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No. 31,902 




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PARIS, SATURPAY^StlNDAY, SEPtj^BER 14-15, 1985 


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By ®LW. Apple Jr. 

New York YhnesScmce ■' 

LONDON: — -Oleg A. Gor- 
lievdty, - the senior Soviet KGB es- 
, fooage officer id Britain,' whose 
detection fed lo the expulsion of 25 
alleged spies, was; a double agent 
for nearly 20 years. Western intelli- 
gence sources said Friday. 

British officials said, that Mr. 
Gordievsky defected late in July or 
early in August because be feared 
that his cover had been blown. 

_ He feared, the- officials said, ‘that 
his Hfe was in danger if he remained 
at his post as head'of the London 
mission of the KGB, the Soviet 
intelligence service, for even a few 
more days. 

On Thursday, the Foreign and 
Commonwealth Office announced 
Mr. Gordlevsky's defection and the 
expulsion of 25-Soviei officials a c* 
cused of espionage. 

The timing of & departure from 


the mission makes it dear that bis 
derision was wholly unconnect ed 
with the recent flight of the West 
German coDxueresDioaase chief. 
Hans Joachim Tiedge, who fled to 
East Berlin on Aug. 19. 

In press speculation that fol- 
lowed the announcement, it was 
suggested that Mr. 'Hedge’s sodden 

switch had « ) a rrwd the British in- 
telligence services because Mr. 
Tiedge might have tipped off Mos- 
cow about Mr. Gordlevsky. Britain 
therefore, might have decided to 
calt Mr. Gordievsky in. • 

But authoritative officials said, 
in addition to printing out that the 
timing was wrong, that it was in- 
conceivable that the West Ger- 
mans, who have a poor security 
record, would have bom told about 
Britain's .spy high up in the KGB. 

The first disclosure (hat Mr. 
Gordievsky had been working for 
the West came late Thursday from 


Ex-CIA Aide Cites Plan 
To Subvert Sandinists 


The Associated Press -■ 

THE HAGUE — -A formerintel- 
ligence analyst for the US. Central 
Intelligence Agency told the Inter- 
national .Court of Justice on Friday 
that ip 1981 the agency prepared a 
plan J for President Ronald Reagan 
to destabilize the Nicaraguan gov- 
ernment. 

Speaking on the second day of a 
hearing in the court case brought 
by Nicaragua against the United 
States, the former agent, David 
j|Macmfchael, was asked by Abram 
•L’hayes, a lawyer for Nicaragua: 
“Were you advised of a plan being 
prepared Tor the United States 
president calling for covert action 
against Nicaragua?** 

“Yes, I was,” said Mr. Maori- 
chael, who worked under contract 
for the QA from March 1981 to 
April 1983c . v. 

Mr. Macini chad’s testimony was 
presented in support of Nicara- 
gua's assertions that the United 


said that his government had iden- 
tified at least 1 1 US. citizens work- 
ing directly with anti-San dinist 
guerrillas. 

Mr. Carrito said that the San- 
dinist forces had obtained much of 
their information from rebel pris- 
oners, who he said had asserted 
that they had been interviewed by 
Americans identifying themselves 
as CIA hgents. 

■ U.S. Responds to Trial 

The Reagan administration is- 
sued a 130-page report accusing the 
Sandinists of backing, naming and 
arming guerrilla groups in neigh- 
boring countries, Reuters reported 
from Washington. US. officials . agent. 


the Danish justice minister, Erik 
Ninn-Hansen, who said that the 
Soviet agent had started working 
for his government shortly after he 
was posted to Copenhagen in 1966 
as a press attaebi. 

Officials in Copenhagen said 
that Mr. Gordlevsky had fed Infor- 
mation to them from 1966 until his 
departure in 1970 and again when 
J» was posted back to Denmark 
.from 1972 to 197B. 

Three Soviet diplomats were ex- 
pelled from Denmark in 1977, 
probably on the basis of Mr. Gor- 
dlevsky’s work. 

According to these sources, Mr. 
Gordlevsky was “handed over" to 
the British by the Danes when he 
was sent to London in 1982 with 
the diplomatic rank of counselor. 
He was promoted to “London resi- 
dent,** or KGB station chief, a few 
months ago. 

But that account was hotly dis- 
puted by the British, at least unoffi- 
cially. Intelligence sources said that 
Mr. Gordievsky had worked for 
Britain from the start, while coop- 
erating with the Danes as well. 

One retired coven operative 
said: “It’s pure poppycock to sug- 
gest that we took him .over from 
anyone efse.** 

Plagued for years by revelations 
of treachery by Britons recruited by 
the Russians, the British govern- 
ment appeared determined to take 
as much credit as possible for hav- 
ing “turned" so key a figure. Mr. 
Gordievsky would appear to be the 
highest-ranking Western espionage 
source within the KGB who has 
ever been publicly identified. 

Some diplomats in London say 
they believe that Mr. Gordievsky 
may have been responsible in 1983 
for foiling the attempt of Michael 
Bettaney, an officer of MI5, Brit- 
ain's counterespionage service, 
who has been apprehended and im- 
prisoned, to become a double 



U.S. Destroys 


A Satellite in 


Weapon Test 


Hw Anoomd Pioh 

A gatekeeper at Kensington Palace Gardens in London, known as “Millionaires* Row," 
where the Soviet Embassy is situated, said on Friday that the street was out of bounds to 
the press. Britain earlier had announced die expulsion of 25 Soviet officials for espionage. 


South African Business Leaders 
Hold Talks With Black Rebels 


sad the publication of the report 
had been timed to coincide with the 
World Court trial 
“Despite Sandinista protesta- 
tions,” the report said, “the record 
is dear that they had engaged in 
massive armed intervention m the 
neighboring states well before they 
alley that the United States or 


Mr. Bettaney approached the So- 
viet Embassy and offered informa- 
tion about MIS operations but was 
turned down — possibly, it was 
argued, because -Mr. Gordievsky 
said be could not be trusted. 

Mr. Gordievsky, 46. who is mar- 
ried and the father of two children, 
still is undergoing interrogation at 


States has trained, supplied arid di- 

riiis <t*hsr Central. American states un- a safe house in’ the countryside 
that KKaraguabad not pR^ioi^y '* i “" 1 ” ’ 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Dupes cha 

LUANGWA GAME PARK. 
Zambia — A delegation of white 
South African businessmen defied 
their government and held talks 
Friday with black guerrillas of the 
outlawed African National Con- 
gress, which is dedicated to over- 
throwing white rule in South Afri- 
ca. 

Both sides said the meeting at 
this remote game park 310 miles 
(about 500 kilometers) east of Lu- 
saka could be the start of an effort 
to bring peace to South Africa. 

Gavin Relly, chairman of South 
Africa’s giant mining company. 
Anglo American Corp M said the 
two sides spoke together “as fellow 
South Africans’* and reached “a 
good sense that more talks might 
lead to a fruitful conclusion" of the 
country's racial unrest. At least 650 
people have been lulled in the un- 
rest in the past year. 

Oliver Tambo, the president of 
the guerrilla organization, agreed 
that the talks fostered “a consider- 


able understanding'' between the 
two previously hostile parties. 

The talks, held ai (he game lodge 
of President Kenneth Kaunda of 


Recent moves by Pretoria are 
likely to ease international pres- 
sure on the government Page 2. 


Zambia, centered on the future of 
South Africa’s economy- Mr. 
Kaunda also participated. 

Mr. Tambo said he told the busi- 
nessmen (hai the African 'National 
Congress wanted to nationalize 
some industries but planned an 
overall mixed economy in a nonra- 
rial democracy after South Africa’s 
apartheid system was eradicated. 

“We said the economy could be a 
mixed economy as far as we're con- 
cerned,” Mr. Tambo said. “But we 
explained we couldn't leave the 
large corporations operating as 
they do. 

“They represent tremendous 
wealth in the midst of unspeakable 
poverty. Some move must be made 


toward bridging this gulf and there 
should be a more equitable distri- 
bution of wealth in the country.” 

Mr. Relly, acting as a spokesman 
for the seven-man business delega- 
tion . said Mr. Tambo’ s economic 
'dews were not in line with the 
South African government's 
branding of the group as a “Com- 
munist organization.” 

He said the discussion reinforced 
the South African businessmen’s 
point of view which he said was 
“essentially reformist." 

President Pieter W. Botha of 
South Africa said last Sunday that 
it would be “disloyal" of the busi- 
nessmen to meet with representa- 
tives or an outlawed organization 
that conducts a guerrilla war 
against the white government. It 
appeared that some businessmen 
who had been expected to attend 
dropped out after Mr. Botha ex- 
pressed his disapproval 
Mr. Relly. speaking separately 
from Mr. Tambo, said he would 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


By Walter Pincus 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States conducted the first flight test 
of its anti-satellite weapon against 
a target in space Friday, and the 
Pentagon said that the experiment 
was a success. 

Pentagon officials said that the 
radio signals “stopped on both the 
satellite and the missile,” indicat- 
ing that both had been destroyed. 

The test shot involved an F-15 
fighter firing a test rocket with a 
nonexplosive warhead at an obso- 
lete. six-year-old U.S. Air Force 
satellite traveling more than 200 
miles (324 kilometers’) above Von- 
denberg Air Force Base in Califor- 
nia in a north-to- south polar orbit 

An infrared homing device car- 
ried by the rocket maneuvered into 
the path of the satellite and the 
weapon destroyed it on impact. 

Ground-based radars at Van- 
den berg and the North American 
Air Defense Command in Wyo- 
ming were used to track the war- 
head. 

Plans for the test, like the anti- 
satellite system itself, had pro- 
voked controversy in ibe United 
Slates and threats from the Soviet 
Union. 

The test took place one day after 
a U.S. District Court judge rejected 
a request by four congressman to 
enjoin it. In her ruling, issued in 
Washington, the judge said that the 
issue was political and “should not 
be determined in this forum.” 

Critics contend that the pro- 
posed system will trigger a new 
type of arms race in space. Moscow 
has said that if the United Stales 
holds “tests using anti-satellite 
weapons” against targets in space, 
it will “consider itself free of its 
unilateral comnutment not to place 
anti -satellite systems in space.” 

Late Thursday, after the judge’s 
opinion had been released, a letter 
signed by 100 members of Con- 
gress was' sent to the While House 
asking President Ronald Reagan to 


recognized the authority of. the 
United Nations body, which is also - 
known as the World Court; 

According to numerous authori- 
tative U.S. sources,'Mc. Reagan ap- 
proved the creation of an anti-San- 
dinist paramiDtaiy force in the fall 
of 1981.Tbe CIA spent an estimat- 
ed $80 million on tlw conflict until 
Congress refused to continue fond- 
ling in the spring of 1984, after it 
was learned that Nicaragua’s har- 
bors had been mined under CIA 
rtirection. 

In his testimony, Mr. Macmi- 
chaei told the court that a plan was 
discussed in the Latin American 
Affairs Office of the CIA in late 
198! to send a covert force of 1^00 
armed men into Nicaragua. 

Mr. Macntichael said that he had 
held 3 top-secret security clearance. 
He said the plan had been “put 
forward as a program to destabilize 
the Nicaraguan government or re- 
duce die menace Nicaragua posed 
to the region." ’ 

Asked by Mr. Chaycs whether 
Mr. Reagan had approved the plan, 
Mr. Macmichael responded: He 
did." He did not say whether the 
plan had been put into effect 
Mr. Macmichael said that the 
CIA expected that the Nicaraguan 
Apovemmenl would respond to the 
^proposed actions with ‘‘hot pursurt 
across its international borders, a 
damp down on civil liberties, and 
ultimately, the barapnent of US. 
Embassy personnel in Mana gua. ■ 
The CIA, he said, had as^ed 

that the Sandinist reaction “wo^d 
serve to demonstrate that theNica 
raeuan government was mr 
and a menace 



In Thailand, Disputes Foiled a Coup 

HighrRankmg Army Officers Were Invoiced , Plotter Says 


General Naruedol Dejpradfynth, secretary to the Thai Army, paying Ms respects in a 
Bangkok church to Nell Davis, an Australian cameraman, and William Latch, an American 
sound tpohnician. Both men were killed in the coup attempt in Thailand earlier this week. 


U.S. Retail Sales Up, Output Rises 


By Jane Seabeny 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — US retail 
sales increased shaipfy in August 
and industrial production showed a 
slight gain, the government repent- 
ed Friday. 

Government and- private econo- 
mists said the new data, when 


viewed with other recent statistics, 
was inherently suggested that the worst of the 
menace to its yearlong U.S. economic slump 
SS£ra.Md would posablyal- might be over, 
low ior sanctions against Nicara- other figures released Friday 

bub under the charter” of the Orga- showed that inflation remained tm- 

„r American Slates. do- control in August, with prices 

nization of Amencan al ^ wholesale twd fallhig 03 


inflation rate for wholesale goods 
at 0.8 percent, according to ibe La- 
bor Department. 

Private economists said the new 
statistics, when considered with the 
other recent reports, suggest that 
the rest of the year may seen mod- 
erate revival from the slow eco- 
nomic pace of the first half of the 
year. Those earlier figures include a 
drop In the unemployment rate 
from 7.3 perc en t to 7.0 percent, an 
improvement of home sales arid a 
surge in new car sales. 

Beryl W. Sprinkel chairman of 
President Ronald Reagan's Coun- 
cil of Economic Advisers, said Fri- 


on 


7 tunriA Court tcstinKHiy at the wnotesaie tevei tailing uj cu oi ixuauum. 

In other WorM«un ^ pe^t, the largest decline in 216 day that Ihe figures reaffirmed the 
i Friday, Luis minister, years. That decline left the annual administration's prediction of 5- 


aragna's deputy 


prediction 


percent economic growth in the last 
half of this year. 

Some private economists said 
that the economy probably would 
strengthen more than had been ex- 
pected but that it was unlikely to 
meet the administration's expecta- 
tions. They also cautioned against 
reading loo much into the figures 
for any one month. 

Sales at retail stores rose 1.9 per- 
cent, following a 02-percent in- 
crease in July, the Commerce De- 
partment said. A large part of the 
August increase was the result of a 
7 JJ- percent gain in car sales. The 
increase in car sales was caused 
largely by a reduction in the financ- 
(CoatiDued ou Page 2, Col 4) 


By William Branigin 

Washington Pusl Service 

BANGKOK — An attempted 
coup that left five persons dead 
Monday and shook Thailand's 
fragile democracy involved some of 
the country's highest-ranking ac- 
tive military officers in a broader 
and more complex conspiracy than 
officially reported, according to 
one of ihe initial plotters. 

The coup attempt failed, he said, 
when at least two key senior offi- 
cers withdrew support for the plot 
at the last minute because of con- 
flicts over the spoils in a future 
government. 

In boiling out, they left a core 
group led by a cashiered former 
army colonel waiting in vain for 
anticipated reinforcements to help 
overthrow the government of 
Prime Minister Prem Tinsulan- 
onda, the source said. 

The plotter, who spoke on condi- 
tion of anonymity, described a web 
of intrigue, bitter long-standing ri- 
valries and personal ambitions 
among senior military officers as 
factors involved in the coup at- 
tempt. 

He said that he had been invited 
lo join the coup attempt by Colonel 
Manoon Roopkachorn, a former 
tank commander, but pulled out 
shortly before it was launched be- 
cause of a conflict with one of its 
senior participants- His account 
tallied with facts already known 
about the coup attempt and has 
been confirmed on essential points 
by other sources. 

Among those who initially par- 
ticipated in the coup plot but laLer 
withdrew, ihe sources said, are se- 
nior officers who subsequently 



Manoon Roopkachorn 


were credited officially with help- 
ing to put down the coup on behalf 
of the government. 

As part of a broad cover-up af- 
terward. these officers helped Colo- 
nel Manoon and his brother, 
Manas, an air force wing com- 
mander. leave the country just 
hours after the 400 to 500 troops in 
their core group surrendered to 
government forces, the sources 
said. 

Colonel Manoon and two aides 
were pui on a Thai Air Force plane 


to Singapore, where they requested 
tiled States. His 


visas to enter the Unii 
brother was driven to the Thai- 
Burmese border. 

According to Thai and foreign 
sources, high-ranking Thai authori- 


1 


INSIDE 



of crviBans by both 
sides in El Salvador’s civil war 
have risen. Page 3. 


■ The Gontadora groop has pre- 
sented a new peace plan for 
Central America. Page 3. 

■ Ttirkey has reinstated some 
dements of democracy, but civ- 
il rights still languish. Page 5. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ The best items at the Burling- 
ton House arts and antic 
fair in Loudon came from of 
countries. 

business/finance 

■ Cessna Aircraft agreed to be 

acquired by General Dynamics 
Corp- IL 


MONDAY 


Senator 


Pete 


VVilson s 

==tl!S£t 
S*USi f~*i 

rej« 


Krishna’s birthday draws thou- 
sands of pilgrims to Brindaban, 
the citv associated with the pop- 
ular Hindu grid’s childhood. 


Congressman Says Protectionist Bills Will Proceed 


Taiwan, Hong Kong, India. Brazil and Japan. 

The Ways and Means trade subcommittee 
will vote on the bill on Thursday, and the full 
committee wfll vote Sept. 26, he said. 

The chairman's timetable appears to assure 
that the textile bill, which commands support 
the House and half of 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — Dan Rostenkowski, 
chairman of the House Ways and Means Com- 
mittee. has warned the administration that its 

plan to draft trade legislation with Republican PJ!K WIU / 

congressional leaders would not stophis panel 
fromwriting its own protectionist btll& itaS m t«in* I tafh, 

At a news conference Thursday, the Illinois 
Democrat said the panel would produce bills to 
curb textile imports and to impose a tariff sur- 
charge (m all imports from four countries. 

Mr. RoslenVowski said President Ronald 
Reaganls “strategy of slowing die push for 


votes showing they are acting on the issue in an 
era of record trade deficits. 

(Senator John C. Danfonh said Thursday 
that the Reagan administration’s refusal to en- 
force unfair trade laws has forced Congress to 
take the lead. The Washington Post reported. 

(“I don’t like the idea of Congress man a g in g 


the Senate; will be the first of about 300 pending trade policy. I don’t think there is any substitute 

.-.2 l.<«. . l il. .Wl- fnr n inHr- rvtlirv frnrn itv. While did 


tougher trade policy isn’t working.’ 

He said the administration would face “a 


crippling fight with Congress” if the new Rea- 
gan program fails to bring “retribution against 
countries who keep out, or unfairly drive up the 
price; Of U.S. products.” 

Mr. Rostenkowski said his committee would 


protectionist tails to reach the president’s desk. 

Mr. Rostenkowski said a bull which would 
place 25 percent surcharges on imports from 
Japan, Taiwan, Korea and Brazil would be tak- 
en up next month as the next order of business 
after the tax bill. AD four countries are running 
big trade surpluses with the United Slates. 

Because Mr. Reagan has promised to veto 
both biDa, there has been speculation that tire 
sponsors would seek to attach the textile mea- 
sure to a hiQ the administration wonts, perhaps 
an increase in the national debt ceiling. 


for a trade policy from the While House,” said 
Mr. Danfonh, chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee's trade subcommittee, ax the second day 
of Senate hearings on tire textile bd. 

(The Missouri Republican cited President 
Reagan's action last month in which he over- 
ruled an International Trade Commission rec- 
ommendation and refused to grant import relief 
to the U3. shoe industry. 

{“When people bring unfair trade cases they 
should have some reasonable chance of getting 
relief," Mr. Danforth said. The shoe industry 
followed his advice in filing an unfair trade case, 


mi. omvi uw wmnumv "vmw* The chairman, who said he personally op* . - _ „ , 

take up the textile bilk which would cut back poses the textile quota bill, had earlier refused to the senator said, but after years of effort they 
imports from the top 20 textile exporters to 1983 ■ let his committee vote on il “ . wer f suckers - 

levels, before it starts drafting long-promised- Another legislative aide said there was now a [“The result is what we see here today large 
tax legislation. Particularly affected by the area- race between the Senate and House to get the groups of people waitmg outside the hearing 
sure- would be Indonesia, China, South Korea, bill orn, since many members are eager lo record room to appeal for special legislation, he said.) 



Dan Rostenkowski 






postpone tire anti-satellite test until 
after his November summit meet- 
ing in Geneva with tire Soviet lead- 
er, Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 

Mr. Reagan, in a certification to 
Congress on Aug. 20. said that the 
administration “had been unable, 
to dale. u> identify a specific" anti- 
satellite proposal that was verifi- 
able. but that it was “seriously ex- 
ploring with the U.S.S.R. arms 
control arrangements intended to 
prevent an arms race in space.” 

The anti-satellite weapon 
launched from the F-15 is not the 
first such system that the United 
States has developed. In tire 1960s, 
the United States tested and de- 
ployed a nuclear anti -satellite 
weapon that was launched atop a 
Thor intermediate-range missile. 
The system was based on Johnston 
bland in the Pacific Ocean. 

After the U.S. system was tested, 
the Soviet Union developed its own 

(Continued on Page 2. CoL 2) 


U.S. Fears 
Soviet Looks 
Too Flexible 


ties have asked the United States to 
take Colonel Manoon in, a request 
that Washington is considering. 

General Tienchai Snisamphan, 
deputy army commander ana one 
of those officially credited with 
foiling the coup, defended the deci- 
sion to let Colonel Manoon and his 
brother go on the ground that “we 
had to race against time to defuse 
tire tension” and avert further 
bloodshed. 

Lieutenant General Picht Kufla- 
v nnich. the commander of the First 
Army Region, which includes 
Bangkok, also helped facilitate the 
departures, informed military and 
civilian sources said. 

The departures and the alleged 
cover-up have drawn sharp criti- 
cism from civilians demanding a 
full accounting of tire coup at- 
tempt. They have pointed out that, 
unlike previous, largely bloodless 
attempts, Monday's action resulted 
in the deaths of five persons, in- 
cluding two foreign correspon- 
dents, and the wounding of neariy 
60 others. 

Associates of Colonel Manoon 
portrayed him essentially as a pawn 
in what one described as “a power 
play” by a disparate alliance of 
retired and serving senior officers 
against Mr. Prem and his newly 
appointed army chief of staff, Lieu- 
tenant General Chaovalit Young- 
chaiyuL 

General Chaovalit, whose ap- 
pointment is to take effect Ocl 1 as 
part of an annual mili tary reshuf- 
fle, has been identified as General 
Picht’s main rival for the post of 
army commander next year. 

The plotter who later withdrew 

(Cootinued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


By Bernard Gwcrtzman 

f/evr Y(*rk Times Service 

WASHINGTON — U.S. arms 
negotiators in Geneva have ex- 
pressed concern about what they 
perceive to be a Soviet public rela- 
tions advantage gained in recent 
months. Reagan administration of- 
ficials said 

According to the officials, the 
issue was raised by Max M. Kam- 
p elmnn. the chief U^. negotiator, 
in a meeting on Thursday with Sec- 
retary of State George P. Shultz to 
discuss the next round of the Gene- 
va talks, resuming next week. 

Mr. Kompdman was said to he 
frustrated at the Russians' ability 
lo create the impression that by 
offering new ideas that were then 
rejected by the United States, they 
were more flexible than the Ameri- 
cans. 

Administration officials, in sepa- 
rate interviews, contended that the 
opposite was the case — that the 
U.S. negotiators bad considerable 
flexibility to negotiate, but that the 
Russians had been uncooperative. 

The Americans have not been 
given new instructions, officials 
said, because they already have suf- 
ficient ability to negotiate if the 
Russians make concrete offers. 

No significant progress has been 
achieved in the first two rounds, 
although officials reported more 
substantial discussion in the sec- 
ond round, which ended in July. 

The Americans are now going 
back to Geneva to see whether the 
Soviet side translates some public 
hints of flexibility into firm propos- 
als. 

If this happens, there may be a 
basis for progress at the meeting 
between President Ronald Reagan 
and Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the So- 
viet leader, in Geneva on Nov. 19 
and 20, senior administration offi- 
cials said. 

This next round is due to adjourn 
in early November, allowing both 
sides two weeks to see whether 
there is a basis for issuing a state- 
ment at the summit meeting giving 
new instructions to the arms nego- 
tiators. 

At Geneva, the Russians have 
insisted that there could be "radical 
reductions” in nuclear arsenals if 
the United States were to hall work 
its space-based defense pro- 


on 


gram. But the Soviet Union has not 
defined the scope of the reductions, 
U.S. officials said. 

According to a senior official. 
Mr. Kampelman told Viktor P. 
Karpov, the chief Soviet negotia- 
tor, in a private meeting that the 
Soviet Union was missing an op- 
portunity in not putting' forth a 
figure to demonstrate its willing- 
ness for “radical" reductions. 

The Russians have been waiting 
for the Americans to give up the 
space- weapons program before 
making concrete offers. But outside 
the negotiations, the Soviet side has 
suggested flexibility beyond what 
was introduced in the talks, offi- 
cials said. 

This has irritated Mr. Shultz, 
who told Foreign Minister Eduard 
A. Shevardnadze of the Soviet 
Union in Helsinki on July 31 that 
Moscow should bring up any new 
ideas at the negotiations and not in 
public forums, a senior official 
said. 

“We assume that if a proposal is 
made public, it is not serious," one 
U.S. official said. 

Officials in Moscow have told 
American visitors that the Soviet 
Union would be willing to cut its 
forces by about 35 percent not 
only in launchers, but in explosive 
charges. No such cuts were pre- 
posed in the Geneva talks. 

The United States has been pro- 
posing a cut of at least a third in 
warheads. 


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Poll Shows Palme’s Parly 
Winning Vote in Sweden 


INTERNATIONAL WF«ALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNPAY, SEPTEMBER 14-15, 1985 

aKSBStb, Reform May Ease Pressure on Pretoria 


Reuters 

STOCKHOLM — The Iasi opin- 
ion poll to be published before 
Sweden’s general elections, which 
are scheduled Sunday, pul Prime 
Minister Olof Palme’s Social Dem- 
ocratic Party narrowly ahead of the 
opposition, with the left’s parlia- 
mentary majority slashed. 

A forecast by the Swedish Insti- 
tute for Opinion Research released 
Friday said that the center-right 
coalition that ruled Sweden from 
1976 to 1982 would win 48.8 per- 
cent of the vote, or 3.8 percent 
more than in the last elections. 

The forecast gave the ruling So- 
cial Democratic Party 45 J percent 
oF the vote. With the 4.8 percent 
that Mr. Palme's CommunisL allies 
are expected to win. this would give 
the left a hairline majority in the 
349-seat Riksdag, or parliament. 

The Social Democrats held 166 
seats in the outgoing parliament 
against 163 for the Moderate. Cen- 
ter and Liberal parties. The Com- 
munists. with 20 seats, supported 
Mr. Palme although he refused to 
bring the party into his govern- 
ment 

The Social Democrats and the 
Communists together polled 51— 
percent of the vote in the 1982 
general elections. 

The campaign has been domi- 
nated by a battle between Social 
Democrats and the Moderate Party 
in which the personalities of the 
two party leaders often seemed to 
weigh as heavily as the issues. 


Mexican 

Restaii rant-Caziti na 


Mr. Palme, 58, who has served as 
prime minister for a total or 10 
years since 1969. has been under 
strict instructions from campaign 
managers to keep his temper and to 
refrain from vitriolic attacks on op- 
ponents. 

U]f AdeUohn, leader of the 
Moderate Party, whcee outspoken- 
ness got him into trouble several 
limes during the campaign, is a 
stark contrast to Mr. Palme's high- 
brow, patrician image. 

Mr. Adelsohn has a weakness for 
wearing loud tartan checks and 
bright-striped blazers, and his style 
is fast becoming a party hallmark. 



.♦Hr I 





Olof Palme 


U.S. Knocks Out a Satellite 
In Test of New Space Weapon 



AMSTERDAM LONDON 

W.umreM.31 5 Login St. m2 

Td;2!-M-U Trh jr*T773 

PARIS 

SO Site. Mgnfpinuxit 
TcLM-u-s; 


(Continued from Page 1) 
system, consisting of a bomb that 
was launched into orbit by an SS-9 
Soviet rocket. The bomb, guided by 
radar, maneuvered dose to its tar- 
get satellite and blew up when it 
drew near. 

The Reagan administration has 
pushed the anti-satellite project, 
citing the existing Soviet orbiting 
system as a threat to U.S. security. 

Moscow also sought to upgrade 
its system since the United Stales 
possessed measures that easily 
jammed the radar guidance of the 
Soviet weapon. From the late 1970s 
to 1982. the Russians tested a new, 
inf rared -guided version of their or- 
biting ami-satellite weapon six 
times, and each time it failed. 

■ Scientists Oppose Research 

A recently formed group of 
American scientists and engineers 
is trying to get colleagues across the 
United States to refuse to partici- 
pate in the Reagan administra- 
tion’s research For a space-based 
i shidd. The New York Tunes re- 
ported from Cambridge. Massa- 
chusetts. 

The campaign, announced there 


Thursday, began gathering signa- 
tures at Cornell University and the 
University of Illinois several 
months ago. It has spread to 39 
campuses, according to the orga- 
nizers, and has gathered signatures 
from fewer than a thousand of the 
tens of thousands of professors and 
graduate students in physics* chem- 
istry, engineering ana the computer 
sciences. 

The four-paragraph pledge that 
is being distributed calls the Strate- 
gic Defense Initiative “ill-con- 
ceived and dangerous.” 

■ Laser Test Cited 

General James A. Abrahamson, 
the director of anti-missile re- 
search, said Thursday that a large 
“weapon grade” laser destroyed its 
target, a stationary section of a 
large missile, in a test last week. 
The New York Times reported in 
Washington. 

The test did not appear to repre- 
sent a breakthrough, since chemi- 
cal lasers have destroyed m e ta lli c 
objects in the past and since both 
laser and target were fixed to the 
ground. 


Reuters 

LONDON — Moves in South 
Africa to scrap fundamental race 
laws are expected to ease the exter- 
nal pressure on Pretoria, with most 
Western governments resisting 
■-nils to impose tougher sanctions. 
Western diplomats said Friday. 

South Africa can earn some 
breathing space if it goes ahead 
with major reforms in areas like 
black citizenship and abolition of 
pass laws, official and diplomatic 
sources in several Western capitals 
said. 

Sharper economic sanctions 
were not ruled out but the sources 
said the South African crisis would 
have to deteriorate further before 
governments took measures that 
could worsen domestic unemploy- 
ment. 

Twin pressure from internal op- 
ponents and the world business 
community, rather than sanctions, 
were still perceived as the main 
motors for change inside the whi- 
te-ruled republic. 

The sanctions imposed this week 
by (he United States and nine of 
the 10 European Community states 
— Britain refused to go along with 
its EC partners — avoided tough 
restrictions on trade and often 
merely restated restrictions already 
in force. 

Belgium said Friday that it was 
withdrawing the accreditation of 
South Africa's military attache in 
Brussels in the first concrete imple- 
mentation of the limited sanctions 
agreed to on Tuesday by the Com- 
mon Market. 


Among the other EC measures, 
which were also approved by two 
future EC members. Spain and 
Portugal were a ban on arms sales 
and purchases, an oil embargo and 
a halt to new nuclear cooperation 
and sales of sensitive technology. 

In Brussels, community officials 
said this week’s sanctions were the 
maximum possible at the moment. 
Diplomats said concern about hun- 
dreds of thousands of European 
passport-holders among South Af- 
rica’s whites had helped prevent 
tougher steps. 

The government of Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl of West Germany 
also opposes economic sanctions, 
saying they seldom hit the right 
target. Diplomatic sources said 
Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich 


Genscher almost went too far in 
backing the EC sanctions. 

Anti-apartheid movements in 
Europe and the United States 
agreed that the reforms now being 
considered in South Africa would 
allow Western governments to ease 
their pressure. 

“Externally, they provide a few 
more straws to those opposed to 
sanctions ” said Mike Terry of Brit- 
ain's Anti-Apartheid Movement. 
But be fell the respite would be 
brief if Pretoria Failed to accept the 
proposal abolishing pass laws. 

The changes on citizenship and 
pass laws “would have made a dif- 
ference 10 years ago," Mr. Terry 
said. “The question now is ‘Who is 
going to rale South Africa?’ ” 


WORLD BRIE FS_ 

Ugandan Army, „ 

resumed unexpectedly Friday pS'dem Miiton Obou- 

that had begun m July, when the j£n> ^ timing of rhc 
The change of venue for ibe talks. ? ' urc£S said Tanzania » 

meeting were not disclosed in advance. Official 50 
president. Julius K. Nyerere. chaired the meeting. 

U-S- Action on Acid Rain Is Sought 

WEST SPRINGFIELD. M^chuset^AP)^ 

Reagan’s special envoy cm acid raid sud FndaytMt i adm j ms i r .i- 
immediate action, not the continued study advocat 

Lewis said 31 a mMmg of New England governors. 
recommend the administration acknowledge to the 

that sulfide, a sulfur compound, doesn t cause^aad ram r .■ 

same as saying smoking doesn’t cause cancer. - ^ a cnecial 

Prime Minister Brian Mulroney of Canada also ££ 
envoy. William G. Davis, to explore with Mr. Lewis ajmnt soluti 
acid rain problem. 


n | , TV SI • T1 • envoy. WDliamG. Davis, to explore with Mr. Lewis ajomtsoiuu 

Rebels, White Businessmen add ram problem. 

Hold Talks, Praise Outcome Sinowatz Presses Craxi on Alto A dige 


(Continued from Plage 1) 
support calls for the release of Nel- 
son Mandela, the imprisoned lead- 
er of the African National Con- 
gress. 

He said the two sides found 
“considerable unanimity of view 
about the importance for South Af- 
rica of structuring a coherent and 
sensible society in the future.” 

He said there was “some dis- 
agreement about the way this 
should be done, as one might imag- 
ine. But I think we found enough 


Retail Sales in U.S. Are Up Sharply 


(Continued from Page 1) 
ing rates charged by large auto- 
makers. Sales would have been up 
0.4 percent had it not been for the 
improvement in the auto sector. 

Production at factories, utilities 
and mines increased 0J percent 
while activity at manufacturers, 
battered all year by imports, 
jumped 03 percent, the Federal 
Reserve Board said. 

“Together the data give the best 
performance of the economy in 


many months,” said ADen Sinai, 
chief economist for Shearson Leh- 
man Brothers.. 

Mr. S inai said the industrial pro- 
duction figures “are hinting that 
the worst is over for U.S. manufac- 
turing. However, it does not indi- 
cate that we’re off and running and 
the industrial sector is on the road 
to recovery.” 

David Jones of Aubrey G. Lan- 
ston Securities said, “Clearly con- 
sumers are spending again.” 


ground to make the prospect of 
further talks quite valuable.” 

Mr. Tambo’s delegation was 
made up of six members of the 
organization’s ruling body, the na- 
tional executive committee. They 
included blacks, people of mixed 
race and Asians. 

Mr. ReDy’s party included Zacfa 
de Beer, executive director of An- 
glo American; Tony Bloom, direc- 
tor of Premier Muling Group, a 
food distributer, Peter Sorour, ex- 
ecutive director of the South Africa 
Foundation; Hugh Murray, editor 
of Leadership SA, a business quar- 
terly; Tertius Myburgh, editor of 
the Johannesburg Sunday Times 
and a manager of the South Afri- 
can Associated Newspapers 
Group, and Harold Pakendorf, edi- 
tor of Die Vaderiand. an Afri- 
kaans-language newspaper. 

Meanwhile, in Johannesburg, 
the South African government 
banned a church conference which 
was to have been addressed by the 
Nobel Peace Prize winner. Bishop 
Desmond M. Tutu, barring five re- 
ligious leaders from entering the 
country. (AFP, AP) 


ROME (Reuters) — Chancellor ‘kSfiF'Xd 
Fred Sinowatz of Austria has asked 
Prime Minister Bettino Craxi of 
Italy to intervene in problems in- g jfy 
volving the region of South Tirol lyMeC*' 
saying these overshadowed Aus- Ma mm am 
trian-T talian relations. After World fxwpip 
War L the territory was ceded to kim, 
Italy, which calls it Alto Adige, but 
it has a German-speaking popula- |||jj§jX ■ 
don that identifies more closely |g|i|fc 
with Austria. * §§£; & 

Mr. Sinowatz, on a visit to 
Rome, said Thursday that many - . 

provisions of a 1969 autonomy ,.j| 

agreement had been implemented, f* 

but be asked Mr. Craxi “personally 
to intervene in order to overcome SjgjHjK 
the last obstacles” Political com- i |||g i 
mentators said these included rais- 
ing German to the same rank as 
I talian in courts, police stations 
and on the state-owned radio. 



Fred Sinowatz 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


ITALY 


U5JL 






JOHN CABOT 
INTERNATIONAL 
COLLEGE 


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Karpov Wins; Chess Match Now Even 

MOSCOW (Reuters) — Anatoli Karpov, the world chess champion, 
won the fourth game of his world title rematch Friday against Gary 
Kasparov, when Mr. Kasparov resigned after the champion's 63d move. 
Mr. Karpov and Mr. Kasparov sow stand even in the series, which is 
limited to 24 games, at two points each. 

Each player now needs five more victories to take the tide. Otherwise, 
the victor is the player with most points after 24 games, with one point for 
a win and half for a draw. 

The game was Mr. Karpov's first victory against Mr. Kasparov in his 
last 25 attempts. 

1 Sf 

Door Jammed in U.K. Plane Disaster 

LONDON (Renters) — British investigators said Friday that a faulty- 
escape chute temporarily jammed an emergency door aboard the Boeing 
737 jetliner that burst into flames on takeoff in Manchester last month, 
killing 55 persons. 

The Ministry of Transport said in an interim report that the captain 
bad ordered the aircraft evacuated via right-hand exits after an engine 
exploded, rupturing the fuel tank on the left wing. 

The report said that one crew member rushed to open the right front 
door. “However ” it said, “a cover over the inflatable slide jammed 
between the door and door frame; preventing the door from opening 
fully.” The crew member finally opened the faulty door with difficulty 
after releasing the door on the aircraft’s left side which bore the brunt of 
the fire. ' 

Nimeiri Leaves Egypt Home in Exile 

CAIRO (Reuters) — Hie deposed Sudanese president, Gaafar Ni- 
jmdri. has left his home in exile in Egypt, security officials said Friday, 
but they dedined to say where he had gone. 

The Sudanese government recently stepped up its c am p aign for Major 
General Nimeiri to be handed over <0 face charges, including corruption 
and treason. He was on his way home from the United States in April 
when the Sudanese military overthrew his government and put General ' 
Abdul Rahman Swareddahab in his place. General Nimeiri. who ha^j » • 
scheduled stopover in Cairo, derided to remain there. 

For the Record 

Portagneseofficiab said Friday that 49 deaths had been confirmed in a 
collision between two trains in central Portugal on Wednesday. But they 
said the final toll could be Taised as more remains were collected from the 
(harred wreckage. _ (Reuters) 

JPngHat Radi Atfossfn of Argentina arrived Friday in Yugoslavia on 
the first leg of a tune-day tour aimed at increasing ties with Belgrade, 
Bonn and Paris. (UPI) 


Arhane Mission Is Aborted 
When Rocket Loses Altitude 



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KOUROU, French G uiana — 
The 1 5th mission of Europe’s 
Ariane rocket was aborted when 
the rocket lost altitude just after it 
was launched. Engineers destroyed 
the craft and two satellites on 
board. 

As the French president, Fran- 
cois Mitterrand, watched at mis- 
sion control here late Thursday, the 
Ariane flight safety officer was 
forced to destroy the launcher and 
its cargo of two telecommunica- 
tions satellites a little less than 10 
minutes after a perfect lift-off. 

The mission, which will cost 
about SI45 million in insurance for 
the two lost satellites, marked the 
first time that Ariane had failed to 
place satellites in orbit for commer- 
cial customers. 

The lost satellites belonged to 
the newly created European Tele- 
communications Satelli te Organi- 
zation and to GTE Spacenet Corp. 
of the United States. 

A statement from Arianespace, 
the organization that markets pay- 
load space on Ariane. said that the 


third-stage motor had failed to ig- 
nite. The flight safety officer was 
forced to activate explosive charges 
on the rocket. 

After watching Ariane fall from 
its trajectory on the radar sen /^s 
in mission control, Mr. Mitterrand 
said: “l am disappointed, of 
course, but above all I am disap- 
pointed for the technicians. It wrfi 
work the next time ” 

“When we had two failures in the 
trial set of launches,” an Ariane- 
space official said, “we took ning 
months off to cure the problem. 
This is a setback but not the end of 
tiie world.” 

The countdown had been free of 
problems, and all systems had 
shown clearance for a lift-off. The 
launch was perfect, with the 42- 
meter (139-foot) rocket dimbing 
into the night sky over French Gui- 
ana's coast. 

Elation turned to stunned silence 
as the mission was aborted, bring- 
ing to an end Ariane’s record of 
nine consecutive successful 
launches and of 14 satelli tes put 
into orbit. , 


Disputes Foiled Thai Coup 


you to -boo:.'- !?•* 

RIGHT SCHOOL 

:n tho 

RIGHT PLACE 



• mot» Ihmn SO Bn.na Kfcoaa am nuun 

• metevf nalipputas lor n auaKif and OsafStj' 

• Suron*. av W«*a r sotwts 

LAKE OF GENEVA REGION 

can ten Of Kuo - SWTZERLAND 
» la*ewablB aMBtnmi for stuovng . 

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(Continued from Page 1) 
from the coop attempt gave 
account of events leaning up to it: 
Colonel Manoon. who was dis- 
missed from the army for Helping 
to lead a coup attempt in April 
1981, told associates that he had 
received a go-ahead to stage anoth- 
er coup. 

The source accepted Colonel 
Manoon’s invitation to join' the 
plot and was told that the core 
group of soldiers loyal to Colonel 
Manoon and his brother would be 
supplemented by 3,000 to 4,000 
troops from other units.. The plan 
was that, once the Prem govern- 
ment was overthrown, key cabinet 
posts would be taken by three re- 
tired generals. 

Knangsak Chomanand would 


become the new prime minister, 
Senn Na Nakhon would be deputy 
premia- and defense minister and 
Yos Thephasdin would become in- 
tenor minister. 

J?*?5 n V9' ed were 

™ P J, ° neI Manoon’s rebels in 
™«r headquarters during the couo 

SSS* a? Se °i^ r loyaIist officere 
asserted after the rebel 

that they had been forced to join 

the coup against their wifi. J 
OD |y hours before the coud was 

launched, the informant sard, dis- 

S t ^ eVd ° ped r OVCT wbo 

get &e posts of interior minister 
^ co ™ uld w, and the two 

JSSOl stffl 















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATlIBPAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14-15, 1985 


Page 3 




* 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


Ciwp Thieves.-AGjwijg Menace _ 

®[* oo-loogpr just lodg raiding the 
chkiS^Lf 8 ^ t ? mps -creeping into the . 

casting f^w“r operators who are 

3^7? farnass and food padcers aboot 

a year m swim crops, theLoT Angeles 

HELBOPJ 1 * CalifoS^nnd 1 ©^? 

Foret says the amount. has quadra- 
PJ'f oyer the past five-years. 

rat^ S ^fL! amily fanns are “ken over by eorprv 
3±%2t encompassing thousands of acres, 

vfi£ t !£.i!r ucs f n *»«ng treble catching up 
^0»e thieves. Increasingly, the bi&qpfedSiri 
“jnpames. or small farmers pooSrwTtheir re* 
»wrces, are hiring their own guards to patrol the . 
fields in pickup trucks and beScoplere. . 


Short Takes . ' 

'itSUSSfJ^f^ *Mb« &ra «h, the 36-foot 
V? 1 2 1 6-horsepower, diesd-driven CeeBee, 
e closing dawn for the winter after plying Fire 
““ New York’s Long Island. One occupy 
uonal hazard few the crew — skipper, *«*»«»»« 
«2tcer and idler • — « listening to jokes about . 
aqiud assets, floating loans and something fishy in 
the accounts; 

.. M 0 ** thm m countries provide maternity 
Kwre, but the United States is not among »bwn. 
Renresentative Patricia Scitroeder, a Democrat of 
Colorado, has introduced a bill that would man- 
date four months of unpaid, job-protected leave 
for employees who have a newborn, newly adopted 
or seriously ill child- The, Ml would establish a 
committee to determine the feasibility of paid 
leave. Labor, feminist and child-welfare groups, 
support the measure. A spokesman for the UJS. 
Chamber of Commerce says the chamber generally - 
opposes new demands on employers. 

The California state lottery starts next month, 
and a $22- million advertising campaig n will stress 


. the "fan** of it ah- A list of rules drawn up by die 
lottery's administrators said that it “shall be por- 
trayed by an image of fun and entertainment while 
maintaining the dignity of the state.” and lottery 
ads “shall not portray the lottery as a gambling 
'activity; or as having any connection with gam- 
bling.” The odds against being one of the $2- 
'milliGn jackpot winners are 23 million to 1. 

• Shorter Takes: Dallas, its expressways chroni- 
cally dogged with cars, is going ahead with a 143- 
m 3 e-{ 23 Hdlometer) rail transit system. It will be 
the second biggest in the country after New York's 
230-mile network and will cost S10 billion. ... 
; New England had a per capita income of $14,421 
last year, the highest of any U.S. region. The 
national average was $12,789. . . . According to 
federal statistics, for every 100 American women 
over the age of 85 there /ire 42 men. . . . Twenty 
• percent of aD new cars m the United States are 
leased instead of sold, and the figure is expected to 
grow to 50 percent in five years. 

HigWlown Drive Fails to Take Off 

When the Air Transport Association, an airline 
lobbying group, heard that the Federal Aviation 
Administration might tighten restrictions on bag- 
gage that passengers carry on airplanes, it orga- 
nized a' write-in campaign among air travelers to 
oppose the idea. 

Of the first 230 letters it has received copies of, 
however, 108 called for stricter tides, The New 
York Times reports. The passengers said they are- 
as bothered by cabm luggage as arc members of (he 
Association of Flight Attendants, winch called fra 
more stringent measures. 

Although federal regulations require that cany- 
on b* gy g p be Of a size that can be stored under a 
seat or m a higgage compartment, flight attendants 
say passengers have managed to bring aboard 
surfboards, bird cages, cellos, lamp shades, fishing 
poles, tents and microwave ovens. 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 



U.S. Senate Kills Proposal to Admit 
Thousands of Alien Farm Workers 


By Robert Pear mg to slow the flow of illegal imini- 

Neu Y.vk T,mes Seme gration with the dvi! and cri mina l 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. penalties for employers, the legisia- 
Senaie. continuing debate on a (ion would strengthen enforce men t 
comprehensive bill aimed at curb- by adding financial resources to the 
jng illegal immigration. sar* Border Patrol and I mm igration 
rowly rejected a proposed amend- and Naturalization Service, 
meat to admit thousands of aliens Mr. Wilson said the bill would 
to the United Slates as temporary cut off the supply of workers that 
farm laborers. farmers need, on short notice, to 

The sponsor of the immigration harvest their crops, 
bill said Thursday that he “This bill” he said, “would force 

passage within the next few days, the grower to watch his crop slowly 
The vote was 50-48. with 33 'Re- but irrevocably rot in the fields or 
publicans and 15 Democrats sup- on the trees if warm weather bas- 
porting the amendment It was pro- tens the ripening process by a day 
posed by Senator Pete Wilson as or a week. These crops are ripe for 
the Senate began a second day of harvest when they are ripe, not 
debate. when the secretary of labor says 

Mr. Wilson, a California Repub- they are ripe.” 
lican, had contended that without The senator Later vowed to try to 

his amendment, the bill would add the measure to a future bill, 
'savage an important American in- Without the provision, Mr. Wilson 


the United States. “How will the 
attorney general know whether the 
workers are in the right district?” 
Mr. Kennedy asked. 

