 22540 
Volume: 2722 lets of 100 Ions. 

Source*. Reuters and London Petroleum E»- 
cnanoe fgasoUl. 


High Low Bid Ask CtTga 

SUGAR 

French francs par metric ton 
Oct 1838 1585 1810 1830 +10 

Dec 1800 1565 1890 1800 +27 

Mar 1820 1570 T810 1813 +30 

MOV 1855 1810 1A40 1850 +30 

Aug 1855 1+50 1880 1885 +24 

Oct 1745 1740 1735 1850 +25 

em. voi.: 2400 lots ot 50 tons. Prav. actual 
sales: 2838 lots. Open interest: 22,170 


N 


COCOA 

French francs per 100 kg 

Z100 Z100 1100 1120 — 

1060 1050 1050 2455 — 

2400 2480 2475 2485 — 

N.T. N.T. 1085 — — 

N.T. N.T. 2495 — — 


StJX. 10 

HOKG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
U-S5 per ounce 

Clou Previous 
HWI Low Bid Ask Bid Ask 
Sep- N.T. N.T. 31940 37140 31940 22140 
Od _ N.T. N.T. 32140 32340 32040 32240 
Nov _ N.T. N.T. 32X00 32540 32240 32440 
Dec _ N.T. N.T. 32540 32740 32540 32740 
Feft _ N.T. N.T. 33040 33240 32940 33140 
Art __ 33540 335-DO 33440 33640 33440 33440 
Jun — 34040 34040 33940 34140 33840 34000 
Aua - N.T. N.T. 344 00 34640 34340 34540 
Volume: 23 lots of 100 


Commodify and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santue. ft. 

Prlntctcttl 64/30 38 b- yd — 

Steel billets (Pttt.), tan 

Iron 7 Fdry. Ptilkt, ton 

Start soup No 1 hvy PftL _ 
Lead Spot, 1b 

Zinc E.SLL. Basis, lb 

Palladium, os 

surer N.Y, az 

Source: AP. 


Sept. JO 
Year 
Tue Ago 
143 187 

x«i -HI 

472J0 471» 

71380 21389 

72-73 tUt 
19-21 3MS 


17950 12080 Sep T254Q 12670 T3L90 12670 +40 

18050 12230 Od 12740 12770 12590 12780 +70 

18440 12X80 Dec 13X20 13180 12950 13090 +70 

16340 12740 Jan 132-10 13340 13140 132.10 —70 

20650 13040 Mar 13570 13580 13370 13480 —JO 

16250 132J0 May T37J0 13750 0550 13740 —70 

16740 13440 Ju! 13850 MOM 13750 13950 —70 

14350 U55D Aug 13780 14148 13780 14070 +70 

16740 13780 Sep 13980 14040 13780 13980 +70 

EsL Sales Prev. Sales >0,145 

Prev. Day Open Int. 45806 offSBZ 
SOYBEAN OILCCBT) 

60400 lbs- dollars per 100 lbs. 

31.10 71X5 SOP 3185 3188 2183 2181 -8)4 

30-17 2148 Od 2170 2180 7LI8 2777 +47 

2955 2080 Doc 21.15 7180 2146 31.17. +.12 

2947 21.10 Jan 3170 2187 2173 7185 +.10 

2850 21.43 Mm- 2158 2175 2155 2170 +.15 

Z785 2170 Mar 2170 2240 2145 2770 +.11 

2575 3242 Juf 2215 2275 2215 2273 +48 

25.15 2215 Aug 2230 22J0 2280 2288 +4S 

2445 2230 Sep 2230 2285 2130 2282 +.E2 

2X80 2230 Od 2233 +43 

EM. Sales Prev. Sales KU73 

Prav. Dor Open inf. 57833 upl39 
OATS(CBT) 

5400 bu minimum- doltors nor bushel 
179 1.11b SOP 140b 170b 1.19b 170 

182b 171 Dec 175b 174 L25W 146 +40W 

187b 176b Mar 1X0 lJCb 179b 1J0b +40b 

183 177b Mar 180 180b 179 180 440b 

lJttb 176 Jul 177b 

EsL Salas Prav. Salas 2B2 

Prev. Day Open inL 3751 off 36 - 


Livestock 


MA 6.1 ta 
Ml MB 

102-104 135-01 
643 774 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
US4 per ounce 


. High Lew Settle Settle 

S*P N.T. N.T. 31980 33000 

Oct N.T. N.T. 320JM 321JD 

Dec 3267D 325.10 325.10 325.90 

Feh N.T. N.T. 33070 NJ3. 

Volume: 85 lots of 100 oz. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian cents pgr kilo 

Close Previous 

£ct 18?^ 1^ hjL NA 


DM Futures 
Options 


IK Gmmt Moet OSM marts ends on- ew* 


London Metals 


Now offering 
CBOT 




FUTURES 

mmsm Sc mm 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Also Furores and 


Fururcs Options on 
MEX-COLb & SUN 


COMEX-GOLD & SILVER 
IMM- CURRENCIES 


15 


* ROUND TURN 
RAY AND 
CR'tRNKSHT 


'Aji/iUes only ft trades 


etr ttdbtK -VI contracts per 
calendar munch. First 2SO 


calendar munch. First 2V 
tmcmcts 575 nunrf turn 


« oil one nf iiurprnlroioTH^ 

212-221-7138 

Telex: mWK 


republic CLEAfinrc 

C0BP0RAH0N 

452 R6k McWK. NT. KT M 
AdASBi wflf 

S^dlklUimllBkdlMU 

A Si; HiUui CummcivLI R»il 


Sept. 10 
Close prevfoos 

Bid Ask Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Starling per metric ton 
S p°» 75740 75750 757.00 75840 

Forward 78040 78140 78040 78050 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

Starling per metric ten 
Soot 103640 103680 104680 104780 

Forward 106340 106440 151X50 157380 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterling per metric Ion 
Sort 101040 101340 102140 102340 

Forward 1(0840 104140 104940 UB140 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric ton 

5P° r 29840 29850 29880 2*940 

Po^gj) 30100 30150 29980 30040 

Starling per metric tan 

Snot 360540 361540 358040 xwnnn 

s/lVEI* 342100 343< U» 362040 362X00 

Fence per troy ounce 

Spat j J5950 46080 46740 4«nn 

rfCTsSadann 47 ^ 47150 «« 

Starting par matrtc ton 

spot 917340 917540 919040 *19240 

zni^ ,,5U0 913ao ° 9,5M# 

Starting per metric Ion 

5. 7 - 00 SWjD0 52100 «5A0 

Forward m no na na 
Source; AP. 


Oct 181.75 18250 NJL HA. 

NOV 18140 18185 - — 

Oec 18150 18240 — — 

Am 18140 18340 New — 

Fob 18340 18540 New — 

Mar 18540 18740 New - 

volume: 2 lots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapor e cents per kilo 

Close Previous 

RSSIOct— 16550 16640 14675 166J3 

RS5 1 Nov_ 16X50 16440 16440 16450 

RSSIOct- 15150 15250 15240 5340 

RSS 3 Oct — 14950 15050 15X00 15740 

P.SS 4 Oct _ 14550 14750 14640 14840 

RSS 5 Oct- 14050 14280 14140 74340 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian ringgits per 25 tans 

one Previous 

- B& *4* Bid Ask 

rK ™ 7W NJL NA 

Oct 730 770 — — 

Nov 730 770 — _ 

Dec 720 760 — — 

Jan. 770 740 — — 

Fp»> 7W 7S0 — — 

Mar 7TO 750 — — 

May 690 740 — — 

-II V- 690 740 — — 

Volume: 0 lots ot 25 tons. 

Source: Routers. 


Sept. 10 

strike Catts-Seflts Pet sSeftJe 

erica Dec Mar Jan Dec Mar Jee 

32 280 344 - 0X7 080 — 

33 1-75 135 — X57 OJ* — 

34 1.17 187 — 090 LIB — 

35 084. IJ2 — 145 1 87 — 

34 044 096 136 113 125 — 

37 025 067 — 294 294 — 


CATTLE (CME) 

40400 lbs.- cents per lb. 

65.90 5X60 Ocr SU5 02! 

6745 55.15 Dec 5380 5545 

67+5 5450 .Feb 5460 55.15 

6757 55J0 APT 5555 5595 

6685 5A40 Jun 5680 5645 

*5+0 5520 Aug 5555 5525 

Est. Sates 19881 Prav. Sales Z7422 
Prev. Day Open int. 5046* up3!5 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44400 tax- cents per ft. 

7100 57A5 sec 57 JO g80 

7132 5747 Oct 5747 57.40 

73X0 58X0 Nov 5840 5945 

7950 6050 Jan 6TJ0 8L15 

7XM 61.10 Mar 6140 61^ 

7855 6145 AFT 6140 61.10 

66X5 6040 May .6030 40X5 

Est. Sotos Z490 Prev. Soles 1847 
Prev. Day Open Int 8235 up 77 


5222 5X07 
5500 SSJ7 
5455 5495 
SS 40 5582 
5625 5680 
5530 55JS 


5680 5725 
5655 5730 

5B.10’ sun 
6080 6140 
6042 6095 

6080 6140 
60.10 4020 


Edlmetadtatel voL 4868 
Cam: Dai nL 2X60 ogee M. 17.151 
Pets : Moil vel. Z440 open lot I1VS7 
Source: CMS. 


HOGS (CME) 

30400 lbs.- centsper ft. 

51X5 3485 Od 35X0 M87 

5X85 3645 Dec 3645 3745 

5X47 3X10 Feb M40 39.15 

47 JS 34-11 AW ZK ME 

4945 3940 Jun «J0 4X50 

4945 4085 Jul 4X75 41.10 

5190 4025 Aug «40 4095 

41.10 3847 Oct 3X30 K85 

4980 3X37 Dec 3*80 3944 

Est. Sales 4 894 Prev. Sales 5297 
Prev. Day Open int. 2X575 eH3» 


3540 3585 
3690 3785 


3620 1680 

4045 4080 
4X75 41.10 
4040 4095 

3380 3880 
3940 3940 


V.YHLM S«sHbllt 4 P • M.Qg 



NSW HIGHS 23 


Am Baker 
CasKiaAIr 

BottMmk 

Chriscm 

Burrghs 

Crols Cort> 

G«nPo«l . 

NtaMadi P( 
Rubom«* _ 
Zurti Jrxl 

CaraPLPtA 

EnsrcfiGaFf 

KatarAJwm-- 

Essex Oi 
Krttwaod Co 
- RrvereCow 
Ttantlofl. 

Fstwtoe — . 
LaoeStln 53 
Rich Vic* ; 

WrtngtnRItn 

PflPL924pf . 
S tavern JP . 

’ * •’ ’ 

WEW-UBHM » 


Srl&s , 

ScorCp 

GCA CD 

HWiCrPrn 

RonerCp 

AlllIlECO 
Conwwgr __ 
EfMellKWTtO 
GEO Inti 
Lanrter 
vlStamaeTcn 

BankAmer 

Copwtd 
FoIrtJlWpr 
Goal Devin 

PalmBaocti 

TexAmBnch. 

Cabot CP 
EQKRtyn r 
Puauo 

Gen Rad. • 

PvfOElW 

TowtaMfgpf- 


RCA Board Approves 
'Poison PiU’ Measures 


New York. Times Service 

■ NEW YORK •— RCA Cocp. said that its w 
board had approved aiew “poison pill" pnm- * 
sion that would make a hostile takeover diffi- * 
colt, even th ough tbere.has been no indication __ 
of a pending bid for the company. .. * 

/-Analysts, noting the absence of any interest \ 
in RCA. said they were surprised by Monday s 
announcement. “The market has not. been treat- -r 
ing die company as if it woe in play," said J. . 
Kendrick Noble Jr^ a first vice president at 
Paine Webber Inc. . / ... 


As part , of RCA s new defensive" stra _, 
each shareholder would acquire a right .that^': * 
wcxdd become exercisable only if an acquhing^ 
company bought 20 percent or more of RCA 
common stock or made a tender offer for AY "• 
least 30 percent of RCA -stock. • 

■v At that point if RCA is acquired in a merger, 
each right will entitle its holder to purchase' -. 
$300 worth of stock in- the acquiring compahjr f_ 
for S150. In essence, that means that an alcquh-'; 
ing company has to seD rights' holders, its. stock 
at a 50-percent discount Such strategies are^ 
called poison pill because they are meant to 1 
-“pmsori” dr dissuade any hostile bidders. 

. In. a fous-page letter to shardiolders, RCA= - ■ . 
sdd,-**We have seen that farmore drastic me a-; '-J* 
sores may be required to protect shareholders '’. . 
after a raid had begun, than might have sufficed? * 

‘ steos had been taken in advance.” • : 


Samon Season 
High Low 

Omni High -Law 

Clow 

Chg. 



. 67-3) 

■« 


Mar 67+5 67-15 67-9 

67-M 

■H 

.ffet sqigs 

Prnv.5alesT69.MB> . 


~ ; _■ 

Prav. Day Opo» lnt236863 up 7^43 

‘ 



ypian 

MUM 




Industrials 


Dhideods 


PORK BELUES (CME) 

38400 Ibi^ certs per lb. 

7620 5585 Feb 5U0 S73S 
7580 5545 Mar 5720 5785 


5682 5697 
5680 5747 


Currency- Options 


S&PKM) 
Index Options 


Strike Cam-Lot PotaLori 

Meesm Ofl He* ok See Od Mm Dec 

2 ijirw. - uit in» * 

ra 7 n, P* 171* 7/16 U/K IX 

W IX Jta 4 51* ft ilk 29/163 

K 306 1 W. 2X 41* 5 M l« 

IW 1/16 3/16 % 1 5/1 916 916 *» 9X 

I9S l/b I/U 3/16 — - - - - 

,280 — 1/14 1/16 — — — — — 


Tbtel nil toImw 14>857 
total an com urf,«U67 
Total Ml tan 12U2I 
TeW oat epee IN.5H823 
Index: 

tfl0kl825U Law BUS 
Source : CBOE, 


Treasurj' 


ua T. BILLS (IMM1 
SI mlniorv mart 108 pd._ 

*323 8694 Son 9297 9247 9242 • 9246 . +m 

9347 8587 Dec 9289 9281 9285 fl« +46 

9249 MM Mor AM 911* 92.12 9234 +45 

*2X8 8741 Jun . 9140 9140 9189 9141 +06 

9241 8X00 Sap 71 .so +JM 

91X8 8945 DM 91 Jl +M 

91X9 B9J8 Mar KM +M 

90X9 9050 Jlin HJB 9B80 9041 9XM : +4d 

EASala* USB ilW 

Prav. Day opan Int- B487 off *46 















































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, S EPTEMBER 11, » _ 



ticorp, McGraw Form Joint Firm 

*** ***”**" the trades, it would not violate fed- CSticoro already has anamngp- 

NEw YO&& Citicorp and eral laws that prohibit from. ment with Ratios m which Reu- 
Md3 raw- Hill -Inis, announced trading in commodities, tens defivHS its foreign-e xchan ge 

Tuesday the^ formation of a joint- to these sauces. and rntmey-maricet quouuons m 

venture company to provide 24- McGraw-Hill, a large publishing Europe through Gticorp’s cash- 

boar iradmg mformation for a company, has been strengthening management terminals, 
broad, range of commodity, spot its activities in the energy area. For . By delivering information _ and 
and i cx>nlxact-marltet&. some years, h has owned Plan's lumping fipewejal transactions, 

GkjbalElectronics Markets Co., Oilgram News and Platt’s Oilgram GEMCO will give G ticor p a major 


LO vu^ioiu n&vra ouu twii a v/ugt 

or GEMCO, is Gticorp’s first ma^ Prices, which axe da ily pub lica-- 
jor entry into whalit calls the infor- dons. And recently, a cc o rdin g to 
!»» ! . « » - an nmnV: rn ilv nil mdiiOTV. it has 


]or cmryimownaiu causme mi or- icuuuy, « 

mation business; an 'area of high people in the oil mdi 
priority far the bank holding com- acquired the Oil Bayeu-w—w^— ~ 
pauy .... Oil Buyers Guide Internati o nal, 


its activities in the energy area. For . By delivering information and 
some years, h has owned Flan's f. Tuning finewrial transactions. 
Oilgram News and Plan’s Oilgram GEMCO will give Gticorp a maj or 
Prices, wludi are daily publica-" ' presence in toe informa ti on bust- 
rionR- And recently, according to . oess pnfl wlQ .bring McGraw-Hill 
people in the oil industry, it has closer to the the b ankin g business, 
squired the Oil Buyers Guide and Waher B . Wristan, who retired 

rtTl Diwhhii fiin^fc TvifJimehAriBl _ ■ _ 1 _ 1 

last year as Citicorp s c h a irm a n , 

. /i — u_L An ntfnrm*- 


Texas Air 
To Give Up 
TWA Link 

By Jonathan P. Hicks 

New York Tima Service j 

NEW YORK —Texas Air Corp. j 
has agreed to withdraw from its 
merger pact with Trans World Air- 
lines, sources dose to the two air- 
lines said. 


ADVERTISEMENT . . in iodc 

I nternational funds (QuoWio^su^pn^ 


•tglBsrr** sFR2Aoa-ia 


Hal cbm) vakH ■emotion* are tmOma w me Red* IW«J •*"* *• 
The HmtMl irMMIt Indiana trerwcoCTrteontdt«w»toB*rt « lWi 


Is Sim 


puny.. . , - last year as unoxps 

According: to oil industry ^^SSf'venture P laccda 1™*^ °* 

sources, GEMCO would allow *** stirwxs . ”7 mamtammg that 

S infbimarion js the essence of bank- 
ers of buyers.and sdlm. * He arted thatjt^jgwces 

Because the system would subsidiary, Gtibank Efcctromc wtheabOirvto 

ly put buyers aSldlas m touch Trading' Services Inc and 1 

with each other without GEMCO McGrawrHa Ts Electronic Markets handle the actual tram^oo. 
itself getting directly involved in andlnfprinationSysieais. 1 ' ' 


Increase in To Capi 
1985 Sales 


(Contmned from Page 9) ^ 

with the Bostk for so long. Such _ v 
reliance may proverisky in the long c 
sfl^but it’s not going to hurt prof- c 
its this year or next," t 

Mr. Hahn said that Volkswagen, t 
which has the largest share — 13 
percent — of the European market, j 
is in a solid position to maintain e 
that lead and possibly widen it s 
• “We contmue to -have very „ 
strong sales . in England, Italy, j 
France and Spam," he said. “Now 
that tire domestic market, Europe's j 
largest, has picked up strongly after \ 
the resolution of the emission-con- i 
trd debate. I'm pretty certain well 
ken the No. 1 spot because of our 
traditional strength in Germany.” . 

West German auto registrations 
ebbed earlier this year during de- 
bate on plans for tougher exhaust- 
emission standards, but began to 
blossom after the European Com- 
munity agreed to ptase in the new 
controls beginning in 1988. 

i wfehveries in the domestic mar- 
ker recovered sharply after die first 
quarter, when they dropped as 
much as 12 percent from a year 
earlier, Mr. Hahn said. In the Janu- 
ary-August period, domestic deliv- 
eries were up 3 percent from a year 
ago, . European deliveries rose 28 
percent and deliveries to the Unit- 
ed States increased Id percent 

Mr. Hahn said that VWs South. 
African unit had improved opera- 
tions, but is not likely to reduce the 
51-rmDion DM loss reported last - 

year because of "tawl unrest in that 

■ count ry. 

t ■ ■ . • • - . - . , 

j Saudi Platt 
: On CHI Price 

(Coolinned from Pafc* 9) 
on official prices for oil sold so far 
s ais year. As a result buyers have 

ii fiS, and Saudi production in Te- 
l: cent months has run at a 20-year- 
c low of about 2 million to 15 mu- 
s- bon bands a day. 

s' The Saudis have warned that 

* they are tired of charing by other 
■ r OPEC members and mtend to m- 
^ crease their sales. 

* Charles Maxwell, senior energy 
strategist at the New York stodt- 
S; of Cyrus J. Lawrence 

I’ SS^ma«d, tot “ 


By John Meehan 

Intemanaaal Herald Tribtmc 

NEW YORK —Morgan Stanley 
& Co., theU.S. investment barildng 
firm, announced ^Tuesday that it 
wiO acquire the rights to.tbe publi- 
cations and stock market indexes 
of Capital International Perspec- 
tive SA, the Geneva-based data 
unit of the Capital Group. 

Richard B. Fisher; president of 
Morgan Stanley, said his firm is 
exp andin g its international re-, 
search capabilities. It will he re- 
named the Morgan Stanley Capital 
International Perspective. 

The takeover becomes effective 
Jan. 1. Mr. Fisher would not dis- 
close the price, but said the Capital 
Group stmwill receive revenues. 


Capital International’s daily in- 
dexes on major stock markets and 

its monthly magazine on shareper- 

fonnances are key sources of re- 
search material for investment 
firms around the world. 

The service currently has 700 cli- 
ents, primaril y institutions and in- 
vestment advisers. 

The purchase reflects growing 
competition among investment 
firms to provide services to U.S. 
institutions on European and 
Asian markets. 

Barton Biggs, who heads Mor- 
gan Stanley's international re- 
search department, said ihc service 
is “not unprofitable.” 


Coke Refuses to GuBFomtuhitoJud^B 

‘. The Associated Presx 

WIIAflNCrrON, Ddaware— Coca-Cola Ca has refused toobey a 
U S federal judge’s order to turn over its soft-drink cola formulas, m 

.factor order 


lUtti — I 4 • __ IVU. IUM1U , 

the same pricing structure as the Coke-brand synifL for aU the TWA stock he does not 

^Attorneysfor Coc*Cola sad m a letter to Seady Texas Air had offered 

disclosing the formulas, which are among the b f st Sf d a “ j26 a share. TWA’s stock was up 

the world, would present the possibility of incalculable and trrepaia 125 cents on Tuesday on the New 

ble harm to the company. , , . thflt thc Wo York Stock Exchange, closing at 

The bottling companies say they need to show that the two 
products are the same except for sweety andJud^SJ agreement to acquire 

S^ed Coca-Cola to turn over TWAvL thvSted by agreements 

with formulas for new Coke, Diet Coke, caffeine-free between Mr. Icahn and the pitots 

experimental tow-calane colas. .v- results and machinists' unions, under 

Coca-Cola did ap» to ^ which the unions granted major 

between caflemo-free Coke and Coca-Cola. The j ge concessions in wages and benefits, 

-cring further action.. ■■■— 

Malaysia to Remain in Rubber Group 

Y > . _ Tk. «rwi„ri« Btso said Malav- compared with the losses that 


foortb-largest U A airizne. 

The agreement, reached over the 
weekend according to toe reports 
on Monday, would end toe long 
battle for TWA between Mr. Icahn 
and Frank Lorenzo, toe chairman 
of Texas Air. 

An investment group headed by 
Mr. I"*" had secured a m^onty 
of TWA’s stock, but toe airlines 
previous agreement to be acquired 

by Texas Air remained a stumbling 

block for Mr. Icahn. 

Although a definitive agreement 
has not yet been signed, those close 
10 toe negotiations have predicted 
that it would he done soon. Ana- 
lysis, remained cautious, however, 
eating two other occasions when 
MnLorenzo failed to sign toe pa- 
pers after Texas Air had reached 
rimilar accords with Mr. Icahn. 

“This means the battle is coming 
to an end, but until you have a 
signed contract it hasn’t ended, and 
it’s simply not a fait accompli, 
said Robert J. Joedicke. an airline 
analyst with Sbearson Lehman 
Brothers Inc. 

• In toe other two instances, a 
number of issues apparently held 
up Mr. Lorenzo’s signature, most 
notably the question of whether 

Texas Air would be required to pay 

to TWA aprofit of about $2 mil- 
lion that Texas Air had made on 
char es purchased at a tune when 
the carrier and Mr. Icahn had 
agreed to refrain from acquiring 
additional stock. 

Sources close to toe most recent 
negotiations, however, said that is- 
sue was not a major problem. 

Mr Icahn is offering $24 a share 

for all the TWA stock he does not 
already own. Texas Air had offered 
S26 a share. TWA’s stock was up 
125 cents on Tuesday on toe New 
York Stock Exchange, closing at 
$2225. 

Texas Air’s agreement to acquire 
TWA was thwarted by agreements 
between Mr. Icahn and toe pitots' 
and machinists' unions, under 
which toe unions granted major 
concessions in wages and benefits. 



employment 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS WANTED j AUTOS TAX FREE 
STUDENT SHKS AU PAR woric in| ” 

TRASCO 

INTERNATIONAL 

LHD. Merosdai Tax Free 
Limousna 36' S 
Armoured con and Smousne* 
Coach bull can 
Other mdees 8, eacanes 

Over 100 imb m stock 
Wodd wide deSvery 
Queer from source 
D.O.T. & EAA. 

UftUWOT 

Trasco London UtL 

6547 Park Lane, London W.l. 



AUTOS TAX FREE 


DAWAJI TRADE 

1NTL DELIVERY 

We keep a large stock of 


^un:cntrA.«a:^ 



AUTO SHIPPING 


Tab 02/648 55 13 
Telex 65658 
42 rue Lem, 

. 1050 Brawls. 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAR INTO THE U5JL 
This documeri erpimns fu% v£* 
mud do to bring a cor into the Ui 
safely and tegr^. It "dude 
used Europeai auto pnees.J»ying ops, 
DOT & EPA oonvereon addresses, cus- 
tom derxonce & dirang procedures 
as well as legal ports. ^ You ajn semup 
to USS1 2X00 wfien buying a Mercean, 
or BMWm Europe £ importing it to the 
Sms. To recwve the manual, send 

7000 Stuttgart 1, Wefl Gemo* 


the,offidal price. c 

Mr; Maxwell said he betieved j 
that the Sands agreed * 

Corp, MobO Goto, and Texaco 
Inchon the general oulbnesofa j 

nelhack system about a month agp. - 

He said Saudi Arabia , appeared 
lately to sign hetback contracts 
those companies soon- 
The sales would start Ocj- 1 jjd 
involve a total of about 850,000 
barrels daily, Mr. Maxwell stud. 

Some press reports have said toe 
Saudis would make simil ar agree- 
ments with. Shell Oil, the UJ3. uni 
of toe Royal Dutch/Shell Group, 
and with toe Mitsubishi Group of 

Saudis and most of the com- 
panies involved have declined to 
cooanem oo toe reports, but 
prominent analysts and traders are 
mkfag them scnously. 

There’s little question that its 
under discussion at the highest lev- 
els," said John Lichtblau, president 
af Petreleum Industry Research 

Ft ^^Vacti, an ofl analyst at toe 
Loadon bSage of ,Gncv«^ 

; Grim &GtL, said be also bell wed 

: tiWvSaudis had agreed in principle 
to the sales, but he said they proto- 
M would test the waters by start- 
ing on with netback salesof^y 

several hundred thousand barrets a 

1 dS %.' yarn also suggested that 

Saudi Arabia. would wsut untfl afw 
> an 1DPEC meeting ' scheduled Hx 
i' Occ 3 in Vienna before making a 
final deriskm. „ .. 

