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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

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ThC Nevvs P a Per 

Editedin Paris 

^feSE 5 , 

ON PAGE , a 

No. 31,907 



INTERNATIONAL 




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Published With Tlie New York Times and The Washington Post 


US. Government 
Negotiating Direct 
^rms Sale to China 


PARIS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 




By David B. Orraway 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
a^mmistralioa is on the verge of 
the first govemmen t-t 6-govem- 
oaent anns sale to China, a S6- 
mtliion package of explosives that 
• l “opes, could lead to the sale a 
>98- million artillery munitions fac- 
tory, according to congressional 
and State Department sources. 


* • 


ing out an agreement in a “compat- 
ible military area. 

“This is something modest, con- 
ventional and non threatening in 
tne field of military cooperation," 
he said. 

Representative Stephen J. So- 
lan, Democrat of New York, chair- 
man of the House subcommittee on 
Asian and Pacific affairs, predicted 
Wednesday that congressional re- 
action to the sale would depend on 
the ordnance involved and whether 


Congressional sources described 

the sale — timers, fuses and deto- 

nators — as a landmark in wbar has xJ^ 35 s ^- as P 03 ?? 3 threat to 
been a slowly developing military larw - an - , na considers Taiwan a 
relationship between the United P rcmn , ce ^ should be under its 
Slates and China. They predicted 
that it would facilitate other, far 
|&>re important, military sales to 
Beijing long under discussion. 

“This is the icebreaker," a source 
said. 

A State Department official 
called it “a very prudent move" by 
the administration, aimed at work- 



control. 

Mr. Sol arc said he planned to 
Hold hearings “to satisfy ourselves 
regarding the purpose and extent to 
which the sale poses an unwarrant- 
ed security threat to Taiwan." If it 
does not and is “anti-Soviet-orient- 
ed," Mr. Solarz said he does not 
expect much opposition to the sale. 

For some time, administration 
officials have been discussing pos- 
sible sales of military technology' to 
China, including anti-tank mislues, 
naval sonar, ship defense systems, 
air defense missiles and avionics to 
modernize Chinese planes. 

Because of the sensitivity sur- 
rounding Chinese purchases of 
U.S. arms, both in China and in the 
United States, where conservative 
support for Taiwan remains strong, 
it has taken a long time for both 
sides to reach agreement. 

Last year Beijing purchased 
commercially 24 high-altitude S- 
7GC Sikorsky helicopters, the civil- 
ian version of the Black Hawk mili- 
tary helicopter, in a transaction 




Major 
Hits Mexico; 
Death Toil High 


The Anoowed IV*ja 


MARCHERS TURNED BACK — South African police 
and troops stopped about 3,000 students and teachers from 
marching to a police station Thursday in Cape Town to 
demand the release of students detained in earlier protests. 


The demonstrators were led by Richard van der Ross, third 
from left in front row, rector of the University of the 
Western Cape. The marchers were Mocked at the universi- 
ty gates and ordered by police to *Vafk no further.” 


Pretoria Business Leader Backs Black Vote 


By Michael J. Berlin 

ftas/ungiuri Pmi Servtcr 


endorsed divestment and sane- urgent attention they deserve." In- It added, “Those still accus- 
Lions, but Mr. van Zyl and Ray- ternalional Business Machines tomed to the old approach and de- 
mon j ParsoDS. chief executive of Coip. said Thursday in a statement mantling the specific details it pro- 


Lmted Press International 

MEXICO CITY — A major 
earthquake struck the west coast of 
Mexico on Thursday, devastating 
portions of the capital. It collapsed 
luxury hotels and skyscrapers, 
started hundreds of fires and took a 
heavy toll of life. 

Official estimates of the deaths 
were not immediately available. 
Unofficial estimates varied widely, 
ranging from dozens to thousands 
of dead. 

The quake, measuring 7.8 on the 
open-ended Richter scale, was cen- 
tered 200 miles <320 kilometers) 
west of Mexico City in the Pacific 
Ocean, 40 miles off Mexico's coast. 

[The Mexican Embassy in Wash- 
ington reported that the earth- 
quake had caused severe damage as 
wefi in the states of Jalisco. Guerre- 
ro and Michoacan. The Associated 
Press reported.] 

[President Miguel de la Madrid 
declared a state of emergency for 
the city. “Unfortunately there ap- 
pear to be many dead," Mr. de la 
Madrid told listeners, according to 
a radio station in Bogota. Colom- 
bia. which monitored Mexican tele- 
vision. 

[‘‘All of the hospitals are on a 
state of alert to take care of the 
injured," he said. “The army is in a 
state of alert.”] 

The old central area of the capi- 
tal and the business district along 
Paseo de fa Reforms were the hard- 


UNITED NATIONS. New ^ South African Association of reported bv Agence F ran ce-Pr esse, vided. in theory if not in fact, will j., . ..u ^ 

y° ri lT, A sp0 u ,:sT ? ianforlhew ^ lc Chambers of Commerce, argued [But the company, which cm- inevitably be disappointed." (Reu- ^ ^ea nooular with tourists. Near 
South African business community t hc case for “conditional" outside ploys about 2,000 people in South «rs) lht , 1 n ,, erv hiiildine 


told a United Nations panel on 
Wednesday that the corporate e&- 


* .‘.it. 


f- ■; 


■ " 

••a • 


BeajamiB M. Weir after his 
return to the United States. 


WdrWaim 




ostages 


„.si .???: * 
•1, - 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Rever- 
end Benjamin M- Weir said Thors- 

S ’v that the extremists who held 
Sn captive 16 months were ready 
io kidnap other Americans and to 
execute their remaining six Ameri- 
can hostages unless Kuwait frees 17 
prisoners. 

“They have released me as a sign 
of their good intentions." Mr. Wen- 
said aL a news conference. “Howev- 
er. they are not willing to wail 
much longer." 

Mr. Weir, 61. a Presbyterian mis- 
sionary, said his captors were pre- 
pared 'to release the other Amen- 
r-anc if their demand was met for 
freedom for 17 men accused ac- 


worth an estimated S 150 million. In ' , a bUsJunem in his country would 
August, General Electric signed a 
contract to sett rhina five gas tur- 
bine engines as part of its naval 
modernization program. 

Although the helicopter sale re- 
quired Skate Department approval 
and formal congressional notifica- 
tion. that and the turbines safes 
were company-lo-government 
commercial deals and did not in- 
volve military items listed under 
the US. foreign military sales pro- 
gram that involves special licens- 
ing. - 

The present transaction is direct- 
ly between the US. and Chinese 
governments, ft involves foreign 
military sales items that require a 
20-day period of informal notifica- 
tion to Congress, followed by a 30- 
day formal notification of any 
“nuqor defense equipment" worth 
SI4 million or more or any “de- 
fense articles or services" worth 
$50 million, or more. 


favor a one-man. one-vole federat- 
ed government. 

The statement by Johan C. van 
Zyl chief executive of (he South 
African Federated Chambers of In- 
dustry. was made to an 1 1 -member 
panel headed by the former Austra- 
lian prime minister, Malcolm Fra- 
ser. Diplomats familiar with South 
Africa suggested that it was the 
first time corporate interests had 
endorsed a one-man, one-vote sys- 
tem , although they had spoken of 
universal representation. - 

The panel is holding the first UN 
hearings cm the role of multination- 
al corporations in South Africa and 
is to recommend whether with- 
drawal of outside investment, other 
forms of sanctions, or continued 
corporate involvement in South Af- 
rica would most effectively end the 
apartheid system. 

Most of the witnesses in the 
hearings, which end Friday, have 


On Page 2 

■ South Africa said it will with- 
draw its troops from Angola. 

■ Pretoria acknowledged it vio- 
lated a nonaggression treaty 
with Maputo. 

support for the economy as long as 
reform continued. 

They both endorsed the need for 
talks between the white minority 
government and black leaders. “ 
Mr. Fraser asked Mr. van Zyl if 
the business community agreed 
that the black majority should be 
“fully franchised." 

“Certainly.” he replied. “The ex- 
pression of one-man. one-vote is 
certainly what business all sup- 
ports." 

[The South African government 
should “address the problems of 
apartheid with (he compelling and 


ploys about 2.000 people 
Africa, also said it intended to re- 
main in the counuy “as long as 
there is a chance that we, together 
with others, can contribute to 
peaceful change." 

[Thc statement, released at 


• Two white men received the 
death sentence Thursday for killing 
a black woman after raping her, 
locking her in the trunk of a car and 
setting the car on fire. 

The sentence, handed down in a 


IBM's headquarters in Armonk. ‘ 7 n ^ 

5S SLbmg. 'Downtown ,uxm * ^tek includ - 


the National Lottery building, 
three tall buildings in a row, one 
over 10 stories, collapsed. 

The famed 10-story-high monu- 
ment to Mexico’s revolution, a cen- 
tral Mexico City landmark, col- 
lapsed. Severe damage was 
reported at several hospitals. 


orating situation is having a signifi- 
cant impact on IBM’s South Afri- 
can business as well as on business 
in general in South Africa." An 
IBM spokesman said that about 15 
percent of the company’s staff in 
South Africa was black.] 

In other developments: • • - 

• South Africa’s state radio said 
Thursday that the old apartheid 
blueprint had proved unworkable. 
The radio, which reflects govern- 
ment thinking said: 'There was a 
‘ime when the government drafted 
Tlueprims and then went ahead 
and imposed them on the people, 
whether they liked it or hoi That 
approach was wrong and ultimate- 
ly proved unworkable." 


marked one of the rare instances 
when a white has been sentenced to 
hang for killing a black. (AP) 

• The British government has 
launched a confidential inquiry 10 
establish whether the export to 
South .Africa of a sophisticated ra- 
dar’ system breached an interna- 
tional arms embargo, government 
sources in London said Thursday. 

The sources said the Defense 
Ministry was checking whether the 
AR3D system, produced by the gi- 
ant communications company 
Plessey. was being used by the 
South African Army, contravening 
a 1977 United Nations arms em- 
bargo backed by Britain. {Reuiersj 


ing the Hotel Versalles and the Ho- 
le) di Carlo, both eight stories high, 
the Hotel Regis and the Hotel 
Roma coUapsed. Major damage 
was reported at the Ejecutivo. Pal- 
ace and Reforma hotels, fire- 
fighters and rescue workers strug- 
gled to pull bodies from the tons of 
brick and concrete rabble. 

.All telephone and telex lines 
went down, cutting the capital 
from the outside world. Subway 
and bus lines ceased operating. 

Electricity went out in large sec- 
tions of the city, knocking out traf- 
fic lights and leaving the streets of 
the capital in chaos as thousands 
milled about in shock, ambulances 
and fire crews fought their way 


France Orders Changes 
In Espionage Personnel 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — President Francois 
Mitterrand, facing a growing scan- 

dal over the sinking of an awi- 

jreeuuHi f . "'Tj c5 ” a g a ^ j { the nuclear protest ship in New Zea- 

tJff'^fiSfSfSSRSSita land. 0 ?d««J Pnmc Minister 
u.b ; tmoassy Laurent Fabtas on Thursday to 

in KuwaiL carry out a personnel shake-up in 

In Washington, the Reagan ad- - C! 

ministration ruled out Pj^unng 
Kuwait to release the extremists. 

Mr. Weir described his release 
late Saturday: 

^*1 was suddenly released bv my t0 ^ j^y utadc, and he 

cantors. 1 niade contact with tne criticized government services for — -~- L 

American Embassy, whose ambas* M provi dmg adequate informa- S -^8^ 

S35a?d fidals P roraplly ^ tion bn the matter. bers and the Rainbow Warn 

efficiently arranged for me io J* -This situation cannot contin- 

reansported to the LlS A UteMon- ^ pres jdem said in theater- 
.4, v Jvenioo I amved bv U.5. gov ilThe taM ^ come w proceed 


In a lettei to Mr. rabios, made 
public by the presidential palace, 
Mr. Mitterrand referred to a series 
of recent press stories tying the 
secret service and government offi- 


day evening, 

(Continued on Page 2, Col 6) 


without delay with personnel 


changes and, if necessary [to 
change] the structures leading to 
this deficiency." 

France has admitted that mem- 
bers of its General Directorate for 
External Security, or DGSE, were 
in Auckland. New Zealand, when 
the Greenpeace ship Rainbow 
Warrior was sunk by two mines 
attached to its hull on July 10. The 
ship was preparing to leave on a 
protest mission to the French nu- 
clear testing site at Mururoa atoll. 

Defense Minister Charles Hernu 
has acknowledged giving the order 
for five Frencn spies to conduct 
mem- 
arrior, but 
denied the agents were involved in 
the actual sinking. 

A presidential palace spokesman 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 



lht Ataebcfed Pibi 


Anay personnel 
Ardmore, New Zeala 


barbed wire around a prison at 
where a French secret service 


agent, Captain Dominique Prieur, is being held. New 
Zealand officials have said they fear an attempt to free her. 


through panicked traffic to get the 
injured to hospitals. 

Channel 13. the only Mexico 
City station able to stay on the air, 
said there were 250 confirmed 
deaths but the toll was expected to 
go much higher as rescuers scram- 
bled to free thousands buried in the 
rubble. 

The station’s broadcasts showed 
people hanging onto each other 
crying in the streets against a back- 
drop of skyscrapers broken into 
smokingjunk steel and concrete. 

Hundreds of buildings were 
damaged in Mexico City, a city of 
18 million people and the most 
populous urban area in the world. 

Some streets were ablaze with 
natural gas from broken gas pipe- 
lines. Hospitals were packed with 
injured. 

Twenty-five persons were killed 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL Z) 


Democrats 
In House Vote 
Trade Policy 

By Stuarr Auerbach 

H ashingion Post Sen-ice 

WASHINGTON — Democrats 
in the House of Representatives, 
ignoring President Ronald Rea- 
gan's recent warnings against trade 
protectionism, approved the out- 
lines Thursday of trade legislation 
that would penalize foreign nations 
that restrict American products. 

The resolution, which was adopt- 
ed by the House Democratic Cau- 
cus with strong support of its lead- 
ership, would also require greater 
intervention in international cur- 
rency markets to bring down the 
value of the dollar. 

Approval of the trade measure 
gives Democrats a head start on 
White House officials and Republi- 
cans in Congress, who are trvmg to 
fashion trade positions of their 
own. 

Reflecting this determination, a 
House Ways and Means subcom- 
mittee on trade approved legisla- 
tion Thursday that would sharply 
limit textile imports, mainly from 
Aria and Latin America. Tne bill 
will come before the full committee 
next week. 

The Democrats' resolution calls 
for House committees to approve 
the dements of a comprehensive 
trade bill by Oct. 30 so it can come 
up For a floor vote by the end of the 
year. 

The resolution offers broad out- 
lines of a trade policy with the 
details left to the House commit- 
tees with overlapping jurisdiction. 

It would require aggressive pro- 
motion of American exports, in- 
cluding low-cost financing to 
counter subsidized interest rates of- 
fered by France and Japan, among 
other countries. 

The administration appears like- 
ly to support a similar program, 
although over the past five years 
the White House has fought con- 
gressional efforts to strengthen the 
Export-Import Bank and once 
called for its abolition. 

Other parts of the Democratic 
initiative would strengthen laws to 
deal with unfair trade practices and 
end barriers to American products 
in overseas markets, and increase 
domestic programs to help U.S. 
companies ana workers hurt by a 
record trade deficit. The deficit is 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


.••-.ra# 


Surprise of the Spy Defection: Moscow’s Tough Line 

F vs Say Gorbachev Felt Need to Show 'Steel Teeth’ at Home and Abroad 

J ivDaI dr mm* Vrpmlm nmmnilw riid liVc. critical noinf in East-West relations, and ti 


- ' ■ ’ u v Serge Schmemann 

: ’ 1 New fork Ttntes service 

& Mosp»-j^£^«s*a 

day diplomaticsh ^ ^ espionage, the 

■ ;; 

' -V SSfS'ng Warn®** 

I > The initial appra^ g Gorbachev had no 
% ; mats was 1 ^ toughness to the 

choice but to respond *■! the 

British aMOtmatwart las^ defected god bad 

“ P J£Sa of agents among Rus- 

"TftSj oSlSwSw 

V^v ^ ,— * B “ 


peQed six more, the Kremlin promptly did like- 
wise. 

Western diplomats believe that Mr. Gorba- 
chev realized he had to act tough, both for 
foreign-policy and for domestic reasons. 

On the international from, he has begin com- 
plex man euvering involving the United Nations 
General Assembly, the arms talks with the Unit- 
ed States in Geneva, his own trip to France early 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

in October and his meeting with President Ron- 
ald Reagan in Geneva on Nov. 19 and 20. 

Mr. Gorbachev has taken pains to depict the 
Soviet Union as concOiatoiy and ready for sub- 
stantive agreements, while assailing the United 
Slates for insisting on J : * 

missile defense. 

In ibis comext. Western diplomats believe 
that be could not allow himself to be put on the 


critical point in East-West relations, and the 
Russians reacted accordingly. 

Mr. Gorbachev’s first six months in power 
have been devoted largely to consolidating bis 
personal control and preparing for a large-scale 
rejuvenation of the economy and of the ranks of 
the party and economic management 
The critical deadline of the campaign is the 
27th congress of the Communist Party next 
February, when Mr. Gorbachev is expected to 
produce an economic blueprint for the next five- 
year plan. 1986-90. By that time be is also 
expected to shape a loyal party elite. 

With the preparations under way. diplomats 
thought that Mr. Gorbachev probably recog- 
that the best way to attract followers. 


vhile assailing tne united particularly in the state security apparatus and 
developing a space-based m jj, e mfljiaiy, gad to deny his opponents a 
weapon to use against him, was to show tough- 


zLVnts ’’ ^ . .un abroad were that be could not allow himself to oe put on tne 

as f n Me past, when Soviet a^en broa defensive by i be British emulsions. He had to 

sent home, d* show that behind his anriafte smile there were 


Crisis and to return swMy jg ^^s in 1971, The British actions, moreover, were preceded 
C When Britain and when by US allegations that - 9 om ^anTjypo- 

' JJcow sent out ewsfled 47 Sovi- lice was using a potentially hazardous chemical 

SEddenl Frw«s did dust to monitor the moveramtsof^Amoicmsin 

ri'' vSficials from France in Moscow. That accusation may have stiffened 

< • _ Q , -II . . f h- Qnviet resolve to react sternly to Britain. cial channels. The scale an 

nC 2 > , » n whenPrunc M inisl f r Western diplomats believe that the Soviet Soviet effort have been evi 
8 25 Soviet offiaak art leadership saw Britain’s expulstons as apolitical duscIfKures of emionage tn 


^ A £3S 0 ordered waiIK j only two days to asl 

W griton^toVraw- And when Mrs. Thatcher 

S'* 


weapon to use against him, 
ness in international affairs. 

Mr. Gorbachev probably hopes that the one- 
for-one retaliation will discourage other West- 
ern governments from expelling Soviet spies. 

Although espionage has always played a cen- 
tral rale in the Soviet Union’s relations with the 
nest of the world, Moscow has also invested 
considerable resources in amassing the Western 
technology it cannot acquire through commer- 
cial channels. The scale and successes of the 
evident in thc recent 
(he United States, 


ex- 


move intended to weaken Mr. Gorbachev at a West Germany, Britain and Norway. 


INSIDE 

■ Soviet methods for obtaining 

Western secrets have been ob- 
tained by the West, according 
to the Pentagon. Page 3. 

■ Congressional leaders do not 

expect a tax reform package un- 
til next year. Page 3. 

■ Soviet cosmonauts prepared 
to switch crews aboard a space 
station Tor the first lime mid- 
way into a mission. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ U.S. consumer spending 

surged 1.2 percent, in August, 
but income rose only 0.3 per- 
cent. Page 11. 

■ The EC raised subsidies for 
wheat exports, retaliating for a 
similar U.S. program. Page II. 

WEEKEND 

■ James Mkhener’s “Texas” is 
the latest and longest install- 
ment in his epic career. Pfcge7. 

TOMORROW 

A tongue-in-cheek exhibit at 
Sotheby’s provides a look at 
that peculiar species, collectors. 
Souren Melikian reports. 


Italo Calvino, 61 , Italian Novelist, 
Modern Fabulist, Dies After Stroke 

admire above all his lightness in a 
world of brutality, his dr eamin g 
imagination — as the poet of 
Queen Mab — and at the same 
time his wisdom, as the voice of 
reason amid the fanatical hatreds 
of Capulets and Montagues. He 
sticks to the old code of chivalry at 
the price of his life, perhapsjust the 
sake of style, and yet he is a modem 
man, skeptical and ironic — a Don 
Quixote who knows very well what 
dreams are and what reality is, and 
he lives both with open eyes." 

Mr. Cal vino’s new novel is “Mr. 
Palomar." The title character, with 
a name that recalls the famous tele- 
scope, is a quester after knowledge, 
a visionary in a world sublime and 
ridiculous. 

. He is impatient and taciturn in 
society, preferring to spin inner di- 
alogues and listen to the silence of 
infinite spaces and the songs of 
birds. 

Mr. Calvino's other works in- 
clude “The Baron in the Trees,” 
“The Path to the Nest of Spiders," 
“The Castle of Crossed Destinies," 
“Invisible Cities," "Italian Folk- 
tales." “Cosmi comics,” “If on a 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


By Herbert Mirgang 

Set i York Times Semre 

NEW YORK — Italo Calvino. 
61. the master of allegorical fantasy 
who became Italy’s leading con- 
temporary novelist, died Thursday 
in Siena from the effects of a stroke 
he suffered earlier this month. 

Mr. Calvino was among the 
handful of major novelists of inter- 
national standing. 

The author and critic. John Up- 
dike, reviewing Mr. Calvino's 
“Castle of Crossed Destinies,” said 
that “no living author is more inge- 
nious.” John Gardner called Mr. 
Calvino “possibly Italy’s most bril- 
liant living writer” and classed him 
with Kobo Abe. Jorge Luis Borges 
and Gabriel Garda Marquez. 

Other critics place him in the 
intellectual school of writers that 
indudes Kafka, Pirandello, Nabo- 
kov, Alain Robbe-Griltei and John 
Barth. 

Mr. Calvino was attracted io folk 
tales, knights and chivalry, social 
allegories and legends for our time: 
Fabulous and comic memory chips, 
slightly askew, seemed to be imbed- 
ded in his unprogrammed mind. 



Italo Calvino 


His characters defied the malaise of 
daily liTe in the modern world. 

When asked in December what 
fictional character he would like to 
be. Mr. Calvino revealed himself 
and his artistic intentions in his 
answer: 

“Mercutio. Among his virtues. I 






1 Page 2 . 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 


Pretoria Admits Violating Pact 
By Aiding Mozambican Rebels 


By Michael Parks 

Ijh -tiiisVit 7*i»lr% iVni.i' 

JOHANNESBURG — South 


diplomat's and has been one of the bique. although such contacts had 
few clear successes or the Reagan been explicitly denied, both public- 
administration's policy of “con- h and in diplomatic meetings with 


Africa, desoite its nonaggression si rue live engagement."" is now very Mozambique. 

treaty with Mozambique.'has con- much in doubt. However. Mr. Bo- The attacks by guerrillas, a 


turned to support the anti-govern- 
ment rebels of the Mozambican 
National Resistance with weapons 
and ammunition, other uir- 


tha indicated that a major effort is emly mounted with South 


under way to salvage it. 

Mr. Botha, speaking in Pretorix 
implied that the country's military 


support, have virtually paralyzed 
Mozambique for the past year, cut- 
ting off the capital and major cities 


dropped supplies and transport, forces, which had built up the Mo- from the countryside and prevent- 
according to Foreign Minister zambican National Resistance into iog the shipment of food and con- 
R. F. Botha. a guerrilla force of 15.000 before sumer goods. Until it received help 

After months of disputing Mo- the Nkomati Accord, were solely recently from Zimbabwe, the gov- 
zambique’s charges that South Af- responsible for the violations. Gen. emmeni had been unable to check 
rica was guilty of violations of the Magnus Malan. the defense minis- the spread of the insurgency. 
March 1984 Nkomati Accord in its wr. had accepted responsibility for South Africa has consistently de- 

support of the rightist Mozambican the actions. Mr. Botha said. nied all allegations of such activi- 

National Resistance. Mr. Botha ac- The continued South .African ties, except for some clandestine 
knowledged Wednesday that the support had included the supply of support that five army officers had 
Mozambican “allegations in broad weapons and ammunition on a reg- given to the rightists." 
terms are correct, and that the ular basis; establishment of a com- ~ But Mozambique found exten- 



South Africa Says Force WORLD BRIEFS 

Sent into Angola Will Be Arab Groups Claim BombAttocks ^ 

Withdrawn by Weekend ^ in 

J Rome. . . thm uereddiv- 


R.F. Botha 


By Glenn Frankcl 

Uoiiw^in Pmt Scnitr 
JOHANNESBURG — South 
Africa, faced with strong interna- 
tional condemnation and a warn- 
ing from the Angolan government 
that a dash with its forces w’os 
imminent, announced Thursday it 
would withdraw its troops from 


vimbi’s secret base is at Jamba, a ip* claims came in s 
bush eneampent near the Naraib- «ed by the same man t 
ian border statement described the 

Despite "public denials. South for Western intelligence 
Africa has long supported Mr. Sa- -based An Nashra. was 


BEIRUT (Reuters) —The Black Alhen5 . 

responsibility on Thursday for bfhng ! “ ^Sj^Auesdav in a cafe in 
and a Moslem group said it was behind an cxplosi 

R The" claims came in statements typewriuenirt ASjjyjSk September 
ered by the same man to a news amy m fmLTbe*** agent" 
statement described the publisher?Michel ^ Athens- 

for Western intelbgence agencies. Mr. Nimn, 57. P 0 ™?® 1 ^L ar tnient 
-based An Nashra. was killed Wednesday by a gunman tn an p 


against Jamba appeared designed 

tocut off rebels' supply lines with the Via veneio in Kome on i * 1 ZEZZm m from Britain, Spain 

nonhem Namibia. A South Afri- group warned loumts. wooftf- And*, to rta> awa> from 


despite treaty prohibitions on sup- General Constand Viljoen. chief 
porting guerrilla operations against of the South African Defense 
one another. They occurred, more- Force, said his force of about 500 
over, according to Mr. Botha, as a men had successfully completed its 
result or South Africa’s attempts to pre-emptive strike against insur- 
bring the rightist rebels into negoti- gents fighting for control of South- 
aliens with the ruling From for the West Africa, the territory known as 


?5>r2. e Jdhh foS c o7 a£?t e ?oo the^krad?^ skirmish «iih France, Argentina Sign Industry Par^ 


terms are correct and that the ular basis; establishment or a com- " But Mozambique found eaten- Liberation of Mozambique, as NamtbUL He said the fora would 

Nkomati Accord was violated." munications network: deliveries of sive documentation that included a South Africa had pledged to do. P4“ back to base inside the South 

The admission, further damag- “humanitarian aid." such as food senior officer’s operational dian-. Mr. Botha, who had been sum- African-con trolled territory be- 


Weir Warns 


the expectation that the leader of transport. Mr. Botha said. There and supply records when its troops. 
Mozambique. President Samora was at least one uip by submarine supported by Zimbabwe forces. 
Machel. will present extensive doc- for guerrilla leaders, he said. overran the "headquarters of the 

umentarv evidence of the viola- 


Ja pSdent Raul Alfonsin was in France at the end of a 
of Europe aimed at winning support for ccononuc ausien^ maai^ 
has imposed in Argentina, which is heavily in ddJt. He mei with mme 
Minister Laurent Fabius before the accord was signed. Mr. .Alfonsin also 
visited Yugoslavia and West Germany. 


In addition. Louis M. Nel. the 


tions to President Ronald Reagan deputy foreign minister, made 
during his current visit to the Unit- three secret visits over the last three 
ed Slates. months to guerrilla headquarters at 

Despite criticism from U.S. con- Gorongosa in central Mozam- 

serva lives, the Reagan administra- 

tion is supplying Mr. Machel’s 

Marxist regime with S-W million in E/#, * „ /Y # 
economic aid. as part of an effort to i.rxCX'IC/f \JmJIJULK* 
lure Mozambique from the era- J 


ionth. cepted his explanation that the ac- ing to engage Angolan soldiers ad- 

AII those amounted to no more tivities had been undertaken with vanning on the military headquar- 


than “technical violations" of the 
Nkomati Accord. Mr. Botha said. 


the intention of “softening" 
guerrillas for negotiations. 


the ters of Jonas. Savimbi's 
anti-government Union for the To- 
tal Independence of Angola. 


Of Hostages 

(Condoned from P age 1) 


Thursday and abandoned the j 

would seek to use the. project's federal funding for masstrangl a ula 


roposed S2-biIlion Westway hig 
in Manhattan- 


Major Quake Hits Mexico; Toll High 


The South African invasion of Norfolk, Virginia.' 


(Continual from Page I) ^ ^ t0 use the.project’s federal fimdiog for mass transit and a 
eminent airplane. landing near substitute road, as opponents had urged since Westway was 


Angola, which began Monday, has He said he agreed to remain se- 
led to widespread Western protest, eluded because of the possibility 
including some of the strongest that “one or more" of those left 
statements to date from the Reagan behind might also be freed, 
administration. The administration Mr. Weir appeared fit and spoke 
accused Pretoria of violating inter- in a strong, steady voice, 
national law by its military opera- He said he believed his captors' 
tion and its continued presence in appeals should be taken seriously. 


brokered behind the scenes by U3. *. hen . a church collapsed during 

Mass in Ciudad Guzman, 420 miles 

west of Mexico City and SO miles 

inland, El Infonnador newspaper 
DREYFUS I in Guadalajara said. The paper also 
IIATT6K' reported “extensive damage" in the 

,UPl ® nearby city of Colima. 

UNPACKING OF "I heard *** trembling and I got 

LEMAKCH£ 

c \ nur ptcp’ptt hallway, a man who escaped from 

*- * -r ILKiLbi the Nuevo Leon, a large apartment 

will be exceptionally building in the center of Mexico 

closed on City, told a television station. 

_ , , c “By that time, the walls had 

Wednesday. Sept 2o. 1985 caved in on the bedroom and I ran 

down the stairs." he said. “There 

were people running for their lives. 

BIG BARGAIN SALE ON w 7* ”*** flying all over. I 

Tuesday, October 1 1985 1 wasD ‘ ablf aw 

Aeromexico, one of Mexico's 

two national airlines, said all com- 
munciations were knocked out in 
IIKIIVFPCITY Mexico City. Guadalajara. Tepic. 

* " Nayarit, the resort of Ixtapa and 
vSgSgf DEGREE Acapulco. The Mexico City airport 

was closed for hours but later re- 

BACHROirS • MASTBTS • DOCTORATE opena j 

fcr Wo He. Axn*™*, tih bp* rim*. quak e. which was fell as far 

Send detailed resume away as Corpus Christi and Hous- 

for free evaluation. lon on ^ eastern coast of Texas. 

PACIFIC WESTERN UMVRSTTY hit during Mexico City's morning 
MON. Sepulveda BIvd„ rtisb hour. 


United States 


'Houston 
I TEXAS 


^Hesaidbeagxeed to remain se- 

ttSTwSfi ££% U.S. Applauds Tokyo Defense Budgel 

bdtind might also be freed. WASHINGTON (AP) — The Reagan administra tion welcomes 

Mr. Weir appeared Cl and spoke Thursday a decision by Japan to sharply increase defense spending over 
in a strong, steady voice. the next five years. 

He said he believed his captors’ “We see that decision as a further indication of Japan s oonuntnn* 

m m mm- _ _ * ■ ■ .1 Lfl*. t C*|V - ^ BT rAU>( 


Namibia. 


He refused to release details of his 


MEXICO 


Guff of 
Mexico 


Mexico\ 

City • 

^-^Acapulco 


Pacific Ocean 


Mm UNIVERSITY 
w DEGREE 

BAGfiOrS • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE ' 

Par Work, A tml amk, Uh Expaiiancr. 

Send detailed resume 
for free evaluation. 

PACIFIC WESTERN UN1VRSTTY 
600 N. Sepulveda Blvd* 

Los Angeles. California 
90049. Dept. 23, U JA. 



The new incursion, which began captivity because **I do not want to department welcomed Japan s decision to double spending on toreigr 
only a week after the return to put in ieopsrdy the safety and wd- aid. . . . , . l00 , roon 

Pretoria of the ambassador, fare of the remaining hostages." The 18350 bfllion yen (S76.5 biUion) defense plan for 1986- 1 990 
Herman W. Nickd, was widely Mr. Weir said he did not know adopted under pressure from the United States, calls for an annua 
seen here as a slap at the United why he had been released. He was increase of 7.9 percent in spending, compared with growth in the f 
States following President Ronald told he would be freed only 60 to 90 percent range over the past three yean. The new mflitary budget amounts 
Reagan's announcement of limited minutes beforehand. to roughly 1.04 percent of current projections for the nation s gras 

economic sanctions. Analysts not- He said that, on Saturday, he saw national product for the five-year period, although a policy set in 197c 
ed that Mr. Nickel had been re- four of the six Americans and that Hmiis yearly defease spending to 1 percent of GNP. 
called to Washington in June to they were all welL The four are _ _ n i » 

protest South -African commando Terry A. Anderson, chief Middle h^nfft IVlffitS HnnmCPr 111 l&St -0611111 
operations in neighboring Botswa- East correspondent for^ The Assod- _ 


Earthquake 
Epicenter: 
Tidal Wave 
Feared 


na and Angola. 

South Africa has insisted from 


ated Press; David P. Jacobsen, di- 
rector of the American University 


the incursion's beginning that it hospital in Beirut; the Reverend 
was aimed at pre-empting an offen- Lawrence Jenco. a Roman Catholic 
sive by rebels of the South-West priesL and Thomas Sutherland, 
African People’s Organization, dean of agriculture at the American 
which has been conducting a bush University. 


war from Angolan bases against 
South African rule in Namibia. 

In his statement Thursday. Gen- 


The two other captive Americans 
are Peter Kdbum. a librarian at 
American University and William 


■nm Aaodcoed pre» eral Viljoen said that South African Buckley, a U.S. Embassy political 

Golden. Colorado, said its epicen- and California but called it off four ^ ‘^d* four Frenchmen and 

ier a.19 in nn MtihiiiLike-nninp. hnurs latpr . r FT _ n ■. t i 1 .: j 


uake-prone hours later, 
fshore and It was the 


ray as Lorpua Lnnsu anu nuu,- wr was m an earthou^e-prone hours later. amounts of weapons and ammura- a Briton have been kidnapped in 

n on the eastern coast of Texas, area about 40 imles offshore and It was the strongest quake in the includinethousands of Lebanon in the last 18 monthT 

l dunng Mexico Cays morning 150 miles northwest of the reson [of hemisphere since March 3. when ^ of ! ammuni- Mr. Weir said he had a “message 

S T b u h ° w- u . ■ ■ Acapulco. The Nauonal Weather one of 7.8 mamitude nearihe coast said two insurgents bad from my captors" that he hadcom 

John Minsch. a geophysicist at Service issued a : tidal waw watch of central Chile JoUcd at least 177 ^ killed and a number of others veyed to President Ronald Reagan 


the National Earthquake Center in for Mexico. El Salvador, Ecuador people and injured 2300. 



had fled north. He reported no when the two spoke Wednesday. 
South African casualties. He did not say what the message 

The Angolan communique drew was, but added that he Fdt there 


a mr oinciem piiziure, spying 30um iwuamw wwj a ^ ui 

African armored vehicles had opportunity" for gaining the re- 
moved within 10 miles of the south- lease of the remaining six. 


WASHINGTON (AP) — The Reagan administration welcomes 
Thursday a decision by Japan to sharply increase defense spending over 
the next five years. , . . 

“We see that decision as a further indication of Japan s continuing 
commitment to acquire the capability of fulfilling its agreed defense role* 
and missions," the U3. State Department said. At the same time, the 
department welcomed Japan's decision to double spending on foreigr 
aid. 

The 18350 bfllion yen (S763 billion) defense plan for 1986-1990 
adopted under pressure from the United States, calls for an annua 
increase of 7.9 percent in spending, compared with growth in the f 
percent range over the past three years. The new military budget amounts 
to roughly 1.04 percent of current projections for the nation’s gross 
national product for the five-year period, although a policy set in 197f 
limits yearly defense spending to 1 percent of GNP. 

Brandt Meets Honecker in East Berlin 

BERLIN (Reuters) — Willy 
Brandt, the former West German 
chancellor, met with die East Ger- 
man leader, Erich Honecker, for 
four hours Thursday and said that 
their countries had a special role to 
play in preserving peace in Europe. 

The Communist press stressed 
the importance of die visit with 
front-page pictures and reports of 
Mr. Brandt laying flowers at a me- 
morial to the victims of Nazism. 

West German sources said the 
treatment bore out optimism 
among Bonn officials that the on- 
going spy scandal in West Germa- 
ny would not damagp relations. 

Mr. Brandt, the Social Demo- 
cratic opposition chairman, was on 
his first visit to East Beilin since 

resigning as chancellor 11 years 

— ry ~ "Mid both countries shook! *«*" 



eastern town of Mavinga. Mr. Sa- If the terrorists’ demand is not _ wi a • ht .1 t 1 

met soon, he said, “they are pro- Cease-riTe raiters ui INorth Lebanon 

pared to kidnap other Ame ricans. 

T I /-if. They said that whfle they “do not BEIRUT (Reutere) — An all-party seenrity committee cahed a cease 

ItaiO l^alvmo want to hann anyone," they wffl fire Thursday afternoon m Ubanon's northern port of Tnpoh after m* : 

-g 0 so far as to proceed to execute than five days of heavy fighting between Moslem groups, but securi-J 
T J £L 1 their hostages if their demand is sources said it held for only an hour. 

IS I Jean at n I not mct ~ Fighting eased just after the cease-fire went into effect, halting the 

w at- v J. shelling of residential areas. But fresh clashes soon erupted between the 

t Continued from Pape 1) * Complex Situation radical Sunni Islamic Unification Movement and the pro-Syrian Arab 

Winter’s Night a Traveler" ana Party, the security rources said. 

“Marcovaldo" iorfc Timer reported earlier from - i 

Fora while after Worid War a JVastun P on: T Orifae KeCQTO . 

he tried to write realistic storio. R^>ert CMd^^Me, the meo- Portugal sent a strong protest Ttarsday to Australia over reported 

JF 5 itw’ P ,ans for joint exploration by Australia and Indonesia erf cfl deposits in 

Nest of Spiders, d«cribed his ex- hintedat Ae complexity of^hos- the Timor Sea. a foreign h^istry spokesman said in Lisbon. (Reuters) 

Wge situation in remarks Wednes- ThtSday a jetty on fran's Kharg Uland 

n^t n t i<n, §* cairf thi» snnnuncBneni of tennmaL Iran, meanwhile, said two South Korean saflore were killed 
rilT^ Mr Wdris retease had been ,r ^' P ,aDCS aJtackcd lhdr ?orth«n Gulf. {Renters) 


~/\n an -parry sccuniy comm nice cancu a uaac- 
l in Lebanon’s northern port of Tripoli after nwf • 
f fighting between Moslem groups, but secun-y 
only an hour. 


their own initiatives and Willy Brandt as he visited 
a or disarmament. ' East Berlin on Thrasday. 

Cease-Fire Falters in North Lebanon 

BEIRUT (Reuters) — An all-party security committee called a cease- 
fire Thursday afternoon in Lebanon’s northern port of Tripoli after to* i 
than five days of heavy fighting between Moslem groups, but secun.y 
sources said it held for only an hour. 

Fighting eased just after the cease-fire went into effect, halting the 
shelling of residential areas. But fresh clashes soon erupted between the 
radical Sunni Islamic Unification Movement and the pnvSyrian Arab 
Democratic Party, the security sources said. 

Forihe Record 


His early noveL The Path to the dent’s national security adviser, 

Nest of Spiders," described his ex- hinted at the complexity of the has- [jj e Tjmof $ 
periences whfle fighting with the tage situation in remarks Wednes- ^ . . 
partisans against the Nazis ‘and day: n ~ v - 


Portugal sent a strong protest Thursday to Australia over reported 
plans for joint exploration by Australia and Indonesia trf ofl deposits in 
the Timor Sea. a Foreign Ministry spokesman said in Lisbon. {Reuters) 
Iraq said its planes destroyed Thursday a jetty on Iran's Kharg Island 


Iraq said its planes destroyed Thursday a jetty on Iran’s Kharg Island 

He said the announcement of °? ^ two South Korean saflon .were lolled 


Eventually, he seemed to fed layed because of intelligence from 
that the only way for him to write the region suggesting that the re- 
was to invent. Straight science fic- gaining hostages were to be ra- 
tion seemed too remote. In “Cos- leased soon, 
micomics” he came close to science “Because today, in Lebanoi 


maming Hostages were to oe re- 
leased soon. 

“Because today, in Lebanon, the 


The sixth 
Karpov and 
Mr. Kasparc 


ame of the worid chess championship between Anatoli 
ary Kasparov ended in a draw Thursday in Moscow after 
’s 27th move. Mr. Karpov now leads 3-3 to 23. (AP) 


fiction, inspired by the workings of competition, if yon wflL for custo- 


the universe. 

Thereafter, he began to grapple 


dy over these people is fairly keen, 
between three and four different 


Trade Policy Is Adopted 


with modern events in his own way factions, we thought it possible that . (Continued from Page ]) 
through fables that often crisscross the awareness Sunday or Monday expected to reach $150 billion this 
time. of Reverend War’s release could year. 

By contrast to his own work, Mr. intensify that competition and The resolution calls for Iegjsla- 









<1 1'lirfaH i [i 1% » 1 . »• « » . • 1 1 M - ik LI ■ |Tvz 


■ 1 1 i'i I’m* ** * ! I*. 1 1 1 ■ l* ' »TiBJ ■ - v'Ar j i t\‘M ■ n I r 


Everything’s right here in the Philippines. 


^OC^herever you live in the region, you're 
only a few hours away on one of our wide-bodied 
Airbuses from one of Asia’s last grear travel bargains. 
And it’s right here in the Philippines. 

Five-Star hotel rooms for as little as $45 a night. 
Room, food and drinks at a first-class beach resort from 
$40 a day. A swinging night on the town, with dinner 
and disco dancing for less than S20. 

And the bargains never stop. 

Designer fashions, antiques, handicrafts. The Philippines. 
A lot more p%a_ w • 
for a lot less. 


tion. In “If on a Winter’s Night a lease of the others." he said during strong House support that Mr. 
Traveler," be invented a group an appearance in Colorado Rea^m has denounced as a proteo- 
called the Organization for the Springs. tionist measure. The. bill, spon- 

Ecc ironic Production of Homoge- Other administration officials sored by three Democrats — the 

nized Literary Works. He said it said the Symn government’s atd- House Ways and Means Commit- 
was inspired by the market re- tude changed sharply after Israel tee c hairman, Dan Kostenkowsld 
search conducted by the television took until September to release the of Illinois, Representative Richard 
networks and some book publish- final group of more than 750 Ar- A. Gephardt of Missouri, and Sell- 
ers to determine what audiences abs, mostly Suites, it had been ator Lloyd Bentsen erf Texas — 
wanted to see and read — and then holding in a prison near Haifa. would force nations with large 
to manufacture it Another official said the Syrians trade surpluses to open their mar- 

He was boro in Santiago.de Las believed that there had been a deal kets to American products or face a 
Vegas, Cuba, of Italian parents, last June in winch 39 American 25 percent import surcharge. 


sored by Representative Stan Lun- 
dine of New York, won the f.i- 
dorsement of a special task force'on 
trade named by Representative Jim 


ity leader. 

President Reagan, meanwhile, 
continued his attack on those bills 
during an appearance in Concord, 
New Hampshire, that was sup- 
posed to have been devoted to tax 
overhaul 

“What we can’t do is be stam- 


oetworks and some book publish- final group of more than 750 Ar- A. Gephardt trf Missouri, and Sen- ‘What we can’t do is be stam 
ers to determine what audiences abs, mostly Suites, it had been ator Lloyd Bentsen trf Texas — peded into the dark hole of Drotec 
wanted to see and read— and then holding in a prison near Haifa. would force nations with large tionism, igniting a trade war that 
to manufacture iL Another official said the Syrians trade surpluses to open their mar- will undercut everythin we’ve ac- 

He was born in Sa n tiago.de Las believed that there had been a deal kets to American products or face a compHshed and, m the lone ™ 
Vegas, Cuba, of Italian parents, last June in winch 39 American 25 percent import sorcharce. throw millions of Americansoiitfrf 
both of whom were tropical agron- hostages taken from a Trans World Its sponsors deny the bill is pro- work," Mr Reagan saiiH*n!n» 
oimsts. Several years later they re- Airlines flight would be Treed in tectiomst, describing it instead as a comments on trade he MHmaH? 

tnmnrl tr\ Qen T?**m.*% An f V ia TtulSen Wf'liann** Tat ilia* nilaaM j ■ - UilU lllaUC 



3SaS b^ogthathoosathemg^^ Moslems — u had 

supplies. The Angolan offensive JOc Revolunonary nibcCaii de Paris on ^ 

against Jamba appeared designed “P 311 A ra ^ c “'^ 7 ^ s ^*^Py rtv . n ; ne persons were hurt. The | 

.zT... «rr ~k-ic- « in niv llniK ix-fih the Via Veneio in Rome on Tuesday Thirty-nine person^ i 


turned to San Remo, os the Italian exchange for the immediate release market-expanding measure: 


Riviera. After Italy’s entry into' of the 

World War EL as a compulsory 

member of the Young Fascists, he 
participated in the Italian occupa- A g 
tion of the French Riviera, but in 
1943 be joined the Italian Resis- *- 
lance and fought the Germans in (i 
the Ligurian mountains. refusei 


tes held by JsraeL 


The Democratic initiative, spon- 


^uing a press conference Tuesday 


Agency Faces Shake-Up Over Greenpeace 


(Continued from Rage 1) 
refused Thursday to answer ques- 


In 1945, be joined the Comznu- tions about the letter, and it was 
nist Party and began contributing not clear if the personnel in ques- 
to party journals. With the writers tian could include Mr. Hemu_ who. 


°n Tuesday, the three men. In New Zealand on Thursday 
aUmg with the former armed forces Prime Minister David 
duefofrtaff Jrann° uL acaze.w«p he knew that more than five FrS± 


Cesare Pavese and Elio Vittorini, as min 

he shared an involvement in Social- for the DGSE 
ist politics and in the neo- realistic Ear lie r Thu 
literary vogue. . had summoned 


Earlier Thursday. Mr. Hemu 
had summoned senior military offi- 


“The Communist Party seemed cm for consultations. He met sep- 
to have the most realistic program arateiy with General J ean Saulnier, 


for opposing a resurgence of ras- the armed forces chief of staff, and 

r.. MkoMifalinl, I,,lu * . J - 


cism and for rehabflitaiing Italy," 
be said, "but I left tbe party in 
1957. and today I am apolitical" 


Admiral Pierre LaCoste. chief of 
tbe secret service; at the Defense 
Ministry. 


18a &vc ® 

Est. 1971 

Just tell the taxi driver "sank too doe noo” 

• 5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 

• Rtlkenturm Scr. 9, MUNICH 


tne Kampow warrior. report that as manv xTmpZ* 

Mr Hemu acknovdodged that agents were in 
five french seoet rervice agents months before the atSc. 
had been m Auddand, but strongly Two French agentsare in 
repudiated thecharge that they had New Zealand 
been ordered to sink the ship. otagbg^R 
His response drew criticism in murdering a Green^Sl 01 and 
much of Se French press Thur^ w« 

Le Monde said that Mr. Miner- Auddand atthe tS t 0 ?SS Jv 
rand had Wundy told Mr. Hemu in have also been identifiKi^f nSS 
a cabinet meeting Wninesday that agents. 45 

"I want to know*, the truth about A story to annw, cjj 
the charges. The newspaper said L’Express maaazmSuc^^ r 
that both Mr. Mitterrand and Mr. woe arouSt^TN^lS! ro ' 
Fabius were “presrins Mr. Hemu iheyaSSi h^L^ 0 ^ 
to establish the truth.- gen bottles. mcWen m ^ ox y _ 

The paper said Mr. Fabius had L’Hxoress - r- , 
told Mr. Hemu that he had been asenK^h^ afourth team of 



u that he had been agents "had teani “ 

culpably slow is investigating the mAustSk^^ f hl ^ Vesse! 
operatioiL wrong.- ^ thing?! went 

(AP, Reuters} 




a 


















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 



Page 3 


|h 

*S| 

!Shl 

r- ss* 

>"m 1 V- 

■'* Vfi*' 


U.S. Details How Secrets Bolivia Jails 
'Were Leaked to Soviet Unionists; 

State of Siege 
hDedared 


• pS Se?:?S 

Vfr ! tvj, 

r' I." '^fe' 

:;35* *■. 
*-**■ 


' *■ . Lin* , 


* r 

• ' •*. 

~=-j 1.7 j, 

r- 


-V 


mEastBe 

v* 


By Michael WelssfcopF 

- ,KtttA f"S«*« *<Wf SfWIrt 

Washington - ik wca 

• «, ai ? ulTe< ^ information, appar- 
entiy from Russian sources, ex- 
plaining in detail the Soviet 
uqjod s system for obtaining West- 
em military and tedutoloBcal se- 
crets, according to Defense Secre- 
. taryCaspar W. Weinberger. 

., This infonnarion was contained 
« a Pentagon report released 
. Wednesday by Mr. Wemberaw 
who said that the leakage of W«i- 
era technology to 'ihe Soviet Union 
, .is a far more serious problem than 
w'e had previously realized." 

Among the Western technolqgi- 
«i. secrets aaroired by the Sowt 
union, according 10 die report, 
^we the fire-control radar for the 
r-18 jet fighter, one of the meat, 
advanced aircraft developed by the 
United States. Also acquired, ac- 
cording to the report, "were runner- 
. ous computers and microchips, 
tnany of them used by the Russians 
to make their own versions of 
Western electronic devices. 

The report disclosed the struc- 
_ .lure of an organization in Moscow 
. that U daims coor dinates efforts to 
obtain technology by. targeting 
. -American universities and UJS. de- 
fense contractors and hiring West- 
. . cm businessmen to assist m smug- 
gling operations. 

\ The report, which Mr. Wernber- 
- . .ger termed “deeply sobering," adds 
'another foreboding characieriza- 
• ■ lion of the Soviet Union's activities 
. -by the Reagan administration as 
arms-con trot talks resumed Thurs- 

- day in Geneva and as the president 
. prepares for his meeting Nov. 19 

. and 20 with Mikhail S. Gorbachev, 
the Soviet leader. Mr. Weinberger 
said the report showed the needTor 

- increased vigilance in the West to 
. try to frustrate Soviet espionage. 

According loan informed source 

- in (he American, intelligence com- 
. . muniiy, much of the information in 


*he new Pentagon report came 
frean a Soviet KGB agent recruited 
m the 1970s by French tnKdligcncc. 
According to the source, this agent 
was part of a team of about 300 
KMauiTic specialists working for 
the Soviet intdfigence agency who 
have been sent abroad on technol- 
ogy-homing missions. 

The KGB agent provided infor- 
mation and documents to the 
French for a number rtf years, the 
source said. He was transferred 
back to Moscow several years ago, 
resumed contact with the French 
there, but that disappeared and is 
now presumed dew. the source 
added 

In late March a Paris newspaper, 
Le Monde, pubtishedihe first ac- 
count of the Soviet technological 
espionage lhai « described in more 
detail in the Pentagon report- Le 
Monde said that the information 
kdio the French government's de- 
cisirjr to expel 47 Soviet diplomats 
in 1983. 

The report released Wednesday 
says only that the information it 
contains was obtained recently and 
“directly by the United Slates and 
allied countries.** 

Compiled by the Defense De- 
partment, the Central Intelligence 
Agency and 20 other UJ>. agencies, 
the report describes a Soviet appa- 
ratus beaded by the Military Indus- 
trial Commission. The organiza- 
tion consists of executives of top 
mi liian, industries who select spe- 
cific items for collection, designate 
intelligence agencies for each job 
and allocate funds for each acquisi- 
tion, a total of 500 million rubles 
per year in the late 1970s, accord- 
ing to the report 

The Pentagon report translated 
that 500 muhon rubles into $1.4 
billion in “1980 purchase-power 
equivalents.'’ but other specialists 
challenged that conversion. The 
Soviet Union’s official exchange 
rate pegs the ruble at about 5130. 


CnmpUnttrr Our Shill />,vw Di’partim 

LA RAZ — Bolivia declared 
Thursday a 90-day state of siege 
and arrested hundreds of trade 
unionists after talks failed to end a 
crippling general strike of two 
weeks over austerity measures im- 
posed 10 curb inflation. 

The Interior MiniMry said that 
150 labor activists, including the 
leaders of the Bolivian Workers 
Central, were flown in four military 
jets to Tour towns in the north. 

The inferior minister, Fernando 
Barr demy, said the government 
had taken the actions because of 
the upheaval that the strike bad 
caused He said provincial authori- 
ties had been ordered to place a 
six-hour curfew on the country be- 
ginning at midnight Thursday. 

.He said that troops arrested hun- 
dreds of Bolivian workers Thurs- 
day morning, including the coun- 
try’s top labor leader, Juan Luchin, 
after die workers staged a hunger 
strike to protest government aus- 
terity measures. 

The infornution minister, Rey- 
naldo Peters, said the government 
offered to lift all sanctions against 
workers arrested or fired for strik- 
ing. The walkout, which began 
Sept. 4. has been declared illegal- 

in return. Mr. Peiers .said labor 
leaden had to cal! off the strike and 
the fast for 15 days to allow negoti- 
ations on the economic program. 

However. Mr. Lechin. the execu- 
tive secretary of the Bolivian Work- 
ers Central, the lefUM-led national 
labor confederation, said the strike 
would continue until an assembly 
of ZOO men voted on the govern- 
ment offer. 

The government of President 



Kidnappers of Duarte’s Daughter 
Demand Cease-Fire, News Blackout 


THe ft aoa w cd ftwi 

Strikers in Bolivia denounce government austerity. 


Victor Par. Estenssoro. which took 
office last month, devalued the 
peso by about 95 percent and froze 
public sector wages Aug. 29 in a bid 
to curb the world's highest inflation 
rate, now over 14.000 percent an- 
nually. 

Troops and police were deployed 
throughout La Paz on Thursday, 
and armored vehicles guarded the 
main square, where the government 
and congress buildings stand. 

An Interior Ministry communi- 
que said ihe government took the 
measures because of escalating 
provocation and acts of sabotage 
“by known agitators under orders 
from abroad." 


U ••.aid hard-line politicians and 
union leaders “had hindered the 
finding of a patriotic agreement on 
the gotemment’s economic mea- 
sures aimed at ending hyperinfla- 
tion. u idesptvad corruption and at 
starting an economic recovery." 

Mr. Bartelemy said the arrested 
workers, who were rounded up 
when troops burst into the univer- 
sity and union headquarters, would 
appear before magistrates within 
4# hours. 

Mr. Paz. who took office on a 
pledge to halt Bolivia's steep eco- 
nomic decline, declared the general 
strike illegal hours after it began 
Sept. 4. (Reuters, .4 P) 


Judge Cites Contradiction in Nicaragua’s Evidence 


K 






k'fe*. 


i*> Brand: 5 V. 

*1 Beri“ 0: Ts- 

mrtii Leta 


Pie Associated Press 

SI THE HAGUE— The U^., 
at the International Court of Jus- 
tice accused Nicaragua on Thurs- 
day of presenting contradictory ev- 
idence by denying that it had 
supported leftist rebels in EL Sal*- 
vador. 

He also cast doubt oh (be testi- 
mony of one of Managua's star 
witnesses, David Macmchaet, a 
former CIA intelligence analyst 

Speaking on the sixth day of 
hearings in a case brought by Nica- 
ragua against the United States, 
Judge Stephen M. Schwebel quoted 
. Mr. Maanfchacfe testimony that 
" “it could be taken as a fact that. 
: Nicaragua was involved in supply-" 
'mg arms to the insurants m El 
Salvador. 

The judge noted that Luis Carri- 
on Cruz, Nicaragua's deputy interi- 
or minister, tohfthe court last week 


that bis government was “not en- 
gaged ... in the provision of arms 
to either of the factions engaged in 
the aril war in El Salvador." 

The United Slates has boycotted 
proceedings in the case since Janu- 
ary, claiming that the court has no 
jurisdiction in the case. A U.S. dip- 
lomat, however, is attending the 
hearings as an unofficial observer. 

Mr. Schebd asked Carlos Ar- 
gudlo, ihe head of the Nicaraguan 
legal team here, whether the 15- 
member judicial panel was to “be- 
lieve "or disbelieve’' Mr. Macmi- 
chad’s statement on the alleged 
aims shipments to El Salvador. 

“Arid if the. court is asked to 
disbelieve Ihe conclusion of Mac- 
michcai, why should it be asked to 
believe his other conclusions?” be 
said. 

He cited allegations by Mr. Mac- 
michaet, who was under contract 
with the CIA from 1981 to 1983. 


that the agency sent an armed force 
of 1,500 men into Nicaragua with 
the approval of President Ronald 
Reagan. 

Mr. Macmichael said the Reagan 
administration's stated purpose 
was to stem an alleged flow of arms 
from Nicaragua to Ei Salvador. But 
its real intern, he testified, was to 
destabilize the Saudi nisi govern- 
ment and undercut its international 
support. 

Mr. Aiguello told the court that 
he would reply to Judge SchwebeTs 
questions on Friday. 

In other testimony Thursday, Sir 
lan Brownlie, an Oxford law pro- 
fessor who is serving on the Nicara- 
guan legal team, said that "public 
declarations by high U.S. officials 
and legislation adopted by Con- 
gress dearly indicated that the U.S 
government is legally responsible 


tor of human rights allegations for 
Interior Minister Tomas Borge 
Martinez from late 1982 until July, 
said at a news briefing arranged by 
the U.S. State Department that he 
fled because “1 came to realize how' 
corrupt and bloody the Nicaraguan 
government was." 

Mr. Baldizon said that after he 
investigated the execution of more 
than ISO Miskiu? Indians during 
the summer of 1982, be was or- 
dered to write a second report, 
r>fThr uw„»a “siring a different and falsified 

wJ. -T rKSSTSSt 

mem." 


for the military and paramilitary 
actions against Nicaragua." 

Nicaragua's leftist Sandiimi 
government originally filed the ac- 
tion in April 1984. charging the 
United Slates with waging “armed 
attacks” aimed at overthrowing the 
government. 

The court, a judicial arm of the 
United Nations, has no enforce- 
ment powers. 

■ Rights Violations Gted 

Char), 
ton Post 
ington : 

Nicaragua has covered up thou- 
sands of cases of human rights vio- 
lations, including murder, while fi- 
nancing its intelligence and 
espionage network through drug 
trafficking, according to a defector. 

Alvaro Jose Baldizon Aviles, 26, 
who said be was the chief investiga- 


Bv James LeMoyne 
S’rw Iflrit Times Semetr 
SAN SALVADOR — The kid- 
nappers of the daughter of Presi- 
dent Jose Napoleon Duarte of Q 
Salvador have established new con- 
ditions for opening negotiations on 
her release, according to a senior 
Salvadoran official. 

fn three radio messages to Salva- 
doran officials, the kidnappers 
haw demanded a halt to govern- 
ment military operations and an 
embargo on all information about 
the case; including further report- 
ing about the kidnapping in the 
Salvadoran press, according to the 
Salvadoran official. 

The conditions were set amid re- 
ports that the kidnappers of Infs 
Guaddupe Duarte Durin are left- 
ist rebels belonging to one of the 
five groups making up the Fara- 
bundo Marti National Liberation 
From. It appears that the rebel 
from itself may not be taking re- 
sponsibility for the kidnapping be- 
cause it wains to minimize criticism 
of the action. 

The official said the government 
would not stop military' operations 
but would stop disclosing informa- 
tion about the kidnapping Local 
newspaper and radio mi tors would 
also tie asked to embargo news 
about the case, he said. 

In its first comment on the kid- 
napping, the rebel radio Vencere- 
mos on Wednesday attacked Presi- 
dent Duane in especially harsh 
terms, accusing him of being “the 
greatest criminal ever in E) Salva- 
dor.” 

■ Interview With Kidnappers 
In an interview with United 
Press International the kidnappers 
confirmed Wednesday that they 
belonged to a faction of the Fara- 
bundo Marti front. 

They said negotiations for Mrs. 
Duarte Duran's release could not 
begin until the military ended its 
anti-guerrilla campaign of “mili- 
tary overflights, sweeps and arbi- 
trary arrests” and began respecting 
“human rights.” 

It was the kidnappers' first pub- 
tic statement since the abduction 
10 days earlier. The guerrilla group 
said it would announce any further 
conditions for the woman’s release 
later. 


They said both Mrs. Duarte 
Duran and a woman kidnapped 
with her were in good health. 

The rebels played a cape record- 
ing that they said was made by 
Mrs. Duarte Duran for her father. 

The voice on the tape said, 
“Papa, today. Monday the 16th of 


September, your daughter, Jnes 
Guaddupe. is speaking. I want to 
tell you. Papa, that I am fine. I am 
fine. Send my greetings to the fam- 
ily. I want co tdl you that I am in 
ihe hands of the guerrilla comman- 
do group Pedro Pablo Castillo” of 
ihe Farabundo Marti front. 


Earthqoake in Indonesia 

United Press International 

JAKARTA — At least 10 per- 
sons died and seven were injured 
when an earthquake recorded at 5.8 
on the Richter scale occurred Mon- 
day in Irian Jaya, about 1,960 miles 
{3.170 kilometers) east of Jakarta, 
the news agency Aniara reported 
Thursday. 


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Where high expectations are quietly met. 


lust i it i Linion Square* Snn Francisco boasts a small, 
private* and notahk cheerful hotel— Campton Place, 
located just stej>s from one ot America's premier 
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TRAVELLERS REASSURED •WATER 
IN BOMBA Y SAFE TO DRINK \ 


Based on his long and intimate acquaintance with 
Bombay our foreign correspondent writes : 

“Of ail the things that people drink in Bombay, 
water has never figured prominently. 

Most prefer Tonic in Bombay, Mar- 
tini in Bombay or Orange in Bombay. 

Indeed, anything that one would 
usually mix in Bombay. 

But, let me assure you, there 
is no need to stay clear 
of the water. 

