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N 




The Globial Newspaper 

Edited. In Pans - 
Printed Simultaneously: 

« "H 1 Mwdon- ZittwH. 


INTERNATIONAL 






ed With The New York Tunes and The Washington Post 


ZURICH, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1985 


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U-S. Hostage Held 
in Lebanon Is Freed 


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Benjamin Weir 


Angola Says 
South Africa 
RaidAided 
Insurgents 

Compiled by <Jvr Staff From Dup&cha 

LUANDA Angola — The An- 
golan government said Wednesday 
that South Africa had carried out 
two major air raids on its forces in 

t apparent attempt to blunt an 
golan army drive against anti- 
government guerrillas supported 
by the South Africans. 

South Africa has said that it sent 
troops and planes into Angola two 
days ago to prevent guerrillas of the 

South African police shoot three 
persons to death in racial vio- 
lence near Cape Town. Page 2. 


South-West Africa 
nizatkm, or SWAPO, 


lie's Orga- 
cany- 


ing out planned raids in neighbor- 
ing South-West Africa. 

However. -Aqgolah television, 
said the raids had-beeh aimed at 
supporting the National Union for 
the Total Independence of Angola, 
or UNITA, whose forces currently 
are 

in the southeastern part 
country. 

Government officials said the 


The Anaatded Press 

CONCORD, New Hampshire 
— The Reverend Benjamin M. 
Weir, kidnapped in Lebanon 16 
mouths ago. u “back in America, 
safe with his family," President 
Ronald Reagan announced 
Wednesday. He is the fust of seven 
American hostages held in Leba- 
non to be released. 

-The White House held out the 
prospect that the other six Ameri- 
cans hekl captive might be re- 
leased, but Edward Djerqian, a 
White House spokesman, said it 
had become apparent Tuesday 
night that no more releases were 
imminent. 

The Reverend Weir was released 
to U.S. authorities in Beirut cm Sat- 
urday, the spokesman said without 
offering any details. 

There were unconfirmed reports 
Sunday that Mr. Weir had been 
released, but the US Embassy in 
Beirut said at the time that it had 
"no such information.'" 

Mr. Reagan, in Concord for a 
speech, said he "will not be satis- 
fied or cease our efforts until all the 
hostages, the other six. are re- 
leased" Some of the families of the 
hostages have criticized adminis- 
tration efforts id gain the release of 
the victims. 

He said he had talked by phone 
Wednesday morning with Mr. Weir 
and added “I am nappy for him 
and his family." 

Mr. Djerejian said that Mr. Weir 
was in Norfolk. Virginia, but would 
not say. He said that the 61 -year- 
old Presbyterian minister was not 
hospitalized. 

Doctors described him as being 
"in good mental and physical con- 
dition,” Mr. Djerqian added 

Mr. Weir’s release had not been 
announced earlier, the spokesman 
said "because we were concerned 
making it public would interfere 
with what we hoped would be the 
imminent release of the other six.” 

Aside from the seven Americans, 
four Frenchmen and a Briton have 
also been kidnapped in Lebanon 
over the last 18 months. Islamic 
Jihad a Lebanese guerrilla organi- 
zation, has claimed to hold most of 
the hostages and has demanded the 
release of 17 men imprisoned in 



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ESTABLISHED 1887 


Reagan Says SDI Plan 
Is Not Negotiable Now 


The Anooetd ftou 


ARREST OUTSIDE CONFERENCE — Troops subdued a man Wednesday daring a 
disturbance outside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Inside, a conference was 
under way to bring younger people into the Communist Party leadership. Page 6. 

Kremlin Expels 6 More Britons, 
But Truce Apparently Is Called 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW —The Soviet Union 
ordered six Britons to leave 
Wednesday in the fourth round of 
retaliatory expulsions marked by 
the defection of the chief KGB 
agent in Britain, but apparently a 
truce has been reached. 

In London, the British Foreign 
Office announced that no more 
members of the Soviet diplomatic 
delegation would be expelled. 

The British ambassador to Mos- 
cow, Bryan Card edge, was sum- 
moned to the Soviet Foreign Minis- 
try and told of Wednesday's 
expulsions, which included five 
members of the embassy staff and a 
reporter. The announcement came 
two days after Britain added six 


Kuwait over bombings of the U.S... Soviet citizens to a list of 25 ex- 


and French embassies there.. 

The United States tried unsuc- 
cessfully to gain the release of the 
seven Americans last July during 
the hijacking of a TWA airliner in 


under attack by Angolan troops geiruL The”39 Americans on the 
the southeastern part of the nUnev 


« 4.U riv \jtvT earned out under the pretense or 

MrLOi phasing SWAPO guerrillas, Agence 
- • ’rrance-Presse reported. 

The Angolan Defense Ministry 
said in a comm uni qufc monitored ]d 
L isbon on the official Angolan 
news agency. ANGOP: “The South 
African Air Force carried out mas- 
sive strikes against our units en- 


plane were freed with Syria’s assis- 
tance, and, apparently in response, 
Israel released more than 750 Leba- 
(Conriimed on Page 2, GoL 6) 


polled, last week on suspicion of 
being spies. 

The Soviets retaliated by expel- 
ling 25 Britons on Saturday. 
Wednesday’s action means each 
side now Has expelled 31 persons. 

“We wish to draw a line under 
this affair," said Christopher Mey- 
er, bead of the British Foreign Of- 
fice news department. “We have no 


plans at present for further expul- 
sions from London." 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher insisted that the Kremlin 
had lost out in the exchange. In 
Egypt, where she is on an official 
visit, Mrs. Thatcher said: ‘‘Ibis 
shows the Soviet Union in a pretty 
poor light. They were caught red- 
handed and are now red-raced. 

“We have eliminated the core of 
their subversive and intelligence 
operation in Britain so we shall not 
respond further to their wholly un- 
justified expulsions." 

Mr. Cartledge called Wednes- 
day's expulsion by the Soviet 
Union “a vengeful and spiteful 
act," and said it would make it 
hander to rebuild relations. 

“The Soviet government's action 
today is far from constructive,” Mr. 
Cartledge said in a statement is- 
sued after he returned from the 
Soviet Foreign Ministry. “It repre- 
sents a further setback.” 

The Briu'sh ambassador identi- 
fied the six ordered oul.of Moscow 
on Wednesday as lan Sloane, em- 
bassy first secretary and cultural 
attache; lan Wall a communica- 
tions staffer, Robert Hooper, assis- 


tant air attache: Sergeant Nigel 
Andrews, a member of the air atta- 
che's staff; Paul Hughes of the na- 
val attache staff, and Martin Ne- 
s/rky. a Reuters correspondent. 

They have three weeks to leave 
the Soviet Union. Mr. Nesirky is 
the second Reuters correspondent 
ordered out of Moscow and the 
sixth journalist among the 31. 

The British ambassador called 
the accusations groundless, and 
said that the six expelled Wednes- 
day. tike the 25 ordered out or Mos- 
cow on Saturday, were “innocent 
victims of retaliation,” He reiterat- 
ed the British government’s state- 
ment that the 31 Russians expelled 
from London are spies. 

The Soviet retaliations were con- 
sidered extremely tough, matching 
the British number for number, 
an# including key embassy person- 
nel. Thearabassy has now lost ap- 
proximately. 33 percent of its Brit- 
ish staff. 

Britain expelled 25 Soviet citi- 
zens from London on Thursday, 
saying they had been identified as 
spies by the head of the KGB in 
London, Oleg A. Gordievsld. when 
he defected. 


Protectionism 
Called Threat 

By Gerald M. Boyd 

Sew Yori Tones Sonic* 

WASHINGTON — Calling on 
Congress “to work with me,” Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan warned in a 
nationally televised news confer- 
ence that “a mindless stampede to- 
ward protectionism will be a one- 
way trip to economic disaster.” 

The president held firm Tuesday 
against rising congressional pres- 
sures to pass protectionist legisla- 
tion. He said that such restrictions 
on trade with the United States 
could impair economic progress 
and result in retaliation by other 
countries chat could "deliver an 
economic death blow” to thou- 
sands of American family farms. 

Mr. Reagan met on Monday at 
the White House with congressio- 
nal leaders, who are developing an 
omnibus trade bill that would in- 
corporate elements of numerous 
pending bills and would strengthen 
the administration's hand in com- 
bating unfair trade practices. 

“We have begun doing many 
good things for America these Iasi 
four and a half years,” Mr. Reagan 
said in an opening statement. “So 
let us not place all that progress, all 
our hopes for the future, at risk by 
starting down a slippery slope of 
impulsive acts and impnidem judg- 
ment. This is a time for cool heads 
and clear vision.” 

Mr. Reagan made these points in 
answers to questions on other do- 
mestic issues; 

• HU administration has spent 
or allocated about S500 million for 
research to find a cure for acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome, or 
AIDS, including S100 million this 
year and $126 million for the 1 986 
fiscal year, beginning Ocl 1. Mr. 
Reagan said that "this is a top pri- 
ority with us," but suggested that 
budgetary restrictions forbade 
spending more, as some scientists 
have advocated. Over his tenure, 
Congress has repeatedly appropri- 
ated more money for such research 
than the president requested. 

• He said be was glad that he 
was not faced with the dilemma of 
having to decide whether to send a 
child to a school where another 
pupil had AIDS. He said that medi- 
cine had not come forth with "un- 
equivocal” proof that the disease 

(Continued on Page 8, CoL 6) 



bunrvun 


Ronald Reagan 


The President’s Views 

United Press Intematn'thii 

WASHINGTON — Key is- 
sues discussed by President 
Ronald Reagan at his news con- 
ference included: 

• SUMMIT: Mr. Reagan 
said (hat the November summit 
meeting with Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev “has got to be moTe than a 
get- acquainted” session 

• TRADE: In response to re- 
ports this week that the United 
States is becoming one of the 
world's largest debtor nations. 
Mr. Reagan said: "I think this 
false impression is being given 
that trade imbalance means 
debtor nation. The deficit that I 
am concerned about is the defi- 
cit in federal spending.” 

• SPACE-BASED DE- 
FENSES: Mr. Reagan de- 
fended his proposed missile de- 
fense system in space because, 
"The Soviet Union is already 
ahead of us in this program.” 

• ECONOMY: “America 
has led the world with 33 
months of straight growth," 
Mr. Reagan said. He de- 
nounced a “mindless stampede 
toward protectionism.” 

• SOUTH AFRICAN 
SANCTIONS: On criticism of 
his sanctions against South Af- 
rica, Mr. Reagan said: “I think 
that when you’re standing up 
against a cellophane wall and 


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you're getting shot at from both 
sides, you must be doing some- 
thing right." 


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NGllAl so® 


UN Faces Crucial Issues as General Assembly Opens 40th Year 



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gaged in actions against the puppet 
bandits of UNITA,” 12 miles (19 
kilometers) from Mavingju which is 
near the anti-government rebels’ 
main base at Jamba. 

“Eight aircraft took part in the 
first raid and 10 in the second, with 
the South Africans using Canberra 
and Mirage planes,” the ministry 
communique said. 

The news agency gave no infor- 
mation on casualties or on the time 
of the raids. . . , 

Colonel Pedro ManaTonha, the 
Angolan defense minister, said that 
the South Africans had acted in 
support of the UNITA rebds, who 
Jjave been fighting a guerrilla war 
■fence Angola gained independence 
from Portugal in 1975. 

The Angolan media said the 
move was intended to help UNITA 
forces resist pressure from govern- 
ment troops and to divert attention 
from racwT unrest m South Africa. 

a. noolan television said that iIk 
S outh Africans had *(menedaF- 
^ the Angolans had tilled mwe 
han 1.000 rebels in the past 45 
a . vs in eastern Mexico prownct 
it was “curious but not srnpns- 


By Elaine Sdolino 

New York Tunes Service 

UNITED NATIONS, New York — Facing a host 
of divisive issues ranging from the militarization of 
space to sanctions against South Africa, the United 
Nations General Assembly opened its 40th year of 
dHiberations on Tuesday. 

A UN spokesman, Francois Giuliani, said it was a 
welcome challenge. He said: “With all those world 
leaders in the same place at the same time this is a 
fantastic opportunity for rdn vigors ting the United 
Nations. It could make history” 

This year the Genera] Assembly will attract up to 
100 heads of stale and government who will speak 
during the three-week general debate thai begins Sept. 


24. or during a special commemorative session from 
Oct. 14 to Oct. 24. 

President Ronald Reagan is expected to speak cm 
Ocl 24, the 40th anniversary of the date that the UN 
Charter came into farce. 

Never before has the Uni led Nations been host to so 
many world leaders, and there is a widespread feeling 
among envoys and officials that the personalities are 
bound to overshadow the issues. 

One veteran UN official said. “This wLD be a people 
session, not an issue session.” 

But others are convinced that the presence of so 
many world leaders will focus new attention on issues 
of concern. 

Stephen Lewis, Canada’s permanent UN represen- 


tative, said: “It will certainly be one of the most 
dramatic sessions since the United Nations was 
formed. With issues like South Africa, the African 
famine, and torture, and the extraordinary number of 
heads of state and government, there will be a cornu- 
copia of debate and disputation." 

At its opening session Tuesday afternoon, delegates 
from the 159 member nations chose a Spanish career 
diplomat, Jaime de Pinies, 67, as president of the 
Genoa] Assembly. 

“F or a diplomat with 41 years in the foreign ser- 
vice," Mr. de Pinies said in an interview, "to crown my 
career with ihe presidency of the General Assembly is 
out of this world, is so exciting.” 

Mr. de Pinies, who served as a diplomat to the 


Spanish mission to the' United Nations for nearly 30 
years, added that for him the UN is a place "to bring 
out the steam and then to sit down, relax and talk 
friendly." 

In his acceptance speech. Mr. de Pinies blamed 
what he called the "crisis” of the UN on the “selfish- 
ness” of member states, rather than on the organiza- 
tion itself. 

"It is a secret to no one that the United Nations is 
now in the midst of a crisis,” he said. "It has not lived 
up to the hopes vested in it when it was founded.” 

Mr. de Pinies said that Lhe United Nations does no 
more or no less than what its member states want it to 

(Continued on P&ge 8, CoL 6) 


mg 


said, that 


h7d cMM-athe an- 

Xmto. UNITA to ^mostten 
(Continued on Page A *■**•*) 



Delegates Worriedby U.S. Proposals on UN Budget 


By Don Shannon 

Las Angeles Times Service 

UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — The 40th session of the 


under the shadow of U.S. congres- 
sional actions reflecting a newly 
critical attitude toward the world 
organization by its host country. 

Outside the assembly hall, where 
delegates heard a farewell speech 
by Paul J.F. Lusaka of Zambia, the 


Nancy London Kassebaam riding talk was 


Jaime de Pinies of Spain, 
of OJL 


legislation 


that would reduce American sup- 
port for the United Nations. 

A bill sponsored by Senator 
Nancy Landon Kassebaum, Re- 
publican of Kansas, and passed by 
Congress m August would cut the 
U.S. contribution to (he United 
Nations to 20 percent erf the total 
budget from the current 25 percent 
ceiling, unless voting on budgetary 
matters is weighted according to 
members’ contributions. Hut re- 
quirement would effectively give 
the United States a veto over the 
UNbudgeL 

The change, to lake effect in 
1987, threatens lo create a new bat- 
tleground between the Western na- 


NESS 


Qf Criminals and Civic Pride in a Japanese Port 

1 'Kobe Inc.’, Business Sense Flourishes Amid Gangs and Spacious Streets 

Yfltf ,VU „ i 






By Clyde Haberman 

‘VfW York Tunes Server 


Some residents talk 
look-how- lough- rny- 


in a proud, 
-is style. Others fail 


tike this old to see any charm. Across the street from the 
KOBE, Japan "7 There« w „_, Yamugudu-gumi's main compound on the east 

ritv so much that even worry ^ ^ neighbors recently put up a biD- 






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4 -j|v SO mu*.** — . 

Shout hurt ljj| il^of ?shooting war that had been 
In 1 hC dans ofgang- 

goingon since underworiddS-- 

5«* ” ismSctaie-fire while Kobe was 

ctof* f oivmDics-siyle event known as the 
holdm: 


town, neighbors recently put up 
board telling the gang to move out 
Moods did not improve last weekend when 
two shootings shattered the truce only a few 
days after the 12-day Universiade had ended. 
“We can’t see the end of it," said Minoru To- 
mizawa, an inspector with the Hyogo Prefecture 


.inivL-rsKwJ* . hec jty look bad, they said, rf police. 

K would maxc while thousands of The Yakuza aside, Kobe is an unusual place. 

fh , v continued so l 4 mjuiQQ people live on an attractive 

foreign athlews were m to ^ stretch of land sandwiched between the Inland 

Their gesture did . occasio ^ y Sea and the thickly wooded Rokko Maintains, 

... rfven ttiontns voimra nrmuls- about 250 miles (400 kilometers) southwest of 







a**. 


fhc; two gpSjr ^called idiitrakai, mody gre* 31 - .... 

L h lkaway uteir breath. - U*y do elsewhere m the country. 

Wanted an "^ re 0 f several minds aboUitlK 


“We’ve adopted a private company's methods 
of holding down costs to a minimum and in- 
creasing our income to a maximum,” Mayor 
Tatsuo Miyazaki said. 

Nothing better demonstrates Kobe's business 
sense than two artificial islands that dominate 
the harbor. The dty literally moved mountains 
to create them. 

Squeezed on a shelf of land and in need of 
more room, Kobe for the last two decades has 
sliced away sections of the Rokko Mountains 
that lie to the west carting than to the sea. 

Every day, huge chunks of dirt and rods are 
chewed off, ground up and sent, at a rate of 
7,500 short tons (about 6.800 metric tons) an 
hour, along five miles of underground conveyer 
belt to the Inland Sea beaches. From there, the 
earth is loaded onto barges and carried another 
12 miles to landfill sates. 

In this manner, ai a cost of SZ2 billion, Kobe 
built the 1,077-acre (435-bectare) Fort Island, 




that officials to 
and irucUito builds. executives of Kobe! 


jSthcrew 


cuts 


Kobe Inc.” (Continued on Page 6, CoL 5) 


lions and the Third World. The UN 
Charter gives each nation, no mat; 
ler bow small, an equal vote with 
ihe largest in the General Assem- 
bly. 

A second Kassebaum proposal, a 
cause of concern among the secre- 
tariat's 5.000 employees, would 
have required that UN employees 
be paid no more than Ui5. civil 
servants. The Senate-House con- 
ference, however, instead ordered 
the secretary of stale merely to con- 
duct a study of the amount by 
which UN salaries exceed their 
U 5. counterparts. 

Another law, . 
tor William V. Roth Jr., Republi- 


INSIDE 

■ The U.S. Senate has ap- 
proved an amendment that 
would provide legal foreign 
workers for farmers. Page 3. 

■ King Hussein's visit to the 
U.S. is seen as a chance to break 
the Mideast impasse. Page 3. 

■ US. conservatives have re- 

acted angrily to the Mozambi- 
can president’s visit to Wash- 
ington. Page 7. 

SCIENCE 

■ Competition for communica- 

tions satellite orbit positions 
causes resentment by Third 
World countries. Page 9. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Saudi Arabia already has be- 
gun producing an additional 
million barrels of crude a day, 
industry sources say. Page 1L 

■ U.S. boosing starts jumped 
6.2 percent in August. Page 11. 


can of Delaware, and enacted last 
month, now applies the same travel 
restrictions to UN staff members 
that already cover the members of 
individual diplomatic missions 
here. For the Soviet citizens on the 
UN staff, that would mean they 
could not travel more than 25 miles 
beyond UN headquarters without 
Stale Department penmssion. 

Mr. Roth coupled his bQi with 
charges that UN employees from 
the Soviet Union and other East- 
bloc countries have used their jobs 
for spying, a charge echoed by the 
former 0.5. ambassador to the 
United Nations, Jeane J. Kirkpat- 
rick. 



William V. Roth Jr. 


Research 
To Go Ahead 

By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has ruled out nego- 
tiations with the Soviet Union on 
development and testing of his pro- 
posed missile defense in space in 
exchange for deep cuts in the Soviet 
nuclear arsenal. 

At the same time, Mr. Reagan, in 
a nationally televised news confer- 
ence, expressed hope that his meet- 
ing in November with Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, 
would “lead to a change in the 
relationship" between the United 
States and the Soviet Union. 

Responding to several questions 
about the meeting in Geneva. Mr. 
Reagan made it plain that although 
be ruled out his Strategic Defensive 
Initiative as a “bargaining chip” in 
the immediate future, he did not 
exclude a future bargain once re- 
search into the space program was 
completed. 

“There’s a great deal of room for 
negotiation.” Mr. Reagan said. 

His comments occurred in a 36- 
minuie question-and-answer ses- 
sion in the White House East 
Room. It was the 3!st White House 
news conference of Mr. Reagan's 
presidency, and the fourth since he 
was sworn in to a second term in 
January. 

When he was asked how he re- 
acted to criticism from Congress 
and both whites and blacks in 
South Africa regarding sanctions 
against that country, Mr. Reagan 
likened himself to a' person stand- 
ing at “a cellophane wall and get- 
ting shot at from both sides." add- 
ing that this suggested that he was 
doing something right. 

"1 must be pretty near the mid- 
dle." he said. 

The president said he had tried 
to avoid “economic sanctions that 
would have militated against the 
people we were trying to help." 

Dominating the foreign policy 
portions of the news conference 
were the issues of Mr. Reagan's 
meeting with Mr. Gorbachev in 
Geneva on Nov. 19 and 20. In ad- 
vance of the meeting, administra- 
tion officials have made it plain 
that a key question remained unre- 
solved — the posable bargain on 
space arms in exchange for deep 
cuts in the Soviet offensive missile 
force. 

Mr. Reagan, looking fit and 
speaking in a strong voice, referred 
to his meeting with Mr. Gorbachev 
on a positive note. 

Amid laughter he said, “1 wasn't 
going to give him a friendship ring 
or anything." 

"It isn’t necessary that we love or 
even like each other." Mr. Reagan 
said. "It's only necessary that we 
recognize that for the good of the 
people we represent, on this side of 
the ocean and over there, that ev- 
eryone will be better off if we can 
come to some decisions about the 
threat of war." 

When asked if his program was 
not leading toward "militarization 
of the heavens," Mr. Reagan said 
no and asserted that the Soviet 
Union was not negotiating proper- 
ly in Geneva to reduce arms. 

“We are talking about a weapon 
that won't kill people." he said of 
the anti-satellite system. Instead, 
he said, it will kill weapons. 

Asked whether it could be turned 
to offensive purposes, Mr. Reagan 
said the purpose of the research 
program was purely defensive. 

Mr. Reagan rejected suggestions 
that his administration accept a 
ban on testing and development of 
anti-satellite weapons. He asserted 
that the United States was “playing 
catch-up" with a Soviet program 
for such weaponry that has already 
been tested. 

“We couldn't stand by." he said, 
“and allow them to have a monop- 
oly cm the ability to shoot down 
satellites when we are so dependent 

(Continued on Page 8, CoL 8) 


Kohl Blocked Check of Spy Suspect 


The Associated Press 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl blocked extra surveillance of 
a secretory in his office who later 
fled to East Germany, saying there 
was insufficient evidence that she 
was a spy, an Interior Ministry offi- 
cial said Wednesday. 

Hans Neusel, one of the highest- 
ranking officials in the Interior 
Ministry, spoke to reporters after 
the defection of Herts- As trid 
Willner and her husband. Herbert 
Adolf Willner. 

Her defection, announced Tues- 
day, is the first time a spy case has 
directly involved the chancellor's 
office "since the 1974 scandal that 
toppled Willy BrandL 

Mr. Neusel, a state secretary, 
said at a news conference that Mrs. 
Willner’s husband had been 
watched sporadically for 12 years. 

Mr. Kohl was informed on Aug. 
28 that Mrs. Willner, 45. a secretary 
in the domestic affairs department 
of his chancellery, was being 


watched because she was married 
to a suspected spy. Mr. Neusel said. 

But the chancellor agreed with 
Interior Ministry officials that 
there was not enough evidence to 
justify wiretapping the couple's 
phone or reaoing their maiL he 
said. 

“We told the chancellor that 
there was this suspicion against a 
man whose wife worked in the 
chancellery, although not the 
slightest information against the 
woman was available,” Mr. Neusel 
said. Mr. Kohl “agreed there were 
no conditions” Tor wiretapping 
“but that the case should be pur- 
sued.” he added. 

By that time, however, the 
Willners were out of the country. 
They left for a vacation in Spain on 
Aug. 12 and are believed to have 
gone to East Germany at the end of 
the month, Mr. Neusel said. 

The Office for the Protection of 
the Constitution, the country’s 
counterspy agency, had asked the 


Interior Ministry on May 17 Tor 
permission to tap their telephone 
and read their mail. Mr. Neusel 
said, 

"Mrs. Willner worked in the 
nerve center of the government." 
he said, adding that Bonn was hap- 
py that the East Germans had lost 
an agent in the chancellery through 
her defection. 

West German authorities an- 
nounced Tuesday that the couple 
had written letters saying they had 
defected to East Germany. Au- 
thorities say both are now suspect- 
ed of being East German spies. 

Mr. Willner worked at the Frie- 
drich Naumann Foundation, 
which is linked with the Free Dem- 
ocratic Party, the junior partner in 
the Christian Democratic chancel- 
lor’s coalition government. 

Kurt Rebmann, the chief federal 
prosecutor, said that Mr. Willner 
had been a member of East Gerraa- 

(Cou tuned on Page 2. Col. 4) 








Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1985 


South Africa Police Shoot 3 to Death 


In Racial Violence Near Cape Town 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — The 
South African police shot and 
killed thiee pereoos, one a 10-year- 
old girl, in clashes Wednesday near 
Cape Town. Two policemen were 
injured in fighting with mourners 
at a Pretoria funeral for a 4-year- 
old child who also was shot by the 
police. 

A police spokesman said that girl 
was killed and a 12-year-old boy 
was wounded when officers fired 
shoiguns at people throwing stones 
in Elsies River, a racially mixed 
suburb of Cape Town. 

In another such suburb, Valhalla 
Park, the police killed a young man 
and wounded a woman in a similar 
dash. A black man was killed when 
officers fired on a crowd throwing 
stones outside a liquor store in the 
Manenberg mixed-race township. 

The shootings were confirmed, 
without further details, by a police 
spokesman in Cape Town. 

More than 50 persons now have 
been killed in Cape Town since 
rioting began late last month after a 
ban on a protest march to the pris- 
on where the leader of the African 


National Congress, Nelson Man- 
dela, who has been in prison for 23 
years. He is serving a life sentence 
for treason and sabotage. Almost 
700 blacks have been killed in a 
year of racial imrest in the country. 

While the violence continued, 
the South African police commis- 
sioner, General Johann P. Coetzee, 
appointed Brigadier General 
Biadde Swart, a policeman with a 
reputation for tough action, to re- 
place another officer, who was sent 
home on sick leave pending a trans- 
fer to Pretoria- 

General Swan was transferred 
from Port Elizabeth, where he was 
the regional police chief at the time 
of the slaying by the police on 
March 21 of 20 blades heading for a 
funeral near Uitcnhage. 

He said on his first day in Cape 
Town that the police would react 
“with all the force at our disposal” 


to rioting by blacks and people of 
mixed race. 


Meanwhile, the South African 
government expressed its unflinch- 
ing hard line toward riots against 
apartheid, declaring on Radio 
South Africa that it would not let 
radicals take over the troubled 
black townships. 

The radio commentary, which 
reflects official thinking, said that 
the government must keep up its 
tough action to quell the unrest 
Radicals were trying to intimi- 
date moderates in black areas but 
“can only succeed in an environ- 
ment in which law enforcement has 
broken down,” it said. 

The authorities must brave criti- 
cism of “effective police action" 
and not “be intimidated into allow- 
ing the radicals to take over in 
those areas,” it said. (Reuters, A Pi 



U.S. Hostage WORLD BRIEFS 


In Lebanon 


Is Released 



South Africa Air Raid Sought 
To Help Rebels, Angola Says 



Herta-Astrid Wfflmer and her husband, Herbert Adolf. 



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(Continued from Page 11 
strangled by the offensive of the 
Angolan forces.” 

In Pretoria, General Constant! 
Viljoen, chief of the South African 
armed forces, said Tuesday that a 
22-year-old South African medical 
orderly had been killed in fighting 
while giving medical assistance to 
UN1TA forces in Angola. 


Visiting ^ 
New York City? 


He said the orderly had not been 
connected with the South African 
force sent to attack SWAPO, which 
is Tighting for the independence of 
South-West Africa. The territory, 
also known as Namibia, is con- 
trolled by South Africa. 

The South African Annv, mean- 


while, said in Pretoria that 500 of 
its troops were in Angola pursuing 
Namibian guerrillas. The array said 
its troops were fighting against 
hundreds of SWAPO guerrillas, 
and that on Tuesday, its warplanes 
had made intensive reconnaissance 
flights to aid ground forces. 

The statement also said the An- 
golan forces not only had provided 
“SWAPO with logistic help but 
also informed them” of South Afri- 
can actions. 


Kohl Blocked Check 
Of Aide in His Office 


It gave no details of any casual-' 
lies in the raid, which South Africa 
has said was expected to last a 
week. 


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Doubles $90-100 
Suites $115-175 
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European Experts Meet 
On U.S. Space Initiative 


In Washington, a senior Reagan 
administration official denounced 
the raid on Tuesday and suggested 
that it might violate international 
law. 


MUNICH — Research ministers 
and aerospace experts began meet- 
ing Wednesday to assess how Eu- 
rope can respond to the accelerat- 
ing U.S. challenge in space 
technology despite divergent views 
on President Ronald Reagan's 
space-based missile defense re- 
, search project 


The official said at the White 
House that “no previous facts were 
brought to our attention that would 
warrant such an action ” 


Commenting on the U.S. criti- 
cism: Radio South Africa said: “ft 
is unfortunate that that govern- 
ment. evidently bowing to political 
pressure as it did over sanctions, 
seems no longer prepared to main- 
tain a fair and even-handed stance 
on this subject.” 


(Continued from Page 1) 
ny's Communist Party before mov- 
ing to West Germany in 1961. 

His wife had worked in the chan- 
cellery since 1973 and had access to 
classified documents. 

Mr. Neusel said it is possible that 
H.i ns- Joa chim Hedge, a former 
West German counterspy who de- 
fected to East Germany on Aug. 
19, warned the couple from East 
Berlin that they should defect. 

Mr. TiedBe, whose job was un- 
masking East German spies, had 
been in charge of the Willner case, 
Mr. Neusel said. 

Bonn's counterspy agency fust 
ran a check on Mr. Willner in 1973, 
when it received a query about him 
from a “friendly” embassy in Bonn 
where he bad many contacts, Mr. 
Neusel said 

Mr. Willner's name has been in 
and out of the counterspy files ever 
since. Mr. Neusel said, but “there 


was not enough evidence to grab 
hold of, just enough to keep one 
from sleeping welL” 

Mr. Rebmaan, the federal prose- 
cutor, said Wednesday that his of- 
fice had decided Aug. 23 not to 
open a criminal investigation 
against Mr. W illner . 


“This was a very old thing and 
there was just not enough material 
against h i m, ” Mr. Rebmann said. 
A veteran legal official, Mr. Reb- 
mann rarely issues public state- 
ments defending his actions. 

Hans-Juergen Foerster, a 
spokesman for the prosecutor's of- 
fice. said investigators who 
searched the Willners’s apartment 
in a Bonn suburb after their defec- 
tion found equipment that could be 
used for spying, including a con- 
tainer suitable for concealing mi- 
crofilm. as well as sensitive docu- 
ments and a large amount of 
money. • - 


(Continued from Pag* 1) 
nese Shiite prisoners it held and 
whose freedom the hijackers had 

Mr. Djerejian refused to answer 
questions Wednesday on why only 
Mr. Weir had been freed. 

He said the United States had 
made absolutely no deal with, die 
kidnappers oT Mr. Weir. “Our posi- 
tion on negotiating with terrorists 
is very clear,” he added, a reference 
to the US. stance of refusing to 
negotiate with terrorists- 

Asked further if the United 
Stales had given up anything to win 
Mr. Weir’s release, the spokesman 
said, Tin not going to get into 
thaL” 

“We have been in contact with 
several governments” in the at- 
tempt to free the Americans, he 
said, a dding that Syria, widely be- 
lieved to have influence with Leba- 
nese guerrilla groups, had “not spe- 
cifically" helped in the efforts. 

He said officials had hoped that 
Israel’s freeing of the last of its 
Shiite prisoners held at the Adit 
prison camp last week “would im- 
prove the atmosphere in the re- 
gion” and that, following the re- 
lease, “we did enhance our efforts.” 

Mr. Reagan said Vice Pres dent 
George Bush would meet with the 
famfliiqc of the r emaining six hos- 
tages in Washington on Friday. 

Church nf firink said that Mr. 
War and his family would hold a 
news conference Thursday. 

Mr. Weir was kidnapped in Bei- 
rut on May 8, 1984. A native of Salt 
Lake City, he had lived in Beirut 
since 1953. Fluent in Arabic, his 
job was to funnel aid from the 
Presbyterian Church into Lebanon. 

The other missing Americans 
and the dates they were kidnapped 
are: William Buckley, 56. U.S. Em- 


ir political officer, March 16, 
1984; Peter Kdburn, 60, a librarian 
at the American University of Bei- 
rut, Dec. 3, 1984; the Reverend 
Lawrence Jenco, SO. a Roman 
Catholic priest, Jan. 8, 1985; Terry 
A. Anderson, an Associated Press 
correspondent, March 16, 1985; 
David P. Jacobsen, 54, director of 
the American University hospital. 
May 28, 198S. and Thomas Suther- 
land, 53. dean of agriculture at the 
university, June 9. 1985. 


Athens Publisher Murdered 


The three-day conference is 
sponsored by the parliamentary as- 
sembly of the Western European 
Union, the military pact grouping 
France. Italy, West Germany, Brit- 
ain and the Benelux countries. 


Acceding to demands not to 
launch such raids “would result in 
the destruction of South-West Afri- 
ca's prospects for developing as a 
democratic, independent state” 
the radio said. 

(AFP. Reuters , Ni T) 


Reuters 

ATHENS — Police said that Mi- 
chel Nunn, the publisher of the 
Athens-based Arabic-lan°uage 
magazine Annashra. which has 
criticized Arab governments and 
written of an alleged plot to over- 
throw President Haferal- Assad of 
Syria, was killed Wednesday by a 
gunman. 


The opposition Social Demo- 
crats strongly criticized Mr. Kohl 
and his government, questioning 
whether Interior Minister Frieder- 
ich Zimmermann should continue 
in office. 


The WiUners were the sixth and 
seventh suspected Communist 
spies to disappear from West Ger- 
many or to be arrested since the 
beginning of August 


Krupp engineering for excellence 


Geodetic surveying 
using Kwpp-buift antennas. 


Getti 




the drift. 


The Earth’s continents are con- 
stantly on the move. Radio tele- 
scopes are monitoring their drift. 
Thanks to the extraordinary 
precision with which Krupp builds 
such special antennas measure- 
ment variations are kept to a 
minimal 7 mm over 1,000 km* 



Trained on fixed stars to an accuracy 
of one thousandth of a degree they 
provide vital information on conti- 
nental drift and seismic activity in 
earthquake zones. 


Herau Replies to Greenpeace Reporf 

PARIS (API —The French defense minister, (Mes Haim, asserted 
PAKJM/vrj _ , „ nvpn to French agents 10 Smk the 


.sjBr.ssSdSv™ » jswassa 

Mr Hemu, who made his statement a day 
Monde him in the scandal, confimted ^ ^ fch* 

ordered mo agents of the French secret service to gather information® 
Se G^SSpenitionin New Zealand. U Monde saccomtsmddat 
a differem^SdSm had earned out the bombing, and u Wtinodn, 
New Zealand television- said that highly placed sources had confirmed 

^MMtorno said in his statement that “there is an 
information and the murder for which 

in New Zealand. This was a reference to the aiTests of the agmts 
SlbkSnJuly K) of the Rainbow Wamor, as it was prymatp 
leada protest fiotiUa to the islands of 

Francecarries out its nudear tests. A crew member was media thfcbtoa^ 

U.S. Will Test a French AIDS Drag : 

WASHINGTON (UPil - 




experimental use of a drag developed in France to fight AIDS, uk Food 
and Drag Administration said Wednesday. •’ . . 

U mil now the drag. HPA-23. was available only m France.. Ra± 
Hudson, the American actor who is a victim of AIDS, or acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome, flew to France in July for treatment with 

the drag. • . • " 

HPA-23 appears to prevent the AIDS virus from reproduuang, but does t 
not eliminate it from the patient’s body and docs not dmnnate the 
immune system suppression that permits AIDS victims to develop* 
variety of infections and cancers. : 


it- . 


Nkomo Held Briefly in Zimbabwe 


HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — 
Joshua Nkomo. the opposition 
leader, was arrested Tuesday and 
questioned about alleged criminal 
charges before being released, he 
raid in a telephone interview cm 
Wednesday. 1 

Mr. Nkomo said that his arrest 
was “deliberate humiliation and. 
harassment” and “part of the gov- 
ernment’s plan to build up a raise 
case ag wot me.” 

Mr. Nkomo’s homes m Harare 
and Bulawayo have been raided 
several times and scores of officials 
and supporters of his party, the 
Zimbabwe African People's Onion, 
have been detained indefinitely in a 
crackdown that bqgan in July. 
Prime Minister Robert Mugabe 
and his ministers have said the de- 
tentions are a result of routine po- 
lice investigations into activities 
against the state. 



Joshua Nkomo 


U.S. Honors SALT, Dismantles a Sul}*. 


WASHINGTON (AP) — An older Poseidon submarine; the Sam 
Rayburn, is being dismantled, allowing the United Stales to test a new 
ballistic submarine while remaining within SALT agreement arms limits, 
the Pentagon announced. . • 


Outburst by Agca at Trial 

Reuters 

ROME — The trial of Turks and 


The new submarine Alaska thiis wiQ soon begin sea trials, the Pentagon 

* J j ftt * * : • iAnr - ■ .1. 1%. 


said, and wiD be put into service in late 1985 or rariy 1986 in the Pacific 
Fleet based in Washington state. ■■■ - . ■ Y . \r, ' 

The 1979 SALT-2 agreement, which the United Stales and Soviet 
Union have generally adhered to although it was never ratified, limns 

.1^ a : - ri— * i nnn 


Bulgarians accused of plotting to 
kill Pope John Paul It resumed 


kill Pope John Paul It resumed 
Wednesday with an outburst by 
Mehmei Ali Agca. the papal assail- 
ant. who accused the Vatican and 


mnltipe warhead missiles to 1,200. 


the White House of congming Jo 
dominate the world. ' 


The nuclear-powered Alaska will become the seventh m the U.S. fleet 
of Trident missile-submarines, each ofwhjch can; cany ^intercontinen- 
tal ballistic irrigate; , which in. turn can each cany Uptod^n 1 nuclear 
warheads. y :i ' 






’•*. .. *’ • ’ 

special antenna used for invesfigojb,. 
ing polar light and the sun’s influence 
on the seasons. : 


5CL . 


*, > . .. 

. c v, 7- . 


Some 4,000 km further south, on a 
mountain top in Spains Sierra 
Nevada, a 30~m antenna picks up 
signals from the Milky Way. 






At Usingen hear Frankfurt, the West 
German FTT, Deutsche Bundespost, : 
operates an earth station featuring 
two 140-tonne parabolic antennas 
for worldwide TV transmissions. 
Krupp played a significant role in * 
these antenna projects. 


5?*?* i, 




Sited 400 km north of the Arctic Cirde 
at Tromso in Norway is BSCAT, a : 






Krupp antenna engineering lends a 
hand in many other areas tod. For 
example, in the search for and V 
exploration of mineral deposits, id 
pollution control and in command 
stations for spacecraft. 






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Creative dialogue is our spring- 
board. Krupp engineers work in dose 
partnership with customers seeking ^ 
solutions to the problems that tddeh - 
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We provide the advanced engineer- 
ing materials, fadl'rties and systems 
needed for speedy and sustained * 

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economic progress. 


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For more information on Krupp ontennas 
contact Ktvpp Industrietechnik GmbH, 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1985 








•^Alters Stand 


Farmhands 

By; Karen Tumulty 

Angela Tima Semce 

■ WASHINGTON — The US. 
Smate, oan turning wort on a com- 
prehe nsiv e bill to revamp immigra- 
boalaws, fias-rewraed its earfio- 
stand and approve an amendment 

taat would mate it possible for 
growers of perishable cams to 
quickly obtain large numbers of 
legal foreign workers at harvest 

In a 51-44 vote; the Senate over- 
turned Tuesday its narrow rriec- 
uon last weds of a shnQar proposal 
by Smaxor Pete Wilson, RefJubh- 
can of California. 

The amendment adopted Tues- 
day different is that it set an 

explicit Umil on the number of tem- 
porary foreign workers who could 
be admitted under the program at 
any one timg 

The immigration bOl, which the 
Republican-controlled Senate is 
expected to approve by Thursday, 
would also offer amnesty and even- 
tuai U.S. citizenship to illegal 

ahens who have lived m the United 

States continuously since 1980. 

Mr. Wilson persuaded five anno- 




TS» Mnaaad Preu 


General Sinesio Jarama, left, in Lima to rebut allegations of a massacre by tbe Peruvian 
Army. With him is General Wilfredo Mori, bead of the Ayacbucho military command. 

Peru’s Military Denies Reports of Massacre 


The AssocuMd Press 

LIMA — The new leader of jPctu’s anned forces 
has denied that soldiers had massacred 69 peasants 
in the guerrilla warfare zone of Ayacucho. 

“There has been no massacre," said Lieutenant 
General Lurs Abram of the Peruvian Air Force, 
bead of the joint armed forces command, on Tues- 


M4gvuoij MUt* 170U. ijy 

General Abram spoke after top military of 
Wore the Senate HtSra Ri*% 


^|.when he added a provision to limit 
(he number of foreign workers un- 
der the program to 350,000 at any 
one time. Alta three years, tbe at- 
torney general could adjust tbe 
number to conform to the demand 
for labor. 

The financial survival erf the na- 
tion’s 53,000 growers of perishable 
fruits and vegetables, most of 
whom operate in Western states, 
could hinge upon passage of the 
amendment, Mr. Wilson said 

But Senator Alan K. Simpson, 
Republican of Wyo ming , the bill's 
sponsor and the diief opponent of 
Mr. Wilson's amendment, sai d the 
issue was “not survival, but greed." 
Tbe amendment, Mr. Simpson 
warned, would mean that farm 
workers would face “exploitation 
deluxe, the status quo.” 


General Abram spoke after top military officers 
testified before the Senate Human Rights Com- 
mission and a special committee investigating the 
killings, which reportedly took place Aug 14 in the 
town of Accomarca. The town is high in the Andes, 
415 miles (675 kilometers) southeast of Lima. 

On Monday. President Alan Garcia Perez dis- 
missed General Abram's predecessor. Genera) Cfe- 


sar Enrico Praelli. Mr. Garcia accused General 
Praelli and the previous government of President 
Fernando Bdaunde Terry of misinforming tbe 
nation about the five-year war against Shining 
Path, a Maoist guerrilla' organization. 

Two alleged witnesses testified last week that 
soldiers had massacred the peasants of Acco- 
marca. 

Members of tbe investigating committee said 
that General Sinesio Jarama bad testified that an 
army patrol entered Accomarca on Aug. 14 but 
found only two huts, already burned and still 
smoking. He said there was no evidence of bodies 
inside the huts. The general is bead of the 2d 
Military Command, which includes Ayacucho. 


U.S. Hoping for Break in Impasse 
On Middle East With Hussein Visit 


Mr. Wilson’s amendment, said the By John M. Goshko 
issue was “not Survival, but greed." fYmkugltm Post Semce 

The amendment. Mr. Simpson WASHINGTON— The Reagan 

warned, would mean that farm administration, anxious to revive 
workers would face “exploitation ihe stalled Middle East peace pro- 
deluxe, the status quo.” cess and overcome congressional 

V Under Mr. Simpson's bill, em- resistance to a bilUon-dollar arms 
loyers could be fined up to sale to Jordan, now believes that 
$10,000 per offense. for repeatedly any break in the impasse must 
hiring illegal aliens. Western farm- come during a visit to the United 


ers are estimated to idy upon ille- 
gal immigration to provide more 
than half their work force. 

Mr. Simpson tried to meet their 
demands by streamlining the exist- 
ing program for bringing in foreign 
seasonal farm labor. 

However, Western fanners said 
it still would be too cumbersome to 
be of much use in harvesting their 
unpredictablean&fragile crops, be- 
cause it would require than to give 
65 days’ notice of their needs under 
normal conditions, or 72 hours un- 
der emergency circumstances. It 
also would allow workers to remain 
in the United States only a short 
time after they had completed tbe 
jobs for which they were hired. 

Mr. Wilson’s original amend- 
ment would have allowed the attor- 
ney general to admit an unlimited 
number of foreigners, based upon 
. his determination of how many 
•were needed. These workers would 
then have been allowed to travel 
from job to job for up to nine 
months. 

Tbe measure, which failed 50-48 
last week, was vigorously opposed 
by organized labor ana Hispanic 
groups, which said it was merely a 
means by which growers could ex- 
ploit foreign laborers and deny jobs 
to U.S. citizens who would demand 
higher pay and better working con- 
ditions. 

