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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 
Printed Simullaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 

, Hon f? Kong. Singapore, 

■v The Hague and Marseille 

WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 18 

No. 31,910 

I French 
Avoid Full 
Apology 

^ Lange Wants 
Compensation , 
Agents Tried 

Reuters 

PARIS — The French govern- 
ment lord New Zealand on Mon- 
day that it regretted that the sink- 
ing of the ship Rainbow Warrior 
had damaged relations between the 
countries, but it avoided a full apol- 

A chronology of the events that 
followed the Rainbow Warrior’s 
bombing. Page 7. 

^.ogy or a promise that the agents 
^involved would be punished. 

The External Relations Ministry 
said that Prime Minister Laurent 
Fabius had sent a message to New 
Zealand's prime minister. David 
Lange, saying he was “truly sorry” 
for the damage to relations. 

The message was given to Mr. 
Lange along with the text of a state- 
ment that Mr. Fabius made Sunday 
night admitting that agents of the 
General Directorate of External 
Security, France’s principal foreign 
intelligence agency, had planted 
the bombs. The Rainbow Warrior, 
the Greenpeace environmentalist 
group's ship, sank in Auckland har- 
bor on July 10. 

But French concern over diplo- 
matic damage is unlikely to satisfy 
demands by New Zealand and 
Australia that France prosecute the 
guilty agents and offer a Tull apolo- 
gy for the attack. 

Mr. Fabius said Sunday that the 
agents involved would not be pros- 
ecuted because they had octal on 
orders. 

Mr. Lange accused France of a 
“sordid act of international state- 
backed terrorism.” 

“Having elected to declare its 
direct responsibility. France knows 
what the consequences" will be. he 
said. He defined them as compen- 
sation for the violation of New 
Zealand's sovereignty, for the 
death of one crewman on the ship, 
the cost of police investigations and 
■ i!«-lesc--c?-thfc ship: He said this 
would run into millions of dollars. 

Mr. Lange predicted that France 
would retreat from protecting its 


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ZURICH, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1985 


ESTABLISHED it& : 



Dollar Takes Sharp Drop 
On World Money Markets 

Traders React 

As U.S. Vows 


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Reagan Acts 
To Reduce 
Unfair Trade 

By Smart Auerbach 

Washington Peat Senht e 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan announced Mon- 
day a package or trade actions 
which, with a coordinated interna- 
tional attack on the high dollar, are 
aimed at blunting a surge of protec- 
tionist pressures in Congress. 

The new presidential proposals 
vrill make it easier for American 
companies and the US. govern- 
ment to pursue unfair trade com- 
plaints against foreign countries 
and to fight piracy and counterfeit- 
ing of intellectual property protect- 
ed by patents and trademarks. 

The proposals also call for a 
$ 300-million fund to counter subsi- 



To Intervene 

By Axel Krause 

iMrnusnortui HtnrU Tntmae 
PARIS — The dollar fell sharply 
Monday on world currency mar- 
kets against West European cur- 
rencies and the Japanese yen. in 
direct response to the U.S. commit- 
ment made Sunday to force it 
down- . 

The agreement, reached in New 
York by finance ministers and cen- 
tral bankers from the United 
States, West Germany. Japan. Brit- 
ain and France, reflected a major 
shift in U.S. policy toward greater 
intervention in the markets. This 


uake victims, among the 3,500 known dead, were 
Sunday at San Lorenzo cemetery near Mexico 


City, as rescue workers continued the search for survi- 
vors in die ruins of more than 400 buildings. Page 4. 


Mexico Finds Some Hope Amid the Ruins 


By Alma Guillermoprieto 

It'ujAin^f.vn Post Service 

MEXICO CITY — A few days after the 
waves of the first earthquake rolled through 
here. Mexico's dazed residents finally have 
had time to survey their situation and take 
stock of what has been saved along with the 
losses. 

Perhaps most important is the realization 
that the major pan of the city survived intact 
after two earthquakes within 48 hours. Thurs- 
day and Friday, that measured 7.8 and 73 on 
the open-ended Richter scale. 


Devastating rinmaoe was wrought on a few restaurant reported that business was brisk as 
populous neighborhoods, but the quakes usual. 

struck with almost finicky precision. While Most importantly, the historic area of 
about half of the tourist area known as the downtown Mexico City, with its palaces and 
Zona Rosa was shut down, waterless and convents, some from the 16th and 17th centu- 
dark. restaurants and boutiques on the other ties, survived with relatively little damage, 
side of Niza Street, the major artery, were even though the buildings were at the heart of 


open for business. 

The southern area of the city, which is 
generally greener, less populated and the fa- 
vored place of residence of artists and intel- 
lectuals. was unscathed. In the colonial sec- 
tion of Covoacan. the owner of a trendy 


the area hardest hit. 

Once again the architects of those massive 
monuments to the Spanish empire proved 
their worth. 

A local newspaper. Excelsior, quoted Sun- 
{ Continued on Page 4. CoL 5) 


Lng of intellectual property protect- _ ** has been urged for several years by 

ed by patents and trademarks. President Ronald Keagan ^ Europeans, notably France. 

The proposals also call for a announces trade package. There appeared to have been no 
S300-miUion fund to counter subsi- major intervention by central 

dized financing by other countries f f • trad : n - riracl ; ccs ahmad." l ^ nks 011 ^ do ar s d *T 

srsr y a™ u Tn t^r,bc ui dom. !«, 

Amencan companies lose their jobs because other j>a- about six cents against the British 

■Qe president s program appears uons do not play by the rule^ ^ aaA ^ iJ^fennigs against 

to be a rmx of proposals previously a senior administration offiaal mar] ^ n centimes 

I b ^ a ? TUn ^^- 1 s* 1 * nooc . 01 ^ **** ^ against the Swiss franc and 40 cen- 

indudes the fund for mi xed cred its, would bc^n easmg the count s ^ aWnsl the French franc. The 
a pledge to use more aggressively estimated S150-bDbon trade deficit TotwTe*chan«* was dosed Mon- 
existing laws, and a request that Unmediatdy. The official said it m 

Congress strengthen laws against could take as long as a year to 18 New York also 

such unfair trade practices as subsi- months before the actions would ^3^31 providing join! poliii- 

fhe cal support f£ PrSmt Ronald 
We will take all the actioa that administration s moves. Reagan’s trade policy speech made 

is necessary to- pursue our rights | KJWCveri appeared aimed more at m Washington on Monday. Mr. 
and interests ui international com- immediate effect on biparti- Reagan's speech was directed ill 
merce, Md “to sa na- ^ congressionaJ pressure for the protectionism in the United States, 

bons bve up to their obhptiorj Whj|c ^ w do something West Europe and Japan, and tbe 
f?" about the loss of raamifacturing reduction of the growing US. trade 

m? j® 1 * associated with the record deficit which is being fueled by a 

^dcfidB. . . aronj delta. Eero^r, oM* 


Show any eiiect. ca! support for President Ronald 

The administration's moves. Reagan's trade policy speech made 
however, appeared aimed more at m Washington on Monday. Mr. 


day at the White House. 

“I will not stand by and watch 
American businesses fail because 


trade deficits. suong 

“What was announced today added. 


Deng’s Policies Challenged Sharply 
At Close of China’s Party Congress 


By John Burns 

Vru York Times Servi.-e 


middle-aged Deng loyalists at tbe 
top. 


But until Monday's speech he 
had never challenged Mr. Deng so 


would reureai irom protecting its Rpnrwr, Th»» r.immuniti ilwiucu wn a uu'.umwiiL wk aa 
agents, adding that the countries p^Toina d£l SS Ch ? Yun. a Maraistcotuervative. 
are not at war and that, therefore, conference Monday with an unusu- m^e a brusque speech that chal- 
orders were not a license to commit ^ W5c ^ of po Ucv differ- ler !f d M f r - ^8 * position on agn- 
enmesm another country. en£. ihai have created iensions 


ft ended on a discordant note as directly in public, nor so tartly. 


directly m public, nor so tartly. 

With Mr. Deng seated on the 
podium nearby. Mr. Chen quoted 
Mao to want of possible social dis- 
order if the rapid abandonment of 


Last month. Mr. Fabius pledged vi M - mB ihe k*- forces in Ihe and 11,6 agriculture by lens of millions of 

take immediately legal action if ^.minded ®vete™ who is the d ? wn 8 radin 8 of ideological indoc- peasants is not abated. 


. u> form-minded vc tcran who is the “V" 1 

A French aiizens appcaredhnvolved. , s leader . and 

C FHTV&2rK , Z more doctnnaire figures in the par- 
ment backed off doing this be- hierarchy of Mr ’ C 

cause if il brought iheagcnts lo cJSmoe ta summoned lhal M ;-. 

tnal. 11 would enrage the rn.li.nn, bv Mt . lo entrcnc h h« open- aul ? crau ' 


and wreck 25 years of patient ef- Zor ^n^c ^ iTthTfi: 
forts to restore trust between the ve . ?earp]an for %6-im and to 

(Continued on Page 2, Cot 7) replace dozens of veterans with 


Who Gave the Orders? 

Last Question in Greenpeace Case 


trination. Still more sharply he reminded 

Some analysis read one section delegates that “we are a Commu- 
of Mr. Chen’s speech as implying nisi country ” and said that central 
that Mr. Deng. 81. had been too planning had to remain the pillar of 
autocratic in imposing his prag- the economy, not market regu la- 
ma tie, profit-oriented ideas on the uon that meant “blindly allowing 
party, but tbe context for this was supply and demand to determine 



Death Toll in Gulf War 
May Be Near a Million 


fr ll „t{ n nrJnnPinr? i A Commenting on the drop in the 
(Cootmoed 00 Page 2, CoL 6) doHaj- on Monday. Karl Otto Pbhl, 

— ■ ■" ■■■ — ; president of West Germany's cen- 
tral bank, said he hoped the 
in \w f “change in the exdiange rate will 

a I T ll|| W 51*1* put up resistance to the protection- 
VrUU TT ClA at threat" in the US. Congress. He 
_ — . — _ . said in an interview in Frankfurt 

r n (VI 1 1 Ij/Afl that he viewed as particularly sig- 
ITIIHWHI nificam Wasbingtou's read in ess to 

- ..1 ,s r ^ : . ^igl etyeag^ the exchange markets 

(560 kilometers) to the south and ' d r . f ... . - w 


“What is new is that the UJS. has 
never said so in such a strong dear 


By Drew Middleton (560 ktiometas) to the south and “ 
that may be approaching one mil- m 8 conlmiies -. But '“Wltgence -SSne L imms 


FSTSISZ The broad agreemem by the five 
there arc uoindica- governments «o mteryene m mpne- 


hon, according to intelligence esti- sourcra report thereae 00 larvmarkas was designed, be said, 

mates here. Hons that Iran has the resources or tary marwas was oai&iai. ac saiu. 

mates nerc. ... , . ihf . ^1. fn .k#. one 10 ^n^ress (he financial markets 

The estimates in London and in that the central banks and govern- 

mentaindnding Ihe Umted Stoles, 


The estimates in London and in 
tiier capital dries of the North 
tlantic Treaty Organization range 


not completely clear. production.” Deng Xiaoping 

Mr. Deng defended his policies, An economist, Mr. Chen also 
LeUing the conference that the sev- said that reducing the influence of heed of the full range of 
en years of his stewardship had the party departments that deal ions, esped ally differingones, 
been one of the best periods the with ideology and propaganda had cbeu saJi “They should disc 
country has enjoyed since 1949. been a mistake, leading to wide- duties according to the 
“We have set wrong things right," spread speculation, swindling and constitution. No individual s! 
he said, referring 10 the scrapping bribery, as well as other illegalities ^ w have the final say.” 
of Mao's theories of class warfare in pursuit of personal gain. The criticism took an adder 


with cbeulrafcL “T^ey shoufd discharge thaV the combSid death S was But he and other sot^crameded SSJT? 


Atlantic Treaty Organization range pres^e of a U^Navy squad- about the exchange rate 

From 420,000 to So IraniS ron mfc tadtan 0«an and the 

dead, with the number of Iraqi proba^ that m a crisis it would oftfe defter than tfley did in cue 

deadpotat 300.000. Y Mr- «hl and other European 

We must accept an olnmate ca- t*racn snips. . finance officials said that they 

sualty totd higher thw- anything would not act in the markets wiS 

experienced in the West , since JChatg. A soure* said that in view or lfl , 

Worid 4- ■» *! 


about 150,000, but heavier fighting toe nmoaroeniant 
in the last year and information enunou in Tehran na< 
from Ir anian defectors has led to attention to the rales 


that the fundamentalist Shiite govr irou .^ rt l en S!? 0t n “ y ^ 
eromem in Tehran had paid sSht: f 


war and However, Mr: FObl and other of- 


By Joseph Fircherr 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The French gov- 
ernment's admission that espio- 
nage agents sank tbe Green- 
peace flagship in New Zealand 
has focused attention on a final 
unanswered question: Who or- 
dered the operation? 

in framing his reply and try- 
ing to limit the political damage 
to France and the Socialist gov- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

eminent. Prime Minister Lau- 
rent Fabius must cope with 
challenges from the political 
opposition, the armed forces, 
the press and even members of 
his Socialist Party. 

When Mr. Fabius revealed 
Sunday the “cruel truth” of 
Frencfi guilt, he may have been 


next week when President 
Francois Mitterrand meets the 
Soviet leader. Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev, in Paris. Mr. Mitter- 
rand. who in the post has 
strongly criticized Soviet milita- 
rism and human rights abuses, 
may be less comfortable in that 
role this time: New Zealand has 
accused France of engaging in 
“state- sponsored terrorism.” 

Mr. Mitterrand’s position 
was further damaged by the 
spectacle of French spies bun- 
gling in the Pacific and the gov- 
ernment being defensive and 
awkward in its responses to 
press disclosures of the scandal. 

Conservative opposition par- 
ties will exploit Mr. Mitter- 
rand's discomfiture in parlia- 
mentary elections next March. 

Mr. Fabius. who has not re- 
vealed which French officials 


in favor of policies that pui me 1 nere are now some party mem- with the tact that Mr. Chen, unlike teliigence 
emphasis on economic well-being, bers who have forsaken socialist some of Mr. Dene's critics, was a tL* a, 


There are now some party mem- 


J . irom Iranian detectors nas lea to »„*-*--** ~ FiHak who a funded the New York 

The cnuctsm took anadded edge the sharply increased estimates, in- might throw half-tramed^ ill-armed rhatS^ imrJ 

ith the fact that Mr. Chen, unlike tdligenoe sources said. *rani“ mfantty. into further at- “21? JS? ™ 


Gulf war started SepL 22, 


At the same time, Mr. Deng ap- and Communist ideals and turned purge victim during the Cultural 1980. It enters its sixth year with Tbe developing st 
ared to go out of his way to their backs on serving the people. Revolution. He first was named to Iran inferior in numbers but sudc- ground led Presrefen 
commodate critics who have ac- he said. AuDniUhnmi^iou . . A r i Mn ..a kk 


peared to go out of his way to 
accommodate critics who have ac- 
cused him of risking the revival of 
capitalism. 


• . ventioQ plan had been agreed upon 
stalemate on the «nd ™>uW bcappliedif the dollar 
an Saddam Hus- nscs a 8 am - DetaJ 5 of ftat agree- 


— ~ e — In pursuit of their own selfish years before Mr. Deng. ducting a defensive war on the cia iu Lmuiumiauumim . ojuwiuc j...,* 

capitalism. gam, they put money above all else His importance was underlined ground and a savage air offensive of Iran. Iran’s resources for coun- **? .**!? 

