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INTERNATIONAL 






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Published With He New York Times and The Washington Post 

“ PARIS, WEDNESDAY/SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 


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Kohl Aide Defects, 
Suspected as Spy 


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Toe American actor Peter Falk, center, and Rome police 
with an unexploded grenade on the ViaVeneto. Mr. Faft 
played a detective on toe relevisioo program ‘‘Colombo.* 

Grenade Attack at Cafe 
Injures 39 on Via Veneto 


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By Loren Jenkins 

y Washington not Service .. 

ROME — Thirty-nine persons 
were injured in a hand-grenade at- 
tack on a tourist caffe here and a 
Lebanese-born Palestinian was 
charged Tuesday in the incident 

The blast occurred late Monday 
night in the Caffe de. Paris, featured' 
in Federico FettihfsfiIm“LaDpIce 
Vita" 25 years ago. 

Identifying the attacker as Ah- 
med Al Hossdn Abu Sercya, the 
Rome police chief, Marcello Mon- 
area. said, “For us, be is the man. 

Tbe police spotted Mr v Sareya 
running fromthescene aftteragre- , 
^ode, one of tod thrown^ixpJoded 
on the Via Venetotidewalk'in front 
of the crowded caffe. - - 

The second grenade, which did 
not explode; was sel off by poKce 
explosives experts, early Tuesday 
morning after the street had been 
sealed off. 

Rome’s police said thit Mr. Ser- 
eya was carrying a false Moroccan 
^isport, and was apprehended af- 


INSIPE 

B A trip to northern Sri Lanka 
revealed widespread sijms of 
separatist violence. Page 1 

& South Africa's raid into An- 
gola revived the issue of Cuban 
troops there. Page 2. I 


ter a half-mile chase through dark- 
ened streets. 

Mr. Sereya, 27, idd an Arabic - 

^dbatle was not responsible for 
the atiadc. 

“I am a Palestinian, I fight for 
my people. but I did not do what I 
am being accused of," the Italian 
. hews agency ANSA said that Mr. 
Sereya oad tdd the Arabic-speak- 


E An Oregon 
top followers 
cist state” 


ora accused his 
creating a **fas- 
Page3. 




.-55? 

-T. ia ■ 


QUi. officials toned down 
iheir version of the detention of 
two soldiers by Soviet forces in 
East Germany. Page 3. 

g East Germany seeks an ac- 
cord with the Bonn government 
on a chemical weapons ban in 
4 «jrope. ** l *8 e *- 

§ In Lebanon, firepower and 
fighting are symbiotic. Page 4. 

BUSlNESS/FfNANCE 

a The U-S. Justice Department 
opposed United Airlines pro- 
posed purchase of 
pacific routes. rage u. 

s Hanson Trust lost a bid to lift 
j court-ordered ban on its pur- 
cha« of SCM shares. Page 13. 

SPECIAL REPORT 
How to choose a personal com- 
puter in a stabilizing mack* 
Small Computers. Page * 


v/itnesses variously reported the 
grenades being thrown from either 
a passing car or a speeding motor- 
hike. Several witnesses also de- 
scribed shots being fired behind the 
caffe before the grenade exploded. 

? T wiis sitting al a' table with my 
wife shortly after 11 PJvL wheh ; 1 
heard three toots," said Manuel 
Vfflaverdc. 52, a Spanish engbeex 
who lives in Buenos Aires. “I told 
my wife to gpt on the ground and I 
threw mysdf on top of her. There 
was. an explosion and 1 don’t re- 
member too much after that” 

Mr. Vfflaverde, who was wound- 
ed by shi^md. said that his wife, 
who received a cot on the face, 
remembered a dark car speeding by 
ibe restaurant shortly before the 
shots and explosion. 

“My feeling is that the gunshots 
were fired to make people get up 
from the tables before the grenade 
went off," Mr. Vfflaverde said. 
"But coming from Argentina and 
knowing about those things, 1 
didn’t stand op but hit the ground." 

No group has claimed responsi- 
bility for the attack. 

“We still don’t know if there 
were one, two or three people in- 
volved," Mr. Monaxca said. “We 
have several ideas as to the motive 
and are examining them, but for 
the moment. 1 cannot say anything 
dse." 

"We don't think it was a deliber- 
ate attack against Americans or 
any other group," he added. ‘There 
wasn't one big group of tourists but 
lots of small groups of different 
nationalities who were there by 
chance.” 

Mr. Monarca said that a search 
of Mr. Sereya's hotel room near the 
Via Veneto had turned op plane 

tickets that showed he had original- 
ly Down from Damascus to Vienna, 
then apparently made his way to 
Italy. He bad an unused portion of 
the round-trip ticket to return to 
Syria from Vienna. 

Only one of the- injured, the ca- 
fe’s oook who was serving tables 
when the blast occurred, was in- 
jured seriously. Most were either 
treated at emergency hospitals and 
released Monday night or released 
during tire day. 


By William Drozdiak 

Washing on Post Srrvn <• 

BONN — The West German 
government announced Tuesday 
that a secretary in Chancellor Hel- 
mut Kohl’s office had defected to 
East Germany and is suspected of 
being a Communist agent. 

The secretary, Herta-Astrid 
Wiliner, 45, sent an express letter to 
the chancellery saying that she was 

Moscow is expected to expel 
more Britons following further 
expulsions by London. Page 2. 

reagningherjob and taking refuge 
in East Berlin with her husband. 
The federal prosecutor’s office 
opened an investigation against tbe 
couple on suspicion of espionage, 
according to Mr. Kohl's spokes- 
man, Friedhelm OsL 

Herbert Adolf Wiliner, 59, Mrs. 
WiUnei*s husband, left East Ger- 
many in 1961 to settle in tbe West. 
He worked mast recently as a se- 
nior official at a research institute 
linked to the fiber al Free Democrat 
Parry, which has participated in all 
coalition governments in Bonn 
since 1969. 

In a letter to his employer senl 
from East Germany, Mr. Wiliner 
said he had defected because he 
feared imminent anest for "a crim- 
inal offense against the security of 
the Federal Republic.” 

Thelaiesi revelations marked the 
first tune that Mr. Kohl’s office had 
been directly implicated in the 
wave of defections and arrests that 
have shaken West Germany since 
early August 

The chancellor’s spokesman said 
that Mrs. WOlner. who had worked 
in the Chancellery since 1973, 
served as an assistant for Klaus 
Kdnig, a department bead for do- 
mestic affairs. • 

Mr. Ost acknowledged that the 
secretary could have seen sensitive 
reports on West Germany’s nuclear 
program and the European high- 
technology program known as Eu- 
reka. But he denied that she had 
access to confidential papers re- 
garding President Ronald Reagan’s 
Strategic Defense Initiative or 
space defense program. 

Three secretaries already have 
been exposed as Communist agents 
in tbe continuing espionage crisis, 
considered the worst in West Ger- 
man history. 

One, Margarets Hfike, was ar- 
rested and later confessed to pass- 
ing secret information to East Ger- 
many for the past 18 years. She 
worked for the foreign and security 
affairs adviser of President Richard 
von Weisz&cker and enjoyed high- 
level clearance for classified pa- 
pers. 


Government security experts 
have predicted further disappear- 
ances since tbe defection of Hans 
Joachim "Hedge, a senior counter- 
intelligence officer who was in 
charge of tracking East German 
spies before fleeing to East Berlin 
cm Aug. 19. 

The WUlners had come under 
suspicion some time ago and Mr. 
"Hedge was involved in their case, 
security sources said. Mr. "Hedge 
visited tbe institute where Mr. 
Wiliner worked at least once to 
learn more about his background. 


they added 
The fedei 


The federal prosecutors office 
said that the Wi linen were vaca- 
tioning in Spain when Mr. Tiedge 
defected and they apparently dis- 
appeared 10 days ago. 

Mrs. Wiliner was due to return to 
work Monday but when she failed 
to appear the prosecutor’s office 
began its inquiry. Her letter to tbe 
Chancellery said sbe decided to ac- 
company her husband to East Ger- 
many but made no reference to any 
spying activities she may have con- 
ducted. 

Security sources said it appeared 
that Mr. Wiliner may have been a 
counterespionage agent planted 
within the Free Democrat Party by 
East German intelligence. 

They said that Mrs. Wiliner may 
have become an accomplice after 
the couple’s marriage in 1974. one 
year after she left the Defense Min- 
istry to went at the Chancellery. 

Mr. Wiliner. who served as a 
member of the Nan SS before be- 
ing token prisoner by the Russians 
during the war, settled in East Ger- 
many in 1949. 

After coming to the West, he 
worked for a while as an editor at 
the newsweddy Der Spiegel in 
Hamburg, fn i965 he moved to 
Bonn where became active in the 
Free Democrats. 

Mr. Wiliner rose within the Free 
Democratic Party to become a se- 
nior official in the party's political 
department dealing with foreign 
and security affairs. He transferred 
in 1979 to the Friedrich Naumann 
Institute, a research institute fi- 
nanced by the Free Democrats. Of- 
ficials al the institute said that Mr. 
Wiliner did not have access there to 
any secret materials. 

"Hie opposition Social Demo- 
crats renewed their demands for 
the resignation of Interior Minister 
Friedrich Zimmetmann. who re- 
fused to heed earlier opposition 
calls to step down over the Tiedge 
affair. 

Meanwhile, Willy Brandi, chair- 
man of the Social Democrats, is to 
visit East Germany on Wednesday 
Tor the first time since a spy scandal 
forced him to resign as chancellor 
in 1974. 


Former Prime Minister 
Held in Thai Coup Plot 


Complied bp Our Staff From Di s patches 

BANGKOK — Police arrested 
the former prime nrimsier and 
three former top nnfitaiy officers 
Tuesday and charged them with 
treason hi connection with tbe a i- 

3 t last week to overthrow Thai- 
s elected government, the na- 
tional police chief said. 

General Narong Mahanonda, 
the police chi rf, identified the four 
as kriangsak Chomanan. prime 
rrunimer from 1977 to 1980 and a 
former supreme commander of the 
armed forces; Krasae Intharama, 
the former deputy supreme com- 
mander, Serai Na Nakhon, also a 
former armed forces supreme com- 
mander, and Yos Thepnasdin, for- 
mer deputy army commander in 
chief. 

Mr. Kriangsak, Mr. Sam and 
Mr. Yos woe with the rebels dur- 

time ihaTSie^were forced to join 
the plot against their wffl. 

Mr. Knangsak is leader of the 
National Democratic Party, one of 
four parties in Prime Minister 
Prexn Tinsulanonda’s coalition 
government. Mr. Firm s u ccee d ed 
Mr. Knangsak as prime minister. 


jLaura Ashley, Welsh Designer, Dies 


and her husband, Bernard, using In the early 1950s, the Ashleys 
.i 1 /tenters silk screens, started printing place- moved to Sumy and then, in tbe 

^roVENTRY. EuS 1 an d .’“ L ^Ti mats and scarves on their kitchen late 1950s to Canto, Wales, the 
, hleV 60. the We]sh s able in the Pimlico area of Lon- present world headquarters of the 

-i multimflH'M^^i^S^ dou. Laura Ashley operation. 


^S 3 rSTtionVBriush prints 
JSfaSU ^ Tuesday, a U»- 
tal sp°kesmafl 531 - her 


The business has expanded to g;nw» its 


inception, 
ible tor the 


Mr. Ashley 


• •*- k* • _ 


.*;« Hi 1 


•al spokesuww her and in ixw. company aiesgrowi and business aspects oi me compa- 

Mrs. Ashley. critical- $130 mfflkra mreroaikaally. The n « and Mrs. Ashley created its 

home in Brussels. n«“ D ^ k wbae firm designs, prints and sefls fab- designs. In Wales, where labor was 
m since 2 fa u j3 this rics. clothing, wallpapers and deco- plentiful the business nourished. 

Irvine with her “augh* - ene ver rative accessories that have come lo . . , . 

* i® central England- Sh synonymous with a simple, En- Mrs. Ashley, who had been 

l S I .rf“" dousDCSS f brought op. in. Wita found rc- 

rt ^ ir , . days in a coma- , cmaiUcsJe prints, Victorian ruf- newed inspiration in the coumry- 

spokesman said ne TSSoresf old-fashioned side and branching out from house- 
\ . Sat her accident JJJ * ° ^SockS. feminine dresses and lace- hold textiles, started designing and 
week lDa * i__,k„ r ihe LOtnpany smoc**, . . (—.rthacirMi making anrons and bousedresses. 



»t only tnc Asmeys s pnKuou * i»— -» — clothing WK migi- 

jnt of view but their down-home uafiy not meant as a fashion stare- Lanra Ashley 

’iosoohv as wdL menu but rather as practical doth- 

Mis. Ashley was bom Laura ' tag » wear aiomidihehorae.'njqr There are more than 220 Laura 
ountney in Merthyr Tydfil were M unracdiaCc sococss " Ashley shops worldwide, 70 of 

ales, on Sept. 7, 1925. In the late 1960s. Laura Ashley them in the United States. The 

She was married to Bernard Ash- weal into retailing, opening the vtoOy owned family business em- 

, in 1949 / first shop in London in 1969. ploys 4,000 people. 


- i Exchange next year as ^ ^ “f view but the& doin-home oaby not meant as afashion stare- 

Stock ^ b P?!J“ i' h v • ment, but rather as practical cloth- 

ieen plan" " Counff y Look p J** ^ hom Lama ing to wear around tbehouse. They 

Merthyr Tydfil were an immediate success. 

$u:a nt!C gjrficr /rum Wales, on SqH. 7, 1925. In the late 1960s, Laura Atoky 



New Assertions 
Blame France in 
Greenpeace Plot 


South Africans Protest at School 

A youth being carried away Tuesday after Smith African 
police fired rubber bullets and tear gas at hundreds of people 
demanding that mixed-race schools in the Cape Town area be 
reopened. Police earlier arrested 107 youths and 66 adults for 
trespassing on the grounds of tbe school in suburban Athlone. 


U.S. Diplomats , in Shift , 
Publicly Assail Pretoria 


By Glenn Frankel 

H ashingtiM Pott Sttrruv 

PRETORIA — In the week since 
President Ronald Reagan an- 
nounced a modified policy of "ac- 
tive constructive engagement” with 
South Africa. U.S. diplomats here 
have mounted an unusual cam- 
paign to publicly criticize the do- 
mestic policies of a government 
long considered friendly io the 
United Siaies. 

On Monday, a senior U.S. diplo- 
mat wbo would not allow bis name 
to be used voiced strong “concern” 
to American journalists over mis- 
conduct by South African police 
and soldiers in black townships 
since the government declared a 
state of emergency in 36 cities and 
towns two months ago. 

U.S. Ambassador Herman W. 
Nickel returning Sept 10 from a 
three-month recall to Washington, 
publicly challenged the white-mi- 
nority government to move beyond 
words in dismantling apartheid. 
Since then, he has criticized new 


domestic initiatives in several inter- 
views with local journalists. 

UJS. officials say the interviews 
and statements reflect a "higher 
public profile” adopted by diplo- 
mats to better communicate the 
Reagan administration’s positions 
on South Africa, especially to tbe 
country’s blacks. 

Tbe purpose, officials said, is to 
correct the impression that the ad- 
ministration has been "winking at 
apartheid" through its policy of 
friendly persuasion known as “con- 
structive engagement.” 

They said they hoped Mr. Nick- 
el's public statements also would 
erase any misconceptions of US. 
policy among South African offi- 
cials." 

His statements, they said, seek to 
clarify the administration's official 
view —despite Mr. Reagan's occa- 
sional comments suggesting other- 
wise — that Pretoria bears a heavy 
responsibility for the political vio- 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Trtbunc 

PARIS — The French newspa- 
per Le Monde said Tuesday that 
two French frogmen blew up tbe 
flagship of the Greenpeace anti- 
nuclear movement in New Zealand 
and escaped undetected. 

Defense Minister Charles Hernu 
or top French intelligence and mili- 
tary officers ordered or at least 
knew about the mission and partic- 
ipated in a rover-up. the paper re- 
ported. 

Mr. Hernu denied in a statement 
issued Tuesday night that orders 
had been given to any French mili- 
tary or intelligence agents to attack 
the ship. ■ 

If confirmed, observers said, the 
disclosures in Le Monde would be 
a shattering embarrassment for 
France, amplifying anti-French 
sentiment in the South Pacific and 
rocking the Socialist government, 
which faces parliamentary dec- 
lions ra six months. 

le Monde, citing government 
sources for elements of its article, 
indicated that some influential So- 
cialists. worried about the potential 
for political damage to President 
Francois Mitterrand, wanted to re- 
solve the Greenpeace scandal im- 
mediately, even if some high-rank- 
ing military officers and perhaps 
Mr. Hernu himself were dismissal 

Two French intelligence officers 
are to be tried in New Zealand in 
November in connection with the 
explosion, in which a Greenpeace 
photographer died. 

The Le Monde report has 
strained French political solidarity 
that has coalesced around Mr. Mit- 
terrand and his firm defense of nu- 
clear policy. 

Conservative opposition politi- 
cians have avoided pressing the is- 
sue, but Jean-Fran^ois Poncet, the 
foreign minister in the previous 
conservative government of Vaifery 
Giscard d’Estaing, was quoted 
Tuesday as saying: "No minister 
has the right to mislead the presi- 
dent." 

If Le Monde's report is true, be 
said, “titis is net a matter for a 
resignation, but a case of treason.” 

Le Monde has generally support- 
ed the Socialist Party but has re- 
cently shown renewed editorial in- 
dependence. Its previous reporting 
on the Greenpeace affair has been 
generally cautious. 

In a separate report, Le Canard 
Eochaine. a French satirical and 
investigative weekly, is lo publish 



Cnoeta Pmi 

Charles Hernu 

an account Wednesday simil ar to 
Le Monde's allegations. 

Mr. Mitterrand was not in- 
formed about possible French in- 
telligence links to the Greenpeace 
explosion for a week after the July 
10 explosion. Le Monde said, until 
he was alerted by Interior Minister 
Pierre Joxe. 

Mr. Joxe, who controls France's 
counterespionage agency, is a mili- 
tant Socialist known to be critical 
of the overall French foreign intel- 
ligence operations under the mili- 
tary and close Mitterrand advisers. 

Sources at Le Monde and Le 
Canard Enchainfe said that their 
information came partly from se- 
cret reports by Interior Ministry 
officials who have been working 
with New Zealand investigators. 

Suspicions of French involve- 
ment were bound to linger until a 
culprit was found for the Green- 
peace explosion. Prime Minister 
Laurent Fabius acknowledged re- 
cently on television. 

Last month he accepted a report 
by Bernard Tricot, a senior rival 
servant, absolving tbe government 
of responsibility for the blast. 

But Mr. Fabius promised to pun- 
ish any French person shown to be 
implicated in the explosion. 

Mr. Mitterrand said Sunday that 
the incident was “criminal, absurd 
and stupid.” Asked about Mr. Tri- 
col's findings, he said that the re- 

(Con tinned on Page 2, CoL 5) 


A senior police official, who 
asked not to be identified, said Mr. 
Kriangsak denied the char g e * and 
was trying to arrange baiL 

Industry Minister Ob Vasuratna, 
deputy leader of the party, handed 
in his resignation along with those 
of two of his deputies Tuesday,. He 
died mounting pressure from the 
cabinet and. members of Parlia- 
ment who suspected Mr. Kriangsak 
of involvement in the SepL 9 coup 
bid. 

Prime Minister Prcm said he 
would reshuffle his four-party co- 
alition government “within two or 
three days," tbe government’s Ra- 
dio Thailand reported. He said he 
could not yet say if the cabinet 
changes would involve more than 
replacement of the three Industry 
Ministry officials. 

When tbe military put down the 
coup attempt in less titan 12 hours, 
the government said tbe plot was 
led by Colonel Manoon Roopka- 
cfaora. 50, a tank regiment com- 
mander who was dismissed from 
the army after engineering an abor- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 



U.S. Sets Summit Policy Positions 
On 4 Areas of Dispute With Soviet 



Kriangsak Chomanan 


By Gerald M. Boyd 

Nen- York Tunes Sentce 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration has established po- 
licy positions in "every area” of 
disagreement with the Soviet 
Union, positions for use in talks at 
the November summit meeting, ac- 
cording to Robert C. McFarlane, 
the national security adviser. 

Mr. McFarlane, disclosing de- 
tails of the administration’s aims 
going into the talks, said Monday 
that positions had been developed 
on the four major areas expected to 
dominate tbe discussions m Gene- 
va on Nov. 19-20. He said these 
areas were arms control regional 
issues, matters between the two 
countries and human rights. 

Mr. McFarlane’s comments 
came in a speech here to the Air 
Force Association devoted largely 
to relations btiween the United 
Slates and the Soviet Union. 

He said the United States had no 
“illusions'' that the Soviet Union 
would change fundamentally and 
had accepted the fact that the two 
countries would be “engaged in an 
enduring competition of ideas.” 



Robert C. McFarlane 


“The United States is ready for 
it." Mr. McFarlane said. 

He indicated that Mr. Reagan 
would continue to push for bis pro- 
gram to develop a defensive shield 
against nuclear missiles. Mikhail S. 


Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, has 
contended that tbe system would 
“militarize” space and would lead 
to Soviet efforts to develop a simi- 
lar system. American officials say a 
Soviet program is under way. 

It was Mr. McFariane’s second 
speech in the last month on U.S.- 
Soviet relations. The earlier speech, 
similar in tone to the one on Mon- 
day, was criticized by Mr. Gorba- 
chev as showing American inflexi- 
bility. Mr. McFarlane on Monday, 
as before, talked about fundamen- 
tal differences between U.S. and 
Soviet views and what he saw as the 
need for Moscow to answer some 
key questions at the November 
meeting. 

Earlier on Monday, President 
Reagan sounded a similar theme 
when he told a group of journalists 
that there were sharp differences 
between the two countries that he 
hoped could be overcome at the 
meeting. The president said he had 
frequently spoken to former Presi- 
dent Richard M. Nixon, who had 
said, "We want peace. The Soviet 
Union needs peace.” 

Mr. McFarlane said that the ad- 

(Coutinued on Page 2, CoL 7} 


American Colleges Assailed on Creativity 


w* 5T— 

hMMin in 1 " ' 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washnt%ion Past Service 

WASHINGTON — American colleges are 
producing uncreative graduates who leave cam- 
puses overburdened with debt, and with too 
little sense of civic responsibility, according to 
an unusually critical report from the Carneg ie 
Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching 

"Students loo frequently sit passively in class, 
take safe courses, are discouraged from risky or 
interdisciplinary research projects and are dis- 
couraged from challenging the ideas presented 
to them,*’ according to the report. “Higher Edu- 
cation and the American Resurgence.” 

Tbe report by Frank Newman, former presi- 
dent of die University of Rhode Island, called 
for a drastic overhaul of the U.S. system or 
higher education and the way students pay for 
it It included a suggestion that the U.S. govern- 
ment curtail its huge loan program and make 
students perform community-service work in 
e xchange for financial aid. 

The current system of saddling students with 
huge loan debts upon graduation discourages 
them faim entering lower-paying, community 


service and public sector jobs, Mr. Newman 
said. 

"Excessive loans inadvertently undercut tra- 
ditional values." wrote Mr. Newman, who is 


'Working one’s way through 
college is a cherished 
American concept that 
conflicts head-on with "Go 

now, pay later/’ ’ 

Frank Newman 
U.S. educator 


president of the Education Commission of the 
States. "Working erne’s way through (allege is a 
cherished American concept that conflktshead- 
on with "Go now. pay later.’ " 

“A student who leaves college with a large 


debt burden may well feel be has already as- 
sumed all of the nsk that he possibly should.” he 
added. 

The suggestions of the report on aid to college 
students are linked to the national debate on 
how to restructure federal college-assistance 
programs, as Congress prepares to reauthorize 
tbe omnibus Higher Education Acl 

The sponsors of this report say they expect it 
to spark tbe same kind of impetus for reform in 
higher education that the "Nation at Risk” 
report produced at the elementary- and second- 
aiy-5cbool level 

That report attacked the low standards of 
American public education and said that the 
nation was at risk from a rising tide of mediocri- 
ty- 

Carnegie’s president. Ernest L Boyer, said: 
"This report sets the agenda for a vigorous new 
debate about the federal government's relation- 
ship to the nation's higher-learning institu- 
tions." The foundation was created by Andrew 
Caro jgicin 1905 with an original endowment of 

(Continued on Page 3, CoL 1) 






8 - 


- Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 , 1985 


In Sri Lanka, Violence Leaves Its Scars 

No Man’s Land Separates Warring Ethnic Co mmunit ies in North 


By Allen Nachcmjm 
A fence France- Freae 

KLLINOCHCHI. Sri 1-mfc.i — 
A irip into northern Sri i-mita 
reveals a countryside scarred bv 
Tamil separatist violence, police 
stations resembling fortresses and 
people fearful of attack from 
guerrillas or government troops. 

A foreign journalist traveled by- 
bus from Anuradhapura, the holy 
city of the Sinhalese majority in 
central Sri Lanka, to Vavuniya, a 
town on the rough demarcation 
line between the Sinhalese areas 
and the T amil north. 

The trip ended beyond Vavun- 
iya, at Kflinochchi, 25 miles (40 
kilometers) south of the Jaffna 
Peninsula, which has been the 
scene of some of the worst vio- 
lence between Tamil guerrillas 
and the security forces. 

A policeman at a roadblock 
displayed a copy of an official 
order barring foreigners from the 
far north. 

Even without going as far as 
Jaffna, the main T amil city at the 


tip of the island, there are marks 
of the separatist violence, in 
which several hundred people 
have died in the last year. The 
violence has flared again since 
last month, when Indian-spon- 
sored peace talks in Bhutan be- 
tween the Tamil guerrillas and the 
Sri Lanka government collapsed. 

The bus from Anuradhapura 
no longer goes all the way to Va- 
vuniya. Passengers must walk the 
final four miles through a no- 
man's-and separating the two 
warring communities. 

The road is stippled with pot- 
holes deep enough to bury a sack 
of blasting compound, the pre- 
ferred weapon of Tamil guerrillas. 
Strung with wire to the surround- 
ing jungle, the explosive can be 
detonated by a concealed insur- 
gent as a bus or army truck 
passes. 

In Vavuniya, once a bustling 
market town] stand the shells of 
shops and hotels bombed or 


rival communities, the Buddhist 
Sinhalese and the Hindu Tamils, 
against each other. 

During the four-hour bus trip 
to Jaffna, young Tamil men speak 
quietly about planned attacks and 
rising violence in the north, but 
conversation stops at the frequent 
police checkpoints. 

Police stations along the way 
look like armed outposts in ene- 
my territory, surrounded by 
barbed wire and sandbag barri- 
cades, and interspersed with ma- 
chine-gun emplacements. 

“The police here do not protect 
the people,” a passenger said. 
“They protect themselves.” 

Police stations and army pests 
are favorite targets of the Tamil 
guerrillas, who want a separate 
state in Sri Lanka's northern and 
eastern provinces. 

The journey was interrupted al 
the roadblock at Kilinochchi. 
where a police sergeant called the 


burned out in the ethnic violence, journalist aside and flagged down 
which also pits civilians from the a southbound truck. 


“Things mil soon be happening 

up there which we do not want 
you to see," he said. “Why don't 
you just get in this lorry and go 
back to Colombo? The govern- 
ment will give you the news. They 
will put things in proper perspec- 
tive. 

■ Gandhi Asked to Help 

Tamil guerrillas asked Prime 
Minister Rajiv Gandhi of India 
on Tuesday to use his influence 
with the Sri Lankan government 
to halt alleged massacres of Tamil 
civilians by security forces, The 
Associated Press reported from 
New Delhi. 

V. Balakumar, a spokesman for 
the Eelam National Liberation 
Front, told Indian news organiza- 
tions that the request was made 
during a meeting as part of a new 
Indian effort to revive talks to end 
the three years of strife. 

The meeting was held amid re- 
ports or fresh Dgh ting between Sri 

I n qnlrgri forces and T amil insur- 
gents. 



Soviet Likely 
To Expel 
More Britons 
In Spy Crisis 


WORLD BRIEFS __ \ 

Soviet Is Said to Deploy More SS-2te ^ 


In Madras, a southern Indian 
Tamil stronghold, the guerrilla 
organization contended that 140 
T amil civili ans, most of them 
women and children, had been 
massacred Monday night by Sri 
I - ank an forces near Trincomatee. 

In Sri Lanka, security sources 
said that 46 Tamils described as 
guerrilla fighters had been killed 
Sunday in two separate raids in 
the Trincomatee area. A govern- 
ment spokesman confirmed only 
one raid in the area Sunday ana 
placed the T amil death toll at 20. 

Throughout the Indian-ar- 
ranged cease-fire, which is to ex- 
pire Wednesday, security forces 
and Tamil rebels have continued 
operations against each other 


In Spy Crisis '"**&?&££** 1*^“° 

tod installed 378 

from Moscow, following London s arnv A- infr , n NATT) the Dutch prime mini ster. Ruud Lubbere, said 

toUion ,o order ou. ft, ftmher if ft* number of 

2lSS»£3toS££!Z Russia Sends 3 

ing the expulsions that began with MOSCOW (Reuters) — The Soviet Umon taM™* 
the eviction of 25 Soviet officials Tuesday carrying three cosmonauts into orbit to join tneaaiyui ap 
and journalists on Thursday. station, Tass said. __ _ . ,h<» 

The Kremlin responded by ex- The news agency said tbai the oomnuder. ' 
pefling 25 Britonsand the Soviet pilot, Georgi Grechko, and a researcher. Alexander Vottm.wo* nrning 
sources said that Moscow would the ninth manned mission to the Salyut-7 station smee the complex & 


. day. 

The sources, who declined to be Rii&e|a Splirls S 
identified, blamed Britain for start- nU8Slil jeDUS ° ’ 
ing the expulsions that began with MOSCOW (Reuters) — i 
the eviction of 25 Soviet officials Tuesday carrying three cosmc 
and jour nalis ts on Thursday. station. Tass said. 

The Kremlin responded by ex- The news agency said tbai 
pefling 25 Britons and the Soviet pilot, Geoigi Grechko, and a r 
sources said that Moscow would the ninth manned mission to i 
continue to meet British actions sent into space in April 1982. 
one-for-one. It said me three cosmonaui 


nnnue to nm onusu acuoua acui uau m npiu wo*. . ._ . 

ie-for-one. It said tie three cosmonauts would carry out scientific ana tecnrucu 

In 1971, when Britain expelled studies on Salyut-7 with Vladimir Dzhantbekov and Viktor Savinywi. 
6 Soviet personnel. Moscow ex- who were sent to the station June 6 on a mission during which they maac 


Raid on Angola Revives 
Issue of Cuban Presence 

By Alan Coweil sion pact with Mozambique that 

New York Times Service was supposed to end a Pretoria- 

JOHANNESBURG — With its backed insurgency in the former 
raid into southern Angola, South Portuguese colony. But the war 
Africa seems to have revived an there has since widened, with thou- 
issue that lately has been eclipsed sands of Zimbabwean soldiers who 
by its own domestic turmoil: the support President Samora Machel 
* continued presence of Cuban fighting an amorphous rebel army 
troops in Angola. called the Mozambique National 

At the same time, the attack Resistance. 

Monday appears to have rein- Mr. Machel an avowed Mandst, 



Former Prime Minister 
Held in Thai Coup Plot 


105 Soviet personnel, Moscow ex- 
pelled only 18 Britons. 

“Times have changed since 
then," one of the sources said. “If 
Britain wants to name another 25. 
then fine, we will name another 
25.” 

Western diplomats in Moscow 


repairs tort. 


Nicaraguan Indians Get Aid in Europe 


SAN JOSE, Costa Rica (NYT) 


iwwwvr __ BrookJyn a 

said that the lough Soviet stand, w: £ J, ISjL ™ 
with its impltedtchallenge of a M “ k,K> nb ^ s m 1 T w ^ a ‘ 

showdownvmh London, was dear- 

i o amounts of aid trains cause. 



leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 


Mr. Rivera, who recently re- 


* The defense spokesman for Brit- turned from a trip to eight Europe- 

. , ,, . Bin’s opposition Labor Party, Den- countries, said he M obtained 

(Continued from Page 1) Five persons, including an ^ Davies, is due to bold talks with fi nan ^ a i could 

t/. ■>. invnnn ami tm Australian cm- o—c.. tjt.j -I-.. w- ■■■ ““““ 


five coup against Mr. Pnsn’s gov- American and an Australian cm- 
emmentin 1981. ployed by a D5. television net- 

Colond Manoon and his broth- work, were killed, and 60 injured in 
er, Manas, an air force wing com- the coup attempt. As many as 500 


NEWS ANALYSIS 

forced the feeling of many com- 
mentators here that a resolution of 
the issue, which once absorbed 
much of Washington's attention, is 
as remote as ever. 

The Cubans first went to Angola 
during the civil war of 1975-76 to 


Mr. MachcL an avowed Marxist, Hj 
is to meet Thursday with President 
Ronald Reagan in Washington. 

By signing an agreement that cut _ _ . . . 

the infiltration of the African Na- Jonas Savunbi 

tional Congress into South Africa, 

Mr. Machel turned his back on his to secure an overall peace without 
Soviet allies and risked the con- him 

tempt of his fellow black Africans. Last November. Angola offered 
He seems certain to ask Washing- a partial withdrawal and redeploy- 


mander, surrendered the day of the soldiers and airforce men took part 
coup and were allowed to fly out of in the atte mpt, which ooUapsod in 
the country to Singapore. Colonel the face of strong opposition from 
Manoon was last reported to have key nrihtary supporters of Mr. 
flown to Western Europe to seek Pron. 

asylum. The resignation of Mr. Ob and 

If the four former generals ar- his two deputies, Prayote Neung- 


Amencan and am Australian cm- top Soviet officials on Wednesday, total 550,000 monthly. He said he 
plcyed by a i US. television net- Reports from London that could bad Wed not to disclose the 
work, were killed, and 60 mjuredm not be confirmed in Moscow said sourcesofthe money because most 
the coup attempt- As manyas 500 Mr. Davies would be received by ShS^^mprivateOTSS 

key nrihtary supporters of Mr. roimd of notings with Soviet offi- Mr. Rivcrasaid, would not be us«I 
^ w, r*u 0 „j dais, receiving a normal welcome. to buy weapons,, 

diamnonnind Womm Polnftom. f 3 ® 0 ^ H®"* “ “bedded to with Samhmst leadm, which col- 




m 4 f 

, :>s';Sfrv. 


r^ted Tuesday are found guilty Jan^ard Wonge talks in New York on Monday laps 

treason, they could face a penalty wkoan hadm ofthj il^non, ^ ^ Soviel forei?n ^ 

at ocecuncm or Me^ruonmenL d ^o^^wrarid rmove K ShevardnX, ootndd- Mini 

G«erd Narcmg mb that an ex- ^ l^iffl^simmstera£«mthe . ^ the opening session of the who 

deCted “ U°i le ^ Nations General Assembly. ,o« 

recovering from an nin—c^ were be- Others linked to the coup at- _ Mr. Howe and Prime Mini s t er 
ing detained by the police. 


rould resume be- 
he year. Interior 
Boxge Martinez, 



l witn tne opening session or tne who oversees government 
sited Nations General Assembly, toward the Misfcitos, has sai 
Mr. Howe and Prime Minister willing to resume the talks. 


Brooklyn Rivera 


tempt who were seen reporting to Margaret Thatcher said they hoped 


ton about his recompense. meat of the Cuban troops. But General Narong said warrants police investigators Tocsday were to end da series of expulsions after TT C ’Wjmrifi TnHiii nn Atom Arms 

In southern Africa’s tangle of South Africa, while avowing its had been issued for the arrest of 25 Ahamad Kamtestang and Sawat Monday s announcement that Bnt- TTtunaillUldUUAlum/uma 


9UUU1CIII AU1U3 uuigic UI auuui ninui, wuuc avuwmt iu 

KSiSt for Seliteaffof cocfliciinj i movements, lie uiues commiuneni^the WI plan, want- 


Angola agains t two other Angolan 
factions supported variously by 
China, the CIA and South Africa. 

Only one of those rival groups, 
the National Union for the Total 


Oriy one of those rival groups, bi s guemti^, with bourn African 
the National Union for th?ToS 
Independence of Angola, led by 

Jonas SavimbL has survived, sus- of Angoli 


conflicting movements, the issues commitment to the UN plan, want- of the 33 persons suspected of in- 
are rarely free of complexity. ed a total withdrawal volvement in the coup attempt. A 

The Angolan authorities play In May, after South African government source said most of 
host to SWAPO while Mr. Savim- commandos attacked Angola's oil- those named were former or cur- 
bi's guerrillas, with South African producing northern enclave of Ca- rent military officers, 
supplies, seek to force negotiations binda, Angola broke off negotia- The source, who declined to be 


Lookdod, former top labor leaders; ain was ordering out ax more Rus- 
Issara Ngamrokj, leader of the sians. 

union at the Mass Transportation thp For»l«m flffire* said that Mr 


lions, and South Africa said it was named, said the warrants were is- 
“no longer sure” that the settle- sued at midnight Monday, at the 


union at the Mass Transportation 
Authority; and two army sergeants 
who were aides to Colonel Man- 
oon, the alleged leader erf the coop 
plot. (AP, AFP, Reuters) 


,- B “i 77, irr/'T, T7- ■ The United States sought to meat proposed by the United dose of an extraordinary parlia- cu a j r rr c 

An.2 bring about a Cuban 3™™l States S-as workable mentary sessiononftenL fecal Shevardnadze Heads tor US. 


The Foreign Office said that Mr. avoid a nuclear 
Howe viewed the meeting with Mr. Michael H. / 
Shevardnadze as important Fortier, deputy 

“We certainly want the m eeting the National S< 
to rak e, place," a spokesman said, discussion of ‘ 
He said the two could wdl discuss statement said. 


NEW DELHI (UPI) — Senior U5. officials urged Prime Minister 
Rajiv Gandhi of India on Tuesday to consider “regional initiatives" to 
avoid a nudear arms race with Pakistan. 

Michael H. Armacost, a U5. undersecretary of state, and Donald R. 
Fortier, deputy assistant to President Ronald Rragan mid a member of 
the National Security CoancO, suggested the regional solution during a 
discussion of “South Asian nudear developments,*’ a US- Embassy 


non in South-West Africa, rein- ing Mr. Knangsak and Mr. Senn, Eduard A. Shevardnadze left Mos- 
fordng the suggestion that it was are senators who are immune from cow on Tuesday for the United 

_.?n ■ - u:-_ a ! - _ n i* - • • . •• . ■ ^ 


still intent on molding the territo- prosecution while Pariiament is in Nations General Assembly, the that the expulsions don’t mean 


ry*s political future. 


Tass news agency said. 


Otwl vnw" in tmiiliMct Ananlz uiiug auum a v-uuaii wiuiuiawdj wuiuuic. uiauaiy msoiuu UU Uie next I1SCSX 

fnr from Ang ola “ return for South On June 17, South Africa in- year’s budget. Several of those al- Reuters 

that mnvmwnt and invasions airh Mncan acceptance of a UN formu- stalled a new surrogate administra- leged to be pail of the coop, mclud- MOSCOW — Foreign Minister 
as the one launched Mondav are ^ for ^ hidependence of South- tion in South-West Africa, rein- ing Mr. Knangsak and Mr. Senn, Eduard A. Shevardnadze left Mos- 
dted bv Angola’s avowedlv vfarx- Africa. Mr. Savimbi's poten- forcing the suggestion that it was are senators who are immune from cow on Tuesday for the United 
id nrime vmLc fnr ua * ro ^ e ^ rm ’ a ^ ne ^ unclear, but still intent on molding the territo- prosecution while Pariiament is in Nations General Assembly, the 

te P pro ST&ta U-S- officials say ii will be difficult r>'s poUtol future. session. Taa news agency saii 

troops, whose numbers are estimat- * 

ed at more than 25,000. _ 

from the Cubans, that may bode ill U.S. Envoys, in Shift, Publicly Blame Pretoria for Violence it 

for the Reagan administration’s J v J J 

policy of “constnictive engage- (Continued from Page 1) tion with the General Agreement division in fundamental philoso- tend the South African government 
meat, which is intended to build ( cnce jjjat has wracked this country on Tariffs and Trade in Geneva.] phy over how to deal with unrest will get nowhere in discussing the 
regional peace while coaxing Presi- f cr more than a year. The South African government has emerged between Washington country's political future as long as 


MOSCOW — Foreign Minister concQiatoiy efforts. 

Inard A. Shevardnadze left Mos- “The government’s not going to 
w on Tuesday for the United leap into action to try and suggest 


the espionage affair and ways of Mr. Armacost and Mr. Fortier flew later to Islamabad to meet senior 
trying to improve relations. How- Pakistani leaders for talks on relations with India and prospects for a 
ever, he ruled out any dramatic political solution to the conflict in Afghanistan. 


anything,” he said. 


U. S. Envoys, in Shift, Publicly Blame Pretoria for Violence in Black Areas 


Syria-Jordan Rapprochement Seen 

JEDDAH (Renters) — Syria and Jordan have agreed during reoondli- 
ation talks here on stqis to improve relations, strained by political and 
ideological disputes, Saudi Arabia's crown prmce, Abdullah ib n Abdula- 
ziz, said Tuesday. 


regional peace while coaxing Presi- [ or more ^an a year, 
dent Pieter W. Botha toward a re- a i*i .—L A rr. 


pressed abhorrence for apartheid, 
but differed widely on what the 


peal of apartheid. 


Although officials have taken 
pains to emphasize that the United 


For one thing, the raid demon- 
> strated South Africa's commitment 

, mnlntam in thnt i. ^ ^ 53,(1 ^ R “gan WHS TOfl- 


has not responded officially to the and Pretoria in recent statements, 
new stance, although President South African officials consis 
Pieter W. Botha warned that the tently have pursued a two-trad 
limited sanctions would serve only strategy of announcing “reforms’ 


and Pretoria in recent statements, it maintai n s its own definition of 


South African officials consis- w ho is a legitimate black negotiat- 
tentiy have pursued a two-track ing partner, 
strategy of announcing “reforms” g Smithsonian Retains Stock 
op the one hand whfle seeking to The Smithsonian Infflitmion’s 


n,einlnm nminHI in n wu tlini !l IH.V, UWI MiU RU. nblE«U nu Mill- — „ 7 _ ..TV , — : , ~0 M UIUIUDWIUII HCHIID UUIUk 

SSSST Us firfd^?Std “ at ** administration had » lessen U.S. influence with his on the one hand whfle seekmgto ^ Smilhsonian institution's 

isar for 1116 “ ^ ttiffisiiEss 


but differed widely on what the 
Smithsonian should do- 
Thc regent s effectively deferred 

J ^“ ,flthdr ”“ ,,,K,!ti,,s ' in Kabul Rebels Say Soviet Officer Killed 

■ Mandeb Receives Treatment ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reuters) — Afghan rebels shot down a 

South African prison authorities «nying an Afghan major general and 

said Tuesday that weblack nation- bnga^era^ a Soviet officer believed to have beena general, a leadmg 
alict ImHm- Ncknn MnndiJa wac guemDn party S3ML _ _ _ . . . 


The prince, quoted by the Saudi Press Agency, said agreement was 
reached during two rounds of discussions that ended Tuesday between 
Prime Minis tecs Abdul Raouf al-Kasm of Syria and Zeid Rifai of Jordan. 
“Both sides have agreed upon a number of steps to aeate a suitable 
atmosphere to develop relations between the two countries and open the 
door for more rapprochement and cooperation,’' Prince Abdullah said. 


outsiders. 

The raid was depicted in Johan- 
nesburg as an effort lo pursue guer- 
rillas of the South-West Africa Peo- 


what it was trying to achieve. 

[Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz said Tuesday that the Rea- 
gan administration plans to go 


African officials have not yet de- they have shat 
rided how to respond to the new of blacks with 
U5. diplomatic offensive, a dear By contrast 


don’s stock in companies that do 
of blacks with whom tiwywm talk. busin ess in South AfriS, The New 
By contrast, UA otfoals con- y ork Times Kpo SS^m Wash- 
ington. 

la VinlatPrl P ar »f The stock is worth $34 million, 

“*■ T wiaHAi j. ai/i about a quarter of the institution’s 
, , _ . „ . , portfolio. The action was dosdy 

signed la* year, the_qffiaal news watched because of the makeuo of 


South African prison authorities e^P.iuouay uurymg umjUl aoienu auu 

id TiMariav that tSSadr nation- «“* a officcr Wieved to have been a general, a leading 


Organization, the ahead with a ban on the import of 


Soviet-armed movement that is Krogerrands, South Africa's gold \fanlip] Save Prptnrffl Vmlfltwl Pnf*t 
challenging Scum Africa’s control coin. United Press international re- macuei Odja i rclOna. T lOldUJtl r aCl 
. of South-West Africa, also known ported from Washington. He said . „ . , 


as Namibia. 


the ban would become effective 


Moreover, efforts to build a re- within “weeks at most, 
gional peace appear to have foun- fin announcing lirrriu 
tiered not only in Angola, but else- against South Africa lat 


Compiled by Our Staj] from Dispatches signed 

MAPUTO, Mozambique — 


Ail qght men aboard the Mi-24hftcopter gnnftip werek Oled wh en it 
j^TZ. crashed near a large rebd center m Palriia province on the border with 


di M?’ SnK Pakistan, the Hezb-i Islami party of Mowlavi Yunus KhaHs said, 

of tile SSS AfriSn fSS u 


moved as wdl as cysts on his Kwr 

and right kidney. addressed by others as generaL 

ReasanNews Conferpnoe For the Record 


la* vear, the official news watched because of the makeup of 
AIM reported Tuesday. _ the regents board, which includes 


[In announcing limited sanctions President Samora Machel has pro- The government said that its Warren E. Burger, drief justice of 
against South Africa last week, Mr. tested to Foreign Minister R.F. forces found evidence of South At- the Sup rone Court; Vice President 
Reagan had left it unclear whether Botha of South Africa about “seri- ™'® n . support lor Mozambican re- George Bush, three members of the 

. , in * i i he Is Iasi month when tnpv fw p r rs n ..i .r 


and right kidney. 

Reagan News Conference 

The Associated Press 


WUvIw PiVlIriHI 1IHU Iwll Al UliWIUU nU^UILI »*** »««” WB uvuuz « Ull - - ■ IIW .Iimmj Vi UM m • 1 I 

On March 16, 1984, South Africa such a ban would be imposed, say- ous and repeated violations” of the ^ last month when u»y overran Senate, three members of the WASHINGTON — President delayed 
signed a U.S.-brokered nonaggres- ing there would first be consul ta- peace accord that the two countries m mc country’s House, the president of Princeton Pdnaid Re agan sche d uled^ a na- 


University, a former U.S. ambassa- 


After feting Monday night dor to Britain and corporate and 
with. Mr. Botha in Mozambique, civic leaders. 


Mr. Machel departed for a week- TTie secretary of the Smithsoni- 
long visit to the United States, an, Robert McCormick Adams, 
where he is to hold talks with Presi- said all of the regents had ex- 


Ronald Reagan scheduled a na- control^ 
tionaHy broadcast news conference Gary 1 
Tuesday evening. The half-hour w0 ™ 1 ~ 1 
session was to be his first formal Thi 
White House meeting with report- Parts < 


AH flights to, from and over France are expected to be canceled or 
delayed Wednesday and Thursday because of a strike by air traffic 
controllers. (AP) 

Gary Kasparov took a timeout Tuesday in his chess title match with the 
world champion Anatoli Karpov in Moscow, postponing die sixth game 
until Thursday. Mr. Karpov leads, 3-1 (AP) 

Parts of western Uganda have bem cut off from the capital because of 


■if-i - 

•'N8. 


ers in three months and fir* since an escalation in guerrilla activity, travelers and transport officials 


In Colombo 

our location is perfect for business. 
Even if your business is watching 
a beautiful ocean sunset. 

HOTEL CEYLON 
INTER • CONTINENTAL 



dent Ronald Reagan. The two lead- 

ers will discuss southern Africa, in- 
cluding South Africa’s invasion -w- 'MM' ■» a 

Monday oF southern Angola. f jr% /Iv/tti/i/) /§ 

In Washington, a top U5. offi- JLyMMJm JTm 

dal who deebned to be named said 

Tuesday that the United States de- (Continued from Page 1) 
plored the raid. He said that Wash- port was “not my business, but 1 
ington hart dismissed Pretoria’s ar- rove read it . . . without broadcart- 
gumenis that the invasion was m£ my opinion of iL” 
needed to prevent natio nalis t guer- His comments were interpreted 
rillas from attacking northern parts 35 mi attempt to distance himself 
of South- We* Africa, or Namibia, from the Tncot findings. 

France and Brazil also critidzed The actual saboteurs' role, Le 
the invasion. Monde said, was concealed from 

In Pretoria, the South African Mr. Tricot, probably by Mr. Hemn 
Defense Force said that attacks and certainly by General Jeannou 
again* guerrillas of the South- Lacaze, France's chief of staff at 
West Africa People's Organization the time, and General Jean Saul- 
were continuing in Ango la but de- nkrr. then military chief of staff in 
dined to provide further details. Mr. Mitterrand’s office. Since then, 
(Reuters, AFP, AP) General Saulnier has succeeded 


his cancer surgery in July. 


Tuesday. 


Le Monde Accuses Paris of Covering Up Ship Blast 


(Continued from Page 1) the General Directorate of Exter- 
port was “not my business, but 1 nal Security, known as DGSE. 
nave read it . . . without broadcast- Mr. Hemu, one of the Socialists 


ing my opinion of iL” mo* popular cabinet ministers, is a third French team, the two still awaiting trial 

His comments were interpreted the official mo* directly threat- unidentified frogmen. Each then -t-l. _ f tfcll .... . 

as an attempt to distance himself ened by the Le Monde report. attached one charge — resembling r™ - 1 . team 

from the Tncot findings. Specialists knowledgeable about a limpet mine — to the hull of the cording to Le Mbnde; TnCot ’ ac ' 

The actual saboteurs' role, Le France’s security se^ces generally Greenpeace^ ship, the Rainbow Le dnaid Enchain* was exoect- 
Monde said, was concealed from shared Lhe view of one of them who Wamor, Le Monde said. -d w ^ 

Mr. Tricot, probably by Mr. Hemn said that “it woidd be unthmkable” The crew of the Onvia escaped. canrefSanotherSteffiSnce^ 

and certainly by General Jeannou for French mtelh grace officers to After being questioned by Mr. Tri- vice directly concerned with nro- 

Lacaze, Frances chief or staff at undertake action affecting nudear col they surrendered to the French tecting France’s nuclear-test n«v 

the tune, and General Jean Saul- affairs without authorization from police and were released. The sec- gram in Polynesia. v 

nier, then military chief of staff in Mr. Hemn and dose advisers to J 

Mr. Mitterrand’s office. Since then, Mr. Mitterrand. 

General Saulnier has succeeded As reconstructed by Le Monde, TT O *. C sn 

General Lacaze as chief of staff in a the operation in New Zealand was IJ.n. HPLS ^llUflTtllT. rflSltlAilg 


agents, Dominique Prienr and ond team, Mrs. Prieur and Mr. Mar 
Alain MafarL fart, were arrested after the explo- 

The charges were then passed to sion in Auckland harbor and are 


as an attempt to distance hims elf ened by the Le Monde report. 


from the Tncot findings. Specialists knowledgeable about 

The actual saboteurs’ role, Le France’s security services 
Monde said, was concealed from shared the view of one of I 


a third French team, the two still 
unidentified frogmen. Each then 
attached one charge — resembling 
a limpet mine — to the hull of the 
Greenpeace ship, the Rainbow 


Mr. Tricot, probably by Ml Hemn said that “it would be unthinkable” 
and certainly by General Jeannou for French intelligence officers to 


who Warrior, Le Monde said, 
hie” The crew of the Onvia . 


Mr.Tri- 




<#■ 


move that had long been planned, core 
Although the article in Le Dill 
Monde don not answer all the puz- bast 
zling aspects of the case — for one 
example, why French spies would rrty 
leave French-made equipment at T 


As reconstructed by Le Monde. TT O C . o • ■ Tl 

the operation lin ^New Zealand was L.U» u6tS A OSltlOHS 

commanded by Major Lonis-Piene « 

A On 4 Areas of Disagreement 

on espionage missions by the secu- o 




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example, why French spies would nty duectarate. (Continued from Page 1) 

leave French-made equipment at The demolition cha rge ji said, . , 

the scene of their sabotage opera- were brought to New Zealand by a nroistration positions had been 
tion — it seemed certain to revive team of the directorate's agents on rovelopcd at Mr. Reagan’s urging, 
press investigations of France’s a yacht, the Ouvfea, and handed **? Mr - Krogro was eager _to 
main foreign intelligence service, over to a second iwm of French ^ lstcn t f > „ s P cc “ c * concrete Soviet 


the scene of their sabotage opera- were brought to New Zealand by a rooistration positions l 
tion — it seemed certain to revive team of the directorate's agents on „ Reagan’ 


AVENUEipUJSE 

INTERIM 

2ffir.ftienuEiaee-XB0BnBSEt5 

ia.o2/64oqm 


main foreign intelligence service, over to a 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE ~ 

For lift. Andante It Work Lqrtriasce 
Dograw tor people who worn to ba mor* affective 
and aecura in their Jabs or Professions. 

Esm« BACHELOR'S. MASTER'S cr DOCTORATE Dwh 
brunlukOB your fif Bind wall •mpanno* CoBtyawHiMbmi 
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proposals” and to meet Moscow 
“more than halfway” at the meet- 
I ing. 

In discussing the summit meet- 

I ing, the national security adviser 
mentioned several difftseaces be- 
tween the two countries and then 
added, “The president sees this 

I meeting, however, as an opportuni- 
ty, an occasion on which we may 
see the Soviet leadership' more 

! opened to change.” 

Mr. McFariane said that the 
American positions on arms con- 


I Pacific Western University i w>iwerea“concrete. spedfic,de- 

BBO fLStpahMda BW, Lab Ang«lM, Cafifamla 9QMB ■ Dapt. B9 ■ U&A. | tafled, flexible way thrOOgfa whkh 

, . ■ — — ■■ ■ — ■ - ■ . . — i we ran reach lowpr levels of arms.” 


He said there was a similar ap- 
proach on the other three areas. 

■ Karpov Blames US. 

Viktor P. Karpov, the chief Sovi- 
et arms negotiator, arrived Tuesday 
w Geneva and blamed the United 
States for making an agreement on 
lmntmg nudear and space aims 
impossible.” The Associated Press 
reported. 

But MnKanov pledged “every 
possible effort” toward an agret£ 
mfflt “if our negotiating partners 
display readmess to seek mutually 
acceptable solutions." L 

The chief US. delegate, Max 1® 
^ amved Monday 
for me thud round of talks. He said 

foe agree- 
ment if the Soviet Union wfllnim 
"^P «bh c statements into spe- 
cie proposals. 












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N 


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30* 


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a Step 

w 

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. (Cdateaod Enm Pxgelf / 
SlOimUkn to promote high. sabot- 
- dardsia UJS.cdnqmoa " 

Someof the repoifssogE OGu n s 
. wffl bc dBOJSScd^for po^ile im- 
•• 'p feiir . nft tfwn 43q campnv* -wben 
100 uuiveuiiy and college prea- 

■ denis pacct m Cambridge, Massa- ' 

:■ ' cfameDs, pBi ninnih- ' :.. . 

Thar group is expected to draft a. 
joint st a temen t rmphagring that 
sradecis mnstbeocrae involved m 
-their c o mmonutes as a Joey, facet of 
‘their college lift S' 

‘i * The rgx)rt, wirifc insistiiijt dm 
. {fkJS. hitter education; itiH .8 the 
best in the vodd, attacks the itier- 
.ariM sw c tte oTfls A—riaa. 

.. college, b which professors often 
.-.lecture in Iarap.haHs! to sodests 
expected to take notes and repeat 
. ths professof's words in am exa nri- 

■ .nation. 

world. Bet tbenew wori?ofbS 
- ness, in a Iri^ily competitive inter- 
national economy, requires woric- 
ers who can Hunk creatively to 
solve problems outside of a formal 
managaneot structure. . - 
“Much aitentxon has been fo- 
. cosed on whether higher education 
-is graduating a large enough pool 


ns Bat 

fnmeiic 
il imtcirv?' 

m Dog. 
■iJ _ made 

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i 

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the needs <jf an. -advanced 
-tedmokjgjcal society," the report 
"said in one erf its summaries. 

“A more orgeat /question is 
whether graduates, ffl dl fields, 
have the ability to be innovative. 

. the will to take thepecessaryr^cs, 
the capacity far civic l 
and the sensitivity- to the interna- 
tional Tmmrf of the vrorid to be 
effective in today's society” it add- 
ed. 

-• On another toi»c, the report em- 
phasized the to improve star 
nority participation iafegberochi- 
■ cation by creating a National 
' Opportunity Fund to 
grants for disadvantaged 
Recent studies and informal sur- 
veys have shown that minority en- 
rollment, particulaxlyblack emofl- 
trwnt J on cdlege campuses has 
» declined since the 1970s. 

‘t The report is the result of a two- 
year study by Mr.- Newman, 
member of ds Carnegie board of 
trustees. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD T RIBUNE, WEDNESD AY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 

Oregon Guru Accuses His Followers 

^ - .+:a Mite Isabel and Ma Pna 


Page 3 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


ag^a^i^saaBaaamaajms 

dnysotSe, a type of asbestos. The mobile homes have not been occnpied for two years. 


Could Practice, To© 
When die a farm went off, 231 
people poured from* Boeing 757 
ierimer in 82.9 seconds — well 
within the Federal Aviation Ad- 

nmnstration ndc that no airlnicr 

can be certified unkss all its pas- 

semBers can get out in 90 seconds. 

The test was nm by Boring 
last fftIL A company spokesman 
said, “We fed we have complied 
withFAA requirements.” Others 

wrran*tsosure T Tbc WashinglCHi 

Post reports. Most of the “pas- 
sengers were Boeing employees. 
They had been practicing the 
emergency evacuation for three 
days. 

In the test, these was no 
mmlni no fire, no fear of d e a th . 
There were no people aver dm 
age of 60 nor any chQdrca. Ev- 
erybody was cold sober. _ 
Representative Newt Gingrich 

ran on the House Pub&^^s 

and Transportation subcommit- 
tee on investigations and over- 
sight, said that such tests are 

“just totally out of touch with the 
real world.” 


Short Takes 

With nane Jobs opening to 
women, the Fuller Brush Co. is 
having trouble finding door-to- 
door salespeople, moaly women, 
t hese days. And with so many 
women m the work force, its 


sales fame finds fewer wives at 
home. The company now is ex- 
perimenting with mail-order cal- 
ogs- 

Theexcornoo boat largely dis- 
appeared from American rivers 
with the growth of superhigh- 
way? and foreign travel but is 
making a strong comeback. The 
Hudson River now has cham- 
pagne, sunset, gourmet and 
moonlight cruises, trips to light- 
hooses. floating lecture tours on 
“ icry and ecology and outings 
to West Point football games. 
The National Association of Pas- 
senger Vessel Owners attributes 
the resurgence to “the towns and 
cities refurbishing their water- 
fronts,” arousing a longing 
among strollers to go for a boat 
ride. 

The National haerest, describ- 
ing itself as a neoconservative 
quarterly on foreign affairs. wiH 
rn jts debut next month. Its 
editors say it will occupy the 
same position oa the right that 
Foreign Policy takes on the left, 
wiLh Foreign Affairs occupying 
the center. Irving Kristin, the 
neoconservative advocate, is 
publisher, and the advisory 
board includes leane J. Kirkpat- 
rick, the former chief US repre- 
sentative to the United Nations; 
Midge Decter, the writer; 
Charies Krauthammer, the jour- 
nalist; and Henry A. Kissinger, 
who ra nk no introduction. 

