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Yhe Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 
Primed Simultaneouslv 
in Paris. London, Zurich. 

*. , Hon^ Kong, Singapore, 
t v IThe Hague and Marseille 


WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL 



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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


No. 31,908 




Hernu Resigns, 
Aide Is Dismissed 
In Greenpeace Case 

By Joscp 

International i 



PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 21-22, 1985 



Charles Hernu 


U.K. Invites 
2inPLOto 
Attend Talks 

Reuters 

AQABA. Jordan — Prime Min- 
ister Margaret Thatcher of Britain 
said Friday that she had invited 
two senior’ members of the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization to 
talks in London in “a fresh step in 
Middle East peace process." 

The move, which the prime min- 
ister said was aimed at facilitating a 
greater U.S. roie in peace negotia- 
tions. was said to be the first at 
such a high level between the Brit- 
ish government and PLO officials. 

It was immediately condemned 
by Jewish leaders in Britain. 

[Israel said Friday that the meet- 
ing would not advance the cause of 
peace. United Press International 
reported from Tel Aviv. 

[A Foreign Ministry spokesman 
said such initiatives ‘'encourage ex- 
tremist elements and aggravate the 
iuitf lieu" Earlier in the week. Israel 
condemned British arms sales to 
Jordan and Saudi Arabia.] 

Mrs. Thatcher identified the two 
Palestinians as Elia Khoury, an 
Anglican bishop, and Mohammed 
Miihem, the former mayor of the 
West Bank town of HalhouL Both 
are members of the PLO executive 
^committee. 

■ “We know them to be men of 
peace.” Mrs. Thatcher said. “We 
know they are opposed to terrorism 
and violence.” 

The men will join two Jordanian 
officials. Deputy Prime Minister 
Abdul-Wahab al-Majali and For- 
eign Minister Taber aNMasri, for a 
meeting in London with Sir Geof- 
frey Howe, the foreign secretary. 

“ Analysis said the meeting, which 
is expected to take place next 
mouth, signaled a major shift in 
Britain’s attitude to the PLO. 

Mrs. Thatcher said her decision 
was based on a desire to promote 
King Hussein's peace initiative and 
help the United States take a simi- 
lar step. She said the U.S. govern- 
ment had been informed of plans 
for the talks. 

The peace process has been de- 
layed, Mrs. Thatcher said, by prob- 
lems in arranging a meeting be- 
tween a Jordanian- Palestinian 
delegation and Richard W. Mur- 
phy, Lhe U.S. special envoy to the 
Middle East. 

Mrs. Thatcher’s announcement 
came after two days of talks with 
King Hussein, who" has been trying 
most, of the year to rerive peace 
ncgotiatu ^s. It reflected a readi- 
ness to go much further than Wash- 
ington has been prepared to go in 
dealing with the PLO. analysts 
said. 

The United States, which does 
{Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


r 


INSIDE 

■ Iran’s Kbarg bland oQ facility 
was reported badly damaged by 
an Iraqi air raid. Page 2. 

■ Scien ti st s sav the satellite de- 
stroyed in the first test of a U.S. 
anti-satellite weapon was pro- 
- ducing valuable data. Page 3. 

■ The United States engaged in 
secret talks regarding hostages 
in Lebanon for more than a 
year, sources say. Page 5. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ American design is the foots 

of a bold, often surprising; exhi- 
bition at the Whimey Museum 
of American Art- Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Japan reported 1-9- percent 

growth in GNP for the second 
quarter. Fage 

SPORTS 

■ A quarterback may be sacked 
by ms brother-in-law in the 

I^plrins-Chirfsgart» Page 15. 


h Fircherr 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Defense Minister 
Charles Hernu resigned Friday af- 
ter being confronted with mount- 
ing signs that French intelligence 
agents were linked to the sinking of 
a Greenpeace ship in New Zealand 
and had covered up their role dur- 
ing an official inquiry. 

Also Friday, France’s external 
intelligence chief. Vice Admiral 
Pierre Lacoste, was dismissed after 
be refused to answer Mr. Hernu's 
written questions about French ac- 
tivities in New Zealand, govern- 
ment officials said. 

President Francois Mitterrand 
said he had accepted the defense 
minister’s resignation with “sad- 
ness, regret and gratitude.” 

He noted that they had been 
friends for more than 30 years and 
thanked Mr. Hernu for “having di- 
rected with honor and competence 
the Ministry of Defease.” 

Mr. Mitterrand appointed Paul 
Quiles, minister of transport, urban 
development and bousing, to re- 
place Mr. Hernu. Jean Auroux. 
deputy transport minister, took 
over from Mr. Quilfes. 

Mr. Qitii£s was instructed by 
Prime Minister Laurent Fabius to 
continue an investigation erf the se- 
cret service's “shortcomings” be- 
gun by Mr. Hernu. Government 
sources said Mr. Quilts was asked 
to submit bis report within a week. 

Admiral Lacoste's refusal to an- 
swer questions seemed to many 
commentators to imply French 
guilt in the bombing of the Green- 
peace ship. The admiral said that 
any information he divulged might 
endanger French agents. 

Diplomats and French commen- 
tators said Mr. Hernu’s resignation 
was one of the most serious politi- 
cal blows that Mr. Mitterrand has 
suffered in his four years as presi- 
dent It was the latest development 
in a scandal which, they said, has 
undermined France's credibility, 
jeopardized the Socialists' relations 
with the military and bun the rul- 
ing party’s political prospects. 

By resigning. Mr. Hernu, who 
oversaw the country’s foreign intel- 
ligence. appeared to be accepting 
the blame for having failed to get a 
full account of his services’ activi- 
ties in recent weeks. 

He said he had finally deter- 
mined that “officials of my minis- 
try hid the truth from me.” and 
added, “Thai. I cannot accept.” 

Mr. Hernu has denied ordering 
the destruction of the Rainbow 
Warrior, the Greenpeace flagship. 
A photographer for the ecological 
movement oied in the July 10 srnk- 

(Conthmed on Page 2, CoL 4) 


s to 1,000 
In Earthquake 

In Mexico City 


Rescue workers in central Mexico Gty swarmed over a building toppled by the earthquake to search for survivors. 



Rniwn 


Firefighters move to battle flames at a popular tourist 
hotel, the Regis, which collapsed during die earthquake. 


. Anoaowd Pr«*i 

One of the many victims of the heavy destruction in central 
Mexico City is helped to safety by a team of rescuers. 


The Associated Press 
MEXICO CITY — New tremors 
shook central Mexico on Friday as 
rescuers in the devastated capital 
dug frantically through scores of 
collapsed buildings m search of 
survivors. 

The toll of dead in Thursday’s 
earthquake surpassed 1,000. Two 
Mexico Gty newspapers, quoting 
unidentified city officials, estimat- 
ed that 3.000 had died in the capital 
and that 300 were killed elsewhere 
in Mexico. 

Mayor Ram6n Aguirre said that 
about 1.000 bodies bad been recov- 
ered and that at least 1,000 people 
remained trapped in the ruins of 
about 250 multi-story buildings 
throughout the city. 

He said 5,000 injured had been 
treated at hospitals and 4,000 
homeless people were bring shel- 
tered in emergency centers. 

President Miguel de la Madrid 
declared a state of emergency and 
three days of national mourning. 
Schools,” universities, banks, gov- 
ernment buildings, cfnemas and 
night dubs were ordered dosed. 
The sale of liquor was banned. - 
Seven major downtown holds 
and 1 1 government buddings, as 
well as countless smaller buddings, 
were flattened. Dozens of other 
buildings still standing were in 
danger of collapsing and might 
have to be razed. 

Tens of thousands of emergency 
volunteers, using picks, heavy con- 
struction equipment or bare hands, 
clawed through the rubble is 
search of survivals, occasionally 
with success. A young man was 
lifted from the nuns of a hotel in 
central Mexico Gty on Friday after 
being buried 26 brans in the debris. 

Mexico City and four coastal 
states, Colima, Guerrero, Jalisco 
and Micboac&n, were hardest hit 
by the earthquake. 

'The WajormeafuredTi On the 
open-ended Richter scale of 
ground motion, making it the 
strongest to hit Mexico since 1973. 
A series of aftershocks, in the 4 to 5 
Richter range, have followed, the 
strongest occurring shortly after 7 
AM. Friday 

“Tt’s like a big monster ” said a 
rescue worker, Juan Carios 
outside a destroyed hotel “It's 
bring bombed or in a war." ■ 
“We know there are people in 
there, we know " a soldier said as 
be stood outride a badly damaged 


apartment building. “But it’s just 
too weak and smoky and we just 
can’t go in there.” 

Children wandered the streets, 
crying and calling out for their par- 
eats. 

The newspapers Excelsior and El 
Universal said city officials esti- 
mated that 3.000 people had died in 
tbe capital 

From HO to 150 people were 
killed in Jalisco state, 100 miles 
(160 kilometers) northwest of the 
capital, and about 1.500 were in- 
jured, a fire lieutenant, Juan Ma- 
nuel Sanchez, said from the state 
capital of Guadairi&ra. In Michoa- 
can state. 30 people were reported 

It was only a matter of time 
before a major earthquake 
struck where it (fid. Page Z 

trilled when two hotels collapsed at 
tbe beach resort of Ptava AzuL 
The Mexico Chy television sta- 
tion Televisa said 10,000 soldiers 
had been deployed in the city of 18 
million to prevent looting and to 
keep people away from buildings 
still in danger of collapse. 

Thousands of people spent the 
night outride because they had no 
homes to return to or feared build- 
ings still standing might collapse. 
Tempor ar y shelters were set op in 
offices and public buddings. 

BuDdazers and cranes removed 
mountains of broken concrete, 
bricks and glass. Mayor Aguirre 
said SOJOOO workers were tricing 
part in dean-up and rescue opera- 
tions. Hour by hour, more bodies 
were bring pulled oat 
Gas and power lines snapped by 
the earthquake touched of t dozens 
of fires, some of winch were still 
bunting Friday. 

Half the capital was blacked out 
'Thursday nknL-E«t power was be- 
ing gradually bring restored Fri- 
day, alongwith some telephone ser- 
vice. Officials said wafer supplies 
would be irregular for at least three 
days. 

Mexico Cry’s airport was closed 
while officials checked for possible 
cracks in the runways, but was 
opened on, Friday. 

. Radio stations broadcast ap- 
peals every few minutes for surgical 
instimneats. Wood, medical sup- 

(ConthmedooPage 2, CoL 3) 


House Panel Rejects Reagan Policy, Korern Hold, Boesak Is Charged With Subversion 

Approves Import Quota on Textiles Family After 3-W eek Detention, Put on Bail 

Reunions 


By Steven V. Roberts 

Hew York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The con- 
gressional rebellion against Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s trade poli- 
cies has accelerated with approval 
by a House subcommittee of legis- 
lation that would reduce American 
imports of textiles and apparel by 
up to 40 percent. 

Tbe action came as Representa- 
tive Thomas P. O’Neill Jr„ the 
speaker of (he House, issued a 
statement attacking Mr. Reagan's 
trade posture and accusing him of 
“being willing to preside over tbe 
de-industrialization of America.” 

The caucus of House Democrats 
also adopted a resolution Thursday 
directing House committees to re- 
port legislation by the end of Octo- 
ber chat would overhaul the na- 
tion’s trade policy. 

The textile bill was approved in a 
voice vote by the trade subcommit- 


tee of the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee. Staff members said the bill 
which is due for a vote by the full 
committee next week, could cause a 
rollback of imports to 25 to 40 
percent below current levels. 

The textile quota would fall most 
heavily on 12 producing areas, each 
of which accounts for more than 
1 25 percent of the American mar- 
ket. Tbe top three exporters are 
Taiwan, with 13.64 percent of the 
American market; South Korea, 
with 11.16 percent, and Hong 
Kong, with 10.55 percent The oth- 
ers are China, Japan. Pakistan, In- 
donesia. India, the Philippines, 
Thailand. Brazil and Singapore. 

Mr. Reagan has denounced the 
measure as protectionist and 
threatened to veto it. Mr. O'Neill 
predicted, however, that the legisla- 
tion would “sail through the 
House" in coming weeks, and Sen- 
ate Republicans are also eager to 


move their version of the bill as 
quickly as possible. 

Republicans in both the House 
and the Senaie have joined Demo- 
crats in arguing that Mr. Reagan 
has not moved quickly enough to 
deal with the trade' imbalance, 
which could reach S150 billion this 
year. Accordingly, they are work- 
ing feverishly to produce their own 
trade proposals and to steal a share 
of the political credit from the 
Democrats. 

Mr. O’Nall said that the House 
probably could muster enough 
votes to override a veto on the tex- 
tile bifl, but he conceded that the 
prospects of overriding in the Sen- 
ate were in doubt 

The Massachusetts Democrat 
commented that the “awesome 
power" of the president could be 
brought to bear on Republican 
lawmakers if Mr. Reagan faced an 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


By John Burgess 

Washington Post Service 

SEOUL — One hundred fifty- 
one North Koreans entered South 
Korea at tbe Demilitarised Zone 
on Friday for a three-day visit to 
Seoul that will include the first re- 
unions of families that have been 
separated since the Korean War. 

At tbe same time, 151 South Ko- 
reans crossed into North Korea en 
route to its capital Pyongyang, The 
exchange, part of an evolving de- 
tente between the two hostile gov- 
ernments, is being sponsored by 
their Red Cross societies. 

Officials exchanged words of 
friendship before crossing at the 
truce village of Panmunjom Friday 
morning. Tbe South Korean dele- 
gation leader, Kim Sang Hyup, 
said passage “should never be 


The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG — The 
Reverend Allan Boesak, a leading 
opponent of South Africa’s rarial 
segregation laws, was charged Fri- 
day with subversion for alleged at- 
tendance at ami-government meet- 
ings. He was released cm strict bail 
conditions. 

Mr. Boesak, one of tbe most 
prominent members of the United 
Democratic Front, an anti-apart- 
heid coalition, was detained Aug. 
27 on the eve of a march be planned 
to lead to demand freedom for Nel- 
son Mandela, tbe black nationalist 
leader. Mr. Mandela, who has been 
in prison for 23 years, is serving a 
life term for treason, 

Mr. Boesak, 39, president of tbe 
70-million member World Alliance 
of Reformed Churches, was re- 
leased on bail of 20,000 rand 
(S8,000) by a magistrate’s court in 
Malmesbury, a town 30 miles 


U.S. GNP Forecast Falls Short of Hope 


Wcck^dagSn.” The leader of the a ^ 3 ?LF I 5 

North Korean group. Son Sung Pik m) 

tie wasordered to surrender his 


By Jane Seaberry 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
economy was reported Friday to be 
growing' at a 2.8-percent rate in the 
current quarter, an improvement 
over more sluggish activity in the 
first half of the year but far below 
Reagan administration’s hopes. 

The Commerce Department’s 
“flash” estimate of third-quarter 
growth was disappointing to many 
economists, who bad expected a 
sharper improvement in gross na- 
tional product from the slow per- 
formance in the first half. 

But the flash estimate of GNP. 
which measures a nation’s total 
output of goods and services, is a 
notoriously volatile indicator that 
is commonly revised in later weeks. 

The department said Friday that 
the economy grew at a 1.9-percent 
rate in the second quarter, a down- 
ward revision from the 2 percent 
estimated last month. Growth in 


Dollar Drops Sharply 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
fell markedly against most ma- 
jor European currencies Friday 
in New York and Europe after 
the release of the latest figures 
on U.S. economic growth. 

Dealers said tbe govern- 
ment’s ’'flash” estimate, that 
the U.S. gross national product 
was growing at an annual rate 
of 2.8 percent in the third quar- 
ter, was disappointing because 
they had exported at least 3 
percent expansion. Page 13. 


the First quarter was at a UJ-per- 
cent rate, which had afro been re- 
vised lower, from a 1.7-percent 
rate. 

Sf the current quarter's ettimatp 
of growth holds through the fourth 
quarter, the U.S. economy will re- 


cord a 2-percent growth rate this 
year 

The Commerce Department also 
reported that after-tax corporate 
profits increased 0.3 percent in the 
second quarter compared with an 
estimate last month mat pi 


quart 
elasti 

dined 0.4 percent. Profits fell 2.8 
percent in the fust quarter. 

Profits before taxes fell 0.6 per- 
cent, compared with last month’s 
estimate of a 0.5-percent drop, the 
Commerce Department said, 
profits afro fell 2.! 
fust quarter. 

Economists say the statistics do 
not suggest a recession is on the 
way, but rather that the long-await- 
ed rebound will be milder than ex- 
pected. 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
Baidrig/e said that the flash esti- 
mate. “if realized, means that our 
economy is emerging from the dol- 
drums of the past year.” He said 

(Contmned on Ftige 2, CoL 6) 


it profits de- 
jfits 


-8 percent in the 


tion's history.' 

Tbe North Korean delegation in- 
dudes 50 former residents of Seoul, 
50 folk art performers, 30 journal- 
ists and 21 support personnel 
Brought to Seoul, 30 miles (48 kilo- 
meters) south of Panmunjom, in a 
convoy of buses and cars, they are 
staying at the Sheraton Walker Hill 
Hotd, a luxuty tourist facility on 
tbe dry’s eastern outskirts. 

On Saturday, some of the former 
Seoul residents are to be reunited 
with relatives. It will be the first 
such visits that the two rides, which 
maintain strict isolation from each 
other, have allowed since the Kore- 
an War began in 1950, 

The exchange was the first tangi- 
ble result of Red Cross negotia- 
tions zhat began in 1972 aimed at 
reuniting the 10 milli on on the Ko- 
rean peninsula who are separated 
from relatives because of Lhe war 
between Communist North Korea 
and the republic in the South. 

No itinerary for the North Kore- 
an visitors in South Korea has been 
set, but sources said 
allowed to meet with fi 


passport, not to talk to reporters, 
not to address meetings, and not to 
organize or support consumer and 
school boycotts. He also was told 
to report to police daily and stay 
home overnight. 

Mr. Boesak was charged Friday 
with four counts under the subver- 
sion section of the Internal Security 
Act. Conviction carries a maximum 
sentence of 25 years in prison. He 
had been detained, without charge 
for three weeks. 

Andrfc Dippenaar, the acting 
chief magistrate who presided at 



The Reverend Allan Boesak after being rdeasedrai^^ 


of 


0 ^, 2 ** eW^on under which 
S 5 f mflllon whiles rule 
24 nmbon disenfranchised blacks 
Mr. Botha told the Transvaal 
Par- 

aucm.il Con- 

_ _ [p* 8 ® wanls only to discuss the 

on South Africa to handing over of power to “an even- 


congress of his 
ty that the African 


bers twice during their slay at a 
hotel in eastern Seoul. 


Mr. Mandda is held, police broke 
up attempted marches, setting off 
rioting in Cape Town’s black and 
mixed-race neighborhoods. More 
than three dpzenpeople died in the 
imresL 

Church groups throughout the 

world had called on South Africa Jo _ . 

Mr. Boesak’s hearing m Malmes- charge Mr. Boesak or release him. fual socialist dictatorship with'S! 
bury, said that tbe charges involved He was rthe most prominent of the its lamentable consequences." 
anti-government meetings that Mr. many members of the United Dem- _ r. 

Boesak allegedly attended this year ocratic Front to be formally ■ Pretoria Backs Rebels 
near Cape Town. At one of them, chmsecj i* recent monlhs Ht , , 

according to the charges, Mr. Boe- helped found tbe group two yean- ^ FxSvfoTrK^ Swenunem 
sak advocated disinvestment by ago. but he held only an honorarV lick, ™* rirst haw pub- 

a crime in position in it. . .. rnT r n wl f t M su PPQrtmg the An. 

bi Pretoria, mean whOe^ -Presi- Outers re- 

dent Pieter W. Botha said that op- OTUL 

popents of his government were 
building a campaign to push bint 
into talks with the outlawed Afri- 
can National Congress guerrilla 

movement. The group opposes vimbi.-was - 0 f a a *'-' 

apartheid, the legally forced system, tariaa and moii natS^ humani ' f 


foreign companies. 

South Africa, 

Mr. Boesak was cot asked to 
plead. He was ordered to appear 
again in court Nov. 6. Mr. Dippen- 
will be’ aar said that the charges were pro- 
y mem- visional and may be revised.’ 



After Mr. Boesak called for the 
march on FoQsmoor prison where 


S?, 1 ^^oria. De- 
aler Magma Mai an said 

Unionltor the T^IndLSe^ 


7 • :: :\ 

. ■v-4- 

i 


J.-V -r. 




S.;- 
'a-_ ' 










Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 21-22, 1985 


** 



JAMES 

GORDON 

BENNETT 

BALLOON 

RACE 


Geneva, 

September 28/29, 1 985 

The world's most prestigious 
balloon race was created m 1906 by 
James Gordon Bennett, Jr., founder of the 
International Herdd Trfoune. 

That year, a qucrter of a million 
spectators watched sixteen gas-fiBed 
balloons from 6 countries rise from the 
Tuiieries Gardens in Paris. The object of 
the race: fly the farthest cfistmce before 
landing. 

The rules haven’t changed over the 
years, and the departure of the 1985 
Gordon Bennett Balloon Race from 
Geneva will be equally spectacular: an 
illuminated night take-off. 

Eighteen balloons from 1 1 
countries will partiapate. Held at the 
Centre Sportif in Vessy, just outside 
Geneva, the Saturday night takeoff will 
be the highfight of a weekend of 
aeronautic events. 

Admission: F.S. 10 vaBd for both 
days. For addrtiond information, contact 
the International Herald Tribune in Paris, 
Td. 747 12 65, ext. 4566, or Patrick 
Kearley in Geneva, TeL 983 862. 

Program 

Friday, September 27 - Fireworks 

10 pirn. - Fireworks launched from a hotair 
bdioon, Parc des Eaux-Vives. 

Saturday, September 28 - Gordon Bennett 
Bafloon Race Take-off 

11 am. - Opening ceremony. Vetercn Car 
Club Parade- 

12 - 6 pm - Inflation of gas bdfoons for the 
Gordon Bennett Race. Tethered hat-dr and 
gas baHoon ffigte for the pubic. Fight 
demonsirafions. 

8 - 10 pirn. - lluminated idcoff of the 1985 
Gordon Bennett Bdioon Race. 

Sunday, September 29 - Gordon Bennett 
Fight Fiesta 

8-.30 am end 4 pm - Mass ascension of hert- 
dr balloons. 

9 cun. - 6 pm. - Higfrt demonstrations: repfca 
of the first hot-dr bdioon fbwn in 1783, hat- 
dr drship, hang gfiders launched from a hot- 
dr bdioon, stunt flying, miniature hat-dr 
bdloore, drpkne and helicopter models, 
gEders, AAartini acrobatic teem Tethered hat- 
dr bafloon flights for the pubfic 

6 pm Casing ceremony. 


'It Was Just a Matter of Time 9 

Experts Say Earthquake Struck in High-Risk Area 



WORLD BRIEFS 


Compiled hv Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK —The earthquake 
that devastated parts of Mexico oc- 
curred in an area of frequent earth- 
quake activity, where major quakes 
recur every 60 years or so, experts 
say. They indicated it was just a 
matter of time before the next one 
struck. 

The quake occurred about 200 
miles (320 kilometers ) west of Mex- 
ico City, off Mexico’s Pacific coast, 
where a email piece of the Earth's 
crust called the Cocos plate is being 
pushed underneath the coast of 
Mexico, said Craig Nicholson, a 
seismologist. 

Mr. Nicholson, who works at 
Columbia University’s Lamom- 
Doherty Geophysical Observatory 
in Palisades. New York, said 
Thursday that the Cocos plate bad 
“been responsible for a number of 
large earthquakes that have oc- 
curred along the coast of Mexico.” 

Tom Boyd, another researcher at 
the observatory, said, ‘The area 
has a quake about every 60 years or 
so.” 

The Cocos plate had been 
jammed against another plate, or 
giant land mass, covering Mexico 
and the United Slates and had not 
moved for about 50 years, Mr. 
Boyd said. 

‘Enormous beat and pressure 
was built, and it was unleashed 
suddenly,” he said. 

From records of past earth- 
quakes, seismologists have been 
able to identify “gaps” where new 
ones have not occurred for a num- 
ber of years and are most likely to 
strike. The earthquake Thursday 
apparently was in such a gap. 

Dr. Lynn R. Sykes of the La- 
ment- Doherty Observatory said 
the earthquake occurred “smack in 
the middle of one of the biggest 
gaps along that coast.” 

This one damaged Mexico Gty 
in a way that none of the others did 
because it was closer to the city 
rhan the other coastal earthquakes. 

Dr. Christopher H. Scholz, also 
of the Lamont-Doherty Observa- 
tory, said the dosest earthquakes to 
the gap in which Thursday's tem- 
blors occurred were in 1973. with a 
magnitude of 7 5 on the open-end- 

Mexico Toll 
Nears 1,000 

(Continued from Page 1) 
s, food and picks and shovels to 
dig through rubble. 

Scores of patients were buried 
under debris when the three-story 
Juarez Hospital, near the central 
Revolution P laza, collapsed. One 
fire destroyed the Hotel Regis, an 
old landmar k where an unknown 
number of people were trapped 
when it budded. 

The Roman residential district 
near the dty center was cordoned 
off because of gas leaks. Radio an- 
nouncements urged residents not 
to light matches, smoke or switch 
on electrical instruments. 

[The government’s central tele- 
phone and telex transissioas tower 
caught fire in the shock, and the 
facility may need to be entirely re- 
placed, officials told The Washing- 
ton Post 

[Although the central dry’s dis- 
trict hit hardest by the quake con- 
tains many buddings from the 19th 
and even the 13th and 17th centu- 
ries, the older edifices conspicuous- 
ly escaped major damage. 

“Buildings contracted and owned 
by the government appeared to suf- 
fer disproportionately, it was wide- 
ly noted.* Among the largest struc- 
tures destroyed were the offices of 
the Labor and Commerce minis- 
tries and a 14-story public housing 
unit all built since the 1950s. By 
contrast, none of the dry’s big pri- 
vate high-rise office buildings col- 
lapsed. 

[Critics contend thai some con- 
tractors disregarded Mexico City's 
strict anti-seismic building code 
with acquiesence erf government in- 
spectors. “This is going to be seen 
as the biggest construction scandal 
in Mexican history,” said a local 
industrialist who requested ano- 
nymity.] 


CHURCH SERVICES 


nuns 

ST. JOSSPlfS PARISH far Engfeh*peoJdng 
Cathodes b now at Si Genavfeva* Qwrch, 
24 rue Oaucfa Leman, 75016 Paris. M* Bui- 
mam. Mosses (m English) an Saturday at 
I &30 and an Sunday aM 0.00, 1 1 JO and 
18.30. Catechism uft ei the lOXO Mass dur- 
ing the school year. Bap&sres and mar riages 
by a p p o in t m ent. The priests. Father Marius 
Donnelly and Fatfwr Comae O'Hara, reside 
at 18, rue Claude Lomrin. T elephone 527 OS 
OP. 


HUBS 

CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH. 13 Rue (fa 
VfawsCo fa mbhr, 75006 Paris. Metro St.- 
Sulptce. Sunday worship in English 9i45 
ojtl. Rev. A. Sommerville. Tel.: 607.67X2. 


PASS SUBURBS 
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH, 56 Rue des 
Bens-Rabins, Rueil-Maimoison. English 
speaking, eva ng elical, a# denominations. 
S-S. 9i45r Worship. 1 (MS. Other activities. 
CaO Dr. B.C. Thomas, Pastor. 74P.15.2P. 


STOCKHOLM 

IMMANUH. CHURCH near dty 
Friendly dristiai fellowship^ Sunday 1 1 >00. 
TeL: (08) 316Q51, 151225. 


BiROPE 

UPBTAnANUMVBtSAlJSr, worship and 
activities in Eienpe. Contact EUU, Stem 
Dick, Serfagsiroat 20. 1271 NCHufeen.The 
Netherlands. TeL: (+31) (0) 2152 55073. 


To place cat advertuemaa 
in thu section 
please contact: 

Ms Elizabeth HER WOOD 
181 Ave. Ch^de-ConUe, 
92521 NenDIr Cedex, France. 
TeL.- 747.12.65. 



Oil Terminal 

Domain 

IraqKaidon 
Khar g Island 


The Associated Press 

MANAMA. Bahrain — Iran’s 
Kharg Island ofl terminal was 
heavily damaged in an Iraqi bomb- 
ing raid, but was continuing opera- 
tions. Gulf-based marine salvage 
and oil executives said Friday. 

A North Korean supertanker, 
the Son Bong, was damaged in the 


^ * __ _ leaccr. h»i> PrtUW 
BEIJING (AFP) — Deng Xiaoping, the Oums*^ Vteenani w«wK 
Minister Lee Kuan Yew of that Hanoi h» 

continue to “gobble up” . 

taken a softer line, the official Xmhua_news Hanot imlu 

Beijing has said it will not normalize ns ^ cew , jgency said 

Vietnamese troops are withdrawn from Cambria. » ^ ressmnee 

Mr. Deng predicted that Vietnam settlement 

forces have been wiped out. He efforts to establish 

£££?£ — - 

G d£&is said the remark more p 

Thursday in which Mr. Lee appeared to tant max ^ Association of .> 
condliatbiy on the issue. MnLee ^ to Cambodia’s trou- ! 

Southeast Asian Nations seeks a pohtiral sctotiM W Beijing to 

bles rather than a prolonged military cmrfbct. ^ISi ngapofo 
promote further economic cooperation between China 

Agca Boycotts Trial, Wants Meetings 

ROME CAP) - Mehmct Afi •V“. l »*55!l2!fSLSwrth.^ 


raid Thursday and was still on fire 
Friday, the sources said. 

There were unconfirmed reports 
that another supertanker, the Libe- 
rian-registered 259,955-ton Atian- 
ticos. also had been hit. 

SfeSw «- * dm 

been destroyed. Bnt shipping and 
oil executives in Bahrain, Kuwait 
and Saudi Arabia said they be- 
lieved that was an exaggeration. 

[Grade o3 prices rose from 10 to 
15 cents a barrel on European spot 
markets Friday on early reports of 
the Kharg Island damage, Reuters 
reported Friday from London.] 

Thursday’s attack was the 10th. 
and most severe, Iraqi raid , on 
Kharg since an Ang. 15 attack se- 
verely damaged a jetty on the east- 
ern Side Of the island • 

The . 5 J ip pj^5' ecu£ivcs s j id Bolivian Miners Refuse to End Strilp 


%_• 


conspiracy to murder Pope John Paul H. demanoms a 

popei and with the UmtedNations secretary-general. L nder Italian 
detendant may choose not to attend his trial. ” Mr 

“I boycott today’s session to protest the silence of me .i—stan 

- -» 

Javier Pfcrez de CuHlar, the UN leader. . . ^ „ Mav 

Mr. Agca, who is serving a life sentence for shooringm® ^ve_on Ma 
13, 1981, has turned state’s evidence. His testimony has provKtod the 
basis for the trial of three Bulgarians and four 
complicity in the attack on the pope. Mr. Agca is also bemg mod on 
separate charge of illegally importing the pistol he used in me annex. 



Tfa 


A poHceman carrying an injured man in Mexico City. 


ed Richter scale and another in 
1919. with a magnitude of 7.6. 

The gap method of earthquake 
prediction has been applied to a 
number of sectors along the eastern 
rim of the Pacific Ocean from Chile 
to Alaska and the Aleutian Islands. 
It has enabled seismologists to pre- 
dict several earthquakes that have 
struck Alaska and the Oaxaca re- 
gion of Mexico in recent years. The 
predictions, however, cannot be 
precise as to time. 

Scientists expect to reap me most 
extensive data ever recorded for a 
major earthquake from Thursday's 
temblor as a result of measuring 


equipment placed in Mexico's 
coastal region about nine months 
ago. 

“We anticipated the quake,” said 
James Brune of the University of 
California, “and we’ve gpt enough 
equipment there to say it will be the 
best-recorded major quake ever in 
terms of recording the motion 
waves." 

In cooperation with the National 
University of Mexico, 30 measur- 
ing sites were selected last year in 
±e state of Guerrero, where previ- 
ous research at Mexico’s National 
University bad suggested the possi- 
bility of large earth quakes. (NYT, 
AP, LAT) 


they had received rep o r t s that 
“fireballs and black smoke” could 
be seen as far as 40 miles (64 kilo- 
meters) from Kharg. They said they 
knew that the Son. Bong was on fire 
but could not tell whether the jetty 
was burning. 

“But we have indications that the 
island is still operating,” said an 
executive. He would not elaborate. 

Another shippimg source based 
in Bahrain said: “The Iraqis and 
the Iranians are play ing a cat-and- 
mouse game with the claim* and 
counterclaims, ft would take a lot 
for the island to be totally de- 
stroyed." 

A Bahrain-based Japanese oil 
executive said the ter minal had a 
loading capacity of seven millio n 
barrels and that if the worst of tire 
Iraqi damag e claim* were true, 
“The Iranians would still be able to 
pump two million or three million 
barrels a day for export." 



Victor Paz Estenssoro 


LA PAZ (AP) — Thousands of 
Bolivian mine workers defied back- 
to-work orders Friday after Presi- 
dent Victor Paz Estenssoro decreetf 
a state of siege, banished 144 strike 
leaders into internal exile and ar- 
rested hundreds of other urrioni ac- 
tivists. 

Bnt rail service, long-distance 
telephone communications and oil 
pipeline deli veries resumed, indi- 
cating dwindling support for the 
17-day general strike. 

At least S20 unio n officials and 
strikers were arrested in predawn 
raids Thursday at union halls and 
workplaces. They were fasting to 
protest a wage freeze and other, 
government measures to halt the 1 
world’s highest animal inflation 
rale. 14,000 percent. , • 



Churches Assail TV Sex and Violence 

NEW YORK (AP) — The National Council erf Churches said Frida, 
that sex and violence on television foment “anti-social and aggresavt 
behavior” that seriously threatens tire quality of American life. 

Over Greenpeace Ship Affair PIX) Officials suits oLan investigation, recommended that the Uilf^ranmaitait to 

i T JJ protect tire public framwbai it called “moral poHatioar from a dominant 


Hemu Quits , Aide Dismissed U.K. Invites 




(Continued from Page 1} 
ing of the ship m Auckland, New 
Zealand. 

But no government explanation 
has been provided for French news 
accounts this week that put at least 
H) French intelligence agents, in-- 
eluding seven combat frogmen and 
their c ommand er, in New Zealand 
at the time the ship was sabotaged. 

Two French agents are in custo- 
dy in New Zealand in connection 
with the sinking. 

French reporters said Friday 
that Mr. Fabius had persuaded Mr. 
Mitterrand to approve Mr. Heiuu’s 
resignation in a meetin® Thursday 
night, arguing that Mr. Hemu’s 
resignation was politically indis- 
pensable. 

They said it was the fourth time 
in two weeks that Mr. Fabius had 
sought the departure. They added 
that Mr. Mitterrand finally agreed 
to sacrifice Mr. Hemu to end the 
government’s silence in the face of 
press disclosures. 

In explaining why the govern- 
ment was slow in reacting to re- 
ports of French involvement, the 
newspaper Le Monde said Friday 
that Mr. Mitterrand had hesitated 
to confront Mr. Hernu because of 
their long friendship. 

Recent government leaks in the 
press, Le Moade indicated, had 
been intended to provoke a crisis in 
which Mr. Mitterrand could say he 
had been acting under public pres- 
sure to challenge Mr. Hemu and 
the military. 

The opposition has accused the 
Socialists of running the intelli- 
gence services incompetently and 
of exposing France to ridicule. 

By dismissing Admiral Lacoste, 
ordering a shake-op of the secret 


that the French government was 
’blameless in the bombing of the 
ship. But he later acknowledged 
that he could have been misled by 
military officers. 

French officials have started 
hinting that middle- rankin g intelli- 
gence officers exceeded' their or- 
ders, then were protected by their 
superiors. This version of events, 
diplomats said, may be intended to 
help dear the two French agents 
fairing trial in New Zea lan d. 

Le Monde, citing official 
sources, said Tuesday that the gov- 
ernment had secret reports that two 
French agents who had not been 
mentioned in the Tricot report had 
planted two bombs on the Green- 
peace ship. 

The loss of Mr. Hernu was more 
than just a personal blow to Mr. 
Mitterrand. It went to the heart of 
his political position as French 
commander in chief. 

In this capacity, analysts said, 
Mr. Mitterrand has tried to place 
himself above partisan struggles. 
This, they said, may have been in- 
tended to set the stage for future 
cooperation with a «ovemment 
that- the Socialists might not con- 
trol after elections in March. 

Mr. Hemu, 62, grandson of a 
World War I cavalry officer and 
son of a gendarme, has doggedly 
defended the military throughout 
the Greenpeace affair. 

In doing so, he was continuing 
his support of the military. In 197% 
he helped persuade the Socialists to 
drop their opposition to nuclear 
weapons, ana when be was ap- 
pointed in 1981, his solid mOitaty 
credentials helped dispel 


influence in modem soriet 
With “excessive portrayals of violence” steadily increasing, “concerned 
dozens fed helpless before a media system that is seemingly out of 
control,” the report said. It dealt with films and network and cable 
television, .sin gling out tdeviaan as “the most pervasive of all media” It 
said that the “vicious character” of program content can be reduced 
without crippling the industry’s potential or profits or abridging Ipgiri- 
mate freedom of expression." 


(Continued from Page 1) 

not recognize the PLO, has ap- 
peared skittish about a meeting 
with a joint delegation. But Mrs. 

Thatcher said it was necessary to 
get the process under way. 

Neither of the PLO men named 
to take part in the London talks 

was on a preliminary list submitted |-» T • • T . _ __ ’ 

by Jordan to the United States for lfe Loregll IndiCted ffll rrann 1 Jlflr gfta 

inclusion in a joint delegation. ncTDnrr/*m . , , , , . . 

DETROIT (AP) — A federal grand jury returned a 15-count mtgjct- 
ment Friday against John Z. De Lorean, lire former automaker, aneging 
that be defrauded investors of $8.9 million, U.S. Attorney Joel M. Shoe 
said. 






•\rv:vf 

m 


While lamenting that the peace 
process was moving too slowly, 

Mrs. Thatcher said she and King 
Hussein still differed on his desire 
for an international conference to 
discuss the Middle East that would 
inciude the Soviet Union. 

The last talks between a British 
minister and a PLO leader were in 
Tunis in 1983 between Douglas 

Hurd, then a minister of state in the 

Foreign Office, and Farouk Kad- under Chapter 7 of the acL 
doumi. the PLO’s top for eig n po- 
licy official. 

In London, the Board of Depu- 
ties of British Jews, a lay o rgan 17 a - 
tion that promotes Jewish interests, 
denounced Mrs. Thatcher’s deci- 
sion to invite the PLO members as 
a dangerous departure from her 
past pledges to tight terrorism. 


The indictment charged Mr. De Lorean with racketeering and 
federal crimes involving mail fraud, wire fraud, interstate transport 
of stolen money, income tax evasion and causing false tax returns tq be 
filed, Mr. Shore said. 

Mr. De Lorean, who was acquitted in August I984ofcocainecan5ptra- 
cy charges, sought protection from creditors in 1982 under Chapter 11 of 
the Federal Bankruptcy Act when his sports car company m North 
Iidandjaced insolvency. The case was later converted to liquidation 


For the Record 

Presidoit Ronald Reagan was scheduled to visit the Betheada Naval 
Medical Center in Maryland on Biday for the fist erf what the Write 
House called routine tests after his colon cancer surgery in July.fReuterjJ 

AQrfneseAir bomber crashed in South Korea last 

month arrived, in Taiwan on Friday to claim political asylum. (Reuters) 


Panel Backs Textile Import Quota 


(Continued from Page 1) 

embarrassing defeat on the textile 
issue. 

The political momentum behind 


have captured 50 percent of the 
textileandi * 


dons of possible SorialTsofmE*' £j 
on national defense. 


ItS. Draft Opponent Freed 


ap- 
parently bopes to halt the decline 
of his government’s credibility over 
the affair, analysts said. 

The president has been quoted as 
saying privately that “between in- 
telligence-gathering and sabotage, 
there is a gulf, which should never 
have been crossed.” 

Bernard Tricot, a former De 
Gaulle aide who investigated the 
Greenpeace affair for the govern- 
ment. said in a report last month 


snspt- 

tial amendments from lawmakers 
who want relief from for eig n com- 
~ petition for other industries. Sup- 
porters of a proposal to limit shoe 

The Associated Press jfP 0 ^ would try to add 

m the Sen- 


War era /or ref using ;o register 
with the Selective Service, was re- 
leased on parole Friday from a fed- 
eral prison camp, authorities said. 
Mr. Sasway, who said he had re- 
fused to register on moral grounds, 
had served six months of a two- 
and-a-half year sentence. 


25 percent 10 years ago. 

As a result, Mr. 0’NdD said, “for 
the first time , management and the 
unions acre working; together” to 
support a bill setting quotas on 
textile imports. 

Mr. Gephardt said the push for 
legislation bad been gnhanrgri by 
the fact that many of the countries 
now penetrating the U.S. textile 
market deliberately ke^> out 


American-made products. “We are 
not being treated with reciprocity 
by a number of countries,” he saicL 



Biotonus 


CH- 1820 MONTRBJX 
TMjMIft mw 453)5 3 ado Cft 

Clinique BmPortl 




Montreux-Swrtzerland 




are. 

The' textile issue has leaped to 
the forefront of the trade debate 
because U.S. manufacturers have 

been swamped by a trem endo us Democrats concede that they are 
flood” of foreign imports m recent promotin g die issue partly for po- 
years, accordiiig io Representative litical reasons. Mr. Reagan’s oppo- 
Ricfaard A Gephardt, a Missoun shitm to a textile bill gives voters 
Democrat who is on the trade sub- ihe impression that “he doesn't 
co ? u ™ ttee - seem to care about these people 

Industry sources say imports and their jobs,” according toRep- 


resentative Tony L. Codho of Cali- 
fornia. • 

Moreover, Mr. Coelho said, 
many of the workers whose jobs-are 
affected by textile imports Tare 
white males living in Southern 
states, a voting group that has 
moved steadily toward the Repub- 
lican Party in recent elections. £ Ba- 
sicaBy, these people feel they have 
beat taken advantage of.by lorggn 
nations,” he added. “I. s a wonder- 
ful issue for us.” 

Front a political standpoint. 
Democrats say a veto by Mr. Rea- 
gan would only highlight the issue 

and make it even more profitable in 

terms of votes next year. 

The president is expected wifjrin 
a week to announce steps he wit 1 
take to strengthen exports and right 
unfair foreign trade practices and 
to edu his news conference warn- 
ing earlier this week against a stam- 
pede toward protectionism. 


■'■■-.I 


Quarterly GNP Estimate Falls Short of Hopes* 


(Continued from Rage 1) 

the sharp increase in assemblies of 
automobile 
percen 
ter 


es contributed about 1 
point to the third-quar- 
rate. 


The flash estimate was belowiex- 
pectations, said Edward YaidenL 
chief economist f«r Prudential 


— wffili 

in Madrid 
Remember... 


Jeweb-Woikc of Art-KUdm 

Mirrn distributor; ■ 

PIAGET -BAUME& MERGER -ROLEX 

Gran Via, 1. Til 232 W 07. 
■BB 28013 MADRID BSSSB 


“While stqmed-up growth in 
output should bolster gains in em- 
ployment and income daring the cmet economist for 1 
months ahead, we still Face serious Bache securities dealers 
economic challenges," Mr. Bal- Th P 
drige said. “Our manufacturing it Dci ™ cnl 

sector remains handicapped bya “dsoveni- 

strong dollar and has yet to regain of ^ cco ™ t / OT nwst 

the vigor it displayed wrier mdSe S H ft^ p,a * ter 

expansion." ^T^.”J I ? ines s fixed investment, 

. , residential investment and ner-n. 

Other economists were less san- ports are expected to 


three memrhs for die Reagan ad- in the third quarto* 

fixS f ^S^f aS ^ red - bY 

Tti* grow* rate is ge^fy 

considered necessary to prevent peered to increa* *3 t£St 
unemployment from rising and ^ third 

k«p fl* .lateral budg« S S 

from growing further. merce DepannuSISd. ™ 


’- 1-,-:- 


it 












INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -5 U ND A Y, SEPTEMBER 21-22, 1985 



cSn? \JS& 


icaragua Seeks $375 Million From U.S. 


