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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 

PARIS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


lisa 

s .ss-^v 

kmn 


’crapping 
'ass Laws 


,rs - C % Glcrin Frankd 

j, /.". • 2 s ; ; 1 *•*<«*« ftai Sonia. 
iKV ' •• .V? irtHA XTXTTXVOT rr+jr-a 


recommendation. she a dded , 

^ k . -' • • ’^ ( ^^2Li COn ? ,ittec recom - N ”* el ’ appearing on the state-run 
'•■••^2 ? SSK? day **"“ SoothAfri- na ^°nal television network, de- 
»»* restricting the ■° a »* the pass laws and. influx 
incwenient of blacks into urban ar- “atrol as “probably in the daily 
; y ::g,2? *«? restrictions were 5 V « of SA blacks the stogie most 
with basic human dehumanizing aspect of the sys- 
■”«(, .: -ri fihr s. . tern." 

^ ^ -. ^T^opted by the whiie-ininOTity that can be brought to ah 

fiwwritnent, the move would mean end ’” Mr- Nickel said, “and of 
- ;, iladcs would no longer be required ibus far we are only dealing 

, ''* .tocarry passbooks, one of the most Wlt h a recommendation, 1 thmb h 

l4 $|- • : halco^ symbols here of the apart- would be regarded as a positive 
flsnj^ -arid- system of racial segregation, development” 

and 300,000 ^ Washington, the State De- 


JWadcs each year are arrested for Partment spokesman, Bernard 
offenses under the laws that the Kalb, said the suggestion to abolish 


panel said should be abolished. 

- V Meanwhile, five blacks in poli ti- 


the pass laws “is very i 
black South Africans a 


jortant to 
we find it 


I'aiBji ■ 
the D.' 

ai igi. 

s the uj.’ 
St'a's- 
- tefc' 

-U* 

: & |£ 

wacait 

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ilil R; 
tytat 
iutohaaj 
Irofa 

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if® Cr 

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«d unrest were kilted when police encoura gtog that the South African 
-L. — - government is apparently review- 


Astudy shows evidence of wide- 
spread torture of pofitical pris- 
oners in South Africa. Page 5. 

opened ■ fire with shotguns at a 


mg its policies in this area," The 
Associated Press reported. 

{Also, in- Washington, Reuters 
reported that Senate Democrats 
temporarily gave up their fight to 
enact tougher Sflnrtirtfit a gains t 


'.crowd in a black township outside 2™ ^ i ^u San S^JT iSl 
Cap* Town. In Soweto, toe coun- ^to Afnca^ ^toan) President Ron- 

• trys largest black urbkn area, a ? d Rc * gans ^ vc ¥ od ? 
-.. white schoolteacher and 10 bbek WW* at * ha Z£ aV t 
students were wounded by police ^2, ?“* P" XU*' 

. shotgun fire and severe! huffi 




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U.K. Expels Russians 
After KGB Defection 


By R.W. Apple Jr. the British Emba 

,Vl-h ViwA Tin us Serrn »■ COW. 

LONDON — Britain ordered hi 1971. 18 Bri 
the expulsion of 25 Soviet officials expelled from Me 
on Thursday. The order followed visas canceled, 
the defection of toe chief agent in A similar reta 
Britain of the KGB. the Soviet in- but inevitable tot 
telligence organization. [The Soviet Em 

The Foreign Office said the or- issued a statemei 
der was issued on the basis of infer- British action l 
mation provided bv Oleg A Gor- Reuters reported, 
dievsky. 46. who had been granted [In an apparent 
political asylum.' Of the people sible reprisals, it 
whom he named as members of the would bear respc 
Soviet spy network in Britain, six consequences. “T 
were diplomats, seven were trade sy would Uke to e 
represent a tries, five were journal- unwarranted aciit 
isis and seven filled a variety of ly character is wii 
other positions at the embassy' and non whatsoever.” 
in other London offices. , ... „„ A 


the British Embassy staff in Mos- 
cow. 

In 1971. 18 British citizens were 
expelled from Moscow or had their 
visas canceled. 

A similar retaliation seems all 
but inevitable this time. 

[The Soviet Embassy in London 
issued a statement describing the 
British action as unwarranted. 


vier intelligence activities and per- 
sonnel in this country." 

No information was available as 
to when, where and how Mr. Gor- 
dievsky. who took up bis post in 
Britain in 198L bad defected- He 
was reported to be in a "safe 
house" somewhere in Britain. 

He was bom in October. 193S. 
according to intelligence reports. 
After one year at a KGB training 


fin an apparent reference to pos- school, he spent 10 jears based in 
sible reprisals, it said that London Moscow d«ilmg with dissidents, 
would bear responsibility for anv . \ n h® began traveling, mx- 
consequences. "The Soviet Embai- in Scandinavia and Bnt- 

sv would Uke to emphasize thatthe ... .. _ 

unwarranted action of an unfriend- .. ‘ n diplomatic list Mr. Gor- 


ly character is without any founda- 
i’ion whatsoever." it said.) 


** *^0" Qf Mr - Gordievsky 
Office spokesman sajd ihe _ had a substantial victory 

5?i°S2 r S3S? ' ^ for the West one that might ulu- 


Diplomais and others said that 




W'.V-v .W. » 



compatible with their status and M *■*- — 

dccl^d tasks." Thev were given ^ numCT0US W * douscoup." 
three weeks to leave. ’ CTCI> ' But he said that even the KGl 

David GoodaJL the Foreign Of- In its circumspect announce- chief might not know toe idemitie 

fice undersecretary of state, or se- menu however, the Foreign Office of all the Soviet agents in Briiair 

nior civil servant told the Soviet asserted only that he was "in a because the GRU military tnielli 

charge d'affaires. Lev A. Parshin. position to know full details of So- genee agency operates separately. 

that "the nature and scale" of Sovi- 

et intelligence activities were unac- 

Mr. Goodall also said, according TT Si (fill tfl ft fill 

to the spokesman, that although XU3I LOW W UVUl 

the expulsions were necessary “in # — I 

Chemical Arms m Europe 

for an improvement in relations ■* 

between London and Moscow. gy Bernard Gwertzman in West Germany. The administra 

Opposition politicians, including 5 New York Times S*r nee tion, in seeking financing fror 

Denis Healev. the Labor Party H/AcuiwcTnv Congress to begin production c 

5 pc*«manoi foreign affairs said n™ chrnaal weapons has said i 

that the episode should not be al- had no plans to stockpile tons 

lowed to influence the current ne- wai ? oas anywhere but in the Unii 

gotiaiions between East and West. Fll ™ Jr f ,u States and on ships. But as pai 


In the diplomatic list. Mr. Gor- 
dievsky is named as one of sit 
counselors, the third-high cat rank 
in the mission of 35 diplomats. 

A leading British expert on Sovi- 
et affairs. Peler Rcddaway of the 
London School of Economics, de- 
scribed the defection as "a tremen- 
dous coup." 

But he said that even the KGB 
chief might not know the identities 
of all the Soviet agents in Britain, 
because the GRU military intelli-. 


Ths Quoded Pnu 


students were arrested. 


vents final action on toe sanctions 
bill. The vote Thursday was 88 to 


tettictiom on black movement 
W^nesda/ s Me 0 nlj one aspect of tbeepartheid 

ESSTJVSS . W - syfflem, but iheyhave b*Z singled 
sPotoa that he would move to re- 


* xrzr r out over toe yea« by critics as one 
Jbtore rataenrinp to blacks m toe ^ ^ nuist pfaniaous. The laws 

nommafly uutojendenl hwnelands, ^ been responsible for separat- 
has led to cautious emtimism from ^hundreds oftoousands rfblack 
some mtics of apartheid. wotkewftom (heir families, who in 

8e ^ eral ^ ur_ many, cases are not aflowed to join 
dies before enactnKnt and analysts them in urban areas, 
noted that Mr. Botha s government ' . „ . . . . 

could back away if it peroewed a ^ ahijmon of the laws was 

significant backlash from its .coo- 

servative wlnte .c<^^ TTto ^ ^ 


Watching Cobb’s Record Fall 

Pete Rose, peering intently at the line drive he had hit. saw it drop into left Geld and break Ty 
Cobb's 57 -year-old major league baseball record for hits. The single, in the first inning of 
Wednesday night’s game, gave the Cincinnati Reds' player-manager 4,192 hits. Page 23. 

Nicaragua Tells World Court 
That U.S. Directs Insurgents 


U,S. Rejects Call to Ban . 
Chemical Arms in Europe 


By Bernard Gwertzman 

Y«' York Times Sernee 


in West Germany. The administra-. 
tion, in seeking financing from 


By William Drozdiak 

iVathm^tim Ptai Serrh c 

government faces : five whkeparfia- S? Thured^iS toe 
mentary by-elections next month. U.S; National Security Council is 

"This cmild be a nail in toe coffin guiding strategy and choosing the 

of aparthdd, n said JohaTxitoe-Ber- by Mr. Botha. military targets of the guerrillas 

man. director of toe South; Afridm. , Ttoyoundl took op there port in who are striving to overthrow the 
Institute. erf Race Relaticns. ^But I . a meeting Thorsday m Cape Tomt Sahdinist govern men l 
wilLbd^toe p^ l^Wb^m^^ .^ lts caainnanv Ha Ko» 2 rnhori, CarltK Arjriieflo Grimez, Nicara- 
abttoriwt m ^ ^ guaVchief counsd ond um^- 

nwo't Wito P.W-^ot^^ agMture . ^^propgak by toe rounol, t6 ^ Net heriandi contended 
on it hits my desk. There havetietn *h *ch has no black i^abers. No ^ pnsyem Ronald Reagan 


Sliuiy arms of the werriltas 


at toe start of bearings against the 
United States, said that his country 
would produce witnesses and docu- 
ments before the tribunal “to prove 
beyond a doubt that the U.S. gov- 
ernment has set justice aside and is 


mis Healev. the Labor Party urAcuiMO-mM tk- Congress to begin production of 

c*«man on foreign affairs Mid new chemaal weapons has said i. 

in the episode should not be al- „ .. had no plans to stockpile those- 

ved to influence the current ne- weapons knywhere but in toe Unit- 

tiations between East and West. Europe free trf all S J a f - 0D sl jPS-. But , as 

Among those who were told to chemical weanons ^ of lhe , ^ slaUon aitowng the new 

tve were three first secretaries. -ni . » <- ■ ,_ rion wid lhere “ a nonbinding 

iri V. Yezhov. 4S. whoso duiio» w 2LtotafS25?taS? P'^cn calling on -he admrna- 


leave were three first secretaries. 
Yuri V. Yezhov. 48. whose duties 
were not specified: Vyacheslav 1. 
Kalitin. 45. in charge of the science 
and technical department, and Bo- 


TtliZET^ East Germany and toe opposition 
and ladinicai dqjarlmenL and Bo- ^ 0aD ^ c Pan/.VWcs! 
m A. Korchagin. AS. in chaige of Gaman ^ rcpact;lgi „ g of 


■■■ ■” V ■ *.. -™™” 1 ““ provision calling on ibe adminis- 
Wednesday Ihat the Sovicilrader s IrJl j t , n [0 pu( ,) 1C nw weapons in 
acceptance of the pian agreed lo by lhc „ lhe 0 ld ones. 

tS tjw-r Since taking office this year. Mr. 


Social Dcmociauc Pany in West Gprt)arf ,ev his cither prcclaimed 
Gornany “»as a repacking of or mdoniMl a nBrober of anas coo- 


proposals we have^beard before." iniUatives lhal ^ ^ 
Larty S peakes. the While Htwe by the u.s. adnumsliatioa. 

spoktsmirc said such a limited Us , ^ nl}x aI (he ^ 0 f the 
dtetmcal btm could «« he ado. 4 o,h anniversary of the dropping of 
quately vnifird It: said the call for ine atomic bomb on Hircuruma by 
prohibiting chemical weapons m. , fce Unilcd S|atB Mr . GorhacK.. 
cenuul Europe was sraular 10 a aonouncedaStwamoiaumumon 


«ijd its 


:w X”* too many-false diwwts before.**. ■ dates were recom m ended, for end- 
■■ZT Sheena Duncan, preadent of toe pass laws. 

ivnvTK _ Black Sash civil rights group that ; The report called for 
sv OiitT counsels blacks facing legal action wbamzauoo and wwili 

s.foeift under toe pass laws, sounded a the I^I han on squaite 

tv more optimistic note. “We’ve proposed vast new housi 

.'t'Vw crossed some sort of watershed,” foa'Jrtack^ seelcinfe aore^ 

ty she said. Referring to Mr. Botha’s African atses and sad th 

statement Wednesday and Thurs- (Continued on Psae 2, 


)VftSTi 
AS V tiK 

ASaiwt 

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.'.vr 




ztutf 

55JF!® 5 

NSTAHT^ 

jKRjsri^ 

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The report called for “orderly 
urbanization" and would not lift 
toe legal ban on squatters, but it 
proposed vast new housing tracts 
feir blacks seeking access to South 
African dries ana said the govera- 
(Continued oa Psae 2. CoL 5) 


Scientists Reaffirm 'Nuclear Winter’ 

2.5 Billion Would Die of Starvation After War, Study Says 


. By Boyce Rensbcrger 

WarfUng/on Pan Servicr 

WASHINGTON — A full-scale 


300 scientists from 30 countries 
that made toe study. 

“1 think our study shows that toe 


nuclear war probably would cause indirect effects of nndbu : war toave 

such a severe and sudden climatic ^ 


, . who are striving to overthrow the 1^4 Nicaragua 

y m Cape Town Sandinist govern men L chzi&d the United Slates with 

K« Koomhoff, c-^ Grimez. Nicara- “dducung paramilitary' minuet 

~i , uanos Argueuo uonrez, Micara- j^jearagna , n vidfauon of 

Snadoid bw and Uvv*i N«- 

lions and Organization ot Ameri- 
ttot afrer IWent Ronald Re^an ^ Svales pr^sio^. 

Tte «»«. i* also known 
U^. pohey is to seek the removal erf ^ toe World Court,, ruled last No- 
toe Sandimsts from powar. the Vcm ber that it held jurisdiction and 
!f "v 3 ? f. would hear toe merits of the case. 
“?* “ and toe United States announced 

cbestratmg attacks by the guerril- m - Januax>1 a rf Uie pio- 

bs, known as toe wntras^ ceedings. Washington had argued 

Mr Argtodlo sp«king hjrfcre j n vain ^ Nicaragua had never 
toe International Court of Justice previously recognized, the court's 

- — - - ■ — ■ — authority and now was seeking to 

exploit toe forum for political pro- 
i|T i a paganda purposes. 

idShJIf* \U ITITI^I* Asserting that "the seat of justice 

is definitely empty in the United 
States," Mr. Argue! lo told the 
r Wm Sf 7 #/#v ^trvs court ' s “ Your authority 

FT UM ^ kJMtlEj tJUjjo j s jjgj n g challenged by a superpow- 

. . . . j,w - . cr that wishes lo set law aside in 

SCI™ order lo have a free hand for de- 

Svi^Tiu known oa SCOPE. US l«l 

»££wta. Nicaragua will no. 


\w>* 
\& 1 
IPX*. 


the International Court of Justice 



^A•* 




Carlos ArgiieJIo Cdmez 


Correspondents for Tass. the So- Larey Speakes. the White House 
viet press agency, for Novoslt, the spokesman, said such a limited 
features agency, and for Radio chemical ban could not be ade- 
Moscow were on the expulsion list, quatdv verified. He said the call for 
So were translators at two interna- prohibiting chemical weapons in 
tionai organization* and a driver central Europe was similar to a 
and security guard at toe embassy. J9S3 Warsaw Pact proposal toat 
Not since 105 Soviet officials urged a ban on stockpiling and pro- 
were accused of spying and sent duction of chemical weapons in 
home in 1971 has there been such a Europe, 
mass expulsion from Britain. In The Reagan administration, 
April of this year, five officials, which is hoping to undertake pro- 
including the Soviet Embassy's na- duction of new chemical weapons 
val altachi. were expelled on spy- for toe first time in 16 years, pro- 
ing charges. The Russians retahat- posed in 1984 at toe 40-nation Ge- 
ed by expelling three members of neva conference on disarmament a 


three years by the council’s Scien- 
tific Committee on Problems of the 
Environment, known as SCOPE. 


Structure of a Cold Virus 
Is Unraveled by Scientists 


By Boyce Rensberga: 

H uAhinghu Ptttl Service 


Biologists have long known the 
general shape of the cold rirus. 


change that il could destroy agri- Harwell aaid. “The polenlial deaths 
culture in Earth’s nonban henu- from itrf^^e^greativ «ce^ 
sphere for a year or more and lull those from the direct effects of 
2S billion pSple from famine fi *5 


fects of 


report totaling nroriy 900 pages. 

The first volume, dealing with mus( p^suaje the court of toe va- 
atmosphenc effects and making jia^f ils daims _ Jf u* coun 


use. of more sophisticated computer 
models of the atmosphere than 


ultimately decides in its favor. Nic- 
aragua will then seek financial 


WASHINGTON - Scientists which can be seen in fuzzy ou tones 

have determined the complete, ■“f 3,1 c }^. It 

three-dimensional architecture of a tooksj somethmg Uke a nucroscopic 
common cold virus, including toe 

position of every atom, flic feat of ?° fit logaher to 


worldwide, according to a major Or- been used before, largely con- compensation for the damage in- 

to toSmal sludyraeased Thins- would be likely ; to kj .about 15 firms earlier estimates that a nude- nicted by ami-Sandinisi forces.. 


international study released Thurs- 
day. 

The study is the Fust large, for- 


bilhon people, in addition to the ar war could trigger an abnormal 
estimated 500 million who would freeze, plunging temperatures in 


position of every atom, inc teat 
promises lo ^hed light on how one 
of the world’s most common virus- 
es attacks the body. 


make the geometric shape known 
as an icosahedron. 

Inside this hollow shell, made of 


Presenting Nicaragua's argu- 
ments. Mr. Argiiello said, “Recent 


\f%rn Ml n . I .1 * a UIVIUIVI iuiu x-n 

1983 Warsaw Pad proposal that 

urged a ban on stockpiling and pro- (Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 
duction of chemical weapons in ________ . ._ 

Europe. 

The Reagan administration. -_~g- 

which is hoping to undertake pro- I r||| rep i-l Afipc 
duction of new chemical weapons * liUpC/o 

for toe first lime in 16 years, pro- __ Jr m 

posed in 1984 at toe 40-nation Ge- r | 1 ^ J 

neva conference on disarmament a Ji. vF J-ilXtX A A/ULU. 
ban on worldwide production and 

stockpiling of chemical weapons. 0^** fnllc 

Moscow has ngected the Amen- VrO. Jl til K> VJrfUlO 
can insistence on verification of So- 
viet Chemical factories tO ensure Compiled hr C*ur Stuff Fr,mi Otspju-hn 
that they are not producing weap- WELLINGTON. New Zealand 
ons. — Prime Minister David Lange ex- 

Taiks in Geneva on a global ban pressed hope Thursday that pon 
on chemical weapons have not got- calls by nonnuclear U.S. warships 
ten anywhere. U.S. officials said, would resume next year if a dead- 
Mr. Gorbachev’s comments on lock, with Washington over his an li- 
the chemical weapon ban in central nuclear policy is resolved. 

Europe were reported Tuesday by He said that if port calls were not 

Tass, toe Soviet news agency, after d by (he wd of , 986i - we 

a railing in Mosixiw between Mr. certainly going to be disap- 
Gorbachev and Johannes Rau. who pointed.” ’ 
is considered the likely Social Dem- F \ ril ‘. . . 
ocratic Pam candidate for chan- K J a!ks «n Washington nexi week 
cehor in detftions due in West Ger- . ,h .« New Zealand deputy 

many in 1987 pnme minister. Geoffrey Palmer. 

Id recent years, the Social Demo- Secretary of State Geoige P. 
cm s have been increasingly critical Shultz . MU, d , a way for a re- 


Talks in Washington next wedt 
between the New Zealand deputy 
prime minister. Geoffrey Palmer. 


Although officials of the Nation- protein, is a small amount of genet- In recent years, the Social Demo- “«o awramy cm scare creoige r. 

ai Science Foundation, which ic material which, wben released crats have been increasingly critical Shultz could wen a way for a re- 

sponsored pan of toe research, said inside a human celL commandeers of the deployment of new U.S, me- suniption of ship visits, Mr. Lange 

the step might lead to the develop- toe cell’s apparatus, directing it to dium-range missiles in West Ger- su “- 

p • ■_ . . _ ■ J ■ ■ J _ _ 1 _ r iL . J La.... I .r. ■ ^ : Ha* VJrvirisi noni* Yrtnl fhmi rrenf.I 


nerind erf daritDcss and freezing the least affected populations being The second volume of the study tion of mercenary forces, 
i^rnru-ratiires that many auno- in Australia, New Zealand and the focuses on the effect this would “This council, hcadec 
•„l5 hv mnM nsult regions of toe southern hemisphere have on ajmculture and ecosystems oresident of the United i 


ment or a vaccine against colds, one make many identical copies of the 
of the leaden, of toe research said virus. 


many and have left the impression 
that if they were in power they 


He voiced hope that they could 
lead to a middle road between his 


—iJlT-. scientists sav could result regions of toe soumeni irenuspnCTe on agricultur 
a globe-girdling pall of smoke where subsistence agriculture is the around the world. 


rcffjf;;: 


f 


■:stM 

■**;; V 


*0' 

dia-** 31 ® 5 

f 

-f ■“ . . 


and dust produced by a major nu- 

clearwar. . . , _ 

“Sudan and Ethiopia today are 
probably far more representative of 
what the world would be like after a 
nuclear war than art 
and Nagasaki," said Mark A. Har- 
well, co-leader of a team of nearly 


INSIDE 

■ Mozambique said it has 

scored a major victory Wj re- 
bel forces. P*# 2 - 

■ Nine Argentines on trad tor 

atrocities were in court io£! elh er 
for the first time. s - 

■ A hormone treatment for 

breast cancer hfs be^ .en- 
dorsed by a panel of ^ ^doc- 
tors. ”®* 

■ The United SUtes feara that 
its military bases in toe Phtop- 
pines may be vulnerabletoai 

Jacks by terronsts. «ge«- 

■ French members of toe Ti- 
tanic expedition accusal that 

U.S. partners of braking an 

accord on photographs. 
WEEKEND 

■ pbotojotiniafiSB is back to 

JL^IStarcSniiiseu"^ 1 

in a new contort- ■ . 


norm. . . , 

The new study was conducted 
under the auspices of the Paris- 
based International Council of Sci- 
entific Unions, an organization of 
scientific societies from 70 coun- 
tries. . . ■ 

The study was canned out over 


focuses on toe effect this would “This council, headed by toe 
have on agriculture and ecosystems president of the United States, di- 
around the world. reels the strategy and even selects 

Paul Cnitzen, the West German the targets to be destroyed by the 
scientist who first raised the possi- mercenary forces.” 


Wednesday that he thought it Viruses arc nonliving objects would be more sympathetic to So- P°hcy of not allowing visits by nu- 
would never be possible to make that can reproduce only by such a viet proposals. clear-powered ships and toe equal- 

such a vaccine. cell seizure. Administration officials have ex- ■> "rt 11 U.S. doctrine of refusing to 

On the other hand, the findings nmij nnH - . . , , „ r 


viet proposals. 

Administration officials have ex- 


do suggest that a new' anti-viral 


Th- nmti nnHi n « -..iM , ««« pressed concern that the discussion confirm or deny whether its war- 

° r a chemical- weapon-free zone in ships are nuclear powered or nude- 
toe exact positions of individual ar armed. 


scieniist who first raised the possi- mercenary forces . ^T hl ^ JesiEned , 0 lre3l exact posmons 01 individual . ^ . ar armed. 

Wily of midear winter in 1982 and ^ Mr. /ygOefio charged that White drug might be designed ra atoms that raak_e up prole, n mote- So^nXin^SSeSSro^ The U, 


who was an author of toe new House involvement in (he guerril- 
studv said (hat the report should las’ military actions has become so 

. a <■ it* * * Z J 1 ...L. .L .i u:. .rt .^1 «L. _ 


(Continued 00 Page 2, CoL I) (Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


olds. ; . ST-nSSow ZiZdi uianSr P uWlc ^ inion in «gtem Europe The United Stales cut defense 

This is the firet time that saen- . , ... . . and pul pressure on Washington to ties with New Zealand after Mr. 

study, said mat “**^*j*”° lists have learned the detailed J** 'PJSrfbff 1 *S P P kli2! adjust its policies. Lange's Labor government blocked 

go far toward dispelling emiasms evident lately that in effect, the slnic{ljre ^ vims infecting ani- val ^ s {orm9d ^ ^ irregular The United Stales currently a viitoby a U.S destroyer in Febm- 


stnicture of any virus infecting ani- 
mals. 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) stockpiles older chemical weapons 


(AP. Reuters} 


InUJL, Racial Attacks Are Said to Increase 


;S/JTNANCE 
Bar fell as. markets 
jjj. economic data 

J Friday. P*g* 21 - 


By Jo Thomas 

AVw Ycrk Tones Service 

LONDON — In toe vast expanses of deterio- 
rating public bousing and small shops or Lon- 
don's East End and other British cities, alarm 
has been growing over attacks on Asians and 
other minorities. 

In July a pregnant Asian woman and her 
three small children were burned to death in 

their East End home in a fire that the police ay 

was arson. Last month, police officers rescued 
nine members of a Bengali family, including an 
infant, trapped in their apartment after gasoline 
was poured through their front door and set 
afire, and four people were injured in what toe 

police described as an arson attack on an Indian 

restaurant in Souih London. 

Although Asians — rowdy people of Indian 
and Pakistani descent — seem to be the most 
frequent taigeis, blacks and Jews have also 
fatten victim. In Woolwich in late June, a black 
woman and her two daughters were beaten and 

^TTie police say there were 691 racial incidents 
in tte fi«i six months of this year m Greater 
London, a rate slightly down from last years 


total of 1.514, but community groups assert that 
the actual number of racial attacks is far.higher. 
In some communities. Asians have organized to 
fight back, a development toat deeply worries 
the authorities. 

“The problem," said Lawrence Roach, com- 
mander of Scotland Yard's Community Rela- 
tions Branch, “is racial prejudice and discrimi- 
nation. The police deal with the symptoms, not 
the causes." 

He said the police have difficulty recruiting 

Scattered proMems were reported Htursibty 
in three British cities. Page 2. 

from ethnic minorities and conceded that the 
number now on the city's force, 260 out of a 
force of 27,000, was “ridiculously small." But he 
said that “even an integrated police force 
couldn't stop these attacks if society supports 
them." 

“They don’t attack their neighbors because of 
lhe police,” he said. “They attack them because 
they are racists. This society produces them. 
They are a product of our educalionaJ system, 
brought up in our families." 

The borough of Greenwich has deteriorating 
public housing where residents say they Ted 
they live in a state of siege- More, than 200 


families have complained this year of racial 
attacks to a local community group. According 
to the group, many of these families, such as one 
that reported 26 broken windows in a six-week 
period, have suffered more than one attack. 

“The cases we’re getting now," said Chelan 
Shall, one of the organizers of the Greenwich 
Action Committee Against Racist Attacks, “are 
more organized, more fascist, more vicious, and 
have greater numbers involved, sometimes 
gangs of 40." In the public housing projects, 
where passageways offer ideal escape routes, at 
least half the attacks are by gangs, be said. 

"We’re one of the groups that has said there's 
nothing wrong with going on toe offensive,” Mr. 
Bfaail said. “We know who the people are. If we 
make their lives a misery, they'll think twice 
before attacking us.” 

Last month four Asians convicted after a 
battle with whites at a pub in Newham last year 
walked free after the judge told them, “Each of 
you overreacted to a v«y longstanding and 
serious provocation." 

The four had been among 50 Asians who, 
carrying bottles, iron bare and tods, marched in 
April 1984 to do haiile with whites at a pub they 
believed was being used as the headquarters for 
a senes of assaults in which lone Asians were 
dragged into a car and attacked with a claw 
hammer. 



n* OwnM R(H 


A policeman assists an Asian man injured during a disturbance in Birmingham. 












Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1985 


Mozambique, Aided by Zimbabwe, 
Drives Guerrillas From Key Base 


By Ken Pottinger 

/mentetionaf Herald Tribune 

LISBON — Rightist rebels in 
Mozambique have suffered a de- 
feat that President Samora Ma- 


bel movement, acknowledged zambii 
Wednesday the loss of their main total a 


e and Zimbabwe, said to 
»t 25,000 troops, overran 


base, at Gorongoza, but said the seven rebel camps in the central 
rebel leadership had escaped and provinces of Sofala, Machida and 

TJ - ... .. V 1 .1 J*... .. tV* \io_ 


would intensify its attacks in the Zamb&ia, according to the Ma- 


chd's government hopes will mark ones. 

_ • . • Ur 


puto government The rebels said 


a major turning point in Its eight- 
year effort to end the insurgency. 


Mr. Madid, surveying the ruins the offensive was supported by jet 




of the Gtarongoza camp, said last fighters, helicopters, tanks and ar- 


Mozambique's army, with the week, “We have broken the snake’s txUety. 



Blacks Help 
U.K. Police 
Keep Peace 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Suit to Halt U.S. 


KAgXto WASHINGTON (AH- A 

I\IaJU JL vtlLv Friday’s scheduled test ofaUJivant^saldQrtewi^^ 

.A (W’ gn p ym en and the Union ‘ Of Concethed S cKntola;!had ; ieqBei^f^ ^ 

In Riot Area 

The Associated Press failed to show the ments of tliflir'aw-.VlIip^iHD^' m any event am 4 

jafssftsta- 


aid of about 5,000 troops from 
Zimbabwe, drove guerrillas from 
their bases in the central part of the 
country during actions last month, 
the government announced last 
week. 

A spokesman for the Mozam- 
bique National Resistance, the re- 


frain back, but we will not rest until we 
from have crushed its head.” 


Zimbabwe and Mozambiq ue are 
close allies and Mozambique’s 




Observers in Lisbon who follow ports, railroad system and an oil 
the Mozambique insurgency said pipeline are vital to Zimbabwe's 


they believed the rebels had been 
more severely hit than at any time 


The come 


forces from Mo- 


300 Scientists Reaffirm 
* Nuclear Winter 9 Theory 


economy. 

According to the Mozambique 
news agency, AIM, the main read 
base on the slopes of the Goroo- 

S mountains, known as “Camp 
eta," was destroyed on Aug. 
28. Troops seized tons of ammuni- 
tion and destroyed an airstrip ad- 
joining the camp, the report said. 
Later reports said about 100 guer- 
rillas had been ldOed. 

The rebel leader, Afonso Dhla- 



ffiHirfmnij where violent* broke 
S this week, was quiet af- !tf.fiE*222 





ESSeags 

-r r The congressmen and the wsentisttf grcsm asfcedsriie fedcrabttfct 

no arrests anHuas- 


(Continued from Page 1) 

that the hypothesis is far-fetched 
The SCOPE study assumes that 
a nuclear war would involve only 
half the midear warheads of the 
United States and the Soviet 
Union, that their use would set fire 
to about 25 to 30 percent of the 
urban areas of North America, Eu- 
rope and the Soviet Union. 

According to the study, much of 
the smoke would rise above weath- 
er zones and enter the stratosphere, 
the highest layer of air. 

Within days, dense patches of 
smoke would block 99 percent of 
the sunlight, and within a few 
weeks, the patches would spread, 
blanketing the entire northern 
hemisphere enough to block 90 per- 
cent of light 

The freeze would be worst inland 
because coastal temperatures 
would be moderated by the still- 
warm oceans. The study also sug- 
gests that a drought could follow 
for some weeks or months and that 
normal weather patterns would be 
disrupted, elhmirating the normal 
monsoon rains upon which Asia 
and Africa depend for agriculture. 
Dr. Harwell said that slight 


drops in temperature, of only three buna, ami jus nnhtmy eonumnd- 
TkmTSm. could prevant SST Z&Z*! * 

Lisbon. He sredthr^SSS m 


U. me non by Omred State, M d ^ ^ conucTiith rebel units 

much of the Soviet Union. ,hn 


Iha MaodcMd Pm 


Under such circumstances, he 


around the country. 

AIM said that documents seized 


said, the United States and C an ada a { the camp included the mfmiira 
would have enough food to avoid gf ^ A ug. 19 meeting between Mr. 


major famine but might be unable Dblakama and Louis M. Nd, dep- 
to distribute it in the absence of u jy foreign wiipfcfgr of South Afri- 


CHECKING OUT VOTERS — Sweden’s budget min- 
ister, Kjefl-Okrf Fekft, checked price of a safaum Thurs- 
day wfcfle sitting in as cashier at a Stockholm supermar- 
ket He was e«i»p«igpijng for Sunday’s elections. 


ever; the West Midlands police said neeaeqroMgooare a.ire^ wimB 

there were 28 arrests in its jnrisdio- \ 

tiou after disturbances in the towns vt g 17 ! t L.t -f 

of Wolverhampton, where wm- vJ«G» IbwIgWS Idlm w 
dows were smashed in a shopping WASHINGTON (API — The tLS. Department" < 
center, and Coventry, where sever- <bop^itsinfcreqinrmgcc^e«es ' - 

al cars were set on fire. fed eral financial aid hav e 

In Liverpool, 80 miles (130 kilo- ^ Ttorsday. v . 

meters) to the north, a Baptist cha- The role was togomtodETectbi 

pd and three cars were set afire, of compliance with draft registrati 
but the police said the inodmte it ^ DOt necessary to have coft 
were not connected with the Bff- demands fiat ail mafccrtnais and 


federal financ ia l aid have registered for themffifaiydraft,; 


fuel for trucks and trains. 


Most other parts of the planet, untO last year. 


ca. which had supported the rebels 


however, would risk severe famine. Mr. Nd reportedly visited Gor- 


Japan, for example, even if not hit ongpza in an attempt to persuade 
by a bomb, probably could keqp no the rebels to reopen negotiations 


mote than half its population alive with the Machd 
in the absence of food and oO im- the war. Talks 


at to end 
the two 


Nicaragua Tells Court 
That U.S. Directs Rebels 


mmgftam rioting, which aupted n g Sta within30days of tb 
Monday night. . Congress passed an amen 

Several Conservative politicians ^ (oWforocertifaitt 
criticized the Birmingham police . ' ^ 

for agreeing to reduce their pres- -. ' ' ■ *..->* 

epee in Handsworth while Wades of UTPPk Sailnri i 
the Rastafarian cult toured the de- ■ * . : 

cayed inner-city area with bull- ATHENS (Reuters) ~ A 


Wm 1982 roffiuriug stncfeniaid'ream. 
they had registered ferite driijfcv ' 


ATHENS (R eutesX-4* A obprt 


horns, urging groups of black sentenced a Greek sea. 


youths to keep the 


nearly 11 yearsmprison.p 


“We should not hand over pdic- for -feowiag 1 I AfiJcarisfow^tefs 
p ixmrrs to &ronD5 of West In<fi- into the Indian Oceaii off fbe dbast 


ports. India and Brazil, although sides in Pretoria broke down last 
far from war zones, could be even October over demands for an im- 


harder hit 


mediate general election, the resig- 


(Conthmed from Page 1) mer State Department legal adviser 

commander-in-chicf of 'the U^. is serving as counsel for the 


jug powers to groups of West LkS- mto the Indiati Ocean off fbe dbast 
an yobbos," said Terry Dicks, a of Somalia in MarchT5«4;SewBral 


nation of the government and the armed forces is also the command- Nicaraguan government 


Conservative member of Partia- crewman 
meat The term “yobbos” .means sentences. 


Vote 00 Hong Kong Visas 

Lot Angeles Timet Service 


rewriting of the constitution. er-in-chief of the contra forces." The first witness brought by Nic- 

He introduced a sworn affidavit aragua on Thursday was Luis Car- 
utes, Mr. Nd tned^to persuade the a former n6n Cruz, the country’s deputy m- 

rebels to rropen the talks without leader of the Nicaragua Democrat- tenor minister, who is in charge of 
prior copmuons. ic Force, one of the largest rebel stale security. 

groups. Mr. Chamorro's statement Mr. Carridn contended that 


WASHINGTON — The Senate prior conditions. 


began consideration of sweeping in Lisbon, Mr. Correia said 


immigration legislation by passing Wednesday, “We admit his troops 
on a voice vote Wednesday an overran oar ramp s in Gorongoza 


thugs in eofioqmal En glish. The jtuy at a court at Pi&kas' 

The police said they agreed on a . found - Antonis Plytzanqpcilo^ 
partial withdrawal provided that captain of theGarifriiaC^ggilfyqn 


the Rastafarians kept the streets 11 cotmts of.ocposiDg 


danger, lit is not knowHi 


lebpSe^to 

thesftn^- 


Mr. Carridn contended that 


' Prime Minister Margaret awayasund^'az^^jiify 
Thatcher’s government decided ednot to return, a murder eparae?' 


described detailed meetings with ance the United States began orga- 
members of the Central IntdH- mzing insurgent attacks in Decon- 


Thursday to hold a Wmitad police don. It reaped its Werdict’ m a 
inqmiy into the Bi rmingham riot- 4-to-3 m^oriiy da^ion. : ■. 


amendment that would inoease but auerriHa bask are never ner- “““"p 01 “» mzmg msurgent auaocs m i^cwai^ ing and rgected calls for a full- : The ship’s boalswain and first 

the annual number of visas avail- manStmd when the troops leave NatI0Iial ^ ^ I«L the rebels have doubled scale judicial probe into the vk>r matewrefound gnftgr.df oompfiq- 


able for Hon 
5,000 from 3,i 


; visas avail- rnanem and when the troops leave 
residents to we will rebuild them and carry on 
as before." 


curity Council 


in strength to 7,000 soldiers 


He recalled an encounter in May equipped, trained and paid largely 
1984 with Ronald F. Lehman, an by the U.S. government 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


U.S. Youths Admit Guilt in Drug Run 


NSC aide, who assured him that In an assessment of the human 


Birmingham’s city council react to a prison tom<bf dn« 
ed angrily and said it-wonld tfy to eight months, and tht 


rty. The boatswam was sentemaed 
aafafmmtiis, and the fireUmate 



after the 1984 elections Mr. Reagan costs, Mr. Carribn said that- 3.886 
“would publidy endorse our effort people have been killed and 4,73 1 


set, up its own inqmiy to identify, ., was sentenced to . two years and 
underlying causes of the rampage seven months. - They and Mr. Pfyt- 


Antucns 


New York Tuna Service and distributed ammng students at 10 remove the Sandhastas from wounded s" 1 ** the began 


BACHaors •MASTBTS • DOCTORATE 

For Work, K c adomte. Ufa D q uri n M. 

Send detailed resume 
tar free evaluation. 

PACfffC VffiSTHN UNIVERSITY 
•600 N. Sepulveda Btvd, 

Los Anaeles, California 
WOW, Dept, n, U^A. 


BRIDGEPORT, Connecticut — the private boarding school in Wal- power and see to it that wo received nearly four years ago. Property 
Ten former students of the exclu- lingfoixL The two students were ar- all the support that was necessary damage, he said, is estimated to be 
srve Choate Rosemary Han sec- rested at Kennedy International for that purpose.” $375 miTHnn 


which Left two persons dead, more . zanqpoulos aRxaled tbeir sentences bnt wilL. remain 1 in prison 
thari 50 buildings damag e by fire appeals are considered. The ship’s ebbk was seotencetfto K mtHahsand 
and manv stores looted. 10 days. Three Ginedciand two Pakistani .seamen werejaiteffet 16 months 


and many stores looted. ' 10 days.Three Gredcand twoPakistam seamen vyerejaneofOT lo mon 

Courts began processing 76 tud 20 days each and it thud Pakistani aew manber was acqintted. 


Wwtnefidnv to FvMonit IQRt And pKanml willi * imwttna 1... * * .1 . .1 hAr ^hfty68 Sflld thecoffl- 


Wednesday to federal charges of 1984, and charged with importing lay emphasis in the case on the ing cramiSiods, NicSSTvS 
finanang a cocame-buymg trip to 300 grams of cocame. = — »- -» ™ ^ 


Venezuela by two other students. “The use of cocaine at Choate in 


The U.S. attorney for CMmecti- 1984 was very wide^jread," Mr. 
cut, Alan H. Nevas, said the Nevas said. A grand jury has sub- 
scheme would have marked the sev- poenacd school officials m cranec- 
enth time since 1982 that cocaine tion with a continuing cocaine in- 
had been imported from Caracas vestigation, he said. 


youths on charges axiangfrom the 
rioting and hoposed a .dnsk-to- 
dawn curfew on many who were 
allowed free oh bafl. Charges in' 1 
duded arson and possession of 
weapons. 


more active involvement by the refute charges that it is supplying ” 

lUpmm.artfd annsro^f^iillffiS P ° MCSS ‘° n 1 

tary pressure on the Sandimsts de- weapons. 

spite an earlier court order to desist 

from the threats or use of force, ^ IIP* 1 A 

oouth Africa Panel Asks 


A^ianRebds C2bimPlaneI)o^^ 


•- ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reuters) — flnemngg dairnt^ n- qyYn^ ' hi i j ty 
Tborsday for Aootine downan-airiiner last week in' AfoWric tan and ctM 






End of Racial Pass Laws 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


FROM 

THE ISLAMIC DEVELOPMENT BANK 
TO ALL MUSLIM PILGRIMS 
IN THE 1405H HAJJ SEASON 


The Islamic Development Bank (IDB) is pleased to announce to Muslim pilgrims 
that the Slaughtering ritual has been fully performed on behalf of those who had participated in 
the Sacrificial Meat Utilization Project. The total number of authorizations for slaughtering, 
whether by proxy to the Project Commit te or to personal representatives amounted to 307J266 
covering all types of sacrificial offerings i.e. voluntary, combined/separate performance of Hajj 
and Ifmrah, reparation (Fidy a), sacrifice (Udhiya) and charity. This figure is 65% higher than that 
of the preceding Hajj Season. 


Parts of the meat have been distributed to the pilgrims and the poor within the 
boundaries of the Haram. 177,567 heads of sheep have also been sent by air, sea and land to 
some Muslim countries as follows: 


Pakistan (for Afghan refugees), 30,667 heads of sheep 


Mali 


5,190 heads 


Chad 


7,080 heads 


Mauritania 


6,780 heads 


Burkina Faso 


5,890 heads 


Djibouti 


17,000 heads 


Jordan 


40,960 heads 


Bangladesh, a ship is scheduled to 

leave on 1 1 September 1985 with 64,000 heads. 

Total. 177,567 


The remaining meat has been frozen and stored at the Moaisim Slaughterhouse 
coldstores for distribution to the poor of the Haram throughout the year. 


The Islamic Development Bank would tike to express its thanks to the Pilgrims 
for their confidence and co-operation in .the project. 


(Continued from Page 1) . 
meat would have to accept "or- 
dered informal settlement.” 

[The government on Thursday 
made it illegal to sell the Sept 16 
issne of Newsweek. The move came 
as one of the magazine’s reporters, 
Ray Waifinson, was deported for 
contributing to an article in the 
issue that the government said ad- 
vocated “violence on the street" 
[Richard M. Smith, the maga- 
zine's editor in chief, said in New 
York that it made every effort to 
report all sides of the South African 
stray.] 


they had used a Soviet missile. The government has audaH 52 dvffians 
aboard the plane were lriflw* , [ . V . - ' 

2 A spokesman for Hezb-i Islmni, cme df tfae main gramflfl gmnps; ga»H 
its members shot domi dm -plane over the southern: town n F Kandahar 
after they received information that it was canyuig- Sonet advisers, 
Afghan secret police and nrifitary affiriahL ■■ \v •••.; v 

Government officials had sud tine ]dane was shot down Sept 4 with a 
UJS.-made missile. The guerrilla spokesman, however, quoted a letter 
from a commando’ in. Kandahar saying the rebels used a Soviet-built 
SAM-7 missQe. '• •- ' "• ' : f / '■* - - 


■ EC Paribrnient Fa3s to Act sam- 7 nnssue.. _ . "7 - • . ; .f v ' _ 

After a day of heated debate, the _ . 1 ^ tr * 

European Parliament on Wednes- ^ lOTltlflff firpfllfft I Wit l»ftar Kampala 
day ended up throwing out every F . ‘ v- _ A . 


resolution on sanctiras against NAIROBI (Rautn)— IMting bctweqi the U gandan Aiiay and the 

South Africa, Reuters reported National Resistance Ariny, the cotmtiyVnmm gnenflla group, brokeopt^ 


from Strasbourg, France. 


The final resolution, seeking to 

r Ttw> Pmlio T-Toonrts 


near Kampala onThuraday, a^wtentfyjeopMdmng peace talks; 


U.S. Rejects 
Weapons Ban 


(Contnmed from Page I) 
underground nuclear tests and 
called on the United States to fol- 
low suit. leading to a negotiated 
ban rat such tests. Washington re- 


approve the limited sanctions The official Radio Uganda, mqnitored m Nairobi, quoted thc headof 

agreed Tuesday by all European Uganda's ruling Military OjanaL liaucnaiit General Tho Okriky as 
Community states except Britain, National Resistance Anny forces in dvfiian clothes had 

was voted down 161-149 after the attacked government positions at Kawanda, seven mfles (11 Mamewrs) 
Socialists condemned it as too north of the capital, Kampala. . 

bland. There has not been any official word rax the future of the peace talb 

Some supporters of this center- that opened in Nairobi on Aug. 26. Sources at the closed proceedings said 
-right motion accused rightists op- the National R esist a n ce Army had. stuck firmly to its demands for half of - 
posed to any sanctions of joining the right seats cm the ruling Mffi<ary Council and a complete overhaul of 
forces with the leftists to prevent the army that would leave its men in control 
the Parliament from voicing any 1 ■ 

opinion. Jeers and laughter greeted -n .. _i n ’ V 

the voting. r or the Kecora 

■ Lusaka Meeting Planna' A CWnese coot needed Thursday the final appeal^ ^of an American 
A group of five top South A£rir businessman, Richard Ondrik of Houston, who was found guilty of 
can businessmen wffl bold talks unintentionally starling a hotel fire in which 10 persons itirf, t hel tmhna 
Friday in Lusaka, Zambia, with news agency said Thursday. .. - • fjteutersj 

membere of the African National Anaed pofice have nrested five whites since Tuesday in Zimbabwe's 


members of the African National 


Congress, Realm reported from southern provincial capital of Bulawayo in en mvy ti on wffh a riatwjv fcwn 


Lusaka, citing informed sources. 
The meeting win take place in 


jected the moratorium, saying that defiance of the South African 


tests were needed to perfect Ameri- 
can weapons and that a ban could 
be practical only if Moscow agreed 
to on-site verification. 

Mr. Gorbachev has also declared 


on supporters of the opposition leader, Joshua Nkomo. . ?. (Af) 

Tfe stepson of Andrei IX Sakharov, the Soviet dissident, ended a!4- 
Washingtm on Thursday. Alexd Semyonov, 29, said 


enaneoL which has said pnMcIy /Mexa aemyon 


a six-month moratorium <m the de- Africa. 


mat it opposes any contacts with about his parents, because t 

ssrss z — 

tional Congress is banned in Smith 


abmit Ms parents, because the State Department had told hhikhatf . 
made the case a top pnority. - •••■( AP) 


ployment of new medram-iange 
miffiiles, a freeze that expires m 


At the Lusaka meeting, the 
sources said, ways of ending South 


Correction 


Because of an editing enot, ^some editions of the Sept. 12 Interiiatianal 


November, and has talked about Africa's political and economic cri- Herald Tribune incorrectly identified the Newsweek coEresbori^toe- 

nietino SnuiM nn. i p»j tt q]] jy, 4 1 ^ 1*1119 ^( 1 rwUnl Kv Cmtli AWm B ttm. 1 


“radical” cuts in existing Soviet nu- 
clear arms if the United States 


peOed by South Africa. He is Ray Wflkmson. 


I would hah farther work on re- , ... ~ ; ~ ' 

SSSsS u - s - Sdentiste VataAo Cold Virus 


ington of Mr. Gorbachev’s propos- 
als has led some administration of- 


(Contmued from Page 1) tion. Such a molecule could be the- 


to be more flexible. 

Mr. Speakes said the problems 
associated with the plan for a 
chemical- weapon-free acme includ- 
ed the impossibility of detecting 
the movement of chemical weapons 
into a prohibited zone. 

“The attempt to negotiate a total 
chemical ban in a limned area p»- 


imv iwvoiui uuiit uj juoi- xtvMuvd ogoutoi URU Y1IUSGS 

tists on two teams, from Purdue have long been considered vgtnafly 
University and the Umversfty of impossible to create because at 
Wisconsin. least 100 different kinds of viruses 


.. VU4VIWI U11W VK ViiilfiQ 

Michael G. Rossmann, who led pause colds and each would require 
the Purdue tram, said Roland own vaccine. The virus on winch 
Rueckert, at the Univeraty of Wis- Rossnaan worked is only one 

cousin, had used the newhr deter- °f these, known as human dunovi- 


“The attempt to nraotiate a total ““““X had used the newly deter- °f these, known as human riunovi- 
dtemical ban in a lhmied area ore- mined structure to find that the m i 14 - . 
seats verification problems more I»rt of the sfadl that must attach to “ch tune a person has a bold, 
difficult than a comprehenave and a .«D to cause infection lies deep nwromune system most tailor new 
verifiable ban now bang negptiat- within z. “canyon" on each qf the 20 capable of attacking 

ed," he said. He said that when “magular. sides. tnat particular virus. This Takes a 

there Is a total prohibition there The site appears too narrow for during , winch the vinis 


there Is a total prohibition there 


articular virus. This Takes a 
tys, during which the vinis 


can be no production of chemical ™ body’s infectionrfightizig and- disease , : 

weapons, thus nmlring ji easier to bodies to get in and block infec- *. ^ enough antibodies form, 

detect violations. tion. however, they slop the spread and 

There has beea an international Still, the finding raises the posa- p Person immune to that 
ban on the use of chmiical weap- bility that a synthetic molecule ^ uns .® , rt vulnerable to oth- 


yK) On this occasion , the Bank would also like to express its appreciation to the 

Saudi Government for making it possible to undertake this important Islamic project by provi- 
ding all the required facilities at the Moaisim Model Slaughterhouse. 

y*3ijv May Allah reward all the. contributors to the project, support our Muslim nation 

and guide it to the right course of action and to the unity of its ranks. (j i 

jggjgglSj^ 



detect violations. 

There has been an international 
ban on the use of chemical weap- 
ons since 1925, but no agreed pro- 
hibition on production and stock- 
piling. 


bility that a synthetic m ck yule vrpe oi vims out vulnerable to oth- 
could be designed small enough lo ers A ca Vfmg similar symptoms, 
enter the canyon and bind to the Anri bodies that eventually stop a 
attachment rile, preventing infec- 0010 mJc ^ tK ” 1 hind to sites on the 
ranyon run and probably distort 

. t the eanw< I . 


beam of X-rays through aystal sf* 
ter crystal to produce hundreds, of. 
una 8 cs indicating how the X-rays 
wwe deflected by the. viral sbmc- ■ • 
tore. • ‘ ‘ 

^ [Die photographs yielded indie • 
than so., munoa bits of informa- 
non, winefr were theuranalyzed on a . 
gpqpommgq; (fyber . 205y . at 

iTnuue. The oonquitatidn wag-tifk*.: 
hardest part of the job. Dr. Em?*/ 
rttann said, and could hot have 
been earned out before" tbe adyesf 
of supercomputers. The cafcula- . 
tuna, whkb might hove taken 10 
years some time ago, were oniplet- . 
ed m about a month, 

■' ■ .{The weaken human vkoses was * 
foreshadowed -by the detennin&- . 
ti<n ofthe three^fimeasfond Ante- 

tures in minute ijetailrd'aKBnl 
jjbnj-yEmses, puaeered ^ screa- 
“rts at. Harvard Ujuvetaty- and 
tiwn by Dr. Rossmann; 


jSmyyJ&edfak San ® 

Est. 1911 

Jusc cdl the taxi driver "sank roo doe noo" 

• 5 Rue Dauncw, PARIS 

• Fadkenturm So. 9, MUNICH 


tne canyons sbme so ii no longer 
can attach to a human cdL These 
ran sites, however, are different in 
each type of cold virus. 

Itk, Rossmann said that to de- 
tormrne the exact shape of the-vj- 
rtB, the research team fim convw- 

edttiMoayttlBnefoOT.^.^ . 

York Tunes reported. Then, nrixw 
an atom smasher at Coraril Hni- 
varsaiy, they shined an intense 


O Eiln«<lltp^[ hnWl 
York Timei'senitk t ' 


. YORK- “r-A Spemeg fr 

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raatges of, financial fiFmjdr f Hie 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 19 



;on Fights a Flood 


ata 


By Howard Kurtz 
.and Fred Hiatt 

M'as/rMgroo Pan Service 

WASHINGTON —When Rep- 
resentative Joseph P. Addabbo 


23,000-member fxatmmy of re- 
tired ncljtwy meg and contractor 
employ eeswbo share in f o rm ation 
on electronic warfare. ' 

GTE agreed to plead guilty to 

l _ _ _ eeoftAnn 


imiuwvc josepa r. AOOaoDO - ~-*-.~**w* *v r-~. r 
asked the U.S. Navy why it seeded ** char 8 es and to pay S590.00p.in 
to buy more P-3 submarine-buntr costs and. foes. _ ‘ 

mgairplases, the New York Demo- Aft f r . U “^? t * hBed madent qc- 
crat was told the information was cuaed w 1M3 * ,l 
classified and could not be given to F* 1 *V tte Defense Dep g fo ^fs 
Congress because it might leak out. ®32TS^' ‘ 
A few days lata, however, J Mr. Adda bbo, ch ainoan o f a Boi^cde- 
Addabbo received the uavydatahe fcnsc appropna^ma *£*»*“*; 
was looking for — in an unsolid ted «*. wanted to know why the u*vy 
Lockheed Corp:, the Panned to 
manufacturer of the plane* old 

Federal investigators are increas- Althou gh the navy 

: ingly comSn^Sardefehse am- 

tractors, through a mixture of in- S'* 6 *”®®?* Lo®™™ *** 
trigne. old-boy connections or even ?' contained 

outright bribery, have managed to ■faring. 

gainT^c«s"-<i>nfidcSpSla- gf conC dmMlmfwnM - 

gori documents. non, as wefl as tire mbcommrttees 

In Philadelphia, 20 defense con- ° wn . 1111 “ hlcd . “** ™P ub “ hed 

tractore and Pentagon employees ht ^$ 8 reoort 

have been charged so far in a wide- The m^jecior gpneraTs report 

ranging schemed which confiden- N™* 4* ^dent onto dose 
tial biddiug informatics ghjm “A 

to the companies m exchange for . / . 
cash kickbacks. Mon mdictmems 



t.S i 



Breast Cancer Therapy 
With Hormones Praised 

By Cri seine Russdl 2S 

Washw S ton Post Strrwe about 36.000 older patients annual- 

WASHINGTON — An advisory . might be candidates for the ther- 
panel with the National Institutes * £f t - s good news for poslmeno- 
of Health has made new recom- " sa , women with locally 
menda lions for the treatment of disease," she said, 

breast cancer, endorsing for the But for patients under 50, the 
first time a hormonal therapy with ^^lth institutes’ panel said, there 
few side effects as ajtreatmeni of was slroag evidence to support the 
choice" for many older women m mo ° e traditional cancer che- 

whom the disease has spread to raol ^ era py i using combinations of 
nearby areas. more lOJ ^ c drugs, as standard care. 

. “This is a major finding." the in this group, international stud- 
paneTs chairman. Dr. John H. ies found that use of such chemo- 
Glick, said Wednesday. Dr. _ Click therapy might reduce cancer deaths 
is director of the University of jjy one-fourth, from 36 percent to 
Pennsylvania Cancer Center. Be- 27 percent in the five-year follow- 

r ,1.:. k. .iiiil “ikfiv one no 


fore this, he said, “there was no 
agreement, nationally or interoa- 


up period. 

In 1985. there are expected to be 


agreement, unuumuij W ““ in k7oj, uiul ojv — 

tionalfy, as to what constituted a about 120.000 new cases of breast 
standard of care for the postmeno- cancer in the United States, and 
pausal woman” whose cancer is 38.000 deaths annually. About one 
discovered in the breast and in in l'l American women will devel- 


A crowd outside a Buenos Aires court building bolds a sign d eman ding “prosecution and punishment for aD those gnilty/ 


nearby lymph nodes. 

The 12-member panel spedfical- 


op the disease some time in their 
lives, with roughly three-fourths of 

■ ■ nmm. 


9 Accused by Argentina Appear in Court 


me lz-memoer pana spcuuta*- •»**** , 

l y recommended the use of a hor- the cases in postmenopausal wom- 

mone-blockingdrug called tamoxi- en. . . . 

. • r A CvwArtn cw that in finfMlt hall IOC 


• fro*foTwomen over 50 with breast Experts isay that is mbout halT the 

r in LOUTl cancer that has spread to the lymph patients than may beewdena of 
L *'*"*' W nodes ^ xems dependent on the spread to adjacent lymph nodes. 

hormone estrogen to grow. Studies The ami- hormonal drug tamon- 

■ Alfoosm Going to Europe showed that in this group, hor- fen is sold under the trade name 
...... , mone-Wocking was effective in re- Nolvadex. So far, it has received 

Mr. Alfonstn was w leave Thors- of death by about approval by the Food and Drug 

day on a three-nation European f , Q lo 24 Administration for use m more ad- 

tour aimed at attracting investment fi ‘*^ lfler initial vanced cancer patients, but physi- 

dS^Dr.oSsaid. dans have discretion to use dregs 

< Rose Kushner, a consumer advo- for other conditions. 


an tractor may have ob dined an un- 

fired by McDonmffl Douglas Cmp. ^ ^ 


has aoused the company in a avfl spokesman, Nk± 

nut of corny tpraokes, mduding ggjd a navy inquiry found cused as criminals. The charges 

the improper acquisition ^ ^ company j^dnot violated against them include murder, tor- 

lary documents and lax handling of laws orrSdations. ture and kidnapping in the disap- 

classifled matenaL bfcl^mnell ^ those gray areas pearances of more than 9,000 Ar- 

MWX whor vre were working vmydosdy gStines. 
contractor, denied the tmaiges, s^r- ^ spgciai.pjdect office," he “The community has entrusted 
mg they were not corroborated by “It’s not unnsual. where we’re me with this difficult task of do- 
its own investigation.- workin? very closely with the cos- manding justice." said Julio Stras- 

Concerns abou t , unaut horized /project like this, for sera, the prosecutor, as he opened 

disclosures were unoerscored l ue$- ^ ^ freer exchangeof infer- his summation Wednesday. “I am 

ftnv Tutvn a flTF. fran cnhndiarv . IW . . , , . . . ... , ' 


By Lydia Chavez 

fJew York Tima Srrrice 

BUENOS AIRES — The nine 
military officers who governed Ar- 
gentina during six violent years 
have stood together for the first 
time in a civilian courtroom ac- 
cused as criminals. The charges 


. day when a GTE Coip. subaidia^, «»5 Un \ 
.. a retired air forec nugotMl two j—p^- 
;■ other persons jwerc wtih ^^ ctmvictions at the De- 

conspmng to obtam dashed doc- f Induslria i Supply Center in 
•\ 00 dectromc-warfare con- inv ^ nart of the 


manding justice." said Jutio Stras- 
sera. the prosecutor, as he opened 
his summation Wednesday. “I am 


straight ah et »^ i avoiding any eye tried by civilian courts for the ■ Alfoosm Going to Europe 
contact with the prosecution. crimes they ^committed during a ^ Alfonstn was to leave Thurs- 
The strongest cases are against dictatorship. day on a three-nation European 

the first junta, which reled from The prosecutor's five-day sum- [qJ|- sjmed at attracting investment 
1976 to 1980 when most of the mation is a review of earlier uxh- lowering European trade re- 
disappearances occurred. Former mony that implicated the com- 5^^ onArgentinegoods, Reu- 
PreadCTt Jorge Vidda, Admiral manders in 709 crimes ranging m Buen«Aires. 

Sal M Or"od“ d A g oT d a“ SSSffKTiSSSfi t ^ 

charged with homicide, illegal de- prosecution contends that these Ec ®jj“2i Dante 

5- - rqjrcscntalive of U* 

^IScrto Viola, president of the ’ The 22 defense lawyers will make m Yu Jf 5 f a '™; sl °P ° n * 

second junta, and Admiral Ar- their closing arguments between *° 

mando LarSnischiiu have been SepL 29 and Oct. 16. Wcst Germany and France. 

charged with the same crimes. Gen- ” 

era] Omar Grafftgna is charged . 


cancer uuu uoa v— r- r , - , , 

nodes and seems dependent on the spread to adjacent lymph nodes, 
hormone estrogen to grow. Studies The anti-bonnond dreg tamon- 
shewed that in this group, hor- fen is sold under the trade name 
mone-Wocking was effective in re- Nolvadex. So far it has received 


ms summation vveonesuay. 1 am .7, „ rf “ u__ 

not alone in this work: 1 am accom- wth all of the 

iw q nnn " miade. He is the only one ot tne 

who nine defendants not being held m 
tried as one erf his first official acts. ™ ' ve 


tracts that the company was seek- 
mg. 


Philadelphia involve part of the 
5600 milli on the yard spends each 


,I1 fr __ ... . ■ , . year on spare parts. tried as one of his first otiicuu acts. 

GTE smd the receipt of such m- RjduudSeraan of the Defense Thousands of Argentines vanished 
lernal budget documents was a p rocurement Fraud Unh said the during the military government’s 
common industrywide practice, ^ phr pentagon employ- effort to crush a leftist insurgency 

and federal officials did notdrspute ^ only in the late 1970s. The military has 

the statement , . ■ three bidders are required on the attributed 688 deaths to the left. 

“The investigation is contmmng OTaTW pjocrenients. After receiv- ‘The guerrillas kidnapped, tor- 


Leopoldo Galtieri. the president 


thee Capture Suspects, Arms 
Hunt for Duarte Daughter 


ail five crimes. The other members TheAxuxuued Press He also revealed that Ana Ceci- 

of the third junta. Admiral Jorge SAN SALVADOR — Salvador- ba Vetleda, “““S-J 

Anaya and Brigadier General Basi- ^ Army troops and policemen Mrs. Duarte Durin. had been 
lio Lami Doro. are charged only „uded 12 guer!ina “safe houses" MW* with her. 1 
with illegal detention and usmg ihroughoul the capital Thursday, Vdleda worked as a secretary at me 
false doSments. capturing suspect weapons and radio stauon managed by the presr- 

L_f n r H e„ amt't Hanphier. 


of the third junta. Admiral Jorge 


aaSBH aer.-aatts 

wto^d^t^cont^Tsu/ aroiSd'^^tblSdWgtoS W ^ne police found a D^nTdri^ 

atf.trsrjess 


“It was extremely widespread." 


JJDUIl 1/tbUtV o l.iuv»lii 1VIVVU IIVUI u. «V * 

There still was no word from the anned men at the New San Salva- 
Oman’s abductors. dor University and taken away in a 

In one house, the police found a van. Mrs. Duarte DurAa’s driver 
1 S - mad e anti-tank rocket, ma- was fatally shot and a bodyguard 


uncovoretL” ; Mr. Seaman said. “It became a way response to the subversion in three 

The indictment says Hjhe^docn- there** He said the “go- words: ferocious, clandestine and 

ments were obtained for GTE Gov- rate » f OT kickbacks was 5 per- cowardly” 

• emmerrt Systems Coip. byTte for- ^ contract value. The defendants, among them 

.• mer consultant, Bernie E. Zetfl, a wheme three former presidents, sat on a 

retired air force major who also has £££ wooden bench facing six Appeals 

done consulting woifcfor Northrop ^ md up get- Court judges. It was their first ap- 

■assr-re SSS3S5' esrissssss 


'Tji 'Ji >p 

C L ~ 

- xrs. 
j-v. • ■ — 

; ] . 


Elderly Are Urged to Back Tax Reform 

Reagan Says His Han^m Help Young to Support Parenls 

u- mnamittv nme referrina. to press for orotectionist legiriation. 


me arrival 01 me luriuei i ihihm ; i i m -mane anu-uiiiR iducl, uj<i- was laiauy snot auu a 
leaders. Hundreds of policemen, chine gimx, Israeli and U.S.-made was critically wounded, 
many carrying submachine guns, automatic rifles, grenades, explo- The van, which was reported sto- 

slood guard around the court, and sives and documents, said lieuten- len a few ^ore the kidnap- 
electronic screening devices were ant Colonel Carlos Aviles, an was fp^d in southeastern 

set up at the entrance to the coprt- armed forces spokesman. gmi Salvador hours after the kid- 

room. Jutio Adolfo Rey Prendes, Mr. napping. 

“THis trial has an aomiouslns- Duarte’s closest iMa;«ud ^ ^red from a 

toncal value, not only for Algcn- Wednesday that the president had ^ said 

linesbutforimofLalinAmer^" wSSdayCt to SEZFZ 

said Ernesto S^ato who presided Q cs or potenual demands of the the road of violence and 

over the presidential comnassion abductors, who have been alent: , rH added- “Tm verv sad 
to. investigated to diupp-r- to* toy lidntjppBl to. G«to SavLItave mylmoSy 
ances. “For the first time *em^ hipe Duarte DurAn. 35, on Tties- ^ rm g'out." 

bars of a military junta are being day. 


inn 01 w«Ai>*w * um j «Mpy 

country, and I'm carrying it oat" 



The Associated Pros . 

TA ^h^^6knotedto 1 Si D?mocra tie" governor, endmay'beimpossibk. 

°vatoM^^n‘° ddrf? Amar- ■ Eariy Passage Doubted 

■- icans on Thursday asa way tobet- nJddie class” b ecause the plan The Ways and Means Conmnl- 
ta the fives xrffotae^^* £»T£?wS^mSS we want tec of the House of Representatives 
and to atiow dnldrm to better care says and help us Ht announced a legislative schedule 

for their eWedy parents. theotixer, we Wednesday that could lead to 

Speaking to the Se nwr Citoens the rich.” House parage of a tax rrfonnbm 

Forum an Tax Reform, Mr Rf*- ? said: “Our fair- by the end of October, The New 

gan, who J&74, commented: ^fou X2 ^ D ] an includes relief for York Times reported from Wash- 
ed I have much in common, a* needy. Under our ington. 

We’ve lived out a great part of our plantbepoorj and all Wind, dtkriy However, Senate Republican 
lives." Now. he told his audience, d j sa j,i cd Americans living in leaders said that probably would 
he needed its help in winning con- poverty would ^ completdy re- not leave enough time for the Sen- 
gressional approval for his pro- from federal income tax ate to complete action by the end oi 

gram. roJes." theyear. 

Mr Reagan warned that “gjerial The plan would reduce the num- The Houre tax-wntmg 
mtertsts’’ were fighting his propose ber of tax rates from 14 different tee plans to begin sessions to draft 
TS sSdtST preset tax ^ _ of 15, 25 and 35 leshOation SepL 26, a comimtte 

shelters and loopholes now in the percent; raise the personal cxemp- spokesman said, and hop« to 
tax laws would^make the rest of os and limit or etiminate several ish that pnxxs by OcL 12 and send 

SI fecial treatment dial S«toandcre*ts.Overan.the an apmoved bffl to the Senate by 
they and their big-money ctientt white House says, 78 percent of die end of October. 
recrive“" Americans would pay less « the Senate Robert J. Dole or Kan- 

-H you’re going to outflank same tax that they pay now. sas, the 0[ 

u 11 .Soi and Ret this However, many of Mr. Reagan’s er, said that if the Senate ; did not 

lh0 ^S^nLsed."besaid,“acer- fdlow Republicans have warned receive the legislation until about 
^ is acSg to need Ln thmmiless he also deals with Nov. 1 that body probably wouM 

CSSS SISO-billto lorrigD not be able lo take a final vote this 
trade deficit and efforts in Con- year. 

If Congress approved his pro- — - 7 ” ” 

gram, Mf%ean said, youagg 

Americans would k«m more^ 

SSrincomes tbrouJilowerjaTO, 
find more jobs in a healthy erano- 
my and benefit from a rising stan- 
dard of living. 

He asserted that present demo- 
tions had failed to keep up with 
inflation. 

• “The tax code has in effect made 

it more and more eiq>ensiveto«re 

fordder parents or gwedWdnm 
S good ^Srmgpng.J«J - <^ acam,a 
they deserve," he said. 

-The president also wpeawd ba 

oledge to the senior atjzens ,^f 
pie T?T n .... t-x plan would af- 
nothing m oar - m 

feet your Social Seamty ewexs m 

any way — porioa. 

h#. derided an unnamed “pnwn- 

■ Ji&rsws 

nuddte oms. ^ ^^ 1^ 


He apparently was referring to gress for protectionist legislation, 
remarks over the weekend by New achieving a tax reform by year's 


Mario. M. Cuomo, dial the tax re- _ . Doubted 

form plan would be “devastating to ■ 

the nffle class" because the plan The Ways and Means Ommulr 
says that “with one hand we want tec of the House of Representatives 
you to reach down and help us hfl announced a legislative sch^uJe 
tbA poor" while “with the other, we Wednesday that oouM tod to 
waniyou to boost the rich." House parage of a 

Mr Reagan sai± “Our fair- by the end of October, The New 
share- tzxpkm includes relief for York Times reported from Wasb- 
mfflions ctf the needy. Under our ington. 

plan the poor, and all Wind, elderiy However Senate Rcp ubll “n 
or disabte Americans living in leaders said that probably wottid 
poverty would be eompletdy re not leave enough time for the hen- 
moved from federal income tax ate to complete action by the end 01 
rote" the year. 

The plan would reduce the num- The House tax-writing comnut- 
ber oftax rates from 14 different tee plans to begin sessions to draft, 
rates to three — of 15, 25 and 35 legislation SepL 26, a committee 
percent; raise the personal cxemp- spokesman said, and hopes to no- 
tion, and limit or chmmate several ish that process by OcL 12 and send 
deductions and credits. Overall, the an approved bffl to the Senate by 
White House says, 78 percent of ihe end of Octobw- 
Americans would pay less or the Senator Robert J. Dole oT ICan- 
same tax that they pay now. sas, the Repubtiran nugong; Jead- 

However, many of Mr. Reagan’s er, said that if the Senate did not 
nu»c™, j . M«tir, (hr lpaid»fjOn until about 


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THE ADVANTAGE IN THE MIDDLE EAST 

m INTER CONTINENTAC HOTELS 




Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER .13, 1985 


Pinochet Assails Democracy Plan, 
Says Foes Seek 'Conquest of Power’ 


By Martin Andersen 

Washington Pan Service 

Santiago — La a speech 

marking the 12th anniversary of 
pie coup that brought him to power 
in - Chile, President Augusto Pino- 
chet has strongly criticized his po- 
litical opponents and a church- 
hacked plan for a return to 
democracy. 

General Pinochet demanded 


agreement signed last month is ness to deal only with the conserva 
known. The agreement, worked oat tive parties. 


under the sponsorship of the Ro- 
man Catholic cardinal T uan Fran- 
cisco Fresno, united opposition 
groups from across the political 
spectrum in a call for elections, 
although with no date specified. 


of the Ro- General Pinochet said: “Wecan- 
Juan Fran- not accept that behind a supposed 
opposition democratic objective there is the 
le political expression and the advance of to- 
r elections, lalitarian communism. Some of 
ipcafied. those who signed this are responsi- 


Cardinal Fresno is said to have for the strategy designed to 


stepped in to promote the 
meat among the parties in an 


ree _ make Chile a mere satellite of the 
fort Soviet Union.” 


vjcnerai nnocfcet demanded among me parties man effort 
Wednesday that opponents show 10 head off growing street protests Chile’s Communist Party did not 
they are interested in more than and political violence that have sign the accord, but the Marxist 



Pyongyang’s Soviet Ties 



By Daniel Southerland mwe to bolster ties with North 
W ashington Post Service Korea, but are putting the best face - 
BELTING — rhina has wd- on a delicate situation, 

corned North Korea’s recent ' ' The North Koreans were long , 
strengthening of ties with the Sovi- considered closer to the Chinese 
et Union, in sharp contrast to the than 10 die Russians, but have de- 
days when h might have remained v ? do P ed a pattern .of playing rare 
silent or expressed alarm. side against the other. Several dip- 

At a press briefing Wednesday, a kunats interviewed in Beijing said 
Foreign Ministry spokesman said *** saw no sign that the pattern 


that the Chinese “poatii 
praise" North Korea’s “i 


tbqr saw no sign that the pattern 
would change. - 

Several remained, however, that 


deeds." 

In a 90-minute speed; before 
anout 2,000 military, diplomatic 
and governmental guests, General 
Pinochet lashed out at critics, say- 
ing, “Their anxiety for reaching 
power at any price makes them try 
le destabilize the government." 

He said that Chile would achieve 
“true democracy” only by adhering 
to the terms of an authoritarian 
constitution he pushed through in 
1980 and he seemed to step bade 
from a more conciliatory position 
offered by officials last week on the 
opposition parties’ proposal. 

However, General Pinochet did 
r.ot reject outright the proposed 
“national accord,” as the 1 1-party 


tend the diplomatic gathering, at non-Marxist parties that “aban- 
Church sources said he had stayed doned their principles” to ally 
away after learning of the response themselves against his gove rnmen t 
General Pinochet would deliver. The agreement picked op anoth- 
General Pinochet did say that er supporter Tuesday night when a 


on “friendship, cooperation and vMiu&K IAMUIUCUL im . - "** *j mw ivnimini^ uj tuaw 

mutual respect.” He did not com- eve of two days of high-level >ng closer UHlto Russians, 
ment on the recent praise by die ^^ks between American and Soviet . China, which is trying to develop 
U.S. State Department for the diplomats in Moscow on their dif- ris economy, dcarfy has an interest 
church -backed agreement ferenoes. ■ over areas of potential . m a stable Korea and has encour- . 

■S fln tiiigo and much of central Trouble in the Far 38®d die on -a gain off-again dia- 

S2 C Z** -i ck f d 001 lwice ^ US. side was expected to North and Sooth. 