Shorter Takes: Cellular tele- 


phones have been installed on 

aiiplanes, and now Seattie is pio- 
neering their use cm buses and 
ferryboats. Amtrak plans to put 
them on its Washington-New 
York ran. ... Personal-injury 
cases take an average 317 days to 
resolve in Phoenix, Arizona, but 
folly 721 days in Detroit, accord- 
ing to the National Center for 
State Courts. Criminal cases last 
from 62 days in Portland. Ore- 
gon, to 253 days in Newark, New 

Jersey. 


Montana Pet Offer: 
Take a Grizzly Home 

Montana says it has 15 surplus 
grizzly beats, but is having trou- 
ble finding other states witling to 
fai»» them. As a threatened spe- 
cies. they cannot legally be shot. 
Other Western states noted that 
introducing predators into sheep 
and cattle country would be like 
inviting the plague. 

Alaska asked if Montana 
would like to trade “Alaskan 
wolves for Montana bears.” add- 
ing: “Presumably such an ex- 
change would be on a pound per 
pound baas." 

A Nebraska wildlife official 
wrote that the state already had 
its quota of puzlifi in the per- 
sons of 160 state legislators, who 
could be “vicious and “short- 
sighted” and who had been 
found to “make terrible pets." 

— Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


By Peter H. King 

Lea Angela Tuna Saner 
RAJNEESHPURAM. Oregon 
__ Bhagwan Shite Rqneesh. the 
Indian guru, has accused a small 
group of his top followers erf creat- 
ing a “fascist state” at Ns desert 
commune here. He also alleged that 
they had attempted killings, 
bugged telephones, drove the com- 
mune S55 million in debt and ab- 
sconded with communal funds. 

Mr. Rajueesh did not give specif- 
ic information to support his alle- 
gations, and none of those accused 

by him could be readied Tor com- 
ment. 

He said Monday that he was co- 
operating with local police of the 
qigpm ^ whereabouts of at least 
seven persons who, until Saturday, 
formed the hieraicbypThis interna- 
tional religions organization at his 
commune, Rjgneeshpuram. 

“It seems these people would 
have even killed me, because my 
s iptif* was favorable to them and 
my absence would have been more 
favorable,” Mr. Rigneesh said. 

The accusations, which Mr. Rq- 
n a^h said were based on informa- 
tion from other followers during 
the previous two days, were made 
Monday night at press conference. 
Nearly all of the approximately 
2,000 commune residents were pre- 
sent. 

Most of his allegations were 
aimed at Ma Anand Sheda, 35, the 
woman who was president of Raj- 
neesh Foundation lnternationaL 
During the guru’s three-year vow of 
silence, she was the only one to 
speak with him and relay his wishes 

to his followers. 

Mr. Rajneesh said that he 
learned Monday that Miss Stacda 
had gone to Switzerland a nd ha d 
beenkeeping a Swiss bank account- 
He said that he believed that ac- 
count contained part of the S55 
million representing the com- 
mune’s newly uncovered indebted- 
ness. 

He also accused the seven former 
leaders with involvement in a wide- 
spread outbreak erf salmonella last 
year in The Dalles, a nearby city, 
and an arson that badly damaged 
the Wasco County planning office. 

[The Oregon state attorney gen- 
eral Dave Frohnmayer, said be 
had seen no evidence connecting 
any of the Rajneeshecs with the 
two incidents. The Associated 
Press reported. 


[John Williams, superintendent 
of the Oregon State Police, said his 
officers were investigating some of 
tie charges, but he would not dab- 
oraie-l 

Mr. Rajneesh said that Miss 
Sheela. as his personal secretary, 
bad become addicted to the power 
and fame she had attained during 
his silence. 

[Ma Prem Isabel director of the 
commune’s press bureau, told AP: 
“It is a big lesson for us. We are all 
looking at what power does to us. 
people feel shocked and cheated 
somehow." 

[Miss Sheda was believed to be 
in West Germany or Switzerland. 


said Miss Isabel and Ma Prem 
StBhrna. another spokeswoman.] 

Mr. Rajneesh. 53. moved his 
commune from In dia in 1981, re- 
establishing it on the rite erf a Tor- 
TTv- r cattle ranch be bought in Ccn- 
oal Oregon about 160 miles (255 
kilometers) east of Portland. 

He is frequently referred to as a 
“Tree-sex gam" for urging his fol- 
lowers to reject society’s sexual mo- 
res- 

Mr. Rajneesh said Monday that 
he was displeased with his follow- 
ers’ takeover of the small to wn of 
Anudope, now called Rajneesh, 
about 20 miles north of the com- 
mune. He offered to let the towns- 
people buy back their community. 



me ouiuuti j- 

216.091st power minus I, which 
contains 65 .050 digits and would 
fill two pages if printed in a stan- 
dard-sized newspaper. 

Prime numbers are numbers that 
have no divisors other than them- 
selves and 1. For example. 13 is 


jujjv u/nipuM» m. ******* Supernumber 

65,050-Digit Prime Would Cover 2 Newspaper Pages 

BrtaDoota, 

LOSANGEJJSS SdentisIs^B 

Houston testing a supercomputer ^ Ma _ syslemaUC aDy, there ts no guanm- 

bave stumbled onto the largest a nth-century French monk tee that all of the numbers between 

prime number ever discovered. It is take 132,049, tewcmouhM 1 f«*nd ® 

the number 2 raised to the ^ fom, t rased to a prime power 1983. and 216,091 bavebeen 

minus I. The first three Mcrsenne 

aw ft £5= 

minus I^id3l ( 2 .olhc 5 lhpower 

uw ~- t Mersmne prime found at “Anyone who is doing it is doing 

selves and 1. F pf example. I3is Ch ^ nuscdapr( ig ra m written by it for his own mmisemenisajd 
prime, but 14. which is the product dXrav Research Mr. Slowmskt- “It’s not a coonli- 

of 2 and 7. is ool The ancient Swa Falls, Wisconsin, ruled effort like a steam enfflne 

Greeks knew that there us an rnfi- ^^eSTlargest Meraenne pulling a train up j * 

nite number of primes, but no one P . was 7 to the more Eke dozens of little rowboats 

has ever come up with a formula ^ 4 ^ poy^- minus 1 . a num- on a lake.” 
for generating them. 

Wbfle there is no known practi- 
cal use for 65,000-digit prime num- 
bers, the method that finds them 
requires trillions of calculations 
and is therefore a useful test of the 
rdiabilitv of large supercomputers. 

It also has engendered an informal 
competition among supercomputer 
manufacturers for recognition as 
the fastest machines on the markeL 
The faster a computer is. the larger 
the numbers it can test 
The latest prime was discovered 

within the last Tew weeks on a Cray 

X-MP supercomputer that was be- 
ing tested by Chevron Geosciences 
Co. in Houston. Chevron’s scien- 
tists plan to use the machine, which 
cost more 510 million, to ana- 
lyze geological data in exploring for 
oil. 

To lest the machine, computer 




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US. Tones Dmm Vernon of Detention 

By Soviet of Soldiers in East Germany 


By. Bctnaot Q«Qffians|n. u . ; 

Ne* York TBna Same ' . ■; 

"... tpjN .- Vjny.y* 

Defense and state , ; depot tiwaiis 
have toned down the R eagan a d- 
mmistrstioa’s original description 
of flic Soviet detention, of a U.S. 

■ Army vehicle in East Germany, an 
episode that was divulged Sunday 
by Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger. 

Spoteinen for the two agencies. 

, white repeating Monday tnal the 

•United Stales had protested to the 

Russians over the Sept. 7 modem, 
said that the army vebid e had fi rst 
got stuck near a Soviet wmnmm ca- 
• cons installation, then became en- 
snared in some Soviet barbed wire 
ofi the side of the road.- 
Later, a Soviet , traci speedmg 
down the road “gnwd” the^vrin- 
de, said Robert B. Sims, a Pent*- 

^traa^tfttr that happened 

that Russians whp were in die truck 
prevented the two Americans at- 
tached to themgharyfiaisa nnns- 
sion in East Gennany from leaving 
their vehicle until a senior tracer 

“Mr^Weinberger, disclosing the 

incident Sunday farthe &stiMe 

while appearmgon a 

news program smdtto theSowrt 
troops had ddibaatdy bumped 
the vehicle to stop ^ 

.• He added, indicating mistakenly 
■ l ihai there was ody 

.hcvefaictethat^I^^- 

eri to «t oat to fix the truck, ihey 


; M^o^Aitimr.D, NidKrfsoa Jr, 
iqTSerftSi liaisonteammanber, 
vras killed in Marei by a Soviet 
&tttjy 'cn ;a reconnaissa n ce patrol 
: in Emi Germany- 

Mr. Sims avoided raying Mon- 
day ritar the military liaison mem- 
bers were hdd at gunpoint, but 
that the vehicle was surrounded by 
several Soviet soldiers whose rifles 

had been “unslung.” There was no 

confirmation that the array person- 
nel were pushed bade into their 
vehicle. - 

Both the State and Defense de- 
partments said the Russians tele- 
pboned the American military mis- 


sion m Potsdam, East Germany, to 
tell jt'tliat an inadent bad occurred 
and’ sBsmdf the Amerirans at the 
mission that ‘the pr<A»tem wa§_tm T . 
der control 

At the State Department, some 
officials gave unofficial critidsro of 
the way Mr. Weinberger drama- 
tized the incident. One European 
expert said the case did not differ 
that much from past cram of ha- 
rassment by both sides. The Nich- 
olson case was unusual because, be 
said, in the 40 years of postwar 
divided Gennany no American or 
Russian bad been ki lte d carrying 
out these reconnaissance missions. 


Duarte Abductors Reported 
To Want Prisoner Release 


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SAN SALVADOR — Salvador- 
an fmwrillaR Harming (q hold the 
daughter of President Jbsfe Napo- 
ledn Duarte have contacted the 
Salvadoran government and de- 
manded the release of political 
prisoners in exchange for her safe 
return, according to Salvadoran 
and. diplomatic sources. 

The sources, who declined to be 




bi ^ 

*■ r~ 


ip. 1 * - . 


Saved in the sanKvray^ 
^did in the 

jgor Nidiolson was Hied and 
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From and represent all prisoners 
from the Farabundo Marti Nation- 
al liberation Front, the umbrella 
rebel organization, now bead m 
government jails. 

Rebel spokesmen in Mexico, 
Nfcaragua and Costa Rka, howev- 
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of the Pedro PaWo Castillo Front 
and did not knew who had kid- 
napped ln& Guadelope Duarte 
Durdn. 

Mrs. Duarte Durfin, 35, and a 
woman friend were abducted by 
gunmen last Tuesday afternoon 
outside a university in San Salva- 
dor. 

Communications Minister Julio 
Rey Prendes and Deputy Foreign 
Minister Ricardo Acevedo re- 
turned from Mexico late Monday 
after allegedly trying to make fur- 
ther contact with representatives of 
the abductors, but they could not 
be reached for comment. 


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** 


Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 


Anti- Communists Convene in Dallas 

Rightist Fighters, Followers and Funders Get Together 


By Charles R. Babcock 

H'asAnqpofi Post Service 

DA LLAS — There were fighters 
representing several armed msur- 
gwaes. wealthy Texans, represen- 
tatives of Soldier of Fortune maga- 
zine and the Reverend Sun Myung 
Moon, and ul cran ghost politicians 
from Guatemala and Paraguay, all 
rubbing shoulders in a new luxury 
hotel in north Dallas. 

The occasion was last week's 
18th annual conference of the 
World Anri-Communist League, 
which was founded by the govern- 
ments of Taiwan and South Korea. 

The four-day conference ended 
with an “International Freedom 
Fighters Dinner.” There were 
greetings from President Ronald 
Reagan, “Freedom Fighter of the 
Year" medals for insurgents from 
Nicaragua and Afghanistan and a 
special citation for a Dallas woman 
. who gave $65,000 toward a helicop- 
ter for the Nicaraguan guerrilla 
movement. A bust of Mr. Reagan 
was unveiled, made by a Cambodi- 
an who had dreamed that “he 
would meet an old white man who 
would help" his country’s resis- 
tance movement. 

“I commend you aD for your pan 
in this noble cause." Mr. Reagan’s 
letter read. “Our combined efforts 
are moving the tide of history to- 
ward world freedom." 

Representatives of eight anti- 
Marxist resistance movements at- 
tended, but most of the attention 
was focused on the Nicaraguans, 
led by Adolfo Calero Portocarrero, 
president of the Nicaraguan Demo- 
cratic Force, and the group’s mili- 
tary commander, Enrique Bennfi- 
dez. ... 

Also in the spotlight was the 
league's chair man, John K. Sirig- 
laub. a U.S. Army major general 
who retired after clashing with 


President Timmy Carter. General 
Singlaub had criticized Mr. Car- 
ter’s proposed withdrawal of U.S. 

troops from South Korea in the late 
1970s. 

During the past year. General 
Singlaub has been active in raising 
private funds to help Nicaraguan 
guerrillas opposed to the leftist 
San di nis i government in Managua. 


for helicopters. General Singlaub 
said he has agreed, therefore, to try 
raising new private aid for trucks 
and helicopters for the Nicara- 
guans. 

There were undercurrents or 
controversy as well at the meeting. 

Tom Posey, of Civilian Military 
Assistance, who said be was at the 


_ _ convention as an “observer," said 

Euen Garwood, who helped pay that too many groups were trying 
for the helicopter, said: “God. in to take credit for aiding the Nicara- 


his mysterious way, has put Gener- 
al Singlaub in communism's way. 
and the general is saying, ‘They 
shall not pass.' " 

The gathering featured moments 
of genuine emotion and impas- 
sioned rhetoric. A woman repre- 
senting resistance forces in Mo- 
zambique said she was upset that 
Mr. Reagan was scheduled to meet 
and “shake the bloody hand" of the 
Marxist leader of Mozambique. Sa- 
mora Macbel. 

Dr. Haing S. Ngor, who played 
the Cambodian reporter in the 
movie “The Killing Fields." said 
that the genocide or his people by 
the Communists was too grisly to 
be portrayed on film “because no 
one could stand to watch it." 

The medal winners, an Afghan 
fighter who had lost a hand to a 
Soviet mine and a Nicaraguan who 
had lost a leg told their stories 
many times. 

Assembled resistance leaders 
had many opportunities to make 
public relations points. Mr. Calero, 
for instance, said several limes that 
the Nicaraguan medal winner, Hu- 
bert R. Rodriguez, known as Sierra 
Three, lost his leg only after a flesh 
wound became infected because 
the guerrillas had no medical-evac- 
uation helicopters. 

The U.S. Congress has approved 
$27 milli on in humanitarian aid for 
the rebels, but none is to be used 


guan guerrillas. 

“We don’t have to preach to the 
choir," he said of his Alabama 
group that has worked in jungle 
hospitals in Central America. 
“We're the infantry troops. We’re 
the doers." 

Dr. Woo Jae Seung. the league's 
secretary-general from South Ko- 
rea. and General Singlaub said they 
did not know that Mario Sandoval 
Alarcdn of Guatemala had been 
invited to the conference. Mr. San- 
doval is a presidential candidate of 
the National Liberation Move- 
ment, which has described itself as 
the “party of organized violence." 

The South American chapter in 
which Mr. Sandoval was active was 
expelled a few years ago because its 
members made anti-Semitic and 
pro-Nazi statements. General Sing- 
laub said he assumed the new chap- 
ter had cleared Mr. Sandoval to 
attend. 

The delegates wrapped up their 
work with a joint communique sup- 
porting anti-Marxist- insurgencies 
worldwide. 

Several representatives of the re- 
sistance groups said they appreciat- 
ed the moral support, but needed 
money to buy guns. As Mario Ca- 
lero, a Nicaraguan guerrilla offi- 
cial, told a French television team: 
“We need money without any 
strings attached, without any ‘hu- 
manitarian’ baloney." 



President Hosoi Mubarak greeting Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in Cairo. 

Mubarak Sees Progress on Taba 

By Ji 

New »’< 


Judich Miller 

York Tima Service 

CAIRO — President Hosni 
Mubarak said Tuesday that pro- 
gress has been made towards re- 
solving Egypt's dispute with Is- 
rael over Taba, a major source of 
tension. 

Speaking to British reporters 
who were accompanying Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher cm 
the first day other Mideast talks, 
Mr. Mubarak declined to elabo- 
rate on the nature of the pro- 
gress. He said, however, that he 


bad sent a message Tuesday to 
Prime Minis ter Shimon Peres re- 
garding the issue. 

Taba, a 700-yard (640-meter) 
strip of beach that Israel retained 
after withdrawing from Sinai in 
1982, has become a major stum- 
bling block in efforts to restore 
normal ties between Egypt and 
Israel, which signed a peace trea- 
ty in 1979. Israel's invasion of 
Lebanon also strained relations' 
between the two countries, and 
when the Egyptian ambassador 
was withdrawn following the in- 


vasion, Cairo said no senior en- 
voy would be returned until the 
Taba issue was settled. 

“I am optimistic," Mr. Mu- 
barak said Tuesday. “I hope that 
we could proceed forward on the 
problem of Taba so as to put it to 
an end," he added. 

Mrs. Thatcher met for two 
hours Tuesday with Mr. Mu- 
barak in Cairo, the first stop cm 
her four-day tour of Egypt and . 
Jordan. 



C1965 Hiton imet national Co 


Now, No Stop Ojeck-Ouf” 
at Hilton International 
and Vista International 
Worlduide. 


Check out 
while 

YOU SLEEP 


We’ve made leaving a Hilton 
International or Vista International 
hotel almost as pleasurable as stay- 
ing there. 

All you have to do Is check in 
with an accepted credit card and tell 
us when you expect to leave. 

During the night, while you’re 
sound asleep, well slip your credit 
card receipt and itemized hotel bill 
under your door. 

In the morning, all you have to 
do is leave. No waiting on check-out 
lines, no waiting for vour receipt 
to come in the mail. 

For reservations, call your travel 
agent, any Hilton International hotel 
or Hilton Reservation Service in 
Copenhagen, Frankfurt. London, 
Madrid, Milan, Oslo, Paris or 
Stockholm. 

For a copy of the Hilton 
IntemationalAista International 
Worldwide Directory’ please write 
the Hilton International office 
nearest you: 

United Kingdom: 

Hilton International Co. 

Hilton Internal iona] Kensington 
179-199, Holland Park Avenue 
London Wll 4UL. England 
ATTN: Mr. Michael Weir 
Germany: 

Hilton International Co. 

Kaisertras.se 47 

D-6000 Frankfurt l, West Germany' 

ATTN: Distribution Center 
France: 

Hilton International Co. 

25, Rue Cam bon 

75001 Paris, France 

ATTN: Mr. Jean-Francois Spira 


Hilton International 


R Stop Check-Out* service is 
now offered at 90 Hilton International 
hotels In 76 cities in 44 countries: 

AUSTRALIA: Adelaide. Brisbane,* Melbourne. 
Penh. Sydney. Sydney Airport - 
AUSTRIA: Vienna 
BAHRAIN 

BARBADOS: Bridgetown 
BELGIUM: BruvseLs 

BRAZIL- Belem, bclo I tori/onie. San Paul* 
CANADA: Montreal. Montreal Airpoti/Dorval. 
Quebec City. Sami John c New Brunswick i. 
Toronto. Toronto Airport, Windsor 
COLOMBIA: Riigoix Cartagena 
CYPRUS. NicnMJ 

EGYPT: Aswan»l.UM it t Cruise Ships*. Cairn* 
ETHIOPIA: Addis Ahaha 

FRANCE: Orlv Airport » Paris). Paris, Strasbourg 
GERMANY. Dusscldurf. Main/. Munich 
GREECE: Athens. Corfu 
GUAM: Agana 


HOLLAND: Amsterdam. Roller dam. Schiphol 

Airport (Amsterdam 1 

HONG KONG: Victoria 

HUNGARY: Budapest 

INDONESIA: Jakarta 

ISRAEL: Jerusalem, TH Aviv 

ITALY: Milan. Rome 

IVORY COAST: Abidjan 

JAPAN: Osaka* Tokyo 

KENYA: Nairobi. Tsavu West, (lodges) 

KOREA: Seoul 

KUWAIT 

MADAGASCAR: Antananarivo 
MALAYSIA: Kuala Lumpur. Petal Ingjaya 
MALTA 

MOROCCO Rabat 

PAKISTAN. Lahore 

PANAMA: Panama Cits 

PHILIPPINES. Manila 

PUERTO RICO: Mas-ague*. San Juan 


SINGAPORE 

SRI LANKA: Colombo* 

SUDAN: Khartoum 

SWITZERLAND: Basel. Geneva. Zurich 
TAIWAN: Taipei 
THAILAND: Bangkok 
TRINIDAD: Pon-of-Spain 
TUNISIA: Tunis 
TURXEY: Istanbul 

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES: Abu Dhabi. At Ain. 
Duhai. Fujairah 

UNITED KINGDOM: London (talk Lane and 
Kensington). Gatwkfc Airport 
UNITED STATES: Chicago (The Drake). 
Honolulu f Kahafa Hilton). Kansas City (Vista 
Internal tonal 1. New York (Visa International ), 
Oklahoma City (Vista International). 
Pittsburgh* (Visa Internal tonal), 

Washington. D C I Visa Internal Iona] 1 
VENEZUELA: Barqutsuneio. Caracas' 

'Opemn^ J9H6 'Tiro ceruer-city locations 


East Germans Seek Pact 
With Bonn on Weapons 


By James M. Markham 

New York Tima Service 

BONN — With support from 
West Germany's main opposition 
party. East Germany has. initiated a 
campaign to persuade Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl's government to ea- 
ter an accord banning chemical 
weapons from central Europe. 

The East German campaign, ac- 
cording to a number of Western 
diplomats and academic analysts, 
appears aimed at stimulating the 
efforts of the opposition Social 
Democrats to make chemical 
weapons an issue in the West Ger- 
man elections in early 19S7. It 
comes as the Reagan administra- 
tion is moving to produce binary 
chemical weapons. 

The stale-controlled Communist 
press in East Germany gave promi- 
nent front-page treatment Monday 
to a letter to Mr. Kohl from Erich 
Honecker, the country’s Commu- 
nist leader, urging a ban on the 
production and storage of chemical 
weapons. 

Mr. Honecker pointedly noted 
that an accord would prevent the 
stationing “on European soil of 
new, exceptionally dangerous 
kinds of such weapons, above all 
binary weapons." Mr. Honecker 
wrote that Czechoslovakia's Com- 
munist government would be will- 
ing to join such an agreement with 
West Germany. 


Pope May Visit 

dget, outlined by the gov- * * • 

of Prime Minister Ruud U.S. Again ill 
forecast that buying dow- & 


Dutch Plan 
Less Social 
Spending 

The .Associated Press 

THE HAGUE, Netherlands — 
The center-right Dutch govern- 
ment, which faces national elec- 
tions next spring, is promising 
more buying power to Dutch wage 
earners in the 1986 budget it pre- 
sented Tuesday. 

The 169.4 billion-guilder 
($5234-bQlion) budget for 1986 
showed a deficit of 26 .5 billion guil- 
ders, or 7.8 percent of Dutch na- 
tional income. 

The bud: 
eminent 

Lubbers, forecast that buying pow- 
er for Dutch wage earners would 
increase 0.5 to 2 percent next year. 

In the past four years, buying 
power in the Netherlands has been 
declining under the government's 
austerity policy. 

Mr. Lubbers's coalition pro- 
posed substantial increases in its 
military and foreign aid budgets, 
but also announced spending-cut 
proposals amounting to 8 billion 
guilders. 

Mgsl of those cuts would be 
borne by the health-care sector, by 
dvD servants, whose fringe benefits 
are to be curtailed, and by recipi- 
ents of social security benefits. 

It would be the third straight 
year in which social security bene- 
fits were trimmed and dvO service 
costs reduced. 

The increase in net personal in- 
come would be achieved by lower- 
ing wage earners’ contributions to 
the Dutch social security system, 
which remains, despite recent cut- 
backs. one or the West’s most com- 
prehensive. 

Under the budget proposal, de- 
fense expenditures would rise 343.5 
million guilders to 13.7 billion guil- 
ders. and foreign aid expenditures 
would increase by 500 million guil- 
ders to 5.1 billion guilders, or 1.5 
percent of the Dutch national in- 
come. 


In June; the West German Social 
Democrats and the East German 
Communist Party concluded a 
draft treaty that would ban the 
storage and production of chemical 
weapons in central Europe. U was 
the first accord of its kind between 
an East European Communist par- 
ty, and -a major Soda! Democratic 
party committed to the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization. 

The agreement would immedi- 
ately affect chemical weapons sta- 
tioned in East Germany. Czecho- 
slovakia and West Germany and 
later be expanded to include Po- 
land, Lhe Netherlands, Belgium and 
Luxembourg. 

The Soviet Union and its War- 
saw Pact allies routinely conduct 
maneuvers on the assumption that 
they might use chemical weapons 
in an attack on Western Europe, 
and such weapons are believed to 
be deployed throughout Eastern 
Europe. 

In Western Europe, the United 
States has old stocks of chemical 
weapons stored only in West Ger- 
many. Withdrawal of these weap- 
ons. as envisaged in the draft trea- 
ty, would leave NATO without a 
retaliatory capacity. NATO experts 
note that troops clad in anti-chemi- 
cal gear have sharply reduced com- 
bat effectiveness. 

To meet a perceived Soviet ad- 
vantage in chemical warfare capac- 
ity. the Reagan administration this 
year secured congressional approv- 
al to produce binary nerve gas sys- 
tems. But the issue of 
such weapons in Western 
has been left open. 

After the debate over the deploy- 
ment of U_S. medium-range mis- 
siles, the Kohl government is decid- 
edly reluctant to join a battle over 
chemical weapons, an issue that 
would touch widespread German 
sensitivities about peace and the 
environment. 

U.S. officials have sought to play 
down the prickly deployment issue. 
One senior American policymaker 
said that the stationing of die new 
binary systems would not have to 
be confronted until the 1990s, but 
added that the old systems would 
not be withdrawn before then. 


United Press International 

WASHINGTON — Pope John 
Paul II may make a pastoral visit to 
the United States in the fall of 
1987, with stops in. several cities in 
the South and West, the National 
Conference of Catholic Bishops an- 
nounced Tuesday. 

The bishops said the trip may 
last a little more than a week, and 
that the exact dates and places had 
not been determined. 

It would be John Paul's second 
major trip to the United States as 
pope. 


La Lebanon, a Symbiosis 
Of Firepower, Figbtmg 

Weapons Bigger and dashes Fiercer 
As Tanks, Artillery Feed Blood Feuds 


Kifner 

New fork Tima Service 
BEIRUT — For more than a 





strife here that demonstrates in 
terms of levels of destruction how 



grounds oi junumou man * other ports I 

variety of sources, tuning the Amal also has us 

country into an arms supermarket, nan heartian ^v Moslem 

Now gunmnning is ot the rise S?” J ’ 

again, according to Lebanese and W»t Mini weapons sup- 

Westem sources^ feeding the blood oSSere. the 

feuds among the morethan 40 fac- ^ buy from private^ 

tions and splinier groups with ever "^S^^ealera. usin^ 
heavier tools of destruction. international raised through 

There is a kind of ar chaeol ogy of 

and other means in territory they 
control- Some money comes from 

wealthy expatriates. 

The Diuze leader. Valid Jumb- 
lat, has established his own direct 


rung more 

ings in the old luxury hotel 

district and along parts of the — , 

Green T ine dividing the Moslem line to Moscow, and now gets some 

and Christian sectors that were the Soviet arms, inc lu di n g tanks, 

< y»-Tyr< of the original mili tia battles redly. Diplomats expect this to 
in 1975 and 1976 are still largely eventually become a bone of con- 
intact, although gnawed and pock- tendon with President Hafez ai- 

Assad of Syria, who prefers to keep 

his allies dependent 
In addition to the rifles, rocket 
launchers and truck-mounted ma- 
chine guns that axe the common 
sinrir of the private armies, the 
Druze forces are estimated to have 
50 to 100 T-54 and T-55 tanks, r 
according to sources. They also 
have three American-made M-48 
tanks that they took away from the 
Lebanese Army. . . 

The smar tly uniformed Christian 
militiamen, now known as the Leb- 
anese Forces, have 50 or 60 tanks, 
some supplied by Israel including 
seven American M-48s they took 
away from the Lebanese Army. 
The Christians also have 30 to 40 
artillery pieces, mostly of Soviet 
and French manufacture. 

The Lebanese Army itself has 
about 130 tanks left. 

The fundamentalist Party of 
God, with a major base in the Be- 
kaa, receives money and equipment 
from Iran. 

Along the southern border, Isra- 
mostly^teis^m mHtia called the 


mar ked by small arms fire. 

But over the last 18 months, 
whole neighborhoods have been 
leveled to rabble by merciless artil- 
lery pounding, mainly in the Shiite 
Moslem slums and Palestinian ref- 
ogee districts on the southern edge 
of the city. 

The weapons of the private ar- 
mies here nave moved from the 
ubiquitous Soviet-designed Ka- 
lashnikov assault rifle carried by 
street fighters to tanks and artillery 
batteries. 

The latest major weapons addi- 
tion arrived last month, when Syria 
presented its main proxy, the Shuts 
Moslem militia AmaL with 50 Sovi- 
et-made T-54 tanks. Some of the 
tanks are thought to be manned by 
soldiers of the mostly Shiite 6th 
Brigade of the official Lebanese 
Army — which, in the chaos of 
West Beirut, has many times be- 

AmaL AMeast twooHhe tanks 
have been lost in street fighting, 
military sources said. 

The tanks considerably bolstered 
Antal and brought the militia to 
near parity in arms with more es- 
tablished militia groups. The Shiite 
forces were frustrated in June in an 
attenmt to drive Palestinian guer- 
rillas loyal to Yasser Arafat, Syria's 
enemy, out of tbeir bases in the 


South Lebanon Army, equipping U 
with, among other things, old ILS. 
Sherman tank* 


/• 


refugee districts. 
There 


was considerable specula- 


L6 More Die 

don about whom the Syrians in- A _T V 

tended the tanks to be used against- | j^iy^HOTl § 

The candidates included the Chris- 
tians, who are Antal's declared cue- Ti« j iv r* j 

mies; AmaP s nominal allies, the Nlflrtlf Winf^llS 
Druze, and in sometime Shiite fun- * 

The Associated Pros 

BEIRUT — Factional fighting 
engulfed Beirut's Green Line, the 


damentalist rivals, die Party of 
God, not to mention the Palestin- 
ians. 

The tanks were used in five days 
of renewed fighting recently 
against Palestinians holding oat in 
the Burj al-Brajneh district near the 
airport. 

In the last few weeks, according 
to Western military sources, Syria 
has given Amal several 130mm and 
122mm artiDeiy pieces at a fire 
base on a slope m the Bekaa region. 
The guns can be fired into either 
Christian areas of Beirut or the 
Palestinian districts. 

The Syrian largess flbstraies an- 
other aspect of the Lebanese arms 
buildup: the willingness of other 
Middle East poweis to aim their 
proxies, and, often, fight their bat- 
tles here. Before load invaded 
Lebanon in 1982, it clandestinely 
armed the Christian militia in 
hopes it would be a strong ally. ' 

Now Libya is trying to resupply 
the Arafat guerrillas m Beirut and 
the Sdon area, according to West- 
ern intelligence sources. These 
sources said several shiploads of 
arms might have been landed along 
the coast, mainly at the new private 
port at Khalde, which is controlled 
by Druze militiamen of the Pro- 
gressive Socialist Party. 


northern port city of Tripoli and 
Lebanon's central mountains Tues- 
day. 

The police reported that 16 more 
persons had died in the fighting 
that began Sunday, nine of than in 
Tripoli Lebanon’s second-largest 
city, 50 miles (80 kilometers} north 
of Beirut. 

Pro-Syrian and Palestinian- 
backed nrilrtias battling for control 
of Tripoli traded artflkry and rock- 
et fire for the third day in six dense- 
ly populated districts. The police 
said that 33 persons have been 
killed and 1 15 wounded in Tripoli 
since Stmday. 

Christian and Moslem militia- 
men. antagonists in Lebanon's rivQ 
war, fought gun battles throughout 
the night across the Green line 
that divides Beirut into Moslem 
and Christian sectors. The police 
said that four dvfljans were killed 
and seven others wounded. 

In southern Lebanon. Arab guer- 
riHas said Tuesday that a suicide 
bomber crashed a car packed with 
explosives into a post manned by 
an Israeli-backed militia, causing 
casualties. The report was not con- 
firmed by Israel 


Effects of Smoking on Health in U.S. 
Are Said to Cost $65 Billion a Year 

Los Angela Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The adverse effect of smoking on health is 
costing the United States an. average of $65 billion a year in increased 
medical bills, premature death and time lost from work, or about 
$2.17 for each pack of cigarettes consumed, according to a new 
congressional study. 

The calculations, released Monday by the Office of Technology 
Assessment, a scientific advisory aim of Congress, are higher than the 
estimate of $40 million made in 1984 by the U.S. surgeon general C 
Everett Koop. 

The Tobacco Institute, an industry lobbying group, disputed the 
results of the new study, saying that it “demonstrates how little is 
known about the rdationship of personal behavior to disease, and 
then in turn, disease to cost 

The study found that the United Stales will spend $12 billion to $35 
billion tins year to treat smoking-related diseases snch as hm g c ance r, 
or 3 percent to 9 percent of total U.S. health care spendin g Addition- 
al costs for lost job productivity will total $27 billion to $61 billion. 
Thus, the total costs range from $39 billion to $96 billion, an averase 
of$65bfflion. use 

Representative Fortney H. Static, a Democrat of Californio, v uri 
“This study confirms our suspicions that smoking is not only a deadly 
habit but a costly one for the federal health care budget" 


Yepishev, a Russian General, Dies 


New York Tima Service 

MOSCOW — General Alexei A. 
Yepishev, 77. who for 23 years was 
the chief political commissar of the 
Soviet armed forces, died Sunday 
after a long illness, the Tass press 
agency announced. 

General Yepishev retired in July 
to the largely honorary post of mlh- 
tary inspector. As political com- 
missar. he had responsibility f ra- 
the political loyalty and moral dis- 
cipline of the Soviet military. 


department of the Central Com- 
mittee of the Communist Party. 

General Yepishev became a full 
member of the Central Committee 
in 1964 and was an influential voice 
the Kremlin, especially under 


The armed forces political direc- 
The budget is subject to patiia- torate, of which General Yepishev 
memary approval was head, also has the status of a 


Nikita S. Khrushchev anti Leonid 
I. Brezhnev. 

He held the title of Hero of the 
Soviet Union and was 'awarded 
three Orders of Lenin and many 
other awards. 

In July, General Yepishev was 
replaced as chief of the main politi- 
cal directorate by General Alexei 
D. Lizkbev. 57, the political com- 


missar of the Soviet command in 
East Germany. 

■ Other Deaths: 

Winifred Cedi, 78, soprano and 
vocal coach, of cardiopulmonary 
complications, Friday in New 
York.. 

Joe Masefl, 45, the singer and 
actra- best known for his role in the 
musical Jacques Brel is Alive and 
Well and Living in Paris." of bone 
camxr. Friday in New York. 

Fernando Parades-BeHo, 56 , 
Venezuela s ambassador to France 
atuE a framer defense minister, 
Stmday. of a heart attack durins a 
nuhtary ceremony near Paris 


* 


i 


1 


! -'Avc-: 




m 


-1 




IM rVI 









: =. . 


INTERNATIONAL IIERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 


Page 5 : 






17J 



r; 


A Japanese Investment Bank's 
Global Role Should Be 


'^Cluito. 

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in l S 
1 1 'ear 


luSttUcJI y° a view recent trends in 
the Tokyo capita] market I . 

Umemura: This past year, the pace of de- 
velopment has been rapid. In keeping with 
the directions set forth in the report of the 
U.S. —Japan Yen— Dollar Co mm ittee in May 
1984, the authorities liberalized the Euroyen 
market, established a yen bankers 1 acceptance 
{BA] market, and further broadened the par- 
ticipation of foreign securities companies in 
the market — as lead managers of Euroyen 
' bond issues, as participants in syndicates to 
underwrite government bonds in Japan, and 
• in other activities. 

It was also an important year because the 
terms at which long-term government bonds 
were being issued more closely reflected 
yields in the secondary market. 

The introduction of a BA market was a sig- 
nificant step toward development of a short- 
term money market, but this market is only 
in its initial stage. I believe that a precondi- 
tion for the growth of the BA market is the 
introduction of a full-fledged treasury bill 
market. 

A comparison with other countries is re- 
vealing. The size of the short-term money ■ 
market in japan is only one-tenth that of the 
United States, although the size of our econ- 
omy is : one-third that of the United States. 
Even compared with the size of the Japanese 
capital market, the short-term money mar- 
ket Is' small: For the efficient functioning of 
a capital market and the smooth adjustment 
of interest rates to market forces, the short- 
term money market must be expanded. Thus, 
in addition to yen BAs and existing short- 
term government bonds, Japan needs to cre- 
ate and build a treasury bill market. 


the result of the growth of financial assets in 
Japan and the desire of investment managers 
to diversify their portfolios. Over the past year 
or two, both institutions and individuals in 
Japan have been attracted by high returns 
overseas. The trend toward international 
diversification of portfolios should continue. 

I would also note the high level of capital 
inflows as more international investors diver- 
sify their portfolios to include Japanese secu- 
rities. Thus, although both capital inflows 
and outflows will continue to grow, I believe 
that Japan will remain a net exporter of long- 
term capital for some time. 


yon see as the longer-iange 
implications of recent developments in 
the Tbkyo market ? 

Umemoxa: As is evident from events of the 
past year, the rapid pace of deregulation is 
both diminishing administrative controls and 
steadily dismantling the previous shelters 
that have protected many Japanese financial 
institutions from the full force of compe- 
tition. 

More important, liberalization is present- 
ing us with new business opportunities, and 
at Nikko, we have moved quickly to ratio- 
nalize our internal operations and to allocate 
managerial .resources to the most promising 
business opportunities. 


analysts have 

drawn attention to the emergence of Japan 
as the largest net exporter of capital in the 
world. What is your perspective on these 
flows ? 

Umemiua: From an economic standpoint, 
the growth of capital outflows is related to the 
rising surplus in the current account of 
Japan's. balance of payments. This surplus is 
projected to be $39 billion in the current year 
and $48 billion next year. It is only natural 
that Japan reexports its earnings from trade. 

Securities investment accounts for approxi- 
mately one-half of capital outflows, This is 


Tokyo market expands and 
capital flows increase, what issues do you 
see facing Nikko Securities as a global 
investment bank ? 

Umemura; There are three strong currents in 
the financial services industry, deregulation, 
internationalization, and the growing reli- 
ance on information systems. In these cur- 
rents, we must steer a course that will not 
only keep us in the lead in our traditional 
businesses but take us into new waters. 

Although we could debate the merits of 
our strategy, we have chosen to remain a full- 
service financial institution committed to 
serving both individuals and institutions. 
Over the years, our customers have assumed 
they can come to us for any service, and wc 
will not disappoint them. 

In providing- a full range of services, we are 
striving for balance. For example, the ratio of 
profits from equities-related business and of 
those from other securities, such as bonds 
and investment trusts, is now 65:35. We are 
gradually moving it toward 50:50 by building 
our capabilities for trading and placing bonds. 
This has involved adding staff to our bond 
operations both domestically and abroad. We 
look forward to the introduction of a bond fu- 
tures market next month and are prepared to 
take advantage of the opportunities— for our 
clients and ourselves — that such a financial 
futures market offers. There is also talk of 
launching a detachable warrants market in 
the near future. 

Another means of achieving balance is to 
make use of our natural strengths. Because 
we are based in Japan, we believe we have an 
advantage for yen-linked products as the role 
of the yen as an international currency grows. 
And as I just mentioned, we are in an excel- 
lent position to help Japanese investors who 
want to invest abroad. 

We also want good geographic balance and 
already have a solid position in all the major 
markets. For example, we are very strong in 
Samurai bond underwritings for Pacific Ba- 
sin countries. This position is attributable to 
our long involvement in the region. For years, 
we have been active in the Republic of Korea. 
In the People's Republic of China, we recently 
opened a representative office in Beijing and 
axe preparing for another one in Qingdao. 

As the core economy in Asia, Japan must 
play a growing role in assisting its nei|fibors 
raise the capital necessary for economic 
development— and develop their own capital 
markets. We take this responsibility seriously 
at Nikko. 


WHAT ORJFflTlVES 


— will you be 

pursuing over the next five years ? 

Umemura: I think the strategy I just outlined 
points to where we want to be five years from 
now. By then, we are aiming ro have more 
than 110 offices domestically and more than 
20 abroad, all linked as a global network. And 
we intend to provide a range and quality of 
service — for individuals and institutions in 
Japan and internationally— that will give us 
an edge on other excellent investment banks. 





Shoji Umemura 

President since 1981, Shoji Umemura has 52 
years of experience with Nikko Securities. 
He is currently serving as Chairman of The 
Bond Underwriters Association of Japan. 


WHAT RESOURCES 


ro compete internationally? 


are requited 


Umemura: The answer to that question starts 
with financial resources. Nikko has an equity 
base of ¥420 billion, or about $1.7 billion. 
This ranks us among the top three securities 
companies in the world. 

Naturally, we must also have the human 
resources and creativity to best use our capi- 
tal resources. Quite honestly, Japanese finan- 
cial institutions do not always compare well 
on technical skills. Part of the reason is 
historical. For instance, I think the leading 
American banks are ahead of their Japanese 
counterparts in global cash management. Bur 
then, Japan has not had a large money mar- 
ket in which to invest liquid assets. . 

To cite what is both a Japanese and Western 
maxim: necessity is the mother of invention. 
The necessity is evident in Japan. The large 
volume of government debt issues is leading 
to the rapid development of a secondary bond 
market. Liberalization of interest rates has 
forced the design of new savings instruments. 
Slower economic growth has prompted cor- 
porate treasurers to find the lowest-cost capi- 
tal, thus leading to disintermediation. 

Nikko has contributed its share of innova- 
tions in the past, and I am confident that we 


will continue to in the future. Back in 1961, 
we were the first to create and offer a bond 
investment trust fund in Japan. More recent- 
ly, in 19S4, we introduced Home Trade One, 
the first home brokerage system using a push- 
button phone to place buy and sell orders. 

Our international accomplishments go 
back many years. In 1961, we were in- 
strumental in setting up the Japan Fund in 
the United States. This past year, we 
launched the first Euroyen money market 
fund, which is based in Luxembourg. 

For a company generally recognized as be- 
ing bound to tradition, I think we have 
demonstrated we can be effective marketers 
of innovative services. But they must be ser- 
vices needed by our clients. I am continual- 
ly saying that we must grow with our clients. 


iVl S JA iJJ l\i Mil Wil :■ services do 
your clients want from you, and what are 
you doing to provide them? 

Umemura: Since our clients want a variety 
of services, we are relying on the combined 
resources of Nikko itself, our overseas sub- 
sidiaries, and such members of the Nikko 
Group as the Nikko Research Center, Ltd.; 
the Nikko Securities . Investment Thist 
Management Co., Ltd.; Nikko International 
Capital Management Co., Ltd.; and Nikko 
Venture Capital Co., Ltd. . 

One service our corporate clients want is 
global underwriting. The development of the 
Euroyen market and the emergence of the yen 
as an international currency have prompted 
us to strengthen our international network 
of 18 offices. We have put additional capital 
into our American and Luxembourg subsid- 
iaries and are in the process of establishing 
a merchant bank in Sydney. In Paris, we plan 
to upgrade our representative office to a 
subsidiary. 

Another service in high demand is global 
dealing, and we have placed a high priority 
on expanding our capabilities in this area. To 
minimize market risk, dealing skills are an 
essential complement to our brokerage and 
underwriting skills. We are putting in place 
a 24-hour dealing system centered on our 
operations in Tokyo, London, and New York. 
In another move to help our clients hedge 
risk, we have become a member of the major 
financial futures and options exchanges. 

Our customers also want fast delivery of, 
and easy access to, a variety of products. To 
meet the domestic demand for variety, we re- 
cently opened a credit card company and 
have ventures with other companies to pro- 
vide particular services. Tb meet the demand 
from customers around the world for faster 
delivery of services, we have been upgrading 
our data processing and telecommunications 
systems. 

To provide any of these services, we must 
also invest in people. After highly selective 
recruiting, we spend considerable time and 
effort on training new employees. For highly 
specialized areas— such as bond trading, 
swaps, foreign exchange, and computer 
systems — we are structuring our organization 
to promote specialization. And overseas, we 
have been fortunate in recruiting top-level in- 
dividuals for senior positions. 


pit* 


NIKKO 

Nikko Securities 

Shin Tbkyo Building, 3-1, Marunouchi 3-chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tbkyo 100, Japan 


DOI V ZURICH GENEVA FRANKFURT LUXEMBOURG PARIS COPENHAGEN BAHRAIN NEW YORK SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES CHICAGO TORONTO HONG KONG SINGAPORE BETTING SYDNEY SEOUL 


! 





Page 6 


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 




Published With The >'ew Yoffe Times ad Hie W**femgioo PM 


Reagan Has an Urgent Decision to Make Have Aged 





Capitalist Crossed Purposes 


Early next month, rich and poor govern- 
ments meet in Seoul to discuss the world’s 
financial crisis. Later in October, the same 
city hosts a meeting on the trade crisis. The 
division of labor is unfortunate. 

Three recent studies are particularly rele- 
vant to these two meetings. 

The rich countries have asked why the 
present system of floating exchange rates 
has shown weaknesses unexpected when the 
system was introduced a decade 3go. Their 
conclusion is that what is needed is a better 
coordination of national economic policies, 
but no change in the system. That is hardly 
an earth-shaking finding. The tools for eco- 
nomic coordination have existed ever since 
the end of World War II, but they have 
progressively fallen into disuse. 

A study by the poor countries is more 
ambitious, since they believe that the pre- 
sent international monetary system works 
particularly to their disadvantage. They call 
for more intervention by the rich in the 
exchange markets to keep currency values 
within agreed target zones, a reshaping of 
policies to make the economies of the rich 
more supportive of growth, and more pres- 
sure on creditor countries to help the weaker 
ones. They' seek more credit from the IMF, 

. more official development aid, the stretch- 
ingout of their debts with special relief when 
interest rates rise, and the rolling back of 
protectionism. That is a familiar Ust. which 
many will dismiss as asking for the moon. 

A more balanced report emanates from 
the United Nations Conference on Trade 
and Development, which has often been 
regarded as an unbalanced pressure group 
for the poor. UNCTAD calls, reasonably 
enough, for somewhat faster growth in the 
world of the rich. But it does not ignore the 


crying need for the poorer countries to cor- 
rect their sometimes hopelessly improvident 
domestic policies, which encourage triple- 
digit inflation and discourage the productive 
investment that is their only way to wealth. 
UNCTAD’s main contribution, however, is 
to underline the need for the governments of 
the rich to break out of a peculiarly vicious 
aide. How, it asks, can the world economy 
function when the poorer countries have to 
reduce their debts — which requires a big 
increase of their exports — but the response 
of the rich is to put up barriers to imports? 

It would help if the United States defused 
protectionist pressure through fiscal action 
that led to lower interest rates and a cheaper 
dollar, but this seems unlikely. It would help 
if other OECD countries increased their 
growth, but this would need overt action by 
governments that doubt the efficacy of ac- 
tivism in this field. It would help if aid 
increased, but the rich governments believe 
— probably wrongly — that this would cost 
votes. And it would help if private capital 
flows to the Third World increased. The 
World Bank is.launching a sensible guaran- 
tee scheme to this end, but it will take time. 

So you come back to the basic choice: 
Either protectionism has to be reversed fast, 
or the debt burden has to be stretched out 
over a longer period. As we read the bottom 
line of the writing on the wall, it is mainly 
through debt alleviation that a solution will 
have to be found. But this is where the 
financial experts in Seoul may differ from 
their trade colleagues three weeks later. 

Tbeir separate meetings illustrate diver- 
gencies of approach inside rich countries 
that may lead to major international contra- 
dictions in the capitalist world. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


Acid Poison From the Sky 


For five years President Reagan has refused 
to lift a finger against acid rain, the slow 
poison that is eating the life out of lakes and 
trees from the Rockies to the Easton sea- 
board. To each new report urging action, the 
administration has always responded that too 
little is known about arid rain to justify any 
plan of action. The excuse was never valid, and 
has now been rendered embarrassing by the 
frank appraisal of Drew Lewis. Mr. Reagan's 
special representative on arid rain. 

“It seems to me that saying sulfates do not 
cause add rain is the same as saying that 
smoking does not cause lung cancer," Mr. 
Lewis told New England governors last week. 
He acknowledged that the emission of sulfur 
dioxide gas from coal-fired power plants was 
the cause of acid rain and must be reduced, 
whatever uncertainties remain in the details. 


The weight of scientific opinion centered on 
ui conclusion many months ago. A blue 


that conclusion many months ago. A blue 
ribbon review panel convened by Mr. Rea- 
gan's own science adviser recommended in 
July 1984 that "cost effective steps to reduce 
emissions begin now even though the resulting 
ecological benefits cannot yet be quantified.*’ 
Mr. Reagan ignored that advice, and rebuffed 
the modest control program devised at his 
request by William Ruckekhaus, former head 
of the Environmental Protection Agency. 

Finally to get an accurate diagnosis from 
this administration is no small gain; it is a 


tribute to Mr. Lewis's candor. But, having 
diagnosed the disease, be shrinks from the 
remedy. Decades of acidified rain, snow and 
mist have so weakened the neutralizing power 
of soils and lakes that a major reduction of 
acidic pollutants is now necessary. The scien- 
tific consensus is that the acid burden must be 
cut in half, which requires a reduction of 12 
million tons a year in the sulfur and nitrogen 
oxides emitted from power plants and other 
sources. Mr. Lewis calls such a program "un- 
realistic'" because it would cost utilities an 
estimated $6 billion to clean up their emis- 
sions. But what is the point of a cheaper 
program if it fails to protect lakes and forests? 

The costs of not reducing arid rain are 
also substantial. Quite apart from the havoc 
wreaked on nature, the Environmental Protec- 
tion Agency calculates that acid rain causes $5 
billion a year of corrosion damage in buildings 
and $2 billion from the cFfects of reduced 
visibility, like disrupted air traffic schedules 
and canceled outdoor activities. 

The principal remedy for acid rain is to have 
utilities pollute much less, by switching to low- 
sulfur coal or installing scrubbers. That will be 
costly, especially for the heavily polluting utili- 
ties in the Ohio Valley and for mines that 
produce high-sulfur coal — but not as costly as 
tolerating the persistent poison from the sky. 
Five years of procrastination is enough. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Leave the Titanic in Peace 


The Titanic lies now in 13.000 feet of water on 
a gently sloping alpine-looking countryside over- 
looking a small canyon below. Its bow faces 
north. The ship sits upright on its bottom with its 
mighty stacks pointed upward. There is no light 
at this great depth and little life cm be found. It 
is a quiet and peaceful place — a fitting place for 
the remains of this greatest of sea tragedies to 
rest. Forever may it remain that way. And may 
God bless these now-found souls. 

— Dr. Robert Ballard, leader of the expedi- 
tion that found the Titanic. 


The finding of the Titanic is one scientific 
discovery whose significance does not need 
belaboring. Since April 14. 1912, the elements 
of the Titanic story have taken hold in popular 
consciousness: “unsinkable” design, a confi- 
dent start, a calm night, distress calls un- 
answered, the shortage of lifeboats, the 1,500 
dead. To most of us, the Titanic story is less 
history than legend. As with most legends, its 
theme is simple: the extravagant pride of man 
and technology, and the revenge of nature. 

Today, "state-of-the-art technology" means 
to us something more powerful than the Titan- 
ic’s overconfident builders could have imag- 


ined. It is harder to remember that however far 
back we push the boundaries of technological 
civilization, the natural forces beyond that 
boundary remain as unforgiving as ever. Only 
those who work at the edge of current explor- 
atory technology — such as the U-S.-Freneh 
team whose revolutionary scanning device. 
Argo. was. like the Titanic, on its maiden 
voyage — retain awareness or what nature has 
the power to do. Hence, perhaps. Dr. Ballard’s 
emotional plea to prospective treasure-hunters 
“not to desecrate this memorial." 

Such a message will not reach everyone. 
Would-be salvagers have declared their inten- 
tion to search for the wreck and raise it or strip 
it of valuables — since nobody actually owns 
iL Within a week of the discovery, six U.S. 
congressmen had introduced legislation that 
would deter such buccaneering by designating 
the Titanic an international memorial site. 
Such a measure is unlikely to discourage the 
more determined would-be scavengers — one 
of whom told Time magazine that “you can do 
anything you're big enough to do out there" — 
but ii wifi be all to the good if Congress can 
amplify Dr. Ballard’s basic message. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROM OUR SEPT. 18 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: US. Tariff Step Is Welcomed 
BERLIN — Herr A Kiener, president of the 
Chamber of Commerce at Colmar and head of 
an important manufacturing firm in Alsace, 
has expressed satisfaction with the practical 
withdrawal of the new regulations covering 
textiles and congratulated the U.S. Treasury 
Department upon the derision. "The export 
trade in textiles to the United Slates," be said, 
“has been cut down to next to nothing by the 
high tariff. The new regulations womd have 
excluded Lhe Tew manufacturers still doing 
business with America. I think a country valu- 
ing its reputation for dignity ought to avoid the 
introduction of a measure that, if not framed 
in the interest of unfair business competitors, 
bears that appearance. The successful issue of 
the Herald's campaign against the projected 
regulations is highly satisfactory-" 


1935: Russell Warns of Slide to War 
PARIS — Not super-statesmen, not over- 
enthusiastic masses but magnates of industry 
were blamed by Bertrand Russell British au- 
thor and sociologist, for manipulating nations 
into war. “Hiller? Why Hitler is just a mega- 
phone for the German iron and steel industry. 
HI admit he is a good megaphone, but that is 
because the German iron and steel industry is 
very competent and would have a good mega- 
phone." Mr. RusseU issued his statements 
from a cafe near the Sorbonne [on SepL 17]. 
“ Imagine! This is an age when the iron and 
steel industry can bring on a war singlehanded. 
The world is simply lunatic." “The states of 
Europe,” he added, “don’t seem to realize that 
die next war will be much more serious than 
the last. If it occurs, civilization will not sur- 
vive in England, France or Germany." 


international herald tribune 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Guurmen 


PHILIP M, FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
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* 1 1 985, Inlemaamal Herald Tribune. AU righu reserved. 


B ERLIN —It is a wasteful exercise to specu- 
late whether the Soviet leader, Mikhail Gor- 
bachev is ready to make real concessions to gel 
an arms agreement that would include a ban on 
development and testing of “star wars but noi 
on research, or whether he is lust cleverly har- 
vesting a propaganda windfall The tea leaves 
won’t tell But there is an easy, straightforward 
tesu it is to take him up on his hints. 

The United States can lose nothing by saying 
that it is prepared to make an adequate trude-ofl- 
Then if the Russians do not deliver in detailed 
negotiations, the United States need not, ether- 
Incredible as it seems, there is still no White 
House decision on this crucial policy issue. In 
less than a fortnight the Soviet foreign minister, 
Eduar d Shevardnadze, will be in New York ana 
Washington, the important last plateau on the 
climb to the November Reagan-Gorbachev sum- 
mit. The third round in the U5.-Soviei arms 
talks in Genera opens next wed:. But the Wash- 
ington battle for the president’s ear is still raging. 

Only last week. Defense Secretary Caspar 
Weinberger declared publicly that “star wars is 
“not any kind of bargaining chip or negotiating 
chip.” which dearly means no search for a deal. 
Secretary of Slate George Shultz and his senior 
arms control adviser, Paul Nitze, are known to 
favor a trade if Moscow will make it good 
enough. There is no sign of President Reagan’s 
decision, although he has already publicly com- 


By Flora Lewis 


mined the United States not to go beyond re- 
search without negotiating. 

There is very little time left, and no real prepa- 
ration, for probing Mr. Gorbachev's intentions. 
It is evident that he feels considerable pressure io 
make some vital decisions of his own before his 
party’s congress next February. He is making 
long-range plans for the Soviet economy. If he 
concludes in the next few weeks that there is no 
prospect of an agreement with the United States 
with mutual concessions, he may commit his 
regime to a course that wQl not provide another 
opportunity for a decade. Hat would mean 
renewed deterioration of Soviet-American rela- 
tions well beyond Mr. Reagan’s presidency, with 
no way of ever knowing for sure whether a real 
chance of improvement was recklessly ignored. 

Europeans and others at a conference in West 
Berlin of the International Institute of Strategic 
Studies make clear that U.S. alliances would 
suffer. Mr. Gorbachev could be expected to ex- 
ploit such a situation shrewdly. He has the time 
and the means. There are already s i g ns that he 
considers openings to Western Europe and Ja- 
pan, perhaps with dramatic concessions such as 
return of the four disputed Kuril Islands, as an 
alternative if he has no “American option.” 

The extraordinary thing about the argument in 


Washington is that it has not ewn .begun to 
address the questions of y 

States should regard as a 
gain. The argument is still essentially a 
whether there is any point m probing for M - 
Gorbachev’s minimum conditions- 
That is the context in which to read *e repon 
about complaints from the U.S. ne^maung temn 
in Geneva that the Russians have been enabieo 
to appear more flexible than the Americans ai 
lhe arms talks. The Reagan admirustration at- 
tends that American negotiators have plenty « 
flexibility, but that the Russians have made ao 
formal proposals to test them. . 

In fact the American ream has been mstnicred 
only to advocate and explain Mr. 
rile defense program, not to explore what Mos- 
cow really seeks and will give in return. And tt 
has been told to insist that the Soviet Union put 

-its cards on the table fim. without any hints ol 

if ^ Gorbachev 

means business, or to seek to influence the major 

long-range decisions that he will soon be makin g. 
Ana ao decision from Mr. Reagan on U.S. policy 
will amount soon to a negative decision. So much 
is at stake if the chance to test the Soviet leader is 
thrown away. If the chance is seized, the only nsk 
would be to discover that Moscow has something 
serious and useful to offer. 

The New York Times. 


By Daniel P. MoynHianpi 


The writer, a Democratic ^ 

New York, was chief 




. ffiTmiTi'fi* vfm rnmgtm 


W ashington - in 
of 40 th anniversaries, 


nuins io observe 


Blacks in South Africa: A Post-Apartheid Horizon? 


S tellenbosch, south Africa 
— Apartheid has become one of 


By S.J. Terreblanche 


the worst symbols of our time — a 
symbol of something that is totally 
unacceptable. As a symbol, apartheid 


But, given that apartheid cannot be 
abolished overnight, there are two 
other options: a firm government 
commitment to dismantle apartheid 


reblanche reform measures, must not be under- 

estimated. It could be of enormous 
seeable future the ethnic people symbolic value and a liberation for 


would operate in their separate many whites who experience ^part- 
groups in a new political structure. It heid as moral bondage. It could cre- 


would be wrong to regard the group 
approach as a new form of apartheid 


Apartheid has many deplorable di- 
mensions. but the image projected by 
the symbol is far worse. We South 


progressive and viable program to 
attain reform in the shortest period. 
The government should state in un- 
equivocal terms that its ultimate aims 


Africans can and must fight that are to dismantle apartheid peaceful- 
wrong image, but until the govern- ly, to get rid of all forms of discriini- 


ment commits itself to dismantling 
apartheid, our options are limited. 