^ Some analysts say the 

:• maylkipettottalkofnetbadcsajK 

„* will frighten other OPEC 
7 into agreeing to adhere moreciosc- 
7 ^ to toe group’s pridng 
r* ductioin rules, thus reducing me 

7 threat of ari oil-price collapse 

Mr. Vatzi and others said tne 
- . Saadis appeared eager to 

. disruption, to the market. I don 
- fife: thty want a pnee crash, ne 


' Reuters 

: KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia 
— The government said Tuesday 
that it would remain in the Interna- 
tional Natural Rubber Orgamza- 
tion, although 500,000 small plat 
union operators have asked that it 

leavc - - . - 
The deputy primary mtrastnes 

minis ter, Jumd Ayub, said toat 
rubber prices could decline dra- 
matically and toe s m a ll ownen 
would suffer if Malaysia left toe 

organization. 

He said the organization’s buffer 
stock operations had kept prices at 
-reasonable levels.” In .London, 
rubber prices have been listed this 
month at 625 pence pa kilogram 
(about 37 cents a pound). 

In July, the small plantation 

government to quit the internation- 
al organization, saying that rubber 
consumers, not prodneers, donn- 
nated toe organization. 


The producers also said Malay- 
sia's annual contribution of 200 
million ringgit ($79.8 million) to 
toe organization to finance buffer 
stock operations could be used to 
support thc local industry directly. 

Mr. Jumd said, however, toat 
Malaysia's contribution to the or- 
ganization was relatively small 


compared with toe losses that 
could occur if prices fell without 

the group’s support. 

Mr. Junid said that if rubber 
prices fell significantly without the 
organization's support, toe ooun- 1 
try’s producers could lose about 
310 million ringgit a year, based on 
last year’s exports of 155 million 
metric tons (1.7 million short tons). 



AUTOS TAX FREE 


■ - 


SwitaeflcreUXCW. G«tnooy 


CORVETTES 
NEW 1985 

Fed dtfivtsy. 

We ded w#lh«dformol^indud!ro 
BaasBohon, Sto^Bond Com"™* 1 
lo cvroptt*! speolkxMRS. 

To order your Coniri tt g* « •* to * 

iNiHi ainort 

urHXE CAST AUTOMOBBB LID. 
MONltCAttO 

I tfir^®MIToSc r 


10 YEARS 

Wa DAnr Core to *• W«W 

transco 

Keeping a oorelonl skxk of more threi 
300 brand new cars, 

"ias°f sssrar- 



H*A / DOT 

OONVBSKftG 

* Custoral brotoragiih«rrfng seonce 

* Pick up & cnywhere m the 

Eartern US. A . 

* Piofauionrf wet i unng only Itw 

•KdSBfiH 


r ^u»mc-lKl. - 

INCOME PRODUCING REAL ESTATE 

Ideal for Pension Funds and oihor large Groups 

1. Safe and Secured 

2. Bdbw Market Acquisition 

3. Tolal Management 

4. High Yearly Returns 

5. Excellent Appredahon. 

Properties $3,00a000 and up 

Principals only phase reply toe 

m mm ' a a UoyCAWBaniryrfta 

III I I 5629 PM I960 W.Sufte 210 

• 1 1 I I Houston, Texas ri°»- 

|T TeLi (713) 586-9399. Tbu 387356. 


Traraco 5A, W N yr^e to". 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSClt. for iareadkXo ddiwoy 

from stock 


RUTEINC 


TRANS AUTOMOBUE 

m£^ e Sfn»cfak aakUe 

- or leoond bond care 

- Siwpng - A - DOT - ireurore* 

. AflfornKitia . . . , 

Tefc XL2/2SSmO. MJiand ded_- 
700. Telex 64SB7 TSAbfiO B. 
AVE DES T1UHAS U. 

1640 RHODE-5T-G0'*5E (BaOUMt 


EUROPORT TAX 
FRSCARS 

Telex awl BOB NL 


ivas ajoapyr sai* 

"tSftSigS'&SS? . 
’“‘■SfSWEfe’** 

u or tolM Mimk^W. (fonm 

(0) 89-4AS04T or 42 Jbe 52385 
America n owned and opwOd 


IACT 

TAX H® CARS ATBUCX5 
NEW 8 USB). 

Col n write Forour pree o ne 
Wedfalaak 108, 3012 KM Rotterdam 
Col Hotond (DJ 10 -112955 Tbe: 366S34 


“■ ’TStelmiwSiw 


Mercedes-Benz Ponehe BMW Ferrari 

EPA/ DOT 

CONVERSIONS 

Fad tunveround Sne. AU work done 
Hk: 322234 20M88-0667 

EPA/ DOT 

• 5operior Eaginwmg • 

* Cartoon Oearanae A BoreSna • 
• Fimcl Pei m u d! Service * 
coSauto wsiraimxtt 
CHARIOTS OF DESIRE 
P.O. 15 FI umdwxivae P A 
Telex 705514 pt5) 7667 676 

CaR For Free CmnltalMa 


LEGAL SERVICES 


DOMINICAN UVOKB. to 20802. 
Sarto Donengo, Donencon Sepubfic. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


THE MAGNIFICENT 
STELLA 
SOLARIS 

7 AND 14 DAY CRUISES 

To the Gee* Wan*. Turley. 
SdVixj Ewyliiondav from Piioew 

THE YACHT-UKE 
STELLA 
OCEAN1S 

3 AND 4 DAY CRUISES 

To The Greek Wmfc & Turtey. SdSng 
every Monday & Friday from Phowh 

to op?* to^aur^vd Aflert or.- 

2. to. Serviaz SI., AtbemJM62 
Telex: 215621. Phone 3228881 

Ptam 1**265 80 36 
ttridlelSBail 
Geneva tefc 327 110 
371 36 55 


ANTIQUES 







tv- 1 .. 






HOTELS 


SWITZERLAND 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


ICBANDAIR 
LAST MlNUTf FARE 
rosenrabon amnoraed withm 
3 days prior to depwlwe 

UNIQUE PRICE 

NEW YORK, WjS«GTON{BW 1> 
CHKAGO or DETROIT 
from Luxembourg 

One way - toeed IWl T 89 

(BR 19,98a sre 899, FFR 3290) 
far forlher wfarmolion ond reMomhon 
F^nWurt lCaA Sp9P978 

KLg 247° 

a* 


r» r n :4 tet \n*\ i ») ■* bi 


AalQv .. 

Even so, wito ; sudi OPEC m«n- 
bp M taq,_Nigaia^dBn«d° v 


probably the best EEEAffi *i< 

I 1 RESIDENTIAL ESTATE IN THE WORLD l| 

| ■ [certaintv tbe best in Au*uaW») ■ 

>1 

1 1 50% PARTNER REQUIRED - A$12tn investment ^ 

l| Wrt» tor Bro^- 2 ARC 

Ml SAIT^T^-tlAIWCUMATE-BAimMnKF.ENCl^ |_ 

l^SLm. OttOAH«HD CHIME OB XAaAL PttOBL^ ^1 


We are pleased to announce 

the opening of an office in Switzerland 

40^ rue du Marche 
CH-1204 Geneva 
Switzerland 
Ttel: (022) 21 16 02 

Iblex: 4M 036 RRA CH 

and the appointment of 

John G. McCarthy, Jr. 

as Managing Director 

RUSSELL REYNOLDS ASSOCIATES, INC 

executive Recruiting Consultants . 

^^Avenue, Newark, NY 10167 

, pnrtrtn Chicago Cleveland Dallas Frankfurt Geneva 
Ne*' Sc ^!- rnn London Los Angeles Madrid Menlo Park 

Singapore Stanford Sydney Wuhington, DC 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

sauna 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Hood office m New York __ 
330 W^MASt. tiXX. 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 
212-765-7754 
major crbjit cards and 
P vJPBUSSBaaem 

v nth w h re Eecort Service by i _ 
USA > Inl y nuO cnd nowemeffici 
todurfing radio and TV. 


* USA A TRANSWORLD 

a-american 

escort service, 
everywhere you are or gol. 

1-813-921-7946 

Cal free from 

ca free from Rortfa 1-800-2820892. 
Lowal Bartern weleomm yoobodd 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SOV1CE 
IN NEW YORK 
TEL: 212-737 3291. 


NEW YORK CITY 

excursions 

7DAYS - AAAJOR CAKD5 

(212) 517-7803 


LONDON 

B&GRAV1A 

Escort Swvia. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


FortaMn Escort Agency 

67 CWtora Mr^t. 
London W1 

Tefc 4M 37*4 or 48*115* 
AH nsafor awB ca* t^te pl e d 


★ LONDON ★ 


AR1STOCATS 

London Escort Service . 
128 Wigmora St a Londo n W.L 
Al new Credit Ccnfe Accaptad 
^Si37 47 41 7.4742 
12 noon - iwdnigfo 


HEATHROW 


ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS A GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES 


I M Pwaw t ESCORT SHWKS** 
London 1 H-tow 01-994 922T 


ESKJEEa 

— ITYTT 


ONGarS ESCORT SBRVHX 
TR: 017M 55 04 - 0227 34 41 86 



Tvvjf. 1 * ■ , «'5r? 


r.'i I-:- 1 :.' ^ 


T7’ .V'f.M . If 17= 

■ i hi Ml 


* 'JASMINE * 

AM5TBDAM ESCORT SSVIGE 
366655 


MADRID INT'L 

ESCORT SBWJCE 
THj 245654a. CREDIT CARDS 


AMSTERDAM 

MKKl * BASS 

Es»rtSento0S>«9«267 853204 


* AMSTERDAM SHE * 

ESCORT * cua«. 02D-2278S7 


wm 





^iiaiitoa MM 







F' F 1 . 1 ’-Tl 





LONDON ONLY JAPANESE ESCORT 
Service. Tefc 01 B21 0627. _ 


VBMNA'DGSRBE PRIVATE ESCORT 

Service. Td: 52 JO^S. 


MADRID SHECTTONS ESCORT S w- 

vicB. Td: 4011507. Oedn Conk 


HAMBURG ESCOirr + PRIVATE 
Guide serwa. 040-39 77 96 


SUPSSTARS - London Escoci Service. 
Tefc 44-1-938 3604. 


MlMCH SIR’SEME ESCORT Service. 
Td: 089/4486038 


FRANKRJKT JENNY BCORT & travel 
service. Tel: 069755-72-10. 



REGENCY NY 


WORLDWIDE ESCORT SBVig 
2IWO8-8027 or 758-1*64 




FRANKFURT SONIA ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Td; 069*8 34 42. 


AMSTBGDAM FOUR ROSES Escort 
Service (01 20- 964376 


AMSTBDAM BERNADETTE Escort 
Senrice (01 2& 329716 




AJASTERDAM BARBARA ESCORT 

Service. 020-954344 


niHKta< MIOBJE ESCORT ad 
aude lennee. Tefc 733 07 98 



** ZURICH 558720 ** 

PRIVATE TOWSM GUIDE SaVTOE 


Al! mafar aid! <tMik aeesplad. 


ZURICH 

C TSfoi/^M , 6v5 ! 4" 


ZURICH 

s ~r**sr»^«“ r 



CATHONE ESCORT SEKVtCL 
London 01-402 7187. 

















Tuesday? 

WIEX 


Closing 


78 FordCn«4J0s 
n FortfCA JO 
18* ForstCB .18 
12V) PwnH 
* Fotoml 

31 Front* JO : 
41A FrUMIy 
14 FreaEJ 
78k Frtefan 28b 
5 FrlesEn 
14V* frtschs 22 
TRk FmtHd 
4* FrtAwf .171 ! 
6* FurVJt 


idsujoih 

347 23 
284 23 

12 22 


20 1 
281 10* 


101 101 tk + V* 
23 23 

22* 23 +» 

244k 241k— 4* 
1* 146 — Ik 
374* 3716 

2116 2m- * 

Sft lft-* 

2!ft 22* + ft 
1814 1*16 — Jk 
7 7 — ft 

lOVi 1046 + 16 



Ml 



■sppqpv 

3ft 

2 KltrV 

sar 

J 

23 2ft 2* 2ft 

18)6 

ID* Knoll 


15 

95 15* 14* 15* + ft 

30* 

7m KO0HC 

W2 

85 78 

M3 27)6 27ft 27ft 




Tables include the nationwide prices 
op to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 





J«iT 

M UW 

J* 10 u 

* 

SI 

ija li io 


1J8 7J 12 
\M 7 J 7 
*25 n Xt 
AX 133 


£ Tt 

3x 714 
. 26 x nt 

42 2*- 

H 2ft 
1 5* 

• 11 54 k 
.MS 71* 
15 7ft 
34 184* 
St 15V. 
4 .3 . 
77 -344 
-31* 12 
34x281k 
I- 746 


32 1146 
.8 lft 

S3 2046 
74 20V* 
SteW* 
22 2»* 
1 » 


24k Zft 

V6 U 

7* 7* + j* 
.016 9)4 + ft 
i • 2 +16 

24* 2* + * 
55k 5ft— ft 
5* B6— % 
7116 7716—.* 
« » 

17* 17*—* 
1516 15* + * 
3 3 + * 

3* 3* 

II* 11*—* 
28* 28*—* 
7* 7* 

11* 11* + * 
■** 3*—* 
20. 2016 ' 
20* 30*+ 16 
» . 38* + * 
21* 31*— 1* 
3ft ,3ft + * 


1016 4* Tonsor M 

31* 22* TmCdO 150 , 

20 8* ToxAIr _ J 

10 4* TBAg " 

22* 18* TOxAfiptt#? 111 
7* l* Thscan 

as suss? » «» 

& 

88* 49 ToIEd Pi JJJ 

M* 80* ToIEd PflOOO UO 

9* 4* Tort* *2 

15 m T01IPIO 3* 

2* TS TotPtw* - 

14 8*TtoUi I* 

!S!J2S££r « a f 

at *a- 

8 2* TobMB* „ 

SStitSSSS?.* «» 

10 9* TmEfl n 

3* i* Tylr wts 


11 9* 
1. 23*. 
1328 11 * 
MS S* 
8. IT* 

,7 S 1* 

109 1* 
S8T32* 
100181* 

T 446 

2 2' 1 |8 
.. 7 12* 
104 14* 

1 15 
13x10* 

5 ’S 

42 2* 
43' 17* 
8 28* 
W 9* 
182 2 


8ft -»• — r 
23* 23*— :V- 
-M*-.1Mbi . 
5*-Hk— «f 

■-WW- 

1* 1*1 . 
3* * -+ V 

i i»- 
32* 32*— H 

61* 61*-MP 

75* 78* + * 
4*" 4* 

14* . 14* .. 
-2* **- • 
Wft 

UM 14* 

H 35 — W 
Wft 10*- W 
13* 13* 

2* 2* j 

17*47* + * 

at* 28 *—* 

9* -9W— Vfc 
i* 



27* 
2* 
39* 
43 
41* 
17* 
10 * 
19* 
IS* 
9* 

1 17* 

MS 
£ 
4* 
5* 
18 
19 
21 
19* 
14 
5* 
19* 
8* 
18* 
a* 

24* 
10 


4 

41 

7ft 

15 

7)6 

14ft 

45 

6* 

646 

3 

6 

Sft 

221 

29k 

2* 

1 

30* 

20* 

10 

35ft 

35* 

022 

13* 

1346 

2 

1* 

1* 

39 

8* 

Sft 

67 

Sft 

546 

15 

lift 

11* 

10 

6* 

6ft 

4 

99k 

9* 

29 

14* 

14 

3x 

3 

3 

9 

99k 

9* 

7 

5ft 

5* 

23 

6* 

8ft 

85 

18* 

18ft 

46 

1* 

1* 

49 

31* 

31 

5 

■U 

8* 

118 

8 

744 

1 

Bft 

Sft 


416 HAL ,10a 1 J 

10* HU BC 40d U 13 
4 Horn®, .a 

TVi Hrarwll 237114 8 
22* Hndymn JSe J 1 
12* Hanfrdt JO 16 
44 Harvey 

W HCrtors 45 J 10 
22* Has&rpflDO 55 
28V. Hasting jtOo 14 t 
12 HlttiCrs 10 

S* HlttlOl 20 

8* HlthEx 17 

11 HatttiM 64 5J 9 
8* Hrtnwr 20m 22 9 
10 Hdnlck .10 j 8 
2 Hetdor 75 

37k HHtont 
K H*(mR 

3* HersJKJ 34 

1* Hbidrl » 

2V. Hofman 

8* HottyCp 24 14 12 
18* HimCn 
20 Hml ns p< 2.95 M2 
14V. Horn** 11 

7* HfnHor 23 

1* HmHwt 

13* HoHPty I JO 10J 18 
3* HOUOT 4*174 
10* HovnE 10 

16* HutwriAs 12 

1546 HUMS 9 13 

8* Husky a 38 45 


5 7* 

18 1946 
23 5* 

4 .7* 
17 23* 

88 2fM 
11 1 * 
929 3116 
30* K* 
3 32* 
45 16* 
83 9* 


958 17 
SG3 20* 
12 1946 
206 146 

110 IV 
a 17)6 
311* 5* 
28 14* 
37 22 
39 23* 
3U 7V* 


7* 77k— * 

IS* 18*— 46 
5* 5*— V< 

7* 7* — * 
23* 23*— * 
25)6 25*— * 
1 * 1* + * 
X 30V.— * 
34 34 —1*6 

32* 32* + * 
16* 16*— * 
TV. 9* + * 
B* 8*— * 
12 * 12 *— * 
a* s*— * 
13* 13* 

2* 246 + * 

‘iw 4 £-* 

4 4* + * 

1* 1* + * 
2 * 2 *— * 
15* 15* — 4V 
1SW 16 —1 
20* 2946 + * 
19* 19* + * 

a a—* 

1 * 1 * 

17* 17)8 
4* 5 

MM 14*— * 
2146 2146— * 
22* 23* + * 
7V* 7*— * 


1046 416 Quebps 


-f* 9*— MT 


» 2 US* ind ■ . 

34* SM UltlWfB 1® 

rak 3ft unfeore . 

15)6 11* Unlo»»f X> S3 
nu 846 unlmrn 144813J 
23* IS* UAirPd 5f> “ ” 
23" 16* UnCosFs JO 2J 5 

.2* 116 UFMOA .10 67 
2* 146 UFoodB 

1846 11* UtMed If 

m 546 UnHriV ■ _..3* 
21* 14* Unilil n 1 J 8 . 7* 7 . 
u* 9* UnvOn 15 ■ 

ISM 64k UOlvRs 14 

20ft 15ft l/ntvRU JO# 43 
4546 10* IMvPot . 


513 17* OH 
45 IDfc HU 
10 1* 1* 
97 10)6 10* 

4 2244 2P 6 
» 1846.18* 
85 Mk 1* 
Ifr- 1* 1H 
76 15* 1S» 
17 7)6 .7* 

...S 32*,' 32. 
SI 1346 12ft 
14 7 7 

3 17* 17 
38 1246 12* 


T2ft— j ft, 
lift + ft 
U 

-10* -- 
2316—44 
18ft- * 

■ 1ft— * 
-1ft— 
JSft— ■* 

m 

17 —ft 
12*— ft. 


IB* 9ft 
1846 1248 
27ft ,17ft 
10 - X* 
27* 18* 
14 9* 

9 S* 
18* 12 
12* B 
19* 44ft 
8ft 5 


VST n Afie 6J 
VoflyBa M0 M W 
Vatan-s M M 14 
Verlt „ , „ 

VtAmC »«, 
VorttfT 20 23 M 
Vlcon , >2 

VItcd J04C J J5 

Vortw JO ^*-11; 
VuioCo JB 44 12 
Vyqust 8 


■39 9* 

21 19* 
7 3346 
89 9* 

1« l 2S. 

2Px 944 
32 8 

7 15 
- 3 «* 

1 18* 
46 Aft 


> • 9ft— -dc 

:ir ■+ » L 

. 23ft - 1 
9* t ft 
16ft— ft 
: 9(6— ft, 

■ 5ft—*' 

15 +16. 

■8ft + * 

■ Ml* +T6 

8ft * *' 


17 

13* 

20* 

19* 

14)6 

lift 

Z 

129k 

23ft 

1446 

77ft 

11* 

21* 

13 

49* 

31 

846 

4* 

17)6 

11* 

18* 

12* 

17* 

12* 

7 

546 

13)6 

6ft 

3 

lft 

3ft 

2* 

17* 

10* 

lift 

94* 

546 

lft 


lift 

8ft 

1246 

8* 


40bX4 M 
.10 A 
791 43 14 
1A5 45 M 
lJOo 5J TV 
M3 L4 15 
J5r 5J 7 
J2 16125 

L50 92 11 
18 
8 


72 14ft 

399 17* 
■ M* 
35x 16ft 

14 Z1W 
TOSS 43* 

1 5 

13 12ft 
9 14* 

15 16* 
22 6 
12 ink 

35 2ft 
TO 246 
100 15* 
9 11* 

S V 

23 6ft 
27 Sft 


1446 1416— ft 
19* 199k— * 
lift lift 
18ft 17* + * 
18 UM— * 
18* 18* + ft 
20* 20ft— * 
42* 42M— ft 
5 5 

12 * 12 * — * 
14* UK— * 
18* 1644— * 
5ft 4 + * 

10* ID* 

746 246— * 

2ft 2ft 
14* 15* +1 
11 lift + * 

^ fctf 
8 8* + * 
8ft Oft— ft 


7)6 4ft 
15* 8* 
8* 3* 

4ft 2* 
mk 


ft 

1746 

12 * Joclyn 

AOb 3A 

J 

9 



14 

1 

7)6 

5* Jacobs 



27 

546 

5ft 

5ft 


2* Jet Am 


• 

31 

3ft 

3ft 

Sft 

9ft 

5ft J*tron 

-711 9A 

14 

35 


7* 


6* 

3 John Pd 



4 

3* 

Sft 

Sft 1 

lift 

7 JOhnAm 

JO 4A 

10 

794 


74k 


inn 

8 Jotvjlod 


4 

33 

A* 

8 

I — * 

7* 

3* JmaJkn 


9 

19 

3* 

3* 

Sft— u 


12ft 5* 
4* 1* 

1446 9* 

BU 4* 
14ft 10ft 
28* 18* 
6* 3ft 
lft * 
10* 7* 
18ft 11 
18* 13* 


CM! Cp 20 

CMXCP 

CcmhNJ 19 

CaSteA 5 

Cal RE 1J0 103 9 
Cal mat AO 23 20 
caitonn 24 

Coltnwt 

Caioron JOtlOuD 14 
Cornea m 19 9 
CMarcfl JO 


238 II 
91 1* 

74 lift 
5 Sft 
89 12ft 
34 28ft 
T5 5ft 
2 ft 
70 8 

29 18 
131 18ft 


1046 1046— ft 
lft 1ft— * 
II* 11* 

8* 646 + * 
12ft 12* + ft 
26* 26*— 46 
5ft Sft + * 
ft ft 
7ft 8 — * 
1546 15ft— ft 
18 18—46 


12ft 8* 
22* 16* 
14* 6 
19 18* 

lift 3* 
1246 9* 
15* II 
28* 19* 
15* 11* 
18 8* 
29 23ft 
II* 7 
43ft 28ft 
3046 22ft 
14* 644 

10 746 

9* 5* 


FPA 

Fodlnd 40 2.1 7 
FdirFtn 29 

Forty pt 
Ftdata 

FtCorm ljOOa 8A ■ 
FWymB A0 83 II 
Fstcrpn 50 2A 8 
FtschP AOt 53 IB 
FttcGE 4 

FttCEpf 4A0 144 
Flan Bn 

FWRck JB 1J • 
nuke lJBt 5A 10 
Foodrm 8 

FoateM 

FlilUIG 20 


20 9ft 
2 181k 
84 14 
64 18* 
182 7* 
2 lift 
14 13* 
17 19* 

29 12ft 

30 9* 
4 Z7* 

50 7ft 
72 39 
50 25* 
8 13* 
22 7ft 
33 4* 


9ft 99k 
18ft 18ft + * 
13* 14 + * 

18* 18*— * 
7* 746— * 
lift lift 
13 13 — * 

19 19 — * 

12)6 121k 
9 9 

27* 27* + * 
7ft 74fc + ft 
38* 38*— 46 
34ft 34ft— * 
13 13* + * 

74k 7*— ft 
846 6* 


39ft 

30ft KflGsef 

450 123 


640t 35 

34 

as +i 

4ft 

1* Kapok C 



5 

159 

3ft 

Sft 

3ft + ft 

14* 

10 Ka-fC# 

JO 

1A 

7 

191 

lift 

114k 

12* + * 

13 

1046 K0VJO 

JDo V 

10 

3 

12 

ini 

lift — * 

18 

9)6 KearNt 

A3 

00 

11 

8 

13* 

13* 

13*— * 

24 

1546 Kwnvtn 

30a 41 

10 

l 

19ft 

19ft 

mk— + 

23ft 

13* Ketchm 

J8t 32 

18 

10 

18* 

17ft 

17ft— ft 

9ft 

5* KeVGo 

-300 17 

25 

15 

I* 

7* 

8* 

16* 

■ KerPh 

20 

1A 

19 

394 

11 

10ft 

1046— * 

8 

3* KevCa 



7 

n 

39b 

3* 

3*— * 

2ft 

1 KevCa wt 




5 

ft 

ft 

ft— * 

41k 

2* KkMtnrt 




59 

346 

Sft 

3ft 

4* 

3* Klfem 



31 

2 

346 

34. 

3)6 

5ft 

2* Kirby 




44 

2ft 

246 

29k 

5* 

3ft KltMtO 



15 

29 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft 


The best 

financial magazine 

in the world is free. 
_For a month._ 

13 months of Euromoney for the price of 12. 


5 

13ft 

13* 

13* 

18 

lift 

11 

lift 

38 

lift 

IT* 

lift 

10 

11 

10* 

n 

12 

34* 

34* 

34* 

11 

32* 

32 

32* 

29 

28* 27ft 28*. 

23 

23 

22* 

22* 

317 

20* 

20* 

20* 

8 

22* 

22* 

22* 

9 

23ft 

23* 

23* 

1 

1046 

10ft 

1(R6 

5» 

21* 

20* 

21 

n 

IB* 

11 

10 ■ 

i 

17* 

17* 

17*- 

i 

19ft 

79* 

19* 

75 

18ft 

10* 

18* 

5 

20* 

2a 

20 - 

841 

26* 

259k 

25* 

4Qx 

4046 

40* 

«*- 

IQBe 

43 

43 

<3 - 

27 

70* 

ft 

T6 

78* 
ft ■ 

341 

amt 

37ft 

38 - 

48 

8ft 

4 

**- 

18 

f 

8 

8 

31 

tovi 

10* 

10*. 

8x38* 

36* 

36*- 

11 

23* 

Z3* 

23*- 

98 

ft 

ft 

ft 

13 

34* 

24 

24 ■ 

3 

10ft 

10* 

TO*. 

90 

0. 