Mr. Wilson noted that his 
amendment requires fanners to 
seek domestic workers before they 
hire foreign farm labor and to pro- 
vide housing allowances, insurance 
and other benefits for their work- 
ers. But opponents predicted that 
fanners would pay bttle more than 
tip service to these stipulations. 

Anioldo & Torres, a lobbyist for 
(he Arizona Farmworkers Union, 
said. “The claim that this program 
WsnT displace U.S. farmworkers 
Jnd protects workers’ tights is in- 
sulting and disgustingr” 


States next week by King Hussein, 

U.S. officials have said. 

The king is scheduled to address 
the United Nations General As- 
sembly on Sept. 27 and meet with 
President Ronald Reagan on Sept. 

30. US. officials said Tuesday that 
they expect the occasions to clarify 
how far the king is willing to go to 
satisfy congressional demands that 
there be no arms sale until Jordan 
begins direct peace talks with Isra- 
el 

“It is dear that under present * 

circumstances we cannot make a King Hasson 

successful case to Congress for seil- 
in« arms to Jordan.” a State De- 
partment officialsaid, “unless we Mlowup that will make the hope 



partmeni official said, “unless we follow-up that will make the hope the administration’s commit meal 
can point to some kind of success in °* P eace a realizable to Jordan is to be more than an 
the peace process.” goal than has been the case until expenditure of precious political 

“We have to find a wav to move now " ■ capital in a losing cause. King Hus- 

the two in tandem.” lie added Lasl weekend it was revealed sein must modify his present condi- 
“Whether we can do that will d* ^t the Reyi administration a- lions for movement on the peace 

Kf ?he*UN SdSSv^t 5 ^ ■ moMd saJfoTF-15 fighler P *%!ShaIk. these involve his de- 
White House. He blows what the P 13 ®* 5 10 Sudi Arabia, had agreed mands that the United Stales meet 
situation is. Tbe Question is ivheih- t0 a Saudi ' decision to buy more with a Jordanian-Palestiman dele- 
-iii nrF«-^vnnnm.niri»s for duin $3-billion worth of British gation without Arab guarantees 
er he wiU offer oppottumues for plane . Ja a meeting win lead to 


er he will offer opportunities for 


U.S. to Probe Conduct 
Of Teamsters Inquiry 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A federal 
grand jury will examine whether 
U.& government officials violated 
the law in their three-year investi- 
gation of Jackie Presser, president 
of the Teamsters onion, according 
to a Justice Department official. . 

Mr. Presser was investigated on 
charges that he authorized the hir- 
ing of employees who earned sala- 
ries but did no work. Before the 
Tuesday announcement. Justice 
Department officials had said that 
the investigation was dropped after 
prosecutors learned that Mr. Press- 
er had been authorized to hire the , 
employees by agents of the FBI. 


planes. that such a meeting wiD lead to 

U.S. officials expect Israel to ar- talks with Israel, and hisfinsislence 
gue that the Saudi sale will mean a that peace negotiations be pan of 
major shift in the Middle East arms an international conference that 
balance that should be offset with would include the Soviet Union. 

I E CONCORD. I 

Mj MARINER-SG 


: >d£ 


East Decides Not to Seek Rejection 
To U.S. Senate From North Carolina 

H aiMngtoa Post Service required a long hospital gup/ last 

ZY$%S&53E£. SW ssrt&sss 

has announced that he Campbell College government oto- 
P M,^Tc«k re-election next year fessor who recently completed a 
wiU n0t Health. He is the stint as UJS. ambassador to Romar 

totes oia. 

2? a month to announce retire- Mr. Funderburk, 41, also ie> 

caved the endorsement Toesdjw of 
t °Th* announcement Tuesday, the National Cocgressional dab 
T “ l i fJi unexpected, will make the powerful North Carolina-based 
moredifficult for Re- New Right fund-raising and politi- 
it retain their Senate ma- cal machine built by Senator Jesse 

puN*^ . qg6 campaign suate- Helms, also a North Carolina Re- 

\3gSES5S Seize the work! 

must defend u m IbelnlcmaikmalHeraM Tribune. 



Carolina Re- 


Concord Mariner. 18 kL gold, black chromium 
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An art carried to perfection in Swiss watches. 


8 ^ defend ^2 of the 34 seats up 

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Kg. a Ll rf hypoiliyioKlBm that 


The International Herald Tribune. 
Bringing tbe WorkfsMost 
Important News to tbe WadA 
MostlnyortanlAutfience. 




179 New Bond Street, London Wl. Telephone; 01-629 2876 
73 Brompton Road, London SW3, Telephone: 01-584 9311 


Nicaragua Alleges U.S. Campaign 
Of 'Terror, Sabotage and Atrocity’ 


the sale of more U.S. fighters to 
Israel, perhaps even the same F- ! 5s 
that the Saudis had wanted. 

In contrast to U.S. acquiescence 
in the Saudi-British deal, however, 
U.S. officials said the administra- 
tion is determined to press ahead 
— probably before the end of next 
month — with a large arms pack- 
age Tor Jordan, including F- 16 or 
F-20 fighters. 

According to the officials, the 
'* administrauon feels a sense of obli- 
gation to King Hussein for past 
friendship toward the United 
States and wants to encourage him 
to begin peace talks. Nevertheless, 
administration officials acknowl- 
edge that the extent to which the 
administration is now depending 
on King Hussein to shed his cau- 
tion is symptomatic of how much 
the administration’s hopes for suc- 
in cess in the Middle East have faded 
since the king’s visit to Washington 
in May. 

However, the officials said that if 


The Aumatcd Prea 

THE HAGUE — Nicaragua ac- 
cused the Reagan administration 
Wednesday of using “terror, sabo- 
tage and atrocity" to tty to over- 
throw its Sandintst government. 

It also asserted before the Inter- 
national Court of Justice that the 
U.S. government "conceived, cre- 
ated and organized" the rebel 
forces, known as "contras,” to fight 
the Sandinist government in Mana- 
gua in violation of international 

On the fifth day of bearings in 
the case brought by Nicaragua 
against the United States. Abram 
Chayes. a Harvard law professor 
and a member of tbe Nicaraguan 
legal team at the court, also known 
as the World Court said that the 
“government of the United Slates 
has armed, equipped and trained 
the contra force.” 

The Reagan administration is 
boycotting the proceedings, which 
began April 9, 1984, when Nicara- 
gua filed its complaint at the World 
Court alleging that the United 
States was waging armed attacks 
with the aim of toppling the gov- 
ernment in Managua. 

Despite the boycott announced 
by the U.S. State Department in 
January, on tbe ground that the 
court has no jurisdiction in the 
case, on American diplomat from 
the U.S. Embassy in The Hague has 
been attending as an unofficial ob- 
server. 

A final ruling is not expected for 
several months. 

The court, judicial arm of the 
United Nations, has no enforce- 
ment powers and depends on vol- 
untary adherence to its rulings. 

Mr. Chayes. who served as legal 
adviser to Lhe State Department 
during tbe Kennedy administra- 
tion. charged that the U.S. govern- 
ment had undertaken "at the initia- 
tive of its highest officials and with 
their full knowledge and approval, 
a coordinated campaign of force 
against a small country, extending 
over four years, and including the 
widespread use of terror, sabotage 
and atrocity as deliberate tactics.” 

He asserted that the purpose of 
"all these actions was to destabilize 
the present government of Nicara- 
gua, and to replace it with a regime 
that was acceptable to the present 


administration in the United 
States.” 

“U.S. military and intelligence 
personnel conducted direct attacks 
against Nicaragua.” he said, “lead- 
ing to the destruction of tbe na- 
tion's oil supply system and the 
mining of its ports.” ' 

■ U.S. Advised Rebels 

In Washington, Robert C. 


McFariane, President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s national security advisor, has 
stated that i he White House con- 
tinued advising Nicaraguan guer- 
rillas on political strategy after last 
year's congressional ban against 
“directly or indirectly” helping 
them militarily. The Associated : 
Press reported. 1 


9 Argentines Accused 
Of Delegating Killings 


By Lydia Chavez 

V«H >'iwA Times Smite 


“A few isolated crimes or facts 
could be considered excesses.” Mr. 


BUENOS AIRES — Argentine Moreno Ocampo argued. “But the 


government prosecutors summing quantity of crimes proved by the 
up the case against nine former prosecution allows us to say that 
military leaders have charged them there was a planned operation dic- 
with being “desk authors" of the rated by the defendants." 
disappearance of more than 9,000 “The commanders,” Mr. More- 
people in the late 1970s and early no Ocampo said, “delegated the 
1980s. decision of who was tortured and 

Although there is liule evidence who was captured and even the 
linking the nine defendants directly decision of who was to live and who 
to the kidnapping, torture and was to die.” 

murder of Argentine citizens, the 

prosecutors died legal precedents 
in which commanders have been i 

held responsible for the actions of f T HYI1A7 \Tf 

their troops. I LUAUl f JV 

The defendants, who previously | _ - --- 

had appeared uninterested in the | Vo lll£* VAli II 

proceedings, listened closely on \ ▼ Alklv yUUU 

Tuesday as the prosecution began | 
to wrap up its five-day summation, j KT .. . 

Luis Moreno Ocampo, one of ^*9 L'iH-TlCS, r 

lwo government prosecutors, said. rio six-star \ 

“They were responsible for their Al rhc Holiday 

troops, who generated an environ- . L 

ment of danger for the society of W L* Simply Out 

which the defendants were aware superior produt 

ttSZX£EZ;£ wilh "" u »p'*-“- 

to “attribute to subordinates” a re- 
sponsibility belonging to senior of- 

ficials themselves. _ 

The nine officers on trial were \ M A 
the members of three three-man ^ Jki am 
military juntas that ruled Argenti- III 

na from 1976 to J982. j 1 

The prosecution has cited 709 I " ^ 
cases which, it said, illustrated the | i& . V 

tactics used in thousands of disap- | MUU I 

pearances. On Tuesday it attacked | 

the defense argument that any “ex- 1 ^»r reservations please cal 

cesses” were committed without | t,f dial direct Ahu IMiahi 354.1 
the defendants’ knowledge. _ _ 


Page 3 


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Page 4- 


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1985 


Puhlulwd * kb IV New York Tina mad IV VwbnglOB Port 



tribune. 


Struggling Out of Marxism 


A mass turnover in tic leadership brings 
Communist China's movement away from its 
once rigid Marxism to renewed Western atten- 
tion. At one stroke, the leading patron of 
reform. Dag Xiaoping, staged the exit of 10 
Politburo members and 64 members of the 
Central Committee. Most are near the 81-year- 
old Deng’s age and will be replaced by techno- 
crats who can ensure the continuity of his 
country’s “second revolution.” To measure die 
scope of the shuffle, recall that anotherpula- 
tive Marxist reformer, the Kremlin’s Mikhail 
Gorbachev, has removed only one Politburo 
member. Deng Xiaoping is serious. 

What he is first of all serious about is mod- 
ernizing China. Seizing power 36 years ago in a 
desperately poor country. Communists ap- 
plied Marxism in the Stalinist command-from- 
the-top mode that was then dominant, and 
found it abysmally wanting. Mao Zedong 
turned to a brutal, low budget model called the 
Cultural Revolution: another disaster. Phase 
three finds old war-horse Deng attempting an 
immense intellectual and political break- 
through to a “socialism’' that relies heavily on 
material incentives, a market economy arm an 
open door to world capital and technology. 

The West looks on agog. It is not simply 
China's size and Mr. Deng’s audacity. (Can 
you believe that the Shanghai stock market 


may reopen?) A Communist country's turn in 
the direction, at least, of the capitalist road 
is ideologically satisfying. A political adver- 
sary’s turn toward a system that would 
strengthen its common interests with the Unit- 
ed States is a geopolitical boon. It is much 
easier for Americans to indulge their longtime 
admiration of China’s people and culture 
when China is moving this way. 

The road, to be sure, is long. Many party 
bureaucrats shrink from a change that will 
shift power to economic managers. Ideologues 
and traditionalists fear the under minin g of 
established dogma and structure. The military 
worry about die planned early demobilization 
of a quarter of the 4-rnfllion-raan standing 
army. A historic sensitivity to foreign “exploi- 
tation” helps explain some of the lingering 
coolness to foreign investors. And the ineffi- 
ciencies of the current system do. after all 
spread the available work around. 

In the Soviet Union, Mr. Gorbachev chases 
crooks, tightens discipline in the workplace 
and cuts down national drinking. He likes the 
word renewal but what he is renewing is tight, 
central authority. For a socialist system, real 
reform means letting economic power flow 
from the center toward, if not fully to, the 
people. That is the fateful course China is on. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Chief Borrow-and-Spend 


When President Reagan took office de- 
nouncing the national debt, it had not quite 
reached SI trillion. In the next 12 months it 
will pass S2 trillion — $2,000,000,000,000 and 
still counting. The man who regularly decries 
“tax-and-spend” Democrats has, in less than 
five years, earned his Ph.D. in the art of 
borrow-and-spend. Under current conditions, 
borrow-and-spend is worse. 

Mr. Reagan has certified his dubious debt 
achievement by asking Congress to raise the 
debt ceiling to more than S2 trillion. At some 
point the layman can no longer absorb zeros; 
the sheer monstrosity of these numbers is hard 
to grasp. As the president himself might say, 
trying to make the abstract graphic, two tril- 
lion SI bills laid end to end would reach to 
Halley’s comet and back — and then some. 

Openings like that are an invitation for 
congressional Democrats to scorch the presi- 
dent. Who can blame them? And yet they, too. 
warrant blame, along with congressional Re- 
publicans. They all approved the Reagan bud- 
gets that have driven the debt so high. 

In any case, sheer monstrosity is not the 
tormenting problem. What is worrisome is ( 1) 
how it gets that way — by borrowing to fi- 
nance continued huge deficits — and (2) the 
economic impact- Already this borrowing 
strains available credit, at home and abroad, 
keeps interest rates high and crimps private 


investment. Moreover, growing foreign invest- 
ment in America's debt commits a slice of 
America’s future growth to paying them off. 
Finally, consider the self-inflating burden of 
interest payments on future budgets. 

The president's litany of homdty anecdotes 
used to include “a dream" of the day when the 
government would start to reduce the debt “to 
prove to our kids that we’re not going to dump 
it all cm them." Well he will not see dial day, 
and the kids had better watch oul If he is 
disgusted by tax-acd-spend, at least that is 
honest It means society buys now but also 
pays now, in present taxes. Borrow-and-spend 
means it buys now and the kids pay later. 

Besides, there is a present cost. Each bor- 
rowed billion adds roughly $100 milli on to 
interest Interest on the U.S. national debt 
alone will rise to almost $ ISO billion next year. 
In other words, almost all the money Washing- 
ton borrows next year will be amply to pay 
interest on what bas been borrowed before. 

Mr. Reagan says the remedy is to cut more 
out of non-military spending. But neither he 
nor Congress is willing to touch Social Securi- 
ty, even in reasonable ways, and there is little 
fat left in other domestic spending Mr. Rea- 
gan's response is to denounce the debt — and 
borrow another $200 billion. One day, “our 
lads” will see who dumped what on whom. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Qpinion 


Communist China’s Best Years 

[The ament special conference of the Chi- 
nese Communist Party] is an event of key 
importance in the political and economic life 
of the whole country at this stage of develop- 
ment. Despite minor snags, the economy is 
flourishing and people's lives are improving 
remarkably. Credit For this goes to the reforms, 
unfolded first in agriculture, then in other 
fields. On the whole, China is shaking off an 
old. rigid economic pattern unsuited to its 
developing productive forces and is blazing a 
new path that fully accords with realities in 
China. A new five-year plan to further the 
reforms is called for urgently. 

In the political field, the party has stressed 
the importance of promoting young, well edu- 
cated and professionally competent cadres 
with revolutionary zeal to guarantee the final 
success of the current reforms. By now, the 
readjustment of leading personnel along these 
lines has been basically completed at the min- 
isterial and provincial levels. The rejuvenation 
of the party’s central leading bodies therefore 
becomes all the more pressing. 

The three-year period following the party’s 
12th congress in 1982 has been the best since 
the founding of the People's Republic in terms 
of economic growth ana political stability. To 
maintain the momentum of such progress, it is 
now the time to take further major steps. 

— The China Daily ( Beijing). 

(Recent changes] reflect China's return to 
the international arena of politics and com- 
merce and the declining role of the military in 
a country which is building its future on eco- 
nomic rather than military might 

— The Times (London). 


Sweden Puts Off Reassessment 

The Swedish electorate has chosen to play 
safe and stick with the policies — the overrid- 
ing commitment to social welfare — which 
have served (he country well for half a century. 
Olof Palme remains one of the few Western 
leaders who can proclaim an absolute commit- 
ment to the pursuit of full employment and the 
further development of the welfare state with- 
out losing credibility with the voters. 

Mr. Palme may have won the electorate's 
confidence, but it is increasingly doubtful 
whether his old-fashioned approach to eco- 
nomic management can rejuvenate Sweden in 
Che 1980s. ffis re-election postpones the pros- 
pect of a fundamental reassessment of eco- 
nomic and social policy in Sweden. Unless Mr. 
Palme accepts the need for structural reforms 
which place a higher premium on individual 
initiative and market mechanisms, the eco- 
nomic stagnation which set in during the late 
1970s may prove incurable. 

— The Financial Times (London). 

Reagan vs. Public Relations? 

President Reagan bas begun disparaging 
public relations, the very art that elevated him 
to two terms as governor of California, two 
terms as president and his status as the Great 
Communicator. In more contentious Cold 
War tiroes, everything the Soviets said was 
deemed in Washington to be “propaganda." 
Now, with a long-awaited summit finally set. 
the White House has cleaned up its vocabu- 
lary. The empty promises that the White 
House sees emanating from the Kremlin are 
being dismissed as “mere public relations.” 

— Ira R. Alien (United Press International). 


FROM OUR SEPT. 19 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Bengali Criticizes Repression 
CALCUTTA — Ambica Charan Mazumbai, 
who presided at the Bengal Provincial Con- 
gress, which opened at Calcutta [on Sept 17], 
denounced Lbe repression policy of the Gov- 
ernment. He declared that the anarchists were 
a minority, and that the “Times” articles on 
the unrest were leavened with prejudice. The 
outburst of lawlessness had subsided, though 
discontent stiff existed and was perhaps deep- 
ening owing to the drastic measures of the 
Government [against Bengali terrorism]. Lord 
Minto, Viceroy of India, had succeeded to the 
legacy of trouble which Lord Curzon had cre- 
ated with the partition of Bengal in 1905, but 
the fact remained that the darkest chapters of 
Indian history would be recorded in the name 
of Lord Min to- The partition, the speaker said, 
was the foremost Bengali grievance. 


1935: Poets Object to Federal Prose 
WASHINGTON — America’s unemployed 
poets rose up in revolt against the govern- 
ment’s practice of handing their sensitive col- 
leagues jobs of a prosaic nature. “It seems that 
the cards are stacked and die poets get the 
joker,” observed Earl Cuevas, president of the 
Poets Laureate League Inc., in an ultimatum 
sent to Harry L. Hopkins, Works Progress 
Administrator [on Sept 18]. “Could it be pos- 
sible that the Administration subscribes to the 
hackneyed and conventional lie that poets 
must experience privation and hardships to 
produce masterpieces?" Cuevas revealed that 
the Poets League had submitted a project to 
the relief authorities but bad failed to win 
approval “We have been informed that the 
poets who are on relief, if employed, will be 
assigned such tasks as compiling directories.” 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOIStE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL AST 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 
Executive Editor RENE BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

Deputy Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAlSONS 


Deputy Publisher 
Assodtte Publisher 
Asuaaie Publisher 
Director of Operations 
Director oj Gradation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Adtenutog Sola 

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P 1985. International Herald Trtinae. AU rigto resaicd. 





t&905 otmaetK. 


r ... and let’s also hear a big hand for oti Cuddles here! ’ 


A Coalition 



At the UN 


By Daniel P. Moyniium 

Tke writer, a Democratic sami 
from New York, was chief US.;det* 
gate to the United Notions in WSand 
W76. This is rite second of iwoamdes. 


W ashington Tb* «»£. 

tion of the nonahgncd and So- 
viet blocs is not withou t a meaisuteof ' 
coercion. Generally speakii^; Mo-, 
cow can do little for the nonaligoed, 
but it can do things to them. Most 
Third World states have a CamnaK 
hist Party that can beset off liken <M. 
bomb, at minimum bteaking a lot ttf 


America’s task is to break up this 
coalition. There needs lo-bft^sraie 
realignment among the Dona li g n eti 
This cannot be that hard: They .have ■. 
so few real interests in common. Yet' 
it will not happen until' the United 




x?., 




1 1# . 


| iJT-^ 


States learns tapay attention to yot- 
ited Natic 


Deng’s Revolution: Leading Toward Political Sense 


ing at the United Nations. 

Allow as an examples recent meet- 
ing in Bering with Deng Xiaoping. 
Seven UJL senators made up a dde- 
ri headed by the majority leader, 
” ' We were thoc to distoas 


W ASHINGTON — Great leaders generally 
leave succession crises of their own making. 
“Caesar.” as the proverb goes, “has no heirs.” But 
Deng Xiaoping is bent on breaking the mold. His 
systematic attempt to organize a smooth succes- 
sion distinguishes him as a leader among leaders. It 


By Joseph Kraft 


able to play ofl the Big Two. He is now beading for 
nth 



also reflects the obsessively personal quality that 
has debased Chinese politics, and the a 


country 

itself, for much of the past century. 

By any standard, Mr. Deng ranks high among 
rulers now in power. Where the most celebrated 


fipires play confidence games with the appearance 


things, he comes to grips with fundamentals. 

modernize China means a 


The campaign to 
genuine economic revolution: withdrawing the ris- 
ible hand or government to leave scope for the 
invisible hand of the market Few developing 
countries — not Brazil Mexico, Indonesia or even 
India, as yet —have had the stuff to persist in such 
a course. In China the new policy has yielded 


a closer relation with the Soviet Union. At the 
same |ime he is prying assistance in t raining, high 
technology and weapons out of the United States. 

The negotiation that forced Britain to cede 
Hong Kong back to China was a striking victory 
Tor Mr. Drag over a supposed Iron Lady. Few 
modem leaders can have enjoyed such a diplomat- 
ic success. He allowed himseu to ride in triumph 
through Beg ing after the deal was announced. 

It was a rare bit of showmanship. For Mr. 
Deng’s achievements have bees accomplished 


Deng seeks the rationalization 
of politics. He is not there yeL 


predictable troubles — glaring inequality, gross 
5tfll Mr. Drag advances. 


corruption, inflation. St 
Ideological changes of a similarly sweeping na- 
ture have accompanied the shifts in economic 
policy. Almost imperceptibly, the cult erf Mao was 
jettisoned. Pictures of the Great Helmsman, once 
in every public place, are now a curiosity. Marxism 
has been similarly diluted. With the iron frame- 
work gone, individuality has asserted itself in 
dress, the arts and entertainment. Chinese society, 


from; 

avoided the power posts of high viability that he 
once sought — boss of the party, or head of the 
government. Instead he has operated behind the 
scenes from the office of deputy prime minister. 

One result is great uncertainty on the outside 
about what goes on in Chinese politics. Almost 
surely a debate rages as to the bounds of liberaliz- 


as head of the 
head 

of government (Prime Minister Zhao ZiyaneL He 
has their successors waiting in the wings. 

At the first of a series of party meetings in 
Beijing, Mr. Deng prepared the way for the third 
echelon. A sweeping purge retired 10 of the 24 
Politburo members, and 64 of the 340 members erf 
the Central Committee which elects the Politburo 
were retired. Among those dropped were many 
known as opponents of Mr. Deng. Presumably. 
Dengists win take their places when the new Cen- 
tral Committee elects a new Politburo next week. 

The final outcome of Mr. Drag’s battle to name 
his followers trill probably not be known even 
then. Some Deng proteges have not been glowing 
successes. Whether the third-echelon leaders are 
pure Dengists or not remains uncertain. 

For Mr. Drag has been led to concentrate on the 
political future precisely because the political past 
has been so stormy. In retrospect, it is dear dial 
many of the great campaigns of yore — from the 
Great Leap Forward to the Cultural Revolution — 
i vehicles for personal rivalries developed over- 


trade and other such matters, * espe- 
cially the recently signed nuclear co- 
operation agreement. There are ant- . 
taal interests, but also huge probtems 
in giving nuclear technology tb a to- 
talitarian Communist state. . :.m 

No doubt such problems occurred ' 
to President Reagan’s negotiators, 
but it is doubtful that the United' 
Nations even entered the calcula- 
tions. We senators decided to raise . 
the subject. The task fell to me. Mr. 
Deng made {teaser by stating at the 
outset that in our exchanges: there 
would be "no need (o use diplomatic 
language.” Our relationship, he said, 
bad “entered a new stage,” it was; 
unimaginable for it not to be friendly. 


I responded that indeed our bilat- 
eral rdaticH 


were’ 


the decades of the lone march to 


of the 


although far from free, is taking in light and air. 

Chini ‘ 


As a force in world politics. China bas inevitably 
been weakened by drastic internal reform. The 
People's Liberation Army got a bloody nose when 
it moved to teach the Vietnamese a lesson back in 
1978. Almost no one today thinks of Beijing as a 
capital on the level of Washington or Moscow. 
Still , by skillful maneuvering Mr. Deng has been 


ing the Chinese economy, and there must be bitter 
dose to draw to the Soviet 


arguments about how i 
Union. In the past hints of rival positions emerged 
through Aesopian allusions to obscure dramas or 
the classics of Chinese literature. Now debates stay 
inside until Mr. Drag discloses the outcome. 

About trying to organize the succession, Mr. 
Deng is clarity itself. He has called it “a central 
mission ... a task of century-long significance ” 


long march to power. 

Chinese Communists. Thousands of fives were lost 
and minions of casualties caused. Mr. Deng's own 
son became a paraplegic when he was thrown out 
of a building during the Cultural Revolution. Mr, 
Deng himself, as he recently reminded an Ameri- 
can visitor, was. twice removed from power. 

What Mr. Drag has in mind is an ending of (he 
settling of scores that made China a nation driven 
by demons. He is aiming at the rationalization of 
Chinese politics. He is not there yet, but if he 
succeeds, he will indeed hold a permanent place in 
the pantheon of world leadership. 

Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


ions had reached a level of 

great cordiality. Yet we were troubled 
by the contrast between these rela- 
tions one-on-one, and those m inter- 
nalional forums-These could nbfbe 
described as cordial It was. I saaL-as 
if China had a “two United States 
policy.” Last year China had voted 
against the United States 89 : 'pcicent 
of the time — by far the most 
American record Beijing has ear 
compiled at the United Nations. ; _ 
There was a farther matter. The 
State Department had .compiled thr 
records of 20 “name-calling votes in 
the . last General Assembly. -These 
arise when, some particularly nasty 
reference to the .United States is 
into a resolution. 


v 

5‘- 






America’s ’Age of Liberation’ Seems to Be Over 


W ASHINGTON - The evi- 
dence is accumulating that 
America has passed through an Age 
of Liberation and is now in an Age 
of Restraint. Statistics on sexual be- 
havior, consumption habits and so- 
cial behavior all show tins trend. 

• By 1982. the steady increase in 
Female teenage premarital ioler- 


Bj Michael Barone 


course had stopped, according to 
"ealthSta- 


the National Center for Health _ 
usiics. More recently, syphilis is 
down 30 percent from l'982 — a 
vivid contrast with a rise of 50 per- 
cent in the preceding five years. 
(One factor, but not necessarily the 


ooljf one; js fear of genital herpes 


ana AIDS.) The change is pro- 
found. As one expert pul it, “You 
have to believe that behavior pat- 
terns have changed substantially 
throughout the country.” 

• The number of abortions lev- 
eled off starting in 1 981, after 
roughly doubling from 1973 to 
1979, according io the .Alan Guu- 
macher Institute. The abortion rate 
declined for the first time in 1982 
That may have resulted from great- 
er sexual abstinence or from greater 
revulsion toward abortion, or both. 


• The divorce rate declined from 
218 percent in 1979 to 21.7 percent 
in 1982 ending a long-term upward 
trend. The absolute number of di- 
vorces also declined. 

• Alcohol use is way down. The 
liquor industry is notoriously in 
trouble, and bar consumption con- 
tinues a long-term decline. Even 
wine sales are languishing. 

• Tobacco use among men in 
1984 was 35 percent, down from 52 
percent in 1964; among women it 
was 29 percent, down from a peak 
of 34 percent. In 1984, teenage 
smoking declined more than it had 
in 20 years; 19 percent smoked, 
down from 29 percent in 1977. 

• The statistics on marijuana use 
a re not very reliable, but they point 
in one direction: Use is down. The 
National Institute on Drug Abuse 
says that marijuana use among 
youths aged 12 to 17 declined from 
17 to 12 percent between 1979 and 
1982, and use among young adults 
aged 1 8 to 25 declined from 35 to 27 
percent Surveys of college youth 
find similar trends. 


• Crime rates have dropped 
sharply in the 1980s. The FBI index 
of major crimes was down 10 per- 
cent between 1980 and 1983; the 
Justice Department's National 
Crime Survey found crimes against 
households down 13 patent in the 
same period. This happened even 
though the number of males aged 15 
to 24 is down only 4 percent. And 
prison populations are way up, 
from 196,000 in 1972 to 463,000 m 
1984. Restraint is being exercised: 
either self-restraint by young men 
who would have committed crimi- 
. oal acts in years past, or restraint by 
a society increasingly willing to lots 
up convicted criminals. 

Not every trend in American so- 
ciety points in the same direction. 
Cocaine use is probably up in recent 
years, and there are more angle- 
parent families than ever. But these 
are trends that result mainly from 
single segments of the population. 

The trends I have cited touch the 
large majority of adult Americans. 
They result not from the pro- 
nouncements of a few politicians or 


intellectuals, but from the individ- 
ual decisions of mini ons of ordmary 
people. Men and women who were 
liberating themselves from con.- 
strain is a decade ago are ddayihg 
gratification and imposing re- 
straints an themselves and. 

Why? A better question is,Why 
t? The historian Lav 


not? The historian Lawrence Stone; 



Blushing Is Overdue for a Comeback 


WASHINGTON - Here is a 
▼ ▼ question that might mntrft 
you blush: What makes you blush? 

When considering the campaign 
against “porn rock" — vulgar and 
obscene lyrics in rock music — con- 
sider that question, and alv> this 
one: Would you want io live in a 
world in which no one blushed? 

Various American parents’ 
groups are putting wholesome pres- 
sure on recording companies, radio 
stations and the makers of rock vid- 
eos to exercise discretion and sdf- 


By George F. Will 


restraint. Approximately one-third 
of U.S. radio stations 1 


— have rock 

formats, and many are behaving re- 
sponsibly. But the son of people 
who profit from aggressively mar- 
keting pom rock have the morals of 
the marketplace, and the market- 
place is the place to get their atten- 
tion. In addition, putting labels on 
records with vulgar lyrics is going to 
help parents exercise supervision. 

Rock music has become a plague 
of messages about sexual promiscu- 


ity. bisexuality, incest, sado-maso- 
chism, satanisn 


. sata nism . drug use, alcohol 
abuse and, constantly, misogyny. 
The lyrics are celebratory, encour- 
aging or at least desensitizing. By 


making these subjects the common 
toptuar entertainment. 


currency of popt „„ 

the lyrics drain the subjects of their 
power to shock — their power to 
make people blush. The concern is 
less that children will emulate the 
frenzied behavior described in porn 
rock than that they will succumb to 
the lassitude of the demoralized — 
literally, the tie-moralized. 

As people become older they be- 
come less given to blushing. This is 
in part because they lose that sweet 
softness of youthful character that 


is called innocence and makes one’s 
sensibilities subject to shock. People 
blush for various reasons. Some- 
times it is because we have embar- 
rassing attention caDed to ourselves. 
Sometimes we blush when alone, 
when we think of something about 
ourselves (hat is shaming. 

Often people blush because they 
are exposed to something that 
should be private or is shameful. 
This may be an endangered species 
of blushing, as omnipresent vulgari- 
ties like pom rock make even the 
vilest things somehow banaL ' 

Walter Berns, the political philo- 
sopher, asks: What if, contrary to 
Fread and much conventional wis- 
dom, shame is natural and shame- 
lessuess is acquired? If so, the acqui- 
sition of shamelessness through the 
shedding of “bang- ups” is an im- 
portant political event. There is a 
fink between self-restraint and 
shame. An individual incapable of 
shame and embarrassment is proba- 
bly incapable of the governance of 
the self. A public incapable of em- 
barrassment about public vulgarity 
is unsuited to self-government. 

There is an upward ratchet effort 
in the coarsening of populations. 


dosed with sexuality, from the sell- 
ing of blue jeans to the entertaining 
of television audiences. Thus it is 
perhaps reasonable to have feelings 
of fatalism. Perhaps societies, like 
rivers, run naturally downhSL Per- 
haps the coarsening of a public is 
irreversible, especially when the 
coarsening concerns a powerful and 

g leasurable appetite such as sex. 
ut it is not true that societies can- 
not move away from coarseness to- 
ward delicacy of feeling. 

In the first half of the 18 th centu- 
ry, the dawn of the Age of Reason, a 
form of English memment on Guy 
Fawkes nights was to bum an effigy 
of the pope. The Coley’s belly was 
CHled with cats whose! 
ny in the flames were 
represent the voice of the 


na: 


Today's American l£year-oIds 
cannot enjoy — can hardl' 


ly sit still 
Westerns 


enjoy- 

far — the fund of 1950s 
that enthralled their fathers. To- 
day's 12-year-olds are so addicted 
(that is not too strong a word) to the 
slam-bang nonstop roar of Steven 
Spielberg movies that their a [ten- 
lion is not hdd by. say, John Wayne 
in “She Wore a Yellow Ribbon.” 

The soda! atmosphere is heavily 


from the Catholic Church, 
id of cruelty to animals js, 
by today's standards, obscene. Sen- 
sibilities can change for toe better. 
So fatalism is wrong and toe pom 
rock fight is worthfighting. 

Mass culture, especially music, 
matters. Nothing is more striking to 
a young parent than the pull of 
popular culture on even 4-year-olds. 
Perhaps good music can make good 
values more adhesive to children. 

People can reasonably argue 
about what is the second finest 
work of music — a Mozart concer- 
to, a Beethoven symphony, this or 
that Bach tune. But everyone knows 
that the a cme of toe art of music is 
the currently popular song that 
says, “Put me in, coach. I'm ready 
w P&v • • v Loo k at me, I can be 
centerfidd.” America has a fighting 


people in England 
strictive in the late 1500s, more per- 
missive after the Restoration of 
1660. and more restrictive again be^ 
gi nning around 1770. “Historical 
change is not a one-way street” 
Writing in toe middle 1970s, Mr. 
Stone foresaw the cycle of history 
“revolving once more.” As toe ex- 
cesses and costs of liberation be- 
come plain, people apply restraint 
In toe America of 1975-1985, toe 
excesses often appeared as threats 
to health. Scotch and steaks (con- 
sumption of red meat is way down, 
too), cigarettes and marijuana all 
crnce seemed the emblems of the 
affluent liberated life, but now they 
are perceived as dangerous. 

Americans have discovered, often 
tragically, what the history of vene- 
real diseases should have told than: 
that whether it should or not, nature 
has a bias against promiscuous sex. 

Lewis Thomas tells bow the de- 
velopment of penicillm in 1938 
meant that physicians for the first 
time could cure many diseases 
thought incurable. Americans came 
to think that there was a piQ that 
could cure any illness and a device 
— a contraceptive, a shot, whatever 
“that could guarantee pleasurable, 
risk-free sex. Now they are learning 
the limits that our physiol nature 
imposes on behavior, and toe penal- 
ties it exacts for excess. 

People may be teaming as well 
the limits our spiritual nature im- 
poses — that it is not always best in 
the long run to iharimrra pleasure. 
or freedom in toe short ran. 

As a society, Americans, are not 
eager to intrude in people's lives, 
lowts of ago- but they are increasingly wilting to 
supposed to penalize what they were reluctant a 
te devil ema- few years ago to n= 


as nnscon- 


chance as long as pom rock can be 
ballrock. 


rivaled by basel 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


ducL .Witness recent laws to impris- 
on drank drivers, track down fa- 
thers delinquent in chUd-su] 
payments;, ban smnlring in p 5 
places and curb pornography. 

Advocates of abortion, who once 
portrayed it as socially beneficial 
(see the fust paragraphs of Justice 
Hany Blackmon’s opinion in Roe 
vs. Wade, 1973), now argue for if as 

a lesser evil for people faced with 
anguishing dilemmas (see toe 1985 
ad campaign of toe National Abor- 
tion Rights Action League), ’ 

Even so, Americans continue to 
tolk as if they were in an Age of 
Liberation. Advocates of liberation 
want to kens fighting and not admit 
that their tide is ebbing; advocates 
of restraint have a stake in zrgmng 
that battles are still to be foughL 

Some surety are, but toe evidence 

is accumulating. America seems al- 
ready to be in an Age of Restraint . 

The Washington Post . 


the Soviet Union. In not one of those 
20 vote* had China been wito Ameri- 
ca. Instead (with three absences) it 
invariably voted with the Soviet 
Union, We -efiis difficult to 
understand; and m toe .circumstances 


v_-jt 


ic.'" 


nil welcome; Senator PeteWIlsbnof 
California asked how we were to ex- 
- plain this- to constituents when toe 
nuclear 'agreement came before us? 

. Mr. Dengxoncluded the meeting by 
' stating^ ~Vfe have taken into refer- 
ence theviews of Congress.” 

• Qoeryi WtD the State Department 
do so? Not these particular views, but 
toe general jwspective that UJL bi- 
lateral relations with a particular na- _ 
tion are necessarily affected 
attitudes toward America in iiile^p’ 
national settings? In all toe official 
briefing materials on China prepared 
for ns in Washington, there wasriDt a 
line about the United Nations. • 

Wfll ; we Americans ever break rat 
of tins pattern? Not, ceztainly.-.until 
we faceup to our own weakness. We 
are an old country, accustomed to 
. one-on-one relations — Benjamin 
Franklin at the Court of Louis XVI. 
Multilateral diplomacy, new to us, is 
the poly land most nations know, and 
franldy they outperform us. . ' 

It is possible to learn fbese'.new 
politics and to -learn from . them. It 
cannot be altogether the Russians’ 
fault chat America is so relatively 
isolated. Still, it is time somexostwas 
imposed on mindless, reflexive hestfl- 
ity to America at the United Nations! - . 

A thought; A quarter-century ago. 
Washington decided to open an em- i 
bassy in evoy new nation,' A fine ; 
gesture; but it dkfoot improve Ame£- ' 

>ca’s standing with all those natioijBf . 1 
It would do no harm to ciose a few of I 

than. Lei ' 


their foreign aid not in their cap it 
cities but at toe US. mission in Ne.. 
York. It would provide an npnrir timi - ’ 

ty to talk politics off toe floor, as 
we say in toe Senate. 


The United Nations needs a vic- 
tory, which wifi only come if - toe 
United States redeems some of its' 
former influence. 

The New York Times. ” V” 




LETTERS • 

f Of Unlimited Doration’ 


In “Lack of U5. Proposal on Arias 
Cootrol ls Dchberate^fSepi. % 

^a ft refers to “toe ABM treaty 
<^»res. ou Jan. 1, 

“ be or on limited draratHfet^gg 

reviews by thepSties. Notfrmgin tbtf ' 
treaty authorizes its termination- oo‘ 
toe occasion of its review. 


Wlaa 

t ' h. r-.. 

Ns 

. i '<•* r- 

fe- 


. JULIE bAHtriiL 
__ United Nations Institute for 
E hsarm a m enl Research, Geneve-* 





ImdlectoakSta^ 


As ah observer of the New Yafc -- 
scraem the 1940s and a faith/a! tead- ' 
er of the Partisan Review at the time, ’ 
I commend James Atlas for “ExodK :■ 
tag toe Intellect in New York’’ Jfc;:. 
Bgtus, Sqtt 5). But not all his condo- ‘ 

S30n£ nrtnvmra imsvn....- - 


■to* 


■Sfika 


I . rr • *■* iwwoiL, out Hour... 

aplrti^k °°t restrict toemsdvc^^' 1 

To toon the thought pucSS&Sfi- f 
tne rust coitoem-ofnanan'eristaice. - ■ 

I assume the species wifi not <fi?tiot^v 7n 


■ 4 -ELL^f R^I^^r 








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I 






■'xvv 



, nrr . . n T1T1F « vir THl RSDAY. SEPTEMBER 19. 1985 

rmi v vl - ||KRALI) TKI — — — — 

Minister Suspended on Sex Claim 

Methodist’s Harassment Trial Is First in Church History 

- A. - 1 _ nnff official speculate 



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; Tt« AmocoM P»«m 

POUSH PRIMATE IN US. — LCanfinal 

Catholic Church in Poland, States, his first- 

Cardinal. Glemjp s arrival to begta an eight -ttey vis« to 

— < "" — . s 

Military Scrambles to CutSpeoding 
As U S. Reduces Rearmament Plan 

• l.. nitiu .nniioK .immunilioi 


T 


By George G Wilson 

Washington Post Sen id 
WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan’s rearmament pro- 
gram is undergoing a fundamental 
restructuring as White House and 
Defense Department officials 
scramble to adjust to what they 
estimate will be a reduction of at 
least $300 billion in the next five- 
year defense plan, according to ad- 
ministration officials. 

“We’re in a sea change." one 
veteran of the Pentagon budget 
battles said Monday. 

Despite the new austerity. Penta- 
gon officials said, the U.S. military 
services are trying to cut their bud- 
gets for the fiscal years 1986 
through 1990 without canceling 
hardware programs. The resah, 
critics in tne Pentagon predicted, 
will be less money devoted to pre- 
paring the armed services to fight, 
particularly a long war. 

To cope with the cuts, the army 
will buy less ammunition, the navy 
will buy fewer ships, the air force 
Will cancel marginal programs and 
.the Marine Corps will reassess its 
modernization program. 

The White House’s Office of 
Management and Budget, in its re- 
cently published “Mid-Session Re- 
view of the 1986 Budget," PW^ed 
$291 billion less for defense m 1986 
through 1990 than Mr. Reagan had 
earmarked in April for his rearma- 
ment effOlt- - -A that 

White House officials said that 

Defense; Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger, in contrasts the : past 
when he appealed to Mr. Rfag™ 
for more money, appeare'tobere- 
signed thisyear to seeing !us budget 

slashed. ■' ■ • .c- 

“Cap has seeortbe writing on tne 

waB" an aide .said. 


. Pentagon officials who have 
been involved in the cycles of mu* 
tary funding through several ad- 
ministrations predicted that ute 
real cut for thai five-year period 
will be more than $400 billion. 

Rather than dictate cuts, Mr. 
Weinberger and his deputy. Wil- 
liam H. Taft 4th, hare directed the 
armed services to slash their bud- 
gets for the next five years in pro- 
portion to what they have moved 
uiihe past. Pentagon officials said. 

Critics said that changes in the 
rearmament program are so c*!™ - 
sh/e that civilian rather than mili- 
tary leaders should reassess current 
strategy and make the necessary* 
reductions. In his Four and a nail 
vears of running the Pentagon. Mr. 
Weinberger has concentrated on 
raising record amounts of money 
rather than directing how the ser- 
vices spend it. . . 

In making its projections. die 
White House assumed the Defense 
Department would receive annual 
increases of 3 percent above infla- 
tion from Congress. Even that is an 
overly optimistic assumption ac- 
cording to many congressional 

leaders. . . 

Mr. Taft, in one directive issued 
on a recent Thursday, urged the 
armed services to find savings of 
$228 billion by ibe following Mon- 
day for the fiscal 1986-90 period. 
Pentagon officials said. 

Thearmy will not say so public- 
ly but to save bilHons it has virtual- 
ly abandoned Mr. Reagan s objec- 
tive to stockpile enough 
ammunition to fight in Europe for 
60 'days. Fffitagta'spuiJ*^ said 
: |a doing so, officials said,_tne 

army tS4ising«a%“S u JP®? 1 
or ess made" in* questioning the 
ttockpilingr US. allies m Europe 


bne only enough ammunition to 
fint about 20 days, goes the argu- 
inoi, so why should the army 
spnd billions to fight alone? 

As Tor the naw. one Pentagon 
cric said that it “will get us 600 
sha bv 1990, but they will be 
caners'and rowboats because oT 
bdget constraints." 

Hie Congressional Research Ser- 
vie has issued a report that said 
th navy will not be able to afford 
th 137 cruisers and destroyers pat 
nvy leaders said they needed. 

The publication Defense Week 
tad Monday that the navy is pro- 
psing to buv three rather than five 
0X3-5 1 class destroyers a year as 
prt of its response to the cuts. 

The air force already has agreed 
t< cancel two aircraft procurement 
nograms, the Fairchild T-46 train- 
eand the Sikorsky HH-60, a 
Eackhawk helicopter modified Tor 
secial operations. 

And, according to Pentagon of u- 
ols. the air force is looking for 
rare cuts. Deploying the small, 
robile Midgetman missile would 
osi more than deploying more gj- 
ni MX rockets, air force officials 
yd, in acknowledging that re- 
tenchment is throwing a different 
ldit on strategic choices. 

In April, the Office of Manage- 
rs and Budget predicted that 
nnual increases in defense money 
\ould range from 8.8 percent to 
3.4 percent from fiscal 1986 
trough 1990, not allowing for m- 
fation. In its Aug. 30 mid-session 
nview. the office forecast annual 
i.er eases of from 3.9 percent to 12 
prcenc Under While House uula- 
m assumptions, this would pra- 
ttle for a real growth of about 3 
prcdalfor fiscal -1987 through fis- 
oll 990. 