Wednesday night after two power voice concern over whattheRea- “» apparently hopes 

pylons near Santiago were gan administration views as a sie- mi* lts contacts with South Korea 
bombed. A Communist gnemHa nificant Soviet naval buikfaro m j * e United States 

organization claimed responsible East Asia, indudins the Soviet de- ■ Ja P an to raemrocate by 'open- 
ly- lively of advanced MIG-23 jet withNorth Korea. 

At least 30 persons were do- figfatera to North Korea eariier thk * moved over the past 

rained Wednesday while attempt- year. About a month ago toee few - y *^£? m a p{dk7 ** virtual 
mg to hold memorial ceremonies Soviet warships made anunprece- to one of actively 

for Salvador ADende, the Sodalist den ted call ata North Korean Don P™ 8 10 1 ! du “ tensions on the 
president who was killed during the Sr,™ ... - Korean peninsula. . I 


MMiKiwi m uivwugh uiu umi « ^ 

among the signatories were sectors retired air force 


Vi out U1UJ U LUW.JT VUUIU iivnu VUllUUlg YVI LU 

show they were interested in more General Pinochet, 
than “just the mere conquest of General Pinochet said that Chile 
power.” was the only nation in history to 

It was unclear whether these liberate itself from “Soviet commu- 
words reflected a shift by the gov- nisrn” and for that reason was the 
eminent toward negotiations with victim of unremitting attacks by 
civilians. Some opponents said they groups “that mil not accept do- 
believed the phrasing was part of a feat.” 

government effort to fragment the He said his government attached 
opposition by signaling a willing - special importance to UiL-Chilean 



mg to hold memorial ceremomes Soviet warahips made anunprece- to one of actively 

for Salvador ADende, the Sodalist dented call ata North Korcanport P™ 8 10 1 ^ du “ tensions on the 
president who was lolled during the Some diplomats in Bdiim- sav K^ean pamusula. ... 

ITO coup that brought General they believes that the OimeseLSr b- 1 worries the North 


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1973 «up that brought GcSeral ZSERS “* !*■*■«*• the North 

Pinochet to power. ally are concerned about the Soviet evay tnnethey sec China 

~ — and South Korea- work out a prob- 

, - ~ , fera- " said a Weston diplomat, 

. frn I I referring to the return of a crew 

kOr JH.XsL JL I member of a Chinese naval aircraft 

— 1 whose pflm crashed in Sooth Korea 

while trying to defect. . 

■ UR, Soviet Discuss Asia 
_ U.S. and Soviet officials began 
discussions Thursday on the Far 
East, the latest in a series of t*TK 
on regional problems prior to the 
summit meeting to be hdd' by the 
two superpowers in November, 
Reuters reported from Moscow. 

. . , _ ... kiuuo. . UjS. delegation was headed 

with large tracts of land, situated in Ideal position with ectenszve hy Wolfowitz, atastint 

Praia Da Rocha secretary of state for East Asian 

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Rescuers search the wreckage of two Portuguese trains. 

43 Are Killed ill Collision 
Of 2 Trains in Portugal . 


The Associated Press 

VISEU, Portugal — An east- ' 
bound express .train carrying. 

' hundreds of migrant workers to 
France slammed head-on into a 
westbound local train in the 
mountains of central Portugal 
late Wednesday. 

At least 43 persons died in 
the burning wreckage. Earlier 
estimates had put the death. triD 
much higher. More than 100 
persons were injured, reports 
said. • 

The seven-coach express, 
bound from the coastal city of 
Oporto to Hendaye,. France, 
was behind schedule and did 
not wait for the load train 


bound for Coimbra to mowe tb 
a riding, the Portuguese news, 
agency AN OP quo ted railroad 
officials as saying. : 

Tire witeked coaches tipped 
off . the rails and, burst :mto- 
flames. ^People were being. 
b\imedalive,sboutmg,junqHng^ 
from the carriages and dying ar ■ 
the ixaimwmdo^”smdI)narte ; 
Santos Correia, 37; one of. the 

. *^^P^ad estrlier mpOTted 
that more than 100 .pecsons ^ 
died. Bui the news agency Noti- 
cias de Portugal quoted Prime . ; 
Minister' - M&rio Soarjes on-* 
Thursday assayingthat theear- 
ly figures were exaggerated. 7 • 2, 







IJlmitfln 



ITTnlrSiw 

MSStnfm 


By Robert Gillette 

Los Angrier Times Service 

WARSAW — Poland’s Roman 


he had not heard of any 
plans for attacks on churches. . 
Asked whether he would vote on 


- — — — - ■■ * MUU1U J 1 UV 1 UM uv vryviu VVIC UU 

Catholic primate, Cardinal Jozef Get 13, he smiled and said, “Ask 
Glemp, has dismissed a daim by after the election.” 
the government authorities that the . When, local elections were, h el d 
chinch is lending rilent support to bi June 1984, the entire church In- 
tuitional parliamentary elections erarchy failed to. appear at the. 

norrt mnntk mils sluuu.'.. 


next month. 

Leaders of the outlawed SoGdar- 
ity trade union have called for a 


polls, choosing instead to attend a 
religious conference. 

Cardinal GIemp T s trip to the 


(PR/14270) 




•He 


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■V ““*V WU«i IU1 a VfVftUp 3 LU|J (flC 

boycott of the election, and some United States is described as a 
radical priests have impbdtiy en- purely pastoral visit to Pohsh-' 
dorsed the protest In sermons. Vot- American or wnmiinih'«»y m PhihwfA . 
er turnout at the Oct 13 dections jrfna, Washiiigton and Detiroit. '■ 





enuneut and the opposition. out the possibffity of informal ocm^ 

The assertion of sQent church tacts with the Rea^n adrmnfetra^ 
support for the elections was made tioo.. 

last week by Deputy Interior Min- Washington .has made 'fcUmo^ 
ister Wladyslaw Pozoga in the that it plans nucontacts witK Geh^ 

Communist Party newqjaper Try- eral Wqjdecfa Jannddd, thePbtish 
toteaLudu. lcader^daring hisyirittoNcw York : 

Mr. Pozoga also contended that latorihis month for the opening of' 

Western in telligence agencies United Nations ^General As- 
pianned to disrupt the elections by sembty. State Dep ar teait officials 
launching attacks on' Polish have said that the dedrion came in 
churches that would be blamed on response to political, anests hi Po- 1 . 

Poland’s security service. land- Canfinal farof rinn... 

Cardinal Glemp, who is to leave ~ — ^nnnai Jozef Gteqy 

Sept. 17 on a weekloog visit to the ■ ■■ • *■ ^ ... r ■ ■ 

United States, said Wedioesday w- -r /-^ _ 

U.S. Fears lax Security 

signaled its support He added • - 

Ghana’sLeadertoVfeitauns At BaSCS 111 PHllin p lilPi S 

The Associated Press MTST-' ■■ 


U.S. 


The Associated Press 
BEUING — Jeny J. Rawlings, 
the leader of Ghana, will make his 
first official visit to China begin- 

ninn MiuiJn. ,L . /T.- t- - 


By Bill Keller 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — US mffi- 


fliag Monday, the OteFbA w ^HlNGTON^ US. mffi- 
MSnistiy announced Thursday toiy bases m the PhflippmK are 
wsaay. poorly protected and are extreme! v 


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poorly protected and are extremely 
vulnerable to terrorist attack, ac- 
cording to a U.S. Senate report sent 
to Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger this week. . 


cunty improvements were 'undrif 
way, including $4.7 million in 
planned fortifications at Clark; biit 
Mr. Sasser, Lhe senior Democrat on 1 
the .military construction panel, 
said the mnitaiy was moving too 
slowly. : . - 

“We’re aerating In a cotmtiy 
where there, is now an indigenous, 

vnm-«M,r '.re ' 


The report by an investigator for mcre 4Si J1 gly effective ’ guerrilla 


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North Logun Beach Cdrfonw a the 

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r eading mud news. The 2 ttsnncuwe 
'osaancei, and rwo utf^ommd anal 
hws a are w raunded by ggefan, Igy^h 
with w otartoHi. founcrens. and pondi. The 
lorgw. *6e*oamhcmoh»breo»hldbna 
luntan diwH 100m, metfa roam with 
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Judy'ofnee and wme ceSor. A domx 
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People’s Army, the gnenifla army 
of the outlawed Oimmnmct Dum.. 


course,- they’re going to turn their 
attention to U.S. installations in 
that countiy.” 

The guerrillas in tiwRIal^ipiaa 


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“Clark and Subic, especially 
u*rk, appear to be very vulnerable 
should the NPA shift tactics and 
begm to target U.S. bases,” said the 


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ftir" 


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jgiijp.:: s 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 13, 1985 




Page 5 


u- 


U.S. Team Broke Photo Accord 


’ He ihad originally thought that 

. — French members of the Thanic-wss largely intact The 
meTitamc expedition have ao* first hint that her stem was missing 
rosea thar U.S. partners of violat- came, he said, when an imigag 
mg an agreement on distributing device was towed across tbe area 
pictures of the sunken passenger .wbde the stem was presureod to 
_ - - lie. Not until be and ins colleagues. 

V 1 e j®* 11 * mission, headed by bound for home, examined photo* 
Kobert D. Ballard, a senior sden- graphs; *»Vm * half nnfc astem of 
^ m the Woods Hole Oceano- the wreck by a camera-bearing 
graphic Institution, and Jean-Louis sled, did the fate of the stem be- 
Michel of the government-run come apparent. • 

French Institute for Research and Tbe photogyaphs show a field of 

. Fxpkxtatioa of Sea discovered debris indudjng a view of an en- 
vime wreckage of the Titanic on gjne room telegraph of the type 
‘■TSqpi.i. _ used by-a pilot or captain to send 

The ship sank off Newfoundland commands to (he engine zoom. Mr* 
on the lught of April 14-15, 1912; Batterd showed a drawing of the 
during its maiden ' voyage from Titanic's stembefarethe sinking 
Southampton, England,- to New with such a tdegraph ui view as 
Yorit. At the time, it was the largest weB as a crane strikingly similar to 
ship in the world and was consul- one lying among the debris far 
ereil imsinkable because of its don- astern. 

ble hulL Following a detailed analysis of 

Last week, the French institute evidence bearing an the positions, 
said that occlusive rights to “press of the Titanic and. neazby strips, 
documents and audiovisuals” from Mir. Ballard said: “There is no 


the joint expedition had been doubt in my mmcT dial the CaB- 
awarded to French and Canadian fonrian should have rescued the 


awarded to French and Canadian fonrian should have rescued the 

groups. _ .* survivors. 

On Wednesday, Yves SQlaid, the Mj. Ballard said that the Califor- 
presidem of the French institute, nian was enough to see the 
said that Mr. Ballard and the Titanic's running lights and its 
Woods Hole Institution, which has w pht distress rockets, 
been freely distributing photo- 
graphs from the search, had pot ' - 

lived up to their end of the agree- ; . 

ment. m TT TTt 

Free distribution ofthephoto- X X X S-J 

graphs “does not conform to all of ■ . * ■ 1 

the agr eements taken in their name PRICE: 3Sg*JSSg-T 

by one of their most eminent repre- T-rrANir NEW 

sematives,” Mr# SQlard said. ™E TITANIC, 

He said iba institute had asked a REPOR TS ARE 

Washingtoncourt to bar theAmer- ■■,T7~ n „o *i r i r- 

icans from distributing the pic- PASSENGERS SAYS) 
tuxes. HIV IHniDTD R7C 



Torture in South Africa 


Widespread, Study Says 


By Glenn Frankel *** 

, c __ cent said thar hair had been pulled, 

JOHANNESBURG^Pbysjcal 3 Parent said the soles of their feel | 
i i - B i - were beaten and 3 percent reported 

and psychological torture of pohu- ^ f ^ 

cal detainees is used systematical- aou ^ B 

ly on a widespread baas" in South ft also accused aulhoriues of 
Africa, according to a report by the widespread use erf psychological 
• i_: -f r._. t. — torture, including false accusations. 


University of Cape Town. 


The study, released Wednesday, solitary confinement, verbal abuse 
reportedly took two and a half and threats of violence. 


years and included interviews with research samp le was made 


176 former detainees. It said 83 — ^ 127 blacks. 36 persons of 
percent reported some form of mixed-race or Asian origin and 13 
physical torture while in custody, The average period of de- 

mUla •ltm/w'f ika anliM c^ntnlp. Tft* - -« — ca f a. mavetliC 


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while almost the entire sample re- was three to four months 

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Wine bottles on tbe ocean floor in ODe of tbe disputed photographs, and anchor chains. 


THE NEW YORK HERALD. 


titanic, new white star liner, 
reports are most contradictory, 


EUROPEAK Epmos— PAMS-— TPBSPAV. Aintn - ”• m - 

STAR LINER. FOUNDERS OFF 


FOUNDERS OFF NEWFOUNDLAND; 

BUT APPALLING LOS S OF LIFE IS FEARED 

' i i ife FIELDS DRIFT 


■ Rescue Seen Possible 

Earlier, Waller SuHivan of The 
New York Times reported: 

Al a Washington news confer- 
ence an Wednesday, Mr. Ballard 
affirmed that rescue, of the . Thim- 
ic’s passengers was wilhm easy 
reach of a nearby ship. Tbecaptain 
of that ship, the Cadjfomian, was 

agenciesmd 8 oritiozed for poor 
seamanship and navigation. 

The destruction of the Titanic's 
stem is the chief mystiay to emerge 
from examination of photographs - 
and videotapes obtained, since the 
sunken liner was found. 

According, to Mr. Ballard there 
was no sign erf a severe impact rat 
the sea floor, implying that the drip 
landed gently. 

One picture of the top deck 
showed whae a grant skylight that 
covered the first dass section amid- 
ships had drflapsed-' “You can see 




UBkLLY Sim 


I hwipT ■■ tb" 1 


-\-J% 




. - .U torn- —• 

0- 9 

mm « Mr T. » Tttijir . *■ ?■» 


(4) ■yT F ftnTTATT - tor u. 

sizsttrjsrjzz- -tartrjss; 


6) aiZKPXO- 


r~ _____ -m n, ia m n-s I*- 




right down the grand staucase,”- 
hfc Ballard said.' - ■ • 


s=^= rAfgjr"* - - \s&£Z:ZZ 
rrH 

tbe EW ^ oim N w YoHc HenUd. ^og the^ 


logical abuse. ( 

Police declined to comment on __ 
the study. In the past, police offi- 
cials have denied aUegauons of tor- 
ture, although the government has 
made an undisclosed number of 
out-of-court financial settlements 1 
with former detainees or their fam- 
ilies after lawsuits alleging physical 
abuse. 

In 1982, Louis Le Grange, the 
minis ter of law and order, issued a 
set of directions on the humane 
treatment of prisoners that includ- 
ed a statement banning torture. But 
the report said tnat Mr. Le 
Grange’s directions were “filled 
with provisos and escape clauses” 
and were not legally binding 

So far this year nearly 2,700 peo- 
ple have been detained under emer- 
gency regulations decreed by the 
government in July. The report es- 
timates that more than 300 others 
have been held under other stat- 
utes, including South Africa's 
sweeping Internal Security Act. 
Under that law, detainees can be 
held indefinitely without charge or 
access to lawyers or family. 

Sixty persons have died while in 
detention since 1963, according to 
the Detainees' Parents Support 
Committee, an opposition human 
rights group in Johannesburg, | 
which smd that 14 others have died | 
since 1977 while in police custody. 

The report was compiled by two 
researchers for the Institute of 
Criminology at the university, con- 
sidered one of South Africa's most 
prestigious. 

Of those detainees who said they 
were tortured, 75 percent reported 
beatings, including punches, kicks 
and slaps as well as blows from a 
variety of implements. Fifty per- 
cent said they were forced to 
crouch or stand on their toes for 
prolonged periods, 25 percent said 
they were had been subjected to 
electric shock, and 18 percent to 
choking. Fourteen percent said 
their bodies had been suspended in 
various forms. 


detained more than once. 



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Fifteen percent of the detainees 
they hud been chained or man- 





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K tt *!■*•* •*>••*»*» 


Page 6 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 


Sribune. 


PnUkfed With TV New Yoik Tines aod The WMtiagtoa Port 


Protection and Party Lines 


Donald Regan’s announcement at a meeting 
with Republican congressional leaders that (he 
president is willing to support sane form of 
trade legislation establishes where the real de- 
bate on trade is going on: within the Republi- 
can Party. The Democrats have advanced 
some get- tough-on- trade bills. But the Demo- 
crats are just making gestures. The Republi- 
cans could end up making policy. 

Leadin g the opponents of trade restriction 
are enthusiastic supply-siders such as Repre- 
sentative Jack Kemp. Mr. Kemp comes from 
Buffalo, an old steel-mill town that was one of 
the few metropolitan areas to support (he 
tough-on-trade stance of Walter Mondale. Mr. 
Kemp believe the economy would bloom if 
only government restrictions and penalties, 
such as taxes and tight-money policies and 
trade barriers, were stripped away. Protection- 
ism may help establish industries in the short 
term, but free trade helps existing and poten- 
tial industries in the long term. 

But for the moment Mr. Kemp and those 
who agree with him — and they have long 
seemed to include the president — are on the 
defensive. Congressmen returning from recess 
have been hearing plenty from constituents 
who are convinced current trade roles are 
hurting them: b usiness men fearful of foreign 
competition, workers concerned about losing 
jobs, local politicians concerned about estab- 


Voting Rights: A New Rattle 


President Reagan, who won by a landslide 
in 1980 and 1984, lost another kind of voting 
battle by another land of landslide in 1982. 
That is when Congress, despite his opposition, 
voted overwhelmingly to strengthen the Vot- 
ing Rights Act The votes, 389 to 24 in the 
House and 85 to 8 in the Senate, so buried the 
opposition that Mr. Reagan reluctantly signed 
the bill rather than have his veto ovenidderL 
Now the administration seeks to win in the 
Supreme Court what it lost in Congress, in a 
case from North Carolina, it has asked the 
justices to interpret the law in precisely the 
ways Congress rejected so resoundingly. 

It is not even a partisan initiative; other 
Republicans rush to dissociate themselves 
from iL Senator Robert Dole, the majority 
leader, and others who guided the voting b£D to 
passage have responded with their own brief 
urging the Supreme Court not to trim the law 
to administration specifications. Such a brief 
dramatizes the administration’s estrangement 
from civil rights, mainstream politics and the 
bipartisan national sense of electoral justice 
that inspired the 1982 taw. 

The law arose because of a 1980 Supreme 
Court ruling that anyone trying to rf mllengp. 
state voting rules had to prove discriminatory 
intent on the part of state lawmakers. Gerry- 
manders and other devices could nullify the 
growing black vote, yet showing they were 
intended to discriminate was not practical. 

Consider a typical tactic, the multi-member 
election district. Smaller districts might enable 
black neighborhoods to elect candidates of 
their choice. Submoging those populations 
within large areas with white majorities meant 
that fewer or no blacks would be elected. But 
who could prove a discriminatory motive? 

Congress did not outlaw at-large districts or 
any other voting practice. It said they were 


invalid if, based on all the evidence, the politi- 
cal process was “not equally open" to minor- 
ities. Electoral success or lack of it was to be 
one of the criteria, but the law disavowed any 
minority right to representation in proportion 
to population — that is, no racial quotas. 

in the North Carolina case a federal court 
weighed all the evidence, including a century 
of discrimination, and found that several at- 
large districts violated the law. The Justice 
Department, joining the state’s appeal, argued 
that since blacks have made gains in two recent 
elections — up from four legislators to 16 — 
the lower court must have been using a forbid- 
den quota as a yardstick. 

Do a few victories for blacks exonerate' 
North Carolina’s practices? On its face, the 
1982 law says no. Congress made dear in the 
law and committee reports that, just as no 
single factor is enough to condemn a district- 
ing plan, no single factor exonerates it Any 
other reading of the law would give greater 
weight to a handful of successes than to de- 
cades of unfair defeats, and under conditions 
that threaten to make them temporary. 

The same Justice Department that tried to 
obstruct the bill has the nerve to ask the high 
court, in interpreting the law. to give more 
weight to the views of Senator Orrin Hatch, 
leader of the right senators who opposed it, 
than to those of Mr. Dole and the 84 other 
senators who voted for iL The Department 
characterizes them as a “faction." 

Ignoring the usual canons for construing 
statutes, the Justice Department must strain to 
read the law the way it does. For the adminis- 
tration to insist on straining is to flout what 
Mr. Dole and his "faction" know: Decency 
and fairness to underrepresented minorities is 
always, regardless of party, the best politics. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 

Apartheid: Pressure, Response .. President Rea 


President Pieter Botha’s restoration of citi- 
zenship, second class, to millions of black 
South Africans will be welcome — like Presi- 
dent Reagan’s sanctions proposals— more for 
(be direction the government is moving than 
for the reforms themselves. The measures will 
enrage his disaffected right wing in advance of 
this month’s important by-elections, while 
meeting none of the immediate demands of 
black leaders. Bui it would be quite wrong to 
dismiss [the] changes as unimportant simply 
because they win have little immediate impacL 
Mr. Botha has dismantled the ideological 
basis of apartheid, the repugnant concept of 
extraterritorial citizenship under which all 
blacks were deemed to have been citizens of 
(he homelands even if they did not live there. It 
is this travesty that enabled whites to delude 
themselves they were living in a democracy. 
Mr. Botha has been pressurized into mating 
an historic intellectual volte-face. To the black 
South African, dodging riot squads in the 
homelands, this is, understandably, an argu- 
ment about the depth of beB. But the objective 
of building a South Africa without blacks was 
not unequivocally refuted until Wednesday. 

— The Guardian (London). 


President Reagan has acted more or less in 
line with the attitude of most Western govern- 
ments. None is willing to jeopardize its real 
economic and commercial interests. Britain, 
with the largest stake, has already declared 
that it will not go beyond banning arms sales. 

— 77ie Times of India (New Delhi). 

If South Africa is not soon persuaded to 
institute legitimate reform, the tragedy will 
oiler yet another phase: Blades and whites will 
be fighting and dying, in downtown Durban, 
Pretoria, Johannesburg. The United Stales 
must not simply sit back and watch it happen. 

— The Detroit Free Press. 


Behind Birmingham’s Riots 


Circumstantial evidence suggests that police 
investigations into drug trafficking among 
West Indians were a factor in the riots. If 
people in Birmingham or anywhere desire to 
see a main effort made against an accelerating 
epidemic of drug addiction, they must uphold 
the right of the police to inquire, w search and 
to apprehend. Ours is a remarkably tolerant 
society. But tolerance would be stretched were 
it to be seen that enforcement of law adopted 
the principle of reverse discrimination. 

— The Daily Telegraph (London). 


FROM OUR SEPT. 13 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1910: Franklin on Tree’ Commerce 1935: Germany Faces Tariff Reprisals 


PARIS — There appeared in the Herald [on 
Sept. 12] a letter commending the campaign 
bong conducted against the new Customs reg- 
ulations which, if enforced, will shut out for- 
eign manufacturers of textiles and further 
squeeze the American consumer. The writer 
forwarded a copy of a letter written by Benja- 
min Franklin in 1783, when he was American 
Minister to France, to the French Minister of 
Foreign Affairs. Mr. Franklin presented com- 
plaints of American merchants who objected 
to the embarrassments which their trade with 
France was alleged to be suffering because of 
duties, searches, etc. Mr. Franklin added: *T 
would only observe that com me r ce , consisting 
in a mutual exchange of the necessaries and 
conveniences of life, the more free and unre- 
strained it is, the more it flourishes.” 


WASHINGTON — America’s new policy of 
tariff reprisals against countries not according 
equal treatment to American products will be 
inaugurated Oct. IS with the application of the 
highest scale of customs duties possible here 
against imports from Germany, according to 
information given out [on Sept 12] in official 
circles. It is asserted that Secretary of State 
Cordell Hull has already informed Dr. Hans 
Luther, German Ambassador to the United 
States, of this decision. Hie date of Oct IS is 
mentioned because on tins day the reciprocal 
trade agreement between the United States 
and Gam any expires. Negotiations for the 
conclusion of a new agreement are now in 
progress. American negotiators are insisting 
that the Germans abrogate their strict control 
measures regarding foreign trade. 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1985 


The U.S. 



m 


lished industries. They have heard as well, 
personally and through their political consul- 
tants, about what trade can do in 1986 for the 
Democrats: It gives them for the first time in 
years an issue on which their posture is aggres- 
sive and nationalistic, and on which they have 
a chance to recoup the vast number of white 
male votes they have lost over the years. 

So it is not a coincidence that the most 
articulate Republican proponent of trade re- 

. • ir^ i _ « rr 


By Charles Wolf Jr 

ANTA MONICA, California — 


j 


W 


V.v„ 


theoretical and ignorant of the way the world 
works, economically and politically. They be- 
lieve Joe Sixpack is demanding tough action, 
and they want (he Republican Party to deliver 
at least some tough rhetoric, as it has on 
foreign policy, crime and racial quotas. 

It was to them that Mr. Regan was respond- 
ing Tuesday, to them that Majority Lead e r 
Robert Dole was responding when he said that 

the Senate may well pass trade restrictions, 
and to them that President Reagan will be 
responding if and when he advances the kind 
of trade initiative Mr. - Regan promised. That 
would be too bad. Hus is one issue on which 
the president’s tendency to stick to a course 
despite the complaints and dire predictions of 
others fans generally served the nation well 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


1 Listen — Fm going over there and beat up m that South African thug. 
If you’re not gone when I get back , Fm gonna beat up on tax reform. 
If you’re not gone then, FU start on Gorbachev ... 9 


A Besieged Reagan Turns to the Center 


W ASHINGTON — For months By Joseph Kraft 

the Reagan administration r 

bowled lickety-split down the wdl- ... 

worn path that leads from landslide came in with a 6-percent rise in nnli- 


to the crumbling of presidential pow- 
er. Then, as Congress came back to 
town after Labor Day, a strategic 
retreat was executed. 

While the pullback comes on nar- 


row issues, it cames implications tor 
the broadest dements of policy. And 


dential pow- tary spending for neat year, Congress 
une back to cut it to zero. When the admimstra- 
a strategic tion laughed off black-led protests 
against South African race policies, 
mes on nar- Congress voted sanctions. Against 
ilications for administration economic polities 
policy. And Congress brandished a hundred 


even though it may be merely lacti- weapons — protectionism: a soak- 
caL the new tilt marks a healthy move the-rich tax reform; even tax rises. 


away from ideologues of the far right 
and toward the politics of the cotter. 

Franklin Roosevelt is Exhibit A. 
The huge victory of 1936 was fol- 
lowed by the Dl-fated plan to pack the 
Supreme Court in 193 / and the fiasco 
when he tried to purge unsympathet- 
ic Democratic candidates in the 1938 
elections. The rot was arrested only 
by the coining of war in 1939. 

Lyndon Johnson went from land- 
slide in 1964 to impotence in 1968. 
Richard Nixon covered the same 
ground from 1972 to his resignation 
in 1974, Mr. Reagan was well on the 
way to an equally dramatic decline. 

His victory over Walter Mondale 
was followed by a change in the 
White House staff. The new team 
took the election as a license to move 
right. Mr. Reagan bad followed an 
economic policy that favored growth 
by deficit spending while helping the 
rich through tax benefits. To that was 
added a tax reform plan that would 
have deepened deficits while preserv- 


Talk of veto was the initial White 
House reaction. Far more than bis 
predecessors, Mr. Reagan is weak on 
substance but blessed with an almost 
n mgi r- a i quality to muster popular 
support He wins by winning: once 
beaten, the spell is "broken. A Con- 
gress with its appetite whetted by the 
overturn of a Reagan veto would eat 
the rest of his authority for breakfast. 

Faced with that prospect the presi- 
dent and some of his advisers pulled 
back. He pre-empted the Congress by 
invoking sanctions against South Af- 
rica. The Pentagon has cut out a ma- 
jor weapons system, an anti-aircraft 
gun. Trade officials announced pro- 
tectionist procedures to gain wider 
access for U.S. exports. Management 


of the anii-Sandmirt gnemBas is be- 
ing moved from the white House to 
the State Department. The Treasury 
accepted a congressional stipulation 
that tax reform not end in revenue 
loss. Still more adjustments arc likely 
in the tax field. 

In that climax of compromise. 
Senate and Hoasc Republicans have 
softened their challenge to the White 
House. There now appears to-be no 
chance of overturning a veto' on 
South African sanctions. Even on 
trade, the veto pen looks like an 
ultimate weapon. 

Many Democrats fume that the 
switch in signals reflects tactical ad- 
justment rather dum a sincere change 
of heart No doubt President Reagan 
will concede as little as he has to.' 
Given half a chance he will return to 
the agenda of the far right- But if 
Congress remains vigilant, if it main- 
tains the pressure, the White House 
will give way. Mr. Reagan would, 
rather be powerful than right. 

So the strategic retreat represents a 
true victory for the American politi- 
cal system. The rightist ideologues 
are on the defensive. The center is not 
only holding. It is gaining ground. 

Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


S anta monica* uunorma — 
There are groonds for greater op- 
timism about the U.S. economy s 
prospects t ^ aD the prevailing gloomy 
consensus would suggest. 

This consensus is couched in for- 
bidding pronouncements: "The trade 
deficit Van economic disaster,' 1 and, 
“No revival in sight for the industrial 
side of the economy." 

One major reason we can be skep- 
tical about tins dark view is that 
American economic problems either 
have been overstated or are suscepti- 
ble to readily accessible remedies. 

Considff the three most widely 
cited problems: the two U.S. deficits 
— budget mid trade — and the inter- 
national debt problem. 

The budget deficit, according to 
forecasts, wul be about $200 trillion 
in fiscal 1986. This imbalance is 
plainly undesirable. It is also nor dis- 
abling. First, the deficit should be 
viewed in conjunction with the pre- 
dicted budget surpluses of the states. 
This probably shrinks the consolidat- 
ed federal and state defiritfdr 1986 to 
about $170 bSBonor $180 bflhan. 

Second , flqaimmg the Senate 
House can sustain, m the appropria- 
tions process, the modest spending 
reductions already agreed to in sa- 
ting their budget ceilings, the consoli- 
dated deficit will dcchne by $40 bil- 
lion or $50. billion more. The 
consolidated 1986 deficit then 
shrinks to 3 percent to 3.5 percent of 
the gross national product This is 


as would be expected But tirissiinpfy,'' 
indicates- investors have freenmpttu 
bullish about the MS. econo^.tiianj. ; 
about other economics in which 
nondollar assets wtre pievKMis^ 
bdd. This accounts for thorwishio . 


r' 

p 


ding up the dollars exdiahgeyduft - j 
^Ilierc is, moreover, an automatic , 
mechanism that assures that the tiatfe ~ 
deficit wifl be transitory: ffandwfceq^ ; ... 
American investmrat dechnev^jr ;. 
savings rise, or asset holdws disngt J- . < j 
their obvious prefaenceTor dopar;[2jf' ■ j 

assets, thedefiat wiEbe reducedand ,7.-.. 
eventually etinrinated. The moderate ; 
decline m the 




^ .1 w a lets mi K f rt ■ 


national debt problem, is also suraecL £ - 
to more benign interpretations, f tas - ■; 




The outlook is much 


pessimists would 
have us think. 


seldom recognizedthat the realcgste^. 

as distinct from the accounting cdste, 
of tire $500 trillion of mtemarianal £ A . 
debt owed W the'^evdfcpfr* v 

tries, as well as by Eastern. Europe’-. * 
and the Soviet Union, have-nheady.: . 
-bees incurred. The real costs are tire ;" 


wdl below deficit ratios, Japan, has \ goods ***« semc^commomiraaim . 
regularly exceeded whfc sustaining - machinay previotisfy export ed to 
its high rates of economic growth •_ debtor cranrtnes by the creditors. --;, 
during tire past 10 years. -These costs vep iesent ' benefits. fQtr_- 

consider tfr trade defici t ffmeby thecreditoraXpniicipalty.the^:- 
$123 baton in 1984 arid a predicted \ United States), because jb& labor,;:?- 
$140 billion this year. Tins is bound capitid and materials needed topro-^ . 
to be a transitory-problem; to call it ad duce these goods wge us ed io r4hfe |» 
if an mjipHiifin n - ^benefit of external borrowers ratfcf^. 


The trade deficit arises fromthe- '• than for internal investment antfi 


feet that U.S. investment exceeds dc*; 
mes tic savings. Thedefiatihus ai-' 
lows a higher level of investment.— 


ductivity — than wouM-be leasable if 
the trade account were in balance, at 
the present levd of savinjss.; v • 


sumption in tire lending countries?' • " 
; Consider, for example,- how moefo 
.higher US. Diodncrivitywould be## 
si gnifican t share of thetoans made in’ 
the 1970s to Latm Ameiica-mtd,®^ 
stead financed -investmea^ reseath? 
and development ift tire- United’ 


the present level of savings. 'v * and development i 
The trade deficit has.bccn accom- States, or tf West En 
pariicd by a hi gh ggrhang c value of • the Soviet Untonana 
thr drJlBr rathiy ^lian' a iinriining oM had instead- finanCec 


had instead- finanCed iavestHie^ ^ 
the European Co anfflunhy . v ^ ^ 


ing special benefits for the rich. 

Social policy, in the first term, ca- 
tered to rural whites of the South and 
West at tire expense of urban blacks. 
In the second term there was added a 
vigorous attempt to undo programs 


Get Tougher With the Botha Regime 

By Robert I. Rotberg ; 


favoring black employment and to 
curtail health and educational ap- 


curiail health and educational ap- 
proaches enacted at the behest of 
urban black leaders. 


in foreign policy, the administra- 
tion had emphasized a vast military 


tion nad emphasized a vast military 
buildup, and a stance of rhetorical 
toughness toward the Soviet Union 
and its proxies. To this there was 
added direct White House manage- 
ment of a guerrilla war against the 
Sandinist regime in Nicaragua and a 
stress on the “star wars" program 
that jeopardized arms control. 

But whatever the president and his 
staff was thinking, the country was 
not moving hand right. The majority 
ejected more deficits to benefit the 
rich; it opposed reversal of dvil rights 
progress: it lost patience for a build- 
up that only increased tension. 

With the 1986 elections in view, the 
Congress was especially sensitive to 
the broad popular mood. Democrats 
led the way, but Republicans felt 
pressure to outbid them. Together 
they fashioned from general public 
feelings a host of specific challenges 
to the administration. 

Thus, where the administration 


C AMBRIDGE, Massachusetts — President Reagan’s 
executive order imposing limited sanctions against 
the white regime in South Africa has been criticized as 
weak, tardy and probably ineffective. The sanctions fefl 
short of what Congress wanted and failed to include a 
congressional plea for automatic further sanctums in 12 
months should South Africa fail to make significant 
reforms. But what the order also revealed was that the 
administration’s analysis of the depth and causes of the 
crisis to South. Africa remains grievously flawed. 

As the unrest has shown, black antagonism to white 
minority rule is widespread ami vicious. Tbe government 
intends to repress the violence, then make reformist 
concessions, but only from a secure position. 

The Reagan administration’s prevailing policy has 
been to support President Pieter W. Botha's approach. 
But it is an approach that lags well behind the reality of 
the South African crisis. It is too late for black “moder- 
ates" to prevail It is too late for concessions. It is too late 
for constructive engagement — even President Reagan’s 
renamed polity of "active constructive engagement” 
The while rulers of South Africa have hitherto refused 
to negotiate in ways that would have boosted the credibil- 
ity of nonviolent leaders of South Africa such as Chief 
Gatsha. Bmhdezi and Bishop Desmond Tutu. By arrest- 
ing nearly all of the significant leaden of the multiracial 
United Democratic Front, the government has virtually 
ensured further eruptions of multant anger. 

The state of emergency. South Africa’s new national 
liquidity crisis, its government’s intrinsic intransigence 
and the international notoriety of black protest have all 
shifted the argument between blacks and whites derisive- 
ly to the left. No longer is it possible for blacks who hope 
to retain their legitimacy to bargain with tbe government 
for anything less than political participation. 

In short, we are beyond the point where social and 


economic concessions can bring about a reconciliation aai P*? 1 ? Mtamg^raenraTO Jave 
between black andwhite: ~ t° revate thgr fafenc^slttets ^o- 

Tbe differences in aspirations are stark. Blacks are Q^d mgly; o ank tosses willCTsue./' -- 
focusing on the adage popularized by Kwame Nknzmah: ,” ow ** a * ca P~ 

“Seekw first thepditical kingdom and an else shall . ^ eqmyrranatn* 

follow” A simple “one man, one vote,” which whites eveg^ntft. pos ttrvr — wtabcan 
naturally fear, is not yet the only rallying ay. There is still ™ would be afflitred by tte Federal 

nvun frt manmwr twit nnKi wirfirn Ihr flmYfl rtf nnRtKfl « RfiSOEVe, *S lender of tiSt ieSGTt 


causethese debts aresul^et^'wide:.^ 

to^^cent prevmHng wn 
ondaiy driHn^rets^Ifti«cranmaT‘' 
rid banks hcddmg tfiesc assets have ; • 
to revdfle their bflfeace sheets 
cordingly, banktosseswilLcnsue. - v 
Howeveri so long as their rim capi- 


rootn to maneuver, but only within tbe arena of poStical 1 v? scr ^‘ “ ~ Qcr _ 0 *J^^ rcson 
power. Blacks want representation at municipal, regiond i * 

and nationd levdsr mey vriff nocbeputoff%les&/ 

Once the White House sees that the Rubicon of pefiti- ••■^ : yte^ l ”?rteylnyathanfc_ 
cal aspiration has beat crossed, it will understand maths- .- 

is to shift publidy^ bom constructive engagopezrt to A ^ 

tougto, more constructive policy that is Idtm.; ' 


is not merely a play rat words. Official 
s much more susceptible to influence from ^ 


Attica is muai more susceptible to uumence from Wash- 

to acknowledge. Moreover, the nature of the j&oblemhas 
altered dramatically, and South Africa has no other 
important friends or sources of psychological support 
Accordingly, if the rulers of .Soutb Africa are to be 
encouraged to focus on red rather than raucous solu- 
tions to their crisis, American derisiveness will be crucial. 

This is not to argue that stronger sanctions would have 
been derisive of themselves. Bat this was plainty the. 
moment to show Pretoria there is no external recourse. 


Attempts to sustain tbe myth of constructive i 
tent will not lead to full-faith bargaumm betweex 


ment will not lead to full-faith bargaining between blades 
and whites. And tbe longer President Botha’s regime 
ignores the issues dividing his nation, the hairier it wul be 
to bring about compromise that minimizes bloodshed. 


■: stocfa-Sbareholders of mtior banks 
fnca worfdfrrasJose, dfhougb aepositQrs , 
to » cWould^wL But even rf the^ share 'it 
a £ ' :juitt &lbese banks fell to single*' 
n^.:. dipt values, there need be tio.great 
ask. ; stress fer the economy as a whole. - 
: Jbafiw tbe way markets wtnfc The 
i}^ ^stockholders of these banks have ex-- 
( titer : ]Ktiencedlaiw profits and dividends ; 
xxt ^«Hhe past (their stocks have dut 2 >er- 
> be formed tbe market as a whole during ’ 
ofu. the past 10 years); not tmreasonaWjr, 
ri a i they may experience substantial, 
tosses in the /mure: 

the - r k sum > evea the economic oat- - 
jp,.. "■ tookfalls somewhat titan of die best ; 
igc. of all possible worlds, it is much , 
Kfr s . brighter than the portout drawn by ? 
^ thepessomsts. 


The writer, a professor of political science and hisi 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, contribute 
comment to The New York Times. 


The writer is director of the Rand 
Corp.’s research program in interna- ; 
Hanoi economics, and dean of Hand’s • 
graduate school He contributed this 
comment to The New York Times; : 


Arms: The Perverse Hold 


Of Buyers Over Suppliers 


By Jonathan Power 


•oes of- 
ectasa 


L ONDON — Arms embargoes of- 
/ ten have little positive effect as a 
punitive device. We know that from 
South Africa. A mandatory arras em- 
bargo was passed by the United Na- 


bargo was passed by the United Na- 
tions Security Council eight years 
ago. Yet South Africa has had no 
problem in finding or manufacturing 
the weapons it needs to repress its 
black population and punish some of 


ey than it took the developing coun- 
tries to spend iL" 

The main arms suppliers in the 
West and in tbe Soviet bloc are feel- 
ing increasing competition from an 
emerging group of Third World ex- 
porters, he notes. This group, led by 
Brazil, Taiwan and South Korea, 
"can now offer all but the most ultra- 


sophisticated weapons at knock- 
down prices," Mr. Dumas says. 

The pressures to keep one’s mar- 
kets are thus enormous. 

And the arms trade is inevitably 
different from trade in cars or com- 
puters: A big customer not only drags 
the arms maker into an intimate rela- 
tionship, it drags his government too. 

If there was ever any doubt about 
this it was laid to rest by tbe way the 
United Slates was maneuvered by the 
shah of Iran. For years, Iran was by 
far the largest recipient of U.S. arms, 
yet there was no carefully formulated 
American policy on these sales. 

No one seriously a sk ed what so- 


The sums of money at 
stake put enormous 
pressure on sellers to 
keep their markets. 


its neighbors. But should effective- 
ness be the only criterion of whether 
industrialized countries sell arms? 
Perhaps responsibility and political 


involvement should play a role. 

One tiling is clear: The West, be- 
cause it is not selling arms to Pretoria, 
is having a more open and honest 
debate about apartheid than other- 
wise would have been the case. West- 
ern politicians are less constrained 
by military and strategic concerns. 
This is to (he good. 

Aims selling is a strange business. 
Nothing is more perverse than the 
hold a buyer develops over a seller. 
Once a major power has entered into 
a selling relationship it becomes em- 
broiled with toe buyer in an almost 
irrational way. 

Perhaps this should nol be surpris- 
ing. According to Lloyd Dumas, a 


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LETTERS 

Total Power Is Just ITiat : - 

Regarding the opinion column “The J • 
Ice Is Shifting injrozen Parts ofEu-\:W 
rope” (SepL 10): - "•••. ; ; 


Ice Is Shifting in Frozen Parts pfJEu- ? 
rope” (SepL 10): V; - "•••_ ; - 

WSIiam Pfaff approves of a sug- j 
gration t hat l i b erty m Eastern. Europe. : 
mi^ht be aided by conceding “a mo- . 
nopoty of state power {tojthe-Com- 
rannist Party in caxfrange for . a dc- : 
mocratizarion of all that does not ■ • . 
directly concern stale power and se- - , . 
cuiity — that is, the economy, learnf . 
mg, toe arts, public roeech.*V ' • :• ... ;• ! 

But surely Mr. Pfaff knows that hr-* > j 
Communist ideology, stale poweris : . . ) 

all-mclusrve. that "the monopoly of/- ' J 
state power" has no Until.* imnnmiV>: • I 


au-mciusrve. that “the monopoly of.. • 
state power" has no limits, economic'-' 
or cultnraL "TotaKtariaaism’’ 
what it says, and Mr. Pfaff & dism- - 
genuous to suggest otherwise. -. - , 

JOHN COLVIN: i.:-’ • 


Or da b Torr. Q n B bpaeakx Gogol* CSW SyndoM. 


rial, economic and political strains 
were bring created by the fact that 
Iran was spending a quarter of its 


anything but nuclear weapons. In 
short, he defined tbe terms of toe 
political relationship. In nod-1976 a 
Senate Foreign Relations subcom- 
mittee concluded that US. arms sales 
to Iran were out of control. The fol- 


budget on toe militafy. Woe the 
armed forces able to absorb all this 
sophisticated weaponry? What was 
the true nature of the security threat 
to Iran agains t which it bad to under- 
take such an immense buildup? What 
would be the consequences for the 
Other states of the region? 


lowing year they totaled $5.7 billion. 
Had there been no revolution, and 


Had there been no revolution, and 
had sales remained steady, Iran 
would now have ground forces 
roughly equivalent to those of West 
Germany, and a substantially belter 
equipped stir force. 

With so much money at stake there 
was little pressure in Washington to 
question the shah’s police state, or to 


ed States in the Philippines and Mo- 
rooo; the Soviet Union in Libya. 

Ethiopia and Cuba; Britain in Chile 
and Iran; and France in Iraq. 

£ t ?s ,ts reiatioa ^. *ith SSSSfe 

South Africa more methodically- those avaflnkv -■ 

SssKt-Ss 

discipline among WestemanxLsdL • 

JmenuztianalH^Id Tribune. As to M?SS£ ^ 


Spots on Japan’s Record ^ 

Regarding “America^ Endurtnz'- - 
Success Is a Successful Jan^r A, ^ 


I have lival in Japan and b^e£' ^ 
many frimHctkaM ■Ait • -r f t 


No one in the senior reaches of the wonder what a successor regime 
U.S. government lost much sleep on would do with the arms it would 


professor of political economy at the 
University of Texas: “From I960 to 


University of Texas: “From I960 to 
1981 the less-developed nations spent 
roughly $1 trillion on their military. 
This enormous sum is difficult to 
comprehend. It would take a printing 
press printing 51.000 per second 10 
years longer to prim this much raon- 


these questions. The accepted view 
was toe one tbe shah articulated — 
that the United States had a major 
interest in a strong pro-Western Iran 
because of its strategic location. 
Arms sales would help ensure friend- 
ly relations with a major oil supplier. 

Herny Kissinger records that Pres- 
ident Richard Nixon ordered that “in 
future, Iranian requests should not be 


inherit. Tbe shah had America by toe 
tail — so much so that he actually 
pushed for higher oil prices in coun- 
cils of the Organization of Petroleum 


AH Sights Reserved. 


Exporting Countries. 
In some wavs the 


In some ways the Iranian case is 
extreme. But die fact remains that t he 
arms trade has often led to more 
involvement than was good for sup- 
pliers, and certainty more than they 


Letter attended fm- publication 

bob* in 

^^^T stcontainaievrit ' 

ers signature . name and full ad- wiUin « *0 pay SWOfor the 
Ul ters should be brief and ***» ride jm to get to 

for die return of ' domesticblunders in ycars^^^i 
unsolicited martuscrints. J . __ 3 

c-.„ . 9^fV G WELLE.^^ ^™ 


* i — ... J v ; •■'•I 

as to t Mr. Lewis’s . use of Tbkyb^-'‘i :--K 
agpwt as an exanqjfe ot 1 

cmctenty: Granted, John F. 
dy Mrpon is difficult, but at least it ^ 


second-guessed.” The shah could buy origraally intended, witness toe Unit- 


- 7 —^ -uiuuut oe met and 
** subjea u> editing. We damm 
be responsible /„ fa Tttjjrn , 
unsolicited manuscripts. V 











• ; 

. ^ 

. -f 










* ! V 


*9i+ 4 W INTERNATIONAL M * 4 

Jieraio^feenbune 



September 13 , 1985 


WEEKEND 



, in a New Context 


by Andy Grundberig 


I YORK. — Photojournalism 
. •. I XI ^ ; P™ >K ? raphy ’ s 130051 visible 
ML. N| clami to fame as recently as 25 

museums, ^ 

wnose ostensible interest in the 

SfSjSL' 1 ««. we turning their 

“graphy from the Crimea to NKanyma, and 
new insights- into the work of HennCartier- 
Bresson, Andrt Kertfesz and William Klein, 


of whom has influenced today’s phoio- 
journalistic style. 

. The renewed 'interest in photojoura aiism 
is mainly historical:: most or the attention is 
being focused on work done in the 1930s, 
’40$ and ’50s. Neverth el ess, it seems to re- 
flect a new sense of vitality within the genre 
— and, possibly,, a -renewal of soda! con- 
sciousness throughout the culture. It also 
reflects a gr o wing dissatisfaction with the 
ability of so-called an photography to grap- 
ple with issues that are political, rather than 
aesthetic or psychological. 

The daft is not without irony, however. 
The arena of art photography, which first 
seized center stage from photojournalism 
and now seems ready to cede it back, re- 
mains in control For the shows and books 


we will be seeing are not photojournalism as 
a wellspring of artistic imagery. This revi- 
sionism is indisputably well-intended (artists 
have more cachet than reporters), but its 
effect is to alter — however slightly — the 
meanings of the pictures by re-con textualiz- 
ing them. In short, photojournalism is not 
displacing an photography. It is bong incor- 
porated into the fine-art fold, joining fashion 
advertising and topographic survey photog- 
raphy as subjects for scholarship ana delec- 
tation. 

Surely the most glamorous photojoumal- 
ist of all lime was Robert Capa, whose ca- 
reer, from the ’30s to his death m 1954, seams 
to have consisted of alternating bouts of 
combat photography and romance. Among 
his best-known photographs are one of a 


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falling soldier presumably at the instant of 
his death, and one of the D-Day landing in 
Normandy taken from the vantage point of 
the English Channel. More than 150 of Ca- 
pa's photographs go on view tomorrow at 
the International Center of Photography, an 
institution founded by his brother, Cornell 
Capa. 

Concurrent with the Robert Capa retro- 
spective at the center will be an exhibition of 
60 portraits by Cartier-Bresson, who with 
Capa helped found the photo agency Mag- 
num shortly after World War 11 The show 
marks the publication of a book of 2S5 of 
Cartier-Bresson’s portraits taken over 50 
years, called "Henri Cartier-Bresson Pboto- 
porrraits." Fans of Capa and Cartier-Bres- 
son will also take pleasure in "From the 
Magnum Archives: Photographs 1932- 
1967 ; ” a show at the Pace-MacGill Gallery 
consisting of prints selected from the agen- 
cy's picture files and recycled into objects for 
sale. 

(Another Robert Capa show, of 60 of his 


photographs, opens Ocl 1 at FN.AC-Fomm 
in Paris. 


des Halles in Paris, and a similar show will 
travel to several West German dues, also in 


conjunction with the publication of "Robert 
>her." On Monday, at 


Capa — Photograph 
FNAC-Montpamasse. another exhibition of 
work by Magnum photographers opens in 
connection with the publication of "After 
the War Was Over," co-published by the 
International Herald Tribune.) 


T HE man to follow Capa as the most 
admired photqjournalist of his time 
was W. Eugene Smith. His classic 
photo essays for Life magazine, done in the 
late ’40s and early ’50s, together with his 
later documentary projects on Pittsburgh 
and Minamata, Japan (a town whose inhab- 
itants were exposed to mercury poisoning), 
will be included in a 250-print show at the 
Philadelphia Museum of Art opening next 
month. It will be the first retrospective of 
Smith's career since his death in 1978. The 
show comes to the International Center of 
Photography next year. 

A third photojournalist whose work is 
worth [raveling to see is Carl Mydans, whose 
retrospective is at the Institute for Contem- 


porary Art in Boston after premiering at the 
Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth. My- 


‘■aa as-:- 

tolas: air. 


A Capa view of war, hear Wesel, Germany, March 24, 1945. 


BofaMGvo.MaoniM 


dans is, with Capa and Smith, part of a select 
circle of extraordinary photographers of 
World War II. Anyone wanting to leant 



Continued on page 9 Joseph and Stewart A bop, by Cartier-Bresson. 


CorftwfliaiiDn. Mognura 


— *zzz 




Indian Composer’s Work, 


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Opens New York Season 


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by Sue Armstrong 




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O NE of the most appropriate aspects 
i of the Festival of India in New 
York is that the New: York PH- 
harmonic should open its season 
with a work by Naresh Sohal — not only 
because Sohal is Indian-born, but because he 
is a man with deep roots m both Eastern and 
Western cultures, and with experiences that 
span the centuries from' life in his grandfa- 
ther’s Punjabi village to that of Wesiem 
dries. 

Until he arrived in London at the age of 
22, Sohal had never been to the West, yet it is 
as a composer of Western classical music 
that he has made his name. In a series of four 
concerts through next Tuesday, the Philhar- 
monic under its music' director, Zubin 
Mehta, will perform his setting of 
from “GilanjalT by Rabindranath 1 
the Nobel Prize-winning author — 
songs to be sung by the bass-baritone John 
Cbeek. , ' . 

“These poems have always evoked some- 
thing in me I find hard to explain- They 
bring me to tears," Sohal said. “Setring them 
to music has been a real challenge because 
there is no drama of any kind to dwdl on. 

But drama is only one aspect of living. These 

works are about sheer bliss, and that is 
altogether more dusave.” 

Sohal was able to indulge Eully his taste for 
the dramatic when he was commissioned by 
the BBC in 1982 to write apiece for the 50th 
anniversary of the Henry Wood PronMnade 
Concerts — the popular Proms. Far that he 
wrote “The Wanderer," a long choral work . 
based on an Old English poem full oflonel!- 
ness and alienation that struck a chord in 
Sohal, waking a life for himself far from 




Naresh Sohal. 


Adtop Tandem 


musical novice, the traditional ragas. “I re- 
torted that people like him who kepi knowl- 
edge exclusively to themselves were respon- 
sible for the decline of Indian civilization," 
Sohal laughs. 

He didn't believe that anyone who showed 
talent would be so arrogantly dismissed in 
the West, so when he failed to win an Indian 
government scholarship, he decided to seek 
opportunities overseas. 


ignoring his family's forebodings about 
►verty, Sohal *' ' 


“The Wanderer" received the kind of ova- 
- customarily reserved for the high-spint- 
Lnal night of the Proms — a remarkable 


lion 

ed final night 




. .-N.'r 


un'V 




career. 


ea itnai iugm _ - - 

response to a new piece of muac that was 

lat& As a schoolboy be was passionately 
fond of cricket and good at sacncc^t m 
the end his commitment to the tlnmgs m 
which he showed early promu* 
studied mathematics and physics at Punjab 
TJnivereity, but left before his finals because 
tebSwdiMy set his heart on anm^ 
and his sights on the Bombay dm 
^ered one way ia- 
i headstrong decision that 

Sohal has an little material ambi- 

into a comfortable middle- 

t B 7?«m»lv he grew up in Jullundur, near 
-class family, ne ^ eariv years were 
the Pakistan border, rus y 

much affected by ^‘ “^ n j cma u officer, 

of people 


industry, which 
It was a 


seeking hdp 


" ' | 4. 



arrived in London in 1962 
with £2 in his pocket and nothing mapped 
out. He is a small, serious-minded man who 
laughs easily — particularly when be recalls 
bis arrival in Britain and his astonishment at 
the sight of so many “pink, unhealthy- look- 
ing people." 

Sohal found work in a canning factory and 
then as a copyist with the music publishers 
Boosey and Hawkes. He took evening classes 
in music and private tuition from a compos- 
er, Jeremy Dale Roberts, whose belief in his 
pupil sustained SohaL 
“Jeremy would often spend a long time 
looking at my score and then just say, ‘I 
wonder how you are going to continue this 
piece?’ I used to wonder why he didn’t actu- 
ally tell me anything, but I'see now be was 
paying me the compliment of recognizing me 
as a composer from the start ” 

The Sodety for New Music gave Sohal his 
break when be submitted his composition, 
“Ashi Prahar,” ah evocative piece expressing 
intervals of time between dawn and dark- 
ness. It was chosen for performance at Festi- 
val HaD by the London' Symphony Orches- 
tra and, SohaJ says, “It was the first rime Td 
heard my own work performed, and if ex- 
citement and joy which are beyond belief 
have happened in my life, that was the mo- 
ment." 

Commissions followed for more orches- 
tral and choral pieces and for radio and 
television, and he is at present discussing a 
ballet with the BBC. A recent comimsston, 
for music to accompany the Indian episodes 
of a television documentary series, "End of 


Continued on page 9 


Before 'Paradise,’ and After — 
Marcel Carne’s Prickly Recollections 


P ARIS — The great period of French 
films was 1 936-45 according to Mar- 
cd Cara 6, the director whose finest 
works, not coincidentally, span 
those years: “Dr61e de Drame," “Hdtel du 
Nord," “Quai des Brumes," “Le Jour se 
Lfcve," “Les Visiteurs du Soir" and a film 
that is on most people’s 10-best lists, “Les 
Enfants du Paradis. 

The last major survivor of his generation. 
Came is stocky, prickly and to his mind 
insufficiently appreciated in France al- 
though covered with honors, including the 


Mary Blume 


rosette of Commandeur of the Legion 
d’Honneur, and a newly-released film of 
homage, “Marcel Camfc, 1'Homme & la Cam- 
era," directed by (he veteran Christian-Jac- 
que. The film celebrates Carafe's 50 years of 
filmmaki ng and. while grateful. Carafe thinks 
it might have been better if he had given the 
director a hand. 

When he speaks of the old days. Came is 
critical of his colleagues except for the ctirec- 
tors Jacques Feyder (whose assistant he was 
and whose wife, Franqoise Rosay, starred in 
Carne’s fust feature) and. the now-forgotten 
Jean Grfemiflon (1902-59). 

“Jean Renoir always spoke ill of me; I 
think he was jealous. Then there was Renfe 
Clair, but I didn't get on well with him. His 
films have aged badly. Grfemillon made films 
that I thought very fine but that the public 
didn't like.” 

A painstaking and expert craftsman, Car- 
nfe — who is about 80 but will not reveal his 
age — says he got his taste for work from his 
father, a cabinetmaker in the BatignoDes 
district of Paris. After a year studying his 
father's trade, young Marcel, dapper in spats 
and slicked-back hau, alighted briefly in the 
business world before talking himself into a 
vague assistantship with Feyder that soon 
developed into a valuable collaboration. 

His first film was a 22-minute short, cine- 
ma veriii long before the phrase existed. 
Inspired by his love for Impressionist paint- 
ing and by the fact that he had only a small 
camera and no funds for indoor work, he 
followed Parisian workers on a Sunday out- 


value "congenitally impotent-" Carafe says 
he never said such a thing. 

When he began making films. Carafe says, 
the French were for the most part making 
awful light romances with people in lesmok- 
i/ig going to casinos. “Then 1 came along,” be 
says, "with ray fog and lampposts and streets 
glistening in the rain.” The film he is talking 
about is the extraordinarily atmospheric 
"Quai des Brumes" with Michele Morgan 
and Jean Gabin ( 1938). From then on. Carafe 
was tagged with a label: poetic realism. 

“I don't like the term,” Came says in his 
grand living room in Saint-Germain-des- 
Prfes (he moved there a few years ago because 
his doctor told him the air in Auteuil. where 
he then lived, was not good for him). "I 
prefer the term famastimte sociale which 
Pierre Mac Orian uses about some of his 
books." 

“Drfile de Drame" put the phrase " bi- 
zarre . bizarre” into die language (in the film 
it was uttered by Louis Jouvet in an eating 


came out headlined. “Attention, Producers! 
Make films that are healthy and optimistic.” 
Cameand Renoir, the article said, had belter 
change their style and start making films full 
" r "courage and happiness and light." 


of 


During the occupation. Carafe avoided 
making films for the Vichy-backed Conti- 
nental film company. With his collaborator 
from the days of his first feature-length film, 
“Jenny" in 1936, the writer Jacques Prfevert, 
Came decided that their next film should be 
set in the past to avoid government interfer- 
ence. They chose the Middle Ages of “Les 
Trfes'Riches Heures" of the Due de Beni and 
built a chateau that, like Lbe chateau in the 
illuminated manuscript, was while because it 
was brand new (a lot of people thought it 
should look old. as medieval chateaus do). 


Arleity starred, the extras included Simone 
Signoret and AJain Resnais, and the film, 
“Les Visiteurs du Soir,” was again a story of 
ill-starred love. The Devil, played by Jules 
Berry, figures in the story and there are lines 
that could be seen as allusions to the Occu- 
pation, but Carafe says there was no such 
intention. 


“There are lines that might be taken as 
attacks on Vichy but I don’t remember, quite 
sincerely, that we thought of any such thing 
at the time. You must remember that we 
were very humiliated shamed. There was in 
each of us — without our being aware of it — 
a surge to recapture by the spirit what we 
had lost by arms." 

The next film was “Les Enfants du Para- 


Continued on page 9 ■ 


Then I came along/ 
Marcel Came says, 
‘with my fog and lamp- 
posts and streets glis- 
tening in the rain.’ 


scene in which Jouvet and his rival actor, 
Michel Simon, were privately vying to nudge 
each other into insensibility by drinking real 
scotch). “Hold du Nord" gave a new reso- 
nance to the word “ atmosphere as uttered 
by Arleuy, the great actress who is Carafe's 
favorite. 

“I never use the word ‘atmosphere , ' “ Ar- 
leity writes in her memoirs, “for it belongs to 
the public.” 



ing to riverside guinguettes where they 
laughed and danced and ate an 


and drank until 
time came, sadly, to take the train back to 
town. The film was called "Nogen t, Eldor- 
ado du Dimanche." and Carafe cdnnoi see 
why people who see it today, are so touched. 
"I don't see anything extraordinary about 
it," he says. 

Carafe has often been at odds with the 
public, the press or producers, sometimes 
with all three ax once. Understandably far a 
man who continued to make feature films 
until 1973. he does not like it thought that his 
career ended with "Les Enfants du Paradis" 
in 1945. 


his filming in a studio. Studio filming is a 
subject that makes him defensive: He says be 
was violently criticized for building a fake 
Barbes- Roch echouart Metro station when 
the real one was right there. The real one was 
unsuitable, he says. 

“I remember the days when one had to 
film in a studio, you couldn’t even film in a 
hotel room, for example, the equipment was 
too heavy. If the nouvelle vague made the 
cinema more mobile, the merit belongs not 
to them but to the engineers who came out 
with lightweight equipment and more sensi- 
tive film. If they'd had the material 1 had to 
work with before the war and just after, they 
would never have been able to shoot in 
natural decors." 

If they were studio-bound, Camfe's films 
seemed much closer to real life than the more 
conventional prewar product. Technically he 
was in advance — “Le Jour se Live" with 


H E feels that there was a distinct plot, 
a cabale, he calls it, to bring him 
down and that it was led by the 
nouvelle vague. “They were critics before 
they became directors and they systematica t- 


Gabin and Arleuy was the fim French film 
hbacfc — s 


ly demolished everyone who came before 
them ' 


in order to take them place They were 
little arrivistes, Truffaut and Godard, people 
who wanted to arrive and who destroyed 
others in order to do so. Chabrol, too." The 
atmosphere was not lightened when, accord- 
ing to Le Figaro, Carafe called the nouvelle 


to be told in flashback — and in his fatalism 
and his distrust of le happy end he was 
reflecting the mood of lbe tune. 

“One felt it was the end of something, it 
was a melancholy time. In 1936 there was the 
Front Popuktire, which gave great hope, then 
the war in Spain which one knew quite well 
would be the start of the world war. To make 
happy films in those days — I think one has 
to let the climate of the time come through." 

The day after the invasion of Poland, a 
semi-official article in a French magazine 



Christian -7 acque and Marcel Came . 


i 


' j 


A 





„ ,5'rfiV." 


Page 8 





TRAVEL 


Joining in Madrid’s Lively Happening 


by Edward Schumacher 

M ADRID — A cultural and spir- 
itual renaissance has taken 
hold in Spain since the death of 
Francisco Franco 10 years ago, 
and nowhere is it more evident than here in 
the capital. 

The city of four million people has revived 
a Spanish avant-garde tradition that bad 
been represented by painters such as Picasso 
and wnters such as Federico Garda Lorca. 
Hie new attitude has a name. La Movida 
Modrilena, which loosely translates as The 
Madrid Happening, and it can be seen in the 
emergence of scores of creative young paint- 
ers, sculptors, musicians and architects. 

The streets of Madrid, especially at night, 
are filled with fashionable young people who 
dress in styles ranging from the extreme with 
spiked hair to the more subtle Jimmy Dean 
lode. Many of (he city’s newspapers and 
magazines brim with political ana intellectu- 
al debate. Ideas of violence and revolution 
are largely dismissed. 

Sponsored by the Madrid regional govern- 
ment, the second Festival de Otono. or Fall 
Festival, opens Sept. 22 in the Teatro Real de 
la Opera, the Royal Opera, with a concert by 
the pianist Alicia de Larrocha. In the same 
theater. Daniel Barenboim will conduct the 
Orchestra de Paris Ocl 9 and 10, and Loon 
Maaze! will conduct the Orchestra National 
de France Oct. 13. The Spanish National 
Orchestra will perform several concerts 
throughout the festival. 

Chamber and other music in exquisite 
settings wOl abound. On SepL 27, the Quar- 
teto Hispanico Numen will perform works 
by Boccherini in the Palacio de Duque de 
Sueca. about half an hour by car outside 
Madrid in the small town of Boadilla del 
Monte. (Boccherini was a guest in the pala- 
cio in die 18 th century, and the building 
remains occupied by the duque's descen- 
dants.) New and old Spanish works win be 
played by various grows inside the Prado 
Museum. Oct. 14, 15, 17 and 18. The con- 
certs are in memory of Scarlatti, another 
Italian composer associated with Spain. 

In La Escorial. the awesome royal palace 
also about half an hour away, the organist 
Montserrat Torrent will perform Ocl 1 1 . On 
Oct. 12. bands will march through the Puerta 
del Sol and 20 choruses will perform in 
churches throughout the city and region. 


After sundown, the Plaza Mayor and its 
scores of surrounding bars and retaurants 
turn into a cotter for revelry by Madrilenos. 

The style is to hop from bar to bar. stand- 
ing elbow to elbow at each, munching on 
appetizers called lapas and drinking curias, 
glasses of draft beer. 

A good place to begin is in La Toja, 
outside an arch leading into the Plaza from 
Calle Mayor. Its seafood is superb. Try long, 
reedy-Iooking shellfish called navqjas for $3 
a plateful. Salpicdn de mariscos, a mixture of 
seafood, chopped onions and green peppers 
brushed with oil and vinegar, costs $5.50 a 
plate. Gambas al ajillo, shrimp in hot oil and 
garlic and served in a s mall, day bowl, costs 
$4. {The current exchange rate is about 170 
pesetas for the dollar.) 

Across the Plaza, outside the Bo ton eras 
Arch, MesdD los Gallegos has fried baby 
squid, called chqpitos, for $2.50 a plateful 
Hoya podrida. a hearty stew of chickpeas, 
chicken, sausages and the like costs $250. 
Pickle lovers should try a halved pickle 
stuffed with a boqueron (a small marinated 
anchovy) for 25 cents each. 

On Cuchilleros Street, back of the build- 
ing that surrounds the Plaza Mayor, is a 
series of bars, many of them dedicated to a 
single specialty such as mushrooms, boquer- 
ones or tortilla espariola (the last is an omelet 
made with potatoes). The food is inexpen- 
sive and the bars in the ndgborbood are 
often filled with university students singing 
in the back. 

Down the street on the far side of the 
Plaza de Puerta Cerrada is the Bar Galtego, a 
comfortable place with Galician specialties 
including steamed mussels for $1.40, white 


Ribeira wine served in shallow bowls for 50 
cents and. for $1.50, small green peppers, 
most of which are sweet (once in a while 
there is a hoi one). . 

The continuation of Cuchilleros is called 
Calle de la Cava Baja. At No. 24, which has 
an elaborate tile facade, is La Chata, a little 
bar-restaurant. Though only six years old, it 
offers jantdn de bellow, a cured ham from 
acorn-fed pigs; a serving costs $5 JO. Huge, 
flat mushrooms, called sews, either grilled 
with garlic or sauteed with clams and garlic, 
cost $5. A portion of manchego, a cured 
sheep’s milk cheese, is $3. 

Botin (Cuchilleros 17: tel: 266-4217), a 
nearly 300-year-old restaurant that was 
among Hemingway’s favorites, is good for a 
traditional Castilian meal. The specialties 
are charcoal-roasted lamb and suckling pig, 
either of which is $7 JO. Casa Lucio (Calle ae 
la Cava Baja 35; 265 J252) serves portions of 
inch-long eels, called angulas. in hot oil and 
garlic for $8 and lamb diops for $6. 

HE Prado (Paseo del Prado; work- 
days 9 A.M. to 2 P.M„ closed Mon- 

days; admission $250) is the standard 

must, and even veterans of the museum will 
be impressed bv the renovation of many of 
the rooms in the last year. The collections 
include more than 100 paintings and 500 
drawings by Goya alone; there are also 50 
Velazquezes as well as many by El Greco 
and Murillo, which can be appreciated as 
never before. The collection is rich in Flem- 
ish (more than 600) and I t a l i a n (more than 
400) works as well. Picasso’s “Guernica" is 
in an annex, the Cas6n del Buen Retiro, 
dedicated almost exclusively to the p a i n t in g. 









MM: 


Painter at work in the Plaza Mayor ; above, the Royal Palace. 


Phaugm^s by The A&xwlad Pres 

The Casdn faces Retire Park, which has a 
lake for boating, many cafes, monuments 
and the Palacio de Crystal, a site of major art 
exhibitions. 

The half-dozen blocks down the shady 
Paseo de los Recoletos from the Prado and 
the Plaza de la Cibeles to the Plaza de Col6n 
are filled with strollers in the late afternoon. 
The siring of outdoor cafes along the paseo 
turns festive on late, warm nights. At the 
Plaza de Colon, dedicated to Christopher 
Columbus, is the National Archaeological 
Museum (9:30 to 1 :30 daily except Monday; 
admission $1). 

The Royal Palace (Plaza de Oriente; 
workdays 9:30 A.M. to 12:45 P.M. and 4 to 
5:45 P.M.. Sundays 9:30 A.M. to 1:30 P.M.; 
$2) is one of the largest and most monumen- 
tal palaces in the world. Built in the 18th 
century, its hundreds of rooms are sumptu- 
ously decorated. Its an collection represents 
some of the best from all over Europe and its 
tapestry is said to be the world’s best. The 
palace includes several museums dedicated 
to books, pharmaceutical instruments and 
armor. King Juan Carlos and Queen Sofia, 


In the Plaza Mayor. 


have opted not to live in the palace, but they 
still use it for state receptions. 

'Hie palace overlooks the Manzanares 
River and, on the far side, the Casa de 
Campo, a sprawling park that includes a 200 
($1.25, 60 cents for children), a boating lake 
and miles of wilderness paths. 

T HE fashionable bars come and go, but 
all are dim, smoky, informal ana filled 
with music. A good place to begin the 
night is the Caff: Central (Plaza del Angel), 
which features live jazz perfo rmanc es be- 
tween 10 P.M. and midni gh t nightly. Then 
the other places get going. 

A concentration can be found in the area 
called the Barrio de Chueca, loosely bound- 
ed by the Paseo de los Recoletos. Calle de 
Genova, Calle de Hortaleza amd the Gran 
Via. . 

The more celebrated establishments are 
Fabrics de Pan (San Bartolomfe 21), which 
has murals and a long marble bar extending 
to an old bread oven in the back. Gris (San 
Marcos 29) has a split-level bar and weekly 
. changing abstract decor, save the two bump- 
er cars on the floor. Q Ras (Barbieri 7) has 
good recorded rock music and people often 
dance, with or without partners, on a small 
floor. 

The latest in fashion design can be seen in 
boutiques such as Adolfo Dominguez (Serra- 
no 96 and Ayala 24). where a loose linen 
dress fetches around $125 and a pair of 
men's baggy pants costs around $60. 

Two ofthe hottest young designers also 
sell straight from their studios, an exciting 
way to buy that seems certain not to last long 
since their popularity is growing In addition 
to high fashion evening wear, Agala Ruiz de 
la Prada (Marques de Riscal 8, basement or 
apartment 4B) sells silk smocks for $75 and 
loose-fitting men's printed cotton shirts for 
S30. Sybilia (del Sil 6; td: 261-7157), who 
must be called first for an appointment, has 
a wide range of styles and prices. 

Perhaps the best hotel is the Ritz (Plaza de 
la Lealtad 5; $180 for exterior double; tel: 
221-2857) but request a renovated room. In 
addition to being next to the Prado, the Ritz 
has formal sitting rooms, an excellent restau- 
rant and attendant service. 

A good buy for a lop hotel is in the Palace 
(Plaza de la Cortes 7; $105 a double; 429- 
7551 ). which is across the boulevard from the 
Prado, has large and comfortable rooms and 
is undergoing a face-lift that makes it look 
splendid. 


The Vfflamagna (Paseo de la Castdlana 

22; $160 a double; 261-4900) is modern, of 
modest size and well run. 

For the economy-minded, Hostal Resi- 
dence Prado (Prado 1 1 ; $50 a double; 429- 
3568) is one of many clean profession- 

al holds. ■ 

Gran Hotel Victoria (Plaza del Angel 7; 
$37 a double; 231-4500), a favorite of En- 
glish writers, has a worn lobby and is being 
renovated. 

Among restaurants, Zalaealn (Alvarez de 
Baema 4; 261-5935) is Basque influenced 
and superb in food, wine, service and d&OT, 
down to its rich colors and tasteful art oh the 
walls. Dinner for two with the house wine, 
dessert and coffee comes to about $85. 
Among the dishes, on its regularly c h angi n g 
menu hac been a lukewarm salad with pi- 
geon and foie gras as an appetizer, followed 
by sea bass iaa sauce of red bell peppers. ; 

El Amparo (Caflej6n de Puigcerdi 8; 431- 
6456) is a cozy but demanding restaurant at 
the end of an alley. Dinner for two with 
house winejs about $65, and includes such 


dishes as angulas and watercress saladahd 
duck in red wine sauce. -s - : r 

El Luculo (Gtoova 19; 419-4029) opened ^ 
recently and is Catalan influenced. Burn V* 
with an Art Deco motif around thepariosof 
a renovated building it serves up-tlnnly 
sliced ediman marinated m olxye pufaha 
chicken stuffed with sweetbreads /fcritTnver 
crabs. Dinner for two with house irate, is 

^Hardier (Alfonso XU 6; 222-073^- and 
the Jockey (Amador de los Rios 6; 4 E9r)QQ3 ) 
are the two classics and conUnu^.^mmg 
international cuisine, each for about $85 a 

l^ree superb and informal restaurants for 
Wood are El Peseador (Josfi OrtegayGas- 
set 75; 402-1290), La TraiheraUaftJwa^Q; 
435-8954) and O’Pazo (Reiria Mercedes20; . 
253-2333). For about $50 Ja epupfe . you haa 
«rmp ie many .different types. of orabs,: Wh 
sters* crayfish -and clams, nottomefition 
mussels, barnacles and other^eafqodsL Fla 
is grilled or baked to moist perfec&oiL-v 

01985 The New Yd)* Tents \ \ .yt ' ‘ 







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AUSTRIA 


LINZ, Festival (td: 275230). 
CONCERTS — SepL 20: Bamberg 
Svmphonv. Horst Stein conductor. 
OPERA — Sept 18: “Die WalkQre" 
(R. Wagner). 