7* 

s* 


i 4WWTC 14 

i IS* WaRjor 40 17 W 
i IS WtmsB . .16 1J152 
14* Wa~C .« M 

I ra HIIHtWT 

I..4BMMHI _ J 

78 WkllFW. 58 ’ * .15 
i. 13* WRIT S 1.17 87 16 
■ . 7* WatscA 30 25 5 
i 7)6 WatscA .18 17 5 
i 2ft WIMrd 

I 946 wabOun 

I M'Webcar , 

i lift wadicn - Me .1 19 
r 4 Walman .14 2J 6 

i 7 WofcJTb M „ 

X* Wridtm 12 

I 4ft Wollai __ 3 

17* Wasco 42 22 9 

* Wupcp 

34* WTn pf 440 IU 
Sft'WatBrC - 12 

0* Wsttors 30 13 

'8W WDtettl 

7* WIHIftto 19. 

15ft WIRET 756 73 15 
Sft WStSLs .16 U 4 

13ft WhEntS 20 

3. Wlctcaa -5 

* wvcfcaswt 

26* WtcfcaspOJO 84 
10ft wtonarn 40 35 9 
19ft Whitln .224 1U 
8 Wdsinm 40 44.-18 
lift WkWear 52 25 7 

2W WwdaE 73 

12ft WWdepMJO 127 
fft.WlorflM 39 
MWtltnrt 

13* Wrathr 32 .1 45 


. 43 5* -5* 96 
-53 23* 23 22 

4308 17* 18ft lift nr ft 
3* T7* 17 17 - - • 

95- * ft Jb + H 
14-8 7ft. 7ft— * 
. 48 121 138* 120* - * 
110 17* 1716" 17* + VS 
• 7 8*. BVfc t 8*— * 
J- 9* 9* 9ft— ft 
250 3ft 3 -»A - 

85 9* 9* 9* 

. 127 ft ft r ft v 
1«3 17ft T7ft T7* +;V? 
46 4-8 —.ft 

3 8* 8ft 8* 

34 lift If : .11 , 

77 13ft 1246 12ft^A 

TQz40* 40* 40*1 ' 
.20 Mk «* 6WF-- ft 

45 714k 17 Uft +ft 

1445 m m B*+ Hr 
39 IS* 18 : lift + ft ' 
5 20 1946- 1946 ,^, 

a S'-SMr? 
"3t A a-fcft 

54 30 2V<* 2nfcrrft 

9*:M* lift ,iiw+ * 
.54 30* 20* 2046— 46' 

« 17ft 17ft . Wt+'Hr 
119 3* - 3H- 3ft— ft. 

29 14ft T3ft 14ft U. ft 
90-10* 10 ...10 —ft 
365 4* 4* IK— h 

5 IM 199k -)99k— ft. 


S3 


846 5ft YonfcCo 


11 .'30 7ft 7ft 7ft— *, 


fit 



AmContJnd Asfrox . 
LttJtyFodPnH PocGTron 
VaUayRmcs. . .. 


.etoetrSnd 
Tafkflax - 


GouMfnvt'" 
. Uoltflo r’ 


NEW LOWS 18 


BaUiCont CMXCP.: ' Country Mtgn DomsEngv^ 
DawelCp ■ EwayMfe FbotoocoD FootaAUoJ • , 
HomeGpn- .■ ICEEUMn. ' KaysKomwt MovEmv g* 
NtJctaorOfo StarraHttbn .. SHaripd .. WabcorEI -4 





HoiMiiig-Riite ]\o<t« 


Sept. W 


Dollar 


Wfe believe Euromoney is the best financial 
magazine in the world. Wfe are so confident that you’ll 
agree that we invite you to try it for yourself at our 
expense and with no obligation. 

Return the coupon and we will send you, free of 
charge, our latest issue. It deals, as Euromoney does 
every month, with the latest issues in the international 
banking and financial world. And in a style and depth 
that makes us the envy of other publications. 

They can only quote from Euromoney. From our 
exclusive interviews with world leaders. Or from our 
comprehensive coverage of every 
major issue, no matter where in 
the world it is happening. 


Or from our articles specially written for us by Che most 
knowledgeable people in the business. (A list of our 
guest contributors reads like a ‘Who^ Who’ of 
moneymen). 

Our unrivalled data is often quoted. Data such as 
our annual review of the 500 largest banks and our 
world ranking of countries’ economic performance. 

And yet a year’s subscription to Euromoney’ costs 
less than half what you spend on a daily" financial 
newspaper. 

Try Euromoney. Cast a professional eye over the 
next issue, and you’ll see why international bankers and 
financiers consider it essential reading every month. 


This information-packed 
guide to the financial 
year ahead will be 
sent to you on 
receipt of your 
subscription 
payment. 


r »■ * *. 


hr- 




m 


m 


155PB 


8*. 7>n 

Bft 2MB 

*ft 3609 


p+r 




9ft 24-n T06.UHMJB 




M 


ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF MAURITANIA I 



jjf:, ‘ 

I lft J 
it? - 

4 ?lW 

.«» J, 

lf| . 

Pfac. 




’T-i 


mm 


HrtrD05(M»tfyl 


♦51 


: 













































- 



. ^AinTHrailNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBERU, 1985 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNL, wwj 






Page 13 



3 1 " Eases Lower on Profit-Taking Tradeldeaa 

AWwTto named Vmav G. Mr. Perez TO 1TI> area director 


- 

' ftj» 

^ Dbpmcha 

The dollar fell 
currencies in 


And higher interest rate* in ifv '•■’"'Tlfc dcflisriS' trading back and . - . 

United States. forth but the mood is one of eupbo- achieve in a democrat such asAe 

currency ria." said Carmine Rotondo, duef Uniled states, according to Mr. 


Howard Kurz, chief 


Bv Brenda Erdmann 

Intemauuoul llt'ralJ Tnbmic 
LONDON — Jean-Pierre 


Choubal manager for Switzerland. 


Amory. vice-chairman of Petrofina ^ Morocco and Tunisia. Mr. 
SA. has been named the company s d*jjubal. who will be based in Ge- 
chairman. He succeeds Adolphe neva> ju^edj shantanu Mukher- 


for Europe with primary responsi- 
bility for Spain. Portugal and the 
Mediterranean countries. His suc- 
cessor has not been named. 

PKbanken International (Lux- 


cmd Carmine Rotondo, chief 

- trad ? s H ader al Bank of An»i«^ r New trader at Manufactmers Hanover Jtrugman and others. 

*** y OTk ««». said lhcrewas a fee£ Trust- “Last week s buoyant auto # ^ marketplace is not work- 

Jpg that the dollar had climbed too sales should boost retail sales and in _ ^ Jt ; s supposed to. a country oemeureut 

- operators fast. But he also said that imdcriv- industrial production.and that imerfereand emerge better ^ month. ij ne ' s headquarters in — - . — — -- 

^ ingdemand for the dollar remained should push the dollar higher stiU. example, if a currency s m, Amorv. who is 60, joined the u&e up a senior management post de Neerga^ degity manao g 

and the currency fSed In «wBer trading m iBm ““g ffESpnniy. yet is icaus- and energy “uJ marketing division. Mr. rector, fie wcoerfs /^ders Graft. 

"flSeaeraUy the day above its lows. meanwhile, the pound firmed to £make (ong-lasting Sets £oup in 1951. He U sue- choubal was in New Delhi as the “w3- 

However, one dealer argued that $13130 in London after shppmg to move abroad, then u vice chairman by Pierre comers deputy manager Tor north- son mT de nS- 

^^^^.^B^ernment some skepudsm over U5.Wtom- $13055 on Monday. Some say it makes sense to protect also 60. Mr. de Tillesse em India. 

* prospects seemed to emerge and In Europear jtnteW ^ companies from the currency p^ofiina in 1948. Esfee tmiKr i„ c ., ,he New gaard was m Stockhoha 

ffe§ 2 sS; EF'W®™ SS% 3 & 

-&mun&iki evidence to see The dollar closed in New York at &988;‘M 33065 Dutch guilders. difficult toknow tMnnrt 

^SS- b “ 0Wk,,le 2.9450 DM, down from Money’s 'fES ?%0W I^LSISfto 

^ of 2.9510; at 2.4290 Swiss ^p^ies that 

abroad. 


*e' previous IVi weeks, the francs, down from 2 4320; at In London, the South African 
5 -cfrmbed 5.8 percent as 8.9895 French francs, little commercial- rand weathered the 
mst 10 other curren- changed from 8.9850, and at 243.0 prosper <rf lip ted^Europc^ Corn- 
leraj Reserve Board's Japanese yen, down from 243.75. — 

- c&te-wei^itM index. The rebound The British pound, buoyed by 
Wa^ atmbuted to fresh expecta- prospects of higher interest rates, 
trios pf -renewed, economic growth rose to S131 10 from $12970. 


Midland Bank to Open 
Milan Branch Office 

humvuionni HerulJ Tnhune 

LONDON — Midland Bank 
PLC Britain’s third largest, was 
given approval by the Italian 
government to open a Milan 
branch- the bank said Tuesday. 

Massimo Caglianu currently 
a senior manager at Bonea 
Commerciale Italiana, wiU be- 
come its manager. Midland wiU 
convert its Midland Interna- 
tional Trade Services office in 
Rome into a group representa- 
tive office. 



• A count 

srrr^ l “uS _ , 

cents after an opening of 39.65 uies that it deems necessary or said Francois- Xavier Ortoli 


Detroit head office as assistant di- 
rector of overseas and Canadian 
borrowings. 

Smith Barney, Harris Upham In- 
ternational Inc. has appointed Min- 
oru Itoh as branch manager of is 


untrv might be willing to van der Schueren and Luc Warners, d^i of Btee Lauder Italy, assumes Ravinond A. ora Itoh as branch manager oi is 

HWwfe Unlever, the Brirish-Dul^ mat- gS ASS? JSSS-r 


cents. 


THE EUROMARKETS 


S^iE^rsSeemtoBeAiBaitingNew U.S.Data 

■Zfc&ss*** -teSMTeas 

■ LONDON — The Eurobond of 18 basis points, inside the total a ccount of 

p^tmded little changed Tues- fees of 20 baas points. ^gomcession at a discount oi 

In the dollar-strajgfht sector, an t- I)riinary . niai k e t aoivi- 


ar- 


seciors 
dies or 

f0 XiS5t^u r ucui 

|y in n on-economic circles, against 
free trade is that ii is a mirage, and 
so long as other counroes protect 
their industries, the United States 


T of foods, detergents and toiler r^Mr SS- cc- Mr. Groo. ‘who is based in Bms- 

L FrinrnK-Vavier OrtoU sor has been named for Mr. Langh lhe pasl ^ mo mhs 

managing borrowing at GMAC or 
Canada Ltd. He succeeds Paul D. 
Bull, who has moved to GMACs 


- anuner. . 

Lockheed Corp. International 


(Reuiers, UP1 ) national security, such as shiPP>°& ^ been appointed an advisory di- 

cteeL It could maintain uiese Mr Onoli is chairman of „ 

through government subsi- Frenc ^ sl ^te-owned Total Com- has named Rudolph 
by ^oieding them from p^gnje Frainiaise des Peiroles and a gional vice president-Europe and 


New York is a holding company 
lain subsidiary is the m- 
banking ana brokerage 
of Smith Barney, Harris 


whose main subsidi; 
vestment 
concern 
Upham & Co 


Devebping a Faster Computer: The Raze Takes a New Tack 

uevewpui g» r regardedBoneoMheworidsto 


(Continued from P*?* 9) 


However, it was quoted on utc ***“ rr iwaied “*“* 

discount w must do the same. ofexistiogprograms.mosdywft- 

•idonltihinkpure^^has pjfiMl .Equip- 


^ with operators seemingly un- 
to open fresh positions 
of the rdease Friday of new 



$ 80 -million bond was launched for Jn o*er 

VIZ U> IT V /Uol. tV. It 


ever 'existed anywhere in the 
world," said Rudo£ A. _Os« 
chief economist of the AFL-C1U 


lead- 
ing experts on supercomputers. 
Soon after they wooed the profes- 

nucT5 are juiimiE, >«. ..hm it moved sor as a consul tan L 

fL P Kd “»Se GT*. N* 1 - Kucfspragmauc approach. 


systems oT 1,000 to 10.000 proces- 
sors. . . . . , 

Others are joining in. though of- 
ten 


But it was Mr. G tuner's misfor- 
iune to lead Data General's North 
Carolina team, whose rainicomput- 
ed 


SST&S. Corp!VpowcrfulV AX rmm- Cw ii b “ SSw?h£3 .5S>SS*l-r 

RUuOU <V_y® . . i ... limit now. most • , _P .I .v_. in,lnr vkuniiA in rOniDUlS lO market, ltie micniai nmnannivri 50 


computers. Until now, 
parallel processors have 


, ness Macnmes r,orp. says u ~ internal a conviction mai nuauugiA-iupu^. 

'* m . os i doubtful that any major change in company “ fSl. “22 programs could be reorganized so 

«l uired computer architecture is in the off- batUe over the f ?te^f ^haujrqot letld themselves to attack 


paiue over Lut . - , 

caused a wave of departures at lhe 



i International fixed “Clearly trade has always been {^refy new programming ine* k, berause of the compatibility caused a wave rt departures ai w bv 'multiple processors simulia- 

$30-milhon bond ,^ 5 ^^ for national secunpr rM- whether ihe FX- 8 ’s capability pr oblems it would create Tor main- company. By 1 Rafter a 13-y neouslv> provet i irresistible to some 
‘ — u™~. ... — r , iic^ri; career at Data uenerai, wir. , , . ; , l LL n .i rt0V < c Mine ven- 


urcs. 

''The dealers said that prices were 
consolidating at the lower levels 
seen in the past couple of da^s. 


pays UM percent 

priced at 101^. It was led by No- 
mura.lniemalk>nal Ltd. 


will propel Affiant to the top along ^ minicomputer users. 

Route 128, the computer belt g ul jt has built an experimental 


The issue was initially quoted on 



irigr 

l>New-issue activity remained 
stow* with the feature bein^ a 5 150- 
ouHim floating-rate note for Man- 
ufacturers Hanover Corp. lead- 
tfianhgeJ by Merrill Lynch Capital 


career .. 

Gruner decided that he. too, was 
ready to strike out on his own. 

He quickly drew in Craig J. 
Mundie. a software expen and 
member or the North Carolina pro- 
ject. For six weeks the two parked 
themselves in the computer science 


of higb-technology’s leading ven- 
ture capitalists. 

Hambrechi & Quisi loc. and 
Kleiner. Perkins, Caufield & Byers, 
both of San Francisco, and Ven- 
rock. the Rockefeller family;s ven- 
ture capital group, contributed 
$14.8 million in two rounds of fi- 
nancing. 

Money in hand. Allianl s 


W* , r r “ — i XJC 139UC WHS immuij ~ Back in lhe secondary nuricels. Most. e«t,omisLsr™msl«[>u- ie"S S rSiion 10 Ne«' York Umverei- 

with some issues actually edging the when-issued well outside the . - d trading in floating-rate ^ 0 r the new wave. They tend to oologies and aiccessTui companies [q furlher re nne the design, 

ahead on professional short-cover- 1%-percent total fees at a discount tended to center on recent ^ck to the free-trade doclnues is tenuous at best The complex task of designing ihemseivesm 

of 2^ But, the price later tighlated ^ t SStch c d using the “mis- Uiathavetjtominaledl^^on MaeMBM commiSXt can make the most Mway at the 

up 10 close at a discount <M about -SSJsSSS "Sr. W 

j&vuesx Sftsajs rtj ggsjsss ȣggSS 

kfckc, SSSSSJSKM^ 2s ^ia^r«i*-. £* - JWiSS'ff p^ : 

The seven-year note ranks as_se- bSSd was led by - - - ■ — - ^ = mnmrv's advantaRe,’ said Strategic Deiense _ who nw „ r tnnil a comouter science the germ nn me a. 


ide- 

now 

ild 

no- 

the 

M 

•ni- 

in- 

ara 

bit 

ma- 

lt!? 

oc- 
ss a 

laiid 
cbe». * 

3?«- 
■SC. 
i Id 

iJcflB 

r. Ea- 

0kg 

a;ifc 

-gi«> 

^uljs- 


. uriced seven-year bond was tea ny The dealers added that news on be to a country's advmitage, stud irau® of doUars u, l0 who never took a computer science 

niordebt and is callable after five intmational (Europe) Tl ^d a y that the U.S. Treasury I.M . DesUer. a senior Mow at Ac research. course, Mr. Gnrner left coHegem 

years. It pays ^ pomtover the Lli ^ has an indicated coupon ask^ Congress to raise the federal Institute for P ^y successful effort to track 1969 to join Dahl Genend Corp. 

mean of lhe three-month London ^ ^rowmeffinit had no immediate nomics in Washingltm. But *ey Any su quickly rose to become its top 

final icnns for this issue, S™ — T -*• preu, hard ,o app.y ,u su, cuuki ^uiic «»pu«r urckucc, 

is guaranteed by the Fiqi Bank here. 


^The^germ emerged from the processor sysiems. costing from 
work of Sid J Kuct a professor S27Q.000 to $1 tnilhon iach. But it 
i,e Umvcrsi^ of llfmois ut refuses fo mute prcdrcuons about 


at 


Champaign-Urbana, and widely revenues or earnings. 



Tuesday's 

ore 

Prices 

NASDAQ prices as of 
3 pun. New Yorktime. 

Via The Associated Pros 


12 Month 
High Low StoO 


. DtV. Vld. IQifc HW 


HH 

Low-aP^LPTBi 


lm 11 ADC Tl 
UK) 14 AEL 
73V. I«l& AFG 
25 101V ASH _ 

1* AomRt 
m Acodln 
m Acrtrh* 


23 

1 ZH 

1 TW 

^7V» 

wt 


17JJ AaiRpv 
ift AdocLb 
6Vt Adm 
5 AdvOr 
. 3 Afqutni 
UVh AH Bat; 

'“ttas 1 


AS 

M m 


, 10 a JB 

140 SA 


iakf 

*fK 

.. TJi> 


RSff 

15 4 H Aloorrx 

3rti .lim Al agW 
22%fc m-AHegBa 
2 GH> m AW Bn 
sT l* Aimat 
10 - 5*4 AlOMIC 

1414 M A W 
U ' cm Amend 
12H4 -4» AWAW 
1714 S» AmAdv 
V*i «>» ABf*r 
MM 10Jh AmCarr 

yw -SHi ACorrti 

. n fi* AmFrtt 
am M* AFtert* 

371b 30 A Gr»*l, 

Mlfc BK A mtnLf 
12% 5V> AMoont 
UPl TOVi AMSs 
3M4 2» AWtlig 
?3- 314 APtwG 
4M HMf" 

34H> 16)4 Am5*C 
IS." TV, AmStt s 
i|k ASotar 
Itk - S ASuro 
• 44% 2414 Amrtr* 1A0 
24 15*4 Anwwst 

Wt 3V» Amnog 
2914 ISHr AmMtB 
. 25*4 W* A" 1 ">* 

1SU * Antoolc 
. THiAnsran 
17 Andrew 

S9t Anooea 

■■3W4 1«4 APtrtoC 
31 ». "1414 ApPkC 
72H^rr% Amato s 
TW1014 APtdCm 

7V» : 344 AltSllwo 
am AraoSv 
4B.J. W4 ArtzB 
V • m Artal ; . 

WA ins ASdHst 
» . 514 AHrosv 

3214 1314 AJCOT 
3M Attnnc 
WW«4 AJWFd 
•. U: .BH AHFbl 
*.* 1M AH Res » 
Wft Z* Att«Ar* 

14% « AntTrT . 

H» - 4» Atttndx 
. t - •> 414 Auxton 
13% 314 AWKJ®. 

25% -* A awtGr 
.Sfc lTft A vntafc 
20 r 1514 Avatar 
2014 Wife AvtolGP 


34 

iS 

313 

36 

445 
57 
SI 
354 
74 
31 
74 
17 
47 
BOS 

i°- 2 i S 
« UM S 

1B2 

522 

M W 441 

. f& 

■“ M i£ 

24 

2 * 

SSs 

40 u w 

s 

1JM X0 170k 
13 
1 M* 

1JK2 3 A 10B 


mi i*» iw>— 14 
12 % liu h,, -r S 
2ii4 am am + % 


414 


+ 14 


57* »% Ca nte^ 2J1» X4 
37 22F4* CnBshS 1U52 43 

3IW 14 CFdBk* 

B nh-Carmtfc 
UH SHr Calm 
SH 3% CMPEn 
32 1314 OvtoS » 

21% 014 OVcPrd 
U SK Q*Tch 

3TM 37 ChLwn 
BVi 3% Ownm 

& » 8 IS;. 


1714 *» aXt' 1 



57 M ‘ 56% 56% — Vi 

3% 3 Wk + J 6 

1414 W M% — 14 

am 4m. aovk + Mi 

i-hs 

m «S «£ + S 

ssr* ! 




lm 7 aivrtd au 

s s 


* 


ISO 
424 
311 
245 
1 
375 

1 no 17 12 

'38 uuji 

S4I 
74 


.14 1J 


.12 ■S 


M J’ 
30 M 


3515 

3912 

173 

3 

13S 

79 

17 

III 

22 

105 

31 
181 
104 

12 

29 

106 

«?! 

23 

341 

71 

32 
150 
142 

22 

127 


4% 

iS* % 

iSS«=t 

14* 14% 14% 

17% 17% J7% 

-11 = S 

iss ir ijt+t 

88®® + * 
£ & *-* 
«% <55 

aas + s 

3% 3^ 

30V, 2714 3W4 + * 

\ % %- Vfc 

Xfu, ]3% 33V 
^ ^ + * 

19 17% 17%- * 

st r is?=? 


540 12 


J* 45 


um s» aiwm» 

SR 'l SS& 

«% 2414 CoeoBU 
18% 12% COBVT 

5% fftcooww 
2V*k 14% Cohrnta 
6% 5B4 Colot»R 
15% »% Cntawm 
614 4 Collins 
36% 23% ColL/Ac 150 3.1 
20* 15% Cnm 
21% 15 ColoNt 
U* 4* WW» 

20* TIN Conwy 
15% 10% Conwtta 
4* 114 Comdtal 

43% 31% Cmerle 
43 . 22% CmaU 

13% 7% amsn 

6% 1% ComAn* 

30% 14% Coffllnd 
14% 7% CwnSy* 

M 12 OnpCat 
11* 3% Comm 
25% 15* CmwCrs 
4% 2% onwa 
15% 6* CCTC 

30. 15V5 CmaAS 

9% 3% Cptg.W 
12% 4% CmptH 
m, 4% emo *? 

8* 5* CinpLR 
7% 2% CmuJM 
10% S% CmpPd 8 
19% 9% CmTMt s 
1114 4% C mourn 
8 1% CPtcH 

iff* 6 Comsiw 
•R 6 concotl 
Tl 14% CnCoD 
18% 14% CCroR 
26* 13 CCOPS 


10N 5 FMI 

4 1% FomR«> 

22% 12% FarmF 
68* 45% FrmG US 2J 
23% 12% FedCH»s 
8 4% Faraflu 

17* 7 Flurons 

34% 20* Fdlcrs U2 43 
56 fi% PlflhT* 140 30 
39% 21% FlagN 48 14 
1B% 12% FlltrtW 40 M 
6% 3% Fine ICO 30 39 

7* 5* Finatnx 
15% 6% FlniBon 

B 20% FAIoBK 1.12 JJ 
32% 23 FIAFln JO 24 
27% 14* FtATns 
-17 11% FtColF “ 

27% 21% FOwnr 130 41 
7 * 7% FlConl 1. 12*153 
36* 16% FDataR 
15% 10 FEXOC 
28% 10 FFdOH 
U% 14% FFFttVl 
27% 15 FIFnCP 
38% 17% RFlBk 
36% 27% FJafJI 

42 % 20 % nmano J4 ^ 

40% 29* FRBGO 140 M 
31 10* FfSvFla JO 29 

20 17% F5ecC 1-10 5,1 

42* 27% FTjnn 140 41 
44% 27* PBUnC 1.12 M 
.8% 3% Flatav 
16% 11% Flood M 42 
22% 13% F»Fdl 20 14 
41* 25% FJONFl 40 24 
17* 7% FtewS* 

17V* 10% Fhiroeft 20 '■> 
6% 3 Fonnrh 

18% 10% F Lion A 4J J 
17% 11 FUon B SO A 
34% 22% For Am 96 


S% T5N WJ + % 

PC IP 

^ll= a 

7% 7% ,7% 

’R 'R Wrt 

3R S* £S-n 

n% sr 

11* 10* «»? 

29% »N ®% 

IR’iiSfS + S: 
5% 5% «■ 

6 S 7 “ 

•% 9% 9 +% 
21* g% 21% — N 
17% 1^4 I’* _ u 
19% 14% 14*— * 



24% 16 F«««3 140 

23% 12^ FortnF 


3% 1* FnrtnS 
10% 5* Forum 
I 4% Foster 
27% 14* F re Tint 
14* 6 Fudrck 

16% 11% FulrHB 


54* 32% CnPcms 1-J® 

3% CotwPd 49 

246U47 

'ii* r giss? • 

16* 4% Convot 

■a 13% convn* 

6* 1% COPTBto 

22% 13% CooraB 
41% 14% coovl«H 
12V4 6 CoTCCn 

11% 6% Cordis 
iff* 37* const 
5 1% Coma 

7* 3% Casino 

17% 11% 

16% 10% Cronus 

27% 20% CrcsTr 

u 9 CwnBK 
3416 15 Cnirno 
S% io% OttJjnFr 
38% 15% Cullum 
57 17% Cvcore 



M 44 
94 41 
S6 24 


S% g* Wfc- * 

32% 32 . 

