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■ Th^ Global Newspaper 

■ Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
. .. in Paris, London, Zurich, 


INTERNATIONAL 




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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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No. 31,904 


ZURICH, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17,1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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C^VtodbOarSuffTmi _ 
JOHANNESBURG — South 
Alricaa troops aossed into Angda 
l^n Monday and attacked black oa- 
-nonaligt guerrillas who are fipfermg 
for South-West Africa’s indepen- 
dence, the military said. - - 
General Constand Vffioen, the 
cWef of _ South- African defense- 
forces, said in Pretori a that the ae- 
uon *>ill be sopported by the 
South African Air Force.” He gave 
no i n dicati on of bow large the op- 
eration would be or how long it 
would last. 

General Vijjoen described the at- 
tack as * pre-emptive strike. He 
said intelligence reports bad shown 
that guerrillas of die South-West 
Africa People's Or ganiza tion. - 
SWAPO, planned "bombardments 
on military loses” as well as at- 
tacks on towns in the northernmost 
part of the South African-adminis- 
|k tered territory, also known as Na- 
V mibia. ' 




Beijing 

Removes 

Veterans 


Move Expected 
To Strengthen 
Deng’s Position 


AT 


General Constand Viljoen 


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Ther guerrillas have fought since 
1966 to end the South African ad- 
ministration of the territory. Sooth 
Africa look control of South-West 
Africa from Germany during 
World "War I and was granted a 
'mandate over the mineral-rich ter- 
ritory. fay the League of Nations in 
1920. But the UhitedNations Gen- 
era) Assembly terminated the man- 
date in 1966 and the International 
Court of Justice- ruled in 197! that 
the South African presence was D- 
legaL 

The Sooth African attack into 
Angola comes at a time when West- 
ern nations have been sharply criti- 
cal of Pretoria over racial unrest in 
South Africa. Five Western nations 
— Britain, Canada, France, the 


insurgents, and hdd part of sooth- other alternative than to continue 
cm Angola on a more or i*« con- with this operation.” 


By John Bums 

New York runes Service 

BELTING — The Communist 
Party announced Monday the re- 
tirement oflO of the 24 members of 
its niling Politburo, foreshadowing 
one ofthe biggest top-level shuffles 
since the party took power in 1949. 

In a development calculated to 
strengthen the hand of Deng Xiao- 
ping, the country's paramount 
leader, the party also confirmed the 
retirement of 64 officials who were 
members or alternate members of 


tbe Central Committee, the body 
In all. 


tinuous basis. 

In an agreement last year be- 
tween Pretoria and Luanda, bro- 
kered by the United States, Sooth 
Africa said it would pull its forces 
out, and Angola pledged to ' 
southern Angola free of SW, 
fighters. „ „ . 

The South Africanwkhdrewal Se^ScIe?^ce 
was completed m April, more than - 
a year behind schedule, but South 
Africa has said the Angolan gov- 
ernment cannot or will not keep its 
promise to restrain SWAPO. 

General Viljoen said he would 
not hesitate to launch cross-border 
raids against guerrillas if they re- 
newed their attacks. In the last such 

raid in early July, he said South pressure ^ economic sanctions 


In South Africa, five more blacks 
were killed in unrest over the week- 
end, police said Monday. 

In Tembisa. northeast of Johan- 
nesburg, a passenger in the cab of 

an mhnluncg shot and IriTIwH two 

men who woe part of a crowd 
attack and rob 
said. They said 
three other 'men were stoned to 
death in separate incidents in 
Soweto, near Johannesburg. (AF, 
Reuters) 


■ Sliffer Sanctions Urged 
The leaders of six black-ruled 
southern African nations have 
called for increased international 


s \tnUT. 5*je* and Wot Germany African forces killed 57 guerrillas Jeainst South Africa. Aaence 

^“ htt r e . hc “ «$***** to and lost one man in aS JXuZ 


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negotiate the withdrawal of South 
African troops, leading to the inde- 
pendence of Namibia. 


0YMEN1 


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The United States withdrew its 
ambassador to South' Africa for 
three months after a South. African 
raid into northern Angola in May, 
and another into Botswana in June 
SWAPO has bases in southern 
[ carries out periodic at- 
; across the border m northern 
Namibia. 


two-day 

operation. 

General Viljoen said Monday 
ihat two disguised guerrillas had 
been arrested in Namibia and had 
admitted they were part of a recon- 
naissance team p lanning the at- 
tacks. There had also been a sharp 
upsurge in abductions, intimida- 
tion snd sabotage in recent weeks, 
hesaid. 


France-Presse reported from Ma- 
puto. Mozambique, on Monday. 

In a statement Sunday after a 
meeting, the leaders of Angola, Bo- 
tswana, Mozambique, T anzania, 
Zambia and Zimbabwe “hailed the 
growing condemnation of apart- 
had by Western countries, taking 
tbe form of different types of pres- 
sure, including economic sanc- 
tions.” 


BN!: 


Over the last five years. South 
African forces have repeatedly pen- 
etrated into Angola, to attack the 


The general called this "irrefut- 
able evidence of SWAPO's plans 
directed at the inhabitants of 
South-West Afiaca.” and said the 
security forces "arc" left with no 


Despite the problems that their 
nations would suffer firm effective 
. sanctions against South Africa, the 
leaders said they folly supported 
such moves. 


that appoints the Politburo, 
the Central Committee has about 
340 such members. 

Those retiring many in their 70s 
and 80s, were mainly veterans of 
the Communists’ long struggle for 
power in die 1930s and 1940s. 
Their places are to be filled at meet- 
ings over tbe next week or 10 days 
by a corps of officials, most of them 
middle-aged, who have been select- 
ed for their managerial skills and 
for their loyalty to Mr. Deng's poli- 
ties of an “opot door” to the West 
and market-oriented economic re- 
forms. 

This is to be followed by a meet- 
ing of the new Central Committee 
next week at which appointments 
of Deng supporters are expected to 
be made to the Politburo. 

The official Xinhua news agency 
said that among those who left of- 
fice were Ye Jianying, 88. a Red 
Army commander who was one of 
Mao Zedong's inner circle and who 
later supported tbe political comer 
back of Mr. Deng. Two other revo- 
lutionary war veterans who 
achieved the rank of marshal , Xu 
Xiangqian, 84, and Nie Rongzhen, 
86, also stepped down from the 
Politburo. Li Desbeng, 69, recently 
removed as commander of the 
northeastern military region bor- 
dering the Soviet Union, was an- 
other member to lose his seat 

A Trirther Politburo retirement 



Britain Expels 
6 More Russians 
In Spiraling 
Espionage Crisis 


Among Communist Party veterans whose retirement was 
announced were Marshal Ye Jianying, 88, top left, Deng 
Yingchao, 82, top right. Marshal Xu Xiangqian, 84, bottom 
left, and U lanb n, 79, a Mongolian and the only representa- 
tive of China's national minorities on the Politburo. 


Bonn Is Likely to Join 
In SDI Research Effort 


' By William Drozriiak 

Washington Past Scnict’ 

BONN — West Germany is like- 
ly to participate in tbe research 
phase of the Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative following assurances from 
the Reagan administration that 
West German companies will be 
able to exploit technology from the 
irogram, according to officials in 


(Continued on Page 2, Col 5) 


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Winds of Change Fail to Comfort South Africa 


PA# 15 

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By Alan Cowdl 

New York Times Service 

JOHANNESBURG — For nearly a week, 
there have been intimations of change in this 
racially divided land, hints wrapped m coded 
messages of intent designed to assure a hos- 
tile world and a black majority that is pact 
skeptical and part bellicose that the indigni- 
ties will soon be lessened. 

On Wednesday, President Pieter W. Botha 
offered a kind of South African citizenship to 
blacks in the so-called tribal homelands. On 
Thursday, a government-sponsored panel 
urged an end to the pass laws that confine 
blade access to segregated townships on the 
fringes of white cities. 

Nothing has happened yet, but even these 
prospects of change once would have been 
heretical to those who designed apartheid as a 
way of totally separating South Africa's 
races. 

If, as many people here still say. South 
Africa is aland of minorities and a patchwork 
of ethnic and racial nations, separate and 
competing, how can there be a common citi- 
zenship. something they fear surely implies 
common political rig fats? 

Such rights, they maintain further, just by 
the fad of the country’s racial arithmetic, 
would surely overturn the notion that no 
minority may dominate another. That is to 
say that do assemblage of black ethnic “mi- 
norities, ” numbering 23 million, should be 
allowed to swamp and take power from the 
white minority of 43 million. 


The answer may tie in tbe caveats and 
provisos of the announcements last week, and 
in the language nuances that give different 
meaning? to insiders and outsiders, and to 
whites and blades. In the resulting splintered 
perceptions, some apartheid policies become 
partly disavowed, bm the ghosts are not easi- 
ly laid to rest. 

For whites committed to change, the devel- 
opments seemed harbingers of real transfor- 
mation. “The political announcements this 


NEWS ANALYSE 


week on citizenship and influx control are of 
extraordinary importance,” an editorial in 
the Sunday Star newspaper said. “The psy- 
chological breakup of apartheid has begun." 

But there are flaws in such pronounce- 
ments. The Botha administration seems able 
to take even cautious steps of change only 
from a position of absolute strength. Thus, 
while many white commentators addressed 
what the government says it might do, resi- 
dents of black townships still saw mostly (he 
emblems of the power that underpins the 
half-promises and focused cm what the gov- 
ernment actually is doing. 

Black spokesmen, therefore, say that even 
after the government's latest fonts of change, 
they see continued segregation in bousing 
and education and other basics, and the white 
troops an the township streets. 

“Sayyon have a heart problem, and some 
lesser Qmess, too,” a 30-year-old black re- 


porter said Saturday during a drive around 
Soweto, Johannesburg's sprawling blade sat- 
ellite. “Well, it’s nice if someone cures the 
lesser illness. But you still have the problem 
in the heart." 

The “lesser illness” is the proposal to end 
the pass laws. The “heart problem" is the vast 
body of legislated and armed while power 
that still stands beiweea the blade majority 
and equality in the land of their birth. 

A white opposition leader was quoted on 
Sunday as saying that Mr. Botha “has opened 
the door of reform, but be doesn't seem able 
to move through it himself .” 

“We have got rid of the dream of apart- 
heid,” said the opposition figure, Frederick 
Zyl Slabbert. leader of the Progressive 


van 


Federal Party, “bm we are still stuck with the 
reality." 

A theme struck increasingly by many of 
Mr. Botha’s foes is that his program of lumt- 
ed change wfll be his undoing. 

“He has lost his grip and wm go within a 
year” said Hermann Gifliomee, a respected 
academic. 

Yet no matter who steers South Africa’s 
white rulers, tbe basic thrust of keeping white 
dominance secure is certain to remain. When 
Mr. Botha spoke last week of restoring citi- 
zenship to blacks living in homelands, one of 
his main lieutenants, Chris Heunis, pointed 
out that blacks still would sot be allowed to 
vote anywhere else but in the homelaiids, thus 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


Government and industry repre- 
sentatives who returned Sunday 
from a 10-day trip to the United 
Stales were satisfied that Bonn’s 
conditions for a share in research 
results had been met the officials 
said. 

West German firms had feared 
that that research in the program 
for space-based defenses against 
infames could not be applied to 
industrial uses. But, delegation 
members said, security and patent 
arrangements should not inhibit in- 
dustry’s ability to capitalize on 
technology spinoffs. 


weapons contingent on a halt to the 
militarization of space. 

Foreign Ministry officials said 
that when Mr. Kohl sees Mr. Rea- 
gan next month, they will discuss 
tbe Geneva negotiations, which re- 
sume Thursday, and the November 
meeting between Mr. Reagan and 
the Soviet leader. Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev. 

By displaying loyalty to Mr. 
Reagan in endorsing the research 
project. Mr. Kohl will “feel more 
comfortable” in urging any limits 
on testing and devdopment in the 
hope that such restraints will elicit 
Soviet cooperation 

Among the European allies. Brit- 
ain and Italy also have expressed 
interest in participating in the re- 
search program. France. Denmark, 
Canada and Norway have declared 
their opposition io ii. 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Britain ordered on 
Monday tbe expulsion of six more 
Soviet citizens, two of them diplo- 
mats. in a confrontation set ou by 
the defection of the KGB’s top op- 
erative in Britain. 

It was the third move in a round 
of expulsions that began Thursday 
when Britain ordered out 25 Sovia 
diplomats, journalists and trade of- 
ficials. 

The Foreign Office said the 25 
were identified as spies by Oleg A. 
Gordievsky. who it said was the 
, chief of the KGB, the Soviet intelli- 
gence agency, in Britain. 

Mr. Gordievsky has been grant- 
ed asylum in Britain. 

The Soviet Union responded 
Saturday by expelling an equal 
number of British diplomats, jour- 
nalists and businessmen. 

The Foreign Office said that the 
latest expulsions were in retaliation 
for what it called “a totally unjusti- 
fied response to die British govern- 
ment’s expulsion of Soviet person- 
nel who bad been actively engaged 
in intelligence activities designed to 
undermine the national security of 
the United Kingdom.” 

A Foreign Office statement said 
that the Soviet charge d'affaires. 
Lev A. Parshin, was told Monday 
that the six Soviet nationals must 
leave Britain by Ocl 7, and that the 
maximum number of Soviet oflfi- 
rials allowed in Britain would be 
reduced from 21 1 to 205. 


cy Novpsii, Sergei Aleksandrovich 
VoJovels, 47. 

The Foreign Office said there 
was “incontrovertible evidence'' 
provided by Mr. Gordievsky that 
all 31 expelled “had been con- 
cerned in the unacceptable activi- 
ties of the Soviet intelligence ser- 
vices in the United Kingdom.” 

The swiftness of tbe Soviet retali- 
ation and the fact that more than a 
token number of Britons was beb)£ 
expelled appeared to have an§ 
the British. 


The Soviet citizens expelled last 
week have until Oct 3 to leave. 

The new expulsion orders are for 
a first secretaiy at the Soviet Em- 
bassy, Yevgeniy liicb Safronov, 37; 
an assistant air attache Colonel 
Victor Aleksandrovich Mishin, 42; 
two embassy clerks. Victor Vasilye- 
vich Daranov and Aleksandr Ivan- 
ovich Yerokhin. both 40; the direc- 
tor of Anglo-Soviei Shipping, Ivan 
Ivanovich Vikulov. 47; and a corre- 
spondent for tbe Soviet news agen- 


■ Spy Had Been Summoned 

A summons to return to Moscow 
for consultation prompted Mr. 
Gordievsky to seek asylum in a 
“safe house" in southern England 
in July, according to a senior Brit- 
ish official, Tbe New York Times 
reported from London. 

The official said that Mr. Gor- 
dievsky feared ihat after more than 
15 years as a double agent for Brit- 
ain and the KGB, his superiors had 
learned about his role and that on 
his return to Moscow he would face 
Interrogation and execution. 

The official compared the Gor- 
dievsky case to that of Arkady 
Shevchenko, a senior Russian bu- 
reaucrat at the United Nations who 
says be supplied intelligence to the 
U.S. Central Intelligence Agency 
for 32 months. Mr. Shevchenko 
was called home for consultation 
and defected to the United States 
in 1978. 

“Gordievsky opens Pandora's 
box for the British and, we hope, 
their allies.” the official said. “The 
KGB's whole espionage apparatus 
in Britain has been blown. But so 
will their organizations in Scandi- 
navia, where Gordievsky served, 
and this is extremely important to 
Russian political and military 
strategy.” 

The Russians, the official said, 
now must reassess the value of all 
erf Mr. Gordievsky’s reports over 15 
years or more. 


The 30- member delegation, led 
oik. Chancellor 


by Horst Teltschik, 

Helmut Kohl's national security 
adviser, will deliver a confidential 
report this week, and negotiations 
are expected soon on an accord 
covering West Germany’s partici- 
pation in the Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative, or SDL 

If no problems develop, Mr. 
Kohl may issue a declaration about 
his country's role in the research 
project when he visits President 
Ronald Reagan in Washington in 
late October, the sources said. 

According to chancellery offi- 
cials, one of the chief political mo- 
tives behind West German partici- 
pation in the research project is 
Bonn's desire to influence the 
course of future development in 
anti-missile defense as well as the 
project's impact on arms control. 

West Germany feds particularly 
threatened by short-range nuclear 
missiles based in Eastern Europe 
and the western Soviet Union. Sued) 
weapons can strike West German 
soil in fifteen minutes or less. 

Bonn fears that U.S. determina- 
tion to press ahead with the re- 
search project could doom pros- 
pects at the Geneva arms talks for 
deep cuts in strategic and medium- 
range nuclear missiles. 

The Soviet Union has made ne- 
gotiations toward limiting these 


Hawke Tells the French 
To Halt Nuclear Testing 


Realm -*The logic of that is, and I under- 

PORT MORESBY. Papua New stand that the French have a great 
Guinea — Prime Minister Bob love of logic, that if you oppose a 
Hawke of Australia told France on particular policy of another coun- 
Monday to stop nuclear tests in the try then you are its foe,” Mr. 
Pacific, and Prune Minis ter David Hawke replied. “That introduces a 
Lange of New Zealand called for very dangerous dimension into re- 


an end to tbe war of words between 
Paris and Wellington over the is- 
sue. 

Mr. Hawke, who is here for Pa- 
pua New Guinea's iOtfa anniversa- 
ry of independence, ngected an in- 
vitation by President Francois 
.Mitterrand of France to visit 
France’s nuclear test site at Mur- 
uroa atoll in the South Pacific. 

“1 have one message and one 
message alone for President Mitter- 
rand/ Mr. Hawke said. “If Presi- 
dent Mitterrand is so interested to 
prove to everyone in our region just 
bow absolutely safe these tests ore. 
there is one logical conclusion that 
follows: Take his tests back to 
France and have those absolutely 
safe tests in metropolitan France.” 

Mr. Hawke was asked if the Aus- 
tralian government, a vociferous 
critic of the tests, saw itself as an 
adversary of France, as Mr. Mitter- 
and has termed such critics. 


lations between nations. I repudi- 
ate it.” 

Meanwhile, the prime minister 
of Papua New Guinea. Michael So- 
mare, signed on Monday the South 
Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty 
that was reached at a regional fo- 
rum last month. He was the ninth 
leader to do so. 

There was no immediate reaction 
lo Mr. Mitterrand’s invitation from 
Mr. Somare or other Pacific leaders 
attending tbe Port Moresby festivi- 
ties, but in Wellington, the Western 
Samoan prime minister, Tofilau 
Eti. joined Mr. Hawke in spuming 
it 

A spokesman for Mr. Eti. who is 
in New Zealand for an eve opera- 
tion, said Mr. Mitterrand's rial to 
Mururoa last week showed an “ar- 
rogant disregard” for nations in the 
region. 

Mr. Lange, in calling for an end 
to the dispute between Wellington 



Bob Hawke 


and Paris, said he was ready to fly 
to Paris at short notice if Mr. Mit- 
terrand would see him. He spoke 


after Paris postponed a scheduled 
* by Ne 


Price of Grade Oil Falls 
As Saudis Plan Discounts 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribi 


Tribune 


mg. ‘T said at the Oxford energy 
seminar that if non-OPEC produc- 
ers do not cooperate with OPEC in 


LONDON - 1 KL?2?.i2S! stabilizing the market, and we in 


4 


Masers.***. 

pwsibiliiy a omdvts, ita I expect there wffl 

&,biato S cn<lu i oo^,f be a price war - 
[ectcd buyers would lead io p OPEC countries often have pre- 
war. . . , -inictsr dieted a price war in calling on 

Saudi Arabias otl mi , producers to curtail prodne- 

Sbeikh Ahmed Zaki non, but Saudi Arabia’s dfoxjunx 

— Fodav at jj plan adds face to the thn*L 


confirmed Friday 

SS&iErffi w. ~ 

f'fft’rSSSdoo of petroleum 


North Sea Brent crude o£l» one of 
the most widely traded varieties, 
quoted Monday at S2&35 a 
ember 


by the Organization EC 


me Saudis have been almost 
n PEC’s members in 

— --affl&.firt; 


was ai 
barrel 

down 40 cents from Friday. 
New York Mercantile 


for November delivery, 
>.On the 


chat 


result, buyers have 


cheaper T*£**«i*& 


I 


adhering 
result, b 

J^gJSh Yamani has denied press 


West Texas intermediate erode for 
delivery in November was trading 
Monday afternoon at $27.25, down 
from $27.31 Friday. QFECs pre- 
sent official price is $28 a band. 

. gbwkh Yamani (fid not discuss 
d etails of the Sandi discounts, but 



U.S. Catholics Urged to Reach Out 

Report Colls for Action on Women’s Rights, Minorities 


By William R. Greer 

New York Times Service 
NEW YORK — Roman Catho- 
lic leaders have asserted that the 
chinch in the United States needs 
to affirm the “ri ght * and dignity” 
of women in the church and to 
farther ^ “thor advancement to posi- 
tions of leadership and dedsion- 
making,” 


Tbe president of the National 
Conference of CathoBc Bishops, 
Bishop James W. Malone, also said 
Sunday that the church must do 
mote to reach minority groups and 
recent immigrants. 


Ahmed Zald Yamani 


vey. a newsletter noted for its con- 
tacts with tbe Saudis, reported 
■--- . ... Monday that the discounts would 

they wouU involve relhngofl on a cma aboul 800.000 bands per 
“netback system. Under Uiatjys- Saudi output in recent months 


Bishop Malone’s remarks were 
contained in a report prepared at 
the request of Pope John Pad n in 
preparation for a special interna- 
tional synod of bishops that the 
pope has called to examine the re- 
sults of the Second Vatican Council 
of 1962-65. The synod is to begin 
Nov. 25 in Rome and last until 
Dec. 8. 


tem, used by some other OI 
members, the price is based on the 
current market value of the prod- 




1 


ported Monday. , ucts that can be refined from the 

“Quite the contrary, coming oil 
will finn «»P 


has totaled between 2 million and 
15 million barrels a day, buz the 
country signaled in July that it 
planned to raise production closer 


0 


& 




The Middle East Economic Sur- (Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


The report, prepared with the 
assistance of bishops of the confer- 
ence and leading American theolo- 
gians. oigM that efforts be made to 
attract new church followers to 
“counter proselytizing by Protes- 


tant ftwwtntnpniaik m** and to “clar- 
ify and reinforce Catholic identi- 
ty.” 

“Particular attention must now 
be given to women, both lay and 
religious,” the report said. “Their 
role in the church and society must 
be clarified, their rights and dignity 
must be affirmed, and their ad- 
vancement to positions of leader- 
ship and decision-making must 
continue.” 

The report stopped short of sug- 
gesting that women be ordained to 
the priesthood, said WiDiam Ryan, 
associate secretary of public affairs 
for the conference. “On the one 
hand the c&ondi should try in every 
way to utilize women's gifts and 
talents, but not through their ordi- 
nation. It is meant that they should 
be advanced as much as possible 
within the confines of church disci- 
pline.” 

The report also said that the 
church to appeal to minor- 
ity groups and to those whose faith 
has lapsed. 

“Far more must be done to reach 
out to alienated Catholics and (be 
unchurched.” the report said. “Pro- 
grams of evangelization, c atech e fls 


and service to human needs are also 
needed for such groups as Hispan- 
ics, blacks and recent immigrants, 
along with continued efforts to de- 
velop leadership from among 
them.” 


Bishop Malone also called for a 
reaffirmati on of tbe reforms of the 
Second Vatican Council and said 
«Mt the Ot rim pc Church in tbe 
United States had made mors in 
its interpretation and application 
of Vatican fl, which sought to re- 
form church practices by altering 
liturgy and encouraging social ac- 
tion by Cafijolics. 


INSIDE 


j in Tripoli, Lebanon. 
1 34 persons. Page Z 


■ Submachine guns are becom- 
,ing the “weapons of choice” of 
U.S. criminals. Page 6. 


■ Hie United States criticized 
the prosecution in die Aquino 
assassination case. Page 7. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


■ Britain will issue $2.5 billion 
in floating-rate notes. Page II. 

■ Washington reported a 531.8- 
billion current account deficit 
for April-June. Page 11. 


“Some of the things bong done 
m name rrf Vatican II really weren’t 
in tbe spirit of Vatican H,” Mr. 
Ryan said. The report “is saying 
that maybe the church did lose 
some good things, like the devo- 
tions, and it was time to see if it 
wasn't really time to take stock of 
Vatican II. It is certainly not for 
doing away with some of the re- 
forms of Vatican IL” 


Ethiopian Jews in Israel 
Maintain Protest Vigil 


The Second Vatican Council was 
intended to “open the windows of 
the church to the modem age.” in 


(Continued on Page 6, CoL 6) 


Hauers 

JERUSALEM — Hundreds of 
Ethiopian Jews airlifted out of the 
Horn of Africa last year spent the 
Jewish New Year holiday on Mon- 
day in their 12th day of protest 
against rabbis' demands that they 
undergo ritual conversion lo Juda- 
ism before marrying. 

The Ethiopians say they are de- 
scendants of the biblical tribe of 
Das and that thor Jewishness is 
whole, complete and not open to 
question. 


visit to France by New Zealand’s 
deputy prime minister, Geoffrey 
Palmer. 

“Let’s cool it, let’s get back to 
what the issues are,” Mr. Lange 
said. 

Relations between Wellington 
and Paris were strained by the mak- 
ing of a Greenpeace ship. Rainbow 
Warrior, in Auckland harbor in 
July as it prepared to led a protest 
fleet lo Munmoa. 

New Zealand is also char g in g 
two French secret agents with sab- 
otaging the vessel and murdering a 
crew member. 

But Mr. Lange made it dear he 
believed that tension had been es- 
calated by Mr. Mitterrand’s week- 
end uip to Mururoa Atoll, and not 
by his own statements. 

He also said Mitterrand’s com- 
ment that France acted lawfully in 
sending secret agents to New Zea- 
land must have been a translation 
error. 

“If be thinks there is nothing 
more lawful than sending agents to 
New Zealand with Swiss passports 
to sniff around that is a whole new 
concept of international law," Mr. 
Lange said. 

Mr. Lange said be wanted lallrs 
with Mr. Mitterrand to cover all 
aspects of relations, including New 
Zealand's limited trade access to 
tbe European Community and the 
move toward independence in New 
Caledonia. 

“We ought not to be standing 
and shouting at each other. We 
ought now to be defusing all of 
those things,” be said. 

Mr. Lange also said he had re- 
ceived no formal notification from 
France of an invitation to visit 
Mururoa. 

“I’d want to see Mitterrand, not 
look down a bomb crater,” he said. 

There was no immediate reaction 
to Mr. Mitterrand's invitation from 
Mr. Somare or other Pacific leaders 
attending the Port Moresby festivi- 
ties, but in Wellington, the Western 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


i 




_ J — 




3 

_ 3 




UT71B TW*MPCJ)4fl4CT*Jtiir»H«D»HllMlIl.lf.C a* OCX 







, ; _ J" . fjf t f * > »■ r - ► 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1985 





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24 Killed 
In Battle 
Of Factions 
In Lebanon 

Untied Press International 

BEIRUT — Militiamen of op- 
posing Modem factions battled 
Monday in the northern Lebanese 

port city of Trbdi, and at least 24 

persons were oiled and 75 were 
Injured, in the fif^hting. nuHtaiy 
sources said. 

Nine Lebanese soldiers and an 
officer were killed by shellfire Oat 
struck Tripoli's main army bar- 
racks, die sources said, and an offi- 
cer said he hoped that the barracks 
was hit by mistake. The sources 
said 40 other soldiers were wound- 
ed in the barrage on' the army’s 
Babjat Ghanem barracks. 

"The soldiers were sleeping when 
shells crashed into their quarters, 
trilling and wounding them in their 
beds/ state-owned Beirut radio 
said. “The fighting in Tripoli is the 
worst in two years and all attempts 
to arrange a cease-fire have not 
succeeded so far.” 

The military sources said the 
mortar and artillery shells appar- 
ently were fired by militiamen of 
the Syrian-backed Arab Democrat- 
ic Party, who are known as the 
Arab Knights. 

The Arab Knights and the mili- 
tias of the fundamentalist Islamic 
Unification Movement have been 
fighting each other despite a string 
of Syrian-mediated cease-fires. 

“We want to believe that we were 
bit by mistake and that we were 
caught in cross-fire,” an officer said 
after the shelling. 

Police sources said the remaining 
dead and wounded were Lebanese 

ci vilians and Moslem militiamen. 

They reported dozens of fires 
burning out of control 

Security sources said that on 
Sunday at least two persons were 
killed and six ware wounded in 
TripolL 





SCOUTING PARTY — Two Russian officers were on 
hand Monday as 60,000 troops from the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization began maneuvers in the northern 
part of West Germany. Major General Konstantin L 
. Cherymukhin, left, and Captain Arkady Bobrov, were 
invited to observe the exercise for several days. 


Party Retires Veterans WORLD BRIEFS 


From China’ S Politburo XJ.S. Deception Alleged onMcaragi# 


(Continued from Page 1) 
was that of Deng Yingchao, 81, 
widow of Prime Minister Zhou Eo- 
lai and the highest-ranking woman 
in the country. 

Those retiring from the Central 
Committee included Wang Don$- 
xing, 69, the former bead « Mao s 
bodyguard, who played a crucial 
role in the arrest of Mao's widow, 

Jiang Qng, and of other members ^ opens Tuesday, a gathering of 
of the Gang of Four m 1976, and i qqo delegates will approve 

79 a rmA-hme utter- . V t /■* Z-'.a 


THE HAGUE (AP) — A former Central Intelligence Ag ency anal y* . 
said Monday that a CIA plat to destabflce the fficaragnan govennaou 
was put into effect under the guise *** 

shipments i “ ‘ " ~ *** 



dropped from sight altogether in 
1981. After being reported ill he 
resurfaced only on Saturday, when 
he met in Beijing with a Japanese 

dignitary. 

New appointees to the party’s 

top bodies will Ro^'RewuTon Monday; be was wtoher tltt dkn;^ 

after two meetings fea i ****** unplemenSLHe said it was but would not say whelta the CJA was. 
carefully prepared by Mr. Deng. Asked whether the plan’s aim was to halt the arms flow**- 

At a special party conference Salvadoran rebels, Mr. Maamcfcacl smd.that argument was-aovariced. 

was uo evidence of such an arms flow. When askeclto evaluate ujS. 
evidence of arms i 




Huang Hua, 72, a one-tune mter- a ^ 0 f ^ Central Committee 

preter for Mao who rose to the post members. This wffl be followed by 

on foreign minister. a meeting of the new committee, at j^ ty much of iTunreliable, some of it suspect, and- presorted in i 

Monday which additional Politburo ap- dc F V ra tdy matmor. 1 " 


The announcements . 

represented the culmination of a pomtroents will be made, including > . fWm - . 

two-year campaigi by Mr. Dengto several men who are being lined up 4 WUt68 Alfe RcleSSCU 01 SlfluaOWC 


w 


‘rgevenate” lUe Chinese hierarchy 
by pushing elderly veterans of the 
revolutionary war period into re- 
tirement ana replacing them with 
younger, better-educated officials 

more attuned to the country's drive 
for modernization. 

At lower levels, the campaign has 
already led to the retirement of 
more than one miHion civilian offi- 
cials, tens of thousands of military 
officers and countless managers of 
economic enterprises. 

Defense Minister Zhang Aiping, 
75, and Culture Minister Zhu 
Muzhi, 74. were also dropped from 
the Central Committee, although 
they will aooarentlv continue as 


by Mr. Deng to take over the party 
anri government when be and bis 
associates step aside. 

Prominent among these is ex- 
pected to be Hu QiU, 56, a former 
Young Communist League official 
who is being groomed on the party 
secretariat to take over from the 
current general secretary, Hu Yao- 
bang, 69. Also considered a virtual 
certainty for a Politburo seat is Li 
Peng, 57, a Soviet-educated official 
who is one of several deputies to 
Prime Minister Zhao Ziyang and 
tbe current favorite to succeed him. 



ministers, 
by tins was overshadowed 


iremjy connnuc s* j A •! HAVANA IKjOUexs; —t' 

surprise occasioned MfMMWjP prisoners on humanitarian 

rershadowed by the MMLWTIKZ Hdd 0^^^ 


HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Four Zimbabwe whhes arrested fan 
week on arapfrion of plotting to establish an independen t nation'm 


49; and 


Trevor Hemms, 56; hfichad Jacobs, 64; Paten* 

Anthony Hunt. 48, were detained last week in mom 1 _ 
of Joshua Nkomo, the opposition leader, who comes from 1 
Scores of blacks, including tour opposition members of pazhamest and 
six Bulawayo city councillors, hare been attested in die lari two months, 
Lawym sakl that the whites were detained ondcr ooaCTgeocy powers 
regulations accusing feem of plotting wife Mr. Nkwnofa minority 22ruib*- 

province from^nbabwe, aaAot, st up or ting cmed anti-government 
rebels who profess loyalty to. Mr. Nkoino. 

r,iha Wilting to Free TOftfeowas - 

HAVANA (Reuters) — r Cuba is wflhng^to free more than 70 political 

* - - r to Pies*- 


Blacks Find little Potential 
In Pretoria’s Hints of Change 


news that Hua Guofeug had kept •— -j -» m ■ 

his Central Committee seat, despite tijrgJfnph I PS1S 
widespread predictions that he * 



not 


U.S. PrisonPopulatkm 
Rose 5.6% in 6 Months 

* New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
federal and state prison population 
grew by 5.6 percent during the first 
six months of this year, the equiva- 
lent of 1,000 new inmates a week, 
the Bureau of Justice Statistics has 
reported. 

The prison population increased 
by 26,183 new inmates, for a record 
population of 490,041 by June 30. 
lire increase for the first half of this 
year nearly equals the total increase 
for all of 1984, when the U.S. pris- 
on population grew by 26,610, the 
bureau said Sunday. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
keeping 13 milli on blades out of 
South Africa’s political equation. 

Moreover, when the President's 
Committee spoke of ending “influx 
control'' of which the pass laws are 
part, it matte it clear that this did 
not imply removing all limits on 
black access to black townships, 
any more than it implied any deseg- 
regation of residential areas. 

In the last two years the authori- 
ties have seemed to seek a new 
division in South Africa that is still 
based on race and that draws a line 
between the races' “own” affairs 


out of either chamber. Meanwhile, 
general affairs, defined as the mili- 
tary and finance, are controlled by 
the white cham ber and by a cabinet 
with only two nonwbite members, 
neither of whom has a portfolio. 


Mr. Guofeng. 64, was appointed 
prime minis ter and then party 
nhairman after the death of Mao in 
1976. He was elbowed aside by Mr. 
Deng within a year and lata: 
dropped from the Politburo. Ridi- 
culed as a “whateverist” by Mr. 
Deng, who claimed that his policy 
was one of following blindly what- 
ever Mao had decreed, Mr. Hu 


(Continued from Page 1) 
Samoan prime minister, Tofilau 
Eli, joined Mr. Hawke in spurning 
iL 

A spokesman for Mr. Eti, who is 


sources sad jfr 

Monday. They said the only condition was that fee United States agree to 
accept than. - ' . ■ 

US. bishops HiOTWMtf fee matter with Mr. Castro during a vish is 
January. Human rights groups said that about 250 anti-Castro Cubans 
are . serving long prison terms. The visiting chorchraen had a list of 
prisoners said to be {Borin poor mental health- 
Mr. P»stm rriflyad hi* response through Cuban churchmen who visited - 
Washington last week. Cubafreed 26 political prisoners during a ' yisitlast 

Ac 


in New Zealand for an eye opera- yc® 1 by *e Reverend Jesse.LObck^n, . 

tiorLsaidMr Mhterrantfs viatto Democratic presidential nomination. Thcpnsonersflew to the United 

States with Mr. Jackson. . • 

Kenya Assails Uganda on Rebd Talks 


World Prices of Crude Fall 


(Continued from Page 1) 
to its OPEC quota, 4J million bar- 
rels. 

The companies to which the dis- 
counted oQ will be sold are Exxon 

w ^ Corp., Texaco Inc. and Mobil 

and” the “tfznWaT affahs of the Cca Vr industry sources say. Chev- 
nat ' nn ronCorp^ another major American 

oil company, said last week that it 


nation. 

For example. South Africa's seg- 
ued Parliament, formed last 


:h for pco- 
racial de- 


pie of mixed and Indian 
scent and a third chamber for 
whites. 

The nonwhites can exercise pow- 
er over what the white government 
determines to be their “own af- 
fairs,” such as housing, education 
and health, although the whites 
have veto power over laws coming 


was interested in netback pur- 
chases from the Saudis but had not 
yet begun talks on the issue. 

“The deals are intended as a 
warning signal to other oO export- 
ing countries, both OPEC and non- 
OPEC, that Saudi Arabia can no 
longer be taken for granted as the 
sole buttress of wond oil prices,” 
the newsletter said. ■ - 
Oil ministers of the 13 pPEC 
countries are to meet in Vienna ou 


Oct. 3, and Saudi Arabia's break 
with fee group’s official price is 
expected to impress other members 
of fee danger of an all-out price 
war that migh t result unless OPEC 
members follow fee pricing rules. 

> Saudis appea 


Observers say fee 
ragw to minimize the effect rtf this 
discounting. “I don’t think they 
want to wreck the market,” said 
John Lkhtblau, president of fee 
Petroleum Industry Research 
Foundation in New York. 

Saudi Arabia plans to limit the 
sale of its discounted ofl to major 
oil companies that can use the oil 
within their own refining and mar- 
keting networks, analysts say. They 
say such sales would be much less 
disruptive than dumping cheap oil 
onto the open market. 


Murur oa showed an “arrogant dis- 
regard” for nations in the region. 

Greenpeace said Monday feat 
the first of five boats in its protest 
fleet was expected to arave ” 
Murur oa within a week 
A spokesman, Rien 
said in Auckland feat fee 


Vega was 600 mfles (about 1,000 
kilometers) west of fee atoll on its 
fourth protest voyage there. It 
would he outside a 12-mfle exclu- 
sion zone to await fee arrival later 
this month of an ocean-going tug, 
Greenpeace. 

France has said it is pr epa red to 
use force against any vessel enter- 
ing the exclusion zoneL ' ’* 


off NAIROBI (AP) —/The ruling party's newspaper in Kenya said, 
u Monday that Uganda’s military leaders woe undermining peace negotia- . 

tions wife aguori&a group being mediated by Kenya. * - v“>V 

The Kenya Tunes, pabiLsbed by President Daniel Arap Mofs party, 
the Kenya African National Umon, Indicated in anedrtorial feat fee 
Kenyan government Named Uganda’s leaders for an impasse in talks 
wife guerrillas from the National Resistance Army. 