Mr. Wilson rejected the compar- 
ison as “invidious.” The pass laws 
of South Africa, he said, apply to 
South Africans, not to aliens. 

Mr. Wilson said that under his 
proposal, fanners would have to 
pay prevailing wages and provide 
housing or a housing allowance, as 
well as workers’ compensation or 
similar insurance, to foreign agri- 
cultural workers. 

Mr. Simpson noted that under 
his bill, fanners would be given 
three years longer than other em- 
ployers to end the hiring of illegal 
aliens. 

“I honestly don’t know what 
more we could have done to meet 
the needs of Western growers, in- 


dustry.” the producers of perish- said, the immigration bill would eluding those with perishable 
« many of force growers or perishable crops crops," be said. “Nothing I have 

'» ■_ f. InfA nniOKAM nf KrAatinO OI Ama mp f/M* tKam 


able fruit and vegetables, 
whom rdy on illegal aliens to pick 
crops. 

Sponsored by Senator Alan K_ 


into “a situation ol either breaking 
the law or losing the farm.” 

Under a provision of the Simp- 


ever done is enough” for them. 


feuwvun 


AND SO TO SLEEP — In preparation for her flight 
aboard die U.S. space shuttle Challenger in January, 
Sharon Christa McAuKffe, 37, tries out a sleeping bag 
daring a tour of a training simulator. Hie high school 
social studies teacher from Concord, New Hampshire, is 
assisted by Jack Lew, a mission training specialist. 


senator /uaa is- 1 — . . , . v 

Simpson, a Republican of Wyo- sonbilL farmers could apply to the rr . Wm*t <S£>£>k 
nting, the immigration bill would Labor Department to approve the HUTU W Oil l OeCK 
prohibit employers from hiring ffle- Y foreign workers, and the 
gal aliens. Employers would be department would establish expe- 
subject to civil penalties of $100 to dited procedures to review appeals 
$2,000 for each illegal alien they “ emergencies. Mr. Simpson said 

hired. Jf there was a “pattern or * is L . an L d . I1 I>lb » s P? a ?l,P rov ?~ 

sums in his bill made Mr. Wilson s 


U.S. Senate Seat 


practice” of violations, the employ- 
er would be subject to a penalty of 
$3,000 to SI0.000 for each illegal 
alien hired. 

Tbe bill would grant legal status 
to illegal aliens who have lived in 
tbe United States since Jan. 1, 
1980. But. in addition to attempt- 


i 


v 


U.S. Opposes 
Soviet Ships’ 
Mexico Visit 


By Fred Hiart 

Washington Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — Two Soviet 
warships are expected to pay a prat 
call to Mexico next month for the 
first time, and the VS. State De- 
partment has expressed concern 
about the visit in a message (o the 
Mexican government . 

The planned visit is significant 
me official said Thursday, because 
until now Soviet . naval . deploy- 
ments to the Caribbean have in- 
cluded port calls only in Cuba. . 

“Obviously, we’re concerned 
about the Soviet Ability to move 
their ships in and out of the Carib- 
bean.” a State Department official 
said. “Mexico is an independent 
country and they can do wnarthey 
want, , bar we. have made our con- 
cerns known." 

A Kashin girided-nrisstle de- 
stroyer and a Krivak gmded-nus- 
ale frigate are expected to visit the 
eastern Mexican poet of Veracruz 
on Oct 4, pffiaals said. The vessels 
now are. in the. North Atlantic 
steaming toward the Caribbean. 

A spokesman fra The Mexican 
Embassy here, Ricardo Ramirez, 
said he had no information about 
the visit and (hat the naval attache 
in Washington also had not been 
informed. ■ 

“I don’t know what the big con- 
cern is about,” Mr. Ramirez said. 
“I know that American ships have 
been in Mexico, and European 
ships, many times.” 

The Reagan administration fre- 
quently has expressed concern 
about what it calls Moscow’s ef- 
forts to increase Soviet influence tn 
Central America and the Caribbe- 
an region. 

“This is a brand-new tiring we 
haven’t seen before,” die U.S. offi- 
cial said. “They have a blue- water 
navy now, and they’re using it as 
you’d expect, for political pres- 
ence.” 

Defense Department officials 
said that the Soviet Navy has visit- 
ed the Caribbean 24 times since it 
began conducting exercises (herein 
1969. ... 

Suharto Starts European Trip 

Reuters 

JAKARTA— President Suharto 
of Indonesia Left for Europe on a 
visit to increase trade. The trip wm 
include his first stale visits to War- 
saw Pact nations since he tome 
power two decades ago after crush- 
ing a Communist-backed coup. 


CHURCH SERVICES 


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ptetue contact: 



Contadora Group Presents Revised Peace Plan 


IVBgo^ (TEscoto Brockmann 


The Associated Press 

PANAMA CITY — The four- 
nation Contadora group has pre- 
sented a new peace plan for Central 
America that softens provisions for 
removing foreign military advisers 
from the region, according to a dip- 
lomatic source dose to the negotia- 
tions. 

An earlier proposal by the group, 
which is comprised of Mexico, 
Venezuela, Colombia and Panama, 
called for the immediate removal of 
all mili tary advisers, induding U.S. 
personnel in El Salvador. 


Diplomats meeting in Panama 
Gty said that the new plan should 
hdp move the governments of Cos- 
ta Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, 
Honduras and Nicaragua toward a 
forma] peace agreement. 

Bernardo Sepulveda Amor, the 
Mexican foreign minister, said that 
the new plan achieved “balance 
and symmetry” among the objec- 
tions and suggestions of the Cen- 
tral American governments. 

But soon after the proposal was 
announced on Thursday, the first 
day of a two-day meeting. Foreign 
Minister Miguel d'Escolo Brock- 


mann of Nicaragua denounced it as 
“something that defends totally the 
interests of the United States.” 

Changes in the document, be 
said, were “substantial changes, 
not refinements.” 

The new plan stipulates only that 
the advisers will be “gradually 
eliminated'’ from the region, the 
source said. 

It also calls for a “reasonable 
balance of forces and the establish- 
ment of maximum limits on mili- 
tary development" in the region, 
instead of the freeze on new arms 
purchases that the Contadora 


Civilian Killings by Both Sides Rise in El Salvador 


By Don Shannon 

Lor Angela Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The human 
rights group Americas Watch has 
reported a sharp increase in human 
rights violations by both sides in 
the Salvadoran civil war in the first 

half of 1985. . 

In its seventh such report since 
1982, the group said Thursday that 
paramili tary death squad killings, 
which numbered only 39 in the last 
half erf 1984, rose to 81 for the first 
six months of 1985. For tbe same 
period, killings of civilians by guer- 
rillas rose from 29 to 33, it found. 

Aryeh Neier, vice chairman of 
Americas Watch, said at a news 
conference that the government of 
President Jos£ Napoledn Duarte 
largely ignores ihekmmgs of Salva- 
dorans and refuses to arrest stu- 
pected memb ers of the rightist 
death squads. 

Mr. Naer also said that the slay- 
ing in. June of four off-duty U.S. 
Marines and 13 Salvadorans in a 
guerrilla attack on a San Salvador 
cafe had resulted in propaganda 
benefits for the Salvadoran govern- 
ment 

The report characterized the at- 
tack as a political assassination 
that public outrage in the 
United States similar to that pro- 
voked by the murder of four Amer- 
ican churchwomen by Salvadoran 
soldiers in 1980. 

“In both cases, it is unfortunate 
that only tbe killings of Americans 
in El Salvador gets attention is the 
United States," Mr. Neier said. 

In one area,' tbe report credited 
the Salvadoran government with 
improving its human rights record, 
saying that no killing ; h»d 
been reported since the. alleged 
slaying by government troops of 
nearly 100 people a year ago in 
rural northeastern El Salvador. 

But it decried a new Salvadoran 
government policy that has forced 
the e v acuati o n of civilians from re- 
bel-dominated areas. Sumlarly, it 


condemned the kidnapping by 
guerrillas of 20 local mayors last 
spring in an effort to trade the 
hostages for imprisoned rebels. 
One mayor was killed, and 13 re- 
main captive, but the report said 
that tbe drive failed fra lack_of 
popular support. 

■ No Report from Abductors 

Mr. Duarte, whose daughter was 
kidnapped earlier this week, said 
tbe abduction was undertaken in 
an effort to weaken him and thus to 
weaken his policies and his domes- 
tic and foreign support. The Wash- 
ington Post reported from San Sal- 
vador. 

“If they kidnap a governing per- 
son’s daughter, he can lose his se- 
renity and lose everything he has 
struggled for for so many years," 
Mr. Duarte said in an interview. 

Officials said there still had been 
no contact from anyone cl aimin g 
responsibility for the attack Tues- 
day, in Much Inis Guaddupe 
Duarte Darrin, 35, and a friend. 
Ana Cecilia VBleda, 23, were kid- 
napped by unknown gunmen as 
they arrived for classes at a college. 

Although many people in San 
Salvador said they believed that the 
attack was conducted by leftist 
guerrillas fighting to overthrow Mr. 
Duarte’s government, officials said 
they had no proof. 

Rubfai Zamora, a leader of the 
leftist guerrillas' political wing, said 
in Managua that be had no knowl- 
edge of who had carried out of the 
kidnapping. 

U.S. Official Meets (M e a n s 

United Press International 

WASHINGTON — Elliott 
Abrams, assistant secretary of state 
for inter-American affairs, met 
Thursday with a group of Ch ilea n 
opposition leaden and expressed 
support for an opposition frame- 
work for a return to democracy in 
the country. 


“I can’t say because I don’t 
know," Mr. Zamora said. “I don’t 
know why anyone would do it" 

[Mr. Duarte has named a three- 
- man commission, including his 
son, to assess any demands made 
by. the kidnappers of his eldest 
daughter, Reuters reported. The 
deputy minis ter of communica- 
tions and culture, Roberto Vieira, 
said that the commission war made 
up of Abraham Rodriguez, a law- 
yer and adviser, tbe defense minis- 
ter, Genera] Carlos Eugenio Vides 
Casanova, and Alejandro Duarte 
Drain, the president's son. 

[Mr. Vicrra said the commission 
would be able to assess the situa- 
tion “without the factors which af- 


fect the president, who is the father, 
and Which in turn could affect the 
analysis.” 

[One senior Salvadoran govern- 
ment official said that the three- 
-nun team would assess any even- 
tual -.demands by the kidnappers 
but did not say if they would make 
any final decisions.] 

In the interview. Mr. Duarte not- 
ed that he had many enemies on 
both sides of tbe political spectrum. 
He said he had received “a threat of 
a strategic plan of action against 
my family" in June. At that time, 
he said, some people said he had 
invented the threat to get publicity. 
“Now we have the confirmation," 
be added. 


group urged a year ago. according 
to an internal briefing document. 

Further details of die plan were 
not immediately available. But the 
diplomatic source said that it 
marked a “softening” of the origi- 
nal proposal presented bv the Con- 
tadora group in September 1984. 

The group has bran trying since 
January 1983 to negotiate a peace 
treaty among the five Central 
American governments. It takes its 
name from the island off Panama 
where the foreign ministers of the 
four member nations first met. 

The original treaty proposal was 
accepted by Nicaragua, but reject- 
ed by Costa Rica, El Salvador and 
Honduras, reportedly at the strong 
urging of the Reagan administra- 
tion. G uatemala had taken no pub- 
lic position. 

The three U.S. allies objected to 
a provision calling for immediate 
removal of all foreign military ad- 
visers. The provision would have 
ended the UB. presence in El Sal- 
vador. where Americans train Sal- 
vadoran soldiers. 

Foreign Minister Jorge Abadia 
Arias of Panama said that the Cen- 
tral American governments would 
be asked to attend another meeting 
in Panama in two to three weeks to 
propose revisions to the new plan, 
and then would have another 45 
days to comment on it. 

Top diplomats from the Central 
American nations have joined the 
Contadora foreign ministers in 
their meeting in Panama City. 


Sir Ellis Waterhouse Is Dead at 80 ; 
Was Dean of U.K. Art Historians 


By John Russell 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Sir EUis Water- 
house, 80, the acknowledged dean 
of British art historians, a teacher 
and former director of the National 
Galleries of Scotland and the Bar- 
ber Institute, has died of a heart 
a trade at his borne in Oxford, En- 
glap H 

Sir EUis, who died Sept. 7, made 
a many-sided contribution to the 
study of art and to the development 
of new institutions. As a historian, 
be was as much at home with Brit- 
ish 18th-ceotmy art as he was with 
Italian baroque painting. His 
books on Sir Joshua Reynolds and 
Thomas Gainsborough, although 
relatively brief, brought a new rigor 
to their subject matter. 

His “British Painting, 1530- 
1790,” first published in 1953, re- 
mains the standard introduction to 
its subject, and his “Dictionary of 


2 U S. Officials to Visit India, Pakistan 

Concern Is Over Nuclear Tension on the Subcontinent 


By Bernard Weirtraub 

New York Tima Service 
WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
adsnmstraiion is sending two high- 
level officials to India aud Pakistan 
to express concern about the possi- 
ble development of a midear weap- 


on Iraqi nuclear reactor in 1981. 

An a dministr ation official said 
tha t the subject of the spread of 
nuclear arms was “always impor- 
tant in dealing with those two 
countries because it’s such an issue 
between them.” He added, “The 


weapons. Such a pact would allow 
mutual inspection of Indian and 
Pakistani nuclear rites. 

Officials said that India was cool 
to the notion. India has not signed 
the Nnclear Nonproliferation 
Treaty, saying it discriminates 


British I8tb Century Painters in 
Oils and Crayons.” published in 
1981, epitomized the studies of a 
lifetime and was unforgettably tart 
in its handling of artists whom he 
disliked. 

From 1970 to 1973 he served the 
new Yale Center for British Art in 
New Haven, Connecticut, as its di- 
rector of studies. More recently, be 
advised the J. Paul Getty Trust. 

Sir Ellis was director of the Na- 
tional Galleries of Scotland in Ed- 
inburgh from 1949 to 1952. and be 
left there to become a Barber Pro- 
fessor or Fine Art at Birmingham 
University and director of tbe re- 
cently founded Barber Institute. 
During his 18 yean there, be made 
the Barber Institute into one of the 
most distinguished of Britain's 
smaller museums. 

John Kerans, 70, 

Guided Ship From China 

LONDON (Reuters) — John 
Kerans, 70, the British naval com- 
mander hailed as a hero after he 
stealthily guided the frigate Ame- 
thyst down China's Yangtze River 
and out or a Communist blockade 
in 1949, died Wednesday. 

He was assistant naval attach* at 
the British Embassy at Nanjing 
where HMS Amethyst was on a 
regular replenishment run when 
caught up in the Chinese civil war 
and fired upon by Communists. 
Seventeen 17 crew members, in- 


STSKraorf aiSnTmwSi issue of proliferation there is very against nonindustrialized coun- eluding the commanding officer, 

kuDonanito us.” tries. were lolled. Mr. Kerans came on 


tensirais in the region, UB.' officials ^erican official said 


board as its new co mmandin g offi- 
cer. He took advantage of a night’s 
darkness to slip the ship out under 
the Communists’ eyes, directing it 
140 miles (225 kilometers) down- 
stream to the open sea. 

■ Other Deaths: 

WnCam Afwyn, 80, a British 
composer who wrote film scores 
and symphonies, died Wednesday 
in a hospital near his home in Ips- 
wich, eastern England. 

Phnf Rory, 75, who won the No- 
bel prize in chemistry and used his 
prize in a battle to protect the hu- 
man rights of Soviet scientists, was 
found dead Monday of a heart at- 
tack in Big Sur, California. 

Antooino Motto, 88. one of the 
regular conductors of Milan's La 
Scab opera bouse since 1923. died 
Monday at his home in Milan. 

Harold Gomberg, 68, the princi- 
pal oboist of the New York Phil- 
harmonic from 1943 to 1977, died 
Saturday of a heart attack in Capri, 
Italy. 

Bartokmre Cahangbaog, 68. a 
former Philippine presidential can- 
didate who led a large movement 
seeking U.S. statehood for the na- 
tion, (tied of a cerebral hemorrhage 
near Manila, tbe Philippine News 
Agency reported Friday. 

Bob Prater, 54, the blind man 
who gave more than 150,000 trees 
to tbe poor over 16 Christmases, 
died Monday in Inglewood, Cali- 
fornia, of complications from dia- 
betes. 


have announced. 

Michael H. Aiznacost, undersec- 
retary of stale for political affairs, 
and Donald R. Fortier, the third- 
ranking aide in the National Secu- 
rity Council, are to visit New Delhi 
and Islamabad from Sunday to 
Thursday, While House ofndals 
said Thursday. ’ 

Aides said that Mr. Aonacost 
and Mr. Fortier would discuss the 
Soviet presence in Afghanistan and 
other “mailers of mutual concern.” 

But other Reagan administration 
officials said that a key reason for 
the visit to both countries was to 
express anxiety about tbe possible 
development of a nuclear weapon 
by Pakis tan and concern that India 
would seek to retaliate in a way 
similar to the Israeli strike against 


that the administration’s underly- 
ing concerns in the region were 
nuclear developments in Pakistan 
and tbe danger of a response by 
India. Tbe Indians set off a nuclear 
explosion in 1974. 

Pakistan consistently has said 
that it has no intention of develop- 
ing a nuclear bomb and that all its 
n iiriear work has gone into re- 
search and development of tech- 
nology for peaceful purposes. 

The official said that tlx mood in 
tbe administration was to “get in- 
volved" to avert a confrontation 
between India and Pakistan. 

One option to be considered, of- 
ficials said, is an agreement be- 
tween India and Pakistan designed 
to prevent the spread of nuclear 


One official said that the admin- 
istration found the concept of a 
regional nonproliferation agree- 
ment interesting and useful but 
that no decision had been made 
about endorsing it. 

India asserts that it has no nucle- 
ar weapons program, despite the 
nudear detonation in 1974. Al- 
though Pakistan has denied that it 
is developing a nudear weapon, the 
government has successfully devel- 
oped the technology to make ca- 
ndied uranium that theoretically 
could be used for a bomb. 

Administration officials said 
that India’s nudear capacity and 
Pakistan's nudear potential had 
given American policy makers a 
sense of some urgency about the 
region. 


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amendment unnecessary. 

More than 200 perishable com- 
modities are grown in the United 
States, according to the California 
senator, and he estimated their 
market value at $23 billion. Under 
his proposal, foreign agricultural 
workers would be admitted to a 
specific region of the country for 
up to nine months a year and 
would be free to move from one 
grower to another within that re- 
gion. 

Twenty percent of the foreign 
workers’ gross wages would be de- 
posited in a trust fund and distrib- 
uted to the workers only after they 
returned borne. 

Senator Edward M. Kennedy, a 
Democrat of Massachusetts, said 
that Mr. Wilson's proposal resem- 
bled “the pass laws of South Afri- 
ca" because it would restrict for- 
eign workers to a specific region of 


New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Former 
Governor James B. Hunt Jr. of 
North Carolina has decided not to 
run for the U.S. Senate in 1986, 
dampening the hopes of Demo- 
crats, who need to add a rmnimitm 
of four seats in the next election to 
take control of the Senate. 

Tbe former two-term governor 
had considered making a bid Tor 
the seat amid speculation that the 
Republican incumbent. John P. 
East, will not seek re-election be- 
cause of health problems. Mr. Hunt 
was widely regarded as his party’s 
strongest candidate. 

Mr. Hunt made an unsuccessful 
bid last year to unseat Senator Jes- 
se Helms, the state's longtime 
publican officeholder, in what 
turned out to be the most expensive 
and bitterly contested of any Sen- 
ate race in 1984. The Hdms-Hunt 
contest cost S20 million, with Mr. 
Helms winning 52 percent of the 
vote to Mr. Hunt's 48 percent. 


17.S. Officials Identify Tongue Sore 
As Early Symptom in AIDS Victims 

United Press International 

ATLANTA — U.S. health officials say they have identified an 
early symptom of AIDS — a tongue sore first noticed among victims 
in San Francisco four years ago at tbe start of tbe AIDS epidemic. 

The national Centers for Disease Control urged health-care provid- 
ers to watch for the sore as a diagnostic tool for early recognition and 
treatment of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. 

The centers said the tongue sore or lesion, known as hairy leukopla- 
kia, appears as raised white areas of thickening on tbe tongue and has 
a “hairy” appearance. 

Tbe sore was seen for the first time in San Francisco AIDS victims 
in 1981, the centers said. Since then it has been reported in AIDS 
patients examined in Paris, Copenhagen, London, Los Angeles, 
Baltimore and Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

The centers said that from October 1 981 to June erf this year, 13 of 
123 patients with hairy leukoplakia seen in San Francisco “were 
additionally diagnosed as having AIDS." Twenty others later devel- 
oped the disease and 78 of the 123 tested positive for antibodies to tbe 
AIDS virus. 

The Centers for Disease Control said Thursday that AIDS has 
killed 6,61 1 of -the 13,074 victims reported to the cemers as of Sept 9. 



7 able clock "Duomo", gold- and silver-plated 


BV LG A R I 

10 VIA DEI CONDOTTI ROMA 
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3 


Page 4 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14-15, 1985 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


(tribune. 


WUfa The New York Time and The WatUngum PM 

Cracks in Apartheid’s Walls 


For more than four and a half years Presi- 
dent Reagan practiced “constructive engage- 
ment*' with South Africa, and reform there 
proceeded at a pace that those who wish to end 
apartheid found completely unacceptable. 
Two days after he initiated mild sanctions, the 
Pretoria government pledged to restore South 
African citizenship to the millions of blacks 
from whom it bad stolen that birthright, and 
the next day a weather-vane advisory commis- 
sion called for abolition of the pass laws. 

It cannot all be due, of course, to Mr. 
Reagan's new receptivity to sanctions. The 
South Africans, insisting that they did not 
merely bend to pressure, say the changes were 
in the works for a long time. Yet less than a 
month ago President Pieter W, Botha appar- 
ently cranked up to make such changes, and 
did not. Soon new blows were delivered to the 
South African economy by private banks wor- 
ried about their money, and then the Congress 
pressed Mr. Reagan into reversing course on 
sanctions. Did Pretoria conclude it had best 
make a gesture to him in order to earn passage 
back toward his patronage? 

The reforms now being cited hardly prove a 
South African change of heart Restoration of 
citizenship undermines the odious intent of 
apartheid to spin off blacks to tribal “home- 
lands." making them foreigners in their own 
country. The restoration heightens the pres- 
sure on Pretoria to permit blacks an acceptable 
political role in South Africa. The pass laws, a 


Seven Still Are Missing 


Israel has now freed the last Lebanese and 
Palestinians whose release was rfwnamtwi in 
June by hijackers of a TWA airliner. The 
hijackers freed the last 39 American passen- 
gers on a tacit understanding that Israel would 
hold to its previous promise to liberate 766 
captives taken from Lebanon. If it was a deal, 
it has been honored. 

Where does that leave seven other Ameri- 
cans held Imprisoned somewhere in Lebanon? 
Pretty much where they were before the noto- 
rious hijacking: out of the camera's sight, out 
of the public's mind. To remind, here are their 
names, and the lengths of their captivity: 

Thomas Sutherland, agriculture dean at the 
American University in Beirut, held since 
June; David Jacobsen, director of the Ameri- 
can University hospital, since May; Terry An- 
derson of The Associated Press, since March; 
Lawrence Jenco of Catholic Relief, since Janu- 


ary; Peter Kilburo, an American University 
librarian, since December; Benjamin Weir, a 
Presbyterian minister, since May 1984; Wil- 
liam Buckley, political officer of the U.S. Em- 
bassy in Beirut, since March 1984. 

All are believed to be prisoners of kidnap- 
pers who are said to demand the release of 17 
comrades convicted of terrorist crimes in Ku- 
wait. The Stale Department insists it is urgent- 
ly working for the Americans' release. Their 
famili es insist not enough is being done. In 
Damascus, a member of Congress was recently 
told that nothing could be done until Israel 
released the last Lebanese. 

In this cruel game, all that may be true, or 
false. What is certain is that leaders behave 
differently when hostages are prime-time 
news. If the seven Ame ricans are half-forgot- 
ten, the fault lies in ourselves. 

— THE SEIV YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


A Soviet Spy Defects 

The defection of Oleg A Gordievsky has to 
be treated with circumspection. The likelihood 
is that of a long-ru nnin g spy coming in from 
the cold, rather than that of a loyal Kremlin 
servant suddenly seeing the light Because the 
Russians know he is gone, and thus that we 
know what he knows, there is no option for 
letting matters lie. The 25 [Russians he named 
as spies] have to go. 

It would be a miserable pity if the exit of the 
25 is taken as signal for Anglo-Soviet freeze. 
Mr. Gordievsky. sure enough, will be busy 
singing many fascinating songs. But the over- 
riding need, at a time of tension and opportu- 
nity. is the need for statesmen and politicians 
across the divide to talk to each other. And 
letting spying get in the way of that is letting 
one constrained set of means dictate an alto- 
gether barren end. 

— 77i«? Guardian (London). 

Peres at the Halfway Point 

A year has passed since Israel began, unen- 
thusiastically, its experiment in political co- 
habitation. On Sept. 13, 1984, Shimon Peres 
assumed a 25-month leadership of a govern- 
ment of national unity after a parliamentary 
majority could not be formed. In October 
1986, Likud’s Yitzhak Shamir win take over. 

No one harbored much hope for this "gov- 
ernment by relay." It has. however, survived 
without too much embarrassment Now half- 
way through his term, Mr. Peres’s record is 
mixed but on the whole, honorable. A man of 
conciliation and compromise, the prime minis- 
ter has helped relax Israeli political life. There 
is a liule less talk of the Holocaust and the 
Bible and much more discussion of the health 
of the currency and of the technological chal- 
lenges Israel faces. 

— J.-P. Langellier in Le Monde (Paris). 

Protection From Ourselves 

An unsettling aspect of the protectionist 
debate emerges from follow-up interviews of 
respondents to a New York Times-CBS News 
poL The poll revealed that most Americans 


think the Japanese work harder and make 
better products, and that U.S. complaints 
about unfair trade practices are a form of 
scapegoating. Consider this typical response; 
“Here, guys want to retire and buy a motor 
home, travel around the counuy. That’s just 
thinking of the individual, selfishly. The Japa- 
nese worker is thinking. T am putting out a 
quality product I am proud of.' " 

At a time many in Congress insist they sense 
a wave of protectionist sentiment, this poll’s 
findings suggest the opposite. Think of the gall 
of calling ourselves overpaid loafers in one 
breath and in the next demanding that the 
government protect us from the consequences. 

— The Dallas Morning News. 

Birmingham: An Indian View 

Those killed and most of those injured [in 
the Birmingham riots] are said to be Indian 
settlers, while the property destroyed belonged 
both to Indian and Pakistani immigrants. The 
government reportedly views the riots as an 
isolated example of lawlessness. What hap- 
pened is neither all that isolated nor a matter 
of spontaneous lawlessness. If immigrants 
from the West Indies attacked Asians in Bir- 
mingham, it was not for reasons of color. 
Social and economic factors are at the root of 
the problem: an unemployment rate far above 
the national level feelings of racial discrimina- 
tion, drugs and urban decay. 

— The Indian Express (New Delhi). 

OPEG Down, Hardly Out 

The OPEC share of world oil liftings has 
fallen to around 30 percent. But the organiza- 
tion’s exports still account for more than 70 
percent of worldwide oil trading! And the 
proven oil reserves of the Soviet Union and the 
United Slates, like those of the British sector 
of the North Sea. will at present consumption 
rates be exhausted in 15 years, whereas many 
OPEC countries can expect continued liftings 
for something like 70 'years. Sooner or later, 
the industrialized nations wQJ have to reckon 
with a renewed OPEC stranglehold unless they 
find adequate substitutes. 

— Neue ZQrcher Zeitung (Zurich). 


FROM OUR SEPT. 14 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Democrats Hail Maine Vote 
NEW YORK — If the political tradition “As 
Maine goes, so goes the Union” is upheld on 
Nov. 8, the United States is within measurable 
distance of a Democratic Congress. Taken in 
connection with the reduced Republican ma- 
jority in the Vermont elections last week, the 
Democrats are perhaps justified in asserting 
that the Maine verdict [on Sept. 12] pro- 
nounces the faieof the Republicans in Novem- 
ber. Frederick Planted, the Governor-elect, 
son of the last Democratic Governor of Maine, 
elected thirty years ago, says: “The people 
voted on national issues. High prices, control 
of the Republican Party in the interest of trusts 
and Canonism. all contributed to our victory. 
The people are tired of Republican rule." 


1935: Long’s Successors Are Divided 
BATON ROUGE, Louisiana — Louisiana 
Democrats were at one another's throats [on 
SepL 13], twelve hours after Huey Long, the 
state’s political czar, was buried before a 
throng of 200,000 in the sunken garden of his 
S 25-rmllion skyscraper. State House. The op- 
position demanded an overthrow of the dicta- 
torship the “Kingfish" had set up, while his 
henchmen seemed desirous of a compromise in 
his fight against the New Deal with “honor" 
on both sides. In other words, in return for 
halting income-tax investigations aimed ai 
them, plus control of Federal patronage, they 
were reported as being willing to repeal laws 
setting up the dictatorship and support Presi- 
dent Franklin D. Roosevelt for re-election. 


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“ Why Japan 

A Narrow View on the Clever Mr. Gorbachev Mugt Spend 


cornerstone of apartheid, control where blacks 
may live and work. Abolition would remove a 
savage instrument of white repression. 

The ruling whites offer up these measures as 
major alterations in apartheid. But they come 
so late and begrudgingly that many blacks are 
likely to find them thin gruel. They are what 
Bishop Desmond Tutu, who is a moderate 
among South African blacks, calls piecemeal 
reform of a son that “no longer exdtes us." He 
adds: “I don't want apartheid reformed. I 
want it dismantled." By dismantling, he means 
ending the system that denies blacks full politi- 
cal rights. In all the twisting and turning of the 
Botha government, no signs are yet visible that 
it understands the rightness, urgency and inev- 
itability of that goaL 

Some whites in South Africa, to be sure, may 
be thinking of taking this step. Five prominent 
businessmen, including an Afrikaner, were in 
Zambia on Friday for a first acknowledged 
meeting with the outlawed African National 
Congress. The five were at once defying the 
government's stated wishes and conducting a 
political reconnaissance. This is the sort of 
initiative the government is going to have to 
take. As long as it not only disenfranchises 
blacks but also locks up thear natural leaders 
— the Reverend Allan Boesak is the latest of 
note to be jailed — it ensures that blacks will 
bun to other means of straggle, and it renders 
suspect and marginal its other initiatives. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


W ashington — T he period 

H eading up to a summit meet- 
ing is a time for expansiveness, and 
Mikhail Gorbachev has been 
adroitly feeding the feeling. His in- 
terview in Time magazine and the 
hints he dropped to a visiting dele- 
gation of U.S. senators have raised 


By Charles Krauthammer 


hungry....” Spoken like' Willy 
Brandt The famine victims of Ethi- 
opia, where Mr. Gorbachev sinks 

milli ons for weaponry and little for 
food, will be pleased with the news. 

2} An air of mutual tolerance: 
“We have never accused the U.S. of 
being an ‘evil empire.’" Perhaps, 
but as the analyst Dimitri Simes 
points out, in the past 12 months the 


cation of U.Sk senators have raised 2) An air of mutual tolerance: 
hopes that this really is a man we “We have never accused the U.S. of 
can do business with — to quote being an ‘evil empire.’ " Perhaps, 
Margaret Thatcher and, most re- but as the analyst Dimitri Simes 
cenuyT Claiborne Pell one of the points out. in the past 12 months the 
senatorial pilgrims to Moscow. Can Russians have accused the United 
we indeed? A dose reading of Mr. States of preparing to invade Leba- 
Gorbachev '5 fall offensive suggests non over the TWA hijacking, and of 
another view: the narrow view. a role in both the assassination of 
The expansive view derives large- Indira Gandhi and the destruction 
ly from the vaunted Gorbachev of the Air India plane, 
style. Not so much bis tailoring or 3) Enough “moral equivalence" 
his wife, but his language. He to fuel a season of neooonservative 
speaks Westemese. It is his rhetori- conferences: “We have something 
cal style that has him “running rings to say about . . . violations of human 

around Reagan in pre-summit pro- rights in America itself Is it 

pagan da,” as Tom Wicker put it- worthwhile for the sake of that to 
Westspeak is hard to miss. It is set up a summit meeting?” And, 
characterized by. “Neither the president nor I will be 

able to ignore the mood in our re- 
spective countries or that of our 
allies. " More good news, this time 
for voters in Moscow and Prague. 
On the whole, he is stylish. And 


“We aim believe it immo ral to 
waste hundreds of billions on devel- 
oping means of annihilation, while 
hundreds of milli ons of people go 


CEN5CSW& ST® 


style is not or itself proof of bad 
faith. What is most troubling is Mr. 
Gorbachev's substance: p re- sum- 
mit politics of the narrowest kind. 
Single-issue politics. For Mr. Gor- 
bachev this is the “star wars" sum- 
mit meeting. 

Follow his discussions and all 
roads lead to “star wars.” And yet 
the remarkable thing about his two 
hours with the Time editors and his 
three with the senators is the fact 
that Mr. Gorbachev said absolutely 
nothing new on the subject. Unless, 
that is. you count the concession 
that he wiD permit fundamental re- 
search on “star wars.” As Senator 
Sam Nunn explained the proposal: 
"We will allow you to think.’ 

Thank you. General Secretary. 
As a concession, this amounts to 
permitting the sun to .rise in the East 
on a daily basis. In reality Mr. Gor- 
bachev’s concession is a reiteration 
of the most self-serving Soviet posi- 
tion at the Geneva arms talks. He 
demands that nonfundamental re- 
search, such as prcdevdqpment ac- 
tivity involving models, be banned. 


Ol course be does. This is precise- 
ly the kind of activity that open 
societies cannot hide and that 

closed societies specialize in hiding. 
Any such ban would be unilateral. 

The other headline-making offer 
was that if the United States would 
give up “star wars." the Russians 
would make radical proposals, pre- 
sumably for reducing offensive 
weapons, on "the very next day. 
This, “The Day After," Soviet-style, 
is an elegantly crafted way of re- 
peating the Soviet stonewall posi- 
tion at Geneva: no negotiations on 
any thing until the U-S. side first 
gives up its trump card. _ ; 

In nonexpansrve limes, this is 
known as a precondition, and gen- 
erally considered unhelpful as the 
diplomats say, to the success of ne- 
gotiation. Today it is considered a 
sign of flexibility, cause for hope. 

Is there a reason for hope? If Mr. 
Gorbachev really is hinting at a deal 
— restraints on strategic defenses in 
exchange for restraints on offensive 
missiles — then he can do two 
things. First, make dear the deal is a 


I GENEVA, 1 


\ rr*\ 


A 


duet for simultaneous, not sequen- 
tial play. No “day after.’’ More 
important, do it at Geneva. Serious- 


THEfw 

ract; 

is 



Dam Summon 
Tho Ortando SenSnol 










□ess is shown there, not in the press 
or in huddles with touring senators. 

There is one more thing Mr. Gor- 
bachev might consider, one of those 
“propaganda gestures” for which he 
lies to feign d^ain — a gesture 
that would make no dent in his 
strategic posture, yet genuindy im- 
press those cynics not yet swept up 
by his style or his substance. He 
could set free Andrei Sakharov, An- 
atoli Sbcharansky and the thou- 
sands of Soviet Jews for whom the 
system is a prison and who ask only 
to be allowed to leave. 

If good pre-summit atmospherics 
is what Mr. Gorbachev wants, that 
is the way to achieve iu It is unlikely 
he will try. The senators noted that 
he cut off all questions on Afghani- 
stan and human rights. (“Unfortu- 
nate,” allowed one senator.) While 
be holds to his negotiating precon- 
ditions, and his prisoners, it win be 
hard to ihinlc of Gorbachev the 
Statesman as anything but a clever 
politician of the highest style and of 
the narrowest vision. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


A Proper Use for ' Star Wars 9 : Trade It for Peace 


W ASHINGTON — U5. strategy for the 
Reagan-Gorbachev summit meeting in 
Geneva hinges on a crucial decision facing the 
American president about space weapons. 

Mr. Reagan’s advisers are divided on his "star 
wars” scheme, as his Strategic Defense Initiative 
is called. One view favors putting the SDI on the 
table as a “bargaining chip” in the Geneva nego- 
tiations, which resume next week. America 
would accept limits on missile defenses in ex- 
change for cuts in strategic offensive weapons. 

That view dominates within the Slate Depart- 
ment. the National Security Council and the 
military. The belief is that an arms control agree- 
ment that benefits U.S. security should be 
sought. But without limits on missile defenses, it 
would be impossible for the Russians to reduce 
offensive weapons when they may need a larger 
force to counter future U.S. defenses. 

Another group, including Pentagon civilians, 
some military men and the Republican right, sees 
the SDI as a useful monkey wrench in the Gene- 
va machinery. They oppose limits on the U.S. 
buildup. By refusing to accept limits on the SDI, 
they hope to block arms control agreements that, 
they fear, will halt the UJS. buildup while Mos- 
cow continues its buildup. 

A compromise united the bargaining-chip and 
monkey-wrench factions in January. Defense 
Secretary Caspar Weinberger agreed to enlarge 
the agenda to include space weapons, on two 
conditions: holding firm for heavily dispropor- 


By Robert Kleinian 

donate Soviet reductions in land missiles, and 
avoiding any “negotiations" now to limit space 
defenses. The Americans were authorized to 
“discuss" the SDI but only to lecture the Rus- 
sians on the advantages of missile defense over 
the doctrine of deterrence. 

The compromise has lasted because both 
groups wanted the SDI to gain credibility, as it 
has, from increased congressional appropria- 
tions. And the Soviet posture was as unnego lia- 
ble as the American. Moscow demanded an un- 
verifiable ban on all space defense research. That 
would halt most U.S. but few Soviet programs. 

But Moscow now hints that it might be willing 
to distin gu ish between some research permitted 
by the 1972 anti-ballistic missile treaty and the 
develop meat, testing and deployment that is 
banned by the treaty. Mikhail Gorbachev also is 
promising "radical reductions — up to 40 per- 
cent, Moscow hints — in offensive aims if missile 
defenses are limited. 

Members of the bargaining-chip faction are 
interested in this. But until they get more detailed 
proposals favorable to American interests, they 
are hesitant to open a bloody interagency battle. 
American negotiators instead will ask Moscow 
for formal proposals with precise numbers. 

But Kremlin moderates have similar internal 
problems. That is why past negotiations have 


usually hinged on American proposals. So res- 
tiveness over the lack of progress in Geneva is 
owing in Congress and among the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization governments. 

The Geneva stalemate is preventing progress 
toward reductions that the Europeans seek in 
Soviet medium-range missiles aimed at them. It 
frustrates European efforts for East-West accord 
that even leaders as conservative as Prime Minis- 
ter Margaret Thatcher of Britain consider politi- 
cally necessary. And it aids anti-NATO groups in 
European opposition parties. 

Most NATO governments, want the United 
States to start negotiating soon to trade off the 
SDI for Soviet offensive missile cuts. They fear 
that the program’s momentum could get both 
superpowers committed to defenses that are de- 
stabilizing, expensive, yet ineffective. Some in 
Washington who feel that way are trying their 
hand at drafting a Reagan-Gorbachev agreement 
instructing their negotiators to negotiate. 

It is worth trying. The Kremlin faces critical 
decisions on a five-year investment split between 
military and civilian needs. President Reagan 
might influence that decision by convincing Mr. 
Gorbachev that serious talks to trade parts of 
SDI for offensive missile cuts are posable: 

The writer is working on a book an the Western 
alliance as a visiting research fellow at London's 
Royal Institute of international Affairs. He con- 
tributed this comment to The New York Tones. 


Veto: When the President’s Vote Is All That Counts 


A MHERST, Massachusetts — 
. Americans have always been of 
two minds about democracy. On the 
one hand, “Vox Populi. Vox Dei” — 
the voice of the people is the voice of 
God. On tbe other hand, Alexis de 
Tocqueville was right when he 
warned — as John Adams had before 
him — against the “tyranny of the 
majority" Even Thomas Jefferson 
could not quite make up his mind, 
witness his first inaugural address: 
“The will of the majority is in all 
1 cases to prevail" but “that will . . . 
must be reasonable." 

Who then is to decide reasonable- 
ness — the majority, speaking 
through legislatures, or the executive, 
exercising the power to veto? 

The response generally seems to 
have depended on men and issues. If 
it is the king or royal governors, or 
even unsympathetic presidents and 
governors of their own choosing, 
Americans seem to fear tyranny. 
When, during the Colonial era, royal 
governors vetoed whatever colonial 
legislation they disapproved — as 
they had a right to do except in Con- 
necticut and Rhode Island — legisla- 
tors outwitted them by adding special 
provisions dose to a governors heart 
in their own appropriations. 

Beiyamm Franklin explained the 
technique: “In Pennsylvania it be- 
came the regular practice to have or- 
ders on theTreasuryin his [the gover- 
nor’s] favor presented along with the 
bills to be signed, so that he migh t 
actually receive the former before he 
should sign the latter." 

Tbe first example of royal tyranny 
offered by Jefferson in the Declara- 
tion of Independence was that 
George III “has refused his assent to 
laws the most wholesome and neces- 
sary for the public good." And when 
the states framed their own constitu- 
tions only three granted their elected 
governors even a limited veto. 

A decade's experience with the fol- 
lies of unruly state legislatures, how- 
ever, had a sobering effect. When the 
Founding Fathers came to frame a 
national government, they readily 
granted the president power to veto 
congressional bills subject to reversal 
by two-thirds of both houses. To be 
sure, they might not have gone that 
far had it not been for the prospect of 
General George Washington presid- 
ing with austere dignity over their 
defiberatioos: Who would dare ex- 


By Henry Steele Commager 

about a president in pably of little value to the country, 
mt Olympian figure? What are some of the pros and 
nts exercised their cots of le gflljring the item veto? 
ringW: Wa shingt on First the pros: The veto would go 
i Jefferson not at all far to end the devious practice of 


press misgivings about a president in 
the presence of that Olympian figure? 

Early presidents exercised their 
veto power sparingly: Washington 
twice, Adams and Jefferson not at all 
James Madison five times and James 
Monroe once; total vetoes from 1789 
to 1865, only 36. 

Within a few years that changed. 
In the 1860s and 1870s, the veto be- 
came a weapon in the party struggle 
over Reconstruction: When the 
Democrats finally returned to power 

If the choice is between 
one man’s views and 
those of the majority, 
who should prevail? 

in the Congress, they sought to undo 
Reconstruction legislation by with- 
holding money necessary to enforce 
it; Republican presidents responded 
with vetoes, and from time to time 
government came to a standstill 
With the inevitable growth of pres- 
idential power during a half century 
of imperialism and war, the veto 
came a g ain to the fore as a major 
weapon in political battles, especially 
under Fr anklin Roosevelt. Theodore 
Roosevelt used it 82 times, Woodrow 
Wilson 44. and FDR the staggering 
total of 635, including no less than 
2£3pocket vetoes. 

The central problem posed by the 
modern veto is rooted in Congress’s 
use of “riders," usually of special or 
local interest, added as free-loaders 
to the general appropriations bOL 
These are designed to open the flood- 
gates of federal money to the spon- 
sor’s district. Naturally, presidents 
are reluctant to veto an appropria- 
tions bill on which the day-to-day 
operation of the government dc- 


Fourth, it woult 
Congress and presi 
major responsibility 


E5 Much More 

alize in hiding. 

1 be undaieraL J}y flora Lewis 

SaSSwS T) ERLIN - Knmm 5<™ the 

• the Russians D mounting pressure for *radepr 
proposals, pro- tecticnism are breaking ft® 

SuSteK dent Reagan's recent 

erv next day." against the Biropean Cornmunu^ 

r,’ ; Soviet-style. Japan, South Korea and Bra-jl *** 

ted way of re- pinpricks, mtended io J 

itonewall posi- gress from launching a barTa^c 

lego nations on against imports. Thev are ■not hk ■ . 

uS. side first to defuse the fury on Capitol HiiLbui 

uri. they probably will increase foreign 

limes, this is demands for retaliation. . 
ition. and gen- The danger to world trade ■ * grow- 

helpful as the ing too serious to deal with in this 
: success of ne- piecemeal way. especiaMy 
s considered a many countries are unable to service 
use for hope. their enormous debts with export 
3 T hope? If Mr. earnings. There needs to be a much 

in ting at a deal broader, intensive international h- 

»c defenses in fort to reverse the imbalance in trade 

is on offensive and prevent contraction. The biggest 

> can do two burden necessarily falls on Japan: it 

ear the deal is a is building surpluses like a sorcerer s 

is, not sequen- apprentice who found how to start a 

after." More magic formula but cannot turn it off. 

sneva. Serious- It is not enough for Prime Minister 

lot in the press Yasuhiro Nakasone to suggest that 

tiring senators. bis compatriots buy a little more 

thing Mr. Gor- from abroad. He must explain to Jap- 
s’, one of those anese consumers that they are really 

s” for which he paying for their exports, in effect suo- 

i a gesture sidizing consumers in other countries 

0 dent in his for no return even as they' contribute 

genuin ely im- to unemployment abroad. 

it yet swept up Japan is a care where the prevailing 

substance. He ideology about cutting government 

Sakharov, An- spending is contradicted. It needs to 

ind the thou- spend much more on housing, public 

for whom the services and infrastructure, and in 

j who ask only ways that will generate demand for 

e. imports to bring a better balance, 

t atmospherics UJS. pressure on Japan has tended 
ev wants, that to urge a big increase in military 

it. It is unlikely spending so as to soak up some of the 

Lora noted that resources flooding markets else- 

is on Afghani- where. This is unwise and could de- 

its. (“Unfortu- stabilize Aria. 

enator.) While A much better approach would be 
fating precon- for the industrial countries to remind 

ncrsTit will be Japan of how the Marshall Plan 

Jorbachev the helped turn around a devastated 

lg but a clever world economy and send trade soar- 

:st style and of ing to everyone's benefit. 

In those postwar days the United 
'riiers Group. States had all the goods to sell, but 
nobody had dollars to buy. If a rea- 
sonable part of Japan’s surplus were 
devoted to foreign aid to struggling 
IMAX developing countries, it would ex- . 

- pand markets for all with a better 
chance for equilibrium. 

pqsaR So res- West Germany too needs to in- 
s in Geneva l is crease spending. The fight against 

the North At- inflation has been largely successful 
meats. but there cranes a point where the . 

ntmg progress cure provokes new distortions. It 
? took too long for the major economic 

ied at them. It powers to react to inflation and to 
st-West aocora force it down. Now, sdectivdy, those 

s Prime Mims- whose excess trade is working to de- 
1,0 - press other economics have a respon- 

ATO groups m ability to generate consumption. 