Those rumours 
which infer that 
water does not mix 
with this most 
distinctive of Im- 
ported London Dry* 

Gins are well and _ 
truly ill-founded.” , 



v House, Senate Leaders Say Debate 
On Taxes Will Spill Over Into ’86 


- . - , - ''V 





- ■' “V - 




a 

, i. 




By Tom Rcdbum 
and Rudy Abramson - 

Los Angeles Tima Service 

. WASHINGTON — The House 
Ways and Means Ccwnmiuee has 
i j d fl ei ) the first step toward cou- 
! gressjona] enactment or U.S. tax 
.'revision by agreeing to draft prooe- 
.. dures that allow its members to 
" amend President Ronald Reagan’s 
’ plan. 

Congressional leaders said 
'Wednesday that their new timeta- 
ble would prevent ihe Senate from 
acting on tax revision this year. 

They agreed that the best Mr. 
Reagan could expect was to receive 
a bill from Capitol HOI in the first 
\ few months of next year. 

“1 don't think it has any chance 
.. of getting through Congress this 

* year,” said the House speaker, 
Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., Democrat of 

- Massachusetts. His remarks ech- 
. . oed those made earlier by the Sen- 

. ■ ate majority leader. Robot J. Dole, 
•• Republican of Kansas. 

Meanwhile, Mr. Reagan took his 
campaign for tax revision back on 

- -the road, telling a crowd in Con- 
-. -cord. New Hampshire, that “the 
' ' political establishment back in 

Washington says you don’t care 
.. * about these things.” 

Many leaders in Congress have 
.. said they can detect nogroundswell 

US. Labor Union Elects 
Woman as a Top Officer 

New York Times Service 

^ NEW YORK — The United 
r Electrical. Radio and Machine 
-■ ' Workers of America has elected a 
- • woman as secretary-treasurer, one 
' - ' of the few times a woman has ad- 
■ vanced to such a high position in a 
' • U.S. labor union. 

• - - Amy R- NeweB, 37, of New 

• York, defeated Charles Lowell, a 
union international representative 

' • from New England, in the voting 
’•Wednesday. She will take office 
• Nov. 1. 


ip= JTEWKIXERY =j| 

WAS LOST 

In a yellow attache caae in 
Geneva on September 6. 

}f anyone knaves or finds any 
information leading to Uu&, 
they will be rewarded gener- 
ously. Pteuse call: 

22/456 523 or 21/391 323, 

SWITZERLAND. 


of support for overhauling the tax 
code, out House leaden remain 
committed to producing a bill this 
year so that Mr. Reagan cannot 
blame Democrats in next year’s 
ejection for derailing his proposal. 

“Are we trying to put it through 
the House? The answer is yes,” said 
Mr. O'Neill, who met with Mr. 
Dole and agreed to end this year’s 
congressional session at Thanks- 
giving. the last week in November, 
leaving only enough time on the 
legislative agenda to act on such 
issues as trade, remaining budget 
matters and an increase in the na- 
tional debt limit. 

The House Ways and Means 
Committee, voting 27 to 2 to bar 
the public, reporters and lobbyists 
from its detiberations, is expected 
to devote most of October to re- 
writing the tax code, 

The closed sessions, according to 
Cbainnaa Dan Rostenkowski, 
Democrat of Illinois, are designed 
to reduce the pressure from lobby- 
ists representing special-interest 
groups and permit members to talk 
freely among themselves. 


The committee, in a key move, 
agreed to work from a list of tax 
options prepared by the staff rather 
than directly from Mr. Reagan’s 
proposal The staff options, ac- 
cording to the committee’s chief 
counsel, Joseph K Dowley, do not 
represent Mr. RostenkowskTs own 
proposals but are designed simply 
to provide a starting point for com- 
mittee members, who will be free to 
offer amendments of their own. 

In another action, the committee 
decided that any member offering 
an amendment that would lose rev- 
enue — such as a lower tax rate — 
would have to offer, at the same 
time, an offsetting provision to 
gain live money back. 

The Reagan proposal would cut 
the top individual tax rale from 50 
•percent to 35 percent and nearly 
double the personal exemption 
from SI ,040 to S2.000, providing an 
average tax cut of about 7 percent. 
On the corporate side, most com- 
panies would pay higher taxes de- 
spite lower tax rales because of the 
elimination of such tax preferences 
as the investment tax credit. 


Sermon Broadcast 
IsBairedbyCMe 

United Press International 

SANTIAGO — Chilean authori- 
ties boned radio stations from 
broadcasting live an Independence 
Day sermon by Cardinal Juan 
Francisco Fresno, the Roman 
Catholic archbishop of Santiago, 
who urged the military government 
and its opponents to senile their 
differences. 

President Augusto Pinochet, the 
four members of the military junta, 
opposition party officials and labor 
leaders attended the thanksgiving 
Mass on Wednesday at the cathe- 
dral in central Santiago at which 
Cardinal Fresno gave the sermon. 

The government's information 
office, known by the Spanish acro- 
nym DINACOS. took over Chile's 
radio stations for more than four 
hours to prevent a live broadcast of 
the sermon. The stations were or- 
dered to broadcast folk music until 
the Mass ended, but they were later 
allowed to transmit an 'edited ver- 
sion of the sermon. 





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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 


Acquittals Are Expected in Aquino Case 




% Seth Mydans . . . _ . . . 

Nev York rimes Service boarding ramp io his death. Marcos according to complicated 

MANILA — Two years after the The soldiers have been held in a and sometimes ambiguous guide- 
assassination of the opposition military camp since the start of the lines drawn up by his office, 
leader. Beoigno S. Aquino Jr., the trial and their testimony, given in TTie president set the tone for the 

truth remains elusive, and the 'way terse, respectful monotones, was proceedings by announcing that 
seems dear for the acquittal of remarkably uniform. General Ver will be reinstated as 


Airlines jetliner and down a narrow of three judges appointed by Mr. said, in the Tagalog language of the 


Marcos according to complicated 


truth remains elusive, and the way terse, respectful mo 
seems dear for the acq uittal of remarkably uniform, 
some or all of the 26 men rjtaryd Given the high stall 
with involvement in the tilling in which General F; 
The defense announced Wednes- chief of staff < 

day that it would bring no more fdSf FtadLSSuf E? 

witnesses in the seven-month trial ££,£5 

and it is expected to present ados- thattteu 

tng statement next week. The pros- 

ecuuon is scheduled to foDow with 

any rebuttal witnesses, and a ver- g5?*5 

diet could come nexl month. 

In a courtroom that has fallen ihat the trial “is not a 


"Die presides t set the tone for the 
proceedings by announcing that 
General Ver will be reinstated as 


Philippines. . 

“Did you shoot Senator Aquino 
when you reached the tarmac?" 
“No. sir." 

“Did you hear the words, "Ew 
no. era no. ako no, ako no. pusila. 


mi 


Given the high stakes of the case, head of the armed forces and 
in which General Fabian C. Ver. liggnce services if he is acquitted. "No, sir.” 

the chief of staff or the armed and by labeling prosecution wit- Those words, the Tagalog for 

forces and a dose associate of Pres- nesses as peg urers. “Here he is, here he is. I'll do it, ru 

ident Ferdinand E. Marcos, is a A number of witnesses haye dis- do it, shoot, shoot.” are recorded 
defendant, a common perception appeared before or after testifying, on tape. 

has grown that the trial faces diffi- On the witness stand this week. Like much of the evidence that 
cult odds in producing a verdict Constable Rogelio Moreno of the points to an alleged military con- 
that will be seen to be just Philippines constabulary, an escort spiracy to assassinate Mr. Marcos’s 

Indeed, General Ver’s lawyer, who followed Mr. Aquino down major political rival, that hurried 
Antonio Coronet said this week the steps from the airliner, sat stiff- shout has not found its way during 


head of the armed forces and Intel- pusila ? " the lawyer asked, 
ligence services if he is acquitted. "No, sir.” 
and by labeling prosecution wit- Those words, the Taga 
nesses as perjurers. “Here he is, here he is. I'll c 

A number of witnesses have dis- do it, shoot, shoot.” are r 


. 

>: t> .. t 


followed Mr. Aquino down major political rival, that hurried 

« sire 4 1 :«(. naA .r 


nearly empty, a series of quiet-spo- search for historical truth." 
ken. neatly groomed soldiers took -What is iiist i.c not n« 


ken. neatly groomed soldiers took 
the stand this week — the escort 


that the trial “is not a forum for the ly and almost motionless as he gave 
search for historical truth." his testimony. 


party that, gripping Mr. Aquino by sarily just," he said. 

the arms, hustled him off a China The case is being tried by a panel 


"What is just is not necessarily “Did you shoot Senator Aquino 
legal and what is legal is not neces- while you were on the staircase?” 


In Riyadh 

the experienced traveller 
selects the established 
leader in luxury 


e steps from the airliner, sat stiff- shout has not found its way during 
and almost motionless as he gave the trial into a coherent picture oi 
s testimony. the events of Aug. 21, 1983. 

“Did you shoot Senator Aquino in the last days of the trial the 
iile you were on the staircase?” chief of the prosecution t eam. Ma- 
his lawyer asked. nuel C. Herrera, has removed him- 

“No. sir,” Constable Moreno self from the case after telling a 
reporter that he had received wam- 

\ mgs from above not to pursue it too 
vigorously. He spoke of a scenario 
in which the outcome was already 
known to those in charge. 

Another lawyer, Lupino Lazaro, 
represents the family of Rolando 
ay Galman, who was shot to death on 

- * the tarmac beside Mr. Aquino and 

j who, according to the military ver- 

L sion of the murder, was the assassin 

of the former senator. 

This week, Mr. Lazaro also 


RIYADH 

INTER • CONTINENTAL 
HOTEL 


Th* Asoosfted P*en 

General Fabian C Ver, 
the Philippine chief of 
staff, above left, is one 
of 26 defendants in the 
Aquino trial. Corazon 
Agrava, above right 
beaded the commission 
whose findings led to in- 
dictments. Below, two 
soldiers who escorted 
Aquino from his airlin- 
er, Mario Lasaga, left 
and Rogelio Moreno. 



the course of the trial and said, soldiers who escorted 

“There was a conspiracy to murder, Aquino from his airlift* 

a conspiracy to cover up, and now ^ ]viario Lasaga, left 

XwrJto ~ Smn8 3 conspttacy 10 and Rogelio Moreno. 

Bienvenido A Tan Jr„ a lawyer 

on the 1 1 -month fact-finding com- 

both prosecution and defense law- 
SSStSSSi “ F virtually assured his 
an interview WednesdayFrhe fnr flM . 


Anti-Japan 
Protest Rally f 
Is Condoned 

By Beijing 

By Jim Mann 

Jjn Angela 7wii 5i ■rr.n 

BEIJING — The Chinese For- 
eign Ministry condoned Fru.a> •* 
series of anti-Japanese demons u.-y 
tions by university students in &=».!’ 
ing. -j 

In a statement, the ministry saw 
that the vial by the Japanese prune 
minister. Yasuhiro Naksseoe, I- 1 * 1 *, 
month to a Tokyo shrine coraxnem f 
orating Japan's war dead^nau ig- 
nored Chinese protests and had re- 
sulted in “hinting seriously Jhe 
feelings of the Chinese people. 

Earlier, the official Chinese 
stance toward Wednesday s stu- 
dent protests had been ambiguous. 

An early account of the Priests 
by the Xinhua news agency played 
down the incident. It asserted that 
the demonstrations were not aimed 
at the Japanese people in genera L 

But on Friday, the Chines e For - 
eign Ministry issued a statement 
expressing sympathy with the stu- 
dent demonstrations, which were 
labeled “commemorative activi- 
ties." 

“We hope that the leaders of the 
Japanese government will faithful- 
ly honor their promise, that is. Ja- / 
pan will not take the path of milita- 
rism attain." tne Chinese 


mm again. tne inmcsc 
spokesman said. 

The student demonstrations 

against Japan erupted Wednesday, 

cation was the rejection by the proceedings point out that the on the 54a anni wrMiyrf iria ns. 
prosecution last Friday of evidence court has a more difficult task than ^ no ^ 1 

supplied by the United States that did the fact-finding commission. JenL JJ JJPj JtKh/iSvfS 
two Philippine Air Force jets were Whereas the commissioa needed Shenyang.^ which pavedtheway for 
scrambled on the Hav of the murder nnlv to cast doubt on the militarY ■^ a P aoesc occupation Of Man- 



FJZZaTI? r rt ,,3* “ The grounds for the ruling, two Philippine Air Force jets were Whereas the commissioa needed 

nmfMJ though — that the defendants were scrambled on the day of the murder only to cast doubt on the military ^Japanese occupation of Man 

not warned by the Agrava board of in what may have been an effort to version of events, the court must ch 4P a -„ . MnK . 

*°tWry*sv*r toremainTaent - were divert Mr. Aquino's aircrafL now prove that someone other than- aoutmg "Downvath Japanese 

sible, he said. >, v „„„ „ r , h „ ;.7c Vv,t man Kited Mr Am,inn mditansnr and “Down with Na- 


1.000 sta- 


ir . . . . described privately by one of the Though it is not clear how such Mr. Galman killed Mr. Aquino, muitanan ana wown wun rva- 

Two controversial recent legal Dwyers as an example of Mr. Coro- activity might have been related to and the evidence is elusive. kasone. approximately 1 .000 stu- 

movra have cleared the way for a ne [’ s assertion that ‘Vhat is legal is the murder of Mr. Aquino, it could The nearly empty courtroom, in dents from Begmg Umvosity and 

possible acquittal In the first, the nol always just” be shown to demonstrate that the dramatic contrast to the overflow Qingno* university staged a rare 


supreme ioun upneia tne court s Mr. Tan cited the prosecution's military knew Mr. Aquino's flight crowds during the earlier hearings. P roicsl rauy m i lenaunen oquurc 
deasion not to allow use by the f^re w appeal the Supreme plans, contrary to General Ver’s attests to a general sense that this u, . ccn ^ 7 ^ img- A ^ 

prosecution of testimony by aght court ruling as one indication that assertion, and could point to a mill- court, as Mr. Corond asserted, is addition, an esumaied 5,000 
of the defendants before the fact- (he prosecuting team was pulling tarv conspiracy. not the forum where historical stMorts demonstrated on! me Bey- 

finding commisaon of which Mr. - lls punches. He said another indi- Those who defend the judicial truth will be revealed. ,n 8 Umveraty cammis. Othw stu- 

Tan was a member. ; dents at Qinghua Umversity re- 

That commission, led by former portedly lned to hold a rally but 


protest ra 
in central 


in Tienanmen Square 
ijmg. 


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Appellate Justice Corazon Agrava, 
beard evidence that appeared to 
refute the theory that Mr. G alman 
was the killer of Mr. Aquino, and 
its flndings led to the indictment of 
General Ver and (he other defen- 
dants. General Ver and seven other 
military men are charged not with 
involvement in the murder itself, 
but with covering it up. 

General Vo’s testimony before 
the Agrava board is (he primary 
evidence against him on this 


U.S. Official Warns House Committee 
Against Rejecting Arms Sale to Jordan 


By Norman Kempstcr That decision, he added, reduced 
Las Angeles Times Service UiL influence with the Saudi nrili- 

WASHINGTON — A top State tary and “represents, obviously, a 
Department official has rebuffed loss of trade.” 


That decision, he added, reduced warfare equipment and training 
U3. influence with the Saudi rmh- simulators. 


congressional suggestions that the 


is of trade.” took a year to m 

Congress must be informed by arranged by the 


evidence against him on this Reagan administration reduce its the administration of its plans to bank Morgan Grenfell & Co., offi- He said, “the mistrust contrasts 

charge, and its exclusion bv the plans to sell advanced weapons to sell weapons abroad, and could dais said. They said it would pro- sharply with the official relations 

Iordan, ravine a legislative fieht block anv sale to Jordan. vide work for about 70 British com- between Bemng and Tokyo, which 


ith will be revealed. ing University campus. Other stu- 

denis at Qinghua University re- 
portedly tned to hold a rally buff} 

Committee 

Some of the protesters also re- 
-w- -g portedly said that China should 

e f/) f/lfYl/IH never again be exploited by British, 
l«U'l v Ame rican or German financial in- 
terests, 

trfare equipment and training One middle-level Chinese offi- 
nulators. dal stud Thursday that the general 

Financing of (he deal, which feeling in the country was that the 
ok a year to negotiate, was being students had engaged in “an act of 
ranged by the London merchant patriotism." 
nk Morgan Grenfell & Go-, offi- He said, “the mistrust contrasts 


Supreme Court is acknowledged by Jordan, saying a legislative fight blodcany rale to Jordan. 


. ; I . 




|®|j2gy 


over the arms could again strain Earlier this year, it approved a 
US. relations with Amman and the non binding resolution that bans 
rest of the Arab world. the sale of advanced equipment to 

Although President Ronald Rea- Jordan in the absence of a commit- 
gan had not made a final decision meat by Hussein to announce his 
on the sale, Richard W. Murphy, intention to recognize Israel and to 
the assistant secretary of state for engage in prompt peace talks with 
Near Eastern and South Asian af- Jerusalem. . 
fairs, told a House subcommittee Mr. Reagan said Hussein had 
Wednesday that he expected an met the requirements by saying 
early notice to Congress of the ad- that he was prepared to meet with 
ministration’s intent to supply Jor- Israel under the umbrella of an 
Han with the weapons. international conference and that 


vide work for about 70 British com- between Beqing and Tokyo, which 
pames. are very good” 


Han with the weapons. international conference and that 

King Hussein's government or- he would recognize Israel once 
dered the fighter jets and anti-air- those talks began. 

. ■* liTl L.-II- . r.w " W- >4 L.. 




craft missiles four years ago. 


'The dulling fact," Mr. Murphy 






Representative Lee H. Hamil- told the panel “is that King Hus- 
ton, the Indi ana Democrat who is sein’s courageous move toward Is- 
chainnan of the House Foreign Af- rad has provoked overt threats 
fairs subco mmi ttee on Europe and against bis regime and associates, 
the Middle East, told Mr. Murphy, The United States must be pre- 
u You have a problem in the Con- pared to support those who are . 
gress.” He suggested that the ad- willing to take risks for peace." 
ministration drop its request.- Hussein is expected to disc 


' '■* V T- T..? r&g' 

Oh * 


*ViSu{. 


Tie ^ OJA 


ministration drop its request.- Hussein is expected to discuss 

The sale is strongly opposed by the arms sale with Mr. Reagan on 
Israel and its supporters on Capitol Sept. 30 at the White House. 


■ ■ . »' • .• -'*; *•>>?. t.. 4 S'-: • '.Jd-rt'-' 


111 


Hill 

But Mr. Murphy responded that 
Jordan had "a genuine need for 


■ Thatcher Visits Jordan 

Prime Minister Margaret 








■ 




advanced aircraft and anti-aircraft Thatcher of Britain, in Amman for 
defenses.” the signing of a £270-million 

The Saudi government is no ($360.6-miThon) agreement to sell 
longer interested in buying major arms to Jordan, said that any re- 
new U.S. weapons in view of its gjonal peace settlement should pro- 
decision last weekend to buy Brit- vide for the creation of a Palestin- 


. j*? 1 -W.-V 

= . 







ish-made Toronado fighter-bomb- homeland, Reuters reported 
ers instead of U.S. -manufactured from Amman. 

F-15 fighters, Mr. Murphy said. - She said Wednesday that such a 
But the administration still settlement should guarantee the 
hopes to sell spare parts to Riyadh, “legitimate rights of all ^the peoples 
as weD as other support systems for and states in the area, including of 
U.S. arms that the Saudis pur- course, the Palestinian people. 






chased previously. 


The contract includes military 


ms rcas 


Mr. Murphy said that King Fahd vehicles and engineering equip- 
tumed to the British plane to avoid ment, radio commnni cations, pa- 
a bruising congressional battle, trol craft, ground and airborne 


Rabin Says Impasse on Egypt 
Could Make Cabinet Collapse 

Reuters Mr. Rabin’s remarks, in a radio 

TELAVTV — Defense Minister interview, followed a late-night 
Yitzhak Rabin warned Thursday meeting Wednesday at the bome of 
that lsraefs coalition government Prime Minister Shimon Peres, who 
could collapse if rightist parties summoned Labor Party colleagues 
continued to obstruct efforts to im- to. Hfcenre foreign policy, disputes 
prove relations with Egypt and to with members of the rightist Likud 
revive peace negotiations in the bloc. 


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The Likud bloc, led by Foreign 
Minister Yitzhak Shamir, is the La- 
bor Party’s main partner in the na- 
tional unity government formed 
last year. Mr. Shamir also serves as 
vice prime minister. 

“It is difficult," Mr. Rabin said, 
“to see Labor sitting another three 
years in the government if there is 
no chance of str engthening peace 
with Egypt and searching for peace 

f iossibilities along our eastern 
rant.” Jordan lies on Israel's east- 
ern border. 

The 10- man inner cabinet failed 
again Wednesday to agree on a 
formula for resolving a dispute 
with Egypt over ownership of 
Taha. a strip of land on the Gulf of 
Aqaba that Israel kept when it 
pulled out oF the Sinai in 1982. 

Egypt regards Taba as the key to 
improving its relations with Israel 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 




Page 5 


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Arms Talks Resume in Geneva 

Delegates Lay Groundwork for Reagan-Gorbachev Meeting 

The Anonmed Prvu nuclear arsenals by 30 percent io 40 comment. “If he means what he 

GENEVA — U.S. and Soviet percent in return for a U.S. ban on says, it puts an end to arms control j 
delegates resumed arms control on its research program. prospects.'' 


talks hen; Thursday in the last 
round of such negotiations before 
the leaders of their countries meet 
here in November. 

The delegates, who have agreed 
to a policy of confidentiality, said 


■ Reagan Stance Criticized 

Uednck Smith of The Sev York 
Times reported carher from Wash- 
ington: 


prospects. 

Administration officials said Mr. 
Reagan had ben prompted to take 


WHEREAS fiumamly ft** eom* to recognize cm»mkm 
ana aiiMMnea to nmAadiiM tunriy . u dan, to aty , to Stale, 
and to nation, ana now nwn e»pe»wne» me cancmsn at 
gMwlisnY. ana 

WHEREAS wends at ortae and positive mawgnu pen- 
mate dynamic Rarmonjc and 
‘/aLV-v* WHEREAS decisions made from a gmteiui heart ore 

endowed wnn ■ntnmic wisdom and msanow piospemy. 

apstitude WHEREAS Qraulude. me opposite o f "(Bking lor 
- * /{«%« granted. i* a DOarffve emotion wtneft creates oooa mN. 

■ U aj is a nasic amotion wmen » indigenous to an people, 

r J> a/.r '» * peace pioduang Hwang. 

***. AND WHEREAS Septefwwr 2J»nsa special flay liw on 

of eaumos one at the two wim oi me year when the aun 

P , j . peases over ine squalor ana flight and flay ana everywhere 

oep*Am6t%> o i eoua> length ana everyone is equal unoer the sun 

THEREFORE let us proclaim World Grati- 


tfrpiem&b 


n t nn oh MJMlit it Lnn mirth. to i ncncrvnc lei us piooiemi wgno uiair 

10 ttJd® Da y- a holiday for ail peoples, a day of meditation for all 
protect his negotmtuig leverage ■ religions, a day ol celebration for all humanity, united by knowl- 


I Chemical Weapons Charge 
A Soviet major general charged 


weapons in Western Europe for use 
in offensive warfare, Reuters re- 
ported from Moscow. 

Major Generai Anatoli Kunise- 
vich said at a news conference in 
Moscow that the Reagan adminis- 


IJw Anoamd ftow 


Soviet cosmonauts after the successful linkup with space station. 

Cosmonauts Preparing First Switch 
Of Space Station Crew in Mid-Mission 


\ United Press Internanend 

MOSCOW — Five Soviet cos- 
monauts prepared Thursday for 
the transfer of cosmonauts in a new 
process that will allow tbc perma- 
nent manning of the orbiting Sal- 
yut-7 space station, Tass said 

Lieutenant Colonel Vladimir 
Vasyutin, commanding the Soyuz 
T-14 transport ship, and the cos- 
monauts, Georgi Grechko and Al- 
exander Volkov, docked with Sal- 
yui-7 on. Wednesday. They joined 
Vladimir Dzhanibekov and Viktor 
Savinykh. who have beat in space 
for 102 days. 

For the first time, a crew switch 
will take place in the middle of a 
mission, with Mr. Dzhanibekov re- 
turning to Earth with Mr. Grechko 
ai the end of the current right-day 
mission. 

“Previously, the cosmonauts re- 
Vning to Earth mothballed the 


station's systems and all scientific 
equipment before leaving the space 
station,’* a space center spokesman 
told Tass. 

“New arrivals, during the first 
days of their stay on board the 
station engaged in the reactivation 
of the entire onboard equipment in 
the conditions of adaptation to 
space factors," he said. “This took 
much rime:" . 

The cosmonauts spent part of 
Thursday preparing the Soyuz T- 
13, which brought Mr. Dzbanibe- 
kov and Mr. Savinykh to Salyut-7, 
for the return journey to Earth. 

“For that purpose, the cosmo- 
nauts dismantled the individual 
cradle of Savinykh’ s seat in the 
spacecraft and replaced it with 
Grechko’s seat,” Tass said. 

“Toprepare for descent, Dzhani- 
bekov is training with the use of the 


Chi bis pressure suit which makes it 
possible to simulate terrestrial 
gravitation due to a differential in 
the atmospheric pressure,” the 
agency said 

Mr. Leonov described as promis- 
ing, “the testing of a method for 
one crew to hand over the orbital 
station to another crew in the very 
process of flight." 

Salyut-7 was launched in April 
1982 and has been the home for 
four major expeditions and numer- 
ous temporary visitors. 

ft was mothballed in October 
and subsequently developed seri- 
ous problems in the power supply, 
leaving die instruments frozen and 
the interior headess nidi no water. 

Repairs, carried out by Mr. 
Dzhanibekov and Mr. Savinykh, 
look almost two months. A perma- 
nent manned station, with rotating 
crews would avoid a similar crisis. 


}9 “ P® uc y connocnnauiy, «uu Critics of the Reagan ad minis- A Soviet major general charged 

utile after mar session. The chief inuion said Wednesday that Presi- Thursday that the United States 
Soviet delegate. Viktor P. Karpov, < j en[ Reagan's refusal to use the planned to deploy new chemical 
“rf,P. rogresswooW v'Sf 1 "- 00 Strategic Defense Initiative as a weapons in Western Europe for use 
U.S. willingness to reach effective -bargaining chip" for cutbacks in in offensive warfare, Reuters re> 
solutions. .. , Soviet offensive weapons bad seri- ported from Moscow. 

The talks Thursday, which lasted pusiy hurt prospects for progress at Major Generai Anatoli Kumse- 
rwo hours, were expected to lay the his meeting with Mr. Gorbachev, vich said at a news conference in 
groundwork for arms control d 15 - Paul C. Wamke. who was the Moscow that the Reagan adminis- 
cusstonson Nov 19 and J] be- ^ negotiator under President tration intended to produce mil- 
lw^ President Ronald Reagan jimmy Carter, said erf Mr. Reagan’s lions of new toxic weapons. 

and Mikhafl S. Gorbachev. ^ 

Asked if there would be progress ■ ■ . - . - - - — — - - - - 1Z 

in the current round of talks, the 
chief US. negotiator, Max M. 
tCampelman, said, “I hope so.** 

He said US. goals are ’•agree- 
ment and stability." 

The talks, now in their third 
round, resumed after a two-month 
pause: They began in March. 

The fust two rounds of six-week _ 

sessions produced no apparent re- 
suits, ana each side accused the 
other of being intransigent. 

Mr. Gorbachev has said the Ge- 
neva negoriations will “lose all 

sense” if the United States remains ^ 

unwilling to negotiate its Strategic 

Defense Iniljauve, a research pro- Hi JV 

gram for a space- based defense 

against missiles. jam m wmm aaH| 

The United States has repeatedly 
reaffirmed its intention to continue 
research on the project, and main- 
tains that disagreement in that area. 

should not preclude progress in ^B ^B 

other areas. Mr. Reagan reaffirmed ^HBI^B ^B 

that stance on Tuesday. ^BH ^Bj ■■■■ BB 

Mr. Kampelman, before arriving 

Monday in Geneva, said the U.S. MM |B 

del^ation would be ready for pro- ^B pfig 

gress and agreement in the Geneva 

talks “if the Soviet delegation ^B ^B ^B^B ^B 

makes a genuine negotiating effort ^B BB ^B ^B ^B 

without preconditions." ^B ^B 

He urged the Soviet Union to Hi 

bock up with concrete proposals its ■■ 

public hints of willingness to re- 
duce nuclear arsenals. 

Newspaper reports during the 
two-month break said the Russians 
may be prepared to cut strategic 


edge of a simultaneously shared emotion, a day when triumph of 
the spirit can make a world community. 

JOIN US in trie UNIVERSAL COMMUNION 

Saturday. September 2 1st - 6 p.m. Greenwich Mean Time: 

GATHER with a few friends 

be AWARE of sharing the emotion of GRATITUDE. — 
KNOW that It is being shared globally- 

The Only Donation we Ever Ask is Your Participation 

Tne World GnUHufla Day Proctematw express** me orulMOpny ol me first universal 
Hobday Cetaoreted since 1965. signed by trtlrty-nine governors of me United States 04 
America, if ie Imafl «(*US Congressional Record and rocognued by me United 
Nations, several countries, and religious leaders me world over. 

The World Onttude Day Foundation. Suite JK 777 UMtad Hattons Place. NYC 10017 


Agca Friend Testifies Bulgaria Knew of Papal Plot 


UK 


. ■■ 




By Michael Dobbs 

Washington Past Seniee 

ROME — The trial of right men 
accused of conspiring to nil Pape 
John Paul II has resumed after a' 
summer recess, with a Turkish wit- 
ness claiming that the Bulgarian 
secret services had prior knowledge 
of the plot* 

The new allegations of a Bulgari- 
an connection to the attempt to kiB 
the pope were made Wednesday by 
Yalcin Ozbey, a long-rime friend of 
Mebmet All Agca. .Mr. Agca has 
been convicted of trying to kill the 
pope in May 1981 and is also a 
defendant in the new trial 

Wednesday marked the Erst rime 
ihauhe court had heard testimony 
on Bulgarian involvement in the 
Vonspiracy from any witness other 
; than Mr. Agca. • 

Although Mr. Ozbey has sup- 
ported some of Mr. Agca’s general 
accusations against the Bulgarian 
secret services, his account differed 
from that provided by Mr. Agca on 
several key points. 

Mr. Gzbey’s.credibflity as a wit- 
ness has been challenged by the 
defense because of repeated con- 
tradictions, errors and retractions 
in his testimony. 

[Mr. Ozbey testified Thursday 
that he doubted the Turks allegedly 
involved in the plot had received 
Lhe 3 million Deutsche marks 
(51.03 million) that Mr. Agca has 


said they were promised. United 
Press international reported from 
Rome. 

{Pressed by Antonio Marini the 
prosecutor in the trial to say what 
happened to the nxmey the plotters 
allegedly were premised, Mr. Oz- 
bey said, “I don't believe they ever 
received Unit money.”] 

The resumption of die trial after 
a. seven-week smynngr break was 
marked by a new outburst from 
Mr. -Agca. He accused both the 
White House and the Vatican of 


plotting together to exploit his alle- 
gations of Bulgarian involvement 
to launch a propaganda campaign 
againsL the Soviet bloc. 

it was largely on the basis of Mr. 
Agca’s testimony during a three- 
year investigation into the papal 
assassination attempt that three 
Bulgarians and four Turks arc now 
on trial with him in Rome. 

“Tie Vatican and the White 
House, together with their accom- 
plices in the Western secret set-' 
vices, want to dominate the world 


Defector Linked to Russians 


The Associated Press 

BONN — The husband of a sec- 
retaiy in Chanceflar Helmut Kohl’s 
office maintained contacts with So- 
viet diplomats long before the cou- 
ple defected to East Germany, the 
daily Die Well reported Thursday. 

The secretary’s husband, Her- 
bert Addf Wilber, 59. reported the 
Soviet contacts to his superiors and 
thus escaped suspicion. Die Well 
said. He bad been a senior foreign 
policy expert in a foundation 
linked to the Free Democratic Par- 
ty, part of the Bom coalition gov- 
ernment. 

The defection of Mr. Wtllner and 
his wife, Herta-Astrid, 45, a secre- 


tary in the domestic affairs depart- 
ment of the chancellor’s office, was 
disclosed Tuesday. 

Die Welt said the Free Demo- 
crats and the foundation did not 
suspect Mr. WiUncr even when he 
“vehemently opposed" the station- 
ing of U.S. nudear missiles in West 
Germany. 

On Wednesday. Interior Minis- 
try officials said the country's 
counterespionage agency had long 
suspected Mr. Wilber of being an 
East German spy. but that Mr. 
Kohl and the Interior Ministry de- 
cided last month there was not 
enough evidence to order height- 
ened surveillance. 


with lies and calumny. All will fail 
miserably because the truth is in- 
vincible,* Mr. Agca said. 

Mr. Agca and Mr. Ozbey were 
members of the same rightist Turk- 
ish terrorist group. Both have made 
sweepbg accusations while provid- 
ing little evidence that can be inde- 
pendently corroborated. 

La his testimony, Mr. Ozbey said 
that Mr. Agca and two other Turks 
had outlined their plans to murder 
the pope to lhe Bulgarian authori- 
ties. He said that the Bulgarians 
showed initial interest in the pro- 
ject but did not play any direct role 
because they mistrusted Mr. Agca. 

According to Mr. Agca’s ac- 
count, the assassination attempt 
was directly supervised by three 
former Bulgarian officials in Rome. 

Under cross-examination, Mr. 
Ozbey said that he had no direct 
knowledge of the papal assassina- 
tion attempt He said that be had 
learned details about the plot from 
Mr. Agca and two Turks named by 
Mr. Agca as his fellow conspira- 
tors: Oral Celik and Sedai Sirri 
Kadem. 

Mr. Ctebey, who faces charges in 
West Germany (or offenses includ- 
ing fraud and drug smuggling, re- 
peatedly tried to extractirara the 
court guarantees of immunity from 
prosecution. His pleas were 
brushed aside by the presiding 
judge, Severino Santiapicol 


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Page 6 


Hcralfc 


INTERNATIOiVAL 


Sribune 


Pobll»Jird With The Vw York Times and The Wfcsbingtoo Port 


'Room lor Negotiation’ 


You can hear two voices whenever Ronald 
Reagan talks about “star wars,*' as he did 
again Tuesday evening. One speaks for presi- 
dential vanity, insisting that he has pointed the 
way to a perfect defense that mil one day make 
nuclear weapons obsolete. The other speaks 
for presdential reality, longing in the three 
short years that remain to develop a saner 
relationship with the Soviet' Union. 

Heedless pursuit of the vanity could soon 
exacerbate the arms race and make the world 
more dangerous. Bui scattered among the 
president's words were hints that, as be ap- 
proaches his meeting with Mikhail Gorbachev, 
he prefers to dwell on reality. 

The vain voice cannot resist representing 
M star wars” as a wondrous way out of the 
world's vulnerability to nuclear war. “I think 
of this weapon as a kind of a gas mask," Mr. 
Reagan says, as if it were proven that masks 
rather than poison gas itself deterred the use of 
gas in World War II. No expert can detect in 
tile contemplated “star wars” research any 
effective way to shield a modern society 
against nuclear ruin in the foreseeable future. 

Perhaps a way to attain that defense is 


conceivable in, say. half a century. But even 
then it probably could be defeated by predict- 
able. cheaper countermeasures. What should 
be obvious is that between now and then the 
mere possibility of a defense that disarms 
either superpower would provoke deployment 
of even more overwhelming offensive aims. 

That Mr. Reagan now understands this risk 
was also evident on Tuesday. He went to some 
lengths to try to sniff the “star wars" genie 
back into the research laboratory. Research is 
permitted by the treaty forbidding anti-missile 


conflict with Mr. Reagan's intention to discuss 
a future "mix'' of defensive and offensive 


weapons. But it argues for ending the preoccu- 
pation with defease in the next century and 
confronting the present mistrust and instabil- 
ity. As Mr. Reagan put it, the task is to engage 
Mr. Gorbachev in “real discussions'’ that 
"could lead to a change in the relationship." 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Mikhail Gorbachev threw Ronald Reagan a 
bold challenge in his Time interview. He of- 
fered to make deep cuts in existing offensive 
weapons if America would limit to research its 
work on the prospective Strategic Defense 
Initiative, the apple of Mr. Reagan's eye and 
the ace — the American technological advan- 
tage — in his bargaining hand. Mr. Reagan 
fired back at his news conference on Tuesday, 
in effect daring Mr. Gorbachev to engage him 
on the terrain of American public opinion and 
declaring that be would carry his no-compro- 
mise position on the SDI right up to the 
summit in November. And then? Any attempt 
to guess wbat will happen in Geneva comes 
down to expressing not much more than the 
degree of confidence one has in Mr. Reagan. 

What has happened this week, however, is 
quite clear. Mr. Gorbachev made the familiar 
initiative available to a totalitarian leader ne- 
gotiating with a democratic adversary. Secure 
in the knowledge that there is no Soviet opin- 
ion that an American president can turn 
against him, he attempted to enlist a part of 
American opinion against the American presi- 
dent before meeting him in Geneva. 

And he did it well To an audience consider- 
able parts of which were bound to be sympa- 
thetic, Mr. Gorbachev said that he sees the 
SDI not in the Reagan image of an ultimate 
shield protecting everyone equally and allow- 
ing nuclear disarmament, but as a weapon 
enabling and encouraging the United States 


alone to plan a first strike. The arms control 
package that he hinted at — in terms not yet 
presented concretely at the bargaining table — 
had more or less appeal not just to broad 
sectors of the American public but also to 
some officials within the administration. 


Mr. Reagan was under considerable pres- 
re to vie with Mr. Gorbachev on the field of 


sure to vie with Mr. Gorbachev on the field of 
Western opinion for the title of pre-summit 
moderate. Instead be chose to make a display 
of his capacity to sustain the bargaining posi- 
tion of his choice. In the teeth of threats from 
Moscow and warnings from many Amen cans 
that he was putting an arms control agreement 
out of reach, he insisted that he would not 
make the SDI negotiable at any of the early- 
middle. research- testing-development stages 
of which the would-be compromisers speak. 

Within the Reagan administration there are 
differences on whether any agreement that 
may be available is in the UJ5. interest. Hie 
evidence is, however, that the a dminis tration 
understands that trade-offs are going to be 
needed for an agreement- What those trade- 
offs should be is a matter still and necessarily 
under review. What Mr. Reagan should be 
judged on is not how he looks in the run-up to 
the summit, but what discipline and responsi- 
bility be brings to ibe process of hammering 
out a position there. Wherever the process 
leads, Mr. Reagan is plainly determined that 
he, and not Mr. Gorbachev, be the master of it. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


And Now There Are Six 


The release of the Reverend Benjamin War, 
one of the seven kidnapped Americans held 
hostage in Lebanon, is splendid news in itself 
and in what it suggests: that determined diplo- 
macy can bring deliverance to the six others as 
welL Perhaps even in this labyrinth there are 
channels of contact with the kidnappers, who 
have so far been demanding what America 
cannot deliver: release of 17 of their comrades 
convicted of terrorist crimes in Kuwait 
Until the 61-year-old Presbyterian minister 
gives his own account we can only guess at the 
motives for his release after 16 months. It may 
have been his health, or backstage pressure 
from the Syrians, who have insisted that they 
could do nothing until Israel released the last 


of its captives taken from Lebanon. Interest- 
ingly. he was freed a few days after Israel did 
just that On Tuesday last week it liberated the 
last of the 766 Lebanese from Adit prison 
whose freedom had been demanded in June by 
the Shiite hijackers of a TWA airliner. On 
Saiurday, it appears, Mr. Weir was freed. 

Mr. War’s return focuses renewed attention 
on the other hostages: Thomas Sutherland, 
educator, David Jacobsen, physician; Terry 
Anderson, journalist; the Reverend Lawrence 
Jenco, Catholic priest; Peter Kilburn. librari- 
an; William Buckley, diplomat. Public prayer 
and pressure can continue to energize diplo- 
macy, the only available key to their padlock. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Neither Wants to Be Inferior 


The United Slates and the Soviet Union 
have recently been spending more and more 
on developing and deploying more accurate 
nuclear weapons designed for war-fighting. 
Given the superabundance of nuclear weapons 
land the overkill capacity in the hands of the 
United States and the Soviet Union, it does 
not make sense for either of them to further 


increase slocks of weapons of mass destruc- 
tion. Perhaps the supreme folly is in trying to 
forge a nuclear Excalibur or to seek a perfect 
defense system. Although military superiority 
is unattainable in today's world, military in- 
feriority is unacceptable to either superpower. 
If there is a solution, it is not in accumulating 
more destructive power but in eliminating the 
weapons of nuclear Armageddon. 

— The New Straits Times (Kuala Lumpur). 


FROM OUR SEPT. 20 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Two Children Saved From Sale 
NEW YORK — Extraordinary scenes were 
enacted [on SepL 18] at Cirdeville, Pennsylva- 
nia, as Lhe result of an attempt of the Rev. Mr. 
Thomas Boord, pastor of Wylie Avenue 
Church, Pittsburgh, to sell two of his children 
by public auction. After he had littered the 
streets with handbills announcing the weight, 
ages and characters of his little son and daugh- 
ter, the clergyman appeared at a street comer 
where a thousand people had assembled and 
proclaimed that the safe was about to start. He 
informed the crowd that he was the father of 
five children whom he was unable to support. 
He had decided, therefore, to sell two of them 
in order to provide them with good homes and 
himself with enough money to support the 
other three. He was allowed to go no further, 
as the crowd threatened to lynch him. 


1935: Doubts at Eugenics Congress 
PARIS — The International Congress oT Eu- 
genics. held recently in Berlin, formulated a 
□umber of conclusions on which there was 
unanimity, but. like its predecessors held in 
London and New York, it made a number of 
reservations about the applicability of mea- 
sures on whose efficacy biological science can- 
not as yet pronounce with certainty. The con- 
gress was largely influenced by the German 
delegates, who made a plea for the universal 
adoption of the sterilization af the unfit On 
this point unanimity was almost obtained. But 
this is as far as science can safely go. It is not 
properly "eugenics." for this word was invent- 
ed to describe the science that would tell with 
certainty how the human race could be im- 
proved. That such a science can be applied in 
the present slate of knowledge is doubted. 


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Q 1985. International Herald Tribune. AU rights reserved. 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 


defenses, he observed, implying that he wants 
to shore up that treaty against sudden renunci- 
ation by either side. He insisted repeatedly 
that he would never deploy a defense until he 
had negotiated, indeed coordinated the effort 
with the Russians and the Western allies. 

‘There’s a great deal of room for negotia- 
tion’' here and now, Mr. Reagan emphasized, 
ss if to ask. Why all the fuss about “star wars’]? 
One reason, of course, is the sudden, uncoordi- 
nated way in which be uncorked the project 30 
months ago. Another is the glee with which 
administration offi cials greeted Moscow’s 
anxiety and the intensity with which they de- 
mand universal support for “star wars.” 

The most serious reason for a fuss is that 
opponents of any negotiated restraints on the 
arms race have exploited Mr. Reagan's dream 
to push for a shorter-range, highly provocative 
program. Under the banner of “star ware" 
they would erect a defense not of America’s 
cities but only of its land missiles — in ways 
that are bound to trigger a destabilizing new 
buildup of Soviet offensive weapons. 

The way to defuse that risk at the meeting 
with Mr. Gorbachev is to propose negotiations 
that will tighten rather than loosen treaty re- 
straints on missile defenses and avoid further 
treaty violations, by both sides. That need not 



— s 

\ AGuajarwH* 

OTmSKOBJ 
WEWKKCF 
TWini^ 


For Both a + 


In 






pates 


By Giles Merrittv 

B russels — /at -Ewfei 

Community's attramHo Jake a 
stand on SootE a 

costly failure so far. Pretoria hasten 

encouraged to think that the &ir®t 

ans have 

the price to me Euro^ans hasbeeh a 
split in their own ranks. j - . 
The tragedy of Eorapes. efforts in' 

Luxembourg on Sept. 10 to agree.on 
a of measures helpful #g|y 

blfStScSm Africais ttettbe ds&M 
ems of success seemed present pa 
the previous day, the 
ministers’ meeting had iaund^ the 


pco 


i 


political process that couldjcaa to a 
Streamlined and more unified, ccm- 


IKwVTS 


Gorbachev: What Kind of Self-Confidence Is This? 


B OSTON — In his first months as 
Soviet leader, Mikhail Gorba- 


By Anthony Lewis 


chev has come across as above all a 
self-confident man. That quality 
marked his recent Time ma gazi ne in- 
terview, with its brisk extemporane- 
ous replies to hard questions and its 
knowing references to the West 
Bui the picture of self-confidence 
is difficult to square with a reality of 
current Soviet life: the intensified 


current Soviet life: the intensified 
persecution of dissidents. The cruelty 
visited on those who raise even a 
small voice in dissent — the harsh, 
even mortal treatment — is at a pitch 
unequaled in years. All that speaks 
not of confidence but of paranoia. 

One story is enough to make the 
point: enough, one would think, to 
melt a heart of stone. It is the story of 
Dr. Anatoli Koryagin, a Soviet psy- 
chiatrist who has just passed his 47th 
birthday in Chistopol Prison. Has, 
that is, if he is stifi alive. 

Dr. Koryagin's crime was to be- 
lieve in the Hippocratic Oath. As a 
psychiatrist, he saw patients in men- 


cm. He was prosecuted in 1981 for 
having “foreign magazines" in his 
home and for writing anti-Soviet arti- 
cles. The police described him as an 
Tdeolomcally unstable person” who 
had fallen under the “influence of 
enemies of Soviet power." He drew 
the maximum sentence: seven years 
in prison, then five in internal exile. 

In prison he has been treated with 
exemplary viriousness. He was beat- 
en in his cell, with the door left open 
so that his screams could be heard. 

When he went on a hunger strike to 
protest against the cruelty, be was 
force-fed. His wife, also a doctor, saw 


June that has just reached the West, 
said that he was “near to death." 

That letter is quoted by Peter 
Reddaway, a British spedalistbn So- 
viet affairs, iD an article in the current 
New York Review of Books. It ends 
by urging doctors everywhere to ap- - 
peal For Dr. Koryagin’s release at 
once: “Yon have the real chance to 
save a human bang’s life." .. 

Anatoli Koryagin is evidently bfr- 
mg made an object lesson in what 
happens to people who effectively 
disclose Soviet abuses of human 
rights. Mr. Reddaway suggests that 
the pressures put on him m prison 


the cases of the best known victims, 
such as Andrei Sakharov, YuriOriov 
and Anatoli Shcharansky. Amnesty 
International says that four- political 
prisoners at one labor camp -have 
died in the last 16 months — after 
pleas for their- release because of Or 
ness had been Quoted - 1 
Soviet repression has always had: 
a deeply puzzling aspect How can 
thepeople-wbo run that system, with 
all their power, possibly fed threat- 
ened by a Koryagin? The answer 
must lie partly in history, m a para- 


political cooperation mecnamans 
that the member gomranents ray bn 
for coordina ting policy on key global 
issues like U.S.-&viet : relations, die 
Middle East and South Africa: / 
The Europeans had ample oppor- 
tunity to preparefor then discussion 
of sanctions against South Africa. 
What the governments’ concerted re- 
spouse should be has been anr epea 
question since July'22,when the for- 
eign ministers recalled airibasSadon 
from Pretoria “for consultations.* In 
the intervening holiday season the 
“troika" of foreign ministers "from 


Italy. Luxembourg and the Netfer- 
}anA* visited South Afric a to. g ain 
firsthand experience of the riraanon. 
' So when the ministers again turned 
to South Africa it seemed lately feat 
they would need only to. put tne fin- 
ishing touches to'- a carefully con- 
structed policy packaged Instead they 
haggled over -any proposed measures 
tViai risked involving financial 'sacri- 
fices, and fourid themselves dead 
locked over Britain’s refusal to' agree 
. tb a list that included withdrawal of 


noia that marked Russian ’ society its two military attK&s in Pretoria, 
long before the revolution. . / . . As one dismayed diplomat put it; the 

No one can expect MnGorbachev occaaon had become a treat forstn- 


force-fed. His wife, also a doctor, saw the pressures put on himm prison to transform the paranoid tradition doits of applied hypocrisy." 
him in September 1983. “He was like were designed to make him disavow overnight, assuming that bewimts to; - ! Most of the' governments woe 

j *• .L. . .j u.. 1 ■ _ r , , 1- ■ . ■' ' l: ■■ _1 : iL. iha Fm 


a medusa," she wrote afterward, “so 
bloated that his neck was wider than 
his face. It was co vered with edemas 
caused by proton starvation." 

That was two years ago. Since then 
no member of his family has seen 
ten. A friend, in a letter written last 


his own reports of psychiatric abase 
— which he has refused to da 
Dr. Koryagin’s treatment is a grim 
example of a general crackdown on 
dissidents that began before Mr. 
Gorbachev became leader and has 
continued. There has been no letup in 


he has the prior interest of consoli- playing the pohl 
dating his power. But if he wants to looking for seemi 
be seen in the West as a sdf-oodfi- such as oflemba 
dent politician, he must begin to act ' of cultural links. 


laying the politics of the free ride: 
joking for seemingly stem measures, 
och as oil«mbaiK)es or thesevema 
if -cultural links, that were iirdevaaff 


that way with those few .of his own to thdr own industries or had been m 
people whohave begged to differ. application for some time. 


The New York Times. 


tal hospitals who showed no signs of 
mental Alness. They had been put 


mental illness. They had been put 
into the hospitals, and there treated 
with disabling drugs, because they 
had questioned official truth. 

In 1979 Dr. Koryagin became con- 
sultant to a private organization 
formed after the Helsinki accords to 
investigate the abuse of psychiatry in 
the Soviet Union. One of this small 
groups important documents was a 
meticulous professional report by Dr. 
Koryagin on his examination of 
many political patients, published in 
the British medical journal The Lan- 
cet in 1981. (The text, and a descrip- 
tion of Dr. Koryagin, appear in an 
important new book, a collection 
published by W.H. Freeman, “The 
Breaking of Bodies and Minds.”) 

The world's psychiatrists reacted 
slowly but with increasin® force. In 
February 1983, faced with condem- 
nation, the Russians withdrew from 
Lhe World Psychiatric Association. 

By then Dr. Koryagin was in pris- 


Gorbachev: Perhaps a Reforming Hero 


Thus, France contrived to word the 
ECs bah on nuclear cooperation so 
that it applies only to fumre work 
:and' not to the ambitions rimdear 


O BERLIN, Ohio — In the Soviet 
Union, where the strongest cam- 


V/ Union, where the strongest cam- 
paign rhetoric follows rather than 
precedes elections, Mikhail Gorba- 
chev has been stumping hard against 
the status quo. His speeches have 
made him an instant hero in a coun- 
try notably lacking in heroes. 

Skeptical Western observers can- 
lion that Mr. Gorbachev’s reforms 
may prove limited. They note that he 
has spoken emphatically about the 
need to permit local industrial man- 
agers and party officials to exercise 
more initiative. They accept as genu- 
ine his assaults on Moscow’s med- 
dling bureaucrats, and concede that 
his appointments to the secretariat of 
the Central Committee indicate a 
readiness to clean up the ministries. 

But they also stress that the new 
appointees are themselves seasoned 


By S. Frederick Starr 


party bureaucrats, better known for 
their belief in law and order than for 
reformism. Moreover, they argue, 
Mr. Gorbachev could quickly shift 


American relations? Some commen- 
tators see a new hard line. Any such 
judgment would be pramaturev and 
possibly erroneous. If- there is one 
constant thane in Mr. Gorbachev’s 


'y -has trader, way in Sooth Africa. • 

commeu- ' Hans- Dietrich Genscfeer, the West 
Atry such ' Gentian, foreign' minister, refused to 
tore, and discuss even the' possfiaHty of EC 
re' is one trade rartotiais, a J5£eze <xT mvest- 
rbachev’s meet spending bran. end. td apart 


course as he assumes greater respon- 
sibQity for the bureaucracy that he is . 


utterances, it is that for the time be- 'credit guarantees. Hut reverence for 
ing domestic policy most take priori^ free trade rn ay fe - tmdiatpmncitf by 
ty over forejenaffairs. Inhisrclatkmy SBOw&aflmg fwot-Gerntaa irivest- 


ability for the bureaucracy that he is . 
now campaigning against. Skeptics 
add that his "reforms” will be super- 
ficial and wiQ pre-empt signfficanr 
change. Why risk uncertainties of 


ty over foreign affair* InhisTe&tkms . ; shovwmSE 
with-the United States, he has tried to mentsia 
protect the climate for domestic fe^ "thane that 

r . it .j* ‘ ■*». nr i_ ■ • - A 


jrienfeMsfoith Afrip& ax& ea 
these th^laftyear ji^pedbya 


newaL Raising the stakes with Wash- The Comnnsaoii m. ^Brussels is 
ington would not save this aid- Nor r drawing up fortoer^anctKjnsjpriSJM- 


free market experiments, they say, if 
the goals can be attained by simple 
administrative adjustments? 

This interpretation overstates the 
case. Mr. Gorbachev shares Russian 
officialdom’s ancient fear of sponta- 
neous and centrifugal forces. Still, his 
rhetoric and actions suggest that the 
new leadership has not ruled out re- 
form that would tap public energies 
and channel them constructively. 

This may only be post-elation 
rhetoric, but it is generating broad 
expectations among educated Rus- 
sians. Mr. Gorbachev has urged pro- 
fessional societies and other groups 
to discuss problems in management 
and motivation. Schools must (ram 
risk-takers and self-starters rather 
than toadies. He calls bluntly for the 
system to reward initiative, realizing 
that even narrow administrative re- 
forms wiH not work unless public 
support is engaged. Hence, he delib- 
erately challenges the bureaucracy, 
staking his career on the results. 

Mr. Gorbachev's policy is risky. If 
he fails to tap the creative talent of 
the Soviet people, he will be another 
Brezhnev, presiding over a listless na- 
tion. If he unleashes public enenties. 
and can keep them under control, he 
will go down in history as another 
Alexander II, the “Czar liberator” 
who in three years abolished serfdom 
and coated a modem court system 
and local self-government. If, how 1 - . 


would a shift toward. isolationism, >':. alsi but the Utafrmunily may 


Reagonism Will Endure 
In the Courts of America 

By James Res ton 

\\T ASHTNGTON — Chief Jus- probably be followed more care- 
VV tice Warren Burger of Minr fully under Attorney General Ed 


nesota (Tuesday) and Associate Meese.) Tt 
Justice Lewis F. Powell of Virginia terested in 
(Thursday) turned 78 this week. It proaches c 
is not dear how the chief justice affirmaliv 
arranged to be bom on the anni- Amendmen 
versary of the signing of the U-S. Former 


probably be followed more care- 
fully under Attorney General Ed 
Meese.) They are particularly in- 
terested in now a candidate ap- 
proaches questions of abortion, 
affirmative action and First- 
Amendment rights. 

Former Carter administration 


Constitution, but the coincidence officials concede that while they 
has given hzm a special and useful often discussed such concerns be- 


interest in the document. A few 
years ago he liked to talk vaguely 
about mandatory retirement for 
members of rhe coral at age 75, hut 
it would be surprising if he did not 
want to say a few words from the 
bench on the Constitution's 200th 
anniversary in 1987. 

The other members seem in no 
burry to gel out, either. Although 


fore appointing judges, they never 
did so to the extent now practiced 
by the Reagan White House and 
Justice Department 
One of the various private con- 
servative groups active in “screen- 
ing” judicial applicants is the Cen- 
ter for Judicial Studies, headed by 


Mr. Gorbachev seems to beseet-'shot its- bolt so - far' as^ Bretpriais 
ihg a middle course The present situ- . concerned; Europe exsrted .mcffe 1n- 
atioh, he appears tCLhave cxtoduded, ». fioettte when the possibffity ctf^uu- 
calls for firmness in. Geneva and a' irine^ ^^smktions-.wtfs'ero&ig. business 
reactive jump in mililary ^wiain& iT totHtfiklence attoalaHaingthcwpdd’s ^ ’ 
only to bead off any marge of soft- . . fmimaal markets. Those were! tl«^. 
ness in dealing whh W ashing ton. At .-pres&nes-tiiat evidently pushtxL-the r -- 
the, same time, however, hie has ea- :Botha goveramcaat into being more 
counted a ratew^ sucb issues & black 

cte dialogue in several areas and has = - extizenship and the pass laws. v’ . L " 
goneou t of his way to affirm theTOw' - peeping ay .th at toye rage-wflLnot 
that superpower conflict is.bbffi be easy. US. coneessional dissatis- 
natural. and avoidable. ' a-.;-. 7 "..; faction; IhesioEntRieagarfs mea- 
ls this mere wmdowkfrts^mg? : sures on Souto.Afr^m nnlfibriy to 
Maybe, but a less confrontational fe- cause market jittersou the satoe scale 
laiionsfrip wdth ihfr United Slates as those of recent weeks. Aiad the 


lationship wjith ihe United States 


would enable Mr. .Gorbachev to fo- signs are that South Africa's foreign 
cos on his domestic projects. In the .debt difficulties are easniff- -J: " ■ ‘ 


future he might wdl.tunf’to r more .. /Die Community membera 1 politi- 
one-ridedly truculent , posture. For 1 cal cooperation machines stiff has a 
now, he scons intent upon keeping , valuable function to' perform on be- 
the door to the United States opoL : half of WadtSouth Aftfi^ Itinust be 
One should be wary of hasty ctm- used tahattenei:^ dot Vifioife ppkai 


dusious about Mr. Gorbachev’s in- 
tentions at home and abrcad. A Srm' 


t than the 
•omg. Anri pc 


, discussed at 
aps. the "need 


American response is called, for* but for a : &esh.OHnmum^y initiative on 
also openness. Soviet '.domestic re 1 South Africa wfll lanfdree the case 
newal is not necessarily .bad for the that Britain has been axgtnag far a 


United States: It encourages pragma-,, pezmaneat secretariate 
tism. By forcing Russians to consider political awperation. : 
what has proved workable tisewhere, Reope n ing the debater 

it discourages xenophobia and links South. Africa options sh 
the Soviet Union with, the open-end- . start involve ijethmlriag ;■ 


shauldfor ^ 
z:the'idea'of 


ever, Mr. Gorbachev releases pent-up 
energy but fails to channel it, he .will 


James McClellan, a former aide to 
Senator Jesse Helms of North Car- 


on average the present members of olina. The center is said to have the 
the court are older than the Nine cooperation and financial support 


Old Men that President F ranklin 
D. Roosevelt tried and failed to get 
rid of, they are holding on as usuaL 
The Supreme Court has not be- 
come the conservative bastion that 
the Democratic leaders feared 
when Ronald Reagan was elected 
and re-elected. He has been able to 
appoint only one member, the con- 
servative Sandra Day O’Connor, to 
replace the liberal Potter Stewart. 
With the tendency of Associate 
Justice Harry A. Blackmon to vote 
more often than expected with the 
“liberal wing,” Lhe balance today 
is not all that different 
In the lower federal courts, how- 
ever, there are many chang es Since 
be entered the White ftouse in 
2981, Mr. Reagan has appointed 
more than 200 district and appeals 
court judges, most of them careful- 
ly chosen to respect Ins conserva- 
tive philosophy. ^By the end of his 


second term, noted The Wall 
Street Journal, “Ik will probably 
have named more than ban the 743 
federal judges in the country." 

That, says Fred Fielding, who 
monitors judicial appointments is 
the White House, is a “legacy that 
wiH last long beyond” the term of 
the present administration. 

Justice Department officials 
concede that they take care to in- 
quire into a prospective candi- 
date’s background and judicial 
philosophy before recommending 
nomination, (This practice will 


of the Moral Majority Foundation 
and other right-wing groups inter- 
ested in perpetuating their conser- 
vative agenda through the courts. 

Liberals are setting up their own 
or ganizatio ns to combat the efforts 
of right-wing factions, and seeking 
funds through prominent national 
publications. One of these is Peo- 
ple for the American Way, found- 
ed by television producer Norman 
T ,q »r and based m Washington. 

Sheldon Goldman, a professor 
at the University of Massachusetts 
at Amh erst, who has published a 
study of Mr. Reagan’s first-term 
judicial appointments, con c lu d es 
that 98 percait of them are Repub- 
lican, 93 percent are while, 92 per- 
cent are men and more than 20 
percent are milli onaires. 

The American Bar Association, 
which has evaluated judicial ap- 
pointments for many years, rales 
more than half of Mr. Reagan’s 
appointees as “exceptionally well 
qualified" or “weB qualified.” 

Nobody, not even the president 
or Attorney General Meese, can 
foresee bow their judicial appoint- 
ees will vote in the future — any 
more than FDR could. The fact 
remains that a most intense cam- 
paign is now being waged to ensure 

that as Mr. Reagan’s power slips 
in bis second term, be will leave 
behind a federal judkaary that he 
hopes will be faithful to his views. 

The New York Tones. 


energy but fails to channel it, he .will 
be like Alexander L who turned from 
reform to grim reaction. Worse, he 
could follow Nikita Khrushchev, who 
was thrown out The jury is still out 
on Mr. Gorbachev's program. 

What does this all mean for Soviet- 


ed discourse of the modern world. ..mthdrawmgmil^^ 

There is less to feair from X Soviet Africa’s geopolitical ii^partance. 
Union that is able to deal with its straddling the Middle East biT Janes 
problems than frfrm a Soviet Union . and rittmgoni vast nunoal rcscrycs, 
frustrated by domestic imlnres. can raoly make the idea of a Mbodr 
— — — bath reading, to. a power vacuum a 
The writer, president, cf Qbertm Col - . nightmare, to Westcm govnnmcnts- 
legc, is a former secretary of the Kerman Europeans and AjnKricans may not 
Institute for Advanced Russim Studies at have a defense pdatipnshifrfrftfi fie- 
the Woodrow Wtboh International Cm- toria, but they; have' a security- reifr 
ter far Scholars, in Washinpon. He eoh- tionship, whether they likeit.orhot- 
rributed this to The New York Tones. . International Herald Tribune - 


Peac 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


i< i 

Pu, 


^Kids Are Like Hiax 


In her tribute to the late Smrmnthft 
Smith ("It Was cm Adult’s Job That a 
Girl Did. ” Aug. 29), EQen Goodman 
writes that “kids are Hke that on both 
sides of the Iron Curteia." 1 was bom 
in the U.S.S.R. in 1939 and left it in 
1975. 1 never heard of a Soviet young- 
ster who wrote a letter to the presi- 
dent of the United States ana was 
given the chance to visit him. But I 
was taught in school, and later, that 
one Soviet youngster, Pavlik Moro- 
zov, informed on his father, a poor 
peasant, and was killed by bis uncle. 
The boy was turned into a martyr and 
a national hero. The case is recounted 
in the Soviet encyclopedia. 


pire to an end. Under the lradoship .ijaiy, .has been so 
of Mehmed U, sultan of the Otto- equipment since 1 
mans, the Turitish forces besieged ^ ", . 