“It may be premature to pronounce verdicibal the direction in whidi 

Uganda rukxshad attempted to bufld/^the newroapos^L It saLdthe^ 
leaders had made “glib addresses” pledging to stiunfrae.Ugasda. 1 


The Associated Press . 

MOSCOW —The Soviet leader; 
MfHctfl S. Gorbachev, met Mon- 
day with Masashi Ishibashi, dwir- 
man of the executive ccsmmttee of 
Japan’s Socialist Party, Tus re- 
ported. 


For ihe Record: 

He Sri gomw nen t said Monday that-it was unilaterally 

extending a three-month cease-fire wife Tamil- separatist guerrillas that . 
was due to end Wednesday, • (Reuters) 

Th«a«wl memimmseed tliw end nf n utate trf rmgrgency Mnndav that had 
been imposed after a coup attempt failed a week ago. {Reuters) 
Anti-nuclear protesters tried'Monday to block, the agates to Britan's 
base lor uudear-armed Polaris submarines, west of Glasgow; and 41 of 
them were arrested, a navy spdeesman. said. .. - - ; . . (AP) 

Johannes Rau was nominated Monday by the the Social Demociatk; 
Party in West Germany as feepartys candidatcfOTtihancenffl- m the 1987 
elections. Mr. Ran is premier.of North RMue- Westphalia. - (AP) 


Some of those magnificent men in their flying machines were Thais. 




‘/ecVnifion 1 ik wumtiyue 
laterHatumcde 


FWANCB 




, k Itifi'Mattcnafe 
VK.VNVK 

.. /xureiryx**/ ■ 

tinmautiq m’ fatermtii#&t# 


'"T 5 -'- 

' 

WrM' r. 


• 


m 




as 


tse 

* 

rimpft $ *** ■ . 






Tr.'-'sSf.v ■ ^ 

fe"'; 

mu*-. 

V i*-.-. 

T&i'lS 


In'jOTi‘.!a.’i|idi^ eight years after 
American aviation pioneers carried V ': 
out the first powered flight in their 
lieavier than air 1 machines, three 
Thai, army officers travelled abroad : ; 

to a French flying school. They ' ; -;V 
learned not only how to fly aircraft " py. m 
but also how to build them. In quick V; :: 
succession the Kingdom bought ':- 
airplane, established an airport arid 
trained new pilots. . 

Startinjg as a mail carrier, the airline '': * i -;~ 
quickly grew and soon a passenger . /J 
service was available. Then in a major : > 

reorganisation just 25 years ago, Thah 
International came into being. ■ V. 

ThaTs pioneering spirit, its attitude ^^:V . 
towards service and the importance V 
it places on . the trainirig arid skill pf^v, ' 
its pilots, has led to the/an-lin^.^f'^^, 
development as one of the world^: ’^/, . j 
major carriers. ! .■ .. . ■ 4 ■ 


Today, Thais route network - 'has 








— : — - - threat**' 

■ * ' ■ 




r» 






grown to include over 40 citiefrin T 3p ^^^: ; 
countries across four continents/ 

And servicing these destinations^ I 
ever-expanding fleet of 
747Bs and wide-bpdied.A30G^ 

So, fly smooth as silk on ThaL : 
aiirfine that's su11enchari^witf^^| 
wonders of flight ' > 




lINTbl “HI 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1985 



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9 


Page 1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBVNE, Tl-ESDAY. SEPTEMBER 17, 1985 


Thatcher Letter on U.S. Arms Sale Worries French 


By Joseph Fitchetr 

I m&KUional Herald Tri bune 

I*ARIS — As the U.S. Defense 
Department prepares to order a 
S4.5-biIlion battlefield communica- 
lions system. French technology 
appears to have the edge despite a 
personal appeal from Prime Minis- 
to Margaret Thatcher of Britain to 
President Ronald Reagan on bo- 
half of a rival British system. 

But French officials, deliberately 
low-keyed in their lobbying, are 
concerned that Mrs. Thatcher's let- 
ter of appeal to Mr. Reagan could 
prove a difference in a deal that 
would be a record U.S. mili tary 
purchase of foreign-designed 
equipment. 

This contract also could set a 
precedent for more U.S. purchases 
abroad: for example, an off-the- 
shelf ami-aircraft system to replace 
the Divad, a UJS.-built weapon that 
was canceled because of huge cost 
overruns. 

The United States now sells sev- 
en or eight times as much military 
equipment to its European allies as 
it buys from them, a sore point in 
the Western alliance. 

In addition to the U.S. business 
involved in the communications 
system, the winning company ■•dy 
will be in position to get a similar, 
perhaps even larger, order from 
South Korea. 

U.S. Army experts, officials have 
confirmed, had recommended the 
French-designed cellular radio sys- 
tem , but were ordered to review 



Margaret Thatcher 

their findings after Mrs. Thatcher's 
letter was sent Aug. 30. 

French officials, while refusing 
to publicly discuss the issue, in pri- 
vate have expressed both anger and 
the hope that Mrs. Thatcher has 
overstepped herself. 

“Blatant political interference 
will not work in the U.S. procure- 
ment context,” a French official 
said Monday. 

“The very fact that she inter- 
vened shows that the French sys- 
tem had won,” the official said. 

French officials appear confi- 
dent that the Reagan administra- 
tion will hesitate to override the 
army experts' recommendations 
and buy the British system 


But the French fear that Defense 
Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger or 
Mr. Reagan, who bas strong per- 
sonal ties to Mrs. Thatcher, ought 
order a major procurement review. 

Publicly, Paris has proceeded 
cautiously despite French press re- 
ports alleging a series of last-min- 
ute British maneuvers. These were 
a $1 -billion reduction in price, in- 
sinuations in Washington that the 
French system has been leaked to 
the Soviet Union, and maps show- 
ing that most. U.S. subcontracting 
for the French system would go to 
Democratic congressional districts. 

This “misinformation.” as a 
French official called it, could 
muddy the waters enough for Con- 
gress to reconsider its enthusiasm 
for buying the system abroad. 

Either a major review or Con- 
gressional reticence could delay the 
deal for months and might even 
reopen the bidding to U.S. compa- 
nies. 

European companies got the op- 
portunity to sell their systems only 
after UJS. companies had failed, 
despite research over 10 years cost- 
ing S700 million, to develop a suc- 
cessor to a 15-year-old system that 
relies on cumbersome, vulnerable 
phone exchanges and cables. 

A year ago, the Pentagon decid- 
ed to acquire one of two European 
systems: either the Frcncfr-made 
Rita or Britain's similar Ptarmigan. 
Both use microelectronics to pro- 
vide a mobile radio network that 
can handle phone calls, computer 
data and facsimile images. They 
deliver tbeir messages, in code and 


graded by military priority, to the 
right officer on any receiver he 
picks up. 

Rita was developed by the gov- 
ernment-owned electronics firm 
Thomson CSF and has been in ser- 
vice for two years with the French 
and Belgian armies. Britain’s sys- 
tem. made by Plessey Co- has been 
in service since last spring- 

A1 though the technology in both 
cases is European, most jobs and 
profits will stay in the United 
Stales, since both European firms 
have U.S. links: Plessey with Rock- 
well International Corp., Thomson 
with GTECorp. 

Even so, the sale would be **a 
huge step forward in the Western 
alliance in terms of trans-Atlantic 
cooperation,” said David M. Ab- 
shire. U.S. ambassador to the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion. 


Both Congress and the Defense 
Department, he said, have started 
“in a new direction toward getting 
the alliance to buy the best weap- 
ons and the ones, regardless 
of where they originate, to avoid 
wasting research costs and benefit 
from having wmilwr equipment.” 

French officials involved in sell- 
ing the communications system 
have left the lobbying to Git's 
specialists. Reports of a French 
diplo m atic note in response to Mrs. 
Tha teller’s letter are denied by 
French officials and by U.S. Em- 
bassy officials in Paris. 

For Thomson, this also is a good 
opportunity to broaden mantels 
for French arms, traditionally fo- 
cused on developing countries, 
mainly the Middle East, and to 
draw the French aims industry 
closer to its Western allies. 


U.S. Finds Cost of AIDS Is Soaring 

Health Care, Loss of ProdudtfvilyPutat$5-6 Billion 


Fairakhan Causes L.A. Furor 


Lot Angela Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — Mayor Tom 
Bradley of Los Angeles Has come 
under attack by Jewish community 
leaden for failing to denounce 
Louis Fairakhan before the black 
Muslim leader spoke here. 

After the speech Saturday, Mr. 
Bradley conceded that Mr. Farrak- 
han's comments “contained strong, 
dangerous currents of anti-Semi- 
tism.’* 

Mr. Bradley, a black, bad been 
caught between demands by Jewish 


supporters to denounce Mr. Far- 
rakhan before the speech and by 
blacks, who asked urn to wait to 
see what the minister said. 

More than 15,000 people attend- 
ed the speech, during which Mr. 
Fairakhan referred to the trilling of 
Jews in Nazi Germany by saying, 
“Don’t push your six million down 
our throats when we lost 100 mil- 
lion to slavery.” 

Jewish leaders reacted in anger 
and predicted that black-Jewish re- 
lations in Los Angeles would suffet 


By Marlene Gmons 

Lot Angela Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — AIDS, the incurable dis- 
ease that attacks the immune system, is beginning 
to place substantial new b lindens on the U-S- 
health-care system, according to public health ex- 
perts. 

I be federal Centers for Disease Control has 
conservatively estimated that the cost of caring for 
the first 9,000 AIDS patients was more than Sl-25 
billion, as well as S438 billion in “lost productivi- 
ty” from the disability and premature deaths of so 
many young people. 

About 13.666 people in tbe United States have 
been afflicted by AIDS, or acquired imm une defi- 
ciency syndrome, as have thousands in other coun- 
tries. More than half of the 13.000 have died. 

“It is likely that the AIDS epidemic will place 
increasingly greater strains upon the beailh-edre 
system in cities and counties with a large number 
of cases, as well as on both public and private 
sources of health-care financing,” said Peter S. 
Amo of the Institute for Health Policy Studies at 
the University of California. He has studied AIDS 
health-care costs in San Francisco. 

“The problem will intensify as the epidemic 
continues to grow,” Mr. Amo said, “particularly in 
high-incidence areas such as New York, San Fran- 
cisco. Los Angeles and Miami, which together 
account for approximately 60 percent of the na- 
tion’s total reported cases.” 

AIDS attacks the body's immune system, leav- 
ing it vulnerable to other infections. In the United 
States, the majority of its victims have been male 
homosexuals or bisexuals, intravenous drug users 
and their steady sexual partners. 

Dr. Ann Hardy, an epidemiologist with the 


Centos for Disease Control, wbo conducted^ 
AIDS-cost studv. said the typicd AI p S ,P““ 

fives an. averag6 of * weeks from the umc of 

^^hiftime of death, the cost of care will have 
become about S 140.000, and an average of 3 1 s 

wfll be spent in a hospital each ume of bospiulu-a 
lion. Hospital charges for .MDS paaenu r^ 
from S830 to S 1.100 a day, company to t]*® 
age daily charge of S350 for non-AIDS patient. 
an acute-care hospital. . . 

Dr. Hardy said she calculated the iheorefcaL 
lost income from both disability and early deatn- 
Stae said the 9.000 patients studied lost a tout oi 
7,500 “work years" ■ — worth an estimated Mp- 
million — during their Alness and 542 billion m 
potential future income as a result of their deaths. 

While the incidence of AIDS nationally is not as 
great as cancer or heart disease, she said, “in areas 
where AIDS is high, the impact is substantial. 
There are some areas that are really struggling and 
fed the burden.” _ . . irV! 

She added that “if the number of cases of AIDS 
doubles in the next 10 months, it may increase the 
total costs of infectious diseases in this counuy bv 
30 percent to 50 percent, and health planners need 
to be aware of that." . . 

Dr. Handy said that 90 percent of the victims 
studied are between 20 and 49 years old, with most 
in their 20s and 30s. 

For this reason, the number of AIDS patients 
without medical benefits “is large and increasing, 
according to Nancy Langer, a spokeswoman tor 
i jmhria T , «» gal Defense and Education Fund, a 
homosexual-rights organization. 

“You don't think of people this young needing 
long-term disability health care coverage,” she 
said “Many have little or no medical or me insur- 
ance.” 




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California Schools Bar 
'Watered-Down’ Texts 


By Keith B. Richbuig 

Washington Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — The Cali- 
fornia Board of Education has de- 
cided to ask UJS. textbook publish- 
ers to put more emphasis on 
evolution theory and human repro- 
duction, gang against a national 
trend toward more textbook cen- 
sorship of sensitive subjects. 

The board, in a vote last week, 
rejected more than 20 seventh- and 
eighth-grade science textbooks as 
too “watered down.” 

State education and textbook in- 
dustry officials said the vote was 
P Ti p rw- ^ fntwl Christiim funda- 
mentalists, who have favored a su- 
perficial treatment, almost, of evo- 
lution rheesy a nd human sexuality, 
have succeeded in swaying many 
school boards in their book selec- 
tion. 

Book publishers also have been 
challenged for their treatment of 
such as racism, sotism and 
nod ear war, and some educators 
say that U.S. textbooks have been 
overly amplified. 

Tbe California vote is expected 
to have far-reaching effects. Cali- 
fornia represents about 11 percent 
of the nation's textbook market 
and publishers generally try to tai- 
lor textbook content to the wishes 
of the largest buyers. 


“We must send a message to the 
publishing industry that we cannot 
tiptoe around certain subjects just 
because they are controversial” 
mid W illiam Honig, California’s 
school superintendent. “Doing so 
undermines our efforts toward ex- 
cellence in oar classrooms.” 

A recent survey by a liberal lob- 
bying group. People for the Ameri- 
can Way, reported that incidents of 
censorship had increased 38 per- 
cent last year. 

"Censoship is on the rise if no- 
body lakes a strong stand for quali- 
ty,” Mr. Honig said. “Those people 
who stand up for quality are the 
antidote for censorship.” 

Textbook publishers have until 
Ocl 15 to teO California whether 
they intend to comply with the 
board’s vote and rewrite their 
books by February. Most textbook 
publishers have indicated that they 
will comply. 

The board members said they 
rqected the science textbooks be- 
cause the publishers had “watered 
down” disnisskm of evolution and 
Imnwn reproduction. 

Some Christian fundamentalists 
have argued that creationism -—the 
belief that the world was literally 
created in seven days — shotid be 
taoght in classes alongside evolu- 
tion theory. 


Study Says Americans Marry 
Later, but Get Divorced More 

IMted Press IniemaOonal 

WASHINGTON — Americans are postponing marriage and opt- 
ing incre a s in gly to Sue together, a new study from the U.S. Census 
Bureau says. It also found that the ratio of divorced people to married 
people had approximately doubled since 1970. 

Tbe report, released Sunday, sod that in Match 1984 the median 
age for a woman to get married was 23, tbe highest level since 1890 
when such statistics were first available. For men, the median age is 
25.4, “nearing the high estimated for the turn of tbe century.” 

The marriage age far women began a long-term decline in 1 890, the 
bureau said, reaching a low of 20.1 years in 1956. In the early 19606, 
the median age began to increase slowly and in the eight years 
following 1976 jumped by 1.7 years for women. 

According to the bureau, the number of unmarried couples living 
together has been growing by an average 107, 00d a year since 1 970. In 
March 1984. unmarried-couple households reached IS mi llion 
About 70 percent of those households had no children I 

In 1984, the divorce ratio was 121 per 1.000 marriages, more than, I 
twice tbe figure of 47 per 1,000 in 1970. He study also found the ! 

divorce ratio differs by race, with blacks having the highest ratio 

240 per 1,000 marriages in 1984. 


Julian Beck, Actor, Director 
Of living Theatre, Dies at 60 


' International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Julian Beck. 60, the 
American actor and director best 
known for his work with the avant- 
garde Living Theatre, died Satur- 
day in New York. 

Mr. Beck and his wife, J udith 
Malina, founded the Living The- 
atre in 1947 and toured with it 
around the world, shocking viewers 
and critics with their bold experi- 
mental approach. 

Mr. Beck constantly sought to 
provoke. He and his actors would 
strip off their clothes, plunge into 
an audience and alternately caress 
and insult viewers. 

They had frequent showdowns 
with police. During tbe troubled 
spring in Paris in 1968. they occu- 
pied the Tb&tre Framjais on the 
Left Bank and staged several weeks 
of provocation until the police in- 
tervened. In later years the troupe 
lost its ability to shock, and eventu- 
ally it disbanded. 

With the demise of the living 
Theatre. Mr. Beck gave up direct- 
ing. He appeared in tbe Francis 
Ford Coppola movie “Cotton 
Club,” playing the pan of an actor. 
Cootie Wflfiams, 77, 

Last of EUingtonians 

NEW YORK fNYT) — Cootie 
Williams, 77, the trumpet player in 
Duke Ellington Orchestra whose 
signature was the growling, muted 
bom. died Sunday of a kidney ail- 
ment in Long Island. 

Mr. Williams was the lastsurviv- 


- "VM 


ing member of the Ellington Or- 
chestra of die 1920s. He joined in 
1928 when the band was playing at 
the Cotton Chib. Two years ago he 
retired because of illness. For him 
Mr. Ellington wrote “Concerto for 
Cootie,” which when lyrics were 
added became “Do Nothing Till 
You Hear From Me.” He was also 
featured in other major Ellington 
oppositions, indudmg“Echoes of 

John Holt, . 62, Wrote ■ 

‘How Children Faff’ ,/ . 

NEWYORK fNYT) - John V 
Holt, 62, a teacher whose book 
“How Children Fail" sparked a na- 
tional debate in the 1960s on the 
quahty of U.S. schools, died of can- 
cer Saturday at his home in Boston. 

- “How Children Fail,” published 
m 1964, was a trenchant diary of 
bis years as a teacher. Critics ’and 
educators praised the book for 
shotting deady what children real- 
ly did in schooland what they real- 
ly felt, and it launched him on a 
career as a lecturer and a consul- 
tant to schooT systems. 


teuton 

MADRID — President Vigdis “ 1 
Fmnbogadottir of Iceland b egan \ 
on M onday a state viat to Spai^ a 
trip that diplomats said would 
strengthen cultural and trading i 
imks between the two countries. 









\:r 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1985 £> \ 


Page 5 


WS* 

SRlfc 

3f w£» 


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Page 6 



Salvadoran Aides, Kidnappers Reportedly in Touch 



Thn Anoccta d Praa 

President Jos£ Napoledn Duarte, in a speech on Ei Salva- 
dor’s independence day Sunday, said the “torment” of his 
daughter’s kidnapping would not interfere with his duties. 


By James LeMoyne 

A'(w York Times Service 

SAN SALVADOR —Two high- 
level Salvadoran government offi- 
cials have traveled to Mexico to 
meet with Salvadoran rebels who 
axe believed to be bolding the 
daughter of President Jost Napo- 
leon Duarte, according to a foreign 
diplomat here and a Salvadoran 
source aware of the negotiations. 

The reported departure Sunday 
of the two Salvadoran officials to 
meet rebel representatives was the 
first indication that the guerrillas of 
the Farabundo Marti National 
Liberation Front are responsible 
for the kidnapping last Tuesday of 
Mr. Duane's eldest daughter, In& 
Guadalupe Duarte Durhn. The re- 
bels have not publidy taken re- 
sponsibility for the kidnapping. 

Salvadoran officials refused to 
comment on the reports of contacts 
with the rebels. But the Salvadoran 
source, who has proven reliable in 
the past, said that the government 
received its first message from- the 
rebels on Friday. The source said 
both that the Roman Catholic 
Church and the International Red 
Cross had served as intermediaries 
in exchanges with the guerrillas. 

A senior official of the Interna- 
tional Red Cross refused to con- 
firm or deny the reports. 

A Salvadoran official said that it 
was possible that the government 
would consider releasing impris- 
oned rebels in exchange for Mrs. 
Duarte Dur&n's freedom. 

{The Dallas Morning News 
quoted sources as saying that one 
of the two Salvadoran officials was 
Communications Minister Julio 
Adolfo Rev Prendes; the identity 
of the second was undear. The As- 
sociated Press reported from Dal- 
las. The paper said that the Mexico 
trip was undertaken to negotiate 
the exchange of at least one impris- 



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oned guerrilla leader for Mrs. 
Duarte Durin. 

[“We have had discussions with 
the government under (he table,” 
the paper quoted a rebel leader as 
saying Sunday, “and we expect the 
government to agree to an ex- 
change.”] 

Mrs. Duane Durin, 35, and Ana 
Cecilia VeDeda, 23, a secretary, 
were seized by armed men on Tues- 


MUitory Leader 
In Peru Resigns at 
Garcia's Request 

Agence France- Press* 

LIMA — The chief of the Peru- 
nan armed forces has resigned by 
request following the military’s ad- 
mission that it was responsible for 
the killing s last month of seven 
persons in the southern region of 
Ayacucbo, the government has an- 
nounced. 

It said that the military chief. 
General Osar Enrico Pradi of the 
airforce, resigned Sunday at Presi- 
dent Alan Garda Pferez’s request 
after the army said in a report that 
three army officers and a driver 
had killed seven civilians in the 
village of Pucayaco. The four im- 
plicated in the killin g*; are in custo- 
dy, the government said. 

The army also acknowledged 
that it had been instructed by the 
government of Fernando Belaunde 
Tory, the former president, to car- 
ryout its anti-rebel struggle around 
Ayacucho in secret Accordingly, it 
said, no figures were recorded on 
army operations or casualties 
around Ayacucbo, the center of an 
insurgency by the Shining Path 
guemBa group. 

The secrecy has fostered suspi- 
cion that the army was behind sev- 
eral killing s in the region, including 
the recent massacre of 69 persons 
near Ayacucho. The government 
has ordered an inquiry into that 
massacre. 


day in central San Salvador. Mrs. 
Duane Durin’s driver was shot 
and killed, and ber bodyguard was 
critically wounded. 

A Salvadoran with dose ties to 
the government said he believed 
that both the government and the 
rebels were seeking what be termed 
“an honorable way" to end the kid- 
napping. He said that the govern- 
ment's concern was that Mr. 
Duane’s daughter not be harmed 
and that the rebels' concern was to 
minimize international and domes- 
tic criticism of the kidnapping. 

A close friend of Mr. Duarte said 
Sunday night that the kidnapping 
bad exhausted the president, who 
expressed his “profo und sadness” 
in an earlier speech. 

It was not dear which of the five 
armed groups that make up the 
guerrilla front was responsible for 
the kidnapping. But government 
officials and Western diplomats 
said the most likely grotros were the 
armed wing of the Salvadoran 
Communist Party or the Revolu- 
tionary Party of Central American 
Workers. The government has re- 
cently captured senior rebel com- 
manders from both groups whom 
the guerrillas can be expected to try 
to free. 

The archbishop of San Salvador, 
Arturo Rivera y Damas, criticized 
the kidnappers in his Sunday ser- 


India Tightens Security 
Around the Taj Mahal 

The A 33 octal cd Press 

NEW DELHI — Security is be- 
ing tightened around the Taj Mahal 
following threats to blow up the 
17ib-century marble mausoleum, 
an Indian newspaper reported. 

The Indian Express said Satur- 
day that the government was study- 
ing proposals to post paramilitary 
troops around the monument in 
Agra, about 120 mOes (195 kilome- 
ters) southeast of New Delhi. There 
were no details on the substance of 
the threats or who bad made them 



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U.S. Crooks Favor Submachine Guns 

Drag Dealers Consider Them 'Weapons of Choice 


By Mark A. Stein 

Las Angeles Times Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — It 
should have been a routine cab: 
Two police officers walk into an 
expensive hotel to investigate a 
report that a man used a stolen 
credit card to pay his bill. 

But when a San Jose police 
officer knocked on the suspect’s 
door last October, the man an- 
swered with a burst of 19 bullets 
from an Uzi submachine gun. 

One of the officers was hit in 
the stomach and aim. nearly dy- 
ing as he crawled down the halt- 
way to safety. The other police- 
man reflerivdy shot the gunman 
once in the chest while diving for 
cover. 

The use of a powerful, military 
weapon by a small-time crook 
may seem surprising. But police 
departments say t hat military as- 
sault rifles andother firearms — 
convertible to machine guns and 
available at gun shops every- 
where in the United States — 
have become the “weapons of 
choice” for a growing number of 
criminals. 

Law-abiding citizens, too, are 
buying military weapons. The 
police attribute this to a “mili- 
tary mystique" glorified in mov- 
ies and on television; gun enthu- 
siasts credit what they believe are 
the firearms' accuracy, historical 
value and crime-stopping poten- 
tial. 

“We’ve seen them on the 
streets with greater frequency 
than in years gone by," said 
Commander William Booth, a 
spokesman for the Los Angeles 
Police Department. 

The number of nrilitaiy-style 
weapons in escalation is diffi- 
cult to estimate. Gun makers 
withhold production figures, and 
there are no government esti- 
mates because registration is not 


the most popular of 
these weapons is the compact, 
easy-to-conceal Uzi submachine 
gun. 

“We’re definitely starting to 
see them more and more." said 
Robert Cox of the San Francisco 
office of the U.S. Drug Enforce- 
ment Agency. “Just in the last 
month, we’ve seal two Uzis. This 
is something brand new, seeing 
our own dope crooks with these 
types al things, and it’s scary." 


In August alone, Los Angeles 
has had to cope with one set of 
Uzi-wielding bandits who 
robbed and shot four persons in 
the Hollywood district, kitting 
mw, anH another that plundered 
a jewdzy store in the posh Bever- 
ly WHshire HoteL 

Also in August, in Oakland, 
New Jersey, two cheap Tec-9 
submachine guns were used to 
settle a grudge between rival 
drug gangs at a crowded picnic 
area. One man, a bystander, was 
killed. 

Even some youth gangs have 
acquired them, the police report, 
although the cost puts them out 
of the reach of most youths. 
Some baric models cost S600, 
and imitations sell for $400. 


There is some 
mystique about 
owning an 
automatic weapon. 
There’s something 
about being 
able to go 
"B-R-R-R-R-R-P!” 
and waste a lot of 
ammunition.’ 

A federal agent 


"They seem to be the weapons 
of choice for drug dealers — for 
good reason," said James 
Brightwell, special agent in 
charge of the San Frandsco of- 
fice of the federal Bureau of AT. 
cohoL Tobacco and Firearms. 
“They are awesome in lodes and 
awesome in what they can da" 

The gims also have been used 
in same startling crimes of pas- 
sion and insanity. James Hu- 
berty, for example, relied pri- 
marily on an Uzi to IriQ 21 people 
in a fast-food restaurant m San 
Yadro, California, in July 1984. 

Fully automatic weapons, 


which can fire a stream of bullets 
with a single pull of 
arc illegal in at least H W 
states, except for police depart- 
ments and licensed dealers who 
sell only to the police. In state 
where such guns are allowed, 
their owners must register with 
the federal government and buy 
a $200 tax stamp- 

However, there are few legal 
restrictions on the sale of these 
gfvqv. weapons in their virtually 
identical semiautomatic configu- 
rations, which firea single bullet 
and automatically reload each 
riirtf the trigger is pulled. 

Semia utomatic rifles are rela- 
tively easy to convert to fully 
automatic fire, police and sports- 
men agree, although it is illegal 
to do so without the proper state 
and federal permits. 

frpnii Anns of the World, an 
authoritative weapons m a nua l, 
reported in its most reemt edi- 
tion That more than 300,000 
copies of the civilian M-16 semi- 
automatic assault rifle, c all e d the 
AR-15, have been sold since that 
model went on the market in the 
early 1960s. 

Action Anns Ltd., which im- 
ports the Uzi from Israel, de- 
clined to share precise sales fig- 
ure, except to say that “tens of 
thousands" have been sold in the 
United States since 1979. 

However, law enforcement of- 
ficials say they believe that the 
numb er of weapons seized in 
c riminal investigations indicates 
that the zuunber of mili tary fire- 
arms now in circulation, already 
large, is growing. 

In several raids stemming 
from n single case in June, feder- 
al agents seized 91 MAC- 10 sub- 
machine gmrs in California and 
Nevada alone. Another 198 were 
seized elsewhere. 

"There is some mystique 
about owning an automatic 
weapon." said a federal agent. 
“There's something about being 
able to go , B-R-R-R-R-R.;P!’ 
and waste a lot of ammunition. 
It’s difficult to understand why.” 

Several sporting organizations 
and a number of individual gun 
owners, however, said fully auto- 
matic winehintt gunc already are 
against the law and any further 
restrictions only mil affect law- 
abiding citizens. 


it 


U.S. Catholic Leaders Urge Help for Women 


(Continued from Page 1) 
the words of Pope John XXHL who 
convened the council. 

But disputes have arisen since 


then over how its sweeping changes 
should be interpreted. Some church 
conservatives have contended that 
more liberal Catholics have used 
the council’s spirit to dilute church 
doctrine and Catholic identity. 
Liberals, in turn, have accused the 
conservatives of seeking to move 
away from the concerns and 
changes of Vatican IL 

In Bishop Malone’s assessmen t , 
the Catholic Church “stands in 
need of a new philosophical and 
conceptual framework — perhaps, 
also, a new symbolic and affective 
system — - through which to pro- 
claim the gospel to the modem 
world." 

“There is a great need for clarifi- 
cation of many questions pertain- 
ing to ministry, priesthood and au- 
thority in the church." the bishop 
said. 

Among the problems that Bish- 
op Malone’s report cites are: 

• A decline in the popular com- 
mitment to evangelization and the 
missionary spirit among Amer i can 


Catholics. In 1950, there were 4-3 
adult converts a year per 1,000 ac- 
tive Catholics and now there are 
IB. 

• False ideas about ecumenism 
have developed, including the idea 
that the differences between the 
Catholic Church and other Chris- 
tian churches are of little practical 
importance. 

• The role of priests and lay peo- 
ple in the church needs to be rede- 
fined. 

• Liturgical changes have led to 
problems, including both resis- 
tance to change and efforts to in- 
troduce further innovations. 

• There has been confusion over 


Austrian Cardinal Resigns 

The Associated Press 

VATICAN CITY — Pope John 
Paul n has accepted the resignation 
of Cardinal Franz Konig, the Ro- 
man Catholic archbishop of Vien- 
na, the Vatican announced Mon- 
day. Cardinal Konig, who stayed 
on beyond the Vatican's normal 
retirement age of 75 for prelates, 
turned 80 on Aug. 3. 


moral issues since Vatican H, in- 
cluding the Limits of dissent and 
specific moral issues such as abor- 
tion and birth control. 

Bishop Malone, however, did not 
attribute all of the problems died 
in the report to interpretations of 
Vatican IL 

Other factors, he said, were “ex- 
aggerated individualism, the cul- 
turally conditioned disinclination 
of many persons to make perma- 
nent commitment, the breakdown 
of marriage and family life, the 
sexual revolution and exaggerated 
secular feminism." 

Among ins suggestions were: 

• Developing “new tods and in- 
struments" like a universal cate- 
chism of Vatican H. authorized 
summaries of council documents in 
simple language and audio-visual - 
popularizations of its precepts. 

• Reviving Catholic devotions, 
which have largely disappeared 
from Catholic life in last 20 years. 

• Clarifying the role of priests in 
the church, and "specifically ad- 
dressing such issues as celibacy and 
the general weakening of the sense 
of commitment apparent in our 
culture today." 


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prosecution 
lo Aquino 
Murder Case 

Manila tt,* » i - 

2“f. mvo jy iD S &e assassination erf 
dS^Phir Aquino Jr - and critil 

SMaS2f“ <,f - U4 - 

it Department said 

naiW^ffi 01 3 ‘ ' ‘ngofcms exami- 
JSOff 1 *** ***** why PhiKp- 
JaS^je jets were scrambled arouS 

TZfff*-* asossiiiation in 
-the leader. It 

fwdthat one of the reasons thaohe 

Pps^Wrs gave for rqecting U.S 
airmen s affidavits -oa theSadeni 
w “ wh °tly without foundation.” 

ifte siaiemeot came as a prose- 
onion source reported thm the 

£2>P7! 8B ? <,r ' Wanuei Herrera, 
had filed for but was denied a leave 
of absence after alleged govern- 
pressure to block use of the 
affidavits in court 

ff The affidavits. executed by six 
u*. A it Force men, recounted how 
Phiuppme officers took over radar 
scopes at the VS. Wallace Air Sta- 
tion, north of Manila, as the Filipi- 
nos sent up the two jet fighters. 

. ...The affidavits alleged that the 
r^riupmos were attempting to inter- 
■ cep i the plane thought id be cann- 
ing Mr. Aquino and divert it to an 
airfield Outside Manila 
Lawyers following the trial had 
suggested the affidavits could be 
evidence that there was a wider 
conspiracy to'ldffMr. Aquino than 
alleged. Some speculated it might 
even have been an attempt by a 
group of airmen, aware of the plot, 
to save him. 

Mr. Herrera did not appear in 
court Monday. 

In court testimony Monday, an 
air force sergeant, Filomeno Mir- 
anda. and a police constable, Roge- 
lio Moreno, denied that they had 
shot Mr. Aquino. They had bed 
named by a civilian fan -f inding 
board as being in the best position 
to have shot him. 

Lawyers for General Fabian C 
Ipfer and the 25 other defendants are 



Gandhi Attends Rallies 
In Punjab* Says Pakistan 
Backs Sikh 'Conspiracy’ 


& 


■ a ■ ■ n^L— , *. '*•**<; v. ??’■**■ j .. A P ..r , 


:s«J € ; 




Th. AODCxMd Kw 


Bernanfo Fernandez, the PtaZf^Miie government ombuds- 
men, talks with reporters about the Aquino murder case. 


concluding the defense case in the 
seven-month trial. AH are charged 
with varying degrees of complicity 
in the killing of Mr. Aquino on 


Aug. 21, 1983, as he returned from 
sdf-exBe in the United States. 

They are also charged in the kill- 
ing of Rolando Galman, who the 
government contends was a Com- 
munist agent and Mr. Aquino's as- 
sassin. Mr. Galman was killed by 
troops immediately after Mr. 


Aquino was shot. 
The U.S. Emh 


The U.S. Embassy released to 
the Philippine media copies of the 
U:S. statement and of the affidavits 
from the U.S. Air Force personnel. 

The statement indicated disap- 
pointment in the prosecution's ex- 
amination of the evidence. 

‘'The (me unambiguous conclu- 
sion to which the affidavits point is 
that there was, in fact, a highly 
unusual degree of activity by the 
Philippine Air Force on Aug 21, 


1983, and that two Philippine Air 
Force fighters were scrambled on 
that day.” said the statement. 

It added, “We cannot of course 
substitute our judgment for that of 
the Philippine judicial processes 
concerning the weight or probity of 
the information in the affidavits. 
We had hoped, however, that a 
rigorous examination of that infor- 
mation would have occurred within 
the judicial processes themselves." 

The statement stressed the U.S. 
position that those responsible for 
Mr. Aquino’s murder, “no matter 
who they may be,” should be made 
to pay for the crime. 

It rejected arguments by Ber- 
nardo Fernando, the Philippine 
government’s ombudsman and Mr. 
Herrera’s superior, that the air- 
men’s affidavits could not be used 
in court because they were not au- 
thenticated bv the Philippine Em- 
bassy in Washington. 


The Anorbutd Press 

AMWTSAR, India — Prime 
Minister Rajiv Gandhi, ringed by 
commandos and bulletproof 
shiriri?, made his first campaign 
foray into Punjab on Monday and 
turned that Pakistan was helping to 
continue the violence in the Sikh- 
donmated stare. 

i The prime minister, campaign- 
ing for Congress (I) Party candi- 
dates in die stale's SqpL 25 elec- 
tion, addressed a total of about 
75,000 people at three rallies. More 
than 17,750 policemen, paraxmH- 
tary troops and special commandos 
were deployed. 

Mr. Gandhi said that the vio- 
lence that has swept Punjab was the 
offshoot of a “deep conspiracy 
tmtrlwl jo a neighboring country,” 
He did not identify the country but, 
by implication, it was Pakistan. 

In the Amritsar district, which 
borders Pakistan, he said: “Some 
people from across the bonier in 
the guise of Sikhs — sporting long 
hair and beards — were sneaking 
into the country to create distur- 
bances here” and to “undermine 
the unity and integrity" of India. 
Many men of the 13-miHion Sikh 
minority m India wear uncut hair, 
beards and turbans. 

India frequently ba$ accused Pa- 
kistan of harboring extremists. Pa- 
kistan has denied the assertions. 

Mr. Gandhi, 41. whose mother 
and predecessor as prime minis ter, 
Indira Gandhi, was slain by Sikh 
bodyguards last Oct 31, attended 
the rallies despite the reported 
tlneat of Sikh extremists to kill him 
if he campaigned in Punjab: He 
returned to New Delhi and is to 
campaign again in Punjab on 
Wednesday and Friday. 

As an precaution, Eve policemen 
with Mr. Gandhi’s blood type were 
waiting in a military hospital in 
Amritsar district in case the prime 
minister was wounded and needed 
transfusions, a senio r officer of the 
Central Reserve Police Force said. 

According to two candi dates in 
the election, Purqab officials have 
ordered all candidates to hove 


blood tests taken so that they can 
be assigned two police bodyguards 
who would be available for transfu- 
sions. 

The two major groups taking 
part in the election are Mr. Gan- 
dhi's Congress (T) and the moder- 
ate wing of Akali Dal, the m*™ 
Skh party. The militant wing. 
United Akali Dal, has cniVd for an 
election boycott to protest the 
peace agreement moderate sith< 
signed with Mr. Gandhi on July 24. 

Mr. Gandhi first addressed 5,000 
subdued Stlchs and Hindus in Jan* 
diala, in the remote north of Amrit- 
sar district, then a more enthusias- 
tic crowd of 10,000 SMi* and 
Hindus in the eastern city <rf Ro- 
par. 

About 50,000 Sikhs, Hindus and 
Moslems attended his final rally, in 
southern Sangrur, repeatedly 
cheering his calls to fight terrorism. 

At each stop, Mr. Gandhi alight- 
ed from a helicopter near a podium 
bristling with commandos and 
sharpshooters carrying semiauto- 
matic weapons. He'spdce from be- 
hind a portable, three-sided enclo- 
sure of bulletproof glass. 