A ' __ Associated Pnss 

• alleccdhr brl-flAn* ^ for 

: ..wt Sandinist gover^nu 
■■ In his summary of ihc Nicara 
.. ^ P^morimthe U twS 
:S2X„”®3“ n “*=■ Carte at. 


Sit's 

w the to 
' iftUmcmy has p5 
^ fw r Turks obc 
A gfa is also ha®, 
pistol he used in^ 

to End Si 

A PAZ |AP) -TV 
vianrainewoikersfc 
•orfc orders Fridays 

i Uctor Paz Estensa 
it£ of siege, b anidri 
io* imo internal ei 
xl hundreds of ode: 
.is. 

<u rail service. It 
phone communicate 
.‘line deliveries re* 
ng dwindling suppr 
lav general strike. 

ii least 52Q union i 
leers were arrested c 
is Thursday at i m 
rkplaces. They wt 
>te$t a wage freon 
.eminent measure t 
irid’s highest anas 
te, 14,000 percenL 


iex and Viol 

i Council of Churdiest 
imcni “anti-social oi 
quality of America! 
:nominational group, i 
si that the U.S. gowt 
“moral pollution" fra* 

ice" steadily increase 
a system that is sem 
with films and news 
‘the most pervasvedi 
,f program content a 
fential or profits or * 


■ ; b«ad of the SandinisTlS] 

■ team at the court, said that “5a 
25S»““ !of Ik* violation oft, 

'pnatwoai law, compensation k 
-..due to Nicaragua. h ^ aauon a 

" ■ "Nicaragua asks the court in 
• -ward the sum of $375 m£ !S 

■ - SffSfSt f rom the Unhed 

Lhe minimiS 
damage suffered by Nicara- 
-TP» as a result of the United Stems' 
-yjolarioiis of international law," he 
4 sai<L 

; . Mr-Arguello was referring to the 
, u A government s alleged sumjort 
t o the reb els fighting the nSSS 
. government. The Reagan adminis- 
..tration says that only "nonlethaT 
“**■ given to the rebels. 

- , £. He also asked the tribunal to rule 
..m dear terms” that the United 
States must "bring to an end" Us 
support to the guerrillas. 

In his summation, Mr. ArcueQo 
; charged that the "policy of the ‘big 
.stick’ has permeated, and still per- 




David MacmfcbaeL, right, a former analyst for the CIA testifying at the World Court. At 
left is Abram Chayes, a member of the Nicaraguan legal team and Harvard law professor. 


was this: The government of B records and newspapers to sue the 
Salvador claims that guerrillas in United Stales before a judicial pan- 


— w-aiua uun America, a 
policy that has been applied with 
particular cruelty to Nicaragua." 
V * The U-S. government has boy- 
«)tted_ the proceedings, claiming 
the Nicaraguan government is us- 
.'*ing the court as a propaganda fo- 
; - rum. It also says that the court, the 
' • main judicial arm of the United 
-■ ‘ Nations, has no jurisdiction. 

- The court, presided over by 
“Judge Nagendra Singh Of India, 
has no enforcement powers and de- 
pends on voluntary compliance 
.. with its rulings. 

' Mr. Argueflo’s presentation oc- 
• curred after seven days erf testimo- 
ny and arguments before the panel 
. of 15. ‘ 

*. After the conclusion of the hear- 
- ings, the court will examine the 


pules, generally between countries 
that wanted to end disagreements 

SafKr rL” P° oc y o* Wf 'tHg that countrv, which many contend el made up, with the exception of but, because of political pressures. 

a f 0 ' u m are supported by Nicaragua, have Judge Schwebel, of non-Ameri- did not feel they could make com- 

States tatiMnf . “e United caused disastrous economic lasses, cans, some of whom come from promises. Thus they agreed to have 
,vLri“ r* 110 Atnenca, a if Nicaragua is indeed supporting countries with very different views the court impose a settlement. 

“ H Salvador, the than the United States. But. Judge Schwebel said. 

The II q Biwfrnmw i J°dgeaskeil is it responsible for The proceedings Monday, for "there's a sense of disappointment 

cotted the mnSSSS 1 economic damage there? example, produced the spectacle of among the supporters of imerna- 

the NicmgSS^vSS^S^ The judge who has pursued the a former andyst for thTcartral tiooal adjudicalionin the record of 
ing the com as amuonda po&sibiijry that Nicaragua is doing Intelligence Agency. Davtd Mac- the court, mainly because relatively 


than the United States. But. Judge Schwebel said. 

The proceedings Monday, for "there's a sense of disappointment 
example, produced the spectacle of among the supporters of interna- 
a former analyst for the Central tionnl adjudication in the record of 


possibility that Nicaragua is doing Miwmgcocc Agency, uavia Mac- uiccoun.mamiy «»iuc iciauvciy 
to El Salvador what it claims the raichael, at the coaxing of Abram few international disputes are sub- 
United Stales is doing to it — Chayes. a Harvard law professor, mined to it." 
which is denied by all the Nicara- ^ e ^ Cnf ?ingiii detail to judges from *»w c have the paradox." he said, 
guan witnesses — is Stephen M. China, India mid other -Qf a ^^0 with imema- 

Schwebd, the only American jurist countnes operations of the mtdli- disputes and, at times, this 

on the World Court and. in most apparatus of the United ^ ^ ain^si nothing to 
cases, the only judge who seemed States. fo " 

inclined this week to question Nic- Of the 15 judges on the court, 

aragos's witnesses cm anything oih- only 7 — the Japanese, the British, 

cr than a small detail here or a the Norwegian, the Nigerian, the yj ri t tt 1 

point of clarification there. Senegalese, the Indian and the M J \ Ifi I j 7*00/1 

r.ufe. c^mi^-i ; c , i mo American —come from among the ^ * ft 

'Mwmutotlujcanh'hw^iu. „ D J ' 

SLn.Uon11a.j-m who* V To RpduCP 


■cuned after seven days of testixno- er -man a smau oeuui nere or a ™ Norwegian, me mgenan. inc fT C V TT J 

ay and arguments before the panel pwm of clarification there. Senegalese, the Indian and the Ml V K 

of 15. ^ Judge Schwebel is a long-stand- Araencan - rorae from among the Xd UfgW* 

* After the conclusion of the hear- ing member of the fraternity of ^. Coun rl U If i ( S!i ^ ^ ^ rou ^ l -° rgl T> f ' 

mgs, the court will examine the international lawyers whose high- £ XO ixSCtllCS 

testimony, aiguments and more- ea and most visible center is the 

•than 1^00 pages of. documentary International Court oT Justice, as J *™ 1 **' O • - Tf 

sl * or,d Coun is ,orma,ly rSn fi Soviet Visas 


44 countries that can be brought to 
the court by other countries. This is 
because unless a country agrees in 


-A final ruling in die. case is not 
^ expected for several months. 

'*■ Problems of Jnrisdfctioo 

Earlier, Richard Bernstein of The 
New York Times reported from The 
Hague : . 

Earlier this week, the judges, 
' seated in black robes under a row 
of stained-glass windows and glim- 
mering chandeliers, heard Nicara- 
gua's finance minister, W illiam 
Huper, catalogue nnllions of dal- 
_ Lars worth of economic damage to 
his country due. he contended, to 
! VS. support for the anti-govera- 
' ment forces. 

; Then one judge— and only one 
judge— askeda safes of polite but 
*' pointed 'questions.,' Among them 


known. 

By its very naiore, the court 
makes a country like the United 
States, with its tradition of judicial 


case against it here. The Reagan 
administration is boycotting only 
the current proceedings. 

The UN General Assembly and 
the Security Council voting inde- 


By Bill Keller 

Nw York Tunes Sertux 

WASHINGTON — Caspar W. 


independence, more vulnerable pen^uy choose the judge from Weinberger, the U.S. defense secre- 
than other countries. a jj s , ^ candidate nominated by t“y. has urged that the United 

“It can certainly be said that government-appointed national State reduce the number of Soviet 
those stale that have adhered to groups of law experts. citizens it allows 10 work and travel 

■L. — r ... C I • .1 in I Inilnt Cl.lH in Anlfl, In 


the court's compulsory jurisdiction 
are at a comparative disadvan- 


"Many countne jui 
the World Court, but 


tage.” Judge Schwebel said at the allow themselves to be ju 


start of the current case, “because expert on international law. who 1116 defense secretary, speaking 
the states that have adhered can be acWsrf not to be identified, said, at a news conference Thursday, the 
summoned to the court to account Those countries are Algeria, China, day after his department released a 
for their actions." France, the Soviet Union, Poland, SUid y detailing a widespread Soviet 

Nicaragua is using mostly Amer- Italy, Brazil and Argentina. quest For American military teefa- 


dtizens it allows to work and travel 
others at ^ the United Stales in order to 
d 0 qoi curtail Soviet collection of U.S. 
&L? ^ military technology, 
v who The defense secretary, speaking 


ican lawyers, calling largely on 
American witnesses and using evi- 


In its more than 60 years, the 
World Court has resolved nmner- 


dence drawn from public American ous commercial or boundary dis- 


Ion Fraud (1 

jury returned a B* 
>rean, the former «« 
ctilhon. T'.S. Auorani 

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AMERICAN 

TOPICS 


- ■-? 


Tho New Yort Taoi 

Left, Ronald Reagan as George Gipp in 
“Knute Rockne, All American,” and below, 
with Aon Sheridan in “King’s Row.” Top 
right, Clint Eastwood in “Sudden Impact” 
Top left, Sylvester Stallone as Rambo. 


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Where Reagan Gets 
All Those Good lines 

“1 am paying for this micro- 
phone,” Ronald Reagan told his 
rivals in the 1980 presidential 
, primary debate in New Hamp- 
shire. 

“Where do we find such 
men? " he asked in a ceremony 
co mmemor ating the Americans 
killed on D-Day. 

Both remarks are Hues from 
old filmsj “State of the Union” 
and “The Bridges at Toko-RL" 
Mr. Reagan appeared in neither. 
But Michael Rogin, a professor 
of political science at the Univer- 
sity of California at Berkeley, 
says that the president uses lines 
from films whether he was in 
themornoL _ . 

Mr. . Rogin noted that Mr. 
R fag fln invoked a Sylvester Stal- 
lone film in discussing the recent 
American hostage ensis in Bcs- 
nit: “I saw ‘Rambo last night, 
and next time HI know what to 

da” He answered criticism of his 
■ tax plan by challenging critics to 

“make my day,” from Clint 
Eastwood’s “Sudden Impact." 

The president's most famous 
line. “Win one for the Gippcr. 
was one of his own, from “Knute 
Rockne, All American.” So was 
lhe title, of his autobiography, 
“Where's the rest of mef from 
i “Kings Row.” 

Mr. Rogin said Mr. Reagan 


H. 

hr-T*.? 


said, “What he's really saying is 
that all of ns are deeply affected 
by a uniquely American art 
form: the movies." 

Short Takes 

In a voice vote, the Senate has 
chosen the rose as the national 
flower. Other Dowers suggested 
over the years included the sun- 
flower, violet, carnation and the 
marigold. The rose resolution 
now goes to the House, and if 
passed, to Mr. Reagan, who may 
well choose the obvious place to 
agn it: the White House Rose 
Garden. 

The first Arab astronaut says 
his space trip strengthened ms 
belief in the need for world 
peace. Prince Sultan Salman al 
Sand of Saudi .Arabia, who rode 
on the U.S. shuttle Discovery in 
June with U.S. and French crew 
mates, said, “On the first and 
second day of the flight, we were 
all noticing our countries, saying 
That’s my home/ By the third 
day you see only continents. By 
the fifth day, you see only the 
Earth — it becomes one place, 
your home.” 

Shorter Takes: Within the 
next 10 years, the number of law- 
yers in lhe United States is ex- 
pected 10 grow to 930,000 — 
Sout 255,000, or 38 percent, 
more than now. Thai means one 


has “inerjpd his pn-screen Md 

off-screea identities. compared to one for every354 

Dolan, a White Houscsp^n- B comparison, France 

writer, when asked to comaicm. J ^ — 




has one member of the legal pro- 
fession for every 2,500 people. 
. . . California is worldtte toward 
the establishment of a Japan ese- 
Amezican history museum in the 
Utile Tokyo, neighborhood of 
Los Angeles. Sponsors say one 
function of the museum mil be 
to remind people erf die 120,000 
Japanese- Americans who spent 
World War II in U.S. internment 
camps. 


Visit North Dakota, 
Not So Bad Lands 

South Dakota has Mount 
Rnshmore, the Black Hills and 
the southern Badlands; North 
Dakota has the northern Bad- 
lands, once described as “hell 
with the fires out," and not a lot 
more to attract tourists. Even so, 
the state is putting up billboards 
to explain why travelers who are 
heading somewhere else should 
stop and look around. 

Sample signs: “Stay in North 
Dakota; Custer Was Healthy 
When He Left” and “Stay in 
North Dakota: Montana Is 
Closed This Week." 

The campaign was inspired by 
Lloyd Omoahl of the University 
of North Dakota, who dreamed 
up: "Isn't This The Flattest 
Place You've Ever Seen?" and 
“You Are Now Entering Minne- 
sota. Why?" 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


quest for American military’ tech- 
nology. said that the number of 
Russians in the United States was 
“Car out of proportion" to the num- 
ber of Americans in the Soviet 
Union. 

Mr. Weinberger asserted that 
“the Soviets don’t send people to 
countries like the United States un- 
less they are fully equipped, fully 
trained, and either part of the 
KGB, or might j’ust as well be." 

He renewed his charge that Sovi- 
et troops in East Germany deliber- 
ately rammed a U.S. patrol vehicle 
earlier, this month, brushing aside 
efforu by State Department and 
Pentagon spokesmen to play down 
the incident. 

After Mr. Weinberger first de- 
scribed the incident on television 
Sunday, other administration offi- 
cials said that he had overdrama- 
tized it 

The incident involved a Soviet 
truck sideswiping an American 
jeep beside a road near a Soviet 
communications center. State De- 
partment and Pentagon officials 
said Monday that the Russians' in- 
tentions in the episode were not 
dear. 

On Thursday, Mr. Weinberger 
said: The word 'intentional' was 
used a few days ago. It's used again 
today. I don’t think it could be any 
other way." 

The Stele Department said that 
Moscow has about 980 diplomats 
and staff members in the United 
States, counting those al the Unit- 
ed Nations or on temporary assign- 
ments, while the Americans have 
about 260 in the Soviet Union. 

The State Department says that 
one large reason for the difference 
is that die Soviet Embassy in Wash- 
ington and the Soviet Consulate in 
San Francisco have 153 Russians 
who serve in such jobs as secretar- 
ies and as maintenance workers, 
while the US. Embassy in Moscow 
and the consulate in Leningrad rdy 
on Soviet employees to do those 
jobs. 

The Soviet Union also has 90 
journalists and commercial repre- 
sentatives, compared to 62 for the 
United States. 

■ KGB Arrests Alleged Spy 

The KGB announced Friday the 
arrest of a Soviet citizen who it 
claimed was passing military se- 
crets to a U.S. diplomat working 
for the Central Intelligence Agen- 
cy, wire services reported. 

The Soviet intelligence agency 
identified the man as A.G. Tolka- 
chev, a staff member at a Moscow 
research institute, the news agency, 
Tass, said. “The spy was caught m 
the act during an attempt to pass 
on secret materials of a defense 
nature to Paul M. Stombaugh, an 
officer of the U.S. CIA,” the KGB 
said. Mr. Stombaugh, who worked 
in the U.S. Embassy’s political sec- 
tion, was ordered out of the Soviet 
• Union on June 14. 

.In Athens, Greek officials said 
Friday that a Soviet diplomat and 
two Soviet trade delegates who 
were believed to have had contacts 
with three Greeks charged with 
spying for Moscow have been re- 
called to the Soviet Union. On 
Thursday, Greek officials lodged 
an official complaint to Moscow. 

(AP, VP I) 


Senate Backs 
Legalisation 
Of Many 
Aliens in U.S. 


By Mary Thorncon 

ltttl hifKInn fini Serrtte 

.WASHINGTON —The Senate 
has approved a landmark revision 
of U.S. immigration laws that 
would gram amnesty to those who 
entered the country illegally before 
Jan. 1, 1980. and provide avil and 
criminal penalties for employers 
who knowingly hire illegal aliens. 

The vote Thursday, after seven 
days of debate, was 69-30. 

The legislation now moves to the 
House, where a Judiciary subcom- 
mittee began hearings last week on 
its version. 

The Senate approved immigra- 
tion packages in 1982 and 1983. 
The House passed a companion bill 
last year, but it died in conference 
committee in the final days of the 
Congress. 

This year, the House Judiciary 
C ommitiee chairman. Peter W. Ro- 
dino Jr., Democrat of New Jersey, 
has become the chief sponsor of the 
House bill and has promised a 
timely hearing process. 

But the House majority leader, 
Jim Wrighti Democrat of Texas, 
predicted Thursday that the bill 
would not make it to the House 
floor until next year. 

The most controversial portion 
of the bill is a program to admit up 
to 350.000 foreign agricultural 
workers to pick perishable fruits 
and vegetables. 

In its revised form, the bill calls 
for the program to end in three 
years unless Congress revives it. 
The foreign-workers program orig- 
inally was proposed by Senator 
Pete' Wilson. Republican of Cali- 
fornia. 

Mr. Rodino has said that be op- 
poses the provision and will work 
to keep it out of the House bi)L 

Under the Senate bill, employers 
found to habitually hire illegal 
aliens could face criminal penalties 
including six-month prison sen- 
tences and fines of up to 510.000 
per alien worker. 

The Senate adopted an amend- 
ment by Senator Edward M. Ken- 
nedy. Democrat of Massachusetts, 
allowing Congress to phase out the 
sanctions after three years if the 
Genera) Accounting Office finds 
that they result in “widespread” 
discrimination against Hispanics 
and others of foreign descent who 
are in the United Slates legally. 

A program would be guaranteed 
within three years to legalize the 
status of illegal aliens who have 
lived continuously in the United 
States since Jan. I. 1980. The gov- 
ernment would provide up to $3 
billion in funding to the states over 
six years to offset the costs of social 
services to the newly legalized 
aliens. 

The Immigration and Natural- 
ization Service has estimated that 
more than two million aliens could 
obtain legalized status under the 
Senate bill. Many more would 
qualify under the House bib, which 
would give legal status to aliens 
who entered the country before 
Jan. 1, 1982. 

■ Senate Panel Votes Farm Bffl 

Ward Sinclair of The Washington 
Post reported earlier: 

The Senate Agriculture Commit- 
tee has approved a four-year farm 
bill that drew an iramediaie warn- 
ing of a presidential veto over its 
cost. 

The majority leader. Robert J. 
Dole, Republican of Kansas, was 
among those who voted Thursday 
night for final passage of the bill. 
He said it would go to the Senate 
hoor in two weeks, but that its cost 
must be cut if it is to win White 
House approval. 

The measure would run about 
SI 1 billion over a budget limit of 
$34.8 billion, according to the Con- 
gressional Budget Office, and as 
much as S19 bulion over by Agri- 
culture Department calculations. 

The panel voted, 10-6, to send 
the bill to the floor after debating 
for months over loan levels for 
farm-price supports and provisions 
to protect farmers’ income. 

The key break came when the 
committee voted, 10-7, for an 
amendment by Senator John Mel- 
cber, Democrat erf Montana, to 
freeze direct subsidy payments to 
fanners at current levels for four 
years. The administration has op- 
posed the freeze, which analysts say 
would cost another 51 billion. 

The bill generally would lower 
price-support loan rates for wheat, 
com, cotton, rice, peanuts and sug- 
ar while holding the income-subsi- 
dy payments at current levels. 
Wheat farmers would get to vote 
for mandatory production con- 
trols. 


U.S. to Add 1,000 
Air Controllers 

»> ushinguvi Post S enure 

WASHINGTON —Transporta- 
tion Secretary Elizabeth H. Dote 
has announced that the Federal 
Aviation Administration will add 
about 1,000 air traffic controllers 
and 500 safety inspectors. 

Mrs. Dole said she expected to 
add approximately 480 controllers 
in fiscal 1986, which begins Oct 1. 
and 480 in 1987. The FAA now has 
about 14,000 controllers. By the 
end of 1987 the agency hopes to 
have 15,000 controllers, about 
1,000 fewer than when the Profes- 
sional Air Traffic Controllers Or- 
ganization struck in 1981 and Res- 
ident Ronald Reagan fired 11.400 
of its members. 

It takes two to three years to 
train a controlJer, and only 60 per- 
cent of the FAA's controllers are 
considered fully qualified. 


Reagan Will Emphasize SDI 
In Gorbachev Talks, Aide Says 


By Bernard Wcinraub 

.V<nr York Times Sen tee 

WASHINGTON — A senior 
White House official says that 
President Ronald Reagan plans to 
make his space-based defense pro- 
gram a central theme of his meeting 
ra November with Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev. the Soviet leader. 

The official said Thursday that 
Mr. Reagan would seek to center 
the discussions on the Strategic De- 
fense Initiative, rather than on nu- 
clear offensive weapons. 

“We will tell them that there is a 
new technology here which may 
give us a different way of doing 
things better." the official said. He 
said Mr. Reagan would “point out 
that the underlying premises on 
which offensive deterrence is 
founded has been undermined.” 

The comments, during a brief- 
ing, made it plain that the president 
was adamant about not negotiating 
a deal with the Soviet Union on 
space weapons. 

In a news conference Tuesday. 
Mr. Reagan ruled out any deal by 
which the United States would for- 
go development and testing of the 
space-based system in exchange for 
deep cuts in Soviet offensive nucle- 
ar missiles. 


The senior White House official 
said the president would seek to 
discuss a “strategy that defends 
and does oot threaten anyone.” 

“He will say. ‘WiU it not be bet- 
ter to adopt a' system that does noi 
involve any threats at all?”’ the 
aide said. 

In focusing on the space-based 
approach, Mr. Reagan will move 
away from the limitation of offen- 
sive 'weapons, the traditional con- 
cern of arms control. 

The Strategic Defense Initiative, 
which would rely mostly on space- 
based weapons to shoot down in- 
coming missiles, has become the 
Russians' chief target in the Gene- 
va arms negotiations, which re- 
opened Thursday. 

■ ABM Pact Questioned 

David Hoffman of The Washing- 
ton Post reported from Washington: 

In his briefing Thursday, tire se- 
nior administration official also 
said that a major Soviet arms build- 
up raises serious questions about 
the value of the 1972 treaty that 
bans most defensive strategic 
weapons. 

The aide said “it might be wise” 
to modify the Anti- Ballistic Missile 
Treaty in the years after President 
Reagan leaves office. 


The United States “simply may 
not be able to deal adequately with 
its defense" given the scale of the 
Soviet buildup, the official said. 

When combined with what the 
United States believes to be Soviet 
“violations of that treaty," the aide 
said, its value is “very much in 
question.” 

The official said the current level 
of research on the missile defease 
program could continue for several 
years with existing treaty restraints, 
as Mr. Reagan has pledged to do. 

The United States believes scene 
testing of the space-based program 
is permitted under the treaty, the 
official said. That position is chal- 
lenged by the Russians and by 
some American specialists. 

The ABM treaty bans tests of 
any space-based or air-based anti- 
missile system or component of a 
system, and precludes the introduc- 
tion -of new technology without 
new negotiations. 

The official said the Soviets have 
expressed interest in revising some 
aspects of the 1972 treaty. Another 
official said later this interest by 
Moscow was clearly designed to 
limit U.S. testing of the Reagan 
space-based defense program, not 
io permit testing of iL 


U.S. Shot Down 'Useful* Satellite 


By Walter Pincus 

H \iiZnnpoo Pent Service 

WASHINGTON — The Solwind satellite de- 
stroyed last Friday during the first test of a U.S. 
anti-satellite weapon was providing “very useful 
data” on solar activity until the moment u was hiL 
according to astrophysicists who were surprised 
and upset at seeing a fruitful experiment used as a 
military target. 

Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger as 
recently as Thursday referred to the target as a 
“burned -out satellite” 

But a physicist. Robert M. MacQueen, director 
of the high-altitude observatory of the National 
Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado, 
said Thursday that it was “deplorable” that the 
Pentagon “had taken a scientifically useful tiling 
and sacrificed it in this way." 

The satellite carried seven experiments imo 
space six years ago for the Naval Research Labora- 
tory and other government agencies. One experi- 
ment used a coronagraph that sent images to Earth 
of activity on the surface of the sun during each of 
the satellite's orbits, or roughly 15 times a day, 
several astrophysicists said. 

Several months ago. scientists of the Naval Re- 
search Laboratory were asked to draft what a 
source said “they thought was a routine paper to 
justify continued operation of their coronagraph.” 
They' acknowledged problems with the spacecraft, 
the source said, but wrote that it should continue. 

In July, however, they were told that “the satel- 
lite would be turned off sometime after Aug. 1, but 
they weren’t told how." the source said. 

Solwind became the target for the anti-satellite 
test after the original target, an instrumented bal- 
loon. became plagued with technical problems. 


The air force has another satellite. Solar Max, 
that was launched in 1980. 

Solar Max imagery covers a smaller area of the 
sun’s surface, one scientist said, and lacks the 
historic data base associated with the Solwind 
experiment. 

Several scientists familiar with Solwind and So- 
lar Max said Thursday that they were “different, 
but complementary.” 

“I t would be wrong to say they were redundant," 
a scientist added. Another criticized Pentagon as- 
sertions that Solwind was defunct as “hardly trust- 
worthy." 

Mr. MacQueen. whose organization designed 
Solar Max and runs it for the air force, said that the 
continuous observations of the Solwind satellite, 
stretching from a period of maximum solar activity 
in 1980 through minimal activity recently, were 
very valuable. 

He said the data has been sought by the air force 
to determine the effect of the sun's surface activi- 
ties on the upper atmosphere and particularly on 
telecommunications. 

[The Pentagon acknowledged Friday that a sci- 
entific satellite used as the target for an anti- 
satellite weapon last week was still providing some 
useful information at the time of us destruction. 
The Associated Press reported from Washington. 

[Robert B. Sims, the Pentagon’s chief spokes- 
man. nonetheless defended the selection of the 
Solwind satellite as the target for the anti-satellite 
weapon, saying it was definitely failing and was 
“expected to expire at any time. 

[“Thai particular spacecraft had not fared well,” 
Mr. Sims said. “Termination of satellite support 
would have been required in early 1987 in any 
event. But the fact is. we expected it to expire at 
my lime."] 


U.S. Military, Media Test Combat Coverage 


By Michael Wines 

Lns A nuclei Tunes Service 

FORT CAMPBELL. Kentucky 
— The Pentagon, in a sharply 
scaled-back test of cooperation be- 
tween the military and the media in 
combat news coverage, secretly 
flew 12 American reporters to an 
army base on the Kentucky-Ten- 
nes see border to observe infantry 
maneuvers. 

The tests Thursday grew out of 
acrimonious sparring that followed 
tite U.S. invasion of Grenada 23 
months ago. when the Pentagon 
refused to allow news coverage of 
the initial assault on the island. 

Last year, the Pentagon an- 
nounced that it would establish a 
pooling system in which selected 
reporters would cover an engage- 
ment and share the information 
with other members of the media. 

In the Kentucky test, army and 
air force troops “rescued” a mythi- 
cal Latin American nation seem- 
ingly modeled after Grenada and 
Nicaragua. It bore little likeness to 
a test lift April during an exercise 
in Honduras, which was disclosed 
to the public almost before it be- 
gan. 

Pentagon officials said they were 
pleased with Thursday’s test “This 
time, in contrast to the Iasi one. I 
think things are proceeding as 
planned,” said Colonel Dante A. 
Cami a, who supervised the news 
operation. 

He conceded that the second tri- 
al was far less ambitious than the 
effort in April which involved 
overseas travel and complicated lo- 
gistics and communications. 

The 20-hour test Thursday, in 
which 12 reporters observed ma- 
neuvers by 4,000 troops of the 


army's elite 101st Airborne Divi- 
sion. went smoothly. 

The maneuvers involved an 
American invasion of a mythical 
country. Sarin a, run by an unpopu- 
lar Marxist government that was 


holding U.S. medical students hos- 
tage. 

The students were rescued and 
U.S. forces stayed on to “stabilize" 
the country and repel forces from a 
neighboring Marxist nation. 


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Page 4 


SATUBDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 21-22, 1985 


Heralh 


INTERNATIONAL 


PoUisfacd Wah TV New York Tune* Mad Tbe WaMogton Port 


Tribune AIDS: a Plague to TW Big Mon^At 


XT EW YORK - Doctors know 
IN relatively little about AIDS. 


By Bene Barth 


' Sear Wars’: 
Newfangled 




America, Debtor Nation iSS aSSK m the. 

Stnte&_ That too. is a fact cal over it: junkies.. Shared needles 


That is a fact The number of cases of 
acquired immune deficiency syn- 
drome has doubled annually since 


have given AIDS to their wives; ba- 
bies have been born with it 
One group that does, not seem to be 


The Commerce Department took official 
notice this week of a symbolic event in Ameri- 
ca's economic life. Some time a few months 
ago. it has now been confirmed, U.S. public 
and private investments abroad no longer ex- 
ceeded Lbe value of foreign holdings of the 
country's public and private assets. In that 
sense. America became a debtor nation. 

Joining the ranks of the world's Micawbers 
has no immediate consequence for the Ameri- 
can people. There is no debtor’s prison for- 
nations. The change in slams should not can™ 
the country to hold its head less high in the 
councils of nations, even if, as is expected, the 
United States displaces Brazil as the world’s 
largest debtor. Nor is it in any way likely that 
foreign investors will suddenly liquidate their 
U.5. holdings, leaving the United States 
scrambling to pay off its fordgn debts. 

The significance of lbe debt measure is that 
ii takes broad account of the U.S. economic 
position vis-a-vis the rest of lbe world. As 
President Reagan suggested at his press con- 
ference on Tuesday, the merchandise trade 
deficit, the focal point of recent concern, does 
not tell the whole story. The United Slates 
could afford to go on importing far more 
goods — shoes, dresses, tape recorders, auto- 
mobiles and so on — than it is able to export if 
that merchandise unbalance were offset by 


surpluses in service exports or returns from 
U.S. investments abroad. The trouble, which 
the president did not acknowledge, is that the 
huge merchandise deficits have overwhelmed 
surpluses in the service accounts- As a result, 
America has been amassing foreign debt. 

The cost of paying interest and other mums 
to the foreign holders of that debt further 
aggravates the current balan ce-of-payments 
problem, since the United States can no longer 
depend on net returns from its fordgn invest- 
ments to help offset trade deficits. In the long 
term, that means that the country may have to 
sacrifice some of its standard of living to 
finance its foreign obligations. 

As Mr. Reagan observed, the United States 
grew and prospered as a debtor nation in the 
19th century, when it imported huge amounts 
of foreign capital and labor to exploit its 
enormous resource base — an investment that 
paid off handsomely both in America and 
abroad. The difference now is that capital 
formation at home has not, at least so far, beat 
commensurate with the inflow of foreign capi- 
tal Instead much of the recent fordgn borrow- 
ing has gone to finance private consumption 
through tax cuts, and public consumption 
through government spending. In a very real 
sense, the country is borrowing from its future. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


When a reporter asked President Reagan at 
his news conference this week whether he was 
disturbed that America had become a debtor 
nation, Mr. Reagan was well primed. Why, 
that conveys a false impression, he said. If 
foreigners are investing more in America than 
they borrow, it is not a sign of weakness but a 
vote of confidence in the American economy. 

That is how it worked in the 19th century, 
when the United States emerged as a great 
economic power. That is how it is working 
□ow, as foreigners buy stocks and bonds in 
dollars “because we are the best and safest 
investment in the world.” Mr. Reagan is right 
in believing that the United States could not 
become a debtor nation unless foreigners 
wanted to buy and bold a piece of the Ameri- 
can rock. And he is probably right (hat some of 
that inflow is explained by the belief that 
dollar assets are safer than the alternatives. 

But he glossed over the aspect of America’s 
slide into debt that is truly disquieting: The 


policies that have taken it there are destroying 
markets for efficient American producers and 


markets for efficient American producers and 
setting the stage for a lower standard of living. 

In the 19th century, everyone benefited 
from European investment in America. The 
Europeans got a higher return than from com- 
parably risky projects at home. American busi- 
ness was able to expand more rapidly than 
would have been possible with access only to 
domestic savings. The wealth generated by 
foreign investments in American railroads, 
factories and mines far exceeded the debt. 
If foreign capital once again represented the 


icing on a large and bountiful investment cake, 
there would be little to worry about. 

In fact, however, fordgn investment is sim- 
ply filling the hole left as the federal govern- 
ment sucks up private savings to cover its own 
budget defidL When the time comes to return 
the capital with interest. Americans will be left 
with less to invest and consume. 

That future burden is growing at an aston- 
ishing rate. By the estimate of the Business 
Roundtable, the net debt of the United States 
to foreigners under current policies is likely 
to reach SI trillion in 1990. 

Would America be better off without (he 
influx of European and Japanese investments? 
Cutting off fordgn capital without increasing 
the amount generated at home would force 
businesses, households and government to bid 
for slices of a smaller pie. The competition 
would raise interest rates or ignite inflation or 
both. On the other hand, if Washington came 
to grips with the deficit and thus freed domes- 
tic savings for private productive uses, Ameri- 
cans would no longer need to mortgage the 
future to foreigners in order to pay today's 
bills. Reducing the demand for foreign capital 
moreover, would reduce the exchange value of 
the dollar. That, in turn, would allow efficient 
American fanners and manufacturers to win 
back their place in world markets. 

Debts to foreigners are not in themselves 
ominous. What counts is how the foreign capi- 
tal is being used. By that test, the rush of 
foreign investment is plainly a threat. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Serious Textbooks, Please 


America’s textbook war has taken a new 
turn. Only a few years ago the creationists 
were on the attack.’ Mel and Norma Gabler, 
the Texan couple who have made a career of 
reviewing textbooks, inspired Texas in 1974 to 
require that high school biology textbooks 
mention evolution as “only one of several 
explanations of the origins of mankind" To 
that command textbook publishers sat up and 
saluted Texas purchases textbooks on a state- 
wide basis; with the second highest number of 
students of any state, it is a huge market. 

But last summer the Texas board of educa- 
tion voted 23 to 2 to repeal the one-of-several- 
explanations rule. And two weeks ago Califor- 
nia's board of education rejected more than 20 
textbooks. The state superintendent of public 
instruction, elected in 1982 on a back- to- basics 
platform, charged publishers with “watering 
down books and lowering standards because 
they think that's what the market wants." and 
he promised more rejections. “It's not just 
science bodes. It’s history, literature." Califor- 
nia buys 1 1 percent of America's textbooks; it 


is the one market that is bigger than Texas. 

Ii is dismaying to see political officials in the 
business of textbook election and editing; 
however good their intentions, the results too 
often make education insipid Consider the 
school boards that try to keep pupils from 
reading "Huckleberry Finn,” or the company 
that took ‘‘ice cream" out of the title of a short 
story because it seemed to advocate junk food 
But if there is going to be intervention, then 
it should be based on the principles that Cali- 
fornia seems to be acting on. The Californians 
are not trying to impose their personal views 
but rather to apply rigorous intellectual tests 
to the textbooks. Are they accurate? Do they 
fairly and fully represent the best of human 
learning? Or do they suppress or misrepresent 
scientific theory in order to ernry favor with 
particular political constituencies? 

The textbook war is not over, but this latest 
turn in it is welcome for telling publishers that 
publishing intellectually rigorous texts is, in 
the long run, the best way to do business. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Reagan Overrides the Doublers 


It was reassuring to hear President Reagan 
state so emphatically again that the SDI is not 
negotiable during its research and develop- 
ment phase. The president has been persistent- 
ly let down by his bureaucracy, meetly in the 
State Department. Some members of the nego- 
tiating team at Geneva are also to blame. 


These officials have been determined to turn 
the SDI program into a bargaining chip. They 
have misrepresented the president all along. 
This official subversion in the administration 
goes deeper, by casting doubts on the technical 
feasibility of the SDI program when all the 
available achievements of the last two years 
show its increasing potential 

— The Times (London). 


FROM OUR SEPT. 21 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Qiiitt Seeking U.S. Support 
PARIS — Again and again evidence has been 
offered that these are the days of American 
opportunity in China. It is regarded as unfor- 
tunate by many that the traditional policy of 
the United States compels the most cautious 
consideration of China's manifest desire to 
find a supporter in her struggle for advance- 
ment and security. At any rate the American 
public is doubtless prepare! for the news that 
the visit of Prince Tsai-Hsun to the United 
Slates is generally regarded in China as of 
greater importance than the official announce- 
ments would indicate. It is intimated in Peking 
that the two purposes of the prince's visit are 
to sound Washington relative to “an alliance 
or the closest understanding," and to consult 
financial interests on loan for railroads, inter- 
nal development and naval reforms. 


1935: War Specter Realigns Markets 
NEW YORK — Convincing signs that people 
on the American side of the Atlantic are begin- 
ning to take seriously the threat of war in 
Africa and the Mediterranean appeared [on 
Sept 20]. Perhaps the most important reaction 
was reflected in the commodity and security 
markets. Cotton and copper, both important 
war materials, showed gains. More evidence 
was reflected in the flight of capital from 
Europe; including the shifting of more than 
58,000,000 of presumably boarded gold from 
London to New York. Gold movements have 
reached such proportions that all available 
space on liners has been booked several days 
ahead. With the insurance companies no long- 
er willing to quote firm rates for gold insur- 
ance, it was expected that nervousness in the 
fordgn exchange market would increase. 


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© 1985, International Haw Tribune. All rights reserved. 



Rights of privacy may 
need to yield to 


United States. Thai too, is a fact. cal over it: junkies.. Shared needles straw. The 
If the current rate of increase con- put heroin addicts at great risk. Even memb^s (i 

tinued, the entire American popula- 

don would be wiped out in 15 years. 

That is speculation. Mights oj privacy may 

No one wants the public to panic , -j i . 

art; the AIDS researchers, not gov- need tO yield to 

SSSS nantlko'mmum 

topreventlhevpread . 

Now for the good news. Most of thisiKWlddsue. 

AIDS authorities believe that the rate 4 ° 

of spread will slow down considera- 
bly-- although not in the next year people with Utile sympathy for ad- 
or two They believe this because diets must realize that addicts can 
blood screening has virtually elimi- spread AIDS sexually or in utero. 


sharing or in timate a mial COntatf- 

Those who kissed presumably went 
farther, so no one can say certainly 
that a kiss is dangerous, or a shared 
straw. The good health of family 
members (who are act spouses) erf 
AIDS victims is the best news, so far. 

Still, we are not talking about a 
common cold. We are talking about 
an incurable, fatal disease. 

If I had an AIDS-afflicted child. 


165160 ,h lv should not v . 

SSS&sC: Boomerang 

IhSc health plannersccadd use V 

"?RSS I 2 55w child By David S. Broder 

■ md> ehraild attend SChOOl ninnTe 


jcietstrJSttdy 


whether an AIDS adult awuw £ T Rcagai , right 

Ilf’S 5!£f«raS 

or in a restaurant Ot^ agree with him aboai*. . 

ten for courts to deadc. These are uomS m. umcrsjw Defenw*' 

sstwwsssssaA 


restrictive measures 


to prevent the spread 
of this new plague. 


or two. They believe this because 
blood screening has virtually elimi- 
nated AIDS-contaminated blood 
from blood banks, and freewheeling 
sex appears to be a waning sport 

Call it panic. Call it self-preserva- 
tion. The segment of society that has 
so far been most vulnerable to AIDS 
is wary. Homosexual men are choos- 
ing partners and practices with great- 
er care. So are single women. 

There are no guarantees. AIDS is a 

disease that can be sexually transmit- 
ted by someone who does not know 
that he or she is afflicted. Husbands 


' child. I ’would rather have my child at 
home or in a quarantined learning 
situation while I prayed far doctors 
to come up with a cure. . 

Some children are rfragnowri as 
pre-AIDS. In the few years since the 
disease has come to light, some pre- 


S topping the sexual transmission AIDS children have succumbed to it, 
of AIDS would seem a herculean en- others have not — so far. Are all 


of AIDS would seem a herculean en- 
deavor in itself. But now some of the 
good people of Queens and of Kako- 


others have not — so far. Are all 
infectious? No one knows. 

Blood tests can now establish 


mo, Indiana, and of a thousand else- whether a person has AIDS, has de- 
wheres are worried about wiping the vdoped anti- AIDS virus (presum- 


tears of an AIDS-infected c lassmate 
of their child, or having their child 
share a Coke with an AIDS child. 

It is not a crazy worry. The virus 
has been found in tears and saliva. 


ably from exposure to the AIDS vi- 
rus) or is AIDS-free. Doctors da not 

AIDS virus, but ‘m^vi^^have the 
right to know if they currently ran 


Doctors assure us that all the cases some or no risk of the disease. It 
so far traced originated via blood- might be wise to have all Americans 


yield to restrictive measures to pre- 
sent the spread of this ncw plague. 
Quarantine as public policy ought 

not to be considered h^gf. We need 

to know more about AIDS as quickly 
as possible. It is a threat that the 
government should throw money at. 
More researchers need to look 
through the microscope and beyond 
it, at the diseased and at the healthy. 
And research must extend beyond 
the United Stares — particularly to 
Zaire, where AIDS is rampaging. 

There have been 13,228 confirmed 
r-flcpt: in the United Sta tes . The death 
roll rises daily. AIDS —or our igno- 
rance about its potential — may be 
the most potent threat our nation 
faces. Where is our defense against it? 

Newsday. 


. juctifv one is flatly contraoK 

““XSooalefortfcotev 


ed bv the raoouiuc :;v 
He says you cannot build uadf- 
harriers at wur borders without id*; - 

viting retaliation, but yon can 

r tma* in Space and no one* 


nuclear fence in space 
Sd mind. That does not compute^. 

M his first formal newsconf^. 
since his summer illness. Mr. Reaglti; 
Sdon Tuesday that protections^ 
because u invites relate* : 


dangerous because it bvww. 

tiem by trading partners- 

on his side. As he said, the mag 


Protectionism 
Could Explode 
A Debt Bomb 




By Tom Wicker 

N EW YORK — The “mindless stampede to 
protectionism" against which President 
Reagan warned at his news conference on Tues- 
day probably would be aimed mostly at Japan — 
but the Latin American debtor nations could 
well be among its major victims, with grim con- 
sequences for Latin democracy, hemispheric se- 
curity and the U.S. banking system. 

These Latin nations, moreover, are already in 
deep trouble, belying glib assurances that the 
“debt crisis" has been eliminated by austerity 
measures and loan “restructuring." Even Mexi- 
co, which had been the regional leader in harsh 
self -disciplinary measures — most recently a new 
devaluation of the peso since midterm erections 
last summer — had announced before this week’s 
catastrophic earthquake that it would require S2 
billion to S3 billion in new foreign loans m 1986. 
Yet Mexico's foreign debt had risen from $90.6 
billion in 1983 to $95.2 billion today. 

Some U.S. bankers were saying that, despite 
its efforts, Mexico had not sufficiently improved 
its economic structure and practices to warrant 
the new loans, and that further austerity mea- 
sures, under the supervision of the International 
Monetary Fund, would have to be imposed be- 
fore new loans could be granted. But the real 
question may have been whether Mexico could 
sustain the unpopular steps it already had taken. 

Peru's new president, Alan Garcia Perez, has 
already announced that his country would pay 
only 10 percent of its export earnings this year 
against its 514-billion external debL That is a 
course that other Latin leaders may find them- 
selves under pressure to emulate. Brazil, with a 
foreign debt of more than 5100 billion and a frail 
new civilian government, might yet welcome 
some alternative to IMF-imposal austerity. 







protectionist measure in recent . 
American history, the Smooi-Hawl^ 
Tariff AcL was so disruptive of mw-* 
national trade that historians 
it substantial blame for thc GrcaS 
DeoressiOG that began in 1929. 