VIENNA. BSsendorfer Hall (tel: 
65.66.51). 

RECITAL — SepL 16: SaverioTrom- 
betti (lute. Marina Cavana piano 
(Bach. Scarlaui ). 


SepL 19: Helmut Wiegiehser piano 
(Bach. Chopin). 

Sept. 20: Ferhan Oender piano 
t Haydn, Mozart). 

•Kunstlerhausftd: 57.96.63). 
EXHIBITIONS— To SepL 30: “1984 
— Looking Ahead to 2000.” 

ToOct. 6: “Vienna 1870-1930 Dream 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


SepL 19: Vienna Hofburg Orchestra, 
Gen Hofbauer conductor (Waltz and 
etta music). 


To Oct. 6: “Vienna 1870-1930 Dream •Staatsoper | teL 53240). 

and Reality: The greatest names of the BALLET — Sept. 17: “Raymonda 

Viennese fin-<ie-si£cle." ( Petipa, Glazunov). 


•Musikverein(ld: 65.81.90). 
CONCERTS — SepL 14: TonkOnst- 
I crotches ter, Bijan KJhadan-Missagh 
conductor (Bach. Handel). 


CONCERTS — SepL 15: London 
Symphony Ore besira. Richard Hicfcox 
conductor (Vaughan Williams, Elgar, 
Walton). 

SepL 19: English Chamber Orchestra. 
Daniel Barenboim conductor. Mali 


^ L, E a ’ OlazuQ0vl - Daniel Barenboim conductor. Ma 

OPERA — SepL 14: “Die Zauber- Haimovilz cello (Scfauben. Mazan). 


WEEKEND 


\ SIGHT SEEING BOATS 


BATEAUX-MOUCHES 


PARIS RIVER BOATS 


® ALMA 
225.96.10 
RIGHT BANK 3593030 


RESTAURANTS 


AN INDIAN ISLAND OF GOURMET ADVENTURE 

, MOORED ON THE SEINE 

{ 

si , LE LOTUS, where ddightfu! mysteries of 
, a “thaJi” unfold. 

JARDIN DE SHALIMAR, "The Garden 
i ILE DE | of Romance”, where you con feast, on a 
| KASHMIR buffet at lunch and dine a !a carte. 

$ 1 Quai Debiily, en face du c2. av. de New- York. ' 

\ Pans I6 : . 

Telephone: 725.77TS ■' '723.50.97 - Perking 
Open 7 d.y.." of -Jic v.«k fer iiindi ard >iinoer. La>; order: i i p..x. 


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PIBilKfS 

SHBXaSUMH 



TBHUSSE 

Daily TRAriEUR until rakfaiigM 
69. A*. Wopoa PARIS 17*. TT- 227 3 * 19 . CB. 


WEEKEND 

appears every 
Friday 

For information 
call Dominique Bouvet 
in Paris 
on 747.12.65 


HOTELS 


r= ADMIRAL HOTEL - 

MANILA 

2138 Roxas Blvd. Manila Chib. 
P.O. Box 7155 MIA 3120 m&ppirKS 
Telex: 74240488 ADHafef PM. 
Cable- Admitel Manila 
Telephone: 57 20 81 To 94 


HOLIDAYS 


TIMESH ARE 


Unique histaii: British 
restored, active he 
crew (competent hmesharers may crew 
at dapper s ioeHon), from May 1986. 
Mnfaum Riit CZ0OO wans 1 day pa tnwn 
rnrtr W« 

Macmn mib CSOjDOO PO day: par atu) 


OHa dan la Oocbe KC5 
Bn 0MO91 
MT. A3 Lang JUre.UwtaiW.CaE, England. J 


note" ( Mozart l. 

SepL 15 and 18: “Cosi fan tune’’ (Mo- 
zart). 

SepL 16: “Andrea Chenier" (Gior- 
dano). 

SepL 19: “La Tra via ta" (Verdi j. 

SepL 20: “The Bartered Bride” (Sme- 
tana). 

•VolksoperdeJ: 53240). 

OPERETTA — SepL 14: “The Beggar 
Student” (Millocker). 

SepL 15 and 18: “The Land of Smiles" 
(Lehar). 

SepL 17: “Der WilldshOtz” (Lortzing). 


EXHIBITIONS — To Sept. 29: 
“Paintinf 
Sportii 
To Nt 


BELGIUM 


ANTWERP. Flanders Festival (tel: 
231.16.90). 

CONCERT — SepL 19: Flanders Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra. Emil Tchakarov 
conductor. Dmilrv Silkovetskv violin, 
Micha Maisky edio (Schubert). 
RECITAL — SepL 17: Frederik 
Gevers piano. 

•Stadsschouwburg ( tel: 23 1 . 16.90). 
BRUSSELS, Flanders Festival 
0*1:312.85 Si). 

CONCERTS — SepL 17: European 
Baroque Orchestra. Jaap ter Linden 
conductor/cdlo. 

Sept. 18: Netherlands Chamber Choir 
and Vienna Muse Consortium. Niko- 
laus Harnoncourt conductor. Beatrice 
Nieboff soprano (Handel). 

Sept. 19: Belgian National Orchestra, 
Mendi Rodan conductor. Annc-So- 
phie Muller violin (Brahms. Profcof- 
lev). 

— SepL 15: “Simon Boccane- 
gra (Verdi). 

GENT. Flanders Festival (tel: 
25.77.80). 

CONCERTS — SepL 14 and 15: En- 
semble Dell’ Anuria Aeterna. Jos van 
Immersed (Bach). 

SepL 16: European Baroque Orches- 
tra. Jaap ter Linden conductor/ cello. 
Scpc 20: BRT Philharmonic Orches- 
tra, Jerzy Semkov conductor. Heather 
rper soprano ( Brahms. Mozart). 
ClTAL — SepL 17: Roberto Aus- 
setgmiar. 


tings of Traditional British 
ng Events.” 

Nov. 3: “Roderic O'Coner.” 
“Gwen John.” 

Through December: "Matthew 
Smith. ^ 

THEATER — Sept 14: “Hamlet" 
(Shakespeare). 

•British Museum (tel: 636.1555). 
EXHIBITION— ToJan. 1986: “Bud- 
dhism: Art and Faith." 

•London Coliseum (id: 836.01.11) 
OPERA — Sept. 14. 17, 20: “Rigo- 
lexto" (Verdi). 

SepL 19: "Cossi fan lutte" (Mozart). 
SepL 16 and 18: “Orpheus in the Un- 
derworld” (Offenbacn). 

•Hayward Gallery (tel: 92857.08). 
EXHIBITIONS —To SepL 29: “Ed- 
ward Burra." 

•National Portrait Gallery (tel: 
930.1552). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Ocl 13: “Char- 
lie Chaplin 1889-1977." 

•National Theater (tel: 928.2252). 
EXHIBITION — SepL 14: “Animal 
Farm” (Orwell). 

SepL 16 and 17: "A Chorus of Disap- 
proval" (Ayckbourn). 

SepL 18: ^he Stoops to Conquer" 
(Goldsmith). 


SepL 16: Pro Musica Chorus of Lon- 
don. John McCarthy conductor, John 
Birch organ (Berlioz. Gounod). 

SepL 18: Rotterdam Philharmonic Or- 
chestra. Netherlands Radio Chorus, 
James Coni on conductor (Liszt). 
OPERA — SepL 20: “Eofance du 
Christ” (Berlioz). 

NICE, Gallery of Contemporary Art 
(td: 62.37.11). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 22: Tout 

Ben." 

•Musee de Terra Amata < tel: 
5559.93). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 30: "Ex- 
perimental Prehistoric Pottery." 

PARIS. ADAC Gallery (tel: 
277.96.26). 

EXHIBITION — To Ocl 17: “Isa- 
belle Emmerique, Patricia Giannim, 
Michd LacosL Raphael Levy, Jean- 
Pierre Pignard." 

•American Center (tel: 335. 2150). 
EXHIBITION —To SepL 28: “7 du 
Centre.” 


To SepL 30: “Rodin Works by Five 


•Theatre du 
(ld:256.70.80). 

DANCE— SepL 17-Ocl 19: Classical 
Music and Dance of India. 
SAUMUR, Festival ((el: 51.03.06). 
BALLET — SepL 20: “Contemporary 
Dance" (Bejart, Heranger, Menaka). 


■ EXHIBITION— To SepL 30: “Mor- 

aodi in Galleria.” 

FLORENCE; Museo Arched ogk» 
. (td: 2T5Z70). 

EXHIBITION ^ To OcL 20: The 
Etruscan Civilization." 

Rond-Point •National Lfljraiy.ftd; 28.70.48L 

. EXHIBITIONr-ToS«)L30:“Rkbe- 
lais: Ulustradons from the 1 6 th Centu- 
ry to the Presem.” 


..GENEVA, Mus6e de TAthteteTtd: 

29.75.66). 

EXHIBITION —To SepL 29: “Cha* 
Ernst. Klee. Lcger and 


GERMANY 


•Royal Opera House (tel: 36.84.08 l 
OPERA — SfflL 16. IS. 20: “Donner- 
stagaus Lichl (Stockhausen). 
•TatcGallerydel: 821. 13.131. 
EXHIBITIONS — To No 


Margaret i 
To Oaob 


lov. 10: 

“Pound's Artists." 

SepL 18-Dec. I: “Howard Hodgkin: 
Prmtsfrom 1977-1983." 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (id: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Ocl 6: “Julia 
Cameron 1815-1979."- 
tober 22: “Textiles from the 
Wellcome Collection: ancient and 
modem textiles from the Near East 
and Peru." 

STRATFORD-upon-AVON, Royal 
Shakespeare Theatre (tel: 29.5623). 
THEATER — SepL 14: Troflus and 
Cressida” (Shakespeare). 

FRANCE 


dbimark 


COPENHAGEN, Tivoli Hal! (td: 

15.10.12). 

BALLET — SepL 14 and 15: Dance 
Theatre of Harlem (“Gisdlc.” “Sere- 
nade.” “Streetcar Named Desire"). 




LONDON. Barbican Centre (tel: 
638.41.41). 


DUON. Mus6e National Maurice 
Magnin( tel: 67.1 1, IQ). 

EXHIBITION — To Nov. 18: “XIX 
Century French Portraits." 

HON FLEUR, Musee Eugene Boudin 
(tel: 89.16.47). 

EXH I BITION — To SepL 30: "Alex- To Sept. 30: “It 
ander Dubourg." 0—1 

LYON, Berlioz Festival (tel: 

860.85.40). 

CONCERTS — Sept. 14: Lyon Na- 
tional Orchestra. Serge Baudo'conduc- 
tor. Nicolai Gedda tenor (Berlioz). 


•FNAC Gallerv (Id: 548.24.46) 
EXHIBITION — To Oct. 26: 
“L'Apr^s- Guerre." photographs. 

•Le Petit Journal (td: 3262859). 
JAZZ— Sept. 14: Caldonia. 

SepL 16: The Blue Doctors. 

SepL 17: Memphis Slim. 

Sept. 18: Watergate Seven + One. 
•Galerie Yoshii (td: 359.73.46). 
EXHIBITION — To SepL 28: “Shu 
Tanaka." 

•Hdtel Meridien (td: 758. 1250). 
JAZZ — SepL 1 4 and IS: Maxim Saury 
and his orchestra. 

SepL 16-25: Benny Carter and his trio. 
•H3td de VTUe (td: 276.40.66). 
EXHIBITION — To Ocl 5: “Victor 
Hugo and Paris." 

•La ViUeiretid: 533.74.50). 
EXHIBITION—' ToSepL ^“Classi- 
cal Music." 

•Le Louvre des Anliquaires (tel: 
29727.00). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 29: “Per- 
fume: XVI -XIX Centuries." 

•Le Petit Opportun (tel: 236.01 J6). 
JAZZ —SepL 14-17: Claude Guilnoi 
and Georges Arvanits. 

SepL 18-24: Babid Reinhardt. Chris- 
tian Escoude and Boulou Ferre. 
•Maine du ler arroadissement (td: 
260.38.01). 

EXHIBITION —To Sept 29: “Four 
Centuries of Ballet in Paris-" 

•Musee Camavalet (id:27221. 13). 
EXHIBITION— ToOcL 27: “The Big 
Boulevards of Paris." 

•Mus6e d'An Moderne (td: 
723.6127). 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341. 44.49V 

OPERA— SepL 14 and l8:“DieZau- 
bcrflate" (Mozart). 

SepL 17: “Aida" (Verdi). 
COLOGNE. Oper der Stadt (tel: 
21.25.81). 

OPERA— SepL 15. 18, 20: “Lucia di 
Lammermoor (Donizetti). 

S^>l 17 and 19: “Agrippina" (Han- 

FRANKFURT. Oper (td:25621). 
OPERA— SepL 14, 16, 19:“Didound 
Aeneas" (PurceO). 

Sept. 15: “Bn MaskenbaB" (Verdi). 
SepL 20: “The Flying Dutchman” 
(Wagner). 

MUNICH, Artcurial Gallery (teL 
29.4 UI). 

EXHIBITION —To SepL 8: “Ecok 
de Paris ‘Les Nails’.” 

•National Theater (tel 22.13.16). 
OPERA — SepL 18: “Ariadne auf 
Naxos” (R- Strauss). 

SepL 20: “Salome” (R_ Strauss). 
•Suatsgalerie modem cr Kunst (teL 
2927.10V 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 15: “Ger- 
man Art since 1960." 


►Palazzo Piri (id: 21 54.40). 
EXHIBITION— To SepL 29: “Mod- 
ern Masters from the Thyssen-Bonxe- 
- orisza collection: CoroL ManeL Picas- 
so." 

MILAN, Teatro alia Scaia (tel: 
80.9126). 

CONCERTS — SepL 17: Monteverdi 
Choir, English Baroque Soloists, John 
Eliot Gardiner conductor (Handel). 
SepL 19 and 20: Orchestra dd Teatro 
alia Scaia, Kurt Sander ling conductor, 
Bruno Leonardo Gelber piano (Bee- 
thoven). 

OPERA— SepL 16 and 18: “D Viaggio 
a Reims" (Rossini), Claudio Abbado 
conductor. 

STRESA, Festival (id: 3J095L 
CONCERTS — SepL 15: Archi della 
Scaia E n se m ble. Ana hi Carfi - violin 
(Bonporti, Pergolesi). 

SepL 18 : Orchestra da Camera di San- 
ta Cecilia. Uto Ughi conductbr/vicdin 
(Handd, Mozart). 

RECITALS — Sept. 14: Vadim 
Brodski violin, Caimo Bocciareffi pi- 
ano (Brahms. Debussy). 

SepL .17: Christqphe Bouher violin, 
Thomas Girard piano (Drdsler, Rav- 
el). 


EXHIBITION —ToSepL 30: “Mont-' 
paraasse ‘Belle Epoque: From Cha- 
gall to BuffeL" 

LAUSANNE The Hermitage Foun- 
dation Gallery (td: 2050.01). :.■*■' 
EXHIBITION— ToOcL 20: “I 
sionists in the Fr 
Collections." 

LUGANO, Villa Favor ita ftel: 
52.I7.41V -• 

EXHIBITION — To Ocl 15: “47. 
Masterpieces from the Museums of 
BudapesL" . 

re" (Donizetti V 

SepL 17 and 19: “Macbeth” (Verdi V- 
S^n. 1 8 and 20: "La Bqhfantf* (Popd-- 


ni). 


UlflTED STATES 


JAPAN 


ATHENE Festival (td: 322.14.59). 
CONCERTS — &pL 17 and 18: 
Washington Symphony Orchestra, 
Mstilslav Rostropovich conductor. 
THEATER— SepL Wand 15: “Salo- 
me" (Wilde). 

): “Coriolanus" (ShakespeoreV 


TOKYO, National Museum of Mod- 
em Art (tel: 214.25.61). 
EXHIBITION— ToSepL 29: “Modi- 
gliani Exhibition." 
^ot.^SP^onCtd: 246.13.70). 
DCHIBITON — To SepL 16: “Ts 
kubaCity." 


rsu- 


nevherlamis 


Sept. 20: 


ITALY 


BOl 

2229. 

CONC 

chestra dd Teatro 


IA, Chiesa di S. Manino(tel: 

TS— Scot. 14 and 15: Or- 
oConui 


•Musiedu Louvre (id: 2605926V 
EXHIBITIONS— ToSepL 9: "XVIII 
Century French Pastels,* “Drawings 
in Genoa: XVI - XVH Century." 
ToSepL 30: “Ingres Portraits." 
•Museedu Petit PaJaisdd: 265. 1273). 
EXHIBITION —To SepL 29: “Gus- 
tave Dote." 

•Musee Rodin (td: 705.0134). 
EXHIBITIONS— 1 ToSepL 15: “Alain 
Kirilii." 


unale di Bolo- 
gna. Alan Hacker conductor. (Weber, 
Cherubini). 

•Chiesa di S. Michele in Bosco (td- 
2229.99V ’ 

CONCERT — Sept, 16: Bucharest 
Madrigal Choir, Marin Konstantin 
conductor. 


AMSTERDAM, Maison Descartes 
(Id: 22.6154). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 27: “Des- 
cartes and The Netherlands." 
•Riiksmuseum(id: 732L2I) • 
BiHIBrnON -To SepL i§: “Rem- 
brandt , drawings. : • 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 15: “The. 
World of Anne Frank, 1929-1945." 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1985 


jP* WIN AND PROFIT 



>od Airline Deals 
J ^ re Found on the Ground 


by Roger Collis 



Tok^f ^ ** Po,e f wm. 

^ rash itssaSfs- 
'Saas^-KstisffSBS 

• •JSft 1 * *** “refreshment package.- if 

ovcj na ® re time, you could have stayed 
2®JP s^ple the deluxe treatment — limo 
ritv hrcak ^ smorgasbord loach, 

5S!«S£ I S 0ns ’ treatm ™i at a health cltrt£ 

hS3^dI n 5Sl an li “EbVin a firsl-claS 
lhc ? packages are free, to SAS 

BBSS SP? 118 -°u inter contmenta! 
n^hts with full-fare tickets (which on SAS 

• £2?uZ?!!i. mto , bu ? mess dass) and who are 


>rc talons the 1 1 :25 P.M. Sight that 
gets you to Jeddah for breakfast Or 


lines before taki _ 

for breakfast Or you 
niighi fly London -Vienna in the evening, 
have a free dinner arid night in the Hilton or 
Intercontinental; and take the 7 A_M. flight 
to Damascus the next morning . 

A novd -way "to fly tir New York from 
London (even better coining the other way) 
is to pamper yourself with Icdandair's free 
24- hour stopover. Plying east you would 
arrive in Reykjavik around 7 A.M. You 
might start with a swim in the thermally 
heated pool at the hotel, have breakfast 
sleep until lunch and then make a shopping 


Free dr discount 
stopovers attract 


transit traffic 


booked tough the next-day fora destina- 
tside of Scandinavia. 


bon outride i 

This is an example of what same airlines 
are doing to make it attractive to transit at 


their major hubs. Clearly, the priority 'for 
most business travelers is getting there 


vuimess iravaers is getting there 
quickly and comfortably. But it can some- 
. 9 xaes sense to stop over somewhere 
interesting rather titan to fly direct (How to 
rationalize this with the Puritan Work Ethic 
the pause that refreshes, or combining fun 
and Profit —is up to you.) Some of the best 
airline deals are on the ground. 

Back before jumbo jets and business class, 
wdien the International AirTransport Asso- 
ciation used to regulate everything from seat 
pitch to sandwiches, many airlines gave free 
• stopovers to include meals and hotels. An 


IATA rule (which still applies, except -for 
South America, Australia and 


.'IV 


(Steal 
frjn.'s : 


;V 


T: - *- 


, - %>* ' 

’-•k- 


iiPrssr \ : . v 
1 *■ 


North and 

' traffic within Europe) allows ah-tings to do 

* this provided there is no prompt onward 
connection, up to a maximum cJ 34 hours. 

- They are not allowed to advertise this, al- 
' - though they may inform travel agents and 

publish the fact m timetables. Passengers arc 
> supposed to hold other a firm onward reser- 
' vation or be wait-listed on the next available 

* flight. However, some ahtines are stretching 
the rules and discreetly marketing free or 
heavily subsidized stopovers, often in col- 
laboration with local totnist authorities. 

The advent of the hub and spoke strategy, 
by which you can make a connection to 
practically anywhere within a few hours, has 
; reduced the opportunities for free stopovers. 

■ But American Airlines will give a free day- 
■’ room and lunch in Paris for eastbouxtd pas- 

* sengers connecting to Africa and the Middle 
; East British Airways win give a free night’s 

- accomodation to passengers traveling from 
; the Caribbean over Miami to connect with 

- Concorde, and Air France will do the same if 

■ you are coming through Paris from, say, 

.' Rome and going onJq Rxo. ' . 

* But for.ftee stopover.bufifs, the best deals 
‘ are with the so-caBed Sixth Freedoniairlines 
[ jritfc small domestic markets that need to 
•.attract transit traffic. (Sixth Freedom is 

* when passengers are carried between two 
" countries by the airline of a third via its 


trip (woolens are great bargains) or take an 
excursion to the not volcanic springs. You 
could coniine to London in the late after- 
noon or stay overnight and leave in the 
morning. Both are great ways to unwind. 

One of the best known stopovers is Ibe- 
ria’s “Madrid Amigo” 24-hour package for 
intercontinental passengers. (There’s a mini- 
package with dayroom and lunch at the 
Barajas Airport Hotel for those with six 
hours or less.) You need to plan your itiner- 
ary from, say, London to Mexico City on a 
Tuesday, Thursday or Saturday, not on a 
Monday when there's 'a straight through 
flight. The package gives you free transfers, 
lunch, a tour of the Prado Museum, dinner 
with a flamenco show or an evening at the 
casino, and a first-class hotel. There are 


similar packages for Barcelona and the Ca- 
s. For exanro 


nanes. For example, flying east from New 
York, you could transfer from Madrid to 
Barcelona, spend the night there, compli- 
ments of Iberia, and continue to a Middle 
East destination the next morning. You 
could transit in Barcelona en route from 
London to Cairo, or stop over in Las Palmas 
for 24 hours on your way from Caracas to 


Abidjan or Lagos. 

he best stopovers are free: there 


home base. For example, flying Icdandair 
.vik-New York, 


KLM 




i t 


* V* Is, 


London-Reykjavik-New York, or 
Mhnchester-Sciiiphol-Singapore.) 

While the SAS packages in ^ _ 
are hard to beat (SAS also does a" free day 
package in Sngapore for passengers con- 
necting to Sydney), Austrian is an airline 
that tries harder than 
want to go from Frankfurt to Jed 
would take a direct flight. But you might be 
tempted to fly to Vienna, arriving at 10:05 


most. Normally, if you 
dah you 


tempted to ny to Vienna, arriving ai su:uj 
A.M, enjoying a day’s sightseeing, perhaps 
fitting in a business call, with limo transfers 
and dinne r compliments of Austrian Air- 


Not all the 
are many worthwhile discounts. For exam- 
ple. Singapore Airlines offers stopover holi- 
days (which must be bought in advance) for 
one to four days, including hotel accomoda- 
tions. transfers, breakfast and sightseeing in 
18 cities, from Amsterdam to Tokyo. Prices 
in Singapore range from S24 for one night to 
$1 14 tor four nights in a first-class hotel to 
S35 to $173 in a deluxe hotel You must 
arrive and leave with Singapore Airlines. 

If you're flying from Europe to Australia, 
try a “Stay-a- While Shopover” with Cathay 
Padfic in Hong Kong. You arrive around 9 
A.M. so you can either stay 24 hours or take 
an evening departure that day. You get a free 
-limo to your hotel (The Mandarin or the 
Hyatt Regency for about S32) and a “Cost- 
less Encounters” discount card and guide- 
book that entitles yon to shopping and enter- 
tainment bargains. 

If you’re making Schiphol your first point 
of arrival or final point of departure in 
Europe, you could do worse than take 
KLM's “Happy Holland Bargain.” This of- 
fers a single room from $29 to $55 for the 
first night, a 50-percent discount on domes- 
tic flights within the Netherlands, and a raft 
of shopping and entertainment discounts as 
well as nee transfers to and from the airport. 

• These are just a few of the deals available. 
You need to do your own scouring with 
airline schedules and a phone book. Who 
knows, next time you might have your wallet 
snatched by gypsies in an Andalu 
rather than in the Paris Metro. 


lusian cave 




Marcel Came 


Continued from page 7 





dis,” shot in the Victorine Studios in Nice 
and in Paris. Again, as an escape from inter- 
ference, Cam 6 and Proven set the film in the 
past — in the colorful early 19th-century 
Boulevard do Crim e, the Parisian center of 
theater and lowlife swept away by Baron 
Haussmann to make room for the Place de la 
Rfepublique. The stars were Arleiry. Jean- 
Louis Barrault (in a moment of panic when 
he thought he might not get Barrault, Cam* 
thought of signing a new mime named Jac- 
ques Tati), Pierre Brasseur and a newcomer, 
Maria Casarts, with clandestine help from 
the composer Joseph Kosma and die design- 
er Alexander Trauner, both Jews in hiding. 

“For me the film was an act of friendship, 
I never imagined it would have, that success, 
none of usdid,” Carnfe says. “I never thought 
people would talk about it forty years later. 
When I’m filming,” he adds, “Tm not much 
aware of what’s going on aroung me, Jm in 
sort of a trance.” Arletty once said that 
anyone who filmed Carnfe while filming 
could make a fortune. 

“I make a film rather as if I am takingup a 

i- ■ _ r n. AM « cMri.il annosonere. 


while Carat: was not Jewish, he was Jewish- 
influenced, which was nearly as bad, and 
that he should watch his step. After the 
Occupation, Came found himself accused of 
collaboration before an ad hoc tribunal be- 
cause he had continued to film. “It’s a period 
no one can understand who didn't live 
through it,” he says. He was given a public 


rebuke and his name was -posted on the 
had loved 



nCVfiT sr^“ uu i*mv***«» w— — -- 

talking about the days when the aew was 
really attached, fixed, to the Erector Today 
thev talk during shots. Not only amid I have 
KSde Tes Enfants du Paradtf without 


studio door. Arletty, who had loved a Ger- 
man officer, was imprisoned. To post-synch 
“Les Enfants du Paradis,” Carafe bad to ask 
the police to send for Arletty. 

“She came to the studio with two gen- 
darmes and everyone turned their batiks on 
her, even Brasseur. I was very disappointed 
by Brasseur. She had terrific guts. She had to 
do her first scene with Brasseur, very lively 
and gay, and she did.” 

Arletty, Kosma, Trauner and above all 
Prfevert were Carafe's team. The decline in his 
work is usually traced to his break with 
Prfevert after “Les Portes de la Nuit" in 1946. 
“Prfevert got bad reviews, worse than m i n e, 
and he said he was fed up with writing 
scripts.” Carafe says. He. understandably, 
bridles at Prfevert’s being given tod much 
importance, but Prfevert’s contribution is un- 
questioned. 

No one can speculate on what Carafe and 
Prfevert (who died in 1977) would have done 


.. 


done it without that crew. 

Carnfe tried to slew up p«t-prpduciiOT so 

that “T^s Enfants du Paradis would be 
SLce^ftoT^iwar film, bat it am* on. 
just before war's end. 


had their 30-year partnership not ended. 
‘ :ts that fell 1 


Some of their projects that fell through are, 
like most fallen projects and some realized 
ones, mind-boggling, such as a life of Diaghi- 
iev with OrsonWelles. 

The real stunner was an idea that came to 
th em just after “Les Enfan ts du. Paradis.” 
Prfevert and Carnfe derided to make a film of 
“Mary Popp ins.” Unfortunately, says Car- 
nfe. they were unable to secure the rights. ■ 


doonesbury 


TRAVEL 



Page 9 


Restoring the Great Wall of China 


by John F. Bums 


M OST travelers to outposts of 
the Old World know what it is 
to feel time receding. On ihe 
steps of the Senate in Rome, 
toward dusk when the crowds have fled the 
Forum, ibe visitor has only to filter out the 
traffic noise to imagine bow it was in Julius 
Caesar's time. In Leningrad, before the Her- 
mitage museum on a snowy winter's night, 
the last days of the Romanovs in their Win- 
ter Palace can suddenly spring to life. 

In China, the oldest continuous civiliza- 
tion of all it is not always easy for the mind 
to track backward in time. In their haste to 
accommodate the hundreds of thousands of 
visitors arriving each year, the custodians of 
the country's greatest relics are making ma- 
jor efforts at physical restoration, but fre- 
quently the sense of history is lost for the 
want of attention to milieu. Too often, there 
is too much noise, too much commercializa- 
tion, too great an obtrusion of the present 
into the precincts of the past. 

Nowhere is this more noticeable than at 
the Great Wall Since Richard Nixon made 
his pilgrimage in 1972, just about every 
American reaching Beijing has made the 50- 
mile trek north to Badaling. the site chosen 
by the Communist government in 1 956 when 
it ordered the first major restoration of the 
wall in centuries. Arriving there, tike Nixon, 
almost everybody has been struck by Lhe 
sheer volume of the masonry and tbe scope 
of the labor involved, but the spirit or the 
place has been disappointingly elusive. 

“It is a great wall, said Nixon, in what the 
press corps at the time took for one of his 
famous tautologies. In fact, the former presi- 
dent captured — perhaps inadvertently — 
the blandness of the scene. There is no muse- 
um; the surrounding hills are mostly bare of 
vegetatioa, and in winter it is bilingly cold. 
With the encouragement of tourism and 
small-scale private emerarise in recent years 
things have deteriorated still further. Those 



Repaired Mutianyu section of the wall 


the collapse of the Ming Dynasty in 1644. 
officis 


Beijing envisage it. Mu- 
off at least two million 


joining the press of humanity atop the wall 


are instantly set upon by hawkers of “I 
Climbed the Great Wall” T-shirts, of fake 
Ming Dynasty coins and of much other bric- 
a-brac. 

Much of this is about to change. On Oct. I 
the Bureau of Relics in Beijing will officially 
open a new site for visitors to the Wall. It is 
in Mutianyu, a village nestling amid the Y an 
Mountains northeast of the capital. It is the 
first major restoration of the wall in the 
Beijing area since Badaling in the 1950s and 
the largest of at least five similar projects 
under way along a 1,000-mile stretch of the 
wall from the province of Liaoning to the 
province of Shanxi. Together, the projects . 
make for (he biggest upgrading of (he wall 
since ii ceased being a defensive battery with 


As officials in 
tianyu will draw 
visitors a year from Badaling, where four 
million tourists are expected by the end of 
this year. Ai each site, about one-third of the 
visitors will be foreigners, the others Chi- 
nese. For the majority of Americans who 
visit China as members of groups with prear- 
ranged itineraries, it may be difficult to 
make the switch, but tbe advantages of the 
new site justify the effort. With the number 
or visitors rising rapidly each year, Badaling 
will continue to be the busier of the two sites, 
and other factors are even more compelling. 

Mutianyu is closer to Beijing, about 45 
miles from most hotels in the center of the 
city. The road is also better, a modern divid- 
ed highway for the first 30 miles or so giving 
way to a narrower road that winds gently 
through lush councyside for the last 15 miles. 
In place of the rugged brown hills that are 
the prelude to Badaling. the approaches to 
Mutianyu are a vista of rice paddies, wheat 
fields and beekeepers* hives, with a glimpse 
here and there of peasants bathing and 
washing their clothes in a broad stream. 


W: 


ORKERS will be busy right up to 
opening day with the last mile or so 
roacT a once dusty track that has 
been widened and surfaced to cany traffic to 
two parking lots a few hundred yards apart 
at the base or the mountains. One is in the 
village of Mutianyu. a sleepy hollow that is a 





picture of rural China, with donkey carts and 
whispy-bearded old men sunning themselves 
on their sloops. From there a climb of 1.060 
freshly cut white granite steps winds steeply 
upward to the wall through orchards and 
groves, which are absent at Badaling. 

When 1 made the climb with my family on 
a scorching weekend morning last month it 
was an endurance test. With the temperature 
in the mid-90s, our 10-year-old son bounded 
ahead with his 4-year-old brother, leaving 
their mother and an English nanny trailing 
with their infant sister. I had resolved to 
carry our picnic to the wall about 1.400 feet 
above sea level, but yielded to impulse along 
the way and persuaded a friendly village 
woman to hire out her donkey. With the 
impedimenta safely roped to the animal’s 
back, she disappeared up a nearby trail and 
was at the top. waiting, by the time we 
arrived. 

For some visitors, the challenge of the 
steps may prove irresistible. For others, it 
will be a relief to learn that a company 
formed jointly by the Chinese and a Hong 
Kong concern will be building a cable car 
route this winter from the second parking lot 
to the summit, carrying up to 1,500 passen- 
gers an hour. Workers are already busy pre- 
paring the lower terminal and a restaurant 
capable of seating 1.000 people. Officials 
hope to have tbe cable car in operation by 
May 1. 

In lime tbe Relics Bureau envisages a 
similar cable car for Badaling. There, buses 
and cars halt within a short, level walk of the 
wall but tbe precipitous climb along tbe wall 
to either side has been too much for many 
viators, particularly older ones. In this, as in 
other Instances, Mutianyu has an advantage, 
with thick stands of oak and sycamore trees 
to hide the pylons that will support the aerial 
car’s cables. At Badaling, where generations 
of peasants have stripped the hillsides bare 


1644. when a disaffected general. Wu San- 
gui. opened the gate to Manchu im □ tiers at 
Shanhaiguan. 100 miles east of Mutianyu. 


for firewood and building timber, disguising 
ediffic 


the route will be more difficult. 

In both places the restored sections of the 
wall date from the Ming Dynasty, when 
millions of soldiers and peasants worked 
over a period of two centuries to construct a 
tonification from the Yalu River, now the 
border with North Korea, westward to 
Jiayuguan Pass in the province of Gansu. 
(The total lenghth of the wall itself is about 
1 .500 miles.) With a granite base and a brick 
superstructure, the Ming sections proved 
more lasting than earthenware portions con- 
structed in the Qin and Han dynasties more 
ih?n 1,200 years earlier. But the wall’s rele- 
vance for the empire’s defense ended in 


AS at Badaling. the mile-long section of 
wail at Mutianyu is doited with two- 
lx. siory watchtowers. sections of steep 
steps and crenelated battlements. But at Mu- 
tianyu, far more than at Badaling. the imagi- 
nation can leap backward across the centu- 
ries. Looking north, the eye takes in a 
panorama of plunging mountains and val- 
leys, with mud-colored sections of the Han 
and Qin walls clearly risible. Looking back 
down the valley, the back-breaking work for 
laborers who lived and died building the wall 
becomes almost tangible. 

A facsimile of their travails exists in the 
donkeyloads of sand and bricks that ascend 
the mountain from dawn to dusk each day. 
serving the crews that are putting finishing 
touches on the restoration. Unlike their an- 
cestors. the hundreds of Mutianyu villager 
drafted into the work are paid.' albeit at a 
rate of barely SI a day. Ironically, some of 
the stones and bricks being used are making 
their second trip up the mountain, five cen- 
turies after their first, having been looted by 
peasants 15 or 20 years ago during the Cul- 
tural Revolution. 

The extent of damage done to the wall 
then is difficult to gauge, but it was serious 
enough to persuade the State Council in 
Beijing to issue a decree imposing stiff penal- 
ties on peasants who ought continue to use 
tbe bricks for their pigsties and chicken runs. 
One peasant west of Beijing who built a kiln 
out of stones looted from the wall was heavi- 
ly fined earlier this year and ordered to 
replace tbe stones at his own expense. When 
another peasant volunteered the return of 
3.000 stones that he had used to extend his 
house and pigsty, he was publicly commend- 
ed and rewarded with a free truckload of 
replacement bricks. 

Tbe stillness that we found atop tbe wall at 
Mutianyu will hardly last once the site 
opens, at least at times of peak visits. But 
those wishing to enjoy the area without 
crowds could skip tbe tourist buses and take 
a taxi from Beijing, either early or late. Fares 
vary but are unlikely to be much more than 
$35 round trip. Foreigners belonging to a 
Beijing church group that holds Easier Sun- 
day services at dawn atop the Great Wall at 
Badaling swear that there is no better lime to 
see the wall t ban when the sun is rising over 
the hills. ■ 


I9&5 The New York T,nus 


Photoj ournalism 


Continued from page 7 


more about war and photography as an act 
of courage and as an instrument of persua- 
sion should see the shows of all three. 

And then there is what promises to be the 
most comprehensive collection of war pho- 
tography ever assembled: “The Indelible Im- 
age: Photographs of War, 1846 to the Pre- 


ery made between the world wars by tbe likes 
of Man Ray and Recife Magritte. 

New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art 
has a new photography curator in Maria 
Morris Hambourg, the Atget scholar. Unlike 
her counterparts at the Museum of Modem 


itograpti 

sent* 4 Its 200-plus pictures, many of them by 
anonymous mid unknown photographers, 
were uncovered by Frances Fralin of the 
Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, but 
the show opens Sept. 25 at New York Uni- 
versity’s Grey Art Gallery. The well-known 
photographers it includes range from 
Mathew Brady, image impresario of the Civ- 
il War, to Larry Burrows, arguably the great- 
est photographer of Vietnam. 

Not all photojournalism is of wars, of 
course Just bow far afield it can range will 
be obvious when the final installment of the 
Corcoran Gallery’s three-part survey, “The 
New York School” opens there OcL 26. 
Featuring work by Diane Arbus, Bruce Da- 
vidson, Richard Avedon and others, the ex- 
hibition argues the existence of a “New York 
documentary style." 


Art, she seems open to playing host to shows 
side her < 


originated outside her own domain. In addi- 
tion. the International Center of Photogra- 


phy is readying a new midtown space for an 
October opening. 

Meanwhile, the Metropolitan's once-de- 
layed Kertesz show, organized with the Art 
Institute of Chicago, arrives in December. A 
key figure of the 1950s — and of any account 
of a postwar “New York school” — William 
Klein, will be showing new photographs at 
Zabrislrie Gallery’ late next month. 


The late Ansel Adams’s 75-print “museum 
set" of what he considered his greatest work 
goes on exhibit at the National Gallery of 
Art OcL 6, in a show titled “Ansel Adams: 
Classic Images.” This, together with the Cor- 
coran Gallery's “L' Amour fou" show, makes 
a trip to Washington almost mandatory. ■ 


1985 The New York Times 


its of miners, 
imsored by 
lustoo, and 
and Surreal- 
Gallery in 


are 

American West, 
able life-size and larger 
drifters and drinkers, is 
tbe Amon Carter Museum in 
L’Amour fou: Pho 
ism," opens at the 
Washington. “In the American West.” a sig- 
nificant milestone in Avedon’s journey 
across the grain of fashion, seems to be 
traveling everywhere but New York. It will 
be at the Corcoran in December. “L* Amour 
fou” is the eagerly awaited study by the 
contentious art historian Rosalind Kxauss 
and the Corcoran’s Jane Livingston of the 
wealth of incongruous photographic imag- 


■ $W/ffBAPPiNe IT! 
• Th 


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OKA**®*? RQNN/E 
U&60IUH. SWNPSFJR 
(mm PEACE! m 
BONNE * 
STRIKES A, 

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X MET tUTTH BBH0P 
TOTOWENNBSOr'A 
THAT BIS AUARP!” 



UH..THAH5 

'TUTU'-**.- SM&tSe 
/ AN ICECREAM 
FLAVOR, n. 




A Smith photo of a Minimata victim. 


W. Eugene Smdh, Mopwm 


Naresh Sohal 


Continued from page 7 


Empire,” he found particularly fascinating. 


“It was a part of my history I was too 
young to know, but which greatly affected 
my life. India was the first country to get 
independence from Britain, and it was tre- 
mendously significant i wanted to under- 
stand why the British decided to leave, and 
bow they went about it and tbe documenta- 
ries turned up information from very ordi- 
nary people who were pan of the process.” 


A distinctive feaiure of Sohal’s music is his 
use of quarter-tones which, he says, is less 
due to his familiarity with them m Indian 
music than to a personal hunch that they 
could add something to Western composi- 
tion. He spent two years researching subject 
at Leeds University. 

“An artist must have some irreverence, 
rome leeway to question the most estab- 
lished things," he comments. He believes 
that in Scotland, where he now lives, modem 


composers lend to be constrained by their 
atonalism. He sees evidence of similar inhi- 
bition further afield, and regrets it 
“Music should express the composer's ex- 
periences,” he says. “Society is changing 
very rapidly, and surely that fact should find 
new expression rather than looking back- 
ward for style.” g 


Sue Armstrong is avniter based in Brussels. 


i 


— 1 


4. 






Page 10 


nvTF.R NATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY^ SEPTEMBER 13, 1985 




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provide the finest traditions of 


hospitality with gracious and 
attentive service, and during 
the last five years more than 
£12 million has been spent on 
alterations and improvements 
for the benefit of the hotel’s 
discerning guests. 

Visitors to The Dorchester 
are first struck by the 
magnificent Promenade — 
more rhan 16S feet of marble 
floors interspaced with 
beautiful hand made carpets 
from Manila, and studded 
with majestic apricot and 
white pillars. 

The Promenade is the 
setting for yet another great 
British tradition - tea at The 
Dorchester, complete with 


wafer thin cucumber sand- 
wiches, oven hot scones and 
rich Devonshire cream. 

During the afternoon, and 
throughout the evening, a 
pianist plays light music as 
tail-coated waiters move 
silently amongst the giant 
palms and growing ferns 
cloned throughout the length 
of the room. 

y purling from the Prom- 
enade is the Terrace Restaur- 
ant presided over by The 
Dorchester’s world famous 
Maine Chef des Cuisines, 
Anton Mosimaim. 

This lovely room with its 
view across Hyde Park, has 
provided London with a 














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The Promenade at The Dorchester 


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In deliberate contrast to the 
traditional English fine which 
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aims to lay special emphasis 
on feeding the eye as well as 
the palate. Anton Mosimaim 
has always believed in pre- 
senting his dishes as if they 
were works of art Colour and 


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Oyer 200 years of painstaking craftsmanship 


simplicity of app e a ran ce are, 
to him, important as the taste 
of the finished article. 

Flavour and lightness are 
the hallmarks of the Terrace 
menu, whether personal 
preference is for a la carte, the 
table d’hote menu, or for the 
Menu Surprise - six delicious 
feather light courses made 
from fresh produce from the 
market that day- the accent is 
on simplicity and originality. 

The Grill Room takes as its 
theme “the Best of the British 
Isles” and uses the finest of 
British ingredients, such as 
Scottish beef, Welsh lamb 
and Norfolk turkey. Each day 
features a regional speciality 
such as broiled sflvereide and 
caraway dumplings from east 
Anglia or braised beef in 
Guinness from the Midlands. 
There is also roast beef and 
smoked Scotch salmo n from 
the trolley, plus an extensive a 
la carte menu including a 
selection of mouth-watering 
dishes made from produce 
bought from the early 
morning markets at Covent 
Garden, Billingsgate and 
SmithfielcL 

The reputation of the Grill 
was further enhanced last year 
when international food guide 
and critic, Egon Ronay, made 
it his restaurant of the year, 
placing it above 500 good 
restaurants in the major cities 
of Europe and the United 
States. 

One of the most fashionable 
places to meet in London is 
The Dorchester Bar. Design- 
er, Alberto Pinto, has dram- 
atically split levelled the room 
and then used limed oak pan- 
elling, mirrors and remark- 
able blue and white ceramic 
tiles specially fired in France, 
to create a seductive, leisurely 
charm. 

This breathtaking room is 
the perfect place for a light 
luncheon or pre-theatre sup- 
per, when it is also possible to 
listen to London’s leading 
piano bar entertainer, Mike 
McKenzie. 


In 1775 Jonathan Mappin 
entered his' mark at the assay 
office in Sheffield, and before 
long cutlery bearing that 
mark was finding its way onto * 
the better-kept dining tables 
of the dty. By the end of the 
eighteenth century, Mappin 
had made a name for hwnmif 
as a craftsman who could turn 
his hands to most things 
salver; fine goblets, engraved 
[date, clasps and even dog' 
collars are recorded as being 
produced at his workshop in 
the early years. 

We most presume that Jon- 
athan Mappin’s eye for style 
and excell e nce was inherited, 
along with foe business, by 
his heirs. By 1849 his descen- 
dants, Joseph Mappin & Sou, 
were well enough established 
in Sheffield to take a foothold 
in foe City of London. Prem- 
ises were acquired at 17 Fore 
Street, and within a very short 
while indeed foe volume of 
business demanded that new 
sites be developed at Moor- 
gate and King William Street. 

The name Mappin had 


achieved for itself a reputation 
for quality that has .been 
guarded jealously from that 
day to fob.; 

Mappin Brothers (as foe 
Company became known) ex- 
panded cautiously throughout 
foe 1850’s. By 1858, five hun T 
dred skilled plate workers 
were employed at the plate 
factory in Sheffield, and it 
was about this time that one 
of foe brothers; Frederick 
Mappin, left the -business to 
move into steel production. 
The other hrofoer, 1 John 
Newton Mappin took into 
partnership George Webb, his 
brother-in-law, thus forming 
the first association of Mappin 
& Webb- 

In 1862 Mappin & Webb 
opened their first newshop in 
London in Regent Street. The 
name Mappin - was already 
wdQ known in foe capital, and 
by foe end of foe decade 
Mappin & Webb bad consol- 
idated this reputation with a 
further two shops'. 

Before long, the rime would 
be ripe for foe first tentative 


The Queen of Shopping 
Streets 


r here is a collection of rare pieces of antique 
jewellery at Massada , 45 New Bond Street 
dose to Grosvenor Street. Mm and: women 
mho find pleasure in the old rather than the modem 
will delight in the hundreds of items on display to 
enchant both the browser and die buyer , whether they : 
rmshjo spend £30, £3,000, or more. 

There are severed stupendous pieces made by the 
master Italian jeweller Carlo Giidamo during the last 
century. Each has a timelessness to attract womm of 
good taste from every generation. For men there are tie 
pins, stock brooches, cufflinks and wedding rings more 
than one hundred years old . Among a range of delicate' 



Bond Street, one of a family with Rome’s via Coodotti, Paris’s 
Faubourg St. Hooore and 5th Avenue, New York. 


cameos is a brooch rimmed with gold and within the 
frame a delicate portrait of Athena feeding an eagle 
from her hand. 

Further down this queen of shopping streets is Van 
Cleef& Arpels where they not only sell jewels worth a 
queen’s ransom, but have created a salon that has a 
sense of luxury so that you can fully appreciate the ■ 
beautiful gems that blaze from perfect settings, proof 
that today’s craftsmen are the equal of their illustrious - 
predecessors. 


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moves into an overseas 
market. 

Gold had been discovered 
in rich veins on foe Witwaters 
Rand in South Africa. At 
about the same rime, in 1896, 
Mappin & Webb opened foeir 
first overseas branch in 
Johannesburg. 







Mappin& Webb’s Assay Office 
mark for Sterling Stiver, 

London, 1979 


In 1904, a branch was 
opened in Paris. The French 
proved to be as appreciate of 

rra frgrngnghr p as the English 

and the South Africans, and 
by 1909 new premises had 
been taken at Number One, 
Rue de la Paix, where the 
Mappin & Webb branch 
remains to foi* day. 

The inter-war years saw the 
Company developing its pre- 


sent philosophy; that quafity. 
mer chan dise should bc rccog- ■ 
nised as the finest sflverware 
according to the reputariqn af 
the name it bears. It was _nue : 
co say then, as indeed it o to-? 
day, that style never goes out 
erf fashion. * : 

Today, foe ; Mappin; A . 
Webb range is one of the most 
outstanding- . riiUections of. 
luxury items available to' foe 
discerning buyer. ‘ :i • 

From foe famous show- 
rooms in London, the reput- 
ation of Mappin 8c Webb has 
spread throughout the. world. 
Since foe early 1960’s, a new 
policy of expansion has result- 
ed in a number of new -prem- 
ises being opened - first with- 
in the British Isles, then later, 
on an international basis.' 

When Jonathan Mappin 
began' lus business in Shdf- • 
field in 1774 he was encourag- 
ed inhis endeavours by the 
thought that every, moment, ; 
painstak ingly spent by him 
would become immo rtal in a ■ 
thing of lairing ' beauty. His 
silverware would- become : a 
celebration of elegance down ; 
foe ages, reflecting the spirit 
of his own dedkarionandthsu: 
of those whoinight come after' 
him. 

At Mappm & Wdbb,' that 
spirit of 1774: fives on. . . 


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The 


•• x. • • - — ^ • •• 

In the heart of Mayfeir, overlooking the greatest of : 
London’s royal parks,' Hyde Park, proudly stands The ' 
Dorchestec. A symbol of gracious hospitality. " 

. A stay at The Dorchester is a unique and exciting - • 
experience. Nowhere else in the world combine ' - 
location, tradition, comfort and hospitality so ' ' ' 

- delightfully or successfully. 

The Terrace 

Omadered by gourmets to be London's finest' • - 
restaurant. The Tbnaceis one of the few dining rooms' 7 - 
outside France to gain a star in the Guide Midielin - 

TnHirmtD mmonfin Mia ii»L = 


.. -■ V — *** •JUIUC ffUUilGilll. •• ' 

Intimate, romantic,, spacious, unhurried. Light seasonal 
cuisine served in an atmosphere ofold-worid British^ r 
..■■■ elegance.. - 



\ T .The Grffl 

A grrat ferounte with Londoners, andrecentlv named ' 

aasasadK': 

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F rankfurt 

A INTERNATIONAL CITY 


n 


Major Center tor Banking, 
World Trade and Transportation 


Prankfuir am Main is the bats erf 
German hanking and finaryf and 
the location of the country’s pi«o- 
pa] stock eschaoge. !c is also a key 
junction for transportation: both 
the ftainkforr airport and the main 
tain station are the busiest in 
continental Europe The airport, is 
also die world's leading cargo air- 
pore outside the United Sobs: 

The dty is weB-situated to wVp 
advantage ctf die ooumiy’s .famous 
superhighway system (Autobahn) 
and die heavily trafficked Rhine 
River, which leads to the mam- 
moth harbor of Rotterdam . 


sented in the Frankfurt area. They 
®e estimated co number a good 
300. Hoe, mo, are the American 
Chamber of C omm e rce in Germa- 
ny and the bt g«£ US. Gonsubrc - 
General 


ond largest group was from Japan 
(81,500), followed by the British 
(58000). Here, too, the emphasis 
is on business. Eighty patent of all 
visitors to Frankfort come for busi- 


The United Scares also provides 
die sngk- largest national group 
among visitors to Frankfort They 
numbered 30000 0 hsc year, ac- 
counting for 29 percent of all for- 
eign visitors, according to the 
Frankfort Tourist Office. The scc- 


ness reasons. 

The IHK survey shows that in 
addition to American firms, 
French, British, Italian and Finnish 
companies are alaa attracted to this 
area. Forty foreign economic agen- 
cies have their offices hoc, includ- 
ing almost ail Southeast and East 


Asian countries. Frankfurt is the 
pome location in Germany for 
Korean companies. An increasing 
number of Japanese firms are also 
fining their way to this city. 

The Frankfort success story id 
not happen overnight. The home- 
town or foe Rothschild family has 
just marked the 4COth anniversary 
of its stock exchange. "Nowhere in 
Germany is history and economic 
growth so formed by the trade fair 
and stock exchange as in Frank- 


furt," a writer noted in the Frank- 
furter Aiigemone Zatung news- 
paper. He added that both the fair 
and the exchange made the city the 
crossroads cf ende routes leading in 
all directions, although local mer- 
chants were not really global read- 


A wide network of services has 
grown up in and around Frankfort, 
including trade and indusoial fats, 
international and domestic trading 


suiting and accounting firms, legal 
services and maiketing and adver- 
tising agencies. 

It comes as no surprise tfaar 
Frankfurt’s residents enjoy Germa- 
ny’s highest per-capica shore of the 
gross national income. The Cham- 
ber of Commerce and Industry 
(IHK) estimates thar in 198% the 
latest year for which figures air 
available, that share .amounted to 
6%S02 Deutsche marks ($22,109 ar 
cunenr exchange rates) pet person. 

Intematzonal trade plays a large 
role. The IHK reports local indus- 
try has a high expat quoa (426 
percent average), Sad by office 
equipment'^ percent), cbemkab 
(55 percent) and ekaropocs (45; 
pacatt). 

U5u firms are saongly tepre-- 



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The stock exchange scarred on 
Sept 9, 1585, with the first regular 
meeting bet w een Christian and 
Jewish merchants in front of 
Lowenstein House on Romerhog 
(site of Gty Hall). The present 
location, a few steps born the 
Haupewache, is in a noo-renai s- 
sanoe building opened in 1879. 
Today, 52 percent of all German 
stock transactions cake place brae 
as well as almost all buying and 
sellin g cf foreign shares. 

Frankfurt’s trade bur is even 
older. The autumn fair (still hdd 
each year) dares back to the second 
half of the L2ih century. Emperor 
Ludwig the Bavarian granted 
Frankfort permission to bold a 
second annual fair, during Lent, in 
the following century. This fair, 
too, is still hdd each spring. 


The city's skyhne attests to the continuation of its commercial heritage 


"We are coming to Germany’s 
main aty," the pilar punned 25 the 
flight knlon drew doscr to 
Frankfort Airport The dty on the 
Main (actually pronounced 
"mind’) is Gerroany’sinain dry fat 
business. Four of every five visitors 
to Frankfort come hoe to wade 
Brit in recent years, Frankfurt 

has been polishing up its historic 
buildings, erecrimj or renovating 
museums and half-timbered house s 
and in general going all our to 
disaacr those statistical four visitors 
from bang all business while in 
town and to make the aty even 
more attractive for die statistical 
fifth, the pure fiitvseekcc. 

Two new museums have 
opened on the ceWbrarcd "Muse- 
um Bank," bringing to seven foe 
number of museums within a few 
minutes’ walk of one another on 
the Main River’s sourb shore. Two 
of the other museums have been 
extensively renovated. 

Most of the seven musaims 


which is topped by a restaurant 
with a rearing float 

Nobody daims thar the six new 
"medtevaT buildings opposite the 
Kilmer are restorations. The fa-' 
cades were rebuilt; bur the interiors 
were constructed to conform with 
modem ideas of what stores and 
ap artme nt s ought to be like. Ncv^ 
etfodess, they and the Ramcr pro- 


medieval atmosphere in down- 
town Frankfurt is artificial The 
district of Hodis^ however, is an- 
other matter. Ir has a vay pictur- 
esque aW section, with a casde that 
came through the war unscathed 
The imitation-adobe Pueblo, 
adjacent to a large office-building 
complex in tbc Nicdenad district, 
is a sevealkd leisure village. In 


■where Frankfurt’s traditional hard 
cider was served along with such 
food specialties as Stblat h tp/att e, 
Rifpdxns, sauerkraut and Handkds 
nut Musk Wacbtpkmr is a mix- 
ture of sausages and smoked meats, 
a Rippdm is a juicy, cured pcxk 
chop and Hendkaj ait Midi is a 


mixture of soft c hees e, chopped 
onions, vin&ar and ofl. All are 


along me socuku 

in ccxtverted vfllas faring the Main. 

The two newest ones, which are 
next ckwr to. one another and 
opened only weeks apart, are the 
German Architecture Museum 
and tire German film Museum. 

The Architecture Museum 
d-als with the building styles of the 
19 * and 20fo centuries, displaying 



onions, vinegar and oil All are 
typeal Sachsenhauscn dishes and 
go nicely with apple wine. 

There are still a good number of 
such places in Sachsenhauscn. But 


they are bong crowded more and 
more by beer bars, wine cdlars, jazz 


more by beer bars, wine cdlars, jazz 
plane* porinre and ICSQU- 

rants. A very huge part of the 
apple-wine Austria now is a pedes- 
trian zone. The old buildings have 
been repainted and there are our- 
door tanks in the summertime. 


Hfcn Museum 


-W 


taction here is me 

□thing bat the shell rrniams cf 

- igoi villa, and a new"buiknng 

diin abuiHngf has been pur up 
ade it, which indudes a glass- 
□fed atrium. 


*> '. ; V- 

• ft V s 





The new glass -and-wood West Wing at the fairgrounds. 


Goethe House 


[he house where Goethe was 
, k also a museum of so®- 

Kt rfchcfonunjrewasacrw% 

c when Germany’s kadfog 

a'cal writer was bving «n Je 
i u nmvides 


author 

Heinrich Hofam 

■ die famous childrens book 
svwci peter" There are wo 

ali zed museums is 
ued by the Hcnranger 

Henningpr Tower, a 
afo on the btewety gmunds. 


vide a suitably romantic backdrop 
for the annual Christmas Market. 
Tire ground floras of the new 
HujkSng? contain stores and tcscau- 
rants and the upper floats oq?cn- 
sve apartments. 

The Romer, a row of three 
Goduc buildings with stair-SRp 
f-Np* is pretty much the symbol 
ofFrankfurc One of die buMng? 
contains the Imperial Hall, where 
barejuos were hdd following die 

coronation of each emperix of *e 

Holy Rcxnan Emjxre. The actual 
crowning of the eroponras tod: 
place a shore distance away, in the 
cathedral 

The Romer area was heavily 
damaged in Wodd War R It 
must be admitted thar any race of 


addition to such customary recre- 
ational activities as bowling and 
beer drinking, ira&rsagym,ycg 2 
dasses, sauna, whirlpool barb, chil- 
dten’s nursery and wgerarian res- 


U n d -tf ound Oty 


TharwiD initially be chree din- 
ing, drinking and dancing estab- 
lishments in the artificial caves 
beneath the Sachsenhauscn brewer- 
ies with plans for 14 more. 

The underground dty, to be 
named Sachs, is just across tbc 
ralkcod trado km what is known 
as the apple-wine tfiaria: the main 
amusement section of Frankfort It 
is so caflcd because ir once o on- 
tamed link: other than coqr taverns 


One of ihe features of the Ger- 
man Elm Museum is optical gu3r 
geny: everything from old stereo- 
scopes and magic l ant erns to the 
latest holographic devices. In addi- 
tion to the coDection of pasters, 
photographs, rnfdrig and the I Ho* , 
there is a Kbrary where the visitor 
can, among other things, botrerw a 
videotape of a dasac On and view 
it on the spot The musaim also 
bouses a theater, open nearly every 
day from 6 pan, to midnight and 
dxwving everything from eady 
"flickers” to. avant-garde material 

The Museum of Applied Arts 
has just been extens i vdy renovated, 
and adds pororiain, glassware, fur- 
niture and ca r pent ry to the things 
robe seen. 

The biggest museum on this 
stretch of the Man is the Munici- 
pal Are Gallery, or Stadd, with 
works by Durer, Holbein, Rrm- 
hrandr. Rubens, Goya, Degas, Re- 
noir and other cricbcared painters. 

The Postal Museum, operated 
by die Postal Ministry, is an attrac- 
tion for the stzxjp coBeaor and 
history buffi A pare cf its vast 
stamp coDection is always on dis- 
play and other exhibits include 
ocnare old nadbcKcs, a postal 
coach, one of foe earliest television 
sets and some eady diakdq&cne 
switching equipment 

TfccMuxum cf fthndqgy has 
artifacts from dbe primitive dwell 
as of Australia, Oceania, Indone- 
sia, Afoca and America. 

The last of the seven museums, 
and tbc one fenhese downsreeam, is 


This year, with 23 fairs and 
exhibitions on its program, the 
Frankfurt Fair anticipates a record 
year 26X00 exhibirocs and 25 mil- 
lion visitors. One of the biggest 
fairs is being hdd now; the Inter- 
national Auto Exhibition (1AA), 
through Sept 22 Ocher interna- 
tionally wdl-knawn Frankfurt fairs 
are for cradles, chemical engineer- 
ing and books ... 


City Places Increasing Emphasis on Its 
Many Leisure and Cultural Offerings 


the Lkbigbaus, with a collection of 
statuary from ancient Egypt, 
Greece and Rome, the Orient and 
also Europe from the medieval to 
rococo periods. 

Not all of Frankfurt's museums 
arc on the Musamufce The most 
important ones in other pares of 
the dty are the Historical Museum 
and the Scnckrnbeig Natural His- 
tory Museum. The latter has one 
of the more important ooUections 
of skeletal remains from die exrina 
great reptiles and agrokgjcal cd- 
leerioo that in d u des some moon 
rocks. 


Apple Wina Express 


A novel way of getting to Sach- 
senhausen from the dow n town dis- 
trier on weekends is aboard the 
"Apple Wine Express," a brighdy 
painted old streetcar with -Kbmaizy 
music on board. The fare price 
indudes a botrie of apple wine and 
a prctzeL 

If you want to get an idea of 
what Sachsenhauscn used to be 
like, there are other, less frequented 
sections of the dty, notably Bom- 
beim and Heddemhdm,^ where the 
tradition of apple wine, gomidxb- 
kht and outdoor rabies carries cn. 
The choice of other (fining and 
drinking establishments in Rank- 
fort is very wide. There arc roof 
gardens, Ametican-style bars, buf- 
fets, salad bora, vegetarian and fish 
restaurants, ahetnaresxne cafes 
and, by a recent count, 24 different 
types of foreign resta ura nt 

Sachsenhauscn is not the only 
widely fre q u e n ted nigbdifc disrricr 
in Frankfort There is another 
around the railroad station. But be 
caxefuL It is the red-light district 
and not designed for family fun. 

Another form cf entertainment 
will be found in the theaters, seme 
of which will be of interest even to 
the nonGetmavspcaking visiter. 
One of them is the Cafe T he a ter , 
which presents Er^lidvfanguagc 
works only. (There is also a movie 
theater at die airport that draws 
exclusively English-language 
films.) The Schauqxdhaus catties 
a full program of opera. Touring 
musical groups, often from Britain 
« the Unirac! Stares, pafetro at the 
Ake Opct, the ferfnllc and the 
Jahrhunderthalk. 

Rx visitors who can ^cak Ger- 
man, the variety is greater. The 


Continued on page 1 3. 


This Is Frankfurt: 


Message From the Mayor 


Lord Manor Valter XTrihum of 
Frankfurt am Main knots bis dty 
better than anyone. Here he extols 
Frankfurt's traktanai mk as a center 
tf canmera as ueH as the many recent 
enhancements m the city's "quality of 
kje" 

Frankfurt’s position as a Ger- 
man economic center and one of 
the most important trade centers cf 
Europe is uncontested Since die 
12th century, Frankfort has been a 
trade-fair and business center in 
Europe. Nowadays, Frankfurt's im- 
portance as a financial ce nt er also 
reaches far beyond the borders of 
the Federal Republic of Germany. 
Some 358 banxs and ocher credit 
institutions from all over the wodd 
have their seat or a divisional office 
here. Banking decisions far the 
whole European market area are 
also concentrated here. 

fiankfurt is the center of one cf 
the largest and most densely popu- 



Dr. Walter Wallmann. 


fared regions of G erm any . Abour 
3CLOOO Goman firms 2 nd approxi- 


30X00 Goman firms 2 nd approxi- 
mately 3XXO enterprises from 3 D 
over die wodd make the dry their 
home The whole Rhine-Main area 
has about 24 million inhabitants 
and L2 million employees. Over 
500X00 people week in fiankfurt 
an the Main. 

The p erson ne l is highly quali- 
fied. Over 75 pate nt have profes- 
sional training, 4 patent more 
than die federal average level The 
planning by the Gty of fiankfurt 


cakes into consideration the face 
that the Frankfort economy is 
mosdy determined by the service 
sector, whose share already 
amounts to 80 percent of all busi- 
ness activity. Owing to the further 
internationalization of great enter- 
prises and because Frankfurt's ser- 
vices arc not only offered to the 
federal Republic of Germany but 
also to customers worldwide, it is 
our aim to develop Frankfurt into a 
European tenor for capital and 
business concentration, the distri- 
bution of goods, information trans- 
fer and communications. That 
means we wfll have id promote the 
location cf more foreign banks and 
enterprises here and saengthen our 
presence abroad. 


Of course, Frankfurt should not 


only consider its awn interests as 
an economic center at the intersec- 
tion of European highways. Since 
Frankfurt is unable to twist prox- 
imity to the Alps or ro the sea, we 
must cornplemenr the attractive 
economic location of fiankfurt by 
a massive increase in whar we now 
call quality of life. Wean mention 
outstanding results in this Odd: 30 
museums; the Old Opera House; 
die Schauspidhaus. housing an op- 
era house, theater and small Kam- 
merspid; numerous theaters; the 
Palmengarten; the Zoo; the Rd> 
snxkfcad swimming poof and the 
ice-sports stadium. These are only 
some of the dry's offerings. 

The recovery of the inner-dty 
living space through new pedestri- 
an zones and green areas, for which 
a total of 70 million Deutsche 
marks will be spent through 1989, 
is a viral aim of the next few years. 

Frankfurt’s image has been im- 
proving in Germany' and also in 
the wodd, and keeps on getting 
better. The increase in tourism 
proves it The number of over- 
night says of foreign visitors alone 
increased by 5 percent during foe 
first five months of 1985 compared 
to 1984. That is doubtkss a repre- 
sentative figure for the change that 
fiankfurt has undergone in foe 
opinion of its visitors as well. At 
the same time it attests id the 
positive efforts being made to en- 
hance this bustling metropolis. 


Frankfurt: 


Gateway to Germany 


A gambling casino with a nearby 
Tim temple, spa towns large and 
small, casks and foe Rhine and 
even Old Heiddbcig. All these 
interesting sights lie within an 
hour or less 5 Frankfurt and can 
provide destinations for one or 
more excursions. 

Bead Homburg: This spa 
town’s gambling casino— Lady 
Luck is a continuous attraction at 
all German spas — offers free bus 
trips from Frankfort to all custom- 
ers. Others may get to Bad Bom- 
bing easily by local subway and 
train. The name cl this small town 


(population 53XXX)) has been car- 
ried around foe wodd on foe heads 
of thousands of men, and a hom- 
burg is. of course, parr of foe 
coDection in the Hat Museum. 


One of Germany’s leaefing spas, 
this town continues to draw via- 
tors from all over foe wodd for its 
iron-rich warns. Kaiser Wilhelm 
II was a regular guest, malting Bad 
Homburg a gathering {dace for 
19 dwmtury German aristocrats. 
The emperor’s name still- graces a 
bath bufle in 1890 (it is pair of the 
Krnpark, or spa park, where foe 


gambling casino and authentic 
Thai temple are also located). 

On the western edge of town is 
foe Sthkxs or castle, bulk duriiw; foe 
17th to 19fo centuries and domi- 
nated by foe older (13* century) 
White Tower. The casde occupies 
the site where a fortress was built 
in 1180, which is now assumed to 
be foe origin of this town. It did 
not become a spa until 1834. 

Bad Hamburg has rocendy un- 
dergone exrenavc updating. Anew 
Kurbans (spa house) tes been 
built, passages lined with elegant 
Continued on page 14. 


* 



fill 


■ • b£'r*". '■ i ■ I’ 




■ * s |; 





“ - '• . ' ■ 

- r--*.-' v - - 


sPiliilil 


Discover the center of German history 
Your unforgettable introduction 
to romantic Germany 



Stadt Frankfurt am Main 


Tourist Office, GutieOitrassa 7-9. 6000 F'Qnkkjrt am Mom J. Phorw 06971)9 B8 49 





Page 12 


ADVERTISING SUPPLEME NT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1935 


Hotels to Consider For Your Next Trip 


Frankfurt wdmmes visitors, and 
knows bow to put them up in 
style The following is a list of just 
scene of the homes-away-from- 
home the dty ofibs: 


Sheraton 


This 820-room luxury bexd is 
linked by pedestrian bodge co 
Frankfurt Airport amval/deparmie 
terminal. Convenient to local train 
and Inter Gey sorion at airpat. 
Conference feciL'oes for up to 303 
persons. Indoor swimming pod, 
solarium. Children's beds, baby sit- 
ters. Wine bar, restaurants. H. 
Vdlmer, gmcral manager. Ad- 


dress: Hughafen Terminal Mine. 
TeL (0w9) 6977a Tdoc 41892#. 

Frankfurter Hof 

Traditional grand hoed in die 
hearr of the dty, a few blocks frarn 
the main train station. 400 rooms. 
Hall for 230 persons. Conference 
and banquet wrilitiw for 300-700 
persons Bar, restaurants Band Q 
Ludwig, general director. Address: 
Am Kaiserplatz Td. (069) 20251. 
Tdoc 411836. 

btferconAietital 

Modem, luxury hotd on the 
Main River. Also near main train 


For Large Conventions 

For Small Conferences 

For Classical Music 

For Popular Music 

For Stylish Dining 

For a Quick Snack 


AlteOper 



Frankfurt 


Opemplatz-Telefon (0 69) 13 40-0 


emanuel 

ungaro 

paralete 

paris 


GO 

valammo 

BOUTIQUE 


station. 800 rooms Hall for lflOO 
persons. Conference farilroes foe up 
to 700 persons Safari urn, sauna, 
fitness room. Baby-siner savice. 
Boer cellar, restaurants Max Herr, 
general manager. Address: Wil- 
hdm-Leuschner-Saassc 43. Td. 
(069) 23056L Tdex: 413659- 

Pcakhotel 

gmall grand hotd in historic 
building across from die main train 
station. 280 rooms Hall far 230 ro 
400 persens. Conference facilities 
for 300 persons Solarium, fitness 
center. Restaurants, wine bar. Facil- 
ities for handicapped Elmar K. 
Grcif, directnc Address: Wicsav 
hurtcnplacz 28/38. TeL (069) 
26970 Tdex: 412808. 

Canadian Podfk Plaza 

Modem hod opposite the 
track-fair grounds Convenient co 
main train statical 1,182 beds Con- 
ference facilities for up to 1,200 
persons. Sauna, solarium, sports 
room. Restaurants P«cr Radia, 
general manager. Address: Ham- 
burger AHee 2 Td (0®) 770721. 
Telex: 412373. 

Gro ve nbrudi Kempinski 

Modernized historic country 
manor in beautiful wooded area on 
the southern (airport) edge of 
Frankfurt, in Ncu-Isenburg. Abour 
20 minutes to downtown Frank- 
furt and airport. 287 rooms Con- 
ference facilities for up to 600 
persons Indoor and outdoor swim- 
ming pools, tennis, sauna, sdari- 
um, beauty farm. Restaurants 
Gunther Haug, managing diroaoc 
Address: Ranldurt-Neu-Isenbuig 
2. Td. (06102) 5050. Telex: 
417673. 


New 296-room hod situated in 
quia wooded area off the highway 
(Autobahn) to die airport A 10- 
minute drive to downtown Frank- 


furt. Banquet facilities for up to 
600 persons 10 conference rooms 
Restaurant; bar. Wilhelm Korea, 
director. Address: Isenburger 
Schnase 40. Td (059) 67S*0 l Td- 
ac 416717. 

Other hotels in the Frankfurt 
area indude: 

Scklosshotel Kronberg - 

Historic 53-room casde-hotd in 

the suburb of Kranberg, 20 kilo- 
meters (12 miles) outside Frank- 
furt Exquisite tapestries, antiques 
and paintings provide dcccc. Hall 
for 250 persons Private meeting 
and c£ning rooms for 6 to 50 
persons Restaurant. 18-hole gdf 
course. Klaus Fischer, manager. 
Address: Hainstrassc 25. D6242 
Kronbeg. Td (06173) 701L Tri- 
er: 415425. 


dress Rhrinsoasse 68, D6500 
Mainz. Td - (06131) 243a Tdoc 
418757a 

Numuer Hof 

HGstnrfogmidhoalin tranquil 
town of Wiesbaden. Local 
train (S-Babn) servioe to Bankfurr 
ardairpott. 220 roans Hall for up 
to 350per»ns Conference facilities 
far 200 persons Baby sitters Ther- 
mal sauna, solarium, fifnrg; <ynfrrj 
indoor, swimming pooL Resrau- . 
rants KadNuser; d i recTOr general, 
Address: Kaua-Friedcich-Hara 3, 
DnSaoo Wiesbadea Td (06121) 
133a Tekx 4186847. 


Expressly Selected 
Frankfurt Restaurants 


Overlooking the Rhine in 
Mainz. Local train (S-Bahn) service 
to Frankfurt and airport. 435 
roams Riverside terrace, sauna, so- 
larium, fitness center. Adjoining 
Rhringoklhalk: auditorium accom- 
modates 3 £00 persons. In hood, 9 
meeting roans for up to 60 pa- 
sons Wine bar, restaurants Erich 
Marcher, ge n eral manager, Ad- 


New 312-room hotd nexr to 
Darmscadc train station. About 30- 
minurc drive to Frankfurt and air- 
port Hall far 500 persons Private 
meeting and dining rooms fix up 
to 500 persons Conference fadlines 
far 900 persons RreQiries for handi- 
capped. Solarium, fitness center, 
indoor swimming pooL H. BcuDs 
and R. Muhlhausen, ftm-mre Ad- 
dress:. Rhrinsrrassc 105, DtilOO 
Darmstadt. TeL (06151) 8004L 
Tckx 176151926. 

Note: You may kr your Ameri- 
can Express card take care of dhe 
bill in ad these hotels 


A Hofei Close to 
Work and Play 


Visttocs to Frankfurt and many 

ety of r e staurant s offering special 
cfcfces from all parts of di globe: 

Tn farr ) iV if HVT ffkinply diffihilr tt~l 

find an old-fashioned Goman res- 
tauranr saving made hearty dish- 
es with mounds of potatoes and 
sauerkraur. Even chcnaghbcrixxxi 
Gasthaus (tavern) is likely to be 
ailed a "taverns" or "bistro." 

Also pare of the pleasant sur- 
prise is the number of -restaurants 
in Getmany today having a high, 
even, gourmet, standard c£ fare. 

. Tire following list tries to com- 
bine some of this variety as wdl as 
the maintenance of high standards 
fix food, service and atmosphere. 
Of course, your American Express 
card is wdcomed in each cf them. 