We may plead for an appreciation 
of our unique situation. We can try to 
explain that some form of apartheid 


is. for the time being, the only way to 
organize social, economic and politi- 


cal life in an orderly way in a country 
where one-quarter of the population 
are First World people ana three- 
quarters are Third World people: 
Given the small size of the modem 


sector, and its small tax capacity, we 
cannot democratize our political and 


cannot democratize our political and 
economic life in the Western sense. 

We can blame the rest of the world 
for its hypocrisy and its double stan- 
dards. pointing out the discrimina- 
tion in every other country. We can 
ridicule our sharpest critics in the 
West for being unprepared, if they 
were in a comparable situation, to do 
what they are demanding from us. 

All these arguments are relevant in 
pleading South Africa's case, but 
they do little to counteract apart- 
heid’s negative symbolism. 

If apartheid has become such an 
impediment, why not abolish it with- 
out further adoV Unfortunately that 
is not passible. H is politically naive 
and economically foolish to dunk 
that apartheid can be abolished over- 
night without devastating results. 


nation, to work toward full human 
and avD rights and to create struc- 
tures of equal and relevant political 
participation for all — ool necessar- 
ily in a single parliamentary chamber. 

As part of such a declaration the 
government also could state in equal- 
ly unequivocal terms that progress 
toward such goals cannot be simple, 
linear, short-term or according to for- 
eign prescriptions. It cannot proceed 
at a pace that would cause disruption 
and would endanger civilized stan- 
dards and overstrain the capacity of 
the economy's modem sector. 

It would have to move through 
several phases before the ultimate 
goal could be reached. For the fore- 


approach as a new form erf apartheid. 
This approach could facilitate affir- 
mative action and reverse discrimina- 
tion to compensate for the many 
wrongdoings of the past. 

A declaration of intern would have 
disadvantages. It mi g h t lead to in- 
creased radicalism. On the left it 
would probably quicken the spiral of 
rising expectations, create unreason- 
able demands and foster a greater 


ate a new hope- and enthusiasm for 
the future. Jt could command indis- 
pensable foreign support. 

As the embodiment of a common 


long-term goal, such a declaration 
could prove, the symbol that would 
unite all moderate people, giving a 
new meaning to our common, destiny. 


week of the 40th General AKejn^r^ 
f say “observe." There is tetje 
position to celebrate --not 

hStoo. at all events What 

rvHnfmeot this would have beefl 

BSSSr D L RooK^lt! wc 

know how much he conceded or amr^ 
nlv left to Stalin in the final months.^-: 
Klifc ^ order m y. 

Nations would get off to a good 
not least in the high and hopeful ta ft-v • ;* 
of creating democracies m the soon toy*-'- 

be independent European colonies.^;. 
Forty years have passed; the .DMprguf ’ 

ales are independent, but few.are:-.^ 
democracies. Most through f 

aligned movement, are solidly Wfcg+ifrv, 
with the totalitarian states led by4Mfc?.<ij- 
Soviet Union. Contrary to what Mgfof 
be a general impression, Mosewjf^g 
late has grown stronger, not w eate^i. =:•.. < 
in the United Nations m teraB«^ .>' - 
votes it can muster. In lhe last Geaerv- 
al Assembly, the State Pepartmoitv^, 

calculates, the non aligned oountrifct"^ 
voted with Moscow S6 percent of the , jpy 
time, the highest level ever, while 
ing with Washington 13 percenl^-^ 
the time, the lowest level ever. . -Vc-^w 
Worse. in or ganizati onal terms, ■ 

nonaligned now seem permanently 
thrall to the totalitarians. They ;; 

just finished a meeting in Angola, 
Communist state under de facto rmh-^r •! 


".T; 

rc'.'J- 1 -;, , 


b,l <i'N 


ii- r ■ ; 

,u : . -.r- 
nj-'-: .. 
u s 

racut 
Cl (an r-. 
f \U >- 

.r. •- : 


ir. *■.- 
yvir 1 


BUT-.' •• 


In his Durban speech last mon 
President Pieter W. Botha got vary 
close to such a declaration of intent 
and to an explicit commitment to 


tary occupation by the Russians and-V:,.^ 
Cubans. Rather than India or Yugj^: ^v 
slavia or another genuinely nq&JJSi 8 ] 
aligned cottony, the wholly aqpecd-^,' j.; 
able Zimbabwe was chosen for‘th ^3 -~ 

new nonaligned leader. . • - 

Few countries had more reason u^.'V^s 
be grateful to the United States thapTT ;- 
Zimbabwe at the moment it gaifl^V\v-j 
independence. The .Carter ad rnnu s-'v;, s -.- 
nation had done everything rt coul4 : ;r. Aj 
to bring about the new gpvernmeA,;: '.: '« 
including having referred to the lead- 
ers as “freed ran figbters" during 
opposition period. Yet at the Uratea'+JK.' J 


degree of instability over the short power sharing^ with blacks. Dire to the 
period. On tire right it mi g ht cause complexities of white politics in 
disruptive resistance politics and South Africa, he unfoitunatdy chose 


even semi-ervii war among whites. 

The govemmoit most realize that 
no solution can possibly satisfy all 
panics. It most look for the most 
acceptable common denominator. In 
order to achieve that by negotiation, 
the maintenance of law and order is a 


not to formulate this important 
speech in the clear terms necessary. 
Those of ns who understand the idio- 
syncrases of the Afrikaner culture 
hope that be meant it when he said 
that we have crossed the Rubicon. 


- , 
it"**" ' 

tr.tc 

rj^’ ~ ‘ 
n.’; 

l* 1 * 1 - ■ 
nu> '■f 

[Of vt-" ' 

bcW; - r . : ' 

i* ? r >' - 
jOiNT- c \ 
nto* 

Vv-‘ •' 
‘ 

- - 
!" 


non-negotiable prerequisite. 

On the other hand, the potential 
internal and external advantages of 
such a declaration, along with visible 


The writer is a professor of political 


economics al the Vrdvernty if Stelkn- 
basch. near Cape Town. He contributed 


basch, near Cape Town. He contributed 
this comment to the Los Angeles Times. 


And in America: An Underclass Adrift 


W ASHINGTON — What is driv- 
ing American conservatives 


Apartheid is not simply a policy. It 
also part and parcel of the South 


is also part and parcel of the South 
African pattern of life — socially, 
economically and politically. The 
pattern was structured in the 19th 
century, and since that time has been 
systematically expanded, legalized 


and adapted. It has become the very 
foundauon of the structure of South 


foundation of the structure of South 
Africa. U cannot be demolished in a 
short period without serious disrup- 
tive effects that would be detrimental 
to every South African. 


YV ing American conservatives 
crazy about South Africa right now is 
the idea (hat out of all the evils in this 
world, American liberals choose to 
focus on apartheid, almost to the ex- 
clusion of everything else. 

The residents of a vast land area — 
stretching from Saigon to Vladivos- 
tok to Berlin — live in constant ter- 
ror, and without any liberty as we in 
the Wert mean the word. Their gov- 
ernments are murderous. So are 
many of Africa’s, and many of South 
America’s. When President Reagan 
condemns apartheid, it is with this 
feeling: Of course it’s terrible, but 
why this one and not all the others? 

That is a fair question. It can be 
answered convincingly in a direct 
way, by explaining how South Africa 
is worse than, say, Mozambique or 
Nicaragua. But both sides know per- 


By Nicholas Lemann 


we ARE moral imperalists — and 
what's wrong with that?" 

America became the world's stron- 
gest society by being' the world’s fre- 


fectiy well what the real answer is: 


Apartheid resonates in the United esL too; unlike the Soviet govern- 
Slates because of the long, sad U.S. menu the US. government operates 


ers as Treeoran ngmers -during u*ary , . : 
opposition period- Yet at tbe umted'^, ;. 
Nations — along with the just amvw%: 
Sandinists ^ — they instantly jotobd^iS.:' 
the Soviet Union in rodtine mvecthi ' ^ '- 
against Israel, the United States find' 
the democracies in general,. : ’ . j 
America’s reply has been a comb^ v' 4 :- Y 
natio n of anger and avradance- In i 
celebrated tantrum ^two yeai3-hgb;-a- 
member of the US. mission in 
York invited the whole otg^niraiion^ .-': 
to sail ofF-into the sunset — wfcttii -. : i - j 
would have got them to HoboketUV 1 
New Jemey, but no matter. . * -4 

For its part, in 1 985, the Senate, 71 r 1 

io B.^ermiHed umlaterally to re- : „ ' . T 


states Decause ot ttie long, sad UJ>. menu the U.S. government operates 
history regarding race. Ifrace were by the consent of the people: That • 
not the most persistently troubling means that Americans hove to obey a' 


doce -tbe' American contribution ta- ^ . 

( Vahnn, Frrwn tt in TIFT * « ' 


issue in America’s own domestic life, moral code, because it is crucial to 
then South Africa would not be alone maintaining the consent that is their; 


at the top of the American 
By imposing tbeir own 


source of strength. A U 
American success in W< 


on another country, Americans are and failure in Vietnam was the differ- 
practicing a kind of moral imperial- ence between a cause tiie whole world . 


ism. Conservatives who get huffy perceived as not just serving UJS. 
about this are being disingenuous, interests but noble, and one .that 


since they are moral imperialists, too, seemed at bert purefystcatepc. When :■ 
on a grander level happy to enlist in Americans are si ire they : are. a force 


the Manichean struggle against world for good, it is easier for them to do 
communism small nations that care what is necessary to be strong- 


more about matters closer to home. 
Taking their argument at face value, 
though, isn't it possible to say, “Yes, 


Five Policy Areas for Rescuing Trade 


As moral consent is crucial to gov- 
ernance, the feeling that Americans 
find racism absolutely .abhorrent is 
crucial to the maintenance of moral 
consent. Slavery was America's origi- 
nal an, and racism, the slaveholder's 
justification, has been its durable 
acy. In the whole world, h can be 
argued that 20th century totalitarian- 
ism ranks with racism as an evil — 


N EW YORK —The tidal wave 
of restrictive trade legislation 


of restrictive trade legislation 
pending in Congress bas concen- 
trated President Reagan’s mind 
wonderfully. In his second term he 
is beginning to give to trade policy 
die attention that was so sadly lack- 
ing in bis first term. 

But so far he has dealt only with 


By Richard N. Gardner 


the politics of the problem, not with 
the economic fundamentals. He has 


not vet recognized that his free 


trade objectives are being under- 
mined not only by the unfair trad- 


mined not only by the unfair trad- 
ing practices of other nations but 
also by some of his own domestic 
and international policies. 

On protectionism, Mr. Reagan 
has the right instincts. Import sur- 
charges and other trade restrictions 
would again ignite inflation, mak- 
ing America less competitive, wors- 
ening its long-ierra trade imbalance 
and triggering foreign restrictions 
against its exports. They could also 
bring the foreign debt crisis to a 
potentially ruinous climax. Unable 
to export debtor nations could not 
service their debts, and this would 
damage the American banking sys- 
tem and even national security. 

Enforcing U.S. law against un- 
fair foreign trade practices is essen- 
tial io protect American interests 
and to restore confidence in presi- 
dential leadership. But unfair trade 
practices abroad account for less 
than 10 percent of the 5150-billion 
annual trade unbalance that is dev- 
astating basic industry in the Unit- 
ed States. A 10-percent solution is 
not enough. To deal with the other 
90 percent, the president will need 
to consider fundamental policy 
changes in five key areas. 

First, the budget deficit. As long 
as Americans go on spending more 
than they are saving, they will con- 
tinue to borrow abroad to make up 
the difference. The high real rater- 
esi rates necessary to attract foreign 
capital are a major cause of the 
overvalued dollar that drives up the 
U.S. trade deficit. 

.America will not escape* this vi- 
cious drcle until the president 
meets Congress halfway on deficit 
reduction — supporting some tax 
increases and limits on cast-of-liv- 
ing adjustments in Social Security 
and pension programs for middle- 
and high-income citizens. Without 


raising individual lax rales, the gov- 
ernment could raise ac least $60 
billion of additional revenue a year 
by a 30-cent gasoline tax. by a mini- 
mum tax on wealthy individuals 
and corporations and by eliminat- 
ing the deductibility of interest pay- 
ments except for mortgage interest 
on principal residences. 

Second, exchange rates. Ameri- 
can leadership and support of liber- 
al trade cannot coexist with an 


Without movement in 
at least some of these 
areas Reagan wilt be 
partly responsible 
for the collapse of 
what is left of the open 
trading system. 


overvalued dollar. While there can 
be no return to fixed exchange 
rates, we can strengthen multilater- 
al surveillance over domestic poli- 
cies in America and oih& countries 
chat determine the relationship 
among currencies. In return for ac- 
cepting some international discus- 
sion oT domestic economic manage- 
ment. the United States could 
mobilize international pressure on 
Japan, West Germany and other 
countries to help its trade position 
by stimulating their economies. It 
could limit extreme fluctuations in 
exchange rates by coordinated in- 
tervention in exchange markets 
with other key countries. 

Third, a national program to en- 
hance U.S. competitiveness. A liber- 
al trade policy cannot survive in the 
United States if the government 
fail* to show the same concern for 
promoting comparative trade ad- 
vantages for Ui industries as 
America's toughest competitor do 
for theirs. This does not mean half- 
baked "industrial policies.” What 
it does mean, among other things, 
is more government assistance to 
worker training and to education 


(especially mathematics, science 
and engineering); maintenance 
rather than repeal (as the adminis- 
tration proposes) of the tax credit, 
and accelerated depreciation for in- 
vestment in modern plant and 
equipment; more Export-Import 
Bank credit for U.S. exporters. 

Fourth, adjustment to imports. 
Since the whole nation gains from 
open trade policies, it must be will- 
ing to help individuals who lose. It 
needs new programs to assist work- 
ers, industries and communities 
hart by imports, emphasizing work- 
er training ratho’ than income 
maintenance. If import restraints 
are required in exceptional cases to 
avert personal hardship, they 
should be selective, limited m time 
and conditioned wherever feasible 
on action by management and la- 
bor to restore competitiveness. 

Fifth, capital flows. One main 
cause of unde imbalance is the col- 
lapse of historic markets in Latin 
America and elsewhere because of 
lhe debt crisis. The major debtor 
countries will need at least $10 bQ- . 
lkm more a year in public and pri- 
vate capital flows, as well as open 
markets for their exports, if. they are 
to sendee their debts, make domes- 
tic adjustments and resume their 


role as healthy trading partners. 

The World Bank could assure 
most of this additional money 
through direct loans and co-financ- 
ing with private lenders, but only if 
the Reagan administration aban- 
dons its opposition to a substantial 
increase in the bank's capital. 

These five changes in President 
Reagan's poDcies would encounter 


political and ideological resistance 
from members of ms adrmrastra- 


from members of his administra- 
tion. Yet without movement in at 

least some of these areas be will hoi 

merely see the end of his free trade 
policies. He will be partly responsi- 
ble for the collapse of whin is left of 
the open trading system — one of 
America's great postwar contribu- 
tions to the general welfare. 


The writer, pmfessar of international 
lav at Columbia University and a for- 
mer ambassador to Italy, is author of 
“SterBng-DoBar Diplomacy: 7 Se Ori- 
gins and the Prospects of Our Inter- 
national Economic Order." He comrib- 
uied dus to The New York Tims. 


but totalitarianism did not happen in 
America, and racism did. For Ameri- 
cans to have a special concern about 
apartheid out ot all the bad that the . 
world’s many governments do is a 
sign that they want their own house- 
to be in moral order — which is 
smart, because when it is, -they oper- 
ate best, even abroad. 

Bat if those are the terms, they 
would dictate more gazing inward 
than seems to be going on nowi In the 
sense of laws ana intentions. Ameri- 
ca’s house is in order — it is at the 
opposite extreme from apartheid. Oh 
the other hand, in the sense of results, 
it is uncomfortably less chan oppo- 
site. There is a big black underclass in 
America, virtually all poor, virtually 
aO living in urban ghettos, heavily 
unemployed, poorly educated and 
with a devastated family structure. 

This is an uncomfortable subject. 
Unlike in South Africa, and unlike in 
the U.S. South 25 years ago, there is 
do easy-to-spot villain. To be moral is 
not ample — it means hard thought, 
and long, day-to-day effort. Just to 
say that the people in the ghettos are 
victims, that it is not their fault and 
that their lot will improve only when 
American society is "fundamentally 
restructured” is not enough, because 
it does aot help anybody right now. 
The conservative complaint that lib- 
erals prefer causes that are faraway 
abstractions to ones more complicat- 
ed and nearer at hand is not dismiss- 
able with a wave of the hand. 

There is a set of emotions that 
underlies the American obsession 
with apartheid: an anger about rac- 
ism, an unwillingness to accept, things 
as they are, an urgency about good 
causes. Every one of these emotions 
should lead inevitably to a fading 

that tb& condition of the American 
black underclass is simply intolerable 
and must change. Millions of Ameri- 
can blades are just dipping away 
from the rest of society, into a lhe 
that does not connect to ever ything 
that makes Americans feel that their 
comtry is great The moral fervor 
about South Africa ought now’ to 
wake Americans up to this, the most 
terrible of all their domestic grab- • 
iems and the one to which many are 
paying the least attention. 


. the United NaUocs from 25 1 6'2flP;-o l " 1 
percent of the budget. - ■ fV-.. 

■■ l$udrineastu¥S have, one common >£ 
feature: propose to reduce ^ ; 

American, influence in the orgmtiza- ; .. 
tion. The TJN budget can surely be : i ; 

.' cut .and probably should be, but to 
■ -cat America’s share, which is mea- ■ \ 
\$ured by the ITS. proportion of world v . O 
,■ economic production, is simply to ~ 
declare America to be a less unpor-- v 
tant country than it is. (The original. 

U.&shaie was more than ooe^thud). 

Ti is odd how difficult it is for- •/ 
Americans to see what has happened . 
at the United Nations. Quite simply, ; ! 
it bas given birth to a world party I. -- •’ 
system. Presidential elections did V v 'i 
. .much die same in America two cental ■ • 
lies ago. The founders thought that; 
the emergence of “faction" would be ‘ 
ruinous: it wasn’t Nor need it beat ; v 
the United Nations. It could be said- . . 
of the General Assembly that if it did 
riot exist, it would be impossible to . 
invent it Kiribati and raigp with * — 3 
equal votes! Still, the U.S. Senate is "s’- "f 1 


L_ 


also an odd place. New York, with 37 
times the population of Wyoming ^.- : 


bas the same two votes,. ./ • . 

As in the Senate, the name of tbe.-^,; „ 
game is coalition. There are three .. 
wodd political . parties. Each bas a ’ ■ - 
recogjuzabJe structure, a political v 
agenda arid an assortment of party; “’-V 


m 

'am; rvj 
PWflWin ,v,v 

■"““Jpweir 


ing Japan. Last, the Soviet bloc, (Otri- r '] 
side any of these groupings is Qiiaaj v 
With a quarter of the world’s popul4r^ ;■ 
tion, it is a party in ite own right) - Q.'S 1 
Just now the Soviet nonaligned cp- ; ■ v-' ’• 
alition is in the majority. It can adept 7 ! i 
any measure H wishes m thetrenetal/- A 
Assembly and in most of the special-^ ' 
aed agencies. The U.S. veto maftfcVj 
Security Council limi t* what lhe cp^ v 
alition can do, but not what it caa>^’ k 
say. If you .think words matter, arid 1 !.' 'a 
they do, this is important. ... Vv'Vj 
The New York times. - 


L- IV, 


bSHs * 


fliere ^ 
•toiled Sjr 


tit 


V- *»■»:? -3 

"•'j'-gv’- :! 


lf W~' 


LETTER ‘ 

'Homelands’ mAmerica^vt 

The “homelands” of Scnrth'Afrka *v - 
are a iim] problem, but Americans^* - r 
nave a homeland” problem aswJh’: v 
and charity should begin at >* 

Enterprise zones could bring jdfe'-JS 
to the ghettos. Another idea is a- rntf-r^.: i 
ropolitan education program with. " -' 
scattered magnet schools, We > 
*»ack noghborhoods :£ree of onafo'.- '' 
and drugs. Most of afl, blacks tons* 
not feel r^ected: Wbate suburbamtes>- 
l i . 3P 10 church now and HusTlor - '' 
the blade “bomeiands," break', bread^ < 
with their black brothers aad sstefc'r 
and pray together that this -&E&P&-. 
cancer wffl be eradicated before*^-; 
destroys our beloved country. -- ■^ 1 %: 

BOBMADDEfLi-^:: 

Pontiac, 


rocket' J 4SL 

t Hz** * 






ldl 2? J?*! 
^■ c 










The wiur is national correspondent 
for The Atlantic Aforahfy. Hecmmbuud. 
tids comment to 7 he Washington Post 1 


Otters intended fa- pvbiicaita& &- ■ 

tytitor and must contain the wfe 

name ang fag ’r*? 

an subject ;v 

Z T? 0 *?** for yeturnW ^ 
unsolicited manuscripts. -. * t*' 


^aCe 

Piw^np 


Glided. 






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Aims 



4 


W>,^v V. • ■ 


* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 




Page 7 


INSIGHTS 




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U S. Minister Says His Code Can Be a Crowbar to Change South Africa 

®y Lindsey Grusoa ■•• S ^' r -X<"'' : ■* reaping profits in a system of institutional rac- In addition, the United States was South O fw» ~W~h • • ■» /• -w-% • 

*-**»-_ *^*They use i t to diwri the debate.” said Timo- huUWCttl M^TmCipleS JOT BUSiUeSSeS 

M R. Sullivan acknowledged that his 
principles have had little impact on the 
life or most South African blacks and 


®y Lindsey Grason 

York rima Service 

P as 
sfsssjaS^"^® 



: ■* reaping profits in a system of institutional rac- 

OW'i'-fer&g ism- 

‘They use it to divert the debate, saidTimo- 

ihv H. Smith. executive director of thelnterfaiih _ __ , . , . .. 

Cetiter on Corporate Responsibility, a leading [% /T R -. tol hvjn acknowledged that his v*. y,*k runes senue 

divestment group “It disguises that they _[yj_ Ehcto and NEW YORK “ ore the anginal 

* 3 that the pace of changeHn South Africa ha^been g"**} ™*’ fl * '* 

^ffiSSSSSSfJSB 5 slo^He also acUo^-ed that^many signal*- * ^ « *-i 

But even the activist critics acknowledge that ™* ‘ no1 fulfi!1 ^ ° r * e code 5 man > P rov1 ' Ncnsegregation of the races in ail eating. 

t * -*. -"-p-o' ■ -sSsKsrssfJSS& ft . « 


Vm J'^l TTimcs Swiif 

NEW YORK — Following ore the original 


re “his social rank and 

HE 11 *® L*° , s**™* of Charleston, West Vk- 
BJma. where he grew up, he said recently 

'■ 'eoSSwfi?* 16 Sl savcd P*™”* for L first 
^ ^ be thrown out of 
inesoda Stop on the long-awaited day by a man 

^ g« up. you can't sit there, you’re 
“I dedde&right there and then 1 would stand 

ar.^riS 5 CB,de f i ha plane in Sooth Africa 
after the tnadenl with the security officials, Mr. 

Sullivan, a veteran of the l/nited State civil 
nghts struggles, recalled his childhood pledge. 

He deaded to fight South Africa’s poWrf 
raoal separation, this time from within the cor- 
porate power structure. 

Mr. Sullivan wrote an employment code for 
American businesses active in South Africa that 
has come to the forefront of the political debate 
m the United States over how to respond to 
touth Africa s system of racial separation. 

President Ronald Reagan announced last 
week that he would cany out by executive order 
v j.raany of the features of a bill drawn up in 
'Congress imposing economic sanctions on the 
African government. He specifically 

urged ail American corporations doing business n. n.*. y»i w 

m smith Afnca to adopt Mr. Sullivan’s code, The Reverend Leon Sullivan 
including recent revisions that have strength- 

mi nln vf n ^ ^ Sou^i Africa and growing calls for institutions 

w divea tfKmsd^ of stock of companies do- 
u S Mport^tisranffi 6 UW ** mdi & bte for ing business there. 45 companies have signed it 

’SS#5t— -hi- 

iwtt'SfiSB both adesof.ihe political qxarum. 

[or superyisow positions and must worit to pr^HE code, and the order announced by 
better their black employees' health and living I Mr. Reagan, are a step short of the 
standards. A recent revision also requires them JL sweeping economic sanctions sought by 
to press for broad changes in South African many activists who oppose South African gpv- 
stxaety, niduding the repeal of all laws requiring eminent policies. They a&sen that American 


combat 


growing pr 
ibat South 


Africa's policies. As such, they 


process to bring about fundamental change. 

When 1 started with the idea. 1 thought I’d build. m P lo > ie s- 


Equal and fair employment practices for all 


say, it marks a profound awakening of Ameri- ?™ 1 lft e mea. i thought i o mma. 

can repugnance toward the white tninoriiv gov- ^ thought the more I got companies on ray 
T« ' wagon, the further I d push my wagon. I thought 


eminent in Pretoria. " ^ ,,,c 1 

On the other side of the debate, many corpo- 
rations and conservatives who favor quiet diplo- dJ< ^? 1 l ,‘- 

macy with South Africa say the code is an ™ l ,CL 
unwarranted intrusion into the companies’ pri- strengthen ine o 


‘d push my wagon. I thought grams that will prep; 
in a direction they, maybe. Asians in substantial 


unwarranted intrusion into the companies' pn 
vate business affairs. It requires an wuccepi 
able meddling in the internal affairs of a sever 


wagon, the funher I d push my wagon. 1 the 
1 could move them in a direction' they, mi 
didn't know they were going.” 

That has led Mr. Sullivan to repeal 
strengthen the code. While the principles c 


Initiation and development of training pro- 
grams that will prepare blacks, coloreds and 
Asians in substantial numbers for supervisory, 
administrative, clerical and technical jobs. 

Increasing the number of blacks, coloreds 


den state and will only promote South African w “* lo overturn South Africa's racial pohdes. 

. ” . v r Nnvt>>fhr> Uc Mr 'Qiillit.'ttn ■ii'L'n.MvlMnAT vhn 


sirengoum l In: uouc. Wnlic the principles ongi- and Asians in management and supervisory 
nallv required its signers to improve the life of positions. 

their employees, it now mandates that they also Improving the quality of employees' lives 


outside the work environment, including 
schooling, recreation and health facilities. 

Fallowing are additions to the code made last 
year: 

Use influence and support the unrestricted 
rights of black businesses to locate in the urban 
areas of the nation. 

Influence other companies in South Africa to 
follow the standards of equal rights principles. 

Support the freedom of mobility of black 
workers to seek employment opportunities 
whenever they exist, and make possible provi- 
sions for adequate housing for families or em- 
ployees within the proximity of workers' em- 
ploy mem. 

Support the ending of all apartheid laws. 


intransigence, they say. 
“We don’t feel it's the 


role of Newironi Min 


Nonetheless. Mr. Sullivan acknowledged that 
the mounting cycle of repression and violence 


ing to lobby," said James Hill, a spokesman for retire stronger action to pressure the dance," he said. “But we didn’t have the train- join the company's board, a position Mr. Sulli- 
the company, which owns a minority share of w “ite regime. He has called for a complete ing. So the companies were getting off the book, van accepted. 

three South African mines. “We have our own economic embargo against South Africa unless { /earned that integration without preparation is As a General Motors Corp. board member 
code. We don’t need to turn to a third party for >t dismantles its system of apartheid by June frustration.'’ Mr. Sullivan said he took pains to inform other 

another set oT principles.’’ ,. . , „. . members of his opposition to the company's 

When Mr. Sullivan wrote his code, what has * 1 kn ? w ,r we have two Years, he said. A FTER ibe boycott. Mr. Sullivan started investments in South Africa. Nonetheless, when 

now become a groundswefl of opposition to Time » running out. Bui these little principles the Opportunities Industrialization he spoke in favor of a shareholders resolution 

South Africa was a cause lacking widespread done more man the UN and ml the other J JL Center, a job training program, in an demanding that the company leave South Afri- 


inree aoum mncoo muuc. wc wuc uui u«u ----- . — ? , — . . , , 

code. We don’t need to turn to a third party for J .dismantles .lh system of apartheid by June 

another set of principles." .. r 

When Mr. Sullivan wrote his code, what has 1 know if we have two years, be said. 




now become a groundswen of opposition to "Time is ninning 0 ui. But these Uttle principles 
South Africa was a cause lacking widespread done more than the UN and the other 


support. praamatic use of economic force is a tradition in 

Corporations refused to sign and Mr. Sullivan |y c - 

was widely derided as a ntolesomc gadfly .am This pattern w as evident by the time he was a 
irksome boWkwer from the avil nghts move- writing protest poetry and demon- 

mem who needed a new issue to fulfill himself. ilnilin | againsl ^grWuion^fttt being thrown 
“I got piles of lettws telling me to nund my ^ of ,h e “ s h 0 p. for instance, Mr. Sullivan 
own business, he said recently. But it became urnI ^ck every Saturday until he was served, 
an obsession. 1 had 10 see how far couldgo. I Then< havios , m Cmori zed‘ a section of the U.S. 
kept thinking maybe a npple could become a Constitution, he integrated a nearby hamburger 
wave and a wave could become a ude that would s[an j v^'hich would onlv sene blacks through a 
change a country. side window. 

“My aim is nor to keep American companies “I kept going in there and they kept pushing 
there,” Mr. Sullivan said. They can leave. But me out.” he recalled "One day when they were 
the companies must become part of the fiber of pushing me out I stood up' and recited the 
the liberation movement. J» you can use the Preamble. The people stood up and applauded. 
American companies, like a crowbar, to move a The owner came up and said. 'Young man, 
great big rock, you have to.” anyone who can recite the Preamble can have a 

The approximately 350 American companies hamburger.' " 


nations. It’s making a difference. Besides, the 


A1 


abandoned jaQ in the poorest section of Phtia- ca, it was a shock. U was the first time in 
delphia. The program now has centers in 100 memory that a director had dissented publicly 
cities across the country and in eight African from management's expressed views, 
countries. The resolution was voted down by 9S.71 per- 

Mr. Sullivan extricated himself from the cent of the voting shareholders and Mr. Sulli- 
slums of Charleston with a basketball and foot- van. although remaining on the board, devoted 
ball scholarship to West Virginia State College, himself to running his church and job training 
Although he badly injured his knee, he kept centers. In June 1975. he briefly visited several 


playing so he would not forfeit his stipend. 

.After graduating in 1943. he went to New 
York City to earn a master's degree at the Union 
Theological Seminary. 


African countries where he had or planned to 
establish similar programs. 

Mr. Sullivan said he believes that until .Afri- 
can countries have enough trained people to run 


Several years later he arrived in Philadelphia their economies, they will never be truly liberat- 
as pastor of the Zion Baptist Church. He ed, even though they administer their govern- 
planned to stay a few years before moving back meats. 

to New York, but he sealed into the community During the trip, he had to stop over in South 
and became what he now calls “a Christian Africa. His arrival was widely announced, 
soldier who labors in the field of urban battle.” Throughout the night. South Africans came to 
That brought him to the attention of James his bote) room and! he said, asked him to work 


operating in South Africa have a Lota! direct it was essentially the same tactic he used in M. Roche, chairman of the board of General to make American companies a force for 

» ■ _ _ . aa it » ■ * *» _ . i. ■ _ j ■. f r i • ■ m * _ _ • _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ »/. . ^ _ • ( fr if# #- f f > . . . » . . , , , 


racial separation. 


corporations doing business there are partners 


, evolves - 


About 150 of the 3SU American companies in apartheid and should be forced to withdraw, 
doing business in South Africa have signed the They further contend that the Sullivan Princi- 
code. and it is winning new converts as it pies are a smoke screen, allowing certiorate 


id it is winning new converts as it pies are a smoke screen, allowing corporate 
In the wake of ongoing violence in signatories to say they are fighting racism while 


investment of $18 billion. Combined with bank winning national attention as the organizer of a 
loans and an estimated $8 billion of American- 1959 boycott or Philadelphia companies that 
owned shares in South African companies, the discriminated against blacks. When the boycott 
United Stales investment in South Africa is an ended four years later. Mr. Sullivan concluded 
estimated $15 billion, according to groups fa- he had won a Pyrrhic victory. 


Motors Corp. He called Mr. Sullivan in 1970 change. So he returned and wrote the code, 
and asked him to meet him in New York. Mr. “J’m looking beyond the end of political 
Sullivan declined, saying he was too busv. But apartheid.” he said. “Then vou’U have people 

1,^ ... w_ d i— i .. j -i * i . .j -n. j* ... j ,C. r I- _ 


voring divestment. 


We found we were getting jobs in abun- 


he would see Mr. Roche if he came to Philadel- 
phia. 

Mr. Roche came and invited Mr. Sullivan to 


without skills. I’m one of the few people who 
still believes there’s a chance for peaceful 
change." 


France May Diffuse Powers of Investigating Judges 




S:- 


'.. ' • . 1 ■ 


the New York Times 


A student at Space Camp tries oat the microgravity simulator chair. 

At Camp in Alabama, 
Aspiring Astronauts 


By William E. Schmidt 


No*' York. Tunes Semce 

H UNTSVILLE, Alabama — Television 
monitors flickered in the darkness in- 
side Mission Control as teen-agers 
wearing radio headsets crouched at consoles, 
pretending to guide the space shuttle Challenger 
to a landing at Cape Canaveral. Florida. 

On the other sideoT a wall, a second team of 
young people in blue flight suits sat buckled mto 
seats inside a detailed reproduction of the shut- 
. trie's cockpit- After a simulated space mission 
that lasted two and a half hours, they were 
bringing the orbiter home. 

Suddenly an adolescent voice came over the 
radio from Mission Control: “Challenger, 
there’s a 747 already on the runway in front of 
you. Please go back into orbit.” 

There was a burst of laughter before everyone 
turned back to the 32-page script that included 
the events of real shuttle missions. It was the 
final assignment for the young people attending 
the U.S. Space Camp here, a summer program 
for aspiring astronauts. 

c DaC e Camp is a nonprofit venture nm by the 
state of Alabama as part of its Space and Rocket 
Colter, a 450-acre (181-hectare) exhibmon of 
rockets and the history of the space program. 

Flight Center, where real-life astronauts are 

-This place is the greatest,” raid Harold Bu- 
j. . n r i oe Serranos, California. Like 

' ch T„r MowcampS. Harold enrolled in 

SENSES » «— “”“ l 

■Td ralber be a pilot, but I'll settle for mission 
specialist." be said. 

About 3.100 MS. and#!* ^ a Sdte 


the ".“^^S^sdStusts beiped build 
A h nK Sut S “OT^®S hIS •» die moon and 

Serspacep^. o^artbro^a, 

The camp Pj«“ . ^ober and November. 

«■ aboul I350> roora md 
nJeals included. 


&■ ‘“tfaS^iiecn^onevejyduug 

‘"tshuu, 

„ m peiap«“ vc0 “ spa 


O. Budcbee, director of the camp and the muse- 
um. “What we have is a whole new generation 
out there who see space as the work place of the 
future.” 

In recent summers, Mr. Buck bee says, the 
camp has had more applicants than room. 

It is currently undergoing a 536-million ex- 
pansion that will enable it to enroll 10,000 
campers annually by operating nine months a 
year. In its first summer program in 1982, the 
camp accepted 700 young people. 

A S3 million dormitory resembling the interi- 
or of a space station will house 300 campers 

The idea of Space Camp 
originated with Wernher 
von Braun, the rocket 
scientist who helped put 
man on the moon. 


when it is completed. The camp also is con- 
structing a$l-imBion full-size reproduction of a 
shuttle orbiter. 

Mr. Buck bee says the idea for Space Camp 
originated with Wemher von Braun, the rocket 
scientist who helped the United Slates put man 
on the moon. Mr. von Braun envisioned a pro- 
gram that would allow young people to become 
involved in science, just as Little League builds 
interest in baseball. 

Campers are divided into two groups, de- 
pending on age. Children aged II to 14 build 
and launch their own model rockets. They also 
practice an astronaut training devices like the 
nucrogravity simulator, a chair suspended by 
springs from ceiling rails that produces the sen- 
sation of being weightless. 

For older teen-agers, the highlight of the week 
is die simulated shuttle mission, in which crew 
members practice deploying satellites. 

The would-be astronauts wear space suits and 
go on simulated space walks. Strapped into 
chairs that move on jets of air, they experience 
the sensation of drifting free in space. 

About 75 percent of the campers are girls, a 
proportion that has tripled since Sally k. Ride 
became the first woman to partitipate in a space 
shuttle mission in 1983. 

Maroy Vincent, 12, of Jacksonville, Alabama, 
said she hoped to be an astronaut someday, too. 
“Besides,” she added, “Space Camp is definitely 
better than ehoir camp." 


By Michael Dobbs 

Wuihtngtan Past Serriee 

P ARIS — France's Juges tTinstruction, or 
investigating magistrates, seem certain to 
be about to lose some of their powers. 
Celebrated in movies and glamorized in de- 
tective stories, the investigating magistrates 
have come under public criticism recently be- 
cause of a series of sensational judicial blunders. 
The Socialist government disclosed plans this 
month to reform an institution that was found- 
ed by Napoleon in 1810. 

The changes, which would reduce the solitary 
decision-making power of a figure frequently 
described as “the most powerful man in i 
France,” could have an impact on other Europe- 1 
an countries whose justice systems are based on 
the Napoleonic code rather than the Anglo- 
Saxon tradition of common law. 

The unique authority of France’s corps of 522 
investigating magistrates derives from the fact 
that they combine the roles of policeman and 
grand jury in the U.S. system. Working in soli- 
tude under strict rules of judicial secrecy, they 
are responsible both for supervising a police 
investigation into a crime and deciding whether 
a suspect should be sent to trial 
If the cases they are working on capture the 
public imagination, the pel its juges, or little 
judges, can end up as national or even interna- 
tional celebrities. 

One thinks of Christos Sartzetakis. now presi- 
dent of Greece after being immortalized in Cos- 
la-Gavras’s movie ”Z” for his investigation of 
Lhe murder of a leftist deputy in 1961, or Italy's 
Ilario Martelia, who looked into allegations of a 
“Bulgarian connection” lo the attempted assas- 
sin anon of Pope John Paul 11 in 1981. 

The strength of the French system, as copied 
elsewhere in Europe, is the independent magis- 
trate who fearlessly presses ahead with his inves- 
tigation. oblivious to political pressure. The 
weakness is that important legal cases can hinge 
on the personality of a lone investigator, who 
has the power to detain suspects for lengthy 
periods on fairly flimsy evidence provided to 
himself has a conviction m/inte. or moral certain- 
ty . of their guilL 

The potential for human error was underlined 
recently by France's tortuous “Gregory Affair” 
— a legal saga that appears to have played a 
decisive role in convincing the justice minister, 
Robert Badinter, that reforms are overdue. Pub- 
lic opinion has been aroused by the blunders of 
a young and inexperienced magistrate investi- 
gating the murder of a 4-year-old boy, Gregory 
Villexnin. 

The magistrate. Jean- Michel Lambert. 33. ini- 
tially suspected the boy’s uncle of the murder. 
The uncle was arrested, held for three months, 
and then freed when the evidence against him 
was found to to faulty. A month after his 
release, he was shot dead by Gregorys father. 

After belatedly deciding that the unde was 
innocent, Mr. Lambert next arrested Gregory's 
pregnant mother on the same murder charge. 
The mother promptly went on a hunger strike. 
She has been released now herself on the order 
of an appeals court and the investigation sus- 
pended while she has her baby. 

The Badinter proposals, which are to be sub- 
mitted to Parliament later this year, are de- 
signed to reduce the likelihood of such blunders 
by ending the present isolation of the investigat- 
ing magistrate. Instead of working by himself, in 
future he would bejJart of a team of three judges 
that would take joint responsibility for all deci- 
sions involving the arrest or release of suspects. 

Announcing the change in an srtide in the 
Paris daily Le Monde, Mr. Badinter described 
the traditional solitude of the investigating mag- 
istrate as “an anachronism" in an age when 
other legal experts including defense lawyers 
worked tn teams. He also criticized the lack of a 
clear distinction between the role of a“Maigrei” 
and a “Solomon.” 

Under the new system, which cannot be intro- 
duced before 1988 because of the need to recruit 
150 extra magistrates, individual judges still 
would to assigned to lead police investigations. 
But information about a case would be available 
to all members at the “investigating chamber" 
and such young magistrates as Judge Lambert 
would be closely supervised by a senior judge. 

T7ie justice minister argued that the principle 
of shared responsibility would help protect 


magistrates from assassination. During the past 
decade, two French judges have been murdered 
by criminal gangs on the assumption that this 
would be a fatal blow to the investigation. 

In Italy, where judges have been a prime 
target of both the Mafia and political terrorists, 
investigating magistrates already have begun to 
work in teams on difficult cases. 

The proposed changes hare been generally 
welcomed bv French lawyers who feel the pre- 


sent system is weighted against the accused. But 
it was critidzed by individual investigating mag- 
istrates, who argued that what they really need is 
improved working conditions and more effi- 
cient secretarial support 
“This reform will paralyze the system of in- 
vestigation and be a source of conflicts between 
magistrates to the benefit of the defense,” said 
Jean -Louis Debre. a prominent investigating 
magistrate in Paris. 


The need for an investigative magistrate to 
persuade two colleagues that a suspect should 
be held in preventive detention should ease the 
strain on French prisons. At present, half of 
France's prison population is awaiting trial — 
compared with about 21 percent in Britain and 
17 percent in Sweden. 

Italy holds the European record for the num- 
bers of prisoners in preventive detention: 64.1 
percent 


Achievement 



- ' .**«*. £**P*>\ 


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- T-S^ir- '»r- 



The Menuhin Contests Novel Repertoire 

public distress and heavy travel eta* 


By Mary Blume 

fwemationa] Herald Tribune 


p ARIS — Since 1979 the city of 


Paris has held musical competi- 
tions organized by eminent soloists 
such as the cellist Mstislav Rostro- 
povich and the flutist Jean-Pi epe 
Rampal. This year's competition 
was for violinists and was devised 
by Yehudi Menuhin- ■ 


costs. 

The competition was divided 
into three parts, starting with a 
piece that the Romanian-born 
composer Marcel Mihalovici, who 
died in August, wrote specially for 
the event 


left hands because there is no free- 

Irflair Ra- dom in the left shoulder, stiff necks 
valdL Purcell, CoreUt Uclair, ^ ^ head ^Quld ^ foe. you 


findljow-holib that arc not flexible 


UiW KS , 

days of the-Concours lniemaLioE 
de Violon Yehudi Menuhin, which 
lasted 10 days, “I had kittens be- 
fore it started because the artist has 


for the violm - J « '££&* is tetter than the left, 

wohn donated the hm^iMora, ^ disappointed that 

he said. And only six contestants wen ^ 21 cbSeSrBrahms D- 

event chose ^^J^SJ^ScCailney minor sonata. “And in the concerto 

It is the perfect piece, veiy turning up with a Paul McCartney lhe ma j 0 rity chose the 

short,” Menuhin said. “In those medley. Brahms and Tchaikovsky, which I 

three minutes you can really tell a J^'ESSSSV* ?“j!!*=SLSsis£; 

litics were Lflio* 
Sibelius, Elgar, 
Shostakovich, 

bow. bis fiagns. It’s vay reveal- su fS^ eGr dll lhe Dvorak 

"• ■ taSS- whore ss-sLsssrSiSsM 


Contestants then chose a wort ™S£L2E5.«- 


KsSfSffioSTK ^S=ff-a“S 

ajJSiSfa^SK 


Menuhin's approach is. to en- 
courage rather than eliminate 
(there were 10 prizes and he said he 
had a few more up his sleeve in case 
of need); the jury and the 27 com- 
petitors were encouraged to meet 
openly, and the choice of repertoire 
was novel and wide. 


zart); Romantic (ranging from 
Schumann to Elgar): French Mu- 
sic; Contemporary Music; Salon 
Music (including works by Kras- 
ler. Saint-Safins and Pagarum), and 
Improvisations and Transcriptions 

(folk, exotic music and jazz). 

For the last part of the competi- 
tion, four finalists (expanded by 


eit Masters, a former director of 
Menuhin's violin school (Menuhin 
has had a school in Surrey, En- 
gland. for 22 years and also has one 
in Gstaad, Switzerland). The jurors 
were all Menuhin's friends. 

Toward the end of the contest, 
one day was set aside daring which 

* « ■ 1 J — nit 


hit fmatets (expanaea oy participants could meet, 

the jury from the three ongmally constants were encouraged 


agonizing. Candidates — there was 
no age limit and they ranged from a 
16 -year-old student to members of 
the Orchestra de Paris and the Los 
Angeles Philharmonic — were cho- 
sen on the basis of mailed-in cas- 
settes, which eliminated weaker 
candidates without causing them 


or third pnze coming here when we 
know from our experience that he 
can’t play anything else.” 

Menuhin would cumulate the 
Brahms and Tchaikovsky concer- 
tos and the Brahms D-minor sona- 
ta from future competitions. And 
in the French music section he 
would drop CSsar Franck- 

What his competition had chief- 
ly revealed. Menuhin said, is gaps 
in violin teaching. “An ideal com- 
petition can be made when those 
gaps are filJed. I'm just laying the 


Much care went into making the 

conust enUgJuemng radier than ~ 

^fiSSTifS* range 

of repertoire, Menuhin was disap- gaS™ uch as possi- ere »ho afterward and d*- 

pointed thal the competitors failed , f foeconcours not to end, cu ^ s - . . „ 

to profit from it, most of them S*“^ 0 :J^^^ mnrt i rions . in the meantime, there was more 


predictably choosing the Gassical 
and Romantic groups. Only two 


like most traditional competitions. 


with one hero, “who remans a god »«■« <° *»• T?*Sjfe 



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for two weeks until the next compe- 
tition knocks him down." 

Having made a triumphant de- 
but as a soloist at the age of 7 in his 
native San Francisco, Menuhin 
played in only one competition. **1 
was about 6 years old and I won 
S200, payable in $20 installments, 
each month. It was quite a lot of 


way past the tables in the Salle 
Pleyd dining room amid hand- 
shakes and cries of Maestro! Mal- 
tre! Yehudi! and went back to the 
auditorium. It was French Music 
day and he would be listening to 
Ravel, Faure and, of course, 
FranclL 



f Alchemist 

With Too Many Styles 


By Sheridan Mdrley 

International Herald Tribune 

L ondon - TbsK u, as mj- 

/ chad Crawford has teen 
marking in “Baraum 
than 1.000 West End perior- 


through undergroirth tf r J®- 

P ??i in the title role Moore.* a 

itendkUy versa^e^dqrW 




¥ 




iit’O' 


m^iccs. asuck«r bQnievery Jtor of pature, 


forever.- 

THF. IONP ON STAGE aaabilrtJoBwMg^gr 

to! 


f 


\K- 


mera mth, whaeOn£fJ^sJ®? ««er stage wilh tteamvalof 
has a production of ^fbe Mate ^ ih e house (Terence 

«f*ii an nmazine assort- ^ magisterial: tomy M 


-i; 


not” cast with an amazing assort 
meat of classical and conn c talents. 


From the R^dShakfi«*are Com- 


pany comes Stephen Moore m the 
title role; from the clubs and pubs 
of the alternative-comedy circuit 

there are John Sessions as. the man- 
ic Dutch pastor and Darnel Pea- 
cock as the bemused derk, and 
from the farces of Dario Fo we 
have Gavin Richards and Rhys 
Jones (who stepped into the role of 
Sir Epicure Mammon after losing 
two actors for the part somewhere 
in rehearsal). - * . 

The result is, predictably, in- 
triguing if a little confused. This 
production is foil of good moments 
and good performances that have 
as yet' failed somehow to come to- 
gether into a coherent structure, so 
that works with utter 


thispointi the curtains arc rosed ta 

reveal daylight and reaEty toto* 

who have be® hvrng 
Richards. having lurched from 
Jeeves to Quasimodo m his imper- 
sonations of faithful 

to admit that he and the AW^st 


rip-.- j;. • • 


x- 


\V. 


t. 


havcL - • . ^ - 

on borrowed premises mat; ewett 
they have pven up trymg toSpn 
thtan out, and Mammon.^ra ^ lo 
preach the end of the woridfroma 
tomip cart. Whenrthey all get-tfirir 

acts together, this mayyet turn out 

to' beone of the most-im^gent 
and welcome revivals in town. ^ 

a. 1 


x; ■ ' 


i- • 




4 •- 


f’-* * 

.■s'* 


SdtSS^dence is RogcrGlos- 


GuyUMan 


Yehudi Mennhm; “I had kittens before h started.^ 


sop’s wonderfuDy extravagant set 
The house that Lovewit has aban- 
doned for fear of the .plague be- 

rather Iras than two hour^ mdud- 

servantandtwo^tees^ 


If cia«ic farce suffered fi^an 
excess of plot, modem fatce teems 
to have the reverse problem. At ihe 
Strand John Chapman and -Mi- 
chael Pertwee have comew with 
-Look, No Hans!" and a dear*of 
comic invention. Their iday-rahs 


P 


H'- 


\7‘V 
,+;r ' 


r 

V' 


only earned $300 a month and lived The Intricate Look, by Jenny Lewis 


m 


believe, $6,500, with a garden, and 
that they were able to pay off at a 
rate of $50 a month. I mean those 
were human days, San Francisco 
was a very human city." 

Looking at today's contestants, 
Menuhin noted an overall high 
quality and poor stance. “Not 
enough attention is paid to stance, 
tenu. You find them pigeon-toed, 
locked in the knees or hips, faulty 


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By Dinah Lee 

H ONG KONG — Jenny Lewis 
ma y never have heard of the 
tittle black dress, but that doesn’t 
bother thousands of bedazzled 
women. Her dresses are made for 
big entrances — sinuous, sensual, 
sparkling entrances. 

In 10 years, the British-bom, 
Hong Kong-based designer has 
earned an international reputation 
dressing women in gossamer sQk 
sheaths slathered with sequins, or 
modified various of the figure- 
hugging Chinese cheongsam, as if 
the “dress-for-success" suit had yet 
to be invented. The Lewis look is a 
combination of intricate handwork 
executed in Hong Kong and main- 
land China, and a Western sense of 
romance. 

Lewis, 38. dressed in layers of 
white antique lace, blue crepe de 


a profitable if _ 
center. Everywhere gantries and 
cubicles and bubbling test tabes 
suggest that 20 more subplots are 
waiting in the wings. A frantic com- 
ical invention here almost mana g e s 
to hide the fact that Rhys Jones has 




- v 


chine and white satin, denied that is, and she is working lo assemble a 

her expensive, seductive designs top-notch management team. ^ . 

were out of keeping with the life- There are four Lewis boutiques in ^ conclusive theory about 
style of the busy career woman. Hong Kong, and Jenny Lewis sec- the play or the need to have another 
“I believe in dressing for the tions in Harrods, Saks Fif th Ave- at it now. 
right occasion in the right way, but mieaDd NriimnMarcu^Jlermcst Acting styles crash into one-an- 
bow exciting, at the end of the day expensive line, the “Righlife other like juggernauts in fog. Some . 
in a suit and a tie, to jump into dresses, are favorites of actresses Q j ^ pigyers are dearly deeply 
something that makes you fed in- such as Stephanie Powers, Zsa Zsa inexperienced at finding thar .Way 

credibly, instantly feminine. Gabor and Victoria PnncipaL Lew- — 

“We women must be assertive, is also markets loungewear, lingerie 

and seqmned shoes. 

In November she is to visit Bev- 
erly Hills on a promotional tour, 
with an eye out tor the right loca- 
tion for her first shop there. 

She is experimenting with inter- 
pretations of traditional Asian gar- 


have therefore .had. to occupy thar 
characters for only 85; rmng t es.'ye t 
the story fine they offer-. friKWih. 
about 10. It’s the kind of -subplot 
that Ben Travers, lei alone fiea 
Jonson, might have used for a frac- 
tion of one scene. 'Nbtvefe&ihe 

considerable comic tatentbf David 
Jason can- persuade us that tins is 
anything more than a ra m s hac k le 
assembly erf on£-liiie'gagjS arufoqe- 
dimensio nal characters.-irr increag£ 
ingly desperate search of a play.' 





but not aggressive — if we're ag- 
gressive, men only get more ma- 
cho." 

Lewis is a disarming combina- 
tion of curly-haired charm and pal- 
pable business ambition. She began 
sewing at 10; she has had no formal 


design training. Her sense of style meats, especially the tight-fit 

- . Sj — — — -i. i — arm wvtn Kill 


ms 


came from holidays spent with her 
aunt at BadmondisDcld HaO, a 

family estate near Newmarket, En- -. , 

gland (Lewis is to be onesubjea of ter to design new uniforms, and 
a BBC-TV documentary about sue- she has stated a jom( ven^rewuh 


cheon gsam, and with 
leather as weft as s3k: 

British Airways commissioned 


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MTl LAW OfflO n Ihe 16th seeks 
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NeuiBy Ceaex, France 


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CONVERSIONS 
* Customs brotaage/bondinq service 


• Pick-up & ddweijr rmywhere «i the 


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• Piofesnond work using only the 
highest quakty components 

• Guarrmteed EPA / DOT i 

CHAMPAGNE IMPORTS 


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2294 North Pem Rd., HNfiekL 

5 822 6852 


PA. 19440, USA Tek 21 . 

Telex 4971917-CHAMP 


MaradefrBon’ Porsche BMW Farm 


EPA/ DOT 


CONVBSIONS 

Fad turn-around time. All work done 
on premises. Sales & feasna 
AUWE Exanc MOTOR CAR 
114 Andenon Street 
Hrefensadc. NJ 07(501 USA 
Tbc 322234 201-48843667 


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» Superior Enjpneenng * 

* Cintams Clecraice A Bonfing » 
• prompt Porwmri Ser vice « 
C.O.D AUTO DtS TRfflUTO BS 

CHARIOTS OP DERRS 

P.O. 15 Plumsieadvffle PA 18949 
Telex 705514 _ _ [21^ 766. 7676 

COfU wl ii Iiflll 


OR For Free ( 


BPA/DOT 


Brokerage, boning, pdt-up, dejhwT; 
Newest technology, modern 40,000 
sq.fi. foafity defeated to quofay.eorv 
versmre. 1 week turnaround. Lab man 


versm. 

ly available. 

EURO/ SPEC Ire. 215*25-7547 USA 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


GA INTERNATIONAL 


AUTO EXPORT TO: 

USA, Canada, Mkfdb-Eort, Japan 


* Worldwide delivery of new and 
used European cars. 

* Worldwide Export of 
from 

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guarantee 
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updated. 5 years expenerex. 

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Td.^M2S < IM63^fe46l Gaint/NL 


TRASCO 

INTERNATIONAL 


LHD. Morcedes Tax Free 
Limousines 36" & 44 1 ’ 
Armowed cars red Kmousnes 
Coach bub can 
Otter makes & aurfia 


Over 100 units in stock 
World wide delivery 
Direct from source 
D.O.T. & EPA 


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‘ I B9560Z2 USAS G. 


Telex (51) . 


Trasca London Ltd. 

"65-67 PaA Lane. London W.l. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


DOMINICAN DIVORCES. Box 20802. 
Sreto Domingo. Dominican Reputic 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTLDBJVHIY 


We keep a brae stock of 
mast car wends 


Tot 02/648 55 13 
Telex 65658 
42 rue Lons, 
1050 Brussels. 


OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 

Since 1972. experienced car trader for 
Mercedes. Porsche. BMW, Jaguar, te- 
medkite delivery. Import/ export. U5. 
DOT & EPA *wmg fa tauratand 
deoler. OcxanwdT Motors G*t 4)H, 
Tersteegeretr. 8. 4 Dre^kfaLW. 
Germany (D) 21 1 -434646, ttx 8587374. 


TRANS AUTOMOBILE 


- 1st doss service 

- A4 mates, dl modeb awJdble 

- Brand new ar second hand cars 
• Slipping - EPA - DOT - fasxanc* 

- Allfamdfai 

T*. 32.2/3587702. 2nd hand da*: 
32.2/3587700. Tetex 64587 TRANSO B. 

AVE DES ULLBJLS 14, 

1640 RHCOE-5T-G9€SE (BaGiUMJ. 


TAX FRS CARS 
P.C.T. 

Ai makes. aB models, brand new 


lloSelei. 147, 2018 Antwera, Belgium 
"I 5^ 00, Tlx 3S546PHCffiT E 


Td: 3/231 — . 

Send USJ5 fa rofaog 


SwitzedreiUJK-W. Germany 


CORVETTES 
NEW 1985 

Fast defivery. 


We ded with dl fbrmaSties inducing 
Registration, Shipping and Converaon 
la European tpeaficahons. 


To order yo ur C orvette call or tele> 

INia EUROPE 

MIDDLE EAST AUTOMOBILES LID. 
MONTE CARLO 
Tele phone: 193] 25 74 32 or 
TeW 479550 AUTO MC 


1985 CLOSE OUT SA1E 
Mercedes 500/380/280 modeb 
BMW 745/635/535 modeb 
1986 RMxMs-SeBtember i 
300 SL/ 9-U TURBO 
Cofl or Mb Munich, W. Germany 
[0] 89-465041 er42. Tlx: 522851 

AfTMl Hill 


owned and operated 


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Call fa free cafaloo. 

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Td-. oi tieaxn. Th: 25071 etcab nl 


20 YEARS AUTO-GRAfR 
Reliable German an decker offers new 
Mercedes. BMW. Porsche. Ferrraii Tel: 
[OJ 731-60033, the 712861 AUTEX 


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sebare. 8-2241 Zoersd Antwerp. Tel: 

03-384.1054 Hx 32X0 Trarem i. In 

dodL ALL TYPES. NEW 6 USH). 


TRANSCO 


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AND STOCK M SJROff 

Keeping a constort stock of mare then 
300 brand new can of all European t 
Japanese mokes campetnmly priced 


Tax free «4 ei diip m n g insurance. 
for multicotar tret oafaogue- 


Send l_ — 4 

Trance SA, 95 Noardelarev 


2030 Antwerp, BeMwn 
Tel 323/ 542 62407x35507 ’ 


Tran 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, fa immedkite ddhrery 

FROM STOCK 

Beil sendee, dipping., kuarance, 
band, eenwraon m USA 

RUTE INC. 

TAUNU55TTL St 6000 FRANKTKT 
W Germ, tef R&-232351, tbs 411559 


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At Frankfurt Na lorttew, boo* 
No.9123, Longinowme + 500 ffiC 
+ 300 E + T» E converters, te 
free, ham stack. SGS Hateurg. T». 
{40(8300051.71* 21 65109 W, Germany. 


TAX Free can. d metes & modeb. 

ATK, NV AnVerrui 22, 2000 Antwerp 

Befaum.Tel 03/CT (6 53 Tx 31 53a 


ALFA ROMEO, TAX H&E LHD/RHD 
ItalyTd: Vienna 


versions, ddwered Italy. 
Austria 222/531896. 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


khandair 

LAST MINUTE FARE 
laservatire authorized within 
3 days prior to departure 


UNIQUE PRICE 


To 


PEW YORK. WASHMGTON (BW1) 
QKAGO ur DETROfT 

from Luxembourg 


One way - about US$ 189 
(DM 499, BFR 9990) 


(SR 449, FR 1590) 


Round Trm^7-21 


about US5 

(BR 19,980, SR 


DM^Sl) 

m 3290] 


For further infamatwn end reservation 
ail ICBANDAIR 
Frrekfat (M9) 29 99 78 

Brvs*eb Pi 216 0680 

Luxemburg ^ 4796 WO 

Zurich P 363 oggo 

An pi) 742 S225 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


West Coast! 


LEGAL SERVICES 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


THE MAGNIBCBNT 
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SOLARIS 

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2 far. Servias Athap 10562 
Tetexj 215621, Phare 3228883. 