While promising that his policies regardless of the slates and peo- last week when party spokesmen against Iran’s ofl-based economy, tenng this offensive are limited. Its vf u’ 

“will by no means change,” he con- pie s interests, to the extent of vio- cited him and Mr. Deng as two Ten in tbe last five weeks air force remains outnumbered and [F* Dy cen P~ I . t>an T’ •'hK* have 
ceded that there should be more fating the law and discipline,'’ he leaders who were too important to iraqj bombers, some armed with of inferior technology. desks to place 

study of Marxist theory a crack- added. ..join dozens of officials i in their 70s French-made Exocet air-to-surface In a war of attrition, Iraq’s posi- 

down on the import and produc- Mr. Chen even seemed to hint and 80s who submitted their resig- missiles, have attacked the Khara tion is growing stronger. A new - «P«ts, eoordinatetl 

tion of undesirable products, and a that Mr. Deng had enjoyed too free nations from the Politburo and island oil terminaL Of the 14 load- pipeline recently laid to the Turk- SSClS w P rk5 ■ '* h “ ll 
fresh drive against “the penurious a hand m setung policy in recent Central Committee. The others ing jetties at the terminal only ish coast is expected to increase oil ■ J? by 

influence of caDitalism.’’ years. were reoiaced Sundav bv the voun- ikL. cn u nsKier tor them to hold the cur- 


the Politburo in 1934. more than 20 nor in advanced weapons, con- setn of Iraq and his military advis- i^ l Ier ^^on ^ntheTnS 




influence of capitalism.'’ 

Mr. Chen, 80. sits with Mr. Deng 


Addressing himself to the 64 Deng loyalists. 


were replaced Sunday by the youn- three are now intact, according to exports by 50 percent. Another 


. _ . intelligence sources. . pipeline to the Saudi Arabian net- 

on the five-member standing com- younger officials promoted by the effect, ultimate authority now According to information reach- work and the Red Sea is about to 
mitlee of tbe Politburo, the inner conference Sunday to the party’s appears to be balanced finely be- ing officials in London, the most go into operation, 
group that has a decisive policy Central Committee, he urged them tween the two leaders, with the recent Iraqi attacks, last Thursday, Intelligence offi 


S und “ w the “" ,ral 


group lhal has a decisive policy Central Committee, he urged them tween the two leaders, 
voice. He has been Mr. Deng’s to follow the Marxist principle or edge lying to Mr. Deng, 
most persistent critic at the (op democratic centralism, which theo- Mr. Deng's hand is e 
leveL supporting moves away from reticaily provides for free-ranging be strengthened furtbe 


officers and oil ex- 


“We do not comment with re- 
spect to when or how we intervene, 

ivhirh mrninc .-a nnl^i. ” 


Mr. Deng's hand is expected to and two tankers. 


leveL supporting moves away from reticaily provides for free-ranging be strengthened further Tuesday in the aftermath of the attack it horizon, they said, would arise 
the rigidities of the Mao era but discussion of policy combined with when the new Central Committee was learned that Iran is charte ring from the death of bran’s Ayatollah 


seriously damaged the lenraiial perts wonder if ihere is an end in < * 04€C ’ 

and two tankera SghL The only one visible on the “S 

In the aftermath of the attack it horizon, they said, would arise ^ OI B aidzed 


cautioning against a wholesale close adherence to decisions. 


preparing French opinion for ordered the sabotage, has 
even more damaging admis- promised to turn over the inves- 


abandonment of Marxist ortho- 
doxy. 


“Leading bodies at all levels 
must practice democracy fully and 


names five to 10 new Politburo six supertankers to shuttle crude oil RuhoUah Khomeini and the recog- 
members, replacing the 10 veterans from Kharg to a makeshift tenni- nition by his successors that the 
who resigned last week. nal at Sim Island, about 350 miles war cannot be won. . 


slons about his government's 
involvement and die attempted 
cover-up. 

Indications so far. however. 


ligation to a parliamentary in- 
quiry paneL 

The government clearly 


Indications so far. however, i 0 thus muzzle oonserva- 

point to this government expla- t j ve criticism by making the op- 
nation: The sinking of the portion share the responsibility 
Rainbow Warrior in Auckland, f or further public disclo- 


Eureka Is Moving Forward on a Cautious Track 


for which suspicion was bound 
to fall on France, was ordered 


sures. Goser oversight of the 
intelligence services by Parlia- 


by intelligence officers seeing meat, which has Communist 
to heighten tension with New mem bers, has consistently been 
Zealand. Their minimal aim rggcied by the government and 
was to stiffen French determi- ^ anathema to the French tnili- 
nation to protect its strategic tary 

presence in the South Pacific- g ut ^ Socialists, who are 


By Axel Krause Eureka is designed to establish partnerships between I 

hamtunmul Herald Tribune ropean governments, financial institutions, and leading 

PARIS — Much uncertainty still surrounds Eureka, dustrial companies to develop high technology ventures. 
France’s bold initiative to stimulate Western European co- Government money is not the main problem. In oontr 


Eureka is designed to establish partnerships between Eu- European executives, bankers and EC officials. Several h un- 


operation in high technology, but the program is showing tci previous, heavily subsidized European ventures such as 
signs of moving forward. the Airbus and the Ariane space programs. Eureka must win 


ropean governments, financial institutions, and leading in- died companies throughout the EC, as well as Norway, 
dustrial companies to develop high technology ventures. Sweden, Austria and Turkey, are studying possible collabo- 

Govmuneni money is not the main problem. In contrast ration under Eureka. - 

to previous, heavily subsidized European ventures such as in recent interviews. French, West German and British 


their maximum goal was to £*£***** to 

embarrass th« S gov- ap ^ ed forces ^ have a margin for 
eminent sources indicated. maneu ver in appealing for na- 
By blowing up the ship in befind the 

harbor rather than sabotapng it y 

f* ’SmhSU af M aeoGauliisu. .he prind- 

death ^ ^photographer who pal opposition patty, havesuf- 
d fhl chk. lent unex- fered in the past their share of 

^Kl^eravity to^te operation embarrassing spy scandals, m- 

gfcS SfsSHs 

soverq- >" -HU-. 

ment’s prestige will be tested . (Gantnnied on P^e 7, Col 4) 


Several industrial cooperation projects are expected to be 
adopted during a Eureka conference in Hannover, West 
Germany. Nov. 5 and 6. Bonn is expected io announce 
financing for the projects then. Last week, senior officials 
from 17 Western European governments and the European 
Community Commission assessed the projects. 

British Foreign Office officials are preparing a Eureka 
meeting in London on OcL 4 to explore funding for Eureka 
projects. It win be attended by bankers and industrialists 
from participating West European countries and EC offi- 
cials. 

Some doubts about the five-month-old program remain, 
however. 


the Airbus and the Ariane space programs. Eureka must win business executives and government officials cited uncer- 

tain ties over the unclear role of governments in determining 

and Financing projects; conflicts between governments over 
f We have made turns uallv fast priorities; overlapping With existing EC research programs; 

J and tbe preference of many European companies to cooper-. 

progress, considering how stow ths United W i ““ ad * wi,h “* 

. ? The U.S. Strategic Defense Initiative, the research pro- 

European cooperation IS. gram for space- based defeases against missiles, is cited as an 

Jacques Battistela the tal concern. 

r, 1 , . Another is that most, of the projects announced have 

rrenen executive originated with French companies, including Matra, the Bull 
“ group. Compagnie Generate d’Electridte and Thomson SA, 

r v„l„ which are state-controlled. The sectors include idecom- 


Jacques Battistela 
French executive 


No govCTnment has yet ^ P ™ 


Mitterrand's call July 17 to join France in committing a Jacques Delore president or the EC Commission, has -| BC iacL ““i we are suu atone on tins point is a Parner, 
billion francs (SI 1 3.6 million) lo Eureka. Leading European termed this a “bottam-up,” approach — companies would bul ^ m providing m«t of the impetus.” said an executive 
industrial companies and bankers say that government and initiate programs, which coula then receive some govern- w * dl onc companies. 

EC financing, even in modest amounts, is a crucial first step mem or community funding. Last week. Prime Minister Laurent Fabius ordered CGE 

in giving Eureka credibility. To date. Eureka" has drawn only cautious reactions from ' (Continued on Page 6, CoL .3) • 


“The fact that we are still alone on this point is a barrier. 


wimuii v? 1 1 j.v muuoat to cureaa, L«iuiug cm upon termed inis a bottom-up, approacn — companies would 

industrial companies and bankers say that government and initiate programs, which couia then receive some govern - 
EC financing, even in modest amounts, is a crucial first step ment or community funding. 

in giving Eureka credibility. fo date. Eureka has drawn onlv cautious reactions from 


the meeting. 

Mr. Baker was widely praised by 
European officials for his role in 

(Coutmoed on Page 2, CoL 4) 


INSIDE 

■ More than 200,000 people are 

said to have fled Tripoli as 
heavy fighting resumed after a 
brief cease-fire. . page 2. 

■ A concert raised money and 
focused attention on the prob- 
lems of U.S. Farmers. Page 4. 

■ Hope waned for thousands 
buned under. Mexico City’s 
earthquake rubble. Page 4. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ European unemployment is 
Ukejy to nse, the Organization 
of Economic Cooperation and 
Development said. Page n. 

TOMORROW 

Florida qay be replacing Cali- 
fornia as a bellwether state to 

SS5»« lneiMte ^ 

inat will soon affect the rest of 
the . United States. 



— 



— r- .-S5TJ.- ■ 


$ ■ 

■■m-- 




200,000 Reported to Flee Tripoli 
As Moslem Groups Intensify Fight 






By Charles P. Wallace 

Ims Angela Tima Serf ice 

BEIRUT — More than 200,000 
people were reported to have fled 
the northern port of Tripoli as 
heavy fighting between rival Mos- 
lem groups entered its second 
week. 

Local press reports said that 
large areas of Tripoli have been 
devastated in rocket and artillery 
exchanges by Moslem fundamen- 
talists and Syrian-backed militia- 
men. 

Police said 21 persons were 


killed and SO wounded Sunday, 
bringing casualties to 147 dead and 
434 injured since fighting began 
Sept 15. 

The fighting, which has flared 
intermittently for the past two 
years, is between a fundamentalist 
Islamic group, the Tawheed or 
Unification, movement and the 
Syrian-supported Arab Democrat- 
ic Party. 


by one official. Fires burned; out of 
control as fire fighters tried in vain 
to battle blazes at hundreds of 
buildings. 

Despite the scale of the fighting, 
the causes of the confrontation 
were unclear. 

The majority of the members of 
the Arab Democratic Party are 
from the Alawite minority, which is 
estimated to total 50,000 in north- 


The finest 
Scotch Whisky 
money can buy 



[fighting broke out again Mon- ^ Lebanon. The Alawiles are a 
day after the collapse of a cease-fire Shiite denomination that are pre- 
that was in force for only 12 hours, dominant in the Syrian government 
Reuters reported from Tripoli, of President Hafez al-Assad. 

There were 00 .^LSSSS £ Tawheed is led by a Moslem fun- 
ports Police said residmtial dis- damcntalisl ^ Sbeikh Said Shaaban, 

tncts far from militia battle lines who in the past received arms from 


were coming under artillery fire.] 

More than 200,000 of the half- 
million residents of Tripoli, the sec- 
ond largest city in Lebanon about 
SO miles (80 kilometers) north of 
Beirut, had fled to safer areas near- 
by, according to police. 

The damage to homes and shops 
in the center of Tripoli was de- 
scribed as “beyond imagination" 


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the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion. 

The militia of the Arab Demo- 
cratic Party has accused the PLO of 
using Tripoli harbor as a route for 
sending supplies to loyalists of 
Yasser Arafat, the leader of the 
Palestine Liberation Organization, 
in other parts of Lebanon. 

Diplomats have tended to regard 
the fighting as a proxy battle be- 
tween the Syrians and Mr. Arafat, 
who have become bitter enemies. 

The Arab Democratic Party has 
demanded as a key element in any 
peace plan that the harbor be 
turned over to the Lebanese army 
under Syrian supervision “to stop 
the Arafat clique from infiltrating 
the city with their weapons." 



Mubarak 
To Press 
Reagan on 
PLO Talks 


WORLD BRIEFS 


The Associated Fmu 

WASHINGTON — President 
Hosni Mubarak Of Egypt was ex- 
pected to renew his call for a U.S. 
diaiogue with the Palestine libera- 
tion Organization in meetings 
Monday with President Ronald 
Reagan and other administration 
officials. 

Mr. Mubarak, who arrived Sat- 
urday. began a day of talks with an 
appeal to Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger For the United 


gsgSasesrcssB 

announced Monday. American high school seniors, is 

■ ™ °“ ataU 

aft* 

point national average. 


States to expedite delivery of weap- 
ons. Egypt, using interest-free U.S. 
I03as,'purchases about SI billion in 
American arms annually. 


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Moslem militiamen fire on rival Arab Democratic Party 
forces on Sunday from behind a sand barrio 1 in TripoEL 

Dollar Falls on World Market 
As U.S. Pledges Intervention 

(Con fin ued from Page 1) 
committing the Reagan adminis- 
tration to greater monetary cooper- 
ation, which had previously op- 
posed intervention except under 
disorderly market conditions. 

The key phrase in a joint state- 
ment after the Sunday meeting said 
that “some further orderly appreci- 
ation of the main nondollar curren- 
cies is desirable," and the partici- 
pants “stand ready to cooperate 
more closely to encourage this 
when to do so would be helpful." 


t pia 

for meetings between the United 
Slates and a mixed Jordanian-Pal- 
estinian delegation before peace 
talks with Israel can begin. Also, 
the king and Mr. Arafat want the 
negotiations held at an internation- 
al conference, with the participa- 
tion of the Soviet Union. 

The administration is willing to 
meet with Palestinians, but Secre- 
tary of State George P. Shultz has 
vetoed some Palestinians on a list 
compiled by Hussein and Mr. Ara- 
fat because the nominees were 
closely identified with the PLO. 

Mr. Shultz also is opposed to 
bringing the Soviet Union into the 
negotiations. 

■ Israel Protests to U.K. 

Israel delivered a formal protest 
Monday to Britain for planned mil- 
itary sales to Saudia Arabia and 
Jordan and the offer to meet with 
officials erf the PLO in London, 
The Washington Post reported 
from Jerusalem. 

Moshe Arens, the acting foreign 
minister, summoned the British 
ambassador. William Squire, and 
expressed “deep displeasure" over 
both developments. Foreign Minis- 
try officials said. 

Yeshayahu Axing, the Israeli 
Foreign Ministry's assistant direc- 
tor-general for European affairs, 
said that Mr. Arens told Mr. Squire 
that Mrs. Thatchers decisions rep- 
resented a “deviation of policy” 
that would bring the Middle East 
closer to confiicL. 


SPAIN 


) 


AN ENTIRE 
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BEHIND 


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advances in telecommunications. 


THE 


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with King Hussein of Jordan. 

Before the White House mee 
the Egyptian leader hdd lunch wi 
Vice President George Bush and 
met during the day with the U.S. 
trade representative, Clayton Yeut- 
ter. ana M. Peter McPherson, the 
director of the U.S. Agency for In- 
ternational Development 
The United States is holding to 
its policy of refusing to negotiate 
with the PLO until it accepts the 
Jewish state's right to exist 
Britain broke ranks last. week as 
In London, Nigel Lawson, Brit- Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher 
flin 'c chancellor of the exc heq uer, her government would meet 
said the agreement was important *itii two PLO officials to promote 
because US. protectionist pres- a peace plan worked out by Hus- 
sures were “perhaps the most dam- scin w hh Yasser Arafat, the chair- 
aging economic threat that the man of the PLO. 
world faces at Lhe present time." But a senior Reagan administra- 
Pierre Berfcgovoy, France's f>- lion official said that that was not a 
nance minister, said that “for the guideline the United Slates in tend - 
first time, we said jointly that the 10 follow in pursuit of Arab- 
dollar should fall, because current Israeli peace talks, 
exchange rates do not accurately 
reflect economic performance.” 

He called Sunday's agreement a 
turning point in U.S. willingness to 
intervene in money markets, which 
could help build support for start- 
ing new trade liberalization negoti- 
ations in Geneva. These are being 
sought by the Reagan administra- 
tion. 