Brucfccnlcoier 

Historic cellar with Gothic de- 
fpr induefing vaulted nrtlir^ and 
a 20joa>4irer wine band. Stocks 
238 different wines and 11 cham- 
pagnes. Serves- fiends and irrtnra- 
tional Ha s h es . Address: Scbutzen- 
strasse & TeL (069) 234238 Open 
from 6 pm. tQl 1 am. Closed 
Sundays and holidays exce p t dur- 
ing fa»ra 


• „ , . L_ n ^m2p:in. 3nd7 rol() : J0 

famishings, beams, dirraied wait- . g^aday, evening pnly. 
teses. Local Goman and mtrrna- pjn. 

SS fa=h tt.-Jft* OxeiSa*)- 

steak and salad and fanqf. desserts Mtndo . 

Address: EsdbenhrimcrAn^ge 4a ^^manbaofdusAr- 

TeL m 551965. Abo eg*** ^^^chain tte.also 
main train station (Am Hasp- # wefl as other ict . 

bahnhof4). Open 11:30 ro 2:30 far ^ located , co, the 

lunch, fimm 5 pm. far dmnen 
Weekends, ftwtrqgs only ton 6 

Steak and salad is, of ;course. a 

GdBo Nora staple. Beer, wine and ctem^ne 

SSSS-M 

and Friday. Popular hots cTocuvre: dress: Taunusanbge 
nvarirvwd salmon with basiL Ad- "7240795. . • * 

dress: Kaiserhofstrasre 7. TeL (069) . Ntdvm1 ptdc RWsi erfa 

284840. Open noon to 2:30 and da In Mo w Ha 


6 JO to 11 pm. Cased Sunday. 

: Humpanfindk 


MavwpkkRftfoeriB 
Boren d» lo Muinlla 


This luxurious restaurant owned > 
by the Swiss rcstairant and hotel 


Named after Engc&xxt Hum- group dranges ns menuw^Ae : 
pcxdinck, composer cf the opera reasons. There are afao a^Iyanda 
"Hansel and Greed," who lived in gourmet menu. Half portions may , 
diis buddfag in the 1890s. Opened also be ordered. last Tpoqy in: 
two years ago by the farmer chef winter months, foca» ! 

and raaitre dhoed of the famous served. Fresh fi^i,;don^n^ and ; 
Le Metre in Bolin. Emphasis on imported draft beer ana. : 
gourmet dishes and fresh fish wines.” Open ll to 250 pm. fix 


The name means "one who 
pedes into the poc." Ffcasant, livdy 
German restaurant. Dark wooden 


(three cr four rimes weekly), with funds and 6 to 11 .pxiL evramgs. 
ingtetfients frees Barite and Italy. Address: Am OperrqJ^Z. ^po- 


Sdecrion of 2DOpkjs wines. Ad- 
dress; Griinebuigwcg 95. Td 


site the Alte Opct Baa: , ocher ] 

Mgvetipidc restaurants at.sa^~fo- > j 


722122. Open! - weekdays cation. Tet (059) 20580 


The luxurious Arabella Hotd 
Frankfurt is very handily located. Ir 
lies b e tw een the airport and the 
downtown district, only a few min- 
utes by car from each. It is right at 
the fiurostadt Niodenad, a large 
, office-building complex housing 
many international firms, to which 
the Arabella offers special corpo- 
rate rates. 


Annabel of Konigstein 


Ingrid Suchsland 


Goethestrafte S 
6000 Frankfurt am Main 
Telefcm (069; 23 71 55 


Wilhelm st raise 53 
5200 Wiesbaden 
Telefon i06121't 30 21 29 


QUAUTY SINCE 1796 

Meissen - Rosenthal Studio 
Hutschenreuther - Crystal 
Hummel- and Uadrd-figurines 
SoUnger stainless steel 
Typical Frankfurt artifacts 
We ship throughout the world 
We accept all credltcards 

Frankfurt BAam - Sch^erstr. 16 _ 

Wiesbaden - Kirchgasse 47 v 


!«■»«? bs^ 

sswiyS 

•’jsSSffiif. 


Frankfurter 
Ailgeraeine Zeitung 


Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung 
ranks number 1 amongst 
senior businessmen in the Federal 
Republic of Germany 


The hotd is also only a few 
minutes’ walk from tbe edge of the 
Frankfurt City forest, which offers 
opportunities fat strolls, cycling 
and tiffing. Golf and tennis facili- 
ties also are nearby, and a jogging 
path begins ar the Arabella. 

Mnptingft <firiir»fc mlwwvw 

and parties^ whether huge or small 
are also cat e red rex There are eight 
special rooms far this purpose 

The Arabella has, in addition, 
three restaurants of international 
standard, a swimming pool, sauna, 
solarium, beauty parkx, travel 
agency, florist arid other diops. 

The Bankfurr hotd. is pare of 
the Arabella Hotd Group, which 
also has four hotds in Mmiidi and 
one each in die Alpine communi- 
ties of Lcnggries, Schlimec and 
SpiedngsBe. 


^ejieuunan/ 


FILiNKFURTs FINEST WINE 
RESTAUHiNT 
ana I6U 


Situ** 

mm A 


Look at What 
Is in Store for You 




Wherirer you -are a. 60mirtuc 
shopper with a plane to earth or 
haveafewlasurdyhcxosro^end 
in the scores, you efonoe have to go 
far afidd. The shops dir this list are 
all within a few blocks of each 
other, in the hearr of the dty. 

So whether you arc boking for 
a man’s tie or suit, luggage, a 
watch or jewelry, a kitchen gadget 
or a dinner setrar hr 1$ you wili 
find it here. / 

German stores are open until 
630 pm Mooc% threx^h Rod^ 
and until 2 pm Saturdays (tbe first 
Saturday of the month until & 
pun.). On Sundays only, restau- 
rants, newsstands ancLbakcrics ate' 
opea There is no latiwtyeraqg 
shopping oa any day. Shops tn the. 
main train sorion. and at the air- 
port stay open di^riyhrer and cn 
weekends. 

Tbe shops oa tins list honor the 
American Express card. 

Corfiar 

One of tbe three Txwriqucs ks 
muse de Garacf in Germany that 
arc dircedy owned by the Paris 
company (three others operate as 
licensees). This shop carries the full - 
Curia range, including leather 
goods, bur with the emphasis on- 
jewdiy. HOTaresomcexmipJescf 
what’s available: a yellow-gold and 
diamond choke neddaor, ball 


M Ruunthnl StmBo Htwa 

W IlCrt 1 - For tbe last 25 years tKs;sbqp d 

has earned the ctxnpktc RoserHhal i 
rn mw - Studio line, whkh reflects conreoa- I 

^ Tffcy f OB 1 porary art and taste in porodairt : 
m Bur it also sells other famous por- 

... . 1 ' , odainmamikiuK^such»AjaSi; 

pomr paK aid liams^facquered ^pin^^GjaaBodi fem . 
in the Caraa otto, (Manx? SwdaL ^ Baafe 

witharowaf<femoQd^q«BKS2S - ^ ^ m- {mn sold iri ftc : 
vririj tbe Toi^Omct“_fe^ Roandal Soxfio shops (thcTC-are; 
solid IS^at gold set widi &- . ^ a ajS nrost:bc- 

mcn s ;.^ ap^toved by a spodfenanord] 

“-^SE m- This sfaopako h fltt.etif: 

gold and diamonds, a oviat fa de 
and server, scarves; yralk^hmd- 

wbpden. tms made by ^iti: 
dress: Gottfaescrasse It. TeL be & this a* 

28<215 * turnn. Het^ roc\ oat can tx^r such 

• • .. .. - ; hanefiaaft amcks as nig$ aid oih: 

In wmf: . / broidery. AdAess- Friotknsstrasse 

A Frankfur t i nstitution dating • 10. TeL '283726.. •" V 


gold and diamonds; a caviar ladle 
and server, scarves; walkts; hand- 
bags dedc accessories and fogy 
gage— fill in .Carrier bandeaux Ad- 
dress: Goethestrasse it. TeL 
284215. 


- c.m.c.H 





Der Spiegel 


Capital 



Manager 

Magazin 


International Real Estate Consultants . 
for 

Commercial Property 
Investment 
Development 
Letting 
Management 
with offices in: 

Frankfurt DDsseklorf Hamburg 
Cologne Stuttgart Munich Vienna 
London Amsterdam New York 

An affilitate of the office network . 
with representation in every major city 
in the USA 


>W . broidoy. Address- Fricxfcnstrassc l 

A Frankfur t p ryirittinn daring ■ IQ, Td. '283726.. " '. } . 

back to 1796. Bom tfae basanent / w • -* 

to dicifopersroiis, Iqrcysoamidr ‘ r , - TN 
have - moose everyth^ fior the ' . .Tfta small cwo«oty shop «ar- 
bcroc kitthoi inamarionalsdarion of the 

linens, aysral.poKdain (ttdab& : ' ***<¥*&? iandmadc 

Mecssen) ; and Wta aft it ems A .- *** ^ -Bcon^ -.Rixnc; 

<pmV dqa i riTuny handles -hotel - Aquascutum from Britamr Ger- 

l^ tfoto-feom 

goes rivaseiloRy peewai ie- ' . W & Tamod^ Avon silk kni t- 
mined to habdfe dre;papawodt Mfan; a*mae fixxn 

" for dripping ^ rib nwd; Soodand and sdk shins from.:- Van 

inducfiiuc tttum -af(:VAT (vabe laackarid DiamantisSwisa Oden 
and nrr-^t rg <*WppW me taken fire custoaHnade. Aoes 
a SAT. (Snvyr At T ifed ). AA from Cavafli and Sanson. Rx 
ckess: Schillasaas sel& Tct 29995. »mq>faos to pic afl tb^ Scaim 

also sells leather luggage and cases.' 
As ^for ties, all tfaefamqus btani 
are krpt in stock Adcfcess: Ka fe r 
This nay dqganc shop curies strassc 23. Td 23X104 v.: - 

the bill range of luggage did travel 

accessories trade by this 130-year- Wompo 

oHfamfly<iwncd company. Steam The Bankfurr shop is o«: af tl 

a trunks ate buik to aria, with ados, induefing dxse iii Paris 
: the inoeriar dcsigaed aparetfit^; to and New York, of Gamauy’s fer- 
tile customer’s instructions. Shoe esc trading company, for ipredson 
onrecs arc made to aoorenmodare timepwoesandjcwdiy: The cS utff - 
the are of anc’s own sboes Oier ry-dld Ban has an jaen fatfongi 
items of ix^gage, hantfoags, ana t- reputation as a maker of ship's - 
die and jewdty cases and dre Man- docks and ocfcia- maririme ihstn^ 
baton Man line of spaas luggage raents, so namralfe^ ■•WeDope cfieis 
(gaif and tennis h^gs, etc.) arc awidcsdkxrionotclretejMta^' 
immcdiatdy availabfe. All these rets, etc. with a nautkaf kxfe!: 
ircms are handmade: Addnss: AdAess: -An da HauptrodK 7- 
Goethestrassc 7. TeL 280010. - : TeL 291077. Opcris^930. " 


trained to ^ handle drc^pspetwoi; 
■ fire Gripping alL putdarcs- dxpad. 
including return of ' VAT (value 
added rax) arid rerangiqg ih^pi% 
w.SAL (Stirice Air Lifted). Ad- 
ckess: SdriDeonasse !& Td. 29995. 

. Louia Vuirtion 

This ne^r elqganc shop curies 
tbe full range of kgg^e^id travd 
accessories made by this 130-year- 
| oklfanrily-avyned company. .Sream- 
| a trunks are built to otdo, with 
'the interior desigpod aaaretfit^ to 
the customer's instmetions. Shoe 
auxfecs are made to accommodate 
the sue of one's own sboet pier 
items of luggage, handbags, atta- 
che and jewdry cases ard chc Man- 
hattan Man line of spaas luggage 
(gotf and tennis fa^gs, etc.) arc 
immediately available. All they 
items are handmade: Address: 

- Goahestnsse 7. TeL 280010. ' 




MJ-s CA ECJ StVTTGAfrT vU Jj ." r 3: K- L ^ ' V • 


720777 


■»^ i py^^iiiTir <m 




Adickesallee 63. D-6 Frankfurt/Main T 


Snutce: The European Businessman Readership Survey 19&4 1 Average Issue Readership) 


Jratiffurfcr Allgemeine 


FEEL THE FLAIR 




FRANKFURT 


2EITUNC FOR DEUTSCHLAND 


Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeiiung. P.Q. Box tOOSOS, 0*000 Frankl'un am Main 1. Tdephone 7 59 10 


he seasoned inter- Conferences and meetings with 

national traveller, who knows all the advantages of the latest 

quality and class at first sight technology - in the ambience 

will appreciate the comfort of of your choice 

Arabella Hotels. Stay in a sophi- And anyone who wants to be 


sticated international atmo- 
sphere, wine and dine in style. 


energets: in his spare time will 
■find a visit to one of our swim- 


ming pools or saunas the 


business investment • 

Tbe sort of amenities that always 
bnng our guests back to Arabella 
■Hotels.; .... 

C«WilBooKtagCfflke.TeLtJ 89 / 923222 i 13 . 


ArMxna hqki WesipwKH&Mi QtymtttpimHarei Central Hnrw 
Munich Munfrt Muiwh UunKA 


Franhfurt 


SrawflaHdtd 










: -iy r 








ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1985 



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?;S\ 

i;^j 

. «eist! 




.c- out of the 
. social , ecoooray banks" founded 
^ oade onions and ccnsuma ct> 
opeames after Wo dd War n, 
ncatydidnoc make ir co Frankfort 
- As fe ax icgiortal Gcracin- 
jwtqq iaa banks in Gaznany pic- 
in® one narion- 
5 W* bank in the tree 1950s, the 



^ucGaifo, 1 

' — jJj jj. 

: ~ -.7 


i 1 


•■•'7 s 

: -'5 ^5 
f— - .tt-tV 
LV "U ^y 


sssrm 


i one; wnfc mods than half the meal 
Bias of alf six T1 k Duskiforf 
Gsoacmwircschafcbank knew 
■ wboc the betdjuarcos of die new 
d^naaion should be located In 
its " ’ ‘ ' 


in 


^oWurt <fid not make -sense be- 
tbc Frankfurt Gcnrin wii t- ■ 
s*aftbankwas not ageniunc fcynk 
but merely a financial adminisoa- 
tor for the trade unions based in its 
city. 

hfowever, Willi Rirherr. then 
head erf the German Feder a tion of 
Trade Unions fDGB), which is 
based in DusseJdorf, was convinced 
dat Frankfurt was the right ptyr . 
pDirarify because the Deutsche 
Bundesbank (German Central 
*^nk) is looted in Frankfurt. 
Ri&tcr antia pared, oontjeriy, that 
Frankfurt would become Germa- 
ny's financial and bankii^ center. 

Richter managed co swing die , 
leaders of die individual trade 
unions in die DGB owes: to his 
view. In Decanter 1958* the six 



Dr. Rolf KrUger. 
regional social economy banks 
into one BfG, based in 



v' Continued from page 11. 
Sdrajspjefhaus has major play pn> 
' duofon^ itoa Die Sdmiae ahd 
' Efe .Msttnfojger ate political cafca- 
jost tte Thesoer am Turm has 

• experimowal works; the Fritz Re- 
mood Theater im Zoo and Die 
Komafe have litdtKfaearer jxo- 

: ducrions. The Frankfurter Figur- 
' entbeater is for puppet shows foe 

• young and oki 

Famous Zoo 

." Though the Zoo dates hade to 
1858, it was made what ic is today 
mainly by the noted naturalist Dr. 
Branbani Gtamek, whcee 1958 
; film "Saengtt Shall Not Die" was 
the first German-made one to win 
an Oscat The Zoo is noted for the 
; natural habitats in. which d* ani- 
- roafs live, for a hard house in which 
bitds % frady and for a "24-Hour 
House" where nocturnal animals 
are tricked by the lighting into 
being awake whikrthe zoo is open. 

The center of the Paknengarren 
is an indoor jungle a large gran- 


Offerings 


bouse full of tropical plants with 
paths, a goldfish pool and a hill for 
surveying the premiss The P£ 
menganen has grown into a large 
botanical garden with lawns, a lake 
with boots, flower beds and gree n - 
houses with constantly changing 
exhibits of orchids, cacti, coses and 
other plants. That are freepenr 
outdoor band concerts. 

The museums along the Muse- 
um Bonk arc open every day ex- 
cept Monday from 10 am to 5 
pm, Wednesday until 8 pm The 
Kfon Museum is open from 11 
am to 6:30 pm, also dosed Mon- 
day. The Postal Museum doses at 
4 pm for a foil schedule of times 
and events in Frankfurt, see die 
monthly brochure Akruefl, avail- 
able from the Frankfurt Tourist 
Office opposite Track 23 ar the 
main train station (open until 10 
pm, Sundays and holidays until 8 
pm) and in the Haupraxhe Pas- 
sage (open during shopping 
hours). 


One erf die first problems was 
office space: The n^hcadjuanets 
was eventually tooted in two near- 
by buildings, in Neue Maimer 
Sccasse and Kaisetsaassc No one 
could guess, of ccurec, chat a neigh- 
boring restaurant complex occu- 
pied what almost 20 years later, in 
1977, would be the site of one of 
the city’s new high-rise buddings, 
the BfG headquarters. 

“lr is not just an office build- 


fog, 1 * said BIG beard member Dr. 
Rolf Kruger. "Ic also docs some- 
thing for the people of Frankfort" 

The basement and next two 
Boots arc lined with a variety erf 
shops, from a butcher and a baker 
to a jewelry score and dodiing 
boutiques. A afc-ixswicmt in 
from erf the building tools our on a 
wide green lawn and fountains. 
When tbe complex opened, some 
kxal enthusiasts called it "Frank- 
furt’s Rodrfcfcr Centex." 

The BfG bui’^ng also provides 
packing space foe evening perfor- 
mances at the th eater s and opera 
house across the street The base- 
ment is connected with a subway 
(U-Bahn) station. 

"All this came ar a rime when 
tte city of-Ftankfott was looking 
for ways to make the downtown 
area more attractive, a place co go 
for shopping restaurants and cul- 
tural activities," Dr. Kruger said 

Tfoer BfG retail bank on the 
second floor recently held an exhi- 
bition of drawings by the leading 
kxal graphic artist, Walter Heck- 
marm. These same works appear in 
the bank’s latest annual report. 


"The BfG has played a van- 
guard role in using such graphics 

in its annual report” Dr- Kiuga - 
pointed out Each year a different 
artist is chosen by the bonk to 
produce works on the themes of 
the individual society, the econo- 
my and banking. The BfG*s New 
York branch Iras held an exhibi- 
tion of a arfkakxr of die resulting 
artworks. 

Other German banks arc also 
active in an sponsorship and a>Ucc- 
rion. But they could do mom, in 
Dr. Kruger’s view. "Banks in the 
United States and Italy do much 
more for die arcs." he said 


The BfG has entered a new 
Eekl "Money and Foresight." To 
gedier with die Volksfureotgj: in- 
surance company, of which ic is a 
parr owner, the bank provides joint 
customer service for the genera] 
public. The plan is to use casting 
facilities of each company in cer- 
tain locations to provide kxal 
banking and insurance office ser- 
vices, one-stop shopping far S3v- 
ings (feposts, leans, home-buik£ng 
and also life, auto and other 
; of insurance. The first pdoc- 
projeer facility started in June and 
four more arc planned for this year. 



like most members ^of ihe rapidly 
growing Bfomenauer Group, Blu- 
menauer Ftankfart ognoaorracson 
the focal rcaksrare market, .. 

Blumenauer’s two principal 
funceforis arcthe btoboir^ of sales 
and of rcmab, aod ir deals iminly 


The firm was founded by Hans- 
Joachim BJumenauer in Kassel in 
15)50, and has been operating in 
Frankfurt since 15)57. It now also 
has offices in wo Bankfoir sub- 
urbs and in Hamburg, Dussddorf 
and Munich. It went international 



in axomaedd and industrial prop- in 19KL with the esrablishraenr of 
eny aid in multi family dwellings.’ ‘Vaster company in Ics Angdes. 


a* v -,• - t \ '■ — . . • • . r 


Recertify refurbished, the Alte Oper shines anew. 


American Express 
Welcomes You to Frankfurt 

A Selection of the many Establishments which Welcome 
American Express in Frankfurt 



DINING OUT IN FRANKFURT 
WITH AMERICAN EXPRESS 


Restaurants 

Aitanchs 118 j. Gr. Rmergasaa 112. 

T SI 85 40 f SGI 

Baron de la Moueita Im MOranpleK 
(181. Opempiatr 2, ~ 287857(301 
Berm aNudeOrea (IB).Kaiserstr. 5a 
r 281214 {40} 

BOrsen - Keller (18). ScMOerarr. 11. 
7^2811 15 (30 

BrOcKenKelier (18), SctiOtzonsir. 6. 
v 28 42 38 [4 G] 

Cate Kranzler (18). An der HaupfwacCie 7. 
.'284114 (3 EJ 

Casablanca (27). MOncftiKr Sir. 35 
7*26970 (5CJ 
Ctilnarestaurani Jasmin (16). 

Gr. Bocfcsnhelmer Str. 37-39, 

7 287528 [3 D| 

Gfiurrasco - Steaktiaus (22), 

Domplatz 6. ~ 26 48 04 (4 F] 

Dla Latter ( re j, Kaisottwfstr 11. 

7: 292121 [3D1 
ttppegucker 13). 

Esehonhelmer Anlage 40, - 551965 
I2F] 

Emo's Bistre (11). LieOIgsir. 15, 

= 72 IB 97 (2 Cl 

Florien (18). Kettendofweg 59, 

S 772891 13 B) 

Fu|i (171. Goethestr. 13. 
s 280261 (50) 

Gallo Nero. Kalssrftofstr. 7, 

'5* 284840 130] 

Humperdinck (11), Grfineburawsg 95. 

r- 722122 nq 

Isotetta (12), Feld berg sir. 31. 

? 72 58 89 [1C] 

La ForcfiertB (12), Stainweg 7. 

“ 20 54 77 [SE] 

La Puldnella Ristorante (12), 
BodtenhetmerLdstr. 43. 

ST- 726685 [3C] 

Le Jardln (27), Kaiserholstr. 6, 

? 28 8956(301 
la MIDI (IB), Liebigs*. 47. 

“ 721438(1 Cl 
Maredo Steak und Salat (22). 
Taunusanlage 12. -. 7 240795 [3C| 
Maredo Steak und Salat (22), 

Gr. Bockanhemer Str. 24, 

~ 2880 54(30] 

Mflvanptek (10). Opemp(atz 2. 

2 06 80 ]3 D) 
jaques Offenbach 
Aita Oper Frankfurt (18), Opempiatz. 
C-134O-0I3D] 

Opemkalker Atte Oper Frankfurt (3). 
Opempiatz. 3 13 40-0 13 D] 

Oyster - Champagner Bar (27), 

Hochstr. 39-41.= 285211(301 
Rlstoranta La Gaiierfa (12). 

Ttiaaterplatz 2. 23 56 80 (4 D] 

SchlldkrOte (IB), Gr. Escharsh. Stf .41. 
281036 |3 E] 

Sukfiotftal Thailand. Spez.-flest (27), 
StntStr.4, 281999 (3 E] 

TW Eulenspiegel (18). Rttuterweg 61, 
724598 BD] 

Vogue (271, Jungholstr. 14. 

282233 [301 

2 urn Schwanwn Siam (18). 

ROmerberg 6. 29 1979 (4 FI 

Zum Standesarmchen UBj. 

Am ROmerberq 16. 282999 (4 F] 

Zu« Pints (3). Kl Bockenh Sir 8. 
285617(301 


AMERICAN EXPRESS MAKES 
SHOPPING EASY IN FRANKFURT 


Antiques/GeDertua 
Galena Akin, Goethes tr 14 [30] 
GaJerie Hans Hoeppner, 
Bockenheimer Ldstr. 2-4 [3C] 

Boutiques 

Boecker. Zell 85-93 13F] 
Boutique Yvonne Haiti. 

Gr. Bockenheimer Str. 35 [3D| 
Flip Machine. Gr. Eschenh. Str. 5 
(3E] 

Fogal Strampfladen. Goethestr. 4 
13 D] 

For tan as. SUftstr. 36 [3E] 

Guy Laroche, Goethestr. 23 [30] 
Hemdan-Saniy, Kalsarotr. 62-64 

» a 

Jll Sander. Hochstr. 43 (3D) 

Laura BlagiotU. Goethestr. 14 (30] 
Rtftel, Goethestr. 25 [30] 

Ritfel, KaibAchergasse 3 [30] 

Tlno Herrenausstatter. 

Gr. Bockenheimer Sir. 54 [30] 


Cameras/ Opticians 
BrIUen Bouffmr, Gr. Bockenh. Str. 44 |3DJ 
Foto-BrelL Kalserstr. 52-64 [4q 
Foto- Hobby, Kaisers tr. 26 [40] 

Foto - Hofmann, Zeil 85 [3 FI 
Foto Ftahn, Kalserstr. 55 [4 Cl 
Optlker MtiUor. Steinweg 12 [3 El 
Photo Neithold, Sctklierstr. 7 p El 
Stotnweg-Ptwto. Steinweg 12 [3E] 
Chlkban'* Wear 
Bambini, Schneckenhotstr. 4 [6E] 

PfOlkjr KJnderheus, Goetfieatr. 12 (3D1 
Prenatal, An der Hauptwache 7 [3 0 
China end Glass 
Behagel & Sohn. Kalserstr. 5 [40] 

Lorey, Gr. Eschenhesner Sir. 11 ]3£] 

.die schaulade', WHU Lumpp. 

Berliner Sir. 60 [4 H) 

.die schauiade: wun Lumpp. 

Kalsereir. 11 [4E] 

Rosenthal am Kaiserplea. 

Frledensstr. 10 [4D] 

WMF. Karserstr. 15(40] 

WMF. SchiDerstr. 2 (3 E] 

WMF, Zed T07 £3F] 

Clothes tor Men and Ladles 
Attons Michels. Swlnweg 9 (3 E] 
Bleyle.ZeU 111 [3F] 

Bogner. Goethestr. 21 (30] 

Peter Hahn, Steinweg 5 (3 D] 

Henry, Goethestr. 13 (301 
HetUage. Blebergasse 6-8 (3 E] 

Mann staid & Stroh, Goethestr. 2 (301 
hUDer & Schoar English House. 
Goethestr. 35 [30] 

Oil & Hetnemann. Zeil 119-121 [3F] 
StTOhfain Chr, Steinweg 6 [3EJ 
Relsner-Kleldung.Zell 57 [3F] 

Vbrena- Couture Bran tm ode ~ 
Abendmode. Berliner Sir. 4 [4F] 

Delicatessen 

Burkard, Escharsh, Ldstr. 75 [2 E] 
Delikatessen - Pl&ger, 

Gr. Bockenheimer Str. 30 [30] 

Der Teeladen, An der Hauptwache 4 (30] 
Le Gourmet. Lad eng. amTheaterpl (4D) 
Department Stores 
Hertfe,Zeil90(3F] 

Kaufhof, Zeil 116-126 (3 F] 

Florists 

Btumen-Metster, Gr. Bockenh. Str. 24 [3 D] 
RirnHure 

Decor- Wdlth or. Kl. Hlrachgraben 16 (3 0] 
Hacker Einrichtungen. 

BQrsenstr. 7-11 f3E] 

HOckor Einrichtungen, 

Theaterplatz 2 ]4 0] 

Hans Frick Inneneinrichtungen. 
Eschenheimer Tor 2 (20 

Furs 

Genson, DOsseldorfer Str. 1-7 14 B] 

Span gon berg Petzwaren. 

Goethestr. 29 (3D] 

Gifts 

Amadeus Gaschenk- Boutique, 
Kaisemtr. 62-64 (4C| 

Ladies Fashions 
Annabel of KOnlgatein, 

Goethestr. 31-33 [3D] 

Cerruti - Sport Theaterplatt 4 [40] 
Cerruti 1BB1 Femme. Goethestr. 23 [30] 
Inge Hormuth. Goethestr. 4-8 [3 D] 
Jaeger. Hauptwache 4 [3 E] 

Kurz Moden Usa. Be rimer Str. 22 [4F] 
Lantana Mode. Kaiserhotstr. 15 [3D] 
Madame Amoul, Goethestr. 10 [3 0] 
Modehaus Planar. Goethestr. 15 [3D] 
Next Gr. Bockenheimer Str. 19 [30] 

Saint Laurent rive gauche, 

Goethestr. 22 [30] 

Juliana von Hees, RossmarWl2 [4E] 

X Mode laden. Kaisertioistr. 13 ISO] 
Leather Goods 
Enzo Mode in Leder, 

Gr. Bockenheimer Str. 24 [30] 

Etienne- Aigner - Shop. 

Kaiserstr. 7 [4 D) 

Gold-Pfeil Lederwaren, 

Kalserstr. 22 [40] 

Gucci Frankfurt Kalserstr. 13 [4D1 
KoHer- Klein. RossmaridlO ]3 E] 

Kudritzkl Lederwaren. 

Gr. Eschenheimer Str. ]3E] 

Leder Roth, Goethestr. 32 [3 D] 

Leder Veter, Kalserstr. 18 [4 D] 

Leder Vhtar. Kalharlnanpfbrts 6 [3 E] 
Leschom L, Kalserstr. 3 [4D] 

Louis Vuitton. Goethestr. 7 [3D] 

Zorbach, Hauptwache 7-8 [3 E] 

Zorbach. Rossmarkt 15 [3 EJ 


Unens 

Hatta, Kalserstr 15]4D] 

Laura Ashley. Goethestr. 3 [3 D] 
Madame, Goethestr. 31-33 13 DJ 
Strunkmann 8 Melsler. 

Kalserstr. 12 (4D| 

Men's Wear 

1 Annas - Hen en moden. 

Goethestr. 31 -33 [3 D] 

Annas - Herren moden. 

Gr. EschenheimerSh 39 [3E] 

Daniel Hechter. Kalserstr. 28 [4 0] 

Karl Hear Herrenklelctung. 

Berliner Str. 44 [4 E] 

Krantz Heinrich, Kalserstr. tl ]4D] 

Lang R , BOrsenplatz 1 [3 EJ 
MO lief & Schaar. Steinweg 4 ]3E] 

New Man. Kl. Bockenh. Str 18 |3D1 
Ernst Nobel. Zell 79 J3F) 

Stamm W. J, Kalserstr. 23 [40] 

Bemd Vbgler, Berliner Str. 6 14 F] 

Theo Worm land. Blebergasse 2 [3E] 
Zechbauer Herrenausslatter. 
Rossmarkt 15 [4 E] 

Perfumes and Cosmetics 
Dans un Jardin, Goethestr. 14 [3D] 
Douglas ParUmerie, 

Gr. Bockenheimer Sir. 21 130] 

Douglas Parfumerle, Zell 105 [3 F] 
Drogerte - PariOmene Albrecht, 

Gr. Bockenheimer Sir. 37 [3D] 
Orogerte-Parfamerie Kobberger. 

Zeil 123 [3F] 

Josephtna K osmetic Solon, 

Goethestr. 22 [3D] 

LS PariOmene Cosmetic- in$tttuL 
Gr. Bockenheimer Str 52 f3D] 

Pharmacy 

Globus - Apotheke. Zimmenveg 1, 

^ 7239-J8 |4C] 

Kaiser- Apotheke, Kaiserstr. 53, 

23 2362 |4CJ 

Radio and Television 
Radio Dtehl. Kaiserstr 31 (40] 

Radio- DlehL ZeHB5I3F] 

Shoes 

ChariasJOurdan. Goethestr. 23 [3D] 
Levtno Chlavelll, Am Opempiatz 8 
[3D] 

Oaniela - Schuh - Salon. 
KaibAchergasse 3b [3D] 

Oaniela - Schuh - Satan, 

Rossmarkt 23 [30] 

Fink-Herrenschuhe, Kalserstr. 8 (40) 
Gdrtz,Zeil 119-121 ]3F] 

Grey Flannel. Gr. Bockenh. Str. 13 
13 D] 

Linda Schuhsalon. Goethestr 7 (3D] 
Ljnda -Schuhsalon. Kaiserstr. 28(4 0} 
Unde Schuhsalon. Schlilerstr. 13 |3EJ 
Roland Herrenschuhe, Kalserstr. 9 
(4DJ 

Salamander France, 

Goethestr. 26-28 [3D] 

Salamander Schuhe, 

Konstabler Wache 89 ]3F] 

Schuhhaus P range. 

An der Hauptwache 2 [3 El 
Sttvalt, Goethestr. 2 [3D] 

Terry. Hauptwache 10 [3 E] 

Taxi 

Taxi - Veremlgung Frankfurt, 

SchOnstr. 22, f? 232568 [6B] 

Tobacco 

DavidoH Hcrinemann. 

ThBaterplatz 2 ]4D) 

Palm Tobacco. Schllleratr. 30-40 [3 E| 
Palm Tobacco, Steinweg 2 [3E] 

Palm Tobacco. Zeil 70 [3F] 

Toys 

Bailie Spiel + Frerzelt 
Kalserstr. 28 [40] 

Behte Spiel + Frelaslt, Zeil 107 [3 FI 
Hflier'a Spiefwaren und Geschenke, 
Hauptbahnhoi )5C] 

Welches/ J ewaSertes 
Cartier- Boutique, Goethestr. 11 [30] 
Christ Juwellere und Uhrmacher, 
Rossmarkt 5 [3 E] 

Chrtstoffle, Goethestr. 29 [3D] 

Clro Perten. Rossmarkt 10 [3 D) 

Robert Koch, Kalserstr. 25 [4 D] 

Lueg Johannes. Kathartnenpiorte 6 
[3 E] 

Lugner, GArtnenweg 1 [2D] 

Ordiam, Zell 83 13F] 

Ptetzsch Fr„ Zell 81 [3R 
Saliatsch Roland, Goethestr. 7 [3 D) 
Stem Juwehere, TheaterplZ |4 D] 

Stem Jimeflere, Frankf. Hof [40] 

Uhran Weiss. Zall 29-31 [3 FI 
Wompe Gerhard D, Hauptwache 7 [3 E] 



















o...i i?iwrr — __j.‘ . ?»£?•• 


Page 14 


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1985^ 


Frankfurt: 

Gateway to Germany 


Continued from page U- 

link shops have been sc up and an 
extensiv; thamal bath with a Japa- 
nese garden has been ereoed 
Along wi die new aces, the town 
lias also paid artention to its hisror- 
ic buildings. The overall impres- 
sion is now of a younger; brighter 

place, one chat will not only atnacr 
spa guests and Sunday strollers bur 
also the Kiaadve convention and 
meeting business. 

Oily seven ldlometns (fair 
miles) from Bad Hombuig is the 
I carefully restored and rrmuained 
Roman legicKinaires’ fore, the 
Soalwrg. The proactive wall 
and restored barracks woe used by 
die Ramans as port of a defense 
line against the Germanic tribes 
and ocher barbarians 

Excavations continue here and 
the findings can be viewed in the 
Soalburg's small museum. (Inquire 
beforehand about opening hans 
far die fare) A nearby restaurant 
offers "Roman banquets" for 
groups of 20 and mate. 

Also in this area is the Hessen- 
paric open-air museum. The park 
is a coOccrion of traditional farm- 
houses and other buildings from 
this area (a windmill has just been 
aided). Here, too, inquire before- 
hand about opening hours. 

Bad Hombuig lies an the 
southern ecjge of the Taunus 
Mountains. The highest peak is 
24 Idfomenas (15 miks) northeast 
of the spa: Grosser Eddberg, at 8S0 
meters (2£S7 feet). This area is 
very popular with Sunday drivers 
and, in winter; with driers. The 
southern edge of die Taunus area, 
where Bad Hamburg and many 
smaller spas are Located, enjoys 
sane of the mildest weather in 
Germany. 

Wiesbaden: This is one at 
Germany's best-known spas. 
Reachable in 30 to 60 minutes 
from Frankfurt by local train (S- 
Bohn), Wiesbaden provides the 
expected gambling casino as weD 
as thermal baths. 

The local Rhrin-Main-Halle au- 
ditorium hosts mare chan 600 con- 
ventions and meetings a yeze This 
(own of 269J330 people is also the 
sice of the International May Festi- 
val (music and theater, with per- 
formers and spectators from 
around the wurial and an annual 



concerts; Sditoss VoHrads and 
SchkKsjohannisbag 

Although 2 new Riesling Road 
runs through this region, the fam- 
ous GeniW* Wine Roadt which 
cefebares its 50th anniversary this 
year, is loaned elsewhere The 83- 
kxkmeter (50 mile) icure goes 
through Germany’s largest single 
wine-ptodudng area. This is the 
Marinate, which gives the wines 
their generic name f'ZjS&r in Ger- 
man). Towns along the German 
Wine Rod are’easQy readied from 
Frankfurt via trains of the Federal 
Railway. 

The mild climate of this region 
has encouraged wine production 
since the time ic was an outpost of 
the Roman Empire. Here, too, is 
Germany’s largest wine festival, 
the Sausage Marker (Worst- 
mark) in Bad Durkhsfrrt which 
is held on two long successive 
weekends cadi September. 

Another landmark along the 
German Wine Road is in Paide s 
heime the oldest cavern in the 
Palatinate, Ttir Kanne, which 
dares from the 12th century. Ap- 
propriately located at Wrin Scctsse 


31. 2ur Kanne has its own vine- 
yaid. Its kitchen is known foe its 
French repine. 

Al» on this route are the town 

of Nwntadr and Hombocher 

Cbsri*,' where Pr ak fe n c Ronald 

Germans on his visit to Germany 
cadlCE this year. 

Those traveling far pleasure 
nfaer _ ttan • speed may use the 
German "Wine Rood as a path 
to...- 

HekWUrjp Reached in a' 
hour or less by train at car from 
Frankfurt (by those not delayed by 
any of the jfaove), this traditional 
Kwrist desrinarion dies not need 
any farther description. A visit ro 
die casde, a stroll through the Old 

Town and a leisurely meal can all 
be accomfdisfacd in a one-day ex- 
cursion from Frankfurt. 

Wry tale Road: With this 
' year and next marking anniversa- 
ries of the Grimm Brothers; the 
famous ccmpikrs of German fairy 
talcs, Frankfurt can serve as a 
jumping-off place for the Fatty 
Tale Road, which starts in nearby 
Hanau and winch its w ay north- 
ward all the way ro Bremen. 


Muller International 

Handles Real Estate 


Muller International Property 
Agents is a large and growing 
inuararionzl real-estate oganiza- 
parc 

Of die seven buildup of 40 cr 
more stories in cbwnrown Frank- 
furt. Muller haidles -leasing in the 
four not occupied by the banks 
that own them. The company is 
the. sofa agent in three of the four 
buildings. 

last year; a low poinr for real 
estate in general, the MuDer group 
manned to increase turnover from 


<55 million to 93 million Deutsche 
macks and raise the number of 
employees from 120 ro 150. 

The company specializes » 
finding owncr-opcrarots or inves- 
tees far office buHings, shops, 

daofyingomtcrsandixidisQialicsl 

estate. Its basic objective is ro pro- 
vide the fall spearum of interna: 
rioral favesemmr services, ofefog 
the advantages of worldwide rdfr 
dons and knowledge df the mar- 
kets; Its services arc 

# purchase and sale of coro- 


meiml and induaml.P^nV.' 

• leasing cf offices, shops, 
shopping centers, and ihdusrrial; 

properties, -i 

• management t^ Lromracraal 
and industrial property, , l - . 

• assessments, vubility scutaes 

and market analyse. . ' . 

In' acBwin to its; Getmah cf- 

ficEs in Dussddorf Fcankfnrt 
Hamburg, Muni ch, Srurtgart and 
Cbkgne, it has’ offices abroad in 
NewYock, Juondon, Amaeniam 
and Vienna, 



Haute Couture 
Comes to Town 


The Stock Exchange: 400 years old. 


horseback-riding and jumping 
tournament. Located in the Rhern- 
gau wine region, Wiesbaden not 
unexpectedly stages an annual 
wine festival with what is claimed 
ro be the workfs longest wine ban 

Chic shops, cafes and antique- 
sellers are part of the traditional spa 
town. Bur WIesbadon is also slow- 
ly becoming modernized and ex- 
panding its office space. 

Moras Across the Rhine River 
from Wiesbaden, this town of 
192X00 people is also a stare capital 
(of Rhineland Palatinate). It is a 
major railroad and superhigh w ay 
(Autobahn) junction and a landing 
place far Rhine and Main river 
cruise ships. The Main joins the 
Rhine nearby, and riverboat pa* 
sengers may board in Frankfurt. 

The cathedral leads die list of 
sights ro see. which far many in- 
cludes the printing museum 
named after a famous native son — 
Johann Gutenbeig. Mainz pro- 
vides one of the biggest and best 
cunrval parades far the German 


Mardi Gras. Mainz is easy co reach 
by local train service hern Hank- 
fart (on the longer Wiesbaden 
route, via the Frankfurt airport). 

The cwo Rhinesidc towns of- 
Wksbaden and Mainz are gate- 
ways ro many famous little wine 
towns and villages. Most famous, 
and a mecca far many tourists, is 
Rudeshekn and its many small 
and very seldom quiet wine tav- 
erns. The town also has a privaidy- 
run museum far mechanical musi- 
cal instruments, a wine museum 
and, ten minutes away via a scenic 
chair-lift ride, the Watch on (he 
Rhine monument (Nfederwald 
Memorial), where the graffiti-cov- 
ered statue of Germania stands 
guard over Father Rhine. 

Other famous wine towns in 
the area include Hochhrim (a stop 
on die S-Bahn train), whose wine 
Britain's Queen Victoria called 
"hock;" Etville (for German 
champagne); Kicdridi; Kkxcer 
Eberaach, a former monastery thar 
houses the sore wine administra- 
tion and holds wine tastings and 


Goetbestrasse has become one of 
die most ekgant shopping streets 
in the heat of the city. A major 
contributing factor is the presence 
of Annabel of KSrugsorin ar num- 
ber 9. 

The bounque reflects the charm 
and taste of owner Ingrid Suchs- 
land She has die otdusive tights 
fa the state of Hesse for Valentino 
Boutique and Emanuel Ungaro 
PataQde womens haute-couture 
fashions. 


Annabel- is Mrs. Sudasbnd’s 
middle name, and also the name of 
the first boutique she started as a 
hobby in the subuib of Kionigsrin 
in 1?&L She attracted so many 
customers faom Frankfurt chat she 
opened her Goctfaesrrasse store in 
1973. Vcgue magazine has called 
her the pioneer of haute couture in 
the city. Shoe then she has opened 
another hratvh fa the nearby spa 
town of Wiesbaden. 


In a Festive Mood 


Remembrance and faregratiori of 
the post is die theme of the fifth. 
Frankfurt Festival, which will con- 
tinue in and around the city’s 
new/oLd opera house, the Aire 
Open through Sept 22. 

The many events are bring held 
mainly in die various halls of the 
open house, which was reopened 
fa 1981 after 27 years as a Wodd 
War II ruin. Seme events, howev- 
er, will rake place in other theaters 
One, an interpretation of the delib- 


erately irrational school of art 
known as dadaism (Sept. 20 and 
21), will be held, ap propriately- 
enough, in the saZf-uvompfeari 
future subway station fa from cf 
the Aire Open 

The festival indudes the works 
of the noted young composer 
Wolfgang Rihm, whose successful 
chamber opera "Jacob lenz n wffi 
be presented Sqm 1 4 and 15. The 
Wadiingmn National Symphony 
Orchestra will perform on Sept. 21 
ar the festival. ?• . - :• - • 



*1.' 4 

• ■ 


-V.- 


. - . v'.' ' 

-O 




J i 




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BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 

Report, M-l, Page 16. 


** 


Page 15 


TECH Not QGY 


uorescent Bulbs 
ce in U.S. 

By ELIZABETH KOLBERT 
"View yqr/T T,ma Smin 

bun >. invented 

:.fe a nsopdi^tnalil: 

■'2JLi,; -3 ' over henric at a °f Qiquiitioa, hovering 

■«fiffi=SSa®S? 3 = 

/epcrgyrcflkjfcnt fluorescent bulb 5 bus “=sses by ihe more 

pBCto-se 

- '.Recently, however, the nation’s maior lii 
Sylvania, which is 
.and /North. American 
Gorp„ have begun to 



manufact urers 

lidtaiyofOIE 


compact 

bulbs that experts say 
replace it 


Tliey last longer and 
are more efficient 
The only drawback 
is the initial cost 


spirit 

Jadduf 
’me after 


fluorescent 
... .... . may 

eyeatuaUy. replace mean des- 
cents itrmany of the most fre- 
quecdy. used household sock- 
ets,” '--v- . ... 

VHiese -bulbs, which have 

fwide acceptance in Eu- 

. i ***■ an offshoot of the development of high-efficiency rare- 
earth phosphors, which allow fluorescent bulbs to be made 
sanalia-as wdl as to emit a spectrum of light almost identical to 
the- “'warm hue of the standard incandescent Phosphors are 
chemical .compounds that convert ultraviolet light to viable light 
tribe- incandescent is not going to disappear,” said Rudy 
3 leader for the lighting research program at the 
. . 'ey Laboratory. But in time, it win be replaced by 

compact fluoresceins in fixtures that are frequently left on for 
long. periods, such as those outdoors and in hallways, he said. 
These bulbs “last longer and they are more efficient” 

‘ Compact fluorescents have an expected life span of 10,000 
horns, .10 tones that of an ordinary incandescent Their only 
drawback, Mr. Verderber said, is that the initial cost is greater. 

C OMPOSED of two thin tubes bridged by a mni>«ntnig 
.tube at the tap, compact fluorescent ts carry a retail price of 
about-SlO, while an incandescent bulb can be bought in a 
supermarket for about 70 cents. To fit the compact fluorescent 
bmbs, which are pronged, into an ordinary socket an adapter, 
costing an additional S10, is required. The adapter, which does 
jXiot-need- to be replaced' with the bulb, regulates the voltage- 
*W- John Hoffman, fluorescent-product manager at North Ameri- 
can Philips Lighting Corp., which spearheaded the introduction 
of compact fluorescent bulbs in this country more than three 
years ago, estimated that two million compact fluorescent bulbs 
are sold in the United States annually. Compared with the almost 
two biflirih ordinary incandescent bulbs sold last year, the n am- 
ber of compact fluorescents is very small, he said, but growing. 
“The response to the bulbs has been very good,” be added. 

■ Both incandescent and fluorescent light bulbs convert electri- 
cal energy into light, but they do so in entirely different ways. 

In an incandescent bulb, current heats a tungsten filament, 
which glows white hot, releasing some of its energy in the form of 
visible light. 

In a fluorescent bulb, a stream ofdectrons flows between 
electrodes sealed in both ends of a tube containing inert gases and 
mercury. The current vaporizes the mercury, winch produces an 
arc RfTttflm thflt grves'off ultraviolet fight A coating of phosphors 
In the tube converts the ultraviolet fight to visibkv whitc lighL ■ 
This method of producing fight is more efficient than that of 
filamenthulbs; a four-foot fluorescent, for example, uses half the 
energy arid emits almost twice the fight as a 100-watt incandes- 
cent . 

Developing a fluorescent bulb at once small enough and bright 
enough for household use was made possible by the discovery in 
the late 1970s of rare-earth phosphors, according to Alvin Hart 
manager of application engineering ai pH’s fig htin g business 
•A group- Unlike ordinary phosphors, which break, down when 
* brought too dose to the arc stream, raroearth phosphors, which 
(Continued on Page 21, Col 7) 


j Currency Rates 

CrvasRates Sept. 12 

• , C DM. FJF. MX. our. M. SJS. Y •» 

Wert™ UBS 4» ns* US* M*: — 

Bnmelsfaj SWD5 77 JB SUE 111* >7.975 atW5 3141 

SSw UW 3MJ 3287* JJW5* 99i»* 49»* UWS* 

f£Ea»> 35 -- aw lisn **» ■» 

Mflan 1,97100 1S714Q 6*5*0 ZUMO 5*13# 32992 ®»8> • UD 

STvmm — «. **> “ MR S jf. SS 5?. 

tail 9 JU2 1UD UA2 4579 X 27142 111® UM 1715 

IT" M mt UI 10* 7123 MS — 

Zatfcb ^W37 118W 8242* 27855* «»• 71315 • 4887* UE1 * 

,- rl , 07 JM 0^768 iXOt 479JS 148199 158J1 449*97 18378 11170 

II Si l£Z OJMW 299C7 9.1185 0U 13W M7B 2*57*2 

n** 7, rich. ftettiBs lo otter Eurvpeon canters. New Yor* rates td* CM. 

fni Commercial franc (M Amounts neettetl to tut ana aw/nd tel Amounts needed to tuty an* 

(m) Tobaveoepaapti: SUM3U 

thherMlwValaes 


currency par USX 
Artan-aostroi 0J0 
AjrtreLJ US09 

\ftttr.vML 2082 

MS. fie. ft-. *0J» 

Brazil am 7J2S80 
Caution* 13733 • 
□radshkraoa 107475 

BerpL pcood Ul 


Cemnar oer US* 
Fin. partita X217S 
Oownarot MOTS 
HgMKMMl 7X175 
Indtan rapM 12JI09 
1 ndo.r«PMi 1.122X0 
Irltbc 0X515 
WWll start. 188175 
Kuwaiti dinar 0J075 


Carrwacr P« 

Mnlav. rtna- 

MW-1WO 

Marw.fcraM 

pmlpbu 

PorLescuda 

Saudi riVo* 

SJns-S 

lJUr.RB*. 


* USS 
2*205 
347 JO 
8*0 
17*5 
173J0 
r*V7 
13073 
2512* 


r U3J 
S.KM-.WM 09273 
Span, peseta 174.10 
Seerttaraa e 1*425 
TaMBl 40X1 
TMM* 27-515 
TM-fcbftWB 55190 
UAS mrhan 3*725 
Venez-Befiv. 1425 


I«erttapr 13475 ’**1* tBmssttsr Bonca QmWKrt ItaOono i Milan); 

fTo *” J/ ,MF (SOR} ' "" •*“ M 

Other data from Reuters cndAP. 


lnh*n*^ Rates 



Ei 


eyD «*•*«* 

Swiss 

DftMrt ' Frwe 

0*4* 4IW-4fc 
«*-*» 4t*4* 

09W4.9W 

HHK. 49M16 
94Vft 4%49fc 4*4-4» 


( 

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Source* 

(SDK). Rates appOcabte 

toy-MameyButes&i*- & 


S? t 22 

SterfTng «CU SDR 

n tw-)7 ee 9**vw •«* 7,4 

llHrlltk ?**-10* ««» 7,4 

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2™*. Il»-11»* lOWrll*. ^ 

II It llfURfc • ■ ^ 


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D fcmua tH m e 
Federal Fends 
PrtraeRnte 
Broker Leon Bole 

Cdm nper 90-T79 dm 



Close Free. 

IVi 7» 

7X5/1* 1 

tVs . 9» 

8954 *Y** 

7X5 750 

7J* 720 

784 78) 

7*5 7*5 

7JB 7*5 


550 550 

450 455 

430 470 

470 *70 

475 4® 


*• £ 

M ™ 

J9fMi 99/16 

m 9* 

Wfe 9 9/1* 



A &U Money 


11» 11» 



Arf—lH«-rDe|NMdta 

lOMKItb JU'J? 

SrimHU 

,Wh» 

i 


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set.-?* 


Source: Heaters. 


IJJS. MrtieyMariw**®* 

ssr^s,‘5S , :““ 7.™ 

Telerote interest Rote lodex: 7X93 

Source: Merrill Lynch. Tterate. 



UteMKonO EU5 3,940 

Hone none _ ,|B7* — 

ZurK*' J11C0 11925 

London jbJO 

Mew York 


Plastics 

Yenture 

Discussed 

ICI, Enichem 
Seek Economies 

By Bob Hagerty 

International Merabi Tribune 

LONDON — Imperial Chemi- 
cal Industries PLC and Italy’s 
state-owned Enichem SpA an- 
nounced Thursday that they are' 
discussing formation of a joint ven- 
ture to cut costs in making plastics. 

The venture would mark a major 
advance in efforts to reduce overca- 
pacity and losses in the European 
plastics and petrochemicals indus- 
try, analysts said. 

The ICl-Enichem talks focus on 
polyvinyl chloride and vinyl chlo- 
ride. Polyvinyl chloride, or PVC is 
used in pipes, upholstery, car seats, 
packaging, floor coverings, window 
frames and many other items. Vi- 
nyl chloride is a raw material for 
PVC. 

“The aim would be to make max- 
imum use of the companies’ most 
efficient assets and to pool their 
technical and commercial exper- 
tise,” the two chemical concerns 
said. An 1CI spokesman said the 
two did not expect lo reach an 
agreement before early 1986. He 
said it was too early to say which 
plants and bow many workers 
would be affected. 

ICi makes PVC in Britain, West 
Germany and Switzerland. Eni- 
chem produces the material only in 
Italy. 

Howard Coates, chief chemical 
analyst at the London stockbroker- 
age of de Zoel; & Bevan, said he 
understood that the cooperation 
would involve joint marketing and 
distribution, but uot joint manu- 
facturing 

“ICI is making a very bold 
move.” he said. 

A combination of the two com- 
panies’ PVC business would create 
by far the largest producer in West- 
ern Europe, with a market share of 
about 25 percent. “They would 
have a commanding market posi- 
tion.” said David Ingles, an analyst 
at W. Green well A Co. 

At present, Solvay A Cie. of Bel- 

(Coofmaed on Page 17, CoL 1) 


/ L.— DM.SF. Pound. FF): Uavxb Bank (ECUK Reuters 


Canada Pu mps Money Into Its Sands 


Development 
Of Oil-Bearing 
Deposits Pushed 

By Douglas Martin 

Mem York Times Service 

CALGARY. Alberta — Un- 
like the United States, where 
Congress is talking about cutting 
off funds for synthetic fuels de- 
velopment, Canada is pressing 
cautiously ahead with a number 
of efforts to develop its substan- 
tial oil-sands resources, poten- 
tially one of the largest synthetic- 
fuel endeavors anywhere. 

“It is our ace in the bole.” said 
John Zaozimy. energy minister 
of Alberta, the province that has 
roost of Canada’s 1 trillion bar- 
rels of oil in known oil-sands 
reserves. Some of the oil from 
those reserves is sold as is, but 
most of that extracted now is 
synthesized into a fighter, more 
conventional crude. 

Mr. Zaozimy and industry of- 
ficials say that even with today's 
eroding oil prices, many oil- 
sands developments, with their 
low cost and enormous re- 
sources, make economic sense — 
much more than coal gasifica- 
tion and oil-shale development 
make in the United States. With 
considerable help still available 
from the Canadian federal gov- 
ernment and at provincial level, 
they make even more sense. 

Nonetheless, companies de- 
veloping oil sands — where ex- 
traction is more difficult because 
of the consistency of the oil — 
are reacting to the lower price of 
oil by building projects in 
phases. A finished portion of an 
operation can then at least start 
producing crude. 

Also, the final stage of “up- 
grading” extremely heavy oil 
into lighter crude is being post- 
poned by most companies, partly 
because of a good market now 
among refineries in the northern 
United States for heavy crude. 

“Has the developing and in- 
creasing uncertainly in the oil 
industry worldwide had any ef- 
fect on the oil sands here?" asked 
Ralph Hedfin. an energy consul- 
tant in Calgary. “Unless people 
are absolutely nuts, the answer is 
yes.” 

But Mr. Zaozirny said talks 
had been held among represen ta- 


The OB-Sands Projects 

Canadian almonds tocMos cm Mw- 
or under cooainiefeon moi 
actual or protected , w oprv,-. 

production capacity 1 AUJtHI A 


BRIT. COL 

WoltLaka 



★★ 



Total capacity: 
75.000 terre* 
PW day by 1386 


Calgary 


Meat Fort 

’ McMunay . 

Syncrude facility \ . 

Total capacity- 200,000 J 

barrel* per day. by 1 988 

SSSJi MAWT0BA 

Suncor lacriity * 

Total capacity: 65 . 000 barrels/ j 
-Elk Point 1 V”*? 

Total capacity: / 

16.000 barrels per day by 1589 
UnAarsb \ \ 

Total capacity \ 

15,000 barrels per day by 1987 

X 


□ TUdt-cruda project Hlgta^aafity crude protect 

Some Qwr of Energy ana Nauru RnourcM. Man 



V ~ ^ • •• ' 


The New VoA Tm 

An oil-sands recovery project at Cold Lake, Alberta. 


lives of his own government. Ot- 
tawa and the oU companies to 
push cautiously ahead on even 
bigger projects. In coming 
months, he promised “to step up 
the intensity of those discus- 
sions.” 

In particular, the energy min- 
ister is pushing for a major new 
operation to mine oil sands and 
then upgrade the product to 
high-quality synthetic crude. Pe- 
tro-Canada, the national oil 
company, already has held pre- 
liminary discussions with possi- 
ble partners and has hired Bech- 
tel Group to perform an 
en gin eering study for a 53-bfllion 
plant to produce 72,000 barrels a 
day of synthetic oiL 

The two existing mining oper- 
ations, Suncor, which is 75 per- 
cent owned by Sun Co. of Rad- 
nor. Pennsylvania, and 
Syncrude, owned by a consor- 
tium of eight Canadian and CJ.S. 
companies, already are engaged 
in expansion programs. 

But Mr. Zaozimy says he is 
discussing an expansion of Syn- 


crude’s operation beyond the 
consortium's 20,000-barrel-a- 
day addition to its 1 09.000- bar- 
rd-a-day plant in northern Al- 
berta. He would like to bring 
capacity up to 200.000 barrels a 
day. 

Canada's oil-sands effort 
comes at a time when similar 
efforts to tap exceptionally 
heavy ofl reserves have ground to 
a halt in other countries. A drive 
to develop Venezuela's heavy oil 
reserves, for instance, has col- 
lapsed with oil prices. 

The reasoning behind the Ca- 
nadian push is that technological 
improvements, favorable pro- 
duction costs and govermental 
help — largely in the form of 
reduced royalties and taxes — 
argue for immediate develop- 
ment. 

So does the fact that Canada's 
reserves of conventional light oO 
are being used up. A study by the 
government of Alberta, which 
produces 85 percent of Canada’s 

(CotMznned on Page 2L CoL 4) 


Fiat Auto’s Head 
Forecasts Pact 
With Ford in ’85 


Reuten 

FRANKFURT — The head of 
Fiat Auto SpA. the Italian auto- 
maker. said Thursday that be ex- 
pects talks with Ford Motor Co.'s 
European subsidiary to produce a 
definite agreement on cooperation 
between the two companies. 

“There is going to be a definite 
agreement on some kind of deal 
between Fiat and Ford of Europe.” 
Umberto Agnelli, chairman of Fiat 
Auto, the Flat group’s motor sub- 
sidiary, told reporters at an inter- 
national motor show here. He did 
not elaborate. 

“Discussions have identified a 
common objective but now it's up 
to the mother companies to go be- 
yond that,” he said, adding that a 
statement would be issued by the 
end of the year. 

The companies previously had 
said it was too early to tell whether 
anything would result from top-le- 
vd talks that have involved the 
U.S.- based Ford, parent. 

In the past, company officials 
had said inai they were discussing 
everything from limited coopera- 
tion to a Tull merger in Europe. 
Such a merger would create a giant 
with around 25 percent of the Eu- 
ropean vehicle market. 

Industry sources said the cooper- 
ation could go as far as joint devel- 
opment of a new car but would not 
involve a full merger. 

With design, manufacture and 
introduction of a new car series 
costing up to SI billion. Ford and 
Hat are aware that cooperation on 
a single model would make sense, 
the sources said. 

One source said Fiat and Ford 
could, for example, develop a car 
combining characteristics of a Ford 
Capri with those of Lancia or Fer- 
rari models produced within the 
Fiat group. 

Or they could cooperate at lower 
levels, stopping short of (he devel- 
opment of a complete car, the 
source said 

The first stage of the talks was 
completed last spring, and the an- 
nouncement of an agreement could 
come as early as November, Fiat 
sources said. The negotiators had 


agreed that some kind of streamlin- 
ing of car output would moke 
sense, the Fiat sources said. 

In his comments. Mr. Agnelli 
warned Thursday ihat European 
automakers would find it hard to 
survive without cooperation agree- 
ments and urged governments and 
the European Community lo en- 
courage linkups by loosening anti- 
trust laws. 

“The future of the auto industry 
lies with major inter-company 
agreements to permit rationalized 
design, production, design, market- 
ing and spare parts,” he said. 

Mr. Agnelli, whose brother Gio- 
vanni heads the entire group. Flat 
SpA criticized the community’s ex- 
ecutive commission for seeming at 
limes to be a “neutral observer of 
Europe's production overcapacity 
of 2.5 million vehicles. 

He expressed concern over what 
he called delay and half-bearted- 
ness in implementing community 
innovation programs of relevance 
to the car industry. 

Mr. Agnelli appealed to govern- 
ments to sup granting subsidies 
that distorted competition, and he 
urged a revision of the rules of the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade in order to maintain trade 
and thwart protectionism. 

Also speaking in Frankfurt, 
Robert Lutz, president of Ford of 
Europe I no. warned Thursday that 
EC governments who tempt Japa- 
nese automakers to manufacture in 
their countries could find that their 
countries lose two or three jobs in 
the auto industry for every one cre- 
ated. 

Speaking on the first day of the 
Frankfurt International Motor 
Show, he told a conference that 
“Japanese manufacturers are en- 
couraged to set up assembly plants 
often on more favorable terms than 
apply to existing manufacturers ” 

“One national government is 
pushing its national champion into 
the arms of a Japanese manufactur- 
er,” he said, in what industry 
sources said were comments aimed 
mainly at Britain. 

Britain has offered extensive in- 
centives to Honda Motor Co. 


Study Ties EC Subsidies 
To German Steel Layoffs 


Reuters 

DUSSELDORF — West Ger- 
man steelmakers wfll be forced to 
slash production and lay off thou- 
sands of workers if competitors in 
the European Community are 
granted more aid, a leading re- 
search group said Thursday. 

The West German steel industry, 
the most efficient and innovative in 
Europe, would be threatened by 
any extension of EC subsidies be- 
yond the December deadline set for 
their expiration, the IFO economic 
research institute said. 

“The government must realize 
that the steel industry, after years 
of losses, no longer has reserves to 
hold out in the long run if competi- 
tion is distorted anew,” said the 
West German Iron and Steel Fed- 
eration. which commissioned the 
report. 

The EC is considering a proposal 
by its Executive Commission that 
would extend the subsidies to en- 
courage further reduction in EC 
steel output through plant closures. 
The commission also intended to 
eliminate operating and investment 
subsidies, which could affect 
prices, by the agreed on dead li ne. 

According to commission fig- 
ures, steel output in the Communi- 
ty needs to be reduced by almost 25 
million tons to balance supply with 
demand. 

The IFO institute said in its re- 
port that the West German indus- 
try would have to shed 37 percent 
of its output and 32,000 employees 
if the government, which opposes 
subsidies, did not match grants 


made by other countries and that 
about 36,000 jobs in related indus- 
tries such as coal and transport 
would also be lost 

West German producers are 
mainly privately owned and make 
profits, in contrast to many other 
troubled European companies. 

They have consistently received 
less aid than other European pro- 
ducers but still managed to remain 
in the forefront of new methods of 
mik ing steel and steel products, 
IFO said. 

The report said West German 
steelmakers had received only a 
tenth of EC-approved subsidies be- 
tween 1975 and 1985 although they 
produced around one third of the 
sted in the 10-nation bloc last year. 

Less aid meant that West Ger- 
man steelmakers had been unable 
to invest as much as their European 
rivals, eroding the pre-eminence of 
West German companies in many 
fields, such as steel bars, steel 
sheets and wires. 

“This report concludes that West 
Germany’s original and existing 
competitive advantage is getting 
smaller, chiefly because of subsi- 
dized pressure from EC competi- 
tors,” it added. 

The Iron and Steel Federation 
has protested the ECs approval in 
July of an additional S3 .5 billion 
this year in aid, mostly for non- 
German steel firms. 

It also opposes EC plans to allow 
limited subsidies over the next 
three years for financing plant clo- 
sures after the original emergency 
aid program expires at the end erf 
1985. 


Srpc 12 
ctrte 
-2J0 
-VS 
— 3*6 
—7*0 
— 150 
-UD 


livs; IWiyL. ywfc comex cvmnl 
Source: Reuters 


Canada Sees Progress in Sale 
Of Canadair , De HaviUand 

Reuters 

OTTAWA — The head of the 
government-owned Canada Devel- 
opment Investment Corp. said 
Thursday that the company is mak- 
ing progress in attempts to sell off 
two aircraft manufacturers to die 
private sector. 

Paul Marshall, the company’s 
president, said the holding compa- 
ny “is much closer^ now than it was 
a few weeks ago in negotiations to 
sell Canadair Ltd. and De Havil- 
Jand Aircraft of Canada Ltd. 

Justus Doraier, who with his 
family sold a controlling interest in 
Doraier GmbH, the West German 
aerospace group, to Daimler-Benz 
AG earlier this year, announced 
Thursday that he was negotiating 
to buy both Canadian companies. 

But Mr. Marshall said those talks 
were at a “vdy prdiminaiy stage at 
this point.” 

Mr. Marshall said three or four 
groups were interested in each 
company and confirmed that 
Boeing Co. was interested in ac- 


quiring De Havilland, a maker of a 
line of bush planes and the Dash-7 
series of smml commuter aircraft. 

He said there that was no dead- 
line for the negotiations. 

Possible purchase prices have 
not been disclosed, but De Havil- 
land was purchased by the Canadi- 
an government in 1974 for 40 mil- 
lion Canadian dollars ($29 million) 
from Britain’s Hawker Sidddy Co. 

Industry sources said the UJC- 
governmem-owned British Aero- 
space PLC and McDonnell Doug- 
las Corp. of the United States were 
also interested in the aircraft com- 
panies. 

Canadair, which makes the Chal- 
lenger executive jet, was financially 
restructured last year by the gov- 
ernment and reported a profit of 6 
million dollars in 1984. compared 
with a loss the previous year of 
184 J million dollars. 

De Havilland posted an operat- 
ing profit of 11.4 miTti on dollars 
last year, versus a loss of 39.4 mil- 
lion dollars in 1983. 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Thursday 


AMEX D lories 


masdaQ index 


aeafx Most Actives 4 


tthh Lew Lot CM. 


RdcCIrn 

WtfoE 

Revlon 

Morans 

KanGE 

RevIPfC 

IBM 

BnhAm 

AT&T 

MMSUt 

BeaKo 

GffSfUf 

Am Exp 

Arkta 

NUtdPS 


20% 79* 
39 38 

44* 42* 
47% <W 
12% 11H 
725% 124* 
mYi 12604 
14 13 ft 

214k 201k 
94k 644 

3444 334k 
rc« ON 
421k 411k 
22 194k 

121k 11% 


1944 

364k + Ik 
441A +114 

47 — % 

lift -2 
125 + ft 

lfeft — % 

SB =5 

B% —ft 
341k + » 
1 2ft —ft 
42 + % 


Oral Hfah Law lost <*»■ 


Indus 131743 132748 1307BI l»»- 

Trans MOM 57164 MM3 4*327- 

Util 154J9 1S4J5 15208 I? 

Comp 54271 546.18 33733 519X2 — **E 


Composite 
I industrials 
Tronso. 
Utilities 
Finance 


HM Law Close CkVe 
107.14 106J6 10636 -Mg 
12M0 123J0 12220— MO 
104.10 10S.13 KH.13 — IB 
5559 55.40 55X0 —060 
I1M7 110X6 HOBS — LOO 


Ml Pro*. 


Qosnag 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 

s ■ -■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ — *■ - . 

new rnpn 

New Lows 
Volume up 
volume down 


- 1«2 m 

345 344 

-251 257' 

BOO 783 

8 2 

' 25 14 


Compart!* 

industrials 

Finance 

lrwurmice 

utinHes . 

Bonks 

TransP. 