Si?SSS 
s 

ssr s»-« 

48% 49 49 

W 3 

15% 15% 15N— N 
1 2* 2* 

12% 12% 12% 

4* 4% 4* 

32% M% BN 
18% 17* 17*— % 

10% 18* 18% 
n% 11% 11*- » 

an* 20 ®s — % 

’R’S ’ 1 % + % 

™ ® S5a 

10% 10 10% + N 

27*^ 26% 24% — % 

19% TOvS + % 
fus 10% if 

r ’i* « . 

r .af af +i* 

C 8 8 =* 

19% W% !*«■,„ 

r 5 % 

iff* ?% 10 - % 

16% 16 14% + * 

15% 15% ]5% 

47% «* HS + 2 
3% 3% 3% + % 

o' 41% 4 IN— % | 

24% 15% HBO 
7% 7% 7% 11% 7 HCC 

8% ^ ^ iF il% JSSSi" 

g* SM h-^ S%B%K a 
1* 3* SR RSSSr B ‘ 

12% 1% Hits In 

5% 1* Hltadvn 
27* 14% MctioAS 
24% 14% HctsBa 
9* 3% HafemT 
37* 20 hb»x _ 
38% 21% HontaF 


AOb U 
JO 24 
M L5 
140 34 


517 

5 

217 

725 

187 

475 

315 

70 

45 

A 

60 

100 

2 

1271 

1458 

13 

1 

24* 

27 

17 

2 

35 

13* 

56 

960 

606 

213 

6 

344 

55 

110 

33 

144 

32 

17 

71 

14 


— % 


46b 6 
.10 Z1 
AO 24 

42 2.1 


138 

233 

17 

65 

51 

4 


7* 7% 7% + * 

2* 2* 2*-% 
12* 11* 12 - % 
64% 63% 63* — % 

20 17% 17% + % 

5% 4* 5 — * 

17 16% 14% + % 

31* 31 31* 

53 52% 52% + N 

38% 37% 30% 

16% IS 16 , 

5* 4* 5% + % 

7* 4* 7 
14% 14* U% 

27% 28% 28%— N 
31% 30% M% 

27 26% 27 

’6* 16 IS- -% 
S% 25 25 — % 

7% 7* 7%— N 

36* ^ 16 
13* 13* 13* „ 

24% M » - * 

fi*5 1 

sa L h.** 

21 * n* 21 *- % 

sj%s*^=a 

3 * 3 * 3 * + % 
12 ii* ii*- ss 

iS% 1 ® + w 

w* iSS £ 

17% 17% 17% 

32 31% 31%— % 

s % r* 

24* 24% 34% — * 
IS* iSS «*— * 


.10 1J 


12* 3* GTS 

16% 2% Galileo 

11% «* GmmB 

56% 20% G*no1cJl 
8* 5 Genets 
11* 1* Genw 

24* 7% 9 oF 2S- 
10% 4% GerMda 
21* 16 GibsGi 
16* 12% Go loos 
17% 7% God 
18% 14% GouWP 

15* 10% Genoa 

7% 5* Grontre 
4% Grohl 1 
4 orensc 
7% GWSov 
8 Gleet* 

13% GulHnl 
3% GHBdC 1540c 


204 

3® 

17 

307 

410 

ITS 


8% 4% Kevex 
12% 7V. KevTra 

11% 3 Klmbrtc 

21% 13 Kinder 
14% 4% Krov 
16* 7% Kroger 
27% 13 Kutcfce 


6% 4% 4% 

9* 0 9% + % 

3% 3% 3% + % 
20* 2»Va 2D* + * 
7% 7% 7% 

14* 14% 14% — N 
13% 13* 13*— * 


MO 

.16 

JO 

JO 

M 

.72 

■32 


11% 6* LDBmfc 

18% 7% LSI Lob 

23% 10 LTX 
17% 6% Ln Petes 
47% 27% LnZ By 
20* 12% LodFm 
18% II LokOw 
17 11% LomaT 

17 14 Lancast 

sw 35 LOTTOCO 
32 21% Lawsn S 

10* 4* LneOta 
15* 8% Letner 

7* 6* 

4 2S> Lexicon 

4* m Lexldta 
24% 17% Llebrt 
46* 3»% Ldnys 
7% 4* LfeCom 

20% 11% L[IyT« 4 
32* IB* LJnBrd 
36% 27% Lln CTel U0 
4% 4* Undbra .14 
47% 21% pCIgs * 
25% 31% LonoF 1J9 
33% 14% Latin 
26% 17 Lynden 
27 7* Lyohos 


154 
150 
234 
320 
3J 22 
J 09 
M 1M7 
52 7B 


16% 14 14 — % 

12 % 12 % 12 * + % 
18 17% 17*— % 

47 46% 46% - % 

19% 17% 17% + % 
15% U 14% — * 
15% 15% 15% 

16% 16 16 


J0b4J 


J7 

J4 


JO 


106 

0 

09 

5 

44 

349 

52 

16 


J 

J l 

1 A 2066 
223 
SA 5 
341 55 

J MM. 

56 77 

4704 

I 

4422 


55 + % 

27% +% 
6% + N 
9 

3*“ * 
2%- % 
22 


60 4J 
t 


55 54% 

27% 29 

6% 6* 

7 7 

7% 7 
3* 3% 

2* 2% 

22% 22 

46% 46% 46% 

5V. 5% .5% 

17% 19% Ig6— ’ 
32* X2% Wk + % 
33% 33% 33% — M 
5% 5* 5* , 

44 43% 43%—% 

23 22% 22*— * 

19% 17% IB — % 
25 25 25 + * 

22* 22% 22*— W 


sat JJ 


M 


14% 

11* 

7% 

10% 

n 


5* MB1 
A* MCI 
4* MIW 
3% MPOI 9 
15 MtSS 


Jle 

JO 3J 
240 3J 
JO 15 


13* 

7* 

22 

1» 

19 

19% 


H9 IjD 371 
34 U <14 
154 
554 

36 46 273 

64 25 90 

40 
635 
77 
135 
42 
99 


68r 25 


4* 4% 4* 

11* II* 11* + * 

JS.T + N 

p % r+s 

T 7 ^ 2 &-* 

10% w* iw 

13* 13% W% 

’S2 ’S% 'gt + % 

13% 13% U% - % 

7* 7% .7% 

& is a=* 

“A ’ft ,S 3%^ 


1* 

II r: 

CSftHS 

3% 20% 30% + % 


.» A 
J4 1J 
L6D 5 2 
JO 2J 
.141 


15 

5 


459 

3 

S3 

32 

28 

14 

SSx 

172 

196 

3 

OS 

35 

17 


51% 37% BBDO 

35. 21% BCPHW 
12 r 5% a oncte c 


2J0 


90 

MS 


JO 

2J0 


aS.’BSffiSKfi® 1 ® 

13% . 9% B CTlKU l 
UN 11* Bartas J6 
19*.- . c% BarenD M 

s% BnchC* 
■l2*'Benhan 
"29% BetzLb M3 
W* BJflB 
9%. P I aB eor 

IMr 7% Blndlvs 


-1 -Btoarc 
6* BWeR 
n • 5 Blrdinc 

37* 26% SootBn 
33%. 15* BoBGu 
n_ii* aostsc 

V - .5* BraeCp 
,3% 3* Breneo 
‘■3% i<kBrwTbm 
14% 8 JKimos 
5% 18% B ulMT a 
Bnta i 

.31 .15. BwrBr. 
. 7* 3.. Bwdnia 



.12 32 

.16 1.1 


20 U 


75 

25 

W 

117 

» 

303 

in 

79 

100 


S-Et 7 * 

IT IS* i«- + 5 

,7 16% 17 + « 

10 * * 
S% 56% — N 

*a£ r 

ffv, OV| 7T4 

171fc IS? 33% + * 

tiu 3316 T 2 

mm 

7 % TSl 
1 % 

6* gj 

9 JT 4 

5% 22 - % 

rse** 

3 % 3 % 

i«e ii% lf£_ * 

W ,7 t% 


9% — % 
1% 

6* 

5£j«;% 


7* 


+ % 



« s coos 

Wft- 4%CPflhb 

n* 6% CML 

a., M, cpi 

Wtf-4 . 05P- 

*%- 3 CACl 

5 % 16 * QbrySc . 

7% CoiMlc 

2% CoiShni 
7% CaUonP 
JBV CtriAV , 

xt&ss. 

12 CrtnlO 
.:»-CS«W«C 
STLCoremk 
JftB- 6M Cortort * 

W6 «% Cosays* 

S 5* Cencor* 

St 21% CntrBc 1J# “ 


^ . 


7 
122 
248 
767 
2178 

27 

163 

JP\ 4J J64 
720 
772 

Sf 

784 
56 
10 
15 
92 
001 
436 

9 
91 


.M 1.1 


ear J 

$ 20 


J 2 2oS= % 

im* 

2 * ZV5. £ 

V» «6 + % 
24 23% "T 

Si 16% 16% - % 
16* IgJ ’J* + % 

lift " M 

32% 31% 32 


17% 

10* 


61 

55 

2307 

1518 

49 

.1 5 
“ S 

1276 

14 

76 

5 

1.1 « 
432 
25 410 
2 


1 

% RS3SS. 

17% 9%Oe*S» 

Sasssss 

M % Si 

4* D«^tMd 
m DktaPr 
2% Diasone 
10 Dlcoon 
4% Dlctned 

■,nst 12% DWCm 
V* 22 Dlone* 

70* 14* DlrGnl 
36% 21% DomB 

tT is% d«mdb 

itv> 9¥* Ditllltz 

1?* 7% prex H- 59 

19* 11% DmGf jn 3|5 

mS !*£ °SSd , 3 re “ 
S5 wSg™, s. « 

lc£i 9* DurFiis 

6N 3NR23SC 

g* 16% DvnlCBC 


0* 

9% 

14% 

5% 

17 

'5% 


.9 
39 
LI 

Al 

506 15 


50 

150 

JO 


210 

14 

4 
257 

3 

77 

95 

7 

452 

104 

21 

76 

5 

60 


.15 1.1 


215 

31 

420 

68 

407 


16% 16% 16% 

10* 15* 10* 

13 12% 12%— % 
g 24% 24%-% 
30% 30 30 

i 

1 « 1 R 1 2 *_ w 

«iFiK 

Cl a|fc=« 

’% JJ VJ + % 
6 * 6 * J*- * 
12 I 12 -, 

3 2* .£* 

T 'SS-* 
CP aa-ss 

Pfefcil 

11 % 10 * If* + V4 

10 % 15 15 +S 

JBfefiE* 8 

ns i SS- % 


„ J92 2J 

24% 16% HtaerCa 1 JOb O 
13* 9 Hlckam 
14 3% Hogan 

31 7% HrnFAl 

12% 4* HmecH 
25% 15% Honind 
» 22* Hoovar 
6% 3% Horelnd 

3S% 12% HwBNJ 
28% 18% HuntJB 

14% 7% Hntaln 
24* 14* HntaBa 
27* 12% Hvbrttc 
11% 4% Hyponx 
11% 5* HvtekM 


11 
714 
26 
13 
37 
45 
173 
343 
37 
53 

J4 3L6 478 
1280 
35 
1 


A4 26 
1 JO A2 


.10e A 


22 % 21 * 21 *— % 

B6 30 20% + * 

4* 4% 4* + % 

3 3 3 — % 

ft * *- » 

17* 17* 17* _ 

w* ” lg£i 2 

BV. 7ft 7ft— * 

2% 2% 2% 

3* 3% 3%— % 

16% 16% 16% 

3 % 'ss 3 %-% 
+% 

» 32* 33 + % 

10% ID* 10*— % 
27* JD%— % 

aR^^-% 
% «-* 
^^ss+% 

«* if* AU , 

23* 23 23% + % 

27% 35 27% +2 

10% W% 10% 

8 % 0 % 9% + % 


31% 13% MTV 
17% 7% MOrtTr 

27* 20* MadG E 238 
11 7% MalRJ 

14* 7* Mcirt l.B 
16% 8 % MotSd 
24% 17% MMlIlw 
72% 37% MlTSN 
17% 13* Marcus 
f 3% Maroux 

13% 6% Marat 

37 % 1 B% MrWNs MO 

24% 6* MSCOlS 

6 * 1 % Mffltior 

182 24 Malms 

24% 13 MOOT* 

6* 3* MnvPt 
4* 3% MaynOI 
38* 27* MeCnn 
14* WNJJeF* 1 
11 % * 

12 4 MedCra 

20% 10 Mentor 
30* 14* MentrG 
37* 27% Merc Be 1 J2 
65 ]7% JWereBk 1JB 

22 10* MrcffCo 

36% 21* MrdBc^ » !-5? 
22% 12 MerlBs J6 
Si* 11% MeryG 
17* W* Mf rFn 

38* 14* Mfcam 
5% 2* Micro 

13 S* MicrMk 
7* 4* Mtodr 

40* 5* MIcrTc 

7 4 Micron 

6* 3% MlcSms 

7% 2% MdPcA 
24 17 MOStW 

41% 24 MIdIBk 
0 3 MdwAIr 

27ft 17 MIlIHrs 
30% Mil iter 
6 1* Mlntacr 

27% 14% Mlnstor 
14* 7% MgBk. 

12* « MoWCB 

SS’S KtSESSfr* 

j 4 a* tUSSci, 

12 7% MonAnt 

20* 7% MonoUT 
34 22% MonuC 

20% 14* MorFto 
14 7 MorKa 

22% 15% Morrin 
7* 2% Mnsetav 
16* 12% MOtCIb. 
64% 30 Multtnd 
26% 10* Mvtone 


175 

21770 

I 

1 

1J 5 
383 
76 

BA 25 
121 

10 

129 


.10 J 


J8 2A 
J5 J 


84 

13 

100 

251 

5T7X 

077 

IIS 

177 

B27 

507 

22 

3S3 

SO 

17 


2721 
A7 102 
2J 45 
72 

s « 

AObJJ S 

21 

16 

J6 1A 216 
51S 
636 
78 

AO 2J S 
1.12 3J 4 77 

A4 U 1036 

■ 48 U & 

146 

Jl. .1 « 

M4M £ 
JO 70 

JSeM wo 

10® 

1J0 4J 10 

fi u « 

^ w s 

J0 2.1 13 

JS 1.1 }3K 

.10 A 3033 


11% 11* lift— % 

7 0* 7 

4* 4* 4* + % 

It 10 1} 

31 31 31 — % 

11* 11% 11% 

H* 13% 13% 

21% 21 21% + % 
66% 66 66% + % 

3* 3* 3ft + % 

10% 10% 1W> + % 

30* 30 30% — % 

26% 24% 25% +1% 

11* u* 11* 

T « ’SS + n 
g» 15% !m + g 

16% 15% 16% 

36 35* 36 

19% 19% 19% — % 
16* 14% IS% „ 
16* 16% 16% — % 
18 17% 17% 

% r f-- 

SS » ™ + u 

6% 6ft SSSlIS 

3% 3% _3% + % 
23* 22% 23 + % 

4 i%r 4 i%: 

3 

12* 12% 13% — % 

^ ^ 1 -% 

IS8 9*StS 
10% 10_ 10% + % 
12% 11* 13 

a S£%-8 

3* 3% 3%— ft 

14% 14% 14% 

61% 61* 61*- % 
17% 16% 17 - * 


g gfi&REr as 

r ,’o% JO 63 

17% 10* POCDP+ „ 

8* 6 PoncAAx .13 1J 
2«* 10* Pansph 
20% 12 PorkOh 

8 4 PotnIM 

12% 5* PaulHr 
13% 6* PaulPt 

io 7% paycnx 
25 9* PeakHC 

33 20* PeortH 

10% 5% peaGM 
31% 20* Pwitari 
IS* 7* PeonEx 
32* 24% Petrlte 
13* 4 PhrmcJ 

12% 7% PSFS 

17* 14% PhUGI 
8 2% PlwtxAlM 

28% 17* PIcSov 
24% 16% PlcCfS* 

37% 27% PtonHI 
11% 7 PlonSt 

15% B% PoFrtk 

34% 16% PICVMs 
27 21 Perex 

j;, 1% Powell 
16* 7% Powrtce 

11% 5% PwCofw 

37* 18% precCst 
7 4% PrpdLO 

7% 3 Prtam 

16% 7* PrtcCm s 

66 36% PrlceCo 

22 9 Prtronx 

6 4% P rodO P -IS M 

42 20* PronC * .12 J 

15* 11% ProotTr 1J0 10J 
19% 13* Ptwin 
7* 3* Pultmn 

26% 12* PuftBH AO U 


.12 A 


27 % 27* 27% , 

45 44% 45 + % 

13% 12* 12*- % 
13% 12% 12%—% 

15 14* 14* + % 

7* 7* 7* 

22% 21* 22% + ft 

13% 13% 13% 

S% 5* 5% 

11% 11% 11% „ 
11* 10% 10% — % 
18% 17% 1B% + % 
13ft 13% 13% — JJ 
32* 32* 32ft— % 

££ 27^+5 

r » «=a 

15% 15 15 . 

2% 2% 3% 

25% 25* 25ft + % 
O* 22ft 23% + * 
33* 32* 32* — ft 

6% 8* ,S^ + JJ 

13% 12ft JJ — % 

23* 22% 23 + % 

^“*%^N 

10 * 10 % w + % 

56 54% 54%— IN 

12* 12* IT* ., 

4* 4% 4%— N 

39 39 37 — % 

12 lift lift , „ 
17% 17V. 17% + % 
7% 7* 7*— % 
23% 23% 23% — * 


36ft SubrB 
2% Sumtna 

7 sumtHi 
* SunCst 

6% SunMed 

8 SunSky 
% vlSyfcM 

6* SymbT 
6% Syntech 

2% Svntrex 

18% 11* Svscon 
26% 14% SVA90C 
7% 3% systln 
lift 6% Syslnlo 
11% 6% SvstGn 
25% 12% Systmt 


1A 


JB J 


167% 168 167% 

66 65 45 — ft 

2ft 2% 2ft- N 
10* 10% ION— % 

1* lft 1% , 

7 7 7 — % 

0 8 8 - % 
u % % 

9% 7* 7*+ % 

12% lift lift- ft 

1 R « * 

*§S ’In ’In— n 
SSISIS-* 

2« 34% 24% 


IS* 8* QMS 5 
9* 3* Quedrx 
13% 9 QuakC s 
32% 16% Quanta! 
5* 2* QueAM 
13% 8% Quhioto 

13 7% Quotro 


J8 


381 
175 
15 14 

1106 
70 
346 
9170 


10% 10% 10’^ 

7* 9* 7% 

11 10% 11 +% 

22* 22 22N + % 

4ft 4% 4ft— * 

I3'4a 13 13N + ft 

11% 10% 10* + % 


14 Oft TBC 
25% 13 TCAOa 

7* 4ft TOCVIVS 
28* 13% Tandem 
B* 3* Tmtdon 
18% 5* TeCom 
22 11 Telea 

34% 10ft TlcmA 
12* 8% T rtPtlff 
25% 13% Telecro 
28ft 13 TetaHct 
5* 1* TeWld 
20 13 TetaM 

17% 7* Telxan* 
12* 4% TermDt 
15ft 8% TherPr 
17* 8% Tjumd* 
57* 27% TTvnINI 
14* 6% Thortrc 

- 7ft ThouTr 
6* TlmeEn 
8ft True FBI 
% Tlprnry 
8 Terhas 
_ 7* TotlSy 1 

17% 10 TrakAu 
12* 6% TriadSv 
30% 22% TnnJo 


.12 J 


I 


27% 

15ft 

14 

3ft 

17ft 

26 


7V 

7 

62 
2218 
006 
26 
87 
146 
Z79 

J2 1 J 276 

657 

209 

167 

I 15 
36 
20 

25 124 
191 
<26 
1693 
585 
317 
S05 
24 
391 
35 
103 


MS 


A0 1J 


7ft Oft Bft— % 
23% 23% 23% 

4ft 4ft 4ft— % 
15% 15% 15% 

4* 4 4 — % 

10% 10% 10% ^ 
13% 13% 13% + ft 
33% 33% 33% + % 
9% 7% 7% 

21% 20ft 21%— % 
36% 25ft 25ft— % 
2* 2* 3% „ 

16% 15% 5ft— J? 
17 16% lffN + % 

5 4* 5 + % 

14* lpk— % 

^^ft 5 !*-; 

k a B+j 
,3 S "K 
T JT + % 

13% 12% 13% + % 
Bft H% B%— % 
25* 25 25* — * 


16% 6% RAX 

18ft 11% RPMs 
16% 8* 5°Sy; 
16ft eft RodftiT 
11 5* Rtvflon 

7ft 2* Rooen 
33ft 19* Rolnrs 
20ft 12% RovEn 
7% 2* RodlCr 

23* isft Reudna 
10% 5% Reoom 

35ft 25ft RedfcnL 
12 ft 3J Reov« 
7ft 5* RucvEI 
20% 11 Reals s 
14* <% Rettob 

10* 7* RpAuf 
30% 9* RnKlIh 

16ft lift RestrSy 
16% 7* Rtutarl 


Jle J 
Si 3J 


M 22 


.16 1J 


160 

130 

183 

91 

16 

75 

2b6 

5 

22 

47 

28 

67 

496 

822 

4 

45 

29 


43* 27 gevRm' l** 
15% 9ft Rfiodes J4 
10 3* RlbUms 

22ft 12* RtdiEI* 

17* 10% Rival 
Bft 34ft RoadSv 
13% B* RobVsn 
34% 16ft Rouse* 

13 6% Ray PI m 

12% 3ft RovIRs 

18* 11 , Ry*n*i 

17% 11% RvanFs 


17 
4 
11 
24* 
463 
7 

JO 5J 33 
1J0 3A 1150 


,15e IJ 
13 
1.7 


J4 2A 


154 

154* 

ITS 

159 

11 

93 


6ft 6% 6%— % 

16ft 16% 16* + % 
12% lift 12 — % 

11 10% W%- % 

7% 7% 7%— % 

4% 4% 4* — N 

31% 31% 31*+ % 
18% 1B% 10%— % 
2% 3% 2% 

21% 21% 2V% 

9* 9* 9ft— N 

28ft 28% 28% . 

12 11% 11* + * 

6ft 6* 6ft + % 

15% 14ft 15% + % 
5* 5ft 5* + % 
9ft 9* nj 
13% 12* Jft— % 
15 W. « + % 

7ft 7* 7ft — * 
38% 38 38 - % 

14% 14* 14% 

7% 7% 7% 

22 21 % 22 + % 
15 Wft 15 + N 

29% 20ft 29 + % 

12 lift 12 + W 

22ft 22% 29%— % 
10ft 10% 10% — * 
3% 3* IN— ft 

16% 16% 14*- % 
17% 17 17 - % 


34% 17 USLICs JO 3A 

24% 15% UTL 
SOW, 5 Ultrev JSe .7 

23% 10ft Unomn 
13% 7ft Ljn jfl . ,, 

29% 14% UnPlntr 1J91 u 

25* lift UACfll t JS J 

11* 8% UBAtok 

28ft 19% UQCal 
11 6 UFnGfP 

22% II* UFWFd 
17ft 7ft UGrdn 
13% 7% UPreta 
S* 3* US Ant 
32 21* US BCP 

6% 2% US Dspn 
33ft 11% U5HC5 JB J 
5% 3% US Shit .« M 

22% 10* US5ur JOB 1J 
37% 25% USTr» IJD 1J 
25ft 17% LiStatn JO 1J 
24% 14ft UnTetev 
48% 27ft UVaBS 
22 13 UnvFrn 

20% 9ft UnvHR 
13 5ft UFSBk 
6% 3% meal JB 5J 


.I5r 1J 
1J9 AD 


TJ4MA1 


1J0 3A 


IA4 3J 


.12 11 
1.76 16 
At 12 


.16 J 


1AQ 15 


13* 13% 13% 


+ % 


’SS 1 ? i§}S 

A JBESS 

1 t|jgr 

11 * ns* 

714a Ekm 
!9* 8* Elblts 

WSk 

S '521®. 

S. EironEl 
« emnAir 

B etauiex 

2 * Enma 
iuk Endwco 
4ft e«Wji 

2* 15* EngCr* 

16ft asijsfL 
S3 iP BSSf 
^ ^ issf. 

6?S V* I® 


35* 

T2ft 

16 

13 


12* 

iS 

9* 


1J4 3J 
,12e M 


1J2 US 

.16 1J 


JO M 


30 3J 
J5e 10 


24 

47 
65 

713 

67 

48 
320 

3 

41 

1 

207 

74 

42 
345 

32 

690 

90 

1046 

74 

5 

206 

25 

42 

1 

101 

961 

no 

452 

46 


10% Ifg + * 

® WJ + VJ 

« 7N + * 

fffil 

igg «a ’Ri:* 
if* a is*— * 

||pEs 

r s a-** 
R S% S-w 
R 6% 6ft + Si 

rm 11* n*— * 

B B S-* 


10ft 7% ILC 
33% 16ft IMS* 

14* 7% I SC 

7* 3% lent 
10% 4ft Imunex 
7* 2ft taoeanp 
46ft 30ft ln£N 
28% 14% inttre 
33* u instNtw 
11* 3% inecm 
is 9* IntoDv 
4ft 3 intoGen 

s“a,iss° 

% 

if* 35 ISSj. 