In another breatnTMr- 

butted the critics of “sarwara wte 
contend that it will spend \ ***“£- 
race to the heavens. Not so, saidjg 
president. If research and testify 
Siow the incredibly intricate anti- , 
missile shield to be feasible why then : U- 
all nations, including the 
Union, will see that nuclear weapons 
are futile and will agree to dimming 
existing atomic arsenals. ; 

It is a nice dream, but it is contra^, 
dieted by history and psychotogsi. 
What Mr. Reagan said about 
applies equally to the an us rac e:?'. 
“Protecti onism is a two-way street 

He compared “star wars’* to gas 
masks and anti-aircraft guns. . 

When “we outlawed poison gas m . 
1925,’’ he said, “everyone kept their 
gas madf I think of this weapon as a. : . 
End of gas mask.” But the analogy is']; - 
wrong, Decause there has been no ' 
prior agreement to outlaw nudeafy 
missiles, nor is one in sighL 




' M 

•pumas 


The anti-aircraft gun analogy? 
rhfch he used to emphasize that the 


States, under the domestic political pressure of 
the biggest trade deficit in its history, “stam- 
pedes" to conventional protectionism. That is a 


live threat, given the job losses and declining 
industries that the trade deficit represents, and 
with a congressional election year coming up. 

Protectionist measures would restrict, first, the 
ability of these debtor nations to export their 
goods and commodities to the United States, and . 
thus to eam what they need to repay their debts 
and expand their own economies and living stan- 
dards — already restricted by austerity measures 
like high internal interest rates, increased taxes, 
reduced government spending and lower wages. 

If the Latin nations cannot export and expand 
their economies, moreover, they cannot afford to 
import from the .United States — a necessity if 
the UJ>. trade deficit is to be reduced. 

Worse, as Latin economies stagnate, as the 
living standards of I^tin peoples decline and 
while these nations remain net exporters of badly 
needed capital to pay exorbitant interest on for- 
eign loans (few of them have any present pros- 
pect of repaying principal), they may not be able 
to contain the potential for political upheavaL 

Whether the result was revolt on the left or 
repression from the right, or both, democracy 
would suffer, with damage to regional stability 
and U.S. security. If a radical and anti-American 
government emerged in Mexico, the New York 


Fidd Castro, meanwhile, is actively urging 
a tin nations to repudiate their debts. None of 


Latin nations to repudiate their debts. None of 
them seem likely to lake this advice — but they 


might, if public resistance to austerity and eco- 
nomic recession becomes sufficiently heated. 


oonric recession becomes suffidently heated. 

The precarious position of the debtors will 
become downright dangerous if the United 


investment banker Felix Rohatyn recently paint- 
ed out in a speech to the Southed Governors 
Association, ii would pose “a greater potential 
security problem for theU-S. than anything that 
is likely to happen in El Salvador or Ntcaiagna." 

And if a Latin government repudiated its debt 
to win domestic poetical support — which might 
force other governments to do the same — the 
. US. banking system could beshaken. U.S. banks 
hold about a third of the 5350-bilErai Latin debt, 
some to an extent that exceeds their capital 

These dangers are real, but so is the tide of 
protectionism that Mr. Reagan warned against 
Thus, easing the debt burden on these nations is 
more urgent than ever, before protectionist steps 
can mafe- their debt problems unmanageable. 
Mr. Rohatyn urged what seems deariy to ber in : 
the long-term sdf-intercst of the United States 
and the banks: that they strdch out shorter-term 
Latin loans to 25 or 30 years and cot interest 
rales drastically, in return for World Bank guar- 
antees of the loan prinripal and regulatory rdkf 
for the short-term losses they would aiffcx. 

There is less profit in such a course; but a lot 
more security for everyone involved — the Latin 
debtors, who are also tbe most important Latin 
democracies, the United States, the iudmdnal 
banks and the people and businesses that depend 
on those banks’ stability. 

The New York Times. ■ - 


Sanctions: To Have Leverage You Need the Levers 


J OHANNESBURG — People 
who support economic sanctions 


J who support economic sanctions 
against South Africa generally urge 
them on two basic grounds; that they 
are the most forceful nonviolent ex- 
pression of the abhorrence of apart- 
heid, and that they can be used to 
pressure the South African govern- 
ment into steadily dismantling die 
whole structure of racial segregation 
and minority political control. 


By Howard Preece 


The main sanction prciposals from 
esident Reagan, ana even some of 


President Reagan, and even some of 
the further measures wanted by many 
in the U.S. Congress, are unlikely to 
have a significant additional adverse 
effect on the already depressed South 
African economy. Indeed, events 
have overtaken them in one of the 
most crucial areas — the plan to bar 
U.S. banks from making new loans to 
the South African government or 
publicly owned corporations. 

Restrictions on U.S. computer 
sales to South Africa would be an 
irritation but not much more. The 
same applies to the prohibition of the 
sale of U.S. nudear technology. 

The warning light is there, how- 
ever, for President Pieter W. Botha. 

The problem with American atti- 
tudes on sanctions is that they em- 
brace two contradictory principles. 

On the (me hand there is the stiefc- 
and-carrot Sullivan code. This began 
as an attempt to compel U.S. -owned 
companies operating in South Africa 


weaken the South African economy 
so as to compel eventual capitulation 
by the Afrikaner nationalists who 
control tbe country? In that case the 
logical consequence during the next 
few years would be a severe deterio- 
ration in the living standards and job 
opportunities for blacks. 

Since 1976, the year of the so- 
called Soweto riots. South Africa has 
been starved of long-term direct in- 
vestment capital from abroad. The 
country needs an average annual 
growth rate of at least 5 percent to 
provide jobs for tbe annual rise in the 
work force, never mind cutting back 
on existing unemployment. During 
the past decade tbe rate has been 
about 3 percent because of various 
causes, including theineffiriency that 
apartheid generates along with its in- 
humanity. But the lack of long-tom 


foreign capital has probably been the 
most important single factor. 

The total number of jobless has 
been increasing by about 250,000 a 
year since 1976 and is now generally 
estimated to be dose to 3 muBon. The 
unemployment burden has fallen 
o verwnetimn gly on blacks. Any in- 
tensification of sanctions must surely 
be considered against that back- 
ground. Would it help or hinder tbe 
chance of peaceful reform? 

It is easy to say from a distance 
that this hardship is an acceptable 
price for eventual emancipation. 
Most black workers who have been 
losing theirjobs by the thousands do 
not give the impression of seeing 


nies to dose their doors. It is a differ- 
ent matter for the mass of angry 
Mack youths who have never hadjobs 
to lose. But can racial reccmdliation 
be brought about by making that 
situation even worse? It is surely bet- 
ter to look for alternatives find. 

America must certainly go beyond 
President Reagan's “constructive en- 
gagement.” The president's sanctions 
wifi have the advantage of demon- 
strating mKXpiiyocally rightful detes- 
tation of apartheid in the United 
States. Bui to go much further than 
that at this stage would be to risk 
losing the game by playing too many 
cards at once. Leverage can be exert- 
ed only if there are levers left to ptdL 


things that way. Black trade union 
leaders tend to be ambivalent on the 
divestiture issue, but hardly any of 
(hem are calling for foreign compa- 


-SSSIjtaaDi 


which he used to emphasize that the./ 
f SDI is purely defensive, prpves-ibe - 

opposite of what Mr. Reagan con:. •••' 
tends . The development of ever bet- ; g , . 

. ter anti-aircraft guns did not stop thgy* ■- - , 
t- production of bombers. It accder- 
nr ated- their improvement Nations tor 

al spend to rivals’ improvements in ,<& 
at tensive weapons oy speeding, the ' 

T development of offensive weapons. . ' 
jt ■ The introduction of radar-guided -, 
tu computerized anti-aircraft wtapp&s/ 

ie ‘{some firing heat-seeking gromd-iot;’ \ 
cs air missfies) did not faze the leaders . _ 
it,. of the UJS. Strategic Air Command 
or 'their Soviet countoparts. Instead 
rf it spurred them to build faster, sneak; 

£ ier bombers capable of fraffijog or 
is evading the eqdiny defenses. If -Mr. ' 
e Reagan were right about the psycho- s 
6-: . hjjflcal iriij^ of •*>taf; wfrs,* the 
n ; United Statics would not bcd^jeJop- 
s ing ;the Stealth bomber or.any Other 

n - weapons system designed to over- 
rt . . crane the. latest advances in Soviet' 
r _ defensive technology / _ 
i . The trade malogy holds: Defen- 
sive measures hrnte retortion- Some 
K . . may think: itimfair tocompaieintep- 
a national trade and the ntidear anas 
n race, or draw a parallel between the ^ 
d . balance ofpayments arid tbe balance- “ 
j of terror, mit they arealike.. 

. fi js. ho accident that the word 
“ret^ation” ^h'es m both trade 
discussions arid arms controL Thc 
—i essential pohtkai psychology is'the 
. tome: When a sovereign nation sees 
. its viral interests .threatened by ac- 
l ■ ' X dons ttf 'a rival; its almost inevitable - 
’ • tendency is to increase its own effort, 

, not to back off. No one can imagine 
ler_ that the Soviet Union is less chauvin/ 

^ istK abool sfrategic weapons than ^ 
Japan is about trade, 
v Jqton^and^ "other' '.countries wrih_ 

- whom theUnited States has an wtfa-V 
lct ‘ vorable balance of trade survive rady ' 

; ’ because of their ability to tap into? < ; 
national markets. If the United Stales ' .' 
cn "- imposes tariffs or quotes'. on. theaP- 
305 products, . they ' must respond. Nb . . . 
3n " matter that their own behavior 'tomf 
^ . well justify such action on Ameriigts i r \\ . 

part. If it acts, they must react/; £ ££;= . 
J? Simflariy with the Soviet Unkrrifc/-, 

““ and strategic arms. Ever since Wttefi&ofc 
War n brought massive losses to mST.:- 
Russian people, the first prinqplejfel'; ? 

“* *e Soviet government has beea;w§§4' C/ 

; assure its nnlitaiy parity, if noting//'' 
" pronacy. To suppose that the Sayifirjr/ ' 


Fijrli 
(>i{! 
In f X 


But Yes , Economic Sanctions Do Work 

J EW YORK — The debate over By David A. Baldwin . not destroy apartheid, but they ecu] 

n l > *> • • - *1 » mfltrmnfrA tv> lliAt and 


N EW YORK — Tbe debate over 
South Africa a gain raises the 
question of whether economic sanc- 
tions work. Each time the United 
States considers them, pundits flood 
the public with reminders about the 
League or Nations and Ethiopia, the 
oil embargo against Japan in 1941,25 


to comply with comparatively high years of trade restrictions against 
minimum standards in pay, condi- Cuba and the United Nations sanc- 
tions and opportunities for black tions against Rhodesia. President 


workers. It has since been extended 
to a demand for direct commitments 
from those companies to work for 
fundamental political reform. 

The code has had its successes. The 
American Chamber of Commerce in 
South Africa reckons that a dear ma- 
jority of UJ3. firms have gone along 
with iL Black pay in these companies 
has risen about 20 percent annually 
in the past five years — about a 30- 
percent real rise after inflation. 

But this has to be seen against the 
second dement in the sanctions de- 
bate. Is theofcgect to create change by 
actively promoting the economic ad- 
vancement of blacks? That can be 
aided from the American side only by 
an appreciable business relationship 
with South Africa. The existing rela- 
tionship appears, for example, to 
have made some contribution to the 
officially permitted development in 
recent years of black trade unions 
that have the legal right to strike. 

Or is the aim to try to progress! vdy 


uons against Rhodesia. President 
Jimmy Carter's grain embargo, trig- 
gered by the Soviet invasion of Af- 
ghanistan, is another favorite exam- 
ple of the foolishness of sanctions. 

To those who doubt the wisdom of 
sanctions, the “lessons of history” are 
dear: Italy conquered Ethiopia; Fi- 
dd Castro still rales Cuba; guerrilla 
warfare, not sanctions, brought down 
Rhodesia's white regime. And the 
Russians are still in Afghanistan. 

But “what everybody knows" too 


opia, yet Mussolini's reported remark 
to Hitler that he would have had to 
withdraw from Ethiopia in a wed; if 
sanctions had incluaed oil suggests 
that they came closer to working than 
is generally recognized. 

The oil embargo against Japan did 
not deter a Japanese attack, but it 
denied a vital resource to a country 
with whom war was likely anyway. 

The U.S. trade embargo has not 
toppled Fidd Castro, but it has weak- 


ened tbe Cuban economy and re- 
duced the resources available both to 
Mr. Castro and to the Soviet Union. 

Guerrilla war was indeed one of 
the last straws to break the Rhode- 
sian regime, but that does not mean 
UN sanctions were inconsequential. 

Although Soviet troops are still in 
Afghanistan. President Carter's grain 
embargo sent a message to Soviet 
leaders that may cause them to think 
twice before invading another small 
country on its borders. 

Let’s re-evaluate the conventional 
wisdom that economic sanctions do 
not work. Spotting some common 
fallacies would be a useful first step. 

Fallacy: “If sanctions don’t lute, 
they can’t work." Even when the eco- 
nomic effects (tf sanctions are nil, the 
psychological or political effects may 
be worthwhile. Sanctions did not 
cripple the Rhodesian economy, but 
they did isolate Rhodesia as a moral 
leper in the international community. 

Fallacy: “Biting off mare than can 

lx easily chewed is always bad policy.” 
Just because economic sanctions do 
not work perfectly does not mean 
that they are worthless. The diver 
who executes a difficult dive moder- 
ately well may score more points than 

competitors who execute easy dives 
perfectly. Economic sanctions win 


not destroy apartheid, bm they could 
contribute to that end. 

Fallacy: ‘'Never do anything that 
hurts us more titan it hurts (ten. "The 
relevant comparison is not between 
costs to the sanctioning and to the 
sanctioned. It concerns costs and 
.benefits (tf the pcdicy options avail- 
able. Willingness to impose costs on 
oneself can be a way to demonstrate 
resolve and moral outrage. 

Fallacy: ". Alternatives don’t mat- 
ter- ” No matter how .worthless sanc- 
tions appear to be in a given situa- 
tion, policy-makers should not: be 
criticized for using such measures un- 
less more attractive options -can be 
identified. In evaluating economic 


except a redoubled effort to inaeast 
tbe credibility of that' nudear atfadc - 
force is to imagine the impossiblel-:^ 
That is the huge hole in President ' - 
Reagan’s argument. He got away 
a with it in his Sept. 17 press confer- .. 
ence, but Mikhail Gorbachev is not . 
likely to be as mdulgenL Srandxxty 
has to give the president a better 
argument than the gas mask analogy 
. to use in Geneva m November : — . or 
better yet, a more plausible posi tion 
to defend,., You. can’t. attack trade 
protectionism' and .defend “star 
war^witBoutbumpngintoyoursdf. ' 

The Washington Pose 


LETTER 

Gtiaciifi and Nationals 

Alexander Reinhardt (Letters, 

C- . Ill r - . . 7 


replied that he liked it very mnrih, 
considering the alternative. ‘ 
Economic sanctions are unlikely to 
achieve spectacular results, but they 
do provide an appealing alternative 
whmi diplomacy seems too weak and 
military intervention is too strong. 
They deserve serious consideration 
despite the misleading conv entional 
wisdom that they never work. 


The writer, professor of political sci- 
ence at Columbia University, is author 
of the forthcoming book “Economic 
Statecraft. ” He contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times 


not legally rive their nationality as 
American. Under. the 14th Amend- 
ment of the Constitution, U.S. citi- 
zens are all persons bora or natural- 
ired in the United States, and there 
should be no donbt whatever in any- 
one’s mind that the nati onali ty afl 
US. citizens is American. 

U.S. nationals are persons, includ- 
es native in h a bi tants of American 
Samoa, who have a right to U& pass^ ; 
pom — because in oneway or anoth- 
a- they owe allegiance to the United 
States or are subject to US. jurisdfc 
non —but are not U5. ritizens. - ' 


Villarvsur-Oiane, Switzerland. 





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, WA 2SnSS*!tz L 

sssd’asfiasr®” 

Sd , SwSS c Sutet o^S2 

"nca na- 

spSaHfi” 

m Mr. Reagan's strong ann-cSn- 
^ " ,s i sentiments and Mr 
equally strong commit* 

rolm WalW a RqnibUcan of Wy- 
ommg, and Represcn la rive Danny 
a Republican of IndP 
ana, introduced legislation to pro- 
vide gnemllas fighting in MozSm- 
bique with as much as S5 million in 
aid during fiscal 1986 and to end 
u.s>. economic assistance to the 
Mozambique government. 

Administration officials have de- 
fended the economic aid and emer- 
gency. assistance program to Mo- 
zambique, which totals about S40 
million this year. They say the 
United Slates is responding io Mr. 
Machel’s desire to move from so- 
cialist domestic policies and reli- 
ance on Moscow. 

Despite the divergent ideological 
views of ihe two presidents, a se- 
nior US. official said after the 
meeting that they had “at 

some length" the merits of the free 
enterprise system and “approaches 
that work and don’t wonr in eco- 
nomic development in “a very posi- 
tive atmosphere." 

Mr. Reagan said in a statement 
that the meeting was meant to un- 
derscore U.S. determination to 
continue playing “an active and 


^ Mozambique Leader Hold Talks 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDA Y-S I NDA Y. SEPTEMBER 21-22, 1985 




Pajje 



Tha taucnM M 

President Ronald Reagan meeting with President Samora Macbel in the White House. 


constructive rote" in southern Afri- 
ca. 

Mr. Reagan haded Mr. Machel 
for taking “a step toward peace" in 
signing the NIcotnali Accord with 
South Africa in March 1984. 

In it, Mozambique pledged to 
halt raids by black nationalist guer- 
rillas in to South Africa, and Pre- 
toria agreed to stop backing the 
Mozambican National Resistance. 

In his statement, Mr. Reagan 
also hailed Mozambican decisions 
to join the World Bank and the 
International Monetary Fund, seek 
Western investment and strengthen 
the private sector. Mr. Reagan de- 


scribed these steps as “a formula 
for economic advancement" 

Mr. Machel said that the meeting 
had established "a solid basis for 
longterm cooperation in all 

Noting Mozambique's consider- 
able natural resources. Mr. Machel 


Mozambique for his U.S. visit. Mr. 
Machel announced that he has evi- 
dence that South Africa is aiding 
the Mozambican National Resis- 
tance in violation of the Nkomati 
Accord. 

On Thursday, the senior U.S. of- 
ficial described the accord as “a 


said, “We seek the participation of major milestone.' 


the United States and its private 
sector in putting those resources at 
the service of our economic and 
social development." 

Mr. Machel also pledged to con- 
tinue strict compliance with the 
Nkomati Accord. 

On Monday, just before leaving 


The U.S. official said the United 
States is deeply concerned about 
the South African accord viola- 
tions, which Pretoria confirmed 
while charging that Mozambique 
also is violating iL The official said 
he does not believe that the pact is 
in serious jeopardy. 


Fighting Secret Talks on U.S. Hostages Reported 

Cripples Port Washington Seeks Syria Aid in Freeing Lebanon Captives 

In Lebanon 


Untted Press International 

BEIRUT — Moslem fundamen- 
talist fighters and Syrian-backed 
militiamen were engaged in fierce 
fightmgFriday in the northern port 
city of^ Tripoli. 

Eight persons died in fighting 
overnight and early Friday, police 
said. 

Police and residents said the 
fighting escalated early in the day, 
despite appeals for a temporary 
truce to ga food and water to peo- 
ple trapped in basement shelters. 

“Many people are trapped in 
their homes, basements ana under- 


By David B. Ortaway 

Washmpon Post Service 

WASHINGTON —The United 
States has been involved in secret 
talks with Arab and other interme- 
diaries for more than a year to g^in 
the release of American hostages in 
Lebanon, diplomatic sources said. 

U5. officials refused Thursday, 
however, to discuss the details of 
past and present diplomatic efforts 
to free the six Americans still held 
captive and the Reverend Benja- 
min W. Weir, who was released last 
Saturday. 

But the Reagan administration 
has been counting on the interven- 
tion of President Hafez al- Assad of 
Syria to persuade the Shiite captors . 


UICU UJUlGs. uuouuua iuiu iiuuw- . » w ^ ' |A r ,v. ' .* 


to bring their casualties to already 
overcrowded emergency clinics and 
hospitals,” a police spokesman 
sakL 

Two earlier cease-fire agree- 
ments had collapsed, and the city’s 
Sunni Moslem spiritual leader, 
Sheikh Taha Sabotuyl. appealed 
Thursday for a truce. 

“1 calf on you to give this city a 
truce, even a brief one. or even for a 
few hours," he said, “so rescue 
groups can help move the wounded 
from the streets, take water to 
quench the thirst of women and 
children trapped in basements, and 
provide bread and medicine to the 
needy.” 

Tripoli reader: is said the cease- 
fire call Thursday stopped an indis- 
criminate bombardment of resi- 
dential areas in the morning but 
that intermittent clashes on the 
edge of the dty could still be heard. 

‘The situation is desperate," a 
civilian said. 

Hospitals reported shortages of 
.medicine and appealed for blood. 
The city of 500,000 people, Leba- 
non's second largest, has been 
without power and without bread 
for four days. 

A member of the Moslem funda- 
mentalist Tawheed militia said a 
debate was going on within the 
movement on whether’ to make 
some concessions to the Arab 
Democratic Party and Syria "or 
fight until the end." 

• Tripoli's Syrian-backed security 
committee brought representatives 
-of Tawheed and the Arab Demo- 
cratic Party together Tor the first 
time Thursday in what militia 
sources said was a stormy session 
that ended with the cease-fire calL 
The sources said the Arab Dem- 


coqdmg — — . 

Other Arab and European chan- 
nels have also been asked to con- 
tact the captors and their Iranian 
hackers. 

At one point, there was an at- 
tempt to persuade the Shiites to 
release the Americans in return for 
a pledge that the 17 convicted ter- 
rorists in Kuwait would subse- 
quently be quietly freed. The U.S. 
government was not involved di- 
rectly in those negotiations but was 
aware of them, according to Arab 
sources. 

The negotiations were difficult 
because the Americans were held 


agree among themselves on the 
terms for the hostages’ release. 

The 17 terrorists were among 25 
persons tried and convicted — 
eight in absentia — in March 1984 
for their roles in seven bombings 
around Kuwait City in the previous 
December in which six persons 
were killed and more than SO 
wounded. Most of the convicted 
terrorists are Iraqi Shiites who be- 
long to the Iranian-backed funda- 
mentalist group known as Dawa. 

Three of the 17 captured terror- 
ists were sentenced to death by 
hanging and the others received 
prison terms ranging from five 
years to life. But the ruling emir. 
Shdkh Jaber al-Ahmed al-Sabah, 
has not yet formally ratified the 
sentences and the executions have 
not been carried out. 

Circumstantial evidence strongly 
suggests that the spate of kidnap- 
pings of Americans in Bonn was 
motivated by the trial of the 17 in 
Kuwait and the desire of their rela- 
tives in Lebanon to gain their free- 
dom. 

The exchange plan failed to ma- 
terialize, partly because the Shiite 
captors insisted that their brethren 
in Kuwait be freed first and partly 
because Kuwait toughened its pos- 
ture after a Kuwaiti airliner was 
hijacked to Tehran by other Shiite 
extremists last December, accord- 
ing to the sources. 


by more than one group. Further- Those hijackers, who killed two 
more, the captors, some of whom officials of the U.S. Agency for 
are relatives of the Shiite terrorists Internationa] Development, also 
being held in Kuwait, could not demanded that Kuwait set free the 


17 convicted terrorists. Kuwaiti 
however, refused. On Dec. 9, the 
Iranians stormed the plane and 
ended the hijacking. 

Since then, Kuwait has become 
more defiant and uncompromising 
toward any consideration of the 
prisoners’ release, despite repeated 
terrorist acts to pressure the gov- 
ernment into freeing them. 

On May 25. a suicide bomber 
drove a car into Sheikh Jaber s mo- 
torcade, killing five persons, in- 
cluding himself, but inflicting only 
minor injuries on the sheikh. On 
July 11, bombs exploded in two 
cafes in Kuwait City, killing nine 
persons and injuring 56. 

The incidents were believed to be 
attempts by friends of the 17 con- 
victed terrorists to pressure the Ku- 
waiti government into freeing 
them. 

■ Kuwait Unlikely to Bend 

Several Arab diplomats and offi- 
cials said Friday that they doubted 
that the Kuwaiti government 
would bow to new pressure to re- 
lease the 17 men. The Associated 
Press reported from Kuwait. 

An Arab ambassador said. The 
Kuwaitis are not likely to respond 
favorably to the fundamentalists, 
because that would amount to an 
encouragement of terrorism." 

“They also cannot say no to the 
fundamentalists.'' he said, "be- 
cause they would jeopardize the 
lives of the six hostages in Leba- 
non. All the Kuwaiti government 
con afford now is to say nothing.” 


U.S., New Zealand Fail to Mend Rift 
Over Use of Ports by Nuclear Vessels 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — New Zea- 
land and the United States have 
failed to agree on a compromise 
proposal from Prime Minister Da- 
vid Lange's government for ending 
the dispute over nuclear vessels 
that has disrupted the long-stand- 
ing ANZUS security affiance of 
Australia, New Zealand and the 
United Stales, since February. 

After the plan was presented by 
Geoffrey Palmer, deputy prime 
minister of New Zealand, to the 
U.S. secretary of stale. George P. 
Shultz, and the defense secretary. 


The officials said that the "par- 
ties didn't arrive at a mutually 
agreeable solution.” 

Sources familiar with the Lange 
government’s plan said it calls for 
New Zealand to adopt a law that 
would give Mr. Lange authority to 
determine whether a visiting ship is 
nuclear- armed or nuclear-powered 
without asking the United States to 
provide clarification. 

That would permit Washington 
to maintain its policy of refusing to 
confirm or deny whether U.S. war- 
ships calling at foreign ports were 
"nucl ear-capabl e.” 

As a result, the sources noted, 


‘ ” that Sbuitz. ana Inc ocicnsc Mcicuuy, the proposed formula could lead to 

rilSffS the Caspar W. Weinberger. US. offi- situations in which New Zealand 

Tawheed wutrol e dalssud Thursday rnghi they were might deride that an American ves~ 

P°? S X noTconvinccd thu E pin was sel was in violation of the nuclear 

and Lebanese armies ana me po- suff - Knent{0 2 iea j the rift and permit prohibition and bar it from enter- 

_ I Israeli U.S. warships to resume calls at ing New Zealand ports. 

In southern Lebanon, lsraeu Zealand ports. The sources said that would be 

troops and tanks stormed the mam- New z-eaianu pt.™. 

ly Shiite Moslem town of Bint Jbeil 
in the frontier “security zone, 
blew up six houses and arrested 
three youths before withdrawing, a 

On Protesters in Philippines 

sindwmissioo 10 atudt. a Lete- ^ Abby Tan 


unacceptable to the United Slates, 
which insists that continued naval 
cooperation with New Zealand re- 
quires an unrestricted right to use 
New Zealand's pons. 

One U.S. official, who asked not 
to be identified, said: 

"From our point of view, this is 
□ot a compromise although New 
Zealand has tried to put a sugar 
coating od its policy, if anything, 
we regard this proposal as poten- 
tially worse than the current situa- 
tion because its legislative feature 
would codify their nonnuclear po- 
licy into law." 

The United States also refuses to 
make any concessions in its policy 
of not confirming or denying a 
ship's nuclear capabilities because 
of concern that such a move might 
cause anti-nuclear forces in Austra- 
lia, Japan and Western Europe to 
demand similar treatment. 


20 Die as Police Open Fire 


nese checkpoint maimed by an Is- 
raeli-backed militia, and reportedly 
was killed in the attempt, appeared 
cm television and said, “I changed 
my mind.” 

Mohammed Al-Masri, 26. said 
Thursday that he parked the car far 
from the checkpoint and asked a 
comrade to drive the vehicle. 


DEATH NOTICE 




Roderick wnSam CAMERON 
73. author and jounuliM. died Scplern- 
ber 18 ai Mcncifjtfs. Fran£- H f V* 
author of more ihan 8.000 book*, on 
history and travel and was a correspcm- 
dam lor I'ogue. House 4 OunJen. Archi- 
tectural Digest and W. He was the son o[ 
the lab Roderick M. Cameron or Nc* 
York and the law Enid. Counicw of 
Kmunare. 

A memorial service will be held h“ cr - 


Washington Pmi Service 

MANILA — Twenty persons 
were killed and 13 were wounded 
Friday by Philippine police in the 
central provincial town of Esca- 
lante during a demonstration in ad- 
vance of the I3th amtiversaiTOflbe 
declaration of martial law, officials 

said. .. _ 

A police spokesman said au- 
thorities began shooting afier 
shot was fired from among 
2,000 protesting Tamers, 
and jobless sugar workers. 

Moderate and leftist groups 


a 
the 
drivers 


the streets of Escalante since 
Thursday, when a three-day gener- 
al strike was called in several towns 
of Negros Occidental province. Es- 
calante is 60 miles (97 kilometers) 
north of Bacolod, the provincial 
capital. 

Jn the central Philippine town of 
Cebu, police chained into a barri- 
cade near the outskirts and arrested 
167 strikers. 

Bacolod. 320 miles south of Ma- 
nila, was deserted because of a 
transport strike and the erection of 
barriers of timber and ether objects 
at major entry points to the dty. 
Offices, stores and schools have 


called" strikes - principal ^ 

rule of Presi- The strike ratal by the leftist 
^^nonsmtora 1 hav?* barricaded dents and the militant clergy. 


Sri Lanka Wants 
Citizens’ Group to 
Monitor Peace 

The Associated Press 

COLOMBO. Sri Lanka — The 
gpverament of Sri Lanka is pre- 
pared to appoint a citizens' com- 
mittee to monitor the cessation of 
hostilities between government 
troops and separatist Tamil guerril- 
las, a cabinet official said Friday. 

The national security minister, 
Lalith W. Athulalhmudali, told 
Parliament that the government 
had rejected the appointment of 
foreign observers, as requested by 
thc Tamil groups. 

“When foreigners come we do 
not know with whom they will 
come, and whose Inielligence 
agents they will bring with them,” 
Mr. Athulothmudali said. 

He did not identify members of 
the proposed cease-fire committee. 


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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 21-22, 198S 


ARTS /LEISURE 




Manuscript Collectors: An Eccentric, Obsessive, Greedy Breed 


Imemunonal Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — Eccentric, obses- 
' sive, greedy, torn between the 


nia and secrecy, dedicatedto art 
but full of themselves, collectors 
form a peculiar species whose role 


in cultural history is out of propor- 
tion to their numbers. Such is the 
endearing portrait that emerges 
from an exhibition here. 

Titled “Hidden Friends'" and 
subtitled, using the Latin for the 


SOUREN MeUKIAN 


same phrase, “The Comites La- 
tentes Collection of niuzninated 
Manuscripts." it is at Sotheby's 


even more important than the exhi- 
bition, despite a few inaccuracies 
inspired by the desire to enhance 
the role of Britain. “Because the 
Corait£ Internationale de Palfeogra- 
phie was meeting in late Septem- 
ber, it seemed appropriate to ar- 
range some kind of exhibition 
which would reflect an aspect of 
the British contribution to the his- 
tory of medieval manuscripts,” he 
writes. “An area where Britain has 
differed from the rest of Europe is 
in the tradition of private owners 
buying and selling manuscripts. It 
was a peculiarly English idea that 
every educated gentleman should 
own a library.” 


through Sept. 28. 
The collector \ 


The collector whose 43 manu- 
scripts are displayed for the first 
time is not named, and bis nation- 
ality is withheld. Only one clue is 

S ’ied: The collection is on in- 
te loan to the BibUothdque 
Publique et Universitaire in Gene- 
va, which means the manuscripts 
are accessible on request 


A brilliant catalog essay by 
iristopher de Hamel Sotheby’s 


Christopher de Hamel Sotheby’s 
expert in medieval manuscripts, is 


Many historians wiQ disagree. 
Private libraries blossomed in Re- 
naissance Europe. In 19th-century 
France, collecting medieval manu- 
scripts was as developed as in Brit- 
ain. It seems even less appropriate 
to bring in the role of Britain as 
“the world center of the art trade" 
in connection with medieval manu- 
scripts : the great names in the trade 
today are those of H. P Krause of 
New York and Pierre B 6 ris of Par- 
is. The great collectors are Belgian. 
French, German, Swiss, American. 

To back up such a statement by 


adding that “England is the only 
country in the world where ait sales 
are reported as daily news in the 
papers" merely suggests that En- 
gland is the only country whose 
papers Sotheby's expert is familiar 
with. 

These lapses, made all the more 
amusing by de Hamel's stated wish 
not to be jingoistic, should not mar 
the reader's pleasure in the enter- 
taining portraits of the art-market 
characters concerned with medi- 
eval illuminated manuscripts, and 
in the display of the manuscripts 
that passed through their hands. 

Sir Thomas Phillips (1792-1872), 
who amassed more than 60.000 
manuscripts, comes out on top. 
“Has this man no heart?" a con- 
temporary asked. “It is shriveled 
up among the masses of parchment 
around him, and in the midst of 
which be spends his useless life." 

De Hamel o alls him “the most 
extraordinary, persistent, short- 
tempered, bigoted, conceited, ob- 
sessive, determined vetiomaniac (as 
he called himself) who built up the 
greatest library of manuscripts ever 
assembled by one man." His vast 
house at Middle Hill in Worcester- 
shire was filled with dust-covered 


crates of manuscripts. Despite 17 
attempts, he did not succeed in 
remarrying after his wife died, but 
he found time to write careful en- 
tries to his every acquisition and 
had a catalog of the “Bibliotheca 
Phillippica" printed at his press. 

Although unable to reject fakes. 


Phillips had an eye for beauty. In 
the exhibition a ninih-centuiy copy 
of the Pentateuch from northern 
France is a masterpiece of Carolia- 
gian calligraphy. 

The opposite type of collector is 
illustrated by Henry Yates Thomp- 
son (1839-1928), who decided eany 
on that his collection was never to 
exceed 100 volumes, and who kept 
refining the collection to the end. 

He had the education and the 
financial means to become the ar- 
chetypal medieval manuscript col- 
lector. His father was a rich Liver- 
pool banker. Young Henry had his 
secondary schooling at Harrow and 
read classics at Cambridge Univer- 
sity, where he excelled. An enthusi- 
astic traveler, he spent his youth in 
Egypt, Palestine, India, the West 
Indies and North America, where 
he went to watch some of the fight- 
ing in the Civil War. He started 
collecting in his late 50s. De Hamel 


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The next Special 

EDUCATION 

DIRECTORY 

mil be published on 
DECEMBER 7. 1985. 


believes his earliest purchase is a 
Parisian Book of Hours of the mid- 
15th century, in the Sotbeby exhi- 
bition. Yates Thompson bought it 
in Paris in April IS 86 but in 1903 
sent it for sale to Sotheby's, where 
it made £400. 

In 1897, Yates Thompson ac- 
quired the collection of Bertram, 
fourth Earl of Ashbumham (1797- 
1878),. for £30,000, then as enor- 
mous sum. He retained one-fifth of 
the collection, and sold the rest at 
Sotheby's in 1899 and 1901. 

Yates Thompson ranks among 
the first modem collectors to have 
seen to it that his works be repro- 
duced. Four volumes of his ‘TTe- 
scripcfve Catalogues” and seven 
volumes of “Illustrations" of 
manuscripts came out between 
1898 and 1918. 


As many collectors do. Yates 
Thompson had an ingrained dis- 
trust of museums, where manu- 
scripts often disappear into the an- 
onymity of reserve collections. In 
the last volume of “Illustrations” 
he announced his intention to sell 
his collection so that “these pre- 
cious manuscripts which have been 
to me of such absorbing interest 
shall go, in the language of Ed- 
mond de Goncourt” — the French 
man of letters was also a great art 
collector — “ ‘aux heri tiers de mes 
gouts' ” (to the heirs of my tastes). 
Three sales took place at Sotheby’s 
in 1919, 1920 and 1921. to the hor- 
ror of the British Museum and oth- 
er institutions. The Hours or 
Jeanne de Navarre was bought for 
£1 1,800 by Edmond de RothschQd. 
setting a record for manuscripts 
that was to hold for many years. 

The residue of Yates Thomp- 
son's collection, consisting of 
manuscripts be had not sent to auc- 
tion and others that had failed to 
sell, was bequeathed by his widow 
to the British Museum in 1941. As 
de Hamel puts it, “a catalogue is 


of a commission cataloging manu- 
scripts in French provincial librar- 
ies. Libri watt around dressed in an 
ample doak under which manu- 
scripts easily disappeared. 

Bookselling was soon his main 
concern. In 1861. when the Savile 
collection came up at Sotheby's, 
ThomasPhillhslertabidofflOoQ 
an early versified tr ansla tion of the 
Bible into French. Libri bought it 
Tor £77, wrote a 30-line catalog en- 
try for it, and sent it straight hack 
to Sotheby's, where Phillips bought 
h the year after far £ 100 . The 
manuscript was.acquired in 1976 at 
Sotheby’s by the collector whose 
acmnritioiis are now displayed at 
Sothety’s, and it may be seen there. ’ 

In- 1848 Libri moved to London 
with 18 crates of books and went 
on selling, mainly through Soth- 
eby’s. Robert Cutzan visited his 
lodgings near the British Museum 
in 1861. He stared in disbelief at 
the early medieval jewded bindings 
and manuscripts, oommentin& “I 
cannot imagine where he got such 
splendid things in the y ransacked 
days." When a curator of the Bib- 
lioth&que Imperiale in Paris went 
to see Libri, he had no difficulty in 
establishing that a number of these 
items had been removed from pub- 
lic collections in France. Most of 
them were eventually returned. 

In passing, de Hamd provides 
invaluable tats of information to 
collectors. He describes and illus- 
trates some 19th-century collec- 
tors’ marks, sometimes saibbled in 
chalk or p encil. He r eminds US that 
prices do not always go 14 ), and 
that one may lose bendy when 
attempting to resell: A collector 
called Waller Sneyd hmg ht more 
than 1,000 manuscripts from the 
heirs of a Venetian Jesuit dealer 
called Metteo Luigi CanonicL Of 
those he sent for sale to Sotheby's 
is June 1836, 85 percent were 



Or"*’ 


. Hr /' ■’•” 
S* 7 • , i 

r 




Detail from “The I 
43 manuscripts on 


H was? c. 1465-70, one of.tfc 
Itfon at Sotheby’s in London.. 


Hard-to- Watch 'Plenty*^ 
Dares to Break the Rules 


By Paul Actanaao 

’ Washington Post Sarice 


in the street. Her performance is a 
combination of craft and instind 
that only a handful of fibn-aetdre 
have achieved. 


to watch, dial achieves its. effects 
through nuance and distant con- 
nections. You resent it for the work 


MOVIE MARQUEE 


eagerly awaited." Yates Thompson 
would have relished this iustifica- 


Vifnrght in, mrlnriing a Venetian 
manuscript of about 1509 with four 


would have relished this justifica- 
tion of his dislike of museums. 


While the English collectors por- 
trayed by de Hamd come out as 
highly cultivated and discerning, if 
slightly cranky, the Italians are the 
villains. There is a lively sketch of 
Guglielmo Bruto Icilio Timoleone 
come Libri Carucri della Sommaia 
( 1.803-1869), whom de Hamel in- 
troduces as “rate of the most color- 
ful rogues in the history of manu- 
scripts.” He was born in Florence, 
taught mathematics in Pisa and left 
for France at the age of 27. In 1841 
he got hims elf appointed secretary 


manuscript of about 1 509 with four 
fug-p age miniatur es, on display at 
the Sotheby’s exhibition. And 
when Sir Alfred Chester Beatty, the 
mining m 3 Krm«Tr fc who donated an 
admirable collection of I ranian and 
Turkish manuscripts to the Chester 
Beatty library in Dublin, sent bis 
Western manuscripts to be sold at 
Sotheby's in 1932 and 1933. a psal- 
ter, on view at the exhibition, was 
bought in at £L250, far below the 
£1.800 reserve. 

If only for such lessens, the 
“Hidden Friends" collection de- 
serves to be scrutinized, catalog in 
hand, by a fl serious collectors and 
would-be collectors. 


AUCTION SALES 


it makes you do. and recognize it by 
the rules it breaks; you recognize it 
as greatness. 

- Adapted by David Hare from his 
play, “Plenty" traces the story ot 
Susan (Meryl Streep) as: she goes 
from British operative in the Resis- 
tance to “working gjrT in a rotting 
empire, from the intensity of the 
war's hit-and-run liaisons to the 
airless trap of a loveless marriage. 

Her nusband, Raymond 
(Charles Dance), crawls his way 
through the hierarchy of the For- 
eign Office (Sr John Gielgud and 
Ian McKellen play two of ms supe- 
riorsX Mortared in tins grey bu- 
reaucracy, he sees Susan, with her 
Boh emian pals (Tracey UHman 
and Sting), as Mala. Han and Ger- 
trude Stan rolled in one. 

Susan is a hysteric given to tor- 


Evcrything about “Plenty" (ex-,- 
cepi for the ridiculous Golden End- , 
ing) is calculated to distance you ■ 
emotionally from it The director.. 
Fred Schepisi (“The Cham of Jim- 
my Blacksmith," “Barbarosa,” . 
“Iceman”), and his onematogrib 
pher, Ian Baker, shot the movie in- 
real light, which makes it hard ot . - . 
the eyes. Schepisi composed the 
movie mostly with long shots, 
which literally keep you at arm’s- 
length, and the staging is defiber- 

mdy artificial The effect is tokeq* £ 
things intellectual. " 


sGenera 


The rational chiH of the movie is- 
wedded to what it's about — good 
manners are part of what drives 
Susan , mad — so the character . 
swim easily through it. There- are 
only two you’d like to spend any 
time with, and. in one of the mov- 
ie's small niceties, they caned each' 


other out. Gielgud’s sdgneuriaL 
tmring bolsters the movie's- best- 
comic tines; he's the best, of dd 

Fnghnri - T ill man ligh fc tip the 

screen Tike a dance hall's minor 
baDi-she’s new England. . ; 


rentiai insults, sporadic gunj 
and the tearing of wallpaper. 


17tb onnuol edition 


THE ART SALES INDEX 


and the tearing of wallpaper. The 
film's greatest virtue, in this light, is 
that it is anti-psyt^IogfcaL- De- 
layed battle fatigue? Career trus- 


, . ■ v 




published October 1985. -~pnce 


nation? Just plam crazy? “Plenty** 
builds lots of explanations for &- 


price and detaii of 72,000 oil 
pointings, watercolours, drawings 
and sculpture sold internationally 
at public auction 
August 1984 to August 1985 

Art Sales Index, Pond House, Weybridge, Surrey, U.K. 


builds lots of explanations for Su- 
san’s behavior into the story, and 
none will do. 

Susan becomes both an individ- 
ual irredudbly particular, and an 
open-ended symbol of postwar 
Britain — not a product of her 
society but an emblem encompass- 
ing it. Streep plays her that way, a 
dubious heroine but a heroine 
nonetheless, vibrant and destruc- 
tive as a high-tension wire dancing 


(Vincent Cahby of Thc^New-'- 
Yoit Times,however l finds “Plen- 
ty” “a mnddled attempt lb equate 
the emotional langnesns of Sosan 
Traherne wilh fife in postwar Brit- 
ain" and Susan **a tirramndy fighi- 
weaght character, given to teary 
pronouncements such as T want to 
change everything, and I don't" 
know bow/'VScbepisi's direction^ - 
he says, “does nothing to offset ^r 4 
what seems to be ibirih-in phoni- 
ness.7)' 


S.C.P. 


; Capsule reviews of other, films 
recently rdeased in the United 
States:. 


M es B. CHAMBELLAND et D. GIAFFERI 

. Associated Auctioneers 

117. roc Saim-Lazare - 75008 Paris - TflL: ( 1 ) 294X15 J6 


PUBLIC AUCTION SALE BY COURT ORDER 

Friday 27th September 1985 at 2 p.m. 

HOTEL DROUOT - Room 4, 9 rue Drouot, 75009 Paris. 

IMPORTANT COLLECTION OF OLD DRAWINGS 


1 - GIOVANNI DOMENICO TIEPOLO: “Etude de paons.” Pen and Indian ink wash. Trace 

of signature at bottom right. 24 x 18.2 cm. Antique frame. . . 