T . There have been dramatic changes 

at the United - m ^ economic scene since a decade 
) trade off the ago. Zooming" oil prices provoked . 

major distortions and changed the 
ould get both patterns of world commerce. But 
cs that are de- now, qO exporters have overcommit- 
;trve - Some m ted their reduced earnings . There has 
re trying tbor been a new shift in the economic 
bev agreement uniw tha t requires new adjustments 

gotiate. in tbe flow of goods and money. 

1 faoescnlical These are nsyor issues that should 

S plit between have been addressed at the economic 

ent Reagan summit meeting in May. The oppor- i. 

anvmdng Mr. tunhy was frittered away. There will “ 

Cradc -,P arts be another chance at the World 

possible. Bank-International Monetary Fund 

meeting next month in SeouL 
w trie Western The bash: trouble is that national 
v at Londons economic decisions remain uncoordi- 

con ~ nated in an intertwined world where 

York lanes. theirimpacl is inevitably internation- 

al The international tools for shoring 
up world economic health, are far 
■ snort erf the need! 

HI UT S Mr. Reagan has been consistent 
with his principles in resisting Ameri- 

v „ can protectionism as far as he can. 

But the fact that he fdt obliged to 
P 8 ??™ make concessions and is still being 

JbS l^ ^gproof lfalrdi aiMeon 


exploiting resources designed for the 
good of toe whole for local and often 
personal profit. 

Second, it would save money — 
though not much — and it might 
raise standards of political morality. 

Third, it might save time and re- 
sources for a Congress already bur- 
dened by a budget of fantastic pro- 

S s, discouraging items 
to benefit a party or a par- 
mgressman ahd, at the same 
time, relieve many congressmen of 
improper local pressures. 

Arguments against: 

First, the item veto is not really 
necessary: The same end amid hie 
achieved by following state practice 
of writing into the appropriations 
bills a proviaon permitting executive 
vetoes for extraneous items. 

Second, it would enhance the exec- 
utive-power — already spreading in 
all directions — by permitting the 
president to usurp an authority spe- 
cifically assigned to tbe Congress. 

Third, it would give the president a 
powerful weapon to punish or reward 
individual congressmen. He could 


major responsibility by encouraging 
intensive investigation as to the valid- 
ity of innumerable petty projects. . 

And fifth, since me veto is provid- 
ed in the Constitution, the courts 
might hold that legislation permitting 
an item veto on a possibly different 
basis (e^. majority vote) was of dubi- 
ous constitutionality. That, in turn, 
would make the courts vulnerable to 
the charge of meddling into “ques- 
tions of a political nature.” 

These arguments are nicely bal- 
anced. Perhaps the only solution to 
this vexatious problem is one rooted 
in those ideals of virtue ever-present 
in the minds of the Founding Fa- 
thers: Abolish the residential require- 
ment for congressmen, thus freeing 
them from a special responsibOily to 
a particular constituency and permit- 
ting any high-minded constituencj^to 

at the same time elect presidents who, 
like John Quincy Adams, refuse to 
use their power for patronage or fra 
mere partisan purposes. . 

The writer, Simpson lecturer at Am- 
herst College, is author of “The Empire 
of Reason’ and other books. He con- 
tributed this to the Los Angeles Tones. 


market forces is not enough to pre- 
vent intolerable disruptions. 

In global economics, it lakes gov- 
ernment intervention to protea free 
markets and free trade. Few govern- 
ments are prepared , to sacrifice ad- 
vantages even though it is in their 
long-term interest But the interna- 
tional community can provide the if' 
context in which a Japanese prime 
minister, for example, would find zt 
possible and advisable to explain to 
his people why Japan should invest 
more a thorn eand expand foreign aid ' 
for their own future benefit. 

There is no country but the United 1 

States that can lead the way to new 

allowing trade to .shrink, launching 
retaliations, and then desperately 1 
seeking a way out of the crisiL 
The New York Times 

~ Letters inten d ed for publication 
■ should be addressed * Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er’s signature, name and full ad- 
dress Letters should be brief and 
me subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts 


LETTERS TO TBE EDITOR 


Beware Red Carpets 

Regarding “It Was an Adult’s Job 
That a Girl Did ” (Aug. 29): 

Ellen Goodman says she could not 
imagine what America had to fear 
from Samantha Smith’s goodwill trip 
to the Soviet Union and adds, “There 
is little to fear from the red-carpet 
treatment." Does Ms. Goodman hold, 
the same opinion about tbe similar ly 


pends; they arc reluctant, too, to af- intended “red carpet” that Adolf Hit- 
Erom congressmen, especially of their ler unrolled for foreign visitors to the 
own Dartv. who rely on such govern- Olympic Games in Berlin in 1936? 


own party, who rely on such govern- 
ment largesse to help win elections. 


Olympic Games in Berlin in 1936? 
Many journalists bemoan to this 


But what profits the congressman day the effect this “treatment" had 

and his district is not necessarily on gullible visitors. 

profitable to all the American people. . Ms. Goodman's approving quota- 


profitable to all the American people. 

It is this sorry situation that has 
given rise to the demand for an 
"item” veto — enabling the president 


Ms. Goodman's approving quota- 
tion of Samantha’s words, “Nothing 
could be more important than not 
having a war,” was answered long 


tic os: Who would dare ex- to veto individual items that are pal- ago by Churchill when he sail 


“There is one thing worse than war — 

slavery." 

JIM PRICE. 

Trieste. Italy. 

Half-Hearted Sanctions 

It was pathetic to watch Ronald 
Reagan deliver a watered-down ver- 
sion of an economic sanctions biQ 
against tbe South African govern- 
ment on Monday. It is an embarrass- 
ment to have one's president shamed 
into adopting a moral stance and into 
promoting the very precepts by which 
his country professes to be governed 
— namely, the preservation and en- 
hancement of I ni man dignity and po- 
litical freedom. 

Still, the people and their elected 
representatives have demonstrated 
that not even a president win be al- 


lowed to stand against values cher- 
ished by alL This is truly democracy 
in action. Let us not rest until every 
South African has the same possibili- 
ty to make a free choice, and to ex- 
press it_ 

URSULA MANSON-VELTE. 

Frankfun. 

No Excuse for the Bomb 

1 disagree with Stanley Woodward - 
(Leilas, Sept. 7). Had the atomic 
bombs not been dropped, the ship I ' 
was on probably would have taken \ 
part m an invasion of Japan and I ±- 
mighr have been kOIed. few it was *" 
imforgiyable to massacre those civil- 
ians. Hiroshima and Nagasaki were 
not legitimate targets. 

PATRICK J.N. BURY. § 
Dublin. 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14-15, 1985 


Page 5 





Rmrian 

COMPOSER HONORED — Carmine Coppola, left, the U.S. composer who wrote a 
new score for “Napoleon,” the film directed by Abel Gance in 1927, was awarded the 
Arts and Letters medal in Paris on Thursday by Jack fang, the French culture minister. 


Despite Gains Toward Democracy, 
Turkey Still Heavily Restricts Rights 


By Henry Kamm . . 

New York Timet Service 

ISTANBUL — Five years after a 
\ military coup, the Turkish govero- 
■ meet has reinstated important as- 
pects of parliamentary democracy, 
but serious restrictions on civil 
rights still make the country .lag 
behind its Western alliws 

Opposition politicians openly 
express vigorous opposition toward 
the polities of Prime Minister-7 ur- 
gut OzaL Mr. Ozal was elected two 
years ago even though President 
Kenan Evren, the general who led 
the coup on SepL 12, 1980, favored 
another candidate. 

Two former prime ministers — 
Suleyman Detmrel on (he center- 
right and Bulent Ecevit on the cen- 
ter-left, Turkey's most respected 
political leaders — are active be- 
hind die scenes even though they 
are barred from political roles. 

The press, according to editors of 
the most outspoken publications, 
tycds increasingly free to express 
criticism- Many Turks say they 
have begun to take pleasure again 
in the spiritedness of their newspa- 
pers after years of uniform, uncriti- 
cal blandness. 

Martial law, which was in effect 
throughout Turkey when Mr. Ozal 
took office, has progressively been 
removed. Now, it is in force in 17 of 
the nation's 67 provinces, including 
Istanbul, Turkey’s largest city, and 
eastern provinces in which Kurdish 
nationalists axe in rebellion. 

Nevertheless, the national press 
remains formally under maztiaF 
law cerisdri&ift : a r ppw«Y flat ^<fi- ■ 
tors say is acerrised latgdy to "con- 
trol coverage of .the Kurdish 
insurgency. .. . 

Hm bans on Mr. Denrirel and 
Mr. Ecevit prevent^ them from us- 
ing their full political weight, which 
is considerable. Although they 
dominated the political scene for 
years until the military coup, their 
parties have been dissolved — a 
1 measure that is considered particu- 
larly radical in the case of Mr. Ece- 
vifs Republican Peopled Party. It 
was the creation of Kemal Atatrak. 
who is revered as the founder of the 
republic. 

Thousands of Turks remain in 
prison or formally accused an 
charges that range from terrorism 
to the propagation of ideas that the 
military deems subversive. Many 
present or former prisoners have 
accused their captors of repeated 
acts of torture. 

The constitution that was adopt- 
ed after the coup, as well as several 
laws, restrict political activities. La- 
bor unions and student organiza- 
tions, women's, youth and profes- 
sional associations, are barred from 
political action or from lin ks with 

Turkish Cabinet Is Shuffled 

Ratters 

'\ ANKARA — Prime Minister 
Turgut Ozal shuffled his cabinet 
Friday, replacing Minister of State 
Canal Buyukbas with Education 
Minister Vehbi Dincerler, national 
radio reported. Metin Emu-oglu, 
42, a Motherland Party deputy, will 
:e the education post. 


parties. Students and teachers are 
prohibited from joining a party. 

In a series of interviews, Mr. 
Ozal, members of his staff, and 
mill tary officers at the rank of gen- 
eral and admir al said the restric- 
tions were- made necessary by. ter- 
rorism and political unrest from 
tiie extremes of both left and right 
in the years leading up to ihe coup 
In 1980. The officers said that be- 
tween 197S and the coup, 27 to 30 
people were being killed daily in 
terrorist acts. 

The prime minister said 7,000 to 
8,000 people remained in prison as 
a legacy of what he called “the time 
of anarchy.” He said the extremist 
organizations remained alive and 
under cover in Istanbul, which he 
said had always been the center of 
their activity. 

Mr. Ozal said there bad been no 
systematic torture. “If it takes 
place, they are prosecuted,” he said 
of torturers. More than 600 torture 
charges have been token to court, 
the prime minister added, and 130 
people have been sentenced. 

Mr. Ozal and his assistants made 
it dear that they had expected 



Prime Minister Turgut Ozal 

questions on civil rights lo be raised 
but that they preferred to discuss 
the issue they considered important 
— the government’s program to 
stimulate the economy through lib- 
eralization, reducing the state’s role 
and emphasizing exports. 


Shultz Says U.S. Is Set 
On Arms Sale to Jordan 


By Bernard Gwertzman 

New York Tima Service 

/: WASHINGTON— Secretary of 
State Gedrge P. Shultz has told a 
group of Jews in Congress that the 
Reagan administration is deter- 
mined to go ahead with a sale of 
advanced arms to Jordan despite 
legal roadblocks raised in the latest 
foreign aid biU, participants in the 
meeting said. 

At a dinper arranged by 22 mem- 
bers of the House of Representa- 
tives who are Jewish, Mir. Shultz 
had what one partidpam said 
Thursday was “a cordial debate” 
on the projected sale of arms to 
Jordan and Saudi Arabia. But most 
of the two hours were taken up with 
the sale to Jordan of advanced F-20 
or F-16 pleaes, anti-aircraft mis- 
siles and other equipment 

Mr. Shultz and Richard W. Mur- 
phy, assistant secretary of state for 
Near Eastern and South Asian af- 
fairs, have been speaking off the 
record to groups in recent days to 
argue the administration’s case for 
the sale of arms to Jordan. There 
seems to be a significant portion of 
Congress ready to vote gainst such 
a sale. 

On Tuesday, Mr. Murphy held a 
closed-door meeting with a House 
Foreign Affairs subcommittee on 
the Middle East and Europe, con- 
tending that UJS. friendship with 
Jordan was at stake in the arms 
sale- 

Mr. Shultz also addressed the 
Senate on Thursday in a closed- 
door session that was expected to 
include discussion of the arms sale. 

James H. Scheuer, a Democrat of 
New York, discussing the dinner 


held at his home, said that Mr. 
Shultz “generates instant respect 
and admiration, but I'm not sure he 
changed any votes.” 

' According to some other mem- 
bers who were present, there was a 
lively discussion over language in 
the 1986 foreign aid authorization 
bilL It stales that no sale of “ad- 
vanced aircraft, new air defense 
systems or new advanced military 
weapons” could be made unless ac- 
companied by a “certification” 
from President Ronald Reagan “of 
Jordan’s public commitment to the 
recognition of Israel and to negoti- 
ate promptly and directly with Is- 
rael under the basic tenets of Unit- 
ed Nations Security Council 
Resolution 242 and 338.” 

The members of Congress at the 
dinner who were opposed to the 
sale, such as Representative Tom 
Lantos, a Democrat of California, 
and Representative Lawrence J. 
Smith, a Democrat of Florida, con- 
tended that the certification re- 
quirement made a sale impossible. 
But Mr. Shultz contended that a 
way could be found to deal with 
that language. 

On Thursday, the State Depart- 
ment issued a statement asserting 
that Mr. Reagan said upon signing 
the foreign aid bill last month: 

“1 believe this requiremen t is un- 
necessary and inappropriate in 
light of King Hussein’s recent pub- 
lic statements confirming Jordan's 
commitment to the recognition of 
the state of Israel and to negotiate 
promptly and directly with Israel 
under the basic tenets of UN Secu- 
rity Council Resolutions 242 and 
338." 


France Plans 
To Maintain 
Its Spending 
For Defense 


>h Fitchect 

international Herald Tribune 

PARIS — France’s military 
spending next year will maintain all 
the main military programs an- 
nounced by the Socialist govern- 
ment after it came to power in 
1981, according to French sources. 

The draft budget, which is to be 
released next week, will substan- 
tially contradict speculation that 
France’s ruling Socialists would 
use the 1986 budget, which is a 
mid-term review of a five-year 
p lan , to cut military spending be- 
fore parliamentary elections next 
March. 

Most other government minis- 
tries' budgets are being cut in 1986, 
in line with the government’s pur- 
suit of austerity policies. 

But the military budge L certain 
to be passed almost intact by the 
Socialist-controlled parliament, 
continues to modernize France's 
strategic nuclear deterrent and to 
strengthen its ability to fight limit- 
ed wars far from its shores. 

Government figures, the sources 
said, call for a military budget of 
1583 billion francs (currently $17.6 
billion) in 1986, four billion francs 
less than mandated by the five-year 
plan. 

The 1986 defense spending 
would give France zero to 2- per- 
cent growth, adjusted for inflation, 
a percentage change comparable to 
the current spending of the United 
States and West European mem- 
bers of the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization. 

In the coming budget, new weap- 
ons programs remain intact: a su- 
personic air-to-ground nuclear mis- 
sile to extend the life of France's 
airborne nuclear strike force, the 
first of a new generation of strate- 
gic nuclear submarines, a new nu- 
clear-powered aircraft carrier and 
the first spy satellite to belong to a 
West European government. 

France is also proceeding to 
build, with the West Germans, a 
helicopter that is lo equip the Rap- 
id Action Force set up by the 
French Army in 1983 to intervene 
overseas or in West Germany in the 
event of war. 

Under the 1P86 budget, France's 
standing army would drop below 
300,000 soldiers. Also, the planned 
purchase of U-S.-made AW AC ear- 
ly-warning airplanes has been post- 
poned, at least until the next year, a 
former Defense Ministry aide said. 
Another new missile, a mobile nu- 
clear medium-range weapon 
known as SX. has been shelved, at 
least for the time being. 

One closely watched issue re- 
mains unresolved — the future 
configuration of the French Air 
Force now that France has decided 
not to participate in a planned joint 
European fighter but to go it alone 
with the Rafale fighter to be built 
by Da&sault-Breguet Funding the 
new fighter could deprive the air 
force of funds it needs to buy the 
Mirage-2000, also built by Das- 
sault, which is a heavier, more ver- 
satile fighter. 

“The heavy costs of starting to 
actually build Rafale will only be 
incurred in the late 1980s,” one 
source explained. In the 1986 bud- 
get, the air force is to get its 
planned 36 Mirage-2000s, two 
more than the number of fighters 
being retired. 



Kurds Release Hostages 
Held in Northern Iraq 

United Press International 

ATHENS — Kurdish guerrillas 
have released two Japanese and 
two South Korean technicians held 
hostage in northern Iraq, a spokes- 
man for the rebels said. 

Omar Sheikhmouss, spokesman 
for the Patriotic Union of Kurdi- 
stan, said Thursday that the two 
Japanese employees of the Japa- 
nese company NEC, were released 
on humanitarian grounds. They 
were captured in April in protest of 
the economic involvement of Japan 
in supporting the Iraqi govern- 
ment, Mr. Sheikhmouss said He 
said one of the South Koreans was 
freed three weeks ago while the 
other was released last week. 



. Kaftan 

^ refugees grabbing a after drifting for three weeks in a small boat after departing 

JED AT SEA — Vie SrCtiral Princess- The 21 from a port in southern Vietnam for Malaysia. The Viet- 
m, the British luxury South China Sea namese arrived Friday in Okinawa aboard die British ship. 

s were !»<*«* up SepL iu 




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Page 6 . 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY^SinVPAY, SEPTEMBER 14-15, 1985 

ARTS / LEISURE 


. ■ / 
■ . • *—■' : * i I 

* • . • ‘ •*s&'s£-*r >> ' ; I 


Foreign Dealers Brought Best Works to Burlington House Fair 


• Ini emotional Herald Tribune 

I ONDON — The Burlington 
• House Fair was opened 
‘Wednesday at Burlington House, 

- on the premises of the Royal Acad* 
emy, by Prince Charles and Diana, 
Princess of Wales. It is an interest' 
mg, if ambiguous, event. 

. The ambiguity lies in its attempt- 
ed suggestion of splendor and 
pomp, which falls flat. The dealers 
who put the show together appear 
to have stopped hairway through. 
The decoration is low- key, to put it 

SOUREN MEUK1AN 

mildly, compared with the Paris 
Biennale, with which the London 
fair is to alternate. 

The general choice of works of 
an appears to have been guided by 
arch conservatism. There is nothing 
very bold or strikingly unusual. Ev- 
erybody seems to have been play- 
ing it sale. More seriously, the 
□umber of masterpieces one ex- ' 
pects in a major London fair is 
disappointingly modest A few ap- 
pear at wide intervals. 

Spink & Son had a bronze tripod 
vessel of the S hang period, called a 
ding — superbly carved, with styl- 
ized animal masks. Despite the un- 
attractive patina, the £100,000 
piece was snatched up by a collec- 
tor within minutes of the opening. 

At the other end of the exhibi- 
tion, the Textile Gallery, run by 
Michael Franses, the only English 
dealer specializing in early Middle 
Eastern carpets to the 18th century, 
displays a 15th-century carpet from 
Cairo. With its linear geometrical 
pattern decked out in delicate crim- 
son and turquoise, it is as rare as it 
is beautiful. It hangs next to the 
16th-century carpets of the Otto- 
man period! also described as Cai- 
rene. of comparable rarity. 

Yet when it comes to the areas 
that are supposed to be strongest in 
fairs such as the Burlington House 
show — top-quality Old Master 
paintings, classical sculpture of a 
high oraer including bronzes, rare 
Old Master drawings, or European 
decorative arts — the Burlington 
House Fair barely comes up to the. 
mark. True, the best seldom comes 
out into the open these days. 


whether at auction or in art fairs — 
it tends to get negotiated behind 
closed doors. 

As in the past, some of the 
world's top-notch firms, which are 
based in London, have not both- 
ered to take part in the fair. Ag- 
new’s and Wfidenstew’s, the Lon- 
don big two in Old Masters, and 
the Lefevre Gallery and again Wfl- 
denstein’s, the big two in Impres- 


si on isis ana MOOem masicia, 

could make major contributions. 
Instead, they prefer to do their own 
thing at a time of their choosing. 

More regrettably, those impor- 
tant dealers that chocee to partici- 
pate refrain from sending in the 
finest of the finest. There are very 
few outstanding paintings at Bur- 
lington House. Richard Green dis- 
plays a winter scene by Hendrick 
Avercamp, priced at £850,000. 
“There isn't another one on the 
market," he said He also has a 
landscape by Jakob van Ruisdael 
to which he has given a surrealist 
title, “The Shooting Pony,” be- 
cause a hunter is taking his aim at 
some invisible game while another 
man holds the bridle of a pony a 
few steps away. 

Best of all perhaps, is Philips 
Wouwerman’s same showing a rid- 
ing master on his rearing horse in a 
crowd, set in a landscape lit by the 
declining sun. It once hung in the 
palace at Tsarskoe Selo near Sl 
P etersburg and was auctioned in 
1 932 in Berlin. in one of the sales of 
works of an organized at the re- 
quest of the Soviet Union. 

Another significant contribution 
is made by Derek Johns, who 
teamed up with Philip Harari to 
open Harari and Johns four years 
ago. His “View of the Lagoon" by 
Antonio CanaletLo. done around 
1750-60, carries a £600,000 price. 

Another Venetian view, the Piaz- 
za San Marco, by Luca Carlevari, 
has the theatrical fed typical of this 
contemporary of Canaletto, with 
the campanile rising from the cen- 
ter right up to the upper part of the 
frame, which cuts it off. 

Top-quality sculpture makes an 
even more discreet appearance. 
One enchanting museum piece is 
displayed by Alex Wengraf on 
stand 57, shared by a number of 


dealers who did not care to go to 
the expense of a full-scale partici- 
pation. This is a plaster bust of the 
Marquis ifEspeuille made in 1794 
by Augustin Pajou, who fully 
signed it and dated it m Vende- 
miaire. Plaster portraits of this kind 
were modeled to be submitted to 
the sitter who commissioned the 
portrait. Since plaster must be 
worked quickly, they have a spon- 


tion, French furniture and decora- 
tive art probably come out best. 
This was the Oral time that foreign- 
ers wore invited to participate in 
the fair, and the French presence is 
particularly remarkable. Didier 
Aaron of Paris brought out a gold 
and black lacquer commode with 
serpentine front stamped four 
times with the mark of Jean Des- 
lorges, who was received as a mas- 

4.0 Dgn'f MKimMiatm 1 


Not far away, Bernard Steinitz of 
Paris brought an exceedingly rare 
floral marquetry, commode made 
by Pierre- Amome Foullet in the 
1760s. At the center, an ormolu- 
framed marquetry medallion shows 
a landscape m which a man stretch- 
es out his right arm to scribble 
some words on the trunk of a tree 
while tenderly resting his left arm 
on his beloved one's shoulder. The 

vunrHc arm h-nniv'T-iknrl nn ika Ukal 


restoration on a : canvas that must 
.have been lying for many- -years 
nn framed and polled up in, some 
European attic, this is the kind of 
picture that wfll eventually land in 
some museum. 

Thanks to lv<f Bouwmah of the 
•Ha gu e, French Impressionism is 
represented by one very good piece. 
Odilon Redon’s “Flowers, in a Blue 
Jug,” which, Bouwman writes; has. 

tiAAn All* aC tlid milrhnt I QtYI ' 


missing in the formal finished guildin 1739. The Japanese lacquer as a name: “Machard Certain." 1 is a splendid stRL life done. in the 
product in terra-cotta or marble, panels are framed by chiseled or- read them as a set Latin signing wake of Fantin-Latour’s manner. 

The fin ish ed bust of Wengrafs mdu mounts that illustrate the formula: “Machar(d) P(in)xit And a West . German dealer from 
plaster “ model! o,” dated only nine height of “RocaiUe." This carries a Anfno)." Translating: “Painted by Kiel Ulf Breede, .is to be credited 
days later, is stffl in the hands of the £l-miliion price, presumably on Machar, in the year*-— the year is for bringiiog to the fair its one great 
family Differences in the exnres- the basis of the £990,000 paid at supposed to be read on the invisible piece of jewelry ’in the early Ba- 


f arnfly - Differences in the expres- the basis of the £990,000 paid at 
sion and costume suggest that the Sotheby's in 1983 for an unmarked 
marquis held definite views on the black and gold lacquer secretaire 
image that be wished to project of made for Lons XVI. It is unusual 
himself to posterity. to see pieces of this caliber in a 

Thanks to the foreign contribu- public exhibition. 


And a West ' .German dealer from 
Kiel Ulf Breede,.is to be credited 
for bringing to the fair its one great 
piece of jewetry.'in the early Ba- 


sideof the Hunt This is a rare care roque taste — a gold and pearl 
of a signature by ibe artist, who pendant formed as a warrior sur- 
painted a scene as a model to be rotmdedby a tropbyof arms. When 
transferred in marquetry by the seen at Christies Geneva auction 


cabinetmaker. 


in November 1984 it was described 


In addition, Stdmtz has one or as circa 1620, Netherlandish or En- 
two extraordinary pieces of Louis glfch. The uncertainty apparently 


COLLECTOR’S GLIDE 




JUST OFF THE PRESS 
THE NEW 1985-1986 EDITION OF THE 

GUIDE EMER 

EUROPEAN GUIDE OF THE ART LOVER, 
ANTIQUE DEALER AND BIBLIOPHILE 


70,000 ENTRIES AND ADDRESSES OF 

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IN FRANCE AND EUROPE, LISTED BY COUNTRY, 
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This important work of L500 pages in on sale in 
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For Frs. 248 (packing and postage included) 

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SB. roe Qmt de ITUtd dt VBe. 750M Pari*. Tet 277JR44 + CCP Fata 6884-57 X 


PARIS 
SECOND HAND 
ANTIQUE FAIR 

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SQUARE SERMENT-KOUFRA 

SEPTEMBER 13 to 22 

Daily from 1 1 a.m. !o 7 p.m, 
Saturday and Sunday 
from 10 c.m. to 8 p.m, 

METRO PORTE D'ORLEANS 


"ART EXHIBITIONS” 
"ANTIQUES” 
"AUCTION SALES” 
"COLLECTOR’S GUIDE” 


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INTERNATIONAL 
ART EXHIBITIONS 

PAHS 

- DENISE RENE 1 

196, Boulevard St.-Germain, PARIS 7th. Tel.s 222.77.57. 
Present*. 

GOOD PAINTING 

Until October 1 2th 


GALERIE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 


1 6, Rue Jean-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel: 359.82.44 , 


PAMS 



250^S 

reasons \ 
to visit J 
LE LOUVRE , 
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250 ART DEALERS OPEN 
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U*i S*M«<b a ' 79, Exhbfcon 

"AUTOUR DU PARFUM" 
DU XVI* AU XDP SEOI 


LONDON 

= CRANE KALMAN GALLERY = 
1 78 Bromploo Road. Lowkn SW3. 
Fine British & European Paintings 

PASCEV, MONET, DUFY 
SERUSIER, BOMBERG 
LOWRY, B. NICHOLSON 
M. SMITH. HITCHENS 
SUTHERLAND, DERAIN, etc. 
Mon.-Kri- 106. Suls 10-1. 

T.4.: DI-SRI TSfVfi 


ATOELY 41 DA FIXE ART 
JIM IM1WA.Y GALLERY 
TREATY FIVE YEARN 


OF THE AVANTGAKDE 
17 SeiNi-mlirr ■ 3) llumdjT 
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OF CONTEMPORARY ART 
Starlit^; *>ilh MIE SIXTIES: 
l7Suj>imilrr- IVHMobrr 
1 1 TuUnihun Vm*. (nil TnUaihuni Stall) 

■bmlMiW.I M: 01-037 5517 

Uni-Pri: ID j.nL4i|un^xit lUun.- 1 jun. 



XIV decorative art His ormolu 
chanddict. made about 1680, is a 
masterpiece of French carving. 

Jacques Perrin, who like his two 
colleagues belongs to the loosely 
knit professional group “Anti- 
quafies & Paris,” exhibits one of the 
nnest ebony desks of the Lexus 
XVI period seen in the market in 
recent years. It appeared at a 
Drouot auction in 1983. 


r emains 

The foreign presence is likely to 
make itself increasingly felt in' the 
next international fairs in London. 
Whether French or German, the 
foreign dealers were thrilled to dis- 
play their wares in die capital of the 
European trade in an and antiques. 
Indeed, its significance extends far 
beyond the fair. Three of the major 
participants are. opening new 


West Germany also contributed branches in London. Didier Aaron 
an important French piece of furni- at 21 Ryder Street, a stone’s throw 
ture. Konrad Bemhehner of Len- from Christie’s, is wMfcw a big 


tune. Konrad Be mhehn er of Len- 
bachplatz in Munich is showing an 
elegant Transition period com- 
mode made about 1770-75 by Rog- 
er van der Cruse, known as La- 
croix, who used the now-famous 
mark RVLC 

Foreigners have left their mark 
in other fields too. Concerning Old 
Masters, an in teres ling effort has 
been made by a modest Paris deal- 


from Christie's, is making a big 
splash with his BiHery extending 
over three floors. The gallery is run 
by Jane Roberts, who has been 
handling Aaron’s operations in 
London for three years, after work- 
ing in Sotheby's Impressionist de- 
partment 

Bernard Steiintz too will have his 
gallery, which he has given a 
French name: “Anx Menus Plai- 



J 



C9»r 


Lively Monuments 


1 

1 

1 


1 




-- 

1 1/1*1 

1 •' -■ ~ • 

1 


IY- 



Y 

l 

X 

1( 

>1 

1C 

ilYta 

ison 


er, Jean-Max Tassel A fascinating sirs,” at 23 Grafton Street And 
picture by Jean Lemaire, known as Bernheuner of Munich is due to 
Lemaire Poussin, shows two worn- open Bemhehner Fine Arts at 32 
en in a park with Roman ruins at St Georges Street a few steps away 
left and in the background. Tassel from the Royal Academy, in No- 
had a BdgLanprofessor from Liftge, vember. The gallery will be run by 
A. Dessert, identify the lines from Heike O’Hanlon, formerly of 
Ovid's “Metamorphosis” that in- Christie’s press office, 
spired the p ainting , which is full of The auction art market has Wmg 
allegories that await deciphering, been an international one. The pro- 
as in so much of French painting m cess is now gathering momentum. in 


By Michael Gibson 

International Herald Tribune 

F ) ARIS — In years to come, 
when people no longer have the 


pain of the daily tragicomedy. His 


ion able art Raymond Mason’s 


Spink’s bronze tripod, or “ding,” from Shang period. the eariy 17th century. Despite the the dealer's world. 

Huguenots in Switzerland: The First Refugees 


The auction art market has kmg work wlD appear as a delightful 
been an international one. The pro- lively, , humorous, humane and 
cess is now gathering mo mentum in touching monument to our age. 
the dealer's world. ' Mason, born in Bir m ing h am, 

England, in 1922, traveled to Paris 

on .a visit years ago and has beat 
here ever since. He is famous for his 
[}> P • .,-r, large /theatrical sculptures filled 

ClCIUff CCS with figures in brightly painted ep- 

& oxy resin. He has also produced 


are good mairarnons or ms: at mq 
a piece showag raimM families 
waiting at the'nane^heacTof li&vm 
in northern Hancoafter a disaster 
had cost the lives of .45 men. “A 
Tragedy in the ■ North, Winter, 
Rain, Tears." is the fulltitle-Peoplc 
stand around,-grim, shodcai, red- 
eyed. The pathosis brilli^ntly exv 
. pressed through attitudes, as wtjft 
as in Mason’s drmtiatic' flair for 
placing people In a rhdrmcaBy . ef- 
fective way, arid it cranes across 
without sentHneBntaliiy."; 

Another.-smaLler'sculpture 
shows a 7 tradesman ’ hi Mason’s 


V 


By Mavis Guinard the Rhone Valley, chose the long Lenner from Camla and Ins broth- and tonnre. treacherous border: 


L AUSANNE, Switzerland — A trip over the mountain passes of the 
/ dagger, a yellowed parchment. or *Je Jura, 
a rusty bobbin-holder stand out in One of thoe was Lradse Graz, 
Lausanne’s austere exhibit on the ®S C \ Wll h die bobbin-holder ual 
Huguenots. Unlike the shows in to the saddle of her mule, she 
London and Amsterdam, where ar- w hded away with her crochet the 
tistic works celebrate Huguenot ac- interminable tnp from Marseille to 
comptishmenls, Lausanne focuses G«mya- 
on the events that led to their flight Switzerland was then a poor 

300 years ago, and on the role of country. Crops had suffered from a 
Switzerland as a land of first asy- s P e ^ that would be re- 

] um membered as a small Ice Age; un- 

The damascened blade stabbed employment forced young Swiss to 
Henri IV, once a Protestant him- themselves abroad as merce- 
self. It left the Protestant minority v™*- ^ le [ C 1 ” 1 chccku ^ that no 
with only the paper protection of clause m thar treaty of alliance 
the Edict of Nantes, which Henri ^fh France, their powerful netgh- 
had signed in 1598 to rid France of hW' could force them to extradite 


er, Jacques, who have left, aban- crossings, 
doning father and mother to go to Craftsmen banded together to 
Holland to live in liberty of con- offer their services. Families split 
science, I did give 10 batz," wrote a Branches scattered among various 


landscapes. The show at the Pbm- 
pidou Center includes dose io 100 
items, six of them big pieces: 


tion and. passersfby' lode on. The 
man xs.d^^ hflc^ag been .stabbed 
in Ks shc^i. A pretty grit walks 


pastor in La Neuvevilk in Febru- countries, some going to America. 

aiy 1687. The Huguenots were is- About 40,000 remained in Switzer- 

sui-d papers voudiing that they land. 

were bona fide Protestants, signed • -The bravest entereri a 

by seyoal mini sla5 ^ coS m LamaroB tal ^ 

signed at each stop. By vmoits come » uwvwsty, and wmt.tadt devXal ip h£*-o* haTlal 
routes, they tnaS to reach Gcmvrn to preach m France, wtee many lo ronrhilfr 


When Mason came to Paris he- btithdypast-lhe scene, craitentetfly 
was a staunch admirer of Brancusi iroktingan ice cream rime; die wife 


til he 'soon became a.£riend:and K.absorbedin heratiguish; aH the 
imirer, of^Qiacomctti^aBd, tike ottees haye their wes riveted an the 
m^ fdt^tKe urge to xquCsenL fiVtd^^fcdSainba fa& tif tfie dead 


principalities that, bled by the were martyred. 

Thirty Years War, were eager for The foresigh ted had transferred 


human. done. The popular aspect. . man. Mason Uses the scene to ex- 
thmdeydoped in his^rodt hasledpress derange of human re^xmses 
over-solemn critics to - coitch^ ; ■ td death. ; < . 
that this is riot serious art.. that the fruit, 

“Some English critic said my: v^tablemul flower market would 


raljgq^strile . mtoneflMyeaia, to In a rsearoh project, being coor- 


tnanpowCT. Thotumda of Ihe itte- tote tftqr bough. ® 5233 rfS H&SS 

tauons thiw earned, which they used avastnetwmk ofconnecn^s Tecent ^ “andJ was temptedto get centertsfParis, be felt a real sense 
gve up wfien thqrembaiked on to trade. Some founded bankmg ffireSH .ofloss, a^SkrtedwraSg 

lM.Rh ne.iScharfhom6h.tt.ro. hou^ SKe^-SSaW 

mained in city archives. Those skilled m textile work i frarm aAiVti rr*Mn«ST»liirTvy» in • r>nr»HriohtHr r-riir-mvi r-oofino-Mf 


o^st^^re ^'cilThTani^cStuto ^“ di " W « 

^fe-hdrahMandgiven^m; SKSylwSfStfSS 

military strongholds dismantled, W go on. pie ailing were nms^. It - ., feeding the scal- 

their children taken away to be is fitting that the show is being held SVSScoSSten to tiSt 
raised as Catholics m the Archbishop’s Manse m Lau- Tr . -r 

ra v eu ■ v^{r 0UC5 '. , . unn . which vnmri is a hnsniial ^ rirst 10355 «0<hlS of modem 

Louis XTYs parchment revoking sanne, wmen seryea as a nospitai rimfs won j •w ueee ” 

their freedom of worship was the for the refugee Neuchatel' with a “ SSiSto *e 
last attempt of an aging monarch to population of 3,666, received some origins o me Huguenots 

xt .i 3.000 refueees a vear. iiiguw. 


totaide. Some ounded banking f ur i ous about But tbaLT raKm- .. ,of loss^ and started working on a 
Tw« ; n boed that the word comcs frotn a nKmument to mark the evenL To- 

JiSSJSaAkieSt ^ Latin teem which means ‘idatiye to_ day r one bristly colored casting of. 

the life oif the peoplc.’.W«5l, ance: this Wg vwShas been placed iriJ 
nlant * at ' s 1 8111 there isncal- side_the diun2i of Saint tu^chc, 

Vgw IWtaL.lj 
Mason’s figures are treated m a fliows the people who had found 
lively, caricatural manner and then livelihood in the place moving 


last attempt of an aging monarch to popmation ot j.wjo, rt 
gain absolute power. Never shown refugees a year, 
before in public, it bears the large Those who arrived 


nlanr ^ t§s 1 **** «al- side Ae jchurdi of Saint tustoib 

^ ly no reason to toicit amiss.” . which dommalcs Lcs Halles. 
Mason’s figures sire treated in a . Stows the people who had foirr 

SSTiSlSS^Ktatod^S: theirlhefctodintheptomovh 

mssiuisvir Nvnn .vmZinVtt painted in bright colors — shock- out with tboi crates of fnnts at 

SSSlWSSSM ^ore-hoprrfetlhetor^ vegetables,. Ure a corttee of d 
auiqiK. x^uuaimc aura. auslent y thought to be derived mental dhimties forsaking a a 

m ” from Grecian elegance: The t^ no longer wants them there. 

Greeks, however, painted their The monument is swanrring wi 


mental divinities forsaking a . dty 
that no kmger wants them there. 


before in public, it bears the large Those who arrived with no re- In diaries and journals, thesurvi- 
green wax seal and the signature of souk* 5 or skills were shunted from vors told of persecution, the ago- 
the king, whose pleasure it was on one parish to the nexL Accounts nizing decision to leave, trips 
Oct. 18, 1685, to forbid any cele- were kept of aid given. “To Pierre through hostile territory, prison based m Switzerland. 


Io diaries and jouroels, the airvi- AM-tnJan.lt. 


bration of the Reformed religion, 
banish its ministers within 15 days 
on pain of prison or the galleys and 
threaten the same fate to any who 
persisted or tried to leave: 

They had a choice. Formulas 
were ready to sign. Many chose to 
renounce their faith and cany on a 
passive resistance. Bui a quarter of 
them — more than 250,000 Hugue- 
nots — preferred exile. 

Some went by sea to England 
and the Netherlands. About 
140,000, mainly from central and 
southern France, from the Ca- 
yennes, the Dauphine, Provence or 



’ thnnmh riri 77 marble statues. as did the medieval details, including some 30 h uman 

ecne, in wugn . u . stone carvers. There is xedly noth-^ -figures and a amplified but faithful 

Mavis Omani is a journalist in8 Mason ' s I 0 * “ 01 rmd 5“S <* ^ bafidings ar- 

Ljv, j contemporary art, though it is rem- rounding the market 

““ bw,LertamL iniscent of Hogarth and BruegeL When he was a young tna^, Ma- 

Mason has BroegePs interest in son showed Picasso photos of some 
the physical realities of labor, an of his works. Picasso liked- one 
^ R - jj-M intimate undemanding, unnsual in piece, a retief ofa streel sceacenti- 

Western art. in the precision and tied “Barcelona Tram.” “That’s 
cnlailed in various tasks, really you," he told Mason' with 


And both artists delight, without warm 
any of the condescension of 17th- to as* 
ana 18th-century genre pain ting, jn to be 
the strong, imp retry monumental- man 1 
ity of human faces. reticc 


Then, turnmg 


to be at their table, he asked the - 
man his opinion. The sculp tor Was 
retioenl finally, hazarding that 


The 8-inch Made that killed Henri IV of France. 


The popular themes and the phi- well it was not really sculptiw 
lospphy and humor that went into “Of course," replied Picasso, river 
Bmegd’s work ledhimtobemis- mg the man with a dark glance, 
taken for a “comic" painter; noth- “and that’s why I like it/’ 
ing is further from the trath. Mason Also tobe seen in the same-space 

runs the same risk. Much profound at the Pompidou Grater are works 


ANTIQUES 

THE 

BURLINGIDN 

HOUSE 

FAIR 

The Antique Dealers' Fair 

THE ROVAL ACADEMY OF ARTS 
PICCADILLY, LONDON WL 
llth-22nd SEPTEMBER, 1985 

Opening Times: 

Wednesday 11th September. 5-8pm; 
Thursday L2lh-Sunday 22nd September, 
llam-7pm daily. 

Leading British and International dealers in both Fine Art 
and Antiques will offer for sale strictly vetted pictures, 
furniture and works of art of the highest quality. 

For further information about the Burlington House Fait 
contact Elm House, 10-16 Elm Street, London WClX 0BP. 
Telephone (01) 273 2345. 


1 l thought goes into his work, but it is by two Indian, artists: Viswaoad- 

' unpretentiously clothed in gay cot- han (photos and environment) and ■ 

The Risks of Modern Dance the face of tragic -events,. and this 

, , , _ * . _ . „ , _ . , absence of solemnity may cause a remhrisceat of Indian -miniaturesl 

Las Angela Times Sernce dent Tuesday. Robert Fitzpatrick, casual spectator to ignore the true Some of than evoke a «aimntiions 
EATTLE— In an interview last director of last year’s Olympic Arts dimension of these scenes. and fabulous mythic SDace^Ttee 

year, Yoshiyuki Takada, a vet- Festival in Los Angela and book- Since the end of the 19th ceatu- is also art about artbv jraS-Mkid 
a performer in the avant-garde ing agent for the five-member ry. art has worked itself into a dead Alberola, part nwnWHi r artisL 
ice troupe Sankaijuku, ex- group, based in Tokyo, said^TThey end, known as the exterritoriality ■ part n aiin^ 
ined that in butoh, a form of will not perform for a year ” of art. which implies that the sub- " Raymctid MasorL Vkwtmdkak 


Los Angeles Times Service 


S EATTLE — In an interview last director of last years Olympic Arts 
year, Yoshiyuki Takada, a vet- Festival in Los Angeles and book- 
eran performer in the avant-garde ing agent for the five-member 


dance troupe Sankaijuku, ex- group, based in Tokyo, said, Tlhey end, known as the exterritoriality 
plained that in butah, a form of will not perform for a year.” of art. which implies that the sub- 
Japanese dance-theater, “our main A generation of choreographers jeci of art is art itself, as poetry is 
theme is life and death, so we try to is investigating physical risk in the subject of poetry- There are 
realize the situation of death and their work. A New Yor k-bas ed per- some grounds for this thesis, but 
the state of just being bran.” formanoe artist Mice recruited a taken as an absdute, it results in 
This week, in an accident that company in an ad asking for danc- sheer nonsense. The real problem, 
; underlined the increasing phyacal ere willing to bail om of an airplane as Mason realizes, is that in- the 
risk in modem dance, Takada fell at 5,000 feet (1,500 meters}. . absence of any common religious 
six stories to his death when his Fitzpatrick insisted that the or mythic ground, the choice of a 
rope broke during the company's members of Sankaijuku were not subject in art becomes an extremely 
milokratAri "Wnimi •'« Ca. -- *» difficult matlPf J 


oi art. wtuch implies that the sub- j 

joci of art is art itself, aspoetry is Gulam Mohammed Shakk,?J2jer-] 
the subject of poetry. There arc da; CtotoWowremponinie^ 
srane grounds for this thesis, but pidomCenter , thnmekNm W- '^ - 1 
taken as an absoluie.it results m ... rr-i v'S-.v,-— J 


celebrated “hanging dance” in Se- 
attle. 


“daredevils or thrill-seekers." 
“They chose to take risks because 


The Associated Press, ."-Vt 

GUBBIO, . Italy — R 
have uncovwed. orouie 


Mason’s choice arises out a bone rings, a decorated' 


Sankaijuku’s scheduled U. S. of the fulfillment of their persona] spontaneous empathy for men and 


tour was canceled after the acri- vision.” be said. 


DOONESBURY 


7H&&OMNPHB%SyiNTHB 

GMm.snM5<mrpoLFocM 

te&suPB&imoFmimaiL 


women taken up in the effort and - savation near tSs 


P objects is» 














y 


/ 




*. . .. 


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATV RDA Y-SU N DAY. SEPTEMBER 14-15, 1985 


Page 7 




What Is This Thing Called 


Why use countertrade when 
soai^itfcrwaid buying and selling 
an do the akk mate tjuiddy and 
efficiently? Over 2JD00 years ago 
cbe Romans introduced gold and 
silver cons far use in foreign mA- 
;The system devdoped over the 
ccnojrics, givingrix to great bank- 
■ ing dynasties and profitable mer- 
chant capitalism. However, by dr 
eady 1970s; an inacaang bahnee- 
erf-payments disequilibrium arose 
betwen die Western industrial- 
ized nations on the one hand and 
the Eastern and Third Wold 
munmes on the other. In each ass 
(East anidSoutb), indebtedness be- 
gan to nadi unma nageable pro- 
portions. In older for cbe West to 
be ahk to keep selling its opens 
to the Gocneoon (Council (or Mu- 
tual Economic Assstarvx) coun- 
tries, and developing countries to 
get access to essential tnchrwlcgy, 
there was a return ro die age-old 
system erf barter: arid its latter-day 
offshoot, countertrade . 

A Viebfe Alternative 

Seen from the Western point of 
view, countertrade musr be regard- 
ed as less desirable than straighrfor- 
ward exporting using the wrifikekd 
instruments of international trade 
such as leneis of credit, sight Mis, 
collaterals, etc. All the same, coun- 
tertrade has emerged as a viable, 
alternative since it enables the 
Western exporter to gain access to 
markets he could not otherwise 
penetrate while at the same time 
obviating maty of the dangers 
inherent in dealing with a country 
tfaar has no foreign currency avail- 
able. 


However, as people in the high- 
ly spm'aliroH fidd will gfoefly ad- 
mit, countertrade is a dedicate art 
fraught with diffimltw and verg- 
ing ar all times on oonfoaoa The 
wadd is singly not teeming with 

piofiabfc axtrtanrade deals just 
waiting ro be supped up. 

GavaaDy spcdartt>, the larger 
Weston exporters — be they multi- 
nationals or major nationalized in- 
dustries — will love fhrii* own trad- 
ing organizations dealing 
exdusivdy with marketing abroad 
under unfavorable conditions. 

vW 



There ore many specialist firms in 
die field, however, who for a foe 
wiD accept full responsibility for 
these transactions and wiD recom- 
mend the most promising proce- 
dure. Many major hanks operate 
coding houses that claim to be 
able to set up deals to benefir all 
pareners. 

Gkmaxy of Terms 

The terminology associated 
with countertrade is so complex 
thar a brief summary of the princi- 
pal expressions may noc be arms. 