The statement after the Sunday 
meeting committed the United 
States to continuing efforts 10 re- 
duce the U5I. federal budget deficit 
and also committed Japan to con- 
tinue liberalizing its financial mar- 
kets. But government officials in 
Paris. Bonn. London and Brussels 
on Monday discounted published 
reports in 'the United States that 
the five governments agreed to pur- 
sue more expansionary economic 
policies. 

Mr. PtthI said “we were never 
asked" to change monetary and fis- 
cal policy, although he added that a 
strengthening of the Deutsche 
mark will increase the room for 
maneuver for further cuts in inter- 
est rates in West Germany, which 
could stimulate investments and 
possibly consumption. 

Earlier on Monday, amid a fall- 
ing dollar and a substantial rise in 
the price of gold. Mr. Baker said 
that there had been no U.S. inter- 
vention. while West German 
sources said that the Bundesbank, 
for the first time since Feb. 20, had 
sold $8 million at the morning fix- 
ing That amount was very modest. 

West German sources said. 

The last major attempt to .curb 
the dollar's strength occurred last 
February when West European 
central banks, primarily in West 
Germany and France, spent about 
S10 billion. Currency market vol- 
ume is estimated at more than S100 
billion daily. 

“The Group of Five deal on the 
dollar will finally drive the dollar 
bulls to the wall” said James Capel 
& Co., a London stock brokerage 
firm, in a report Monday. It pre- 
dicted that the dollar would fall to 
2.60 DM and 220 Japanese yen by 
the end of the year. 

(Bob Hagenv in London ana 
Warren Getter in Frankfurt contrib- 
uted to this report.) 


Lange Sees Thaw in Dispute With U.^ 

WELLINGTON. New Zealand (Reuters) — The United States has 
started to show signs of flexibility in talks with New Z ealyd that are 
intended to settle a dispute over Wellington’s anti-nuclear policies. Prime 
Minister David Lange said Monday. 

-j . Mr. t nrig a said that after initial talks broke up with no apparent 

An Egyptian official said the prospect of agreement, U.S. officials had indicated in meetings last week 
main purpose of the visit was to in Washington with New Zealand's deputy prime minister. Geoffrey 
express to Mr. Reagan “the feeling Palmer, that it did not want to see relations between the two countries 
that things have to keep moving.” deteriorate further. 

The officiaL who requested that Relations have been strained since February, when New Zealand 
his name not be used, also said that blocked a visit by a U.S. destroyer because the United States refused to 
Mr. Mubarak would report to the confirm or deny whether the ship was carrying nuclear arms. Thai lead 
president on his. talks last week the United States to halt most military cooperation under the ANZUS, 

the Australia-New Zealand-United States defense pacL 


Turk in Papal Trial Is Given an Alibi 


ROME (AP) — A Turkish wit- 
ness for the prosecution testified 
Monday that Oral Celtic, accused 
with Mehmet All Agca tit the assas- 
sination attempt against Pope John 
Paul IL was watching television at 
their home in Vienna when the at- 
tack occurred. 

“I was speaking on the phone 
with my brother in Turkey, and 
Oral was watching television in the 
next room," Abdullah Catli, the 
witness, said at the trial of three 
Bulgarians and four Turks chained 
with complicity in the shooting 
May 13. 1981. Mr. Celtic, sttil at 
large, is being tried in absentia. 



Abdullah Catii 


Salvadoran Abuctors Drop Conditions 

SAN SALVADOR (UPI) — The kidnappers of President Jose Napo- 
le6n Duane's daughter have dropped some of their conditions and are 
wiling to begin negotiations for her release in return for jailed comrades, 
sources said Monday. The abductors had earlier demanded an end to 
government military operations. , 

The sources, who spoke on condition that they not be identified, saiw 
government representatives and the kidnappers were to communicate by 
radio Monday nighL They said this could be the beginning 0 / talks for the 
release of Inis Guadalupe Duarte Duidn and a companion, who were 
seized Sept 10 by gunmen here. 

A group calling itself the Pedro Pablo Castillo Front has taken 
responsibtii^for the action. It reportedly belongs to one of the five 


factions in the Farabundo Marti National liberation Front, the main 
guerrilla organization fighting the U-S.-backed government in H Salva- 
dor. 

West German Doctor Defects to East 

BONN (AP) — A West German physician defected to East Germany 
early this month and is under investigation as a spy suspect, the Federal 
Prosecutor's Office said Monday. 

A spokesman declined to identify de doctor by name, but said thtabe 
had beat .working in the pharmacology research department of the 
university hospital in Mainz and wrote a letter to the university saying he 
had gone to East Germany with his 13-year-old daughter. 

The spokesman declined to link the case with the wave of defections 
and arrests in the current West German spy scandaL ; 

Philippines City Paralyzed by Violence J 

MANILA (WP) — A journalist and a policeman were among five ^^5- 
persons shot and killed Monday at the start of a two-day general strike t 
that paralyzed Davao City in Mindanao, 600 miles (about 1,000 kilome- 
ters) south of Manila. One persons was wounded. 

Radio reports in Manila said the policeman who was killed was 
trapped by armed men. The journalist, a pro-government magazine 
editor, was. lolled at him home. .Three civilians were killed in unclear 
circumstances. Davao was without any public tnuuport and stores, 
offices and schools were closed The provincial capital has been described 
by military authorities as a testing ground for urban guerrilla warfare by 
the Communists. 


' 1 


Reagan Plans 
Trade Action 


For the Record 


(Continued from Page 1) 


Drought Hits Lourdes Source 

Reuters 


LOURDES. France — A 
drought has .partially dried up the 
source at this Roman Catholic 
shrine, where thousands come to 
seek miraculous cures attributed to . . _ = 

the waters, the sanctuary rector ministers and Central Bank heads 
said. Special baths have been from the five hading industrial na- 
closed and pilgrims have been j™. was cued as being responsi- 
asked to limit their consumption, ble for 50 percent to 80 percent of 

the trade deficit, the administration 
official said. 


Arthur SrargUL president of Britain's National Union of Mmewotkers, 
was elected Sunday president of the new International Organization of 
Miners. (AP) 

A 21 -year-old man was charged Monday m Birmingham. England, with 

the murder of two Asian brothers, whose bodies were found in a post 

ought' to be greeted with consider- office set on fire during riots in the city two weeks ago. (AFP) 

able enthusiasm” in Congress “by Finance Minister Roberto Jungiato erf Columbia has resigned and has 
responsible members of the iegisla- been replaced by Hugo Palacios, governor of the Central Bank, President 
tive community," a senior adminis- Belisario Betancur said Sunday. He said Mr. Junguito would become 
nation official said. But, he added, ambassador to France. (Reuters) 

“it will not satisfy the protection- Three former Thai military officers alleged 10 have plotted a coup SepL 
ists.” 9 in Bangkok apparently have given up on seeking visas to enter the 

While much of the president's United States, the State Department said Monday. (UPIri I 

program focuses on addressing a Peace talks between Uganda aid the rebels of the National Resistance 
major complaint of American busi- Army wiD resume Tuesday, Kenya announced Monday. (AP) 

nessmen that other countries do — — __ : 

not allow them the same access to 
their markets that the United 
States allows foreigners, the admin- 
istration official acknowledged 
that unfair trade practices by oth- 
ers account for no more titan 10 
percent to 20 percent of the trade 
defitiL 

The overvalued dollar, attacked 
at a meeting Sunday of finance 


France Avoids Full Apology 

(Continued from Page l) He said there would be no at- 

political left and the armed forces, tempt to enter the zone until other 
Two French agents are awaiting Greenpeace boats arrived France 
trial in New Zealand in connection has said that it is prepared to use 

e fleet. 



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liJS. Keeps Cool on Less Cash 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Americans 
saved more than S13 billion in air 
conditioning costs this summer be- 
cause of cooler-than-normal 
weather, according to a report by 
the National Oceanic and Atmo- 
spheric Administration. The sav- 


witfa Lhe ship's sinking and the 
death of Fernando Pereira, a Portu- 
guese-born photographer and 
Dutch citizen who was aboard. 

The former skipper erf the Rain- 
bow Warrior, Peter WiUcox, called 
on France to halt its nuclear tests in 
the Pacific. Hie ship was preparing 
to lead a flotilla to protest the tests 
when it was bombed He said com- 
pensation was not enough to rectify 
the death of Mr. Pereira. . 

Mr. WiUcox said by radio that 


force to keep out the 1 
■ PTIes Reported Destroyed 
_ Key documents in the investiga- 
tion of the Rainbow Warrioris 
bombing have been destroyed. 
United Press International report- 
ed sources close to the French gov- 
ernment as saying Monday. 

These sources said that the new 
defense minister, Paul Quil&s, be- 
came aware Saturday that the doc- 
uments had been destroyed A day 


the Greenpeace yacht had arrived earlier Charles Hernu resigned the 
Sunday at the 12-mile exclusion post amid mounting evidence of 
zone around Mururoa AtoD where high-level French involvement in 
French nuclear tests are conducted the bombing. 

Mr. Willow said a French naval Mr. Quiles has asked the secret . 

35S-T 4 peKCDl of jbei^^^een. no contact between 

expecledcosL the vessels. . restored,” the sources said 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 24. 1985 


Page 3 





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Caueitui 

tfdai. 


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ti 






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. Page. 2 


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Page 4- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1985 


Hope Wanes for Thousands Buried in Mexico Rubble 


Comp, led by Our steji From Daputcha cal days or the disaster, began ac- Mrs. Reagan paid a three-hour about 2,000 

MEXICOCITY — Survivors of <*■- dfal * rdirf over ihe tanpg funder ooll^ bmld- »**« 

oScSSat "n.ernauona. Mona.ary Kl™“byEl- ^MOOa^.OMp^ ^ 

dead Monday and continued their Fond pledged S800 million in cred- lioil Ab^aasjatan.aeeretmrf "^M^heaS; 


A U.S. Embassy spokesman said 


medical rare or shelter, the agency g-Ui — e — 

finding many more alive ebbed as supplies and other necessities. _ and M- Peter McPherson, di . . _ S 


the hours passed. 


Rescue workers from die United of the U.S. Agency for Intemauon- 


Rescue teams found several States, Canada, France and West al Development- 


h called for helicopters to help 700 people believed trapped when a 
remove the rubble from collapsed 12-story wing of Benito Juaret 




rescue reams touna several duw®, ~ ** United Nations buildings, and for 1.000 oxygen Hospital collapsed, 

more survivors Monday m then.- GenmmyconUnuedtoamveMon- In Geneva, masks Urgently needed by ricue At the Topeka and Anabel cloth- 

|,S"iTS 5 S gaftSBgE »!■*££;- TS— K!SSSSM£S 

T, M’2s - ... 2s"ttrswt. sgresaw j^-s&sss szszl *™* — 
areissr.ss rTIT^Z,^ Ssssxs -ewsssra. JxasiasiS 

5 Stei organized icscue effort until Satur- 


3300, but estimates of the eventual 
toll here and in outlying areas were 
as high as 20,000. 



The Mexican govern™ L after Washington toin^tdre damage MMBteu for ELiTEas badly damaged, 

refusing help for the first two enti- and offer American help. Rescue teams & ___ 


f 1385 Hilton inwrna»ior.ai Cc 



Nou\ No Stop Check-Out 
at Hilton International 
and Vista International 
Worlduide. 


day. Dr. Roberto Yanez Vazquez, 
in charge of the rescue effort, said 
late Sunday that it was not known 
if they would find anyone alive. 

Meanwhile, police reported that 
armed gangs masquerading as re- 
lief workers were raiding sections 
of Lhe city. 

Officers said Sunday night that 
the looters sped through road- 
blocks in cars marked with red 
crosses to pillage jewelry shops, 
businesses and homes left unguard- 
ed. 

Mayor Aguirre Velasquez said. 
“We will act without mercy against 
such criminals since these kinds of 


Part of the crowd of 70,000 country, rock and blues miBic fans at the Farm Aid conc^jt; 


Concert Raises 'Seed Money 9 for Farm Debt 


Checkout 

while 

YOU SLEEP 


actions are condemnable under the 
conditions that now exist-" 

Police said they had arrested 
more than 20 people, and troops, 
deployed to keep order after the 
city was declared a disaster zone, 
detained more. 

Hundreds of people have flocked 
, to the scenes of destruction, mak- 
ing it difficult for officers to distin- 
guish between potential looters and 
i the 50,000 genuine emergency 
i workers. 



We've made leaving a Hilton 
International or Vista International 
hotel almost os pleasurable as stav- 
ing there. 

All you have to do is check in 
with an accepted credit card and tell 
us when you expect to leave. 

During the night, while you’re 
sound asleep, well slip your credit 
card receipt and itemized hotel bill 
under your door. 

In the morning, all you have to 
do is leave. No waiting on check-out 
lines, no waiting for your receipt 
to come in the mail. 

For reservations, call your travel 
agent, any Hilton International hotel 
or Hilton Reservation Service in 
Copenhagen, Frankfurt, London. 
Madrid. Milan, Oslo, Paris or 
Stockholm. 

For a copy of the Hilton 
InternationalA'ista International 
Worldwide Directory please write 
the Hilton international office 


The Mexican federal district at- 
torney's office announced 1,000 
newly confirmed deaths from the 
quake, bringing the official death 
toll in the capital to 2,832. Several 
hundred people were believed to 
have been killed along the Pacific 
coast. f AP. UP1. Reuters) 


Las Angeles Times Service 

CHAMPAIGN, Illinois — In 
retrospect, the hayseed-and- 
rock-music mix that a Farm Aid 
crowd of 70,000 heard at the 
University of Illinois stadium 
may have been one of the most 
daring pop-cultural exercises 
since Woodstock. 

From the country whine of 
Willie Nelson to the surf chants 
of ihe Beach Boys, a more eclec- 
tic gang of performers probably 
had not assembled in the area 
since the 1968 Democratic Na- 
tional Convention in nearby Chi- 
cago. 

But just how the 14-hour mar- 
athon Sunday will help save 2J 
million American farmers from 


their S212 billion of debts re- 
mained unclear. 

Mr. Nelson, the organizer of 
the Farm Aid concert, had only a 
sketchy notion Sunday of how 
the funds raised would be dis- 
tributed. 


The concert had generated 
telephone pledges of S3 million 
by mid-afternoon Sunday. Pro- 
moters said the concert had also 
raised more than $4 million from 
corporate donations, the sale of 
cable television rights and the 
sale of 78,000 concert tickets. 

Governor James R- Thomp- 
son of Illinois said: “I think the 
nation is talking about the Amer- 
ican fanner today. So this con- 


cert has already succeeded wjtlk . 
out distributing a penny. I think 
maybe you’ll see a little better 
farm bill.” 

This week. Congress considai: 
a farm bill that could mean as 
much as S50 billion in subsidies* 
loans and other aid for family 
farmers in the United States. 

Merle Haggard, whose; 
planned Farm Aid train was dfrf 
railed due to a lack of corporate, 
underwriting, said that he would. , 
make a train ride next April from 
California to Washington. Herin- 
vited the more than four dozfit 
acts who appeared on the Farm ' 
Aid stage to meet him there fora : 
continuation of Sunday’s conr ; 
cert. 


. V;.- 

pin* ' 


CarB« im ' 


bPrt 


Ml* 


■ Cultural Treasures Spared 

Many cultural treasures and 
monuments in and near Mexico 
City were unscathed or only slight- 
ly damaged by the two earth- 
quakes, The Associated Press re- 
ported Monday. 

The pyramids at Teotihoacan, 15 
miles (25 kilometers) north of Mex- 
ico City, were untouched. The pyr- 
amids were constructed by a civili- 
zation that flourished from 300 to 
900 A.D. 


nearest vou: 


Mexico City's National Museum 
of Anthropology, which contains 
one of the finest collections of arti- 
facts from pre-Columbian civiliza- 
tions. survived intact. 