Rv I aura Sessions Stepp decisions." She said the court had 

^SESSE? ^i^ W hire US Carter, who is black and 

United Methodist maintains that his prosecution was 

conveted another m^ier on^ motivated, declined corn- 
er two chaigis retotoi torexi^ ^ ^ was pro . 

nounced at Good Shepherd United 
him from the ministry tor tnree Methodisl Church in Silver Spring, 

’Tn a decision that.chureh offi- a ^e^n^Hhites and 

wSSen in three blacks in their 20s and early 
pact on the treatment . ^womenin assmcd ^ Mr. Carter had 

w sSriSfr K Tuesr made sexual. advances to then e- 

• n AnAMHirl Ti-khn P I nr* 


wmen nc The three women who worked 

,b- [or Mr Can,r said atejhey 
. T SJr5i.Vii3 vote, the court refused his advances, he dropped 
stention. ghm®. of his support for their work. The I five 

acquitted Mr. Carter oi cuargc took their charges m April 

immorality. Uld to Bishop Joseph Yeakd. the bish- 

OP of Baltimore .Annual Con- 

M< 2^SdV*xuShaSS fSence, who convened an rnresu- 
on charges rdatea to scxuai ujuw- that was racially 

mem, according to national ctuiren ^ * xual | y The committee 

“"•K^ourt unanimously rccom- found that .hore was mason to 

1 jAj ,Ua. Mr Carter 36 under- prosecute Mr. Carter, 
mended dwt Mr. w lhe ^ ^ed in prayer 

•P “““t'S said tl^v X about 25 blades gathered around 

f'?s2S«SSsS ^Youtao JSd'lbcmpuutuon 
he woddapprohHe ealled Ok mn- ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ B 

"°^ e “Son '“rom 'jhT trial "“ib^tvinion on dte charge of 

=ESsb SS5SBSS1.SS 

was ^ilty of tbe^eeusat^ 

SS »d"\« W moral according to several eburob 

Surch law does no, define inf 

K , l LEdSsaual- morality, and the jurors may not 
testtfied that thqi - bac ^oeen sexu warned to put themselves in 


selves, one official speculated. At- 
lempis to reach lhe jurors were un- 
successful. _ _ . 

In finding Mr. Carter guilty of 
what amounted to a lesser charge, 
yet handing down a stiff sentence, 
.the church may have done “irrepa- 
rable" damage to relationships be- 
tween blacks and whiles in the 
church, said Mr. Lockman. 


M CP 

“T. 

proprietor himself. And we offiero AKj 

guests the ultimate Beverly Hills JR M MIgILl BS 
experience: free llmo service to Tmff J fTp]»| |rt| g 
glorious Rodeo Drive. 

El Beverly Pavilion 

9360 wild*. ■tvd-.u^qtymns.CA 90212 -' 1 - 10 ^ 0, 691 366 


have warueduTput themselvesin 

urn posiuon of defining it dmm- 

Support Group for Ex-Fundamenlahsts 
Begins Organizing a Chapter at Yale 

— i h ave given up their beliefs, is orga- 


U m ml Prtsi International 

NEW HAVEN, ConnecUcut — 
The founder of Fundamentalists 
Anonymous, a support group for 
fundamentalist Christians who 


niring the first campus chapter at 
Yale university. , , . , 

Richard Yao. of Brooklyn. New 
York, said Tuesday that the organi- 
zation he founded in April now has 
27 chapters in the United States. 
Mr. Yao. 30. a 1980 graduate of 

ir ■ OaViaaI caiH hp K 


Asian Crime Syndicate ^3* - gam 
RrokeiL, U.S. Police Say trying to form a chapter at the 

b^W WRX fNYT) — Federal because ius "a pretty liberal 

and local police authonu« here P'ace- ^^5 down South, 
announced the arrest Monda.y of tCTS wou |d be tom down 

12 leaders of ao .Aajn ” S d fSd™ heckled,' Mr Yao 

crime syndicate in an - d -j ultimately want to go there. 

33$ MV* IS a safe place to Stan.- 

inol activities. . 

The syndicate calls itself United 
Bamboo, the authorities said. They 
said its activities included drag 
dealing, gambling, extortion, brib- 
ery. kidnapping and muroei 



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Hello, Cliristian? 

Happy Birthday! 

... Mot ami? At the 
Ramada Renaissance, having 
breakfast With a glass of 
champagne because you're 

ten years old! The hotel 

even put flowers on the 

table - they must've guessed 
today is special. 

...My room here? 

Really comfortable - feels 
like I’m at home. Big 
difference is, I have a 

balcony looking out over 

the sea. 

...Cost lots? No, don't 
worn' -I'll still be able 

to buy you a present to 
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ll= WALLY FINDLAY =ii 

Galleries International 
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EXHIBITION 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 19BS 


"Light of France" 

Permanent cahfcitiwi of 
AUGE, BOUDET, BOURSE, CANU, 
CASSK3NEUL, CHAURAY, FABi EN, 
GALL, GANTNER, GAVEAU, 
GOBBTi, HAMBOURG, KBME, 
KLUGE, IE PHO, MK>£L-HENRY, 
NE5SI, VALTAT, NEUQUEMAN, 
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31 Ave. George-V - Paris 8th 

M. flan. taL TOlM am-T PA-3J0 ID 9 PM. 
& M fa r 7p B >.-9pm 


China Ready to Name Young Leaders 
To Confirm Shift Away from Maoism 

The Associated Pms Deng Xiaoping, to ensure the con- Mr* Zh“ . w™ed the changes a 

BELTING A total of 326 “out- 


standing ™i2ST" e— — - n office, despite ibeir age, because 

m^ U Styefdere Wednesday at Mr. Hu said the eootam dj» of 
alandimrit conference that willen- will elect S3 new members of the and in the international arena, 
large leading party organs and ap- Central Advisory Commission, ai- 
prove an economic blueprint for ter 37 resignations, and 33 new 
the next Five years. people to the Central Commission 

Hie young cadres were among for Discipline Inspection, which is 
992 delegates who heard General losing 30 veterans. 

Secretary Hu Yaobang open the Ten Politburo members and oth- 
six-day party conference by an- er retirees, who accepted Mr. 
nounongtbal 56 full members and Deng's suggesuonip msie wayte 

- * *•— younger, more qualified members, . , 

will retain full pay and other bene- Mr. Hu, 69. reinforced die point 
fits. Culture Minister Zhu Muzhi, in his speech, as reported by the 
one of those leaving the Central Xinhua news agency. 

Committee, said. “R ™ res P on ^ t0 * e t ^ of 

Mr Zhu said the end of the life- the party s cause that most veterans 
tenure system for party bosses was have retired. It is also m response 
M a symbol of the maturity of the 
Chinese Communist Party” and 
would create a new climate to in- 
vigorate China. 


Mr. Deng, who is chairman of 
the Central Advisory Commission 
and. the state and party military 
commissions, is SI. 

“1 can say for sure that Comrade 
Deng Xiaoping and some other old 
leaders will continue to function in 
the parly’s central leading organs.” 


UWUI»VW«g I IH 19 — _ 

34 alternates will be ejected this 
week to the Central Committee. 

The retirements, and in one case 
resignation, of 65 committee mem- 
bers and alternates were an- 
nounced at a plenary session oF the 
committee on Monday. Some of 
the 56 new full members were pre- 
viously alternates, Mr. Hu said. 

The rejuvenation drive was 
launched by the Chinese leader. 



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France (Mines Draft Budget for 

g; 

PARIS — The French < linet aims to remove a Mtenuai f rom operations abroad. .at 

approved a 1986 draft I lget j° r r mlifaly 11 P ereent - JPZ&tuiF* : 

SMEME Z Sl g par& elections^ 

^rorainUra'sp,™ 

They said it had been desig d to B&ecowy called out planned spending cutbacks asQ 

drfuse attacks on the Sodalis pv- irS whrther it could reduce ^suern 

emmenf s economic policy om ?®J^Y i ff l 7t ^ eni | z i na the econo- from its current annual njp- ef. 
the.conservative opposition.. placing abqui.5.6 pomitto a prqectedl? • 

The mam economic goals < the X to durable percent at theend of _ 

budget are to restrain govern rat. France me p Total spending is 

spending, to maintain confit ice growtn. . . ^ by 3.6 percent from 1985 toa. 

fathe franc and to stim ite Mr. B4rigow>ysaid ^cord 1.03 'billion francs, but be-^ 

growth in corporate investn its icit would be ikept loj percem m ^ projected inflation ist 

and consumer spending, gofr- shghtly bdow that level sp«^ 


if' in 







. I 1 

, "a 1 • 


Pierre B£r£govoy 


ment officials said. 

The budget, which will be 


about 


b- lion). The government has prqject- 


io the needs of the party’s cause 
that a few of them have remained,” 
be said. 

Mr. Hu told delegates that a fifth 
plenum of the 12ih Central Com- 
mittee will convene immediately 
after the conference to name M a 
number of younger people” to the 
Politburo and party Secretariat. 

Politburo and Secretarial mem- 
bers are taken from the Central 
Committee, which previously had 
210 full members and 136 alter- 
nates. The election of 90 new mem- 
bers, to replace 65 veterans, would 
expand the total membership from 
346 to 371. 

Prime Minister Zhao Ziyang told 
the conference that the five-year 
plan for 1986-1990 calls for eco- 
nomic growth of 7 percent a year, 
below the 10 percent average in 
1981-1984, with concentration on 
economic efficiency and expons. 

Mr. Zhao identified major tasks 
for 1986-1990 as reform of the eco- 
nomic structure, key construction 
projects, upgrading technology, de- 
veloping intellectual resources and 
improving living standards. Eco- 
nomic reform is most vital he said. 

Meanwhile, about 1,000 Chinese 
student protesters screaming 
“down with Japanese militarism" 
marched through Beijing’s Tienan- 
raen Square Wednesday to com- 
memorate the 54th anniversary of 
Japan's invasion of China. 

Die students said they were pro- 
testing what they call a resurgence 
of Japanese militarism and arro- 
gance, pointing to the visit of Prime 
Minis ter Yasuhiro Nakasone of Ja- 
pan to a Tokyo shrine commemo- 
rating Japan's war dead. 

Elsewhere, several thousand stu- 
dents at the Beijing 'University 
campus gathered in a similar dem- 
onstration, visiting faculty sources 
there told The Associated Press, 

By one account, several anti-Jap- 
anese wall posters were pasted on a 
long wail near the campus post of- 
fice. and one depicted Japan as an 
alligator ready to swallow China. 

Japan invaded northeastern Chi- 
na on SepL 18. 1931, and occupied 
much of the country before World 
War II ended. 


Of Crime and Civic Pride ink Japanese Port 


(Continued from Page 1) 

larger, at 1 ,433 acres, and undoubt- 
edly more expensive. 

Port Island has already changed 
Kobe's look and feel giving the city 
high-rise office buildings, apart- 
ment complexes, a sports center, an 
amusement park and a computer- 
run overhead monorail connecting 
the island to the mainland. 

Change is equally apparent miles 
away to the west There, an indus- 
trial park and new bousing for 
97,000 people have risen on a dusty 
plateau that used to be a mountain. 

To pay for all this, the city re- 
sorted to a creative combination of 


financing plans. It borrowed ft 
West German and Swiss bar 
gelling , the newly created land pit 
by piece and holding a proflta 1 
six-month exposition on Port 
land. Perhaps just as important 
least to the mayor and his aic 
they did it with little help from 
Japanese government. 

“We want to be independent! 
much as possible,” said Mayor ' 
yazaki. 74^ who has been in of 
since 1969. “Local govemme^ 
tend to ask the national gove 
mem for help. We want to keep i 
autonomy.” 


more succinctly. “This city’s very 
good at making money ” he said. 

Either way, Kobe is in the major 
leagues of shipping, with 157.mil- 
lion tons of cargo passing through 
last year, much of it in large con- 
tainers that are scattered across the 
piers like so many children’s 
blocks. 

The concern now is the protec- 
tionist mood on trade that -is 
emerging in Washington. The 
United Sates accounted for one- 
ihird of this dty's foreign trade last 
year. If Congress restricts Japanese 
imports, Kobe officials expect, to 
feel the pain fairiy fast. 


in real terms will stagnate, govern- 
ment officials said. 

Moderate spending mcreas»afe 
planned for national defense, edu=. 
cation and culture. 

Substantial rats arc, planned; 
across the board, but reduces 
will be greatest to spending OT the . 
Industry Ministry, particularly ® ' 
subsidies and other forms of finan- 
cial aid to state-owned enterprises. 

Capital grants to. nationalized 
companies, with the. exception of. 
Renault, the ailing au tomaker, and '• 
the steelmakers Usmorand Satalor, 
will be reduced to 8.&bfilion francs 
from 1 1.8 billion francs in 1985/; • 

-To stimulate spending and fe 
vestment,. the government plans to 

and to pufT effect- a global re- : 
duction of 3. percent .in personal ; 
income taxes* to stimulate spending' 
and investment. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1985 



lr* 


Tokyo Sets 

>* Spending on 

Military Oyer 
1 % of G 3 NP 

By John Burgess 

T <tvXSSf* fm **' Serwe 

TOKYO ■ — The Japanese cabi- 
ns adopted Wednesday a S76-b2- 
non, five-year military speadine 
Plan. that could bring an^dto 
25°^ Policy that has hddmfli- 
budgets to 1 percent of grass 
national product & 

GNP*i^ 1 . CUnenl Projections of 
.. tlie government's Eco- 

,f -ounc Planning Agency, the plan 
would mean average yearly nuli- 

vio« Kjn ' S ° utpQt of goods and scr- 

Despite these figures, the chief 
cabinet secretary, Ttdcao Ftginaim. 
said that the government would 
continue. “to make efforts to re- 
spect the intent" of the 1 -percent 
c«hng, which was adopted in 1976. 

Officials is Tokyo have (coded 
off questions about the seeming 
contradiction between these two 
policies. However, the question 
could become academic' if Japan's 
economy grows faster than expect- 
ed, so that actual spending re- 
mained below 1 percent. 

Earlier this month, ruling party 
V ciders turned down a request from 
Prime Munster Yasuhiro Naka- 
sone to scrap the spending ceiling 
formally. But as a compromise, 
they approved creation of the five- 
year cabinet spending plan. 

Formerly, the plan was an inter- 
nal “wish list" of the Defense 
Agency, subject to heavy cuts by 
the Diet, Japan's parliament, dur- 
ing budget deliberations. Its dera- 
tion to a cabinet policy appears to 
assure it will cany greater wight. 

Meanwhile, the lead opposition 
group, the Japanese Socialist Party, 
called the government's decision 
“outrageous" and promised to 
fight it when the Diet reconvenes. 
Other opposition parties also con- 
demned iL 

Mr. Fujinami pledged that Japan 
would maintain a “strictly defen- 
sive" posture and would not be- 
> come a military power. His remarks 
apparently were aimed both at 
neighboring countries that Japan 
occupied miring World War H and 
anti -military Japanese. 

The government also said 
Wednesday that it intends to in- 
crease foreign economic assistance 
in stages to about $8 billion in 
1992, from an estimated $4 billion 
in 1985. 

The military spending pjanis not 
expected to change the basic speed 
and direction of the continuing 
buildup of Japan's 245,000-mcm- 
ber armed forces. 

Despite Japan’s economic sue- . 
cess, its government is short of cash 
and running a defeat Jtou isjiro- j 

Japan's national budget is^owced 

through borrowing, making larger 
defense spending a financial as wdl 
as political issue. 

The action Wednesday followed 
all-night bargaining within the gov- 
,■ eminent. The Defense Agency, 
which is in charge of military af- 
fairs, bad pressed for spending 
equivalent to about S8Q billion, but 
backed down in the face of opposi- 
tion from the Finance Ministry and 

parts erf the ruling Liberal Demo- 
cratic Party. 



U.S. to Help Upgrade 
Afghan Guerrilla Media 


Saraora Machel with Secretary of State George P. Shultz after his arrival in Washington. 

Mozambican Leader’s Visit to U.S. 
Prompts Right to Criticize Reagan 



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Catalogue on request 


By Doyle McManus 

Lu i Angeles Ttna Serntr 

WASHINGTON — Amid cries 
of anger from conservatives, the 
Marxist president of Mozambique. 
Samora Machel. has arrived in 
Washington for talks with Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan aimed at ce- 
menting improved ties with the 
United Slates and at winning new 
aid for his leftist government. 

The administration's cordial re- 
lationship with President Machel 
appears at odds with Mr. Reagan's 
usual rhetoric on the Third World. 
In this case, the United States is 
supporting a Soviet-hacked Marx- 
ist dictatorship against a pro-West- 
ern rebellion. 

The United States is supplying 
Mr. MacheTs government with S40 
million in economic aid this year. 


indication" that Mr. Machel. “who Conservative Caucus. "The only * ’ . 

had gone so far over to the other evidence that Mozambique is tilt- Jbe U.S. effort will enable me 
camp, was maybe having second ing toward the West is that they are rebels to disseminate the message 
thoughts. We think it’s worth a try willing to lake our money." l ? lh * ^ *’" al 


The AssucuUtd eras 

WASHINGTON — Guerrillas 
in Afghanistan are about to get 
money from the U.S. government 
for a publicity campaign intended 
to hnng their struggle against Sovi- 
et troops to the world's attention. 

The money will go to tram Al- 
ghan journalists to use television, 
radio and newspapers to advance 
the umi-govemmem cause. Report- 
ers will he given mini-cameras to 
photograph the war inside Afghan- 
istan. 

“It is the goal of this project to 
facilitate the collection, develop- 
ment and distribution of credible, 
objective and timely professional- 
quality news stories, photographs 
and television images about devel- 
opments in Afghanistan." said a 
notice in the U.S. government’s 
Federal Register. 

The program will be supervised 
by the U.S. Information Agency. 
Congress appropriated 5500,000 to 
start. 

In making the money available. 
Congress all but instructed USlA 
to consider an organization like 
Friends of Afghanistan, a new 
group whose board includes Zbig- 
niew Brzezinskl the national secu- 
rity adviser during the Carter ad- 
ministration, who is known for his 
hard-line anti-Soviet views, and 
Lawrence Eagleburger, a former 
undersecretary of state. I 

The U.S. effort will enable the I 


Afghan rebels, called the Muja- 
hidin. have been fighting the Soviet 
Union since its troops, now esti- 
mated to number U 5,000. occu- 
pied their country in December 
1979. The rebels have their head- 
quarters in Peshawar, Pakista n , 
near the Afghan border. 

The Federal Register said the 
project also will help train Afghans 
“to develop an independent, self- 
funded media organization." 

■ Attack by Pakistan Alleged 

Radio Kabul said Pakistani mili- 
tiamen attacked Afghan troops in 
Afghanistan Sept. 6, prompting the 
Soviet-backed government to lodge 
a protest, according to a United 
Press International dispatch from 
New Delhi. It said 15 Pakistanis 
were killed. 

This was apparently the first 
time that Kabul has reported the 
deaths of Pakistani troops within 
Afghanistan. Pakistan did not re- 
port any fighting. 

The clashes occurred in eastern 
Paktia province, the broadcast stat- 
ed. It said, “Pakistani militia at- 
tacked the Afghan forces. During 
these clashes. 15 Pakistani militia 
men were killed." 

It did not mention Afghan gov- 
ernment losses. 





4&. 


) ilias LALAoUNIS^ 

PARIS - 364. RUE 5T-HONORE (PIACE VENDOME) 
GENEVA - -BON GENIE", ZURICH - "GR1EDER' 

ATHENS - 6, PAN EP1STIM 1 OU AVENUE 
HOm GRANDE BRETAGNE & ATHENS HILTON 
MYCONOS, CORFU, RHODES 
NEW YORK - A WEST 57 TH STREET & FIFTH AVENUE 


INTERNATIONAL POSITION 


to the world of what is going on 
there." said Senator Gordon J. 


to let him see what our system ^ Jjsse Helms of North N ew HamcStire Re- 

In addition, a senior official said Carolina, the second-ranking Re- 2S5 ^b5!m3ES»» 

^ruS^t^'K P- ublicaD 0,1 ft For T C Tff* 

Svire and ‘-omm.uee, and four other conser- have ,^ dv iuccee ded » 

vauve senate* said in a letter to Uieir efforts of hiding that war from 

fromaii Lt Mr ’ ***% Hi ^ ^ the people of the world and from 

01,1 ttTitncni “would inevitably rah u . lW f d nninion " he said. 


appears at odds with Mr. Reagan's “would be that if you wish to 
usual rhetoric on the Third World, displace something which is con- 
In this case, the United States is vaxyto our interests — namely, a 
supporting a Soviet-hacked Marx- portion of Soviet strength in that 
ist dictatorship against a pro-West- p* 10 °f w orld the way you do 
era rebellion. it is by competing with the Soviet 

Tfc- T \c nmni.uni, Union. rather than bv a “quaran- 

xx J m tine" of the region in question. 

Nfr. MacheTs govenunmi with SW gut conservative Republicans 
million in economic aid the year. ^ complained that aid for Mo- 
Congress turned down an admum- ivi.h 


right Soviet embrace." lapse without Western sustc- 

“Our view, the official con tin- -JL^ »■ 

.. J L.. .tan, :r ..... ... 


tration request for SI. 1 million in 
military aid. 


zambique was inconsistent with] 
Mr. Reagan’s policies in Nicara- 
gua. Afghanistan and Cambodia, 


Mr. Reagan and other officials where the administration has been 
said that Mr. Machel, who arrived aiding rebels against leftist govern- 
Tuesday. has helped US. attempts menls . They called on the president 
to calm tensions between while- t0 th e rightist Mozambican Na- 
ruled South Africa and its black yonal Resistance, which has been^ 
neighbors. The officials voiced fighting to overthrow Mr. MacheTs 


hope that he can be wooed away 
from his dose relationship with the 
Soviet Union. 


government. 

“The president is engaging in 
what seems an ultimate act of hy- 


Mr. Reagan said at his press con- pocrisy by extending official hon- 
ference Tuesday night that “for ors to Samora Macbd." charged 
some time now. there has been an 'Howard Phillips, chairman of the 


OTTEEMATiam POSITIONS 


enttneni "wouto tncniaoty cot- wcir , d opinion - h c said, 
lapse without Western susie- Mr Humphrey, who says the 
nance -’ Reagan administration has failed 

“We question whether it is in to provide enough assistance, to the 
America's strategic interest to pre- anti-Soviet guerrillas, told the Sen- 
vent the inevitable toppling of a ate in June tiuit the project had 
pro-Soviet, dedicated Marxist gov- been cleared! with the National Se- 
emment which has ruthlessly sup- curiiy Council. Congress’s under- 
pressed its people and bankrupted standing is that the administration 
its economy," they said. may ask for another S500.000. 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


We ere a Caribbean bawd multinational group 
■dive in tbe PETROLEUM and SHIPPING sector. 
For our London office we are looking for a 

CRUDE OIL and 

PRODUCT BROKER 

The Mutable candidair should have nome experience as 
broker or trader and should be an EEC national with 
perfect English. 

Added advantage with Freneh or Spanish. 

An attractive lolaiy and benefits according to qualiflco- 
tioiu and past performance. 

Pktit jc write in confidence to; 

Mr. D. Kaplan, 21 Addison Plw London Wll 4BJ. 


A.D.N.O.C. 

ABU DHABI NATIONAL OIL COMPANY 

Wishes to recruit a 

SYSTEMS ENGINEER 


To establish tbe standards and procedures for Local Area Networking 
(IAN). Duties involve participation in the design, sizing, implementa- 
tion and effective control of multi-dissimilar host networks connecting 
ICL, IBM and HP mainframes. 

The candidate should have a degree in computer science or equivalent 
discipline and four years experience in Data Processing mainly in the 
design and implementation of local area and multi-dissimilar host 
networks. 

Interested candidates are invited to forward their applications together 
t vith photocopies of their education and experience certificates , within 
three weeks from the date hereof to: 


Personnel Directorate - Employment Division 
Abu Dhabi National Oil Company - (ADNOC) 
P.O. Box 898 - Abu Dhabi - U.A.E. 


R 

scitex 


Scifex is continuously broadening its reputation as an innovative 
leader in computer imaging technology, venturing into new areas . 
of business and launching new product lines. 

An ambitious marketing program enabled us to achieve a 
considerable growth rate over many years. To sustain this 
momentum we are looking fora high-level marketing profession- 
alto take up the position of (m/f) 

Product Planning 
Manager 

at our European Headquarters in Brussels. 

The successful candidate wiH: 

□ form an important link between our R & D resources and the 
market place in terms of strategic planning; 

□ come from a high-technology environment with a successful 
track record in marketing high-value capital equipment; 
experience or exposure in the priming or publishing industries 
will be considered an advantage; 

O have a technical education and possess a post- graduate busi- 
ness qualification ; 

□ be fluent in English and one or two other major European 
languages. 

The remuneration package will be in line with the level of responsi- 
bilities. 

Candidates should submit their handwritten application and detailed 
c.v. to: Universal Communication (ref. RM/PPM), chaussee de 
La Hulpe 122, 1050 Brussels. 


COMMODITIES 
§§r DEALER 

Do you have undeniable talent as a salesperson 
and business negotiator ? Would you like to put 
| Y a to good use in a company that is market leader in 
V its field ? Are you an experienced foreign exchange 
dealer, ship chartering operations specialist, or 
graduate from a leading university? if so, your 
background interests us. 

Our company can offer you a salary in line with your 
performance. If you are completely fluent in English 
and a second language (German and Spanish) / 

and if commodities dealing and international /y 

markets attract you, send us your resume //*; :■ 
and a handwritten letter to : G.T.I.P. - 
Departement Ressources Humaines - Jy "- 
39. chemin de I’HosteHerie - : 


SENIOR EXECUTIVES FOR PARIS 

Established financial services multinational, a world 
leader in its field, is seeking two top ‘shirt 
. sleeves* executives to assist their expansion plans 
into France. 

OPERATIONAL EXECUTIVE 

Top level retail orientated businessman/woman, 
capable of identifying potential locations and then 
heading up a top flight operation. 

ADMINISTRATION EXECUTIVE 


Qualified lawyer or finance executive, to direct aii 
administrative functions of the operation. 

Superior financial package wifi be offered fo the 
right candidates and infernal progression possibili- 
ties are excellent, french nationals preferred. 

Phase write enclosing full C.V. to: 

BERKELEY ADMINISTRATION INC. 
Avenue Louise 283 
1050 BRUSSELS, Belgium. 


39, chemin de I Hostene 
30000 NIMES (France) 




IMPORTANCE BANOUE D’AFFAIRES mnmtmmMmm 
recherche pour sa SALLE DES CHANGES un 

CAMBISTE DEPOT h/f 

Oans un cadre de travail en pteine evolution, (e candidal (gradS 
HI/IVJ possedera : 

. un temperament dynamlque 

une rapidite et une fiabilirt dans le traltement des operations 
I une experience de 2 S 3 anr*es dans une safe des changes 
- si possible une bonne connaissance de ? ’anglais. 

Arfresser lettre manuserrte, CV, photo et pretentions sous ref. 

1 5954 a Contesse PUbfiO't* 20. avenue de I'Opera 75040 Paris 
CPdex 0 1 qui transmettra! Discretion assure? preclser Mnque 
^tequelie 'votre C.V. ne dak pas ttre rransmis. 


ne iebna*' 

-J00 ” tn ^„di4a.« .Ik* 1 

Succe»»i«J ^ ,. 0 nuoem>ai ®r^Th«J w \,ha compa°? 

Forrif tonfid^ w- | am e&-* **1' 




ESTEE LAUDER COSMETICS 

INTERNATIONAL 

TRAINING 

MANAGER 

This excellent opportunity requires an 
outstanding experienced Training/Sales 
orientated person with proven motivational 
abilities to provide education in the areas of: 

# Productknowledge/sellingskills 

# Consumer orientated promotional 
programs 

# Advanced sales psychology - 

The role will suit a 28/40 year old with an 
extensive sales education background in 
cosmetic and/or fashion related industries, 
preferably fluent in English. French, Italian 
and German. 

The position is London based but will 
involve some international travel. 

The salary and benefits package is highly 
competitive. 

Please write, in confidence, enclosing a 
resume and photograph to: 

John Gottmg, Group Personnel Department, 

Estee Lauder Cosmetics, 65, Grosvenor Street, 
LONDON W1X 0BH. ENGLAND. 

ESTEE LAUDER 


MCU 


Management Consulting 
Conscils (Tent rep rise 
Unternchmcnsberatung 


4. boulevard Ju.m-~l-.tfy - UI-^CW C.vr.vvc Tel. -. OH2 31 M 6* - TcK-x +28 CTO tSDM 


TIME 

The Weekly Newsmagazine 


We axe looking for an experienced associate sales manager to 
work in our DOsseldorf office. This is an opportunity to join 
the international sales operation of one of ihe largest 
publishing companies in the world. 

You have recently worked in an advertising or marketing 
department, in an advertising agency or for a publishing 
house. Most importantly, you enjoy selling, you have initiative 
and the ability to make decisions independently. You are 
ideally 30-35 years of age, a German national or fluent in 
written and spoken German with a good command of the 
English language. 

We offer an excellent salary plus personal expense allocation, 
company car and additional social benefits. 

Please send your application in English to Gerard Baigneres, 
European Publishing Director, Time Magazine, Time & Life 
Building. 1S3 New Bond Street, London W1Y 0AA. 

All applications will be treated with strictest confidence. 






n rrci>NA'rinN AT. HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDA Y, SEPTEMBER 19. 1985 



x- 


v. 




K 


f / 




s» 


27 YEA 




>*.o. 


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ReaganWams Agam^i 

in Trtwfe 



1). 

could not be spread in sudi a situa- 
tion. . , 

“I can under stand the problem 
j of the parents.” he said, refemngto 
, families across the country who 
have kept their children out_oT 
schools because of the AIDS 
threat . 

• He was not afraid of losing ms 
leadership in Congress, in hgpt of 
recent resentment of his policies m. 
the trade area and regarding , South 
Africa that emerged despite tas 
high public approval rating- M t- 
Rcagan said of Congress, “I think 
we arc getting along pretty well- 

• Asked if be is disturbed that 

the United States has now become 
a “debtor nation,” Mr. Reagan re- 
plied: “Are wer He said that a 
false impression is being given that 
just because the country has a large 
trade deficit, it has become a debt- 
ar nation. . 

The presdent said the deficit 
that he is concerned about, and 
that must be solved, is the deficit in 
federal mending. He argued that 
despite the growing trade defiat, 
employment had been rising and 
inflation had come down. 

Mr. Reagan's latest criticism of 
protectionism was delivered in ad-, 
vance of a trade policy statement 
that White House aides have said 
the president will make next week, 
possibly on Monday. 

Aides said on Tuesday, before 
the news conference, that Mr. Rea- 
gan was unlikely to send Congress 
legislative proposals of his own to 
curb the trade imbalance. 

Mr. Reagan began the news con- 
ference with a statement similar in 
tone to his radio address two weeks 
ago, when he said that protection- 
ism “is almost always sdf-destruc- 
tive.” The president said Tuesday 


night that a need ousted forstronr. 
• aer economic growth, not just at 

but throughout wodd, 
and that there must be free and fair 

^^This is a path of cooperation 
and success that will mate affp»- 

million new jobs m the nsA four 
years," he said. “But there is imoth- 
Hpath that can only, ka^away 

from opportunity and piop^ a 

mindless stampede toward ptOtn- 
rionism will be a one-way top to 
economic disaster. 

Mr. Reagan said that among 
those who would suffer were Amer- 
icans whose jobs depend upon ex- 
ports of machinery, commensal 

Srcraft, high-tech datrooKs. tmd 
chemical products, who be said 
could well be the first tercels < of 


In a Summit 


(Gjotiouedfwm^® 11 '7. 
on them for wnminnk^ons aad- 

eV He'aSrSi that the U& 
store at Geneva had been flenbfc 
while the Soviet negotiators $ierp 


m' (] 


deal 


[euuiouuut ui szer 

agriculture, already m great Affi 
c3ty|waoId be even more vulnera- 
ble. . 

“Protectionist tariffs would in- 
vite retaliation that could deliver 
an ec on omic death blow to literally 
tens of thousands of American 
family farms,” he said. 

Asked at the news conference 
why he had resisted efforts to re- 
strict i mp orts of textiles; Mr. Rea- 
gan repeated his assertion that 
“protectionism is a two-way street, 
and there is no way that you can try 
to protect and shield one industry 
that is having these competitive 
problems without exposing oth- 

ere. _ 

"There just is no excuse lor pro- 
tectionism that is based , on legiti- 
mate competition,” he said. Mr. : 
Reagan added, however, that his 
adminis tration would take actum 
against nations that “are taking ad- 
vantage” of free-trade poHcies. 


of member nations on Tuesday 
nominated a Swedish diplomat, 
Henrik Amn euS, for chairman of 
the budget committee. Rut the 51- 
nation African group countered by 
nominating Tommo .Monthe, a 
diplomatfrom Cameroon. Mr. 
Monlhe was elected on a 92-53 
vote. 


DOONESBURY 


UN, Opening Its 40th Year, 
Confronts Divisive Issues 

(Continued from Page 1) 

do, since it lacks executive power to 
impose its decisions. 

He said: “If the member states, 
of allowing their individual - 
interests to prevail on various oc- 
casions were to strive to see the 
common good of mankind over 
a pd above their own, we would be 
on the way to the solution of many 
conflicts.” 

The assembly presidency is 
largely ceremonial but the incum- 
bent can have an impact on impor- 
tant issues through procedural rul- 
ings. For example, in 1974 the 
assembly president, ‘ Abdelaziz 
Bouteflika of Algeria, .was instot 
mental in encouraging the assem- 
bly to deny South Africa the right 
to take part in any subsequent as- 
sembly proceedings, a ruling that is 
still in force today. 

Before the assembly ends its ses- 
sion just before Christmas, it will 
consider at least 147 ag e nda it ems . 

The current turmoil in Sooth Afri- 
ca guarantees that the apartheid 
system of racial separation, a long- 
time target of the General Assem- 
bly, will be its major focus erf atten- 
tion. according to a number of 
diplomats. 

The assembly is expected to re- 
new its efforts to get the 15-mem- 
ber Security Council to adopt 
tough, mandatory sanctions 
against South Africa. 

Another major battle s hapin g up 
for this Genoa! Assembly is the 
threat by the United States to cut 
its financial support for the United 
Nations unless weighted voting, or 
a Larger voice for the heavier con- 
tributors, is introduced in fiscal 
matters. 

Apparently in an effort to gain 
mam mu m control over UN fi- 
nances, the West European group 


not. 

He rqected the it 
with Soviet Icadere that 
American researoh ou andte^- 

“l^would ride that out, 

He said -such a system was v. 
important to dm world tohaw^, 

be wil ling to trade that ofi in ■ 

ebangefor land^basedjuiel^; • 

weapons. There are already more,.. 
^ enough land-based wage™ 
“to Wow both countries out of the 
world," he said. . : 

When the weapons arc deed- ■ 
oped, he said, the United Sta»V;: 
might be! willing to decide against . 
deployment in exchange for Soviet 

concessions. 

Mr Reagan said that American, 
and "Soviet todm. could begar ; 
“solving problems when you step . 

talking about each oither f and «Mt^ 

ed tatting to each other. And. i ft . . . 
time we started talkmg.” . i V 
He said he was not concerned 
Soviet publicity' about the Rns- y 
sians’ expectations, for the GewnJ 

meeting and their arms control 
plans. 1 

- “Thisisacantmuationofalcmg 1 -...- 

Hmft campaign aimed mainly at cat , ' 

allies in Europe in an effort to bofld- - 

an impression That we may be the; 
villains, and thai they’re the good. 
guvs,” be said. “I don't think it has . 
registered with our allies,. and Tm 
not going to take’it seriously. . ;. "*• 

■ Moscow CritidxesReagan 
The Soviet Union conderiroed..-.. 
Mr. Reagan's latest yov to comm 1 : 
ue his Strategic.. Defense Initiative 
on Wednesday^ saying U provedhe. .. 

is determined to obstruct the bflat-.v 
eral «*rtm negotiations scheduled to 
resume this week in Geneva, Unit’ : 
ed ' Press International reported 

from Moscow. 


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Mr. Reagan ‘Repeated his fabric 
cation referring to tLS: ndhtaxy iff-" 
feriority, and accused the Soviet 
Union witiioul anycvidence that it 
does not want to conduct negotiar 
dons in Geneya,” Tass'smd.:;;. : . .. 


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SCIENCE . - — - 


Page 9 ^ 


s 


Jockeying for Satellite Space: 
Third World Wants Its Share 




By Thomas W. Nettcr time they have ihc resourc es to The 

M«w York Times Sendee ' launch one, the geostationary «t»t w '^, ^Lfwmce. in 1988. nearly a 

GENEVA -m Ihn 22 y^ns wffl 

tJT S mce the United States be placed m lower or lugber ortnis '— — if c nicvniuxs. 



/^.ENHVA — In the 22 yean Sm 52' “2£ Third World be- 

VJ since the United States be placed m lower® c** 1 * S^Vit^eva^ 
launched the first communications because they would go slower or 8 a ?. £j de jockeying forpo- 
satellite, the geostationary orbit faaer than Earth’s rotauo^ 

22J0Q miles (36.150 kilometers) _ More than 100 countrymens u^dMRextf cording. but there 
above the equator — where a said- here of to tatemati^ Tt^coro- |* uI ri J a Jf p f ieq uSi^mterference. 
lite travels at the same rotational wnmeanons Union, £lih™Jine Ihilw^PP^Md garbling °f ra- 
speed as Earth and is a fixed target bans agenw, have boon heams^Thc congestion is worst 

forradio signals — has become the for ira« to a who iSSSmd Europe. 

hottest property in space. There are geismtoihc orbit 1932, India had to bargain 

fe an estimated 138 sStes in the fc Whrj* wiSlildskt toan orbital slot and 

orbit, relaying telephone calls, tele- tope ®f l J eac *“ )B has since had to make expensive, 

vision pictures and weather re- though tin^Suming adjustments on its 

ports. About 160 more are in vari- ^SSS^^SSSr S23S si^ 1—. » 

ous stages of planning. Pf inc,p ^ . 2E«»!5 iim“ 5 iiE avoid an overlap of frequencies. 

Not surprisingly, the competi- *3 ®®uld noiaffeemtwhat _ which cost $130 million, 

tion for the available positions and table mcanL rdm telephone calls and links 

frequencies in space has caused re- peared to accept a rhausands of Indian villages to tele- 

sentment on Earth, mainly between ^*4 Australia, dm 6* vison. Land-based telephone lines 
the industrialized .countries and the developing nauOTS adiancc d ^ave performed those chores, 

Third Worid. Most of the satellites serve m theor ™ 1 ' but would have cost $1 billion, the 

belong to the United States, Cara- Even with the agreement, ^ mTTient estimated. Moreover 
da, Japan, Western Europe and the though, the conflict will not be re- f the weather, photo 

Soviet Union, or to the Intelsat soWed soon- Tteproceedn^ or tne naD jjj ng ^ snow pack on tne Hi 
consortium. World Administrative Radio odd- for instance, to providi 

Although some developing coun- ference on the Use of Geostauoo- eariy -'fi 00< j warning. 




" V? . 

©°f ¥•*<. Jr.. 


Earthquake-Proofing Is Tested* 

Rv Brooke =5 SSSMHtaK 


By >o» Broke jg 

«uBMft£rvsr = » sg-se-JM? 

B skyscraper niodd swayed P«- hopelhat such devices will sunned wu* 

akriwSS^asascven-and-aialf'toa ^Seijhdp stabilize nuclear Professor Miller saul. 

table pitched and shook benrath it w plants and other budding ^ Soong is also icsungmolhw 
in a laboratory simulation of an P ~ ains I earthquakes and protect device: His team countered wind 
earthquake. The tremors ceased, qQ rigs from ocean sum stress on model skysra^bv "; 

Ite nar eSCa icto_«P«“d.*'“: RKy « dso Bying » finda way tarhinf 


earthquake. The tremors ceased, 0 ^bo reofl ri &s from ocean storms. stress M model skyscrapers 
then a researcher repeated the ex- are also trying to find a way wing-shaped appe_- - 

perimenl — but this tin* uTcounter the excessive sway m va ^ )US ^ to the 

-turned on" the model, aoivaunga ^ that is a stumblmg od/ ^ & in tests m a wind tu«» 

network of computerized season. ^ w ^ constrocuon ofv^ ^ appendages, sunQar to wng 
The building stood steady as a rock ^ skyscrapers. A study of Chica- on airplanes, were controuw 
as ihe uiblc sbook. "«S 


commnnicauuua »»<“», — 

avoid an overlap of frequencies. 

Insat, which cost $130 miDjon, 
relays telephone calls and Imks 
thousands of Indian villages to tele- 
vision. Land-based telephone lines 
could have performed those chores, 
but would have cost $1 bun on, the 
government estimated. Moreover, 


fMtftfv’ v : - ' 


l ne duuuiu£ ^ — tail — j . yaos on auum"— ; — . . 

as the table shook. gp- s 1 10-story Sears Tovrer. the ^^jupuiers reacting to mforma- 

-Smsrt buildings," capable of re- XuMTs tallest buildmg, tion fed from srasors on the out- 

sponding to earthquakes, wind and that, extended to 200 stones, me ^ ^ ^ model 
waves, may become common, in lop floor mi^ht swmgbaat ana Professor Soong is the 

part because of experiments in a foith as much as 70 feel (21 * ^^fS^nywSSs-near- 

cavernous laboraiory in Buffalo. ihs). OsdBanous ofa ^ luSdSon tl* 

. 


inn and Systems Dynamics _ Lab- 
oratory of the State of 

New York at Buffalo. “The idea of 


“active control” techniques: anei- regarttedMtte! 

Jnrv or flexion tendons, which structural conttot 
stiffened the^^d on the shaking that is about 15 years ol 

table, and a sysiOT ^formally 

called “air bags" pioneered by two 

^.“^^r^tendon Ampricai 


conromim World Admuustmree Safaya^ for instance, to provmc I the table, a computer morning nn—*r«* 

Although some developing coun- ference G«»tai^ eady nood warning. . ° , thm it is feared that if a sensors on the frame of *e 100- American 

tries have satellites, many oSiers in ary Satellite Orbits, orWAKC, !t | exico> Brazil Indonesia and a cheetahs in eastern Africa proved «*“** J 1 “ ijJ^Africa, chee- inch-high ( 2 ^- meter) modeL Jbc -p DINB^GH AnAiM ^ 

the Third World fear that by the have been slow and complicated. ^ Arab countries also have Ne *- >art TbusSeeu tr . of djeetahs m roragn virus&o sensors triggered a hydraulic con- JJ will fill Bntains l^si P 

1 Stes. Indonesia’s Palapa-A «thEN Marco Polo visited Ku- ^X^rica. careful breeding tahs could not combat «. “fSu»S ihe base of the model, serial chair m paraps^^^ 

! ^dPalapa-B. for instance, link, a Wblai Khan at his summer d have to take place with ume- Mammal populations oormall> whic P h ncx ed and relaxed aenss- Robert Moir^jOsad teroM 

TO DDTPT? ^ area that includes Malaysia, d oice in the Himalayas 7M y«fs ch eeiahs in captivity m order have a wide enough range of gaiet ^ 0 f tendons, or cables on expose fraud ^rticre be fmmdt. 


= — American to Fill 

Averse Germ Sought W Save Ow^nhs gaj^g^ Ko-teO? 


IN BRIEF 

Ancient Ice Samples From Andes 

WASHINGTON (NYT) - Using a techmque nof^y 

nr ika A Trtir crtPiMlcK flY\m OhiO StltC UttlVCTSty 


mpore- c niler kepi I.IW 

U S Japanese and Western Eu- j n „ companions, 
rooran delegates to WARC argue The use of till 

.tL\ll..iii*ini mmflinfltiQQ Ol Sfll- it,* uinrld 10 SU 


lea uiiu uic «vdes. i c iraits inai n a 

oo cheetahs as hunt- researchers re- of cUrnate dtreaumed 1 the spea^ 

. - .. ooned in the journal Science, 10 to some members would be able to 

^rloretniof cheetahs caught in the adapt. 


eign virus got into Africa, chee- inch-high . nhvdrauli c con- K will fill Britain’s first profes- 

s Suld not combat «. SSSS^^mSS^Si. Or 

Mammal populauons normally JP Md relaxed a criss- Robert Moms, 42, said be wmW 

w a wide enough range of genet- ® of lcn doos or cables on expose fraud where be f ?Jimd it, 

jails that if a disease or a change B® ■ P 6 ™ 0 an^proach his job with su^ 

cUmate threatened the sp eats. wind," Dr. Soong scientific rigor that he might make 

me members would be able to “f|e doesn’t walk erect, but he u disappear, 
apt. leans into the wind." . o r . Morris, a senior research sa- 

Eslimates of the worldwide pop- Researchers will soon test thor al 5^01^ University in 

ation of the cheetah range from MnsorSt called accderomeiers and New YorVu ^ chosen from about 
500 10 20.000. strain gauges, in a real BOdmfrui M ^didaies to become the first 


workedweDso far andthat ^ STTand was become » 

wsmmwmrnmmm 

samples provide new evidence of the scope of tke ^ 'gg&SSSSSESt atLW® 

J»«nsa gsrsfcsr SSsSSSEte fiSMsassasa 
SKSa&trt»at fesSSSS S|s ti &BSSS& SBg 8 "^ 

Major Test for SDI Called Snc«J. S£;fSSstS S3S^“l|i ~ " 4H8 

1 LCfi ALAMOS, New Mexico (NYT) — Somnsls »l I2B SStoUtoA—fe P--sS*lS 1 iHI 


■ , P J - 1 Sffiruli have sought com irmea 0 f cbeetahs aiccessiunvui«^» 6 .- 

J °Thf SS^icz samoles provide new evidence of the scope of these- resc ^J lidns for lower-frequency captivity until 1956. 