-telephone 


KENNFTH S. HOYT. 


Systena-lxandon; 


JOHN M: McMAHON. 
Karlsruhe,' West Germany. 


Ydur^report “SmaB FlUo^cait’ 

Tibet on Taiwan’sMaps • 

mmdedthat official Tffiwanese maps who' 
of_ mainland China mdude'-nbt raty" the 
XTbet bptalsothe 

JEAN-CLArmP PPOOCT- - ' -".a 






, V- ”7- ti 

wmes from Taipei ro deplore 
tragedy of Tibet."" He might be' re- 
minded, that official Taiwanese maps 
of m ainland China include' -not only 
Tibet but also the vrfwle of Mongolia. 


c-- 


v ' 


One midu try to imagine a child 
writing to Hitler about peace. 


iiler about peace. 
E.MATDANTK. 
Jerusalem. 


JEAN-claudE-PERRET.. • ; aches and.can.tri^tsr: epiktotteEti 1 
Lansanne. rtodcraW:«r i 

In Addition to AT&T Juuan. l^gr^cser:". * 


Hie Empire Fell to Turks 


Michael Gibson, in “Bibhotlteque 
Nationale Puts Ronsard in Context" 
(Arts/ Leis ure, A ug. 24). asserts that 
the conquerors of Constantinople 
were Arabs. It was the Ottoman 
Turks — not Arabs — who brought 
the civilization of the Byzantine Em- 


Re gar ding “Doubts Surround 
AT&T’s Short-Term Prospects" (Per-v 
sonal Investing, Sepi 9): ’ ; 

The report describes AT&T, i 
"fonneriy the sole provider of U.S. 
telephone .service and equromentT. 
But some 1,500 independent cconpa- 
mes have served tteariy20 petoenl of ' 
me U5. market for almost a century. - 
StrombergCarison, tmrUS. snbritf-. i- 


\ . Letters Attended fcn- pid^adon 

^^ernd must amtam ttie&fcr ^ 
• &_s jsignature, nahtc tindfM difc- .- 
I^ers sfioukf bc ftriefarid 
one subject ia G&tmg We'canriat: 

« regomie fdrstit Ktttfrif: A - 1 


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illrj . . 


1985 


jjcralbjj^gribunc . 

WEEKEND 



Page 7 


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Portrait of the Artist by His Sitter: 
Giacometti Seen From Inside the Frame 


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by Joseph Fftchett 

AW^r _In ‘ »“ degamly understated 
i. at Bank apartment hangs one of 
«ns city’s peat collections of mod- 
. . era portraits. Most of them art of 
*. •■•5* P®^ou — the owner, James Lord, 
03, an .American aesthete fax Paris who sat, 
patiently and atteatiudy, for a generation of 
.. renowned artists.' Their works amount to a 
visual biography. • 

Thefirst portrait shows a very unfinished 
g man: To Lord, March 45, Picasso." 
—» Pi ca s s o did snoftcr th&t Wgs ott the 
, opposite wall Cocteau (Sdscveral for “Qrcr 
J antes." Over the bed are two — 

..almost boyish — by Balthus, perhaps the 
greatest modern French figurative painter, 
whose works are rarely shown. Dozens of 
jesser-known . painters and sculptors who 
.. nave' portrayed him — for example, Dora 
‘ Maacr, Picasso’s mistress — have left a mass 
of other work for his walls. The biggest 
group — and the most powerful art — are 
■« portraits of him by Alberto Giacometti, the 
.. Swiss- born artist whose ceaselessly reworked 
drawings and skeletal bronze sculptures 
> have become icons of modernity. 

Lord knew Giacometti well for nearly IS 
- . years and sat for him often, once for an oil 
■ portrait that involved intense ggsyipns 18 
. days in a row. For hours at a time in Ids 
. clingy Montparnasse studio, Giacometti 

• wrestled with his characteristically gray and 
. charcoal tones, groping for what he called 

“an opening" through which to present the 
sitter's presence with an acuity that matched 
his own intense vision. 

Lord was working, too, committing to 
memory both their, emotional tensions and 
■ Giacometti’s half-joking, half-despairing 
- • comments on his art. These detailed recolleo 
tions, noted at night, became the baas for a 
book published five years ago, “A Giacomet- 

• ti Portrait,** an extraordinarily direct ac- 
count of the birth throes of a work of art. 

j : In conversation the other day, Lord was 
seated beneath the portrait, with the ele- 
' gance of someone for. whom posing is second 
nature. He cultivates a quiet dandyism: sub- 


- riy marched stripes and patterns in double- 
vented jacket and broadly knotted tie and 
tailored shirt of striped cambric, with three- 
button cuffs on which he carefully buttons 
only the middle one. His looks, which fasci- 
nated so many painters, are perplexing: Big 
head,, slightly concave-appearing face, 
strong features. The effect is of conventional 
good looks. 

What the painters saw is something else: 
“Yon have the head of a brute," Giacometti 
told him. "You lock like a real thug. If I 
could paint you is 1 see you and & policeman 
saw the picture he'd arrest you immediate- 
ly!" 

If Lard’s looks are slightly elusive, his own 
writings are, increasingly, frank about him- 
self and about the artists he has known well 

— all of them European and generally pri- 
vate in a way that contrasts with the publici- 
ty that surrounds most modern American 
artists. “Writing is an effort at self-knowl- 
edge, and publishing shows one can live with 
oneself in full view of it," he explains. This 
week he is publishing a biography of Giaco- 
metti on which he worked for IS years. W 1 
didn’t have an inkling of what it means to 
come to terms with another person's life, just 
as I had a lot to learn, unpleasant but not 
unbelievable as it is to admit, about how to 
look at pictures." 

The . book. "Giacometti" (published by 
Farrar, Straus, .Giroux in New York this 
week to coincide with a Giacometti retro- 
spective at the Sidney Jams gallery and to be 
published in London next month by Faber & 
Faber) is as precise and direct as Lord’s 
conversation, illuminating Giacometti's of- 
ten mysterious work with quiet authority 
and telling his life in an unblinking way that 
brings out hs previously hidden drama. 

In discussing the troubling symbolic pre- 
war works done by Giacometti is his Surre- 
alist phase, Lord evokes the artist's sexual 
anguish, deftly linking it to the genital war- 
fare stunningly conveyed in the works. 

A FTER the war, Giacometti Was known 
mainly for the skeletal sculptures and 
XX often deliberately unfinished draw- 
ings of solitary figures. Critics, noting his 




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_ Portrait, subject and artist, in New York, 1965. 


friendship with Sartre. Samuel Beckett and 
other existentialists, were quick to find a 
theme of social alienation in his work. But 
Giacometti protested: "While working I 
have never thought of the theme of solitu- 
de .. . even though I must work in soli- 
tude." he said. Lord u n aca dcm icaHy and 
convincingly explains this siarkaess and re- 
lentless destruction and re-creation as a 
quest — similar to C fe a nn e's — to represent 
intense vision. "Nobody works like me, but 
in my opinion everybody ought to: that is, 
try to see an object as it really is," Giacomet- 
ti said. 

A lonely holdout against abstract art in his 
day, Giacometti saw himself in a tradition 
reaching back from Cdzanne to the Egyp- 
tians, "The artists of today want only to 
express their own subjective feelings instead 
nature faithfully. Seeking for 
it y, they lose it," he said, 
favorite painting by Cfaanne was an 
unfinished portrait of Audit Vollard, the art 
dealer. "After Vollard had posed a hundred 
rimes, the most Cezanne could say was that 
the shirt front wasn't too bad. And he was 
right It's the best part of the picture. C£- 
zanne never really finished anything. He 
went as far as he could, then abandoned the 
job. That’s the terrible thing: the more one 
works on a picture, the more impossible it 
becomes to finish it" Giacometti said. 

Giacometti quietly maintained a total 
commitment to his own artistic mission re- 
gardless of its impact on his private life. Few 
great artists’ lives have been as intimately 
probed as Giacometti's in Lord's book. 

Seeing his brother Diego squandering his 
talent, he persuaded him to become his help- 
er, who gradually became indispensable, fin- 
ishing Alberto’s sculptures, overseeing their 
presentation at shows. Yet Diego remained 
subservient: His own work — decorative 
iron or bronze furniture often with antique 
heads that became increasingly sought after 
— was only signed “Diego." Despite inter- 
national acclaim, Diego never permitted a 
show of his work. Diego died last month 
(and was buried alongside Alberto in the 
Swiss Alpine valley where they were born). 
Although Diego's sculptural furnishings are 
used in the Maeght Foundation in Saint- 
Paul de Vence in the south of France and in 
the new Picasso museum opening in Paris 
next week and are in many homes (including 
Lord’s), the first museum show of his work is 
scheduled early next year in the Musee des 
Arts D&oratifr in Paris. 

After Diego, women were the most essen- 
tial figures in Giacometti's life. Feeling 

sterile and by a lrit-and-nuMlriver who left 
him with a limp, Giacometti often told peo- 
ple that he found marriage difficult. His 
easiest relations were with women like the 
beauty Isabel, model for Jacob Epstein and 
wife of Seftan Ddmar, or the easy-going 
whores in Paris brothels or Caroline, a girl 
with underwork! connections who was close 
to him for a decade before he died in 1966. 

His marriage to Annette, a younger, 
Swiss-born admirer, was tormented by fun- 
damental differences, and Lord says that 
Giacometti’s widow has been left "horribly 
deformed" by the marriage- Giacometti's 
growing success did not change his simple 
habits of living in a barely heated studio, 
eating hard-boiled eggs at the same plain 
cafe and roaming the city at night. A forma- 
tive experience for Giacometti was his por- 
traits ra Isaku Y anaihara, a Japanese profes- 
sor with strong features that fascinated the 
sculptor: Yaxuuhara, at Giacometti’s urging, 
became Annette's lover, and the three Sved 
together openly for several years. But noth- 
ing seems to have reconciled Annette to 
Giacometti’s relative indifference to every- 
thing but his own work. After his death, she 
broke with many of their old friends and, 
Lord says, never allowed even Diego to have 
any further say in handling of Alberto’s 
work. 

She refused to cooperate with Lord on the 
biography, not even allowing him to quote 
from Giacometti's letters to Turn. There are 
no major disclosures in the correspondence. 
Lord Believes. Perhaps the intimate details 
be gives of Giacometti's life explain bar 
hostility to him? "Actually, as Franqoise 
Gilot said to me after she published her book 
Continued on page 8 


Michener Takes on Texas 


by Caryn James 


T HE elderly gentleman sluing quietly 
in an Austin. Texas, restaurant, 
hands folded before him, tends to 
store straight ahead into space. It is 
impossible far someone who has just met 
him to know whether this signals shyness, 
boredom, the self-absorption of an obsessive 
writer or the natural distraction of a 78-year- 
old, tired and hungry at the end of a long 
day. Bui it is the most surprising of James A. 
Michener's many unexpected traits — this 
author, renowned for his curiosity, does not 
seem curious about other people; he rarefy 
meets your eyes. 

Yet moments later, be is chudding, with a 
modesty and a teasing sense of humor that 
are endearing. An apologetic waiter has re- 
turned to say the kitchen is out of the roast 
duck Michener ordered, and the dinner be- 
comes part of a running joke between the 
author and his right-hand man, John Kings. 
Michener has a knack for choosing the most 
popular item on a menu. Indeed, a few days 
later, he misses out on the last of the shrimp 
at a private dub, and on both evenings 
Michener, on stage in his own low-key way, 
responds with the same laugh and the same 
line: "Harris and Gallup don’t have to make 
all those phone calls to find out what people 
think. They should just call me. I'm the 
average guy." 

No one doubts Michener's instinct for 
popular taste, but he was never average. 
“Tales of the South Pacific.” his first pub- 
lished fiction, won the 1948 Pulitzer Prize, 
but only when he moved from small stories 
of people to monolithic tales of places — 
beginning with rite fictionalized history of 
“Hawaii" in 1959 through Israel in "The 
Source." South Africa in The Covenant,” 
“Poland." “Chesapeake” and “Space" — did 
be become the kind of brand-name author 
whose books hit the best-seller lists before 
they reach* the bookstores. 

His new epic, “Texas,” due out next 
month, has been as much a media event as a 
novel from die start, and a measure of Mich- 
ener's unique place among today's writers. 
What other author would be officially invit- 
ed. as Michener was in 1981 by Governor 
William Clements, to write about Texas? Or 
offered a staff and office by the University of 
Texas to help him along? How many average 
guys have more than two years of time and 
upward of $100,000 of their own money to 
travel the state in borrowed planes, talking 
with scholars, tycoons and just plain folks? 
The product of this extravaganza is the befti- 
esi Michener work yet, weighing in at 1,096 
pages, moving from 16th-century Spanish 
explorers to 1980s cattle barons. Random 
House says its first printing of 750,000 is the 
largest in its history; ABC bought the televi- 
sion rights for a mmiseries before a word was 
written. 

Mari Michener, to whom the novelist has 
been married for 30 years, has an easy expla- 
nation for her husband's success, which is 
consonant with his Quaker upbringing. "He 
works very, very hard," she says with a 
summary nod. As with so much of what the 
Micheners say, the determined simplicity 
hints at a more complex truth. For a Mich- 
ener novel is a tribute to the industriousness 
of both author and reader, and, in addition 
to the easy- fo-swal low data, it contains a 
morality tale about the heroism of hard work 
and guts. His thick, fact- filled books seem 
thoroughly impersonal, but several days in 
Michener's company show the novels to be 
perfect expressions of their author's anoma- 
lies — moral without bring stem, methodical 
yet digressive, insistently modest yet burst- 
ing with ambition, full of soda! conscience 
yet grasping at facts as a way to avoid 
emotion. 

As the literary critic Leslie Fiedler says. 
"Some writers are read because Lhey have a 
voice like that of an old friend; Michener 
doesn’t have that. His is as dose to a neutral 
or non-style as you can get.” Yet that detach- 
ment is pan of his appal to readers, Fiedler 
suggests: "He puts a book together in a 
perfectly ludd, un disturbing way, so that 
even potentially troublesome issues don’t 
seem so. ’Hawaii' is about the problem of 
imperialism, yet one never senses that The 
Source' is about the Middle East, one of the 
most troublesome political issues in the 
world, but he's forgotten all the ambiguities. 
His approach is that if you knew all the facts. 


;5rt*V: 



Si 

.mb 


James A. Michener. 

everything would straighten out, so it's 
soothing and reassuring to read him." 

T HE official Michener biography, the 
story he tells and approves for Ran- 
dom House to distribute, is perfectly 
Dickensian. As an infant, he was taken in by 
Mabel Michener, a poor, young widow in 
Doyiestown. Pennsylvania, and raised as her 
son alongside many foster children who 
came and went. At times, he recalls, reduced 
circumstances forced her to send him to the 
local poorhouse, but at home he felt loved 
and was inspired by her reading aloud from 
19th-century novels, particularly Dickens. 
Not until he was a 19-year-oid scholarship 
student at Swarthmore College did he learn, 
from an acquaintance, that be was adopted. 
He has never learned who his real parents 
were. 

Michener escaped poverty through educa- 
tion. becoming a social-studies teacher in 
private schools and college and eventually a 
textbook editor at Macmillan. He became 
financially independent as a result of the 
stories he began while in the U. S. Navy 
stationed on the Pacific island of Espictu 
Santo during World War II. That book never 
became a test-seller, but it was turned into 
the hit Broadway musical “South Pacific.” 
(Michener liked to advise struggling writers 
on the key to success: “Make sure Rodgers 
and Hammerstem read your first book.”) 

Michener has not slowed down much for 
Texas," traipsing through old forts, follow- 
ing the Brazos River, reading hundreds of 
books to make sure the wildcatters, planta- 
tion owners and religious leaders who inhab- 
it the novel are historically accurate. He 
listened to music of the region, from Mexi- 
can dances to songs by Charley Pride and 
Willie Nelson. As always, Michener consult- 
ed dozens of experts. But in the past, he did 
not have full-time help — with some notable 
exceptions, such as “Centennial” and non- 
fiction works like “Kent State." For Tex- 
as,” Michener employed the kind of weU- 
ofled staff he has been rumored to have had 
all along. In addition to the secretary and 
office space, the university provided two 




graduate students in history as part-time 
research assistants. John Kings, who first 
worked with Michener on “Centennial" in 
197Z signed on at Michener's own expense 
as full-time coor dinating editor — that is. be 
organized trips and drove the car, ran the 
office and fielded so many requests for 
Michener’s time that he pinned a button on 
his bulletin board, reading. “NO! Mr. Mich- 
ener CAN'T!" 

Michener's longtime pattern has been to 
block out the plot ana write one section 
while continuing to research another, “It 
does not get easier." he says of the writing. 
“When I start one of these projects, I am 
painfully aware of my inadequacy. But the 
arrogance of the artist is a very profound 
thing, and it fortifies you." Michener kept 
his own arrogance under wraps for half a 
lifetime. Tales of the South Pacific" was not 
written until he was nearly 40. “Partly be- 
cause I'd had such a hard childhood, I was 
quite content just to go along,” he says in 
explaining his hesitancy about writing. 
“There must have been a factor of fear — I 
didn’t want to face the big challenges, was 
perfectly happy the way it was.” Even now, 
he says, he counterbalances his mammoth 
efforts by thinking “Let’s just get through 
Friday afternoon. 

If the writing has remained difficult, the 
research has become easier in proportion to 
Michener’s fame. These days. T just drop a 
hint that I want to knowhow the building of 
Houston is financed and first thing you 
know, eight people fiy up here or I fly down 
there, ana we have a seminar for a weekend 
and talk. 1 set up hypothetical situations and 
they fill them in completely.” For Texas,” 
the graduate students fetched his books, 
checked his facts, wrote reports and accom- 
panied him into the field, though Michener's 
weD -developed instinct for a good source 
was still crucial. Robert Wooster, one of 
those staff researchers, recalls that on a typi- 
cal trip to the Brazos, Michener stopped for 
directions. "He went to a house and talked to 
this elderly black woman. He not only got 

Continued on page 9 


" ,<,fr 


Peace, a Rose That Has Gone by Many Names 


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F OR the history books, 1945 was the year of pease. For rose 
lovers it was the year of Peace. The name of the most 
famous rose of our time was chosen on the day Berlin fell, 
while war Still raged. When the 49 delegates to the newly 
... formed United Nations fust met in San Francisco, each delegate 
found in his hotel room a Peace rose and a message from the 
American Rose Society expressing the hepe^^ it womd 
all men of goodwill to strive for Peace on earth for ah mamma. 

Peace , a yellow hybrid tea, was in fact invented in France in June, 
1939, by the famous rose breeding firm of Mrilland and its first name 

Mary Blume 

was 3-35-40. U was later named Mine. Antoine Mrilland, after the 
wife of the patriarch of the family business. On the eve ofW odd War 
H, Antoine Mrilland prudently sent package of 3-35-40 to Germa- 
ny where it received the pious name Gloria Da, and to Italy where it 
’ Was called Gioia, or joy. A package of propagating wood riso went 
■ on one of the last mrcrafr to the United States, addressed to the 

American rose grower Robert Pyte- 

It was Pyle who introduced and promoted 3-35-40 — I am 
convinced it wfll be the greatest rose of the century he wrote 
MeiDand — and helped name it Pwce. Today, 40 years later, there 
~ areTmore titan 30 million Peace rosebushes blooming throughout the 

world. - - •*- = — — -- its pale gold and . 

delicate carmine.” 
apher of Peace, "is 

U.i V. Saclcville-Wes^ 

" KS." •m'^rSTno, my favorite rose." says Philip 

Harkness 31 a fourth-generation English rose breeder. It grows 
wdl Siwr^yK«t climates, it’s good and reliable. Bunt's 
*n Kffl i every diction ~ “ « of fiowcr ' ,nazeof 

Pl PhiHo’s father Jack Harkness. dean of English rose breedew and 
, _ ver job awards disagrees with his son about Pe ace . It s a 

holder of over avraw. ^ ^ . f h Ks ^ 

on teauStiungs, I’m no believer in doing that, 
to pour cold water on j ^ in my whole life." 



century. "I think the next phase of development is going to be what 
you call dwarf or patio roses which are small and better suited to a 
dense population with less space,” Philip Harkness says. 

This may suggest that, after the French and the British, the new 
leaders in rose breeding wilt be the Japanese who were not rose 
fanciers until Peace came along, but who have speedily built up a 
thriving specially of miniature roses. Jack Harkness is especially 
interested in Torn F. Onodrra’s rose Nozomi, which translates as 
Hope. "It seems to me it will take the rose world by storm,” he says. 

Much honored and loved in the rose world. Jack Harkness feels 
very affectionate towards rosarians, as he calls them. “I’ve spent my 
life with rose growers. Ji’s not just been my job but my social life as 
well. I’ve found within the trade people who are helpful cooperative, 
good-natured. It's been a marvelous trade to be in." 

He has just written a book of 17 potted biographies of famous rose 
breeders, ending with the Harkness nursery, founded in 1879. and 
ranging to France, Spain, Denmark, Japan, Germany and the United 
States. A picture of Peace is on the cover ("it seemed the rose that 
deserved to be there") and the book is called “The Makers of 
Heavenly Roses" (published in London by Souvenir Press). 

Clearly an earthy, kindly and modest man (he says he is a poor 
budder}, Harkness, as the excited book title suggests, tends to see the 
world through rosarian eyes. “The second Worla War was no friend 
to rose growers," is one typical sentence, no more single-minded, 
really, than another rose fancier's proclamation. The year 1910 will 
be known hereafter as the year of Rayon d'Or." 

He says he had a very hard time narrowing down the choice of 
breeders who appear in his book. It begins chronologically with 
Pierre GuiUot, who opened his Lyon nursery in 1829 and whose son 
created a great rose immodestly named La France, which was 
forecast as a certain winner at the Paris Universal Exhibition ofl 867. 
Unfortunately the judge arrived two days late and awarded the 
withered plant nothing. 

The first English grower to challenge French supremacy was 
Henry Bennett, a farmer who brought a cattle breeder s eye to rose- 
growing and encouraged selective breeding (roses today are even 
subjected to chromosome counts, like the criminally insane). 


maintains that the best training for a budding breeder is simply to 
. leave school and go into the nursery. Emphasis these days is on long- 
flowering, easy-care rosebushes. 

“Some people would like us to breed them without thorns,” Jack 
Harkness says. “People do want flowers that last longer because they 


are fleeting, aren't they — a few days and they’re gone. The trouble is 
if you want them scented, then you don't want petals that last too 
long because they lend to be very hard and you need soft petals, 
which means short-lived flowers, a you want scent.” 

R OSE breeding is big business. Meffland, the creators of Peace, 
which began outside Lyon and is now based in Cap d" An- 
tibes, has seen its annual turnover grow from 13 million 
francs in 197 9 to 80 million in 1984, with 82 percent of product going 
for export. The American giant, Jackson & Perkins, creator of the 
Dorothy Perkins rose, is the world’s largest grower and is now part of 
R. J. Reynolds Industries, whose other interests include tobacco, 
wine, energy and Kentucky Fried (Thicken. 

The industry at present divides into breeders who specialize in cut 
flowers, such as Mrilland, and breeders of garden plants. English 
breeders grow for the garden: The climate encourages a long flower- 
ing season and greenhouses for growing cut flowers would be too 
costly to heat. 

The French are very fond of cut flowers, the British really like 
roses as garden plants,” Jack Harkness says. "And they don’t like 
paying someone else to grow the flowers. They’d rather buy the 
plants and grow them themselves.” 

Roses also have their uses. While Betty Harkness. Jack’s wife, does 
not make rose petal jam or rose hip tea, she used to make a quite 
potent rose wine. “With Peace you’d get a nice white wine," Jack 
Harkness recalls. “With Ena Harkness a very nice red.” 

Lord knows what Canon S. Reynolds Hole, the first president of 
the National Rose Society in 1 876, would have thought. He fervently 
hoped rose growing might get the working classes out of the barroom 
and into the garden. 

Like General de Gaulle, Peace may be French but it has Irish 
blood (a touch of Margaret McGreedy, a carmine and yellow rose, 
went into its breeding). The roses bordering the Tower of London are 
from the German breeder, Kordes. Roses are hermaphrodite, which 
leads Jack Harkness to write such bewildering phrases as . . the 
seed-bearing parent, the mother, must be emasculated before her 
pollen was ripe, otherwise she would fcrtilze herself," 

Henry Bennett honored a colleague by naming a rose for him, only 
to see it condemned for ugly color, scentlessness, inability to open 
properly, and propensity to mildew. In the swinging sixties a Ger- 
man breeder came out with a rose called Erotica, later changed to 



Peace, bom in 1939. 

Eroica. Irish roses are notable for their form. Spanish roses for their 
color. 

The English breeder Edward LeGrice came up with roses that were 
purple, blue, gray and brown. Jack Harkness is hying for a brown. 

“It’s just for interest to see what nature will give usrfae says. “And 
once we get something that is brown, or partly brown, or nearly 
brown, then it is interesting to see what that will give. One just 
doesn’t know what changes will come along and where we’ll finish 


up. Yew just have to go along with what nature gives you and let her 
have a bash." 

Most countries have laws protecting plants that breeders have 
created, but each country's laws are different- Mrilland, who sell 
their bushes to carefully selected licensees throughout the world, 
spend a great deal of time and money protecting their copyrights. 

Says Meilland's Michel Chauveau, it takes about 10 years to 
produce a rose and copyrights run from 15 to 20 years (Peace, for 
example, is out of copyright). Counterfeiting and fraud are not rare. 
“We usually have about ten or fifteen court cases going on at once,” 
Chauveau says. “We are, after all just like Chanel or Cartier. With 
than it’s protecting a perfume or a jeweL With us it’s a rose.” ■ 


,, »T' 







in V . - . 




Page 8 


PVTFR NATIONAL HERALD TRIBUTE EB1PAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 


TRAVEL 


Versailles and a Bit of History 


by Richard Bernstein 


V ERSAILLES. Fiance — It was in 
the exquisite opera house of balus- 
trades and chandeliers built by 
Kong Louis XV for the wedding of 
his son and heir that, according to historians 
of the great palace at Versailles, a band of 
monarchist s&diers unleashed the anger that 
led to die palace’s finish as a home for kings. 
Thar was 196 years ago. 

The soldiers of the king of France, the 
representative of God on earth, were in the 
opera bouse for an evening of revelry. Sing- 
ing monar chis t songs, they trampled the Tri- 
color, which had already become the symbol 
of the simmering revolutionary movement 
News of the soldiers’ sacrilege reached Paris 
and, two days later, on Oct 6, 1 789, a revolu- 


XV, where from 1781 to 1783 Benjamin 
Fr anklin negotiated the treaty with Britain 
that formally ended the American Revolu- 
tion But Versailles is dominated by what 
began as a 17th-century hunting lodge built 
by Louis Xffl, and was transformed into a 
concrete symbol of power by his son, Louis 

XIV, the Sun King. . m _ 

In front of the palace, which sits behind an 
iron grating tipped by gold-leaf spikes, is a 
vast parking lot for buses and cars.. And 
tourists see the palace quickly, first gazing ar 
the magnificent stone and bride edifice from 
the expansive cobblestone plaza in front of 

- _■ ,1V. rtNik a mtirlA tnfhiiaYi 


tionary crowd stormed Versailles demanding 
that the king leave the palace and return to 
the city. Louis XVI and his much-disliked 
wife, Marie Antoinette, who appeared on a 
balcony of the palace to try to appease the 
revolutionaries' fury, had no dunce. They 
left for Paris that night The balance of 
power shifted to the revolutionaries. Three 
years later. Louis XVI and his Marie Antoi- 
nette died on the guillotine. 

Knowing a bit of history helps one appre- 
ciate a visit to the palace of Versailles and 
turn it into something more than a plodding 
progression through a group of magnificent 
but empty and, to be fr ank, somewhat simi- 
lar royal chambers. Versailles is one of the 
most visited single institutions in France, 
drawing as many people — 8,000 to 10,000 a 
day during the summer — each year as that 
other former royal palace, the Louvre. 

The trick is. to make your visit in an 
informed fashion; spend some time in the 
palace and the town; imm erse yourself in the 
17th and 18th centuries; get the message of 
Versailles not merely as an audacious and 
grandiose structure with wonderful views of 
gardens and parks outride, but also as the 
architectural embodiment of an idea and of a 
history, that of the rise and fall of absolute 
monarchical power. 

Versailles these days is a pleasant, upper 
middle class town, its streets lined with syca- 
mores and chestnut trees, its outdoor cafes 
sparkling in the summer sun. There are some 
other historical attractions in town, .most 
notably the old foreign ministry of Louis 


fabulous Hall of Minors, all 79 yards (73 
meters) of it, the Cabinet Room, the Peace 
Room, the War Room and others. _ 


many of than on the cei lin gs, lots of gold 
ornamentation, a few very busy post-Renais- 
sance playthings, like a highly gilded clock, 
built in the days of Louis XV, that still tells 
the time and the date. The rooms are only 
scantily furnished, since most of the otgects 
in the palace were deemed not authentic 
some years ?gr> and removed; the museum's 
curators are trying to purchase the original 
pieces that were sold by the escaping nobilily 
in the wake of the revolution. There is noth- 
ing wrong with such a visit; it is a wholly 
enjoyable tour through some timeworn 
splendor. But it is far better with some 
knowledge of history. 

For me, Versailles is a kind of stage where 
some of the world’s grandest players strutted 
through their parts. A preparatory step for a 
visit is to become familiar with the charac- 
ters that disported themselves throughout 
the palace and who were at the center of 
French history for the 107 years that the 
palace was the royal capital 


F IRST, there was, of course, Louis 
XIV. who created the palace — the 
French use the term chateau — - be- 
cause he hated Paris, where he was obliged to 
Uve in the Louvre. 

In his childhood, Louis bad been terror- 
ized and shocked by the rebellion of the 
nobility known as the Fronde and, when he 
came of age in 1661 and decided to rule 
France hims elf, be turned his palace and its 


dail y routine into the physical expression of 
his favorite ro 3 *” 11 “L’fctat, tf est roof -- *T 
am the state.” To this political idea, Louis 
added an enormous degree of self-love and 
an appetite for flattery and ceremony. Ver- 
sailles, where Louis moved the courun 1681, 
became the place where the Sun King kept 
the troublesome nobility within view, creat- 
ing the elaborate rituals performed by its 
members to recognize bis absolute power. 

So, when you visit the grand bedroom of 
the long , set in the absolute geographical 
center of the palace, what you see is a projec- 
tion of Louis XIVs image. Louis decided to 
Sleep there in 1701 and he converted what 
had b een the palace’s major reception room 
into his sleepmg quarters, thus uniting his 
private hours with his identification with the 
state. He wanted his life to be entirely public. 
He felt no need, apparently, for the land of 
small private apartments that were later con- 
structed by bis successor, Louis XV. 

In a room adjacent co the bedroom, 
known as the Buffs Eye after a large oval 
window, the nobility waited for the king to 
rise in the morning; in well-defined se- 
quence, various officials would then present 
themselves at what was called the lever. ; help- 
ing the king with his toilet, putting on his 
shirt, his jacket, finally his hat; then, the 
procedure would be followed in reverse at 
the coucker, the bedtime ceremony. 

Among the more fascinating aspects of 
Versailles are its conscious mythic im ag e s. 
The Greek and Roman gods are well repre- 
sented in the paintings, the most spectacular 
perhaps being that of Francois Le Moines, 
completed in 1736 and displayed in the Sa- 
lon of Hercules. It shows 142 mythic figures 
mailing around in different poses on the ceil- 
ing — Hercules himself, Jupiter, Diana, 
Apollo and others. Various gods have their 
own rooms dedicated to them — Mars, Mer- 

rite^'oFTau^'^ throne, is dominated by a 
splendid painting by Charles de la Fosse 
showing Apollo in bis chari ot drawn by four 
horses and accompanied by the seasons. 
Other common figures appearing in the pal- 
ace’s iconography are Caesar and Alexander 
the Great. The imagery of the sun is_ every- 
where: Versailles, radiant and splendid, was 
the expression of Louis XTV’s own radiance 
and splendor, his megalomania and his real 
power. 



fK*' 1 

stH u ' 


tl 


y >• - 


’ *" 


In the Galerie des Batcdlles. 


Another major character, perhaps, after 


Louis XTV, the most interesting of those 
living at the palace, was Madame aeMainte- 


of these apartments can be visited 


non, the Sun King’s second wife, a great 
letter writer, an informal power and one of 
the great examples of upward social mobilicy 
in history. 

She was bom Franqoise <FAnbign& in a 
prison in 163S, her family having been jafled 
because of their Protestantism; she married 
weU to a husband who died eariy and eventn- 
aily she became Louis XTV’s favorite mis- 


tress and eventually, on the death of the 
queen, wfaat was called his “left-hand wife,” 


queen, what was called his “left-hand wife,” 
meaning a legal spouse but one without the 
i* gal rank rmri power of queen. Madame de 
Maintenon was given separate r-hamhgrs in 
Versailles on a comer of an timer co ur t y ard; 
they can be visited by special arrangement. 


depart from the Stairway of the Queen — 
and they give a nice sense of the quality of 
royal fife outside die public eye in the 18th 
century. The private apartment of the king 
can be seen from 9:45 to 3:30 only as part of 
die general guided tour of the palace; which 
costs 25 francs (about S3). Most of the great 
rooms of the palace, suck as the king’s bed- 
room and the Hall of Mirrors, can be visited 
without guide from 9:45 to 5 any day except 
Mondays and public holidays. There axe. 
numerous guided tours in' English. 


Giacometti 


Continued from page 7 


about her years with Picasso. ‘He should 
have sent me a bouquet of roses a mfle wide 
for all the things I didn’t say about him.’ ” 


She is not die only person likely to be 
irritated by Lord’s frank portraits of the 
Paris art world. One of Giacometti's most 
interesting friendships was with Balthus. Al- 
though both were figurative artists, they dis- 
agreed, passionately, about everything. In a 
memorable meeting, the two ran into one 
another in front of the bear pit in Bern, 
where Giacometti had stopped on his way to 
make the acquaintance of Paul Klee. En- 
grossed in conversation, the pair moved on 
to a caffc and only separated late that night 
So Giacometti never met Klee, but he and 
Balthus continued for years to debate their 
ideas. 

For Lord, Balthus incarnates many errors 
that Giacometti avoided — in essence, sub- 
stituting an artful lifestyle for unremitting 
pursuit of art To make the case. Lord in 
other writings has defied Balthus’s demand 
that critics protect his privacy. Writing for 
The New Criterion prim to Balthus’s major 
retrospective Last year. Lord revealed that 
Bilthus, whose full name is Michd Balthasar 
Klossowski, is not a count as he claims, but 
the descendant of minor Polish nobility, and 
described how bis fascination with young 
girls (some encouraged by obliging relatives) 
and elaborate, almost feudal surroundings 
gradually occupied his Interest at the ex- 
pense of fctis own painting. Some of these 
facts were used, rather baldly, in the New 


article to the succinct catalog. “Which 
shows,” says Lord, “that he may be a false 
count but he is a real aristocrat” 

He is working on his memoirs — “actual- 
ly. more a series of portraits of geniuses I’ve 
known welL” These include, besides Giaco- 
metti and Balthus, Picasso (“I went straight 
to his studio when I got to Paris in 1945 with 
U. S. Army intelligence”), Gertrude Stein 
(“Picasso sent me to meet her, for his own 
perverse reasons, thinking we wouldn’t get 
along, but we dicT) — together with Parisian 
arbiters of the postwar arts scene, Jean Coc- 
teau and Marie- La ure de Noailles. 

The books and articles are flowing fast 
now that Lord has found his genre. For 
years, he concentrated on fiction — two 
novels published out of 10. “Your ignorance 


of them is bliss: Fortunately only two were 
published, and I certainly don’t advertise 


them. Only if I’m asked a direct question do 
1 have to confess to them, a little like Nixon 


with the tapes.’ 

H is recollections are not all tranquil: Gen- 
erous admiration is matched with sharp de- 
lineation of mediocrity. Writing he finds 
“terribly hard, but at least one finally begins 
to understand a tittle about one’s relation- 
ships,” Lord says, studying his never-still 
fingertips. Regrets? “Yes, about Giacometti 
I don’t convey bow warm and bow funny he 
could be. His humor came out of little spur- 
of-the-moment things which it would be te- 
dious or take genius to relate. And his end- 
less fascination with people; I mice made 
some mild remark, not a remonstrance, but I 
showed I felt neglected by his absorbed con- 


York catalog, and Balthus recently told 
someone that he actually prefers Lord’s long 


versa tion with a journalist who joined our 
table. ’But James,’ he said, Tm just as inter- 
ested in someone I’ve known for ten minutes 
as someone I’ve known fen ten years.' ” He 
had capacity for immediate genuine intima- 
cy, Lord says, which was part of his total 
commitment to his own art. 

Giacometti, compared to many of the art- 
ists collected by Lord, was easy to meet. On 
of Lord’s short stories (“the only acceptable 
piece of fiction 1 ever wrote”) was published 
m the last issue of Britain’s Horizon maga- 
zine, and its angel Peter Watson, who also 
collected Giacometti work, introduced Lord 
to the artist one evening in the Deux Magots. 
“He was fascinating, and I asked if I could 
come to his studio, and then I was interested 
so I learned a lot” 

In Lord's almost 40 years in Paris, “my 
excitement came from living around people I 
was convinced were not just first rate, but 
really people to whom, without reservation, 
one could give one’s entire admiration." 

If Lord also discerns feet of day under 
some of these towering figures, he pities, he 
says, those who today are denied the inspira- 
tion of those years when Paris was the place 
where Che most exciting creation in the plas- 
tic arts was happening. 

“It must be very discouraging not to have 
that,” he comments, excusing himself with 
infinite politeness in time to change for the 
new show, at Beaubourg, of the work of 
Raymond Mason, a British representational 
sculptor who lives in France. The catalog 
contains one essay by a foreigner James 
Lord. ■ 


The room of Madame de Maintenon is 
ornate and splendid. It contains a collection 
of 16th-century portraits that belonged to 
Louis XIV and several pieces of 18th-centu- 
ry furniture, including a desk, a large cabinet 
and some upholstered chairs. 


M OVING to the next generation, 
Louis XV, the great-grandson of 
Louis XIV, name to the throne in 
, 1715 after the Sun King's 72-year reign end- 
ed. Louis XV did not want a relentlessly 
public life. Small apartments were bmZc on 
either side of an mner courtyard rat the 
second floor of the palace that served as 
i private apartments of the king and the queen 
— connected by a passageway for nocturnal 
visits and close to stairs leading to children’s, 
servants’ and mistresses’ quarters. 


The private apartments of Lotus and 
Queen Mario-Therese are small bat still or- 
nate rooms on inner courtyards, with lower 
Halinpj gjjlt nanris colorful rugs, tidt drap- 
eries, chandeliers and other royal trap pings 
In die inner apartre ca ti of die queen, you 
can virit die tiled bathroom where two small 
boles in the wall indjcaie where the hot and 
cold water spigots were. Water was carried 
by servants and poured into tanks above! 
Then there is an after-bath zesting room, a 
small reception room where the.queen lis- 
tened to music and an adjunct to the palace’s 
mam fibraiy. During die time of Loins XV 
scene 5,000 members of the nobility lived in 
private apartments in the palace, but the vast 
majority of these were dismantled by Louis- 
Phflippe in the 19th-century restoration of 
Versailles to make room for large painting 
galleries, most of which are at present dosed 
to the public. 


oh the top floor, next to what are called the 
Small Apartments of the King. There two .; 
women were celebrated mistresses of Loujs- - 
XY, and the swrce of mniieroiB and 

political anecdotes. .*• ’ 

. . The end of Versailles came, of course, with 
the revolution. Arid some dra mati c events, ■ 
shfo as The gjiards’ reyeliy.in the opera-- 
house, can be refilled to specific places in the ‘ ; ; 
. palace. On that famous moiningr for exam- ^ 
pie, the revolutionaries surged into the pal- 
ace drananding the return to Paris of the king s . 

and Marie Antoinette by the ornate marble . : 
Staircase of 'the Queen. Marie Antoinette^ 
themost hated member of the royal famfiy, . 
earlier ' had stood alone, on .tile balcony of . 


Me courtyard where Louis XUTs- original 
hunting lodge stood, and paid reluctant 

-allegiance to the revolutionary crowd. r . 

• <'. Versailles, the most splendid palace in 
Christendom, is a land or hannted hoas^ a 


place of ghosts, uninhabited since the revo- 
lution- In about >1833, Lonis- Philippe, 
France’s newly installed affistitutkraal iuon- 

• : - A. 


by. -then much. d3apIdated. BHt the king, 
aware of anti-monarchist- sqifrincnl, .. be- 
queathed the' extnt property to the state as a 
stand of guarantee Quit fre;wptdd never" it-.; 


U4UIA VlUlllb Uivv W WJ— 

The idea that Versailles represented was 
dead. By 1837, Wifit the ttgxaira tagdy fin- 
ished. — paid for oitf of Louis-Fnil^jpe^ 
personal fortune — - VereaiBesbecamea mn- 
scum, a group xrfspfcndyi aadtmrnlmhrtcd 


Before leaving the era of Louts XV, yon natinn to hring/backlo fife 
will no doubt notice the apartments of Ma.- • * • • y; 

dame de Pompadour and Madame du Baity ;'~ w * v c-ojssJ For*rtm« . - 


DOONESBURY 




UNZ, Festival (tel: 27.52.30 >. 
CONCERTS — Sepi. 24: Moscow 
Philharmonic Orchestra. Dimitri Ki- 
taenko conductor. Alexander Rudin 
cello. 

Sept. 26: London Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Klaus Tennstedt conductor. 
VIENNA. Kunstlerhaus (tel: 
57-96.631. 

EXHIBITIONS— ToSepL 30: “1984 
—Looking Ahead lo 2000." 

TO Ocl 6: “Vienna 1870-1930 Dream 
and Reality: The greatest names of the 
Viennese fin-de-sifecle." 


EXHIBITION — SepL 26-Dec. 22: 
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•MuteedTxelles (id: 51 1.90.84). 
EXHIBITION — To OcL 24: “Neo- 
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•Muse£s Royaux des Beaux Arts (tel: 
513.96.30). 

EXHIBITION — SepL 26-Dec. 22 
‘XJoya.” 

•Palaisdes Beaux Arts(tel : 5 1 322. 10). 
EXHIBITION — Sept. 25-Dec. 22: 
“Velasquez." 



INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


ENGLAND 




•Staatsoper del. 53240). 

OPERA — SepL 21: “Cos! FanTutte” 
(Mozart). 

SdpL 22 and 25: “LaTraviataTYerdih 


CHARLEROI. Palais des Beaux Arts, 
(tel: 31.4420V 

EXHIBITION — Sept. 25-Dec 22: 
“Picasso, Mini. Dali." 


Sept. 27 : “Maria Stuarda” (Donizetti). 


BELGIUM 


BRUSSELS. Muse* d’Art Modeme, 
ti0: 5)3.96 JOl. 


GHENT, Flanders Festival (25.88.6 1 ). 
BALLET — Sept. 27: “Le Baiser de la 
ffce" (Stravinsky, Btjajl). 

CONCERTS —SepL 21 : Belgian Na- 
tional Orchestra Mendi Rodan con- 
ductor (Beethoven). 

Sept. 25: Flanders Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, EmO Tchakarov conductor 
(Mozart. Mahler). 


Barbican Centredel: 638.41.41). 
CONCERTS — SepL 26: London 
Symphony Orchesira, Gerard 
Schwarz conductor, Carol Rosen- 
berger piano (Beethoven). 

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra — 
SepL 21 : Victor Pablo Perez conduc- 
tor. Joaquin Acfaucharro piano (Tur- 
ina. Brahms). 

Sept. 27: Nicholas Cleobury conduc- 
tor. Vovka Ashkenazy piano (Tchai- 
kovsky. Ravel). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 3: “Ro- 
dericO’Coner." 

To Nov. 3: “Gwen John." 

To SepL 29: “Paintings or Traditional 
British Sporting Events." 

Sept. 24-Nov. 3: Egyptian Land- 
scapes: Weaving from the School of 
Ramses Wissa Wassef." 


DUON, Music National Maurice 


Mamin (tel: 67. 1 1 .10). 

EXHIBITION — To Nov. IS: “XJX 
Century French Portraits.” 
HONFLEUR. Mu tee Eugene Boudin 
(tel: 89.16.47). 

EXHIBITION —To SepL 30: “Alex- 
ander Dubourg.” 

NICE. Gallery of Contemporary Art 
(Id: 62.37.1 it 

EXHIBITION— To SepL 22: “Tout 
Ben." 


Through December: “Matthew 
Smith. 


WEEKEND 


RECITAL — SepL 23: Ivo Pogordicfa 
(Bach. Chopin). 


SHOPS 


HOLIDAYS 


THEATER — SepL 27: “Les Misfra- 
bles" (Hugo, Musical Adaption: Bou- 
bil and ScbSnburg). 


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EXHIBITION— To Jan. 1986: “Bud- 
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•London Coliseum (tel: 836.01.1 1) 
OPERA— Sept: 27: “Rigoleno”(Ver- 
di). 

Sept. 21,25: “Cod fan tutte” (Mozart). 
SepL 26: “Orpheus in the Under- 
world" (Offenbach). 


•Musee de Terra Amata (tel: 
55.59.93). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 30: “Ex- 
perimental Prehistoric Pottery.” 
PARIS. ADAC Gallery (tel: 
277.96.26). 

EXHIBITION — To Ocl 17: “Isa- 
bdle Emmerique, Patricia Cia nn ini, 
Michel LacosL Rap had Levy, Jean- 
Pierre Pignard.” 

•Gallerie Eolia (32636.54). — To OcL 
26: “Furniture-Sculpture by Diego 
Giacometti.” 

•Hdtel Mfcridien (td: 758.1230). 
CONCERTS — SepL 21-25: Benny 
Carter and his trio. 

•Hdtel de Vllle(td: 276.40.66X 
EXHIBITION — To Ocl 5: “Victor 
Hugo and Paris." 

•Le Louvre des Antiquaires (td: 


CONCERTS— Orchestic de Paris— 
Sept. 25 and 27: Daniel Barenboim 
conductor, Jessye Norman soprano 
(Wagner). 

SepL 26: Danid Barenboim conduc- 
tor, Luben Yordmoff violin (Brahms, 
Stravinsky). 

•Thfeatre du Rond-Point 
<ld:256.7O80X 

DANCE— To OcL 19: Classical Mu- 
se and Dance of India. 

•Theatre Musical de Paris (tel: 
261.1933). 

DANCE — SepL 24-27: Martha Gra- 
ham Dance Ccanpany. 

SAUMUR, Festival (td: 5133.06). 
BALLET — SepL 21: “Dance and the 
Soul” (Heranger, MargandX 
EXHIBITION — ToOcl 4: “Contem- 
porary French Drawings." 

RECITAL — SepL 22: Fred&rich Lo- 
ci eon cello (Bach). 


und Themes aus Wie Eucfa geftUt" 
(Neumeter Marksdn). 

OPERA — SepL 21: “La Bohfane” 
(PucdniX 

SepL 24: “DieZauberflOte” (Mozart). 
SepL 26: “Die EntfOfarung aus dan 
Sera3”(Mo*artX ' 

MUNICH. National Theater (td: 
22.13.16X 

OPERA — Stol 21: “Die Vier Gro- 
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SepL 22: “Le Nozze * Figaro” (Mo- 
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German Fbnutnretiom t9Wto 1984,” 
and “Works by Luciano Baldessan.” . 
•Palazzo Rede (tel: 87L913). 
EXHIBITION — Through Septem- 


EXHIBITION —to SepL 29; “Cte-. 
gaR, Picasso, Ernst; Klee, Lteer and 
Calden Tapestries and Engravings.” 


•Mused Rath (tdr2SJ6.I 
EXHIBITION ‘To Oi 


ATHENS. Festival (teL 322.14.59X 
THEATER — Sept 21 ? “Coridanus” 
(Shakespeare). 


CONCERTS —Orchestra ddTeatro 
aBa Scak — Sept. 2 1: Kurt Sandeding 
conductor, Bruno Leonardo GdbCr 

piano (Beethoven). ‘ " 

Sept 26, 27: Carlo Maria Gadinicoo~ . 
doctor, Salvarore Accardo violin (Bee- 
thoven, Schumann). • 

OPERA — SepL 23: “A Viaggio a 
Roms* (Rossini), Claudio Aboado 
conductor. ^ ‘ 

VENICE, International- Contempo- 
rary ^Music Festival (Td 71.01.6 IX 
SepL 2 1 : Ordtenra dd Teatro la Fen- 
ice, : Luciano Berra/ George Mester 
conductors, Kim Wheeldr soprano 


Tr&orsdeC Islam. 
•Petit Palais (td : t 


To OcL 27: “Les 


•Petit Palais (td: 46.1433). 
EXHIBITION— Td SepL 3 


paraasse ‘BeBe 
gall to Buffet.” 


>L 30: “Mont-, 
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LUGANO. Villa'-Favorita (tel: 
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EXHIBITION — To Ocl 15: “47 i 
Masterpieces from the Museums of , 
Budapest” V: -a. 


- J 1 -- ’« 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 

34 j ,44.49V 

OPERA — Sept 21 : “Fidelio” (Bee- 
thovenX 

Sept 25: “Die Zauberflflte” (MozartX 
SepL 22 and 26: “Cod fan tutte” (Mo- 
zartX 

•Muse Festival (id: 25.48 JO). 


DUBLIN. The Abbey Theatre (td: 


SepL 23: Southwest Getuan’Radig 
Orchestra. Michael Gielen/Pierre 
Boulez conductors, Ocorg MOnch vio- 
lin (Boulez, Nono). 

SepL 24: Ensemble lntwrontenqxff- 
ain, Pierre Boulez conductor (Berio, 
Boulez). ■ 


787.179X 

THEATER— To Sg>L 30: “The King 


MARTIGNY.Foodation Pierre Giai^ \ 
adda (tel: 23978). . / . V- L-. 

EXHIBITION — To. Nov. 3: “250 
Klee Paintings.” 

ZURICH. Opera(teL 25 1.69 -20V 
OPERA —Sept 22, 25: ‘TL’Hnfrd’A-. ; 
morcfDonmnti). 

Sept22and26: “Mad«h."(VerdiX : r 


THEATER— To Sg 
of Friday's Men” (M 
•The National Galie 
EXHIBITION— To 
Munch.” 


XMoUqyX 
y(td:608L533> 
a. 20: “Edvard 


JAPAN 




CONCERTS — Sent 23: Frankfurt 
Radio Symphony Orchestra EBagn 
Inbal conductor. Augustin Dumay vi- 
olin (Messiaen, Soit-Saftns). 

SepL 27: Alban Berg Quartet (Berg. 
Ravel). . . 

RECITAL — SepL 24: Maunao Pot- 
lini piano (Bach). 

COLOGNE, Oper der Stadi (td: 
21^5.81). , 

OPERA — SepL 24, 27: “Luaa di 
Xanuuermoor” (Donizetti). 

SepL 26: “Agrippina” (Handd). 

Sept- 22. 25, 28: “Tarandot(Puccm). 


297^7.00X 
EXHIBITION — To SepL 29: “Per- 
fume: XVI- XK Centuries." 

•Le Petit Opportunftd: 236.0 IJ6X 
JAZZ — SepL 21-24: Babid Rein- 
hardL Christian Escoude and Boulou 
Ferra 

•Maine du ler arrondissement (tel: 
26038.011. 

EXHIBITION —To SepL 29: “Four 
Centuries of Ballet in Pans.” 




RESTAURANTS 


•Hayward Gallery (tel: 928.57.08). 
EXHIBITIONS —To SepL 29: “Ed- 

t ** 


ward Burra.' 


HALLE AUXVINS 

French restaurant oyster and cham- 
pagne bar. Fine French wines by the 

S 'ass. Every day (mm 6pjJU-I a.m., 
rikkenstraste 35, D-oOOO Frank- 
furt/M. 70. TeL: (0) 6&61 90 44, 
Patron: Derek Mae Go wan 


PORTUGAL 


HOLIDAYS 

see classified 


•National Portrait Gallery (tel; 
930.15.52). 

EXHIBITIONS — ToOcul3: ‘•Char- 
lie Chaplin 1889-1977." 

•Tale Gallery (td: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 10: 
“Pound’s Arusts.” 


•MusceCarnavalet (td:27Z2l.l3). 
EXHIBITION — To Ocl 27: “L 


•The Olympia Theatre (tel: 778.I47X 
THEATER— SepL 23-28: “Northern 
Star” (Stewart Parker). 

•The Project Art Centre Theatre 


TOKYO. National Museum of Mod- 
em Art (id: 214.25.61). 
EXHIBITION— ToSepL29: “Modi- 
gliani Exhibition.- ; . ■■■.- 


UWTDSMTES 




American Museum' of 


Natural HKioryOd: 87T.13JOO 
EJOilBmON— ToOcLl5:^ 
.of CameroiaBL" 


(7I3J27X 

Theater — SepL 23-28: “Frocks" (Ar- 
istophanes). : - 


AMSTERDAM, Concdtgefibuw(tel: 


•Metropolitan Museum of Art ftdL^ *- 
535.77.%. -7 

• EXHIBFnON — To Jait S:“indiar. 1 




ITALY 


71 - 83 . 43 ). ^ 

CONCERTS— SepL 21, 24: Aa»»- 
dam Phflharmonic Orcbestre,Edb de 
Waart conductor, TbeoB niins . piano 
(Satie. Debusxvl > - - 


s5l 22.25.S: “Tarandot"(ftiecmi). 


EXHIBITION — To Ocl 27: “Les 
Grands Boulevards." 

•Mus6e d'Art Moderne (tei: 


To Dec. 1 : “Howard Hodgkin: Prints 
from 1977-1983.” 


723.61 -27V 

EXHIBITIONS — SepL 25-Ian. 5: 
“VcniSzekdy” 

•Musee du Louvre (tel: 26039^6). 
EXHIBITIONS — To SepL 30: “In- 
gres Portraits." 

•Mustedu Petit Palais(td: 26S.12.73X 
EXHIBITION —To SepL 29: “Gus- 
tave Dore.” 

•Mus6e Rodin (tel: 705.01 34). 
EXHIBITIONS —To SepL 30: “Ro- 
din Works by Five Photographers.” 
•Salks Favart (td: 296.06.1 11 
OPERETTA — SepL 21. 23-25: “La 
Belle HHtae" (Offenbach). 

•Salle Plevd (id: 563.07.96). 


WEEKEND 


appears 
every Friday 


TIMESH ARE 

Unique historic British spaing vessel, futy 
restored, active .trader, prona aond 
crew (competent tm«harers may crew 
at skipper scfaaenon). from May 1986. 
Mbron) xte: aoqo naia ldtwpv mun 
imeatun pnty m an baaxl 
Madmans onft £ 2 CtM 0 CO days per oron 


ORm dot> In Ooobr t5€5 
Bat 034091 , _ 

. BIT, 63 Lang tow london W.C2E, Enehnd. . 


•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS— To OcL 22: “Tex- 
tiles from the Wellcome Collection: 
ancient and modern textiles from the 
Near East and Peru.” 

To OcL 6: "Julia Margaret Cameron 
1815-1979." 

STRATFORD-upon-AVON. Royal 
Shakespeare Theatre (td: 29.56.23)- 
TH EATER —SepL 21-26: “Othello" 
(Shakespeare). 


SepL 25: “DieTrojaneT (Beriioz). 
•Alie Oper (td: 1 34.03.80). 
RECITAL— SepL 21: Pi-Hsien Chen 
piano (Bach)- 

CONCERTS — Sq?L 21 : Washington 
National Symphony, Msuslaw Ros- 
tropowitch cond uctor (Schubert). 
SepL 22 and 23: Frankfurt Opera Or- 
chestra David Shallon conductor, 
Alexis Wassenberg piano (Bernstein. 
RachmaninofO- _ _ 

JAZZ — SepL 27: Peter Glcssmg 

SwingietL 

HAMBURG. Siaatoper. (tel: 
BALLET -Sept. 22, 25. 27:“Mozart 


BOLOGNA. Teatro defle Cdebra- 
ooni (td: 22J9.99). 

CONCERTS — Orchestra dd Teatro 
Com unale di Bologna— SepL 21 and 
22: O rmar Hags conductor (Sa tic, 
JXutok). 

FLORENCE. Masco Arcbeologieo 
(td:2I3L70x 

EXHIBITION — To Ocl 20: “The 

Etruscan Civilization.” 

■National Library, (Id: 28.7Q.48X . 


Sept. 27: Rotterdam PhflfiarmonicOr- 
J 8 ®*® Conlon . conductor, 
Mikhail Rndy piano (Debussy, Gi^. 

•Maison Descartes (tehZZtf fiSfl. 
EXHIBITION 

cartes ami The Netherlands.** • 

73 - 21 

BCHlBTnON —To SqjL29: “Retn- 
brandL drawings. - - 


EXHIBITION — To S«L 30L“Rabe- 
lais: Illustrations from toe 16th Ceniu- 


lais: Illustrations from 
rytothcPresenL” 


SCOltAND 


•Palazzo Piti (td: 2134.40X 
EXHIBITION — To SepL 29; “Mod- 
ern Masters from the Thyssen- Borne- 
miszcoHectioa: Corot, Manet, Piczs- 


EDINBURGH, National -Portrait 
suresof FVvie." 


MILAN, Palazzo delTArte Triennak 
(td: 862,44 m. 

EXHIBITIONS — Through Septem- 
ber: “The Alfa Romeo and Its Histo- 
ry.” “Mobil design: A Retrospective of 


SWITZBtLAND 


• EXHIBrnON — To JaiL SrSindiar ' 

To Oct. 1 3: “Kart Bodmer’s America^ -■ 

?’ li 111 .• °f Modem"'.; -Art / ■ 
ltel:70854J00j. /• 

EXHIBrrON — to Xkt ^ 

Schwirtcrs.” : < “r. 

S^FRANOSCXU^useuiQ rfhtod-ol 
«5^*M^863.88.0G1 . - j*"?’.- 

EXHIBITIONS — To Ocl fc'.fExr r.' 

b< Twentidh: f- 

dining Figure." • ■ 

enonlune.” .. . 

To Aprs 13: “ftfwate Uvra cWtf& C 
.Figures: The Nineteenih CenttinL^ 

Family PriaCT-. - . ■ *- v 

' •' 


POt.; 1 '; :'VI 


' r -"~ 

T?' 

i W 11 arr-. - 

- , 'i - . 


4lC<v f:. 'Dj’-' 










OGNEVA, Musfie de MAUi'ttf 




co-wtociw.JeanSS 

aoo (Beethoven, Rirrei^Kor^^^:- 




v 3rd ^ “ 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 


'f 




^^festaj 


•• r.. • w* , 7 ^®e- 

fen.; 

• - '-“xySQaAjL' 

Wi» 
‘V“ ,- B paisa? 
!'■ - 



• • -‘.io— ?’ fc^v 

icaav 
‘Vi :sw3siasj 
’-■ • T^sS.; 

••' :”iTil2B 

■.: ..: -• .■: 'Lci-ft; 

i * ■ * ■" l, .‘ il’liif" 

" .■ liKEli 

• . *.s l: 


■■ - /.« 

OflWW/ 1 f 



• ^ 


^5- 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 




NUKE most products and sa- 
yy 6 ?* value for money in air travel 
Dears no relation to how much yew 
. ■ P a y- especially when Hying first 
class:. At around twice the cost of business 
dMfi, up 10 three times that of full economy 
and sevat tunes the APEX fare, GretSaS* 
h** bai S ai n m the sky. however 
■nu^chainpagne and caviar you consume: 
LWi £ 5 an opportunity to stretch the 

^ VtTrvrin 5 the ^ *** premium you 
pay (51,000 or.. more on a trans-Atlantic 

£?“!? tnp) would keep most gastronauts in 
rood and drrak for several days. And given 
that standards of comfort and service in 
sou» ..business class cabins are almost as 
good as first class was in the early ’70s. it’s 
not stupri&ng that a growing number of 
e xecut ives (not to mention corporate trea- 
surers^ believe that this is the way to fly. 

Business class originated eight years ago 
to reward executives who paid full fare with 
a sepa rate cabin from the discount travelers; 
some airlines charge a premium for this,, 
some like KLM ana SAS do noL Most busi- 
ness class passengers are refugees from econ- 
omy while others have been downgraded 
front first class. Many companies now allow 
only their chief honchos to travel first class; 
everyone else must fly business class, except 
on very long-haul flights to the Far East. 
There has been a concomitant demise of first 
class on most short haul routes. Today, only 
Austrian, Iberia. Lufthansa and Swissair of- 
fer first class within Europe. (Jan Carizon. 
president of SAS, described the airline’s for- 
mer first class cabin on its DC-9s as “the 
most expensive management dinin g room in 
the world.” On average, seven of the eight 
seats held SAS executives. “Four years ago, 
there were 150 executives entitled to first 
class travel, now there’s a maximum of 20.” 
says a spokesman at SAS). 

Consequently, the front cabin has become 
even more exclusive. A few years ago. the 
first class cabin on a 747 would have 40 
seats; typically, this is now 2Q to 24 with 
business dass taking over the upper deck. 
SAS has only 16 first dass seats compared 
with 99 in business. KLM has 18 first class 
and 68 business dass on its standard 747s. 
Air France plans to reduce first class seats 
from . 28 to 24 when it introduces a new 
sleeper seat later this year. 