Barter, of course, refers to the 
eadiest farm of exchange Instead 
of receiving payment, the exporter 
will Deceive goods from his import 
partner. By selling the offered 
goods the exporter will receive the 


funds ro cover the value of his 
expects. Payment is made exxdu- 
svdy by the countcrsupply of die 
agreed products. Thus barter trans- 
action tuns die ride of noreddivoy 
erf goods. This risk can best be 
avoided if the baiter goods are 
delivered to the exporter first; 

Counterpurchase was prdoably 
the most frequently used method 
of countertrade during the early 
1960 s, paiticulady in dmk with the 
Gomecon countries, although it 
has now been extended ro trade 
with die developing wodd. In 
counterpurchase the exporter re- 
ceives payment for goods supplied 
to his import partner. However, 
the exporter commits himself in a 
parallel oantiacr to purchase goods 
foe a certain percentage value erf his 
export contract been the importer's 
country. He can fulfill this com- 
mitment himself or, if he has ap- 
proved a "third-party danse” in hts 
contract, he on transfer this com- 
mitment to another partner. Deliv- 
ery and 
casesi 
each ocher. 

Compensation refers ro a ooun- 
ropurchase arrangement in which 
dettvoy and aiunterddivny are 
covered by. one amtraa and the 
goods are given monetary value. 
The deliveries do not have ro take 
place simultaneously- The time 
limit for completion of the coun- 
t er o ommitmeni is usually about 
three years. 

Cooperation is also a form of 
axmnajxirchase, whereby die ex- 
porter declares his willingness to 
pass on the manufacture or amain 
products; attar wholly or partially, 
to an appropriate foreign company. 


IU11 IM dllUUJU wvu* 

and countnddrvery in more 
take place within hvc years of 





Mcrx’s trading room in Linz relies on direct connections to international commodity exchanges in New York, Chicago and London. 


The foreign trade company can, in 
return, make certain purchases 
from the exporter. 

Buyback is an increasingly 
popular system. In this form erf 
counrertradc the importer pays the 
exporter for the supplied plant (or 
know-how) with products thar 


will be practiced by the plant 
when it is completed (or using the 
know-how provided). The great 
advantage to die exporter in this 
instance is the chance ro benefit 
from cheap labor and low-cost raw 
materials and to get a foothold in a 
potential long-term market. 


Evidence and Escrow Ac- 
counts are means of organizing a 
counterpurchase in such a way thar 
the exporter can mcer counterpur- 
chase requirements by reimbursing 
himself out of funds geneiared 
through his own purchase in the 
importer's country. 


All die terms listed so far are 
(datively straightforward. Consid- 
erably more complicated, and im- 
possible to describe adequately in a 
nutshell, ate the dealing and the 
switch deals thar entail multilateral 
links between exporters, importers 
and brokets in widely separated 


markers. Clearing payments can be 
utilized far payments to third coun- 
tries, eg, in trade with developing 
countries Through this method erf 
payment it is possible for the 
Western exporter to oonvtrt "soft" 
clearing currencies into "hard” cur- 
rencies. 


A New Name in World Trading 


Presenting his compands annual 
report for 1964, Richard Kireh- 
weger, chairman of Cbemie linz 
AG, Austriis largest producer of 
fertilizers 2 nd pharroaaroricals, re- 
ferred ro a profit of 43 million 
schillings deriving foam the fully- 
owned subsidiary Max This was 
024 percent of die registered turn- 
over (17&i biUian schillings) of 
the infant enterprise which, since 
its both in 1983, has made a signifi- 
cant impact on international trade. 

Much of the credit for this 
modest but significant figure musr 
go to Kircbwegcr himself, who 
was brought in to get the chemical 
business out erf the red In 1984 he 
was able ro tdl die owners, the 
Republic of Austria, that he had 
dene sa It was ar his instigation 
char Men HandchgeseUschaft 
(Trading Company) was formally 
founded inspired no dcubt by the 
favcrafcde showing nude by the 
other Linz industrial giant, Voest- 
Alpine, with its Intmrading oega- 
nizarion. 

• Until die advent of Max, cadi 

of the four divisions at Orani'e 
Linz maintained its own distribu- 
tion and trading structure, both for 
historical reasons and because of 
conflicting interests. With a good 
sense erf priorities, Kirdrweger ap- 
pointed the Chemie Linz purchas- 
ing manager, Helmut Scheichl, as 
<&act 3 the new supenrading 


of raw phosphate needed in the 
manufacture of fertilizers Metx 
^xxtod the chance ro cut costs for 
Cbemie linz by supplying overseas 
customers locally, the trade being 
backed by the parenr film’s good 


A Global View 

It is this strictly practical, eco- 
nomical approach ro international 
trade thar Max offers its business 
partners. A small headquarters 


telefax services, instantaneous deci- 
sions can easily be made at Austri- 
an headquarters where a global 
view of the situation is available. 

Merx has already starred to 
branch out in die fidd d fertilizers 


atm. 


| Connection 

a] purchases of raw 
ngfrom 5 billion to 
ngs. Schddil already 
lea erf the needs of 


na nuutu w 

ral ways. Hist and 
ic Linz could bene- 
e — cautiously — into 
nnarwgc for these 
s are inexorably 
i petroleum prod- 
bowed that 90 P 0 ” 

j material require- 

t ie linz depended 
c the same rime it 

^looked that many 
puntries war sa- 
wn refineries near 
id providing favor- 
bron-chc-spapur- 
reduce- 

tjicsc scums tor 

cnc ,bcrodorP ,K ' 

sary, n vding 
3 - essentials, 
be I™- 

i£ d rid* 



f 


'N 



Chemie Linz has found it profitable to get into die oil business. 


name- coupled with an assirana: 
rfrar if anythir* went wrong, Cte- 
ntie linzoiuld always provide the 

goods from Austria. 

Thanks to the prevailing armo 
sphae in world oil martes, tbc 
tfxxrey quickly proved workable 
and has paid off in a thoroughly 
satisfactory manner. S a tis facmty 
rttho- than spectacular, because, as 
Kirchw^ga insists, it is noc his 
i„*nrion to press fcr bra turn- 
over It does not matter if Max . 
turnover drops by 50 penmr or 
nwre from one year rochc next It 
anfy las ro show a profit 


staff, working with highly sophisti- 
cated axnmunkatkxis and daca- 
link equipment, keeps in constant 
touch with Chemie Linz offices 
Located in some 20 countries 
around the wodd. These are noc 
always in conventional ce n tos of 
trade. In West Africa, for instance, 
Metx picked Lame, in Togo, for a 
representative office because it prc- 
efiaed major developments in the 
potash business there. Hie Lome 
representative also happens to be 
an expert in "phong” coffee and 
cocoa, so both tides ans^ well saved. 
With the bdp of teleprinters and 


Ir has established a trading ccmpa- 
ny in Greenwich, Goon, ro cover 
the United Stares and adjxcnr 
markets. It intends ro set up some- 
thing similar in the Far East, bur 
exactly where that will be— Hong 
Kong, Singapore, the Philip- 
pines— has nix been derided One 
thing is conoin; Max will soon be 
setting up shop fa Jfadcb in order id 
be in direct contact with the Saudi 
Arabian petrodxmical and audo- 
ol! busincs. As Mcrx director Hel- 
mut Schddil repeats; Mccx is 
chemicals, and dioriicals are crude 
cal 


Some firms bring 
expertise to countertrade, 
sane bring financing. 

Bankers Trust brings both. 


Structuring a countertrade 
transaction is one of the roost 
difficult tasks faced by exporters. 

Even more difficult if the 
firm that helps you put the deal 
together can not provide the fi- 
nancing for it. 

That’s a major advantage of 
dealing with BT International 
Trading Corporation. We pro- 
vide both expertise and money. 
Which can greatly simplify — 
and speed — even a complicated 
transaction. 

Such single-source assistance 
in countertrade reflects Bankers 
Trust’s merchant banking philos- 
ophy: a philosophy that says a 
bank should do far more than 
lend money. 

BT International Corpora- 
tion embodies the Bank’s long, 
strong tradition of trade finance. 

Recently, we have assisted 
exporters in a wide array of 
complicated countertrade trans- 
actions. For example: we as- 
sumed a two-year counterpur- 
chase obligation for an exporter, 
provided pre-shipment finance 
to bridge a payment gap between 
import and export, and struc- 
tured the pricing and payment 
mechanism for countertrade 
involving oil. 


Behind each transaction was 
our uniaue combination of know- 
how ana in-house financing. 

You can put that combina- 
tion to work for you, by using 
our worldwide network of 
offices that often makes the 
"impossible” possible. 

For help in your next 
countertrade transaction, call 
on BT International Trading 
Corporation. In New York, talk 
to Jeffrey J. Glibert at (212) 
850-1758- In London, D. Paul 
Fletcher at 01-726-4141. In 
Hong Kong, Tim R. Antiila at 
5-281211. 





BT International Trading Corporation 


OBankersTrust Company 

Merchant banldng,vvcddwide. 







Page 8 



ADVERTISING SUPPUSMENTTOTHE INTERNATIONA I »ATO.n t V^V, ’ W> '“‘ S ~ 

' Aoslrio’s 












k> # % y ■ f i * 







A Risky but Interesting Business 


After b? years in die business, 
one: Austrian company's mature 
judgment of countertrade: The 
risks arc very high, but since dicre 
is hardly any country nowadays 
wliicli does nor indulge in ic, we 
can expect it to runain important 
for the next five to 10 years.” Alex- 
ander Wakknn. managing dira:- 
tor of AWT, Austria’s inrcmariorh 
il cradc and finance corporation, 
was spcalong in Vienna this sum- 
mer about the current activities of 
this enterprise, the oldest of its 
kind in Austria. Founded in 193), 
AWT is a fully-owned subsidiary 
of Gcditanstalr-Bankverrin, die 
country's largest commercial bank. 
This Enartdal backing is indispens- 
able far die company’s far-flung 
operations in all areas of foreign 
trade, export consulting and export 
financing. 

Since die early days. AWT has 
been engaged in solving trade 
problems with Austria's neighbors 
in Central and Southeast Europe. 


However, countertrade activities 
have expanded since the early 
1980s to cover virtually the whole 
world, and AWT has naturally 
moved with the rimes. It maintains 
branch offices in Jakarta, Cairo and 
London, with three other offices 
abroad sbwrdy to be opened Even 
though their locations have not 
been divulged, ic is perhaps indica- 
tive that AWT already operates — 
through West German trading 
houses — in South America and 
Easr Asia (Japan, Taiwan, Korea 
and Hong Kong). 

Expert Experience 

Now, as ever. AWT sees itself 
primarily as a service institution for 
dients of its potent bank Creditan- 
stalt. With a small staff— 60 at 
headquarters in Vienna and about 
20 in the field at any given time— 
AWT relies heavily on its experts, 
who have to understand every- 
thing from Lada cars bom the 


Soviet Union to coffee beans from 
Colombia. This is especially impor- 
tune when a customer has counter- 
trade problems and AWT needs to 
arrange a barter deal or a switch 
operation. 

AWT has a long fund of expe- 
rience which enables it to be an 
efficient partner in ail types erf 
transactions. It can negotiate barter, 
counterpurchase, buy-back and co- 
operation contracts and, where re- 
quested, take over such obligations 
in its own name. The Austrian 
company differs from its counter- 
parts in the United States in dnr ic 
actually does die business instead 
of acting only as a matchmaker. 

As Waldstein explains, the lim- 
ited banking license enjoyed by 
AWT gives it die edge when the 
classical methods of financing an 
export to a single country arc not 
feasible. AWT can step in to pro- 
vide a complete package cf in- 
house measures. Its own trade pro- 
gram mainly ewers timber and 


related produces, chemicals, food- 
stuffs, metals and textiles. And in 
these Bdds die offer includes net 
only financing but also marker 
research, marketing and distribu- 
tion — all tailored in meet individ- 
ual needs. Developing countries 
with heavy loan commitments are 
particularly anxious to acquire a 
marketing network (which they 
usually cannot afford) for their 
goods Thus if they get an assur- 
ance erf marketin g, the y are likely 
to accept the AWT customer's 
product. 

Action vs. Reaction 

The considerable risks involved 
include quality, performance, ab- 
sorbability erf die marker and— last 
but not least— political instability. 
Waldstein declines to put a con- 
crete figure on turnover but says: 
”If one goes about it cautiously and 
realistically, it is nevertheless an 
’interesting' business. We do not 


Largest Trading House 


Intemiding is u name dior.syrn- 
K4i/cs security in the uncertain 
' world of toncHBtfe Vow-Alro 
lntenrading Is a fuilv-wned sib- 
siJuirv of Austria's; main national- 
iyul enterprise, which tsubli&wi 
its reputation as - a srai producer, 
but which has brand led out to 
such an extent dtir' iron and steel - 
now account far only 15 percent erf 
die group's turnover. 

VAIT. or die "Trader" as it is 
referred ro in Austria, was created 
in die late 1970s out of die nptri to 
disentangje die multifarious com- 
pensation arrangements Vocsc-Al- 
pne had entered inm oyer die 
years, parriculariy'with die Gouncil 
of Murual Ecuromic Aid coun- 
tries. At about diar rime doc then 
Austrian chancellor, - Bruno 




1 


1 


♦ " • ' 


agricultural, chemicals Widrin J 
iKn time VAIT altered d*’ «1 
business, trading on bodi kmg and 
slvott-com conations Barer Aub 
widi ouck bil raw the bulk 
of current .-turnover. St--- patent 
in I’M-.. I’--’ 

.. Rapid Growth . 

A glance ur die Maha.ste 
reveals VATFs explosive Avdop- 
ment Whereas in 1^0 Intotnu- 
ing showed a turnover ot 5.3 «1- 
lion schillings, in 1985 it -was 
319 billion, aid jn I9S4 tt*e- ngurc 
hud jumped to 12-14 billion shil- 
lings. Now, although profits from 
VAIT arenoe explicitly listed m 
d vi Vocst-AIpinc groip company 
reporc, Aptiker is emphatic drat 
“profit-rare in relation to turnover 


. -r 


' 

.. 


krcountuuM. 

□otti. ln-pamcifcthc^AG 

im-jliubicwlttn luamrn^; 
ire cmiaca far ibe anira$. 
/«« iivfasofal planes b)-yo«r- : 
Alninc. Hair VAIT cin. jnd <faa. 

AwIapiBtoallinxfact'natemg 

ombilicv dirixigh W £»;. 

AFinn Bndrins 

VAIT has the adsanbgp.ifrf 

bdngbaclrodby-.tbC»6iVpe*-. 

•Alpine sff0CtuRS.^.^W:- 
with the neutral Rcpubhc «AuSr 
. tria bdiind k-Many ot Thc.ca^tErtg 
. Voesc-AIpine oqxaencwscre&ES' 
around dvc wbdd have been 
runded to dCXXXnnTodatC ^VATT 
specialist. In half a tfoacn cks^-^ 


AWT experts advise on . 
everything from coffee to cars. 


run after countertrade. We are all 
bankers at heart, and can earn 
mote — and deep better— by con- 
ducting business along classical 
banking lines. What we are doing 
is not so much 'acting’ as 'reacting/ 
With the degree of irafebredness 
unlikely ever to sink hack to the 
levd it had at the beginning erf die 

1960s, we go inro the martet under 
very difficult circumstances and do 
our best to help a customer in his 
business. This is why trading 
houses tied to banks have become 
so Luge recently — because tradi- 
tional methods of trading have not 

been possible.” 

Bar a rdativdy small country 
such as Austria, whose very surviv- 
al depends on exporting, it is im- 
porant to find alternate ways of 
selling when the dasseal routes are 
dosed The same applies ro most 
European countries, although not 
so much to the United States, 
because of its large domestic mar- 
ket. 


. - 




Barter deals with crude oil farm the bulk of VAlTs turnover. 


Kreisky, approached die new 
Vocst-AIpinc director-general. Her- 
itor Apfalrcr, about the need for 
Austria to set up a trading house: 

Initially Inrcrtrading was con- 
fined to negotiating with Vofisr- 
Alpinc products, although die in- 
tention was to widen die scope 
swiftly so as ro incorporate other 
Austrian firms and thus increase 
die opportunities for business. 
Starting widi a few billion sdiil- 
lings in compensation obligations. 
VAIT soon moved into indepen- 
dent trading, concentrating at first 
on sted, foodstuffs, osment and 


is at the international lcyd, i.c,; 
between ai and 0.5 paxau.” 'In 
this case die minimum earrangs 
from VAIT last year would have 
been 124.4 n^Dion.sdhillir^ 
cr indqpcndcnt reports put them as 
liigh as twice that figure; aroorid a 
■quarter of a. billion schilling. • 

If is rax.eaqr ro identify thc full 
extent of VATFs in^xsranor widv 
in die Vocst-AIpinc grctip. How- 
eva 1 , given, die worldwide cocrunrr- 
nxair nowad^s ro tOTippnsiro^ 
trade, ic is dear diai.thc oerr^any’s. 
sinurion would be setiously.^ weak- 
ened without this additional, cudct 


•East Bain, Hong 
^Manila,' Sin^pctf .and Tokyo^' 
. special . Intettratfifig ■' sifoskfianes 
. have been set up^--. ; : - . .. .. 7 1 

. CXI is big buaness.ior VAIT. 
tkrweva,sina;i^ 

' ‘ die 'finished produces) ,'iri^Acbscpar 
Itself,- but arrfy art ritird maded^ 
there: is Dttle tcsenmt5K : ,ariM^ 
hrarifrbased deda&iMtireti^ al, 
is a 'tislqr BusmesS vwffi- suddtii 
' price nkwemates so that sediadcs 
can, and da, oacur kom time ro 
time, iheavdall trend, ^ougE^s 
shosim by-’ ffK.inassive. 19&i turn- 
ovq- t still fan^ yAIT. ..;.' ;. . . 




- :*> .t' 


:|.g 

V - 1 , >A 







:arl 


'uatibndj ij i usineSt. 
«5rtoSft.^ > >v >h. 

A:* X. 

a . v T k ■'ti 9 

% • /- • v- -.1 • 


* Vx t*. : 


Besides oor 
expert guidance and 
all the traditional 
international 
banking services 
we offer you 
a precision Instrument 
to conduct even your most 
complex countertrade business > '>*: ? 

. Our trading company '■ „ 

FJ.ELSNER &CO.- tbe specialist for: ; ; 

— Countertrade and barter transactions 

- Buy-back arrangements 

- Switch and clearing operations 

— Compensation and parallel deals 
-Trustee services 


GZB-VIENNA 
we are tuned 
to perfection 


X 

GZB-VIENNA 

Genossenschafriiche Zewtralbank AG 

A 1 01 0 Vienna, Herrenqas-'iol 3,® 66t>2 0‘ 



T.;ie/ 1 36 989. Swrtt Code : ?tNT AT WW 



















c^SSSSS^ 














ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-S UNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14-15, 198S 


age 9 




smi 


Wr. mail vy regime, 
Majoc^Scnccal Ibrahim 
anoomcod upoo com. 


a Controversial Alternative: a Nigerian Case History 


I yyui.usa 


co review afl 


■SSF^ ■ iBc * 10 procure B- 
fern its taefiog 
This led to a sharp drop 

shona 8C of aw manerials and 


a rhj - — ““*»***». reaming m 
r ucgcoarcd snee ® taw materials and 

of tfe year by tfe iK* P ^ 15, ***** *“ krai 

- >&l£teraed Bahari. °"v , a fcacnon of there installed 

, : v^&fax a brief but dynamic fata, 3 3aat y- 1,1 adtfiwxi, the shortage 
S goods and b»c^ 

'^'v ‘ * ^cucmiD tfe living sandaids 







" TKCMKfc-T 
" OF 
r AFRICA 


Bom!. Ranee, Austria and fady 2 s 
wefl as negotiations with at lpacr 
. another cuan Western and £ast- 
riti-btxscarcs, Nigeria now seems 
(6 be headed for mate classic poli- 
cies^ designed do remedy ills thar 
have seriously perturbed the coun- 
uysocooomjr since the drop in the 
price of ofl at the bcgfarraig of the 
1990s; In .an eccoorok U-turn, 
President Babangida declared thar 
his adminisaarion -mould seek to 
teach an agreement with die Inter- 
Ttational Monetary find (IMF) far 
a loan of $2.5 billion ro$32 billion, 
a rescheduling of debts anti finally, 
access to new commercial hank 
loons, arid credits from Western 
export agencies. In turn, Nigeria 
would devalue its cutrency, the 
naira,-and carry our other aonomk 
reform measures traditionally fa- 
vored by the IMF. 

Ir was the strong oppoarioo of 
President Buharfs regime do IMF 
oondiDons that brought Nigeria 
into die countertrade arena. With 
overseas debt mounting to areouncl 1 
$25 billion, Nigeria. found it in- 


of Nigeria’s 100 mQHcn inhabit- 

anrg 

In spite of growing criridsm 
'within his government; ex-Prcs- 
denr Buhari ardendy rUfmArl his 
countertrade policies in these 
arms: "We bdievechar die private 
sector, especially die factories, 
should not be starved ef essential 
taw materials. We bdkve that as 
much as passible we should be 2 hle 
to save jobs and produce goods 
basic to us. And we do not have 
money, bur we have an alternant 
It is a A4iheran» rfcrit^ . . „ and it 
hroughe a Joe of relief oOus” 

Indeed, the bur ofl-forgpods 
deals signed duriqg the first half of 
1985 provided Ntgaia with a wide 
range of industrial goods, pro jeer 
finance and agroindustrial prod- 
ucts. The principal characteristics 
of the c o ntracts were: 

• Brazil's Coda reading house 
was ro supply 1500 million worth 
cf industrial goods, including cdto- 
pfctriy-krxxloKlriown (GKD) kits 


plant, and foodstuffs like sugar in 


exchange tar some 4OJMO50P00 
b an ds a day (b/d) of Nigerian 
crude ofl. 

• France’s scsie-connoUcd oil 
firm. Elf Aquitaine, was do lift 
same 30000 b/d and, in rum, the 
trading concern Sod etc Gammer- 
dale i TOuese African (SGOA) 
was to furnish sugar and CKDs far 
the Peugeot utility -vehide assem- 
bly plant near Lagos. There was 
also a $125 million cash compo- 
nent in the French deal 

• Austria's Vocst-Alpinc Inter- 
trading, the commercial affiliate of 
the state-controflecJ Voest-Aipinc 
engineering group, was to supply 
seal, building equipment and och- 
er capital goods in exchange for 
around $100 million in oil 

• kslys Agip was scheduled to 

lift abcur 40000 b/d of Nigerian 
aude oil, while Nigeria was to 
receive CKDs for the assembly of 
Rat trucks and credits for the com- 
pletion of project work being car- { 
tied our by Italian firms, in particu- 
lar the Esaavos-Lagos gas pipeline 
being built by Saipem ! 

By the summer, many of these ! 
deals had already run into double ! 
For example, it is repotted that ebe | 
Italian arrangement had still not 
been finalized It hi also known char | 
Sfhad suspended its lifting within , 
the fame-node of the rcreemenr : 
with SCDA because the rail in the | 
price of oil had made the deal , 
unprofitable for the French nation- j 
al oil company. The Brazilian deal I 
also came under dose scrutiny as j 
being unfavorable oo Nigeria. j 

Concern g«w in both public ; 
opinion and the Nigerian press I 
tharthe goods being obtained woe I 
not botg- boi^hf from the cheap- j 
est source. It -was daimed, in parric- | 
ular, chat the sugar being put- i 
chased from Brazil cost mate than | 
the going price on the wodd roar- j 
fox Other sources stressed that this 
was intentional, bring a discreet 
W 2 y to provide discounts on Nigp- 
rian oil and, thereby, assure an 
acceptriJe demand levd in a weak 
wodd market. There was a rising 
ride of complaints too over die 
quality of gcods supplied and the 
restrictions the deal imposed on 
the liberty of Nigerian traders. 

All this was in addition to the 
objections to countertrade voiced 
by the IMF and shared by the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade (GATT). They daim that 
co unte rtrade drab are bilateral in 
nature and deviate from the princi- 
ples of multinational tract More- 
over; IMF economists insist drat 








\ ■ •- • 




<■ >“■ >.1 


. Xv'.SINi 






countertrade often results in die 
disguisng of prices and, conse- 
quently, in ineffiriem wodd trade 
Nigeria's countertrade offensive 
during the first six months of the 
year also raised the ire of the 
Organization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Gauntries (OPEC). Middle 
Easrem OPEC members were con- 
cerned chat Nigeria could employ 
boner dads id discount oil and 
further sap the organization’s disci- 
pline on pricing matters and pro- 
duction quotas Nigeria's official 
quota is pegged at 1.3 million b/d. 


In the spring, output reportedly 
surged to IP million b/d, with 
OPEC sending a team of Dutch 
experts to monitor Nigerian out- 
put, During the summer, however, 
Nigeria's production dipped id less 
than 1 million b/d This poor 
result undercuts the argument ad- 
vanced in certain sectors of the 
Nigerian dire that countertrade 
would enable the country to ride 
our in relatively gcod shape the 
doldrums in the world ofl markx. 

Officials in the state oil concern, 
Nigerian National Petroleum 


Gap. yNNPC), also raised their 
voices in protest against the oii-fer- 
goods barter contracts. They 
stressed chat it significantly reduced 
their ability ro place Nigerian 
crude oil on the market given the 
discounts that were rumored ro be 
built into the countertrade arrange- 
ments. In addition, a number cf 
NNPC oilmen panted out thar 
countertrade was essentially a 
shorr-rerrn expedient, while the oil 
industry must plan also for medi- 
um- and long-term conugendes. 
The debate within NNPC tanks 


resukod in dissension among exec- 
utives responsible for Nigeria's oQ 
snatchy. 

Tlx ccuntenrade page has like- 
ly been turned for Nigeria, al- 
though some small deals could be 
concluded in the future. General 
Bahangida's regime is moving ro 
reach an agreement with the IMF 
as soon as possible This means 
thar Nigeria is prepared to accept a 
devaluation of die naira and the 
easing of restrictions on trade. By 
the same token. Nigeria’s new 
leaders could adopt a more prag- 


matic pricing policy for its oiL to 
the detrimenr of OPEC solkfcriiy, 

in order to bcosr exports and hencr 
foreign receipts, which would en- 
able the leva of imports to be 
stepped up. 

Tlx apparent shortcomings of 
Nigeria's counrernade stnircgY 
mean that its effectiveness as on 
arm for oil-producing countries in 
Africa during j rime of economic 
uncertainty is limited Gcumcr- 
crade won’t disappear in Africa, bur 
ir is nor likely to dominate the 
trading scene. 


GZB- Vienna Zeros in on the Far East 


The Gcnoss roseh afelkhc Zencral- 
bank AG (GZB- Vienna) is the 
central financial institution of the 
Austrian Raiffeisen Banking 
Group, representing one-fifth of 
the domestic financial marker. 
GZB- Vienna ranks among the 
largest Austrian bonks and has 
extensve foreign interests, encour- 
aged by its membership fa the 

Unico Banking Group with al- 
most 37000 banking outlets in 
Europe and strong representation 
in the world's major financial cen- 
ters. 

Through its team of consultants 
the GZB-Vienna offers a special 
foreign trade service to domestic as 
well as to foreign exporters and 
importers, providing guidance and 
advice to individual bank custom- 
os. In addition to the traditional 
hanking services, inchxlirig guaran- 
tees, expect and projecr finance, 
forfeiting and foreign exchange 
transactions, the GZB-Vienna has 
earned a reputation in merchant 
banking arcC in particular, counter- 
trade, experience of which is re- 
flected by its participation in bexh 
the Unico Tracing Company — a 
specialist in East-West transac- 
tions, formed as a joint venture of 
the Unico Banking Group part- 
ners— and its subsidiary Fj. Eisner 

&Col 

The trading company 
F.L Eisner & Co. has over 100 
years of oommerrial experience and 
has built up a firm bore of business 
contacts. The company is extreme- 
ly active in both Council fer Mutu- 
al Economic Assistance (Gxne- 
con) and developing countries and 
has a reputation for bring success- 
ful in particularly difficuk markets 
chat require specialise capabilities. 
Thus, this international trading 
bouse is in a position ro act as a 



Vienna provides an important link in East-West transactions. 


link between East and West as 
well as ro bridge the gap between 
the developing and tire Gomecon 
countries. 

As die oldest Austrian exporter 
to the Chinese mario— with two 
trading outlets fa China until 


Mao's time 2 nd, more recently, its 
subsidiary Bravona-Hong Kong — 
Eisner has gained a foothold fa the 
Chinese market Due ro these links 
and GZB- Vienna’s direct presence 
in Hong Kong since 1976 and in 
Singapore since 1984, GZB-Vienna 


can offer package solutions to inrer- 
ested exporters providing mctfiunv 
ro long-term financing and, at the 
same time, the possibility rif buy- 
hack and countertrade options. 

Besides ptovitfing experr advice 
to small and medium-sized Austri- 


an firm* Eisner irsdf operates as an 
exporter of high-quality Austrian 
products, eg. agro-products, food- 
stuffs, timber and chemicals. Eisner 
is also a major supplier for interna- 
tional hoods and airlines in the Far 
East 


"Mr. Polo; 

could you give us 

your opinion, concerning the 

countertrade activities 

of VAIT?” 


“I think I am right in saying that those who 
know me, would agree that my endeavours 
to open up new markets and extend trading 
links were not Just a question of luck. 
Trading has retained much of its original 
nature, it still requires ideas, courage, 
mutual trust with one’s partners and a high 
degree of creativity. 

The latter must be combined with a touch of 
aggresshrity in order to secure the 
continual evolution of new methods of 
solving clients’ problems. 

The VAIT experts possess these vital 
characteristics and have learned to be one 
step ahead. 

Take their office in Beijing for example, or 
their global network of contacts, I could 
have usqd something similar. 

VAIT has made the world smaller by 
bringing trading partners together, why 
don’t you give them a call and convince 
yourself?” 


Offices in Hong Kong, Beijing, 
Tokyo, Singapore, Manila, Tehran, 
Jeddah, Tripoli, Lagos, Buenos 
Aires, Rio de Janeiro, Caracas, 
New York, London, Berlin, Prague, 
Warsaw 

and more than 40 VOEST-ALPINE 
offices worldwide. 


Head Office: 

VOEST-ALPINE INTERTRADING 
Ges.m.b.H. 

Postfach 83, A-4041 Linz, Austria 
Schmiedegasse 14, A-4040 Linz 
4 m floor. Lentia building 
Tel.: (43) 732/2392-0 
Telex: 22511 vai a 


We from VAIT don’t wish to add anything except a list of 
our countertrading highlights: 

• countertrade 
k # barter 

0 project-financing and refinancing 
0 escrow-account programs 
0 buy-back 
0 clearing and switch 
0 consultancy and advisory services 


VOEST-ALPINE 

INTERTRADING 

... a synonym for aggressive creativity 





Page 10 


_..n TRIBUNE ■AT»mn*Y- 80HDAT. SEPTEMBER 14-15, 1985 
INTERNATIONAL herald TRIBUJVE, &a * jj — Z. 


NYSE Most Actives 


~pow Jones Averages 


NYSE index 


Hifli Low Last CM. 


CcssAlr 
wrtoe 
PtlllPtS 
CtOata 
RekCtrn 
Revtnwd 
ReylpfC 
IBM 
BnkAm 
CmwE 
Mobil 
RchVck 
AT&T 
; KcmGE 
Ark lo 


30ft 28Vj 

39 37?. 

nft lift 
229% 1914 
two ira 
*ift 40ft 
VB 135 
138 19 Bft 
14 Uft 
»ft m& 
mk am 

49 44 

2\Vb am 
lift lm 

22* 20 Ml 


29ft +114 
38ft - 14 
lift — ft 
20ft -3ft 
19ft + ft 
40ft 

127 +3 

127ft + ft 
14 + ft 

39 + ft 

29 —ft 
48ft +2ft 
20ft 

10ft —I 
2Dft —lift 


lost in*. ■ 

07.68-/ *>1 
56.47 i- 480 


! Indus 1 31 4,94 1320.12 12*471 130788-/ 4* 

I Tram 4*2-00 44*89 4S020 4SM7/- JS 
Ulll 152JB 13157 151.14 jMS 

Comp 539 X 54100 SQEL01 S37JO- /222 


NYSE Diaries 


Commit* 

Industrials 

i transp. 
Ulllirioc 

Pi nonce 


hmi L*w ao» cnw 

10441 10589 10585 —081 
12184 1JL2S 12L40— M0 
10483 103-90 10444 — U9 
rc 17 ft? 55.19 — 031 
109J3 109J59 109 JO— 0-55 


Fridays 

lSggE 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ 


a m EX Mast Actives _! 

— ' HU L0W Lp8t • Oft.- : 


Advanced 

Declined 

UndtwW 
Toiai issues 
New His M 
New low 
V olume uo 
volume dawn 


183 104 

348 3M 

2S* 252 

^ “S 

22 ' 23 

1898.100 
3850090 


ComposMe 

induslriais 

Finance 

UB9tW» 

Utilities 

Banks 

Transit. 


l-CPge " AW 
[—'272 3?4J? 
! — 3.11 30244 
I — 3.10 3815* 
S— 280 24977 
3—209 374.90 
I —.203 30450 
r-225 2714* 


BAT!" 

p«tLW 

warns 

lOrtJY 

WdtM 

S3S 

NYTimes 
DMA 
GttCdfl 
ToxAir ; 
.OzarfcH, 
FmlHO 
HasOrs 
TIE 


V*L »«■ 

190W 3*£ 
11257 3ft 
4010 l*ft 
3380 3 

382 £S 

2758 2ft 
1714 

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1543 * 
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1355 lift 
1143 1*ft 
1158 3g* 
1134. 5ft 


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7ft 

14ft — * 

:1k- il 

5 ft . .. 



rwirui nt Trading in N.Y._ 


Vot.8t4 PM 

Prev.4P-M.V0L — — 

Prev amaolWoWl dose 133832J33 


Dow Jones Bond Averages! 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Close CliVc 

7951 +0.10 

7445 + 0-17 

8257 +082 


Sis. Close 

** jjwQuot.f 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Hiptts 
New Lows 
Volume ue 
Volume down 


472 415 

1055 1133 

401 4W 

2008 2023 

IS ll 

5* 40 


33449540 

62450820 


-fSiuded m the sales ftaures 


Bn Sales *3hVt. 

452,713 413771 U7S 

151545 451850 M» 

156891 44A949 Ujj7 

154J02 420721 5875 

1SLM3 346805 1748 


Tables include ttre 

SirtSSS. trads .MW.™ 

Via The Associated Press 


| standard* Poor's Index] 

HW> Low Close CUte 

asr 

®Es ss Si! S8=8iSS 

SESSle 184.19 182.05 182.91 — 07B 


AMEX Sales 


4 P.M, volume 
pm.4RM.vok™* 
pm-.cotw. ww™ . 


AMEX StocKinacA_ 
wan w* . 

22479 22*.M 22459 



Stocks Down in Heavy Trading 

ui:-l 


United Pros International ■ 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange lost ground for the fourth con- 
secutive session Friday in the heaviest trading in 
more than a month. 

The market turned lower ‘shortly after the 
open and by early afternoon the Dow Jones 
industrial average was down more than 10 
points from the previous dose. Nervous short- 
covering and scattered bargain hunting in blue- 
chip issues helped the market trim some losses 
in late trading, participants said. 

The Dow Finished down 4.71 to 1,307.68. For 
the week the Dow fell 28.01 points. Declines 
pounded advances more than 2 to 1 among the 
2,003 issues traded. 

Volume totaled 111.39 million shares com- 
pared with 107.07 million Thursday. 

Before the market opened, the government 
reported that producer prices fell 0.3 percent in 
August, retail sales rose 1.9 percent and indus- 
trial production picked up 03 percent 

Some analysts died mild disappointment 
tha t the numbers were not stronger — particu- 
larly the industrial production figure. But other 
observers called the series of data a “non-event” 
that did not alter the view that the economy’s 
pace remains sluggish: 

On the trading floor, Cessna Aircraft was the 
most active issue, dimbhig 114 to 29^4. Cessna 
said it has entered into a definitive agreement to 
be acquired by General Dynamics for 130 a 
share. General Dynamics feu 1% to 73H. 

Westinghouse Electric followed, easing K to 
38ft. 

Phillips Petroleum was third, down 14 to lift. 


HloftUrw Slock Dlv. Ykl PE ICPsHiqh Low oSS Qijjg 


Control Data fell 2ft to 20* on a published 

dividends on its preferred 
Revlon Inc. declined ft to 43. Pantry Pnd 

share. Pantry Pride was unchanged at oh. 

Tektronix was the session’s bi g^i los ® J®5" 
inn 414 to 48* after reporting its : 
quarter earnings fell to 17 cents a share from 90 

° e %daSl Ift toioft after climbing Thursday 

on speculation Scmat is in talks to acquire the 
pil KanMS<S a Sfc f Electric feU another ft to 1 1 

creases than thoU Kansas Gas l 

* 

dosed at S90 Tuesday, boosted by- takeover 
speculation. It has been backtracking m the 
absence of concrete developments. 

Among actively traded blue chips, IBM 
climbed ft to 127ft. The company is expected to 
reorganize its sales force. . 

American Express eased ft to 41ft and AT&T 
was unchanged at 20ft. 

Among technology issues. Digital Equip- 
ment, Cray Research and Burroughs were all 
lower. 


i2Monm 

kJksh LOW Slope 

199k TSVjj 

jm 1Z5 

35 19ft 
6W 2*k 
12V* 
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17 9 Vs 

14* l» 

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30’* 15?% 

T* ”5 

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Sis. Ctae 

nhf WM pp TWHHMiLowQuaLOite 


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28ft— ft 
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SS + ft 

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$*=& 
34ft— ft 
32ft— ft 
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609k— ft 
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lift + ft 
63ft— ft 
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Stock Dlv. Ykt P6 T^ HMfiLowSSoLChte 

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Mbai TrEE^C 

25ft 13ft CnP prU 340 15.1 S SL £ 

15 US 1 3ft W& “i% + w 

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ibw i ru*ir 

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k 11 Corain 46 *| 


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117ft + ft 
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30ft— ft 
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40 291 

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9 20 30Vr 

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7 1*15 33ft 
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13 49 

10 267 SOft 
B 391 40ft 
1226 7ft 
570= 51 
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21 29ft 
20 24 
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100= 52*. 

28 36 

8 26ft 
K 25ft 

7 17ft 

9 15 
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6 16ft 
20 905 42 
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187 ft 

8 139 lift 
8 612 23 

13 2£LS* 

9002 37 
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15 

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7 299 15ft 
14 654 22ft 
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19ft 20ft— 2ft 
35 35 —3 

22ft 24ft— Ift 
35ft 35ft 
1 1ft 
35ft 35ft— ft 
37ft 37ft— ft 
15ft 15ft + ft 
22ft 22ft— ft 
Bft Bft— ft 
19ft 19ft + ft 
24ft 24ft— ft 
lift lift— ft 
46ft 46ft— ft 
46 V> 46Va— ft 
10ft 10ft 
35ft 36ft— ft 
44ft 45ft— TV. 
52ft 52ft + ft 
23ft 23ft + ft 
67ft 47ft + ft 
37ft 37ft 
45ft 45ft— ft 
57ft 57ft— ft 
30ft 30ft 
17ft 17ft— ft 
64ft 64ft + ft 
10ft 10ft— ft 
36<A 36ft , _ 
44ft 45 + ft 


70 52 F 

28 19ft F 
13ft 9ft F 
14ft 10 F 
20ft 9ft F 
394% 23ft F 
16ft lift F 
27 15ft F 
19ft 13ft F 
38ft 23 F 
28ft 15ft F 
13 Ift F 
6ft 4ft F 
43ft 29ft F 
52ft 31ft F 
39 30ft f 
22ft 13ft F 
26ft 16ft t 
SOft 25ft f 
25 17ft t 
19ft 139% I 
65ft 4BV% F 
32 22ft F 
35 25ft I 
lift 5ft i 
5ft 4ft I 
37ft 27 1 

Bft 2ft I 
22ft 16ft. I 
27ft 14 I 
43 25ft I 
34 22 I 

46ft 23ft I 
27 19ft I 
18ft 11 I 
50ft 35 I 
46ft 32V. I 
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2M% lift 
60 40 . 

55ft 36 1 

34ft 23ft 
114% 7ft 
30ft 16 
79% 5ft 
30ft 231% 
31ft 25V 
28ft 174% 

34 ft 19ft 
55ft 46ft 
44ft 29 
12 8ft 
43 24ft 
2BV 184% 
39ft 26ft 
13ft lift 
29ft 18ft 

35 14ft 
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29ft 20V% 
18ft 119% 
6ft 3Ua 

21 UV% 
20ft 14ft 
59 47ft 
51ft 40ft 
13ft 104% 
BOV 561% 
15ft 10V 
12ft 7V 
32ft 24ft 
27 22 

224% 18ft 
135ft 91% 

10ft 79% 
22ft 14ft 
34ft 23V 
20 V 21ft 
32VJ 25V 
36ft 249% 


FMC 120 14 3 
FPL Gp 1.96 83 
ftmetr 28 2.9 2 
Focet _ 
Folrchd JO 2.1 
Falrcpf 340 129 
FatrW .18 1-5 
PowiDIS JO 19 2 
Faust* M *2 1 
FrtNMF 

Farch -88 49 
FovDro 20 24 1 
Fcders iM 9 
FMSCo L84 *4 1 
Fed E xp _ ; 

FdMOS L52 *4 1 
FadNM .16 2 

FadIPB 90 39 
FFoPPf 221 «4 
FadRtl 126 6-7 1 
FdSsnl 90 *5 1 
FUdDfir 294 *5 
F*iTO 120 4J 1 
Fidcst 190 X7 1 
FlnCpA 951 
FlnCppf 40 1L7 
FlnCBPf &258185 
i FnSBor 

l Flrestn 90 -42 
FtAtl s 48 29 
i FIBkSy 140 *6 
FBLF11 1.00 32 
i F BoSlS 190 22 
I FStCWc 122 *.1 
FIBTe* 40 5.1 
FfBTx pf 594a139 
i FtBTxpf523el42 
i FKUfy 

. FFftdAz 48b 39 
FFB 3.12 54 
FlntSlO 250 52 
i FlRtSt pf 227 82 
i FtMlSS 24 27 
FtNomn 
* FstPa 

k FstPa Pf 24fl 9J 
i FtURRl 2MU 72 
% FtVOBk 98 37 
■ FtWbc 120 39 
% FWbcPf 625 114 
Ftscfib 190 32 
i FhtiFd 95a 4 
% FltFnGS 122 XB 
h FbretEn 44 22 
U Flemna 190 27 
% Flaxipf 141 122 
% FfsWSfs .16 4 

6 Float PI 

FtaEC 26a 4 
% FlaPra 2-16 87 
% FlaSn 40 25 
u FtwGan 
% Flowrs 44 24 
% Fluor M 24 
U FooteC 220 *2 
h FondM 240 54 
1% FtDrar 126 107 
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BUSINESS / FINANCE 



U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10- 


14-1S, 1085 


* * 


Page 11 


ECONOMIC SCENE 


^s~ 





Big Blow to Apartheid 

' : ■ By LEONARD SILK 

' . New York Timet Snrjcr 

am^SKLT P ?? id * ,xt Weter W. Botha of South 
nca hai proposed to restore citizenship to niiHinns 

‘°? il whm ** Sovcnm^t set op its 

• o' a s* .^°®«aoas policy, which was intended to ma te 

& a white state. The pass laws controlling 

^^^^ l ^ Ial ^ appearlikd y logo next. If. asitnoS 
Mems, apartheid is crumbling, what finally cracked it was the 
threat of economic collapse, brought on not by political p re ssures 
. or sanctions but .by the actions of bankers uSbudn^aco^ 
Uv ?5~ and by. the economic blunders of the government 
j -Tte econonnc crisis has been a long time in mming - The 
optral piece jjf legislation to remove blacks and control the 
influx of blacks into urban ar- 
eas was a 1951 version of a 
1936 pass law. For the first 
time, women as well as men 
were required to carry passes. 

Under- section 10, an African 
was permitted in a dty for 
more, than three days only if 
<a) he, or she was born in that 
city, {b) had lived there for 15 
years' or worked for one cm- 


Car Sales 
In U.S. Up 


Crisis resulted from 
relaxing economic 
controls while 
continuing the grand 
control: apartheid. 




lent 

'fast 

r- ' ^ 
J . '- 1 


*■ 






* t-v." 




I^oyer continuously Tor 10 years, (c) was under 16, or (d) received 
special government dispensation. A person's status could not 
. change through marriage. 

Thus a rural woman who married a “10 (la)” mtm could be 
forced to leave a dty after her husband died. The police began 
arresting women on streets and buses in Cape Town in 1954. 

The removal program, as Andrew Silk noted in his study of 
South African migrant labor, “A Shanty Town in Sooth Africa," 
was also reflected in housing policy. The government blocked 
plans of cities to create famil y housing for blades, instead 
requiring one-sex hostels for workers. 

C URIOUSLY, the government sought to combine its rigid 
controls ova blacks with an increasingly laissez-faire eco- 
nomic policy. Stephen Lewis Jr. of Williams College, a 
specialist on southern Africa who has been economic adviser to 
Botswana, says the current crisis -was “the inevitable consequence 
of attempting to relax selected economic controls while continu- 
ing to develop the grand control scheme: apartheid.” 

For nearly a decade South Africa has beat moving away from 
direct controls on private capital and toward freer markets and 
market-^detenmned prices. The rand was first unpegged from the 
.dollar and then allowed a managed float for trade and current- 
v* account transactions. The “financial rand” (introduced for capir 
■f lal-acccmm transactions after the Shaipevillc massacre in 1960, in 
which 69 blacks were killed, to prevent capital flight) was elimi- 
nated. Private exporters were allowed to keep proceeds abroad, 
forward cover was provided for importers needing foreign ex- 
change; and direct impart; controls were reduced 
AS a result of these measures. South Africa adjusted to the 
declining gold price for several years by a downward Goat of the 
rand and an active monetary policy. Only recently did problems 
of potential capital flight bean to appear with some regularity, 
but, Mr. Lewis says, “when, thecruncn came, the deregulation of 
capital movements meant it came with a vengeance.” 

Pretoria's determination to maintain while control, he adds, 
required huge expenditures on internal security and defense at 
and beyond its borders. At the same time; steeply rising costs of 
enforcing apartheid and supporting the “homelands” polity 
nroxipA u<inal problems, compucating the pfibets of titc Reserve 
• frank to maintain balanced external payments.: _ . 

When these dements came together, il was just a matter of time 
before there was a run on the bank. After all the debate In 
colleges, universities and Congress over disinvestment, it was 
bankers who pulled the plug on South Africa. Capital began to 
leave the country. Output fell,- and the rand fdL And South 
Africa began to propose serious chang es in apartheid. 

But, as Mr. Lewis says, “Nothing less, than the fundamental 
reorientation of the economic system and its political superstruc- 
ture win bring long-term economic health to South Africa. 




| Currency Bates 


CramBaies 


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Other data from orators tmdAP. 


Inter est Rates 

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Domestic Figures 
Best in 30 Years 

The Asiocroied press 


DETROIT — Domestic auto 
sales in the United Slates for early 
September rose 56.9 percent com- 
pared with the like period in 1984, 
according to company figures re- 
leased Friday. 

Americans continued to flock to 
dealer showrooms for cut-rate fi- 
nancing and rebate arrangements 
on selected 1985 models. However, 

. analysts expect that the dramatic 
sales increases of recent weeks will 
level off in coming weeks as those 
stocks dwindle to make way for the 
1986 models. 