The Andean, ice samples p . , .1^ i al£ imh century. The . n; r „ “Otherwise, the law of ciy C years ago researchers from 

S^»SKSSSJlSS.SMMSS!fi S-r^SES^“-S~ SJSsfe"”""!' 

sssgaftssHsi. w-»-“ a^-f-tasa .sssi'ssss 

( Major Test for SDI Called Snc«M asifSffl'SCS 

N L toUAmury N ^ih«^ < ^ , ^ bo ^® lide * a f iai ita " Althmgh dnrl^S "? u . ons ‘TtaTSffuie 

“ |l support the Australian P^. it ^ roarehen jhavei 

Mfeaa-, diat beam Of chaigpd partidtt. -J— -> 22fc "SSTte*-*- «“ 

<]SlvSSA>le to Set by EaS?magnetic fidd, tmgjithe able to be slffl app w to posiUons sooa be vulnerable to 

5iw»s Sri^n 

thC u bca ^iK?;h?SS ofhrftL ■ Ihe attraction between the negativdy t m a C -band expan- ^ ^ ecological pressures can be 

S^Mero*Re^BB«tauked jg&j jgJSft^ 

MOItipK: J5CM3TU»^ *” a treaiinent'thalf T^Rufisians. -Who nsually can zoos^rere tested. The researdi- 

■-dop ;t isjs-SKSSffSSSf 


frequent. 

Two civil engineering ] 
at the University of Soul 


i BSSsnffr^ 

ihe study of capuve cheetahs u m*™* out the cheetahs as the last ice age. — — — ~~ ■ i 1 


k <r3 *r. 


offered nope rorviwiutav» *«—r havenjeen Keq»nga*w" k—-'-;: uou rescuiM....© 

Journal of Australia reports. ~ . rtrrwni ^ neur0 i 0CT al the Universi- ^ conference. They are concerned inbred nnce — the Sd» otuie 
• Professor James Lance of Ncw YorkSd indicated that mainly with preserving their pos- cheetahs were wnuallj^ sarrw- 

showed the treatment was of no m der pressure had no The United States, the biggest - m captivity. , . 

The study found that oxygen He ^ of saielliie cotranumcauons, ybc cbeetahs that once roamed 

advitSeover a placebo gas supports the Australian North Ameri^, Aaa and Europe 

ad^Aat two later studies m oto counims had come id uSi«J Slats has tong are «tiacL Oraiaha aw emim 

" „ From Water SsSSliff^ffl 

Al oafi Gel Harvests Gold r rom because it’s wasteful" said hoping that those in eastern Africa | 

^*0“^ ^ - /Am —Scientists from the Umve raityo f head of the U. S. dele- a different genetic makeup. 

!^CRU(^NewM^coCAFT»“ gac. which have a smmg iSr^Snnoi seriously cut ^-o’BrienrecentiywenttoKe- 
New Mexicoin Us Ou^ ^ ^from waste water or, eventually, ^ the g^bonary orto wtthorn n^and Tanzania tocoUertblw| 
affinity for gold, can narvesi _ . knowtagthe characteristics of the ^ samples of cheetahs 

from the oceans. . gold from water evra when ^ m going into that from Astern Africa. He said analy- 

Algae. of the resear* tarn. SSl“ . ^tETsamples would be com- 

they are dead .said of gold in water are vta Y. s ™^; ° a less favorable solution was. lelc( j m October. If the genes dif- 

They also ^S^Sia^ wXudoo ™ appaaitly beualton wiu urge Uretwo 

“° ver . 9 ?, inul%rt-per-bniioii range, said Dr. Denms W. ^ „ eMBObm, countries' g ovemm ems 10 eapon 

though the gold wasmincp^^ w^„^dto said Steven Lew, an Amencan i(W cheetah5 for breeding, 

DarnaD, who oA costs much less than the resins ^ “But we can accept 1 dus be- Uurie M^kcr, cheetah curator 

RecyclaWe Sct. and algae are mwesclectiv^ Sue it limits res«vaaonstoJ)Mds m Winston, Ore- 

renrove metals from adjust the acuhW less used by the United States. It that if the genes from 

researchers said. You “With oaiventional resms, you teno ^ ^ OT noihmg." g ' 

you get only gold I 

to get a mix of metals- — ___ 



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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


SI 


NYSE Index 


Indus IJK 2 I « 727 laui 120048 + V4 

Trans 44421 mm 4402 ? 64 U 9 + Z46 

UIR 1 SL 75 15320 1024 15321 + MJ 

am 571 iW SLR 5272 * 53 X 54 + 1.14 


Proves 

HIM LOW CUrti 1P-M- 

s» i 1 1 i 

KB M W ® ot 


Wfednesd a)^ 

NISE 

Oosing 



NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y 


VnlntlpH .... 

luam 

Prev.Spji/Lvot. 

! 

ptbv aasoildotsd dose 

msoj« 



Standard & Poor's index 


AMEX Sales 


Daw Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Mvand 
Po cflnsd ^ 
Uadmgrf 
TaM issiM 
Now HUM 
Now Laws 


i fl 
1 1 


sem.tr_ 

Sept. 14 — 
Seat. 13 — 
Sent. 12 — 
Sept. II — 
■Included l 


Bur w« men 

I 3 MH gjfjt MB 

_ 1313 W B 3444 1 < 0 « 

159.501 439,08 1.140 

— 451313 411371 1 J 75 

• Z 151 <345 45 M 5 B ftMS 
i itie sales Hflum 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 
Pia The Associated Press 


Previous Today 
Hfsb Low Clot* 3 P.M. 
Industrials 2KU3 3DL54 302.15 20139 

TfOnSP. UU 5 14145 l<&§3 144BI 

utnmcs Barf klm mo nui 

Finance m* 3BM 3VB mff 

Composite 13 X 18 18028 IB 126 18147 


3 PM volume 
Prov .3 PM volume 
Prev. cons, volume 



Trading 


12 Month 
Kbit Low Stock 


OIv. YM.PE MbHfOfl Low OMLOiW 


Oh,. YicL PE BfcHWlUW fllwLaiW 


19* 
M 

274 3718 
48 12 * 
3TM Z» 
046 55 
214 21 
VS* 
7* 
1714 
IT* 
12* 
am 
m 

13 
4 Jto 
SSVi 
2974 

St 

22 to 
nh 
27H 

amt 
m 
mu 


NEW YORK — Prices were head of equity trading at Montgomery Securi- 

the New Y ork Stock Exchange late Wedn y ^ ^ s^Fnmnsco. “The mood is somber and 

in active trading. people are extremely bearish. They have no 

The Dow Jones indusmal average was down P“P . . * - . - d _ 


“Recent carnage throughout the marketplace 
has terrified everybody,'’ said Robert Kahan, 
head of equity trading at Montgomery Securi- 
ties in San Francisco. “The mood is somber and 


0.56 to 1,297.60 shortly before 3 P.M. 


Although prices in tables on these pages are from 
the 4 P.M. close in New York, for time reasons, 
fftif artirJe is based on the market ai S P.M. ___ 


Declines led advances by a 3-2 ratio among 
the 1,935 issues traded. 

Five-hour volume amounted to about 
88,31 MOO shares, compared with 89,490,000 in 
the same period Tuesday. 

Analysts said the market remains fragile, per- 
vaded by overwhelmingly bearish sentiment. 


inclination to buy stocks,” he said. 

Analysis said the government's report that 
U.S. housing starts rose 6_2 percent in August 
was unsurprising and had no impact on trading 
"The question is, can the market improve 
from an oversold condition?” said Larty Wach- 
lel, of Prudential Bache Securities. “Even with 
the market improving from the bottom here, 
there is some overhanging concern about some 
possible selling programs." 

The selling stems from the fact that Friday is 
the last day of trading in September contracts 
Tor stock-index futures and options, he said 
“The economic numbers [released Wednes- 




pr 






VavlGU Ujf UVCl YVIifcLUUJi^l J jwuiuiiwii. | []C CLUIIDUIJL uumuua [lUUW^U HUUWJT 

Keith HenelJ of Merrill Lynch noted that jayj really aren’t of any consequence,” the 
weakness in Merck stock pressured the Dow analyst said. 


Jones industrial average, which was down near- 
ly nine points at midday. Traders said Merck's 
stock was weak due to adverse comments by an 
EF. Hutton analyst concerning a Merck heart 
drug. 

Mr. Hertell said very negative reactions to 
any kind of bad news reveals even more dearly 
the fragility of the market. 


to 


to 
Mi 
* 
M 
to 
14 

104— to 
5Jto— *h 
TU. 

39 

27 + Vi 

35—14 
3396—18 
14 to— 4 b 
25*4 — 14 
148 


4UIUITW4 >7U6W. 

Portland General Electric was near the top of 
the active list and fractonaUy lower. 

Other actively traded issues included Ameri- 
can Express, which was moderately lower, and 
IBM. which was ahead. 

City Investing Company and General 
Growth Properties were both tower. 

( UPI.AP ) 


n Month 
won Low stock 


Sis. Close 

Dhi. «d PE HUbHlgnUiw Quoi.Cti-Qt 


The Global 
Newspaper. 




aito 

20V8 ( 

135 

65* t 

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418 4 

13 

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6098 

3598 4 

3294 

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2796 ( 

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3818 

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2696 

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2198 

4698 

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1596 

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2898 

2794 

1998 

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6018 

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35* 

15 

79b 

43 

34* 

26* 

17 

27 

199b 

31* 

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1618 

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HcralhSCSribunc. 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 


19, 1985 


U.S. Slocks 
Report, Page 10 

Page 11 


WAlL STREET watch 

^ New Cash Poses Problems 
21 For Some Mutual Funds 

ByVARTANIOG. VARTAN 

' Hew York Tina Serrtar 

n^T lnVesm2S I f'' - ln ““d-M** Vanguard Group of 

:1s;- . X T “ «* Windsor Fund, the lareest equity 

5- 1, - <■} swelled to™3 4 bilW ^n? C United States, after net assets bad 

S § *■; cangrawT tw'KS? * ' ““Pty a point at which a fund 
i* 5 ^ Wmrfwr’t sa ^ l°hn C. Bogie, Vanguard’s 

- 1 b- Jhi?«2 ? v,aWe P roble « wasTwiSBundanwrfS 

* £* !*■ SSovfloSSdfatoSES ended Apiil 30. $700 million in new 
1 1 5> ^ ?*“* « managed by John B. Neff, 

?■ M 5 “We woulfSrekr to take the 


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excellent performance record. 

Vanguard's solution to the /%_ » 

type of problem many organi- Uvcr ™ years, many 

funds have been 

IZSJ2&2SZ2 forced to suspend 

viser was Barrow, Hanley. sales to new holders. 

Mewhmney & Strauss Inc., of 

Dallas. 

Both Windsor and Windsor D use a value-oriented strategy 
v b that emphasizes slocks with low price-earnings ratios. 

are fllso part ot the .Vanguard Group, which markets and 
distributes 34 driferem funds with assets totaling SI4.4 billion. 
Vanguard hues independent managers to run portfolios of most 
equity funds that sail under its flag. This differs from the more 
typical approach, whereby a mutual fund group handles both 
J 713 . e ii n ® an< ^ investment management functions on an in-house 
basis. The new fund, Windsor II, has been in operation since late 
June. . 

B UT isn’t there a sense of intramural competition now in 
play between Windsor and Windsor II? James Barrow, 
Windsor ITs portfolio manager and a partner in the Dallas 
firm, which also m ana g es some S2 billion in assets for institution- 
al investors, fends off that question. 

**I don’t have any sense of competition,” he said on Monday. “1 
don’t watch the Windsor portfolio. In fact, I don't even know 
what John Neff owns." 

Vanguard has just made public the portfolios of the two funds 
showing their equity holdings as of July 31 . On inspection, there 
seems tittle overlap. 

ln Neffs Windsor Fund, the 10 largest common stock invest- 
. • meats as of the latest reporting date were Exxon Coip.; First 
■\ Interstate Bancorp; Nynex Corp.; Texas Utilities Co.; US West 
Inc.; Ford Motor Co.; General Motors Corp.; Royal Dutch/ 
Shell Group; Shell Transport & Trading Co.; and Tenncco Inc. 

Windsor U, according to Mr. Barrow, expects to follow a 
policy of remaining substantially fully invested. Its 10 biggest 
holdings as of July 31 were Union Carbide Corp.; Chrysler 
Corp.; Borg-Warner Corp.; K mart Corp.; Sears, Roebuck & 
Co.; Philip Morris Cos.; Burroughs Corp.; Southwestern Bell 
Corp.; Consolidated Natural Gas Co.; and Colt Industries Inc. 

At the same time, Windsor II had smaller holdings in some 
issues owned by the original Windsor Fund- These included Ford 
and GM, as well as Royal Dutch, and Shell Transport. 

For the three years to June 30, records indicate that the 
Windsor Fund and the Dallas investment firm have been pretty 
evenly matched in performance. . ; " . 

According to Computer Directions Advisors, 6T Silver Spring. 
Maryland, Mr. Neffs Windsor Fund showed a total return of 
132.8 percent in the period, compared with 1293 percent for 
institutional accounts managed by Barrow, Hanley, Mewhinney 
& Strauss. In the same period. Standard & Poor’s 500-stock 
average displayed it total return — market appreciation plus 
dividends and interest reinvested — of 100.4 percent 
In May, Vanguard also suspended sales to new investors in the 

(Continued ou Page 17, CoL 4) 


■ > 


Currency Rates 


Cross Bate* ^ 18 

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Source: Reuters. 


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Building 
Starts Up 
In U.S. 

Signs of Revival 
Seen in 6 J2% Rise 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — U3. bous- 
ing construction in August posted 
its best gain in five months, a 6.2- 
pereent increase which analysts 
said Wednesday provided further 
evidence that the economy is final- 
iy rimwing signs of a revival. 

Hie Commerce Department said 
construction of sew homes and 
apartments rose to a seasonally ad- 
justed annual rate of 1.75 million 
units in August, reversing a 3.2- 
percent July decline. 

It -was the biggest increase in 
housing activity since a 14.7-per- 
cent March advance. 

The report on housing was the 
latest in a series of relatively bright 
August economic statistics. Unem- 
ployment declined for the fust time 
in ax months while industrial pro- 
duction and retail sales shewed 
gains last month. 

The commerce secretary, Mal- 
colm Baldrige, said the new report 
showed not only a rise in actual 
construction Nil a gain in building 
permits, a good barometer of fu- 
ture activity. ”1 expect further 
moderate gains in building activi- 
ty," he said. 

Economists had been mystified 
as to why dramatic declines in 
mortgage rates since last year did 
not seem to be triggering a big 
increase in sales and construction 
activity. But ihey said the latest 
report should show that the gains 
woe just delayed. 

Kent Colton, executive rice pres- 
ident of the National Association 
of Home Builders, said home sales 
may be rising because home buyers 
may be afraid that mortgage rales 
have dropped as far as they will. 

. “We don’t see any reason to 
think mortgage rates will do much 
of anything. They may inch up- 
ward a touch, but we don’t expect 
them to go up very much because of 
the weakness in the economy as a 
whole," said Mark Obrinsky. an 
-economist at the U.S. league of 
Savings Institutions. 

For the first eight months of the 
year, construction starts have to- 
taled 1.18 million units, 4 percent 
below the pace set in 1984. 


Jobs Resigns 
AsGuurnum 
Of Apple 

By Andrew Pollack 

ftfa York Times Service 

SAN FRANCISCO— Steven P. 
Jobs has resigned as chairman of 
Apple Computer Inn, severing his 
lak ties with the company he co- 
founded in a garage in 1976. 

The resignation Tuesday fol- 
lowed a bitter dispute that arose 
last week when Mr. Jobs told Apple 
of his plans to start a new company 
and mat he was hiring five of its 


employees. 


nrwofc. Bank el 


^ 18 
KM. 

«.«. s *- =g 

gi sis r; s 

Hem Tot* LoMi an ottietd fin- 

soora. Kcuten. 


America’s Trade 
Deficit 

hi twfftorts of doffans 


.Eatrasted# 




-J 


3JJ 


Saudis Starting 
To Raise Output, 
Sources Report 


1981 1983 1983 49841 1988” 

‘Figure esrimeaed 

• Source: Department of Commerce 


Tl* Nm York Tm 


Is Growing U.S. Protectionist View 
A Real Threat to World Economy? 


By Leonard Silk 

Nm York Tima Service 

NEW YORK. — After pursuing a free-trade 
policy for the past 50 years, the U5. Congress is 
seriously considering protectionist measures of 
the son contained in the damaging Smoot-Haw- 
ley tariff act of 1930, which many economists 
believe helped to create the Great Depression. 

There is much perplexity about the strength of 
protectionist sentiment in Congress — and much 
anxiety over the danger that, if it prevails, the 
United States would again provoke retaliation 
and start a trade war that would inflict grave 
damage on its economy and that of the world. 

Could this happen. 'again, or has the danger 
been greatly overblown? 

Supporters of restrictive trade legislation to- 
day insist that they are not trying to start a trade 
war but seek only to protect US. labor, industry 
and agriculture from unfair competition. 

What their intentions are and what the results 
would be, however, may be two different things. 
Most trade experts believe that the danger of' 
serious protective measures taken by the United 
States is a real danger and that such measures 


could indeed spark some kind of trade war. But 
they add that its disastrous economic effects 
could be tempered if the United States and other 
countries undertake strong spending programs 
or other expansionary moves. 

In 1930 the supporters of Smoot-Hawley in- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

tended merely to help some injured Americans 
— especially the farmers. The Republican Party- 
had promised in its 1928 platform to relieve the 
agricultural depression, which had already be- 
gun. 

After Herbert Hoover was elected president. 
Congress wrote a trade bill that steeply increased 
tariffs not only on farm imports but also on 
virtually all other imports. When Smoot-Hawley 
reached the president's desk 1.038 US. econo- 
mists — including just about every reputable 
economist of whatever political view — signed a 
petition urging him to veto the bill. 

They warned that it would “inevitably provoke 
others to pay us bade in kind," damaging the 

(Continued on Page 17, CoL 5) 


By Peter Be hr $27.45 Tuesday and the official 

Washington Pun Semce price of S?8. A more widely traded 

WASHINGTON — Saudi Ara- erode, Britain’s North Sea Brent, 
bia has begun to increase its oil was quoted at $26.65 for November 
production, breaking with the rest delivery, 
of the oil cartel in a move that is There is an outside chance, how- 
expected to force another drop in ever, that other OPEC producers 
world prices. will attempt to match the Saudi 

According to informed sources, production increase, triggering an 
Saudi Arabia will produce an extra escalating price war. 
million bands dail y by the end of A sudden drop of any magnitude 
the month. This would raise Saudi could have dire consequences for 
output to 3 .5- million barrels daily, some heavily indebted U5. ofl 
The bulk of the additional Saudi companies, for Third World oil 
production nil! be sold to four producers such as Mexico, Venezu- 
American companies — Exxon ^ and Nigeria, for the U.S. and 
Corp., Mobil Corp., Texaco Inc. European banks that have billions 
and Shell Ofl Co. — although none of dollars in loans outstanding to 
of the companies would comment, these countries and to the fragile 
The S a'ufis reportedly have negpti- military balance in the Gulf, 
a ted so-called netback contracts in Speculation widened following 
which the price for crude is deter- remarks by the Saudi oil minister, 
mined bv the market prices for gas- Ahmed Zakt Yaraam, at Oxford, 
oline, heating oil and other prod- Engla n d. The OPEC news agency 
urts. said Saturday be had warned a pri- 

The action is seen by U5. energy vate seminar of the dangers of d 
analysts as an unprecedented at- price war that could push prices 
tempt to force other members of down to $15 to $18 a Darrel after 
the Organization of Petroleum Ex- the winter “if non-OPEC produc- 
porting Countries to honor pricing era do not cooperate with the orga- 


pusb pne 
barrel aft 


agreements. 

The strategy could push oil 
prices down by S2 to S4 a barrel by 


nization and we in OPEC do not 
discipline ourselves." 

There are various versions of the 


next spring, depending on the de- possibility of such a price war. 
mand for beating oil over the van- “The conventional wisdom is 
ter. oil company officials said. Thai that the Saudis are bluffing and the 
would be comparable to a 5- to 1 U- markets are disregarding whai Y a- 
cent-a-gallon reduction in gasoline mam is saying," said John C. Sa- 
and fuel-oil prices. whill. a partner with the consulting 


cent-a-gallon reduction in gasoline mam is saying, said John C. 5a- 
and fuel-oil prices. whill. a partner with the consulting 

On the spot market Wednesday, firm McKirtsey & Co. and former 
Saudi Arabia’s Arab light crude deputy secretary of the U.S. De- 


deputy secretary of the U.S. De- 


World Bank to Sell Portion of Its Loan Portfolio 


was quoted at $2725. down from partment of Energy. “My view is 

that the Saudis are really serious 
this time.” 

, D/xwl+rkl 1 ^ Peter Cl Beutel an analyst with 

[ OFuOllO Rudolf Wolff Futures Inc. in New 

York, does not believe the odds of a 


By Carl Gewirrz 

haemummul Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The World Bank be- 
gan a test program Wednesday of- 
fering to sell to institutional inves- 
tors a small portion of its own loans 
made to 15 selected countries. 

If successful and subsequently 
expanded, the program could cre- 
ate more headroom for the bank to 
substantially increase the flow of 
funds to cash-strapped developing 
countries without having to in- 
crease its own capital base. 

Initially, the test program is 
aimed at determining whether in- 
stitutional investors other than 
commercial banks are interested in 
holding debt of less developed 


countries and to what extent this 
demand may be influenced by the 
currency of the loan or its maturity. 

The vast majority of syndicated 
commercial bank loans, the prime 
source of financing for the LDCs 
until the debt crisis exploded in 
mid- 1982, has been denominated 
in U.S. dollars. 

The World Bank will be offering 
fixed-coupon loan participations in 
Deutsche marks. Dutch guilders 
and Swiss francs as well as dollars. 
Maturities will range from six 
months to 12 years. 

The major difference for poten- 
tial investors between the World 
Bank offering and commercial 
bank syndicated credits is that they 


are not being asked to lend directly 
to Third World countries. Instead, 
investors are being offered a por- 
tion of World Bank loans to those 
countries. 

The World Bank remains the 
lender of record. This is significant 
because the bank’s first-class 
standing in international financial 
markets is in pan based on the fact 
that no borrower has ev er defaulted 
on a World Bank loan nor has the 
bank ever agreed to reschedule a 
loan. 

The 1 5 countries whose loans are 
included in the test program are 
not fully representative of the 
World Bank’s 540-biilion loan 
portfolio insofar as none of them 


are currently in the midst of com- 
plex negotiations to reschedule 
their commercial bank debt. 

Further, six of the countries have 
developed to the point where they 
no longer are eligible for low-cost 
loans from the World Bank. 

The 1 5 countries are Fiji. Greece, 
Iceland, Ireland, Israel. Smith Ko- 
rea, Malaysia, Oman, Pakistan, Pa- 
pua New Guinea, Portugal, Singa- 
pore, Thailand. Trinidad and 
Tobago, and Tunisia. Of these, 
Greece. Iceland, Ireland, Israel, 
Portugal and Singapore no longer 
are permitted to borrow from the 
bank. 

The Worid Bank is pulling up 

(Continued on Page 16, CoL 6) 


price war are very great, but the 
action will affect the situation in 
the Gulf. Iraq is expected to begin 
shipping 500.000 barrels daily 
through its new spur of the Trans 
Saudi pipeline next month, adding 
to the increased production from 
the Saudis and bringing additional 
pressure on Iran. 

“1 think it’s kind of hard to pre- 
dict where the price is going at this 
stage," said B. M. Thompson, a 
vice president of Phillips Petroleum 
Co. 

“Certainly we don’t see the bot- 
tom falling out of the crude oil 
market OPEC will get their house 
in order before it reaches that 
point" The OPEC ml ministers are 
meeting in Vienna Oct 3. 



Japan Wonders: Is This the First Takeover Fight? 


Apple officials, feeling betrayed 
by Mr. Jobs, have said they were 
considering forcing Mr. Jobs to re- 
sign Ins post as chairman and suing 
bun for breach of fiduciary duty or 
theft of trade secrets. Mr. Jobs’s 
resignation is seen by those close to 
him as an attempt to head off a 
forced resignation and to avoid a 
lawsuit 

“l submitted my resignation in 
no uncertain terms," Mr. Jobs, said 
Tuesday night. He said he resigned 
because the Apple board had made 
his plans to start a company “into a 
very hostile situation." 

‘Obviously, J have great emo- 
tions about it" he said. 

Mr. Jobs said he hoped to be able 
to work out some arrangement with 
Apple. *Tm 30," he said. “I don’t 
think that it’s Apple’s right to keep 
me in the back room and sterilize 
me for the rest of my life. There 
must be away for six people in bine 
jeans to co-exist with Apple:" 

Mr. Jobs transmitted his resigna- 
tion in a letter to AC. Markkula 
Jr, vice chai rm an of the board. 
Apple spokesmen said neither the 
company nor Mr. Markkula had 
received the letter. 

But Mr. Markkula, in a state- 
ment issued by the company, said 
the board was continuing to evalu- 
ate what action it would take with 
regard to Mr. Jobs. 

“As chairman of the board, Steve 
Jobs is responsible for protecting 
Apple and acting in the nest inter- 
ests of the company,” the state- 
ment said. “In light of recent 
events, the board of directors con- 
tinues to evaluate what posable ac- 
tions should be taken to assure pro- 
tection of Apple’s technology and 
assets." 

Analysts say Apple officials are 
not worried much about competi- 
tion from a new venture by Mr. 
Jobs as they are that Mr. Jobs will 
take more Apple employees. 

While having no more rote at 
Apple. Mr. Jobs remains the largest 
shareholder, with about 5J mflhon 




Steven P. Jobs 

shares, or 9 percent of the stock 
outstanding. This summer, Mr. 
Jobs sold a fifth of his holdings, 
raising almost $20 million and fuel- 
ing the speculation that he was 
planning to start bis own company. 

The dispute between Apple and 
Mr. Jobs began last Thursday when 
Mr. Jobs told the board of plans (o 
start a company to make products 
for higher education. He told the 
board the company would not 
compete with Apple and “implied" 
he would not hire key Apple per- 
sonnel. Mr. Markkula said. 

But last Friday Mr. Jobs (old 
Apple that he was hiring five Apple 
employees, inducting its director of 
education marketing and some key 
engineers. 

Mr. Jobs’s account differed from 
that offered by Apple. He said be 
told the board of his plans Thurs- 
day and indicated be would bring 
some Apple people with him. He 
said he offered to resign at that 
time. The board excused him from 
the meeting and when he returned, 
told him they wanted him to re- 
main chairman and even wanted to 
invest 10 percent in his company. 

The resignation is the culmina- 
tion of a series of events in which 
Mr. Jobs, 30, has increasingly lost 
his power in a dispute with Mr. 
Scull ey. whom Mr. Jobs hired from 
PepsiCo in 1983 to add some expe- 
rienced management to Apple. 


By John Burgess 

H'arfirng/on Part Service 

TOKYO — Conflicting theories 
abound in a tangled, three-sided 
corporate acquisition drama that 
Japan’s financial press and rumor 
mill have been following since the 
middle of August. 

The events are bizarre for Japan 
and there are differing versions 
about what is really going oq: 

• It is a ruse to secure capital 
gains. 

• It is mostly a creation of the 
newspapers. 

• It is Japan's first American- 
siyle takeover battle. 

Almost everyone agrees it would 
not have happened this way several 
years ago and probably portends 
evolution in the roles by which Jap- 
anese companies are bought and 
sold. 

Japanese takeovers are compara- 
tively rare and occur oaly if both 
sides approve: one company is on 
the ropes financially or two healthy 
companies agree that advantages 
would come through combining 
operations. 

The current affair began unfold- 
ing a month ago, with a report in 
the Japan Economic Journal that 
Minebea Co„ a growing leader in 
precision bearings, with annual 
sales equivalent to about $550 mil- 
lion. had quietly acquired a 19 per- 
cent interest in Sankyo Seiki Man- 
ufacturing Co. 

Sankyo is a medium-sized preci- 
sion-electronics company with a 
product line including compo- 
nents, digital clocks, machine tools 
and movie cameras. It has a tie to 
Internationa] Business Machines 
Corp. in robots. Sales in the year 
ended April 1984 came roan equiv- 
alent of about $350 million. 

Minebea quickly acknowledged 
its stake Ur Sankyo and said that it 
was opening talks for a merger. 
Sankyo responded publicly that it 
was not in teres tea This should 
have been the end of it in Japan. 

But Minebea's president. Ta- 
kanri Takahashi, has continued to 
press his suit. Sankyo reportedly 


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began lining up support among its 
shareholders and threatened to cut 
off business ties with Minebea. 

“Old-fashioned people don’t 
agree with my ways," said Mr. Ta- 
kahashi. dismissing the criticism. 

Then a third player appeared, 
Trafalgar Holdings LuL, a Los An- 
geles-based investment company. 
It is headed by Charles Knapp, 
former chairman of Financial 
Corp. of America, who resigned 
last year under pressure from fed- 
eral regulators. 

Trafalgar said it had acquired an 
option for 23 percent of the out- 
standing shares of Minebea and 
was interested in obtaining more or 
buying the company outright. In 
addition, Trafalgar said, it might 
buy into Sankyo and merge the two 
Japanese companies. 

Mr. Takahashi says Minebea 
was approached through an inter- 
mediary with an offer to sefl that 
option back at a price equivalent to 
about doable the price of Minebea 
shares. He suggested that Trafal- 
gar’s real intent is capital gains. 
Market speculation, however, has 
Minebea and Trafalgar working to- 
gether to drive up Minebea’s 
shares. 

The Trafalgar executive wee 
president, Don Reynolds, dories 
Trafalgar made any such offer and 
says his company’s goal is a long- 
term stake in an attractive comer of 
tbe Japanese electronics industry. 
“We have every desire to do this on 
a friendly basis," he said, but added 
that be does not feel precluded 
from — “I don’t tike the word hos- 
tile" — an offer to all shareholders. 


BANQUE 
DE l/UNION 
EUROPEENNE 

U.S. $50,000,000 
Floating Rate Notes 
1979 - 1989 


In accordance with the 
terms and conditions of 
the Notes, the rate of in- 
terest has been fixed at 
8 V6% per annum for the 
interest period running 
from September 20th to 
December 20th, 1985. 


Mr. Takahashi denied that he 
would press a hostile takeover, but 
at tbe same time he said he would 
use rights accorded by Minebea’s 
existing stake in Sankyo — Mine- 
bea is now the largest single share- 
holder — to open a major investi- 
gation of its books. 

Some Japanese security analysis 
believe that he really intends to 
continue talking in hopes that San- 
kyo will agree, following the usual 
Japanese pattern. Sankyo itself is 
declining comment. 

Meanwhile, Mr. Takahashi is 
building up defenses against Tra- 
falgar. ln a meeting this week, his 
board approved a private offering 
equivalent to about $65 miliioQ in 
new convertible bonds in an at- 
tempt to dilute Trafalgar’s option 


and make it harder to buy a con- 
trolling inieresL 

U.S. takeover battles are viewed 
in Japan as proof that Americans 
are shortsighted on stability, em- 
ployee relations and profit through 
productivity rather than specula- 
tion — all attributes considered the 
core of Japanese business practice. 

Loyally binds shareholders, 
management and employees in Ja- 
pan. It was no surprise "when San- 
kyo’s labor union backed up man- 
agement with a statement that it 
opposed Minebea's merger idea. 

Shareholders trust management 
to know best, even if things are 
going poorly. Annual meetings are 
so tranquil that a special class of 
extortionists will buy a few shares 

(Continued on Page 16, CoL 5) 


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international 


Wednesdays 


mse 


Tables Include tt» naHanwMfl price* 

up to Hw doting w Won S trert 

and do not rafted late trades etsewnere. 




144 

U 2 5ft 

am s» 

,T8 i rat 

St MM 
US MVi 
43 2FK 

12 5 
”? §* 


US. Futures 


236 7ft 
13 12ft 

no me 

4319 Ofc 
7 02 
Ml 34 

9 31 

m im 

i«4 m 
1345 44 
II 75* 
TO 37 
)U 15ft 
940 32ft 
SIS Mft 
71 
49 37Kl 

10 22V. 
9 sen 

473 45ft 
01 29 
45 M fc 
3402 HU 
33M mi 
29 zn 
141 38ft 


IJI « * 
1.52 44 13 
164 S.1 TO 
176 Id 17 
JO 19 22 
.56 20 11 
SO. i* 12 
ISO 64 7 
J U I 
52 42 9 
1.04 17 W 
150 33 f 
1300115 
.12 U 
76 40 10 
J4 U 1 
30 as 13 
130 43 
38 43 17 
OC 73 
30 43 9 
30 22 12 
2.9 10 
95 14 


Wi 
137 26ft 
40* 34V. 
4* » 
lfil 13V. 
519 7ft 
4N 
HU 
12 
16ft 
79 
V 

22ft 
14 
19U 
49ft 
3314 

’8 32 


22S7 444 
136 17V. 




513 

43 2S6 
1SL2 23 

44 31 7501 
SO 0 136 

33 6 3009 

63 I Ml 
U 13 
21 13 










V 

4% 




FBRDIR CATTLE (C64JC) 

44600 Rn^cants par Bl 
* 7300 5650 sw 4U5 4U9 

7202 5635 Oct 61 2D 6257 

73J0 5410 NOV 6338 6417 

7930 6050 Jtt 4A7D MAO 

7055 4032 MOT 8735 4092 

7035 6030 APT 6750 6030 

4475 60.10 MOV 6635 6425 

E3L5QN3 law Prev.Sotu 1950 
Piw.DovODMiRt. laosuusjn 


4130 4-50 

6257 +150 
6437 +150 
6422 +127 
6492 +150 
44X0 +158 
6425 +150 


HOOStCMCI 
30000 Ibi-centi per ft. 

5173 3435 Oct 3450 3920 

5835 3625 Dec 4050 4150 

5037 3410 F8b <137 4230 

4725 3412 APT 3410 3922 

<935 3930 JOT 4225 4265 

4935 4035 Jul 4175 4125 

5150 4025 Alio 4250 <235 

<1.10 3*37 Oct 3930 3*30 

4950 3427 Dec 

EsLSOta 4640 Prev.Sotes 9,848 
Prev. Day Open Ink. 19.169 off 806 


39.15 +38 

4135 +135 
4155 +53 

X.T2 +50 
<222 +.10 
4327 +38 

023 +30 

3930 +35 

3950 +28 


Currency Options 


PLATINUM CHYME] 

50 tray axrdoltan per fray ea. . 

34730 TfK o Bap 

39X00 25030 Oct 29930 30030 

37X38 25750 Jon 39158 3B150 

35730 26450 APT HUB 30638 

363X0 27338 Jut 31830 31020 

36030 3(050 Oct 31530 31530 

EsLSolai 430 Prw.9otai 44*1 
Prav.DavOpan lit 1S479 op 282 
PALLADIUM (NYMB} 

100 troy or- doitar* par at 
T4U5 9050 Sap 

ML58 9138 Dac 9738 9733 

12750 9120 MOT 9825 9825 

T1400 9158 Jun 10030 10030 

11530 9728 Sap 

EsLSalaa Prav.Sota* 225 
Prev. Day Open Int. 6589 off 50 


29460 
29238 291.10 
29X50 29650 
29758 30130 
30138 

31130 31150 


9435 
9550 9555 
9738 . *465 
9958 9738 
*735 




*5 

lift Bft 

IP 


S*^ 

Sift 26 

T7ft 1BU 
5 

17ft 
Aft 


73 9 34 
83 9 53 

a * 156 

210 

43 18 1079 
33 


55ft 3Sft Xerox 330 53 14 JIM 51 ft »ft 51 + ft 

55ft 46ft Xerox pf 565 183 * *** + * 

29 19ft XTRA 44 If 11 4 22ft 22ft 22ft 


38ft 

24ft ZataCp 

UZ 

4.9 

9 

27 

Jfft 

2Hfe 

V% 

21ft 

7ft Zapata 

.12 

13 54 

567 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft + ft 

57ft 

311% Zayrae 

At 

13 

15 

1358 

48ft 

47ft 


27 

16ft ZentfftE 



18 

1428 

16ft 

lift 

16ft + ft 

Zlft 

15ft Zeros 

33 

17 

16 

82 

18ft 

18ft .ISft— ft 

, 37ft 

! 

22ft Zumln 

U2 

JJ 

12 

112 

35ft 

34V% 

35ft + ft 


QtK*0» 148 17 U 1002 Oft 51 ft 31 ft + ft 
QuakSO 30 43 18 146 28 19ft »+ ft 

Sam 23 125 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 

Queetre 160 57 10 46 28ft 28ft 3ft 

&RM 340 U 13 T 54 20ft 19ft » 



Id 
34ft 
32ft 
21ft 
21ft 1 8ft 
57V* 44 


32 SG 

22ft 22ft 
ISft 15 
33ft 33ft 
HU 28 


£££ 
25ft 19ft 
Uft 7ft 
85ft 63 
M 77ft 
25ft 22 


47ft 29ft 

<Tft a 

23ft 72 
Sift 26ft 
T7ft 15ft 
49ft 32ft 

27ft 22 
30 2Tft 
2 8ft 7ft 
31 U 22ft 
49ft 29ft 



PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 






smite 







Underlying 

Price 


3nfts— Cat 

Puts — L est 


Sop 


Mar 

See 

Dec 

Mar 

12380 BliHU) PouadtontS ner DOtL 


070 



120 

- r 

- • f 

r 

f 



T2S 

1230 

r 

r 

535 


r 




630 


r 


• r 


135 


360 

• r 

r 

635 

820 

13348 

140 

r 

2.K) 

3.90 

r 

935 

r 

13348 

M5 

l.M 

s 

r 

r 

r 

r 

13348 

150 

r 

065 

160 

r 

r 

r 

50860 Cn nod tan DalteTS-cantS per an IX 


0.17 


COoilr 

71 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

7265 

72 . 

r 

r 

r 

r 

044 

ara 

7235 

74 

r 

8.19 

r 

r 


r 

62J00 West German Marts-cents per OWT. 


021 



32 

r 

r 

r 

r 


3442 

33 

r 

r 

r 

r 

044 


3442 

34 

fu 

1JS5 

r 

r 

078 


3442 

35 

133 

163 

r 



3443 

36 

r 

065 

1-22 

r 

168 


3442 

37 

r 

079 

038 

r 

5 




r 

023 

r 

r 

328 


moM Front* Fraoo-lQtbt of a ceat Per unit. 




no 

r 

520 

r 

r 



6358308 Japanese Yen-lDWis ot a cam oer orft. 




40 

r 

r 

220 

r 



4138 

41 

r 

136 

r 

r 

049 


4138 

42 

r 

056 

r 

r 

132 


4138 

44 

r 

0.13 

r 

r 

r 








33 

r 

941 

r 

r 



4231 

36 

r 

630 

r 

r 

r 


4231 

38 

r 

r 

r 

r 

0.16 


4231 

39 

r 

r 

r 

r 

028 


4231 

40 

r 

r 

r 

r 

049 


4231 

4! 

r 

220 

r 

r 

r 



42 

342 

1J8 

248 

r 




43 

r 

1.16 

r 

r 

r 

2.1 


44 

r 

077 

r 

r 



4241 

45 

r. 

052 

r 

r 

r 




r 

035 

r 

r 

r 




Cali ophj mt. 3*2,146 


U« 


Put open tat 159.158 

r— Not traded, s— No option offered. 




Lost ri premium leurenase pries). 





Source: AP. 











OS T. RILLS CldIM} 

SI minion- ola ot 180 pet 
9133 BAM S8P 

9337 Ii77 DaC 

9259 8658 Mor 

922* 87.07 Jun 

9201 MOO Sap 

9121 WJB5 Dac 

9139 058 Mor 

9839 98J8 Jim 

Esf.Sofai 7038 Prev. 5 

Prev. Day Open U& 344 


9233 9303 9232 9340 -Ml 

9243 9248 9242 9241 +31 

9233 9233 9227 9227 —42 

9231 9231 9133 9133 - —JO 

*1-70 9X70 9X65 9145 -41 

9137 9137 9137 *127 -43 

9X11 9X11 9X11 9X11 —43 

9047 9047 *817 9037 -43 


86-1 85-25 *539 

*5-2 5+70 84-25 

M-T BJ-23 8»3S 


Gommmlities 


I 


London 

Commodities 




Coimmkities 


U.S., EC Begin Talks 
On S teel Import Pact 


37 UAL 130 23113 
2«ft UAL Pi 248 77 
9ft UCCEL 17 

23ft UDCn .159 4 17 
» UOI 234 9 2 11 
19ft UGI Pf 275 113 
Sft UNCRes 

18V. URS 40 16 13 
21ft USFG 120 67 46 
i 26ft USG I 141 44 7 
l 12ft UR) Fnt 20 14 12 
46 l/rfftar 233033 * 
■1ft UnlNV 526a 54 10 
31ft UComp 144 44 13 
32ft UnCqrfc 340 64 13 
♦ft UnkmC 

13ft UnEMc 144 104 t 
24 UnEl PMM38 124 
51 UElPfX LOO 1X4 
2M UnEl Pi Zf* 114 
WU UnEl of 2.U 1X1 
21ft UnEl pi Z72 103 
•48 UnEl Pi 744 117 
51ft UEIPIH 830 117 
22 UnEkPn 
37ft UnPoc 130 27 11 
i 87ft UnPcpf 775 73 


S594 49ft 49 49ft + ft 
889 21ft 38ft lift— ft 
85 15ft 15ft 15ft + ft 
126 34ft 34ft 24ft + ft 
68 22ft 22 22U + ft 

300* 25 25 25 +1 

229 10ft 9ft 10 + ft 

74 lift II 11U + W 
749 33ft 32ft 33 — ft 
304 JMVl 38ft 38ft + ft 
4 14ft 14 14ft 
3 Si Si 54—1 
270 105 104ft 104ft + Va 
776 37 36ft 37 + ft 

2023 aft 52ft 52ft— ft 
13 5ft 5Vi 5ft— ft 
655 17ft 17ft 17ft + ft 
24 9111 31ft 31ft + ft 
2050i H 78 70 +1 

10 26ft 36ft 36ft— ft 
3 19U 19U 19V* — W 

1 25V. 25V. 25V. + ft 

2J0z 62ft 62ft 62ft— ft 
2502 SJ 66U 67 +1 

473 22ft 22 22ft + ft 
1608 46U 4SV. 45ft + ft 
238 104ft TOH* 703ft + U 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The United States has 
begun talks with the European Community to 
try and extend a steel import agreement that 
U.S. producers say is critical to providing the 
import relief envisioned in a plan by the Reagan 
administration. - 

The existing pact, which was signed in 1982, 
covers such broad steel product categories as 
hoi- and cold-rolled sheet and heavy structur- 
es. While the agreement expires at the end of 


1985, U.S. negotiators headed by Joseph Papo* 
vich of the office of Clayton Yeutter. the U.S. 


Sales IHnjm are unofficial. Yearly highs and laws reflect 
The previews 52 weeks plus me current week, but not ihe totes* 
trading day. Where a spilt or stack dividend amounting to 25 
percent or mere has been mid, me year's Mob-tow ronoe and 
dividend are shown lor the n ew s toc k only. Unless otherwise 
noted, rata ot dividends are mental disbursements based on 
me totest declaration, 
a— dividend also «ctro(s)7l 
b — annual rate ot dividend Plus stock dividend-/! 

C— JMMaHnf dlndoMAl 
dd — calledTi 
d— new yearly lowJl 

e— dividend declared or paid in preceding 12 ittonttwyi 
g — dividend In Canadian funds. sublect to 15% notwesidence 
tax. 

1— dividend declared after spHMfP or stock dividend. 

. f— dividend paid Bite year, omitted, deferred, or no action 
taken at latest dividend mooting. 

k— dividend declared or paid mis year, an accumulative 
I save win dividends In arrears. 

n — new Issue in the po» 52 weeks. n» Mob-tow range begins 
wfffi the stun of trading, 
nd— next day delivery. 

P/E — pnce-eamlra ratio. 

r— dividend declared orpaM in preceding 12 months, plus 
stack dividend. 

s — stack split, Dividend begins with dote ot soiii. 
sis— sales. 

t —dividend paid In stock In preceding 12 months, estimated 
{ash value on e it -dividend or ex-dtstr button dole, 
u— new yearly high, 
v — trading hatted. 

vt — In bankruptcy or rgcelvtrshlP or Wins ib»'wJ«I un * 
dernw Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed bv such com- 
panies. 

wd — when distributed, 
wf— whenissued- 


irade representative, have set a target date of 
Ocl 31 (o wrap up the talks. 

“We expect the negotiations to go up until 
that final day," said Desiree Tucker, a spokes* 
woman for Mj\ Yeutter. "We just expect them 
to be tough." 