His rn f«ag»» each rirp* WES the 
same: Vote for the Congress (I) 
Party to bring peace and prosperity 
to Punjab. Only his party. Mr. 
Gandhi said, can eradicate terror- , 

A statement issued by SOrh mb- , 
tants in Amritsar said that Mr. 
Gandhi, “by alle ging that ywrw . 
people came across the border with ' 
long beards and turbans," was 
“turning all Sikhs into suspects in 
(he eyes of Indians. ” 

The statement said that Mr. 
Gandhi was attempting “to drfame 
the Sikhs by spreading lies.” It 
called the trip “a farce” because - 
heavy security prevented a sponta- 
neous turnout 

Mr. Gandhi's stops were brief. 
Pnrfi time he arrived and departed 
in a different one of four identical 
helicopters. Only in Ropar, a Con- 
gress (I) Party stronghold on Pun- 
jab's eastern border, did he shake a 
few hands as be was followed by 
commandos. 














A btQboard in Ropar, in the Amritsar (fistrict of Punjab, was covered with photos of Rajiv 
Gandhi before the Indian prime minister arrived to campaign for the Sept. 25 elections. 


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Polish Prelates Give Warm Welcome to Solidarity Pilgrimage 


By Mi dud T. Kaufman 

New York Times Strike 

CZESTOCHOWA, Poland — 
Leaders of Poland's Roman Catho- 
lic Church greeted more than 
50,000 industrial workers who 
came here an a pngrfmagi- with 
prayers far the ideals that were 
raised by the Solidarity movement 
and with acoohdcs toq the leaders 
of the nowoutkwud labor union. 

"Hang in therei; as we are hang- 
ing in," said Cardinal Henryk Gul- 
bincrwicz after he celebrated the 
Mass on Sunday. Below, an a large 
open field in front of the outdoor 


altar, came cheers and two-fingered 
Solidarity salutes from the of 
thousands who came hum aS parts 
of Poland to third annual pil- 
grimage of workers who identify 
with Solidarity. 

Cardinal Gulbinowicz, who was 

named Poland’s third car dinal in 

April by Pope JohnFaul II, joined 
T.acfr Walesa, the Sdidarily leader, 
in sending a telegram to the pope in 
the name erf Pohsb workers. 

At the ahar, the cardinal spoke 
whfa the parents of the Reverend 
Jerzy Popidomko, the pro-Sohdar- 
itv priest who was IdDed in October 
1985 by secret police officers. Ms 


parents were seated in a place of 
honor at the nhrine Prolonged ap- 
plause greeted a mention of them 
by a steelworker addressing the 
crowd. 

The church leaders welcomed 
the pilgrims with mare enthusiasm 
than they did last year. Two years 
ago, when Father Popieluszko 
helped organize the celebration, 
there was a debate in the church on 
whether the workers’ outing should 
be sanctioned as a pilgrimage. Only 
a Jew hundred workers came. Last 
year there were about 20,000, and 
many were shocked to hear one of 


the priests criticize them for carry- 
ing Solidarity signs. 

Last week. Cardinal Jozef 
Glemp, the Roman Catholic pri- 
mate of Poland, dismissed the con- 
tentions of a Communist Party 
journalist that the church’s silence 
on the dections signified support 
On Sunday, no cleric mentioned 
the ballot box or a voting boycott 
Still, the prelates implied that the 
church leaders stood with those 
who have opposed the election. 

' The time was set when the pil- 
grims were greeted by the Reverend 
Rnfin Ahramek. the abbot of the 


Swiss Plan to Curb Auto Emissions 
Through Converters, Lead-Free Gas 


Acmm 

BERN — Switzerland said Mon- 
day it planned to set the toughest 
standards in Europe for vehicle 
emission controls. 

The s tandards, which would re- 
quire cars to be fitted with catalytic 
conveners and to use lead-free gas- 
oline, would take effect in October 
1987. 

Justice Minister Elisabeth Ropp 
said that the move would reduce 
carbon monoxide emissions by 91 
percent. 


Mrs. Kopp said there could be 
protests agfixnst the sew measures 
from European Community coun- 
tries, which, after long debate, de- 
rided to introduce less-strict con- 
trols more gradually, from 1989 to 
1994. 

She said that the Swiss govern- 
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tion of the highway speed hunt to 
100 kilometers per boor (63 mph). 
It was cut to 120 kph from 130 lqpb 
for environmental reasons in Janu- 
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Page 8 


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1985 


iteralh 


INTERACTIONAL 


Sribunt. 


Pubiwbed With The >w York Tfane* and The Wiwhmyum Poet 


A Defector in a Crowd 


Think back a few months to the convulsions 
in Washington when the Walker spy case 
broke. What went wrong? What are the dam- 
ages? How can a repetition be prevented? 
(And how is that review going, by the way?) 
The recollection allows a better appreciation 
— a deeper relishing — of what Soviet intelli- 
gence must be undergoing after the defection 
of the KGB chief in London. Having a few of 
your spies caught is one thing: breaks of the 
game. Having a spy. especially a resident, 
defect opens up a whole new range of costs. 
True, had Oleg Gordievsky stayed in place 
longer, the coup might have been more profit- 
able. Establishing whether he is genuine can 
take an eternity. But it is nice for the American 
public to feel that its side wins sometimes. 

The British are expelling 25 other Sennets — 
six diplomats, seven in trade missions, five 
journalists, and others, including the obliga- 
tory driver. Again, outsiders cannot know 
whether some of them might have been more 
usefully left in place. The total, however, is 
eye-catching: 25 is not as high as the 105 Soviet 
agents lost in a single British sweep of 1971 or 
the 47 tossed out in a French sweep of 1983, 
but it is a lot of spies. The scale of the Soviet 
espionage effort is immense. It is hard to 
believe any Western country matches it. 

Spying is essential and accepted: Every se- 


Choosing Between Killers 


Cases of AIDS are doubling each year. Be- 
fore any vaccine or treatment can be devel- 
oped, the disease may kill tens of thousands 
and their care will cost billions. Yet AI DS is so 
hard to contract that further transmission 
could in theory be halted immediately by pub- 
lic health measures. Why are the authorities 
not rushing to take them? 

AIDS is spread in two main ways, anal 
intercourse and the sharing of unclean needles 
by drug addicts. Homosexual groups have 
educated their members effectively in how to 
avoid AIDS, but the message has not reached 
drug abusers, who account for 30 percent of 
the 4,387 AIDS cases in New York since 1981. 

There is more society can do to inhibit 
sexual transmission. Society now winks at 
prostitution. But if prostitutes prove to be 
major transmitters, which is not yet dear, state 
health authorities should drive out of business 
those exposed to the virus. Homosexual bath 
houses should be forced to close if thevdo not 
observe stringent health precautions. 

Meanwhile, prevention of AIDS among 
drug abusers has scarcely begun. David 
Sencer. New York City's health commissioner, 
recently recommended to Mayor Edward I. 
Koch that drug abusers be encouraged to use 
clean needles. By “forcing" them to use old 
ones, he said, “we are condemning large num- 
bers of addicts to death from AIDS.” He 
suggests selling needles without prescription. 


and setting up sites at which used needles 
could be exchanged for sterile ones. 

The proposal provoked an immediate out- 
cry. The mayoral candidate Carol Bellamy 
ascribed the plan to Mr. Koch and called it 
“one of the most hare-brained ideas I've heard 
from city government," It creates a tormenting 
problem of choosing between two killers. 

Drug addiction is a scourge, but AIDS is a 
scourge that multiplies. Addicts are the princi- 
pal route by which the disease passes into the 
general population. The number of such vic- 
tims is small, but will soon reach significance if 
it keeps doubling each year. Clean needles 
would proieci not only addicts but also those 
to whom they can transmit AIDS: their 
spouses and children of addicts with AIDS. 

Law enforcement officials argue against the 
idea on practical grounds. They doubt that 
addicts care enough about their health to use 
clean needles. Making needles freely available 
might encourage addiction. How can cities 
ravaged by heroin condone its use? 

The medical case is entitled at least to pre- 
sumptive. initial support. The issue is more 
needles, not more heroin. New York's law 
against the open sale of needles is a pragmatic 
barrier, lowering it before an overriding health 
concern does not weaken the stand against 
drug abuse. AIDS is a wildfire plague and no 
reasonable means of halting it can be ignored. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


White House or Doghouse? 


Mrs. Reagan was starting up the steps to a 
helicopter on the White House lawn recently 
when the Reagans’ dog. straining at the leash 
she was holding, lunged ahead of her and 
nearly knocked her over. The dog. Lucky, was 
acquired by the Reagans last year arid has 
since been the impetus for several brief news 
stories containing phrases along the lines of 
"stumbled but recovered her footing” and "the 
president was able to untangle himself, howev- 
er." It has also provided TV footage suitable 
for closing the evening newscasts. 

This sort of thing happens at the White 
House. Presidents must have pets, and if you 
have pets you have to live with them. Given 
these circumstances, presidents as well as the 
rest of us would do well to become familiar 
with certain standard maneuvers practiced by 
household pets. The following list is based on 
observation and experience over some years. It 
is worth memorizing to avoid embarrassment 
even if you are not subject to heavy media 
coverage when you board your helicopter: 

• Dog acting alone. A) Dog being walked 
wraps leash around parking-meter post or 
man's legs. Man releases leash preparatory to 


unwinding it. Dog breaks free, attacks neigh- 
bor’s German shepherd Man pays all veteri- 
nary bills. B) Dog begins barking furiously at 3 
A.M. Man awakens, peers down staircase. Dog 
runs back, curls up on man's pillow. Man 
attempts to lift dog off. Dog yelps as if in pain. 
Family wakes. Man gives up and sleeps with- 
out pillow, gets crick in neck. 

• Cat acting alone. A) Cat conceals self in 
closet as dinner is being prepared. Family fears 
cat is trapped in a wall, begins frantic search of 
house. Search moves upstairs. Cat emerges 
from closet, eats whole salmon in kitchen. Bell 
rings. Dinner guests arrive. 

• Dogs and cals in combined maneuvers: A) 
Dog pushes water bowl to center of kitchen 
floor. Man enters with two bags of groceries, 
Cat crosses man’s path. Man stumbles over 
cat, steps in water bowl, spills groceries. Man 
goes to change milk-soaked pants. Dog eats 
chuck roast on floor. B) Dog barks at front 
door at night Man opens door. Man is dis- 
tracted by sound of retching from cat on 
couch. Dog bolts for freedom to seek female 
dog in neighboring state. Cat eats dog’s food. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


A Dangerous Shot in the Dark 

The opening ceremony of the “star wars" 
epoch took place over the Pacific on Friday, 
when a two-stage rocket launched by an F-15 
fighter destroyed a disused American satellite. 
ASAT is in theory a distinct program from 
"star wars." or at least a very primitive precur- 
sor of it. The technology needed to shoot down 
one satellite in known orbit is crude compared 


with that needed to destroy up to 10,000 war- 
beads immediately after launch or on their way 
to the target. Yet the ASAT test demonstrates 
again the American intention to proceed with 
SDI and thus to run the strategic risks which it 
will entaiL There cannot be much profit in the 
arms limitation talks now that the project has 
begun. The only consolation is that there was 
not much profit in them anyway. 

— The Guardian (London). 


FROM OUR SEPT. 17 PAGES, 75 AM) 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Egypt’s Nationalists Reproved 
LONDON — The Morning Post comments on 
the British occupation of Egypt: “The British 
Government will not be diverted from its duty 
to the Egyptian people by any Nationalist 
oratory. Egypt will be governed for the benefit 
of its inhabitants by British agents and such 
Egyptians as are able and willing to work 
harmoniously with them, and any seditious 
actions will be repressed and punished. Evacu- 
ation will not come until the Egyptians have 
proved their appreciation of the administra- 
tion that exists.” Meanwhile, the French gov- 
ernment has decided to forbid the meeting in 
Paris of the Egyptian National Congress. In 
the opinion of the Government, it was out of 
the question that such a- revolutionary body 
should be allowed to make incendiary speech- 
es in a country which it constantly attacks. 


1935: Order Begets Law in America 
PARIS — Homer S. Cummings, LLS. Attorney 
General and creator of the presen L-day G- 
man. stretched out in a chair at the American 
Embassy [on SepL 16] and told newspapermen 
that America's reputation for lawlessness was 
on the wane. Mr. Cummings said kidnapping 
had been almost stamped out and that public 
indignation and voluntary propaganda by the 
press and moving pictures had put a stop to the 
moral laxity that had permitted every street 
gamin to set up shop as a full-fledged gangster. 
“Realization that crime must be dealt with by 
a central agency.” be said, “has brought a 
higher state or efficiency in the Federal force 
and we have pul this efficiency at the disposal 
of local agencies. The result has been the 
disappearance of friction between Federal and 
state men and the rise of close cooperation." 


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£> 1985, International Herald Tribune. AO rights reserved. 


Tax Plan May Become 
Reagan’s Face- Saver 


uim*lZ3!P2f Z 


By David S. Broder 


curi tv-conscious country must do it. and even 
its embarrassments become bureaucratized. 
This is wby the British could explain that the 
mass expulsion is not expected to affect their 
relations with Moscow, though the heavy- 
handed Soviet response in expelling arbitrarily 
25 British citizens from Moscow surely calls 
into question Soviet professions of wanting 
good relations with London. 

The Soviets do not just do espionage; they 
overdo it. Just because they are more aggres- 
sive in intelligence-gathering is no reason to let 
them get away with it It is good to see the 
British lowering the overall ceiling (by 23, to 
21 1) of official Soviets in London; the subceil- 
ing for diplomats goes up (by 7 to 46). A rough 
role of reciprocity oughi lo apply. 

It is a tough nile to apply in the American- 
Soviet relationship. The Soviets bring their full 
staff to Washington; the Americans hire a 
good number of lower staff in Moscow, and 
the post-“siar dust” effort to change the pat- 
tern will be slow in producing results. While 
embassy levels can be kept relatively even, 
however, there is no balancing the Soviet pres- 
ence at the United Nations — 260 in official 
missions, 300 in the secretariat, not lo speak of 
the nationals or Soviel diem states. Effective 
counterintelligence may be the only answer. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


W ASHINGTON — There is a 
chance — even at this late date 
— for President Reagan to salvage 
something substantial from a session 
of Congress that has been more of a 
shambles than the triumph to which 
his second- term landslide might nor- 
mally have entitled him. 

The “something" is no cheap, sym- 
bolic victory but a major step toward 
the overhaul of the Federal tax code 
— the goal which Mr. Reagan put at 
the top of his January wish list. Since 
then, he has been forced to retreat on 
defense spending, to accept a budget 
that fell far short of dealing with the 
defidt problem and to see much of 
his social-issue agenda rejected. 

This month, he is scrambling to 
find compromises that will spare his 
policy on South Africa and on for- 
eign trade from being run over by a 
rebellious Republican Senate. 

The only thing that can rescue this 
year from going into the record books 
as the year the “Reagan Revolution” 
ran aground is a breakthrough on the 
big tax bill. And given the widespread 
belief that Mr. Reagan has failed to 
ignite the voters' passion for what he 
likes to call “America’s tax plan," a 
victory on this measure would seem 
like a real long shoL 
But it is a long shot that can come 
through. The chief reason for making 
that rash judgment is a bit of political 
perversity: This is one issue where the 
divided party control of Congress 
works to the president's advantage. 

Waiting Is 
Mind Game 
For Whites 

By Richard Cohen 

W YNDAL, South Africa — This 
town does not exist It was cre- 
ated for a book called “Wailing: The 
Whites of South Africa," but it is 
actually Franschhoek. a place in the 
mountainous wine country. 

It is as good a dateline as any 
because this column takes place in 
the heads of South Africans. That 
really, is where they are waiting. 

My host in this place just north of 
Cape Town is waiting. His vines 
climb the mountains. He has a won- 
derful house, swimming pool, tennis 
court and lots of help — blacks who 
graft the vines, turn the soil and bring 
afternoon tea. It will end someday, 
my host says, but he neither knows 
how the situation wdl be resolved nor 
when. “I'm wailing," he says. 

In the affluent Hyde Park suburb 
of Johannesburg, Helen Suzman, the 
foe of apartheid and longtime mem- 
ber of Parliament, also wails. She 
wonders not if apartheid will last, but 
what will replace iL Will a black ma- 
jority government be as intolerant as 
the white one it displaces or will it be 
a Western-style democracy — free 
press, the rule of law and a guarantee 
of minority rights? 

“I'm not at all sure that is the aim 
of the black movement,” she says. 

Jannie Momberg, the mentor of 
Zola Budd, says he is waiting, too. He 
is an Afrikaner who travels the world 
with his famous runner and with oth- 
er South African athletes. The pre- 
sent system is shot, he says. Some- 
thing, something short of one-man, 
one-vote, must replace iL 
Like many, if not most white South 
Africans, he casts his argument 
against one-man, one-vote in cultural 
rather than racial terms: Many of the 
blacks are Third World peoples; the 
whites are First World. The former 
cannot be allowed to out-vote the 
First World peoples. 

A Washington colleague asked me 
to find out from white South Africans 
what Lhey thought was going to hap- 
pen here. Nearly always the answer I 
received was that the present system 
could not endure and that something 
would have to take its place. Just 
don’t ask whaL 

A white Johannesburg cabdriver 
could uot envision one-man, one- 
vole, but knew things must change. 

Pieter Roux, 23, is a pole vain ter 
from Cape Town University and an 
Afrikaner. He has come back from 
track and field events in Europe 
where be was not allowed to compete. 
He dears the bar at 18 feet, but that 
hardly matters. As a South African he 
can only observe. 

Like many Afrikaners. Mr. Roux 
blames some of South Africa’s trou- 
bles on an unlikely conspiracy of 
communists and well-known capital- 
ists — the Rockefellers of America, 
the Oppenheimers of South Africa. 

Still even he says the country must 
change. He will wait for it 
Some are not waiting. A classified 
ad in a newspaper says that a lawyer 
will arrive here this week from Atlan- 
ta to help with immigration prob- 
lems. Young men with no desire lo 
enforce apartheid in the blade town- 
ships are leaving the country to avoid 
array service. Others are going be- 
cause the future is so uncertain. Rev- 
olution, continued violence, a black 
Marxist government; There is no sce- 
nario too unlikely to be disbelieved. 

High in the wine country, a farmer 
waits. So does the politician, the ath- 
lete and everyone t talked to. 

Some of them will go because they 
can. Some will stay because the} 1 have 
to. But some will remain because they 
think they can do some good. “I don i 
want to go, really.” Mrs. Suzman 
said. “There have been limes when I 
wanted to go. But if someone gets 
into trouble, detained or something, I 
can still see a [cabinet] minister.” 

Vincent Crapanzano. the author of 
"Waiting," lived in a town here and 
made up its name to protect the ano- 
nymity of the people he studied. It 
should have worked because, in an 
important sense, they are like people 
anywhere in South Africa. Here, ev- 
eryone is waiting. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


The best political operatives in the 
administration are convinced that 
they can get a serious, substantive tax 
bill through the House before Hal- 
loween. They believe this because 
Dan RostenkowskL a Democrat of 
Illino is and chairman of the House 
Ways and Means Committee has set 
that as his timetable, and Mr. Ros- 
tenkowski is in a position to deliver. 

Slowly and pauently, Mr. Rosten- 
kowski has managed to cultivate the 
notion among his colleagues that this 
is the opportunity for Ways and 
Means to demonstrate that the cynics 
are wrong. This is their chance to 
show that they are not so hog-tied by 
the campaign contributions they 
have received, not so subservient to 
the lobbyists, that they cannot legis- 
late in the national interest. 

Mr. Rostenkowski’s motives are 
complex but powerful, and he is 
ready to ride his committee hard in 
closed -door markup sessions and to 
make the compromises there that will 
prevent the bill from bring picked 
apart on the House floor. 

If the Democratic House passes a 
strong tax bill by a big bipartisan 
margin in October, as now seems pos- 
sible, the political heat will shift to 
the Republican Senate. 

No one in the administration is 

kidding himself about the Senate's 
wish to duck, defer or defeat the 
whole Reagan-inspired scheme. The 
Senate cares more about the deficit, 
trade, farm supports, foreign policy 



, ■ 



and a dozen other things than it does 
about tax reform. It has its own ideas 
on rewriting the tax code, which are 
far removed from Mr. Reagan's or 
Mr. Rostenkowski's and tend to fa- 
vor some form of consumption or 
business transfer tax. 

Left to its own devices, the Senate 
might well postpone tax reform right 
past the 1986 election or hold it hos- 
tage for Mr. Reagan's acceptance of a 
tax increase. But if Mr. Rostenkowsfci 
delivers on schedule, Mr. Reagan will 
have an opportunity to capture the 
momentum of his House victory and 


r GesnhdheUF 


tell the Republican Senate to deal 
with the tax issue in November as 
promptly as the House. 

Despite their claims that the calen- 
dar is running out on Senate action 
this year, it might be hard for Major- 
ity Leader Bob Dole, a Republican of 
Kansas, and Senate Finance Com- 
mittee chairman Bob Packwood, an 
Oregon Republican, to refuse such a 
request from a president about to 
leave [or a sunmai meeting with the 
Soviet leader. What the Senate puts 
m the bill may be less important to 
Mr. Reagan than its moving a mea- 


sure to passage before adjournment. 

The final tax terms will be written 
in the House-Senate conference com- 
mittee in any case. But if both cham- 
bers have passed tax-reform in 1985. 
there is little risk it will die in confer- 
ence in 1986. 

Instead, the odds would be good 
for Mr. Reagan receiving a delayed 
Christmas present soon after Con- 
gress returned in January — and be- 
fore it received his new budget and j, 
resumed its normal pattern of kicking p* 
the president around. 

The Washington Post. 


Teen-Age Killers: Draw the Line at 18 lor Execution 


C OLUMBIA. South Carolina — 
Texas executed a prisoner 
named Charies Rumbaugh last week. 
He was the 40th person to be put to 
death in the southern states since the 
death penalty began its resurgence 
there two years ago. 

By now. such executions are hardly 
news. But the one last Wednesday 
marked a legal watershed, because 
Mr. Rumbaugh. 28. died for a crime 
that he committed when he was 17, 
and it had been more than 20 years 
since an American had bran executed 
for a crime done while a minor. 

Mr. Rumbaugh could not have 
been sentenced to death if he had 
committed his crime in South Africa, 
Libya, Iraq, the Soviet Union or Chi- 
na. Those countries forbid the use of 
the penalty on anyone under 1 8 at the 
lime of his crime. So does the Inter- 
national Covenant on Civil and Polit- 
ical Rights, which President Carter 
signed m 1978 but which the Senate 
has yet to ratify. 

Biit Texas uses 17 as its age limit 
for the death penalty, and 26 other 
American slates impose even lower 
age limitations, or no age limits at all. 
More than 30 U.S. prisoners who 
were J7, 16, and even 15 when they 
committed murder await execution, 
and the number is increasing. 

Mr. Rumbaugh was not the youn- 
gest person to be put to death this 
century. That distinction belongs to a 
14-year-old black youth named 
George Junius Stinney Jr., executed 
on June 16, 1944. Stinney was elec- 
trocuted less than two months after 
bring convicted of murder in Claren- 
don County, South Carolina. Now 
that the United States has resumed 
executing people for crimes commit- 
ted while they were juveniles, we 
might consider what Stinney's pun- 
ishment has to teach us today. 

A sawnriU worker’s son, Stinney 
confessed to killing Betty June Bin- 
nicker and Mary Emma Thames, 
aged 11 and 8, with a railroad spike. 
Both died from blows to the head. 


By David I. Brack 


Stinney stood trial on April 24. 
1944. A special term of court had 
been summoned, and the judge ap- 
pointed a local lawyer ana fledgling 
politician. Charies Plowdeo, as Stin- 
00/5 defense counsel. Mr. Plowden 
was preparing to run for the state- 
house and an appointment to so con- 
troversial a case could not have been 
welcome. The case looked no easier 
after meeting his client: Stinney ad- 
mitted his guilt, and Mr. Plowden 
saw no defense. He also saw no need 
for a psychiatric evaluation. 

The Clarendon County courthouse 
was overrun with a crowd estimated 
by the local newspaper at 1.500, sev- 
eral times the capacity of the court- 
room. Despite the crowd (or possibly 


he added, Stinney’s family had no 
money to pay for an appeal Without 
an appeal only an order of clemency 
from Governor Olin D. Johnston 
could stop the execution. 

Mr. Johnston received hundreds of 
letters and telegrams about Stinney, 
most asking for clemency. Mean- 
while, Stinney waited in a small hold- 
ing cell just a few feet from the death 
chamber. On the evening of June 14, 
Mr. Johnston visited Stmney in his 
celL According to a newspaper re- 
port, Stinney “told the governor that 
at times his mind went blank." The 
next day, Mr. Johnston announced 
he would not grant clemency. 

Just before Stinney was brought 
into the death chamber, the sheriff 


Sometimes a crime tempts us to cross the line from 
justice to cruelty. When that happens, there wiUbe 
very sensible-sounding arguments infavorof cruelty . 


because of it), Mr. Plowden made no 
request to move the trial to another 
county, and a jury of 12 white men 
was selected before the midday re- 
cess. Testimony began at 2:30 P.1VL, 
and the death sentence was passed at 
just after 5 P.M. 

The main evidence against Stinney 
was his confession. The defense of- 
fered no evidence. To Roston Stakes, 
a white merchant who attended the 
trial “the boy looked like he was in a 
dazed condition. He seemed like he 
didn’t really realize the seriousness of 
the crime that he’d committed." 

The judge sentenced Stinney to be 
electrocuted. The execution would 
have been automatically stayed for at 
least a year if Mr. Plowden had fileda 
one-sentence notice of appeaL But 
Mr. Plowden never saw the boy from 
that moment on. “There was nothing 
to appeal on," Mr. Plowden recalled 
in an interview two years ago. And, 


talked to the boy. James Gamble, the 
sheriff’s 17-year-old son, was with his 
father. Now a stale police lieutenant, 
Mr. Gamble recalls that Stinney told 
the sheriff that he was sorcy ihal he’d 
committed the crime, and that he 
hoped that God and his parents 
would forgive him. 

Then Stmney was led to the death 
chamber. According to one reporter, 
the “guards had difficulty strapping 
the boy’s slight form into the wooden 
chair built for adults." 

Mr. Gamble, who watched the exe- 
cution, remembers that moment. “It 
had a lot of effect on me,” he says 
now. “For a long time I turned 
against electrocution, period Tm not 
that way today. I think the death 
penalty is proper in its place. But I 
don’t think that a 14-year-old should 
be electrocuted,” 

Betty June B innicker’s father and 
older brother Raymond were also at 


500 Years On, Richard Tricks His Fans 


L ONDON — Just over 500 years 
/ ago, the battle of Bosworth 
was fought and King Richard III 
was killed Five centuries later, 
there are Richard HI Societies in 
New York and London to keep his 
memory green. They would tike to 
think that Richard was not a crimi- 
nal and not guilty of murdering his 
nephews, the Princes in the Tower. 
But Ricardians are not historians, 
and do not know, or face, the facts. 

Meanwhile, no one can deny that 
Richard took the throne from his 
nephew, young Edward Y, and got 
his comeuppance at Bosworth from 
the Welshman, Henry Tudor. Rich- 
ard's crown was picked up on the 
battlefield and handed to the victor, 
who became Henry VTL 
What is the relevance of all this 
today? For one thing, Henry VII 
became the ancestor of the present 
royal family in Britain. The family 
is proud of its Scottish descent, and 
Queen Elizabeth n has named three 
of her children from Stuart names 
— Charles, Anne, Andrew. They 
overlook the fact that they owe 
their Smart descent to the canny, 
farseeing Welshman Henry Tudor. 
He maimed his daughter Margaret 
to the Scots’ King, James IV, with 
his eye on a union of the island. 
This eventually happened with 
their descendants. 

Meanwhile, no one has dared to 
revive the name Richard for an En- 
glish king. There has never been a 
Richard TV. Why not? 

Henry Tudor was hardly known 
in England until he won the country 
at one blow, in a brief battle of only 
two hours on Aug. 22, 1485. He was 
more Welsh ana French than En- 
glish, had hardly ever been in En- 
gland. but spent his first 14 years in 
Pembroke, a remote Welsh castle, 
and the next 14 in exile in France. 

Richard was wholly English, a 
far better and more experienced 
soldier than Henry. He had fought 
all over the country in the Wars of 
the Roses, and had been victorious 
against the Scots, for which he had 
received the thanks of Parliament 
At Bosworth; Richard had an 
army twice the size of Henry’s. 


■ By A.L. Rowse 

10,000 men to Henry’s mixed lot, 
mainly Frenchmen, of 5,000. How 
came it that Richard was over- 
thrown and his army yielded the 
victory in such a short time? 

The answer is that one-half of his 
army would not fight for him, but 
stood cm their arms on Ambien Hill 
taking no part in the battle. Richard 
had a far better tactical position up 
on that hill — Henry’s little army 
was down on the marshy plain. 

Only Richard’s troupe of cronies 
fought for him, and in a desperate 
charge Richard nearly got through 

During the Wars of the 
Roses, you MUed your 
opponents; you did not 
kiU women or children. 

to where Henry was standing, actu- 
ally killing Henry's standard-bear- 
er. Then, at the crisis. Lord Stan- 
ley’s contingent from Lancashire 
intervened and tipped the scales for 
Henry. Richard was overthrown — 
“A horse! My kingdom for a 
horse!” — and killed. 

. His naked body was carried in 
indignity from the field, cm the 
back of an animal receiving inju- 
ries in crossing a narrow bridge on 
the way to Leicester. The body of 
an anointed King would never have 
.been treated like that — if he had 
not been what he was. 

What had happened to him? 

He was the acknowledged leader 
of the Yorkist partv, properly 
willed by his dead mother, Edward 
IV, to become Protector for his 
young son, Edward V. Edward IV 
died m April 1483. The young heir 
was to have been crowned in June, 
but at immense speed, taking every- 
body by surprise and leaving them 
breathless, Richard usurped bis 
nephew's throne and instead had 
himself crowned in July. 

Perhaps Richard’s action mi ght 


have passed muster. It was a tune of 
crisis There was danger of war with 
France. Richard was an able sol- 
dier, and nobody wanted another 
youth like the feeble Henry VL 
Henry VI had been done to death in 
the Tower, on the night when, we 
now know, Richard was there. 

The Lancastrian royal house was 
virtually exterminated by the 
bloody Yorkists before the Yorkists 
turned mi each other. Edward IV 
had his brother Clarence done to 
death in the Tower. That left only 
Richard and his nephews. 

These nephews were never seen 
alive again after August 1483 — 
two years before Henry Tudor 
came to ■ Bosworth. One-half of 
Richard’s Yorkist party went over 
Henry Tudor, the unknown hope of 
Lancastrians and people abroad. 

The Duke of Buckingham. Rich- 
ard’s right-hand man m the coup 
d’&aL turned against him. That au- 
tumn of 1483 there were uprisings 
in every county in the south of En- 
gland on behalf of the Princes in the 
Tower. People did not know what 
had happened to them, for all had 
been done secretly. 

The next year, Richard’s only 
son, for whose succession to the 
throne be had committed his crime, 
died; not long after, his wife died. 
The rumor went that Richard in- 
tended to many his niece, his neph- 
ews’ sister. Why? Her brothers were 
■dead; she was now the heiress. 

The clue to all this is that, in the 
Wars of the Roses, you killed your 
opponents, but you did not' kill 
women or children. Richard had 
done that unforgivable thing, and 
turned the country's stomach 
against him: That was why he lost 
everything at Bosworth. 

'Henry Tudor, the Lancastrian 
candidate, came as a deliverer, and 
married Elizabeth of York, to unite 
York and Lancaster once more. 
Their descendants have occupied 
the throne ever since. 

The writer Is Emeritus Fellow of 
AB Souls College. Oxford. England 
He contributed this comment to The 
New York Times. 


the prison that morning to watch the 
execution. Both are dead now. Ver- 
mdle Tucker. Betty June's older sis- 
ter, recalls that her father had looked 
forward to seeing Stinney die. But 
when her father and brother re- 
turned, neither of them was eager to 
talk about what he had seen. 

“I think it really worried him." 
Vermelle recalled 40 years later. “I 
think he thought that he’d feel real 
relieved about it after, about watch- 
ing the tittle boy gel killed, but I don't 
think he felt that way." 

No one quite as young as Stinney^ 
had been executed before in this cen- 
tury, but executions of prisoners who 
were 16 and 17 at the time of their 
crimes continued until the mid- 
1960s. and now, with Charles Rum- 
baugh’s execution in Texas last week, 
they have resumed. Stinney slipped 
between the cracks or a legal system 
that, as the clemency pleas showed, 
almost never executes children. 

In one respect an execution like 
Stinney’s is certain never to recur: 
The teen-agers on death row today 
won't be executed until they’re grown 
to adulthood while appealing their 
sentences. Some of titan may bear 
little resanhlahce then to the teen- 
agers who committed their crimes. 

But what matters isn’t how respon- 
sible someone is when we execute 
him, but how responsible he was 
when he did what we're executing 
him for. It wouldn’t have made Stin- 
ney's sentence any fairer to have 
looted him in a cell until the boy who 
committed murder had grown into a 
man of 21 or 24, and then killed him. 

It might seem at first that what > 
happened to Stinney reflects only the 
judicial mores of the Old South. But 
the people who tried and -executed 
Stinney were not monstera. They 
were ordinary people reacting to a 
horrible crime. The feelings that mo- 
tivated them are familiar today as 
Americans seek ever more drastic re- 
sponses to violent crime. What was 
unusual about Stinney's case wasn’t 
the anger of the community but that 
the load community’s anger encoun- 
tered no restraint. 

That is why democracies have Laws 
that impose absolute limits on what 
government can and can’t do to Dan- 
ish individuals. In calm times, these 
laws don’t appear to be needed: The 
limits on punishment axe embedded 
in our society’s basic sense of decen- 
cy. But sometimes a particular crime 
tempts us to cross the line from jus- 
tice to cruelty. And when that hap- 
pens, there will usually be some per- 
fectly sensible-sounding argument! ; 
in favor of cruelty. 


use the death penalty against youth- 
ful prisoners argue that the law 
should not be rigid, and that some 
juvenile murderers are more mature, 

. and more dangerous, than others. No 

matter that the law says that all juve- 
niles are too immature to. vote or to 
sign for a loan. 

Society has the right to imprison 
juvenile offenders, for life if need be. 
But there is only one way to ensure 
that we will never again re-enact the 
demoral iz i ng spectacle of the execu- 
tion of Stinney. And that is to draw 
an age limit for the death penalty that 
admits no exceptions. Most or the 
world’s countries that still use capital 
punishment have drawn that line at 
18 . So should the United States. 

. The writer is a Columbia. South 
Carolina, attorney who specializes in 
death penalty cases. He contributed) 
this comment to The Washington Post. 

LETTER 

The Threat From Hiller 

In response to the letter “ What Sovi- 
et Threatr (SepL 3): 

At the lime to which Lionel Bloch 
refers, the threat was from Hitler's 
Germany. Britain, France and Russia 
. committed to the defense of 
Czechoslovakia but, hi the event, 
only Russia was willing to honor its 
commitment. In the 18 months lead-’ 
mg up to Hiller’s invasion of Poland. 

? nt “h governS; 

together with that of the United * 
States, three times rejected Soviet* 

fhTrvS for J0m -- a F tion ^ halt 

IAN SHARPE. 
Graz, Austria. 


-It : 




! ' 4 

1 i • 


i ,■ 1 ■ f 

* • ’ ” i ■' 
, 


I k p •; 










Palme Calls Re-election 
Welfare State 'Victory;’ 
His Party Loses Seats 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1985 




age 9 


7** Associated Prea 

VR^;E Wed ^, s Communists, Prime 


i^day that the 

victory for the weUhrestate! 

™*grVe chosen it themsdves." 
.. 1 gVe "Ott the victory for the 

tvah results m from all mrior 
wjng areas, the Sodal Democrats 

W171 for the Conservatives and 
flwr affiea, the Liberal and Center 
Dartres. 


_ Em major party lost seats in 
the election except the Liberals, 
who more than doubled their repre- 
sentation in the parliament, the 
Riksdag, from 21 to 51 seats. 

The Conservatives, formerly the 
laigest nonsodalist party, lost 10 


Fliers, in Poll, 
Value Service 
Over Safety 

fUaaerx 

LONDON — People who fly 
regularly are more concerned 
about punctuality and traveling 
comfort than an airline's safety, 
record, according to a survey 
published Monday. 

Hie survey, published by Ex- 
ecutive Travel Magazine, 
showed that despite record air 
fatalities this year, only 9 per- 
cent of the 5,500 travelers ques- 
tioned made safety their priori- 
ty when choosing an airline. 

Six of those questioned had 
been hgacfced and 53 bad been 
on planes when an engine failed 
or the l-Tndmg gMr locked. 
Three had been involved in 
crash landing s, 23 bad wit- 
nessed bomb scares, two bad 
been in aircraft strafed by Iraqi 
warplanes and H had been in 
airliners struck by lightning. 

But almost 90 p erce n t of the 
travelers questioned listed 
punctuality; in-flight service or 
comfort as their top priorities. 

All were regular travelers 
who averaged 40 flights a year, 
the London-based magazine 
said. 


seus, w inning 76, and the Center 
Party was down 12 seats, to 44. 

Mr. Palme's Sodal Democrats 
lost seven seals. At 159 seats, they 
are more dependent on legislative 
support from the Communists. 


Before the elections Sunday, the 
Sodal Democrats had been abk to 
carry out programs by themselves 
as long as the Commnjusts did not 
vote against them, which they never 
did on nugor issues. In & new 
parliament, they may need Com- 
munist votes to push legislation 
past the nonsodahsts. 

The Communist leader, Lara 
Werner, said .during the campaign 
that bis party would notask-for 
ministerial posts in Mr. Palme's 
government if the election pro- 
duced a result such as the one it 
did. 

This is an enormous success for 
die workers’ movement,” Mr. Wer- 
ner said Sunday, adding that his 
party would meet with the Social 
Democrats "and discuss how to 
handle the new ma jority in a sensi- 
ble way." 

Mr. Werner said his party was 
not content with Social Democratic 
efforts to cut Sweden’s 3-percent 
unemployment rate or its efforts to 
redistribute wealth. 

The party had campaigned for 
.removal of a 23-percent value-add- 
ed tax on food and groceries, more 
tax on huge personal fortunes and 
profits from stock trading, lower 
housing costs and a ax-hour work 
day. 

One Social Democratic idea that 
appeared fikeljr to be curbed by the 
Communists’ new influence was a 
proposal to stimulate (he economy 
by easing some taxes on the invest- 
ment community. 

The current Riksdag will be dis- 
solved Sept 30. when the new one 
takes office. 