Paris tek 265 BO 36 
Munich let 398 811 
Geneva let 327 110 
Zunch let 391 36 55 


PORTUGAL 


7 DAYS INCLUSIVE TOURS 

FROM LONDON TO: 

USBON £238 


ESTORIL/ CA5CAIS _„C2I6 

03CTAVRDEIOPOIITO)_£191 

ALGARVE £J«5 

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HOTELS 


SWITZERLAND 


LUCERNE. GRAND HOIH. HtWJn= 
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BOOKS 


FOR YOURSTATBPEBOOK,^ 
write or ptiree: BOOK CA1L oa 
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966^5470. Med orders weiaame. 


EDUCATION 


HTOT CARffll TRA1M NO. . 
Our ful 1 war aautses start mOdteer 
a* Gtetfieft UKcowrmg ^ nytr^j™ 
ground iretrirton fa.Bra fewpmJ > 
censes fa arai* aid 
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tion Authority, Ful rwdwte ««mh 
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The Course AtedraBrator, 
ntarr AffiSHV 
CranfMdAirfMd, 




751243 


FRB4CH FOR AU fate in your home. 

20 80, yaw first rendm-vota a free. 


sle from Macdesfidd, 


cessful peopl 
in Cheshire.) 

“She was a tremendously talent- 
ed and elegant but assertive wom- 
an." Lewis said of the aunt “She 
once pulled a pair of high-heeled, 
pointed shoes — winktepickere, 
they were called — right off my 
feet, saying that they were incon- 
gruous and disgusting. Of course, 

t _ '.La ** 


the Lyon fabric house of Brochier 

tn -mfllce silk m Chma: ' - 

Other designers manufacturing 
in nut inland China have Tim into 
unreliable deliveries, as weft as the 
fashion gap between Communist 
factories and international design, 
but Lems appears to have worked 
around the difficulties. 

Another problem that came mth 


she was right." 


success in Asia was the risk (rf being 
it- copied. “I had to get rid of several 


Arriving in Singapore as a Brit- copied. . 

ish Army bride of l 8, Lewis found manufacturers for doing that, die 


I3U mill) LPKKAJV U1 iW, *-v"**' — — ~ . 1 1J 

another source of inspiration in the said. ^>ne man evm openal .ins 
colors and textures of the Far East, own shops in Hong Kong and lai- 
Her sewing and designing became a wan, handed out my biographies, 
full-time business when she re- and said. This is a Jenny Lewis 
turned to Aria after six years in which my factory wfll make for you 
Guadalcanal in ihe Pacific. Do- on order for half price, 
spile the responsibilities of raising She added “Yon really have to 
two children and her duties as a enjoy doing battle, have it together 
civil servant's wife in a British cdo- inside you and keep your humor 

than anything else. 


ny, she set up her first boutique in more 

Hong Kong m 1974. t . , . 

Since then the business has ex- Dinah Lee is a journalist bas&l in 
panded almost too rapidly for Lew- Hong Kong. 


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SMALL COMPUTERS 


A SPECIAL REPORT 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 


Page 9 


When to Buy: 




to Wait 


aS3>. 

tr j 

§S M 

W| 

fftS*** a 

•i* e £ 

i-\ .. •. ."• 

* — = K5 S* 

Scii. 

T-‘ ^ N,i ; , 

: ~- ‘.*2; , ~" 



a^Vj; 

- i v A~; a 
*6*5 ȣC 
S' aafli; yi 

*-«■? •& 
5v-*,5 



By Paul Freibcrger 

P ALO ALTO, Califnmfc — TTui 
personal computer world is not the 
labyrinth it once was. and buyers 
no longer have to puzzle out tong 
passageways to find the machine 
that is right for them. The shakeout 
in the market has left purchasers 
wrth a smaller selection, but also 
with a greater chance of buying a 
dependable computer. Although 
each country has a somewhat dn- 
ferem product line available, many 
good systems are available. 

Moreover, one of the dilemmas 
of computer buying seems to be 
disappearing. PC purchasers have 
often agonized over whether to buy 
now or wait for better technology 
and lower prices. Today, however, 
Firm enough standards have been 
established so that technological 
advances tend to be subtle. In addi- 
tion, prices may decline but no dra- 
matic drops are expected soon, ex- 
cept in Spain, where prices should 
fall when the country enters the 
Common Market. 

IT you are used to shopping for 
computers in the United States, 
you will Find buying abroad more 
difficult. It is not as easy to add 
peripherals from third-party manu- 
facturers and the variety of options 
in general does not approach that 
in the United States. Moreover, 
sometimes yon have to ship a pan 
out of the country to repair it, a 
process with roadblocks of its own. 
Hence, when buying personal com- 
puters abroad, it is a good idea to 
locate a reliable dealer and buy a 
total system. 

IBM, which did not offer a per- 
sonal computer until the industry 
had been established, now domi- 
nates the market. Buying IBM is a 
conservative choice. The IBM PC 
lacks special features .such as 


more. IBM offers a version of its' 
PC with a 10 megabyte hard disk (it ' 
holds 10 million characters), called 
the IBM PC XT. An XT sdis for 
less than $5,000 in Britain and as 
much as $6,000 in Italy. 

IBM recently began selling its 
new PC AT computer, which oper- 
ates faster than roost competing 
systems, has a higher-capariti' flop- 
py disk drive ana hard disk. But the 
cost of the AT is also high, more 
than 57,000. . 

The IBM PC may not be your 
ideal computer. Its keyboard has 
been widely criticized for its place- 
ment of several keys, and a dis- 
criminating buyer should consider 
some of the alternatives. Many of 
these systems are compatible with 
the IBM PC, meaning they can use 
the same software, add-on cards 
and peripherals. Hence, they often 
possess the main advantages of a 
PC at a reduced cost. Some offer 
belter performance. 

Olivetti, Europe's largest office- 
cqiripmem manufacturer, has an 
impressive line of personal com- 
puters. The M24 is Olivetti’s stan- 
dard desktop computer, the same 
machine Olivetti supplies to AT&T 
in the United States, which sells it 
there as the AT&T 6300. 

The M24 is fully compatible with 
the IBM PC. It also offers several 
improvements. Doe to newer tech- 
nology, it runs programs nearly 
twice as fast, boasts a higher resolu- 
tion screen and has a plug at the 
front of the keyboard to connect a 
mouse, a handheld device that 
moves the cursor on the screen. The 
disk drives conveniently cause the 
disks to pop out when the door is 
opened. The hardware is smaller 
and has a monitor that tilts. 

A standard M24 comes with 



How to Choose a PC 

In a Stabilizing Market 


Itabd Cwa-Mnna '' Hi 


User Groups Pick Up the Pieces 
For Owners of the 'Orphans’ 


128K. of internal memory, which 
can be expanded up to640K. Mod- 
mouse-pointing device or a touch, els wkh one floppy drive, or two. or 
screen. Ittakts up jporeAssk spape -a floppy .and a bard-.drskare all 
than its competitors, : ;axid mahyT availaWe^Thc M24- gphcfajly sells 
other computed offer better per- for several - hundred dollars less 
formance. Connoisseurs refer to than ^similarly equipped IBM PC 
the IBM PC as “plain vanilla." But Ever since the portable Osborne 

even if you do not plan on purchas- 1 appeared in 1981, personal con*- 
ing one, you still need to know that putas have been getting smaller 
IBM created the standard followed and lighter. Both IBM and Olivetti 
by most makers of peripherals and offer portable versions of their 


" i , . H’i- 

i 

*■ V-;. M 

1 * L; B 

1 i 



software. 

The market success of the IBM 
PC has given it a wealth of soft- 
ware, most of which uses an operat- 
ing svsstem created by Microsoft 
called' PC-DOS, or MS-DOS by 
competitors. You can buy a system 
with one disk drive, but you need 
two to run the computer comfort- 
ably. The price of an IBM PC with 
256K, a monochrome monitor and 
rwo floppy disk drives runs from 
S2.8Q0 to $3,000. 

The PC boasts an open architec- 
ture, Inside, it has five dots for. 
add-on cards, which can provide 
the connection to a hard disk, 
printer or modem, as wdJ as snch 
pleasing extras as enhanced graph- 
ics and larger memory. 

" The accessories you will need for 

the PC depend on how you use it 
For word processing, you rwum: 


computer that come with a carrying 
handle. However, these machines 
are not featherweights. They weigh 
around 28 pounds (12.6 kilograms) 
and you wulnot want to tote them 
all day. 

Compaq Computer of Houston 
makes the most popular portable 
IBM-compauble sold in the United 


offering its line in Europe. Compaq 
also has a portable with floppy 
disks and one with a hard disk 
called the Compaq Plus. In addi- 
tion, it sells a nonportable system 
called the Deskpro, which resem- 
bles the Olivetti M24 in perfor- 
mance. 

Less compatible with the IBM 
PC but more portable are two Hues 
made by Apricot, Britain's moat 
successful personal computer man- 
ufacturer; which last year took 4.6 


for worn ^ percent of the European market, 

onh/ a card to connect ^ Apricot computers employ the 

printer. But if you MS-D§5opmKg sysS/but the 

large databases. „ system cannot use add-on cards de- 


crabhs, then you should consider a 
SShics card, additional memory 
Sd a hard disk. Each of these op- 
tions adds several hundred dollars 
to the price of your system, except 
the hard disk, which adds one or 

two thousand . 

Hard disks are becoming in- 
creasingly popular on personal 
computers. They are external stor- 
agedevices that work Oner and 
store more informanon than floppy 
disks, between 30 and 60 times 


vefcrped for the IBM- PC and will 
not run aD PC software. Instead, 
the company has contracted with 
many key software firms .to modify 
their programs especially to exploit 
Apricot's angular features. 

Apricot offers several computers 
with noteworthy and controversial 
characteristics. The most impor- 
tant of these is the Apricot FP, a 
portable that weighs 13 pounds 
(Continued on Next Page) 


By Beth Karlin 

LONDON — The precarious 
state of many personal computer 
makers today is worrisome to more 
than just investors. Users can suf- 
fer, as well, when their equipment 
manufacturers go bankrupt or get 
out of the PC business. 

Indeed, millions of PC owners 
bave already faced the problems 
caused when their equipment is dis- 
continued. Software support comes 
to a halt, spare parts are hard to 
Find and maintenance becomes dif- 
ficult. 

“Without support from the man- 
ufacturer, you re on your own,” 
said Tony Carter, marketing man- 
ager of Compuieraid Services, a 
unit of Thom EMI that repairs 
personal computers. Left on their 
own, however, PC users have 
proved resourceful. Many have 
formed user groups to hap each 
other make the most of their “or- 
phan" machines by sharing infor- 
mation on such topics as spare 
parts and software availability. 

One of the largest organizations 
is the First Osborne Grraip (FOG), 
which now has more than 15,000 
members two years after Osborne 
Comp uier Corp. filed for bank- 
ruptcy. “We picked up the pieces,” 
said William Graham, head of 
FOG in Paris. 

Chapters in Britain and West 
Germany also serve European us- 
ers. Although Osborne has reorga- 
nized under new management 
since, it still counts on FOG for 
help. 

“When Osborne became the First 
big victim of the shakeout, it was a 
warning.” said Mr. Graham. Own- 
ers of other makes realized that 
they, too, could benefit from a user 
group, leading to the creation of the 
400-member Ordinateur Utilisa- 
teurs France (OUF), of which Mr. 
Graham is president. 

Unlike FOG, which was a direct 
response to Osborne’s failure, OUF 
and other groups were created to 
help owners of current PCs as well 
as orphans. With 400 members in 
Europe, APPLE Co-op. (Apple Pu- 


getsound Program Library Ex- 
change), assists users of early Ap- 
ple 11s in finding software and 
spare parts, while serving owners of 
later models as well. 

“We tiy whenever we can to in- 
troduce new products that are com- 
patible with early models," said 
Charles Stillman, APPLE manager 
of product development. Parts are 
more difficult. “The older they are, 
the less likely it is that we can find 
them.” 

Usually, manufacturers them- 
selves. if they are still in business, 
are the best source for spares. Com- 
modore Business Machines, for 
one, supports a product with spares 
for seven years after its shelf life. 

Spare parts can also be found at 
third-party maintenance opera- 
tions. Britain has more than 170 
companies that repair machines for 
dealers and individuals, and busi- 
ness is booming. In four years, 
Thom EMI’s Compuieraid, for ex- 
ample, has increased its turnover 
12 times. 

“There’s no shortage of people 
who can fix machines,” noted Rus- 
sell Nathan, managing director of 
Rom tec Ltd., a market-research 
and consulting company near 
Maidenhead, England. Mr. Nathan 
said that the pans scarcity is not as 
severe a problem as It might first 
appear. Due to increasing stan- 
dardization, he said most PCs now 
have a high percentage of common 
parts. “While there might be one 
maker's name on the box, there's 
nothing inside that hasn't been 
seen before in someone else’s box." 

Personal computer owners can 
also suffer losses when a software 
company goes under, particularly 
when that software supplier em- 
ploys an anti-piracy method called 
^time-bombing.” At a random 
date, a message flashes on the 
screen notifying the user to call the 
software company for a new code, 
.thus assuring that only those that 
purchased the software can contin- 
ue to use it. 

In at least one case, a software 
company that built “time-bombs” 
into its programs went out of busi- 
ness and virtually disappeared. 


making it impossible for users to 
get a new code. England's Micro- 
Decision magazine reports that 
Logical Step's C/FACC account- 
ing package is just such an exam- 
ple. 

“If a company goes out of busi- 
ness, you can be left high and dry. 
which is exactly what happened in 
this case." said Margaret Coffey, 
editor of the magazine. 


By Michele S. Preston 

NEW YORK — Next year will mark the 10th 
anniversary of (he personal computer industry, which 
began with the introduction of the first Apple comput- 
er in the spring of 1976. During its brief history, this 
industry has undergone dramatic change and growth. 

In 1985. retail sales of personal computer products 
including hardware, software and peripherals is ex- 
pected to exceed S10 billion. The industry has gone 
through two stages and is about to enter a third. From 
1975 to 19S0, die market was emerging. While the first 
Apple computer represented a breakthrough in price 
performance, several years went by before hobbyists 
developed software and peripherals' that made person- 
al computers commercially viable. 

Milestones that set the stage for the second PC era 
included the development of Basic for PCs by Micro- 
soft. the CP/M operating system by Digital Research. 
VisiCalc by Software Arts, floppy disk drives, and the 
emergence of computer stores. IBM ushered in the 
second era — a boom-bust cycle — nidi the introduc- 
tion of the IBM PC in August 1981, which changed the 
rules of the industry. At first. IBM's introduction 
stimulated demand. The company's endorsement of 
the concept prompted business to view personal com- 
puters as serious productivity enhancements. The 
open-architecture strategy created an industry stan- 
dard that compatible hardware vendors and applica- 
tion software developers could capitalize on. IBM’s 
decision to sell through computer retail stores generat- 
ed rapid expansion of the distribution channel. 

The IBM PC incorporated next-generation. 16-bit 
architecture that offered performance and features 
necessary to create more sophisticated business appli- 
cations. As a result, hundreds of start-up companies as 
well as existing office automation vendors poured into 
ihe market, even though there was no hope of their 
getting more than 10 percent of the demand potential. 

While it was clear that there were too many vendors, 
what was not readily apparent was that IBM was to 
capture 50 percent of the market. The result was one of 
the bloodiest shakeouts in the history of technology. 
Start-up companies Filed for bankruptcy and one-time 
leaders including Apple, Commodore and Tandy lost 
significant market share. In a similar vein, the home- 
computer market experienced a wrenching consolida- 
tion, with Texas Instruments. Atari and Coleco re- 
cording substantial losses, leaving doubts about the 
viability of this segment. By the end of this year, the 
shakeout in the personal computer industry should be 
complete, and a new era of stable growth should begin. 

While microtechnology will continue to advance, 
change is expected to be more evolutionary and pre- 
dictable than in the past. Such an environment repre- 


sents an attractive opportunity for businesses and 
individuals to purchase computers. Certain factors 
should be considered in malting purchase decisions. 

While the cost of technology has declined dramati- 
cally. a personal computer still represents an impor- 
tant investment in money as well as the time required 
to learn applications and input data. The consumer 
must be confident that the vendor he chooses will exist 
over the years to support and enhance this investment. 
Although there is a 99.9-percem probability that IBM 
will always he a leader in the personal computer 
industry, even IBM created over 200.000 "computer 
orphans” when ii announced plans to discontinue 
PCjr. 

In addition to IBM. COMPAQ Computer is expect- 
ed to be a long-term participant, and since its products 
are compatible with die IBM standard, the COMPAQ 
user can feel confident that future enhancements will 
be available to him. Apple is committed to evolving 
the Apple II and the Macintosh, and both product 
families are expected to remain viable: AT&T appears 
to have a serious commitment, although sales to date 
have fallen short or expectations. Other office-auto- 
mation vendors may be successful in niche markets. 
Undercapitalized start-up companies are suspecL 

The sure bet is to buy IBM. and the only decision to 
be made is which I BM computer to buy. But the astute 
consumer may benefit by investigating equally safe 
but better alternatives. In recent months, IBM man- 
agement has clearly announced intentions to continue 
to support and enhance the standard it has created 
while also maintaining an open architecture. This 
means that competing manufacturers that offer com- 
puters that are fully compatible with this standard can 
offer the same enhancements and that future applica- 
tions developed for IBM computers will openue on 
fully compatible computers. 

The purchase of a totally compatible computer — 
some have only limited compatibility — is. therefore, a 
safe decision. However, there just might be a better 
choice. A few vendors — the most notable of which is 
COMPAQ — offer computers that are fully compati- 
ble with IBM yet are substantially better with respect 
to speed, features, memory expansion, storage options 
and price. While buying industry standard products is 
the safest decision in some cases, it may not be the best 
decision. For instance, while the Macintosh technol- 
ogy is not as firmly entrenched as the IBM standard, it 

(Continued on Next Page) 


The author, a microcomputer industry analyst, is 
senior vice president of LF. Rothschild, Unterberg, 
Towbin 


Market Expands for Foreign Language Software 

u i Snirrirfue l 1 pay 5 to be first in anv country. Micrppro’s rough text for translators to make fluent. B 

By Helena atumage Wordstar, the popular word-processing pack- then examples must be changed as endless bai 


r» Cmmdee it pays to be first in any country. MicroPro’s 

By Helena bnirnage Wordstar, the popular word-processing pack- 

t nNnON A year ago asking a French ag^ was available in French and German three 

“Parlez-vous FrancaisT" or a years ago at least 18 months ahead of the com- 
nw “Sorechen Sie Deutsch?” would petition and before the local suppliers had do- 
r e cL m« with a blank screen of incompre- veloped their products, Microsoft's Multiplan 
have been nw ^ you check your beat Lotus 1-2-3 to the French spreadsheet 

henston or a mafket ^ ^ ^ favorite. 


S ^Al/but a handful of the top sdtatw™oB£ In the first instance the problems were techni- 

nnrer software packages were^ ^ cal The original version of Louis 1-2-3 will 
flnited States by Amen cans and never be translated. The latest verson, 2.0, has 

The Irtish tedW problems but for Os «» °T ^ basic level changes that make translation 
KSditwas a matter of learning to use the p^ ble . '^German will be avaflable 
software in a foreign language. shortly. The problem was fundamouaL In the 

Tndav the U.S- sof tware 5™® original the text that appeared on the screen, m 

alinpM eettheir products commands, or help messages, or even in the 
lanmia&es to open up new markets as the ffom wUcfa us ^ s ^ ecl option they 

Pf^nn.^tiehteu. j want, was embedded in the code where and 

^A'rSIrdinltc* IDC 1 ^ et t£SS2i when il *** writers to pul it there. To 

Britain, the Western translate the words meant first finding them and 

ufffrnr business computers are going to ^ a translated word of 

gii too machines this year i° same number of charactere to Gil the 

grow from 9 1 1 . Qgg jjjg Uniie d Kingdom 

mill' 00 of this market. . 

represents onb language, even if a 

“People buy rnthcu fafenor 

w JLf/l iU r^ri Armitage, European 


is an 


translation.” ^L^Ashton Tate. 

mnrirrtmS manage . .I,, rmr 


space. 

Sensible software writers, Lotus Develop- 
ment included, now organize their software 
code so that all the text messages are kept in one 


place where they can be easily found. 
Bui the problems of translating cot 


come in tay- 


flianagv* v " "T" ,k- mmnanv s top »ui uw piuunsuo v» MMwwuua »*««* •« «y- 
^ A fcsHk ers. Once one level is trade the others 

JEL database package^D 0 ^' frame* 0 *- become more important •-*— * m3 "- 

and its integrated s P^^e{man!W uals must be translated. Tin 


word for word 
They , leave a 


rough text for translators to make fluent But 
as endless base- 
ball has little relevance in European markets. 
Also all the illustrations of screens must be 
redone to take into account the new languages 
they display. Little is left of the original manual. 

With the software itself the tupu technical 
approaches have solved some of the problems 
but getting the test right is difficult. Alain 
Bloncquart, MicroPro’s French managing direc- 
tor in charge of all its Western European mar- 
kets, said that with its latest product, Wordstar 
2000, “aO the commands are based on mnemon- 
ics; it is very difficult to translate them.” Good 
software depends on giving the user an intuitive 
sense of what is meant by rather abrupt com- 
mands. 

Even the translations have rippling effects. 
‘Help’or’JT asit appears on the screen becomes 
‘Aide' or ‘A’ in France. It is then sorted into a 
different alphabetical sequence and so appears 
in a different part of the screen as well. 

All sorting in foreign languages causes more 
headaches for U-S. packages as they do not 
know what to do with an c or c or fi. Even more 
problematical is the spelling checker. It is com- 
mon with most U.S. word-processing packages 
but difficult to translate into languages where 
verbs must conjugate and. adjectives change 
their sex. Micnwro has only just launched the 
first French spelling checker. 

“The better we get,” Mr. Blancqoart said, 
(Continued on Next Page) 


MINITEL IN BUSINESS 


\\ 






MINTTELS are now established as the most popular text/videotex terminals for use in business, capturing 
more than 80 percent of the terminal market in Europe. In France alone MINTTELS are used by more than 
250,000 professionals to reach more than 1,200 private videotex systems. 

The MINITEL is a compact, stand-alone and portable terminal with descriptive function keys (i.e. SEND, 
NEXT, PREVIOUS, ERASE) and contains a built-in modem. And, it is attractively priced. 

As simple to use and install as a telephone, the MINITEL offers a high degree of user friendliness, facilitating 
information retrieval and data processing in general - ESPECIALLY for users who have no computer 
experience. 

This versatile terminal provides ready access to existing and dedicated computer systems and opens new 
horizons for business communications to all potential users - inhouse staff and clients. 

Take, for instance, the case of franchising in a retail network : the MINITEL speeds and facilitat es communica- 
tion between the franchiser and his agents by providing a cost effective means for order taking, electronic mail, 
a products and clients list and management systems. 

EXPAND YOUR COMMUNICATIONS WITH THE MINITEL 

INTELMATIQUE FRANCE 98, rue de Sevres - 75007 PARIS - FRANCE - 
Tel. : (33) 1 306 16 36 Telex ; 203 185 TELEMAT F - FAX (33) 1 306 13 24 


□ I wish to receive further information on business videotex systems and the Minitel. (Pleasespecify the computer 
brand you plan to use with the Minitel.) 

□ ! wish to have a better understanding of the Minitel. 

Please send me copiesof theMiniteltechnicalspecifications. The price per copy including postage is $ 31.50. 

I enclosed S to cover the charges. 


Name : .. 
Firm: .... 
Address : 


Signature : .. 
Position : . 
Country : _ 





Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON SMALL COMPUTERS 


Executives Find PCs Aid Autonomy, Productivity 


By Han ns G.K. Schwimann 


paiible add-ons and extend their systems by discrete 


PARIS — While the mass of today’s middle- and low- 
lech industries are carrying out modernization in tbeplant 
for their survival they are attacking the new frontier of 
hying to boost productivity in the office: White-collar 
costs are racing far past the revenues produced by the 
basic industries' flat markets. 

The reasons for these mounting administrative costs are 
many: shorter work hours, a greater number of complex 
tasks, fewer well-trained entry-level workers and higher 
turnover. Chief executives are concerned about the prob- 
lem. In 1978, less than 20 percent of European executives 
believed that white-collar productivity was an important 
issue; 52 percent of them believe it is today and 67 percent 
believe it will be very important by 1989. 

on dramatic advances in nncro-electrod^mid electronic 


building blocks as they want. 
It is this f 


As a result, it is estimated that as many as 50 percent of 

will have a 


networking, which make computers easier to use and 
capable of better performance. Stiff competition among 
jff-sha 


, freedom that generates greater worker motiva- 
tion and increases productivity. 

Few white-collar workers actually require linkups to 
mainframes in order to process large amounts of data or 
gain access to databases. Only 20 percent of the white- 
collar population of industrial corporations need to be 
hooked up to a conventional mainframe on a regular basis. 
On the contrary, more than 50 percent of the office 
workers need only dedicated units for specific tasks and 
require only occasional access to the strong processing 
power of mainframe utilities. Therefore, top management 
favors the mushrooming of PCs in their coiporation in a 
first wave of office automation. 

There are dangers, however, in the random proliferation 
of personal computers throughout corporations. Offices 
are centers of teamwork and the full potential of desk-top 


business employees in the United States 
personal computer for support by 1990. By that date, 
some of Europe's most advanced corporations, like FIAT, 
also plan to provide computerized support for 50 percent 
of its office workers, compared with an anticipated Euro- 
pean average of 22 percent And it will be the mid-1990s, 
at the earliest before 75 percent of the office workers in 
the United States and 50 percent of those in Europe wiH 
benefit from the support of a professional desk-top micro- 
computer. But PCs will never be quite as widespread as 
telephones. 


While the personal computer’s penetration of the busi- 


ness world is growing rapidly, the consumer market for 
home use is sifll larger 


capable 

manufacturers, off-shore manufacturing in the Far East 
and the multiplication of distribution channels have re- 
duced prices so far that the personal computer is now a 
mass-marketed consumer good. 

Set into the office worker’s desk, it makes available all 
the computing power and storage capacity seeded to 
complete daily work better and faster. Undo' the impact 
of automation tools, and the trend of granting greater 
decision-making authority to smaller corporate entities, 
the way office duties are performed are slowly but surely 
changing. 


Perhaps as many as 50 percent of 
business employees in the United 
States will hare a personal 
computer for support by 1990. 


laiger in total number of units. Already, 
boosted by workaholics, moonlighters, computer addicts 
and hackers, personal computers have entered 16 percent 
of all U.S. households, half the video recorder penetration 
rate. By 1990, it is predicted that the personal computer 
will be present in up to 30 percent of U.S. households and 
perhaps half of those PCs will be videotex-compatible. In 
addition, most governments promote the use erf PCs is 
school at all levels of education. 


computers for the individual and his corporation is only 
achieved by adding communications facuitic 


The desk-embedded personal computing devices have 
achieved their popularity because they help office workers 
do what they want and need most: to manipulate on-site 
their own information in the form of words, numbers and 
pictures, to perform many types of personalized comput- 
ing, interactive graphics and filing of personal reports or 
simil ar information. 

The technical model of the device may vary. Many of 
the machines on the market today are able to meet the 
office worker's needs equally well: single-user PCs, user- 
programmable terminals, multiuser micros locally 
networked to departmental or work-area minis, which 
share expensive resources like printers, graphic terminals, 
integrated workstations, tomorrow's terminals integrating 
voice data and PC functions, portable PCs, etc. 

The form does not matter, what is really pushing the 
PC -proliferation is the individual's freedom of having 
computing power at his fingertips. Many white-collar 
workers are disappointed, rightly or wrongly, by the 
rigidity, slow response time, heavy bureaucracy and the 
need to share that is inherent in many management 
information systems. With the PC, these individuals can 
now rapidly implement their own solutions, make pur- 
chases from the comer computer shop with funds from 
their own departmental budget, buy low-priced software 
tailored to their specific needs, innovate with many com- 


w ities for infor- 
mation transfers, such as electronic mail, linkups to in- 
house databases and outside information sources or con- 
ferencing services. 

Only through the combination of all three elements of 
office automation — personal computing, c ommnnic a- 
uon, motivation — will office workers reap the full poten- 
tial of saving 15 percent of their time —equal to one hour 
per day — and improve the quality of their work. The goal 
is the electronic office that uses an integrated system to 
reduce the reams of paper today's offices chum out 
To date, only 20 percent of the PCs in use are able to 
. In 


Ironically, man) _ 

precise idea of the real purpose for a PCs home use. 7 
these individuals are eager to make the purchase so they 
can fed that they and their families are participating in t he 
new technological age. Questioned about the electronic 
home in 10 years, consumers usually mention a broad 
group of convenient and reasonably priced services such 
as home banking, shopping. b£Q payment, entertainment, 
ticket reservations, household accounting and budgeting, 
home monitoring, vacation and travel planning, video 
games, appropriate linkups to bnsiness services and tele- 
phone listings. 

Perhaps 27 percent of consumer revenue could be 


Lapped by advanced videotex services. Unfortunately, in 


co mmunicate . In the future, the Tower of Babel's numer- 



praciice, few of these services are available on a large scale 
and even (ess are purchased. Videotex suppliers, which 
link the personal computers in homes to many of these 
potential services, view these indications of their future 
market with relish. 


integrate its islands of office and factory 
to put advanced software, like relational databases and 
expert systems, to work. For that reason, forward-thinking 
chief executives are making sure that a measure of stan- 
dardization is achieved in all PC procurement 
In the United States, about 17 percent of afl white-collar 
workers and 14 parent of those in government now use 
personal computers, but only 5 percent in Western Eu- 
rope. 

The PC boom is now so strong that, since 1984, micro- 
computer power has outsold mamrame-coinputer power 
in the United States. By 1987. rite installed power base of 
micro-computers in the United States will exceed that of 
mainframe computers. 


In Europe, governments are trying to stimulate the use 
of borne information systems through the allocation of 


public funds. The public post office, telephone and trie- 
graph utilities — the PTTs, and in particular the French 


— are pushing the use of inexpensive videotex 
terminals by private consumers as well as businesses. 
Tsoffe 


Some PTTs offer microcomputing capability in low-cost 
videotex terminals for the home. And the British and 
Austrian PTTs offer systems that can use telephone tines 
to gain networked access to computer programs stoned in 
software banks maintained by vendors. . 


The author is a vice president and computer analyst at 
Boo:- A Hen & Hamilton, international consultants. 



To live 
With Your 
Computer 


By Sarah and Paul Edwards 


SIERRA MAD RE, California 
— Computers do not require much 
special attention to settle comfort- 
ably into most homes. Within sec- 
onds, a car full of children can rush 
into a house with computers under 
arm, cables and joysticks flying be- 
. hind them, hook op to the televi- 
sion and challenge the latest video 
game. 

Having a computer underfoot 
when you turn on the evening news. 

however, is not most people's idea 
of a “user friendly” workstation. So 


Some ideas for 
computer from die 


a home environment to apesonaf 
: “Working From Homer Bray-. 


the Same 


even though today’s personal com- 
r can make itself at hom 


purer can make itself at home al- 
most anywhere from the kitchen to 
the garage, taking a few ample 
steps will prevent your newest elec- 
tronic resdent from strangling the 
household with cables and cords. 


usurping 
crick in the 


to putting a 
and a strain on the 





eyes. 

Before deriding where you want 
your computer, consider these fac- 
tors: . . . 


• What will you and others be 
using your computer to do? In ad- 
dition to your work, win someone 
be doing homework on it? Paying 
bills? Keeping recipes? Playing 
games? Using it with the telephone 
for communications? Place your 
computer for convenience near a 
filing cabinet, bookshelves or other 
equipmait you will need while us- 
ing it. 

• Where wiH you be most com- 
fortable with your computer? Do 
you like to be in the midst of house- 
hold action when at the keyboard 
or do you prefer the silence and 
isolation of a separate room? And 
what about others coming to your 
bome? Do you want the computer 
where everyone will see it or would 
you prefer it to be out erf sight? 



found that 90 percent of people 
working at a computer terminal 
suffered some physical discomfort 
Of these, 93 percent experienced 
eyestrain, 89 percent had head- 
aches and 88 percent back pain. 
Other studies have shown that 
these problems can be controlled 
by using the right furniture and 
lighting. 

To avoid discomfort select fur- 
niture and emnpment that is ftexi- 


tiple settings or. overhead, l i ghtin g, 
with dimmer switches. An amber 
monitor will reduce eyestrain or 
you can also fit your monitor witha 
glare screen. 

Although standard electrics 
wiring vriST usually accommodate 
your computer (older homes may ~ 
be an exception), power drstur- 
bances can De frustrating. Powgr t 
outages, voltage fluctuations and 
line noise from nea^. switching 
equipment . or. radio/tejeviaoq' 
broadcast sgnatecanwreak havoc : 
with your computer. ' . ' r . .y 
Developing a habit of routinely 
saringyotnworicbibebestprotet> 
lost data, bat for your 


« 


zc- 




When to Buy: It’s No Longer Safer to Wait for New Models 


• Where is the comp uter least . ble and adjustable to your body. 


(Continued From Previous Page) 
(about 5.8 kilograms) and accepts 
speech inpuL You can actually 
train the computer to recognize 
your voice and execute oral com- 
mands. You should realize, howev- 
er, that voice recognition remains a 
struggling technology, and the 
company warns that the Apricot 
will not get your commands right 
100 percent of the time. 


The FFs screen is a flat-panel 


LCD (liquid crystal display). Al- 
though it can shot 


ironies buOl in and can be connect- 
ed to a color monitor. 


and the mouse in a traditional man- 


ner. 


tow as many lines 
and characters as standard moni- 
tors, LCD technology irritates 
some users. Unlike most screens, 
which emit light, the LCD reflects 
it and functions well only under 
proper lighting conditions. Even 
then, it remains somewhat dim. 
The computer does have color eleo- 


The FP also has an infrared key- 
board and mouse, which eliminate 
two more cords from your desktop.. 
But to work properly, the keyboard 
must be within two meters of the 
computer and in direct line with it. 
Apncot also offers a thin fiber- 
optic cord to connect the keyboard 


Built into the system is a disk 
drive, which, although small in size, 
can hold twice as much informa- 
tion (about 350 pages) as most 
standard floppies. Two different 
versions of the FP are available. 
One. with 256K of internal memo- 
ry, costs about $1300, and the oth- 
er, with 512K, about S1.900. The 



system is lighter than other porta- 
bles. but you need both hands to 
carry it 

Apricot's most successful com- 
puters lack infrared technology. Its 
PC is a desktop system with two 
microfloppy drives for 52,400, and 
its PC Xi has one floppy disk and a 
hard disk for $4300. 

Apple Computer, which last year 
'garnered about 9 percent of the 
European market (mainly in 
France), remains the only major 
player with systems that are not 
IBM compatible. 


For business use. Apple sells its 
fie, essentially the same computer 
responsible for Apple's rise From a 
tiny firm to an international com- 
pany. It is not as powerful as an 
IBM PC and can support only 
128K of memory, although Apple 
is expected to increase its capabili- 
ty significantly this month. The 
Apple lie boasts a great deal of 
software. It sells for between 
$1,000 and $1,300 with a mono- 
chrome monitor. 


Apple’s Macintosh is the most 
technologically advanced personal 
computer among the big sellers. 
The Macintosh uses a mouse- 
pointing device, comes with up to 
512K erf internal memory, a bit- 
mapped graphics display that al- 


lows multiple fonts and type sizes, 
‘ terrace that 


and a famous user int 
makes it easier to learn and operate 
the computer. 

The Macintosh has its disadvan- 
tages. It lacks (he useful IBM com- 
patibility, takes floppies with broil- 
ed storage (400K) and has a system 
with closed architecture, making it 
impossible for a user to add addi- 
tional memory or certain other en- 
hancements. 


likely to encounter misuse and 
abuse? Usually, you do not have to 
make any special electrical" or tem- 
perature adjustments for your com- 
puter. Some problems can arise 
that you want to avoid, however. 
They indude heat buildup in (he 
computer itself, electromagnetic 
fields from other equipment and 
static electricity. AS of these prob- 
lems create the risk of losing valu- 
able material or disrupting the op- 
eration of your equipment 

So find a well- ventilated spot in 
a room, that does not get so warm 
you would break into perspiration 
while using your computer. If it is 
too hot for you, it could be too hot 
for the computer. Do not stack 
your computer components or en- 
close them in tight spates. Keep 
yonr equipment and disks away 
from ringing telephones, • stereo 
speakers, calculators, magnetic pa- 
per holders and power tools. 

You will find your computer is 
poorly suited to standard tables or 
desks around the house. The tradi- 
tional height erf 29 inches (74 centi- 
meters) for writing surfaces is less 
than optimal for working comfort- 
ably at a computer, 27 inches (69 
centimeters) is desirable. 

Computers are overeaters when 
it comes to space. Your computer 
desk not only needs room for the 
computer unit, keyboard and mon- 
itor, but also space for the printer 
and paper, a modem and other per- 
ipherals yon have or will have. Add 
in the documentation and the com- 
puter has consumed your desk en- 
tirely. 

So, set up a separate work unit 
for the computer that is deep and 
wide enough for all the compo- 
nents, has multiple surfaces so you 
do not have to stack components 
and provides unobstxusive chan- 
nels or holes for cables and cords. 

A study of computer users by the 
Buffalo Organization for Social 
and Technological Innovation 


Do not nse just any chair. Your 
computer chair should support 
your back and allow your arms to 
rest at a slight upward angle (no 
more than 10 degrees) to the key- 
board without raising your elbows 
more than 3 indies (7.6 centime- 
ters). 

Eyestrain is often the result of 
glare, tight reflecting off the com- 
puter screen into your eyes. Reduc- 
ing glare is generally a matter of 
less light rather than more, so in 



own peace of mrnd yen can take 
other steps as w efl. Uang a smS: 
protector wifi guard against higfc 
voltage current rises, and electrical 1 
noire If you have proMems with 
power outages of with blawingcn^. 
cuh breakers, you can nse software 
that automatically saves data on 
disk or buy a backn^powa-supply 
device. 

You mil find a wealth of other 
computer accessories in Ideal txati- 
puta; stores or advertised in com-, 
purer magazines. They include - 
copy holders, sound cavers to re- 
duce primer noise, aizxjffiary Ians 
for cootihg your system^ antistatic 
spray, Doormats anddi^bflrge do- 
nees, master power switches tip: 
the entire system, cable managers, 
computer deamng^ kits and radfe 
rion-protection sercens. ’ - 


tri 


►'TO 




.. . k • 

5-v i-' • ■ 


The rnfdwrs operate a compute r- 
tmimngemdamsultmgfijTrL ’ 7 . 


Computer Systen 

ts Under 

1983 

1985 

- Unite Gp 
/1987* 

msumed- 

1989* 

United States 

Europe.. _ 

Pacific Basin 

Rest of Worid__. 
Worldwide * • 

5.4 • 
12 

1.6 

O.S . 
9.6 . 

6.9 - - 

. 2.7 

• • IS »-:• 

V 03 T ~ 

V J2L8 

-112 

4.6 

; • 4.4 : 

r i2. ■ 

2 \2 

163 
; 7.7 
* 7.0 

1.9 

32.7 

■ • Profecatm • •>' ' * . 

••Y- Source: Infocorp 


How to Choose a PC 
In a Stabilizing Market 


Foreign Language Market Widening 


(Continued ftwn Previous Page) . 
offers significant benefits in ease; 
of-use and graphics. A large and 
growing library of applications ex- 
istsforMac A buyer must serious- 
ly evaluate what use wifl be made of 
the PC and who will use it and 
decide accordingly. 

A common dilemma for the user 
is whether 
techno! 
ucts 

make this investment obsolete. 


of the AT —skeptics are still look-, 
ing f or a product in that position in 
1986. IBM is also expected to offer 
connectivity between the PC family 
and§ystem36. ; 

Most believe the easy personal 

S puter sale& have already been: 

e to leading-edge technology 
integrators. 



use features] 
Macintosh 
become standard. 


(Continued From Previous Page) 
“the less technical the job and the 
more subtle the problems.” 

“When Wordstar went color we 
had complaints from the French 
about the green background. We 
had to change it to blue for them.” 

It is expensive. Richard Bradley. 
Apple's Macintosh software man- 
ager, estimates $17,000 to cover the 
software translation and testing, 
rpannal rewriting and printing and 
miscellaneous costs. “If you are 
making S58 on each package it wiQ 
take 293 sales in the local language 
to break even,” he pointed out. 
This is in spite of Apple's going to 
great lengths with the Macintosh to 
wvide software writers with easy 
utilities to change from U.S. key- 


promises to be a market later, eves 
bigger than the UJC, once the 
problems are overcome: 

The problems start with lan- 
guage and go right through to Japa- 
nese preferences on color and the nmducL the TBfcf pr K 
busing 

problems, lotus is in the process of endoH985 
translating 1,2 and 3 mto Japanese IBM PC with 512K meSSyradh 


Choosing a vendor is again tin- 

SSSafe-SwSSiS 

asswj*sB«ss 

AnSte ^nmtewaiwattbtlBacc^p- 

Apple n created a 10-year-old tanceof Vfmdowsaad IBhiTsTbp- 

Vfew interface. ' 


through ajoint venture with a Ji 
nese company called Kauri 
gaku Kenkyusho (K3X It has al- 
ready mastered the difficult art of 
translating the 50 phonetic Kanas 
used to enter text on Japanese per- 
sonal computers as the first stage of 
writing. These most then be con- 
verted to the Kanjis or more formal 
script used [or correspondence that 
□umber 7.000 in common i«a g*» It 


i? ' h * rd _disk drive for 

* puo. That represents an incredi- 
ble hardware value that can be used 
effectively for many years. It could 
be that today’s technology isriust . 
what you need. 

While the staying power of the 
vendor is important to the evolu- 
tion of the technology, everyday 
support is morelike’ 


Caramon wisdom has h^d that 
the last thing the wodd needs is yet 

another spreadsheet, word-pre- - 

cessing or data-bases apptication. 

Yet new products that incorpo- ’ 
rate advanced features, artificial-- 
intelligence technology tod that . 
can take advantage or frigber-per- ‘ 
fonnance personal computers are 
ex Pected to be introduced over die 

next 12 months: — 

Comraunteations wiB be a major 'Vs 

owth area for thr mA i 't ini nn* ’ r 


boards to French or Swedish pecu- son take a year to prepare the 

Parities and get the right style for Lotus software to handle the more 
and tfmw according to na- complex alphabet, and they include 


i ne shakeout m the. computer dig- *“"* - - i- 

tributioa channel will not be over 


tiooal preferences. 

The expense means that market 
size matters. France and Germany 
come firel Then Italy and Spain; 
the latter because it brings in South 
America. Benelux and Scandina - 
v ian countries follow. But os the 
translation job becomes less techni- 
cal and more subtle so it is easier to 
find a local partner to woric 

European languages may 
some problems for the translators 
but not as meat as when very 
f erect alphabets and cultures com- 
bine in Japanese and Arabic mar- 
kets. 

At the moment Arabic is snu a 
small market and only the hard- 
ware manufacturers and a few spe- 
cialist software packages are look- 
ing for their share. But Japan 


(be more subtle differences such as 
color preferences, different logical 
sequences and designs that appeal 
to the Japanese eye. They are not 
the same as those that appal to the 
European. 

The pace is quickening. Where a 
year ago local translations of U.S. 


for some months. When 
dealer it is important to know w 
level and type of sendee and 'sup- 
port options that are offered and 
executed to satisfaction. It is alto 
good to know the finanaaT condi- 


PC-tO-PC 

mK. 

cro-iQ-mam-fr ^TiK links. and- tete-.' 
computing capabilities are become 
mg Jncreasihgly - import an ! \fo ' 
business. White ttindwar^ \& ava3- y 





expect to be working _ 
rectly or with local companies on 
Spanish. Dutch and Scandinavian 
versions. Ashton Tate, has already 
launched Framework in Ja - 
the temptation of 3.6 mitiin n m; , 
crocomputera expected to be in 
Japanese businesses by 1990 wfl! 
bring the rest with iL 




main astron 

and plete netwo rkin g- anrf m.,!*/?? 2 " ^sm^d particuIarlndn^TY 

nounced that thereis nosuch thing t04nee f'- 

as the long rcimoiS ot 

‘ievtd to bf a ^ * ' 


Vr ■ ■ . 7 .;'; 
: -v' - ,v'- 



. ' ' - 




i 









over the world skip the slow parts of their pro- 
gress, and bring their talents to bear much earlier 
in their careers. 

Nixdorf lets them access and process in- 
formation, hundreds of times as fast today. 

So they can act on the information before it 
becomes history. And make some history in the 
process. 

Nixdorf helps speed up decision making. 

It helps answer all the “what if?” questions by 
helping the executive analyse them systemati- 
cally, thus getting the jump on the competition. 


In the old, slow days, people usecfiu say time 
is money. It's more than money today. Because in 
the old days you couldn’t buy time, no matter 
how much money you had. But today, with 
Nixdorf, you can. 

You can telescope the time it takes to do your 
job, and speed up both the rate and the quality of 
your work. Not to mention the accuracy. 

Or the creativity. Which is what gets you ahead 
in the world. And Nixdorf software is so easy to 
learn to use, you find yourself using it more and 
more each day. 


So you can get to the top and be there a while 
before your child is ready to take your place. 

Nixdorf Computer AG 
Furstenallee 7, 4790 Paderborn 
West Germany, Tei. 5251/5061 30 


NIXDORF 

COMPUTER 


?e for companiesto grow. 

ime in slow, steady, pre- 

; were developed gradu- • 

■s to evolve, and inter- 

the result of tedious and 

/ears. 

Mixdorf. 

too Because when com- 
^ives tend to get Pro- 
sed to have to be old 

fheS executives all 


a Computer: 


MegarMarketing by Magazine Switching On, Internationally 

WASHlNfiTOM — Pw^.inal ovni rlilrtwt rmW minrmlc rnffic art* KM SnnmwH fur u> 


•*! 


. 

V 

’■ — » 

' ::: j'j- 

• .’ _k “ *4*05 
sdi 5., 

- 

••• .TV** 


Don Till 

WASHINGTON - Modem 

to perform alt the computing ^ 
quired forasmall business. In the 

bom^ thb PC can become the cen- 

ta of many faintly activities, from 
leisure to sextons business. 

For a oamber of reasons, amooc 
them fear erf the unknown andlack 
of fanrihanty, the PC bas not vet 
^gained the acceptance Icvd of other 
consumer, products. This article 
provides a basic introduction to 
PCs for tot novice. 

• P Cs are easy to use. Most of us 

appreciate the-benefits provided by 
modern electronic and mechanical 
devices of all kinds and are quite 
content to use them without anv 
knowledge oT how tht^ work. Sit in 
a vehicle, switch on the ignition and 
activate the starter, the engine will 
turn. Put the car in gear and de- 
press the accelerator and you will 
move forward or backward. 

Behind all these simple functions 
lies a very sophisticated machine, 
weH beyond the comprehension of 
the average motorist, yet if these 
few ample steps are carried out in 
the right order, anyone can drive a 
car. 

Personal computers are a lot like 


rersonal computers are a lot like 

automobiles in this respect You do 

not have to know how they work to 

«goy the benefits they provide. 
Learn a few basic fu nct i ons, carry 
them out in the right order and you 
can operate a PC just as easily as 
you drive a car. 

. • Hardware and software. Per- 
sonal computers all have two basic 
components: hardware, the -parts 
you can see and touch, and soft- 
ware, the list of instructions that 
tell the hardware what to do. Soft- 
ware is provided in the form of ail 
necessary computer instructions re- 
corded on either tape cassette or 
magnetic disk. 

To understand how these com- 
ponents work together, think of 
hardware as an orchestra: Every- 
thing is there, violins, trumpets, 
trombones and drums, but naming 
wiD happen without a conductor 
and musical score. In a PC, the 
central processor, memory, moni- 
tor and keyboard may all be there, 
but nothing will happen without 
“operating system software” (the 
conductor) or “application soft- 
ware” (the musical score). 

Just as a conductor coordinates 
the activities of the different, or- 


c hes*re sections, system software 
® a * e s sure that information is 
passed between keyboard, screen, 
j loppy disk and printer in an order- 
ly manner. 

But unless all orchestra sections 
have a musical scon in front of 
them, there will not be any mnsic 
produced. In a PC, unless all com- 
ponents are using the same applica- 
tion software, you will not be a b le 
to write letters, calculate, access an 
information service orplay games. 

When you buy a PC, yon are 
always provided with operating 
system software that matrhm your 
hardware. With very few excep- 
tions, you cannot run that same 
system software on ano the r type of 
PC and seldom will another PCs 
system software run perfectly on 
yours. 

Application software you buy 
according to what you want to do, 
but you must also buy programs 
that arc designed to run on your 
particular PC. Software designed 
for the IBM PC will not run on 
Apple, TRS 80 or Commodore, and 
vice versa, although you may be 
able to get the same software in 
different versions to suit each type 
of PC — just as you can get the 
same music scored differently for 
piano, quartet or full orchestra. 

As a practical matter, loading 
system and application software, 
either separately Or together, re- 
quires no special skill and takes a 
few seconds. 

• Hardware options. All PCS 
must have a central processor (to 
do all the calculations, transfers 
etc. |. a memory', (to store the soft- 
ware and your information), a 
monitor, (to display what you enter 
and computer responses), a key- 
board (to enter information and 
commands) and a tape player or 
disk drive (to load software into the 
memory and to store yoor informa- 
tion permanently.) 

The memory in the PC loses all 
information stored, including the 
program, when the PC is switched 
off, but you can keep it all on tape 
or disk for as long as you want. 

Improved performance can be 
obtained in systems with more than 
the above basic components. For 
example, a basic system might have 
64,000 characters of memory, (64k) 
but systems expandable to 640k 
and more are now available. A sec- 
ond floppy disk drive (the remov- 
able magnetic disks are called 
“floppy” because they are flexible) 
would provide more permanent 


By John G Dvorak 

BERKELEY. California — It is an old but firm 
rule: If you are going to buy a personal computer, 
you had better read a Jot of the popular magazines 
beforehand. That is the way it has been since the 
introduction of the microcomputer in 1975 and it 
continues to be so today. 1 do not know of another 
industry where magazines so dominate the market- 
ing scene. 

The computer stores were quick to discover this 
phenomenon. The stores, at first, tried to control 
the fk>w of products with the old-fashioned sales 
pitch. It did not work. You could not convince a 
would-be buyer (whose nand was made up by the 
magazines) to purchase anything he or sbe did not 
already want to purchase. Store owners just hoped 
u> have the product available for them so they 
woo Id not go elsewhere. Now the stores look at the 
magazines to see what is hoi, buy it and wait for the 
pre-sold customer to wander in to purchase iL 

The root cause of all this is the granddaddy of 
the microcomputer specialty magazines, Byte- 
Published by McGraw-Hill, it is available world- 
wide. 

“It's more technical than newcomers can han- 
dle,** admits a former Byte staffer, John Markoff, 
who now tracks the industry for the San Francisco 
Examiner. “But even newcomers to the scene can 
understand the general interest columns and the 
advertisements.” 

At one time, people felt Byte was only read Tor 
the ads. Byte has a Vogue magazine-like allure. 
You just want to flip the pages to see what is 
happening, if you advertise m Byte, you are “in." 

I recommend that newcomers, looking for their 
Erst microcomputer, should immerse themselves 
for at least three months in the best of the Ameri- 
can-produced mayyines. These include general 
interest magazines tike Personal Computing, Pop- 
ular Computing and Creative Computing. You 
should note, though, that the general interest mag- 
azines are suffering a subtle but disconcerting 
decline in popularity as established users move to 
magazines that just talk about their brand of 
computer. These are called machine-specific maga- 
zines. 

Newcomers should look at these, too. The best 
ones can be found in most European railroad 
stations, airports and better bookstores. Some of 
the best examples are PC World and PC Magazine, 
both published for the IBM PC user, Mac World, 
published for the Macintosh user, A+, published 
for the Apple 11 family; Hot CoCo for the TRS-80 


color computer, RUN and Ahoy! for the Commo- 
dore machines. 

And there is Byte Magazine. While Byte is 
written for the advanced user and hobbyist, it is 
still highly recommended for advertisement scan- 
ning and Tor an easy-to-read general interest col- 
umn written by a popular science-fiction author, 
Jerry Poumelle. 

What do some of the professionals wbo are in 
the microcomputer industry read? “We always 
look at England's best computer magazines when 
we’re in England or Europe,” says Ron Brown, 
president of Osborne Computers. “That means 
Personal Computer World. If you can read Ger- 
man. 1 can recommend the slightly technical Micro 
magazine from that country. Other than that, the 
best American magazines are preferred. For gener- 
al news, Computerworld has versions of iu maga- 
zine everywhere. They’re excel lent" 

Mark Kvamme, vice-president at International 
Solutions, agrees. “Ail the CW-Computerworfd 
magazines are excellent in Europe and England, 
but there still are no up- to-lhe- minute micro-ori- 
ented American newsmagazines tike Info World 
over here." be said. He and other executives in the 
business still need to ship over many of the Ameri- 
can publications from home. 

Many executives contract with special compa- 
nies that will accept their U.S. domestic mail and 
remail it to them anywhere in the world for a small 
fee. One such company. International Postal Ser- 
vice of San Francisco will do it for 515 a month 
plus the cost of postage- You simply use their 
address to receive your mail and they' ship out a 
bundle every week by airmail “We also accept 
UPS. Federal Express and drop off packages to be 
remailed,” the owner, Hiroko Thompson, said, 
international Postal Service comes highly recom- 
mended. 

Some parting advice from one who both reads 
and writes for these magazines. If you are a com- 
plete novice, you will pick up one of the magazines 
and read about “20-megabyte hard disks" and you 
will not know what a hard disk is (let alone a 
megabyte). Do not worry about il This is one of 
the few industries where it is required /through 
these crazy magazines) to teach yourself through 
simple osmosis. The confusion miraculously goes 
away after a few months and you become the 
neighborhood computer expert. 

The author writes computer columns for a number 
of publications, including fnfoworld and PC World 


storage (typically 360k each disk) 
and would allow easy copying of 
programs and information from 
one disk to another. 

• Buying a PC. The cost of a 
basic system can be as low as S200, 
using your own television set as a 
monitor. Such systems are fine for 
games and learning computer ba- 
sics and, in fact, a lot of inexpen- 
sive software has been written for 
low-cost computers. At this price, 
however, you must expect limited 
memory, probably 64k and not ex- 
pandable; your monitor will dis- 
play 40 character lines instead of 
the more convenient 80 and opera- 
tion will be relatively slow. 

If you are interested in serious 


home computing, a powerful start- 
er system suitable for most people 
would consist of a PC with 256k 
memory, two disk drives, mono- 
chrome monitor and printer. This 
will cost $2,000 and up. Substitute 
a color monitor if you want to play 
games ($300 extra) or add a modem 
($200 to SS00) if you want to com- 
municate with the outside world. 
Such a system will allow you to use 
most popular software and is versa- 
tile enough to retain your interest. 

• Software options. You get 
your system software with your 
hardware, so the only software you 
have to worry about is application 
software, and you have a wide 
choice, growing wider every day. 


• Helpful hints. Beware of IBM 
"compatibles." This does not mean 
they will run IBM software. Some, 
like AT&T and Compaq, will, but 
Sanyo 550 will not, for example. 
The only w ay to be sure is to try the 
software on your PC or receive an 
assurance from an expert who 
knows. 

Beware of PCs that come with 
free software packages. 

If you buy a PC, start with the 
simpler, inexpensive programs. 

The author is vice president of the 
Los Angeles Times-Washington 
Post Sews Service and director of 
communications of The Washington 
Past. 


WASHINGTON — Personal 
computer users are fortunate in 
having at their disposal a number 
of international networks suitable 
for communication from PC to PC 
and from PC to host computer. 

The Public Telephone Switched 
Network (PSTN) is typically used 
for PC communication at 300 or 
J J200 baud (3*30 or 1,200 words per 
minute). Higher speeds are possi- 
ble, 2.400. 4.800. 9.600 baud, but 
modems are then more expensive 
than the S20G-to-S6Q0 variety de- 
signed for PC use, such as the 
Hayes Smaranodem. 

Packet-switching networks, such 
as Tymnet. Telenet (United States). 
Transpac (France) and IPSS (Brit- 
ain). were designed as interactive 
“database access" services to link 
terminals to database services such 
as Dow Jones. CompuServe, The 
Source (United States) and Daia- 
solve (Britain). These networks 
consist of large numbers of com- 
puters (nodes) all interconnected 
by reliable, high-speed channels. 
Host computers have multiple per- 
manent connections to these net- 
works, now available in more than 
60 countries. 

Some of these networks now also 
permit PC-io-PC communication. 
Tymnet's Async Outbound service 
permits a subscriber in France, for 
example, to access the Transpac 
network and instruct the Tymnet 
network to dial up a connection to 
a PC in the United States. Packet- 
switching charges are based on a 
combination of monthly subscrip- 
tion fee, connect time and charac- 
ters transmitted and received. Av- 
erage charges are a S25 monthly 
subscription. $10 per hour connect 
time and SI2 per 64.000-character 
IrilosegmenL 

Instead of calling an internation- 
al number direct, as would be the 
case with the PSTN, packet-switch- 
ing subscribers make a local call to 
their nearest node, then key in the 
address of the distant subscriber 
they wish to reach. The network 
alerts the node nearest to the called 
party, which then establishes a con- 
nection. either over leased line or 
dial-up via a local PSTN call. 

Tyranets's recently announced 
X.PC service permits PCs to estab- 
lish virtual connections to up to 15 
hosts or PCs. which can be accessed 
one at a time, without the need to 
re-dial the network each time. 

Unlike the PSTN, packet- 
switching networks are “intelli- 
gent." capable of alternate routing, 
speed conversion, error correction, 
flow control, fault signaling and a 
host of other features. One end of a 
packet-switched connection can 
operate at 300 baud, for example, 
while the other operates at 1200 
baud. The network makes the 


speed changes and controls traffic 
flow. Generally, costs for a particu- 
lar transaction are lower on packet 
switching than on the PSTN. 

Circuit-switched Datex L net- 
works. running at 2,400, 4.800 and, 
ultimately. 9,600 baud, can also be 
used for PC communication, but 
are expensive if traffic volume is 
low. 

Any personal computer 
equipped with a modem (MODula- 
tor-DEModolator) and communt- 
ca lions software can communicate 
with another PC or with a host 
computer. In the United States. 
Canada and several other coun- 
tries, the most common PC mo- 
dems, such as the Hayes Smaruno- 
dem. follow Bell standards: Bell 
103 for 300 baud. Bdl 212 for 1.200 
baud. Modem modems are dual 
speed, 300 and 1.200 baud, and 
switch to match the speed of the 
calling modem. Ail are full duplex, 
permitting simultaneous transmis- 
sion in both directions. 

In Europe and most other coun- 
tries, modems follow CCl lT stan- 
dards: V21 for 300 baud, V22 and 
V23 for 1.200 baud. 

Complicating this issue is the 
fact that although Bell modems 
work perfectly well in Europe 
(t housa nds are in daily use), and 
CCHT in the United States, Bell 


modems are not a ppro ved for use 
in Europe and CCITT modems are 
not generally available in the Unit- 
ed States. This is not a problem in 
packet switching but it is a serious 
problem when the PSTN network 
is used, since the modems at each 
end must be compatible. For a 300- 
baud PSTN connection there must 
be either Bell 1 03 modems at each 
end or CCITT V21s at each end. 

Just as modems at both ends of a 
connection must be compatible, so 
must the PC character and code set. 
The common language used by 
host computers and PCs is either 
ASCII code or CCITT code 5. In 
basic alpha numerics, these charac- 
ter sets are compatible and. in both 
cases, a character is made up of a 
combination of 10 “bits" of infor- 
mation. 