The 10 nations of the EC account for about 
one*quarter of all steel imports into the United 
States. The 1982 agreement limited shipments 
of ra^or European steel product lines to 5A 
percent of the U.S. market. 

Private talks were scheduled for Tuesday and 
Wednesday in Washington before shifting to 
Brussels next week. The EC delegation is head* 
ed by Jean- Pierre Leng, who specializes in in* 
dustrial trade. 

w We are going to be listening to what the U.& 
wants us to do," said Ella Knicoff, a spokes* 
woman for the EC “They are the demandants, 
the ones looking for restrictions." She charac- 
terized the first few days as "exploratory." 

U.S. steelmakers have said that extension — 






SepLia 




CIOHt 



High 

Low 

Bid 

ARC 

Cbtae 

Frencfi fm& per metric ton 



Dec 

1527 

1516 

1520 

1531 

— 24 

Mar 

1570 

1538 

1545 

1546 

— 27 

MOV 

14.10 

1580 

1587 

1588 

— 23 

Aua 

1435 

1630 

IA33 

1435 

— 20 

Oct 

1695 

1685 

1500 

1690 

— X 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1720 

1740 

— 30 

Est- val. 

1650 tots ot 50 tons. Prey, actual 

sales: 1381 lots. Open inlerest: 17945 


COCOA 






Frvnefi franc* per 10e kg 



Sep 

ftr. 

M.T. 

1725 

2,744 

+ 15 

Dec 

2.118 

23*8 

Z105 

2,7 1 0 

+ 21 

Mor 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2.125 

Z150 

+ 30 

May 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2,135 

— 

+ 25 

Jly 

N.T. 

N.T. 

XI 40 

— • 

+ 25 

See 

N.T. 

N.T. 

ZU5 

— 

+ 25 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T- 

2.145 


+ 25 

E&t vol.: 18 tots of TO tans. Prev. 

actual 

sites: 32 Iota. Open inforesf: 7 71 



COFFEE 






French francs per H8 kg 



Sm 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1370 

— 

+50 

HOt 

1,960 

1930 

1/945 

ySi 

+ 40 

Jem 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1,9*0 

1010 

+ 45 

Mar 

2348 

2348 

2336 

2*054 

+ 50 

MOV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2355 

— 

+50 

Jlv 

N.T. 

ULT. 

2375 

— 

+ 48 

SCQ 

N.T. 

N.T. 

23*2 

— 

+ 43 

Est.voJ,. 

27 tot* of 5 tons. Prev. actual sales: 

8 lots. Open Intareri: 331 




Source: Bourse du Commerce. 




Treasury 



Otter 

■M 

Sept. 17 

Prev 
YleM YWd 


7.U 

7.n 

7.37 741 


7 JO 

738 

768 771 

One y«* 

752 

750 

UB UndL 

Senv; Sdkoooo BtuHtora 




Srpt JB 

Close previous 
Hlgb Low BM AS* Bid Art 

SUGAR 

StorSbg par metric tan 
Oct 13930 13530 13930 14030 13630 13740 
Dec 14620 14100 14640 14630 14SJ0 14540 
Mar ISAM 15200 75640 15640 15440 1550) 
May 15830 15630 16040 16130 15730 1SIUD 
Aog 16030 16340 16630 16640 16430 16440 
Oct 16930 14830 17120 17220 16940 17030 
volume: 3346 lots of SO tons. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric too 
Sop 1265 1245 1261 1245 1240 724? 

Dec 1306 1290 1303 13M 1285 1287 

Mar 1330 1315 1326 1327 1312 1313 

May 1344 1330 1340 1344 T3J7 1328 

Jly 1345 1335 1346 1353 1332 1336 

Sep 1356 1346 1352 1360 1341 1343 

DOC I3S6 1355 1355 1357 1339 1343 

Volume: 2230 lots otlO tons. 

COFFEE 

Starling par metric ton 
Sep 1281 1480 1482 1406 1455 1460 

Nov 1240 1212 1210 1215 1200 1202 

Jon 1272 1248 1236 1240 12« 1250 

Mar 1300 1263 1267 1268 1275 1280 1 

Mar 7325 1360 1295 1300 1300 13B 

Jty 1339 1325 1315 13J8 IJI5 1325 

Sap 1355 1355 1330 1360 1315 1350 

Volume: 3259 lots of 5 tons. 

GA50IL 

UA. dollars per metric ton 
Oct 24730 34630 24630 24675 24435 24450 
Nov 24230 24130 24125 24230 ZI930 239.75 
Dec mao 23740 zsbjs mas nun oass 
Jan 236.50 23538 Z367S 236^1 23325 23430 
Fob 23149 23130 231-25 23230 22940 230-50 
Mor N.T. N.T, 22230 22330 22230 22S3B 
API 21740 21475 21540 71640 21475 21330 
Mar N.T. N.T. 20S30 22530 21030 2T6JD 

An K.T. N.T. 19530 23038 21940 22030 

Volume: I741lot»of TOO tans. 

Sources: neuters and London Petroleum En- 
chanpe (oafoUS. 



commodify and Unit . 
Coffee 4 Santas, lb. — __ 
Prlmcloth 64/30 38 ft. va _ 

Stmri bfltots iPiti.l.ton 

Iron 2 Fdrv. Ptxlia. ton 

Steal scrop'No.T hvy Pitt— ■ 

Lead Spot, lb • 

Copper, elect, ib 

tin (Straits), lb 

Zinc. E.St.L.BasiAlb^__ 

PoUodtanxoi 

Sliver N-Y.oz . — 

Source: ap. 




ALUMINUM ^ V 

stertaw mt metric tan 
Snd m.00 7SLM 7X30 73130. 

Forward 75530 75630 75X90 75430 

COPPER CATHODES (HI8h Grade? T^T 
Sterttag per metric ton 
Spot " ■ 18K59 100940 131040 TOU30 

Forward - 103340 103430 103630 103640 

COPPER CATHODES (SfBndann 
Sterflng bar metric toa • 

Soot 99240 9*340 99430 99430 

Forward - 101730 101830 101030 182038 

v Fin 7 


Forward - 101730 101830 1018JXI 182038 
LEAD ' .. . 

Starting per metric ton . - 

Spot • . 29730 298.00 2*730 29830 

Forward 30440 . 30600 30240 30330 
NICKEL 

starting ear metric top - 

Spot 334030 334530 331530 332030 

Farwort 3395.00 340530 3X030 338230 

Paece ner tray oeece ... . ;. 

Spot 44040 44140 ' 4424b 4443Q 

^-^45330 .*43,. 45630,45640 

Strrllno prr metric tag - i 

Spat ' 916330 916530 917530 T1BD900 
Fj^word . .911X00 911430 *17530 918030 

Starting pgr metric ton 

Spot 51230 51330 53430 51630 


Dividends 


and expansion — of the pact is crucial to the 
success of President Ronald Reagan's plan, an* 
nounced last year, to reduce the foreign share of 
the U.S. sled market' from about 25 percent to 
about 18.5 percent. So far. agreements have 


been reached with 14 Meelexporting nations, 
including Japan, which itself accounted for 
nearly 7 percent of the V.S. market in 1984. 

“These negotiations are absolutely critical to 
the success, and even the survival, of the presi* 
dent's sled program promulgated last Sep tern* 


New Photo Products 
Announced by Kodak 

Urns cJ Press Inter nut tonal 

ROCHESTER, New York — 
Eastman Kodak Co. expanded 
Wednesday its video products line, 
offering systems to display still 
photographs on television and 
make prim copies of TV pictures. 
Kodak claims the machines are the 
first of their kind. 

The company also announced 
plans for a new line of camera- 
recorders. similar to the products 
introduced earlier this year. New 


x — ex-dIvMend or cx-flghte. 
xdls — ex-01 Etrl but ton. 
m— wfltwirt womans, 
y — ex-dlvMeiKl and sales la fulL 
vld— yield. 
i— solnintviL 


her." said a briefing paper circulated to Con- 
gress this week by the American Iron and Steel 
Institute. “Slice 1977, the EC has been the 
domestic industry’s most intractable foreign 
steel problem." 


equipment for displaying photo 
graphs on TV will be tested at trade 


graphs on TV will be tested at trade 
shows and by selected consumers 
later this year and could be rede- 
signed before being sold commer- 
cially. the company said. 


Company 

Per 

Anri 

Pov 

Rae 

EXTRA 




IndOMndent Bk Cp 


22 10-21 

18-10 

INCREASED 




Q 

.15 

10-21 

10-1 


QjOlft 

ID-16 

18-2 

Wedoastono REIT 

M 

.11 

MO 

V-l» 

INITIAL 




First Boston Inc 

O 

.25 

10-15 

T0-3 

STOCK SPLIT 



Fire* Find Corp— 2-tar- 1 




Plow system — War-2 




USUAL 





q 5iw 

114 

10-15 

AT8.T 

a 

JO 

1M 

MO 

9krs Trust NY C» 

O 67 w 10-25 

10-1 


Q 

55 

10-25 

9-X 

Cardinal Dtstrlb. 

U 

JQ 

11-1 

10-15 


a 

at 

III 

10-15 

FIWi TT»W Bancorp 

U 

AD )0>U 

MB 


o 

35 io-a ion 


0 

,10 10-21 

10-10 

ftnfoctra. Hanover 

a 

60 1025 

102 

Ka-flfcor Inc 

u 


11-1 

10-14 

Nortek 

u 

iU 

11-1 

9-27 

Roriierier Tele. 

u 

61 

11-1 

10-14 

SMUoeCorp 

0 

.11 

1015 

9-35 

Valky Rstoorees 

Q 

JJ3 

10-13 

9-30 

Wolber Inc 

Q 

.10 

1>15 

IM 

otaRngol; pwpgntWy; 

q-qwrteriy; t-se«nL 

gpmMl 





Source.- UPI. 







SMk» . CoAs-lmt _ „ pehUd - 

Price 5 ** Dd Me* Dec Sag Od iin Dk 

170 6ft 7U I - - lm * U/U 1ft 

175 Ift Pt 4ft 9n f/rt 1ft 2H 3ft 

» l/H !» 1 » 4 4* 5ft 5ft 

ns i/m '* lira ift «■ * n» R 

in i/m ini ft wu 14 )4 ijft i4 

1*5 Ult UM l/H . re, _ _ 1 

ZD — 1/14 1/14 — - _ - 



Trite Ertnfcmt 2B749B 
Tefal coll m IqLTl&SIS 
Trial Pri vrt « JIUO 
Trial pul am M. 4857]] 


HW 171 1] Law 17X75 CtaseTO®— IM " 
Source: CBOc. 




(i 











































































. V'''\ ' - 

.'V-:- jJjV' £» i^- 4 v- t - t ' -.•- - • 

t, . ■• , _ . 

•_;• 'i.’C'i' - - v * 

ft BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


TwnaiWE. TOUBSPAT. SEPTEMBER 19, . 985 


ers 


Shifted in Realignmi 


C^pjhxtbv Oar Staff Fran Dupmcka 

'V NE W .YORK — Citicorp, the 
laj^pst U5. bank holding compa- 
-mf, smd Wednesday that it had rc- 


<;■ vi 


u ^% 

v 

c «Kenj fl |L 

aJ: 


r 55 CS; 

“• ***^; laiist> 
^’■'prusi 

'■••••' 'i-KSifc. 

—••-■•i-u :jBp- 

5S?s-^»Sfc 

'•• '• i !iuir.|' 

i.vwvtc i; jp.- 
i" 1 - I-'-ZftiV; 


t^te "structure to enable it to 

- capitalize on global growth oppor- 
■ 'toro&s. •'"/ 

Citicorp's 1 chairman, John S. 
Hjgftri /said the, changes were needed 
" to ad^Jt tbe corporate structure to 
i- 4 hehcpi(tdiaii^s in the global cap- 

- itfllmarkets. The announ c ement. 

. ■ Trtach 'had been expected, marks 
jS ihe Erst major shakeup at the bank- 
Iju company since Mr. Reed be- 
came chairman in June 1984. 

.! ’•• Tie structural changes include 
. ' moving the company’s treasury op- 
erations from the investment bank 
; ‘‘ division to the commercial bank 
sector. These operations include 


Suntory to Sell 

QidteauLafite 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Suntory LtcL, Ja- 
pan’s largest producer of wines 
and spirits, agreed Wednesday 
with CMteau Lafite to distrib- 
ute the French vintner’s wines 
< in Japan and exchange wine- 
making technology. | 

Keizo Sato, president of Sun- 
lory, and Baron Eric de Roth- 
schild, president of Chateau La- 
fite, signed the accord in a 
ceremony at the Imperial Hotel, 
then toasted each other with 
glasses of Chateau Lafiie-Roth- 
schfld- 

ln 1984, Suntory imported 
100 cases of three to four types 
of the French company’s wines, 
said Masahide Kanzaki of Sun- 
tory. Under the agreement, 
Suntory will expand imports 
this year to 200 cases of wines 
ranging in price from 3,500 yen 
(SI 430) to 70,000 yen a bottle, 
he said. 


foreign exchange, trading and secu- 
rities hedging. 

The changes also indude cre- 
ation of the post of senior corpo- 
rate officer Tor North America, re- 
porting to the chairman. The 
appointment goes to Paul J. Col- 
lins, who has beaded the invest- 
ment bank division, one of Citi- 
corp's three core businesses. 

Other managerial changes in- 
clude moving Thomas C. Theobald 
from head or Citicorp's huge com- 
mercial banking business to take 
charge of its investment banking 
activities. 

Richard S. Brad dock, who has 
been in charge of Citicorp's domes- 
tic business with individuals and I 
small businesses, will be responsi- 
ble for such activities worldwide. 

And Lawrence M. Small, who 
heads the commercial banking 
business for North America, is to 
succeed Mr. Theobald as head of 
all commercial banking. 

Mr. Small. Mr. Braddock and 
Mr. Collins also were elected to the 
boards of Citicorp and its chief 
subsidiary. Citibank. 

Mr. Theobald, who also is a vice 
chairman at Citicorp, remains a 
member of the Citicotp and Citi- 
bank boards along with Ciiicorps 
two other vice chairmen, Hans H. 
Angermueller and James D. Farley. 

Richard Kovacevitch, former 
1 head of Citibank's international 


Airbus Industrie 
Is Seen Winning 
$l-BUUon Order 


RruJrrS 

NEW DELHI — Airbus In- 
dustrie, the European consor-. 
litim, appears to be winning a 
contract battle with Boeing Co. 
for a $ 1 -billion order from Indi- 
an Airlines, a senior aviation 
official said Wednesday. 

The official, who asked not to 
be named, said the domestic 
airline had completed its evalu- 
ation of offers made by Airbus 
and Boeing to supply new 
planes and that the scales ap- 
peared to be weighted in favor 
ofthe European group. I 

“Planes ottered by Airbus are 
more fuel-cffident and priws 
quoted are attractive,” the oiii- 
SaJ said. The Indian govern- 
ment is expected to make a final 
decision next month on both 
ihe offers, he added. 

Last year, Indian Airlines is- 
sued a letter of intent to Boeing 
io buy 12 versions of the 757. 
But subsequently it entered into 
negotiations with Airbus lor an 
alternative offer of up to 30 of 
its new A-320 senes. 

An Indian Airlines spokes- 
man said at the lime that. “The 
letter to Boeing does not com- 
pel us to buy their planes. We 
will seriously consider any ofTer 
we get." 


By David E. Sanger J? 

Atp. Viiii Times Scrtue . 

NEW YORK — Control Data 
Coro., the rourth-largest U3. com- 
puter manufacturer, canceled * u 
S300-million hnancia. of filing ^ 
Tuesday, prompting Wall Street es* 
timaies that the company sprob- fc 
Inns could result m losses of more L 
than S100 million this year. 

In the aftermath. Control Data 
executives scrambled to arrange . 
short-term financing from banks. ( 

Three of Qmtrol Data 5 key bua- . 
nesses — computer peripherals, 
computer services, and mainf ramtt 
and minicomputers — have wors- 
ened in recent weeks, and ihecom- 
pany lost $14 million in the first 

* >a Cancellatian of the offering of 
preferred stock and debt was ron- 
adered highly unusual and took 
Wall Street by surprise. U touched 
off a selling spree that reduced the 
wJue of Control Data's stock by 14 
percent, making it the taggP* per- 
centage loser on the New York 
Stock Exchange Turaday. 

The stock closed at $17,625, 
down $2,875. on a volume of nearly 
1.8 million. 

Late Tuesday. Standard & Poor 
lowered a series of ratings for Con- 
ifol Data's obligations. 

The developments were the latest 
in a series of troubles for the largest 
U S. computer manufacturers. 
Control Data’s woes are particular- 
I ly acute, stemming from us inabil- 


ity to stave off Japanese competi- 
tion in computer peripherals or to 
break into the personal-computer 
business. 

The company blamed severe 
. . I'tmifwnriillv inooor- 


troubles in its strategically impor- 

tant computer-pen pn ends sector; 

but analysis said the move ndJcL-ted ft 

broader problems. Most held out 
little hope of a turnaround in the n 
next 18 months, if then. 

"Basically. Bob Price now real- c 
izes he must dismantle 15 years of 
diversification efforts at Control 
Data." said Michael Geran, the f 
technology analyst at Merrill i 
Lynch, referring io thecompany s i 
president. Robert M. Price. 

V Others agreed and speared i 
that Mr. Price. 54, the matheroau- 
cian who runs the company under 
William C. Noms. Control Dam s 
founder and chairman, must ova- 

SS'-SKt 

of assets. 

Mr. Price Tuesday dismissed 
predictions that the company 
might not be able to continue oper- 
, ations without a merger or a major 
r reorganization. “In each of our 
businesses there are core strengths 
r on which the future of the company 
. can be built.” be said. 

He said, however, that the com- 
il pany would seek to sell at least 
it SI 50 railUon in noMinl^c »■ 
i sets, which he would not identify. 

He added that Control Data s 
l- Commercial Credit Corp., die li- 


rtandal sen-ices branch, would not 
be put on the block! agaim 
The offering that ^irolDaia 
canceled was intended to free 
company from a tangled web of 
bank debt. It hoped to use the pro- 
ceeds — S100 million fronts pre- 
ferred stock offering andS^md- 
lion in 14.75 percent subordinated 
notes — to pay off loans that were 
already in technical default be- 
cause of the company’s recem 
losses. 

The lead underwriter for the ot- 

m ■ j Cnrthe Jr I 1*1 


COMPANY MOWS 

Beatrice Cos., the Chicago-based 
food and consumer products 
group, sad it expects per-share 
earnings Tor the second qaNB 
endingAug. 31 to be from 62 cents 
to 66 cents. Per-share earnmgs woe 
59 cents in the first quarter and oj 


l ne icau uuu« , -z- 

rering was Goldman, Sachs & Co, 

which began soliciung conurni- j 

meats to purchase the saunwsa ( 

week ago. As potential buyers be- 
gan to focus on a Securities and 
Exchange Commission filing tor 
the offering, they grew increasingly 
wary. 

The company disclosed for the 
first time that it expected a azable 
loss for the year, and raisal the 
possibility that its dividend pay- 
ments might have to be suspended 
if losses continued. The prospectus 
was revised late last week to indi- 
cate an even more dismal outlook 
for earnings. 

-It ihat revelation scared a 
lot of customers with commitments 
to the offering." .^> d n Jona ^T 
Fram, an analyst with Paine Web- 
ber Faced with ihe possibility that 
; it might have been left with unsal- 
able securities. Wall Street sources 
: said. Goldman. Sachs urged the 
. company to cancel. 


shara in Saxon OU PLC at 540 ! 
pence t$7 .231 each, raismg iisstake 
io4.95 million shares, or 22.19 per- 
cent. A rival proposal from Saxon 
Petroleum Corp. to merge Saxon 
Oil and Charterhouse Petroleum 
PLC through a share exchange also 

is outstanding. . 

Imre Corp. said it and Iromun- 
svstem of Sweden have agreed to 
lo-minate an agreement for Imre to 
distribute antibodies produced by 
Immunsystem. It 

uon has no connection with the 
relationship between i Imre : and 
Skandigen AB, the Swedish mvest- 
ment wm that is its largest share- 

& General Group PLC a 

London-based insurance group. re- 

■ norted a worldwide first-half un- 

l dSwriung loss of £28.8 million 
s compart with £18.3 milUon a year 

■ earlier It said losses on Bnush 


leans-based companysid tite 
men is are posable because oF rft 
cent rate increases for the utihu^t 

Mhsubisfaa Heavy Industries U|- 
of Tokyo said it has won a 
billion-yen ($62.17 milliom c wd* 
for two power generators from Paj 
usahaanUmum Listnk Neffjra. * 
Indonesian state-owned 
power company. The generators 

Power Station in February vw* 
and November 1989. 


earuci- »»• — : - 

property and motor insurance ac- 
counted for more than half of the 
ueriod’s result. „ ., 

Hviiddle South UdBbes Go. said 
that its Mississippi Power & Light 
Co. and Arkansas Power & Ligpt 
Co. subsidiaries should have suffi- 
cient revenues to make monthly 
payments on their 69-percent share 
in ihe S33-billion Grand Gidfl 
nuclear power plant. The New Or- 


Natioual Home Loans Corp. ?r 
London said its offer of partly paid 
shares and loan slock was oversub- 
scribed. The offer comprised 50 
million ordinary shares and 
minion of 20-year, 8-percent con- 
vertible unsaured lou | slock in 
units of 100 shares and £100 of loan 
stock at £200 per unit with £100 
payable on application. . 

United Biscuits Holdings PLC. 
said that it would buy Early Cali- 
fornia Industries Inc.’s Early Cali- 
fornia Olives unit for not more 
than $73 million. The company, 
which markets California black ol- 
ives and Spanish green olives had 
recorded pretax profit of $10 mil- 
lion on sales of $65 million in the 
year ending March 31. 

Victor Petroleum & Resources 

Ltd. of Melbourne said it plans to 
. purchase a 30 -percrat mierest man 
operational oilfield in north Suma- 
trofroro Union Texas F^nfcom 

1 Inc. Cost was not disclosed- Union 

' Texas figures show output from the 
l Asamera Block “A" field totaled 
f 871.762 barrels between January 
r . and August 1984. - 


arm. now will “manage special pro- - 

jects, reporting directly to the 
chairman," the bank said. 

Mr. Kovacevitch. who remains a 
group executive, “was personally 
uncomfortable with some of these 
changes and so he was put on *>pe- 
cial assignment," Mr. Reed said. 
“But he doesn’t want to leave .and 
we don’t want him io leave. 

Analysis earlier had said ibal| 
Mr. Reed had warned Mr. Theo- 
bald to remain in a key pMiuon in 
Citicorp, even though he had been 
Mr. Reed's major competitor m uie 
coniekt to succeed Waller B. Wnt- 
son. the chairman who retired last 
year. (AP. Reuters, NYT J 


_ — — — INVESTMENTS — UAA . 1 

INCOME PRODUCING REAL ESTATE 

■■ j j ,! -- U ff M i (Wduds 


Idaal far Pension Funds and other targe Groups 

1. Safe and Secured 

2. Below Market Acquisition 

3. Total Management 

4. High Yearly Returns 

5. Excellent Appreciation. 

Properties *3,000,000 and up 
Principals only plant* repiy to: 

ilnajl wvkmiir Realtor 
56MHA 1960 210 

. 'XFZZJSS. Tlx-i 387356. 


YOU’D BE PHONING THEM TOO 


twf most UQUID of THE TOP AMERICAN BANKS 
KNEW THAT REPUBLIC IS ONE OF THE HO 


lORM 1-212. 


.. i , - — 








.i'VVhV 


1 


i 


m 


Page 14 


tmtkrn ATTONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 19gS 


Wfcd aesdgs 

VMIA 


Closing 


Tables include me nationwide prices 
up to the closing on wail Street 
and do not reflect tale trades oisewtiere. 

Via The Associated Press 


u Month 
High Lon Slack 


Div. YHL PE 


Sis. 

lBBs High Low 


Close 
Quot.CM* 


U Month 

HMiUW Stock 


Dhi. m_PE 


It Worth 

High Low Start. 


Bht. YM.PE 


Sb. 

1BK High Low 


Clast 
QuoLdiHe 


It Month 
High Low Slock 


Dht. Yld PE 


Sts. 

T8Da Hr» Lon 


Oom 
Q gaLQrtg | 


13 

3ft 

15ft 

im 

13ft 

no 

6% 


17 


.ID 


16 

J 16 

w 


IS M AL Lab a .16 1.2 16 
n »AMi«n iihii * 

Bflk 6» ATTFd SATO 68 
Hft Bft AoneU TO U V 

18* no Action 

Mb lft Acton 

4% lft Admits 

30% ink AdRied 
211b 15% Adobe 
8* 4 Aeranc 

SI 1b 2Tft AfUPtae 
Tto 5ft AjrB» 

12 6 AtoCdl _ 6 

13% ?* ArOatDf 1-20 HL1 

4 ft ATOmco 
KB% 45VU Aim Hon 1 

36 30 Alcoa pi 325 112 


13 
T 

A 16 
U 12 
71 

12 19 


m nwwiott 

4V> 2% Am Bril 

18ft 18* Amdahl 
111* 5Vb AfnedOD 
tm 5% Amwn 
■to 4 AmCOP 
43* 18*b AE*PWt 
9 5 AFroeA 

9 5 AFfUCB 
TO* fflb AHIItlM 

m 4*Aiaraef 

W* UObAltaoA 
UW 12ft AMzoB 
Sft Hi AMBld 
Mb 3 AmOl 
62ft 47* APftl 

10 41 AmPtnv 

1 Sto 121b APree 

aw 61b AmRltV 
14ft IIWAKovIn 188a 82 
A 3 ASdE 

529b 51toATExun 
46 4514 ATE* PT 

59b ATExac 
1* Ampal 

Mo Anaal 
214 AiKLhfi 
59b Anplos 
9b Anaal wt 

1* vlAitSl v 
3W ATBOPt 
5ft Arlevn 
4* Armtm 
61b Armola 
17 Arundl 
Sft Asroro 
99b Astra* 
l Astrota 


**S8 

"§ » »S-a 

's •?£ •a ia=a 

m + « 

138 171b 1714 1714 — 14 
71 S 5 5 

J2 449b 449* 44* 

2» ra W tk + S 
266 n n* it; + « 

114 8416 83ft Mft — ft 
4 7» 7ft 7ft — % 

s wm im lfa- % 

■ A ft A T VI 

553 30ft 2B9* 2991— 99 
WlTOTOffl ft «-«• 

i sr a g 

1£££=& 
■» M41 J ’2S T « + E 

20 57 41b 4W Mb 

2J» 42 19 ^ ** ** 

^ M 7W W + S 


31 

jOD 37 27 

50 Id 16 

AS 18 


69b 

314 

6 

694 

1014 

19b 

7* 

694 

79b 

Hto 

1114 

94 

99b 

U14 

3* 

1794 

114 

414 

Mb 


24 


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IT 


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Astrotpf 180 13J 


.. AHsCM 
Tft Altos wt 
2 AutSotr 


06 i5% 12 rt%— ft 
40 414 394 3J4— ™ 

I S£ SS 32=5 

1 a Ht Sik 

SSS S-* 

9 m jfc m 

’i 7* ? 

H 14 I 1 — 

150 394 M4 39b 

12 59* 591 B4 

6 5*4 5 SJb 
32 6 594 594— 9* 

18 23Vb 21 Vr 2194 + 94 

li! BW » ,gi + IS 

25 1314 129b 1294—14 
311 lib 114 ]14— V. 

3 «W UW13V4-W 

4 ? r* r r+» 


B 


4V4 314 BAT In . Mi 19 5 

259b 13V. BOM a “ 

ISS'KSSSU 40 3d 11 

101b 7» BoJflwS A2o 15 

49b 21 a BoMMwt 
2694 221b BanPd 2J3o 9-5 

71* 49b Bonstre _ , . 

m 694 nnkBIU A 4d 11 

49b 314 Bara 

4V4 2V4 BarnEn M 

Mb 4 BorvRO 
19 BoonS 

22W 1094 BrtdBIK 1 M 164 

49b U. Battrm 3 

3294 2014 BwoBr J2 1.1 13 

339b 219* BICQP .72 2-2 9 

tS nb Btov M 27 IB 

» 21* BtofciWI 1A0 44 II 

in* 9M. BtoR B I 

19 rn BIoRAb 

19 W«b BtoSOPS dO 

in* 9* Bloc me 

199b 13* BkwntA « U 5 

TVW 14 BtoWHB A U 

21 111b BaiorPl _ 

STiS i(B* BowVOl A0 

MW 994 BowtA I -44 4.1 10 

Sift 3W Bowmr 1} 

189b 129* BONIM ,-44 20 13 

a* 191b Bnaifl ldO 
3794 36U BmPA -08 2.9 10 
419b 279b BmFB ldO 2d 10 
j 394 Bwckhn , „ , 
349* 249ft Buoll M Id 6 
131b 7W Bush n 6 


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13 9W 0X4 9W 

3 394 314 314 

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6 294 214 Zft— V4 

21 M A A 

13 99b 9W 

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104 W Vb 14— J* 
263 2BW 28 28 — 44 
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43 15 149ft 149b— 9b 

8 22V9 22W 22W— * 
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139k 139b 1Mb 
^27^27^-^ 

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1394 13 U»4— * 

TOW 109b 10W— W 
low 10W low + Mi 
49* 4V4 • 41b — V. 
530 14W 16 16— W 

BS 229ft 22V4 22*— W 
13 35W 35 35 — * 

336 38W 379b 38—94 
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2 31W 3114 3IV4— W 
4 79b 7V. 71b— 1A 


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3201300 98 100 

5 22% 22% 22% 

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you make the best possible 

use of your cash? 



Rothschilds are Europe's leading 
managers of international money funds. 
These funds provide an efficient 
alternative to a deposit account in any 
major currency. 

Their principal features are:- 
Security of capital. 

Wholesale rates of interest without 
deduction of tax. 

Fourteen different currencies. 
Ease of acquiring and switching 
currencies - free of charge . 

★ Speedy redemption. 

★ A choice of interest distribution 
or accumulation. 

They are designed for:- 

Both large and small investors. 

Residents of all countries where no 
local restrictions apply. 

Those who wish tochoose theirown 
" currencies 
or 

Those who wish to use Rothschilds' 
expertise in currency selection. 

Those who require income 


Those who prefer capital 
accumulation. 



To receive funher details of our international money 
funds, please complete and return this coupon to: 

N M Rothschild Asset Management (C.I.) Limited. 

P.O. Box 342, St- Julian’s Court. St. Peter Port, Guernsey. 
Channel Islands. 

Telephone: Guernsey (0481)26741 & 26331. 

KAME 


ADDRESS 


This advertisement has been placed by N. M- Rothschild & Sons 
l imihJ an encmnied dealer, and does not represent an invitation La 
suErihJ ?o5 or purchase shares in Rothschilds international money 
SSh !shB* ta wch funds may only be acquired on the basis or a 
current prospectus and application form 


IBT 19/9 


lus and application form. 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MANAGEMENT 


19 10W POGotA UO 11 J 

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U.S. House Votes 
Securities Rules 

Los A ugefa Times . Senrire . 

WASHINGTON — Iban effOTt to ^revem 
the kind of -panic 

tb - otend ; federal r^ulaudn .to all deates m 
government securities. . ' _ . 7 j/ 

The measure would create a a mne-Borauw 
Govenunent SecuriU^ Jtn kmaki Pg^oard aa-- 
der the Federal Reserve Board." Itwonld targd; 
an estimated 100 securiues dealers that currait- 
ly are unregulated: requiring- thein to register 
with the Seauilies Exaiange Cominissicm. 

gimiiar l>ydarinn still mUSt.be O Qnsidg W m 
the and 'the Reagm ndnmiistn^ 



Under current law, tlmFi 
closely monitors tbe 36 
which it -direcj3y , briys and 
billion in .Treasury securities each 
nani»thenaikmaid^ : Howevet_a . 
the estimated 400 secondary companies ^thai 
also deal in seanities1^ t»irdufflnKtl^ 
the primary dealers are „ . 

The legslatkmwasintrodiKX^ittreqxHMe \o 
the failure of some of the secondary dealere, 
most notably ESM Government Securkies- The 
coUapse of fte Florida^based cohyimy led toa 
Ka u — sj. /i ,-i run m an Ohio sayings instituijon Jhat?had 
to It 1 invested : 'heavily p^ resn Red 

m hi 'St'ift— ft] temporary dosing rif 71 ^udjMnstuuliOT^mjUie 
cratA -T.a^ryiignd institmions sufferetr amflar 
problems with-the faflure pf-New-Jersey-based. 
BeviH Bresler & Schnlman AssctManagement 
Cap. '■ - 




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rflntecoaticml Herald 
liibane readers own 
Stocks, Shares, Brads 
lities. 




Trib ads work. 



ADVERTISEMENT : — ^ ^ ■ ‘ 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Sept. 18, 1985 

• 


AL MAL MANAGE ME NT 
-(«» A 1-Mat T ruff. 5A— — — — — — 

BANK 4UUUS BAER A Ca LM. 
-Id I Baertoootl 
" Conbar. 


■Id 
-{d 
-til 
-Id 
-id 
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BANQUE IND05UEZ 
-{ d I Asian Growth Fund. 

Iw) Dlvarband.. 

.(wl FIF-AlT 


Sl»T-Boerb«ffFa; 
D-mark-Bner Bond Fi 
Eoulooer Amertai— 

Emil beer Euroeo 

Enulbaar Pacific 

Grobar 


SloCkhar 


5 16189 

SF T12JQ 
SF 123280 
J999JM 
DM IQZTdO 
*1116800 
SF 1290800 
SF 11SUJ0 
sf linado 
SF 156480 


l-tm) Amartcon valuta Comrnon_ 

-Im) Amor Valiws CunvPraf 

1 - Fidelity A mor. A Mff»- 

Fidelity Australia Fund 

Fldelify DlsqvwvFantf 

Fidelity Dir. 8vnA. Tr — 

Fldalltv Far EpffJ Fund 

FktelitvinrLFural 


-iw) FIF-Eurooe 
(wl FIF-Podfk: 


"SF 


1083 

IWIW 

18J7 

12J0 

1485 


S 9788 
1 16082 
S I023L0B 


l(di indosu«!Muiffiggg;S 
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m t rf ] inrfostwz USD (WUVLFJ , - ■ » 

BRlTAMKlAJKJfiJHVSt HdteV Jw J eY rLK7 - 

4w) BrtiDoIlar Inconro * MTO 

ilwi Brits ManogXurr— - * 

- Id I Brfl. InJU Manaagortt. 

4 0 1 Brit, inti J Mchwb Jortf 
-iw) Brit. Am. incB. « 

-4 w ) Brlt.Gald Fimd 


FMHHv Frontlnr Fimd 

Fidelity Poclllc Fund_ — 
Fidelity Sad- Growth FtL. — 
:^dl FMatltv World Fu«L—--—-» 
FORBES PO BTO7GRAND CAYMAN 
London Aoent 01-83M0I3 

plw) Dollar Income — * 

Uni Fart» Hlff» UK. GW Fd C 

-|w) Gold lncanM_- J 

U w) Gold Aapredallan * 

Uml Strateolc TracHno * 


-A Vft I UTlIATuni rw-*w 

-(wl BriLMonOS.Cur™»CV— 

-I d ) Brit. Javan Dlr Porf. Fd — 
-iw) Bril Jeratv GIN Fund... 

-( d I Brit. Worm LC I5. F und.- 

-I d ) Brit. aSfirrinHai 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 


CHEDrr SUIS5E (iSSUE PRICES) 


CaaNal inti Fund. 

Capital Italia 5A- 


9AS 
utn 
1137 
1883 
0749 
1 M2 
0722 
0223* 
l.lg 
niwfl 

38.18 

1584 


Gfi FI NOR FUNDS. 

-(w) East Investment Fund 
-{wl Scottish world Fund 
-fw) State St. American — — 

London :01 -491030. Geneva:*!- mapw 
gloKl asset manaoeaaentcoh^. 
PB 119. SI Peter Port, Guernsey, WBWsnS 

-tw) FofurCAMSA— f 

I -{wl GAM AfbllfBHlnC S T3J8J 

!-(wj GAMorieo Inc * 1?U» 


Actions SuiaW 
| Bond Volar Swf. 


SF 42580 
SF 107.70 

BS5v5tol-D^arb— — DM !U« 

Convert Valor U S-DOL^AR - 4 
Cenosec _ — - g£ 'StS? 

ga£gffl±rrr= S jB 
:i3 i SI 2S5S SSTS ^SSS^_”41SSS8 


-I wl GAM Australia Inc. 

-Iw) GAM Boston Inc 

, -Iw) GAM Ermitaoe 

-Iwl GAM Francsyal — 

■Iw) GAM Hong Kona inc.— 
-l wl GAM intemattonal Inc. 
-tw) GAM japan me 


.( d ) Eneroie-Valor . 

■td) Usmc- 


_ SF M780 
_ SF 80680 
SF 16BJS 
SF I53J5 


-fd) Europo- Valor 

SKSSKS^^*" s mll 

-Iw) FlnTOurvGrwe iUO— - — | 

-(mJ Wlneftefftr Dhwrsmed^ — * 2J8 4 
■im) Wli KhesTOr nnon ffl LM— | jgg 

msssssEffls^-w; is 
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D1T INVESTMENT FFM nM mJA 

ild} 

•(ml Trans wortj SSSaflATfa.*" 1-4 

g£S u s af?iSlr'!5S^' 

TRADED CURRENCYFIJ'ID. 

WreRSTlONALIIKCMtoE FUND 

-td) Short Term ‘A (Acxnni 5 {tSum 

.( d > Short Term A Dlstrl-- — S 18TO 

F»C INVADVISBRS^ 

-iw) FtC European — ■■ — * IrS 

FiDE^JTY^POBflft Hamlfin imM 


Fldelllv Orient Fund. 


S 9185 
S 1(054 
5 46-32 
S 1036 
5 1020 

S 12637 
S 20.10 
S 4117 
S 26.94 
S 1118 
I 13160* 
S MJ1 
% 3382 


-<w ) Class B - U8. u- 

a i aoss c - Japan— 
LIFLEX LIMITED 
-tw) Multicurrency - - — 
-(w) Dollar Term, 

riw) Doliar Loao Term— 

v») Jaaorwse Yen 

w) pound Slerllng. 


w) Deutsche Mark, 
(wl Dutch Flortn— 
iw) Swiss Fronc-H 



, TON, 

igtassaag E "-: 

-I d ) Cortexa Ifttamcrtlanal * Big 

-fw) OB LI -DM — WftlMUg 

-tw OBLIGE ST ION — SF VM8 

-Iw) OQ LI -DOLLAR. 

-(w)OBLFYEN — : 

-(w) OBU -GULDEN FL11H7T 

-(d) PAROIL-FUNO — »• Be. 

-Id) PAR INTER FUND — i- * .1J*® 
-t d l PAR US Treas. Bond *• 1MJ* 


_ s iouv 
_ s 106JO 
_ S 1536 
. SF 10.93 
_ % T6J3 
_ S 119-00 

iw) oaiw japan me . - .. — * .JfJj 
I w) GAM North America lnc.— _■ S 10680 


ROYAL B. CAHADAdy B JWijSUERNSEY 

-MW) RflC InTl Copttal RtL... S 73M- 

rt-I w) RBC InH Income Fd~ ■ -IJ-IB 

Id) RBC ManXurrancy Fd__ S 2483 
w) RBC North Amor. Fd 


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l:{ w) GAJBsfn aaoora/Maioy in ElA?S5 
;w) gma Sterl A Inti UnftTr«t_tlW p 

liffiaaaWfrSB^ ■ ™ 

“ % 1384 
t 1188 
S 386 
S -25-75 
% 1140 

J 1289 

i its 

5 11.93 

» .2191 

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,-(r) GT.TeetBTOtaay Fund * 

-< d 1 G.T. South Chlnaftjnd——- * 16» 
HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT; INTL.SA. 


-Id) Barry Pac. Fd . L8tt._ - 

-Irl G.T.ApplladSci«»-— 

-t d ) G.T. Aeean HX. GwttaPd- — 
-Ml ' 


»J GT. Asia Fund- — 

dlGT. Austral la Fund 

. .d) IT. Eureaa Fund — • ■■ 

-Iw) G.T. Euro, small cos. Fund — 
-( r ) G.T. Dollar Fund . — ■ 

-Id 1 G.T. Bond Fund , — - 

-t d 1 G.T. Global Tertmtov; FrL— 

-Idj &T. Honshu PatMT~ w 

kdl G.T. Investment ^Fn 



j.POmtKrMurah. 

}f Hang Kona Trust. 
J.F JacAPac Conv— 


SF 989 
SF 26.13 
S 984 

S 2451 
... S 1289 
i ersaas fo in. awickii^O— _ l * 0 X 1 
9DIHB FLEMING, POD 78 OFO HO Ito 
) J.F Currancv Montt, — j 

Y 21.96 

J _ . Y 449S 

J.F Japor Tectmoioav — — Y 16J90 
•i r j J X Pacific SecS-IAcc) — - S «6 
LLOYDS BANK INTL, POB 43t Cnna 11 

-+(w)Uav«8 inn Dollar 5 11440 

-Hw Dovds Inf^ Eurooa — — SF im® 

-Hwi Lloyds IntT GtWttl, SF 

-Mwi Lloyds inti incoma SF XOJD 

•+(w) Ltoyds Iirtl N. AintrfCO_ I TK.T5 
-+lw) LMvtts mn PaclHe_ — 5F 12580 
-HW) Liovds inn. Smeller C03_ % MJO 
NIMARBEN . . 

■IdlCtelA -.3 S7J5 


I Jenin Trust 


8 9981 
-I 8113 


S TO874 

i 1089 

=3'M 

_FL UL462 
Sir ’ TO8T3 


5 TJO- 


J l FOND INTLPUNDJto*4307*l 

-I w line.: Bid J SfP9f5* ? ! 

-(w)Acc.: BM S 5-630H*r__* J 

SVENSKA I NT ERNATIONALLJ R 
17 DcvnnsWr* SaJLondorvjn -377-0040 

-I r) SMB Bond Fund J ZL_ 

-(w) SUB inUGrawm Fund — — — * 2172 
SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES! ^ 
-<d) Amertcoh Valor, . „ . 5T0J5 

Hd) D-MurkBandSelecHan_ DM J22J4 

-Id) Dollar Band Selection S W» 

-Id) Florin Bond S el ection — — PL U6J0 

-Id Ifitarvalar J SF. BSJM 

-Id Joaon ParHado — __ — 1 SF 82SJJB 
-Id Stertbra Band Sffedtlan — — -t 18471 
-Id Swiss Ftarcion Bond Sel— SF T0-3B 
Hd Swlssvalor NewSertts— i SF 349.25. 

-td Unhroraal Band Sffect SF SSJS) 

-fd Unlveriai Fund- • SF HIM 

-fd Yen Bond Sele ction . 1. Y 1044580 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND^ 

-Id Arocn UJL 5h.^ - — — SF 

-Cd Bond-lnvesl— SF 

-Id Fonaa SwtTOSh. . SF 

-id Jgpan-lmmff SF 87080 

-td Sam South AW. Sh. SF 36S80 

-Id Sima t ffock . priori SF 21280 

.UNION INVESTMENT FrankMtr ’ , 

-td) Unttwifa : — I DM 46.11 

Untfanh DM 080 

Unttan dm tun 

UNIZINS DM 11485 

Other Funds . 

w) Art (band* invastmentiFUnd : 

W) AcHvsat Inti ... 

ImiAllMLhL 


m) Maanahmd N.V 

‘Mediolanum SaL Fd. 

Mateora: 

NAAT 

NIKKo Growth Pocfcaao l 
Nlaoan ftwi 
MOST EC Portfolio. 


34JS 

6E50 


-tai 

-td) 

-fd) 

-id) 


S 2280 
S 1125 
S 388 
S 14684 
VWU) 
S 172781 
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1 11172 
SF 13785 
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. I 1187 

. S 182 

, S TJ6 

■ - , , S nuo 

,m) Oavffand Otfahore Fd___ 82175.12 

IwlCahimbla SneurttleK FL 110.TO 

’rlCOMETE S 70.13 

wi Convert. Fd. inn A C«1* t 1081 

•wi Convert.Fd.l nfl B Cirt*-— % 2884 

I w) Dafwa Japan Fund Y 10897 

fw) DJ3.C ■ S 8685 

tter Wld Wide ivt TW. % H.12 

STUBJ6 

I 980 
5 0.98 


;w) Aaulla Internathinal Fund 

' r I Arab Ftnance LF 

, rlArtetf— ... 

iw) Truffeor inn Fd. lAElF) 

— BNP Infertiond Fund — 

... Bondrokrx-lnue Pr — 

WD.Qnada GM-Mortnago FA 
• d ) Capital Prenrv. Fd. infL. 

.wICKadd Fund 

I a ) CJ.R. Auffrolla Fund__ 
■d>CJ.R. Japan Fund. 


. dl olw^TtL nn, nrr i » 

fd) DrayhisFund Inn. ■- 


Ftrff EisliHl 
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Flxtd Income Trans J 
■ Fcmetox Issue Pr.^ 

[wl Formula SetecUon Fd. 
id l FctKiHgita j 

d 


w) 


'DravfwslntercontbMtdSi 
The EffaWiShment Trust— 
l^rapeOW^rt tarm L. 


Govemm. Sec. Fwyit™ . 

Frankt-Tnuff Inhrffns 

Haussmatm Hlttos. M.v . , 
Haffto Funds-^^^^B 




SF 

S - TOJJ 

.* • ■1B43'. 