Bellas Aries, a palace that houses 
an arts museum and theater across 
from Alameda Park in the capital's 
center, was also undamaged. 

The Cathedral of Mexico and the 


l '/ tiled Kingdom. 

Hilton International Co. 

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179-199. Holland Park Avenue 


nearby Temple Mayor Azteca were 
spared. In the city's Zocalo. or 
main plaza, only minor damage 
was apparent 






Th» An ne i oMd ftm 


Johnny Cosh, left and Waylon Jennings performing at the Farm Aid concert in Illinois. 


London WI1 -til, England 
ATTN: Mr. Michael Weir 


Germany 

Hilton International G). 
Kaisenrasse 47 

D-6000 Frankfurt 1, West Germany 
ATTN: Distribution Center 


Mexico Finds Blessings Amid Losses 


France: 

Hilton International Co. 

25, Rue Cam ho n 
5001 Paris, France 
ATTN: Mr. Jean-Francois Spira 


Hilton International 


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Quebec City. Samtjohn ( New Brunswick). 
Toronto. Toronio Airpon, Windsor 
COLOMBIA: Bugnu.Canjgcru 
CYPRUS: Nicosia 

EGYPT: Aswan/ 'Luxor I Cruise Ships). Cairo* 

ETHIOPIA: Addis Ababa 

FRANCE: Orfv Airpon ( Paris). Paris. Strasbourg 

GERMANY: Dusseldorf. Mainz. Munich 

GREECE: Athens. Corfu 

GUAM: Agana 


HOLLAND: AmMerdam. Roilerdam. Sehiphul 

Airpon i Amsterdam i 

HONG KONG: Victoria 

HUNGARY: Budapest 

INDONESIA: Jakarta 

ISRAEL: Jerusalem, Tel Aviv 

ITALY-. Milan. Rome 

IVORY COAST: Abidjan 

JAPAN: Osaka* Tokvo 

KENYA: Nairobi. Ttfvc West, (Lodges) 

KOREA: Seoul 

KUWAIT 

MADAGASCAR- Antananarivo 
MALAYSIA: Kuala Lumpur. Petal ing Jaya 
MALTA 

MOROCCO: Rabat 

PAKISTAN: Lahore 

PANAMA: Panama Guv 

PHILIPPINES: Manila 

PUERTO RICO: Mayaguez. San Juan 


SINGAPORE 

SRI LANKA Colombo* 

SUDAN: Khartoum 

SWITZERLAND: Basel. Geneva. Zurich 
TAIWAN: Taipei 
THAILAND: Bangkok 
TRINIDAD: tan-of-.Hpain 
TUNISIA: Tunis 
TURKEY: Istanbul 

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES: Ahu Dhahi. Al Ain. 
Duhai, Fujairah 

UNITED KINGDOM: London I Park Lane and 
Kensington >. Garwick Airpon 
UNITED STATES: Chicago t The Drake i. 
Honolulu ( Kahala Hitmn ). Kansas Cnv <\Tsia 
iruerrurional ), New York I Visu imernaiinnji i. 
Oklahoma City i visa International t. 
Pittsburgh * , Visa International I. 

Washington. DC (Visa internal tonal i 
VENEZUELA: Barquislrneto. Caracas' 
‘Opening 1086 'Tlco center-city iocamns 


(Continued from Page 1) 
day the watchman at the Iturbide 
Palace, now the headquarters of a 
bank, as saying ‘’Not even a pen 
rolled off the desks here.” 

In a city whose history has been 
steamrollered by a succession of 
building booms and lack of urban 
planning, the survival of its most 
precious buildings is an invaluable 
gift. 

In the midst of the week's hor- 
rors, Mexicans discovered another 
treasure in their own strong spiriL 
City residents living under the con- 
tinuous strain of severe overcrowd- 
ing have developed a “me- First" ap- 
proach to everything from 
elbowing onto packed subway 
trains to bribing cily officials for 
permission to build on a designated 
“urban green space.” The earth- 
quake put a temporary halt to all 
that. 

An artist, Gonzalo Ceja, said 
Saturday. “I was beginning to lose 
faith even in our character. But 
watching people cooperate, seeing 
how young kids volunteer for the 
rescue brigades, how even children 
manage to direct traffic so effi- 
ciently has been like a balm.” 

Any analysis of the disaster’s se- 
quels in this city of IS million has 
to take into account the shambles 
that already existed before Lhe 
earthquake. 

According to Mayor Ram6n 
Aguirre’s preliminary assessment 
Saturday of the quake’s damage, 
about 800 residential and office 


buildings were destroyed or were 
slated for demolition. Most of them 
were in overcrowded, working- 
class neighborhoods in the city's 
center. 

Their loss will amply add to the 
squalid living conditions in those 
areas. Reconstructing the disrupt- 
ed water and sewage systems will 
further strain neighborhoods where 
water is regularly hoarded against 
dry spells. 

A spokesman for the department 
of the federal district, the equiva- 
lent of city hall, said Saturday that 
many of the water mains in the 
affected areas dated from colonial 


Earthquake Simulator 
Will Help Researchers 


The Associated Press 


LA JOLLA, California — A 
huge earthquake simulation lab- 


oratory is being built at the Univer- 
sity of California at San Diego to 
provide insights on exactly how 
quakes do thar damage and help 
prevent the type of catastrophe that 
befell Mexico, researchers say. 

The S2-million facility will be 
capable of shaking apart a full- 
sized five-story building, according 
to laboratory officials. The most 
important data it will use in dupli- 
cating an earthquake's effects 
probably will come from the two 
quakes that devastated Mexico 
City last week, they said. 


times and are not charted. Simply 
finding the network will be a slow, 
costly operation. 

Officials from the national 
phone company union said Satur- 
day that re-establishing service 
would take at least two months. 
The equipment at the two main 
telephone offices downtown was ir- 
reparably damaged. 

According to scientific esti- 
mates, the city’s pollution results in 
as many as 100,000 fatal illnesses a 
year. The loss of Mexico’s largest 
hospital complex, the Centro Med- 
ico, which provided advanced, free 
health care for thousands, could 
result in even more deaths than the 
earthquake. 

For a government squeezed into 
a tight financial comer by a S 100- 
billion foreign debt, rebuilding the 
medical center and restoring public 
services will drain funds that might 
have been used to deal with the 
city’s chronic problems. 

There is a Mexican saying to the 
effect that a fallen man generally 
gets kicked. It was on the mind of a 


Oregon Commune. ' [ 
Reportedly Had 


Bugging Network 


The Associated Press 


planning official who mentioned 
Saturday that one of the govem- 


Saturday that one of the govern- 
ment buildings hit by the quake 
collapsed on top or the computer 
where much of next year's budget 
was being processed. “This (exple- 
tive deleted) country never gives us 
a break,” he muttered. 

But like so many of his fellow 
residents he was planning to report 
for work Monday to start all over 
again. 


RAJNEESHPURAM, Oregon 
— Law officers have uncovered an 
extensive system of electronic sur- 
veillance at the central Oregon 
commune of an Indian guru, B hag- 
wan Shree Rajneesh, The Orego- 
nian newspaper reported Monday. 

Equipment found at Rajneesh- 
puram is “evidence of the most 
massive wiretapping and bugging 
episode ever in Oregon history." 
said state Attorney General Dave 
Frohnmayer, the paper reported. 

Since the departure Sept. 14 of 
several of the guru's top aides, Mr. 
Rajneesh and others have made al- 
legations of crimes ranging from 
wiretapping to arson at the com- 
mune of 1 ,200 people. i - ^ 

A task force of state and locaw 
police is investigating the allega- 
tions or criminal activity, thing 
unidentified law enforcement offi- 
cials, the newspaper said the police 
at first doubted many of the accu- 
sations but said enough evidence 
has been produced to take them 
seriously. 

The commune’s chief purchaser, 
Deva Avaga, said the man who 
bought the listening equipment had 
the authority to order it directly. 
Mr. Avaga said she did not know 
what it was for. “I knew that it was 
something that had to do with secu- 
rity.” she said. 


'Aciri-a- 


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re subjects) 
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I Yl'KU NATION VI. I IKK ALL) TRIBl'NE, TUESDAY* SEPTEMBER 21, 1983 


Page 5 




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“ ' : 44 j fii'J Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi toured Punjab on Monday with a reinforced security guard. 


. Car Bomb Kills 3 Hindu Children 
m Pre-Election Violence in Punjab 




AMRITSAR. India — Three 
Hindu children were lulled Mon- 
day in a car bombing a& the election 
campaign in the state of Punjab 
neared its dose. Four other bomb- 
ings were also reported in the stale. 

The explosions, which also in- 
jured two persons, hit cars belong- 
ing to candidates or supporters of 
Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi's 
Congress (l) Pony and of the main 


Alf onsin Makes Offer 
To Britain on Falkland^ 

JgOtce France- Presse 

BUENOS AIRES — President 
Alf onsin says that he is pre- 
pared to end the state of war with 
Britain over the Falkland Islands if 
Britain agrees to discuss the con- 
flict. 

Mr. Alfonsin. speaking Sunday 
during his return flight from a 10- 
day trip to Yugoslavia, West Ger- 
many and France, said he had 
made the offer at a meeting in Paris 
with Nefl Kinnock. the leader of 
Britain's opposition Labor Party. 
Mr. Alfonsin said he had not re- 
ceived a reply from London, and 
that he did pot think an end to the 
official state of war wa* near.'. ' . 


Sikh political party, the Akali Dal. 

They were set off by sophisticat- 
ed magnetic bombs with timers fol- 
lowing the detonation of a booby- 
trapped transistor radio that killed 
three persons in New Delhi on Sun- 
day, 

Police warned residents of Pun- 
jab and other parts of the country 
against Sikh extremist bombings 
before the elections on Wednesday 
for a new state government and 13 
national Parliament seats. 

On Monday the First opinion 
poll cm the election put Mr. Gan- 
dhi’s party ahead, forecasting it 
would capture 37 percent of the 
vote against 30 percent for the 
Akali Dal. 

The wave of attacks began short- 
ly after midnight in the western 
Punjab village of Dogarbatsi, a 
stronghold of Jamail Singh Bhin- 
d ran wale, an extremist leader who 
died when the Indian military lost 
year stormed the shrine of the 
Golden Temple in Amritsar. 

Police said the three children 
were killed when a bomb blew up 
an unoccupied car belonging to 
Sheila Dikshit, a Congress national 
parliamentarian campaigning for 
her party’s candidate in the nonh- 
em Punjab town of Batata. 

In another attack on a leading 


Congress politician, a bomb ex- 
ploded in Amritsar near a cor be- 
longing to Brij Bhusan Mehra. the 
Iasi speaker of the Punjab assem- 
bly. 

Bombs also exploded in the con- 
stituencies of two Akali Dal politi- 
cians. The Amritsar deputy inspec- 
tor general of police, Narpai Singh, 
said a youth who was injured when 
a bomb went off in his hand alerted 
authorities to the planned attacks 
before the election. 

Meanwhile, two leaders of Mr. 
Gandhi's party have resigned from 
provincial posts in the past two 
days. 

Norain Dan Tiwari, 60. the chief 
minister of Uttar Pradesh, gave no 
reason for his resignation. He quit a 
day after a former Finance minister. 
Pranab Mukheijee, resigned as 
leader of the Congress Party in 
Marxist-ruled West Bengal. 


Tehran Traffic Kills 11 Daily 

Reuters 

TEHRAN — About 2,000 peo- 
ple, an average of II a day, have 
been killed by Tehran’s anarchic 
traffic in the last six months, the 
Islamic Republic newspaper re- 
_ported Monday. 


Pretoria Plans to Move Blacks 


TRAVELLERS REASSURED ' WATER 


Zulu Chief Opposes Removal of 42,000 From White Zones j • IX BOMBA y SAFE TO DR1XK'. 


Compiled by Our Shiff Fnmi Onpuhhei 

DURBAN, South Africa — A 
South African commission an- 
nounced a plan Monday to remove 
thousands of Mocks from designat- 
ed white areas to a reshaped Zulu 
tribal homeland in the eastern port 
of the country. 

The proposal, made by South 
Africa's Cooperation and Develop- 
ment Department, drew immediate 
criticism from Gatsha Buthclezi, 
chief minister of the KwaZulu 
homeland, and from white political 
leaders and businessmen in Natal 
province, who said the plans would 
provoke serious unrest. 

The South African government, 
amid violent protest of its apart- 
heid policy of racial separation, an- 
nounced earlier this year a morato- 
rium on forced removals of 
nonwhites living in designated 
white zones. That decision would 
have to be withdrawn if Monday's 
recommendations are to be carried 
out. 

The government-appointed com- 
mission announced after five years 
of deliberations that 42X100 blacks 
would be moved to KwaZulu in a 
process of consolidation under 
apartheid of geographically frag- 
mented black homelands. 

KwaZulu is one of 10 black 
homelands created along tribal 
lines by South Africa's white au- 
thorities, Four of the homelands 
have been declared independent by 
Pretoria, but are not recognized by 
any other government. 

Chief Buthelezi, leader of South 
Africa's six million Zulus, has re- 
fused to have his territory declared 
independent, and he rejected Mon- 
day's proposal as a “prescription 
for disaster." 

Ray Swan. Natal province lead- 
er of the Progressive Federal Party, 
the white opposition group, said 
the proposal snowed the authorities 
were "hell-bent on the apartheid 
road." 

KwaZulu is currently mode up of 
Tour major parcels of land and 1 1 
smaller units spread around Natal 
and Transvaal provinces. The pro- 
posal would add to it 942.000 acres 
(38 1.000 hectares) of Natal, includ- 
ing two game reserves. 

The plan calls for the clearing of 
“black spots” — South African 
parlance for black residential areas 
in zones reserved for whites. About 
300,000 blacks were moved under 
an earlier plan for extending Kwa- 
Zulu. 

Anti-apartheid groups, including 
the United Democratic Front and 
the outlawed African National 
Congress, have consistently reject- 
ed what they term the “balkaniza- 
tion" of South Africa through the 
homelands policy. 

In Pretoria, police said seven 


person*, were killed over the week- 
end in South Africa's unrest. 

(Reuters. AFPt 

■ Angolan Action Defended 

South Africa defended Monday 
its latest incursion into Angola and 
admitted that three soldiers were 
detained in Mozambique, Reuters 
reported from Johannesburg. 

Radio South Africa said: "Dip- 
lomatically, it is Angola which 
should be in the dock Tor breaking 
faith.” 

The United Nations has con- 
demned South Africa for sending 
troops into Angola lust week in 
what Pretoria said was pursuit of _• - 

guerrillas from South-West Africa. KCflffSH SL Letter 
or Namibia. Angola said the inya- D 


fighting north of Mavinga. m 
southeastern Angola. 

{It appears, the Durban newspa- 
per The Sunday Tribune said, "that 
the Defense Force is righting a pri- 
vate war in the region." and that 
President Pieier W. Botha of South 
Africa was not being kept informed { 
of army activities in Mozambique, j 
The New York Times reported} 
from Johannesburg.] I 


Soviet Detains 
Man Who Wrote 


sion was to thwart its offensive 
against anti-government rebels 
supported by Pretoria. 

In the case or the three South 
African soldiers picked up in Mo- 
zambique. Pretoria acknowledged 
that technically it had violated its 
peace accord with Mozambique. 
An army spokesman said the men 
had gone absent without leave 1 1 
days ago. 

South Africa said Sunday that it 
had pulled out the 500 troops it 
saiJ it sent into Angola. On Mon- 
day. an army spokesman declined 
to comment on Angolan reports 
that a South African-ted battalion 
was still across the border, backing 
rebels of the National Union for 
the Total Independence or Angola, 
or UNITA. 

In Lisbon. UNITA said Monday 
that it had pushed back Angolan 
government forces during heavy 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — A Soviet man who 
wrote to President Ronald Reagan 
asking him to help 20 Russians join 
their spouses in the United States 
has been arrested outside the U.S. 
Embassy and charged with “petty 
hooliganism." according to his 
mother. 