16% 6% I ntrtFl r J6 l.l 
25% Intent! s 
1B% 4% Irarmon 
22% 13% In tmec 
13* 5ft intrmtr 
21* TON lejciln 
18% 8ft I Gome 
as* 15% mtKlns 
M% 7* InlLse ■ 
ia 4* InMobll 
3 % % IRU 

ku 7ft IT CP a 
14* 5 Iomega 

13% 9% leomttx 

8ft 3% itei 


25 

343 • 
233 
371 
56 
33 
27 
111 
40 
162 
460 
1 
203 
2064 
168 
182 
20 
76 
300 
3217 
46 
65 
9 

013 

3 

70 


% 


9* 7% 7% 

31 30* 31 

12* 12% 13* „ 

Bft 6* 6% — N 

5% 3N 5% 

4* 4* 4* + N 

45ft 45% 45ft 
21ft 21% 21% , 

17ft 19 19 — 1 

5* 5% Wi— % 

12* 12 12* + * 
3ft 3ft 3ft + % 
16 15% 15% 

26* 25ft 26 — % 
3% 5 5 

2 % 2 % 2 % 

12% 12% 12% 

,5* 13 % ^“S 

13* 13 13% - ft 

10% 10% 10% 

IS* B =6 

at as a-* 

23 21% 21% — 1* 

ID* 10% 10% 

12 11% 11%—% 

8% 8% 8* + * 


36 

a 

9 % 

10ft 

12 

9 % 


U 4 MCA Cp 
6ft 2% NMS 
lift 3% Noo«» 
24ft 18* NBdTex 
KM. 30% NtICly . 
20% 11* NtCPtr* 

14* A* NDOIO 

16% NHItC S 
2ft NMIom 
2* NdUOte 
6N MetsnT 
6 % Nelson 
5 % NwWjee 
27 * w* NJwfcSe 
HH 7% NBronS 
34 23% NEBW 

ne* 17 NHntpB 

»% 16 % 

17ft 8% MWteB fc 
30% U N e wnt 
M 1% NwnPti 
7* aSNICteO 
12ft 6* Nlhe.B 
21% 15% 

52% 28% RortWr 
45% 28% MrakBe 
Bft 5% Nerston 
10 * 5 NAtlin 
17* 6% Neetsw 
20% 13% NwrtjG 
33% IT* NKjrnt 
36% 20ft NwNU 


32 

156 

404 

J4 3A 432 
LOO 45 455 
Jfl 1.1.1007 
J4 34 370 
J4! J » 

519 

JO 3J 4 
97 
143 
976 
269 

52 1J 7 

JO 28 13 

1.12b 27 34 

JSO J 
■06 J 62 
2722 
t 20 

AO XI B6B 

5 1J 1290 

- ■* ’fl 


8J 14 

m% 18% 88 3J M 

,ov * as s* 


1A4 

AB 


13ft 


4% 3ft 4% + % 
4ft 4* 4* 

11% 10ft 10 ft— * 

24% 34% 24% + % 
4Sft 44ft 44ft— * 
17% 17% 17% + % 
13* 12* ]2%— N 

r ’s*i+n 
a as a+s: 

7% 7 7 

2 SK 3 & 2 &-N 

g iT^+i 
»% n% wj 
20* 28% 28* 

SI 15% 15ft 
22% 21ft 21ft „ 

'K w 5 
13 12* 12* + % 
16ft 16% lgA + % 
45* 45% 45ft + 
45% 45 45 + % 

6ft 6% 6%— % 

ir 

28% 27* 27* — * 

SftSi^ + £ 

PJE&ss 
t a a-* 


.16 

AS 


.15 


•eft 9 JBRstS 
i* 3* Joeknot 
Aft 25ft JocfcLie 
27ft ]4ft Jomwtr 
8ft 4* JetMort 

23* 14% -lerlco 
7 % 3* JwrteM 
10* 6% JoBPhen 
19% 9* Ju™ ’ 

20% 12ft JWtln 


.16 u fSS 


70 

197 


.12 


i24 5 

402 

29 

2.1 108 


13 12 12% — * 

n t+% 

23% 31% 21*— 1* 
6ft 6 6% + N 

9% 8* 8*+ % . 
19% 18ft 19% + * 1 
18* 18* 18*— % ' 


6* 6ft 

28* 

’5* « 


** jl% ii-' 4 


24% 13% KLAb 
Bft 4ft KVPW 
as 20 % Kaman 
S% 13% Karchr 
17% 1« Komr 
18* 6* Kavttan 
6i% 37 % Kema 
41* 23ft KVOlLf 1J0 


M U 
JSl 


M0 


132 

a 

121 

137 

TtB 

SB 

116 

M 


18ft U 18 -ft 

8% 7* 9% + ft 

31ft 31 31ft +1 
16* 14% tS%- % 
11% 10ft >1 —ft 
7% Wfc 9% 

5B% 57 57 —1 

39% 39 39ft— % 


5% 1 * 0 «aner 
JSfc 3 S oSjGp MO jS 

S 10* oneBcP J* ia 

9 % 3ft OnLtee 

19 ft ™S5Pf!SS 
48 ft 22 % OoncR 
19% 12% Orb«« 

Bft n%Orbtt 

7% 4 OrtlCP 

28 14 0*pm« 

34* 24 OttrTP 
.16% 8 OwnM S 
6* % Oxooo 


JO M 
2J6 JJ 
JS M 


9 

16 

27 

65 

12 

287 

6 

177 

3 

430 

564 

252 

186 

205 

5 

73 

241X 

115 


31% 21% 21ft 
34% m 24 — % 

?Ir+! 

iasss^=§ 


16 7* SAY Ind 

19% 10* SCI SV 
19% 10% SEI 
13% 7 5FE 

33 16 SRI 

21* 6% Soloed J 

44* 29 Safeco 
23 11* samitn 

16 7% stJude 

re* 39% StPoul 
6* 2% SalCat 

11% 6% Son Bar 

9% 5% SaMSv 

49* 32* SavnF 
20% 10% SBkPSs 
10ft 6% SamOn 
16% 10% SconTr 
13* 8* Scherer 

25* 15ft SChlmA 
Bft 3ft SCIMlC 
16 7 SdSM 

2D* 12 Sdtex 
9% 4* SeaGul 

8* 4 Seaaate 

4ft 2ft SecToo 
12 1* SEEQ 

30* 16 Settle) 

18* 6 Sensor 
16* ID* SvcMer 
25% 17% Sums) s 
23 13* Service 

8* 4% SvcFrct 

18 12% SevOti k 

34* 23% ShrMed 
37% 27% Sttwmts 1A8 
20* 12% Shelby 5 -16 
14% 7* She Idle 

35% 24* Shoneys 
16% 10 ShonSo s 
11* 5* Silicon 
20% 9% Silicons 
znfe 11* siiicvai 

24% II* Sltlcnx 
12% 4* Slltec 
17* 11% Slmpm 
15ft 10* Slpolns 
24N 13* Sixtier 1 
13* 8* Skipper 
4N 2 SmllhL 
54 Si Society U* 
21* 10 SoctvSv 

10% 6 Sottedh 
21* Ii* SaTtwA 
39% 10* SonocP* AB 
27% 14% SonrFd 
6ft 4 SoHosp 
30* 21% SthdFn 
2B* 16% Sou tall 
9% 5% Sovran 
31% 21* Sovran* 

19% 8* Sp eedy 

29ft 0% SPCtran 
B* 5* SpecCll 
16* 13 Solro 
17ft 3% StorSr s 
7% 5 StalBM 
30 19% standv 

23* 11% StdMJc 
27 19 Shmhos 120 

34% 19% Sin SIB s 
6% 3* StateO 
7* 4ft Steteer 
19% 10* StewStv 
25 17% Slwlnf 

8% 5% StHel 
18% 7ft Strafes 
38% 26ft StrwCI s 
35% 19% Sirvlcer 


345 

172 
1106 
■10r 1J ,31 
A0 40 3<7 
JO 1J 341 
1.60 AD MO 


270 

3J0 Al 358 


33 

35 

342 

372 

357 

6 

172 

20 

136 

257 

BO 

52 

51 

27 

275 

126 

326 

14 

213 

17 

216 

81 

17 

34 

771 

7 

72 


ii* £ £=» 

12ft 12% 12% 

28ft 20% 2t%- % 
23% 22ft 22*— % 
10ft 10ft 1®ft 
27% »* 7J — % 
7* 7 7% + * 

IBft 17ft 1®— % 
12 11* 11*— % 
10% 10* 10 *- % 

4* 4* „ 

28 27ft 27ft— % 
3% 3ft 3ft- % 
24ft 24% 24* 

4 4 4 — ft 

20ft 17* 19*— * 
36% 36 36% + % 

21ft 20* 20ft 
24 23* 24 + % 

43ft 42ft 42ft — ft 
18% 18 18% — % 
16% 15% 16% + * 
II Wft 1 0ft — % 
4 * 4* 4*-% 


] 


5 

29 

195 

96 


258 

32 2A 125 
A0 1A 157 

U 

S3 

164 

142 

123S 

20 

1075 

80 A2 6* 
JS A 371 
JB J 343B 
JO AO 1041 


12 

31 

823 

90 

85 

IS 

685 

56 

152 

137 

1 

13 

7 

26 

21 

103 

74 

343 

235 

98 

21 

22S 

103 


JO 51 


J6 


J2 

AO 

.10 


_ 2A 
A5e 2J 

167 
2.1 454 

16 IBS 
LS 145 
1068 
507 
148 

86 .9 2- 

58 

JO 26 .» 

M0 3A 107 

2V 

13 IB* 

.15b 3A » 

11 

32 11 2 

297 

* u i5S 


12 % n% 12 — ft 

15 14* 14* 

10* 18% IB* + % 

7ft 7 7% + % 

20 19* 20 + % 

Z1 20* 20* 

39ft 37% 37* + % 
IS* 18% 19* + % 

15% W* 15 
72ft 72ft 72ft + ft 
5% 5% Sft— % 

6% 6* fik 

20% 20 20 
B 7* 7* 

16% 15* 16 

2SS ^ + N 
Sft SS R-% 

12* 12% 12ft— % 

r u a-% 

% R R-» 

17* 19% 19%-* 
0* B% 8% 

15% 14% W%— J* 
20ft 19* 20 — * 
17% 19% 19% + % 
4% 4% 4% — ft 

17% 16* 17% 

32 31% 31* + * 

3S% 30% 38% 

18* 18% 18% — 8 
lift 10* 11 

26* 26* 26* — JJ 
11* 11* I]*— % 

6 5ft 5* + JJ 
11% Ufa lift— % 
15ft 15% 1S%— % 

20 19* 30 

Sft 5% Sft 
15* 15% 15ft 
14 13* 13*— % 

16ft 15* 16 — % 
10* 10% 10ft 
2ft 2% 2ft— ft 
47* 46* 47ft + ft 
10U 10% IBft 
9 9 9 

15* 15* I®*— H 
2B 27* 2t 
19% 19% 19% 

4* 4ft 4* 

?S5?g?g + % 

6* 6* 6* 

20* 27* » 

17% 17 17 

23% 22* 22* 

6* 6% 6% 

15 14ft 15 
6* 6% 6ft— % 
7* 7* 7% 

28% 28% 28% 

15* 14* U*—* 
22ft 22* 22% + * 
30* 30% 30ft — % 
4% 4* 4*— % 
5% 5% 5% + % 
15* 15* 15* , 

23% 23% 23% — H 
6* 6% 6* + % 
17% 17% 17ft 
33ft 33 Mft— % 
33% 33 33 


9 * 4* VLI 
15* 7% VLSI 

13* 4NVMX 
20* 6% VolldLa 

21* 7 * ValFSL 

42% 36 VBlNtl 
36% 19* ValLn 
18* 11 N vanoue 
15% 5% VaraHI 

6ft 7ft Ventre* 

28* 13% Vlcore - a _. .. 
14% 8ft VledeFr J2e 2J 
14ft 9% vyinu, 

28% 13* Vlratek 
12 % 6% vodovl 
22 14% Van ltd 


313 

57 

95B 

1273 

309 

*38 U 3 
“ T 8 

570 

J7e A «!« 

ITS 
200 
16 
<75 
W3 


1% , 1 * 

SS K,fe6 + % 

30% 19* 17ft— % 

’S* ’2* S* + % 

i5% 1 

10 7* 9 *- % 

12ft 12% 12% 

14* 14% 14* + % 
8% 8* 8% 

1* IBft 10*— % 


W 


25% 17% WD 40 

16* 10 Watties 
13* 5% Wlkijel 

25% 14ft WgiE 
26% 12% WFSL s 
16% 7% WMSB 

9ft Sft Wave Ik 
14% 11% Webb 
lift 6% WestFn 
17* 5% WstFSL 

12 5 * WMIcTc 

W% 4* WtTlAS 
31 * 15 % WmorC 

17% S WStftCl 

34% 21ft wattre 
6* 2% Wlcat 
13ft 4* WkJenjn 
46* 2Bft Wlllmt 
15ft 7% W1IIAL 
17* 8* WmeSn 

10* 4ft WltenF 
4 Wlndmr 
8ft 2ft WJnnEn 
24% 16* WTserO 
21* UN WoMd 
27ft 21ft Warttw 
9ft 6* writer 
30ft 21 * Wvman 


A0 118 
LB 2 
313 
BA 197 
2 S 775 
Sll 
57 

3A 45 

129 
78 
13 
41 

2J 103 
430 
3J 727 

130 
692 

33 

337 
15 
106 


J31 

AD 3A 
A0 A7 
A4 2J 
-Ue ^ 
JO SA 


406 

» 

* 

98 

73 

I 


19% 19* ink 

8 S.S*-* 
IHS3KU%-* 

14* 14 W%— * 

7 6* 7 + % 

13% II* 11* 

17 16% 17 +1 

I Sft 16 16 - N 

8% 7* 7*— % 
13% 13 13 — ft 

17* 17% 17ft— N 

12% 12ft 12* 

44ft 44% 

14% 13* W + * 
16% 16% 16% 

Sft 5% Sft— % 
4% 4% 4% 

B 7* 8 + % 

It* 16ft 16ft 
13* 12% 12% 

27* 27* 27ft — % 
8% 8 8 
23* 23* 23* 


10* I* Xebec 
13* 5* Xtanr 

17* 10% XKJetc 


281 

177 

1457 


2 % 2 * 3 *— % 
7* 7ft 7% — ft 
13 12% 12ft — % 


21% 14% YlOwFt J4 2J 92 


20 % 20 % 20 % + % 




30ft 5% Zen Lbs 
13* 10% ZletHer 
40 * 30ft DanUt 
7 % 2% ZHel 
13* 3 * Zlyod 
15* 6% zandvn 


4745 
3.9 2 

3J -J 

99 

J8I A 41 


L36 


™ B 1 -l 
•?*&*&=* 
iS’* i» 1 S' 6 + % 


— * 



the world. 


ThelritaiMikiial HeraldTribuue. 
Pr tnring the Worid*s Most 

lmpnar tantNewstotheWariJs 

Most Impcatant Audience. 


9 

i 





Page 14 



BOOKS 


THE DANCER .AND THE DANCE 

Bv Merce Cunningham, in conversation 
with Jacqueline Lesscham. 238 pages. 
527.50. 

Marion Boyars Publishers Inc 262 West 
22d Street, New York, N.Y. 1001 1. 

Reviewed by Pamela Sommers 

S INCE 1941 when he fashioned his Brsi 
dance. Merce Cunningham has taught a 
great many souls how to look ai and listen to 
art in radical, open-minded ways. His dances 
— meticulously wrought and infused wuh col- 
ors. shapes, speed, stillness, rhythms and en- 
counters — do not purport to be about any one 
thing, leaving the spectator free to interpret 
them any way he sees fit. 

Now that his revolutionary methods of com- 
position and performance are being used the 
world over, Cunningham has reached out to 
embrace the intricacies of film and video. His 
companv has expanded and continues to 
thrive. And at 66. the choreographer continues 
to ttanflw a curly-haired sage moving quuxuy 
among his disciples. 

Despite this incessant flow of activity. Cun- 
ningham found some time over the past eight 
or so years to sit down and talk with the French 
writer Jacqueline Lesschaeve about his devel- 
opment as a dancer and creator of dances, his 
collaborations with a host of artists and. com- 
posers, and his philosophy on how movement 
relates to all aspects of daily existence. The 
result, “The Dancer and the Dance," is an 
interesting, though not compelling, series of 
quesrion-and-answer sessions that provide 
scant original material for the Cunningham 
enthusiast, and insufficient background and 
banter for the general reader. 

The main problem is Cunningham himself. 
A notoriously elusive interview subject, he is 
not the sort to gush, gossip or reveal intimate 
details about his personal life. Though he re- 
sponds to each of Lesschaeve's queries and 
comments directly and in depth, he maintains 
a definite reserve. ’He reflects on his work in the 
most careful and reasoned terms. It is in the 
accompanying photographs and sketches that 
we see him ai his most animated. 

There are moments, however, when Cun- 
ningham loosens the verbal reins a bit. He 
paints a wonderful portrait of his first dancing 
instructor. Maud Barrett of Centralia, Wash- 
ington (“She came on stage dressed in a yellow 
gown with white pantaloons and little black 
patent leather shoes, swinging Indian dubs. Td 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 


never seen anyone do that, and she ;• 
talking to the audience because ihej- Jl 
her friends: that was quite a sight >. Henas 
manv wtttv observations about his catlabewu 

lions’ with" the painter Robert Rauschenberg 
And after Lesschaeve remarks that certain peo* 
ole find it astonishing to see a man of hi* -5* 
dancing. Cunningham says: “l dance because 
it gives me great pleasure. Not only because oi 
the questions that are raised through dancing, 
but because of dandng itself. ...» don t see 
why cliches or conventional ideas should inter- 
fere with the explorations that I can still make. 
Those people who are shocked think of danc- 
ing in a very limited way. I think of dance as a 
constant transformation of life itself.*’ 

Pamela Sommers is a frequent contributor to 
The Washington Post. 

/• 


BEST SELLERS 

The New VmLTincs 

This [iy is Isucd «1 ncpnri' firm nniv ilun I/Ml hnnWiMN 
ihnw&houi ibe United Suies WecL-on ILsi are nm iuv.-wbJt 
iittAuntc 


FICTION 


Tks 

Wed. 


Im Actl* 
*«ll OH 1*4 


1 LUCKY, hv Jaekar Collirt 

2 LAKE U’dBBCiON DAYS. b> Cuitimw 

Keillor - - . • • • 

1 SKELETON CREW, hv Sierhcn King 
a THE FOURTH DEADLY SIN. hv Law 

rente Samlets ■ ■— 

S THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, hv 

b THE TWO MRS. GRENVILLES, by 

Dominick Dunne ■ ■■■■ 

7 THE CIDER HOUSE RULES, hv John 

K LON&SOMJE DOV E hv Lam McMunrv 
■J TOO MUCH. TOO SOWN, hv Jacqueline 

Briskin • •-••••• 

tO IF TOMORROW COMES, hv Stdnev 

Sbddon — - - - 

tl THE LOVER, hv Marguerite Duras . . . 

12 J1.AN. hv Eric Van LuMbaUcr 

1.1 JUBAL SACKETT. trv Loin* L ‘Amour . 

14 HOLD THE DREAM, bv Barbara Tavkn 

Brail ford _ — . ..... 

15 FALL FROM GRACE, by Lam CoUhl* 

NONFICTION 

1 YEAGER: An Auiohiosnipbv . hv Chuck 

Yeager and Lew Jam» - 

2 IaCOCCA: An Auwbmgraphy. hv Lee la- 

eoeca with William Novak - 

3 A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE, by 

Toro Pews 

4 SMARTWOMEN. FOOLISH CHOICES, 
hv Connell Cowan and Mdwn Kinder . . 

5 LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Busua*- 

6 THE MtCK,*Bv~ MLtkey'Mamie wiih Herb 

Gluck ’ — 

7 THE AMATEURS, bv David HalbctMam 
it HAMMER OF THE (iODS: The Led Zcp- 


12 
• H 
2$ 
4 

in 


33 

X 

I 

17 

X 



petin Saga, bv Siephen Davis ... 

9 FUNNY MONEY, bv Mark Singer 

10 CONFESSIONS OF A HOOKER, by Boh 

Hope with Dwayne Netlaml 

1 1 NUTCRACKER, bv Shana Alexander ... 

12 FINAL CUT. bv Steven Bach 

13 THE GRASSHOPPER TRAP, by Patnek 

F. McManus - 

14 MARTINA, by Martina Navratilova with 

George Vectcy 

15 THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 

Richard Bach ... . 


|- u 

2 j? 

4 IS 

3 23 

12 S3 

v 7 

6 4 

111 5 

11 b 

s£r.7 
V /o 
— 1 

13 4 
7.’ X 

14 53 


B 

E 

B 

□ 

□! 

B 

E 

□ 

E 

□ 

□ 

B 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

B 

□ 


□ 303 


9/11/85 


ADVICE. HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS- 

1 DR. BERGER'S IMMUNE POWER 

DIET, by Sawn M. Baser ... — I 13 

2 WEBSTER'S NINTH NEW' COLLE- 
GIATE DICTIONARY 2. 44 

3 WOMEN WHO LOVE TOO MUCH, by 

Robin Norwood . 3, 4 

4 THE FRUGAL GOURMET, hv Jeff 

Smith — — 4, 23 

5 FIT FOR LIFE, by Harvey Diamond and 

Marilyn Diamond 5 - 3 


BRIDGE 


Unscramble these tour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
four ordinary words. 


NOJIT 



□ 

rn 

□ 

□ 


CHOAR 



TE 



By Alan Truscott 

O N the diagramed deal, it 
might not seem that the 
four-four trump fit offered any 
advantage, but Sooth was able 
to demonstrate otherwise. He 
won the opening heart lead in 
his hand and drew two rounds 
of trumps. He was delighted to 
see thejack-nine of trumps ap- 
pear from West, because he 
could now see a way to score 
12 tricks without relying on the 
position of the diamond ki n g 

Making the assumption that 
West would not have false- 
carded with jadc-oine-six of 


trumps. Sooth entered his 
hand twice in hearts and ruffed 
both his dubs. He then came 
to the diamond ace. drew the 
raising trump and claimed the 
slam. He had scored six trump 
tricks, five hearts and the dia- 
mond ace. 

In the post-mortem. South 
inspected the East- West cards, 
hoping to find that the dia- 
mond long was on his righL He 
was disappointed to discover it 
on his left, which meant that he 
had amply broken even with 
the pairs who reached he mun- 
dane contract of six hearts. 


NORTH 
4AKQJ 
OQS432 
0 QS73 

WEST EAST 

«• iiv. - 

oirm o to a 

♦ AQB874 4 J 10 5 3 2' 

SOUTH (D) 

4 10873 
CAKJS 
-o^Aja 
4 KG 


Both aides wwe 
bidding: 

vulnerable. -The 

Berth 

Vrtt 

North 

East 

1N.T. 

2* 

3* 

Pa». 

3* 

Pass 

4* 

Pass 


Pass 

5* 

Part 

6« 

Peso 

Pan 

Pan 

6 * 

Pass* 


Wot lad Um heart ntnr. 


GAPOAD 



r 


BLAMCY 


~ixr: 

JL 


j WHAT " tPI PLOMACY" 
SOMETIMES TURNS 
OUT TO SE. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


^“ rm t 1 1 1 1 1 i 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow} 

Jumbles: ODIUM COACH TYPIST INDUCE 
Answer Whai the hash simget knew how to do— 
DISH IT OUT 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 

HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

C 

F 

Alearva 

2b 

79 

20 

&a 

Amsterdam 






29 

64 



Barcelona 

2 a 

7V 



Beta rade 






It 





20 

60 



Bucharest 

22 






46 














20 





IB 

M 




V 





18 




Genera 

19 

66 




13 

55 




20 





27 

81 




27 

01 

2(1 


London 

22 




Madrid 

35 





25 





16 

61 




17 

63 





61 

ie 

64 


13 

55 

15 

69 

Paris 

22 

72 



Prague 

15 







0 



27 

81 



Stacknafin 

15 





19 


6 



22 





17 

63 




13 

55 



Zurich 

1/ 




MIDDLE EAST 




29 

84 

9 

46 


29 

84 




36 




Jerusalem 





Tel Aviv 





OCEANIA 






16 

61 

11 

52 


21 




Cf-Cloudvj fo-looovs ir 



CI-CIOUBV, 

vn-snowerv. sw-snow; yi-trpr mv. 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 



C 

F 

C 

F 


Bangkok 

JO 

6* 

24 

75 

St 

Belling 

21 

73 

— 

— 

h- 

Hang Kang 

27 

81 

23 

73 

sh 

Manila 

30 

B6 

24 

75 

a 

New Delhi 

36 

97 

36 

79 

tr 

Seoul 

22 

72 

18 

64 

O 

Shanghai 

33 

91 

36 

70 

tr 

Singapore 

32 

90 

34 

75 

si 

Tolpel 

35 

95 

36 

79 

fr 

Tokyo 

30 

66 

34 

75 

a 

AFRICA 






Algiers 

32 

90 

14 

57 

fr 

Cairo 

33 

91 

21 

70 

tr 

Copo Town 

18 

64 

14 

57 

ci 

COsaOlaaar 

2 1 

79 

21 

70 

cf 

Harare 

26 

79 

11 

53 

fr 

Lagos 

2S 

n 

23 

73 

a 

Nairobi 

— 

— 


M- 

na 

Tonis 

28 

82 

19 

66 

Ir 

LATIN AMERICA 



Buenos Aires 

14 

57 

A 

43 

tr 

Caracas 

27 

81 

31 

TO 

cl 

Lima 

19 

66 

15 

59 

a 

Mexico City 

24 

IS 

10 

SO 

fr 

Rio de Janeiro 

— 

— 

— 

— 

na 

NORTH AMERICA 



Anchorage 

14 

S7 

5 

41 

Or 

Atlanta 

22 

« 

21 

70 

fr 

Boston 

21 

70 

15 

59 

r 

Chicago 

24 

75 

14 

57 

PC 

Denver 

26 

r> 

10 

50 

PC 

Detroll 

23 

73 

18 

64 

PC 

Henolain 

11 

88 

21 

70 

h- 

Houston 

30 

86 

23 

73 

si 

Los Angeles 

21 

70 

17 

63 

PC 

Miami 

31 

88 

74 

75 

PC 

Minneapolis 

19 

6* 

9 

48 

PC 

Montreal 

24 

75 

14 

57 

PC 

Nassau 

31 

88 

24 

75 

PC 

New York 

24 

75 

30 

68 

sf 

San Francisco 

>3 

64 

13 

55 

sh 

Seattle 

1? 

66 

II 

52 

PC 

Toronlo 

27 

81 

20 

68 

el 

Washington 

12 

« 

19 

66 

PC 

o-overccof. pc-oartl/ douttv: 

r-rain; 


WEDNESDAY'S FORECAST - CHANNEL: Smwlh FRANKFURT: Fair. 

v'm— 371 LONDON: Fmv earlv. cIoihjy loler. Temo. 23 — W 
7rT°«n? mIohiD- F air Temo. 35 — 16 195 — 611. NEW YORK; Fair Temp. 

PARIS: FqirTVSna. 24-9 175-481 ROME: Fair. Temp. 
2JZ S ifu— mV TEL, AVIV: NA. ZURICH: Fair. Term M — 5 (75-411. 
aViB r- V n V Y Pfn O. 32— » 191 — 79). HONG KONG: Ram. Temp. 
W-w P^-lSl^ANlLAT Rom. Temo. V-UM U- M). SEOUL: FoggY. 
TBmo M— 19 172 — 64). SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms. Temo. 37 — 24 
Tio - tt 77LTOKYO: ShoSifS. TemP. 30 - 24 186 - 73). 


Wbrld Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Sept. 10 

dosing prices ui local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 





AnstmtaBi 



Close 

Prev. 


ABN 


50650 


kCF Holding 



AEGON 



AKZO 



Ahold 



AMEV 




ATtam Rubber 

B.M 

&d5 

Amro Bank 

87 JO 

87 JO 





Buehrmann T 

101 JO 

102.70 

Coland Hkfg 

32JO 


Elsevler-NDU 

127 JO 

12850 

Fokfcar 

7860 

7950 

Gist BraccxJes 

21650 

218 

Hefneken 



Hoooavani 

42 50 

6250 


61 J0 

61.7D 

Naarden 

4850 

48 

Not Header 

7450 

7450 

NedJJovd 

186J0 

1 B6J0 

Oce VanderG 

35250 

35350 

Pakhoed 

66 JO 



50 

50JO 

Robeco 



Rodamco 



Roilnco 






Roval Dutch 



Unilever 

340 

09^0 

von ommeren 

27.10 

2750 


340 


VNU 

227 

si 

ANP.CBS Gear index : m>a 

Previous : 22]j| 




Brussels 

Z] 

1 ArtMd 


■FTj 


lekoarl 




tackcriii 


■ <1 1 


:obeoa 

/ .I 



£BES 

Bi'v 

3010 


SB-innu^M 


4150 

GBL 

1935 

1955 


levaert 

Kv 

4050 


tabaken 




nlereom 


1 


(redielbank 

9130 

■lf'l 




uv. 'll 


Sac Generate 

1865 

1875 


5ollna 

Hn J 


Scfvav 



Traction Etac 


4140 

UCB 



Unerg 


■jjV£ij| 

Vioille Mcntogne 

KJ 

E^JI 


Previous : ms j? 