Bulgaria Raises Prices 
Of Goods, Power, Wafer 

The Associated Prea 

VIENNA — Bulgaria an- 
nounced on Monday steep whole- 
sale and retail price increases, in- 
cluding 58 percent on electricity for 
industrial use. The price of drink- 
ing water for nonprivate users was 
rased by more than 360 percent. 

The news agency BTA said that 
the measures were adopted by the 
government “to compensate for 
losses inflicted upon the national 
economy by the natural calamities 
of 1984 and 1 1985” a reference to 
the drought that has afflicted the 
country. 


CHof Palme reads to the news of his re-election. 

Rosh Hoshcuia Bombings 
Hurt 12 in Copenhagen 


The Associated Pros 

COPENHAGEN — Bombs set 
off at a kosher food store and a 
travel agency specializing in tours 
to Israel injured 12 persons, offi- 
cials said Monday. 

Police initially reported up to 22 
people injured in the two bombings 
in central Copenhagen late Sunday, 
but hospital officials later reduced 
that figure and added that none of 
the injured to have been appeared 
hurt seriously. The injured were 
treated for cuts and shock, medical 
officials said, and none required 
hospital admission. 

No group immediately claimed 
responsibility fra the bombings. 

Police increased security precau- 
tions at Copenhagen’s central syna- 
gogue, which was damaged by a 
bomb July 21 A Jewish old peo- 
ple’s home and a U.S. airline office 
were also bombed that day. Three 
persons were killed more than 20 
were injured. 

Islamic Jihad, a Shiite Moslem 
group based in Beirut, claimed re- 
sponsibility far the July 22 bomb- 
ings. saying they were in retaliation 
for “Zionist and American aggres- 
sion.” 


Rabbi Bent Melchior, chief rabbi 
of Copenhagen, said he had no 
doubt that the bombings at the 
food shop and the travel agency 
woe connected with the celebra- 
tions of Rosh Hashana, the Jewish 
new year, that began Sunday. 

“It is the first time since World 
War U that our holiday has been 
disturbed,” Rabbi Melchior said. 

The damage was most severe at 
the rood store, where the explosion 
left a deep bole in the pavement 
and damaged parked cars. 

Military demolition experts were 
sent to the Israeli Embassy and the 
Israeli ambassador’s residence to 
remove parcels found near the two 
building, police said, but it had 
not been determined if the pack- 
ages contained explosives. 


Ghana's Leader Visits China 

The Associated Prat 

BEUING — Flight Lieutenant 
Jerry J. Rawlings, the leader of 
fihanii, aimed here Monday on his 
first visit to China, the Foreign 
Ministry said. 



£jf HE FIRST INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF FASHION 
INVITES YOU TO THE WORLD'S BIGGEST 
FASHION SHOW. 

SUNDAY 22nd SEPTEMBER FROM 3 p.m. TO 4 p.m. 
AVENUE FOCH, PARIS 16 e 
500 MANNEQUINS PRESENT THE FASHION 
FOR FALL-WINTER 85-86 

The festival invites Hie general public to .• 
the film cycle « Mode et Cinema », 

— at the Cinematheque Francaise 

an exhibition of photographs 
« Vivre en Maillot de Bain » 
at the Deligny swimming-pool on Hie Seine. 

And by special trade invitation 

« La Nuit des Hommages de la Mode. » 

The international fashion symposium. 

Reception at the Hdtel de Ville, Paris. 

FEDERATION FRANCAISE DU PRET A PORTER FEMININ 





• . ;•••• ;-r-.« :: :: a? v* -s &&er&u xtoi «?.-»• 


sa* * 









Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE* TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER IT, 198S 


Elegant Nona Hendryx on the Path 
From Soul to P unk to Techno-Pop 


ARTS / LEISURE — - 

Paris Reaching Out for Fashion 


** •• 

-i* e' 


By Michael Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 

P i ARIS — Nona Hendryx, an 
elegant woman, took one mote 
chocolate from the box. “My only 
vices are sugar and shopping," she 
said with a smile. “The sugar was 
there from the beginning but the 
shopping was cultivated — the 
more money I made, the more I 
shopped." 

Her name became known from 
the 1962 hit “I Sold My Hean to 
the Junkman" with Paid Labelle 
and the Bluebell es, a classic Atlan- 
tic Records soul group. (Another 
member of the group. Cindy Bird- 
song, left soon after to join the 
Supremes.) The road Hendryx has 
traveled is long and unusual — 

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from what she described as “sweet 
songs sung by elegantly dressed 
pretty girls," through rock, disco, 
punk, post-punk, funk, jazz and 
New York techno-pop. 

Last week, she sang her song “I 
Sweat” for a gala during the Deau- 
ville film festival It is on the sound 
track of “Perfect," which was 
shown at the festival and which 
opens in Paris this week. She was 
promoting the film and her latest 
album, “Heat" In her fancy hotel 
suite near the Champs-Eysfies, 
books by Henry Miller and Ralph 
Waldo Emerson were on a side ta- 
ble. 

Once she wanted to be a history 
teacher. She never thought about 
music until she was in college. The 
first performer she ever saw was 
Elvis Presley. At the time she was 
"vary interested in integration. I 
wanted to belong to white society." 
Anger followed, and she says she 
learned to control it by re aliz i n g 
that “society does not accept or 
rgect because of race. Basically it 
de p ends on yourself, and Finding 
your place in the world.” 

Opening in the 1960s for The 
Who, then for the Rolling Stones, 
the Bluebell es sang songs like 
“Over the Rainbow” and "Danny 
Boy." Hearing the volume and fury 
of “My Generation" and “I Can i 
Get No Satisfaction” every night 
convinced them to change their 
name to Labelle and work in a 
hipper, funkier style, using material 
written by Hendryx. In these days 
blacks did not generally play what 
was considered white music, but 
Hendryx says: “When you are try- 
ing to create something really new, 
you don't listen to other people's 
opinions.” 

By generation and instinct, she is 
attracted more to rock than rhythm 
and bluesy and she has played a role 
in the gradual melding of these 
styles. “Now you hear Elton John 
on black radio, and R&B times are 
Top 10 hits on white radio. And 
that's healthy. But of course the 
whole idea of black and white radio 
is absurd to begin with. To say 
nothing of the charts — ‘Rock,’ 
‘Black.’ ‘Pop,’ ‘Adult Contempo- 
rary’ — those categories are insane. 
They keep coming .up with new 
categories. There's something 


called ‘BOR’ or ‘BAR’ now. What’s 
that? I have no idea, and 1 really 
don’t care. I just make my music 
and whoever bears it bears it." 

She formed the group “Zero 
CooT in New York in 1977. They 
recorded a hard-rock record in the 
middle of the disco craze. No more 
glitter fora while. Her brief associ- 
ation with tire jjjroup Defimkt, 
which was beginning to combine 
jazz and funk, pushed her farther 
underground. She had never im- 
provised seriously, she was not sure 
that she wanted to, she “under- 
stood nothing about jazz." But she 
learned that “it's not important to 
understand it, just to play and en- 
joy it." 

The New Yorkers she was begin- 
ning to work with were putting to- 
gether a new sort of popular music 
that was not black or white, jazz or 
rock, classical or popular. They 
lived in lofts and were compared to 
the Andy Warhol “Factory" of the 
1960s. Their music combined a 
neo-disco mechanical beat with vi- 
sual and verbal intellectual con- 
cepts, filtered through the latest 
electronic and studio techniques. 

By the mid-1980s these people, 
like Hendryx, had come into the 
mains tream of a scene that was 
creative, influential and profitable. 
They include Tina Weymouth and 
David Byrne of Talking Heads, 
Laurie Anderson. Kim Clarke of 
DefunkL the producers Nfle Rod- 
gers and Bill LasweQ (who pro- 
duced Hendryx’s first two solo al- 
bums, as well as Mick Jaggeris). 

Hendryx’s songs are deceptively 
direct. The ambiguity sneaks up on 
you: lines like “Space is only in our 
□rinds" and “I tried to wake up/ 
Before I realized/ I wasn't dream- 
ing" 

She said the producers of “Per- 
fect” used “I Sweat" as a working 
track while shooting the film. 
“They had a couple of people write 

Show of Nevelson’a Latest 

The Associated Press 

ROCKLAND, Maine — The 
newest works of Louise Nevelson 
will be shown Friday through Sun- 
day when the sculptor returns to 
the town she grew up in to celebrate 
ha 86th birthday. 





me nue Focfa. A giant podium will be Laurent and Rosette Mette of Tor- 

E ii built, 500 mannaqinns will march rente. n t 

n. up and down and thousands of . The day before, the n yscam of 


international Herald Tribme nue Foch. A giant jwdium will be Laurent and Rosette Mette of Tor ^ g^y day. 

P i ARIS is eying hard to prove it built, 500 mannflqmns will march tom. of purpos e of the V^ has beeaJjo 

is die woricTs capital of fashion. . up and down and thousands of The idjy provide a source of w^cra».,.. 

Sourred, no doubt, 1 by the promo- people are expected to attend. the Lyon Cnanujerct rttrosuec- meat for every sort of student 

tromdspim of other fashion cen- TLdMfiinctkm,sdre*d^for *21 the last 40 years, tire mris^Ias.- 

as Milan and New York, the Dehgny swimming pod Sept nve. whu± presto be fdt a very special rcaa^Joi 

Sric professional organizations 23. will be an exhilntwn of. bathing-, event for fashion^pros^TheS^mM .. students. ThemusttBri. 


Paris professional organizations 23, will be an exhibition of . bathing- . 
are d oming up projects to regain suit photographs, shot between 


thejr position. 


1900 and 1985. They will include 


The city has many fashion weeks offerings from JacquesrHenri Lar- 
couture, ready-to-wear and tigue, shot in DeuwiHe. 


Ski The Chambre Syndreale’s fash- 

rirtnorv ion Oscars will be held after the 
HEBE liORSEii ready-to-wear collections. A cora- 

ndttee of fashion cognoscenti, in- 

menswear reflections, all twice a dudmgHahne Rochas, PalomaFi- 
year. as well as interim fashion casso and the writer Edmondc 
fairs. Two new events planned this Chari es-Roux, are to nommate die 
month and next are meant to be candidates. About 350 fashion 
more prestigious than commercial, journalists will vote after having 
The rival events will be held by seat the reflections. There will be 
the two major French professional five different Oscars, 
organizations, the Federation Other fashion happenings _jn- 
Francaise du Prtt-a-Porter Ffi- chide the “Train de la Mode" ore; 
minin. headed by Daniel Hechter, mred by the French weekly Elle, 
and its chief competitor, the Cham- with five cars holding a cross scc- 


.ZKKSS fashion students. The muretm. 

Xflih trill also have a Versace retrospect 

his outfits wOI be on display, 3tos- in Rome, the Fendi asters are ,, 
taring the excdlenoe of biscut and planning a Wadt-tse eretrijfl£ihfc. 
Iriscoior sense. The show will nm launching of thp. new, perflSM,-.- 


th rough Jan. 6. 


The social scene is livening up, 
with Dior perfumes giving what _ ^ . r _ 
promises to V the bigptbafl of Two 

[he season Tuesday at the CMteau wmtennssed 
de Vaux-le-Vfcomte to launch a Galeom mwl C 
scenet called “Poison.” It is expect- spL who recent! 
ed to draw 700 guests; the women meats. . 
haw to wear green and amethyst, Galretu^ 


Fcwfi, on OcL 5, just befdwJhe: 
opening of the reatty-to^ttrsefc- 
son,whicfa start inihl2iiffiO(3.fi. 

':v ; : ■:'% 


Two major fashion personalities : 
will be missed this season: Sergio 
Galeotti and Count Rodolfo Cm-. 
spi who recently died of heart aife - 
nuents. ' 

Galeotti, 41, was Giorgto Arfv 





bre Syndicale des Cteateurs de tion of Elle-type clothes, cosmetics, The next day, the Marquis cTAu- 
Mode, presided ova by Rene fabrics and accessories, as well as a ^ president of the Kper-Heid- 
Berge, partner of Yves Saint Las- retrospective of French fashion, rhnmpagne concern, will ede- 
rent The train is going to li French fcrate the company’s bicentennial 

The federation has 980 firms as towns, through SepL 25. at the Chateau de Versailles with a 

members, accounting for 87 pa- Things are also brewing in Lyon, black-tie dinner and fireworks, 
cent of the industry's total sales. Its a silk capital that’s been trying to Also at Versailles, on OcL 7, Prmce 
members employ 70,000 workers, * Patron it largely tost to Edouard de lobkowicz, represeo- 

of which 83 percent are women, the more ague Italians from Como. ,„*«• nf the Sovereign Order of 
The more restricted Chambre Syn- CtaSepL 27anasodatk>nc 

. . # .■ Mlb momnnnle nrill i uifanl 


^gSSSESES. 

m \h£ next day, the Martpiis d*Au- “V.th«u &&’J2Si2g. 


towns, through SreL 25. at the Chatean de Versailles with a 

Things are also brewing in Lyon, black-tie dinner and fireworks, 
a silk capital that’s been trying to Also at Versailles, on OcL 7, Prince 
regain a petition it lamely tost to Edouard de Lobkowicz, represen- 
the more agile Italians from Como. ta ^ w of the Sovereign Order erf 
On SepL 27 an association of Lyon Malta in Lebanon, will throw a 


Nona Hendryx w ‘ ^ lth ^ app^i ^ Mayor Jac- metading fori Li- ^nga Charia Aznavour wfll enter- 

other songs bn. they didn’t wort. **■ a 

roth^d^ up i^mine in the Fes gS^f^Si S»l 2M1 Gtaid Nm Fhi- 


dicale rep: 
of French 


resents the creative side ®Ik merchants will present a series benefit for six clinics and a. 


fashion. 


of outfits created for them by top nm by the order in Lebanon. 


film. The theme of the movie is . d OcL 23, with the official “H* venK . nerre '- armn ’ 58 

about how important it ha s b e come ^ Culture MMaler Jack : 

in America to have a pofect pby-. SH* Chambre is holding what 

ta^lTiSSt’sataS" jo“ y a S t S 01 fash " Russians Return 

8311116(1 600158 
As Fair Qoses 

doing it. You don’t have time to Reuten 

Unnk about Utings like love or fam- IVfO^OW - TbeMoacow 

y ‘ decline the honor. Foreign design- r/j ternational Book .Fair em 

Running and getting somewhere ^ ^ ^ Calvin Klein, from New Monday with authorities hand 

They tell me do it tike this York, and the Missonis, from Mi- they, bad banned a 

Do it like that — if you want the ^ decided to accept. So did Di- Muscovites begging to lake av 


lippe Venet, Pierre rawtin, Saint 


^es organizing. dte houaeYeotn- 
brate bicentennial nKra^mfrastnictore.^Iw^ 

at&e ChaSEvereaffles with a who died Atig.;M^I«wjg«M-. 
black-tie dinna and fireworks, moves that projected the house way 
Ato at VeSes, on OcL 7, Prince ahead of ^ 

Edouard de Lobkowicz, represen- was the 
tative of the Sovereign Onter of P 01 ^ st ^ 

Malta in Lebanon, will throw a erately piacrf 
benefit for six clinics and a hospital yoonga and broader sptOiilui erf. 
run by the order in Lebanon. The customers. • - ; . . . 

singer Charles Aznavour wfll enter- CrespL as he was known, 

tain. died SepL 6 in New Yorii, where he : 

□ movedafewyearaagaCrespi.who 

was in Ms early 60s,' .was a'Tashkm. 

On the foreign front, the Italians publicist and much more! With Ms 
are wwlrfug waves. At the Victdiia wife, Consudo, who vras cditOT of. 
& Albert Museum in London, Oct American Vogue in Rome in, die . 


2-3, Gianni Versace will stage a 


cess. 

"My song is about how people 
try to control life to make it perfecL 
They sweat to do iL Bui you can 
become like a machine — doing it 
doing it. You don't have time to 
fhinlr about thing s like love or fam- 
ily." 

Running and getting somewhere 

They tell me do it tike this 

Do ' it like that — if you want the 

money 

And I sweat 


study day with students from lead- 
ing art schools. It win be Versace’s 


1950s and ’6&, he cut a patriaan 
figure in society and fashion Or- 
des. Tte'Crespis weieTirtia ther 
start of the Ilahan ready-to-wear ; 


first presentation of his work in indushy, which they hdped estab- 


Reuurs 

OSCOW — The Moscow In- 
ternational Book Fair ended 


Britain. 


DOONESBURY 


Muscovites begging to lake away 


ana Vreeland. (AJroT Emilio Pucci any volumes left over as publishers 

is coming from Florence to receive ***£*“ “P- . . A . 

B - — The biennial event attracted 


hsb at a high levcL 


ITHOUGHTWOSHW?: 
seem.mffiSELFum . 
ITS SUCH /W HONOR-ID 
BOAsrsnrr 
DOTHESHOW. 


“My point is ‘perfect’ can be an one of four “Mfidailles de la Vflle * “ e Dien f „ ev ““ 
imperfection. Pm not sure the pro- de Paris" to be bestowed by Chirac Publishers from more than 100 
duEos understood what I was U- on Ocl 23.) They v«re iteeto do 

tog. but Tm happy they like the On SepL 22 a mammoth outdoor T slat£ ^ WI i fid ^ 

sShgT ^ fashiondiow will be held on Ave- bshing houses, but for tiiousands of 

^ atizens who packed the pavilions 

during the weeklong fair it was a 
rare chance to see and read foreign 


fashion 



AT0UCH OF GENIUS. 









1 





citizens who packed the pavilions 
during the weeklong fair it was a 
rare chance to see and read foreign 
books outside slate bookshops. 

The publishers were not allowed. 


men cheated all bags at the exit to 
remove any stolen books. 

Penguin Books Ltd. said state 
censors returned 15 titles at the end 
of the fair but had notified the 
company only of three seized. No 
reasons are given for the seizures, 
which mostly concern books by 
Emigre authors or those deemed 
anti-Soviet or pornographic. 

Banned books included works by 
Vladimir Nabokov; Frederick For- 
syth's “The Fourth Protocol,” a 
novel about a Soviet plot to subvert 
Britain; James Fenton’s reminis- 
cences on ‘The Fall of Saigon,” 
which contained an advertisement 
fora book about Alexander Solzhe- 
nitsyn; and John Updike's “The 
Witches of Eastwick,^ whose jacket 
promises “wicked sensuality. 


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’ikirrnumAMii. 


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HcralbSSifcfcribunc, 


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1985 

^WIIIES AWPQPTIOH5 

few Issues 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 



U.S. Stocks * 
Report, Page 12. f 


Page 11 ; 



ByHj.MAJDENBERG 
-w-Aunrtvi **•* «*7tom Sermx 

I invncir^ bcncflaaries of the continuing 

I i£^°h ® nush finandal community by U.s! 

I—/ »«« Iwtart booming fimmdkl future 

inteodncrtSS?* 25 ”» son a *«t fte U.S banks have 

Sgaa-^sfssittss^s 

“APonfc^oof hOTtemongagesL Bankers 

£ SJbj -* “ sccuritization " -“•n? 


- -.- * “ UIUIC 

. British banks are following 
tne example set by their 
- American opposites and are 
jnpvmg from simply being 


Banks moving into 
_ m ^ vv ^ securities packaging 
■'SSWSJgPS are exposed to rapid 

' dSFSrtt S3& ?£ interest-rate changes. 

international accounting " 

house of Arthur Andersen & Co. “In doing so, our banks will 

«the fuS^S^” me 0n murca - ra1 ' *»&* '“*&» 

thfLSHiiS!* bo *Sf id 5, of the Atlantic move further into 
the seam ties markets, Mr. Kingsley asserted, they will have to 
become market makers in the debt issues that they and their 
competitors create in ever-increasing volume. 

“As market makers, the banks will become increasingly «- 
“te minute-by-minute fluctuations zn interest rates,” be 
. said. “Our banks arc well aware of the adverse impact interest 
rates have had on unhedged portfolios of packaged mortgages 
that many American savings and loan institutions have tried to 
market under various securitization operations.” 

S IMILARLY, Mr. Kingsley-noted, unexpected fluctuations 
in interest rates have caused many swaps of mrtrawvj 
mortgages between lenders in the United States to become 
. unraveled, causing a number of these institutions to go under this 

“Our ba nk s also know that they tend to move much more 
slowly than their major competitors in the debt market, the 
investment banking houses and other arbitragers who work off 
differences in currency and interest rates,” Arthur Andersen’s 
market expert went on. “So if they want to compete as market 
makers in the packaged debt they are creating, they will have to 
depend, as roost now do, on the equally swift futures mar kets for 
protection against adverse market moves.” 

Banks will continue to move into the finan cial securities 
business as both issuers and market makers because they want to 
shave costs by eliminating the underwriting middlemen. Mr. 
Kingsley said- 

“Bul this win be easier said than done,” he added, “because the 
underwriters, especially those in America, have ibe advantages of 
long experience in the use of futures as arbitrage tools, the 
willingness to ride their own capital and the ability to rapidly 
distribute securities. So, for the time being, the financial futures 
market should benefit freon the growing competition between the 
banks and the underwriting fraternity. 

Another innovative move by the British financial community 
last week was the Introduction on Tuesday of a “no-lose” com- 
modity fund by ED&F Man Ltd, a 202-year-old commodity 
trading bouse. •* * 

: As David M. Anderson, managing director of ED&F Man and 
vice chairman of the London Commodity Exchange, explained: 
“Our concept is simple: Investors in our new commodity funds 
will be guaranteed their original money bade in five years if, 

(Contmned on Page 17, CoL 8 ) 

j Currency Rates 

Sept. 16 


U.S. Posts 
Deficit 
In Trade 

Nation a Debtor 
After 71 Years 

By Martin Crucsinger 

The Assoeioud Press 

WASHINGTON — The broad- 
est measure of foreign trade regis- 
tered a near-record S31. 8-billion 
deficit from April through June, 
confirming that the United Stales 
now has become a net debtor for 
the Grsi time in 71 years, the gov- 
ernment reported Monday. 

The Commerce Department said 
the deficit in the current account 
was 4.9 percent higher than the 
$30.3-btihon imbalance registered 
in the first three months of the year. 

The current account measures 
not only trade in merchandise but 
also in services, mainly investment 
earnings. 

Since the United States began 

The dollar ended slightly lower 
in European trading. Page 17. 

the year with only a $2S2-billion 
surplus in investments, the S62.1 
billion in deficits for the first six 
months of the year has undoubted- 
ly wiped out (flat surplus. 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
fialdrige said in June that it ap- 
peared the United States had be- 
come a net debtor, bur economists 
could not pinpoint when the nation 
crossed over. 

Monday's report provided fur- 
ther confirmation that the country 
now is a net debtor for the first time 
since 1914. That means the United 
States now owes other nations 
more chan they owe die United 
States. 

The current-account deficit is 
likely to top $120 billion this year, 
making the United Stales the 
world’s leading debtor nation. 

In other reports issued Monday, 
the government said that business 
inventories were virtually fiat in 
July and that the operating rale of 
U.S. factories, mines and utilities 
rose slightly in August. 

Monday's report showed that the 
S31.8-biIlion current account defi- 
cit for the second quarter came 

(Continued do Page 17, CoL 5) 



Racial unrest led U.S. 
bankers to warn Finance 
Minister Barend du 
Plessis, left, about South 
Africa's debt; Gerhard 
de Kock, head of the Re- 
serve Buik, later learned 
of Chase Manhattan’s 
lending cutoff. 


Anatomy of Pretoria’s Finance Crisis 


Unrest Opened 
Bankers’ Eyes to 
Gravity of Debt 

By Roben A. Bennett 

New York runes Struct 

NEW YORK — The usually 
unflappable senior vice president 
of a major New York bank sat in 
his suburban home a few weeks 
ago watching television excerpts 
from a Jong-awaited speech by 
South Africa’s president, Pieter 
W. Botha. Like many other peo- 
ple, the banker had expected Mr. 
Botha to be conciliatory and in- 
dicate that his government 
would change its racial policies. 

But the banker was stunned — 
more by what be saw as Mr. 
Botha's pugnacious tone than by 
the words themselves. The bank- 
er turned to his wife and said, 
“There’s financial trouble 
ahead ” 

There was. As weeks went on. 


more and more banks, fearful 
that racial tension would under- 
mine the South African econo- 
my, refused to lend new money 
or renew maturing loans to any 
South AfricaxjDorrower. It 
caused a plunge in the value of 
the rand. South Africa’s curren- 
cy, and eventually forced the 
Pretoria government on SepL 1 
to take the drastic step of forbid- 
ding South African companies to 
repay billions of dollars of prin- 
cipal on their foreign debt for the 
rest of the year. 

Interviews with bankers 
around the world show that the 
problems had been developing 
for some time but that there were 
some critical occurrences, in- 
cluding these: 

• A surge in borrowing from 
abroad by South Africa's private 
sector that began about throe 
years ago. 

• Worldwide coverage of 
growing dvO unrest over the 
country's racial policies. 

• A shifting by major interna- 


tional banks of their South Afri- 
can loans to smaller banks, be- 
ginning last fall. 

• The widely publicized deci- 
sion by Chase Manhattan Bank 
in late July to stop all lending to 
South Afnca. 

• President Botha’s speech, 
made Aug. 15, that dampened 
hopes of a voluntary easing of 
the nation's racial polides- 

What makes the crisis so un- 
usual is that South Africa's econ- 
omy was robust, the govern- 
ment’s coffers were full and the 
country’s trade position was 
strong. Never in recent history, 
in fact, has a country so econom- 
ically sound defaulted and risked 
a cutoff of credit for years to 
come from the very banks that 
are its financial link to the rest of 
the world. 

ft was only a year or so ago. as 
racial disturbances were increas- 
ing and coming to world atten- 
tion, that most international 

( C o ntinu e d on Page 17, CoL 5) 


Britain Issues 
$2.5 Billion in 
Floating Notes 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The British gov- 
ernment said Monday that it was 
building up its foreign-currency re- 
serves by issuing a record S15 bil- 
lion of floating-rate notes. 

The issue is the largest floating- 
rate issue ever by any borrower and 
was welcomed by traders, who 
died Britain’s excellent credit 
standing. Economists here said the 
proceeds would prove helpful if die 
government again feds the need to 
buy pounds to help stabilize the 
currency, as it did early this year. 

S.G. Warburg & Co. and Credit 
Suisse Hist Boston Ltd, the two 
lead managers, announced early 
Monday that the offer would total 
$2 billion, but they raised the figure 
to S2.5 billion when demand 
proved strong. “It’s perfect,” Hans- 
Joerg Rudloff. deputy chairman of 
CSFB, said of the market response. 

Previously, the largest issue of 
floaters was one totaling $ 1.8 bil- 
lion made by the European Com- 
munity last July. 

The British issue, which has a 
seven-year maturity, will pay inter- 
est equal to the London interbank 
bid rate, currently about 8.25 per- 
cent. In preliminary trading Mon- 
day, the notes were quoted at about 
99.65, a slim discount to the issue 
price of 100 . 

At the discount price: the notes 
yield about 0.07 percentage pram 
below the EC notes. 

Floaters appeal mainly to banks 
and other financial institutions. 
Such institutions have had plenty 
of opportunity in recent years to 
buy notes issued by the EC and 
such nations as Sweden. Belgium, 
France and Italy. But Britain has 
never issued a floater, and its last 
international bond issue of any 
kind was in 1978. 

“Obviously, Britain is one of the 
best names one could find” to tap 
the market, said Stephen Gasper, 
an executive director at Rank of 
America International Ltd. in Lon- 
don. 

In absolute terms, Britain does 
not need the money, analysts said. 
The country's foreign reserves easi- 
ly exceed its foreign debt of about 
SI 1.9 billion. 


Britain Reports 
1 . 1 %-Dectinein 
Industry Output 

Reuters 

LONDON — Britain’s in- 
dustrial output fell by an esti- 
mated i.l percent in July — its 
biggest monthly fall for nearly a 
year — but officials said the 
figures published Monday did 
not suggest the start of an eco- 
nomic slowdown - 

The Central Statistical Office 
also reported that manufactur- 
ing output fell by LI percent in 
July. 

Officials described the July 
drop as erratic and said the un- 
derlying trend remained up- 
ward. Government sources said 
.the decline could have been due 
to inadequate seasonal adjust- 
ment tor people on vacation in 
July. 

The Statistical Office revised 
its figures for June, saying that 
industrial output fell by 0.4 per- 
cent, not 0.6 percent, while 
manufacturing output rose by 
1.6 percent, not 1.2 percent 

Output in the three months 
to July was 0.5 percent higher 
than in the previous three 
months and 5 percent higher 
than in the like 1984 period 

A Treasury spokesman said the 
borrowing was designed to bring 
reserves of convertible foreign cur- 
rency up to an “appropriate levei." 
She said such reserves nad fallen to 
$7.5 billion from S9.6 billion at the 
end of 1982, partly reflecting funds 
spent to support the pound. Total 
reserves, which also include such 
items as gold and Special Drawing 
Rights, currently amount to $14.3 
bihjon. 

Bri law’s timing in offering tbe 
notes might have been influenced 
by fears that oil prices would soon 
begin tumbling, suggested Stephen 
Lewis, chief monetary economist at 
the London slockbrokerage of 
Phillips* Drew. 


Bankers Express Doubt 
On New Loans to Mexico 


_ 

< 

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OM. 

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ILL- 

OMr. 

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Amsterdam 

3277 

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HZ355* 

3604* 

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154*9* 

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Zurich 

2301 

3.1943 

02565* 

275B* 

0.13*1 * 

732*5* 

44563* 

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1 ECU 

Brio 

0575 

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149156 

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(at Com m erci a l franc tb) Amounts needed tv buy one pound (CJ Amounts needed fa our ana 
ooUarC) units of mint UnltsonoOD(y) unitso/7a0D0/*.O.:notavatad; HA.: noftrvonotiie 
(ri rotor one twmdrSUSAM 5 

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Carrmcv Per US* Comncr oar USS Camoar var USS Cumae* par iUi 

MMWlml a* FUnBOrtta &.13S M 0 Mv.rfa&. 25145 S.Kor. 

15J28 <***fc*t!c. UMS MU.PMO m00 Mn.1 

Antr.wML »US Haw tow 5 raws No«r. krone 851 Sw 

BeW.fin.fr. fOM IxuOaatuoaa 122159 FMLpMO 1W T P— -- t— - 

BmzUcmz. 7J1MD lwta.nw» 8 B UMO. ***«*"*» 

CtawSonS UM Irtokt MXl Scotfrtiwl 3552 ToneWiHro 5500 

DdShkrooe 10SS lereefieiwk. 150125 Sfcw.5 US4 UAEdMwm 2572S 

Emtmntf U31 • Kuwaiti (floor U0A7 S.Afr.nmd 2J9S1 vanea.ua*. 1 O 0 

• Sterling: 1247 Irish S 

Saurcas: Borne du Benehj* (BrusseM: Banco CoumeaMe ttoHono iMtmii OmmiaM 
Bonk Wo*/ York): ffa rf fr a tXstionaie do Parts tPartsj: Boot ot Tokyo [Tokyo }; IMP [SDR): 
BAH fatoar,rfyal turnout), other data from Reuters otOAP. 


Interest Rates 


SepL 16 


Buro c urr w eyPep*^^ 

Donor D-Mark. Pruac 
1 month TtyS*. 4W-4W 

* months 4 ^^ im-il<* VWr-WW IM* » 

irw-tiw MHM 0 * 

4«>r4‘w. 4*r-47b 


Sterling 

lUh-llft 

lllb-U4h 


ECU SDK 
SVtOtt Wfe 

OfirOlk 7* 


Fronc h 
Prune 
M-ne 

— M 

1 month* BtMUi 
t months KMH 

nit, ip, Poo/uL PPJ,’ Doyds Bonk (BCD): Reuters 
multan mWmum ror 


atfa-OK 7*i . 

n *.» w. life-nit. sowom. av. 


BepMpacgr Rates $ 9 * «® 


UoftoU States 

DteMraHtate 


Prime Rote 
Broker Loon Ode 
com Payer te-r7t Oars 

}m»an Treasury *Bk 

Unowhi Treason BWs 
CD’s »5f don 
co* 4*0 dan 


Lautart UM 
Onmlf MBM 
OooMflOtti Interbank 
Xnanth Interhenk 


Fto*c« 

-letnmalion Rate 
CefiMenev 

O— emi Hr totertenk 


nonet* toUrt at t 

Britain - 
Bmk Base Rate 
CaA Money 
OMey Treesurr fiflt 
femfttotarfnDt 


e/ou p»»*' 
7» TB 
ave 7WU 
9W YB 

a«-* to* 9 
7JO 7.95 
7.1S 7.W 

725 725 

7 MS 755 
720 7M 


520 S20 

IS kS 
420 *» 

420 420 

425 4W 


*H ** 
9 Hr 9» 
9 vj etna 

m 9* 
o*/m *** 


in* nw 
12 «* 
life iiw 
119/U O 3714 


******** C J 

■Cottuamt _ „?/« 

MyMNraufi . 

SBUtw; Mivm'aw vnen***. 

Lnmts, bo* <* 


AjuUa (MlarDepwlifi 

SepL lb 

l monte in, -Bn* 

I months 8 W-BW 

3 months 8 W- 0 fe 

( month* Bh-W 

lnar Bhh-BW, 

Source: Rattlers. 


UJi. Jrtwwy Market Ftotds 

SepL 16 

Merr«l Lynch Hood* aw** 

30 day ffftroW y 7 - 13 

Telerote int«re*t flow lade*: 7.919 
Source: Merrill Lynch* T titrate. 



Sepc 16 

PM. cn vo 

JIM* 

_ -190 

31820 —M* 

31925 - ’20. 

J1920 — 3» 

3W40 

MdV TOT* 

ports and Lauton o«cW Hx- 

•mreuneto 

source: Rautr rs - 


U*. 

Hone Ko«e 

s«®-s 

SSS. 3.085 

MeWVOril 


u-kets Closed Malaysia ^ Japal 

jajidal markets m 

nAnn/iav for holidays- 


By Robert J. McCartney 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — US. bank- 
ers say that they are unlikely to 
meet Mexico’s demands for new 
loans next year to help solve the 
country’s debt problems. A denial 
of loans would be a serious setback 
for long-term efforts to restore 
Mexico’s financial stability. 

The banks’ skepticism about 
Mexico could cast a doud over ef- 
forts to deal with other Larin 
American debtors as well, because 
Mexico’s handling of its debt has 
served as the model for the rest of 
region since the debt crisis emerged 
as a major concern in 1982. 

"Mexico was the country that 
started the whole process of solving 
the debt problem?’ said one senior 
U.S. bank official involved in nego- 
tiations with Mexico. “It was Mexi- 
co’s success that led to rite euphoria 
and all this ally nonsense about the 
debt crisis being over. Now Mexico 
is going to be the leader again, but 
in the opposite direction. The 
whole game plan is blown out of 
the water” 

Tbe Mexican government an- 
nounced last month that it would 
need S 2 billion to $3 bfllion in new 
foreign loans in 1986. But tbe 
banks are wary of lending more 
money to a country that already 
has postponed repaying anything 
but interest on its S96-bflIion debt, 
tbe bankers and U.S. officials said. 

Tbe banks are expected to grant 
new loans only if Mexico is making 
significant progress toward cutting 
its budget deficit and loosening re- 
strictions on trade and foreign in- 
vestment, tbe sources said. 

The basks also are likely to re- 
quire that Mexico reach a new 
standby loan agreement with the 
International Monetary Fund be- 
fore lending money of (bar own, 
according to the sources. 

Such IMF accords are viewed as 
“seals of approval” because they 
fix specific rapiircmenis for indi- 
vidual countries in solving their 
economic problems. Mexico’s cur- 
rent IMF loan second expires eariy 
next year, but the country has fall- 
en short of its targets for curbing 
inflation and trimming its deficit. 

“It win be a difficult negotia- 
tion,” said one U.S. official who 
monitors the Mexican economy. 
“It may wdl lunge on whether 
there is an IMF standby agree- 
ment." 

After the debt crises emerged. 
Mexico was the first big debtor to 
accept a harsh austerity program. 
Creditor banks then agreed to ac- 
cept only interest payments on it 
loans. 

The program called for Mexico 
to resume borrowing from interna- 
tional banks by eariy 1986. In the- 
ory. the banks would extend new 
loans voluntarily because of im- 
provements in the country’s eco- 
nomic performance. 


Instead, the banks are concerned 
that Mexico has not made suffi- 
cient structural changes in its econ- 
omy to enable repayment of new 
loans when they come due in the 
1990s, bankers and U5. officials 
said. 

The banks also are worried 
about Latin America's debts in 
general, because of rising pressures 
in the region to ease the burden of 
interest payments and thus permit 
more rapid economic growth. 

The official position of the inter- 
national bank committee that deals 
with Mexico is that the country wiQ 
obtain the loans. That was the view 
expressed last month by William R. 
Rhodes, a Citibank vice president 
who is co-chairman of the commit- 
lee and has played a prominent role 
in restructuring Latin America's 
debts. 

But other bankers, who asked to 
remain anonymous, said that Mr. 
Rhodes’ statements were “wishful 
t h i n k in g.” One senior bank execu- 
tive said that the Mexicans “made 
the quick fixes in their economy, 
but they didn’t have the follow- 
up." 

Mexico’s position on next year’s 
loan negotiations is that tbe coun- 
try is doing its best to solve its 
domestic economic problems and 
that it is the victim of factors out- 
side its control — such as falling 
world oil prices and slow growth in 
the industrialized world. 

Without the new loans. Mexico 
would have to accept even more 
severe austerity measures or risk 
running out of money to keep up 
interest payments. 

Some of the needed money could 
come from the IMF, the World 
Bank or other international lending 
organizations. But the commercial 
banks will have to contribute at 
least SI billion and probably more 
to satisfy the Mexicans, according 
to U.S. banking sources. 

The concern of both the banks 
and the UR government is that the 
administration of President Miguel 
de la Madrid will back off from its 
program because of domestic pres- 
sure. 


ARGENTINE 

REPUBLIC 

EXTERNAL U3. $ BONDS 

5*0 

BONOS NOMINATIVOS 

THE WESTON 

GROUP 

Enquiries to: 
CH-1003 LAUSANNE 

2 Rue de la Paix. 

Telexs 25869- 
TeU 021/20 17 4-1. 