Comfort and frills in the air and on the 
ground are the competitive issues in the 
battle for the executive dollar. In 1 984, KLM 
installed its old-type first class seats in busi- 
ness dass. It's an mystifying arena or seal 
pitches, self-adjusting foot rests and cabin 
configurations. TWA recently spent almost 
SS million on advertising its ergonomically 
designed business dass “lounger” seat Both 
TWA and Pan Am have upgraded business 
dass cabins to a six-across arrangement. 
Most airlines now offer Long-haul business 
dass passengers free limos and helicopters at 
their main nubs. Some provide executive 
lounges at airports. With these frills, what’s 
so special about first d ass? 

The exclusive luxury of first class is space. 
{“Y ou pay three times the price for five times 
the room,” says Peter Jod, London-based 
spokesman for Pan Am), And the opportuni- 
ty io get a good night’s sleep in a redunng 
seat that streches across five windows. Japan 
Air Lines and Philippine Airlines actually 
offer a real bed. Trans-Atlantic flights are 


, Privacy 

like (he chic restaurant that has become so 
crowded nobody goes there anymore. 

According to a recent survey by the Inter- 
national Airline Passengers Association, 41 
p e r c en t of its members outside North Amer- 
ica fly business. dass. double the number 
three years ago. This increase comes mainly 
at the expense of economy. The number of 
first dass passengers has declined from IS. I 
to 12^6 percent. 

This reflects a markedly less benevolent 
attitude by most corporations toward first 
travel In general. Bx 


class I 


. In general. European companies 



Users range from 
business leaders 
to hedonists 


(especially British) ore more conscious or 
hierarchical privilege than their counterparts 
in North America, where who gets to fly first 
glass depends much more on how long the 
flight, irrespective of rank. Says Peter Long, 
travel manager of Rown tree- Macintosh, the 
British confectionary group: “Our travel po- 
licy is under review. The day is not far off 
when only directors will go first class. 
. . . We're even thinking of business dass 
for the Far East now ” 

The London-based manager of a U. S. oil 
company says that a new policy since the end 
of last year precludes anyone — except for 
the chairman — from flying first dass on any 
trip of less than 10 hours. “It used to be six 
hours, but we raised it when some people 
started creeping under the curtain by start- 
ing their journey to Los Angeles from Aber- 
deen,” he says. For one U.S. pharmaceutical 
company, the rule is that anyone — whether a 
director or a technician — flies first dass if 
the trip is longer than eight and a half hours. 
On the other hand, a senior executive of a 
major Swiss drug firm says that “only mem- 
bers of the divisional management board 
end above go First class." 

Africa is one pan of the world where first 
dass cabins are invariably crowded with 
executives and local government people. 
This is because many airlines flying to and 
across Africa just have two classes, economy 
and first. Says an executive of a major U. K. 
travel agency: “I thought at one time that 
first dass would disappear, but I don't think 
it wiU, not with sleeperettes. When 1 came 
back from Smith Africa in the beginning of 
June, it was chock-a-block up front, includ- 
ing Bishop Tutu and other African diplo- 
mats and politicians.” 

Air France, in a motivational research 
study, has identified three main groups of 
first dass passengers: Business leaders, who 
have “natural authority and attach impor- 
tance to the symbols of power”; pragmatics, 
“more managers than policymakers, who ap- 
preciate efficiency and total discretion on 
board,” and hedonists, “for whom a first 
class flight is a ritualistic ceremony at which 
they are guests and officiating at the- same 
time” and for whom cabin crew members are 
“mediators of reality.” _ 

TWA puts it more simply. There's the 
businessman, who feds he has earned the 
right to fly first class, the aristocrat, well- 
heeled. who enjoys the meals and service and 
the “nouveau nche, for want of a belter 
word, who enjoys the psychological and 
-‘-ysical rewards. 


felt. According to John Herbert, director of 
public relations at SAS. professional first 
dass passengers don’t use the amenities that 
seem to be so attractive, drinks and meals. 
It’s yeDow legal pads and sleep. What they 
most appreciate is the privacy. By contrast, 
as one wag puts it, business dass has become 


f you are. not in any of these categories, 
don’t despair. You can find excellent bar- 
gains in discounted first dass tickets at up to 
30 percent off the published fare. Or else you 
can start your own airline: There's a conven- 
tion that airline presidents get unlimited first 
dass travel on any airline in the world. ■ 


TRAVEL 



Page 9 


Change in the Kitchen, Continuity at Table 


P ARIS — One entirely positive aspect 
of this city’s changing restaurant 
scene is that classic ana reliable res- 
taurants rarely die, they just change 

hands. 

Such is the case with three personal favor- 
ites: Le Globe d'Or near the Louvre, La 
Coquille near Porte Maillot, and Au Cochon 
d’Or in the heart of Lcs Halles. All three 
restaurants have been around for decades; 

Patricia Wells 

all ore homey, friendly places serving a 
hearty, dependable bistro-type cuisine. Each 
bos changed hands during the last few 
months, yet each establishment's distinct 
character and personality has been carefully 
maintained. 

The new owners of Le Globe d’Or ore 
Christiane and G&rard Constiaux. an outgo- 
ing young couple who moved around ibe 
first of the year from the restaurant Vallon 
de Verooe in the city's Alesia district. Gerard 
Constiaux comes from Ages, where his food- 
loving family instilled in him a fondness for 
the local bams, the tiny and flavorful echo- 
lore grist* (the prized French shallot, admired 
for its role as an aromatic garnish), and aged 
goat cheese, enveloped in us traditional syc- 
amore-leaf wrapping. 

The chef is a passionate man, and his love 
for food is readily transferred from kitchen 
to table. What he loves best are the warming, 
rustic dishes that remind him of home. One 
such specialty currently on the menu is the 
wonderfully simple, full-flavored jambon de 
pays grille d Fechalote. The chef marinates 
sliced shallots in oil Tor several hours to 
soften and sweeten them. Then he grills 
slices of ham lightly on both sides, seasons 
them with the marinated shallots and a 
sprinkling of red wine vinegar. The dish is 
covered and set to steep for several minutes. 


served with a fine side dish of pan- 
potatoes; the fabulous petit sale ae cc 
(duck is marinated for three days is an ] 


then showered with minced chives. Add to it 
a green salad, a glass of the house Madiran. 
and you're in heaven. 

There are some dishes, though, that are 
deemed ioo rustic for polite Parisian compa- 
ny. “This time of year at home,” says Con- 
stiaux. “we like to rub toast with panic, dip 
the bread in oil, and eat it with freshly picked 
chasselas grapes.” 

He would love to serve the dish, but can't 
imagine sending a proper businessman back 
into the world reeking of garlic. 

However, diners with a bent for the rustic 
will love his tomates farcies ( tomatoes stuffed 
with well-seasoned ground meat and topped 
with the marvelous local ham): bis light 
confii de pare, smothered with shallots and 
served with a fine side dish of pan-fried 

canard 
i herb- 

rich salt solution, then cooked until moist 
and lender); and the cold, sliced duck confit, 
served with potatoes and tomatoes. A special 
salute to the chef: Although the dishes are 
mealy, they are neither fatty nor heavy. For 
dessert, trv the extraordinary traditional pas- 
tis. paper-thin layers of pastry laced with 
apples and ormagnac. 

Less traditional, but equally appealing of- 
ferings include grilled goat cheese with a 
lovely green salad, and a stunning charlotte 
aux fruits rouges. 

The chef has an extensive collection of old 
postcards, the best of which he has enlarged 
and framed to decorate bis cozy restaurant. 
Also note the antique plum-drying rack that 
hangs above the bar. Miniature versons of 
the harp-shaped wooden racks ore used to 
serve their fresh cabecous goat cheese, served 
with walnut bread. 

Like the previous owner of Le Globe d'Or, 
the chef continues the bouse tradition of 
serving cassoulet every Thursday. Here it is 
the Castelnaudary version, laced with toma- 


toes and mutton, a convention Constiaux 
follows, at least for the moment. 

O VER the years, some of my most 
pleasant Parisian dinners have taken 
place ax La Coquille, the small and 
cozy restaurant run for years by the outgoing 
Paid Blache and his daughter Catherine. 
When they decided to retire some months 
back, I feared it was the end of an era and 
that I had lost the first and last neighbor- 
hood bistro of my life. 

Well. I returned recently, to a pleasant 
surprise. In the hands of the new owners, 
Clement and Marie-Ther&se Lausecker, La 
Coquille is as alive and well as ever. Pierre Le 
Moullac. the well-informed and good-hu- 
mored maitre d’bdtel still scurries about with 
great professional aplomb. The rest of Lhe 
stuff, in the kitchen and the dining room, has 
remained in place. Best of all. the menu is 
still filled with dishes I’ve learned to love, 
tike the well-seasoned boudin noir (blood 
sausage) served with a variety of mustards, 
the perfect grilled fish (this time it was whole 
turbo tin, served with a pleasantly buttery 
sauce), and the famous hazelnut souffle. In a 
few weeks, the classic coquilfes Saint-Jacques 
(simply baked in their shell with a touch of 
herbs and butter) and a variety of game will 
be added to the fall and winter menu. The 
Lausedcers have brought along some fine old 
bottles of Bordeaux, and plan, slowly, to add 
some personal touches to the menu. But for 
now. La Coquille is as it was, a sterling 
example of a neighborhood Parisian bistro. 

As the seemingly endless construction 
continues around Lcs Holies, some of the 
fine, old-time establishments are beginning 
to get lost in a jumble of glass and metal. 
Tourists continue to flock to places like Au 
Pied de Cochon for their obligatory onion 
soup, while at dinner tables go empty at one 


of the neighborhood's most pleasant spots. 
Au Cochon d’Or des Halles. In recent 
months, the restaurant's direction has been 
taken over by Robert Viart, the former mal- 
ire d'hdiel. He’s a friendly, chatty fellow, 
who assists the amiable Swiss- born waitress' 
in the tiny ground-floor dining room. 

Go when you're really hungry, in a meaty 
mood and be prepared to sample a little bit 
of everything from their classic bistro menu. 
For starters, there’s a fine salade frisee aux 
Iordans lopped with a perfectly poached egg; ‘ 
a formidable serving of bone marrow (moelle 
pochee a la croque au sel) for spreading on 
toast and sprinkling with chives and coarse . 
salt; and a classic jambon persillee, accompa- 
nied by properlv puckery comichons. 1 have 
rarely sampled better roast lamb chops 
(carre d'agneau r&ti d tetragon) or grilled 
veal kidneys, and beef eaters will certainly 
want to try either the cote de boeuf with bone 
marrow sauce or the special beef of the day. 
accompanied by a lovely shallot butter. For' 
dessert, try the marquise au chocolat, a car- 
bon copy of the incredible chocolate dessert 
made famous by Tail! event- With the meaL 
sample the 1981 Chateau Ramage-la-Ba- 
tisse, an up-and-coming Bordeaux cru bour- 
geois, well-priced at 83 francs a bottle. 

Le Globe d’Or, 158 Rue Saint-Honore, Par- 
is /; tel: 260.23.37. Closed Saturday and Sun- 
day. Credit cards: American Express, lisa. 
From 200 to 250 francs a person, including 
wine and service. 

La Coquille, 6 Rue du Debarcad&re, Paris 
17; tel: 574.25.95. Closed Sunday and Mon- 
day . Credit card: Visa. From 275 io 325 francs 
a person, including wine and service. 

A u Cochon d'Or des Halles, 31 Rue du Jour, 
Paris 1 ; tel: 236.38.31 . Closed Saturday’ lunch 
and Sunday. Credit cards: American Express, 
Diners Club, Visa. From 200 to 250 francs a 
person, including wine and service. ■ 


Michener 

detailed directions, but three generations of 
her family history.” 

When not on the road he kept to his 
routine of sitting at the typewriter from early 
morning until noon. But this time. Midi- 
ener’s typed drafts were photocopied for the 
staff — the administrative secretary, Lisa 
Kaufman, Kings. Wooster, and the second 
researcher. Frank de la Teja — which would 
have lengthy meetings with the author. They 
offered suggestions on everything from char- 
acter consistency to style, which Michener 
frequently incorporated into revised drafts. 

He insists that every word is his, but he 
admits, “I don’t think the way 1 write books 
is the best or even the second-best- The really 
great writers are people like Emily Bronte 
who sit in a room and write out of their 
limited experience and unlimited imagina- 
tion. But people in ray position also do some 
very good work. I'm not a stylist like John 
Updike or Saul Bellow, and don't aspire to 
be. I'm not interested in plot or pyrotech- 
nics. but 1 sure work to get a steady flow. 

“Texas,” of course, is long since finished 
for Michener, but wherever he goes, there are 
Texans impatient to learn how this famous 
outsider has treated their stale. Michener 
seems to enjoy the chauvinism, adopting just 
a trace of it now that Austin is borne. He 
takes along his cowboy hat as he and Kings 
go off to the nearby town of Dripping 
Springs, out toward the hBl country and the 
ranch of the real-estate developer and long- 
horn breeder H. C. Carter. 


T HE occasion is a barbecue for Car- 
ter's employees, and when the crowds 
arrive, Michener is suddenly among a 
cross section of his readership — they defy 
categorization by age, sex or class, but these 


Jewish Enclave on an Arab Island 


by Steve Siflrin 


it 


H ARA SEGHIRA. Tunisia — In- 
side, the elderly barefoot men sit 
on the benches and straw mats, 
their backs against the pillars that 
hold up the many arches that decorate the 
ceiling, and murmur melodic Hebrew pray- 
ers. Outside, the Saharan beat bounces off 
the ice-white walls of the synagogue where 
one of the world’s oldest and most isolated 
Jewish communities comes to worship. And 
a Tunisian guard sits in his booth, an auto- 
matic weapon leaning against the walL 
When the Babylonian monarch Nebu- 
chadnezzar destroyed Jerusalem in 586 B.C„ 
burning the first temple, some of the Ko- 
hanim- Jewish biblical priests, fled across 
Egypt and sought refuge on the desert island 
of Djerba. Other versions of lhetr origin 
place the emigration from Jerusalem alter 
the second temple was destroyed in 70 AX>.. 
or a combination of the two. 

Two of the villages they founded on the 
island remain populated by the direct de- 
scendants of the refugees: Hare Seghua and 
Hara Kebira. It is said that the Jews who fled 
to Djerba carried a door and some srones 

Griba (The Marvelous). 

The synagogue, which is open to the pub- 
tic™ dTffible by bus or mt tom 
■Dierba’s largest city, Houmet es^Souk, was 
Bin 1920. The modem version is com- 
posed of the room where the prayer «»ders 
ston heavy wooden benches, relax, talkand 
rad from Ute Torah. The walls are hmd with 
cooling blue ceramic tiles and ““J^nfts 
* the air There is a plaque commemo- 
rating a visit that President Habib Bourgui- 
ba of Tunisia made to the tonpJe. . 
visitors who introduce themsdve are grett' 
ed uoon arrival by a barefoot rabbi who sits 
hands on <hen 

and says a blessing over them. 

=a55Bgraag 

P SSTage. Behind them is 

Soredoneof 

Across fromjhc 

white traveler s interior court- 

But moa 



SOun 


In the inner sanctum. 

visitors stay at the numerous tourist hotels 
on the beaches of Djerba. The synagogue is 
about five miles (eight kilometers) from 
Houmet es-Souk: a UMninute taxi ride cost- 
ing Jess than two dinars (about $2 JO). 

The pilgrimage is a celebration of the 
founding of La Griba, and includes com- 
memoration of a miracle that is said to have 
taken place there, according to which a 
young girl of mysterious origin was sponta- 
neously enveloped in flames; she died, but 
without her body being burned by the fire. 
During the weeklong festival, there are elab- 
orate candle-lighting rituals involving a huge 
multi-tiered menorah, and pilgrims leave 
eggs on the site of the miracle to ensure that 
an unmarried woman will find a husband 
within the year. 

There is nothing outwardly unusual about 
the rest of the villages. But their interest ties 
in the Jewish communities that still maintain 
their traditions in the heart of the Arab 
world. (Hara Seghira was renamed Erriadh 
in 1981 by the Djerba municipal council, and 
Hara Kebira was renamed As-Sswani.) 

Although the Jewish population of Djerba 
after Worid War II numbered approximate- 
ly io,000, now Hara Kebira (the Big Village) 
has 700 inhabitants, and Hara Seghira, (the 
Little Village) 300. The decrease in popula- 
tion is not due to assimilation or intermar- 
riage, of which there has been virtually none. 


but to constant departures, mostly for Israel 

Are these communities disappearing? “I 
think it’s fair to say that,” says Abraham L. 
Udovitch. professor of Near Eastern studies 
at Princeton University and co-author, with 
Lucette Valensi, of “The Last Arab Jews,” 
about the Jewish communities of Djerba, 
published this year by Harwood Academic 
Publishers. 

“These were the last integral communi- 
ties .. . there are stiD Jews in North Africa, 
individually and in small groups. But as a 
community that maintained its traditional 
values, we wanted to study it while it was still 
there. Slowly people are beginning to leave. 
At some point, it’s questionable whether 
there’ll be enough people there to maintain 
it,” Udovitch said. 

Valensi, professor at the Ecole des Hautes 
Etudes en Sciences Social es in Paris, says 
that the Djerban Jews co-exist with their 
Arab neighbors in an atmosphere of “recip- 
rocal distrust” 

Udovitch points out some concrete exam- 
ples of that distrust: “In the past two de- 
cades, every time something happens in the 
Middle East, there is tension. In 1982, during 
the Israeli invasion of Lebanon, some were 
seriously threatened in their houses and 
shops.” The Jews living in Zarris, a city not 
far from the island on mainlan d T unisia, he 
says, were moved to Djerba for protection. 
And a synagogue was burned in Hara Kebira 
in I97S after a school fight between a Mos- 
lem boy and a Jewish boy. 

| HE Djerban Jews are reluctant to 
discuss politics with visitors. Udo- 
vitch says they are apolitical but that 
they look upon the 82-year-old Bourguiba as 
the guarantor of their safety, and after his 
death there might be some “insecurity.” 

“But they codld hang on for another 20 
years,” he says. “They nave a pretty good 
birth rate.” And Valensi points out that 
recently the Djerban Jews have not only 
been emigrating, to Israel but to Tunis, 
where they marry within the group and thus 
maintain and perpetuate the community. 

What will happen to the synagogue when 
no one is left? “We can’t take it with us.” 
says a young Jewish jeweler who plans to 
leave for Israel after he marries, thus qualify- 
ing for a reduced term of military service 
there. But emigre Djerban Jews have copied 
the •‘Malicious’’ synagogue in various sites 
around Israel, using the original as a model 
not the rebuilt 1 920 version. 

La Griba is men to visitors all year front 9 to 
12 and from 5 to 4. Services are held on 
Saturdays from 7 to 9, when the ancient Torah 
is taken out. ■ 


Continued from page 7 

ore people who read for information. Sitting 
in the sun among them, Michener looks tike 
a tourist in a For Eastern-style yellow prim 
shin never meant to go with a Stetson, and 
people approach him shyly. A junior-college 
teacher says she assigns pan of “Centennial” 
to liven up American history; a young man 
says, “My grandmother can’t wait to read 
Texas.’ * 

Although Carter has known Michener for 
just a few years, he illustrates the way Mich- 
ener surrounds himself with people who un- 
derstand him. For example. Carter recog- 
nizes Michener’s dual need both for privacy 
and adulation: “He wants to be recognized, 
but is a very low-key way. He'd never push 
himself forward and say. ‘You probably 
don’t know who I am. I’m James Michener.* 
But nobody can be that good without having 
a big ego. He didn't have to stay here in 
Texas for three years to write one book, but 
if you feel the book can't be unsuccessful, 
that's what you do. He wants to be popular 


and he wants people to think he's good, but 
he does the best job of saying it doesn't 
matter. I don't believe that, but l love to see a 
guy have it down so perfect.” 

Those close to Michener realize how diffi- 
cult it is to get to know him, and some 
anticipate the charges of coldness his vague- 
ness about his past might bring. Owen Last- 
for 17 


er. his agent 


s, recalls that the 


' years, 

distracted tendency that strangers notice is 
nothing new: “When we first started work- 
ing together, he sometimes seemed preoccu- 
pied, as if he was not interested in anything 
you had to say. Not knowing him at the time, 
I interpreted that as coldness, but it wasn’t 
It’s just that his mind never stops. He was 
taking everything in, but wasn't reacting. I 
came to realize he is as warm and generous as 
anyone I’ve ever known.” 

On balance, the novelist's reaction to his 
monumental success would have to be called 
humble. Again and again. Michener’s con- 
versation turns to the difficulties facing 
young writers. He recently donaled $2 mil- 
lion to Swarlhmore and endowed a S 500,000 
fund for the Writers’ Workshop at the Uni- 
versity of fowa. True to Michener’s let’s-get- 
results approach, the fellowships at Iowa are 


not for beginning students; they primarily 
support those at the end of their studies who 
have proven themselves with nearly publish- 
able manuscripts. 

Contemplating art and artists, he recalls 
Hemingway’s suicide: “The death of Hem- 
ingway raises a fabulous number of ques- 
tions. It was so contrary to his public image, 
there is a failure to mesh with inis enormous 
tragedy. I didn't know Hemingway well but 
I knew his wotk and 1 knew his public figure. 
It fooled me.” 

Guiding the discussion easily between 
himself and Hemingway, this man who 
claims not to care about his own posterity 
warns about the deceptions of public images 
and at the same lime presents an image of 
himself that is as pure and ample as the 
message of his books. “You must remember, 
you've heard all these guesses about me. I am 
a far more simple mechanism than the guess- 
es would imply.” 

And, with a command of his public perso- 
na that Hemingway might have admired, 
“I'm just a guy up on a hill writing.” ■ 

This was excerpted from an article in The 
New York Times Magazine. 


President Ranald Reagan. 


Colonel Moamer QadhafL 




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20-9-85 | 




J 






Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


RctlVck 

Cillers 

IBM 

AT&T 

AnvE*o 

HewIPk 

Amrlch 

Tro*rer 

Moiono 

GenEi 

Bccrtco 

Dhillol 

CIDoia 

Moron, 


VoL 

High Lew 

Last 

eng. 

15107 

Si’s 

44'. 

47 

—3 

15921 

41* 

41 

11 >■ 

+ 

14871 

129 

126’: 

1277. 

+ ft 

Hera 

21% 

201. 

21 ■! 

■*. s- 

11758 

42 

407. 

41 ft 

+l’i 

11454 

»>b 

33 

33% 

— ’< 

10194 

91% 

39% 

91'.- 

+1% 

99|4 

4J/s- 

40L 

40ft 


95b4 

35 ft 

33% 

35 

fl'S 

•518 

50'. 

49% 

M 

+ ft 

9107 

59% 

W 

59' a 

— % 

7778 

33'-. 

33 

33V: 

+ V: 

’698 

IMW 

106 

108ft 

+3% 

7440 

19 

IS' ■ 

18% 


7357 

45% 

45* 

45% 

+ ft 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open High Low Lad Che. 

irxJuf 129BJ4 I312J9S 1 2?1.22 IMo.3? + bJ« 

Irons 04129 tS8.ll' MjJO tStOl + S7J 

•Jill 153 36 IMU 152AQ 153. #3 + 0.41 

Comp 53JJ0 530X9 iMJ5 53b S4 + IK 


NYSE Index 


High Low Clou Ch-n 
Cwmoosjlo 106.00 106.10 106X0 + I 00 

industrials 121^4 121*1 121*4 + 1 J? 

Tronsp ID4.16 im.10 103.05 +1.13 

55.73 SSJ7 55.73 +0*0 

Finance 109X4 108X0 10026 +122 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages I 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Close 

7057 

7658 

8256 


Ch'ge 
+ 0X1 
+ 0X6 
— 0X4 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

Total issues 

New Highs 
New Lows 
Volume up 
V olume down 


1080 

440 

454 

1*74 

IS 

34 

68.784X90 

18X70.260 


Prrr. 

658 

B72 

481 

7011 

16 

56 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Sept. 18 
Sear. 17 
Sept. 16 
Seal. 13 
Sept. 13 


Buy Sales 
149JIB 379X26 
U9J15 371,944 
133X95 323X46 
1 5050 1 439,888 
452.713 412271 


•included In the soles figures 


•Sh'rt 

5X34 

1238 

1X42 

1.140 

1275 


Thursdays 

NISE 

Closing 


VoLotf PM 100220X05 

Prev.4PM.vol 105210X00 

Prer consolidated close 126X63240 


Tablet include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


Close 

380 

176 

235 

791 

7 

a 

4.000265 

1,908.955 


Prev. 

206 

320 

241 

776 


Standard & Poor's Index 


High Low Close Ch'ge 
Industrial* 2042* 20258 20429 +1X1 

Tramp. 167.18 16454 16654 + l.«6 

UTimtSs 812* £55 8)20 +023 

Finance 50.95 205* 20.95 +026 

Composite 18350 181.71 18139 +158 



13 Month 
High Lew Stack 


ClOSB 

QUPt.OTge 


24Je 16 AAR 
17% 9% AGS 

16* ,7% A MCA 
31% 13 AMF 
261* AMR 
W? 18% AMR of 
2»y a anrpi 

14ft 7% APL 
61% 34% ASA 
27 114* AVX 

28% 19% AZP 
60 »% AblLdb 


25 15 
13 


218 9A 
267 115 

200 52 
22 26 
272 115 


18 


104 22% 21% 2T'b + X, 

143 16% 16% 16% 

5 10% 10% 10% + % 

482 13% 13% 13% 

4814 41% 4011 41% + % 

414 23'i 23% 23V. — ■ g 

1 23% 23% 23V, 

S 8% 8% B% — % 

403 37% 37 37% + % 

34 12% 12 12V! + V! 

620 23V 23% 23% 


150 25 16 1941 55% S4* SSft +1 

25% 20 AccoWd s JO 13 16 9B 21% 30*1 31% + % 

?1% 12* AcmeC M) 29 15 14 . 13% 14 + % 

1.92ell2 30 17% 17 17 

22 IX 7 4 ?T’.j IT*-! 17% + * 

53t 29 19 389 13V 13% 13% + % 

17 7050 28% 77% 37% + * 

.12 IX 1* 176 Sift 8% B%— % 

11 211 13 13% 13 + % 

254 5.9 15 2556 44% 43% 44% +1% 

5X8O10A TO 55V! 55% 55% + % 

1 JO 35 8 1330 30V! 29% 30% + % 

103 2% 2V: 2% 

1.20 23 12 — — 

M 2.7 13 
.10e 5J 


.16 

JS 

Jb 

120 

120 

1X0 


19 If* AdoE 

20 13% AdmMI 

17% 8% AdvSv* 

22% AMD 
12* 6% Advegl 

15% 9% Aerflex 
<9% 32% AetnLI 
5JJ! STft AetLpf 
37% 20'/; Ahmns 
3% 21* Alleen 
57 42 AlrPrd 

74% 14 AlrbFrl 

.2* _>% AlArtoo s 

33% 37% AlaP PlA 192 129 
8% 6% AloPdof X7 11.1 

83 64V AlaP ot 9X0 115 

74 59 AlaP at 

75 58V AlaP Ct 
16% 11% Alogsco 
26% 11% AiSSTF 
25 JP;7 Albrfos 
Bft 26% Alblsns 
31* Alcan 
38% 271* AlcaStd 

33 21 AlexAlx 

££}! 20% Alendr 
89% 72ft AllgCe 
fflV 50V Ala Ini — 

20% 16% Alain at 219 133 

98 85 Alai pfCIlXS 121 

34% 26% Alla Pm 2.70 9X 9 

23% 15% AllenG ton 29 14 
115% 103% AldCn pfl2X0 10.9 
105% 100% AldCol 1 1 57el 1 A 

23V 15% APIdPd 11 

AlaSpnn 
Aids PlA 

AldSpIC 6X4 1TX 
60'1 46V AlldSir 212 4X 7 
11 3% AlllsCh 

34% 24 AlisC Pi 
29% 21% ALLTL 
39% 39% Alcoa 
20 13% Amu 

34 22% AmHn 

2% 1% AmAirr 

23V 16 ABakr 

70 56% A Brand 

30% 25% ABrdPi 
116V 56% ABdcsl 
30% 19% ABIdM 
28V; 20% ASusPr 

M% 473, AmCan 

25% 22 ACanot 280 11J 
52% 47% ACan a I 3.00 63 
20% 17% ACOpBd 120 129 
30% 2S% ACopCv ZSle 9 X 


8.16 11X 
838 11.9 
1X4 7_5 10 
X 8 
1.9 16 
2B 11 
4.7 26 
17 II 
3A 

21 

1X41 20 
1X0 


1X4 

120 

.101 

1.10 


290 

275 

1*0 

56 


63 9 151 
33 30 1421 
966 

4X 21 1228 
219 
9 58 

63 
9* 


294 52% 52% 52% + % 

267 22% 22% 22% 

172 1% 1% 1% + Is 

14 30% XV 30% + V. 

63 8 7% 7% 

200! 78 78 78 + % 

1001 70 69 69 —3 

S0r69% 69% 69% 

21 13% 1J% 13% + '• 

827 20 19% 19% + V 

? 70V 20% 70V 

338 27V j 27% 27*8— % 
692 75% 35% 25’! + % 
145 32V! 32 32% — % 

1828 28V 27% 27% + V 

14 24 33% 23% — V 

4 77 77 77 

207 21% 21 21% + % 

9 17’.® ir,« 17% + % 

4 92% 92% 977* + % 

875 2*V! 28% 29% + % 

SO 21 20% 20% — % 

131 110 108% 110 +1U 

164 101% 101% 101% + V 
3 17% 17% 17% + H 

5726 42% 42 42% 

9 62 62 62 

137 63 61 61% 

3*6 53% 53% 53% + % 

252 3"! 3% 37* + % 

5 29V 29 3'.. + V, 

28'V26% 28% +1% 
34% 33% 33?* + % 

14% 14% 14% + V 

28V 25V 2d* + % 

1% 1% 1% 

__ 21% 21ft 21% + V 
379 57V 56% 57V + ft 
28% 28% 28% 


Prices Advance in Light Trading 


Z*0 


TA U 
SJ 10 


11 6% ACenfC 

57% 44% AC van 
27V 18% ADT 
24% 18% AElPw 
49% 77 AmExD 
25% 12% AFaml s AS 
36V 22% AGnCo 1X0 
It 6% AGnl wt 
56% 51% AGnJpfAi87elOA 
96V! 64% AGnl pIB SjSOe 6.9 
71% 45% AGnPtD 2*4 4* 
36% 26% AHertl U0 3* 10 
17% 7% AHoiSt 

66ht 46% AHame 2X0 
47% 26V AHOSO 1.12 
97% 72ft Amrfch 6*0 
90V 62 AlnGro M 
ISO 112% AIGppI 5X5 
28% 18% AMI .72 
4% 2% AmMOl 

29 16% APrusds 50 

13-b 5 ASLFlO 11 

1B% 12V ASLFI ot 2.19 14* 

16 11% AShio XO 5.9 10 

35% 26% AmSId 1*0 5.7 9 
67% 15% AmSfar *4 12 ID 
78 46% A Stmt A 4J8 65 

57% 51 ASlrpfB 6X0 111 


43 21 


24% 17V AT 


414* 32V AT&T pf 3*4 
42 33V AT&T Pf 3.74 

27V 16% AWatrs 1X0 
13 V 10 AWOlPt 1X5 ... 
28% 17% AmHoll 2*0 117 
72% 60ft ATrPr 
IB 6% ATrSc 
89V 67ft ATrUn 
40% 26% Aneron 
50 24% AmesO 

29% 19% Ameiek 
28% 18% Amtoc 
16 5 Arrtfesc 

6* 50V Amoco 

37?, 28% AMP 
2J% lift Amoco 
234k 12% Amreos 
36 22V AmSIh 

45V 30 Amsied 
4V 1% Anocmo 
34% 16V Anlog 
27% 19V Anchor 
46V 30 AnClov 
13% 9% AndrGr 2A 
77V 17 Angelic *0 
34% 21% Anheuss XO 
71% 48V Anheupt 3*0 
194* 13% Anixtr Xfi 
16% 9 Anthem X 4 

15% 10% Anlhny 
12V 9% Aooche 


I* 17 2303 11SV 114% 116V— % 
3.7 14 28 33V 23 23V + % 

J 2 261* 26 26'* + V 

i 54V 54% 54% + % 

3 24% 24V 24-4— % 

14 47V 47V 47V + V 

II 20% 20 20% + % 

9 27% 77V® 77% 

64b 6% 6% — % 

1.90 17 13 1153 51V 50% 51% + % 

.92 19 23 133 23% 23% 23%— Vi 

2X6allJ 8 1724 20% 20% 20% + % 
1.20 3.1 14 11758 42 40V 41V +1% 

2.1 IS 236 23% 23% 23% + % 

13 9 1936 30 29V 29% + % 

6) UV II 11% + V 

4 55% 55 55V» + % 

41 SO 79% 79% + V 

39 bO'u 59% 594b— lb 

3 33% 33% 33% 

153 10% *44 10% + % 
5.0 12 1157 58% 58% 58% + % 

2 A 15 2553 47 46V 47 + \t 

77 9 1D194 91V B9V 91% +14. 
5 22 706 85% 83% 854* +24b 
11 IS 142 IX 142 +4 

12 11 2646 22V 22% 22% + % 

359 3% 3 3 

267 17> 17% 17% — V 
13 6V 6% 64* 

24 151s 14% 15 + % 

228 13% 13% 134b + % 

609 2BV 27V 2B — V 

968 55% 55V 55V— % 

2 67V 67Y4 67V 

12 56 56 56 

5* 16 12677 714b 20% 21% + % 


2X 


1X0 


310 40 


40 


8 



40V 40% 40V + % 
33 25V; 25V 25V + V 

SK 12V 12V 12V + V 

65 17% 17% 17%— V 

63 4B% 67V 68% +1V 

12V 12V 12V + % 
80% 80% 80% +1 
36% 36V 36% + % 
44% 42% 444b +1% 
21 20% 20V + lb 

24% 24% 24%— \j 
_ 5V 5 5 

2562 65% 63V 65 +1 

31%+lV 


22 4767 32 30% 


13 



2 % AnchPwt 

19% 15% AodtPunZIO 17-5 
74% 57 ApPwpf 8.12 11* 

2b 21% ApPwpt 2*5 105 
34% 29 ApPw Pt 4.18 12* 

31 Vb 26V ApPwpf 3X0 1Z~ 
39% 21% AplOta 1.761 ... 
15% 8% ApdMa . f? 

24V 16V Arch On .140 J 12 
“ ArIP pf 9X3e 9X 


100% 71 
30V 25 


25% ArlPPit 


d 8 


102 80 ArlPaf 

24% 14 ArkBst 

24 V 16 Ark la 

% V ArlnRI 
15% 11% Armada 
12 6V Arm co 
24% 13% ArmsRb *8 3* 8 

XV 26% ArrnWIn 1X0 3* 9 

34V* 21V AroCo 1X0 4J 9 

23 12% ArowE 20 U 17 

30V 16 Artra 73 

27 15 Arvlns X0 

27V 17% Aiarco 

37 23V AshlQll 1*0 

44 V 34% AshIO pf 3X6 

34V 24% AsdDG s 1*0 

24V 184* AIMone 1*0 

29V 21V AtCvEl 258 

64V 42 AtlRICh 4X0 

101% 32% AIIRcpI 2X1* 2X 

153 100% AHRc pf 2X0 10 
17V 10% AtlOSCp 
29% 18V Augat 
54V 34% AutoDI 
5'A 4 1 i Avalon n 

31V 17% AVEMC 

39% 28V A verv 

34% 10 Avion n 

XV 27 Avngt 

25% 17% Avon 

28% 16% Avdin 


.. .. . 31% +' 

16 9 12% 12 12 — % 

9 16 19V 19% 19V + V 

9 31 33 32% 33 + % 

207 42% 42V 42V— % 
1238 T\ 2 V TV— % 
475 20% 20 20% + % 

76 25V. 24?, 25V + Vi 

35 XV 39% 39%— % 

15 11% 13 13 — % 

-- - 56 25 24% 24% + % 

2J 12 4786 31% 30% 31% + % 

‘ 64V 64 64V + V 

16V 16 16V + % 

13 12% 13 + % 

14% 14% 14% 

11 10V 10% + % 

1% l 1 — Vb 

18% 18V IBli— % 

100* 70 70 70 — V 

27 25% 25V 25V + Vb 

5 33% 33% 33% + % 

1 30 X 30 

8X 21 352 22% 21% 211* + % 

60 12% 12% 17% + % 

845 19% 19% 19% — % 

iQooQziootb 100% 100% 

3X8 12X 18 29V 29% 29V + V 

UU0 1U 8Di 95 95 95 —1 

27 9 345x22% 21 22% +1% 

5.1 28 1541 21% 70% 21 + % 

loO tl — 

3 IT* 11% 11% 

320 9% 9 9% + % 

30 14% 14 14% + % 

1101 34 32% 34 +1% 

77 27% 27 27% + % 

T3x 13V 13% 13V + % 
79 22V! 22 22% + % 

95 23% 23% 23% — % 

5435 21% 20% 20V — % 
497 33% 33V* 33% + % 
29 42% 421b 42% 

900 33% 32% 32Vi — V 
8 19% 19V 19V— % 
107 27 26V 26% 

3708 59% 58% 59% + % 
lOOzIOI'A 101 V 101V— V 

4 141% 141% 141% +1% 

7 12 12 12 — % 

IX 23V 23V 23V + % 

765 52V 51 52% + V 

42 5 4% 5 

26 30V 30% XI! 

485 31 XV 30V»— % 
83 24% 24V 24V 

463 32% 31% 32% + V 

8J 12 4012 24 V 23% 24% + V 
18 60 21% 31V 21% + » 


S3 

2X0 


IX IX 
3* 9 

4J 

9* 

4J 11 
B.t 11 
9* 9 
L7 


1.7 24 
IX 21 
9 

2X IS 
2X 12 
13 

IX 23 


B 


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.92 

J6 


2* 9 

5X 14 
1J 14 


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J2 

2*0 

X0 

1X0 

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8.1 9 
11 12 
5* 7 
SX 

3 J3 59 
7-2 14 


14V 7% BMC 
35% 22 Bairn co 

19 15 Bkrinll 

24V 18% Bolder 

2% % v|BaldU 

10 2 viBldU Pf 

61% 3SV BallCp 1*4 
30V 17% Ball Cowl 
18% 11% Ball/Mf X0 
11% 7% Ballv-Pk 

23'i 17V SHOES 1X0 

48 X BaltPtB 4X0 10X 

23% 15% Bacons *0 3* 11 

5% 2% Ban Tea 

62 46V Bandog 1X0 2* 10 

55% 34% B 1-005 2*0 SX 5 

53% 49% BkBPfB -99e 1.9 

47% XV BkNY 2JJ4 5X 6 

XV 20V Bar*va 1.12 4* 8 

22V 13V BnkAm X0 5* 

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16% 12V BkAm pf 2X8 
32% 27% BtcARtV 3-40 65 12 

79% 47>i BankTr 1TO 4-1 6 

S7 21'* BkTrpf 2 SO 97 
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39% 19 Bard X6 1* 14 

25 19V. BamGo XO 3* 15 

41% 25V Banters 1.04 Z8 10 

31V 17 BaryWr *0 Z9 15 
13% 7 BASIX .130 U 

35% 23V BauSCh J8 
16% 11V BaxITr X7 
27% 20% BavFIn _X0 
34V 24% BavStG 2*0 

XV 31 V Bearing 1X0 
342b 26% BealCa 1X0 
64% 48% BeotPt 
Idv. I2V Beoor 
58% 35% BectnD 
8% IV Baker 

11 3V Bekerpf 

17% 12% BeldnH 

37% 22% BelHwl 

37 22 BelHwpf *7 

97 74% BellAtl 6*0 

33 24V BCE g 

27 19% Balllnd 

44% 30% Bell Sou 
S7 41% BeloAH 
33V 22V Be mis 
45% 27V BenICP . 

40 XV Bene/ of 470 »J* 
40% XV Bend of A50 lix 
19% 16% Bengal n I JO 7.1 
6% 3v« BengtB 071 

9 3% Berkev 

15 10% BesIPd X4 IX 

21% MV BelhSII *0 2* 
49% 37V BelhSIPfSXO II J 
24V 18% BelhSt pf 3*0 1IX 
40% 28% Beverly *2 
26% 19% BieThr 
24% 13% Biociln 
26% 17V B la CAD 

36V 22% BlcV HP 

2«V MV Blair jn 

57% 39% BICkHR 2-40 

5a% 33V Banna s 1X8 

51 36V BaiseC 1.90 

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33 18*a Ball Bar .10 

421* 28% Bo/dens 1*2 

34% 19V; BoroWQ .92 

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251» l?V Bowatr .72 IX 

lit, 28 BflgSf 1*0 5.7 


146 71b 7% 7H — 14 

115 23 22V 23 + % 

705 17 16V 16V— V 

52 21% 21% 21% + % 

208 1% 1% 1% 

40 6% 6V 6%— % 

25 13 143 56% 56V 56% + % 

I 28% 28% 2B%— V 

3599 17% 17% 17V + % 

SO 10% 10 10 

533 71% 21V 21% — % 

1001 45 45 *5 +1 

571 22 21V 22 + % 

903 2% 2V 2% + % 

483 50V 50 50% 

2891 45V 44% 45V +lvk 

50 53% 53% 53% + % 

IX 39V 39V 39% + % 

358 25% 24 25% +1% 

3292 14% 14% 14’* 

76 42% 41% 41% 

73 1SV 15V 15% 

39 2E% 27% 28% + % 

432 63 62% 62V + V 

3 25% 25% 25% 

177 12% 11% 12% +1 

90 35% 34V 15% + % 

50 23% 73 23% + Vb 

277 36% 36% 36% + V 

48 »lb 20'i 20% + tb 

195 7% rtjj + b 

17 16 1509 29% 2916 29% 

2* 70 2015 14 13% 14 + % 

XI4I 11 25% 25% 25%— V 
22 32 31% 32 + % 

13) 32 32 X + V 

7778 33'! 33 33Vt + V! 
15 61% 61'* 61% — V 
138 14% MV 14V 
886 54'.'. 53% 54 
180 2% 2 2 — % 

4 4 4 4 + Vi 

6 13% 13% 13% + % 

S39 33 32V 32% — % 

I 32% 32% 37% 

5943 B9V B8VJ 89% + % 
755 30% XV 30% — % 
IB 23'i 23 23 

1483 39% 38% 39% +1 
195 45% 44V 45 — % 

73 33 'i 33V* 33V + lb 
194 39% 39 391! + '1 

7 37 37 37 

120Z 40 38% 4Q +11! 

7 17 16% 16% 

4V 41b + % 
8 8% 


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11 

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1.92 S6 
781 


87 


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81 81 
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L nitrJ Pm\ Inltnunonul 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange made broad gains in moderate- 
ly active trading Thursday. 

Pressured by a sharp decline in ihe siock of 
one of its components — General Foods — the 
Dow Jones industrial average still managed a 
gain of 6.39 to 1.306.79. 

Among the 1 .968 issues traded, advances out- 
paced declines more than 2 to 1 . Volume totaled 
100.32 million shares, compared with 105.71 
million Thursday. 

“The market is attempting to rebound from a 
very deep, short-term oversold condition," said 
Christine Rallies, vice president and technical 
research analvst at Dean Witter Reynolds. She 
said leadership was confined “mostly to some of 
the more well-known technolog}’ stocks and to 
some potential takeover candidates." 

Analysts said there was nervousness in the 
market before Friday's expiration of September 
stock index futures and options contracts, fa 
the past, activity related to the expiration of 
those contracts has made the market more vola- 
tile. 

Selling before Friday's expiration date has 
contributed to pressure on stock prices this 
week, but some of that influence seemed to 
wane Thursday, analysts said. 

The Commerce Department is scheduled to 
release the “flash" estimate of third-quarter 
gross national product growth Friday. The ex- 
pectation is that GNP grew at a 3 -percent to 
3.5-percent rate. 

Before the market opened, the Commerce 
Department said U.S. personal income rose 0J 
percent in August, a smaller rise than many 


M-l Jumps $3.7 Billion 

The AiumaieJ Freu 

NEW YORK — The nation's basic money 
supply. M-l. grew $3.7 billion in early Septem- 
ber. the Federal Reserve Board said Thursday. 
The M-l aggregate, comprising cash in circula- 
tion, deposits in checking accounts and non- 
bank traveler's checks, has now increased for 
eight consecutive weeks. 

Since July 15. M-l hasgrown by $2 1.6 billion. 
The latest increase pushed the aggregate farther 
above the targets the Fed has set in its attempt 
to encourage economic growth without reviving 
higher rates of inflation. 


economists had anticipated, and that consumer 
spending rose 1.2 percent 

After the close, the Fed reported the nation's 
basic money supply, M-l, rose S3.7 billion in 
the week ended Sept 9. 

Albert Wojnilower. First Boston's economist 
chief, told clients in a quarterly analysis that 
strong monetary growth and a firming economy 
would force the Federal Reserve to tighten 
monetary policy “sooner or later." 

Richardson- Vicks was the most active 
NYSE-listed issue, falling 2 to 47. Unilever 
added 2 to 56. 

Citicorp followed, adding to 41 H. IBM was 
third, up '/i to. 128. 

In semiconductors. Motorola lVi to 35. Na- 
tional Semiconductor W to 12% and Advanced 
Micro Devices 14 to 21%. 


17 Month 
High Low Sw* 


Div. no. PE 


SI*. 

ion Hign Low 


Close 

QuctOiDe 


66% 43% BrfetM 1X8 U 
4% 3% BrilLnd 

32% 21% BrllPI 1.998 6X 
28% 22 SrtT2 00 *1g 2X 

5% 1% Brock 

28 16% Brckvry 1X2 48 

41 29% BhrUG 3.12 7J 

2SW 2D BkUGof 2*7 ID* 
373. 30% BkUGof 3.95 12X 
26% 15 BwnSh X0 5 
32% 24% BrwnGO 1X6 4* 
56 32% BrwnF 1X8 12 

40% 2a'. Bmswk IDO 19 
40% 29 BrshWI S3 1* 
19% 15% Bandy *0 4X 
20 15Tb BunkrH 116 11* 
21V: 14% BurtnCI 
30% 24 Burtlnd 1*4 5.9 
68% 44% BriNth 1*0 23 
7 T b 6% BrfNotrt *5 &D 
23% I9'i BrfN of 2.12 9.1 
S2 J6' : B4TN at 
18% 10% Bumdv 
66% 50V: Burrgh 
20% 14 Butlrln 
64. 1% Butin 


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65% 63V® 65 +1% 


14b. U% 14% + '* 


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31% 20% CBI in 
125 68% CBS 

BV= 4% CCX 
60% 35% 

32% 25% 

S3'! 49% 

71b 1% 

59% 27% 

11% 9% CNAI 

28% 16’! CNW 
46% 35% CPC Int 
26 15% CP Nil 

22% 19'! CRM Ml 
28% 21% CSX 
40% 23% CTL 
7% C 3 Inc 
201! Cot»f 


lAOc 6S 167 21% 219! 2U! 

3X0 7J 20 1773 113% 110% 112% +1% 
J% 4% 4V! + % 



54 52% 51% + 4! 

2Tb 29% 29’!— % 


1X4 11.1 


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1% 1% 1%- % 
197 51 50% 

IB 11% 11% 


13% 

iS: 



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17% 8% Coesaf 15 

25% 12% ColFbd *8 25 5 
54% 15% CalFd Of 4.75 93 


15% 

26 


131! Calltin 
12 Comml 
15% CRLkg 
6% 2% CmpR g 
40' 4 30% CocnSos 
15% 11% CdPocs 
22% 16Tb CanPE B 
228 1 ! 150% COPCIlS 
27% 17>! CooHdi 

1244 10 Carlnoo 
4Q% 28% Carlisle 

26% 18 CoroFI 


X56 1* 

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*0 

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*8 

£0 

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1X8 

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26% 20% CarPpf 2*7 10.9 


19 

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Jb 


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.40 

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IV! 6% Carrol X7 
24% IB CarPIrs *0 
31 21% CartHw 1X2 

46% 22 CorhJVI 32 
181! 11% CaseNG 1X0 
16% 9i» CastICk 
29 15% CstICPf 

15 12 CsKCpf 

38% 28% CotrpT 
27% V»4* Ceco 
129V! 68% Celanse 4.40 __ 
44% 35% Cel ail Pf 430 10* 

IS 7% Ceng* n X4e * 25 
45 34% Cenfel 238 SJ 9 

26% 17 Center n .25 1.1 10 
27 19% CenSoW 2X2 &3 7 

31V1 20 V! CenHud 2X4 10.9 6 
211! 16’! CnllPS 1*4 7X 10 
2T.% 20% CnLaEI 218 U 7 
37 31 CLaElpf 4.18 12X 

13% 8% CeMPw 1*0 11X106 
21% 13% CVfPS 
11% 2'! CenlrDl 
12% 7% CntrvTI 
23W 17% Cenvill 
28W 15% Crt-iebd 
30>! 16% CaSSAir 
25% 18% Chmoln 
27% 20% Chml pl 1X0 
54’! 45V: Chml of 4*0 
9% T% Cham So *0 
4% l viaiftc 
4Vb 1'! vIChripf 
63% 39% Chaw 3X0 7X S 

«i! 39% Chase ol 5X5 II* 

56% 50 Chase of 635el2X 

56% 51 Chase oflO*4e2DO 

22% 16% Chelsea J3 U f 
32% 24% Owned 132 5X 12 

44% 77% OimNY 2*8 ax 5 

56% 51 CUNY pl 4.08e 73 

55% 49 ChNY pt 4X7e 7* 

399! 32 Chesok 1X4 15 10 

38% 31 ChesPn 200 6X 9 

39 29% Chevrn 240 

200 130 OuMlw 

80% 53 1! ChiMIPl 

29% 16% ChIPnT 

11% 7% ChJiFull 

54% 29% ChrlsCr 
13V« S’! Chrism 

13% 9% Chroma 
38% 25% Chrvslr 

77 44% Chubb _. 

63% 50% Chubb of 4X5 

30% 12% Churdis M 

27% 20% Cllcorp 222 

51 36% On Bel I 

19% 13% ClnGE 

74’! 58 ClnG Pf 

6) 46 CinG Pf 

75 58% C/nGof .... 

100% 771! CJnG Ol 1237 123 

26% 187* ClnMIl J2 3* 26 

37 28 ClrdK J4 77 12 

31 18% CirCIfy .10 3 11 

301* 15 Circus 14 

51% 33% Cilicro 226 53 

84 ■! 70 ClllCPPf 7X5* &9 


. . + 

208 18% 18% 18%-% 

456 44% 43% 43Tb— % 
54 ZVb 23i! 23% + % 

101 20's 20% 20’.!— Vi 
3388 24'i 23% 24 — % 
310 35% J3 34% +1% 
IS 8% 8% Bta + % 

ISJ 21% 21% 21% + % 

1083 15% 15% 15% + % 

757 18% 18% 18% + % 

63 49 49 49 + % 

6? 17V* 16% 17 + % 

2 13 13 13 — % 

457 22% 71% 22V! + % 

24 2% 21* 2% 

71 37% 37** 37% + % 

175 12% 121! 12% + Vb 

21 19% 19Vj 19% + ft 

786 202% 197ft 202ft 
1655 22 21 21% + % 

23 10% 10% 10% 

166 29V, 28% 29% + ft 

297 20% 20% 201! 

2153 26% 26 26% 

4 24% 241! 24ft— % 

88 37% 37% 37% + ft 

41 6% 6ft 6%— ft 

179 19ft 18% 19ft + 7b 

50 26% 26% 26% + % 

244 33 32% 33 + ft 

159 16’* 15% 16’.! + % 

0*7 12'.! 12 12 + ft 

338 26lb 36 26% — ft 

71 14% 14% 14% 

578 34% 34% 34% + % 

317 24ft 23% 23% — % 
748 114% 113% 114% +lft 

5 42Vj *2ft 42ft— ’A 

1032 10 9% 9%— % 

178 41% 41% 41V! 

75 22ft 21ft 22 — ft 

1610 25?b 23ft 23ft + % 

161 27ft 26ft 27ft + % 

328 18ft 17% IB’b + ft 

75 25 IS 25 25ft + % 

10 34 34 34 — % 

150 12ft 12% 12% — ft 
M 1«% 19% 19% + ft 
779 4ft 4% 4%— ft 
108 lift 11% lift + % 
588 1 7% 17% 17% — ft 
30 24ft 23% 24 + % 


12 Month 
High Low Slack 


Div. YHL PE 


Sis. 

IMS HJflh Low 


Dose 

Oudanw 


31 21ft CraNG 110 M 9 

15ft 12% Conrac .10 10 t 

38 27 ConsEfl 2*0 7.1 8 

47% 36ft CoaE Pl 4*5 10X 

50 39 ConEPf 5X0 10J 

36 23 CnsFi-1 l.io 3.7 ID 

47% 37ft CnsNG 2J2 if 1 

B% 4ft ConsPw 
33% 19 CnPolB 4X0 14X 

54% 31% CnPalD 7*5 14J 

31 Vi 15% CnPprV 4*0 15X 

25% 13U CnPorU 3*0 15X 

28% 14U CnPorR 4.00 15X 

28V* 14V* CnP orP 198 15* 

28ft |4% CnPorN 3X5 IS* 

17 9ft CnPprL 2X3 15X 

29 15 CnPprS 4X2 15* 

18 9ft CnParK 2*3 14J 
47% 31ft CntICa 2*0 
rO«e 4ft Confiri 
4ft % Cantll rl 

51% JO'* Cntlllaf 
4ft % CtllHdn 
12 4ft CntlnlO 
24% 20’* Con f Tel 1X0 
30% 16% Cl Data .72 
40ft 331! CnDlPl *50 
2% % 'dCookU 

39 27% Cooor 1X2 

41V. 31 Coaplpf 2«0 

20% 14ft CoorTr *0 

27 15 Caopvls *0 

17 8% CapwW 721 

24% 18% Cnrrld pf 2*8 13J 

27% 17V* Cor dura X4 3.4 16 

15ft II Coreln 

48% 30% CamGs 

49% 26V: CorBIk 

11 4% Crow 


SmvRi 


1* 28 5159 29% 29ft 29ft 


8% 6% CiaWr 
29% B ClairSI 
32% 23% Clark. E 
12% 7% CloyHs 

22ft 17 CIvCII 


2963 21 21% 21% + V* 

9 25 34% 24% — V* 

49 50 49% SO + ft 

SB 8ft 8 S —ft 

76 215 2% 2% 

34 2% 2% 2% 

886 52% 51ft 52% + % 

9 46ft 46 46 

1 £[% 5T5b 53% + ft 
100 53ft 53ft 53ft 
12 21 21 21 
307 29% 29'’. 29ft — % 
1245 37 36ft 36ft — ft 
200 54ft 54% 54ft— Vb 
191 5JV! 53ft 53ft 
45 36ft 3S7j 35% — 

. 588 31% 31ft 31% 

66 8 2495 36% 36 36% + % 

110 7 133 1321! 132ft— 1 

14 60% 60’/® ex'* — ft 

joe 1.1 9 34 36% 25% 26% + ft 

.241 3X271 4 81* 8% Bft 

*81 .9 104 53% 53ft 53ft + '-i 

15 101* 10% 10% — ft 
40 60 12 11% 12 + ft 

JJ 3 6659 37ft 36ft 36% + I* 
33 12 1770 71% 69% 71ft +»Vb 

6.9 45 61ft 61ft 61ft + % 

2.9 13 488 15% JSl* 15% 

92 23% 22% 23% + % 
20 50 49% 49% 

317 17% 171. 17% + V® 
30* 72 72 72 + % 

580* 58 57 57 —1 

SO* 721! 72ft 72ft +1 
TO 100 180 100 
369 20ft 19% 20 + % 

452 31% 31% 31% + ft 
393 20ft 19V* 20'.* +!ft 
89 28 27ft 27ft— ft 
6)5921 41% 41 41% + ft 

5 8? 81 V: 81ft 


39ft 32 
52ft 23 
19% 17ft 
52% 49V* 

24 18% 

70 40ft CrwnCk 
44% 27Tb CrwZei 


M -- 

X6 4 S 11 
1X8 
1X0 

16 

IXOb 4* 10 

rckN pf 2.18 lix 
rckNpf 2*3e SX 
rmpK 1X0 57 12 


1 JOO 


14 28% 28% 28% 

73 13ft 13ft 13ft 
364 33% 33% 33% 

100* 45ft 45ft 45ft + V! 

10 48% 48 48% + ft 

946 29% 28% 29% + ft 
233 40% 401* 40ft 
1043 7% 7ft 7% + ft 

90131ft 31ft 31ft 
4002 52ft Sift 52ft +lft 
121 29ft 28 29ft + % 
61 23% 23 23% — ft 

26 25% 25% 25% — ft 

11 25ft 25% 25ft + ft 

2 25 25 25 + ft 

3 15 M% 14% 

14 26ft 26ft 26ft— % 
21 16% 16ft 16ft + ft 

6* 19 2066 41 40% 40% + ft 

16 242 7% 7ft 7% 

587 1% 1ft 1% 

75 50 49]! 50 + % 

477 % lb 4k 

9 37B* lift 10ft lift +1V! 

8 680 23 22ft 23 + ft 

7439 19 18ft 18ft— ft 
8201 37 35ft 37 +1% 

131 1% 1 1 

4X IS 1150 36V* 35% 36V* + % 
161 37ft 36ft 37ft + ft 

69 14% 14% 14% 

r2S 22ft 22ft 22% + ft 

27 8% 8% 8% 

14 18% 18% 18%—% 
73 24ft 24 24ft + ft 

_ 30 11% lift lift— Vb 

2X 19 1078 46% 45'4 46ft +lft 
23 109 44% 44ft 44% — V* 

19 10ft 10ft 10ft + ft 
105 36ft 35% 34 
3029 49% 46% 48% +3 
8 19 1B% 1«% 

130 52V! 52ft SZft 

12 22% 22% 22ft— ft 

' 66% 66ft 66% + '.* 


7X 

£ 


27 7 
IX 14 


JS2 37% 37% 37V»— ft 
SOI* 43% CrZel pf 4*3 10X 40 461! 46ft 46% + ft 

35ft 22'- Culbro X0 23 19 171 35 32% 35 +2'! 

33% 15% CuilnetS 23 2853 17% 16% 17ft + ‘ 

88’! 58ft CumEn 2X0 3.4 4 791 65% 64% 65 

10% 8% Currlnc l.lOalOJ 17 10ft 10ft 10ft 
38% 30% CurtW 1X0 3X 16 9 36ft 36 36ft + % 

52% 33% Cyclop® 1.10 2* 8 49 45ft 45ft 43ft + V. 


xi 


15% 15% 15% + ft 
297 11% 11 11% + ‘ 


266 

- - - - %l 

845 24% 24 24ft + ft 
410 9% 8% 9 + ft 
382 8% Oft 8% 


23ft 151! Dallas *6 4X 10 

14% 9ft DamonC X0 1J 

30% 22 DoraCp 1X8 53 7 

9% 5% Danohr 13 

15 8% Daniel .18b 2.1 

38% 25% DorlKrs 1X6 4* 11 1525 35ft 34% 35ft + % 

” ' 17 3455 40ft 39ft 39% + % 

3.1 9 8 7% 7% — ft 

IX 10 46 18% 18ft 18ft 

1.9 16 4531 39 Vb 37% 39 +lft 


X4 

X4 

J* 


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8 2 9 
23 7 

2J 17 
41 13 
10 
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7X6 12X 
3X4 12X 
113 127 
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216 12* 
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7*4 13.1 
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16V* B'm Clevpk . 
17% 10 Clvakpf 
41ft 26'® Cloro t 
20% 14% CluOMn 
38% 25'! ClueMP 
34ft 16’* CluelPf 
21 ft lift Coaeftm 
36% 16ft Coast 1 3 
74% 59ft CocaO 
19% 10'* Cotaco 
33% SSi* Coiemn 


4.7 

4X 

9X 


Z*% 16ft __ . . 

14% 9 CalFtls S 

30ft 35ft Col Pen 1*0 

65ft 48% Colllnd 2X0 

35 36% Col Gas 218 

48% 45’i CalGspl 513 11.1 

53 45ft CoIGspf 5J9el(U 

28ft 24ft CSOPf 3*5 

21ft 16'* CSOPf 2.43 11.7 

110 99'. CSOPI01SX5 14X 

50 33ft Combln 2.16 S.l 

37ft ?3% CmOEn 1X4 7 A 

21ft 8 Cornells 

18% 15Vb ComMIl 
33% 8ft Comdre 
32% 25'» Cm»E 
33ft 34ft C«E Pl 
18% 13% CwEpf 
18% IJftCwEel 
7»i® 57 CnE of 

36 ft 21ft CwE Pf 

65% 49ft C<«E Of 
30% TO 1 * CoMES 
38% 23% Comsal 
35ft 23ft CPsrc 
35% 33ft Conwor 
24 ft 17-.- COmpSC 
4sr. in* Co rusn 
39% 241: CanAgs 
30 15 Vi ConnE 


.72 9.7 5 114 7% 7 7ft 

.10 * 32 3256 19V* 16% 17 —2 ft 

1.10 3X 33 108 31% 31ft 31% + ft 

47 10% 10ft 10% + ft 
30 18% 18% 18% + ft 
36 3Hb 20'! 20% + ft 
1615 21% 21ft 21% + ft 
TMr 60 60 60 +2 

B7 30% 9% 9%— ft 

30 13 13 13 + ft 

323 40% 40% 

18 22% 23% 23% — ‘i 
393 36% 36ft 36%— ft 

14 22% 22ft 22% — ft 

359 11V: IV/* 11% + ft 

. 596 29ft 18% 29 + ft 

43 14 2237 68% 68ft 68% + ft 

1350 19'* 18% 1B%— ft 

45 19 379 26% 26% 26ft 

52 37 1315 36ft 25% 26 + ft 


J0I 
1.111 

1J6 3* 12 
XOe .9 18 
1X0 27 19 
1X0 4* 

.40 35 IS 
*0 1* 10 
2.96 


29 B 1061 22% 32ft 23 - + ft 

2 10 14% 14% 14% + 

51 29ft 39ft 27V': + ft 

44 59% 59V. 59% + ’.« 

818 33% 33ft 33'!— ft 

10 46 46 46 + % 

310 52 51’! 52 + v: 

I 26ft 26% 26ft + ft 

1 30% 20% 30% — '•* 

’BhHKft 109'- 109’- + ft 
205 43ft 42% 42% — ■! 