II Frankfurt | j 


Hochtief 
Hoechst 
Hoesch 
Horten 
Mussel 
IWKA 
KoH -*■ Sab 
Kars tad I 
KauHtoF 

Kloeckner H-D 


730 77B 

221.90 2 19 JO 
124 124 

195J0 19SJ0 
372 37240 
309.80 302 

340 349 

258 243_50 
29i2Q29i50 
31020 295J0 


Kloeckner Werke 74.90 72 
Krupp Stahl 120 170 


unde 
Luithansa 
MAN 

Mannesmarm 
Muench Rveck 

Nljcdorf 

PKI 

Porsche 

Preuuaa 

PWA 

RWE 

Rhein me tall 
Scnerlm 
5EL 
Siemens 
Tllv 
Veba 


574 543 

23) 23ZS0 
183 182 

224^0 219.90 
1940 1945 
54250 £4840 
465 M2 
14351347''] 
27950 27750 
147 50 14650 
196 197.20 
328 312 

505 487 

356 358 

573 54050 
13L70 130.10 
738 2 3550 


Volkswofienmrk 34558 340 

Wei la 630 633 

Commerzbank Index : 151550 
Previews : 149850 


| Bong Kong | 


AEG-Telcfanken J-2.70 74850 

All lam Vers 1500 1498 

Altana 363 356 

BASF 226^0 224^0 

Bcver 223 222 

BtrvHyoa Bank 38 8 38050 

Bov verolntbank 399 389 

BBC 269 266 

SHF-Bonk 332 315 

BMW 513 504 

Commerzbank 20750 206 

Cent Gummi ISUO 161 

Daimler^eni 997 997 

Deeussa _ 36* 3*4 

Deutsche Babcock 179 7 77 

Deutsche Bank 59150 579. SO 

Dresdncr Bank 245 JO 264 

GHH 195 19350 

Hardener 33950 327 


Bk East Asia 
Cfieuno Kona 
China Light 
Green Island 
Hang Seng Bonk 
Henderson 
China Gas 
MK Electric 
HK Really A 
hk Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shana Bank 
HK Telecnone 
HK Yaumatel 
HK Wharf 
Mulch Whampoa 

Hvsan 

mn City 
Jardine 
Jordine Sec 
Kowloon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
New world 
Orient Oversea* 

SHK Prows 
SMrfux 

Swfre Pacific a 
T ol Cheung 
Wan Kwong 
Wheeiock a 
W ing On Co 

Winsor 

World Inn 


2250 

1750 

1S.W 

73)5 

44 

Z125 

9.45 

755 

1050 

35 

555 

7J0 

8.10 

105 

650 

2SJ0 

060 

087 
17 M 
1360 

950 
4450 
7 JO 

5USD. 

1250 

260 

1450 

168 

088 
Susa. 

169 

5.70 

2 


22.10 

17.70 

1SJD 

730 

4335 

2.13 

950 

7.90 

1030 

3550 

535 

755 

835 

3.10 

650 

25.90 

059 

0.83 

tt.70 

13.10 
955 

4450 

7J0 

1250 

260 

2460 

157 

0.90 

167 

5.10 

um 


Nang Seng Index : I546JI 
Prevkhi* : 155083 


I «fohaia»wlmrg | 


AECI 
Anglo American 
Anglo Am Gold 
Barlows 

Bhrvoor 

Buffen 

DeBoers 

Drlefanteln 

Elands 


750 750 
3100 3090 
18450 18800 
7100 UWJ 
1390 1400 
7300 7250 
it55 use 
4925 4925 
1725 1750 


GFSA 

Harmony 

Hlvefd Sftt'l 

Kloof 

Nedbank 

Presstevn 

Rusplal 

SA Brews 

St Helena 

5asol 

West H OKU no 


3050 3225 
2700 2700 
545 S5D 
1975 TLA. 
1035 1050 
5500 5480 
1750 1750 
TOO 700 
3300 3300 
735 755 

4500 4450 


Composite Slock Index : NA 
Previous : 112TJ0 


Lmdw 


AACorp 
Allied- Lyons 
Anglo Am Gold 
ass Bril Foods 
Ass Dairies 
Bordavs 
Boss 
BA.T. 

Beeeham 

SICC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Croup 

Boalj 

Bowoier Indus 
BP 

Bril Home 57 
Brji Telecom 
Brit Aerospace 
Briimi 
BTR 
Bur man 

Cahlo Wireless 
Cadbgrv Schw 
Charier Carts 
Commercial u 
Coro Gold 

Courtoukis 

Daigely 

De Beers • 

Distillers 

Drlefanteln 

FHons 

Pree &| God 

GEC 

GwjAccident 
Glaxo ( 

gBS - *" 

w— 

Hanson 

hanker 

Imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Land Securities 
Legal General 
LlovasBank 
Lonrha 
Lucas 

Marks and 5o 
r/etal Box 
MldlAd Bank 
Nat Wjst Bank 
Panel o 
Phklngton 
Plesse/ 

Pru den lla! 
gP CPI E lect 
Rand tan irin 
Rank 
Reed inil 

Reulors 
gevol Dutch i 
“TZ 

saaic hi 
Sdtnsburv 
SWs Holdings 


SHU Sills 
276 283 

5694a S694- 

226 Z30 


>J8 

374 

584 

321 

338 

218 

34 

506 

277 

197 
350 
553 
288 

198 
371 
215 
343 
XS 
555 


140 
36? 
592 
330 
343 
318 
33 
SB 
282 
200 
360 
548 
293 
1*9 
378 
224 
345 
JIN 
555 
140 
185 
228 
413 
151 
435 
418 
406 

si7iv sim 

345 371 

sim sim 

168 170 

616 625 

228 227 

I3'-i13 31*33 
335 341 


183 

225 

413 

148 

433 

420 


Shell 

5TC 

Sfg Chartered 
Son Alliance 
Tate and Lvle 

Ji* 50 .- 

Thom EMI 
T.l. Group 
Trafalgar Hse 
THF 

Ultramar 
Unilever £ 
United Biscuits 
Vickers 
Wootworth 


70S 730 

94 90 

432 429 

454 444 

458 463 

260 263 

387 402 

383 390 

374 378 

144 148 

206 213 

1045/441019/32 
184 114 

278 

445 47B 


F.T. 38 Index : 1004JW 
Previous : 1920-50 
F.Tjs.b. 180 Index : 1311.48 
Previous : 13B9J0 


j MOeb 

Banco Comm 

22700 23500 

Central# 

ma »■ i 


10250 1D0U 

Cred ital 

2850 3EH 

Erldanla 


Farm Italia 

13300 134H 

Flat 


Gwnerail 


IF1 



47800 4721C 


1788 17BC 


111500109X0 

Medtabanco 

1 290001 25350 

Montadlsan 


OJJwetfl 


Pirelli 


RAS 

k'l 

Rlnascenle 




SME 

K » : 

Snta 

3535 3500 


15010 14510 

5 ter 

3500 3572 

MIB Cerrem index : 1672 
Previous : 1656 

I j 


676 
288 
873 
315 
399 
697 
187 
295 
39* 
684 
419 
153 
370 
153 
508 
392 
654 
410 
248 
140 

677 

1J6 

5731s 573’,! 

400 403 

714 733 

331 335 

45-. 4}*. 

589 594 

70S TOO 

340 3«2 

IWl llITVi 


646 

283 

853 

209 

397 

632 

184 

293 

293 

472 

40® 

151 

373 

147 

503 

392 

454 

410 

265 

143 

472 

132 


Air Liquids 
A Whom All. 
Av Dassault 
Bancalre 
BIC 

Bangrabi 

Bouvgues 

BSM-GD 

Carre lour 

Cttargeuri 

Club Med 

Deny 

Du max 

Eil-AquHalno 

Europe I 

Gen Eaux 

Hochciie 

Lo Faroe Cop 

Leorand 

Lesteur 

lOreai 

Martell 

Mtnra 

Merlin 

Michel In 

MOet Hannessv 

Moulinex 

Ocel den tale 

Pernod Ric 

Perrier 

Peugeot 

Prlntemns 

Rodlotectin 

Redouts 

Roussel Udal 

Sanell 

skis Reuignor 
Telemecan 
Thomson CSF 
Toiol 


594 595 

301.10 303 

1145 1150 

448 64 

519 522 

1650 1656 

761 755 

2273 2290 

WB TW4 

686 694 

500 509 

1440 1439 

821 835 

20040 301-70 
753 759 

646 450 

1435 M35 

523 521 

3123 2154 
625 430 

2345 2420 

1634 1445 

1720 1742 

214 2170 

1315 1219 

1940 1984 

7B 77 JO 
742 750 

719 728 

484 489 

4,1 

294 2 9930 
303 304 

1485 15K7 

1520 1901 

670 471 

1440 1445 

258000 26S0 

551 554 

229.90 231 


A«efl Index : 269.57 
Previous : HM1„ 
CAC Index : 2ZU8 
Prertoui : Z2L29 


Cokl Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Neave 
Haw Par 
inchcapa 
Mai Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 
OUE 

Shangri-la 
Sim# Darbv 
S'pore Land 
SVwre Press 
S Steamship 
51 Trading 
United Overseas 
DOS 

Straws Times led Index : 75BJ7 
Previous : 75942 



Stockholm 


AGA 

Alto Laval - 

Aseo 

AStra 

Allas Copco 

Boliden 

ElecdroJux 

Ericsson 

Essetre 

Handelshanken 

PnarmockJ 

Saab- Scania 

Sandvik 

Skanaka 

SKF 

SwsfSItthMcrtch 

Volvo 

AffaersvaerMen 
Previous : 39IL40 


NA. 134 
W 205 
325 326 

430 N.Q. 
122 123 

197 NA. 

143* 285 

^ 557 

370 3715 

178 180 

181 183 

420 N.Q. 
450 440 

#55 95 

226 228 
194 194 

230 232 

Index : 3893*0 


- UfraMtaraZ-ftrl uackrpU 


Syifaey ] 


ACl 

ANZ 

BHP 

Boral 

Bougainville 
Castlemalne 
Coles 
Coma I co 
CRA 
CSR 
Dunlap 
Eiders ixl 
ICI Australia 

Magellan 

MiM 

Mver 

Nat Atru Bank 
News Carp 
N Broken Hill 
Poseidon 
CHd Coal Trust 
Santos 

Thomas Nation 


2-78 2M 
482 *UHt 
7.16 7.14 

3B2 174 

1 J0 IJO 
B 8 
■tSS KX2 
m ijq 
5 M 5J3 

3.15 120 

2J3 2J2 

3.43 135 

209 20» 
23S 3J0 

2M 248 
17D 147 

440 4JJ4 
6J90 680 

257 258 

4.15 450 

170 144 

£40 3.43 

271 373 

358 355 
446 442 

IJO 1J2 

:: 95640 


Tafcya 


Akol 

Asahl Chem 

Asanl Glass 

Bank of Tokvo 

Bridgestone 

Canon 

Casio 

ciroh 

Dal Nippon Print 
Dalwa HoiKe 
Dolwa Securities 
Fdnuc 
Full Bor* 


410 HO 

781 784 

785 7/9 

781 780 

535 S» 
950 920 

1»0 1400 
433 435 

1050 KHO 
£25 m 
896 895 
791G SOSO 

150 * m 


| dose 

Pre*. 

1 Full Photo 

1970 

1950 

FulltSU 

884 

870 

Hitachi 

sn 

is* 

Hitachi Coble 

560 

559 

Hondo 

■iftj 

1340 

Japan Air Lines 


5550 

Kollmo 

481 

468 

Komwl Por.ur 

1810 

1810: 

Kawasaki Steel 

147 

147 

Kirin Brewery 

715 

717 


570 

560 

Kubota 

380 

382 

Kvocera 

3590 

3550 

Matsu Elec Inds 

1250 

1230 

Matsu Elec Works 

654 

841 

Mitsubishi Bonk 

1480 

1500 

Mitsubishi Chem 

478 

486 

Mitsubishi Elec 

350 

339 

Mitsubishi Heavy 

387 

387 

Mitsubishi Corn 

627 

620 

Mitsui and Co 

416 

415 

Mlteukosbl 

687 

689 

Mitsumi 

72S 

709 

NEC 

M4 

920 

NGK Insulators 

845 

-842 

NlkkoSeC 

785 

790 

Nippon Kogaku 

919 

910 

Nippon Oil 

764 

774 

Nippon Sleel 

166 

169 

Nippon Yusen 

302 

300 

Nissan 

623 

620 


1160 



980 


Pioneer 

1740 

1700 

Ricoh 

640 


Shore 

810 

805 


7SJ! 


Shlnetsu Chemical 

715 

681 


3730 

3590 

Sumitomo Bonk 

1760 

1750 

Sumllome Chem 

252 


Sumitomo Marine 

700 


Sumitomo Metal 

152 

197 

Taiset Corp 

341 


Taisho Marine 

561 

564 

Tafeeda Chem 

666 

875 

TDK 

4130 


Tail In 

481 

482 

Tofik) Marine 

B92 

MM 

Tokyo Elec. Power 

2010 

TQlff 

Tappan Printing 

788 

788 

Tarov Ind 

512 

yip 

Tasnnxi 

345 

*CTR 


1160 


Yomoichl Sec 

786 

786 

NDdcel/DJ. Index 

12S19JU 

Prev leas : 1M5&72 



New Index : TSWJ« 


Previous : IWU9 



1 Zurtrti li 

Ad la 

41IQ 


AkiswiSM 

760 


Autopfton 


6Q SO 

Bank Leu 



Brawn Boueri 

1795 


CtaaGeigy 

Cred II Suisse 

3440 

3390 

Electro -rats 

3450 





Inlerdlscount 

3<rri 


Jocob Suchard 

7025 


Jelmaii 

2850 


Landis Gvr 

2140 


Maevenoick 

5000 





Oerilkon-B 



Roche Baby 

10150 


Sondaz 




4700 





Surveillance 



Swissair 

1445 








Swiss Volksbank 

1925 


union Bonk 

4240 


Winterthur 

5375 


Zurich Ins 

2390 

2410 

SBC index : S20.W 
Previous : 51546 



w.a; net quoted: 

NA: 


ovoi table; Xd; eiMflvidend. J 


Sax. 10 


Canadian stoda da AP 


Sales Stack 
1400 AbH Prce 
3440 Adfllco E 
1300 Agra indA 
117421 Alt Energy 
5400 Alta Nat 
44803 AlBOma SI 
517Argcen 
6100 Alca I f 
220 BP Canada 
51478 Bank BC 

52406 Bank NS 

59147 BarrlCfco 

1200 Baton A F 
2292 0 Bonanza R 
12380 Bra tome 

710 Bromaleo 
22089 BCFP 
20445 BC Rh 
19347 BC Phone 
1900 Bnmswk 

2150 Budd Can 
37429 CAE 
1300 Cad Frv 
3soo compeau 1 
3951 C NOT West 
ioooc Packrs 
3940 Con Trust 
2400 C Tung. 
50CGE 

37244 Cl Bk Cam 
46172 CTIre A I 
2500 C Util B 
IBM Cora 
4499Celanese 
20900 Centrl Tr 
100 CHUM 
TiMClneplex 

8300 C Dlstb A 
1BS300 CDhrtb B I 
5*58 CTL Bank 

170 Conwest A 

1511 Caseka R 
19M Canron A 
29800 Czar Ras 

isssssr 

WttDenlsonAp 

7200 Denison B f 

3350Devefcon . 
4620DicfcnsirAf 
820 Dlcknsi B 
102741 DofOSCO 
2 Donohue 
1340 Du Ponl A 
100250 Dvlex A 
1200 Elcttxtm X 
8300 Equity 5 vr 
1300 C Falcon C 
67000 Picnbntge 
7200 Fed Irid A 
700 PCHy Rn 
1634 Gendls A 
1800 Groc Comp 
177545 Geoerude 
3750 Gibraltar 
3SWQ GakScon f 
so Goodyear 
1250 Graft G 
113970 GL Forest 
17* Grey hnd 
2000 Hawker 
3468 Haves D 
7200 Herts Inti 
17329 H Bay Co 
2731* Imaico 

3300 indol 
,674 inland Gas 
13402 mil Them 
4573 Intpr.PIpe 
400 Ipsao 
3392J Jon nock 
200 Kelsey K 
73 Kerr Add 
4857 Labatf 
MLOni Cem 
1340Laeana 
3000 Lu monies 
400MDSH A 

2000 MICC 
6413 M<lan.H X 
2444 Marl Umaf 
4744 MWlund E 
33765 Mai son A t 

2300 Matson B 

2203 Murphy 
1W64 Noronoo 
30610 Nor con 


High Low Close Cha 
HW 20*9 2046 
SWA lBVk 1IW+M 
5866 OH 856+ V, 
81914 1836 1966 — 14 
S14V6 14V6 Utt 
120 19M> 1914— 1 

S21 21 21 + 14 

S1OT4 10% 10% 

S33 33 33 

SPA 5 5 — W 

113% 1314 13% 

180 178 179 +4 

SI 914 1VW 191k 
405 395 395 —10 

460 ass 450 + 5 
S17 17 17 — % 

*9% 9Vx 9V>— 14 
229 226 229 +4 

S2416 2496 2414 
S14K> 14V6 UVa 

530 U. 7A, 30+96 
SI 5ft 1554 1 514- 14 
SI214 12 1214 + W 

S28 Z7W 28 + Va 
S2314 23 23 — k 

S34% 34% 3484 
54216 4146 4214 + 46 
814 14 14 + 14 

S61VS 61 Vj 6196—7 
S3M 3816 3814 
S944 9V4 944 

51744 1744 1744 
817 16Vj 17 + Vfe 

5946 9Va 944+ 14 
115ft 15ft 15ft + ft 
53814 3814 38U 
510ft 1014 10ft- 14 
8746 7ft 744+ ft 
57ft 7ft 714— ft 
CT1K lift lift 
58ft 8ft Bft+ft 
315 310 310 —5 

51414 1414 1414— ft 
235 220 225 —10 

415 405 405 —10 

405 46® 400 —ID 

51 2ft T21A 12ft— ft 
512ft 12 12 — ft 

5516 5 514 + ft 

S7ft 746 7ft + ft 
57ft 7ft 7ft+ ft 
52696 25ft 26 +ft 
816ft 16ft 16ft— ft 
522ft 2214 22ft 
81344 13ft 13ft 
58ft 8ft ” 

58 7ft 

515ft 15ft 1596+ ft 
52014 20 20 

S12ft 1296 12ft — ft 
81214 17 1214 + ft 

83296 32ft 3216+ ft 
SUM 10ft 10ft— ft 
370 360 3*0 —5 

SSft Bft 8ft— ft 
57ft 7ft 7ft— ft 
54294 4294 4114+314 
513ft 13ft 13ft 
nW4 10ft leva— 194 
523 23 23 + ft 

52096 2014 aft— ft 
512 lift 12+14 
522ft 22ft 2214— 14 
523ft Oft 23ft + ft 
526 25ft 25ft— ft 
Slfift 1*14 1614— ft 
522ft 2214 22ft + 14 
■9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 
54214 42 42 — ft 

81414 1414 1414— ft 
8104 16ft 16ft— ft 
540ft 40ft 40ft 
515ft 1416 15ft + ft 
528 27ft 27ft 
81414 1494 1414 
811ft lift lift— ft 
518ft 18ft 18ft 
51714 1714 1714 
4TO 405 405 —10 

812ft 12ft 12ft 
51514 15ft 1594+ ft 
375 375 375 

518ft 17ft 1796— ft 
8181 4 18 18 

523ft 23% 23ft + ft 
816ft 16ft ■ 1614- 14 
SUft 15ft 16ft- ft 


8ft + ft 
8+14 


153212 NvoAlfAf 

500 NCT.-3C0 W 

39247 NuWst sp A 
3164 Ock wood 

90OOshaiw At 

1350800 PoeWAtrln 
9300 Pomour 
42300 PonConP 
3051 Pembina 

*0 Pino Point 

28707 Placer 
lOOProvtao 

3885351' 

11750 Redeem 
918 ReedSt 1 Sp 
500 Rogers A 
1734 Roman 
103OO Ro t h ma n 
1231 Scootra 
1 140 Sco its! 
27779 sears Can 
29139 Shell Can 
56760 Sherritt 
loo Stater B t 
18200 5auttiam 
6316 Soar Aero I 
30675 S telco A 
1960?SulPlro 
7700 Steep R 
800 Tan> 

38® Teck Cor A 
54856 Took BF 
300 Tex Can 
32370 Thom N A 
76810 Tor Dm Bk 
17165 Tartar B f 
14M Traders A f 
325 T m3 Ml 
17400 Trinity Res 
25540 TmAHo UA 
24308 TrCan PL 
2526 Tr! mac 
107357 Triton A 
<M Trizec A f 
54000 Turbo 
ugo Unicom At 
470 Un Cartttd 
3850 U Entprlse 
416 U Kano 
BWO Verstl A t 
jaovestgron 
Basoworaair 
WWeMwod 
500 Westmin 
xrn Weston 
462S9 woodwd A 
67900 Yk Bear 
Total sales! 


TSE 300 Index: 


Nigh LewCleseCNge 

ft 

20 

45ft-Jft 
6'+- ft 
3214 +. W 
14ft— ft 
,8ft + ft 1 
34'4— U 

+ - !*■ 

25ft— 


1614 6ft 
520 20 

49 45ft 
56ft 6ft 
53214 32 
515 lift 
58ft 8 
53491 33ft 
517 17 

52314 2314 
S25U. 24ft 

S2Sft 25ft 

475 465 465 4^0 
5994 9ft 9ftf .ft 
514ft 13ft 13&-ft 
S38ft 38ft 38U 
81219 12 12 + ft 

513 12ft 13 

36 36ft + ft 
55ft 5ft 5ft . 
*j» 2BH 39 + ft 
59ft 7 9 — ft 

5269k 25ft 25ft — ft 
58ft BVe 8ft— ft 
517ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
814(4 13ft 1414+ 9k 

aMH+Vk 

227 220 220 —7 

OT 280 300 +25 

519 19 19 — Vi 

51514 1594 1514 ■" 

53214 32ft 32ft 
52214 22 22'4+ ft 

524ft 24ft 24'i— ft 
S2Bft 28 28ft— ft 

31ft 2lft=ft 
510ft 10ft Iffft — ft 
■ 

^ J* 

gun 2G9. 

*sr T !*■_, 

^ iSfe .sr^- 

'2, isE+Vk 
*£“ 44 ,4 ti5 n 
sli* 20^ 

S16ft 16ft 

514 14 
890 89ft 

SI 9ft ]9ft 
58'4 7ft 
1790.137 shares 



S , +1 ft 
ft— Vj 


14 

89Vj 

1914 

BV> 


t 


Close 

176&80 


Previgas 

2.780.70 


MMlread 


Sept. 10 


fato Slock 
1S2M Bank Men! 
BontbrdrB 
^OCBPak 

n 28 09 Dorn TxtA 
22K0Gaz Metro 
fJJWNatBkCda 
Power Com 
Royal Bank 
J llTSStelnbraA 
Total Soles 1761,1 64 


Industrials Index: 


Sift 21 1? % . 

Slflt 9%. |qi, 

■17 16ft imL 
jiftinT 
^14 35* JJ* 

S17JV 17ft irw., 
2 1 * 1 3liv 


Ciose 

11140 


Prevtogs 

11483 


Seize flie waft. 


The bteniatkoal Hmtld Tribune." 


0 . ^cws to the World’s 
Most Important Audience. 




VI 




■ i 

■ \ 


i- ■! 

1 . i 

i 

T 4 

» 




•? 




3y>"-i 


aasaaswwiiwiLj'.ft >;;« 




f 












_• •r-*' 

- V v 

‘■s 




- V ■> -'-7.:.-- 




.ri'K* 








°* Fd- 

atiamoebaL. 

.^SK^swara 

i.s^e days are c ranin g 

- *“<! ou'd’No- 


«* revested, starting 
aatcfacs £ai5S 

rag^j^resk foar years of pian- 

rffl U fasia hOity of soccer is such 
^tuaitanc^ dtaxapaoQ of the oonti- 

Z v . BOB HUGHES 

ini- potentially wodd master 
o £ the cre ative are of the game, is 
'tecptensiairiy desperate to even 
Team Mexico. 

* /-Defeat for the French in East 
j Germany on Wednesday would 
leave Michel Hatini and company 
•stragpng- behind the GronpFoto- 
leaflets, Bulgaria and Yugoslavia, 
'despite the apparent advantage of 
tame games to come in fiuii 
1° ffnth. France, having had ev- 

eiytiung its own elegant way 
.through out 1984 — everything on 
amch«Ml —has begun to travel 
baflly/ Inspiration deserted les 
bkues m Sarajevo, where they held 
Out for a goalless draw agains t Yu- 
goslavia, and in Sofia last May 
where they were drawn into an ill 
-advised roughhouse and soundly 
beaten in a 2-0 defeat. 

East Germany is neither as hard 
tv as competent as Bulgaria, yet 
France should outwit such iwmc 
with a flourish, not stoop to scram- 
bling far dangerous draws. 

' Three men — none of them Pla- 


Meanwhile, Poland and Belgium 
play the deciding matrih of Group 
One. The winner goes to Mexico, 
the loser faces Holland in a played. 


SCOREBOARD 

I Baseball 

ftjmday’s Major League line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
p^rtft m« Ml 602—3 V 1 

Toronto 1 H m B3»~5 H 0 

MM bar, Seherrer IB) and Parrish; Kay. 
Hank* (91 and Whitt w— Kanr, 1M. I Muh- 
tar, 0-L Sv— Hanks (10). HRs— Oatrolt, Pw- 
rltfi (25 J. Leman (I4J. Taranto. FMdr (8), 
Bsfl (20). I ora (5). 

Ml nneiola . 000 210 900—5 9 0- 

□riaaott HH dm mlj a m 

BuWmbp ood Lxmdmr; Bamtlatar, SoDIntr 
15). Aoosta 19) ana SJcInner. W— Butdtor. to- 
ut L, — Bannteter, 6-11 HR* — Minnesota, 
Goetll 2 (16), Hrtwk (10). 

Mew Vert 000 200 M 5—0 16 .0' . 

Milwaukee 610 0H 010 M H I 

(10 Imlnes). 

' Bystrom, SMrfw IS}. PUher (51. Rtu hllt 
(B) and HattevJWynegar (10) i Haas.Searaee 
(7). GOtson nmanalMa am. W—fUohettl, W. 
L— Soaraoe, W. HR— New Vorfc, WinfiaM 
(Mi. Paananiia (10). 

■KOnatCtty • OMfOttfO-* 3 1 
ColHornlo 060 Ui TZx— 7 7 0 

Sabemaean. Hutanwmn (0) and Woman; 
Canejetarto, Corbett (0) and Boone. W— Csn- 
detarta 5-1. L-Sabertnoen. 1*6, HRs— CaH- 
fomia R. Janes (21). SconJer* (2). Kansas 
City. Martov (14). 