Week 
t am ass 
t — TX0 295JH 
t — 1J4 30158 


i=»S8 

|_121 27055 


f t +lft 

I* — * 


NYSE Diaries 


.BAT hi 
HmeGn 
WongS 
Hasbrs 
Wlekas 

8SS 

AEXPwt 

NYTfnm 

. QltMAS 

Saplncls 

ATE* SC . 
AM 1"" 
Domap. 
Pb»-w 


HIM ilXW 
3* . 3ft 3ft 

■SB-P S; 

■■v.-w 1 

t?% SS* 

« flk 

22ft »ft 2Jft 

«ft 

a r* s 

3ft 3 


i 

r..... 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


v»bmp M-- wgnjKn 

Prcr.4PJA.nK. lOWSQjM 

PTW OBBiOWOlld Cllii C' T17J1QJM 


Standard & Poor's Index 


AMEX Sales 


Dow Jones Bond Averages! 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Close ClToe 

7941 —0.17 

7628 — 022 

8255 —0.12 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New HUH 
N«w LOWS 


415 345 

*8 1 

40 33 


Volume up 
V olume dawn 


n 49&440 

67561580 


■included in the sales flmiras 


Buy solas 'SU’rt 

151J45 451X50 M2B 

156391 464,949 2267 

154JE3 422721 5475 

151/153 3105 1348 

14&282 3701101 7,191 


Tables induda Hie naHonwlde nr Ices 
up to Hw dosing m Wail street and 
da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via Vie Associated Pros 


Industrials 

Tronso. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


Hfch Lew .dose CUVe 
20454 20(71 2454 — 177 
17US 168X1 14859 —170 
8153 8043 8055—155 
ZU* 2151 2153 -XW 
18551 18349 18359 — U4 


i PM. volume 
Prev. 4 PM- volume 
Prev. eons, volume 


aihex Stock Index 


Htob -low Close -Otfoe’ 

v nyi 22*47- 22472 —1*2 


13 Month 
High Low Stack 


Ste. CIDH 

Dtv.YM.PE HUB High Low QuAOiVe 


34ft 16 AAR 56 25 

17ft 9ft ACS 

14ft 9ft AMCA 

21ft 13 AMF .251 

56ft 2514 AMR 

23ft 1Mb AMR Pi 218 94 


10ft 7ft AcmeE 32b 43 
19 ISft Ada Ex IJZrll.l 
2D 13ft AdmNU 32 15 
17ft Oft AdvSys S3t 43 
toft 22ft AMD 
12ft Aft Advert .12 14 
15ft 9ft Aerflax 


49ft 324k' AetnLi 164 42 15 2251 toft toft «%— £ 


57ft 52ft AetLPf S.79e105 


54ft SS — ft 


37ft IHVi Ahmnj 136 33 6 1043 31ft 36ft 3gft — ft 


3ft 2ft Aileen 


2ft 2ft— ft 


57 42 Air Prd 130 23 12 613 52ft SS SS — St 
24ft 15ft AJrtiFrt M 24 13 M9 23ft 22ft 77ft— ft 
21k Ilk AIMoas .10a 53 78 lft lft 1ft 


29ft 23ft AMP Pt 234al03 
33ft 27ft AiaPPfA3JZ 125 
8ft Aft AMP dnf 57 113 
82 431k AlaPrt 950 114 

104ft 94ft AloPpt 1150 107 

84 49ft AlaPPf 944 114 

74 58ft AtaPnf 8.16 115 

73 57 AMPPf 838 117 

14ft lift AkiBSCO 154 75 10 

24ft lift AISfUUr .14 7 8 

25 12ft AlbrtOS 38 17 18 

33ft 24ft Albtsns 74 24 11 

31ft 23ft Alcan 130 44 27 

38ft 27ft AlCoSTd 1.20 35 12 

32 21 AlexAlx 150 37 

25ft 20ft Alexdr 21 

89ft 72ft AJIOCP 1541 25 
2 6ft 241k AlgCPPf 254 105 

28% 70ft AJeillt 140 45 

20ft 16ft Alglnpf 2.19 123 

98 85 AlolpfC 1135 123 


,UW 53 78 1ft 1ft 1ft 

274al05 100 27* 27* 27ft— ft 

372 125 17 30ft 30ft 3»J- ft 

S7 113 20 7ft 7ft 7ft 

950 114 H90z 77ft 77 77ft + ft 
1150 107 SOttlKft 1B2W 102ft 

9X4 113 50* BOft B0 00 —to 

8.14 115 lift: 71 71 71 +1 

LS 117 lift 7«ft 4^ TWk +1* 

154 75 10 84 14ft 13% 13ft + ft 

.M J 8 301 21% 2T» 7m- ft 

J0 17 IB »9 2346 2246 2246— ft 

74 25 11 1040 28 27V. 271A— ft 

130 44 27 342S 24ft 25% 26 — ft 

130 35 12 52 34ft 33% 34ft— ft 

150 37 541 27ft 27ft 27ft 

21 13 24 23ft 23ft— ft 

1541 25 2 77ft 77ft 77ft + ft 

ZW 103 5 26ft 24ft 26% 

MO AS 46 21ft 21 ft 2TH 

2.19 123 7 18 18 18 — ft 

135 123 9 92ft 92ft 92ft + ft 


34ft 2444 AIMPW 270 94 8 2062 29ft fflft 2Bft— ft 

23ft 15ft AIIbhG 50b 24 14 183 HVk 21ft 21ft- ft 

46ft 32Va A1KJCP 150 43 8 1915 43 42% toft— ft 

66 57ft AldCPPf 474 104 46 65 44ft 44ft— ft 

115ft lTOk aScSSi550 1U .. 13 111. 110% 110%- % 


23ft 15ft AlldPd 11 n 17ft 16% 17ft + ft 

60% AlldStr 2.12 3.9 7 1169 55 54% 54* 

11 3ft AIIHOl V7 4 Mfc 3ft 

14ft 24 AllSCpf » 29ft 29ft 29K 


14ft 24 AltoC Ff 


29ft 21ft AU.TL 154 43 ■ 


46 27% 2446 24ft— % 


39ft 29ft AlCOO 
20% 13% Anna 


730 16 30 757 34% 33ft 33ft — ft 


AnWXPf 350 95 


443 14% 14ft Vfft— % 
I 33% 33% 33% 


22ft AmHes 1.10 11 22 425 27% 24ft 27% - ft 


2ft 1% AfflAST 
23ft 16 ABakr 9 

70 5Bft Afirond 190 67 B 
30% 25ft A Bed Pf 27S 95 
116ft 56% ABdCSt 150 14 18 
30% 19% ABJdM 54 34 14 
20% 20% ABttePr 54 25 14 


428 Ift 1% VH 

122 22% 22% 22ft— ft 

544 59ft 58ft 58% —I 

41 29 28ft 29 + ft | 

289 116 115% 115% + ft 
17 25ft 25% 25% — ft 

11 26 25ft 25ft— ft 1 


60% 45% AmCOn 2.90 51 11 421 57% 56% 57ft— ft 


25ft 22 AConpf 250 114 
20% T7U. A CODBcf 220 IM 
30% 25% ACopCv 251e 95 
71 4% A C#nlC ?d3 

574k 44% ACron 7 JO 37 14 
27ft 18ft ADT 72 37 24 


250 114 21 24ft 24ft 24% + ft 

230 1 1.1 57 20 19ft 19% + ft 

251c 93 25 27ft 27 27 — ft 

103 03 dft 4% 4% 

1 JO 37 14 2101 52% 51ft 51ft— % 
J2 37 24 84 24ft 24% 24ft— ft 


24% 17% AElPw 276011-1 0 2672 20ft 20ft 20ft— ft 

49ft 31% Am Exp ITS 30 1510373 42% 41ft 42 + 46 

25% 12% AFoml s M 21 M 939 23% 22ft 22ft— ft 

36% 2246 AGflCP M0 U 9 2079 30ft 30ft 30ft— ft 

16 4ft ACnl wt 41 12 lift 12 


54ft 51ft ACnl of A 557+107 5 

»% 44 AGnlPfBJJO* 45 77 J 

71ft 45ft AGnpfD 244 44 182 

34ft 24ft AHerlt 130 24 10 5 

13ft 7% AHOtSt 54 

44ft 44ft AHorne 290 55 12 2363 
295 210ft AHmapf 200 5 2 

47ft 24ft A Hasp 1.12 24 16 4130 
97ft 72 Am rich 640 73 9 1009 
K'A 62 AlnGrp 44 5 22 3206 
28% 15ft AMI 72 21 II 4M3 

4% 2ft AmMal 115V 

29 1«M APmdS 50 23 4 414 

13% 5 ASLFlO II 16 

18% 12V, ASLFIpf 219 117 71 

16 lift A3NP 50 65 10 89 

35% 24ft AmStd 140 54 9 528 
67% 35ft AmStor 44 1.1 10 138 

78 46ft A5tr pf A 478 64 22 

57% 51 ASfrpfB *50 122 10 

24ft 17ft AT&T 170 SJ 1617133 
41ft 32ft AT&T Pf 344 92 212 

42 33ft AT&T of 374 92 126 


5 55ft SS H—14 
171 81% Bff% TOft + ft 
182 4 Ift 60% 60% — ft 
5 33ft 33% 33% — ft 
54 lift 11 II — ft 


16 15ft 16 + ft 

13ft 13V> 1316— ft 
29ft 28ft 28ft + ft 
54% 54 54 — ft 


22 68% 68ft 68% 


14ft AWatrs 150 37 
13ft 10 AWatPt 12S 95 
28% 17ft AmHotl 240 137 
72ft 60ft ATrPr 544 BJ 
18 6% ATrSc 

89ft 67ft AT rUn 5M 45 
40ft 26% Altwran 140 44 


S 55* 55ft 55ft— ft 
21ft 20ft 20%— ft 
212 37ft 39ft 39% 

17% 

2? 1SS ff 6 IFZ'Z 


21 82% 82% 83% 
4 Sift 36ft lift 


50 24% ArnesD 20 5 21 506 44ft 43% 44 +ft 
29% 21ft Ametek 50 14 12 230 22% 22 22ft + ft 


28% 18% Amfoc 
16 5 Amfesc 3 

69 50ft Amoco 3J0b 57 8 

37% 28ft AMP 72 24 23 
23ft 11% AmPCO JO 24 17 

23ft 12ft Amropf 11 

36 22ft AmStti 15 U I 

45ft 30 Amsted 140 37 16 

4ft ift Anacmp 
24% 16ft Afllog 21 

27ft 19ft Anchor 148 55 

44ft 30 AnOoy 172 37 31 

13% 9ft AndrGr 74 15 14 

27ft 17 Angelic 40 27 14 


45 26 25% 25% — ft 

3 99 5ft 5 5Vk + Vk 

370b 57 B 1370 64% 63% 44 
72 24 21 1239 3T% 30% 30% — % 
JO 24 17 228 12% 12ft 12ft— % 


228 12% 12ft 12ft— % 
40 20 20 20 — ft 


47 8 122 32ft 32ft 32ft— ft 

37 14 94 43ft 43ft 43ft— ft 

1«S 3 2ft 3 

21 33? 21 20ft 21 

55 210 25% 25% 25% + ft 

37 31 52 toft 41ft 41ft + ft 

15 16 140 13ft 13 13ft + ft 

27 14 247 26ft 25% 2* + ft 


34% 21% Aofwus s 50 26 12 1MB Jlft 31ft 31ft— % 
71ft 4ffft Anheu pf 340 55 281 M 45 45ft— Ift 

19% 13% Anlxtr 


Anthem 44 j 20 


14 19 146 17ft 


15% 10ft Anthrrv 44b 38 
12ft 9ft Anactie 78 25 
2 % ApchPwt 

19% 15ft ApchPutO.10 117 
74ft 57 ApPw Pl 8.12 114 
34% 29 ApPwpf 4.18 1X0 
31% 26ft ApPwaf 350 124 


46 17ft 17ft 17ft + ft 
89 13ft 13ft 13ft— % 


2o 15% 14ft 14ft— ft 

258 11 10ft 11 

103 1ft 1ft 1ft 
400 18ft 18ft 1B%— 1k 
200x71% 70ft 70ft— 1 
31 32% 32ft 32ft 

4 30% 30 30ft + ft 


ApIDta 1761 75 23 337 23% 23% 23% 


31 13% 131k ISft 


24ft 16ft ArChDn .1* .7 12 SSI 20% 19» 19ft— ft 

100 71 ArtPpI 943c 95 74«M0Q% 1 00% 100% +| 

30ft 25% ArIPpf 358 121 12 29ft 29ft 29ft 

102 00 ArlPpt KL7D 11J 500z 95 94% 95 

24ft 14 ArfcBst 40 15 9 128 23ft 22% 22ft— ft 

24ft IS Arklo 158 47 29 P444 22 l» 22 +1% 

ft 16 ArlnRt 284 ft ft — 

15% lift Armada 14 12 12 12 

12 4ft Armco 619 9ft Bft Mb— % 

JJVk 14ft ArmsRb 48 33 8 117 14ft 14% 14ft— % 

39ft 24ft ArmWin 1J0 45 I 2136 32ft 31ft 32ft— ft 

30 29% ArmWPt&TS 104 70x35% 35% 35% — 1 

34% 2116 AraCP 1-20 64 7 34 27ft 27% 27ft + ft 

2. 12ft ArowE 70 15 17 306 ISft 13ft 13ft 

30ft 14 Artra S3 S 142 SO 2«ft 34% 24% — M 

» 15 Arvlns 50 37 9 560 24% 24 24ft + ft 

27ft 17% Asareo 145 22ft 22% 22ft 

37 ZF* AshtOII 140 45 87 33ft 32ft 33ft 

45% 35 AOlllOpf 4.50 10-0 40 44ft 44% 44% + % 

44ft 34% AslllO Pf 2J6 9J 2 42ft 42ft 42ft 

34ft 24% ASUDGs 150 47 11 2S2 33ft 33 33 — ft 

24ft left a in lane 150 87 11 15 19ft 19ft 19ft— % 

29ft Tift AtCvEI 258 9.1 10 336 28ft 28% 28ft— % 

44% O All Rich 4X0 67 5573 60ft 59% 59*— % 

101 32% AtIRcPf 251a 25 10x101 101 Ml 

153 100ft AtIRCpf 250 1.9 2 143ft 143ft 143ft + % 


284 K fc_ 

14 12 12 12 

619 9% 8% Oft— ft 

117 14ft 14ft 14ft— % 
2136 32ft 31ft 32ft— ft 
70x35% 35% 35% —1 
34 27ft 27% 27ft + % 
306 ISft 13ft 13ft 
SO 24ft 24% 24% — % 
■>*0 24% 24 24ft + % 
145 22ft 22% 22ft 
87 33ft 32ft 33ft 
«) 44ft 44ft 44ft + ft 
2 42ft toft 42ft 


10 10% AtktsCp 

31 18ft Augat 50 15 23 
54ft 34% AutoDI 58 14 20 
5% 4ft Avalon n V 

31ft 17% AVEMC M 15 15 

39ft 28ft A very M l.V 13 

34% 10 AVMIn 13 

38ft 27 Avnef 50 15 24 

»k 17% Avon 240 84 11 

28ft 16% Aydln 20 


4X» 67 5573 60% 59% 59*— % 

251a 25 10x101 101 Ml 

250 1.9 2 143ft 143ft 143ft + % 

29 12ft 12% 121b— % 
50 15 23 129 23 22% 22ft— ft 
58 15 20 493x 49ft 49ft 49ft— ft 
9 89 S 5 5 

50 15 15 2 30ft 30% 30ft + ft 

50 1.9 13 329 32% 31% 31% + % 

13 149 24% 24% 24% 

50 15 24 1703 33ft 32ft 33% 

250 85 11 1774 23ft 23 23ft — % 

20 35 23% 23ft 23ft— ft 


IS* T* BMC .121 02 8ft 

35% 22% Balmco 50 25 10 20 24% 

19ft 15 Bknnn J2 57 14 1356 17% 

24ft 10% Baktor Si 15 75 73 22ft 

2% ft vlBatdU 394 2 

10 2 vIBIdUM 10 7% 

61% 35ft BallCp 154 25 13 42 57% 

30ft 17% BanCpM 2 2Sft 

ISft 11% BallyfM 70 17 714 17% 

11% 7ft BaflvPk 12 75 10ft 

m. 16ft BltCEs 170 0.1 lUNtn 
23% 15% BncOns 50 35 11 170 22 

10ft #ft BncCIrn 37b 29 J 9ft 

5ft 2ft Ban Tex 453 2ft 

62 44ft Bandog 170 2J II 64 53% 

55ft 34% SKBoa 250 4J 5 216 49% 

54% 44ft BkB ptA 4Jle 9.1 21 54ft 

47% 28ft BkNY 244 50 4 506 40ft 

33% 20% BanKVa 1.12 45 0 35 26 

»ft 13% BnkAm 50 5J 12448 M 


5 9ft 
4S3 2ft 
66 53% 
216 49% 
21 54ft 
506 40ft 
35 26 
12448 U 


4? 40 BkAm Pf 45lell5 4 42% 

16% 1» BkAm Pf 258 152 15% 

32% 26% BkARtv 250 &7 12 65 Z7ft 

75ft 47ft BonfcTr 270 47 6 1331 64ft 


27 21% BkTrpf 2J0 95 0 26 

43 35% BfcTrpf 472 95 2 44% 

13 8% Banner J33o 7 12 162 12ft 

3?% 19 Bard 56 15 14 271 34V 

25 19% BomOp 50 35 15 14 24 

41ft 25ft Borne ts 154 2J 10 574 37% 

32% 17 BaryWr 50 35 15 48 20ft 

13ft S BA5IX .T2b L5 9 372 OH 

35ft 22% Bouse* 78 27 16 660 28% 

16% lift BoxtTr 77 27 49 1483 14ft 

27% 20ft Boy Fin JO 5144 IS 25 


27% 20ft Bay Fin JO J 144 15 26 

34ft 24ft BayStG 250 85 9 14 32ft 

38ft 31% Bearing 1.00 XI 12 37 32% 

34% 26ft BeatCo 150 5J 711304 34ft 

64 48% BoalPt X38 5J 14 64 

16% 12% Decor M 35 59 91 14% 


58ft 35% BectnD U0 2J 14 1442 54% 


Bft 2ft Baker 441 2% 

II 3ft Bckorpf 591 14 4ft 

17ft 12% BOfdflH M 35 10 40 13ft 

37ft 22ft BdHwt 54 15 11 148 35ft 

37 22 BelHWDf 57 15 2 3Sft 

97 74ft B+UAtl 450 77 9 4909 09ft 

33 24 BCE S 278 70 30ft 

27 19ft Behind J2 15 19 21 23% 


44ft 30ft BtnSov 280 7.1 « 4720 toft 


57 41% BetoAH 50 17 21 410 46ft 

33ft 22ft Bemls 150 37 W 19 32ft 

45% 27ft BaftfCp 250 55 9 260 40% 
40 30ft Banefpf 4J0 117 11 37% 

40% 32% Benef Pf 450 117 20t 38% 

22ft 18 Benef Pf Z50 11.1 100*22% 

19% 17% Bonaqtn 1J0 75 298 17% 

6% 3% BenotB 571 ISO 5% 

9 3% Berkay 1 44 8 

IS 10% BOStPd 74 15 51 SCO 1Mb 

21% 14% Bemsit M 23 533 17% 

49% 37% BeftiSIPf 550 115 J 

24% 1Mb BethSlBf 250 115 . ..33 22% 

4Q% 28 Beverly JZ 3 1$ 1178 35 

20ft 19% BIbTTf 50 X5 17 122 B% 

24% 13% Btoefln 7S 44 17ft 

26% 17ft BlackO 54 35 15 38U 17ft 

36% 21% BtekHP 172 55 9 27 25 

29ft 14% Blairjn jai B7 19ft 

59ft 39ft BICkHR 250 4.1 13 IN 56% 

50% 33ft Boeing 9 156 2J 15 3« 47% 

51 34% BoteeC 1.90 47 19 723 45 

61 48 BobeCpf550 85 » 57 

32 18% BettBor .10 J 31 163 31% 

42% 28% Bordens 1-52 45 10 1426 37ft 

24% 19% BorOWa .92 45 >1 520 21 

9ft 4% Boimns 16 42 9% 

44% 28% BosEd X24 &3 a 321 39ft 
85 65 BOSE pf 858 115 100x81. 


16 42 9% 

8 321 39ft 
1008 81. 


6% 8W— % 
34V. 34ft— W 
17ft 17ft 
n 22 
1ft 1ft 
TVS 7ft— % 
56% 36% —1ft 
28ft 28ft— 1 
T7ft 17ft 
Wft 10ft + % 
20ft 20*— ft 
21% 22 
9ft 9ft— ft 
2% 2% 

53% 53% — ft 
49 49 — ft 

54% 54%—% 
40% 40% — % 
35% 25% — ft 
»» >3% -ft 
42ft 42% 

15% 15ft— % 
27% 27ft + % 
64 64 —1 

25% 2b + % 
44% 44% 

13% 12ft 

23* 23ft— % 

34ft 34%— 1% 

20% 20% + ft 
28% 28% + % 

25ft 2S* _ * 
32ft 32% + % 
32% 32% — ft 
33ft 34% + ft 
*3% 64 +1% 

14ft 14ft 
54 54% 

2ft 2ft— % 

13% 13% 

34ft 34ft— ft 

39% 39%— ft , 
46 46ft— ft 

31ft 31ft— ft 
40 4Q% + % | 

36ft 36ft— ft , 
38% 38% 

22% 22% +1 1 
17 17% 

5 S — % 
7ft 7%— % 
13% 13% 

17% 17% — % 
43% 43% 

21% 211b— % 
34ft 34ft— ft 
22ft 23 

17% 17ft— % ' 
17% 17% 

34ft 34ft— ft 
18ft 19%— % 
58 58% 

47% 47ft — ft 
44% 44ft— ft 
54% 57 
30% 31% + ft 
37ft 37ft + » 
SOW 20ft— ft 
9% 9W— ft 

38% 39 — ft 
■1 81 


Stocks Fall to a 2V>Month Low 


J6 15 15 101 Z5» 4 22% 22ft— ft 
13 328 14% 15% 14% + % 
10 10% 10ft l$ft- ft 
7S1 96 406 13% 13% 13% ... 

T 6013 42ft 41% 41ft— 1% 
L18 94 1559 23% 23 a% + % 


23% 23 ANRpf X67 117 J2 22* SS g*— £ 

61% 34% ASA 250 5J 288 38ft 37ft 38— ft 

Z7 12% AVX 72 25 >7 5 

28ft 18% AZP 272 117 7 34*4 24ft 2M4 23%— ft 

60 36ft AbfUib 1A0 25 16 1488 56 55ft S5ft— % 

25% 20 AccOWdS JO 23 14 36 2H4 21ft 2I%— ft 

24ft 121k AcmeC A0 19 4 H 1M6 % 

Mlk 7ft AcmeE J2b 4J 11 17 7% 7ft 7%— % 

19 15% Ada Ex 1J2FI1.1 41 17% J7% T7%— % 

20 13V, AdmMl .32 1-9 7 3* 17ft 17 17 

17% Bft Adv5yi J3f 47 18 170 12% MW 12ft 

40% 22ft AMD 15 4449 26ft 25£ ^4 + ft 

12% 6% Advert .12 1 A 19 224 8ft 8% «, 

15% 9% Aerflax 11 89 13ft 13% 13%—% 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Stocks skidded to a broad 
loss for the third consecutive session Thursday, 
pushing the Dow Jones industrial average to a 
2 ^-month low. 

Interest rate-sensitive finanaal issues came 
I under notable pressure. Airline, retail, auto and 
telephone stocks also retreated- 
The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials fell 
7 05 to 1 J12J9, its lowest lcvd since June 20. 
when it stood at 1,299.73. The average is off 
2330 points so far this weeL 
Losers swamped gainers by nearly 3-to-l on 
the New York Stock Exchange, whose compos- 
I ite index lost 0.86 to 10636. NYSE-listed issues 
hitting new 52-week lows outpaced those reach- 
ing new highs by 40- to- 19. 

Big Board volume totaled 107.07 nnuion 
shares, against 10038 million in the previous 
session. , , 

Futures-related “sell programs” by brokerage 
firms, a key contributor to Wednesday’s steep 
loss, initially abated Thursday but reappeared 


M-l Rises $1.4 Billion 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The nation’s basic money- 
supply measurement, M-l, rose $1:4 billion in 
late August, the Federal Reserve Board report- 
ed Thursday. The rise was above most analysts’ 


adjusted $609.8 billion in the week ended Sept. 
2 from S608.4 billion the previous week. M-l 


2 from $608.4 billion the previous week. M-l 
includes cash in circulation, deposits in check- 
ing accounts and nonbank trawler’s checks. 


also stressed that the programs are reacting to 
established nwHmt s en t im ent. 

‘'They tend to occur in the direction that the 

i . ■ -i : " n. m..L :a 


market is already moving,” Mr. Bloch said. 
“Tbe indicators these firms use are predicated 
on market strengths or weaknesses.” 

The market's underlying weakness reflects 


stepped-up selling by money managers and in- 
dmdual investors who are concerned about the 
outlook for the economy and corporate earn- 
ings, traders said. 

Wall Street is hoping to get a clearer picture 
of die economy on Fnday, when the govern- 
ment issues Angust data on retail sales, industri- 
al production and wholesale prices. 

But even if the reports are relatively positive, 
there is uncertainty as to whether tney can 
ignite a rebound in stodcs or merely provide a 
brief respite from the market’s downward trend, 
mainly because of fears that a strongg economy 
might send interest rates higher, analysts said. 


luiuiwumuiMii. — -w — xj 

to the indexes themselves. So the firms have 


IO me indexes uKiuscma. jv 

been buyin g the futures and selling the indexes’ 

underlying stocks to take advantage of the price 


^Regardless, “the market's inability to rally 
when there are no programs is just as revealing 
as the selling generated by the programs,” New- 


ton D. Zinder. senior vice president of EJF. 


garten. 


Chicago. 


12 Month 
Hfah Low Stock 


Ste. Ctoft 

Mv. YM. PE BUS H Low QuotOiVe 


T2 Month 
HWiLow Stock 


AHome 2J0 541 12 2363 58% 57ft 57ft— % 
AHmapf 200 J 5 259% 259ft 259ft — t5ft 

A Hasp 1.12 24 16 4130 47% 47 <7% + % 

Am rich 6M 7J 9 1009 90% 90% 90% 

AlnGrp M J 22 3286 84% 83ft B3%— ft 

AMI JJ 2LJ II 4143 23* 23% 23% — * 

AmMrt 1159 M 3 3% 

APmdS JO 27 4 414 18ft 18% 1B%— ft 
ASLFlO 11 16 4% 4% 4%— ft 

ASLFIpf 2.19 117 71 16 15ft 14 + ft 

AStUp JO 60 10 89 13ft 13% 13%— ft 


lift 9% 
14% 11 
25* 19ft 
31% 26 
66% 43ft 
32ft 21ft 
28ft 23 
5% 1ft 
28 16ft 
41 29ft 
25% 19ft 
37% 30% 
26ft 15 
32% 23ft 
56 33ft 
40ft 28% 
40ft 29 
19ft 15% 
20 15% 

71% 14% 
30% 24 
48ft 44* 
7% ift 
23ft 19% 
52 44ft 
18% 11 
64ft 50ft 
20ft 14 
4ft 1ft 
14ft 3ft 


BosEpr 

BasEpr 

Bowatr 

BrtoSt 

BrfrtM 

BrftPt 

BrtT2pp 

Brock 

Brrtcwy 

BkyUG 

BkUGpf 

BkUGpf 

BwnSh 

Bi-vwiGp 

BrwoF 

Brawk 

BrsfiWl 

Bundy 

BunkrH 

Burmo 

Burilnd 

BrINtti 

BriNOPf 

BrIMpf 

BriN pf 

Bumdv 

Burrah 

Butin n 

BtrfJas 

Birtrspt 


1.17 105 
1-46 109 
72 XI 9 
1-60 56 12 
1J8 22 14 
!J9a6J 7 
Jla 2J 


11% 10% 
13% 13% 
23 22* 

38ft 28 
58% 57ft 


132 4.9 23 
X12 79 8 
Z47 U 
3L9S 1L4 
JO .9 8 
iS 43 M 
1J» 22 17 
1.00 2J 3 
-53 1J 15 
JO 44 63 
2-16 117 

13 

1J4 6J 
1.40 23 9 
ss ao 
2.12 9.1 
533nl0J 
44 40 11 
7M 41 12 
-S3 33101 


36ft 25% 
1ft 1« 
37% 27 
39% 39ft 
25% 25% 

34 33% 

21ft 21ft 
32 31% 

51 49% 

35 34ft 
33ft 32ft 
17ft 17ft 
18ft 18% 
17% 17ft 
25% 28 
62ft 41ft 

6 * 6 % 
23% 23% 
50% 50% 
11% 11% 
64% 63% 
16ft 16% 
2 1% 
3ft 3ft 


11% + % 
13% — % 
22 *— % 
28% 

57% + % 
28* 4* % 
26% + ft 
Ift 
27% 

39ft 

25% + ft 
34 + ft 

21 % 

31ft— ft 
49*— % 
34%—% 
32ft + % 
17ft— % 
18ft + % 
17ft— % 
26% + ft 
41ft— ft 
6% 

23% 

50% 

lift— ft 
63% —1ft 
14% + % 
1% 

3% 


31% 20% CBI In 
125 48* CBS 

8ft 4ft CCX 


I AOa 6 J 
3J23 2j6 20 


198 Zl% aft 21ft + % 
936 118ft T14 117 + ft 


35ft 34ft 
24ft 12ft 
45* 11* 
39% 24ft 
20 15ft 
31 21ft 
15ft 12ft 
38 26ft 
47% 34ft 
50 39 

36 23 

47% 35% 
Bft 4* 
33% 19 
54% 31% 
56 32* 

31ft 15% 
25% 13% 
28% 14% 
asft 14% 
28% 14% 
30% 14ft 
18ft 9ft 

17 8% 
V 15 

18 9ft 

47ft 31ft 
10% 4% 
4ft ft 
4ft ft 
12 4% 

24% 19% 
38ft 21 


60ft 34ft CIGNA 240 4J 35 
32ft 24% CIGpf 275 9.0 
53ft 49% CIGpf 4.10 82 


54ft 53ft 53ft + 


53ft 49% CIGpf 
7% 2% CLC 
99% 26ft CNAFn 
lift 9% CNA1 
28% 16ft CNW 


31 30* 30% 30% + ft 
139 50 49% 49* 


139 w .j r. ,ii. 

1® 2% 2 7 — % 

302 54ft 53* 53% -1% 
» 11 % 11 11 — % 
S3 18ft 18ft 18ft + % 


46% 35ft CPC Int 2J0 5J 12 671 44ft 44% 44% 


- 56 23* 23% 23ft— ft 

_ 181 20% 2D* 20* + % 

US 47 9 4448 25 24ft 24ft— ft 
5 154% 154ft 154% + % 
32* 32ft 32ft 


394 110 8 7ft 7ft— % 

4.1 8 234 22ft 22 22%— ft 

15 1529 14% 15% 15%—% 
25 5 221 19ft 19 19% + % 

23 48ft 48ft 48ft— ft 
153 19 18% 18ft— % 


36 15ft CP Mil lto 6J3 9 
22ft 19ft CRIIMI 28% 93 
I 28% 21ft CSX 1.T* 47 9 4448 25 24 

148ft 130 CSXpf 7J» 45 

40% 21ft CTS 180 XI 

12ft 7ft C3 Inc 394 11 

33ft 23 CufaOt 82 4.1 8 234 22ft 22 

17ft 8ft Coospr 15 1209 14% 15 

25ft 12% Co I Fed At 25 5 221 19ft 19 
I 54% 35% ColFdPf 47S 98 
21 13ft Cdl*» -25b L4 

I 15* 12 Comm 1 .12 JIM 

26 15% CRLfcO A0 

6* 2ft CmpRs -lit 

40% 30% ComSu j 12 544 38ft 37 

15* lift CdPocs -48 
22% 14ft ConPES 80 
228* 150% CopCMs JO 20 515 210*207 
27ft 17 CopMda 77 17 8 1346 21% TO 

13ft io Carinas At 70 11 iff 

40% 29ft Canute 188 314 9 27 30ft 30 

26% 18 CnruFI to 1-9 M 104 21% n 

30ft 21ft CorPW 2-60 M.1 7 2718 26 25 

34ft 20% CorPpf 257 107 19x25% 25 

48 , 35% Car Tec 2.10 55 14 HM 30* 38 

11* 6* Carrol 57 18 10 126 7% 7 

24% 18 Carflrs 50 38 ■ 42 20 1» 

I 31 21ft CortHw 1-22 48 22 146 25ft 25 

46ft 22 CartWI 52 L5 12 123 36 35 

18ft 11 CascNO 130 77 7 29 15% 15 

14% 9% CartKk 
29 15% CrtICPf 188k 

15 12 CrtICPf -90 4 A 

39ft 2Bft CatrpT 50 1 J 23SS 35% 33 

27% 19ft Coca 74 XI 11 13 24* 24 


tfft 13* Uft 


399 22* 22% 22* 

153 2ft 2ft 2ft— % 
12 544 38ft 37ft 38 — % 
405 12% 12% 12%—% 

43x 20 19ft 19* + % 

20 515 210* 207ft 210* 42% 

37 I 1346 21% 20ft 20%—% 

TO 11 10ft 10% 

314 9 27 30ft 30% 30%— % 

1J M 104 21% 21 21%— ft 

0.1 7 7718 24 25* ISft— % 

19x 2S% 25 25 — % 

" " 38ft— Ift 

7 — % 

38 8 42 20 19% 19*— % 

4J 22 146 25ft 25ft 25* + % 

LS 12 123 36 35ft 35ft + % 

77 7 29 lift 15ft 15*— % 

464 12 lift lift— ft 

6 36 36 26 + ft 

291 14% 14 14 

1J 2355 35* 33* 33*— 1% 
XI 11 13 24* 24ft 24ft— % 


35* 26ft 
2ft * 
39 27ft 
41% 31 
20ft 14% 
27 15 

18% 8% 
27ft 17% 
15% 11 
48ft 30* 
toft 36% 
11 4ft 
39* 32 
52* 23 
63% 49% 
34 ISft 
70 40% 

44% 37% 
50% 43ft 
35% 22% 
33ft 15* 
88% 58% 
10% 8ft 

3«k 30% 
52% 33ft 


35* 
37* 
15 
22ft 
8% 
34ft 
lift 
47% 46ft 
47ft 46% 
18% 10ft 
37ft 34ft 


52% 52% 
23% 23% 
48 47% 

37ft 37ft 
44 45ft 
30ft 30% 
17% 17 
44ft 43ft 
10ft 10U 
34% 36% 


44% +1 
18% 

34%—% 


M 48 18 
20 18 
1-28 57 7 
12 

.180 18 
184 4 A 11 
17 


129* 68* cefansa 4A0 38 10 307 1M% 113* 113%— 1% 


44% 35* Cal ixi pf 4.50 106 


5 42ft 42* 42* 



7ft Canny n Me J 24 152 B% Bft 8* 


34ft ConM 238 5-7 9 
17 Cortex n J5 1.1 10 


4 to to 41* 41ft + % 
81 22* 22% 22ft— * 


IS* CenSaW 282 X4 7 2301 24% 23* 24 — ft 


31% 19% CanHud 236 1X6 


21% 16 CnllPS 1-44 BJ 10 733 19 18% IBft— % 


29* 20 CnLaEI 288 87 7 301 25% 25% 25%—% 

37 31 CLaEl pf 4.18 UJ 3 35 35 38 

13% 8 % CbMPw Ito 11.1 105 200 IZ% 12* 12* 

21% 13% CVtPS IJ0 M 6 43 20* 20% 20ft 


11% 2* CantrDf 
12ft 7% CntrvTl 60 67 t 
23* 17% Canvfll 248 1X6 I 
28* 15% Crt-t nnd Jo 28 11 
28% 16% OteSAIr 40 14 27 
25* 18ft Chraoln _S2 2J 
27ft 20% dirnl pf 1 JO 4J 


146 4* 4ft 4ft 

67 1 131 11% 11% 11% 

14 8 29 17% 17% 17ft 

28 11 803 24* 23* 23*— ft 

14 278085 28*27*21% + % 
2J 1099X22* 22% 22% 

6X25* 25% 25% — % 


54% 45* dim I pf 4J0 98 17x51% 51 51 — % 

9* B CtartSp 4058 15 744 1*8 8 — % 

* v JHJ K 3 105 3* 2ft 2ft— * 

Ift % vIOltwt 10 ft ft ft— % 

,4* J* vJU’rtPf 7 2ft 2ft 2ft 

M* 39% OWM Ut 73 5 981 53% S2 52%— 1ft 

S? K MS ”-2 2 47 47 47 + % 

54% 50 Orao Dl &45C12.0 1M 54% 54% 54% 

56ft 51 Oxjse pflH64el9J 12 53* S3* 53ft 

22ft 15* Chateau 72 3J 8 32 20% 20ft 2D% 

«* 24* Owned 1JJ U 13 17 31 30% 30%— % 

44% 2T* OrntTf 248 68 5 908 38% 37% 37*— 7 W 

44% 27% QiNYpf 187 4.9 1 38% 38ft -28%— % 

49 CftNY pf iJS7e 74 23 53% 53% S3%— % 

»* 32 ChMPk 1J4 34 10 31 36% 36% 36% + % 

»ft 31% QxnPn 2130 6.1 9 483 33* 32* 32ft— 1 

» 29% Qievrn 2xQ 65 9 3508 37% 36% 34*— % 

IM CWMIw 112 18 \35%13S%135% 

80% 53* OilMIpf Z7 62 62 42 

29ft 14ft ChVPnT J0« 1J 9 » 25% 2S% 25%— % 

11% 7% QlkFull J4t 24 273 130 8* 8% 8* + % 

5£4 28ft OtrteCf 48fJ 339 54* 53* 54— % 

13% 5% Christn 13 10* 10% 10* 

13ft 9ft Chrome 40 100 12 11* lift— % 

34 4416 Chrm pf 5 54% 54% 54* -61% 

25% Oirv*r 1J0 27 3 3791 37ft 34* 34ft— % 

77 44% QnJUb 2J4 3X 12 1468 70* 49* 70 — % 

63* 50% ChuOe pf 623 7J 2 61 40% 61 + % 

20% 12% Church* 44 25 13 1341 15% 15 15% + % 


M 30 9 
34 13 K 
74 1.9 16 
ZOO UJ 7 
748 12J 
1250 118 
SO 14 18 
1« 3J 38 
181 73 9 
1JD U 7 


1JM 27 17 
1-33 48 13 
140 4J 10 
148 1U 4 
9J2 124 
748 11J 
745 114 
275 104 
3-24 1X1 
XI3 1X2 
3.17 120 
275 107 
140 12J 
342 124 
440 125 
612 1X4 
1X68 134 
228 1IJ 
40 61 11 
44 33 
225 74 
176 107 
4X0 1X8 


27% 20% a learn 2J2 97 

57 36% ChlBelJ 3.17 64 

19ft 12* ClnGE 216 122 

39* 29 artGPf 675 124 

74* 57 anOPf 9J8 124 

61 43ft OnG pf 744 124 

99% 7* anG nl 1252 1X5 

26* 18ft anMfl 73 u 

37 26ft ardK 74 22 

31 20% ardtv .10 J 

30ft 15 Circus 


233 23% 22* 72 

3 49 toft toft— ft 

894 18 17ft 17ft— % 

lOOz 37 37 37 

301:72% 7Zft 72ft +1% 


41 100% 100V. 106% +1% 
72 16 25 132 20ft 19* 19*— ft 

74 22 12 354 33ft 33 % 

.10 J 12 132 21% 21% 2t%— % 

14 88 28% Z7ft W6- * 


ST* 33% atlorp 2J6 54 6 6483 43% 41ft 42ft— * 

1*5* 82% Cltep pfA9^H» 94 164 99 98 99 + % 

IS Si H!l l . nv ,1 - SOc 1 HR 7ft 7ft 7ft 

-**• f* aoWr 72 98 5 64 7% 7 7% + % 

*gj ■ 2°^?' ,- w S 29 171 21ft 21% 21* + ft 

??* ^ OarkE l.TO 34 32 285 30ft 30ft 30* + % 

J* . 9 ClayMm 13 46 14ft 14% 1f%— * 

” SvCT 1X0 5J 9 54 19 18% ]»— % 

21% 20% Ova Pf 200 94 36 20ft 20* 29* + ft 

*** Igi CtevEI , X52 1L3 6 Ttol 22ft 22% »*— ft 
->9% OvElpf 740 123 100Z 60 60 60 +1 

16* 8% Owvpk JOf 31 Id* 10* 18% — % 

17% 10 OvPkPt 1.11] 22 13 12% 13 + % 

™ M Clvpkpf J21 24 n* 11% lift— ft 

Si* »* a«rw 176 33 13 1153 41ft 40ft 41ft + ft 

** OlltlMn JOB J 19 54 23ft 23% 23*— % 

3» 25* OuettP 140 17 19 1949 37% 36* 37% + ft 

24% 16% Ouataf 1X0 63 1 23 23 » 

5% 12% Coartuii 40 32 14 117 17% I2ft 17* 

36ft 16* Caartls to 1J 11 404 31* 31* 31ft 

« 29 Crtlpf 1X3 34 6 SI SI 51 


J XI I 
1X0 3X ID 
14 

120 14 46 
140 58 7 
3 

.12 

232 9J I 
46 X5 9 
1.16 XI 15 
170 44 11 
X8 X5 12 
1 JO 57 M 
78 1J 21 
SO 39 
JO 61 17 
240 1D7 
40 14 14 
340 54 14 
150 94 
650 97 
260 XS I 
Pf 870 109 
Pf SJO in 
Pf 7X0 1X8 
Pf U9 1QJ 
Pf 1X3 113 
Pf S78 1QJ 
rd 270 ID 20 
246 1X1 7 

210 12J 
2J1 1 73 
235 1X5 
770 127 
40O4J 12 
70 8 11 


Six 14ft 
92 11% 
388 36ft 
79 8% 

83 9ft 
1812 35* 
U74 39* 
136 5% 

95 S* 
111 19% 
T743 39 
443 18 
200* 61 
sanre 
57 38ft 
2209 26ft 
362 34% 
1548 44% 
126 8ft 
419 39% 
17 34* 

17 32* 
6691 15* 

4501 75* 
4001 65* 
UIOz 65 
22 25* 
14 27% 

18 26ft 
2 26 

40 25* 
SO 28 

19 28 
17 32* 
26 33% 

115 

7 20ft 
S3 19* 
146 17ft 
17 31 
2164 16* 
2 37% 
460 20* 
26 9% 

300 35ft 
4633 106ft 
1157 87 
117 24% 
6V 5% 
1132 9ft 
1514 29ft 
126 19% 
329 56% 
47 27ft 
1235 3«* 
3544 35ft 
1250 42* 
63 13% 
1166 20 
M 19 
700 60* 


24% +% 
43ft— ft 
8ft+ % 
36ft— 1% 


15ft— ft 
75% — 1% 


75% —1% 
65% —1ft 
64% +1% 
25* 

2fft— % 


36 +* 

25ft + % 
27ft- % 
27ft— ft 


31ft + % 
33% + % 


19ft— % 
17% 

30 — % 
16* — % 


37% + % 
20* + % 

33% — 1% 
106% +1* 
■4% —3ft 
23ft— ft 
5% 

9%— % 
28*—* 
19 

56% + ft 
27%— ft 
35 —1 
34%.— % 


12*— M 
19ft— % 


35 = A 


4 36* 
2 46% 
ion 3i% 


!37CT 73% 
320S 72 
2 26% 
17 34% 
lta 75% 
2050 73* 
630 14 
3 16% 

9tt 24 
lQz 59 
106 14* 
12 39% 


36%— * 
46*— % 
30*— 1 
80 + % 
74 —I 
72 
26% 

34% + % 
75% — % 
73%—% 
15% — % 
16ft— % 
19 + % 

24 —I 
99 

14ft— % 
23ft— ft 


Si 4 Cocoa 286 4J 14 2216 48% 48 48% * % 


M* 10% Colaco 1702 18ft 18% 18% + % 

raj 25% Colemn 1J0 44 » 34 37% 27% 77V, ~ % 

28* 22ft CoWal ljfe 48 37 3007 36* 25*26% + % 

W* IS ColAlks 44 XS 8 1312 23% 23 23% 


16* 9 Col Foss 
*% 2S% QHPen Ito 47 


193 15* IS* 15ft 
99 29ft 29ft 29ft + % 


Col rind 250 4J ? * 458 61% 59ft 59% —1ft 


24% CofGas X18 93 
48 GofGSPf 548 118 
45% CoIGSPf 5.12 11J 
«* CafGspf 549el04 
33% CamOln XU 48 


M06 33* 33* 3J* — % 
18 50 50 SO 

5.45* 45% 45% — % 
■207 52* 51* 51*+ % 
131 44% 44 44 — ft 


29 EGG 48 U 18 
Igk EOKrt 1J6 8X 
23ft C 5VSt JO 18 13 
20 EouleP IM U I 
12 Ernes S4 X2 

3* East Air 12 

Ift EALvrtC 
% EALWtA 
7% EsAlrnf 2 3St 
8ft EAlr pfB 2J0k 
10 EAirpfC 
21* EOOiGF 1J0 517138 

Mto Eosrun ZOO 93 t 
41% EsKodl 220 XI 12 
47% Eaton lto 7* 7 
10% EcMIns 11 

30 Eckerd IJ4 27 13 
26% EdteBr 1X8 SB 13 
14% EDO 33 17 14 
22ft Edward BO XI 13 
20ft EPGdPf 233 M 
27ft CFG Pf US US 

26 EPGP f 


28 CnAEn 1-84 67 10 722 28% 27ft 27*— ft 

21* 1 Ccxndb JO 1.1 IB 734 19% 18% U*— % 

12* 15% CamMtl J6 11 15 16 H 17 17 


19ft El Toro JM6 B 14 
7ft EKST J6 AA 
Z% EiecA* 27 

19% EtCtSPC JB J 28 
11% EWn XB 5B 13 

3 Etednt 

65ft EmrsEI 2X0 38 13 
•ft BmRod Bf 1X7 W 
15% EmrvA to 28 14 
26% Emhart 1406 *9 9 
ISft EmpDS 186 84 7 

4 Emppf to J3 
7ft Emppf -91 1X0 

Entxc 

22% enolCP 82 38 J 
lift EnttBus J* 2B 13 


33 ft 8% Camdra 

24% CmwE 3X0 1X4 
15? I** CwEpI 180 11.1 
w* 14% Cwepf 2X0 1X9 
» 65 CwEpfB&to 9J 

76% 57 CwC Pf Ut I1J 
24% 18% CwEpI 2J7 9B 
26* 31% C»Epf 2B7 108 


30ft 20% ComES la 92 


86 11 15 16 17 17 17 

6 2468 Bft i% 8ft 
3X0 1X4 7 7640 29ft 28ft 28*— 1 

180 11.1 108 17% I Aft 17% + % 

240 1X9 5 18% 18% 18* 

M0 M 50002 a 88 88 

838 118 40Qr 71* 71% 71*— 1 

237 9B 1 24% 21% 24%—% 

287 1X8 5 26* 26% 26* 

la 92 6 544 28ft 27% 27% —1% 


38ft 22ft CoflHOt 1J0 24 10 531 33% 32% 33 + % 
36 « 23% CPsye at IX 20 ZV48 27ft 26ft 27% f % 


17* Eraordi 1X0 72196 
98ft EmctlPflDJS MJ 
17ft EnSEXn xoe 20 


492 36ft 35% % 

23 15* 15ft 15ft 

ssirikiss-* 

«a « w w 

IS ?* ?8 * 

13 20* 20ft aw.— % 

67 22* 22% a %— * 
81 29% 38% mi— % 
583 2Bk S2ft 22% + % 
Z53 «* « 27, — * 

^5 gg%St=J 

rm a* 27% 2«— * 
17 32 31% 31%—% 

137 17 16% 16* 

799 27% 26 26 —1% 

2 24 24 24 — * 

3 28 Z7* 27*— % 

1 28% 28% 28% + % 

S4S IS* W* 1ft— * 
21 7ft 7ft 7ft 
37 4* 4ft <*— ft 

4 28* 28% 28%— % 
45 14% 13* 13%—% 

326 3% 3 3 

745 70% 69% 69ft— ft 
672 9% 8* % 

362 IflW 17* 18% + % 
98 28* 31% 23*— ft 
872 21ft 21 » — % 

240* Sft S » + % 
3081 9% 9% 9% + % 

5145 % * 

534 23% 22% 22% + % 
257 18ft 18 18 

2TS4 23% 22% 22* + % 
non cn in in — * 

132 20% 19% 20 — ft 


Htekltoi Slot* 


Ste. CkM . 

Dte.YkLPE WOsHtetlLaw QucLOiW 


fiMAolh 
High Low Sted. 


Stk • Am 

PhfcYIXPE Utah Low OtotCWl 


Fed said that M-l rose to a seasonally 


19* 15% 
21ft 17ft 
35 19% 

6% 2* 
5% T2% 
30ft 25* 
5D% 31% 
T7 9% 
Mft 18% 
34% 12ft 
30% 18% 
23ft 15 
30% 15* 
25* 12% 
4 1 % 

9* 2% 

to* 32* 
17% 14 
Jf% 41 


21 MS 3ft 2% 2ft— ft 

35 12 11% 11*— K 

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1JA 73 11 131 19 18% 18* + % 

1.14 38 t5 54 30% 29ft 29ft — 1% 

66 4 3ft 39k— % 


ttft 65 HollyS 
20ft 10% HwneD 




27% 15* HmFSD 


77 m 12* 12% J2% — * 
S 187S 19% 1»6 W6 + * 


9* 7 HmoGpfl.10 I1X » mw aSfa— % 

28% 28% Hmrffct JD B 49 tit 2^2 W* * 

18 10 HrrotFh AO 38 4 B0 IWk 13% ^ 

63% 46% Hondo toe 3 9 3W W* g” 

47% 53% Honwnll 2X0 3J 13 268S «% gW fflS »» 

35 2D% H ran Bn 1.12 3X11 33% 3^ 3»4— 1 

■ 6% 8* Harbttt 199 5ft » » ♦ ™ 


X31 11X 6 2D* 20% 20ft — ft 

3 29* 29* »%— ft 
173 M I 87 45% 44% **%— ft 

.16 U 9 119 13* 13% 13* + % 

JO Z4 13 209 12% 12 12% + % 

M 20 13 8 21% 21% 21% , 

BOb 27 17 36 30% 29ft 79% — % 

I 1 30% 38% 30% 

.72 38 23 93 10% 18% 18% 


■ 6% . Tft Hainan , i, „ dS .3 iS JSLZ % 

32% 36% HCA XO IJ 12 29H 4gJ 46% 44ft ft 

30ft 25 Hera In 2x0 x? M lto. «% » »%— » 

42* 28ft HauahM -96 24 14 W 3ffl 37% % 

19% 13%. HOUR* -68 15 11 170 13* g* 

.39% 28* Hourtnt 181 5J 8 ^ 55 


to 2X 14 44723*23*23%+% 
34 1* Ift 1* 

« 5 2% 2ft J%— % 

182 4J 11 214 42 41* «*— % 

IBAellJ 63 16* 16* 16ft— % 
Xto 6A 8 J7J9 toft 51ft 51%— ft 


58% 45* Homtpf X50 48 1 »% »*— > 

81% 67 Hointpf 635 XI M 77% 77. 77 — % 

19ft Haulnd 2X4 1QJ 6 3*33 26% 36 M — 1 

8 HauOR 1J8B16J _ If 10 ,Sxn 



230 14 35 
186 OS 7 
30 79 72 


30 XI . 
3X0 1X9 
.IB L5 9 
JO IX 21 
X0 4.1 12 
7 

to 48 9 
JO 24 19 
M J | 
1B4 4 A 10 
29 

1A4C4J 
1J2 44 10 
to J 
70 U | 
L20 24 
231 &2 



1 24 17% KusflSp 

44% — .% 34% 21% Humm 

S%_ % 31* 20* HuntMf 

% 41* 2&ft HuttEF 

lSi + % 31ft- If Hydra 

9ft + ft ■ 


. h£oS itoaiS ' ”14 10 « ,W6 

22% 14* HowtCp to 24 » 

27* 22 HuBUrd 2J8 93 11 53 24% 2» + W 

13% 9% KfhV 40 4.1 11 « W «* 9% 

17% 12% HtlflhTf 49 3J »46- M% U 13 — % 

24 17% KusflSp J2 1 J 12 61 21* 2Tft— ft 

Human At 23 14 Uto IPf, »% g*— * 

HuntMf to IB 17 22 28* » S 

HuttEF JO 24 9 1521 34 

Hydra 2X0 6B W 17 29% 29 29% + % 


lto 67 M 
JO +5 15 


Xto 45 a 
130 44 15 
1X0 X7 13 
X51 

XO 1X7 
43S617J 


28 +Z% 

11 * + % 

ar%— ft 

14% 

17*— % 

ia 

8%—% 

4ft 

42 — % 
46*— ft 
33*—% 
34*— ft 
19% — % 
17ft— % 
49*— ft 
28% +% 
23ft— ft 
17ft— * 


23% IClnd 144 44 
15 1CMR to# ax 
s%tcn 

14ft tNAIfl 182 11.1 
23 ipnmn 142* sj 

14% iRTPra lto 9J 


144 44 U 512 33 
to# 3X to 15ft 
63 205 9ft 

182 11.1 26 17% 

1426 58 33 34% 

lto 98 7 45 16* 


25ft ITT CP 1X0 3X 10 3937 W4t 


47* ITTptK 4X0 64 
>48% ITT PTO 5X0 XI 
32ft -ITT ptff 225 52 
49% (TTpfl 4 to 69 
IV* tu lrt» X0 4J 
16* IdohaPa U2 XI 
9% ictecdB 


1 42ft 
28 62 

2 43 
9 t5 

2B0 12ft 
309 23ft 
127 9* 


19* lltPowr 2X4 118 4 1B42 23% 


to O 14 
At 23 9 
1X0 45 7 
1X0 U 14 
1X0 Z6 12 
7J2 XT 
M 02 11 

554al3J 

5J3BI4B 

8 

XS) 28 8 
X12 SX 8 
2to 53 7 
237 B2 
34 73 9 
20 


Dlv. YM. PE WOsHlgti Low OuctChtee 


24ft— % 
23*— * 
13% + % 
37% +1 
17% 

30%— % 

14 + % 
32ft— I 
43ft— %■ 
48 —ft 
30*— * 
39ft— % 

7ft— % 
S3 +1 
51% + ft 
53%—% 
28% — % 
24*— % 
25% 

36% — * 
36 — % 
25% 

17ft— ft 

15 + ft 
36ft 

16ft + ft 
41ft + ft 
7ft 

tit 

ii*— % 
23 — ft 
22ft— ft 


2X2 95 
2X0 73 15 
to 16 10- 
1-30 XB 10 
1X0 32 
X5e 4 
132 38 |- 
44 2J 9 
1X0 26 13 
141 1X3 
.16 4 20; 

17 

.160 4 13 
X14 85 8 
40 24 14 


44 24 17 
to 24 
220 43 II 
240 54 3 
136 KL8 
1B4 24 17 
44 13 II 
48 54 12 
1X4 +1 73 
16 

too 23 


2.510158 5 
40 XI 13 

xa 25 20 

20 J 5 
ZOO 73 
40 14 8 


27% — % 
27 — * 

5ft— ft 
5ft 

35ft— % 
5ft 

19 —ft 
24 —ft 
35%—' 1* 
31*— ft 
36 —ft 
21ft— ft 
12 —ft 
39ft— ft 
38 —1% 
7ft— % 
23*— ft 
55% — % 
47ft— % 
29 —ft 
Bft— ft 
30* + * 
8* + ft 
27ft— * 
27*— ft 
24ft— ft 
34% +% 
30ft— ft 
11* 

3S 

19ft— ft 
37% — % 
13% + % 
36ft 

29 — % 
40 — % 
23*— ft 
16% — % 
5% — ft 
18% — ft 
15ft— ft 
51ft— %r 
44% — % 
13ft + ft 
77 

TTft— ft 
12ft— ft 
25*— ft 
25* 

If* + ft 
11%—% 
10 

17% + ft 
24%—* 


IS UPowpf X13 113 180X 18% 

27 UPowpf 178 112 ISM 3 ®* 

37 llpowpf 4.14c 9J 8 44* 

31% llPowpf 447 114 50fe39 

28* ItPWtfpf 4X0 VU 2 toft 

26 ITW- JZ 24 12 -39. 29* 

31ft ImpChm 2.13a 6A 7 1114 35% 

6* ImrtCp 11 377 Bft 

9% -INCO -. 30 145 1921 13ft 

49% IrxHMpf 726 1 13 JOOOt 66% 
91% incHMpniXO 1X0 2QiM» 

14* IndlMpf 115 12X II- 17ft 

T5% (ndlMpf 725 UJ J.jW 

744, IndlMpf 343 1X8 50 28% 

19* IndlGts 2X4 X7 7 341 23* 

4% Inaxcn X71 75 5ft 

39 IngorR X60 XI 17 120 51% 

28 1 no Rdl 2JS tS 8 36ft 

11 ■ 4noTToc 54 17 20 ■ .36 to* 
19* InldStl to 2X 2160 25* 


32%—'% 
15%— ft 
9%—% 

17% 

24* 

16* 

3St=# 

S=t 

Sft-* 

21ft— ft 
9%— % 
23* — % 
18% — % 
33% — % 
44ft— ft 


1921 13ft 
3000X 66% 
20x100 

13 17ft 

a. if* 

50 28% 
241 23* 
75 5ft 


34 — Vt 
29* +.% 
3S* + ft 
Oft— ft 
13% — % 
66 % — % 
100 +lft 
17*- ' 

mi + v, 

28* + ft 
23* + % 
5* . 
50 %—% 
34 

14% + ft 
34%—% 





2m— % | 

29ft + ft 


38H inldStpt *75 98 - 7 .49 

16* I ratal 1X00 X7 18 351 1«* 

Vt, insPRs 100 5* 

11* irrfsRic 0 151 17% 

19 IntgRpf 3X3 1X1 T25% 

42 InfoRpt 631*1X7 1 44 

25% IntaRpf 435 133 54 32 

7%- lottos n 40 a* 

8‘ IntRFs 66.9% 

16% i tens* . XlOallJ 32 19* 

to* Infarcp JX 8 48 13 .6277 70% 
9* lotrtst 40 5X 4 854 11 
41 fntrtk 2X0 S3 7 21 45* 

Bft lidiMd 106* 11% 

15ft IntAhi JZ 4B * MO 18% 
1U IBM 440 XS 1313875 MB* 
16* IntCth to IX 9 to 25 

toft lotFtav 1.12 37 17 345. 39ft 
6ft intHarv 1317 |% 

3ft MtHrWt 169 5% 

28* IrttH PfC ■> 14 .52 

34 IrtMta 2X0 63 9 311 40% 
24% IrrtMuM 1 36 52 11 83 3S% 

47* IntPopr- 240 56 » 1351 «U 
9% IntRci SS6 134 T1% 

35* Inf Krill 248 S3 10 531 43% 

130* [nmtpUO50 68 1 152 

30* lotpbGp 1X8 23 13 70 38 

13% IntBoicr . ' 13 159 19* 

16* IrrtrtPw 1 JO 97 8 53 20ft 

17% InPwpr X28 11.1 100* 20* 

Mft intSacn 11 30 IS* 

15* lowaEi lto 1X1 9 1193 19* 
24% lowllG 274 85 7 ■ 348 30ft 
17ft lawfllpf 2J1 10X 301001 21% 

36%. lawuRs 3X8 93 9 279 33% 

29% IPOtca 3X4 9.1 B 310 34* 

9% IparCp J4 19 U 35 12 
77 IrvBnk lto 5L6 7 144 36. . 


17%—% 
4ft — 'ft 
IT* 

25ft + ft 
46 + % 

32 

■ft— % 

l^+'ft 
48ft— Ift 
M%— ft 
44ft— ft 
lift - 
18ft . 
126%-* 
24% +ft 
29ft + ft' 
Ift- • 
5ft . 
51*—% 
40% +ft 


' a - . 

Cbogord & Cla &A-. 0, rua da Vayrrat- Ganfcm BZ2 82 171 


lon^iui 


12 Month . : ■ 
-Wgh Low Stork 


. 5J^' _ -- • • Qgsar * ' 

mv ^ad- PE WkHMlLow QB0tt»P» 


sfu_ M 11%. -2ft MGMuwf . ..- - US-i-t*. 

JU+P ■% 7% MLConVU *i2S: 4 ii Ml 

to5_1v! lift U* ML Inert • :- -140 1T% lift lift " 

22% 14 MBUl J8t • 4- 13% 13% 13% — % 

* * Ntoonra - JJ -U W M8| - toft' : 3D , 3»- % 


1 15B 
13 70 31 

13 159 19* 
■ 53 28ft 

Uttz 20* 

11 30 18ft 


J«=5 'ssS-'aiBM-i-.™?" 


C«* 




30100C 21% 
9 279 33% 
B 310 34* 
13 35 12 

7 144 36 


19ft— % 
20* 4 
10ft + ft 
18ft— % 

sa+% 

st=.t 

a=ai 


29ft 14ft Marc 9 J6 3 70 2475 24 22* 236— * 

a% 36ft MfrHon 330 » 4 .2488 36%, 35ft 1ft 

56* 44* MfrHPf XOalU UK S4‘ S?-+;W 

52* 41 MfrtfPf 5J261TX + V. 

5ft VfManvT -'. 2 914 5%, :g>- % 

& V2» • 3-ilb 

■4ft— % 


2 * 

38* JSft 

am Wi 


35% + ft 
1ft + % 

36 

37% + % 
15ft + ft 
22ft— ft 
■% + ft 
7440 

lift + ft 
47 —ft 
46ft— 1 
10 * 

37 — % 
46% — ft 
52% + % 
23*— ft 
67ft— % 
37ft— ft 

30% - % 


21 OAF B ill 1116 
27% GATX 130 XI 13 281 

12ft GCA IB 412 

54 GEICO 1X0 X5 10 80 

3* GEO 246 

5ft GF Cp 31 

38% GTE Hi U 7 2360 

19ft GTE Pf 2X8 1X6 11 

3 GolKou 85 

41* Gannett lto 16 19 1MB 

» Geo Inc to IX 25 250 

Bft Goortrt 301 27 128 

13* Geko to 25 12 158 

9% Garni 1C 259 

io Gam 1 1 1 too 16 129 


31% GoConr l_50b 13 49 722 


14% GAInv 1X36 93 
31% GtiBcrti 1X0 U 11 


22* GCUim * to 1 J 10 275 


17* + ft 
44ft +1 


22 GCnpfs to 
10% GftDofu 
12* GnDevn 
2ft Gnoovwt 


S2s:+?5 

13% 13% 

%ft 46*-* 

s X'—'* 

38ft 38%—% 
23% 23* 

ri=: 

ii* lift— % 

mt i7ft— % 


Skjfe to 13 

a«* i* aSfZrr .w j u «2 2B* i?ft S%— % j® ■A'at.-lS SS 2 


33ft'MorMlid lto 58 -J m vr 31 

46ft MatlM.. 2to 33 J* ' 442 48% 67 


SS 10% ssr itoeuj iS Wft im ,Sft-% M *' *« « g 

47* 32* JotfPll 152, 33 7 3673 47ft *5* 47ft +1% M2l!5t r 'S, ml M 

31* 24% JcrCpf 4X0 125 21- . M J* MoryK ;C «« W 

as 49 JcrCpf . 7to 1X6 10X62* 62* 63* — ft M. M tnC O to Jf'”. 2 ”’ ^1% 

18% 14 JcrCpf X18 1X2 18 vm TO 17% + ft JJSSS ' ' 3 “. U : ™ 

12% 6% Jowtcr - 16 81 11 . Wft lWh— ft. . T 

49ft 30% Jotaun I JO 28 15 1436 46% 45% iSC + ft SS S -{6221 J1 22? 

46% 38% JotalCn 1 J6o 45 9 64 41ft 41% 41* + ft HS 4 a 55 

50% 50% JhnCpf 435 84 -4. 50% 90% S8% - ’ «% ,5? 515 

27% 21ft Jurgen 1X0 4.1 18 67 a4%.S* toft— ft TJft. ’ Y. J 81, £ 


44% 38% Johncn 1J6 o45 9 

50% SO* JhflCpf 435 14 

27% 21ft Jorsen 1X0 +1 18 


am-17% jsafms jo ax 13 <31 24 %-2Mt g% 
27* 22% JoyAMP lto 38 15 162 24 23% Bft 


74% 75% —2* 
99% 59% — ft 
84% Mft— 3* 
Aft 6ft 
5* 5* 

16* 16*— % 
10 TO 
U 15 

Sfft 57 — •% j 


GrtOvn 1X0 1J 8 1137 
GonEI 230 33 12 4812 


GnFdi 250 25 1] 4070 


16*—% 
11%— % 
24* 

8%— ft 


5% GGthn XOdfJ 243 

5* GftHma 8 43 

11% GHaatS JO 1J 3 310 
8* GfiHous 34 24 23 

14% Gtilnrt JS 1-7 403 

<7% GfiMflU 224 35 352 

65% GMal 5X0 r 7 A 6 4675 

16*GMES XS .1 648 

35 GMotPt 275 93 1 

46 GMatPf 3X0 93 _ 13 


38% + ft 
Sft— ft 
• — % 
19 + ft 

38*— * 
17% — % 
61 —1 


KDI . 34 XB 18 268 
KLMs 31a 25 7 47» 
KMIpf 4to 1X8 1 

Kmart lto 44 10 4327 
KW Eng lto. 4J 17 -4M 


67% 67% 
Bft 37ft — 


S3* 54ft + % 
4ft 5 + ft 


3ft Gf4C .16 33 17 130 _ . 

9 GPU 7 U>1* >3% 13* 13ft— % 

57 G«lRa lto 15129 536 82 81 II — 1. 


14% 6 GnRnfr 7 55 9ft 9ft Wfc + % 

53* 40* GnSigni Ito A1 II 1153 to% 43* + % 

7* 3* Germ 127 3* 3* 3% 

24% lift GfiRod .10 5 61 205 IK* 11* lift— % 
26% 17ft Ganrt g 138 5A 39 H* Sft 2Z* 

36 38ft G*nu PI 1.11 U 13 546 3T% 30% 31 + ft 

27ft 20 GaPoe JO 3J 28 1470 22% 21* 27* — % 


37ft 33% GOPCM 2L24 63 
37 33 GcPpfB 234 44 


26* 24* Gapwpf 3X8 1X1 75 

X 25% GaPwpf 2J0» M 9 

30% M% GCPWPT3X4 1X9 44 

25ft GnPwpf 3J6 1X1 24 

18 GoPwpf 2to UJ 27 
17* GoPwpf X5Q 12.1 IB 

21% GcPWPf 2J5 11.1 4 

54 GoPwpf 7 JO 12X 10a 

53 GoPwpf 7J2 1X3 10X 

20* GcrbPd 132 43 12 187 
73*6 Garttfc .TS 3 II 30 


13* Getty 6 
B* GIANT 
7ft GfUrFn 
17% GfffHW 


4S 36ft 36ft 36ft— * 
7 35 33 35 + % 

25 25 24% 24% — % 

9 J6N to* 36*— % 
44 26% 26% 26%+ ft 
24 28% 28% 28* 

27 Z7% 27% JHfc 

78 20% 20* 20% 

6 24% 24% 24% 

10QZ 65 *5 65 

— 63 43 43 +% 

30* 31 + % 

15* JJ* 

34ft 24% 

18ft 18ft 
7ft 7ft— ft 


4S% Gillette 2X0 4J 17 455 


21 21% + % 
59% 60 — % 
12ft 13_ + % 
11% lift— ft 
1% 1ft— ft 

4 6ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 
2%' 2% 

JQ% 31ft— 1% 
31ft lift— ft 
27ft 27%— ft 

15ft 15ft ^ 

36% 27 + ft 

61% 41ft + % 

urranrs top u IX J a ai a ttf* 29% + « 

9* GIA^I XB2J 8 1W „ 

1A| GtAIPC 7 4S4 15% Wfc 15H + Vo 

5% GtLkln lto l» 11 3 S[% 57% 57% - % 

15 GNim 1B5elU to 16% i«J 1«— % 

31% GtNNk . IB « II 306 3%* 3g6— % 

19* GtWFIn 1X0 4J B 4X 2rtA 34% 2g(— % 

13 GMP 7-72 9X 9 74 IB* te 15**“ S 

23% Green T 7 331 27% 24* 27 — ft 

m GmS U* " w *“ S 22? Si-ff 

37* Grevti pf 4J5 W3 _ “ 

2% Grnlicr , 9 66 5% 5* 5* 

9 30 33 U 40 mi 10 !0 

6% GnACI -08 X 15 211 9ft 9* 94k— ft 


lift GfooiC 
7 GfenFd 
1* GloWM 
5ft G*ot > Mat 
B* GfdNug 
7% GldNwt 
14 GkJWF 


toa A 5 U4 

.721 505 

I is » 

19 291 

170 

JO X 4 497 


lj% 11% - 

1% lft- 


24% Gdrtch lto SB 174 

24% Gooetyr 1X0 59 I .1660 

14% GordnJ S M 19 89 

19 Gould XB 2S 2H2 

38* Groce 2J0 &J 12 OB 

26ft Graagrs XB 13 12 

9% GiAFrt to 2B 8 


Kafir AJ .151 2739 

KateCa to U 26 
KrtCM TJ7- 82 ■ g 

Kanet) A0 48 3» 

KCfVPL 236 122 4 <782 
KCPLPT4J5 t2X BOX 
KCPLpf 4X0 125 ■ Ittt 
KCPLpf 2J0 127 24 

KCPLpf 233 T2J 11 
KCSau lto XS 9 453 
KanGE X36 198 414143 
KanPLt lto X5 8 196 
KaPLpf 2J2 103 . 4 

KaPLpC 233 1X4 12 

Kotyla 92 

KatYpf 1X6 39 • 3 

KaufBr AO 71 4 114 

Kauf pf 1X0 . *B • » 
Kaufpf 8J5 HL7 1 . 

Kalian 1B4 -33 15 655 

Kellwtf 130 33 7 204 

Kanol • ‘ ' 479 

Keren} JO 3* 14 165 
Kyum 244 98-9 25B 
Karroi to *0 TO 
KerGpf 7 JO U _ 3 

KerrMc 1-W 57 TO 273. 
Ktyop lto 43- 0 370 
KavCan . ■- .. M 
Key lots to 24 18 » 

KkXtt TJD 15 9 269 

Ktmua 2J2 XI n 483 

KnghtRd J6 23. 14 430 

Knego W 42 

KOO OT X58 -» 49 415 

KoW 32 18 47 126 
Keporg to 48 .352 

KopprpfTOXe 1X4 2 

Karoo - J3a 41 264 

Kroger 2X0 4J ii 570 
Kooofa JIB tj 32 ■ i 
KuMms A0 10 15- 47 

KVOC6T 33* 1-1 16 56 

Kysor to 45 7 88 


«% £35 + w *% * • ii ^ 

SS 3£tF j « SS 

•SS=a ■ as 

. SS SSSJ '»il> ' ™ SS 

■■ - ■ . - -I mvc 42% Mam , 2J0 iO n 78 56* 

.1 • -I 31* 21 -.MeDrpt Zto 9X . to 23% 

B* .2*— ft ‘tern 2» MCDTPf 2X0 »J 263 24* 
17* T7%— ft 31.' J9% McOOtl . lto 9J , 18£ 19% 

41ft 41*^— H . im, S.SSri"t --• •• V 489 3% 

21* nft^U -Mft M-.IIKDM 30 23 13 - 3 9% 

Mft 3B5 + % 73 48ft MCDnW to IX 14 3400 86% 
76% IM- % -V 63% McDnO " L84 “2J _ 8 599 75 
TSft.lS H - JTHMcGtH 1XO 33 15 SB 43ft 


68*+.% 
34 — -* 
13% 

31 — « 
14 -eft 

«*— ft 

29ft—* 

11% 

5I%— 'ft 
Mft — ft 

?0ft 


Mft — ft 
10ft — % 

**! 
n*.— 
?«V + ft 




79% • 19% —1% I J8 ■ fft Ajri-ean. 

Mft. ML— ^ nu- TOkMcLAOWt^ 


3ft— % 
•ft +.* 
65ft— ft 
74ft—* 
43ft— ft 
29ft —ift 
4«8— % 

in + % 


^Wt 


■.««=* 
54% 56% —1*1 
if% ii *— a 


29% 22ft MctM ' 1J0 4J A 23% 

44% 32ft Maad lto SB 10 • 113 40* 

24% 15ft Maarux 34 LI 13 2W 22% 

J9ft 25ft Mtdfra to 23 (3 882 33ft 

56ft- 37* Malian 16* S.1 8 3*8 52* 


85- — %J 30ft *4- .Ma lion pf 280 .98. 


23ft— ft 
40ft— % 
22ft — ft 
35ft— ft 
52H-* 


28ft + ft 
*3% +;=* 


32* '22% +. ft . 48* 35% MefWfll 1X4 33 IX 1688 43* 43 Oft +,% 

21* 27*— % 70 -51* MareSt lto XI 10 « 61% 61* 41ft 

Mft Mft— ft 117% -79% Man* lto 29 ft 1444 112ft 111% 112 —-ft 

17ft 37%—% «8--47ftM«dBl 1XO IX M : .134 64* M 44ft ‘ . 

M* 14*—* 36% 25* MarU-n 30 73 W 6614 30* 28ft 29*— 1 

35% 73% - 3* 1ft MeaoOf '381 2* 2% 2ft 

01* 81* ' to- ' 13ft MasaPf 7 1842 17ft 16ft- Mft — ft 

58* 58*—% 35 , 28% MtaaR lBBaSJ 11 35ft .35 35% +2 

37% 37%— ft 7% 5* M nob JBelU 7 TO 6* CTA Sft-^ft 

. ft. . . 4ft 2* Mertek 52 4 3ft 4 + * 

21% 27ft — ft 67* Sll.MtEjAl X12 1X8 Ste 65 65 46 — 1.. 

27ft 27% — ft -3% 2 ManFd J3el43 .2% 2% 2ft 2ft.'.I, ' . 

n 11%—* l»fc w MchER 1X0 X4 11 10 16ft 16ft 18ft „■ 

18% 18ft— % 7ft 4* MkdUby X6 IX 30 4% 4ft 4ft—* 

29ft. 29ft— % SS* 37 Midapn X34 4B 9 8515 58ft 47% 49ft— 1 

28ft Mft- % »* ‘ go 4«dSUf ; 1 12090 -9% 8% Bft- * 

3 3 ??%, }5ft MldFos L00 6J 94 16% 16 16 — * 


BSsnVaic* 


? 


2*ft Mft— ft 
I 3 

U- M — % 

33% 34 

iflu 80% * 

35M 35ft- H Wft 2m MlnPL ' 138 79 0 540 35% 34* 34ft-l * 
17 17 —.ft SftMJanlOt.. ■- 74 5% SM Sft— ft 

■V -27* + ft I. 4ft MfW . .277 7% 7ft 7ft— % 

T7 17 - - 34* 25* MoMt ' ■ U0 ‘ TS -10 6667 29ft .29 • 29% + ft 

17 17 — ft 2% * vIMrtlJH . -2 ft ft TS 

7S% 95% B*. 5%'ModCot 11 17. 6% 6% 6ft— % „ 

12% 12ft 33% 17ft.Mdhcaa . to IB .11 780 Z7* 27ft 27%—%/ 

42% 42%—* ,i«. nj.MomtD* ;• 742 i* i% ^rv?T vT- 

2V*-.2f*— * 53ft TSft MonCo 1X51 11 - 140 50% 49% 50 +V 

19% W%— ft 14% Moaxh to SJ 23 27 15% 15% 15% r . 

9% 29%— ft » 40ft Maroon 2J6 53 11 32*9 48% 47% Wk +1% 

19ft 19% + % 30ft TMA «MQPW 2X0 SJ 12 797 79% 29* SS- ft 

' - — m ’Si M . . * -W !«*• imo^.% 


20ft 15% NUtfRos 7X0 63 
33% 23ft MWE : 236 9X 
15ft 10% Ml riTl R X4 . 4X 
Ot ■ 73% MMM . 3J8 46. 
39% 27% MlnPL 236 78 
11% 5% Mtenlns .. 

■ . 4% BMW 


23ft MWE : 236 9X 11 . 193 29% 29ft 29%— % 

MMMIHnR -X4.4L0 15 259 u% 10% 10% — * 

7Mk MMM . X58 4*. .13 ^047 76ft 76 76% + ft 


: Inter 


jtuS^5U»EHT 


29% 29% — ft 
19% 19% + ft 




LACfl 420 25ft 25* 25*—% 

LN Ho 2J7a«X 10 25 30ft 30ft 30ft— % 

LLERy XJ4a17X 334 13 ' 12% 12ft '■ 
LLCCp ' 42 2 1ft 2 

LTV 4974 1% 7%. 7%—* 


R.-StSSSSo 32 39 13 M.Wft iSS lK^ft 

5 - MfM.wu TT-m Sot* npl- 


30ft 30ft— % 37 24* MerMpf 3J0 93 27 toft to" toft + ft 

i %.-* -.^.SBar ^ s is ^ ss 

51 51 — 1 21-14% MfgRtV 139e1B3 10 141 T7% T7% \tZZZ % 

17* 17ft-- 38' 35% Morions M 18 S 323 Av* 33!+ - 

44* 44*—* 4M6. 29* Moforla M 18 14 40H m «* OT4— V 

71ft lift— ft 26ft *ft Munfrd 84 X5 ll O TL toft toftZft 

13% »%—* Mft ' 8* Muaaos ' 73 «* «% SS” w 

« 'is , ?. m7 g % 


9 ™ MSfSSet? 7, “? g* ts 


30% GtUcIn I to 18 11 
15 GNim ItoelU .. 


LTVA Xto 38 
LTV pf 

LTV Of 3XA122 
LTVpf 5JS-71J 
LTV a 135 10J _ 
LQufnj to 

LoUGi 170 W 7 
Lafarge 30 33 
Cairo a 2X4 1X3 „ 
Lormirs J24 2J II 
LamS«s 1*4 


2 11% lift lift. 

A 51 St 51 —1 
106 17% 17* toft - -’ 
196 45% 44* 44*—* 

in i2 n% im— * 

717 U% 13% 13%—* 
361 22 21* 21* — * 


a&ssr- 


13* 12%r 12% — * 


7 m 7* 7*—* 
12 n% -23% ;21% 




9* •% Sft— ft 

4 n » 


Lowtlrtf 86' 3B 14 296 lift 11 11* 
LeorPf 30 IX 150 72% 72% 72* 


24% Grumn 1X0 IX 9 486 33 32% 32% + ft 

4% Gruntal .16 X0 48 39 5% 5% 5VS— * 

2D Girttfrd X U 11 JJ « “ « +J5 

24% GlfWrt 80 XI 13 390 42H 41ft 42 + * 

57 GffWrt 5JS W 3 63 “ 6J -4 

71* GuffRs 2X TO !|% % 

70 GlfSntt 1X4 129 SIMM ^ 

24 GHSUPT3JS712 2 S? S'* - " H 

27ft GtfSU pr 4X0 13J 30 31% S 


LeorP pf 2J7 1X1 _ 5 27% 21% 27%—.% 

LeorSg 2X0 .4J 9 387 47% 46* 47 +% 

LooRnli X8 3J 13 2 17* 17* 17*— * 

Lswvrr lto ; 43 is 779 32 31% 31%— * 

LoeEnt 82 23 19 21 40% 40% 40%—% 

LegM06 20b W 19 75 18* 1HA 18*—* 

Lea Plat JZ XI 18 6625*25 25—* 

LOflVOI to 2<% 2* 2% - 

LVlnat 3 29* 29* 29*— * 

Lrttmn 188*112 387 44M 14 14*— ft. 


21* 15% NAFCO 1X0 SB 16 k 

36% H* NBD* 'Mg 4X | 543 


nsejp fs'» 

' C ■* l>m- -V 


I ago Baa BOb M 19 
LagPlat to XI 18 
Lefrvoi 
LVtitpt 

Lrtimn 188*112 


GtfSU pf BJ0 10X 
Gunon X0 13 12 


Lamar- to 18 II 
Leucftta - - 4 

LOF 182 28 8 
LOFpf 4J5 6J 


82 10% 10* 10*— % 
328 20ft 79% 20ft + ft 
V47 4W «* 45%—%. 