5642 25'* 24V* 25 + ft 

383 19% 18% 19ft + V! 

23 16% 16% 16ft 

588 9% 9ft 9% + ft 

2266 29% 291! 2»% + ft 

1 29% 29% 39% — % 

12 17% IT 1 -! 17V* — ft 

9 18ft 18ft 18ft 

30z 72% 72% 73% +lft 

13 26". 36-* 36ft— ft 

90162’ 4 61 62"! +!’/! 

20 77ft 287b 27ft + % 

3.7 10 219 32V- 32ft 32% + % 

IX 20 3634 78 36% 27ft +1% 

2X 7 75 24% 23% 24% + % 

11 HB 23 27% 23 + % 

4825 131* 12ft 13 + % 

51 U It 323 37 35% 35% —1% 

1*0 &9 JD 5 IB'.a 18 IB + Vi 


X0 


3X0 ID. I 
1*2 4A 
1.90 11.1 
£00 11.0 
8X8 115 
2X7 10.9 
7X4 11* 
355 OJ 


1X0 

J8 

60 


76 31 Data&a 
5% 4 Dotpt n 

12ft 7% Dta Dig 
22 14ft Doyco 
45ft 29% DOVlHd 
20% 14V! OOYtPL ZOO 11* 

65 49% DPLOf 7*8 1Z0 

66 52 DPCpf 7 JO 122 

66 48% DPLpf 7J7 11.9 

40% 24% DaanFd X6 IX 18 

25V! Deere ixo 
26% 20 DelmP 1X2 
52% 31% DeltoAr 1X0 

10 4ft Deltona 

44% 24Vb DIxOl* 1X4 
38V® 22 DeS&IS 1X0 
37ft 30% OeSalo 1.40 4J 
17ft 13% DelEd 1*8 11.1 
80 60 DetE pf 9X2 12X 

67% 50ft DelE Pf 7*8 1Z0 
65% 49% DetE of 7*5 1Z3 
64% 48% DetE of 
28% 21% DEorR 
27% 20V3 DEpfO 
27V® DE OtP 

25% 21 DE pfB 
29' . 22% DEpfO . 

27% 22% DE BfM 3*2 128 
33% 26'! DEprL 4X0 13* 
34% 27% DE pfK 4.12 13X 

116% 102% DE DfJ 15*8 1X7 
20ft 15 DelE pr 2X8 121 
24 IS 1 ! Dexler X0 40 1 1 
18% 10% DiGlor *4 XB 
33% 22% DlGlOPf 2X5 7X 

11 IS 1 * DicmS 1J6B11X 
38% 34% DlaShat *00 11X 
20'! 20% OfflSOfn .70e 3* 

11 6ft DtonaCp X0 ” 

58'* 31% Dlebidb 1X0 

125% 85ft Digital 
•S 53% Dtsngv 
28v= 15% DEIS ' 

6ft 4% Divrsln 
11% 6% Do meg 

34V® 35 DomRs 
21 Vb 16V! Donald 
61% 42% Donley 
33 Vj 23'i Dorsey 
42vj 32ft Dover 
37% 26% DowCh 
50 36'i DowJn 

15ft 11 Drava 
24ft 17% Drear 
21% 16ft DrexB 
65ft 32% Dreyfus 

61% 46V® duPonl 

40 31ft duPntPf 3X0 9 X 
50 39V! duPnrpf 4X0 9* 

35% 26ft DukeP 2*0 8X 
SS-i 68 Duke pf &70 10.9 
BOk! 64 Dukept 8X0 11 J 

77 60Vi Duke Of 7X0 10X 
Z7 22% Duke d 2*9 10 J 
35% 39ft Duke of 3X5 UX 

IN 96ft Duke pl 11X0 10 J 
07>! 61 Oufc afM a*4 10J 
80% 65 Du kept 8XS 109 


305 17Vb 17 17ft + Vb 
2501 62% 62% 62% + Vb 
SOz 63 63 63 — % 

1707 62 62 62 +1 

23 37% 37% 37% + Vb 
978 2fft 26 2SVb 
117 23% 23ft 23%— ft 

1299 43Vb 4Z% 43 +% 

44 9ft 9% 9ft + ft 

275 38% 38 38 

64 25 24% 25 

4 32% 32ft 32% + ft 
756 19b 15 15% 

1007 73V! 73 73 —1 

210Cz 64% 64W 64% +1% 
26007 62ft 60% 60% + % 
41007 61% 59 5» — % 

29 25ft 24% 25ft 
68 24% 34 24% + % 

7 25 24% 25 + % 

1 25 25 25 

59 27ft 26ft 27 

139 27% 26% 26% + % 
14 30ft 29% 29%—% 
29 31 30% 30% 

114% 114% 114% 

24 18% 18% 18%— % 
67 20ft 19ft 20ft + % 

120 16Tb 16% l«b + % 

4 30 30 30 

2349 16% 15% 16 + % 

5 36% 36% 36*— % 
1260 70% 70* 20% + % 

2 9% 9% 9% 

772 35% 33% 34% +1% 

. 15 7698 108% 106 108ft +3* 

1* 46 000 B5* 84% 85% +1% 

48 22% 22% 22ft 
125 5ft 5 5ft + Vb 

847 9 5% 8% + % 

920 29% 18% 29ft + % 
35 19ft 19ft 19ft 
339 54 S3Vk 54 + % 

16 29% 29ft 29% + ft 
459 33% 33% 33% + % 

5.1 14 4181 35% 35% 35% + ft 

IX 21 202 42% 42% 47*— % 

4.1 219 12ft 17% 12ft + Vb 
... 4.1 17 3417 2Dft 19ft IVft 

2X0 105 11 19% 18% 19 

*0 IX 14 208 60ft 59% 60% + Tb 
3X0 5J 14 2262 57 55% 56% + * 

2 37 37 37 

10 46% 46 46ft + ft 
1358 31% 31% 31% + ft 
1007 80 79'! 79% — % 

IDlQz 72* 72% 72% 

200z 72% 71 72% + V: 

1 25% 25% 25% — it 

17 34ft 34 34ft + * 
20010:106% 103ft 106% +1% 

50207 82% 82 82% + TV 

70007 75% 75% 75% + % 


121 

1*0 

.12 

272 

*6 

1.16 

1X0 

■88 

1X0 

78 

X0 

XO 


3.1 _ 
29 10 


6X 7 
3 

?J 9 
3* 9 
21 15 
4.1 12 
2i 12 


B3ft 57* DunBrd 2X0 3X 20 1329 73% 73ft 73ft— % 
17V: 12* DuoLt 2X6 1 3X 7 902 15% 15% 15ft 

18% 15ft Dim dIA 2.10 I2J — ~ 

17% 12* DiMPl 1X0 UA 

IB* 13ft Duqpl 207 11.7 

18 T4ft DuqprK 210 124 

16% 8% DYCoPI *0a 4X II 

26V! 20% DvnAm X0 X 12 


1500z 17% 17* 17% + Vb 
5007 16ft 15Tb 15% + % 
29907 IB 17% 17ft— ft 
2 17 17 17 — ft 

2S 13% 13ft 13% 

194 26 23% 25ft +ZVj 


43 29 EGG 

.a 

IX 19 


17% 15* EOKn 

1X6 

8.1 


32% 23% ESvst 

JO 

1.9 13 


38ft 20 ErateP 

1.04 

4 A 9 


20ft 12 E cisco 
12ft 3* East Air 

.44 

22 

11 

225 19% 19% 
3427 9ft 9 


2% 

22'b 

35ft 

33V* 


1% EALwtO 
% EALntA 
7% EsAlrpf 235k 
8% EAlr PfB 280k 
„ 10 EAlrpIC 

28* 21% EastGF 1X0 
23% 14ft EoslUII 206 
SOU 41ft EtlCodS 270 
eOft 47ft Eaton 1A0 
15% 10ft EcJilins 
W% 20 Eckerd 1X4 
33ft 26ft EdlsBr 1*0 
18% 1«% EDO XB 
34V: 22ft Edward *8 
24% 20% EPGdPf 2X5 


1.7 14 
29 13 
97 


13 


TTy 77% CFG Pt 375 13X 
29V1 26' « EPGpr 

19ft io% eitoto 

12 7* Elcar 

S- . 7ft ElecAs 
30% 19% ElCtSOC 
W 11% Elgin 
12% 3% Elscml 
78ft 65% EmrsEI 2*0 27 13 
14% «! EmRod .94111* • 

20% 15% ErnrvA 
33% 76ft Em hart 
22% 16 EmoDt 
5% 4 Emo pf 
V- EnErc 
Mft 32 Erase u .72 3X 9 
11% EhlSBuS X6 21 12 
39% 17t» Enserch 1*0 7 A 180 
105ft 94 Ensdl Pfl IXOelO* 
21% 17ft EnsEx n IXOe 6A 
2% 1% Ensrce 23 


... 9Vb 

72 3% 3% 3% 

188 2% 2 2% + ft 

65 21 20% 21 

57 23ft 33 23ft 

13 58% 23% 38ft + % 

5X 119 297 22V! 22ft 23% + ft 

*X 8 106 21 ZY! 21 + % 

5X 1J 5918 44ft 43% 44ft + % 

26 7 1749 53% 52* 53% — ft 

.. 11 521 11% 11% lift 

3.9 13 1335 27Tb 26% 27 — % 

5X 13 4b 37% 31ft 32% + % 

97 16% loft lt% + ft 

542 77% 26% 27ft + % 

41 24% 24% 24% + % 

6 27% 27% 27% — Vb 

4 23% 28% 28% 

343 14% 13ft 14% + % 

10 8% 8% 8% + % 

5 41, 4ft 4% + % 

68 24% 26% 26% — ft 

19S 14% 13% 14% + 1! 

317 3 2% 3 + % 

587 69ft 69 69ft + ft 

2688 BV* 7% Bft + ft 
717 17ft 17% 17ft + Vb 
353 Bft 28% Bft + ft 
19 20% 20% £0% + ft 
JDOz 5 5 5 — % 

553 % % % 

261 22% 22 22ft — % 

96 17 16* 17 + % 

873 21ft 21% 21% 

252 106 106 1116 + % 
93 2D% 20 23% + ft 

1» 2ft 2% 2ft + v* 


Xie X 
Xb 42 

27 

.08 X 26 
JO 5* 13 


X0 28 13 
1 40b 49 9 

1.76 8* 7 

X0 10.0 


17 Month 
High Low Slock 


DIV. Ytfl. PE 


95. 

IQOt High LOW 


13% 9Vb Enleru 
19% 15ft EftlexE 2X0C14X 
21% 17% Efllbxln 1X6 7X II 
35 19ft Eoufxs 1.14 3J 16 
6% 3% Equlmk 

Bft 13ft Eqnvk pf 231 121 
50% 31ft EatRas 1.72 3.9 
17 9% Eaullec 

14% 10ft Erbnwt 
24% 12% EsSBia 
30% 18ft EuexC 


6 

9% 

12 % 


86 

159 

173 

32 

351 


.16 13 - 
XO 2* 12 
*4 21 13 
X0b2J 16 


15* E strlne 

X2 19 

23 

17 

18ft 

18* 

12* Ethyls 

J6 £5 

14 

2121 

22* 


1% vlEvnnP 




lft 





2% 





3% 




11 

107 

41 

39% 




16 

16% 

16% 

41 Exxon 

3A0 6J 

8 

9583 

50% 

49% 


II 10% 11 
17ft 16% T7ft + % 
19% 19% 19% 

30% 30ft 30% + % 
3ft 3% 3% + %. 

19% 19* 19%—%' 

32 44% 44% 44ft 

33 13 12% 12ft— ft 

597 lift 11% lift— % 

96 Zlft 20 21ft +1 
12 28 28 28 


lft— Vb 
3ft 
3ft— Vb 


70 52 FMC 2X0 JX 35 

B 19% FPL GO 1.96 6X 7 
13% 9% Fa! Cfr X8 £9 21 
14% io Facet B 

20% 9ft Fairchd 70 20- 
39Tb 23% Faircpf 3*0 129 
16ft 1f% Fafrfd .18 IX 9 
27 15ft FamDIs X0 
19% 13ft Fanstei *0 
Bft 23 FrWstF 
28ft 15% Farah J8 
13 8% FayDrg 

61! 4ft Feders 
52ft 31ft FedExP 
39 3!>ft FdMog 

22% 14 FcdNM 
26% 16% FedIPB . . 

M% 25ft FPee.pl 2X1 
26 17% Fad Rif 1X6 


19% 13Tb FdSanl *0 

*5% 48% Fad D 51 2X4 

32 22ft Ferro 1X0 

35 2Sft Ffdcsf 1 00 

lift 5ft FtnCoA X5I 
5% 4Vb FlnCPPf *0 II J 
37% 27% FlnCpPl 6X50185 
6% 2% FnSBor 
22ft 16% Firbifn X 4X 

27% 14 FtAflg *8 28 

58 51 Ff AM pf 6Xee1QX 

43 TSM FtBkSv 1*0 4* 7 

34 22 FBkFIS 1X0 3X 13 

46% 23'.! F Basis 1 JO 2* 12 

27 19% FjfOlIc 1X2 A) 

18 V! 11 FtBTex *0 5X 11 

50% 35 FiBT*pl tSie119 
20* , 6% FI City 6 

24% lift FFedAz. *8b 2J 8 

60 41 FFB 3.12 5.9 8 

55% 3A'.i Flame 2X0 SX 7 

34ft 23ft Finis Pt 2X7 IX 

11% 7% FIMfeS 31 17 9 

30ft 16 FtNamn 20 

7^1 5% FstPo 
30% 23% FslPapf 2*2 9* 

31% 25ft FtUnRI ZOO 7* 15 

28Vb 17% FtVaBk *9 17 ID 

35% 19% FIWsC 1X0 17 10 

44 Vb 27ft Fisctlb 1X0 3* 

12 BVJ FHtiFd ,05e * 

43 24ft FlfFnG S 1X2 4.1 7 

Bft 18% Fleeter! M 23 9 


140 64 63% 63ft 

•59 24 23% 24 

S5 9ft 9% Mb— % 

23 11% 11% lift— % 

151 10 9ft 9%— Vb 

66 28 27ft 28 + ft 

24 12* 12 12Vb + %i 

175 23 20% 23 +1% 

30 14% 14Y* 14% + ft 

7 37ft 37 37 

20 17ft 17% 17ft + Vb 

91 8% 8% 8% + % 

. 102 4% 4% J%— Vb 

29 5140 47ft 46ft 47% + % 
45 10 27 34% 33% 34 

J Z109 19% 19 19% + W, 
4J 8 203 17Tb 17% 17% 

51 77 26% 26%— % 

106* 23 22% 22%— % 

88 17ft 17% 17ft + % 

360 55% 54% 55% + %, 

277 27ft 77ft 27% + % 
13 26% 26ft 26% + ft' 
785 5% 5’! 5% 

1 5% 5% 5% 

92 33* 33% 33Tb 

38 S 4Tb 4% 

14 1401 19ft 18% 18% — V! 


_ .9 24 

*0 4.1 12 

J8 SJ 9 
30 13 20 
.Me S 


1X2 

.16 

JO 


SJ 
7J 13 
4* 14 
4* 8 
4* 15 
3* 13 


__ _ _ . 23 

39ft 26ft Flemng 1JQ 2J 13 
13% 11U FleulPf 1*1 124 
Bft 18% FJghtStS .16 .7 II 


35 14ft FloatPl 16 

45V! 31 FtoEC .160 * 13 

29% 21 FlaPrg 216 8* 8 

18% 11% FlaSII *0 25 14 

6% 3ft FlwGen 
21 14ft Flrnvrs M 27 77 

20'.! 14% Fluor *0 2J 

59 47f* FooteC 220 42 11 

51% 40% FordM 2*0 SX 

13ft 10% FtOeor 1X6 10J 

80ft 56% FIHowd 1*4 2 * 17 

15% 10% Foawh *4 17 11 

\Th 7ft FoxSIP *8 5* 12 
32% 24% Foxbro 1J4 4.1 75 

77 22 Foxmrr lb 

22% 18* FMEPn l.lOe 5* 

13ft 9V! FMGCll 
10ft 7% FMOG 2XBe2S* 5 
72V, u* FretMC *0 X* 12 

32* 22V* FHgtm *0 2* 27 

28ft 21ft Frueni JO X 5 

32% 25ft Fruhfpf 200 6.9 

36% 24* Fuouo *0 IX 8 


113 24% 23% Bft + % 
418 57ft 57ft 57ft— ft 
261 35 34% 35 

19 30* 30ft 30% + % 
946 38% 37% 38 +1 

1148 71% 21% 21%— ft, 
315 lift 11% 11%— ft 
22 39% 39ft 39ft 

6% bft 6ft— ft 
24ft 23% 24ft + ft 
53% 52ft 53'<* + % 
47 46% 46% + % 

28ft 28% 28ft + H 
9 8% 8% 

30% 30% 30% + ft 
6% 6% 6% 

27'.* 77 27ft + ft 
83 27% Z7 27 — ft 
341 23* 23% 23% — ft 
77 35ft 34Tb 34*— » 
721 28% 27% 27ft— % 
60 11* lift lift 
584 B 32 32% —2 

208 19V! 19ft 19% + % 
131 37 36% 36% + ft 

13 13 13 

24% 24% 24V® + % 
27ft 26% 27ft + ft 
40% 40% 40% + ft 
963 25ft 24ft 25ft 
22 1* 15% 16 + % 

53 5ft 5 5ft + % 
99 19 18% 18% 

1716 15% 14Tb 15 
19 57% 53% 52% + % 
3 3557 43% 43% 43% + ft 
14 12% 12% 17% 

244 76% 76% 76% + Vb 
473 11% 11% 11% + ft 
49 i2% 17% i:\. 

187 25% 25% 25% — Vb 
324 24% 24% 24% — ft 
90 19% l9Vb 19% + Vb 
60 11* 10% 11% + % 
224 ID 9% 10 
730 16% Jbft 16% + Ur 
191 23ft 22 23ft + % 
157 24% 23ft 23% + ft 
48 29 28Tb 28% + ft 
326 30 29% 30 - Vb 


220 

559 

13 

261 

29 

360 
B0 

361 
158 


1 

167 

183 

41 


36% 21 GAF 
37% 27% GAT X 
3?Vb 12% GCA 
7Tb 54 GEICO 
6% 3 GEO 
10% 4ft GFCp 
44% 38% GTE 
24* 20 GTE Pl 
Bft 3 GalHou 


XO * 12 
1X0 4.1 13 
10 

1J0 IX .9 


974 


X16 SO 
2*8 10.7 


66% 41% Gannett 1*8 2* 1? 1192 


30% Gcninc 
16ft 7* Geartit 
22% 13% Geico 
12ft 9% GemiiC 
12% 10 Gemlll 
5T% 31% GnCora 
18% 14% GAInv 
58% 31% Gn&csh 
39% 22% GCinms 
20V! 10% GnDato 
13% 10% GnDevn 
3V! 2ft GnDevwf 


X0 I* 25 
X0[ 26 

56 XI 11 

*oe 3* 
IXOb 3* 49 

ttFHn 

*0 IX ,0 



15% 8% GnKras 


IX 
JX 

25% 14% Gnlroi' X5 1.7 
64 47% GnMills 2X4 3J 

85 65% GMot 5X0 r 7X 

46% 16% GM Es J55I .1 
58ft 46 GMolpf 5J0 9X 
8% 3% GNC .16 
15% 9 GPU 

“ 1X6 


35% 34% 35ft +1% 
29% 29% 29% 

_ 13ft 13% 13% + % 
170 66 65% 66 + % 

265 3* 3% 3ft + Vb 

11 4% 4% 4% 

8 <224 39% 39% 39% + Vb 
28 23% 23% 23% 

59 3% 3ft 3ft 

57 56 56% + % 

32 31% 32 + Vb 

11Y Bft 8 BVb + v® 
46 18% 18ft 18ft— ft 
166 9Tb 9% 9% 

112 11% 11% 11%- ft 
747 44% 43ft 44% + % 
45 17% 16% 17% + % 
58 56% 56% 56% — ft 
729 32% 32* 32% + % 
232 11% 11% 11% + Vb 
217 10* 10% 10ft 
17 2% 3% 2% + % 
71% 70ft 71 + % 

— , 59% 59 59*—% 

29 13 4515 88 84 84ft— 4 
6% 6ft 6% + Vb 

n s s — % 
16% 16% 16% 

9% 9% 9ft + % 
15% 14% IS + % 

575 58V® 56ft 58 +1% 

5560 68% 67% 61% + % 

T1I9 37ft 36% 36% + ft 

1 53ft 53ft 53ft— ft 
21 II ISO 5% 4ft 5% + ft 
7 1017 14 12% 13% +1 


12 Month 
Nigh Low 5todc 


Div. Yld. PE 


QuoLPro* 


1.12 


as 20ft H ran Bn _ _ 

28U 23 HrrBn pf Z94elOX 
6% 3% Horizon 
52ft 3b* HCA *0 
30% 25 Hotel in 2*0 
43% 28ft HouPhM .96 
19ft 13ft HouFob *8 
29* 28% Houdlnt 1J1 
86 69 Holntpf 2X7 

58* 45* Holntpf 250 
81U 67 Holnlpf 6XS 
29* 19ft Houlnd 
15* 8 HouOR 


22* <4% Howl Co *0 
27ft 22 HllfabRf 2X8 


33 10 lb 

101 

1* 11 21bl 

9.1 14 18 

27 13 71 

3X 11 79 

SX 8 
11 
5J 

8.1 

264 9.9 6 
TJBelBX 


30* JD SM f ft 
27% 27% Z7%— * 
5% 5ft. 5% 

42% 41* 42* + % 
29 28* 28V! — % 

35* 35* 35* 

.. 13ft 13ft 13ft + * 
718 34ft 33% 34* + % 
1 76% 76% 76% —a* 
1 49ft 49ft 49ft + ft 
0 77 76% 76% + % 

il 26ft 26* 26% 

9ft 7* 9ft 


13% 9% Huffy 

1«% 12* Hugh! I 
24 17ft HugfvSa 
36ft 31% Human 
31% 20* HunIMl 
41% 26% HutlEF 
31ft 19% Hydra! 


*0 

*8 

X2 


29 

15 

16* 

16ft 

161! 

+ 

* 

10 

87 

23* 

23% 

23* 

+ 

* 

12 

1D9 

W% 

9% 

10* 

+ 

% 

2134 

13 

12% 

12* 

— 

* 

12 

44 

23* 

271b 

23 

+ 

% 

M 

1457 

29* 

28* 

29 

+ 

% 

16 

91 

27% 

27* 

27% 

j. 

ft 

10 

6741 

36* 

34% 

36 

+2* 

10 

15 

29ft 

29 

29 

— 

ft 


1*4 4X 
A5e 3* 


2J0 

1.92 


11 
6* 
SX 
SX 
7 J 
4X 
8* 

11 * 

tlJ 


35ft 23* ICInd 
19ft IS lCMn 
11% 8ft iCN 
38 32* ICN of 

18ft 14% INAln _ _ 

27ft 23 IPTtmn 1*2e 5.7 
17* 14ft IRTPfS 1X0 9J 
36ft 25% ITT Cp TJX 
68ft 49 ITTpfK AM 

64 49 iTTpfO 5JM 
46ft 33ft ITT pt N 2X5 

65 49% ITT of) 4X0 

19%' 11% IU int *0 
M* 17 IdahoPs 1X2 
18* 8ft I deal B 
27* 19% lUPowr 2*4 
21% 17* llPavrpf 235 
40% 32 KPowpf 4*7 MX 
37ft 28* HPowpf LOO 11J 
36ft 26 ITW X2 2* 12 

4o<a 3i* imaOtm 213e 6.1 7 

12 6% I mol Co II 

15% 9ft INCO X0 IX 

63% 45* IndiMpf 7J8 119 

76 57 IndLM pf S*8 M_9 

19% 14* IndIM pt 215 11.9 
20% 15ft IndIM Of 2X5 122 
25% IndiMpf 275 MJ 

28* 20* IndIGss 2M 8X 7 

10ft 4ft Ine/tco J7| 

S3* 39 iraerR 2*0 SLl 17 
37* 28 IngRPi 235 6J 
15* II loarTec X4 3* 27 
2b 19% InldStl X0 21 
48ft 38% IrtdSlpf 4X5 111 
Tift 16% Halloo L00t> 5.7 10 

7ft 3% InspRs 

26% n% inigRsc 8 

B IV IntgRpf 3J3 11.9 
49% «2 IntgRpf 6X1el3X 
35% 25ft IntgRpf 475 1X7 
9% 7% rnliogn 
14ft 8 InlRFn 
19% 16% IIcpSc 

73% 55ft Inter co 

13* 9% Intrtsi 

53% 41 Intrfk 

13ft 8* -Inlmed 

S * 15% InfAlu 

ft 116 IBM 

Bft 16* IntCTrl 
33 24% inlFlav 

lift 6% Ini Ha rv 
7% 3Tb IntHrwf 
3ft 3* InIHwtB 
60 28% InlH PtC 

34ft 1« IntH pfD 
44 34 litfMm 260 63 

35 24ft InfMult 1X6 
87ft 47% lot Poor 2*0 
16% 9ft intRcs 
54% 35* IntNrtti 2*8 
43ft 30* IntpbGa 1J8 
19ft 13% InlBokr „ 

22% 16* infcrtPw 1X0 
13* 9% InISecn 
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235 29* 28ft 29% + ft 
3170 35ft 34ft 34% + * 
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** 



• FMPATf, SEPTEMBERloTmT 

V-::.-’-' TECHwoioor 

Computers Untangle 
lie Pipes From the Wires 

'L ' i = By THOMAS C HAYES 

' ■ Hevr loiA Timet Service 

^ ^ hCn “S»«crs sketch designs for a new 

' R? t f° teuin refinery or other aanS 

aaVSE c ? all ? l Sf figuring how to kceplhe 
electrical wiring and ventilating ducts 
teotn eofljdmg when the actual construction bee£^ the msl 

. The computer helped eliminate many misplaced »" g w in 
^L^Svjngengmeere mom n«ibai^S^iSwiS 
togns^brfore the cranes swung mto actioa. Still, much of that 
early, computer-aided engi- 

Systems are expected 
to increase 
productivity, reduce 
design errors. 

terns. The addiuon of dt*pih on foil -color, 1 9-inch screens has led 
tO signi f ica n t advances in engineering speed and accuracy. Major 
engijoeemig companies such as Fluor Corp. and Bechtel Group, 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 



U.S. Stocks 
Report, M-l, Page 10. 


Page 11 


oeering was executed in two 
d im e nsi ons on the computer 
screen, like sketching on an 
electronic piece of paper. 

.. Today, however, many 
large engineering, construc- 
tion and architecture concerns 
are installing so-called three- 
dimensional engineering s ys- 



*-Cab 



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^ ‘.X? 

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reduce design errors oerore building « c ulut]tu . 

' “If . you don’t have a 3-D capability five to 10 years from now, 
you're- going to have a hard time staying competitive in the 
ea^neering and construction business," said Wi lliam C Breen, a 
senior vice president for project operations at Fluor, in Irvine, 
California. 

Three companies, the Calxna division of General Electric Co., 
Intergraph Corp. and Computer-vision Corp., are among the 
major manufacturers of the systems for the engineering and 
architectural market. 

! HAT business generated about $460 million in worldwide 
sales Last year, according to Calma estimates, and should 
lop SI billion by 1 990. Carl Machover. an industry consul- 
tant in White Plains, New York, put the total for last year at $1.8 
billion, or 60 percent of the computer-aided design market. 

. Calma. acquired by General Electric in 1981, is essentially a 
software creator. It has put together programs for electrical 
systems, heating and cooling, piping, construction management, 
stress analysis and other dements of the design-and-build regi- 
men. 

Using portable work stations built for Calma by Apollo 
Computer Inc, design engineers at Fluor and Bechtel are able to 
work independently, as well as away from the office 
' This means that an engineer working on piping designs can 
check the electrical or ventilation designs in progress to avoid 
missteps as the design takes shape. It accelerates the communica- 
tion between the various engineers on a project and eliminates 
what could turn out to be costly errors. 

The three-dimensional systems are able to store design infor- 
mation from eariy stages of a project. Since engineers know how 
to retrieve it, they are free to spend more time on problem- 
solving, said Chris Demiuh, manager of computer-aided design 
and computer-aided engineering in Bechtel’s advanced technol- 
ogy division in San Francisco. . 

Once the design is complete, and checks for misplaced pipes, 
ducts and wiring have been completed, another program can 
produce complete lists, with , specific dimensions, of all the 
equipment, valves and instruments needed for construction. 

Packages developed by Intergraph, with headquarters in 
Huntsville, Alabama, can help engineers deduce where moving 
parts will show eariy stress signs, which parts can be cut by the 
manufacturer from the same piece of steel and what illustrations 
might best be included in a user’s manual. All the information 
juired is in the completed design, 
ic difficulty Bechtel and Fluor are confronting is training 
fGontmued on Page 17, CoL 8) 


| CurreneyRates 

Cram Bares __*** 

% 

Amsterdom UJS 
Bruuat&ta) SUSS 
Frankfurt UI8 

London (bt USD 

Mitan 145490 

New York(e) • 

Paris Utt 

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fa) To boy one ooood: (U&134S 

Otber Dollar Value* 

Currency per U51 
Arpen. outrai MV 
Awtrai.6 1X736 
Austr.sc&U. 30J7 
Befo.fln.lir. SSB0 
Brazil croz. 7,490.00 
Conations 15804 
DmiM krone 1050S 
epyptnoona Ol 


Corrency per UAS 
Fin. markka 6.11 
Greek flrsc. «« 
Note icono * 74185 

(ndtanruMC 12J153 
tnda. rupiah 1.12ZM 

Irish % 0.W* 

Hraefistwfc. InWJO 

Kuwaiti Anar 03063 


Currency per UAS 
Malay. riM. 2X995 
Max. peso 380M 
Norw. krone EA6 
pun. peso om 
Pori, escudo .173JS 
Saudi rival 16535 
Sipw.5 ZXU 
S. Air. rand 25381 


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Prime Rota 
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L njnncui Sani of Tokyo. 


I month 

1 months 

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BmoJrths 
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Source: Reuters. 



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The Royel Bank 
_ _ of Scotland 
7M\ Group 


Elizabeth I. 
Ritchie, 
branch 
manager 


tv Mr- Y>«t TVnr. (vtun. k.iui 

Marie Antoinette Huegenin, manager of the women’s branch 
of the Banque Hypotecaire du Canton de Geneva 



Thu New Yak Tap 


2 European Banks Cater Exclusively to Women 


By Paul Lewis 

Vew Iiartt Times- Semee 

PARIS — Marie Anioiaeue Huegenin. 
manager of Europe’s newest women's bank, 
works out of a rather ausicre office: No 
carpet, no pictures on the blue and gray 
walls and only a telephone mi her desk. 

The rest of the bank that she runs in 
central Geneva is equally functional and 
unadorned, particularly the white-walled 
main hall, where customers wait to speak to 
tellers seated behind a bullet-proof glass 
screen. 

“This is a working office,” Miss Hue- 
genin said, when asked to explain the mar- 
keting strategy behind the decor. “Women 
want a bank 10 feel serious.” 

But up in Edinburgh, Elizabeth 1. Rit- 
chie, manager of Europe’s only other wom- 
en's bank, dunks her customers want a 
feminine touch. She woos clients with cut 
flowers, thick carpels, a luxurious powder 
room, and free morning coffee. “We aim to 
make this a kind of ladies* dub,” Miss 
Ritchie said, “a place where ladies can drop 
in after a morning’s shopping and meet 
their friends.” 


In their differing styles, Miss Huegenin 
and Miss Ritchie preside over the most eye- 
catching of the various efforts of European 
banks to market their services to women, 
whose economic clout is growing 

Women now make up about 40 percent 
of the work force in the 10 Common Market 
countries, compared with 34 percent in 
1973. and many businesses these days are 
owned by women. Some banks are making 
a special pitch for their business, throu 
advertising, as West Germany’s Denise] 
Bank does, or through such gimmicks as 
Swiss Credit Bank’s "fashion and finance” 
seminars. They combine a fashion show 
with counseling on investment and personal 
finance: 

The vast majority of European banks, 
however, hold to the view chat the best way 
to win women customers is to avoid singling 
them oul “There is no need for special 
banks when all our customers are equally 
loved.” Bemd Spree ger, a spokesman for 
the German Bankers Association, said. And 
the French Bankers Association agrees. 
“We’ve never even thought of women's 
banks." a spokesman said. 


Britain’s Barclays will not even advertise. 
“We make absolutely no distinction be- 
tween men and women in our strategies and 
we have no intention of doing so. a Bar- 
clays official, a woman, said. 

ln Sweden. 30 percent of the new compa- 
nies registered in the Iasi two or three years 
were started by women, and the competi- 
tion for their banking business is intense, 
Amnika H alldin of F-nskilda Bank in Stock- 
holm said. “But there is no demand for 
separate women’s banks ” she said. “Swed- 
ish women entrepreneurs are interested in 
the some things as men — interest rates and 
the availability of credit.” 

That sort of thinking isolates Miss Rit- 
chie and Miss Huegenin at the very extreme 
of the marketing spectrum. More precisely, 
it isolates the Royal Bank of Scotland and 
the smaller Banque Hypothecate du Can- 
ion de Genfcve, which own and operate the 
two women’s banks as branches staffed 
entirely by women. 

Miss Ritchie’s branch has been in busi- 
ness since the mid-1960s; Banque Hypothe- 
cs re opened its women’s bank last May. It 
(Continued on Page 17, CoL 4) 


Spending in U.S. 
Surges 1.2%; 
Income Up 0.3% 


The AtotK luted friv 

Washington — Americans 

went on a buying spree last month, 
boosting personal spending by the 
largest amount since April. But 
they financed the purchases by 
draining their savings down to a 
record low. the government said 
Thursday. 

The U.S. Commerce Depart- 
ment said personal-consumption 
spending soared 12 percent last 
month. Americans apparently were 
rushing to take advantage of cut- 
rate financing incentives being of- 
fered by automakers before the 
new-model year. 

The August spending gain was 
three times the 0.4-perceni July ad- 
vance and the biggest increase since 
a 1.3-percem April rise. 

Income gains lagged far behind 
the rise in spending. Personal in- 
comes rose a modest 0.3 percent in 
August, the weakest showing since 
a May decline. 

The discrepancy between spend- 
ing and income growth was made 
up with savings and debt. The per- 
sonal-savings rate of Americans 
fell to LS percent in August, the 
lowest it has been since the govern- 
ment began keeping statistics in 
1959. 

Other statistics show Americans 
carrying a record consumer debt. 
The" combination of sluggish in- 
come gains, low savings and high 


EC Raises Some Wheat Subsidies, Blames U.S. for Its Action 

By Steven J. Diyden 

international iTerulJ Tribune 


BRUSSELS — The European 
Community, saying it was reacting 
to a special U.S. farm-export subsi- 
dy program, has voted to raise sub- 
sidies on European wheat exports 
to Mediterranean nations. 

The action, taken Wednesday, 
allows EC member countries to 
raise farm-export subsidies on 
shipments to the region to 55 Euro- 
pean Currency Units ($41,800 per 
metric ton, from 41 ECUs per ion. 

The EC later said that the move 
was prompted by a special U.S. 
farm-export subsidy plan. A U.S. 


official in Brussels rejected the EC 
argument, saying that. “I think it’s 
a step further." 

Trade tension between the Unit- 
ed Stales and the EC in the sensi- 
tive agricultural sector has been on 
the rise in recent months. On Sept. 
9. President Ronald Reagan an- 
nounced a move against the EC 
and other nations Tor “unfair trad- 
ing practices.” He challenged the 
EC subsidies on canned fruit. 

In June, the U.S. secretary of 
agriculture, John R_ Block, and the 
EC agriculture commissioner, 
Frans Andriessen, traded threats 
over trade subsidies. The issue at 


Algeria, a traditional French mar- 
ket. In July the U.S. expanded its 
grain subsidy to indude Egypt. 

The United States launched the 
$2-billion farm subsidy program in 
May with a pledge to win back 
agricultural markets it claimed 
were taken by other nations, in par- 
ticular EC members, through un- 
fair trade tactics. 

The EC decision Wednesday to 
raise wheat subsidies followed two 
purchases by Egypt in the past 
week under the special U.Sl plan. 
The sales, which were for 450,000 
metric tons of wheat and wheat 


flour, were the first made bv a for- 
eign buyer taking advantage of the 
U.S. plan, an American official 
said in Brussels. 

The EC Commission, calling the 
U.S. subsidy plan “deplorable." 
said it was forced to react by ad- 
justing the price of grains in order 
to safeguard its commercial inter- 
ests in traditional markets. 

Egypt now purchases about 70 
percent of its imported grain from 
the EC and U.S. officials reported- 
ly have said they would like to 
supply 40 percent of Egypt's grain 
import requirements. 


Under the U.S. program, the 
government provides American ex- 
porters with free surplus farm 
products so that they can lower the 
prices offered to foreign buyers. 

The U.S. official said the United 
Slates might oonclude further pacts 
with foreign buyers under the plan 
this year, although he added be did 
not know of any purchases current- 
ly in the making. Algeria has not 
yet responded to a U.S. initiative. 

The EC faces pressure from a 
record harvest of grain this year 
that has been estimated at 140- 
million metric tons, with surpluses 
put at 15-million tons. 


debt will likely doom hopes of 
much more consumer spending in 
coming months, economists said. 

This would be bad news for the 
Reagan administration, which is 
counting on gains in consumer 
spending to propel the economy 
out of the doldrums it has been in 
for the past year. The administra- 
tion is predicting a rebound in eco- 
nomic activity to a rate near 5 per- 
cent in the second half of the year, 
far above the 1.1 percent rate from 
January through June. 

Other economists say the econo- 
my is unlikely to grow above a 3 
percent rate in the second half. 

“1 think the economy is going 
through a last gasp before it takes a 
breather,” said Robert Gough, se- 
nior vice president at Data Re- 
sources Inc., a private economic 
forecasting firm. 

The government is due to report 
its initial flash estimate for overall 
growth in the gross national prod- 
uct on Friday. Consumer spending, 
weighed at 60 percent, is the largest 
single component of GNP. 

The Commerce Department said 
auto sales provided the biggest part 
of the August increase. Total 
spending increased at an annual 
rate of $31.1 billion last month and 
$21.9 billion of that was in durable 
goods such as autos. 

However, Allen Sinai, chier 
economist for Shearson Lehman 
Brothers, said the big surge in auto 
sales would mean weaker sales of 
1986 new cars. 

The 0.3-percent income gain fol- 
lowed a 0.4-percent July advance. 
While personal incomes rose 9.8 
percent last year, they have ad- 
vanced by just 4.1 percent at an 
annual rale for the first six months. 

A big pan of the August income 
advance came from a $3.6-billion 
annual rise in manufacturing pay- 
rolls. the first sign of strength in 
this sector in some time. 

But fanners, another belea- 
guered sector of the economy, con- 
tinued to suffer. Farm incomes de- 
clined $12 billion in August, (he 
second consecutive monthly drop. 

Disposable, or after-tax, income 
rose 0.2 percent in August, down 
from a 03-percent July increase. 


World Bank Loans Fall 
For First Time Since ’ 67 


By Carl Gewirrz 

International Herald Tnhuiw 

PARIS — The World Bank, 
which is drawing ever more vocal 
criticism in official circles and 



- USX 
89230 
17230 

60X1 

273*5 

551X0 

1672* 

14X5 


siC^skfss^ssss&rffs^sss. 

Other data from Routers and AP. 


plight 

the developing countries, reported 
Thursday a decline in the volume 
of loans approved in the fiscal year 
ended June 30 — the first annual 
drop since 1967. 

The awkwardness of having to 
report a decline in commitments 
was magnified by the near dou- 
bling of the bank's net income, to a 
record high $1.14 billion, from the 
S600 million earned a year earlier. 

The annual report showed that 
the bank approved loans totaling 
SI 1.36 billioa. down 4.9 percent 
from the previous year and well 
below the $J2.6-to-$13 billion tar- 
get it had set itself. 

Actual disbursements, in con- 
trast to commitments, rose a scant 
0.76 percent, to $8.65 billion. This 
compares to increases of 25 percent 
in the 1982 and 1984 fiscal years 
and almost 8 percent in 1983. 

The bank said the drop in ap- 
provals was due to a combination 
of factors — a reduction and/or 
reorientation of investment pro- 
grams in a number of countries, 
unanticipated delays in project 
preparation and a derision by the 
bank to hold up lending where it 
was not comfortable with the eco- 


IU5. Market 

StpL 19 

Motrin Lfocn RpotfrAwets 

so oov »*otooc vfcW- 

Tsiarate inwra** Rei * WOWU 7,17 

Source: Morhtr Lvnetu Totem*. 


■9 048 
UfKti. 

_ ■ _ * JB 

sibs JJ«s 

375.90 +W® 

319.90 +5JS 

„ Ptarfs sntf London offletot the 
LiMmooun. on? Zurich opening one 
Ipos- Comer current 

SSMSS. 


India Targets. 
5%GNPGrmvth 

Reuters 

NEW DELHI — India's 
five-year development plan 
ending in 1990 aims for annual 
growth of 5 percent in gross 
national product, 4 percent in 
agriculture and 8 percent in in- 
dustry. (he deputy chairman of 
the planning commission, Man- 
mohan Singh, said Thursday. 

Those targets compare with 
averages in 1980-85 or 5.2 per- 
cent growth in GNP. 3J per- 
cent in agriculture and 6 per- 
cent in industry, official figures 
show. Mr. Singh said the plan, 
approved Wednesday by the 
commission, aims to reduce the 
proportion of people living be- 
low the poverty line to 26 per- 
cent by 1990 from 37 percent. 

Uncertain overseas aid pros- 
pects and a shortage of domes- 
tic resources have delayed the 
plan to later this year, govern- 
ment officials said, 1( had been 
scheduled to start on April 1. 


comic performance or stabilization 
plans of Third World countries. 

“Creditworthiness and perfor- 
mance problems in several major 
borrowing countries required the 
jbankj to limit temporarily its ex- 
posure in them," the report said. 

Establishing a defensive, self-an- 
alytical lone, the report went on to 
say that this experience “highlight- 
ed the need for the bank to be able 
to respond to altered circumstances 
by haring at its disposal a variety of 
flexible lending strategies.” 

Further, the report indicated 
that the bank’s executive board had 
ordered it to lake a less bard-nosed 
approach. 

In a section discussing collabora- 
tion between the bank and its sister 
institution, the International Mon- 
etary Fund, the bank made clear 
that its new marching orders meant 
that “close collaboration should 
not be identified with ’cross-condi- 
uonality.’ in which before receiving 
assistance from one instituiipn, a 
country must meet the conditions 
established for benefiting from the 
resources of the other.” 

The bank's net income for the 
year, $ 1 .14 billion, is about equal to 
the annual profit of a major com- 
mercial bank holding company, 
such as Citicorp- 

But the World Bank, owned by 
governments of 148 countries, was 
not created to be a profit-making 
enterprise. 

It is niD on a commercial basis in 
that it is expected to be financially 
sound and capable of standing oh 
its own feet. But the reason it was 
established in 1945 was to help 
raise standards of living in develop- 
ing countries by channeling finan- 
cial resources to them from devel- 
oped countries. 

The profit was more than ac- 
counted for by the $620-million in- 
crease in investment income earned 
od the cash and other liquid assets 
held in its own account The liquid 


aqui 

assets it reported totaled S 1 7.36 bil- 
lion, up S15 billion from a year 
earlier. 

The 1985 report devoted more 
space than in previous years to ex- 
plaining why the bank maintains 
such a large treasury and measur- 
ing the profitability of the portfo- 
lio. In view of these record earn- 
ings, the bank ceased charging its 
own borrowers a front-end fee of 
0J25 percent for loans submitted 
for approval since last Jan. 8. That 
fee stood at 1.S percent at the start 
of the previous fiscal year. 

The report noted that the joint 
ministerial committee of the 
boards of governors of the bank 
and the IMF “bearing in mind the 
bank’s need to maintain lending 
standards and prudent financial 
policies, called for an expansion in 
the bank's lending program in or- 

( Continued on Page 16, CoL 5) 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 



Page 12 


COMPANY NOTES 



BjtrBdb : Hagerty 

Jmtrnadanal Herald Tribune 

tONDOTt— British Tciccora- 
axawc3$tx&'2J-£ reported Thurs- 
day rhatpretax prom in the fiscal 
tot quarter ended June 30 climbed 
39tereqiv;.tp £443 nullicm ($594 
m£onX'^£nCMat £319 million a year 

The- reader exceeded most fore- 
as« andbdped boost BT shares 8 
*nce to dese ar 204 pence on the 
xrodem Stock Exchange. 

-Net . profit .rose .■ 20 percent, to 

ratiRa,** 4.1 pence a share, 
com £204 jpBUpn, or 3.4 pence a 
h»K Revenue grdv n percent to 
2.01 MKonfromfl.81 billion. 
BTcOTBMKd to benefit from the 
hazp . reduction of debt achieved 
ist yearwhen the government sold 
off of the telephone company^ 
harcs to the poolia. Stripping out 
be resnffiBtg.drop in interest costs, 
fT said, the. company showed an- 
ledyisgL growth, of 27 percent in 
iretax profit and 17 percent net. 
‘Tbe-ahderiyuig trend is pretty 


Olivetti Joins 

n First Quarter Thomson in 

& Computers 

£1 -84 billion, up 24 percent. 

The improvement in results dor- 
mg the latest quarter was largely 
£*2® ■. totfier volume of calls 
nandJed by fewer workers and to 
grater interest earnings on invest* 
tnents, BT said. International call 
volume grew 15 percent, and do- 
mestic growth was 8 percent 


Followers of BT are awaiting a 
decision from the Office of Tde* 
comrnunications. a regulatory 
agency, on what kind of access 
Mrcmy Communications Lid. 
win be given to BPs network. 

Mr. Meek said the dwyw . Kke- 
-Jy to come early next week, wil] 
have a big influence on bow suc- 
cessfully BPs small rival will be 
able to Jure away lucrative business 
traffic. Mercury is a uni t of Cable 
& Wireless PLC. 






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By Axel Krause 

IntenuatoM d Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Slate-owned Thom- 
son SA of France and Italy's Oli- 
vetti SpA said Thursday that they 
would cooperate in developing a 
new generation of microcomputers, 
primarily for the educational mar- 
ket in western Europe. 

Under the agreement, Thom- 
son’s consumer electronics divi- 
sion, Olivetti and Acorn Computer 
Group PLC of Britain, in which 
Olivetti has a 79.8-percent interest, 
will also work to develop integrated 
software and hardware. 

Acora' specializes in educational 
and home computers. 

Many details remain to be nego- 
tiated among the three compames, 
including joint research financing, 
production and marketing arrange- 
ments, according to executives. 

Jean Gerotbwohl, president of 
Thomson’s consumer electronics 
division, would not specify spend- 
ing plans, but said a microcomput- 
er Uae could be in production as 
early as 1987. 

He invited other West European 
electronics companies to join the 
new venture in an effort to meet 
competition from the United 
States, Japan and other European 
companies. 

Thomson held talks with N.V. 
Philips of the Netherlands aimed at 
a common standard for microcom- 
puters, but the Dutch electronics 
company last year adopted the Jap- 
anese MSX standard. 


VW Adds Jobs, 
Plans Spending 
To Meet Demand 

Reuters 

FRANKFURT — Volks- 
wagen AG sales should contin- 
ue at a high level into the first 
half of 1986. with demand cur- 
rently outstripping supply de- 
spite full use of capacity, ac- 
cording to Waller Hiller. VW's 
vice-chairman. 

Speaking to employees, he 
said this was a time of "high 
economic development.” 

Guenter Hartwich. the man- 
agement board member respon- 
sible for production, told the 
same meeting of employees that 
VW has added 5,000 new jobs 
(his year. A further 2,000 
should be created by the end of 
the year, 1.700 of those in 
Wolfsburg, West Germany, 
headquarters. 

VW has more than 131,000 
workers employed in its sLx 
West German plants, the high- 
est number since 1973, Mr. 
Hortwich said. 

He added that 750 million 
Deutsche marks (5258.6 mil- 
lion) will be invested annually 
over the next few years to mod- 
ernize assembly lines in Wolfs- 
burg. 

Demand for VW’s Golf and 
Jelta cars cannot be satisfied, he 
said, and in the Wolfsburg. 
Brunswick, Salzgitter and Kas- 
sel plants the limitations of the 
machinery have restricted out- 
put. VW will invest around 120 
million DM to increase ma- 
chine output and cut back, over- 
time, he said. 


Combustion Engineering Sets 
$200-Million Charge for Sale 


l •mirJ Prr\> hiiirnuiniiM/ 

STAMFORD. Connecticut — 
Combustion Engineering, a diversi- 
fied worldwide engineering con- 
cern. m id Thursday that it will take 
a S200-million writeoff against 
third-quarter earnings in order to 
sell a major portion of the compa- 
ny’s oil and gas service assets. 

Charles £. Huge!, president and 
chief executive officer, said the 
companies up for sale include 
Vetco Offshore. Gray Tool and 
Naico operations. The sate, he said, 
was pan of C-E's strategy to focus 
on tne power and process indus- 
tries. 

Directors also voted to reduce 
the quarterly dividend to 25 cents a 
share from 46 cents, payable Oct. 
31 to shareholders of record CVt. 
17. C-E stock dosed up 25 cents to 
525 on the New York Stock Ex- 
change Thursday. 

•*We are changing the character 

Sony Third-Quarter Net 
Shows Decrease of 9-2% 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Sony Corp- said 
Thursday its consolidated profit in 
the third fiscal quarter ending July 
31 dropped 9.2 percent, as net earn- 
ings fell to 17.48-billion yen (S73.8 
million) from 19.25-billion yen a 
year earlier. 

Sales rose 12.6 percent, to 349- 
billion yen, from 310-billioa yen. 
Officials attributed the profit de- 
cline to an unusual gam a year 
earlier of 1.8-billion yen in pro- 
ceeds from a public offering of its 
subsidiary, Sony Magnescale Inc 


i»f our in vest mem base os we con- 
tinue to become u more services- 
onciued. value-added supplier.” 
Mr. Huge! said. •’Today’s actions 
will help us to improve our return 
rates and give us greater flexibility 
in use of capital.” 

Mr. Hugel said the oil and gas 
businesses up for sale “have experi- 
enced people, excellent technology, 
modern facilities and a high reputa- 
tion with customers throughout the 
world.” 

He said the company intends to 
maintain those strengths as it holds 
discussions with buyers. 

“We’ve been downsizing plants, 
streamlining our management and 
reducing employment at all levels 
to improve our cost effectiveness.” 
Mr. Huge! said. 

The latest measures and earlier 
initiatives jre designed to make C- 
E ~a leading tingle source supplier 
to the process and power indus- 
tries.” he said. 

There is an annual worldwide 
market for capital investment and 
maintenance expenditures of over 
5135 billion in the process and 
power industries, be said. 

C-E which is involved in engi- 
neering and design of a broad 
range of industrial equipment and 
generating systems, had revenues 
of $3.10 billion in 19S4. 

In the second quarter ended June 
30 C-E*s earnings dropped to S9.4 
million, or 29 cents a share, from 
S14.4 million, or 44 cents a share, in 
the same quarter last year. 

Revenues rose to S7S8.4 million 
from $745.0 million in the quarter a 
year earlier. 


Bank of Credit & Commerce In- 
ternational of Hong Kong has been 
given permission to open a branch 
in China’s Shenzhen special eco- 
nomic zone. Last month, Hong 
Kong & Sha nghai Banking Corp. 
got permission to open tee first 
new foreign hank branch in China 
since 1949. 

C1GA hotel group of Italy has 
offered to buy Spain's government- 
owned Eniursa note! chain, which 
the Spain has said it is wilting the 
privatize. The details of the offer 
were not given. Any offer is subject 
to examination by Spanish authori- 
ties. 

Fairchild Industries Inc^ the fi- 
nancially troubled aerospace and 
electronics company, is discussing 
a possible reduction of its role in a 
joint venture to build a a 35-seat 
twin-engine commuter airplane 
with Saab-Scania AB of Sweden. 

McDotmeB Douglas Corp> said 
American Airlines has exercised 
options to buy 10 more MD-SQ 
jetliners Tor slightly more than $200 
million. The order brings to 1 10 the 
total number of MD-SQs American 
has contracted to buy or lease from 
McDonnell Douglas' or third-party 
financial institutions. 

Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. 
and the staff of the New York State 
Public Service Commission have 
reached an agreement that would 


place a cap of $4.45 billion on costs 
of the Nine Mile Point 2 nuclear 
plant that can be included in rate 
bases of its owners. $900 million 
less titan the projected plant cost. 

Nippon Steel Corp. has won an 
order of 5 billion yen (520.7 mil- 
lion) from China National Machin- 
ery Import & Export Corp. and 
China Petroleum Engineering & 
Construction Corp- to build a 
crude oil terminal at the mouth of 
the Yellow River. 

Rowntree Mackintosh PLC has 
reported pretax profit erf £20.5 mil- 
lion (S27J5 million) for the half year 
ended June 15. an S.7-perceni de- 
cline from £22J million a year ear- 
lier. Revenue rose to £519.4 mil- 
lion, an 83-percent increase from 
£4793 million. 

Signal Gos-’s shareholders have 
approved a merger into Allied 
Corp. to form Allied-Signal Inc. 
Allied holders approved the merger 
Wednesday. Each Signal share will 
be exchanged for one Allied share 
in the merger, winch will create a 
company with sales of more than 
514 billion annually. 

Unilever NV has been granted a 
temporary restraining order 
against Richardson-Vicks Inc.’s 
planned issuance of a preferred 
stock, a protective move against 
Unilever's proposed buyout. 


New York Industrial 
Index Fund N.V. 
Curasao, Netherlands Antilles 

At the Annual General Meeting of 
Shareholders held on 19 th 
September, 1985 a cash dividend 
of USS 32-85 per Ordinary Share 
was declared payable as from 
26th September, 1985 against 
delivery of dividend coupon 
No. 9 with Pierson. Beldring & 
Pierson N.V., Herengtracht 214, 
Amsterdam. 


V.AIC'H 1 K_V 1U L : 

Gnmr ol Ski)! 
AMSTERDAM 

Oudviijds Voorburjual 157-159 
Telephone 020 -24 44 33 





Address. 


Working in partnership 
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Nomura brings its multiple str< 

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©NOMURA 


NCMJRA KTH^NATOMAL LIMUED. (London) Tel:{0l)283-8811 
NOMURA EUROPE N.V. (Amsierdam) Tel: (020) 444860 /NOMURA EUROPE GmbH (Frankfurt) Tel: (069)770621 
NOMURA (SWITZERLAND) LTD., ZURICH OFFICE Tel: (01) 219-9111 / GENEVA OFFICE Tel: (022)324646 
LUGANO OFFICE Tel: (091) 20 22 22 / NOMURA FRANCE (Paris) Tel: (01) 562-1170 
NOMURA INVESTMENT BANKING (MIDDLE EAST) EC. (Manama) Tel: 271099, 254282, 233432 
BRUSSELS REPRESENTATIVE OFFICE OF THE NOMURA SECURITIES CO., LTD. Tel: 230-7167 

THE NOMURA SECURITIES CO., LTD., TOKYO HEAD OFFICE Tel: (03) 211- 1 811, 21 1-381 1 




. .J 


«««a T» o-a j; oa«i 



f: 

I 



f 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 


P*. 


Pargesa 

Holding SA 


GENEVA 


Notice is hereby given to shareholders of an 


Ordinary Shareholders’ Meeting 


to be held on Tuesday October 1, 1985 at 1 1.30 A.M. 
at the Head Office of 
BANQUE PARIBAS (SUISSE) S.A. 

2 Place de Hollande, Geneva (Switzerland) 


AGENDA : 


1 . Report of the Board of Directors, presentation of the Financial Statements for the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1985, and the Auditor s Report. 


2. Discussion, approval of said Reports, and proposals to allocate the net profit. 


3. Release and discharge of the Board of Directors. 

4. Resignations from and appointments to the Board of Directors. 


5. Appointment of the Auditor. 


6. Increases of capital. 

a) Resolution to increase the capital from SF 787,500,000 to SF 792,000,000 by 
issue at par of 45,000 new registered shares of SF 100 each and resolution of the 
registered shareholders to renounce to exercise their subscription rights. 

b) Confirmation of the subscription for the shares and payment in full to the Com- 
pany of the proceeds of the capital increase. 

c) Resolution to increase the capital from SF 792,000,000 to SF S9 1,000 ,000 by 
issue at par of 90,000 new registered shares of SF 100 each and by issue at par of 
90000 new bearer shares of SF 1,000 each, reserved to the present shareholders, 
in the proportion of one new share for each eight shares held. 

d) Confirmation of the subscription for the shares and payment in full to the Com- 
pany of the proceeds of the capital increase. 


7. Amendment of articles 5,23,33 and 34 of the statutes. 


Shareholders may obtain entry cards to the Shareholders’ Meeting at the BANQUE 
PARIBAS (SUISSE) SA., UNION DE BANQUES SUISSES, SOCIETE DE BANQUE 
SUISSE and CREDIT SUISSE, from September 20 until 12 noon on September 30, 
1985, depositing their shares or a receipt for such deposit with another bank. 


The Annual Report, including the income statement, the balance sheet, the Auditor’s 
Report, the proposals by the Board of Directors regarding the allocation of the fiscal 
year's net profit as well as the proposed amendments, to the statutes, are available to the 
shareholders from September 20, 1985, at the Head Office and the subsidiaries of the 
aforementioned bonks. 


Geneva, September 18, 1985 


For the Board of Directors 


A. de Pfyffer 
Chairman 


S. Tapemoux 
Secretary 



(SL^MONEV 

i\mi;iK.irnix 


ANENTERNATOV^ 

OILDAHY CONFERENCE 

I X )NI K)N.(K;iX)Bi:il^-25,m‘x 

"Surviving in a competitive environment", will be the theme of the sixth International Herald. Tribune/ Oil 
Daily Conference on Oil and Money in the Eighties’ 9 . The program, designed for senior executives in energy 
and related fields, will address the key issues effecting the ament energy situation and assess future trends 
and strategies. H.E Professor Dr. SubrotD, Minister of Mines and Energy , Indonesia and President of the 
OPEC conference, and John S. Herrington, U.S. Energy Secretary, will head a distinguished group of 
speakers from Europe, the Middle East, Latin America and the United States. 


OCTOBER 24 


OCTOBER 25 


KEYNOTE ADDRESS: 

— Professor Dr. Subroto, Minister of Mines end Energy, 
Indonesia 

COMPETITION FOR MARKET SHARE 
— Moderator: Herman T. Franssen, Former Chief Economist, 
International Energy Agency, Paris, 

— H.F. Kepfinger, Charman and Chief Executive Officer, 

The Kepfinger Companies, Houston. 

— Afirio Parra, Mcnogrng Director, Pefroleos de Venezuela 
(UJQSA, London. 

— Douglas Wade, Senior Energy Analyst, She! International 
Petroleum Company LfcL, London. 

THE IMPLICATIONS OF OPEC PRODUCT IMPORTS AND 
DOWNSTREAM S7RATEGffi5 ON THE OIL MARKETS. 

— Nader H. Suhan, President, Kuweit Petroleum International 
Ltd, London. 

HOW TWO MAJOR Ofl, COMPANIES ARE SURVMNG 
IN A COMPETITIVE B4VWONMENT. 

— Allen E. Murray, President, Msfcfl Corporrtion, New York. 
— Arve Johnsen, Resident, Sfafofl, Stavanger. 

PRODUCERS Ah© RERNERS STRATEGIES IN AN ERA 
OF GROWING COMPETITION. 

— John R, Hafl, Chrirman and Chief Executive Officer, Ashland 
Oil Incorporated, Ashland, Kentucky. 

— Gp Mahnvirtq, General Manager, Neste 1 
— Nicola MongeS, Assistant to the Executive ' 

Ente Nazionde Idroarburi, Rome. 

— Saud O. Oundbh, Manager, Supply Coaitfinatiorv Pefromin 

Participation, Dhahran. 


NEW OUTLOOKS FOR UNTTH) STATES’ ENERGY POLICY. 
— The Honorable John S. Herrington, United States' Energy 
Secretary. 

NORTH SEA OIL: SffiDCORN OF TOMORROW’S 
PROSPERITY. 

— John Moore, MJ 3 ., finanad Secretary to the Treasury, 

United Kingdom. 

THE EFFECT OF FLUCTUATING OU. PRIGS ON THE 
BANKING SYSTEMS, SHARE VALUES, NSTTTUTIONAL 
INVESTORS AND WORLD BANK LOANS. 

— Robert B. Weaver, Senior Vice President and Globa! 

Petroleum Executive, The Chase Manhctftcn Bark, NA, N.Y. 
— Peter Gignoux, Senior Vice Preadert, Shearson LeHncn 
Brothers Ltd, London. 

— Robert L Frarlin, Fbunder.and President, Lawrence Energy 
Associates incorporated, Boston. 

— kji M. Hume, Assistant Director, Energy Department, The 
World Bank, Wash i ngton, D.C 
MEGAMERGER TRENDS AND THE FUTURE OF TH- OL 
INDUSTRY. 

— Robert F. GreenhS, Managing Director, Morgan Stanley & 


Go. Incorporated, New York’ 
NONCONVENHONAL < 


\ Hekmki. 
President, 


.OIL SALES. 

— Nkhoks G. Voute, Ol Gonsutent, London, The Hague. 

Charles L Ddy, Menacing Director, LM Fische! &Ca Ud, London. 
— Dieter Kempermann, Mcnaghg Director, Uraon Rhemche 
Braunkohlen Kraffctaff A.G. 


-Rosemary McFodcJen, 

.OSING PANEL DISC 


President, N.Y. Mercantile Exchange. 


CLOSING PANB. DISCUSSION OF CURRENT ENERGY ISSUES. 
— Pail H. Frenkel, President, Petroleum Economics Ltd 



CONFERENCE LOCATION: 

Royd Garden HoH Kensn^xi Hf^i Sreef, LONDON Wi 4PT. Telephone: (441 J 937 8030. Teteac 
263151. A block of rooms has been reserved for conference portidpar fa . Please canted hotel dredty. 
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM. 