A BAT INDUSTRIES REPORT 

Extracts from the interim results for the six months to 30th June 1985 


Dividend up 17% 
despite currency changes 


Group Results 

is Juno 
1985 

Half year 
to June 
1984 

Pre-tax profit 

£449 m £594m 

Attributable to BAT Industries 

£249m £339m 

Dividend per share 

4.75p 

4.05p 

£1=51.403 at 23.8.85 ($1,159 at 31.12.84i 


underwriting tosses on motor and 
property insurance i'n the UK and a 
lower investment performance 
worldwide. Allied Dunbar achieved 
further record levels of new business 
and in five months contributed £22 
million lo Group profit. 


Group results have bean adversely 
affected on translation into storting by 
some £116 mUfion before ta* in the first 
haff of 1985 as a resuff of the 
exceptionally strung impact of currency 
fluctuations. Many c* the currencies in 
which we do business weakened 
against the pound, including the US 
and Canadian dollars as welt as the 
Deutschemark. 

Had exchange rales remained 
unaltered, we would now be reporting 
profit tower by 5 per cent at pre-tax 
and 6 per cent at attributable level 
These results are still disappointing. 
Above all they reflect the unexpected 
setbacks which we in common with our 
competitors have suffered in two 
important areas of business- US 
retailing, where a hopsd-tor recover/ m 
the market failed lo materialise, and 
UK insurance where claims experience 
has been very adverse. 

As a resuit of tnese developments 
(tie Groups pre-tax profit was down 24 
per cent, at £449 million for the half- 
year, while attributable earnings were 
27 per cent lower at £249 million. 

It should be borne in mind that 
the interim results also reflect sub- 
stsntial changes tn the composition ot 
the Group. Cosmetics and toed 
retailing are out. while Allied Dunbar 
has Joined the Group and Horten is 
consolidated for the first ' 

Interest charts are therefore 
substantially higher 

tJIftAn encouraging 
feature of the half 
year was a further 2.3 
per cent increase m 


iirsi time. Financial Se 

•teretore growth r 

_ busi 

ISHHfek. rr 


our worldwide Tobacco volume, which 
again matched our confidence in the 
future of our major business activity 
and led to an increase in operating 
profit before currency fluctuations. For 
the first time lor some years Brown & 
Williamson increased its market share, 
with gains in economy-priced brands, 
but its profits were affected by higher 
advertising costs. In Brazil a substantial 
improvement in cigarette volume and 
leaf exports brought a 7 per cent profit 
increase in dollar terms. Exports from 
the UK grew strongly in volume and 
profits, but margins in Germany came 
under severe pressure. 

Paper had an excellent half year, 
with Wiggins Teape showing a 35 per 
cent increase in sterling profit. 
Appleton achieved record sales but 
profits were affected by the costs of 
expansion at West Carrollton. 

Retailing, Argos and Marshall 
Reid achieved very pleasing increases 
in both tumewer and profit. Our other 
US retail companies also generally 
gained in sales but suffered a significant 
decline in profit, in common with other 
major US retailers. Horten made heat* 
way againstibe overall trend in Germany 

•^•Overall profit was down In 
Financial Services. Eagle Staris strong 
* vth in general insurance 
business continued, but its 
profit contribution was 
down from £70 million 
to £19 million, the 
deterioration coming 
mainly from substantial 


i had an 

excellent halt year, with very good 
results in Canada, Australia and 
Denmark. 

•^•Overall cash flow from operations 
was very positive, and this together with 
the disposals (including the recent sale 
ot our packaging interests) is expected, 
on present trends, lo tying the Group's 
' i debt/equity ratio down close to 
i per cent by me year end. 

-PROSPECTS 


Exchange rates, particularly the US 
dollar, will continue to be tne principal 
factor in determining the results of the 
Group for the year. 

This apart I expect our tobacco 
ana paper businesses to continue lo 
show improved results. However the 
outlook tor retailing in the US remains 
uncertain and Eagle Star's results tor 
the full year will be depressed mainly 
by the adverse 11K conditions, in spite 
of increased levels of business. Allied 
Dunbar will continue to progress. The 
net interest charge will be substantially 
up for the year 

I expect that the full year's results 
will show a similar position to those at 
the half year with a small decline 
overall m pre-tax profits at constant 
exchange rales 

In view of the underlying 
profitability of most businesses and 
the continued financial strength of the 
Group, the Board has declared an 
increase of 17.3 per cent in the interim 
dividend to 4.75 pence per share net 
of tax. As was staled at the Annual 
General Meeting, the Board still 
expects to be able to recommend a 
total dividend increase for 1985 which 
will be substantially in excess of the 
rate of inflation. 


PATRICK SHEEHY Chairman 


B AT INDUSTRIES 


Copies ot it» hill interim report are available from BAT Industries IN.YJ, 445 Park Avenue. New YbrV.. NY 10022 




JPage 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Vnt. HM Low Lost ora. 


Dow Jones Averages 


20312 S3 
28263 2m 
W726 lift 
12714 159k 
9707 20 
9344 41 
3741 45 
BUI IIU 
n» m 

7981 27* 
7549 341k 
7311 31 
7122 444k 
6853 128* 
6636 22* 


S1U. +2* 
59* 

31* + to 
154k + to 
1944 

4244+46 

43 -a 
10* -ft 
1346 — V 

SE +5 



NYSE Index 



NYSE Diaries 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Handi 

Utilities 

Industrial* 


Advanced 
Pod Med . 

until wn—d 
Total issue* 
New HMu 
New unn 


TOO <74 

747 WSJ 

339 

1974 2009 

14 13 

» 36 


Previous Today 
High Low Cloee I PM 

» b h n ii 

“£ £5 -SS S ™ 


nrfrt-Lnt Trading In N.Y 


BUT Sales *511 Tt 
Sept, 13 1S9J01 439 J3B 1.140 

gifts tKS Sjg E§ 

■Included In the sales Rgures 


Mowfe ^ 

MSE 


AMEX Olorles 


NASDAQ index. 


Closing 


Advanced 
De clined . 
Undmoed 
Total issue* 
New HIom 
N ew Lowe 


dose Pm. 

165 1B4 

313 349 

340 355 

7TB 788 

4 4 

19 32 


Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Utinile* 

B anks 
Trot op. 


Week rear 
aose Noen 
287-21 ftH 
292-73 291 AS 
369.44 — 
34043 — 

2SHS “ 

30021 — 
26L07 — 


Volet 3 P. M- •- HJJS 

PtW.3PM.WL 5221 

Prav consolidated dose 13W0M® 


Tables include Hie ^S^SSlSS 
w to the dosing onWall Streetojf 
do not reflect late fro** elsewhere- 

Via The Associated Press 


standard & Poor's Index 


Prr»tow _ Today 
High Lew due 3 PM 
industrials wwto 203,03 204jOS 303717 

TraraS. 168.91 ItfM lOJH 146B 

Uinitle* 8077 79-8? BO-* JJfi 

Finance ZUJB JOBl 20.93 2053 

O^mttte 184.19 18305 18251 WM 


1 . 

AMEX Sales 

1 1 

3PMvohfflW __ 
Prw.3PJ6.wWJ“ 

Prev. cunt voiwn* 

irmogj 

73\csm 
10949 JOO 




uo u i3 
.sun 
* . 10 e so 

pfA3J» 11B 
<Krf 47 107 
pf 9J» 1U 
pf llJM 107 . 

104 IS 10 
.14 J B 757 
J| U li 167 
M IB 11 130* 
U0 L6 27 344 

1J0 3* T2 
U00 X7 m 
22 

1.541 u 

pf 2J6 108 

lAO 64 
of 119 1U 
C1US 112 
270 94 * 
mb 2.9 14 
i MM! I 
pf 6-74 10J 
witonn if 
oil A 


£5 a 


Prices Mixed in light Trading 


United Press huermaional 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
S lock Exchange woe mixed late Monday w 
light trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was up 
0.79 to 1308.47 about an hour before the close. 
Declines Led advances 7 to 6 among the 1,891 
issues traded before 3 P.M- . . 

Five-hour volume amounted to aoonl 
millio n shares, compared with 95.15 million in 
the same period Friday. 

Although prices in tables on these pages are fnm 
the 4 P.M. close in New York, for time raisons, 
fills article is based on the market ta_3_P^M. . 


amid In 
volume 




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“Everybody’s licking their wounds after last 
week," said Ralph Acampora, of Kidder Pf»- 
body, when the Dow Jones index fell 2S.U1 
points in four consecutive losing sessions. “TVe 
did a lot of damage in the last couple of trading 
days," he added. 


Some analysts attributed the Dow's slight 
bounce upward to Saudi Arabia's announce- 
ment that it would increase its oil production 
and lower its prices, which could signify lower 

market's gains were limited. “There's 
still a lot of confusion out there. You'll see it 
fairly sloppy the rest of the month,'’ said Thom- 
as Epperson, of Wood, Mackenzie, New Or- 
leans. 

“The broad market remains under pressure, 
and that still seems to be the dominant trend," 
said Alfred Gol dman, of A.G. Edwards & Sons, 
Sl Louis, with selling going on in almost all of 
the important stocks. 

Action was restricted to speculative and spe- 
cial situation stocks. 

Mr. Goldman said he expected the Dow to 
catch up with the broader market indexes, 
which have already broken down, within the 
□ext several sessions. And further declines 
could spark some institutional dumping, he 
said. 

Active issues included Polaroid Corp., Rich- 
ardson -Vicks and Johnson & Johnson. 


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Y 50CIETE CENTRALE > 

f de banque 

$ U.S. 20-000.00 ok 

floating rate notes 

DUE 1987 

We inform the bondholders that in 
accordance with the terms and 
conditions of the notes, SOCit ^t . 
CENTRALE DE BANQUE, PARIS 
has elected to redeem of 
outstanding notes on October 9, 1985 
at 100% 

Interest on the said notes will cease 
to accrue on October 9, 1985. 

The notes' will be reimbursed, 
coupons nr 13 due April 1986 and 
followings attached according id the 
terms and conditions of the notes. 

, the principal • 

PAYING AGENT 

SOCIETE GENERALE 
ALSACIENNE DE BANQUE 
15, Avenue Emile Reuter 

Djxembourg 








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27 
37 * 
19* 
1* 
■ 7 * 
17 * 
17 * 
S* 
33 * 
10 
48* 
100 
45* 
6 

7 * 
32 * 
IS* 
42 
M 

a* 

15* 

12 

61 * 

35* as* 


a + * 
as* + * 

7* . 

12* + * 

17* 

42* + * 
42* + * 
33* + * 
MU— * 
13* + * 
24* 

a*— u 

65* + * 

74 —1 
34 * + * 
15 * — * 
33*— * 
15* + * 

a 

34* - 
22* 

24 — * 
27* + * 

45 + * 

29* * 

4* + M 
23* . 

i 19* + * 
i 23* + * 
i 39* +« 

I 29 + * 

I 26*—.* 

I 34*— * 

1 49*— * 

I 13* 

7* + * 

I 49* ■ 

M -.11 
I 12* 

i 16* — * 

i 70* + * 

i 26*— * 
22 *— * 

14 
1 19 

! z 43*— U 
k 31*— * 
b 36*— * 
k 46 — * 
k as* + * 

3 Tf* + U 
k 11* 
k 44*— * 
h 16*— * 
k 12*— * 

6 28* + * 
a w* 

h 3* 

u 

31* + * 

* 2S* — * 
Ifc 12* + * 
a 40*— i 

27* + * 
h 38* + * 

BUS-* 

* 87* + * 
lb 18*— M 
A 17* 

U 5* 

* a + * 

M 

* 48*— * 
100 - 2 * 

* 46* + * 

4 

M 7* 

* 12* + * 

*2 It 

* 35* 

• 12 + * 
* 61* + * 
i* 3S* + * 


i'-fZISS 

r*r sot 

JXTCS3B 


1 



Roval Oak 
rWpetucl Calendar 









as 2 

046 
1.42 
1J9 
a99 


14MUCA51K 
THj QS34Z7351 


( - a - 
1RW- 4192063 
JND 5 .S& 




Mproiiacahitawt 

BUSmESS/FINANCE 


gas industry tfirougn 

XSSJW 

asssassst 

The quarwW 'fS' 83 


/ The Trib’s business secdon is now \ 
/ tasser afid better thanevor. 1 

\ Every dayus {»dced with the business newsl 
y y^ DeedTSmucfa, much more. / 

Monday/Eurobonds. 

Tuesday/Futures and Options. 

Wednesday/Intemalional Manager 

'ITtiuisday/WalL Street Watch. 


Satujday/Econormc 
And the latest financial figures 
















































Page 14 


international 


T 


Tables Include me nationwide prices 
u» to tM dosing on Wall Street 
and do not retted late trades elsewnare. 


»V*> SOU ' 
27» a 
30 21* ■ 

Mft m 

31% 22* 

<m 2m 

Bft » 
10b 12ft 
26*- IM 
15* 9* 
C* 31* 
14ft 9* 
41 30 

17V 13ft 


4.16 U 
3+Be)JL3 
ISO 93 
30 J 4 
1JH M f 
M 13 1« 
30 13 12 
JO 32 
.100 A 23 
1.10 73 
300 73 0 
M 33 16 
JO 2.1 10 
JO 23 10 


a 51ft 
79x 26ft 

UX27V. 
122 25V. 
79 3Mb 
261 44* 

a a* 
19 w% 

2W 30b 
52 14ft 
B2 38% 
5 14V* 

a a* 

a u» 


51ft 51 W 

36ft as* 

27% 27V. — ft 
3M 34ft- ft 
» 29ft +1 
44ft 44ft- ft 
6ft 6ft— » 
12ft 13 
Z4H 21ft— ft 
14 M -ft 
37ft 37*— ft 
14ft 14ft + ft 
a 38ft 
13ft 13* + ft 


23% 

24ft 

22 * 

23 - 

331* 

33ft- 

34* 

34% 

34 

24 

30ft 

30* 

38* 

38* 

20 ft 

22 * 


21 ft 

21 % - 

56* 

57ft 

23ft 

23ft 

a 

9 

5 

5ft- 

W% 

10 ft- 

18ft 

18% 

20 

30 

33 

33 - 

52ft 

52%. 

49 

49 

94* 

34*- 

15ft 

15* 

39* 

99*- 

12 

12 

** 

«*- 

2 * 

2 *- 

71* 

22 

2 * 

2 %' 

36* 

36ft- 

11 * 

12 - 

33ft 

34 

37 

37 - 

*ft 

«%- 

lift 

11 *- 

tM 

13ft- 

37* 

30 - 

36ft 

37 

27 

27ft 

38* 

39*. 

48ft 

4M- 

7ft 

7ft- 

18ft 

TSft- 

44* 

44ft. 

30ft 

30ft . 

47* 

47ft- 

40* 

40ft 

36 

2 * - 

22 % 

22 * 

10 * 

18% - 

lift 

11 % 

11 * 

12 ft 


USiRitures 


Sown Season 
Low 


Open High Lm Oese Os. 


Grains 


WHEAT (COT) . . 

SJM bo nUnhtium- dotloriperbtahel 

176^ 164ft SOP 230ft JfL. 

16 jft ZTWx Oec 2.90 2 +JJ* 

174 ft 187 Mar 237 1X1* 

Tea 284 May 290 U* 

172ft 2« . JVl 2«ft 2M 

3.45 2+7 Sop 2BSft MS* 

E*f. Sale* Prev. Sato tfi& 


276ft 200* +JZ* 
lm 193ft +32* 
296* 101ft +X2ft 
236* 101 +JE* 
2X1 183ft +22* 

ttfft 225 +31ft 


Prev. Dcy Open Int. 34351 ef!447- 

fmo 5u rfKmum- deltas pot butaei 
171ft 220ft Sop 232 231* 


121ft 220ft 

1 PS 21<ft 

110 234ft 

121ft 231 

2J4 233 

2JAft 234ft 

2 3 220ft 

Esl. Soto _ 


Sob 232 231ft 

Dec aMft 233 

Mot 236* 233ft 
NOT 234 239ft- 

Jul 237* 243ft 
Sop 231ft 234 
Dee 22B 231 

Prev. Soles 26J72 


232 230ft +X7* 

216 2a +XS* 
12C* 232ft +JB 
134 239* 4JB 

237ft 242ft +JJ4* 
HI 233* +X3ft 
23B 231 +J2ft 


55ft 3Sft Xerox 3X0 SX 14 964 ST* 50ft 51 + ft 

55ft 46ft Xerox pi 5+5 lai 200 +4 54 54 + ft 

» 1Mb XTRA M 19 11 IQS 22ft 32ft 22ft + ft 


Company Results 

Revenue ond profit* or lasses, m millions, an m local 
currencies unless oltientlsc htdtcateO. 


JknatnuMM 
Dunlop Olympic 

Year 1985 1984 

Revenue— _ 1250. 1+D0. 

Proms 80.14 6155 

Britain 

Dalgetv 

year 198S 1984 

pretax Net_ 67+ 672 

Per Share _ 0557 0503 

Tarmac 

1st Half 1985 1984 

Revenue 7729 5874 

Pretax Nel— 41 A 362 

Per Share— mat 0X84 


Vailed Stales 

Eogle-PIctier lad. 

SrdOoar. 198S 1984 

Revenue 1502 1M+ 

Net Inc. t.49 7JB 

Per snare (US 078 

9 Months 1985' 1984 

Revenue 4803 4992 

Net Inc. 1BJ7 2044 

Per Share — 191 211 

Worthington Ind. 

ISi Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 1746 1493 

Net Inc. B38 jU2 

Per Share — 045 0+7 


1 41* 

22* VF Com 1.12 

27 

11 

229 

41ft 

41 

41ft 

14ft 

5% Valera 




262 

U?ft 

10 

18ft + ft , 

25* 

14 Voter at 

3+4 W J 


28 

23ft 

ZTft 

23* 

4ft 

2* Vaievln 




10 

2ft 

2ft 

2* + ft 

28* 

19 Vanom 

1X0 

4+ 

7 

J 

22* 

22% 

22% 

4* 

2* Varco 




156 

4* 

4* 

4* + * 

1 12 

6* Varco pf 




10 

12 

12 

12 

43 U. 

26ft Vartan 

36 

X 

10 

107 

29* 

29ft 

29ft— ft 

73ft 

9* Vara 

+e 

2+ 31 

38 

11* 

11* 

11*— ft 

25ft 

16ft Veeco 

+0 

2J 

14 

95 

17* 

I7M 

17ft + * 

>2 

3* Vanda 



10 

37 

9* 

9 

9 — ft 

im 

9* VOTSe 

iXUalOJ 


36 

11* 

II* 

11* 

52 

29* Viacom 

+8 

1.1 

20 

722 

45ft 

44 

44 

gift 

73 VaEPpt 9-73 113 


at M 

86 

a* 

73 

57ft VaE PlJ 

771 nx 


lOQz 70 

70 

7D 

47ft 

32* VO mod 



11 

71 

46* 

46ft 

46ft 

OS 

66ft ViflcnM 

2J0 

3+ 

12 

246 

00* 

so 

80 


21% 

7ft Zapata 

.12 

1+ 

34 

62! 

7* 

7ft 

7ft— ft 

57* 

31ft ZOvrea 

+8 

IX 

15 

436 

50 

49* 

49* — * 

27 

17ft ZanittiE 



11 

<79 

17ft 

IT* 

17*— ft 

21% 

15% Zeros 

■32 

IX 

16 

82 

18% 

18ft 

18ft 

37ft 

22ft Zumln 

1-32 

3 3 

12 

239 

36* 

35 

35ft — 1 


prev. Dov Open I rd .133+20 off 745 

SOYBEANS (CST) 
sM bu minimum- ttatetperBwtal 
6J1 520ft SW 526% fl*% 

U£ SJlft Mov S24 5.1M 

6. 79 5.11 Jon 5.15ft SSft 

7JZ 532ft Mar 126 5 37 

7.79 5Jlft Mar S36ft W6 

658 536ft J«* 

6J4 535ft Aug 543ft 5+0 

6X8 U2 .SN US U1 

632 3JB ' Nov 5J5ft M» 

cjf Soles prev.Sais 22+60 
Prev. DavDuen lot. 62985 oftl.MS 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBTJ 
100 fora- dollars per fan 
179 JO 12060 5eP 1Z7.2D 130JD 

180+0 12130 Oct 127 JO )31-§D 

184X0 12140 D*c 1322D ]»60 

16100 T27JJ0 Jan 13170 137-00 

1 VM Mar 136X0 139.M 

TAZ+t! VBJ0 MOV US+D Wl+B 

167X0 134X0 Jul 140X0 

.14150 13550 AWP 14050 144X0 

167X0 J37J0 Sep 141XOMW9 

Esl.sela> Prev .Sato 14X57. 

Prev. Day Open int. <5334 up90 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) _ 

60X00 lbs- dodars per 100 IWj 
31.10 2135 Sg 11A *J0 

XX7 20.94 Oct 2125 2L1J 

2955 2080 Dec 2 HO 21-14 

29X7 21X0 Jan 21 X 21.25 

Z850 2135 MOT 2L2S 2Lg 

27+5 JIJO MOV 2134 21« 

2535 21.95 Jul 22-™ Eg 

25.15 22.15 AUO Kfl4 

jiik y)25 sep 2235 3230 

•wan n.TO Od 

Est. Sales P«v. Sato 11+46 

prev. Dav Open int 55329 afllMS 

Sawbu n5n7mum- dolktys perbashrt 
139 l.llft Sep 131ft l» 

lX2ft 131 Dec 134ft 139 

1+7* 136ft Mar IJHft JJJft 

1+3 137ft Mav 139 131 

130ft 136 _JaI .137 1£ 

Est. Sales Prav-SaM 304 

Prev. Day Open inL 3351 oHO 


12230 130.10 
127+0 131.10 
13190 134J0 
I3l» 136X0 
136X0 139X0 
13850 MUM 
140X0 141X0 
14050 14170 
14050 141X0 


2UB ZL77 +X5 

21X0 21.16 —SB 

20X1 21.12 +.12 

axe 2135 +.10 

2135 21+0 +.10 

21+5 IUO +03 

■non t><k 

22X5 2230 +XS 

222S 2230 +X5 

2237 +X5 


131ft 131 +X3 

134ft 137ft +X3ft 
138ft 131ft +X2ft 
139 131ft +X2 

137 138ft +J11* 


ixS 13240 13200 13365 +WS 




NYSE Hfighs-Lows 



NEW HI OHS U 


BaatCSSSof 
Horizon Cp 
R amin pfC 
UnEI39tPt 

FtNafnwdn 

JahnCnpf 

RIchVtck 

Verts 

FstWisc 

NSPw456ot 

stofcevcpf 

Gruman 

PaPLilpr 

TiWimkadlP 


' NEW LOWS 36 


Ametek 

CobntCo 

Dal las 

Cten Rad 
KanGasEi 
McDer 220trt 
Oaklndl75p 

r*~wi H nl 
KeOUIlUDGI 

Standex 

Baker Ind 
CleveCKpf 
Dan HI lad 
GaPir JOOOsf 
Kosaara 
McDer ml at 
PoaoPrad 
RdgBatcvpf 
Swank Inc 

ButtasGapf 

CombEng 

EnaaihanKP 

GBrttFM 

LL&E Rovfty 

McOrmlntwt 

PuifeHme 

Redman Ind 

UDCDevn 

CCXCorp 

Cam post 
G enlDevI wt 
Ideoi Basic 
MBLMa 
Newark Rs 
Purotetor .. 
Rvmer pf 

Zenith E . 


CATTLE (CME) 







<0X00 tta.- cent* aer rtj. 






65.96 

52X0 

Oct 

S5JS 

S53S 

5677 

55X5 

++0 

67 JS 

55X0 

Dec 

5828 

5875 

S7JS 

5865 

++J 

<7+5 

505 

Feb 

57X5 

57+7 

5665 

5727 

+■& 

67+7 

55X0 

Aar 

57X7 

58+0 

57X0 

SLI7 


N2S 

5625 

Jun 

58X0 

59+5 

5865 

MS 

++5 

bSAO 

5528 

Ana 

57+0 

5125 

57+0 

58X0 

++B 

Esi. Safes 14+54 Prev. Soto zu&z 




Prev. Day Open Int. 40+61 off 448 




FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 





44X00 ibs.- cants per ft. 






71D0 

56+0 

Sea 

59+5 

<8X0 

9855 

60X0 

-1-25 

7L22 

56+5 

Oct 

59X5 

6090 

5925 

60X2 

+X0 

7320 

5810 

Nev 

6115 

6115 

6L30 

6192 

*17 

7^+0 

60+0 

Jan 

65.75 

6645 

6460 

6425 

+U0 

78+5 

MAI 

Mar 

65X0 

6662 

64+0 

6638 

+L1B 

70+5 

40+0 

Apr 

64+7 

6610 

64+0 

65+0 

+120 

66X5 

<saio 

Mar 

4190 

6525 

6190 

<525 

+100 

Est.SoJes 

1+38 Prev. So to 3X9* 




Prev. Dev Open Int. 8X01 o»3SS 




HOGS (CME1 







30X00 fts.- cants per lb. 






51.75 

14+5 

Oct 

36X0 

37X5 

3675 

37 J 7 

+22 

50X5 

3625 

DK 

39.15 

40.10 

38J5 

48X0 

+X5 

50.47 

38.10 

Feb 

39X0 

<0+5 

39+7 

40JD 

+20 

ays 

3L12 

Apr 

37+0 

38.15 

37 JS 

37X2 

++7 

49X5 

39X0 

Jun 

4125 

41+2 

<120 

0X7 

++2 

<9X5 

4045 

Jul 

4i+a 

4117 

41+5 

<117 

++7 I 

51+0 

4025 

Aua 

4125 

4I2S 

4125 

4122 

+.15 1 

41.10 

38X7 

Oct 

3853 

38X5 

3865 

38X0 

— .15 

49+0 

38+7 

Dec 

39-30 

39 JO 

39-30 

3930 

—20 

Est. Soto 

5+56 Prev. Soles 5.995 




Prev. Day Open int. 19.902 off 110 





Industrials 






*V? 1 






¥0 

■m* 












Vdd*nx^iMadi3l. 1986 




i mi f>ii ■ mi 


ana we n give you an exira monm or i nos rree wim a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand price 
in nK3st European countries! That’s 2 issues of the Trib for every 1. 
More coverage of world issues in the global newspaper. 

I Hi HI ■ ^tatb^^Srib unc.H b Bll 


To: Subscription Mana^r, Irrtemcationd Herdd Tribune, 

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Currency Options 


Sac 13 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

option A Strike 

Underlying Price Cans— Last Pats— Last 

Sep Dec Mar sea ok . . . Mi 

11580 British PDonds-ceats par >att. 

BPcund ins r 2950 r r r 

13339 lig 24+0 r c r r ■ 

13339 115 1930 18+0 t T t 

13139 120 1150 13+0 t T 0X5 

13139 125 9X0 - r r r 1.78 

13139 130 4+0 630 T r 175 

13339 135 0X5 350 555 030 6+3 

13339 140 T 25 ,5S 5+0 9JO 

13339 T4S r 1.10 i5D r t 

.ISO r • (l+o 1120 r r 
5UM Canadian DoUarvcents per anil. 

CDollr 72 0X0 T X t 0+0 

7184 73 r r r 0.11 r 

7J|4 74 r r r r ui Si 

71B4 75 r r r 122 r 

42508 WM German Marks-centt per cmlL 
□Mark » 531 r r r 0X6 

34+8 30 432 r r r r 

34+8 31 333 r r r r 

34.48 2 is r r r nil e+6 

34+8 33 1+6 r ZJ6 r 0+1 - r 

34+8 34 DJ4 156 2J0 0X1 0J7 X 

34+8 35 0X1 1X1 1+6 539 L18 1+0 

34+8 36 r 0+3 127 1+8 1J8 r 

34+8 37 r 0+3 0J7 r S 

34+8 » r 02* r r r 

125+00 French FrEDcs-lOttK of o ceot per onlL 
FFronc 100 1190 r r r r 

1)3X5 DO 3X0 r r r r 

6258X08 Joponate Ych-iootbi of a cent per onh. 

JYen 38 la r r r r 

4iJ4 40 1J6 ' r r r r 

41-34 41 033 ix* r r 0J4 

41.34 40 r 058 1X3 0+8 1X0 

41J4 43 r 026 0+2 X r 

fxmswta Froncs-cents per oatt. 

SFranc 17 4X0 r r X X ' 

4L71 38 4+6 r r r r 

41J1 40 173 257 r r 052 

41-71 41 DX5 2X0 r 0X2 092 

41.71 42 0X3 1+6 2.12 015 1J0 

41J1 43 1.14 1JB 177 r r 

<1.71 44 r fl+9 jjo r r 

<171 45 r 0.50 r r r 

<171 4* r 028 r r r 

ToM call VOL ust Con open let. 237X2 

Total put roL 3+43 Pat open lot - 157JI 

r— Nat traded- &— Na option ottered. 

Last b premium (purchase price). 

Source: AP. 


r 063 1.27 1+8 1JB 

r 0+3 087 r s 

r 021 r r r 


Commodity Indexes 


Prarans 

mart 


con open w. ram 
Pot open lot - 157,389 


Cbtnnioclkies 


ScpL 16 

O0M 

HWi LOW BU Ask orve 

SUGAR 

French franc* per metric too 
Dec 1+06 USD 1J70 IJM +77 

MOT 1+25 1-575 l+oo 1+03 +30 

Mav 1+6) 1+10 1+34 1+42 -MS 

AUB .1685 1+80 1+72 1+80 +25 

Od 1760 I JM IJil I^g + J1 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1775 1,795 Mew 

Est. VOL: 2+00 lots of 50 tons. Prev. actual 
sales: 4.933 lots. Open Interest: 17+15 
COCOA 

F reach fraacs per to kg 

See N.T. -N.T. Z0K Jig UiKh. 

Dec 2X98 2X80 2X86 2X90 + 3' 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1100 1115 UnefL 

MOV N.T. N.T. 2.110 — Undy 

jiv N.T. N.T. 2.120 — Uneft. 

Sep N.T. N.T. Z125 — —5 

Dec N.T. N.T. 2.130 — —10 

Est. vat.: * tort of 10 Ians. Prev. actual sales: 

9 lob. Open Interest: 702 
COFFEE 

French francs per WO ks 
Sep 1+60 1X60 1X00 1JBJ Uneft. 

Nov 1575 1X75 1X70 1.910 -5 

Jan N.T. N-J. 1925 19W +S 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1J88 2X09 —5 

May N.T. N.T. 2X15 2X15 +5 

Jtv N.T. N.T. 2X22 2X65 +W 

Sea N.T. N.T. 2JJ55 2X77 + 2* 

EsL VOL: 17 lots of 5 farts. Prev. actual sates: 
ta lob. Open interest: 339 
Source: Bourse Ou Commerce 


London 

Commodities 


\ Stpc 16 . 
dose 'Previen 
HIM tew Bid Ask Bid Ask 

SUGAR 

Starting per metric tan 
Oct U9J0 141X0 142X0 143X0 141X0 142+0 
Dec 151X0 147X0 147X0 148X0 145X0 145J0 
Mar 1*2X0 157X0 157a 157+0 155X0 1552) 
May T64X0 16200 160+0 I6BJ0 U7JU 15620 
APS 178+0 169+0 165+0 16600 16100 T64X0 
O a 17120 175X0 172X0 17100 170+0 171X0 

Volume: 164* lots of 50 tans. 


Asian 

Commocfities 


Cash Prices 


Commadtty andUnit 

Cofta* 4 Sceitas. Hi.’. . , 
Prtntcfofti 6<^o 38 ft, yd _ 

Steel bWeifi (PlfU.lon c 

iranZ Fdry. PtdhL. ton __ 
Start KTOP No 1 hvyPUl _ 

Lead Soot, lb 

- Mon 

IJT 
. -Mf 
47320 
3UX0 
7728 

A» 

. . 1X5 
875 
<1328 

mu 

*<-«7 

THK5birtlai-Bi 

6U9 

44-47 

Zinc. E. St. C Basis, ft 

• C41 

mm 

Silver N.Y.oz • 

Source; AP. 

as 

722 


1977 1930 
1975 1977 
1996 1997 
1911 1X13 
1922 19H 

M20 7929 


Treasury Bills 


n 


n- ■■ei ie 'ii’ i 


Cl Mg iLjjli Lr/^jjJ 

BBSS5 1 KJir'l WEE EZ3 




Name 


Adfas 


Qy/Courtry 


Tel/Telex 

17*9-85 . 


Sxpc 13 

Prev 

Offer Bid Yield TMM 
s-monlfl 7JI 7.19 7+5 JX 

6 -montti 7a 7J6 731 IB 

One year 7+4 7J2 412 6X4 

Source: Satamen Brothers 


STOCK USS USS 

DoVoe-Holbeifl 

international nv 696 7% 

Gt>-Qock 

International nv 2% 37fc 

Quotes as of: September 16* 1965 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gain-*) in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and tbe weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Work! Trade Center 
Sirawinskvlaan 8S7 
I0T7 XX Amsterdam, 

Tbe Netherlands 
Telephone: (3lX20jb2TJ 62 
Tetex: 14507 fireo nl 


COCOA 

StmrBao oar metric tan 
SM 1943 1935 1935. 1945 

DK 1996 1983 1983 1984 

Mar 1X19 1X04 1X04 IXM 

May 1X33 1X18 1X18 1JG0 

JlV 1X38 1J3S 1X25 1^ 

S*p 1X44 1X31 1XX 1X31 

Ok 7943 7942 7925 7940 

Votuma: 4.9S2 tats of 10 tow. 


COFFEE 

Starting per mdrf c tan 
S*p 1+20 1+12 1+25 1+30 1+16 1+20 

Nay 1+60 1+47 1+60 1+65 1+48 1+51 

Jon 1+98 1+0 1+96 1+9* 1+84 1+09 

Mar 1.724 1918 1925 1930 1920 1924 

May 1965 1JS5 1964 1970 1955 1960 

JlV N.T. ULT. 1980 1X00 1975 1X00 

Sap N.T. N.T. IJIO 1920 1905 1920 

volume: 67* lotaot 5 ton*. 

GASOIL 

U-S. doUors oar metric tan » 

Oct 243+0 34235 242^5 24250 24425 34495 
Nov 240X0 03750 237+0 23795 24093 240+0 
OK 23695 23395 23425.23450 23795 238X0 
Jon 23425 23195 232X0 22295 23595 33*00 
Fan N.T. N.T. 229X0 229+0 232X0 23291 
Mar 221X0 221X0 778X0 221X0 224X0 229X0 
Apt 213X0 21195 2)195 212X0 21595 716XB 
MOV N.T. N.T. 210X0 21400 2101*920X0 
Jua N.T. N.T. 218X0 21895 200JD 320X0 
Votuma: 199 lata ol 100 tana. 

S ou rces. - Reuters ana LonOon Po tra fe um B- 
cAonps (person I. 


Ijondon Metals 


ALUMINUM 
Starling par metric Tun 
Soot 729+0 730+0 739+0 

Forward 753+0 75100 761+8 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade! 

Start in g par metric tua 

Spot 1IB2+0 102L50 UniXO 

Forward latex totfjx wtfjn 

COPPER CATHODES (Shmdardl 
5 tartars par metric no 
Snot 1005X0 1008X0 100190 ' 

Forward 103090 1012X0 HOUR ' 

LEAD 

Startkia per matrtc tap 
Sod 299X0 300X0 29*00 

Forward 30390 304X0 381X0 

NICKEL 

Starting oar u if fri c ten 


Dividends 


i 


. Sept 13 


^wmr Per Amr Pay 

USUAL ' 

§^~. 0 du3trtra | 

SS** ’ -is its 

iXWW-Bax Carp a ia jicii 

Prater IntarruftonM 3 3 io-U 

u-uuit^. 1 ,- mtoootMy; wRooriartv; > 


1,1 


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9 S&I51L vNiniww* 

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9 KSMS'SL.* » * » m 

1H l/M 1/1* 1/16 — — 17 — 

3B - 1/16 1/16— - 7 _ _ _ 


XU. 1» Uft UVi 
— .17 — ' — 


sssKass :y 

iwn 5SJ55 iS.S« 

HlBtim Low 17697 CkM 177X7— BJB 

Scarce: CBOE. 




Forward 
SILVER 

Pence per troy ante* 

Spot 4MX0 44090 450+0 45L5D 

Forward 4*190 462X0 46390 4*450 

TIN (Standard) 

Starting par matrtc too 
Spat 9155X0 ft 60X0 81*099 716290 

Forward 011090 111 190 mUO 913)90 

UNC 

Sterling p*r metric tan 

sear 5)0X0 5i2xo soexo sioxa 

Forward no. iul no. no. 

Scorer; AP. 


■*1 




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S i'!£3r' : '^ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 17. 1985 


Page 15 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


W.S. Court Halts Hanson Piircbases of SCM Shares 


By. Jonarhan P. Hicks 

New York Times Service 

. : NEW. YORK - A U.S. federal 
judge, m a victory for SCM Conx. 
has issued a temporary order pre- 
venting Hanson Trust PLC. the 
British conglomerate, from acquir- 
ing any additional SCM stock or 
voting any of. the company's shares. 

SCM, the typewriter, rood and 
chemical company, had sued Han- 
son on the ground that Hanson 
entered the market and began buy- 
ing SCM stock after withdrawing 
from a hostile takeover bid. Han- 
4 »n withdrew last Wednesday after 
Wgroup led by Merrill Lynch Capi- 
tal Markets offered a higher bid of 
S74. a share, or $906.5 million, for 
SCM?s 1125 million shares. Han- 
son had offered $72 a share, or 
$878 million, in cash. 


SCM charged that Hanson’s 
share purchases constituted a 
tender offer and violated the W3- 
tiaxns Act, which requires disclo- 
sure to the Securities and Exchange 
Commission of any intention to 
make significant stock purchases. 

The judge’s ruling reached Sat- 
urday in New York, remains in 
effect until the completion of a full 
hearing, which is to begin Oct. 1, or 
until the court permits otherwise. 
The US. district judge, Shiriey 
Wohl Kram, found that “SCM 
shareholders will be irreparably 
harmed if Hanson is able to block 
the Merrill Lynch tender offer 
through purchases which (he own, 
ai some future date, may determine 
violated the Williams Act.” 

Robert Pine, president of Roth- 
schild Inc., the adviser to Hanson. 


said Sunday that Hanson would 
appeal the decision Monday. Law- 
ySsTor SCM said the company 
was proceeding with the Merrill 
Lyucn offer. 

The SEC was said to be intensi- 
fying its investigation of the pur- 
chases or SCM stock made by Han- 
son after it withdrew its bid to 
acquire the company. SCM h3S 
contended that within three hours 
of withdrawing its offer. Hanson 
acquired about 3.1 million SCM 
shares, or about a 25 percent suite, 
at $73.50 a share, or about $230 
million. Those purchases included 
about 12 million shares bought 
from Ivan F. Boesky, a Wall Street 
arbitrager. 