PCs, nodes or host computers 
linked directly together by a mo- 
dem connection must operate at 
the same speed, with the same pari- 
ty. before information can be ex- 
changed. 

The Integrated Services Digital 
Network (ISDN), currently in the 
first stages of implementation in 
Europe and the United States, will 
be the communications network of 

the future. 

— DON TILL 


COMIOBUFORS 

JOHN C DVORAK is a journalist specializing in microcomputing. 
He is a regular contributor to several U.S. newspapers and magazines 
and co-author of “Hypergrowtft — The Rise and Fall of Osborne 
Computer Corp.” 

SARAH and PAUL EDWARDS operate a training and consulting 
firm in California and have developed a personal-computer manage- 
ment system. They have co-authored “Working from the Home" 
(Jeremy P. Tarcher. 1985). 

PAUL FRE3BERGER is an editor for Popular Computing maga- 
zine and a columnist for the San Jose Mercury News. He is co-author 
of “The Making erf the Personal Computer" (McGraw Hill). 

BETH KARLIN is a London-based journalist who contributes 
regularly to Electronic Business and other technical publications. 

HANS ex SCHWIMANN. a vice president and partner of Booz- 
Allen & Hamilton, leads the Information Industries and Technologies 
Practice in Europe and is the managing officer for Austria. 

MICHELE S. PRESTON is senior vice president of L.F. Roth- 
schild. Unterberg, Towbin. Sbe has been voted the leading microcom- 
puter industry analyst for the past two years by the Greenwich Survey 
of institutional investors. 

HELENA STURRIDGE is a Loudon-based journalist who con- 
tributes to several microcomputing magazines. She has participated in 
ibe writing of two books on computing. 

DON TILL is vice president of the Los Angeles Times-Washington 
Post New s Service and director of communications at The Washing- 
ton Post. 


-IriiiCssE 


Nixdorf makes a rosy future happen faster 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


voi. High L-BW La* os. 


3 Vnt 1SV 
30040 29* 
1815S 20ft 
uw 40* 
113 tf m 
11148 5ZV 
11877 29* 
10531 39* 

9XA 32 
93W ZI 
7130 34* 
8713 Sift 
4278 27» 


IS* 

20» - ft 
17* -1* 
39* —2 
m —to 
int —fl* 

29* + ft 

39 — * 

35* -ft 
1XV -1* 
32 +9. 

2B» — J* 

5* 

37ft + to 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

utilities 

Industrie's 


Dow Jones Averages 


Indus 130838 131432 120162 1298.16- 1098 
Trans t£ m 46011 64048 A45LB3-1X70 
||*tl 15043 15*04 132.13 1S.16— 041 
Como 53781 348B3 SUM SJ238- 5,90 


NYSE Diaries 


A&mncad 
Declined 
Undtenged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
Now Lews 
Volume up 
V olume down 


doss Prav. 

*35 499 

1163 744 

4Z7 531 

205 1974 

13 14 

79 34 


NYSE Index 


Composite 

IndirtJrleH 

Tnonm 

Illumes 

Finance 


High Close CJrte 

18573 10*62 10449 — MO 
12U7 120.11 1X143 — 1JJ4 
\(£M £J2 10143 - 1-89 
58*4 55* -030 
108ZJ 107.77 KU - UJ 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


BOY SdftI 

Sept. 14 131395 J2MX 

Sept. 13 159401 <39488 

Sept. 12 452.713 *11371 

Sent. 11 1514*5 451450 

Sect, to 158391 446.W9 

’included in me sales figures 




Closing 


VM.at4PJM — 11V3M0V 

RTCT.4PJA.trtH «W» «0 

Prev consoDdsted dau 1540479 


Tables include the nationwide Prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
da not reflect lot* tnxtes elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


AfwnaKf 

Declined 

VTTWOTW 

Total inn 
New Highs 
New Lows 
Volume up 
Volume down 


Standard & Poor's Index 


High low Close arte 

industrials 202.92 5B1M 2 D 2 .« -168 

Trattp. 14645 16345 1£UB -2.» 

UtUlttes 8049 BO-1* «*®— 

Finance 2CJ4 XL£fl 

CoRloasBe 18248 180JB 1810A— 1-52 


NASDAQ Index 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

tfffiffos 

Banks 

Trtmsp. 


Week VMr 
aose CSV* am aoo 
28147 —431 29*50 25199 

33371 — 460 347X3 27431 
24442— 473 27485 21407 
29437—248 30443 257-33 
25608-4.16 273.17 22981 


AMEX Sales 


4 PJUL volume . 

Prev. 4 P4L volume 
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AMEX Most Actives 


vlCortA .1211 M 


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Market Turns Sharply Lower 


The Associated Pms 

NEW YORK — A steep decline in airline 
stocks led the market sharply lower Tuesday, 
pushing the Dow Jones industrial average be- 
low 1,300 for the first time in three months. 

Computer, auto, retail and health-care issues 
also were notable losers. 

Tile Dow Jones average of 30 industrials 
skidded 10.98, to 1.298.16, closing at its lowest 
level since it stood at 1,29738 on June 19. The 
Dow Jones transportation average tumbled 
13.70 to 645.83. 

Declines overall led advances by nearly 3-to- 
1 on the New York Slock Exchange, with 79 
issues selling 52-week lows. The NYSE com- 
posite index fell 0.90 to 104.89. 

Big Board volume swelled to 111.93 million 
shares from 66.70 million on Monday, when 
many traders were absent to observe Rosh Ha- 
shana, the Jewish new year. 

Prices opened mixed but retreated in the 
afternoon when the airlines and other transpor- 
tation stocks began sliding. 

The seiloff in the airline sector came after 
Michael ArmeUino, an analyst with Goldman. 
Sachs & Co„ cut his estimate of the upcoming 
earnings of AMR. Southwest Airlines and Pied- 
mont Aviation. 

Some other brokerage bouses also have re- 
cently downgraded their earnings estimates or 
investment recommendations on airline stocks, 
which were among the market's best -perform- 
ing groups earlier this year. Some of the down- 
ward revisions have included warnings that the 
airlines' strong traffic growth is slowing. 

AMR, the parent of American Airlines, 
dropped 2 to 39**; UAL, which operates United 
Airlines, slumped 34* to 48#; Eastern Airlines 


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Treasury Sale Postponed 

Untied Press International 

WASHINGTON — Citing uncertainty over 
when the federal debt limit will be raised, die 
Treasury Department on Tuesday postponed its 
auctions of four-year notes, seven-year notes 
-and 20-year bonds scheduled for its mini-re- 
funding auction next week. Congress was asked 
last week to raise the debt ceiling to $2,078 
triflion by the end of September. 

The mini -refunding is a smaller version of the 
regular quarterly refunding that pays off matur- 
ing government debt and raises fresh cash. The 
package is expected to amount to nearly 518 
billion when it is finally announced. 

lost % to 914 and Piedmont fell Vi to 29%. 
However. Southwest was unchanged at 24. Tex- 
as Air fell ltt to 15% on the Amex. 

Brokers said the abrupt decline in the trans- 
portation sector quickly revived the bearish 
sentiment that was building in the broader 
market last week, when the Dow Jones indus- 
trials lost 28 points. 

They said that stocks remained under pres- 
sure because of investors' uncertainty about 
whether the economy is improving from its 
weak showing in the first half of this year and, if 
so. whether that means interest rates are headed 
higher. 

The Commerce Department is scheduled to 
release its initial, or “flash.*' estimate of the 
economy’s third-quarter performance on Fri- 
day. a figure that is subject to later revision once 
the quarter is over. 


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Mrs. Fisher, with a Gro&rftih dispenseryou ho iohger^ nm/to 
stand on your head to spray the underside of th* feauiesZ 

GrowPak” from our Emiro-Sprav Systems: .Inc. ' 
subsidiary, is the most innovariyc.arld yc.rs^Htf f 
y technological development-in pressurized packaging 

in 40 years. For our 1984 Annual Report wrire^. >'• * - 
p GrowChemical E u rope, N, V. vQudes traa 1 8 B-2630 
Aartsefaar, Belgium., Depc. G ’-‘v . t • - -; l . . .. 


Awtarip, AJumigrip, Devoe, three of outyrelMcriowri branrfnamesl 


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Young European Executives 
discover Art Patronage 

^ - - % SHERRY BUCHANAN 

■ ’ " ;kp TC _ tool Herald Tnbune 

. l ^^ation F ^ cfoS? cxa ? tive * have the time or 
:. wort But a few are^SSn ° t £? r - lhan lheir 
, intellectual skills to nroa'ISL 8 organizational and 
-firiheir communities. This nelfh^Ji^ 110 aca . vit * cs 11131 hene- 
■-> «ther than do^fh^sSo/^^ ^tive jms pauons, 

• sq^resoujces: lime^ Sffl ° f “* “n^huting other 

suit 5r d y 0 *®! 0, cxccutiv « i 
: basal AsSjciaSonfor^he dm %* °^ e Loadoa - 

- organization grouping l5o mcSS ^ >0n50rsl ^P of the Arts, an 
^ pqmp^nte that sponsor the 

- mts. Mr,Twe^y worked for a 

"■■: « City of London 

before his current position. 

- 4 One of - the younger escecu- 

llWS whn nn> amA.. - , 



”lt isn’t a piece ol 
cake to organize a 
festival,’ said the kp-ad 
of a patronage group. 


\i 


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twes who are getting involved 
in the arts is Tun Bell, group 
executive of the Lowe How- 
ard-Spwlr Campbe?l-£wald 

pipgnma IBMUmZd $£&££, UiaSi'^SonSflS 
raises funds on his own time for the LondS SySSbT 

1 HIIjyPE Toussaint is head of corporate finance and a 
_ member of the executive committee aL Crfidit duNord, one 

S? 10 ! S r4 r | est hanks. A graduate of the prestigious 
.Nauonal School of Admimstration, he was inspector of finances 
atme Finance Mmistry before joining the corporate world. Every 
fall he also organizes a three-weekend September Musical of the 
Ome in Normandy, where he lives. This year’s program was a 
mixture of ja2z, Gregorian chant and Bach. 

There are afl kmds of reasons why, unlike in the United Stales, 
few. executives in Europe show any individual commitment to the 
arts. Jn France, West Germany and the Netherlands* govern- 
meats foot the lion’s share of the arts bill. Until recently, there 
was little incentive for corporations, let alone individual execu- 
tives, to get involved. In Britain, a traditionally suspicious atti- 
hide exists between the aits and business worlds. 

“In the United States, there is a field network of executives 
who are very keen to woiic with arts groups,” said Mr. Tweedy of 
ABS A. “There is a concept of a skills bank you can rely on- But, 
here (in Europe), the arts world felt they didn’t need outside 
help." 

For executives, the main constraint is time. “It isn’t a piece of 
cake to organize a festival,” said Charles Monin of the Paris- 
based Association for the Development of Industrial and Com- 
mercial Patronage, the French association that encourages corpo- 
rate sponsorship of the arts. “Usually when you organize a 
festival, that’s all you do. Or else you have to be a good 
delegator.” 

Or you have to find the time. “My real. problem is lack of time.” 
said Mr. To ussain t. “Life as. an executive is very tiring, it 
. consumes all your energy. So I have to spend all my weekends 
organizing the music festival.” 

For those who have made a serious commitments to the arts, 
individual motivations include making a name for oneself, con- 
tributing to the .life of the.cominimiry or fulfilling a personal 
dream. 

“The festival is like my own small business enterprise, Tm 
alone, l*m responsible for it," said Mr. Toussaint. “1 like the 
creative spirit, and you’ve got to fight to keep that alive. In 
business you're always fighting for money.” 



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U.S. Court 
Upholds 
SCM Ban 

Hanson Loses 
Bid to Lift Stay 

The AiMotjulcU Press 

NEW YORK — A federal ap- 
peals court on Tuesday left m 
place. Tor the time being, a prelimi- 
nary injunction thal prevents Han- 
son Trust PLC from buying any 
more SCM Corp. shares or voting 
the shares iL now holds. 

Barry A Garfinkel a lawyer for 
Hanson, told the 2nd U.S. Circuit 
Conn at Appeals that the injunc- 
tion issued Saturday by the U.S. 
district judge, Shirley Wahl Kram. 
unfairly allows an investor group 
that includes Merrill Lynch & Co. 
and SCM management to proceed 
with its own offer. 

Mr. Garfinkc! urged the court to 
stay the lower court order while it 
reviews the decision. But the ap- 
peals court instead promised thal it 
would hear arguments Friday on 
the validity of the injunction and 
return a decision early next week. 

The lawyer said a new tender 
offer by Hanson remained “an op- 
tion." 

On Monday, (he Merrill Lynch 
investment group began its tender 
offer for SO percent of SOM’s stock 
at 574 a share, or a total of 5740 
million. 

The investor group, called Mer- 
rill Lynch Capital Partners Inc., 
says that a successful tender offer 
would be followed by a merger in 
which SCM’s remaining snares 
would be converted into subordi- 
nated debentures — also valued at 
$74 a share — of the new, private 
company. 

In addition, Merrill Lynch and 
SCM, which produces typewriters, 
food and chemicals, said that they 
agreed to place the assets of SCM’s 
food and pigments businesses into 
an escrow account 

SCM previously granted the 
Merrill Lynch group an option to 
buy those business for 5430 mil- 
lion. Such “lock-up options," as 
they are called, are offered to 
friendly suitors to discourage un- 
friendly ones. 

Judge Kram issued the prelimi- 
nary injunction against Hanson af- 
ter SCM filed suit arguing that the 
British conglomerate illegally 
bought SCM stock after withdraw- 
ing its latest hostile takeover bid. 

Hanson withdrew its tender offer 
last week after the Merrill Lynch 
group offered a higher bid of 574 a 
share which totals $9063 million 
for SCM’s 12.25 million shares. 
Hanson had offered S72 a share, or 
5878 million. 

SCM said Hanson acquired 
about 3.1 million SCM shares, or 
about a 25-percent stake in SCM. 
within three hours of withdrawing 
its offer. 



!!■ AuaaaMdP>* 

Visitors looking at a Porsche on display at the Frankfurt Automobile Show. 

Japan Auto Sales Rising in Europe 

But Firms Think They Must Also Make Large Cars 

By John Tagliabue 

flew York Times Servin' 

FRANKFURT — The Fiats and Renaulis ro- 
tate on turntables, and the Mercedes-Benz limou- 
sines are spotlighted like movie stars. 

But out in hangar-like Hall 10 at the Frankfurt 
Automobile Show, Europe's biggest such show, 

Japan’s cars — made by Honda Motor Co.. Nissan 
Motor Co., Mazda Motor Corp- Mitsubishi Motor 
Co. and others — are lined up as in a used-car lot. 

The Japanese share of the lO-million-car Euro- 
pean market, industry officials say. has doubled in 


five years, to more than 10 percent. But Europe's 
market is stagnant and excess manufacturing ca- 
pacity has spawned fierce price-cutting. 

So the Japanese are finding that the apple they 
bit into in Europe is not as juicy as in the United 
Stares. 

“You can never compare the United States with 
Europe,” said Jurgen Voss, sales director at Hon- 
da’s West German unit. 

Most Japanese can sold in Europe today are 
inexpensive compacts and sub-compacts pur- 
chased by young people as first cars or by older 
Europeans as second cars. Nissan’s Mi era has 


replaced the Cherry as its front-runner. Toyota 
Motor Co. gets the most mileage out of its Corolla 
and Starlet. 

The Japanese feel that if they are to keep broad- 
ening their market share in Europe, they must also 
sell medium-size and large cars. 

"It's now less of a price concept." said Burkhard 
Grefrath. sales manager of Toyota’s West German 
unit, "but a sales idea linking Japan's technological 
prowess with low pricing made possible by im- 
mensely large production volumes." 

At the show, the Japanese have emphasized 
technology, with large blinking signs demonstrat- 
ing new fuel injection or brake systems. The cars 
most in evidence are large, aggressive vehicles 
designed to compete with those of BMW AG, 
Saab-Scunia AB or Volvo AB, rather lhan those of 
Volkswagen AG or West Germany or Fiat SpA of 
Italy. 

Sales of Japanese-made cars continue to grow, 
particularly in Britain and West Germany. In the 
first half die Japanese share of die German market. 

(Continued on Page 17, CoL 6) 


United-Pan Am 
Pact Opposed by 
U.S. Justice Dept. 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The Justice 
Department said Tuesday that it 
opposed UAL Inc.'s proposed ac- 
quisition of Pan American World 
Airways' Pacific routes, saying the 
purchase could "substantially re- 
duce" competition on service be- 
tween the United States and Japan. 

In a brief filed Mowing public 
hearings on the issue, the Justice 
Department urged that any ap- 
proval of the acquisition be made 
conditional on the spinoff to an- 
other carrier of one United-Pan 
.Am route between Tokyo and one 
of three UJS. West Coast gateways: 
Seat de-Portland. Los Angeles or 
San Francisco. 

In addition, it recommended 
that some U.S. takeoff and landing 
rights at Tokyo's Narita Airport 
and the rights to fly from Tokyo to 
other points in the Orient, such as 
Hong Kong, be divested if neces- 
sary to preserve competition. 

The finding was relayed to the 
Transportation Department late 
Monday and made public by the 
antitrust division Tuesday. It was 
not clear Tuesday whether the Jus- 
tice Department would formally 
intervene to block the accord if the 
Transportation Department did 
not heed its recommendations. 

The opposition came as a sur- 
prise to Doth the airlines and indus- 
try observers. It had been widely 
reported, following the announce- 
ment last April of Pan Am’s agree- 
ment to sell its Pacific operation to 
UAL for $750 million, that the 
transaction would be approved by 
the main arbiters, the U.S. Trans- 
portation Department and Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan. 

On the New York Stock Ex- 
change, UAL shares fell $3,375 to 
close at $49,125, and Pan Am 


shares dropped 50 cents, to S725. 

The Transportation Department 
is not required to rule on the trans- 
action before Oct. 24, and the pres- 
ident is not required to act until 60 
days after that. 

Pan Am and UAL rank as the 
third and fourth largest carriers re- 
spectively in the highly concentrat- 
ed airline market between the Unit- 
ed States and Tokyo. 

The deputy assistant attorney 
general Charles Rule, expressed 
concern that the sale by Pan Am 
would transform UAL from a “dis- 
ruptive price-cutter" to a major 
player with the ability to m axi m ize 
profits by cooperating with the In- 
lenutional Air Transport Associa- 
tion's efforts to fix fares and re- 
strict output. 

The department said it found the 
increased concentration on flights 
to Tokyo to be especially troubling 
because entry by new ’carriers is 
severely limited by a UJS.- Japanese 
bilateral agreement and a scarcity 
of slots at Narita. 

In urging the route spinoff, the 
department said it would be best to 
require UAL and Pan Am to sell 
one of those routes to the highest 
bidder. 

It remained undear Tuesday 
how an adverse Transportation De- 
portment ruling would affect UAL. 
The airline has sought speedy ex- 
pansion this year and is already the 
country's biggest carrier. 

Shortly after announcing the ac- 
cord with Pan Am. it announced an 
ambitious restructuring of its pen- 
sion fund assets and later bought. 
RCA Corp.'s Hertz rental car unit 

But some in the business suggest- 
ed earlier this year that UAL might 
be placing the wrong bet, putting iL 
in danger of being overtaken oy 
American Airlines. 


Despite Emotional Screen, Brazil May Ease Computer Stand 


By Alan Riding 

AVxi York Times Sente 

RIO DE JANEIRO — A couple 
of lines in President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s recent trade speech, threaten- 
ing to retaliate against protection- 
ism in Brazil's computer industry, 
set off immediate nationalist pro-, 
tests here. ..... 

Newspaper editorials denounced 
meddling in Brazil’s internal af- 
fairs, while some politicians 
claimed an economic war had been 
declared. Yet behind this emotion- 
al screen, Brazil's traditional prag- 
matism is stirring. 

Aware of the risks of a trade war' 
with the United States, President 
Josfc Sarney has ordered that the 
dispute be negotiated at a technical 


level. The entire issue remains po- 
litically delicate, however, because 
Brazil’s bid for computer indepen- 
dence has acquired the aura of na- 
tional security. 

When Brazil’s Congress drew up 
the legislation last October, sup- 
porters of the free market were 
smothered. The new taw allowed 
foreign companies to make or sell 
imported mainframe computers, 
but it excluded them from the pro- 
duction of ramicompuiers and mi- 
crocomputers. the fastest growing 
sector of the $1 .6-billion domestic 
market. 

U.S. officials protested to no 
avail. Finally, on Sept. 7, along 
with cases involving Japan. South 
Korea and the European Commu- 


nity. Mr. Reagan ordered an inves- 
tigation to determine whether Bra- 
zil’s law involved unfair trade 
practices. 

He noted that Brazil had not 
only restricted U.S. products, but 
had also "squeezed out” some U.S. 
computer firms,” an apparent ref- 
erence to restrictions on Texas In- 
struments. Hewlett-Packard, Digi- 
tal Equipment and Motorola. 

Brazil’s Foreign Ministry says ir 
is ready to discuss the problem, and 
expressed the hope that Washing- 
ton would bear in mind the broader 
interests of the bilateral relation- 
ship. 

The Foreign Ministry also began 


preparing Brazil's defense, expect- 
ed to include the arguments that 
protection of the new computer in- 
dustry does not violate the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, 
and that import restrictions in this 
and other areas are necessary to 
release funds needed to cover inter- 
est on the country's $103 billion 
foreign debL 

Brazil enjoyed a $5.4-biUion fa- 
vorable trade balance with the 
United States last year, and some 
Brazilian officials argued privately 
that a flexible response is in the 
country’s interest. They noted that 
on specialized steel last year, and 
on shoes just last month, Mr. Rea- 
gan did not impose quotas or spe- 


cial tariffs on imports from Brazil, 

In just six years, Brazil's “infor- 
matics" industry as it is called here 
— some 200 companies with 1 8,000 
employees — has increased its 
share of an expanding market from 
22 percent to 5 1 percent, while such 
American giants as International 
Business Machines Corp. and Bur- 
roughs Corp. have been res train ed. 

Many Brazilian executives have 
argued that, with a captive market, 
Brazilian companies have concen- 
trated on making expensive copies 
of such products as the Apple H 
and IBM Personal Computers. 
This means they have acquired lit- 
tle independent technological ca- 
pability. 


Amsterdam 
MMIWB) 

Frankfurt 
Lawton !W 
Mian 

New rorkfc) 

Parts 
Tamm 
Zurich 
i ecu 
i son 

CfofirtBa In London ant! Zurich. 1 t*UW in outer Eowean centers. New York rata at 4 FjH 

(a) Commer&ri franc <b) Amount* needed to buv one Bound (Cl Amounts necdiKi to bur one 

donor Cl Units of HXHxJ UnltxatlMO(r) UtdtsafHUK//Arnafeuoted/MA:no/mitilltMe 
t«; To bur one pound: SIXS.U35 


Phibro-Salomon Offers Options on Oil 


Other Dollar 

Currency oar U-SJ 
Araan. austral OiK 
Austral. S lAb5 
Asstr.KblL BUS 
BeJ p-fto.tr. ’ SMO 
BraxOcraa. 7,45500 
Canadian * UTS 
Danhli krone 10 O 
BvrM. pound IJt 


Values 

Currency per UU 
Fla markka tMi 
Greek drac. 13VJ30 
Heap Korns 7jms 
Indian rupee 1UI53 
indo. rupiah I.UQjOO 
Irlih c 0.W76 
Israeli ihefc. 1.4S1J3 
Kowottf amor 0J0S3 


Currency per U.Sj$ 
Malay, rina MBS 
Me*, peso 37100 
Nerw. krone 144 
PUL pen 1X41 
Port, escudo 17150 
Saudi rtyal 15512 
Slna-S 2.1T5S 
S_ Afr.rood Z40M 


Currency per 
S.KBT.WOB 
Spaa. Peseta 
Swod. krona 
Taiwan S 
Thai hold 
Turkish lira 
UAE tOrtmin 

Veaekhonv. 


UA* 

RZ4Q 

172.11 

2475 

4035 

27205 

554OT 

3A72S 

14J5 


Benelux (Brussels): Banco Commerdale ttaBano (Milan); Band UP Akp 
S^de^X/n^jT^nk of Tokyo (Tokyo); imf (SDR); bah (dinar, riyoi, tfWtom/. 
Other data from Reuters and AF. 




Interest Rales 


Em arnmfgy 


Dollar 

anrJBW 


1 month 

2 months 

3 months flhrO W 

' 4 months BMW 
I 


D-Mark 

4H-4W 

4**-4V» 

4SM^ 

4hr4k* 


Sept, ir 

Sterling Franc ECU SDR 
9Mr9*0 OMK 

nw» 

i ivy. use 9 m-io*w BiirBK iu. 

11%-nvs lOto-iw. 


Swtss 

Franc 

4WH 


BMW llhrll* II *-11 "W 

* foot 4 * r V SF twA FFl; Lloyds Bank (ECWi Heaters 

Sources: Morgan of SI million mtntmarr, (or euotvotoU). 

(SDR). Rates twpucable to f ntenank 

ifcey Money V 

Ol 


Dftcomt Rate 


Prime Rate 
Broker Loan Role 

Cam POPerWOT dors 

Manat Treasure B1IM 
Unatoti Treasury Bills 

cbhM-Sf days 
CM days 

WU-Oenoan t 
LoaiOardRaK 
OeorUgM Rate 


tanomfi Interbank 

France 


Jeaaow lo tekoak 


CoB Money 
M-day Traasarv BW 
XoMfetewriwik 


Close Pre*- 

Tb 7Vj 

Vi 

9W w» 

B«r4 BVj-9 

7.90 7.90 

7.11 7.16 

728 727 

1/B 7X0 

7J0 7-tf 


SJ0 550 

445 

4J»5 4J0 

4.70 tJO 

475 *75 


9«* «•> 

9IO ’ft 

97/14 
9V* f* 

99/14 9 9 fit 


llVi I'" 

roe u 

JUS It’* 

ii ||/M 113/1* 



Sources : ReuUn. 
LyVnoaK Bor* 0/ r< * va 


Asian Doltar Deposits 

SepL 17 


i month 
3 months 

3 months 

4 months 
tveor 
Source: Reuters. 


Bh-BK. 
8* -8*. 
8U.-BW 
8 *»- 8 V« 
8WW-BM. 


UJS- Mwwy Market Vnn4s 

SfjM~ )T 

Merritt Lynch Asnto 
30 da* avarope yield. ».is 

Teierata interest Rate index: TSI 

Source: Merritt Lead* Telerate. 



By Bob Hagcrty 

International Hernia Tribune 

LONDON — Just as fears of an 
oil-price war are mounting, Phibro- 
Salomon Inc is offering a new 
form of insurance against sharp 
movements in the oil market. 

Two Phibro units, Salomon 
Brothers International Ltd. and 
Phibro-Energy Inc., announced 
Tuesday an offering of options, or 
“warrants," giving buyers the right 
to buy or sell crude oD at a future 
date and at a set price Phibro- 
Energy is one of the world’s biggest 
oil traders, and Salomon Brothers 
International is the London unit of 
Salomon Brothers Inc, the New 
York investment banking firm. 

The offer came four days after 
Saudi Arabia confirmed reports 
that it plans to increase its oil soles 
by offering certain major custom- 
ers prices below those officially ap- 
proved by the Organization of Pe- 
troleum Exporting Countries. That 
move is widely .expected to add 
considerably to downward pres- 
sure on the oil market. 

Charles McVeigh, managing, di- 
rector of Salomon Brothers Inter- 
national, predicted that the options 
would appeal to oil producers and 
refiners, banks thal lend to the oil 
industry, investors with large hold- 
ings of oil-related securities, and 
industrial companies thal are big 
users of oil-based materials. 

Some potential users expressed 
skepticism, however. “1 can’t see us 
being interested in it," said Alun 
Michael, a vice president involved 
in energy lending at First Chicago 
LtcL, a London unit of First Chica- 
go Corp. 

Phibro officials conceded that 
the idea would have to be explained 
carefully to an industry unaccus- 
tomed to options trading, “I think 
it will take people a while to digest 
just what we’re proposing,” said 


Andy Hall, an executive vice presi- 
dent at Phi b no- Energy. 

But even before the offering, he 
said, some small to midsized banks 
had asked Phibro about the possi- 
bility of arranging such options. 
Mr. Hall said many banks that 
have lent heavDy to oil-related 
companies are worried about the 
possibility of oil prices falling from 
the current range of between about 
$25 and $28 to well below $20. 

“At thai level a lot of small, inde- 
pendent oil producers are just not 
viable." he said. 

The New York Mercantile Ex- 
change, which has heavy trading 
volume in oil -futures contracts, 
also sees strong potential in oil op- 
I Marks, chairman of 


rations of a sharp drop in the spot 
market. 

The options will be sold outside 
the United States, and Salomon 
Brothers will be the only firm mak- 
ing a market in them. Holders will 
have the choice of settling the 
transaction either in oil or dollars. 

Mr. Hall said Phibro could 
hedge its own risk in selling the 
options by offsetting them against 
Phibro- Energy’s position in the 
physical oil market. 


lions. Michael 


the Nymex, said it expects to intro- 
duce options on its ou futures next 
year. 

Futures are obligations to buy or 
sdl the underlying product at a 
certain level during a set period. 
Options, by contrast, provide the 
right — but not the obligation — to 
buy or sell. At worst, the buyer of 
an option stands to lose the amount 
paid for the option; if exercising 
the option would be unprofitable, 
the owner merely throws it away. 

Phibro-Salomon is offering a to- 
tal of 32,000 options to buy or sell 
1,000 barrels of West Texas Inter- 
mediate crude, some exercisable 
next May and some in November 
1986. For instance, it is offering for 
$1.28 a band an option to buy the 
crude at $28 a barrel on May 13, 
1986. Another option, costing 
$1.42 a barrel, gives the right to sell 
the crude at $23 on the same date. 

On the spot market. West Texas 
Intermediate for immediate deliv- 
ery currently is trading at around 
$28. but the price of a futures con- 
tract on such oil for delivery next 
May is about $25, reflecting ex pec- 


IfS 


hflutton 


MANAGED CURRENCIES 
PROGRAM 

PBIFORMANCE RESULT 
FOR BEGINNING EQUITY OF 



AFTBl AIL COMMISSIONS 


NEXT U5UI N OOOGBt 15* 6Sl£ 
■MBS & NO MANAGEMENT FEE. 
RkST PBJORMANCE IS 
NO GUARANTEE 
OF FUTURE PBIFORMANCE 


PlneoarOaa 

OBnior EMofan 

A. Vita fVesdml 

H ^ hitton 


43.1 

75110 PAHS - FRANCE 
Tab 72341-51 
Tetec 630975. 

FOB NON fflSVCH EESJDSVT5 C*&V 


Hona trows 


Sefi.tr 
pm. crae 

JIBJ0 — 8X5 

- 

31930 +036 

suns -xw 

31740 — '■» 

_ 31640 -** 

■jfyf Yort 

p-fl s oner London efflcteS to- 
l and Zurich opening ond 
it WS; York Cemex cwrenf 

Source : Reuters- 


AM 
31940 

**** 318.70 

lockMh 
Mew York 




Markets Closed , (or 

MarixLs were closed Tuesday < n lfl(iia 80 


WORLD-WIDE SERVICE BY 

Jet Aviation - the international leading organization for business aviation with 
a charter fleet of 46 aircraft and world- wide eleven maintenance bases offers you 
complete aircraft management, purchase, sales financing, insurance, 
operation, crews, refurbishment, completion, maintenance and handling 
service of professional perfection. 


Our Alr-lbxi service is available to you around-the-dock; 

1 Mitsubishi 2-4 Citation if - 3 Learjet 35-1 Laarjet 36 - 

0 Falcon 1O.-0 Falcon 20-7 Falcon 50-1 Jetstar H — 7 Gutfstream 11/111 - 

1 DC-9 - 1 Boeing 737 - 5 Boeing 727 - 2 Boeing 707 - 1 DC-8/72 



Aisijgrfo/v 


Basal, Dunaidorf. Geneva. Kassel, Munich. Zurich Europe: 

Jeddah. Riyadh MJddte East: 

Bokton. MA, Momstown, NJ^ West Palm Beach. Fl. North America: 


Zurich (1) 81*20 02 TU. 59820 
Siyadh (1} 2201888 Tlx205 5S1 
Boston (817)2740030 TW.961 195 


Does ^ Your Bank or 
Broker Charge $110 for 
1,000 Shares of IBM? 

Andrew Peek Does. 


A SAMPLE OF OUR VERY LOW COMMISSION RATES 

500 shares of any price stock $ SO 

1.000 sharca 110 

5.000 shares 300 

. 1 0,000 shares 450 

20 options (5 1/2 53 

50 options <g>3 180 

If you live in Europe or the UK. and you make your own investment 
decisions, Andrew Peck Associates will charge you much less in 
commission when you trade or invest in U.S. securities’ markets. 

Our London office gives you the convenience of a U.S. discount 
broker to contact during your business day. Your calls are answered 
promptly and executed orders are reporred immediately. And you 
can make payments and deliveries to your account without sending* 
securities or funds to the United States. 

Accurate record keeping and custodial services are provided by 
Securities Settlement Corporation, one of The Travelers Companies. 
The Travelers is the third largest publicly owned insurance company 
in the U.S.. and every account is protected for up to 10 million dollars. 

Our London office is ready to receive your inquiries. Please call 
us or return the coupon to receive our free brochure “SIMPLIFIE D 
TRADING." We look forward to hearing from you. 


ANDREW FECK/TO 

ASSOCIATES, INC. ' 

JV Bedford Square. London WCIB 3E(*. En&hmd (01 1 5SU-KW6 Telex; 88JJJ.30 (MCLE1S G) 
.12 Broadway. New York. N.Y. 10UO4 (212) 3AAJ770 Telex: 42VOV7 (ST(X'KS) 
Licensed deuler in securities. 

□ Please send me vour SIMPLIFIED TRADING brochure. 


Name. 


Address. 


Country. 


DHT-8 


I 


immmmmmmm* 


MEMBERS NASI). K11H M A 







] 


I 


Page 14 


.mtitptsjaTIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 


Tuesdays 


NVSE 


Closing 


Tables Include the nollonwlde prices 

up to the dosing on Wall Straw 

and do not reflect late trades wsewwre. 

Via The Associated Press 


•is n u 


10 h 


(Continued from Page 12) 

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28% 18% RuOtnds 
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20% 15% RwsToa 
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111 S S 3gb% — 

42 io 13». .ft. ■ 4?: 


It 47+ 67+.4J+ 


» TMhXTRA 44 2X » .,« «*'■» ■ 

30% Zoiegy ‘ ;AJl *** % ‘ 

ZT* 


7+Zopota .S'TX"g 
n* Xoyres • 46 .IX- W 


57* M+ ^tnes. 


77 - 77% 

21*- IS* Zeros 
37% 22% Zunda 


3KT -X* *JW- ■■ jE+T.-W -I- : - 

r „ 20S : “S%- is* v* -wi ' : 




USl Futures 


Season Season 
High Law 


Open High 

73.15 55X8 Aug 6RX5 61X0 

Est.Sa+s 4X97 Pnev.Sates 2X05 
Prev.Oay Open Ink 6,905 oftii3 


.'Seann-Smon' 
Htah - Low- 


6147 


SrpL l> 


Food 


Open Htfi Low. jCtess -V. 

%%. ; t? as ::W -itw ;,BM2 ^ : ; 

76* SMB ;?«■ T- - . : W ^ / 

, r '■ 7 * 4 : w-: ' -• 


'Jun 


Season Season 
High Low 


High Low Close Cha. 


Grains 


5X00 bu minimum- itollars per bt+J+l 

37SW 244+ Ml 

3X3+ 2JW: Dec 2.93 2X8 

3J4+ 2X7 Mof Ml ^ 

f m 2J4 MOV 3X0% 1M 

s* is ass 

Pre%DovOpen im.'Skin oHIW 
CORN tCBTl 


2X1 2X2 +X1+ 

2X2% 239* WO 
IMPA 3X2% +XT+ 
Sm M1++X0M. 
281 2X2* — X0* 

2X4% 2X5 


COFFEE Ct NY CSCE) 
37X00 Rsr cents per lb. 
15DJ0 127* 

15040 129X5 

149X5 I28XD 
148X0 131X0 

148X0 nsw 
147XO 13275 

138X0 08X0 

Eat. Soles 


!ta> 135.15 136X0 134X5 13M0 +1^ 
iw rann 138X9 137X0 . 138X4 +2X8 
N& 09X0 140X0 laws 1«X6 +2X9 
May 13940 140X5 139 JO 140.95 +1X5 
Art 140.10 141X0 148,10 J41X8 J -’’” 

Sen 


i^WinWtn.iitiviWlCBpgr^bi^^^ ^ ^ 


121 + 

2.95 

3-10 

121 % 

2X6 

2X6+ 

2J1 

Est. Sales 


2X0+ 

214+ 

2X4+ 

2X1 

2X3 

224% 

2X0% 


jnk Vn“ 220* 2X2% +X0% 
S£ 2X2 233% 2J1_ 


Ntav %M iSfjg 


fiH, 15% 15+ la^ 15% -M 

SS ^ *** 230 

Prev.Soln 31571 
KSomiJSm ofMJTS 


-an 


7X 8 
7.1 10 


1X4 

6X0 

-52 

1XB 

J2 


1X2 

1X2 


814 12* U* TJ*— & 

74 7 433 16* 16+ 16* + + 

7 A 8 1371 78* 77* 70* + * 

1J 11 59 27+ 26* 26+ .. 

84 B 1349 22* 22+ 22% — 
4X322 76 14 12* J2*— 1+ 

107 19* 19 1»+ + + 

19 9 2385 49 48+ 48*— + 

4J 13 230 33_ 32* 33. 


■“^FWrflb hb Ills il 


*X1 
640 
679 
7J2 
7.79 
6J» 

6X4 
6X8 
6X2 
Est. Sales 


5X0+ 

5X1+ 

111 

522+ 

5X1% 

5X6% 

5X5+ 

5X2 

5X8 


sso% +Xflt 
555+ +X5 


£B 

BKIFBLb 

N«w SHta 542 538 542 

Prev.Soles 23X85 
Pnw^Dtrv Open lnt. 63.13B UP 143 
SOYBEAN MEAL CCBT) 

100 Ions- dolloxs Per )w WJ# 129 ^ Ul.M 


-KBS 

+X2+ 

+X3+ 


DVC 

r -f , Prev.Soles 831 

Prev.DayOaenhdL 10270, OTT313 
SUGARWORLD 11 CNYCSCan 
I iixoc r&^cenf* per nx 

9X5 274 Oct 536 547 

7 7s 3jn Jan 558 5J3 

fa 334 Star 596 518 

7.15 S May 512 5M 

6J9 179 Jul 4X1 0A2 

bJJi 4X4 Sep 445 5*5 

6X5 « W iH « 

Jan 7X5 7X5 

EstScies Prev-SQiw K7» 

Prtv. Dav Onen WL 91977 off 1422 
COCOA (NY CSCE) 

10 metric fang-Soer lea 
2337 1945 Dec 

2295 7955 MW 

2315 TWO May 

2340 I960 Juf 

2TM . aa- fp- ;■ ■• M(1 

23S5 ‘ 2055- DS C, ;2» 5 JOOi 
Eat Sale* 2J62 PtW+SWoe 850 
P¥w. Day Open lot, 19,197 up 18 

ORANGE JUKE (NYC*) 

15X00 lbs.- cents perltv 
1B2XO U0JS 


+2X3 ; 
14563 +2X5 
141X0 4530 . 


— X5 


527 

544 

5X3 

598 

5X0 


SJS 

7X0 


521 

545 

5X7 

583 

521 

543 


-1.10 
— .W 


—JO 
— >11 


75-17 58-25.. 

9?E.S— - 

.Prev, Day Oneh Uiti OK u»l 
. cert, donmitcwam) 

1 nmHMon-PtsofltOpct ■ 

9278 , B5X0: Sep ,«J8 
"9237 •’ 85X4, Dec 9U* 

9175 : 8556 Mar: 9U7 
9140 ' 1 8543 . Jun . 90-97 

.JEm-XEUrn--. 

PrevToSopenlnt. .77X3. 

EtmoooujuaaMO '• - • . : ' .‘.V 




•230 12X5- .92X5' 

. 91X2;. 9U0 "SKS 

nx7Yi5J9i^ 

. 9097 9597 -9100 < 
,i. : .■ 90X9 

l .. . 


-.j 


■v 


»: c ' 




■a <: 






W..:.-^ rX =\ 




&V-;. 

lieP t> s M- - 

r ' - 


WlVip^".'- 

£,c*r ,: -- ' 



meAlfifJ 

l^sachu 




wte rX5PCL" 

BS a "scs-s-^s- 




■91X7 

nm 


9E4»;- -r3S _ 


594 -J4 


-9053 


90X4 


87J4 -. Mor 99X 


|fjau»35.,|937 . _ . 
U- Jim 8957 - »J7 1847 .0 »4f 
Est Sales ^SfWnncSgSMm;.''. J: 


zu» 

2233 

X257 

2275 


7l» 

2247 

2372 


2M7 

3236 

2251' 

2375 


2295 


aa< ,-«■ 

2245 +14 

.2272 .. +» 
2290 IJ+W 

M- P° 

2308 * +21 


P^D^op«iinU3K40r jan» ; y ■ . j ■ .. .. ■- . •. 

: V -v-*' --'■-V 


•RITliH PMiTOOMM*- 


—145 


fffgerce 
Upprcrfs^fjc 
ecsfc^r^r: 
gjjgl?Si‘C*S 

tears 2^* V s- 

•ar-’S*-' 

toiler .nforr 
OSerEroc--' 

jjagsnsnt W- 

Qaon:Sr- , ' ii '^ 


Prwr. Day Open Int 37X36 apXB.- 


181 xa 
tooxo 

177X0 

16250 

157X0 


12740 

1X3X0 

moo 

12275 

12250 


Sop U7X0 137X0 13500 13455 —HAS 

Nov 133X8 13350-13110 1B4S — 3S 

7SH mm auo wxo mw 

Mar 127X5 12730 T2U0 06^ 

May T2&iD 

T 124X0 


J19J 


JW 


—75 
— X5 
— XO 


+ * 


raj it* Staley X0 1? 22 » » »« ?SS~ ^ 


m IwS K. san» »v. it* i«_ 

iliuk ii SIMOtT 32 23 t2 IlBr *■■■ ■■ ,|T- — 

»* 39* K *» • =£ 

23% 9* 5IPOCCS Jl « { “{ 

16* 12+ SltmdeK ^2 4X 9 119 

31* 23* StanWk IX* IT '• W 

35* 26* Storrott !■“ 9 -n 

11+ 9* StaMSe g 

n 4X 10 M 


179X01 
180X0 ] 
1B4X0 
163X0 
20550 
1*2X0 
1167X0 
14400 

litfxaH 
Est Sales 


+1XD 


3+ 2* Shwao 

15+ Sterctil 


44+ <3% 44% — % 
17 16* 17 + % 

12 * 12 + 12 * + % 
28% 27* 28+ — + 
32* 32* 32*— % 
ID* 10* 10* 

3* 3+ 3+ 

19+ 19 19 


— + 


21.90 

2125 

21X5 

21-45 

21X5 

2I.9S 


22X4 

21X5 

2149 

21X5 

21X0 

ZL2D 


2175 

21.18 

21.12 

2U0 

21X0 

21X5 


21X4 

21X5 

21X1 

2148 

21X3 

2212 



London 

Commodities 


Commodities 


Dec 

Mar 

May 

Aim 

OW 


1735 1745 
1.783 1784 
1X04 1X85 
1J1B 1X20 
1X25 1X30 
1X26 1X31 
1X25 1X40 


SrpL IT 

Close Previous 
High Low BM Ask Bid Ask 

5UGAR 

Sterling per metric ton 
Oct 14340 138X0 136X0 J37J0 lflXO 143X0 
14840 144X0 145X0 14540 14770 148X0 
15940 15460 154X0 155X0 15770 157 JO 
16270 159 JO 157X0 15840 160x0 16080 
N.T. N.T. 16400 164J0 165X0 16*00 
N.T. N.T. 169X0 170X0 17270 173X0 
Volume ; 2458 lots of 50 ions. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric Ion 
Sen 1745 1.740 1740 1749 

Dec 1789 1773 1.785 1787 
MOT 1X14 1.799 1X12 1X13 

May 1X27 1X17 IXZ7 UHH 

Try 1X35 1X30 1X32 1X36 

Sea 1X41 1X34 1X41 1X43 

Dec 1X45 1X35 1X39 1X43 

Volume: 3.9Z7 lots of 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per me Irk: Ion 
Sep 1X58 1X35 1X55 1X60 1x25 1X30 

»Ev 1.702 IMS 1700 1.7D2 1X*0 1X65 

j£T 1749 1X95 1745 1.750 1X96 1X98 

Mar 1.775 1.732 1775 17B0 1725 1.73S 

May 1X00 1.770 1X00 ]WS J764 1.770 

Jly 1X13 1788 1X15 1X25 17SB 1^0 

Sw NT. N.T. 1X1S 1X50 1X10 1X20 

volume: 2X60 lots of 5 Ians. 

GASOIL _ . 

UX. dollars per metnc ion 
OCl 24450 24150 244.25 24450 MS 24250 
23V JO 23800 23950 23975 23750 23775 
23600 23475 23*00 23*75 234M 

23400 230 50 23375 23400 23200 23225 
mSO 22975 22950 23050 22900 22950 
22100 22100 22200 22500 22000 22100 
21500 21150 21+75 21500 21 ITS 21700 
NX N.T. 21000 21*50 21000 21400 
N.T. N.T. 21950 22000 21800 21175 
Volume: 1x19 lots o! 100 Ions. 

Source's: Reuters am) London Petroleum Ex- 
Chatrsm (gasoill. 


High 

Sep _ NT. 
Oct — N.T. 

Nov _ N.T. 

Dec _ N.T. 
Feb _ N.T. 
API — N.T. 


SepL 17 

HONG-KOMG GOLD FUTURES 
UXJ per ounce , 

Close Previous 
Law Bid Ask Bid Art 
N.T. 31800 32000 31800 3JO0O 
N.T. 31900 32100 319.00 32100 
N.T. 32200 32400 32100 32300 
N.T. 33400 32*00 32300 3S0O 
N.T. 32800 330.00 32700 3K0O 

.., N.T. 332.08 33400 33200 1)400 

Jun _ 33800 33800 33700 339.00 33700 33900 
Aug _ 340.00 34000 34200 344.00 34200 34400 
Volume: U lata oi 100 oz. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Ma+vsian con* PCr kilo 
Close 

BM Ask 

Oct 18200 16350 

Nov 18150 18100 

Dec 1B250 18150 

Jan 184J» 18500 

Feb 16500 1 8700 

Mar 18700 18900 


volume: 5 lots. 


Previous 
Bid Ask 
1B250 16350 

18275 1B350 

18250 1B350 

18400 18500 

18500 167.80 

18700 18900 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
SlBuapara coo* per kilo 
Close 


RSS 1 Oct _ 
RSS1 Nov _ 
RSS 2 Od — 
RSS 3 Od _ 
RSS 4 OCt — 
RSS 5 Oct_ 


Bid 

1*475 

16475 

•351.58 

14950 

14550 

14050 


Ask 

16525 

1*4.75 

15250 

15050 

14750 

14250 


Bid 

1*625 

1*550 

15250 

15050 

14650 

14150 


Ask 

1*675 

1*600 

15350 

15150 

1*850 

14350 


NO* 

Dec 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apl 

MOV 

Jon 


'Now offering 

CBOT 

BOND 

FUTU RES 

bw & mms 

futures 

OPTIONS 

Also Futures and 
Futures Options on 
COMJEX-GOLD & SILVER 
imm-currencies 

Lrr C ii — tm i— Ibm 


15 


ROUND TURN 
HAY AND 
CAXRN1GHT 


’Api >lxt ti*h‘ m trades 

i xceedtne i5n amtmcls per 

ftwJW 

(ortmoctf round tom 


Call «mc of our pnifwinnaK 

212-221-7138 

Telex: 2T7II6S 


BEPUBUG CLEABING 
C0BP0BAT10H 

45 iBSkA««.«.NT»“' 

taAEtarof 

BapeUk PTOieuI Bu* olMewlN* 

* m Wllnm I jjiwnmul Bant 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 


Nov . 

Dec . 


Jon . 
Feb . 
Mar 


Jly 

Sup 

Volume: Olotsaf 25 tans. 
Sowca; Reuters- 


Close 

Previous 

BM 

Ask 

Bid 

ASk 

710 

750 

710 

750 

720 

760 

720 

7<0 

720 

760 

720 

760 

705 

755 

705 

750 

700 

750 

700 

750 

700 

750 

700 

750 

090 

740 

690 

740 

690 

740 

670 

740 

tao 

730 

New 

— 


Ijondoii Metals 


SepL /; 
Previous 
Bid Ask 


Commwlities 


SrpL I 

Close 
BM Ask 


Ch'ge 


High Low 

SUGAR ^ 

French francs per mehlc ran 
Dec 1X61 1X50 

Mar 1X90 1X55 1X72 

May 1X20 1595 1X10 

Aug 1X55 1X43 1X50 

Oct 1715 1.700 1.710 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1750 .. . ^ , 

Est vol.: 1X3° lots ol 50 Ians. Prev. actual 
sales: 2787 Mis. Open Interest : 175*7 


1X50 

1X73 

1X13 

1X55 

1.720 

1.770 


— 29 

— 30 

— 28 

— IB 

— 28 
— 25 


COCOA 1<w> 

French francs per 108 kg 
Sep 2,130 7.130 2,105 

Kc 2085 2079 ?JW5 

Mar 1105 2.100 7.100 

MOV N.T. N.T. 2.110 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2.115 

Sep N.T. N.T. 2.120 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1120 


2,130 Undv 
7089 — 1 

1110 —5 

— Unch. 

- -5 

— —5 

_ _io 


Est. vol.: 21 lots el 10 Ians. Prev actual 
sain: 21 lots. Open Inleresl : 702 


COFFEE 

French francs per 10* kg 

N.T. N.T. 1X30 

1,915 1.905 1.900 

N.T. N.T. 1.935 

N.T. N.T 1.975 

N.T. N.T. 2010 

N.T. N.T. 2027 

N.T. N.T. 2JD7 


Sap 

Nov 

Jan 

Mar 

Moy 

Jly 

Sep 

Est. vol, 


— Unch. 
1,915 +17 

1X75 + 10 

2X20 unch. 
— Unch. 
— +3 

+ 11 


7 iota of 5 Ions. Prev. actual soles: 

30 lots. Open Inleresl : 329 
Source: Bourse Hu Commerce. 


Commodity and Unit 
Coffee 4 San loi lb. 


Primciotti 64/30 38 +. yd .— 

Steel billets (Pllt.l. ion 

iron 2 Fdrv. Philo- iwj - — 
Steel scrap No 1 hvv Pin. - 

Lead Spirt, lb — 

Cower elect, lb 


Tin \5lralts). (b . 


SepL IT 

Year 
Ago 
1X5 
076 
473X8 
21300 
8+87 
24-28 
64-67 
6.1729 


Zinc. E. Sf.L. Basis, lb. 

Palladium, oz 

Silver N.Y. oz 

Source: AP. 


Tue 

1X3 

0J1 

473X0 

21108 

77-7B 

18-28 

68X9 

6X869 

0X1 

99-182 

I960 


£ 81 91 31 U a 

ULJU „ P»S Solos 12X74 
prev. Dav Open irtf. *5X13 up 279 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

60000 lbs-C«rtl«ws perlOO Ita 
31.10 21X5 Sep •' 

3037 20X4 OCt 

29X5 2030 Dec 

2907 2100 Jpn 

TO M 21X5 Mor 

27X5 21X5 MOV 

2SXS 2175 Jul 

25.15 2205 A« 

2405 2125 SeP 

eSSw £" 

Prev. Day Open Int. 55073 ofl»6 

Srota^Wr^iWyngrbughrt^ 1^* -00* 

}J9 l.llVi See J-jj" 1 77 ]J7V» — ^HVa 

ns 


130-139 

7X9 


Di\l Futures 
Options 


IK Oermoa mor* tHOOB marts, awft oer mart 


Strike 
Price Dee 
33 

34 MB 

15 0X5 

3* OX* 

J7 OX* 

38 aw 


Cull 9-Settle 
Mar Jipi 

Dec 

274 

122 

QJ9 

2.11 

261 

020 

160 

110 

1.14 

1.18 

165 

127 

008 

129 

25B 

062 

101 

]J4 


Sept. I 
Pirts-seme 
star Jb 
0X7 — 

ox? 

1.44 
1X8 
2X0 


128 

1J1 

209 

167 


128 - 


Estimated total voL WOO 

Calls: Mon. voL 3X72 opeoiirt. 23,193 

Pots : Moil *oL 951 open urt- IA>31 


Source : CME. 




Company 


SepL IT 

Per Amt Pay Rec 
INCREASED 


[ 


S&IMOO 
Index Options 


BP Canada Inc 
Crump Cos 


S JO IMS 
a 0* % 10-18 

STOCK 


Getty Petroleum ^ 5 PC 10-23 

5TOCK SPLIT 


99400 99500 100500 100800 
101800 102000 103000 103100 


dose 

BM Ask 

ALUMINUM 

Starting per M«trK ran ^ 

SSLanl TOXO 75400 75150 75300 

COPWER cathodes (High Grade) 

Staling per mefr^tat j^ 1Basg 10 ^ 

F^wanl 103*00 

COPPER CATHODES tStapdord) 

Starling per "**!£■ *? 

Soof 

Fonwara 
LEAD 

Starling per metric tan ^ ^ 

' 302X0 30300 30300 30400 

NICKEL 

Sterling nor metric ran 

s*’ 0 ’ - 

Forward 
SILVER . 

Pence per trot OJJ“ 444x0 44800 *4000 

S^ara 4M$ 3?S 66100 

TIN {StauitardJ 

Staling per metHcJJM^^ ^ 


Sic Corp — 2-for-l 
Crump Companies — 2-for-l 


SlloO 332000 338500 3391v0 
Saoxo ^00 343500 344000 


917500 918000 911000 911100 


Forward 
ZINC 

Sterling per metric Jon 

SPO. iu, njt. 


51600 51000 51100 


Forward njx. 
Source: AP. 


Ban*, at Virginia 
Bell Allantic 
Bic Coro 
Dennison Mnfg 
DiGMraki Carp 
Fair Lanes 
Federal Paperboard 
Fst Boston Corp 
Goulds Pumps 
Great Western Sv 8k 
Hamilton Oil Corp 
McCormick & Co 
Midwest Commerce 
NBO Bancorp 
Oiloeor Co 
Pay N Pak Stares 
Peoples Bncp-Wash. 
Stocker & Yale Ine 
Thompson NledCo 
Transamer incShrs 
Welsfellifs me 
Ziegler Co 


9-30 

9-30 


28 10-22 
51.70 11-1 
.IB 10-31 10-11 
JO 12-10 ll-B 
.16 11-15 10-18 
04 11-15 10-25 


O .17* 10-15 
Q 25 10-15 

Q .19 10-15 

Q .12 10-11 

O 02 * 10-1 

O 22 10-10 

25 10-21 
25 11-11 
00 10-10 
.16 10.24 
25 10-25 . __ 
.04 11-15 10-IB 
_ .10 10-15 9-SU 

M .18 10-15 9-30 

Q .12 * 10-17 10-1 

Q .12 10-18 10-4 


9- 30 

10- 3 
ltW 
ID-1 

g-i* 

9-2* 

9-30 

Hi-7 

9G0 

IG3 

9-30 


frannaal; m-montbly; o-Auortwly; t-wmi- 
omioal 


Source; UP/. 




SepL H 


Strike CoBrtxd 
Price Sep Od no» Dec 

DO »Vj Ttt 8 — 

‘ 1% » rt W 

1JTA 14 2 2*1 

1/16 >i 1171* 1H 

1/14 1/1* %„ f<>* 

1/16 I1I6 1716 - 

_ 1/16 1/16 - 


1« 


PetHinl _ 
Sep od No* Dee 
ini *1 13/1* 1** 

9/16 1+ 2+ W. 
4 4tt 5+ M 
9 1 Pi P« 

u u n't 14 

pii _ - - 


TeM aril wlwre JJJXN 

ratal coll opt* «f- 71 
Trial pui wkmw 3iswn 
TOM pH 0P*o«t-«S733 

Hl^l77.n LOW 17S7S 

Source: CBOE. 


□asa 17*09—124 


Netherlands Has Surplus 

On Current Account 


keep UP TO DATE WITH 

8&»«ssreopi£ 

APK^GE^WffiNKDW 

andfwdwintheiht 


SepL Ii 


Otter 


Frey 

Yield 


3-mentn 
6-month 
One year 
source: Solomon Brothers 


7.14 
7 JO 
7J2 


7.12 

728 

7X0 


7J7 

768 

808 


7.41 

7.72 

Unch. 


Reuters, 

THE HAGUE — The current 
account in the Netherlands showed 
a provisional seasonally adjusted 
surplus of 4.9 billion guilders 
($ 1 .49 billion) in the second quarter 
of 1985, the Finance Ministry said 
Tucsdfly* 

Thai compared with a sligbtlv 
downward-revised surplus of 4.28 
billion guilders in the first 1983 
quarter and an upward-revised sur- 
plus of 5.10 billion guilders m ihe 
second quarter of 1984. Current 
account in the broadest measure of 
trade performance. 


120X0 

12230 

125X0 

17700 

13000 

132X0 

13400 

135X0 

137X0 


oo mama MM 


+100 

+00 


Est. Soles tab PiwJW* , m 
PrBv.DorOpen lot *347 cff9 


.11260 

.11200 


tEc 1300 m3 13320 135X0 +1.M I r 
13*00 13800 13520 137X0 +-1XO I 


Jan 13400 138X0 M 




Metals 


59X0 59XS 59X5 


r>3S 22X5 
22X0 22X5 
22X0 ,22X0 


22X0 

22J0 

22X0 


22X2 

22X7 

22X0 

22X5 


+.17 

+.19 

+21 

+23 

+23 

+29 

+27 

+.17 


61X0 

61X0 

61X0. 


61X0 

<1X5 

6105 


*0X0 

61X0 

61X0' 


-JO 


COPPER IGOMEJO 
25000 u&- amts pu- lb. 

82.10 57X8 S®P 

60X0 6850 « 

8423 58X0 Doe 6053 6075 59X5 

8420 SMB Jan 

8000 EM8 Mar 

7400 6T.10 May 

7/^0 61X0 

rasa txss Sea 

7DJO 62J0 DOC 

7020 64X0 Jan 

<7.90 63-15 Mar 

67X0 6450 May 

66X0 <3X0 Jul - ' 

EaL Sales 1 T r 2y-l?“« W 

Prev. Day Open Int 75X32 IM29S 

ALUMINUM tCOMEX) 

«0oo Jtu-aontaperlh. 


62X0 <2X0 <2X0. 


63.10 <W0 6W0 


59X0 — .15 
— J® 
60X5 — >15 
6020 ' '—>15 
6050 — >1T 
61 JO 
<1X0, 

61X0; 

4220 • 

*275 
035 -20 

63X0 — >20 
<0X5 


CANADtANDOUAROMM --. 

££ ■ : i j® •; S zn 

8*Sm -uapPi w.SM ee fiffs 

Prev. Day Opertinf^-*272upOT^ 

fiwrchfrahcommiJ,^ . 

»6er fnmc-l Mnt womM*. 