Please enrofl the fototvfog pu Topartf far the oi conference. □ Check endosed □ Please invoice. 


SUBWfe. 


WST NAME. 


postoom. 


COWSW:. 




»»- v.s/::.r ; --h 

PmAMsIhedBimdBrnr. ' * 


At} am. 


aiY/CONRf;. 


farihexar&rmce. 


7 &BW»6- 


.THfXr. 


20-9-05 


LLSiRitures 


Open Ws» Low' Close Oifr- 

PORK BEULieSICMEl 

7MB Mar 62-V5 xMO 4135 6265 — 02 


SrpL 19 


lA) rvuir iu.n bmr *rri lie 

m S" *“2 ££ Z§ 


Season Season 
High Low 


57 JO Jul UAO 6A£ Q3Jfl 6190 — ■» 

p?p > AM 6132 6222 61.711 Xl 45 —-*7 


Open HW LOW Ctosr Qyg. 


J&j00 

1451 Prev.Soles WB 
Prev Dot Odea Iflt. 60« uoll2. ' 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBT) 


M00 bu minimum- aollors pe r UMI 


3 J6V3 IMVt 

3*Q*3 ZJ*fl 

174V, 287 

402 284 

307V, 2*3 

3.45 U7 

EM.Scles 


Sea 2M 221 
Dec 1W* 23Vu 
mot 299 299*6 

Moy 296 S. 2.97 
Jul 277V, 208* 
See 280 280 

Prev.Soles 7ZN 


Z90<j. 281V.- ~B2 

189 28V U -JWi 

IVSVj 1955i 

293W 2.93b — JOS 

2Jfi»4 274 a n — J4 

Un. 27P6 -035 i 


Prev.Oov Open Inf 32.984 aH 349 


corn lean 

MOO Du minimum- ddlorsper buSMI 
321W 220"; S«p 141 233* 


US 2.14V} 

no 224V, 

22»*e ZJI 

28* 233 

234"; 224 L. 

23Ui Z2B*ti 

EH.Sofn 


Dee 119 220 

Mor 228^ 129'i 
Mar 23414 ur* 
Jul 236 237 


» *» SL 


Dec 224V6 _ 
Prev. Soles TSM\ 


22S 2JKi +JT 
118 218'- — Jlllft 

128 228'a — i01'i 

233 VJ 234 -JMb 
2»'j 234'.'; — 

230 +.0QV5 

USSl 227’.’3 +48P4 


Prev. Day Open Ini .124^66 off 1422 


SOYBEANS ICBT) 

MOO bu mlnfniunv dollars per bushel 
&J1 SJBVj Sep 5.1 7Vj 5394. 


(x*B 

4J9 

1M 

739 

6J8 

634 

638 

432 


5JB1W 
ill 
532 W 
531 V. 
5361- 
535V, 
532 
538 


N0» i17 517V3 

Jon &2n* SJ 2 SV 1 
Mar S3 9 £3934 

Mar £4ft Sifto 

Jul £4316 5LS4K, 
Aug £52 £54 

sep 

HOY Ml 1 * 5.41V, 

Esi. Sales Prey. Soles iftMl 

Prev. Dur Open Ini. 61.146 off 1331 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBTl 
lOJfom. dollars per fon 
17930 12040 Sep 

i22Jo get 
125AD 
12748) 

13030 
13250 
13400 
135*0 
137 JO 


£.16 

Sliv, 

£ 22 '- 

534 

£44’A 

54310 

5A8'A 


538 538 


£18’i +JBWi 
£114, -UK 
£2261 —JOle 
534 <A -3U 
534V, —JO*. 
£50 

538V, — anv, 

£38 — J» 


—D* 


1BQJ0 
1BCOO 
163410 
204J0 
1030 
WJX 
1*630 
167JM 
Est. Sales 


13030 
.10 13130 


Dec 135.40 1 3520 
13250 


Jwn 


137i0 
Mar 139.90 139 JO 
Mav 14130 1*230 
JuJ 1*200 1444V 
Aue 
Sep 


12940 13020 

S23 ISiS 


+.10 


-AQ 

—JO 


. P rev. Sales 8J18 

Prev. Oov Open inf. 4M24 o«4» 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBTl 
60000 Ua-dollarsPfjl00R& 

31.10 Tijs Sep 22 

3037 2UJ4 Oct 2135 


13*00 
13830 13930 —30 

14L00 U2JM 
14380 14*J» 

14*30 — 30 

1*220 


2935 2U0 Dec 2134 21 A* 


VSTl 


21.00 Jan 2135 2135 

2135 Mor 21J0 JL«r 

27 AS 21 AS Mav 2210 2215 

7 £?S 21.95 Jul 2240 22*0 

2S.15 2205 Aug 2230 2235 

3435 2225 SeP 2225 2235 

2280 2230 Ocf r 2235 2235 

Esi. Sales Prev. Sales 2926 

Prev. Oar Open Int. 5)350 off )J3B 
OATS (CBTl w . 

£000 bu minimum- doftorseerbushel 
139 Line Sep 131 132V, 

132V, 131 Dec 5 JJ6 

1A7A. L24U; Mor 139V, 130 

1A3 137V, MOV 130.5 131 

730V, 134 Jul 139 139 

Est. sales Prev. Sales XS 

Prev. Dav Open Ini 34)10 up 34 


2175 21-78 —i» 
21.15 21.16 —.12 

2138 21.12 —.12 

2136 2130 —.10 

2138 27-60 —.16 

21.90 21.90 —.16 

2215 2230 —.10 

■nVi -Tin —.10 
•nv. nv. 


.10 


131 132tt +40*» 

135 L25V4 

139 130 +30V, 

IJ0V, 131 +JOOV5 

739 L29V, —IHV3 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

*04X10 lbs.- cente per lb. 

4£9Q 5230 Oct 56.95 5735 

6735 S£00 Dec 59 JO 6035 

67.45 5*35 Feb 5840 59 JK 

6757 5530 Apr 5950 60.10 

1625 S4 9S Jun 6047 60.90 

65.40 5550 Aug 5930 59 JO 

Esi. Sales 21J25 Prev. Soles 25366 
Prev. Day O mp Ini. 473*2 off 1390 
FEEDER CATTLE fCME> 

*+000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

7X00 56J0 Seo 6130 6133 

7232 56.45 Ocl 6230 6235 

7X20 58(0 Nov 6430 6530 

79 AO 4X50 Jan 684)0 69A0 

7035 4X62 MOT 68.90 7tL*0 

7X65 6X60 APT 69-10 7X00 

6825 6X10 MOV 683S 6825 

E sl. Sales 1119 Prev. Sales 4393 
Prev.Oov Open Inl. £607 off 198 


SA62 5737 
59 JO 6X07 
5820 5882 

5935 59J5 

wits 6X80 
59.10 5935 


+.15 

+.17 

+37 

+3S 

+.« 

+AS 



6735 6863 


HOGS (CME) 


30400 [bv- cents per lb. 

39.10 

4010 

3945 

4040 

+45 

50MS 

035 


4105 

4217 

4105 

4)07 

+-» 


38.10 

Frit 

41.95 

4272 

4140 

4265 

+.70 

4723S 

3X12 

Apr 

39.12 

3945 

39.12 

3940 

+08 

<945 

3940 


<205 

4340 

4235 

4207 

+J5 

*905 

*0*5 

Jut 

42X5 

4XS 

JUS 

4300 

—.77 

51.90 

*005 


42X0 

42X0 

42X0 

iO sn 

+.75 

*1.10 

3847 

Oct 

39X0 

39X0 

39X0 

39X5 

+.15 

4»X0 

38-37 

Dec 

4000 

4000 

3900 

39J0 



Est. Seles 7360 Prev. Soles 7376 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 19.152 off 17 


(iir-rency Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option & Strike 

Underlying Price Cons— Lost 

Sep Dee Mar Sen Dec 
12390 Br if iso Poonds-cenfs per unff. 


Sept 19 


Pats— Last 


B Pound 

IS 

r 

r 

r 

r 

134.11 

125 

r 

r 

r 

r 

134.11 

130 

r 

LSD 

t 

r 

134.11 

135 

r 

345 

_ r 

r 

134.11 

1*0 

545 

225 

305 

r 

134.11 

145 

1.14 

S 

r 

r 

134.11 

159 

r 

6X0 

100 

r 


035 

1J0 

120 

535 


2JB 

r 


CDoilr 

72*5 

72X5 

72*5 


i Do Ho 

70 r 

71 r 

72 r 

73 


unit. 
■ r r 

r r 

033 ' r 

033 r 


CUM West German Marks-ceats per sett. 
OMark 29 r r r 

3«_S0 30 r r r 

3430 31 r 180 r 

3*30 32 r 186 r 

3*30 32 r 209 

3430 34 r 1.51 

3*30 IS r 0J9 

3450 » r 033 

3*30 37 r 038 

3*30 38 r 0.19 

12SJM6 French Frencs-lOfhs of a cent per dML 
FFranc 115 r 230 t t 

43S(U>00 Japan ete Yen-lOWtsof a cent per unit. 


X30 
032 
1 JOS 


£ 2 * 


188 

r 


r 

134 

1.16 

r 


9 pi 
cuts 
0.11 
022 
0X2 
X75 
122 


148 

r 


JYen 

41 

r 

r 

4701 

4? 

r 

0X2 

4101 

43 

r 

025 

4101 

4* 

r 

012 


62300 Swiss Francs^enrs per uniL 


032 

r 


SFrooc 

37 

r 

506 

41.96 

38 

r 

r 

41.96 

39 

r 

302 

47.96 

60 

r 

272 

41.96 

41 

r 

2.10 

41.96 

62 

r 

1.6B 

4146 

63 

r 

100 

41.96 

66 

r 

072 

41.96 

«5 

r 

045 


r 

275 

22 « 

r 

r 


048 

0.16 


0X8 


1-30 

r 


1J0 

r 


Total call vet £285 

Total pet veL 1X87 

r— Not traded, s— No option offered. 
Last is premium (purchase Price). 
Source: AP. 


Call open int. 2B395 
Put open bit 1524*1 


Food 


COFFEE C (NYCSCE1 

“ 13430 U£3 
12935 Dec 13750 13X40 
13J0 Mar 139.25 139.95 
1314)0 Mov 139LK 1403 
13550 Jul 34100 14100 
13275 Sea 
13*00 Dec 

Prev. Sales UJl 


150X0 
149 JS 
14*0 0 
1484)0 
14750 
13*00 

Est Sales . i^..— 

Prev, Dav Open («•- 10.187 up 8 
SUGARWORLD 11 (NYCSCS1 
112000 lb£- cents Per to. 



94)5 
7.75 
■ M3 
7.1 S 
639 
630 
6.95 
225 


274 Oct 5J9 554 

100 Jon £55 555 

134 Mar 5195 £95 

358 MOY • iM2 6 lQ 
179 Jul £27 JUT 
42* Seo -6X6 6X6 

*J» Oct. 638 . 6.71 
. _ 72) Jan- 670 630 

Est. Sales 721 Prcv.SaleS 17A43 
Prevraw Open Int. 92581 off2S6 - 

COCOA (HYCSCE) 

10 metric tons- S pw tan 

2237 19*5 Dec 2175 

19S5 Mar: 22B 
I960 May - 2267 
1960 Jul 230 
2023 Sep 2308 

2055 Dec 2295 2319 

Est. Sales Prey. Sales 1569 

Prev.Oov Ooea inf. 1937* w»8S 

O RANGE JUICE (NYCEI 

i£0Qa lbs.- cents per lb. 

1814)0 157.AI Noe 13450 13*30 

18030 ms 0 JOn 129.80 12930 

moo 6Aar 12630 12A90 
12275 MOV 12550 1255D 
_-’50 12190 Jul _ 

Est. Sate, 100 Prev. Sales . T7S 
Prev.Oov Open In*. 450 


£10 5.17 

£30 £31 

£70. £72 
£87 £M 
£09 £10 

M>. ■’ 656- 
650 653 

' off - jus 


—.12 
— 72 
— 23 
-CM 

— 3D 

3 T 


2295 

2315 

'i£ 

2335 



17750 


^ U3X- 
1294)0 12933 
126X0 12635. 
125.20 123X0 
12480 


+.15 

—50 

—^10 


Metals 


6040 


COPPER (COMSX) 

2SJB0 lbs.- cents Per lb. 

82.10 5750 SIP" -5870 5835 5750 5BJS — vB 

6050 Oct - 5835 —50 

Nov 5870 — XO 

5850 Dec 5950 3975 59-00 59.10 —-35 

59 A0 Jan 5935 5935 5935 S9J5 — 35 

3930 Mar 6X30 6045 59JC 5970 —70 

6O50 MOV- 6035. 6X75 6X25 6X35 —78 

6X65 Jul 6T.10 6170 6XS0 6075 —.15 

61 JO Sep 6175 6150 6175 • 61.15 .—.TO 

624)0 Dec :t\SS 6155 6175 6130 — ^ 

6*30 Jan 69 p n — 35 

62J0 Mar .6240 6275 6240 62J5 — 0* 


season Season 

Hlsh W* 1 _ , 

7+24 ' OK ■ W* ™ 

7+W 56-27 MT 

7+» 63-12 Jun 

72-27 63~4 S8P 

72-18 g*C 

69-27 67 J*ar. 

EM. Sole* JPC 

Prev.DcvOpenlnJ 


OP* HUh ^ c ^f ^ 

70-18 I} ?. 


70-11 

619-21 

69-1 

68-14 

67-29 


I' 


(V 




7540 


23 7+1) 7+M +3 


iis ?? VOX tS Si* P ■« 


72-24 73 


i+3 


I ¥ EM r 

open 1^4X02 UP7 • 

CERT. D8P05IT I1M8U . .. * 

simmten-PggWg Jjfl JS H =| 

M & & SI ll « sis rs 

nxo 86X3 Jun 90.90 ^ 

Ills 87* Sep 90 JO — Jg 

MX7 SStl 9000 

89^1 8870 „ 

a«f Sak«s PnVeSiiiRS W 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 2,193 ofU4 
EURODOLLARS 1 1 MM) 

a* SS' S Si« 

86.10 Mar «£7 WJI 

91.15 8673 Jun S-fis SnS JOTS — -03 

9X8* 873* S&> SS -40 

9053 57 JS OK g" g^ 7 

•fi ia )Sr 8i S3 ss 



BRITISH POUMD «IMM) . ■ 

lpernotxttf-1 oolftf aWOlsWjMOl 1T71 t i nw 

iSS ® » S 

Prev.Dav Open int. 2+575 o«fi276i 
CAKAOil AN DOLLAR tlMW 


* 


*W 

+95 

+95 


Sp4rdlr-l point ewoUSUnOT _ m 

™ 3B.--SS im m m % 


8475 
8470 
804)0 
7400 
7*xn 
7X90 
70J0 
7070 
6770 
67 JO 
4670 

EST. Sain 


6275 


63.15 +3S 


—3D 
— 70 
— 70 


6450 May 
6340 . Jul 

Prev. Stiles 134)18 

Prev. Oay Open tnL 77J40 w 1 789 
ALUMINUM (COMSX) 

*XOOO lbs.- cents per lb. . . ' 

74J0 4275 Seo 

Oct 
Nov" 

7040 425S Dec 43X5 -4345 4375 

7650 400 JOll — 

7340 4475 Mar 4465 4470 M*S 44X5 —30 

6675 5X75 MOV 4S.15 — ^ 

6145 *£90 Jul . 4630 464)0 464)0 *5X5 

5210 487S See 4X55 —70 

Dw; 47 AD —70 

Jon - '• *7 95 —70 

Mar . 4845 — B 

" 3X35 5ST SS =3 

Est. Sales .100 Prev. Sale* 143 

Prev. Dav Open lot. 1734 up 14 
SILVER (COM EX) 

SixB rray az.- cents per trav az. 

11810 57X0 See 39X0 60X0 9925 6005 +84 

AiAj) 6QSJ3 Oef- S01J +9J7 

ftov ' 60X8 +9J0 

5900 OK 6040 6145 6020 61X5 +94 

5«4 Jon 4WJ) 6094 6084 6149 +9-0 

6074 Mar 6155 6274 6154 6215 +9.1 

4194 May 62X5 630.0 6265 632X +9J 

6294 Jul 6354 6365 6345 6*2 2 +94 

6404 Sep 6*35 65X5 6635 6S2X +97 

6S20 SSI 6W4 6675 6684 +1XJ 

UX4 )tor 6744 68X0 6744 iSj +1X4 

68X5 Mav «9£7 +1XJ 

6994 Jul 7VU) 7104 7104 7074 +104 

Est. Sale* 15400 Prev. Sates 16J8* 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 7X791 Un235 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 tray <2z.-dollorsp«r travOT. . . ' ■ J 

3*740 30550 Sep 30140 +6X0 

37X00 2sxm Oct nr at moo mso mso mm 


12304 

12154 

11934 

10*84 

9454 


7994 

7894 

7704 

7S24 

7154 


25750 Jon 30)40 30550 3 0 84 0 38X60 +470. 


35740 26450 Apr 30X50 30940 38X50 5*40 +640 

36100 27340 Jul ' 31340 4+30 

36040 30X50 Ocl 31600 31950 31600 31850 +740 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates 4.VS5 

Prev. Dav Open Ini 15489 up*10 


S3 » 


PALLADIUM (NYME) 

l oo trov oi- doikm per az 

I417S 9QSD Sep 

1*150 9140 Dec 9740 9940 9675 ._ 

2750 91 JO Mar 9825 V)U» 9750 99X0 +2J5 

11*40 9150 Jim 9850 9950 9860 100.15 +115 

11540 97 JO Sep 10050 +3.15 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 4J07 .’*• 

Prev. Dav Open IrL 1+770 upElll 


GOLD (COMBO 

tOO trov 01.- dollars per trov a*. .,7. 

14X50 31X50 Sep 31950 +540 

*9X00 29740 Oct 31740 32140 31670 320X0 +670 

224 JO 3200 Nov 32240 33040 32040 322X0 +670 

*8950 30150 Dee 32L30 325J0 32070 33660 +640 

*8550 30640 Feb 32X20 32940 32SJO .32850 +450 

*9X80 31670 Apr 32940 3»40 XBDO 3XU0 +450 

*3X70 32050 Jun 33458 33550 33638 3S72J +690 

*2JL*0 33140 Aua ' 34270 +690. 

39X70 33540 Oct 3*770 +540 

39340 34240 . DrC 3*840 351X0 .3*840 352X0 : +540 

38X40 35540 'Apr ‘ ■ V' +540 

39*50 36940 Jun 36870 +540 

EM. Sales 38400 Prev.Soles 36^7 

Prev. Day Open (ntt3XZ7B aH 1518 


Finonciol 


US T. BILLS (IMM) - - - 

SlmfllkJn-ptsonOOpcL - _ __ . * 

9X33 86M SeP 92M 9X02 9297 9140 . .. 

9X07 8X77 Dec 92X0 92X4 9257 92X2 —41 ' 

9259 86X0 Mar 9223 9225 9221.9125 —42 

92J8 !D41 Jun 9147 9150 9147 .341 —.02 

9241 B84S SeP 9158 9158 9157 91X0 -iM: 

7178 8945 Dec 9147 91J7 91^ 9141 .— B 

91 J? B758- Star 9146 9140 9140 7145 -—46 

90.99 9050 Jun 9076 9X76 *076 90X0 —JS 

EM. Sales *498 Prev Sale* 11452 
Prev. Dav Open Int 34794 up 391 


19 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

S100400 prtn- cts 3. 32ndS of 100 PCt 

75-18 Sep 85-23 86-2 85-23 85-» 

75-13 Dec 8+18 8+31 E+18 8+3| 

75-14 Mor 83-22 8+30 83-71 83-29 

7+30 Jun 82-26 B3-2 82-25 8+1 

80-7 Sep 82-1 83-8 

83-11 80-2 Dec 

Est. Soles Prev. Soles ^932 


18-21 

87-13 

8+2 

85-7 


B27 r ^ 
81-16 . 


Prev. Dov Open Int. 59472 up 5 


US TREASURY BONDS CCBT^ 


7+1 7+11 

7+1* 7+30 


(8 Pd-S1004QD-Ots4 32nds of 100 PN) . 

79-12 57-18 SeP 7+1 7+16 

78-13 57-8 Dec 7+17 75 

77-29 57-2 Mar 73-14 73-29 73 U 73-a 

7+6 - 5+2* Jun 72-14 72-30 72-14 72-28 

75-31 S+29 Sep 71-17 71-31 71-17 71-31 


3 

+? 

+7 

+7. 


J006 Dec 

J50* . -X8I1-.: Mar .wo -irss "+191 

:SS « ™ 

Est. Sales 506 Prav.SaJes im 
Prev.dov Open lot. 6407 off 3497 
PRENCM’FRANC'flMMy 
*pertnmc-i *o)nteuuaisRU)000i - 
J16M . 49670 ■ Dec - 

.um, .ions . 

Cst-Saies ' Prev.Sates 
Sv^VOPinlhL 101 off33* • • • 

GERMAN MARKOMMX ■■ -. . 

Jjg m 

si s 5 sr ** ^ 

4762 4768 SeP, 


.11300 

,11350 


+40 

+50 


Eat. Sales. -2X260. Prev.Salfls^^L^ ■ ; 


-355? 

4599 


+14 

+14 

+14 

+14 


Prev.Dav'OnenhiL 38.911 afl 
JAPANESE YERfIMM) 


^^“Kssssffisjais^ « 


00*238 JNKZ20 -. Jun 
EM. Sales - 78 - Ptcm S ates. 5485 

Prev. Dav Open Hit. 1573S ansa** 


•gauss FRANC (P4M3; - 

S per franc- IpoW equals JOJ300V. • . - __ 

X512 4531 Dec XZ14 . X2** . XZU XOT 
.4555 . 4835 Mar . <X26I. X280..X2S7 XOT 


X510 


Jun 


ESI. Sales WX29- Prev.Sates. 3 34 0* 


X318 


+16 

+76 

+16 


Prev. Dav Open int 34X04 otfTJ 


Industrials 


UMUER7CM8-- .... 

mnootxj.ft-ipenjooba.n- • _ 

186.10 126X0 Nav.. 13650 13+90 135^ 13640 —.70 

1K7JBQ . 133X0 Jan- 13800 139 JO 137X0 13820 —.90 

19540 l555 Mar 1*330 MX50 .14220 ICX0 — 1J0 

176X0 1«40 MOV 14740 148.10 1*620 WJO —13 

18X00 - -1*950 Jut 15TJO1510O 150X0 150X0 ~-U0tt 
I7640 -. 133X0 StC 156p0 .15*40 15640 15610 —.50 

: HUS} 15740 Nov .... " . 15640 -IJ» 

Est Sate* *450 Prev. Sates JL4D1 ... 

Prev. Dev Open ML. .TXSSaff 51 
COTTON KNYCE) -- 

6040 6030 59X5 ' 60^ - +-M 

7635 ' ’’ a^'.-.Sfr' M' UA 59.90 MXO ; +M 

- 7040 5840 - Mav 6025 60.90 6020 6090 +40 

7045 - 38X6 .Jul 5940 59X0 5940 59X8 +33 

6SJ0 SIS Oct - 'SUN 5615 - 5600 5610 +27 

S3 os .. Die swo S20 Sjo s-to +2* 

6635 . ’• 66X5" "Ma* - V. .- . 5330 . - +J3 

E4t. Stiles 6X00 Prev. Botes 1J98 
Prevjjav Op*) inL ZIXB* np75 . 

HEATING OIL'(NYME) ’ ’ 

*24G0oal-cejtt*per pal • 7 ■ 

«40 67X5 Oct 7825.7835'' 7820 78X6 —4* 

9025 flS N« M 79.10' 7826 784* +43 

KJD .. *9.15 DK, 7830 , TMB 7X» Sw + l4f 

9035 . SMB Jan 77 JS 7888- 77.90 78 71 +1 f9 

' 7040 - Feb 7635 - 77 J5 7E3S 7745 - ,+Xfl 

"76m *840 . Mar 7235 7X2S 72X0 ' 7340 1 +X» 

7440 «40 APT 69X0 7050 69XQ 70X0 +A0 

7240 6840 ' May 6L7S 6835 6833 68X0 +XD 

... OCt Si . 

Est Sale* . Prev.laM* 9X91 -- 
Prev. Dov Opetr lnt29Xl 1 Off 195 
CRUDE OIL aOYME)- 


I 29X0 

I 39.50 
29X0 
29X61 




Oct. 3843 ^2821 2842 2822 

26X0 . '-Nov . 127X2 ; 27X2 27 JS 27X6 

-- Dec .2642 27X1 2602 27.10 ... 

2638 -. Jan 2636 .2*3 .ffu 26X8 .+-3Z- 
262J" : Fe+. ' 2SL93 2628 25X3 -'26^1- +49 




[ 26,70 1 

26 . 1*1 

■ 27jOO ■ 
Est. Safe* 


3613 Mar 2£55 2506 2£55 2545 +.11 

2393- Apr 25X0 25X8 2£40 -25X4 +45 

23XS May : 2599* *640 ■ -26A - 2£19 +.12 


2328 \ Jun* 2675 2540' 2670 2540 
.24X5 Jul - -265D . 2630 '3650 -2630 
2440 Sep 24X0 24X0’ 26X0 - 2640 


Prev. sate* ISXOT - 

pntv. Dav Open Inf. 62X97 5ff1 


12 

+J3 

+.13 

+48 


run 


4 

m 


Stock Indexes 


5P COMP. INDEX (CME)-... : TJ' ... 

ootats and crnit* -. : . ' 

19840 16040 -Sep 1BU0.TS3XQ 18130 18330 +1AS 
20005 . 17530 -Oec - 181X5 1B543 18255 1B6A5 +100 
2C33J . 183X5 . Mar 78670 18X55 784X3 .186X5- +1X5 
206X0 •• -18633 Jim -18840 16540 .W7.ll 189.10 +1.95 
Est. Sales Prev.Soles 7L574- ; • 

Prev.Oov OpenfiiL 74X29 off <37 ' 

VALUE LINE (KCBT) ' t'"- " " “. 

•: SS . ~Sep 1883S 79130 188X0 190X0 +230 
23745 ■ .11880 Oec ' 18998 ,19330 187X0 I9I05 +245 
209X0 : 1*650 -..Mar- 19400 .196X0 19650 19405 +240 
Est Soles - . '. Prev.Soies 5J29 ' 


Pntv. Doy 0P8f> 7nt 71X28 0»977 


NYSE COMP. INDBX (NYFE) 
ootnts and cents 
3)805 - - fijs 
11730 - 10130; Dec 105X5 M74Q 105X5 10600 +1— 

11835 - 10X15 , Mar 18805 ^10805 107.10 10840 +1.00 

12040 107X0 Jun J0735 10935 109-W 10930 +140 

EsLSofee M0SS Prev. Sates, nxa. 

Prev-Day Open Int 1<U36 off 6*7 


WJ®. S**»" _W6»’ 10640 W660 10505 +**_ .- _'-" 1 


Commodltylndexes 


Moody's- 


Reuters. 


DJ. Futures. 


Clo» 
880J0 f 
TJ2&J0 - 
11439 
22066 


Com. Research Bureau. 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31,-1931. 

P - preliminary; f - final . 

Reuters .* base 100 : See. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 10Q- : Dec. 71, 1974 


Previous 
88830 f 
1,72460 
114JO 
220X0 


London 

Commodities 


Sq*. 19 

Close Prevftws 
mob Unv Bkt Ask Bid Ask 
SUGAR _ _ 

Starling Per metric ton 
Oct 14140 13700 13940 16040 13940 U040 
Dec 167X0 145X0 14530 145X0 146X0 1*600 
MOT 15840 15*40 15530 155X0 156X0 15X60 
Mar 16130 158X0 159X0 1«X0 T60X0 16140 
AUO N.T. M.T. 1£40 0X0 16640 66X0 
Oct N.T. N.T. 17030 17140 17130 17120 
Volume: 7311 lots ot SO Ions. 


COCOA _ 

Sfertlnv per metric ton 
Sep 1365 1® 1356 1365 1361 13tf 

Dec 1005 1-791 1397 1398 1402 1003 

1030 1016 102* 10B 1026 1027 
0D 1037 7036 1036 1040 10*4 
045 1035 1038 10*0 1046 1052 
1053 10*7 1045 1049 10S2 1060 
1052 1461 1460 1465 1455 1457 


MOT 

Jlv 

SOP 

Dec 


volume: 2.937 lets of 10 tons. 


COFFEE 

Stert toe per metric lee 

22 1 Ig & WS 

^ ^ g? 

14U 1^5 1010 lSs lS 

1050 )05D >010 1060 1030 1068 


Jan 


Volume: 1411 tots of 5 tons. 


GASOIL 
U4. dollars per metric ten 


Oct 

No* 

Dec 

Joe 

Feb 


2*L50 2*540 24535 2*640 24X75 

g93S 2*075 2*140 2*175 2000 

23940 21X75 238X0 3835 ZXJ5 
ww 33*40 ram ZS6X0 ZM3S 2SX5D 
nS NX mSffljo 

M t mt 231 JB 73<M 232-00 Z2UD 

ZSt 7T7JJQ ZUH 2T 6JS 21 700 21530 216J5Q 

May NT. NX 2liS 20540 ffi4Q 

j£f N.T. N.T. 19940 22040 19540 23040 

volume: tM tots of 100 tens. 

Sources: Reuters anti London Potrglown Ex- 
tsiange (gamin. 


• S&P100 

I hfe Options 


Sty*. 19 


M, Cett-Lnsi 
Ms to od ini Dk 
165 — — — — 

i7o m* i n in 

175 Ps *?» P» «. 

188 3/16 1 *V 71* 3b 

IIS 1 HO 7/M lSi I*. 


1« 1/U 1/76 5/M 13fl« IK. ITDi H - 

m - in* to — 

» - - i 'M - 


MrtJBf . 
to Od to 0 k 

- l/U to 5H6 
inontMi i 
VU I P» 2 VI* 
1!1 3*t 4U 

ito » Tto 75. 


TeM cno vsfime 2*W 
Total C8B apee W.8B7XH 
Total oel mloaa J27X4 
TOM PM opalnt.43XH 


HtOP 171X4 Lee 17659 OoBUUO+tJi 
source. 1 CBOE. 




Smonoi 
i-mowh 
One veer 




Sepc 19 
Prev 

Offer 

BU 

YieU YleM 

7» 

746 

741 

704 

704 

702 

7.71 

701 

7X6 

7X4 

8.13 

8.11 


Source: Solomon Brothers 


O MiinKHlities 


Syc 19 

HONO-KOMG GOLD FUTURES 

uxx per ounce _ 

Close Previous 


Dec - N.T. N.T. 31940 32140 32040 32240 
Feb — N.T. N.T- 32340 32S40 32440 32XDG 
AM _ 32840 32800 32740 32940 327.00 32940 
Jun _ N.T. N.T. 33240 33440 33340 33540 
Aue - 33840 33840 33740 33940 33840 34040 
volume: 23 tots of 700 M- 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJJl 


Sep. 


Htob Low Settle Settle 

NT. N.T. 31 £30 315.10 

N.T. N.T. 31640 31640 

320X0 319X0 320X0 326X0 


Oct 

Dee _ 

Volume: 4t lots of 7 00 az. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mafayskm ceats per kilo 

Ctoee Pi e» tout 

Sid Ask BM A* 
184X0 185X0 18150 18*40 

18540 18640 18150 18440 

76440 78740 18150 78*40 

186X0 187X0 18540 18640 

Feb 187X0 189X0 1BXO0 18840 


Oct. 


Nov 

Oec 


189X0 191X0 

volume: 12 tots. 


19040 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore amf* 


perkfto 

One 

BU Ask 816" Aik 
RSSlOct- 16X25 16X75 14440 164X0 

RS5 1N0V_ 165J5 16XB 163X0 16*40 

RSS20et_ 151X0 154X0 151X0 IHXO 

RS5 3 0et- 151X0 1S2X0 1»X0 15050 

RSS 4 Oct_ 147X0 149X0 145X0 1*7X0 

RS5 5 Oct 162X8 144X8 14050 1*2X0 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 

Matavsias rtPevits per 25 toes 



Preview 
su Ask 
710 750 


Jlv 708 758 

Sep 690 760 

volume: 0 Ian ot 25 tens. 
Source; Reuters. 




close 


Sepc 19 
Previous 

BM ASK BM Ask 

ALUMINUM 
StorKtte per metric ten 
Spat 72040 77140 73240 73340 

Forward 70X0 74440 73540 75640 

COPPER CATHODES (HIM Grade) 


sssi-iins -.i.^jjetol^tBff 


SPOI 

Forward 


7029X0 MB incoo 

COPPER CATHODES (STondanf) 

Stemns per metric ton 
Spot 99040 99240 993X0 99150 

Forward 101640 101640 101740 lOROo 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric toe 

Soof 29240 29340 29740 29B40 

N?CKEL * ,J “ “ 

Sterling per metric ton 
spot 322540 324540 33M40 336540 

Forward 328040 328100 339S40 -tSwon 

SILVER 

Pence per trov ounce 

SPot -66X40 66740 4*0X0 441X0 

EBSSUhu 4 * 50 " “ “ 

stertlae per metric ten ■ 

Spat 916640 916740 916340 916540 

ZH5c Br< * 77151,0 9n? -W *TaS 911440 

Sterling Per metric ton 
g*_ . SW" «>40 51240 SHOO 

Forward na . no no no 

Source: AP. 


Coimwlilies 


Sept. 19 

- • • . ■ ' ’Close ■ . 

Men LOW BM Ask Oi\a 

SUGAR 

Freed! francs per metric Net 
DK 1X65 1X60 1«0 1« +36 

Mor 1X95 1X70 L578 1579 „+34 

MOY 1035 1015 1020 1022 +33 

Alto NX NX 1065 1078 +40 

Oct 10W 1015 1»‘ 1015 +30 

DOC N.T, N.T. 1045 1070 +■» 

-Est. voL: 1/450 lob of 58 teas. Prev. actual 
sales: 2045 Ms. Open interast: 1U88 


COCOA 

FVencb fToocs per I W kg 
Sep ai40 1140 2.120 , Z1S5 Unch. 

Dm XI 10 ZVK 2105 . £ll0 Unch. 

Mar 2.127 2.125 £722 £729 —10 

May N.T. N.T. £135 . — Unch. 

Jlv NX N.T. 2140 — Unch. 

Sop N.T. N.T. £US . . — Unch. 

Doc 8LT. N.T. £T45 - — UnclL 

Est. voL: 50 late of 10 Tons. Prev. actual 

soles: 18 lots. Open Interest: 7(2 . 


French franc* per 100 kg . . - 

S*P *LT. ‘ tLT- MOO -"1045 +10 

Nov l.m 7,945 1040 7.955 + 1 

Jon N.T. N.T. 1085 " 2414 Unch. 

Mar N.T. N.T. 20*0 2464 +7 

Mpv . N.T. -N.T. Z0S5 — Unch. 
jlv N.T. 8LT- 2468 • — - +3 

Seo N.T. N.T. 2490 — +5 

esl.v«u 5 tots ol 5 tome Prev. actual sales* 
38 tots, open Interest: XD ■ 

Source: Bourse do Commerce. 




Company 


Sept J9 

par Amt Pov ' Roc 
INCUJflfO.n. 


Hartford Nott 
Shopweti Inc 


§ 03 10-20 9r30 

Q - JB6 11-12 IGia 


REDUCED \ . 

Parker Drilling .. ■ Q JO 11-19 11-4 


SPECIAL. 

Altv&Gargono . « JS 18-17 9+0 


STOCK 


Stioimell Inc 


-35PC 11*12 10-10. 


STOCK SPLIT 
Circle K Carp — 3+or-2 r : 


. USUAL 
American Inti Grow 

Amertoeefi 
Athkme Indus 
BksWMMvunera 
Carolina Pwr 8, Lt 
Commercial Naft 
DCNYCOO* 

EAC industries 

Evers JanagsCr-B 
Ever. & Jemgs CLa 

$%***?**■ 

Hotel Propertlec 
Little (AJJJ 
MeoRntoK Carp 

S&Ssrdr 

* i?^S5> 

gonobtouSTmear 

Rochester G & El 
Stone ft Webster ", q 
S umitomo Book Col Q 


5 iw 

g *105 IM • wo 

2 « 11-15 -n-T 


__ 18-16 80. 
g 0 S im id-id 

0 JS 10-W 10-1 
- -U 10.15 T0-1 
Q ' .10 12-16 11-lj 
0 42*4 10-25 T04 



0-25 10-4. 
ifa .1000 
10-77 Mil 
0-W 1(M 


i .17 W 10.15 Mo 


0-16 10-3 

■M U-S 

42 _J1-1 . 9-27 


10-11 

. MD 

jg BV-ltt 

XS 10-25 MM 

■fi !l-2? w-i 

» 10-25 MO 
Smm 11 '' «M«iiarterfy; mbbl 



Source- UPl. 


Cash Prices 




Srpt.19 

Year 

Commodity tad mtft • '- The Ago 

PrtrSdam6A« Sita. Vd — 

Steel scrap No llivy pm. _ TOW. S+W 

Lead Spot to IMS 24-28 

Copper riect. lb — ' 6809 62U+5 

Tin (Stroffsl, lb — 645T XUM 

Zinc E. St- U Baris. lb__. _ Ml W 

Pollaakjnvaz NJW. MM® 

Silver N-Y.«t 5JW 

Source: AP.- 


7.12 


DM Futures 


Groat *to*-J2S48f morte mob B&aut . 



■Stac.79 

Mrtte . COEi+dttr . .'. PiiW^'"' 
Price Dec Mm Jan Dec " Mar. . 

33 218 . 277 325 . -0J7 066 *-■ 
36 10T--X14 205.. 066 140 .tli 
21 QJH 10T * £12 . I.I2 L4X- 1X7 

36 0X» LIB 106 173 176 ZB5 

37 • . 033 .B86-. 109 r 2*5 15».’ 2X2 

38. .AW 802 140 338 3X1 . 


.+ , 


MMhfbWnLlNf 
Source: CME. 


*niai£xportReYei)ne 
Esq>ecied to Fdlby4% 

Reuters ■- . 

BANGKOK — Tha9and ! s r ex- 
port revenue win fall. by. h percent 
in U& doCar terms this war, dant- 

nan>4 m ill . «-l* -L' -■ 1 -- 


V;- 




V ; : 




— - W. uivuaiu ui Iiimur. ^ 

ber and poor commodity pnees, ^ 
Vzrabongsa Ramangfr nra chief 
economic advj^r to fhc goVpra- 
mew, saidTlunsday. . -c S 

He said the offlaal target fe li- 
percent annual growth m 'ej&otf 1 


8, 

& 




*■■■■"! -TTeutwo 
tONDON” — ^Enterpt^<OiJ 
PLG said Thmd- - - ^ - * * 

control^ 
purchases on the 

terpdse"saMit 

to 16.17 3uinioadiaics,br" 
ccntof Saxon'stotil 
Anval preffosallHHa 
leum Corn. BLC-to, 

Oil and^ 










■ 

% 

2 • 

rv 

f;s 

i-t*. 

& 

P* 

,-v 


«*. 


s *! 

ik:. 

• - fa: i 

•n. - 

i. '. 




C*-*: 


i! 

. V 



t. 

■J 



i 




















F**:. 


>rv 

4a 




I'McnUl 
HOUW S*** 


HKthLoo Stock 


-Q^Yia.P E gjff 


33 ICH t 
lft ICQ 
lft IPM 
lft IHTCnO 
4ft I&S .13 
1»* imoGp .tic 
S Inwlnd 
30 imnouo 140 

6VI Ifritstll 

1 1 lieltn i JO 
lft mitSv 
J'k iniSvirf 2St 
Oft imCly o JO 

10ft mlmk ,13& 
2ft inlDknl 
Vi inlBkWt 
Ail InlHtrd 

9ft IIP .96 

3Vj IniPwr 
A inIThrn 
S'- inThr ol 
)• intDla 
13Vi loMUt 
19ft iroaBrd 


63 45ft . 
Iflt I 7 ] 

S3 Jft 
a4 lit 

1 fi? 
31 jfr* 
«3 lft 
473 361% 
37 9 

1] 11*4 
139S **» 

1 2ft 
A* lib 
S 131a 

* \ 

33 lN- 
is 

1434 5ft 
1S3 i'- 

ll to 
35 30b 
3 3414 


44b — ft 
I'll 

lft 

■ft 4- ft 
4VJ + ft 

Vh+'M 

1V» 

3ft +44 
i 9 + ft 

l 1464 ♦ V4 

l 1% 

I 2ft + ft 
lib + ft 
, 13b — 'A 

L 

, 7ft 4- ft 
I 10b + -.9 

l 4*. + 14 

, 5 — ft 
, 414— ft 
i ah + I* 
■ 30 b -lb 
> 34V4 - V4 


17b 13 Jocivn J0b 4.1 9 

n. Sft JOCOK - 

494 2ft jetAm 7 

lft ViJbIAwI ,, 

m Sft jotran .llilttl 12 

6V? 3 John PH __ 

114% 7 JohnAm JO 4j> 10 

114 6 JohnlnU • 

7ft Jft JmiUkn J* 

36 35 Juailer <4 


5 12ft 12ft 12V. 

15 SV] 544 5b 
34 3b 3*4 314 

]i l" ^ 7* + » 

.S £ S RS-S 

74 Oh 7b »+» 

6 344 3'fa 344 - V4 

5 36 36 36 + U 


2ft 

2 

lft 

Hi 

2Vj 

7ft 

5ft 

2V> 

7 

Sft 

2ft 

m 

1ft 

lft 

3ft 

lft 

3ft 

Sb 

5b 

5ft 

5ft 

5 

5ft 

5ft 

5ft 

5ft 

8ft 

8V: 

Bft 

12ft 

lft 

b 

12b 1 
lft 
ft 

2ft 

lft 

b 


39*4 30V] 
444 1V4 

Wfa 10 
13 1044 

1544 9b 
24 1544 

234V 14 
1594 a 
■ 3 

3b 4% 
494 2ft 
494 314 

5H 344 
5b 394 
344 3 
lib lBJfa 
30b 22*4 


KltGsPf 4 JO 1! 
KooofcC „ , 
KovCP JO , 

Kay J n JBn 

KoorNI M 
Kerr* to Mo ■ 
Ketfihm at 

KovPn -® 

KovCo . 

Klnork 
Kirov 
Kit Min 
Klocrv J2r 
Knoll 

KoocrC 133 


340a 3474 33b 
67 3*4 344 

S lZb 12b 
11b 11V4 
6 1314 13 
3 19 10b 

30 lib lib 
313 10b 10 
12 3b 3 
30 44 *4 

71 3b 3 
24 3b lb 

102 3b 3b 
1 4b 6b 
46 3b 2b 
49 Ub 1444 

139 27b 26b 


34b + b 
3b - b 
T2b - b 
11b + 94 
13 — b 

lib- » 
16b + b 
10b — b 
3b + b 

3*-b 
3b + V4 

Sr* 

2ft + ft 
i4b + b 
27b + 74 


11-fa PGEpfJ X 
16V PGEotS 2. 
7b PGEplH I. 
16b PGElHR X 
14b PGEotP Z 
14b. PGEntO X 
14<fa PGEDWI. 

14b PGEiMft z 
16b PGEWJ Z 
71* PGEotl I. 
lift PGTrn l 
31b PocU Pi 4 
SAW Potu Pf 7 
32b PoIICP 
i 5b Poniost 
lift PoiicCh 1 
7 PolTeh 
i 3b Par Foil 
7ft PEC IV 
i S'. P*«rTu 
, 15b PwvTr 1 
' b p E Co , 
, 19 PafiRE 5 I 

■ 7ft* Penrll 

■ b Pantrn v 
3«V* PcrlmC 

i 1 1 Portal 

■ 9b Pcrmi ot 1 

■ 2b Pc*Lw 

1 b PctLwrt 

■ iii PaiLe pi 

■ 7b Pel Le Bt 

■ ub PaiLcPf . 
t lb PMli-D 

. 2b PicoPO 
2b Pier 1 wl 
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31b PS Col Pt 
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54 2>b POtplE 
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243 11 1 

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114 TcftAm _ 

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i lb Tusawi _ 

i lb ThorEn _ « 

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■ 3b Turn a .10 17 16 

■ 76 TolEdPl AM 13.1 

■ 4'« Tartel JW10-1 
Bb TMIPIO J4 

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4 16’4 TomB n 35 

4 21b TumrC IJO 46 10 
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J4166 25 


64 38 7 
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73 5b 
li lb 
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35 77V 

17 17b 

110 7 

is 14b 

IS 3b 
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53 4b 
25 13b 

200X103bl 
76 2b 
116 33b 
141 HU 
244 9b 
186 4b 
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18 9VV 
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218 5b 

7 19b 

14 lb 
1 lb 

15 

16 3b 
17Sr 32b 
71 4U 
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6 25b 

7 12b 
128 15 

9 14b 
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| 9 27b 

303 9b 

145 ib 


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14 14b H 

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183b IB3b 

H 33 - 
10b 10 vs ' 

8 91V ' 
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3V. 3b- 
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13b 13b 
14b 14b ' 
14b 14b ■ 
9b 9b 
13b 13 ‘ 

3b 3b- 
231 2b 
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27b 27W 
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5b Yank Co 


11 15 *b 6b 6b + ’.V 


41 4 Vs 4 4b + VV 


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6 FoIrFbi 32 

16 Fartvpt 671 19 
3b Fldata 

11 FWymB 80 60 13 
19 Fslcrpn JD 26 6 
lib FischP 681 56 18 


Ub FUdiP 681 56 18 

2»V Fli^pi 4JD0 15.1 

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22b Fluke 1J81 58 10 

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19b ForstCA JO U 25 
19b ForttCB .18 8 » 

12b ForoslL 28 

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14 FrcaEI >7 

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6b Furvn 21 


50 19b 
64 15b 
234 16U. 

53 6b 
74 13b 
13 19b 
22 12b 
25 Bb 

2 26b 
2 7b 

10 37 
100 24b 

11 Ub 

54 616 
1B0Z 99 

2 22b 
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258 22b 
309 lb 
8 37b 
90 22b 
48 Bb 
149 2216 
498 1116 


1916 19b 

15 1516- 

16 16b 
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13 13b 

18b 19b 
12b 13b 
Bb Bb 
Mb 26b 
7b 7W 
36b 17 

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22V. 22b 
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37b 37b 
20b 22W 
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21b 21b 

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+ b 
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+ " & 

+ V. 




+ 16 | 6 
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14b 
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lib 
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18 SDeopI 267 10.9 
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64 64 

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25b 25ft— ft 
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9 10 +lft 

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l 4W S’fa ft 

i m wt 

% 4ft 4ft 
V lBb lBb 
A 17b 17b , 

* y- pi 5 
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4 r r-w 

b 46ft 44b + ft 


2 USR Ind 

Bb Ultmte 10 

i.-m Unlcorp 
lift Uiucoet JS .55 
Bft Uninwn 164*146 
1*3- UAirPd J4B 24 12 
lib UnCosF % JO 26 7 

lb UFoodA .10 87 
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lift UtMed 15 

14 USAG Wl _ 

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6b yntvRs 16 


1 2b 2b 
185 12b lib 
100 lib 11 
17 13W 13ft 
55 10 9W 
60 2Tfa 21ft 
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80 1ft lb 
6 lb 1ft 
1S2 IS 14ft 
16 15ft 15ft 
24 7b 7b 
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33 7 6b 


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lift + Vs 
lift + v* 
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15ft + b 
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fra ! ^S!£ribiinc. 

BUsmfss/FmAJvrcE 

(§tenER. 

The Trib’s business section is now 
bigger and better than ever. 

And once a month look for the 
review of the world of investment: 

PERSONAL 

INVESTING 


T» V* + 

3 ft + JS 

i«5 + £ 

^i^tg 

law— ft 

7b— ft 
lft + ft 
18ft + ft 

4b- ft 
14ft + ft 
lib + b 
2 ! + ft 
22b + b 


lift OEA 
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4 OdetAn 
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13b OhArt 
18ft OHolnd 
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13 

JOB 8 11 


J4 >J 
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J4 1.1 18 


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821 6J 10 
JO 28 10 


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10 17b 
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2 6ft 
I 19ft 
1 20ft 
132 2SV 
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a 4b 

24 1ft 
26 22ft 
7 13 
1143 10ft 


15 10b 

13b 9b 
12ft 9b 
12ft 9ft 
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36 29b 

33ft 2Bft 
29b 23ft 
24b 18b 
22ft 16ft 


PGEpJA 1 
PGEplB 1 
PGEpfD 
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PGEptF i 
PGEpfZ ‘ 
PGEPIY 
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20 20b +» 

17b 17b 
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6 ft 4ft _ 
19ft 19ft + ft 
20ft 20ft 
21b 22ft + H 
4b 4b 
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13 13 

10 10ft — ft 


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ill! lib- ft 

10 ft 10 ft — ft 
33 33 —lft 

30b 32ft + ft 
2Bft 2flft — ft 
32ft 22b— ft 
20ft 30ft + ft 


Now Yamaichi Wakes 
Your Funds Work 
Even Harder. j| 






ptoating-Hate Notes 


Syt 19 


Dollar 


^■jiMr/MiL 
■ Allied Irish g 


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Bft 29-11 7760 7760 
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& sees hi? 

(ft S« 99.75 100J0 
7ft 23-11 79 JO 77 JD 
Blfa QH1 77.18 9981 
(ft TWO 7782 77J2 
k ZHI1 100J51HU5 
tw Miffflisa 

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fft 12-11 10017510185 
ib 27-o ioBJiine.il 
fft 07-10 1002510035 
lb 24-12IOUinn.il 

ift fifiSSSHl 

f 12-11 17.15 10823 

■b am Touainw 

M 29-11 1003010060 
99% 1M0 WJ.MKIOJ* 



BN 0741 
Bft 07-11 
Bb 20-11 

oft nun 

Bft 12-12 
aw wn 
B 14-0 
BN 07-10 
BN 7182 
27-0 
BN 13-11 
Bb 1B82 
Sb 1M3 
76543 14-12 
75S »11 
9b HMD 


Non Dollar 






ittuor/MaL CowonlUid Bid Aikd 

Anz Bkfl97 lib J* 11 100*10060 

Bo Iixkouerfl J22-I2SJS 

nnltbilm M 12% 10*10 IOOJ010&.40 

IJN 15-11*764 9754 

gSSBBf SIS 

sL iESi MS 

MID Bk Den 76/79 H? !SwtS* 

MU Bk Den 91/94 RN »■» 

■ihl in 12 Im 1 “JC TT.n 

N«wZM*ind97 UN 14-11 7TJ2 7961 

STb Ub 04-11 99.14 7726 

% IZN 24-10 10047100-73 

SSJcErtSloPoTP Hft 

YWfctMr* Ini 71/74 12b 27-81 108.1410031 

Source : Credit Sutsso-Firtt Boston Ltd, 
.London 


mtrodBcina Ya maichi's New Automatic Cash Hanagement System 

Fffectiveness in the fast-changing An AM: Coring System 

arsssSKSSSS “-n^-o-P-n-j 


th 77-027960 BM60 
6b 12-12 97JOTMO, 
Ib TM2 9965 100.15 

9 12-u Hoinnn 

ION 77-07 100-1IIOO3 
BN 3MI99J0 97J0 
lft 07-10 9966 7966 
BN U-U UOD71DOI7 
■ 0S-nUt24U0J4 
Oft 2687 UBS 89 
«2 MJBMW 
IN 1982 77.71 MM 
7b 15-10 9*^1009 
Tft 23-12 7765 9965. 

ion 2HJ2W2V 

lb 2V11 9722 9762 
0181916% 7924 

£ isms 
a m ub 
s ssesa 

Sw 

Oft JDU 1 £c100J7 

R S-ffi ml51062S 
M3 99J0 99JD 
BN 2M2 100.UH02B 
vn jmi woinmiT 
Bb Ml U03310IU2 
Ib 28-11 100MSJJ 
«% tun ub 6B 
K «M1 99^3^963 
Oft 07-11 WU310BJ3 
BN 39-11 «JB WOOD 

in oomififlg 

ib as-nuuoioojB 
7b HWltOJJJM 
BN 14-T8 2« 2-« 
lft 27-11 *961 *951 

Sb »m«unKM 


STOCK US* US* 

DeVoe-Holbdn 

Inlemalional nv 694 7% 

Gty-C3ock 

lnicmalional nv 21% 3% 

Quotes as of: September 19, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital g«it« in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and Ibe weekly 
II .'VECTORS ALERT newsleuer 
* /ill be sent free and without 
obligati on. 

First Commerce Securities bv 
World Trade Center 
S tra winiky loan 857 

1077 XX Amsitfdam,. 

The Nechcrtands 
Tekpbone: ( 31 X 20)627762 
Trick: 14507 firto nl 


Effectiveness in the fast-changing 
Japanese securities market requires not 
only timely investments but also prudent 
management of temporary surplus 
yen funds. , , 

Only YSamaichi, one of Japans leading 
securities firms, offers a sophisticated 
new Automatic Cash Management 
System (ACS) service mallets you 
preserve high yields and respond to 
market changes with greater flexibility. 

With Yamaichi International 
(Nederland) N.V„ 

Yfaur Funds Earn Higher Yields. 

With Yamaichi’s ACS service, sales 

proceeds from your securities are 

automatically deposited at Yamaichi 
International (Nederland) NV. (YIN), in 
an ACS account earning a high yield 
based on the UBID Rate. YIN. as a 
member of the Yamaichi Group, under- 
takes lencflng and money dealing 
activities with full banking status under 
Dutch law. 


details to Yamaichi. Our unique ACS 
service integrates securities and 
banking operations as never before to 
eliminate troublesome procedures in 
transfering securities and funds. So 
settlements on all sales and purchases 
are handled smoothly and automatically 


to information for improved planning and 
management, including monthly state- 
ments for all your ACS accounts, con- 
firmation for securities transactions, and 
cash flow data detailing the future 
balance of your ACS account. 

For full details, just call your nearest 


■"higheryfekis. 'femaichi office or fill in the slip betow^ ^ 

"pleaseprotfide further information about how your Automatic Cash Management System 
(ACS) service can mate my funds work harder. 


Company Name. 
Address 


.Telephone 




rw andmonev draiii^g , .^1-tond) N.v. IHIVIMIW^ » 

I YAMAICHI SECUR._T.ES CO_LT«_ 

I — . — — — _ — -fa — — — — — — ~ — 

Hud owe* M. Vtesu s-chome. ^ , 

422 

P * ri * Mew York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Montreal, Singapore, Sydney, Seoul, Beijing, Hong Kong 


























Page 16 


tivtfrnatTONAL CLASSIFIED — 

-111 J- Li 11 ^ x — AUTO CONVERSION 

EAL ESTATE I (Continued From Pack Page) DOT/ 0>A CONVERSION 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 

— cgTrT r n — 1 World Bank Reports Dedine in Lending 

r . A SS I r IHjJLI • _ • . cations for mediunHom grc 


REAL ESTATE (Contim 

FOR SALE 

SPAIN 

MAHQ1A, ONE YEAR 0U>, 44wi- 

USA RESIDENTIAL _ 


USSiafiXM. ihfcrmn hw col Mfoiw 
04-53635 15 cowrite to 324 IHj-B 
Kaono, Marfadto, 5pon. 

FOR SALE IN BENDOBME, ASamft, 
Span, ratawant with decs. 15 
room, 3400 sojjl gardens, parang. 
Pnce Pesetas 20 miCon. IttwesFar- 
bdo Armando, Benidorme. Tet (65} 
85 39 67 Spain. 

COMPLEX B4 RR8ERA DEL SOL 35 
flats. 2 or 3 bedroom, fitted krtam 


flab, 2 or 3 bedroom, fitted kitam 

LM). Tierra Mas. Loeol 29, Fuenjr- 
(34J3OT31Z 


PALM HEAOI 

renowned Braden Hotel Cfltawm- 
um. Priwle safe by <**»* & 
sn^momn/crtcsledor wj 
exdushra 3500+ squore foot, 
room with ocean vew terraces npjt- 
mete with or^oKfconedbMOWD™ 
cabana IndudM awiphtfe.boW & 
dubs ommenbias. CompWwn^WH 
1986. The ody 3 bedroom nvnMB : 
unique to this eportmenh spopyft 
private, gerefan potbs 



wanthd/exchange 

^tie. 01-426 55]8- __ , AM LOOMNGTObuy dwd from 

Telex.- 8955112. — — - .... u.^,«.Fnrifch-SnS 


DOT/ EPA CONVERSIONS 

WANTED/ EXCHANGE pnees. Eure** ta USAfluatuilttA 
S tfp p Mfc lrOflt 117. 2506 H C Ip® 
WANTS) FOR PBHOO 20lh Dec - 4th Hogue, Hodtnd. Pnone (0J7D-559245 
Jav a fanJy dwtet in me French or — ■■ — 

AUTOS TAX FREE 

Sj.SC.’SASAwffi excaubur 

I AM LOOKING TO buy *ed from The "dl new " 198 5 Senes V bcalton 
SSlJr^SSltiwrtm ftarie. Coft ore now awAAIe. 

^6620tec^ mthe UiA |213) 

vJi Ofi zi Date ore ihe.moB kmtnaps taaan 


Batv Amaw' n tj. «yj,ivTis These are the moB nnunaps nraiwi 

employment 3£jgA— -SB 

M®^ a,,lK - ^Ud_ saataaBBS 

MUSS ?B3EBXB* 

JW&n . ™ |K£Z___ - Weh^bbd^wbite and wy on ■■ 


SWITZERLAND t 

I 

ZURICH 

SWITZERLAND 

Only 30 mm. away from ZiridvJOotwi 
Airport, we can otter ytw o chap or 

1W + 216 room apeetmenb wt*i» era 

pustandmg both in qiKfltyand in «rtj- 

tecturd deign. Indoor wnmmmg pod, 
fitness, restaurant + room serves. 

By for the closest apartment project to 
the metropafa of Zurich withi Mg P«- 
neb to foreigners. It end* t nepOM Pfr 
tie of either an kferi voc OTon re e- 
denoe or on nttroctiwe mveshnerr tor 

anyone who appreode the chmmoria 

appeal of a deSghtfd .environment 
iwlW eosy reach of Zixich. 

Up to 855t of the pwthffle prip ronbe 

financed on vwy easy tarns. So riatae 
contact us.. your copy ot our ja-poge 
brochure awrits you. Such onopponu- 
nty as this wil not repeal itsen I 

RESJDBCA AG 
CH-8001 Zurich, Tdedter50 
Teb (1)221- 33 95 Tl* B1 3 376 RES! OH 

ITS YOUR DECISION 

hi the famous ding and summer 
resorts DAVOS and rifadutai war 
ST. MORITZ q s wbB ° n world 
famous IAXE UKHNE we dfer beau- 
bful apartments m typed Swiss rty£d 
houses. Best loonfiom. Top qw*y- 

Pnces: SRIOflOO up to SF1 mfan. Free 

far sde to foreigners Mortgages at low 
Swas interest tales. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD 

DorUr. CH-887£W»M« 

Tab CH-58-43T778 
Tbu 876062 HOME CH 

VERBIER 

Sb aid Summer resort in the Stria Alp. 
Aitroetive upurt m e nls in a chalet at 


NYC 43-Story CONDO 

Dag HammaisIqoW Tower 

240 EAST 47th ST. 

1 Block To United Nafare 
-SPCOAOJLAR- 

I, 2, 3, 4 4 Bndroom Apartments 

New L MSariis^^^Wh 

Swimming Pod Hadth Q ub on d 

ARE ALW AVMLAa| 

Far Info Colt 21 2-7»fW4. 

Sat, Sun 1M; Mon to Fn 9-5 


^Kddi&Alw raided uwittry- JP-/3r-*no i™*™, 

Safari aatasa&w: 

SECBETA1UAL 

"+ 7 BQTftOOM FLATS for rented in POSITIONS A VAILABLE 

Esae!“ 


(Cootnmed from Page 11) ■ should be applkdwilhs^t 

der for it to respond more effective- dvity to the social 
ly to ie nSs of its borrowing and costs inherent in changes ina 
members and to stimulate the Dows affea eeooMnic 
of capital from other sources. Some of the toughest 

Ameeting of its executive direo- which were direct 
tom ^strepsed that the bank would report to the 
have to be innovative and should concerned the need for bettermop- 
streamiine its operations to ensure nation and elaboration betwwi 
that it will continue to be in a the bank and the international 
position to respond to changing Monetary Fond, 
world economic conditions and the The report noted that wkJmx 
needs of borrower countries in an been some cases of disagreenran 

effective and timely manner. It on analytical and policy issues, ana 
should also be more active in pro- inconsistent policy advice to gov- 
moting the cauK of development in eraments. ■ 

the international community.” The report noted that “w 
“It was also agreed that bank important that bank input be pro- 
ppon for adjustment and reform vided at an eariy stage on the impli- 


cations for medium-term growth of 
alternative stabilizauon 
during the formulation of IMb- 
supported adjustment programs. 

Difficulties' that arise as a result 
of difference in timing between 
bank and IMF activities.^the dire^ . 
tors’ report suggested, could be 
mitigated through better anuetpa- 
Sn>y the bmikoflMF needs, as 
well as by quickening the bank s 
response time to requests by the 
jMF for information- 

The directors approwd an in- 
crease in the number of documents 
that are exchanged in. draftw- 
tween the two institutions, permu- 
ting cross-attendance of staff in se- 
lective board meetings. 


assigns Agreement 

O/tD^Reschedubng 




pAR ^r C ^. *h had ! 

onnais said Thursday- rfr . 

ft 

^ K°due in 1985. The 

ssrstrasrs* 

1 Sept 30. 1986. 


Contact 

BRAT ENT3IPWSE5 
m New Yorki tS 
(516) £73 2884 * 


advertisement — ~ ^7 . Seo t 19, 1985 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Su _ pplied bY 

- -rr 


— - - nwMm Hum in rmx 

75114 Poro. fronea-Tefc 


, INTBl WROPE 

■iniemiE SEBG for AMffijCAN muxxe EAST AUTOMOBILES LTD. 

M1NERVE hi pabs: montc caho_ 



625 8611- tetenrtk.wii 

^gjgMaaa aruir 

1788. Telex 763001 FA NRUK G. gg 

HOLLAND POSITI 


DUTCH HOUSING CMVE B.V. 