Sergei Petrov. 32. was detained 
as he tried to enter the embassy for 
a meeting with a consular officer on 
Thursday and was led away by two 
uniformed Soviet guards, witnesses 
said. 

He was sentenced to two weeks 
in a labor camp, his mother said 
Saturday. 

Mr. Petrov, a free-lance photog- 
rapher. received a reply from Mr. 
Reagan last week in which the pres- 
ident said he would try to help the 
couples. Mr. Petrov's mother said 
she believed he was carrying the 
letter when he was arrested? 


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i Basel on his long and intimate acquaintance with 

Bombay’ our foreign correspondent writes: 

J "Of ail the things that peuple drink in Bombay, 
i water has never figured prominently, 

i Most prefer Tonic in Bombay. Mai 

tint in Bombay or Orange in Bombay 
Indeed, anything that one would 
; usually mix in Bombay. 

i But, let me assure yuu. 

1 is no need tn stay clear 
l of the water, 

j Those rumours 

! which infer that 

' water does not mix 

i with this most 

j distinctive of Im- 

( ported London Dry 

I Gins are well and 

I trulv ill-founded." 

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Watches - Jewellery 

Zonck, Pindcplttz. Zurich, San IV* HalH, fljdromzrtiv 430. 
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Terminal A. Trnnul B. Sitr&tc. Berne. Mirfcigkur 1 
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=!J JlTi 


BALLOON 

RACE 


Geneva, 


The world's mast prestigious 
balloon raoe was created in 1906 by 
James Gordon Bennett, Jr., founder of the 
International Herald Tribune. 

That year, a quarter of a million 
spectators watched sixteen gas-filled 
balloons from 6 countries rise from the 
Tuileries Gardens in Para. The object of 
the raoe: fly the farthest distance before 
landing. 

The rules haven't changed over the 
years, and the departure of the 1985 
Gordon Bennett Balloon Raoe from 
Geneva will be equally spedacukr: an 
flkjrwiated night take-off. 

Eghteen bdbore from 11 
countries will pcrtidpate. Held at the 
Centre Sportif in Vessy, just outside 
Geneva, the Saturday night takeoff w8l 
be the highlight of a weekend of 
aeronautic everts. 

Admission: FS. 10 valid for both 
days. For additiond information, contact 
the International Herdd Tribune in Paris, 
TeL 747 12 65, ext. 4566, or Patrick 
Kecriey in Geneva, Tel. 983 862. 


Program 


Friday, September 27 - Fireworks 


10 pjn. - fireworks bunched from o hot-air 
baltoon, Pcrc des Eaux-Vrves. 

Saturday, September 28 - Gordon Bennett 


Balloon Race Takeoff 


1 1 am. - Opening ceremony. Veteran Car 
Club Parade. 


12-6 pm - Inflation of gas balloons for the 
Gordon Bennett Race. Tethered hokir end 
gas balloon fights for the pubfic Ffight 
denwnslrations. 


8 - 10 pun. - Illuminated takeoff of the 1985 
Gordon Bennett Balloon Race. 


Sunday, September 79 - Gordon Bennett 


Fight Fiesta 


&3Q am. aid 4 pm - Mass ascension of hah 
air balloons. 


9 am. - 6 pm. - Fight denKjnsfrations: replica 
of the first hokir balloon flown in 1783, hot- 
air airship, hang gliders launched from a hot- 
air bdbon, stunt flying, miniature hot-air 
balloons, airplane and helicopter models, 
gliders. Martini acrobatic teem. Tethered hot- 
dr balloon flights for the public 
6 pjn. Closing ceremony. 


INTERN \TlON U, 1IEK U.l) TRIM NK- TTKSDAT. S.EPTKMBKR [V85 


Eureka Starts With Caution and Optimism 



(Continued from Page 1) 
France's largest telecommunica- 
tions company, to suspend negotia- 
tions with American Telephone & 
Telegraph Co. that could have e$- 
: tabUshed a joint venture between 
the two companies in advanced 
telephone switching. The govern- 
ment told CGE to explore first a 
similar arrangement with Europe- 
an companies under Eureka. 

“We may not be moving as fast 
as some would like but we are mov- 
** said Lutz G. Stavenhagen. 


“What is supposed \o happen 
under Eureka." said Yves Stourdze 
of France's Research and Technol- 
ogy Ministry, “is that an idea for a 
project surfaces and, if il makes 
sense and financial backers can be 
found, it is given political and gov- 
ernment, or EC. financial back- 


“Once it is launched, we move on 
to other projects, involving not al- 
ways the same partners, which is 
why Eureka is unique and perhaps 
difficult to understand," said Mr. 


would organize their participation 
in Eureka and SDI, and many 
clearly prefer the U.S. program. 
“The money and the organization 
are available under SDI." said a 
German executive. 

“What we fear is that SDI re- 
search contracts to German com- 
panies could tie up their research 
manpower on classified, U.S. mili- 
tary projects with little spinoff for 
civilian use." said a spokesman for 
West Germany’s Research and 
Technology Ministry. 

a- f 


for European affairs, “and Eureka 
is reflecting growing realization 
that we must combine our efforts in 


i7*TTT7* l* H 11 - • i * "•! > lJC r 


Eureka also is supposed to be- 
come a vehicle to breathe new life 
into the ECs slow efforts to reduce 
national barriers to the introduc- 
tion of high technology products 
from outside suppliers. For exam- 
ple. electronics ventures being dis- 
cussed by Thomson. Siemens. Phil- 
ips and General Electric would be 
targeted for favored treatment by 
government purchasing agencies. 

At the July meeting in Paris, 
Britain proposed adoption of a 
“Buy European” private procure- 


|uT) i ! -■ » Tl L I 


nrope in high technology.” 

“The signal for our concrete par- 


ticipation will be given at Hanno- 
ver.” said Mr. Stavenhagen. Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl will be address 
the conference. 

The projects most likely to come 
out of Hannover involve electron- 
ics. robotics, the environment and 
new materials, officials said. 

“We have made unusually fast 
progress, considering how slow Eu- 
ropean cooperation is” said Jac- 
ques Bauistela. an executive of Ma- 
tra, an important defense 
contractor. 

The French company is estab- 
lishing several Eureka projects: in 
the field of compact compilers 
with Norsk Data, a Norwegian 
company, and in laser and space 
technology with Messerchmitt-Bdl- 
kow-Blohm, the Germany aero- 
space company. These also may be 
adopted at Hannover. 


French government participation 
with other governments. 

In Bonn, officials said, environ- 
mental groups, union and opposi- 
tion leaders have raised questions 
about the program. Union leaders, 
for example, say Eureka should 
emphasize creation of jobs. 

“Unlike our French colleagues, 
who are in a huiry to launch indus- 
trially. even military related strate- 
gic projects, we have to deal with 
die concerns of other political in- 
terests here, such as the environ- 
mentalists.” said a German official. 

He and other German officials 
said they viewed Eureka as a broad 
response to the Strategic Defense 
Initiative and there probably 
would be contracts for companies 
working on both programs, which 
could be placed under an umbrella 
agreement between Bonn and 
Washington being drafted. 

But the officials also conceded 
that making progress on Eureka 
was difficult, since most companies 
were still trying to assess how they 


largest electronics company, was 
part of a delegation that recently 
returned from a trip tothe United 
States to explore SDI participation. 

Siemens is also assessing possi- 
ble participation in Eureka projects 
with Thomson of France. Philips 
NV of the Netherlands and Gener- 
al Electric Co. of Britain. 

“We are interested in both pro- 


jects.” a company spokesman said, 
“but we still do not know what 
Eureka is about and will be looking 
to see what comes out of the Han- 
nover conference,” 

The Siemens spokesman and a 
spokesman at Philips emphasized 
that government financing from 
other countries would play a deter- 
mining role in whether they partici- 
pate in electronics ventures now 
under discussion. 

“We are still talking," the Philips 
spokesman said, “but the main de- 
cisions on specific support mea- 
sures should be taken by govern- 
ments and. with the exception of 
France, this has not yet happened." 


America Act in the United States. 
The act requires that government 
agencies give preferential treat- 
ment to U.S.-produced goods. 

“Governments can. provide the 
framework.” said a senior British 
official “but the key to success is 
mobilizing private-sector financial 
institutions behind Eureka.” 

Each of the participating govern- 
ments has been asked to name two 
delegates from industry and bank- 


ing to attend the meeting, which 
will be addressed bv Sir Geoff rev 


will be addressed by Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, Britain's foreign secretary 
and an early Eureka supporter. 


NATO Pipeline Is Bombed 

Rexam 

LIMBURG, West Germany — 
A bomb damaged a North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization fuel pipeline 
near Limburg early Monday, police 
said. No one was injured and there 
was no immediate claim of respon- 
sibility. 





AN ELECTION JRACE — Prime Minister Witfried 
Martens of Belgium, an ardent cyclist who had open* 
heart surgery in 1983, campaigned Monday in Ghent for 
the general elections on Oct 13. His center-light coali- 
tion is involved in a dose race, partly because of its 
decision to permit U.S. cruise missiles to be installed. 


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The Chronology of Events Following Ship’s Sinking 


A'cn- l'i»rt rwvj'.S'/TBi 1 

JuJ - v Jf® 1 — The Rainbow Wjr- 
n ‘' r - a 16ft- Toot ^hip belonging 10 
the environmentalist group 
Grewpeace. is sunk by twoexplo- 
yens m Auckland, New Zealand. 
A crewman, Fernando Pereira, a 
Porruguese-born photographer 
and Dutch citizen, is killed. 

July II — New Zealand police 
determine that the ship, which 
was to lead a flotilla to the Pacific 
atoll of Murnroa to protest 
French nuclear testing there, was 
sunk by two bombs placed on its 
hull. 



- Jtdy 12 — New Zealand police 
begin looking for a French-speak- 
ing man whom the crew of the 
Rainbow Warrior reported seeing 
near the ship before the explo- 
sions, and arrest a French-speak- 
ing man and woman with false 
Swiss passports. 

Juty 74 — The man and wom- 
an. identified as Alain Jacques 
Tcmengc. 33. and Sophie Frcderi- 
que Claire Turengc. 36. are 
charged with murder, arson and 
conspiracy to commit arson. A 
statement from the French Em- 
bassy in Wellington condemns 
the bombing and says that Paris 
was “in no way involved.'* 

July 26 — New Zealand police . 
issue warrants for three crew 
members of a French-registered 
yacht, the Ouvea, believed to be 
somewhere in the Pacific. It was 
chartered in the French island ter- 
ritory of New Caledonia and was 
seen leaving Auckland the day 
before the Rainbow Warrior was 
sunk. 


Admiral Pierre Lacoste 


Aug, 8 — Prime Minister Lau- 
ren i Fabius announces that 
France has begun an official in- 
quiry into the sinking of the Rain- 
bow Warrior. Bernard Tricot, a 
respected Gaullist senior civil ser- 
vant is to lead the investigation. 

Ang. 10 — The state-owned 


French radio says that the two 
persons arrested in New Zealand 
were part of a Defense Ministry 
security team sent to collect infor- 
mation about the Greenpeace 
vessel, but that they were not in- 
volved in its sinking. 

Aug. 26 — Mr. Tricot con- 
cludes his investigation, reporting 
that France bears no responsibil- 
ity for the sinking of the Rainbow 
Warrior. Prime Minister David 
Lange of New Zealand calls the 
report “so transparent ii could 
not be called a whitewash." 

A UR. 27 — Mr. Fabius asks 
New Zealand to turn over “ail the 
facts” it has on the case to French 
judicial authorities. He also says 
that he bos ordered Defense Min- 
ister Charles Hemu to pursue an 
inquiry into “shortcomings” in 
the General Directorate of Exter- 
nal Security, the French foreign 
intelligence service, that were 
pointed up by the Tricot report. 

Sept. 17 — The French news- 
paper Le Monde reports that two 
French military divers working 
for the intelligence agency sank 
the Rainbow Warrior, and that 
Mr. Hemu or his top aides appar- 
ently ordered the operation or at 
least knew of it. 

SepL 18 — Mr. Hemu main- 
tains that he is innocent, but ac- 



Two French agents. Major Alain Mafart and Captain 
Dominique Prieur, who entered New Zealand as Alain 
Turengc and Sophie Turenge on false Swiss passports, 
have been charged in the Greenpeace ship's sulking. 


knowledges that he authorized a 
team of five agents go to New 
Zealand to monitor the protest- 
ers. He also says that he will he 
“intransigent" in his search for 
the truth and “pitiless" if it turns 
out that a member of the French 
government took part in the cov- 
er-up. He calls reports ihar 
French military officers took part 


in the bombing a campaign of 
“rumor, insinuation and calum- 


ny. 


Sept. 19 — President Francois 
Mitterrand orders an overhaul of 
the French intelligence agency. 

Scpf. 20 — Mr. Hemu resigns 
and the head of the intelligence 
agency. Admiral Pierre Lacoste. is 
dismissed after he refuses to iden- 
tify French agents sent to New 
Zealand. 

Sept. 22 — Prime Minister Fa- 
bius admits that French agents 
were responsible for the sinking 
of the Rainbow Warrior. 


Both Engines on DC-9 
In Milwaukee Crash 


Found to Have Failed 


By Richard Wit kin 

Vn V*«fi r«wi'J Smrif 

NEW YORK. — Both engines of 
the Midwest Express Airlines DC-9 
jet that crashed in Milwaukee on 
Sept. 6 experienced power losses, 
according to government officials 
and a spokesman for the engine 
manufacturer. 

Earlier, government officials had 
said the plane's right engine, 
mounted on the tail, hod lost all 
power before the jet plunged to the 
ground shortly after takeoff from 
General Billy Mitchell Field in Mil- 
waukee. All 31 persons aboard 
died. 

Now tests have shown that the 
plane's left engine, also on the tail, 
lost 2ft percent of its power, the 
government officials said. A 


spokesman for the engine's maker, 
the T 


s 


Moscow Unresponsive 
On Arms, Shultz Says 


The Aitucuumi Pres. i 

UNITED NATIONS. New 
York — Secretary of State George 
P. Shultz accused the Soviet Union 
on Monday of failing to respond to 
what he described os “far-reaching 
proposals" by the United States for 
an arms control agreement in Ge- 
neva. 

“We have offered trade-offs and 
made clear our readiness to take 
account or legitimate Soviet con- 
cerns to obtain an agreement that 
would enhance strategic stability 
and strengthen deterrents." Mr. 
Shultz said. 

"Thus far the Soviet Union has 
' not negptiuted with a responsive- 
ness that the talks require." he said 

Among U.S. proposals at Gene- 
va. he said, are a reduction by al- 
most one-half of strategic ballistic 
missile warheads and “elimination 
of the whole class of U.S. and Sovi- 
et” intermediate- range missiles. 

“We repeatedly have stressed 
our readiness for give-and-take, 
and lo consider alternative propos- 
als," Mr. Shultz said. 

His remarks were made in an 
address for the opening session 
Monday of the 40th UN General 
A&semWy. Mr. Shultz will meet this 


week in New York with the Soviet 
foreign minister, Eduard A. She- 
vardnadze. 

Mr. Shevardnadze is scheduled 
to go to Washington brer in the 
week lo meet with President Ron- 
ald Reagan for talks regarded as 
important for the success of the 
meeting that Mr. Reagan will hold 
with the Soviet leader. Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, in Geneva on Nov. 19 
and 20. 

In his UN speech, Mr. Shultz 
said that the United Suites "is 
working hard" to ensure that the 
Geneva summit meeting is produc- 
tive. 

He said he hoped the meeting 
would “give further impetus to the 
wide-ranging dialogue on which wc 
both are already embarked.” 

“Soviet acts of good faith and 
willingness lo reach fair agree- 
ments will be more than matched 
on the American side." he said. 