Tenw 000 001 630—8 6 t 

Oakkmt 001 000 000—1 S 1 

Russell, Harris (U and Skmsht.- Bhlaoa. 
Ontlvom* (4), Allwrton l9)ondTetttolon.W— 
Fbmen. *1 tr-Onflwiia, 1-1 5v-Hanto(*). 
aM — Oakland. Conseco 11). 
ctevsi u arf jHmmm-rn # 

Seattle 300 W1 011 002-0 7 1 

(12 kwitnae) 

WBddell. Read (6). Romero (0). Ruhto (S). 
Thomason (TD.van Ohlen (12) and WBIard.- 
Lanaston, MlratxOa («). Lawfco (7), Vanda 
Bera «). Lons «). Nunes llOJ.ToWk (11) and 
Scott. VaHe 110). W— ToW*. 1-0. 1 — Thoma- 
son, W. HR»— Seattle. Tltainas P0). Preeley 
071, ADavta 06). D Henderson 021. Clave- 
-■and, Castillo 2 IB). 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
e«s»mvMoa 

w L PcL GB 

Toronto 86 SI 62* — 

tSSTork M S2 Al« IVi 

OoWmont 71 ^ 

Detroit 71 AS SO. VO0 

bK 67 M AV3 18* 

Oewtand 40 » jss 

Weal owbioe 

Kansas Ctty 77 50 Mi — 

SSSUr 77 . 60 * 

Chicago 68 M JOS 9 

sr s ;s*» 
s s s ® 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

"-"TV PCL « 

^ H - 

SL Louis n « ' 

S SSS Lln «tf J»>» 

65 70 681 17 

W 90 -323 38 

W 1-1 wed Wild- „ ^ 

” 63 ^ » 

Hoirton S 77 630 21W 

B 82 J3 ^ 

Son Prancn« ** 


Transition 

BASEBALL 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
SMMOOD ho bis ms l 4 1 

C lndne i A l 000 001 101-41 1 0 

Druvedcv, MeQiUtn (7), eosssoe (t) and 
Bochy; McGomoorv Franco (V) end Diaz. 
W— Franco. 12-2. L-Gassago. M. 
sob Freec fao e m m Me—* l i 
Heextoe UO T 20 osx— 1 11 0 

Hantn tab o r. Minton (5). mxiovU (7) and 
Nodes ; Scott. DIPIno (0). Smith (9) and Bai- 
ley. W— Scott. 167. Li— (tammakcr. 4-1L Sv— 
SmWt (22). HR— Son Frzmdsea Nodes f IK 
U» Anodes ' . 000 120 0S1—9 13 2 

AHotlla 000 101 401—7 10 2 

. Welch, Howell It}. Nledwtunr (7), Horton 
(7). Powell (I) and setasda; Barker, Came 
(« 1 . Smith (B), Sutter (7). Garber (9) and Ben- 
edict Ceroae (8). W— Horton. 1-0- L— Sutter. 7- 
7.Sv— Ptjwefl a). HR* — Lai Aneefes. £ctov 
cta It). Marshall OK. Atlanta Hubbard IS). 
CMcm 2NOO0D00-S f 0 

SL Lams 100 000100-1 8 0 

Fontenot Barter [6).MerMnh 19) anti Da- 
vta.; Kapahhe, Keauab UO, Beaver Ui.wor- 
reU (0) tmd Nieto, Porter 00. W— FantetMt.6- 
0>L TCeesb lre. 109. 


Football 

MStandm^ 


Now Enebmf 
Buftato 
Indianapolis 
Miami 
H.Y. Jets 

Houston 

pirtssaran 

Ondnnotl 

Cleveland 


AMERICAN COMFHRHMCH 
East 

W L TPtt PF 
shml l . D O 1600 2 


Kamos arv 
la. Raldera 10 0 LBOO 

SOn Diego 10 0 1000 

Seattle 10 0 UJOO 

Denver 0 1 0 JlOO 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
East 

Dallas 10 0 UNO 

N.Y. Giants ) 0 0 3-K* 

Si. Louis 1 0 0 1JN0 

ptiltadelPhta 0 1 0 JNO 

wasWnahin 0 I 0 J»9 


W L T Pet PF PA 
I. 0 0 UNO 26 20. 

0 1 0 JOIN 9 14 

0 1 0 JNO 3 45 

ff l 0 NOO 23 26 

0 1 0 JO0O 0 31 

Central 

1 0 0 1000 26 73 

10 0 UNO 45 3 

0 1 O JNO 24 20 

0 1 0 JNO M 27 

West 

1 0 0 UNO 47 27 

10 0 UNO 31 0 

10 0 UNO 14 * 

1 0 0 UNO 20 W 

0 1 0 JNO 16 20 


Q D UNO 44 14 

0 0 LHN 21 0 

0 0 1JN0 27 24 

1 0 JNO 0 21 

t 0 JMJ 14 44 


Chicago 
Detroit 
Minnesota 
Green Bay 
Tampa Bay 


0 UNO 30 28 
0 UNO 20 27 

0 UNO 26 21 

0 JOO 20 26 

0 800 30 31 


College Top-20 

The TOP Twenty learns la Me Aseedahd 
press cofleee fbatbotl poll. «*i l «*«■ 
votes la p etenWiesB * . seam record, MNd 
points based on M-19-W, etc. ood tat week* 


yatfoodl Lao®® 0 . 

no and Michael Pbedw. warm. 
FOOTBALL 

NaManM FooftaBUwu^ 
INNESOTA^-P fa ced 

eh Muncie. rannlno back. 

■a suspension. 

HOCKEY 
tiatjanal Hector 

sr, bv one __ Halldv 


Record Ph Pva 
l^wbum (16) WJJ * 

Z-Oklattocna (28) WH) MU I 

XFtorldo (3) S 

^southern Oal (6) )*0 WO 0 

SJwa 13) Si i 

6J9D. Method! Sl (2) 1JO « J 

7J®lorMa Slate " 

IQIttohanta State 1*0 7fl « 

h?** - st 15 

VLNotre Dame «« « M 

lAArkamas 0 ^° 15 

lLBrfotwn Yowto »* • 

l7J»arvtand M-0 » ’ 

lENebraska fji ’? 

19.lllbitris ME 796 11 

SOAlalwme 74W) 173 

The UMied Press intereeHoeM Beard of 

Mpine ysH s ewd i e cmtls lnsuiSulhessa. 

u (or second, ett), and prs nasott rteddae: 
irOUahoma (»MW» » ! 

a. Auburn (HI n-°) ^ \ 

X southern Cal IS) (W * 

a. onto State (1) 

• Florida Stale (*) (HI f*P 

A OkMemo Stale H) 0-0) 

7. Iowa (tM» Zn-l 

0. UCLA (IE) ?2 ll 

y. pen Slate (T« *JJL 

10 . Loutslona Sfato lM) Wll 

li south Cerallon (241) 106 H 

11. ' N&tre Dome 100) 

is. Brlenam vouna n-« !“ 7 

14. Nebraska IW» 

,5. Arkansas («» *7^ 

il Alabama (M) * 

17. west viralnio (14» 51 J 

ia Maryland (6-U £ 0 

19. FIM (W> 5 “ 

» Texas !8-0) W * 

W«h the AmeHcnn 
i cuadirt Assodottov Mam# «m 

sSswaassss 

^ soumw" 


COLLEGE 

CRA — Named jq MPh ^ P unleoW 

oml ** Ml Z£Zi %??£**' *« 

na tram F^uerv W <■ 

In a ear accident. as*. 

- nci-rv OF TEXAS— AAn puncca * 

Jrec*lvb rB ll lBW ®2^atid < w^'5w 

vntorv Monday «md w«' » 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEIVIBER 11, 1985 


SPORTS 


Ji ‘■J'l^.vjsa 


Page 15 


S Soccer Matches 
nrn e the Strong 

e dupe pf p . . y~S 

gc for the log* ““*1 be careful after be- 
lli the clarity of f°r dissent in Sofia — 

^ ^S«fcByWhfl C wearelSbyp- 
^ to go cj^y how Z rtL by ^ ““^Jd, we forget 
“re asaueddf re f CDt »*dify of French 

!>* libtraKd tixn Ut 

sctic and dect. v' 

5. -r **** cannot create with abandon 

lad mid-hfo- ^ oolc irig over yonr slioul* 

sealed, star ring ^'pl^i, a !, d ^ cnly ’. “naecessarily, 
atebes that can defense ravems its own 

yranofplm- W ^ ^ 

me conn- fullbacks arc bolting For the same 
hole, as sweeper. Bossis. recently 
equaling the national record of 65 
, — _ Bppearances, has possession of (he 

of the 3 >Ql .k ul Baniston has youth. And 

perate^SJS says he will not wah; he 

perate to even p?ays sweeper, his new dub posi- 

> r . .. . _ hop, or nowhere. 

j 111 I* 1 midfidd, the French must 

^ lcomc back ^th rdief Alain 
G'resse, the marvdtxjs Me pocket 
w Group Fonr general who has just played Ws 
t ariw^tf aV ^r 8«ne for Bordeaux. Without 
_ ®J? sse ’ Franc « hast its rhythm in 

em Plans. Sofia; without Giresse, Plarim is a 
Qtortflg had ev- less flamboyant match winner, 
elegant way And in attack, barren even while 
‘ everything on the midfield was winning the Enro- 
>e S u fl to travel pean Championship, there is new 
desened les — or rather resurrected — hope 
mere they held that Dominique Rocfaeteau is near- 
iw against Yu- mg ful] blossom as a goal scorer. So 
ofia last May delicate, so special a talent when 
wn into an ill the mood and the limbs axe sound, 
- Bfld soundly Rochet ca n appears to be a bom 
ri. again marksman now tbyi Paris 

neither as hard Saint Ger main tops the French 


Angels Rout Royals, Trail Only a Hall-Game 



CVwpffcrfJy Our Staff Flan Dispatches 

ANAHEIM, California — Just 
when everybody was begi nn ing to 
call them (he fallen Angels, the 
er st whi le leaders in the American 
League’s West Division have risen 
again. 

Monday night, behind the two- 
hit pitching of John Candelaria and 
Doug CorbeH, the California An- 



bun 

Patrick Battiston: sweeping 
dissent on the French team. 

The draw favors Poland on goals 
scored. 

It will be tight, negative and 
painful for opposing catalysts 
Zbigniew Boniek and Enzo Safa 
Boniek, Poland's captain, has the 
experience and the form of his 
sparkling debut for Roma last 
weekend. Scifo leans cm the experi- 
ence around him but keeps doing 
what is expected of a boy asked to 
inspire mwi, including taking on 
the pivotal role of Belgium's 2-0 
victory over Poland in Brussels last 
May. 

That came jost before the Heysd 
Stadium tragedy that took 39 lives. 
It is perhaps as wd! that the return 
match win be played in Poland, 
away from the shadow of Heysd 
which, with ghoulish insensitivity, 
is apparently now open to coach 
loads of tourists who come to see 
block Z, the wall of death. 

That shadow hovers menacingly 
over Britain, where two World Cup 
qualifiers are to be played. Tues- 
day, Wales was to meet Scotland in 
a Cardiff stadium wired and armed 
with all manner of grotesque mea- 
sures intended to keep die clans 
apart 

The match itself promised heat- 
ed passions, every bit as much a 
decider as in Poland but with add- 
ed fuel Scotland sought revenge 
for a home defeat by the Welsh, 
and Wales nursed a longer griev- 
ance. In a similar qualifier in 1977, 
a French referee gave Scotland a 
penalty and the match - — for a 
handball seen by most to be a Scot- 
tish hand. 

England, a short stride from the 
finals, entertains Romania at 
Wembley on Wednesday. Enter- 
tainment may be diametrically op- 
posite to what takes place. 


City Royals, 7-1, in the first game 
of a three-game series. Craig 
Gerber drove in three runs as the 
Angels, who had led the division 
for more ftn two months, closed 
to a half-game of the Royals. 

“Maybe tonight set the stage for 
the rest of the series,” Candelaria 
said. “We didn’t ploy well on the 
road, but this is a nice way to sum 
the homestand.” 

The Angels have won 23 of their 
last 30 home games. The loss 
snapped Bret SabeAagen’s seven- 
game winning streak and put an 
end to the Royals 1 eight-game win- 
ning streak. 

Candelaria strode out four and 
did not walk a batter over right 


innings in winning his third 
straight. He gave up both-hits, Hal 
McRae’s second-inning double and 
Darryl Motley’s home run in the 
eighth. 

“We were talking the other night, 
‘Let’s hope it’s a nice cool evening 
out in Anaheim,' so tbe bi£ man 
can go a few innings,’’ said the 
Angels’ manager. Gene Mauch. 
“That's exactly what happened." 

Blue Jays 5, Tigers 3: in Toron- 
to, rookie CecQ Fielder hit a tie- 
breaking homer in the second in- 
ning against Detroit, and Geoxge 
BeD and Garth lorg each homered 
in the eighth, helping the Blue Jays 
protect tbeir l^-gamelead over the 
Yankees in the AL East. A four- 
game series between the teams 
starts Tuesday in New York. 

Yankees 9, Brewers 4: Mike Pag- 
liarulo and Don Mattingly each got 
four hits in Milwaukee, with Pag- 
liarulo’s two-run single breaking a 
tie in the 10th when New York 
scored five runs. The Yankees have 
won 10 straight, their longest streak 
since 1968. 

Twins 5, White Sox 0: Gary 


BASEBALL ROUNDIFP 

Gaetri hit two homers in Chicago, 
both lo deep center, and John 
Butcher pitched a four-hitter for 
Minnesota, which has won all four 
games this year in Comiskey Park. 

Mariners 8, Indians 7: In Seattle. 
Gorman Thomas, who earlier hit 
bis 30th homer to break the club 
record, drove in the winning run 
against Cleveland in the 12th with a 
ground ball to left field that was 
recorded as a fielder's choice: sec- 
ond hase was tagged after the run 
scored. 

Rangers 3, A’s !: Wayne Tolle- 
son tripled and doubled in Oakland 
and scored both times on singles by 
Don Slaught to help Texas break a 
six-game losing streak. The loss 
was the sixth straight for the A’s. 

Cubs 3, Cardinals 1: In the Na- 
tional League. St. Louis dropped 
its third straight and fell into a tie 
for first place in the East after los- 
ing to another leTt-handed pitcher, 
Chicago's with Ray Fontenot. The 
Cardinals and the Mets. who were 


idle Monday, begin a three-game 
series Tuesday in New York. 

St, Louis is 23-22 against left- 
handers this season. Fontenot 
pitched five and one- third innings, 
scattering six hits, then Jay Bailer 
checked the Cardinals until, with 
two out in the ninth, he allowed 
two singles. But left-hander Ron 
Meridith relieved and threw one 
piich to Ivan DeJesus, who flied to 
right to end the game. 

The Cubs took a 2-0 lead in the 
top of tbe first inning. Bob Dernier 
lea off with a walk, stole second, 
advanced to third cm Gary Mat- 
thews' single and scored as Ryoe 
Sandberg grounded ont. Keith 
Moreland singled in Matthews. 

Vince Coleman beat out an in- 
field single leading off the bottom 
of the first, was balked to second, 
sidle third — his 92d steal of the 
season — and scored on Tommy 
Herr’s grounder. But that was it for 
the Cardinals. 

Herr, who has hit only four 
homers this season, now has 9! 
RBI — third best in the NL. The 
last major-leaguer to drive in 100 


runs and hit less than 10 home runs 
was the Detroit Tigers’ third base- 
man George KelL who drove in 101 
and hit eight homers in 1950. 

Reds 2, Padres 1: Dave Concep- 
cion's third hit, a single up the 
middle with two out in the bottom 
of the ninth, scored Dave Parker 
from second base to beat San Die- 
go. Pete Rose, one hit shy of break- 
ing Ty Cobb's record, did not play, 
but is scheduled to start Tuesday 
night against San Diego right- 
hander LaMarr Hoyt 

Astros 4, Giants 2: Mike Scott 
pitched seven innings in Houston 
for his 16th victory and Kevin Bass 
and Phil Gamer each got three hits 
against San Francisco. 

Dodgers 9, Braves 7: Pinch -hi tier 
Franklin Stubbs and Mike Mar- 
shall each hit two-run singles dur- 
ing a five-run eighth that gave Los 
Angeles its victory in Atlanta- 

Brian Holton, in his major- 
league debut, got credit for ibe vic- 
tory even though the only batter he 
faced, Terry Harper, got a two- run 
single that put the Braves ahead in 
the seventh. [UP I. AP ) 



Hugh Green of Tampa Bay used a portable air conditioner to cool off during Sunday’s NFL game against the Bears in Chi- 
cago, as tbe temperature on tbe playing field readied 121 degrees fahrenheit. Not rally that, tbe Buccaneers lost 

Jackson Takes Hard Swing at Drug Users 


England, a short stride from the 

finals, enienains Romania at „ . _ , 

Wembley on Wednesday. Enter- LOS ANGELES — Reggie Jack- 
tainment may be diametrically op- was ^ This was bade in 
posite to what takes place. t P J ^ l _ at Springs, 

__ . ., » CaMomia. The baseball player was 

T^reperaisoondtheBr^ wmd u* tiforoia 

tragedymeans (hat no alcohol will AngdTdubhouse. waving a news- 
be served to help anyone get over 

wfaal, in prospect, is ihe most bar- ltwasa m feaIuring 

SaduS-^nnmbi^Mmteh J^SSST """ 

— and what Romania has achieved ‘ ^ u_n 


Redskins Get 
44-14 Shock 
By Cowboys 

The Associated Pros 
IRVING, Texas — The Dallas 
Cowboys said they did not get a 
chance to wish Joe Theismann a 
happy 36th birthday Monday 
night But they gave the Washing- 
ton Redskins’ quarterback a pre- 
sent he wQ] not easily forget: five 
interceptions during a 44-14 vic- 
tory by tbe Cowboys. 

Dallas' triumph, after three 
straight defeats by its biuerest Na- 
tional Conference East rival, 
capped an upside-down opening 
weekend for the National Football 
League, with four of six of last 
year's division champions — 
Washington, San Francisco, Miami 
and Denver — being beaten. 

The Cowboys took a 17-7 lead on 
quarterback Danny White's 55- 
yard touchdown pass to Mike Ren- 

f fro with six seconds left in the first 
half, then broke open the game in 
the third period, intercepting 
Theismann three times and recov- 
n , 9 Anocwad Pw ering a fumble by tunning back 
ame against tbe Bears in Chi- George Rogers. Victor Scott and 
f that, tbe Buccaneers lost Dennis Thurman closed out tbe 
scoring with 26- and 21-yard inter- 
ception returns for touchdowns. 
t The loss was Washington's worst 

to| I (Y a fo/) since a 3B-7 drubbing by Pittsburgh 
■ mAfcL IjoGI g 1 in 1979; Dallas’ points were its 
C/ most since beating Seattle on 

me more, because I feel that the Thanksgiving Day 1980. 


Ha Anaarnd Pnw 


on its last two visits to Lond on - ^ ^ tiie paper and see 

more Prostration -—prompted the JoimLucas, Joe 

BBC to role out frve television cov- McLabTHoDy- 

erage as of msuffiaeot interest. - 

An thn fmnl a f 


Every day we come to the hafl- 


The low attendance may support 
ibis view. Romania comes rein- 
forced with extra defenders, En- 


Pepitone, Denny McLain, Holly- 
wood Henderson, on the front of 
the sports page. What do you have 
to do to gk your name in tbe pa- 



IUTCGU W1U1 BUd uaoiuas, *_u- . 

gland’s response is to emphasize a 

the importance of not losing, to * , ^ 

and m*n fce 
££ ftawly competitive Peter 

This, I suspect, means special at- 




'I get resentful 
when I read about a 
guy telling me how 
he’s reformed, how 
he almost died. 
We’ve all had oar 
chances to bay 
drags/ 

Reggie Jackson 


privilege of making the kind of 
money blacks have the opportunity 
to make in sports is a greater privi- 
lege because, on the outside world. 


“It was a hot night and we were 
hotter. Washington wasn't,” said 
the Cowboys’ coach. Tom Landry. 
Although the Redskins out- 


the percentage of us making (his gained the Cowboys, 369 yards to 
kmdofmoney and bettering our 304. and White was just 14 of 33 for 
families is just not there. 219 yards, many of Washington’s 

-TVtalTOWjfflntofcUtmn ^whe-vtao., 

from Alabama,’' Charles Fmley, w.n. 

then owner of tbe Oakland A’s, D "SS , 

sSlrodup to Se andZe m Ran Fdlcws.BniBales, Scott and 

would like to start out at tbe age of , 

19 with $100,000? That's a lifetime 
dream. And so respect that dream.” j ay Schroeder. 


19 with $100,000? That^ a lifetinto 
dream. And so respect that dream. j a y Schroeder 
Newspapers, Jackson said. ^ ^ g^e ended, the Cow- 
rimuld let the pubhctacw what te boysf fans Sd ring happy birthday 
going on, .“tot the public's also got to Theismann. 


forming, we may help other people 


tendon to20-?«iw!ld Gbeorj^ avmdtoejntoSsnf^aacntoff 
Hflgi, the one genuine Romanian , newsworthy, but I 

physical price for attempting any- JSf.SSld S.'&ffraS? 


financially, it’s not good for you “I would say in all honesty 1 have 
mentally, it’s not good for your been curious, but not curious 
family, it’s not good for you social- enough to take that step. 


to be reminded that it is a minority _ „ , _ A _ , . 

of players doing these things I go ® Eagles Demote Jaworski 

out in public now and introduce Ron Jaworski, the Philadelphia 

myself as a professional athlete, I Eagles’ veteran quarterback, has 

M . . , n , ,, feel like 1 have lo prove that F m not bem replaced by a rookie, Randall 

J would say in aD honesty 1 have adrugaddicL CunninSham.Tl.eAssociatedPress 

*“ c r°?* u U . 1 , n ° l cunous “Tm sure there are great stories reported Monday from PhiLadel- 
ough to take that step. . about drugs, like the stoiy of Ber- pnia. The coach, Marion Campbell, 


thing fancy. 


he’s reformed now, how he lost it, 
how he almost died. 1 mean, come 


« », I .1 ■ 4 ♦11 “vvm uiutp, uav miv -H.VIJ wi pmu, i uv wquu, avuuivu vtuupu^iif 

Iy, it does nothing for you intellec- “And you know, I don’t know nard King, a guy who really has said the change was made because 
toalJy. and there are no vitamins m w { iat ^ ^elTs wrong with our turned around. I know that’s a tbe team must improve its scoring. 

. . . ... court system. Baseball player gets good story. But like I said before, Jaworski, 34, had missed only 

. , V s n .?u stopped for speeding, drunk driv- just because you stop at the drug three games since joining the Ea- 


LA. Rom* I B 0 LOW 20 14 

Allan lo 0 t » " * ■ 

Now ortaom ! ] “ m 2 * 

San Francisco o 1 0 JW 21 26 

Monday's RMlfll 
Dona » 44, waihlnatan 14 


Sure, its only a game thqi are on. Yon had the same chance we nil 
playing- Tell that to Northern Ire- We’ve aD had our chances to 
Sawkstill cEn^ng to hope m En- buy dnig ^ 3 ^ 4 # ^ monc y i 
gjand s group. The Insh must wm hang out till 5 in the morning." 
m Turkey (whereeverybody does So what did he want fotbewer, 

anyway) but are tumbling at the ^ ^ 5^^ 

not write about a Rod 
£500,000 ($659,000). Carew or a Bob Boone, a success 

Finally, in Switzerland, the story, rather than dwelling 00 peo- 
southem Irish and the Swiss com- pie that have been failures with 
pete more in hope than in antidpa- handling their lives and handling 
tion in a group expected to be won success? It’s not that I think ath- 
by Denmark, with tbe Soviet letes need to be patted on the back, 
Union second. because we get enough of that, 

iassasr^tKs; 


idoL Hoe s Hollywool Heudersmi 'cocaine, marijuana. He gets center in Orange County and have gles in' 1977. In Sunday' s~21-0 loss 
saying he had looked for a high, N 0 r r m 25 years old and mak- lunch, I don’t want to read 6,000 to the New York Giants, he was 12 
MmTwin IhTfSSo *“& 500 S rand a year, l get five words on how you reformed, of 25 passing for 137 yards, despite 


ity of Europeans. But by next week- 
end that majority will have been 


to young athletes. 
Jackson contini 


„ . . , . - . - r . jackson continued 1 “They need bnu ««« wiwum. > wuwvi 

dmmuriied as teams ooUiefmige to tbgy s ^ aoo ]^ stay away from never seen marijuana, tha 
discover they tetve lost ™ rt drags, because it’s not good for be a lie. I haven’t seen a lot. 
takes to create life m nme months. ^ health, it’s not good for you I’ve sure seen it 

Berra Testifies of Pirates’ Drug Use 


feeling Well how about the feeling rf^es against me. r gel off. And Please.’ 
of winning a game, the TeeUng of Tm “ ^o-time. three-time offend- 
being around a fnend. the feding ^ No! And Tm stffl getting paid, 

of ^, with3 ( our P ar ? nt V $75,000 a month. Now, are vou 

Talk to tbe people that never gnm , a tell me that Tm wrong? I 
got involved with drugs and find ^ be wrong. I got off, didn’t I? 

iSSrl! uwt about It next tune, aren’t I? 
tried drugs. But I sore learned at a **One of ihese days, Fm probably 
young age that it is not the damn gonna wind up in someone’s base- 
tHing to do. 1 ran say that I’ve never ball frost office. Okay, I bust you 
even seen cocaine. 1 cannot say I’ve two or three times with drugs, I 
never w * n marijuana, that would send you to a rehab center, I hold 
be a lie. I haven't seen a lot of it, but press conferences for you, I lake 


right sacks. 


BlancpaiN 


The Associated Press 


financed by sources outside the cocaine in a folder. We used it,” 


peoples* time. I at down and con- 
verse with you. Try. I send you to a 
psychiatrist, I send you to a doctor. 
1 pay for your medical bills. And 1 
pay you $500,000 a year. Gee. do 
you think, once in a while I can test 
you, to make sure you’re dean? 


PITTSBURGH — New York courtroom. The nine women md He first -met .Strong, be said, in 1a y0Q ^ to ^ m for 


Yankees infidder Dale Berra testi- three men on the pand said they PhfladelpUa hotel suite in 1982 «gur personal lights. Don’t 1 have 
find Tuesday that amphetamines, had not been. when he, Paricer, Afflnojmd Lee nght^Tm paying you half a mil- 


or “greenies,” were available on tire 
Pittsburgh Pirates' 1 979 champ ion- 
ship dub through teammates Bill 
Madlock and Willie Stargefl. 

Berra, who joined die Pirates for 
. the last month of that season, said 
he got the drug from both players. 


naa not oeea. wnen uc, ranter, «uuio auu lax. ri _j, rs 9 p navina vnu half a tnil- 

Berra b^an testifying Monday Lacy, now with the Baltimore On- ^ ■ year . . 

at tbe trial I of 'Cords Strong. 38, a oles. jom«i sever^j^hes to eat JdieJe^testmg. I thSiklfWre 


ship dub through teammates Bill former Philadelphia Phillies dub- food supplied by StargeH 
Madlock and Wuh'e Stargefl. house caterer. Berra said Milner, Pai 


: m testing. I think if you're 

house caterer. ‘ Bora said ^taerr Parker and 

Berra, 27, the son of the Hall of Ucy later joined Jum man adjoin- shoSS’t do thaL But if I 

f S ^oom. wberehe bought cocame ^ reas<mBbh l don , t 
he “had a problrai with cocame from Strong. Berra did not suggest think there’s anything wrong with 

lwrt ua a g nrnild nnlK Ina Uif M aa lla iLni CtnMnll tna rAoraM lrnMU nt — _ _ * . 0 0 



any snven day 1 asseo mm ior one. DaiasmmiBusaicwamewiui m amrag wa» m me rutf* . . ... ... 