2 - FEDERICO ZUCCARO: “Pensormase assis vu de dos." Seal of the RICHARDSON 

coUectioa 25.7 x 18.5 cm. Antique gut frame in carved wood. 

3 - MICHEL DORIGNY: “Hercule terrassant 1’Hydre de lTIerne" Black crayon. 21.5 x 19 cm. 

Carved gill wooden frame 

4 - SIMON VOUET: “Etude de femme.” Verso: study of a man. From the collection of the 

Marquis de Chenneviires. Black stone Carved gilt wooden frame 

5 - JACQUES STELLA: ‘“L’Automne." Indian ink wash on sanguine etched for engraving. 

23 x 31.2 cm. Carved pit wooden frame 

6 - CLAUDE GILLOT: “Les Funerailles de Pan." Pen and Indian ink. Verso: light decorative 

sketch. 21.5 x 33 cm. 

7 - JACQUES RIGAUD: “Perso images devant un chateau" (St. Cloud?). Pen and Indian ink 

wash. 19.8 x 41 J cm. 

8 - JACQUES RIGAUD: “Persona ages devant une cascade" (Sl Cloud?). Pen and Indian ink 

wash. 20 x 44 cm. 

9 - JACQUES DE LAJOUE: “Le Roi David devant un palai&" Black crayon on hln* paper. 

Signed on bottom lefL Upper part arched. 37 x 26 cm. 

10 - JEAN BAPTISTE OUDRY: “Etude d’oisean." Black and while crayon on blue paper. 

30.5 x 325 cm. _ . : 

1 1 - JEAN BAPTISTE OUDRY: “Rude d’fichassier." Black and white oayon on blue naott 

30Jx32Jcm 


Kevm Thomas of the Los Ange- 
les Times on "Agnes of God": 

In a convent near Montreal, a . 
young nun's strangled baby is 
found inn wastebasket. The science 
vs. religion debate at the .heart of 
this tedious and contrived film, 
adapted by John Ptebneier from his 
play, commences as soon as a ; 
court-appointed psychiatrist (Jane 
Fonda), who is to determine wheth- 
er Sister Agnes (Meg Tffly) is fit to • 
stand trial lor manslaughter, meets 
the mother superior (Anne Ban- • 
croft). Fonda exclaims, Tm not 
from the Inquisition.*" Bancroft jt 
counters, Tm not from the Middle , T 
Ages!" and proceeds to act as if she- 
were. “Agues of God" cannot sus-"~ 
tain the prestige treatment it re- . 
ceives: the dark glow of the lighting 
by Sven Nykvist, who has photo- ’• 
graphed so many Ingmar Bergman' 
films; the discreet Georges Ddenie 
score; the shea intelligence and 
force of Fonda and Bancroft. Nor- 
man Jewison's .direction, is relent- " 
lessty neutraL ; 


' 0 PU> > 




12 - PHUiPPE “Femme.assise vue de face.” Blade .stone, white chalk and sanguine. computer oroemmtKr 

Bears seal of ROBINSON collection on bottom nghL 31 x 24.5 cm. c 

: __ .. . _ exotic aorio m pursu: 


13 - PHUiPPE MERGER: “Femme assise accoudfe." Black stone, white chalk and sanmrine- 
Bears seal of ROBINSON collection on bottom left. 28 x 24.5 cm. sanguine. 


14 - EDME BOUCHARDON: “Emded’un Jupiter.” Sanguine. “BOUCHARDON” maricerf on 
bottom right. Gilt wooden frame. 45 x 31 J5 cm. 


15 - LAURENT DE LA HYRE: “Trois moines intercident aupr 6 s de la Vieree.” ctmw» . 

(Paper stains and teats). “LA HYRE IN” noted on bottom right Carveddk 

16 - PIERRE SUBLEYRAS: “Etude d’homme ageuouillfe." Black crayon on blue™««. ijrJXIi 

on bottom right with seal of LEMPEREUR collection. 35 x 24 cm. 01ue paper- Marked 


17 - GIOVANNI BATTISTA GAUUL cdfed DE BAQCqO; “Adam et Eve chassfer A, 
Paradis ” Pen and bistre wash. 20 J x 28 J an. Carved gilt wooden frame. 0033565 ^ 


18 - Attributed to LORENZO TIEPOLO; i "Setae ; dliistoire andenne.” Brown 

ink wash. Carved gilt wooden frame. 25.5x41 cm. own pen and Indian 

19 - MCQUESIXHJTS DAVID; “Etude depersonnages." Remo and vaso black cr^on. 

20 -Attributed to FRANCESCO BARBIERI called GUERCJNO: “Etud*. hw- no 

Carved wooden frame. e ^ enfant Sanguine. 


Viewing: Thursday 26th September, from 11 ajn.tofin 

Expert: Mr. Bruno de BA YSER P ’ m ’ 

69, rue Sainte-Anne, 75002 PARIS. Tel: (1) 703 49 g 7 


Canby on “After Homs”: ~ 

Martin Scorsese's new film is not" • 

an easy comedy to get the hang of*t - ■ 
until you realize that it’s as much - • 
about emotional disorientation as '- 
it is disorienting. In the middle of 
the MhL on a.whiin, Paul Hacketl C 
(Griffin Dunne),' a bored, uptight ’’- 
compoterprogrammer, goes ofFtov.. 
exouc S 0 H 0 in pursuit of pretty. ’. ■’ A 
elusive Marcy (Rosanna Arnuettefe-’^ 4 
whom he'd met earlier -in me ever v : 
ning m a coffee shop. After a hair-r l 
raiapg taxi ride. in which Iris ontiv 
folding money. flies out. the 
dow, Paul spends the next 1 feW^*- 
hours in an urban Wonderland 
eccentric sculptors, artists, bar=_ - 
tenders waitresses, freaks and 
toners. Much of the time. Eke ABcer- 
r, auI J ? 05 unnoticed.; “Afiet -i 
Honrs is baad on a screenplay by ^ 
Jweph Minion, 26, wlro^ wrote it 
a film comse. He has a fine feeling f 
fw the absurd, whidi Scqts«e-n>- ; 
spects and- illuminates trp to — ■ . ' 
though nol induding — die 
scene. The best thing -abonf “Aft$ 

the photogtasAy v 

chael BaUhacs. His tak» v ^ x t 

on an aggressive, willftd pecsoii^ r ;- ^ 
ity of tts own, playmgihertiedft 
narrator whose mamuy fe amused. 
skeptical and not at - \ 




K: ;• 
W, V 


ly involved. - v ' > ■ 













itrcirv. t 


'^>4 
f| "Plenty 
the 


■“ '"‘rtz\. H:r >»»■*•_ 

•::v '.-5^ 


V *"’••• -Vj '1W 

• • - --‘w^.vu; GjjjL; 

a . • • .* “Ittif 

• " . to ram* 


- f, r- ■* raffle 

■ s ~> “ -n.v rW 


ARTS /LEISURE 







^0 Conor to Gwen John: Exhibitions 
At Barbican Link 4 Disparate Artists 

T fwmtT J <£S J°- VCe P f Iot * ^ vigorous li/e. He The loodd for these was Vera 

I .-wV, fo >*5 .three and a «ved at Grez-sur-Lcung, at Pont- Cuningham (1897-1955). to whom 

yf 815 J™, existence, the A.ven. and, from 1904. in Paris. Smith was introduced in 1922 by 

has estab-- until in 1933 he married and set up Bernard Memnsky. one of her 
25 0116 Britain's best house at NueU-sur-Lavon. in the teachers at the Central School of 
inifh^*^ 0 as demonstrated t-oirc. _ * An. During- their turbulent rda- 

. ^^^trrent shows of works by Inevitably, at, Pom-Aven he en- tionship, Cuningham’s painting 
«ir artists whose lives were joined countered Gauguin, and of the bt- lapsed mto obscurity. She was best 
ry somewhat tenuous threads. • tor's entourage he bod met the known in Britain as Smith's model 
.fhe quartet was Ro- French artists Armand Seguin and muse, though she was produc- 
aenc O Conor (1860-1940). chief (1869-1903) and Charles Fin ge r ing drawings and paintings of un- 
axnong late 19th- and early 20th- (1863-1928), the Swiss artist Cuno usual vigor, gradually losing the 

Irish painters. This is the Amiet (1868-1961) and the En- powerful influences of Smith and 

^st significant retrospective of his glishman Eric Forbes- Robertson Meninsky. 
work. Bom in County Roscommon 0865-1935) before Gauguin re- ck- ui-j- found a chamnion of 
to which moved timed from Tahiti in 1894. Gau- her art in the Frenchderier and 

to DubUn when 0 Conor was 5 S“ux mid O’Conor became suffl- collector Raymond Creuze. who. 

oeiatijf friendly for Gauguin lojgj* with jSm fKTcutJSSTof Uk 
gous Catholic School of Ample- ^ Inshman a monoprmu “The 8^^ An Gallery, has selected 
A J ff 19 hc Angela ® Bratawr iowibed m a show of more than 40 Oinin^ 
student at the Meiropoli- English “for my fnwdO Conor oils and walercolors. augmentS by 
m Dublin, where f Samoa. P. Cfeugum. Malthcw Sm j,h nudes othtf 

"5 n w °“ Prize- While O Conor lent Gauguin his Pans ^ nlio „ ^dc at the outset of 

SUB at the Metropolitan School, he studio and Gauguin invited & ndationihin 
began studies at the Royal Hiberni- O'Conor to join him on his return . K 

an Academy in DubUn, winnins to Tahiti. (He refused; years later, Cuningham became almost 

several prizes and showing paint- wben asked why, he said: “Do you surreal in her fantasy as she freed 
mgs in the academy’s aiwualexhi- see me going to'the South Seas with her&elf from Smith’s strong vision, 
bition. ' that character?") Frequently she took the female 


A Kaleidoscope of U.S, Design 






ublin, winning 
J s annua/exhi- 


several prizes and showing paint- wben ^ked why, 1 
mgs in the academy’s annual exhi- see me going to'th< 
bition. ' that charactaT') 

He then did the fashionable O’Conor's frien 
thing: ‘postgraduate’ work on the gum and interest 
Continent — first at the Beaux- van Gogh and Ce 
Arts in Antwerp, where his teacher many, photograph 
was Charles Verlai; then in Paris, paintings — led t 
Tfchere he worked in the studio of that he took his c 
Carolus Duran. His first exhibit in BUin. Ids brushwor 


that character'?") Frequently she took the female 

O’Conor’s fri endship with Gau- nude » theme, ringing the changes 
guin and interest in the works of between light-hearted dancers and 
van Gogh and r*** nn* — he had grieving and tragic figures: at other 
many photographs of the lauer’s bines she produced (juiniessential- 
pain tings — ko to the accusation I) English and poetical fantasies, 
that he took his colors from Gau- as “ Poltergeist in the Rain” 


’ nwiawM III IUW 3 LUUJU U 1 — “ , tm . * — , , » 

Carolus Duran. His first exhibit in guin, his brushwork from van Gogh I ne Metamorphosis of me 
France was at the Paris Salon of and his composition from Cezanne. Vampire. 

1888. A comparatively rich and AH three points are clearly dis- Long before he met Vera Cun- 
highly successful painter, he found proved by the 125 works in the ingham. Smith had been married to 
living in France congenial, and es- retrospective. O’Conor diows him- a fellow painter. Gwen SaJmond, 
mblished himself there for the rest «lf to be very much his own man, who. as a student at the Slade 

- ■ comparatively little influenced by School of Art, had been one of a 

his contemporaries. famous trio of friends. The others 

DOONESBUBY The earliest works are Irish land- were Ida Nettleship, who become 


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his contemporaries. famous trio of friends. The others 

The earliest works are Iri sh land- were Ida Nettleship, who become 
scapes and traditional still lifes. the first wife of Augustus John, and 
Then, with his settlement in France Gwen John, Augustus’s elder sister, 
come sparkling land- and sea- In 1898, after graduation from the 
scapes with coloring that prefigures Slade, the three went to Paris, 
the brilliance of the Fauves, and where the two Gwens briefly at- 
massive nudes that had a marked tended Whistler's school. Like 
influence on some of his English O’Conor. Gwen John (1876-1939) 
juniors. In Brittany his drawing be- fell in love with France. Moreover, 
came less tentative and much crisp- she fell in love with Rodin, for 
er, as in a series of rhamnak of whom she modeled. She lived the 
peasant women in native costume, rest of her life — “an interior life” 
He painted romantic, near-Expres- as the title of the Gwen John retro- 
siooist works such as “Romeo and spec live puts it — in attics in Mont- 


By Suzanne Slesin 

- V\SL| XT EW Y0RK — ’’fhgh SiyJes: 

i iTi'TXjyfjffn 1 v20-Century .American De- 

TSMM ^r f A ^ sign,” which opened Thursday at 

. the Whitney Museum of American 

Art. is a bold and often surprising 

: HL** 1 tB' look at the stylistic innovauems in 

- SQrCcf the design of American products 

. V ' : ' v and furrushings between !S99 and 

» >„/ ■ The more than 300 objects in the 

- show are di rided into 15 -year peri- 

Vv • ods, each organized by a different 

;/ - curator. Unlike most other exhibits 

| . IBk' surveying design, this one does not 

W/'f iry to eslaWish 3 aesthetic 

c . . -• •. standard. Rather, the objects — 

V 1 1 v. 7' - ~ - ranging from a Tiffany lamp to a 

' .f-. : ‘>.> gyjf '■ granite cook top — seem to have 

been selected to challenge conven- 

• fe *>r , jk ' . tional notions of taste. 

' . -M ' Eccentric directions in design as 

, ■ J ■ ■'3. ' well as the familiar classic trends 

ir & *, are represented in tbe objects cho- 

' - Wk-S V* V sen, which are arranged chronolog- 

'j-; ‘ ' j,f. ically by period. Along with televi- 

HHw' < s *S?' * sion sets and Eames chain, teapots. 

• *' t ' "*• jk lamps, radios and clocks — mass- 

^ produo^ industrial-design fare of 

. ** ,y^r ’ $ i dozens of handcrafted, one-of-a- 

i V a \ kind collector’s items such as a 

i^WrimSPP- - r . 1905 silver inkwell, a 1935 carted 

f ■ Steuben Glass bowl and a sinuous 

gaafeifit' . * F 1963 music stand. The amoeba- 

^ shaped tables that are synonymous 

“A play ^ the period of their origins, 

{'• *. f “ N ^»U: \ the ’30s. It is in such instances — 

_ * • ' •’ v '• - . when viewers do a double take — 

/-vi - that the show is most intriguing. 

%I _ . . , While design purists mav balk at 

Vera Cu ningh am s L Anstocrate (detail). some of the more esoteric pieces 

and Bauhaus fans may find the 

_ . . , . , „ familiar objects of their affections 

finittve catalog of Gwen John s Barbican Art Gallery. London EC2. {QO f(W faf -Hjgh 

paintings to be published next year through Nov. 3; Ulster Museur* S tv1es" expands and diversifies the 
by Yale University Press; and by Bel/au. S<«. 15 through Jan. IS; definition of desien. A grab bag 
Davtd Fraser Jenkms, now of the Sanonal Gallcn oj Ireland Dublin, utat mirrors the ravriad add son*? 
Tate Gallery, formerly curator of Jan. SO through March 8; dmes contradictor directions de- 
painting at the National Gallery of Myrrh Art Ga/leri. Manchester. ^ has ^ ^ 1900 ^ show . 
Wales, which has a considerable March 14 through May 10. nashes of stvle ^ la , l( . 



>->/• lit 

.1 ^ IW 

* *• J • •**}.' 




-*-i 


f% 


Vera Cuningham’s “L’Aristocrate" (detail). 


American design show 
includes dining table 
and chairs designed by 
Frank IJoyd Wright in 
1899; radio by Walter 
Dorwin Teague, 1936. 



Wales, which has a considerable March 14 through May 10. 
holding of John’s work. “ Matthew Smith . ’’ selection fron 

The 125 works in the show are the Mary Keene Bequest, perma 


" , ww °J 'r'rr T? that mirrors the myriad and some- 
i. .it) rAruugl) ™ J arc “ S ' times contradictory directions de> 
ynh Art Gallery. Manchester. ^ ^ko, since 1900. the show 
rch 14 through May 0. offers flashes of style and taste 

Matthew Smith, selection from j^gj. a comprehensive his- 
Mury Keene Bequest, perma- lor j ca | suney. Provocative and 
t y at the Barbican Art Galley, l0 be controversial, the exhi- 

Yera Cuningham, loan shout biljon> however it is perceived by 


quietiy contemplative. They con- nently at the Barbican An Galley. haand lQ ^ c^niroversiaL the ex 
trast greatiy with the passionate ‘Vera Cuningham, loan share bition. however it is perceived 
colors and wild brushstrokes of from the Raymond Creuze couec- A:rt^ n , « n „, h.irino 

O’Conor, Smith and Cuningham. tiew. through 3. 

After examining the work of Gwen John: An Interior Life, ^ a receptiveness to leara 


Juliet” (1910) and nude groups 
such as “Figures in a Poor’ 
(c. 1897-8) and “The Bathers” 
(c. 1920). At this period be did a 


paraasse and then in a garden shed 
in the suburb of Meudon, where 
she moved to be closer to Rodin. 

Tbe tempestuous affair with the 


these four disparate artists, one through Six. 3; Manchester City Art aboul ^ history of design.” said 
may well conclude that Gwen John Galley Nor. 28 through Jan. 26; ^ phjjiipc an assoriatecurator 
—described by her brotiicr as “tius Yale Center for British Art. New of ^ whiVney and the director of 

rptirina nprtiin in Want unlK hpr H.tvph C .i nnr^ltnif F#h rhrmiol i ■ ■ J 


I SAID NO! OUT 
OFTHEQUesnONf 
IDONTamnO -«acu- 
HEARANOIHER. %%} “ 
?aa>ABOurrr, \ 

OKAY * l I 

"V 


number of fine still-lifes, of which did little for her spirit and 

“Choufleur*’ (c. 1926) is typical, well-being but much for the quality 
and statuesque portraits that have ^ her draftsmanship, since Rodin 
been said to owe something compo- c^icd a drawing from her as a 


retiring person in black, with her Haven. Connecticut. Feb. 2b through 
tiny hands and feet, a soft almost April 20. 


sitionafly to Matisse. 


daily love token. (There are still 


inaudible voice, and delicate Pem- 
brokeshire accent" — is the most 
powerful of them all. 

-Raderic O'Conor. 1869-1940.” 



One pupil of Matisse who re- drawings of her cat Tiger in the 
spotted O'Conor was the English Musee Rodin, where, unsigned, 
artist Matthew Smith (1879-1959). they pass as the master’s work). 
After serving with the British Army Throughout her life she concert trai- 
in World War I he tot* his demobi- ing on four themes — portraits of 
lizationin Paris and settled at Grfcz. young women, usually in tenebrous 
He met O'Conor in 1919 and with interiors; nuns; people in church; 
him became a member of theSocife- .and. cats.- AO Jour are splendidly 
te des Amis de Montparnasse, represented, as are her uncommon 
O’Conor’s influence on Smith is landscapes and infrequent flower 
particularly to be seen in a sc- pieces, in this international retro- 
quence of voluptuous nudes on spective organized and cataloged 
which Smith started to work in Par- by the American art historian Ced- 
is in 1923. ly L&ngdale, who is writing tbe de- 


Institute Buys 3 Portraits of Killers 


rtaven . l onncaicui. reo. -o tnrougn lbe sbow 
Apn! Tbe fact that the exhibit is taking 

....... . place at the Whitney is in itself 

* 1a f ttvf-x-Joyce yes regular- ^ lcworthy . The museum has no 
ty m the IHTon London art exhtbi- decorative arts or de- 

nons - sign collection and this is the first 

time it has ventured into the area. 
. r *7,™ “We don’t collect American de- 

treuts of Killers sign,” Phillips explained, “and it 

J did take a bit to convince the rnuse- 

cuted last year, and Gerald Eugene urn, although not too much." 


United Prm iniemuiionut cured last year, and Gerald Eugene 

C HICAGO— The Art Institute Slano. convicted of eight murders. Supported by the Chase Man- 
of Chicago bas bought per- The institute’s director. James hauan Bank and the National En- 
trails of John Wayne Gacy and two .Wood, said the prints “were ac- dowmenl for the Arts, the show, 
other murderers but says it has no quired for their expressive quality which took three years to put to- 
plans to display them. as a visual statement." gether. continues through Feb. 16. 

The institute paid a total of 

$2,700 last month to a Chicago 
artist, Linda Lee. for portraits of 
Gacy, James Autry, who was exe- 


Veith Turske announces 

THE PURCHASE OF 

Knoedler Modarco's interest in 

Knoedler Zurich 

The gallery is now known as 

Turske & Turske 


as a visual statement.'' 


gether. continues through Feb. 16. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


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INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITIONS 


DIEGO GIACOMETTI 

HOMMAGE DE SES AMIS 

September 17 - October 31. 1 

GALER1E EOLIA 

10. rue de Seine - PA.RIS V I* 

(V) i 3 26 56 54 


— Editions du musEe robin ■— 

RODIN’S CORRESPONDENCE 

Tome 1. 1860 - 18W paper bound ?55x240 mm, 54 fcacria* 252 paps FJr. 15tt* 
on sate at Mate RODIN, 77, rue deVweme 75007 Fws TeL 705 01 34 


IPOUSTEGUY 

Recent sculptures 

From September 20 to October 26, 1985. 

GALERIE CLAUDE-BERNARD 

9, Rue des Beaux-Arts, Paris 6 e , lei. : 326.97.07. 


— MUSfeE RODIN — 

77, rue de Varenne, Parb (7«) - Metro Varenne 

Rodin/ Five Contemporary pfiofographera 
Tob BRIMS, ITffdffn RALLb Bnm UfflET, Bernadette THUMB. Wgff TAUSEB. 

Qady (except Tuesday} 10 RJQ^ain. and 2 p.nv - 5:45 pjn. 


GALERIE MERMOZ 

g PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

6# Rue Jean-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. Td.= 359.8Z44 


DENISE RENfc 

196, Boulevard St.-Germafn, PARIS 7th. Id.: 222.77.57. 


PARIS 

= WALLY HNDLAY = 

Galleries International 

now ywk - Chicago - palm beach 
beveriy Mis - pars 


EXHIBITION 

ARDISSONE 

"Light of France" 

Permanent exhibition of 
AUGE, BOUDET, BOURKE, CANU, 
CA SStGNEU, CHAU RAY. FAB&N, 
GALL, GANTNSt, GAVEAU, 
GORRm.HAMBOURG.kBME, 
KLUGE, t£ PHO, MCHR4&IRY, 
NE5SI, VALTAT, NEUQUBMAN, 
StMBARI, VtGNOlES. 

2 Ave. Matignon - Paris 8th 

T*L: 22 S^ 0 J 4 . noMtay On. Mday 

TO bjoc to 1 p.m. . XSO !■ 7 pjn. 

Hofei George V- 723.54.00 
31 Ave. George-V - Paris 8th 

■MB.fcu.ntlOJOaJV -1 p»-U0>»9 Jtm. 


WITHOUT COMMUNISM 

RUSSIA WOULD BE THE GREATEST NATION ON EARTH 

Aatfrei Sakbarov, refena Bonner, Anatoly Sftc&aransJCY, Raoai WaUenOero, Irlno Grtvnfna and a #ewol»er Russian dissMeaft are 
well known In me west. However, they represent only tke Hoof tl»e iceberg. Far example, wbo knows about the cose of Mrs. Oksana 
Methko? Like all other members ot me Helsinki Monitoring Grooo, Mrs. Mesbko hns been ar rested and sentenced to S months 
prison + s rears exile In Siberia lor Anti- Soviet 09 Karon and propaganda. Mrs. Mesbko is » yean QM, suffers from diabetes, 
hypertension, rheumatism, is crippled and almost blind. The te m per a t ur es in Siberia ranee from -TO® to -40° C daring > months of 
the year. Several months ago, she wrote fro m exile: "for me to winter here Is like on u ntra i n ed athlete attempting to climb Mount 
Everest. I live here atone In almost complete Isolation. The winters here ere so ho rreu do as and Hie local Inhabitants frtgbten me. 
I'll never survive atone. . . I hope that good people wUI at least write me. It Is a shame that the mall has got sa had.'* Mrs. Mesbko 
■served' already ie years during the Stalin era: her late husb a nd ond her son served each IS years. Altogether, the Mesbko family 
gave more than 35 years of their lives in prison comps, in spite of several req u ests to the Soviet Authorities for anticipated 
dismissal and for emigration 10 Holland, Mrs- Mesh Ico is stiU in Siberia, where she Is dying all alone in the most disgraceful 
circumstances (or human mankind: a harmless, old woman of BO yean, sick, crippled and almost blind, the entire body lull of 
wounds caused by lice due to lock of hygleoe during w in t er months. This Is only one of tbe more than thousand dramatic coses of 
dissidents, who ere condemned for the rest of their Eves, as well as their families. 

The biooest superpower of the world finds H necessary to out Its own harmless cittuns, even oM women, in exile in Siberia, In 
prison, labour camps or psvchatnc hospitals for criminal acts: rellgioas or bumon-rlghts activities, intention to emigrate, writing 
poetry, letters or articles unpleasant to tlw communist system. 

Information such as names, sentences, family address and prison address of 887 Known' cases of political prisoners, including 
55 women, are complied fan a comprehensive book ot 325 pages, illustrated with more than 3D6 photographs of dissidents. ^ This book 
is edited bv Dr. Crank) Lu bursty and his staff with the help of anonymous co-eperators in the Soviet-Union and several 
organizations and Individuals in the West. The tttle of this enlightening book, pabllshed by the Foundation 'Das Land Und die Wetr 
r.V- Schelllngstrasse «. D-8000 Mbnchen 48, BJL Deutschland, 


4. 

At 


"LIST OF POLITICAL PRISONERS IN THE USSR" 


PARIS 

mmm A REUS ■■■■ 
MAGIE 

DE LA TAPISSERIE 

September 12 to October 10. 1185 
art INTERNATIONALE 
DES ARTS 

12, zuc de ]’H6iel-de-VjDe 
75004 PARIS 
From 1 p.m. lo 7 p.m. 
Saturday and Sunday included 


Action Committees 

Authorities 

Colleges 

Communes 

Consulates 

Councils 

Churches 

Embassies 

Foundations 

Institutions 

Inlernotignol Courts 

libraries 

Ministries 

Hews Agencies 

News MogozJoes 

Newspapers 

peace Movements 

People's Tribunals 

School* 

Trade-Unions 

TV Stations 

The United Nations 

Universities 

Workshops 

World Shops 


Actors 

Activists 

Advisors 

Advocates 

Agents 

Amozoaes 

Anarchists 

Animal Lovers 

A n thr op ologists 

An H-Am erlcons 

ABh-comimmists 

Anh- Popes 

Antl-rachas 

Aristocrats 

Artists 

Ascetics 

Authors 

Believers 

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Captains 

Caro Takers 


Catholics 

Editors 

Jehovah's 

Orators 

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Egotrippers 

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Engineer* 

Jurist* 

Pointer* 

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Entertainer* 

Know-alls 

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Chaplains 

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Fanatic* 

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Feminists 

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Freaks 

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Lower* 

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Cosmopolitans 

Freedom Theologians Madoms-in-Fur 

Poets 

Country Singers 

Fundamentalists 

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Polenwlogists 

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Millionaires 

Policy Mo Hers 

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MJ*.*s 

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Dialectical* 

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Negotiators 

Producers 

Diplomat* 

tanorers 

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Professionals 

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Nurse* 

Professors 

Disbelievers 

initiator* 

Officials 

Promoters 

Doctors 

Innocents 

Opinion Makers 

Propagators 


Prophets 

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Protestants 

Pretest Singers 

Provo's 

Pseudo's 

Psychiatrist* 

Psychologists 

Publishers 

Punk Heads 

Radicals 

Reporters 

Republicans 

Rescuers 

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Roransts 

Sailors 

Sceptics 

Scientists 

Searchers 

Self-den lers 

Senators 
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Show Girls 
Skin-Heads 


Slavicists 

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Solicitors 

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Stalinists 

Students 

Supporters 

Talkers 

Teachers 

Terrorists 

Tbeophlli 

Theologians 

Truckers 

Truth Lovers 
Unopproachataes 
Untouchables 
Vegetarians 
War Heads 
wiseacres 
Worry Heads 
World Trans fo rm ers 
writers. 


Unilateral and Bilateral Disa r mament Activists and any person c on ce r ne d with Human Rights and Peace. 

More than M 0 men ond and women with their families are tfesparateond anxious foron unexpected sign, letters, souvenirs and maybe small g i fts from the West. If you 
wish 10 write, correspond, support, adopter Invite a Rossian dissident, needless to say. your Initiative will bring some hope in the heart of your favorite or protegh(e) 
and might contrtaute to world peoce. Information, valuable directives and a list of arg on no tions, which are ready to assist and advise you, are recommended by Mrs. 
Galina Salevo in her book "Helping band for oppressed dissidents in the Soviet Union" and goes olooa with the List of Prisoners. Dozens of friends are at yoar disposal, 
in the name of the poilttcal prisoners: thank you and may God bless you. 


The Foundation "LRierte-Egallta-Praternlte” alms at exposing the dangers « commiadsm and to help its victinnand oppressed dissidents. Donations welcome. Your 
letters, poems, reactions, suggestions, comments, articles, relevant information are invited and will be published lo the brand newanateriy magazine: "My Opinion” 
Internatloaai. first edition available at the end of the year. send to: L.E.F.- P.O. Bax 134 - NL-37W Ac Bearn - The Netherlands. 



Presents 


GOOD PAINTING 


Until October 12 th 


s CRANE KALMAN GALLERY = 
178 Bnwipfra RuvL London SW3. 
Fine British & European Paintings 
PASON, MONET, DUFY 
SEKU51ER, BOMBERG 
LOWRY, B. NICHOLSON 
M. SMITH, HITCHENS 
SUTHERLAND. DERAIN, etc. 

' Mon- Fri.. IftA. Sub 1M. 

TeL: 01 ■ 58* 7S6fi 



r^ra; : 1 i B 

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■■■*>>?- 

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BRUSSELS 

leonor push -> 

Sepc.Sl -♦ Deb. 31 

La dtamfrt forte 

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Rje des IVIrimeB S7 {Seoksnl 
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Also 

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Total price for the 2 books is US5 25 1 

including postage and decals, payable 
by cheque to the order of and to be 

I mailed to: Liberre~£galite-Fratemil6 
P.O.Box 13M NL- 37110 AD Baarn 

UJ u—MTUMoax*!* 

M.fi ■■ ujewsnu* wiMiwuovt 

toe tancncmaYA 

The Netherlands 








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NYSE Prices at 3-Month Low 


12 Month 

HMUwJw. 


in m i 
2J5 96 
140 1 A 17 
06 25 14 
04 24 14 
1M 13 10 
200 llj 
300 t2 
1175 1X3 
2_20 105 
2510 9.1 

43 

1.90 34 13 
.92 18 23 
2560114 8 
1JB XI 14 
48 ZD IS 
1 « U I 


22 21 % 
57* 57 
28% 28% 
1516 114* 
34% 23% 
26 26 
55% 54* 
24% 24 
48% 48% 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock F-wihany moved lower Friday, finishing 
at the lowest level in three months. 

The broad-based liT^nimi rally that the mar- 
ket staged Thursday extended itself into Fri- 
day’s early activity. The market was mixed 
though much of the session. Tbe potential for 
market gyrations related U> Fridays expiration 
of September stock index futures and options 
contracts contributed to some investor nervous- 
ness, analysts said. 

The Dow Jones industrial average turned 
lower in the afternoon and losses accelerated in 
the last half hour of trading. The Dow finished 
down 8.85 to 1,297.94. For the week the Dow 
fell 9.74 points. 

Declines outnumbered advances, 763-722, 
among the 1,980 issues traded. Volume totaled 
101-39 milli on shares, compared with 10032 
milli on Thursday. 

Before the market opened, government pro- 
jected, in its “flash** estimate of gross national 
product growth, that the economy was growing 
at a mediocre pace of 2.8 percent in the current 
i .quarter. The 2.8-percent. rate was on the low end 
of most forecasts and represented only a slight 
pickup from the revised 1.9- percent growth in 
the second quarter. 

Wall Street's estimates for the GNP estimate 
ranged from 3 percent to 33 percent. 

Peabody International Corp. was tbe most 
active NYSE-listed issue, up % to 10ft. Peabody 
said that litigation between it and companies 
controlled by Victor Posner, an investor, has 


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Amrees 9 

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16* 9% CasflCX 198 12% 11* 12 

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38% 28* CatrpT 80 IJ 1704 35 34% 34% — * 

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51% 35* BallCP 184 25 13 51 57% 55* 57% + *1 

18* 11% BallyMf JO 1.1 597 17* 17* 17%— % 

11% 7* BallvPlc 12 24 10% 10 10% + % 

23% 17% BltGES 170 80 8 1603 21% 21% 21* 

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29* 15% ChfPnT J0e IJ 9 

11* 7% ChkFull -24t 3J271 

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51 36% CinBell X12 63 

19* 13% OnGE 216 1TJ 

39% 29 CinGpf L75 128 

74% 58 ClrtG pf 9J0 1X1 

73% 57% CinGpf 978 137 

100% 77% CinGpf 1262 128 

26* 18* CtnMIl 72 37 

37 28 CIrdK 74 23 

31 18* CirCHy .10 6 

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'78 137 130Z 70% 70% 70% 

LS2 128 2 100 99* 99*— * 

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B4Vj 70 Cticp Pf 775* BJ 500 81% 81% 81%—% 

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13* 7 BASIX .12b 18 9 673 7* 7% 7*— % 

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51* CIvElpt 766 124 
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lOOz 60* 60* 60* + * 
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been settled and that a previously announced 
merger between it and Pullman Co. would pro- 
ceed. 

Rjchardson-Vicks followed, down ft to 46ft. 

AT&T was third, off ft to 21ft. 

Northwest Airlines was tbe session’s biggest 
loser, plummeting 4ft to Sift. 

Cdanese Corp. was the day’s biggest winner, 
climbing 3 ft to 118ft. A major brokerage firm 
upgradra its opinion of the stock. 

IBM lost 1ft to 126ft. It is offering rebates to 
dealers on some of its personal computers. 

In other technologies. Digital Equipment 
added ft to 108ft, Cray Research rose ft to 49ft, 
Burroughs firmed ft to 65ft. Honeywell lost ft 
to 64. 

E.F. Hutton earned ft to 36ft in active trad- 
ing. The stock lias gamed recently on rumors 
that outside investors, possibly led by Sanford I. 
Weill and Lew Ghick&man, plan a takeover. 

TRW added 2ft to 79. TRW said that it 
would buy back up to 8 million of its shares and 
that it was establishing a $ 170-million reserve in 
the current quarter for estimated losses in con- 
nection with a company restructuring. 

General Foods lost 1ft to 83 after its board 
approved anti-takeover measures. Ralston-Pur- 
ina rose 1 to 43ft. It said it would sell one of its 
units for $450 million and would buy bade up to 
five million common shares. 

Among media stocks. Capital Cities Commu- 
nications added 2ft to 205. MG-MUA fell 1ft to 
24ft. United Cable rose 1ft to 31ft. Chris Craft 
Industries added 1ft to 54ft. 

In autos. General Motors dropped l to 67ft, 
Ford lost ft to 43 and Chrysler eased 1ft to 35ft. 


IJ6 XI 12 Via 40* 39* 39*— % 


B* 1% Baker 

>1 3% Baker pt 891 

17* 12% Be I da H 80 

37* 22* BelHwl 66 


109 2* 2 

M 10 23 13% 13* 13*— *1 

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26* 14% CJubAAn JOe .9 18 79 22 

38% 25* CtuettP 1 JO 2J 19 341 36 
24% 16% CUtOtPf 1JD AJ 5 22 


21% 11* COCCtun 80 X4 15 408 
36% 16* Coast I s 80 18 10 419 


~ 22* 72*— % 

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38 15 408 11* 11* 11* + % 

18 10 419 29* 29 29% + V. 


74* BHIAtl 5J0 78 9 2747 90% 


tt 24% BCE S 
27 19* Betlind 


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72 18 18 


47D 30* 30* 30%— * 
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44* 30* Ball Sou 280 7 2 8 3283 39* 39* 39*—% 


57 41* BetflAH JO IJ 

33% 22% Bemls IDO 3JJ 
45* 27% BenfCp 200 5J 
« 30% Benefpf 4J» T18 

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19* 16* Benwrt n L2J 72 


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tS 72 79 rd* Id* 1544— tt 

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74* 59* CocoCI 295 48 14 2511 68* 67% 67% — % 

19* 10* Cotaco _ 1288 13* 18% 18*— % 

32* 25% Coiemn 1J0A5 19 258 24* 26* 25*+* 
28* 22* CpJaPfll 1 J6 5J 37 1334 26* 25 26 

94% 16* Col Aiks 84XB 8 80S 22% 22% 22% + * 


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31 21* CnnNG 260 9J 9 

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18* 9* 

17 9V. 

29 15 

18 9* 
47% 31* 
10* 4* 

4* % 

51% 30* 
4* % 

12 4* 

34* 20* 
38% 16% 
40* 33* 
2% % 
39 27% 

41V, 31 
30% 14* 
27 15 

17 •% 

24% 18% 
27% 17% 
IJ% 11 
48% 30% 
49% 36* 
11 4% 

J** 32 
53* 23 
19% 17* 
52% 49* 
24 18% 

70 40* 

44% 27% 
50* 43% 
65V. 50% 
35% 23* 
33% 15% 
80* 58* 
10 % 8 % 
38% 30% 
52% 33% 


ConsPw 

CnPpfB 420 1 A3 
CnP ptt= 723 14. 5 
CflPPtG 726 145 
OiP prv 480 1S5 
CnP pru 260 158 
CnP PTT 278 111 
CnPpfH 768 146 
CnPprR 4-00 155 
OiPprP X98 IU 
CnPprN 3J5 116 
CnPprM250 14.9 
CnPprL 2.23 T4.9 
CnPurS AJJ1 112 
CnP orK 283 III 
CntICp 260 48 19 


ClIiHo n 

Cntlnta 8 

ConlTri IJ0 7.9 8 
CtDalQ 22 29 
CnDtpf 420 1X5 
vlCookU 

Coopt 152 42 16 
Coopl uf 250 ID 
Coop I pf 2.90 76 
CoprTr .40 27 7 
Coopvls -40 IJ 15 
CootyW 2 21 
CPWfd pf 248 IU 
Cardura J4 38 16 
Corein 26 AM 11 
CornGs U8 IM 19 


» a 19 

180b 48 10 
CroyRs 24 

CrckNpIlia 115 
CrckN pf 2630 5J 
CnmoK 1D0 SJ 12 
CrwnCk 13 

CrwZri 1D0 27 17 
CrZelDl 463 I0J 
CrZel ptC450 7.9 
CulUro JO U 19 
Cull net s 23 

CumEn 220 38 4 
Cwrrlnc 1.10alX7 
CurtW 120 U 16 
CyricM 1.10 U 8 


1103 7% 7% 7%+* 
302 31* 31* 31* 

2002 52% 52% 52% — % 
57Qz 54% 53% SJH — % 
85 29* 28 28%—% 

61 23% 22% 23*— * 

17 25 24% 25 — IU 

lOOz 52% 52% 52% 

16 25% 25% 25% + % 

21 2S* 2SV« 25*— % 

26 24* 24* 24% — % 

7 T7 15% 15% — V. 

43 IS 14* IS + * 

28 26% 26* 26% + * 

13 15% 16* 16*— % 

881 40% 40 * 40%—* 
623 7% 7V, 7*— * 

356 1* 1* I*— * 

« SO 49% SO 

711 % * % + !k 

141 11* 11 11 — * 

642 22% 23% 22% — U, 

1561 18% 18% 18* + * 

230X 37 35% 35 —7 

139 1 ft— * 

938 36% 36* 36* + V. 
1 261 261 261 +66' 
30 38% 37% 38* + % 

192 14* 14% 14% + % 

385 23 22* 27* + * 

43 S% 8% BW 

1 18% 18% 18% 

SI 25 244k 25 + * 

14 11% 11* 11% + * 

<11 46* 46* 46%— * 

11 45 44* 4i% + % 

9 10 10 10—41 

51 36* 36 36 

2609 51 49 49% + * 

0 18* 18% ir"» 

64 52* 52% 52*— * 

14 22% 22* 22% + * 

134 66% 66% 66% — V, 

340 37* 37 37 — * 

45 47 46% 46% 

27 57V, 57V« 57* 

61 35 34% 35 

1944 18 17% 17% + % 

246 65V. 64* 64* — Vs 

5 10% lO’J 10* 

2 36V. 36 * 36V. + * 

66 47 45% 47 +1* 


I 10 61 16* 15% IS* + * 

' 127 12 11% 11* + * 

I 7 1967 24* 23* 23*—% 
13 743 9% 8% 9* + * 

697 S% 8* 8*— * 
i 11 2568 35% 34% 34%— % 
17 1843 40% 39% 3911k 

196 5 4* 4%—* 

9 9S 0* 7% 7% 

I 10 58 18* I8'm 18* 

' 16 ’639 39* 38* 38*— * 

I 7 309 17% 17% 17% + * 
1007 63>i 63 63 

i 18 4| 37* 37V, 37% + % 

I 39 1131 26* 26* 26* + * 

1 9 149 21% 23% 23* + * 

I 7 1380 43% 4 Z% <7% — % 

232 9* 9* 9*— * 

77 IW 38% 38% 38% + % 

13 98 25% 24% 25% + % 

10 5 32* 32% 32% — * 

6 5757 15% 14% 14% — * 

•Ote 74% 74 74% +1% 

lOz 63 63 63 —1* 

TQQz 60';. 60 60 +1 

<7 25* 2S% 25% + * 
15 25% 24* 25 + % 

1 25 24* 2S 

64 25% 25 25% + % 

10 27 26% 27 

11 27 26% 26* + * 

35 30* 30 30% + % 

31 31% 30% 30* + % 

2 114*114 114 — * 

200007 97* 97* 97* +2% 

9 19 18% 19 + % 

11 538 31% 20* 20% + % 

71 17% 16% 17 + * 

II 31 30 30% + % 

3727 16 15* 15% — % 

4 36% 36* 36*— % 

198 20% 20 * 20% + * 

3 89 9% 9% 9% 

10 «n J5 34% 34% + * 

IS 6227 109% 107% 108* + % 
46 1286 85% 85 85* + * 

7 S2 22* 22% 22* + * 

3 2« 5% 5* 5*— * 

. 9* 8% 8%— * 

• 1592 29% 28* 29 — % 

9 41 19% 19% 19% 

15 771 54% 54* 54* + * 

12 65 29% 29* 29* 

12 398 33% 33* 33% 

14 5021 35* 35 35 — * 

20 873 42* 42 43 — % 

23 12% 12* 12* — * 

16 2100 20 19* 19*— % 

21 19% 19 19 

14 202 62% 61% 62* +1% 

14 3422 57% 56% 56*— % 

75 37* 37 37 

„ 2S5 47 46% 47 + % 

8jg« 12* 31% 31* + * 
209002 75% 75% 75% +3* 
TOOi 71 71 71 —I* 

55 26% 26% 26% + % 
7 34% 34 34% + * 

_ SOx 81* 81* 81*— 1 
20 2111 73% 72* 77*— 1% 

7 JE J5Vt T5* 15% + * 

*900; 18 17 18 + % 

50te 17% 17* 17* + * 
297Cx 17% 17 17% 

5507 13% 17% 17% — % 
»I 57 56* 56* —1* 

11 ,-13 ,3 * 13U * '3* + * 

13 1958 27 25% 26% + * 


29 EGG M IJ 18 
15% EQKn 1X6 8.1 
23% E Svri JO 2D 13 
20 EogleP 134 U 9 
12 Eases M 22 
3* EastAlr 11 

1% EAL wtO 
* EALwtA 
7% EtAfrpf 235k 
8% EAlrpfBZJSk 
10 EAlratC 
21* EastGF 1J0 5J119 
M% EastUtl 206 9.6 8 
41% EsKodfi 220 5.1 12 
47% Eaton 1^0 27 7 