Lawyers for SCM have attempt- 
ed to show that Hanson used the 
stock exchange ticker illegally to 
indicate its interest in buying SCM 


slock afier rescinding its bid- They 
have argued that, without a re- 
straining order, Hanson would 
“likely continue" its “rapid accu- 
mulation*' of stock and that it was 
possible that Hanson might obtain 
a controlling interest in SCM in a 
matter of hours or days." 

Judge Kram cited SOM's con- 
tention that “Hanson's conduct 
was a de facto tender offer" and 
that “there are many factors which ! 
compel that conclusion." 

Merrill Lynch’s offer for SCM is 
pan of an effort by the investment 
banking firm to become a larger 
force in leveraged buyouts, under 
which management buys its own 
company until financing partners, 
such as Merrill Lynch, and then 
pays back the money through prof- 
its. 


mm |V* "■ "■ Com6 tO flcVVOT 

Marlboro 


, *■ 

p 


NatWest Plans Subsidiary 
To Develop Capital Markets 

Reuters 

LONDON — National Westminster Bank PLC said Monday that 
H planned to establish a £3Q0-million ($402-miBicm) subsidiary, 
NatWest Investment Bank, to develop the group’s capital markets 
and securities activities. 

Approval from the Bank of England under the 1979 Banking Act 
must be obtained before NW1B is incorporated. 

Charles N. Vflliers, chairman of NatWest’s County Bank LuL/mu 
be chief executive of the new organization and join the main board of 
NatWest, the statement said. Lord Sandon. NatWest Bank’s deputy 
chairman, will be chairman of NWIB. 

NWTB will build on County Bank's international bond market 
activity and coordinate with NatWest’s existing banking operations 
to develop new services for the corporate market worldwide, NatWest 
said. In addition, it will direct the group’s future growth in securities, 
merchant banking and fund management 

County Rank will continue to provide traditional merchant bank- 
ing services, the statement said. 

NatWest's chief executive, Philip Wilkinson, said in a statement 
(hat the es tablishmen t of NWTB was an important step m.the bank s 
efforts to become a major player in the world’s changing capital 
markets. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Unilever Dangles Better Bid 
In Front ol Richardson-Yicks 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Unilever US. 
Inc. said Monday that it had begun 
a tender offer for all of the 
outstanding stock of Richardson- 
Vicks Inc., which last week rejected 
a bid by the Brilisb-Dutdi consum- 
er products giant. 

Unilever said it would offer $56 a 
share if Richardson- Vicks's board 

of directors approved (be offer, and 
$48 if it did not. Unilever aid the 
offer was conditioned on at least 5 » 
percent of Rich ard son- Vicks s 
stock being tendered. 

Last week, the board of Richard- 
son- Vicks unanimously rqected an 
unsolicited bid from Unilever ol 
$54 a share. The board called that 
$1 2-billion offer “inadequate. 

Richardson- Vicks's stock rose 
$2,625 to $51375 on theNewYoik 


Stock Exchange at raidsession on 
Monday. It nad risen $2.75 to 


Monday. It had risen 52.73 to 
$48.75 on Friday. 

Richardson-Vicks, a producer of 
health and personal care products 
based in WUton, Connecucut, also 
said last week that it would unmc- 
diately begin to acquire up to 22 
percent of its common stock in the 
open market. It has 24 million 
shares outstanding. 

The Richardson family owns 
about 30 percent of Richaidson- 
Vicks's stock. Stuart Richardson, 
who serves as chairman of the com- 
pany, said last week that his famtiy 
planned to buy an unspecified 
amount of additional stock- 

Tbe company recently adopted i 
measure requiring that any merger 
be approved by two-thirds or the 
company's shares. 


* 

/ 




L-: 



Associated Hotels Ltd.’s creditor been approved S*ilSu TScsdayT ^ 

ILTin^rsS P -nteof- n*elnc. agreed Ito buythe 
v«o«* miEkm’l bv a fer will expire Oct. 11. -80 percent of Asiaweek Ltd. helu 

General Motors Corp. has by header's Digest Assertion 


’■ , - » 










V.i- .v £f$%. 




at $160 a share to raise about $53 praised ma^i^uc..nc^»- 

miSiM to replenish cash reserves condition that the aty findaredo- nal changes. 

after recent acquisitions. Books vdoper or uw to the property Textron Inc. has completed the 

dose OcL 9. the end ofl985. The plant closed m ^ 0 f the John Sands printmg unit 

un Fairchtid Industries Inc. said a 1982. . of its Valentine Sands Ltd. division 

Steven Jobs.- previously announced waiver from HNG/InlerNorth said it and . Q Melbourne to Advertisers 

Apple’s Jobs jjarassss* JttpajSW'E 

„ General Bedric Co. PLC has Co. tan purchase price ^ f ^ cars ^ t^cks in the 

Qfligl f/) PlffTi ' bought a further four million of its mj_ United Stales would be 1.3 percent 

OUUXIO XiAMJl own ordinary shares on tire market it or $117 more than that of compara- 

at 1633 pence ($2.19) each. vof sud AatthroughSepLl^^ Sw equipped 1985 modds. Prices 

■ \T GeneraTSnamics Conx_said a b-d reeved about 18.7 ogm * C dica will to an- 


Said to Plan 
New Venture 

j By Michael Schragc 

'4 Washington Pan Stsmce 

WASHINGTON — One of the 
founders of Apple Computer Co 
" Tone ffnfl tile 


.u'mff W S~ 


own ordinary shares on the market 
at 1633 pence (S2.19) each. nois, 
General Dynamics Coip. said a bad recei 
tender offer was started for all shares or 
shares of Cessna Aircraft Co. at Energy 1 
$30 «»ch- General Dynamics an- stodcinr 
pounced that ihe offer, which has at $41 a 


had received about 18./ nmu^ H CeUca will be an- 

-cheers. 




WASHINGTON - One of the ,, i 

SSSSSSS Tapping Europe’s Telephone Market 

ESP** v/can^Mm^De^^anOpenine 

There have been tnnwrs rirtce Catherine Amst lfcphonique, a former subsidiary of P?®n Swe 

May that Mr. Jobs would attempt By ^tnonne -rxn was nationalized in am s Thoro PLL and bwe 

to start a new company. - — cienscncsson. 


By Catherine Amst 

_ Reuters 

LONDON — The $7.8-billion 




to start a new company- i ONDON — The $7.8-billion 1982. 

It was during May that the 30- t European telecommunica- In return, AT&T would prom^ 
year-old Computer expert was Uons marfS is in theory opening CGJs m*e Unilwl 

suiprwd of all operating response JJ p w competition, but U.S. compa- Stales, parti^larly aEMng Since 51 percent of BT was sold 

bffiuwby Applet chief ^fes see thansdves as fighting en- »ier wtaAmdie local BeU op- 

officer, John Sculley. as part of a nationalistic buymgpat- mjni!;[ers m a company can, in pnndplc, buy 

SSor corporate restroctunng. ^ according to executives of cqSJmit for its network wterej- 

Mr.Jobshadbemmchargcrf lading the w>. £ 

gi gMSBga s —srtgsffs 

^However several Apple employ- JSSIe in Europe, is showing the wo^d,!^ the rompuier mdu^. that BT would buy 

SSSSdbeea told that Mr- &gns of loosening JLytw* c^e re be dormnated by foreign ^ S0urccs whenever this 
a new computia 1 onvemmeni announced that it corap aru . nossible. 


den’s Ericsson. . 

That loss highlights the racom- 
olete nature of the liberalization in 


plete nature of the liberalization in | 
Europe. 

Since 51 percent of BT was sold 
ofr by the government last year, the 
man in nrincinld. buv 


several Apple employ- is storing <■■ would. Ife to compu^ moustg. — would bu> 

SSSteitiWthaiMi. ^agrconoosemng.L* twe* one » te dommuted by foragu ^ ^ wtenme r Hus 
S^Sunch a uew compute, report ptep^ byjhe wcU ^ ,0 per- 

“Sf^Iobs reportedly informed 5 jj[ government over eariiig the consulting finnEu^^^MJ^ cent of our purchases are from 
^ 0 vJSfmi Thursday that haniers against entry to the tele- Associatesfor the n K. sources and I see no reason 
tepffi^ewv^mreand Ae communijtions market for U.S. for^tn^to to change dramati- 

^d inMr- J obs ’ s “Suffiirope is not even dose to communications ^ ISSrptiS tiS ^ itself trying to expand be- 

Apple should invest in bring as open to competiUOQ astire economic andj yond its home market and may not 

company. reached, iiniied Srates after the breakup last autonomy of Western Europe. J,. to buy equipment from a 

No decision was re Urn I 5kmerican Telephone & -Any community tdeconmum- with which it competes 

sources- said. . ivvtrrrmh Co.'s network- cations policy must aim at retain- elsewhere ^ 

In further disoKfflons wtii Ag- European telephone com- ; ng this autonomy, the report said. ^ of ^ world’s ude 

pie executives on Fnday. mt-iu a— wholly or partly owned - ^ around such attitudes, communications markets issued re 





source^said. . SgSph C^Tetwork.^ catU« policy mutt ain ^retain- 

In further disoKfflons witii Ag- European telephone com- ; n g this autonomy, the report said. ^ of ^ world's ude- 

ple executives on FndayiM^. wholly or parity* own«i To get around such attitudes, communications markets issued re- 
revealed that he would be reenu £0veroinem and toy toar diey see as amounting to by ^ international Insn- 

ing some of his new ^ «auipinenl from natioiral suppliers, proiectiomsm. most U3. tdecom- lute of Communications found this 

from Apple. enme ^tus Siemens AG is the domin^t mim ications concerns arc trying to action to be an important trade 

- Thai apparently sparked some ^ West Germany. NV appear European, and anahrats said barrier ui the Bntish market. 

argumsitCaccormn^ to n^ps in the Netheriandj jSi strategy was vmuafiy a ne- .^y gpvernmmt e£f«t to en- 

Itistinclear whether Mr. ■ Britain and LM- Ericsson m cessit y sure the smxessof the newly pnva- 

vrill remain as chairman of Appl - “Fundamentally, a foreign com- tized Bnnsh Telecom could fnis- 

after he launches the new vmiture. Even countries trying to fostw ^ ^ have a local staff," said trate the goal of tn^oducing 

Sasa.«S iss-SSS Swti Bffflg ? 

aasrSsfB 2Ssi eass 

3f5? JSr* 5 Ihssfsssjs s 

Wozmak started money ^uipmenl sales m the others ^ it lost a key contract from mitment” to sejhng shares Jf Bnt 


More details are 0 ^“** come own* the Alan iiorne, a jlajuwu-««»^ 

4Wdosednext week, but appwtoj: ^siSy suliant who advis^lLS. compa- 

company being Americans as compeutoj w^ nics on European opportimiues 

S^tSr Marintosh-com- ^ problems en^toredbyap aX&T s effomtove met with 

wltB Stephen ^^P^ture has 

Ml. J°bS. who , fi Fran« . .^pygeadia share simificant results, 




ta July, hi Has "■/SSs-* rSn ' Ki i 

^TcfoTfSS S *» c’T&ScdaC— 0 ^ 

mitlifgL , ■ 1 1 — 1 ■ 

G ° VERN S 

H ** 

1 parti r du 17 sept*®^ j itxl>mbo urg 

uerkificaU au porter j U _ 

A partir du .6 ^ " 

Luxwnlwufg-. | — — — mm " 


gjtal switches to a fully Euro- private investors. 

INVESTMB4TS — UAA. ■“ 

INCOME PRODUCING REAL ESTATE 

(deal far Pension Funds and other torga Groups 

1. Safa and Secured 

2. Below Market Acquisition 

3. Total Management 

4. High Yearly Returns 

5. Excellent Appreciation. 

Properties $3,OOO,000 and up 
Principals only please reply ten 

_ * Uayd J. WHlksns, ReaHwr 

I ti l I $629 FM 1960 W 4 Suite 210 

^|| I | Houston, Texas 77069. 

• Teti 1713J S 86-9399. Tlx.: 387356. 


Barlbmulhenumberone 
LiaiL citiarotu* in tin* world. 







international herald tribune, tuesda\, septehibeh i7< 1985 


... cw I n Month 

I 9k in* UHvPat 


ght YW. PE 


! vnjjAs 1£ « « 

i Votsors M U ' 4 
Vent _ - 

vlAmC «U * 


55K ’ CMC* ' • -V 

iiflsnMHaiLOW qwAOt*** . 

si iim iw* |M * 


s» » . 
im in* 

23ft a 4 + 

pto 914 — 
lift Ig* : ... 

vlt-fc 

aft net— » 

■6 A .'..s' 

aft n% '*..• 
Wft 

5ft **'+*. 

IB I*.:.-. - 

*ft AM + ft: 


.ft 

«js 

ft'.- '•> 

K +JB 

17ft' 


'S '* Ik 

IWr. 



20 7ft 
12ft 5ft 
4M 1ft 
19ft 14ft 
14ft 9ft 
8ft Aft 
14ft 10ft 
ttft IBft 
10ft 7ft 
lift 11 
15ft 13ft 


CHS J4 20 12 
CoesNj 17 

CooksA 5 

Cal RE 120 10J 9 

Cal in at 40 24 19 
Catanw Mt V 14 
Cameo 44 U 9 
CMarcg JO 


5 10ft 15ft 

09 10ft <0ft 
15 1ft 1ft 
29 lift 17ft 
42 1<M 10ft 

I Aft Aft 
54 12M 12ft 
38 25ft 24ft 

10 ttt (ft 
21 13ft 13ft 
32 15ft ISU. 


15ft + ft 
10ft 

lft— ft 
17ft— ft 
10ft + ft 
Aft 

12ft + ft 
24ft— ft 
514 — ft 
13ft- ft 
15ft 


12ft Ift 
22ft lAft 
15ft A 
19 lAft 
IT 3ft 
12ft Vft 
15ft II 
lift 19 
15ft lift 
18 Aft 
29 23ft 
lift 7 
30ft 22ft 
14ft Aft 
10 7ft 
9ft 5ft 


FPA 

Fablnd .40 21 7 

FolrFIn 22 

Forty pf 
Fldato 

Ftconn 1 JOa 59 5 
FWytnB m 63 ll 
FrttJPn Al 2A A 
FlsdlP Mt 54 18 
FtteGE 4 

FttGE p4 AM 15.1 
FlanEn 

Flu** 1JB 5J 10 

Foadrm I 

FtwtoM 

Fitinio 19 


2 9ft 
9 19 

102 15ft 
175 16ft 
A Aft 

3 im 
5 12ft 

12 19ft 
2 12ft 

4 Oft 
8 27ft 
2 7ft 

12 24ft 
30 1 2ft 
2 .7ft 
A Aft 


9ft 9ft + ft 
19 19 — ft 

1514 15ft— ft 
lAft 16ft 
Aft Aft— ft 
lift lift— ft 
12ft 12ft 
19ft 19ft 
12ft 12ft 
Oft Oft 
26 Mi 2Aft— 1U 
7ft 7* — ft 
24ft 24ft— ft 
7214 12ft— ft 
7ft 7ft + ft 
Aft AM— ft 


39ft 30to 
Aft 7ft 
16ft 10 
13 IM 
15ft 9ft 
24 15ft 
15ft 0 
> 3to 
Aft 2ft 
Aft 3ft 
5ft 2ft 
5ft 3ft 
3M 2 
16ft 10ft 
30 to 22ft 


KnGspf 440 02 
KdPOfcC 5 

KavCp 40 14 7 

Kovjn -2»s 1J8 9 

Koorftf -40 3J0 18 

KMiwm 40a 44 9 

KavPti 3D 14 19 

KeyCa 7 

Kidds wt 
Klitarfc 
Kirby - 

Ktf Mfp 14 

KtacrV lOr 3 

Knoll 15 

KogerC 232 U 80 


1Mb 34 
55 M 
U 12ft 
13 11 
77 13to 
6 19ft 
345 10ft 

9 3ft 

10 3M 
5 3ft 

55 2ft 
3 4ft 
27 2ft 

11 14ft 
73 20to 


34 34 

3ft 3to— ft 
12M 12ft 
11 11 — ft 

13ft 13ft + ft 
19 19 — ft 

n»ft raft 
3ft 3ft — 14 
3M 3ft + ft 
JV4 314 — ft 

2M m 
4ft 4ft 

2V4 214 — ft 

14ft 14ft + ft 
27ft 28 + M 



HEW HIGHS 4 . 

J 

FalrmtitFInl 

GoutdlnvTr- OhtoArtCo 

WHtbTMS . 


NEW LOWS 19 

- ‘ ’ '•'W 

AmPetnrt 
Brttran wt 
GrahamOO 
LaBarue In 
Sierra Htth a 

AmTrExun AmTrExpr 
DamsEiWA . DmnsEhBy B 
HtadertHar ■- tCOlne 
MUPIn NnfCtartJ 

SwstBCPn vernttitm 

AmTrExscre 
Mined' ■ *. , 
jortvn lac.;' 
Scope lad" - 


3ft 2 

?g 2 

15ft lift 
lift 8ft 
23ft 15ft 
23 1AM 
2ft tft 
2ft 1ft 
lAft 111* 
22ft 14 
8ft 5ft 
22ft 14ft 
14ft 9ft 
10ft AM 
20ft I5M 


USRInd 

Ulhnts 10 

Unlciirp 

UlHcppf 33 5LS 
Urrtmrn 144el44 
UAlrPd 34b 2A 12 
UnCosF* JO 27 A 
UFaotSA .10 W 
U Foods 

UtMsd 15 

USA&wt 

UnftriV 23 

Dnlffln 172 8.1 7 
UnvCm 13 

UnlvRs IS 

Uir/vKu JDe 45 


2 3ft 
43 12ft 
45 lift 
70 13M 
213 -10ft 
13 22ft 
1 ISM 

7 IM 
28 lft 
35 MM 

8 16ft 
21 0 

5 21ft 

1 lift 
13 7 

2 7AM 


3ft 3ft + ft 
17ft 12ft + to 
11 lift + ft 
IMA IMA 
914 10 — to 
22ft 22ft 
IBM 18M + to 
1ft 1ft 
IM IM 
14ft 14ft— ft 
14 lAft + ft 
7M 7ft— ft 
20M 21ft + to 
lift lift— ft 
CM AM— to 
1AM 1AM— to 


2ft lft LSB 
3M 2ft LaBara 


80 2M 2U Mb 
4A 2ft 2ft 2ft 


24 ZFU 23ft 
7ft 7M 7ft 
1ft 

12 lift 

* S 

7ft 7ft 
9to 9M 
UV» 13ft 
lft 
2ft 

Is 



Salas Houretare unofficial. Yearly fifths and laws reflect 
ttw previous 52 weeks plus the current week, but not Vie latest 
tredms day. Where a spilt or stock dividend amounnaa la 25 
pen^mtar mace has btenpaktttm rears hlaMowrxam ana 
dividend are shown far theiiew stack only. Unless alhenwIAe 
noted, rata* of dMdends ora annual dlsburswnwits based bh 

the kited declaration. - " ” 

a— dtoWend also extra (s)JI 

a — annual rata at dividend phw Hock cflvtdend/I ' , 
c — llwtdottna d>videtKL/l 
eta — cnlledL/l 
d — new yearly lowTI 

«— dividend dedarad or paid In preceding 12 manthsTI 
g — dividend In Canadian twe&subfect to IMA non-residence 
lax. 

1— dividend doctored aftersplll-up or stock dividend. .. 

1 — dMdend naW this vear, omitted. deterred, or no action 
taken at latest dividend meeting. 

k — dividend dedarad or Paid ttUsvoar.ai accwmidatty* 
Issue with dividends In amors. 

ri— new Issue In the past 52 weelg.TtwhlglHo w ro n gi b e^ns 
wtlti^he start of hading. 

nd— next day delivery. _ • . - . 1 

P/E — prtce^amlnm ratfa 

r— dividend dedarad or paid in preceding 12 month* plus 
stock dtvldvnd. .i, * 

s— stack poHt Dividend begin* with date of spill.. 
sn — sates. • 

t— dlvldand paid In stack In preceding 12 months, estimated 
cash value on ex-dividend or ex-dMrBxitlon'data. 
u — new yearly Won. 
v— trading Iwdted. '■ • . 

vl — In bankruptcy or receivership or being ,tww*tteed un- 
der the Bankruptcy Ad, or securflfes awwned bvsuch com- 
panies. * • 

wd — when distributed. . 
wl— when Issued, 
ww— with warrants, 
x— ex-dividend or cx-rigtrts. 
xdh — ex-distribution. 

xw — without warrants. * 

y— ex-tflvMend and soles In ML 
yid — yield. • 

z — soles In full. 


: : : ADVERTISEMENT ~r r <-* — 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) 


West Germany Agrees 
To Help Iraq Sell Oil 

. Rouen . • . V i. 

BONN — The Bona government has agri 


to help Iraq sdl oQ in West Germany so Bagh- 
dad ryn renav debts it is now unable to meet, a 




Monday: • '■;vv-v 

West Germany’s economics minister, Martin 
Ban gemann, ended three days of talks in Ba^t- , 
dad on Sunday. Het agreed to help find ai^onH . 
ers for Iraq's ofl so it could pay back about .SR? 
million Deuisdic marks (SIT. 1 million) of cec»- ; 
its by the end of the year, the spokesman .sakt,. 

Aboat 280 milli on DM in Bonn govemmtait- 
back credits originally were due for rcpayment- - 
on OcL l. • > '• ;. 

Mr. Ban gemann agreed to extend the loans 
after Iraq, its economy weakened by tht five- 
year war with Iran, said it could . not meet the 
deadline. He signed an economic and technical 
protocol with Iraq’s minister of industry and; 
minerals, SubM Yasin Khndayr. .' 

Oil accounted for almost afl of West Germa- 
n/i-'l J7 billiott DM in imports from lraq last 
year, . • • 




100 million DM next year and the nest in 1987,. 
the spokesman said. The credits are mainly for 
buikungprogects for whkh lraq inMallywas to . 
have paid cash. 

The jpiAesman said talks would have to be 
reopehed by thertaid of the year if suffident 
funds were not .raised. 

- Iraq and West Germany also agreed to estab- 
lish two committees to study commercial and 
agricultural, and economic, technical and sdeh-. 
tific cooperabon. - , ^ 

^•Diplomats said West Germany exported 
duStnal madrinery and construction materials:: "■ 
valued at 5860 minion to Iraq last year while 
goods'— mainly oil — valued at $480 


•} T- 


Sept. 16/ 1985 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBltffE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1985 



Page 1' 


Reuters 

S'SSus' 5 '^?* 

• 5 ^^ K '? U.S. economic indicators 

'^ed^in«. «flect££S JEffi 

a . P0Dn ^ Slightly 

to S1340Ton 

.^edoDar showed little reacUon 
to - news ttal,U.S.-basnras tovw? 
; JjtUe changed ii^kr 

" : w w^ 4 ' p ^ rcent mcrease m 
te ® 1 revised down to 03 

. The sdfing hegan on news that 
•‘V-* lactones, mines and utilities 
openieA at 805 percent of capari- 
■ty m August, compared with a at- 
P^g.^ipAiJereent in JuIy 
and 80^ percent in June. J 

figure ^ down 
gom the forecast of 80.8 percent. 
Bm dealers said that the dollar was 
most impacted by .the downward 
revision of the July figure. 


^gain in Europe Trading 


One US. tank dealer said the 
jjar fc «t appeared to be talcing tfiT 
hvo figu^ together. Ontabwn. 
the business inventories data sua- 
that stocks are bong sdd, 
which isapostuveagn. 

But this figure and the drop in 
capacity usage could together mean 
that industrial production is lower 
or that companies are preparing for 
a slowdown in production. 

^cftlers noted th.*» many opera- 
t®t^had built up long positions 
during trading Monday and that 
those were cut when the figures 
were released. They added that the 
niarket was fairly ihin because of a 
Jewish holiday. Most trades were 
executed by the interbank niarket 
and corporate interest was at a low 
ebb. 


The “pouncement that Britain 
had issued a S2-bQlion flo ating -file 
note later raised to 52J btilion, 
had tittle immediate effect on the 
pound, dealers said. 

Treasury sources in Britain said 
fhe move was designed to rebuild 
>ls foreign currency reserves bade 


to the levels that prevailed in 1932 
and 1983. 

One UJ5. bank dealer argued 
that this could support the pound 
because the government now has 
ammunition to support the curren- 
cy if it came under pressure. Bui he 
said there appeared to have been 
little talk in the foreign-exchange 
market about the issue. 

. in London, the dollar closed at 
241.12 Japanese yen compared 
with 242.40 on Friday. Markets in 
Japan were dosed Monday for a 
holiday. 

Other late dollar rotes in Europe, 
compared with late rates on Friday, 
included: Z9I58 Deutsche marks, 
down from 2.9190; 8.883 French 
francs, down from 8.8925; 2.3978 
Swiss francs, up from 23955, and 
1,948.95 Italian lire, compared with 
1 .930.00. 

In Johannesburg, the South Afri- 
can commercial rand slipped on 
apparent squaring of interbank po- 
stuons to dose at 40.95 US. cents 
compared with 41.10 cans on Fri- 
day. 


TurkeyScraps 
Plans to Sign 
New IMF Pact 


The .‘IsjociuicJ Press 

ISTANBUL — Prime Minis- 
ter Turgut Oral disclosed on 
Monday that Turkey' does not 
plan to sign a new standby 
agreement with the Internation- 
al Monetary Fund. 

Last month, the deputy 
prime minister. Kaya Erdem. 
said a new agreement was still 
being planned. But on Monday, 
Mr. Ozal said that Turkey “has 
solved its problem and the IMF 
is enormously glad about this.” 

The prime' minister said that 
consultations would continue 
with the fund and that IMF 
delegations would visit Turkey 
once or twice a year. “Bui other 
(h«n diis, a standby agreement 
is out of question.*' he added. 

Turkey received 51.65 billion 
in loans from the fund in the 
1978-82 period. Standby agree- 
ments providing S240 million a 
year were signal in 1983 and 
1984. The latest agreement ex- 
pired ia April 


Multiple Causes Seen in South African Debt Crisis 


. {Continued from Page 11) 
banks began 10 realize just bow 
great South Africa’s debt burden 
had become. 

Last fall, for example, the execu- 
tive in charge of a major New York 
bank's African business took one 
of the bank's top officers to meet 
diems in Johannesburg. 

The senior banker did not like 
wtai he saw. He found that in the 
previous three years South African 
commercial tanks had borrowed 
heavily abroad. The borrowings 
consisted mainly of short- term 
loans that had to be repaid in a few 
months. But the banks used the 
proceeds for making longer-term 
loans to South African companies. 
In banking, such a practice is con- 
sidered a classic error. 

If South Africa's creditors sud- 
denly decided not to renew those 
short-term loans, the borrowing 
banks could not quickly get repay- 


ment from their customers, who 
had borrowed on a long-term basis. 
And with racial disturbances 
spreading, the New York banker 
realized that political problems 
could couch off a financial crisis. 

At a meeting with Finance Min- 
ister Barend au Plessis, the New 
York banker warned that South 
Africa had a “tremendous vulnera- 
bility” as a result of its debt. 

The New York bank begin re- 
ducing its lending to South Africa. 
Caution spread among other 
banks. Bernard Shutdewonh. chief 
financial economist for Standard 
Bank of South Africa Ltd., said he 
thought that “foreign hank* bad 
become increasingly nervous after 
September 1984.“ 

Most of South Africa's tradition- 
al creditors, such as North Carolina 
National Bank, began cutting bade 
then on loans. 

Among banks in the United 


fttarev Citibank remains the one 
with more loans outstanding in 
South Africa than any other. 


Many banks began reducing 
their exposure on loans in South 
Africa by setting participations to 
other This sharing of the 

loans was not always apparent to 
the borrowers. 


nounced that it would cease ah 
lending to South Africa. Ira Sta- 
panian. the bank's president, said 
the bank feared it might lose busi- 
ness at home because of its dealings 
with South Africa but that the main 
reason for the cutback was fear that 
racial problems would destabilize 
the South African economy. 


In some cases, instead of telling 
the South Africans of the credit 
cutbacks, large U.S. banks began 
selling pieces of their South African 
loans to less informed banks 
around the world — especially in 
Japan. 


The big New York banks liked 
this procedure not only because it 
helped reduce their exposure to 
South African debt but also be- 
cause they could make a profit on 
the transactions. 

In March, Bank of Boston an- 


As racial tension mounted. 
Chase Manhattan Bank decided in 
late July to cease all lending to 
South Africa. Financial sources in 
Johannesburg say the decision was 
made by Willard C. Butcher, 
Chase's chairman. Chase refuses to 
comment on the issue or even to 
acknowledge that it changed its po- 
licy. 

Word or the decision spread in 
South Africa as Chase's officers 
told their clients of the new policy. 
South African companies began 
unloading the rand. 


U.S. Trade Deficit Widens 
By 4 . 9 % During 2 d Quarter 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Huge U.K. Floater Dominates Day’s Trading 

r By Christopher Pizsey 


2 U.S. Oil Firms 
To Develop Find 


Reuters 

•LONDON — The Eurobond 
markets were dominated Monday 
by Britain’s surprise launch of $23 
billion in floating-rate notes, the 
largest such issue ever seen. 

This is the first time Britain has 
borrowed in the FRN sector, and 
the issue attracted strong buying 
despite its tight terms, dealers said. 

The demand for the issue en- 
abled the joint lead managers, S.G. 
Warburg and Credit Suisse First 
Boston, to increase it from an ini- 
tial $2 billion. 

Dealers said the issue leaded well 
within its total fees of 60 basis 
points throughout the day and end- 
ed at 99.67, just outside the 30- 
basis-point selling concession. 


One syndicate manager noted 
that the co-management group of 
31 banks was formed extremely 
quickly for such a large issue. “The 
spread may be tight, but it's the 
sort of issue that everyone wants to 
be in on," he said. 


With market activity centered on 
the British issue, dealers reported 
little interest in seasoned secondary 
market floaters. “We've been in- 
volved nearly all day with the new 
issue and we’ve written hardly arty 
tickets for other issues." one trader 
at a European bank said. 


However, dealers said that trad- 
ing in the secondary dollar-strajgfat 
market was moderately active, with 
prices tending to dose between U- 
poim and Vi-pomt higher. 


Dealers added that the dollar- 
straight sector remained under- 
pinned by recent U.S. economic 
reports showing continuing slug- 
gish growth. 

A new issue with equity warrants 
attached was launched for Swiss 
Volksbank Finance of the Cayman 
Islands. The five-year bond has an 
indicated coupon of 6 b percent 
and has two separate tranches of 
warrants, which will be exercisable 
into the bank’s equity. The issue 
was led by Union Bank of Switzer- 
land Securities Ltd. 

In the Danish krone sector, Nor- 
dic Investment Bank issued a 250- 
mfition-krona bond paying 10 % 
percent over eight years and priced 
at par. The lead manager was Den 
Danske Bank. 


Smeri 

OKLAHOMA CITY — Texas 
International Inc. said Monday 
that it and Conoco Inc. would 
spend 5150 million for a half inter- 
est in a 500,000-acre 1202 . 000 -hect- 
are) concession in Egypt where 
Texas International has made two 
oil discoveries. 

Texas international said the 
plans were subject to appropriate 
Egyptian approvals, noting that 
Egyptian General Petroleum Corp. 
had approved commercial quality 
of one of the discoveries. The con- 
cession is 200 miles (325 kilome- 
ters) west of Alexandria and 50 
miles inland. 

It said a Conoco subsidiary. 
Conoco Khalda Inc., would pro- 
vide capital needed to develop the 
oil discoveries, construct pipelines 
and drill eight exploration wells in 
the next 18 months. 


(Continued from Page U) 
near the record deficit of $323 bil- 
lion in the third quarter last year. 

The unbalance came from a re- 
cord S3 3-billion merchandise trade 
deficit, which swamped a small 
gain in investment and other ser- 
vice receipts. 

The trade deficit came from a 
$2.5- billion drop in exports, which 
totaled $532 billion from April 
through June as agricultural ex- 
ports dropped for the second con- 
secutive quarter. 

Imports rose $1 billion to S862 
billion as petroleum imports in- 
creased sharply, offsetting a slight 
decline in nonpeiroleum imports. 

The United States ran a small 
$4.5-billion surplus in investment 
earnings and other service receipts 
in the second quarter, but this was 
not nearly enough to wipe out the 
trade deficit 

In another report Monday, the 
government said that business in- 
ventories rose a miniscule 0.02 per- 
cent in July following a large 0.3- 
perrent gain in June. 


The slight change, which left to- 
tal inventories at S579.8 billion, 
was likely to be greeted with some 
optimism by economists, who have 
been concerned that an unwanted 
buildup in inventories was contrib- 
uting to sluggish economic growth. 

Total business sales rose a strong 
0.9 percent in July to S424 2 billion 
after a 2J percent June decrease. 
The big gain came from a sharp 3.4- 
percent increase in sales by whole- 
salers. 

In the third report Monday, the 
government said die operating ratei 
at factories, mines and utilities rose 
slightly in August but still re- 
mained well below the high point 
reached last year as U.S. manufac- 
turers continued to be battered by 
foreign competition. 

The Commerce Department said 
U.S. industry operated at 803 per- 
cent of capacity last month, up 
from a revised 80.4 percent in July. 
In a sign of weakness, the report, 
revised down the operating rates 
for the three months from May 
through July. 


PPG Purchases 
Its Own Slock for 
$529*8 Million 


Reuters 


PITTSBURGH — PPG In- 
dustries Inc said Monday that 
it had purchased 8.897 million 
shares of its common stock held 
by Pitcairn Co. and 1 .86 million 
stares held by New Church In- 
vestment Fund, three other 
charitable foundations and an 
estate for a total of S529.8 mil- 
lion, or $49.25 a share. 

The two blocks together rep- 
resent about 15.4 percent of 
outstanding PPG common- 
stock. 

PPG said about $266 million 
of the price for the Pitcairn 
stares was paid in cash and the 
balan ce in its 10.75-percent in- 
stallment notes. 

The company said its remain- 
ing shareholders should benefit 
from the transaction through a 
reduction in the number of 
shares outstanding. It added 
that if the transaction tad oc- 
curred at the be ginnin g of 1 985, 
the six-month per-share net 
would have been $2.65. 


U.K. Boom 
In Futures 


(Continued from Page 111 


unlike our other fundi we fail to 
make a go or u. All our investors 
can lose is the opportunity cost of 
having their money tied up for five 
years." 


Tim 1 reton, an ED&F Man mar- 
keting director, filled in the details: 
“Investors, which may include 
those in America after the fund is 
launched on Ocl !, will put up 
about S30.000 per unit. Roughly 60 
percent will be placed in zero-cou- 
pon, five-year United States Trea- 
sury notes. Although the Treasury 
notes will act as a reserve, the com- 


pany will replace the sum thus set 
aside so that the fund will in effect, 


be using all the funds invested.'' 


No matter how the fund — Mint 
Guaranteed Ltd. — fares, the glob- 
al commodity trading house prom- 
ises to make good on the entire 
amount invested in five years. 
Hugh Dumas, another of the com- 
pany's marketing executives, said. 