21. 12% NBI 

22* 17* NCM 
44% 20ft NCMB 
36- 22% NCR 

Mft 9* NLInd 
36% 28ft NU1 
1% » NVF 

59* 35% NWA 
38% 27* NORSO 
to* 21% Nashua 


• - 11 65 

37 33 12 3Q 
lto 38 * 232 
J8 2J . 10 -2251 
to 18. 646 

732 XI 14 


.80 IX 25 2716 
TJD 48 M 201 
f 4 


78* TO* NtOrvi J6 2J 15 


44 75* W W — 1*1 M% 23ft NotDtet 230 S » 446 


HolIFB 1X0 23 
Halfctn ! JO 66 12 



HatWn lto 66 12 
Halhed to M 17 
Hahwfof 86 58 
HamPa 1J6 13 15 
HwviS IXToIM 
HonJI U4a 9.1 
Hanoi s .86 25 13 
HandH 86 25 21 
Hanna X0 2J 21 
Har Sr J 1X8 -18 » 
Horindi -56 1 J.2Q 

Hornteh » 

Ham PfB 3X8 136 
HampfCXU &0 .. 
HrpRw* ' 14 

Harris 88 38 13 
Hortjrn • 


m-K 


Harsco L2» +4 10 
ttarf mx lto 48 9 


Hattsa 7 JO 107 17 
HowEI 1X4 7J 9 


13* 9% HavasA X0* 4X 


14ft 

M* + *i 
22 % — * 
lift - 
17*— ft 
56% 

32ft— % 
9*—* 
TS 

26*— % 
18% 

25% 

14*— * 

29 —ft 

... 32% + % 

18 17 Mft M»- » 

688 Zlft 21 27 — ft 

8 IM 'M 10% — * 

61 27ft 27. to— Hi 



LfbfvCp 32 24 15 . 287 30* 30% 30% 

Ulty 330 88 12 1475 B4ft 83 S3ft— Ift 

UfllNds .16 , J 25 2141 24* 2Z% 23 — % 

LlncNtl 188 • 48 11 10M 41% 41 « — * 

LinePI 1240 93 1 7J 23 23 + * 

Ltnan ZX0* 15 II 678 80% 79% 77% —1% 

LoCktld 30* TX » 1335 51% SDft 50%— * 

Locttr* 80 27 13 29 30 29% 29%—% 

Loews r TXOp 22 12 2912 48* 45% 45%— 2% 

Lnafaon JB 4 T7 fin 34 32% 32% —1% 

Lomnn 1x0 o 12 7» 32% 32% 32%— % 

LomMtS 2X4 98 M 372 2S* 24ft 25 

LofnMwT 45 3* 3* 3ft- 

LanwsMa . : ' 63Z 20 19ft a . + * 

LnSter 180 78 5...H7 3Rt 36 - 36% +:* 
-OneSat 5J7 1X3 _ . 13 53ft SZ% 53ft— ft 


IM NDfStPT TBS »8 354 

Ift ’ll* NatCdu 17 jm 


09, NatFGa ]M 7* 8 IB 

“ ’I 

.THk'U Mil an __ 


S^Sft Siipf £3* ”3 

TT* '7% 32 22 T31 ”5 


n% 53ft — ft 


2 2922 7* 7% 7ft— ft 

14702 ft* 48ft 40*— * 
77 ITO 19ft 1941— % 
10 19ft 19ft 19H 
13 20 19% Wft ' 

17 23 23ft 23%—% 
. A 19 IM* im— * 
1 15 15 IS +.% 

, 2* . W»k— ft 


34 22% Hadetn X< 18 « « » *L, T S 

13ft 9* Haauh 32 It 73 36 {SJ * % 

29 13% HttnAm » I? toft 135? ii 1 ? 2 


-onoD* 32 73 If 302 27* 26* 72 


82 18 19 540 35% 34* 36% 


29 13% HttnAm 32 Ito 

23* 20 HttCrPn .»* .9 

22ft ID* HttUSA _ .. 

ISft W% Hacks . to 22 

10% 13% HedaM to 1J . —= 

23% 14ft Haflmn XO 26 12 3rt 


20 % 16 % Hama 
56% 39 Hrfaz 
30 T2% HalnaC 

24% 18 HeimP 


So 20 % aw. 20 % — * 

42) 17 M% 16%-% 
ui 13* 12% 13 —ft 
SO 16* 15% 15% — ft 

3 ffa.-aBjsrrzj 



24ft 18 HeimP to 18 to » J*. -.E* " 

40% 30ft Htrojjs 1X0 45 11 13» »% OTk 

19ft io* Homes .mi ,2K 25 iS mS — % 

21 16* Henwm ,, !i ,3 I! iS 1S2— % 

49ft 32% HrtWlV 1X0 312 12 9* 4m 4« ft 

— “ ” iffi 11% 11% ^ 

“ 33ft—.* 

... _ „ * to*— 1 


xeeif 87 sj 9 44 11 11 11 +-* 

lolom itouuuBxnoazftto " 

LflPOC JOb 4X 40 442 10% 18% 18% — .% 
-OP}-Pf 4J0 1AX 106 30* 28% 29 —1% 

LflPLpT 218 148 349 22ft Zlft Jlft— ft 

XWvCte 282 88 8 320 28% to* 28% ' - 

XMSt 2X0 U 10 77 Mft ilft- 61%— % 

x*w J* 76 13 382 22* 22 to— % 

JM 1.16 53 13 KI4 21% to* » + * 

jArn XO 1 3 23 73 35ft 34% 35% + ft 

-uefcvs L16 SJ 11 3to 8ft to SS ~ 

MUm At 33 1* lto 73% 12% 12%—* 


n* 7* NMines f, 

“B Jg 
••PM.-Bssa -4 * 7 -s ^ 

PSSST S -3 1 

J? 6 SEES '-Mia % 

1 4 

M* NJRic 120 1U in 2 

*% NYSEC iS ,Sj 7 

ito>. wowon 80 38 10 8s 


77% 17% — * 

31% 31%—% 
13%: 15%— *' • 
19*. 19*-+.% 

36 '34%—M 
37% 32* +.7% 

II* 11* - .• 

as*. 26 *—;* 
itofc 12 *.-. ' - •' 

32* 32* —% 

19* If* 

to|. + w ^ 

26. 3616— IK - ' 
56% 56% , Y 
OTJ »% +:* 

-w* 2W6-t *- 

JZ' 22 — * 

3 ?**''- 






!tSaflssrt' a -'' 




ii ^Sa* 


^5= 


10% 78%— ft 


HB 


to* 26% ... 

at -as d 


eulTaai. 


31ft Mewtmf S 

JStOSSP ItoelU ^ 


282 SJ 8 
2X0 33 10 
J* 13 13 


■Jk 22!5i? ,3»u ;: t 


SS 1J “ ” ^ K 

^ ^"faSS ISIU 1 % 

r.srssasjg-: 3 




w* 5% Ha g w n 
13* f Hasbipf 


13ft 9% Hivott 
26ft 18* HllnOfd 
73* 49% HlltOft 
37% 26ft Hitachi 


35% Holiday 1X0 ZJO 


a T,ffi L fi!n5 »*^macom 2 iett%2*z2 

97 n% !&- % ZStlPmSfrilS 8 4 ■■’SSSEa^ 

» i SS * 47ft 34 ME1 80 U 14 S to* to^-to Z S 


17ft- u . nIpbsii tSJIH ■ tote 43% 

m fift NteSw . ^a J H „ 41 

■toft 25* NICOR iE lai 17 12 a ' 


48% 31% Howin JZ 7 16. - 

JM 74 Hettcrt to 2.1 15 91 -29ft »* W6 1 

23ft 14* HIStwar 80 2X -9 ,2 h im* nft— ft 

13ft 9% HlVoft -17 IX 7 ISO « U% 2SS S 

26ft 18* HllnOfd 84 XI 14 . .» 3f» »* 


23% 23»2Lt& 
18- 

30ft to* : If. 
16* T6* .••»• 
Mft Mft.+ b 

•ft »*“^F 
«Hi Wft- % 

fatS® 1 

J1 lift 15ft 15ft— 

ssftissm? 


Sblrjf*- r. 


i& 


■S WBE" “ p-t 4 K r 3 L-Z 

to* Wn Norsti- 2X0 U ■ - 5, tt%"ltoX-U*i£.B. 

to itotorpf ^ * ^ 














-W- ■■■ - ••• • -• • ’ - ■ 










- ? ' • jj r' ' 

•«*■>•.-• . . 

er . 

', • • : -/ : 

; •••■ " ** 
•'vf^Vv 'wf-?' 'j " 

* *’ *■ J . • ■ 


'>luK 

■ - i 

r -iil'.V :■•■•• 


»s roundup 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13. 1985 


j 


Page 17 


H^ U ^ €llt ^ Shows Profit Rise 

^.ha&*aiiot*l HeraidTrihune Prudi^ifj 0n ? an Stock Exrf WngC. lion. adding: “Then: are now sie 

- rruaenual shares shot to mi ,h*, T 


ka&Luomt H^^ une Prude^Sif 11 h° n St0Ck Exchan 8 e ' 

- j* LONDON — PrudemiaTcom ,2 *L shat « shot io 697 

• ja^att&Jag^st insurer,^LSri2d 55 ^ 33 pen “ from WedneSr 

• re- . Prudential reported hint™ 


increase in 

nwetax^wofii for.the first half rather 
Ji^an^ecqjected decline. 

^ die 

JflWdrirs.lMsest independent in- 

•tffiffiiSSS?®* ^jusappointed 


lion, adding: “There are now signs 
that the measures taken aver the 
past two' years are beginning to 
have some effect.’' 

Prudential said the rise of the 
pound reduced. its overseas results 


21-perom in- 

4 cxeasodn first-half pretax profiL 
^P^M^imnditcti to the U.S. 
nsagcffftesame^ name, said pre- 
.■% S^.^ r 5~“’ § r ? w K> £46.4 million 
■”■ wFjniUimlfram £35.9 miffion. A 

s iJ!£fiK5r a ?S e helped increase 
, «a p^;76 percent, to £30 5 nd- 
•^Ifeor^O^ pcncc a share, from 
of 5.8 pence a share 
-.Tac'wmpany raised its interim 
. Evidentl to 9 pence a share from 


ICI^Enichem in Plastics Talks 


V^XGOTtHmedfrpm Page 15) 

^uin is t&e jeader with a market 
Start of about 15 percent. foUrwed 


. , nave some ctieci. 

its frS , KS. r S£ rtedh ‘ 8heri ? of ‘ Prudential said the rise or the 
and inv™ ‘ pensions pound reduced. its overseas results 

P*™* _ . 

^Ksjsaas! 

d«aar s fgf “"lion. N “ r Tor " «"T 10 

insurance unit — losses narrow'd £50^ million, or 13.1 pence a share, 

Gencral ^rnSS k^S^ ^ ° 9 t ”»>"• “ 1M P“* » 

particularly large in Caoaada, where “* rt 

severe weather increased claims on The results were below expecia- 
motor and property policies. Pro- lions, and Sedgwick shares supped 
dential also reported poor general 23 pence, to 370 pence. 

results in France and the The latest figures include Fred S. 

N r u ? I “ S ’ aoit offering James & Co* a U5.-based broker- 
a aught improvement in tin Belgian age recently acquired by Sedgwick 
subsidiary, L’EscatiL from Transamerica Corp. for about 

The company said the operating £530 million in Sedgwick shares. 

rS 5, f a S^ UI H t Excluding James. Sedgwick’s 
had been about halved, to £8-5 iml- p^a* profit edged up to £533 mil- 
lion from £52.9 million. 

I W/k+iV 7l,7L« The company said the cost of 
v X CfloULo JL Uflio hedging against foreign-exchange 

risks hun results in the half. 


chemical plants in the Middle East, 
fn 1981, ICI opened a new PVC 


i if TT-j xir I ? uo P c include me rvc operations oT Swjizer- 
iorek .Hydro AS of Norway and land’s Lonza AG. Also in 1981 ICI 


poechst AG. of Germany. swapped ils British polyethylene 

f? Excess capacity has kept the in- operations for British Petroleum 
Sustry ara whole in the red. Mr. Co.’s PVC manufacturing. 

Cbtitos of de Zoete estimated that At present. ICI is losing about 
Western, European PVC and vinyl £50 million a year on PVC, Mr 
iddonde plants are operating at 80 Coates said. “The doesn’t 
percent of capacity. really appear io have worked," he 

ICLsaid the West European pet- s^d. But, Mr. Coates added, the 
cochemicals and plastics industry proposed joint venture would be a 
a® a'wbofe suffered losses of about ste P in the right direction. 

nun:., /m e u-nr « . **ir > r _ j 


swapped ils British 


.TCustry as'-a whole in the red. Mr. 
jCbates. of Zoete estimated that 
iWestom, European PVC and vinyl 
kjdoride plants are operating at 80 
Ipercent of capacity. 

L'.JCtsaid the West European pet- 
jrpchemicals and plastics industry 


Burmah Oil Posts 
33,8% Profit Rise 

Reuters 

LONDON — Burmah Oil PLC 
reported Thursday that' pretax 
profit in the first half rose 33.8 
percent, to £37 2 million (S48.4 mil- 
lion) from £27.8 million. Revenue 
fdl to £787.4 million from £809.2 
million in the first half of 1984. 


Alfa Romeo Says 
Plant Will dose 
bi South Africa 

The Associated Prrs> 

JOHANNESBURG — Alfa 
Romeo said Wednesday that ii 
would shut down its South Afri- 
can subsidiary, dang mourning 
losses and the dropping value of 
the South African rand. 

The managing director, 
Gianna Marindli, said the par- 
ent company’s decision to close 
Alfa Romeo’s manufacturing 
plant in South Africa after more 
than two decades was not based 
on politics. 

He emphasized that the move 
was bas£l purely on financial 
considerations. 

Mr. Marindli said the Alfa 
Romeo plant at Brits, north of 
Johannesburg, will be shut 
gradually, and he gave no time- 
cable. The plant employs a work 
force of 500. 

"The recent dramatic deteri- 
oration of the rand exchange 
rate and the persistently poor 
market conditions have de- 
stroyed the possibility of a re- 
covery in the short term,’’ he 
said. 

“It has been dedded to hall , 
further investments in the 
South African company and to , 
suspend the production and 1 
sales operation activities,” he | 
added 


Plan to Cut Losses Proposed 
To EPICs Creditors, Insurers 


^uraaciv 


jj£2 billion ($2.6 billion) a year from “if you're m a commodity prod- 
91980 through 1982. Aol IQ spokes- net, it’s best to be as big as you can 
gnan said that the industry’s results be," he observed 
{have unproved since then but still For Enichem, the venture might 
jshow a net loss. provide better access to markets in 

»’* Despite its losses, ICI has pur- northern Europe. Last year, Eni- 
IsuBd a strategy of being one of the chem began renting a plant in West 


The company said its main activ- J nfrnnr Ttonrtrte 
es should benefit from satisfar- jagUUT nepOTTS 
lory trading and economic condi- r> , Afji n< „ • 
trons and improve on 1984’s /C^liMSO HI 

Progress has been made toward firSt-Holf Profit 
concentrating on the core interests 
of oil, Castro) lubricants, specialty 
chemicals and liquified natural gas 


■ toK.1* 
•0 BIS ^ 

Tssiwa. { 


jttiojvji aui vivuiS in 

SparUy because PVC is one product 
$hat is not expected to be made in 


Reuters 

LONDON — Jaguar PLC re- 




By Bruce Kcppel 

to i Angeles Twit's .Siro, t‘ 

LOS ANGELES — Insurers and 
lenders facing huge potential losses 
stemming from the financial prob- 
lems of a Virginia real estate invest- 
ment company were to meet Thurs- 
day in Chicago to study a rescue 
plan proposed by Ticor Mortgage 
Insurance Co„ which stands to lose 
the as much as $166 million. 

The plan to be presented by Ti- 
cor. the privately held, Los Ange- 
les-based parent of Ticor Mort- 
gage. aims to cut the group's tosses 
significantly, according to Winston 
V. Morrow, the president and chief 
executive. 

He said Wednesday lhai ihe plan 
would give insurers up to six years 
to resolve the problem, offering 
mortgage holders an alternative to 
writing off their entire investment. 

Ticor s potential loss stems from 
defaults in payments on $1 billion 
in mortgages and mortgage-backed 
securities that it insured for Equity 
Programs Investment Corp.. a real 
estate syndication concern that has 
filed for protection under IIJL 
bankruptcy laws on behalf of its 
34] limited partnerships. 

State regulators have taken con- 
trol of EPIC and its parent. Com- 
munity Savings & Loan Associa- 
tion of Bethesda. Maryland. 

Ticor Mortgage ceased writing 
new mortgage insurance policies 
Wednesday, but the company has 
not yet announced layoffs among 
its 350 employees. 

Last week, Ticor split its profit- 
able title insurance operation into a 
separate subsidiary to protect it 
from any financial fallout at the 
mortgage insurance unit. At the 
same time, the Federal National 
Association stopped 


EPIC is PSFS of Philadelphia, j 
which holds an estimated S215 mil- , 
lion in EPIC mortgages and securi- 1 
ties. 

Under the proposed plan. Mr. 
Morrow said. EPIC’S mortgages, 
which typically have lives ranging 
from 10" years to 30 years, would be 
converted into six-year notes bear- 
ing a fixed rate of interest lower 
than w'hat they are supposed to 
pay. reportedly 9 percent. Interest 
would be paid from rents from the 
properties, with insurers paying 
any shortfall up to 25 percent of the 
mortgage value. 

After six years, the principal 
would be repaid from the sale of 
the properties. The mongage insur- 
ers would then have to make up any 
shortages. Bui the plan would spare 
their having to make payments im- 
mediately on the mortgages. 


N.V. Nederlandse Gasunie 

Dfls 25,000.000. - 
10 bearer notes 1980 
due 1984/1987 

As provided in the Terms and Conditions of 
the above Notes. Redemption Group no. 2, 
amounting to Dfls. 6,250,000. - has been drawn 
for redemption on September 5th, 1985 and 
consequently the Note bearing consecutive number 2 and 
all Notes bearing a consecutive number which is 4 or 
a multiple of 4 higher than 2 are payable on 

OCTOBER 15. 1985 


Bank Mees & Hope NV 
(Central Paying Agent) 
in Amsterdam 

Bank M»es & Hope NV 
in Hamburg 

K rediet bank S.A. LuxembourgeoUe 
in Luxemburg 

Algemene Bank Nederland (Schweizl 
in Zurich 


Swiss Bank Corporation 
in Basel 


September 13. 1983 



« wut iaj uc m }aji i * 

{large quantities at the new petro- rope. 


I Company co 

| Results ~ 

| Revenue oner profits or fosses, to WOIili 

■ mllltooxan hi local currencies unless ^,~s. 

■ ouwrwtso fmftcatad. 




. „ thus reducing trans- 

port costs for sales in northern Eu- 




nys restructuring program. — 


American Express Co. said it 
would sell 49 parent of the proper- 




fi* :-V. 

'A I 

Z *->! 

••ye, 

i 


'M 




‘Britain 


- 

Bor mob CHI 

■'lUHdf 

‘ is 

Ruvenuv 

■Prwtax Nat 

— TV A 

Shore — 

o: • • 

0.1611 

- ; - • Turner ft Neural! 

■ i*Hdr 

iw 

rJtovmue — - 
. Pretax NeU- 

— « 

P»r Shorn— 

■3-fr ■ 



1 ty-caaialty buaness of its troubled joint venture with Chiron Corp. of 
-r Fireman's Fund insurance suhsid- the United States to develop com- 
iaiy in a public stock offering, merciaUy an enzyme protecting hu- 
• probably next month. The offering man tissue from injury after a tem- 
- of 32 million shares wentid reduce poraiy lade of oxygen. 


Canon , i 


the first half of 1 985 rose to £63 
• , . , million ($82 million), a 54.4-per- 

contmued with further cuts m tank- ^ ^crease from £40.8 million in 

a neels - the first half of the previous year. 

- Revenue rose 32.7 percent, to 

£400.9 million from £3022 million 
in the first half of 1984. 

■ ■ ■ i — i — —— The company said it expected 

Pharmacia AB of Sweden said it satisfactory 1985 second-half re- 
signed a letter of intent to form a suits despite adverse currency 
joint venture with Chiron Corp. of movements. Demand for Jaguar 
the United States to develop com- models exceeds supply and ship- 
merciaUy an enzyme protecting hu- menu to dealers are expected [to be 
man tissue from injury after a tem- in line with planned production of 
poraiy lack of oxygen. 30,000 cars for the year as a whole, 

RenisoD Goldfields Consolidated it said. 

Ltd. said it had agreed to acquire a Demand remains strong in all 
50-percent stake in Allied Eneabba main markets for Series 1 1 1 sedans 
Ltd. from £1. Du Pont Co. For 4.61 and XJS sports cars, it added, 
million Australian dollars ($3.09 First-half sales totaled 19.530 se- 

nuUion), equal to 65 cents a share, dans, sports cars and limousines, 
Rothmans International PLC up from 16,783 a year earlier. Jag- 
faces another difficult year in 1985- uar said its U.S. sales in the first 
86, Chairman David Nicolson said, half were up 13 percent, to 10,481 


29S the Amex stake in Fireman’s Fund Remsu Goldfields Consoidated 
zu to 45 percent. Lid. said it had agreed to acquire a 

110675 Argyfl Group PLC has had prof- 50-percent stake in Allied Eneabba 
its inline with expectations for the Ltd. from E.1. Du Pont Co. for 4.61 
fim 20 weeks of fiscal 1985-86, million Australian dollars ($3.09 
Chairman Janies Gulliver said. minion), equal to 65 cents a share. 

• Atlantic Richfield Co. agreed to Rothmans International PLC 
puidiase ofl and gas properties in faces another difficult year in 1985- 
- California^Kansas, Missouri, Ore- 86, Chairman David Nicolson said. 


■ Proto* Net——— 

' Pw3t»an> - ■ - 30® 

Z en l aa d 

Ftefcher Cltalieags 

fjy r nir1t 4fKi 

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• Per Sftarr— 0*" 

tMdUpptaM 

Son MHmal 

■ in Half IMS 

I -Profits .. I two 

iTnltodSmies 

- Collins ft AlJunafl 


.Mot Income . 
PWS/MTO _ 


-- goh and WashiBgloa state - from Forthey^ ended March 31, 1985, cars.'while West German sales rose 

Sm ‘ 3 J 9 ML Reichhdd Energy, a subsidiary of p«tax profit feU to £121.9 mdbon 52 percent, to 1,404 cars. The main 

'*£ 10 - Reiehhold ChemicaL for an undis- from £151.2 miUion m 1983-84. He factory holiday shutdown falls in 


Mortgage's chairman and 
chief executive, Raymond R. Ro- 
deno, has resigned; his place tins 
token by William J. Fitzpatrick, ex- 
ecutive vice president, secretary 
and counsel 01 the parent compa- 
ny. Mr. Morrow said that “a hand- 
ful*' of other executives subse- 
quently resigned - 

Mr. Morrow said be did not 
know whether Maryland and Vir- 
ginia officials would attend Thurs- 
day’s meetings in Chicago. Other 
major insurers, including Chicago- 
based Republic Mortgage Insur- 
ance Co. and Milwaukee-based 
MGIC, are to review Ticor’s bail- 
out proposal Thursday, and major 
lenders are to convene Friday. 

Republic, a subsidiary of Old 
Republic International, estimates 
its potential loss at $100 million; 
MGIC, a unit of Northwestern 
Mutual Life, stands to lose as much 
as S65 million. A major lender to 



Nr, 

*y. 

**N" 

■N 

He' 

N 

N:;, 

N.' U 

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For Sale. 
New 29-Story 
Office Tower. 

With 301,000 leasable 
sq. ft. Prime location: 
comer of Baltimore & Light 
Streets, Baltimore, Md. 
Scheduled completion 
date: Fall 19857Sale by 
sealed bid. For complete 
information and request 
for proposal, please contact 
Stone & Associates, Inc., 
at (301) 528-1000. 

?. Suite 1380, 100 S. Charles 
’ Street, Baltimore, Maryland 
21201 


* ;»b 



^ Reiehhold Chemical, for an undis- 
closed amount of cash. 

British Aerospace PLC said it 
had signed a memorandum of un- 
im derstanding to supply eight 
146-200 re^ooal fanjet airliners to 
Hawaiian Airimes beginning in 
: ' November. 1986. 

Marantz Japan lac. will start 


said the effect of exchange rate 
translation on results this year had 
been unfavorable, and that tobacco 
demand was falling in Britain. ■ 


factory holiday shutdown falls in 
the second half. 

The company's balance sheet is 
strong, with cash balances rising 
£34 million in the first six months 


Torvifl and Dean at the Winter Olympics 


Newman and Cedeno in Gnamati. 


rt, i /V f V. . • _ - I C HUUIUU IB Utt. IUW OIA uiubuu 

01 198S - 10 1134 rainiorL 

bfllion Deutsche marks (S506o ...... 

million) in its domestic electronics *° e company said it had made 


Maratiz Japan Ina will start sales and marketing in the next five good prc^eai in laying foirnda- 
mS^S-fSSattddeoiapere- years, according to Hans-Gerd tijefuiur^ ^t^b»n 

S rare in 1986 and aroolv Neglein, a member of the manag- le ” m cretimg a stronger tech- 


"N«t incoma . 
Pw Shore - 


:*ntQw». 
^Mttlncwna. 
-Pvr shorn _ 

VSU ml bm 
Not income. 
Par Shore — 


.Eaton Vance 


carders late in 1986 and supply 
them toNV Philips, which holds 50 
percent of Marantz shares, a 
spokesman said. 

Mitsui Engineering & SbipbreM- 
ing Co. has won an order worth 16 
billion yen ($657 rmOion) to build 
an oil-drULing platform for Ras- 
mussen Offshore AS of Norway, a 
Mitsui spokesman said. 

Occidental Petroleum Corp. said 
the British Department of Energy 
had approved its plan to develop 
[he 42-million-barrel Scapa field 
southwest of Claymore field in the 
North Sea. 


Negleia, a i 
ing board. 


nology base. 


CREDIT NATIONAL 

US$200,000,000 Guaranteed Floating Rate Notes )994 
Unconditionally guaranteed as to payment of principal 
and interest by 

THE REPUBLIC OF FRANCE 
For the six month period 
11th September, 1985 to 11th March, 1986 
the Notes will carry an interest rate of 8 , )4(>% per annum 
Bankers Trust Company, London 

Fiscal Agent 





— ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Sept. 12, 1985 

nvuiV vnwe noohitloni arc tuppUoO hv Funds listed wttli flip excottflon ofswna qoote* ots Iswe prk». 

Sdl5rt?irwwScr of qootafioM suonttod: (d> -ftri lv; (w)-wmfcly; W-M-monlMy; Irt-nwBlwtr; CO - Irrcnuiortv . 












V 







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Thursdays 

N1SE 

Closing 

. Tabtes include the nationwide prloss 

up to the ck»liiB on Wall Strtef 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


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Henri Cartier-Bresson, The Ascot Train, Waterloo Station, London 1953 


r»~ ~ v 


Erich Lessing, Railroad workers, 1956 





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Photographs b> : 

We-er Btschof. Rene Burr.. 
Rober. Cap^. Henri Cl-jct- 
Bresson. Elliot Erwitt. Em>; Hi” 
Erich Lessing. Lice Month. 

Marc Ribo;:c v DaMd Seymour, 
ar.d other Magnum 
photographers. 



From the archives of Magnum Photos, a photographic record of Europe m 
the immediate postwar years — striking images of a continent shaking off 
the debris of destruction and coming to life. 

Mary Blume, the International Herald Tribune’s distinguished feature 
journalist, sets the postwar scene and interviews many of the photographers 
in her introduction. The I JIT. is pleased to present this unique volume that 
captures a decisive epoch and commemorates the work of some of the 

20th century's master photojournalists. , , 

Here you’ll find some of the most famous images and faces of our IggllpP 1 Hardcover, 
time Once vou open its pages, you will want to spend hours poring over this 200 pages, 

magnificently produced collection. Truly this is a book to treasure for 168 duotone illustrations, 

yourself, and a beautiful gift as well. 32x26cm (12.5x1 0.25 in.) 

Available from the International Herald Tribune. Order today. nrat smaM ♦ * 

(tribune 

^ FTER Please send me copies of After The War Was Over 

r«^^ :MWeachtaEurope: 

□ Enclosed is my payment (in any convertible 1 3.9^ 

European currency at current exchange rates). Name m a0CK lErm 

□ Please Charge to □ Acre*. DVisa □Ame* 

my credit card. nEuiocard DDinm nMaslercanJ .. 








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e’STSw ^ pE?.»N 5 UA40 
prcv.Dov Open Int. 0.902 oHTSJ 
SOYBEAN OILCCBT1 

“srTJ-jK ts sa i 

%% S3 SS: 20.95 2105 a 

2U0 j«l 211J 51^ \ 

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1.67*. 126W MOT 1^^ 122 J' 

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I Livestock 


CATTLE (CMS) 

®gr S " e ES.^<Xt 5115 5LS7 
«*5 55jCS Dec 5SOS 572B 

Feb 5500 5457 

47 J7 aa AS an g» 

44J5 5625 Jvn 5625 

jr mi 5570 Aud 55JftS 57.10 

PreSsalM 17296 
^DSOpeninL 49A76 up 069 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMEl 
«^o r .-C XSTSb 5045 5950 

T TW St45 Oct 58.10 S9J7 

118 NOW 60.10 61^ 
7oS 4050 JOn *140 6X00 

6052 Mar 62-*0 6330 

mai 6060 APT g.15 6350 

S2S 60.10 MOV MAS <075 

Esf 5am p rev. Sales 1458 

p7b£dov Open Ini. 8278 up370 

HOGS (CMEl 

center ^ ^ 

Sm -mm Dec 38.15 3».*5 

raio M20 Feb 2900 *0.45 

\l 17 APT If ^ 38.10 

SS 2S r is ™ 

t2 AUP 40AJ1 41-50 

JliS SS SS: SS 5S 

Est Soles Prev . 5o »e3 SA29 

pSJ!oSopenim. 20233 up!21 


12440 1W50 
127 JN 12920 
13030 13330 
13330 115.10 
135JOO 13730 
13630 138.90 
13920 14120 
14120 
13950 


2125 2155 +24 

2080 2M5 -2J 

2120 71.15 —29 

2125 2135 — 

2120 7150 —55 

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■ww 2227 — 53 1 B420 

2X33 +51 


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u* l^y. — ^ 5ow 
1J9U. 12914 —50V. 
127 


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5X12 *3 0* +28 

5530 57.17 +I.W 

55 sm 55.90 +53 

S55 +158 

56.70 5720 +3S 

5525 5630 +50 


5X30 58.90 +20 

5735 5X55 +38 

59" «« +1.10 

rtb 6327 +1A7 
tOM 6320 +130 
Sl5 6X50 +1A 
6130 6725 +120 


35.97 36.75 

37.95 »27 

3X95 3937 

3635 37 A7 

4030 4127 
4120 *120 
4030 4120 
3820 3825 

3925 3925 


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2046 7046 — 14 
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Currencj' Options 


Sept 12 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

SKno Staf sw Co i l Jr U jL- 5ep P °D^ U, Mnr 

12308 British PojmdfrCMilS peronlt 

"gfil m £3 K75 r r r Jg l* 

ii9i4 115 r r r r «» r 

r Xio *20 


115 r 
120 1220 


133 115 545 725 0.15 *20 r 

]3 W ? V°5 3^ 7J0 11.7$ '*1 

1 r ,J °r ^ f ? 


13X1* iso r B4S r t 

50300 CcMMKtinn Dollors-cenls PW unit. 

CDoiir 71 1« r r r 

7S0 " I 8S‘ r r 0.17 

gs s ; u. f.ffl 

62300 West German MnrbKMrts Pet unit- 
□Mark 29 446 r r r 

33.99 31 2JB _ r 12* T 


.19 lAl 725 


as a MS “r r 020 

ss 2 as u? i.« 017 as 

as 2 “r SS Lw U7 ^ 

Is S f 55 vS J ? 

1752*0 FrepGb Fnwcs-ljtbs of a cenl per eolL 
F Franc 105 620 r r T r 

11135 no 1.10 X70 r r * 

11135 115 r r r 1455 £90 

6350JN0 Jnponei* Tib’lOOttis ot o coni per wilt. 

S ™ Ig t r r 

ini 2 aS aS 1 j ij W 

si 3 i as a ^ u 

41.11 4* r XlO r r r 

6X980 Swiss FranCKWits per wHt _ 

SFronc 25 £2D r r r r 

4124 34 532 5 ; J i 

4U34 3? r r r r 


4124 36 5^ J 

*12* 37 430 J 

41X4 38 320 r 

4124 39 221 r 

4124 40 126 2.18 

4124 *1 0-® 1J0 

4124 n 025 

41-2* 43 r 

4124 44 r 0.48 

41 74 45 r 0-35 

4124 _ * 6 . r ai9 


» 221 r r r 02 U 

40 126 2.1B r 0JJ3 fiji* 1.17 

047 1J0 748 0-16 1-08 r 

43 025 122 7-00 0J7 1A0 2.11 

43 r 0-79 1.42 r 221 222 

44 r s.48 U2 r r r 


4124 45 r 025 

4124 *6 r ai9 

Total cnU voL 142M 

T< lSSoi r |f«ied. s— NooPWwioltared, 
Lost is premium (purchase Mice). 
Source: AP. 


Call a»ai tat. aM/nt 
Put open lot 15X733 


35410 354 


Financial 


US T. BIL1JIIMM) 

SI million- ptsMlOOPCt. 

9133 8624 SOP WJO 92BS 

9107 8527 Dec 9X44 9X48 

9X59 8440 Mar 92.10 9X13 

9X28 87-01 JU" *120 91 

tyy m gftju Sop tU9 91JI9 

5i5» Vc£ 

9129 89.58 Mar 9094 TO2* 

90 99 90-50 Jun 9069 9069 

EBLSales Prev.Sales »276 

Prcv.Dov open mt 36A60 up 5S4 
18 YR. TREASURYMCrn 
S.OO^OprUvpt.X^dbelTOPC* 

87-13 75-13 Dec 84-15 8+21 

86-2 75- *4 Mar 83-18 g-21 

BS-7 7+30 Jun 02-34 0X25 

8+4 80-7 Se» 

83-11 80-2 Dec,. 

Est. Soles Prev.Sales 

Prev. Day Open inL 59.463 
US TREASURY BONDS ICBT1 
(B Mrt^lOOJBO+irta XStadSOMOOPO” 
79-12 H-W S*P 75-16 7MS 

78-13 57-8 Dec 7+9 7+g 

77-29 57-2 Mar 73-5 73-12 

76-6 5+29 Jun JS-10 72-12 

75-11 5+29 SCP 71-13 7T-14 

7+24 5+25 Dec 7MB 70-11 


Stock Indexes 


9282 92X5 +21 

92A4 tlfl _ 
9X10 9X12 —m 

91 JB 9129 — ^ 

91 A9 9150 — iOI 

9121 91 Jg 
9094 9055 

906* 9070 


85-12 85-14 
8+11 B+U 
83-14 83-14 
82-18 »18 
ffl-25 
§KJ 


78-13 75-18 —1 

7+3 7+9 

73-1 73-7 

73-2 72-7 

71-5 71-10 

70-10 70-15 


SP COMP. INDEX ICME) 
< 1mM C,n,, l3u» SCP 10420 18SA0 

« »£ 18X30 18XM 

SJ&50 19180 Jun 1892S1S9J5 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 64486 

Prev. DavOaen int. 6SJ80 oH 7*1 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
Mjntaandcmn ^ 19400 19440 

217JD5 19585 Dec 19620 19680 

2«X 19XX Mar MBJB M 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 6873 

Prev. Day Open InL 1X15* oH2l* 
NYSE CO MP. I N DEX CNYFE1 
PjrfrtoandcMTta 

11720 10120 Dec 1072S 10X45 

11825 109-00 Mar JO*)® JJJee 

17000 11040 Jun 11OB0 11X80 

Sn lljS Prev.Sales 14362 
Prev. Day Open Int. I1AI9 UP 876 


18X20 1B340 
18490 18X20 
187.10 18720 
18925 10925 


19X00 19X10 
19400 19410 
19850 1*780 


10550 10405 
10450 107.15 
10820 1DX25 
11025 10955 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody's. — SMS f 

Reuters 

D-J. Futures.. 

Com. Research Bureau _ Zi9-« 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p- preliminary; f- firial 
Reuters * base 100 : Sep- 18,1931. 
Kj^nes^tase 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Previous 
879 JO f 
1,740.10 
N2V. 
21820 


Paris,... 

Commodities 


Sept 12 

CIOWB 

hhxi low Bid asx ctrue 

=1 

I If Lf is 9 =i 

Oa WO 1.710 1595 1210 — X5 

E*r. vol.: X*M u>lb ol 50 Tool Pr»v. actual 

saws: X72S iSs. Ooen Interest: 205*2 

COCOA 

French trams per 108 ku 

g£ flfi f*5 tfi 

B w. vs is 1 - if 

e s?: n in = a 

rSer NT N.T. 2-135 — +3° 

Esl. vol.: 5 totaot 10 tons. Prev. actual sales ; 
6 lots. Open Interest: 693 
COFFEE 

French francs per lMka 

bl T N.T. 1JQ5 leBHO +13 

S w! vs US 1 m upSa 

£ si Kx a isi +v 

2 T St Ut - +So 

S £j. wbL: IM tola ri S lorn. Prev. ociual 
sales: 2 tots. Open interest: 339 
Source: Bourse tfu Commerce. 


London, 
Commodities 


Commocltties 


Cash Prices 


1548 1545 1842 15*7 1539 1541 
Volume : 2J18 tot* ol 10 tons. 

“"“b.’lS’liM 1*5 1-Hi !« 


HONG-KONC GOLD FUTURES 
UAHweeee ^ 

Sep. Wfi 

»- 53:?: Hg8« 

n«- NT. N.T. 37X00 37580 
fSS “ 32400 32X0!i K7.^ £9.00 
API — N.T. N.T. 33X00 D4M 

Volume: 26 lots ot 100 ox. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mala yiton cent* Pgr^kUo 

E= ii i i 

VST ' 1KLOO 1B4J30 1 

SL 1MJ00 18*JXI t 

nff- ' 1B6JMJ 18X110 1 


prevtoes 
Bid Ask 
32UB323XW 
32X00 37400 
32400 326JH 
32780 OT88 

moo moo 

33580 33780 
3*080 34X00 
34580 34780 


Com modify aadUnll 
CoHae 4 Santos, lb— — — 
PrlntcJOlti 64730 138 W, Vd - 
Steel blllols (P|h-1< Jw? — 
iron 2 Fdrv. Pblla- tog — 
Steel scrap No I iwv Pitt- • 

Lead SpoLtb — 

Copper elects lb .. 

Tin (Straits!, lb -■■ 

Zinc, E. SI. L-Basls, lb — 
Palladium, az — - 

Silver N.Y.az 

Source: AP. 


Sept 12 

Year 

TUB AM 

153 1-46 

041 *J& 

47X80 473J0 

72-73 88-B9 

19-20 2+» 

6+69 64W-67 
55291 6JH15 

041 858 

102-10* 130-139 
6JQ 785 


lSS 15*5 12*0 15*9 1290 15M 
Volume: 1509 tots a( 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

U5. dollars pot metric tan 

24X50 24025 24X00 34225 24X75 2080 


Volume: 1 tots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
St Bwaaore cents p»r kno 

Bid Ask 

RSS 1 oa — J6525 16525 

R5S 1 Nov- 1*425 164-g 

RSS 2 Oct _ 15150 15X50 

RSS 3 oa — 14950 15050 

RSS* Oct- 1*£50 ]*7-» 

RSS S oa — 14050 14X50 

KUALA L UMPUR P*LM01L 
Matavstan rtngptts per 75 tans 


Previous 
Bid Asft 
18125 IBXS) 
18325 1B225 

18150 18280 

18150 18350 

IB350 18550 

18550 1B7J0 


Dhidends 


Prevtoes. 

Bid Aik 
16680 16625 

16*80 1W.M 
15280 15380 

15080 15180 

1*680 1«80 
14180 1*380 



volume : 0 lots a 25 tans. 
Source: Reuters. 


BW AJk Bid Aik 
710 750 7*0 

71A 750 720 ‘W 

71Q 7K rm 7m 

m 750 no 760 

™ 7 » ™ 

ua 750 700 '60 

4*0 7* TOO 750 

ag& 730 690 740 

680 730 690 740 


S£fsm oSW « SB. S 5 - 1 ^ «c 

111 » Wb 11 r- S ; Si » 

w ? f* IP J5 nJ 7** 

SS B8 Sni ? 5ih lit TOt 9i »« 

3 1= = = = 

TNMCBfl WbHM JgW 

TBWeei*9m“-*“3B 

TMMlWtwNM 214W 
Total pel opatoLSWSl 

IS^iWm IMlU OW 13861— 18t 

Source: CBOE. 


DIVI Futures 
Options 


London IVleials || | Iteasiiry 


DBer Bid Yield Yield 
S^nonth 736 73* 780 747 

+ month 74* 74* 78S 780 

One veor 746 78* 88* 111 

Source.- Salomon Brothon 


Dutch Trade Surplus Falls 

Reuters 

THE HAGUE — Dmch mer- 
chandise trade showed a provision- 
al non-seasonaUy adjusted surplus 
of 400 mill i nn guilders ($121 mil- 
lion) in July, after a surplus of 600 


STOCK 

USS 

USS 

DeVoe- Holbein 
International nv 

6% 

7% 

, City-dock 
International nv 

2% 

3% 

Quotes as of: September 12, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply wme us a 
note and ihe weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht 485 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)3 120 260901 
Tele*: 14507 firconl 


























































Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1985 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED China Trade Opens to Small Firms 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


(Continued From Back Page) 


autos tax free 


FOR SAUE IN 8B4JDORME, Akarte, 
Spain restaraB with rjyr> 15 
rpona 3400 MJiLaqrderi, parting. 
Ptk* hiehs 20 (raEoa Inquiries Par- 
tido Armanelo, Benidorme. Tet (65} 
. 85 S9 67 Spain 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 
PARIS AREA FURMSHED 


EMPLOYMENT 


MERCB)ES SPECIALISTS 
FOR USA + MIDDLE EAST 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


lARGESIodcWNEW 


SWITZERLAND 


ZURICH 


SWITZERLAND 


My 30 an <nwy from ZunCMOota* 
Airport, we can oner you a dice* of 
IK + 2ft room apartment! wtich ore 


«MandngbodinqwAyandinaidu- 
todural dwiga Indoor swimming pool, 
liheui, restaurant + room senna. 


By For dw dcsest qpartnwt praied to 
me meliopu fa of Zurich with saw per- 
mit* to forejgners. It offers the pass**- 
lias of either an ideal vocation re s- 
denoa or on attractive investment for 
cnyomwhoappreeiata the charm and 
appeal af a deSghtful environment 
vwmin easy reach of Zurich. 


FORT IB ILL- The Ulthrate Estate. 
One in a niton. Free- form pool, pri- 
vate spa guest quartan, otnum pool 
house & man house. The epftww of 
guns fang. $1.1 miton. Cdl fa 
nil deads, brochure & private show 
ing: Murphy Redly (201)8*5-7171 

FABULOUS MBTANNG m jw- 
wpr Port Ay. yet superb condition, 6 
rooms, $520,000, ma infawe $717. 
Landsatoed roof terroee far outdoor 
baureTCal M. Furtmberty NT 212 
734-93»73*0010 

QARRN ft NEW CANAAN Goniedi- 
cui Executive type homes for rent & 
trie. Pleasant N.Y. Gty subtxb. 
French spoken. Natranwide comec- 
dons. GofiibbeHs HE 20M5W724. 


PAMS IA DB0CE *■ 67 

mom. 2 baths. taws- hi WOO net. 


non. 2 baths. Wj njB" w - 

Tefc |31| 64 Wffl or 774 76 2S. 

NEAR WCN1PARNAS SE. , fa ff 
hMrtAJ slew 3. garden, Tel: 


beautiful defer. 


3257833 / 54249 


RESTLESS Executive, 23, ex.lHT em- 

Aurirdn / Europe. No Ms. Wrae 
EG?, 29 WoWenw Are J Fulwro. fat- 
don SW6 l Anjdwg hgd consdered. 


CHAMPS ELYSES. 3/3 roaw. rf 

comforts, short or brig fwta Cii Tit 

387 5303 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


ISSY IB MOUUWAW, m rmrtro 


aid HR 2 bedroom house, 

Tefc 621 32 71. - 


IBB ur 5EBCS fv AMERICAN 
RRMSnPABSi 


M&CBXS CASS 
280 S. 280 SL 280 SB, 

500 5L 500 SEL 500 5K with both 
vetoun and leather irtenw. 
1986 M00BSWU.BE . 
AVAILABLE SHORTLY 
Shipment ft delivery worldwide. 

NASSAU EXPORT GMBH, 

MAfNZBt LANDSTR. T91, 
D-6000 FRANKRJRT/M 
IB: (0) 69-73 30 61 
TUt 414018 




English, Belgian. Dutch < 
secretaries, knowledge of 
qiwed, EnaSsh shorthand 
tefestis. Write a phone; 


LOS ANGBB M KfcL Jbed- 
room condo. $660,000 a w* trade 
equity fa- Pons apartment- Write O. 
Greenwood, 1554 So. Sepulveda 
Blvd, Los Ai^da. CA 9002S 


18TH ICAR MONTMARTRE, 3/3 


ion. Dutch or Genrni 

le a phone: 138 Avenue 
751 16 Paris, France. Tel: 


SHORT TERM in Wn QiWMr. 
frfo agues. Ted: 329 38 83. 


Up to 89% af the purchase price cat be 
frond an very toy terms, So rieree 
contact i*_ your copy of our 34-poae 
brochure awaits you. Such on oppori^ 
nity as tha w3 not repeat it* eP I 


REAL ESTATE 
TIMESHARING 



EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 
AMBKAN UMV3SITY >i Paris has 
cxi ope ning for a pa+time student 
ho ofc s l o m mwor/ajfeurd erb^ 
advisor vaSd wtxr penrit or EC "o- 


ELDORADO AND 
RIVIERA CONVERTIBLE 
NEW 1985 

Foe delivery. 


We dad with O* farmaKes indutSnj 
Reastration. Shipping Converaon 
to curapeon ^JBofiwaons. 


RE5DB4ZA AG 
CH-eoOI Zurich, Teiockor SO 
Teli (1)221- 33 95 Tbe 813 376 RES CH 


UGO MAGGfORE 
ASCONA 

to ita world famous resort v« offer Brat 


MAMXUEU CAWCS MAJ8NA. De- 
cember, January ft February shares m 
FuOy furnished apmtmert, berfcoom, 
Ining roam with 2 extra beck hoP, 
kitchen, bathroom ft bgaa faring 
park, 64 nxm. second floor, poet 
outside porting, cellar. teruM. pfl. 

aESSfiW«“ 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


tar vaSd wort pennt or EC no- 
4 reqmred. Send deteris of expen- 
<w w. to Box 2666, Herdd 


MARAIS; Swerb 4 
done. FI 1,700 ne>- 


rooms, new 
Tefc 72094' 


Tribune, 92521 NtnHyCedn, France 
DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


To cxder your E l dorado or tSviera cril 
or telex 

OTIS EUROPE 

MIDDLE EAST AUTOMOBIIB LID. 
MONTE CARLO 
Telephone; fi® 25 74 32 or 
t 3« 479550 AUTO kC 


BEAUJOtAIS CHATEAU. Would you 
Urn to be the owner for Be rt O | 


ad houses, 

□eof Ascxmo or an 


the Mm with indoor pool, you wi find 
your home. Prices from 5F320.000 up to 
SF1 .100,000. Mortgages at kjw Swiss 


MARBB1A, FULLY EQIMFPB1 VIUA 
loaxed tfawiy on sea with large 
beach, 5 man bedrooms aS with own 
bathrooms plus 2 guest b edoons 
bath with bathrooms, lory & xdert, 
heated s wim n re g pod, tenns axxt. 


May. Applicants must hare exceflent 
finenod references. Oetaib and fWrt- 
d lerms on nppfccaay. Interested 


interest rota. These red eskXei me 
free for sde to foreigners. 


gundy vinyards. For further details 
sand name and address to Dor, Pare 
de to Cadende. 122 rue du Com. 
Mtaid. laOBBMaisaAe. 



I A A 

NOVELTIES 


Sr-4S£L£SSasic 

c/o Femdde Intomatiord. 3 Ptaca du 
Mdard, 12D4 Geneva, Swttxeilcnd, 
la Boor. Tekx= 439814 HMCCH 

LUXURY 1 BB3ROOM flat in petur- 
mcwe Puerto Po&rco, telephone ft 
mad service, central nosing, dxxt- 
Aong let. ovafade NoverSer. Tel 
UK Stmi 57853 / Spain 71 531 263. 


BAERALD HOME LTD. 
RBDENZA TIZIANA 
VTA LOCARNO 27 A 
044612 ASCONA 
TB. 04-93-352184 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 



POSmONS WANTED 


'86 MODELS 

9U TURBO 
500 SL 


EXPERENCS SWISS 
BUTLER - CHAUFFEUR 


With eduerfiond bodcffttcmd, fobo in 
busnesij, 41, plecacnX pwsoncity, 
good presentation, Germoiv EngBjh & 
French, takes care of you ft your norne. 
Free to trovaL Rrst doss r ef erences. 
Plecae write to: Hubert Brengger, La 
Cuburaz E Ftoce de to GariL Ot-1095 
lutry / Lausome or Kh 071/39 48 76. 


Gerfinalr. 1 00, D-4330 Mudbeim 
Tel^ 0)200-434099, TU 854118ft 


BOGUSH EXPERTS 


af Tax-free 


Brand New 


THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 


New York 10022 



PORSCHE BMW, ft ROUS-ROYCS 
LH/UH dive. New ft PreOwnod. 

8 yetn experience in Invport/Export. 
Documentation, shipping etc. 

USA our scieodiy. 

Take advantage of our experienca. 


By John F. Bums 

■ .Vn- York Tunes Sen-ice 

BEIJING— Twenty months ago 
Michael A. Andreouoia was out of 
a job, his position as an engineer 
and designer with Applicon Inc. 
eliminated when a French compa- 
ny, Sehlumberger. took over the 
U.S. company. 

Last wedt Mr. Andreottola was 
in China as the president of his owe 
firm, Ameri can Ink Jet Corp. of 
Wobuhi, Massachusetts. 

While in Bajing, the 38-year-old 
executive made fresh inroads into a 
market that has provided his com- 
pany with 580,000 of business in 
little more than a year. His compa- 
ny's total first-year revenues were 
about $600,000. 

Since the resumption of trade 
between the United States and Chi- 
na started in 1972, the dominant 
corporate players have been large 
multinati onal corporations such, as 
Boeing Co^ General Electric Co. 
and International Business Ma- 
chines Carp. 

The Chinese like to buy from 
companies that are market leaders, 
and the big companies are better 
equipped to meet the heavy costs of 
building a relationship in Beijing. 

None theless, entrepreneurs like 
Mr. Andreottola are proving that 
there is a mebe in die Chinese mar- 
ket for small businesses, and not 
only in the arts and crafts trade 
that has flourished since 1972. 

Mr. Andreottola, making his 
first visit to Beijing, found little 
time to see die sights. At Applicon 
he specialized in the development 
of computer-aided plotters and the 
inks used with than, notably in 
seismology. 

He has built up his own business 
in mmnfarmng and servicing plot- 


|n a few days in Beijing and 
Guangzhou, which is dose to die 
major explorations being conduct- 
ed by Giinese and Western oil 
companies in the South China Sea, 
Mr. Andreottola met with the buy- 
ers of his inks and identified the 
operators of several plotters previ- 
ously sold here who are potential 
customers. * 

Along the way he also sounded' 
out the possibility of selling the 
Chinese second-hand plotters from 
U A companies hit by slumping oO 
exploration at home. 

“About 90 percent of my busi- 
ness is sdsmologyoriented, and in 
the United States that's .going 
down fast." Mr. Andreottola said. 
“Here, it's headed in the opposite 
direction — there's a lot of oil ex- 
ploration. and a lot of seismology" 
He added, “I can see where I will 
be doing 10 to 15 percent of my 
business here, more or less offset- 
ting losses in the market at home." 

Mr. Andreottola’s effort to enter 
the Giinese market has been aided 
by another Massachusetts-based 


a small hospital in the Vietnamese" 
central highlan ds that was dedicat. 
ed lo Americans who died in the 
war. From those experiences grew a 
conviction that an American ^com- 
pany did not have w be lisfed in tte 

Fortune 500 to be competitive 
overseas. 

The opening to . China came 
when the governor of GuangdOM, 
one of the most populous of Gu- 
na’s provinces, visited Massachu- 
setts m{9S3. ■ 

At Mr. Cairoll’s invitation, the 
official, Liang Ungguang, spent 

. I. .. f III* .. 


Dragoncdr Boute' 
Again Refected $ 


& 


VTkuwiu, ■ m muq ■■" ‘ C P ^ ■ - 

two days looking ax business ana 
industry in the Worcester area and 
reciprocated by inviting Mr. Car- 
roll to lead a small-business delega- 
tion to Guangdong. That 1984 trip 
provided the contacts for the most 
recent visit 

“As the Chinese explained _u to 
us," Mr. Carroll said, “a lot of their 
companies have no opportunity — 
and insufficient funds to deal 
with IBM or GE, bin they are eager 
for die advantages that can flow 
from dealing with smaller compa- 
nies that proride a match for their 
activities.” 

. He added: “I think they realize 
that smaller companies are more . 
fieri bJe,; can malre their decisions . 


company, Small Business Service 
Bureau lac Under the leadership 


Bureau Inc Under the leadership 
of Francis R. Canon, who founded 
the company in 1968, it has orga- 
nized two small-business ddega- 


preneurs like mzed two smali-mKincss deJega- 
proring that tions to China in the past year that 
Chinese mar- have produced promising links for! 


: Realm " . 

HONG KONG —Th* 
eminent of Hong 
again rejected an application by . 
Dragonair to fly charter routa 
to Bey ing and Shanghai. A . 
statement Thursday said the... 

application was premature -be- 
cause Britain and China Arere? 
negotiating an air accord. The ■ 
talks ended this month without 

agreement. .. • • 

Dragonair, a Hong i^ on | 8114 - " 
law with financial backing from - ' 
China, applied for the charto - ■ 
routes in August Dragonair of- . ■ 
ridais called the fust rejection- 
an imriMsked effort td.stifle uf^ .. 
airline’s growth. . : 

Cathay Pacific Airways has a- . 
license to operate scheduled •• 
flights to Bemng and Sh angha i. ■ 
Caledonian Far East; Airways. 1 
also has expressed interest. in. - 
the routes. r - 


ters, supplying tbe inks and expert 
knowledge. This provided a needed 


wk>k unrrt maiMMY 


Sutax. 


AUTOMOBILES 



knowledge. This provided a needed 
service for Chinese companies in- 
volved tn burgeoning on-exp 
tion operations here. 


participants. 

Mr. Carroll’s company has 
signed up 35,000 small businesses 
in the United States as members, 
and prorides them with a broad 
range of serrices from management 
assistance to electronic mailing, ac- 
cess io group medical insurance 
and legislative lobbying. 

Years ago, before the Commu- 
nist takeover in Vietnam, Mr- Car- 
roll was involved in a business that 
built concrete-hulled shrimp boats 
there. 

Later he was the prime mover 


more quickly and can work on 
smalle^p^ctfitma^^ns.’ , . n 
On the amative side, many small 
companies could be daunted by the 
high costs and the time involved in 
visi ting China Blit Mr. Carroll, 
whose company charges a basic fee 
of- SI , 000* for organizing a business 
executives trip and. setting up in- 
troductions: says that a first jour- 
ney to Beijing can be budgeted at 
less than 55,000, half the cost of tire- 
some trip-if organized Lhroughone 
of the GiS. banks now offenng in- 
troductions to ihe China market 
in adiStion to Mr. Andreottola. 
several othfirmanbers of thegroup 

fniinri fciicrriKC ~ ’ — 1 5 iL " 


. One satisfied participant was . 
Roger Broederdbrf, . presidait.aL 
R.O. Broederdcrf Inc, a company-. 

in Lake in the Hflls, Ilhnok 
It serializes- in industiial automat 

tion. ■ 

Mr. Broederdorf negotiated 
-agreement: to form a jomt-yennsj; . . 
company with a Chinese, dectnatf 
jes factory to prddnee madnoeC, 
controlled loading equipmenffora 
Guangdong coal mine, . 




. The A&xbietl Press - 

NEW YORK — Colgat^Palio- 
olive Co. said Thursday that; ; H. 
would repurchase 3 mfllicm -diaits. 
in the open market or in privacy 
tiaiotiated transactions in addition 
JTimwwii cash J — “ — c 1 *’ 




$100,000 in the Worcester area lor recent visit 


A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 


pre-opening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 


Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and aH with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 



US Conversion 


DOT/EPA 

We offer Ful service from 
pickrUp m Gemwny to shipping, 
testing + door-del rvery in USA 



10 YEARS 

We DaTnrar Cm to Itw World 


FCHAROC 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCO 


Keeping a contort tfocfc of eere itoi 
300 brand new can, 


TRANSCAR 

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SPEOAUSTS 


rooting 5000 happy dfertt every year. 
Send far free mufocolar entdog 
Traraao SA, 95 Noordalcxxi, 


Executive Services Available 


Model Suites 


(212) 371-8866 


LINCOLN CENTER 
PALACE 


A1FINAM APARTMH4TS for efejnd 
serviced aptrtnwlL 5 nent warn) 
detance to OxfbrdSL/Band SL/Har- 


ley SI. ES7 per day. Tel London 01-636 
a 21. Tbt 884130 VIEIF G. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


PAHS DI 225 64 44 

CANf.CS/NCE J93) 39 43 44 

FRANKFURT (06 1 07) 80 51 

BONN / COLOGNE CQ22ffl 212921 
STUTTGART _pm\) 880 

MUNICH (0891# 10 

BREMERHAVEN (04711 430 

NEW YORK PJ3 69S 70 

HOUSTON 713 931 76 

105 ANGaS 213 568 92 

MONTREAL 514] 866 66 

AGB4TS WOOD WH 
Leave it to us to bring iMa you 


2030 Antwerp, Belwroi 
Tel 323/542 62 40. Tlx 3SXI7 TANS S 


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6K7061 


695 7061 
931 760 5 
568 9288 
866 6681 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE; (or invnedote deffetry 

FROM STOCK 


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band, uxn wxn l cn in USA 


RUTH INC 


TAUNUSSTA. 52, 6000 RANCRIRT 
W Gem. tel (0^-232351. 6x 411559 


Mpyxficete 18 loan perthame condo- 
rrirautn m ihe heart af Lincoln Center 


Area B t e ut h to hno pun u m ic views of 
cd Central Park, Manhattixi, and New 
Jersey. The pradgiaus bokfrtg pro 
vidw 24 hour d oanno n | c onoyg e, 
rooftop pool ml health dub, pariang, 
ddhr mad Hrvice & exceptional seam- 
ly- Apartment cm be altered to wit 
your needs, tonal corporate hoodqum- 
ten or for a fnrnfty with itocontprarna- 
ing tode. Contort us for an exetaive 
viewing. 


MARILYN E. RBSNBt 
G.L STEVENS REALTY 
60 East 42nd Street 
New York, N.Y. 10165 
(212) 687-6767 



MOTORS GmbH 

S nee 1972, exp erie n ce d cor ftnder for 
Mercedes, Porsche, 8MW, Jaguar, bo- 
roedtote deSvery. Import/ wpart, IIS. 


DOT ft &A, shipping far tourist and 
dealer. Ocsanwitfe Motors Gmtft 
Terstoegenrtr. ft 4 Dueadd arf, W . 
Germany (0) 211-04646, * * 858>374. 


HJROPORT TAX 
FREE CARS 


CbB or write far free catalog, 
■ta 12511 


dan Aeport, Hoiand 
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» 2071 ffCAR M 


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*$ 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


INTERNATI ONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1985 

BUSINESS PEOPLE 


Page 21 


Hollar Lower in U.S. Amid Profit-Taking 


t ompileJ hr Our Staff From Dupattha 

NEW YORK — The do! far end- 
ed sharply lower in volatile trading 
Thursday as operators took profits 
■and squared positions before Fri- 
day s scheduled release of major 
U-S. economic indicators. 

The dollar traded up to 2.98 
Deutsche marks in Europe, a key 
technical level, and was just below 
that £rice when speculators on Chi- 
cago s International Monetary 
Market began taking profits in U.S. 
trading. The’ currency then fell to 
2.9350 DM before recovering. 

In New York, the currency 
closed at 19410 DM, down 2 pfen- 
nig: f from Wednesday's 2.9620 
DM: at 8.9665 French francs, 
down from 9.0225, and at 14250 
Swiss francs, down from 14400. 

The pound rose to SI 324, up 
from Si JOS Wednesday while the 
Japanese yen closed at 243.15 to 
the dollar, up slightly from 243.60. 

Earl Johnson, vice president at 
Chicago’s Harris Bank, said the 
dollar su'JJ had a very firm tone, 
mainly on the expectation that the 


government’s report on August re- 
tail sales to be released Friday 
would show a good gain. 

"Although the retail numbers 
should be good. I’m wondering if 
expectations have gotten so mgh 
that they might be a disappoint- 
ment,” he cautioned. “IF that is so. 
a reasonably good figure might not 
be positive for the dollar.” 

But, he said. “I think a test of 

3.00 German marks is inevitable, 
whether it happens tomorrow or 
next week.” 

In earlier trading in London, the 
dollar closed more than 2 pfennigs 
below its opening 19695 Deutsche 
marks after being quoted as high as 
19800 DM during the session. 

“It looks like people are starting 
to tire of baying dollars.” one deal- 
er said. The U.S. currency closed at 
19442 DM in London after finish- 
ing at 2.962 DM Wednesday night. 

In London, the pound rose lo 
SI 3 1 75 front S 1 .3090 Wednesday. 

Dealers said the pound’s recov- 
ery from the day's lows of around 
$139 mainly reflected the dollar's 


decline toward the end of the ses- 
sion. although early Bank of En- 
gland support had been detected. 

In earlier European trading 
Thursday, the dollar was fixed in 
Frankfurt at 2.9691 Deutsche 
marks, up from 2.93SR DM 
Wednesday, and at 9.0420 French 
francs in Paris, up from 8.9635. In 
Zurich, the dollar closed at 2.4370 
Swiss francs, virtually unchanged 
from 2.4360. 

In Tokyo, the dollar dosed at 
241.70 yen, down from Wednes- 
day’s close of 243.40. Importers 
continued active purchases in the 
afternoon on expectations that the 
dollar would not decline, but sell- 
ing by exporters prevented a sharp 
rise, they said. 

Interbank dealers in Tokyo, re- 
luctant to take long-term positions 
in the market, also traded actively 
but only for quick profits, dealers 
said. 

Meanwhile, South Africa's com- 
mercial rand closed in London at 
40.45 cents, doan slightly from 
Wednesday’s 40.75. (Reuters, API 


Hong Kong Bank Plans Rights Issue 
To Make Up for Balance-Sheet Deficit 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — Hong Kong Industrial & Commercial Bank 
Ltd. said Thursday that its liabilities exceeded assets by 963 million 
Hong Kong dollars (5 1 2.4 million! when the government took control 
of it m Jane, and that it planned a rights issue and capital reduction to 
make up the deficiency. 

It said that an audit by Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. showed that 
the bank lost 340.4 millio n dollars from July 1984 until the govern- 
ment takeover on June 7, 1985. The government took control of Hong 
Kong Industrial when it rescued Overseas Trust Bank, which owns 
63.5 percent of Hong Kong Industrial 

HICB said the losses were mainly from increased provisions for 
nonperforming loans but did not specify the size of the provisions. 

Il said it hoped to raise 4043 mutton dollars from the issuance of 
408 million 10-percent non cumulative redeemable preference shares 
at par of one dollar each. Rights would entitle holders to four 
preference shares for each share held as of Sept. 26. 1985. 

It said that Overseas Trust Bank would take up its entitl ement of 
259 million preference shares and that it had underwritten the balance 
at no cost to Hong Kong Industrial 


Canada Exploits Its Oil Sands 


EUROMARKETS 


Primary Sector Is Again Focus of Attention 


1 

1 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Reuters 

LONDON — Three new float- 
ing- rate-note issues were launched 
in the primary Eurobond market 
on Thursday os attention again fo- 
cused on the sector. Secondary- 
market prices showed little change 
before Friday’s release of new UjS. 
economic data, dealers said. 

The most successful of the day’s 
issues was a $1 00-million, seven- 
year floater for Credit Commercial 
dr France with warrants attached. 
The warrants are exercisable into a 
straight Eurapean-eurrency-unit 
bond. The issue was led by CCF 
itself, and. on an ex-warrants basis, 
finished above the par issue price. 

The CCF issue pays five basis 
points over the six-month London 
interbank offered rate. Each 
$10,000 note has 10 one-year war- 
ra^.s, priced at S36. Each warrant 


entitles the holder to subscribe to a 
seven-year. 8%-percent ECU bond. 

The holder may either exchange 
one note plus the warrants and 
$625 cash to obtain 12 of the ECU 
bonds or can keep the note and 
exchange the warrants and pay 
$9375 Tor 12 bonds. 

Dealers said the issue was mainly 
being traded on an ex-warrant ba- 
sis. One trader at a U.K. bank said, 
“strip the warrants out and you’ve 
got just what the market wants at 
the moment, a straightforward 
floater for a quality name.” 

On an ex-warrants basis, it end- 
ed on the when-issued market at 
around 100.05. It pays total fees of 
10 basis points. Prices on a cum- 
- warrant basis were hard to obtain. 
The actual warrants jumped to 
trade at $45 bid $50 offered before 
dropping to be quoted at $35 bid. 


Also introduced Thursday was a 
floater that has a novel maximum 
coupon cap that does not apply 
until later in the note’s life. The 
$ 1 00-million, seven-year issue was 
for Security Pacific Corp. and pays 
M point over three-month Libor. A 
maximum coupon of 13 percent 
applies from years three to seven 
inclusive. 

The issue, which was lead man- 
aged by Banque Paribas Capital 
Markets, ended on the when-issued 
market at 99.67, just inside the total 
fees of 40 basis points. 

Also launched was a 5 100- mil- 
lion. seven-year “mismatch” note 
for Morgan Guaranty GmbH, 
which will In turn lend the funds to 
Italy's Isveuoer. It will pay the 
higher of one- or six-month Libor 
semiannually, but with the coupon 
refixed monthly. 


(Continued from Page 15) 
oil, predicts that conventional re- 
serves in that province will faO to 
1.04 billion barrels by 2007. from 
3.16 billion now. 

Although the big oil-sands pro- 
ducers are still the two mines, 
which together turn out about 

175.000 bands a day, a growing 
proportion of the basic tar-like 
crude called bitumen is being 
pumped to the surface of other oU 
sands using conventional wells af- 
ter being softened with injections 
of steam. 

Production of bitumen alone is 

55.000 barrels a day and is expect- 
ed to triple in the next few years. 
Although the bitumen could be 
transformed into synthetic crude, 
as is done at the two existing oil- 
sands mines, it currently is sold 
much as is. primarily to refiners in 
the northern United States. 

The thick bitumen is mixed with 
natural-gas condensate, a thinner 
cnide-like liquid, and sent to the 
refiners by pipeline. 

The biggest oil-sands develop- 
ment using conventional oil wells is 
at Cold Lake, Alberta, and belongs 
to imperial Oil Ltd., a 70-percent- 
owned unit of Exxon Corp. On July 
22. its first stage of commercial 
production began at 19,000 barrels 
a day. By the end of 1986. it is 


Mannesman!! Names Chief Executive 


expected to be churning out 75.000 
barrels a day of bitumen. 

Unlike various multibillion-dol- 
lar projects abandoned three years 
ago by Imperial and Shell Canada 
Resources Ltd. of Toronto, the 
Cold Lake development proceeds 
in smaller stages, an approach 
more sensitive to cash flow and 
future price expectations. Other 
companies takin g this approach on 
specific projects include Petro- 
Canada, BP Canada Inc, Amoco 
Canada Petroleum Co. and Dome 
Petroleum Ltd. 

“None of these investments are 
firmly committed,*’ said Pat 
O'Connor, manager of public af- 
fairs for Amoco Canada, which has 

2.000 barrels a day onstream out of 
a possible 23,000 barrels a day. 

Bitumen production costs range 
from about 51 1 a barrel to $14.80, 
industry experts say. The combina- 
tion of bitumen and condensate 
can then be sold for nearly $25 a 
barreL 

Ed Kemp, vice president of oil- 
sands operations for Esso Re- 
sources Canada Ltd., Imperial’s ex- 
ploration and production 
subsidiary, said the per-unit cost of 
bitumen production was much less 
than at oil-shale projects Exxon 
abandoned earlier this decade in 
Colorado and Australia. 


By Brenda Erdmann 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The supervisory 
board of Mannesmann AG, the 
Wesi German engineering group, 
has named Werner Dieter chief ex- 
ecutive, succeeding Franz Josef 
Weisweiler, who dial at the end of 
July after a brief illness. He was 57. 

Mr. Weisweiler had been with 
Mannesmann since 1970. taking 
over as chief executive from Egon 
Overbeck in 1983. Under his lead- 
ership the group nourished. In late 
August, Mannesmann reported 
that turnover for the half year rose 
by 16 percent, to 8.01 billion DM 
(S2.7 billion). 

The new Mannesmann chief, 
who is 56. studied mechanical engi- 
neering at Esslingen School of En- 
gineering and started his profes- 
sional career in. 1952 with Robert 
Bosch, the West German white 
goods maker, as development man- 
ager. 

In i960. Mr. Dieter joined GX. 
Rexroth GmbH. He took over as 
bead of the company from Ludwig 
Rexroth on Jan. 1, 1973. when Mr. 
Rexroth retired. Mannesmann ac- 
quired an interest in Rexroth in 
1968 and took over the rest of the 
company in 2975. 

Under the chairmanship of Mr. 
Dieter, Rexroth became one of the 
world’s l eading hydraulics makers 
with 1984 turnover of 1.4 bittioD 
DM. 

Standard Chartered Merchant 
Bank Ltd. said Ng Eng Leong has 
been appointed m a na ging director 
of Standard Chartered Merchant 
Bank Asia Ltd. in Singapore. Mr. 
Ng, who was director in charge of 
corporate finance at the Singapore 
unit, succeeds Kenneth MacLen- 
nan , who has completed his period 
of secondment and will return to 
th e Lo ndon head office. 

ITT Europe Inc. has namad John 
K. Aho director, Eastern Europe, 
succeeding George Tsygalnitzy, 
who retired. Mr. Aho moves to 
Brussels f rom Istanbul where he 
served as ITTs regional (Erector. 
Near East 

First National Bank of Atlanta 
said Greenfield W. Pius is return- 
ing to Atlanta to become head of 
European and Middle Eastern cor- 
porate marketing. As previously re- 


ported. Bruce Durkee will succeed 
Mr. Pitts as head of the bank’s 
London representative office. 

RnsseU Reynolds Associates Inc. 
has opened an office in Geneva, 
headed by John G. McCarthy Jr. 
He was in the London office of the 
U.S.-based executive search firm. 

Postipankki has named Ulf Bur- 
meister deputy general manager of 
its international department, re- 
sponsible for foreign exchange and 
treasury operations. He was an as- 
sistant general manager in the Hel- 
sinki-based bank's international 
department. 

Svenska BP AB, the Stockholm- 
based unit of British Petroleum 
Co„ has named Clive Chambers 
supply and trading manager. John 
Smi th has been appointed lubri- 
cants-services divisional manager 
at BP Oil Ltd. in London to suc- 
ceed Mr. Chambers. . 

Grinflays Bank PLC of London 
has named Giraja Pande regional 
coordinator for the Pacific Basin, 
based in Hong Kong. He succeeds 
Brian Human, who. as previously 
reported, has been named to head 
Grindlays’ new representative of- 
fice in Bangkok. Mr. Pande was 
credit and marketing manager for 
South Korea. 

Prime Computer (UK) Ltd. has 
appointed David Prior marketing 
director. He succeeds George Ken- 
dall, who has become managing 
director of Prime’s Hong Kong 
subsidiary. Prime Computer is a 
U3. maker of minicomputers. 


Industrial Bank of Japan Ltd. has 
named Nobuo Ova as associate di- 
rector in charge of new issue syndi- 
cation at IBJ international Ltd. in 
London. He succeeds Kazuhiko 
Murakami who is returning to the 
Tokvo head office of Industrial 
Bank of Japan. 

Arco International Oil & Gas 
Co~ a unit of Atlantic Richfield 
Co., has named P.V. Newman 
manager of its Asia-Middle East 
exploration region and Robert Ol- 
sen manager for the Europe -Afri- 
ca-Latin America exploration re- 
gjon. 

Texaco Ltd, the London-based 
unit of Texaco Inc., has appointed 
Roger Hawksworth and Owen Jen- 
kins directors. Mr. Hawksworth is 
general manager, finance and eco- 
nomics, and Mr. Jenkins general 
manage r, marketing sales. 

Wood, Mackenzie £ Co- the 
London and Edin burgh stock bro- 
kerage. said Roy Dannie is to be- 
come a director within its corporate 
finance department. He was a man- 
aging director of Dillon. Read Lid. 

Advanced Micro Devices Inc. 
the California-based maker of 
semiconductors, has named 
Charles P. Mulligan as plant man- 
ager of its planned manufacturing 
facility in Ireland, the company's 
first wafer-making facility outside 
the United States. 

Avon Products Inc. saul Alan J. 
Daniels has become group rice 
president, new business develop- 
ment. Europe, for its Avon divi- 
sion. 