10% Etfillns M 27 11 
2a Eckert UM 3J 13 
26% EdlsBr 1J0 SJ 13 
16% EDO JS IJ 13 
22% Edward JO 10 13 
20% E PC dot 235 9J 
27% EPGof X75 1X5 
10% ElTorg J46 J 13 
7% Elear J6 4J 
2% EfecAx 24 

19* Elctapc M J 26 
11* Elgin JO SJ 13 
2% El stint 

65% EmnsEI 260 18 13 
6% EmRpd .941704 10 
15* EmryA JO 29 13 
26% Emhori TJOb 4J 9 
16 EmnDs 1J6 05 7 
4 Emppt JC1 9.9 
4 Emppf JO 105 
EnExc 

22 EmrfCD .72 U 9 
11% EnlsBus J6 20 12 
17* Eraeroi U0 7-4 179 
94 EnsriipfllJOeiao 
17% ErasE* n 1 JOe &9 . 
1* Entree 21 

9* Entera 

15% Enlue 2-50014,0 
17% Entaxln 1J6 7J IT 
19% Equfks 1.14 17 IS 
2% Eautmk 
12% Ecunkot 231 111 
31% EqlRw 172 29 9 
9* Equftac .16 IJ 8 


1498 36% 35* 35%— % 
,14 15% 15% 15% + * 
182 25* 25* 25%— 40 
19 24 23* 23* 

11 19% 19% 19% 

1»7 9% 9 9% 

,78 3* 3% 3% 

345 2* 3 2 — * 

14 21 20* 20* — Vo 

63 23* 23 23 — % 

38 28% 22% 28%— % 
52 32% 22H 22% 

100 21 * 21 21 * + * 
2B01 44% 43 <3*— 1* 

1225 53% 52* 52% — % 
1424 12* 11% 12 + % 

2387 27* 26* 27% + % 
34 32* 32* 32* 

145 16* 16 16 — * 

262 27* 26* 3«k-% 
104 24* 23* 23*— % 
10 27% 27* 27% 

315 14% 14 14 - * 

1 8* 8* 8* — * 
69 4% 4* 4k— * 
.48 26* 26 26* + * 

104 14% 14 14 — % 

190 3 2* 2*—* 

880 79* 69% 69%—* 
1474 9% «9 9 + % 

612 17% 17* 17*— % 

13! 28* 28% 28* + * 

14 20% 20% 20% — * 

460z 4% 4% 4%— % 

3CX 4% 4% 4%— % 

1 * * * 

322 22% 22% 22% 

43 17* 17% 17% + % 

874 21* 21* 21*— * 

200 106 70S 106 
4 ) 29* 20 20% + % 

48 2% 2* 2*—* 
10 11* 10% 11* + * 
173 17* 17* 17* + % 
186 19% 19* 19* 

32 30% 30% 30% - * 
426 4 3% 3% + % 

4 19* 19* 19* 

198 44% 44 44% + % 

73 12* 12* 17% — % j 



Dtv.Yid.PE~ OSHtaRar 




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J0 J 12 939 
1.20 4.1 13 573 
f 250 59 11 

uo u '5 H 
m 2 

116 Xt 8 32<n 
200 7J 2 

248 108 12 

MS 2 7 18 1»5 

.50 IJ 25 44 

xt ff 

-We 16 ’w 
MCbXI 49 153 
lJ3e 9.1 30 

1D0 IJ 11 184 

A) 12 10 1351 


36* +1% 
79% 

4T.e +2% 

3**— * 
25* + % 


1D0 M | 937 
220 X7 12 7318 
2-50 10 13 4195 
JOa 9-4 220 


SDOr 7-4 6 8344 69 
-051 .1 724 38 

5D0 9J IB 54 1 


40* 
10 % 
3% 
24% 9% 

26% 17* 
36 28% 

27% 20 
»* 23* 
30 25% 

30% 24% 
31* 26* 
21% 16% 
23% 17* 

a% 23 

60* 54* 
67* S3 
37% 20* 
23* 12% 
28* 13* 
12* I* 
12* 5% 
27 17% 

64* 48% 
14* 11* 
14% 7* 

7% 1* 

23% 5% 

13* 8* 
4 1% 

39 15* 

35 24* 

30% 24% 
18% 14% 
2B% 19 
45 38* 

34* a* 
21* 10% 
18* 14% 
56% 30% 
21* 15 
41% 31% 
29% 21* 
20 13% 

29% 22% 
30 % 21 % 

»% 2 % 
13% 9 

12 % 6 % 
36% 24* 
7% 4% 

27* 20 
43* 26% 
18* 11* 
16* 10% 

40 30* 
42% 34* 

37% a* 
35* 27% 
19* 14 


.16 U 17 51 5% 

7 1871 14% 
1-56 1.9 131 607 82% 

. 6 86 9* 

UO ti II 969 43 

IJ0 10J 700z 12% 


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9%— * 
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5 5^ 

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7 9% 9% 9% 

511 15* 15 IS* + * 
1095 5376 57% 57%—* 
8344 69 67* 67*— 1 

734 38 36% 37* +1 

IB 54* 53% 54* + % 


35* 2Kh JWTs . L12 JJ 16 74 29% 29 29 — % 

V 23% J River -56 IJ 11 635 33% 33* 33* + * 

128* 16 JOfMwy .12 J 11 255 20V. 19% 19% — * 

13% Iff* JnonF . 1-430127 . 148 lift 11* 11* 

47* 33* JeffPil -1J2 33 7 1045-45?% 45V. 45ft— ft 

33* 24% JorCpf LOO US 7ttt 32 . 32 32 

71 58* JerC pf 935 TZ7 20x 73ft 73* 73* — * 

66* 50 JcrCpf 8J0 1X4 S20Qz 64* 64* 64* + ft 

18% Uft JorCpf XU 123 123 17ft 17% 17ft + * 

12ft 6ft Jewtcr 17 35 IT* lift lift 

40* 30% JohnJn 1J0 29 14 3942 45ft 44* 44*— 1* 

46* 38ft JohrrCn 1 J6o 46 9 63 40ft 40* 40* + * 

Sift SOft JhnCpf 42S 8J 4 SI* 51ft 51ft— * 




Sift SO* JhnCpf 42S 
27% 21ft Joroen 1D0 
26* 17% Justens J0 


4 51* Sift 51ft— * 
9 24ft 34% 34% + * 
435 »* 23% 23*—* 


27* 22* JovMfg 1-40 60 15 28823*23*23* + * 


NAFCO 200 
NBDs L48 
NBI 

NCNB 132 
NCR JB 
ml ind 20 

NUI 232 
NVF 

NWA JB 
NolOd . UO 


11 Sllflk 135 16 


132 XT M «K 
JB 18.50 -2277 


5V, 4ft 4ft— * 
14% 13% 13ft — * 


U0 10J 700z 

13+ 

.» IJ 53 500 
UO SJ 9 

1.10 XS 13 374 
JO 16 21 HU 
100 1X2 7 


132 43 12 591 
.12 J 11 432 
.16 .7346 22 


22 22 BO 87 
260 44 J! 376 
22 

DSo A 5 19S 


13% T3ft — * 
ft 82% + % 
ft 9*— * 
42 —ft 
12 *— % 
3ft 
10 

21ft— * 
30%— ft 
22 

24*— * 
27*— * 
27 +ft 
28*— * 
20%— ft 
20* + * 
25* + * 
65 +1* 

64* + * 
31 + * 1 
16ft + * 
24* + * 
10 

7ft + ft . 
2Dft— ft 
59K— ft 
— .. . .... 13*— V* 
DSe A 5 195 Tift 11* lift + ft 
-13 608 2 1ft 1ft 

1751 37 6 5ft 6 

19 395 10 9ft 9ft— ft 

179 2ft 2ft 2* 

JO J 6 247 31* 31 31* + ft 

1J6 JD 240 31ft 30ft 31 

M0 SJ 8 2185 28% Z7ft 28 + ft 

-52 3-4 IB 17 15ft 15* 15*— * 

JB 14 3427 aft 27% 27ft— % 

280 63 12 451 41ft 60* 40*- ft 

68 22 13 265 30ft 30ft 30% + % 

M 10 7 2W 15% 15* 15% 

, 7 193 16* 16 16* 

1D0 IJ 11 70 51ft 51* 51ft + ft 

USe 11 J 8 16* 16ft 16ft 

1-52 L3 11 Ml 35% 35% 35* + ft 

1X0 U I 1164 24* 23V, 23*— * 

1-72 9J 8 10 17% *7% T7% — ft 

7 12? Z7% 26ft 27* + ft 
132 4J 10 1022 3* Z7% 27% 

_ B 74 5% 5* 5ft + ft 

JO 3J 13 67 9ft 9* 9% 

DB-9 14 1819%9 9% + ft 

IDO X0 9 725 35% 33* 33%— lft 

.16 12 45 115 5% 5 5 — ft 

38 11 II 101 24M V 24 + * 

.90 22 13 600B 4T% 40% 41ft + * 

25 602 15 14% 15 

1-64 127 6 884 13 12% lift 

W0 10-7 300z 41 41 41 +1 

LOB 1X1 3202 42 42 42 + * 

L85 1X7 46 2Sft 28% 28ft— ft 

WO 1X4 34 37% 31* 32% +1* 

40 U 8 331 I8ft 17ft 18 — ft 


KOI 24 29 10 19 

KLMt Jlo 28 8 2065 
KMI of LSfl 109 11 

Kmart 140 43 IO 6020 
KNEnn 219 

KolsrAl -is 4236 

KaisCo JO IJ 6297 

Kaneb -40 L? 536 

KanebPiUSollJ 302 
KCtvPL 236 111 6 699 

KCPLpf 4J5 T26 MXh 

KCPLpt 420 tX9 1002 

KCPLpf 230 120 17 

KCPLPf 233 124 2 

KCSau 1DB 20 » 69 

KCSOPt 1D0 72 30Qz 

KanGE 236 21J 4 2798 
KanPU 296 8J 8 153 
KaPLpf 232 KL6 0 

KaPLpf 223 10-4 9 

Kotvln 77 

Katypf 1-46 29 1 

KoufBr -40 28 4 272 

Koirfpf 120 92 5 

ttaufpf 835 109 4 

Kellogg 1J4 an 16 772 

Krihrt lJO 3J 7 44 

Kenal 277 

Kenmt JO 19 14 86 

KyUtll 264 9.1 9 550 

KerrGI M AD 74 

KwtMc 1.10 U 28 964 

Koygrt 130 U I 21 

KovCan 4 

Key lots 68 X5 17 227 

Ktdde 1J0 10 1124 

Kimba 232 3.9 11 553 

KiigtitRd -76 2? 16 796 

Knogo 17 113 

Kooor 250 96 48 76 

Koimoj- 32 21 43 326 

Kopers 30 AS 307 

Koorpt LOO IU 1002 

KapprpflQDO 106 2 

Korea J3e 29 152 

Kroger 200 L5 II 491 

KuMmi 60 Z1 15 74 

Kvocer J3e Ll M 67 

Kysor J8 46 7 69 


8* 8ft 
17ft 18* + * 
41ft 41ft— ft 
32% '37% + ft 
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17ft 17*— * 
15* 15*— * 
S 8ft— ft 
99*- 99* + * 
19* 19* 

34ft 34ft 
£ 33 — * 

17ft 18ft + ft 
18% 18% + ft 
54% S4%— * 
13 13 + * 

lift 11*— * 
33ft 34*—* 
21ft 21ft 

T ..tb 21* 21*— * 

7 IS 14* 14% + ft 

1 31* 37* 37* +1 . 

2 14% 14% 14*— * 
15% 15* 15* 

80* 80 80* 

60* 60ft—* 
35% 36 + * 

+ 

20ft 20ft — * 
26% 26% 

11 lift + * 
29* 29*— % 
27 27 — * 

3ft 3ft + * 
13% 13ft— 1 
31* 31ft— * 
60 40* + ft 

Eft 35* + % 
15% 15% — ft 
26ft 26ft— tt 
15 15% +ft 

16% W%— ft 
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94* 94V, — U 
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ISft 19 + % 

29* 29% + % 
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1D0 IJ 11 70 51% 

USellJ 8 16* 

1-52 L3 11 Ml 35% 

1X0 U g 1164 24* 

1-72 9J 8 10 17% 


32% 22* KailFB 1D0 U 


437 28ft 2ft 25% + ft 


LAC n 336 

LN Ho 2J7o9J 10 13 

L LE fty 22*182 678 

LLCCp 123 

LLCvri 231 

LTV 8074 

LTV A, 631 19 112 

LTVcf - 5 

15* LTVpf 104 17J 74 

40 LTVpf 5J5 1ZJ S3 
10* LTV Pf 121 11D 12 

10* LQutrfl 22 92 

18* LodGs UO 76 7 78 

6% Lafarge JO 27 43 

23 Lofrgpf 244 106 1 

8* Lamars J4 18 11 12 

1% LamSes 194 95 

10% Lawtlnt st, 52 15 141 

11* LearPt. JB IJ 1)59 

21% L-earPpf 287 1X3 14 

LearSg 200 42 9 559 

LeoRrHS 60 25 13 44 

LswvTr UO 46 13 293 
L MEM .92 23 IP 178 
LooMas JQb 1 J M 59x 
Loo Plat 22 11 10 7 

LohVol ■ 120 

Lohmn USellJ 221 

Lennar JD U 11 98 

LeucNts 3 65 

LOF l» 28 8 113 

LOFpf L7S 63 S 

LjbtyCp 22 13 15 713 
Lilly 320 37 12 550 

Unites s .14 6 27 300 


326 24% 
13 30% 
08 12* 
123 1% 

231 I* 
8076 7* 

112 lift 

5 *7 

74 17* 
53 41* 
12 11 * 
92 13ft 
78 22* 
43 7ft 

iS* 


24% + ft 
30*— ft 
12% + ft 
1% + ft 
lft 

6% — ft 
11 — % 
47 — ft 
17* + ft 
41* + * 

lift— ft 
13ft +.* 
22ft + ft 

£ 

lift— * 


NWA JO IT 2312507 
IJO 5.1-13 255 

NtCnvs J6 XJ 14 415 
NotDW 22fl 69 28 <37 
NDMpr 1J5 96 103 

NaiEflo IS 535 

NatFG* 2JB IX 7 17 

NFGpf 230 96 1 

NatGyp 228 4J 7 226 
NtHom 25 

Nil JS 20 503 

Nil pt 5D0 B.9 1T1 

NAItaflE J2 2J 12 2062 
N Mints . 3 

NtPritri 1D6 X9 -12 168 
WtSerol 33 3877 

MtSem pf 4J0 7J 275 
NtSvcJn IDO 12 11 338 
NStand 60 27 24 17 

Norco -640 56 7 4 

NovPw 284 96 9 98 

NovPpf 2J0 11D 203 

NowSvL JO 53 V 74 

NEngE) 360 .17 6 .76 
NJtoc 220 S3 9 30 

NYS6G 254 106 7 442 
NYSpf 175 11J 6th 
NYSpf 3-80 121 1O0X 
NYSDf 212 113 23 

NYSnfD 375 126 7 

Nowell JO 10 10 134 
Nowtiat .64 .17 36 .10 

Nowbll 1J00106 5 6 

NwtURs 72* 8J 8 64 

Nowmt IDO. 24 33 513 
Nwpark - 43 

NlaMP 208 1M 4 1980 
NlaMof AID IU . 20Qz 
NiaMpf 4JS T20 200z 

NtagSh 1J50121 42 

NiaoJet .12 J 17 377 
HI COR 2D4 102 468 

NcMAf - ,12b J 49-1194 
MortRg 8 55 

Norflcso 360 5D 9 7014 
Martin 29 

Narrir 260 53 9 128 

U0rofrpfL430S7 395 

‘foriok JB J .6 65 

MACaat IJfl 20 7 13 

MAPWI 1D0 3D 8 57 

173e 96 10 12 

HaeriUt L58 97 S 834 
flndPS 136 1X6 TO 1001 
■toStPw X52 77 * T78 
•fSPwpf 4J0 ioj loaax 

4arT« 30 1472 

«»aw#» 27 

1JD 25 10 776 

s&e fi *~. v 

tartan 2J00 56 13 life 

tarwst UO 73 15 1718 

tavo - Jio l.I TO .894. 

SSK -S, ■* 12 

IfrfrES 3Bi -AT 

I YN EX' 660 7J 0 2004 

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-35* BVl— * 
31ft 31% — ft 

H* n» + * 
28* 28* _ * 

51% 52% —3* 
23% 23% 

25% 25% + ft 
TO* 11 — * 

32 32 — * 

TO* T9ft + * 
18 ft Wft+ ft - 
25% 26—15*9 
24* 74ft + *~ 
A 40 —ft 
3% 3ft + ft 
25* 26 +ft 
56 56 

23% 23%— ft 
7ft 7ft 
27% 27ft 
12* 12*—% 
52% 53 +* 

30% 31 
MV 14%—* 
lift lift— ft 
29ft 38ft— ft 
21 21 + * 

9* 9*— ft 
41*. 41* 

7Sft 25ft + ft 
8ft. 24ft 
31* 3T»— ft 
73 -73 + ft 
18 18* + * 
29% 29ft— * 
16% 16ft + V. 
53% 54* + % 
IT* .17*— ft 
8* 8ft + U 
41ft 41ft— ft 
1* 1* 

18 18 — » 
35* 35* — 1* 
40* 40* 

14ft IS* + ft 
13 13*6 + * 

29* 29ft + * 
13ft 14* +% 
13ft *13% 

67* 67ft + ft 
12* 12*— ft 
43* 43ft— * 
S2% S2%— ft 
15* 15% + * 
56* 56* + * 
32% 33 — MMg 

18 , 18* + SP 

15ft -16 + W 

11* Tl* — * 

46. 44 
66 66 —1 
33* 33*—% 

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a 48 — % 
n* 2i* 

B* 8* + * 

23% 2* "■ 

»*«*-% 

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•'*& M'.Ml 


5* I* Oaklna 
36* Z5% OokJIkP U2 42 12 
35* 23* OcdPef 250 86 9 
14% 9*OedPvrt 


21ft- * | SJ 9^E •* iS 



33% 25% Hafbtn 1 JO 70 11 2335 26* 25% 25ft— * 

1% ^ Hallwfl gun 190 1% I* 1% + ft 

11% 5% Halted Pf J6 62 37 9 8% 9 + * 

42% 26ft HamPS 1J6 .X4 « W0? « «* + $ 


15* 12 itoJS' H7O10-I S IS? iS Vs + * 
21* 17 HcnJI 13<a 9.1 M a 7m 

20 16* Hotxfl 6 J6 2J 13 177 22% 22 22 

20% 16 HondH 66 14 M 17 18% 18* 18W- ft 

21* 16ft Homo M 26 21 14 17 14% 14ft — % 

68% 35* HorBrJ UK U 15 182 56 53 55ft + ft 

36% 21% Harlnd » J6 IJ 19 ID 31 3Wk 31 + % 

12% 7% Hamah 21 178 9ft 9* 9% 

28% 24* Haro pfB 360 117 36 24ft »% 24%- * 

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BUSINESS / FINANCE 



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ECONOMIC SCEWE 

Calcnlatmg the Burden 
Of Reagan’s Tax Proposals 

. ®y DAVID E. ROSENBAUM 

• N « York Tunes Service 

ih?2fto } 5 >l h ' “~ llM : re ff* ways to analyze 

toe rffeci of changes in U.S. tax law on people in 

Sn^hnr^n 0rae .i Ca ^^: a process lhat *» P^nere 
. h awnk ca ^ burden analysis. One common wav is to figure 
the average percentage increase or decrease in «»»»* in Sch 

S dS^ 680 ^ - Another U 10 calcu^te the increase or deciSS 

_ This week, as they made plans to begin drafting what mav be 
the most thorough overhaul of the federal income-tax system in a 

JJ^SJrflSS members ? f S® Hoase Wa ys and Meai^Commii- 
EJUJ t« e new burden analysis of President Ronald 

Reagan s tax proposals by the 

committee staff. The analysis rn 
stimned the lawmakers, in- The analysis Stunned 

eluding some of the presi- „ - f 

dent’s staunchest supporters. CVCtt Some Oi the 

president’s staunchest 

age increase in after-tax in- supporters, 
come, the amount left over af- rr 
ter income taxes are paid and 
payroll taxes withheld. 

It showed that taxpayers in every income class below $75,000 a 
year would have an increase in after-tax income in 1 987 of around 
1 percent if the president's entire package were wiartfd For 
example, taxpayers with incomes of $10,000 to $20,000 would get 
an average increase of 1 2 percent, those from S20.000 to $30,000 
would get nine-tenths of 1 percent, and those from $50,000 to 
$75,000, 1.1 percent. 

But the average rise in after-tax income for those with gross 
incomes between $75,000 and $100,000 would be 1 .9 percent, and 
for those between $100,000 and $200,000. 2.4 percent. And for 
taxpayers with incomes of more than S200.000, it would be a 
whopping 6 percent. 


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— approve a Ml that gives the richest group ^ 
spendable income six times greater than lhat given taxpayers of 
modest means. 

O F THE nearly 100 million tax returns Filed every year, 
fewer than 200,000 show incomes greater than $200,000. 
Even the most ardent congressional advocates of supply- 
side economics know that two-tenths or 1 percent of the taxpay- 
ers do not cast many votes. Here are some of die steps that the 
Ways and Means Committee may take so lhat the tax benefits in 
its bill will not be so heavily skewed toward the wealthy: 

• Raising the proposed top tax rate. The main reason that the 
Reagan plan would be so advantageous to the well-to-do is that 
the maximum tax rate would be reduced to 35 percent from 50 
percent. Mr. Reagan and his aides argue that if the top rate is cut 
far enough it would stimulate productive economic activity and 
discourage the use of tax shelters. 

The administration's critics note that tax-shelter investments 
have actually increased since 1981, when the maximum rate was 
cut to 50 percent from 70 percent. The way 10 attack tax shelters, 
they say, is to impose a stiff minimum tax. 

There is considerable sentiment on the committee for putting 
the upper-income tax rate at 40 percent, if not higher. Treasury 
Secretary James A. Baker 3d has said that the president has 
drawn “a line in the sand” on the question of the m a xim u m rate. 

. — • Limiting the tax break on capital gains. Mr. Reagan would 
reduce the top rate on capital gains to 175 percent from 20 
percent In justification, the administration dies a Treasury 
Department report last week showing that reductions in capiial- 
gains taxes in 1978 and 1981 (the top rate went to 20 percent from 
49 percent) “resulted in modest increases in economic growth, 
capital formation, productivity and long-run consumption lev- 
els” without significantly reducing federal revenues. 

Those worried about giving away too much to the wealthy cite 
another observation in the same Treasury study, the one stating: 
“Income from capital gains and capital-gains taxes are highly 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 4) 


The Steel Market 



Imports 

Imports' share of tire U.S. steel 
market, m percent 

1 — 40% 



Operating Capacity 

Domestic steel capacity utilization, 
in percent 

--— 100 % 



J'MttJ S H J M MJ 


?a£v£ 

. ‘ n- rr rr V T Wri ’i i ri. . 

J MMJ.SNJ M M J 

Source' American IronantSSieei institute 


Tha Haw M Taw 


Steel in U.S.: Focus Shifts to Price Wars 


By Daniel F. Cuff 

New York Tunes Sernee 

NEW YORK — For the US. steel indus- 
try. imports remain a worry, but they are noi 
the dominant issue they were a year ago when 
the president's program to control foreign 
shipments was announced Today, the main 
problem is closer to home: The mills are 
caught up in a fierce baule among ihemsd ves 
for market share and are cutting each other 
up on prices. 

“The complaint isn't about imports any- 
more: it's about domestic price-cutting'' said 

Chair man, some board members quit at 
Wheding- Pittsburgh SteeL Page 11. 

Charles A Bradford, steel analyst at Merrill 
Lynch & Co. 

"On the surface, there are signs of progress. 
After years or trauma, the major nulls are 
trim and relatively efficient. Tne results of 
their effort to reduce costs have received 
strong praise from analysis. The complacent 
management altitudes are gone, replaced by a 
competitive breed. Some companies have 
been turning a profit even with the rampant 
price-cutting 

Bui the improvement that has occurred 
cannot be credited to the import program. 

“Looking ahead a year ago at this time 
with the present import program,” said James 
N. Rudolph, analyst at Wertheini & Co., 
“one would have expected the industry would 
have been doing nicely by September 1985. In 


terms of expectations, things are worse.” 

In the past year, one major mill, Wbeehng- 
Piusburgh Steel Co„ entered into bankruptcy 
proceedings and is being struck by the steel- 
workers' union over its plan to reduce wa$es. 
Troubles have spread to many small mills, 
and plant closings have continued. 

The battle for market share among the 
major mills is said 10 be fierce: led by United 
States Steel Corp^ a company that used to 
announce the price increases that the rest of 
the industry followed. UjS. Steel has in- 
creased its market share to 17.6 percent in the 
second quarter from 16 percent in the first, 
Mr. Bradford estimated. 

“The industry has had a price collapse, 
which is hurting the second half,” said Peter 
Marcus, steel analyst at Paine Webber. The 
price of some products has fallen by as much 
as $70 a ton this year, he said. ' 

To be sure, imports still provide some pres- 
sure on prices, and the industry is still looking 
to the import control program to take hold. 

President Ronald Reagan, who has denied 
import relief to many industries, announced 
the steel program on Sept. 18. 1984. as the 
presidential election neared. The program 
called on countries to agree voluntarily to 
limit their imports. But setting up the pro- 
gram took longer than expected and controls 
were not generally in place until spring. 

The president's five-year program set its 
sights on reducing foreign market share to 
18.5 percenL In July, import penetration fell 
to 21.9 percent, from a worrisome 28.1 per- 


cent in June. August figures woe not imme- 
diately available. 

Donald H. Trautlein, chairman of the 
American Iron and Steel Institute as well as 
of Bethlehem Steel Corp.. said July's perfor- 
mance created hope that the program “may 
be beginning to have some effect,” 

But even if the program succeeds in bring- 
ing imports under control, some analysts fear 
lhat the rewards will be short term. They fear 
that import controls will increase the imports 
of finished products that contain steel, hurt- 
ing the customers of the mills and eventually 
the sted industry itself. 

John C. Tumazos, analyst at Qpp enhdmcr 
& Co., said he expected a 1 -percent decline in 
demand for domestic steel next year, even 
with trade protection. He believes’the devel- 
opment of plastic auto body panels will dis- 
place 4 percent of domestic steel shipments 
over the next decade. 

In the recent past, steel consumption has 
declined because of trends towara smaller 
cars and aluminum bev erage cans. Many ana- 
lysts believe that any major gain in consump- 
tion in this business' cy cle, such as in durable 
goods, has already oixurred. 

All this means that the milts must continue 
to cut costs, analysis say. They fear that any 
short-term success brought abour by import 
controls would coo! the desire to hold down 
expenses and whet the unions' appetite for a 
larger share of the pie. 

U5. steel producers may do some import- 
(Con tinned on Page 1L CoL 1) 


Japan Reports 
1.9% GNP Rise 
For 2d Quarter 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispairho 

TOKYO — Japan, which has 
been criticized by trading partners 
for its massive trade surplus- on 
Friday reported strong economic 
growth in the April-Jime quarter 
that was based to a large extent on 
rising exports. 

In a preliminary report, the Eco- 
nomic Planning Agency said Ja- 
pan’s gross national product grew 
in the second quarter at a rate of 1.9 
percent, adjusted for inflation, well 
above the revised first-quarter 
growth rate of 0.2 percent. Gross 
national product is the measure of 
a country’s total output of goods 
and services. 

The quarter’s increase translates 
into a 12- month annual growth rate 
of 7.9 percent, adjusted for infla- 
tion, compared with a 0.8-percem 
annual rate in January- March. 

Masahiko Koido. Sumitomo 
Bank’s chief economist, said the 
main reason for the strong growth 
was a 4. 9-percent increase in ex- 
ports. compared with January- 
March. when they fell IJ percent 
from fourth-quarter 1984. 

Exports accounted for I percent- 
age point of the 1. 9-percent in- 
crease; agency officials said, with 
the remainder attributed to in- 
creased domestic demand. Officials 
said the increase in exports was led 
by car shipments to the United 
States and television shipments to 
China. 

Consumer spending, an indica- 
tor of domestic demand, rose just 
0.7 percent, slowing from 0.9 per- 
cent in the first quarter. The offi- 
cials attributed the decline to a lack 
of increase in workers' incomes. 

Plant and equipment investment 
soared 5.3 percent from the preced- 


ing quarter and 12.6 percent from 
the like period a year earlier. 

Japan's domestic demand has 
been one of the major subjects in its 
trade talks with foreign countries 
which are urging Japan to stimulate 
domestic markets to help rectify 
trade imbalances. 

The government of Prime Minis- 
ter Yasuhiro Nakasone is expected 
to announce measures to spur do- 
mestic demand in October, before 
his scheduled visit to the United 
Slates. The issue is likely to be a 
major one in talks between Mr. 
Nakasone and President Ronald 
Reagan. 

The preliminary GNP report 
comes amid a growing dispute over 
Japan's huge trade surplus with the 
United Stales, which is expected to 
reach S50 billion this year. The U.S. 
trade deficit with Japan rose to S37 
billion last year and Washington 
has put heavy- pressure on Tokyo to 
cut the surplus. 

Members of Congress have 
warned that Washington was likely 
to retaliate by passing protectionist 
legislation unless Japan does more 
to open its markets to foreign 
goods and boost spending by Japa- 
nese consumers. 

Tokyo and Washington ended 
an agreement on voluntary' quotas 
for car exports to the US. market 
earlier this year, but Japan said it 
would still “restrict” shipments to 
2.3 million cars in the year that 
began April I. an increase of 
450.000 from last year. 

Mr. Koido said more than a third 
of Japan's exports go to the United 
States. He said Japanese exports 
would probably continue to grow 
in the current quarter. 

t Reuters. UPI. AFP ) 


Mexico Out of Compliance With IMF Plan, Blocking $900 Million in Aid 


J Oirmicy Rafes 


By Nicholas D. Krisrof 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Mexico has fall- 
en out of compliance with an aus- 
terity program established by the 
Internationa] Monetary Fund, a 
move that probably will cost it 
more than S900 million in IMF 
assistance and substantially com- 
plicate its relations with creditor 
banks, financial sources say. 

jThe IMF confirmed Friday that 
Mexico was out of compliance, but 
stressed that there haul been no 
break in relations between the two 
rides, Reuters reported from Wash- 
ington. In an unusual formal state- 
ment. the IMF said it was mislead- 
ing to imply that it bad made a 
“decision to cut off** Mexico from 
access to Fund resources.] 


The fall from compliance — cou- 
pled with the economic demands of 
reconstruction after Thursday's 
earthquake — is a major blow to 
Mexico’s efforts to emerge from the 
burden of its S96-billion foreign 
debt. If these difficulties discour- 
age foreign banks from making 
uew loans to Mexico, putting the 
country in a severe cash squeeze, 
then the government might de- 
mand easier terms of repayment to 
the banks or even curtail payments. 

The dual blows of the probable 
loss of IMF money and the earth- 
quake come at a difficult time for 
Mexico, as falling world oil prices 
have cut sharply into its export 
earnings. Mexican officials, includ- 
ing President Miguel de la Madrid, 
already had taken a tougher line on 
the debt issue in recent weeks in 


public speeches, asserting that new 
ways would have to be~ found to 
address the Third World’s debt 
problems. 

Mexico feB from compliance be- 
cause various economic statistics 
— including the size of its govern- 
ment budget deficit — exceeded 
targets set by the IMF as condi- 
tions for receiving fund money, the 
financial sources said. The costs of 
rebuilding cities after the earth- 
quake will only increase the size of 
the budget deficit, and the fMF 
almost surely will not make an ex- 
ception because of the earthquake, 
the sources added. 

The fund always refuses to dis- 
cuss whether countries are missing 
their economic targets. Thursday 
night, a spokesman for the IMF 
declined to say whether Mexico 


w as out of compliance, but added 
lhat S908 million remained in a 
three-year, S3.4-billion fund pro- 
gram that expires at the end of 
I9S5. 

Banking sources said that Mexi- 
co could still return to compliance 
with the targets later this year and 
claim the S908 million, but that it 
was unlikely the economy could be 
turned around quickly enough. Ne- 
gotiations have not yet begun on a 
program beginning in 1986, one 
source said. 

“It's an extremely difficult situa- 
tion for Mexico; there's no doubt 
about that,” said Komal S. Sri- 
Kumar, who runs a consulting ser- 
vice in New York on the economies 
of Latin .American countries. 

Mr. Sri-Kumar. for 
said that the government's 


deficit was likely to be about 8 
percent of total economic output in 
1985, compared with a target set by 
the IMF of 5.1 percent. 

The second largest debtor in the 
developing world, after Brazil, 
Mexico was widely viewed as the 
Latin debtor farthest on the road to 
recovery. It was also the Grst debt- 
or country to achieve an agreement 
with international banks to stretch 
out repayments on several years of 
debt obligations. 

But a few banks stffl have not 
signed that repayment package, 
and they could refuse to do so now, 
bankers said. They added, howev- 
er, that the rescheduling itself prob- 
ably would not be jeopardized. 

The fall from compliance could 
discourage international banks 
from making new loans to Mexico, 


however, and the country has said 
lhat it needs $225 billion from for- 
eign banks through the end of next 
year. It might ask for even more, 
bankers say. 

If Mexico cannot obtain new fi- 
nancing, some bankers said pri- 
vately, the country could reduce its 
debt payments, jolting efforts 
across Latin America to resolve the 
region's $ 360-billion foreign debt 
problem. 

The World Bank has been nego- 
tiating a loan of several hundred 
million dollars to Mexico, to ease 
the country’s capital needs and re- 
duce the possibility of a new debt 
crisis, according to a source dose to 
the bank. It was not dear whether 
the earthquake or the fall from 
compliance with the IMF would 
affect those negotiations. 


GraMKates 

s 

Amsterdam UUS 
Brussels (a) sms 

Frankfurt 2MB 
im UM 


SepL 20 


1 

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F-F. ILL. 

Gfatr. 

SJF. 

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112415 • 

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Pam BJW 

Tokyo 

Zurich USDS 

i ecu «zm 

I SDR 1JB982 - 

CkufoBS m U mdon one Zurich. tn other European carter % new Yo rk roles of C PM. 

(a) Commercial franc (oi Amooots needeo to t>uyaoeoouru)(cj Amounts noetSed to ba ron e 
dotorTvttoteoflOO M of UOOM UnltsofiaM>N.Q.:notauaUm; NA.: not ovaftaOto. 
(ml To bar one pound: SUSJJJ5 
Other Dollar Values 


■ : Currency per U&S 

■ Aram, austral 0J0 

• AuhtroLS 1-SW3 
Aottr.sehH. 2M2 
- Befe.fla.fr. 58J5 
Brail crus. 7 MjN 
>S 14773 
t 1047 

■ In* pou n d 13t 


Comacr w or UAS 
F to. markka 4.125 

Greek drac. 13000 
HaaUNl 7J)4J 
liKflonrveee 1 X 3001 
indo. nurfatx 1,12240 
iruh s esm 

Israeli then. MHUU 
Kuwaiti dinar 04050 


Currency t* 
Malar, naa 
Meapaso 
Mena krone 
mens 
Port, escudo 
Saadt rival 

Stoas 

& Air. rand 


r U44 
24985 
38000 
847 
1043 
17150 
44538 
2408 
7*nn 


Currency w 
S.Kor.woa 


Sweatveea 

TBh«ll 
Thai bate 
Turkish ora 
UAK dirham 
vaau.boHv. 


r u As 
89145 
17110 
0425 
4047 
27405 
551J0 
34725 
1445 


ESta-ftne: 1457 Irish c ■■■■- , 

. lOnKMKl; Banos CammercMe Italian: l Moan). Bonaire r*o- 

~ tTOkvo): IMF (SOM: BAN (dinar, rlyal ArtumH. 

-■ other data (ram Reuters and AP. 


Interest Rates 


B m nv u mmvy 

Dollar D-Mark Franc 

T menRi IMh 

Smooths WWW 4*4* 4*4^. 

3 means 8M* 

Smooths IMk 4SW4M. 

f nor 8«rOSW 49W9V 


SepL 20 


Sierthw 

Frcncfc 

Franc 

ecu 

SDR 

iin-m* 

9ft-9ft 

Mft 

7» 

|1 Krll % 

VSfrWi 

nuv* 

7% 

11 Krll * 

fft-Ffe 

sift-n* 

79k 

11 IW-11 *• 

lOVh-lQft 

SIW-SSL 

79k 

11 Vh-11 * 

11-1116 


S*w 



, ^ - Itrear F Fi: Uavds Bunk tECUH Reuters 

■ ■ ■ Sources: ^raan G^antyJ^^ „ w mton minimum tor eauteatentl. 

/SDR). Rtdosapullcnble to Udertiank aemw ^ ^ 

K*yMoMyBa«»V 

noted States 


.20 


DUceewtRete 
Federal Feeds 
Prime Rote 
.Brekar Lead Bote 
Q* Paper »W dors 
1 ramth Treasury Bills 
tern* Treamry BOS 
.CD* see* dan . 


*2U 




Jt; i ■■*» » 
n, U.y 

51 ’’ii -■&. 

4-‘ 



Prwf. 
m Th 
j unt 715/1* 
9ft 9ft 
ew-9 Wr9 
7JS 745 
un 706 
741 742 

740 TAB 
7M 740 


548 

450 

445 

476 

458 


550 

448 

455 

478 

475 


Prance 

Uderreettoft Re* 
-GoBMoaer 
O mm ee t hl utuU a nk 
fcwwrtti lifleme rti 
tBiMitti leierhaek 

frUnto 

Book Boh ROM 

cattMeeey - 

tidoy Treasury WO 
>moatb Interbank 


m **> 
m 9* 
me «• 
Bint 9 7/1* 
9 ft « 


lift n» 
lift 

n in* 

ii an* n^ 16 


•' , a" 

■ 1 ^ IU . V 


TO tarn* Rest 
Cel Mum 
- OMiy htfertasfc 


S 

47/1* 


Reuters. Ommetshof*' 
Lvoonnts. Ban* ol Tokyo 


S 

6 7/M 

Crfdff 


Aslan Pollnr P epowi te ~ 

ivio 

Ift-BW 

Bsw-Blfc 
WA-* 


I mean 

j month* 

j month* 

6 month* 

1 year 
Source: Reuters 


PA IHtoney Mw** 1 Fronds 

SefL20 

Merrill Lynch Brody Assets 
jodBTpveraoeyieU: 7.1* 

Teterate lolemst Hate index: 7422 

Source: Morrill Lynch. TWrrate 



AM. V* 

unna a# png 31940 I1M0 

Hong eiRrtQ — 

Ports (125k»J) E0» 3ll75 

Zurich 319.15 

London „ 

He- York - 


SepL 20 

one 

+ 330 
+ U8 
+ 355 
+ 200 
+ 1B5 
-008 


at, Ports and t-tuAan aMcM «k- 
LiMembOunbPB™°* , Zufjch epenfflc and 

YorK Comae current 

Source: Reuters. 


Business Bears the Brunt 
Of Australia Tax Reform 

By David Skinner 

Reuters 

SYDNEY — Australia’s busi- 
ness sector will bear the brunt of 
the package of tax-reform mea- 
sures announced this week by Trea- 
surer Paul Keating, accenting to 
economists and businessmen. 

Bui it is too early to fully assess 
the impact of the changes, which 
vary in the timing of their introduc- 
tion, they said. 

The measures include an in- 
crease in company tax to 49 percent 
for 1986-87, from 46 percent, ac- 
companied by an end to double 
taxation of dividends, a capital- 
gains tax, lax cm foreign earnings 
and tax on fringe benefits to be 
paid by employers. 

The package appears to contain 
a number of pluses and minuses for 
growth ana economic develop- 
ment, the Business Council of Aus- 
tralia said. 

Eric Mayer, the chairman of the 
council’s task force on taxation re- 
view, said the council was con- 
cerned about the significant overall 
increase in business tax, given the 
current fragile investment climate. 

He said it was also concerned 
about the fringe-benefits tax, the 
impact of the capital-gains tax on 
investment and incentive, notably 
on small businesses, and the impact 
of the foreign-credits tax on efforts 
by Australian companies to . ex- 
pand, he said. 

Foreign earnings will be taxed 
from 1987-88 after credits for for- 
eign tax. 

Mr. Mayer said the council en- 
dorsed cuts in the personal income- 
tax marginal rates. The top rate will 
faO to 49 percent from GO percent 
in two stages. He said, however, 
that the endorsement was qualified 
because the cuts will be made over 
time and will be financed signifi- 
cantly by the corporate sector. 

The council has strongly sup- 
ported ending double taxation of 
dividends, but it did not accept that 
imputation should be at the ex- 
pense of increases in company tax, 
he said. 

Under a system of imputation, 
corporations are obliged to “im- 
pute” to their shareholders a tax on 
dividends, which is then forwarded 
to the government as an advance 


Paul Keating 


tax. Without imputation, compa- 
nies are obliged to pay a corporate 
tax and to deduct tax from divi- 
dends. 

The council is also concerned 
that tax scales were not indexed 
Without indexation, the tax system 
will continue to disintegrate, Mr. 
Mayer said. 

Mr. Keating, is announcing the 
reform package before Parliament 
Thursday, said a breakdown of the 
tax system was the major reason for 
the changes. 

Mr. Mayer said the council re- 
gretted the dropping of the broad- 
based consumption tax originally 
supported by Mr. Keating. The 
proposal was dropped after it was 
severely criticized by unions and 
sections of the governing Labor 
Party at a tax conference in July. 

Economists generally agreed 
with Mr. Mayer’s assessment of the 
changes, although they said it was 
not easy to foresee the overall im- 
pact 

They said imputation and cuts in 
marginal rates were long overdue 
but noted that the tax cuts would 
be financed by ‘‘bracket creep” as 
well as the extra tax on business. 


Britain Reports 
Growth in GDP 
In 2d Quarter 

Reuters 

LONDON — Britain’s gross 
domestic product rose an aver- 
age of 5 percent in the second 
quarter from a year earlier, ac- 
cording to provisional figures 
released Friday by the Central 
Statistical Office. 

Allowing for distortion 
caused by the coal miners’ 
strike that ended in March, the 
growth rate was 4 percent, the 
office said. Government 
sources said that after adjust- 
ment for the coal dispute, gross 
domestic product showed very 
liule growth between the first 
and second quarters. Gross do- 
mestic product measures a 
country's output in goods and 
services, minus investment in- 
come from operations abroad. 

Real income grew by 4 per- 
cent between the second quar- 
ters of 1984 and 1985, while 
consumer spending at constant 
prices rose 2 percent in the peri- 
od. General government expen- 
diture expanded about 1 per- 
cent between first and second 
quarters this year, to about 1 
percent higher than in the sec- 
ond quarter of 1984. 

Commenting cm the figures, 
the Central Statistical Office 
said there was no dear pattern 
that would allow a firm predic- 
tion cm when the next turning 
point in economic activity 
would occur. 


IMF Lowers World Growth Estimate 


Bv Hobarc Rowen 

li'jshtKgtor. Post Senice 

WASHINGTON — Because the 
U.S. economic outlook is “less 
buoyant,” the International Mone- 
tary Fund staff has scaled back 
economic growth estimates for 
global economic activity in 1985 
that it made only sax months ago, 
according to officials at the agency. 

The figures are part of the IMF's 
World Economic Outlook report, 
which will be released on Oct 6 in 
Seoul during the meeting of the 
IMF Interim Committee, the agen- 
cy’s policy board. 

Officials said Thursday that the 
report would project the real 
growth rate oT industrial countries 
at about percent for 1985, down 
from the 3.1 percent forecast last 
spring, and far below the 4.9 per- 
cent of 1984, which was the highest 
in almost 10 years. 