• The seven major domestic auto- 
makers sold an average 33,669 cars 
a day in the Sepu 1-10 period, 
breaking a record of 23,815 in that 
reporting period in 1955. 

Chrysler Coip. sales shot up 62.8 
percent, compared with the like pe- 
riod a year ago. Ford Motor Co.'s 
were up 61.9 percent, and General 
Motors Corp.'s were up 58.8 per- 
cent. 

Domestic auto sales took off in 
the last 10-day reporting period of 
August after manufacturers offered 
rebates and auto loans at as low as 
73-percem interest. Inventory had 
backed up because of slow sales 
and a three-week auto haulers’ 
strike. 

GM, which started the latest in- 
centive war, continued to lose mar- 
ket share to Ford. GM*s share for 
the 10-day period was 562, more 
iH«n 3 percentage points below its 
traditional level, while Ford was up 
several points at 27 percent Chrys- 
ler’s was about average at. a 12.6- 
percent share. 

Harvey Hdnbach, an automo- 
tive industry analyst at Merrill 
Lynch in New York, said, “I 
wouldn’t read anything into the 
market share because it’s a ques- 
tion of availability right now. 

“We continue to fed that they 
are borrowing from the future and 
that these sales are gang to drop 
like a rock come October ” Mr. 
Hdnbach said. 

Among the small producers. 
American Honda Motor Co.'s sales 
were down 9J percent in the peri- 
od. American Motors Corp.’s were 
down 22.4 percent, and Volks- 
wagen of America Inc.’s were up 
302 percent. 

Cars imported for sale under 
GM, Ford and Chrysler name- 
plates are counted as foreign. Cars 
made in the United States by 
Honda, AMC-Renault, Volks- 
wagen and Nissan are counted as 
domestic. 


World Bank 
Seeks Backers 
For Agency 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The World 
Bank’s directors have approved 
plans to set up an agency to encour- 
age foreign investment in develop- 
ing countries by covering certain 
noncommercial risks. 

The bank said directors hoped 
that the Multilateral Investment 
Guarantee Agency would be put 
into operation before the end of 
1986. 

The agency will cover risks re- 
sulting from government restric- 
tions on currency conversion, ex- 
propriation, government 
repudiation of contractural com- 
mitments and war or civil unrest. 

The agency, which will be sepa- 
rate but affiliated with the bank, 
requires the approval of at least 15 
developing natrons and five indus- 
trialized countries and an invest- 
ment comsutmem of at least $360 
million. 

Those commitments will be 
sought at next month's World Bank 
annual meeting of the board of 
governors in Seoul. 

The bank’s vice president and 
general counsel, Ibrahim Shihata, 


Americans Are Aping the Imitators 

The Japanese, 

Once Disdained, 

Are the Target 


By Nicholas D. Kristof 

,Viw York Times Service 

NEW YORK — After de- 
cades of pooh-poohing Japanese 
scientific research, American ex- 
ecutives no longer patronize the 
Japanese as 'imitators” and 
“copieis” of American technol- 
ogy. Quite the contrary. In the 
wake of Japan's drive for techno- 
logical supremacy, they are 
scrambling to keep up with the 
new scientific research in Japan. 

It is not an easy task. As Japan 
finally moves from imitation to 
innovation — and becomes a for- 
midable competitor in crucial ar- 
eas such as supercomputers, bio- 
technology and robotics — 
American scientists find them- 
selves hard-pressed to learn of 
Japanese breakthroughs. So in 
the past year or so, a small indus- 
try has been emerging, consisting 
of companies that help monitor 
Japanese technology and. in ef- 
fect, broker developments to 
American corporations. 

“What's at slake may well be 
the competitiveness of American 
industry,” said Richard J. Samu- 
els, who directs a program on 
Japanese science at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. 
“If you can’t pay attention to 
and assimilate technological in- 
formation beyond your borders, 
you’re playing the game with one 
arm tied behind your back” 

The new technology brokers 
are trying to address the problem 
by translating and indexing Jap- 
anese scientific articles. For ex- 
ample. the Japanese Technical 
Information Service, a Xerox 
subsidiary, is starting up opera- 
tions near Philadelphia this fall. 
Nissho Iwal the Japanese trad- 



ing company, already has done 
something similar. A year ago, it 
began publishing Techgram Ja- 
pan. a magazine full of brief 
su mmari es of Japanese techno- 
logical developments. Here are 
some recent examples: 

• A new “killer yeast" that de- 
stroys harmful bacteria while 
fermenting beer. 

• A machine, run by a micro- 
computer, that manufactures 
“riceburgers," a Japanese food 
consisting of ground meal inside 
a ball of rice. 

• A machine that reads aloud 
from Japanese paperbacks (but 
takes 25 minutes a page). 

So far there are feu’ success 
stories of UJ>. companies suc- 
cessfully adopting Japanese 
technologies, partly because by 
the time an invention is practical 
it Is often cheaper to manufac- 
ture it in Japan than in the Unit- 
ed States. 

Many scientists say that the 
new American effort to get at the 
stream or Japanese research in- 
formation is too little and too 
late. Even with the latest under- 


f There , s a certain 
intellectual 
arrogance that 
everything on the 
cutting edge is 
done here.’ 
Bobby R. Inman 


takings, the vast majority of the 
10,000 technical journals pub- 
lished in Japan will be neither 
indexed nor abstracted in the 
West. And while the number is 
rising, only about 400 science 
students at universities around 
the country are studying the Jap- 
anese language. 

“There's a certain hard-to-de- 
fine intellectual arrogance that 
everything on the cutting edge is 
done here,” said Admiral Bobby 
R. Inman, the former deputy di- 
rector of the Central Inlelligmce 
Agency who now heads Micro- 
electronics and Computer Tech- 
nology Corp- a research consor- 
tium . "That’s been true in the 
past, but I detect a smugness 
setting in." 

That smugness certainly is not 
justified. In robotics, an expand- 
ing area of high technology, Ja- 
pan deploys more than twice as 
many robots as tbe United 
States. Fifty-four percent of new 
chemical patents worldwide now 
belong to the Japanese. Biotech- 

( Con turned on Page 13, CoL 1) 


Cessna Agrees 
To Acquisition 
By Defense Firm 

Compiled br Ow staff From Dapotdta -j think it’s a real pity that in our 
WICHITA Kansas ^ — Cessna gjeaicountiy companies and work- 
: ”" r ’ rv * ,v, “ ««•*«"'« crs can't survive by themselves," 


Aircraft Co., the nation’s last inde- 
pendent major manufacturer of 
general aviation planes, announced 
Friday that il had agreed to an 
acquisition proposal by General 
Dynamics Corp.. the huge Sl Louis 
defense contractor. 

Spokesmen for both companies 
said a merger agreement called for 
Genera) Dynamics to acquire 2 
minimum of 1 1 . 18 million shares of 
Cessna stock at $30 a share, making 
the tender offer worth at least S335 
milli on- With the 500,000 shares of 
Cessna stock already owned by 
General Dynamics, the company 
would control 50.1 percent of the 
Wichita manufacturer's stock. 
Plans call for Cessna to become a 


said Mary Neff, who has worked ai 
Cessna 12years. 

Edwin F. Lewis, an analyst wiib 
B.C. Christopher Securities Co„ 
questioned the value of the deal for 
General Dynamics’ stockholders 
because, he said, the company 
might not be able to use Cessna's 
manufacturing capacity. 

“Cessna might be viewed as dead 
weight. Cessna has productive as- 
sets now, but it is unclear if there 
will be a market for what General 
Dynamics might produce with all 
the additional manufacturing ca- 
pacity." he said. 

Mr. Lewis said, however, that 


General Dynamics could well em- 
whouy owned substdtaiy of Getter- p j oy ^ electrical engineering and 
ai Dynamics with the current manufacturing skills of Cessna’s 
Cessna officers. Russell W. Meyer. wor j cers ^ 


German Bids for 2 Canadian Firms 

By Warren Gcder “The financial aspect will be im- nies to be maintained, with the 

International Herald Tribune portanL but we're also taking a same name and location, ait^igh 

FRANKFURT - Justus Dor- close look at the overall corporate w, *Sreau* coorduaroa via the 

nkr. a Was, Cfennan mdasuiata. fta. b* nd. "C to*. S W 

Mr. Doraier, who in May sold ^ m Seattle, said his company 
his stake in Dornier GmbH to its was interested only in De Havil- 
new owner. Daimler-Benz AG. for land and was not in the bidding for 
what some industry analysts said Canadair. "What we can bring to 
was nearly 100 million Deutsche ^ Havilland is the fact of bring 
marks ($34 million), said he could jj C number one manufacturer 01 
not think in terms ofa price corn- commercial aircraft and, of course, 
petition against Boeing. our extensive relations with the 

He said he expected his offer to world's leading airlines." He said 
be attractive to the Canadian gov- 
ernment because it “allows for the 
present structure of both compa- 


bas entered the competition against 
Boring Co. and other industry gi- 
ants for control of De Havilland 
Aircraft of Canada Ltd. and Cana- 
dair Ltd. 

Mr. Doraier, until recently a ma- 
jor shareholder in the aerospace 
group, Doraier GmbH, said be 
wanted to obtain management con- 
trol of both companies but that 
they would be allowed to operate 
“as independent firms under a joint 
bolding company." 

He said that a price had not yet 
been discussed in talks with Cana- 
da Development Investment Corp., 
the government agency that owns 
the two aviation companies. 

Paul Marshall CDICs presi- 
dent, said from Toronto that Mr. 
Dornier was “a man of means, a 
man who knows the industry and 
thus must be taken seriously." 

Mr. Marshall said be expected 
the Ottawa government to decide 
on new owners by year's end. 

Canadair, he said, was “margin- 
ally in the black, with the profit 
curve improving,” while De Havil- 
land “has yet to return to a profit 
position” but also had seen steady 
improvement. 

In 1984. Canadair had a profit of 
6.4 million C-madim dollars ($4.66 
million) on sales of 376.4 mtition 
dollars. De Havilland in 1984 
showed a loss of 40 million dollars 
on sales of 204 million dollars. 

Mr. Marshall said several major 
companies had expressed an inter- 
est in one or both of the companies. 
He would identify only two compa- 
nies, saying that Boeing was trying 
to acquire De Havilland, a maker 
of commuter planes, and that Gulf- 
stream Aerospace Corp. was dis- 
cussing a takeover of Canadair, 
which builds the Challenger busi- 
ness jet. He declined to comment 
on reports that McDonnell Doug- 
las Corp. was interested in De Ha- 
villand. 

The issue of price had not sur- 
faced in any of the talks. Mr. Mar- 
shall 


Boeing was particularly interested 
in De Havilland’s new commuter 
plane, the Dash-8. 


chairman, and R.W. Van SanL 
president, re taining their offices. 

In addition, Mr. Meyer will be 
elected executive vice president of 
General Dynamics and will be ap- 
pointed to that company's board of 
directors, an announcement from 
Cessna said. 

General Dynamics is a major de- 
fense contractor involved in devel- 
oping and producing military air- 
craft, submarines, missile and gun 
systems, cruise missiles, tanks, elec- 
tronics and space systems. 

In 1967. the company became 
tbe world's leading aircraft manu- 
facturer by surpassing Piper Air- 
craft Corp. in the total number of 
planes delivered. 

About 64 percent of the 213,000 
active aircraft in the United Stales 
are Cessnas, according to industry 
estimates. The company is the lead- 
ing manufacturer of business jets 
with a 37.3-percent market share. 

Since 1 580 when an economic 
downturn hit the aviation industiy, 
Cessna has laid off thousands of 
workers and severely curtailed its 
operations. It had gone from deliv- 
ering 9,000 units a year to about 
1,000. Employment dropped from 
15.200 in 1979 to a current level of 
about 5.500. 

Cessna had been the subject of 
takeover rumors for more than two 
years. Its stock hit whai at tbe time 
was a 52-week high of $28 on Tues- 
day and dosed at $29.50 on Friday. 
General Dynamics dosed at 
$77J75, down $1,875. 

Some Cessna workers expressed 
disappointment that the company 
would not continue as an indepen- 
dent 


“There are special aerospace 
manufacturing processes at Cessna 
that will certainly dovetail at Gen- 
eral Dynamics." Mr. Lewis said. 


Retail Prices 
Rose 0.3% in 
U.K. in July 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — British retail 
prices in August rose 03 per- 
cent from July as inflation con- 
tinued to abate, the Depart- 
ment of Employment said 
Friday. 

The retail price index was up 
b2 percent from a year earlier. 
Thai compares with year-to- 
year rates of 6.9 percent in July 
and 7 percent in both May and 
June. 

Inflation had declined by the 
end of 1984 to 4.6 percent, far 
below the peak of 26.9 percent 
in August 1975. Early this year, 
however, the pound plunged 
against other major currencies 
amid fears that the government 
had relaxed its anti-inflation 
rigor in an effort to spark the 
economy and create jobs. 

To defend the pound, the 
government forced interest 
rates up sharply in January, and 
the resulting rise in mortgage 
payments helped spur inflation 
in the spring. The government’s 
goal is a 5-percent inflation rate 
by the end of the year. 


AsUn Dollar Deposits 

Sept, a 

imaniti BVb '*** 

2 mwitn* 

3 months 

4 months Vb-WA 

I roar 

Sourer.' Reuter*. 


Sep*. 13 

Vterai umcb mradrMutB 
jO day awww »hU* 

Tertiote WWW* Bate lirtw: 7.927 
Source-' Merritt LynctL Tolerate. 


Sep. 13 
JIM. PJk. CHUB 

(COM »SS 3ZU0 +MB 

parit (izj mo) M mm +£ 

***** S5 mm +io5 

T» 

Yar * Con ** evrrm 
StZ£*«** stoUAToeroH**. 
Source: Reularf. 


said Thursday that he was confi- 
dent enough countries would bade 
tbe plan. 

He said that the executive direc- 
tors, who represent the 148 mem- 
ber governments, approved the 
agreement on Thursday at a closed 
m ee ting, with no objections. 

He said the United States, which 
is the largest member country, ac- 
counting for about a third of the 
bank’s funds and almost 20 percent 
of tbe voting rights, supports the 
plan. 

The bank also said {ha! tbe agen- 
cy would be allowed to reinsure 
national insurance agencies and 
private insurance agencies that 
provide risk protection. 

It is hoped that tbe agency mil 
eventually have about $1 billion 
capital, with 10 percent to be paid 
in cash, a further 10 percent in 
promissory notes and the remain- 
der in callable capital 

Agency membership would be 
open to all World Bank countries 
and to Switzerland. 


MANAGED CURRENCIES 
PROGRAM 

PERFORMANCE RESULT 
FOR BEGRMNG EQUITY OF 


$ 10.000 

JANUARY 1st 1985 


HAS BECOME 


% 14,089 

I SHTOABBl 1st 1985 


AF1HI AH COMMISSIONS 


tea issuer n ocroem is* issue. 
1K3E IS NO mANAGEMBVT FS. 

PAST PERFORMANCE 6 
NO GUARANTEE 
Of FUTII® PSffCRMANCT. 


flame ante? 
.Ofiviar Dalefan 
A. Vtca Piwkfart 


43, Avenue Monsou 
751 74 MRS -RANGE - 
TeL 723-61-51 
Tala* 63CP75i , 

707 NON FS&& BSKWIS QbtY. 




Kidder, Peabody 0 Co. 

Incorporated 

International Investment Bankers • Founded 1865 
NEW YORK LONDON PARIS GENEVA HONGKONG ZURICH TOKYO 

Statement of Consolidated Financial Condition May 30, 1985 

ASSETS 

Cash 5 10,647,000 

Cash segregated under federal and other regulations 31,052,000 

Deposits with dearing organizations and others 3fiJ2fi00 

Receivable from brokers and dealers *. 497,541,000 

Securities purchased under agreements to resell 5,174,921,000 

Receivable from customers— less reserve for doubtful accounts 955J61fiOQ 

Securities owned by the Company — at market value 3,638,207,000 

Investments in and advances to unconsolidated subsidiaries— at cost plus equity 

in undistributed earnings 10,547 fiOO 

Office furniture, equipment and leasehold improvements — at cost less allowance 

for depredation and amortization 64,327,000 

Other -165,266,000 

Total $10350,881,000 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY 

Short-term loans 5 1,215,114,000 

Payable to brokers and dealers 357,575,000 

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase 4,070,022,000 

Payable to customers 578,393,000 

Securities sold but not yet purchased— at market value 3,591,896,000 

Drafts payable 42,864,000 

Other _ 351,957,000 

Total 10,207,821,000 

Subordinated borrowings & stockholders’ equity 

Subordinated borrowing 119,015,000 

Stockholders' equity 224,045,000 343,060,000 

Total $10550,881,000 

Sec Notes to Statement of Consolidated Financial Condition by Juriring lo office nearest you. 

Members All Principal Securities Exchanges • SIPC 


New York Boston Philadelphia Chicago San Francisco Los Angeles Atlanta Dallas KansasGty 
Albany Altoona Amarillo Austin Baltimore Buffalo Carmel Cherry Hill Cincinnati Cleveland Denver 
Detroit Fort Lauderdale Garden Gty Hagerstown Hartford Houston Jacksonville Lowell Milwaukee 
Minneapolis Morristown Newport Beach Norfolk Palo Alto Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, ME Portland, OR 
providence Reading Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Sar jose San Juan Sarasota 
Seattle Spokane Springfield Tampa Toledo Troy Tulsa Washington White Plains Wilkes-Barre 








2 


Fridays 

MSE 

Closing 


12 Monte 

HtOtl LOW Stack 


Dhf. VW.PE IDOsHiflfi LowQvQt 


Tables Include fhe nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 




3m 
12ft 
im 
16V. 
TOM 10ft 
9ft 9ft 
20 V, 20ft 
13th 13th 
30 30ft 
10ft 10ft 
, 17M I7M 
lTVfc 17M 
10ft 17ft 
24 24 

i 34 ft 34ft 
34 34 

34ft 34ft 
1 3ft 23ft 

53 S3 

45ft 45ft 

22ft 22ft 
37V* 37ft 
17V* 17ft 
32ft 33 

54 55ft 
13ft 
37ft 

2ft 


US futures 






Grains 


41ft 22ft 
14ft 5ft 
25ft 14 
4ft 2V> 
28 Ul 17 
4ft 2V. 
12 4ft 
4 3ft 25ft 
13ft 9ft 
25ft 17ft 
12 3H 
lift 9U 
52 29ft 
91ft 73 
73 57ft 
66 53 

27 ft JJft 
47ft 32ft 
85 64ft 


34 3 17 

.40 3-5 32 

4 un 

18 

13D0107 
08 1.1 20 
97S 110 
7.72 114 
730 113 

14 

11 

280 05 12 


41ft 41 
VM 10 
23ft 23ft 
2ft 2ft 
23 22ft 
4ft 4 
.12 12 
37ft 29V* 
lift lift 
17ft 16ft 
9ft. 9 
lift lift 


41ft + ft 
10 —ft 

23ft + ft 

2ft 

22ft— ft 

4ft + ft 
12 


r 86 85ft 
170 70 

:43ft 63V* 
24ft 23 


lift— ft 
17ft— ft 
7M + ft 
lift 

44 — ft 
70 

23^—1*% 
44ft + ft 
80 + ft 


10ft + ft 
17ft + ft 


10ft 
20ft 20ft 2DH 
20ft 20 20 

8ft 8ft Sft 
35ft 24V* 25ft 
8ft 8ft 8ft 
Oft 8ft 8ft 
47V) 49V* 47ft 
57ft 57 57 

7ft 6ft 7ft 
Mft 15 15 

15ft 15ft 15ft 
22ft 22V* 22ft 
17ft 19ft 19ft 
19ft 19ft 19ft 
17ft 16ft 17ft 
171* 18ft 

357b 35ft 





conree corrcsc®) . 

57500RJS.- cents PTrJO- ^ lUJS 13330' 13X38 >32 

15070 127.® S» 13*25 - _J7 


DM »J0 9001 9740 .« J 


8740 1938 +M 


12875 13070, +140 
12*50 12740 +JS 


Metals 



Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40000 itat- cent* per IP. 

6550 5230 Ocl 5390 5537 

67 JK 55X0 Dec 5720 5845 

6745 5435 Feb S6.15 S7.17 

67.57 5530 APT 5*85 5830 

6625 5625 Jon 5*15 5935 

6540 5520 Aits 5720 5740 

Est. Sates 2X796 Prev. Soto 20745 
Prev.DavOoeninl. 47309 oH *67 


5305 +120 
5B22 +L10 
5*85 +.95 

5787 +132 
5B70 +130 
5720 +130 


FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44300 tbs^- ctnts pv m. 

7330 5650 Sep 59-35 6010 

72-32 5645 Oct 5930 5995 

7320 5*10 NOV 6130 6220 

7940 6020 Jan 6430 6527 

7025 6042 . MO r 6435 6520 

7045 6020 APT 6375 6530 

662S 60.10 MOV 6335 6425 

EsL Sales 3209 Prev. Sales 3371 
Prev. Day Opaiim. *356 up 78 - 


5925 +3S 

5942 +127 
6235 +1.13 
6525 +148 
4112 +142 
6440 +U0 
6425 +120 


HOOS(CME) 

30300QS.- ants per lb. 

51.75 3443 Oct 3*95 3742 

5025 3*3} Dec 3830 3940 

50.47 38. K) Feb 3920 4020 

4725 3*12 Apr 2735 3705 

4905 3740 Jun 41.10 4140 


37.15 +40 

39.15 +43 

3790 +33 

37,35 +28 

4125 +.18 


Currency Options 


18ft IM 
49ft 49ft 
20ft 20ft 
71* 7ft 
00 100 
93ft 93ft 
25ft 25ft 
9ft 9ft 
47 46ft 
39U 38ft 


55ft 

35ft Xerox 

300 

S3 

14 

3226 

51ft 

50ft 

an*— ft 

55ft 

46ft Xerox of *45 10L1 


2217 

54 

53ft 

53ft + ft 

29 

19ft XTRA 

M 

Z9 

11 

56 

22ft 

21ft 

22ft. 


30ft 24ft Zalecp 132 *9 9 47 26ft 26ft 28ft— ft 

21ft 7ft Zapata .12 14 54 346 7ft 7ft 7ft 
57ft 31ft Zavres 48 14 16 2S5 51ft 50 50 — ft 

27 17ft ZenlttiE II 1175 18 17ft 17ft— ft 

21ft 15ft Zeros 32 19 I* 102 19M 10ft 10ft— ft 

37ft 22ft Zumln 132 34 12 418 36ft 36V6 J4ft — ft 



PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 



0 


Option a 

S trace 







Underlying 

Price 


roils— Lent 

Puts— Lost 



Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

S*p 

Doc 

Mar 

12000 British Pocnutoc&nts per unit 





105 

r 

2950 


r 

r 


13309 

no 

2440 

r 

r 

r 

r 


13X39 

115 

19.7(1 

1B70 


r 

r 


13X3t 

120 

139) 

1X60 


r 

005 


13X39 

125 

900 

r 


r 

1.70 


13X39 

130 

440 

630 

r 

r 

X75 




005 

X50 

*55 

070 

645 


13X39 

140 

r 

230. 

375 

500 

970 


13X39 

145 

r 

1.10 ’ 

zso 

• r 

r 



ISO 


000 

1130 

r 



5O0M Canadian Doltarvceats Per natt. 




CDollr 

72 

000 

r 

r . 

r 

*40 


7Z84 

73 


r 


*11 

r 


TIM 

74 

r 

r 

r 

r 

158 

11 

7X84 

75 

r 

r 

r 

122 

r 


4X506 West German Marks-CBrts per unit 



DMark 

29 

538 

r 

r 

r 

006 


3 AM 

30 

432 

r 

r 

r 

r 



31 

333 

r 


r 

r 


3*48 

32 

ZS3 

r 

r 

r 

031 

0/ 

3*48 

33 

146 

r 

276 

r 

1141 


3*48 

34 

0.54 

156 

230 

tun 

077 



35 

001 

101 

104 

039 

MB 

1J 

3*48 

36 

r 

003 

137 

1-48 

108 


3*48 

37 

r 

0-0 

007 

r 

s 


34+8 

38 

r 

036 

r 

r 

r 


125000 French Froncs-IBHis of a cent per win. 



FFronc 

100 

1290 

r 

r 


r 


11305 

no 

300 

r 

r 


r 


64S0JM Japanese Yen-lBOttis of a amt Per unrt. 



J Yen 

38 

X22 

r 

r 

r 

r 


41 J4 

40 

136 

r 

r 


r 


41J4 

41 

033 

106 

r 

r 

054 


4104 

42 

r 

058 

102 

008 

100 


4X34 

43 

r 

036 

002 

r 

r 


6X540 Swiss Francs-ceats per unit 






37 

400 

r 





41.71 

38 

406 

r 

r 

r 

r 



40 

172 

157 

r 

r 

052 



41 

005 

200 

r 

002 

*92 



42 

nm 

106 

112 

X15 

130 



43 

1.14 

100 

177 

r 

r 


4171 

44 

r 

809 

130 

r 

r 


4171 

45 

r 

050 

r 

r 

r 





038 

r 

r 

r 

r 



Call open mt. 237027 


X443 


Pul open tot. 157389 

r— Not traded, s — No option ottered. 




Last Is premium (our chase price). 





Source: AP. 









PALLADIUM (WYME3 ■ ■ 

WO troy az- dollars per or ' ' '' 

14195 9050 Sen 9795 9793 9730 

14L50 .run Dec 10050 10150 9950 

12750 9190 - Mur 10150 10X00 10150 

11480 9150 Jun 

11500 9790 - Sep • • . - 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates .177 

Prev. DoyOpen lot *567 off *7 . 


SOLD (COM EX) • 

1 00 trov Di-boll nn per frw BL ■' , • 

34050 31550 Sep 

49X00 • 29740 Oct ••• 22*30. 32440 3l9.uf 
32420 ' 324.20 Nov ~ m 

40950 30150 - Dec 32740 32850 32X30 . 

48550 30*00 Feb 33190 33240 32000 

49640 31490 Apr 33540 33740 333.50 

43570 32050 Jun 34*00 341 JO 33U» 

42840 3J10Q AuB 

39593 33540 Oct 33R50 3S050 35050 

39340 34240 Dec- 35590 3K70 35590 

38840 35540 'APT... 

39450 36940 Jun 

E*t. Sales 33400 Prcv.Sotos 2*022 
Prev. Day Open I rrt.1 30431 oH 1423 -- 


SP-COMP. INDEX (CME). 

points and DeMs- . . : 


-20C4S .17S71 --OPC--J05JB KS 
20395 187.10 Mar 18740 U7J0: 

20*50 . -um jjm TMflo Taaj^ 
BASotes • ntma ST. 

Piter, Dot Open^id.^waafjeriEWO- ; ■ 

valo* Umrocaro i j 

il Ohllt tEiilCmll •/ 1 ' , ■ . 

“21328--' . .10525 - . SepITXJOTOTD 

samara &*?.#*■ 


Sep 18340 183.95 
DeC-18540 ttUF 


•Est-Soto* V't^WtehMeeJMEi: 
Pntv. Day Open tot. 12430 ofTEK - 


MYUCOMP. 1 PD KXlMVFE) 
pointsond Cents- • 

.11845 . 9145 10*05 10*35 

• 11720 ... 10120 Sc 10725 10705 
asjs- .WB20 - 9IMr. HE45 10845. 
32840 *n035 ' . 5un ‘ 10945 -110.10 
Fst SnleS 15J87 Prev-Sates 13977 
Prev. Day Operrtaf . T\495 offm 


.” -i • ’• Close 

Moody's . ' 8B2J0f 

Reuters ... i - . • -TJ2S.10 

DJ. Futures 1U24, 

com. Research Bureau - 2itjo 

Moody's : base 100 -. Dec. 31, 1931. . 
-:p-i>re«minary;f- final - 
Reuters : ban 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. . 
Dow Jones : base 100. : Doc. 31, 7974. 


Previous 
879.60 f 
1,740.70 - 
113.11 . 
27920 


Comwlfifies 


■ London . 

Commodities 



■SpZ }3 ■ . 


73ft 
12ft 9ft 
32ft 19ft 
19 IS 
21ft 15 
20ft 12ft 
12ft 5ft 
2ft 1ft 
38ft 23ft 
34ft 24H 
35 24ft 
23 17Vh 
lift 9ft 
8ft 3ft 
35ft 24ft 
54 51 

20ft 20 

Oft 5ft 
12ft 8ft 
49 ft 31 
25ft 20 
35% 23ft 
45 29ft 
54 ft 50 ft 
35ft 29V* 

1 9ft lift 
16V* 
9ft 
5 

9ft 
19ft 


s 

200 20 

17 

834 

32 10 

10 

27 

00 17 

14 

73 

04 J 

34 

146 

I50el38 


137 


193* 


33 

222 

1 


S 

; 00 1.1 

24 

69 

100 50 

9 

985 

52 11 

11 

647 

172 9.1 

7 

» 

108 1*4 


17 



24 

.16 5 

15 

239 

X62e 70 


11 

234 87 

8 

8838 

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10 

S3 


19 

7 

00 10 

19 

877 

104 80 

13 

37 

100 XI 

14 

3904 

104 30 

12 

771 

! X91e 74 


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7 

78 

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194 

150 120 


26 

116 90 

B 

336 

148 37 

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130 35 

9 

9393 

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17 

720 

761 

13 

715 

30t 10 

10 

112 . 

134 30 

10 

1699 . 

52 *0 

10 

115 ' 

02 13 

8 

93 : 

106 117 


i 

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110 1X2 


65 

08 20 

8 

5X1 ; 

£0 11 

11 

1761 : 


19 

ns i 

04 1.4 

17 

i»9 : 


35ft UAL 140 1.9118 

25 UAL pi 240 7J 

9ft UCCEL 17 

25ft UDCn -15e 4 17 
17ft UGI 244 9J 1| 
8ft UNCRes 

10ft URS 40 34 13 
21ft USFG 240 67 46 
26ft USGS 108 43 7 
12ft UniFrst 2D 13 13 
46 Unltvr X12e X? 6 
80ft UnINV 126e 5.1 10 
31ft UCamp 144 64 13 
I2ft UnCorb 340 64 13 
4ft UnlonC 

13V» UnElec 144 104 6 
23V* UnEIPl 3J0 108 
X UnElpt 640 114 

26 UnEIPiM440 124 
51 UEIofL 840 114 
20 UnEI Of Z98 114 
14ft UnEI of 213 109 
31ft UnEI Pi 272 107 
68 UnEI Pi 744 11J 
50ft UEIcrtM 840 124 
22 unExon 

37ft UnPac 140 29 II 


4896 54ft 51ft 52V*. 
615 32ft 31V* 32 - 
107 15ft 15ft 15ft 
152 25ft 24V* 24ft • 
64 22ft 21ft 22 
88 9ft 9ft 9ft 
107 lift 11 11 ■ 

7133 32ft 32 ft 32ft 
441 39ft 38 39 

14 15ft 14ft 14ft. 
2 54ft 54ft S4V*. 
317 104ft 103V* 103ft 
1275 37ft 36ft 37ft- 
2488 53ft 53ft 53 - 
13 6 6 6 

1113 17ft 17ft 17ft- 
40z 32V* 32ft 32ft 
120x 39 39 29 

26 31ft 31ft 31ft 
4Qz6f 69 69 

32 26ft 2Sft 26ft 
5 19V* 19ft 19ft 
5 25ft 25V. 25ft 
250z 63ft 63ft 63ft- 
360* 66ft 66ft 66ft- 
407 24 23 23 ■ 

1843 4716 46ft 46ft- 


Murdoch Trying 
To Buy Rest of Fox 


-CvJ 


Soles Satires ore unofficial. Yearly Utah* and lows reflect 
the previous 52 weeks Plus the current week, but not Itie latest 
trading day. Whore a sollt or stock dividend amounting to 25 
percent or more hot been pakt the year's hlc4i-low range and 
dividend are shown far the new stock only, unless otherwise 
noted, rotes of dividends are annual disbursements nosed on 
the latest dectarat Ion. 
a— dividend oteo extra I si jl 
b— annual rate of dividend plus stock dlvtoendJI 
c — IteuWanns dividend/! 
dd — coliedJl 
d— new yearly IowjI 

e— dividend declared or sold In preceding 13 monttis/1 
■ — dividend In Canadian funds. subject to 15% non-residence 
tax. 

/ — dividend doctored after spiff-up or stock dividend. 

I— dividend paid this year, omitted, deferred, V no action 
token at latest dividend meeting. 

k— dividend doctored or paid Itils year, an accumulative 
issue with dividends In arrears. 

n —new taut In the poet 53 weeks. The hfgtuew range begins 
with the start at trading, 
nd— iwxr day delivery 
P/E — pi lue-eui nines ratio. 

r — dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 months, Plus 
stock dividend. 

1— slock solli. Dividend begins with dale of split, 
sis— sales. 

t - dividend paid In stock In preceding 1? months, estimated 
oosh vote* gn ex-dtvktono or ex-distribution dots, 
u— new yearly high, 
v— trading halted. 

vl — In bankruptcy or receivership or being reoro onl ied un. 
dor the Bankruptcy Ad. or incurlllns nuumad bv sudi com- 
panies. 

wd — when distributed. 

wi — when Issued. 

ww— with warranto. 

x — ax -dividend or ex-rigtito 

xdls — ejt-tflsfrfbution. 

xw — without warranto 

y — ex-dlvidmd and Mies in full. 

rid— rleld. 

1— soles In full. 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — Just six months after 
buying hajf of 20tb Ceawry-Fox FUm Corp. for 
$250 million, publisher Rupert Murdoch is ne- 
gotiating to purchase the rest of the movie 
company from Marvin Davis, the Denver oil- 
man. sources have confirmed- , 

The talks are the la test in a series of efforts by 
Mr. Murdoch to become the sole owner of Fox. 

Mr. Murdoch had tried to acquire the entire 
company from Mr. Davis before settling for 
half in March. Three months later, Mr. Davis 
reportedly was on the brink of sel l i n g out his 
remaining holdings to Mr. Murdoch but 
changed his mind. 

Sources close to both men described the cur- 
rent negotiations as serious but one said the 
chance of reaching an agreement was "about 
even at besL" 


High . Low Bid AW\ 

SUGAR ■ 

Frafth hrooc* per mthrfc too 
Od lJOT; 1J58 1J30 1,599 

me 1544 1-524 -JJ46 U60 

Mar U80 1J» L570-.. 1J7* 

Mery 1.600 L580 1J06 

Aug N.T. NX - V642 -W60 

Od. U85 UK VU7 1J15 

Est val.: *800 Ion of so tons. Prtv. 1 
Mies: 34*5 ioto Open interest: 194(2. 


CenunodHy oad Unit 

CottM4 Santos, lb ■ 

Prlntdotti 54/30 38 ft, ya _ 
Steel billets (Pitt.), ton __Z 
iron.2 Fdry. Pblla. loa - 
Steel mtop No Ihw Pitt - 
Load Saof.ttJ - - - - 

Cooocr elect, !b 

Tin (Strolls), lb • • 

gto&E.st L. Bail*, to 

Poiiadiunvoi: 

Silver N.Y « at > 

Source: AP. 


StpLl3 ~ 

_ , Toot 
PM Ago 

1-M L46 
>51 0-76 

47X10 47X88 


COCOA 

Freedi francs per MB ho 


Z120 Z105 Z100 2.140 +J5 

■H.T. H.T. ZC30 ■ ZOW Linch. 

zns zno. ziw- zwo -- +s 
N.T. N.T. zno — +5 

N.T. R.T. UJQ — +5 

H.T. N.T. ZT30 — +.5 


EKvkieiids 


Dec N.T. N.T,. £340 ; +S. 

Est. val.: 9 lot* of 10 loos. Prev. oduat soles: - 
5 tots. Open fntoresf i S» 


COFFEE ... - . 

French francs w 180 kg . 

Sep N.T. N.T. -’U00 1500 . — 5 


Nov 1«1« UTS 7.910" +5 

JOT N.T. H.T, 1J2D 1^60 —5 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1,990 ZOOS —2 

MOV N.T. N.T. ZQ10 . — —25 

JiV N.T. N.T. 2X17 — • — ZS 

Sen N.T. -N.T. Z037 — —IS 

E5t. ML: 20 lots of 5 Ions. Prev. actual sates: 
125 lots. Ooen Interest: 331 
Source: Bourse duComamrem. < 


N.T. Nx-zoia. — —as 
N.T. N.T. 2X17 — - —25 


Mr. Davis is reportedly seeking between $300 
illion and $350 million for his remaining 


million and $350 million for 
stake. 


Fox has had financui problems recently. 

For the nine months ended May 25, Fox lost 
$80.1 million on revenue of $468.1 million. It 
blamed the losses on poor showings at the box 
office. In fiscal 1983, the company lost S89J 
million. 

However, ihic s ummer the studio had a major 
hit with “‘Cocoon,” which has grossed in excess 
of $70 million. 

In May, Mr. Davis and Fox were considering 
teaming up lo purchase part of Metromedia 
lnt, but Mr. Davis pulled out of that deal Mr. 
Murdoch went ahead on his own and agreed 1 
buy six Metromedia television stations for $ 135 
billion. 

Mr. Murdoch owns newspapers and maga- 
zines in the United States, Britain and Austra- 
lia. 

Mr. Davis is head of Davis Oil Co. of Denver 
but splits his time between Denver and Los- 
Angeles. His son, John, 34, is a production 
executive at Fox. 


Ijondon Metals 


Sept 13 ' 
Bto°*° Ask Ern* 

ALUMINUM 
sretUag per metric ton 
spot 73950 74000 75X00 75400 

forward 76100 74200 77*00 77700 

COPPER CATHODES (MMl Groda) 
Sterling per metric too 
spot 102300 102*00 103*00 UQ70O 

fcrworC 109900 >04900 >06*00 106500 

COP PER C ATHOD ES (Standard) ' 

spot " ,per 100100 100300 101700 101800 

forward 102800 lOUH 104150 T0*40O 



strike CoDs-lflit 

Price J» M »i Ok 

171 » £ *2 

m 7/j* * » 

m 1716 W • Ufc 

no im i/m Jo ^ 

I» l/M Wtt I/M - 

200 - 1/Ml/M — 


TMvtnt 

its M Un w 

J/J* an* wm 
1/M Ii ft « 

jsnci* » « 

H W W TO 

m, a* ,i» ni* 


’bxSo 8 ": 29700 29700 23X00 
30100 30200 30X00 3000 


TiMcNlwhm 2BW 
Tote eafl omm U-tfZtn 
Total put Khine SWh 
T ote) out apwM.sn.135 


HW rf9N Low 174/7 aoo»177J7-W 

Source: caoe. 


spot 1 001 00 10(000 101700 101809 

torward 102800 103UH 104X50 104*00 

LEAD 

Storting pgr metric ton 
spot 29640 29700 29700 WD 

forward 30100 30200 30106 30200 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric ton 

s£ard mmmfss 

SILVER 

TWO per troy ounce * 
pot 45050 451 SO 45809 «« 

forward 46300 46*50 47100 45*50 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling par metric taa 
sod 916000 916200 920040 920540 

forward 912140 912340 916X00 916440 

ZINC 

Sterling par metric ton 

»» 50840 31000 52700 52900 

t™™ n* njg. im. n* 

Source: Reuters. - - - - 


HongKong Company 

Ends Deposit-Taking ; 

-- .’Roam : ■. s 

HONG KONG — The Hm4 
Kang comstisrioner-of deposit-tak- 
ing companies said Friday the reg- 
istration of Manila & Hong Kong , 

Capital Corp. as a d^iosil-talting 
company bad been revr^Kd^t the 
company’s request 
.According to the 1984 Horn . 

Kong interbank directory, the coo- Unoatt ' 

^^diary of Mahfla g 


Tneasury Bills 


741 7J* 

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•#*# 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAT-SUNPAY, SEPTEMBER 14-15, 1985 



Page 13 


pEvettt Sales Up 33.1% in First Half GEC Reports 

Profit FeU in 
First 4 Months 


Reuters 

rVREA, ltaJv ni.'ut.s e . [ C \«i“es *o 1 8 J percaii id tiw first 

JJU w ^wnm *S a?Sl Sdy . 1985 from "fp™**: 

percent to2J50l S?m ‘3 it??* 1 * WporU; rose 

bffliori) frorathe ameS£? ■?!? 12 3 £ P **” 11 ovcral ! «» ftc.pcnof 
earlier same period a year The company said the group s 

Tbe company said Noah Amen- %^ « *^ ***» ™ ■ 


tie region ris- 
ing 340 percent in the First half over 
the first six months of 1984. 

Parmt company gross margins 
rose 31.9 percent to 586.6 biffion 
lire from 444.7 billion lire a year 
earlier. Cash flow was up 593 per- 

S™ &“» Ure 

n ' .““dwu me auu u 

'-ash now rose as a proportion of end of June 1984. 


and has dose ties with American' 
Tekpbooe & Tdegraph Co^ which 
owns. 25 percent of the Italian 
youp. 

Parcel company act debt at the 
end of Jane stood at 159.4 billion 
(he compared with net Ikndditv at 


New orders acquired by the par- 
ent company in the first half to- 
taled 807 bilnon lire, an increase of 
9.4 percent while group orders rose 
34 percem to 23473 billion lire. 

Olivetti said that by the end of 
group orders nad risen by 
and parent company 
*! percent from same 
earlier, but gave no 

figures. 

Research expenditures contin- 
ued to rise; with first-half spending 
up 25.4 percent to 973 billion lire 
btun 78.1 billion a year earlier. 

Net group profits in 1984 were 


thread of December 1984 of 1&X8 ■ 356 billion fire, after research con- 
bifijon fire and 61.4 bUfion at tlK '. criburions, on sales of 4,578 billion 

lire. 


BankAmerica 
To SeUBmlding 

Reuters 

SAN FRANCISCO— Bank- 
America Com. said Friday that 
it had signed a letter erf intent 
to sell Us headquarters complex 
in San Fr ancisco to Waller H. 
Shorensfcin, a developer, for 
S660 million. 

The complex consists of a 
52-story building, the bank's 
main office and an adj oining 
(building. The company said it 
f S{bel>eved the price would be the 
['highest ever in the United 
States for a single building com- 
plex. Under terms of the letter, 
BankAmerica will lease back 60 
percent of the lower initially, 
plus all of the main office and 
the adjoining building. 

The tower building is the 
largest in San Francisco, and 
the complex has a total of 1.8 
million square feet (162,000 
square meters) of rentable 
space. Goring is expected be- 
fore the end of this month. 


COMP ANY NOTES 


. Airship Industries, the British di- man conglomerate, to produce auto 
rigible manufacturer, said it had parts in Rorea beginning next year, 
been licensed to cany fare-paying Konisbirobu Photo Co. will make 
passengers. It said that it had no a l-for-20 bonus stock issue on 
current plans to start passengerser- Dec. 5 for shareholders registered 
vice and that its eight airships were on Ocl 20 to pay back premiums 
committed to advertising or other j cqmnjated partly by convertible 
non passenger work. bonds issued last year. 

Ko Tmlo-Bnc Cmp. PLC ibe 

Daiwa Securities Co. will make a Standard Telephone Sc Cables 
3-for-100 bonus stock issue on PUC said that its business had not 
Nov. 15 for shareholders registered dramatically improved since the 
on Sept 30 to pay back premiums company omitted its midyear divi- 
on 20 million new capital shares dend and reported sharply lower 
issued at the market price through interim profits and that further 
public placement in December cost-cmung measures, including 
1984. additional layoffs, would be mev- 

B Al Afrfines of Israel has re- itable. 
ported a S 9.7-million loss in the Toshiba Cocp. bas lowered its 
year ending March 3 1, partly biam- prqeoed capital spending on semi- 
ing the effects of a government ban conductors to less than 100 billion 
on flights on the Jewish sabbath, yen ($440 million) in the year end- 

Geoeraf Motors has formed two mg next March 31 from an earlier 
more joint ventures with ihe estimate of 108 billion yen, because 
Daewoo Group, a large South Ko- of sluggish sales. 


Reuters 

LONDON — General Electric 
Co. PLCs pretax profit for the First 
four mantis of its 1985-86 finan- 
cial year was down from the like 
period last year, although earnings 
per share for the full year are ex- 
pected to be up, the chairman, 
James Prior, said at the annual- 
meeting Friday. 

Sales in ihe first four months 
were slightly ahead and the results 
are in line with the company’s in- 
ternal budget, which foresaw an 
imp rovement in the second half, 
Mr. Prior said. 

Shares in GEC which is not con- 
nected with Genera! Electric Co. of 
the United States, dosed Friday at 
164 pence, down 6 pence from 
Thursday. 

Share dealers said the market has 
anxiously been awaiting GEC s an- 
nual meeting statement in view of 
worries about the electronics sec- 
tor. 

GECs pretax profit for the year 
ended March 31 amounted to £725 
/niU ion (5955 million) on revenue 
of £5.98 billion. The previous year’s 
pretax profit was £671 million on 
revenue of £5.6 billion. 


New Director Named 
By UJK. Merger Board 

Reuters 

LONDON — The British board 
that regulates mercer activity has 
appointed John .Walker-Haworth, 
a director of S.G. Warburg & Co- 
director-general as of Dec. 9. the 
Monopolies and Mergers Commis- 
sion announced Friday. 

Mr. Walker-Haworth will suc- 
ceed Timothy Barker, director-gen- 
eral for the last two years. 


Americans , in a Turnabout , Copying the Japanese 

(Cbotnmed from Page 11) . streets, for example, already pub- World War II, Japan devoted itself 
logy was pioneered by the Unit- Wishes 1 40- word summaries of arti- to importing lechnotaies from the 


and HiSriare^ntrcally design- 
ing plans for computers far more 
powerful than anything that now 
exists. 


was pioneered by the Unit- Iisfaes 1 40- word summaries of arti- to importing technologies from the 
m.wu^bat Japan is ireadytte des «? U00 Japanese chemical °*j 

dominant producer of amino adds, magazines, phis innumerable per- and applying them. D 
an important field in biotech, and kxficals from other countries. And nylon patent led to Japan sboom 
is genSy believed to beimprov- Engineering Information, a New in synthetic textiles; Bell Lfbonto- 
mgitswoi extremely quickly York company, publishes abstracts nes breakthroughs in nuking tran- 
The United States stS h2 the from 5,000 journals from around astors produced J«an s senucon- 

the world, including 150 from Ja- ductor industry; RCA s licenses 
pan _ ' provided the foundation for Ja- 

„ - r aMn , e v.-; that pan's color televisions, and so on. 