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94b 9* 
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lift 10 ft 
61ft 60ft 
18ft 18ft 


9* +,ft 

X — * 

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lift- ft 


12 Month 



Sales In 



Net 

HUlLow Slock 

Dtv. YkL 

100s 

Low 3 PM curt 

mm 




236 

5 

4* 

4* 





264 

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14ft 

14*— ft 


21 Fdicrs 

1.32 

44 

26 

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33 FHfhT s 

1.40 

XI 

7 

S3 

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B ~ 

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18 

14 

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37* 

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2 

16 

16 

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82 

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37 



14 

33 

20* FAtaBk 

1.12 

48 

34 

28ft 

a 

2B —ft 

32ft 

23 FtAFkn 


14 

10 

30ft 

Ki 

30ft— ft 




177* 

24 

PCI 

22ft— lft 


11* FICWF 



29 

15* 

15* 

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22ft FCnmr 

1 JD 

58 

12 

24 


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9* 

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1.7201X2 

3 

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34 ft 

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170 

38 

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37* 4-1* 

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29 

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19* FtFIBK 

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44 

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123 

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66 

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57 

51 

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320 

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384 

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14* Fransrt 

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9* Galileo 



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241 

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40 

48 — * 





453 

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19* 

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44 

137 

29* 

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54 

9 

8* 



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51 

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97 

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31 

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19 

391 

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272 

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24* 

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146 

10 

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1 

KM 

7* ILC 



47 

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9* 

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214 

12 

lift 


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155 

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32 

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4 

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140 

15 

201 

46 

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32 




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26 

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28ft 




38 

21 

20 

20 —1 

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20 

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43 

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34 

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5 

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4 — ft 

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W* 




170 

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6 —36 

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237 

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199 

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1«4 




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is inttcinn 



105 

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14 

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aw 

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218 

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10 

11* 

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8* 




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8 

7* 

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r 




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1j4 

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153 

& 

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5 

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20 

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3* Joniebt 
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1 



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20* Kemcsn 

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15 

37 

30ft 


38* 

25ft 




111 

15* 



17ft 

Wft Kostar 

JM 


44 

2-0* 

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78 

9 

9 


41* 

38 Kenrn 

U8 

13 

II ■ 

55 

55 

55 

41* 

24* K9CALI 

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26 

33 

38* 

38ft 

38ft + ft 

■ft 

4ft Km** 



108 

Aft 

Aft 

6ft+ ft 

lift 

7* KSYTm 




7* 



lift 

2* KifflCrk 



9 

3* 



21ft 

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at 

J 

754 

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14* 

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11 

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211 

16* 

16 

lift— ft 

BE 

10 LTX 



7 

12* 

12ft 

12* 

8* LflPOIM 
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87 

17* 

17 

17 — * 

47* 

140 

38 

44 

46ft 

46 

46 — ft 


12 Month 

m m 


Sort In 




Htoh Low Slock 

Div. YkL 

1005 

Htoh Low 3 PM Ch-ge 














lBVi 


.20 

1A 

105 

14ft 

14* 

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17 

lift LomoT 

JO 

53 

100 

15ft 

15 

15 



40 


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15* 

fift 

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59* 


92 

1.7 

11 

54 

54 

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32 

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154 

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29 

& 


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714 

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33* 




J6B 

33* 

33ft 

33ft 

34* 

77* LincTet 

721) 

AA 

38 

33* 

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33*— ft 

49ft 

71* LfctCtos 

35 

.9 

901 

39* 

39 

39 - ft 


20* LonoF 


SJ 

41 

22ft 

32* 

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37* 

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334 

18* 

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795 


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92 

lift 

lift— * 



228 

44 

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11 

7* MaIRt 



10 

Bft 

Bft 

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Jill 


13 

12* 

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lift 

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101 

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33 

IW 

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131 

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13 

32 

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9 




84 

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13* 




77 

ID* 

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37* 

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1-00 

14 

1/6 

30 

29ft 

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699 Mscols 



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A* 




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1 

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24* 




763 

19 

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14 

12 

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12_ + ft 

tfft 

31* MavPt 



221 

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4* 

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4ft 

4ft 

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as 

36 

1* 

34 

33ft 


lift 

6 Mode* 

as 

a 

TDK 

10* 

III* 

10* 

12 

4 ModCre 



4B 

5ft 

5ft 

5ft- ft 





wo 

12 

11* 

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77* 

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39ft 


1.92 

52 


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37ft — ft 
62ft- * 

65 

1 r?M, i ■!- r .J 

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22 

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28 

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26 


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11* MeivG 



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441 

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261 

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44 


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31 

31 

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264 

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140 


1 

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IS 

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39 

64 

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127 

15* 

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35 

21ft 

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1* NwaPh 



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198 

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14ft 

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IM 

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1132 

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93 




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120 

23 

187 






31 



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75 


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9 



1 


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46* 32ft 
47* 39ft 
82* 17* 
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22 ft Wft 
2S lift 
9* 3* 

19* 124* 
40* Uft 
19ft T2H 
Bft 5ft 
7* 4 

344b 24 
15 9ft 
14* 8 
Aft ft 


ocino 

OeiKjp 

OtrtoCa 

OldKnts 

OldRps 

OMSpfC 

OneBep 

OMJne 

Optkc 

OurtcR 

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11 
93 
108 
71 
521 
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42 

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lift 14* 
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58ft 58* 
28* 27ft 
29* 29ft 
21* 21* 
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15 144* 

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Aft 

30 

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32ft 

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16* 

8 ft 

24* 

20ft 

1244 

«* 

18ft 

25 

33 

10 ft 

35 

31ft 

30ft 


21ft PNCs 

rafts- — w — — 

jt*o ruvuir 
7 PacFst 

10* POCTlH 

IQVj pocaPti 
6 PancMM 
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12 ParttOh 
4 PatnlM 
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9* PaakHC 
20ft PaulH 
Sft PnCM 
22ft PmEn 
20* Pontars 
7* PMDEx 
24* Petr Ho 


122 

42 

1734 

28ft 

21* 

38ft 

1200 X7 

10 

45 

44* 

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144 

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12ft 

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20 

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43 

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12 

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33 

Uft 

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14 — ft 

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12 

12 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft 



452 

19* 

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19 

40 

42 

143 

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21 

5ft 

5 

3 — ft 

t 


87 

lift 

lift 

lift + ft 



7* 

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36 

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201 

mt 

11 

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6 

32* 

32ft 

32ft 

£ 

2 

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44 

IIS 

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33ft 

33ft— 1 

48 

XS 

26 

27 

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27 

J05r 

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230 

12ft 

12ft 

Wft 

1.12 

44 

72 

24* 

34* 

34* — * 


12 Month 
High Law Stott 


Sales En Nd 

Dta. YkL 1006 HWl LOW 3 PJft ChVe 


13ft 

4 Phrmd 



335 

r 

Sft 

Sft— ft 

Wft 

7ft PSFS 

.I0e 1.1 

181 

Bft 

9 

17ft 

14ft PtillGI 

JOe 32 

1159 

15ft 

15ft 

15* + ft 

7* 

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To oar Readers in Spain. 



In central Madrid and 
Barcelona, you can now have 
the International Herald 
Tribune hand delivered the 
morning of publication and pay 
no more than the regular 
newsstand price. 

For details contact: 
Madrid, Salvador Vidal, 
teL: Madrid 250-38-84. 
Barcelona. Inti Press Service, 
teLMadnd 733-9+49. 


Bcrai MSfaSrib unc. 


J 


. J 

J 







Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1985 



ACROSS 
1 Minutes of a 
meeting 
5 Trial run for a 
horse 

9 Site of "a poem 
in marble” 

13 High time 

14 space 

16 Slush 

17 National park 
in the 
Cascades 

19 Cloches 

'20 Coalition 

21 Otalgia 

23 A French 
quarter note 

25 John pneceder 

26 Comprehend 

28 Wrongdoing 

32 Julia Migenes- 
Johnson.e.g. 

33 Female 
herring 

.35 in the 

bucket 

3€ Aomin Arles, 
s.g. 

37 She wrote 
*' Penti men to” 

39 Bonnet 
inhabitant? 

40 Actress from 
Mexico 

42 Polo Grounds 
rookie in 1951 

43 Rhine feeder 

44 Saim-Saens 
was one 

46 Middlecoff and 
Gram 

© New York 


lo 11 He wrote 

49 A special -Goodbye 

si Columbus” 

51 12 Church part 

Netherlands 15 interpret a 

54 Parallels part 

58 Bail 18 A son of Seth 

59 National park 22 Sort of fort 

in Wyo. 24 Rival 

61 Completed 26 Instrument for 

62 Jack of old M Shankar 

fijms 27 Nauonal park 

63Ponicofor in Fla. 

Plato ■ 29 Lennon's" 

S6D™S- S “SSSfto„ 

«cS? t y f0n " 

37 Maid of 

DOWN 38 Rose 

1 Suffix with Ji gS 1 overshoes 

43 Naive 

2 Shipment from « Architect 

Des Moines JOnes 

3 Precisely 47 Med. course 

. _ , , 50 Norse race of 

4 TV attachment gods 

5 Curtain in a 

doorwav 51 MoraJ naw 

6 FiiMhpr h i r 52 Pan of a roof 

6 e.g “ h ‘ 53 Radiologist's 

7 Letter from item 

Crete . 5S Graham of 

„ , . . * football 

8 Lap dog. for 56 Thus 

Shan 

9 Feeling guilty 57 Unexpected 

10 National obstacle 

monument in 00 Woody vine of 

Alaska N.z. 

Tunes, edited by Eugene Mateska. 


re people ? 

ilace: ' ^-17 


BEETLE BAILEY 


HOW 
POVOllj 
WANT ( 
YOUR 
ZG&S 
ZERO* 


EFFORTLESSLY U I HUH? 


HE MEANS 
"OVER EASY" 


OH ... 

yeah 




m 

& i 


fa* 




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WIZARD of IP 

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DENNIS THE MENACE 


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has always provided a 

drama nostalgia and characters, and genera- 
tions of writers have wandered ineluctably to 
the American version of cricket. In fiction. 
Ring Laidner, Bernard Malamud/Mark Har- 
ris. Philip Roth and Robert Coover, and in 
nonfiction Lawrence Ritter, Roger'Angefl and 
Thonm BoswdI, have dug the qoany of base- 
ball with wondrous imagination and skill. 

P et-hum; the best loved of recent baseball 
books isKogsr Kahn's “The Boys of Summer,*' 
an rn genirms and moving account of the au- 
thor's affection for the late, great masters of 
Ebbctts Field, the Brooklyn Dodgem. The 
book, published- 13 years ago, intertwined sev- 
eral stories and passions; the author's rela tio n- 
ship with hi< brilliant, baseball-mad father; the 
Dodgers anf i their valiant adults on the Yan- 
kees; the old Dodgers as aging heroes. 

In “The Boys of Summer, Kahn's writing 
was driven by his feeling for the subject, and it 
was the subject of the oook that carried tine 
reader. The prose was fine, but not first-divi- 
sion. The joke in baseball is that Kahn is the 
second-best Roger writing about baseball to- 
day, and that is certainty true. Kahn's skill as a 
writer in no way matches AngdTs. 

In his new book, “Good Enough to Dream,” 
Kahn looks for another way “into" baseball 
No one can hope to write first-rate baseball 
literature without a path into the sport Kahn 
has taken the George Plimpton route. Age and 
skill and good sense prevented Mm - from, say, 
batting against Dwight Gooden (that would 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 


CEQBQ □□□□ □□□□ 

□cnca a ana oaaa 

EDDDH □□□□ □□□□ 

sEaaaaaaann ana 
aoaa aanaaa 

QDQQE3B aiDBaSID 
EEHQ DI321Q E1BQE3S 

DniDBOQa annanoa 
DBG3BQ □□□□ 

amaaaa aaaaaa 
DDaaaa aaaa 
oeh tnsaaHaaQana 
□esb Haas □□□□□ 
oedq □□□□ anaaa 
eecjd sana snaaa 


the order or me aay. ■ 

chairs, watching a boy fish gentle watersnwna 
bank where stalks or dimr-gra® snrred- : 
spbke as was thar wont, not pf theWessmgsof 
the day,, but of baseball. 

• “ 'Did you ever want to manage a 
' asked Jay Acton. He is soft-voiced and 
haired at the age of 33: lawyer, writer, «nnQP' 
Uteraiy agent mend. • . ' , . 

“ ^ot tnudi. I just wanted -to play r - , • 

- ‘Own?* Acton said. “Would that appeal to ' 

•^0. the Dodgers were not for sale, but; the 

Utica Blue Sox, a Class A “indepenctent team 

in upstate New York, were, and with a gaggle . 
of partners Kahn became the exalted major- 
domo. Kahn’s players were castoffs, .flawed 
profes sionals making S500 a month, banLIOT. 
Hie love of baseball, half in. pursuit of the 
dimmishing dream of being called up. to 
Kighw level and then to “the bigs-”" 7 
Kahn’s attempts to portray his player* aej 
usually superficial He does a better job with- 
his 31 -year-old m a n a ger,. Jim Gattis, Whose- 
straw-colored hair and lantern jaw murium " 
seem “a movie version of a grown-up 1 IturaJe- , . 
berry Finn." As it turns out, Gattis is a man^ 
possessed, too often the “sadistic drill . ser# 
geant,” obsessed with instilling his players wim ■ 
^intensity" Kahn is forever hying topatGal- 
' tis* temper in a sympathetic light, bat it seens a 
' shaine that the bat-drawn character m the 
, book is such a steely-eyed fellow. - : 7 -- 
A greater shame is that Kahn seems not to 
approach the writing project with as much rare - - 
■ as he did the baseban preyecL Qrcumstarices - 
• provided him with a potentially dramatic jxrir-" ■ 
nant rime,:but Kahn does little witii it Grann- 
stancea provided a diverse cast of cbaractiefs- 
and a bleak, small-town setting, but Kahn’S: 

. writing lacks detaD, verve, real ambition. Occa- 
aooa^r there are -mteresting vignettes v^: as ■ 

■' wben Kahn most deal with Ms ace reliever Who , 
has to leave the team , to patch up a fmKngv 
marriage — but they are. rare and casaatty . 
Tendered. 

The path into baseball was not su ffi cient, tix ; . 

•' carry tire day . “Good Enough to Dream” is not , " 
good enough to onto that peculiar pantheon of- -~ 

. the transcendent baseball 


REX MORGAN 


this is me. Bishop.' hi? wife j 

-7 1W 420 WILL WOT BE 
f^RMlTTEP AWY 


1 VO WT 
UWI7ER- , 

STAND i * 
WHAT WAS 
THAT ALL 
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THE MAKI WHO 
WALKED I WTO HER 
POOl\ WHILE WE 
^ WERE THERE 

wpwt do so sy , 

ACCIDENT.' 


I'M IUC LINED TO BELIEVE 
THAT CLAUDIA CALLED HIM. 
THAT HE SUPPLIES HER . 
W-M WITH COCAINE f Wk 




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‘HOW COME HE ‘S ALWAYS SCRATCHIH 1 ? 
IS HE ALLERGIC TO FLEAS 2* 



GARFIELD 

/ SO, BACK AGAIN, HOH? 

( I THOUGHT VOO LEARNED 
1 YOUR LESSON LAST TIME _ 


THIS TIME 

' vo u Pie 1 


Unscramble these four JumUee. 
one letter to each square, to form 
four otdbwiy words. 






CM rs 



1 (9 iflBS Uritwl F«Qbff« S»™teaie.ine 


By Revert Byrne 

S lXTEEN-year old Adam 
Lief of Los Alamitos, Cali- 
fornia, scored a perfect 8-0 in 
winning the annual United 
States Junior Open Champion- 
ship, which was held at the Stu- 
dent Union of the University of 
California at Berkeley. 

Lief s success came a month 
after his tie for fifth place in the 
United States Junior Champi- 
onship, an invitational round- 
robin at the Manhattan Chess 
Club. ... 

Lief put a quick stop to an 
attack and won handily against 
19-year old Dennis Monok- 
roussos of Las Vegas, Nevada. 

The fire Defense began in 
quiet, positional style, and 
Monokroussos should have 
continued in the same vein, with 
the prophylactic 12 P-QR4 to 
prevent a black expansion on 
the queenside. 

On 13 B-N3, there could 
have occurred 13 . . . P-N5; 
14 N-QR4, NxP: 15 QxP, but 
in return for Black’s capture of 
a center pawn. White has the 
initiative and rapid mobiliza- 
tion. 


It was indeed tempting to try 

14 N-N5, R-BirTs P-QRI, 
since Black cannot get: rid of- 
. the bind except by playing 

15 . . . P-R3 and allowing 16 

NxBP».RxN; 17 BxP vAereby 
Monokroussos wbufd^ obtain a 
took plus tWd mwns; for two 
minor pieces. However,; tins ' 
was not an end game: but a. 
middle g«ne in which Lief 
coidd use. his minor pieces to 
the fulL :• ; $f., 

MdnokronssbsV JB ;Q:N5 
hoped for 18 ; .:. &N?; M 
QxNP, N-BU^QxBrna^.bot 

Instead,- 18.. .,.N-B4!;^9 
BxRcfa, KxB ; 20 BxB, KxB 
beatoff the^tadc. 

It was clear after 23 . P- 
B4 that the white poritiem was 
constricted and that the three 
Mack minor pieces were func- 
tioning beautifully.- 
Monokroussos was hardly 
happyatottplaying 3J RxR, 

pasred. QNP, but ttee was 
nothmg dse to do in view of the 
looming . . . B-Q6! 

After 33, . P-B5, there 

was no resource against the 



knight incursion wil. 
34 . . .N-B4and35 V-.:^ 
Qfich, which blasts the wayircu 
for the further march is 
QNP. Monokroussos gave up;- 

TjSt' ■ TS5 


Wrkl Slock Markets 

Via Age nee France-Presse Sept. 16 

Closing prim in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Now anange the drciedleners to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by Uw atom cartoon. 


Print answer here: A 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: WAGON PORGY BOUNCE WIZARD 
Answer Mma^bo^do^when they grow up— 


530 550 

2050 2000 
1075 1080 

5S50 5875 

1750 1740 
72S 730 

3250 3425 
770 770 

MOO MOO 


WEATHER 


1 S3 

8 46 

9 4t 

7 

45 

B 

46 

a 

50 

9 

66 

10 

SO 

9 

48 

6 

43 

6 

43 

B 

46 

B 

46 

5 

59 

22 

72 

» 

66 

9 

40 

4 

57 

4 

57 

8 

46 

9 

48 

18 

64 

9 

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0 

50 

9 

48 

5 

41 

17 

63 

10 

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C 

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29 

66 

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72 

29 

84 

30 

86 

20 

82 

23 

73 

79 

34 

26 

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30 

86 

20 

tn 

28 

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29 

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20 

hj 

27 

25 


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77 

St 

63 

o 

81 

tr 

77 

a 

73 

d 

63 

d 

77 

fr 

75 

o 

61 

r 

64 

sh 

64 

cl 

64 

lr 

52 

h- 

70 

lr 

61 

tr 

75 

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Thom EMI 
T.I. Group 
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THF 

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Untied Bisculls 
vicfcws 
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P.T.3B Index : 1M7J0 
Piertocrs : MIIJB 
F.TiE.t0e Index : UOUO 


a 454 

458 

3 1? 

3 £ 

141 144 

204 208 

I0H 10 45/44 
103 185 


Haw Par 
I netscape 
Mel Banking 

OCBC 

OUB 

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ShMH*rt-lo 
SI meowin' 

ST >ore Land 
S'pore Press 
S Steamship 
St Trodino 
United Overseas 
UOB 


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3.14 2JDS 
2.13 NjQ. 
iA5 5i5 
7 JO 7 JO 
242 RA. 
214 2.17 

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N/3. 550 

082 041 

1 tin *1 
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336 338 


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230 230 

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475 474 

7.10 6J0 
245 245 

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574 575 
2.18 ail 





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Bk East Asks 
Cheung Kwig 
China Ughl 
Green Island 
Hong Seng Bonk 
Henderson 
Chino Gas 
HK Etoctrlc 
HK Realty a 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shong Bank 
HKTeieWiane 
HK YaunKitci 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hyson 
Inn City 
Jardlne 
Jar dine Sec 
Kmrtoon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
New World 
Orient Oversaai 
SHK Proas 
Slefux 

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whemockA 

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Wlrtsor 
World inri 


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4050 4130 
330 2775 
10 ?30 

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3530 3235 
635 630 

735 735 

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445 645 

26.90 2690 
032 032 

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1430 14.10 
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740 775 
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1130 1330 
275 2525 
2440 2440 

IS IS 

Susa. — 

1.70 170 

4715 475 

17X 270 


Hang Seng Index : 110023 
Previous : 168544 





Marten 

Matns 

Merlin 

MJcheiln 

MoetHednegsv 

Moulinex 

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Pernod Rle 

Prlntenw* 
Rodiotedui 
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2530252500 
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22930 229.10 


Agefl Index: 2B633 

3?lS h?7i«J* 

PrevISIM ! 219 JO 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1985 



SPORTS 



Page 19 


Blue Jays Hike Lead to 4V2 Games 


Compiled fa Our Stuff From Dispatcher 

NEW YORK —Three days ear- 
lier, the pressure had been on the 
Toronto Blue Jays. After Sunday, it 
was squarely on the backs of the 
New York Yankees. 

A four-game series that started 
with a victory last Thursday, mov 


Mike Heath hit a three -run home 
run following a two-out throwing 
error by losing pitcher Charlie Ld- 
brandL 

Twins 5, Indians 2: In Cleveland, 
Steve Lombardozzi singled, dou- 


bled and tripled, scored twice and 
drove in a ran to pace Minnesota’s 
attack. Winner Bert Blyleven scat- 
tered seven hits over his eight in- 
nings of work. 

12, Rangers 4: In Ana- 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


Emie Whitt’s sweeping tag naSed Yankee Don Mattingy, who tried to score from second on Dave Winfield's fourth-inning hit. 


mg the Yankees to within 1^ 
games of first place, ended with a 
third straight loss. Toronto built an 
5-0 lead and held on for an 8-5 
victory that dropped New York 
games behind m the American 
League Eastern Division. 

A two-run single by Cliff John- 
son keyed Toronto's six-run third 
inning. The insertion of left-hand- 
ed reliever Dennis Rasmussen for 
right-handed starter Ed Whitson 
cleared the way for Johnson to bat 
for Al Oliver, the left-handed half 
of (be Blue Jays’ designated- hi tier 
duo. 

“Putting points on the board — 
that's what I'm here for," said 
Johnson, who tangled in another 
ran in the seventh. 

A's 4-2, Royab 2-7: In Oakland, 
California, Frank White and 
George Brett homered and Bud 
Black pitched a four-hitter to give 
Kansas City a doubleheader split. 
In the fourth inning of the opener. 


Kiieg’s 5 TD Passes Lead Seahawks Past Chargers 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupadia 

SAN DIEGO — Quarterback 
Dave Krieg fired five touchdown 
passes, four of them to wide receiv- 
er Daryl Turner, and running bade 


NFL ROUNDUP 


kiwi mm 

‘Sihatfiga- 

siitssifc' 

'■yiztii. 


Curt Warner rushed for 169 yards 
and two scores as the Seattle Sea- 
hawks roiled to a wiki 49-35 Na- 
tional Football League victory over 
the San Diego Chargers here Sun- 
day. 

The 2-0 Seahawks won convinc- 
despitc a brilliant passing 
fonnance by San Diego's Dan 
Pouts, who completed 29 of his 43 
throws for 440 yards and fourTDs. 


times, the Oilers had two touch- trampled Buffalo. McNeil broke 
downs and a 51-yard pass play the Jet mark of 180 yards, set by 
called back in the second half- Fol- Matt Snell in 1964. 
lowing the second TD nullification. Dolphins 30, Cohs 13: In Miami, 

they siHi had a chance to tie, but Dan Marino threw' for 329 yards 
Tony Zenddas’s 33-yard field goal and two scores and Fuad Reveiz 
attempt with 4:23 to play hit the kicked three field goals to pace the 
right upright and bounced wide. Dolphins' rout. 

Lions 26, Cowboys 21: In Ponti- Rams 17, Ragles 6: In PhOadei- 
ac, Michigan. Eric Hippie passed phia, Charles White rushed for 144 
for one TD and ran for another to yards and scored a fourth-quarter 
help the Lions cash in on two turn- touchdown that sealed the victory 
overs at the start of each half. for the Los Angeles Rams. 

Jets 42, BSs 3: In East Ruther- Votings 31, Bucaneers 16: In 
ford. New Jersey, Freeman McNeil Tampa, Florida, corner back Rufus 
rushed for a team-record 192 yards Bess set up two touchdowns with a 
'York 


and two touchdowns as New 


fumble recovery and a blocked 


punt to spark Minnesota. James 
Wilder of Tampa Bay rushed for 
1 13 yards on 22 carries and caught 
13 passes for 71 yards. 

Canfioals 4 L Bengal 27: In Sl 
L ouis, Neil Lomax passed for two 
scores and Neil O'Donoghue 
kicked two field goals as the Cardi- 
nals got past Cincinnati. 

49ers 35, Falcons 16: In San 
Francisco, Roger Craig scored on 
tuns of 9 and 62 yards and Joe 
Montana added touchdowns on a 
1-yard run and a 9-yard pass to 
Dwight Clark. 

Broncos 34, Saints 23: In Den- 
ver. John Qway passed for 353 


yards and four TDs in leading the 
Broncos over New Orleans. 


Packers 23, Giants 20: In Green 
Bay, Wisconsin. Eddie Lee Ivery's 
I -yard scoring plunge with 4:07 re- 
maining put the Packers past New 
York. 


Bears 20. Patriots 7: In Chicago. 
Jim McMahon threw for one TD 
and set up another and Mike Sing- 
letary led a ferocious defense as the 
Bears smothered New England. 
The Patriots got into Chicago terri- 
tory only once before Tony Eason 
hit Cratg James with 2 90-yard 
touchdown pass in the fourth quar- 
ter. <UPI. AP) 


A Brother Act in the Bronx: 
The Yankees Knuckle Down 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The Yan- 
kees reunited the Niekro broth- 
ers Sunday, but the move was 
more out of need than nostal- 
gia. They picked up pitcher Joe 
Niekro from the Houston As- 
tros. and he is scheduled to start 
Thursday in Detroit. 

The Yankees are trying to 
holster their weak starting 
pitching — only Ron Guidry 
(3.07) and Phil Niekro (3.90) 
have earned run averages under 
4.00 — as they try to catch To- 
ronto in the stretch drive for the 
pennant in the American 
League East 

“We’re four and a half back 



m 

Joe Niekro 
Happy to change hats. 


and there are three weeks to 
play," said Phil Niekro after 
New York lost to the Blue Jays 
here Sunday. That gives Joe 
four or five starts. They're look- 
ing for someone to win a cou- 
ple.” 

His brother, an 18-year veter- 
an. could be the man. But be- 
cause Niekro was not acquired 
before Sept 1, he would be inel- 
igible for the playoffs should 
New York win its division. 

Both righthanded knuckle- 
bailers, the Niekros last played 
together for Atlanta during the 
1973 and 1974 seasons. They 
have won a combined total of 
501 major-league games. 28 
short of the all-time brother re- 
cord held by Gaylord and Tim 
Perry. 

“I'm happy to join a team 
like the Yankees," said Joe, 40. 
“They have someone near and 
dear to me. I wanted to see Phil 
win his 300th, but 1 thought I'd 
be in the stands and not in the 
dugout It's gonna be fun." 

Phil. 46, was thwarted in his 
Hist attempt at winning his 
300th game last week. He will 
start Wednesday night in De- 
troit. 

Joe Niekro began his major- 
league career in 1967 with the 
Chicago Cubs. He has also 
pitched for San Diego, Detroit 
and Atlanta and joined the As- 
tros in 1975. He was a 20-game 
winner for Houston in 1979 (21- 
1 1) — when he was ninnerup in 
the Cy Young Award voting — 
and in 1980 (20-12). Last sea- 
son, he was 16-12 with a 3.04 
ERA; he is 9-12 this year with a 
3.72 ERA. (UPI, AP, NYT) 


ham. California. Reggie Jackson 
hit a three-run homer in the first 
and a five-run eighth completed 
California’s pounding of Texas. 

Tigem 4, Orioles 1: In Detroit, 
shortstop Cal Ripken's two-out 
wild throw allowed pinch-runner 
Barbara Garbey to score the de- 
breaking run and trigger a three- 
run eighth that boosted the Tigers 
past Baltimore. 

Red Sox 4L Bremers 2: In Mil- 
waukee, Jeff Sellers was a winner in 
his major-league debut and Dwight 
Evans had three hits as Boston beat 
the Brewers. Sellers scattered eight 
hits over 616 innings. 

While Sax 6, Marinos 3: In Se- 
attle, Carlton Fisk had three hits 
and drove in three runs to spark 
Chicago. After the Mariners chased 
White Sox starter Joel Davis in the 
second. Dave Wehnntister worked 
416 shutout innings for the victory. 

Cardinals 5, Cubs 1: In the Na- 
tional league, in Chicago, Cesar 
Cedeoo went 5-for-5 ana drove In 
four runs to lead St Louis. Cedeno 
was acquired from Cinrinnati on 
Aug. 29 and has hit .500 — 18-for- 
36 — as a Cardinal. 

Mets 6, Expos 2: In Montreal, 
Danny Heep hit a three-run homer 
in the first and New York went on 
to down toe Expos. Ron Darling 
won his sixth straight game. 

Astros 2, Padres 1: In Houston, 
Glenn Davis set a dub rookie re- 
cord with his 15th home run of the 
season, a leodoff shot in the eighth 
that broke a 1-1 tie and sent toe 
Astros to their 13to victory in 15 
games. Davis broke toe mart; of 14 
set by Joe Morgan in 1965. 

Pirates 5, PtnDles 4: In Pitts- 
burgh, The Pirates rallied in toe 
eighth, Johnny Ray doubling home 
the tying run 'and Denny Gonzalez 
singlin g in toe eventual game-win- 
ner. Ride Reuse he! pitched his sev- 
enth straight complete game. 

Braves A Giants 1: In Atlanta, 
Claudell Washington drove in two 
runs to back toe combined six-hit 
pitching of Steve Bedrosian. Rick 
Camp and Bruce Sutter as toe 
Braves won for only the second 
time in their last eight games. 

Reds 10, Dodgers 6: In Cincin- 
nati, Gary Red us hit a three-run 
homer to cap a nine-run sixth that 
lifted toe Reds. (AP. VP!) 


imho* 
curriHsfe 
•Ram 
raarikk 
iflom 
re Bniz 
jniNli 

Damans 
;elv;ad»l9?3 
- M 


After trading by 23-14 at balf- 
xploded 


time, Seattle exploded for four 
touchdowns in the third quarter as 
Krieg completed 12 of 14 throws 
for 192 yarns in toe period. Three 
of his completions went for touch- 
downs. 

Warner, who carried 28 times, 
scored his second touchdown of toe 
game on a 1-yard plunge with 15 


seconds left in the period, giving 
2-29advan 


toe Seahawks a 42-29 advantage. 

Krieg, who was 22-for-32 for 307 
yards on toe day, threw a 34-yard 
touchdown pass to Turner in toe 
second quarter and connected with 
the fleet wide receiver on scoring 
throws of 15. 30 and 7 yards in toe 
second half, Krieg also hit Steve 
Largent with' a 6-yard TD pass. 

Fours, who fell just four yards 
short of his single-game dub record 
or passing yardage, bad scoring 
'passes of 7 yards to running hart 
Lionel James, 18 yards to wide re- 
ceiver Charlie Joiner, 20 yards to 
wide receiver Wes Chandler and 5 
yards to tight cod Eric Severs. 

Krieg’s five touchdown passes 
tied a club record he set last year 
against Detroit. He now has 
thrown at least one touchdown 
pass in 20 straight games, the long- 
est current streak in the NFL 
Redskins 16, CWcts 13: In Wash- 


4 


ingion, the running of George Rog- 
ers and John Riggins built an early 



SCOREBOARD 


Football 


Baseball 


NFL Standings 


Sunday’s Major League line Scores 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 



w 

L 

T Pet PF 

PA 

Miami 

•1 

1 

0 

JBfl 

53 

39 

Now Eisttond 

1 

1 

B 

SOD 

31 

40 

N.Y. JOto - 

1 

1 

0 

409 

42 

34 

Buffalo - 

0 

2 

B 

480 

12 

58 

imUanaaoIbi 

B 2 
C—tral 

0 

400 

18 

75 

PBtaburah 

1 

D 

0 

1400 

45 

1 

Houston 

1 

1 

B 

400 

» 

19 

Cto viand 

8 

1 

0 

400 

34 

27 

Ctectenart 

8 2 
Wtat 

0 

400 

51 

99 

Kama Cl tv 

2 

9 

0 

1400 

>3 

47 

5aaffto 

2 

0 

0 

140B 

TT 

59 

Danvar 

1 

\ 

0 

400 

50 

43 

LA. natam 

1 

1 

0 

400 

51 

39 

San Dteao 

1 

1 

B 

400 

49 

SB 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


SL Louis 

2 

0 

0 

1400 

8B 

51 

Dallas 

1 

1 

D 

400 

95 

40 

•4.Y. Gloats 

1 

1 

■ 

400 

41 

73 

mwwwDn 

1 

1 

0 

400 

30 

57 

PhlladaMifa 

■ 3 
Centra* 

0 

400 

9 

3B 

Chicago 

2 

0 

0 

1400 

Si 

35 

Daffbrt 

2 

0 

0 

1400 

54 

40 

MJonaota 

2 

0 

B 

1400 

» 

37 

Groan Bov 

1 

1 

0 

400 

43 

49 

Tomaa Bay 

0 2 
Weal 

B 

409 

44 

99 

LX Rams 

3 

0 

0 

um 

37 

22 

Sen Pranchco 

1 

1 

0 

400 

56 

44 

Affiaita 

0 

2 

0 

400 

43 

63 

New Orleans 

B 

2 

0 

400 

SB 

81 


AMERICAN LEAOUE 
M tones ofo m m hi— s u • 

Ctevoltoid HI W HI— 3 7 • 

Btytovon. Davis (7) and Salas; Smith. Van 
Ohtofl (7), Renters 19) and Willard. ML-Blyte- 
vwvM-15. L— (Smith, 1-4. Sv — Davis (23). 
HJh MlHHHH. Salas (I), Hrtoek (21). 
Cta vel n nd. Thornton (IS). 

MS OH 1W— I 2 • 
■H MOGfaC— 4 5 B 
Davis. Snell (1), Stewart (!) and Rayford. 
Demaoay (B). Morris. Hernandez (9) and Por- 
fteta W mmnn Oei. M. L — Stewort, S-i 
HR— Baltimore. Young (27). 

Toronto OM HO 2H-B M 1 

km Tort sos bh a-f ■ 3 

Alexander. Lovelle (■), Henke (*) and 
Whitt; Whitson, Rasmussen (]). Bardl (3). 
Scurry (71. Armstrong If) and U ma r. Espino 
(*). W Alexander. 14-8. I— Whitson, 108. 
HR— New York, Grtttev «). 

HI Bit HI— I II S 
BH 1MHB-2 f B 
Seders. Trullllo (7) and GeWnan; Coen n- 
anar and Moors, w Setters. 7< L— Cocan- 


Lotbrant tt . Huismann (7) and Quirk; Codtr- 
oU. Ontiveros tit, HoweU (f> on! Heath. W— 
CadtrcU. 13-12. L— LMbrondt.lSA.Sv llowell 
(25). HRs— Kansas Oty, Bat bent (32). Oak- 
112 ). 


Flrsl Sams 

BH 1H 180—3 B 


Kansas aty 901 »0 BIB- 7 11 1 

Oakland Ml BH HO— 2 4 0 

Black (M Sandberg; Young, Atherton 15). 
Unmoor IT). Mura (8), McCarty (B. Conroy (?) 
and Terttetan.W-tUock.f-M. L-Youna. M- 
H IM Kan sas CKv. White (20). Brett (25). 
Oakland, Davis (23). 

BHOttOn— 012 B 
2H Ml IBs— 12 M ■ 
Oazman. Sets a UK Welsh (7). Cook (8), 
Surhofl IB) and PatraUI; MeCasklll. Cftoum 
(7) and Boone. W-McCasklli 19-11. L— Gca- 
msb B-2. Sv— Cttoum (*). Hfto-Texa* Par- 
rtafiC Ml. Walker Ml. Qdtfomta. Jackson (241, 
Dodnces (U). 

31B 1H OBI— 4 12 B 
BH BH 000—3 f I 

W ehrmt ta tor (2). Agosto (7). 
Jamas (I) and Sktoner; Lonastan. wnifa (41, 
Vdndg Borg <91 and Scon, vaito l«).W— Wttv- 
nteister, M. L— Lonastan. 7-11 Sv-Jamas 

an. 


Miqor League Leaders 


NATIONAL LEAOUE 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


Hu dson. Sh lp ano lf (7>artd VfryH; Heuschel 
and Pina. W-ftowsehaL 13-7. L-Shbxmo«,1- 
2. HRs — Phi ladetaMa, Stans OLSchmkrt (29). 
NOW York 401 BH an— 4 f B 

Moatraal BIB 0B1 BBS— 9 5 B 

Darting, Oragco (B) and Carter; Daaaon, 
OCannar n >. SL Oolrs (3). Rabarga («). Lu- 
cas (fj and (TBarry. Butern (4). W— Dartlna, 
14-5. L— Doom. H Sv— Orosco (14). H Re- 
New York. Heer (7). Johneen (10), Wilson (5). 
Montreal Wnllach (17)- 

-14 0 

1 10 B 

Mason. MDavta (0), Moors (7) and Branlv) 
SednafatoGonip <71, Suffer (() and SenodU 
W H adrnda n .7-12.L- M OOOtvBI. Sv Suffer 
(23). 

Lee Aagatos BH BH BOB- 4 f 2 

OadanaN BN Hf BBx—lB f 1 

Vatonniala, CDlaz (4) andSdasda: Brown- 
ing. Hums (7). P ow er («) and BJMob Van 
Corner (f). W-Bm mbs. I*». L — Vatoit- 
zuela. 17-10. S v P ower (Z2).HR— dndnnart. 
tadas (4). 

SL Leals BB1 0H 3N-5 IS 0 

Ctocnso HI OH BOO — I 5 1 

Cm,worreU (a) and Nleta Porter (7); En- 
goL Bailor (7). MereWth (7). Board (B> ond 
Davis. W— Co*. U-f. L— eaeot. IS. HR—6L 
Louts. Cedeno (7). 

no BTC 009- 1 B 3 
OH MB Bto- 2 B 1 
Hoyt. Lertorts (7). McCultors (B) and Kan- 
nedv; RyataCoOiOun (7), Smith (f) ana Bol- 
tov. W— Cakwun. *3. L-Lefttats, 7-6. Sv— 
Smith 130. HR— Houston, Davis <155- 


Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 



W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Toronto 

*1 

52 

436 

— 

New York 

H 

59 

406 

4ta 

Bam mar* 

75 

99 

432 

15 

Detroit 

73 

99 

414 

171b 

Boston 

71 

72 

497 

20 

Milwaukee 

92 

7V 

440 

2B 

Cleveland 

52 

West DMUon 

93 

459 

40 

Kansas CHv 

B2 

90 

477 

— 

CaUfarala 

B0 

93 

459 

2V. 

Chicago 

73 

99 

414 

9 

Ofl^InnH 

70 

74 

4H 

13 

Seaffto 

4d 

76 

MS 

74 

Minnesota 

95 

79 

451 

19 

Texas 52 90 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
EM DlvlNoa 

466 

30 


W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

SI. LOUIS 

89 

55 

410 

— 

New York 

86 

59 

MS 

Vr 

Montracs 

74 

66 

435 

101b 

PMIadetaMa 

99 

71 

493 

16V. 

Chicago 

99 

75- 

498 

20 

Pittsburgh 

47 

MM DhHlen 

92 

438 

38 

Las Angetes 

84 

58 

sn 

— 

Onckmatl 

75 

49 

432 

21b 

Houston 

72 

70 

407 

12 

San Dleoo 

71 

71 

400 

13 

Atlanta 

90 

02 

423 

34 

San Fronctoco 56 

19 

494 

28 


16-poini lead toe Redskins held on. 
to defeat Houston. Penalized 12 


BnnemUMd fVen Mvtssiand 

Freeman McNeil rushed for a dub-record 192 yards in 
helping the New York Jets hammer Buffalo, 42-3, Sunday. 


U.S.-Soviet Olympic Pact Signed 


SUNDAY’S RRSULTS 
N.Y. Jots 42. Buffalo 3 
SL Louis 41, anefanoH 27 
Detroit 24. Dates 2T 
Wntottastob 1A Houston 13 
Miami 30. Indlanwtom 13 
l-A. Rems 17. Phlionslnhlo 4 
CMcoaa 20. Now England 7 
Minnesota JT, Tomaa Bay U 
Denver 34, Now Orleans 23 
Often Bov 33, M.Y. Gfants 20 
San Francfseo H Atlanta 14 
Seattle 4V, San Dtaoo IS 


G 

AB 

R 

H 

Pci. 

141 

577 

93 

211 

499 

139 

483 

95 

141 

433 

124 

477 

129 

155 

425 

140 

571 

91 

1B5 

434 

139 

561 

77 

179 

414 

135 

525 

*5 

194 

JI3 

136 

556 

80 

171 

408 

121 

494 

85 

150 

404 

128 

433 

59 

13) 

403 

135 

507 

73 

153 

402 


Compiled by Our Staff Frm Dispaicha 
. INDIANAPOLIS — Soviet and 
■yfs. Olympic officials Sunday 
signed an agreement to cooperate 
in athletic competitions and ex- 
change ideas. 