But for 1986. tlx staff saw a 
slight improvement over 1985 to a 
rate of 3.1 percent, reflecting an 
expected modest recovery in the 
United States next year. This also 


reflected a marginal pickup from 
the IMF's spring forecast for the 
industrial countries for 1986 of 3.0 
percent 

On a global basis, the IMF fore- 
cast for 1985 is a growth rate of 3.1 
percent, down from 4 j percent in 
1984, and 03 percent, down from 
the spring forecast of 3.4 percent. 
For 1986, the global forecast is un- 
changed at 3.4 per-cent. 

“There’s more concern about the 
world economic outlook than there 
was in the spring,” an IMF spokes- 
man said. “Not only does the 
American picture look softer, but 
oi) and other commodity prices are 
down. Everything is a little less 
positive.” 

But another IMF official offered 
a slightly bright® perspective. “In 
reality ” he said, “what the staff is 
forecasting now is a steady 3-; 
cent trend for the two years, H 
86. That is reasonably positive, and 
I think shows quite a bit of strength 


which are heavily dependent on the 
trend in the industrial world, the 
staff predicted a decline to real 
growth of 32) percent in 1985 from 
3.75 percent in 1984, but a gain to 4 
percent in 1986. 

At the time the IMF made its 
forecasts for the spring meeting of 
the Interim Committee in Wash- 
ington, the estimate on U.S. eco- 
nomic growth for 1 985 was 3 J per- 
cent down from 6.8 percent in 
1984. 

But actual results for the first 
half of the year showed that US 
gross national product gained at an 
annual rate of only 1.5 percenL The 
new estimates by the IMF staff 
placed the U.S. growth rate for all 
of 1985 at about 25 percent to 2.6 
percenL 

All of the figures may be adjust- 
ed before they are released in 
Seoul reflecting the early estimates 
of die U.S. third -quarter GNP rate. 


in contrast to some of the gloomy 
forecasts you bear.” 

For the Third-World countries. 


□ 


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Hotel 


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Tel ephon e 212744. 1600 

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i a u a,' ihmii 


Fridays 

W3E 

Qoang 


Tobies include the nationwide prices 
ap to ttie dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades etaewtwre. 


n, H.MriF-- ill 1 1 Nl 



108 


18 

70 

1X2 

5 

1X4 


1X1 


1X3 


1X7 


1X8 


IXS 


7X5 


1X3 


143 


1X7 


62 

13 

52 

9 

25 

14 

&6 

7 

43 


1A 

13 

.9 

9 

73 

17 


15 

38 

13 

54 

S 


32 

13 

45 

31 

12 

170 

4 

24 

4.7 


18 

26 

78 


1X1 

7 

112 


113 


133 


118 


47 

13 

78 

9 

19 


9.9 


703 


18 

17 

58 

8 


14 

3 

25 

48 

15 


22 

98 

9 

1X8 


118 

10 

143 


118 


1X1 


148 


148 




PNHpfC 

PNHpfD 


PNHpfE 

PNHptG 


PubUck 

PuUeHm 

Purotat 

Pvro 


S3V, 33 QuakOs 140 2.7 14 
IQS 90ft QuaO Pt 986 "A 
23+ 16ft QuakSO M 4.0 18 

10ft 6ft Ouonox 23 

34ft 26ft Quretiar 1M 5J 10 

26ft 14ft QkRcll 34a 1.1 13 


574 52ft 51ft 51ft 
20*100 100 100 +1 • 
415 20ft 20% 20-4 + ft 
58 7ft 7V. 7ft — ft 
131 28ft 274. 2856 + ft 
172 21W 20ft 21 + ft 






Metals 





13840 13740 13834 +■£ 


8+W 


687 iffl X05 f-!i 


8728 Dec 


nn +32 

Ss ts 



1.0200 OoC 



1 









M 


industrials 




61 JQ 6230 +88 

6X20 6347 +33 

6540 66.15 • 

6640 7047 +737 

6930 7137 +1.77 

6945 7045 +30 

6835 7000 +1J8 
6050 6850 


3445 Oct 39.90 4030 
3635 Dec 4140 42.10 

38.10 P«b 4240 4247 

36.12 APT 3940 4040 
3940 Jun 4240 4343 
404S Jul 4100 4150 
4035 Aug 4240 4240 

3847 Oa 3940 3940 

3857 Dec 3940 4030 
Preu. Sales 9404 


3955 3932 —38 

4140 4132 —35 

41.95 42.45 —30 

3940 3945 —35 

<155 4247 

4100 4140 +30 

4240 4240 

3940 3930 +35 

37J0 4030 +40 




1^ 

37X50 31180 30880 

310.18 

•» x j 

315,10 


32X60 

875 on 1874. . . 



PORK B CLUES (CMC! 

18400 its.- cents ner Dx. 

7630 5535 Feb 6235 6235 

75.40 5545 Mor 6240 6240 

7540 5785 May 6132 6150 

7600 5730 Jul 6X55 6330 

73.15 5530 A<i0 HAS SI A3 

•Est. Sales P rev. Sales 4896 

Prev. Dov Open In*. 6.762 up 68 


6140 6137 —J8 

6135 62.10 —85 

6X90 6115 —35 

6130 6340 — 80 

6133 *1-25 —40 


Currency Options 


32531553= 


55V* 35ft Xerox XQ0 S.9 14 2151 Sift 51ft 51ft— ft 

55ft 46ft Xerox Pf 545 108 68 54 ft 54ft 54ft + ft 

13 17ft XTRA 44 24 11 24 22ft 22ft 22ft + ft 


30ft 24ft ZaleCn 142 4.9 9 29 26ft 26ft 26ft 

21ft 7ft Zapata .12 14 54 756 7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 

57ft 31ft Zovres 48 .9 16 367 51ft 49ft 51 +]ft 


57ft 31ft Zovres 
27 16ft ZenithE 
2lft ISft Zeros 
37ft 22ft Turn In 


.9 16 369 51ft 49ft 51 +lft 
10 684 17ft 16ft 17 + % 

1.7 16 23 18ft 18ft 18ft + % 

33 12 100 36ft 35ft 35ft 


2o 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Oai ton & Strike 

Under-tying Price Cans— Lad Puts— Last 

Sep Dec Mar Sep Dec Mar 
12380 Brim ftsstwH oer tan. 

B Pound 12D s r r s 040 r 

137J9 125 s 1135 1X50 s 185 r 

137X9 130 S 830 980 *2315 f 

13749 135 S 545 745 5 <00 r 

137J9 140 s 115 440 s r r 

13749 14* r 130 r r 11.00 r 

13748' 150 r 090 245. r r r 

50496 Canadian Dolta rc-ceats per onlL 
COallr 70 r r r r r 023 

7231 71 s r r 5 015 r 

7231 73 s r 1.19 s r r 

7231 73 S 039 r S 094 r 

7231 78 s DID r s r r 

62400 West German Martsceata Per onn. 


SPCOMP. INDEX ICME): ... 

’tom^taooo Sep mir-iwar ww.ittg 

ioaB 17530 Dec 18*55 78545 78X60 18X85 

20XZS 13X55 ' MaT 386M 78X70 0580 Kg 

20650 I864S Jun l».n W5B' uffiB U&H 

Eat-Saias Prev. Softs 7940 * "■ , 

Prev. Day Open Int. 7X380 oitljSf . 


VALUE LINE (KCBTV «... .Vi-.W,?. 

points ond cents : 

21120 . 18535- 5ep TTOJ» 19130 “0945 WC8B 
21785 18MQ Dec. 19X30 . l«40. J mj5 StE' 
20940/ lH« M(V c 19540^^40 19X60 m30 
Ext. Sales . ' - P WV.5S 1W..M7.-. 2. ■' • . . 

Prev. Day Open inf. lajmHwJsPr — -■ •* • 


Financial 


M SI Highs-Low* 


NEW HIGHS 25 


O Maris ZB 

3540 29 

352D 30 

3540 31 

3540 32 

3540 33 

3540 St 

3540 35 

3540 36 

3540 37 

3540 _ X 


UST. BILLS (IMM) *- - 

SI million- pts of TOO oOL " ■ 

9X33 8694 9306 -9X13 

9X07 8537 Dec 9268 9X80 

9X59 8660 Mar 9X35 9241 

9248 87 in jun 928< 9X05 

9281 8880 See- 9142 9138 

9138 B98S Dec 9140 91-50 

VI49 8958 Mar 

9099 90J0 Jun 

Est- Sales Prev. Sales 9.997 

Prev. Day Open Int 3LM8 up 154 


NYSE COMP. IHDEXCNY*® ? ' -f 

pOtntsandcaiA " • " . 

11845 J1J5 SOP 185JC~T#X3S 10540 10X39 —46 

1T740 ' ...30140 • Dec 106NJfe». WS6JK 10640 —40 

1JSJ5. . 706.15 Mar 107.90 UB45 10740 10745 —SS 

12000 . 10730. Jun 40940 10945 30840 10040 —40 

Est. Sales 12316 Prav. Softs 0117 . 


s 152 r 

t 232 130 

5 M 2ii 

S US 135 

E 190 132 

r 156 1.10 

r iM r 


0-U 048 

047 r 


18 YR. TREASURY 1CB33 
SI0C80B prtn-pts &32ndsaf mpd 
87-13 75-13 Dec B5-70 85-U 


o 50 r 

185 144 


AllledSgnl n 
CapHoldodl 
DvnaCp Am 
GifSU 44tet 
ManorCrewi 
Rohr ind 
Vomadainc 


AlWSgn pfA 
ChriECrft 
Fisher FUs 
Heinz 


AlldSgnpfD 
DtarulSftOtn 
FletFn odl p 

Lowertsteln 


NatFualGpf PittstonCn 
SooLlne TRW Inc 


BkBasodl at 
CJuaLf 2S1rt 
GAFCorP 
LuckvStr 
Revnln PtC 
UnEnRes 


AikJSoti pK: 
FePa 120«M 
LTV Caro 
Missioning 
RabrtsnH 
Tesaro Pel 


BMC Ind 

Fiatvind 

LTVCeAA 

PSEGfiJipf 

SaraLeepf 

US Leasing 


BankAmer 

iCMProan 

ML Convn 

Purototor 

SwstForest 

Wlnneoaoa 


Beneaulty n 
ideal Basic 
McLean wt 
Rds Bat odl p 
S unsfiMn 


Sweden May Curb 
Bank Stock Bids 


12X0M French Froncs-lOtta of a cent per unit. 
PFronc 115 s 3LW r s 

6451000 Japanese Yea-ieotttsaf a cent per anil. 
JYeti 39 s 249 r s 

4L*7 41 5 146 155 s 

4102 42 S 175 1.13 s 

4182 43 5 137 r 1 

41J2 44 r 116 r r 

62500 Swiss Fnmcs-cEnts per win. 
s Franc j; r r r r 

■tZB2 38 r r r r 

4X82 39 s r r 5 

4X82 40 S 330 r S 

4X82 41 S 244 r S 

4X82 42 S 1.92 250 5 

4X82 43 S 140 r s 

4X82 44 r 0.99 156 r 

4282 45 r 167 r r 

4282 46 r 044 r r 

Total call voL 11263 Can open] 

Tefal put v»L SMS Pat open i 

r — Not traded. s — No option ottered. 

Last b premium l purchase price). 

Source: AP. 


87-13 75-13 Dec B5-T0 85-14 

86-2 75-14 Mar 0+17 84-14 

85-7 74-30 Jun 13-17 83-17 

84-4 917 Sea 82-23 82-23 

83-11 80-2 Dec BV27 81-29 

Est. Seles Prev. Sales U365 

Prev. Day Open Int. 60,01 up 449 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBTI . 




L___! 

Commodity indexes I 


Can open int 187452 
Pat open 1st 114473 


78-13 57-8 Dec 75-16 75-21 

77-29 57-2 Mor 75-12 75-13 

7+6 56-29 JWI 73-14 73-18 

75-31 56-29 sen 72-17 72-20 

74- 24 56-25 Dec 71-22 71-23 

7+15 5+Z7 Mar 7023 70-29 

7+26 63-12 Jun 

72- 18 62-24 Dec 68-27 6030 

69-27 67 Mar 

Jun 67-26 67-28 
Est Soles Prey. S a les! 54 3 65 

Prev.Day Open In (230850 up849 
GNMA (CBT) 

STOOiJOO prln-ptsi axis of 100 nd 

7+28 59ft Dec 75-27 75-29 

768 58-20 Mar 

73- 17 58-25 Jcffl 7+5 24-12 

75- 2 65 Sen 

Est. Soles Prev. Sales 1,116 

Prev. Day Open ML 4MB DP 666 


75-8 75-14 

7+6 7+12 

7X8 73-12 

72-18 72-13 
71-14 77-19 
70-23 70-26 
703 

4027 60Z7 
6010 
67-26 67-27 


af.^TTT^ 


Market Guide 


wlcopa Boors at TraOn 
pumao Mercoatne Exchange 


75-18 7528 
■ 75ft 
74-2 7+12 

73-16 


NYCSCEl 

NYCE: 

COMBX: 

NYME: ■ 

KCBT: 

HYFB: 


HrienwHonM Atanelary Market 
2* ch JP2 0 / Mreo Q l,, » txchonpe 
New Yortc Cocoa Sugar, Coffee Exchange 
N*w Ylwtc Carton Exctxanse Eara,onw 






1« Exchanae 
at Trade 
Exchange 


Commwiilies 


London 

Gmumodities 


Reuters 

STOCKHOLM — The government said Fri- 
day that it would consider introducing tempo- 
rary measures to prevent large investors from 
gainin g control of comma-rial banks, following 
heavy trading in bank shares on the Stockholm 
bourse. 


U issued a statement after Sweden's bank 
inspection board called on the government to 
limit a single investor, his family and associates 
to 10 percent in share holdings in a single bank. 

The board, the supervisory body of the bank- 
ing system, expressed particular concern Thurs- 
day over Sweden’s fifth largest bank, Gotaban- 
ken. About 45 percent of Gotbanken’s shares 
have changed hands since the beginning of the 
year. 

The Finance Ministry said Friday that large 
shareholder domination of banks was against 
the public interest, since the shareholders could 
bring the banks into their private business em- 
pires. 

Bankers said the threat to intervene was 
mainly aimed at preventing Sweden’s growing 
finance companies from gaining control of 
small and middle-sized b anks, and did not sig- 
nal tighter regulation of what banks themselves 
could do. 


Hlgb Low • Bid ASk CYge 

SUGAR 

Frauen frtract R«r metric Ion 
Dpc 1^ 1JM 1«S27 1.SJ2 —25 

Mor 1.553 1J2S 1-542 L546 —33 

MOV 1.595 L570 1.582 l^B —36 

Aug UH 1450 IW MM —23 

Od 1485 147ft liW5 JAM — 35 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1710 TJX —St 

Eel. vuL: 1,700 Ms of 5Q tons. Prav. actual 
tala: 1.989 krtv opai tnterast: 18483 


1.595 L570 1J82 l^BB -36 

IAS 1A50 U45 1 AS4 —V 

1A85 lA7ft 1^5 JAM — 3S 

N.T. N.T. W1D TJX —38 


Srpt.20 

Ctosa Pravkxn 
msh Low Bid Ask BM ASfc 

SUGAR 

SftrUne par metric lm 
Oct M840 13X40 14000 14M0 139j0 14080 
Dec 14480 14080 14440 14548 74520 14X60 
Mar 15X00 15020 154J0 15500 15X2Q 15X40 
May 15940 15440 15840 15948 15940 15940 
AUg 16X80 16X80 165JO 16X60 16780 16740 
Oct 17X80 17180 17140 17180 T702Q 17188 
Volume: 2427 lots of 50 tans. 


COCOA 

French francs per IN kg 
Sep 2J45 1145 2,120 2,179 +10 

d£ ZlS Ills X119 2123 +13 

Mar X1S2 1143 X» ZM5 +17 

May N.T. NT. 1155 — +» 

JIV N.T. N.T. 2,160 — +20 

See N.T. N.T. 2,lg — +X 

Dec N.T. N.T. 2170 — +25 

Est. VOL: 66 lots of 10 fora. Prev. actual 
gales: 49 lots. Open Interest: 710 


COCOA 

Sterling pgr metric tea 
Sep TJK 1,745 L775 TJ73 IJ56 1765 

Dec 1420 1808 1814 1815 1T97 1J9B 

Mar 1842 1832 1836 1837 1814 1826 

May 18S5 1843 1848 1850 1836 1836 

Jht 1855 1845 1853 1833 1838 1840 


Jft 1855 1845 1852 1833 

Sep 180 1854 1858 1862 184$ 1849 

Dec 1857 1851 1854 1856 1840 1845 

Volume: X762 lots of 10 tons. 


COFFEE 

France francs per IN kg 

Sea N.T . NT. I860 — — 

Nov I.93S 1,925 1825 1® — 


COFFEE 

Sftrtlwg per metric too 
Sep 1870 1450 1851 1853 

NOV 1.704 L673 1473 1875 

Jan 1J35 1J71 1813 1^16 

Mar 1865 1737 1835 1,740 

May ,1786 1T71 1865 L769 

Jhr 1811 1810 1860 1805 

Sep 1830 1830 1800 1833 

. Volume: 2845 lots of 5 tens. 


Dividends 


GASOIL 

U8, Pol km* per metric ton 
Oct 24980 244J5 34785 24780 24580 
NOV 24580 24X00 24X73 34480 24075 24180 
Dec 241 J5 Z»JS 24180 24155 23X50 23X73 

Jao 23985 2X780 23X73 21980 23680 «K , p» 
Feb 23580 23380 23480 23680 MlJlo 23380 
Mar . N.T. NT. 22580 22880 22180 22580 


. . . 22180 217.75 21973 22080 31+25 31780 

May N.T. N.T. 27480 22580 21080 21X50 
JOB N.T. (XT. 20980 23080 19980 22080 
Volume: XI 41 lota ot 100 tons. 

Souroa: Rm/te n am / London Petroleum Ex- 


The government statement brought a calm 
reaction from the markets, and bankers said it 
would almost certainly have no impact on pub- 
lic confidence in the banking system. 

Gotabanken shares remained unchanged at 
.155 kronor ($18.24} in quiet opening trading 
Friday on the Stockholm bourse. Traders said 
said the market was reacting very cautiously to 
the government statement. 

Gotabanken's managing director, Hans Mi- 
kaelsson, said that he sympathized with the 
view that it was not good for banks to be 
controlled by a few strong owners, but said the 
board criticism would not affect confidence in 
his bank. 


Company Par Amt 

INCREASED 

Fst Kentucky Natl 0 2Sft 

F*1 Mictiteon Cap. . .73 

Genl Cinema ^ £.«» 

Genl anema Cl-A Q M 

Goal Cinema Cl-B B .11 % 

MkDcnttc Banks Q 3\ 

SPBCJAL 

Reh+ProvUenr Lobe . 83 Mr 

STOCK 

Am rep - 30% 

Dura-Test - 4% 


IM IMS 

10-17 W-S 
IM) 1 M 
10-37 10* 
1031 109 
10U T01 


11-21 1017 
VIS 13-10 


StpLSO 

Prey 


The bank inspection board has charged that 
1 percent of Goiabanken’s stock is controlled 


32 percent of Gotabanken’s stock is controlled 
by a Swedish financier, Robert Weil or by Ins 
associates. 

The board’s proposal brought into the open a 
long conflict between a new generation of cor- 
porate raiders grown rich through speculating 
on financial markets and Sweden’s traditional 
establishment. 


Sien Wallberg, the bank infection board’s 
lief, said it was unacceptable that banks which 


chief, said it was unacceptable that banks which 
performed a public service should be subject to 
raids by financial whiz kids about whom very 
little was known. 


USUAL 

Aiexndr & Alex Sve g 

Amer Fd SSL color. 0 

Bay Find Q 

Berfdtne Cort# Q 

Boothe Financial 3 

Comcast Con S 

Curtfao-WrightCWP Q 

Dura-Test S 

Each industries C 

Frtglfrgnles Inc 5 

Genl Elec _ C 

Gibson ICR> Co C 

House of Fabrics 0 

Humana Inc G 

indopond. Bk Cp Ml Q 

InUepondcnl BksNrs C 

Kaiser Cement Cara G 

Marsh 4 McLeman Q 

Michigan Ersy Rsrc Q 

Piedmont Aviation Q 

Ponderosa Inc u 

Ripley s 

Sklppert Inc • S 
Southern Coi E^sen C 


J5 n-® 1+4 

is 

- ,2 s n-i’s ® 

5-SS H 

5 1-15 13-10 
,10 1031 104 

.15 1018 ^2 


Otter BM YWd Yield 
Vmofltft 780 488 - 723 7J1 

6-montti 786 736 745 773 

One year XSl 749 . 1M XI3 

Source: Solomon Bremen 



Cashftrices 


um • 


London Netais 


Bid .. Aak-. SSr*^ ' 
ALUMINUM - 

Sftrl lpg per metric tea 

SU™ ,ES.,g53SS'iffig-,-: 

ISBSBg «S 

LEAD .... 

Starting per metric ton ■ ." 

SS-S 2W80 29280 29X00'-- 
29780 29780 30080 30180 . 

SSyneper-iWMrlcteii . ... 

SStfmi ^J-22 3230j)0 322Sm 32<5j00— * 

326080 326580 32Bs3> .i 

Peace per troy oaoce 

**80 44680 44780^ " 
Offward 4SU» 45180 45X50 '45980 

TIN CShmdardl . 

Saline Per metric tea ... 

bSLrm ‘ ’’3S80 YlftUJO 976X00 976780 

Forward «1M0 »m80 9US80 ffiSS’;^? 

Stottao per metric tan • f\ 

Source: AP. . - *“*■ ^ . 


„ & KJ-25 MO 

S 3 1031 iw 
O .12 w 13-6 
o :i7 • 11-1 103 
Q .10 10-S lg-10 
g 87 K 9-30 9-2S 
g 85 1031 
3 87 ft 11-12 10» 
0 85 12-31 12-2 
a 87 U-25 lift 
Q JO 7015 MO 

5 .18 1001 10J 

§•' 84 1031 IM 

I'-sja » 


Stheast BanUnc 
Transanwrica Cora 


DMRitures 

Options 

K C*rrnmMBr1tA3Mmn*xaaUparawirt 


! 


Swiss GDP Bises lor Quarter 

Reuters ; 

ZURICH — Switzerland's gross 
domestic product rase by a real 3 
percent in the second quarter of 
1985, the federal statistics office in 
Ben estimated Friday. The sec- 
ond-quarter growth rate compares 
with 2 percent in the first quarter. 


'nwiland Lowers Gating 4. 
OnDebuoSlBUUon X 


StriW Coatfteme 

Price OK Mor JOB 

34 186 261 107 

35 I J2 XOO X47 

36 816 IJO l.«7 

SI 083 UD l_a 

36 831 080 182 

a 4» W - 


Dec liar 
044 OJi 
079 1.14 

185 115 

a “ 


o-gamw l; m-meoHtfy; o-worNiW? PamaH 

ermoed 

Source: UPl, 


fidimoted Ma| ««L 4843 

££* : ISn-w^LraweeW-SL® 
Pen : Tiui. veL 18a open Iol 16838 

Source: CMC. 


To Our Readers 

The S & P 100 index options 
wme not available in this edit^ 

traosmissioa delays - 


Reuters •* 

Thafland has'.’' 
year ending Sqjtember 3586, Fi- -■ 

in i^ d r ?* Jclion was 

because of lower prqected^ 
Thai exnort Tpvpr,,^, UflCCia f ■ 







of about $1.09 biffion. 


































































■ : r 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURD.W-SU N DAY , SEPTEMBER 21-22, 1985 



Page 11 


^arney, Directors Quit 

A _ ra'iv • i _ V 

‘Pittsburgh 



‘CsT^r • 
!ic -R>Jd u ) 


Soibebx's 



V-iU I«(6tu 


■TV (inodared Pros 

PITTSBURGH — The chair: 
man and live , directors of strike- 
bound WhfidiM-Piltdwigh Sted 
Corp. resigned Friday, paving the 
way for.arealignment of the board 
to consdidaie the power of the 
company's largest shareholder 

DeiHiis i. Carney, the chairman 
and chief' eaecative officer; two 
vice _pr«jdeiiis. and four other 
board members announced their 
resignations, 

Aden E. Paulson, a long-stand- 
rentic of Mr. Carney w&> owns 
•ercent of Wheeling-Pitts- 
1 4 slock, promptly nominated 

Texas Air Tenders 
For Frontier Air 

The Associated Press 

DENVER — Texas Air Core 
which recently lost a bid to acquire 
Trans World Airlines Inc, offered 
Thursday to buy Frontier Holdings 
Inc., the parent of Frontier Am- 
tines, for $234 million. 

Texas Air owns Continental Air- 
lines and New York Air and says it 
already has 800,000 Frontier 
shares. The company said it would 
initially make a tender offer of $20 
T share for up to 7 million of Firm- 
tier's IZ5-nmhan common shares 
and equivalents outstanding. 

PhD Bakes, president of Conti- 
nental Airlines, said Frontier Air- 
lines would continue to operate 
from Denver as a separate airline 
under its current name in closer 
cooperation with Continental Of 
the 53 cities served by Frontier 
from Denver, 36 routes do not have 
Continental service. 


board of directors, which in 
Iu rn elected him chair man 

Ferris - a former Ford 
ISX £>■ president, was 
ettewd vice chairman and chief ex- 

Sd V «r°?S *£' Fwris ’ 69 - « 

® r F «ds Rouge Steel unit 
when he retired at 65 under Ford’s 
retirement policy. 

Nfr. Paulson is also chairman of 
Gnffsiream Aerospace Co ip„ a 
leading producer of business jet 
aircraft recently acquired by 
Chiysler Cotp. for S637 million. 

it 5 tune to do something dras- 
tic to break the stalemate/ said 
Ro bert E. Scymoor, who resigned 
I’’®™ die board. The company is 
ciose ,0 8P«*g down the 

tube. 

^Wheeling- Pius burgh filed for 
Chapter 1 1 reorganization in U.S. 
Bankruptcy Court in April and 
won approval on July 17 to termi- 
nate its labor contract. The compa- 
ny imposed wage and benefit cuts 
of 18 percent and the company’s 
8,200 steelworkers walked out in 
protest. 

Since the July 21 walkout, little 
substantial negotiation has oc- 
curred to bring the sted workers 
back to work at the company's pine 
plants in Pennsylvania. Ohio 

West Vir ginia 

Mr. Carney lashed out at the 
United Steelworkers of America in 
a statement issued in conjunction 
with his resignation. 

He said: “It is unfortunate that 
the international union and its 
leaders have elected to cause exten- 
sive damage to the Wheding-Pitts- 
burgh Sted Corp. by ignoring the 
U.S. marketplace and world com- 
petition in sted and ignoring the 
overriding fact that Whcchng- 
Piitsburgh is bankrupt.’* 


Nippon Steel, 
Inland Discuss 
Venture in 17.S. 

United Press Inimmiitmal 

TOKYO — Nippon Sled 
Corp. said Friday that it has 
begun talks with Inland Sted 
Co., the fourth-largest U.S. 
steelmaker, to set up a joint 
venture to produce sled pri- 
marily for the auto market. 

If agreement is reached, the 
two companies would build a 
cold rolling steel plant in the 
U.S. Midwest with a capacity of 
1 million tons a year, said the 
Nihon Keizai Shimbun, the 
Japanese economic daily. 

Under a five-year voluntary 
export restraint agreement, 
signed last year. Japan’s quota 
of sted exports to the United 
States has been limited to only 
5.8 percent of the U.S. market. 

A spokesman for Nippon 
Sted, the world’s No. 1 steel 
maker, confirmed the negotia- 
tions with Inland Sted but de- 
scribed them as “vay fluid." 
The spokesman said financing 
for an agreement had not yet 
been arranged. 

The Nihon Keizai report said 
that Inland Steel, which is 
based in Chicago, wanted the 
plant to increase its competi- 
tiveness in the U.S. market, and 
that Nippon Steel wanted to 
secure its share in the growing 
market provided by Japanese 
automakers setting up plants in 
the United States. 

In three years, Japanese auto- 
makers are expected to produce 
1.2 million vehicles annually in 
the United States. This would 
require 400,000 tons of cold 
rolled sted plates, Nihon Keizai 
said. 


CBS News Cutting 125 Jobs 
Amid Corporate Tightening 


Srw Vert Times Srr\i,r 

NEW YORK — In the most se- 
vere single cutback to hit network 
television news, CBS announced 
Thursday the dirni nation of 125 
news jobs, representing a 10-per- 
cent reduction in the staff of 1.250. 

The cutback was more sweeping 
than had been anticipated. 

Edward M. Joyce, the president 
of CBS News, said in a memoran- 
dum to his stafr that the cutbacks 
were caused by "a number of unan- 
ticipated adverse financial circum- 
stances" including **in part the con- 
sequences of successfully resisting 
the takeover attempt, a listless 
economy and a market softness in 
the advertising marketplace for the 
balance of this year and 1986." 

Last month CBS bought back 21 
percent of its stock to block Ted 
Turner, the Atlanta news executive, 
in a takeover attempt. As a result, 
CBS will have inenased its total 
debt to about S700 million by the 
end of this year, compared with 
$300 million before the stock pur- 
chase. 

All three televison networks are 
also attracting less advertising rev- 
enue this year than they had antici- 
pated — an increase of roughly 7 
percent instead of 10 percent. Wail 
Street analysts still predict that 
ABC, CBS and NBC together will 
take in record revenues of $7 bil- 
lion this year. 

Announcements of cutbacks 
elsewhere at CBS are expected be- 
tween now and mid-November. At 
the same time, however, it was an- 
nounced that Charles Osgood, a 
radio and television correspondent 
and anchor, bad signed a new con- 
tracL 

Ann Morfogen, speaking for 
CBS, said. “Although there are cost 
cuts and although correspondents 


are being let go it doesn't mean we 
can't take action to keep people 
vital to our organization." Mr. Os- 
good had been discussing a job 
offer with ABC News. 

Two CBS News correspondents 
are being let go, Larry Pintak. 
based in Amman, Jordan, and Liz 
Trot ta. who spent six years with 
CBS after 14 years with NBC. Neil 
Strawser, a veteran of 33 years at 
CBS News, and Dallas Townsend, 
a radio correspondent for 44 years, 
have elected to take early retire- 
ment. 

Also being eliminated are two 
senior CBS News positions, the 
vice president and assistant to the 
president, as well as the vice presi- 
dent of labor relations. Ralph 
Goldberg. 50, an aiiorney. the as- 
sistant to the president, has been 
with CBS for 25 years. 


BHP Stock Gains 
On Bid Reports 


Rculcn 


SYDNEY — Speculate 

i Hill Ptv. domi- 


nion on 

a bid for Broken 
nated trading Friday on Aus- 
tralian stock exchanges, as bro- 
kers reported that more than 24 
million of the company’s 1.03 
billion issued shares had 
changed hands in three days. 

On the Sydney market. BHP 
shares closed at 7.40 dollars 
(S5.02) on Friday, up from 7.30 
dollars on Thursday. 

Analysts said that John Spal- 
vins’s Adelaide Steamship Co. 
and Robert Holmes a Court's 
Bell Group Ltd. were the buy- 
ers. Some brokers said they be- 
lieved the two bdd about 14 
percent, but that Mr. SpaJvics 
had at least 2 percent more than 
Mr. Holmes a Court Neither 
would comment on the reports. 


COMP ANY NOTES 


Apple Computer Inc. will select a 
successor for its departed chair- 
man. Steven Jobs, from among the 
present board, according to execu- 
tive vice president Del Yocum. 

British Petroleum PLC and Lon- 
don and Scottish Marine Oil PLC. 
in a joint venture, have made an 
important oil find in the Malacca 
straits off northeast Sumatra. 

Bond Corp, Holdings Ltd. wiJJ 
extend its SS.25-a-share takeover 
offer for Castlemaine Toobeys Lid. 
to Feb. 19. 1986. As or the original 
closing dale on Thursday, Bond 
held 86.6 percent of CTL’s issued 
capital of 145. 53-million shares. 

BOT Lease Co., leading a con- 
sortium of 26 Japanese firms, has 
ordered three A300-600 aircraft 
from Airbus Industrie Co. 

C. Itoh & Co. America Inc. en- 


s -s- 


1l - 

■'I--'?" 

•‘H , i >*£ £ 
i -ip job j £ 
• ,pe s 


At General Foods , New Products Prove a Slow Recipe for Profit 


JVC :,•> nHu: Jt’iihH-j; 

s *13 j 

7:_<_ — o :?;££_ 

” > ".rcoti! it Tfe 

■ * - - ’ i.r B ISfii: 
•• .aosafcr 

" C-tj.:: iia^ 

•' : ’* l - is iMe-; 
- i cr- Si't JttiBSi. 

isfc e: 

e" : a_*..*rlaf;E 


v.".: 


By N.R, Kldaficld 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Jello. Maxwell 
House coffee. Post Grape-Nuts, 
iirds Eye frozen peas. Kool-Aid. 
layer hot dogs. Log Cabin 
J. Louis Rich turkeys. Ronzoni 
spaghetti. Entenmann's doughnuts. 
Cool Whip dessert topping. 

There is not much that those 
products have in common — ex- 
cept that they all come out of the 
cavernous warehouses of the 
mighty General Foods Corp. 

If there is any doubt about the 
length of the General Foods shad- 
ow in the supermarket, one only 
bos to consider that the company is 
the country’s No. 1 maker of cof- 
fee, frozen vegetables, frozen nov- 
elty desserts^ sliced meats, fresh 
baked goods, table syrup, pow- 
dered soft drinks and packaged 
desserts. 

Five years ago, General Foods 
was reliant on coffee. Throughout 
the 1970s, in fact, it was a hibernat- 
ing giant, doing hide to change its 
: ..M”-’ product mix. 

" But it boiled into this decade 

• ' * ' ■ < ->. JT sc ready extend its kingdom. It is 
' fortifying its lead in desserts and 

' “‘f ’ 'bevoages, while at the same time 

■■ — - moving into main -course foods and 

gourmet items. And what it cannot 
readily make in its labs, it has will- 
H ingty paid for on the acquisition 

majkeL 

Although earnings improve- 
ments are still slow in cominj» Wall 
Street clearly feels that the a9-bil- 
tion company is poised to deliver 
results. Genial Foods stock, sell- 
ing as low as $29 a share in 1982, 
has zoomed, hovering near $90 last 
week, although it shed S4 on Thurs- 
day to dose at $84.75. 

“It's a premier company in the 
food industry, or f os that matter in 
the whole consumer goods indus- 
tiy," said Roger C ummins , a food 
analyst at Wertheim & Co. “Strong 
brand names, very broad product 
lines, excellent marketing, very 
large advertising budgets. Plus it’s 
an improving company, based on 
i changes by current management" 
it is also a hot prospect on the 


' Ttv 
sa61: 

rj 

li-iuair si 
. ,-f.* JSSPBT 
r • ; IL-f-iffiT-: 


Profits From Groceries 

General Foods net income 
in millions of dollars 


—$350 


300 






- - 'ft- '2^' 

■ &U- 

- - ofijj 

- ' JfcgS 


takeover lisL Takeover rumors 
have swiried around the company 
in die last few months, as they have 
around lots of other consumer- 
product companies. 

The most repeated rumor is that 
Philip Morris tnc„ the biggest US. 
cigarette company, is set to dangle 
a $5- billion offer, which would 
come out to about $100 a share. In 
early June, RJ. Reynolds Indus- 
tries lnc„ the No.-2 cigarette mak- 
er, reached an agreement to buy 
Nabisco Brands Inc, one of the 


- ■■■ :v3p& y 

• - ■ Ji:g g v 

• - "T, 

... 

- ’ iVScS' 

: VV- . V 

.< :r 


Morris is bdieved to be eager for a 
similar deal with a consumer-prod- 
ucts heavyweight. 

General Foods has said repeat- 
edly that it has not been ap- 
proached. Philip Morris will not 
comment- In Jury, however. Gener- 
al Foods adopted some anti-take- 
over artillery, including a provision 
that any hostile bid would have to 
be approved by owners of at least 
80 percent of the company’s shares. 

The company has also been buy- 


Tti, Yor* !«■» 


ing back its own stock. It picked up 
9 percent of the outstanding shares 
last year and another 2 percent so 
far this year. 

As has long been true. General 
Foods sells more food than any 
other U.S. company. Americans 
spend something like $225 billion 
on groceries, and General Foods 
collects about 4 percent of those 
sales. The company employs 35,000 
people in 20 countries. Its brands 
arc sold in more than 100 countries. 

For all its products, though. 
General Foods ended the 1970s 
it of iisrcve- 


■ ' " ‘ \ J 1 


Steel Focus Shifts to Prices 


••••• 


(Continued {ran Page 9) 
ing of their own, if executives of 
some of the major companies have 
their way. The idea, bitterly op- 
posed by ibe unions, is to ease out 
of some areas — particularly the 
expensive production of slabs and 
ingo t — by buying dab overseas. 
- This would allow then to concen- 

trate on finishing bare, sheet suip 
t fid and other products. 

Shipments of semifinished steel 
are not counted in the import-con- 
trol program’s attempt to hmit for- 
eign steel to 18.5 percent of the 

t-. U.S, market Semifinished steel ac- 

''■-r... counts for about 3 percait of total 
’ 1 " fordgn market penetration in the 


M 


ucts closer to \rtiat customers ^are 

“It’s fairiy widely recognized 
that there have boat a lot of dollars 
per ton taken off the price in the 
marketplace,” Mr. Keslar said. 
“We’re moving to a price that more 
accurately reflects what’s going on 
in the marketplace." 

The company said it would cut 
by $60 a ton both the price for sted 
and the existing discount, which 
will also be trimmed an additional 
40 percent 


nues stemming from coffee alone 
(Maxwell House, Sanka, Yuban, 
Brim). Most of the remainder of 
General Foods’s money came from 
other old warhorses like Jell-0 and 
Log Cabin that hdd out little 
promise for growth. Profits seemed 
to be frozen. 

“They tested on their hands,” 
Mr. Cummins said. “They fell they 
were the smartest company in the 
industry, that they could do things 
other companies couldn’t do. They 
became overcoofidon and compla- 
cent. And their earnings growth 
was very disappointing.^ 

“We went through a lot of intro- 
spection and soul-searching to re- 
think ranr goal and mission,” said 
Irwin Engdman, General Food’s 
executive vice president and chief 
financial officer. “And the compa- 
ny found out it Hked a lot of things 
and didn't like a lot of things." 

James L. Ferguson, chief execu- 
tive officer of General Foods since 
1973, had been adhering to a path 
of cutting costs and squeezing all 
he could out of established brands. 

But by the end of die 1970s, he 
had gotten about as much as there 
was to get. Per capita consumption 
of coffee continual its downward 


A hypothetical ton of steel listing sUd and as Procter & Gamble Co. 

at $500 a ton and discounted $100 pu lils F 


^ " Vv"'\ 

-- 

- * jj >■ 

■ 

V l V--V 

' . . f'- ~ 




United States. 

Tom Graham, U5. Steel’s chief 
operating officer for steel, told a 
trade magazine recently that the 
marketplace for Steel in the Untied 
States “would accept a finishing 
operation in this country with re- 
mote-steeimaking. The economics 

are so powerful that if we can over- 
come national chauvinism, it s al- 
most as sure as death and taxes. 

■ U.S. Sted Plans New Pricing 
US. Sled is planning a new pric- 
ing structure next year that win 
boost costs to purchasers. The As- 
sociated Press reported from Pttts- 

. ..... bl T^No. 1 U.S. steelmaker saidij 
would reduce its list prices for sheet 
sted but, at the same time, bun ■ 
discounts 'll nerw offers, ana that 
will result is its customers paytofi 
more than they do now. ? 

The change is designed to hnng 
prices for V.S. Sled s sheet prod- 


; .'l 


. H 


■ <%y. 


put its Folg^xs brand into national 
distTibutioa in 1978. 

So the chairman got to work en- 
gineering a new strategy. He ap- 
pointed Philip L, Smith president 
and chief operating officer in Octo- 
ber 1981, and Mr. South began 
mapping out the direction. 

A goal was set far earnings to 
grow each year at 3 percent to 5 
percent above the rate of inflation. 
But the food-processing industry 
grows only at about 1 percent a 
year. So the company figured it had 

hums - — x- . to plunge into new markets and to 

nans have dipped since midsum- woric harder in the areas of the food 
JJL world that were hot 

A think you’ll see more of these With the ascendancy of working 
- «loc« rremn£ as the import pro- women, smgle people and waist- 

line-watchers, more healthy and 
^TrSfotd said most of the low-caloric foods have become 
• was tied up in popular, and foods could be eaten 

mntract 5 that would not asfest as the package could be 
affected by the unwrapped have become whal 
he said, “the pnee many p<»ple want 
k^rcallV needed if lb** So General Foods s&raned its 
gpiogto roSeiL” organization down, decentralizing 


will cost $416 under the new struc- 
ture instead of the $400 chaiwd 
under the old system, Mr. Keslar 
said. 

Both Bethlehem and National 
Sted Corp.. a division of National 
Intergroup Inc, are studying the 
US. Steel plan, company spokes- 
men said Friday. 

Charles Bradford, sted analyst 
for the Merrill Lynch investment 
firm, said the change was partly the 
result of the Reagan administra- 
tion's sted import controls. Int- 


ope rations, reducing headquarters 
staff and gelling rid of soft spots 
such as the Burger Chef fast-food 
chai n and Gaines Pet Foods. 

It also fattened product lines, by 
developing and acquiring. 

For example. General Foods 
paid $469 million in 1981 to get 
Oscar Mayer, the biggest acquisi- 
tion in its history. In 1982. it came 
up with $315 million to get Enten- 
mann's bakery. 

Last year, it picked up Ronzoni 
for $52 million and it paid $60 
million for Oroweat Foods, a spe- 
cialty bread maker. 

In addition, it has expanded the 
acquisitions by pushing their re- 
gional product lines into its nation- 
al distribution network. General 
Foods's ambition, for instance, is 
to make Entenmann's the first na- 
tional fresh-baked goods company. 
Last year, it introduced Enten- 
mann's coffee cakes and doughnuts 
to the West Coast and Denver. 

Acquisitions can bring surprise 
blessings. When General Foods 
bought Oscar Mayer, it got one of 
that company's subsidiaries, a pro- 
cessed turkey company named 
Louis Rich, as part ait the transac- 
tion. The company was losing mon- 
ey; now. riding the trend away 
from red meat, it is solidly in the 
black, proving more valuable than 
Oscar Mayer. 

It also developed new products, 
such as Crystal Light, a powdered, 
non -carbonated, sugar-free soft 
drink in such flavors as iced tea (the 
most popular), lemonade and lem- 
on-lime. The drink, which was tar- 
geted at young, on-ihe-go singles, 
reached national distribution Iasi 
year and rang up nearly $150 mil- 
lion worth of business. 

General Foods has also siphoned 
new Kfe from old product bodies. 
Jell-0, for example, was made 
ready-to-eat — Jell-0 Pudding 
Pops. 

The Pudding Pops came out in 
1982, followed last year by frozen 
JeUo-O Gelatin Pops. Tbe two 
products together attracted SI 40 
million worth of business last year. 
These fit into a category known as 
frozen novelties, the fastest-grow- 
ing category in the grocery store. 

For Raisin Bran, another elderly 
product. General Foods stirred in 
some honey and outs and bad a 
companion’ product. Honey Nut 
Crunch Raisin Bran. The company 
said the cereal has been doing well 
with the health -conscious set 

Mr. Engdman. the executive vice 
president, said that coffee, which 
was 40 percent of revenues five 
years ago, is now 28 percent. 

The second-biggest category is 
meats, about 18 percent. It was 
zero five years ago. In 1981, 25 
percent of the product line was 
“well-aligned with emerging 
trends.” Now it is 45 pcrcenL 

In 1980, 60 percent of revenues 
were from brands that were No. 1. 
Now 75 percent are. Some 35 per- 
cent of revenues today are from 
businesses that General Foods was 
not in five years ago. 

However, nothing wonderful has 
shown up on the bottom line so far. 
To be sure, the company has ab- 
sorbed debt from buying compa- 
nies and has had to bear the cost of 
developing new products and get- 
ting acquired ones into tbe national 

pipeline. 

Still, even Mr. Engdman admit- 
ted that last year was a disappoint- 
ment. In the fiscal year ended 
March 30, net income rose only 2.5 
percent, below the rate of inflation, 
to S324.9 million on sales of $9.02 
billion. 