Mr. Shultz accused Moscow of 



Last Question Remains 
In Greenpeace Scandal 


George P. Shultz 


Roman 


engaging in “blatantly one-sided" 
Mr. Reagan's 


propaganda about 
proposed Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive. 

While Moscow attacks SDf. he 
said, it has for the past 20 years 
spent nearly as much on its defen- 


sive programs as on its offensive 
forces. 

He said Moscow' was engaging in 
research in many or the same areas 
as Washington. 

Mr. Shultz said the 1972 ami- 
ballistic missile treaty envisioned 
that limits on defensive systems 
would make possible real reduc- 
tions in strategic offensive arms. 

Bui he said the Soviet U nion has 
never agreed to any meaningful re- 
duction in offensive arms, while 
continuing an unprecedented mili- 
tary buildup, particularly of heavy 
intercontinental ballistic missiles 
with a first-strike capability. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
and other conservative parties have 
always been vocal defenders of ihu 
military, w’hich controls France’s 
foreign intelligence agencies. 

The key military figure is Gener- 
al Jean Saulnier. now France's 
chief of staff. As Mr. Mitterrand's 
military counselor, he authorized 
expenditures — reportedly more 
than $500,000 — for the intelli- 
gence mission in New Zealand. 

Although General Saulnier has 
signed a statement denying any 
knowledge of the sabotage plan or 
of the subsequent cover-up. his ap- 
proval of such a sum has prompted 
speculation that he must have 
known the facts long before Mr. 
Fabius confirmed them Sunday. If 
General Saulnier is implicated, the 
extent of Mr. Mitterrand's personal 
involvement will become a matter 
of national debate. 

This theme has emerged in the 
French press, which published a 
series of scoops about the activities 
of French spies that the govern- 
ment. after initial denials, was 
forced to confirm. 

For Mr. Mitterrand, perhaps the 
most worrying aspect of the press 
disclosures was their source, which 


appears to be mainly officials 
working for Pierre Joxe. minister of 
the ulterior, who is responsible for 
the country's police and its domes- 
tic counterespionage agency. 

This service, assigned to protect 
France from terrorists and Soviet 
spies, has often criticized French 
overseas intelligence operations for 
sloppiness. 

Beyond the interservice rivalry 
there are him* of a clash of genera- 
tions among the Socialists. With 
the Socialists facing the prospect of 
going into opposition in the coming 
parliamentary elections, Mr. Mit- 
terrand is mainly concerned with 
finishing his term in office in 1988 
with dignity. But younger militant 
Socialists such as Mr. Joxe. who are 
jockeying for position in the posh 
Mitterrand party, may be ready to 
precipitate even more political 
bloodletting now. 

Alain Savory, who was dismissed 
bv Mr. Mitterrand as education 
minister because he was too zealous 
in attacking conservative-support- 
ed church schools, said Monday 
that the French military would nev- 
er have ordered the attack without 
checking it first “at a very high 
political level.” 


i Pratt & Whitney division of the 
United Technologies Corp.. con- 
firmed that the left engine had a 
power loss. 

The loss of power in the second 
engine is considered important be- 
cause such twin-engine jets are 
built so ihai a crew should be able 
to fly them *afel> even with one 
engine out. Government and indus- 
try engine experts suggested that 
the 20 percent power loss cm the 
left engine was probable related to 
the complete power loss on the 
right engine and therefore was not 
an isolated malfunction. But this 
remained to be established in die 
crash inquiry. 

Pratt & Whitney is the world's 
biggest jet-engine builder, and the 
jeis it has turned out for the airlines 
have over the years established an 
exemplary record. Various versions 
of the basic JTSD engine that fig- 
ured in the Milwaukee crash power 
more than 50 percent of all airliners 
made in non-Communist countries. 

But recently the engine, first pro- 
duced over 20 years ago. has been 
involved in a series of accidents. 
Besides the Milwaukee accident, 
these included the crash of a Brit- 
ish-operated Boeing 737 in Man- 
chester, England, Iasi month and 


seven nonfaut accidents since 1981 
that were traced to turbine failures 
in the engine. 

In the Milwaukee accident, spec- 
ulation is still focusing on why the 
plane lost so much speed that it 
stalled, nailed over abruptly and 
crashed out of control. Put another 
way. why had the pilots — even 
after losing some power on the sec- 
ond engine — not been able to keep 
the plane above stalling speed and 
make a controlled landing. 

“There is no evidence so Tar of 
any failure of the controls" that 
would account for the way the 
plane went down, said an official of 
the National Transportation Safety 
Board, which is in charge of the 
inquiry. 

When board officials first ar- 
rived at the crash scene, they con- 
cluded from a quick examination 
that the left engine had been gener- 
ating normal power when the plane 
hit the ground. 

But in the disassembly, it was 
found that many of the engine’s 
compressor blades had been badly 
deformed in the air and that it 
could have been generating no 
more than about 80 percent of its 
power at impact. 


3 Foreigners Expelled 
For Yugoslav Pamphlets 


The isu+iuheJ Pm* 


BELGRADE — An Italian, a 
Frenchman and a Belgian have 
been fined and expelled perma- 
nently from Yugoslavia after dis- 
tributing politically provocative 
pamphlets, the Vecernjc Novosti 
newspaper has reported. 

The stiue-run paper said Sunday 
that the three hod handed out pam- 
phlets in Dubrovnik portraying an 
“ untruthful representation of con- 
ditions” in Yugoslavia. The news- 
paper did not say specifically what 
was offensive about the handouts, 
which it reported were apparently 
the work of Italy's Radical Party, 
or provide any other detail*. 


A small hotel 
on a little street 
called Rodeo Dr ive. 


. \ Max Haril Hi ild 

THE BEVERLY RODEOHOTEL 


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MilWihl With The Nm York Time* and He Washington Post 


Expulsions Are No Game 


There is a tendency to regard the expulsions 
waH those diplomats and other personnel by 
Britain and the Soviet Union as a kind of tit- 
for-tat game that sophisticated nations play. A 
“score” is kept — now 31-31 — and motiva- 
tions or stubbornness and pride are attributed 
to both sides. At the same time, explicitly in 
Moscow, implicitly and quite widely in the 
West, a certain onus is put on London for 
overreacting and expelling the first 25 spies 
fingered by the KGB London station chief 
who defected. It is said that the train of expul- 
sions thus begun may have damaged relations. 

But let us not forget where this train left the 
station. It was at Espionage Central, the typi- 
cally laige, hostile and intrusive extravaganza 
that the Russians mount wherever they can. A 
government that was presented with formida- 
ble evidence of a huge spy nest and did not act 
would not deserve to hold office. Prime Minis- 
ter Margaret Thatcher had it exactly right 
when she said, “We have eliminated the core of 
their subversive and intelligence operation in 
Britain.” This is what is railed the national 
interest. To categorize the episode as a 31-31 


“draw" in expulsions trivializes this fart. 

East- West relations have built into them a 
certain tolerance for mutual espionage, one of 
its purposes being to minimize surprises. But 
the Russians, working arrogantly in open soci- 
eties, gp too far. It is the outlandish size and 
intrusiveness of their espionage program in 
Britain, not the uncovering and undoing of it. 
that assaults the principle of good relations. To 
put even a slight burden on the British is to 
turn the equities upside down. For the Rus- 
sians, “good relations" means a condition in 
which they can practice espionage with mini- 
mal restraint. “Bad relations" is a pqorative 
term Lhey wield against a Western government 

ready to challenge their audacity. 

Margaret Thatcher called Mikhail Gorba- 
chev a man Britain could “do business with. 
She meant, it seems, commercial business and 
general diplomatic business, and perhaps she 
will turn out to be- right. But the best way to 
“do business” with him is to do hard things 
when you have to do them. Mrs- Thatcher did 
just that when she cracked down on the KGB. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Resisting Protectionism 


! A mindless stampede toward protectionism 
will be a one-way trip to economic disaster. 

— President Reagan 

The president's courageous stand against 
additional import restraints makes good eco- 
nomic sense. Protectionism would raise con- 
sumer prices and destroy as many jobs in 
export industries as it saves in businesses beset 
by imports. What has yet to be understood in 
Congress, notably by timid Democrats, is that 
resisting protectionism probably makes politi- 
cal sense as welL 

Last spring. Washington failed to take the 
big step that would make American products 
more competitive. By sharply reducing the 
federal budget and Treasury borrowing, it 
could have reduced the demand for foreign 
capital and the exchange value of the dollar. 
Now, after that failure, the clamor for the 
quick fix of tariffs has swelled into a chorus. 
The only questions seem to be which protec- 
tionist measure will be passed first and wheth- 
er Congress will override the president's veto. 

The urge to curb the imbalance of exports 
and imports is understandable. Legislators 
muy be able to resist individual pleas from the 
clothing or shoe or lumber industry. But the 
cumulative pleading from dozens of industries 
can be overwhelming. Legislators who mea- 
sure the national pulse by the sentiments of 
lobbyists or segments of constituents, howev- 
er. may still be makings political mistake. The 
people who take (he trouble to complain are 
always those most directly affected. They may 


be vastly outnumbered by voters with oppo- 
site. if less strongly felt views. Opinion surveys 
suggest that interest groups pressing for pro- 
tection do not have the public's broad support. 

According to a New York Times-CBS News 
poll in July. 63 percent of Americans favor 
trade sanctions against Japan. However, only a 
third of these say they would stand by that 
judgment if it resulted in higher prices and 
diminished product choice. Moreover, a ma- 
jority of Americans under 65 say the United 
States has made Japan a scapegoat on trade. 

Yet congressional Democrats celebrate the 
president's resistance to tariffs. As a House 
committee drafted legislation to cut clothing 
imports by 40 percent. Speaker Thomas 
O’Neill charged Mr. Reagan with “being will- 
ing to preside over the deindustrialization of 
America.” The president’s opposition to tex- 
tile restraints, some Democrats say. could cost 
the Republicans the South. 

What they overlook is the clear risk that they 
and their party will continue to be seen as the 
agent of narrower interests, especially labor 
unions. If the Democrats want to regain (heir 
appeal lo the pragmatic middle in American 
politics, let them ask how centrists fed about 
trade wars. Support for trade restraints ap- 
pears to be weakest among voters who label 
themselves independent. 

Waiter Mondale ran as the candidate who 
wanted to stop the Toyoias at the dock. It did 
not work in 1984; it probably will not in 1988. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Greenpeace: France Confesses 

Bv admitting that agents of the General 
Directorate for External Security [France’s 
foreign intelligence agency} sank the Green- 
peace flagship. Prime Minister Laurent Fa bios 
implicitly paid tribute to the press, which was 
the first to expose what those in government 
circles had tried to hide. President Franqois 
Mitterrand himself has admitted that reading 
the papers taught him more about the affair 
than information from his own services. If 
journalists had not persisted in their investiga- 
tions in Paris. Auckland. London and Noumea 
[New Caledonia], responsibility' for the sabo- 
tage doubtless would never have been estab- 
lished. The sabotage or the Rainbow Warrior 
became an affair of state from the moment 
when someone in the government deliberately 
hid the Lruih. 

— Daniel Vertiet in Le Monde (Paris). 

It is good that the truth, or most of it, is out; 
but the way it was helped lo emerge suggests 
there are some in the military apparatus who 
cannot stomach a democratically elected gov- 
ernment of the moderate left. The possibility 
that the whole Greenpeace caper was got up to 
hurt the government cannot now be dismissed. 

The government's only sensible course now 
is a complete purge of the disgraced secret 
service by changing its nature from a military 
dirty-tricks unit to a properly accountable ci- 
vilian intelligence organization. 

— The Guardian (London). 

Why was such an elaborate operation 
planned, involving three of four different 
teams of French agents, almost any of whom, 
if caught, were bound to be identified as such 
— two of whom indeed were foolish enough to 
telephone the French Defense Ministry on an 


open line while in the custody of the New 
Zealand police? The mutual suspicion between 
Socialist political appointees and officers fear- 
ing they would be made scapegoats must ex- 
plain the unusual wealth of detail that has 
leaked to the press. Mr. Mitterrand emerges 
sorely weakened, whether or not thaL was the 
objective of anyone involved. Assuming, as 
one must, that he had not approved the esca- 
pade, his authority has been shown to be 
defective in a key area of national security; 
and he has lost a colleague [former Defense 
Minister Charles Hernu], who commanded the 
broadest respect and might plausibly have 
remained in office after the expected rightist 
victory in the election in March. The chance of 
such a victory is now even greater; the chance 
of Mr. Mitterrand successfully “co-habiting” 
with the new majority significantly less. 

— The Times (London). 

New Criticism of the FAA 

For a third time in a month, the U.S. Feder- 
al Aviation Administration has come under 
scathing criticism of its enforcement of air 
safety. The latest is a congressional report 
charging that the air traffic control system 
suffers a “diminishing margin of safety" be- 
cause of staffing shortages, employee stress 
and fatigue and an unseasoned work force. 

Even if the system was somewhat over- 
staffed for 1981 traffic levels, as the Reagan 
administration contended at the time, it is 
hard to believe that 2.000 fewer controllers — 
in a relatively inexperienced work force — can 
handle today's sharply increased traffic and 
still maintain necessary safety standards. The 
FAA should step up the hiring and training of 
controllers and tighten inspection procedures. 

— 77ie Sacramento (California) Bee. 


FROM OUR SEPT. 24 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Aeroplane Crosses Alps, Crashes 
DOMODOSSOLA, Italy — The Alps have 
been crossed by an aeroplane. The hero is the 
young Peruvian. Seiior Jorge Chavez. Howev- 
er, after crossing the snowy peaks and yawnin g 
gorges of Simplon Pass he was the victim of an 
accident in landing Notwithstanding his fail- 
ure to reach Milan, the Peruvian's exploit 
constitutes the greatest triumph human flight 
has yet recorded. M. Duray. a friend of Sefior 
Chavez, said: ”1 had watched him soar above 
the Gondo Gorge [then] fly over Domodossola 
towards the landing field. From a height of 
1,000 metres. Seiior Chavez began a Vol 
plant’ Twelve metres from the ground both 
wings collapsed and the machine dropped tike 
3 stone. Chavez was lying unconscious beside 
one of the wings. A cursory examination 
showed that both legs were broken." 


1935: Bordeaux Gives Up on America 
PARIS — “The .American people are spiritual- 
ly ill and there is liule hope of any change, 
except for the worse." “They have no time for 
the fine things of life such as wine." These and 
other opinions were expressed at the Associa- 
tion of Bordeaux Wine Exporters meeting just 
held in Paris, during which it was derided that 
the United States is not interested in wine and 
that the association will make no further effort 
to sell wine to Americans. Roger Desras, presi- 
dent of the association, declared: “We are sad, 
not simply because of the loss of a market, but 
because of the loss of an ideal. Silk stockings, 
movies and autos have conquered America. 
They require too much money to leave scope 
for the refinement and culture which are nec- 
essary to appreciate the fine things or life, such 
as wine, grand music and fine literature.’' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEW1RTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 

Execute Editor RENE BONDY Dtpm Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LECOlfR Associate Publisher 

Deputy Edna- RIC HARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operations 

Associate Edtitn FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Circulation 

ROLFD.' 


KRANEPUHL Director cf Advemsmg Saks 
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•v 1985. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved 



IF«' 


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E*Pelle£ of British '$Pie$' 


Plugging the Big Ears 9 of the KGB 


W ASHINGTON — In the new 
Soviet Embassy compound 
atop Washington's Mount Alto, 
350 feet above sea level, laser-beam 
listening devices are bring installed 
by Soviet technicians. They have a 
clear line of sight to the While 
House and the CapitoL Aimed at 
windowpanes. the superbugs will be 
able to pick up conversations in all 
rooms with north-facing windows. 