4SSk'"-n& ■ : - 1 

XT70O •• JEN ' ••- _ . 

m w > r. Prev. Sale* . .20 
W-ta".J._>r. 415 »f 

OCaMANMARK tlMM) - 5 

SPOT mart:- lpotat 
X69B ■ - "aXTl - Dec JR 1 

•221 '-Sr ST ..■*? - 
jffi . , SS i 

Froir, Dar Ooeo ML. 54X12 ; up 2*9- • J . ;5 

JAPANEi ETfRW 

yen-1 potateawde 


—9 



-42 

—MO 


XS39 

XS53 


X472 
X509 . 


XS75 

JB 

J359S 


=s 


He 


i-'-taiT »» — s I 


VK 




55SS1 

rxoflg?. 


74X0 


42X5 Sep 42X0'. 42X0 4230 


Oct 


70X0 

76X0 

73X0 

6475 

63X5 

5110 


am 

4470 

jcm 

53X5 

46X0 

4825 


Livestock 


Dee 

Jim 

Mar 

May 

Jot 

Sep 

Dec 

Jon 

Mar 

May 


4195' 44.10 


45J0 .4110 


4300 
.4325 
41X5 
43X5: +US0 
+433 
4505 45.10 
. 4500 

463® 
47X0 
4&2S 


TSoc 0O4 I61 004 J« 004152X04157 , —12 
'Mar 004182 004118 JM41760O4IW . -M 

mop 'Jon - 0O4M* . —a 

;S^Sta'^w , nw.iBiM 8276 ; 
..SJMDSopaalnt.a5tfl7upBO; . . ■ 

, SW15SFRANC(fMA4) . 

HSnerfr nn &l pobrt equQbBOOOl 

XO. - 3531 Dec- ASS X275 X225 

xno xiro jJon, W<MS 

Est. Sales 25X45 Prev-So+t 19X08 - .. - 
^!dSSK. 1B. 21X48 off 834 


JBT1 

X320 


— 35 

+20 


—35 

-35 


industrials 


3 


—75 


49X0 

5000 

5870 


CATTLE (CME] 

40000 lbs.- cental per n. 
*5X0 52J0 OCt 

6705 5500 Dec 

<7X5 54X5 Feb 

67X7 55X0 Apr 

6675 5675 Jun 

A5AQ 55X0 AUO. 


Est Soles 80 Prey.Softa . 
Prev. Dav OPM HE. 1X11 W» « 


BUS 

»SJ 

57X0 

5000 

5975 

5805 


56.15 

3907 

57X5 

58X5 

59X0 

50X0 


55X2 

58X5 

56X7 

S7.9S 

3900 

5800 


5505 

5800 

5777 

5877 

5972 

5800 


+70 

+.15 


SILVER (COMEX) 

5X00 fray tfLr cents perttwaj. 


+.10 

->13 


11830 


5730 

*050 


50P 

Oct 


*020 6025 5920 


Est. Sales 20X21,PW.*alM MX45 
Prev.DavDpenint <7022 ptt7w 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 
*^0U rt .-«T+perto j 4 

56M Oct *0X0 61.15 
7375 XA0 NOV 0X0 OM 

BM *0X0 Jan 65.9® 

70X5 60X2 MOT *6.15 67-ta 

J0X5 68«e Apr 68TO 67^ 

44J25 60-10 May , fi5 - sn _jSP S 

Est Sales W9 Pw-SalM 2gO 

Prev. Dav Open Int 3X17 pH 5784 

HOGS (CME) 

tlqoO lbs.- cents per lb. 

CI7S 3445 Oct 3700 3877 

53s 4005 4005 

OTJ7 3EW Feb 4870 4170 

47JS 36.12 Apr 

4905 JW» 

4905 4845 Jul 

51X0 40» AUP 

41.10 38.07 Od 

49X0 38X7 Dec 


12300 

72150 

11930 

10480 

900 


6800 

60X0 

62X0 

*5X0 

**.15 

65X2 

<5X5 


*0X0 

<107 

63X7 

66X5 

<7X2 

<7X0 

6*75 


+X0 

+X5 

+X5 

+X0 

+1.12 

+1X0 

+1X0 


7990 

7890 

770UO 

7520 

7150 


5980 

5930 

6070 

ana 

*130 

<410 


Dec 

Jon 

Mar 

May 

JM 


611.5 

<1*5. 

*250 

6350 


6020 

<100 

6150 

623X 

<360 

<450 


Dec 

Jan 


Mar 4880 4080 <79X 


May 


5920 —1M 
5988 — 18X 
5970- —104 
6025 —100 
406J9 -180 
<15-5 —102 
634J —184 
*340 — 185 
<4*0 —1«X 
459X —'04 

**4.9 — 188- 

053 ;-11X 
606X -nx 

6985 — nx 


'■* A 




3800 

42J0 

4205 

4250 

39X0 

39X0 


37X5 
41.90 
4225 
4105 
31X0 

39X0 

Eg*. Sates 7X95 Pw.Sdes *761 
prev. Dav Open inL 19075 uo73 
PORK BELLI ES (CME 1 

7600 57 JO Jul 


3755 

390S 

40X0 

37.95 

4105 

4205 

4100 

38X5 

39X0 


3827 

40X0 

41X2 

3863 

4222 

42X7 

4215 

38X5 

39X2 


+X0 

■H4B 

+JH 

+X0 

+XS 

+X0 

+J3 

+.15 

+JS 


<2X0 


<3.10 

4170 


59X0 

*005 

61X5 

61J5 


6105 

<200 

<110 

<3X7 


+1X5 

+1X5 

+1X0 

+1X0 


<130 
<1*9 
625.5 
*350 
*400 
4580 <51S 
6700 . 6700 

<780 
<770 
6930 

7140 Jtu 

Est. Sales U000,Frev.Saraa *jra 
Prav.Oav Open Int 6B0J5 up339. . 

PLATINUM (HYMN 

^ r So°^ruS 3P ST , 3toX) 395X0 29850 29850-1810 

M0O TW Od 51850 31Z0O 29000 299 JM — 10.TO 

mSo jSi 31100 31100 299.90 30050 ~9X8 

M4J0 APT 315X0 31800 303X0 30500 -9X0 

MOD OT0O- J«l 318X0 318X0 31800 31000 -XX0 

HUO ^ 315X0^^0 315X0 31M0 -0X0 

Est. Sales PTtv-Sof€«^ 4755 

Prev. Day Open Id. 18277 offZ75 
PALLADIUM (NYMEJ 

XX) tray oz- dollars per ol 

141X5 9850 S«P 

141X8 9100 Dec 

1Z7X0 91X0 Mar 

11*00 91X0 Jun 

11500 97X0 Sep • 

Est.Sales- Prev. Sales _ 162 

Prev. Dav Open tat. *639 w 2* 


97X0 99X0 9700 

99X5 10800 9*50 
.UR 00 WI0O 10700 


9*00 

97X0 

9850 

8885 

99JO 


LUMBER (CME) . . 

> M“- , KS ,r '5S"y!« !»» -.» / 

1B70O 133X0 Jan 14100 14100 138X0 14870 — 06 

139X0 Mar 14M0 14jS 144JR t«J8 
17*60 145X0 May 149X0 15840 14900 74900 

18300 149X0 Jul 15300 15400 1S2SJ 152XO 

17600 153X0 SCP 15560 156X0 15X40 -T«X0 

IttXO 15700 »»v , - ■ WWW 

EatSatae _U04 Prav.iotes .2X20. 

Prev.Oay Open Int 7*0 uplW • 

cotton a qo/an 

”ssr-°s<r& ** S m m* *mj 

7300 - 57X1 1 Dec 5852 585* 5821 5847 

7*75 5877 Mar 5960 59^5 58X7 S9X3 

EDO 5890' MaV 5906 . +01. « 

: 7RK 5860 Jul 5890 5895 5805 6805 ; -~M 

6550 - 53X5 Oct 5360 53X5 5360* S3X7 +03 ' ' 

58X5 52X5 D*C 5200 5255 52X0 5209 +09 JVT 

*6X5 6605 Mar 5365. +35 ~<_ • 

Est Sales USD Prev.Soles 2X88 ... . Vv.- 

Prev. Dav Open Int 21X65 off 245 

HEATING OIL CHYME) - ?&/?*:'- 

tB^Od. 76X5 7810 74X5 7807 ' 

80X5 ' 88X0- NOV 7705 7830 7605 7825 +101 L- ... 

8023 69.15 Dec 7700 . 7850 7*90 7807 ‘+109. 

KL25 69 JW Jdn 74XU 7100 76XS 77X2 

7933 ■ 7800 Feb 75X0 7660 75X0 7860 

7*33 *880 Mar. 

7400 . 6800 Apt 7860 7860 

7200 .6800 Mar .. 

Est.Sdes Prev. Sales *687 

prav, Dav Open inL 29642. off 761 
CRUDROILOiYME) - 
UBO bbf^boliara Per bbl. 

29X0 2*X5 Od 27X3 2808 2708 2806 

29X0 24-40 Nov 2704' 27X0 27.16 27X7 ■ :+3»' .'j. . 

2*50 . . 23X0 Dec 2660 26X7 2664' 2*59 - .4-37 AT: 

29X8 - 24X1 Jan 2*12 2*52 2*11 2*69 +0*^ 1 

2866.. 24X5 Feb 2573 2*15- 25X3. 2*09 . ..+2*>>t-Sr- 





. ^GO£ 

w ... - -.^^.Tofr 
: te «n ^Eur t 

7060 Nr.*, 


. -p. 




‘J6 CH; 

enter 7 


y: 


2965 
2905 
2706 
2*14 
EaL Sates 


2*13 

2303 

23X5 

2U6 


K« -X TC 

APT 2562 2102 
Stay 2*05 25-10 

Jul 24*5 2465 
Prev. Safa 12679 


2565 

2822 

2405 

24XS 


M 


"triM 




PreY. Day Open int *5034 oft 228 


j^jCurraiq^Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option* Strike 
Undertvlng Price 


SepL 17 


Calls— Last 
Sep Dee Mar 
12X10 Brlttoli Poands-ceiit* per nail. 

nPraitlH 17Q ■ ' _ 


Puts— Last 
Sep Dec Mar| 


GOLD (COMBO ...... 

TOO tray ot- dollars per kw ox. 
340X0 315X0 

49300 29700 

324X0 B420 

489X0 30158 

4B5X0 

49*00 31420 

43SJ0 320X0 

42840 33100 

» ss 

553 SS 


Est. Sales 230W Pnty.Sgleelfctal 
Prev. Day Open Int! 0X70 up2B3 


SIAM 

Oct SH9jOD 319JU 316J0 U7M —250 

Hgu. 31949 —2^0 

Dec : ~ rr, ‘” 32*10 33060 32UU —3-00 

Feta 327X0 327X0 32600 325X0 -3X0 

APT 33100 332X0 329X0 32900 -3X0 

Jun 395X0 335X0 335X0 334X0 -*M 

Aus 34000 34000 33900 319X0 — 15P- 

Od 342X0 34UQ 342X0 34460 —3XO 

Dec 349X0 349X0 3*9X0 349^ — JX0 

Apr 33900 — 

Jim 36560 —400 


Stock Indexes 


2171 .'WfifK- * 

2502 • ' ■ 4J7. v ;<■ •. 

v.-m& issjv 

•■g IJSg' ' 


- . "Ot'H .,8 ^ . I r 

1 Da . 


il I2JW 

133-58 
133X8 
133X8 
133X8 
133X8 


1.14 


*JHJ 

3X0 

2.10 


505 


IS) 

135 
140 
145 

160 r 0 X5 
30010 Canadian Dotrarscents per 
CDaiir 71 r t 
72X5 
72X5 


070 

1JO 

3X5 

605 

9X5 


Financial 


SP COMP. INDEXfCME) 

paints and cents L ivV;' l'tth. 

19600 16000 Sep 1KL10 T83L25 180X0 10030 J ^ 

SUMS . 19*30 - Dec 18*85 18500 1tl.9C JB2JW -9*3 , X/ 'J,-. ' 

203X5- 185^ Mar 18*00 18700 T03X5 lELM 

20*50 -18808 Jun 10660 18*60 18660 18660 .—305 ~ " 

Esl.Sales _■ • • Prav.Sala 41X16 r --^- 

Prev, Dav Open rnL 74072 up 628 • 

. VALUE LIHB(KCBT) --' --t -. 

. points amt cents 

7)3X0 1UX5 Sep 190X0 191X5 107X0 788X5- 

\Z>3S Oec 19260 W1D0 18805 IS9A 
20760 19*50 Mor VOX' 

BstSofes Prev.Soles 3X23 

Prev. Day Open Int 11018 o«S73 


16a 

unit. 


. 74 r 81* r 

as&Vleti German MraMnlS per uN 
§ r r r 

£ u2 IS 16S 

*3 i : is 


0.17 

066 

r 


0X0 


0X1 


9206 

92X7 

92X7 

92.10. 

91X0 

9160 


9209 

92X2 

■92X9 

92.10 

71X0 

9168 


34X2 


aro 

5 

160 


l^J^ira^T 5 sm ° Nf r Tjl 


F Franc 


*2S*«0 JapartMO 


Yen-IOOIM of a enrt per unft. 


961 

*50 


S3 2 ' 8S 

ijiaoswHs Frmci-centa per uni V 

rsst 1 

ss; i 

42JU 40 

42JR <1 

42X1 « 

42.01 J 3 

4201 £ 

4101 g 

42.0’ „ , 66 

Total coll rot 
Total PVT.' «*; 


2X0 


r 

06? 

102 


362 


2X0 
I JO 
1.16 
877 
0J2 
835 


r 

£48 


0.16 

0^ 

069 

r 


r 

r 

2.11 

r 


4X88 

KGF iTSoed. siJ2 option otferad. 
Last 13 premium (purchase prlcel. 
Source: AP. 


Call open lot. 

PW apei int. 


262,146 

159,150 


US T. BILLS UMMJ 
smHUan-PttofMOPd. 

93X3 8*M Sep 

9307 85X7 Dee 

72J9 86X0 MOf 

9228 8701 JW» 

9201 8800 iW 

W S|'8E 91X4 «J4 
9097 R-50 Jta 9008 WJ« 

Esf- Sorts MB, Pw.Salta, M». 
Prev. Dav Open Int 3*«r oH48l 

H YR.TR EASUBYlCaTl 
sigiu)0aprln-ptaA32ndaatl0OPCi 
»3r 75-18 See BfrU 86-16 

S7-« 75-13 OK 85-14 85-16 

S6-2 75-14 M«r 84.11 84-11 

BS-7 ' 74-30 Jun 

864 W Jb 

83-11 80-2 Dec 

Est. Soles Prev.Soles 1843 

Prev. Day Open Int. 59X66 off 770 

US TREASURY BONDS CCBT) 

(8 Pd-S1O00«»pt38r32ndsdl(»Pdl 

79-12 
78-13 
77-29 
766 
75-31 
7+24 
9+15 
74-36 
72-27 
All 
6T-Z7 
Est.Ssles 
' Prev. Dav Open 1nt22O0O7 off 4062 


9207 

92X8 

9127 

9105 

91 X 7 

71X9 

91.14 

9000 


9209 

9262 

92X9 

9106 

9168 

9160 

9U* 

9000 


— 01 
-02 
—JM 


NYSE COMP. INDEX (WYFE) 
points and ewH8 

71 80S 71X5 Sep 10S6D 10500 104X0 104X5 

T17X0 10L20 Oec 10*90 IOTAS 1KU 

>25 *fw ]^I5 tows mms.mum 

U0J® 1 09X5 Jun 10ED5 10005 107.90 . 10765 

Est. Sates 13X77 Pw.Sata* 7X0B 
Prev. doyOpsp int 10088 attoos 






Commodity indexes 


8M9 

84-27 

8343 


85-29 —11 

84-28 —11 

El-29 —11 

13-1 —11 

82-8 —11 
81-18 —11 


/Moody'S 


Reuters. 


D J. Futures. 


Close - 

884201 

i.moo, 
m.i? 
22080 ' 


3® % 13^4 

• '1BHE4&S-I 


Com. Research Bureau _ 

Moody’s: base 100: Dec 31, 1937; ' 

p - prQlimlnorv; f - finol 
Reuters : base 100 1 jSeo. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Oec. 31, 1974. 


FtSM 


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L-*. » ■ 

1 ' V 1 | 








u./l 






Wf J '\ 

mrfrrU 







■jLLL^H 


■yArB 















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CBT: 

CME: 

IMtt 


Market Guide 


HYCSCE: 

L- kycet 

COMEX: 
NYMEr . 
KC 8 T: 
HTP81 


Otfcasa Board or Trade 
SgSgo^toemrtllrejalionge 
<S>»S«tand Monetary Matleet 


°* «««"»»• EwSwige; 


VMri : 9°°«- Suogr. cnftee 

New York Cotton Buchcrae ■ * • ■ 

g*w yerk Meramltle Exdiangfr 

Bear* ta Trade 

New York Futures exchange: .• . •• 





I 

















^” I '~ i"iiinlitillV i 


■-: - 


*♦ ; *• v’ ' , 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 




Page 15 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 

Consolidate d Gold Fields 
Says Profit Rose 9 % in Year 

' ' v cent growth In profits from con- 

.. LONDON — Consolidated st ruction materials, I6*percerit 
Gold FiiddsPLC,_ the British- based higher profits in share dealing aid 
International mining and industrial a 357 -percent inewsw. to £75 rail- 
group, said Tuesday that pretax lion, in the share of profits from 
profit for the year ended June 30 Renison Goldfields Consolidated. 


tose 9 percent, to £114.9 ariUioa RGCs higher profits came from 
($15:3.9 miSion), from £105 million mineral sands and copper, while 


a year earner. 

Sales rose 12 percent, to £1.18 
biffion, from £1 .05 bilHon. 
Tlsegroup saidthe main factors 


gold and tin showed poorer results. 

At Consolidated's New mom 
Mining Co rp., which showed prof- 
its 45 percent higher at £2.9 mil- 


results. 


behind the increase in profit prior lion, profits from oil increased and 
to tax and interest were a 22-per- losses on nonTerrous metals were 
-k . . slightly down. Gold and coal prof- 

Covat Says Ford r C^toied said lower profits 

... - J from South Afncan gold milling 

Cannot Ban Sales 

• * . Remea to $325 an ounce, from $392 the 


LUXEMBOURG — The Euro- P^oa&yau. 


LiVjm-lTUIVWIW I lit L.U1U- ■ - , J y |J 

pean Court of Justice ruled Tues- 

fcythat Ford Motor Co.'s West P^ uced £>8^*. 

Goman unit, Ford-Werke AG, can but this w “re ton 

no longer block the sale of inexpen- °^ s ® 1 die ramfs faD against 
sve zSt-hand drive cars to BntSi sterling, the company said. 

. “ D.nRt. (mm llu MMIIUnVI 9|T||. 


mo toasts. 


'idbyS motoasts. . Profits from the company's affil- 

: & hat'll Demand for. the right-hand-drive iates in South Africa TeD 8 percent 
$ cars from dealers in West Germany during the year, Consolidated smd. 
"t surged in-1981 after British motor- The lower dollar gold price also 

* i-ffift. ^ Lsts found exchange rates made it adversely affected results at the Or- 

- 1 'Cat cheaper to bay abroad rather than tiz Gold Mine in New Mexico, 

-^=partn ^ at home. But a year later, Ford said where ore available under the pre- 

3 C 003 J. that it would no longer supply West sent plan will be exhausted by 

German dealers with the can; in a spring 1986. Consolidated said it 

' ‘■’hilc^ w&to protect the sales of its British plans to dose its operations there 

perccrj ,j subsidiary, Ford Motor Co. Ltd. early next year. 

-Hie .court said that Ford's move A provision of £4.1 rafllion has 

* icn^A restricted competitibn within the been made against 1985 profits to 

ttuaenfo. European 'Community and it ruled cover the casts of closure. 

i fish that Ford must withdraw its ban on In the United States, profits ben- 

ia Aaj^J supplying right-hand drive cars to efited from higher sales of pre-cast 

“-jCV>G£ 

•--■‘Suiu -ft-, 


plans to dose its operations there 
early next year. 

A provision erf £4.1 raOlion has 


West German, dealers. 


concrete pipes. 


| iichardson'Vicks 
Rejects 2dBid 
From Unilever a 

Reuters tl 

WILTON. Connecticut — ti 

Richardson-Vicks Inc. said e 

Tuesday that its board rejected v 
a raised mergerbidbv the Un- ft 
ilever group and declared the 
issuance of a new preferred r 
aock to figltt the unwanted t 
takeover. J 

The company said it will dis- * 
tribute one preTereed share for . 

every five common shares in the . 

defensive action. , 

Payout on the common stock j 

will be reduced, the board said, 

but with the new preferred divi- 
dead, the payout per share of 

conunon stock will rise to Si 34 
annually from the pre-distribu- 
tion level of $1.48. 

Last week, Richardson-Vicks 
rejected as inadequate an unso- 
licited bid from the British- 
Dutch consumer products want 
of $54 a share. In a revised bid 
on Monday, Unilever's U.S. 
unit offered S56 per share for a 
friendly merger and $48 a share 
if Richardson did not approve. 

1 jifihanflfl U) Buy Boeing Jets 

The Associated Press 

COLOGNE — Lufthansa, West 
Germany's state-owned airline, an- 
nounced Tuesday that it would buy 
10 Boeing 737-30Qs to be delivered 
in late 1986. The deal also includes 
options for 10 more short- and me- 
dium-range aircraft. 


- — — : ' any more SUKA mini ■ 

By Donald Woutar Thursday that "he was forming an mrad K . r Ser insider trading roles, accord- 

lm Angeles Times Service _ unspecified new venture in the edu- to Michael Murphvjditor of 

CUPERTINO. California -- field. The company said Mr. ill Calif orrna Technology Stock 

Apple Computer Co upseiihauis ^ w ^ [hill ^ ncw pr od- prodw. £“*P * 11 was Letter in San Francisco, 

chairman, Steven Jobs, had raided ^ wwuld not compete with Apple education ^ 

the company of at least fire execu- d lhal he wouU j no i raid the One The new venture se 

lives for a mysterious new comput- c0mpanv for employees. nr£ Mr. estrangem 

__ venture will not invest in the ■ .. has headed Apple s marketing pro- . anJ John Scullev. 

vetuur^AppIe officials indicated On gram for schools. he recruited from Pei 

Monday. , company, Mr. __ “They're all computer jocks: u marketing expertise 

The raid on Apple talent also of five wterarr App P ^ ^ cpuld be almost anything electron- — 1 — 

raised conflict-of-interest ques- including an pngi nal d^eioper « ^ Mail act, prest- — 

lions about Mr. Jobs’ future as Apples Maaniosto airap Jent oflnfocorp. a market research INDUSTRIE 

chairman or the company he who were resigning. company here. “The interesung INVEST! 

helped to found eight years ago. There were tumors that two parl is Ui C conflict-of-interest situa- n 

AnAppie official said the board employees quit N uon. You can stay chairman of a 1 1 ATIANTj 

initiaUv voiced interest in investing ^ Mr. Job's, although Apple de- comp anvand ran another one if it's M 1 

in the new venture, but that thoe mej il Mr. Jobs and the five whose nol ^ ^mpetition. but when you 

was a reassessment when the resig- resignations have been confirmed slarl snipping away Apple's key ^SkT 

nations occurred. .. did not return phone calls Monday. [ don’t know.” 

Mr. Jobs. 30. was removed from decision bv Mr. Jobs to The picture is further muddled DEV ELL 

daily operational management in a ^ - confinned bv Mr- Jobs continuing to own the 

ffie-ip at the company earber during the sum- largest single block of Apple stock 

this year, but remains its largest ^id i.35-million — about 5.3 million shares trf the 

shareholder, with about a 9-percem ^ ^ pp | e jmet valued at up 60.9 million outstanding. 


CUUUllivut iiiMi 

One of the employees leaving to 
join Mr. Jobs is Dan'l Lewin. who 


r r emnlovees. join Mr. Jobs is Dan'! Lewin, who . jobs’ estrangement from Ap- 

companyfo empy has headed Apple's marketing pro- John ScidS^ihe presideni 

On Fnday. according to im for spools. P recnjited f rom PepsiCo to bring 

company, Mr Jofepr^l^i« ^ compmer jocks: it Marketing expertise and proTes- 

of fi'e veteran Apple . ld ^ almosl anything dectron- — — — ~~ 


Mr. jods b pFoniww* aov{o& computer company. 

5 any more stock unul Jan. 1 ousted from day- 

ider insider trading livda y operations in May after he 

g ,o Michael Murphv^dnor of jSadwUncks that Mr. Sculley 
e California Technology Stock needed - m light of the 

■tier in San Francisco. severe slump in the personal com- 

The new venture ^io further after the ouster of 


P fwo »«b after the ouster of 
Sidmi Mr- Jobs. Apple laid off I -00 em- 
o bring ployees and shut three or ns six 
profes- plains. 


holding. 


ic. said isicnara 
dent of Infocorp. a market research 
company here. “The interesung 
part is the conflict-of-interest situa- 
tion. You can stay chairman of a 
company and ran another one if it's 
not m cdmpeii tion. but when you 
start stripping away Apple's key 
resources. I don't know ” 

The picture is further muddled 
bv Mr. Jobs continuing to own the 
largest single block of Apple stock I 
— about 5.3 million shares of the 
60.9 million outstanding. 


INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 
INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE 

ATLANTA INVESTMENT BRIEFING 

Sponsored by 

ATLANTA ECONOMIC 
DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION 

Wednesday, Seplember 25, 1985, 5-7 p.m. 

INTERCONTINENTAL hoth. 

LONDON 

Tea and refreshments will be served 


COMPANY NOTES 


— , „ ' ^ mA _. a diversified U.S. conductor maker, will cut capital 

Associated Holds Ltd. of Hcmg ^d earn- outlays for its semiconductor divi- 

Kongsaid shareholdCTsappjo^ firel ended Aug. sion to 120 billion yen (S5L-8 irn^ 

change of nanw to Turn Jack Land m ure t rsiq ^llion. lion) from an unually planned 140 

Lid. after crediiora voted in favor 25 rose 17 peron^ earlier, billion yen in the year to March al. 

SSS toiled sS billion, up 7 1986. 

S2jr a Sngapo re-based private pf ab Gir Siemens AG, the West German 

IS«m«roSwUlbeiheW Land^Rhet^ndWabGfr- concern, is ,o mke a 49- 

StSddCT in Tian Teck Land. < ncnl ^ P^cem stake in Electronic Control 
rS Groan Ltd. of Australia re- mg concern, said partial operating ^ s . f Ilal> ^ cooper- 
JJS atiSo^tt rise in net op- profits in the first s.x bodAs of ^ ^ of nQmcri c 

promT65.7 million ffi >985 ro* Stiff for machine tools and in- 1 

£ (W4-6 million) last year, from Deuische mmks ($36.9 mliionL aulomall p n , a Siemens 

MS l ntiUion dollars a year earlier, from Ittmrihon DM ,n ycar spokesman said. He declined to 

gi\-e financial details. 


.MiwcTUtMTS ~ 

INCOME PRODUCING REAL ESTATE 

Weal for Pension Funds and other large Groups 

1. Safe and Secured 

2. Below Market Acquisition 

3. Total Management 

4. High Yearly Returns 

5. Excellent Appreciation. 

Properties $3,000,000 and up 
Principals only please reply to: 

Uoyd J. Williams, Realtor 

I II I I 5629 FM I960 W . Sort. 210 

L 1 1 I I Houston, Texas 77069. 

Tel.: (713) 586-9399. Tlx.: 387356. 


tlie Alfred P. Sloan Fellows Program 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

A twelve-month program leading to a Master of Science in 
Management for U.S. and International industry and gwemmem 
executives. A Health Management option Is also available. 

Applicants should be in middle to upper-mkkfle management 
orstaff positions with approximately ten to twelve years of 
experience. 

* Applicants are nominated and sponsored by pri^a^pubfle 
sector organizations, selected by BBT, and appointed Anted . 
Sloan FeUows. 

We are actively seeking to increase the number of qualified 
women in the program. 

For further information on the programandourottierCon- 


tinuing taucanon rruy.a,.» 

Office of Executive Education, Alfred RStomiS^iorf of 

Management, Massachusetts Institute ofTechnotogy, 
Room E52-144, Cambridge,6tess^ujse^02tM- 
Telephone: (B17) 253-7166; Telex: 921473 MT CAM. 





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price in most Europe^coun^ ^ — .. * - - -| 


Ptease charge rryr 
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□ Americcn 


□DrareOub 


DMoBteraxd 



Arab Bank Limited 

bringing our worlds together 

. and the largest financial institutions in 


CixdexaryckXe 


For over fifty five years now the Arab 
Bank has been working to bring our 
worlds together. A truly international 
network with more than 80 worldwide 
branches and affiliates, the Arab Bank 
works literally around the clock to 
nerform services for its clients, to 
strengthen economic relations between 
the Arab countries and the outside 
world and to provide an insight into the 
complex and lucrative Arab markets. 
Our branches and affiliates span four 
continents: Asia; Africa; Europe and 
America with key offices in all of the 
world’s major money centres. We offer 
a full range of international banking 
services. Demand and time deposit 
accounts. Trade and project finance. 
Medium and long term credit. Foreign 


exchange services. Corporate and 
merchant banking. Correspondent 
banking and important advisory 
services. 

Quite naturally, our main business is 
Arab business. The majority of our 
offices are concentrated in the Middle 
Eastern markets and our branch man- 
agers are experts in all markets and their 
distinctive differences .We are amongst 



the largest financial institutions in 
our area with over $12 billion in assets, 
decades of growth and contacts through- 
out the Arab world. 

As the world gets smaller and markets 
more competitive, the Arab Bank is 
always there to give you that edge in 
Arab markets. 

If you are considering negotiating any 
business in the Middle East why not 
contact us first? - You will be pleased 
with our expertise and. advice. 

London (01) 6067801 

Paris (01)3593434 

Zurich (01) 2213035 

Athens (01) 3255401 

New York (212) 7159700 
Singapore 5330055 






Tu esdays 

AMEX 


Ckfciig 


Tattles include the NMjM> pricea 
up to the ctosiiw on wall Street 
and do not reflect tote trades elsewhere. 

I'm The Associated Press 


Dlv. Yld. PE 


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37ft 

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19 14% 

11 3ft 
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10 4% 

39 23% 

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Fohlnd A0 2.1 7 

FoJrFln 33 

Forty Pf 

FlCcXi UXtaO.9 B 
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FlschP A8t SJ IB 

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11% lift 
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12% 12% 

8% 8% 

24ft 34ft— ft 
36% 34% — 1% 



Boating-Hate Notes 


Coupon Next 


Dollar 




BkKOwYort.96 

Bk Nova Scotia 88/93 

Fk Nova Seel la 94 

Bh Tokyo 93 
Bk Tokyo 87 

Bk Tokyo FebU/91 

Bfc Tokyo DecM/vi 

BonkameriCOO/Sfe 

Banters Trust 00 
Bankers TnistVi 
611 CooilolM 
BoUFm 87/91 
Bail 97 
B0llnt95 
et; ini »9 
BbHnl93(MttPVI 
Balndouie<99 
BueFV 

Bice 77 1 Copt 

etoPdctsa 
Btce Jonffl 

Bice 99 

Bq Indnouez 97 iCOPl 
Brio 95 

Bm>97 (Cap) 

Bnr> E5/88 
BHPB4/9A 


7ft 15-10 1 
9A 3V1D 1 

r-s imi i 

9*. SMOI 

B% 29-01 I 
Fi 0642 ' 
8% 12-17 
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8k. n-12 ' 

7 ! i 2609 
8% 13-H 
105, 3049 1 
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81. 17-12 
9*> 11-10 

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109. 23-09 
75. WOT 

or. 1611 
9 l , 30-10 
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B'-e 31-10 
B's 11-12 


100X0100.101 

100*310073 

1004110071 

1 00.15100 JO 
100X0100.10 
1002010030 
1 00X51 00.15 
9970 183X0 
9950 100X0 
1002010030 
1007210432 
99X2 100.12 
77 JO 98X0 
: injtiHLio 
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I 99.90 100X0 
1 100.77101X7 
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9945 99 5S 
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I tOO.Q1100.lll 
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1 99X2 99.72 

1 101X4101 3« 
} 99.33 9943 
1 1 00X41 aou 

2 1004010050 


Blip 99 
Bnp87 
Bnp8B/91 
BnpJuWt 
Bnp05 IMttilv) 

Bq Portbas Peru 
8a Wonia 89/94 

Bardavs Bk Ptrenew 
Bor clamors 95 
Barclays O/S Pern 
Barclay* O/S 04 
BdsHim Peru 

D«99/IM MUi 
BdgwmOOIMHiiyl 
BttBUim 00/05 (Mini 
Be Mum JuHB 
Baraen Bk 88/91 

Belgium omm 
B eMluin 0099/04 
Cere 98 
CtxeBi 
Cnco 90/95 
Cnl 90 

cm oo 

01x95/05 IMttOyl 
CHK2S84 
Cllx9t(Wkiy1 
CHx94 

Carter el S+L^ 94 
Centra! ml 97/00 

Chase Mon 0/5 93 
Chase Man Cap OT 
Chase Man Caro Oo 

Chemical 94 
Chemical 94 1 WV. I, ) 
Christiania Bk 91 
T chrlslianla Bk94 
OUcorpAua96(Wkl«l 


LVTERXATIONAL 

business opporttnitbes 


TeL 01/219 81 U 

The fully integrated business services in the center 
of Zurich 

offers 

Offices/Conference Rooms. Secretarial/Translation, 
compl. Telecom-Systems, Company Formarion/Tiduaary 
Transactions 

Executive Business Services ag 

Usteristrasse 23 (Lowenplatz) CH-8001 Zurich 


===== Take your profit from ' 

THE FITNESS BOOM 

Coin-operated Compu-Pulse 2.000 heart rate tester has yielded high 
returns of investment both in Scandinavia and in Middle-Europe. 
Microprocessor controlled, modern design. 

For further information please contact: 

SellnuLir Oy, P.O.B. 43. 00311 Helsinki 81, Finland. 
Tl - 358-0-7820 77. Tlx.: 12-1394 TLTX SF Alenin. = 


SlCfESSFUIX? 

YOUR BUSINESS IN WEST GERMANY 
We nuke your business prow by 

— acquisition 

— distributor 

— joint venture 
— licensing programs 
We aba recommend, rf necessary, legal 
odvisan. 

Contact: 

Hassemer & Partner 
BuaineeExpatnan Setrdi Consuttants 
GoathcsinsM 4-8 
D-6000 Fmnkfiirt a M- WW Gennany 
Td. (069) 292902 
Tdnx: 4185276 HAPA D 


HGENT/HASTER DISTRIBUTOR 

Our c o mp an y is ana of the largest AAA-1 
rated OEM outlets for pioducrs m mo 
lolloping industneS: water puirp and wo- 
ter well supplies, swimming pool, irrigation, 
industrial and plumbing supply equpmeri. 
We cany m dock over 60 mnion items in 
245 categories. If you have a mcrfcet m 
your country for rfiese produds. And if 
you are seoousJy imecested. send us a 
deposit of SS0J» for our 4 had bowid 
cotoMS covering our foot divisions. The 
S50«ft«B be erected to the first order 
you place. We now do business with over 
4,000 chTriwtofs at North America and 
are seeking to establish markets overseas. 
Picas* write in delai of yew company's 
capabilities to? 

The American Granby Compaiy, 
1111 Vine Street. Liverpool, 
Now York 13088. USA, Attention: 

Ms. SdiermertHMn. 


ROULETTE 

Partner wanted for system, 
proved successful for many 
years. Capital required: DM 1 
Million. 

Fixed annual revenue 10% plus 
capital gain. 

Please reply (a 

kitamafianai Herald Tribuna, 
Bex N" 2197, 
Fnadridtstrasse 15, 
D-6000 frankftirt/ Mean. 


- PANAMA = 

Consider operating intamohonally, 

compWy tox-fre* on a strict confi- 
dential basis. , , 

Write hw informative free brochure 
about the advantages of Panoma 
companies, convenient ship registra- 
tion, trust sarviees, tompar ymangg e- 
merit, the advantage of Ranema s 
financial center and iiryestmentop- 
portunifies, including the Coribbcan. 
Basin Initiative. We are Panamas 

largest management company 

INTERTRUST P-O. Box 7440 
Parana 5, Republic of Panama 
Talepban oi 63-63 00 
Cafakn INTStTRUST 
Tx.: 3151-2708 INTRUST PG. 


OISTKIK1TTOUS 

required lo market 

British air operated 
double diaphragm pump. 

Knowledge of ihc pumpir^ market 
is required. Initial stock order likely 
la be in the region of £8.000. 

Applications should be made to the 
manufacturers 

Walspar Engineering; Lid., 
Montgomery SlrwL Sparkbrook. 
Birmi ngiuun BU 1DY. U.K. 

• Teles: 3391 17 


Clbcorp SeoW 
Cltlcoro Plop 94 
Citicorp 97 
ClHcoro94 
CIHcon»P«rp_ 
ancoroPteoVT 
Comer ica 97 
Oimu ier i b k FH89 
ComnterzDk NovOT 
Comm Urh Montreal 91 
Comp Fkl Cic 97(IWti) 
Cornell Of Eii ran* 93 
CctBorts 
Ccim"»s - 
Cd»7IMUi1yl 

Ceome 87/99 

Cr Fonder 88/93 
CrFarEkimrtW 
Cr Lyorniotavirt* 

Cr LvonnoblEI 
Cr Lyo™ios9Q/9/ 

Cr Lyonnaa 89/94 
Cr Lyamnls 91/95 

S r Lyonnais 99 
r Lyonnais Jeet92,'94 
Cr Lyonnah 97 lOsn) 
Cr Lyonnais 00 
Cr Lyon nos Jun92/96 
Cr Nattonai88 
Cr NoWanol 90/94 
Cr Notional 00 
Creaitanstall 94 
Credltanstall 94 
Crlta«ono9I 
Dalictil Kon9yo9o 
DanqH/99 (Mthly) 
Den Norsk* Nov90 
Den Norsk* Dec*B 
Denmark JanHl/90 
Denmark DO 88/98 
Denmark 99/04 
Die ErsteOest 92/94 
Drmdner Finvi 

Dresdner FlnJ9 
Drcsdner Fln92 
Ek/wodo N uc 89 
E«97 

E0I97 IMIhlyl 

End 00/05 IMIhly I 

EneiOo 

Eab93 

Eat 90 

Eecso 

Exterior Ini 91/94 
Feirovl*95IMttityl 
Ferravtc 92/99 
Finland 90 (Mltiiyl 
FbmbhPoper 90/95 
Find Boston 91/94 
First Bk Svsi % 

First Bl Svst 97 
Fits! Chicago 97 
_ First Chicago 92 
First Chicago 94 
First City laws ®S 
First Inler 95 
Ford 91 

Fortune 5+L 92 
Flillln) 94/94 
Gent wance W/92 
Genfinonce 92/94 
Gib 39 
G*»2 
Gib Pore 
G=U9* 

Giro 91 

Gl Western 92/95 
iftlrilkivT.92 
Grindk»vs94 
Gl Western 89/94 
Hill Samuel 96 
Hill Samuel Pero 
Hlseano9i/9S 
Hong Kong Pen 
Hydro 02 (Mlhlyl 
Hydra 05 1 Mthlvl 
Id 91 

icehmd95.U0 
Indonesia 88/91 
IM NovflS 
Ireland %/99 
Ireland 97 
Ireland 94 
Isvelmorte 
Iln/v99 
llori 09/94 
_ Italy 05 
C llah 87 
Jn Morgen 97 

KOP FeV92 
Nemlro Oy 95 
Klekntori Ben 91 
Klein«wrtBen94 

Klebteort Ben Perp 
Korea Dev B4 B4/89 


Coupon Next BW ASkd ] 
7ft 05-12 99.95 11X1X5 
12-11 TMJ21B1 « 

8V- 04-03 10139101 30 
(ft 22-01 IDOXllOtLll 
8ft 17-10 99.75 99X5 
Bft 11-12 100X51DOJ5 
8ft Mffi MSL0Z1B0.12 
3ft 0241 99X8 9938 
8ft 31X1 10125101^ 
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Oft DM1 1W. 12100 22 
8% 11432 100.1010020 
8ft 13-17 100.1310023 
Bft 28-32 miBIQOJfl 
lft 27-11 99X5 99X5 
8ft 17-01 9921 99X1 

Ik. lB-io ioacoiao.is 

lft 9931 10004100.14 
9ft 11-10 1002010030 
■% 1207 100X510020 
Eft 15-11 10004180.14 
0 09.12 10ai81002D 

fw 24-in iDoanaus 
8ft 07-W 99.95 180X5 
8k, *OT 99.94 im-W 

8% 24-si looxamio 
8ft 30-11 9820 99 JH 
Bft 71-01 UtfLUlMWfi 
BV; W-ll 99X3 99.93 
B.912512U 9998 100X8 
8% 31-01 1BLBHJB.43 
8t. 05-17 99.97 100J7 
8ft 12-11 WX0 99.90 
8ft 27-09 100.2310033 
8% 27-11 98.70 98X5 
Bft 13-11 100X01" * 

ITS owmoaxoi 

8% 14-11 9848 98X3 
Bft - «9J9 99X9 

8% 31-10 W.W 100X7 
7ft ID-01 99X0 99X0 
8% 12-12 101X0192X0 
7ft 15-10 99X0 1ISXB 
8% 31-10 9927 100X7 

s-e 

0% 20-11 10(31710027 
1 Bft • 99X8 99.98 

Bis 1211 9923 99 
Bft 21-10 99.95 1 
9ft 24-09 100231 
97k 09-10 100291 
8ft 27-09 997* 99X4 
Bft 12-12 100X910029 
r*l Of 10 100X010025 
8ft 030! 99.97 1C0X7 
9% 11-10 10OJ21M22 
10ft 23X9 100X0 
9ft C9-10 lBaJ310fl/3 
Bft 0M1 100.1210022 
8% 29-11 10025101X5 
1% 77-H 10044100X6 
8ft 21-01 100J7MHW7 


Issuer/ Mot. 

Korea Euh EUcBSiXS 

Lincoln Se-L 99 

Lloyds Bk Pero 

Lloyds 93 

LkrrdsVJ 

UovdsM 

UcbB5 

Ud>84 

Lid) 92 

Makmki 94/09 
Molovsla 00/15 (Mltil 

Molarslo A«W"n 
Matavsk) DedF/92 
Malaysia 88/93 
Mcriavsia 00/05 
Man Hon M 
Man Hon M IWk lv> 
Mar Mid 94 
Mar Mid 09 
Mar MM M 
MeHaaBkn 
Midland Bk Pero 
Midland Bk Pero Nw 
MkUona irrtW 
Midland Ini 89 
Midland lot 92 
Midland lnt?l 
Mid laid lid 99 
Mitsui Fm97tCaoi 
Mitsui FI" 94 
Man Grenfell 94 
Mfg Bk Den 92 
Nab 97 (Cool 
Nat Bfc Detroll 96 
Hat Comm Bk 89."»4 
NatWead PertHAl 
Not West PerpiBt 
not West Fin 91 
Nat Wed FmflS 
Nat West 94 
Nat Wed Fm 92 
Nat West Fin Pero 
Nesfe Ov 94 
NewZeaiaid87 
Hi Steel Dev 92 
Nippon CrB» 

Nordic mt 91 
Oku 84 
OU>«4 
OIB95/99 
ottsha re Mining 91 
Dltsnore Mimng 86 
Pirelli 91/94 
Pnc97 

Pk Barken 88,71 
Queensland l Boll 94 
Rente 91 

Rep Bfc DaHas 97 
PUC 05 
libs 84/94 
Sm lama 91/93 


Coupon Next Bid Askd 


ilS 
39 
38 
124 IZVl 
94 7% 

» 12% 
M 
.4% 
30 W 
45 1% 

4 1% 

5 14% 

2 2Vh 

173 14% 
1X48 141A 
290 20% 
115 18% 
96 7% 
20 1 % 


8ft 21-01 100J71HU7 
8' 7 07-11 99X1 99X1 
7ft BrOI 99.97 100X7 
Bft 16-12 iwxiiinJj 
8V« 21-01 lOOIfllOOJS 
Bft 11-03 100.1410024 
1425 2002 100.11100.14 
Ry, 1101 1 002010030 
8ft 27-01 100X5100.15 
7ft 0fl2 99X8 99.« 

8ft 13-11 1002210022 
Bft 99-10 100JJ7100.I7 
Bft 11-11 99.95 WOXO 
ST, - 99.95 1B0K 

Bft omi tooxmr.12 

9»s 15-lfl 18042' J072 
BVj I WE 10074100X4 
Rft 29-01 99X5 10005 
9% 2M0 101.1110121 
8 ft 2f 11 9?.9t 100X1 
■ft 2702 TOO W10O24 
8'fc 2802 99X8 99X8 
8ft 27-02 101X7181.17 
8% 14-03 99.95 10005 
8.175423-11 99 JO 
Ofe 03X3 105X918019 
Bft 17-12 99X4 99.94 
It 24X9 1001510025 
7ft 0W11 99.49 99X4 
7** 23-12 99X5 100X5 
8ft 25X9 1*8110011 
8ft 2 WE 100X810018 
8X7 25-10 99X4 99.94 
Bft 3M1 100X010010 
Irt 29-1 ] 99XJ 49X6 
Bft 13-11 WJ5 99-5 
8ft 29-11 99.10 99 SB 
lft 07-119885 99X5 
1287518-11 98 X5 99X5 
3ft 21-11 99.10 99JO 
8'k 22-10 92X0 94® 
Bft 06-17 99X4 99X4 
8ft 15-11 100X410016 
8% 24-10 99X1 99.91 
By. IMl 1001151(1015 
8"? 31-12 100X510015 
8ft 22X1 1002810030 
8ft 13-U !0aX4»«i» 
lft 1M7 100X410074 
9 14-11 98X0 9JX0 

8ft 2W1 100X8181.18 
8 <U 77-0? 101 07101.17 
8% 06-12 98J0 98X0 
10ft 3WT» 1002310033 
8% D3X2 1003510045 
10ft 71-OT «X3 9f/J 
Bft 27X2 100.1010030 
8ft 29-11 94X0 <xXB 
9ft 24 10 99X3 99.93 
RVt 14X2 99.75 99X5 
lft 19X1 99X5 99X5 
8ft 01-11 1C!0. 010023 
8% 15X1 99JS ms 
fl'V I3XI 99^5 WX5 
?■"» 09 10 IOOJH1U02D 
8ft 58-11 100X6)00.23 
8ft 17X3 1002010030 
8ft 28-02 100XS10O1B 
Bft 10X1 108051 08.15 
Bft 12-1199X9 99.99 
Bft 04X3 1(110710117 
Eft 13 H 1«)J)91Q0.14 
8 3X9 99X8 9*Jt r 

10ft ZJ-09 1001510045 
Eft 20-11 1007410084 
Bft 03X2 100-471® 57 
10ft 25X9 1 00.15111325 
8ft 20-11 lOO.iatflOJfl 
1«» 27-09 1CCJ3100J1 
8% 39-11 99,40 994# 
8'k 05-1299X0 100X0 


Sonwa Int Fm88 
Sanvralnt Fin 94/04 
Scnwo lot Fin 92 
ScandIFIn Apr93 
Scondl Flnt>«c93 
Scotland IntW 
SecPocHlc47 

Sec PorHicVJ _ 

Sha annul Caro 97 
Suet 88 
Seat 90/93 
Sle Ini B9 
SfelnIVI 
Soc Gen 90)95 
5acGenMar94 
5acGenNov94 
Sac Gen 97 
Sncbfl 
Spain 92/97 
Soain 05 ( MIN vl 

Spain SB/93 

Sod In 99 
Stand Chart 94 
Stand Chart 91 
Stand Chari Marts 
Shod Chart Mismatch 
Sid + CM Assenl Nts 
5!o>e Bk Indio 87 

SumllomaTst 92/94 
Sweden 00 
Sweden 90X5 
Sweden 92/85 (Mltlfyl 

Sweden 89/99 
Sweden »1 03 
Sweden Pera 
Talvo Kobe 97 (CaPt 
Talvu 92/04 
TokuainVi'W 
Taka I tens 94/99 
T«dom42 
ToyoTst92i99 
Tvo 44/04 

Ub Norway 99 

Writs Fargo 97 
wells Faroe . 
werioac*7(Caol 
vrmsGhmVi 
World BkPerp 
World Bk 89/94 
Yokohama 91/W 
YDfcohama 97 (Can! 

ZentroispkassVi 


iiUi, 




13% 

19V. 

14% 

WVx 10% WA 

» » K 

4% 3% 3% 

3% 3U. 3V. 
3% 3% W 
2% 2% 2% 
' 47k «. 

2% 2U 2% 
14% 14% 

28% 27 
3% VU 2Vi 
2% 2% 
3% 3% 
17% 17% 
17% 17% 
10 


17 9% NM.'MHf 




M 


m 






ISK 

a 


5 5 iws i> 


:a 


«% 5% rmdtto 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds ListecO Sept.. 16,1985 

Tl.. !ZBga^SSS5^ !, SS5iXg ^SSSSS jjJSSSSSa,, <n -saa.-- »p -rrr^.M^rv- - 


Tlw marginal 


Non Dollar 


Are Bkj)97 
Bk Montreal 94 
Bk Tokva 88/90 

Bqlndosuez9l 

Be*wlm94 
Cil Icorp B9i 91 
Can Gold Fin 75 
Ceome« 

Cr Fonder 00 
Cr National 91/9S 
Denmark 93/98 
11(94 

irekmd 43 
Ireland 94 

LkorvdJ Eurn»4_ 
MtgBk Den 94/99 
MtgBk Den 91/94 
Mini 10 

New 2enlonel 97 

RBS05 

SiKt 90/93 

Stand Chart Sta Pero 
Yoritshlrelnl 91/94 

Source : Credit 

London 


lift 14-11 100JIW141 
12% 27X9 100J1MUI 
lift 21-11 100.1300X2 
lift 71-H 100.1418024 
12% »-10 10CJOMXWO . 
lift 15-11 99,42 99X2 
11% 05-12 97.25»» 

11% 23X9 10H37180X7 
12ft 99-70 1003410444 
12ft 18X9 10037WOX7 
lift 22-11 100X410044 
12 ft IS-H !f-31»33 
11% 14-11 

11% 06-12 MLOWm 

11 % 3M* lDOKTO'S 

12% 

12% 09-10 10078100X8 
12 07-11 99X8 nJB 

lift 14-11 99J2 WJD 
11% 04-11 99.16 99X4 
12ft 24-10 Iflaanoon 
1214 18X9 9^ 

12ft 77X9 10O15HB2S 

Svisso-Flrst Boston Ltd, 


n 


■ 


= BUY AMERICA =j 
IN SMALL SLICES 

A new invertnicni oppon unity in 
ihr devrlopmeni of American real 
enisle with high offshore capital 
pi ns and guaranieed retunia. 

For details contact: 

Building Ground Developments 
Infernoflond lid* 

96 Chiswick High Rood, 
London W4 1SH, England. 
Brokers enquiries trekome. 


SCQA0 


The targets of SCOA S.A. presented lo Ibe sharetaldere’ annual general 
meeting of May 20llu 1985. give priority to the following lines ol acnon- 

• To consolidate the group's positions and main activities Aftica. 

• Tu develop nii. iraSr nows, especially with Central/Soulh East Asia, 
the Middle East and North America. 

• To expand I he group’s interventions in higher tficnnolagy tie*®' 

Such expansion and international development tailed for a consideraWe 
increase in the nsouircs ol tbe gnnrp. together with a reinlorcenienl ai i 
financial si rue lure. For thic reasons an increase of 400 million francs 
SCOA S.A/s permanent funds was made last July. 

This operation has allowed the Dumez Group and Saudi intercste ^ ,cc0 ^ 
than? holders of SCOA S.A. the Paribas Croup, which «“““*? *“*5 
shareholder of SCOA S.A. with a share of 37 per run has tranrfered part ® 
its holding lo ODBEPA. his Belgian xuhaidiaiy. 

At i he nexlboard meeting of SCOA S.A. it is propped w appoint director 
n- prevailing the new shareholders. 







SSSft - ,j 


p?V Wtltj HA • Mol AVDlloWe, a 

Mdemot, Price- E«-<-ouooo; •• - Fonneriv Worldwide Fund UU» • 






li \ 


















































CURRENCY MARKETS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TJUBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 


PEOPLE 


page I # 


Dollar Edges Up in U.S., Drops in Europe 


nSIT FrW ^ a TZ dollar come off. If its above 3.5 forced bv substantial buying by the 

T 0RK - Tbe , doUar perceau it will go up. And if ii fails Eastern bloc, 
mo'ed higher against most foreign within that range, there probably , ~ , . . „ , . „„ 

currencies on Tuesday after fluctu- will be a very neutral reaafoa." * , the do ^ r f nded al 

aung during trading m the United , r A . . 0 2 f 1 - JjP“ Markets were 

States and retreS* in Eurooean ln Loodon ’ ™ U.S. currency closed Monday for a holiday. In 

trading. * ™ finished at 2.8930 Deutsche marks. New York, it ended at 241.65. up 

Dealers said that the market was ending at from 241.10 on Monday, 

edgy ahead of Friday’s scheduled T^? 20 ' Other late dollar rates in New 

release ifu> dollar was fixed at 2.8784 DM. York- comm red with late rales 


edgy ahead of Friday’s scheduled Other late dollar rates in New 

release of the third-quarter “flash” “ S7 k 8 f York, compared with late rales 

estimate of U.S. gross national fT7 , . fr ?5® 5 1 M° nda >- Monday, induded: 2-380 Swiss 

product, which measures the total ^oon Q 5 ,0 ? ed a ‘ francs, up from 2.370: 8.834 

value of a nation’s goods and ser- Up fr ° m Monday s c ose of French francs, up from 8.755; 

vices, including incSme from for- L94200 halian lire, up from 

eign investments. The pound ended steady against 1.922.00, and 3.2320 Dutch guii- 

“ Everybody is focusin» their at- tiie doBar al Sl.3395 as recent dere. down from 3.2365. 
tendon on that,’’ said Frank Pusa- doubts about °d prices continued Earlier in Europe, the dollar 


“Everybody is focusing their at- 
tention on that,” said Frank Pusa- 
teri, manager of commercial for- 
eign exchange at the Bank of 
Mdi.reaL "There has been a laige 
reluctance on the part or corpora- 
tions to take positions on that num- 
ber. It’s very much a fence-sitting 
proposition.” 

He added: “If the estimate is 
bdow 3 percent, well probably see 


1.922.00, and 3.2320 Dutch guil- 
ders. down from 3.2365. 

Earlier in Europe, the dollar 


to fade. It opened at 51.3388 after closed in Zurich at 2J695 Swiss 


finishing at $1.3438 on Monday. 

Later in New York, it cost 
$1.3350 to buy a pound, less expen- 
sive than Monday's $1.3430. 


francs, down from 23978 on Mon- 
day. It was fixed in Paris at 8.7795 
French francs, down from 8,8850; 
in Milan at 1,930.00 Italian lire, 


Dealers in Europe said that the down from 1,948.95, and at 3340 
pound did well agtinsi most cur- Dutch gutiders in Amsterdam, up 

OC lVi4» marUfkt ivnliqoH it ivnr ifOUl J>«i I Im 


r Helmu t uiugi WUl rn * 

rendes as the market realized it was rom J 
short on pounds. This was rein- 


(AP. Reuters) 


Attention Remains on Huge U.K. Floater 


[ By Christopher Pizzey 

i Reuters 

i LONDON — The Eurobond 
i market generally ended little 
5 changed Tuesday from Monday's 
• closing levels after a day that dcal- 
: «v&id was a lot more subdued 
j than Monday. 

i Attention in the floating-raie- 
I note sector tended to remain on 
I Monday's massive $2.5-billion 
I floater for Britain. The issue, which 
I pays the three-month London in- 
j ter bank bid rate, fluctuated nar- 
i rowly throughout the day and 
i eventually ended unchanged, at 
199.68. 

\ However, one new floater was 
; launched, the expected 175-mfl- 
lion-Europcan-currency-unit issue 
for France's Credit NatiooaL 
The 10-year issue pays i/16 
point over the three-mouth London 
interbank offered rate and was 
lead-managed by Banque Paribas 
Capital Markets. Unusually for a 
floater, which are nearly always 
! priced at par. it was priced at 
; 100,05. 

Tj*e issue, which is guaranteed 
by the French government, was 
quoted at about 99.95, just inside 
j the total fees of 13 basis points. 


Seasoned dollar floating-rate 
notes were mainly steady, although 
some issues began to edge up dur- 
ing the afternoon as Eurodollar de- 
posit rates eased off 1/16 point in 
places. 

The doDar-straight sector saw a 
couple of new issues during the 
day, both for units of Japanese 
banks. Mitsui Finance Asia Ltd. 
bundled a 51 00-million bond pay- 
ing 10'A percent a year over five 
years and priced at lQQfe 

The bond was lead-managed by 
Mitsui Finance International Ltd. 
and was guaranteed by Mitsui 
Bank Ltd. It was quoted oil* the 
market just within the total 1% per- 
cent fees at a discount of about 1%. 

Also launched was a S 100-mil- 
lion bond for Mitsubishi Trust Fi- 
nance Asia. It pays 101? percent a 
year over 10 years and was priced 
at 99*L 

The bond was guaranteed by 
Mitsubishi Trust & Banking and 
was quoted at a discount of about 
1%. inside the total fees of 2 per- 
cent 

Seasoned dollar-straight issues 
also ended the day little changed. 


with dealers commenting that oper- 
ators seem reluctant to open many 
new positions ahead of Fridays 
“flash” third quarter forecast of 
U.S. gross national product 
growth. Gross national product is a 
measure of the total value of a 
nation's goods and services. 

News late in the session that a 
U.S. Senate committee bad agreed 
to raise the U.S. federal debt ceiling 
by $255 billion, to SL079 trillion, 
did not have any immediate impact 
on prices, although longer-dated 
domestic U.S. bonds (fid come ofT a 
liule. 

The Canadian-dolbr sector saw 
a 50-raiUion-dollar issue for Laval, 
a suburb of Montreal Lead-man- 
aged by Orion Bank Ltd. it pays 
1 Hi percent a year over 10 years 
and was priced at par. 

The issue ended on the market at 
a discount of 2% on an offered 
basis, well outside the total fees of 2 
Derrent 

Dealers noted speculation in the 
floating-rate note sector that Ire- 
land is shortly to launch an issue, 
possibly of 5*300 milli on- using a 
“mis-match" formula. 


Outstanding 
U.S. Credit 
Rose in July 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — U.S. con- 
sumer installment credit outstand- 
ing increased a seasonally adjusted 
S635 billion in July, the Federal 
Reserve Board said Tuesday. 

In June, the amount of existing 
debt grew a revised 5533 billion. 
Previously, the Fed said credit in 
June increased 56.79 billion. 

The July increase represents a 
1 5-percent annual rate of growth in 
installment debt. In June the rate 
was 127 percent. The annual rate 
of growth in July and June com- 
pared with an IS. 9-percent growth 
on an annual basis in the second 
quarter, the Fed said. 

Automobile credit grew $2-37 
billion in July and $2.69 billion in 
June, the Fed said. Revolving debt 
expanded $856 million in July fol- 
lowing a drop of $73 million the 
previous month. 

The category which includes 
cash loans at banks and credit 
unions rose $270 billion in July 
and grew $242 billion in June. 

The report said that before sea- 
sonal adjustment total credit out- 
standing amounted to $503.83 bil- 
lion in July, up from £4220 1 billion 
a year earlier. 