The earnings were hurt In part 
because of overseas earnings slip- 
page from the strong dollar, since 
international sales constitute 20 
percent of the company’s business. 
Moreover, beverage sales suffered 
from the brisk weather in the sum- 
mer of 1984, and Oscar Mayer was 
bothered by labor disputes. 

In the company's first fiscal 


quarter, which ended June 29, in- 
come tumbled 30.4 percent, to 
$77.7 milli on, or $1.65 a share, 
from SI 11.6 million, or 5117 a 
share, in the period a year earlier. 
But last year's quarter did include a 
one-time gain from the sale of 
Gaines. 

Both Wall Street and the compa- 
ny are predicting that in the current 
fiscal year, eammgs will at last be 
above that 3 percent to 5 percent 
target. 


tered a guilty plea to criminal 
charges of making false statements 
to the U.S. Customs Service. Tbe 
subsidiary admitted selling S2 -mil- 
lion north of steel at prices below 
the amounts declared. 

Hitachi Lid. suggested to its 
West German partner, BASF AG. 
that they halt sales of medium and 
large general-purpose computers to 
South Africa, a spokesman said. 

Hoare Govett Bond Broking Ltd. 
will cease operation as an inter- 
dealer broker in Eurobonds, view- 
ing this role as incompatible with 
the plans of its parenu Hoare Go- 
veu Ltd., to expand activity in the 
Eurobond market. 

lmestronka. which is linked to 
the department store chain El 
Cone Ingles in Spain, will produce 
a personal computer. Spectrum 
128. developed bv British Sinclair. 

Mideon Corp- raid it has received 
approval from tbe U.S. Federal 
Trade Commissi on to proceed with 
the acquisition of United Energy 
Resources Inc. Mideon said it wifi 
purchase for S41 a share all United 
Energy shares tendered by 5 P.M. 
Sept. 19, when the offer expired. 

NBC Cable News will start no 
later than June 1, 1986 if cable 
systems commit 1 3 million sub- 
scribers by December, according to 
Lawrence K. Grossman, NBC 
News president 

News International the Europe- 
an subsidiary of the corporation 
headed by Rupert Murdoch, has 


“Fiscal 1986 appears to us to be entered into a television alliance 
the watershed year,” Mr. Engetman with the Belgian holding company 
said. Analysis are predicting earn- Groups Bruxelles Lambert. 


ings per share of anywhere from 
S6.8Q to $7.30. compared with 
$6.20 a share from operations last 
year. Mr. Engdman says that the 
company is “not uncomfortable 
with that range." 


New United Motors Manufactur- 
ing. the joint venture of Toyota and 
General Motors, has begun train- 
ing US. workers in Japan in order 
to add a second shift producing 
Nova cars. 


Srtbune 


it Leaders* Vow to Push 
an Eeunoraie Recovery 

(a am ; 



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MAIL TODAY • WIN TOMORROW • MAIL TODAY * Wltf' 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 21-22, 1985 



Fridays 

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12ft 12 
23% 22% 
2ft 2ft 
4ft 4V* 
2>h lft 
29ft 29V 
TV TV 
20% 30% 
9ft 9ft 
17 17 

3ft 3ft 
14ft 14ft 
KW. 10% 
19% 19 


4tm 

3ft + 'a 
16 — % 
16V— ft 
% 

7% 

115 +1% 

17% 

7% — % 

3V 

9ft + ft 
% + ft 
3% — '* 
11% 

5ft— Vj 
7ft 

10ft- ft 
3ft— V 
2V 
IV 

6% + 'i 
10ft- >* 
7% —lft 
17% 

18V— V 
12V + % 
73 —1 
2% 

ft-V* 

29V* + V 
IV 

20% + V 

vv* 

17 + v* 
3ft- p 
14V* +6 
1QV— -ft 
19% + V 


8% 5% Yank Co 


11 4 6% 4% 4% 



AMEX Highs-Lcms 


FrenttorHaW 
Mart InP roc 

FnmlAwt 

HocrvCorp 

Home imp! 


NEW LOWS M 


Elsinore 

MayEngy 

RHySooa- 

Tortet 

GataxyOH 

iVUdArafnf 

SartrPrtntn 

Wedco 

JtonheyOH 

MtoPirt 

SotncerCas 

Jum pJachn 

MonsSirwr 

SuawnUtEnov 


E 

t: 






Til. 

ipii 


i 


r , J 

$ 


1 

$y§\\ 





EC Imposes Restrictions 
On Turkish Clothing 

Reuters 

BRUSSELS — The European Community * 
on Friday imposed stringent restrictions on?* 
sales of inexpensive clothing from Turkey in 
reply toTurkey’ s refusal last week to negotiates 
restraint agreement, a spokeswoman said. j 

The executive commisaon has placed quotas i 
throughout the community on imports of Turk- ; 
ish T-shirts, pullovers, trousers, skirts and bed ' 
linen. The restrictions, following increasing , 
from European manufacturers who sav 


levels, were imposed to prevent serious injury to . 
the EC industry, tire spokeswoman said. il 

Turkish exports of pullovers to the communi- e 
ty during the first six months of 1985 were ^ 
pinning at almost 80 percent of the levels dur- % 
ing the whole of last year. j 


ADVERTISEMENT ; 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) 


Sept. 20, 1985 


^ . W«t asset ytrUw rootallon* oresupidieii by mt FpnOt Usfd ydtft the wcgptloa o* tame qiwtw baied on totoq prteg. 

T>% maretaal symbols Indicate frequency of quotations ■w U rt :18>-4<r; (w) -w«e«y; (b) -N-montfily; (r) -remtarly; (I) -irregularly. 


ALMALMANAGEMBNT .(«.! I png Tim . 3 23J8 

. .J ■ * U5 - 3? HCM6MT. LTD. 1 14V. ADVISERS 
BAN K JULIUS BAER&Caua. 1. Lourana Powily KIIL EC4. 01-423-4680 

-(diaaertjont! SF 912X0 -fw) FSCAIkinttc — S 11JB 

i M . 11 ^ SF iroxo FAC Europoon 5 13X4 

-j d 1 Dolkw-Basr bano Fd s lOEXO -(w) FAC OrtwikU S 2651 

-} d 1 D-mark-eoei- Bond Fd OMIQ29XO FIDBUTY FOB 67A- Homlrtca Bermuda 

' 2 Amei-lco *1130X00 -ImlArorrlam Vetoes awimoo- S 91X5 

'!S Eurao. SF 12S5X00 (ml Amv Values CunxPryf S 1DJ4 

-Id) EaurbaerPocinc SF H84X0 -i d> Fidelity Amer. Asmti I 6051 

■ dlGrobor 5F 1CQ1X0 -Id} FltftlHy Australia Fund S 1026 

-1.S > Stockttar — ^ SF 157QX0 -( d S FTdrtlty Dhcowfv Fund s 10.19 

... -id) FTttniivDlr.Svss.Tr - 5 126X1 

- wl ntorairrancy USA 3 10X7 -{ d Fkt«ntv Far Easl Fu nd _ s 20.17 

Hwl nioreurrencv DM- DM 3tUS -rd ) FhtoJilv inn. Fund_ S 63.W 

-Iw) Inierajrrrficv Slerltno t 10.10 -Id i Fidemv Oritm Fund s 2697 

-Jw ) Inroreoirihr Pacific Oftor 3 9-81 -Id I FkMiiy Franllar Fund S 13.12 


4wl intareavlty N. Amor. OH#r_ t 1000l-(dl FkJeirty PocJffc Fu 


iwumci wm. 

4J* 


nee 1913) A-1061 Vienna, Austria. 


29 MariahHfer Sir. (S ince 191 3; A-1061 Vienna, Austria. 

■ EH Please send 

Full UckeKs) at US $438.00 each 

wmr Half licketfs) a( US S 219.00 each 

wV Quarter ticket(s) at US 5 109.50 each 

varid for an 22 Weekly Drawings of the 121" Austrian National 
Lottery beginning Nov. 11", 1985. For «he mailing of all winning 
Gats, I add US $ 12 for Overseas Airmail Postag e (or US S 8 within 
Europe). »-.~ 

I enclose total payment of US S 
with check payable to J. Prokopp. 

**•*□ please send further information. 


DiTEMATIONAL POSITIONS 


unfeef 


The United Nations Children's Fund with Headquar- 
ters in New York and offices throughout the world, 
working with developing country governments to 
provide disadvarrioged children arid their mo th er s 
with die basic services they need to survive and 
develop, seeks: 

SPECIAL PRODUCTS OFFICER 
UNICEF GREETING OPERATION 

New York, U.5.A. - Reference VN 663 

Research/ Develop new product lines as extension 
to existing range. Subsequently follow through on 
day-to-day administration of these new products. 
Qualifications: 

University degree or equivalent. Training in interna- 
tional business transactions, business development 
and public relations an asset. Minimum 5 years 
relevant experience, preferably in field of product 
research and development and public relations. 
Fluency in English, French or Spanish desirable. 
Salary commensurate with qualifications and expe- 
rience. Excellent benefits package. 

Send detailed resume no later than October 4, 

Michael K. Corbett, 

Chief Recruitment and Placement 

UNICEF 

866 UN Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10017, U.SA 


MLrtHbonflsB $ 16153 -4 w) Get* ApOTckrtton . 

USD l MM. FI S 1025X8 |-(m) Strategic Trading . 

*08271. st Htller, Jengy gefinor funds. 


BANQUE IND05UEZ. 

-< d 1 Aston Growth Fund 

-lw> Dlverbond S 

-Iwl FlF.Amgrtcg ... 

-(wl FIF-Eumcc _ . - 

-Iwl FIF-Pocinc— — 

-[ d ) indosuaj MuIHbondS A 

-Id! Indosorz MulH bonds S 

-( d ) indosuu USD IMX6F1 

BRITANNIA, ROB 271, St Halier, Je 
-twl BrltDoJwr income 

• Iwl Brlt.JJWonoo.Curr 

•Id) Brit. InlLJ MoncO-Pdif ! 

-Id) Brit Intti ManooJ*ortl i 

-iwl Brit Am. Inc. A Fd Ltd ! 

-Iw) Brll^SoJd Fund ! 

-Iwl Br It JAnnoo. Currency 

-Id ) Brtt. joaan Dir Perl. Fd ! 

■iwl BrttJereey G1H Fund £ 

•Idl BHt World Leu. Fund ! 

•I d 1 BrH. World Trchn- Fund ! 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-Iwl Capital Inn Fund 

-iwi caonor rtoito sa 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 


-(d| Fidelity SPCl. Growth Fd. S 14X3 

S 1DJ1 -(di Ftoomv World Fund S 33X4 

SF SSJ0 FORBES PO BS87 GRAND CAYMAN 
S 1 8X7 London Agent 01-8300013 

S UX6 -tw) Dollar Income S 7J2 

} 17J4 .IWI ForbMHtohlntGIttFd C 98X0 

S 9932 -jw) Gold ""m S 7X8 

S 1^X3 tw) Gotd ApMftdatton, S 4X3 

S 1025X8 -jnt) Strategic Trading S 1.19 


S 0X76 -tw) East Investment Fund S 33616 

S 938 -Iwl ScoltlUt World Fund { 11641 

1X6! -lw) State St. Amwican S l«W 

11X7 London: 01^91 423a Genevo:41-!!3S5530 
1^73 GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 
X7T7 PB 119. St Peter Port, Guernsey, 0481 -38715 


£ 13X9 1 -tw) FnturGAM J 


-ld> Action Suhses. 

-Id I Bond Vator 5wf— — 

-I d I Band Valor D-mark DM U4JK • wl GAM N. America Unit Trust— 10635 p. 

■ I 6 1 Bond Valor US-DOLLAR S 121.72 - wj GAM Pacific Inc S 114JS 1 

-Id) Bond VoiorYen— Yen 11070X0 - wi gam Pent 6 Cnor.Worktw.^ )00X0p 

-Id) Convert Volar Serf SF 119XB -IwtGAM Pen*. & Char. U.K. Fd~ TDQX0 o 

-<d) Convert Valor US-DOLLAR. S 121.23 -tw] GAMrlrrt S 11337 

-<di Canaiec SF 733X0 -tw) GAM Singapore/Malav Inc S 99X5 

-( d 1 CS Fondt-Sondi SF 7BJ0 - wl GAM Sterl 6 inti Un It Trust— 13640" p 

-Id) CS Fonds-lnt'l SF HATS - wl GAM Systems Inc s 10630 

-(dl CS Money Mo r*et Fund S 1038X0 - wl GAM Worldwide Inc S 153X2, 

-I d ) CS Money Martel Fund— OM llSIXO - w) GAM TVche SJL Clow A S 117X1 1 

■Idles Money Market Fund C1QZ7X0 B.t. MANAGEMENT (utQ Ltd. 

-I d 1 Enernle- Voter SF 147 J5 - d ) Berry Pop. Fd. LM. S 9J2. 

■I a i Ik»«r SF 887X0 • rj GT. Autriiett Science S 13X4 1 

-I d I Eurono-Vater SF 1*9^ d > G.T. Aseon RK. GwttU=d_ S 11.98 

-( d I Pncrtlc -Voter _SF 15150 - d! G.T. Asia Fund S 2X4 

DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC - d ) G.T. Austral lo Fond S 2524 

Winchester Houw. 7 7 Lond on Wall -f d 1 G.T. Burooe Fund S 11X6 

LONDON EC2 (01 9305797) - w 1 G.T. Euro. Smell Cos. Fund S 12X7 . 

-iwl Finsbury Group Ltd S 12611 -tr) G.T. Dollar Fund S 1445 1 

• (ml winchester Diversified—— S 21X4 -Id) G.T. Band Fund S - 1077 

•tmi Winchester Financial Ltd.— S 10X9 - d > G.T. Gtabai Tecteiigy Fd S li.n. 

■im) Winchester Frontier I 105X2 - d ) G.T. Honshu Pathfinder S 2174 1 

-tw) Winchester HoldlnM— FF 1052 - d ) G.T. Investment Fund— _ S 17X4 

S 1239 - w) G.T. Joodn Small Co. Fund— S 3847. 

■twj Worldwide Securities 5 45.14 ■ r J G.T. Tecmntog V Fund * 2249 1 

■( w l Worldwide Soectol S 161327 - d I G.T. South China Fun ri s 14X9 

DIT INVESTMENT FFM .. HILL SAMUEL INVESTjMGMT. IPCT1_5JX. , 

-♦Id) Concenlra DM 3032 Jersey. P jD. B ox 63. Tel 0534 76029 I 

-Hd> Inti Rmtenfond DM 9636 Berne, PJX Bex.2622. Tel 4131 2340S1 i 

Danq & HorgiH i Ltevd JSeorge, Brussels -Id Crossdow lFor_E<Mt) SF 9X6 

-iml dah Commodity Pool 53«XI“* -Id CSP (Botanced) SF 2613 

-l«nl Currency & Gold Pool 3 ft! £7 — -td mtnL Bond Fund _____ S 9X*I 

-iml Winch. Life Put. Pool, S 560X9“- -id InL Currency UJ. 8 2653 

-im) Trans World Fur. Pool— S 85444 -Id ITF Fd (Technology) S T3X0 1 

EBC TRUST CO. (JERSEY) LTD. -Id 0"Sra Fd IN. AMERICA: _I S 27X0 

1-3 Seale St-St. Heller *1534-36331 JARDlNE FLEMING, ROB 7B GPO HB ICS 

TRADED CURRENCY FUND, . -I r J.P Currency ABand S 1235 

S ( d line.: BW 3 10X6 Offer — S10J82 Sr JJ= Hons Kona Tru*t 3 3AM 

I a I Coo.: Bid S IT. 1 1 Offer 511453 -lr J.F Jon&POC Corn, y ZI.96 

INTERNATIONAL UKOME FUND ' -(r J.F jopod Trust Y 4492 ■ 

-( d) Short Term 'A' (Acwml— S U981 -I r J.F Jopsm TecftnotoBy Y 16790 

-Idl Short Term'A' (DTstrl— S 1X009 Hr IF Port He SBcS.lto-1 S 594 1 

-td l Short Term's 1 tAeeuml — - S 1.191* U-OYOS BANK I NT t_ Fob CSL Geneva Tl 1 

-t o > snort Term 1 6‘ toStrll S 0X872 -Hw) UoydS Inn Dottor S 11440 


* -Iwi GAM ArWh-ooe Inc 

E 0323* -lw) GAMertco Inc 

S 1JL24 -iwl GAM A lq trot to Inc 

S 0482 -Iwl GAM Boston Inc 

, -twl GAM Ermitoe# 

S 3818 -Iwl CAM Fnnc-vel . 

S 15X4 .lw) GAM Hong Kong Inc. 

I) -I w 1 GAM Internotbool loc._ 

SF 429X0 -lw) GAM Jpoonlnr. 

SF 107X5 -t wl GAM North America Inc 


. S 11743 
S 13136 
. 5 13606 
S 1(049 
S 10670 
S 1536 
SF 107X3 
S 9673 
5 119X0 
S 9838 
» 10670 


City/Country 


— , * (pjaase prmi doarfy) 

'o MORROW • MAIL TODAY • WIN TOMORROW • MAIL TODS' 


dm - Deutsche Mark; SF - Belgium Francs; FL- Dutch Florin; LF - Luxembourg Frants: ECU - Ei 
P/VSlOjoSl oer unit: NJL - Not Ayot Wttto: N.C - NotCommunl^gted ;g- New; S- suspended; 573 
Redemol- Price- Ex-Ceuaon: “ - Former ty wortawtoe Fund Ltd; 9 - Offer Price Ina. prelim, c 




Lrf; $ . Offer Price tea. 3% prelim, charge; ++ - dally stock price as on Am*fw*>m : (no, 



















































. N v.' 

*♦ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 21-22. 1985 



Page 13 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


DoIhr FaUs in Europe, U.S. on GNP Figure 


Calculating 
Tax Burden 


BUSINESS PROFILE / Moha mmed al-Fayed, Quiet Acquisitor 

Purchaser of Harrods Draws Unwanted Spotli 



NEW YORK' — The dollar fell 


marSva^st mnsimaSTF V? raornin S and the fact that [the after reports of a further re 

S?8SEW5%E GNPcstunaurlcameinaHsU- Iraq .I&s Kharg Island. 


raid by 
lerrai- 


(Continued from Page 9) 
concentrated among upper-income 


w*.“* 


z ■*&*)$ 


*«! Or— ^ fit 



’ of the latest figures on U.S. eco- 
. nomic growth,. which dealers caDed 
'disappointing. 

’ . The ..Commerce Department’s 
“flash” estimate showed that the 
'US. gross national product was 
growing at an annual rate of IB 
percent in the t hi rd quarter of this 
year. Dealers said traders were dis- 
appointed because they had ex- 


Vn Kiri TVnm Senue 

LONDON — As Mohammed al- 
Faycd talks of his family’s prized 

the ~«*tiin>-' " "..T TTllT: Vn^nriev MPTinst the year for which data are available, possessions, such as Harrods. Lon- 

^ W» -hh ta-5.- EStasJnsus 


iff" «uinaici came in at z.o per- iraa on iran » rui«B uiomm ^ . ■ j ■ - jofti ,h_ u,i 

’oric and Europe after the reksue T. L *g KXr JSStai i 


slightly 
at 3.8895 
of 


.p^ted an apansoncf 3 percent lo sche marks, down from 1894; 
33 percent m ihe GNP, the mea- r. 655 Fmnrh h™™ fmm 


count Coip^ of New York. However, it eased 

«> iLfT 1 *“* *?. number against the marie, ending 
so had, n was just that many had dm after a dose Thursday 
expected it to be higher,’* Mr. xbqm 
M cGroany said. 

In New York, the British pound The dollar's drop ended a week 
dosed at SI .3750, up from Thurs- 
day's close of SI 3450. Other clos- 
ing dollar rates were: 2.840 Deut- released Thursday and Friday. 


thanYlOO.OOO reported 8 percent of or the Ritz Hotel in Paris, he is an 
the total income in the country but effusive and joyous man. 

S3 percent of the capital gains. But when a visitor to his elegant 
tier than reduce the capital- Mayfair penthouse residence over- 
looking Hyde Park turns the dis- 
cussion to his friends, his family 
background and the scope of the 


Rai 

B-iinc rate, many committee mem- 
bers are talking about raising it. 

the two-earner de- 


- •Restoring the iwo-eamcr ae- background ana tne scope oi me 

m which Aenukn had JijSSj duction. Uadcr current law. Tara- family fortune, affability fades 
aI ^ lu>st J ^ u ^ > J _ pn _i'l^i a . USUCS dies with two wage canters can take f rom the face of the 53-year-old 

a deduction of up to $3,000 a year Egyptian patriarch, 
to help offset the disadvantage of He rustles impatiently in the 
tbdr having to file a joint return, deep cushions of his chair and, al- 


. In London, the pound dosed at 

percent m ine GNP, the mea- 8.655 French francs, down from SI. 368, a strengthening from 

:^^SS!252S? S ' ^ onl P utof 8.8303 and 2.334 Swiss francs, also Thursday’s dose of SI. 3503 TT^p^dSiTwc^ld 'disallow the the politeness is unfailing. 

down from -.380. On other exchanges Jale Friday, he becomes tense. Sucbjcpiestioos 


- n; i S*R. 1 




ilia! 

'•-ta.M r *r 

Clf “l'ie 

.:«.» *:***. 
. _ •“ 'ktSdd,.. 


and services. 

result is a lower trading 
for (he dollar," said a West 
‘ German dealer. 

Dealers also said the fact that the 
estimate appeared to have been 
leaked before its release Friday 
may also have depressed the dollar. 

The flash estimate is based on 
relatively" inconclusive statistics 
and is subject to considerable revi- 
sion later. 


may sc 

Other lEMiiaiijp hu i iiuo;, ■ - w 

In London, the dollar fell more tf>* dollar i ras fixed in Frankfurt at deduction pri- MvV become the bane of Mr. al- 

[han four pfenmgs m the Iffitfov manly benefits middle-income Faved's existence, 

hours of trading to close M18432 |9122 . D M Thmsday at 8 799 y ^ Rcvenue Service Last March, Mr. al-Fayed and 
DeutKhe marks. It had opwed a French francs ui fern. < town 1 from to ^ ^ thirds of his two younger brothers, Ali and 

2.8875 and closed Thursday at 8.884. and at 1,938 lire in Milan, eouoles with n"«iuil incomes •-»«»• •«■*'<» wIimi ihev 
2.8781 DM. It also fell to 2.3423 Hobih fmm 1 954 9 Ute eoupW «un annual 


Swiss francs, compared with an 


8.884. and at 1,938 lire in 
down from 1,954.9. 

It closed at 13505 Swiss francs 


jemns of 2373? 1 and a dose in Zurich, also down, from 13898. 


ay or 23623. In Tokyo, the dollar dosed at 

Delaere said the pound was sup- 241.7 yen. down from 24235 on 
ported early in the day’s trading Thursday. (AP. VPI. Reuters) 


between $30,000 and $75,000 take 
advantage of the deduction. Less 
than a third of those filing a joint 
return with incomes above 
$200,000 use it. 


Salah. made news when they 
mounted a management-supported 
bid for control of the House erf 



ThB Nn VbV lane. 


Mohammed al-Fayed 


of Fraser, to his dismay.^ been a the village of Oxted, southeast of 


THE EUROMARKETS 


1 ^' 50.55? 
• r ®^arci» inj _• 


First Convertible ECU Issue Gains Attention 

ssfadDg jts v. ^ LONDON — The center of at- quoted on the when-issued market 
•* 'fssnis: aidttrJj Mention in the Eurobond market at between 101% and 102, which 


while the expected conversion pre- seen, as well as fresh buying on 
mium is 5 to 7 percent. It was more constructive fundamentals 

und charts, they added. 


‘f agree to ctS Friday was again the primary mar- compares with its par issue price. 
‘--l 4rier.i> ^ IceC as it had been nearly all week, Tlie lead manager was Credit 

•■•s 4’eiin. Wmi „ ■ . 

i, 


4tk Quor. 
Revefiua^ 
aw i 




. 

■Jja loom t 
& inns c. 


Oner Shore- 
Ywr 

Revenue 

CMtr Ncl 


" — ~i...jli pi nt 

i: pouoot 

• lit 
1 of (Aeapcc;. 

Bu: the 

'■-■-jCj r lent Ll. |yj" 

resmen. :» ^ 

"i‘ r sitk 

r.:, -aircraft zud 3 ^ 

-c empSascc da! 

‘a:e:V Jeler.?'nf. prova r 
-ajt Mr. Reasan c 
-.r ile\e:opmcR: of ret* 
ran? did n^stp. 
' l - bomber!. 1 ; xt 
mir.'temraL Natw*: 

r\>^W rmpr.T.-meniiQ. 
Aear.w S 
r„T.: .i f o:{cr.*nc r-qk 
vrccLcLor. of radat-p; 

;s -rJ -r.'.i-ajvTiit 
rz; f iit-srsStiag SKfli- 
C'.-i ’"he I c. 

,S. \ir Cone 

N :ci*.te 7 aru. Is: 

:'i:- capabir of baffhe- 
L'-; cefen» i* 

.,-i the Ef-c- 

;rrr.i.:‘. f "star w&i 
w.v£i r-M be O'A 
S;e..!:b. bor.bcr or aaf.b 

• -tr.T: MS 

. ■ :.vhr 

--ci.V. h/'i’ - It 
.. _--j. 'tf ‘.OTBOa S-' 

Vw .r/j: **' 

.rjjs arJ the 3 . 1 erf" 


4Hi Ovor. 
Revenue- 


Oper I 
Oper Shora. 


Y«er 

Revenue. 


Talk of prospective Chinese and 
Indian buying was vague, but India 
has emerged as a re-seller of Nica- 

dealers said. Suisse First Boston Ltd. raguan whites. 

The main feature was the first It was not the only bond in the Dealers sard the week smain rea- 
convertiMe Eurobond ever denom- ECU sector Friday. Ireland issued uik nr die floating^ate sector was obirs mi* 
iriated in European Currency a 50-miUion-ECU straight paying undoubtedly the SL5-tnlhon note 
Units, which received an enthusia- 8% percent over 10 years and Bntain. It ended at j 99Jq ^inside 

tic welcome from investors. priced at par. The bond was lead the 30 -tasrs-pomt rellmg ccwkxs- 

Activity in the secondary market managed by Banque Paribas Capi- sron and well inside the 60-basis^ 
picked up a little after publication tal Markets and ended just inside point total fees. 

of the “dash” estimate of growth in the total fees of 2 percent. Secondary market dow nn - 

the U3. gross national product. The dollar fl Dating- rale- notesec- sector were slighUy firmer at the 

But, althoirah the 2.8-percent tor saw another new issue Friday end of the day and showed little 
growth estimate was a little lower that took the total value of transac- change over the »«*■ 

San expected, price movements lions this week in the area to just In the dolb Mtr aight ^stt.tor. 
were not ereaL over $33 billion, dealers said. Danish Export Finance Corp. is- 

The eS? convertible was for The $60-milUon. 15-year issue sued a SlOO-nunion toad paying 
CIR International SA and is con- was for the Icelandic power compa- lOh percent over five 
vertible into shares of the parent ny, Landsvirkjun, anapays 
company, rnmpagnie Indusiriali over the London interbank offered 
Rj unite SpA. rate, which was aided by a de- 

u jhe 15-year issue carries an indi- pressed dollar rate, dealers said. 

Wted coupon of 5 to 5% percent Weekend short-covering was 


Company 
Reailts 

a^renae ana profits or loan, in 
mtliiom. am In loco) cyrrenckn un 
ottvrwise IncHcaluL 

(iBlledSlatM 

AM International 


IMS 

ISM 

5J35 

0.13 

ms 

*ii7 
30.88 
D 21 


rods r 0 r the cqurt-alent of S842 notable exception because of the London, 
million. This was a dream come bitter battle with Loorho PLC for Besides the Rite, thefamilyOTm 
true for the fanulv, which buill its the company. . an aparunent building on the 

wMfSsa^ SSHS ttsssfi&sss 

ItaSSlSKSsSS: Bn " h busnca ,irt " pr " B 

the United Slates paiSQ 10 overturn the take- Corp. m Texas and the Warner 

Unlike many high-Hying deal over by convincing the government Coramurucanons Guiding in Neu 
makersT however Mr ^al-Fay-ed that the al-Fayeds have nenher the York s RockfeUer Plaza, 
treasures his privaev and tries 5 to wealth nor the background that The family has participated ac- 
keep his familv from the limelight, they claim. lively in a variety of cons trucMn 

l9W To the general public, the al- Rovston Webb, a lawyer for the projects, ^paruodarly m the Middle 
Fayette were knovra if at all. for al-Fayeds, has said in response: East, and joined major oil compa- 
i diiaMavish restoration of the Ritz "There were exhaustive checks mes m f his life 

Hotel <.ince acquiring it in 1979. made by the Department of Trade Mr. al-Fayed s aaount of his life 


parents’ or my grandparents’ 
achievements. Banks were my main 
interest because you see everything 
moving from there. I started my 
own company. Middle East Navi- 
gation. when 1 was 21 to prove I 
could make it on my own. 

Middle East was one of the fam- 
ily businesses nationalized by the 
Nasser government in 1961. ac- 
cording to Mr. al-Fayed, who 

found the experience traumatic 
Last March be was pleased to 
attend Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher’s dinner for visiting Presi- 
dent Hosni Mubarak of Egypt- but 
he is not ready to forgive his home- 
land. Although both his brothers 
have been back — Mr. al-Fayed 
has stuck to his vow never again to 
set foot in Egypt. 

Mr. al-Fayed’s exodus took him 
first to the Gulf. One of his earliest 
ventures was ferrying Moslems to 
Saudi Arabia for pilgrimages to 
Mecca. He established many con- 
tacts in the Gulf countries that 
served him well later in bis career, 
most notably a close friendship 
with Sheikh Rashid bin Said al- 
Maktoum of Dubai, and his family. 

In the late 1960s. he plunged into 
the construction developments that 

to 

British business lire In projects 
such as the construction of the port 
of Dubai and the Dubai Trade 
Center, both of which the al- 
Fayeds operate. British companies 
such as Costain Group and Ber- 
nard Sunley & Sons Ltd. piled up 
the equivalent of about S2 billion 
worth of business. 


IW4 

sns 


Associates are struck by the f am- 
is one of honorable enterprise and ily’s closeness. “In general, if you 


s 


Eckerd (Jack) 


Fire.” 


IMS 

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2J10. 

584 

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__ nag ovartar cm> rtar net eectvttts 
atone otsst mutton from sate. 


Gen conn 


3rd Omar. 
Rtvenu*. 


Opw Share. 
9 Manila 


ini priced at 99%. This issue was led bjj Re*™^. 


IMS 
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249 
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IMS 

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674 

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a.-.*—- Ss’saanfiK! iSS"" 1 "" 

ri-oasssss aggrvSai -sasssspsa 

rich asseLs - such as the British spmi four continents. nor^Engand.He d^s^ Douglas-Home, head of the inter- 

department store, long a magnet They have a shipping empire, naliSfinance division at Mor- 

for some of the world’s ridiest said by Kleinwort B™*? 0 “ 1 thtf British gan Grenfell Ltd., a merchant bank 
shoppers. “There is only one Har- stet of more than 40 ships that riaMtad jm^Bnbsh hel ^ 0 ^ mize numerous 

rods." said Mr. al-Fayed, who is operated primarily from bases in Scd^Sduaied Fayed deals\is tlrn it has always 

im« Tond of comparing both Harrods Cairo and Genoa. . . Mi- ateFayed gradu^ r 

^ and ihe Ritz to the Pyramids ofhis Properly interests m Britain in- from the Umv^t^f^ocanOna 

nauve Egypt as an international elude 60 Park Lane, a rune-story with a degree Jli “All of mv deals are my cre- 

W attraction^ ^ building. on one of (he city’s most ready M * m> dCalS ^ 


1M4 

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83.7 

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41J 

m 


Chase Manhattan and was quoted owr snare ■»« 

on the when-issued martel el a ”SSSSS7^tStX^S^ ^ hend“« raml’dShSs' wilh a toiland along .ilJ 32.000 acres TJese. were nor fannly he 
discounl of 2 percent, just on the SUSSSSSSU StOlSSS SreJn of pubUeirri* House ( 12.955 hectares), and an estate in es. he sard. I rarer relied 

‘ ' uod operations. r 


l »aved. who makes the BSSESfWS ^hmjdmg-materials ^npany 

^ly’smajor mv^t^dai- ^,5“ * rSg'tS “^^tere not family business- Sfe I tl do that fof a friend, I do it 


on my for free/ 


total fees. 



Friday^ 

OIC 

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NASDAQ prices a* of 
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Via The Associated Press 


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the world. 


The International Herald Tribune. 
Bringing the World's Most 
TmpnrtantNewS to the World’s 
Most Important A udi enc e . 
















Page 14 


ACROSS 

1 Lesage's“GU 


5 Frank Norris 
book: 1921 

18 Juliet's 
betrothed 

15 “Hop- 

Poe tale 

19 Where Plzarro 
died 

20 Violin’s kin 

21 “This sweet 
wee wife 
Burns 

22 Hamlet is one 

23 He wrote “The 
Virginian" 

25 Clancy’s “The 
Hunt lor " 

27 Voltaire hero 

28 She wrote 
“Angel of 
Light” 

30Makeaboo- 

boo at bridge 

31 Author Harte 

32 De Coverley or 
As cham 

33 Forward 

34 Ruark’s 
“Something of 


ACROSS 

47 Surf sound 

48 Christie’s 


ACROSS 
83 Light anchor 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SXJNPAY, SEPTEMBER 21-22, 1985 


Book Country By&T. m. peanuts 


‘Death in the 


mjssst i» i * i* m i 6 1 7 1 6 i h m^ u ,z 13 14 m 15 16 17 * 

Mrs. Jenkins — K 


I MATE WAITING 
. FOR SUPPER — 


49 Evan Hunter’s 
"Streets of 


50 Zoology suffix 

51 Danielle Steel 


37 A sister-in-law 
of Albany 

38 One bearing 
witness 

42 “But what is 

he to ■?”: 

Shak. 

43 “North of 
Boston” poet 

45 TV’s" 

Haw" 

46 Writer Woolf, 
to friends 


bestseller 

55 Like certain 
forces 

56 Poems with 
six-line 
stanzas 

58 The Cat Nation 

59 Tire parts 

68 She wrote 
"Women and 
Beauty" 

61 Din’s burden 

62 Fast-food 
order 

63 Dance step 

65 Livy’s tongue 

66 “Penguin 
Dreams . . 
author 

69 “Network” 
director 

79 Judith Michael 
bestseller 

72 Sheed subject 

73 Tub plant 

74 Hass's “ to 

Win" 


86 End of a 
Hemingway 
title 

87 Colombian 
explorer- 
author 

88 “ 

Sanctorum" 

89 Free-for-all 

90 Scorch 

92 Folksinger 
from Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 


SOMETIMES, IF Y3U 
PRETEND YOU PONT 
REALLY CARE, SUPPER 
COMES FASTER- 


139 140 141 






IT'S NEVER - j;v. 

WORREPVEj/u, | 






BLONDtE 


WE NEED A 
r NEW CM, f 


95 Rescued 

96 Theory 
expounded by 
Howells 


NOT REALLY- OUR OLD 
CAR CAN SO ANOTHER 
50,000 MILES N ' 




SURE- 


"ur if rr 

V. shuttle ) 


100 Wallace best 
seller 

102 "A Passion for 

Peters- 

Austin 



105 Like Ben 

Jonson 

106 West .New 

Guinea 


BEETLE BAILEY 


107 Ranch in S3 

"Giant" p 

108 Connell's "Son. L_ 
of the Morning I 1C 


197 196 199 


1102 1 1D3 JIM 


THIS ISA REAL CUSHY 

job you have the 

LIGHTHOUSE, CHARLIE 


ITS PRETTY 
GOOP, EXCEPT 
FOR THE JOKE 


WHAT 

JOKE? 


gVERVOHE WHO . 
PASSES YfeLLS^ 

%s 0LAST off/ •- 


75 Tare's partner 

76 Collie event 

77T.C.U. rival 
78" of a 

Hooker”: 

Hope-Netland 


109 Steinbeck hero i 

110 Balms los 

111 Creator of the L_ 
Moffats 

112 Resentful 


<8 New York Timet, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DOWN 

1 Political group 

2 Moslem 
administrative 
district 

3 Preacher’s 
sign-off 

4 Rewrote “The 
People, Yes" 

5 Larson's " 

of the Far 
Side” 

6 Change type 

7 Browning's 

•• Vogler” 

8 "Rhine 
Maidens" 
author 

9 Mariey's 
partner 

10 Sign for 
Cassandra 


DOWN 

11 Afghan bigwig 

12 Disencumbers 

13 Helle's 
stepmother 

14 Wambaugh's 

"The of 

Harry Bright" 

15 Palm leaves 
16L.C. Douglas's 

-The ” 

17 Designer 
Cassini 

18 Actor from 
Philadelphia 

24 Cabled 
26 Doctrine 
29 Pulitzer Prize 
historian: 1934 
32 Wat Tyler was 
one 


DOWN 
33 Lindsey's 
“Tender Is the 


34 Sienkiewicz's 

“Quo ?” 

35 Byrd book 

36 "Juba! 
Sackett" 
author 


DOWN 
41 Trout’s 
spawning 
grounds 
43 a clef 


44 Famed 
English 
publisher- 
writer 


37 French meat 
dishes 

38 Fourth-century 
theologian 
condemned as a 
heretic 

39 He wrote “The 
Dynasts" 

40 Fished 
selectively 


47 Punjab 
princess 

49 Salute 

51 Morrell's 

“Rambo: 

Blood . . 

52 Nobelist in 
Literature: ' 
1923 

53 Adebook: 1896 

54 Mortgages 


DOWN 

55 McEnroe rival 

57" a fine 

lady . . 

59 "Last Case” 
sleuth 

61 Eliot's "The 
Land" 

62 Log splitters' 
wedges 

63 Segal's "The 


DOWN 
70 Five: ~omb. 
form 


71 Wrap 
76 Adjective for 
The Bard 


78Saguaros 

79 Part of 
HOMES 

80 Poet Wallace 


64 Author of “The 
Nun's Story” 

65 Idles 

68 Sockets on 
clarinets 

67 Funeral 
oration 

68 Annual 
matchers 


81 Pump pan 

82 Bay of Biscay 
island 


83 S. African pen 
85 They dye often 


DOWN 

91 Apollinaire’s 
"Alas!" 

92 Norwegian 
river 

S3 Pillar Masque 
site 

94 Architect 
Saarinen 

95 Shadow: 

« Comb, form 

97 Ambler's 

"Journey 

Fear" 

98 Battle 
memento 



I 




ANDY CAPP 


0(11 





•hAtgfflgS, 


tw^okw^ll) 




89 Zygomatic 
bone 

90 Homeland of 
Daedalus 


99 Simple; bare 
101 Ending for dull 

103 Ballot marks 

104 Garfield, e.g. 


I ^ * 

WIZARD of ID 




MIDAIR 

By Frank Conroy. 149 pages. $15.95. 

R P. Dutton, 2 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
10016. 


BOOKS 


Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani 


F I UBLISHED in 1967, when he was 31, Frank 
Conroy’s “Stop-Tune” remains one of the finest 
contemporary memoirs of boyhood and adoles- 
cence — so shapely and piercing in its candor that it 
reads more like a novel man a work of reminiscence. 

What made the book resonant was not only its 
depiction of Conroy’s unraveling family — the 
unstable father, who moved in and out of mental 
institutions; the sly, distracted mother; the self- 
absorbed stepfather — but its precise evocation of 
the timeless, primordial world of childhood. A 


glimpse of young boys flying through the Florida 
woods on their bicycles m the summer dark; the 


woods on their bicycles m the summer dark; the 
author, left alone in the house by his parents, lying 
in bed, fi ghting between sleepiness and fright — 


such scenes captured early adolescence with such 
immediacy that the reader marveled at Conroy's 
access to his memories and his ability to render 
them in words. 

Almost two decades later, Conroy has brought 
out his second book — “Midair," a collection of 
short prose pieces that range from vaguely autobio- 
graphical sketches of fathers and sons to Kafka- 
esque tales tinged with the surreaL It is a slight, 
disappointing volume — one reads it, eagerly antici- 
pating the pleasure of hearing Conroy’s voice again, 
but the wry, clear voice of “Stop-Time.'' so free of 
self-pity, is nowhere to be heard. Instead, there are a 
lot of muddy, muddled generalities (‘Tie becomes 
aware that there is a reality that lies behind the 
appearance of the world”) and a disagreeable tone 
of barely concealed anger and brusque impatience. 

In story after story, Conroy rushes along, as 
though be cannot wait to get the telling over with, as 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


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though be really had very little to say. The title story 
collapses a man's life in to two dozen pages, summa- 
rizing whole periods with phrases like “four years 
pass, and nothing happens.” “Gossip” similarly 
skims over time and events, with abrupt notations 
like; “The end of the sixties marked a period of 
great change for George — all crammed into a year 
or two, like the playing out of some cabahstic, 
mystical prophecy — and the changes frightened 
him profoundly. Such vague passages, used over, 
and over again, result in dry, pinched narratives, " 
virtually devoid of flavor or suspense. Since we are 
never given any detailed information aboui the 
texture of Conroy's characters’ lives, never shown 
how they really think or fed, they never become 
more than shadow puppets, mechanically going 
through their appointed rounds. 

Pari of this problem stems from the characters' 
reluctance to look too deeply into their lives. 
Conroy seems to share his characters' lack of curios- 
ity about their inner lives: He seems to conspire in 
keeping their secrets opaque. “Transit." which 
takes the form of a report written by a bureaucrat, 
depicts a hallucinatory episode about a train that 
refuses to stop for passengers; “The Mysterious 
Case of R” recounts a psychiatrist's bizarre encoun- 
ter with a victim of writer’s block. 

“You must never forget,” the writer tells his 
doctor, “that the artist who works without inspira- 
tion creates a dead child, a child he nevertheless 
loves as he would a living one, and that the sensa- 
tion of all one's work and love going into something 
not alive, as nothing can be alive without the Muse, 
is very much the same sensation you would feel if a 
patient you had worked your painstaking dedicated 
work with Tor years, and come to love, were sudden- 
ly to raise his hand in the air, snap his fingers, and 
disappear .” This unfortunately serves as a kind of 
commentary on “Midair." 


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Michiko Kahnani is on the staff of The New York 
Times. 



I WHAT5 THE AIMTER;GARFIELP? / j. 




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HE'S AFRAID I MIGHT CATCH HIS TEMPER. * 


W)rfd StockMarkete 


Via Agence France-Presse Sept. 20 

Gating prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 














































SPORTS 


t* 


Archie Moore 
Remembers: 

The Fight, 

And the Loss 

By John Ed Bradley 

Washington Pan Service 

LAS VEGAS — Archie 
Moore aits on the edge of the 
king-size bed in his hotel room 
and stares out the window. He 
is weazing one of those cro- 
* cheted beanies he likes so much, 
with a little gold bulldog pinned 
toits center. 

At least it looks like a bull- 
dog, though ^ may be a mon- 
goose. That is what they called 
him a long time ago: The Old 
Mongoose. Ancient Archie 
Moore, light heavyweight 
champion of the world. 

He is remembering that night 
in September 30 years ago, 
when he look it to Rocky Mar- 
ciano and Rocky took it to him, 
and as a result they both left the' 
ring ehangari men. 

“But I could have taken it 
from him," Moore says. “I could have been heavy- 
weight champion of the world. I could have . . 
And his voice, once strong with possibility, fades. 
For the most part, Moore, who is 71, enjoys 



Archie Moore fell to the 
the eighth round of their 


The Anoocsed Ptbb 

Marciano in 
2h 1955. 


just 
world to 


the heavyweight champion of the 
knees. 