During the Nixon administra- 
tion. the National Security Agency 
— so secret that its initials were said 
to stand for “No Such Agency" — 
joined with the Central Intelligence 
Agency and the Federal Bureau of 
Investigations in objecting to the 
assignment of Mount Alto to the 
Russians. Somebody — nobody 
will say who — overrode those ob- 
jections. So the Russians have a 
huge advantage in electronic espio- 
nage: about 70 percent of local tele- 
phone conversations in Washing- 
ton will be wide open to Mount 
Alto’s Big Ear. 

What is being done about it? 
President Reagan has ordered mil- 
lions of “secure" phones with un- 
derground lines, at huge expense, 
for government officials and de- 
fense contractors. That costly 
scrambling will quickly be over- 
come; moreover, the vast majority 
of private calls in the capital in- 
cluding those that make the Rus- 
sians such wizards in commodity 
trading, would go completely unde- 
fended in a country whose citizens 
are supposedly to be protected 
from “unreasonable searches." 

The way to slop this rape of pri- 
vacy is to inform the Russians that 
such espionage is against U.S. law 


By William Safi re 


and simply make them slop il 

Ah. no, say some of America’s 
spooks: We do the same thing over 
there, albeit from a much less ad- 
vantageous spot. If we close down 
their listening, they will close down 
ours; since theirs is a closed society, 
we learn a lot more about them 
than they do about us. 

t wonder. Years agp. when the 
United States was secretly bugging 
Soviet limousine transmissions. 
Americans knew which marshal 
was seeing which prima ballerina, 
causing much cackling at CIA 
headquarters in Langley. Virginia. 
But that edge is gone; both sides 
know of die other’s surveillance. 
Has anvene been assigned to ask if 
the United States is really getting 
more relevant data than it is losing? 
Is the demeaning trade necessary? 

Senator Daniel Patrick Moyni- 
han of New York has put forward 
the Foreign Surveillance Protection 
Act to slam the door, but it is op- 
posed by the administration. That 
is not the only attempt to stop Sovi- 
et spying that Mr. Reagan resists. 
In the U S. Embassy in Moscow, 
more than 200 Russians make the 
beds, serve the food and spy. (Not 
one American works for the Soviet 
Embassy in Washington.) The 
American ambassador in Moscow 
knows his driver is a KGB colonel. 

Last March. Americans learned 
(probably from the Brits, who had a 
good KGB source) that the type- 
writers in the Moscow embassy 
were transmitting everything writ- 
ten to the White House directly to 


the Kremlin. Of course. Russians 
inside the embassy serviced these 
machines. And the carcinogenic 
“spy dust" found in the embassy 
was spread by Soviet nationals to 
facilitate surveillance. 

Representative James Courier, a 
New Jersey Republican, offers -a 
bill requiring replacement of all So- 
viet nixing by Americans in the 
Moscow embassy within a year. 
The State Department response: 
How about half? That would 
only the best KGB personnel would 
continue to make the beds. Under 
congressional pressure, the State 
Department says the central UJS. 
facility there will be free of Rus- 
sians, but that the compound will 
have non- American workers. 

Why? The State Department 
fears the Americans will be seduced 
and turned into spies, that they wffl 
not be as effective in getting people 
on die phone, that they may get in 
trouble or accidents. Apparently it 
would rather have fall-time KGB 
agents on the premises than UJ&. 
citizens, because — get this — such 
close contact keeps diplomats secu- 
rity-conscious and enables them to 
send messages by talking to the 
chandeliers. Stale also moans about 
how hard h rs to get drivers and 
domestic servants to work over 
there, but that is malarkey. 

The Russians are regularly pene- 
trating the Moscow embassy, and 
increasingly penetrating telephone 
and office conversations in Wash- 
ington. and Mr. Reagan’s “hard- 
line" administration is dong noth- 
ing about iL It may be time for 
rigorous congressional oversight. 

The New York Tunes. 



The Greenpeace Case: 
Nearing a Fatal Tni 

By William Pfa# 

P ARIS — The Greenpeace afTair tam. The first is that the intelligence 
hemme serious in France at raid- service, whatever it d,djvas. aomg 

sH’ia-sas ssBisssaft 

SSS&SSiiSS SSMSfflSSSS 

2S the in New Zea- office of the 

shi,, bZgiog to the fM*; 


Greenpeace environmental group 

The French —while regretting that 
a man had been Wiled in the bombing 
of the ship, the Rainbow Warrior — 
bad until then been rather smug 
about the affair, finding in it more 
ti (illation than cause for concern- The 
“nationalist frenzy" of which New 
Zealand's prime minister, David 
Lange, recently spoke was more evi- 
dent in Wellington and Auckland 
than it was in Paris. 

There is a solid popular consensus 
in France on the country’s present 
defense policy, on the nuclear testing 
regarded as necessary to that policy, 
and on the legitimacy and legality of 
protecting the test sites in France’s 
pacific island possessions — from 
Greenpeace or anyone else. 

With Le Monde’s revelation that 
tbe government, or parts of it. had 


(errand's personal military staff. 

Moreover, the intelligence service, 
and the military hierarchy to which it 
is answerable, clearly are refusing to 
allow the political authorities thtk 
state to put the blame on . them' ■ 
Hence Mr. Fabius’s pains Sunday- ■ 
night to state that the individuals - 
who executed tbe mission- acted on 
orders “and have often in the past 
carried out very dangerous missions 
for our country." - '• 

But if the intelligence service and 
the military establishment were act- 
ing under proper orders — and if H 
was not the defense minister, the 
prime minister or the president who 
gave those ordeivthen who did? . -. 

We soon will know. Not only . do 
the opposition pailies .and the press 
want to know, buttoo many political 
and institutional interests made the 


beaT lying to the French public, the government have come into conflict 
affair assumed a new dimension, a lOf tbe truth 


affair assumed a new dimension, 
political one. What Le Monde had 
reported. Prime Minister Laurent Fa- 
bins confirmed Sunday night: that 
the Rainbow Warrior had indeed 
been -ointr by French military divere, 
working under orders from France's 
external intelligence service. Until 
then, the government's claim had 
been that while there were French 
agents in New Zealand to spy on 
Greenpeace, France had had nothing 
to do with tiie ship's bombing. 

Tbe government now has taken up 
a new position: that while France was 
responsible for the bombing, no one 
in the higher reaches of government 
— including tbe president and the 
prime minister — had advance 
knowledge of the operation. Defense 
Minister Charles Hernu, an old 
friend of President Francois Mitter- 
rand's who has earned the respect of 
the public and the military, was com- 
pelled to resign Friday after sayuig he 
w as unable to determine who had 
ordered the bombing. . . 

The sacrifice of Mr. Hernu accom- 
plished nothing. The government's 
new position is already proving as 
difficult to maintain as was the origi- 
nal denial of responsibility. The. first 
official investigation of the affair, 
carried out in August by a highly 
regarded former minister of de 
Gaulle's, Ber nar d Tricot, merely re- 
ported what officials themselves did 
or did not say about what happened. 

Bui Mr. Tricot offered two conclu- 
sions that suddenly become impor- 


to be concealed It may 
be a truth fatal to Mr. Fabtus*s gov- 
eminent. Il could be a troth, fatal to Jg 
Mr. Mitterrand’s 1 praskiehey. 

Tbe oddest thing abort it all is that 
tbe charge the French people have 
made against that 1 government is not 
that it carried out such an .attack, 
France is a cynical nation where in- 
ternational politics, are concerned. 
The crime, in Frehch eyes, is that 
those responsible have made France 
look ridiculous before the world. 
They have made France seem incom- 
petent and mendacious:., and this 
is unforgivable: - 
There is a final consideration, the 
most serious. Why was the operation 
undertaken in. the fiat {dace? To 
block Greenpeace’s planned harass- 
ment of French nudear tests, and to 
wain the Greenpeace activists. One 
more time we. find ourselves with the 
notions of “leaduhg .lessons" and 
“giving waitungs" by jpeans of stu- 
pid. unproductive acts of violence. ^ 
What official with tbe slightest “ 
sense of political; or of human, reali- 
ties could possibly have believed that 
to sink a Greenpeace ship would de- 
ter the anti-nuclear movement? ■ 

To sink ibe boat was to present the 
environmental group. wiih a gold- 
plated public relations gift. To do U 
in such a way that a man was lolled 
was worse.. To tell, convoluted lies 
about it ali was , simply suiddaL 
Those are the. realities Mr. Mitter- 
rand and Mr.; Fabius now confront. 

- © /flSJ I VimamPfaff. ' 



The Battle Has Begun foTlhe l£S. Senate 




<€*> 




-bvt 




N EW YORK — A shift of only 
four seats in next year’s U.S. 
congressional elections would give 
Democrats control of the Senate 
again, making President Reagan a 
considerably lamer duck in the last 
two years of his term. It is not surpris- 
ing. therefore, that knives already arc 
being sharpened, curve balls are be- 
ing thrown, and the public interest is 
taking a licking. 

Among crucial new developments 
is the announcement by John P. East 
of North Carolina, a Republican sen- 
ator cloned in 1980 from the finger- 
nail dippings of Senator Jesse Helms, 
that ill health will force his retire- 
ment. Coming on top of Senator Paul 
Laxalt's decision not to run again. 
Mr. East's decision has shaken Re- 
publican confidence for 1986. 

Rumors persist moreover, that 
Senator Charles McC Mathias of 
Maryland, one of the last of the old 
“liberal Republicans." will also re- 
tire. Mr. Mathias, who is cordially 
despised try the Jesse Helms- Richard 
Vigjiierie right wing, is no doubt en- 
joying their dilemma: They would 
love to be rid of him but since no 
other Republican is likely to win in 
Maryland, they need him to hdp 
keep the Senate in Republican hands. 
The Washington Post, its ear ever 


By Tom Wicker 


to the political ground, even 


The Travels of Jamil (Ex-H. Rap Brown) 


A TLANTA — From the sun-dap- 
. pled park conies the back- 
ground rhythm of urban life, the slap- 
slap-slap of basketballs on blacktop. 
Across the street, in a small conve- 
nience store, and in profound peace 
of mind, sits the proprietor, selling 
eggs and reading the Koran. 

He is Jamil Abdullah al-Amin. He 
is 41. He used to be H. Rap Brown. 
But that was long ago and. in a sense, 
in another country. It has been a 
winding and ascending path from his 
boyhood in Baton Rouge. Louisiana, 
to Atlanta's west end. The hyperki- 
netic human torch of urban unrest, 
circa 1967. is. in 1985. enveloped in a 
strange serenity in a city known for 
its hum of energy. The man who was 
the hammer of America, or at least of 
Cambridge, Maryland, has become a 
merchant, but with this distinction: 
He is, at last, really radical. 

That radicalism was a short candle. 
11 was rhetorical radicalism, elicited 
from young people by older flatterers 
and amplified by the media 18 years 
ago. Today, and for the long haul. 
Jamil is in inner emigration, out of 
his country and into Islam. 

He burnt upon the nation in the 
1960s, when The social air was com- 
posed of (in the words of a Rex Stout 
character) “oxygen, nitrogen and odi- 
um." He succeeded Stokely Carmi- 
chael as head of the Student Nonvio- 
lent Coordinating Committee, which 
soon changed the second word to 
“National." He said the sorts of 
things that then passed for trenchan- 
cy: “If you give me a gun I just might 
shoot Lady Bird.” The only lasting 
legacy of his brief blast of promi- 
nence is an aphorism: “Violence is as 
American as cherry pie." 

The 1960s were God’s gift lo con- 


By George F. Will 


he served five years in jaiL But by 
1971 be had converted and had con- 
cluded that the change that matters is 
the one the changer can control: tbe 
souL Democracy is less a creed than a 
dimate of opinion. His interest is in a 
creed. He prays five times a day and 
fasts during the month of Ramadan. 

The transmission of religion to the 
rising generation is never easy, and 


servatism, a decade dominated, not 
numerically but culturally, by over- 
reachers. Those years were noisy with 
the voices of fundamentally frivolous 
people feigning seriousness, people 
convinced that sentiment is the mea- 
sure of virtue, that rhetoric is the _ _ . 
measure of sentiment and (hat moral- inoculating Muslim children in the 
ity is a stale of mind: I feel therefore middle of a metropolis against tbe 
l am. This radicalism helped to pro- temptations of American youth cul- 
ture wall be especially difficult To 
that end he and neighbors (he has 
been chosen Imam of nis community) 
are founding a religious scbooL 
Kierkegaard said that Christianity 
is not glad tidings to tbe unserious 
because it seeks first to make them 
serious. Religion has done that for . 
Jamil, who snows a flicker of levity 
only when asked if he goes to see the 


reports 
Thur- 
mond of South Carolina will hero- 
ically yield his Jodidaxy Committee 
chairmanship to Mr. Mathias, as bait 
for (he latter to ran once more. ' 

There would be more than poetic 
justice in (his. since Mrl Mathias was 
in line for the chairmanship or 1980, 
only to be bulldozed aside when the 
more senior Mr. Thunnond shifted to 
Judiciary from the Aimed Services 
Committee. Mr. Thurmond has not, / 
however, confirmed his readiness for 
another leap, particularly one on be- 
half of Mr. Mathias. . 

In North Carolina, Mr. East's re- 
tirement has split that state’s recently 
prosperous Republican Party. Mr. 

East and his political sponsor, the 
right-wing National Congressional 
Club headed by Mr. Helms, quickly 
announced their support for David 
Funderburk, 41, until recently the 
ambassador lo Romania. North Car- 
olina political bulls say Mr. Fiinder- 
burk, who has never ran for office, is 
another Hdms creation. 

He will be opposed in what prom- 
ises to be a bloody Republican pri- 
mary by Representative Janies T. 

BroyhflL dean of the state's congres- 
sional delegation and a dose asso- 
ciate of Governor James G. Martin. 

Both are what once would have been 
called “conservatives^” but. they are 
being labeled “moderates" or “main- 
stream Republicans" in recognition 
of their differences, often great, with 
tbe Helms-led radical conservatives. 

That might seem to offer the Dear- : _ 
ocrats opportunities. But thtir best , with 
candidate, former Governor James public h 


retirement. No- other Xtemocrat 
seems a oaiural or assured choice, so 
a tough Democratic primary seems 
likely, too. -hi the general election, 
bpweverr Mr. Reagan will not boat 
the top dTlhe ticket as ;hb was when 
Mr. East won an upset .victory m 
1980 and wheir Mr. Hdms defeated 
Mr.. Hunt last Jear. ; 

Meanwhile, back in the Senate, the 
formidable, ME Hdms has maneu- 
vered .the Emaiace Committee, of 
which he is not a member, into ap- 


proving a new tobacco price-support 
er which (he 


Hunt, took himself out of the race 
even before Mr. East announced his 


program, a subject over 
committee normally has no jurisdic- 
tion. He did it lay promising not to 
filibuster the committee’s plan to 
keep the cigarette tax at 16 cents per 
pack, as part of its defidt-redurtkm 
package. The tax, had been scheduled 
to drop to only 8 cen ts on Ocl 1. 

What has that got to do with poli- 
tics? .Well, the proposed new support 
plan is. designed to remove a huge 
tobacco surplus that is threatening to 
banknqrtthe present program, [twill 
either save the taxpayeis j500 millio n 
or cost them SI billion, depending on 
who makes the claim, but it w31 
please tobacco growers either way. 

And though toe 16-cenl tax will be 
retained, that is better for die tobacco 
industry than the even higher taxes 
the Finance Committee rqected or 
the 20-cent tax the House Ways and 
Means Committee may yet approve. 

So these actions in tbe Senate will 
not hurt and may. help Republican 
Senate candidates next year m tobac- 
co states such as North Carolina, 
Georgia, Honda' and- Kentucky. 
Never mind that with all those $200- 
bfllhw .federal deficits ahead, and 
ttes deariY harmful to the 
th. doubling tbe tax on 


h * 


them would make more sense. 
The New -York Times. 


duce two significant effects: tbe 

To give him his due, he 
has not been absorbed. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

China’s ’Back-Stabbing’ 


“backlash" candidacy of Alabama’s 
George Wallace and the presidency 
of Richard Nixon. 