Finnish Bank Changes Management 

Bv Brenda Erdmann assistant general manager in charge men division as deputy gpaayl 

insemaUmd Herald Tribune of the new regional management manager with [responsibility tor 06- 

LONDON — KansaDis-Osake- division. Mr. Kahari currently is vgoping busi n ess m Europe. N&- 
Pankki. Finland's largest' commer- with Nordfinanz-Bank Z finch. Ohyama turns over tus dunes ;m 
cial bank, has announced top-level KOFs Swiss unit, as an assistant London to ^ op Nishutawa. who is 
management changes in its offices general manager. (StaTa 

bourg. z.oncb and Helsinki. head of the management commit- bT Katsuhiko AraL Mr. Aral cut- 

AU of the appointments are ef- tee at Nordfinanz-Bank ZQncfa k in the bank's 


fcciive from Jan. 1. In K.OFs Hel- _ _ iumuvui- _ 

s'inki head office, Pentti Koivisto, Uggla. Mr. Schfltknechi joined the “ W LJ^Etfcssi^the Swedish tele- 
assistam general manager currentiy bank in March from the Swiss Na- communications and electronics 
in charge of the loan-syndication, non a] Bank, where he was director -^p jjhat has run into problems 
corporate- finance and capital-mar- of the economic section. recently with faHmg profits and 

^ Tes P onsi ^ Kyosti Jarvinen. assistant genex- production difficulties, has named 
!?,h, r KS?SS S ptarmmg WIlh ' al manager, currently response Carl Wilhelm Refinance direoor 
in the kop group. f or ^icSaJ management -and ad- and controller. The company has 

Mr. Koivisto will be succeeded ministration, will head the new ad- been hying to fill the post of ft- 
by fikka Laukkonen. who currently ministration division. He will con- nance director for several months 
is general manager of KOFs Lon- unue to be based in Helsinki following the resignation of Fritz 


upon the retirement of Bengt dora ^jc division. 


LM. Ericsson, the Swedish tele- 


is general manager of KOFs Lon- 
don branch. Kan Janhunen, man- 
aging director of Kansallis Interna- 
tional Bank (Asia- Pacific) Ltd. in 
Singapore, will move to London to 
take up Mr. Laukkonen’ s post- 


ministration, will head the new ad- been trying to fill the post of fi- 
ministration division. He will con- nance director for several months 
tinue to be based in Helsinki. foOowing the resignation of Fritz 

S tafias. Mr. Ros, who currently is 
Tetmeco Inc. said Raymond H. executive vice president and head 
Marks, senior vice president, has of finance at Flakt, a unit of ASEA 



First National Bank of 

said las L. Scfaniegdow has 

joined the bank as a setaw^* 


been appointed chairman of its AB. takes over his new post Dec. 1. I president and as director of Firs* 


Ice up Mr. Laukkonen’s post Tenneco Europe unit, effective ^ r|jK) UdL London, has 
Mr. Janimnen will mra over his get _L Mr. named SadtioSasabe president He 
duues as head of the Singapore unit ”■ Cousins, who is retiring. Ten- n ,h^kae 


succeeds Hiroshi Onodera, who has 


to Frank Lonnqvisu whois manag- neco is ba«d in Houston and has tadSE 

er. credits and capital markets, in mlere ® ts “dude oil, natural f ^ parent Nippon Kokaa, Ja- 

Singapore. ^ SJSSHi JSSSSSJ? 

In Luxembourg, Heikki Kahari COQSlructlcm equipment ^orgenenti manager in charge of 

will be taking over as managing Daiwa Bank Ud. said Masahiro the overseas plant and offshore 
director of Kansallis international Ohyama, currently deputy general project sales departments. Previ- 
Bank SA from Kai Fagerstrom. manager of its London "branch, is ously. Mr. Sasabc was in Tokyo as 
Mr. Fagerstrom will be transferred being transferred to Tokyo to join general manag e r of the offshore 
to Helsinki to assume the post of the international business develop- and special ship sales unit. 


Chicago m Londo n- t ne 
hawic said Ws first assignment 
wffl be to direct an 
meotsd task force to guide First 

Chicago’s mternaliocia! busing 
straieges. Most recently, 
was an executive director ot 
Haubros Rmk Ltd-, a Loodoo- 
based merchant bank, where he 
was responsible for the interna- 
tional issues and b an king dryl- 


and special ship sales unit. 


West German Economy Is Expanding 
At 3%- Annual Rate, Bundesbank Says 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Confirming government projections, the 
Bundesbank said Tuesday in its monthly report that the West Ger- 
man economy was growing at an annual rate of 3 percent 

"The basis for economic growth increasingly has extended from 
I foreign demand — which has stabilized at a high level — to domestic 
demand," the September report said. 

Concerns about an economic recovery excessively dependent on 
exports, and more specifically, on a strong U.S. dollar, are set aside in 
the report The central bank foresees a continuing high level of 
exports supported by a gradual turnaround in the two major weak 
spots in the domestic economy: individual demand and construction. 

Corporate investment continues to fuel the domestic recovery, the 
Bundesbank said. Domestic orders for capital goods, excluding auto- 
mobiles, rose 5 percent in the May-July period from the previous three 
months and exceeded the year-earlier period — distorted by a-seven- 
week metalworkers' strike’ — by 13 percent. 

Private demand has picked up since early spring, the report said, 
following the resolution of a prolonged debate about new emission- 
control standards for automobiles that is stud to have delayed many 
car-buying decisions. Abetted by a 0 -5-percent rise in net disposable 
income in the second quarter from the first three months. 


Japan Anto Sales Are Increasing in Europe 


(Continued from Page 13) 
Europe's largest, climbed to 13.2 
percent, or 165,000 cars, against 5.7 
percent a year before. 

But profit margins shrank in re- 
cent years as the yen's value rose in 
relation to the West German mark 
and other key European currencies. 
European governments, troubled 
by rising unemployment, have ner- 
vously watched the rise of imports. 

Some capitals, such as Bonn, 
have acted cautiously. Others, in- 
cluding Paris and Rome, restrict 
the Japanese to about 3 percent of 
domestic car sales, and the Europe- 
an Community has urged Tokyo to 
observe self-restraint in auto ship- 
ments. 

Undaunted by restrictions, the 
Japanese have expanded their net- 
works of dealers across Europe — 
Mazda has more than 1 ,000 in West 


Germany alone — and have modi- 
fied car designs to meet Europeans' 
preference for lean-looking models 
of great technical capability. More 
significant, the Japanese have be- 
gun to reach agreements with Euro- 
pean automakers to produce cars in 
Europe. 

Harald Wulff, executive vice 
president of Nissan Germany, said 
Nissan delivers the Patrol, a four- 
wheel-drive, off-road vehicle, to 
several European countries from a 
factory near Barcelona. 

And Nissan manufactures, with 
Italy's Alfa Romeo, a European 
version of the Cherry, called the 
Ama, at a factory near Naples. 

Nissan also plans a factory in 
northern England to build about 
100,000 medium-size cars, perhaps 
the Stanza. 

Honda, Mr. Voss said, is polish- 


ing plans to build a six-cylinder 
modd at BL PLCs Austin-Rover 
factory in Longbridge, England. 

To win cooperation, the Japa- 
nese {dan to use lots of European- 
made components. “We wiH widen 


But Fiat's chairman, Giovanni 
Agnelli, has denounced Nissan's 
Alfa project as a “fifth column,'’ 
and Robert Lutz, president of Ford 
Motor Co. (Europe), recently 
warned Britain against letting 
Honda in at “more favorable 
terms" than existing factories get. 

Officials of Japanese auto com- 
panies say their sales expectations 
are buoyed by Europe’s nsrng birth 


rate, which should mean new cus- 
tomers in tire 1990s. 
















































** 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 



H 

a 

a 

a 

a 



■ 



a 

■ 



a 

■ 



■ 

■ 





PEANUTS 


HAVE VOU EVER 
THOUGHT THAT MAYBE 
YOU'RE A LOON? 



blondie 


TWEV SAY A LOON 

UA5 A CALL THAT IS 
VA6UEL.Y F0RE80CWS— 

HA'00-00-00„v 

TOO F0REB0PIN6! 

^ -- 



||p ■itftii' 


v^a ® HBSurao fm»»v Siooc^.m. 


jwWte. 


BOOKS 


91-18/85 


ACROSS 


1 Alack's 
partner 
5 Oozed 

11 Items In a 
publ.'s 
mailbox 

14 Wander 

15 Kind of cat or 

sweater 

16 Islet 

17 Burgess work, 
with “A” 

20 Dominican 
Republic's 
neighbor 

21 Germ 

22 Not any 

23 Corleone and 
Carlo 

25 Angelo's three 

26 Angered 

27 Coils 

30 Prices 

31 Armed -serv. 
branch 

32 Stop-sign 
shape 

36 Burgess work, 
with "The" 

42 Smoker's 
companion 

43 Dobbin's 
dinner 

44 Goodnight girl 

47 Potential home 

wrecker 

50 "Budden- 
brooks” author 

51 Landon 

0 New York 


54 Chair 

55 Pocket bread 


24 A deadly sin 
27 Big Calif. 


56 R«I Coraland gggeklet^ BEETLE BAILEY 


Black 

58 Bandleader 
Shaw 

61 Burgess work 

64 To be, in 
Barcelona 

65 Area 

66 Mother of 
Apollo 

67 McMahon and 
51 Down 

68 Like some 
horror pictures 

69 Cupid 

DOWN 


1 Prefix with 

duke or deacon 

2 Poet Ridge 

3 Steering clear 
of 

4 Part of a 
military front 

5 Carpenter's 
tool 

6 Baseball's 
Slaughter 

7 Wading bird 

8 Card game 

9 Wear away 

10 Women's org. 

11 Landed estates 

12 Seal 

13 Mounts 

18 Quinine 

19 Negative 
particles 

Tones, edited by Eugene Makska. 


29 Glaswegian. 

e.g. 

Jailbird 

33 Sailor 

34 Premed. 
course 

35 Late singer 
Marvin etal. 

37 Mother of 
Samuel 

38 Mao tung 

39 Maud Muller's 
creator 

40 Consume 

41 Type of whisky 

44 Obtrude 

45 Teemed or 
drizzled 

46 Signs up for a 
race 

48 Partner of sow 

49 Christie 
character 

51 TV’s Grant 

52 Shelf 

53 Prima 

evidence 

57 PJod through 
mud 

59 Ambler's 

"Journey 

Fear" 

60 Selves 

62 Part of a circle 

“ port in a 

storm” 



A MAGGOT 

ByJohn Fowles. 455pag&M 9 - 95 _ \ 

Uitle, Braun, 34 Beacon Street, Boston, 

Mass. 02106. 

Reviewed by Herbert Mirgfflg 

ilTtber novels. So\m 
for a foe book rf 
Brokoff called “The Emgira 
Eh he described his 

hood with those rnysienons boulders st anding 
Sitade on the Salisbn 7 
the theories about the anaem moauE^ as a 
regions temple or astr^otm^ oto^ ot 
boUTbis tend was sure. Now. by a kap 
imagmarioa. Stonehenge pUys a^pdficani 
part in his new noveL “ A Maggot. 


n*ndte'.S!!? , IB4 stefc— « 


*e °LA rg* to * n&ir . . 

maaa £2 ’SSEtf teSrwraUi.™ 1 

((he afflhort 

gSBMgt 

imperiled 20th cennny- y&jky: 


Herbert Mitgpng is on 

York Tories. 



I || U- l/IUUM 

for sexual purposes, 
of the " _jr 


WAS I EVER' 
SHE ATTRACTED 
A FULL HOUSE? 



Set in die 
of die modem 
character uses Ston _ 

Fowfes, in the quaint 
writes. “He pointed to a great stone — ~. 
imbedded ffautendcothers that S^ood^ 
iddhertofieuponiLforsuchTOSthe^^ 
two. or so he said, that a woman taken there 
might hrf p g man regain his vtgpts. 

Sx a prologoc and an grilome. Fowtes in- 
vites the reader to share his t 

cess about the origins of A — -w - . 

<fircct address between writer and readers a 
venerable literary devr^togned toe^^ 
a aorytefimg bond, which few 

^SV^SzlSJSSJ^SZ. 

says that for some years before writing tas 

noveL te envisioned a smaD group of mounted 

travelers, faceless and without any apparent 
reason, riding against a desened lan dscape : 
“The riders never progressed to aw aestm*- 
tion, but simply rode along a skymttj. likea 
sequence of looped film in a movie pr ojector. , • 
So, too. his novel begins, witfl traveta s. 
crossing a remote upland in the southwest of 
England — the region where the a atbor fiv es 



BESTSELLERS 


Weds or Bn ntt mxleirfMBj. 


FICTION 




tail 


y LAKE WOBEGON DAYS by CRmson ^ V^ 


_ ' z-k'J. 

5 ..TJk 'tWO 3 MRS. OffiNVaLB. 

6 THEWFOTTOR R£D OCTOBER. 

8 TOO MUCK TOO SCXJN.by Jaoqnefeie * 
Brofoa ' 


9 TOECmH OUSE RDUS.W *** • 

M 1TJBAL SACKCTT. byLjw 

rr. if tomorrow comes.. by SMqtjafci 

■ <Sbc!t3oa • t , — _** ■ ■■ ■■■■ ■■■ :/• 

12 HOLD THE DREAM, frr Borbeor Txjffor >£, . 

• Bradford — ; SH--7 :V 

13 LESS THAN: ZERO. bgBc* E»toa Elfis . ~ ^ 


ficnlttosnstain: . __ 

and-answer fonn that make the n ovd t epai- 
tious and circuitous instead of artful . amL 
enating. : ' • . ■ . 

Any tia n ac rip t of court testimony i s turgid 
enough to read; the archaisms are evenworserf 


.IS FALL FROM6RACE.byLa?y CoJSa* 9^ 

. . . V A ; : . nonfiction .. . : ; /tiffin \ 

1- VEAgOL as Aatobwgrapby-T>y 
. ; Van and Leo Snoot . ■* . ■■■ — ■ jr *::- _ 

2 1ACOOCA; • 

■wi*. wiiimilBimMatM. — 1 j ^ ■ 

3 A FOR EXCELLENCE. 

• Tomtom gad Nang Aanm ^ S S SSS SS 
.4 SMART WOMEN. FOg OSH 

by Conocfl Comm and MeftywKfatto _ X 


by CbnaeU com maso w enm w w* — V4^.7t 
5 -. LOVING EACHOTHER.by LeoBesar J 

« THE MICK. ^M«|^MaBtkrwiih.Htib r a '' 1 ‘' 

Gtocfc ' '• 


"T Zy 
'»>. 




Sobrfbn to Previous Porfo 

iaIgirIaK 


: c- c j„. b^iiM Dans ~ ■ - ■ .fc - 


0OHC3 


9 TO MLg jf. 

” RifariBKh — ... 

12 NUTCRACKER by SbMR Afamto .-aj.: i»T« 

13 THE BEMU _0F Tffi DJMfigN^bjr;^ ^ 
AhMBMrQwTC 

. H 




v* raw vj- . ..-apr r- 

is 

- ' F. BfcMma .. — « J . ■ 



J DR- 
DtET. 

2 WOM 

-Robin Nonfood 


j: WEBSISCS . NINTH./ pOLLJBCSATE.: 


: 2 « 


4 nffi FRUGAL UWURMET^: by Jaf- 
ef rSnflfc W-- : ~b. r„' ~ ...... , Tr ^ ■ ■- 

5>iJ'STTro»TJFE;byB^^t»m*aiidawi- : 

- a/18/85 ' ;• r--- M^ilyxtl>a»awidr. r • ■>'* 


j • .‘ r -i MT/. 



briih;e 

. -• . 

: ikl' 




... L. t • ' ' 


By Alan Truscott 


UrucramUe these four Jumbles, 
one lener to each square, to farm 
four ordinary wonts. 


KELLN 


^nd 



NYNIF 


Txn 

□ 

□ 


O N the diagramed deal. 
West had to defend four 

spades after his partner madea 

weak jump ovcrcaD in hearts. 

The opening dub lead was 
won with the ace; and South 
dedded to take no risks. He 
planned to lead to the spade 
ace; return to the diamond 
king and lead a second trump. 
As it happens, this plan would 
have given Mm 11 tricks. 

But when he led a trump. 
West inserted the jack, a dia- 
bolical false caret It now 

seemed to South that be could 
safely finesse the queen with a 


OMsaz 

OQ9S43 


trktoe . He was opdriderahly 
iffynmBtal towmd.tp.wnfa-'. , 

- rime tricks. - 

Eastprodaood Aekmgand i Vest 
. W ^dnb rime. Wreriuffcd, ♦/»* 
led a beart to hispartner’s mx 
and scored a second dub raff 
since the "teri: cqujkl ovenuff 
South’s nine. '; ' , 

There inis some iraoy m 
this. If South had not' tried to 
nulie >oratdcks, he would 
have made than: lherorighal. 
plan would have revealed the 
trump position .and. allowed 
JamJo take the marked trump 
ten and 







" - 






r.-V. 


S^Lsrf^T 

s£?r 




i£ST ' 


t%/:; 

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pan's SL’ v " 


tat ...... 

513 

JSSS*! 




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Bfisp' t. v ‘ 

|bl4c tx • 
n d-,a-rA-'“ 

■■ f ltes* l ‘ r 1 '; 

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vnacC 1 - 

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*K» 79*JhS^%^ 

JWS:-., 1 '-' 


*a*rt 

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soon: .-Ir’ro-.'r,. 

9K4 *• 

0KJ7* 

* aq v v? 


make all : 



PRITOM 


’jror 

JL 


LENCAG 


mx: 



THERE'S USUALLY* 
A RIME FOR 
PARKIN© IN ANY 
SPOT THAT'S TH 1$. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


*mr lIlIl ™ lXlXlX n 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Yesterday's 1 JumWes: ^ NKY AWASH HUNGRY DETACH 

Answer What sort ol existence did that crapshooter 
lead?— A "SHAKY” ONE 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Aleorve 

Anuterdom 

Alliens 

Barcelona 


HIGH LOW 
C F 


ASIA 


Benvkak 


HICK LOW 
C F C F 


Bcrttn 

Brauets 


jKoae 

Manila 

New Deed 


25 77 32 73 
23 72 15 51 


Budapest 


coda Dei Sol 

OaMla 

EdHWarvli 


_ .. .. fr 

33 71 26 79 d 

33 91 25 37 sit 

29 64 23 73 d 

20 6B 17 53 r 

30 85 25 77 a 

30 86 23 73 d 

30 M 26 79 o 

25 77 18 54 Sfi 


Fran Wart 


Helsinki 

MOOM 


Madrid 

MBan 


Monlcti 

Met 

Otto 


- - C F 

26 79 18 64 d 

II U U 57 ih Beflfm 

29 84 15 61 lr 

28 82 15 59 fr 

M 75 10 SO tr 

18 64 11 SZ Sh Seoul 

19 66 14 57 0 snonuhal 

26 79 5 43 fr S ta e np ora 

21 70 12 54 a Taipei 

15 59 10 90 sfi Tolcyo 

26 79 23 73 Cl 

19 66 14 57 d 

16 61 12 54 stl 

29 84 14 57 rr 

20 58 12 94 q 

22 72 6 43 fr 

14 57 6 43 st 

27 81 17 63 IT 

28 82 22 72 lr 

24 75 18 64 a 

24 75 16 61 fr 

26 79 TO 58 fr 

M i » i * 5 *»2. A,r “ w s * « 'S 


AFRICA 

Al Were 


Cape Town 


Nairobi 

-rant* 


23 73 16 61 r 

30 86 19 66 lr 

20 58 7 45 fr 

25 77 20 68 d 

22 72 12 $4 cl 

37 81 24 75 o 


24 75 17 63 sh 

LATIN AMERICA 


21 70 9 48 

27 81 18 54 


15 61 4 39 

21 70 15 59 


■unrMavlk 

Rome 

Stockholm 

St ra sbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 


16 61 9 48 
8 46 4 43 


28 82 20 68 fr 

23 73 13 55 d 

Ria de Janeiro — — — — na 

NORTH AMERICA 


Caracas 
Uma 
Mexico cav 


70 85 5T AMhonwe 


M % 8 « « Ariema 


20 68 9 48 
23 73 15 59 


19 66 12 54 
13 £5 10 SO 
31 70 8 46 


BaWM 

Chloopo 


Zartdi 

MIDDLE EAST 

35 79 5 « fr 
20 82 11 53 ' 


Ankara 

Befirvt 

Damascus 

Jerusalem 

TelAvte 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 

SrdiHjY 


Detroit 
Haaalatu 
Haastwl 
Las AAflefm 
Mia ail 
Mfameapelb 


29 84 15 51 fr 


lr 

na Mantraal 


30 85 18 M fr New York 


13 55 -T 30 fr 

35 79 14 57 fr 

20 68 12 54 lr 

27 81 12 54 pc 

29 84 II 52 lr 

24 75 9 48 PC 

32 90 25 77 fr 

31 88 20 68 PC 

24 75 18 64 PC 

30 86 25 77 ST 

24 75 T7 53 PC 

22 72 9 48 »r 

31 88 21 70 d 

26 79 IS 59 fr 


Son FraedtCO 20 68 14 57 PC 


15 50 12 54 
20 58 12 54 


Seattle 
Toronto 
Wasfilfflftan 


15 61 11 52 sh 

20 68 5 43 lr 

28 82 13 55 fr 


SSU; foloSy fWMWK ^overcast.- wW dOUdr; r-rauif 
jh-showera; whikw: m-stwmv. 



Wbrld Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse Sept. 17 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

AEGON 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

A ’Dam Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

BuehrmannT 


g 495 JO 
230 
97 97 JD 

125J0 12460 
747.70 24X50 


CalandHMg 
■-NDU 


Elsevier- 
Fokker 
G**t Brocades 
Helnefcen 
Haooavens 
KLM 
Naarden 
Nat Ncddar 
Nedllavd 
Oce Vender G 
PaMuaa 
pumps 
Raboao 
Rodamca 
Rolinca 
Rarmio 
Royal Dutch 
Urri lever 
Van Ommerwi 
VMF Stark 
VNU 


30A50 
ILSO 
85 JOT 
216 
107 
■2?3B 


304 
8A0 
85J20 
215 
106 

— 30.au 

129 12630 
78 7450 

218.70 21 7 JO 
199.20 158.40 
61 M 61.10 
5060 5790 

4760 48 

74.20 7490 

190 18920 
347 346 

t& 6390 
50L10 49.70 

7620 7 (.JO 

13490 13490 
MJK 69 JO 
4470 4640 

19OJ0 191 

yT »n 2MM 

2790 27.10 

237 JO 24090 
224 223 


AHPjCBS Oat ., 

Previous : 21 9 JO 


Ipdeic : ZHUM 


Attied 

Bekaert 

Cockarlll 

Cobeoa 

EBES 

GEMnno-BM 

GBL 

Gavaert 

Hoboken 

Intercom 

KradMbank 

PetraAna 

Soc Generate 

Safina 

Sotvav 

TractPm Elec 

UCB 

Unerg 

VMIIe Montagna 


1735 1700 
6610 6600 
219 208 

3460 339® 

3200 52 

4125 4130 
2MB 1945 
4100 4050 

SSS SS8 

2309 7270 

9250 9150 


1865 1B50 
7840 7750 
5680 5438 


uw 


5160 

1730 

8550 


Comal Stack Indu : 345437 
Free huts : 2832J4 


AEG-Tatartunken 
Aiiioru Vers 
Altana 
BASF 
Bayer 

Bay Hype Bank 
Bov Vcrelnatxmfc 
BBC 

BHF-Bonk 

BMW 

Commenbank 
Coni Gwmml 
Daimler-Benz 
Deoussa 

Deutsche Babcock 
DeufKtw Bank 
Dresdner Bank 
GHH 

Ha metier 


147 14460 
1534 1501 
380 375 
227 JO 23448 


501 5C 
22410 X 
15650 U 


Close Pra*. I 

Hochtief 

735 

735 

Hoechst 


219 

Hooaeh 

12780 12530 I 

Horten 

W8 

12J 

Mussel 

398 

385 

IWKA 

3173031940 

Koli + Salz 

38350 379 JO 

Karstadl 

268 26050 

Kaufhal 

308 

303 

Kloeriuor hhD 

311J0 

3J0 


75 

7450 

Krunp Stahl 

121 

117 

Unde 

573 5555D | 

Lufthansa 

22850 22850 1 

MAN 

IM 

HI 

Mannesrmmn 

227.® 

221 

7<fiuenCh Rueck 

1920 

1930 

Nlxdort 

581-50 

576 

PKI 

494 

6® 


1406 

1395 


366 

268 

PWA 

14940 14930 

RWE 

197 19350 1 


370 

340 

Scherlno 

Bl 

SIS 

SEL 

34550 

345 


607 


Thyssen 

13650 13430 

Veba 

238 23330 

VaiKswaoemMrk 

345 

fS 


668 

6sa 

1 Conunenbcmk Index : 1534JB j 

Prevteas : 15U3B 



|| HaTOtitoftg J| 

Bk East Asia 

71® 

2250 


18 

1A40 

China Uaht 

15.10 

1530 


8JK 

8 


43 

4358 


220 

130 


930 



■ 

14 


1150 

1150 

HK Hotels 

35 

35M 

HK Land 

6.15 

635 

HKShana Bank 

735 

735 


■50 

■65 

HK You motel 

335 

3375 

HK Wharf 

633 


Mulch Whompoa 

2650 

2650 


051 

062 

Inri aiv 

058 

0.92 


11® 

12 


1350 






44 


New World 

755 

7® 


Soso. 


SHK Props 

1240 

1340 

5Mux 

250 

239 


245D 



1.98 

HI 

Wah Kwano 

045 

an 

Wheeladc A 

SUSP. 



132 

130 

Wlnsor 

World Inn 

430 

2.W 



156958 

Pmrlovs : 1MJ3 



II ntm f 1! 


WM 361 
177JD178J0 
599 591 

27BJ0 Z7U50 
2D3J0 IK , 
320 323 j 


AECI 

Anglo American 
Anglo Am Geld 
Barlows 
Biwoar 
Buffeb 
De Beers 
DTMOrtMin 
Elands 


760 

3225 3200 
18300 18200 
1100 1110 

i£2 35 

7250 7200 

1 


1165 

IP 48751 

1750 1738 


25® m 

2750 Z750 

sa m 

2100 2MD 
1085 1075 
S950 5BJO 
1760 17S0 
725 728 

3225 ^ 
770 770 

6800 6800 


51215 

278 


512 

278 


222 

136 

374 

574 

Z76 

330 


36 

503 

279 

202 


BP 

Brit Home St 
Brit T elecom 


52S 

% 

198 


222 

ru 

377 

330 

221 

34 

i 

S3! 


Britell 
BTR 
Bur mail 
cable Wireless 


Charter Gam 
Co mm ercial U 


KUOS 

□ataefv 
De Beers* 
Dunnera 
DrWtonhHn 
Fhan* _ 
Free StGed 
GEC 

OenAcddent 
GKN 
Glaxo C 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Gubmess 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

IC! 

imperial Group 


am 

293 

575 

142 

1>S 

224 

442 
165 
436 

443 


190 

403 

203 

3® 

jW 

573 

142 

1C 


147 


443 

386 

S18% 51W; 

351 -3S 

821 * 

166 166 

*15 S2 

327 220 

m. 13 19764 
336 
M 
277 


Land Seal rl lies 
Legal General 
Lloyds Bank 
Lertfho 
Lixttt 

Marks and Sp 
M etal box 
M idland Bank 
No) West Bank 
PandO 
PUUfwton 


Si 

664 

190 

287 

2N 


ISO 


699 


Prudential 
ftocolEtad 
H and ta nta in 

Rwdlntt 

RaYd^DvIch E 4J47/M 

SSdB i 1 

SeareHoidlra l" .lA 


670 
277 
■63 
204 

387 
662 
IN 

284 
294 
M4 
401 
150 
382 
152 

698 
392 
639 
406 
275 
136 
682 

3801* S»M 

699 30 
332 


154 


392 


Shan 

STC 

Sid Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tate and Lyle 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
Tj.Graop 
TrafalaarHse 
THF 
Ultramar 
U ni lever C 
Unhed Biscuits 
Vickers 
Woolworlti 


673 

678 

88 

» 

432 

434 

456 

453 

* 

m 

260 

250 

374 

382 

3® 

383 

365 

373 

140 

141 

203 

206 

1021/32 

10% 

179 

1® 

» 

2® 

478 

483 


F.T. 30 indns M82JB 

Previous : 1M7JV 

KuauBi «« : !»«• 

Previous : 139038 


Banco Comm 
Centra le 
Osa hotels 
Cradltai 
ErWonla 
Farm Hallo 
Fiat 

Generali 

IF1 

H olewnentl 

Itelgas 

UabnobHIarl 

Mcdk*anea 

Montadtsan 

Olivetti 

ptraffl 

RA5 

Rtaasconte 

S1P_ 

SME 

SnkJ 

Slanda 

Stel 


24680 23 HO 
3645 3411 

TOJ® 

2995 2890 
11490 11499 
13510 13490 
4474 4387 
64060 62750 
105SO U400 
50490 49000 
1810 1772 

13230013000 

2445 2OT 
7770 7795 
32W 3180 
112900109297 
960 ?29 

2659 2605 
1535 1465 
3900 .3M0 
15300 14350 
3698 3681 


mib Currant Index : I74S 
Prevkws : T7tfl 


AfrUaulde 
AJsthatn AIL 
Av DastauH 
Bancoira 
BIC 

Batigraln 


Carretour 

Onraetirs 

Club Med 

Darty 

Dumaz 

ElMMultalne 

Euraoel 

GanEaux 

Hacnetia 

Lotorwe Cop 

uegrand 

Lesieur 

roreal 

MarMI 

Moira 

Merlin 

MWheiln 

Mod Hermesey 

pe tned Rlc 

Perrier 

Peugeot 

PrtnfemM 

Rodatadm 

Ptattar fB 

Roussel Udof 

Sanaa 

SJtB RossKmol 
T e H meca n__ 
Thomson CSF 
Total 


s 


1422 


570 CT3 
30200 29^5 
HW 

640 640 

m 5M 
157C 15® 
740 JM1 

2178 V* 

1 

Uta iS 

7*2 JOB 
195J0 J97 

685 715 

630 ,05 
1411 1422 

2075 

600 

JOT 2312 

iSM ss 

16® 1701 

aoao am 

R J® 

Tf 728 
691 

1450 M2 
1512 1588 

635 

1361 

“38 - 

z» 229 JO 


Aswfl Index; 

Prwtaw:»f3L 

CACinoex ;«1^B 
Prevtaut:3TU0 


Cold Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Heave 
How Par 
mchcoM 
Mol Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 
OOE , 

ShangrHa 
SI me Darby 
Spare Land 
Spore Press 
5 Steamship 
SITrocflnO 
Untied Overseas 
UOB 

Slndfs Time* tad Index : 75740 
Prevkms ; 75431 . 


2740 270 
5J15 4.96 
S75 Hfl. 
117 116 

NJQ. 1U 
570 165 
770 770 

243 243 

214 214 

176 NjQ. 
174 174 

2.10 215 
5.55 NjQ. 
bus 082 
206 3JQ 
1J7 L54 
342 236 


Full Photo 
FuUtw 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 

Japan Air Lines 
KaUma 

Konsat Power , 
Kawasaki Sleel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kvocera 
Mafsu Eleclmfs 


AGA 

AMa Laval 


128 U8 
200 3 ® 


298 310 


Astro 
ANoxt — 
BaUden 
Electrotox 
Ericsson 


405 

118 118 


... NjQ. 
143 143 

229 OT 

h-Q. W® 

173 176 

■s 

93 


Hondelsba*en 
P h ormocto ^ 

Soob-Scania 4« 

SamMk 

Skanska ® _K 

bvc 223 B* 

SwedlshMafrSt W ™ 

Volvo 233 

Aftotawmjtora index ; 3MJ8 
pievtaa»i38IJl 


ACI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Boral 

BougalmrBle 

Co efi eniolne 

cates 

Comotoo 

CRA 

C5R 

Duntop 

Elders tad 

ici Australia 

Magellan 

mim 


Nat Asst Bank 
Hew* Carp 

NT ' 


273 271 

480 482 

7 JO 7J6 
382 380 

186 185 

8 < 
488 485 

Ltt 188 
546 S54 
3J4 118 
251 256 

344 342 

210 210 
230 230 
263 265 

X48 344 

476 475 
7 • 7.10 
243 245 


QWCooJ Trust 


Thomui ftolkw, 

ymtm fSS ^ g 


173 174 

544 ' 574 
220 218 
183 188 
470 475 
1J0 UO 


ABOntota ritato dex: 96M8 


Tofry 


AstMChem 
AecMGtoSf 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 


Casio 

Cltoh 

Dal Nippon PrM 
Dehvo House _ 
Daton Securities 
Fanuc . 

Pull Bank 


390 . 390 
779 781 

805 H3 
781 7® 

553 548 

ion mo 
MM 1660 
429 43< 

WO 1940 
■74 258 

900 9® 

80®. 81® 
1590 UN 


925 ?38 

660 679 

MM 

1B20 1790 
MB- 146 
693 . 6«0 
SO SU 
OT * 

1200 1350 


Sates Stock 


Matsu Etoc WOrks ®6 m 
MiHutrtsW Bonk 1470 T4M 
Mttsubtml Qiem 
Mitsubishi Elec 
MftsuWsW Heavy 
MitsubisM Cara 

Mitsui and Co 
MftSdfcOSM 
Mitsumi 
NEC . 

NGK Insulalore 
wikfcbiec . 

Nippon Kooofca 
Nippon OU 
Nippon Steel 
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Prev i ous; laseue 
New index : M9M 
Previous : 186938 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1985 


SPORTS 


Scotland’s ' Big Man’ Departs at 62 


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■ I n\TAA ri *™**-l Menu Tribute 

■ e xo^d^iedJ* , Aanonsof atragic summer are far from 

aad Wednesday, when major soccer so 
palpahjy needed to radwte joy. a instead emphasized £ 

shoots ^* ** barTCn ” 3CCtIon adventure, te lethal off- 

ne^S!?5 :i t p European cities produced five 

negative stalemates. The only losers w*w rh» 


newzS-rP? European cities produced five 

egativc stalemates. The only losers were the French, those 

Rob Hughes 

^ « P“*“l sk goals were wrong 
■*2£-W play m front of a qumter of a rnfflioa 

y Merd^hy, the fans behaved. Some players did not Icidr- 
• ™8 at fellow professionals, with cynical disregaidfor die 


That he should, at 31. c ap ta in Cd tic to the league and 
Scottish Cup double of 1934 speaks volumes for his charac- 
ter. 

When i njur y lennmied play, Stein molded youngsters 
who would be the foundation of the finest club sick Scotland 
(and possibly all of Britain) had ever seen. 

Men of the caliber of Billy McNeil], Bobby Lennox. 
Tommy Geamafl and Bertie Auld swore that Stan made 
diem what They are. David Hay. now Celtic’s manager, and 
Kenny Dalglish, Liverpool's player-manager, came later kit 
saythesame. 

They all knew the wrath of the big man, the kick up the 
backside when they brokedub disripBne; they also knew the 
guidance, the interest in them as individuals, the lust for the 
game that were Stein’s. 

His 1967 team broadened Scottish soccer’s horizons. By 
outplaying Inter. Milan to win the European Cup final, by 
i - - - relentlessly att a c k i n g and stripping down the destructive 

~ wJci Welsh and Scottish players collided with «=tvb caientiodo defense of Hdenio Herrera, Celtic hauled soccer 
ferocity, sucb dansirophobic intensity, that another out of a phase as unwanted as today’s. 
tL' - - Stein’s instruction was simply to “defend in the other 

- ltus bmeir was somebody famous. Jock Stem, Scotland’s team’s penalty area.”, 
uuuiajger for seven years, collapsed and died at the fowl . Of necessity, an early Italian goal obliged Celtic to com- 
wtustle. ply, and after the 2-1 Scottish triumph the late Bill Shankly, 

was among the most revered, genres in what we another legendary team-builder, said: “Jock, you are now 
abmrdly caflagame.. manorial.” 

** e loved, and feared; (he damn game so natch it killed O 

p- A Protestant leading his country’s premier Catholic dub, 

Kather the awful stress — tire winner-iake-all disease that Stein earned at least a second bar to immortality. Celtic was 
[~ once knew how to handle — overburdened the heart he champion under him 10 times, including 1971, when he had 
warned wa al risk. rebuilt an aging side from scratch. 

-Kong “tire bigman,” as he wasJcnown and m many ways The clamor for Sirin to take over Scotland’s national 

really was, earned from the touchline provoked numbing squad was finally answered in 1971 
soockjouite why ^difficult to rationalize. The football association's stinginess and the big man’s 

. s *^ e 7 we have not forgotten leading managers in En- price had kept them poles apart while Scotland lurched from 
toe Netherlands, Czechoslovakia and West Germany tournament to tournament, kanukazi on the fidd, hara-kiri 
who have suffered heart attacks in the past two years. Or tire drunk off it 

Yugoslav national team physician who died suddenly during I truly believe Stein was never able to give Scotland his 

the 1984 European championship. best. He was 56 when he accepted, already warned to slow 

It begins to look endemic, an industrial hazard in an down because of a suspect bean 
overstressed industry. He had survived near-fatal chest injuries in a 1975 car 

ffgoveranKiitswcrenot themselves sometimes so ready to crash, when he — a noted teetotaler — was the victim of a 



tire 1984 European chaimjHmship. best. He was 

It begins to look endemic, an industrial hazard in an down becans 
overstressed industry. He hadsu 

ff governments were not themselves sometimes so ready to crash, wheat 
exploit the sport’ s emotive potency, they might slap a health drunk driver, 
warning on il But was he quite so sure of hinwlf afterward, quite so 

■ The vulnerability of managers is obvious. Thar perform- demanding of players, quite so courageous? 
mg days over, they become sedentary overlords, living fay Stein’s brand of management may never have translated 
results that depend increasingly upon others’ physical out- to tire national level At Celtic he lived players' lives with 
Pul them, often from adolescence; with Scotland he borrowed 

Stein’s deification m his life time in Scotland came in part men a few days at a tune, 
from his persuading players to gjve everything and then, in His priorities had been a settled team playing patient 
the words of one Critic player . u to extract a further percent- soccer from the back, “cutting out fighting football.” Vet his 
age.” selections were restless — 32 players in his first 1 1 matches 

At Glasgow Celtic in the 1960s, the big man instilled in his — and his tactical variations were beyond even the senior 
team spirit akin to his own during his II years as a hewer of men he often chose. 

coa). The pressure in Cardiff last week was enormously self-in- 

Underground for eight hours a day, Stem once observed dneed. Having, as Stein generously conceded been out- 
no man could count his work done until his mates had fought try Wales in Glasgow, ibe Scots had to draw to avoid 
finished too: Through respect, fear and love, they ins tine- elimination. 

lively watched out for one another. Draw they did, by a horrendously tortuous route. Warring 

There was more miner than footballer in Jock Stan in instincts, deplored by Stan, disfigured the start and cost 


P> om Sport] 

Jock Stein in 1970 

...A victim in an overstressed industry. 

er system disintegrated and Scotland was a goal down. Blood 
pressure stayed high for an hour. Only when Wales sagged, 
when substitute Davie Cooper ran at ibe Welsh with an old- 
fashioned winger’s flair, did the Scots threaten. 

They were saved by a lucky penalty, awarded after the ball 
struck — surely unintentionally — a Welsh hand. Every Scot 
m the stadium, except Stein, leapt to his feet 
Stein did rise on. or fractionally before, the final whistle, 
apparently to remonstrate with a photographer. He fell, 
holding tus chesL Whether he appreciated that his mission 
was accomplished we shall never know. 

Al least we should not deny that the substitution of 
Cooper for Gordon Sirachan was the master's shrewd last 
act of courage. Tune will tell if it gets Scotland to the World 


Cup finals. 

Had the big man not left so early, at 62, we might now be 
contemplating tire first round of European club competi- 
tions. Alas, we would be saying they are denuded, or rid, of 
English clubs that dominated the past decade. 

There is no getting away from tragedy, no hint that the 
business contains enough of a game to bring better times. 


those days. A leggy centerbalf, hard and left-footed, he (fid 
not ex tract a living from soccer until he was 27 — and then as 
a Celtic reserve 


instincts, deplored by Stan, disfigured the start and cost 
Alex McLeisn a booking for a foul that could have ended Ian 
Rush's season. 

Then two defenders collided, Stein’s experimental sweep- 



Baseball 


U.S College Team and Indmcbal Leaders 


TEAM DEPEMSf 


lowo 
Stanford 
Southern caL 
Arkansas 
Iowa stale 
Miami (Fta.) 
Utah State 
Arizona 
Kentucky 
Wake Forest 


Nev.-ua Vegas 
western Mich. 
Mlsstsafopi 
Baylor 

’^iatre Dar-e 
“Air Force 
Te«a» ASM 


HSS Mm Slat* 

Arizona 

Car Yds Yds 00 Arizona 5*. 

■jj .34 - 34 j) Miss. Slat* 
. D Si -37 J) Stanford 


Bynum. Ore st 
Foeete. Minn 

B9 I S2 lilt Stodlln, Vo 
139 407 ares vrortav. Ky 
73 717 7J7J Reyela, Tern 
1*0 jrp mm McCollum, Now 

II ssj 2244 HWtflektWBStVO 

172 416 817 IMICfi MtoSt 


m nuu 

3 0 0 IB tkfl 

0 4 4 16 UJ) 

0 2 4 M 14X 

■ 2 4 14 MJ 

4 0 0 34 120 

4 0 0 34 T20 

4 0 0 24.120 


College Top 20 s 

The fop 20 foams fat The Associated Press 
U.S. coileoe football poll tHrsl Hoa wfos In 
taereotMHS, season records, total points 
booed on 2B.lO-IVl7.etc. aad last week's rook- 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Dhrbhm 

W L PCt. GB 


29 

33 

3X0 

Air Fora 

147 464 

2323 

34 

35 

3U 

Dofca 

132 502 

2513 

57 

70 

3U 

Atataomo 

117 508 

2543 

69 

95 

473 


TRAM OFFENSE 


68 

98 

493 


Seortou 


21 

53 

533 


G P» 

Avg 


62 108 5*0 lawa 

■p Air Force 

AttepYdsVdsno Army 
20 6 70 3SJB Indiana 

19 « 93 4L5 Stanford 

31 15 101 SOS Vfrvtnlo 

31 9 M0 7M Autaim 

17 7 74 740 5oa*h Candida 

36 16 164 S 20 Wisconsin 

12 r « KO Kansas 


1 58 580 

2 97 48 S 
1 41480 
I 41410 
1 41 410 

1 4Q40O 

2 78 390 
2 76 380 
I 38 380 


Narsettw Kansas 
TtUtoftnsn. Tenft 
Everett. Purdue 
Bradley, imf 
Bosca 8YU 
RansdMl Ky 
Tipton, Hawaii 
Cemeiandr. Rice 
TestavrdeJAia FI 
FeeeJe, Mm 


Tam Otfowso 

Yds A VO Yds DO 
s 174 94 4370 

A 417 94 4170 

) 381 *4 3B1J 

37J 84 3750 
IQS? 7.1 3530 
335 82 3350 
627 64 3130 
» 310 04 3100 

PI 600 70 3000 

297 11.9 7970 


Miss. Stato 

S& 17 177 883 

Wisconsin 

14 4 w no 

Texas Tecta 

39 15 185 .923 


SWIM 


G Pts Avg 

lawa 

1 0 03 

Michigan SI. 

1 3 33 

lawa Slat* 

1 3 33 

Armv 

1 6 63 

Fresno St. 

1 6 63 

Air Fare* 

2 13 63 

Ohio Stole 

1 7 73 

Stanford 

1 7 73 

Miss. State 

2 17 83 

Arizona 

2 17 83 


Total DOfMHt 


p lavs Yds Ydspg 

lawa 

64 148 1483 


INDIVIDUAL 


Jackson. Auburn 


Pohnar. remote 


Car Yds Awo Yds P0 
53 415 94 2474 
10 428 54 2140 
22 180 82 1800 
3? 174 44 1740 
55 335 6.1 1674 


1 38 380 Pawn. E Mich 

2 75 374 Jw*«n. Auburn 

•LDovts. TCU 
Tnomas. OblaSl 
Looan, Ky 
Muster. StanW 
/a Yds oa Palmer. Temple 
94 2474 Bariolc. CotaSt 
54 2M0 McCollum, Nvy 
82 1800 Sworn, Mia O 


AIMtarpose Runners 
Rush Rec PR KOR Yds YdSPg 


118 *7 0 107 312 3120 
n 4*5 0 0 0 495 2474 
153 81 0 0 233 ZOO 
428 4 JO 0 462 2310 
94 3? 0 77 210 2100 
95 107 0 0 202 SOLO 
i 335 40 0 21 396 1980 
280 85 8 0 365 1824 
230 87 21 24 362 1810 
180 0 Q 0 180 1800 
loterc en Wons 

G No Yds TD IPG 


1 .Auburn (23) 
2Dklohafna (23) 
34outhern CM (61 
Liowa IS) 

5_So. Methodist (3) 
6. Florida state 
7-Ohio State 
OOklahomo Slate 
9.L4U 

IkPotwi Stale 

11. Florida 

12. UCLA 

HBrtMwm Yeung 
1 (Arkansas 
i54outh Carolina 
lAAIabomo 
17.Maryland 
lBXebraska 
l?MicMaan 
3B.iUlnob 


Recant Pts Bw 


207 18 

127 

93 19 


Tennis 


Pro Leaders 


MEN 

C cin U od i 


Cannon. 5444436. 5, Baris BeOcnr.Wl 
%Sers Jorryfl, 5299418. 7. Tim M| 
5277.704. a joaklm Nvstrom. 

Lid, Noah, 534W78 1W Tomas SfflM. *3 
Grand PYU Potass 


tSers JariYtL lUlW a MHostav M edr. 1481 . 
Mayotte. 14Da Ufa ***** Nystram. 

1,171 comm lor UoMms 


n^lOlUT.i.KdVtaCurrwe M** YZZZ Zendelas. Art 
AinQ. 7, Andm JofTvu. Bias. «• w** 1 * i »a ucla 

^^8 9. Staton Esoenk 5800. ilLJea. £^tah« 

kl m Nvstaam. -■» C(M!I| TZ&fiSr 

Etvnlnv* Dawson. Fla 

. Martino Nowrafflaya. SI.12S079. 2. Chn* 

'■ S762449. 1 Hana Mondllkova, 

^^■4.HelerMSukovn.g4X a P.aClau<flo Miai0Ti snjnM 

SSTkiwR. JocMDn '*^ 

i«— * Canadia 

-.ri.Fwari Ltayd.1.9Q8.1»oritnaNcivro- 
Kdhde-Wls49».Mre. 4. 

^jLGabrielaSat¥rtIfjl,8®-*< He *** w: * u,tI3V,t RfoOwaY,Sask 

ia ^ B50 ' Hoy. Cat 

re ' ****** **** 

9 - — 1 Dorsey. Ol» 

P Transition J SCsST 

* * — 1 Routt Hem 

BASEBALL Jenkins. BT. 

Amertodo Leogoe 

SE ATTL E-^r5 e S»w dSSwSetL 

^nteider.lTOP* “J^p^^^^joiheenody- 

1 1 poffU* 1 _. LU ta f nf ttm war. WUlOflpWl 

0 twH tar «* remahv*r ‘* m w. ej^so^ 

in* FOOTBALL cntMtl 

Brown. Ott 


XWUiams^ram 

25 156 62 1560 

wMta, Tom 

1 3 44 0338 

tCDovta. TCU 

26 152 63 1523 

Thurman, So Cal 

1 2 20 0 238 

Hnttartt L5U 

31 142 43 1420 

Moore. OfcuSi 

2 3 79 1 130 

Harare. UTEP 

58 434 7J 1413 

Walker. E Care 

2 3 34 0 130 

Sonata, CotoSI 

44 280 63 1403 

NormnatnOn SI 

2 3 29 0 730 


Passers 

Glenn. 5W La 

3 3 45 1 130 


Rating 

Ttamas BYU 

3 3 40 0 138 


Alt Cp YdsTds Pis 

Henry, NM St 

2 2 90 1 130 

Statataurr3o Col 

IS » 164 2 2IB3 

Martian. BnfGm 

2 2 83 2 130 

BaO, Fla 

54 39 584 7 1933 

Coen. Art* 

2 2 IS 0 130 

Noraoth, Kansas 

67 45 798 4 I860 


Puatteg 

TiLRobnsn. Venn 

35 25 387 2 M33 


No Avg 

Dewberry. GoTecfi 28 10 177 3 1722 

Colbert. Auburn 

8 483 

Kins. SMU 

21 It Bl 1 1693 

Keller, NewMox 

15 483 

F. White, WakoFr 

56 44 296 5 163.9 

Preacher. Oregon 

11 453 

Santas, SD St 

33 16 209 2 1572 

Adler, MO 

4 45J 

Tfoton. Hawaii 

72 41 626 5 152.9 

Kidd. Rice 

4 457 

McCoIrv. Clncy 

69 39 5M 61513 

Tatar, Kv 

4 453 


■tecMvers 

GJohnsoivBiNlGra 

11 453 


Gras a YOsCf 00 

Burdick. Clncy 

16 44.9 

Muster. Stanfd 

1 11 W7 113 

Cenlcky. Wls 

4 445 

Aden, fnd 

I M ?49 UtB 

Dllwea Duke 

10 443 

Carter. Pursue 

1 10 93 mo 

Pom Return* 

Scott. Purdue 

1 9 « 93 


No Yds TD Avg 

Bynum, Ore St 

2 17 252 X5 

London Array 

S IK 0 213 

Lockett. UtgScft 

2 17 MB 83 

Odornes. Wls 

3 61 0 203 

Hilton, Houstai 

1 8 94 S3 

Green. Duke 

4 77 1 19J 

James. LSU 

1 8 72 83 

Everett. Bov tor 

6 104 1 173 

Winfield, NaCara 

2 15 273 73 

Austin. Pitt 

3 45 0 153 

O, Wiliams. Ill 

2 15 196 73 

Redick, Fuirtn 

5 69 0 133 

Plata Goals 

shorn*, smu 

3 41 0 13J7 


FGA FG Pet PGPG 

Glenn. SW La 

11 149 1 135 

Wortov, Kv 

4 4 1300 430 

Thurman, TxTecta 

7 91 0 133 

Revolt. Term 

4 4 1300 COO 

Mathews. E Mlcta 

2 25 8 123 

Carney. Notre D 

4 4 1300 COO 

Kkxott Retants 

Stodlln, Vo 

5 4 300 430 


No Yds TD Avg 

Zondotas, Artz 

ra 7 jaoxsa 

Fullfrvtn, Wis 

2 114 (81 

Leo, UCLA 

5 5 U»B 258 

Gtvins. Lsvlle 

4 177 1 442 

Gamer. UtataSt 

3 5 1MD2J0 

Punirktoe, No 111 

3 KB > 42J 

THfUL Atabmo 

6 5 333150 

Tucker. Utah 

5 204 1 403 

Guardi. Utah 

6 5 338258 

Calhoun. Fuirtn 

4 156 1 393 

Dawson. Fla 

4 4 1300 230 

Walker, TxTecta 

3 118 0 367 


Scoring 

Ambraaa, Miss 

3 100 0 333 


TD XP FG Pts PtPg 

T Jackson, Go 

3 93 0 313 

Musier. StanW 

4 0 0 24 243 

Kelley. Tulsa 

4 109 0 272 

Jackson. Auburn 

6 0 0 * 180 

RoAck. Fuirtn 

5 136 0 274 


Ike United press Mtematianai Beard ef 
Coaches too 7S cnltaee foattxdl rattaes (first- 
elect votes and recefdk la parentheses. tetM 
prints, baiad an 15-14.tj.tl etc. and tail 
week's l a g gings ); 

1. Auburn (23) (2-0) 549 2 

Z Oklahoma (101 (00) 52S 1 

X Southern Cal (5) (1-0) 446 3 

4. lawa (1-0) 408 7 

5. Ohio Slate (1-8) 406 4 

6. Florida State (11 400 5 

7. Oklahoma State (I) (20) 381 6 

a Penn State 0-0) 777 ? 

9. Louisiana Stale (1-01 717 10 

WL Brigham Young (2-11 196 13 

1J. South Carmine (20) 164 )J 

IX Alabama (20) 162 16 

IX UCLA 11-0-1) 143 8 

14. Aricansoe (1-0) 122 15 

IS Michigan (l-Oi IDS z 

16. Mary land (1-11 88 18 

17. NehrtBfca 10-1) 64 14 

ia west Virginia 120) 63 17 

t*. Arizona (20) 12 z 

19. Tanas (Ml 12 28 

(z-Unronked loot week) 

(Bv agreement with the American Football 
Coaches Association, teams on NCAA or con- 
ference probation are Ineligible for cansJder- 
ationhy UP). Currently an erebatlan are Flor- 
ida ana Southern MelhedlsU 


NFL Standings 

AMERICAN CONFERENCE 


Toronto 

*1 

52 

A36 

— 

New York 

86 

57 

301 

5 

Baltimore 

_ _ 26. 66 

335 

14ft 

Detroit 

73 

70 

310 

18 

Boston 

71 

73 

393 

2Dfo 

Milwaukee 

63 

79 

344 

27VJ 

Cleveland 

51 

93 

363 

J9v» 


(Most Division 




Kansas City 

82 

61 

373 

— 

California 

80 

63 

359 

2 

Chicago 

73 

69 

314 

8ta 

Oakland 

78 

74 

386 

12to 

Seattle 

47 

74 

349 

15 

Minnesota 

46 

79 

3S5 

17 

Texas 

52 

97 

364 

20 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 




East Division 





W L 

Pet 

GB 

St. Louta 

88 

55 

315 

— 

New York 

87 

54 

308 

1 

Montreal 

77 

46 

338 

11 

Pnitadetotala 

69 

73 

38* 

11 

Chicago 

66 

76 

365 

21VJ 

Pittsburgh 

47 

*4 

333 

40 


West Division 




Los Angeles 

84 

» 

387 

— 

Cincinnati 

76 

46 

315 

7Vj 

Houston 

73 

70 

310 

11 

Son Diego 

72 

71 

303 

12 

Atltota 

60 

83 

320 

24 

Son Frandsco M 

87 

392 

28 


ranadifln Football League Leaders 


SCORING Greer, Ter 

TD C PG S Pis Tolbert. CM 
- 0 38 28 12 118 Bovd. Woo 


Miami 

New England 
N.V. Jets 
Buffalo 
Indianapolis 

Clavatond 

Houston 

Pittsburgh 

Clndiwetl 

Kansas Otv 
Seattle 
Denver 
LA. Raiders 
San Diego 


W L T PW. PF PA 
1 1 0 iOO 53 39 

1 I 0 -S00 33 40 

1 1 0 500 <2 34 

0 2 0 JXO 12 56 

0 2 0 AN 16 75 

Control 

1 1 0 SCO 41 34 

1 1 0 JU 39 39 

1 1 8 SOD 52 20 

0 2 0 J»0 51 69 

West 

2 0 0 LOO 83 47 

3 0 0 1JJO0 77 59 

1 1 0 500 SO 43 

1 1 0 JDO 51 36 

1 1 0 SOD 49 58 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
East 


jsssj-j-safssr*; 

.«s&s=ss=s= 

if ~~jocc er 

rrtrtf L*«- KOOBd 

-“"j ; 5 £KS 


0 

28 

U 

14 

98 

Ellis. Sask. 

67 

773 

70J 

3 

St Louis 

2 

0 

0 

7M0 

68 

0 

20 

U 

13 

87 

Kollv, Edm 

87 

642 

17.9 

3 

Dallas 

1 

i 

8 

300 

65 

O 

14 

1# 

U 

S3 

AlrWae. Off 

37 

444 

173 

3 

N.Y. Glams 

1 

i 

e 

390 

41 

0 

20 

18 

2 

74 

Sanduskv. B.C 

33 

408 

183 

5 

Washington 

1 

i 

0 

300 

30 

0 

14 

17 

9 

74 


PUNTING 



PhltodefoMo 

0 

2 

0 

JU 

6 

8 

33 

11 

9 

75 


NO 

Ydk 

Avg 

Lb 


Central 




12 

8 

0 


72 

Dixon. Edm 

77 

3427 

47.1 

72 

Chicago 

2 

0 

0 

LD0Q 

58 

0 

T7 

u 

14 

72 

Clark. Ott 

•? 

4158 

467 

78 

Detroit 

7 

0 

0 

1500 

54 

9 

0 

0 

0 

54 

RuoH, Ham 

79 

HOfr 

453 

77 

Minnesota 

2 

0 

0 

1300 

59 

RUSHING 





Cameron. Wpg 

70 

3173 

453 

93 

Green Bay 

1 

1 

8 

300 

a 

NO 

Yds Avg TD 

Passes ita. B.C 

82 

3449 

447 

68 

Tampa Bov 

8 

2 

0 

300 

44 

168 

•S2 

&1 

.7 

liesic. Tor 

98 

4223 

411 

81 


west 




13 1 

7W 

53 

4 

Hav, Cni 

83 

2528 

423 

77 

LA Rams 

2 

0 

0 

urn 

37 

75 

528 

« 

7 

MCTasue, MU 

84 

35*3 

412 

65 

Sen Frandsco 

i 

1 

8 

JK 

Si 

57 

488 

15 

A 

PUNT RETURNS 



Atlanta 

a 

2 

8 

MO 

43 

47 

34* 

W 

0 


NO 

Yds 

Avg 

TD 

Nov* Orleans 

0 

J 

0 

MO 

58 


Clash, BX. 
Zena Ott 
Sleefe. Wpg 
Corine), Tor 
Woods, Bdm 



PASSING 




Trettlln, Edm 

31 

263 

85 

0 


Att 

Com Yds 

Ini TO 

Fraser, Sask 

38 

254 

6.7 

0 

Dun loan. Edm 

291 

183 

2932 

U 

15 

Bennett. Horn 

22 

224 

103 

D 

Bamaifa Cal 

328 

193 

2602 

14 

11 

Sanduskv. BjC 

10 

205 

70S 

0 

Oetnonts, Wag 

20 

185 

2440 

13 

12 

Yeung, Mtl 

30 

202 

67 

8 

Poooao. Sask 

399 

181 

238012 

6 

KICKOFF RETURNS 



Dewall. B.C 

273 

168 

2341 

7 

14 


NO 

Yds 

Avg 

TO 

Walts, on 

276 

144 

1996 

14 

9 

Zeno. CW 

23 

507 

2X1 

8 

GUL MJI 

282 

ITS 

MB 

12 

1 

Jenkins. BX. 

17 

389 

225 

0 

Hebert, Hem 

2 S 

121 

.1517 

7 

9 

FtafdA Ham 

16 

361 

2U 

0 

Jordon. Soak 

133 

19 

1223 

5 

3 

Townsend, Tor 

16 

360 

225 

0 

Holloww. Tar 

153 

96 

1146 

3 

6 

phoson.Mii 

12 

314 

262 

D 

PASS RECEIVING 



Eiarms. Sask 

U 

• 274. 