It is Japans basic reearch that F ]951 through 1984 , more 
experts say the United States needs than 42,000 contras were signed 
- . .*® n 3 £ f ut ^ most,- cot inventions t transfer technology to Japan 

These are all emerging scientific that already are practical. And to from abroaA y j^cogy 
areas that the United States cares this end. several American coropa- CFQSSed ^ occa ^ Roin „ the 
about immensely and, in the past nies — including International 

year or so, there has beenhirngeof Boainess MadrinesConxTMotor- ^ u[ ^ ^ meantime, the Japa- 
AiSnicaninlftes^jpL^temrocltthr ola^ Burtmighs, General.. ngSf . constructed their own 

nofogy. A ampessionar subcora- Motors and Hi^bes — are said to ^search industry. A rigorous edu- 
mittee published a rqiort qamha- be improving their survefflance of atiofJ 555 ^ —longer hours and a 
sizing business concerns about Japanese technology, normally nraH^mir war m«n that by 

being able to keep up with; Japa- from offices in Tokyo. the time they graduate from high 

nese technology. Two. conferences widi the backing of several school Japanese students have had 
have addressed the issue. - American companies, and a two- four more years of school than 

year, $500,000 grant from the Com- 
merce Department, the American 
Electronics Association opened an 
office last year in Tokyo, m part to 


American companies have sent 
more scientists to Japan to learn 
about that country’s latest scholar- 
ship. For the firct time, MTT is 
wfering Japanese classes, begin- 
ning this fall The Commerce De- 
partment is proposing a joint ven- 
ture with industry to program 
computers to translate Japanese 
intatnglish- 

Ooe result of the mowing con- 
cern in the United States about 
Japanese scientific progress has 
been -a modest boom in the publica- 
tion of indexes and abstracts. of 
Japanese scientific articles. 

For some companies that al- 
ready do this for outer foreign jour- 
nals, this just means expanding the 
Japanese ^section. Chemical Ab- 


p repared a 


American students 
foundation. 

Then, goaded by foreigners who 
called them mere imitators, Japa- 
roonitor Japanese technology. Sev- nese industry and business began a 
era! months ago, the office issued a major campaign, about five years 
72-page source list on Japanese ago, to develop a basic research 
technology, and this fall it will be- capability second to none, 
gin publishing a newsletter on tech- “It has been said for a long time 

nologicai developments. that the Japanese are good only at 

“With our small staff we can't applying technology, that they arc 
look ai all technology, but weTUry not skilled enough or talented 
to pick the raisins out of the cake;” enough to develop technology on 
said Rail* J- Thomson, a senior their own,” said Yasuo Wataru, 
vice president of the association, general manager of tire Washing- 
Behind America’s scramble to ton office of Nissholwaa American 
monitor Japanese technology is a Corp„ a Japanese trading compa- 
fundamental shift in Japanese sd- ny. “1 don't think that is true. Cer- 
entific research. uunly we are spending a great deal 

For most of the period since of money on basic research-" 


Since 1965, Japan has roughly 
quadrupled its research expendi- 
tures. In the United States, spend- 
ing on research has grown by less 
than 50 percent in the same period. 

Moreover, in Japan it is the big 
cpin p-~rcifts, the koisho, that have 
dominated research and develop- 
ment, which could mean that schol- 
arship is more likely to lead to 
commercial gains than work fi- 
nanced by. for example, the Penta- 
gon in the United States. 

A study of research spending in 
the two countries, in a forthcoming 
book by James G Abeggfen and 
George Stalk Jr., two consultants in 
the Boston Consulting Group's To- 
kyo office, found that in 1978 ma- 
jor UJS. and Japanese companies 
both spent about 3 percent of total 
revenues on research. But by 1983, 
the fraction had risen to 5.1 percent 
in Japan, compared with 3.7 per- 
cent in the United States. 

In scientific fields, software and 
aerospace are the only two areas in 
which Japan is indisputably well 
behind the United Slates — in part 
because erf past U.S. strengths and 
heavy military spending on aero- 
space. 

“Competitive strength of Japa- 
nese companies has bom based on 
price and on quality of product," 
Mr. Abegglen and Mr. Stalk say in 
their book, “Kaisha. the Japanese 
Corporation.” “Added now, very 
rapidly, is a highly competitive lev- 
el of research and development ex- 
penditure, with technological inno- 
vation becoming the center of 
competitive capability." 


ADVERTISEMENT 




\_ r *'■ 


■ ■' 








Sept. 13# 1985 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) 

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|«Hd) RBC Maa.Currencv Fd J 2443 

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Kwlinc.: Bid. * *»%»£-— 8 HS 

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17 DmeniMra Si v .lJinriavOl-377- 

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-Id) Americo-Voter^^^H 


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2 d ) Universal Fun d , »P OJ41 

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wl Act toonds Investments Fund, 
w) Acttveet In*. 


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|w[ Ao5taJn1emat1g nol Fond~ I 
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dl CjSftSSfejd Fond s W 

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% 749.13 
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di Europe C_r. 

wl Flrit Eagle Fund_ 

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wl Fixed income Tnans 
w I Foneelex imue Pr._ 
w) Forexfuud. 


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Foadltaila. 


d) Sovemm. Sec. Food* 

d | Franfef-Tmtl lolerzln* 

Wl Hagssmann HWBS. M.V 

Hestta Funds 


Cm 


(d 


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IBEX Hold teas LM 
IU4W 

I LA-1 G3 ■ . — 

Inferfund SA— _ 

Intermaricet Fund. 



DM 

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. S 1200.13 
SF 1)423 
S 1021 
1 1043 

. S 1523 

_ i VW 

MtertUbtinoMM. Fd. CLV. S 82022 

Inti Securities Fund S 1124 

Invexto DWS DM 5527 

tmmt Attantunm s id 

ikrttortune Inti Fwtd SA s 1543 

Japan Selection Fund S 11052 

Jaoan Pacific Fund S 10029 

JeHer Pins. MIL Lid *1141291 

KlmUmofl Benson lnt*l Fd. _ S 2220 

Klelnwnrt Bene. JaP. Fd S 4*27 

Korea Growth Trust 

Lei com Fund 



NAAT — 

Nlklco Growth Pockooe Pd — 

N tenon Fund 

NOSTEC PortWIO 

Movotec Investment Fund — 

, , NAJAJF 

!m) NSF FJ.T 

d ) Pacific HerUon Invt. Fd 

' PAMCURRl Inc... — ... 

Parian Sw. R Est Geneva. 

PermanAdue N.V_ 

PSCO l Fund M.V. . 

PSCO InH. M-V— 

Putnam Inti Fund 

Pr1-T«c0 ...... 

Quantum Fund N.V. 

Rente Fund 
Renfinvesf 



dt Reserve lnsarvd C 



SCI/Tech. SALuxambaura^ * 924 

Seven Arrow* Fund H.V % *74.97 

State St. Bank Eaultv HdesNV 5954 

St ra tegy investme n t Fund_^ * 2225 

Syntax LlaiCioM A) - S 9.72 

_. TectmoGnM<hFund__ $F 8450 

w> Tokyo Pnc. Hold. (Seal S 8422 

Tokyo Pat. Hold. N.V— *11014 

Transpacinc Fund * 7929 

TUrwtee Fond S 10427 

Tweedy Arawne n.vJ3«s»A^_ *223356 

T weedy Amwne i>uj:ia* 5 B S1SS.19 

rowae (UXI n.v * 


UNI CD FundHH 

UN) Band Fund 

UNI CoMtal Fund. 
VonderW tt Assets. 


worm FimdJLA. 


_ D '*)0W49 

: | n BS 

_ S 1127 


- #l» *** prte as on Amsterdam Stock Eechanu 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


EMPLOYMENT 


exJECi/nvES available 


(Conduned From Bade Page) 


MARKETING. AOVSITTSING 
Gemmn executive, PM).. 47. ueerno- 
wnd management and pate erpar 
erne- byname, sen-tfarter, prngnav. 
neootetor, seeks position or retire sen- 
tenon- Please redy to Bax 2195TLM.T.. 
Fr«dtehs>. 15.MOOO 


I Fronlthirt.'hton. 


MHXCAL SURGICAL PRODUCTS - 

French husness executive, 36. nuent 

EnaUi/Ptendi, 12 yeerv experience 

in Irondi £ Wes# Europe m«6cnJ 

field, ides, seeted«aBmwng position 

in Pons Sox 2719, Her old fnfcxxiB. 
92S21 NeuBy Cedes. Fiance 


uxasnes OPHCBt/OfnCE inanog- 

cr, Dutch, afis 31. experience rfi Mo- 

fiasr + Atrca seeks pasrfion abroad. 
PJO Box 2011, Goudo^Hotand 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


tOOMUG FOR TOF BUWGUAL pe«- 

atreR Ccfl the experti Gfi INjutiM. 
Mn Bencrd 758 S? 30 Para 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


LANGUAGE TRADMNG 1NSTTTU1T 

sedts quolihed Eft. teacher watt expe- 
rience lor drtienanq position <w«t> 
good confisom. work papers necn- 
sery. Sand C V, dvtq. present sdary 
tnbax 2716. Ud TiAxme. 92S2t 
Neudy Cedar, France 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MOUSSCSPER- young woman pre- 

fetred Opportunity lo fudne’ educo- 
fean, vxtedng Inning Engfish it nec- 
essary. Must M free K3 tr Orel to four 
homes. New Hope PA, NYC. Man 


& Antibes, Frixtce. Sepmote tmng 

quarters. Lodang & drivers license 
preferred. Send letter with leoent 
phono & recommendcuons to- Box 
2723, Herald Triwne. 92521 NeuiBy 
Cedes. France 


AU PAIR needed November 1. Live In 

Socdond Counte, NT, 45 mnufA 

From NYC Own Loom. ErgWi Sr-.ak 
no. Norv-Smoker. Core a Mo school 

dSd-wi HO A 1 1] plus We houm- 

keepmg. rVcse write mckang refer 
mess and photo to Mn Paine, 10 
Araserdan Road, New City, NY. 
10956 USA. 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


YOUNG RSNOf WOMAN 34 j 

En^tsh Mwks Au-Psr tpb U 




B4GUSH NAMOS A mothers' hefcs 

Nanh r • " 

Suae*, 


Agenn, 53 Owtc h Bd, Hove, 
i. OK. feh Brighton f273j 29044 


AUTOMOBILES 


MERCBJC5 fmm EUROPE 
WE FH3BWJZE CABS TO MEET US. 
SAFETY STANDARDS 

D.O.T. & E.P.A. 

S YEARS EXPSBSUCE 
X PRAMC INC 

fachmopois. Instate 317-29UJ0B 


AUTQMOBtlE DR. GStL 
Rofls-Rojos Comiche, cobnoiet, brand 
new. avaJaUe td once, whrte /block 
letaher. Pnas USSUOOQO 
Abo Mercedes. BMW, Porsche, Perron 


73* 652m M ffl 942V 10036 


PORSCHE 911 CABRIOLET 
1986 model, at passble opnoro. 
uidmlpg axdytc converter. 
Defivery eerty October. Cafi Munich 
PI 89 - 35 42 rn (Weekdays) 


TOUR CONTACT M GERMANY fix- 

mod buys of Mercedes, BMW and 
Porsche cars. Enhaiu bn and Export. 
Tel- n 2861/7201. Th. 813424. 


1964 OAMtflt 2500 CC V8. auto- 

matic 56.000 rates, only 2 owners, 
LW>. C1.59S Tet London 566 2261 


AUTO RENTALS 


AU PAS - Engbsh ueoting norvsmok 

tr to help eve for 1 year old & 

newborn, driver, to live in inwersrty 

town, tft ta. horn Wbshn^cn, Dll 
Charactef references requred Write 

to Dr. & Mrs. Mark Kunmel, 1508 

Wesrfidd CT.. Chortdtes Wle. va 
2290?. USA 


2 AU PAIRS/ HOUSBCE9EBS. Clear 

water Rondo, for 2 homes rwn-smok- 

er, English speaking, drivers bemse. 

Send resume, references, pfiote & tei 

number to P.O. Box 20871, St. Peters- 

burg. FLA 33742 USA. more mf omo 
lion on fomi&es with wtmen request. 


AU PAIR- To axe for 2 girts. 6 yeas & 

9 months. 6 hours, 5 (toys a week, 
light housekeeping 30 mm. from 
NYC, awn room pars boo'd & exceh 
lent salary, tend prtures & resune to 
590 Dor emus Avenue, den 2ock Nj. 
Q74S2 tet 201 445-2719 


AU PAIR/HOUSSQ>B- 2 chUren 

ages 6 & 2 expeang 3rd child. Met 
spool Engfch, timers license. Send 
resume & phoio to 29 Brompton feL 

Garden Cny, NY 11 530 USA. Tek 51b 

7464848 


AU PAIR- Ft. Lauderdale. Honda To 

care for 2 boys ages 7 & 9. Drivers 
icense preferred College opportuni- 
ty. Send photo & references to: Mrs. 
M 3ii m, 11)35 N.W. 26th Street, 
Sunrise HA 33322 USA 


AU PAIR WANTS NEW YORK. 

Workrg couple with 2 chldren - S & 

J Engfch spaedmg a must, bght 
houseteepina Send resume, photo I- 
Feuenrmn. tU7 £ 66 Sf, BrooUyn, 
NY1 1234. (718) 76333611 


AU PAKL French gd preferred. 5 year 

old pH. Your own room in o large 
Virgra Beach home. References ex- 

changed 6465 CoHege Pak Squcxe, 
Virgano Beach. Mryna 23464 USA. 
T«fc804 42D395D 


EXCH194T POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

for Engkh/Frendi nannies in CHicooo 

& suburbs- Please send recommends 

nans and restms to Reit-A-Mun. 

4765 North Lncdn Avenue, Chtcogo. 

1.60625, USA let 312 275 OD55. 


AU PAIR; French lamiy seeks help for 

boby R 2 young grts, shxt Non. fix 1 

yeor, countryside neo imal town, cor 

!j J .Hinn Peyras, Si LaurerU de 
16100 Cognac Hence 


HOUSaSPBO. NANNES, buttes - 

podtam now. MAID INC. 1424 KeA 
worth Av, Gfenwew IL 40025. USA, 
lb 752466, tefi 312 998-11171 


AU PAK needed m Manhattan. 2 txy 

him, norvsmcier, 2 yeprs or lonair. 
Send photo Ben 2/05. Herald Tn- 
bune. 92S2I Newly Cedcx. France 


AU PAR Seek young girl, experi- 

enced. 2 dxMten. 6 B.>yeor old. 
house £ garden. Tel Poris 534 24 S3. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


SESV* 


Moyer, 2166 Menton Avt., 

Lowmbus, Ohio 43221, USA, (6U 1 
48S-4097, 


YOUNG FRRICHMAN, 22, with de- 

gree from the Coofang School in f*oe, 


19 87 France. 


NORTH 


TC uounjn ftwmie, icn 

INT.IJCTd 01-444 4911. 


B4GUSH CHAUffBK. 46 , leekshd 

ttrtificcfc. 


tonsH, etc. UX Pll 907 1034 


CHARC RENT A CAR. Prestige an 

with phone. Spurt. Mercedes, 

Jaguar. BMW. tmousoes, smcU an. 

46 r Pierre Charron, 75003 Pais. Tet 
720JJOAO Telex 630777 F CHAFLOC 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


GA fNTBENATIONAL 

AUTO EXPORT TO: 

USA. Crmadc. Mi d d l e fimt , Jgpm, 

Worl dw ide defivery of new and 
used European care. 

* Worldwide Ex port at sore pans 
ham M 8 !C®BrPC*SOfE. Bfiw& 
VW/AUD1 

• EPa/DOT comereon, woh 
mxvontee 

USA dateery via las Angeles. 
Houston ft New York. 

» (V own (ron^xnJteSW'a- 
g»hy aic»^hy pgig botto rig 
and warrotey progtixit 
AjrA. Member, wSch keeps us 
updated. 5 yecn e x penecce. 

GA INIHINATIONAL 

14, Schgdrart, 

TeL 


TRASCO 

1NTERNA710NAL 

LHD. Mercedes Ten Free 
(jfoousxnm 36“ ft 44 1 ■ 
Armoured an ana kmouanes 
Coach tedi eon 
Other rrdtes ft exolia 

Over 100 uris in Stock 
World wide defivery 
Direct from source 
D.O.T. ft LPA 


Tet London 
Telex 01J 


1 629 7779 
7RA5G. 


Trosas London Ltd. 

6667 Pork lore, London W.l. 

SwitzerionhUK-W. Germany 


NEW AMERICAN CARS 



CHAUFFEUR 

SERVICES 


AUTO SHIPPING 

Wetldvride Car Shfaxoing 
TBANSSUP Gmfifl 

BatL-Snudr^tr. 53/60 

2800 Braron 1 

Tel: (0)421/ 14264 Tlx: 246584 Tram D 
Bei den Muefren 91 

2CC0 Hartoxg 11 

Tet <0)40/373703 TK 214944 Tram D 
aho DOT/EPA + bond in USA 
Member of AJCA, Wcttengron 




mmm 

AUTO CONVERSION 

B*A/ DOT 

CONVERSIONS 

• Customs brokerage/bonifing service 

• Pici-up ft defvery anywhere in the 

Eastern Ui. & fexca 

• fiufesaonri wori irstog only the 
highest quddy componetes 

• Giioranteed S’ A / DOT approval 
CHAMPAGNE IMPORTS MC. 

2294 NoHb fferet Rdl firifield, 
PA 19440, USA Tel: 215 822 6S52 
Telex 4971917-CHAMP 

EPA/DOT 

• Superior fteginaoriog « 

• Curiame OereoKe ft BaacSeg * 

• Prompt Pwxonri Servioa * 

CO.D. AUTO DtSTimUTORS 
CHABOTS Of DffiRE 

P.O. 15 fiunwteodvSe PA 1B949 
Telex 7D55J4 (2IS 766-7676 

Col For Free Corauttoboa 

DOT - EPA 

uca<sa> csmncATioNs 

We mrange shfpTO. eustams Itonrfng 
mi US. 5 year repair won antes far 
Emupeui aifTO$- 

ATLANTIC IMPORT® MOTORS 

r«w jKser.uSA 

Tet 201-322-7811; 226078 

Mfii 



Fast door-todoor defivery. 

Call or We* 

MTSI EUROPE 

MUDDUE EAST AUTOMOBILES UD 

monte carlo 

Tet ra 25 74 32. 

Ike: 479*30 AutO MC 


MffiOTES 5PEOAUSTS 
FOR USA -f-MIDDif EAST 

for 20 yean. 

(ARGE STOaCOP NEW 
MSKH3B CARS 
200 5, 280 SL 2BO SSL 
500 SL, 500 SH. 500 SEC wS. both 
velours <nf leather urierior. 

1986 Mooas W 01 BE 

AVAILABLE SHORTLY 

Shipment & defivery worldwide. 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 

MAJNZQ 1ANDSTS. 191, 

D-6000 FRANKFURT/ M 

TH; 10) 69-73 30 61 

TLX: 414018 


HRBIRD TRANSAM 
NEW 1985 

Fad defivery. 

We deal with afl fu m xto i inducing 
Regeftafon, Sfeppng and Conversion 
to European speoftco Ao M . 

To order your firebird Tramotn 
ca# or totec 
(Nisi amort 

MBME EAST AUTOMOBILES 1ID. 
MONTE CARLO 
Telephone; K3 25 74 3? or 
JAem 479550 AUTO MC 


IMiSA 

ofhqal rolls royce 
DEMB FOR BBJGUM 

TAX FRH CARS 
ROUS ROYCE BENTLEY 
RANGE and LANDROVS 
SAAB 

Also Used Cm* 

rue MDD&BOURG 74^2 
1170 Brussels 
TBj 2-673 33 92 
71X- 20377 


10 YEARS 

Yfe Deferer Canto fee Worfd 

TRAN5CO 

Keeping a constont Stock of more than 
300 brand new an, 
raddng 5000 hoppy cfierto every yecr. 
Servj for free rnukicakir carriog. 
Traroco SA, 95 No ad rioun. 
2030 Antwerp, Belgium 
Tri 321/542 62 4ft iitSsSBi TRANS B 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


NEW MERCEDB& 

PORSCHE, fer m u wd te e defivery 

FROM STOCK 


bead, rom te ni nn m USA 

RUTEINC 

TAUNUSSTC. Si <000 fRANKHST 
W Gena., wl (0)6^232351. to 41159? 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTL DELIVERY 

VVTa fceep i s tar y s tock of 
most cor hfonot 
TeL 02/640 55 13 
Telex 65656 
42 rue Lens, 

1050 Brussels. 


TRANS AUTOMOBILE 

- lit dess service 

- AD /rakes, A sno dob available 
. Brand new or second hand an 

j- EAA-DOT -insurance 


Tdb 322/3587702, 2nd hwd dept- 
322/3587700. Telex 6*587 TRANSO EL 
AVE DB TB1BJLS 14. 

1640 eHCO€5T-G&«SE (BaGfUMl 


ROM STOCK 

Meroedss 300 SL new, midnigV blue 
Porsche 928 S automatic, new. bloat 
Mercedes 190 E lorireer 
olher mcies and models upon request 
Same day registrobon possible. 

iczKovns 

OaridendrasM 36. 068027 Ztvidi 
Tri: 01/202 76 10. Tritnc 819915. 


280 SI. new. bfitobfcot/gray, loaded 

fVmt^e ConverfiUte new, botferf, 
berk blue /blue, DfcOvM. 

Randle Com te rttole turbo, new, 
boded, blade/ block, DMUOJMO. 

300 SE ‘B5, rS/creom, boded, 
DM58,000. 

FA. AO/ ll TeL Germany |C?62344092 
or 462l!tlx: 464966 


LEGAL SERVICES 


DOMINICAN DIVORCES, to M02. 
5onlo Dotmgo. Domingan KepubSc- 


LOW COST FUCHTS 


ROUND TV* WORLD from $860. 
Cheapest fixes worldwide. MaSbu 

Tram. Danvak 30, Anton ttom/Hot- 

tond. Trt CT 2740*1. Telex 14635 


NY ONE WAY SI 5a Everyday N.Y.. 

Wetf Ctsasi 5145. Rons 2S 9290. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


US MAGNIFICENT 
STH1A 
SOLARIS 

7 AND 14 DAY CRUISK 

To toe Greek blends. Turkey. 
Egypt ft Israel. 

Sailing Every Monday from Piraeus 

THE YACHT-UKE 
STELLA 
OCEANIS 

3 AND 4 DAY CRUISE 

To the GreeV Iskaids ft Turkey. Sodng 
every Monday & Friday from Piraeus 

Phase coph> to vrxi Travel Agent o>: 
SUN UNE 

2, Kar. Servxss St., Athens 10562 
Tries: 215621. Phone 3228883. 

Paris trt &5 80 36 
Munich tri 398 SI l 
Geneva est 327 1 10 
Zurich tri 391 36 55 


HELIAS YACHTING. Yacht Owners. 
Aasde«ixas2a Athens 10671. Greece. 


HOTELS 


SWITZERLAND 


2BOS of 10/84 

3400 km hkxrienl Bh*. gray leother 
Airtoraotic ABS. many more eargs, 
DM58J35 nckrir^va!. 


SE of 2/84 

58,000 Itm, dassK white, blue fabric; 
OUtomtoic ABS, ctum Control, mgny 
more extras, DMS3UOO mctotiiig vto. 
AUTOHAUS THOMAE GMH 
ATTN. MR. NSMAUER _ 
FRANXfUrr, WEST GBIMANY 
TH: IO> 69-7(«0 *1 
IIX; 041 1 149 HBTO 0 


GENEVA 

SESJDBKX W FRANCE 
4 Aw. de France, CH-1202 Geneva 
Tri 0041 fe/31 14 79 
Beautiful, first class, cirHxnditioned 
te te dentiri f-rmshed opo r t m ena and 
stuefios. Fully equipped kitchen, 
da4, m»d service. 

Weekly ond monthly rdes. 

Excelent location. 


ESCORTS A GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SERVICE 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New Yak 
330 W. 56tft St.. NY.C I001P USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR OBIT CARPS AND 
CHECKS ACCST8D 
Private Memberships Avrriabte 

Ute pwt mJ wimeng %*nrka bas 
bean fe atu re d a* tea top l ari 
exdadva Escort Samca by _ 
USA A arfsmahonri Mewmeda 
inchicfing rwfio mid TV. 


* USA A TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERfCAN 

ESCORT S8MCE. 

EVERYWhBIE YOU AKE CS GOL- 

1-813-921-7946 

Coil free from US.- 1-BtP-CT-^W 
Coll free from Rondo: 1-800-282-0892. 
Low eN Eastern welcome s you bodd 


CAPRICE 

BCORTSERYia 
IN NEW YORK 
TEL- 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 
KENSINGTON 

ESCORT SaVKE 
10 KBWNGTON CHURCH St W« 
ra.- 9379136 OR 9379133 

All nqer aedR caw accepted. 


HIROPEAN E5CORT SERVICE How 
B ^g3 t 5T66 O5tf/66 84_80 

fRAMffURr “TOP TfiN" Eaxxi Ser 

v«.069/5?doa 


nUUtfnjRT - ANNF5 6con Setwee. 

Tri 069 / 2081-03- _ 


inNBQN OBKH/CBUMH AB- 

^baxt Semce. Iri 381 6852 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort Service. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


LONDON 

Portman Escort Agency 

67 Oritem Street, 
London Wl 

Tab 486 3724 or 4S6 1 1SB 
AB na|or credit conk accepted 


★ LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT 5SVKI 
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F ridays 

MfEX 


Closing 


Tables include me nationwide prices 
up to Hie dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. j 

Via The Associated Press 


IfljUiih (k Cl0S6 

Htofi Low Stock Div. YM. PE 188sHM> LowOiwt-OiUe 



F l'Ml-.- ' f. ' .U. T * 


9% 4W 
16% 13 
7% 4% 

3<6 2% 

23% 17% 
40 31% 

15% 7% 

2% 1% 
33% 15% 
6% 2% 
Mb 5% 
13% 1Mb 
7% 2% 
% % 
ins ms 
2% % 
17% TM4 
4 V. 2% 
12% 7 
29 14% 

4% 1% 

37% 30% 
9% 6 

9% 4% 



7% CDlS 
S'A CMICP 
1% CMXCP 
13% CRS 
7% CoesNj 


34 « 1? 
5 

138 104 8 
« 24 20 


10% Col RE 138 104 8 

18% Colmot 40 24 20 

3% Canon n 34 

Vi Cairn wl 

7% Calproo sot 94 14 
11 Cameo 44 33 8 
1% Cain pm 
13% CMorcg 30 
1B% CdnOcc 44 
1% Conf.ll 

8% Cores , 17 

8% CarsA .10 7 14 

4% Careen IB 


19 ia% is ia — % 
221 10% 10* 10% 

105 1% 1% 1% 

117 17% 17% 17% 

B2 1Mb 10 13% — % 

103 6% 6V. 4% 

14 12% 12% 12%—% 
U 25% 25% 25% — % 

,3 * %+* 

22 B*4 B% 8% + % 
19 MM 13% 13%— W 
10 1% 1% 11k 
48 15% 15% 15% 

1 19% 19% 19% — % 

2 1% 1% 1% . 

4 14% 14 14 — % 

17 13% 13% 13% — M 

B8 11% 11% 11% + M> 



10% .4% Quaogi 


24 9* * 


A A 1 

M 

18% 18% 
2% 2% 
12U 12% 

■ 37% 38% 

5 5 

48k 4% 
10% 10% 
i 2% 3% 

' Wft'SS 

i 18% 18% 

i «% J.. 

15% 14 

. 21% 22% 


3% * lISRlntf 


24% IN 
22% 15% 

12 4 

16% 4% 

19 13% 

24% 18% 
27% 10% 

7% 3% 

7% 3% 
2% I 
25% 16 
14% 6% 

13 8% 


OEA 

Oofcwd 

OdbtAn 

OdotB* 

OtlArt 

OUalnct 

OBten* 

OOktee 

Oopenh 

Ormond 

OSuIvns 

OxIrdF 

OzorkH 


12 

JD8b 3 11 


34 U 
40 15 77 
34 U 20 


42 2.1 14 
XB 60 11 
30 1J 11 


5 19% 
63 17% 
89 5% 

38 6% 

N 19 
2 20% 
24 24% 

3 4% 

2 5% 

4 1% 
20 20% 
56 13% 

7365 1IW 


19% 

17% 

5 - % 
4%— % 
19 
20 % 

24% — Vfc 
4% 

5% + % 
1 % 

20% 

t3%— % 
11 % + % 


17% 12% jocfvn 
7% 5% Jacob* 
4% 2% JotAm 

1% % JetAwt 

9M 5% Jetran 
6% 3 JohnPd 
11% 7 JahnAir 
11% 6 Jotmlnd 


7% 3% JmpJkn 


jaelyn 31% 3.9 8 42 

Jacob* <0 

JotAm 8 385 

JetA wt 70 

Jerran 311103 13 58 

JohnPd 4 

JohnAm JO 43 10 40 

Johnlnd 3 33 

JmpJk n 9 18 


UM 12% 12% — % 

5% 5% 5%— % 

* * 

7 AM 6% — % 
3% 3% 3% 

7% 7% 7% + Vk 

8 7% 7%— % 

3% 3% 3% 



39% 30% 
4% 1% 

1616 10 
13 10% 

16 9% 

23% 13% 
9% 5% 
16% 8 
8 3% 

2 % % 
9% 4% 
4% 2% 
4% 3% 

4% 3% 
5% 2% 
5% 3% 

3% 2 
14% 10% 
30% 22% 


KnCSPf 450 133 
KoPokC S 

KqvCp .20 14 7 

Kayjn u ? 

KearNI 40 3 j0 IB 

Ketchm -5B1 35 14 

Key Co J0* 33 23 

KevPt! 30 15 19 

KayCa 7 

KmrCswt 
KevCaun 

KWdewt 

Kllem 31 

Klrark 

Kirby 

Kll Mta 14 

Kleerv JJ2r 5 

Knoti ]5 

KoaerC 2J2 84 79 


: 34 34 

3% 3% 
12% 12% 
11 % 11 % 
13% 13% 
16% 14% 
7% 7% 
10 % 10 % 
3% 3% 
% % 
4% 416 

3% 3% 
3% 3% 

3% 3% 
3 2% 

4% 4% 
2 % 2 % 
14% 14% 
27% 27% 


34 -% 

3% 

12 % 

11%— % 
13% — % 
16% 

7% — % 
10% 

3% + % 
% 

4U 

3% — % 
3% 

3% 

2% 

4% + % 
2% + % 
14 to — % 
27% + % 


6% % GNC En 

6% 4% GRI 
4% 2% GTI 


15 % % ' % 

80 4% 4% 41% — J* 

106 13 2% 2% 2%— M 


2% 1% L5B 

3% 2% La Bare 
7% 3% La pm 
19% 11% LndBnn 
19% 11% Lndmk 
14% 9% Laser 
27% 21% LearPP 
9% 2% ueePh 
31% »% LeMahs 
6% 3% LolSurT 
34 7% LWFPh 

3% 1% LlfeRsl 
4% 2% UHM 
39% 27% Lorlmr 
19 10U< Lumex 

14% 8% LundvE 
1516 9% Luria 
14% 10 Lrdal 

26% 11% LvnCSS 

10% 8% LvnchC 


40 33 11 
40 24 12 
36 

300 140 

12 

jn Jii 
40e U 12 


16 

sm 5 31 
16 
10 
4 

20 17 B 

30 20 22 


18 2% 
88 2% 
4 4% 

31 18% 
3 17 
304 10% 
77 21% 

139 4U. 

17 39% 
35 5% 

140 34% 
182 2 

7 4 

Z74 32% 
49 17V. 
86 13% 
41 9% 

38 13ta 
213 12% 
132 10U 


7% 2% 

2% 216 — % 
3% 4 + % 

18% 18%— % 
17 17—16 

ic-% nm. 

31 31% 

6 % 6 % 

29% 29% + Ml 
5% 5%— % 

33 33% + % 

1% 2 + M 

4 4 — % 

31% 31%— % 
14% 17 
13% 13% — % 
9% 9%— % 
1316 1316 — 16 
11% 12 +16 
9% 10 + VI 


m 








10% -9%-VSTn 


9% - 9%— to 




y- -+rr^ 


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11% 414 T Bar . J3I 56 21 , u a Si 22 mi. 

1316 - 7% TEC .16 L9 2Ir .17 8% Mb % 

1316 4% TIE -..MB « ££ SS bt 

14% 4% Til * . • - 29 88 .■% .7% %-r* 

Xl% mbTObPrd JO VI lf.lBJB 1816 1M 18% ■ 

10% 6V. TandBr -5 17. 6% 6% 6% + M 


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II HI 

on 


Floating-Rate Notes 


Dollar 


NTERNAnONAL POSITIONS 


Germany 

Two hundred year old German security 
company seeks a self-starting dynamic sales 
engineer with German language capability to 
represent Gamy systems in the U.S. Govern- 
ment market - Europe. In addition to pro- 
ducing their own electronic and physical 
security products Gamy systems is the exclu- 
sive representative for the following U.S. 
firms: 

Mosler - An American Standard Co. 
Sargent & Greenleaf , Inc. 

Master Lock Co. 

Applicants should send resume to: 

Franz Gamy Systems GmbH 
Starkenburg s traBe 13 
D-6082 Moerfelden-WaBdorf 1. 
Tekne 413 213 dlrs d, 

ATTN.: A. Ryan - V.P. 

and call 06105-205-173 for interview. 


Gorny systems 










j. fwi- 

5 £w+- 



W| "‘••J 





Tnrrt»i 



lEUROPEA Ngfl 

MANAGE 


A young expanding American Multinational 
Software Company developing and 
marketing system software tools and 
products for large IBM mainframes has 
decided to coordinate the operations of 
its European subsidiaries acid create the 
post of EUROPEAN MANAGER to be 
located in Amsterdam or possibly in 
Munich, London or Paris.. 

The manager that we would like to meet is 
an American who has worked and lived in 
Europe for many years or alternatively 
a European vsiiohasworkedf or severafyears 
with a medium size American Company 
involved in the software products and 


services industry. He must speak fluent 
English, and have at least a good waking 
knowledge of German and French ; he' is 
familiar with communication methods and 
procedures that are followed in American 
Companies. Experience of operations 
management with profit and loss respon- 
sabQibes in Germany and in France is 
essential. Knowledge of the European way erf 
life and of conducting business is an 
advantage 

If you consider tins post to be interest, 
please apply with a letter and curriculum 
vHae to GROUP/3 - 2, roe de TAmiral de 
Coligny 75001 PARIS- FRANCE quoting 
reference 1466. 




Well Known Automotive Components 
Manufacturer 


for its Group Headquarters a qualified and experienced 

Business Development Executive 
and Strategic Planner 

Commercial vehicle experience preferred. 

Please mfy in strict confidence with resume andphotaffapk to: 
Box D-122 International Herald Tribune, 

181, Avenue Charles-de-Gaulle, 92521 Neuilly. 


t3ll RESERVE 

l*4SURE0 DEPOSITS TRUST 



U.S. Dollar Dwio mi nated 
Insured by U.S. Govt. Entities 
Important Tax Advantages 
Competitive : 

Money Market Yidda 
No Market Risk 
inYDadute Liquidity •- 
Absolute ConfidentiaBy 


CHEMICAL BANK, Naw York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
ANDTRUST 
Registrar - 


RES IN DEP ' 

Cow Postale 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Swifterktod 

Please send prospectus and 
account oppBcoton tot 




sW 




230 


m 




• ■m - X? 


JtalCK 


Non Dollar 






- 


VALUE UNE brings 
COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE of 
1700 AMERICAN STOCKS, 
to European Investors ' 

THE VAL-UE LINE INVESTMENT- SURVEY continually reviews nmi ’ 

relative future price performance of each stock are kept up-to-date in 
the wsekty Index. And sbout 130 hew fulj-pago reports am iwdnf -- 

report 

every 13 weeks. The hM^oge .reports include operating and tireS- 


CV! 


NWa>afaUr tMHtaSf USA 



•* 

ii : 

ftSf 

i$ 

ii 

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sSi : 5* 





































i TlcvCi* i ’.■* * v*^'-. 




CURRENCY MARKETS 

Dollar Retreats in U.S., 


I NTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDA> , SEPTEMBER 1 4-1 o, 198o 

BUSINGS PROFILE / Jean Riboud. A Legendary Man' 


Pape IS 


new york' ■ uis "“ nI «*P- °i N» »«*. 

1 , *S ' The dollar re- “Some people bought the dollar at 
vJS^ “Pf 1 * Friday in 188 Gcrm an mart and Thurv 
,iq NewYork and Europe after a day's jump to 2.97 gave them a nice 
U.S. retail ales report gave impe- profit.'* 

; New York dealers said Europe- 

L»eaiere in New York auribuied ans followed through on the East- 
tbe mildly n egativ e" sentiment in cm-bloc sdling and the .U.S. mai^ 
trading — a complete turnaround ket jumped in to sell after the early 
irom Thursday’s view. — to what morning release of die safes report 
some saw as a disappointing 1.9- Hie dollar had one spun upward 

^rcent nse in retail sales reported In mid- rooming when the Saudi 
Friday. Arabian oil minister. Ahmed Zald 


European Trading 


•j ,u—u uvcireacica to tne earner prices would drop to ais a trarrei. 
. i di cators “and pushed the dollar The comment later was clarified as 
«PJjoo far." being said in a ^joking manner," 

“But there was selling before according io dealers. . 
fet from an Eastera-blcc country Mr. McGroartv aai d that neat 


the Gross National Product, due on 
Friday. 

In New York, the pound rose to 
$0330. up from $1 .3240 on Thurs- 
day. It was at $1.3408 in London, 
up from $1.3175. 

Other late New York prices, 
compared with Thursday, includ- 
ed: 2.901 Deutsche marks, down 
:from 2.941; 2.3955 Swiss francs, 
down from 2.4250; 8.8450 French 
francs, down from 8.9665; 1,939 
Italian lire, down from 1.962. and 
242 Japanese yen. down from 
243.15. . „ 

Other late dollar rates in Europe, 
compared with late Thursday, in- 
cluded: . 2.919 DM, down from 
2.9691; 2J955 Swiss francs, down 
from 2.437; 8.8925 French francs, 
. down from 9.042. and 1,950 Italian 
lire; down from 1,973. 


{felt from an Eastera-blcc country Mr. McGroartv ^aid that next 2.9691; 2J955 Swiss francs, 
».®ch ought have been taking prof- week the dollar probably would rrom ^ 437 ;®- 8 ;j- 5 ! 

its in die dollar’s sharp riser said fluctuate, sfighdy as traders await down from 9.042. and 1,950 : 
James McGraany, vice president the “flash" third-quarter report oh lift down from 1,9/3. 

euromarkets 

Prices End on Firm Note After U.S. Data 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Return 

LONDON — Secondary-market 
Eurobond prices ended firmer Fri- 
day. Dealers reported that there 
was a little buying after publication 
of new data that showed the U.S. 
economy was growing more slowly 
than professional investors had be- 
•Sped, dealers said. 

'However, actual volume was 
light, with many professionals un- 
willing to open fresh positions be- 
fore die weekend. 

The primary , market was also 
quiet, with only one new issue, al- 

Economic Indicators 
Dip in Sooth Korea 

Reuters 

SEOUL — South Korea’s index, 
of leading indicators fell 02 per- 
cent in Juiy from June but was 12 
percent above its level in July 1984, 
the Economic Planning Board said 
Friday. 

The index is made up of 10 indi- 
cators, including export value, let- 
ters of credit received, stocks in 
vsfyehouses and M-l and M-3 
money supply. 


though this was novel in that it was 
a straight bond offering an investor 
pur options after only two years. 

" The new issue-was for Tbomson- 
-Brandt International BV, guaran- 
teed by Thomson SA. It was priced 
at 1001s and pays 10 percent over 
seven years. The lead manager was 
Banque Paribas Capital Markets. 

Because the puj option, which is 
aL par, can reduce the bond* s life to 
two years, fees for it were only IK 
percent compared with the more 
usual ]Vt percent for a seven-year 
maturity. 

It ended on the when-issued 
market at a discount of about 1 
percent bid, although dealers said 
volume was not particularly large. 

In the secondary market, sea- 
soned dollar-siraight issues gener- 
ally closed with gains of Vi or 14 
pant, although selected issues rose 
further, dealers said. 

Sentiment was boosted by news 
that U.S. retail sales, excluding car 
sales, rose only 0.4 percent during 
August and that industrial produc- 
tion was up 0 3 percent in the same 
month. Some professionals had 
predicted that production would 
rise by more than 0.5 percent. 

“Tne figures came as a real relief 
to the market and although there 


wasn't that much buying after them 
we may well see some follow- 
through interest on Monday " one 
trader said. 

On the week, dollar straights still 
ended with slight losses, generally 
around ft to ft point, with prices 
not totally recovered from the 
loses suffered last Friday and 
Monday after news that U.S. un- 
employment dropped to 7 percent 
in August from 73 percent in July. 

Floating-rate note issues closed 
with gains of a few basis points on 
the day, dealers said. One trader 
said some professional operators 
shorted the market before release 
of the UJ>. figures and then had to 
cover their positions m the after- 
noon. “After the data, trading was 
active for a while, but then dial out 
once people had tithed up their 
positions,** he said. 

Japanese convertible bonds were 
generally firmer after a quiet day’s 
trading, during which activity was 
generally restricted to book-squar- 
ing because of a two-day break in 
trading on the Tokyo stock market, 
dealers said. 

Sterling-straight issues finished 
firmer with some bonds moving 
higher on the back of the U.K. 

government bond market. 


Nissan to Make 
NewIHTruck 

L'nitnl Pnru Intfrmitwrtul 

CHICAGO — International 
Harvester has selected Nissan 
Diesel Motor Co. io manufac- 
ture a new generation of medi- i 
urn-size trucks displaying the < 
IH nameplate, according to of- ’ 
firials. j 

Deliveries are expected to be- i 

gin in early 1986, officials said 
Thursday. Financial details 
were not given. 

Cabover trucks, as Lhey are 
known, make up about 12 per- 
cent of U.S. industry's demand 
for medium-size trucks. Neil A. 
Springer, Ws president, said it 
was not economically prudent 
for Harvester to design, engi- 
neer and tool up for a relatively 
narrow spectrum of the market. 

Intelsat Planning 
To Sell Excess 
Satellite Capacity 

By Sari Horwire 

Washington Past Servtte 

WASHINGTON — The Inter- 
national Telecommunications Sat- 
ellite Organization, the consortium 
that provides worldwide satellite 
communications, has announced 
that it plans to sell excess satellite 
capacity for domestic use by its 
member nations. 

The proposal announced Thurs- 
day, has drawn complaints that In- 
telsat may underprice U.S. compa- 
nies that want to sell satellite space 
to foreign countries. 

“It is predatory pricing, and it is 
done to bar new entrants like us," 
Fred landman, president of Pan 
American Satellite Co., said recent- 
ly. Pan American Satellite is a New 
York company recently authorized 
by the Federal Communications 
Commission to provide service to 
Latin America. 

But a spokesman for Communi- 
cations Satellite Corp„ the U.S. 
representative to Intelsat, which is 
a 110 -nation nonprofit coopera- 
tive, said that Intelsat prices would 
pass on planning and operating 
costs. “As long as that’s followed. 1 
don't think that there will be any 
unfair competition,'* he said. 


Leadership Ends at Schlmnbergt 


By Todd S. Purdum 

\, „ |.0-l Tntv\ Vitii.1- 
NEW YORK — Jean Riboud. 
the dynamic chairman and chier 
executive of Schlumberger Lid., 
who once said that leaving the giant 
oil-field services company “would 
be like trving to shake an oyster off 
a rock.” stepped down Wednesday, 
after 20 years or leadership. 

At a ’special meeting in Pans 
called by Mr. Riboud. the compa- 
ny’s board elected Michel Vaillaud. 
who has been president and chief 
□penning officer since 1982, to suc- 
ceed him. According to sources 
close to the company. Mr. Riboud 
has had cancer for about a year. 
Mr. Vaillaud. 53. a former French 
government official, was his hand- 
picked successor. 

Mr. Riboud, who turned 65 in 
November, has already served 
nearly 10 months beyond the com- 
pany's normal mandatory retire- 
ment age. A company spokesman, 
Seth McCormick, took pains to say 
that Mr. Riboud was not resigning 
or retiring. He will remain a direc- 
tor and a member of the executive 
committee and will become chair- 
man of the finance committee. 

But his departure from active 
management is a watershed at 
Schlumberger. Under his leader- 
ship. the company has grown from 
a relatively narrow, but highly suc- 
cessful. business or testing for oil to 
a diversified operation with a focus 
on technology, including holdings 
in electronic instruments, semicon- 
ductors and computer-aided-de- 
sign systems. Schlumberger. which 
: has its headquarters in New York. 

also has major executive offices in 
j Paris and maintains operations 
> throughout the world, 
i Under the autocratic Mr. Ri- 

■ baud. Schlumberger forged a dis- 

■ linguished record, often posting 
I annual earnings gains of 35 percent 
5 until the recession of 1981-82, ac- 
) cording to analysts. It thrived dur- 
ing the 1970s as the Organization 
of Petroleum Exporting Countries 

I set off a frenzied search for oil. 
s And. as the oil industry softened 
- in reeent years. Schlumberger fared 
i better than most oil-related compa- 
g nies. Mr. Riboud’s empire' has of- 
1 ten been cited as one of the world s 
y best-managed companies, in par- 
ticular in a iwo-parl article in The 



Th« New Tort Tunes 

Jean Riboud, former chairman of Schlumberger. 


New Yorker magazine in 1983 by 
Ken Auleiia that was later expand- 
ed into a book, "The An of Corpo- 
rate Success." 

Not all of Schluraberger’s moves 
under Mr. Riboud have worked 
equally well however. Fairchild 
Camera & Instrument Corp., a 
semiconductor maker based in 
Mountain View, California, for ex- 
ample. has lost millions of dollars 
since Schlumberger bought it in 
1979. And in 1983, the company’s 
overall earnings declined for the 
first time in 19 years. Although 
earnings rose slightly last year, they 
are still below 1982 levels and ana- 
lysts expect another decline this 
year. 

In the first six months of this 
year, Schlumberger’s net income 
fell 8.8 percent, to $515.6 million, 
while revenues rose 10 percent, to 
S3.3 billion. The company attribut- 
ed the earnings decline to losses 
from Fairchild and to a downturn 
in its North American mi-field ser- 
vices business. 


Nonetheless, the financial world 
still regards Mr. Riboud, a pro- 
fessed Socialist despjte his role as 
an aggressive capitalist, with a de- 
gree of reverence. 

“He’s a legendary man." said 
Edward P. Reilly, an analyst with 
Fahnestock & Co. Mr. Riboud's 
success in attracting top-notch 
managers and in bringing together 
personnel “who are qualified to 
come up with the most sophisticat- 
ed instrumentations, has made the 
company the leader in its field, 
Mr. Reilly said. 

“I think he has been a great lead- 
er of the company." said Vishnu 
Swamp, an analyst with Goldman. 
Sachs. “Every leader has some 
weak points, and his weak point 
has been being very stubborn on 
Fairchild- and in perhaps hanging 
on to it longer than he should.” 

But Mr. Swarup said Mr. Ri- 
boud’s strategy had always focused 
on long-term results. Mr. Reilly 
said Mr. Riboud's emphasis on 


heavy spending for research made 
the company’s oil testing — or 
■■logging" — devices the most so- 
phisticated in the industry', and 
gave it an edge over its rivals in the 
recent oil industry slump. 

Even Mr. Riboud’s competitors 
express admiration for his manage- 
ment or Schlumberger. 

“They’re an excellent company 
and thev're a good competitor, and 
we’re very sorry to see him go. said 
Marvin Gearhart, chairman and 
chief executive erf Gearhart Indus- 
tries. one of Schlumberger’ s main 
competitors in oil-fido services. 
Other leading competitors are 
Dresser Industries ana Halliburton 
Co. 