StareelL now a coach with tbe Rod Sctmy, a pitcher for the PS- room at Three Rivers Stadium, Another tinng that bothers me, 
Piram. was knows for handing Oflt rales, and John Mflner, then an where the caterer apparently had as a black man, rm very hurt that 
stars to his teammates for out- outfielder for the team. gained access through his friend- n»sl of the people 1 read about 

danHmi nerf onnances ' that vear. In February 1980, Berra said, he shio with Lacy and Parker. involved with drugs are black. 1 am 


mM: ' 

wm- 

’Mmmm 


The day’s testimony was delayed 
while U.S. District Jnd^s Gustave 
Diamond asked jurors m individ- 
ual interviews if they bad been in- 


cocaine. the game I saw him standing in tbe God a fair shake. 

litte r, Berra said, Parker called hallway. 1 said, ‘HeDo.’ My manag- “I’m no angeL Tm not asking 
him into his hotel room “and said cr. Chuck Tanner, said, ’Don't talk anybody to be a saint. But I am 




‘Does tins answer you? 1 He had to that gentleman.’ ’ 


anybody to be a saint But I am 
hurt by the black guys. That hurts 


: r : 3^ej=r;^LQNBoS -Jh 


I 

i 





5 IPJ?PS8ttSDa ?»sr» 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1985 


OBSERVER 

Fading Urban Smarts 

By Russell Baker bin were also unconscious in j 


The Critic as Artist: The Wit of Harold Bloom 


XT TW YORK — Only three 
months living in another 
place, and already I am losing sur- 
vival habits developed during 10 
years as a New Yorker. During a 
brief visit last week, for example; J 
caught myself at 46th and Lexing- 
ton looking up at the beauty of the 
Chrysler Building in a pastel twi- 
light. 

There are three good reasons 
why New Yorkers don't look up: 
the speed, rage and treachery of 
city traffic. Not focusing full atten- 
tion on trucks, buses, taxis and cars 
with diplomatic immunity can be 
tbe death of you. Also, crooks mav 
prey on the unwary tourist, distin- 
guishable by obvious curiosity 
about the marvels around him. 
Also, while dogs don’t use tbe side- 
walks as their personal thunder 
boxes quite so freely as five years 
ago, the custom is still common 
enough tojustify pedestrians' keep- 
ing their minds on their feet instead 
of the stars. 

My walk has slowed down. too. 
Settling in the city in 1974. 1 found 
that to fit in unnoticeably I had to 
accelerate my normal walking 
pace. You had it about right when 
you were hopping along in tbe 
herky-jerky kangaroo style of peo- 
ple in antique newsreels. 

It’s a mystery why New Yorkers 
zip along at Olympic walking 
speed. Possibly it has something to 
do with the mass psychofogycreat- 
ed by an environment where stun- 
ning noise, overcrowding, tension, 
fear, ambition and hyperihyroid 
greed are commonplace. Or maybe 
the New Yorker is so desperate for 
quiet that he subconsciously hopes 
for a fatal head-to-head pedestrian 
collision at the next comer. 

It is a mystery, but I quickly 
mastered that staccato walk when 1 
wanted to qualify as a New Yorker. 
Returning last week, I found I had 
lost it, or maybe had just aban- 
doned iL That would have been 
sensible, for it would make you 
suspiciously eccentric to walk any- 
where but in New York with that 
single-minded, slightly insane air of 
determination. 

I have also lost the New York 
talent not to see —to blind yourself 
to all that does not make you feel 
fine and dandv about being a New' 
Yorker. 1 had It once, but last week 
I kept seeing people who were not 
only clothed most unfashionably 


bui were also unconscious in pub- 
lic. 

The first of them was at 42d 
Street and Vanderbilt Avenue. His 
lower half was on the sidewalk, the 
upper half in the gutter. How many 
people were stepping over or 
around him? To sav 500.000 would 
be overstatement. To say th3t not a 
soul among that horde could see 
him would be uot too far from 
Gospel truth. 

I was appalled that I could see 
him myself. For 10 years I must 
have stepped over ill-dressed peo- 
ple unconscious in public, but I bad 
always managed not to see. Now, 
seeing this one half on the sidewalk, 
half in the gutter, smelly, badly 
dressed, challenging the world to 
reflect that not every sweet, lov- 
able, cuddly new-born babe can 
end up eating lunch on an expense 
account — now I realized why I 
had cultivated the art of not seeing 
them in the old days: 

They did not belong in my New 
York, nor in any New York that 1 
wanted to be associated with. They 
spoiled the ambience. With people 
like that on the sidewalks, how 
could you Teel wonderful about be- 
ing part of the Big Apple, home of 
the big condos and the trendy dis- 
cos, the filthy richos and the beau- 
tiful people with their private per- 
sonal jettos? 

Such people could take the po- 
lish off the Big Apple, could make 
you fed you were living in the Big 
Skunk Cabbage. So you taught 
yourself not to see them. It was 
amazingly easy. In no time at all I 
could milk over and around their 
stupors and never know they were 
underfoot, and this, mind you, de- 
spite my reputation for bang a 
soft-hearted liberal. 

Yet here I was, only three 
months out of New York uniform, 
and suddenly able to see squalor 
everywhere. Sprawled on a push- 
can in Greenwich Village, occupy- 
ing a parking space on the East 
Side, everywhere, the city filled 
with them. 

Some of my old New York in- 
stinct survived, though. Once I felt 
a soft-hearted impulse to drag an 
unconscious form from the middle 
of a thoroughfare to the safety of 
tbe gutter, ihen changed my mind 
upon recalling how testy and prone 
to gunfire New Yorkers can be 
when their serenity is disturbed. 

New York Times Service 


By David Rem nick 

iiashtngtoii Post Scm<x 

N EW HAVEN. Connecticut 
— Harold Bloom, the most 
notorious literary critic in Ameri- 
ca. joins his notorious precursor 
Oscar Wilde in the belief that 
“criticism is the only civilized 
form of autobiography.” 

“Ah! A brilliant sentence!" 
Bloom boomed. “The divine Os- 
car.” The divine Harold. With his 
manner marked, at turns, by a 
scabrous wit and an endearing 
camaraderie, with his uncanny 
ability to talk in shimmering sen- 
tences decorated with Victorian 
furniture, plush nooks and ser- 
pentine hallways. Bloom is a 
Wilde intellect: playful, passion- 
ate and strange. 

In a world in which “serious” 
and “careful” are the highest vir- 
tues. Bloom said of his criticism. 
“I write jokes. I am a comic critic. 
Alas, all I get are solemn re- 
views.” 

One arrives at the home of 
Yale’s literary majordomo to a 
find a rumpled gent slumped into 
a brown leather armchair, sur- 
rounded by a landscape of leafy 
legal pads and literature — a hill- 
ock of Haziitt. a mountain of 
ProusL 

“Conte in, my dear. As you can 
see Fm embarked on a huge pro- 
ject Tm writing two or three es- 
says a week on authors great and 
some noi-so-great for Chelsea 
House. 7he publishers are plan- 
ning on nearly 500 volumes and 
I’U have an essay for each. It’s 
quite insane.” 

Bloom has a family: a wife and 
two grown sons. Bloom has a job: 
He left the Yale English depart- 
ment in 1975 to become the 
school’s only “department erf one, 
professor of nothing.” And 
Bloom has a reputation: a recent 
winner of a MacArthur Founda- 
tion award, a colossus in his par- 
ticular nook of the universe. His 
articles for The New York Review 
of Books and controversial books 
on British and American poetry 
(especially his work on artistic in- 
fluence) have earned him a legion 
of admirers and, he sighs, “an 
endless number of enemies. I am 
the pariah of my profession.” 

Above all. Bloom is a reader, a 

man whose f ulminatin g mind and 
often infuriating work have been 
shaped for nearly all of his 55 










Robert C CWd. AP/T1» WcshngSon Rail 

Harold Bloom: “The texts are there for us.” 


years “by the phantasmagoria of 
reading” 

“I was a crazy reader, my dear, 
an obsessive reader as a child. 
And 1 picked up, no doubt from 
some mad Talmudic ancestor, an 
astonishing reading speed. When 
I am not too borne clown by life 
and mv sorrows, I can read up to 
1,000 pages an hour.” 

Reading Bloom shut his hood- 
ed lids and, by dim of memory, he 
was deep into Milton's “Paradise 
Lost” (“None ever wished it long- 
er.” said Dr. Johnson) or his be- 
loved pre-Raphaelites, Swinburne 
and Rossetti. Reading: Bloom 
sees it “as an act of defensive 
warfare." anything but a passive 
process. His theory of “the anxi- 
ety of influence,” the notion that 
poets write in an Oedipal rage 
against their poetic forerunners to 
create new, original work (a “di- 
vinating triumph over oblivion”), 
is the result of a personal and 
imagina tive reading of English 
and American literature. 

Bloom slouched further into 
the leather and kneaded bis fleshy 
face with his fisL His voice was 
breathy with fatigue, a river of 
sighs. The tone doesn’t change 
much in the course of an after- 
noon. It matters little if the sub- 
ject is his celebration of Dr. John- 
son or W illiam Hazii tt (“1 am a 
pygmy next to them!”) or more 
lancing estimations: of W illiam 
Blake (“once a favorite, alas, 
these days 1 fed he was wrong 


about everything”); of the Har- 
vard English department (“a 
complete disaster”); of U. S. Edu- 
cation Secretary William Bennett 
(“a sublime ass, you may quote 
me on that”): of the critics and 
editors Hilton Kramer, Joseph 
Epstein and Norman Podhoretz 
(“more sublime asses”); of the 
late French critic Roland Barthes 
fTve always called him Roland 
Frou-Frou"). 

John Updike has called 
Bloom's vision, of poetic influence 
“torturous” and many fellow aca- 
demics find his waik wrong or 
overblown. Academia is still a 
world of obsessive discretion, and 
the private critiques, no doubt, 
are much harsher. Bloom referred 
to conservative academics as 
“moldy figs." 

His parents left Eastern Europe 
for the East Bronx. They spoke 
Yiddish and never learned much 
En glish. Bloom, the fifth of five 
children, taught hims elf English 
when he was 5 and soon found 
hims elf “living in bodes.” 

The first poet he loved “deep- 
ly” was William Blake. Shelley, 
Keats, Whitman, Yeats — Bloom 
kept reading. When he was 8 or 9, 
an unde told him there were peo- 
ple who taught literature at places 
like Yale. 

“I knew then that was what I 
wanted to be," Bloom said. “I 
held on to that notion." 

Bloom was shy and struggled at 
“that ghastly place," tbe Bronx 


High School of Science. He did 
not distinguish hims elf until he 

finished first in a state-wide re- 
gent exam and won a scholarship 
at Cornell University. 

He arrived in New Haven for 
graduate school in 1951: “In 
those days Yale was an Anglo- 
Catholic nightmare, an Eliotic de- 
partment dominated by Maynard 
Mack, Louis Martz. Robert Penn 
Warren. . Qeanth Brooks, W.K. 
WimsatL It was the New Criti- 
dsm of the TS. Eliot persuasion 
with their crypto- religious neo- 
Christian ideology.” 

The New Criticism (fairly old 
by now but still predominant in 
many universities) saw the poem 
as a self-contained unit — a 
“well-wrought urn" in Qeanth 
Brooks* phrase — to be examined 
with minimal reference to history 
or personality. As a graduate and 
junior faculty member at Yale, 
Bloom saw “the need in myself to 
overturn Eliot and reinstate the 
Romantic tradition in American 
poetry.” His first hooks were 
studies of Shelley. Blake. Words- 
worth and other 'Romantics. 

Tbe idea of criticism as a sub- 
jective, creative Form was held in 
low esteem among tbe New Crit- 
ics. They saw criticism as a kind 
of “handmaiden” to verse, an aca- 
demic exegesis, preferably prac- 
ticed by poets. 

“But that was just ridiculous.” 
Bloom said. “Haziitt was not a 
poet neither was Rusltin or Pater. 
Oscar Wilde was a very bad poet 

“Criticism doesn’t have to be 
creative; but obviously criticism is 
a genre or subgeure of literature. 
It is part of an art To say, auto- 
matically, that a bad minor poet is 
part of literature and a great critic 
is not is obviously preposterous. 
T hink of Haziitt and Mrs. Fdida 
Hemans, who were contemporar- 
ies. Mrs. Hemans had the same 
reputation in her day. especially 
after her tragic early death, as the 
abominable Sylvia Plath has in 
ours. Mis. Hemans could not 
write her way out of a paper bag, 
nor could Sylvia Plath. But Haz- 
litt! He was a genius.” 

Bloom has had limited experi- 
ence outside of the critical office. 
He wrote a novel called “The 
Flight to Lucifer” and now says, 
“it was a mistake. I'd get it out of 
the libraries if I could. It is like my 
great precursor Dr. Johnson who 
went to see his own play and left 


after the first act muttering. T 
thought it had been better.’ ” And 
as for poetry. Bloom says, “I have 
never written a line in my life. For 
me. poetry is a sacred threshold 
guarded by demons and one must 
not cross iL” 

Bloom looks at one of his earli- 
er books on Romanticism, “The 
Visionary Company.” as merely 
“a useful trot, nothing extraordi- 
nary.” His leap into a highly per- 
sonal, creative criticism came in 
the mid-1960s, and with “The 
Anxiety of Influence,” published 
in 1973. “The nastiness with 
which it was received was unprec- 
edented,” he recalled. 

If Bloom is the best-known crit- 
ic in the United States, Yale is 
certainly the most controversial 
department, a center for a score of 
critical movements: feminists, 
Marxists, semiotidans. 

The most visible of Yale’s theo- 
rists are the practitioners of de- 
construction, a philosophical way 
of looking at literature influenced 
by the work of German Idealism. 
Nietzsche and recent French phi- 
losophy. Geoffrey Hartmann, 
John Hollander, J. Hillis Miller, 
Jacques Derrida and the late Paul 
de Man. known as “the Decon- 
structionist mafia,” have all pub- 
lished work that looks at the lin- 
guistic assumptions of a poem, 
as king questions about tbe funda- 
mental meaning of everything in a 
text. Nothing is to be taken for 
granted. 

“I've been called a Deconstruc- 
tionist, you know, a member of a 
so-called Gang of Four or Five, 
but I have never been infected 
with any of the French diseases,” 
Bloom insisted. “It should be 
dear by now to younger Decon- 
structionists, to purple-haired se- 
miotidans and other reception- 
ists. that I am purely an American 
and Eme rsonian phenomenon. 

“I tell my students, following 
the divine Oscar, that there is no 
relation between literature and 
society. No one can bear to hear 
that. I tell them that what we do 
as teachers and critics erf litera- 
ture has no imim-Hi-nre social rele- 
vance whatsoever. 

“The student or reader is to 
consider himself or herself the 
text, and all received texts are 
secondary. Poems matter only if 
we matter. The texts are there for 
us, not us for them.” 


PEOPLE 


Helen Bayes Presides ! ; 
As O’JVoff Home Op&ts 

Fourteen years after her List 
suae role, as' Mary Tyrone in Eu- 
gene ONears “Long Day * 
neyinto Night “ Helen Hayes visit- 
ed the house in Danvilk. 
California, where O'Neill wrote ms 
finest plays. She went to the small 
community' 30 miles 1 50 kilome- 
ters) east of San Francisco as host- 
ess fora supper benefiting the non- 
profit Eugene O’Neill Foundation 
and celebrating the opening of 
O’Neiirs former home. Tao House, 
to the public. Recalling “Long 
Day’s Journey." which she called 
“the great plav of our whole histo- 
ry.” Hayes said that in playing the 
role she felt as though “I had il w 
hands the sou! of Eugene O’NTIil. 
O'Neill and his wife, Cariocta Mon- 
terey O’NeflL designed and built 
Tao House after he won the 1936 
Nobel Prize in Literature. It was 
there that be wrote “Long Day's 
Journey," “A Moon for the Misbe- 
gotten” and “The Iceman Com- 
eth.” 


From Paul Newman, at 60 the 
youngest to Cary Grant and Isaac 
Bashevis Stager, both SI. McCalFs 
magazin e has offered its selection 
of the 10 sexiest American men 
who arc 60 or older. Ronald Rea- 
gan, 74, made the list, as did Frank 
Sinatra, 69. Joe DiMaggio, 70, 
John Huston. 79. Norman MaSer, 
62, John Forsythe, 67. and U$£a- 
cocca, 60. McCall's called Singer 
“the Frank Sinatra of Nobel laure- 
ates." 


Brian Urquhart, 66. the senior 
British official at the United Na- 
tions. has received the Distin- 
guished Peacemaker Award for his 
work in the Middle East and Cy- 
prus. Urquhart, 66, is the second 
recipient of tbe award given by the 
International Peace Academy. 
Lieutenant General EXJVL Bums 
of Canada, who commands the UN 
Emergency Force in the Middle 
East, was the first The academy, a 
UN institution, was founded in 
1970 to develop the skiDs of mili- 
tary officers and diplomats for 
peace-keeping and multilateral ne- 
gotiations. In 1974 Urquhart .was 
named UN undersecretary-ge/f^ral 
for special political affairs, direct- 
ing UN peace-keeping operations 
in Cyprus. Kashmir, the Sinai, the 
Golan Heights and southern Leba- 
non. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


MOVING 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


NKE-MUSiaee. Exceptional mag- 
nificent 4 more , lie new. Bam. light, 
lop floor. F890.C00. PronB lBn Mo- 
ron. PL Mocort. 06000 Nice. Tefc (93) 
87 082) 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


AVENUE MONTAIGNE 

SUMPTUOUS PIHXA-TH0IE 
ABOUT tao SQM.. luxuriously fitted 
& decorated, with air<ondirianaig and 
ete a rorxc security, upper floor, FULL 
SUN, equipped mads stvxfio, parking. 

HGH5ECUKJTY BUILDING, 
day and night guatSon 

BATON 704 55 55 

TH£X BATON 630855 F 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PALMA DE MALLORCA 

Luxury flan overlooking Hie bay and 
dry or Pdma. Sctuafetfat the BeJtar 
C ante Park xi a very quiet and elegoti 
area, excellent value. Iwc mini from 
Hie ary center. Swimming pooh. Sauna, 
rennn and private pariang. Flat with 5 
bedrooms, living, dimg etc. 242 sqjn. 
+ terrace 32 lam., price m USS ca 
260.600 to 350,060. Penthouse; 9 bed- 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


LAGO MAGGIORE 
ASCONA 

In the world famous resort we offer first 

das apartments aid house*. Right 


Justin Marie 
SHELBY-SEZNEC 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 




MOVING 


FOUR WINDS 
INTERNATIONAL 

Officer Worldwide 

PAHS (31 036 63 11 . 
LONDON (6l] 578 66 11 

RRST CLASS SBMa~ 
ASSURE) EVERY MOVE 



•'WWJM i s-MAiHfl 




260.600 to 350,060. Penthouse: 9 bed- 
rooms. fang, tiring etc 913 aim. + 
tarroce 404 Sam., price in USS ca. 
2^00.000. r 

For Fwther information 
Please ask: 

INVERSORA BORIA S A 

JOSE BOMA 6 SON ARMADANS 
07014 RAIMA DE MAUOSCA 
Teh 6-71 -269900 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE GENEVA 
AND 


MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Foreignen am buy lovely a p art m en ts 
with aiagnificant views of Lofce Geneva 

VTHTRUD MHL SOsq^hotee. law I 
Twig, kitchen, bar, bedroom wsh rVjnnH Invrin 


fang, kitchen, bar, bedroom with Gsiood Levan 
menanme, bath. F50O.OOQ. Tel 296 43 ^^(vSTfi 
09 from noon. Martoooet ua 6 



Prices from Sfl 23.000 
Mortgages up to 65* at (Wh rtterest. 
ckSflE PIAN 5A 
Av Mon Repos 24, 

CH-I005 Lausanne. SwitzericwL 
Teh (21] 22 35 1? Tbe 25185 MQJS 

Established Since 1970 


LAKE GBCVA LUGANO, Montreux. 
Loaama. etc. Forergners con buy 
mognScent newapuTuneiiii/chatefc/ 
vflks. 5g choice. Swiss residency pas- 
rible. H SEBOLD. Tour Gnse 6.XH 
1007 Lausanne 21 '252611, Lugano 
91-687648 


above me old viflogs of Ascona or on 
Hie Me with indoor p od, yo u w31 find 
vow home, ftices from SF320 ,000 up to 
sn.100.00a. Mortgages ol low Swiss 
interest rates. These red estates are 
free for sate to foreigners. 

EMtjSAID HOME LID. 
HBJD0CA TtZlANA 
VIA LOCARNO 27 A 
04-6612 ASCONA 
TH. 04-93-352184 


SWITZERLAND 

foreigners can buy STUDK3S/ APART- 
MENTS / CHALETS, LAKE GBCVA - 
MONTREUX or in these world famous 
resorts : CR AN S-MONT ANA, IES 
DfABlSEiS, VERHBL VOLAJtS, 
JURA & region of G5TAAD. From , 
5F1 lOjOOa Mortgages 60% at 6K% 
interest. 

REVACS-A. 

52 Martfanllcrt. 04-1202 GBCVA. 
Tel: 022/34(540. Telex 22030 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


USA 


. Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 
Hotel Suite 
Residence 

offonog 

pre-opening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

tolling 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 

Executive Services Available 

Model Suites 

( 212 ) 371-8866 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARES AREA UNFURNISHED 


EMPLOYMENT 

EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


020448751 (4 Gn*] 

Nederhoven 19-21. Amsterdam 


75008 fab 

Telex 231696 F 



■gur vi/n f pmr Rnm. You amt 
indvtfo eon w tofo wn/ T - 
cdW* ivS&is address. 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


ORLANDO, FLORIDA 
INVESTMENT 

• This area hat been torgetted as one 

ml iL. 1 i t imre in tna 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


JOIN 

PRUDENTIAL 
IN EUROPE 

We offer a lucrative market *i Europe 
among ILS. miitary 4 avion person- 
nel, with Hah eanima i pottnii. The 
first 580.000 a year sUi Inccme Tax 
excluded. One yecr of successful tfa 
inwrance scries experience, a airier* 
voide US. life insu r an ce frame & 
NASD R e g sti rejo n ■ o n absolute re- 
quuwnenr rtx comroding. 

Interviews held continucdy m 
M an nheim. West Germany. 

For i nfor m at i on contact 
Let GJIespey & Jan Hudson 
General Agents for Europe 
Prudential Insurance Co. of America 
Foreign OperaSkms OAAD-4DN 

P.O Bax 389 flHT) 

Fart Wdthmgton, Pa. fftEM, USA. 

In Europe Call W. Germany. 

TX(0621) 471077. 

INTERVIEWS WHl BE H£U> IN 
SOUTHEAST ASIA IN NOVEMBER 


17IHGUYMOQUET. LcraeUudo.dB 
c o mforts, cabre sun. T2JXD + 
charges. Tek 229 52 96. ' 


International Business Message Centex* 



YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT M PARIS 
562-7899 


AT HOME IN PARIS 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENTS FOR RENT OR SAUE 

7 2 & v “p£ h “ 563 25 60 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8th 

Sludlq t 2 or 3-ra opi upu t m e nt . 
One irratfh or more. 

IE CLAWDGE 359 67 97. 


16th: FOCH 


'LOVELY DUPLEX. SORBONNE area 
1300A. Fufy equipped, Od-June. TeL 
(1) 633-2495 crNVC/12 2550396 


7THAVE RAPP. Lovely doutris lying, 2 
bedrooms, 2 bcAs, modern krtdin. 
bdooTMt. Ft JJXXTrefc 720 37 99 







Ncwty re 

MARAIS 

done. Luxury 2 rooms, both. 
H^OQ: 563 68 38 


MTBU4AT10NALLAW HRM in Pore 
wb Engfah mother tongue bfinanl 
l e uclu y with accaSent shorthtna in 


Engfah. Apply with C V to Box 2688, 
Herald Tribune. 92521 Neuity Cmtex, 
From 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 

MaEng ■ Telephone - Telex 
FJ1 secretarial services 
bie of Man. Jersey. Guemesy, 
Gibraltar, Panama libera, 
Luxembourg. Andes, UK. 
Ready mode or spebd 
Free explana tory! b ooklet. 

Bod legstrafuns 
London representobve 

Aston Company Formanons 
Dept T1 . B Victoria &.. Douglas. 
Ue of Man. Tel: 0624 26591 
Telex 627691 SFWA G 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SWriZBUAN} 

Safety first far yog and your ftusty; We 
help ret up business and tesdertid 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BURGS KINGS 

Metro NYC Uscafiom 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


office servict: 


YOUR INSTANT OFFICE 
FRANKFURT/ MAIN 


Metre NYC facafiam 

S^d ui yo ur teleph one i number 6 we Pres, Growth Fortners, Inc., 919 3rd 
**- N, - NY, “ 2s 


Please contact advertiser under 
LH.T. Bov 2176, Friednchdr. 15, 
D4000 Franfcfvrt/Mtxn. 


QUARTZ WATCHES 

100% 5wbb quality 
far expert. Up to 30.000 


100% 5wfa quality 
r export. Up to 30.000 


in 1-4 opttted, dfnx Ms Mar the 
exit wfadi vras onos sold far 
US$2000 an acre suddenly rocketed 
to S300.000 

• EurfrAmerieon hot options 
negotiated 3 yean ogo an land 
srrategicaDy located near 
Disney World / Orlando. 

ai Addtoond partner# required to 
compl ete puiehcee and tare rule. 

• Short hafctng period before wry 
profitable re-sole protected at 
100% plus. 

• Investme nt range USS 15.000 to 
1 miRon. 

EURO- AMERICAN 
INVESTMENT CORPORATION 
100 N. Becoyne Bh*L 
Sure 1209. Mct b. FL 3 3132 

Tel (3051358-8097, Tt 803237 Euro Ma 


SHARE WITH US 
PROFIT & FUN. 

You am dynamic, you fifce eonta^you 
are looking far an ever expanding ac- 
tivity Hint will Mtsfy you 
SucceuflJ 10 year aid Parson uub 

de lattks” for srules, new expsxtng 
woridvnde offers exgting. op partun sy 
la exceptional irefadua for irnnrwni 

investment. EURQCLUB, 39 Ouat rfAn-l TeL- 004142 21 32 88. Th 864 913: 


A ***** ** YotirScn 



Consider operating inter nabandiy, 
conxrielely tax-free on C Strict confide u . 
rid bass. 

Write far infarnvAve. free brochure 
dsout die advantages of Panama cam- 
panes, convenient ship regarrarian, 
trust se rvices, company maribgwner# 
the advantages of Parana s fnnad 

center and investntert Opportunities, in- 
ducting the Garibbeai Borin Irilidive. 
We are Panama's largest maiogenM 

company. 

WTHTTRUST 
P.O. Box 7440 

Ik na wi 5, RopuUc of Parana 
Telephon e: 63-63 00 
One: MTBtTSUST 
Telexes: 3151 - 2708 INTRUST PC. 


INTERNATIONAL OFFSHORE 
COMPANY INCORPORATIONS 
FROM Cl 10 

Ccmprehenove Acbmistrabon. 
Nomnee sconces. Powers of Attomev. 
Roistered rffiqes- Tefe^ telephone,' 
mol forvrardno. 

Wand Resource! 

BcJcaxne House, 
Swranerfifl, 

We of Motl 

Tel (06741 28020-20240-23933 
Teles 62B352 tdand G. 


RAMPY SKVJCTS INC ' 
□4-1290 Versa*/ Geneva, Switzerland 
Phene: 0041 22 55.40.42 
Telex.- 28279 04