Devebping Fluorescent Bulbs 


(Continued from Page 15) 
contain rare-earth dements such as 
yttrium and europium, can with- 
stand a rdaiivdy high current pass- 
ing through a narrow tube. 

Today’s compact fluorescems 
start as small as 25 indies long (65 
centimeters) for a 5-watt bulb that 
emits the light of a 25-watt incan- 
descent The largest compact Fluo- 
rescent is an 28-watt bulb with a 
bullt-m adapter that gives off 
slightly less li gh t than a 75-watt 
incandescent The bulb, about 65 


inches long, is made by North 
American Philips. 

In addition to thdr durability, 
rare-earth phosphors also have the 
advantage of producing a spectrum 
of light dose to that of (he incan- 
descent according to lighting ex-, 
perts. 

While the initial cost of a com- 
pact fluorescent is several times 
higher than that of an incandes- 
cent fighting manufacturers say 
that the fluorescent more than pays 
for itself in saved dectridty costs. 


_T 


Bo 
■ 5 
Sot 
Hot 
Off 


Thtnsdays 

ore 


Prices 


NA5DAO prices as of 
3 pjn. New York lime. 

l uz The Associated Press 


JJMortffJ 

Hi* Law Slack 

Dm. Yld. ^D&^Hloh 

Net . 

LOW 3PJH.OIW | 


1 - 

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11 ADCTI 



33 

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18*4 

1914 + ft 

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12 

19 

18ft 

18ft— *4 

18ft 

14 AEL 



49 

16 

lift 

15ft 

19ft 

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2 2 

19% 

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19 + % 

23ft 

16ft AFG 



IDO 

1914 

18ft 

JBft— *6 

JR 

13 Coast F 



17ft 

17% 

17%—% 

25 

10ft ASK 



274 


10ft 

10ft 

9 Cat* Lb 



321 

19 

1884 

18ft 

23 




687 

21 

20ft 

20*6— ft 

48ft 

24*4 CocaBtl 

540 IJ 

83 

48 

47*6 

47*4— % 

12*4 

216 Acodln 

JO 

4 J 

333 

4ft 

3ft 

4ft 

18*4 

12% Coeur 



5* 

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15% 

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lift 

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129 


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8ft— *6 

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■kZK-Evma 



157 

216 

2ft 



M 

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145 

24 

23ft 

23ft- ft 

26*6 




1385 

15% 

Mft 

15% 

lft AdacLD 



48 

7 

Ift 

lft— ft 

6*4 

2*4 CMaQR 



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Tft 

Tft— ft 

12*6 

Aft AOooo 



671 

Oft 

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15ft 




lift 

lift— ft 

1 lift 

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4A5 

10ft 

10*6 

10ft— ft 

Aft 

4 Collins 



4 

4ft 

4ft 

4*6— ft 

■ Sft 

2 Aroufrn 



111 

M 

38b 

3*6— lb 


1JW 

XI 

1 

32% 

32% 

17ft— % 

I 13 

13ft AfIBSh 

JO 

XI 

I7B 

1596 

158b 

15ft— ft 

20ft 

15% CoIrTle 




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83 

13ft 

12ft 

13ft + ft 

21ft 

15 CnloNt 

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90 

15ft 

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532 

11 

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1 399: 

28ft AlexB 
131-a Allln 

1A0 

17 

109 

3886 

38ft 

38*4 — % 

2096 

11% Com cst 

.12 


20 

20*6 

19ft 

20ft + % 

: 2* ■ 



210 

22 

21 

22 + *6 

15*4 


.16 

15 

225 

lift 

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154 

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Aft 

6*4 

496 

186 Comdlal 


Z78 

3 

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284 — 14 

i 24V, 

10*6 AioflW 

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43*4 

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43 

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1J4 

25 

362 

40ft 

40ft 

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I 36ft 

20ft AlldBn 

J4 

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114 

21 

2096 

21 — % 

13*4 

984 CmlSh 

50a 5d 

35 

10 

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12+ ft 
28ft — *4 

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56 

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31ft 

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58 

15 

470 

25ft 

25ft 

25% 4- ft 

; 26 


At 

XT 

43 

15 

15 

15 

1484 


JO* 


118 


9ft 

Oft 

I 12ft 

<ft AWAIrt 



656 

10*1? 

10ft 

10ft 

24 

12 CmpCds 


119 

20 

19*6 

19*4- % 


.. _ BVj AmAdv 
14ft 10ft ABnkr 
14ft JOH i AmCarr 
oft 5ft AConn 
17ft 13 AFdSL 
8ft 4ft AmFrst 
30ft 14ft AFlOtCS 
37ft JO A Greet 
14ft eft AmlnU 
12ft 5ft AMosnt 
14ft 10ft AMS 3 
34ft ZSft ANtlns 
4ft ft A Quash 
34ft 14 ft Am Sec 
IS 7ft AmSfTs 
6 1ft ASolor 
•2ft 7» ASutb 
44ft 24ft Amrtrs 1.60 
Eft 3ft Airmen 
29% lAVi AmskB 
20ft 14ft Amwl 3 
15ft 2 Antovlc 
ISft 7ft Anoren 
394. 17 Andrew 
10ft 6ft Anooee 
Mft 16 AootoC 
31ft 14ft ABPMC 
27ft lift APIBIos 
mi Ipft ApMCm 
36 19ft APldMi 
13ft ■ APtdSIr 
71* 3ft Archive 
22ft ■ 5% ArsoSV 

to 78ft Arlzfl 

9 Aft Artel 
17ft 10ft AsdHEt 
9 5ft Altronv 
27 12ft AfMffl 
43ft 35ft A tint Be 
14ft 8ft AIHlRJ 
14 8ft AtlFln 
JO 17ft All Res 5 
16ft 2ft AtSeArs 
10 15 AtwdOc 

14'* 6 AutTrT 
12ft 4ft Autmtx 
9 4U Auxtan 
13ft 3ft Avacre 
25ft « AvnfGr 
25ft 17ft Avntefc 
20 15ft Avatar 
20ft 13ft AvtatGP 
7ft 4 Art CM 


107 

25 

26 

84 

49 

JO 

83 

2891 

110 

43 

19 

17 

121 

19 

97 

40 

29 

116 

115 

113 

8 

98 
37 
151 
69 

5934 

3333 

712 


S3 
7 
02 
42 
123 
83 

.12 Id S3 

24 

.40 13 S5 

.90 24 93 

57 
65 
226 


60 3.9 
I 

JO 39 
SB 1 9 
40 XI 


un so 

1-02 34 


IJ0 3J 
40 22 


9Vi Oft „ 

12ft 12ft 12ft 
72ft 72ft 13ft— ft 
Bft 8ft Sft 
lift lift 15ft— ft 
Bft Oft Sft -t- ft 
28ft 27ft 27ft— *6 
30ft » 30ft + ft 
13ft 13 13 — ft 

6ft 6 6ft— ft 
14ft 16ft 16ft + ft 
3«34£*ft 

30ft 29ft 20 
12ft 12 12 — ft 

2fc !«. 1#.— ft 
ft ft ft 
33ft 33ft 33ft— ft 
8 7ft 7ft— ft 
24 ft 25ft 26 
18ft 10ft 18ft + ft 
13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
17ft 17 17 

10ft 10ft 10ft— ft 
17 16 16ft + % 

16ft 15ft 16 + ft 

22ft 22ft 22ft + ft 
13 12ft 12ft— ft 
21 20 Vj 21 

8ft Ift— % 


ZD 


137 

370 

217 

57 

1B4 


457 

37 

71 

20 44 29 


Sft 

10ft 

39ft 

7ft 

13ft 

Sft 

24ft 

37 

lift 

10ft 

28ft 

12ft 

15ft 

5ft 

Sft 

i 

7ft 

9 

20ft 

18ft 

15 


5 5 — ft 

18ft 10ft 
39ft 39ft + ft 
7ft 7ft 
12ft 12ft 
6ft 6ft 

14 24 — ft 
36ft 36ft— ft 
IT 11 

10ft 10ft 
27ft 27ft— ft 
lift 12ft + ft 

15 15 

6ft 6ft + ft 
4ft 5ft + ft 
Sft f%— ft 
7 7ft + ft 
9 9 — ft 

19ft 19ft— Vt 
18ft lBft— ft 
14ft 15 -I- ft 

4ft 4ft 


39ft BBDO 
7ft BRCom 
15ft BancokJ 
21ft BcpHw 
6ft BonoH 
28ft BKNEs 
Bft BkMAm 
Oft Bankvt 
7744 Santa J 
Aft BaronD 
4 SsTnA 
7 BOSAfll 
3116 BsetF 
38ft BayBks 

Aft Bavty 

Sft BntftCl 
12ft Bcnnan 
29ft BetzLb 
JOft Bio B 
oft BloSeor 

- Oft Binary s 
3ft BloRas 
4ft Blown 

1 Bfosrc 
Aft BtcrtcR 

- 5 Bird Inc 
26ft BoatBn 
15ft BoDGv 

Aft BoItTc 
lift Best Be 
9ft BsrnFC 
Bft BroeCP 
3ft Branca 
1ft BrwTom 

* B Brunos 
10ft BulkJTs 
15ft Bmnm 
15 BurrBr 
21ft DMAS 
3 BuslnhJ 


220 « 101 
152 

JO 54 27 

126 A3 3 
JO 83 25 

200 <5 90 

120 95 32 

48 

24 22 464 
1 

IJMtlOL* 39 
J0O24 19 

222 42 89 

.12 U 16 
48 
139 

129 AO 15* 
85 
26 
323 
363 
274 
38 
14 
40 


Aft 

Bft 


48ft 
Sft 
16% 15ft 
32ft 32 
9ft Oft 
45ft 
10ft 
13 
17 


11 


Oft 

12ft 

J4V5 

Oft 

WVb 

Oft 


Oft . 
33ft 33 
55ft 54ft 
6ft 6ft 
Oft Oft 
1 Aft 15ft 
33ft 33 
14ft 14ft 
15 14ft 
10 Oft 
TVS Aft 
Oft Bft 
1 % 116 
7 Aft 
Sft Bft 


48ft 

Sft 

16 

32 —Vt 
Oft 

44ft— ft 

10ft 

12ft 

J6ft— K 
8 ft + Si 
10ft— ft 
7ft— ft 
33ft + ft 
54ft— ft 
Aft— ft 
Oft 

15ft— ft 
33ft 

14ft— li 
14ft + ft 
10 + ft 

7ft 

8ft— ft 

lft 

Aft— ft 


150 

AS 

35 

33% 

33 

33 — % 



21 % 





15 

6*6 

6*6 

4*6— ft 





24% 



67 

23% 

22*6 

22 *6— *6 



1 



11 *6— H 

.12 

35 

in 

72 

lft 

386 

lft 

s r+ft 

.16 



Mft 


14*6— ft 


1 

20*6 

20*6 

20*6 + ft 

20 


30 

Mft 

16% 

1646— *6 


1 


17ft 

17ft + % 


3J 


27U 

27*6 

27% 


894 

•7 

6*6 

fib— I6 


12 Month 
HtohLow Slack 


Sale* in Net 

Dlv. Yld IDO* Hlsti Lon 3 PM. OlVe 


31ft 

16 CFdBkS 

54 

X4 

68 

25ft 

74ft 

24ft- ft 

■ 

lft C*rmtk 



44 

Tft 

3U 

38b + ft 

16ft 




393 

M 

13*6 

13ft— % 

6 ft 

3ft ChapEn 



134 

4 

3ft 

4 

77 

13ft ChrmSs 

JO 

Id 

1293 

20 ft 

20*6 

20 ft + ft 

71ft 

11 % ChkPnt 



237 

18ft 

17 

17 —lft 

11 

6 % ChkTeh 



44 

8 ft 

8 ft 

8 ft— Vi 

31*6 

10*6 ChLwn 

JS 

2 d 

43 

19 

18*6 

19 + % 


3ft Cnoroex 
15 Oft CtiryE 

16ft Oft Chichi 
31 25ft OilPocs 
77 Aft Chranr 
19ft 9ft OirDwf 
12ft 5ft Chvron 
44ft 2416 Clnto* 
34ft 14ft 


.12 12 



Bft 8ft 
10’-- 10ft 10ft + ft 
10VS 10ft 10ft + ft 
29ft 28 23ft— ft 

9ft 964 W6— ft 
19 18ft 18ft— ft 
Oft Sft 8ft— ft 
38 38 38 —1 

15ft 15 15ft + ft 
Aft 6ft 6ft— ft 
6Vi 6 4S6 + ft 

21ft 21ft 21ft — ft 
32ft 32ft- H 
39ft 39ft— ft 


3 * 

34 ft 
10ft 


34 

Oft 


31ft 31ft 31ft— ’A 
2S 24ft 25 + ft 

16ft 15ft 15ft— 1 



lift 3ft Compaq 
25ft 15ft CnwCrs 
4ft Sft Camus 
6 CCTC 
15ft QnnAs 
Oft CmpDt 
3ft CotEnt 
4ft CmptH 
4ft Cmoldn 
5ft CmpLR 
2ft CmplM 
Aft OnoPtf s 
9ft CmTsks 
4ft Cmputn 
lft CptcfJ 
6 Canter 

6 Concpll 

14ft cnCon 
18ft 14ft CCopR 

26 ft 13 cams 

Bft Aft COURT 


15ft 

30 

13ft 

8ft 

12ft 

9ft 

Sft 

726 

10ft 

19ft 

lift 

8 

10ft 

Oft 

27 


J8 


1506 
20 1046 
39 
182 
129 
J 4 
64 
31 
II 

.12 1J 161 
525 
35 
168 
90 
5 
78 
161 

240 liC 952 
IJ8allJ 49 
216 laJ 1195 
A 


54ft 32ft CnPoes 1.48 3.1 655 

Sft 3ft Con 5 Pd 08 24 . 21 

Sft 2ft Consul 17 

42 2BW CntIBc 20ft A 9 33 

18ft Sft aiHItS 27 

‘ Cl LOST 26 


16ft 4ft 
23 13ft 
6ft lft 
22ft 13W 
49 14Vi 
12ft < 
lift 6ft 
60ft 37ft 
5 IVS 
7ft 3ft 
me 
29ft 20ft 
14 9 

34ft 15 
33ft 18ft 
21ft lift 
27 17ft 


Cenvat 

town* 

CaprBlo 

Coots B 

Coovtei 

Carcam 

Cordt* 

Const 

Corvu* 

Cosmo 

Crttfl/1 

CrosTr 

CwnBk. 

Crump 

CwtMFr 

Cuturns 

Cram 


17 

1381 

.40 1.9 159 
860 
15 
30 

248 45 143 
352 
36 

.14 1.1 38 

JO 24 212 
If 

M U 523 
.94 41 8 

30 24 24 

4 


lift 10ft .. 

17ft 15ft 15ft— lft 
3 29k 35V— ft 

Aft 6ft Aft + ft 
25ft 25ft 25ft + ft 
10W 10ft 
7ft 
12ft 
Oft 
7ft 
3 

7ft 


2 

10 

Aft 


3ft 
3ft 
41ft 
low 
4ft 

■w . _ _ 

13ft 13 > 13ft — ft 
Ift lft 1ft— ft 
20ft 20ft 20ft 
44ft 41ft 43ft -f-tft 
7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 
Sft Sft Sft— ft 
55 ft 5476 55 — ft 
1ft lft 1ft— ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft + ft 
Mft 13 13 — ft 

24 23ft 23ft— ft 
13 12ft 12ft— V. 
29 28ft 28ft 
22ft 22ft 22ft — ft 
20ft 20ft 20V- 
30ft 20ft 20ft 


10% 

10% — % 

7ft 

7ft 

12% 

12*6 

Bft 

9V. 

6% 

6ft— ft 

2ft 

2ft— ft 

»% 

7*6 

1/ft 

18 — ft 

5% 

Sft + % 

2 

2 

9*6 

9*6— % 

68b 

Aft + ft 

Mft 

15 - % 

14*6 

15% — % 

12ft 

13% — % 

6*6 

6*4— ft 

46*4 

47ft 4- ft 

3*b 

3*6 

3 

3ft + ft 

41% 

4I%— ft 

10% 

10% — ft 


4*6— ft 

786 

B 






D 



1 

17ft 

7 DBA 



16 

15ft 

15ft 

15ft— % 

11% 

Aft oep 



X 

10^ 

10*6 

10*6- ft 

30% 

11*6 DSC 



5958 

8 

12 

13 + T6 

37ft 

2086 DalsySv 



1756 

23% 

24 

30ft 

19 Date? 



28 

30 

29ft 

30 

716 

4V, DmnBlo 



29 

5ft 

Sft 

S%— 16 

108 

83 DartGa 


.1 


106 

Iftfft 105ft + % 

2296 

11% Oat era i 

J4 

IJ 

174 

JR 

18ft 

19ft— ft 

Mft 

886 Die IO 



181 

7P% 

I0H 

9% 

3ft DtSwtdi 



22S 

6*6 

Aft 

Aft 

22% 

11 Datscp 



100 

21ft 

21ft 

218b + ft 

5ft 

7ft D tetri 




3% 

3ft 


8ft 

4ft Datura 



63 

4 

5% 


7ft 






5ft 


19ft 

9*6 OabStis 

JO 

U 

106 


17 

17% 

19ft 

10ft DtClsO 



558 

1086 

1N6 

10ft 

26*4 

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J2 

XI 

441 

2586 

25% 

25% + ft 








1 

8*6 

% Denelcr 



618 

8b 


ft— ft 

9% 

4ft DantMd 



41 


Aft 

Aft— % 

14ft 

7ft DtoaPr 



IX 

12% 

12 


Sft 

2ft Dteone 



172 

3 

2ft 

3 + ft 

19 

10 Dicean 



45 

13*6 

13*6 

13*6— ft 

15*6 

4ft Dlcraed 



89 


4ft 

5 


12% D totCm 



268 

30% 

29% 

30% +■ % 


22 Dlanax 



628 

fit 

Jlft 

31ft— % 


Mft DlrCnl 

20 

.9 

7V 

21% 

31% — ft 


21ft DomB 

1JD 

X9 

31 

3096 

30*6 

30ft— ft 


12 DrehM 
15ft OoyIDB 

JO 

IJ 

24 

1786 

17 

17*6— *6 

27 

58 

44 

15 

20 

70 

20—86 

13ft 

Oft Drontz 

JOO 1.9 

17 

10ft 

10*6 

10*6— ft 

19 

9*6 Draxlr 



156 

18ft 

17*4 

18 — ft 

19ft 

11% DravGr 



853 

19% 

1886 

19% — % 



J2 


372 

17% 



25ft 

14ft OunkDs 

J4 

id 

A2 

23ft 


23 — ft 

12% 

9ft Durlron 

56 

S.1 

96 

lift 

11 

11 

15*6 

9*6 DurFIts 

.15 

ij 

42 

13% 

12*6 

12*6 

AM 








28*4 

Mft DvnfdtC 



*25 

2616 

2M6 

2fih 9- ft 

1 




£ 



1 


10 ECI T«l 



21 

R 



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1 EaatTi 



67 

lft 

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133 

10*6 


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11 

Sft EdOnp 

.120 14 

12 












16 

11*6 EIPOJ 

152 105 

323 

Mft 


Mft 


7% Elan 







IZft 

8ft eiblto 



445 

8ft 



15 

10*6 Eldons 

.*6 

u 


12% 

T2% 

12% — % 

9*6 









lift ElCottl 3 
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15ft 



1996 



174 

Mft 


15ft— % 









12ft 

4% EletWUs 



111 

IT 


11 + ft 

13ft 

8 E Iran El 



180 

Bft 

Bft 

8ft 


Sft EmpAlr 







14ft 

Sft Emu lex 



429 


796 

Bft + ft 








3% — ft 

Bft 

3% Enavco 



S3 

Aft 

A*6 

6*6— ft 


4*4 endaLs 




lift 

11 

11 — ft 

36 




S3 

18% 

17*6 

17ft— % 

16*6 

786 EnFoct 



171 

15ft 

14% 

14ft— % 



JO 



15ft 

IS 

IS — ft 








m, + ft 

20ft 

•ft Eauot 



201 

lift 

lift 

11*6 + ft 

Sft 

.596 EAtOII 

JO 

3d 

M 

Aft 

1*1 

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4186 

25*6 ErfcTl 

JSa XI 

703 

271b 

7716 

27% + ft 


11 EvnSut 



395 

IB 

17*6 


16V6 

4% Exavlr 



9 

Oft 

Oft 






* 




10ft 

Sft FDP 



80 

B% 

8 

8% 


12 Month 
High Low Slock 


Sales In 

Ohr. Via IPO* 


Net 


8ft 4ft 
33 20ft 
25ft 13ft 
17 ft lt« 
1096 Aft 
41'— 37ft 
41*6 23ft 
8ft 4VS 
12ft 7ft 
lift 3 
21ft 1J 
Mft 4ft 
( 6*6 9 ft 
29ft 13 


XLAs 

KVPnr 

Kaman 

Karenr 

KOSJer 

Kavdan 

Kahid 

KyCnLl 

Kevex 

KrvT m 

Kim hr* 

Kinder 

Kror 

Kruoer 

Kukhe 


3S54 
14 

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75 

3S{ 28 

231 

1J8 33 113 

1J0 2J 62 
10 
138 
98 

J6 J «3 
■06 J 392 
32 22 77 

.121 J 176 


17ft 16 16ft— ft 

Bft 71b 716 + ft 
3lft 30ft 30ft— ft 
UYb 15ft 15ft— ft 
11 10ft 11 + ft 

Oft 9 Vi Oft — ft 
S5ft 55 55 —ft 

15 ’tv, % 

J 5* F- * 

30ft 19ft 20 — ft 
7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 

1 4ft Mft 14ft + ft 
13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 


gig 

5 FMI 
lft FamRost 


246 

121 

R S fc* 

lift 10ft lift + ft 


1086 FcrmF 



519 


45ft FrmG 

1J6 

2J 

230 

67ft 62ft 62*4— ft 


12ft FedGos 


262 

19% 19 19ft— ft 

1 ■■ 

4ft Feroftu 



1650 

5ft 4ft 4ft— ft 


7 Fib ran 5 



105 

16*4 1684 I Aft — ft 

1 

20ft Fdlcr i 

1J2 

4J 

111 

30*4 30ft 208b— % 

56 

32 ft FHttiTs 

1J0 

XI 

25 

52*4 52ft S2ft 

38% 

21ft Flo 0*6 

M 

IJ 

95 

38 37% 38 + % 

1t% 15*4 15*4 

18% 

12ft Flllrtk 

M 

3J 

11 

9*6 

596 Flnsnvc 



105 

Aft Aft Aft 

15% 

Aft Fltaoan 



IBM 

Mft 14ft 16% 

III' 

20*6 FAJaBk 

1.12 

48 

AOx 

29 28% »%— *4 

23 FfAFIn 

JO 

XA 

22 

S SftSft^S 
16 16 16 — % 


Mft FIATni 



IS4 

19 

11*6 FtCotF 



13 

29% 

21ft FComr 

1J0 

SJ 

76 

2434 24 24 -1 

9*4 

7H FtCotll 

1.12eMJ 

3 

7*4 7ft 7ft + ft 
36ft 36 36 —ft 

36% 

Mft FDatoR 



92 

15% 

10 FExec 



931 

13ft 13% 132m 

28% 

ID FFdCaJ 



J17 

25ft 25 25ft- ft 

29% 

15 FtFnCp 

JO 

ZJ 

64 

28% 28 28% -f % 

Mft 

10% FtFnM! 



7 

19ft 19ft 19ft— % 

2S 

19ft FtFIBk 

AA 

15 

172 

28*4 21ft 28ft— ft 
36 35ft 3Sft— ft 

2786 FJbtN 

1.80 

5.1 

240 

66 

258o FMdB 

140 

19 

20 

55 53ft 55 

42*6 

20ft FNIdn S 140 

4d 

66 

35 34ft 3444 + % 

24ft 

13ft FN Sup 

d2e 

43 

24 232* 24 + ft 

40% 

25ft FRBGa 

IdB 

3d 

89 

S 

S5S* S*=S 

£ 

18ft RSvFlC 

JO 

X8 

40 

17ft FSOCC 

1.10 

5 A 

608 

4296 

27*6 FTenn 

140 

42 

139 

44ft 

29ft FstUnC 

1.12 

11 

458 

37 36% 36*b + % 

Sft 

Sft Flakev 



156 

3ft 3*b 3*6 — % 

14ft 

11% Floxstl 

AB 

4A 

17 

lift 10*4 11 — ft 

22ft 

13% FloFdl 

20 

id 

287 

2086 Mft 20% — ft 

4196 

25*4 RoNFl 

JO 

2d 

36 

40 39*4 40 

19ft 

7ft FlowSS 



249 

11 17 17 —1 

17V, 

10ft Flurocb 

JB 

IJ 

83 

16ft 16ft 16ft 

Mft 

3 Fonar h 



232 

4>6 386 4 

1084 F Lion A 

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S 

255 

17% 17 17 

19% 

11 FlJonB 

DJ 

A 

14 

17% 17% 17% 

Mft 

Mft ForAm 

M 

XI 

24 

31% 31 Jl% 

24ft 

15*1 ForortO 

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44 

15ft 15% T5*b + ft 

23% 

386 

12ft FortnF 
lft FortnS 



16 

1049 

Sift 21% 2T% 

28b 2% 2ft 

1 0% 

58* Forum 

d* 

4 

426 

9ft 9% 9ft 

8 

4ft Faster 

.10 

XI 

41 

5 426 4ft 

2986 

148* Framnt 

At 

2d 

143 

24ft 23ft 23ft- ft 

14ft 

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320 

7*4 7ft 7ft— ft 

lAft 

lift FulrHB 

J2 

XI 

87 

15% 15ft 15ft 

EZ 




5 

1 

in*. 

6ft GcmaB 

.10 

1A 

27 

7% 7 7 - ft 

SSft 

28*6 Conetrti 



196 

SO 49ft 50 — % 

Sft 

5 Genets 



828 

7ft 7 7 — *6 

lift 

Ift Gene. 



169 

2 1*4 1*4— ft 

Mft 

7ft CaFBk 



546 

23ft 23ft 23ft— % 

10ft 

4ft GerMds 

« 

Id 

170 

7ft 7ft 7% 

24ft 

16 GlbsGs 

2A 

IJ 

348 

18ft 17*4 18 + ft 


m GtooTr 



3 

16*4 16% 16% 

16ft 

12ft Go Iran 



76 

13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 

21*4 

Oft Gott 



1687 

21*4 21% 21% — % 


14ft GouWP 


42 

74 

16% 14 16ft *■ ft 

15% 

10% Groco 

AA 

3d 

9 

14*4 1484 1484 

9*4 

Sft Grantre 



129 

Bft 8% 8%— % 

13ft 

4*6 GfPhls 



43 

13% 13 13 — % 

9ft 

4 GfPhSc 



1374 

7% 7 7ft + ft 

22 

9% GWSov 

Aar Z5 

9 

20 19% 19% 

15ft 

8 Gtect. 



280 

Mft Mft 14% — % 

19 

13% GuJIfnf 



87 

IS.. 14*4 141b + ft 

15ft 

3ft GffBdC TSdOc 

2766 

3% Jfc 3ft 




H 

_ 1 

34ft 

15ft HBO 

JO 

S 

90S 

22ft 21*6 22% + % 


7 HCC 


4 

25 



12 Mnber 



45 


10ft 

3% Hadco 



133 

4ft 4ft 4% 


2 Hoason 



192 



ft Hates* n 



4 



12ft HomOll 

.10 

4 

104 



18% HarpGs 

J4 

IJ 

4 



23ft Hrtfrtr 

1AO 

SA 

439 



5ft HottiwS 

JO 

22 

36 



A*4 HovrKB 

.141 





1ft Mllhln 



1 



1J6 Mlttutyn 






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.16 




74ft 

14ft HehoB S 

JOB 

S 

42 



3 ft HetenT 



174 








38*4 

31ft HenrtF 

S3 

Z7 

1 



16ft HlberCs 

IdCta AA 

127 



9 Hlckara 



13 



3ft Hoaan 



115 



9ft HmFAi 



57 

28% 2784 28ft + ft I 








15% Honlnd 

JA 

Z5 

37 



22*6 Hoover 

JO 

4J 

317 



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41 



12% HhBNJ 



267 






24 





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205 


27 Hi 




342 



4*4 Hyponx 



93 

10% H> 10% 

1 



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363 



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4ft tallSy 









244 






47 









Aft intrtFir 

.16 





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1890 



4ft inrrmon 






lift mtmec 






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10ft IntCHn 















259 



7*6 IntLses 



85 


3% 

lb IRIS 


146 

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708 



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9% Iwrndx 



106 






214 

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1 



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27% 

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77 




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Sates In 

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684— ft 

18% 

9*4 LSI LOO 



800 

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23ft 

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39 

1286 

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1784— ft 

4784 

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30 

36 

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lift LcmaT 

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32 

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29 

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34 

10 

9ft 

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9ft 

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3*29 

48 

7ft 

7 


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155 

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32 

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07 

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22 

2184 

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322 

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70% 

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1784 

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33% 

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23ft 

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3285 

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21 

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JO 


14ft Sft MB! 
lift Aft MCI 
31 15 MTS* 

31ft lift MTV 
17ft Oft MOCkTr 
27ft 20ft AtadGE US 
11 7ft Mel Rt 
14ft 7ft Mol r It 3 
14ft *ft MatSd 
24ft 17ft Manttvr 
72ft 37ft MfraN 
19 Vj 13ft Morcus 
9 , 3ft Moraine 
13ft 6! 6 Manat 
37ft 18ft MrHN s 1JOO 
26ft SHMscors 
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34ft 24 MatrxS .10 
24ft 13 Moxcrs 
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185 
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lift lift lift 

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31 31 31 

lift lift lift 
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8ft _ 

131b 1236 12ft— ft 
13 12ft 13. + ft 
21 21 21 
66ft 66 66 — ft 

IS* 18ft 18ft— ft 
4 3ft 396 + ft 
10*7 10ft 10ft + ft 
30 29ft 29ft— ft 
25ft 25 25 —ft 

2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 
32ft 32 32 —1 

19ft 19ft 19ft— ft 

W Ttt 

4ft 4ft 4ft 

34ft 34ft 3446 
lift lift lift + ft 
10« 10ft 10ft— ft 



4 MadCra 



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10 Mentor 



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lift 

12 


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285 

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27% Merc Be 

192 

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38 

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37ft MercBk 

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21ft MrtBC % 1J0 

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516 MIcrMk 



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9 

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4ft Mla-dy 
5ft MJcrTc 
4 Micron 
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2ft MtlPcA 


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24 17 MdSIFd 

41ft 24 MJdlBk 
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27ft 19 MIIIHr* 
44 30ft Mflllpr 
6 Ift Mlntacr 
27ft Mft Mlmtnr 
15ft 7ft MG«* 
12ft 6 Mot 1C B 
20ft 13 Modlnos 
10ft A Moled r 
39ft 28ft Mate 
12 7ft MenAnt 
20 ft oft Mononr 
20W 14ft MorRo 
M » MorKa 
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7ft 2ft Moselev 
16ft 12ft Motaa 
A4Vi 30 MuftThd 
26ft 10ft My tan 8 


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98 
21 
74 
282 
311 
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1273 
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62 

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10 
103 
344 
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2D 20ft + ft 
36ft 36ft— ft 

23 2^2 

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10 Oft 10 
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17Vb 16ft Mft— ft 
7 Aft 7 — ft 
31ft 31 31ft 
10W Bft Bft— lft 
lift lift lift 
17ft T7ft 17ft 
lift 12ft 7214 
19ft 19 19 — ft 

3ft 2ft 3 
14W Mft Mft — ft 
61ft 60ft 61 + ft 

17ft 16ft 16ft + ft 


13 396 MCA CP 

Aft 2ft NMS 
lift 3ft Napcot 
24ft 18ft NBflTex 
50ft 30ft NtlCty 
2DW lift NTCPtri 
14ft 6*6 KOota 
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2ft HMfcm 

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242 

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27ft Z7ft 27ft 
28ft 28W 38W 


Sft Sft— ft 


Tft Oceaner 
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39ft OMoGO 280 A7 
17 OkDCnt* 1J0 33 
23 OldRP* 34 2 A 
18ft OtdS pfC UD 122 
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Mft 59ft 5W, 

Mft 28ft 28ft— ft 
30ft 30ft Mft + ft 
21*6 21*6 21*6— ft 
23ft 22ft 23 
7ft 7ft 7ft — ft 
15 Mft 14ft— ft 
28ft 27ft 27ft + ft 
13» 13ft 13ft 
M Aft Aft— ft 
7ft 7 7ft + ft 
Mft Mft 14ft 
30*6 30ft 30ft— ft 
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ft *6— S 


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53ft 3J*A Paccar 
15ft 7 Poe Fit 
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34ft 10H Paraph 
27W 12 ParkOh 
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12ft 12ft 12V6— ft 
13ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
14ft Mft 14ft— ft 
7*6 7ft 7ft 
21ft 20» 20ft— ft 
13ft 13ft 13ft 

a 5 5 — ft 

lift lift 
10ft Oft 18ft 


8% NrridBk 

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221 

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255 

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18 

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3384 

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32ft 

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6 

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7% PSFS 

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9ft— ft 

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14ft 

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2ft 

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24% 

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M 

IS 

SS 

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37ft 

27% PtonHl 

97 

79 

384 

32 

31ft 

31ft— % 

11% 

7 PlonSt 

32 

JA 

31 

8*4 

8ft 

8ft— % 

15% 

8ft PoFotk 



89 

12ft 

1? 

T2Vb — ft 

34*4 

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233 

22 

21ft 

21*4 + % 

29 




165 

24% 

74 

34 —ft 

38b 

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495 

2ft 

2% 

2% — % 

16*6 

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lift 

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37*4 

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31ft 

31ft— ft 

9 

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784 

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133 

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3*4 

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198 

10*4 

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10ft— ft 

66 

36% PrfceCo 



5765 

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53% 

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22 

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A 

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79k 

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389 

7ft 

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36*4 

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JO 

1 3 

71 

23ft 

23 

23 — % 


12 Month 
HtotiUrw Stock 


Sales at Nat 

Dh. YU. 100* Utah Lew 3 PJK. OiO* 




a 




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8ft QMS* 

3ft Qoadrx 

106 

10ft 

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9ft— ft 

981 

315 

9 

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51 

11 

10ft 

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32% 

14*4 Quantm 

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23ft 

2284 

2284— ft 

5ft 

2*i QuestM 

72 

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484 

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117 

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13 

7% Quote 

1» 

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R 



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kH "' 1 ™ 

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16*4 

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12ft 

lift 

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rtf tti 

19 

10ft 

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10% — % 

ii 


283 

8 

7ft 

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69 

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3ft— ft 

33% 

19ft Rfflnrs ldO X3 

305 

30ft 

30 

30ft 

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12ft RayEn 2* IJ 

62 

19 

lift 18ft— % 

7% 


16 

28b 

28b 

2ft 



29 

21ft 

21% 

21* + lb 



154 

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9% 

9%— ft 



76 

2884 

28% 

28% 



478 

lift 

11% 

118b— % 


58b Racy El JO 3d 

320 

6ft 

Aft 

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11 Resfcis .12 J 

30 

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4ft Rente 

17 

5*4 

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78b RpAuto .16 U 

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251 

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16 

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7% Rsuteri .15e id 

91 

> 

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17ft Rsutrtt JS# u 

1 

26 

24 

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5 

38 

38 

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81 

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10 

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95 

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7% 

23% 

3 

23 

22 

22 

17ft 

1W8 Rival JO SA 

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301 

15 

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274 

29 

2084 

3084— ft 


lift RobNuo 04 3 

22 

lift 

lift 

lift 

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lift 

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lift— ft 


16ft Roames 34 JA 

347 

2284 

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22% 


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12 

10*b 

10ft 

10ft 


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48 

386 

3ft 

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11 RustPel 

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15*4 

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92 

17ft 

17 

17 —ft 

1 

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1A 7W StJude 
75ft 39W StPoUl 
Aft 2W SalCot 
lift Aft Scm Bar 
Oft 5ft Sol BIS y 
49ft 32ft SovnF 
20 W 10ft SBkPSO 
10ft Aft Samoa 
IAW 10ft ScunTr 
13ft Bft scherar 
2Sft 15ft SchlmA 
8W 3ft SdMUc 
20ft lift Sdtex 
Oft 4ft SeoGal 
Sft 4 5Kgah 
4ft 2ft SkTob 

12 18b SEEQ 

3086 16 Setei 
lift Sft Semlcn 
10ft 6 Sensor 
1586 left SvcMer 
25ft T7ft Swtnsts 
23 13ft ServTco 
Bft 4W SycFrcI 
18 12W SevOak 

34ft 23ft shrMod _ 

39ft 29K Sfiwmt* IJ8 44 
12ft She by t .16 .9 

7ft SheW* 


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2886 15ft SnitraT 
9ft Sft Sovran 

31ft 2186 Sovran* 

19ft Bft Speedy 
28M 886 Spctrati 
Bft 5ft SpecCH 
1686 13 - Spin 
19ft Sft SfarSr* 

Oft 5 Store Id 
30 19ft Stomfy 
23ft lift SWMJC 
27 19 SMnhos 1J0 

34ft 18ft SMStB » 

Aft 3ft 5tateG .19 
7ft 4ft Stater 
18ft 1086 StewS fv 
25 17ft Stwlrt . n 
■ft Sft snw 
18ft 7*6 S Ireful 
38ft 25*4 STrwO* M 
35ft 19ft Stryker 
17 1 ft 97 Subaru 1J8 
A» 36*6 SubrB 192 
2ft Sum mo 

7 SyrrtlHl 
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Aft SunMatf 
3 Soprtex 
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Sft SymbT 
Aft syntoeh 
2ft Syntra* 

2tft MW SyAtoc 
7ft 3ft Systln 
lift sft Sysinte 
lift 4ft SvstGa 


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327 

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106 

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Mft 13ft Mft + ft 
IBM M 11 — ft 
7ft 7 7ft + ft 
19ft 198b 19ft— ft 
m$ 2086 20ft— ft 
3816 30 38 

18ft IBM 15ft 
MU, 13*6 13ft— W 
71ft 71W 71ft— ft 
Sft SW 5W— ft 
4ft Aft 6ft 
5ft 5ft Sft— ft 
49 48ft 49 + «b 

20ft 198b ' 190b— ft 
8 7ft 7ft— ft 
15W 15ft 15ft— ft 
13ft 12ft 13 — ft 
24 U. ZH 23ft— ft 

4 3*6 4 + W 

lift Oft 10 —lft 

5 4ft 4ft— ft 
48b «ft Aft 

2*b ZU. 2W 
_28b 7ft 2ft— ft 
mb 18ft T8ft 
4ft Aft 4ft 
8W 8 8W 
18ft 14ft 141b 
19ft 19W 19ft 
18ft 18ft 18ft— ft 
4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 
161b Mft 14*6— W 
32ft 3184 3286 +lft 
38 37ft 37ft— ft 
18ft 1BW 18ft 
10ft 10ft 10ft— *6 
2A» 25ft 26 
lift lift lift— ft 
5ft 5ft 5ft— ft 
10 ft low 10 * 6 — w 
15W 15 IS 
19 18ft 19 
5 48* 5 —ft 

IS 15 — ft. 
Mft 13ft— ft 
15V. 15ft— ft 
10ft 10*4— ft 
2ft 2ft 
47 47ft 
19ft 188b 19ft + ft 
9W (ft Sft— ft 

14 1514- M -tft 
27ft 27W 27ft 
19ft 19ft 19ft 

48b 4ft 4ft 
24 23ft 23*6 + ft 
1«4 16ft Mft — ft 
4ft Aft 686 
27ft 27ft 27ft — - Y» 
17 17 17 — ft 

3Bs 19ft 30 — ft 
411 Aft 6ft— ft 

15 Mft 14ft— ft 
A Sft 5ft + ft 
78* Tft 7ft 

27ft 2Aft 26ft— 1 
I486 14ft 14ft + 86 
njb 22 ft 22*1 +■ ft 
30ft 30 30 —ft 

«ft 4ft fib— ft 
Sft 5 6 — lb 

V Mft 149b — ft 
23 23 23 

Aft Aft 69b 
T7ft 16ft 17 
33ft 33 33ft + ft 
33 32ft 32ft— ft 
147 163 164ft— 3 
44 63ft 63ft— W 
2% Sft 2ft— Vt 
10ft 98b 98b— 8b 
lft 18b 1*4— ft 
*W 9W 9U, + U, 
4 4 4 + ft 

W *6 . W 
9V. 880 9 — W 
119b 118b 11*4 
V* 3W Sft-t-K 
ISft IS 15 — ft 
Sft 5W 5ft 
lift MM 11 + ft 

lift 108b 1084— ft 


25ft 

12*4 Svstrat 

M 

3 

16 

3484 

36% 

24%— % 





r 



| 

14 

8% TBC 



16 

Bft 

1 

Bib— % 

2Sft 

13 TCACtJ 

.12 

3 

175 

23% 

72ft 

22ft + ft 

388b 

UJ) Tandtra 



1103 

15ft 

15 

15ft + % 

Bft 



889 

4% 

4 

4 

10ft 

5ft TcCotn 



225 

10ft 

10% 

10ft 

22 

11 Telco 



29 

13% 

12ft 

12ft— % 

34% 

18*4 TTemA 

t 


552 

33ft 

33ft 

33ft 

12ft 

8% TsIPte 



1372 

9% 

8ft 

884— ft 

25ft 

13ft Tetecrd 

32 

L4 

31 

22% 

71ft 

22ft + ft 

28*4 

>2 Teitpfd 


514 

23*6 

25ft 

25ft— % 

5ft 

1ft TeMfl 



26 

2% 

2ft 

2ft— ft 

20 

13 TOMB 



IB7 

Mft 

14ft 

14*6 

17ft 

Oft Tehran s 
4ft TsrmDt 



55 

16ft 

14% 

16% — % 

Uft 

I 


73 

4ft 

4ft 

4% + ft 

15ft 

Bft TlwrPr 



270 

Oft 

9% 

Oft + ft 

17V. 

-tft Thfmcls 



30 

15ft 

158b 

15ft— ft 

57*6 

29% UKrtMt 

UB 

16 

155 

47% 

49 

49 —ft 

Mft 



138 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft + ft 

29ft 




451 

9% 

9ft 

9% 

1584 

1 liW “ 



272 

Ift 

B 

•ft + ft 

14 

Hik n 



50 

13% 

13% 

13% — % 

3*4 

% Tltwnry 



11 

ft 

\ 

ft + 1% 

im 

8 Tofu 5 



271 

13 

17ft 

121b + ft 

27 

7ft TollSvi 



43 

27 

24 

25ft— % 

17*4 

18 TratcAu 



7 

12 

lift 

lift- ft 

12ft 

6V. TrfadSv 



36 

Bft 

8ft 

Sft— ft 

30% 

22ft Tn*to 

AO 

L6 

JO 

23 

WKi 

24ft 


JO ZA 


24ft 17 USUC* 

24ft 15ft UTL 
20 ft S Ultrsy 
23ft 10*6 Uitgmn 
13ft 78b UnM 
29ft Mft UnPlntr ld9f AO 
S29b ,20ft UnTBcs UO XI 
25H lift t/ACms J6 J 
lift 8ft UBAUk -- 
21ft 19ft UBCol 

n s uFnGn* 

22ft 118b UFstFd 
1484 Aft uGrdn 
Sft 28b USAnt 
32 ZHb US BCD 
4ft lft US Cap 
Aft 2ft US Dsn 
3386 lift U5HC8 
Sft 7ft US Shit 
22ft 108b USSW 
37ft 25ft USTr* 

2584 17ft UStatn 
Mft I4*b UnTWBv 
48ft 2984 UVaBS 
20ft 984 UnvHB 
13 5*4 UFSBk 

Aft 3ft UKOf 


439 
151 

235 
346 
245 
76 
14 

99 
49 
213 
29 
252 
13k 
148 
416 
170 
6 

JU J 1735 
.12 2d 44 
joe LA 38 
1 JO XI 69 
JO Id 42 
154 

144 X? 8 
218 
42 

JS SJ 349 


-Mb J 


.1 Sr L5 
IJ8 A1 


1J4M7J 

L00 3J 


24ft Wft 23*6— ft 
20 1884 19 —lft 

8*6 8*6 886— ft 
14 13ft 13» + ft 
12ft lift 12 — 8b 
28 Z7ft 27ft— ft 
49ft 4886 48*6— lft 
23 2214 23 

10ft 10ft 10ft 
261b 2684 2684— 8b 
784 7ft 7*4 
17ft 178b 17ft 
9ft 8*4 Oft 
49b 4ft 4ft— ft 
26*4 26*4 26ft— ft 
3V. 3 3Vb 

3 3 3 

26 24*6 2584 + *6 

4V. 4 4W + W 
19V. 19ft 19W — Vt 
36ft 36 36 + W 

21*4 20*6 20*6 
23*6 2Jft 2384— ft 
42ft 42ft 42ft 
16 15*4 15*6 

Km 10ft 18ft 
Aft 4ft 484— ft 


98b 4ft VLI 
1SW 7V. VLSI 
12ft 4*4 VMX 
20*6 Aft Valid Lo 
228b 7ft VOIFSL 
4214 26 VoINtl 
3Aft 19*6 VaILn 
18ft 11V4 VBnous 
15V. 586 Varan! 

Aft 286 Verrtrex 
28*4 13*4 VI COTP 
Mft Bft VledePr J2e 23 
Mft Oft VlUiw 
20V6 13ft Vlratok 
12ft 684 vodovt 
22 14ft VeiHnf 


506 
180 
274 
1308 
165 
65 
13 
161 
60 
524 

Me S 2040 
204 
1 

16 
327 
355 


1J0 X3 
JO 20 
JO 2J 


6ft 5ft 6ft + *4 
1216 lift 12ft + ft 
A 5*6 5*4— ft 

7ft 696 7ft— *6 
18*6 18ft 18ft 
36*4 3A46 36ft 
20ft 20ft 20ft 
IS 17ft 18 
6ft 6*6 Sft + ft 
Jft 414 516 + lb 
19 18*4 18ft — 44 

W 98b »8b— 8b 
1214 T2U 12ft 
14ft 14 M — ft 
.Sft 8*4 Bft 
18ft 16ft ISft — ft 


w 


25% 

19% WD 40 

96 


863 



16*4 

IB WalbCs 

34 

IJ 

9 

13ft 


1386 

5% WScrTet 



91 



23% 

14ft WWlE 

136 

84 

41 

21% 


36ft 

12% WFSLS 

40 


147 



16ft 

9% WMSB 




14 


Oft 

5*4 Wavettc 






14% 

11% Webb 

A0 

14 

60 

1184 



4ft MtetFh 



171 

16ft 



5% WttFSL 



BO 



12 

5*4 WM1CTC 



28 

8 



4ft WtTlA X 



168 



21*4 

15ft WmorC 

40 


99 



17ft 

5 WxtwCs 



277 

12% 



21ft Welli u 

90 


167 



Aft 

2ft Wlcot 






13% 

.48b WMcom 






46ft 

28ft WlUmt 

145 

18 

149 



lift 

7% WIIIAL 




13% 


T784 

884 WrnUn 






1086 

_4ft WltenP 



254 





Ml 


386 

4% 



2ft WtnnEn 



M 




168b WlserO 

40 






11% WoodtW 

M 





29ft 

21% Worths 

44 

24 

91 





■13a 






21*6 Wyman 

JO 

14 

175 

24 

23*4 


13 

9ft 


7*4— ft 


4Jb— ft 
7ft + ft 
«. ~ 


a-* 

7ft 


as 

16 

as 

47ft 


i 



X 



-| 

10% 

13*4 

17*4 

1% Xebec 

io% 


87 

67 

150 

284 

7ft 

13ft 

2ft 

6% 

12*4 

2ft 

13 + ft 

1 



Y 



1 J 

31% 

w% nowps 

34 

27 290 

199b 

19ft" 

1984 + V, 

in 



z 



1 

30% 

13*4 

408* 

716 

12*4 

15ft 

5% Zen Lbs 
10ft Ziegler 
30ft ZJonUt 

2% zriei 

384 Zlvod 

Aft Zondvn 

__ 1918 

JBa XB 129 
U6 33 617 
302 

33 

■OBI 4 521 

1884 

3 s 

28b 

6 

M% 

17ft" 

12% 

36% 

2ft 

58b 

13 

J** + ft 
12ft 

37 + ft 

2ft + ft 
,Sft- ft 
13ft + ft 


Semiconductor Trade 
Sees Recovery Starting 

Nnv York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Semiconductor shipments in 
the United States increased slightly during Au- 

|usl while there was a small drop in oidere the 

Semiconductor Industry Association said. ’ 

Q.T2 m -July, the association said Wednesday A 
ratio of 0.74 means that for every $74 wort h of 
new orders recorded, manufacturers shipped 
$100 worth of product. 

The ratio reached 1.53 in January 1984 hut 
fett w a low of 0.64 last Decemb^The fibres 
are for US.. European and Japanese manE 
turere doing business in the United States 
“pere are signs of a recovery in selected 
product fines, -Thomas D. Hinkdman. S 
dtmi the Relation, said. “The balancing^ 
orde.-s wuh shipments means that the procS of 
rerovery is beguinuig, but we expect thathwS 
take place over a number of months.” 








r 





Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1985 


1 

2 

3 

4 

1 

5 

6 

7 

& 

9 

1 

10* 

11 

12 

13 

14 




16 





16 




17 




18 






19 




20 







A 

21 


22 






23 




24 

1 

25 





26 

27 

28 




1 

29 

30 





31 

32 

33 





1 

34 




- 

1 

35 



36 




I 

37 





B 

38 




39 



1 

43 

40 




1 

I 

41 





43 







44 







45 




1 

46 

47 




«11B 

48 

49 





50 

1 

S7 

51 




52 

53 

54 

55 




1 

56 









SB 




59 





1 

60 




61 




62 






63 





PEANUTS 




UJE 5H0ULP BE GRATEFUL 
THAT WE'RE LIVING AT 
THIS POINT IN HI5TDRV 



WHICH POINT 
15 THAT, SIR.? 




THE IMAGE AND OTHER STO- 
RIES 


BOOKS___ 

,0 their 


ne 


live io their various P-f ‘„7 deoe nds 
their need to t* umqu* 

his uassion is susy , . 


beause his passion this*' volume. 


By Isaac Bashevis Singer. 310 pages- 
$17.95. . 

Farrar, Swans & Giroux, 19 Union Square 
Wen, New York, N. Y. 10003. 


i a ho Lit UU3 

There is an u W^ er -s previous work 

Readers familiar With P ^ there 


BLOND IE 


ACROSS 


1 Seaweed 
5 Rejects a 
Romeo 

10 Made tracks 

14 Old orgy cry 

15 Baths heba’s 
first mate 

16 Briny droplet 

17 Slight fault 

19 Brazilian state 

26 Threesomes 

21 Bombastic 

23 Namesakes of 
a wife of Jacob 

25 Organic 
compound 

26 Rome's 

Way 

29 Unyielding 

33 “ a 

Symphony,” 
Supremes hit 

34 Clowder 
clamor 

35 Article 

36 Large: Comb, 
form 

37 Sea anemone 
or hydra 

38 Pale-blue hue 

39 Conceit 

40 KingCyaxa- 
res* subjects 

41 Lax 

42 Museum 
employee 

44 A fin doubled 

45 College org. 

46 Begrimes 


48 Emulated 
Zenger 

51 Sponsor's 
charge 

55 Carry on 

56 Comb-shaped 

58 Single entry 

59 Crow’s home 

60 "Peter Pan” 
dog 

61 Dick Turpin's 
Black Bess 


62 W.W. 1 planes 

63 Oates book 


DOWN 


1 Reserved 

2 Ward with 
green or 
lasting 

3 Places 

4 Strange 

5 Of an ancient 
division of 
Palestine 


24 Free- . 

1848-54 

political party 

26 To love, in 
Lyon 

27 One that eats: 
Comb, form 

28 Rio Grande 
feeder 

30 Certain 
windows 

31 ” Foolish 

Things . . 

32 Member of the 
piscatorial sec 

34 Form of scale 
arrangement 
37 Recognizable 
sensations 


38 Unvarying 
46 Grove on a 
prairie 
41 Reveal a 
secret 


43 Unit of speech 
mrcbiirs 


44 Churchill 
supporters 

47 Chose 

48 Shrub used for 
hedges 

49 Pro 

50 Benchiey's . 

“The ” 

52 Eskimo 
settlement 

53 Part of the 
double helix 

54 Dutch seaport 
57 Busy man in 

Apr. 

€> New York Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


6 Hibernian 

7 Diamond — 

8 Samoan’s 
starchy fare 

9 Used a prop 
10 Part of a 

turbine 


11 Embezzlement 

12 Gross, in a way 

13 Stowe book 

18 Close, to a poet 
22 Blame 



Reviewed by Janet Hadda 

H OW can Isaac Bashevis Singer,, a United 
States resident for half a century, contin- 
ue to bong alive the vanished realm of Yid- 
dish-speaking Eastern European Jewry? What 
need be' do to represent his current existence 
without abandoning his mission, both self- 
imposed and pressed upon him from without, 
of describing the miliar be left behind io 1935? 
“The image and Other Stories,'’ his latest cob 
lection, provides some dues to this quest for a 
balance between artistic independence and lit- 
erary responsibility. 

Over the years. Singer has turned with 


steady and increasing regularity to a bcUetris- 
dc version of himself: a Yiddisl 


— _ Yiddish writer who, 

fu nctioning as a screen, reflects the adventures 
of others.. Almost half the works in the present 
volume are. of this type. The narrator lives in 
cont emp orary New York, but his visitors 


transport ton back to the Old Country: .War- 
saw, Lublin or a small Polish village. As if they 


Readers ™ M just as mere 

may be aupascd p ^tor 

has been a dramatic -nt pages. there is 

as Yiddish authwm the pbe- 

»* 

Singer s ^ l0 o busv with 

Singer life » faWe 

she nuasjwr Mp „ i ne viubwjfes 

he returns io in his wn Lings. 

Sometimes this power may be perceived ts » 
niSSon of God's band, as when the 

^teller of “Miracles’: decides dial 

sible for God to help turn 

since He .may also have been capable of abet 


J •*- "• 
7%^ 


t \ V* M 


tV ; 


m 


themysicr- 


WIZARD of ID 


ublin or a small Polish 1 

had known him forever, they i 
ies of their lives to him. 

- The nameless anecdodst of “The Secret,” for 
example, pours out' her. misery 'over the fact 
that nor illegi tima te daughter is unwittingly 
about to marry her father. A dentist calls on 
the narrator of “A Telephone Call on Yom ■ 
Kippur” to regale him with an account of his 
eene discovery that his favorite Jover, - long 
supposed by Mm to be dead, is alive - — if hot 
wdl — in Los Angeles. 

The narrator is consistent from one story to 
the next and bears a strong resemblance. to the 
public Singer. He hails from Warsaw, lives on 
M anhattan ’s Upper West Side, astounds his 
devotees by continuing io list his number in the 
telephone directory, is a vegetarian and exerts 
a peculiar magnetism on women. 

Above all, mis fictionalized Yiddish author 
craves stories. The individuals confiding in 
their listener have been mad with love, or lust; 
they struggle with issues of faith and ultimate 
meaning, ne, on the other hand, is hungrier for 
tales than for sex or truth and will push every- 
thing else aside in order to hear someone elses 
experience. They need him because heisrecep- 



of the tit^tory 

and therefore he can be exorcised. Metamjjwjjr 
is silent, and xhereraties its unraimy 

For Singer, at this juncture, tne greatest 
internal mechanism is the miracle of memory. 
There, as in dreams, death can be surrooua»o. 
When the characters who inhabit tnese prges 
begin to recall the events that have enlarged 
andembeffished their lives, the desutuman or 


liMt 




'iifl. 




auu tuiusunuw *«*“ — ■—» .. , « J . 

Eastern European Jewry is temporally healed. 
When Singer spins a yarn narrated by . 


DENNIS THE MENACE 






imHfci&mp 

amsornme 

re&cm'OF 

amee 




Solution to Previous Puzzle 


□ 

E 

E 

G 

a 


□ 

E 

□ 

B 

3 


G 

D 

G 

□ 

□ 

a: 

E 

G 

□ 

E 

a 

G 



a 

a 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

m 

a 

a 

a 

□ 

□ 

a 

a 

□ 

13 

□ 

G 

□ 

a 

□ 

□ 

a 

1 


□ 

E 

□a 

a 

E3 

a 

IQ 


□ 

□ 

□□ 





o 


REX MORGAN 


caatosiacjnsHCJ 
□EGDO aOH E3E3I1CDQ 
GQHG 
0 

Sana 


]y»»iniMi iwusn 


GUILTY 


DOCTOR 


AM 1 6LAXP TO SEE VOU.DfZ. I AS CHARGEP, 
MORGAN ! MY GOOD HUSBAND 
HERE GOT IN A TIZZY WHEN HE 
COULDN'T GET ME ON THE 
RHONE BECAUSE I WAS 
TALKING TO A WOMAN 
FRIEND 


MUCH AS I LIKE TO GEE HIM, 
1 FEEL THE NEED FOR A GOOD 
NIGHTS SLEEP^-AND I 
THINK HE NEEDS ONE TOO: 


Tbe»i£Y 


EDeS&ri 



□ 

□ 

Q 

E 

D 

E 

G 

□ 

D 

D 

G 

□ 

□ 

E 

G 

E 


T] 


1 


ID 

a 

□HEDHBD 

□ 

a 

Q 

oBaaniHG 

□ 

□ 

a 

G 0GDDD 

E 

a 

□ 

□ aaaHQl 


nucu Singer- spins-a yarn narrated by, Aunt 
Yentl or iglte of an incident that may nave 
occurred in his father's rabbinical court a 
silent world again calls out to the reader. - ■ 

• Although Singer comments in his authdris 
note, that a writer should never abandon to. 
native tongue,, it is essential for his purpose 
<h« t ‘The Image and Other Stones be an 
English volume, with many of its stories trans- 
lated, alone or in collaboration, by the author 
ucing a Yiddish-accented, homey English. This, 
is the only way Singer’s Eastern European 
Jewish world has a chance of remaining alive, 
through those who read English and those who 
will use the translated version to render his 
work into other, less accessible languages., : 

- If many of the stories in this volume are tltiti, 
episodes and individuals flitting acrossjthe 
pages, it is because Singer wants to oomi$r-.io 
paper every possible vision of his heritage? 
narrator of “Confused," a Yiddish author, l__. 
tides that he always teUs Ms female admirers: 
“When you happen -to wot New York City, 
come. to see me if Tm-stfll alive. 7 *' Singer, 
supremely aware of death and the consequent 
obliteration, of -Ms vibrant pasf, is raring 
against time to ensure that : when lie is gone, 
Aunt Yentl and a D the rest will have entered 
the memories and soul* of others. 


k 




9/13/85 


Janet Hadda, associate professor oj 'Yiddish at 
UCLA and research etimeal associate ainhe 
Southern California Psychoanalytic Institute, 
wrote this review far theLos Angeles Titnez. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscqtt 


’When you 


PEOPLE eOTMARRIED/DfD YOU THINK 
YOU'D EVER 6E LUCKY ENOUGH TO HAVE ME?" 


GARFIELD 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
I* by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble them lour JiimMaa, 
one letter to aacb square, to form 
tour ordkniy words. 


BERPO 


m3 



YUSUR 


JLL_ 

□ 

□ 


SNORGT 


zczc 

□ 

u 



O N the diagramed deal. 
West felt distmctiy pesa- 
mistic when his opponents bid : 
to six spades. As South had 
asked for kings, it was dear 
that he was interested in seven 
and that he had all the aces. 


Nevertheless, West led his. 
singleton heart. There was lit- 
tle chance of a ruff, but it was 
the only contribution he could 
make to the defense. 


play couldhardty co^iiufit 
succeeded in ocmfusiqgthei^ - 
sue for Jhe dedarer.' He won 
with the act and concemrated 
oh .gogxding against- the: pre- 
sumed [barm, hcMmgan Ms. 
kft: '• 

Making tiie “oonccT safety 
play inthesuit, Sdirth leda low 
' :atihe third fricL This 


if he had played in six no- 
trump seven spades.; . 


northed) .. 

4 10 6 3 ..... 


- Wl; 


WEST 
4.9 4Z 
*2 

o i io 9 a 

* J 9 4 3 2 


South won in dummy and 
led a low (nm^. He was pre- 
sumably planning to finesse 
the queen W did not have the 
opportunity. East nonchalant- 
ly played the spade king. This 


the hypothetical ;j:-9-4 in the 
West hand, but he did not have 
iL Instead East produced the 
jade and gave [West a heart ruff 
to defeat the slam. 


VXQJ 

4 AQ785 

♦ R5 

east. 

♦ XJ /* 

V 109-0 543 
O 4-J . ^ 
*10 79 
SOUTH 

* A Q 8 7 3 

C A97 - I-.?-', . 
OKI • 






tori- 


South was. in shock, but his 
happy opponents did not gloat 
or rub salt into the wound.- 
Tbey did not tdl him that he 
could not possibly have failed 



♦ A KJ — 


Bath Sides Were vulnerable.., Tt* 

Narlh 

En 

South 

.Waal. 

1 0 

Ms 

2ft'. 

,-.P98B 

3ft 

PStaf 

4H.T. 

-PMi 

5 4 

PWS 

JNJ. 

£948 

6ft 

P«*s 

6 ft, ' 

- JB944 

Phss 

Pte 


3 


Woe lad the Heart cao. 


TUMONT 


m3 

□ 

u 


HOW HE WORKED 
HIS WAY* DOWN # 
IW THE WORLD. 


Wbrkl Stock Markets 


Now arrange the dieted tetters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 

n 


Anwr.FROM iTYXTTTTl “m 


Yesterday's 


(Answers lomorrow) 

Jumbtes: DINER NIECE UPROAR COUPON 
Answer How the hotel room clerk appeared— 


■PREOCCUPIED” 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 

HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 



C 

F 

C 

F 



C 





Algarve 

27 

81 

20 

68 

Cl 

Bangkok 

JO 

8S 

34 

75 

r 

Amsterdam 

25 

77 

9 

48 

tr 

Belling 

34 

75 

15 

59 


Attains 

29 

84 

16 

61 

fr 

Hoag Kong 

31 

88 

25 

77 

o 

Barcelona 

29 

84 

77 

63 

fr 

Manila 

30 

86 

25 

77 

r 

Belgrade 

24 

/S 

9 

48 

tr 

tMwoeflu 

37 

90 

28 

82 

o 

Berlin 

19 

66 

8 

44 

(r 

Seoul 

27 

81 

19 

66 

d 

Brussels 

77 

81 

9 

48 

(r 

Shanghai 

31 

M 

25 

77 

■ fr 

Bucharest 

74 

7S 

a 

46 

d 

Singapore 

31 

88 

23 

73 

o 

Budapest 

19 

66 

10 

50 

tr 

Taipei 

35 

95 

74 

79 

d 


11 

70 

6 

43 

d 

Tokyo 

27 

81 

21 

70 

fr 

Costa Del Sol 
Dublin 

28 

16 

B2 

61 

21 

12 

7D 

54 

Cl 

r 

AFRICA 






EdlnBureh 

22 

7! 

8 

44 

0 







Florence 

29 

84 

11 

52 

ir 







Frankfort 

22 

n 

1(1 

50 

tr 




7 

45 


Geneva 
















59 










IStaabal 

23 

/3 

13 

55 

cl 


26 


73 

73 


Los Palmas 












Lisbon 

24 

74 

20 


o 

Tunb 

26 

79 

22 

72 

fr 









Madrid 

31 

SB 

15 

59 

d 

LATIN AMERICA 







54 



19 


“ 



MOSCOW 

12 

St 

b 

43 

o 

Buenos Aires 

66 

14 

57 

to 


lunlch 

lea 


arts 
reo ire 

erfclavik 

MIC 

ack halm 

rtunoom 

nuw 

Cnna 

arvew 

irieh 


2S 77 
IS S9 


8 46 
13 M 


» 84 

18 


It 54 

2# 79 


IS 59 
23 73 


13 55 
7 45 


2S 

21 70 


9 48 

13 SS 


17 43 
» 75 


Lima 19 66 14 

Mexico aty 31 70 11 
Rio do Janeiro — — — 


57 o 
52 t 
— no 


WORTH AMERICA 


tIDDLE EAST 


ikanr 
4 rut 

i mason 
nnolein 
I Avhr 


31 70 13 55 cl 

30 86 31 79 tr 

32 90 17 43 no 

24 7$ 18 64 cl 

29 84 30 68 Cl 


CEANIA 


18 64 9 48 Sit 
18 64 13 54 r 

3-clotidv: 1 o-tooflv; Ir-folr; h-hall; O-eaereost; pc-parily 
h-shovrars; s»»-snow; sl-srorm». 


ddand 

Uney 


Aadwroee 

Altanto 

Beitan 

aikow 

Denver 

Detroit 

HOOOlUlB 

Houston 

Los Anodes 

Miami 

Minneapolis 

Montreal 

Nassau 

New York 

San Francisco 

Seattle 

Toronto 

Washington 


46 13 


39 d 
66 ne 
46 PC 
48 PC 
55 r 
41 PC 


86 21 

77 14 


At Si 


a 14 


70 13 
cloudy; 


r-roln; 


■ DAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: 5!tehny ehoonv. FRANKFURT: Fair 
Iv. cloudy later. Toma. 26—7 (79 —451. LONDON: Vortc^lt. Temp i 8—12 
— 54). MADRID: Fair oar!*, cloudy Btcr TemA T1 — 14 (88— 57). NEW 
rk- Fair. Temp. 16—10(61—501. PARIS: Cloudy. Toma. 21 — tl no— 52). 
ME; F^ilr. Temp. 29 — 12 (84 — 54). TEL AVIV: NA ZURICH: Fair oarly. 
“ieteTtSpS® 6137 - 43). BANGKOK: ThundmfmjMjTSfflAB- 74 
-75). HONG KONG: Fair. Temp. 37— » (84—791. MANILA. Shaanon. / 
no 30 — 25 ( 86 — 77). SEOUL: Cloudy. Tamo. 37— 16 (81 —641. > 

iGAPORE: Thunderslorms. Temp. 39 - 23 (84 - 73 1. TOKYO: FoeW-Temo. » 
-22(81—721. 1 


Via Agence France- Presse Sept. 12 

Qasing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 



Close 

Prev. 

ABN 

49850 

49J 

acf Holding 

234 

734 

AEGON 

98^0 

97J0 

AKZO 

125 

1 2550 

Ahoid 


t 1 

AMEV 

t t 

ol 

A-Dam Rubber 

BAG 

850 


85.90 

8670 

BVG 

21850 

21850 

Bueftnrtann T 

104.90 

10350 

CalandHkta 

3150 

31.90 

Elsevter4tDU 

177 JO 

127.90 


7850 

7950 


21650 

21650 

Helneker 

1S8A0 

156 

Hoagavens 

62.10 

6120 

KLM 

6050 

61 

Noarden 

48.10 

48.10 

Nal Nedder 

74.70 

7450 


188.70 

18950 

Oce Vander G 

348 

35150 


65 

6520 


49.90 



7650 

77 


13S.40 


Rollnco 

70 


Rorento 

4650 

4640 

Royal Dutch 

19450 

197 A0 

Unilever 


34220 

Von Ommeren 

2720 

27 

VMF Stork 

240 

340 

VNU 

227 


Alt P. CBS Gem index : 220 JO 

Previous : m 20 




Brussels 


Arted 

Sektert 

Cocfcerlll 

Coteco 

EBES 

GB-Irwo-BM 

Hoboken 

intercom 

KrMMtxmk 

P l rofinq 

Soc General* 

Soflna 

Solver 

Traction Elec 

UCb 

Unerg 

VIeiiie Montagna 


less 1660 

66M 6450 
205 206 

3305 3345 
7975 TOO 
4150 4125 

1535 

4020 4020 
«I0 5490 
3255 2370 
9110 7130 
“W 6070 

IS 100 

7590 7630 

5360 sao 

3980 ran 
330 5240 
>730 7705 
8510 8510 


Current Slock Index : 2423J7 
Previous : 342349 


Frankfort 


AEC-Telefunken 

Alllaiu Vers 

Altana 

BASF 

Barer 

Bav Hypo Bank 
Bav Verein5tMnk 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Coni Gumitli 
Dalmler-Bom 
Demssa _ 
DovHcne Babcock 
Deutsche Bonk 
Omdncr Bank 
CHH 
Maraner 


1432014180 
1491 1490 
3B1 36940 
277 JO 224 
22130 221 JO 
395 396 

395 400 

333 330 

SO 57J 
21540 »1 

16940 1S3J0 
987 W 
365 366 

170 179.90 
59250 592 

37020 249 JO 
19420 I95J0 
330 32840 


Hochiier 
Hoechsl 
Hoeich 
Horten 
Hu art 
iwka 
K aJI + Soli 
Korstodt 
Kouffwl 
Kloeckner H43 
Kioeckner Werke 7520 
Kruno stohl 
Urxle 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Mannesmonn 
Muench Rveck 
Nlxdorf 
PKl 

Porsche 
Preussag 
PWA 
RWE 

Rtelnmetall 

Siemens 
Thrseen 
vena 

Volkswaeanwerk 
WbIIo 


735 

746 


3150 

3125 

2202021900 


2850 


12750 12750 


S45 

550 




2050 


38150 

373 

Nedbank 

1070 

10S5 

312 

315 


6000 

592S 

36150 

3 58 



iMi 

264 

263 

SA 8rew? 

715 

lift 

294 29450 


3425 


312 91450 


775 


7520 

74 

west HoitHng 

8975 

6900 

121 


Composite Stods index : 1HUB 

238 

229 

Previous: 1137.18 



182 

183 





22250 22150 
1958 iaso 
573 572 

696 
1418 1424 
27X60 235 

149 150 

19*50 I«6 

331 32950 
S19 514 

353 357 

577J0 57S20 
135 13110 
236 23750 
346 347.90 
445 635 


Conunennogfc Index : 1523130 
Previous : 1513L79 


r~ BmasKsm^ 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kong 
China Light 
Green Island 
Hang sens Bank 
Henderson 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 

HK Land 

HK Shong Bank 
HK Tcteatione 
HK YaumalH 
HK whorl 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hyson 
inn city 
JOTdhte 
JardineSec 
Kowloon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
New World 
Ortenl Ovgrseas 
SHK Praps 
Stelux 

Swire Pacific A 

TalCbeuos 

Wah Kwong 
VWwttoeitA 
Wing On Co 
Win ser 
Warm Inn 


22J0 

la^o 

1550 

7^0 

4325 

225 

965 

a 

11 
35 

620 

725 

855 

325 

425 

2640 

061 

090 

12 
13.90 
«J0 

4540 

746 

Sum. 

1320 

240 

2420 

1.94 

089 

SUSP. 

1.70 

5.15 

220 


8% 

940 

7.95 

3550 

ft 


S8 


.IS 

_44S 

26.10 

061 

088 

11.90 

W 

13 


1240 

iso 

2420 

Iff 


143 

5.10 

210 


tfOng Seng Index : 159642 
Previous : 1571.95 


jahawt lint | 


AECl 
Anglo Amerl cun 
Angle Am Gaia 
Bor tows 
Blwoor 
BuHel5 
Di Beers 
DrleFonlirtn 
Elands 


725 725 

3175 3175 
1B700 18750 
1120 1120 
1455 1425 
7425 7450 
1180 1165 
5100 SO X 
17M 1750 


AACorp 

SUM 

517ft 



281 

Anglo Am Goto 

548 

S67ft 


224 

224 

Ass Dairies 


138 

Barclays 

379 

374 

BJlT. 

579 

284 

£3 



336 

BICC 

218 

218 

BL 

34 

34 

Blue Circle 

501 

501 

28S 

278 

Boats 

200 

196 

Bowater Indus 

345 

34S 

BP 

548 

546 

Bril Home St 

286 




198 




Brltoil 


211 

BTR 

368 

lift 

Burma* 

304 

303 

Cable wireless 

580 


Cadbury Scftw 

145 

14Q 

Charter Cons 

183 

IftY 

Commercial U 

225 

224 

Cons Gold 

424 

419 

Court aulds 

149 

147 

Dofgetv 

431 

tt 

De Beerst 

427 

Distillers 


390 



’’SS 

FI sons 

363 


Free StGed 
GEC 

Gen Accident 

GKN 

GIOXBC 

Grand Mel 

GRE 

Guinnass 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICT 

Imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Land Securities 
Legal General 
Lloyds Bank 
Lonrho 
Lucas 

Marks and Sp 

Metal Box 

Midland Bank 

HOI West Bank 

PondO 

Pllktnytan 

Plessev 

Prudential 

Hoc ol EJect 

Rond fan teln 

Rank 

Reed mu 

Reuters 

Rcval Dutch c 

PT2 

SoatcfU 

Sainsbury 

Sears HoMIngs 


521ft 

S30ft 

170 

613 

it! 

228 

227 

13 19/6413 11/33 


333 

666 

663 

281 

858 

£ 

207 

207 

397 

397 

679 

683 

138 

184 

299 

293 

390 

290 

oB4 

664 

414 

417 

151 

151 

380 

375 

151 

148 

498 

498 

394 

394 

644 

654 

431 

276 

268 

148 

144 

697 

664 

IJ9 


S75V? 

396 


714 

714 

332 

45ft 

45ft 

589 

509 

728 

765 

340 

340 

107ft 

104ft 


SMH 

STC 

Sid Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tata and Lyle 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
T.l. Group 

Trafalgar Hte 
THF 

Ultramar 
Unilever t 
UnHed Biscuits 
Vkften 
Wool worth 


203 

1M1 

180 


F.T. 30 Index: 181428 


F.T4.E2W Index : 121X18 


Barca Comm 

Centra I e 

Cigatiateis 

Cred Ital 

Eridanla 

Farmllailo 

Flat 

Generali 

IFI 

Hotcemmtt 

I taigas 

llairrcWlkirl 

MedJobonca 

AAontadlsan 

Oitvetu 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rtnescente 

SIP 

SME 

Snia 

Stonda 

Slel 


24000 22000 
3320 3405 
1D&SD 10655 
2920 2900 
11000 11000 
13400 13400 
4345 4315 

606SD urn 

10510 10590 
<9995 <7900 
1793 1785 
1096101 11358 
128200132000 
23S5 2369 
7327 7435 

3135 3190 
109000109500 
920 930 

2617 3650 
1555 1560 
3625 3580 
15900 15480 
5519 3600 


MIB Current index : 1694 
Previous : 1694 


Air Lhnihle 
AlsttlOffl Atl. 
Av Dossoul) 
Barcelre 
BIC 

Bong rain 
Bouvaues 
BSN-GO 
Carrel our 
Cher sours 

ctub mod 

Darfv 

Du met 

gl(-Aaultalne 

Europe 1 

Getr^aux 

Heawtte 

Lafarge Cot. 