I thought, ‘I got him now, I got him . 1 And he’s 
standing up against those ropes, looking at the 


talking about the old days, has been doing it all people as if he wants to apologize for going down, 
week as Larry Holmes prepared for his fight Satur- “the referee looked for me to go to the corner 
day night with Michael Spinks. Moore was hired as clear across the ring, but I'm smart, you see. I'm in 


day night with Michael Spinks. Moore was hired 
a consultant to Holmes, the world heavyweight 
champ preparing to defend his title on the 30th 
anniversary of the night Moore and Mardano took 
it to each other, and Marciano won the last fight of 
Iris Hfc. 



had a certain something not happened. 

And that is why he is looking off through the 
window: because he cannot forgive or forget, be- 
cause he cannot lei go of the memory. 

He remembers: "It was comical, the way Rocky 
looked in the ring He was like a bull with gloves 
on, trying to fight. From all I'd seen of him, his way 
was to come out like a swarm of bees, swarming 
over people. 

“Bui this fight with me he did not come out that 
way" and “I said to him, ‘Rocky, I thought you’d 
come out to fight.’ And that made him mad, so I 
jabbed him once or twice and whistled a few over 
his head." 

Moore assumes the classic boxing pose, fists 
clenched tightly. He takes a stab at the bright air, 
then asks you to picture the ropes around him. The 
window there is one side of the ring, the wall 
another. You can feel the crowd if you let yourself. 

Moore remembers: “In the second round, he 
came out swinging which was okay. A fighter can 
size up what’s coming immediately, and I saw what 
was about to happen. 

“I feinted him and he threw an overhand right, 
and it sailed off, because I stepped back. Then I 
moved in, and I hit him with an upppercuL I hit 
him and watched him fall." 

Moore falls to the floor, but at this moment he is 
not Archie Moore. He is Rocky Mardano, his old 
friend, down on his knees with both arms extended 
for support, waiting for the count. 

Moore counts off two seconds — the two sec- 
onds that referee Henry Kessler counted out above 
the roar of 60,000 in New York — and he, Moore, 
who is Mardano, pulls himself off the floor and 
leans against the window, against the ropes. 

His eyes blur. He looks embarrassed, yet he is 
appealing to the crowd. He holds his gloves high 
and smiles as if to say. "You can’t hurt me, you 
can’t I'm -Rocky Marciano, and you can’t hurt 
me." • 

Moore steps away from the window. It is 1955 
all over again; it is Sept. 21, and Archie Moore has 


clear across the ring, but I'm smart you ! 
the one right here.” Moore hurries past the window 
and stands next to the television set 

“All I have to do is swing out and hit him again, 
but Kessler swings his butt between me and 
Rocky. He starts to count again, and he grabs 
Rocky's gloves and he wipes those damn gloves 
against his chest 

"It takes six seconds, I know, and he's quit 
counting, and my corner's shouting for me to hit 
Rocky, they’re saying that ain’t no eight-count. 
Then Kessler pulls Rocky's gloves and snaps his 
head back. And that gets him going again, snap- 
ping his bead that way. 

"But I’m standing there looking’’ at Kessler 
"right in the eyes, and he's looking in my eyes. And 
be sees the hate in my eyes; he sees it all right And 
he knows I hate Mm; I hate him to this day." 

Archie Moore sits back down on the edge of the 
bed and closes his eyes. The window is a window 
again, the television is no longer in the comer of a 
boxing ring. And Rocky Marciano has been dead 
16 years. 

Thirty years ago Saturday, Rocky Mardano 
knocked down Archie Moore six tunes before the 
fight ended in the ninth. The last time he hit the 
canvas. The Old Mongoose, who then was 41, tried 
to pull himself up by the ropes but could not make 
it 

get the fight wr^Mardano, had sprat Icmg^nigLts 
writing letters to newspapermen and congressmen 
asking them to help his cause by talking it up in the 
papers. 

He had told everybody he could win. He had put 
his reputation on the line. But Ms dream had died 
with the talk, and he found himself taking a seat 
against the comer tumbudde and watching Mar- 
dano raise his arms in victory for the last time ever. 

Thirty years ago came a big, hard night, and it 
would never die. 

“In the final analysis," Archie Moore is saying. 
“Rocky Marciano’s superior condition wore me 
down, and my age. 

“I was angered by what the referee had done to 
me, and that didn’t help. I began to fight Rocky 
Mardano’s fight by trying to outsla g him. I lost my 
cool He outfaced me. I couldn’t trade punches 
with him. 

"What happened in the rad, I was out there in 
deep water, and I had to swim or dse. You know 
the rest." 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Transition 


Thursday’s Major League line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
MHwniikM no in 080-5 12 ■ 

* Baltimore 800 ioi ooo-2 10 i 

Wee men, McClure (6) end Hvnpert; Bod- 
dicker. Snell 151. Havens 16) and Pordo. 

* Dempsey 14). W— Wegman, 1-0. L-Bao- 
dlcker. 12-17. HRs— Milwaukee. Robkfoux (I), 
Cooper (161. Baltimore. Murray (30). 

* Mm York 002 001 088- 3 9 0 

.Detroit 0M 281 080-10 II 0 

j.Ntokro, Scurry (2), Allen (5). Rasmussen 
(61, Armstrona <71 and Winwnor: Tonona 
, 0‘N«sl(11andM«Jvln.W— Tonana.H«.L— J. 
\ JHekra, 0-1. HRs-6tew York, Henderson 122). 

* Detroit, Evans 2 ISA). Trammell l»2), Gibson 
(281. 

Co n tom to Ml 0M 331—0 15 I 

CWeow. MO 000 100-0 6 I 

Condelario and Boons; Srovur. Wohrmelj- 
terl7).G)eaton(a),Correa (8) and Fisk. Skin- 
ner (8).W— CandotarkuW. L— Soever. 13-11. 
- HRs — California, Jackson 2 (26), Boone (5). 
Seattle 080 828 022-6 17 1 

-Kansas City 000 020 2BO— 4 3 a 

■ - Langston, Lazorko (7). Vande Bora (8j, 
Nunez 18), Mirabella (9),Tot>lk (8) and Scot). 
Valle (6): SotMThosen, Quisenberrv (8) ana 
-Woman. W — Nunez, 7-2. L—Qol sen berry, 7-9. 

■ 5v— Toblk (1). HR— Kansas City. Smith (6). 


BASKETBALL 

Notlonol Basketball Association 
NEW JERSEY— Signed Bobby Cottage, 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
San Diego 2M ooe e»-n 13 l 

San Francisco 000 200 ISO — 3*3 

' DravedcY and Kennedy; Hammaker, 
Moore (2), Robinson (7). Williams {<) and 
Bren l Y, Trevino (6). W— Oravedcv. 11-11. 1 — 
Hammker, 4-li HRs— San Dtego, McRevn- 
olds 114). Son Frond sea Deer (7). 
Cincinnati 018 010 319-15 II 1 

'Atlanta 800 102 011— 5 10 5 

* Browning, Franco (?) and Diaz; P.Perez, 


Major League Standings 


Garber 17), Como (?). Sutter (9) and Own. 
W— Browning, 18-9. L — P Perez. 1-11. HRs— 
Cincinnati. Esaskv (19), Parker (28). Atlanta, 
Owen (2), Homer (251. 

SLLOuts 010 110 000-3 8 0 

Philadelphia 024 080 OOx-6 18 0 

Kao ugh, Boever (3). Campbell (3), Perry 

(4) , Horton (6) and Nielo. Porter (61 : Rucker. 

Childress (6), Carman (7) and Virgil- W— 
Rucker, 3-1. L— Keotigh. 0-1. Sv— Carman (61. 
Chicago 001 080 000—1 3 0 

New York 032 000 OCX— 3 11 1 

Fontenot, Bolemo (3). Sorensen (51. Perl- 
man IB) and Oavls; Fernandez. McDowell (9) 
and Carter. W— Fernandez. 7-9. L— Fontenot, 
7-9. HRs — Chicago, Matthews (It). New York. 
Carter (29). Strawberry (25). Foster (19). 
Pittsburgh 103 030 HO 3-8 12 2 

Montreal BOO <28 8H 0-6 9 0 

Turmoil, Guonte (4). Winn (9) and Pena; 
BJSmtth, st. Claire (5), OXonnor (7), Burke 

(5) , Lucas (10) and O'Berrv. Butara (5). Fitz- 
gerald (9). W— Whin. 3-5. L— Burke. 9-4. H Rs— 
Pittsburgh. Reynolds (2). Montreal, Brooks 
( 121 . 

Hoaston 103 BOO 210-6 17 2 

Los Angeles 191 000 030-5 10 t 

Kitenoer. Smith (0) and Boiler; Welch. 
Powell (71. Castillo 17). Nledtnfuer (9) and 
Yeager, Sclosda 19). W— Kneooer, 15-10. L— 
Welch. 11 - 14 . Sv— Smith (25). 


Football 


NFL Standings 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
East 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East DtvisMn 

W L Pd. 


GB 


Taranto 

New York 

Baltimore 

Detroit 

Boston 

Milwaukee 

Clave land 


91 54 
86 60 
78 67 
74 70 

73 73 
64 81 
54 94 

West Division 

12 64 
82 64 

74 71 
71 75 
70 74 
68 79 
52 91 


.California 
Kansas City 
Chlcooo 
Oakland 
Seattle 
.Minnesota 
.Texas 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East OMsiM 

W L 
90 56 
89 57 
77 69 
71 73 
67 78 
49 95 

West DivWoa 
65 61 


St. Louis 

New York 

Montreal 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Pittsburgh 


Ui Angeles 

CMdnnaH 

Houston 
San Diego 
Atlanta 
San Frandsca 


79 66 
74 70 
73 73 
60 M 
57 89 


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Miami 

New England 
N.y. jets 
Buffalo 

Indianapolis 

Cleveland 

Houston 

Pittsburgh 

Cincinnati 

Kansas City 
Seattle 
Denver 
L_A_ Raiders 
son Diego 


T Pci. PF PA 
0 JM S3 39 
0 .600 33 40 

0 .500 42 34 
0 JM 12 56 

0 JW 16 75 


PHOENIX— Reached agreement wttti Ed 
Pinckney, forward, on a multi-year contract 

FOOTBALL 

Not kmal Football League 

GREEN BAY— Traded John Jefferson, 
wide reciever. to Cleveland tor an undisclosed 
1987 draft choice and me NFL rights to Tom 
Robison, offensive tackle, cumwittv property 
of me Houston Gamblers of the United Slates 
Football League. 

LA. RAMS— Reached contract agreement 
with Greg Meisnar, nose tackle. Re-signed 
Tuny Slaton, center. Waived AJ. Janes, run- 
ning bock, and Booker Reaso. defensive end. 
Placed Mike Guman, running hack, on the 
Inlured-reserve list. 

PHILADELPHIA— Signed Aaron Brown, 
linebacker, formerly with the Winnipeg Blue 
Bombers of the Canadian Football League. 

HOCKEY 

liotlQiiuI Hockoy Lnbdc 

MINNESOTA— Stoned Tony McKegney, 
led wing, to a three- year contract. 

ST. LOUIS— Traded Mark Johnson, for- 
ward, to New Jersey for Shawn Evans, de- 
fenseman, and a fHIh-round draft plA In 1986 
or 1987. Stoned Joe Mullen, right wing, to a one- 
rear contract. 

COLLEGE 

CAN ISI US — Named Dave Spider men's as- 
sistant basketball coach. 

HAWAII— Announced the resignat io n of 
Lynn Nance, men's a ssistan t basketball coa- 
ch. 

PENNSYLVANIA— Named Gordon Austin 
assistant basketball coach-. 

RUTGERS— Named Tom Crowley assis- 
tant man's basketball coach. 

ST. BONAVENTURE— Named Kevin 
Dunne fuU-tlme assistant men's basketball 
coach and Rica Cabraf part-time assistant 
men's basketball coach. 


Reds Giving NL West 
Its Own Tide Race 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ATLANTA — Do not dismiss 
the Cincinnati Reds just yet There 
may be a p ennan t race in the Na- 
tional League West after all. There 
is for sure in the East Division, 
where ihe New York Mets drew to 
within one game of the St. Lotus 
Ordinals on Thursday night 

The Reds got 19 hits in defeating 
the Atlanta Braves, 15-5. That with 
Houston’s triumph over first-place 
Los Angeles, put the Reds only five 
and one-half games behind, the 
Dodgers. And those teams play 
each other three more times. 

"We still have a lot of games 
left," said Nick Esasky, whose 
three-run home run in the seventh 
i nning delivered the game- winning 
run. "If we keep doing what we’re 
doing now, we’ve got a chance of 
winning it" 

What the Reds are doing now is 
winning: five in a row and eigh t of 
their last 10. What the Dodgers are 
doing is losing: four of their last 
five. 

In the seventh, with Atlanta 
leading, 3-2, Pete Rose led off with 
a angle off loser Pascual Perez. 
Dave Parker doubled and Esasky 
hit reliever Gene Gaiter’s first 
pitch into the left-field seats. 

Rose got three hits in the game to 
go over the 100 mark for the 23d 
straight season, breaking the record 
he bad shared with Ty Cobb and 
Carl Yastrzemski. 

The Reds got nine runs in the 

ninth innin g, four 0D Parker’s 

grand slam, to make it easy for 
Tom Browning to win his 18th 
game, most among rookies in the 
major leagues. 

"The last two times out, I’ve had 
a nine-run inning , and it’s nice to 
see that,” Browning said. 

Astros 6 , Dodgers 5: In Los An- 
geles, Craig Reynolds hit two tri- 
ples and a single and drove in the 
go-ahead run as Houston, behind 
17 hits, won its ninth straight. 

The Dodgers scored three times 
in the eighth bat left the bring run 
on in the ninth as Enos Cabell hit 
into a fielder’s choice and pinch- 
hitter Greg Brock grounded out. 

Mets 5, Orbs 1: Sid Fernandez 
held Chicago to one hit — Gary 
Matthews' third-inning homer — 
for eight inning s in New York 
while Gary Carter, Darryl Straw- 
berry and George Foster homered 
for the Mets. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

FfaBlies 6, Cardinals 3: Osrie Vir- 
gil and Luis Aguayo each drove in 
two runs in PnDaddphia as their 
team scored six times m the second 
and third umings to rad St Louis* 
seven-game winning streak. 

Pirates 8 , Expos <fc RJ. Reyn- 
olds’ homer, leading off the 10 th, 
gave Pittsburgh its victory in Mon- 
treal 

Padres 11, Giants 3: Kurt Bevac- 
qua singled in two runs during a 
six-run second inning as San Diego 
won in San Francisco, f AP, UPI) 


Coleman Steals 
His lOOth Base 

The Associated Press 

PHILADELPHIA — Rookie 
Vince Coleman of the SL. Louis 
Cardinals became the third 
player in National League his- 
tory to steal 100 or more bases 
in a season when he stole sec- 
ond in the fifth inning of Thurs- 
day night’s game. 

The only other National 
League players to steal 100 
bases in one season were Maury 
Wills, 104 in 1962, and Lou 
Brock, 118 in 1974. 

It was Coleman's 146th 
game. Brock, when be set the 
National League record in 
1974, had 106 at that point. 


Angels Win, Tying 
Royals in AL West 


The .Associated Press 

CHICAGO — Reggie Jackson 
hit two home runs Thursday night 
for the California Angels as they 
beat the Chicago White Sox. 8-0, 
and tied for the lead in the Ameri- 
can League West. 

But while the Angels were tying 
the Kansas City Royals, the New 
York Yankees were fit to be tied. 

The AL West became the closest 
division race in baseball after the 
Seattle Mariners beat the Royals, 
6-4. to complete a four-game 
sweep, and the the Angels' John 
Candelaria shut out the White Sox 
on a six-hitter. 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

In die East, the idle Toronto 
Blue Jays' l«d tome fiveand 
one-half garoa with 
seventh straight loss, a 10-3 drub 
bine by the Detroit Tigers. , 

The Angels scored a run in the 
third inning, then got w starting 
SSc^TtoSeava-inttesev^ 
for three runs. Jackson jut a £ 
nm homer in the eighth and h-.s 
529th in the majors in the wntn. 

*Tm reallv enjoying this pennant 
race." said Candelaria, wl 

.8 A _ -. 1 * nn AtlO ? If 


[5 per 
vho came 


to the Angels on Aug. 2 in a trade 
from Pittsburgh and 
first shutout smee July 1 954. If we 
keep playing the way we have, ilus 
thing is going to go down right to 
the end. 

Mariners 6 , Royals 4: In Kansas 
City, Missouri, Alvin Davis and 
Dave Henderson doubled during a 
two-run ninth that gave Seattle us 
ninth victory in 10 games against 
the Royals this season. . 

The Mariners had tied at 4 with 
two runs in the eighth off Dan 
Quisenbeny, then brat the Royals 
ftp* reliever in the ninth. Davis led 
off with a double and pinch-runner 
Ricky Nelson was sacrificed to 
third before Henderson doubled 
and scored on John Moses’ single. 

When the Royals’ Lonnie Smith 
bit a two-run homer in the fifth, it 
ended a dub-record string of 30 
scoreless innings. 

Tigers 10, Yankees 3: Darrell 
Evans hit mo of his team's four 
homers in Detroit and New York’s 
newly acquired Joe Niekro was 
chased in the second inning, having 
given up six runs on seven hits. 

“It happens to great teams.” said 
the Yankees* manager, Billy Mar- 
tin. “Yon can’t give up. It's very 
frustrating. All ofa sudden our 
pitchers stop patching and our hit- 
ters stop hitting. Usually, you have 
one or the other. But both of than? 

“You can’t even manage. What 
can yon do when you’re down sev- 
en or eight runs?" 

Brewers 5, Orioles 2: Billy Joe 
Robidomt homered to help Mil- 
waukee win in Baltimor e, The Ori- 

terNiS k* 1 k* 3 30th 

Gaiy Carta-, who earlier had hit a home run, was tagjed ontby the Cubs’ Jody Davis as he 1 15 mashmed in, hehasdrivrata 
tried to score in the seventh inning. Bat Metsvroa, 5-Land dosed to one game of die lead more than 100 four consecutive 
in the National League’s East Dmsion when St Louis was beaten, 6-3, In Philadelphia, years. 



BaMtiOn 


Dolphins-Chiefs Game May Become a Fa 



NFL PREVIEW 


could get it with the expected 

tackle. The Steders 


Sew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The Kansas City Chiefs, 
and the Miami Dolphins have made their 
occasional meetings memorable. Perhaps the 
most celebrated was their American Confer- 
ence playoff game in 1971, which remains 
the longest National Football League game 
ever played. It was decided in the 23d minute 
of overtime, when Garo Yeprenrian of the 
Dolphins kicked a 37-yard field goaL 

The Chiefs, 2-0 this season, and the Dol- 
phins, 1-1, play again Sunday at the Orange 
Bowl in Miami in a game with potentially 
historic ramifications: This could become 
the first time in NFL history that a quarter- 
back is sacked by his brother-in-law. 

Cindi Maas is the former Crndi Marino. 

Her husband, BQL is the Chiefs’ nose mdci* 

Her brother, Dan, is the Dolphins’ quarter- 
back. 

The brothers-in-law spoke to each other 
twice this week “I wanted to know what they ^ smee tnere may be ) 
were t0 ? lay “ seamdaiy ” Man- number ^ yart £ ^ 

no said Thursday. He wanted to know when - _ 

to be double- teamed. 


return of 

Harvey - Salem at left 
looked flat in losing to Cleveland on Mon- 
day night, rushing for only 54 yards and 
having difficulty completing passes. (Steders 
by 6 points.) 1 

New England (1-1) at Buffalo (0-2): Both 
lost last Sunday, but the Bills by more than 
other teams. They were routed by the Jets, 
42-3, which makes it hard to believe they can 
correct all the things necessary to beat the 
Patriots, a better team than the Jets. The 
Patriots had a bad time against the Bears, 
rushing for 27 yards; but the BiDs gave up 
288 rushing yards to the Jets. (Patriots by 6 .) 

San Diego (1-1) at Gnrinnati (0-2): This is 
a vastly important game for both teams. 
Both had the same problem last Sunday: 


be was _ 

Maas said they discussed the notion of 
sacking Marina "We laughed about it," he 
said. “He told me if I get across the line, he’s 
going to have someone there waiting to trap- 
block on me. I told him where I need help is 
on that ‘wham’ play, when I get through and 
a running back comes from somewhere and 
whacks me.” 

Maas and Marino are friends and former 
teammates. They played together for four 
years at the University of Pittsburgh, where 
Maas met his wife one s umme r day in a 
dormitory. She was painting walls. A year 
and a half ago, they were married. 

“We get along real wen," Marino said. 
"On the field, though, I imagine our relation- 
ship will change.” 

Still, the Dolphins are the only team in the 
league that has uot allowed its quarterback 
to be sacked. Part of the reason is Marino’s 
quick release of a pass. 

The Dolphins will get help in their defen- 
sive backneld. Veteran Glenn Blackwood, 
who rejoined the team only last week after a 
long contract holdout, will start Sunday. The 
Dolphins are favored by 5 points. 

AMERICAN CONFERENCE 

Houston (1-1) at Pittsburgh (1-1): No 
longer the pushovers they once were, the 
young Oilers are playing with unaccustomed 
enthusiasm, evident throughout last week's 
16-13 loss in Washington. [The Oilers said 


be no limit to 

can 

give up. Seattle got 494 in a wild, 49-35 
victory so, if nothing else, the Chargers’ 
comer backs still may be a little tired. (Ben- 
gals by 4.) 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
St Loos (2-0) at New York (1-1): The 
Cardinals have given up 51 points in two 
. games, which puts this game in reach for the 
Giants. But their secondary, which has held 
up well so far, has not yet faced a quarter- 
back of Neil Lomax’s ability. He threw for 
350 yards against the Bragals last Sunday 
and for 300 the last time the Cardinals and 
Giants played, in 1984. (Game rated even.) 

PhOadelpIria (0-2) at Washington (l-l):- 
With a rookie quarterback in Randall .Cun- 


ningham and a bad offensive line, the Eagles 
win have difficulty winning, even though the 
Redskins' two best runner^ John Riggins 
and George Rogers, were him against the 
Oilers. The Redskins may have to pass more, 
and the Eagles’ secondary has played well; 
also, Joe Theismami has not consistently 
made use of his deep recovers. (Redsirins by 
14J 

Tampa Bay (0-2) at New Orleans (0-2): 
Both teams have given up many yards and 
points, a surprising turn of events fra the 
Saints. A year ago, they had the top-rated 
pass defense in the league, yet they have 
given up 395 and 327 yams in the air. Steve 
DeBerg, the Buccaneers’ quarterback, has 
played better than any of the Saints’ quarter- 
backs. (Saints by 214.) 

INTERCONFERENCE 

New York Jets (1-1) vs. Green Bay (1-1) at 
Mil waukee; Despite the lopsided victory last 
week, the Jets have reason for concern. The 
Packers, in defeating the Giants, got excel- 
lent play from their defensiv e line, bedding 
the Giants to 76- yards rushing and sacking 
PM Simms five times. The Packets also 
expect to have two key defensive players 
back, linebacker Mike Douglass and safety 
Mark Murphy. (Packers by 6 .) 

Cleveland (1-1) at Dallas (1-1)'- With Dan- 
ny White throwing three interceptions and 
the offense losing two key fumbles in last 
week’s loss to Detroit, the Cowboys do not 
appear to be the automatic pick they normal- 
ly are. Besides, the Browns are an up-and- 
coming team with a gritty quarterback in 
Gaiy Danielson and a defense that plays wdl 
against the pass. The Browns held Lomax to 
203 yards and the Steelers’ Made Malone, 
who had thrown fra 287 yards and 5 touch- 



downs the week before, to 178 ; 
touchdown. The Brown^ also j 
offensive hdp Thursday' act 
wide receiver John Jefferson from i 
a day after Jefferson ended Ms contract] 
out. (Cowboys by 7.) 

Denver (1-1) at Atiafita (0-2): Three of the 
Falcons’ dtfrastrc backs were hurt last Sun- 
day, and that shouMmakc it almost impossi- 
ble for them to beat the Broncos. John Dway 
is crating nff his best game, when bt com- 
pleted 28 passes fra 353 yards and 4 touch- 
downs m a 34-23 victory over the. Stints. 
(Broncos by 6 .) 

Detroit (2-0) at Indfamapofis (0-2): Each of 
the Lions’ victraies has bera dose, but this is 
likely to be a rouL The Colts have yet to 
demonstrate any semblance of a nmting 
game: Nor have they been aide to mount any 
pressure on the opposing quarfoback. (Li- 
ons by 5.) 

San Francisco (l-l)at Los Angeles Raiders 
(1-1): The Raidas’ maxt-to-man defensive 
scheme showed an uncommon vulnerability 
to the kmg pass in a 36-20 loss to Kansas 
Gty on Thursday night. The 49ers usually 
pick a team into submission with short -un- 
derneath passing, but this time might - try 
throwing; long more often. (49ers by 3.) . 

MONDAY NIGHT 

Los Angeles Rams (2-8) at Seattle (2-0): 
Eric Dickerson, the league’s leading rusho: 
last season, and nose tackle Greg Mhisner 
are expected to make their first starts this 
season, but it is more likdy that quarterback 
Dieter Brock will determine whether the 
Rams win. The Seahawks have less trouble 
stopping runners than passexs; Dan Foots 
threw fra 440 yards last Sunday despite the 
Seahawks winning, 49-35. (Seahawks by 6V4.) 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

TCU Suspends 6 From Team 

FORT WORTH, Texas (UPI) — Six players from the Texas 
Christian University football team, including all-America run- 
h Davii 


Control 
1 1 
1 1 
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0 2 
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2 0 
2 0 
1 I 
1 1 
t I 


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300 

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1X00 83 
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ting back Kenneth Davis, have been suspended from the team 
for allegedly receiving cash payments from a university alum- 
nus. Jim Wacko - , the coach, said that, in addition to Davis, 
defensive players Gary Spann, Gerald Taylor, Egypt Allen, 
Darron Turner and Marvin Foster had been suspended. 

In a related development, officials at Southern Methodist 
University, recently given stiff NCAA sanctions for recruiting 

violations, acknowledged that they were helping the. NCAA 

Thursday that a member ‘of the league's investigate similar allegations against Southwest Conference 
officiating department had called to say that ° va ^ s TCU> Texas A&M, Texas Tech and the University of 
comerback Steve Brown’s interception for a 

European Soccer S?^i 1 = 0 S < S^^ d „SSby World Cnp Sites Not Damaged 

a penalty, and that a 16-yard pass to Drew 
Hill late in the game should have counted as 
a completion and a touchdown.] The Oilers' 
passing game needs a little boost, and they 


UEFA CUP 

(Ftm Round. First Log) 
Boavtsta 4, Bruooo 3 


McMahon Rallies Bears to Victory 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
Eoat 


St. Louts 

2 

D 

0 

1JXM 

68 

51 

Dallas 

1 

t 

0 

500 

65 

40 

N.Y. Giants 

1 

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JOO 

41 

23 

Washington 

1 

1 

8 

300 

30 

57 

PhUatMeMa 

0 

2 

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6 

38 


Central 





Chicago 

3 

0 

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91 

59 

Dot roll 

2 

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54 

48 

Minnesota 

3 

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667 

S3 

70 

Green Bair 

1 

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JM 

43 

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Tama Bav 

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44 

69 


West 





LA, Rama 

2 

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0 

uno 

37 

22 

Son Francisco 

1 

i 

0 

500 

56 

44 

Atlanta 

0 

2 . 

0 

M0 

43 

63 

New Orleans 

0 

2 

0 

MO 

so 

81 


The Associated Press 

MINNEAPOLIS — - Injured quarter- 
back Jim McMahon came into the game 
to throw three touchdown passes in sev- 
en minutes of the third quarter Thurs- 
day night, rallying the Chicago Bears to 
a 33-24 National Football T^agtiw vic- 
tory over the previously unbeaten Min- 
nesota Vikings. 

Steve Fuller started fra die Bears be- 
cause McMahon had injured his neck 
and back last week. Fuller completed 13 
of IS passes for 124 yards, but they led 
; field Eos’ 


touchdown pass to Mike Jones gave the 
Vikings a 17-9 lead with 7:32 left in the 
third quarter, McMahon f «tru» in. 

On his first play, he passed to Willie 
70-yan 


NEW YORK(AP) — The Oiganizing Committee of the 1986 
World Cnp soccer championships said Thursday that the earth- 
quake in Mexico had not damaged any of the 12 playing sites 
and that the tournament will be held as scheduled, a television 1 
report said. 

Mexico’s Channel 2, monitored in New York, said the Inter- 
national Association of Football Federations in Zurich had 
bera telexed (hat a thorough infection of all stadiums showed 
that none were damaged. 

For the Record 

Curtis Strong was found guilty by a U5. District Court jury 


Thurwtay-. ResuH 
Chicago 33. Minnesota 24 


only to three short 
Buffer. 

After Tommy Kramer’s 


goals by Kevin 


mne-yaid 


Gault fra a 70-yard touchdown. After 
Wilbur Marshall intercepted a by 
Kramer, McMahon threw to Dennis 
McKinnon for a 25-yard touchdown. 

Minnesota again failed to advance and 
the Bears toed: a 30-17 lead on McMa- 
hon’s 43-yard scoring pass to McKin- 
non with 33 seconds left in the period. 

McMahon completed g of IS passes 
for 236 yards. Gault caught six for a 

career-high 146 yards and McKinnon ’ The LitierFonnub One tram said in Paris itwffl not compete 
got four for a career-high 133 yards. in the South African Grand Prix on Oct 19. ( uPi ) 


in Philadelphia of 11 of 14 counts of dealing cocaine to major I 
league baseball players. (AP) \ 

Nfidator defeated stablemate 
length to win the Little Brown 
Triple Crown, in Delaware, Ohio. 

John KdEhb, who has been leading the New York Yacht 


te Pershing Square by a half- 
i Jug, the third leg of pacing's 
io. (AP) | 




■MBaBH 

IlfiWiBSH 





gW MSiiS. 












. V'VVV.\' 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY. SEPTEMBER 21-22, 1985 


POSTCARD 


people 


Golden Horn Cleanup 


Serge Gaimbourg’s Talent for Scandal 2,500 at AfflS Benefit 

O C7 ' . emlicit excessively v 


By Vedat Erdamar 

The -issue total Press 


I STANBUL— This city is dean- 
ins UD the CinlHen ffnm the 


A ing up the Golden Horn, the 
once-scenic waterway that was a 
playground for Ottoman sultans 
but is now an open sewer. 

Mayor Bed renin Dal an is razing 
warehouses, factories, derelict 
buildings, shipyards and a city- 
owned slaughterhouse that have 
been spewing filth into the water- 
way since the start of industrializa- 
tion in Turkey SO years ago. 

In some instances, Daian. 44. bas 
ignored or circumvented court or- 
ders against demolition. 

The Golden Horn flows through 
the heart of Istanbul, once the east- 
ern capital of the Roman Empire 
and later the seat of government of 
the Ottoman Empire. Some of the 
Ottomans' most famous mosques 
and palaces can be seen from the 
4.5-mile (7.5-kilometer) waterway, 
which divides the older part of the 
city from the newer. 

The horn, so called because of its 
shape, runs south into the Bospo- 
rus, the strait that divides Europe 
and Asia. The Golden Horn was 
one or the world's great tourist sites 
until its stench drove visitors away. 

"The color of the Golden Horn 
waters will be as blue as my eyes," 
the mayor declared after he was 
elected in March 1984. Installa- 
tions on the shores have been pour- 
ing animal, human and industrial 
wastes into the inlet, turning the 
water black. 

The rotten-egg odor rising from 
the Golden Horn permeates the air 
over a wide area. Few people now 
lake boat rides on the waters once 
plied by the pleasure craft of the 
Ottoman sultans. 

Dalan's effort has drawn praise 
from many, but also some criti- 
cism. 


Golden Horn soon. Already the air 
has improved." 

One of Turkey's leading colum- 
nists. Cetin Allan of the newspaper 
Gunes. recently lauded Dalan's ac- 
tion as “revolutionary in the histo- 
ry of the city." 

Allan pointed out that the Gold- 
en Horn project was only the larg- 
est and most dramatic of several 
that the major has initialed to dean 
up the city of six million. 

Daian has dosed a cement fac- 
tory in one district and razed build- 
ings in the Person be Pazari, or 
Thursday Market, a clogged center 
of small industry, wholesalers and 
ironworkers near the horn area. 


By Mark Hunter 


P ) ARTS — Twenty years after 
his first hit. “La Javanaise,” 


lifted him out of the piano bars 
where he had made a living for 15 
years. Serge Gainsbourg. 57, has 
become a French national institu- 
tion (not to mention a Chevalier 
of Arts and Letters, as of last 
year). His latest album, “Love on 
the Beat.” has gone platinum in 
France (400,000 copies sold), and 
his three-wok stand at the Casi- 


no de Paris, which began Friday, 
is a certain sellout. You might 
dunk Gainsbourg would be a per- 
fectly contented man. 

You would be wrong. “I’m very 
disabused," Gainsbourg said in 
his elegantly furnished apartment 
loaded with an electronic player 
piano, works of art and an origi- 
nal manuscript of "La Marseil- 
laise," the French national an- 
them. “Because, when you have 
everything, you have nothing.” he 
explained. “And I have every- 
thing, everything.” 

From the top — among con- 
temporary French singers, only 
Johnny Hallyday and Jacques 
HigeUn have comparable follow- 
ings — Gainsbourg looks back on 
a long and bitter struggle. less for 
acceptance than for survival. He 
recalls that during the German 
Occupation his father, a Russian 
Jewish Emigre, was forced to 
leave his job as a musician by 
French musicians who threatened 
to denounce him. In the closing 
years of the war, Gainsbourg hid 
in a forest to escape being turned 
over to the Nazis. 

He came out of the war with 
the habit of following his own 
lead. Called into the French 
Anny in 1948, he went AWOL 
for three days — “to be with a 
girl." he said — and was punished 
by being sent to a "very tough” 
disciplinary battalion. “Some- 
thing no one remembers." he re- 
marked, “is that l was a very good 
machine-gunner.” 

One could say that Gainsbourg 
remained a gunner but shifted 
targets to what he calls “very im- 
portant taboos in France.” 

“The first is religion, and I 
drink to that.” he said, sipping a 
Pernod, “because I said on one of 
my records. ‘God is Jewish, Marx 
is Jewish, Trotsky was Jewish’ — 
and that was taboo for the 
French. 


All together about 1.2 million 
square meters (13 million square 
feet) of land is scheduled to be 
cleared of buildings along the 
shore, city officials said. They said 
more than half this work has al- 
ready been done in the Golden 
Horn project, including the clean- 


ing up of the Thursday Market 
About 55 percent of that Land be- 
longed to tbe city. The remaining 


45 percent privately owned, is 
gradually bring bought by the city. 


ie officials said. 


About 622 factories employing 
30,000 people, and 2,020 other 
business sites, as well as thousands 
of homeowners, will be affected by 
the project Deputy Mayor Unal 
Beyazid said. The plan calls for 
relocating the businesses to the out- 
skirts of Istanbul 
Daian has said that historical 
buildings, such as tbe Evup 
Mosque complex, several summer 
palaces of Ottoman sultans and a 
19th-century Bulgarian church, 
would be saved. 


On the ground cleared the city 
has begun building playgrounds 
and parks. 


“The entire resources of a mu- 
nicipality have been mobilized 
against us with total disregard for 
human rights and property rights.” 
said Aziz Sasa, a businessman 
whose depots along the Golden 
Horn are to be razed. 

Judicial sources say the city may 
be embroiled in court cases for 


A new sewage system is to cotn- 
«e the protect. For the southern 


years to come. 

But Mustafa Karasu. 47. a taxi 
driver, supports the mayor even 
though his sister's house fell to Da- 
lan’s bulldozers. He is a resident of 
Balai. on the shore of the Golden 
Horn. “If they keep up this speed. I 
may be able to go swimming in the 


piete the project. For the southern 
section or the system, Istanbul has 
obtained an S88-million loan from 
the World Rank, The mayor ex- 
pects the sewage system to be com- 
pleted by 1988. 

Then, according to the city’s 
plan, foul water will be pumped out 
of the inlet and fresh water from 
the Bosporus will run in. bringing 
fish and other water life that should 
help further clean the bed of the 
Golden Horn. 


Art Buchwald is on vacation. 



- I 

,, * 





A* 

v-vj-ri/fJL vl 

■■A'Nt 


Hj 



..lore than Z500 peo ple , fadud- 9“^ ^ 0 ^)drug and^jlwl use. 

i^EKz^h Taylor, SWri^c- SmW rf ihe 

Lane nod Mavor To® Sister said they 


Laine and Mayor Tom Bradjev, 4^ppa. - g; sier said they 
crowded mto a Los Angles * Jjgjj ^ parents’ efforts misgBuI- 

jMflroom Thursday night at H Y un <Sv restncfcva At one 

wood's “ComimtmraJ to Life edan fl ppa hwnicked Mis. 8* 

benefit darner for wuu id accent. He called ft- 
attired immune deficiency svp , ^wwisals a bid to “house* 


•.Min 1 




total raised will be SI mdhoa ^ M “You could 

dinner was OTginallysdKdui^ gpp t0 gjve the Constitution of 

assssRgss Efe rains 

SlTWlSB “«« 

and “Tie «*. 


UUUiWO -- — — 

about Rock Hudson, I’ve never 
seen anything take off like this 
one,” said Lodfle Polachek of 
Events Unlimited, which handled 
sa les of tickets at $250 to $500 a 
person. Hudson bought $10,000 


of suigery, and added, "lie only 

sado-masochism, bonaag^ ^d 

rape in this song is m the nandrar 
Mrs. Gore.” Asked by Senator^ 

Rockefeller, Democrat Wst 
Virmnia, why he a Hacked . Mrs-. 

_ “ r, - j mwn 4f 




' r. 


, ,«j f i t 


Ck*da Detorme 


backers had. Some youngsinsSrt 
now not allowed to buy his records, 

be said. Mrs. Gore said the paimtf 


Two faces of Gainsbourg; left, photo as woman for “Love chi tbe Beat” album. 


“The second is sex, so I made Me 
Tairae . . . Moi Non Plus.’ " 
That song was recorded in 1968 
with Gainsbourg’s longtime part- 
ner. the English actress Jane Birkin, 
mother of his daughter Charlotte 
( they are now separated). It explic- 
itly represented the act of lovemak- 
ing in words and sound — and was 
a hit as well as a scandaL 


"And the last.” said Gains- 
bourg, “is patriotism.” This pro- 
vided the material for his most 
famous song, “Aux Aimes Et 
Caetera,” a reggae version of “La 
Marseillaise." in 1979. Gains- 
bourg did the song in his trade- 
mark “talk-over” style to a beat 
provided by Jamaican musicians; 
the talk involved catling off the 
refrain and substituting an ironic 
declaration of “etcetera.” French 
patriots were infuriated. 


Gainsbourg, I love your ‘Marseil- 
laise.’ ” He remembers that in 
1979. three paratroopers came to 
a concert in Strasbourg expressly 
to beat him up. Legend has it that 
Gainsbourg looked them in the 
eye, sang tbe anthem perfectly 
straight and. as they stood to sa- 
lute. finish the song with an 
obscene gesture. 

Gainsbourg retains a talent — 
and u red —Tor sranrialmnp “I 
can always find a way to shock, to 
aggress. For me, it's a vital moti- 
vation.” The release of “Love on 
the Beau" for example, was ac- 
companied by a full-page nude 
photograph of Gainsbourg in the 
daily newspaper Liberation. This 
summer, Gainsbourg appeared 
(“drunk,” be admits, “though 1 
never drink before a concerv) on 


He added, “One gets tired of the 
part one must play in public.” 

He acknowledges, though, that 
be wrote the part. “I play on the 
media." he said. “Without the 


not happythai I have AIDS. But if now not allowed to buy ta 
that is helping others, ‘I can, at be said. Mrs. Gore said tnt 
least, know that my own miSor- group wanted tbe record 
tune has had some positive worth.” to label records witn a 
President Reagan also sent about content, make lyn 


to taoei recur us 

about content, make lynes a 


trilogy of press, radio and televi- 
sion i wouldn't exist, and I'm 


conscious of that.” To keep the 
media busy', from the start of his 
he presented himself as 

a kind of Dadaist clown. 

Gainsbourg, a former painting 
and architecture student, greatly 
admires the Dadaists. “Dada was 
a nihiljsm, but extremely posi- 
tive,” he said. “And Fm a nihilist, 
in certain ways. 

“We have to be like tbe Dada- 


ists, to express ourselves in per- 
ishable m«lia. in arts that die." If 


priority, ms message was pio-uu- guiuouia ■: 
ed by h’^s from some people, records should be labeled. S owor , 
prompting an angry response from James J- Exon, Demoant of -Nft* 
Bart ReynoJdsT^M don’t care what braska, called the bearing fctfifce 
your political persuasions may be. Senate Commerce Cornua tteC.rthe 
But il you don i want me to read it, largest media event I’ve e veraffi ." 
than go outside.” His comment objecting that no one has propoyafc 
brought cheers. Entertaining at the legislation to regulate lyncaTSSF" 
dinner were such performers as ley Gortikw. president cif.iKj 
Carol Burnett Sanony Dark Jr., cordmg Industry .Associati®^; 
Rod Stewart, CyntB Lauper and America, said 24 members et»e 
Diahann Carrofl. Taylor arid Reyn- organization would _put kb ds'tm -r 
olds auctioned off three small Andy certain records staring; “Pafrisal; 
Warhol painting s; ie buyer, at Guidance — Exphdt Lyrics."’ 
$25,000, was the producer Jou Pfe- 

ters. Other hems raised $56,000. □ . i 


xchn>^,: 

follow^--. v 

boovb’-^ ■ “ 


ogy ■ 

T>- ; 

Fan*; 
2ei=- 
UP 1 


a television phone-in program, 
“Le /aide [a Verite,”of wfnch he 


The main problem, Gains- 
bourg maintains , “was that the 
French couldn’t accept six blacks 
and a Russian Jew singing ‘La 
Marseillaise.'" 


Apparently, attitudes have 
changed. Gainsbourg recounted 
with relish that “a few days ago 1 
was in a nightclub, and a guy 
came up with his son, a para- 
trooper — and the kid said, ‘Mr. 


recalled, “People aggressed me 
terribly.” Gainsbourg returned 
the favor, in keeping with his im- 
age as an acute but obnoxious, 
chain-smoking drunk. 

It's a role that obscures what he 
considers his fundamental gift, as 
a musician and writer. “When I 
did that program,” be said of “Le 
Jeu,” speaking with evident dis- 
appointment, “no one talked to 
me as a great musician. No one." 


that sounds defeatist, Gains- 
bourg hardly seems defeated. 
“The human’ being always sur- 
passes the work,” he said. “There 
was a poet. Andre Chenier, whose 
last words were. ‘I have so much 
more to say.' I don't agree. May- 
be fate beat him — but Tm beat- 
ing fate.” 

He declared, “Fm free in my 
acts and my crimes — if there 
have been any ” 


Mark Hunter is a journalist who 
writes about cultural affairs in Eu- 
rope. 


At a Senate hearing on a plan to 
put warning Labels on certain rock 
records, a pair of . musicians 
mocked the prominent Washington 
wives who support the idea. Sena- 
tor Slade Gorton, Republican of 
Washington, tdd Frank Zappa that 
his comments were “bobnsh, in- 1 
credibly and insensibly insulting” 
to Tipper Gore, wife of Senator 
Albert Gore, Democrat of Tenues- . 
see, and Susan Baker, wife of ■’ftea- 
smy Secretary Janies Baker. Tlie. 
two helped found die Parents' Mu- 
sic Resource Center, a Washing- 
ton-based organization of parents 
wearied about rode lyrics that are 


. Janmfee Bjortras, fianc^e oT! ^ 
i winis star Bjorn Roeg,- has.gtǤi 
birth to a soil. "r *- 


Tbe British actor .to McK&n 
says his acclaime d perfonnanasas;. 
Coriolanus was inspired bytbelenr 
ms star John MdEmoeL: “Haying 
Shakespeare, I imarine - wh^% : 
character would be tike if Se wfere ' 
alive today. Coriolanus is-JcW- 
McEnroe/’ he said in A 
where. Britain's N atiopal Theatre 
was giving two perfannaocssTof 
“Conolanus" at the Ro m an a&pfah . . 
theater of Herod Atticus.,; 


II . , - “ ' 


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