S 16J5 

IntcnTrorkrt Fund - ■ -S 29782 

Inter mlnl no Mut. Fd. Cl.-B- * 83466 

Inft Securities Furr, $ tLM 

investa ^ dm 55.93 

invest Atbmttaues S .845 

itaHortune mn Fund SA *- UU4 

Japan Sofarttan Fund- % TT4J9- 

. _ . Japan Pacific Fund — $ IOQJ2 

hn) Jffff pnto Irrtl l ni— 

*,d > Kielnwert Benson inn FtL. s 72JQ 

w> Klefnwart Bens. Japt Fd % ' 70J3 

wj Karas Growth Trust-.—., KW 880184b 


. 986-1. 

imri. 

srataeT 

S, 7101 
S' 17*41, 

5 W»1 





"w 

Nsvatee Investment Fund 

HA ur . . 

NSP FJ-T-- . . " — ■ ! 

Pacific Hortzan Invt. F d 
PAHCURR1 

Parian SW. R Eff Geneva — - . 

Permnl Vnhw H u ~ ■ 


PSCO Fund N.V. 
PSCO InfL N.V_S 
Putnam i nti Fund. 
iPn-TadL^^^w 


Ouantom Fund N.V.. 
Renta Fund^^^H 
I Ranttnvex) A 


dl Renta Fund -. =■ 

• dJ Pe. d i .wff Sj 

ittSsssvs^SSE. W 

s i , W 



wl" Somurai PortMBo^ 

idiSd/TedLSA-Luxeraboura _ 

ffl5asaaB«5B5= 

d J US FoderaiSecurir — »«»«*• 



Iw) Vanderbilt Assets 
(d) TAirld FtndSA* 




DM- Deutsche Mdric. 
p/V S10 TO Si per unit; ha- 
Bude mp l- Price- E»-CouPOh 


Icov^n^ FontSly worWwtde Fima udi & - OHer Price IncL 3% peril m. charge; -H- -dotry stock price as on AtSfirtam hS^CSSw^: 


' . • Wt'i 


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48*r.V.W-.- 





INTERNATIONAL ™,MINE. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1985 ^ \ 


Page 15 


Non Dollar 


advertisement 


The unde reigned announces that the 
jjjftamial Report April 1st. 1984- March 
Trial. 1985 of The Dai-lchi Kangyo 
pmt Ltd. will be available in 
Amsterdam at: 

Algemene Bank Nederland N.V., 
Amsterdam-Rottenlam Bank N.V.. 
Bank Mees & Hope NV. 

Pierson, Heldring fit Pierson NA 
Kao-Aasocialie N.V. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam, 12th September 1965. 


RICOH COMPANY. LTD. 

(CDRb) 

TTie undersigned announces that the 
Annual Report 1985 of Ricoh 
Company Ltd. will be available in 
Amsterdam at: 

Arnsierdam-Roiierdain Bank N.V.. 
Algpmene Bank Nederland N.V., 
Bank Mees & Hope NV, ^ 
Pieman, Heldring & Keraon N.V- 
Kas-Afi&oeialie N.V. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N-V. 

Amsterdam. 12«h Sept em b er 1965. 


The undeisignwl uimuimmS' that llie 
Annual Report 1985 as per 3Lsl 
March. 19&5 of Tonhiba Cor- 
poration will | be available in 
Anwlenkun at: 

Algcmetie Bank iNede Hand N.V- 
Amsterdam- Rot teidani Bank N.V.. 
Bank Mees & Hope NV. 

Pienon, Heldrine fit Pierson N.V., 
kjb- A^ociatie NiV. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Anuneidam. 12th September 1985. 


DAI NIPPON PRINTINB CO.. LTD. 

(CDBa) 

The inulenienrtt announce* that a* from 27ih 
September 1983 at Ka» Aafwcialie N.V. 
Sp&uaai 172. Amsterdam. div^p.no. M 
(aeramvanMil bv an AlfidsiH loflbeOJRn 
Dai Nippon Printing Co- “ lU ** 
pa.abJeVStir Dfl*. 5 A per CDR. mw 
TOO nlm and with Dili*. 55.- per CDR 
rep,. 14100 rim. (dW. {*r wwid-date 
1.1965: ciu*. Yen 5,- piUihr drfur 
linn ol 15% Cpawse MR - Y ™7S-' ” ““ 

1 .02 per iDRTiOO sfe.. 1 en 750.- " Dfl? 
lOJSlper CDR. 1.000 shs.. ttiihnui an AIR 
dSu'^iap!ux - Yen L00.- - Dlk. Ub 
prCDR. 10&d»- Yen 1.000.- - I«k 1M0 
her CDR. 1.000 ate.. «» br deJmlr.1- Alter 
1231.1965 The di«. will «mh be turd under 


pi 3 1 jggS ihe div. will uni* be paid under 
dnlucfiiin uf 20% Jap lax iwp. Mb. 5.1& 
DOs. 51.90 nrt per CDR reyf- "*?■ ““ 

1.D00 ihn.. each in jcconumr wiih it* Jajn- 
near cm regulation. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam, 1 3th Setpember 1965. 


Weekly net asset value 

i 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on Sept. 17, 1985: U.S. $120.10. 

i 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Information: Pierson, Heldring & Pferaon H.V., 

Herengradit 214, 1016 BS Amsterdam. 


r V 


/£rf 

t -. 







V 






comfortable 
place to rest your 
head 



2 Contoured support for 
the small of your back. 



When you tilt bade - 
le cushion tilts up 

.it your feet up - 
5 made for it 


TWA's new Ambassador Class seats are a new experience. 

No other business dass has seats Me ^nyir^toandh^W^^er ^Atlantic FtyTWAs 747 Ambassador 

these. They're new The widest business be / |eeo serened But you can always enjoy 6-a cross 

dass seats. The/re exclusive to TWAs 747 the ^ Sleepserer^ ceatine onatfour transatlantic aircraft 


SScxClai Ofcourse these SMb are only »< 

in them is to float. Perfectly relaxed across There's plenty ofleg room and 

Thevcurve to support every partof your plenty of space al round. 

body There's even aspedal leg and foct rest TryttenewexpenenceofBoalingacross 


seating on atf our transatlantic aircraft 
YburTWA Main Agent will teH 
you ail about it 


Leading the way to the USA. 




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RENTACAR 


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. ss m |S EH 35 

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0-50 km/ 


0-50 km /h very quickly. 


long queue 

Ye hope y°“^ ^at we don’t UUe 

Wis rental des • 

popular-Wedo- . ntroduce d ways 
Yhirfi is ^ h y We our ^ faster than 
[ring y° u in y 


Our Avis Express Card for instance 
All those tedious questions you’re usually 
asked are encoded on a magnetic strip. 

When we run it through one of our 
computer terminals your rental agreement 
is printed automatically. 


But it’s not just our speed that’s made 
the largest rental company throughout 
Europe, Africa and the Middle East. (Around 
the world we’re represented in 126 countries 

and more than 1100 airports.) 

We may have the only direct world- 


wide computer link in car 
rental. 

But we also owe a lot 
to those three old-fashi oned 

words. m 

We try harder. \=z 


AVIS 


Avis features 

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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1985 


IF YOU CAN TELLUS EXACTLY 

WHAT THESE WILLBE WORTH 
IN SIX MONTHS TIME, 


3-Si 


Sided Fight Reuters Starts Share Price Service 


For Takeover 


Shocks Japan 


But hmton Stock Exchange b Still OPP 0 ^* ’ 


(Continued from Page 11) 


By Bob Hagerty >®on a single dectraov 0 f conduct being * 5 ®?^ 

intJJSSHeTmL' ailowing mvestors w the tel ^change to «o* er ,f e 2?S 

LONDON - Raitrn Holdings pn« qoick^. Such pa^^ljW mding ^ intemanoarf sham 
PLC said Wednesday that it has ^ 25 "There has to be * code tf 


and threaten to ask embarrassing 
questions at meetings if manage- 
ment does not pay them off In ad- 
vance: 


shares. 

contact: 







' iSrS 




YOU MAY NOT NEED 
OUR OPTIONS. 


Only last year the Chicago 
Mercantile Exchange launched its 
options on the Deutschemark and it 
quickly became the most actively 
exchange - traded currency option 
in the world. 

And now, with CMETs latest 
options on the British Pound and 
Swiss Franc, togetherwith an 
interest rate option on the Eurodollar, 
corporate treasures, bankers and 
dealers have even greaterflexibility in 
managing rate uncertainty. 

Corporate treasurers use CME 
options as “insurance policies” 
against future rate fluctuations in 
hedging strategies, tender or take- 
over situations and as an insulation 
against translation exposures. 

Leading banks, institutions and 
government dealers use CME options 
as an essential dealing and arbitrage 
tool to lay off foreign currency and 
interest rate risk. The high volume of 
CME options and the tight pricing 


which arises from the link between 
our options and futures contracts has 
enabled our customers to benefit 
from an improved and even more 
sophisticated service. 

Fora free copy of “Options on 
Currency Futures: An Introduction” 
and/or “Options on Eurodollar 
Futures: An Introduction”, write to 
or telephone Keith Woodbridge or 
Neil McGeown at Chicago Mercantile 
Exchange, 27 Throgmorton Street, 
London, EC2N 2AN. 

Telephone: 01 -920 0722, 

Telex: 892577 IMMLON G. 


“Shareholders are entitled to a 
decent re.ura," said James Abegg- 
lea former president of the Japa- 
nese affiliate of the Boston Con- 
sulting Group. “But they don't 
have ynfjmfan rights, which is real- 
ly the Western notion." 

Another barrier to hostile take- 
overs is that a comparatively small 
portion of a typical Japanese com- 
pany's shares are actively traded. 
Others are in the hands of “stable 
shareholders'’ looking for long- 
term earnings. “Major sharehold- 
ers do not release their holdings 
very easily,” said Yoshihisa Tabu- 
chi. executive vice president of No- 
mura Securities Co. 

Cross-shareholdings help bind 
together the Japanese industrial 
groupings, such as the dusters of 
companies and banks bearing the 
Sumitomo and Mitsubishi names. 
Any group member targeted for a 
takeover could count on the sup- 
port of the whole. 

Takeovers are. in theory, permis- 
sible under Japanese law. but the 
same law tends to favor the status 
quo. A besieged management 
group or union could throw up 
roadblocks in court that would de- 
lay matters for up to two years. 

Trafalgar's status as a foreign 
company further confuses things. 
Though there is nothing illegal 
about what it Is proposing, power- 
ful bureaucrats in the Finance Min- 
istry could well deride to raise ob- 
stacles if they feel it is trying to 
impose “foreign ways” in Japan. 


PLC said Wednesday that ithas "B * sLHfta 2 

begun a new service displaying State, fivetrom to ensure that 

share prices of major companies, from the U m tea ^ common set of rules, 

despite faBnre ttvreach an-accord Canada P change official smd. 

with a key provider of such data, ^JSSSSSS'tlai the total Reuters countered that U only 

ihe London Stock EaJumge. JEfifiSSiS?* Sen allows respo^bk toto « IU. 

The service provides owwi. of to aboul Reuters 

Roiihs computer tenmeali wth Tbembisttot the London Stock 1 foSTselling share- 

more than 250 shares nnlv four of 1 1 u FaL minkac tn K(S 23£ ££ MS-M cLp^t 


conu nuany .npaatea prices to &chMge has told its mamas not ~ - - conipuler 

more than 250 share, only tour of quotes to be muted on pn* j£,S,oipiWsucb 

which are. British. The prices arc u. e na» with those of firms equipment used to mamp 

’J J 1 I- UJV.~aaafc.p-ft- , , 


wuuiu aic.oflUML inc-pnco are ^, c <a m p pay. with mose Of wins — ■ 

pnMded by 30 securities dealers in ^idonot belong to the exchange, dam. { ^ worried' 

5^rssss.^2rjs5st 

Thirteen of the dealers have Hie exchange, which has its own 

agreed to let Reuters list their competing service, said it does not Loodon merenani ^ Ftem- 

prices alongside those of cooped- want its members' prices to mingle, ao Banking trading certain 


World Bank Offers Portions 
Of Its Loans to 15 Nations 


(Continued from Page 11) kept small, no larger than $5-mil- 
for sale only the equivalent of $300 lion equivalent, to allow the bank 


lMr Mi » , 

British shares outside of the ex- 
change. In addition, a large per?.. 

centage of the trading in some itMr. 

(or British shares takes place in the /- 
United States through American. 

Depositary Receipts. . 

Reuters already has made a mg’ . 
success of selling terminals ifaaLal- 
low banks and brokers to trade 


million worth of loans. The resales the widest possible measure of de- 
will be priced “to provide a com- mand forspecific.curnsndes atdif- 

Hvp vielH ralnnc in»n nrr-mmt mnfMrtrip« TT]»» mintmnm 


w g* ■ AVWU k V W W uiv a UUUIU (A/L W 1 * Ol Uli 

petidve yield, taking into .account ferent maturities The mininmm 
the currency, maturity and country amount is Si-million equrvalent- 


currencks electronically. Trying to 
repeat that success in shares. Rcu- ; 
ters last spring acquired rights tq 
market share-dealing equipment 
supplied by US.-bssed Instinct 


the currency, maturity and country amount is 51 -mill] on equivalent- sunn Ned by U5.-M sed Instinct - 

involved and the continuing role of . “We know we can seU paper of . ^ Ratios also is holding tails 
the bank as lender of record, the countries who no longer borrow ■ ^ pairing 3 major sharo- g^ 

bank said. | from us, he said. “We also know mlnstimre ' T’ 

While the bank remains lender of we can sdl paper at a price. The test holding m insu 

record, few its own bookkeeping is to see whether we can sell World ' - 

purposes the loans sold no longer Bank loans to LDCs at or about J PnmfljlflV 


count against its capital and free our own cost of borrowing those 
those resources for making new currencies." 


The bank’s atm is hot to create a 


• a WH IM O M i Hl W M/ H 

Eugene Rot berg, treasurer of the profit, he said. The prime aim is “to 
World Bank, said in a telephone test whether there is a market- out-, 
interview that the size of the loan side commercial banks for LDC 
participations up for sale would be paper on the. World Bank's books." 


Company 

Results 


Revenue one nroflfs or tosses, tn ‘ 
mJiifon* or* Jntocoioirrendvs unless 
WU n mt WaM 


Brllala 


AUCTION 


Coots Patoas 


CANADA 


CHICAGO 

MERCANTILE 


THE 108 DESTINATION 
RESORT IN B.C. 


3Snar EXCHANGE 

International Monetary Market - Index and Option Market 

FUTURES AND OPTIONS WORLDWIDE 


The Resort is to be sold by Auction in Eleven parcels 
complete with furniture. fbaures& chattels, three subject to 
staled opening Ml prices and the balance by unreserved 
auction to the highest bidders. • 




rtff! 

0 










.riS” . 

;-~ 




■i :•' ■•. "■ ■• . •. 







Page 1' 


u 



51-3355. down from SI .3 395 on in mid meting on short covering 


vuwn iram jiJm oo in uuui .... „ 1 1 e 

Tuesday. Nevertheless, dealers said ahead of Thursday s data on ua 
the pound was holding up well, personal income and ihe nash »u- 
despite recent uncertainties about mate of third-quarter GNP growth 
oil prices and dollar strength. on Friday. 

“There’s — ,L: — — 


.197^ 


■ ■•*. 11 . » just nothing against 
sterling at the moment,” one said. 
Traders said that the dollar was 


- muu unu tub uvn 

locked into a stable trading range, 
but warned that that could change 
after US. GNP figures were re- 
leased. 


s« 




[ fi% 


be 




Ss 

>4 


pmf&d fy’Our Staff From Dispatches 

- LONDON — The US. dollar 
braved" higher Wednesday in nar- 
,-iov European trading, boosted by 
^avgovennnent report that US. 

- .bousing 'starts rose faster than cx- 
pectediast month. 

f ^ exchange dealers said 

; ; the doflar rose sharply in early 
^ _ trading following the report that 
bousing starts were up 62 percent 
hr August, more than a point higher 

■■ t han market expectations. **«= wuu wu iuwu m rnw 

: - But the currency later lost some 
"*V ofrits gains in advance of Friday’s 

. rdeasectf a U.S. gross national o% 7 £?“* francs ’ ^ 

te^d^r oo ' 5outpmo ' 

■ Dealers said investors were wait- 
ing for. stronger indications of f ast- 
qr Uneconomic growth before in- 
vesting in the American currency. 

In London; the pound closed at 


ier in European Trading 


Insurers Discuss 
Gulf Shipping 


The dollar was fixed in Frank- 


*ii4uw pibviinuii. 

Earlier in Tokyo trading, the dd- 
lar ended the day at 241.80 yen. 
down from 241.25 yen on Tuesday. 

In New York trading, the dollar 
was higher at midsession, after re- 
bounding from a low of 2.8930 DM 


on Friday. 

Overseas dollar purchases con- 
tributed to the gam, one dealer 
said. Trading was fairly active. 

The dollar eased from its opal- 
ine levels after the 62-percent rise 
in UA housing starts in August 
and a revision for July’s decline to 
3.2 percent from 2.4 percent. 

Meanwhile, the South African 
commensal rand closed in London 

at 3925 U.S. cents after being 
quoted astride 39.00 cents early in 
die London afternoon following 
Johannesburg quotes of around 
38.00 cents in response to softer 
bullion prices and large import or- 
ders for dollars. 

The rand started at 40.30 cents in 
London, having fallen about one 
iStWnight- IAP. Reuters) 


Trade 


Pic |jit. nihil Pm 1 

KUWAIT — A consortium 
of 31 Arab underwriters in- 
volved in insurance or the fleet 
of the United Arab Shipping 
Co. met Wednesday in Kuwait 
to consider premiums as a re- 
sult of Iran’s recurrent seizures 
or the ships and confiscation or 
cargo, insurance sources said. 

The consortium, led by the 
Kuwait-based Gulf Insurance 
Co . was evaluating the escalat- 
ing dangers to international 
navigation in Gulf waters and 
increasing financial losses re- 
sulting from Iran s deumuon of 
company ships. 

Insurances sources disclosed 
that the 31 insurance compa- 
nies paid more than 551M mil- 
lion to the UASC in 1984 as 
compensation for the lossts in- 
curred bv (he company s neet. 
mainly resulting from the spil- 
lovers of the Iraq- 1 ran war. 


cttnt 




THE EUROMARKETS 


■“pjS 




Market Has Multicurrency Flood 


- Funds Awash 
In New Cash 


**»e 

T- w 


»--to 


: Ns* 


'■% 10 




Wtt cf 
ueilnj 

:i > k 


‘■agtfe 

“ OipiTt 
1 . 

«S<" a r . 

r - 0 :irc-^ 
Otii- 
wc 1 i»,. 

- ‘iai-: 
--•SS 5 

: .ijj* 

:*U. 


■ r.s: 


:: ; c >-. 


■W‘ 


By Christopher Pizzey 

- Reuters 

LONDON — The Eurobond 
. market had a Hood of new issues in 
a variety of currencies Wednesday. 
The most novel one was the issue-of 
zero-coupon Eurosleruug bonds 
backed by Britsh government 
bonds, wuch the lead manager, 
S.G., "Warburg & Co., named “ze- 
bras,” dealers said. 

Other borrowers included the 
World Bank — which issued bonds 
in both Deutsche marks and U.S. 
dollars — Electricity de France in 
French francs, Sweden’s Fors- 
wiarks in Danish kroner and a Eu- 
ropean -currency-unit issue for 
Luxembourg's Societe Nationale 
de Credit a VlnvesrissemenL 
The actual issuer of the “zebras” 
is called Zero-Coupon Euros lerling 
Bearer or Registered Accruing Se- 
curities BV and is a company regis- 
tered in the Netherlands. 

The nominal amount of the issue 
is £19324 million and consists of 
four "corpus” zero-coupon 
^tranches and seven short-dated 
7 tranches secured by stripping the 


SSEKSS 

sMiriues, called SiXfSitobv* L 

eawaSittS EsraSaras 

issue will have stronger demand. ™ f aci ju for Uie World 

In the noating-raie-note sector. S^nuiuoaiacmiy or 

ito expected S30G- million note is- ^*^KSSflStd“uSs 
soe en^ed for Mtod totog <* 
morning. It pays the higher mb -™”® 0 


ther the one- month London inter 
bank offered rate or the mean of 
six-month London interbank bid 
and offered rates, called limean, 
and was priced at 100 . 10 . 

Under the “mis-match” formula, 
the coupon is refixed monthly but 


in West Germany Wednesday, 
dealers noted. 

The World Bank dollar issue 
pays lOfc percent a year over 15 
years and was priced at par. The 
lead manager was Morgan Stanley 
International The issue ended on 
the market at a discount of about 
1 ft. inside the 2 * percent fees. 

The DM bond issue was led by 
Deutsche Bank AG and pays 6 * 
percent a year over 10 years. The 

‘ • 1 : xvcll within 


(Continued from Psp 10 
Explorer Fund, whose portfolio is 
concentrated in small growth com- 
panies. The similar aim was to re- 
duce the now of new (ash. As in- 
vestment adviser for Vanguard II. 
Vanguard picked Granahan In- 
vestment Management. 

Over the years, other mutual 
funds have suspended sales to new 
shareholders. In 1967. for example, 
the T. Rowe Price New Horizons 
Fund took this step, explaining 
that new money was coming in so 
fast it could not find enough stocks 
to buy at reasonable prices. In 
1970. the fund reopened its doors 
to new invesiors. 

the Fidelity Magellan Fund, 
originally geared to international 
investments, suspended sales to 
new invesiors between 1%5 and 
1981. by which time it had become 
— • pvifih fund with as- 


( Continued from Page 11) 

U.S. economy. But Mr. Homer, 
who felt bound by his party s P« 1- 
form pledge, signed the Smocu- 
Hawkv legislation. 

The economists were right about 
retaliation from America s trading 
partners. Britain. France, Italy and 
other nations raised tariffs or intro- 
duced quotas. Switzerland boycott- 
ed u.S. products. Canada raised its 
tariff walls to the highest in history. 
International conferences were 
held in 1931. 1932 and 1933 in an 
effort to work out a truce in the 
trade war. All those talks failed. 

The higher U.S. trade barriers 
frustrated Tokyo's efforts to im- 
prove the economic conditions of 
the Japanese people through ex- 
panding trade. Japan lurped to a 
more nationalistic and militant for- 
eign policy. 

The United States was worse off 
after Smoot- Hawley than it had 
been before. Its exports plunged 
because of the higher trade barriers 
and because of the spreading world 
depression, which was aggravated 
by the collapse of trade. 

By 1932, U.S. exports hadplum- 
meied to about one-fourth of their 
1929 level. Agriculture, the rector 
Hoover had tried to help, suffered 
the mosL Wheat exports, which 
had totaled S20O million 10 years 
earlier, slumped to 55 million lji 
19 V* Auto exports Tell from 5541 
million in 1929 to S76 million m 
1932. 

In retrospect. Smoot-Hawley 
was worse than futile. It Tailed 10 
solve unemployment and other 
problems of U.S. labor, industry 
and agriculture; instead it aggra- 
vated the problems. And it coninb- 


U.S. Trade Official Urges Japan 
To Open Martels 'Pretty Dam Fast’ 

The AsumaieJ Press 

WASHINGTON —The US. trade representative. OaytonYeut- 
.J^lSSJSnon W«iS*ta? ^ open iK markets to imports “pretty 
'SteiSlMZLJSSe Indus, rialb-od nanons >nd a 


Mr. Y cutler cantoned VS. businessmen ,o 

nmone that the administration can support m its 

Pr Bui l he ^ Sd NTT officials that while the administration 
JElliTS fVel ii could not tolerate much longer a trade 
imbalance wiih Japan nearing S40 Wum Um uke 
“If that message has not yet sunk in yet m l oKyo, ope yw 
it back wiSyou? he said, “and that s noij ust rhetii one 

Hisashi Shinto, the NTT president wSh one 

the United Suites can benefit.. af we dont cooperate witn one 

another.” . 


to between $140 billion and SIM 
billion this year, compared with 
$123 billion last year, and there is 
00 turnaround in sight- 
No nation, whether the United 
States or Brazil or Argentina, can 
expea foreigners to finance its def- 
icits indefinitely. “Such a gigantic 
imbalance is simply not sustain- 
able," said Lawrence A. Krause, an 
international economist at the 
Brookings Institution, a private re- 
search institute in Washington, 
voicing a widely shared sentiment. 


tectionist spirit among many 
Americans is that the losses to the 
Japanese have been both large and 
growing, and they feel that the Jap- 
anese have not played fair but in- 
stead have discriminated against or 
excluded U.S. goods from their 
maiket through a variety of meth- 
ods. At the same lime, however. 
American consumers have contin- 
ued to buv Japanese goods heavily. 

Last year the United Slates ran 
its biggest bilateral deficit in trade 
with Japan — more than $37 bil- 
lion, compared with a bilateral 


ncuiturc; iu*ira« ^ ■ for non, compareu w»M. - 

te problems. And it coninb- Anotiier major r^on ior^ ^ defiril a&jnSl Wesl Germany 

uted to th? deepening political and buildup d of just S 8 billion. . 

economic crisis and the bitter na- — despire the irenetits n Yft |hieat t 0 U5. dominance 

uonalism that helped to bang on in manufaemred goo^ « by_no 

World War II. —«t 


trade is the best means of promot- 
ing the development of both the 
U.S. economy and the world • 
Although economists still gener- 
ally support free trade they are 
beginning to lake a more skmtial 
look at the doctrine in the tight of 
present conditions. 

Stephen V.O. Clarke, an econo- 
mist who has served in .senior posi- 
tions at the Federal Reserve Mnk 
of New York, suggests ibau “Free 
trade is designed to serve the self- 
interest of the nation that is indus- 
trially dominant.” firM , 

One way of regarding the P rcs “[ 
surge of protectionist spinu nw 
only in Congress but also m U.^ 
industry, is that the United Stares 
has lost confidence that, it is the 
industrial leader and needs to re- 
vert to a more aggressive and na- 
tionalistic trade policy. 

Under this theory. Japan, as uie 
emerging world leader, ought to 
embrace free trade. And indeed 
there are some signs that it is doing 
so, although some critics of Japan 
believe it has waited too long and 
has endangered an open world 
trading system by provoking V . 
resentment and protectionist spun- 
How great is the danger that lire 
mood of protectionism will prevail 
in the United States? And, if it 
does, how great is the danger that 
the world economy would suffer 
the kind or shock that followed 
Smoot-Hawley? Robert J. Dole. 
Republican of Kansas and the Sen- 
ate majority leader, says he has 
“never seen stronger sentiment 111 
Congress for restrictive trade legis- 

laU But President Ronald Reagan, 
seeking to undercut congressional 
pressure for protectionism, has in- 
troduced a more aggressive potior 
to open foreign markets to UA 
goods? He has said he would iniu- 

” .f into 


ss 

to 

m 

n- 

in 

1 - 

jf 


"“^‘totoPas.cvx.u.wh, BrSjfeJlS* 

HSSSatS 

ine setting off the biggest wave of means lasses that ihj cornet ^ ^ le ^ ology ^ nqudly dif- 

resirictive trade legislation since acceptable. regardleM o| ihe ng throughout the world, tire 

toeal also cons fiom ntny devd- 

For one thing, the pressure on Particularly vexatious is me commies as well, ranging 

le^blators has been mounting as rfjw.uonms^aswhwei^Jmt f^ Brazi i l0 Ch ina, which is now 
tta nation's trade defreit sweUs. ^ States tas CMKidCT^i^f ^ making an enormous bid to take its 
The pressure come from affected — *he mdustml nations. 


pan. the European Community, 
South Korea and Brazil. And tt 


1981. bywtodi time it had beconre ^/p^ure SZEZJZ* wortd^ i^ter high qdMtanrnA SSSSSSSS 
tojust within the total fees of 17 ***** The an aggressive jmwh fond ijjf £ groups de- capital rads. strains that are now 

basis points, at about 99.95. The g^JdSefflded well within sets totating $50 mtilion l With .e- restrictive and ag- States still ran irate “ weighing on US. trade policy, 

lead manager was Merrill Lynch ^r-pn^BSue^oea we |cr L?nch as its portfolio manager. ^ these otegones in sSIetife Reciprocal Trade Act of 

Capital Markets. ^SSiinn FCU Eurobond Fidelity ranked as tire b«t-per adminisiraudb officials pluses have shrunk considerably. , 03 ^ that policy has been based on 

2sg»sjgs S3ES3SS t a sassaaaa 

ihrSmonthLibor. ***- — !. so^m SSL l sk 


now seems likely that additional 
tough measures, intended to im- 
press and appease Congress, will 

follow. , . 

It is too early to know whether 
the president's efforts to stanch 
protectionism, possibly reiruorced 
bv his veto power, will prevail — or 
whether his efforts to use tough 
means to redress the U.S. trade 
position will themselves become a 
form of protectionism. 






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2W- * 

a — w 

17*— w 
4* + * 

iSV* 

im + w 

4V, + Vk 

JT-* 


1 VLI 
1 VLSI 
, VMX 

VSt -UO 

■ VolULff 
• VolFSL 
1 VOtNIl 120 

4 VoJUl A0 

. VanOui AO 


Sft SM 
12 Iff 
SW SW 
9W 9W 
4ft 6 W 
19W IBM 
37V, 37* 
20 20 
14 1SW 
7* 7 


17M 17M 
9M 9* 
IM » 
16* 15* 
7W 7* 
18 17* 


M SJ 
M 17 


UW 



IW- 
3N 

13*- ft 

ww- ^ 


'SSWt 

30* Kawpw J* 
isw bbti J« r 
w* KaAr -29 


1J 


’S’St 

M* WW 


16 W- * 
TM— W 
SOW 

1JW— w 

IBW 


I OfefciCs 2J0 XI a 

‘SSSS?^ S aS 

I OWPtC 1J0' « 3 

, OnxBCP J99 ti IN 

b ONTO- U, 

4 DBtWB ^ 

b OrbnW S 

. orttt n 


aw— w 


4W 4* 
14W I4W 


24* 26V, 
UW MW 


4W 4W 


a 5SS urn* 
T iSSST IW 

UM sonatf* A. 27 m 
IflSsonrM A5*2J M 
. j soHW » 

■ aw BMFn jo u 

, uw aoutra ■* K J* 

I 5W Sovran 70 u 169 
1 22 Sovran* vu 

1 B* SyertV ^ 

i sss ^ , S 

b 13 Spin « 


U Iff 
4W ff 
14W 14 
uw nw 

MW 14W 
9ft «W 

aw 2 

40M 48 

aow w 

71k ak 

isw iff 

16 25W 

IM 1M 
4ft 4W 


144k + * 
10ft . 
24ft + ft 
11* _ 
SW + ft 

IBW + w 
u* 
17W— 1 
4W— * 
MW— W 
UW— IW 
14V. 

9ft + Jfc 
2 W— Jk 
48ft + * 
2BM +1W 


SOW 


174 BA « 
AO 26 152 
378 
2 

A0 14 B 
B4 

e IM 

‘ -■ M s 

70 U 7U 

1 2104 

IAS 40 193 

279 

' 137 

n “ ’m 
I JD 3i 04 
d A0 XI ,44 
I A4 14 121 
•15a 1J 4 

n JB Xi 38 


19W IV 
13 UW 
WW M 
a 20 * 

23* 22M 
U 11ft 
4* 4* 
11 W 11 
IS* 15 
15ft 15 
7* 7W 
12W lift 
17W 17W 
11 * 11 
32 3ff 
4ft 4ft 
4ft 3W 
41* 41* 
13ft 12ft 
UW 14* 
4* 4* 
4* 4M 
TV, 7ft 
16ft Iff 
n iff 
25* 2ff 

a* a* 
M* 23* 


19* — * 
Uft— w 
10W 4- W 

ao»+ w 

33*— W 
12 — W 
6 *— W 
11 
IS* 

IS — w 

7V, — 1% 

lift— ft 
17W 
11 * 

3M— 1ft 


4Vk— ft 
41W— U 
13* + ft 
16* 

4ft— W 
4W 

7ft— W 
15ft— * 

^*-W 
a* + * 
23*— W 


MW 


1ft Xatac 

5 * Xtew 

17* UW XMm 


A 2* 2ft 
aft 6W 6W— w 
13 12W 13 + W 


IS*— W 

asw— w 

19ft + W 


nft 14* YtowFk J4 27 


1CW 16ft 
*w «k 
2SM 25ft 
17 UW 
aow 20 
6W 6W 
U UW 


22W + W 
16ft— W 
4* 

23ft- W 
17 + W 

ao — w 
6ft + W 
UW- W 


30W SWZfnUt* 
WW Mft PwO. 

Uft 4M Zondvrt 


1144 
ABO 37 61 
136 37 U 


19W 10* 19 + W 

12* 12* 12*— * 


#"3WS7 , 

2* 2ft 2* + W 


JWI 


5 4ft 4ft- W 
UW 14* ,14ft — W 


\ 


J 


3.T . 






































rmrnrpiNj ATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1985 




books 


coufdW 


the UNWANTED: Refogeea and i 

Ox/oraf University Press, 200 Madison Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. 10016 . 

Reviewed by Walter Laqueur 


would cause 
for off i T 

was full” jb, 


..mdiriaieatliftfe^ gg -V 

memorable words of a Swiss : 
1941' 


' publicans after the 

i <no nn condition that most of . vir- > 


a 

a 

a 

■I 

a 

■ 

K 

■ 

a 

■ 


■ 

a 


■ 

■ 


ca. since nmc ui~«. 8~-*fe n»ved 
from one land to another, eariy on the. Bible, 
idls a story of one such ntatiojL. B®, «■ 
Michael Mantis poms out in his valuable new 
book, refugees as a category ^Mtuapuige 
on European consetoosness and addom [trou- 
bled relations between stales, totally, the 
term referred to the Protestants expeSed from 
France in the late 17th century; only lata was 
it extended w all those who left their native 
country in times of distress. . . . 

In the 19th centuiy there were several waves 
'ideal: Germans 


; ACROSS 

1 Chen's game 
.5 Strikebreaker 
•9 W.W. II town 

13 Cupid 

14 Pool ploy 

]G d'Orsay 

' (French 

Foreign 
• Office) 

} 7 Greenback 
8 Silly 

19 Literary Leon 
20 Come to the 
• point 
23 Westerns’ 

1 Grey 
24 Latin abbr. 

25 Rudiments 
28 Porgy 
30 Blarney-stone 
■ gift 

33 Healing plant 
34 Expect 
35 Dockers' org. 
36 Goofed off 
40 Ratite bird 
41 Bring to court 
■ again 
42 Photo-finish 
item 

43 Russell 
nickname 
44 Extorted 
45 Lines for 
hoisting sails 
47 Prefix for 
fraction 


48 London flunky 

49 Expose inner 
feelings 

57 Neighbor of 
N.M. 

58 Omani money 

59 Pointless 

60 Former 
Mexican 
president 

61 Squire Cass’s 
creator 

62 Enthusiasm 

63 This does it 

64 Cartoon 
“bulb" 

65 Coastal cruiser 

DOWN 

1 Troop of 
toughs 

2 Melville opus 

3 Writer Pierre 

4 Running amok 

5 Heirs 

6 Tippy craft 

7 Islands, 

off Galway 

8 Fido's 
treasure 

9 Unit fighting 
vice 

10 Toss's partner 

11 Not of the doth 

12 Seine tributary 

15 Fodder tree 

21 Tic toe 


22 Sonar reading 

25 Cotton packer 

26 Tex. shrine . 

27 Soviet space 
venture 

28 Prince 
Valiant's 
weapon 

29 Like rattan 

30 NCO’s charge 

31 Cather's*' 

Lady” 

32 Innocent ones 

34 Chip in a chip 

37 Celestial path 

38 Social work- 
er's concern 

39 Activate 

45 Calif- mount 

46 Solo of "Star 
Wars” 

47 Jazzman 
Gillespie 

48 Lover of 
Daphnis 

49 Put on cargo 

56 Silkworm 

51 Juan's aunts 

52 Role for Caron 

53 Produced an 
egg 

54 Neisse 

Line 

55 Bator, 

Mongolia 

56 Far: Comb, 
form 


the war. But the great 

wanted to emigrate could not ao - < 

refugees, behaved as badly as ^ ; 

other countries. ■ * L-*L.sL*' ' r '* } ''' 

One of the few rays of hope to Aug 
period was the establiriupait by rae«fB^ . . 

Nations oTa Hig ^ \\ 
While it did a great deal of 
after WoridWarl.its resouraSwOT”^^ - 
cient to cope with 

' 1930s. 

The fate of the 



i» *V. • ’’jit 


S-/-. L- ■- 


of escaping Rom* OOP*-- ... 


BEETLE BAILEY 



Jews left Eastern Europe because they we 
pereecuted and starved; there was a similar 
emigration wave from die Balkans. The south- 
eastern European refugees arc seldom remem- - 


tkm csdasngcs 7 v . 

thing more .unpleasant); . Mripy^jcot op 
United -States .^aud other connincS, i 
m Europe; So grcar w as “ " “ ' 





KS^W^WarTUmillion 
bad to leave Turkey. Their absorption m mam- 
land Greece was difficult and contributed to 
the radicalization of Greek politics^ 

On tte whole, the attitude of 19th-century 



true-' 


=n fA 


*£*,39* -='• V - r 

k hiiuk, ui>. — - — « - uww ">^. . .y — — — — ISOipliCSlof Al^ QIM Sr. A . 

Eunwe was more tolerant than in a later age. ip France, and there Imvebeenffowmg ^ : 

Hk Times of London could deride the Conh- lems'wftb new imnugpants in'Biaain and me> Wi 
nental revolutionaries recently arrived as “guest worireis” (above aU Thrio) m -f 

“wearing hats such as no one ever wore and Germany. Were these people refugees? -Aiort>- J ._ 
hair wbere none should be.” But no one was did not leave their aHmttie&because th^ 
denied entry into Britain at the time, and. there persecuted for political L or other leasons mtJL; . 
was no need for passports and visas, not only because Hky wanted a better Efe.This isTKra^^ - 
because there were not that many refugees but major political issue facing European goran^.- 
because the refugees were not considered a merits. The Wcst Genpan ^ ; , 

political or economic threat- - in Europe, makes the graritmg -of ponpcal^.:. . 

All this changed after World War I. More asylum to foreigners mandatory. 
than a million Russians left their country artet no denying that .ttw^/jbeen^iiau^qf flat' . _ 
the revolution and an exodus followed the • provision^ and. ihe staOuchest mte mation a fe T . : 
disintegration of the Ottoman and Austro- win flinch at the danger that he and hfa lmaffl;: 
Hungarian empires. The situation of minorities • be outnumbered Ijy arrivals from tarawW”; 
in the successor states and Nazi persecution of . places* This, is true all thewbrid 
Jews were further causes of the increasing Manrois fess than fair whm lxj deaies lhe ^ . ^ ■ 

^ 1 vdeeply'ooosexyatiTCi^^ * r - 

Sohitkm to Previous Puzzle 


tcaibbratyE^ politics. . . .... 

-In. this respect ' there is not the slightest ;*■ V • 
difference between conservatives and liberals,— ~\- 
sociaiists andconnmntistsm 'Enrcpe. InsHred^ V; 
by rode music, they may give gwqfous dafHK - ;V : 
tions tprcfugccs, Iwt thqr-donot want 
their bomei Fortunately, the oroblem m 
rope today S diffdtint from jhe crisis ... 

1930s and ’40s when it WasBterally a qaestioit .; ... 
of life or draffr- Marrus has writtm a fine book: , - 
on a difficult subject that will preoccup y gog? ; ^ ; 
p mrnm tR and nations for many VMS 16 CWEC;- 


■V\ l 


nos QaaaQa aas 

deqb nmaHoa ana 

BO 0 BaC 33 I 3 iaC! 3 I 3 ni 30 C 3 

□□□a sana aa 
□Has aaci □□ 
tanQana shb 
eb □ HanaBsa 
□DBQPoaaanaQaBa 
EiaianGiar 
aQQBS a 1 
□dbd naa 
□dqd aaaa _ 
EEQQaiaiiianocaaana 
E 3 BD GltiailQQ 3303 
bfih anaaa 


9/19/83 ^ 


V .Walter baqueur, diairmari-of the research, 
council of. the Center for Strmepc aid /htema^, : 
tjnruil Studies of Georgetown. University, is'thej . -v. 
author . of "The Terrible Secret: St 
the: Truth About Sitkris find/ 
wrote this review for The 


■ 

s <r* 

r 

is- 


2-?r- 

v> I-*-"- 

■esc - 


Pf*' 

m 

'JS* 




tiv - 


BRIDGE 




Unscramble these tour Jumbles, 
one tetter to each square, to tann 
lour ordinary words. 


DYBER 


hn nr 




NOOLC 


in 

i] 



INKANP 


M 1 

_L 


By Alan Truscott . do iL If he leads a. trnmp, . won. *e Matzump. 

Soutii wins m duniiny, toffs a* tnmq) read from me westpoji' .. 

O N die (tiflgramed deal, ^.K -iyith the made ace and sinon South was hd|Mess; He;. - 
South played in four cashes the heart ace. He can was now an entry sbort m the ; ; 
spades 
nozuN 

spades, 

second major at the four level make his contract ;> • -* 

A trump was led and South _ - > ■ V L ' L V , ; „- 

captured East’s ten with the N0fi3 * 

qoecn. He cashed the king and 
ace of dubs and ruffed a dub. 

East discarding a diamond. A 
low heart was led from the 
dosed hand, and East won 
with the ten in this position: 

It is not obvious what the 
defense can do at this point to 
defeat the contract. South has 
four tricks, and is threatening 
to score the heart act together 

with a cross-raff for ten tricks. East and West fotmd the 
It is es sen tial for the defense to right sointioo. East led a low 
lead a tramp, but East cannot diamond and when his partner . 




WEST 

♦ s'..-.- ' • 

OKS - 72 


4X11 

❖ »» 

EAST- 
♦ J4 ' 
VQ53 
« A69 

■ : . ■- 

soora 

4AT- ■ 
VAI> • 

’4 QS 3 


.. VTf. . 

• ' «ai . v ' 

•ajms r 1 

♦ bast 

♦ JIM 
VQH51 
4Atll 

♦ 4* 

SOOTH(D) 

♦ A Q 7^ 

: 9 A J S 2 , 

«QI1 ' . 

. •K7 - • :■ 

Bait nd Wert mgm 


WEST - 
♦ 52 ' 

9X»« 
OKJ73 

♦-q u>i 2 


.. » 


Tbebiddb*! 

• . 

• L'-lZ. 

Sorth Wert 

North 

Bart 

lN.f. PMS 

2 ♦ •• 

^Pbm 

19 PatE 

»N-T. 

Pm. 

4 ♦ PUB 

. to* -• 

~vm: 


IFs>l 



SHOPIN 


nTd 

_ 

j 


WHAT A WORKER 
WHO ALWAYS 
I WATCHES THE CLOCK 

generally remains. 


Now arrange Die circled tetters to 
torn the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Yesterday's 


nmr. nn &Tn nr 

(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: KNELL HNNY IMPORT GLANCE 

m — 5 ssn 

WEATHER 


EUROPE 


tUoorvc 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Barcelona 

Beterade 

Berlin 

Brussels 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Co v on haee p 

Costa Del Sol 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

MOSCOW 

Monidi 

Nice 

Oslo 

Parts 

P'rotnw 

Reykjavik 

Romo 

StackBoHn 

Strosbauro 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 
U 79 20 66 
If 06 13 SS 

30 B6 16 61 
27 Bl 15 W 

26 TO 15 Sf 

18 64 11 53 
It It 15 9 
39 B4 11 52 
24 75 M 57 
15 W 8 66 
77 81 21 70 
17 03 13 55 
11 52 7 45 

31 B8 13 55 
23 73 16 61 

23 73 9 48 

14 57 4 39 

24 75 14 57 

27 81 22 72 

26 79 17 63 
20 48 14 57 
77 81 11 52 

26 79 14 57 

13 55 B 46 

23 73 12 54 

27 81 19 66 

15 59 2 36 

25 77 16 61 
20 68 11 52 

5 41 4 39 

29 84 16 61 

14 57 4 39 

24 75 12 54 

25 77 IS S9 
20 68 17 63 

15 59 9 48 

23 73 9 ♦ 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tel avi* 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 


25 77 3 37 

29 84 23 72 
34 93 13 55 
27 81 17 63 
29 84 20 68 


ASIA 


Bangkok 

Beilina 

Hone Kong 

Manila 

Now Deni 

Seoul 

5banobai 

Singapore 

Taipei 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 
Ale ten 
Cairo 

Com Town 
Casablanca 
Harare 


HIGH LOW 
C F C f 

30 80 14 57 r 

25 77 15 S9 O 

28 82 26 79 sh 

30 86 26 79 r 

30 86 24 73 Cl 

22 72 19 66 r 

30 86 25 77 St 

— — — — no 

32 90 27 81 fr 

22 72 20 08 sh 


Nairobi 

Tarts 


25 77 17 63 
33 91 38 68 
28 83 15 59 
25 77 21 n 

19 66 14 57 

20 79 24 75 

25 77 15 59 

26 79 17 03 


1* 61 8 46 

29 84 » 68 


LATIN AMERICA 

Boeoos Aires 
Caracas 
Lima 

Mexico city 
Mode Janeiro 

NORTH AMERICA 


fr 
ft 

— — — — na 

25 77 11 52 cl 

39 84 23 73 o 


Meharoee 

Atlanta 


IS $9 12 54 lb 
19 66 IS 59 


Chicago 

Denver 

Detroit 

Hoeotald 

Houston 

Los An g el es 

Miami 

Minneapolis 

Montreal 

Nassau 

NOW York 

San FrtMdsGo 

Seattle 

Toronto 

Washington 


13 55 4 39 r 

27 81 14 57 fr 

23 72 13 55 fr 

21 82 16 61 PC 

29 84 12 54 

25 77 12 54 

33 91 2S 77 

33 91 23 73 

22 72 18 64 

30 16 24 75 

26 79 19 64 

22 72 9 « 

30 86 23 73 

27 81 16 61 

21 30 14 57 

16 61 9 a 

2D 68 7 45 

27 81 17 63 


S !3?taudy ; .kovercarti -wort* cloudy; Grain; 

sh-sitowen; sw^now: si -stor my. 