Detuxe rentals. Voternartr. 1 74^ 
Amstertianv 02M21234 or 623222. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

lANGUAGESCHOpisgetaMI^ 
nKHtier-tonque EngBsh Mu« 

papers. Cal Pcre 747 12 80 5oFar 


raBma&S!&M 

Amtordm. let: 020-768023. hoUSBTS’BL- Cou^e looking far injurance-s 

tmlv sma&Tsnrs 

old. Private room. 10 mn. Id NTC upeWed. 5 

GAU ^ 

ttoibOifa. France TdtSSaS 

M] PAIR needed in Manhattaa 2 bo- ^ 

t 

bone, 92521 Neuily Ceden. Fronca I 

MEAN FURNISHED APARTMENT to NANNY/ H0USBCB3« far 5 war ps[T| 

m ■■ - ■ otd boy. Resume with 

iretw/24520 S.W. 152 Ave., 5cwJfi LHi 

PARIS AREA FUKNISHtJJ . S. HA USA 33020. Umo 

DOMESTIC Coo 

ia rwAMP5-H.YSES 8tb positions wanted ore. 


MONTE CAHO 
Tefc 33 (93) 25 74 32 

GA INTERNATIONAL 

AUTO EXPORT TO-. 

USA, Canada, M hk B e C a rt , Japan 

• Worldwide cleSvery of new and 
used European art. 

VW/AUD1 _ 

• EPA/DOT comeraan, win 

• t&A^d^ery via Los Angeles, 
Houston & New York. _ 

• Our own IrjjTsport- stiipp ng- 

i njjx ancc-shipptng-banang 
and wwronty progroro 

• AiCA Member, wheh keeps us 
upetaed. 5 yeon eipetwnee. 

GA INTERNATIONAL 


PARIS AREA FUKNISHJUJ 


74 CHAMPS-EYSES 8fh 

Stud». 2 or 3-room opart mwl 
One month Of more. 

IE CLAMDGE 359 67 97. 


TRASCO 

INTERNATIONAL 

LHJ>. Merowfes Tax Frae 
Umousnes 36" 8 44 
Armoured ears and Smousnes 
Coach bidt ari _ 

Other makes & mafia 



NYMUnON PLACE SOUTH. 2 bed-1 
room + balcony. Begant co-opt 
aia tiii e nt with unobstnKted nyer 
views from master bedroom. Lrwng 
room + diring area, 2 baths. !»ga 
wnfcfa doset, etf-tn kridm Avat 


automobiles 


Over 100 units in stock 
World wide dflfivery 
Direct from source 

D.O.T. & EPA 


Tel London 
Telex PI) 85 


1 629 7779 
(TEAS G. 


r * 

- AvakSe with purctewe pern* for 
foreigners with finonong at low 

18 Aye. St OofiWe, 1M G«W 
Tefc 022/ 28 69 61 

r 

i 

VALAIS / SWTTZHILAND 

CHANS - MONTANA 
THYON. IES COUONS 

ST me. VAL D'AMMIVIBB 

Hah and chalets 25 to 150 sqjn. 

1 to 5 rooms. Credit 601L. Interest rale 
6751 Duration 15 yean. 
OwnervBoilden. Deeet srie. 

VAL PROMOTION SjA. 

10. Ave du MM-OilW SION 
Tel: 41-27/23 34 95 


RIVER HOUSE- ALL RW® VIEWS. 
One of NYCs finest buildings, 4 mas- 
ter berk acres, modem kitchen. 14 
rooms, high floor, 4 exposure^ 3 
mods' roams, 6 batte. tap anxfcwn. 
Write owner: Bax 2747 HercJd Tri- 
bune, 92521 NeuRy Ceaex, Frcmoe 
Qrctdl 212-W9-9lfe USA. 


bedraanvone ana a nan nnw 
baths. Decorator furnished. Southern 
& Western Crtv viewvMorrtti Monte- 
nonet 5605. Price J73MBL 
(212) 48f -1617 or wnte Mr. Oort 721 
htih Av. N.Y.C. 10022 


Trasco London Lfci 

6S67 Park Lara. London W.l. 

Swit=eriand4JK-W. Germany 


BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FRS AND USE OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 

WRITE FOR f*H CATALOGOR 

mSSI^JSSKS * f 



NYC- PARK AVENl*. Gfertati 7m 
finest prewar buMng. Oratro, 
French decor. Moriale thjoudiout. 
Sl^OOJWO. Montenance ,5950- Gd 
Mono litt. Broker 212-534450a 


COUNTRY UVING N.Y. L 69TH 
Modem duplex, 2 tadroanv 2 bath. 
1400 sa. ft. with 1000+ green gor- 
dervpgg USS550JQ0i 21^7347960. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


YOUR AMBBCA’S CUP RgTOB4CE 
Pnriti - Wftan Aodi dfa , 

To loose short or long term. Actkimed 
ouhtandmg new luxuy 
Minutes to the aly. 
views over Swot war and th e to yg 
Penh YoeN Chib. 3 bedroom. 2 baft- 
ream etc. Jraitar and Ml security. 
Swimming pools. Tetm o»d sqF«n, 
spas, saunas. 

interested pohes contact 
Dr. Wonbeek, Box 68. Maoiwi Park, 
Western AustroSo 6012. 

Teh Perth Western Austnia 386 3409. 




it?"* 


695 7061 
931 7605 
568 9288 
866 6681 


bdorado and 

RIVIERA CONVERTIBLE 
NEW 1985 

F«t dehvery. 

We deal with ail farmrfties inducing 
Rnostratan, Shi pcmg cmd Convenwn 
to European spednasbons. 

To order vour Eldorado or Riviera nJ 

WIBEUCTS 

MIDDLE EAST AUTOMOTJIS UD. 
MONTE CAB.O_ 

t 13MS?ASc' 


Redemot- Price- Ex-Coupot; •* - Formerly 


AUTOS TAX FREE 



vn-A*+.u>ivifl 


LONDON BKstArai 
FOR RENT 

Charming mews bouse d fodiy bJ xnd 
Amencan Embassy. 2 bedr ooms, 


Central West Corn] USA. 26 am 3 batta, Sving roam, (feme room, 
(10576 hectare^ ptWic water & rti- fabulous kitchen, rod garefen. F# 
ties. $1 50.000 or etyxyajent an y hard farmed Iona tern itease avoWfe. 
cuneney. Also consider Scwth lUo> (212) 689-1592 USA. 


U.S. REM. ESTATE, All TYPES, im» 
tor & broker attunes invited: RE 
Services 100 Brush Creak. Rd, Stmta 
Rosa. CA. 95404. USA. 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


NYC 43 5TORY CONDO 

LINCOLN CENTER 
PALACE 

Magnificent IB room pernhaute opndo- 
mnum in the heart of Lmcntn Center 
Area. Brt«rJhtal>irxj prxxxaimc vwws at 
ofi Control Park, Monhattote and New 
Janey. The presti^us buridmg pro- 
vides 24 hour .doormen, mnaage, 
rooftop pool and health dub, peeking, 
drily nxed term* & exceptional securi- 
ty. Apartments can be ottered to art 
your nee*. Ideal corporate headquar- 
ters or for ofemiy with uncornprpmo- 
■ng taste. Cbntod us far an exduswe 
viewmg. 

MARILYN E RElSNe 
G.L STEVENS REALTY 
60 East 42nd Street 
New Yoric, N.Y. 10165 
{212) 687-6767 









Il'J 


ertJi'rrarv'* 




Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 

offering 

pre-opening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

featuring 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All mograficentlY 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 

Executive Services Avrilable 

Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


DOT & EPA 
CONVERSIONS 

Dam fa Ita .U-SA. 

WE PRO^’bOI^NG 

US. CUSTOMS Q£ARANCE& 
PICK-UP SERVICE FROM PORT 

EUROPEAN FINE CAR 

Imparls & Convwsiore 
36-21 31st St. UC.W 
718-729-2407 Tlx 5101009922 


EPA / DOT 

CONVERSIONS 

» Customs brokeroge/boreing lerace 

* Pick-up & deJrvrry anywhere m the 

Eastern US. & Texas , 

* Prafesaond work uong only Ihe 
righest quriity oampriwi* 

* Guaranteed ff A / DOT ttaprovd 
CHAMPAGNE lMPORIS WC, 

2294 North Pott Rd.. Hatfield.. 
PA- 19440, USA Tefc 215 BM 6852 
Tefax 4971917-CHAMP 




LMJ. SA 

OFFICIAL ROILS ROYCE 
DEALS! FOR BB.GTUM 

TAX FREE CARS 
ROLLS ROYCE BBNTIEY 
RANGE and LANDROVK 
SAAB 

Abo Ueed Care 
rue MlDOBBOUIC’ 74-82 
1170 Brussels 
TEL 2-673 33 92 
TLX: 20377 


ENGLISH EXPERTS 

W« meat the longuaoe dTcK-hw 


US Conversion 
DOT/ EPA 

We offer full service from 
pick-up m Germany to sepring, 
testing + door-defcyery m USA 
cn wel cn iretril aHon of 
power-windows , or -co nation & 
owsc control. 

AJC.T. 

Auto4Catedyw»tar Tedrf^ GMB 
Ememfirarair. 115. D-4300 Esun 
^M^^4340^, Tbc 8561 1B8 


TRANSCO 

TIC LARGEST SHOWROOM 
AND STOCK W BJROFE 

Keeping a COTSkmt stadc of more than 

300 brand new core of al European + 
Japanese moket cwnpettvely priced. 
Tax firm Hita ihfap.mn insurreKe. 
Seod far miiflkotor free a*dos««. 
TramceSA, 95 Ng reddrem . 

Td 32^42^40^x mStTixw 


amOPORT TAX FRS CARS 
Cxf for free cotriog. 

BlUMtlMfiM 




NEW MERC&ES 

POBSCHE. far xTvnedate ddvwy 

FROM STOCK 

Bed imtrice, 'taf***. k *"? K " k 
bond, amrernon m USA 

RUTE INC 

A000 FRANKHJKT 


EUROPE C USA SffiCS. 

AD atoto far worldwide dei wry from 
stod- 5 «dferaWW®OT^ 
nuur _ MERCEDES - PORSCHE 
VW - SAAR-VOWO - PR1GK7T 

EUROPE AUTO BROKER S , faa ' . 


T3TM 


s y;S^ E-. 



■»EW vV it ; ,■ fy t 7t?l 

. 1 eg 


ZSW fW - > V 1 W ; : : ' > ' K* '■ R '- 


TAX Bfi CARS 
P.CT. 

AD mrices, an rnddefa; bran d raw 

sSS^ssr. 


. S TY1 R 4C GARAGE 
At Friankftert ■ Motardww, tarfi 

wfifisafis 

free, from dock. SGSJkotnbixg. Tek 
uffl8300051.Tb2165109W.Gennariy. 


ItANSMUNDI BELGIUM. 21 GorfeJ- T 
tebaxt. 8-2241 Zoersd. Antwerp. Tek 


S3T^WB.NEW8,USHX ~. 


preqous sttones 


JEAN DELOR ^ 

JEWHiR - CREATOR . ' 

f YOUOOMfeTOWJBDOjrTMlSS 

FR^SoUAU^^Sf^N. • 

REASONABLE PR1CB. 




SaiiNG. BUYffYG, EXCHANGES. 
TAX ftS 

1 RUE DU HAVRE 
PARIS 8TH 

FACING GARE ST. LAZARE 
TH: 294 25 55 


EDUCATION 




ESCORTS & GUIDES \ ESCORTS & GUIDES 


EPA/DOT 


Brokerage, bonefing, pkMd. d^vwy. 
Newest technology, modem 40JJQ0 
iq.lt. fadity deriaited to puakty cot- 
versons. I week turnaround. Lao roefi- 
ty awaDoUe. 

EURO/ SPEC W. 215-825-7547 USA 


PORSCHE BMW, t ROUS-ROYCE 
LH/RH aive. New & PraOmed. 

8 years experience m Import/ Export. 
Doeumtntoion, stepping elc. 

USA our KJeocny. 

Tcie odvOTtoge of our expenenee. 

HUGHS MOTOR COMPANY 

Bournemouth, Englaid 
(0) 202 744M37 
Tlx 41254 HUGHES G. 



Place Your CtassHiecI Ad Quickly end Easily 
MIERNATKMAL HESMD TUBUNE 

By Hum Cel your bed W ra prere n te tive w* your ted- Yw 
mA be informed of the cod raimrioHy. and once p«toaynwrl a 
modi your ad wil appear withm 46 howl. 

Cote; Hi# bane rate a $950 per tire pw day -I- kxrit «» Therew 
25 Ima. ip* and ipcxK in the first Sno aid 36 in *0 fbnowwg sn«* 
Mnnwn space a 2 knee. No efebnviobom aoMpted. 

Credit Grek; Amercer. Expiw. Dteer 1 * Club, Eurocard. Mnrier 
Card, Aeon and Visa 

HEADOHKX LATIN AMBUCA 


p uln(ll Art— 41 40 31 

Park: [For classified oriyk (Dept. 312] 

747-4MKL tow™ 33 14 54 


* USA & TRANSWORID 

a-american 

escort service. _ 

EVBTYWHBBE YOU ARE OR GOU 

1-813-921-7946 

Coll free from US: 

CdO free from Florida: 1-0OHBM892. 
Lowed Eastern weknma you bodd 


CAPRICE 

escort senna 

IN NEW YORK 
THj 212-737 3291. 


NEW YORK CITY 

excursions 

7 DAYS - MAJOR CARDS 

(212) 517-7803 


parliament 

ESCORT SERVKX 

NewYorit 212-517-8121 
Chicago 312-787-9059 

Mejar a«dtt avdi chmpM 


★ LONDON ★ 


ARISTOCAT5 

lortden Eewri Serww 

^437 47 41 / 4742 
12 noon - radregfa 


HEATHROW 

* AND LONDON + 

» BCOW SERVICE 01 -834 6601 « 


* JASMINE * 

amsibdam Boon sons 
suss ■ 


ZURICH-GENEVA 

wfliisa 


APPLE * MADRID 

a^gS^SSUn 


Z UR I c H 


REGENCY NY 

T5S!5I^15iSF 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

GLIDE SERVICE firwal Soft 
«>™AM(0) 1CMS4155 
THE HAGUE [0] 7040 79 96 







b-'M-' 1* * ! : l fr. 1 rrlJI 







p r" VI t : t -MBQBBSMWl 



Jt.'.vii: ,>1 V.S.' Vi 7 \ 1 ■■ 




in i i' r 'it :l i 

|r, ; 





REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 



t Hampton, 


SrfiBna London 01 



MEGEVE-B«iSH FAMILY, readcri 


Varies]. Tefc021/2661 50 


Anaterdom; 26-36-15- 
Mew 361*97/360-2421. 
Brueeebe 343-1BV9. 
Co pen h agen ! fOI) 32 9440. 
Fkanhfart: (069) 724755. 
Laaeane: 29-5894. 

U6 mk 67-7-93/660S44. 
Uredoa: pl|836-40ffi. 
Madrid: 4552891/455-3306. 
Mfian P2) 7531445. 
Norway. 0] 41 29 51 
Rome; 679-3437. 

Sweden; (08| 7569229. 
TolAvhn 034S5 53?. 
VkeM Contact Frankfurt. 

UNfT« STATES 

Now Yoric (2121 752- 3890. 
Wael Caret: (*!5) 362-8339. 

SOUTH AFRICA 

ft y eei u ta ra 421599. 


Qwoyane3: 51 4505 
Urns 4I7B52 
teana 690511 
San Jew 23-1055 
Sanffaira 6961 555 - 
See Praia: 852 1893 

MIDDLE EAST 

Brirahn 346303. 
Kuwait: 5614485. 
Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
Qatar: 416535. 
SaediAnfM 
Jeddrip 667-1500. 

U JLEi Dabai 224161. 

FAR EAST 
Bangkok: 39W6-57. 



ZURICH 

s ™r^57 + ^ ! * , 


***fr**GENEVA BEST 

ESCORT SERVICE. 022 / 8615 95 


** ZURICH 558720 ** 

PRIVATE TOURISM GLIDE SERVICE 


Hang Kara 5313691. 
Mraflar 8170749. 
$4004:73587 73. 

Sktgraor* 222-2721 
Teevran 752 44 23/9. 

Tokyo: 304-1925. 

AUSTRAllA 

Meftrarai 6908231 

Syikwy: 927 56 39, W <3 20. 
Perth: 32896 33L 
i W fcrian, Quee ra lra rt- 

369 34SX 


LONDON 

BBjGRAVIA 

EwtSeork*. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


LONDON 

Portmen Escort Agency 

67 CKtara Sfreet, 
IrtflAni W1 

Tel: 486 3724 ar486 llM^ 
AS iraior orodfl ocPd* oeeoptad 


MADRID INT’L 

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DAILY ESCXWr SERVICE 
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4- VfSBV + TRAVa 



RC8ME OUB EUROPE ESCORT 
& Guide ServwJeli 06/589 2604. 589. 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 pm] 


































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^KRtNCY MARKETS 


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^oHar DecIines in N.Y. on Income Report 

-.-. t C > *^¥yp Su Q Fiim.Dafimhts at SI 345. up from Wednesday’s They said that U.S. data released 

■': -NfiW:i3©fUt. ^ The dollar dose of SI 3320. Other dosing dd- Thursday showing that personal m- 
do^ to , ^ 1 ^ ^ Icw YorkThurs- Jar rates were. 2394 Deutsche come had risen 03 percent in Au- 
. day. refl&^ng disappointment marks, down from 2.911; 8.8303 gust and personal spending nad 
. • oVdri *dfc#ocre” rise in jjersonal French francs, down from 8.8725. soared 13 percent were in line wun 
iocbine- '-'l ;" . and 23800 Swiss francs, down market expectations and baa naa 

••Deai^S^ere taking long dollar from 23925. little impact 

portions’-, iff Europe: expecting a Earlier in London, the dollar fell in London, the dollar fell to 
hja&er increase in personal in- to dose at the day’s lows in late close at 2.3623 Swiss francs from 
corned**® Carmine Roiondo. trading after trading slightly higher the opening 2.4015 and Wedncs- 
- Manufacturer Han- for most of the day. day’s close of 2391. 

V-'o^Tri^';;": J/J ' Dealers said there was no signifi- On other exchange late Thurs- 

:ThodoHar rMbaijKd at firm lev- cance to the movement, which they d _ v the dollar twsmed in Frank- 
■ '^jjowCTtX. Ahead of the “flash” attributed to interbank position ad- j u ^ a t 2.9122 DM, up from 2.9095 
M 6 iiafedf j ffbss national product justing before Friday’s release of nu Wednesday, at 8.884 French 
-to^je rdeased Fnday. Most expect the U 3. GNP estimate. They said francs in Paris, up slightly from 
- the GN? report to show 33 percent the U.S. currency fluctuated 8 854- and at 1,954.9 lire in Milan, 
ortrid^^amomie growth. around 2.9 Deutsche marks toward ‘ i 951 . 


INTERNATIONAL HERA LD TRIB UNE, FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER ' ^ 

__ 2 European Banks Cam GESetsIJ LondonM ^a^ y9temi Umt 
ep°rt Exclusively to Women — 


Page 1' 


Exclusively to w omen * „ ^ m ssbtS 

fc rjrr- ¥ a ^ ast5 2 SSc agaggS 

publicity has drawn new smen inSituUons. believe that has appointed Soe«n Modg Sed by John Potter, 

customer* to a branch that had of lheir 3ppea i lies in their »!* ^^rtnuinmeni in Europe. Nielsen a managing dtreeior. Wim computer Inc., the U3. 

served many male diems before its j® ( . to provided wider range of nSTkfrica. * his appointment. Mr. maker 0 f minicomputers, has 

S' Saasaa M.Mwgg -tsnsmM . 


conversion. , . , . 

“So far, no men have dosed their 
accounts in protest at the changes, 
she said. 

In Edinburgh. Miss Ritchie 


ipm mmm im wwm a*™ 

branches. . .. ._ . . Mmirman. was walking down Park PJ**., -1 Riviric's head oudy head of its u^ury “f tdw the Cleveland-based 


year. Henri Ddaraye, the bunts e busiQCSS development and 
chairman, was walking down Smew at General Electric 5 head «"*>. head 


jcutive arid manager of cor- JPg*--* &SSS 

*rSES5?i!!S of its treasuo- division. 


at 

.:2ssS. 


once that Jf over, economic rep 
nuy Stafirt w look so-so again 
insiccNdd- see, some selling of dc 
pogtkais,*Mr. Rotondo said. 


In New York, the pound dosed generally quiet. 


THE EUROMARKETS 




241.80. 


(UPI. Return) wives’ accounts. „ . , 

In the United Slates, small, inde* 
— pendent banks, owned and operat- 

ed by women, emerged in the 1 970s 


Trading Again Focuses on Primary Market 


«* p" I i sft ** 

doounated banking world. Most of R . director 

these banks were rot paiuotlarly fclurne( j frora voting a daughter 
successful, and Ae handful that « Ncv> Zeabnd and reported find- 
have survived, including the First devoted exclusively to 

Women's Bank in New York, have ,n B a 


asss.wefBs - 0 r2&'£S™» s«SS3Ss-*- 
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By Christopher Pizzey 

-• . >— Retain 

LONDON — Activity in the 
Eurobond' market Thursday was 
Main centered on the primary sec- 
: tSrThuisday, dealers said. Opera- 
tors in the secondaiy market re- 
uuaoed on the sidelines before 
Friday's “flash” estimate of U3. 
thhilrquarter growth in the gross 
national product. . 


That is to allow for formal enact- ’ manager was Credit Suisse First 

ment next year of legislation allow- BwtonLld. . . n . 

SfiJlSfiFMSS wSfiSfl Australia to Raise 

sSThtar ^ Cor P oration Tax 

The note was bid on the when- bfliion issue for ml Reuters 


] oe note was ma on uic wucu- ««— — — - A c Reuters 71 ne -i-emn«-. ■*nu- 

issued market at a discount of 35 dom. “ CANBERRA - Australia’s 

ba«s points against the total fees of coloration tax will be raised u 49 y § AgenC% Approves 

Fust Savings t^MonsU 


"a 3 ‘ how does the womens 
movement in Europe view the all- 
women banks in Geneva and Edin- 
burgh? “I know some tewmsis 
hate the whole notion.” El nine Du- 
mont or the Swiss feminist nuga- 
7 ine “Femnw." *a\A- _ 


Company Results 


.lustralia 

Mver Emporium 


unless ot herwise mate 

l ulled Steles 
Amer. Greetings 

im ?* <**»■■ i 


Mocv CRaU 
mowr. J«S 

Revenue 

Net Inc 

W»J per snore — 

20*4 rr ms 


Thompson. 

TRW Inc., the Cleveland-based 
automotive, electronics, aerospace 
and industrial producis concern, 
has appointed Jack L Osborn vice 
president of its Asia-Pacific office 
in Tokyo. He has been acting man- 
ager of that office for the past year. 
Separately. Ed Barry *»s been 
named managing director ol l K-w 
Cam Gears, UJv. 


r 3-D 9 Systems 
Aid Design 

(Condnued from Page 11 ) 


Yw IMS 1 W 2 ?S ISs wwr, “ 1934 engineers 10 use the s>-stems. There 

KJlSSrS — 0 ^ oS rSSov— are* !00 to 500 s>’siem commands to 

per shore u» 0.143 ^ in4 ,6 ^ w & ^ mastered. It takes a mimrauir lof 


SSSl ^ Great Amaican F^stSsmgs Credit iaued a SNMUi Lower Options Margins 

“^y P t^Snal became Utc B»k Uautai a wjmjjar M» S3 Tbarstlaj by Tmasurcr ^ 

third British buSditig sodcty to SStSTreeis- l^tmMgerwsSuitiim Sadis PaulKeaun^ . , , WASHINGTON — The U5. 

Han and a further £100 million will ^ when-issued market at a discount end of d°uble Pf dl mairin levels for'shS po>itions in 

remain on lap. The lSyearnole St^ZHbc isstat was SwSSujSrtbin the told paid t o ah ambokicra. Mr. ; Kgu^ s£a, S urck 

, «SS« U .K0.rnmio» S*a" ■ 

option after seven years. SS4. Cotambia co™ dfa!5m £” 31. generally 

S33»te£Si«a lf« Mutudpal Finance Authority- The “""f’S^SSd'u.a. in 1987-88. will let investors amjatwr short 


RpilJlia Revolt 

‘’ nl Net UK 

Rowntree Mackintosh pM m 

m H«ii Ito^ 

Revenue 5”c tnOw 

p«ta» Mot— »5 Rnvnm 

Per Store — ■ uw * 0 ,04 Nel In* 
Per sn 

British Telecom. persn 

wsfc.- B is t* 

Per snare — 0011 OJO* 


was lean managea oy aamuci wiuu- _ . — j 

tarn & Co. ana has an investor put bid on the wh»-issued i 
Son after seven years. side the 20 -baas-pomts< 

The issue was structured like the cession aL 99 M perceni 
two previous floaters for building made the jE-baas pom t 
societies, in that the first coupon Ttey added that the . 
wffl be 1/16 point over the six- geted registered formb 


MQuor. 
Revenue __ 

«lli Net Inc. 

"I 1 _ Per Share — 

«LMa XL?S 


"" ^ McCormack three months of solid practice be- 

Per Sbare— ^ 048 jrtQuar. T|« 1 |W fore engineers are ready to use the 

■ C * ,0B ™ 1Ma ESTTISf ” systems on a real projeo. 

J 5 *SS m i!Sa pwsiiorc- ui ^ The calma system costs 

>« ’rKSJS— ««4 slJI SI 00.000 to SI 50.000 per work sta- 

wSS^raw/isr^««a> ’ojw uon, depending on software. Las 

Rosa vis u Caimas senior vtce presi- 

E *4Urtw SSSSftSSS'tfflS IS d^Tfor P roducts Md marken ^ 

«o«ar TWS gEftXTS3?SSS& said the cost Should tap 10 be- 

^ ^ tween S 25.000 and S 50 . 00 Q by 


21-* McCormack 

168 SrdQiMr. IMS 19M 

IMA Nel inc. 3RD 4.U 

,3* Per Shore— U1 

i»S t Month* slJg 

156 » 2 J 


Mr. Rearing said that in 1987-88. 


The new requirements, which be- japan 
come effective Jan. 31. generally 
will let investors cam larger short wwj. 


Revenue 2KW 

Uel Inc. 1*47 

Per Shore — UB 

9 Months ]M5 

Revenue *3A° 

Net Inc. 37.J3 

Per Shore— 2 A 1 


SH3 million -- 

““ .ales. 

“2 Wilson Food 

8547 •honor- IMS 

3847 Revenue 3TO.7 

-t -n Mail I Ml 571 


2.73 Ne' Loss 


Sonv Federal Express Revenue — *■*■*% 

Sr B « = 

„ 7 UI u» Net Income- * aiB rlods includes iMN" "■ 




Wilson Foods 1990. _ , . 

mouor. IM 1WJ Mr. Breen said Fluor intends to 
SJTESS— £ increase its work stations to about 

Yew ig* ӣ 400 by 1990. from the 42 Calma 

KS'zrtoiuS ^5 units it Operates today. He said that 

r^^rneTwopj- most of Calma’s prepms are lop- 
erating well sdthough one for d<x- 
ii trical wiring does little more than 


^ offered — jSSSSa JS olS== da^lteLpn^ M t^STJBd £2 

j^SSgl- sSSSlSB centage ol the opttotts product 


per ADS _ 
77 trillion. 


liDTMSJM . 25JOT7K5, rncai Wiring ul«u».w 

“SS “SS SS.faSSWMIi two-dimensional drawmgs. 

mtllon vs CO nvUlon In IPS4 pwnrems™- — 


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' -:14:5.183s 


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Via The Associated Press 


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9ft Bb 9ft + A then will 


WQ 40 .96 5X « 

WolbCi J4 W ^29 

1.76 8J 75 

VF5LS 40 24 ^44 

7t 

40 34 a 

WslFSL « 

MMlcTc M 

WIT LAS M 

wmort: 40 13 W 

^ wCS 58 12 SS 

62 

widcom ... 2061 

Wlllmt 145 4X as 

....... JY3 

23 
403 

windmr J31 B6 


a 10 S 8 fi* Ji ii 

SI as - -is 53 

Mft 13 WFSL9 40 24 
16ft 10A WM5B 
9b 5b WOvelk 
14b 11 W*S*_ 

18ft 6A WeHFn 

17b SA WslFSL 

12 5b WMlcTc 

MA 4bWITIAS 
21b 15ft wmrC 40 13 
17ft 5 Ws^rCS _ 

34 A 21ft Wottra 

66% 7b WlCOt 

13ft 3V, WkJcom 

46b 28ft Wlllmt 145 41 
lS5 7bW1IIAL 
17b gb WmsSn 

10b 4b WjlsnF 

7%% 4 Windmr J3I 

8ft 2ft WtinE" „ ,, 

24b 15b WlsejO 40 3J 


Jl u » 
.150 1 J 231 
JO 34 2 


21b T4A YlowFl M 2J 250 


30ft 5A lanLX* ^ — , 

assam d 

7A 2A Z Ml « 


19b 19 19b + b 

13 12ft 13 + ft 

10A 10 10ft— ft 

21 20b 2tP4 

23 22b 22b— A 

12 ft lib 12 ft + ft 
6ft 6A 6A 
lift 11 11A- A 

15b 14b 1»%— 1% 
!5V% 15 15ft + ft 
7ft VA 7ft + A 
12 12 12 + ft 

11 17b 17b + A 
HA 11 lift— ft 
»ft 30 A 30 ft + ft 

4ft 4b *ft + ft 
4b 4A *ft + ft 
42 41 41b + A 

13ft 13ft 13ft + b 
16b 16 16 — A 

4ft 4b 4ft + A 
4A 4ft 4ft 
7ft 7b 7ft— ft 
16 15b 14 + A 

12 11 b lib 
25b 24b 25ft + ft 

BA 8 8A 
23A 23A 23A 


2 ft 2 ft B% 

7b 6b 7b + ft 

13ft 131% 13b + A 

19b 18ft 19A + ft 


20A 19ft 19b + b 
12A 12A 12A 
38 37 a +*.. 

2b 2ft Tft- V% 
5A 5 5 

14A 12b 13 —1ft 


Bank of America, U.S. 
Discuss Reporting Fines 

The AsstmateJ Press 

SAN FRANCISCO — BankAmerica Coro, 
disclosed Thursday that it is discussmg with ihe 
U.S. Treasury Department several reporting 
violations lhai could result in a “large fine 

a& A% l (SS'Peier MagnanL lhai Bank 
of America had failed 10 comply wuh ihe fed«- 
ai Bank Secrecy Act, which requires banks to 
report all cash iransactions involving more man 
$10,000 to ihe Treasury. 

Mr Magnani said he could noi confirm pos- 
sible pen dry figures, although tiw San Francis- 
co Examiner ncwspaper said T^i^sday tkflt 
they would be “in the ballpark of $1 million. 

The act is aimed at preventing laundering of 
money bv crime figures, who can deposit cash, 
then withdraw it through a cashiers check to 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 


PEANUTS 



1 Laver rival. 

once 
5 Climax 

8 La Casa 

(The White 
House) 

14 Legal claim 

15 CaJlina's 
largess 

16 Compensation 

17 Pianist 
Templeton 

18 Gas-pressure 
gauge 

20 Emulates John 
R. Neill 

22 Newsserv. 

23 Emanation 
from 

stagnation 

24 Acad, title 

25 Ben Adhem's 
group 

28 Merit 

30 Wild speech 

31 Carpenter's 
companion 

33 Leaf 

appendage 

35 Ursa Minor 
cynosure 

37 Francis 

Marion's ploys 

40 Having a 
handle 

42 T ropical break 

43 Elec, term 

45 Belgian city 


47 Branch of zoof. 

48 Kind of review 

49 Finally 

51 Hero of llris’s 
■•Exodus" 

52 Calumnies 
57 Rambling 

59 Sub in a tub 

60 White poplars 

61 " let them 

clash!": Burns 

62 Well informed 
about 

63 Church seat 

64 TU-144, e.g. 

65 City on the 
Yonne 


1 Turkish 
regiment 

2 Threshold 

3 Bounder 

4 Burden 

5 Short surplice 

6 Disinclined 

7 Hats, trees or- 
sheep 

8 Cheese-making 

French region 

9 Units on space 
vehicles 

10 Reverential 
feeling 

11 Student ol flora 
and fauna 

12 Crinkled fabric 

13 Aimless 


19 Jumps a 
battery 

21 Sirs, to Louis 
XIV 

24 Affectedly 
grand 

25 County subdiv. 

26 Contemporary 
Indian novelist 

27 Unwise 

29 Homer’s 

legendary 
burial place 

32 Rama’s land 

34 Cobb's Judge 

36 Ermines in 
summer 

38 W.W. H arena 

39 U.S. missile 

41 Log notations 

43 Cultivated 
areas in Tex. 

44 Vicious 
tropical fish 

46 Ai da and 
Spartacus.e.g. 

50 “. . .not— 
for tribute”: 
Harper 

52 Affair of honor 

53 Gaelic 

54 Spoutless jug 

55 It glows for 
shows 

56 Pearl Buck 
book 

58 Year in the 
reign of 
Antoninus Pius 


BEETLE BAILEY 


SIR, YOUR 
TIE ISIhl 
YOUR A 
AAARTlMI M 


RATE/ 
THAT'LL 
RUIN 
v IT/ 


i Your 

I tie? 


NO, MV MARTINI/ 


f JfcEL 


ANDY CAPP 

f SErw8Cq«roN 1 '' 
l PET- WEl IX QO OUT 
FOR AbWNK nr * 


r OOM. ^ 
LOVELY-/. 


OlMS Dealt Mimw l u ei m p.n, IM. 
IHtt. MMMtc* SyndtuM 


WHS3E»ffE 
WE GOING? 
> DO X v 

PackxceV] 


SURE.VOU 
WAVE-WE 
CAN EITHER 

’iSgan^ 

AT HOME ) 


' •• (you 


WIZARD of ID 


'•? Nwr York Tones, edited for Eugene Malesko. 




urn me# 

Youths you 
toiowAit thik^ 
about 
mem, „ 


ou y 


WM r 
Mmv* 



REX MORGAN 



NO. SHE ISN'T, 
AK- BISHOP t WOULD 
YOU l IKE TO STAY IN 
HER ROOM WITH HE* 
SHE SEEMED 
QUITE RESTLESS / 



WE'D BETTER NOT LET HER 
KNOW I'M HERE/ SHET3 RESENT 
# IT' r LL JUST STAY NEARBY 
5 WHERE I CAW SEE THE DOOR' 


r” 


‘MlSOffc GONNA GIVE ME ALL OF HIS LEAVES THIS YEAR' 4 GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
^ by Henri Arnold and Bob Lea 


WELL.GOVS, IT'5 TIME FOR THE 
LATE NIGHT FRIGHT MOVIE 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter lo each square, to form 
tour ordinary words. 



REMEMBER, OPIE, 
ITS VODR TORN 
THIS WEEK 




SEGIN 








SCUMEL 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon 


Wirld S(ofk Markets 

• Via Agence France-Presse Sept . 19 

Ooting prices in local currencies unless otheru Ue indicated. 


(Answers tomorrow] 

Yesterday's J Jum6le,i: DERBY COLON NAPKIN SIPHON 
1 Answer. What a worker who always watches the 
clock generally remains— 

ONE OF THE “HANDS" 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


HIGH LOW sale 

C F C F 
Atgorva 24 75 JO 68 cl Bangkok 

Amsterdam 25 77 12 54 tr Belling 

Afltens 31 8B 22 72 fr Hone Kaos 

Barcelona 25 7* U 61 Cl Manila 

Belgrade 28 B2 12 54 fr New Delhi 

Berlin 26 79 10 50 fr Seoul 

Brussels 25 77 13 55 lr Shanghai 

Bucharest 25 77 7 45 fr Singapore 

Budapest 27 81 10 50 fr TOhMl 

Copenhagen 16 ol 9 «8 d Tokyo 

Costa Del Sal 77 SI 21 70 cl . __ 

Dublin 14 57 10 SI S AFR 

Edinburgh 16 61 11 52 Cl Atoter 

Florence 10 86 14 57 tr Cairo 

Frank furl 27 81 12 54 fr pniwl 

Geneva 26 79 10 50 fr XSw 

HMsInkl 17 63 1 14 d 

Istanbul 26 79 17 63 fr rSlT 

Las Format 26 77 2f 70 a 

Lisbon » 75 19 66 a 

London 20 68 14 57 a 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

31 88 22 72 st 

27 81 15 59 st 

» M 25 77 r 

28 B2 24 75 a 

32 80 25 77 cl 

21 70 15 59 r 

26 79 23 73 r 

30 86 24 73 o 

35 VS 25 77 d 

28 82 20 68 a 


Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Munich 

Nice 

05(0 

Paris 

Prague 

Revklavlk 

Rome 

SfockAcrfm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


zr BI it I /a Cl • r-n ,r a 

T4 57 io so a AFRICA 

S !! 2! 5 £ ***** 39 84 17 63 hr 

52 H H S £ Cairo 27 81 22 72 fr 

M 70 io m fr e#MlWB — — 11 52 no 

?S 2 5 S Cesabtanca IS 64 no 

2 S li 25 ?r C“ * ™ » 55 * 

g S 19 2 2 "S* 1 £ 

M 3 lS 57 S TWte 25 77 ,7 63 fr 

“Sill £ LATIN AMERICA 

12 54 0 46 o Bueno* Aire* — — — — no 

28 82 9 4s lr Caracas — — — — no 

27 81 18 64 cl Urn# — — — — no 

10 50 3 37 r Mexico city 25 77 12 54 fr 

26 79 is 5* fr ft lode Janeiro — — — — no 

” 48 2 36 fr WORTH AMERICA 

* “ 'jj £ • Andwnwe 11 52 5 41 r 

11 S S ,1 Atlanta 27 81 16 61 fr 

S 25 J? 5f £ Joslan 26 79 15 59 fr 

® ” j J V Caieoga J1 a IV m pc 

S 2 sS Denver 21 70 11 52 r 

2 $? 4 2! 5j D«™<» 28 12 15 59 fr 

27 81 12 $4 fr HoaOtalH 31 » 24 75 oc 

1CT Houston 33 91 23 73 PC 

. LesAngeiet 23 73 M 57 pc 

23 73 S 41 fr Miami 28 82 21 70 st 

31 68 22 72 fr Minneepolis 29 84 29 68 PC 

34 93 13 S5 fr Montreal 25 7T 11 S2 PC 

29 84 16 61 lr Nassau 29 B4 20 <8 DC 

29 64 2D 68 fr Hew York 28 82 M 61 fr 

San Francisco 22 72 13 55 tr 

Seattle 18 64 8 46 to 

16 61 10 50 O Toronto 26 79 10 SO d 

30 68 13 55 r Washington 28 B2 15 59 fr 


12 54 8 46 o Bueno* A 

28 82 9 4s lr Caracas 

27 81 18 64 cl Urn# _ 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tel Aviv 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 

Sydney 



GF5A 
Harmony 
Hlvnld Steel 
Kloof 
Wedbonk 
Pres Slayn 
Rusoiat 
Sa Brews 
SI Helena 
Sasoi 

West Holding 

Composite Slock le 
Previews : U43JN 


3150 3125 
2BZ5 2800 
530 515 

2125 2100 
1155 1140 
6050 WOO 
1825 1780 
740 728 

3175 32W 
775 765 

6400 6850 


Snell 

STC 

Sid Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tate and Lvl* 
Teuco 
Thom EMI 

T.l. Group 
Trafalgar Hse 
THF 

Ultramar 
Unilever t 
United Biscuits 
Vtckers 
Wool worm 


681 678 

m m 

439 427 

466 458 

4» 460 

260 260 

377 369 

388 380 

356 361 

139 140 

20* 205 

1819/3210 19/32 
778 174 

Ml 278 

466 480 


F.T. 30 Index: 188780 
Previous : MMJ0 „ 
F.TAE.r8> Index : WtM 
prevlaas : I2MJ0 


Cold Storage 

Das 

Fraer Heave 
How Par 
inchctw® 

Mai Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 
OUE 

Shangrt-ta 
Slme DartJV 
STwre Land 
SUare Press 
5 Steamship 
SI Trading 


3J0 2.930 
5-45 5^0 

580 5J5 
Z18 2.17 
229 2.18 
580 £70 
8.10 8 
281 27* 

JM 280 
182 182 
1J8 1.74 

1187 084 

114 384 


Unlfed Overseas 1^3 187 


siratts Times Imt Index : 77U9 
Previous :764J5 


Uadon 


AA Carp 
I Allied -Lyons 


SI2J4 512W 
273 778 


Anglo Am Gold S67 1 * 568’a 


» “ ” « 5 Anchorage 

V S « U fr 

26 79 16 *1 fr SSao 

on m ^ V B*w*r 

70 68 4 39 d Detroit 

27 oi i2 $4 fr sss;,,, 

ACT Houston 

— „ , , , Las Angeles 
23 73 S 41 fr Miami 

31 68 22 72 fr Minneapolis 
34 93 13 S5 tr Montreal 

29 84 16 61 lr ttauau 

29 84 20 68 fr New York 


Brussels 


fbnhfton 


AEG-Telefunken 
Aiffanz Vera 


Oeottfe 

16 61 10 50 o Toronto 

20 68 13 55 r Washington 


c1<Iouov; to- Ionov; fr-fafr; h-MIl; rwwercast: pc-oorlfy cloudy; r-ratn: 
sn- showers; sw-snow; stsfor my. _ 

FRIDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: SlfBfllly ChOBOV. FRANKFURT: 

□vercasl Temp. 23 9 <73~48}. LONDON: Cloudv eartv. fair kifer- Temp. 

»— 12(68 — 547. MADRID.- Owdy. Temp. 26— 18J.79— 64). WEW YORK: Fair. 
Temp *- 18 (86-64). PARIS; Rain wrtr, Wr 01er. Twm>.23- 13 r72-55). 
ROME: ThunderSorrm. Temp. 30—19 186—661. TE L AVIV . N<L ZURICH. 
Cloudv. remo. 22 - 9 (72 - 481. BANOKOK: Thwido^oni^ Temp. 31 
IBS— T 31. HONG KONG: FOCOV. Temp. 31—26 CM— 79). MANILA. SfanRIB- 

T,»ma aa 74 490 751. SEOUL: F090V. Ttffil>. 20 — 16 (68 — 611. 

SINGAPORE: TfMjnderslorrni. TemA 30 — 24 (8s— 7J). TOKYO: Sbawwcs. 
Temo. 28 — 20 (82 — 68). 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung tamo 
China Llgfil 
Graen Island 
Hang Seng Bank 
Henderson 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
hk Hotels 
HK Land 
HK 5hana Bank 

HK Telephone 
HK YaumalM 
HK Wharf 
Mulch Whamooa 
Hyson 
int'l City 
Jar dine 
Jardinesec 

Kowloon Motor 

Miramar Hotel 
New World 
Orient Overseas 
SHK Proas 
Stelux 

5ertre Pacific A 
Tal Cheung 
waft Kwotig 
wheeiack A 
Wing On Co 
Wlnsor 
World Infl 

tfana Sens tadex ; 
Prevfaus : 156X43 


2i.ro 2iAd 

18L10 18 

.15 15.10 
6JK 8 
42 42J0 
1225 1225 
g -90 9SS 

J 8 

1080 IM0 
34J0 35 

6.10 63)5 

7J0 7 JO 

s 

6A5 &M 
2160 26.10 
DAI 0A1 
088 089 
1180 had 
1150 1150 
9.40 Pjo 
44 44 

7 -SO 7 AS 

It® 

MM 24.40 
1.98 1.99 

D86 085 

SUSP. — 
!*5 IJ1 
4-70 4.70 

1075 2.15 


AECl 

Angle Ameri con 
Anglo Am Gold 

Barlows 

Blwoor 

Buffels 

De Beers 

Drlefonfem 

Elands 


765 760 

3310 3300 
18500 18300 
1105 I09S 
1415 13M 
7350 7250 

ms n» 

aw 4925 
1750 1740 


Am Bril Foods 
Ass Dairies 
Barclays 
Bass 
, BJLT. 
Beoctiam 
BICC 
BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
BooSs 

Bowolw Indus 
BP 

Bril Home SI 
Bril Telecom 
Bril Aerospace 
Brlloll 


Cable wireless 

Cadbvrv Schw 
Charter Cons 
Commercial U 
Cons Gold 
CouituuKb 
Dalgelv 
De Beers e 
Distillers 
Diiefanleln 
Ffsons 
Free 51 Ged 
GEC 

Gen Accident 

GKN 

GMnot 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 

Imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Land Securities 
Legal General 
Uovas Bank 
Lonrho 
Ludn 

Marks ana So 
AAelal Bax 
Midland Bonk 
Nat West Bonk 
iP andO 

PI Iking tor] 
Plenty 

Prudential 
Rocai Elect 
Randfanfefn 
Rank 
Roea mil 
Reuters 


Poval Dulcfi t 44 £76443 
RTZ 563 

Saatdii 72 0 

Safnsburv 336 

Scars Holdings 111 


222 222 

136 134 

377 372 

574 574 

1J0 273 

335 328 

225 223 

32 32 

!3 3$ 

201 201 

340 30 

841 536 | *te» 

285 2&5 1 

204 196 

411. 401 

208 20* 

366 358 

290 292 

590 575 

140 139 

190 IBS 

232 226 

<40 4W 

148 146 

428 431 

432 440 

396 386 

518 Sim 

JS* ** 

S2Mh Clk 

160 166 

625 621 

13 5/32 135/32 
335 336 

683 675 

277 374 

863 063 

203 203 

393 389 

659 657 

194 195 

281 262 


409 402 

151 150 

375 378 

152 151 

503 501 

392 389 

639 624 

406 401 

278 275 

124 136 

602 689 

140 138 

S78V* J79W 

418 408 

697 699 

330 329 



DANTE’S INFERNO ^ 

Translated and illustrated by T&n Phillips. 
311 pages. S 35 . . 

Thanes & Hudson Inc i, 500 fifth Avenue, 
New York, N.Y. IOUO: '"^ V; 


of H.F. Cary ( 1814 ). ■ihe^ctanWable troika of 
Henry Wadsworth LmgfdkWf Jaiqes.RaMidl 
Lowdl and Charles ‘E&cn Norton. 0 ^ 67 ). the. 
more recent attempt by Dorothy. L, Saycra.ipd 
a dozen others.' ■ ;• . : : ' : 

Illustrators havebeen bto, too, from Botd-^ 
ccffi to Gustavt Dorf: and KctoTRansciiea- 


then no one was - ever bater-.fitan Dante at 
raaWng something ^nvid 

Even so, eyebrows may. be raised' aod tps. . 
pursed at the taneri?y frf Tam PKIhps. an. 
En glish painter 'not yet 50," in aspiring' both to 
translate and to Illustrate the “Inferno” of ' 
Dante. Even if it could be done, why shoiiW it 
be done? Was not the result likely to be ama--' 
teurish, anti^tirna^qtjiisi^ikiii pnsosaptpr 
ous? Even William Blake, equally- gifted for- , 
both painting and poetry,- did not attempt the 
combination when he worked on Dante ■ > 

Besides, the task was adossaL The * f Infcmo’ ? 
runs to not much less than 5,0(K) fines. . 
and pdhicidly writted, it has- an inimit able 
ease, speed and lightness of movement and an 
ineximtstible fdiotyof met^hwLNeyet.issd 
much as a comma wasted. It ^been mimUeiy 
studied by peopl&whosesote aim m life was tn - 
get Dante right- Remembering the grjeat edK: 
tors — among whom the wetfnamed ;.Gmrid-' 
gent will have stuck in the mind of '^veQfdnfr 1 
who has read lames Joyce L- we may wefl ask ‘ 
what can remain for us lb-find. 

The answer is that every generation- reads , 
Dante in a new way andneverfalls tefind Inm' 

to thorn; wb^toiLy getb^Sent, 

with theprafifecation of Dante’s sttdqmasqcb- 
istic fantasies and. his obsession with reTCaagr 1 
and punishment wifi find lines, that speak di- 
rectly to themselves and, in particular, lo the 
traps that they have walked into,- without 
knowing it, and are now never: Ukdy to get but 
of. Such an anth^ can always be renid, re- 
secu, retranslated and repictoed. - 

With a newcdxtion of this ldnd, it is inevita- 
bly the images that lake our attenrioh fifd. 
What on earth can st£Q he 'done with, tba 


Sohrtion to Previous Ftade 


EEDIQ Q 3 QQ C 3 QCIG 
nciHD snaan anion 
□eqb naaaa aans 
aEoaaaaaaDaaiaaa 
oana aaa 
DGansa asaa ana 
nnHB aaaca aao 
BGaEaaaaaQaaaaa 
bed i QQaaa aasa 
qeq aaaa aaaaaa 
aas saan 
HDnnnnaanoaaaoa 
□gob anaas aaaa 
boob aanao oaoa 
ggso aaQO aaoa 


KS 


passage orthaL we askoursdv^ 

Beatrice look ocppMy f3 ^y^ t 

could hwchewt 

SSRjbSra of to most challen^^- 

sodes in literature. v ~ r - 

But h U. ate oil. to « JN* J*3SS 




- ^^ntirwmKvwiure. For that ts wtel 
“Divine Comedy" 

' Lmngston Lowes wrote m 1 930, WdJ.m^iaa 

the encyclopedic eruditioo ot tm 


fadoriritaWe will, into the sted-kmi. - - . _ - . 

■ -of-TTbe; Divine Comedy. . * 

■ -StiU; Acre are other very good translation 
■-The Steoess or failure of th» ofihon wffbe 
'-decided hi ihe end by the 138 pnnu $“} 

• Phillips raftHg for this edition over a period of 
^even yeaii Re has always been not menfy a 

- book-reader but a bodc-builder — s onyon e 

■ who cuts rip -other people’s books, poadong a. 
•warrior two here and a, word or two there and 

- settirig those purloined words in a visual cnqjy- 
reanofhisown. 

In making hjf/vtnag ad prints for ibis Trifer- 
uo,”, he drew on many sources, from a postcard 
"of the Scrovegm .Chapel in Padua to an old . 

- fesiwof magazine, apack of Tarot 

, cards 'and *hat standby of the English schoot- 
boy, The “Boy's Own Paper." Reading, travel, 
anatomical prints, the Jook of the “LadComL^ 

■ ] echoes' from Eua Pouni James Joyce andXJfr 
ESot, z universal traffic signal of our own.asgi, 

■ and; even one.of bis bank statements (rebrived 
lat a. rime when he was horrendously over- 
odrawnJ^raD;**, thrown into the blender of ids 
- imaginati on^ together with hints beyond num- 
. bering from the original teset His prints donot 
■so much ffiasirate'the text as run parallel to it, 

h hbounds te^its occasional brisk 

■ buffo quality. ■ 

• ■ Tins is not an anriquarian edition, though 
-_FWEp$ is akrtnot ooly to the obsceneycfer- 
ences &om Dante’s d^,thaLttrai up; in the 
Italian text but to the zest with which Dante 

i di^eiffles Ovid U* a stylistic dud. These 138 
'prints dart in andoutot today, 'whether in the 
iise ctf brand-^^ that come 

' strai^fromiheltaliaa smj^^ — Dante 
otive-int foe instance, andvirg 3 butter— -orin 
the. sudden appearance.: of a South African* 

with an 


■rj/i > » f j iV f » ivi j i# jj . 


• ; | m t f - ■ > \ [ t j» ' 1 f* 


It I K'jrr 


to int^gence- Nature he observes 
is sensible to have made i ts.most powerful and 


. — ■ u | : m I i i 1 


;of their desrioc^ve potential. 

In wotd andhuage alike, this edition rises to 
that partgular (toTfengr. But thffli this ts in 
every way an .etfitimi for dm last quarter of the 
20th century, riiid one ihrir will notsoon stale. 

; Jdhn Jbusell is art tfcxtqff of The Nav York 


By Alan Trnscoa 

O N the diagramed dead. 
South landed in sk hearts 
doubled, choosing that suit 
rather than dobs, because his 
Parmer's responsive double of ' 
three diamonds suggested mar 
jor-suit length. Be regretted 
this decision when he raffed : 
the opening diamond lead nr 
the closed hand and led the 
heart ace. 

The 5-0 5 ptit was * nasty, 
shock, but South did not give 
up. He drew three morciounds 

of f w in m e . iticramtim* • vnikfe.. 


BRIDGE 


and hopedfor ananormiracle 
m dniba. Tins .wris forthcom- 
ing: When he - finessed rite 
queen fiiidipliyed.the ace, .the 
seat ym esuUuhed-Besinq^y 
coatniuedriril^ aniihe dou- 
bled slam was safe West could 
- sbame-lns-Ccmqp! tafcic'wriheilriwvr 
hetiose.; ^ . ■ 

•; In the r^ay r West crowded 
tbeauctk>nby bidding five di- 
amondsover the tako-out dou- 
ble- North-Sooth settled for a 
penalty double, collecting 300, 
arid' gained' Mffonr more than 
its eventual marain of victory. 


NORTH 

**73 + 

9QJ73 ril 

«AJ 1 

<>WS632 HWHn O KQ9734 
*JS +K3 

SOOTH 
4^X6 
OAK* I 

••••..* — 

4 A QMS 72 

. ,?* ■■■* WM vulnerabfa. Hx 

OldlltlMJ \ 

W M East SoMta 

PM« . PM* — I ft DM. 

S ft ML 5ft 69 

DM. Pam- Pan Pan 

W rat ted Uk 4ii^niprf' st*. 


ACI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Borei 

Bougainville 

Gastloinalng 


Eldon ixl 
ici Australia 
Magellan 
MIM 
Myor 

Nat Aust Bank 
Nnvs Cora 
N Broken Hill 
PosMdon 
Qtd Coal Trust 


Ttiamas Ncrtfaa 
Wgctern MMna - 
Wesfaac Banking 
WoadkMe 

All Ordtaarte* IwN 
Pravim : 945JW 


Akal 

Asahl Chctn 

Asahl Gloat 

Benkoi Tokyo 

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UNTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEP TEMBER 20, 1985 

SPORTS 


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16-3 




. Mida^Spinks: “One firing's already happened to me that everyone said wasn’t possible." 



P Is Nothing New to Spinks 

Tilting Holmes No Harder Than Battling the Ghetto 


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Ed Bradley 

j r Past Servin’ 

- LAS VEGAS — Michael Spinks, 
f jhe youngav'tmd more accotn- 
N^ILshcd brother of Leon, the former 
. - heavyweight champ, also is easier 
' lolik& y -. v .. • 

LxonSpihks, who whipped Mn- 
“ hammftd Ali m l 978, when every- 
: body sajdAS wad no longer Ali, 
■' rapidlydCTrioptti the reparation of 
^being a goofy, gap-toothed ldd 
■ from the tiietto who talked funny 
and antique* keep out of trouble. 

Michael Spinks also grew up in 
- that St Loms ghetto, a doomed 
* project caDed Pruiu-Igpe that later 
' *was razed or r as he put it, “bombed 
out fortwr," when it became an 
ugly, crimc-infested spike ham- 
^ 'mered into the bean of the city. 

-*“■ Michael Spinks always dreamed 
big, though big in those days was 
.-■'best measured on the scale of hu- 
■“ man suffering. What he wanted 

Uway out*^Believd." he Etedto&iy, 
T.^and anything can happen.” 

Now, in the dry heat and bright 
^fights of las Vegas, Spinks is 
* -paring to challenge Lany Hof 
r Jor fag. .heavyweight tidcL The 
vtuGcanceof Saturday night’s 
..ris twofold. Hist; Holmes is trying 


And Spinks, at 29, hopes to become 
the first light heavyweight champi- 
on to successfully challenge the 
heavyweight boss in a title bout. 

“One thing's already happened 
to me that everyone said wasn't 
possible." Spinks said. “I left, I left 
my hometown, and 1 always want- 
ed to leave. 1 always said I didn’t 
belong there. Td say I know this is 
aot right, I know there’s a better 
place for me to live. And I still love 
the place, I love It I just knew I 
couldn’t and wouldn't live there,” 

He is gravely aware of the im- 
probability or success against 
Holmes. Over the past 64 years, six 


:^<6'eflntfflfe49-0 record set by 

_ . ... . “ - 7551 


RockyMarriano on SepL 21, 195: 


have tried and feflwi, including 
Archie Mode, the last man to fight 
Marciano and only the second to 
knock him down. Moore, who now 
is working as a sp ecial assistan t to 
Holmes, lost to Marciano in the 
ninth round. 

Although Spinks, whose record 
is 27-0. ts by far life best fight 
heavyweight around, be. Is giving 
up as much as 35 pounds (16 kilo- 
grams) to Holmes, who packs very 
tiule flab on his ,6-fo ot-3 (1.9-me- 
ler) frame. Spinks generally fights 
at 175. pounds, bui mis week he has 
refused to divulge Ttk weight. He 
said he wants “to kero it a surprise. 
I like surprises,” and added, Tve 


been earing so much I'm sick of 
earing." 

Bui Spinks has been training in 
Las Vegas Tor three weeks and ap- 
pears to be in superb condition. He 
seems truly undaunted by the chal- 
lenge. All' his life, be said, he was 
"getting picked on by people bigger 
loan me, including brother Leon, 
who once fought with him over a 
bologna sandwich and busied open 
his cheek with a curtain rod He 
said that if he was not fighting 
Leon, he was fighting because of 
Leon. 

After an afternoon workout, 
Spinks looked back on more of his 
days living in Pruin-lgoe, which he 
once called “the land of terrible, a 
rough, rough place." 

“Once 1 got jumped by this 
gang." he said. “They spotted me in 
a crowd for some reason, me and 
this guy named Gilbert Coleman. I 
said. ’Gilbert, we're being 
watched.’ Then I told him to move 
on the count of three. Now, 1 
couldn’t run as fast as Gilbert, so I 
got caught. Everywhere I ran, there 
was a guy there waiting, waiting to 
hit me. 

“They said, ‘Come on, little 
Spinks. Come on,* and they hit me. 
Tliey 


Giants Fire 
Davenport, 
Hire Craig 

The Animated Pm . u 

SAN FRANCISCO — Jim Dav- 
enport was fired Wednesday as 
manager of the San Francisco Gi- 
ants and replaced by Roger Craig, 
as the new president and general 
manager, A1 Rosen, made his first 
moves in shaking up the last-place 
team in the National League west. 

Afterward Craig, Bob Brenly 
and Rob Deer hit home runs to 
help beat their new manager's old 
team, the San Diego Padres. 9-6. 

Rosen also put the players on 
notice that none of their jobs are 
safe and that “we promise" that 
“there will be changes made. I'm 
not afraid to chang e." 

Rosen's first move; in replacing 
Tom Haller, was to hire Craig, the 
former manager of the Padres and 
the pitching coach in Detroit last 
year when the Tigers won the 
World Series. 

Craig, 54. was Firedby the Padres 
after managing in 1978 and 1979. 
and left the Tigers after a salary 
squabble. Although he said 
Wednesday that “1 can win. I'm a 
winner.” in 12 years of pitching in 
the majors be was known more for 
his losing. In the New York Mels’ 
first year of existence, 1962, he lost 
24 games, the next year 22. 

Haller has not been offered an- 
other job with the Giants but Dav- 
enport, who left with a 56-88 record 
as a manager, may be. 

The team's owner. Bob Lurie, 
skirted the issue of whether the 
team will be moved but restated 
that this is his “year of decision” 
about whether to remain at much- 
criticized Candlestick Park. 

“in the coming weeks we will 
make a decision about the long- 
term home of the Giants,” Lune 
said “Until then I will have noth- 
ing further to say.” 


Jackson Helps Angels Close on Royals; 
Both Cardinals, Mets Win in NL’s East 



binwun 


Phil Niekro, trying for the second time to win his 300th game in the major leagues, instead 
gave up 11 hits and found little to admire as his Yankees were beaten, 5-2, by the Tigers. 


NCAA Is Finding TV Ban Unenforceable 


SCORBBOARD 




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tubs am aw aw— s 

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doner. Lamp (3). Cerufti (4). Acker (5). 

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? . teinidrm and Skinner. W — Sutton. 15-8. L— 

■ MOi'H Rs-CaUfomfo. Dawning (20). 

-riCBhada, skumer (i). 

irt - NAlTOMAL LEAGUE .. 

wS&Snail ■: . *11 He «M — 7 n 2 

fijiail' / 110 BW 800—3 5 1 

Power (V) and Diaz, van Gordnr 
^-^^PNirker, Shields (I). Dedmoa'M). Suiter 
■^W%wt ll eiiecBcr.W— Rob)nso(v»4.L— Bark. 
7 f . Hr» — AJ kmta. MurpOv on, Ramirez 

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802 888 888— 2 i » 

VM» ‘ DBS 3M BIZ— 4 11 I 

i. Gumpirt (7); Bruator (8), . 
(« and Davis; AgidUnx McDowell 
qi ml Carter. W—Aoullera W. Ij— T rout ► 
Ue~McOawe«l (15).HR— Hew Yprt.Str£iw- 
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-.- fMttui (t>. Carman (9) and VlrWI. W- 
■j'flmeh, L/— Oennv, IM2.HR-S). Louis, 
..PBrt«r;nm. . 

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; HWk. Cuonle (71. dements (S), RoMman 
'(B) and Pena; Laskov, Burke (7), Reardon 
' * - J VjpjtKW- Raberi» (10) and O’Berrv, Bu- 


tera (91.W-RcHiiian.S-11. L— Ratwroe. 3-2. 
HRs— PHtstwreh, Pena 2 (Ml. Bream (4). 
Hmwtoa - - *88-201 MV- 713 > 

Lae d n pel ci _ BM B2B BIB- 2 4 2 

Scan, Calhoun. (7) and Brilev; Honeyc u tt . 
Howell (6), Powell (71.COSMW (7], Diaz (7) 
and ScloscJo. W— Scan. 1B-7. L — Howell, 44. 
Sv— Calhoun (4). 

Sm DMeo B22 BOO 2*0— 6 t 2 

Son Francisco 32B B38 2B»— *110 

Thurmane, walina (2). LeHerts (31. Jock- 
son 151, DeLeon MJ.McCullers (7) and Bochv. 
Kamway (71; Blue, Minton (8). Williams 17), 
Gorrrita (81 and Brenlv. W— Blue, 7-4. L— 
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Dloae, Ma r tine z (19). San Francisco, Brenly 
[181. Dear (6). 

Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Eotl Division 


they hit me again. 

“Later on. I'm siting on these 
wooden blocks and i'm mad. I'm 
mad because I'm getting beat on 
for no reason at all and because the 
world isn’t fair. Pretty soon, I see 
one of the members of this gang 
walking by. i said, ‘You ain’t gonna 

. ■ ; — ■' ■ ■ ■ - — ■ - J jump me by yourself, are youT So 

f t o > Ww - - fn- ■ he sends this guy to go get. the rest 

JHajor Leagne Line scopes of fis gang, iidd him rd fight him 

but no wrestling. That was the rule. 
We’d stand there and box but no 
wrestling. 

“So we walk out to this lot and 
xu»t thing you know a gang of guys 
appears. I hit him with a jab and 
take off running, and I run m a 
complete circle. I run until I run 
into a fence and they start working 
me over. Then all of a sudden, out 
of nowhere, Leon comes and he's 
standing there: He tells them to 
slop h. but they keep punching me 
in the month. ‘Get out of the way, 
big Spinks,' they said. ‘Get out of 
here.’ 

“Man, 111 never forget that. I 
had on a Charlie Brown sweatshirt, 
you know the kind. Then this little 
guy came up with a switchblade. 
And be sent everybody away. 

“But what happened, the follow- 
ing fall, one of those guys who 
jumped me and beat me was silting 
right next 10 me in class.” And 
“thaL guy became one of my best 
friends. He had the greatest left jab 
you ever wanted to see; he could 
have been something. But it hap- 
pened to him. He died, man. Rob- 
bing some place. Security guard 
shot him. His name was Louis 
Finch and he might have made it.” 

Spinks clenched his fist and 
waved it in from of his face, at no 
one in particular. “The way I see 
it,” he said, “if I can come out of 
that, anything can happen.” 


By Gordon S. White Jr. 

Nm- York Times Service 

NEW YORK — One of the ma- 
They said, ‘Are you Leon Spinks' jor sanctions the National Colle- 
brotherT And 1 said, ‘Yeah. 5 And gjate Athletic Association often im- 
poses on a major college football 


ege fa 

team on probation, the banning of 
live telecasts of its games, has prov- 
en to be virtually unenforceable. In 
this age of satellites, dishes and 
television pirates, the games can be 
seen live from start to finish no 
matter what the NCAA rules. 

Florida, for example, is on prtv- 
-bation and in-ihe first year of a 
two-year ban against live television 
appearances. But thousands of its 
fans, in bars and homes equipped 
with dishes that receive satellite sig- 
nals, watched the live telecast of 
Florida's 35-23 victory over Miami 
of Florida on SepL 7. 

Turner Broadcasting System, 
with headquarter studios in Atlan- 
ta, was taking a satellite feed of the 
entire game from Miami to show 


Florida's football grams were 
cut from 30 to 20 this year and next 
year. 

P 

Noire Dame lost io Michigan 
Stale. 28-23. two years ago in South 
Bend. Indiana, when Dave Yanema 
threw three touchdowns for the 
Spartans. The Irish, who were up- 
set by Michigan last week, were not 


pain in Yareraa’s right hand forced 
doctors to X-ray iL He will miss at 
least two games. 

□ 

Coach Dick Anderson of 
Rutgers does not have fond memo- 
ries of Michie Stadium at West 
PoinL New York, where his sur- 
prising Scarlet Knights play Army 
on Saturday after their big come- 


looking forward to his return Sat- back gave them a 28-28 tie with 
urday night in South Bend, when Florida last week. The former Penn 
the teams meet. But Yarema, now a State end said Michie Stadium was 
senior, will not play. He broke a not an easy place to play, 
bane - in his righL or throwing. "1 had a lough time at Army." he 
thumb during Michigan State's vie- remembered, 
tory over Arizona State last Satur- It happened in 1962 in Penn 
day. The break was not discovered State’s 9-6 loss at West PdinL 
until Monday, when the constant Asked to be more specific. An- 


ular telecast of the TBS game oi 
week that day. A team on proba- 
s permitted to be seen live 
30-second 


on 


highlights during 
other game. 



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lion is 
such 

the telecast of another game. Flori- 
da’s fans simply zeroed their dishes 
in on the proper satellite and pirat- 
ed the game in progress. 

David Beret, the NCAA director 
of enforcement, said his staff was 
aware of fins sort of thing but was 
not sure how it could be stopped. 
An alternative. Beret said, might be 
to drop prohibitions against live 
telecasts as part of penalties. 

“That kina of pirating action di- 
lutes the effectiveness of the TV 
sanction,” he said “One way io 
stop it is to make the TV sanctions 
even harsher, or-to forget TV sanc- 
tions altogether. In recent years the 
move to cut scholarship grants for 
football players at an institution on 
probation seems to be very effec- 
tive. A cut in grants may hurt a 
team more in the long run than a 
loss of TV revenue.” 


Transition 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Bafopean Soccer 


- 


WINNERS’ CUP 
, . Round. Rrsf L89) 

- Uiwwpl £-bi*to Prague 2 

FradrtksM^Vtnaor 1 : 

RaoH JAwiatf^ Totafianwi 0 
■ UtarfrttA tynarao Kiev 1 . 

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. AIMica MMkiif L CHtta J 
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■ l --<l c >tf R*w«L(=»rrt L4a) ” 

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Verona-* p** Shtfaka 4 ' 

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AUTO RACING 

BRITISH RENAULT— RHeosod Derek 
Warwick, driver, so he can drive tor loiiis- 
Renoutr. 

BASEBALL 
Nattoaal Laoaoe 

■ MONTREAL/— ApaaMw) Gam Huatte* as 
Director of SawNna. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Fired Tom Hal ler, pen- 
era) monoaer.ond Jim Davenport, manager. 

Named Al Rosen preskJanl and 

aaer and Roaer Cnrta manaaer. Recatiw-«m 
Robinson, pitcher, ham Phoenix of me poch- 
. ic Coast League. 

basketball 

KpHosbI Basketball Association 
. GOLDEN STATE— Named Owrl WHIN. DL 

rector of Media Relations. 

UL LAKERS— Stoned Eon Jones, center- 

^JLY.KNICKS— Stoned Pal Ewlno, center, to 

a mulH-v»or contract L ^ w 

PHILADELPHIA— Stoned Dwryl Ltowt 

fmvard. vex Ed McToaue. guard. 

SACRAMENTO-Ston^MWWl 

and Carl Henry, guards. «id Joe BWon. lor-. 

"SEATTLE— Stoned Gene SmH*. «*»• 
guard. 

FOOTBALL 

National FoefbaH LM9W 


the 

in 


McMahon Unlikely to Flay for Bears 

CHICAGO (AP) — Jim McMahon, the injured ouartoback of th 
Chicago Bean, did not practice Wednesday ana probably will not piay i 
Thursday night’s game at Minnesota, the team said 

Steve Fuller, the backup quarterback, will start against the Vikings and 
ihe coach, Mike Ditka, was quoted as saying it was “veiy remote* that 
McMahon would play at alL McMahon was expected to suit up. 

McMahon suffered a stiff neck and muscle spasms in his upper back 
during last Sunday’s 20-7 victory over New England He left the game in 
the fourth quarter, with Fuller replacing him, and was placed in traction 
the next day. 

Defense Rests in Baseball Drug Trial 

PITTSBURGH (WP) — The defense rested Wednesday in the trial of 
Curtis Strong, a Philadelphia caterer accused of selling cocaine to major- 
league baseball players, without calling the defendant or any players as 
defense witnesses in the U.S. District Court trial. 

Adam Renfroe Jr., Strong's attorney, said, “It may not be in my client’s 
best interests” to call any players. Instead seven persons, including the 
defendant’s parents and two of his sisters, testified to Strong’s character 
and provided additional alibis to cover all but one of the 14 cocaine- 
counts against him. 
ive 



Dancing the Match Away 

Van Goal, left, of the Sparta team and Hamburg’s star, Felix 
Magath, found themselves face to face in an uncomfortble 
meeting on the playing field while the soccer ball went its 
own way Wednesday night in Rotterdam. Sparta won the 
UEFA Cup tournament’s first-round, first-leg match. 2-0. 


derson laughed and said, “I 
dropped the winning touchdown 
pass in the end zone. 

Anderson is the one who grum- 
bled a little after Rutgers' tie at 
Florida last week because, among 
other mistakes late in the game, one 
of his receivers dropped a pass that 
should have been caught and could 
have given Rutgers a victory. 

□ 

Army may have the only offen- 
sive line in major college football 
consisting of five centers. From 
tackle to tackle, each of the linemen 
has snapped the ball from center at 
least once while playing for the 
academy, and in most cases quite a 
bit. The present starting center is 
Ron Rice. The two guards who 
once were centers are Clint Pollilt 
and Don Smith and the tackles are 
Ed Shultz and Joe Manausa. 

□ 

Villanova returns to varei ry foot- 
ball Saturday after four years with- 
out the sport, and a crowd of about 
20,000 is expected to see the Wild- 
cats play Iona in the new football 
stadium on the Main line campus. 
This is the first of five games this 
season for Villanova: three Divi- 
sion III teams and the Navy junior 
varsity. After two years of this type 
of competition, Villanova will be 
an official Division I-AA team and 
a member of the Yankee Confer- 
ence. 

Andy Talley. Villanova’s coach, 
said: “The Wildcats are really just a 
bunch of kittens right now. We 
have 18 freshmen starting against 
Iona. But the enthusiasm for the 
return of varsity football is so great 
we may have a sellout Saturday, 
and that would mean 20,000.” 

Villanova, according to Talley, is 
a team without a division. The col- 
lege groups are I -A. I-AA, □ and 
III. Since the Wildcats have given 
scholarships to freshmen this fall 
the school cannot be placed in Di- 
vision m, which prohibits scholar- 
ships. Bat since the majority of the 
Wildcats' opponents for the first 
two seasons are in that group, they 
cannot be considered in another 
group, either. 


Raines 9 Father 
Strikes Out on TV 


77rr Associated Press 

SANFORD, Florida — The fa- 
ther of Tim Raines, the Montreal- The NL West-leading Dodgers 
c • — K-u— L have last three of their last four, but 


Cempitnl in Our Staff From Dupatrha 

CHICAGO — Reggie Jackson, 
who has earned the nickname Mr. 
October for his excellence under 
pressure during pennant races, got 
an early start on 1985 by driving in 
iwo runs Wednesday night during a 
9-3 rout of the Chicago White Sox 
that closed the California Angels to 
one game of the American League 
West lead. 

The division leaders, the Kansas 
City Royals, were beaten bv the 

BASEBAJLL ROUNDUP 

Seattle Mariners, while in the East 
both the division-leading Toronto 
Blue Jays and the second-place 
New York Yankees lost. 

In the National League's East, 
the division-leading St. Louis Car- 
dinals won. as did the pursuing 
New York Mets. 

A few nights ago. the Angels’ 
Jackson had said that lesser known 
players must take their turns in the 
spotlight while such big names as 
himself and pitcher Don Sutton 
must come through without fail. 

In beating the White Sox. six 
Angels drove in runs, with Jackson 
and Dick Schofield each batting in 
two. And the winning pitcher was 
Sutton, who breezed to victory No. 
295 in the majors. 

“We can get into a streak tike 
this where everyone contributes.” 
said the Angels’ manager. Gene 
Mauch. “Hopefully, that is what 
we are going to do." 

Sutton, acquired in a trade from 
Oakland on SepL 10. held the 
White Sox while the Angels scored 
in every inning but the first, sev- 
enth and ninth off six pitchers. 

Mauch praised his veteran pitch- 
er for being crafty while the offense 
did its job. 

“He didn't have as great stuff as 
he did the first time he went out 
and won for us.” Mauch said. “But 
be dipped down into his bag of 
iricks and got the job done.” 

Mariners 6, Royals 3: In Kansas 
City, Missouri. Dave Henderson 
drove in three runs and three' pitch- 
ers gave up only three hits as Seat- 
tle’s staff extended its string of 
shutout innings against the Royals 
this week to 26; it was the first ume 
in their history the Mariners have 
gotten consecutive shutouts. ' 

Red Sox 13, Blue Jays 1: Rich 
Gedman hit for the cycle in Boston, 
going 4-for-5 and driving in seven 
runs against Toronto. The Red Sox 
got 18 hits, with Wade Boggs also 
going 4-for~5 to raise ins major 
league-leading average to .371 
Tigers 5, Yankees 2: Rookie Nel- 
son Simmons ended a 2-2 tie with 
an RBI single in the sixth and 
foiled Phil Niekro's second attempt 
to win his 300th game in the ma- 
jors. Mickey Mahler's seven and 
two- thirds innings of one-hit relief 
pitching ran the Yankees’ losing 
streak to a season-high six. 

Orioles 4, Brewers 2: Fred Lynn, 
returning from a torn ankle liga- 
ment that kept him out of 21 
games, homered for the second 
straight game to break a 2-2 tie in 
Baltimore and Scou McGregor 
pitched a six-hitter against Mil- 
waukee. 

Twins 4, Rangers 3: Tun Teufd's 
two-run double beat Texas in Min- 
neapolis. 

A’s I, Indians 0: Pinch-hitter 
Dave Collins' two-out single in the 
eighth gave Oakland its victory in 
Cleveland, although loser Don 
Schulze had allowed only two run- 
ners to read) second bare the first 
seven innings. 

CanEnab 7, Phiffies 0: In the 
National League Bob Forsch 
pitched a three-hitter in Philadel- 
phia and Tomnw Herr drove in 
three runs as SL Louis won its sev- 
enth straight to remain two games 
ahead of New York Forsch, who 
had back surgery last year, posted 
his first shutout since pitching a no- 
hitter SepL 26. 1983. 

NL baiting leader Wtl tie McGee 
of the Cardinals, now hitting .363, 
had a double and two singles, drove 
in a run, scored his 107th run and 
stole his 48th base. 

Mets 4, Cobs 2: Ray Knight, 
hitting just .207 in a frustrating 
season, doubled in two runs during 
a three-run fourth in New Yonc 
and pitchers Rick Aguilera and 
Roger McDowell held Chicago to 
six hits. 

Astros 7, Dodgers 2: Houston, 
winning its eighth straight, got 
four-hit pitching from Mike Scott 
and Jeff Calhoun in Los Angeles. 


Expos* outfielder, can still watch 
his son play. This season. 

Ned Raines, whose son played at 
Seminole High School in Sanford, 
was informed this week that the 
satellite dish in front of his home, 
with which he picks up telecasts 
from Montreal, must come down 
because it violates zoning codes. 

Raines appealed the decision. 
The county board of adjustment 
rejected it, but gave him six months 
to dismantle the dish. 


need only a combination of 12 vic- 
tories or Cincinnati losses to clinch 
the title. 

Reds 7, Braves 3: Cincinna ti’^ 
Nick Esasky, playing in his home 
town, homered and drove in four 
runs in Atlanta. 

Pirates 10, Expos tic Tony Pena 
bit a three-run bonier, his second 
homer of the game, during a four- 
run 11th that gave Pittsburgh its 
victory in Montreal. (AP, UP I) 


- A '\ ss£sstffisr“ ,p ™"' 












. Judge Gustave diamond said he would limit Thursday's dosing 

I^Teen Jofm jeftorsavwtos a^menis to 75 minutes for each side and that he expected the jury to United Press imenmimmd 

motto*, to O one- veer contra*. .. considering the evidence by midafteraoon. Diamond said that the NEW YORK — Even before the 

iurywould be sequestered if it did not reach a verdict Thursday. United States was eliminated from 

this year’s Davis Cup competition, 

5 ^ him to O seo« at T1 |T D „ T> rt ¥i there was deep concent about the 

N.Y. 6'^“* " w ^ ' {inn Wins Hong ivong-Hening Rally team's future prospects. 

p^dcor.oninij^ra-rvB. m. mmmmm. J J The problem is twofold. First as 

Nrftawi Moctoy Lraw* RFtnNr, f Apt — With police squads holding back curious crowds, evidenced by recent results, the rest 

Fiidand’s Harmu Mikkola drove across the finishune at the famous Ming of the world has caught up to the 
onThursd^Md won the Kcig_Kcmg-Beijing555 R^v, Chma's Umted Stares in producing new tal- 
tourtti-rounfl wow ‘•J®** first international motor sports event in 78 yearsTswedois ^ars-Erilc ml Second, when it comes to play- 

Wes. German ruUonal 

^ost a constant row of people. 

tent women 1 * twS**K»lf cooed. 


Help Mby Be Coming for the U.S, Davis Cup Team 


bly is of day. Faced with this disad- 
vantage, the United States was 
beaten by Argentina in 1983's first 
round, by Sweden in last Decem- 
ber’s finals and by West Germany 
in the second round this summer. 

Also not helping this year was 
the absence of John McEnroe, be- 
cause of a requirement that he sign 
a certificate of good behavior. 
While he cannot do much about 



are lagging farther behind. 

As a remit, when the United 
States is the visiting team for Davis 
Cup matches, the surface inevita- 


dolph Gregson, first year president 
of the U.S. Tennis Association, 
would like to ensure stronger U.S. 
representation in world comped- test of men ani 


tion. To accomplish this , Gregson 
speaks of creating a national tennis 
academy under the aegis of the 
USTA where the most promising 
juniors — girls and boys — would 
live in dormitories and be trained 
by a national coaching staff. 

“Improving our clay court per- 
formance is one of my goals,” 
Gregson said. “I fed very strongly 
about iL. but the situation is boom- 
ing more difficulL A lot of players 
don’t like to play on clay. It is hoL 
requires a lot more work and the 


On a dissenting note, Dennis 
Ralston, the coach of Southern 
Methodist University m Dallas, 
does not see the need for a national 
program as bang so urgent. 

“1 don't think there's any real 
reason to press the panic button,” 
said Ralston, a former worid dass 
player. “We lost to a good team in 
Swklen and we pressed the button. 
Our problem last year was our guys 
didn’t get there in time to prepare. 

“My personal feeling is our guys 


points are longer. It is a tougher can play on European clay. It just 
a material. ” takes getting used to." 



■ • ]jp- 


ge 3 


T3 

>ty may 
:ly with 
: of the 
said, 
hat the 
: Soviet 
he aide 

mrh in 

mi level 
defense 
'several 
strain ts, 
to do. 
es some 
irogram 
aty. the 
is chal- 
and by 

tests of 
ed anti- 
mt of a 

uroduc- 

wi thout 

els have 
]g some 
\nother 
irest by 
gned to 
Reagan 
am, not 


/Jax, 

; the 
the 
vind 

1 So- 
rent, 

mu” 
n as- 
rust- 

gned 
it the 
dliie, 
avity 
were 

force 
airi- 
ly on 

a sri- 
anti- 
some 
rtion, 
’ton. 
okes- 
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tellite 
1 was 

yeti,” 
pport 
l any 
ire at 



lents bos- 

aied and 
stabilize” 
es from a 
in. 






Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 


OBSERVER 


An Overdose of Ketchup 


With f Interaction,’ Western Novels Ride Again 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — The mo\ie 
. scene is pure bliss these days if 
you're a gangster fan. Not since 
Warner Brothers packed Barton 
MacLane away in mothballs have 
there been so many tough cookies 
looking daggers at each other, so 
much mayhem and snarling, so 
many guys named Vito and Red 
pumping so many machine-gun 
bullets into sound-stage reproduc- 
tions of the old Warner Brothers 
Edward G. Robinson set. 

1 write the name — Edward G. 
Robinson with reverence, for I 
am a connoisseur of gangster dying 
styles, and Edward G. Robinson 
set the standard by which all others 
must be measured. 


In August, to check up on how 
the new crowd compared with the 
old master. I spent a week watching 
up-to-date gangster movies. They 
axe all in color now. which I con- 
sider unhappy for two reasons. 

One: Aesthetically speaking, dy- 
ing ought to be done in black and 
white; it is simplv not a colorful 
activity. Two: Filming in color 
tempts movie people to cover the 
dead and dying with a bright pho- 
togenic red sauce, which 1 take to 
be ketchup. 

Edward G. Robinson didn't have 
to be gussied up like a barbecue to 
die impressively. When the bullets 
went into him he didn't have to 
spun all over the camera to make 
you realize be was hurting. He just 
winced, and you knew that those 
bullets had gone through the in- 
credible densities of his overcoat 
and those huge lapels on his suit 
and bad lodged right there where 
he was clutching the midriff with 
his cigar hand, and the wince told 
you everything. If Lhey shot him at 
the foot of the church steps, he kept 
fighting his way up the church steps 
despite unbearable pain so he 
could die at the church door. If they 
shot him at the top of the church 
steps, he always made it all the way 
to the boiiom so he could die in the 
gutter. 

People who say James Cagney 
was the better man when gunned 
by the law are doubtless too young 
to remember Robinson. Cagney 
could dance rings around Robin- 
son — I'll give you that — but he 
couldn't die in the same league. 

Remember “The Godfather"? 
They had to resort to ketchup to 


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help those kid actors persuade you 
they were really dead, didn't they? 
And what about Marlon Brando? 
The great Brando — I concede he is 
great — oo argument there — but 
you noticed. I hope, that he chose 
not to try to outdte Edward G. 
RobinsotL 

When Brando's time came, how 
did he go? Brando dies the way 
Brando wants to die. if Brando 
says. “Build me some church steps 
— I am going to show the world 
what a ham-and-egger Eddie Rob- 
inson was.” they will build the 
church steps. 

So how did Brando choose to 
die? A heart attack in a vegetable 
garden. I couldn't believe I was 
seeing it. The greaL Brando playing 
his greatest gangster, and he dies of 
a coronary thrombosis under a to- 
mato plant. 

Well, what can you expect of a 
gangster movie they have to photo- 
graph in color? You do Donald 
Duck in color. “The Wizard of Oz." 
And now all the gangster flicks. It's 
sad. but it can produce some good 
moments, as in “Priza’s Honor.” a 
really elegam sendup of gangster 
shows. If you're going to dp gang- 
sters in color, what do they deserv e 
except sendups? 

D 

After “Prizzi's Honor.” though, 
the week 1 spent watching gangster 
movies was very mediocre. In mov- 
ie after movie I saw nobody die 
with style. In “The Pope of Green- 
wich Village” one hood killed an- 
other by putting lye in his coffee, 
thus producing some thrashing 
around on the coffee-house floor 
and a dash through a cardboard 

wall. 

That is a no-class wav for a gang- 
ster to go. The same obtains for 
Dutch Schultz's demise in “The 
Cotton Club.” Machine-gunned at 
a saloon urinal. Dutch seems for a 
moment in the mood to stagger out 
in search of a church with a long 
flight of steps, but he barely gets 
out of the men's room before fold- 
ing on a back-room table. 

The most disgusting dying I saw 
was in “Once Upon A Tune in 
America”; Edward G. Robinson 
would never have died disgustingly. 
Cagney either. I couldn't take it. 
Walked out. Gangsters shouldn't 
put you off your feed, even though 
they have to’ do it to each other. j 

Y«*u York Tima Sen tee I 


MOVING 


By Edwin McDowell 

Vfi York Times Vrwrc 

Y EARS after moseying off into the sun- 
set. the western novel, once America's 
most enduring morality play, is again rid- 
ing high in ine literary saddle. 

The comeback has been ramrodded by 
the success of Louis L’ Amour, who with 95 
books is one of the biggesi-seiling authors 
of all time. But ibe movement owes its 
strength also to a growing group of writers 
who have moved far beyond the laconic 
cowboy and savage redskin, just as L'A- 
mour has largely moved away from or 
fleshed out those familiar characters. 

The difference between the new and the 
traditional westerns was summed up by 
Elmer K el ion. one of the new breed of 
western writers, who said that L'Amour’s 
characters wen: “always seven feel tall and 
invincible: mine are 5 feet 8 and nervous.” 

The “formula western” still pits white 
hats against black hats. But few authors 
siill take a stereotypical view of Indians or 
follow Max Brand’s advice that "there has 
to be a woman, but not much of a one. A 
good horse is much more important." 

"We're getting a lot more realisuc books 
about the West and a lot more books deal- 
ing with the West from a woman's point of 
view." said Judith .Alter, editor of Texas 
Christian University Press in Fort Worth. 
Alter, president of the 425-member West- 
ern Writers of America, said that there was 
still a paucity of westerns written by wom- 
en but that their numbers were increasing. 

The growing popularity of the western 
and the frontier novel, its literary cousin, is 
evident from the U.S. best-seller list, 
where Larry McMurtry’s “Lonesome 
Dove" is this week's No. 7 hardcover fic- 
tion best seller and Louis L' Amour's “Ju- 
bal Sackeu” is in its 17th week. That is 
L' Amour's third hardcover best seller in 
three years, and last week Bantam pub- 
lished 1.2 million copies of a L' Amour 
paperback original, "Passin' Through.” 

Glendon SwarthouL whose “They Came 
to Cordura” and “The Shootist” were cho- 
sen by the Western Writers of America as 
among the best western novels ever writ- 
ten. recently published “The Old Colts.” 

Neither Swarthout nor McMurtry re- 
gards himself as a “western writer.” 
Swarthout recently said, “I never set out to 
write a western; 1 used western settings to 
tell stories that are universal.” 

All three books nominated by the West- 
ern Writers of America as the best novel of 
1984 were hardcovers from the major 
houses: “English Creek" by Ivan Doig, 
“Love Medicine” by Louise Erdrich and 
“Winterkill” by Craig Lesley. 

Paperback houses are busy rushing back 
into print the works of Brand and Zane 
Grey. Bantam has dusted off five of El- 
more Leonard's old westerns and a number 




Louis Eamour 

Jubal 

Sackett 






- + ' i 



(VI t\ 


Larry McMurtry 


SSr 

P t ^ \J 

L W i 


“Jubal Sackett,” 
another best seller 
by Louis L* Amour. 


:L uLruL'. 'i*. 

if*!. -i V> ■» .■ Cum •** tsS.1 
\.t U 111* -l.-lir 

GLENDON SWARTHOUT 

||M * NlMNamfct 

Glendon Swarthout 


DnwHWAar 


of houses are publishing western originals 
and buying reprint rights from hardcover 
houses. 

“We see the return of the western very 
clearly in our sales results.” said Roger 
Cooper, publisher of Berkley Publishing 
Group. Not only are the sales of westerns 
increasing, but publishers are paying more 
for them. 

Even smaller publishers are prospering 
from the western revival Jameson Books in 
Ottawa. Illinois, sold a a trilogy about the 
frontier by Terry Johnston, a Colorado- 
based writer, to Bantam Books for $65,000, 
and a frontier novel by Don Wright to Tor 
Books for S 15.000. “We have a half-dozen 
westerns in manuscript, due out next year.” 
said Jameson G. Campaigne. the company 
president. 

“There’s a hunger for authentic books 
about the West,” said Richard Wheeler, an 
editor at Jameson Books whose western 
novel “Winter Grass” will be reprinted by 
Ba I lan line next year. 

Some western writers contend that the 
western fell into decline because of the rise 


erf the “adult western,” books with a west- 
ern setting that are really about sex and 
violence. But the fall from popularity in 
bookstores, at the box office and on televi- 
sion more probably resulted from the 
black-white world it projected, a world that 
struck many people as unrealistic and of- 
fensive. 

“The generation of the '60s was under- 
standably not going to accept the concept 
of good guys and bad guys, where the bad 
guys were alwavs Indians and Mexicans,” 
said Patrick Lo&mtto, a Doubleday editor. 

Such stereotyping rarely exists today. 
“The younger writers are blending serious 
historical research with good writing.” said 
Michael Sagalyn, an editor at Walker & 
Co. “Their frontier characters are still self- 
reliant and have nobility of spirit, but they 
interact and have problems with their love 
lives, the wav other contemporary people 
do.” 

Like other literary genres, the western 
continues to evoke criticism and debate, 
“It has always been split between two ex- 
tremes.” said Don Graham, an associate 


professor of English at the University of 
Texas and an authority on western writing. 
“There's the bus station western, the pa- 
perback original, that's mostly a lower- 
middle-class literary form — the tradition 
of Zone Grey, of which Louis L 'Amour is 
the chief practitioner today. Then there's 
western American literature, by writers like 
McMurtry. William Eastlake, Wallace 
Stcgner. What's interesting is that both 
forms seem to be enjoying a resurgence." 

Paul Horgan and A. B. Guthrie Jr. are 
other notable writers about the West whose 
works are taught in college courses, as is 
Swarthout, a former college professor who 
has a doctorate in English literature. 

Among western writers who are little 
known to the general public but highly 
esteemed by critics are Kelton: Loren Esi- 
leman. a Michigan-based writer of west- 
erns and mysteries whom one editor of 
westerns described as “our Hemingway” 
and Jeanne Williams, a past president of 
the Western Writers of America, many of 
whose bodes feature strong women as 
characters. 


people 

Garbo Reportedly franf 
ToGoBacktoSuxden 

A Swedish joureata:^ GreO 

Garbo wants to reiurn to ner - 

tunes. “She wants 

girL delayed ujgp 
saving “Cbngratulauoi* Jgeu. 
The southeastern town of Hut & 
— where, it was recenjb teujM; 
she was bora, though tejjgg, 
registered the birth m StoJJw«F 
— sent a present to her. 

□ 

Gina LoHobrigWa turned up w 
catch a plane in New Delhi and 
discovered that her passpon was 

mitring The actress-turn ed-pDo- 

tographer tried to board the jet but 
immigration officers said she had 
to get a replacement passport from 
the Italian Embassy. Because she 
was bound for California, she also 
needed a new U. S. visa. She was in 
New Delhi to interview Prime Min- 
ister Rajfr CZpndhX and his Italian- 
bora wife, Sonia. 

□ 

WRly Brandt, chairman of the 
opposition Social Democratic Pain- 
ty of West Germany and a keyi 
architect of detente between East 
and West, has named winner 
of the 1985 Einstein International 
Peace Prize. “He has compiled an 
unsurpassed record of moral lead- 
ership since his fight against Na- 
zism as a teen-ager,” said Norman 
Cousins, bead of the Ebstein Peace 
Prize Foundation's selection board. 
Brandt is to receive the award Nov. 
13 in Washington . . - UNESCO 
has awarded its annual peace prize 
fox education to General Indar Jit 
Rikhye of India, the former leader 
of United Nations peacekeeping 
forces who helped setup the world 
Peace Academy in New York and 
has headed it since 1971, and the 
Georg Eckert Institute in Bruns- 
wick, West Germany, which does 
international textbook research. 


Hu Km, 22, of China, won the 
international Yehudi Menuhin vio- 
lin contest m Paris with his rendi- 
tion of a Sibelius concerto. His 
prize: 50,000 francs (about 55,600) 
and five engagements. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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WORLDWIDE 

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FOR SALE 
FRENCH PROVINCES 

COTE D’AZUR. For *aie by owner. 3 
bedroom apartment, furnished at un- 
furnished, iiwmi condition, north- 
south view of lea & mountain!, pool, 
private garage, storage, tennis courts, 
in high starving Fabran area of hfiee. 
?toe call No, (93) 81-97-01. (93) 86- 
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BeveHy Sts. CA 90212. Tele* 194795 
ASTERN BVHL 

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coop, panoramic sea view. In) sqm. 
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REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PERSONALS 

L JOAN SAINT PMX. hove no knowl- 
edge of the whereabouts of my hus- 
band since 1983. Aicnn EL Yves Saint 
Priv, Fiench national of permanent 
address 2400 km Route de Re Dome. 
Fort de France, Mnrtieque. French 
Wes bides, end son of me late Paul 
Saint Prix af Marti rique. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts is requested 
lo c on tort me at 41-42 Maher Charv 
ben IB, Nanmai Point. Bombay, 
400021 Incfio. 


ANSJE 

Acconenodations found for sales per- 
sonnel From GuB. Looting forwerd to 
hewing from you. An 80 * 05 96 Paris. 

HAPPY BWTHDAY MJM1, love you 
much. Charles 


FOR MORE REAL ESTATE 

OPPORTUNITIES SS 
PAGE 13 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

COTE D'AZUR 

BEAUTIFUL UTTIE CHATEAU 
In good condfion, situated n small mP 
lage. Fantastic view with the sea w the 
dbtaKE. About 3-5 acres of garde n. 
pool, permission obtained to Build 4 
houses on lower level without affecting 
mein property. Most interesting propo- 
sition aTF4.OCb.COO or F3^0Q,CO0 for 
the chateau and 1% acres. Ref. 1*15. 
Apply: 

JOHN TAYLOR 5A 

55 La Creisette 
06400 Cannes 

Tel: p3] 38 00 66. Tele* 470921 F 


'la collection' 

\£mC3eef&Arpds 


vi ia - 9Ssq.m. Innng space with 2JXX) 
sqm. Umd. Unobstructed view on sea. 
Everything in perfect condticn. Cm 
be sold hrnirod Wnta Me. HIM. 
Place de fa Gore. BP 75, 78510 Tneh 
Sur-Sew 

MICHEUN GUUX SAYS: 'The most 
beautiful view on die Bviero". It’s all 
yours for F1.6M0001 Right an the 
Medierranem, 300 sqm. Svmg space 
to be renovated or converted into 
flats. Cdl Mark at (93) 38 19 19 for o3 
details concerning this or my other of 
our 600 properties. SS. 47 La Crot- 
sene ■ 06400 CANNES. 

SHUNG LAND 6 WILDING PERMIT 
for 10,000 sqm. harbor vJfoge and 
manna with 200 moorings on the 
dream island ol "Cavc*o between 
Cor ico & Sardmia. Promotion Mo- 
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Tel: 93 87 08 20. Telex Imnwzar 
461 23S. 

PROMOTION MOZART - French Rivi- 
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equipped. Hah doss. F270X00 
rwtarjree induded. PI] 7T 66 81 
after B: 30PM or write Mr deem R4»- 
ro, 376 A* du Prado. 13008 MorteJe 

VB4CE. COTE D’AZUR, lovefy & lu»- 
urrns property, old stone 'mas" style. 
400 sqm. m a 4.800 sqm. rwfc, pool 
AS very spaoous rooms. An nresato- 
bTe charm F5/BO.OOO. Agence GuJ- 
baud, Pfoce Ataeehd 06140 
Vence. Tet (93) 58 16 79 


SENS. 100 km south Pans. Prefer pri- 
vate ia pnvate. B ea u t i ful 18th cent, 
townhouse. 400 stj/a tvma space, 
superb interior courtyard andigarderw 
on 1000 sqm. Cme taker's house. AO 
m perfert condhon. FTfiOOJXO. Paris 
904 07 67 or (86) 64 9»33 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


BEAUTIFULLY IOCATH) vOa f or ide 
due to retr emery of for eon owner. 
50 km from Bonn, Aadien & Cologne. 
Indoor pod, beautiful gmdea All 
modem electronic foalties mdjdmg 
dorm. Also possibility of selmg a 
limited Gentian oorqpcny which will 
dlow owner to have residence n 
Germany. Box 2189. IJ-LT Fne- 
dnchstr. 15, D-6000 Fronkfurt/Atea 

YOUR STATE AGENT IN MUNICH. 
Enquire in writing ta John Sdvntter. 
Onen GmbH. Bnemw Sir. 3. MOW 
hVrruch Z 

FRANKFURT PENTHOUSE. Own cov- 
ered roof swimming pool, *00 iqm. 
Rent SI 800, sale S2CL000. Cal 0049. 

| 60-7891483 

GREAT BRITAIN 

IDEAL FAMILY, 4-BROOM. 2-bath 
house with gmaga near London 
Queens Tends Chib W14 & conve- 
nient for transport & access n Heath- 
row. Offer ei reoon of £175^00, 
pnvate saie. Phone 01-486 9458 day 
or 01-383 3052 (evenings & weekend^ 
for detoSs & photographs. 


LONDON CHtSWIOC BY THAMES. 
20 minutes Hcyrodt & Heathrow. Dip- 
fomas 6 beds, 3 baths. 2 bichens. 3 
receptions, gotten. Peaceful I860 
house of chooser, just raodamisad. 
suit American or continertd fandy. 
£200X00 negotiable. Tet 01-948 T9S8 


I LONDON HAMPSTEAD by Swiss Cot. 
tage and American Inti School n 
London. 2-ffoored house with beauti- 
ful paved garden, 48 ft « 24 ft double 
reeephon, large latdien, 3 double 
bedrooms. 2 btfh rooms, freehold. 
E230JQ0. Tet (01) 499 9981. 

LONDON AND COUNTRY Property 
Seekers wit search high & low for 
your ideal home, give advioe & pro- 
gress purchase to completion. A com- 
plete service for busy or oversea 
buyers. London 203 6644. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
GREAT BRITAIN 

LOtOON, HOUAM) PARK, modem 
tewn house, gordw setting, 5 bed- 
rooms, 214 bathrooms, pariang. long 
lease, convenient to Heathrow, dose 
to Kensington ffton & West End. 
£280,000. leL London 01-602 1661 

ASHLEY PARK, V/oHorvorv-Thotnes, 
Surrey, yeSow bride house af dieroe- 
ter in 1» acres. 4 bedroom*. 2 berh- 
rooms. I wing room, study. Vise any- 
time- London 25 minutes Iran. 
£230.000. Tet- 0932 229100. 

BATH, ROYAL CRESCSfT mopyfi- 
centty refurbehed Hot, 2 bedrooms, 
conservatory, perio. London 1 hours 
n mins. £1 TSjQCO. Tel 0225 66225. 

MAYFAIR - Just by Grcsvwior Squcre. 
Prestigious flat, garage plus pariang. 
quiet ajJ-desac, oynaedate. 

G2S JXO, 86 years. Ascot 28946. 

CHELSEA, IMMACULATE Pied*4erre ' 
m pnvofc courtyard. £621X30. Tel 01- 
3521 584 or 01-4992525. 

GREECE 

NEOCLASSICAL. 3 dory bu*£ng. d* 


dmed Nstanc, ngte octob the Ament 
AoopoSs & the Theatre of Dionsaos. 
Perfedty suitofate as company Me- 
ters or for Meaty. A red esmete 
could hove ho Athens morion here. 
Licence for rest or otion obftawd. 
Owners wtfng to oondseter offers ei 
range of USST.l mi Con. Brokers are 
speaficaSy exduded. Canted Mr. K. 
DinVtriorfc in Athens, Greece fDl) 
4524 069 during office hoars. 


4524 069 during office hoars. 

CORFU, owrassus beautiful vito, 
4J050 sqm. with breathtaking wew, 
European budt, 1982, automatic pool 
T elepho ne. air condtianirm serious 
domestK, Lest bids received around 
$300,000. Phone: Mr. Pdnayppe 30 / 
661 / 30143 or 34565. 

FOLEGAMMOS - CYCLADES, typical 
isfand house, guid; 200 m. ban vil- 
lage. superb view, sleeps 4. 530X00. 
D. Brugger, 37005 AJanssas, Greets. 


REAL ESTATE 
! FOR SALE 
ISRAEL I 

JERUSALEM, FOR SBOOUS only, lux- 
ury duplex midfown, about 400 sq.m 
Lower level: Wem/dming, Sfcrcry, 
study, kitdien, moia s room with own 
bath, laundry room & 1 ful tahraom. 
Upper lev«k 2 masqr bedrooms, 
wok-in dosets. 3rd bedroom wdh , 
shower. 5650JX30. Write Box 2726. 
Herald Triwne, 92521 NeuOy Codex. 
France 

JBtUSALEM. DUPLEX PB4THOUSE, 
with wraproround terraces, living, tfn- 
ina, study, m«5a roam, ttchen. Low- 
er level 3 beefrooms + 2 baths, 
S4 50,000. Box 2729. Herrid Tribme, 
9252^ Neuly Cedex. France 


ITALY 

SARDINIA, MAR A RBAIAX 

(Ox ferryi, exlruotjncxy property 
50X100 eanv, superb 3oCP view of 
seo/ beadu mounhxnvjpley 4 afong 
axet. witfi spacious 225 sqm. VILA 
(U5. cfdxted), 3/4 btWrocmi. 2 
bedvooms, targe Svinfl/dring, pabo 
+ barbecue, 100 sqm. terraces wish 
"belvedere", electricity certrd heat- 
ing. telep hon e , own water supply. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

ITALY 

HEART OF ITALY (fifty iterate high- 
way from Roam or AipariL smbfl 
estate of 6000 sqm., the 1 61h century 
stone house (sem-detedied] il entirely 
modertexed. Large kitchen, 3 - 4 bed- 
rooms. lounge, certrd heawm, fire- 


places. Hus small independert lodge. 
KUy country (vineyards, ofrve trees) 


dominated by beautifd aid Fronds- 
con Abbey. Ided permenert home. 
Asbnm SF480,00a Ako avtteabte sep- 
arated Tiny one roam flat in Rome: 
SFB0JD0.TaM75fl 89191 ltdy. 

MEXICO 

CANCUN. WHITE SAND BEACH of 
the Cartbeon righted your do orttep L 
opu tnunf, pool & tennis. 
$603300. Wnts/cd S. Martin, 77B20 
Usfowia, France. 161 069 4748. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

PARIS 4 SUBURBS 

16th: NEAR BiA 

HK3H CLASS BUILDMG, doubfeAvil 
2 bedroaois, bcthrocro + shower. I 
sqm, + ganteq terrace 60 sqm, 1 
parang 

CALL: 720 9235 


LOUVEGOtCS. OWNBI sefc henri- 
ous v3a, constructed in T98Q, Ughly 
retedertid West DoJria 3« sqm. 


MONACO 


UrSgoe apwrtimity. USS 475,000- Box 
2703. Herdd Trfoune, 92521 NeuSy 
Cedex, France 

VENKE SANTHENA 5 iterate from 
lido, 10 mnte from Sm Moray 
Large entrance hall, 3 doub le bed- 
rooms, firing roam, lining roam, 
study, eat m dtdwrv terrace wdh 
uu norattec mew of park & taoocn. 
CSU 85^00, Veteos W1 /523 ffifiO or 
Washington D.C 202-234-2190 


HBTORIC MANOR HOUSE, ljOOO 
sqm, near Come, buft on de of 
fioman vila Beautiful park. 4,000 
Kyn. vineyard, chvt grove. £360,000. 
w«l consder se&ng main restored 
buftfeg only, E240&XX Phone eve- 
rangs London 883 7104. 


MONTtCARlO 

Private mansion, near Monaco frinoe 
Pdace. P anorooK sea view. 

Tte. (93) 30 46 54. 

MOROCCO ~ 

CORNKHE OF CASABUNCA 
( Morocco! NEAR. 
CROWN PMNCE PALACE 

Magnificent kneurious vBa in the fam- 
ous tesktertid Anfa, 1700 sqm, certrd 
heating 2 flo ors, ponsrts and M- 
drtns upurtmmls, 6 reception Ivina 
rooms, dmina room, 3 kitchens, 12 beet 
rooms, 9 brthrocm, modem & tradi- 
tional architecture. 

Write BM. BOUTAYEB, Eomand. 2, 
Imroeuble Romande, Cosotitaikxc 
Telex 21656 GffiC 
Tel: 3610.13 - 36 07 17 office 
or 2557.09 - 25 90 63 home 


ECOiE MJUTAlRf 

SP10MD 5/6 ROOMS 
DUFLEX - ALL COMFORTS 
PWCb F2.950A»- 

ETUDE BOSOUET. TO: 70S 06 7« 

5*,’RUE DE BffiVRES facrass from 
Notre Domek mdremely dxxtteno 
16th century biking, beauftfijf smao 
apartment n ptefed coraition. thing 
with separate bedroom qxxz, fun 
equipped bulhin btdien. matte 
bath, beam enormccs chorader. 
F6Sum Teh 720 37 99. 

Gwoges ft Pcdkmg Spaces 

96 Ave. de Suffren, Paris 15. 

Tel: 501 94 39 from 10-1 & after 5. 



r«ted«ltidWes , DaJria 
garden 1330 sam, pnee: F4^00^CC. 
IS H 918 51 44 nuu le ndr 8. eves. 
PORTE DE ST CLOUD. Mortem apart- 
rant, dgb dan, faring + 3 bedrooms 
+ 2 bams, equppedto*#fl + ter- 
OTymifog spaa. Fl^OOjQOIL Tet 

3RD: MARAS. BEAUBOURO. (brig, 
bedroom, fufl bath, equipped kikhen- 
ette, chexm, recent renouarion. 
Unique location. Tet 795 03 44 after 

6jxm 

ITR, best port mar Nrateb. spodom 
40 sam. stucio + 8 sqm bajeany + 
pcrkuig. prwtlgtaus rwxfarn buBing, 
Endswped gonfan. 250 03 63 
OESFOtATELY SEEKING TO SBI 
kwtey home, nor Thoiry. Gal eraty 
mommgs or after 7 txn 327 5498. 

6* QOEON. L iqtrt & ch o ntenggypcro 
flat in perfect mo dsni Wdi- 

en& both, quiet F950J00.7203799 
NEULLY. 2 rooms, sun, upper Boor. 

comforts. Ttk 624 63 20. 

REST. LOUS, flammed studo, south. 


MARAS. -Large rtudm fari ng s outh. 
bath, kitchenette. F30Cto0Q. W 5282 

ST MOCL STUDIO with dwoeter. 
Tet 705 2S 80 

SOUTH AFRICA 

CAMPS BAY. CAFE TOWH cfioroo 
ter ho rrie . 3 Oed oonB. f dl ameities. 
large swetimmg pad, uuuvicmt 
mourtdn & sea views. US$90,000. 
Tet South Afrkry Copt Town 48/249. 


AUCANIE Was & . apartments for 
ide. rural 8. heodi locations, low 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

SPAIN 

PALMA DE MALLORCA 

Limy flote overioobng foe bay and 
aty of Pdma Statefa the UNer 
Cmde Part in a very quiet and tenant 
area. e i c eB e rt vdue, two am. from 
Ibe aty center. Swemnog pooh, sound, 
tanas and pdvare pariona Rat with 5 
bednxxrq. faring, aring tec. 242 sqm. 
+ terrace 32 son. price in USS as. 
260/00 to 35C3 x> PMKainei 9 bed- 
rooms, faring dring etc 9)3 sqm. + 
terrace 40* sqm. price ei L*5 oa. 
ZXOflOO- 

For further mformabor 
PleaM asks 

MVRSORA BORIA S JL 

JOSE BOMA 6 SON ARMADANS 
07014 PALMA DE MALLORCA 
Tflk B-7T-28990O ^ 

CHARMMO VR1A FOR SAK 40 km 
ban Woo. Otertodong Portugd. 
Bo* 1950 by ouwondinfl ardmet. 
IdecAy located, privileged cfemrfe. 
Stone manor h ows, owerd heating, 
sftm fiitojAxBp ^ bofc # »irgf rami 

adUrrf fast, afriis trees, vnaytrd and 
super wine. 20^X10 sqm Hone 
wafledfo lend, 5 adns. from sea & 
nver beaches. Separate office and 4. 
room stone guest house. Stables, 
sheds, store rooms, gorcue, warh- 
foap, imderoroirad wmeadtar, erigo- 
tion chomeh, dbgndant water, mod- 
ern farm uterafe and tractor. Ided 
le traraert m ot. Excdert opportunity. 
(3486)611019 for further erformation 




ad tftte deeds, from | 
Trovet/viewtag ex- 


pmes refunded on purchase 
ando Boye MjwrtsL 6A East S, Nc<- 
findtom, NG1 3AY, UK. fot 
Nottingham 470501; Tlx 37107 


PAGE 16 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


International Business Message Center 






VAN CLEEF & ARPELS 

LONDON 

153 NEW BOND STREET- 
TEL: 01-491 1405 TELEX: 266265 


CAP PANTOES, SWOT VtUA on 
the roof, 200 sqm. duplex, 210 sqm. 
terraces, very luuirioui Delivery: 
Apdl986. teudence des Sables, 3 
Cnerran dss Sobtes. 06600 Antibes, 

Tel (93) 67 53 30. 

MOUGINS. 5 km. Cannes. Gorgeous 
typed house. Double view sea and 
mountain. 6 roans, mediterranean 
asrden. iwrmnuno pod. Near snaps. 
Direct from owner. FZ8SD.OOO. Teh 
|93) 90 13 87 wnw^ 

YOUR CONTACT IN PROVENCE. 
Houses with character. Charmrag 
properties. Fvctes. Eitele GARCN, 
B.P 55. 13532 ST-REMY-DE-PRO- 
VB4CE Cedex. Tel PTO92J15B 
OWNBI SELLS SUMPTUOUS 3-tted- 
room paithouM, 120 sqm. + 145 
iqjn. terrace, ponorqrric sea view, 
svamming pool, luxurious residerca. 
FIASOJOb. Phone (93) 720404 em. 
SANARY, Vor. wla. seowew, 170 
sqm. frying space. 4 bedrooms. "^00 
sq.m. Darden pod. F2J50.QM . Tefc 
France 94 Q7o^Q. London 1 549 9283 
HYBtS CBTTSL near sea ft airport, 
magnificent 2500 sqm. tend, aS oom- 
moames. fenced, far hotel consrruc 

non TeU93) 86M 98/ (1)776 29 /~8. 


HIANKHJRT KOBDOSTBN / Taunis. 
Ow*w» sefis unique 1st floor 200 sq m. 
apartment n listed perod house. &■ 
aaltert deeortrtve co nd ition. Phone 

morrwigir PJ617«84J 


ATTB^TION EXECUTIVES 

Pubfoh your business mestape 
bt fhm Mmnsa6anci Horrid nU 
buna, whma men fhaa a third 
af a auBian readers wotid- 
stnda. mod af whom as in 
tw M HB end industry, wifl 
road H. Just fete r us (Paris 
613595 ) before 10am. era- 
surihg mat m eon taint you 
bock, and your matra gm wif 
appear within AS hours. The 
rata it US. $9.80 or lead 
oquhndotd par Ena. You must 
btduda e e nsp l oto and werifi- 
abh UBng address. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

FINANCIAL TIMES 

SUBSCRIP TION DSJVERY 
IN SWITZBZLAND 

, The F.T. o perates tarty m a mma day of 
I pubSentwn defcvery services for sub- 
I Bjfoers in the Mowing aties: 

BASa - GB4EVA - LUGANO - 
ZURICH ft stating soon LAUSANNE 

For detoil* on these services and for 
I further information, contact- 

Tatar Lancast er, F. T. Swrtzsriond 
Tefc Geneva (022) 31 16 04 or 
Tebd22S9 

HNANOAL TIMES 
EUROPE’S BU5H«S NEW5PAP® 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

U. S. A. 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 



MONEY TREE5 ? 

YHl Invest m one af America s most 
exciting tsdnalogkd braak- 
fciwirfi >n a bSion dollar industry. 

Over 30.000 nut trees planted in 193*. 
Projected arawd ram evMuaBy 
reaches 52%. Praductog trees known 
te Kve aver 100 y ear s . We guaroo- 
tee to repurchcse mvesmem. 
BHOKOT 7 S4QUIR1ES invito. 
Material avalabie in Engfish. French. 
German. Bax 2358. Herdd Tribune, 
92521 Neuifiy Cedex. Frtmce 

Malta mm li ive x tniewt - US 57,950 

PANAMA UBSBA. CORPORATIONS 
From US54G0 ovflibbfe new. Td 
10624) 20240. Telex.- 63352 ISLAhO 
G. fvi UK? 


DUE TO BAFSC UQUDATION Span- 
oh colomd ehotet m the banking orea 
Fittad For bonk/ insurance c om pany, 
footwes marble counters ft floor*, 
vodr. rtavowi tefcr, many extras. 950 
sqm. house on 2300 sqm. land. Pre- 
sent value USS15M we sej far QSS1 
hWon. teformahon on bant/renBur- 
ance fieenriig avoiobte far USS10. 
Tet 264982 &I582. Telex 3591 ko- 
perpa Write N. D'Ardta, Bax *70? 
Zorta 5. Panama, Ponorna 

HDUOAHY BANKING on large cd- 
Irterdced loans. IT* only ccrmw- 
aaJ bank with q representative office 
in London specudsna j *n service. 
Arab Oversees Bank ft Ttusr [WJJ 
Ud. 28 Sack PnncB Rood, London 
SE1. tel: 01-735 B171 ■ LOT °°" 

TOE INFORMATION with myW 
jon. Earn STOOD ta S3J00 
beccme a finanad admsor ; 1FX. 73 
New Bond Steel, London Wl, En- 


MONEY AVAILABLE. Lot« term - or 
attractive reflet. Business laani ■ red 
estate. Mnimum US55O0JD00. CartKT 

TS&jS-iSSK !" MM07 ' 

EXPLOTATION POSSIBILITIES for 
row materiob and aenerds m Suriiw- 
me. biformceian: Arcus FourajOian 
PQ Bo. 3493. 1001 AG AnWw 

»■ 'PASSPORT 35 ecuntoes. CMC, 
26 Kkomenou, ?0e76 Athens Greece 

BUSINESS SERVICES 

} WM’j Better Health 
bee. Cardiac Bsk Prevtoinon ft 
Health B ecorattio ning Program now 
ttegcnl mown, peaceful Surre> 
Lwg+dv quiified nedS 
supennaen. Vist Entan MesfaTSS 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


raODUCT ASSURANCE 
Former Director af fVodoct 
AMorrasca in Fortwne 500 
Badronic Corporcrtian 
Now Rerifono in G fl un an y 
Saeta faRearnetst 
A Few Sdw Oonll 

P otertad efierts should bfl headquar- 
tered o ut rid e af Germany end be ei 
need of an frxfividud to provide ser- 
vices in Germany and the rest of West- 
ern Europe. Am camprtent in vendor 
surveys ft survrilance. i ncorama ft in- 
process enspeawn, bhrefiabSly ft derm 
roam asserndy ft npecriai\ inspection 
cf printed winng boards ft assemblies, 
s h ee imeld ft sdfoee plate inspertion, 
find ft shipping taspection ofl to LLS. 
fflfttay or comnerod stonderds. U5. 
reference* am be provided- All mari- 
nes touted axMerdtAr. Xspty te 


DIAMONDS 

DIAMONDS 

Yo ur best buy. 

fine rfaxnonds in any price range 
at fcvrart whdesde pat 
<Sed From Artwerp 
carter of the efiranond world. 
FuS guonmtee. 

For free price 1st unite 


I HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL f 

LOW COST FLIGHTS j HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL | HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


., . — __ MUFBCH / GBMANY - _ - _ . 

vitti □ representative office Mcnufoefuring ood toxfing company is prafesriond staff at your dispose! 
WteMfiwig P «fl service, offering storage cand/or nxmufort u rmfl • Can be legefly used al yOW corpc 
Barf ft Trust (wi} fooMes as wel as ferwardna, telex, rctfe domiafa for Germany/ Bjrops 
Eood . London te tap h a na, cm ne uter and office ser- • Your brnmes* aperdtan can start 


Established 1928’ 

P e Bujjutr qot 62, B-2D18 Artwerp 
Bri wan - TetS2 31 23* 07 51 
Tbu 71779 eyl b. M the Dicmond Oub. 
Heart of Artwerp Diamond industry 

OFFICE SERVICES 
Your Office in Germany 

-we are “At Your Samai” 

• Complete offioe services rt two 
prestige oddresses. 

• K4ty equipped offices for the short i 
term or the long terra 

• bevnahoneAy rrcxned office end 


ICBAfOAIR 
LAST MMUTE RARE 

reservation authorized within 
3 days prior to departiee 

UNIQUE PRICE 


NEW YORK, WASHINGTON (BWI) 
OBCAGO or DETROIT 

from Luxembourg 

One way - about USS 189 
(DM 499, BFR 99901 
(SR 449, FFR 1590] 

Round Trip 17-21 d ays) - - 
idtetot USS 3VO {DM 999) 
(BFR 19,980, SR 899, HR 3290) 


LUXURY 7-DAY PORTUGAL 


telephone, comp uter and office ser- 
viem. 20 min. from center of aty. . 

ConlKt: __ _ 

VUilGSt SOBM GMBH 
D7890 WadshriTwiger 2, W Germ. 
Tel: fJj 77*140 lOT TSxr 7927470 . 


•unite legftey used as yaw corpo- 
rote dowse for Germany/ Bjrape. 
• Your business aperrtfon con start 


Uriroe Busfoea Sflfvfcto GabH 
Loirco-Hoos am Hobhcwenpark 
Justnanstraue 22 
6000 Frcrifurt am Man 1 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 

CANADIAN GOLD STOCKS aid oth- 
er speculative stoda on the largest 
venture ccmrtd Stock Mcvfat n the 
world - the Vawower Suck Ex- 
change - reaxtnended m upT1B<ID, 
Canada's only pemyntarigsradvaery 
letter. Tnal after - S55- 6 isues (every 
3 we e ks) with subscription get free fist 
of 40 Vancouver S»>or Gold Stoda. 
upTrend liwestmera Servxss Ltd., TO 
Bor 49333, BentaB 4, Vancouver BC 
CANADA V7X 1UJM 687-7990 
tcoBecs] or Telex 04-5321 Cartnantol 


supervision. Vist Enton Mericd Cerv 

22X1 R»f *f«U AL RET IMW. an 
1042) 6 7 92231 »ng awrage, has been fleneraal by the 

■low Tn m ■ ■ GortSean Joan Investment TWj 

< 2l l TO i® ST A2nd PASSPORT, non m* rrainmpooL Drtgfo 
SfVwg mahMd. Do- FIRST INTS^Al^I TRST Ca 

tat WMA. 45 Lvndhunt Terrace, LTD, Dept. 950. P.O, Box 301005, 
Sate 53, Ortraf, Hmg Ifonq ' Sen JaTCbsta Ricn. lafat WT 

Jmpritne par Offprint, 73 rue de FEvangile, 7501 8 Pans. 


I^ 70 ^ A 2nd PASSPORT, 


Tefc 69-59 00 61 
Tetefae 69-59 57 70 
Telex: 414561 


_ EURO BUSINESS CENTER 
99 Kesersarodit, 1015 CK AmterdoB 
Tefc 31 -2(u6 57 49 Telex 16183. 

World-Wide Business Centres 

gftsgfe' 1 " 

PARS AMK Champs- Bysies. 
Snee 1 957 liP. provides mofl/phone. 
I telex, meeteig room. 5 me dArtoa. 
TOM. TA 3594704. Hx. 642504 

COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 

WANTS 500-700 SOFT, shop for 
■oe geam w Pens. Good co mma dd 
rieo. Tefc 278 79 82 mort M igs, 


Round Trip 17-21 d ays) - - 
idtetot USS 390 TDM 999) 
(BFR 19,980, SfR 899, HR 3290) 

For further informat i on ood reservation 
col , ICELAND AIR 
Frankfurt P691 2? 99 78 . 

BrvBeb (02) 718 0880 

Luxemburg 4798 2470 

Zurich Wl) 363 0000 

Para (an 742 5226 


ACCESS USA 

On* Wav Ra upd Tri p 
New York FI 500 F2990 

Lee Angeles F2400 F4600 . 

Oveapo F2390 F3690 

Mam F2750 F*190 

Ortando F2650 F3990 

Delta F3430 F5T70 

Morered FI 890 F3060 

and more d est i nat i ons „ 

15% cfiscount an 1st dtas 
PARIS tel: 11) 221 46 94 
(Cor. lie. 1502} 

NYONEWAYSlSO-EvvydavKY.- 
W«t Coast 5145. Pars 23 92 90. 


Mediterranean 

CRUISES 

Mediterranean Playgrounds 
aboard the flagship 

Ocean Princess 

• Weekly denatures from Venice 
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Oct. 12, „ 

• Cafina on Portanno, Onto 
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oSwik. 

Greek Isles & Dalmatia 
aboard the yacht-like 

Ocean Islander 

• Weekly depatures from 

Venice or Athens (Piraeus) Saturdays 
through Oct 19. 

• Cdfina an Mitonos, Orte, Santamj, 
Kujadtjo (Ephesus), Dubrovnik, 
Corfu, Kanali Wands, Zada- 

For i mm rafcfle raservediorai eonKtet: 

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Veracfli Sen Marco 1497 


7 DAYS MCUSVE TOURS 

FROM LONDON TO; 

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E5TQWL/CA5CAIS ~ ctia 

MAD tH tA -—£212 

, . _P WeC ortocfe 

London, Tel 4933873, Tlx 24SA53 


FROM ZURICH TO: 


ESTOftuTcASCAIS —ZHSiS? 
MADe *A — SF1090 


Oenava SST^ihlflyyog kq. y 

For o ther prog ram and detafed 
mtanrinn, ask yoor 


Teb J41) 709822 
htco: Gfoude Travel 

37 Ave. Ma ro chd Fodi 
Tri (9^B56986 
Athens: TraveSar* 

97 Synmau Ave. 

Tefc pllj 9Z1 4478. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 

SPRING BOS MIGRATION. SaXtbh 
rfiaikxndt May - July, staying htron- 
otrty m remote boron i d residence an 1 
tage aivufe es tutt^ proressiani^y 
ff«Wtours. Panes up ta 7, mdiave 
pnew. Brochure from M. Wrogn,"Bor- 
• robaL Kmbrace, Sutttafand^KWll 
■ 6UB, UJC TefelotibrocB (D43 13 26B. 

Far mare HOUDAY ft TRAVB. AtlS 
PLEASE TURN TO 
M ^ P«C 8W 
77E W9CB4D SKIXm 


SPB4D CWKTMAS IN PARIS. Oir 
knmry 5 backroom house and car, 3 
mb US$2200. Tek 131 962 37 19 or 
Bat 2746, Horrid TrW. 92521 
-Neugy Cedex. firtmee 

Odober. Crtl Greece (D29B1.2^r 

PBHTCNAIvblD QUARTB. ne^ 

- 

BAW.OWfrAtC.VW book hotrt, 

. rads*, ' toun and fhactrts. Confod 
"ndtets-. Bafo, (0229 66541.^^ 

tffl±ASr YAOflWG. Yodir Otorten. 
AcodBo»as28, Athens 10571, Greece. 


TRAVa AGDrfT 
~ HOTELS 

FRANCE ~ 

PARIS - Plata Mlrobaou “ ■ *uj in 

GREAT BRITAIN 
«n»J^hertBlwitiajfor bums 
«»yor. etc teMpuront l ber / nma / 1 

BEManui \ 

HCHXAND X ' 

SAVE HOIK examei, Pi-mf n Sm 

ArtWerdan. 

SWITZERLAND 

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