Lcgrond 

Lee tate 

roreal 

Morteil 

Moira 

Merlin 

Mlchdln 

Moei Heruiessy 

Moulinex 

Ocddontale 

Pernod Rle 

Perrior 

Peugeot 

Prin tamps 

Rodlotectm 

Redevte 

Roussel Ueiof 

SonsA 

5k ts Rossipnol 
Tetomecon 
Thomson CSF 
Total 


580 

300 


586 
300 
1159 H5B 
640 641 

515 514 

1600 1630 
741 750 

2240 2260 

rpn 2263 

1420 U20 

1*0 a? 

23 2 

1423 U« 

2105 312S 

2325 am 

1608 ]6M 
1771 1760 

2130 '2165 
1176 1185 

1M> 1941 

7725 77.68 
730, 723 

70S 707 

473 477 

290 W 

W0 1455 
640 665 

1404 1425 
253025401)0 
533 5<2 

230 230 


Agefl Index ; M. 
Previous : *0873 
CAC index ; 2I9J8 
previous ; 22859 



SJ5 580 




OBI 

3 


Prevhns :7$L46 


AGA 

Alto Laval 


Astra 

AfkJS COPCO 
Bollden 
Electro tux 
Ericsson 
Essolte 

HorxWstoiken 

ptwnnodo 

SooD-Scanta 

Sandvik 

Skonoka 

SKF 

SuedWiMatch 

Volvo 


146 

241 




450 

N_CL 


271 


Alfoersvaerfiftn Index : 38758 




AC) ■ 

ANZ 

BHP 

Boral 

Bougrtnvjlte 

Coettemeine 

Coles 

Coma I co 

CRA 

C5R 

Dunk* . 

Eiders ixl 
ICI Australia 
Magellan 
NUM 

Mvor , ■ __ 
Not Aust Bank 
news Core 
N Broken HHI 
Puj o l don . 
Old CeM Trust 
Santas ■ 

Thomas Nattan 
Western Minn* 
west poc Banking 
wocCs We 


1 Close 

Pw, 


wo 

70)3 

933 

913 

J 1 fTn — 

677 

681 

i Hitachi Cable 

5/D 

568 


1360 

139(1 


5501) 

5540 

i Kajima 

476 

474 

Konsal Power 

l/vo 

1880 


147 

147 

Kirin Brewery 

702 

■kj 

Komatsu 

566 



371 

Ht', 


3610 



1240 

1> 

Malsu Elec Works 

870 

■P[T 

Mitsubishi Bank 

1470 

r ■ 

Mitsubishi atom 

4/5 

475 

Mitsubishi Elec 

350 

353 


405 

400 

Mitsubishi Cora 

620 


Mitsui and Go 


K-iil 


676 

678 

Mitsumi 

762 

739 


991 

970 


861 

869 

NtkkoSec . 

781 

781 


948 


NlmnOU 

765 

774 


167 

168 


302 

301 


618 

■TVI 


1190 

* 1 


ION 

te ^ *~I 


UQO 

K* ' J 


892 


Sharp 

834 

'715 

8301 

ml 

SMnersu Chsmlcoi 

77S 

730 





N : .'I 

bzil 


- 25) 

252 


690 

700 

Sumttoma Mstur 

152 

151 




Totsho Marta# 

561 

561 



•66 



Ll 

rn(m 

ao 

481 


888 

898 


2070 

2030 


792 

79S 


534 

514 



352 


T160 

1160 

YamaldW Sec 

784 

785 

NHdcei/DJ. Index : 

126UJM 1 

previBM : 130525 
NSW index : W1US 



Previous : 7*1157 



II 55“ II 


AD ordtoartas Index : 955^8 
Prey tags : 9S5J8 


Taliy 


Altai 

AsaWOtem 
Asobl Gloss 
Banket Tokyo 
Bridgestano 
Canon 
o»» 

Clioti 

Dal Nippon Print 
Do two House 
Oaiwo Securities 
Fanue 
Full Ban*. 


y» 


as as 

1000 1D40 

1700 1850 

S 433 

HH0 

m » 

SIN) 8150 
1990 1600 


Adks 
Aiinuisse 
Autgphon 
Bonk Leu 
Brown Baverl 

-.-iGetor 
Credit Sul Be 
EHKtrowott 
Helderbonk 
irKerdlsceunr 
Jacob Su chard 
Jrlmoll 
Landis Gvr 
Maevenpick 
Nsme 
OerDkon-B 
Roche Baby 
Son do* 

Schindler 

Sutaer 

Surveiiianer 

Swissair 

5BC 

Swiss Reinsurance 
Swiss Volksbank 
Union Bank 
Wlnlerttwr 

Zurich im 


4125 #175 
750 745 
6100 6100 


3810 

1830 


1840 W 


tea, — 

2940 2950 

2B ^ 

2170 3140 

1710 1680 
10775 10775 
1560 T580 
4900 4900 
410 420 

4550 4550 
1430 1445 
470 430 

2275 2270 

1M0 Mis 

& 

2385 2390 


SBC Index : 3H48 
Preview : NJL 


N43.: not auwocu njl: am 
available; xa: ex^Mdend. 


SepL 12 


Canadian slock* via AP 


Sales Stock 
1000 AMI Pros 


High Law dose chg. 


1700 Action# 
nlaoE 


2000 AgrUoo 
1000 Agra IndA 
TOIBSaH Energy 
451 Alto Nat 
SAigoma St 
1200 Argcen 
5370Atco I ( 


20W 

M + U 

I7Va— «r 

M 

18V5— <A 
14W 
I8te- fb 
21 


2914 8PConpda 
UcBC 


35169 Bank _ 
110187 Bank NS 
115606 BarrtCkO 
300 Baton Al- 
42443 BonaUDR 
30400 Braion* 
3230 Bramalea 
TOOBrendaM 
1 14054 BCFP 
29290 BC Res 
20185 BC Phone 
6862 Bnmswk _ 
250 Bodd Can 
96749 CAE - • 
1300 CCL A 
3650 Cod FlV , 
3500 Campetw f 
1843 C Nor West 

C Poolers 

5792 Con Trust 
2780 C Tung 
200 CGE - 
20868 Cl OK Com 
85497 CTIreAf 
2400 C UIH B 
250 Cora 
lJWCetanese 
100 ce Ion 175 P 
- 7590 Contrf Tr 
nisocinooiex 




1550 C Dislb A 
ICDWbBf 


3900 

26S1SCTL Book 

36914 Coowest A 

31UCoseka R 
1350 Canron A 
15552 Cruwax. 
26gOCior Res 
4006 Dot* Dry 
SDODOOnA 
9133 Denison A a 
8783 Dentaoa B f 
isaODeveion 

SlOODkAnsn At 

soODlckranB 

687 < DofOKCO 

ODOODoaohve 
7800 Du Pont A 
23215Dyf*x A 
4M0 Elcmom X 
2690 Emco 
4450 Eauttv Svr- 
taocFawanC 

6»w Flcnbrdge ■ 
1001 Fed Ind A 
200 Fed Plan 
MOGwxflSA 
, ““GBoetonp 
)2^ Geocn>de 
WO Gibraltar. 
M5MGOWCOJ1I I. 
1200 Greff G .. 
4200 GL Forest 
HSGrrrhhd 
3212 H Group A 
1500 Hanker 

WA- 

1000 Ineal 

2*g inland Gas 
39600 inti Thom 
2i» inter Pipe 
SjQipsco 
*50 ivocoB- 
7627 Janoock 
4M0KettevH , 
38V78l_abo1t 
TOOLOni Cam 
IflOLaaona 
, »LobtawCe 
iSteg L umou t w ' 
H0MDSHA 

«tcc .. 

1== MclanHX 

1*83 Mart ttm# I 


5T ^ 

S17W TOfc 

m m 

SIM. I Me 
. SUW 14V. 

ST T 

sms tow .... 

537ft 32ft -32ft— . 
S5 490 490 —5 

S12IA n 13ft 
-.185 175 176 —4 

-St» -It W 

■ 395 m- 3W 

445 425 445 

S17 Wt 17 + ft 
-• 49ft 9ft . 9ft— ft 

• » Bft 8ft— ft 

227 221 323 — 3 

S4ft - 33ft 23ft- ft 
VUft- tat 13ft— I 
S29W 29ft 29ft- ft 
SI 5ft 15ft 15ft 

.. sn 17 17V« + ft 

S12ft 12 12 — ft 

S27ft 37ft 2791— ft 
*23 23ft 22ft— ft 
-S34ft 34ft 34ft— ft 
Mlft 41ft . 41ft— ft 

- S14 ,U 14 
481ft rift 63ft 
137% 37ft 37ft— ft 

48ft Oft 9ft— ft 

- SUftV17ft 17ft- ft 
418ft 16ft. 18ft - 

• » - 9ft- ft. 
. *19(6 19ft 19ft— ft 

118 Kft 15ft + ft 

SIM* 

- 87ft 7ft 7ft 
sm .7ft 7ft 
411ft lift lift— ft 
S8ft 8ft+ ft 

310 305 - 303 — S 
4J4ft 14ft 14ft 
2». 20ft 

-ies 730 235 — 2 

405 400 400 —I 

-Sft'fl. ^2 it 

2 ft 7ft 
*7> 7ft 
S25ft 2Sft 

423 22% 

S13ft 13V& 

47ft 7M 
’ SJTft 2\V: 

87ft 7Vi ... 

■ 415ft 15ft 15ft 
Sint 19ft 19ft- ft 
413 lift 12 + ft 

am. sew- ft 

32ft. J2ft-ft 

' SS ft 

•OT. 3*5 345 

■3S **■-»-* 

«3je « 

SS » 

: 27ft 22ft 

■£* JF* 

520ft 30 20 — ft 

gft Sft+2 

«« 3a« am 

ink ‘9ft 9*4— ft 

■ 542ft .'41ft 43^2 

513 .lifi'Mb-S 

aiw 3ft ?ift— a 

•*i4Ya 
.441 
527ft 
SM. 

srrvi 

S3Tft 

nn 

w 


lift- ft 
5 — ft 
7ft— ft 

7ft— ft 

25ft— ft 

16ft- ft 

22ft— ft 

7ft— ft 
2lft-i ft 
ft 


77l5Merfond E 

10167 Moison At 

7044 Motion B 


500 Murphy” 
t Noronda 


386*1 L 

9813 Norton 
309373 NvuAHAf 
4900 Nawsca W 
46560 Nuwst sp A 
814 Oak wood 
IBOOOshana A ! 
38840 PocWAIrln 
6IS0 PaimKir 
BSOPanCanP. . 
1321 Pembina 
1250 Pine-Point 
35019 Plocw 


HMi Lew close Owe 

365 “BO ■ 330 —20 
417ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
518ft 18ft Tfift + ft 
*73ft- 23ft 
SISft 15ft 

516ft 18ft 

48ft "8 
S20ft 20ft 
44 40 

47 Oft 
43216 32ft 
414ft 14ft 
48ft t VA 
534ft ,34ft 
S17W 17. . 


23ft-i ft' 
ISft- ft 
16ft 
6 -r ft 
20ft—- ft 
40 -4 
6ft— ft 
32ft— ft 



m* 


W'Tii ft 
23 ^ ft 
.'Uftrir 'ft 


Mi 


■tOf 


ft* 


' SOOOuei,.— , 
130 0 Rayrack i 
OWRedpatti . 
2OTReedSt 1 Sp 
ITOORogcrsA 
100 Raman 
IW Rot ft man 
2700 Sceptre 

amscetfir 

208020 Soots con 

4910 Shell Con 
<878 Shorrl tt 
800 Stater SI 
8800 Southam - 
9300 Saar Aero 1 

12222 Stolen A 
i6O0surptrn 

- 

,3900 Torn 
1400 Tech Cor A 

7 WgT«Nfc»C. 

4400 T*x Can - 
2116 Thom n A 
H 5997 Tar Dm Bk 
5*« T orstar B< " 
>4n Traders A I 
,*00 T ms Ml ‘ 

9449Tr&xiPL 
.152 Irtmac . . 
16S10 Triton A 
lOOTrlweAt 

77100 Turbo 
two Unicom A r 
3QDUnCarMI 
W«U Entprlse' 
2704 U Km - 
1570 Versti A f 
IBOVestaron 
17UOWa«foir . 
”SSWeWwod 
TWO Weei nMn 
. - MOYttaxton 

arat waodwdA 

■0330 Vk Bear 
- ' Total saiesl 




2 t=r 4-.t\ 


SL*** 






S23 23 

424ft 24 
425ft -25, 

450 450 4» — 5 

59 * . . * -Ai.18 

S)3ft 13ft U% 

537ft 37ft 37ft— ft 

*»» lift lift ’ 

512» 12ft 12fti^ft 
. S36ft ,36ft 36ft i- 
^Sft HS 5ft — tk 
smft.Wk 284kv* 1* 

-S, ** 

Sgft «ft 25ft^- ft 

*S» 1»;.1» + ft 
-13ft— ft 
raft rwn 27ft— ft 
aite + ik 
230 -325 230 

2*5_ 280. .295 — 5 . 

418ft 13 .18 — ft 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1985 


SPORTS 




ftose Succeeds: r The Big Knock’ Breaks Cobb’s Long Record for Hits 


By Thomas Boswell 

• .Vedn^iay night and pasS^ jea ^ career 

bai * 

the San 

>a» the first in™™ Pitcher, Eric Shaw 

then a fa«S 


— — « imin niui 

100,1 - *• W1 tad* ttamm ^ 

Mid Euphoria, 


confetti poonadout of the upper dedcs of River- 
front StwjK um an d firewu i ta exploded above the 
center field root His teammates engulfed the 
Cincinnati Reds’ player-manager at first base. 
Several Phtbesjaznecf the eongnrariarions. 

Pete Rose Jr., age IS anddrcssed in a Reds 
umfOnn,ran on to 3 k fiddandgave hit father a 
long hug; The younger Rose had hit fungos to 
fto Red* during in^dpraaice and wanned up 
hisfatterwith agamcof.caichomskte the Reds* 
dugoot before the game. Now, his father wiped 
tears f ram his eyes. 

Wfcflf Rose has called "the Big Knock 4 ’ had 
fins% cdnie..AUbdu^i he tripled in his last at 
bat,'aad scored both tuns in die game the Reds 
won, 2-0; thetripk was a far lesser blow. 

Aifhcugfr it took Rose 442 more games and 
2^39 mare at bats than Cobb to break the 


record. Rose has played one less season than 
Cobb's 24. “I’ve been more durable,” said Rose. 

He had emphasized that *Tve never said I was 
better th a n Cobb." Few, if any, would maintain 
that he is as good a player as was the demoo- 
driven left fielder for toe Detroit Tigers who 
batted 367 and stole 892 bases. 

On the other band, few, if any. would deny 
that Rose is a finer person than the violent and 
virtually friendless Cobb. If Cobb has lived in 
lore as the game’s best aD-around player and 
perhaps its worst all-around man. Rose has been 
an emblem of light throughout his career. 

Again Wednesday night. Rose chatted with 
fans, teammates, umpires, writers, TV crews, 
grounds crewmen ana all the other denizens of 
his baseball subculture whom he knows by First 
name and treats as old buddies. His spirits were 


ebullient, his energy endless, his smile craggy 
and sincere; as always, his competitiveness was 
as obvious as his sportsmanship. 

Rose, Strang and indestructible with bis thick 
trunk and stocky legs, has lacked most of the 
game’s more glamorous skills: speed afoot, a 
strong throwing arm or even the power to hit 
hone runs. Bat he worked. He proved that die 
more he worked, the more he could work While 
others’ skills faded in their 30s, he batted .325 
and led the league in hits when he was 40, played 
every day until he was 41 and, this season, at 44, 
has the fifth- best on-base percentage in the 
National League. 

Before tins game. Rose was asked if he could 
explain his almost-superhuman energy, his abil- 
ity to sleep five hours or less a night and yet 
outwork men half his age. 


“I can only think of one thing.*’ he replied, a 
mischievous grin growing. 

Then, like Superman pulling off his suit coal 
to reveal the “S" beneath, he ripped off his snap- 
open jacket to show a “Wtoaties" T-shirt. 

That is Rose. Quicker- witted than those 
around him. Funny. But always looking for an 
edge, a buck or a plug. 

Rose also has proved that, in baseball, the 
quality of attention to detail roughly equals the 
quality of performance. No one of nis time has 
contested that he has watched and studied the 
game more and. perhaps, better than anyone 
else. 

Above all. Rose proved that, at least in his 
game, all the sober virtues of the woik ethic can 
be combined with laughter, hard play and a 
manly joy. 


■ Second Record for Umpire 

Umpire Lee Weyer, who was behind the 
plate; got a particular thrill out of seeing Rose 
break the mark, and it was the second time 
Weyer had worked a go me in which a record fefl. 
The Associated Press reported. 

Weyer, who came into the NL in 1962, a year 
before Rose, had umpired at third base in the 
1974 game in which the Atlanta Braves* Hack 
Aaron hit his 7 15 th home run to top Babe Ruth. 

The 6-fool-6 (1.9-meter) Weyer has watched 
Rose peck away at Cobb's mark over 23 seasons, 
and even had predicted be would be right where 
be was Wednesday. 

“1 told him three, four, five years ago that I 
was going to be behind the plate when he brake 
it," Weyer said. 


ipala 

l-sv r>i- 
iy.hfctt 

i tes*: 
ie Oi&i 
: Jvlitf £ 

’ W&z 


- r*-*- 
-c-tna: 


{ AS* 
rclP- 

iv Z . 

4 

Ziff!* 5 *' 


Tony Komhriser 

• Mi a Past Smiu 

ri<* ^d H ^ GTON ™ In ftnsbmgh, the 
“c ttestamL one 
Sn^i?°i 0ther ’ ' ^^riesang their sing aurinam- 

fa P 0Us **"■■ *ey have 

■■3RSSSK1SSS5SS5-. 

; walk onto a fieldas if nothing 

. And has it? . . •• [. 

' • Has anything happened? 

_ We know from the court testimony so far 
■ that Lonnie Smith, Keith Hernandez, Enos. 

• Cabell, Dale Berra, Dave Parker and Jeff 
Leonard are all a dmi tted cocaine users. 
These players have named otter players tbey- 
said were cocaine users, mclucfin^Gary Mat- 

- ~ NEWS ANALYSIS 

Jhew&, Lee Lacy, Rod Scurry; JU Holland, 
Lary Sorenson and Joaquin Andiyar. Prior 
to this trial we learned from orazit testimony 
and personal admission that stichacoom- 
■ plished professional athletes as George Rog- 
, ' era, Tony Peters, WifljtWUsoh, Chock Mun- 
V cie. Steve Howe, Micbeal Ray Richardson, 
\ David ThqmpsOii, John Lucas, Vida Blue, 

' NSai Raines and Alan .Wiggins have used, 

■' ^a3V^hsed,'«fiiame. 

Hctar many people am 1 tanriqg oof? More 
than 10? More than 50? . 

' AntJ 1 have npt memkmcd any drnghnt 
cocaine. How nteqy more names would we 
be Karina if tins trial were about marijuana, 
'or amphetamines, or those terrifying and 

- commonplace mystery-drugs, steroids, or 
• that pervasivedrug, alcohol? 

' ftmight be easier to ask; Who is not using 
something? '*■ 

Yet by and large, the reaction to this most 
painful testimony of theyoung, tiac rich and • 
the restkss, is a cocked ejiebrow. It seems the 
public is no longer; shocked by-drag use in 
sports. '-The laundry fist of names in mis ugy 
witeb-hoptof d (adjust confinng t he ob vi- 
ous: -Anyone Who" thinks athletes are on a' 

enough already, let die games resume. ' . 

These players, with mdr innnnidJy, just 
walk bade onto the field and, more often 
than not. get a standing ovation. And mean- 
while, in Pittsburgh, same - caterer named 
Gntis Stron& wbt\tyttew^, is tire defen- • 

t at in this thing, the one tacmgjafl, sits and 
tetes a parade of baseball players — to- 
mes to many, and Dot just to a pack, of kids 
alter — confess their eagerness and willing- . 

SCOREBOARD 

” Soccer I 


Cards Win Gooden-Tudor Duel 
On Home Run in 10th Inning 



Compiled fry Our Staff From Bupjtcha 

NEW YORK — Dwight Goo- 
den and John T udor had dueled for 
nine innings Wednesday night, 
Gooden shutting out the St. Louis 
Cardinals on five hits, Tudor 
blanking the New York Meis on 
three. Then, in the top of the 10th, 
Cesar Cedeno led off with a home 
run just over the left field fence and 
the Cardinals bad a 1-0 victory, and 
another tie with the Mets atop the 
National League's East Division. 

Cedeno, acquired Aug. 29 in a 
trade with the Cincinnati Reds to 
help in the pennant drive, hit his 
sixth homer of the year, and third 
since coming to the Cardinals, on 
an 0-2 pilch from relief pitcher Jes- 
se Orosco. Orosco was in the game 
because a pinch hitter had batted 
for Gooden in the ninth. 

Tudor, 18-8, walked one. struck 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

out seven and allowed only three 
singles. Gooden, who is 20-4, 
walked three and struck out seven, 
raising his major-league leading 
strikeout total to 236 and lowering 
his league-leading earned- run aver- 
age to 1.68. 

**l'd just as soon never have to 
face Dwight Gooden again," said 
Tudor, who now has 28 scoreless 
innings in a row and a 1.87 carned- 
rim average, second only to Goo- 
den's. 

Dodgers 12, Braves 3: In Atlan- 
ta, winning pitcher Fernando Va- 
lenzuela homered and Mike Mar- 
shall drove in four runs for Los 
Angeles, which has scored 41 runs 
in rite first four games of the five- 
game series. 


Cubs 3, Pirates 1: Leon Durham 
homered for Chicago to break a 1-1 
tie in the seventh inning in Pitts- 
burgh. The loser was hard-luck 
Jose DeLeon, who struck out eight 
and allowed only seven hits but fell 
to 2-17. 

PUffies 4, Expos 1: Juan Samuel 
singled in a run and scored in the 
third inning to help beat Montreal 
in Philadelphia. 

The Phillies' Mike Schmidt hit 
his 453d homer in the majors, mov- 
ing past Carl Yastrzemslti into I7th 
place on the all-time list. 

Giants 11-9, Astros 4-10: Dan 
Gladden had four hits and scored 
four runs as San Francisco tri- 
umphed in the first game in Hous- 
ton. In the second game. Kevin 
Bass' two-out, two-run homer in 
the eighth inning gave the Astros 
their victory. (AP. UPI i 


Jays Win, Yanks Stopped in AL East; 
Royals Defeat Angels in West Race 


"nwAwntfadPra* 


The baO flew off Pete Rose's bat in the first inning, heading for left field and his 4,192d hit in the major leagues. 


liess'tOTpnrdjase OlegalTdrogs. 'Tten, he 
watches them go out the door and reads the 
next day that they angkd in the winning run, 
and that their teammates, their managers, 
their owners and dearly their fans have pro- 
nonnoed this whole unfortunate thing as his- 
tory. Done. Gone. Forget it. 

It should not wade that way. You, me. we 
have a light to be disappointed in these 
people, these young, gifted people with so 
much cadi to spend and so much time to IciQ. 
We have a right to be aagrywith them. 

We arc not talking about people who are 


Baseball 


occasional, recreational users. The testimony 
in this trial has mule it clear that some of 
these baseball players were drug dependent. 
Hernandez spoke of how the use of cocaine 
produces “an insatiable desire for more.*’ 
You might ask why an athlete, someone 
making a living on the strength of his body, 
would ever risk that body by messing around 
with drags. But an athlete wDl do anything to 
gain a competitive edge over his rivals, which 
is why steroid use is so prevalent Bora said 
cocaine made him “fed euphoric, it shm- 
pened my senses, "and that an amphetamine 


‘Tnahes*you_rauc h more alert and alleviates 
pda; it makes your body feel stronger." 

One of the root problems here is that 
athletes are coddled, taught from the very 
beginning of their prowess that they are 
exempt from the common rules, and immune 
from the common punishments. But even if 
you take the stance that such a public humili- 
ation as this is punishment enough, as Cabell 
did. arguing. “I’m up here and embarrassing 
myself before everybody else in the world, 
even then you still can be angry. 

As fans, we surely have been cheated. 


Compiled bv Our Staff From Dispatches 

TORONTO — Just as soon as 
the Detroit Tigers could be. dis- 
patched Wednesday night, the To- 
ronto Blue Jays begin looking 
ahead to their showdown Thursday 
with the New York Yankees. 

“They're ready and we’re ready," 
said their manager. Bob Cox, after 
Uoyd Moseby's run-scoring single 
in the seventh inning gave the 
American League East-leading 
Blue Jays a 3-2 victory over the 
Tigers. Now the stage is set for a 
four-game series that probably will 
determine who wins the division. 

The Blue Jays, following their 
three-game sweep of the Tigers, 
have a two and one-half game lead 
on the Yankees, winners of 11 in a 
tow before losing in Milwaukee. 

With the score 2-2 in Toronto, 
Tony Fernandez opened the bot- 
tom of the seventh with a single to 
center and was sacrificed to second 
by Damaso Garda. Moseby then 
smashed his single op the middle, 
pairing Dennis Lamp the winner 
after pitching one and two-thirds 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

innings. Tom Henke struck out the 
side in the ninth for his 11th save. 

What was significant about Gar- 
da's bunt was that the sacrifice is a 
play seldom called by Cox, yet it 
was the third time* in as many 
games to had used it. 

“Every so often you have to do 
it," to explained, adding that with 
the wind blowing in “you can't bit 
flout.” 

Reminded that Garcia already 
had homered, Cox said, “I don't 
know why I do things. If 1 did, we 
wouldn’t be in first place." 

Brewers 4, Yankees 3; Cedi Coo- 
per’s soft single down the left-field 
Kne with one out is the bottom of 
the ninth scored Mike Felder with 
the ran that beat New York. 

The Yankees thought the ball 
was foul and argued (he call with 
third-base umpire Vic Voltaggio, 
left fielder Bufy Sample claiming 
“the ball hit a good foot, foot and a 
half out." 

Royals 2, Angels 1: In the West 


Division race, Jamie Quirk singled 
in one run and pinch hitter Jorge 
Orta doubled in another in the sev- 
enth in Anaheim, California, as 
Kansas City beat the Angels a sec- 
ond rime and widened its lead to 
two and one- half games. 

The Angels threatened in the 
ninth when Gary Pettis tingled 
with two out and stole second — 
his third steal of the game and 49th 
this season. But Dan Quasenbeny , 
who got his 33d save, struck out 
pinch-hitter Ruppert Jones. 

Rangers 6, A’s 3: Ellis Valentine 
hit two tingles, drove in a ran and 
scored three as Texas won in Oak- 
land. 

Red Sox 4, Orioles I: Boh Ojeda 
pitched a three-hitter and Tony Ar- 
mas homered to beat Baltimore in 
Boston. 

White Sox 5, Twins 0: Britt 
Boras, aided by a four-run first 
inning, held Minnesota to four hits 
and struck out 10 in Chicago. 

Mariners 9, Indians 5s Jack Per- 
conte gpt three hits, one a homer, 
off Cleveland in Seattle. (AP, UPI) 


Wednesday’s Mjgorleagne Line Scores 


' ' . m I*!!" 


ira? 




• v:.-' 




. Poland 0 . Betohim 0 

■ (Potar«oi»n«Mfwnnalatn Mexico 

stum awet* Holland In P tawff W **«* 
■flnnW. 

oroap S 

Turkov a Northern Ireland 0 
England L Romania 1 

Oroap * 

East Gtmwnv Z Franc* 0 
Grow 4 

Switzerland 0, Ireland 0 

I Transition 

basbbau. 

l Amortcoit League- 

Wl iuWAU KE E— Called up 
a& Mike FeWtr- oWhftoktow 
man. Ttm Leary, and B 
from Vancouver of ttw Pocmci^adL^oo^ 

cau«d up BflhrJo* BoOldow. Aral jWMWL 

and Dav* Hupport, catcher, from E' Paso oi^ 
Hi* Texas pBoauo. 

National Loam)* 

MONTREAL-^ cnflort YoanfcPU^- 

er. totfte Toronto 8 /W Jws to compete « 

aarller. trade- ' - 

-SAN FRANCI 8 CO-^^irt*i««^‘ h e“^ 
tracts ol Rooer Mason and BoOW Moon*. 
Pitchers, and MlVe WoodwU ,l ^«T. 
Phoenix, at Mt* .PadWc Coos* Loaouo. 

BASK ST BALL 

National Ba**»all **«*■"«" 
PHILADELPHIA— samod Volse WinWrs, 

' ^^AH^-Srtveteron cwtfw BJJIy Poult*. 

FOOTBALL 

Nattoaal Foottwll Lewm* 

and. Waived Barnard Hewv ond ^ 

. Taylor. wWe reeetvers. J -,^, r _ Bl j fl0 and 


■ AMERICAN LBAAUR 

Tens on n* RM t i 

(MM sn MM-t i 3 

Mason, Harris 17), and skmtMs Conroy, 
Kroeaar Rt# Vaane l7U.Onnvem »t. and 
Heath. W— Mason, M3. L-Conrav. 0-L 5v— 
Harris OOL HR— Oakland, Koaih till. 

BatHmart WWEW 3 1 

MM . »«1MM 7 • 

DjMorttnaz, Stswart (U aod Dm wow: 
OMo and Gadrocav w— oi«4a, 1-9. 1^— 
OMartftwz, tM. W-OHdA 7-f. L—OjMar- 
tlaez, 15-9. H U B os t on, Armas (331. 

Detroit WSW1SSM 5 • 

Toronto W1.HHM-* * • 

Terrell, mrnondt (I) and PorrWu DavU. 
Lamp (it. Lowed* {«, Henkr w and Whttt 
W— Lamp, M. L— TerrsB, TM. Sv— Hank* 
nil. HR— Toronto, Garda ( 7 K 
MhumoM MS «• HS-* 4 I 


KL u>-NMra. 7-H HRs— son Prandsca. 
Gladden CJ1, Galt OJ. YBunoMood Ml. 
Second Game 

So a Francisco ziT tea tot— rue 

HU M S no MS Mn— IS 11 1 

Jefftsat, Moore Ml. Minton Ml. MXKrvta (5) 
and Hokes. Brenly 15 >; Hoattwock, Dawtev 
(SI, Calhoun (51, DIPIno (SI and BaUov.W— 
DfPtna 5*. L- MDavlA Ff. HR*— Houston, 
GJ>av» (14), wain no (t), Bass (131. 
CMcom Mt Ml IIS— * 7 S 

putsboroo ost ns os o i 7 a 

Afireoek Merldltti (61. Boiler (7) and Davts; 
Dolma. Guxile W and Pena, w— Merldltti, 
3-1 L— DeLeon. 5-17. Sv— Batter El). HR— 
ChtcawL Durham (1SI. 

Mostroal SM SM Wt— 1 5 S 

PfeikuMHntila stj set in — 4 9 a 

GulHcfcmv Lucas (71 and Butern, OVarry 


rwCTOO sas sn an— * * a (7|j icGross and Dautton, w— K-Gran. 14*. 

Viola, settrotn ffl, Lyearxier (7) and Enott; L— GMUcksofv, 13-1L hr— PhUod eWh lo, 
Burns and nifc.W--Gurns,T7*.L-Viola.lJ. Sdwddl OS). 


Itow York MS 3M MS— S « 1 

MJTwaakw Mmsav-4 n a 

Onriay, Shlrtev UU, Bond) B), RkdialH (9) 
and Wvnaflon Hkwtro and Moora,lhmwrt 


t9).W— Hla«jr»l3-4. L^ BardL5^.HB— MIL MOl Sy— Power (201. 

™*2Zr rl ' S '- on as*-* 1 • st loois 

***°* an 7 1 itewYortt 

Tudor and Porin'^ 

^ L-Rdmanlck. LW S— Outemt^rry 

So** 2 


San Dteso SMO8SI0B-* 5 t 

CMdman an m* tax— a 1 a 

Show, Jackson U), Walter (S) and Boctiv; 
Browntna, Franco m. Power m and Oku. 
Van Gordor ( 9 ). «— oramilna. 144 . G- 5 Jw«w, 


SL LOOM SM SM 0M V-4 4 • 

Nnr York an aso SMt-4 3 a 

(W imUnost 

Tudor and Porter; Gooden, Orosco riD) and 
Carter. W— Tudor, 1 M. L— Orosco. 54. HR— 
SL LMb, Cedeno (4). 

■La* Annates * MS sw sos — 12 u • 


IN BM She-* U ( AHonftr 


soottie ■“r _ - 

5 niiltij Rutua (5). Romoro Ml.ThomesanMJ 


S» OSS S20— 3 9 3 


Valeazuata, Hatton (7), Dta (9) end 5ctos- 



E. Germans Beat France 
In Soccer Qualifying 


The Associated Press ning, look the lead in the 25 ih min- 

LEIPZIG, East Gennany — ute on a shot by the unmarked 
France, the European soccer chant- Glenn Hod die, but Rodion Cama- 
pion, was 2-0, Wednesday lani burst throu^a the En^ish de- 
night and the Frenchmen's hopes tense 15 minutes into the second 
of qualifying for the World Cup half to tie the scons. 


tournament in Mexico were severe- 
ly damaged. 


That stiB left England ai the top 
of European qualifying Group 


Striker Reiner Ernst and foil- Three :•> a virtually cenam quslifi- 
back Ronald Kreer scored in the nrmth rune pants from sc rams. 


second half for East Germany, 
while France failed to manage a 


Romania, with seven pom is, is 
second on goaf difference, ahead of 


qualifying matches. mrct m Bucharaa next momh. 

Foin other World Cop qualify- Bul which seemed to be 

ing matches played WeSSy f^qj^cabon t ifter 

ended in drawa Romania hdd En- wmnmg ,ts first ihn* ^am« m its 
gland to a 1-1 tie at Wembley, and ^ *“ ^ «ctim away 

in the matches between Switzer- tromnome. 
land and the Republic of Ireland in Wter iheu bnlhanu 24 vtctory 
Bern, between Poland and Belgium w u France over South Amman 
in Choroszcz and Turkev and champion Uruguay, id a match io 


land and the Republic of Ireland in . meu onmanu w vKiwy 
Bern, between Poland and Belgium w u France over South American 
in Choroszcz and Turkey and champion Uruguay m a milch to 
Northern Ireland in Izmir there “ l}e . ««offmaJ worid soccer 
was no scoring. uUe L 851 ** f"?* P 

The resells left most group 
siandmgs stiD m confusion, al- •r defense 

SAifaSriZMJriES Po ^ d of a fourth 

? el8 ’ UI ? K h ^ 10 consecutive appearance in the fin- 
faoe a playoff with neighboring ^ ^ salva ^^ scordess draw 


MMawnihirtt; IMmoaO Seen. Volte (». W- Oa. Raw 17); BtelmoloivStttefcii 13), Coma 
Sira T*I L-amiin. 1-3. HRx-CtewkwJ. Ml. Schuter ( 6 ). Forster (B>. Gortor (9) and 
Hr •Lottie, percent* (3). SonoMcL W— VatenruHa. T 74 . L — Badraskm. 


Wilton) (3). Seattle. Percent* £21. 

NATIOMAL LBAOUE 

First Game 

c-n FramOsae W IM tlV-11 M I 

BOO i*l * 33 — 4 1 1 

Brenly; NteknvMxtthteM). AAjO- 
aan Sotana (») ana NUzemck. l»—Gott, ^ 


6 - 1 z HRs— un Angelas, VMenwUn (I), 
Brack (X). 


Romania’s LadislauBokmi brought down Engfish forward Gary Lineker with a hard tackle 
during their World Cup qualifying match. The teams played to * 1-1 tie at Wembley. 


Holland. 


with Belgium before 70,000 fans 


1^4 ^ have re- 
cured a place in the finals by wm- 


•f •*' 


■ -’0‘ 

r ; 




PHILADELPHIA— SlomKi DaU ® LWl *' 

T QrtPM-S*: 

JobnaoaiteliBrolvabaeks,onttilu^ m*lev, 

SigmW l*. Nmson.satrty.ond MUU “ T 

defensive back. . _ «a)Atv. 

SEATTLE^SWied Hick SanhKtL W 
. -Placed Paul Mayor, safety, on ^ 

Has back-Wotved MIehaol Morton, runn 
-back-kick rotumor. 

- - HOCKEY 

- National Moekev rta nt 

DETROIT— SJoned Bronl Fedvfti 

"MONTREAL-^Woned 

to a W»ear contraef. Plu» o° 

?NJ. DEVILS— Waned Arcfile *&&***• 

^SjEBEC— SH ttlwJ AWn Leml****' conw. 
o a two-veor centra CL nmee, «NUW'. 

LWr droit m 

jPjullLyoar. pad- 

cnLteo® 

- itewi OrsbVTt 

KAMSAS-Aonoonc*d ttw corfain. 

and Lyon WBWona, “rJU,. lin*- 

aflonslvc aubrt. tSuy e ° n *^^ntel4s*llno- 
man. Dm* Griffin and ,/ v e bac^ 

oackon. onfl Alrio Walton. lW swot- 

wobMm dtctared weUB^ w 1 

MU season. . 


Mteoradc. **-Gott, 7- SPORTS BRIEFS 

U.S.-Soviet Olympic Pact Readbted 


United Press International 


— ■ English Order Identity Cards 

„ - TT if H 1 The English Football League or- 

Raiders. Chiefs Unrested but Ready szzZtt 

7 * First and Second Division soccer 

said the Raidas' coraerback, Mike earlier demand about halfway — grounds “as soon as possible," The 


Toronto 

Nm> York 

BatHmore 

Detroit 

Boston 

Milwaukee 

OeMtonH 

Kansas City 

CalUarnto 

aifcaoa 

OoWOTKt 

Seattle 

Miiewsoia 


Bat ptvliion J a 

^ ■ WASHINGTON (WP) — The 17.S. and Soviet Olympic committees on 

e a m » Sunday will sign an accord providing for exchanges of athletes, coaches 
and training camp visits over the next three yearn. 
m to a* A US. Olympic spokesman, Mike Moran, said Wednesday, “We tope 

ft T7 m acn H will establish a dnnaie (hai w2I lead to a return of Olympic parriripa- 


KANSAS CITY, M is souri — Haynes. “Afl your peers are watch- that Dickerson must report before Associated ftess reported. 


The Los Angeles Raiders, who ing. All America is watching. Every any negotiations take place, 
come to life when the sun goes game is a big game, but when But the Rams, told of Dicker- 
down, g»n the Kansas Gty Chiefs you’re on national television, it’s son’s proposal by reporters, flatly 
on Thursday night in one of only like a Super BowL” rqected it 

Offer ltejecfed Mf o*fe Retires From NFL 

Both teams wfil be playing, be- Eric Dickerson appeared to be Chuck Muncie, the running back 


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’ by Moscow, although the agreement domains no such commitment, 
le Soviet Union declined -to participate in the 1984 Olympic Games 


rqected it. 

■-MttDcie Retires From NFL 
Chuck Muncie, the running back 


The Soviet Union declined to participate m i the J984 Olymmc Games fere ^ expected crowd of 75,000 at compromising on his long contract for *e Minnesota Vikings, saying 
in Los Angeles. The United States boycotted the 1980 Summer Olympics Arrowhead Stadium, with only holdout with the Los Angeles he could not balance his drug rebar- 
in Moscow because of the Soviet invasion of A fgh a nis ta n . ^ flowing imp-res- Rams; but the team did not. The bilitation and football has an- 

* a yq j »n ri ' l , sjve season -opening games. Los Angeles Times reported. nounced his retirement. United 

bale Ol OrareniU UOWHS oOUSDftt The Raiders blanked the New Dickerson, apparently moved by Press International reported. 

_ .. . _ _ T 7 _ . York Jets. 31-0. on Sunday for their suggestions by the coach, John The nine-year veteran of the 

LOUISVILLE, Kentucky (UPI) — Churchill Downs' .directors voted s ], utoat since 1977, and the Robinson, that to was lettingdown NFL was traded to the Vikings on 
Wednesday to bold off responding to a $46 tnjllkm bid by a Florida 0^5 New Orleans, 47-27. teammates, held a press conference July 19 by the San Diego Chargers 


horseman, Louis E. Wolfson, to buy the home of the Kentucky Derby. 
The track's president, Thomas H. Meeker, said the directors did not 


feel com] 
tradeoff! 


The Raiders, one and one-half Wednesday and said he had M the urging of the NFL commis- 
noim favorites, are in their ele- dropped his demand to have a sioner, Pete Rozelle, 

* ora- Jt. . tint tt <*Kn • ahJ " MllMAiA M ItAl) koAM 


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id to take any action either in favor or ag ains t Wolfson. A gj nce inception of Mon- guaranteed contract extension Muncie, 32, had been suspended 
said previously that ChurchDl Downs would oppose the bid. ^ football in 1970, the signed before to would iqoin the for the 1984 season after traces of 

Raiders have a 26-5-1 record cm team. cocaine were found in his urine. He 

jig prime time TV and no team ts close AH to wanted, to said, was “a suspended again for the Vj- 

10 matching their .828 success rate, good-faith offer*’ that could be ne- kings* scason-opeoer because he 
“The guys have no trouble get- 
ting up for those type of games," 


• Rice’s football coach, Watson Brown, 35, on his first season’s HO 
record; “1 went from a great, young coach to a dumb, old coach." (AP) 


gotiated while he played. 

That seemed to meet the Rams* 


had missed two drug counseling 
sessions required by Roadie. 


Chibs will have to allocate half 
their seats to membership card- 
holders. Casual supporters still will 
be able to attend, but in limited 
numbers. 

The edict, announced after a spe- 
cial meeting of the league manage- 
ment committee, comes in the wake 
of widespread violence at matches 
at home and abroad last season. 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher had demanded that a na- 
tional identity-card system be in- 
troduced for all spectators at all 92 
clubs in the four divisions of pro- 
fessional soccer in England. 

Cute initially balked al the sug- 
gestion, maintaining it was imprac- 
tical and expensive. 

Thursday’s meeting considered a 
working party report. It then 

mgoiriy First andslecond Division 
dubs and restricting seating. 


f 



§££ " SSQSSttto a 



Page 24 


OBSERVER 


The Middle-Class Elitist 


Bv Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — I am too dis- 
dainful of shoddy goods. The 
word for this condition is “elitist." 
it is a bad word that is meant to 
fnake the person to whom it is ap- 
plied seem despicable. The air is 
filled with such words. Notice how 
rotten you feel when somebody 
calls you a “sexist," a “yuppie” 1 ? So 
you stop saying “lady.” you sell 
your BMW. Anything to avoid fur- 
ther assault, right? 

That's the way I am about “elit- 
ist,” so when shoddy goods are be- 
ing offered I am now very careful 
not to curl my lip. I sometimes even 
hear myself — hypocrite! — de- 
fending inferior stuff. Plastic, for 
instance. 

Until a few years ago, it was 
obligatory to be scornful of plastic. 
No more. Now journals of ad- 
vanced opinion, the sort that use 
words like “synthesis” and go on 
about navthis and neo-that, speak 
disparagingly of people who speak 
disparagingly of plastic. Intellec- 
tually. plastic is in. T now speak 
well of it. 


think America would be a better 
country if everybody went to the 
Uffizi Gallery every' Sunday in- 
stead of reading "The Kaizenjam- 
mer Kids.’ ” 

This exchange occurred during 
the early Eisenhower period, when 
there was a brief attempt by a few- 
brave pioneers of conservatism to 
rehabilitate middle-class tastes. 
These bad been so ridiculed over 
the last 30 years that millions of 
Americans preferred the anarchis- 
tic “LTI Abner” strip to solid, good, 
boring “Rex Morgan. M.D.” 


1 don't know what prompted my 
recent defense of “Lifestyles of the 
Rich and Famous,” because 1 have 


never seen it and probably never 
will. That's because I can't stand 


I have a typewriter Out is mostly 
plastic and rubber bands. Between 
us, it is an infuriating piece of junk, 
but you won't catch me saying so. 
and if anybody else does. I’m likely 
to reply. “So you’re one of those 
tiresome elitists who are alwavs 
putting the knock on plastic, eh?'"' 

Not. long ago I beard myself de- 
nouncing somebody for saying a 
television show called “Lifestyles 
of the Rich and Famous” was vul- 
gar and trashy. Americans have al- 
ways enjoyed' vulgar trash, 1 said. 
What could be healthier than the 
whole darned country sitting by the 
TV set enjoying some good, inno- 
cent, healthy, \ml«ar trash? 

. Then, to pul the boot into this 
critic of “Lifestyles of the Rich and 
Famous," I said, “People like you 
would rather see the whole country 
reading Virginia Woolf instead of 
haring a little harmless entertain- 
ment.” 

. This wasa neat way of callin g the 
poor devil an “elitist,” as I knew 
too well having had the trick 
pulled on me many years ago after 
telling a small audience that when 
it came to comic strips. “Rex Mor- 
gan. M.D.” was not even in the 
same league with “Li'l Abner.” 

“Sure,” some coarse Voice of the 
People replied, “and I suppose you 


hearing about “lifestyles.” Nobody 
with any self-respect' would permit 
his life to be “styled” 

Local TV news performers have 
their hair “styled.” and considering 
how fantasncahy overpaid they 
are. I suppose they’ve got no right 
to resist iL People who permit their 
lives to be “siyled” though, strike 
me as being beneath contempt, and 
I don't want to look at them on 
television no matter how rich and 
famous they are. 

Naturally, 1 would not say this 
aloud nowadavs; it would sound 
too “elitist.” Come to think or it. 
though, what is so sait-of-the-eanh 
about having your life “styled"? 

As with so many other aspects of 
modem life, the struggle to avoid 
charges of elitism is a reaction 
against recent history. For most of 
the century the terrible words that 
made people sound despicable 
were “middle-class.” 


From the age of Harding to the 
dawn of Reaganism. it was a dread- 
ful judgment to hear one say. “so 
middl e-class — you're so hopeless- 
ly middle-class." The party thus 
denounced was made to feel despi- 
cable because of the implication 
that he hadn’t the discrimination 
necessary to dis dain shoddiness, 
avoid plastic and stay out of the 
clutches of quacks exploiting the 
gullible who believe that life, like a 
TV weatherman’s hair, can be 
styled. 

Those attitudes, or course, were 
“elitist." They were swell once, but 
they're out. “Middle-class” is now 
where it's at. 


Nev York Times Service 


Stevie Wonder and 'the Clock of Now’ 


By Roberr Hilbum 

tat ,4njWo Tinges Service 

OS ANGELES — You get an idea of bow 

~j bard Stevie Wonder works on his muse 


when vchj listen to him describe the thought 

Rather 


he puts into selecting his album titles 
than naming the album after one of the col- 
lection's most appealing songs. Wonder 
warns his titles to represent the direction and 
tone of his records. 

Wonder. 35. said “In Square Circle" was 
chosen as the title of his newly released album 
to suggest the complexities and ironies of 
human experience. 

“Take the album itself — the cover is 
square, but the record itself is a circle.” he 
said. “Bui also the world is round even 
though it is based off in squares — with 
north, east, south and west. In the West, most 
buddings are built in Che square form, but a 
lot of the African buildings of old are built in 
the circular form. 

“There is also the need to pay careful 
attention to thing s because they often are not 
what they seem. Some of the songs talk about 
this. You have many people these days who 
uy to convince you that they are acting in 
God's name — as if he okays what they are 
doing. But they are actually just using the 
creator’s name to justify their own selfish 
motives. 

“Take the apartheid song on the album. 
That’s a perfect example of a government 
that says it acts in God’s name.” 

The song — “It’s Wrong (Apartheid)” — 
speaks to rulers and oppressed blacks in 
South Africa. The album version of the song 
ends with an expression of hope to the latter 
“Freedom is coming. . . hold on tight-” 

The song will be extended on die stfll- 
unrel eased 12-inch angle and on the com- 
pact-disc version of the album to include this 
warning to South African officials: 

The clock of now says it’s time 

For you to make up your mind 

Before it’s too late for you 

To earn your redemption. 

Wonder has bad a steady series of hits in 
recent years, including “Master Blaster (Jam- 
rain’)” in 1980 and “That Girl” in 1982, and 
he won an Academy Award for “I Just Called 
to Say I Love You” from the film “The 
Woman in Red.” 

Still be maintain ed something of a low 
profile in the 1980s after establishing hims elf 
in the 1970s as one of the most rafted and 
acclaimed figures of modem pop. His domi- 
nance was highlighted in the mid-1970s when 
three consecutive Wonder albums won best- 
album Granunys: “Innerrisions,” “Fulfil- 
lingness' First Finale” and “Songs in the Kev 
of Life.” 

Although the album that followed, the 
sound track for the documentary “Journey 
Through the Secret life of Plants,” was an 
exquisite musical statement, its esoteric dc- 



Sterie Wooden “Freedom is coming. . . bold on tight’ 


sign was not wbat the public or the industry 
was expecting, and it was widely viewed as a 
disappointment Still, the two-record set is 
likely to stand as one of Wonder’s top 
achievements. 

While the foQow-up, “Hotter Than July,” 
was generally admired and sold well it did 
not catch the pop imagination the way his 
earlier work had. The sound track to Gene 
Wilder’s comedy “The Woman in Red” was a 
mostly light-hearted sidestep. 

Wonder sees the new album as the start of 
bis most ambitious series of albums since the 
1970s trilogy. “This is the first of a group of 
three albums,” he said. “Some of the songs 
will deal with relationships and love, some 
with political themes and social issues, and 
some just with religious beliefs and con- 
cepts.” 

There is an exuberance and grace to the 
best songs in the new album that echo the 
ambition and confidence of the early work. 

Wonder, a participant in the “We Are the 
World” recording session for African famine 
aid, is one of many artists who are helping 
restore a sense of social consciousness to pop. 

Unlike some of them, however, he is no 
newcomer to social commentary, although 


ward the disadvantaged — backed by a vigor- 
ous, danceable tune. Other songs touched on 
such matters as the difficulty of Vietnam 
veterans in readjusting to life at home; one 
song called for a national holiday in memory 
of Martin Luther King. 

Because of that number, “Happy Birth- 
day,” Wonder was associated with the drive 
to honor the memory of King, and he was 
thrilled when Congress voted to establish the' 
third Monday in January, effective next year. 


as a national holiday. (King’s birthday was 

Senate 


Jan. 15.) Wonder was in the U.S. 
gallery with Coretta King, the widow of the 
slain civil rights leader, and her son on the 
day in 1983 that the bill passed. 

Wooder is encouraged by the upswing of 
social awareness and responsibility among 
pop artists. 

think it took a long time for people to get 
over the disillusionment of losing such very 
great people,” he said, referring to the assassi- 
nations of King and John F. Kennedy. 

The memory of the 1960s, Wonder said, 
had somewhat faded until recently. “The 
younger generation, black and white, didn’t 
know a lot about the struggle that bad gone 
on,” he said. “They took for granted a lot of 
the advances that were made. 


his importance as a commentator in pop is 

its his 


often overlooked because he puts 
thoughts into such a melodic and accessible 
format. 

A classic example was “You Haven't Done 
Nothin',” one of the most scathing attacks of 
the 1970s on governmental indifference to- 


“That may be why so many yoang people 
titude, The 


today have such a conservative aitit 


interesting thing is that a lot erf the momen- 
tum for this rent 


renewal is coating fnmpeople 


my a g* people who grew up in the *6 
did see what happened. A lot of these people 
realize it is time to get involved again.” 


PEOPLE 

Famous Eyes for Science* 

.wu-t " chi' iiiH 


EBzabrth Taylor was 45 minutes mine in 1969 it 1 
late for the Sta showing at the -I ‘ ofPuU 

Deauvilfe Flm Festival [of ter T965 ^ ^dtecornedran Joe Piscopo. 


film “The Taming of the Shrew, 
and an hour late for a tare news 
conference the next day. One fed- 
- ■ ter dubbed her “the 


Lhe former Bract Sprmgstecn gui- 
tarist Steve Van Zandt and other 


Se9£33&5 


admired young directors 'such as the fire. whi«didestros^~penMt 

Ssevea Spielberg and George Lo- of tbecitv s mdustiy. ieacmg ^2U0 
cas. said: “1 have every intention of people jobless, 
playing E.T. in the remake.” She □ 

also said she planned to donate the 

e 1.0 T TV. 


r as soloist, his 


famous violet eyes to science. Tay- ^jSiSfi^rSEed’ to he heard 


ior] who was to be made a com- 1 orefas tru. ~ Ra* » Shan 


m under of the Order of Ans_ 
Letters on Thursda. 
refused to discuss 


der of Arts and No j for suar and 

1 “Si " “ P ^- £3£Sr5riv«t its VorfL 


rciuacu iu ui»u» u- c” , nna miere at tne scast-n-v-T-*-****™ 

her professional plans or Rock P New York Philhar- 

Hudson. a victim of acquired .Si' manic, as part of the Untied States 


mune deficiency syndrome. Taylor 
is a kev figure in next week's Holly- 
wood benefit for AIDS victims. 

O 

ItTl be one of the hot tickets in 
New York: On eight Sunday eve- 
nings, 16 of America's best-known 
writers, two each evening, will read 
from their works and talk at the 
Booth Theater. The $1,000 sub- 
scription for the senes, organized 
by the writers’ group PEN. has 
some interesting pairings, such as 
Nov. 17, when its president, Nor- 
man Maher, teams up with a long- 
time antagonist. Gore VidaL Other 
nights will feature Saul Bellow and 
Eodora Wetty, Isaac Basberis Sing- 
er and ADce Walken WDfiam F. 
Buckley and John Irving; Susan 
Sontag and Kurt Voonegut; Joan 
Diction and Tom Wolfe; Arthur 
Miller and William Styroo; and 
Woody Allen and John Updike. 

□ 


lS-month Festival of India. Con- 
ducting was the Philharmonic > In- 
dian-born music director. Zubin 
Mehta. 

□ 

Nine luxury restaurants in Brus- 
sels owned bv Albert Michids have 
been rofed bankrupt after a court 
established ihat he owed more than 
75 million francs (Sl.25 million) in 
taxes and social security payments. 
An inquire was opened to establish 
whether Michiels. whose restau- 
rants include La Pomme-Cannelle. 
Le Cheval Blanc and La Marts, 
had evaded tax payments or em- 
ployed undeclared workers. Mi- 
chiels' financial problems appear? 
to have started when his “Saint- 
Jean-des-Pres” restaurant in New 
York failed. 

□ 


Jake Butcher, the former Ten- 


“Whm you can’t put it in The 
Congressional Record, or publish it 
in the newspaper, or put it on iele- 

- - ” MVC 


Mssee financier who is serving drae , 


at a federal minimum-security pris- 
on camp in Atlanta for tax evasion 
and bank fraud, has a new job: 
cooking, washing pots, cleaning 
floors and tables, a prison spokes- 
man said. Butcher is earning about 
1 1 cents an hour. He will be eligible 
for parole in 1992. 

□ 

Beverly Sills, director of the City 
Opera in New- York, says fans have 
been sending in checks to help re- 
place more than 10,000 costumes 
lost in the Passaic, New Jersey, fire 
Sept. 2. Sills said insurance would 
cover about SI 5 million of the loss, 
estimated at S5 million. “When we 
made our ‘Rigdetto’ jester’s cos- 


r DcLay. 

Republican oT Texas, one of several 
members of Congress trying to swp 
the National Endowment for (he 
Arts giving grants to poets whose 
work they deem obscene. At a hear- 
ing Tuesday, a House education 
and labor subcommittee will hear 
pros and cons on the endowment’s 
policies, as well as testimony from 
Cleanth Brooks, professor emeritus 
of rhetoric at Yale University. An- 
other Texas Republican who is a 
critic of the grants. Representative 
Dick Armey, promised to briefg 
some of the poetry’ to the hearing. 
Whether it will end up in The Con- 
gressional Record is another ques- 
tion. 




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river, b<g fish pond iprng, wood. Tri: 
B Ownchard (86) S3 21 Tt 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

FUENCH PROVINCES 

PROMOTION MOZART - French B*. 
era Real Estate Agercy - Speariof in 
beautifd optitmerft and mites it am 
Cannes to Menton. N«e 06000 ■ Ptace 
Mann el Hotel Meridian. Tel: f?3 
87.0620 -193) 3148.80 Telex Immo 
ior 46123a. 

liills 


NAPOLEON in, splenrid sea mew. 
megnrheent 85 sq.m. 3 rooms, 20 
sq.m, terrace, equipped kitchen, un- 
derground double parking, pool, Wo- 
rm. P950D0O. Promcirian Maiort, 19 
Ave Auber. 06000 Nee. Tel- 93i'87 
06 20. Tele* 1MMOZA* 46)235. 



ARE YOU loafanq for a h/rurious vflta 
m Amibex. cone bafL Swimmuia pool 
pool house, big fivira room, 5 bsd- 
loorra. nice bfdien. 2500 sqm. fend. 
Cafl us (16-93)94 40 53. Latcur, 20 rue 
Lotaur Maubourg. 06400 Cannes. 




|Mpl 






GR A5 S E 

Owner sells 3 rooms, 80 sqja. + 23 
sqm. terraces, hijft dess buJdng in 
park, panoramic view, adlar, garage. 
F860.000. Tel (1693) 36 >£57 


ipilli 

iHHi 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


SMAU CASTLE XV/XV1II century, per- 

fect av*£*on, loirq, 15 km Roanne, 
90 Ian Lyon, la rooms, central heot- 
19 ha F2 nrifam. T«iy7) 64 SO 10. 
fans Office 260 34 01. fad. 3033 


ng- 

Or Fora 


attic Spoocvs 
m. garden. Foudm (461 1 


4311. 


Warrae, said by t 

usjl.000.000i (93) < 


SANARY. Var, wflo. leavtew, 

ayn. fivtng voce, 4 bedroom*. 1 

apm. Borden. .pool. FZ250.0t». 

France 94 Q762?OLondon 1549! 


MEGEVE FSB6Q4 AlPS. 

chaka, 7 rooms, 5 baths, 2 
Tel (56) 2110767 


GERMANY 


due to rekremerT of for» 

50 bn from Bqmv Aachen 2 _ 

Indoor pod. beautiful garden. All 
modem electronic fociSties mehring 
alarm. Abo pasabiEty d se&ng a 

Med German company which will 

dfaw owner to have resdenee in 
Gerirtonr. Best 2189, LKT Frie 
dndrir. IS. D 6000 frontfart/Moiiv. 


Enquire in writing to: John Sdnnifter, 
Onan GmbH, Bnennet Str. 3, &800d 
Mmhi 


GREECE 


NEOOASSICAU 3 ttory 


dared hatorit right oows the 

afa & tt» Thewre of Dionasos. 


Acropofe & 

Perfectly suitable at 
ters or for Bnbassy. A 
co tM hove hit Athens morion hero. 
Licence lor restoration obtained. 
Owners wtKng to condsider offers in 
range of USJT.l tniBon. Brokers are 
y eo ha Jy mrduded. Contact Mr. X. 
Dmtnade in Afters, Greta (01) 
4524 Q69 during office hairs. 


bet datrid, 20 ferns from Atham, luxu- 
rious upu t m a n l in block of fiats by 
sea, lovriy view, swim mi ng po ol, 18 u 
sa m- air ovritioned, 5 bedrooms, 3 
bathrooms. USS2OO,0CO fuftr far- 
triephone. Cril Afters 
1710845 


8960146 or 6710 


(90 Kjjaeochyrd penthouse 


buMng 

ieaf« 


sqm. lx* 1962. Brriers accepted. 
Write; M. Mokrn, 5 Grovias 5t a 152 
33 Kriantfri, Athens. TeL- 6832*3! 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 
PubBthyourbrnuneammaage 
mffm International HanMfit- 
bunm, where mare than a Hunt 
of' a nriBo n rmaderj wertd- 
erU% ma$ i of whom are 01 
bmbieu and tn&ntry, w3 
it Just telex vs (Ptwh 


61359S£befor» lOajti, en- 


suring mot we can men you 
both, and your metr rifle wS 
enwer w Ohm 4 8 hours. The 
ttSxW is 


UJ.S9.SO or food 
equivalent per Ene. Yea must 
mdudm complete and verdt- 
t±le bSBng address. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


PUBLIC & PRIVATE 
U.S. SYNDICATIONS 

S3OO.OOO.0CC- in Various Amounts 


OIL A GAS 

Guaranteed wcomo funds, banded le- 


Resort property, hoieb. office budrincs, 
cnl brid- 


apartment completes, hrstonenl 
ires, raw katai 

COMMUNICATIONS 
Cobte TV movies TV syndicators 


{ton mum Invesnroiv ri^OODOO] 
We c re a puUit US oil & gar ccmpmy 
that hes expanded ns base at product. 


first friternatienai 03 A Gas Inc 
hri Whmer V Lmda Carfiste 
Oeever. CO USA 303-53^.1714 
London. E rqfand 01-828-5425 
Pans. France 502 1800 


PANAMA COMPANY Formation, to. 

td privacy assured IFX. 73 New Bond 

Street. London Wl . England 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

MONEY TREES ? 

YBI Invest n one of America's mast 
ttacftna tectmofuflicri breafc- 
thrauula n a bSwn daSar mduslry. 
Orei 30.000 nut troei planted in 1984. 
Projected mud mrome evamudly 
readies 52%. Producing frees known 
to five over 100 years. We gucs an- 
tes to repurchase investment. 
BROKERS' ENQUIRIES INVTTHJ. 
A4a»enal avoktate »i Engfesh, French, 
German. Bon 2K8. Herald Triune 
92571 NeuDy Cede, Fiance 

Mnamim imroetnwnt - USS7.950 

USA 

BUSRCSSE5 A REAL ESTATE 

Bumss total: aromeroal, industrial & 
residential real estate ides & leases. 

vetoprtent, Write with your reqwre- 
merits & financial sea to: 

Heson Realty A Bus-rest Brokers, 
14795 Jeffrey Ed, *210, farine. 
CaSfarrvo 92714 USA. 

Tet 714651-8030; H*i 590194. 


OPPORTUNITY FOR HNANQAL 
t REAL STATE ADVISORS 
bseated m Europe & Asa Became one 
at our exidusve conmrtBoned drtfribu- 
tars for our commeidd & agr cultural 
utopeittei located ei Cotfonua USA. 
Guaranteed return an investments for 
your cheat. Wale or phone; 

Mr ftesrient 

The Oxxwed Grot® Ud 

Post Office Box 430 

Walnut Creek CA USA 94997 

TeL 415.947-1047 


-LOOKING FOE IMPOKTBtS-deuibv- 

ten . wpgten in maior Bropean 
atri for first dass vanaus vuewnn 
canned nuts from Turkey. Tta Turkey 
XI 74 SJTA UL Tel: 90 (I) 5270616 or 
5271755 

U. S. A. 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 

Established company requires adtfoan- 
ri mprtnt to evptait revofurcror/ tech- 
nafaacal breakthrough. Hw* dhrldei ui 
ptntL Uiilirnited morfcot potenlltul. 
Mirwnum investment LF5S1C.000. rtgh 
annual returns projeded. For detailed 
informotiots Bax 2587, Herald Tribune. 
92521 Newly Codex. France 


f 

i - 

^ . 

ii 

BUSINESS SERVICES j 




BUSINESS SERVICES 


MTL 

BEAUTIFUl PEOPLE 
urauwra>MC 

IZSJk. 4 WORLDWIDE 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

GREECE 

'■ BEST DISTRICT OF A3HB4S. Kalorofo. 

■ luxurious office! lit, 5ft 6ft Score 
«r coaifioned. 1st and 5ft floors. 245 
iqun. each. 6lh floor 163 sqm., can be 

1 toed for home risa Each IS58CL0QQ. 
h Cril 89601 46 or 671 0845 Athens code 

D GREAT BRITAIN 





| ITALY 




LUXEMBOURG 

PANORAMIC VIEWS long Tenant- _ 
3 bedrooms fa Luxembourg, p 
51 95BOO. monthly thargw 5 1 50. G* 

M. Fortinberry NY 212 734-9395 / 
7340010 




MONTE-CARLO “ 

Private, mnroian. near Monaco Prince - 
Pataca. Pumjianic lea view. B 

Teb (93) 30 46 54. 


A complete personri & burmer* rervn 
pravK&ig a urigtie ooBecHan of 

Uenwd, versatSe & 

rtdviduafc for a B toad 
promcrionri aecaaom. 
112-765-7793 

212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St, N.Y.C 10019 


Service Representatives 
ed Worldwide. 


Needed 1 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 

report . 12 courtrid anriyiged De- 
ratt: WMA. 45 Lyn*itf« Terrace, 
Hung 


WMA. 45 
Sate 52. Central, I 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


22% REAL AmOAL RETURN, an 

am rage, hoe been garwrond by the 

Ca baton Btrin Investment Trust's 

uni trust mortgage pooL Defafc 

H52ST INTHNAfrahWimiST CO. 
LTD, Dept. 950. P.O, Bo* 302. 1005, 
Son Joee. Cage Bca Trie* 2857 


BUM 21% - 30%. INVEST in rimrt 
term cammerad paper notes, 'mvest- 
mentgumantee d Ailed LnL POBqot 
422. Hamsonbwa. Vitomia22801, 


OFFICE SERVICES 


BJRO BUSMESS CBflER 


99 Keizengrocht. 1015 Of Amsterdam 
Tel: 31.20.26 


57 49 Tele* 16183. 
IKnyifiri Business Centres 


YOUR OfflCE M PARK: THS. 

ANSWB8NG SBNKE. seamy, 
errands, mcriboy. kve 24H/d ay. 


Tel. PAT: <09 95 9& 


RAWS ADDRESS. . r .. 

Snoe 1957 15R. pro v ide s mep^ 

Me*. meeSoai roars. 5 rue d'ArtoB, 

75006. Tri. 3S9 47 04. The. 642504 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


HONACO 


LUXURY HAT. IHKD FLOOR. Ttfi 


sqjn, sonny, quiet, sea new an 3 


conenon gorder*. swmn n 

SftV 

ried I March 

UX. fXP3l 722891. 


2 lame garages and 2 woe 
Brikten new and «vdl be fia- 
Warth 1986. CcR RJ. Wflons 


MOROCCO 


OORMCHE OF CASABLANCA 
(Morocco) NEAR 
CROWN PRMKE PALACE 


Magnificent hMorioas vBa in fttfam- 
ous residential Anfia, 1 700 sqm, centred 
booting, 2 Roan, parents and chi 


rooms, cknen room. 3 fafchem, 
roams, 9 bathrooms, modern & kadi- 
tional ardvtactw*. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


Sardinia 


SARDMCA. NEAR AXMATAX 

fCarfierryL ttrtroordinaiy property 
5CLQQ0 sqm, superb W wew at 
imafb moat, motrians. voOey & along 
roast, with spoaout 225 saia VILLA 
(U5. u rc h te ti ), 3/4 bedroana, 2 
boftrccoet faro* keag/sbrng, paoo 
4- barbacM, TOO mm. terraces noth 
"brivedere". electnaty central heat- 


Cedes, France 


SPAIN 


PALMA DE MALLORCA 


Trir 36D6.13 - 36 T7 office 
or 2537.09 - 25 90 63 home 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


9tfAve.de 


Pais 15. 

I & after 5l 


terre 40 xq.m., ell conveniences, Juxo- 
notriy equipped by inletiar designer. 
6lh Hoar, sunny, quiet Pictured it 
“Howe i GordroVfiMOjOOa. Tek 
563 20 11 office Hwrv 574 6954 


, large necepbaa, 


pace. 


ow vffla, constructed in 7980, highly 
rrodenbgl West Driria. 34«J 


^c^UpOsqm, prices H^OoSofe 


:(3)91851 44 weriw»fc6< 


ptest hoirsa, private cnwtyqm. 2 Pw- 
mgs, 2 bedroorm. 2 baffa, 200 sqjn, 
Lttuc fe t ri y redesignetLnBVBr fitted in. 


fa- 


Tefc: 


1 +3bedroocm 
Ikitchan + ter- 


40 sqjn. jfucfo +"8 sqjn. 

— ' _ rioousnxxte 

gcrdcn.250 03 63 


r, spooous 

-t- 


old house, 7 main rooms 4- seporate 


rooms, 3 baths, smril garden. New 
York 212-751 96 35, hub : 504 86 2D 


large Kronen. 


Tri 


73WJIL 


loniy fiats owl 
a»y <x 


ary c« Prinw. 


, ft® 

at the 


1 and 
elver 


Cattle Perk in □ very quits and elegant 
vdue, hra nwe. from 


area suroflent rile, 
the aty canter. D “ 


terns and privqie perfang. Hat writ 
FYWq, efining vc 


. 242 sq.m. 

. price m U5S ca 
Penthouse: 9 bed- 
e»c. 913 sq/TL + 
sqjn, pnoe ui LfSS ca 


bedrooms __ 

+ terrace 32 
2«W00lo 

as* 

TpOOJXto. 

Far hfaher mformatioo 
Please aria 

INVERSORA BORIA S.A. 

JOSE BOOA 6 SON ARMADAN5 
07074 PALMA DE MALLORCA 
Tel: E-71-2A9900 


AUCANTE Vlfas & 
sale, rural & beodi 


for 

tew 


prices, guaranteed trie deeds, from 
has 2M000. Trt “ ' 


Travel/ viewing 

ponses refunded on prochaie. Mir- 
anda Baye (AqenjsJ. 6A East St. Not- 
r ^I 3AY, UK Tek 
I. H* 37107 


MASBBLA, ONE YEAR OU), 4-bed- 

room, Abaft, completely famshed 
vffla Swimring pool, near Enajiih 
Sdioal, tennis dub, good views, !j00 
s^-^ior. 238 sqm. bait area. 


. Information ad Alfonso 


04-52) 83 35 75 or write to 324 Urfx 0 

Rosoto, Morbefa, Span. 


5PAMSH WINE FACTORY. 4000 
sqjn. In Vddepenas (Nrftonnl Wine 
Region) 2 hours from Madrid Large 
wine ceBar & nee house inducted 


Negotiable price 5270,000. Wnht f 
'OP-12/28020 ' 


Sor 


dab Cruz 1C 


MINORCA i OW7« SELLS dract 780 

S^'yL’^SSHSi SJS 

bribing permit 6 viEa drawing. Tefc 

508 Ongftrt.Tbc; 216235^ 


IN A MAKVBOUS dty of South Afi- 

corUB, vilas S tos, 40 km ntl arport. 


PAGE 20 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


HOTELS 


FRANCE 


PAMS - Hsu Mrrobeew *’*NN, 10 
Ave. £ Z aki 1-23 room Acts, baft, 


GREAT BRITAIN 


B»J PLAZA MOTH, LONDON - 

KnramgtQft; best sfruatoi for biriness 
and pleasure. Afl rooms bath f show- 
er / TV / tetephftie / ratio / har 
dryer, etc ReProrant / bar / sauna / 


mauagfl, 
incknrvB Eng&h breridast, service 8 
tax. 68 Queen's Gate, London SW7. 
Tel: 01-370-6711. Tbo 916221 


HOLLAND 


SAVE HOTS, expense. Hart a flat 

SI 30/ week: Kanqy A ijj m i euU , NZ 

Voarburawri 611012 tt Airaterdom. 
Teh 31-tSTl 1S14. 


SWITZERLAND 


, GRAND HOTB.BKOPE 

has vaeanoes. Free Pciitea. 
Td 047 / 3011 11 Tele* 72657. ^ 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


THE OLD WOHtD IN CARAVAN. 

Europe ■ Midri* &at - North Africa. 
Rent a caravan writ driver & why not 

with a rook l Man or married 1 
From 1 to 6 prontfe. 5D00 to 
kins. Write to Box 2704, He 
bune. 92521 NeuSy Cedex. ..„ 

indicate how tang a your lean _ 

yaw mein halting places. Nod start: 
Oa. 20. 1985. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


SPRING BIRD MIGRATION. Scottish 
Hghtonds. May - July, slaying luxuri- 
ously m remote barorad residence 


estate, profassionaBy 
_ _ . I tout?. Ptrtes up to 7, indusve 
p«». Brochure from M. Wigcr, Bot- 




Per more HOUDAY A TRAVEL ADS 
PLEAS TURN TO 
PAGE IW 

M THE WSOND SECTION 


OCEAN SAOJN& 434aot yacht has 
bprtte open- Aftens Mpux . Lecnre s 
October. Coll Greece (029S-227B7. 


P H7P1GNAR OU3 QUAKTB, terw 

Wiuitnwnldl cooveriences, by weef 
month, Tek France (6q51 03 64. 


miAS Y AOTTWG. Y«N Charters. 

Acodeneas 28. Aftera 10671, Greece. 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


ACCESS USA 

One Way Bound Trio 

ytaw Yo* mo 9 

las Angeles F2400 F4600 

CNcogo F2390 F3690 

Mteae F2750 f4190 

Oflpn* £2650 F3990 

Detos . F343Q F5170 

trod FT890 F3O0O 

and more destmaero _ 
iSK ifccount on Is dass 
PAMS Wi (1) 221 46 94 


fjx.\A 1502) 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


ICSLANDAiR 
LAST MINUTE FARE 

3 days pnor k> departure 



UNIQUE PRICE 


To 


from Luxembourg 


ISFR449, IHl 1590) 


19.9*0, SFR*^"- 599 


m 




Frankfurt 

Brussels 

Poos 


yjSIff 

742 5J24 




I nip rime par Offprint, 73 me de I’Evanple, 75018 Paris. 


W-GwiSI?i%&SfeU Y - 



*r4cr,-\ 






3