Mr. Riboud, whose closest 
friends have included President 
Francois Mitterrand of France, 
Saul Steinberg, the artist, and Ro- 
berto Rossellini the filmmaker, 
was bom in 1919 in Lyon. He 
served as a lieutenant in the French 
Armv during the early days of 
Worfd War 11 and later joined the 
Resistance. He was eventually cap- 
tured and spent two years in Bu- 
chenwald concentration camp. 

After the war, through a friend 
of his banker father, he got a job 
with an investment bank that had 
Schlumberger as one of its clients. 
In 1951. he joined the company at 
the request of its co-founder, Mar- 
cel Schlumberger, serving as Mr. 
Schlumberger’s assist ml 

In 1957. Mr. Riboud took charge 
of all of Schlumberger's operations 
i outside North America, and in 
i 1965 he became president and chief 
i executive officer. A literate, articu- 
r late man, Mr. Riboud has put his 
i idiosyncratic stamp on everything 


from the company’s research bud- 
gets to its public documents. 

Mr. Vaillaud joined Schlum- 
heiger in 1973. after holding vari- 
ous posts in the government, in- ( 
eluding director of the Petroleum ‘ 
Administration in the Ministry of 
Industrial and Scientific Develop- 
menL „ , 

A graduate of the Ecole Poly- 
technique with a degree in mining 
Md petroleum engineering, Mr. 
Vaillaud is well regarded for both 
his scientific knowledge and his 
diplomatic skills, which are impor- 
tant to a multinational enterprise 
like Schlumberger. 




































































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HE RALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUND AY. SEPTEMBER 14-15, 1985 


ACROSS 

1 What X marks 
5 Sign another 
contract 

10 Cloak 

14 Vichy, e.g. 

17 Ness 

18 Gay 

15 Ages galore 

20 Sandy’s bark 

21 Birthright 
seller 

22 Former P.M. 
of India 

23 Kill-joy runs 
harljor for ill- 
gotten gains 

27 Rudolph and 
Mrs. 

Flintstone 

29 Actress 
Jackson 

31 He might use a 
ladder 

32 Used a cutlass 

34 Sensitive plant 

36 Security, in 
Savoie 

37 Fabric worn by 
a swindler’s 
cousin 

39 Dish eaten 
with “Any- 
thing Goes” 

41 Niccolo’sson, 
the traveler 

44 Chief Norse 

gods 

45 BraziJ-BoJivia 
border river 


DOWN 

1 Lots 

2 Assert as fact 

3 National 

Forest. Fla. 

4 Tom's hands 
are put into 
torture 
implement 

5 Saudi water 
boundary 

6 Air-current 
lie. 

7 Gogol tale 

8 Character in 
“Charley's 
Aunt” 

9 Beach near 
Diamond Head 

19 U.S. electrical 
scientist: 1850- 
1936 


ACROSS 

46 Alums-to-be 

47 Like a rotten 
apple 

49 Having narrow 
orbs 

53 Classroom 
break 

54 Felt shoe 

57 Freud’s 
concerns 

58 Bones thrower 

62 Nibble on a 
soup bone 

63 Lizardlike 

66 Kind of show 

on a field 

68 Asiatic tent 

69 Ark. Senator’s 
watch 

becomes car 
attachment 

72 Yugoslav city 

73 Nervous ones 

75 Sid and Irving 

76 Finale tor 
Fischer 

77 Balance-sheet 
listing 

78 Dijon season 

80 Put on a 
pillbox 

81 Sad 

83 Daydreamer 

87 Like some 
peanuts 

89 Spire 
ornament 


DOWN 

11 Some are 
painters 

12 Upward: 
Prefix 

13 Omega 
predecessor 

14 Flavors 

15 Has a scull 
session 

16 To scrub and 
clean: Sp. 

24 Actress 

Anne Down 

25 Twist 
sideways 

26 Tartan 
trousers 

28 Detests 

30 Arabian 

bigwigs 
33 Cloth 


across 

92 Saloon suds 

93 Barbecue 
topping 

96 African plants 
informally 

97 Turn out from 
a princess’s 

home 

100 MiceinN-Y. 
mountains 

102 Dramatic 
narrator in 
Indonesia 

103 Israel’s Plain 

of 

105 Thong 
material 
109 “...baked 

I10N.B.A.,e.g. 

111 Hoity-toity 

1 12 Skelton junket 
is depicted In 

the funnies 

115 Indians of 
Peru 

119 Actress Naldl 

120 Author Yutang 

121 Widespread 
l22Netman 

Fraser 

123 Fool: Ger. 

124 Chemists’ org. 

125 Jewish month 

126 Canadian 
Oscar 

127 RR stops 


Two Sense Worth byjimpage 


154 155 ISO 


10 

11 

12 

13 


19 




■ 

1 

23 




24 




■ 

■ 

31 




35 


3b 



1 

39 

40 



■ 

45 




1 

50 





1 

57 




56 

— 



66 

67 



15 

16 











46 



1 59 160 161 


193 194 195 


[IDS 1107 1 106 I 


113 





115 

118 

117 

pT8 


1 

119 

121 





122 



jZ 


■ 

123" 

125 






126 






127 


DOWN 

34 Pileonaned.'s 
desk 

35 C.P. A. ’s 
concents 

38 Maintain 

40 Gary intake 

41 Fata — - 
(mirage) 

42 Ways and 
means 

43 Detroit actions 
45 What 

paracletes do 
48 Progeny 

50 Gave off fuzz 

51 River to the 
Fulda 

52 Verbal thrust 
55 “Chances 

Mathis 

hit 


€> New York Tones, edited by Eugene Molesko. 


DOWN 

56“ Palace”: 

T. S. Eliot 

59 Rummy’s kin 

60 Released 

61 Plants anew 

64 Weehrs. 

65 Third king of 
Judah 

66 N.F.L. player 
at Green Bay 

67 Musical 
pauses 

69 Snaffles 

70 Prefix for bar 
or therm 

71 A Canadian, 
colloquially 

74 Shelter 


DOWN 

76 Brotherly 
quartet’s 
sounds are real 
crushers 

78 Dueling 
swords 

79 •* better to 

have loved 

82 Sleeve style 

84 Sponges 

85 Math, system 

86 Peter and 
Pauli 

88 Diamond from 
Brooklyn 

89 Like old Norse 
works 


DOWN 

90 Mechanical 
“ivories” 

91 Of the Moslem 
lands 

94 Penitent's 
activity 

95 Seabee's rail, 
branch 

98 Certain rabbits 

99 Chemical suf- 
fix 

100 Cartoon’s 
“Friendly 
Ghost" 

101 Flat dweller, 
for one 


DOWN 


_ ANDY CAPP 


104 Israeli seaport 

106 Raise Old 
Glory 

107 Nick 

(Yank of the 
40’s) 

108 Old English 
gold coins 

113 Ariosti’s 

“Amor 

Nemiti" 

114 Make free (of) 

116 Mary Lincoln, 
Todd 

117 Worms holder 

118 Quarry's quar- 
ry: 1976 


JOHN RUSKIN: The Early Years, 1819- 
1859 

By Tim Hilton. 301 pages. J 22.50. 

Yale University Press, 302 Temple Street, New 
Haven, Conn. 06520. 

Reviewed by Robert Bernard Martin 

I N THE wholesome scholarly exhumation of the 
Victorians in the past half-century, one of the 
most dramatic rehabilitations has been of the repu- 
tation of John Ruskin. This critic of art, architec- 
ture. and society had dwindled in public estimation 
into a quaint word-painter, but now we are begin- 
ning to realize that he was as original as his contem- 
poraries believed. Unfortunately, the scholarly in- 
dustry that restored bis reputation has also made it 
painfully apparent that he was one of the oddest in a 
century of eccentrics and that the sad insanity of his 
old age was dearly foreshadowed in his early life, It 
is the triumph of this fine new biography lo make 
both sides of him fascinating and believable. 

Tim HD ton apparently plans to publish two vol- 
umes: this one introduces Ruskin s ambitious, pi- 
etistic family, his financially snug suburban child- 
hood as the only offspring of elderly parents, then 
his undergraduate years, during which his mother 
moved to Oxford each term so that be could spend 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


BOOKS 


every evening in filial conversation with her until 
the college gates were closing. This first 40 years 
included his writing of “Modern Painters," “Seven 
Lamps of Architecture." “The Stones of Venice" 
and his defense or the Pre-Raphaelites (of whom he 
actually knew little). In this first half of his life he 
began developing his deeply Puritanical educ of an, 
according to which the work is to be judged by the 
attitude and morality of the artist or workman 
rather than by the product itself. Running parallel 
to this was his attempt io erase the distraction 
between fine and applied art Still to come was the 
logical conclusion to these tenets, the belief that 
before art could properly exist, a fit society for it 
had to be brought to birth. 

This volume also covers Ruskin’s youthful love or 
Adele Domecq and his un consummated marriage to 
Effie Gray, which ended after six years with an 



the volume Ruskin is on the verge of his pathetic 
infatuation with Rase La Touche the 10-year-old 
daughter of one of his Oxford contemporaries. 

Solution to Last Week’s Puzzle 


oaaaooa aaaaa hoobooi 
□□□anna □□□□□□ □□□□□□I 

non □□□□□ □□□on 
□□a □□□□□ □□□□□□□□ 

an a a aaaa aaaaa oaani 

□□a □□□ □□□□□ □Daaam 

□□aaaaa aaaaa □□□□□□□] 
□paaaa Sanaa asaa ana 
□□□□□□ aaaa □□□□ □□□□ 
none aaosaaa □□□□ 
□□□a □□□□ □□□□ □□□□□□ 
□□a □□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□□ 
□anaaaa □□□□□ □□□□ana 
□□□□sc ssssa □□□ ano 
aaaa aaaaa aaaa □□□□ 
□□□□□□□□ □□□an □□□ 

aaaaa □□□□□ sea 
□□□aacaaaaaaaaaaQaaaD 
laQaaoD anaaaa □□□□□□□ 
!□□□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□□□ 


Not surprisingly, the history of his erotic life has 
generated more indignation than understanding. 
When they were traveling on the Continent be 
found that architecture had more charms for him 
than Effie did. and he confessed that he had “no 
heart nor eyes for anything but stone." His polite 
neglect erf the feelings of a young and passionate 
woman was intolerable, but it is improbable that he 
ever really understood what she was going through. 

WithouL seeming to condone Ruskin’s behavior, 
Hilton is urbanely unshockable about it, taking the 
attitude that the reader can see what was mean and 
pitiful without the help erf a wagging forefinger. 

Hilton brings much fresh information to this 
book through the patient re-examination of previ- 
ously known sources and the discovery of new 
material. By his splendid and leisurely assembly of 
small details and supporting characters, he saturates 
the book with the flavor of Victorian life. Inevitably, 
the reader is reminded of the crammed furnishings 
of rooms in the last century, of the accumulation of 
detail in its paintings and poetry, and even of the 
combination of ideas that made up its intellectual 
ferment But the sheer plenitude of Victorian collec- 
tions was often in danger of becoming clutter, and 
Hilton doesn’t always avoid this risk: He becomes 
so fascinated with each person Ruskin met that he 
feels compelled to give background on even the least 
important, and the narrative flow is often held up. 

Nor is it always safe io rely on the details. For 
example, we are lold that Tennyson met Ruskin in 
"1855. the year in which he succeeded Rogers as 
laureate." But Tennyson became poet laureate in 
1850. and Samuel Rogers, who died in 1855, never 
held ibe post. What is important is the year of the 
meeting of Tennyson and Ruskin, which is probably 
correct enough, but the erroneous embroidery of the 
bald date makes one question the author s accuracy. 

Dubieties like these aside — and usually they are 
minor — this is as good a life of Ruskin as we are apt 
to have for a long time. 

Robert Bernard Martin, professor of English at the 
University of Hawaii and author of “ By Friends 
Possessed: The Biography of Edward Fitzgerald," 
wrote this review for The Washington Past. 


Wbrld Stock Markets 

Via Agence France- Presse Sept. 13 

Closing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


I 


\. .AND I WANT VOU TO STOP REFERRING TO 

me as'iour SMi/mcmtNr 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Aigorve 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Borodkina 

Beta-otto 

Berlin 

Brussel* 

Bucharest 

Buda p e s t 

Copenhagen 

cosio mi Sol 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfort 

Genova 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 


Prague 

Revkiavik 

Rome 

Sloe* holm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


Zurich 23 73 

MIDDLE EAST 


21 70 lr 

13 55 sh 
17 63 tr 

15 64 fr 
7 45 d 

9 48 tr 

14 57 r 
II S2 r 

7 *5 o 
10 90 fr 

22 72 d 

8 4b cl 

10 SO cl 

11 52 lr 

9 48 d 
9 48 fr 
1 34 fr 

14 51 sh 
31 70 fr 

19 66 0 

12 u a 

20 68 tr 

13 55 lr 

9 48 o 

6 43 fr 
17 63 fr 

10 SO o 

16 61 ti 

4 39 fr 
B 46 o 

14 57 ft- 

5 41 O 
8 4« el 

11 Si lr 

7 IS fr 
5 41 cl 
7 45 tr 


Bangkok 

Beiling 

Hoag Kang 

Manila 

new Delhi 

Seoul 

Shanghai 

Singapore 

Taipei 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 

Algiers 

Cairo 

Cape Town 
Casablanca 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

31 88 24 75 o 

21 70 14 57 a 

31 88 26 79 cl 

30 86 24 75 a 

30 86 24 75 r 

24 75 16 61 o 

20 82 76 79 tr 

33 90 24 75 o 

IS 95 26 79 fr 

30 86 22 72 o 


29 84 16 61 fr 

31 «8 21 70 a 

16 61 7 45 d 

21 70 no 

16 41 no 

26 79 24 75 o 

- — 12 54 no 

28 82 21 70 fr 


LATIN AMERICA 


Buenos Aires 

Careens 

Lima 

Mexico City 


21 70 8 46 o 

28 82 19 66 d 

— — — — na 

25 77 13 55 cl 


Ankara 23 73 6 43 fr 

Beirut 30 86 23 73 fr 

Damascus — — — — no 

Jerusalem 25 77 14 57 fr 

TciAviv 29 84 19 66 lr 

OCEANIA 

Auckland IB 64 7 45 fr 

Sydney 18 64 13 55 cl 

cl-cioudy; fo-foagy: fr-tolrJ h-hall; 
sn-showers; sw-snaw; sf-stormy. 


IB 64 7 45 


Blade Janeiro 23 73 18 64 fr 

NORTH AMERICA 

Anchorage' 14 57 5 41 pc 

Atlanta 25 77 17 C! d 

Boston 14 57 8 46 pc 

Ottawa 20 68 5 4] fr 

onvir 24 75 4 43 fr 

■ Detroit H 61 4 3V pc 

Honofula 31 88 19 66 pc 

Mansion 31 88 21 70' pc 

Las Angeles 31 88 16 61 fr 

Miami 30 86 23 73 d 

Minneapolis 19 66 8 46 d 

Montreal 31 88 21 70 fr 

Naswu 31 B8 21 70 pc 

New York 18 64 9 48 fr 

EaaPrandsco 24 75 13 55 fr 

5 same 19 66 11 52 r 

Taranto W ST 5 41 pc 

Washington 20 68 10 50 tr 

thuvercost; pc-pcrtty cloudy: r-raln; 


ABN 

ACF Holding 
AEGON 
AKZO 
Ahold 
AMEV 

A' Dam Robber 
Amro Bank 
•VO 

Boehrmonn T 
Coland Hlda 
Eisevlar-NDU 
Fokker 
Gist Brocades 
Helneken 
Hoogpvens 
KLM 
Naorden 
Hal Redder 
Neaitayd 
Oce Vender G 
Pa* hoed 
Philips 

Robeco 
RoCamco 
Roltnco 
Rorenro 
Roval Dutch 
Unilever 
Van Ommoren 
VAtF Stork 
VNU 

ANPXBS Getfl Index : 220X0 
Previous : 22*90 


j ntmo b 

Cocker 111 
COtWPO 

EBES 

GB-lrmo-BM 
GBl_ 

Gevaert 
Hoboken 
Intercam 
K rod tot bank 
Petroling 

iSS ST”* 

Soluoy 

Traction Elec 
UCB 
Unerg 

View* Mon tog ne 

Current Stock Index : 24SUB 
Previous : M2JJ7 


Hoaitiei 7)8 

Hoecltsl 219 

Haesch 125.50 

Horten I9J 

Hussei 385 

IWJCA 31020 

Kali + Salz 3nl 

Karstadt 26L50 

Kauthof 29o JO 

Kioeckner H-0 307 

Kloeckner werke 74.40 
krupo Slam 115 

Linde SjS 

Lufthansa 231 SO 

MAN 179 

Marines marm 2I9.S0 

Muencti Rueck 1«S0 

NUdarf 569 

PKI 691 

Porsche 1401 

Preussag 369 

PWA 148.70 

RWE 197 

Rheutmetoll 329 

Sobering 510 

SEL 250 

Siemens 57150 

Ttlyssen 123.70 

Veba 234.ro 

Volkswogenwerk 342 
wella 650 

Commerzbank index : 1507.60 
Previous : 153X30 


E kinds 1730 1740 

GFSA 31W 3150 

Harmony 7800 28a 

Htveld Sieef 550 

Kloot 2000 2£3 

N*dbcnk 1M0 10ft 

Pry* stevn 5B75 6000 

RuspkJT T740 17M 

SA Brews 720 715 

St Helena ^ 

So* ol 770 775 

Wesl Holding 6800 NA. 

Composite Stock Index : 113M0 
Previous : 114Z50 


PEANUTS 

|M 60NNA TO OUT 
FOR THE GIRL'S 
BASKETBALL TEAM 


YOU HAVE A LOT 
TO LEARN;;. 


3 mVEAL^EAPV.LEARNEP 

I -SOMETHING.-, 




YOu bOKT PUT THE 
kneefapson a 
OVER YOOR HEAR- 




blondie 



GO Y. THftX SANPWICH 
NEEDED SOWS 
^ ^ PIMENTO v 


/!' • *• ‘Ill THERE'S A *JAR J I 

\ ON THE TOP \ I ‘$5*1 tedfiSnall 

( PANTRY SHELF ) : OP 



BEETLE BAILEY 


THIS ISA-.. 
17ULL PART V. 
X WISH THEY 
- HAP 
SOMETHING 
k TO PRlHK > 


X HAVE. : K 

'•AW tig 

8OTTLE f m 

in my I ml 

JEEP { “ 

in 




wouL& y&ULixe jt -. 
- v STRAJ<5HT<?R-POYPM - 
WAMT CHOCOLATE IN 






WIZARD of ID 


r rf? > 

COMffHM&i T 


REX MORGAN 





m- 











• 4 '^. ; 'uv* 9 ^ 


THAKJKS FOR GTOFPIWG BY, ■ MEANWHILE, a wif. -S/Aip -tone, ww.in j 


GARFIELD 



ANP WHY PiPTHE-V HANP ME 

PHOTOGRAPH*?. SO BAP#.- WmjWftSr Of GLASSES? 


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KVaakfiirl 


SATURDAYS FORECAST — CHANNEL: SllgiilW dk»PY. FRANKPURT: 
FtoaavfSAv. talrtotW/rSno. 23 — B (77 - 461. LONDON: OoudV.Temp.21— 11 
170 — 521 MADRID: Fair. TenW, 36— 19 (97— 661. NEW YORK: Folr.Temp. 
2 t — 11 170 — 523. PARIS: Foagv eartv. ctotidv taler. Temp. 22 — 9 (rt — 481- 
ROMEJ Sir. T*w. 27— 15 «T- 593. TEL AVIWNA. ZURICH: RHjv earli 
douay later. Temo.24— S ITS— 463. BANGKOK: 1^ , xlw~sforTrT&.TeT n P.31 a 
(88 — 773. HONG KONG: Cloudy. Temo. 29 — 26 791. MANILA- Mowers. 

no ic 184 — 771. SEOUL! Fgflay. Temp. 24 — 16 (75— >61). 

SINGAPORE: ThunderstorniA Temp. 31 — 25 (88 — 77J.TOKVO: Foggv, Temp. 
29 — 23(84 — 733. 


AEG-Tb total ken 

Allianz Vers 

Altana 

BASF 

Saver 

Bov Hypo Bank 
Bov Verairabanl. 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Commerzbank 

Cant Gumml 

Dalmler-Betu 

DCOUSSQ 

Deutsche BabcadE 
Deutsche Bank 
Dreedner Bank 
GHH 

! Harpemr 


141 SO 1432S , 
1496 1491 I 
377 183 

22180 2Z7 JO 

18950 39S 

265 265 

322 323 

493 502 

214 21580 
15450 109.50 
«iSQ 9g7 
361 365 

177 JO 179 

5B6J0 S92J0 

267J0 270JD 
191 19<20 
32S 328 


BK East Asia 
Cheung Kong 
Chino Light 
Green island 
Hang Seng Bank 
Henderson 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A‘ 

HK Hotels 
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HK Shang Bank 

HK Tetonhone 
HK Yaumaiel 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Who nwao 
Hyson 
Inn City 
Jardlne 

JardineSec 
Jtawloon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
New World 
°i l 5 n » Overseas 
5H r. Props 
Slelux 

SwirePodHcA 
Tel Cheung 
Wan Kwang 
WheetackA 
wine on Ca 
Wlnsor 
World lni’1 

Hang Seng Index : 
Previous : 15*442 


AECI 

Anglo American 
Angle Am Geld 

Sareotts 
Blwoor 
Buffets 
De Beers 
■ Oricfonlem 


2230 22J0 
18^1 1840 
15J0 15 JO 
740 740 

43J0 4125 
W75 Z25 

9J0 9^5 

8 J 0 B 
11 J 0 11 

35J25 33 

630 6J0 

7J5 7J5 

A70 SJS 
XX 325 
6JS 

24.50 2LiO 

0A2 041 

xn 090 
1 Z 10 12 

14.10 13.90 
940 9 JO 

43J0 45J0 
. 7.75 7J5 
Sues. — 
1130 1320 
1525 2JD 
24J0 ?L80 
1.95 1.94 

.057 189 

Susp. — 
170 1.70 

4.75 5.15 
020 Z20 


735 725 
3165 3175 
18500 18700 
1100 1120 
1400 1455 
7175 ’425 
1170 1180 
4900 5100 


AACOfP Slrtk 

A1lle<W.vons 278 

Anglo Am Gold S68M 

AS4 Bril Foods 2 22 

ASS Dairies 138 

Barclays JS3 

Bass S77 

BAT. Bt 

Beectwm -£3I 

BICC 721 

QL 34 

Blue Circle 501 

BOC Group M4 

Hoots ^ 2W 

Bowater Indus 111 

BP 543 

Brit Home St ?8§ 

ant Telecom 199 

Bril Aerospace 380 

Brttoll 213 

BTR *g 

Burmah 304 

Cable Wireless 57S 

coduurvSenw H4 

Charier Cons 1M 

Commercial U 225 

Cons Gold 422 

Court ou Ids 147 

Do/oefy 432 

Do Beers* 440 

Distillers ^,390 

Ortotantetn S18H 

F Isons 353 

Free St Ged S21J*. 

GEC 164 

GanAecJttont 613 

Glaxo £ 13 131 

Grand Met 333 

GRE 666 

Guinness 

GUS S» 

Kcraor W6 

Hawker 3»J 

ICI 664 

imperial Group 1W 

LQMdSecurltlea 292 

Legal General 66J 

Lloyds Bank 412 

Lon mo tj* 

Luau 

MarksatidSP 152 

Metal Box 4W 

Midland tank »2 

Jlgi West Bank 6M 

Hand O ^ 

Pliklnglan ^ 

PteMev 

PnxtanMol J® 

Racai Elect. 

RVMftarrteia S78W 

Rank Jf] 

Reed inti 

QflirfsfC - 33* 

Sral Dutch* 44 63/64 
RTZ W 

Saotcht ™ 

Satnsburv 3-0 



F.T.N Index HI L90 
pmton : in«J0 
F.TAH.100 Index : 13*7J« 
Previous : 1313.10 


Banco Comm 

Centrato 

Cigahclets 

Cred liar 

Erldanta 

Form Italia 

Flat 

Generali 

IFI 

Itoleenwill 
I taigas 

I tat maW l lari 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Oiiveftl 

Pirelli 

RA5 

Rlnascente 
51 P 
SME 
Sri la 
Standa 
Wet . 


MIB Current index : 1701 
previous :1<M 


Air Liquids 
Afsfflom An. 3 
AvDassaull 

Bonaolre 

BIC . 

Bongroln 

Bournes 

bsn-gd 

Corratour 

Chargeurs 

Club Med 

DertV 

Dumez 

eit-Aqultatne 

Europe 1 

Gen Eaux 

Hochette 

LaforgeCoa 

Lewnand 

rOreal 

Mortert 

Matrp 

Merlin 

MKhenn 

Moet Hennessv 

AtaWtne*, 

OoctaBittle 

Pernod RW 

Perrier 

Peuseah 

Pr Intemps 

RadkileDw 

Rowel uctaf 

S AbRoota nal 

Teienwean « 

Thomson C5F 
Total 2 

CAC Ireto*j219je 
prarfaes : 21TJ8 


C^dStoraae 

Fraser Neave - 
Haw Par 
inchawta, 

Mai Bonking 
OCBC 
OUB 
DUE 

Shangri-la 
5lme Darby 
Share Land 
STaore Press 
S Steamship 
SI Trading 
United Overseas 
UOB 


SS i 

tLQ- — 
165 HD- 
7.90 735 

NA. 222 
2.17 NjQ. 
179 NJ3. 
1J3 1J4 

2.12 2M 
150 155 

QJ 1 081 
3STi . 3 
110 110 
138 134 


Straits Tima led Index : 75U1 

Previous : 73X51 


AGA 

Alta Laval 

Aseo 

Astra 

AtklS COPCO 

BoUden 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Estette 

Hondefsbpftfcen 

Phormocla 

Soob-Soonta 

Sandvlk 

Skansko 

5KP 

SwedHtiMotch 

Volvo 


Wl 134 
205 202 

310 310 

415 420 

120 119 

196 190 

146 146 

225 241 

440 450 

176 .176 
178 T63 

440 425 

465 450 

96 NXL 

226 226 

191 191 

233 230 


A mm voertdew index : 
Previous : 387 M 


ACI 

ANZ 

BMP 

Baral 

Bougainville 
Co sl lem el ne 
Coles 
Coma ico 
CRA 
CSR 
Dunlop 
Elders Ixl , 

ICI Australia 
Magellan 
MIM . 

Myer 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Cora . . 

N Broken Hill 
Po s eid o n 
Ota Coal Trust 
Santas 

Thomas Nothin 
Western Minina 
westpae Bantam 

Woods! de 


*S2 4 sa 
7.16 7.10 

186 182 
1^ 182 
I 8 
4.12 4.15 

Z 130 
set lea 
3.18 113 
153 2J2 

140 140 

2.10 110 
130 2X 
2JS Zil 
150 150 

474 448 
ta 

.165 Z63 

4IS 4.15 

IK MS 

475 4 a 
iai tjo 


japan Air Lines 
KoDma 
Kansal Power 
Kawasaki Steel ‘ 
KJrtn Brewery 
Komatsu 

Kubota . 

Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank . 
Mitsubishi Chem 
Mitsubishi Elec; 
MltsubWiI Heavy 
MiltubisM Cora 
Mitsui and Co 
MltsukosW 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

N3K fnsufOtars 
NlkkaSec 
Nippon Kogoku 
Nippon Oil ■ ‘ 

Nippon Steel 

Nippon Vuscn 
Nissan - 
Nomura See 
Olympus 
p i o n se t ; 

Rlcoti 

Sharp . • - . 

Shimcmj 

Shlnetsu ChemlCDl 
Son/ ... 

Sumitomo Book 
Sum I tamo Chem 
Sam Kama Marine 

Sumitomo. Metal 

Talsel Carp 
Tatoho Marine 
Takedo Chem 
TDK 
TsHki ■ 

Tokh) Marine ' 
.Tokyo Elec. Power 
Tawan Printing 
Toroyind . 
Tnshlbo 
Toyota 

Yamolehf Sec 


NBck et/tLJ. index : 12585J 
Prcvtoes : 136S1M 
New index : lKTU . 
previan : ntzas 



Canadian jtoab tks AP 

High Low Oosi Chg. 


SXIV*, 17Vh--17lbT--1b 
5178k mb . ,124b— lb 
SSW. «lb ■ aw- <fi 
SI 865 in 
*1436 J4N I486 
S18W -ttta IBVi— 1 
sim in id Vi • - 
S32W 1 32W.3ZV&— V, 
55 495 t 495 + 5 
.. 13V» — Vt 

wiser 1+4 

*77 

395 IBS 385 
440-.. 435- 435 -^0 
SIT ""16* -17 . 

SMh 8V> 8VJ— 16 
22 J1D 212.-41 
S24 ZM 2Mb— 16 
S13W UW 1386-4- 16 
SZPffc 29 • 

*1*16 isn...i5n— -1% 
sun - .105 Tift— ^6 
S» - I18b . 12. 

*27 - 26ft- -26ft— 1 
S22% 221b 

Site 34ft 
S47ft 41ft -41te+ 16 
SITU Wb -13ft- ft 
S64 . 53ft- Oft 

37ft- 37ft— V, 
998k. 9ft 9ft+ ft 
*i 7ft 17ft 17ft- ft 
SMft:T6ft lift— 
SOT* 9* 9ft 
rim T*ft 

msn-tsft isft— ft 

_ 9ft.-. 9ft— ft 

S7V6 7ft 7ft— ft 
51 Hk • lTft -lift— ft 
SH «ft— ft 
OT 300 300 - — 5 

SI4te 1416. 14ft— ft 



All OrdiBBrtsg index : 9<ui 
Previe w : Mill 


Akol 

Ascdif Own 
Asahl GMSS 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 

Canon - 

Caita 

tltah 

Del Nippon Print 
Da two House 
Dohvo Securities 


E? % 

803 800 

• 7S0 780 

^ ’ 2 ? 
1040 1050 

•too >180 I 


Ad la 

Aiufulsee - 
Autoonan . 

Bark Leu r •’ - 
Brown Boveci ■ 
Clbo Geiev . . 
Credit Suisse 
Elect rawatt . 
HoKteriwifc ■ ; 
Interdtscwm- - 
Jacob Svctian) 

Jet moll . 
LomitoGyr * 
Moerenpiek , 
Nestle . 

OerUkamB 

Roche Boay . 

5andw 

Sdihidtor ‘ 

Suiter 

Surveillance 

Swtoalr 

SBC 

Swiss Reinsurance 
Swtos Votksbank 
Union Bank 

Winterthur 

Zurich Ins 

SBC ladee : tut. 
Previous : 53440 


4075 4125 
740 750 

175 6100 
JS2D 



7590 7610 
1730 1710 
10250 10275 
155* 1560 
000 <900 
418 410 

4975 4550 
UK 1430 
475 470 

2275 
1940 
4320 4290 

ago 5300 

2390 2315 


NA: not (woted: ka: not 
available; xd: ex-dhridend. 


33021 Doan Dev 
■7410 Denison A o 
[7495 Demean B fw 
|8900 Develcan 
6350 Dtckasn A I. 
■ioao Dtatcnsn SB 
[40274 Dotosao 
110600 Du Pont A 
I4B0Q Dylex A I 
1 250 etethom xl 
linEmca . • 
Q0680 Eaultv Svr 
13050 FCA trm 
I 57S C PoKanCj 
feso Ficnbrdgei 
I 2850 F ed Indraj 
216570 Fmnm 
■1357 Geodll AH 

■6500 Gal [Mont 
■200 Graft G I 
262 GL Forest 
150 Gt Pacfflcl 
■732 Grey hndg 
[12200 Hawker j 
|4g2 HbvMD 
fl1SK>H«eslnfil 
|»440H BavCa^ 
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M2850 Irtdal^H 
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inn ThornE 
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■1000 LOnt CH 

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R4770 LoblawCa- 
[28670 Lumonfes_ 
|5KgMMWA| 

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^4800 Merlatw E 
H>«M©i*aoAH 

700 Metoofl B1 
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■2000 NsdnewU 

[D55* NOronOrjl 
77766 Narceoij 


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■JDS 2* 220 — 15 

- 405 400 405 +? 

fJ2ft . lift lift- ft 
- sinb- Ute lift— v» 
5S9f 480 480 —20 

&* TW 7ft- ft 

Sft ^ 

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S2lft, 21ft 21ft— ft 

ST** 17ft 17ft— ft 

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IM... 1*6 rift— 2 
SI* im .nft+ & 

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23ft 24ft 

16ft— ft 
22ft 

SWk 9ft . 9 


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SUte 16ft WVi +te 
M2 42 43 -6 1 

H7H 27ft 27ft— ft 






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W "■ '■ 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURD AY-SUNDAY , SEPTEMBER 14-15, 1985 


Page 17 

■■■■-■■ 

SPORTS 

1 ^ 



%-Mays’ Name 
Surfaces at 
Drug Trial 


It’s a New York Day: Both Mets and Yanks Pull Out Victory 


Single in 9th FoihRaUybyCardmah 


By Mark Asher 

W as *mgio* Pan Saw* - 

PITTSBURGH — Former mu- 
jor league baseball player John 
has testified in uJ/District 
t-ourt that he bought two grams of 
caaine in the Pittsburgh Pirates* 
dnbhouse at Three Rivets Stadium 
during a game against the Houston 
Astros on June 11 loan 


By Craig Wolff 

In r 



I 


, -- . — juice,” a liquid 

amphetamine, or stimulant, from 
the locker of Willie Mays when 
their dressing stalls wens next to 
each other, in the New York Mels’ 
clubhouse. Mays, a member of the 
Hau of Fame, played for the Mets 
in 1972 and 1973 before retiring. 

The use of amphetamines, was a 
key issue in the sixth day of the 
cocaine- trafficking trial of Phila- 
delphia caterer Curtis Strong. Mil- 
ner's former teammate, Dave 
Parker, who now plays for the Cin- 
cinnati Reds, supported earlier tes- 
timony by Dak Berra that the Pi- 
rates* team captain, Willie S Israeli, 
and Bill MacDock supplied their 
teammates with the prescription 
drug around 1980. 

StargeQ and Madlock have de- 
nied distributing amphetamines 

Milner, who was released during 
spring training in 1983 after an 11- 
year major league career with three 
tea ms , said he bought the cocaine 
from Strong after meeting him jn 
the clubhouse in the early nuirngn 
of the 1980 game. Milner testified 
that he and Parker, who, MQner 
said, gave him cocaine on 15 to 20 
occasions, “went for a ride after the 
game, snorted a little bit and then 
went our separate ways.” 

On his second day of testimony, 
Parker also said be and his team- 
mates were warned by the Pirates’ 
manager. Chuck Tanner, and the 
team captains to stay away from 
Strong and Sbelby Greer, another 
alleged cocaine dealer who had ac- 
cess to the team clubhouse. 

. . Contacted before Thursday 
f night’s game. Tanner said that *T 
really don’t know that Greer guy, 
and I’m almost sure 1 didn't” warn 
his players. “If we felt anyone was 
involved, we would have corrected 
it The Pittsburgh Pirates baseball 
dub would not have stood for any- 
thing Eke that." Parker is “totally 
wrong,” Tanner said. “Maybe his 
mind was not working right.” 

Mays’ name surfaced during 
cross examination as the defense 
attorney, Adam Renfroe Jr, was. 
reading Milner’s testimony to the 
grand jury last winter about getting 
“red juic e” fro m a player described 
only as “WflHe.” ' - ~ r' 

“He didn’t gjveit to me,” Milner 
said. “I took it out of his locker. 
Willie Mays. His locker was right 
next to rot" 

“Willie who? . Willie Mays?” re- 
plied Renfroe, seemingly some?, 
what startled. 

“That’s right, the great one, yes,” 
Milner responded. 

“Who produced the red juice?" 

“1 ijnn'f IrnfflU 1 dnn 1 ! Accimwb 


New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK —The New York 
Mets lost a six-nra lead, barely sur- 
vived the top half of the ninth tu- 
tting, then scratched their way to a 
7^6 victory ova the Sl T«irt Car- 
dinals on Thursday «> again open a 
one-game lead in the National 
League's East Division, 

“We had to win. this one,” said 
the manager, Dave Johnson. “We 
had to snow the Ca rdinals that 
we’re going to win.” 

Pennant fever was running 
through New York like it has not 
since the days when the Dodgers, 
the Giants, and the Yankees bal- 
ded for glory. Neverbeforehad the 
Mets arm tire Yankees entered the 
crucial stages of the season with 
both racing for first, and rarely had 
New York been treated 10 a double 
pennant race with two teams play- 
ing ai home on the same day in 
September. 

On a sunny afternoon with a 
World Series nip in the air, the 
Mets gave the day its proper bap- 
tism, scoring four limes in the first 
timing and twice in the second 
against the Cardinals’ 20-game 
winner, Joaquin Andujar. The 
Mets’ starting pitcher, Ed Lynch, 
did away with the first six St. Louis 
hitters. The crowd of 50.453 at 
Shea cheered. 

But iw the t bird inning the Pftr rfi- 

nals sent in a left-handed pitcher 
named Pat Perry, who had never 
before appeared in a major league 
game. He retired the next 10 Mets 
and the Cardinals began to solve 
the tricky, slow-ball pitching of 
Lynch. 

They rose up with three runs in 
the third and scored twice in the 
fourth. 

Then in the ninth, WflHe McGee, 
batting with one out, hit a high fast 
ball, on a.2-and-2 count from the 
Mets’ fourth pitcher, Jesse Orosco, 
over the 39Woot marker on the 
wall in left-center Grid. The score 
was tied. 

Moolric Wilson opened the bot- 
tom of the ninth against relief 


- NATIONAL LEAGUE 


in the ninth inning, preserving vie- 


the Sixth, the Padres had run- 
ners on lint and third with no outs 
but could not score because short- 
stop Dave Concepcion speared a 
hard hit ball to start a double play. 
Jn the eighth, third baseman Buddy 
Befl made a brilliant Stop of Steve 
Garvey’s drive 10 begin another 
doable play. 

The Reds got both their runs in 
the first Eddie Milner opened with 
a single off Andy Hawkins, who 
allowed only six bits, and scored all 
the way from fast on Bell’s double 
— which bounced off third base- 
nan Graig Netties' glove and trick- 
led into the bullpen off the left field 
Hoe. Bel 1 scored on a single by 
Tony Perez — which bounded off 
second baseman Flannery's glove. 

Braves 11, Dodgers 6: Brad 
Kommissk hit a three-run homer 
during a six- run third inning that 
overcame Los Angeles in Atlanta, 

ending both a f our -game losing 

streak and a four-game winning 
streak. 

Pirates 10, Cubs 2: RJ. Reyn- 
olds bit a three- run homer in the 
third inning and relief pitcher Don 
Robinson hit a grand slam during a 
six-ran eighth that beat Chicago in 
Pittsburgh. 

Expos 6, Phillies 3: Hubie 
Brooks’ fust grand slam in the ma- 
jors, in the fifth inning, gave Mon- 
treal its victory in Philadelphia. 

Astros 5. Giants 2: In Houston, 
Kevin Bass doubled, tripled and 
scored twice against San Francisco. 



6-Run 7th Inning Overtakes Blue Jays 


the Autodet) Pteti 

Darryl Strawberry and Ray Knight of the Mets joined teammate Keith Hernandez, right, 
in a small victory dance after bis single in the ninth inning defeated the Canfinals. 7-6. 


By Murray Chass 

V«i York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The Toronto 
Blue Jays, who have held onto first 
place iii the American League East 
Division since May 13. cracked for 
just an instant Thursday night and 
the Yankees roared through for a 
six-run rally and a 7-S victory in the 
opening game of their critical four- 
game series. The Blue Jays' lead 
over the Yankees was cut to one 
and a half games. 

Tony Fernandez, the young 
shortstop, opened the crack with an 
error in the seventh inning and Ron 
Hassey hit a tie-breaking three- nm 
home run. bringing a thunderous 
roar from the Yankee Stadium 
crowd of 52,141. 

The Yankees now are 51-16 in 
their stadium and have won 30 of 
their last 36 games on all fields. 

The six-run rally, overcoming a 
4-1 deficit, made Ron Guidry a 
winner for the 19th time this sea- 
son. putting him one victoiy away 
from reaching the 20- victoiy pla- 
teau a third time. Guidry struggled, 
but he lasted long enough for the 
Yankees to catch up to Dave Stieb, 
the Blue Jays’ No. 1 starter, who 
allowed only one hit the first six 
innings. 

Stieb got the first batter in the 
seventh, then walked Willie Ran- 
dolph. Bobby Meadiam hit what 
should have been a force-play 
grounder to short, but Fernandez 
was indecisive in nuking the play. 
First, be started toward second as if 
to make the play himself, then sud- 
denly flipped the ball toward Da- 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


maso Garcia, the second baseman, 
who had backed off from the base 
when Fernandez started toward ii. 

No one made tbe play, and Fer- 
nandez had his 28th error this sea- 
son. The Yankees had two runners 
on and one out instead of one on 
and two out. When Stieb made that 
three on bv walking Rickey Hen- 
derson, the Blue Jays' manager. 
Bobby Cox. brought in the left- 
handed Gory LaveDe to piich to 
Ken Griffey and Don Mattingly, 
two left-handed hitters. 

Griffey grounded to third, but 
the Blue Jays could get only a force 
at second as Randolph scored. 
Mattingly singled to right, driving 
in Meachaxn, and Cox summoned 
the right-handed Dennis Lamp to 
pitch to Dave Winfield. 

Winfield grounded a single into 
the hole between short ana third. 
Fernandez fielded the balL but 
then threw over second base, where 
no force would have been possible 
anyway, and into short right field. 
Griffey scored the tying run on the 
hit, and the other runners wound 
up at second and third on the error. 
Then it was Hassey's turn. 

Last Sunday. Hassey got four 
hits and drove in four runs in a 9-6 
victoiy. Tuesday, he bit a three-run 
homer that pul the Yankees ahead. 
6-3. en route to a 13-10 victory. 
This time he took two balls, then 
drove Lamp's third pitch into the 
third tier of the right-field stands. 


Oilers Hoping to Embarrass Another Quarterback 


ground ball toward 
zie Smith charged and fielded it, 
but his throw to first went into the 
dirt and bounced off the heel of the 
glove of first baseman Brian 
Hazper; an outfielder by trade: Wil- 
son was safe, and he moved to 
second on Wally Backman’s sacri- 
fice bunt 

Up ram* Keith Hernandez, hit- 
less his last 11 times at bat against 
lhe lam that traded him two years 


ago. On a one strike pilch, he drove 
sen Smith and the 


going to be on trial 
ys he thinks he saw in 


*7 don’t know. I don’t assume he 
made it." ' t 

“You saw him take the red 
juice?" 

“I never saw him take it.” 

■ Mays Denies Allegation 

Mays has vehemently denied any 
involvement with drugs, The Asso- 
ciated Press reported from Ather- 
ton, California. 

“Why am 1 l 
for what be says 
my locker?" Mays said by tele- 
phone. “I've tried for years and 
years to be a hero to the kids of 
America.” 

Mays said that under normal ar- 
cumstances he would not have 
granted an interview. “But is this 
case 1 have 10 . 

“It's a shame a man can be cruci- 
fied for one statement, to play all 
those years and have one statement 
crucify me.” 

- He' added, “If you’re going to 
"oring me into this, that’s un-Ameri- 
can. This is a trial of a different 
meaning. The* guys are into hard, 
hard drugs.” 


a fits! ball between 
.third baseman, - Terry Pendleton. 
Ootfiddar Vince Coleman raced in 
for the ball, hoping 10 cot down 
Wilson at the plate, but the speedy 
left fielder overran tbe ball and 
Wilson scored standing up. The 
game was over. 

One group of Mets surrounded 
Wilson and another mobbed Her- 
nandez, in 2 scene that resembled a 
championship celebration. 

“If we bad lost, after being six 
runs up,” Hernandez said, “that 
would have hurt us. And if they had 
won after being six runs down, they 
would have kept rolling for who 
knows how long." 

So the Mets had won the first 
two g array m this three-game se- 
ries, with both decided by one run. 
Fadr team has 24 games left, in- 
cluding three in SL Louis 

in the final week of the season. 


The AsocuUed Press 

NEW YORK — Tbe Houston 
Oilers humbled Dan Marino last 
Sunday. This week, they get a 
chance to humble Joe Tbosmann, 
who already has been humbled 
once this National Football League 
season. 

Theismann and the Washington 
Redskins, who opened with a a 44- 
14, six-interception Monday night 
debacle in Dallas, try to regroup 
Sunday in their home opener at 
RFK Stadium against tbe nq'uye- 
nated Oilers, who shocked Marino 
and the Miami Dolphins, 26-23. 

“It always makes things interest- 
ing when I set foot in RFK Stadi- 
um,” said Theismann, who “cele- 
brated" his 36th birthday Monday 
night by throwing five of the six 
interceptions. 

“They*vc tried to'botnue-ouFof' 
this place for 12 years. FA come 
regardless. You can bring your 
megaphones and bring your boos 
and bring your cheers. I'm still go- 
ing to show up.” 

The Redskins are only one of 
four 1984 divisional champions 
who return home this week to at- 
tempt to recover from opening 
losses. 

The defending NFL champion 
San Francisco 49 ere will play the 
Atlanta Falcons after being 
shocked, 28-21. in Minnesota last 
Sunday; the AFC West champion 
Denver Broncos take op the New 
Orleans Saints after losing, 20-16. 


to the Los Angeles Rams, and the 
Dolphins will tTy to rebound 
ag ainst the Indianapolis Colts at 
the Orange Bowl. 

But the Redskins, who finished 
1 1-5 last season and twice beat the 
Cowboys, seemed the most embar- 
rassed of an in losing to a bitter 
rival in the NFL’s showcase, the 
Opening Monday night telecast. 

“You don’t know why things like 
this happen," said their coach, Joe 
Gibbs. “Tm convinced you proba- 
bly could come up with 100 reasons 
why we played as badly as we did. 
Tm not sure there are just one or 
two.” 

Gibbs said be plans to continue 
alternating running backs John 
Riggins and George Rogers. Hous- 
ton's coach, Hugh Campbell, will 
start Butch Woolf oik and alternate 
him with Mike Roz/er. who scored 
the winning touchdown against 
Miami with 30 seconds lefL 

Campbell said he expects to have 
Warren Moon pass more against 
Washington than against Miami, 
and played down the upset of the 
Dolphins. 

“Except for one penalty call and 
<me pass play, tbe game would have 
gone the other way and we 
wouldn’t be doing all this celebrat- 
ing,” he said. 

Harrah’s Reno Race St Sports 
Book favors tbe Redskins by 1W6 
points. 

Here is a look at the other games 
this weekend: 


NFL PREVIEW 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

Atlanta (0-1) at San Francisco (0- 
1). "We’ve got 15 games left and 
we'H have to start there ” said the 
49ers' coach. Bill Walsh. They 
gained 489 yards last wed; but were 
beaten by seven turnovers. The 
pass rush was a disappointment 

The Falcons’ Steve Bartkowski 
completed 16 of 23 passes, with no 
interceptions, for 179 yards and 
two touchdowns, but was sacked 
five limes for 39 yards in losses and 
his team lost. 28-27, to Detroit after 
losing leads of 14-0 and 21-14. 
(49ers by 14 points.) 