2L1 

0 


Fcnmoez. 8.C. 
EKwora Sask . 
PentawtkL Wpg 


No Yds Avg TP 
57 947 IdS 7 

51 891 1X4 3 

48 826 172 4 


Cota rtwn*. ott 
Edwards, Otl 
5klmer. Edm 
Jones, Edm 


268 2X3 D 

239 19.9 8 

239 184 0 

214 264 0 


M u edayY Remit 
Cleveland 17 . Pittsburgh J 

SCHEDULE 
SapL 19 

Chicago at Minnesota 

Sent. 28 

Cleveland at DaRas 
Denver at Atlanta 
DataoJi at UMlaneaans 
Ho u ston al Pittsburgh 
New England at Buffalo 
Philadelphia at Washington 
Tampa Bay at Now Orleans 
sl Lewis at N.Y. Giants 
San Dfogo at Cincinnati 
Kansas Otv at Miami 
N.Y. Jets vs. Green Bay al MRwautue 
Son Frond ico at lA Raiders 
Sat. 23 

LA Rams at Seattle 


Gooden and Tudor Match Victories, 
But Cardinals Widen Lead Over Mets 


Compiled t r Orn Stajf tmn Dtiputcbes 

NEW YORK — Within the race 
for the National League East tide 
between the St. Louis Cardinals 
and the New York Mets. John Tu- 
dor and Dwight Gooden are wag- 
ing an individual war. 

Until recently it appeared cer- 
tain that Gooden would add the Cy 
Young Award to the rookie of tire 
year designation be earned last sea- 
son. Now Tudor is firmly in the 
picture: the divisional title as well 
as recognition as the league's top 

f iitcber seems to hinge on their per- 
ormances in the stretch run. 

Both recorded victories on Mon- 
day. but the Cardinals moved a full 
game ahead of the Mets by sweep- 
ing a doublebeadrr in Pittsburgh. 

Gooden raised his record to cl-4 
with a two-hit, i I -strikeout perfor- 
mance in a 9-0 thrashing of Phila- 
delphia at Shea Stadium. Gooden 
ran his streak of shutout innings to 
31. tying him with Tudor for the 
longest m the majors this season 
and leaving him two-thirds of an 
inning short of the Met record. 

in becoming I985’s first 21-game 
whiner in the majors, Gooden also 
tied a franchise mark with his sev- 
enth shutout of the year. He has 
struck out at least 10 batters 25 
times in his two-year, career. 

“After the third inning ! realized 
I had a pretty good fastball.’' said 
Gooden. 20. who had two hits and 
drove in two runs. 

Gary Carter had a three-run 
homer and a run-scoring single. 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

Loser Kevin Gross lasted 3*5 in- 
nings. surrendering nine hits and 
six earned runs. 

.After a 1-8 start. Tudor im- 
proved to 19-8 with an 8-4 victory 
in the opener. His siring of score- 
less innings was snapped by Bill 
Almon's grand-slam m tbe fourth. 
Tudor allowed eight hits, walked 
four and struck out two in his six 
innings of work. 

“1 didn't imagine this would be 
happening.” said Tudor, who has 
supplanted Joaquin Andujar as the 
ace of the Cardinal staff. “It’s been 
fun. I’ve always fdt I was a half- 
decent pitcher — not a yearly 20- 
game winner — but that I could 
win J4, 15. 16 games a year.” 

Andy Van Slyke and Terry Pen- 
dleton each drove in two runs in 
support of Tudor. In tbe nightcap, 
Willie McGee singled borne Vince 
Coleman in the eighth inning to 
break a 1-1 tie and tbe Cards went 
on to a 3-1 decision. 

Padres 4, Dodgers 2: In San Die- 
go, Carmelo Martinez hit a three- 
run seventh-inning home run that 
broke a M tie -and lifted tbe Pa- 
dres. 

Reds 7, Giants 6: In Cincinnati. 
Gary Red us raced home from third 
on Mark Davis's wild pitch with 
one out in the I lib to give the Reds 
their victory. 

Astros 7, Braves 2: In Atlanta, a 
four-hitter gave Jeff Heathcock his 


first major-league complete game, 
and JcwS Cruz. Jerry Muznphrey 
and Denny Walling bomered to 
help Houston win its sixth straight. 

Expos 8. Cobs 5: In Montreal, 
Scot Thompson broke a 5-5 tie with 
a sacrifice fly in the seventh and 
Tun Raines added a two-tun angle 
as the Expos handed Chicago its 
fifth consecutive defeat. 

Mariners 5, Royals !: In the 
American League, in Seattle. Mike 
Moore’s five-hitter and a two- run 
homer by Danny Tambull carried 
the Mariners past Kansas City. 

Indians 9, Yankees 5: In New 
York. Julio Franco hit a two-run 
triple during a six-run ninth, and 
Andre Thornton hit a pair of two- 
run homers as Cleveland handed 
the Yankees their fourth straight 
setback. 

Orioles 14, Tigers 7: In Detroit, 
Cal Ripken's two home runs led a 
six-homer barrage that buried the 
Tigers. Baltimore had 19 hits and 
racked up 41 total bases, to break 
tbe team record of 39. 

Twins 7, Rangers 6: In Minne- 
apolis. Gary Cfaetti’s home run 
with one out in the 1 1th got Minne- 
sota past Texas. After striking out 
Mark Salas, Greg Harris came in 
with a fat 3-0 pitch that Gaetti 
lined over the left-field fence. 

Brewers 5, Red Sox 3: In Mil- 
waukee, Bob Ojeda balked Ted 
Simmons home with the go-ahead 
run. helping a two-out, three-run 
seventh-inning rally by the Brew- 
ers. (UP!. AP) 


VANTAGE POINT/Steven Crist 

Early Retirements Hurt Racing 


,Vrv yprt Times Service 

NEW YORK —It took less than 
an hour for the word to spread 
through the stable area of every 
racetrack in the country last Thurs- 
day morning. Spend a Buck, the 
Kentucky Derby winner, had come 
up with a swollen ankle and would 
miss his scheduled start in Sun- 
day’s Pennsylvania Derby. 

A decade ago, the reaction would 
have been: Too bad, the injury 
might keep him out of tbe big fall 
races, but he can come bade next 
year as a 4-year-old. But in racing 
today, that equation’s halves are 
reversed, and the virtually unani- 
mous reaction was: He was going 
to be held out of tbe big fail races 
anyway and was already scheduled 
for early retirement, so he’ll proba- 
bly be retired and packed off to 
stud now. 

Two days later Spend a Buck's 
owners decided to do just that, 
which hardly seemed approbate for 
a horse that many consider the best 
in the country, or for a game with 
any pretense of being as much a 
sport as it is a business. 

There was no reason Spend a 
Buck could not have come back to 
race next year. A long vacation 
would have done him a lot of good, 
especially since he had developed a 
bleeding problem. That had al- 
ready restricted him to races in 
stales that permit tbe race-day use 
of furosemide, a volatile diuretic 
that controls hemorrhaging but 
also is widely believed to improve 
overall performance. 

In the days before greedy state 


legislatures approved furosemide 
and such painkillers as phenylbuta- 
zone to keep sick and tired horses 
racing year-round, the prescription 
for bleeding was rest. Spend a 
Buck’s reputation and ability have 
been clouded by his having run on 
furosemide in the Kentucky Derby 
and the Monmouth Handicap, and 
he will not be given a chance to 
recover and come back next year. 

The premature retirement of top 

3- year-olds has become rampant in 
the last decade. It began with Sec- 
retariat. but there was a good ex- 
cuse. Penny Cbenery, Secretariat’s 
owner, had to syndicate him before 
his 3-year-old season in order to 
pay the estate taxes on Meadow 
Stud when her father died in early 
1973. 

But the three top 3-year-olds of 
the mid-1970s had sportsmen for 
owners, and their decisions to keep 
them in training and race them as 

4- year-olds increased the horses' 
value and reputation. Seattle Slew’s 
owners almost retired him before 
his 4-year-old season when the colt 
nearly died of various illnesses and 
infections, but decided to give the 
1 977 Triple Crown winner a chance 
to prove himself again. He had a 
brilliant autumn, coming within an 
inch of sweeping Belmont Park’s 
fall championship series. 

Affirmed could have been retired 
after winning the 1978 Triple 
Crown, but came back at 4 to win 
the Woodward and the Jockey 
Club Gold Cup- Spectacular Bid 
could have retired in style at the 


Monday’s line Scores 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
First Game 

St Louis 230 2 M 018-8 11 0 

Pimbarot) 000 400 000-4 11 7 

Tutor. Lahti ( 7 ). Doyle* IH.VWnH) (»| and 
Porter. Nieto ( 71 ; DeLeon. BJetackJ ( 2 ). 
McWilliams ( 4 ), Clements ( 7 ). Guonte 10 ). 
Winn ( 9 ) and Pena W— Tudor, 194 . L-Oe- 
Leon. 2 - 11 .Sv — Worrell ( 2 ), HR— Pitt. Al man 
16 ). 

second Game 

St. Loots 000 001 020-3 M 0 

Pittsburgh 000 ON 000-1 S 0 

Horton. COmotaeff 171 . Perry {71 ond Porter; 
Rhoden. Clements 18 ). Robinson ( 8 ) and Ortiz. 
Pena If). W— Perry. ML L-domortla. 0-2 
Houston 200 102 200—3 » B 

Atlanta 200 000 009—3 4 0 

)loomeoch and Bolley; Johnson. Forster 
10 ). Dedmon ( 9 ) and BonetBO. W — H e ath- 
cock, 7 - 1 . L— Johnson. 4 - 1 . HR s H ou. Cruz 
(Tl.Mumphrey ( 71 . Walling ( 71 . Att, Murphy 
( 361 . 

P hi lad elph ia 000 000 000-0 2 1 

New Yam in 230 tax — 9 14 0 

K. Grass. Childress ( 4 ), Toliver (S), Rucker 
le). Stewart (I) and Oautlon; Gooden ana 
Carter, Reynolds ( 71 . W-Goadea 21 - 4 . L—K. 
Gross. 14 -WL HR— N.V- Carter ( 281 . 
Chicago 118 830 100-5 I 2 

Montreal ON 4 t» Jta— « I l 

Abreoo. Beteltio IS). Frazier ( 6 ). Mertdllh 
17 ). Sorensen <•> and Davit! Gullicksen. 
Burke ( 7 ). and Butera. (TBorry ( 0 ). W— 
Burke. 9-1 L— Frazier, 7 - 7 . HRs— Mon. WaL 
HCh ( 16 ), Low (V). 

Son Francisco 030 000 310 BO -4 14 i 

Cincinnati 130 100 MB 81—7 U 0 

Gait. Williams ( 3 ), Moore 15), Min ton ( 7 ). 
Davis ( 0 ) and Trevino. Nokes ( 61 . Breniv ( 9 ) ; 
Ttabs. France ( 7 ). Power (l).stuoer (lliond 
Diaz. W-Stuoer. 7 -S. L— Oavts^-IO. HR— S^,. 
Brawn ( 16 ). 

tot Angeles 014 000 019-2 9 I 

San Otago 100 010 3 B *— 4 8 1 

Roass. Ho wan ( 71 . Powell <81 and Sdescta; 
Shew.Gossage ( 8 ) and Kennedy. W— Show. 15 - 
15 L — Reiss. 12 - 10 . Sv— Gassaoe ( 23 LHRS— 
L_A. iwatuizek ( 3 ). SJX. Ranter (SI . Martinez 
( 18 ). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Cleveland 00 088 126-9 51 1 

New York 008 130 010-5 II 3 

Easterly, Rutile ( 5 ). Von Omen ( 6 ). Reed (I) 
and wtliard. Bendo ( 9 ); Cowley, Fisher (81 
and Wvnegar. Eoino ( 9 ). W— Reed, 1 - 5 . L— 
FTsher. 4 - 4 . HRs— Cie. Carter (IT), Thornton 2 
( 17 ). 

Snaffle 271 W 180-5 0 0 

mesas City 1 M 000 000— 1 5 1 

Moore ond Volta; Jackson, Bockwttn 13 ), 
Hulstnonn (81 and Quirk. W Moore. 158 . L— 
Jackson. 13 -KL HR— Sea. Tartabull ( 1 ). 
Bam mo re in oos on— u 19 o 

Detroit 001 303 005 - 7 9 2 

DJMartlnez. TjMartfnez U). Aase ( 4 ) and 
Detnasov. Ravford (II; TerrolLCorv ( 3 ).OT 4 - 
eat ( 61 . Schemer ( 71 , Lopez ( 71 . Stoddard ( 8 t 
ana Ptortsh, MeMn m. w— ' T Martinez. 3 - 3 . 
L — Carv. 5 - 1 . Sv—Aaaa. ( 12 ). HRs— Bat 
Dempsey mi.Swfov ( 6 ).Rl**en 2 ( 24 ),Mur- 
rov ( 39 ), Lynn ( 20 ). Det„ Shumans 2 ( 9 ). 
Gratae ( 3 ). 

Boston 003 OH OOS— J 9 2 

MHwaokw 818 108 38»-5 14 1 

Otodo. Woodward (71 and Gedmon: Haas. 
McClure (51 and Mooro. W— MCOure.s- 1 .L- 
Ojeda. 7 - 10 . HR— MIL Householder ( 6 ). 
Texas 2 » 100 082 05-4 11 f 

Minnesota MIHM 01-7 14 2 

Mason, Harris (BlondSfougto.PWroW ( 91 ; 
Smithson. FRson ( 4 ). Davis ( 7 ), Eutemfo ( 8 ) 
wid LMJdMr.satos (81. W — Eirfem fo, 4-2. l— 
Harris. * 4 . HRA-TWL. O'Brien 1171 . Welker 
(SI, Porrlth (U). Minn. Goeftf ( 1 * 1 . 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Czechoslovaks Barred After Dope Test 

PARIS (AP) — Czech athletes Zdenka St&ava, the women’s world 
record-holder in the discus, and Remigius Machura, who won the shot 
put at the recently completed World University Games, have been 
banned from competition for life by tbe European Athletic Association 
after f ailing dope tests at the European Cup in Moscow tn'mid-Augusu 
The bans, announced here Monday, are automatic Gist p uni s hmen t for 
failing tbe tests. But the Czech federation may appeal for tbe athletes' 
reinstatement after 18 months. 

Watanabe Stops Katsmna, Keeps Tide 

OSAKA, Japan (AP) — Champion Jiro Watanabe floored feflow 
Japanese Kazuo Katsuma four times and retained his World Boxing 
Council junior bantamweight title here Tuesday when tbe scheduled 12- 
round fight was stopped in the seventh round 
Watanabe, 30, knocked Katsuma down twice in the fourth round and 
twice in the seventh, when U.S. referee James Jenkin stepped the fight at 
1:26. It was Watanabe's third title defense and 25th victory lifetime; be 
has lost once. The 27-year-old Katsuma, ranked sixth by the WBC, 
absorbed his ninth defeat against 17 victories and a draw. 

Quotable 

• New York Yankee owner George Stembrcnner, after watching Dave 
Winfield fail to deliver in a clutch situation: “Where’s Reggie Jackson? I 
need Mr. October and I’ve got Mr. May.” 


end of 1979, but returned to win all 
10 of his starts as a 4-year-old. 

All three had proved their quali- 
ty at 3 in tbe Triple Crown races, 
but their campaigns at 4 gave them 
added certification of excellence 
and elevated them to the level of 
being among the best ever. 

Spend a Buck’s owners had al- 
ready denied their colt an opportu- 
nity to bid for even the first level of 
that greatness by holding him out 
of the Pi cakncss and the Belmont 
Stakes in order to cash in on a SZ6 
million jackpot in the Jersey Der- 
by. They did it again by dodging 
Chief's Crown in the Travers 
Stakes, where their coll would not 
have been allowed to run on furose- 
mide. They planned to do il yet 
again by passing the major fall 
races in New York: the fink, con- 
sistent gesture is the decision not to 
race him al 4. 

Spend a Buck's owners, sincere 
and likable people but newcomers 
with little perspective on racing tra- 
dition, only reflect the sport’s cur- 
rent problems. Their decision is far 
from tbe first of its kind. 

• In 1981, Pleasant Colony was 
syndicated and sent to stud at the 
end of his 3-year-old year amid 
uncertainty over the severity of a 
supposedly career-ending injury. 

• In 1982. Conquistador Gdo's 
career was managed for a hurst of 
greatness that made him worth $36 
million as a stalhon. and be was 
quickly retired after a defeat in the 
Travers. 

• Id 1983, an Arab-owned colt 
named Shared Dancer was syndi- 
cated for $40 million after being 
retired in tbe midst of his 3-year- 
old season without proving himself 
the best of his crop. 

• In 1984, Devil’s Bag was sent 
home with a bone chip — which 
would have cleared up in six 
months — became the syndicate 
that bought him had agreed not to 
risk devaluation by bringing him 
back as a 4-year-old. 

The good news is that the stallion 
market has probably peaked. There 
is already a glut of overvalued stal- 
lion s, and the annual foal crop is 
growing more quickly than the de- 
mand for horses. Perhaps in a few 
years, a Spend a Buck will not be 
worth the SIS million to $20 mil- 
lion he is commanding as a stallion, 
and to make him worth that much 
his owners would have to make him 
prove a lot more. 

In the meantime, Spend a Buck 
joins tbe other early retirees of re- 
cent years as a question mark. No- 
body wiQ really know how good 
they were, whether or not they de- 
serve mention in the same breath as 
Seattle Slew. Affirmed and Spec- 
tacular Bid. They never had a 
chance because their owners took 
the money instead of nrnning them. 



TOUGH D — Tbe job that safety Chris Rockins (fid on Pittsburgh receiver Rich 
Erenberg typified tbe aggressive defense that led Ckvdaud to a 17-7 National Football 
League victory Monday night The Browns didn’t allow tbe Steelers inside tbe 35-yard 
line through three periods and picked off two passes in the final period to seal tbe verdict 










Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER IS, 1985 




OBSERVER 


people 


The New VWmn-iri-Chief John FowIgS 


After Finishing a Book, f You Feel Empty, a Field 
Lying Fallow, and You Musi Let It Stay Fallow Awhile* 


By Russell Baker 


There are other fascinating cul- 


N EW YORK — The triumph 
of Republican conservatism 


i^of Republican conservatism 
has produced remarkable cultural 
changes. Who, for example, is the 
man everyone now loves to hiss? 
Fidel Castro, of course. 

Great political movements al- 
ways require a villain-in-chief, a 
hobgoblin who can be summoned 
to revive the faithful when their 
juices have grown sluggish with too 
much triumph. When liberalism 
and Democrats ruled the nation, 
the v illa in -in-chief was Herbert 
Hoover. 

Fidel Castro is the new Herbert 
Hoover. Democrats and liberalism 
could have bad Fidel Castro them- 
selves at one time, but they were 
afraid be was bad luck. 


tural changes. The old bleeding- 
heart liberal for instance, is being 
driven off the political map by vic- 
torious conservatism just as effec- 


tively as neighborhood shoe- repair 
shops are bong pushed off Man- 


shops are being pushed off Man 
battan Island by triumphant real 
estate-ism 


President Kennedy (Democrat, 
liberal by today's definition) got 
into a terrible mess trying to de- 
stroy Fidel Castro militarily at the 
Bay of Pigs. 

Afterward Kennedy let the CIA 
try to make Fidel Castro's beard 
fall ouL It didn't work. So he let the 
CIA traffic with Mafia hit men to 
munfer Fidd Castro. Another fail- 


After that the Democrats felt 
jinxed by Fidel Castro. Sure, on 
political campaigns they went to 
Cuban Miami and said they bated 
Fidel Castro, but that was not like 
the old days when they crisscrossed 
the continent getting the masses to 
hiss Herbert Hoover for causing 
the Great Depression. 

Herbert Hoover was good luck 
for Democrats and liberalism, and 
a curse to Republicans and conser- 
vatism. At the end. when time had 
done its awful work, most voters 
probably didn’t know Herbert 
Hoover from J. Edgar, and thought 
the Great Depression was a geolog- 
ical curiosity on the moon. 

Fidel Castro was there for con- 
servatism to take, and it made him 
the new Herbert Hoover. What is 
his villainy? He is exporting com- 
munism. You mustn’t say, “Bur 
haven’t bearded, long-winded men 
been exporting communism ever 
since Karl Marx?” 

The beauty of having a really 
top-drawer villain-in-chief is that 
people who ask sensible questions 
can be hissed just as enthusiastical- 
ly for being sensible as the villain- 
in-chief can be hissed for being 
villainous. 


The bleeding-heart liberal is now 
replaced by the siony-heart conser- 
vative. The difference? In the old 
days, if a broken-down horse col- 
lapsed in the street the bleeding- 
heart liberal lobbied the govern- 
ment to set up a network of nursing 
stables where broken-down horses 
could spend their declining years in 
comfort and dignity. ‘ 

Nowadays, seeing the collapsed 
horse, the stony-beart conservative 
orders a study to determine how 
many broken-down horses 'per 
week collapse at that location and. 
if the figure is promising, borrows 
capital to build a glue factory on 
the site. 

The knee-jerk liberal is not quite 
gone, but almost. How conserva- 
tives used to love getting together 
at the dub and laughing about the 
latest knee-jerk liberal tomfoolery. 
Little did they know that political 
nature abhors a vacuum, so that 
after conservatism did away with 
knee-jerk liberals, the country 
raised up armies of knee-jerk con- 
servatives. 


By David Rcmnick 

Washington Post Sernce 

N EW YORK — Most mornings John 
Fowles wakes in his ISth-csfltury stone 
house in Lyme Regis on the southwest coast 
of England. He is free of dty sounds. The sea 
is a quarter-mile down the road. A bizarre 
garden runs around the house. “It’s the enor- 
mous privilege of not living in the city that 1 
enjoy," he says. “I need the isolation." 

So when Fowles, in his reluctant stab at 
playing the artist-as-salesman, comes 10 New 
York to push his new novel “A Maggot,” his 
role as isolalo is not easily yielded. There is 
not one but a passe! of “Do Not Disturb" 
signs on his hotel doorknob. One must knock 
about 14 times before he comes to the door. 
He has the look of an exhausted vacationer. 
He is 59, has a full beard, lousy teeth and a 
voice full of plaintive singsong. 

“At the moment I’m not working on any- 
thing. After you finish, you are intensely 
depressed. It doesn't much matter whether 
the reviews are good or not. You fed empty, a 
Field lying fallow, and you must let it stay 
fallow awhile. 

“You love a book when it’s being written. 



Magazine, which is a great scholarly source 
book. The French novelist Alain Fournier, 
who is my most important modern influence, 
once said something that moved me very 
deeply: T only like the marvelous when it is 
strictly enveloped in reality.’ ” 

A photographer arrives. Fowles’s wife, 
Elizabeth, lopes across the room and removes 
her husbands spectacles. Fowles does not 
move. He seems accustomed to such gestures. 

Fowles is the son of a suburban ci^r 
importer. He read French at Oxford, taught 
school in Greece and began writing in his 
early 2Qs- He sent a “perfectly wretched" 
bookof travel pieces on Greece to Paul Scott, 
who was an agent before writing “The Jewel 
in the Crown!" Scott did not encourage the 
travel writing but did admire a passage of 
“seamfictional" prose. “That probably start- 
ed me as a novelist," said Fowles. 

The insistent simplicity of his life — gar- 
dening, writing, long evenings reading Mat- 
thew Arnold by the rare — began when be left 
London 1 9 years ago and began to publish his 
first works. In “A Maggot," he writes admir- 
ingly about the Shakers religious group. 

“As you grow older you realize you cannot 
live up to aQ your sacred ideas of how one 
should live. Keeping (hat virgin state of au- 
thenticity is impossible. The Shakers were 
authentic, in that way. They believed in a 
certain life and they lived il 

“New York at this moment makes me 
think of the Shakers, the severity and simplic- 
ity of their lives. New York is an impossibly 
rich dry. There is so much to do here that one 
does nothing, so much to buy here that one 
boys nothing. 

“I somehow fed places like New York are 
enormously rarefied, isolated forms of hu- 
man society. They’re not real. It’s not just 
flying to New York, it’s flying to a different 
planet. If you fly to Los Angeles it’s another 
planet still 

“I just read an article how the great social 
activity in California now is shopping. That is 
a very sick and peculiar thing to a staid 
European like myself. Giles are neurotic. I 
think people who live in die country, the 
provinces, are lucky. If people were economi- 
cally free to move I somehow think there 
would be an enormous exodus from places 
like Chicago or New York or London." 

Rain dicks against the windows. Fowles 


Spy Wins Litero 


k 




“You love a book when it’s being written. 
You are so dose to it. You’re the only person 
who knows it and it’s still full of potential 
You know you can improve it_ Then suddenly 
there’s the dreadful day when you have the 
printed proof texts. You get a feeling of 
‘That’s it. This is the final thing and I shan’t 
have a chance to change it.’ It’s a feeling of 
death, really." 

Critics and a wide audience have lon§ 
praised his work, especially “The Collector,’ 
“The French Lieutenant's woman" and “The 
Magus.’’ There is a wildness about Fowles’s 
■ workthat is rare in most of the recent novel- 





■■ ■ 
■■■■. ■ 




..jt* 
i ?Sl 


It was only last spring that tri- 
umphant conservatives were sneer- 
ing at the usual knee-jerk liberal 
reluctance to punish Nicaragua for 
letting Fidel Castro export commu- 
nism. Hard-headed conservatism 
required us to be actively interven- 
tionist in the cause of democracy, 
did it not? 


It did not Since an actively in- 
terventionist economic policy to- 
ward South Africa was proposed 
this summer, knee-jerk conserva- 
tism has made nonsense of logic. 
For reasons that conservatives will 
sit up all night explaining to you if 
you are not careful to have a prior 
engagement, conservatism ap- 


is ts admired in Oxbridge. Fowles teases, 
dares his readers. Though his books are mid- 
dlebrow they are challenging, a curious blend 
of 18lb-cenlury play — tne tradition of Dan- 
iel Defoe. Samuel Richardson and Laurence 
Sterne are behind him — existentialist philos- 
ophy and modern voice. 

In “The French Lieutenant’s Woman," for 
example, Fowles told a story set to old Lyme 
Regis, interrupted the tale in the voice of the 
contemporary, omniscient author and let the 
reader choose between two endings. 


Autbor Fowles: “Do Not Disturb." 


ply rode along a skyline, like a sequence of 
looped film to a movie projector.” 

Soon the moody narrative yields to a news 
report from The Western Gazette: One of the 
five riders has been found hanging from a 
tree; the others have dispersed. Suddenly “A 
Maggot" becomes a series of depositions, 
question-and-answer chapters conducted by 


an odd detective named Henry Ayscoogh. 
The siorv is reminiscent of the Japanese 


“Yes, the endings to that book really 
ought the mail to mv doorstep." he said. 


proves repressive government in 
South Africa and detests repressive 
government in Nicaragua. As the 
politicians say to Chicago. "Plus fa 
-change, plus e’est la mime chose.' 


New York Tima Service 


brought the mail to my doorstep," he said. 
“But I like to experiment with that great 
mystery, the part the reader plays to the 
experience and form of the novel." 

“A Maggot” his 14th work, has upon first 
hearing the least ingratiating book title since 
“The Female Eunuch." But in this case a 
maggot is meant as an odd notion or w him, 
and to a prologue Fowles describes his whim, 
the inspiration for the noveL He writes of 
imagining a group of travelers on horseback 
riding along a barren landscape: “The riders 
never progressed to any destination, but sim- 


The story is reminiscent of the Japanese 
tale by Rvunosuke Akutagawa called “In a 
Grove,’’ dr. more familiarly, “Rashomon." 
Like Fowles, Akutagawa finds intrigue in the 
way people lie or see things askew. Reality 
here is the sum total of perceptions and 
misperceptions. Again, the ending is left to 
the reader. 

“There was one source I used extensively 


. but Pham, 38, is fhieaiiri Vie&mF 

The Norw^ian spy Arne Trehon F d ^ EagH& Chinese^ 

haswonaUKaiy^rftog ^“a fSaU: a Emlas, 
account of to nine yean of «P“> S“ £lia officer, he- escaped 


account of his nine yean « Scence officer, he CSC; 

cage and his arrest and mtertW*- J“ l ~%bo r canto m 1977L ‘ •. 
tioik his publishers said Tuesday, ft® 01 a 
Treholt, 42, a former senior diplo* u • ■ 


iimum -i*, « - _ . 

mat and junior minister, was con- QgfA yager, speaking; to foe 

victed in June of spying for the 3gth & Force convention 

TTmAn aiiH Trait, find SQh . madtf* thft’-oHiffnJ 


Soviet Union and Iraq, and “J - ^ Washington, made theomiga-' 
fenced to 30 yea*s in pnstffl. He comments about military 
wrote the book wWe awaiting mai ‘ 


wrote the book wide awaiting trial a A { ^ foreign pobey before i*: 
after his arrest in January 1984 r^^giisatutie^^ nevergave 
Treteh, who has said hewillappeal & ^ m ny.lif< and' 

the sentence, won second prize and laimc biug into a story abcsjt a w* 

a 25 , 000 -kroner (S3, 000) award m a flight suit the mflttaiyct. . 

competition for documentary _ cr £ ineQC g<j with in 2944. “Pretty ' 
books organized by a Norwegian- ^ ffa. gallons qf ’TftteT' : 
publisher. Readers of- ms manu- ^ around 

script cited h is vivid account ot d . mC [ ^ ^own around yotiran-' - 


!> . 


meetings with KGB agents and ms w ^ rct j rtt j Air Force bngsfc : . 
attack on the methods used by his ^ ^ recalled. “ItmadeAtot 

interrogators. of.sloshmgand renraded^nttoTa: 



The cartoonists Gany Trudeau, 
Charles Sdadz and MBtoo Caitiff 
have asked almost every major 
U. S. newspaper comc-strip artist 
to devote ThaalcsgiVizig Day’s stnp 
to world hunger. “I don’t t hin k 
there’s ever been a simultaneous 
effort on the part of all comic strip 
artists like this," said Schulk, cre- 
ator of “Peanuts." Schulz. Trudeau 


couple of active pi 
terbed — alotof si 


hi •a.war' 


Prince Charles of Britain, in a 
break from tradition, hasxbosdz a - 
fanalearmy officer tobeontof'hu 
personal attendants. B uc k i n gh am ' 
Palace said CftptefflAJfisonKwan, 

29, based m Hbhg RdiiftiWas ' 
appointed assistant equeny 

..... >m.a MUM . 



rDoou'StayVand S 5u« ^ 

(-Save Canyon") Ao proposed 


accompanying advertisements so- 
liciting donations to USA for Afri- 


palace -also announced that TJea-. • 
taunt Commander Richard AyfauC 


uaung uunauuus ivi — - - - • • . • 

ca, which began as coordinator of 33 , had been appeared equa^ ^ 
tS “We AreftbeWodd” Worthy the prmce s u^fe, Dtona. 


rock stars. Trudeau, who is to 
chance of the project has just pub- 


Cbristo has started drajungSand^ 


-at the , 

D^” acolto^moftos smpson Paris ’s oldest bridge to - 1 *. 

the USA tor Afnca rodr recording Snsfonnit into what he sa»1«r 


m _ _ - - . — UlXUaiUlIU U IUH/ nuu*. J 

sessions and trips to Afnca; pro- .. a ^ an t lummcms 
ceeds will go to famine relief. Tne nr ^. ™ . *v.^ tw,* v, 


ceeds wfflgo to f anune reuef^tne. Woric ^ ^ Nenf prqett 
atonal Thank^vmg Day »ips, bemnlast weetwilh a steifitrac- 
wffl orobablv will be auctioned to fa* ■ 


has endured the “Today" show and now 
another nosy questioner. If given the dunce. 


/or ‘A Maggof — a book by a Lord Littlg'ohn 
called ‘Persian Letters.’ He simply described 


called ‘Persian Letters.’ He simply described 
a Persian touring London. As usual, it was a 
device to satirize London. It was published 
the same year I set my book. 1736. It helped 
me get the feel of how people spoke, of what 
writing was tike. I also used The Gentleman's 


another nosy questioner. If given the dunce, 
he might grab a cab and beat it for the nearest 
jet With no projects at hand, it's the perfect 
season for tending house. 

“I have times when I am not writing at alL 
If I'm not answering letters I’m in my garden. 
Lyme is roughly lute San Francisco to di- 
mate, so we get away with all sorts of subtrop- 
ical plants. If we have a bad winter I lose 
them. It's a wilderness, the garden. I’ve seen 
real gardeners turn white as they go ’round 
h." 


wui proMDiy ymi K auenonroro ^ to m 430,000 squartsjftei 
raise funds, said USA for Africa s mq qoo square meters) of matenaL 
chief organizer,. Ken Kra- Nbedrarmof the doth, hadrSeen 

8 ?V - V A oq*S3to begin Saturday. 

climbers from Pennsylvania, New. ^^^oajaTmkead. - 
Jersey and Massachusetts is pie- -. * . i . 

paring to climb Mount Kflunan|a-- • • . ^ 

; The French mathematician 
r Jean-Piarre Sore and the Anstif- 

British, art historian Sfr 
atnes resident and spokesanan fpr • combriA rcedrod the yeiriy 

theprcgecL . -‘.t Balzan 'Foundation jpizes -Tibs- 

D' . * •' Am- mcIi miri w on' iiuilk'iJ 


0 { 




eprcgecL • ' Balzan foundation jxaes -Tucs- 

□ ' : :;v ; ; ' dw; each, carries an awtarf rf 

Eight years after leaymgifYiet- 250,000 Swiss. fiancs .fJlO^OOf^, 
Tiam Luc Pham has Been named Serre, 59, was cited f or his conn? 


teacher of tile year to- Sait Lake - button to algpbrinc g«Hnctcy arid 
City. Utah, where he teadies En- topology. Gombridi was toniflred 


glidi. Most of his itridents, . in fra-fris interpretation of theKstory 
grades one through ait^are Asian, of Western azL i. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


ANNOIINCEMENTS 


TO THE HOU»S OF SEALVS HOT 
SPRINGS FINANCIAL. N.V. CURA- 
CAO. rCTHSUANDS ANTIUB - 
RRST MORTGAGE 7% CONVBT- 
OtE BOWS HATH) 9/1/13, DUE 
4/15/81 

Take nofica that the Crciit Court of 
Mortgomery County, Alabama, USA. 
has set a deodtne of Novsn^ier 1, 
1965. within which any holder of the 
above described bonds wishing to 

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COIE D'AZUR. MOUGINS. A bar- 
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PARIS 16th: MARCEAU, GEORGE V. 
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fi|upped naif s room, porting hph 
secunty bukfing. highr S- day 
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CB4TRAL BANK OF TW SOUTH 

Formerly 

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W S ub rcii|jtium Deprtwwt 
181, Avenue CharhHMaDH, 


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as Suc m bot Trustee d 
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Or tnfc Paris 747-07-29 


M ASIA AMT PACBTC 


HOTa-BESTAURANT. French Alps. 
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EXC8110NAL CANNB. CdHbrde. 
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3 68 3B 


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contact our feed Jstrfartor or: 


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PLOOO. Cabinet Bn*ierS77S5 14. ' 


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Tsfc HX 5-286726 


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FRAN<RJRTKOe«GSTHN / Taunus. 
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PARIS. 24 HOURS/DAY. Fancy fruit 
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6 place Vendame TO 95 52 
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large bedroom, 60 sqjn, quiet, sunny. 


temo and Private periwig. Hat with 5 
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R e uu e d ed for I nlu wB uud ' 

Private baric. Opera Ah i tl " 


GOBHJNS, South Pare, tfixfio, moe & 
quiet. FZ0DQ- Tck 336 55 2Z ' 


the krte with indoor po d, yo u wj find 
tout home, fticss from SFJzO^OD^ta 


your home, fticus from SF32I 
SFI.lOOjOOOl Mortgages at 


rtorest rates. These red estdes me 
free far sde to foreigner. 


7 MINS. EAST PADS: 2-bedruom 
hous*. triepbon* ft heating, long 
term. F6tH0/morth, visit today 1 pm 
/ 6 pm. 111. A*, de Romy. 93130 
Nosy le Sec Teh (1) 849 23 46. 


I Tefc 336 35 22, 
SPAIN 


AUCANTE. VB1AS 8 APARTMB4TS 
to iet low redds. Long or short stays. 1 
Raid & beodt loccdons. en- 
quiries mvited. Mironda Boye 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


Offices Worldwide 


NBflUY SUR BOtS 

Lwwy apartment, uniewe view. 5th 


I AMSELUE. 


1 1NVOSORA BOR1A S A 


329 78 50. 

Vavin, 75006 Peris. 


JOSE BORA 6 SON ARMADANS 
07014 PALMA DE MALLORCA 
Teh £ -71-289900 


iwy apartment, uniewe view. 5th ®*VWEVTOOW. fiesidertid, viev^ 
Boor, 4 bedrooms. 160 sam. v«a sq.m garden. 3 

+ individual bedrewm. Paiang. "*9® bedroarm, 50 sa mfi ng dn- 
TeU (II 329 78 50 !»: 3 bart »- f^SOOM). Tet 


OUBMD HOME LTtt 
RE5SEKZA TTZLANA 
VIA LOCARNO 27 A 
CH-6612 ASCONA 
TEL 04-93-352184 


LA COLE ST OOUD 92- House with 
tgreten. 6 rooas. 0^000 net. Tet 225 


NG1 3AY, UL 
470501. Tit 37107 


6 A East St 
i. I*. Tet 


NoW i itfn m 


HAVE A MCE DAYl BONO- Have a 
nice day! Bokei 


AUCANTE V&B & aaaimeds lor 
sole, mrd & beach locations, bw 


ITOHOUSE AVE MONTAIGNE 
near Qianpi Bysees, 120 sqm. + 
large terrace, bghdem. 723 43 28. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


. ’ Stiafio, l-Bedroom & 

*• 2-Bedroora SOvtes 
All magrafrcenliy ■ 
furnished ancf aH with ' 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


RJU.Y' 

BILINGUAL SECRETARY 


Engfish mother tor 
. hm utefd but not 


fob Short- 

Few ywara 


experience Send CV A sdoty to . 
FRANCACP. Ref: 143- 


FRANCAOP, Ref: 143 - 
17,' Rue de la Bantjun. 
75002 ftjril, Frmoe 


PORTUGAL SS 
Hobdays & travel 


RUST CLASS SERVICE 
ASSMB3 SVBtY MOVE 


Talc 

AMSB1S.3 


l 329 73 50. 
b. Vavin, 75006 ftris. 


MARAIS. Urge studio, facing south, 
bath, kitchenette. F300.000. 647 52fO 


MONTMARTRE SUPERB HOUSE, 250 

I space. Perfect conation. 


space. Perfect 


sale, mr d & bea ch locations. t taw 
prices, guaranteed We de ed s, from 
has 2,491.000. Travel/ viewing «- 
penses refunded an purchase. Mir- 
anda Boye (Agents) 6 A East St, Nat- 
tingham, hCl JAY, UK. Tet 
NSfingham 470501. Tfc 37107 


LAKE GBffVA + 1LK5ANO, Mon- 
treux, Grtaadreffon, Lccamo, etc 
Ftxegners can buy mogi f peenf new 
opartTTiBTIs/d»de<s/ v4ias. ffia diaioe. 
Swbs residency pasible. H590L0 
5A, Tour Grise 6 , CH 1007 Lausanne 
21/252611, Lugaw 91-687646 


SHORT TERM in Latin Omaha. 
Ns agents. Tet 329 38 81 


CAIwe CAUFOWg, 10 room yffla. 
SKsqjry Syina tP*C 3to0l Rim. 
girdcrv furttohai F450Q/mortlyw- 


Executive Services Available I 


16TH PASSY, 3-ROOM OUP1EX. 
FBBOO/morih. Owner. Tdk 520 3630. 


bfiedk^TOWy. Tet { 93 ) 3959 1 


TROCAPEBO. Luxur ious 2-f ocm + in- 
dependent room. 6475282 / 5534275 


CKARMMG COUNTRY COTTAGE i 
lOOkms West of Paris, 4 besfoxuns. 2 ; 


Mode!' Suites 


TeL 579 45 88 Peris ev«s. 


(212) 371-8866 


MGE 8 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 




ATTENTION EXECUTIVE j 
Publkh yam buunrttt message . 
aiRMlnternaflonafHeraWln- 
fomte when men that a tfM 
of a mSKon mad** wo tid- 
>™4 matt at whom are in 
buemam tad SntbUry, w m 
read it. J oat telex us / Paris 
6135951 before 10 a.m. en- 
suring that we can telex you 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


International Business Message Center 


CAPITAL WANTED 


DIAMONDS 


OFFSHORE & UK 


back, and your mes sa ge wdf , 
n ppte v vriM 48 hours. The 1 
rata is US. f 9.80 or heed , 
ewhrcdent per fine. You must 
Mate complete and veriB- 


LTD COMPANIB 

baxporation and management ift UK, 
I j* f * an - furfa, AnguJfa, Qtamd 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


HAVE BANK COLLATERAL instm- 
tnenfc. Need fbmfing.- Any mount 
Euro Dolor loom sought. Medfund 
Telex 6713362 Fundnie or write PO 
Box 598. N Man Beadi, fta 33160 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


ORLANDO, FLORIDA 
INVESTMENT 

> Tlv area has been trr petted as one 


of the dynamic vowth oerfen m the 
USA. After the Mortlcmd interchange 
xi F4 opened, atna lands near me 
exit which wos awe said far 
US$2000 m acre suddenly rocketed 
to 5300,000 


bkrxfa, Paionte Ubena, Gixnhr 
mart other dhhore area. 

• Confidenfid advice 

• Imme ju te avafiaUity 

• Nommee services 

• Bearer shoes 

• Boat regi stra t i on s 

• Accovniina & admirisfrotian 

• Mol. te^hone 8 telex 

R ” , 3!S?aS5gSi w 

SERVICES UTO 
Head Office 

*** _£*«»“**, Doorij*. t rie of Man 
Tet Douglas 10624) 23718 
Telex 6285 54 SELECT G 
London Representative 
, 2-5 Old Bond SULondon W1 
Tel 01-493 4244. Tlx 28247 SC&DN G 


MONEY TRKS? 


YES Invest in one of America's mast 

Arising todmologicnl break-. 


OPPORTUNITY FOR fMANOAL 
4 REAL STATE ADVISORS 
Located in Europe 6 Asia. Become one 
at oy exclusive commerioned dissribu- 
torslofour commerod & ogricuitiral 


in a Mton ddkx induary. 
Over 30JX30 mu trees planted in 1964. 
Projected amtal ncome e wswtuafy 
reaches 52%. Weduring trees known 
to five over 100 years, We guaran- 
tee te repurchase investment. 
BROKERS' BNQUUBE5 fNVTTHJ, 
Matenal avattle m Engldti. French, ■ 
German. Bar 2358. Hercrfd Tribune, 
92521 NeuBy Cede*. France 


properties located in Cafifonta USA. 
Guaranteed return on investments for 
yow dient. Write or phone: 

Mr Praiaert j 



The Chartered Group Lid 
. Part Office Bov 430 


Wdnul Creek, CA USA 94597 
Teh 415-947-1047 


Mrn wimm Investment - US$7,9SO 


NORADEAN L7D 


SHARE WITH US 
PROFIT tt FUN. 


“tofCAL PROraSION 8 TRADE 

apparatus for tjmt^xvtic appSmhons 
*j| 9 *wrol and veterewy inedcme, 
rf ’““ T “telog* physmtherapy. dental 
surgery, dermatology, functioned 
reh oM rtc il iun. etc. 


LONDON 

Rducim y & trust services 1_ Compary 
formations & dornafiation I kiternarorv 
at tea I Bo* accounts estchfahed f 
General business advice & gsas t uce J 
iPCR. 17 WidepcteSt, London El Trf 
Tet 01 377 W4. ftc 893911 G 


TRAVB AGB4CY, Beverly KBs, Cofi- 
fomia Proffittole. fufo computeriied. 
prafessionel staff. WBtwtium invest- 
mere. US5475TO0. Serious buws 

only. Bar 2643J-iertdd Tribune, 92S21 

Neuily Cedex, Frtmce 

COMTUTBS for buriness or personal 
use. Consultant services, sdes, omort 
Inexpenshte tele* connechans. Mqar 
brands - towesjpnc^ Amrmwmty 
Mr. Lawrence, Pens Tb: 21 3822. Trip) 
563 2909 / (fl 348 3000 


MONET AVAILABLE. Lang term - at 
attract** rates. Business loens - ted 


attractive rates. Business taxis • ted 
estate Mrimum U S SSOilJMQ. Contact 
Venturer U4 London : 01245 6507. 
Tfe 8952387 Ameer G. 


' GOST SESKDM1AL STATUS in 


food perafise. Na pfrpirol L — 


MUUUWUAL MnERPRETGRS 

Ti m dtXon, SecretanaL Cable S Tele* 
Services for exeaitivn & visitori m 
NIC & mefor afos in LLS. HcrteL Bmou- 
sne. restaurant & rigtt dub rnsarvo- 
bons< conventions, kade shows & trov- 
eSng perspnneL 

The best in m tarnalicn d a a i st u nen. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


CANADIAN GOU) STOCKS md Oth- 


D1AMQND5 : 

a - Yw r M buy.. 

-6-j afssT 

(fired from Antwerp - 
owter of the Oanand worid.' .. 
_ MgnwlK-'o 
for free ftaCB 5sf write . . 


SEUMG CHEMICALS. Sohwds & lob- 
oratery eqdpnwA Uriversd Owj- 


hU.SUBUSB NYC Successful -hr 30 
years. Screw oroducts manufodurer 
wwhes to sell factory I'cfistrixman cen- 
ter - tded for investor seeking to 


LOOKING FOR VENTURE PARTNER 

for Seed txanca, creation «sf a ser- 
vine co mpany, wim a new concept of 
inti rrewtefing of varieties. About 
$85 joa Write 6 a* 2650, Herrid Trv 
bune, 92S21 NeuHyCedra. Frtmtz. 
NOVATE INVESTORS “CUfB" in. I 


60 5& ' Ff0n0e ^ 


i ABARSA WTKNATONAl 
212-688-6054 or 212-223-4786 
The 230199 Svrift UK-ABA 


change - /Baxnsended n tpTTS® , 


ttS. COMCCnOM Unique 
rt. FSEE DfTAflS: NTL A^O- 
N, Bo* 36656 Tucson. AZ 


i EuroAmeriasn has options 
fl&yuHotBd 3 yean ago on land 
ri ratej a fiy located near 
Disney World / Orlando. 


Reentered London Commo d ty Briers 
we offer o eom ri ete service n at 
COMMOOfTY FUTURE MARKET! 


i Addtunel pcrtnerH rei 
complete purchase and 


S hort ha lting period before very 
profitable re-sole protected at 
TOM plus. 


For details of our 

Commod i ty 

Investment Programme 



ES T “wnnea, quairea 

I Dub 9 mi ton/ Agents woridwvle 

Conteeh JPM.JIT PO Ba* 54 , 
CH-1214 Vemer /Geneva. Th 418830 1 


develop a foothold m U5. 

AnrwaT tries (£$1^0000. Stafffl. 
Please contort: E Stanmetz, 36 Route 


vofved in knative deals USh^Worid- 
wide, "miritiMr returns 30% invites 
financial member ouuiuitan. Deftris 
from Secretary, PXJ. Bax 185, Key 

West, FIA33M1 USA. 

FOROIL COMPANY EXEOITTVei on | 
the move. Yew CV. prepreed by an ; 


du Port, 1009 PUty, Swi ue rt u nd. Tbt 

28 99 50 WTCG CH. 

COMPUTBt POtmAtn. T-shirt friar 
B&W or ookir. A cash busines pro- 
duang SIDjOOO & more/montti. New 
& used systems pared from $9,500 
FOB. Abo necessary 'suppfies. Credit 
cards accepted. KEMA $18, ftasffadt i 




Investment range USS15JOOO ta ’ 
1 mlfian. 


BJSOAMBUCAN 
INVESTMENT CORPORATION 
100 K Btenyre Bhd 
Suite 1209, Mi m. fL 3 3132 
Tel P0S35&8097. Tx 803 2 37 Euro Mia 


This pr o gra mm e has tracked 
raid monitored T (Efferent Commodty 
Marked whidi, in the last 12 months 
(to 30/6/85), hove shown an exedw 
177% profit. Mrwnum investment 
£10,000 or US$ equriaient. 


SW1TZBLAN0 

f far you aid your I 
up buines and 


QUARTZ WATCHK 

100% Swfo quality 
export. U p fa 30 ,000 

o 

Tete*: 25279 CH 


PANAMA COMPANY Fatmafion, tre 
tel privacy assured. IFX, 73 New Band 
Street, London Wl. Enriaxf 


HD PASSPORT 35 countries. GMC 
WOeomenou, 105 76 Athens Greece | 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


nonce m for & dwicri tahshy. 
TeL Encfard 0722 333642 or trie* 
EntW 47455 ST AM for fletrib. 


170340, Fibrirfurt W. Germany. Tie 
412713, KenteTek {0691-7478M. 

OPPORTUMTY TO BUY French leath- 
er £ dodwig rntnuhaOwer. based 0 
forts, pasabarty to keep present own- 
er on sata-y to mu i xjg e business. 
Working with tap quofcy European 
leuilieis. rise posable with Eurcpeoe 
fofarks. S330JJ0O. Gcrenton, 205 Bd. . 
Pereire, 75D17 Pans France. 

PANAMA COMPANIES with nominee 
Directors and confidential Swiss V 
Uweminurg bank account fa rmed in I 
48 hours. Swiss branch office opened 


help set up business and resnmtial 
property, obtan permane n t residency 
{permit B. work pennit. penrit C& note- 


Teh London 621 1664 or write to 
NORADEAN Ltd SHT1 4 B Pkmtatton 
Hse, fondsurdi St, London EC3M 3DX. 
Tele* 894540 COMBO G. 


ideation}. Carifidenbd informotion 
only by a penonri beerview in Europe. 
Send i is your Rfephone rajmber & we 
mfonn you prompt ly . Necessary invest. 
merit around U^DjOOO - US$65,000. 


OFFSHORE COMPANIB 
BANKS 


B(CO HOME PRODUCTS, dwston of 
Bso Housewares, a taxing US mm - 1 
uhxturer of cookware & cutlery is 
now acoKjng cppfctotioro from ex- 
perienced finauwy qualified (firect 
seKngdstributors. noo Home food- 
udts offer? severe/ foes of 3-Ply, Mly 
aid 7-Ply itaUess «eri cookware 
with exdusiM Sonic Sensor siffn de- 
vice es «wl as world fanous &co 
Arrowhead cutlery sets. You ore 
booked with at assortment of frtwiitg 


INSURANCE COMPANIB 

Mafaig - Telephone ■ Telex 
M teeretanal services 
Isle of Man, Jersey, Guernay, 
Gibraltar, E^riema. Liberia, 
Luumboura Anriles. IK. 
Beady mode or neoaL 
Free p^ to iatary booklet. 

Boot regi stra tions 
London representativB 


Please contact advertiser under 
LH.T. Ba* 2176. FrwJidislr. 15. 
06000 Frontfurt/Man. 


FUTURES M ARKET IN VESTMENT 
W SWITTHOA!® 

Acc ount MrnioHenite Tt - 
Cnnqwtinh e J ff eieret li A Tradng 
COMPUTRADE FUTU8H 
, MANACaWfT UD. 

For free brochure, td 41/22/28 63 31 
? wnle to Om 34 Ouci Generd 
Gusan, CP. 566, 1211 Geneva 


JOB LOIS, WE EXPORT large sriec- 
txsn hirii guriity b -ad nmne dseon- 
tinued domingat 40 - 7WS dbaouteon 

fnticB 

NEW U4E OF COSMETICS avaUfo 
far bfaek women. Territories avdable 
worldwide, (nwetted principals en- 


qtara ftesdertf BSC Inc, 310foqad. 
worL u wrence. NcwYonjllCTUSA 

HONG KONG, YOUR TAX Shelter, 
re-invoicing career, nom i nees, hade 


& sating ads. Far father mforntohon 
please forward your inguky & «?«**•- 
oatiare to Dowd Trifer, Presidett. 
Bern Home Products, 904 W. Bri- 
menl Av. FrryAfciffaric. IL 60131 USA 


Aston Company Fornwno m 


Depf TT, B Vidcno St.. Douglas. 
Isle of Man- Tet 0624 2fi»l 
Td« 627691 SPIVA G 


MIHMATIONAI. OFTSHOBE 
COMPANY INCORPORATIONS 
, FROM £1 10 
Comprehenjjve AtkmstraSon. 
Noninee services, ftjwen of Attorney. 
Re^stered offices. Trie*. tdej*ow. 
mal frewu’ di a. 

Maid Resources 
BaBacurie House. 
Summerhil. 

Me of Mon. 


raua OWN COMPANTfff 

SWITZERLAND 

ZURICH - ZUG - UIZBM 


far tax-free tr a d ng. Anonymous term 
deposits. Foreign exchange & buBon 
deriere. Monax, 10 PortT Place. St. 
Jomws. London SWI.Tri: 629 


VS. Star House. T5.T. Hong tong. 
Tbt 39644 DSm6t T«f 3^2fl833 


PCODUCT ASSURANCX 
Former Director of Product 
A aui ma in Fortum 500 
Bod r o w ic C np etri fo 
Now Cewdirn in Gennony 
to Wrewrt 
A Few Sriiri CBmte 
Potential dents should be headquar- 
tered outside of Germany and be in 
need of an mdfnduri ta provide ser- 
vices m Germany and the rest of Wiesf- 
em Europe. Am co mp e te re b vendor 
surveys & snaScra, mcorwg & in- , 
process in speeao n , h^dabity & dean 
room assembly & repeehon bspedwn 
of printed swing boards & aiwjibfat, 
dmetmetd & surface ptae bisection, 
Rnri & risppmg teKMH « » US. 
u Jtary or cotmiieroal standard s . ILS. 

r ef erence* con be trorided. AS bqw- 
rin Ireored copfkwttfaay. fopfy toe 





’ rmn sou re moai or BjDI 8 Antwerp - 
Heart of Antwerp -Diamond industry 


;-V'- 




gSffiMS omcE SERVICES 


iy m- Mstroeu Itadnc. Aviation By. 
W- AustnAw leaders bi Corporate 
• Je» Charter 4 a drvion of Aw 


YOUR INSTANT OFBCE 
FRANKFURT/ MAIN ' 




pwSte erfadcitionri Exeadhte Cta^ 
porateJef ChartorConfoa; The Gen- 

S* £&*&*• faofc AvfaSgn, T»a 


,p£ftS±±. 




Tdy, telete^fAX, BIX, 
Corinreoce rooms. .. 


■** ^a* 8 **! Atroorr 2020. 5yd- 
66?\799. Tlx: AA12052S^^ * 


v-ootereoce rooms. . 
Al office frxdiies. 
Own partdng riooe.' 


PIBVATt DETECTIVE SCANDMAV1A 
and FtnlancL- cril Norway: 24 hours 
Oh 42 72 Id, tx 78N9 oaenL Mm*> 
er G. Rektev, fanner 
oer.woridwfijB.”- ‘ 




EAB4 ■ 

20% ANNUAL YIBD 

Swured^lWK GOARAN1BE 

.Dritafc^^raY^GROUP - 
, Chomps Bysfe, 750QB Paris 
. ■ France . Trie* 660492 


WORLD-WIDE 

business cams 


ABm-R— 10 - 


“fCd 


HOW TO GET A 2nd “PASSPORT, j 






report - 12 oo w it r ie s onriyzed. Del 

te£T WMA, 45 LynefoM^foce, 


Stste 53, Certrri, I 


TEOR40LOGY SEARCH bartm 
nofagies needed to inpe ase p rams. 


Fi iedndrif. 


d confidwrioSy. fopfy toe 
Box 211% LKT, 

15, D6000 Fnmfcfurt/Moin 


from SF500 per amwm, uo 
idew, Baarente. 36, CH- 630 Q 


TnWMsyfh’STMP 

A Present For Yow Son 


RDUOAKY BANKING on large eol- 
totenwrOd toms. The only commer- 
oel bonk with g reproentative offlee 
m London speorAm m this servica 
An* Oreneas Bart & Trust (VWJ 


Amber Research Group, T09Q7 Hurt 
Oubjtesion, VA 22090 USA. Tet 703- 
471-^U3j The 650-27341011. 


BVOBKSD ORGAMZBt wil «for 
Tribune, 92521 NarihtCedBvFronot, 


CANADA BUBOES FACTS and op- 
port u o ri es Newsletter. 3 month >vb- 


DBAWARE-U-SJk Custanue jar 
USA presence: D&AWARE CORP, 
Domeaic a twn of non 1X5. enpora- 
tion, temporary transfer of non U5. 


Lfa, 28 Hock Prince Rood, London 
5E1. wL 01-735 8771 

HH3H FASHION WOMAN Gamert 
Desist Compony, already cfcpatahed 
citernctfi q nJ y would be mtererted in 
maoting fintjidal patiw in order Id 


c orporati o n domicile to U5, sheet or 
P.d. Box address, tel, telex, tefefo. 
Corporate none reservation by 
phone. HRH.P.O. Bo* 9843, WiMng- 


port u p m es Newsletter. 3 mortfi *«*■ 
sokmon USS31 Evergreen NeM, 
1525 Robison $L, Vancouver, B.C, 
Canada V6G ICS 


Bin 

BEAUTlfUL PEOFlf 

UNLtMfTED INC 
USJL 8 WORLDWIDE 


SUCCB5WL U3,Cdi»hrifoy future 
flow trader writes ta roonogeosndr 
rwriier of accdante from Jhe floor of . 
omriw M4- ooBenodsy exthangn. 
530,000 mnaum mresment. Ffom 
amtoct Mr. Gta a Talk' Userty ; 


ztt wotaus pgss omcE.- 
"^gtate tad vatee p ren eMr 

tnodmeffiaereoffioeetZu 

ro^ w WBwg iye v^eqUi 
. w Bpenoneed, . reEafaia ■ * 


CAPITAL wanted 


FSfif WOWATION reft oppfeo- 


New Bond Start, London WI. &v 


BORDEAUX WWB ~-DtVtyO«>, 

TrirTfl TwS'Sfc Slfe HJTA 


BMU5H COMPANY FORMATION, 
tetri privacy osswed. Kt. 73 New 
Bond Sfrsef, Urtfa" Wl. Engtand 


m09tmg nrucjol potaef in ( 

o***cp os brand prfey in findrw . 
agency & tensing luxury nod 
Crirtaa 277 73 19 Paris 


ton, DE 19809 USA. Tet 302-76 
69l9.fi* 757674 


SBL COMPANY bedtferofon. P.O. 1 
Ba* 253. Psreafs Laracrote. Sport- 


PANAMA LB8BA. CCXK38AT10NS 
from US$400 ovotobte now. Tri 


A complete personals business senrice 

nfiriwls far cri wdriiS 
nui ta ion d occasions. 
212-765-7793 
2 T 2-7 65-7794 
330 W. 56th Sf, N.Y.C 1001? 




COTi D'AZUR. 1 
» red. aide; 


nrm m ram You 
W"°*P#tmmr&ycutnai wdi , 
to mrest 8 or doom e far semftna 
to ret could ye yy „ 
m sshanan er nrk ku.„ _ 


p-groflp bvrived 
whSwh, jrinfe 

•re, seen patiner 
■ktbqk to boofl 


’ tofafa*. Iwpra- PoW 


... .„. mvHtment of 

nOJOTMtVWte to iM Herdtfj 
T^vng,?2S2l hteriRy Qedtt, France 




■ ■ m iJte 

' Men business.' CenfW-. ipt t 

-JL792H 


• h ■ '•* : 

•ei, - .. 

t.. 4 •* 
^ v"r-’-v.r-, 

• i ■ 

>'. k ; 


Uened corid om ore of a. fW 
"to Bo* 2661, Herdd T)K2 
«S21 NcrifyCrtte^firona. """Pj 


Trim 62835 2 BLM-O ! 




Inprimi par Offprint. 73 rue de I’Evangile, 75018 Paris. 


22% REAL AMWAL REZURK CM 

sssRasrfir” 


p A«S ADDRESS, ^ 
!?* liP.- provides mriL 




IrttiRom 








. /'r. kl