A “memorandum of mutual un- 
derstanding and sports coopers- 
rion" was Signed by U.S. Olyncic 
Committee President Robert Hd- 
ntick, USOC Secretary General 
George Miller. Sowet Olympic 
Committee President Marat Gro- 
mov and Vice President Vjacheslav 

& Both'sides said the docoment did 


hot guarantee participation in toe 
1988 Olympics in Seoul 


It’s not yet rime to enter those 
."Hetrick! 


; said. “This agree- 
ment is a first important step to 
ensure our entry into those games." 
The United States and 61 other 
nations boycotted the 1980 Mos- 
cow Olympics, and the Soviet 
Union and 12 other countries boy- 
cotted the 1984 Los Angetes Olym- 
pics. 

“We intend to support the Olym- 
pic movement in all ways," said 
Gramov. “This document was 
signed by two sides, it should re- 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Soccer Violence Pad Effective Nov.l 


European 

Ln ~^Z x. -set sets binding roles on toe sale of alcohol at soccer 


coontries, segregation, ticket sales, pol ici n g of 


st *j3S?a,S toe dcsigB of sports grounds, 

the code following nots at Heysd Suufimn m 

ftnssds last May in which 38 people died. 


Thorpe Takes First PGA Tour Event 

f . V .. arm - n VI 


fleet continuing relations between 
our countries in sports. We weren’t 
supposed to link this document 
with games in 1988 or 1992 or 
1996. 

The document says that “both 
parties agree to make efforts to 
insure that their teams participate 
in the Olympic Games." Either can 
terminate toe nonbinding agree- 
ment through a written notice to 
the other. 

The agreement’s major points in- 
clude: 

• Both sides will “encourage 
their member organizations to es- 
tablish and expand sport ex- 
changes," including dual and mul- 
tinational competitions, joint 
training camps and exchanges of 
coaches and officials for seminars 
and clinics. 

• Exchanges of information, 
sports equipment and facilities, 
sports medicine and science, drug 
control and research, and coaching 
and training techniques. 

• Exchanges of technical and ad- 
ministrative observers to U.S. and 
Soviet national sports festivals. 

Both parties also agreed to 
“wort out an nual plans of common 
action which will be agreed upon 
during toe last half of the year 
previous to their operation." 

Tlie first scheduled exchange will 
send a Soviet delegation of Olym- 


CFL Standings 


■own Dtotoloa 



W 

L 

T 

PF 

PA 

Pis 

Montreal 

4 

4 

0 

399 

IGA 

12 

Ottawa 

4 

4 

0 

175 

287 

S 

Toronto 

3 

7 

0 

229 

273 

4 

Haaffltan 

0 7 0 195 

Westers Dtvtsiea 

289 

4 

Bril amt 

• 

1 

a 

280 

167 

14 

Ittmfpgg 

8 

2 

0 

St 

112 

M 

Edmonton 

4 

4 

0 

273 

271 

12 


4 

4 

0 

229 

247 

B 

Calgary 

2 

7 

a 

197 

217 

4 


SUNDAY’S RRSULTS 
Hamilton 41, Taranto 10 
Camon to n 27. Scwfcotcfrnimn IS 


Golf 


top musters and earnings la the Greater 
Milwaukee Oaen. ntacti entod Sunday at me 
ro-72. 7AiGyart Tuckaway Country Oak: 


Jim Trtoroe. S54iX» 
Jack Nlcklous, SZL400 
Brad Fabel S13J30 


7340-43-70-274 
7049-47-71 — 277 
4073-4049-277 


Boogs Bos. 

Bnrff K.C 
Henderson N.Y. 

Mattingly N.Y. 

Baines Chi. 

Bullor Cle. 

Cooper MIL 
Mo 1 1 lor Mil. 

Cad man Bc«- 
Davis sea 
Runs; Henderson, n.y. I Jo; Ripken, Bat. 
101 ; Murray, BoL97; Winfield. N.Y.99; Brett. 
ICC. *5; Butter. Cle. 9S; Evans. Bos. 95. 

RBta: Mattingly. N.Y., 125; Murray. Bal. 
ill; WVnBeW.N.Y.101; Baines. CM. 99; Rice, 
Bos, 99. 

Hits: BcHWs.Bas.21l: Mattingly, N.Y. IBS; 
Baines, ChL, 174; Puckett Mine 174; Cooper. 
MIL 171. 

Doubles: Moffbieiv. N.Y. 41; Book Bos. 
39; Buckner. Bos. 3B: Cooper, MIL 37; Mur- 
ray. Bal. 34. 

Triple*: Wilson. ICC. 19: Butler. Cle. 13; 
Puckett. Mliuv. 12; BarfleMt Tor. 9; Femcm- 
itat Ter. 9. 

Home Runs: Fbk.Chi.35; BalbanL K.G.32; 
Evaiu. Dot. 3),- 7 homes. Sea. 31; 3 are itod 
wllh 28. 

Staton Bam: Henderson. N.Y. 70: Peltts. 
CaL 51; Butter, Cto. 41; Wilson, ICC. 40: 
Srtiim. ICC. 34; Masebv. Tor. 34. 

PITCHING 

Wen-Lmd/Wtanloo PcL/ERA: Guidry, 
N.Y. 19-5, Jn. 107: Soberhoeen. K.C. 184. 
J50, 273; Htguera. MIL 134. 484, 408: Key. 
Tor. 134. 484. 105; Burns. ChL 174.480, 3JEL 
strtfcBoats: Blyleven. AUnn. 179; Morris. 
Del. 177; Bannister, OrU 171; Hurst. 80 S. 140: 
Bums. ChL 157. 

Saves: Qubenberrv, K.C. 34; Hemandeb 
Del. 28; James. ChL 77; Mooro.CoL.27; How- 
ell. Oak. 25; Rlghelll. N.Y. 25. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 


Tim Slnwsoa 5)1530 

70-71 -46-73 — 279 


G 

AB 

R 

H 

Pci. 

Gragg Twiggs. 51X530 

66-46-70-73 — 279 

McGee SLL 

132 

534 

100 

189 

J9I 

Pal McGowan, 511530 

72-73-44-45 — m 

Guerrero LA. 

124 

439 

92 

Ml 

.321 

Larry Rinker. 513330 

65-70-46-73 — 27V 

Herr SIX. 

139 

523 

S3 

163 

J)2 

Jodie Mudd. CIJOO 

73-7046-70-288 

Sandberg ChL 

133 

539 

« 

168 

Jtt 

David Frost. 58400 

70-48-78-72—080 

Raines Men. 

134 

519 

102 

161 

JIB 

Mike Sullivan. *8.700 

48-74-71-47—280 

Gwvtm SX>. 

136 

555 

74 

171 

JOB 

Jl«n Halleff. 54800 

70-71-47-73—281 

Parker CJn. 

Ml 

553 

72 

199 

J04 

Payne Stewart. S4400 

68-73-71-70—281 

Oester Oil 

132 

456 

Sl 

139 

JOS 

Don Pooler. >6800 

72-46-72-71—281 

Sdocda LA. 

122 

367 

37 

111 

J02 

Andy Bean. SL600 

71-48-70-73—281 

Cruz Hhi. 

128 

497 

58 

149 

J00 


Jeff Senders. S4JB» 
Rues Cochrane. UW 
George Bums. S4OB0 
Clark Burroughs. S4400 


4B47-7B-77— 2B? 

48- 71-48-75-20 

49- 48-73-72 — 282 
74-79-7147— 2B2 


European Soccer 


»#IT u/aIIKEE (AF) — Veteran Jim Thorpe shot a 2-uiufcr-par 70 ™ c training center experts to the 
be J? i gunday to win his first PGA tour chaminoQsh^,^a throMtroke Unitcd Sjal^ in Sepwraber or Oc- 


l976,hadafour- 

roun^J"^ iSJ'with a 71; tied for thhdal279 were Lany Rinker (a 
*525 tri » m Twiggs m Fht McGowan 

^^tadFabdm 

Quotable 

after a foul brill cansee^ [mm toe on-dock arde. If « s wo 

VS2SS&. I’ve ovcrcstijMledtoL If it's on the mral, I ]mow»0I 


tober 1986. Another Soviet delega- 
tion is to participate in “an ex- 
change of mformation on wort of 
sports medkdne-sdence centers'’ in 
October or November, 1986. 

Two other Soviet visits are slated 
for next year; three US. delega- 
tions (comprising USOC leaders, 
drug experts and track and field 
coaches) are to visit toe Soviet 
Union in 1986. No dates have been 
set 


SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
B arc a taoa 2. Ooaouna 2 
Cffaa J. Yaunde a 
Vaitodoiid L zaraaara 1 
Rood Socfadod 2, Ratio 2 
Horculas a BBbao 1 
Cadiz £ Affrtfco Madrid 0 
Carta i Eswdlol 1 
Roal Madrid 1, Bo n tandf D 
Savlrta 4, Las Paknas 8 
Potato: Roal Maorta. ARitatlc Bilbao 7; at- 
|«i8; Zarogaa, Alletla Madrtd, Real soda- 
dod. Barts Si B o ra o lcno, VoOadond, Savtlkb 
Valoncte, CadBeC; Ooaouna. CaJto 3/ BspafaL 
Bantandor 2; Harcutow Usi Polmoo 1. 


Transition 


top 


Other exchanges are tentatively 
set for 1987. (AP. UP!) 


have u> i 


COLLEQB 

KANSAS STATE— AiNttuncod tt» rastoao- 
Itonor Jim Dldwy.taaltaaliGDarti. Nomad Laa 
Moan football aeacft- 


Buos; Murphy.AtL 108 ; Ralra^ Man. IK; 
McGee, SI.U TOO; SanOwre. ChL 94 ; Cote- 
man. SU— 94 . 

RBli: Parker. Cln. 103 ; Murphy, Ah. 97 ; 
H 04 T. Sf.L. 94 ; Wilson. PhlL «; 4 are ffWarffh 
84 . 

Hits: McGee, 3 ( 1 — 119 ; Gwynn. SJ 9 . 171 ; 
Parker, an. 149 ; Sandbars, ChL 148 : Harr, 
SU — 141 

Doubles: Parker, On. 34 ; Wlhon. PhlL 34 ; 
WDIIach.M 0 n. 34 ; Herr, Sf.L. 33 ; Cruz. Hou. 
32 . 

Trialas: McGee, St.L, 14 ; Haines. Man. 11 ; 
Samuel. PhlL 11 ; Cotoman. SU. 10 ; Gamer . 
Hou. 8 . 

Home Reas: Murahv, At). 35; Guerrero. 
LA. K; Schmidt, PhlL 29 ; Carter. N.Y. 27 ; 
Parker, an, 27. 

Stales Bases: Coleman. Sf.L. 95 ; Raines. 
Mon. 58 ; Sandberg. CM. 44 ; McGee. SI.L. - 45 ; 
SamuaL Phil. 45 . 

PITCHING 

Htao-LostAMkotog PcL/ERA: Franco. Cln. 
13 - 2 . 457 . 149 ; Gooden. N.Y. 294 . 433 . 148 ; 
Hendiber, UA- 15 * 431 249 ; Wekft, LA. 11 - 
X - 786 . 117 : Smith, Men. 14 - 5 . Jil 241 ; Dar- 
ling. N.Y. ta- 5 . J 62 , 274 . 

Sh-rkeeeh: Gooden. N.V. 238 ; Soto, Oil 
HO; Rv 40 > Heu. 191 ; Vaieraaieta. LA. 189 ; 
Fernandez, N.Y- 152 . 

Saves: Reardon, Mgn. 35 ; Smith. ChL 28 ; 
Smlm.Hau. 34 ; Suffer. AIL 23 ; G«so«.SJD. 
22 ; Power, On, 22 . , 



PL F00TBAIL 
miMACK! 



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9 


Page 20 


I INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1985 



JAPAN POSTCARD 

Making a Theater World 


By Maggie Jackson 

The Associated Press 

T OGA. Japan — Nine years 
ago. the avant-garde theater di- 
rector Tadashi Suzuki exiled him- 
self and his up-and-coming compa- 
ny to the remote mountains of 
western Japan. 

At his first performance there, 
1,000 people showed up. Suzuki 
tore the doors off his theater so all 
could see, and despite a raging 
thunderstorm no one outside left. 

Suzuki remains removed from 
the hub of Japanese theater but 
closer than ever to the forefront of 
international drama. He is the un- 
disputed leader of the avant-garde 
in Japan. 

“I though i nothing creative 
could be born in Tokyo,” said Su- 
zuki, a soft-spoken man who turns 
into a fiery force in rehearsal. “I 
consider Tokyo a show window of 
art,” buL not a place “where art can 
be produced.” 


‘S 


company, the former Wa- 
seda Little Theater, is now called 
the Suzuki Company of Toga, and 
he is in his I9th year as its bead. He 
has attracted widespread attention 
for his adaptions of Greek classical 
plays, his method of training actors 
and, more recently, his annual in- 
ternational theater festivals in 
Toga. 

An American reviewer wrote af- 
ter seeing Suzuki's best-known 
work, “The Trojan Women.” at the 
Arts Festival erf the 1984 Los Ange- 
les Olympic Games, that the play 
was “one of the single greatest 
nights in the whole sweep of world 
theater, an experience of shattering 
— if not traumatic — impact.” 

In “Trojan Women.” the troupe, 
led by the actress Kayoko Shirai- 
shi, unleashes a forceful condem- 
nation of war through the eyes of 
an old woman possessed by the 
spirits of the survivors of ancient 
Troy. A combination of drama and 
dance, the production transcends 
language barriers. It is a symbol of 
Lhe international theater that Su- 
zuki would like to create. 

The company has had successful 
runs in New York. Paris and To- 
kyo. and. last year, in San Diego, 
London. Copenhagen. Brussels. 
Washington, Athens and Delphi, 
Greece. 

This summer, at Suzuki's third 
festival, about 8,000 actors, writers, 
directors and devotees journeyed to 
Toga. 650 kilometers (400 miles) 
northwest of Tokyo, to see compa- 


nies from the United States, the 
Netherlands and France perform 
along with Suzuki's troupe at the 
latter's unlikely home, a small clus- 
ter of farmhouses. Between pro- 
ductions. visitors strolled around 
the compound where in 1976 Su- 
zuki finally decided he had found 
the setting and architecture best 
suited to his productions. 

Suzuki uses farmhouses from 
western Japan because they are 
large and nave high ceilings and 
wide interiors. He transferred three 
farmhouses to Toga and converted 
one into a theater. The second he 
turned into a dormitory. The third 
serves as a teahouse. Nearby he had 
a Greek-style amphitheater built 

His actors answer phones, wash 
and mend costumes, set up lighting 
and props, even usher before pro- 
ductions. They also spend up to 10 
hours a day in t raining . 

The Suzuki method consists of 
exercises drawn from Japanese rit- 
uals and classical theater, mostly 
for the feet and lower torso. It is 
aimed at conditioning the actors 
physically and forcing them to re- 
cover connections with the earth, 
connections Suzuki believes have 
been losL 

“From the ground we draw our 
energy," Suzuki wrote in his book 
“The Grammar of Footwork." 
“The feet are the last remaining 
pan of the human body that has 
kept, literally, in touch with the 
earth." 

Jeff Burnett, a Yale Drama 
School professor who was one of 26 
foreigners studying at Toga for the 
summer, called' the Suzuki method 
“brutal” but worthwhile. “The 
training this summer is going to 
strengthen every one of us as ac- 
tors,” he said, predicting that the 
method would “strengthen the 
American theater enormously.” 

Further, the training fuses the 
actors together as an ensemble, 
said Masuhiro Kato, a member of 
Suzuki's troupe. “We share body 
language" and thus are more sensi- 
tive to one another's movements in 
performance, he said. 

“I would like to see different 
people from different countries 
working here together in 10 years.” 
Suzuki said. “I would like to make 
this area a theater republic. Maybe 
some day we will secede from Ja- 
pan.” 

Art Budtwald is on vacation. 


Turning 80, Garbo Is as Elusive as Ever 

"Being in the Newspapers Is Atcfully Silly,' She Said — Almost 50 Years Ago 


By Paul Roscnficld 

Los Angeles Times Service 

«'\17‘OULD you like to have 
VY dinner with Garbo?” 

Irwin Shaw, in the course of a 
very long night, decided that the 
question ranked right up there 
noth the best questions he'd ever 
heard. Shaw said the line a g ain, 
savoring it. “Would you like to 
have dinner with Garbo?" The 
raconteur and novelist was talk- 
ing about Greta Garbo as a 
neighbor, and he was as dramatic 
as ever. (Which is to say that 
Shaw seasoned his stories with 
more than a grain of salt) 

In Switzerland, said Shaw, his 
place and Garbo's were nearby. 
For months on end. maybe years, 
Shaw hounded friends to get an 
introduction. Finally it came. 
“Would you like to have dinner 
with Garbo?” asked a friend. 

Shaw’s anecdote stopped there, 
with just the question. The gentle- 
man writer was not about to talk 
about such a dinner, or when or 
even whether it came to pass. Nor 
should one expect him to. Some 
things are sacred, and Garbo's 
privacy is among them. 

One' fact, however, is worth 
noting. On Wednesday. Garbo 
turns 80. 

So what, you ask. After alL 80 
is what 70 used to be. And Garbo 
will celebrate her own way. She 
has managed, perennially, to out- 
fox her pursuers, the media. Life 
magazines entertainment editor. 
Jim Watters, whose graceful book 
on aging Hollywood stars, “Re- 
turn Engagement.” features ev- 
erybody but Garbo, said recent- 
ly: “To have her on the cover erf 
Life on her 80th birthday would' 
cap my career as a joumansL" He 
did not have to add that a brand- 
new picture of Garbo for the cov- 
er of Life would have meant an 
annuity for any photographer. 

But, as somebody said in the 
film “Sunset Boulevard,” life can 
be strangely merciful The pho- 
tographers and' the reporters and 
the television cameras have let 
her be. There was a rumor last 
year that the director Sidney Lu- 
met had persuaded Garbo to play 
herself in his film “Garbo Talks." 
It proved unfounded. (Lumet 
persuaded the lyricist Betty Com- 
den to play Garbo.) 



hum 


Garbo on the street in 1976 and in “Ninotchka” (1939). 


Lumet his crews spent weeks 
outside her apartment on East 
50th Street in Manhattan, where 
Garbo- watching has become a 
virtual cottage industry, with 
shopkeepers and doormen boast- 
ing of chance encounters. 

Garbo lives by herself, socializ- 
ing only rarely and never granting 
interviews. 

“Being in the newspapers is 
awfully silly," she said in her last 
published interview, almost 50 
years ago. “ICs all right for im- 
portant people who nave some- 
thing to contribute, to talk. I have 
nothing to contribute.” 

Yet she contributed, in her 
short career, some of the greatest 
performances on film, in such 
pictures as “Flesh and the Devil” 
1 1927). “Anna Christie” (1930), 
“Grand Hotel” (1932), “Queen 
Christina” (1933), “Camine” 
(1936) and “Ninotchka” (1939). 
She retired after the flop of 
“Two-Faced Woman" 1941). 

She was nominated for three 
Academy Awards, but never re- 
ceived one. She was named recip- 
ient of a special Oscar in 1954 
“for her unforgettable screen per- 
formances.” 


Garbo’s law — that legend in- 
creases in proportion to seclusion 
— applies to everyone from Jac- 
queline Onassis to Michael Jack- 
son to Jennifer Jones. It is a code, 
invented 'by Garbo upon her re- 
tirement in 1941-.. and it works. 
Why, and how? 

A top New York publicist had 
one explanation: “Years ago. I 
was a salesgirl at Henri Bendd on 
57th Street, and I sold hosiery to 
Garbo. I'm telling you the God’s 
honest truth that I didn't know it 
was her. at least not the first few 
times, because she would indicate 
her purchases without talking. 
The day she opened her mouth, I 
knew it was Garbo, ft was the 
voice. But the other salesgirls, see. 
they always knew Garbo when 
she came in. One girl knew her 
'cause of the eyes. Another, from 
the bangs. But me, I needed to 
hear the voice. When I heard it, I 
froze. But I didn't let on to her 
that I knew. That’s how you react 
to Garbo.” 

“Exactly,” said Anne Bancroft 
when she was told this story. It 
was Bancroft who played the dy- 
ing mother in Lumet's film last 
year. “I saw her once, in New 


York." Bancroft remembered. 
“Joan Crawford you could walk 
up to, and even Katharine Hep- 
bum, if you were an actress — her 
you could approach. Maybe 
young actresses need role models, 
I don't know. Crawford fascinat- 
ed me at one point, and i got to 
know her. But Garbo? No. I 
looked, and then looked away. I 
don’t care who you are, you have 
to respond to her dignity, her 
need to be unapproacned. 

If a salesgirl and a movie star 
respond this way, you have to ask 
yourself, “What would you do?" 

Last fall, in the middle of a 
long Saturday night, l saw Greta 
Garbo. What you do is what Ban- 
croft did. You look, and then 
-look away. 

What you see is so personal so 
beautiful. it borders on betrayal 
to describe iL Garbo has an un- 
compromised face. She has not 
told anything, and it shows. Not a 
gesture or a glance is artificial. 
She is private. No questions 
asked, none answered. 

“Would you tike to have dinner 
with Garbo?” 

Sorry, Mr. Shaw, I would noL 
Nor, I suspect, did you. 


people 


Films Still in the Dump 


A film historian wants to recover 
as many as 300 silent movies buried 
under 3,000 tons of garbage in a 
county landfill in Los Angeles. 
Paul Caruso of Archival Research 
Co. said that, after a nine-month 
search, he discovered an old film 
vault sealed off in 3 Hollywood 
studio that had been turned into an 
office building. Only 21 films were 
left, mil of 200 to 300 film cans, he 
.said. These included works by 
Charlie and another comic, 

Charlie Weaver, and silent Chinese 
films from before World War II. 
But most of the films, he learned, 
had been hauled to a landfill and 
covered by garbage. A sanitation 
official said that searching through 
the garbage would cost at least 
$2^00 a day. 


A former BBC reporter, Anthony 
Summers, writes in “Goddess: The 
Secret lives of Marilyn Monroe," 
published by Macmillan, that the 
actor Peter Lzwford destroyed a 
letter or suicide note from the ac- 
tress to protect Robert and John 
Kennedy, then his brothers- in-law, 
who have long been reported to 
have had affairs with Monroe. 
Summers, who also wrote “Con- 
spiracy," a book about the assassi- 
nation of John F. Kennedy, says 
Monroe did not die at home, after 
taking an overdose of barbituates 
on Aug. 4, 1962. but in an ambu- 
lance en route to a hospital: her 
body was then returned home, 
Summers says, because Robert 
Kennedy, then U. S. attorney gen- 
eral, was with her. “Even had he 
□ever had an affair with Marilyn — 
and all the evidence suggests the 
contrary — for a Kennedy to be 
found with a dead Marilyn Mon- 
roe, even on a legitimate mission of 
mercy, would have meant certain 
political disaster,” the book says. 
Lawford, who was divorced from 
Patricia Kennedy in 1966. died last 
December. Bob Mann, a spokes- 
man for Senator Edward M. Ken- 
nedy, said the family would have no 
comment oa the book- 


Erskme Caldwell, 82, who in nov- 
els such as “God’s Ultle Acre” and 
“Tobacco Road” depicted the 
seamy side of life in the U. S. 
South, has returned to his native 
Georgia as a lecturer, and found 
that be is still resented there. 
“Some things will never be forgot- 


ten - or foremen,” Caid*^ 
•‘Uhink that's human nature^ I 
don't think it's 

Caldwell worked as a reporter on 
the Atlanta Journal Were sun 
his first novel in 19-9. 

a 

Hamilton Jordan. 4 0. eh ief^of 
staff under President Jimmy 
ter, has cancer of the lympthauc 
system. “At this point it is too early 
to say exactlv what son ^ treat- 
ment he will be undergoing. But the 
normal treatment for Tympthoma is 
chemotherapy, radiation or a com- 
bination of both," said Judy Snum. 
information officer Tor the Atla nta^ 
hospital where Jordan was takers^ 
She said his doctors had not deter- 
mined the exact location of the can- 
cer. Jordan has stayed out of the 
spotlight since leaving Washington 
at the end of Carter’s term in 1980. 
He wotks as a business and pohu- 
cal consultant and lives near Atlan- 
ta with his second wife, Do rothy , 
and their 18-month-oId son, Hamil- 
ton Jr. 


Buckingham Palace declined to 
comment ‘Monday on a newspaper 
report that Princess Margaret, as- 
ter of Queen Elizabeth H, watched 
members of the Rolling Stones 
rock group sniff cocaine before a 
1976 concert and called it an 
“amusing drug.” The Mirror. aJ 
mass -circulation tabloid, quoted*! 
the group’s former tour manager. 
Peter Radge, as saying the princess, 
now 55, watched Keith Richards 
and Romne Wood sniff the drag 
from a silver spoon, and then 
smiled. “Ah, cocaine.” he quoted 
her as saying. “Such an amusing 
drug, don't you think?” The Mirror 
said that Rudge added, “At no time 
did 1 see the princess take the 
drug." 

□ 

A newspaper column fashioned 
from the writings and speeches of 
Pope John Paul Q, strongly criti- 
cized earlier by Vatican officials, 
will proceed with Vatican coopera- 
tion, the bead of the syndicates 
distributing the column says. Hie 
syndicates agreed to make several 
changes, including the column’s^ 
name, according to Richard & 
Newcombe, president of News 
America Syndicate and The Times 
of London Syndicate, both owned 
by Rqwrt! 


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• Short or long term Bvdktoby 
World-Wide Baanets Centres 

1 lOThe Stnrad London WC2R OAA 
Tefe OI 836-8918 The 24973 


YOUR OFFICE IN PARIS: TRE& 

ANSWERING, senna seaHory. 
errands, maba. Sw 24H/doy. 
TeL PAT: 409 9S 95. 


UWETUS - ZURICH • 252 76 21. 

PHONE / TELEX / TELEGRAMS. 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


ETOILE 

fURNSHS 

OFFICES 

VBtY HIGH CLASS 

COMSSNCE ROOMS, 
SHOWROOM. SKRETAUAT-TBBC 
Teh (1)727 IS 59 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 

fb reintete can buy STUD IQS/ APAET- 
M69TC J CHALETS, LAW GBCVA - 
MONTRHJX or in these world famous 
resortseOANS-MONTANA, IB 
DIABtBSTS, VHBfflL VTUAJtS, 
JURA & region of G5TAAD. From 
71KUXXL Mwtgages 60* at 614% 

UBT8SK. 

REVACSJA 

52 Mortbnlart, CH-T202 GBCVA. 
TeL 022/34(540. Telex: 22000 


LAKE GBCVA area Ftragnm 1 
buy: t 4 *i tme n l butlAna with 8 apart- 
inteta, dl rented auL SF1 .920^00- H. 
5 SOLD SA. CH-1007 Lnraonoa Tet 
21/252611. 


SPAIN 


ALICANTE Vilas & utxta ite ils for 
safe, rural ft beoth locations, low 
pricH. wwrttteed title (feeds, from 
Pira Z450U0Q. Travel/viewing ex- 
penses refunded an arrthase. AGr- 

6 A East St, NoL 

Tel: 


cndaBoyel 


UK." 

Nofenghrsa 470501 . Tlx 371 07 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA 

AMBASSADOR PARK 

PARADISE FOR THE HAPPY FEW 

An exdutive Medterranc wi t^agt is 
befog built ngfe by the ieo on the most 
bea^rfol site on Mdbrts. Med loco- 
lion. 20 m inu tes front FUuta. Spacious 
op er tment s , 1 to 3 bedrooms, aB with 
large terraces. Veiy high quaBy * 
iriidiaitei faMi i ippi en Hlt 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


PAIMA DE MALLORCA 

Luxury Bats u voriodo ny the bay and 
oty or Pakna Stuatea at the Befcer 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


VBW AMBASSADOR PARK AND 
BE CONYR4GED 
For iufexmatiart 
GLOBE PUNS A. 

Ay. MorvKepas 24, 

CH-1005 LALISAM't'Switrerland 
Tel: (21) 22 35 12. Trial 85 MRJSCH. 


Broker Enqunee Wefoome 


M A MARVBOUS dty of South AB- 
emte, vilos ftflets. 40 bn inti airport 
marine, 18-gotL Price frorn 540XC0. 


m 


Jtnoal agency. Umesi 
AbBite/3465710985. 


Conesa/Torre- 


Catie Pcxk in a very quad end elegant 
trta. excelerd vdae. Two ran. from 
the aty center. Swiramng pools, saun 
term and pmate parkmg. Rat with 
b e dramm . wtng, dmmg etc. 242 sqm. 
+ fc m n 32 son, price in USX no. 
260/00 to 350i0Q. P»rthorae-9bed- 
roans. Kving, (firing etc 913 sani. + 
tarace 404 njn, price in IBS ca 
ZZXt&XL _ _ 

For fi/rther information 
Pfoase ask; 

INVERSORA BOR1A 5JL 

JOSE BORIA 6 SON ARMADANS 
□7074 PALMA DE MALLORCA 
Tet *71489900 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


43EAT BRITAIN 


LUXURY HJORSIB) APARTMB4T5. 

ftify serviced. dra» of Mayfair or 
odj u o enf lo Knosingtan Moo. from 
£300 to £550 p er tra de 3 montig to 2 
years. Hunte uwt MvvTjff rnertf Ltd 
01-491 2626. Telex: 2991 


LONDON. For tin best funahed fiats 

aid houses- Consult the S p ecM fou 
fWipi. Kay and Lewi*. TeL South of 
Pa«L 352 Bill. North of Pa* 722 
5135. Telex 27846 RESIDE G. 


ALPMAM APARTMENTS br 1 
sarvnd Cportm O Btf, 5 nuns. 1 
dntanoe to Oxford WBand St, 1 Har- 
ley Sl £57 per day. Tel London 01 -636 
« 21. He 8841% M09F G. 


PAHIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy 

8 Avs.de 


Service 


75O0R Pafe 
Tries 231696 F 

YOUR REAL STATE 
AGENT IN PAWS 
562-7899 


AT HOME M PARIS 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENTS FOR IffitiT OR SALE 

gjgTpS* 8 563 25 60 


- / 
{ 


PAGE 7 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


International Secretarial Positions 


Printed by gdz In Zurich (Switzerland) 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


ASSISTANT! 

DE DIRECTION 
TOP NIVEAU 

IMPBIA1TVEMB4T 
M WGUE ANGIAK 

'urination Boc rniininv ayont dAfo 
ravafl* dans une petite structure 


taporaable de tomes Is t&dhes lifia A 
Tmpfctaafianer Fraice de notre sooi- 
r* mformrtkjtte, rife sera 6 Tunoge de 
noire dynmriente, la coflrixratnce de 
noire Rreeteur G 6 n 6 rai: vrve, rigour- 
euse, mteBgente, tfisponble. 

Compfeternent aitonome sur le plan 
(Tun seafitariat avfapfe quele devra 
l u t ri emert tnaRriter. rife pasrtrfar o 
tfexeeflertes quetitfo d'mtiotTv», de 
contact, de gefoon et eTargamunon. 

Barifenl ifiveau de rii nuntr ofa i . Lieu 
de trout* CHAMPS B.Y5EE5. 

Debutantes et peno nn es ne axresporv 
dart pas 6 a paste sdbstenlr. 

Merd tfadretsw CV. + feme menu- 
scrite & photo sous rtf. 103 ft 
ALPHA C33I 

181 Av. Charles de Garife, 
92200 NeuOy 5tr Sene, France. 


Pans Subsidiary Group 

Ptenod Beard 
web for 

its Ex p ort Dtportntert 

ADMINISTRATIVE 
ASSISTANT 

B4GUSH Mona TONGUE 
PRBSIAB1E 

In charge of.the utkiii fotro ti o n of ex- 
port doom, possibly ato to tafcm 
charge of oomrnnrdql secretarial duties 
corresponding to the lector. 


i of M comerca. Perfect 
> oi Engfah ft French 
1 of Germon a plus. Good 

• &dge of French shorthand 
jp prerictftl Free inneefiateiy. 
S&xi CV to: Contese Pubfcrfe 
sntff 16309. 20 Ave Opera 
750*0 Pars Cedex 01 
who wit forvrtxd. 


MATURE EXFBieKB} domteta: s» 
a-e»ry/PA reguaed «mnetiately for 
fonriy based m the South of Ftotcb, 

to 

pr&riALMusSwe. ExraSnrSS 

ry offered. For further delate send 

cv, r ric rBi xj e t and recent photo to 

Box 2697, Herald Tribune, 92521 
NewBy Cedex, France 


LEGAL. SECRETARY. Growing nOl 
node law fem seeks 2 secretaries: 1 1 
friUkra and I part-time. BSngucL 
Tynq^ wpra Wang ex^nepce 
cuwra. bone mums Jo: Cabmai 
Hays, 8 FVsoe Vendocne, 75001 Paris, 
atirt Jane Taylor, Esq. 


Secretarial 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MBlKSVC Sffl3 for AMBUCAN 
HRMS in PAHS: 


EngGsh. 

seaetanei, 
qwred, English 
tries*. Write 
Victor Hugo, ^11 
TB 61 69; 


Dutch or Gemoi 
of French ra- 
id. BSngual 
phone: 138 Avenue 
6 Paris, Frax*. Tet 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY / Office 
Monqger for Americnn Bums Gf- 
fias raris, biSnguri Engfeh/French, 
writ or gor ged pe rs on, obfe fa per- 
form concurrency eortend fcto - 
p oi rtt menH. travri scheckAng, Sght 
t)rpmg) and other moMy admridro- 
five tasks finduefirta brl wym niii 

TrSwne. 9252lF4euBy C«kxl Franoe 


MiatNATIONALLAW RRM in Paris 
seefo Enghh mother 
secretary with etariL . _ 

Engfah. Apply wife Of: Box 2728, 
Horab Tribune. 92521 NeuOy Cedex. 
Frcnee 


TELEX, TYfWG. word pl 

Req wnd langoages French. &i^sh ft 
Spanish taTcwnputer company. Box 
27% Herald Trif 
Cedex, France 


FOREK3N RANK M PARIS 8 TH seeks 
young hAnguri French-Engfafi typist/ . 
dert Fluency in Engfahenentxiti 
Send c-v. to Box Z722, Triune, ' 
92S21 NeuBy Cedex, France 


PART-TIME ENGLISH mother tonne 
hfinpxj secretary. Hdf days or Tfo 
days a week. Paris suburb, GH sur 
Yvette. M. Ptt>BONO(d) 941 B0 *0. 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


FR0KH EXECUTIVE SEOSCAKY / 

RA. 1 7 years expaima top manage- 

reert level muttmatond car 
France, Europe, Ana fluert I 
good German, seeks new l_. ... 
Pmstarea Free now. Tet 776 1702 or 
Box 2733. Horrid Trih™, 92521 
Neuily Cedex, Fraice 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


Quofified 


RANDSTAD 

BftMGUAL AG 8 ICY TvDy Bfeoyd 
^758 12 40 TefnPOr °Per»w2 


B4GUSH MOTHK TONGUE. French 

nation gt ty, ex-exeanive seaeftry, 
39, seeks motivating 10 b, part-line or 
flrafole hours. PreteriijfeSoirth Paris 
or near Sceaux. Bax 2701, Herald 
Tnbune, 92521 Neuily Cedex, France 


E Xfm iCBl SEOttTAAT &gCfo 

mrtla tongue, French spvridn^ car, 
seeks part-tune position, Paris area 
Teh 66 ! 24 71 or write Box 2714, 
Her rid Tribune, 92521 Neuily Cedex, 
France 


EXECUTIVE HUNGUAL secretary, 
Frwndi/Endish wrJced m nt'J de- 
p ortmen fa ft USA. seeks ireeredunft 
Bvety position, west of Paris. Tet 772 
16 tt2 Paris or Box 2717. Herdd Tri- 
bum. 92521 NeuBy CeAx, Franc 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


G 8 IMAN LADY, 29, RUBfT Engbh, 
3 yean working experience in Japan 
king some _ Jopmese ft Frsndv) 
for mteresfaig position oversees. 
Pfease reriy to: Box 2196. IHT. Fite- 
rfodrtr. 15, D6000. FrcrMirt/M. 


— - — Engfafi mother 

tongue, rrendi, Spansh, seeks new 
bon over 45 wife sense of humour. 
RepEes Bax 2683, Herald "* 
925 21 NeuBy C edex. France 


Tribune, 


TROJNGUAL Secretary, Arabrc . — 
~di / French, series PA position to 
|h feW mexiagar in Pars. Write Box 


Cedex, France 


92521 Neuriy 


LOOKING RM TOP BIUNGUAL 
samri? CoS the nwli GR NTC 
Mrs Eenard 758 82 30 Pans 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY French/Eng- 
Ssh shorfeand/typst tdex seeks erfter. 
noon iow mploofenent. 651 9513 Ports 


EXECUTIVE SEOOtTARY Frendi/Eno- 
U seeks partian, Paris 361 2311 


s o c ks for its International division at 
its headquarters in Paris !a Defense 


BILINGUAL SECRETARY 

- INGUSH-FRENCH 

for the American section of its International division. 

The job would suit o perfectly biEngual professional person, 
BTS or equivalent, having at least 2 or 3 years experience. 
Extensive work on word processor, handing qf documerta- 
lion, statistics, translations, fifing, telephone, organizing busi- 
ness trips and various administrative tasks. 

Please send handwritten letter, detailed CV., photo aid 
salar y requir ed, under reference 737B7/F to.- MneOERR 
S 6 I e C EGOS, Tour OwnBnceaux. 92516 Boufagite Cede*. 


f 


PRESIDN 1 OF PRIVATELY OWNS) GROUP OF COMPANIES 
REQUIRES SECRETARY/ PERSONAL ASSISTANT 

We are looking for a peraozz with a cheerful, outgoing personality, of smart 
appearance and with good secretarial skills. Applicants should ^bare a good general 
education, possibly Lo nmvenoty LeveL Fluency in English and good written/spo- 
ken French are required. ” 

The successful ca n dida t e will work closely with the Chairman and become 
involved in his business and personal affaire and will he required to travel 
extensively with him. A salary of £15,000-20.000 is negotiable and fi*fl expenses 
wiD be paid. Applicants aged between 25 and 35 whh complete mobility ami no 
personal ties are invited to write enclosing a Curriculum Vitae and a recent 
photograph. 

All ktiere will be acknowledged and the identity of the Groop will be disetoed to 
short listed candidates prior to interview. 

Reply in confidence Uk 

Box P-123, fate malgond Herald Trttwne, 

ts= — 1 81 Ave. Qtaries-de-Gaune, 92S21 Neuilly Cedex. ; 


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