THURSDAY'S FORECAST T w'-Tj 

28 - i7 (B2 — 631. PARIS: Partly goud^ Temp. ^J^^zuRiCH^Wr'. 

RirfeM&T TOTa.E-i8W -64). SINGAPORE: Storms. 
Temp. 31 —24 ( 08 - 751. TOKYO: Fogg/ Temp. Z1 — 18 173 64)- 


Wbrid Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Sept. 18 

doling prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

AEGON 

AK20 

Alio Id 

AMEV 

A’Oom Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

■uehrmann T 

Co land Hide 

Etsevler-NDU 

Fokker 

Gist Brocades 

He! nek on 

Hoosovera 

KLM 

Noarden 

Nai Nedtfer 

Nwlllayd 

Oee VanderG 

Pakhond 

Philips 

Robeco 

Rodamco 

RalltiCO 

Ronenta 
Royal Dutch 
Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
VMF stork 
VNU 


50050 500 

227 230 

97 JO 97 
12SJ0 125J0 
246.70 247 JO 
305 304J0 
860 850 

ai50 85-80 
716 716 

107 107 

3® 2SJ2B 
129.90 129 

7BJQ 78 
21BJ0 218J7B 
1AO40 159 JO 
61 6160 
5760 5040 

4740 4740 
7540 7A20 

189 190 

347 347 

6540 65 

50.10 50.10 
7A10 76JO 

13SJ0 134.90 

69.10 6940 
46.70 46JD 

19040 19040 
344 34340 
2740 2740 

236-00 237JO 
222 224 


ANP.CBS Gent Index : 22046 

prevlon : float 


Aitiod 

Bekoert 

CocVertll 


EBES 

GB-Inno-BM 

GBL 2020 200 

Gevoert 4150 410 

Hoboken 57» 570 

Intercom 2335 23K 

Kredlelbcnk 9350 V2S 

Petroflna 6230 621 

Soc Generate 1905 186 

Safina JfM 784 

Satvav M 568 

Traction Eloc 4135 411 

UCB 5660 535 

unern 1775 176 

VUH lie Monlagne 8600 859 

Current Stock tadex : 247245 
Previous : 2456J9 


AEG-Tetefunken 14440 
Allianz Vers 
Altana 
BASF 
Saver 

Bay Hypo Bank, 

Boy Veretesbank 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 
BMW 

Commerzbank 

Cent Gumnu 
DalntW-Benz 

Deuttdte Babcock 17930 T7730 

CMutsdu Bonk 604 599 

Dresdner Bank »7J0 WUO 

ghh 19 %2 20 H2 

Harpener 322 330 


378 


401 
407 
2791 
333 

49740 _ „ 
225 224.10 
15680 15W0 
97650 989 

360 36740 


I Close Pre* I 

Hochttet 

749 

to 

Hoochst 

1 ^.1 ji 

HOflsch 

128J0 12740 

Horten 

196 

198 

HUSSOl 

400 

390 

IWKA 

31440 31720 \ 

Kali + Sab 

383 383J0 

Karstadt 

272 

248 

Kmrfbot 

307 JO 

300 

Ktoeckner H-D 

313 311 JO 

Ktoeckmjr Werka 

75 

75 


12140 

131 

Linde 

572 

573 

Lutthonsa 

* 231 22&5D i 

MAN 

182 

184 1 

MameuTNmn 

23QJ0 227.90 1 


1950 

1920 

Nixdort 

57940 581 JO 


490 

696 1 

Porsche 

U17 

M06 | 

Preussoo 

241 

244 



RWE 

198 

197 

Rhelnmetall 

355 

370 

Schertno 


521 

SEL 

336 345JD 

Siemens 

607JQ 

607 

ThVMon 

13740 13640 

Veto 

241.10 

238 

VolLawgpenwerk 

339 

345 


675 

660 


j Previous : 1534J0 



11 HtoWlKMtf 11 

Bk East Asia 

7140 

2140 

Cheung Kong 

18 

18 

China UoM 

15.10 

15.10 


8 

BAS 


4250 

43 

Henderson 

342S 

2A0 

China Gas 

9-H 

9J0 

HK Electric 

8 

B 

HK Realty A 

HL7D 

11.20 

HK Hotels 

35 

35 

HK Land 

60S 

6.15 


7 JO 

7J5 

HK Telwhone 

140 

040 

HK Yaumglel 

X2S 

025 

HK Whorl 

440 

6J5 

Mutch Whampoa 

24.10 

26J0 

Hyson 

041 

041 

Inf 1 Cltv 

049 

048 

Jordlns 

1140 

1140 

Jardlne Sec 


13.90 

Kowloon Motor 

940 

9.10 

Miramar Hotel 

44 

44 

New world 

745 

745 

Orient Overseas 

Sum. 

— 

SHK Props 

1240 

1240 

Stetu.it 

250 

250 

Swire Pacific A 

2440 

2440 

Toi Cheung 

1.99 

1.9S 

Woh Kwono 

Oi^ 

045 

WhUlocfc A 



Wing On CO 

1J1 

172 

Wlnsnr 

440 

4J0 

World Inri 

its 

2.10 

Haeg Sepglndw 
Prevlon : 156948 

156142- 

] Mmm 

.liilwn' 

EJ 


AECI 

Anglo American 
Anglo AmGoM 
Barlows 
Blwgor 
BuHal& 

De Beers, 

Drielonteln 

Elands 


760 765 
3300 3225 
18300 18300 
1095 1100 
1390 1425 
7250 7250 
1180 1165 
4925 4925 


GF5A 
Harmony 
hi vela steel 

KlOOt 

Nfidbank 

Pres Sleyn 
Rusplat 
SA Brows 
Si Helena 
Sasol 

West Hatdlna 


3125 3090 
5808 2750 
515 525 

2100 21 0B 
1140 1085 
6000 5950 
1780 17® 
728 725 

32D0 3225 
765 770 

6850 6800 


Composite Stock index : 1I43A8 
Previous : 114020 


AA Carp SI2M, ST2JA 

Allied Lyons 278 _,278 

Anglo Am Gold 568 W. S6BU 
Au Brit Poods 2Z2 222 

ASS Dairies 134 136 

Barclays 372 374 

Boss 574 574 

BAT. 273 276 

Baectiam 320 330 

BICC 223 223 

BL 33 34 

Blue Circle 516 503 

HOC Group 279 27? 

Boots 201 2® 

Bawdier Indus 343 338 

BP S36 52S 

Brit Home 51 385 2fl6 

Bril Telecom 196 198 

Brit Aerospace 401 400 

Brltoll 206 201 

BTR 358 361 

Burmuh 292 293 

Cable Wireless 575 575 

Cadbury 5cfiw 139 143 

Owner Cons IBS 185 

Commercial U 326 224 

Cans Gold 439 442 

CourtouMS 146 MS 

Daioetv 431 436 

DeBoers* -we «3 

DisNIlers 386 ® 

□rtetanteln JIB^ti SIBj 

Ftaora 346 3S1 

Free SI Ged SZIVk S2IV, 

GEC 166 166 

G6n Act: Idem 621 615 

GKN M4 227 

Glaxo C 135/32 13V6 

Grand Met 336 336 

GRE 675 87D 

Gukinesa 276 277 

GUS 863 863 

Hanson 203 sm 

Hawker 389 387 

ICI 657 662 

imperial Group 195 196 

Jaguar SH 384 

LandSKurittoS 293 294 

Legal General 669 644 

Lloyds Bank 402 404 

LonrtM 150 ISO 

Lucas 378 383 

Marks and Sd 151 152 

Metal Bax 501 498 

(Midland Bank 389 392 

Nat West Bank 634 639 

PondO 401 406 

"Pllfclngton Z75 275 

Piestwv ~ 136 136 

Prudential 689 682 

Ratal Eton 138 138 

Rondfnntete S79V. S80Vs 

Rank 408 398 

Reed Inti 699 699 

Reuters 329 332 

Royal omcnc 4325/3243 47/64 
RTZ 572 5« 

Soaldil 720 720 

Sainsbury 330 


1740 1750 | Heart Hoiames 1 10 


Shell 

STC 

Sid Chartered 
Sun AJ nance 
Tale and Lvle 
Tcsco 
Thorn EMI 
T.l. Group 
Trafalgar Hse 
TNF 

Ultra mor 

Uni lever £ 
United Biscuits 
Vickers 
Wool worth 


F.T.30 Indw: l« 
Previous: 1296JB* 



Afllm 


Banco Comm 
Cenlrcio 

Ogti hotels 

Credltoi 
ErUonio 
Farm llalia 
Flat 

Generali 

,FI 

ItalCBinantl 

iwiaas 

tfalmabUIorl 

M e dlobo n co 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

PlrelU 

HAS 

RWascwle 

SIP 

SME 

Sola 

Statdo 

5 let 


24350 24680 
3450 3445 
1 Obi'S 10860 
3029 2995 
11380 11490 
13380 13510 
4519 4474 
64060 
10600 10550 
50500 50450 
1789 1810 

ingoings 

129000132300 
2475 2445 
7460 7770 
3310 3210 

112000112900 
964 960 

2475 2459 
1515 1535 
3965 ten 
15350 15300 
3595 3698 


MIB Currert Index : T74I 
Previous : 1745 


Air Lloulde 
AWhocn AIL 

Av Dassault 
Banco Ire 

BIC , 

Boos rain 

Carretair 

Choraours 

dub Med 
DOTTY 

Europe 1 
Gen EcrtX 

Hortwtto 

LatargoCop 

Legrond 

Lesleur 

tXJrenJ, 

Morten 

Mofra 

Merlin, . 

Mlchetln 

MogtHennessv 

AMulhtex 

Pernod RJc 
Portlor 

Rodkrfectin 

ISfRossignol 

JSSSfSaF 

Total . 


562 570 

305J0 30X80 
1125 1005 

627 640 

490 499 

1580 1578. 

734 740 

21SS 2170 
7300 2285 
695 698 

491 J8 4®jj 

1415 1440 

773 782 

"ffl 

nl! 

593 «8 

2345- 2336 

^ I 

2030 2020 

W7S 1078 
1816 1935 

77 JO 7M5 
71S Til 
m 

455 459 JO 
399 3M 
286 287 

2*4 296 

1425 1450 
1505 1512 

62! 625 

,3 2 SS! 

2655 200 
560 534 

S5 229 


APO« l«texi W57 

CAC index 

previous : 317A0 


Close Pryv. 

( ?1mrrtwnrr ]■ 


2430 

2740 


520 

545 


SJS 

47i 


2.17 

11/ 

Inehcop® 

111 

SS 


5J0 

OCBC 

8 

7J0 


274 

243 


270 

2.14 


142 

176 


174 

174 


2.06 

2.10 


540 

545 


044 


SI Trading 

3LB4 

346 

untied Overaeas 

14/ 

IJ7 

UOB 

342 


Streets Tlmta led Index : 766JS 

Pm loos : 75744 



I StodkWba || 

AGA 

130 

I2S 

Alfa Laval 

202 

200 


298 

298 


405 

400 

Alla Capoa 

120 

118 

Boliden 

203 

197 

Electrolux 

144 

143 

Ericsson 

231 

229 


NjQ. 

— 


172 

172 

Pharmacki 

175 

173 


NA 

448 

Sondwik 

440 

470 

SkmesSta 

94 

93 

SKF 

223 

223 

Sw^dishMalch 


19T 

Volvo 

234 

N4L 

AffaersvaarMifl index : 381 Jl 

Prevlevs : 380J8 



1 Sydney 

ACI 

240 

273 


AID 

440. 


740 

740 


177 

343 

Bougalnvlite 

143 

8 

146 

8 


446 

440 

Camaloo 

143 

140 

CRA 

548 

546 

CSR 

us 

114 


245 

241 


345 

144 

IO Australia 

2.10 

IK 

Mosel km 

130 

240 



243 

Myer 

SM 

Itt 

Not Aurt Bonk 

670 

47A 


670 

7 

N Srehat Hill 

242 

243 

Poseidon 


4 


170 

173 

ScartM 

*10 

544 


2.10 

7 JO 

Western Mln.-j 

174 

33 

Wcilpoc BcfWng 

440 

Woodshte 

141 

140 

AU Onflnortes ladex : 94548 

Prevtoes : 96140 



II 1 


375 

390 


765 

779 


799 

■as 


781 

TO 


SSI 

533 


1010 

TOM 


1670 

MU 

ciioit 

425 

429 

Pal Nlwon Print 

1060 

I0« 


865 

874 


892 

900 


9000 

BOBO 

Full Bank 

1590 

1590 


Full Photo 
Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 

Japan Air Lines 
Kallma 
Kansal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brenarv 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kvacero 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
MtsuMrtil Bcnk 
Mitsubishi Own 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
MlteubMil Cora 
Mitsui end Ca. 
MltSUkasM - 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

HGK hautedors 
NifckoSec 
Nippon Kogaku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusan 
Nissan _ 

Nomura Sec 

Olympus 


gam £5 \ 

Sharp -1 

SWtnaiu 745 1 

SMnetsu Chemical TO i 

Sony 3590 S 

Sumltama Bank 1690 T1 

Sumifomo Chsm 2» ; 

BunHasno Marine 6W 3 

Swiritamo Metal 152 1 

TssJssof Corn 371 . 

Tbhdn Marine 564 1 

Takeda Chem 845 I 

TDK 4000 41 

TglUn . 497 - 

Toklo Marine 8» I 

Takvo Elec. Power; 2140 9 
toms Printing 710 1 

Torav lad 530 

Toshiba 332 . 

Toyota 1160 11 

YamaleM5ec 779 < 

NOdM/DJ. Indue : 12539J6 
Previo us : 12S91JS1 . 

Now Index: I8B173 
: IMMI 


Adla 
Ahisut s se 
A u tophon 
Bank Leu 
Brawn Bavin 
Cftd G*tey 
Credit Suisse 
Eiertrawatt 

■ Ulrtuehuuh 

nOHUTDlHIIV 

inter discount 

Jacob Sudiard 

JaHnoll 

Landis Gyr 

Matvenpldc 

Nestle 

OertlkorvB 

Roche Boby 

Sandas 

Schindler 

Sutler 

Surveillance 

Swtoolr 

SBC 


4150 4150 
721 72S 

6050 6075 
3Jm 3390 
18U 1810 
3410 3440 
3030 3085 
3380 3410 
NjO. — 
2880 2900 
6900.6900 
2875 2M0 
2130 2150 
5100 5200 
7S60 7560 
1690 1710 
10125 10200 
UK 1520 
4750 4700 
423 419 

5500 5520 
MIS 1440 
4T4 476 


Swiss Reinsurance 2270 2290 

Swiss Vottsbank 1990 2030 

Union Bank 4335 4350 

Winterthur 5350 5400 

Zurich Ins 2315 2390 

SBC Index : 522J0 
Previous : 534 JN 


N.a: not quoted; NJL; not 
ouaflabtei »d; exrtlvldend. 


Sates Stock 
440 AMI Prco 
5000 Acklands 


Canadian Ondcsna AP 

jiteh Law Close a*. 
S2BW 20Vk 20V»— Vk 


Apnlas E 
urn Aft Enerav 
500 Alta Hal 
4te9Ahwma5t ■ 
msArocen 
5730 AlCO 1 I 
798 BP Canada 
4210B Bank BC 
432066 Bank NS 
112061 Bmricka 
5800 Baton At 
15186 Bonanza R 

19400 Bralam* 

. .1108 Bnxnatea 
24093 BCFP •• 
20290 BC Rb 
12000 BC Phone ■ 
2»00 Brunswk 
300 Budd Can 
13850 CAE 
1 CCLA 

21502 cod Frv 
. UffOOCompeauf 
75300 C Nor West 
uaocPacfcrt 
1312 Can Trust 
760 C Tuna 
57373 Cl BkCom 
73887 CTIrtf A f 
1290CUtaB 
3576 Celanese 
IflCetan T75p 
9500 Centrl Tr 
1301T Cteentex' 
3400 C Diztb A 
22640 CDtett B I 
ss-MCTLBank • 
2400Canwest A 

7500C<»oka R 

9801 Crcrwnx 
15900 Czar Ras 
46518 Doan Dev 
2000. Doan A .. 
13190 Denison A p 
8100 Denison- B I 
17125 Deveican - 
55DO DkJmsn A f 

W83 Olekren B 

36000 Dofaseo 
100 Donohue 
7874 DU Pont A 
140575 Dvlax A 
4000 Elcthottl X 
lTOOEmco . 

I030Q EauftV Svr 
78000 FCA Inti 

3750 C Falcon C 

5231 -Icnbrdae 

1921 Fed Ind A 

9100 F City Fbt 
1439Gandts A 
4200 Gvoc Camp 
iSOlMGeacrade 
1900 Gibraltar 
7300 GoWcorp f 
TOGmWG 
400 GL Forest 
2D0GT Pacific 
UISGreytMd 
12760 H Group A 
3430 Hawker . 
■013 Hayes D 
1900 Hees Inti 
. 4WMH BavCa 
97208 IfTKHCO 
600 Indot 
3SSD Inland Gas 
165300 Inti Thom 
1488S tnforPipe 
6100 Ipsco 
uooivacoB 
8307 Jannoek 
300 Kelsev H 
; 3140 Kerr Add 
20283 Labatt 
MOLOntCem 
5300 LOCdrtO 
4150 LobtawCo 

8710 Lwmanics 
_1 POMPS HA . 
WgMICC 
2 07 29 MdonH X 
; 2225 Maritime I 
WOMerlontJ E 
, 54239 Mai son A f 


ST7W 1714 17W ' - 
51716 .1710 1716— b 


sia .... 

514 13fa 13W— W 
S181A 17« mfc— 9k 
i2T mb tav>h kl 
S 99k m »*— ft 
53106. 31ft 31V6— <A 
490 415 475 —10 

51 3ft 12ft 12^~ > 
183 174 134 — 7 

519ft IBft 18ftA- ft- 
385 350 3S0 -48 

m ■ 435 ,435 
517 17 IT • 

5506 -816 • 

223 S15 Tl5_ — 7 

*23 22* 24*- V. 

51346 13ft 13ft— 0k 
S2*ft 27ft 27ft— 1ft 
515ft 15ft 15ft 
5n 17 17 + ft 

512ft lift 1216+ ft 
527 26ft 26ft— ft 
522 2!ft 2JR h-ft 
534ft 34ft 34ft 
54146 41 41ft"-t- 9k 

"512ft 12ft t2ft — ft 
-536ft 36ft 36ft— lb 
Wft 9ft:- 9W— ft 
SI7Wl 17ft 17ft 
S9ft -9ft 946 
518ft lift " 18ft— ft 
515ft 1446.1446—46 
S9ft 946 946+ ft 

5716 7 . 7 — ft 

STM 7 •••. 7- - 
• siift lift 1146 
SI 8 8 '.- 

295 2S0 395 +3 

520ft 20ft 20ft~L ft 
rn 305 2TQ-.— ■» 

390- 360 375 —25 

395" 335 "375 —30- 
511ft lift llft^ ft 
JiRk ”5* ft 
w eig . 419 
S7ft 6ft 7 • - 

57ft 716 7ft + ft 
525ft. 2446 241—- 46 
516ft. 16ft 16ft— ft 
*2316 23- 23 —ft 

CT 20 20 — V 

5716 7% 716— 16 

5W 1746 Y8- +ft 
515ft 1416 1416— ft 
SISK) 1816 18ft— 16 
511ft lift lift 
51146 llVr-TIft^-ft 
-53146 3116 31ft— ft 
- «6 - 9ft 9ft_ ft 
W) 340 mt . 

55ft 5 . -.I-"—: ft 

57 6ft 6ft'-- - 
513ft 1M Wft-ft 
517ft 17ft. 171^4 ft 
" 534ft 34ft 34ft- .r 
522ft 22ft 22ft- ft 
55ft 8ft -8ft— ft 
51946 ■ JVKl 19ftr~-ft 
.«» Ilft-Wk . - 
. 521ft. JDft, n " 
52S 2446 -24ft'. 

524ft SHY 2316-46 
W W 16+2 
Sfflk 22ft 2246+ ft 
S9ft 9.-9 .—.ft 
. MM6" .43ft -.42ft- ft 
51346 T3ft 1346^ ft 
521 21 ' 21 —.ft 

Siift 15ft 15ft— Vi 
539ft 39ft 39ft— 1ft 
515, . 15 - 15 — ft 
527ft 27ft' .27ft-t-'ft 
51316. 13ft- 13ft'.' - 
511ft .ltf* 10ft— ft 
12136 21 - 21 ft 

. 51816 . 18 18 — Vk 

SW6 ,16ft ’6ft r ft 
400.." 400 :>iS5 ' '+ 3 • 
5131t 13ft'-13V6— ft- 
S15ft llft'-.Mftld ft' 

^ * 


3000 Mol son B 
1800 MurphY 
•4063 Nabisco L 
26570 Noranda 
05865 Moreen 
397544 Nva AM At 
MTOOMOWSCD W 
38343 NuWst « A 
H)T20akwaod 
8300 0shawaAI 
34150 PocWAIrtn 
4700 Pamaur 
44oaRonCanP. 
.2300 Pembina 
100 Pine Point 
BS&53 Placer 
W0550 Provtao 
3S8a due Mwra 0 
■s«tRavraelcf . 
3268 Rcdpalh 

399 ReedSt 1 5p . 
4100 Raman 

440 Rothman - 
- 3210a Sceptre 
7300 5cotts f 
86717 Scars Can 
19064 ShettCon 
136100 Sherrttt 
70 slater Bf 
103365 Southam 
16301 Soar Aero f 
100 St Brodcst 
29757 Steico A ■ 
21422 Sulptro 

400 Stepp R 
1000 Taro 

TO Tack Cor A 
19193 TeCkBt 
3108 Tex Can " 
34250 Thom N A . 
307265 Tar. Dm Bk 
.50*9 TorsfOr.B f 
1000 Traders At . 
23700 Trns Mt 
1408 Trinity Rea 
33187TmAtta UA 
SJ139 TrCon PL . 

8631 Trtmac .. 
387ll7Tr1lanA 
TOO TrtxeeAf . 
30463 Turbo . 

■ 20 Unbsra A 1 

■ MUnCwbHU. 

12110 U Entprisa 

400 U Kano - 

2DiooveranA( ' 

1060 Vest aron • 
7950 Woedolr . 
TMfWrtdwad 
SSDWestndn 


527ft Z7ft 27?k+-J6‘ - 

sis* . 15 . is-.—*:-: 
516ft .lM.-.16ftT+ft; ■ 
55ft. 5ft Jft-r#.:-- 
520ft 20 20r -i-X 

43 41 - 41' -ftl fc.-V ; 

57ft. 7 - 7ft . + ft.-- 
■532ft at-sR/*#: 
514ft 14ft Uft-r 'ft- A : 

^6 ^ 

517ft 17ft I7ft :s '-r. : 
52246 22ft 22ft-r.J6>.> * , 
52346 23 23^—5 . .' 

526 2546 26- ’ + - 

435 -430 - ‘ 430 • : 5 - ; • 

® B46 .5*+;' ft." .. 

sisft.iuft -v 

53646 3646 ,3S4t—‘4k-- \ . 

sn* nib iift—ft- .. 

536ft 36 a«;-t:3fc;7..r 

55ft Sft 5ft + ■*!.-• 
XBOb 2744 :7m —. ft 
58ft 8ft._*k,.-Zf.-,.. i 
524ft 23ft 24 —ft, .-V 

5121b, 1ZU ISftT 


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in 

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ITT 21 -21 ... 
nwt ana .-aaibrr-' 
225 - - 

270 3W.-2M.--rV.' 

518 . 78 - IT- -.: u 
51466 :14ft Mft-r-ft- 
ST4ft J3ft .1366-** 
531ft- 3046 -aOft-^nb. 

523ft ZHk 






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•2146 

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355 350 -*B.'-rW. ;• . 

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521... ' 20ft- -28ft-Sfe-- ' 

. - sauiL. 206 »w 

-57ft- 

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4§* 4^-*^^#?.- 



Wssftara • 587ft. • B7V6 • gnf Z&&' v. Wj 3 





55jOBon*brdrB 
5S50 CB Pqk-- " 
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4B2£ConBatft 

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15175 Power Cora 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1985 


li" 


Page 19 


SPORTS 


in' 9 



IP 1 


VlUBlA 


ties a Si 


?!„ *•." i-i 


v : ’ ■*■ 





Matured Mandlikova Finally Checks In at the Top 


__ Ptp» haw i m oo uu t 

Haaa Mandlikova: No more headbands, and no longer playing only for the money. 


By John Fcinstein 

Wutiiingtuft Pa if Srm if 

NEW YORK — On the surface, (he 
similarities between Hana Mandlikova and 
Ivan Lendl are striking. Both are Czech o- 
slovukian citizens who spend much of ihrir 
time living in the United Suites. Both are 
major talents whose ability to live up to 
their potential has been questioned in the 
past. Both play tennis right-handed and 
golf left-handed. 

Both, loo, are U.S. Open champions, the 
products of a small country that has pro- 
duced some of the great tennis talents of 
this century: JarosJav Drobny and Martina 
Navratilova, Lendl and Mandlikova. 

But one man who has bad a tremendous 
influence on tennis in Czechoslovakia In 
the lost IS years often is overlooked: Jan 
(Codes. He was a Wimbledon champion, in 
1973, but that was during the professional 
players’ boycott. He also was a two-time 
U.S. Open finalist and a French Open 
champion. It was his success, as much as 
anything, that inspired such young players 
as Lend and Mandlikova. 

*'He was the big hero because of what he 
did.'* Mandlikova said. “He helped make 
tennis very popular in our country. It was 
always popular before, but much more 
after Kodes. People, knew of Drobny but 
he defected, so it was different. It was 
Kodes that people always talked about." 

Now, it wtU be Mandlikova and Lendl 
they talk about. For each, the road to the 
US. Open title was a difficuJi one. Mandli- 


kova was supposed to lake over women's 
tennis when she won two Grand Slam 
tournaments, the French and Australian 
opens, before she reached the age of 20. 
Lendl was in the top three in the world by 
21, yet never rose to be No. 1. 

“1 think 1 appreciate this championship 
much more than the French," Mandlikova 
reflected after beating Navratilova in the 
final of the recent U.S. Open. “Then, I won 
just on talent. It seemed so easy — I was 
just out there free as a bird playing. For 
this one. I had to suffer and put in a lot of 
hard work. 

■it’s hard for people to underctand 
that,” said Mandlikova. “for someone like 
me, coming on tour was completely differ- 
ent than if 1 was an American. When 1 First 
played here in 1978, ( was 16 and ( beat 
JoArnie RusselL who was a very good play- 
er. But I still had to go home to play in 
juniors because if 1 didn't win 1 couldn't 
travel outside the country. It was hard for 
me because I didn't speak the language and 
l couldn't just play ail the lime the way an 
American girl could if she was good. But I 
learned from it.” 

Mandlikova, 23, is almost six years 
younger than Navratilova. She remembers 
being a 12-year-o!d ball girl for Navrati- 
lova and admiring her attacking style. But, 
unlike Navratilova, she and Lendl nave not 
defected. 

“Martina is an American," Mandlikova 
said. “If you read her hook, you know that. 
She thinks now as an American and 1 think 


that is O.K_ it is good for her. 1 am a 
Czech: l love my country. I love being able 
to go home to see my family. 

“Bui 1 know there is more in the world. I 
couldn't live there now because I have seen 
other places. I have ray freedom to travel 
and to do what 1 want. 1 do not think they 
[the government] want me to have a prob- 
lem with that-" 

The Czechoslovak government, accord- 
ing to people in ternb. has an arrangement 
with Mandlikova and Lendl: They are free 
to live where they want, play where they 
warn and make as much money as they 
want. In return, they don't defect and they 
agree to play on national te ams . 

Mandlikova says she feels intensely 
Czechoslovakian when she watches her 
country compete in sports. “This year, l 
was watching the ice hockey team play in 
the World Cup against the Russians," she 
said. “J was going crazy, partly because I 
love hockey but also because it was the 
Russians. When we woo. all 1 could do was 
jump and say. ‘Yay!’ " 

When Lendl speaks about his new home 
— be lives in Connecticut, Mandlikova in 
Florida — he gets emotional. Mandlikova 
is not the same way. 

“Ivan is different than I am." she said. “I 
like it here. I like the people very much, but 
I also love Europe. There are things there 
you cannot find here. But Ivan really loves 
it here. He loves everything about it. I'm a 
little more old-fashioned. 1 like small res- 


taurants and quiet places like I can find in 
Europe." 

Both have matured here. Since her emer- 
gence in 1981, Mandlikova has been pres- 
sured to challenge Navratilova and Chris 
Even Lloyd for the No. 1 spot in women’s 
tennis. At times, she says, the pressure was 
almost unbearable. Now. feeling more 
comfortable with herself, with other play- 
ers and with tennis, the U.S. Open title may 
be a first major step toward the top spot 

“I fed like all the work paid off for toe," 
she said. “When 1 first played tennis" — at 
the age of 9 — "I always thought I would 
never play it past 16.- But 1 started winning 
championships and my father kept idling 
roe 1 could be the best. That always kept 
me going." 

Was there a turning point? "My brother 
[William, who is 27} told me at Wimbledon 
it was lime to gel a haircut and get rid of 
the headband, that it was old-fashioned," 
she said. “I just decided he was right, it was 
time." It had to be coincidence, but with 
her new cut she has found new consistency. 

“At this point in my life. 1 don't play 
tennis for the money," she said. “When 1 
had the 6-0 lead in the last lie breaker 
against Martina, people were cheering so 
loud ! had to remind myself the match 
wasn’t over. 

“Then, I choked on a volley at 6-1. 1 just 
choked, very simply. But when 1 hit the 
next volley and won, I was lying on the 
floor and all I oould think was. 'I won the 
UJ5. Open. 1 did iL 1 really did it'" 


[ Football 

National Football League Team and Individual Leaders 


All 4 American League Contenders Lose 


Hall. DM. 
Monon. wmh 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
TEAM OFFENSE 


Son Dleoo 
Miami 

Kansas Clfv 

Sen nie 
Buffalo 
Jets 

Cincinnati 

Denver 

ftakfei-s 

Pittsburgh 

Cleveland 

New Ena land 

Houston 


i Indianapolis 


829 

716 

ns 

ns 

7U . 

709 

Mt 

MI 

MO 

I - 6U 

582 
457 

TEAM DEFENSE 



NUfmcioia 

530 

16$ 

365 

Ritoaoer, S.F. 

■ 

337 

57 

42.1 


Green Bay 

495 

185 

310 

Horan, PltlL 

14 

589 

57 

47.1 

Poas 

Del raff 

486 

202 

=84 

Hansen. N O. 

to 

420 

51 

42.0 

TO 

Pftiloaelphla 

46B 

200 

2AB 

H0VM. Wash. 

to 

4t7 

55 

41.7 

too 


TEAM DEFENSE 



Donnelly, All. 

11 

458 

56 

41A 


193 636 

2K7 49 V 

1M 559 
350 VS 
267 447 

MS 50 
189 507 

ZI7 444 
32) 329 

235 m 
246 336 

143 314 


Giants 
Wash Inst on 
OW OOOO 
San Francisco 
Dallas 
Rams 

PtiUadetpnia 
Atlanta 
Tampa Bay 
Cretin Say 
S>- Louis 
Minnesota 


Yards Rush Foss 
■*58 206 252 

507 l«4 313 

513 192 320 

571 209 3)2 

569 192 377 

577 IBS 294 

SSI 365 286 


PUNT RETURNERS 
NO YDS AVG 


194 313 MtConkv, Gnis 
193 320 Cooper. PMi. 

709 3)2 Mliawfl. Six. 
192 377 /Handley. Dot. 

IBS S94 Stanley. G.B. 
355 286 B Johnson. Aff. 

315 348 Taylor. CM. 

244 434 McLemar, S.F. 

2B4 441 * Cherry, wash. 

29} 415 Ganzolex. Dali. 

332 504 KICKC 



Yards . 

Rush 

Pass 

Detroit 


854 

263 

592 

Pfffsouratr 

452 

m 

260 

New Orleans 


916 

2T4 

722 

Cleveland 

502 

154 

348 


- 





Raiders 

518 

146 

272 

QUARTERBACKS 



New England 

574 

219 

255 


ATT COM 

YDS 

TD INT 

jels 

626 

' 204 

422 

Bamowsld. All. 

53 

35 

329 

3 

0 

Denver 

627 

254 

373 

MCMahaa CM. 

55 

36 

506 

3 

2 

Kansas CttV 

644 

203 

441 

Lomas. SLU 

54 

29 

453 

3 

1 

Miami 

692 

261 

421 

Meitona. S.F. 

65 

43 

469 

3 

J 

Houston 

693 

309 

384 

DeBarg, T.B. 

59 

39 

397 

4 

4 

Cincinnati 

744 

3or 

443 

Simms. Giants 

61 

29 

405 

3 

1 

Buffalo 

848 

388 

452 

Kramer, Minn. 

S3 

30 

374 

2 

2 

Seattle 

901 

2X4 

687 

Dfckev. 05 

55 

2* 

393 

2 

2 

Indtonanoli* 

931 

320 

611 

Higgle, Del. 

47 

19 

339 

4 

3 

San Diego 

944 

280 

664 

awtitte. Dali. 

7X 

37 

445 

I 

3 


Freeman. TA 
Martin, N4>. 
Hunter. PMI. 
Jenklnj. Wash. 
Austin. At). 

An many, NjO. 
Me Conk r. Gnis 


KICKOFF RETURNERS 
NO YDS AVG 
Minn, 4 124 3)4 

kTA 6 165 275 

4.0. 5 137 27A 

»hll. A ISO 2SO 

Wash. 4 97 243 

>H. 4 94 2X5 

NO. B 184 23.0 

Gnis 3 67 223 


Craig , S.F. 
Chadwick. Dal. 

J Janes. Del. 
Anderson. MHmv 
A nderson, Sf.L. 
Brown Minn. 
J.Betl. TO. 
dark. G.B. 
Coffman, G.B. 
Grofh. NO. 

Hill, DOIL 
Manuel, Glanls 
McKinnon. Chi. 
McMahon. ChL 
Morris, G hints 
Rice. Minn. 
Suhey. Chi. 
While. Rams 
Wilder, TO. 


3 66 no 

6 131 21 J 

SCORING 
Touchdown* 

TD Rush Rec 
5 3 3 


CimfHleJ by Our Slujj From Duputihcs 

BOSTON — Ait four of the coa- 
lending learns in the American 
League lost Tuesday night, but the 
Toronto Blue Jays, confident after 
winning three out of four games in 
New York, were equally confident 
in defeat. 

The Blue jays can afford to be. 
They have built a breathing-room 
lead over ibe second-place Y ankees 
in the Eastern Division, and they're 
well aware that they haven't lost 


BASEBALL RW1VDLT 

more than two in a row since the 
AU-Siar break. 

"Everybody's been contributing 
and we've been consistent," said 
Jesse Barfield after the Boston Red 
Sox downed Toronto, 6-5. “To- 
night we had our chances. We’ve 
come through most of the ti- 
me We just let it slip away to- 
night." 


Tony Armas's three-run home 
run during a four-run fifth inning 
helped send ibe Blue Jays to their 
fifth straight loss ai Fenway Park, 
but Toronto still maintained its 
five-game edge because the Yan- 
kees also lost Tuesday night. 

Trailing by 3-2 in the fifth, the 
Red Sox took advantage of first 
baseman Cliff Johnson’s error and 
chased starter Dave Siieb. Dwight 
Evans started the inning with a 
walk and Wade Boggs followed 


Grant’s Vikings Turn Over New Leaf 


'iVCSiiwJ. 

r. s infeePE 


sou?- one 
$ : erra 
rc cicksup 


: u.U 

,<* V»C 


Krtoa, Sea. 
Fouls. 5JD. 
Kenner, K.C. 
Plunkett. Radrs 
Elwav. Oav 
Andaman, On. 
Moan. Mai*.. 
Danielson. Clew. 
Malone. PHI. 
CTBrfen, Jets 
Marina. Mia. 
Eason. N.E. 
Panel. IntL 
Ferranam. B ft. 


McNeil. Jets 
Warner. Sea. 
Ktanebrew. Cn. 
Bvtter, Clew. 
Winder. Den. 
Bell BuH. 
Alum. Holders 
Heard, K-C. 
Pollard. Fill. 
Cjomes,-N.E. 


Cnrisinsn. Rdrs 
Beil- Buff. 
Chandler. SIX 
Carson. K-C. 
Clay l on, Mia. 
Stallworth. Pitt. 
Largoni. 5*0. 
LIpps. PH*. 
Siuiier, Jets 
N Moore. Mia. 


QUARTERBACKS 

ATT COM YDS TD I NT 
57 31 50 8 0 


72 45 658 5 2 

72 40 656 5 1 

69 48 545 3 2 

81 46 582 6 2 

28 U 156 2 0 

45 24 407 % I 

55 35 408 3 7 

75 39 445 6 3 

53 32 373 2 3 

72 42 488 7 2 

43 34 475 2 4 

36. 17 225 1 1 

74 47 577 0 6 

RUSHERS 

ATT YDS AVG LG TD 


35 

236 

6J 

69 

7 

45 

235 

52 

21 

3 

31 

166 

A4 

16 

1 

39 

158 

3J 

21 

1 

30 

147 

4.9 

42 

9 

34 

131 

3.9 

14 

0 

34 

126 

3L7 

20 

7 

38 

120 

U 

13 

1 

25 

112 

4J 

14 

0 

19 

104 

55 

65 

1 

EC El VERS 




NO 

YDS 

AVG LrG 

TD 

17 

203 

115 

33 

1 

16 

109 

6JS 

>8 

O 

15 

704 

IB 9 

45 

1 

13 

291 

TLA 

37 

3 

13 

305 

155 

45 

1 

13 

158 

12 2 

27 

2 

11 

180 

I6A 

40 

1 

11 

177 

16.1 

38 

3 

II 

129 

1M 

18 

0 

11 

110 

105 

24 

1 


O-WItam. *1X3. 
Brack, Rams 
Tbofamnn. wsh. 
Cumnanm. PM. 


Wilder. T.B. 
White, Rum* 
Rtoos. AM, 
Craig, S.F. 
Tyler. 5.F. 
Payton, CM. 
Anderson. ST.L 
Deraett. Doll. 
RLoalm. Wash. 
Rogers, Wash. 


Wilder. TA 
Hill# DalL , 
CosWe. Dali. 
Crola.S.F. 
j-Beii. T.B. 
Solomon. S.F. 
Monk. Wash. 
Manuel, Glanls 
McKinnon. ChL 
Renfro. Doll. 
Green. 51 J_ 
E«PX G.B. 
Hunter, Rams 


57 20 310 2 2 

55 27 345 1 3 

57 30 344 2 6 

_4l— - 1$ 235 0 5 

RUSHERS 

ATT YDS AVG LG TD 


Baseball 

Major League Standings 

AMERICAN. LEAGUE 
. East Wdfloa 

W L Pet. ‘ OB 



PAT 

FG 

LB PtS 

O'Danoahuo, 51.L. 

M 

4-5 

49 

20 

Luckhurst. Atl. 

3-3 

5-5 

48 

18 

Sept len. Doll. 

B-8 

3-5 

53 

17 

Buffer, Chf. 

7-7 

35 

38 

16 

Andersen, N.O, 

5*6 

3-4 

55 

14 

Lunsford. Rams 

44 

3-5 

37 

13 

Murray. Del. 

6.7 

23 

46 

12 

Hall-SneiklL Glanls 

5-5 

M 

52 

11 

Slenerud. Minn. 

M 

M 

Jt 

11 

igwcOulka. T.B. 

S6 

14 

25 

B 

' Worsening. S.F. 

8-8 

O-l 

0 

8 


European Soccer 


49 

279 

5.7 

24 

2 

Toronto 

91 

S3 

-632 

— 

1.. — ...... — 1 

54 

237 

43 

20 

3 

New York 

86 

58 

597 

S' 

; CUP WINNERS' CUP 

51 

223 

43 

31 

1 

Baltimore 

77 

66 

-538 

13!f| 

(Fin* Round. First Leg) 

24 

185 

7.7 

47 

3 

Detroit 

74 

30 

514 


Larissa 1, Sampdorta ) 

31 

179 

58 

26 

1 

Boston 

72 

73 

497 

19 Vj 

Galalasarav 1. Widzew Lodz 0 

28 

199 

SJ 

76 

0 

Milwaukee 

63 

80 

441 

27V*j 

Rad Star Betorada 2. Aarau 0 

37 

144 

39 

11 

2 

Cleveland . 

54 

93 

-367 

389s 

HJK Helsinki ], Flamurtorl Vlora 2 

31 

132 

43 

19 

1 





Lvngbv 1. Galway United 0 

28 

128 

44 

IB 

1 

Kansas Cllv 

82 

02 

569 

— 

AIK SlocMiolfn 8. Red Bovs OHfenJonoe 0 


125 

43 

31 

1 

California 

80 


556 


CHAMPIONS' CUP 

RECEIVERS 




Cntcapo 

74 

6V 

517 

79* 

l First Room. First Leg) 

NO YDS AVG 

LG 

TD 

Oakland 

70 

75 

.483 

129 j 

Garnik Zaorze 1, Bayern Munich 2 

14 

76 

54 

13 

0 

Seattle 

68 




Zenith Leningrad 1 Vaalerenoen 0 

13 

206 

153 

44 

• 2 

Minnesota 

67 

79 

AS* 


KuuSVSl Lotto 2, Sarajevo 1 

13 

187 

144 

sa 

0 

Te»«s 

52 

92 

J4J 


Budapest Hanvea Z Shamrock Rovers 0 

l] 

149 

115 

38 

2 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Veil* 1, Sieauo Bucharest 1 

11 

T26 

115 

19 

7 






IFK Gctetwro X Trakla Plovdiv 2 


88 

58 

• 18 

0 


W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Rebar Alax ft. Omenta 5 

10 

86 

86 

18 

0 

Si. Louis 

89 



— 

UEFA CUP 

9 

197 

71.9 

43 

2 

New York 

87 




(First rooms First Leg) 



NO YDS LONG 

AVG 

Sasan. Dali. 

B 

373 

57 

464 

Ldfidem, Gtonls 

U 

599 

68 

46.1 

Coleman, Minn. 

12 

533 

62 

444 

Garda. r.B. 

6 

261 

54 

435 

Black, out. 

11 

477 

57 

434 


Montreal 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Pittsburgh 


Houston 
Son Dlaga 
Atlanta 


77 67 535 12 

70 72 #493 18 

67 74 -419 21 Vs 

47 95 J31 41 

West Division 

85 59 JW — 

77 14 JR 7H 

74 70 .514 11 

77 77 JflO 13 

60 84 417 25 

a 56 88 -389 29 


Cheinamarets Odessa 2. Werdar Bremen 1 
Dlntuno Bucharest 3, VOrdar 5fc«pte 1 
Wlutiut Aon l. Dnepr Dnepraaatrowsk 3 
Coleraine I, Lokomotiv Leipzig 1 
PMn Blasoevgrad 1, Humnwrth 3 
Dinamo Tirana 1. Hamrun 0 
Vldeotan I, Mol mo 0 
LASK 2. Banlk Ostrava 0 
Holduk Spill £ Metz 1 
Spartak Maoism I. TPS Finland o 


c.'!:2 r ' r - 5 

Hein- 


. C- '■ w 


-6«-.T5, p 


PUNTERS 

NO YARDS LONG AVG 
Camarilla. N.E. 15 TO 75 474 

MPlSlelenkO. SD. U M 59 4S8 

Newsome. Pitt. »2 ® ® Hi 

i_jonnson. Hou. B S iif 

Jennings. Jets '! 2 « nt 

Stark. ind. *1 2 5s 

Guy, Raiders 9 2! 

Norman. Den. 13 Q 4L3 

Me l pally. Cln. JO S 4fl3 

Klde. Bu«. 10 ■*?* 53 <a - 7 

PUNT RETURNERS 

, NO YDS AVG LG TD 

SSS.-I 5 s : 

s s H . 

con*. K-r- , « aj 12 0 

Drewrev. H°u- J “ S i* # 

James. S.D. 4 , M u 0 

Fn ^‘ H t£i S 33 64 « 0 

Martin, cin. ? ^ H o 

Grwne '^« , ‘ 6 26 A3 8 0 

Woods. p « |C|toF|s RETURNERS 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 
* 197 TIP 52 0 

Tasker, Hau- 5 » JA7 34 0 

Greene. SM. s in 2U 28 0 

Morris, sea ! IS Si 38 0 

Horn plan- W)a , 77 2 40 JO 0 

Morti-vCIh. j; as It o 

vouiw. dor. 224 36 0 

Marlin, ind. ? 134 223 « 0 

James. 5.D. ‘ 131 “ - - 

Seoie. Raiders 
Smith- K-C 


149 24.1 

72 


1 *3 214 25 0 

4 14 710 23 8 

SCORING 

TOUCH downs 

TD Rush Rec Rel PtS 


Tuesday’s Line Scores 

r^lf AMERICAN LEAGUE 

WU Toronto 006 130 118- 5 10 2 

— — ■ — — — ■ ~ Boston 802 04# Ota— 4 11 D 

. , - SI led. Davis (5). Caudill (71 and Whlit; 

"ItA Leaders Boyd, Crawford IB) ontj Gedmon. W— Boyd. 