Dallas (1-0) at Detroit (0-1). The 
Cowboys' coach, Tom Landry, who 
calls the defeat of Washington one 
of the best performances he has 
seen, is concerned that his team 
may flatten out against the Lions. 
That happened last year, when the 
Cowboys opened with a Monday 
night victory, then were badly beat- 
en by the New York Gians, who 
eventually edged them for a wild- 
card playoff slot. (Cowboys by 4.) 

New York (I-O) at Green Bay (B- 
1). The Giants' pass rush, which got 
eight sacks in a 21-0 victoiy over. 
Philadelphia, meets an offensive 
tine that allowed seven sacks in a 
26-20 loss to New England. 

But the Packers’ coach, Forrest 
Gregg, says the line, riddled by 


Chiefs Triumph, 36-20, End Raiders 9 Reign 


■ Reds Tom to Defense 

With their player-manager, Pete 
Rose, taking a rest after breaking 
Ty Cobb’s hit record, tbe Cnctn- 
nati. Reds beat the San Diego Pa- 
dres, 2-1, with fielding and hide 
Thursday night. United Press In- 
ternational reported from Cincin- 
nati. 

“We had a guy playing defense 
so hard,” said Rose, “he knocked a 
hole in the wall.” 

Thai was left fielder Eric Davis, 
who capped a night of spcctacnlar 
defense by crashing into the wall to 
haul in Tim Flannery's long drive 


Complied ty Our Staff From Dispatches 

KANSAS CITY, Missouri — 
Nick Lowery kicked five field goals 
and BDl Kenney threw two touch- 
down passes in the third quarter 
Thursday night to give tbe Kansas 
City Chiefs a stunning 36-20 vio- 
t over the Los Angeles Raiders, 
very accounted for Kansas 


lory ow 
Lowe 


Gty*s first 15 prints, on field goals 
of 39, " “ 


, 22, 42, 58 and 21 yards, and 

the Chiefs held 15-14 lead midway 
through the thud quarter. The five 
field goals had tied one dub record 
and Itis 58-yarder tied another. 

Kenney then threw touchdown 
passes of 25 yards to Carkis Carson 
and of 5 yards to Slepbone Paige to 


ensure the Chiefs’ first victoiy "over 
the Raiders since 1981. 

“Well, J don’t have any excuses,” 
said the Raiders’ coach, Tom Flo- 
res. “There are no excuses. 

“They have a good football 
team. We knew it coming in. We 
know it going oul” 

Kenney completed 18-of-38 
passes for 259 yards. Carson 
thwarted the Raiders' two Pro 
Bowl cornerbaeks, Lester Hayes 
and Mike Haynes, all game long, 
making five catches for 1 17 yards. 
He caught four of his passes over 
Hayes, but beat Haynes for the 
touchdown, his first in six years of 
playing against the Raiders. 


Hayes was called for interfering 
with Carson on one play early in 
Lhe third period. On the next play, 
Carson caught a deep sideline pass 
on Hayes, who claimed he had been 
interfered with. To make his point, 
Hayes look off his helmet and 
dashed it to the turf. 

But the official presiding was not 
impressed. 

That drive ended in Lowery’s 21- 
yard field goal. Until then, the 
Raiders still had not given up a 
touchdown in the six-plus quarters 
this season. But Lhe next time the 
Chiefs got the ball, Carson beat 
Haynes for the 25-yard touchdown 
pass. (LAT. UPI) 


injury and contract problems, is 
starling to improve. Greg Koch, 
who last week returned after walk- 
ing out of training camp, will be 
back at one tackle. (Packers by 2 1 :.) 

Minnesota (1-0) at Tampa Bay 
(0-1 y. Bud Gram, who made a tri- 
umphant return as the Vikings' 
coach, considers this game even 
more important because it is 
against another NFC Central team, 
file Bucs, 38-28 losers to Chicago 
last week, will have Sieve Young, 
the U.S. Football League's S40- 
million man, in uniform, but Steve 
DeBerg will be their quarterback. 
(Bucs by 3.) 

Los Angeles (1-0) at Philadelphia 
(0-1). After last week’s eight-sack 
disaster, the Eagles’ coach. Marion 
Campbell, changed quarterbacks 
instead of blockers, installing mo- 
bile rookie Randall Cunningham in 
place of Ron Jaworski. The Rams, 
still without Eric Dickerson, will 
use Charles White and perhaps 
Barry Redden in his place if Red- 
den’s injured ankle improves. 
(Rams by 3'A.) 

AMERICAN CONFERENCE 

IntBanapofis (0-1) at Miami (0-1). 
As if the Colts did not have enough 
troubles following a 45-3 loss to 
Pittsburgh, they now have to meet 
the angry Dolphins. 

Marino, who ended his contract 
holdout just five days before the 
Houston game, and was lifted after 
completing 13 of 24 passes for 159 
yards and two interceptions, again 
will start ahead of Don StrocL Tbe 
Colts expect to continue with quar- 
terback An Schlichter, who won 
the job from Mike Pagel in presea- 
son and bruised his knee against 
the Steelers. (Dolphins by 18.) 

Seattle (1-0) at San Diego (1-0). 
While winning last week was wel- 
come, the Seahawks were even 
more encouraged by the running of 
Curt Warner, who made a dazzling 
cut on the 11-yard touchdown run 
that beat Cincinnati, 28-24. Warner 
missed nearly all of last year with a 
knee injury. Tbe Chargers, who 
beat Buffalo, 14-9, will be without 
place lacker Rolf Benirschke, who 
pulled a groin muscle. (Seahawks 
by 3.) 

Pittsburgh (1-0) at Cleveland (0- 
1). Despite their long domination 
of the AFC Central, the Sieelere 


have not won in Cleveland since 
1981. The Browns began their sea- 
son on a discouraging note, rallying 
from a two- touchdown deficit in 
the fourth quarter to take the lead, 
only to have Sl Louis tie and win in 
overtime. (Steelers by Hi) 

Buffalo (0-1) at New York (0-1). 
Neither team scored a touchdown 
the first week, though the Bills got 
three field goals from Scott Nor- 
wood: quarterback Vince Ferra- 
gamo was 31-46 pasting for 377 
yards but could not score. 

The Jets, who allowed 10 sacks in 
a 31-0 loss to lhe Los Angeles Raid- 
ers, opened ibeir coffers this week 
to lure back walkout offensive 
tackles Marvin Powell and Reggie 
McEIroy and to sign wide receiver 
AJ Toon, their top draft pick. (Jets 
bv 3'i.) 

' INTERCONFERENCE 

New Orleans (0-1) at Denver (0- 
1). The Broncos' loss to the Rams 
was made worse by the loss of three 
starting defensive backs: Dennis 
Smith with a shoulder separation, 
Steve Foley with a twisted knee and 
Steve Wilson with a bruised knee. 
Wilson was filling in for Louis 
Wright, still recuperating from a 
preseason knee injury. 

But the Saints may not be able to 
attack tbe weakened secondary 
successfully. Their coach. Bum 
Phillips, says he will start Dave 
WOson at quarterback; Wilson was 
replaced by Richard Todd in a 47- 
27 loss to Kansas City after going 
2-for-22. throwing 18 straight in- 
complete passes. (Broncos by 10.) 

Cincinnati (0-1) at Sl Louis (1- 

0) . The Cardinals are one of the 
favorites in tbe NFC. but lost de- 
fensive backs Jeff Griffin and Bob- 
by Johnson in the Cleveland game. 
Ken .Anderson, who left last week’s 
game with stomach cramps, again 
wiD be quarterbacking the Bengals. 

New England (1-0) at Chicsgo (§- 

1) . The Patriots, who began the 
season with a suspect defense, got 
seven sacks against Green Bay as 
linebackers Andre Tippett and 
Don Blackmon each got to quarter- 
back Lynn Dickey three times. 

The Bears, who specialize in 
sacks but entered the season with a 
suspect offense, gained 436 yards 
against Tampa Bay. Jim McMahon 
was 23 of 34 passing for 274 yards. 
(Bears by 4fe.) 


■ Angels Beat Rangers 

Mike Witt and Donnie Moore 
pitched a seven-hitter and Ruppen 
Jones drove in two runs Thursday 
night as the California Angels beat 
the Texas Rangers. 5-3, to again 
close 10 two games of the West 
leader, the idle Kansas City Royals. 
United Press International report- 
ed from Anaheim. California. 

Witt, pitching seven innings, al- 
lowed six hits, among them a bases- 
empty homer by Alan Bannister 
and a two-run shot by Steve Bue- 
chele. Moore got his club-record 
26th save of tbe season by working 
the eighth and ninth. 

The Rangers’ starter, Dave Stew- 
art, left the game with a 3-2 lead in 
the seventh after allowing a leadoff 
double to Bob Boone. But losing 
reliever Dwayne Henry gave up a 
game-tying fielder's choice ground 
ball to Rod Carew and Jones tri- 
pled to right-center to score Carew 
with tbe winning run. 

White Sox 4, Twins 2: Greg 
Walker’s two-run triple in the third 
inning and Gene Nelson's seven-hit 
pitching beat Minnesota in Chica- 
go- 

Orioles 3, Red Sox I: Floyd 
Rayford hit a two-run homer to 
back the six-hit pitching of Ken 
Dixon and Don Aase as Baltimore 
won in Boston. 


Pete’s Numbers 
^Appeared Rosey 


The Associated Press 

HARRISBURG, Pennsylva- 
nia — Pete Rose's record- 
breaking performance was a hit 
with so many players in Penn- 
sylvania's daily lottery Thurs- 
day that it forced a halt in sales 
of tickets bearing the numbers 
4-1-9-Z 

Those numbers correspond 
to Rose's hit total after he broke 
Ty Cobb’s mark. Sales of the 
numbers 1 -4-9-2, 1 -9-4-2 and 2- 
9-1-4 also were stopped, a lot- 
toy board spokeswoman said, 
because on each combination a 
potential payout limit of $5 mil- 
lion bad been reached. None of 
the combinations won. 

This was the second time 
Rose had brought the lottery to 
a halt. In 1981. when be was 
playing for the Philadelphia 
Phillies, it stopped selling the 
number 3-6-3- 1 when he broke 
the National League hit record. 


SCOREBOARD 




Baseball 


Transition 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


TTmrsday’s line Scores 

NATIONAL. LjEAOt/6 
St LOU l* “> ™ #B1 - 41 “ * 

Andulor, Horton Ol. P«ty 
K ioto. Hunt 

■I (Oi onaco (fl) ond CartRT- w— O tOACd* 
HB-iJ. U**. MCGOO 19). 

ON HI l»— 1 > 8 
aoowooo*-** • 

ana 

<«) and DKU.W— Tttte. MS. L- How 
kini. !?-*■ S w-Pow <«>- 


.Major League Standings 


Toronto 
Hew* Tort 

Baltimore 

Detroit 

Boston 

MllwBitvee 

CiBuausad 


AMERICAN UEABUa 

gait DleUlai. 

W L PeL CB 
N 52 MS — 
36 53 -419 IKl 

n H SB I** 
71 sr SW K 

69 71 «*93 W 

61 77 Ml 26 
90 <W 231 3»* 

Wert DlvW*» __ 

70 59 sn — 

79 IS JOT 7 

71 « 511 W 

69 71 An n 

63 74 .66# Wft 

62 77 Mi 17VS 
SI a N7 UK> 


Kansas Cttv 

California 
cnlcBSO 
Oakland 
Seattle 

Minnesota 
Terns 

national, ceaous 
Easi dwiNwi 

W L Pet. 


OB 


- N evr vor* 

as 

54 

M 9 

— 

83 

35 

Ml 

) 

51 . Louis 

74 

64 

536 

10 . 

Montreal 

48 

69 

JO 6 

IM 

oniiadciphto 

66 

72 

X7S 

to 

Vnla»9 
. ‘ Piilsourt^ 1 

« 

91 

J31 

38 


n 

M 

JfM 

mmtm 

Los Anoe«* 

73 

64 

M3 

Bfe 

Cincinnati 

71 

60 

511 

Ill'll 

San Dl«t° 

tf 

70 

jot 

13VS 

Houston 

59 

M 

jot 

2W> 

Atlanta 

Son Frondaot 

. M 

83 

jaa 

28*i 


alow I19M0N9— * > • 

p nte borgR on ho k»-m 9 • 

eckerstw. Pertmon IS), Beam (6>, Bn» 
iter U) and LokK DovU MU Rhoden. Rcbki- 
m CM and Pena W— Rhoden. Ml Lr-€dc- 
erslev. 9.13. S*— RoWneoo. (31. HRs— 
pmabvratv RomoWe ID. Bram Cl. ftotrin- 
son. <D. 

Montreal H* Ml M9-C W ■ 

PHtNfeMla Mo no we— J i 9 

Youmanx. Burke (61. Reardon (BJandBu- 
(era; Rawtey. SurtwH (6). Andereen (7). CHI- 
dross m. Toliver m oad DouBea w— Yoi>- 
mtra.3-2. L — Rowley, 1 1-7. Sv— Rrarctan <W). 
MR— Montreal. Brooks (Tlk 
Saa FmdKe iw oh in 8 9 3 

Houston IRWIN—* 8 8 

La Point. MMon [71. Garre rtf (X) and Bran- 
ly; KertWcL&nHh (BY and Ballev.W— KerfekL . 
2-2. Lt—M) Point. 7-13. 

Las AOMoe 000 HI— 6 13 3 

Atlanta Mi OW Bta—ll 11 8 

Reins. Casrttto OI. Ota U) and Sdascto; 
JemawvSmm Mi.Corber C7I.SuHer IS) and 

Cetane. W—8mWvW. L—Cartllfc»,3-2. NRe— 

Las Arnu Ltmkaou* till. Mdfcrt <TIJ. 
Atlanta. Ko mmln sk 131. Honnor (30. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Minnesota hi .HO Ml— 3 f l 

Cntcaao Dll HO Ha 0 1 1 

smtlhsoa ana Salas. Nelson. Jamee (91 and 
SUwar. w— Nelson, 9-9. L — Sralttrwo. 14-TZ. 
Sv— James (361. W— Nelson. M. Lr-SniKl*- . 

Bammere 888 888 001—3 9 0 

Boston STt at* 999— t i » 

Dixon. Aon (U and Demosev; Nlpotf and 
GedmoA. W— Dixon. L— Ntaper.Ml.S^e— 
Asm im. HR-Badimora, Rortort Cl 2). Bos- 
ton. (Seaman (1*1. 

Toronto bMIOI oto-4 ie 2 

New York «• OW «*-> 3 1 

sued. LoshSIo (D.Lomp ro.Clarke tn and 

wnHtr Guwrv, Plstwr (9) and Hossev. W- 

HRs— Toronto. WWtttli). NW YarfeHaMW 

T^mss 001 *08 MO-3 I 9 

Coftfomm . it* « * *“* 

Stewart. Hewy Cn and Sta»M! wm. 
Moore (Stand Boone, ttanw 

■ 7. i^-Henrv. 1-S. Sv—tooon ael- HRs— tiw- 
as. Bannister Ml. BvcNrf* (31. CoWomla, 
GrWi HOI. 


BASBBALL 
AlTftfflR LMM 

TORONTO— Activated Tom Filer, pitcher. 


5AM DIEGO- 


Bob Clack nos 


N.Y. METS- Recalled Calvin 5ddrakU. 
pitcher, tram Tidewater of the I nt ernational 


Football 


NFL Standings 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
East 

W L T Pet. PF 


Now England 

1 

6 

0 

1M0 

26 

Buffalo 

O 

1 

0 

MO 

9 

Indiana pal Is 

0 

1 

B 

M0 

3 

Miami 

D 

1 

0 

MB 

23 

H.Y. Jnta 

D 1 
Central 

a 

jwo 

a 

Houston 

1 

0 

B 

1M0 

26 

Pittsburgh 

1 

0 

e 

1500 

45 

Cincinnati 

0 

) 

0 

500 

24 

Clawelafld. 

0 1 
w mat 

0 

500 

24 

Kansas City 

2 

0 

0 

1500 

83 

San Dingo 

1 

0 

0 

1500 

14 

Ssanto 

1 

B 

0 

15M 

28 

LA. Raldbre 

T 

1 

a 

JOO 

51 

D«fxv*r 

0 

1 

0 

580 

16 


PA 

30 
M 
45 
K 

31 


Dallas 
N.Y. Giants 
SL Louis 
PtXtodetohlo 
wash baton 


1X00 46 
IM 21 
1A0D 27 
M0 0 
M0 14 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
East 
1 0 
1 0 
1 0 
0 1 
0 1 
central 
i o 
1 o 
1 o 
o t 

0 T 
won 

1 . o 
» i 
0 1 
0 1 

Thursday's Return 
Kansas City 16, Los AnoMe* Raiders 20 


been replaced as memaaer of Itw San Dleoo 
Padres* Class AAA farm dub In Los Veeas. 

BASKETBALL 

National BoUcetboH asucMUm 

boston— S toned jerry Sktillna, guard, to 
on offer sheet. Stoned oavJd TMrdklU, tor- 
want 

Nj. NETS— Stoned Yvon Joseph, center, la 
a one-year c o ntract. 

PHILADELPHIA— Stoned Derrick Garvin, 
town! 

UTAH— Stoned Scan Lavam. assistant coa- 
ch, to a flv»-yocir contract. 

FOOTBALL 

Not tonal Football Leoaoe 

DENVER— Stoned Dan Reeves, head coa- 
ch, to a contract extension which will carry 
Mm through the tot seam. 

MIAMI— Agreed to ferms wMi Gtonn 
Blackwood* safety. 

MINNESOTA— Re-Stonea Fred McNeill 
and Dennis PawUcea. Unebodcer* and free 
safety John Turner. Plaeed Tim Meatnber. 
Dnebadcer and Ted Rosnaale. safety an in- 
lured reserved. 

N.Y. JETS— Waived Greg Gunter, center. 
Std Abramawlft, tackle, and Chv Davidson, 
wide receiver. 

PITTSBURGH— Announced nose ladde 


U.S. Holds Slim Lead in Ryder Cup 


SUTTON COLDFIELD, England (AP) — Lanny Wadkins and Ray 
Floyd won Friday’s final match, defeating Howard Clark of England ana 
Sam Torrance of Scotland, 1-up, and salvaged a 4V4-3W lead over the 
British-Enropean team in the opening Ryder Cup golf matches. 

Wadkins and Floyd beat Scots Ken Brown and Sandy Lyle, 4 and 3. in 
the morning as the United Slates took a 3-1 lead. But Seve Ballesteros and 
Manuel Pinero of Spain, winning both their matches Friday, helped the 
Europeans win two and one-half of four points in the afternoon. 


Colbert Leads in U.S. Golf Tourney 


MILWAUKEE (AP) — Jim Colbert shot 6-under-par 66 Thursday for 
a two-stroke lead over 12 other players after one round of the Greater 
Milwaukee Open golf tournament. 

Jade Nicklaus carded 70 after double-bogeying the ninth bole and 
ihreo-puiiing from the back fringe for a bogey on No. IS. His son. Jack II, 
an amateur, shot 80 in his second PGA lournamenL 


I an At Injured in Grand Prix Practice 


CMcodo 
D rtralt 
MUnnMote 
CTMn Boy 
TamM Bar 


1.000 38 28 

IMS » 27 

1M0 28 21 

MX 2» 
MB 28 28 


la Rams 
Atlanta 
N*w Ortoana 
San Francisco 


t 


7 MO TO 16 

M0 27 28 
MO 27 47 
OM 21 28 


Gary Dunn will bo out UteflnlMv ohw ant*. 
roocoalc kneo ouroarv; ha will bo replaced 
Sunday bv affhar (Mark Catena or Edmund 
Nelson. • - 

SAN DIEGO— Stoned Bab Thomas, kicker, 
and Antboav Coder, naming berk. Placed 
Rolf BentrecMta# kicker, an in lured reserve. 

SEATTLE— Named Reggie McKenzie as- 
sistant director ot marketing- 
HOCKBV 

National Hockey League 

EDMONTON— Traded Cities Metoeho. 
mlto, to the PltttDunrti Penguins tor Marty 
Mcsartay. d ot enaenu m . and Tim Hrvnewich. 
toft wins. Stoned Mike Patmeteer, eogt to. to a 

ana-roar con tract. 

COLLEGE 

LOUI5VILLB— Announced senior defat- 
»tuo lineman Jon Cade has atilt the football 
town. 

NIAGARA— Stoned Michate PonnutL cen- 
to.', of Trent u, Holy, who will novo 3 years of 
eligibility to ptov on tho schagr* basketball 
town bmfnntna tola season. 


SPA-FRANCORCHAMPS, Belgium (AP) — Niki Lauda of Austria, 
the reigning world driving champion, tore a tendon in his right wmi in an 
accident during Friday's opening practice session for the Belgian Grand 
Prix and will not be able to compete in Sunday’s race. 

Lauda said the accelerator of bis McLaren-TAC-Porscbe apparently 
jammed and the car “hit almost head-on” into sted guardrails at the long 
Spa track. 

“Luckily I was slowing down to come into the pits, said Lauda, but his 
car still was going more than 100 miles per hour (160 kph) at impact 

In Paris, the French automaker Renault said Thursday that it had 
withdrawn from next month's South African Grand Prix. 



Quotable 






“When 1 was 17, 1 wanted to be 25. Now that I’m 33, 1 want to be 33. 1 1 
have no complaints. If 1 hadn’t made it to 33. then F d have a complaint/ 
— tennis player Jimmy Connors. (A PI \ 




J 


—vi' -V 1 * 




_ x 


... i 


u rru TKturcKtKtcrx* Lictmoavauanta. me a 4 GGK 





I 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER UU15, 1985 


brazil postcard 
Indian Public Relations 


By Allan Redin: 

Reuters 

Y AWALAPITI. Brazil — Ama- 
zonian Indians, after nearly 
500 years of pillage, are learning 
the white man's public relations 
techniques in a bid to get a better 
deal for the surviving tribes. 

For the Fust time, the Indians 
invited three government ministers 
to attend this year’s sacred Kuarap 
festival of mourning for the dead 
and. having got their attention, lob- 
bied them intensively on the need 
for Indian land to be protected. 

When the Portuguese arrived in 
Brazil in 1500. it is estimated, there 
were four million to six milli on In- 
dians. Only 220.000 remain, still 
battling settlers and prospectors 
for their dwindling terrain. 

_ As a Brazilian Air Force twin-en- 
gined transport plane twisted over 
the jungle to land at a dust strip 
near Yawalapiti, in a comer of the 
upper Xingu region, the Indians' 
problem became clear Huge es- 
tates cleared of timber encircled the 
reserve. 

Marcos Terena, a Terena Indian 
working at the Ministry of Culture, 
said: “We hope to encourage re- 
spect for the Indians through this 
visit, to establish better relations 
between the Indians and the gov- 
ernment.” 

The 100-strong party of whites 
included Ministers of Culture Alui- 
sio Pimenta, Interior Minister Ron- 
aldo Costa Couto and Labor Min- 
ister Aimir Pazzianotto. President 
Jose Samey was unable to attend 
but sent a spokesman, Fernando 
Cesar Mesquiia. 

Their host was Aritana, chief of 
Yawalapiti village. Guests from 
neighboring villages of Indians 
speaking the Aruak. Karibe and 
Tupi languages Indians attended. 

Resting with families and pets in 
hammocks slung in clearings, near 
fires kindled to offset the night 
cold, the men painted themselves 
and any white who cared to join 
them in preparation for the night- 
long ceremony. 

They scored their skin with stiff 
wooden combs and daubed them- 
selves with orange pigment from 
waxy uruat seeds, with charcoal or 
with the sap of the genipap tree, to 
make bold patterns. In some cases 
their short-cut hair was solid with 
red pigment. 

Welcoming parties set fire to the 
undergrowth to guide neighbors 
who came by truck, on foot, in 


canoes and on bicycles. Some, in- 
congruously, carried huge radio 

and tape recorder sets. 

“We dedicate this Kuarup to all 
the tribal people of BraziL especial- 
ly the forgotten tribes or the Ama- 
zon. the oppressed Pataxo. Guara- 
ni. Kaingang inionea 

Yanocula Rodane. a deputy direc- 
tor of the Xingu Indian reservation. 

in the center of the village stood 
six carved tree trunks denoting 
people in line to the chieftaincy 
who died in the last year, including 
the 2-month-old daughter of Ari- 
Uma. After a night of lament, the 
logs were thrown into the river to 
liberate the spirits. 

Despite the colorful ceremonies, 
the Indians did not forget their rea- 
son for permitting the white intru- 
sion. Chief Raoni of the Txucam- 
mae Lribe told Costa Couto: 
“Samey pays attention to you, I 
have to pay attention to my peo- 
ple.” He delivered a stream of com- 
plaints about killings of his people. 

“I don’t have the means to wage 
war.” Raoni said. The former mili- 
tary government of Brazil appro- 
priated a 15-kilometer (9-mile) 
strip of his land. Costa Couto as- 
sured him that compensation was 
being arranged. 

As dawn broke after a night of 
wailing and lobbying and explod- 
ing fireworks, the mood changed. It 
was time for the Jiuka huka wres- 
tling contest and the emergence of 
the virgins, white-skinned from liv- 
ing in seclusion for as much as 
three years. 

Throwing up clouds of dust the 
wrestlers whirled around. Aritana 
emerged as champion. It was diffi- 
cult for white visitors to assess 
whether the fight had been straight 
or a political compromise. 

The ministers flew back to the 
concrete jungle of Brasilia promis- 
ing their hosts that the demarcation 
of Indian lands would be included 
in a new constitution to be written 
next year. 

There are powerful lobbies 
ranged against the Indian claim, 
however mining companies and 
ranchers say that, given Brazil's 
more than SI 00 billion in foreign 
debts, allowing 220.000 of the 
country’s 144 million people to 
maintain 7 percent of the territory 
in an unproductive state would be 
economic suicide. 


An Buchwald is on vacation. 


Full Life, Empty Hall for Renee Katz 


By Linda Wolfe 

.'«n 1‘iirt Times Serrne 

N EW YORK — In the sum- 
mer of 1 979. her name was in 
newspapers around the world, a 
testament to the single moment 
on a subway platform that could 
irrevocably change a person's life. 

That sense of vulnerability pro- 
duced a flood of public concern 
for Renee Katz, a music student 
whose right hand was severed 
when she was pushed in front of a 
subway train. Could the hand be 
reattached? Would she play the 
piano or flute again? What would 
she make of her life? 

"Follow me.” said Katz the 
other day. the tails of her lab coat 
flapping as she darted down the 
corridor of North Shore Univer- 
sity Hospital on Long Island. At 
24! she is working as an occupa- 
tional therapist, helping others 
along the road to rehabilitation 
she trod for more than two years. 

She entered an empty lecture 
hall and headed to the back of a 
stage. Buried in a jungle of cable 
wires, slide projectors and video 
screens was a piano she had 
scoured hospital grounds to find. 

As she often does at lunchtime, 
when the auditorium is empty. 
Katz sat by the piano and began 
to play. But the fingers that once 
whisked over the keys now plod; 
playing the flute, which Katz had 
been studying at the city's High 
School of Music and Arts, is vir- 
tually impossible. “It's rally so 
sad.” she said. 

All traces of remorse end with 
this matter-of-raci admission. 
The hand, so mangled that doc- 
tors considered not trying to save 
it. was reattached during 1 6 hours 
of microsurgery and is now 
strong enough to arm-wrestle. 
The teen-age sweetheart who 
stood by Katz's side during her 
ordeal. David Simon, is now her 
husband. The aborted plan (o 
pursue a music fellowship at the 
New England Conservatory of 
Music led to a degree in occupa- 
tional therapy from New York 
University and a creative and 
challenging career. 

Katz is nor jus: muddling 
through her new- life, but rejoic- 
ing in iL She does oot just walk, 
she bolts: she does not just talk, 
she spills out ideas in a fast-flow- 
ing river of words. 

Tm lucky." she said, “really 
lucky." She was eating yogurt 
with her left hand, a small tribute 



Renee Katz, left with a patient: “I really understand anger and frustration." 


to the years of therapy that trans- 
ferred such skills from her right 
side to her left. 

“It's a question of concentrat- 
ing not on what you've lost but on 
what you've been luck)- enough to 
keep." said Dr. William Shaw, an 
associate professor at New York 
University Medical Center and 
head of plastic surgery at Belle- 
vue Medical Center who led the 
surgical team that reattached 
Katz's hand. 

Over two years, for more than 
an hour a day. five days a week. 
Katz attended physical and occu- 
pational therapy sessions al the 
Institute of Rehabilitation Medi- 
cine of New York University 
Hospual. She can remember 
bursting into tears a number of 
times as she lifted weights and 
did stretching exercises, working 
to regain the use of her hand. 

“It was traumatic and very 
frustrating for her," said Pairicia 
Caster, the occupational therapist 
who wrorked with Katz at the in- 
stitute. "For the first month she 
couldn't move her fingers. Then 
she could move them but couldn't 
grasp anything. It took about five 
more months to be able to feed 
herself, and even then it was with 
special adaptive equipment." 

Katz ended formal treatment 
toward the end of 1981. although 
the therapy she now administers 
to others is in itself rehabilitative. 
Coaching people whose upper 
bodies have been debilitated by 
injury or illness. Katz's right 


hand is constantly at work build- 
ing splints, for example, or dem- 
onstrating innovative ways to cut 
a cucumber or lie a shoe. 

The satisfaction of being able 
to use her experience to encour- 
age others has been as rewarding 
as it was unanticipated. 

"You must never tell someone 
that you understand what they 
are going through." Katz said in 
the white-walled room where she 
and 15 other therapists at North 
Shore treat outpatients and those 
who are hospitalized. “Every- 
body’s experience is really differ- 
ent. and some people would re- 
sent bearing that. 

“At the same lime,” she said, 
recalling the agony of being able 
to play classical flute one day and 
then having to concoct elaborate 
schemes just to blow-dry her hair. 
“I really understand anger and 
frustration.” 

Not all of Katz’s 12- patients 
know about her accident, despite 
the bandage she wears for protec- 
tion when she works. She tells the 
story only to those who she thinks 
might draw something from it, 
she said, and not those whose 
Lrauma has made them too self- 
involved to learn from others. 

Ann Carbonaro. one of Katz's 
hospitalized patients, suffers 
from a rare spinal disorder that 
has left her on her back with little 
muscle controL She knows ail 
about Katz. "It makes me feel 


better," Carbonaro said, “like 
maybe she understands what I’m 
going through." 

“One of the most Important 
things patients can see from me is 
that pain ends.” Katz said. *Tl 
might take a really long time and 
fed like it's never going to hap- 
pen. but they can look at me and 
see that it does." 

Linda Caplan, 28, who lost the 
use of her arms after a stroke 
three years ago,' sees Katz as a 
reminder that she, too, may re- 
gain her abilities. 

“I can't pick up a dime now." 
Caplan sail “It makes me crazy. 
But I watch Renee do it and I 
know that she was even worse off 
than I am. If she can do it, I 
should be able to do it better.” 

And for Katz, there is still her 
music. A soprano, she now sings 
semiprofessionally. 

Sometimes she will emerge 
from the back of the stage in the 
hospital s lecture hall and belt out 
a ballad to the empty seats, or 
practice scales to warm up for her 
weekly singing lessons. She per- 
forms with a Long Island band 
that ptoys at weddings and is pol- 
ishing up an act that she hope* to 
take to a Manhattan nightclub. 

“Sure it would be nice to play 
the piano while I sang," Katz 
said. “So you get an accompanist 
instead. A lot of people do. May- 
be it's even better that way. be- 
cause then you can focus all your 
energy on getting better at one 
specific thing." 


PEOPLE 


Kirkpatrick 


ins rrize/ 

Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, the former 

U.S. representative to the United David MjJwLawJ m ^ [a , er 
Nations, and Operation Moses, the are schedul - . _ .j-ii- Clare 

rttcu^missionthat 10.000 - * 

chorus girl in the show but on 

don production of 4 -nd Sir * 
utkes over the role m New ’i ork on 
Tuesday. 

□ 


Ethiopian Jews to Israel, have been 
named co-recipients of the 1985 
Jabotinsky Prized Defender of Jeru- 
salem Award. The 5100.000 prize 
has been awarded annually smee 
1983 for extraordinary efforts “in 
(tefcnsf of the rights of the Jewish 
people." Ervk Spekior, chairman 
of the Jabotinsky Foundation, said 
in New York. The award to Opera- 
tion Moses will be used to fund 50 
scholarships at Israeli colleges for 
young people brought to Israel by 
the rescue mission. 


A dozen folk artists have been 
awarded fellowships in Washing- 
ton by the National Endowment 
for the Arts and praised by Presi- 
aean. Frame Hod- 


The Soviet film director and de- 
fector Andrei Tarkovsky says Pome 

Munster Oiof Palme of Sweden h 
agreed to help him get permission 
for his son. Andre, 15. to leJ vc l ™-* 
Soviet Union. The director. 
has been shooting a film in Sweds*-- 
delivered a written appeal to the 
prime minister' s office. If Palme i> 
returned to office in Sunday s elec- 
tions. be is expecied to visit Mos- 
cow at the invitation of the Soviet 
leader. IVBkbsO S. Gorbachev. 


•UU 

aue Doctors have removed a bone 


dent Ronald Reagan. 

soft, the endowment chairman, pre- 
sented plaques and 55.000 cash 

awards to Jimmy Jansoro, a Basque 

accordionist from Idaho: Can Nor- .spur from the right elbow of the 
ris of Kentucky, accepting for her U. S. Senate majority leader. Rob- 
gran dmotber, LOy May Ledford, an ert Dole, in a minor operation that 
Appalachian musician and singer allowed the Kansas Republicanto 
who died July 14; Eppie Archuleta, resume work later in the day. “The 
a Hispanic weaver from Colorado; . bone spur was pressing on a nerve 
Alice New Holy Blue Legs, a La- and causing pain," said Walt Kiker. 

■ -If „ - f - - . “ “ 


kola Sioux quill artist from South 
Dakota: Fenktis Halloas, a Greek 
clarinetist from New York; MeaH 
Kahuna, a Hawaiian quilten Leif 
Melgaard, a Norwegian wood- 
carver from Minneapolis; Boa Xon 
Mna. a Laotian musician from Ore- 
gon; Jidio Negron, a maker of mu- 
sical instruments from Puerto 
Rico; Glenn Ofaitin, a cowboy sing- 
er, storyteller and illustrator from 
Arkansas; Henry Townsend, a 
blues musician and songwriter 
from Sl Louis: and Horace WO- 
Cams, a spoons and bones player 
and poet from Philadelphia. 


If you were the hamburger king 
of Japan and you wanted to import 
a bit more American culture to 
your country, what would you do? 
Den Fupta is going to spend 55 
million to import an American 
company of the Broadway musical 
“42nd Street" for a one-month en- 
gagement at the prestigious NHK 
Hall in Tokyo, then mm the En- 
glish-language production, air it on 
Japanese television and release it as 
a video cassette. Fujita is president 
of the 600-store McDonald’s chain 


Dole's press secreiaty. "It was the 
result of his World War II inju- 
ries." 

□ V/ 

Prince Charles of Britain will go 
to Texas in February to celebrate 
the stale’s 150th anniversary of in- 
dependence from Mexico and to 
present the Winston Churchill 
Award to the Dallas businessman 
H. Ross Poot Perot’s reaction to 
this news? “It’s very kind of him to 
come." . . . Lord Snowdon, stay- 
ing at the Sheraton-Cariion Hotel 
in Washington, was so taken with 
the towels and washcloths that he 
wanted to take some home. The 
photographer, being a gentleman, 
did not just stuff a few into his 
suitcase but asked the Carlton's 
resident manager. MarkHamber, if 
be amid have a set. H amber saw 
tha t they were gift-wrapped. Per- 
haps Snowdon noticed that the 
towels were monogrammed with a 
big Sheraton “S." . . . Printe 
Henri and Princess Maria Teresa 
of Luxembourg are m Washington 
for a salute at the American Film 
Institute to the films and filmmak- 
ersof Europe. 


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ON SALE NOW! 

A sntedhm guide writt e n by Pierre 
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othen, ffluftrated by Now Tarter 
c artoon is t Sempe. A perfect gfft 
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order to Traders 6 Travelers 
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far $10 indudmg airmail 

WIJBtNATlONAlFESTIVAlofBhKV 

graphic Rm. London, 23 - 27 Septem- 
ber. 1985. Man ooytsne seswns 
booked out; defects ovotobte tor sup- 

porting evening sessions. Press enqui- 
ries to Director, Boyd Anthrqpotog- 
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ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 
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premies. Depression. Paris 3*8 90*2 

HAVE A NICE DAYI BOKH- Have o 

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home in nice tfudos. one be^oom 
and more n Pans. SOfiHJM: 80 rue 
de TUniversite. Pons 544 39 40 


NEAR PARC MONCEAU, 2 bed- 

rooms, elegant biritfing, quiet ccart- 
yad. no Bfingud School, avabbte 
tale December to late August 1986. 
$950/n»ruh Teh 267 03 35: 


SHORT TERM in Latin O^a-ter. 
Noogents, Tefc 329 38 63. 


18TH: 2 rooms etc. al com- 


forts. ! 


. Tet 259 64 26 


SPAIN 


ALICANTE. VILAS ft APARTMENTS 
to let low renkfc. Long or short stays. 
Rrnol £ beach bartons- Agency en- 
mvtwd. Miranda Boye 
6A East St, Notfewham, 
il 3AY, UK. Tefc Nott^ham 
470501. Th 37107 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


JOBS 

US7 CANADIAN EXPATRIATES 
Are you looking for your next overseas 


8f. 


can helpl We hove over 11.500 
certified overseas fobs fated with us. 
We provide a r .nj t etog service ifacri 
gets you in from of hiring companies 
nowf 

We are America's largest overseas em- 
ployment agency repnesentfag erver 300 
cSenr axrcanes in over 40 countries 
rig Gina. 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


AMERICAN COUPLE. DB4TAL fry- 

brperiwcBd, dans unB 


paying bnq term pontons 

Tefc Italy 055/4361052 


abroad. 


IN PARS, YOUNG IMGUSH warm 

ftendi 5p«*jna adewtobfe. cmy op- 
tion csrcpderecLSoe 4)666. LH.T,<53 
tong Acre. London, WC2E 9JR 


PRES04TABU LOYAL LADY, 29y 
seefa paedion a PA to a tap ececu- 
live. Bo* 2709, Henrtd Tribune, 92S21 
Neuily Cedox, France 


RRtnSH PA evatobto. French, knowf- 
ec^eo^Arabic; free to troveL Td UK 


mdu ^i^ I 


Overseas 

Unlimited 


813-985-7300 

CORPORATE SQUARE SUITE 800 
7402 NORTH 56TH SIRST 

TAMPA, fUNRDA 33617 
Advance Fee licensed ■& Bonded 


USA 


Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 

offennp 

pre-opening servings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

featuring 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and oti with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 

Executive Services Available I 

Mode! Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


SM SEASON 85-86* hosts & hostejMs 

far Araarimn efisnfato in French dd 
raort. Bat 2701 Herald Tribune, 
92521 Neuity Cedex. France 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


TRAVEL AG84T, 38, SWISS MAN. 

English, French, Ge rman with wide 

Experience m tour operating (padc- 

age tour*), cont ra cting, reprEserfo- 

hon, isles + operator pratertfy 


92521 Neufly Gedeto Frtmcc 


! TH£VKIONPRODUCH-6yecn«B- 

warfc news exparima leeks chdeng- 
mg medaor related poskion bmed m 
Pont. Comidering df offers. Woriang 
French. Lott of wrinndm. Box 2676, 
Herald Tribune. 92321 NeuiDy Cedex, 
Frmov 


AMBBCAN MAN a 

erred prafwsxjnds in 

tain, bums* brokeroge & rad es- 

tate sofas, try producers, s e ek poa - 
tion with uiJui<iwd eornmg potenfid 

woridwide. Rerfy S. Jcnws. Vto 5ten- 

1 4, 50139 Rortnce. Italy. 


PmitP HARVARD SBBCS Ft / Wtor- 

feeling fjvanxi Monog em e nL M 

boseo. 


Ruedul 

17137 Frcrca. (46j 5097D6 


RESTLESS btecutrve, 23. ex IHT em- 
fkoyee, seeks inspiring active work 
overmen. Experienced traveler /da / 
Aurtraia / Europe. No bes. Write: 
ECU 29 Wdderacr Ava. Lon- 

don 5Wb. Anything legd consider 

CONTRACT SFEOALKT, faOngud 
Fr»nch-&wbsh,5year* c3 mdustiy + 
o*«r industrid experience. Mtodle 
Ecei, USA., Europe negot«or seeks 
porition or Fm el aio e . Peris 741 0366. 

GSMAN FASHKJN MOOB. Wei- 

edicated, tniAingud, look* for inter- 
edtog position. London 245-0080. 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


DIRECTOR, FISCAL AFFAIRS 
UNWERSiV OF MARYLAND 

RBPONSWUTffifc Ovenees dl bust- 
ness operations ana 8 eweetty nspoMh 
ble far aD business; fried and conhact- 
ri g a drvrtfat; fbnuulate* and 
recommends ciurga and uUtiuri to 
bed poGcyv r«toqn»bfc far dl aBOOUd- 
ing, poyroS. purchasing, cash manag- 
meol and other business related fane- 
prepares finoncid ssatementt; 
fiwi tote 

tidpatas n rate _ _ . 

fad i ci d information fat the 

rivmon cmd home empus; supwvM* a 
rtaff of 15. Other duties as a»gned by 
dw Director, European Division. 

QUALIFICATIONS. Graduate degree; 
working knowledge of accounting, 
uunenn of 5 ye« senior fried msm- 
ogem ent etrper i yce; Imowfadge of 
data processing finanod appkcatiorcri 
expariteWe ri manogtrnent of fried af- 
far* in acodaric mstinrtion m U5. 
preferred. 


Sokxy negotiable dementing on quoSfi- 
Appfcont 

l a T i S2? 10 «*un» pasdion 
November I, 198S 


Appk cations due September 23, 1985. 

Send fatter of qtpfication, rbum6 and 3 
references tot 

SEAR CH COM MfTTg, DFA 
7» WRVERSnTY OF MARYLAND 

WJ^raxsty 


I ra 

D4900 HBDEUERG, 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


PLUSKURS 

CONSHLS 

GBTTON 

Rtsoudhont fas P robfam es 
qw se poseur our P JAE 


- forme* 6 ncs otfhodes de traval 

- pmterares if we eqwpe 
dymdque 

RS ONT s 

- un seriew tatol 

• TeiqjfcnenoB de la PJAE dans un 
cu plusieura d« don wi nes suvonts.- 

- FffrtANOT 

- COMMERCIAL 
• PRODUCTION 
.INFORMAnQUE 

DC GESTK3N 

Us beran acerus d» PME. , 
exigent que nous reoutions da » w 
HOMME OU FORMES DE V AlH S 
IMMHRATEMSfT DfSPOMBIB 

rfcidanr tons loutes lei 

rtigkats Frwraises. 
emioyngtreCVavecphotod 

3, rue das 2 Boufavcrds, 

94100 SAINT MAUR 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


MSULATION AND PAINTING. Su- 

perintendent, Rend), 35, seeks em- 
ployment wtth o strong company the 
worid over. Overseas e xperience in 
running large contracts in me refinery, 
nuclear power & petrochemical rv 
Atrrie*. Speokmq fare kmguaga, 
highly experienced with enguteenng 
oompame* contacts, reorgomzaton 
or sues in trouble, quality control, 
moceuranent. BK, Residence St. 
Come, Bat. 6, 13300 Sdoo de Pro- 

wtnee, FronceL TO 56 18 06 mynme- 


YO IMG WC MAA. well spoken. 
gocd.opp ecxiTOi seeks emptoyment 
onywhn ei Itte world, wifing to 
feat, work ihord t travel. Help to to 
5* g"-** ^ ^ LHT.763 Long 
Acre. London. WCrf9JR 


PAGE 13 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


NYC - PARK AVt- 80's, luxury 
buUdmg. Juntar 3 room furnijhed 
apartment 1 veer lease. $1700 per 
nfonth. Avdfable OCL »5. Td. 
evetengs: (212) 427-1768. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE I 


WANIS FOR FBDOD 20»> Dec - 4th 

Jmt a fomtiy chalet in the French or 
Svass Alps, minimum 4 bedrooms & dl 

usual servKJes. Top references ovtri- 

ode. Hecse reply to Ben 41621, 
LKT„ 63 Long Ape, London, WC2E. 


EMPLOYMENT 


FOR MORE EXECUTIVE POSITIONS! 
LOOK UNDQI 

•wraiNAnoNAL PosmoNs" 

PAGE 14 


GENERAL POSITIONS 

AVAILABLE 


OVBSEAS POSITIONS. Hunded, of 

top paying Pa»«w ovoildjle. Toe 

free incomes. Attractive benefits. Op- 1 

portunhes for dl occup ations. F 

details. Overseas Em pto > iu e u | S , 

vice*. Depr. HT. P.O. Bos 460, Town 
cfjMowit Royal. Quebec, danoto] 


TRANSLATORS WANTS. 

/French & German/ French ubfa to 
write high level quality French for 
press & pubfefvito agency and to 
work on 0 r*gud» ban d home. 
Write tm f tew* Concept Inc^ la Ok* - 
PHve St VUereuv 


FEMALE CREW, SAILING FLORIDA, 

Bahama s , wiB ran, cad now, UK 01- 
404 SDH. faave mssaae AIdl 


DAKS 

LONDON 


DAKS CORNER. 
MUNICH 
IS 

NOW OPEN 


DAKS Corner 
MUNICH 

Maximilisnstnisse 16 
8000 Munchen 22 


Top level jobs 

domestic and 
international 

$50,000 - $200,000+ 


The ICA Executive Search Newsletter’’ is 
a unique publication created in 1974. li has 
readers in 60 countries and lists in exclusi- 
vity more than 500 job opportunities each 
year ranging from 550,000 to $200,000 or 
equivalent. 

The information is provided only by 
reputable executive-search firms in many 
countries at no cost to than. These inie 
search Consultants never advertise their 
assignments in any publication of any fcin H 
They use (be ICA Executive Search trade 
newsletter only to supplement their own 
gaae-ttHnttea5ure search procedures. Subscri- 
bers can read the newsletter at home in full 
searnty. if opportunities interest them, they 
wnte t° us and we pass on ihc inquiries to 
the Consultants concerned who win then 
contact suitable candidates directly. 

... .The newsletter is thus a simple way 
of keeping in touch with possible opponu- 
n jtics at home and abroad, la complete con- 
*w««w - which makes sense even if your pre- 
sent job is reasonably satisfactory. Only 
subscribers can have access to these oppor- 

Airmaa subscription rate for 10 issues: 

Subscribers^ residing in countries with cur- 
rency-tnntrpl regulations will receive a pro- 
forma invoice upon request. 


f 

■y 


.. _ 

'•H 

J 1 - 

% 4* 

^ • 

• • • "'•? 

' '"J!* ' 


- i 

i 


ber 30, 1985 - 

Inc, 

► !■€! A. TO Madtam Avenue 

ftew Yorit - N.Y. 1DC2a - U^A . 
NEWTORK Mi 


f u lf i l* » •? rje Offiipi), 1 } rtr rr. 1 ^— I, 


D ori r . 






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