14 -H. l — S tleb, 13-11. 5v— Crowtora (101. 
Leaders on me Professional GalfersAssod- HRs— Toronto, loro it), BartleU 124). Boston, 
odan tour through the Greater Milwaukee Armas 1231. 

Open, which ended SepL 15: Oakland «TI 632 610- ( IJ 2 

EARNINGS Cleveland 232 181 31»— II IS I 

I. Curtis Strange SS25.J7? BlrTan, Muro (31. Altierton (*», Conroy in 

7. Ray Fiovd 378.W9 and Heath; wardie. Clark 16) and Willard. 

3. Catvln Peats 368439 w— Waraie. 8-7. L— Blrtsas. too. Sv— Clark 

4 . LMiny Wadklns 3614)3 | 2 ). H Rv-Clevoland. Carter 2 1141, Castillo 

1 Corev Pavln 353440 iV|. 

• Roger Moiarie 352774 Texas 609 083 0*0- 2 4 1 

7. Mark O'Meara 11A015 Minnesota 631 822 tax— 7M • 

8 . Hal Sutton 290J40 SemnWi, Williams 15). Raiertw 17) ond 

9. Craig Stadler 7B1B24 stcuohi; Viola and Salas. W— ^ Viola 15-14. L— 

10. Bernhard Longer 2710*4 Schmldi, 5-5- HRs—Teios. O'Brien nil. Mlf>- 

II . JOev ShMWar KWI1 nesrrta. Brunansky (761. 

11 Fuzzy Zoeder 241403 California 009 WO lift- 2*2 

13. John Mahal lev M 0 J«H Chicago 1W IN 20k- 5 6 0 

14. Tipn Kite 231713 win. ClUwni 171 and Boone; Burns. James 

15. Hubert Green 230.1B) [71 and FHUl w— B ums, 18-8. L— Will. 13-8. 

16. George Bums 217.735 Se— Jamas <281. HRs— California, Downing 

17. Lorry Mize 215,146 |J9) CMcaoa, Bdtoes 1191, 

18 . Andv North 2013*8 New York MS 188 880—1 4 1 

1 *. Save Ballesteros 204438 Defnrit 121 26) «*— 9 17 ■ 

20 . Jim Thoroe 204J7I Guidry. Rasmussen 17) and Hauev; Petrv, 

2t. Tom Watson 197,938 . Hernandez «i and Parrish, w— Petrv, t5-U. 

XL Peter Jacobsen 197399 l— G utorv. 19-6. HRs— New York. Mohlnglv 

73. Wavne Levi 195489 t79t. Detroit. Gibson <261. Simmons (10). Win- 

24. Hole Irwin 19&007 taker <701. Evens 2 (33). 

35. Pavne Stewart 192.164 Milwaukee 688 086 810— 6 « t 

Baltimore 808 180 65*— 4 9 3 

SCORING Hlaucra. Flnoers( 8 )tmdMaere; Dlzdnond 

1 . Rev Fiovd, TOlSX 2. Dan Poaiev. 7054. 3, oempsay, W— Dixon, 8-3. L— Hleuera, 13-7. 
Carey Pavm, TtLSS. A Calvin Peete. 7045. 5 . hr— B atlimaro. Raenicke (13). 


-v-C^' r ' C ' : 

' ’ y; ^ 


k’”' . m 4<' 

itf*' 


Turner, Sea 
Carsart. K-C. 
LIPPS. P'**- 
Warner, Sea. 
Alien. Raiders 
Brooks. Cln. 

Mn«br«*' Cln- 
McNeil, ■»»'* 
palae, Jefi 

jornason. Den. 
Sieverft SJ3- 
Sioilworth. Pl«- 

Luwerv. < - c - 

Re**'*. ^ 

Breech. Cits 
ZenbelaS. MW. 

Kurils. Den- 
Norwood’ Buff- 
Banr. Cl«. 

J0h0 ^. S plti 

^nderson, 

Bohr. RoW«V 


Loony wadktos, »7S t. Lorry Mize, 71X78. 7, seame 390 823 0 66 7 9 1 

John Mahaffev.TOJl-B. Roger Moltble. 7089. 9, Kansas City 880 880 888 8 7 1 

Craig stadler, TLflft M. Scott Shnos an, 71 JU. Young and Valla; Parr, j ones (5). Ferreira 

AV E RAGE DR IVING DI5T ANC E (8) Mid Sundberg. W— Young, 12-15. 1 — Farr, 
I, Andv Bean. 27B4. 2, Greg Norman. 2764. 3, 3.1 . hr— S eattle. Bradley (20). 

Fred Couples, 276A 4. Mac O'Grady, 2759. 5 — 

joey Stodeiar. 2752. 6, Tam Watson, 2744. 7. NATIONAL LGAOUI 

Greg Twiggs. 274JX 8. Bill Glasson, 2717. 9. saa Franclsca 888 808 

Sandy LVte. 2734, 10. Jim Dent. 2724. Clndnmitl 880 MB 

DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY LDPDlnLMoore(6l,Garralfs(l 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
saa Francisco 888 808 180-1 7 0 

Cincinnati W MB Ota-4 U 1 

LoPalnLMoore (6). Garrolts [81 and N 0 M 5 ; 


1, Calvin Peete. MS. 2. David Edwards. .799. McGaffloon and Diaz. W^ McGofflBan, 3-2. 
3, Jock Renner..7A54,Mlke RWd, J53, 5 Lorry l— L oPnlni, 7-14, HR— ClncMnatL EsaSky 


2 2 “ 

2 0 2 

2 0 2 

, 0 2 

Kick l»0 

PAT FG 
841 +* 

Sri 6-7 
4-6 >3 


11-11 0-1 
7-7 1-7 


Nelson. .749, 6, Doug Tewali. .742. 7, David jitj. 

Frost. .741. A Tim Morris, jee. 9, Hale Jrwkv p&|iedeipMe 
.739. 10. Three tied with 732. New York 

GREENS IN REGULATION Rawtev an 


(17). 

p&ltodeipMe M8 360 680-5 9 2 

New York 010 118 B8B-1 5 1 

Rawtev and Vlroll; Lynch. Niemann (4), 


1. jack Nlcktaus, .716. 2, Bruce Llelzk'e. 714. unnam (6), Gardner IB) and Carter. W— 
X John Mohaffey, 712. A Calvin Peete, 709. S. Rawtev. 17-7. L— Lynch, 1M. HR— Fhllaael- 


Don Pahl, 705 e. Andy Bean. 701. 7, Corey phta. virglt (1*1. 

Pavln. 706- 5 DouaTewelL 4W.9. Roger Moll- Chicago 
bis. 498. 10L Wavne Levi, 497. Montreal 

AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND Eckersley. Smll 


Chicago 801 003 808- 3 6 0 

Montreal 688 888 888- 0 * 8 

Eckerstov. Smith (81 and Davis; You mans. 


rv f F 




£jileo®° 

SI. LCSlI* 

T am«» 

Mew Orient 

Gio nfs 

POO 15 

AtW’ 0 


145 IS 

310 * & 
36 a V3 
Ml 37 s 


t, Craig Stodiar. 34.70.2, Frank Connor. 287X Roberge (7). St. Claire (91 and BwHro. 
3 (tie). Bobby Clempaff and Mlhe DonaM. O-Berry (9).W— Eckerstov. 9-6. L^-Youmqns. 
JM5* 5. Roy Floyd, 2*77. 5 George Burns. 3-iSv— Smlih(29l.HR— Chlcaga, Davis (14). 
»J» 7. Ro» CaldwelL 2946. 5 Willie WOood. SI.LOuH 831 834 880-18 13 8 

29.67. 9. Three tied with 79-09. Pittsburgh 181 866 28ft— * 18 1 

PERCENTAGE OF SUB-PAR HOLES Andular and Nleio: k toner, McWilliams 
l.Crato Stadler. .211 X Ldtwy Wodklns-JO* tel. Krv wevzk 16), Winn IB) and Pena. W— 
3 file), Tom wotion end Rav Flova. 70*. 5 Andukir. 21-9. L— Kipper. 0-1. HRs— SI. Louis. 
Tie-OMIM Chon. 302. A Larrv Nelson, JDft 7 smith (51. Ceueno (8). McGee 110). 

(Wei, Don PoattY ond Mac (TGrodV, .199. 9 Houston 8» 813 808—18 IB 8 

(We). Hat Suffon and Graa Norman, .148 , a Mania 820 983 21ft- 6 9 3 

EAGLES Kerteld.OlPlno (4). Dawiov (8) ana Bo! lev: 

1 (tie). Cam Povhi gnd Lorry Rtoker. 113 Wmitn. Shields (3). Camo (St. Dedmon i«). 
irte) joev Slnflelor and Philip BlachmaMt. 5 Gartior (7) end Benedtel.W— tMPIno.3-5L— 
Hovld Gramm. Jodto Muddand Pavne ismlm,7-il HR*-HousioaGX»ovls I16LAI- 
Stewart 14 B. Sevan lM wilt) 9. -Ignta, Washington |13), Perry 13). 

BIRDIES l« Angelas 641 608 216-7 18 B 

t jaeySlndelor,37Xa.Ro06rMaf(W».3243. San QMS 199 DM 18ft— I 1 2 

Hal Sutton. 326. 4 WoVne Grady. 323. 5. Brett Herihtser ond Sdascto: HowkHw, Wolno 

■joprr.317. 4 Ray Fiovd, 314 7. Thn SimwHl (81. Jtttuan 111 and Kmnodv. W-HenhiSOr, 
312.4 George Burns. 308.9 (lie). BebbvCMm- 14.3 . l— H awkins. 17-7. HR— Lae Anodes, 
pcit ond Butov Gardner, 367. Brock (21). 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American League 

CLEVELAND— Acquired Rich Yen. pitch- 
er, I ram the Toledo Mud Hone, and assigned 
him 10 Maine of ffw International League. 

MINNESOTA — Gove Steve Howe, pitcher. 
Mis uncondlllonal release. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Assodatioa 

CLEVELAND— Placed Kevin Williams, 
guard, on waivers. 

LA. LAKERS— Named Randy Pfvitd assls- 
tgnl coach. Signed Dexter Shouse. guard, and 
Tony Npal. forward. 

NEW JERSEY— Named Paul Silas assls- 
tanl coach, 

PHILADELPHIA— Signed Terry CaWodae. 
forward, to a multi-year contract. 

PORTLAND— Signed ante D re* ter, 

guard, 10 a two-year contract extension. 

5ACRAMEN TO— Signed Rich KWtoy. cen- 
ter. to a one-year contract. 

FOOTBALL 

NatkMOl Football LtNW 

BUFFALO— Signed Mike Pralff. fullback: 
Eric Wilson, imebackar, and Joe DaLamlet- 
leuro, guard. Placed Justin Cross, offensive 
tackle, on Mured reserve. Waived van Wll- 
uoms. running back, and Larrv Kuoln. line- 
backer. 

GREEN BAY — Released Buford Jordan, 
naming back, ond Mike Obrovoc offensive 
lineman. Aatvated Massv Cade, defensive 
back. Placed Ronnie 8 urges*, defensive doc*. 
on In lured reserve. 

KANSAS CITY— Stoned Louts Cooper, line- 
backer, ond EJ. Jones, running back. Placed 
Jeff Paine. Unebockar. an Mured reserve. 
Waived Ken Lacy, running back. 

MIAMI— Placed Mark Duoer. wide receiv- 
er, on the Injured reserved list Recalled 
George Snarttmse. wide receiver. 

NEW ORLEANS— Stoned Willie Tullls. CDT- 
nertiock. 

N.Y. GIANTS— Stoned Jess Atkinson. Place 
kicker. 

SEATTLE— Released Jeff West, punier. 
Sinned Jimmy Colqutlt, punter. 

ST. LOUIS— Pieced Lionel Ktosturuton. 
coraertwck, ana Themes Howard, lineback- 
er. an I he Mured reserve list. Stoned J. T. 
Smith, wide receiver-kick returner, and Don- 
nv Sorodllng. Ilnetaaeker. 

Tampa bay— S igned Ron Swings, run- 
ning back. Waived Melvin Carver, running 
bock. 

HOCKEY 

Mat lewd Hacker League 

LEAGUE — Announced It has reached an 
asraemafit with Hie NHL Officials' Associa- 
tion. 

HARTFORD — Stoned Dana Murzyn, de- 
fenseman: Rav Neuield. right wing; Grea 
Maiane. center, end Paul Fenton, (eft wino. 

Montreal— S toned Mike McPhee. tett 
wine, and Kant Carlson, defensemen, to two- 
vear contracts. 

PITTSBURGH— Stoned Gil Ira Molache. 
goalie, to a muitl-y eor con t ract. 

QUEBEC— Invlled Real Cleutter. right 
whig, to (raining come. 

WASHINGTON— Stoned Bobby Carpenter, 
center, to a muMrear contract 
COLLEGE 

FAIELEIGH DICKINSON— Named MUu 
Eikaw sperts tetormo Uu n director. 

MASSACHUSETTS- BOSTON— «QmW 
Gary Dank hockey coach. 

MISSISSIPPI STATE— Suspended Stuan 
WW toner, Unobocker. from the leotbal) Itwm. 

SEYON HALL— Named- Phyllis Manglne 
women’s ggtAetMif conch. 


By Gary Pomeranrz 

H'aihmgUm fast Sertitr 

WASHINGTON — The Na- 
tional Football League's Minneso- 
ta Vikings are 2-0, and have all the 
trails of a typical Bud Grant team. 

They beat San Francisco, 28-21, 
in the season opener by scoring two 
touchdowns in the final three min- 
utes. On Sunday they beat Tampa 
Bay. 31-16. in large part because of 
-a locked punt recovered on the 
Buccaneer five-yard line that was 
turned into a touchdown. 

Minnesota has forced 12 turn- 
overs in two games, including seven 
by (he defending Super Bowl 
champion 49ers. and has commit- 
ted just three, for a league-best fig- 
ure of pius-nine. 

Perhaps (he team's biggest rum- 
over came when Coach Les Steckel 
was fired after a 3-13 finish in 1984 
and Grant was paged to return 
from his one-year retirement 

The Vikings will play the Chica- 
go Bears (also 2-0) Thursday night 
in Minneapolis. Does anybody re- 
member the last time the Vikings 
and Bears played a glamour game? 
it might have been in November 
1977 when, although Walter Pay- 
ton ran for a league-reoord 275 
yards, the Vikings won. 10-7, and 
edged the Bears for the National 
Conference Central tide. 

“Bud's kept his wits about him. I 
think he’s having more fun now 
than in the past," ninth-year line- 
backer Scott Studwell said Tues- 
day. “I think his attitude is rejuve- 
nated. loo. 1 think he’s doser to his 
players now and his attitude is 
lighter, i think he's come to the 
r^lization that this life won't last 
forever, so let's enjoy it now." 

A third of the 45-man Viking 
rosier is new: several of those play- 
ers have been, or will become, im- 
pact men. Defensive end Keith 
Millard and wide receiver Anthony 
Carter come from the U.S, Foot- 
ball League, and such draft picks as 
linebacker Chris Doleman and 
George Rhymes have produced. 

The return to health of veteran 
defensive linemen Mark Mullaney 
and Doug Martin has brought per- 
formance that was lacking in 1984. 
Quarterback Tommy Kramer, who 
missed seven games last season, 
hasn't been spectacular by any 
means (two interceptions, two 
touchdown passes), but his quick 
release and nimble feet have kept 
his sack total to just one. 

“I think we've won these first 
two games on defense," said Stud- 
well. “We haven't played well sta- 
tistically. We haven't blown any- 
body ouL But we’re capitalizing on 
other teams’ mistakes, and that’s a 
Bud Grant trail, too. 

“Bud can recognize when you're 
up and when youre down. Against 
die 49ere, he felt If we could stay 
dose we'd have a chance. As it 
turned out, that’s what happened." 

Since the league moved to a 16- 
game schedule in 1978, the greatest 
one-year improvement by a team 
was a seven-game swing — the 
49ers improved from 6-10 in 1980 
to 1 3-3 the next season and Detroit 
advanced from 2-14 to 9-7 from 
1979 to 1980. By any reckoning, the 
Vikings have an easy scheduled and 
could conceivably match that. 
Their final five games are against 
Philadelphia (twice), Atlanta, Tam- 
pa Bay and New Orleans; all five 
are without a victory this season. 

"People around here are 
shocked, surprised and ecstatic," 
Studwell said "At the start of the 
year, realistically, a J00 season 
would have been considered a suc- 
cessful season. That is amended ev- 
ery week, ihough." 


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Bud Grant 


Hw Nw YorV Toua 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Retrial Sought in Tulane Bribery Case 

NEW ORLEANS (.AP) — District Attorney Hany Connick will ask a 
Louisiana appeals court to let him again try former Tulane basketball star 
John Williams on sports bribery charges, Connick’s office announced 
Tuesday. 

Charges were dismissed against Williams last month when District 
Judge Alvin Oser ruled prosecutors had deliberately tried to provoke a 
mistrial in order to get a new start on a case that was going badly. 
Connick contends that while his assistants may have violated some of 
Oser's orders, they did so unwittingly. 

Connick’s office said the appeal was to be filed Wednesday in the 
state's 4th Circuit Court of Appeal, which Connick is asking to overturn 
Oser’s ruling and permit him to bring Williams up for trial again. 

Williams was accused of three counts of conspiracy and two counts of 
taking bribes to control the outcome of basketball games last season 
against Southern Mississippi and Memphis Stale. 

Howe Released After Cocaine Relapse 

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Min- 
nesota relief pitcher Sieve Howe, 
who missed a weekend series in 
Cleveland because of an admitted r ; 
recurrence of cocaine usage, re- 
quested and was granted his uncon- 
ditional release, the American 
League baseball dub announced 
Tuesday. 

Howe, 27. the 1980 National 
League rookie of the year nith the 
Los Angeles Dodgers, disappeared 
last Thursday after appearing on 
ABC Television’s “Nightline" 
show to discuss drug problems in 
sports. Former Commissioner 
Bowie Kuhn suspended Howe for 
the 1984 season for violation of 
baseball's drug policies. He was re- 
leased by the Dodgers on July 3 
after failing to report for agame for 
the fifth time sioce 1983. TheTwins 
signed him Aug. U. Steve Howe 

For the Record 

New York Met refief pitcher Doug Sisk will undergo bone-chip surgery 
on his right elbow next week and will be lost to the team for the remainder 
of the 1985 season, the dub announced Tuesday. (AP) 

The Toronto Blue Jays and Kansas Chy Royals, respectively the leaders 
of the American League’s Eastern and Western divisions, won coin tosses 
Tuesday for the home-field advantage in possible divisional-tie playoffs. 



Quotable 


• San Francisco Giant pitcher Dave LaPoint, on a recent sparse 
turnout at Candlestick Park: "It was the first game in major-league 
history where everyone in the stands got a foul ball," 


with a single. Siieb got the next two 
outs, but Rich Gedman grounded a 
run-scoring single to right. 

On the play, right fielder Bar- 
field threw toward third; shortstop 
Tony Fernandez cut off the ball 
and fired to Johnson, who ap- 
peared ready to nail Gedman 
rounding fim. But Johnson, substi- 
tuting for the injured Willie Up- 
shaw, dropped die ball applying 
the tag. Armas then belied an 0-1 
pitch uno the left field screen for 
his 22d homer of the season. 

Winner Dennis Boyd pitched 7'A 
innings, allowing nine hits and one 
walk while striking out five. 

“It takes a super effort to beat 
these guys." Boyd said afterward. 
“It intensifies me to face them, and 
I’m not intimidated — even ihough 
1 feel they have the best club in the 
league." 

Tigers 9, Yankees 1: In Detroit, 
one night after Baltimore had hit 
six homers to crush the Tigers, De- 
troit turned the tables and hit five 
— two by Darrell Evans — to send 
New York to its fifth straight de- 
feat. Ron Guidry, who was seeking 
his 20th victory of the year, had 
never before given up so many 
home runs in a game. Said Guidry: 
“It was one of those games where 
you could probably hare told them 
what was coming and done better." 

Mariners 7, Royals 0: In Kansas 
City, Missouri, Phil Bradley drove 
in four runs with his 20th homer 
and a single as the Mariners 
crushed Kansas City, which none- 
theless maintained its two-game 
lead over California in the Western 
Division. Matt Young, who won 
for the fifth time in six starts, didn’t 
walk a batter, had one strikeout 
and was supported by four double 
plays. 

White Sox 5, Angels 2: In Chica- 
go, Harold Baines's three-run 
homer and RBI single helped Britt 
Bunts to his 18th victory of the 
year. Baines drove in the first 
White Sox run in the first for his 
100th RBI of the year and hit his 
19th home run of the season in the 
the seventh. 

Indians 15, A's 8: In Cleveland, 
Joe Carter hit two home runs and 
Andre Thornton drove in five mis 
as the Indians buried Oakland. 
Carter has five homers in his last 
nine games and is batting .358 in 
his last 30. “1 wish it was opening 
day," he said after Cleveland 
closed to within 38*6 games or To- 
ronto. "But since it isn't, you've 
just got to keep things in perspec- 
tive." 

Twins 7, Rangers 2: In Minne- 
apolis, Frank Viola retired the last 
)1 batters he faced, and a four- 
hitter gave him his sixth complete 
game of 1985. 

Orioles 6, Brewers 0: In Balti- 
more, Gary Roenicke's two-run 
homer highlighted a five-run rally 
that broke open a 1-0 game in the. 
eighth. Ken Dixon registered his 
first major-league shutout as the 
Orioles Beat Milwaukee for the sev-. 
enth time in eight meetings ihis- 
year. 

Canfinab 10, Pirates 4: In the 
National League, the Sl Louis Car- 
dinals, noted more for their speed 
than (heir muscle, had three home - 
runs in breezing past the Pirates in 
Pittsburgh. U was the 900th major-: 
league victory for Manager Whitev- 
Herzog. - 

Phillies 5, Mets l: In New York.. 
Shane Rawley won his sixth game 
in seven decisions since the All-Star 
break as Philadelphia dropped the 
Mets two games behind St Louis in. 
the Eastern Division. 

Dodgeis 7, Padres I: In San Die-: 
go. Orel Hershiser pitched a com- 
plete-game seven-hitter for his 
eighth straight victory and Greg 
Brock hit his 21st home run of the 
year to lead Los Angeles past the 
Padres. 

Reds 6, Giants 1: In Cincinnati. 
The Reds completed a nine-game 
home-field sweep of San Franfcisco 
tins season on Andy McGaffigan's 
seven-hitter. 

Astros ID, Braves 6: In Atlanta, - 
Glenn Davis drove in three runs to 
lead Houston to its seventh straight 
victory and its 28th in 21 garni*? 

Cubs 3, Expos (h In Montreal, 
Jody Davis hit a three-run homer 
and Dennis Eckersley and Lee 
Smith combined on a four-hitter to ’ 
shut out ihe Expos, (UPl, AP) 









'Sz£. ^ .rV>v : 


DSTERNATIOWAt HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1985 


EGYPT POSTCARD 


'Alex 9 Wasted by Sewage 


Look Out, Sam Spade: Susan Rosen’s on the Case 


people 




By Judith Miller 

New York Timet Senior 

A LEXANDRIA, Egypt — Each 
/v year, wealthy and middle-class 
Cairenes flock to Alexandria to es- 
cape Cairo's burning desert heat 
for the coda, humid orcezes of the 
Mediterranean. Alexandria’s popu- 
lation ordinarily grows from three 
million people to about live million 
in the summer, especially on the 
Fridays and Saturdays, Egypt's 
weekend. 

Usually, by midday it seems that 
every spade of sand is shielded by 
contiguous beach umbrellas. The 
45-mile-long (72-kilometer) Cor- 
niche, the broad boulevard along 
the coast, is jammed with cars, mo- 
torcycles, donkey-drawn carts and 
beach-bound pedestrians. Hun- 
dreds of thousands of children play 
in the surf. 

But this year the Comiche is 
navigable even during the 2 P. M. 
rush hour, when Alexandrians 
leave their offices for lunch and 
nap. Hotels are offering weekend 
packages to lure customers away 
from Cyprus, the favorite summer 
haunt this year. Reservations are 
no longer required even at the most 
popular restaurants. The beaches, 
by Alexandria standards, are de- 
serted. 

While reliable Figures are hard to 
come by, travel agents estimate 
dial the summer tourist influx 
plunged from a usual peak of 2 
million to about 500,000. 

The main culprit in tbe decline 


The sewage scandal was widely 
died as a major cause of the recent 
cabinet shuffle. Commentators 
said the problem had highlighted 
the government's in decisiveness 
and inability to solve urgent prob- 
lems. 

In late August, prominent mem- 
bers of the Alexandria Yacht Club 
complained to local officials of 
“the presence of sewage on their 
private beach,” reported al-Shaab, 
an opposition weekly, several of 
whose editors and senior reporters 
own or rent apartments in Alex, as 
does Baha ei-Din. 


By Judy Klemesrud 

New York 7imes Service 


N EW YORK — Susan Ro- 
sen’s right arm is in a sting. 
She pulled some muscles in her 
shoulder and elbow recently 
when, while trying to enforce a 
court order, she escorted a woman 
into the Long Island home that 
the woman had once shared with 
her estranged husband. 

“Suddenly he appeared," Ro- 
sen recalled. “He was enraged, 
and be lifted me off the ground 
and threw me against a door." 

Irene Greenberg recently drove 
from Brooklyn to a motel in New 
Jersey. She sat in her car and 
waited until the man sbe was fol- 
lowing came out of a motel room 
with a woman who was not his 
wife. Greenberg took photo- 
graphs. 

“Tbe guy is now divorced,” she 
said. 

Alice Byrne recently checked 
out a man who drove a BMW, 
lived in a beautiful apartment and 
had told his well-to-do fiancee 
that he had a good job. It turned 
out that tbe BMW was his broth- 
er's, the apartment belonged to 
someone dse and he was unem- 
ployed. 

“The wedding didn’t take 
place.” said Byrne. 

These three women, all in their 
early 40s. are among the growing 
number of women earning livings 
as private investigators, once one 
of the most masculine of Fields. 


“If this situation continues,” a 
prominent phyadan complained, 
“Alexandria could experience not 


only serious economic problems, 
hut health hazards as welL" 


still pumps raw sewage into the sea 
close to its shores. The effects have 
been painfully evident this year, 
even to the most devoted fans of 
“Alex,” as the city is sometimes 
called. 

“Ail of a sudden. Alexandria’s 
sewage problem has become a na- 
tional problem,” said Ahmed Baha 
el-Din. a columnist for the semiof- 
ficial Cairo daily al-Ahram. “The 
sewage that now covers Montazah, 
Aida and the other aristocratic 
beaches has been there for months, 
so why all this sudden fuss? 

“Because Cairenes, the first-class 
Egyptians, traveled to Alex for 
their summer vacations! Thai's 
why. 

“More to the point,” be contin- 
ued, “government officials with Big 
Mouths and Loud Voices traveled 
to Alex and ‘discovered* the prob- 
lem.” 


but health hazards as weiL" 

Al-Shaab reported, and several 
doctors confirmed, that many chil- 
dren who have swum in the ocean 
this summer have contracted un- 
usual skin rashes and intestinal ail- 
ments. 

“We're seeing disorders that we 
haven't ever seen before here,” said 
a doctor who teaches at Alexandria 
University’s medical college. 

Tbe local government of Alexan- 
dria, whose economy is heavily de- 
pendent on the annual summer in- 
vasion. has been eager to escape 
blame. A convenient scapegoat has 
been found: the United States. 

In late August, al-Ahaly, another 
Cairo-based opposition newspa- 
per, asserted that the Council of 
Alexandria had formally protested 
to Washington the delay in com- 
pleting a long-planned, desperately 
needed “waste water” project at a 
cost of nearly $1.5 billian. Ameri- 
can officials in Cairo said they did 
not know of any such protest. They 
acknowledged, however, that the 
project had been delayed for at 
least four years, partly by a dispute 
between Egypt and the United 
States over several issues. 

Stitt. Alexandrians blame Wash- 
ington less than their government 
for the city’s plight. Specifically, 
many point to Alexandria's gover- 
nor general, Fawzi Maaz, a former 
intelligence chief who was in deep 
political trouble even before the 
sewage crisis became a national 
scandal. Several Alexandrians pre- 
dicted that not only would Maaz 
lose his post, national politicians 
who defended him might also fall. 



The New York Tm»j 


Susan Rosea 


Although tbe profession is still 
predominantly male, more and 
more women have entered the 
ranks in recent years, according to 
John F. Manila, president of As- 
sociated Licensed Detectives of 
New York State; based in Hemp- 
stead, New York. He said 15 to20 
percent of the organization’s 450 
members were women. There are 
954 private detectives licensed by 
New York State. 


•Ten years ago, it was probably 
only 1 percent,” he said. “Female 
interest seems to have increased 
because of the women's move- 
ment and because more women 
are looking for work. And there's 
a new surge of interest in die pri- 
vate detective field now because 
of TV.” . 

One of the first women to go 
into private detecting on televi- 
sion chose the name ‘“ Remingt on 
Steele” for her firm because she 
was afraid she would get no cli- 
ents if she used her own name. 
Today, most women in the busi- 
ness use their real nany* Some, 
including Byrne and Greenberg, 
own agencies. Byrne deliberaidy 
included her name in the Yellow 
Pages advertisement for her com- 
pany, Ambassador Investiga- 
tions, “because I think it helps me 
get business.” Greenberg lists her- 
self as “Irene Greenberg Private 
Investigator" 

Byrne left minting at the age of 
27 after a heart attack. Divorced 
in 1975, she scraped up enough 
money to buy a small burglar- 



Tta New Ymk Teres 


Alice Byrne and chid investigator, Michael Marino. 


South Africa lifts Bait ^ .'A;.. 

On Stevie WartderMt^^' 
The South African government J. 
has returned Stevie Woote to’the ;.- . 

Airwaves, lifting frban os his vnk 
imposed after be defeated;*^:; 
Academy Award for best song to 
Nelson Mandeta,1mpriKH»d.^*: ; :-;; 
a of the African .Nation^ urn- . , V; 

eress. After a popular radio station ; 

played a Wonder tune Tuesday^" 
spokesman for South Mucaa*; 
Broadcasting Coro.. said thau al* ;.-..- 
though the network stIB ocgectedlo , ' - 
“blatant politicization of -jana&V.. . 
the six-month boycott -of tttj&pr-' .... 
CT-songwriter’s works had made : us ... : 
point Mandela s saving a fcfe\ .. 
term on a 1964 conviction ^ at ptah ; \ ‘ 
uiiig sabotage. 


m 


alann and security-guard compa- 
ny from her former husband. Se 


Matula added that, including 
unlicensed investigators who 
work for a licensed agency — a 
legal practice, as long as the inves- 
tigators are fingerprinted — 
about 30 percent of the total are 
women. 



• n n s e x 



oy from her forma husband. She 
says her detective agency, which 
she runs from her home in Brook- 
lyn. grosses $2 million a year. 

She employs 10 full-time inves- 
tigators and 40 full-time security 
guards. Her chief investigator is 
Michael Marino. 42, a retired 
New York police detective. She 
said 40 parent of her work was 
for corporations, 40 percent was 
for lawyers, 15 percent was mari- 
tal investigations and 5 percent 
involved missing persons. 

“It’s never boring,” she said. 
“Each day is different, and that's 
why 1 like it so much.” 

One of ha most celebrated 
cases involved Vida Wayne, a 58- 
y ear-old California ou heiress 
who was reported missing and lat- 
er found dead in New York's East 
River in 1979. The police accept- 
ed Byrne’s theory that the heiress, 
confused and dizzy from medica- 
tion she was taking for high blood 
pressure, had fallen into the river 
by accident. 

Byrne’s favoritejobs, sbe said, 
involve robbery, “because I like 
anything that's'a thinking investi- 


gation — bow did they do h, 
where are they now.” Her least 


- 

rite Nw York Too 


Art Buchwald is on vacation. 


Irene Greenberg tests a videotape. 


where are they now.” Her least 
favorite is surveillance, wbicb of- 
ten means long hours in a car 
without food or toilet breaks. 

Byrne is married to a systems 


analyst for Trans World Airlines 
and has two teen-age children. 
She is national rfmirmwn of Child 
Find Inc, a group that tries to 
find lost children, and president 
of Women Business Owners of 
New York, a nine-year-old group 
with 550 members. 

To reach Irene Greenberg’s of- 
fice, one must walk through a 
Video U. S. A. store in Brooklyn, 
then two adjacent offices. The 
store is not a front: Greenberg 
and her partner. James P. Brown, 
a former city policeman, have an 
interest in Video U.5.A. and 
much of their work involves in- 
vestigating counterfeit video- 
tapes. 

Tbe firm also supplies security 
guards for two New York disco- 
theques, Studio 54 and the Palla- 
dium. But most of Greenberg's 
work is “domestic,” meaning 
marital investigations. She 
charges a $10,000 retainer. T 
work mainly for affluent people, 
and I don't work for less" she 

Greenberg, who took over the 
agency From her husband in 1978 
after be went into another line of 
work, told of one “domestic” she 
had in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 
where her agents traded a man's 
mistress for two years. 

“He felt that if he was riving 
her money to live on. she should 
not be with anyone else,'’ she said. 
“Finally, be left his wife and mar- 
ried her.” 

In her most distressing, case, a 
man killed himself after Green- 
berg confirmed his suspicions 
(hat his wife was unfaithful. 


Greenberg, who has two chil- 
dren, said she thought women had 
one Kg advantage over men as 
investigators: “No one ever ex- 
pects a woman to be a private 

eye.” 

Susan Rosen is a former model . 
who used the E. M- H. Investiga- 
tion Service in. Great Neck, New 
York, while she was going 
through a divorce: She woond up 
hired as an investigator for the 
company, a job she has held 12 
yeare. -• 

She is known at her agency for 
' solving a marital case by station^ 
ing her parents, her daughter and 
her dog at various exits of a moteL 
The woman involved had eluded 
previous investigators by arriving 
at the motel and disappearing. 
Rosen discovered that she was 
slipping out a side door and get- 
ting into a car with her boyfriend. 

In another surveillance case, 
Rosen and her three children once 
spent New Year's Eye in her sta- 
tion wagon parked behind an 
apartment house. “We ate fried 
chicken, drank sodas and had a 
good time,” she said. “When a 
cot came by around 2 A. M., I 
told him I was waiting for my 
husband.” 

Rosen, who earns $40,000 to 
$50,000 a year, said sbe had been 
on cases in rannrin California 
and tbe Caribbean. Her work has 
involved insurance fraud and 


A women’s education group says- 
the U.S. attorney general Edwin 
Meese, wins its Supreme 
award for demonstrating "leader^.' 
ship in maintaining an unjust soci- 
ety” The Project on Equal Educa- 
tional Rights gave Silver fttau- 
a wards to policymakers, srate&anti 
individuals ' or , institutions it . feh 
had contributed to une n lightened.; 
and discriminatory attitudes; 
worked to maintain barrios, op^, 
posed dvfl rights and helped inara-; 
tain injustice. “These- are t he folks ; 
who. are making ' sure that women • 
gei nowhere fast” said Leslie it * 
Wolfe, director of thegrcup. wntete- 
criticized Meese for trying to dqn*- 
nate governmental ■ affirmative ac£; 
tion requirements, strike- down &}-?J 
cisions such as the one tfctd 
legalized abortion and reverse a 
licytif denying tax breaks toraqai-r 
ly discriminatory schools. ' ; . •.)£•;•// 


A lot of people may wish you;a:,Ts: 


child custody. 

She has also served subpoenas. 
She once got to an elusive ortho- 
pedist by putting her arm in a 
«:Hng and making an appoint- 
ment. 




■55 



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Olympic Towera. 5th Avenue ot 51st 
street Upper Hoar. 2 bedroom, 214 
bathroom s frnqrfjie), btefen. large Fv- 
ing roonv dmiro area, wdl to wdl 
mrran, Centrd Ptxk view. Purchase 
price $1,425,000 or rentd S8JWpei 
month. Can New York (212) 382 3920 
between 10am and 5pnt 


Executive Services Available 


Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


VILLE D* AVRAY 

On American & Gerrmt bus route. 

5 ROOMS WITH LOGGIA ON BOB. 
R,400ro0. Do HavOand 602 6060. 




CONTUtoL Smrfl & medun moves, 
baggage, can worldwide. Cal Cher 
fepSrrs 281 18 Sj (near Opera). 


PERSONALS 


ANSJE 

Accommodations found for sales per- 
sonnel From Gulf. Looking forwtxd to 
hearing from you. Jsn 804 05 96 ftns. 


PALMA DE MALLORCA 

Luxury fas overlooking the bay and 
d*y of Pdma. Stunted o» tbe Beflver 
Gsiie fat «f a wry qietand etegortf 
area, exceflenl value, two minx, from 



to the 

INTERNATIONAL 


the pfy center. Swumrang pooh, soma 
tennis md private aerkmg. Rd with 5 
be tfro oms. living, aring etc. 242 sqj-n. 
+ terrace 32 sqji^ prxn in US$ oa. 
260/00 to 35056 o. PeNtxjwe: 9 bed- 
rooms, living, ahing etc 913 stun. + 
terrace 404 sqm. price in LfSS ca. 
2500^». 

far furtfw wfarmo to n 

Pteaio ado 

INVERSORA BOR1A SJL 

JOSE BORIA 6 SON ARMADANS 
07014 PALMA DE MALLOBCA 
Tel: E-71-289900 



International Business Message Center 



3, rue del 2 Boulevords, 
94100 SAWT MAUR - 


vwki qucfiied 
■' young leodwr cf Engfeh 
wfth cor, free to start now. . 
OA- 264 76 14 PARIS . - 





positions wanted 


PBWCTLY 1HUNGUA L 
EXECUTIVE ASSIST AW. 

Dfa nationality Gerexm/Fnench, a- 
y«tive, mid 4»^ dynanec & resource- 
rut Twenty years experience with ma- 
jor ml I a-gancatiom Europe & Afika 
pubkc rekjons, com m e m eu aymnctrn. 
lion A fvxrx*. Seeks chatangm and 
eriovt postioa Box 2707, Hernia Tri- 
bune. 9K2V NeuSy, Codex, France 










BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


Couple botitf fcir- 


OFFSHORE&UK 
LTD COMPANIB 


ORLANDO, FLORIDA 


Incorporation and management m-. UK, 
Isis of Man, Turks. AnguJa. Oxm nef 
Ubena. Gibraltar and 


HERALD 

TRIBUNE 


AND SAVE 

As at new cuburiber to the 
Infiwt ia nal Herald Trihme, 
you eon save up la hatr 
the newsstand price, deferring 
an your country or residence. 



LAKE LUGANO 
RESDB4CE BQLAV1STA 


For (totals 

on this speed mfrodtttar y offer, 
wnt# B: 


IHT S ubeo Wi e w Dspartmnt 
181, Avow* Ot ad es -d e Gauie, 
92200 N*u By -wr- Serna, Frmn. 
Or tek Pan* 747-07-29 


Luminous apanments o veriodti n g the 
Lcto Utgano & Ihe beautiful sunound- 
in&. Apartments from 110 nm. up to 
17D tqjn. Each has it's awn fnpkse, 
laundry, alar, wine ceta S parting 
place 4i indoor garage, frtduor swim- 
mins poOi & privae beads with Icning 
staBBi. Sotos prices: 5=640^100 up to 
StJCHMIOOL frewfar safe to fcreigrws. 
M ui lgoges of law Swiss interest rata. 



ABXCAL nORSSION A TRADE 
Swiss Company Produces 
Soaww&aiari LASK 
oppontfNi for ttocpeytic npp U.«^«a 
in genend and v eterinar y me ddne, 
rhaumetoiopy, oftn loJ 

surgery, oemiaWogy, nn^onQl 
rohuLSWtoru etc. 

Seels wel rAta h h e d , qrxihW 
P nliiUitu i s /A u m itr woridvnde 
Coated: JPM, WJ-L PO Bax 54 
GH-I214 Venter/ Geneva. Tb 418830 


wrt 

BEAUTffUL PEOPLE 

me 


TtXml MACMNBBT . 
Tampan Ared u d ic n Modwte 




• Fu#y equpped offices an daily, 
monthly v permcnent bosk 

• MthKnoual secrattnd service 

• Ugcti denaktoion 


• Modem triftoe egtopmei* . 
EURO BU5B®S can® 


2 AU PAIRS/ HOU5B0B«& Ow- 
wotor Rcvtdn fee 2 ham ooh*geir 
er { Engtdt specitog. drivere.JtefBfc 


hotel brrabuodng. SR&renez 8 . 29336 

Madnd, Te) 4566061. Tk 22548 EufaK 122 YEAR OU) NEW ZEAtAWDdd 
seek sto arw emptoymew, 


Cotton Sw r A Fonnfag Ma 
CnMan Pod Machine 
K. FASSBTsBWJUDWlG & Co. AG 
Jona 

Tel: (55) 28 31 41. Tbe 375349 FAIUCH 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 

report - 12 ccuntnes ont^yzed De- 
taSfc WMA, 45 Lyndrarst Terrace, 
Slim S. Cbnfrct Hang Kong. 


COMMERCIAL 


' 1 i n “ ■ '• ; 


LET US BE YOUR 
OFHOE IN BANGKOK 

Short Tiorifl terra furnished offices, hit 

buanm - gCWtarkd, trie*. [VERY ATTRACTIVE G8WAN 1ADY, 

messenger, htmskitions, company 1 ~ 
rnpresentwon / HaProhan. Unhand 
Mcmagemant and Offiae 5ervica Ca 

113/5 Sorowoome KtL fonaxok T lVnr| 

ThcAmd TaFmaw, 235 46S9 
Tele* 21456 UMOS UH. 




Regbterad London Commoctoy Brokers 
we idler a c ompl re semce in dl 
COMMOOHY FUTURES MARKETS. 

Far detail of our 

Commodity 

Investment Programme 


FRS WQRMATKM tridt appfira- 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


ton. Earn S1JXXJ to S3JOO per.mcntH 
become a frerwj ahraon IrX, 73 
New Band Stoat, Lender Wl, En- 
gland. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 




Thn progmem hes tracked 
aid monitored 7 drfterent Commotfity 
Markets which, in toe last 12 months 
(to 30/6/65), hove shown on ncefcnt 
177% profit. Minimum inv es tm en t 
£10J)0D or USS equivatort, 


toner. Trial 

3 weey with subscripSor igd 
of 40 Vtmeouvw Server GSd 
upt rend jj rtu tnanf Services Lid, PO 
Bo 49333, Bentdl 4. Vancouver ~ 
CANADA V7X 1L4 


Tefe Iordan 621 1664 or write to 
NORADEAN Ltd (IHT) 4 B Plonk* 
Hse, Fendwh St. London K3M 3D 
Tatar 674560 COMEX1 G. 


LONDON 

Ftdudory & tut ww» l Canpay 
rormoiwra & wimPTO n i inret ntuofr 
id tar f Bank accounts afafamd I 






i i do* or wttk: tv /* 1 k|, n - n „ r — o i 

(IHT) 4 B Plonktoen 17 


M ASIA AND PACUK 
contact our lottd dstobutw on 


EMOAID-HOME LTD. 


Intamalianai Horrid Tr3taaa 
1005 Td Sang Cananerdai BuMng 
VLM Hmm Road 
HONGKONG 
Tab HK 5-286726 


VIA G. CATTOR1 3 
CH-6900 LUGANO 
Tab 0^9)442913 
Teles 736T2 HOME CM 


PROFIT FROM 
LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY 


ii I — i ~ 


in i-is 

■^vTTHl 


K\Vt Ml 

Unpiif-Qr. 




|:,>wy 

M!f 1 ' f ITT; rm 


F9UOARY BANCMG on large oto 
latondoed loans. The orfy emtm- 
dd baik with 0 representative office 
in London spedaSsmg in Ns service. 
Arab Oversea* Ban & Tut (WU 
Lta, 28 Black Prince toad, London 
SB. tel 01-735 8171 






22% BE At ANNUAL RETURN, on 
avenge, hot been generated by the 
CorkSem Bosut I n vestment Trust's 










LTD- Dept 950, RO, Bos 3ffiJ 005. 
Son Jew, Gxta Bea Tefa ^1 


vk y i . l'i I ' * w 


OFFICE SERVICES 


> t " k 'L *. - 


YOUR OffiCE M HAMBURG 
. _ SB4ATOR GMBH 





7T1J 1 B". 1 . 1 


tateon ospotnate 
Vmtad bay. Send 


hire, nortmokw 2 




Wl I III. I M l 








AUTQMOBIIjES^ i In 


P.04. 2553 0-2000 Haitourg 13 
Phont (40) 440 555. Tte2T?5&3 




Know, «*g» *wl pnccsor prebned.; 

WllJ.Pmhwp I^O/j^hond^fc,^^