“Many people," Jamil says, “reck- undistinguished Atlanta Hawks play 
on time from the '60s. Time stopped basket bah: “No, I go to see the other 
for them then. I don’t miss the ’60s.” (earns play." 

Now that Brown is someone else, and Driving a Toyota van on one of the 
quite quiet, be is, at last, impressive, freeways that has made (his city a 
He is tall and gestures slowly as he symbol of Dixie transformed, Jamil 

reached behind him for a plastic car- 
rying case, removes from -it a cassette, 
sups it into the dashboard tape deck 


gestures 

speaks, pointing with fingers that 
snould belong lo a pianist. 

There are many Black Muslims in 
his neighborhood. The store next 
door sells incense and Arab-style gar- 
ments, Many of his customers, in- 
cluding a 3-year-old seeking six eggs, 
wear the kind of crocheted cap he 


and the van is filled with the almost 
musical sound of passages from the 
Koran recited first in Arabic and 
then in English. This might seem like 
another example of America’s atoaz.- 
for absorption. But to 


In response to the report “US. Sen- 
ators Assail China for UN Votes" 
(Aug. 28) by Jim Mann: 

It was good for a change to see the 
United States asserting itself and its 
interests during' recent taTta with 
mainland China. If the mainland 
hopes to continue profiting from its 
relationship with toe United States, 
its back-stabbing in international fo- 
rums must stop. Nor should the -Unit- 
ed States tolerate such behavior. 

TTie senators were correct to voice 
support for Taiwan, even if k was^ 
unpleasant news to Beijing's ears. If 
the United States cannot protect its 
interests and those of its allies when ' 
dome business with the mainland it 
should not do business at all. 

ELSIE MARKS. 

Taipei. 


ers to manufacture in their countries 
could find that their /countries lose 
two or three jobs in the auto Industry 
for every one created.” But Japanese 
manufacturers did not voluntarily, 
propose such overseas inves tmen ts; ft 
was the other way arotuxL-- 
We are, nevertheless, -.very aware of, 
Europe’s economic difficulties, p&r- 
tteulariy the high levels of uneamloy- 

! “ cn f* ■ * Japanese investment 

should help by creating jobs, 
ironically. For d Motor Co. is the 
only manufacturer in’ Europe that is 
considered “rDtematKmAl.’’ Ford 

cannor afford to become protectiort- 
ist, even if it does buy' Japanese parts. 

M.SW2UME, 

• ' Director General - 
,, . • Jtg&n Automobile 
Manufacturers Association. 
• r - V .Paris, 


& 


wears beneath a gray cloth. His mg capacity for absorption. But lo A,i tlte . T 

shelves are sparsely stocked, but h is give Jamil his hard-won due. he has utus ' UUTOpe VS. Japan 
customers are buying only Cheerios not been absorbed. After reading the report “fiat An- 

Pac ‘ Wlh Foni 
oepr. /3) t I want to protest 


mytng 

and milk a few dollars worm at a tune 
and, anyway, commerce is not the 
point. The Roran is the point. 

After inciting riots in Maryland 
and elsewhere and getting into a 
shoot-out with police in New York, 


Members of Atlanta’s large black 
middle class are driving all around 


middle class are driving all around in ’85" (Scot Hi I V- 
him on the freeway. But H. Rap the charee L W ^fV° Protest 

Brown, a boy from America’s SouS president FoJri Robet ? 

bas become a man of a distant Easi P Mr .? un ?P5 lnc - ‘ 


distant East. 

Washington Post Writers Group 


Mr. Lutz “warned that EC govern-. - 
men is who lem Pl Japanese automak- 


waded, for publication 

addrased^Lenm id the 
find must contain the writ- 
\ers signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should bg- brief and* 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
he rcspwisafc for the ‘return of 
unsolicited manuscripts, z. 










INTER.NATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24. 1985 


Page 9 


Ufc# By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

Mp* YuH , Tintri Smite . .. 

. Washington — Many for- 
eign governments and. for that 
matter, many American trade spe- 
cialists, challenge the 'view of the 
Reagan administration and many 
in Congress that unfair, trade prac- 
tices by other countries are largely 
to blame for the huge U.S. trade 
deficit. ’ 

As they see iu. the United States 
is guilty of its own share of unfair 
practices. They also say the part of 
the American deficit attributable to 
unfair foreign practices is not all 
that big. 

C. Fred Bcrgstcn. director of the. 
Institute For International Eco- 
onomics, a research group based in 
* Washington, estimates mat ending 
other countries' unfair trade prac- 


Impact of Foreign Trade Practices 




The danger is the 
belief that what one 
does oneself is fair 
and what the other 
fellow does is 
unfair. 9 

Sir Roy Denman 
EC Official 


barely taken notice of that deci- | 

“°Boih Europeans and Americans that it should speed up these tariff 


die GATT rulings in their favor, concessions. , ’since "not all grape 

and each side accuses the other of The case on tit breaks involves P ■ nro J l!CCT j, < ,}, e 

ignoring rulings with which it dis- SI 1 billion ^' a }^. roenean ,'^ l [^' £ ur0 peans sav this*!* inconsistent 
agrees. GATT b a 90-naiion accord mes saved by setting up domestic Enrols saytn«B a 
thatsets out fair-trade rules and international sales corporations. «-«& SLrJSS^air 
procedures fur scalme Joules. Unto ihis prog™.. ■«**«*«; com - 

In pressing action against the EC corpora uons plain?, bTdve United States that 

for refusing to end a subsidy sys- f erred. A GATT panel in 195 P. _ . Vimis markets are closed 

=yrssrs£ra 
fsrs:i%!rnx Trips. 

^bncWn'lM^Tta&r^ins to 

stt^wsrss s^va^HJfis 

?«« “S3SH 


unfair trade case against European 


settlement.” said a White House 

Twosningiou, estimates uuu ending ■ ■ report 

other countries' unfair trade prac- Europeans, for their port, 

where to. wto. on«dt is S’dS.uB toJ bS 


and the European Community are head of the EC delegauon here. ^ toRd hk. he ban States agreed to reduce tariffs on 

cautioning riaTunfair trade is in One of the many complaints <rf vS^T 2 . But the Europeans 

the eye of i the beholder. unfair trade against the United ™s *°h£ sav TasWogton. apparent!^ 

“the danger is the belief eveiy- States concerns the ban on imports trade charter. But Washington nas say > 


— i.e. alike in all respects" to any 
foreign industry it lodges a com- 
plaint against. 


steel. But die Japanese say there 
have never been such findings 
made against Japan. 


WHO r™,W„ w to Seek to Coordinate Worldwide Strategy Against AIDS 


By Thomas W. Nctter 

New York. Times Service 

v GENEVA — The World Health 
Organization is scheduled to open 
a two-day conference here Wednes- 
day to coordinate worldwide strat- 
egy to combat AIDS, or acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome. 

Officials at the organization’s 
headquarters in Geneva said Fri- 


ed, although many cases are sus- 
pected there, the officials said. 


WHO is also plying a regional to M IH-j* 0*“ SSiS 

SLTJSWSKS ortoca^havetoain;™ 


workshop on <\IDS 


a me Soviet bloc. Old not repon uct. tz-o in Bangui, uw w»>mi »> u.«. - . h contaminated 

any cases. the Centra I .African Republic wdl “"SS ’ f or blood products, or in het- 

The organization's conference have as its first pnontyestabhshmg ceMtoSOgKn^^ ^ erosaula i partners of people in the 
mil sjvk m irlrntrfv anii-viral vac- a system for survetllnncc of AIDS Tneuisease . , - , 


April in the United States that was 
sponsored by the U.S. Department 
of Health and Human Services and 
the Centers for Disease Control in 
Atlanta. 

“AIDS is not only an .American 
problem.” Mr. Assaad said. "When 
we began to realize that it was 


^ is virtually unknown. ta found in the most important gathering of 

SSmSlt M semen, saliva and tears. In specialists on AIDS since one m 


have the means available, all the 
tools for handling il" 


immunTde/iriVnrv ZZvmT will seek iSidentify anti-viral vac- a system for surveillance of AIDS The ^S^risk^uDS. spreading in other countries, we 

. encysyndr . tines that might be adapted for use in an area where the extent of the that attacks defenses The Geneva meeting this week is decided we must make sure we 

Officials at the organizations against AIDS? to improve the ex- disease is virtually unknown, ftSJta the most important gathering of have the means available. aJl the 

headquarters m Gtmeva said Fn- change of information about AIDS AIDS was finl identified id the The vm* hasjmjan* n onAlDS since one in tools for handling il 

day that the number of cases oT the and % coordinate a worldwide United States in 1981. according to blood, semen, saliva ana tears, in spa. 

fatal disease reported worldwide slralegy for containing it, WHO - 
had surpassed 15,000 by mid-Sep- officials said, 
t ember, showing an increase in the - We f 0resee using WHO as the 

1 I..*.. J o.- . . .. t “1 m 4 P.aitofe . . . 


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S Europe). ^ ^ 

* I enclose total payment of US S 

| with check payable to J. Prokopp. 

:***#□ Please send lunher informanon. 

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^OMORROW e MAIL TODAY • WIN TOMORROW e MAILTODP^ 


United States alone to 13,074. from 0 raanization that would be a coor- 
12.612 cases reported Aug. 30. dinator for the exchange of infor- 
Figures issued by the World mation." said Dr. Faxhry A. As- 
Health Organization, which is an saad. chief of the organization's 
agency of the United Nations, in- division of communicable diseases, 
eluded 1.284 cases in Europe. 103 who is organizing the meeting He 
in Australia, 15 in Asia ana 723 in said the organization would proba- 
Latin America. No cases were re- biy also coordinate research and 
ported from Africa, where health provide “support to countries in 
experts believe the disease original- the developing world." 







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□ Oren □Mas«ard 


Deselection for their 

iiew fleet of Boeing 737-300 jetliners as a vote 
of confidence — in a company that delivers on its 
promises, and an engine that beats them. 

Thank you, Lufthansa. 


Bp. dale 



Address 


24-9-85 


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ARTS / LEISURE 


Monotonous 'Song & Dance’ 


By Frank Rich 

Hew York Times Soviet 


of all" or “Show me a dream and Pll show you a 

N ,rr " "«* i rma ovrnct nightmare!" — Malt by has injected his customary 

PW YORK — In Andrew Lloyd Webbers “Song professionalism into the inept London text But he 
, * Dance,” Bernadette Peters and the choreogra- must share the blame for perpetuating, if not accentu- 
pner Peter Martins all but break their necks trying to a ting, the patronizing characterization of the heroine, 
entertain us. In the first act, Peters belts and sobs and. Ana why didn’t he give Peters any material to capital* 
shimmies her way through a solo song cyde that nine ize on her sense of humor? The one comic song, a 
for an hour. After intermission, Martins tab* over, London holdover titled “Capped Teeth and Caesar 
sending nine admirable dancers, led by Christopher Salad,” recycles Beverly Hills jokes that had seen 
d Anaboise, into a 40- minute exhibition of pyrotech- better days when Joan Rivers was still in college, 
mcs. So why is “Song & Dance" grating (Act I) and It’s a tribute to the star, who's incapable of 
monotonous (Act II)? No one has given Peters anv- dishonest moment, that Act I of “Song & Dance 


monotonous (Act II)? No one has given Peters any- dishonest moment, that Act I of “Song"& Dance' 
thing to sing about or Martins's dancers any reason to doesn’t earn unintentional laughs. While much of 
tap. Empty material remains empty, no matter how Lloyd Webber's impersonal and bombastically or- 
iented those who perform it. chestrated music sounds like the stuff that's piped into 

Peters is more than talented: As an actress, singer. a 747 just before takeoff, Peters does get to sing a few 


— — -m univiN, 

comedienne and all-round wanning presence, she has 
no peer in the musical theater right now. In her half of 
“Song & Dance," die works so hard you’d think- she 
were pleading for mercy before a firing squad. Yet for 
ah her vocal virtuosity, tempestuous fits and husky- 
toned charm, we never care if her character lives or 
dies, as long as she’s brief about it. That character, an 
English ha [maker named Emma who settles in New 
York, is a completely synthetic, not to mention insult- 
ing, creation whom no performer could redeem. 

Describing herself as “a girl who lets men lake 
advantage,” Emma devotes most of her 20-odd songs 
to sulking about her misadventures with various un- 
seen men who take her to bed and then kick her into 
the street. The authors treat her almost as shabbily. 
They don’t bother to examine Emma , they merely 
exploit her. For all the time we spend with this woman, 
we learn little about her beyond her sexual activities. 
She is an empty-headed tramp with a heart of gold. 

The men who created Emma are Don Black, who 
wrote the lyrics used in [he even drearier 1982 London 
version of "Song & Dance," and Richard Maltby Jr., 
the gifted lyricist and director (“Baby”) who receives 
credit for providing the Broadway edition with "addi- 
tional lyrics” and its “American adaptation." A few 
howlers aside — "Loneliness must be the worst feeling 


sprightly tunes. As is the composer's wont, the better 
songs are reprised so often that one can never be quite 
sure whether they are here to stay or are simply 
refusing to leave. 

In Act II, Lloyd Webber provides no original music 
— this show is as miserly as his "Cats” is profligate — 
but offers variations on Paganini’s A-minor "Ca- 
price." Rachmaninoff need not worry. Lloyd Web- 
ber's main contributions to Pa ganini , conducted by 
John Mauceri. are electronic gimcracks and a rock 
beat. Certainly his variations have failed to inspire 
Martins, whose labored vision of nocturnal Manhat- 
tan fieetingly recalls "Fancy Free" and "Slaughter on 
Tenth Avenue” but is unlikely to join them in reper- 
tory at the New York City Ballet. 

Most of the choreography is a cynical, acrobatic 
approximation of vintage Broadway dancing, without 
the repose, pacing and conviction that make the proto- 
types electric. To forge a shotgun marriage between 
the song and dance halves of the evening, d' Amboise is 
costumed as one of Emma's Act I lovers — a cad 
named Joe whose only known characteristics are his 
place of birth (Nebraska) and favorite color (red). A 
fine young dancer who as yet lacks the stage presence 
to drive a Broadway show, d ’Amboise raises his fist 
joyously when it's rime to applaud. 



Fashion Students Meet the Pros. 
Courtesy of Swiss Textile Industry 



> )Jl 


International Herald Tribune 


gARMT G ALLEN, Switzerland 


■ The "Rencontre Suisse du 
Jeune Talent” is an interesting at- 
tempt by about 30 Swiss textile 
companies to bring together fash- 
ion students and manufacturers. 
The ambitious. S200.000 promo- 
tion took place earlier this month at 


Hebe Dorsey 


Ensemble in “Song & Dance.” 


Km Duncan 


Hmong Musician Keeps 
Tradition Alive in U. S. 



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By Richard Green 

77ir Associated Pros 

P )ORTLAND. Oregon — Bua 
Sua Mua is carrying on a musi- 
cal and spiritual tradition bom 
thousands of years ago in south- 
west C hina. 

Mua. a Hmong tribesman who 
aided the United States during the 
Vietnam War by leading Laotian 
villagers on military campaigns, is 
now waging a different kind of bat- 
tle. trying to keep alive (he heritage 
of his people. 

The 70-year-old musician trav- 
eled to Washington this month to 
pick up a check for 55,000 from the 
National Endowment for the Arts 
and perform at Ford's Theater. He 


Laos, fled with family members to 
Thailand and then to the United 
Slates in 1978. 

“If we had stayed in Laos, ray 
family and I would have been 
killed." Mua said through an inter- 
preter. He said many people who 
had promoted the U. S. cause in 
Vietnam were killed after the fall of 
Saigon. 

As a shaman in Laos, Mua was 
concerned primarily with the spiri- 
tual health of his village. He said 
his father, grandfather and great- 
grandfather were also shamans, 
healing the sick by promoting 
"good spirits" and* dispatching 
"bad spirits" with music. 

Music also was used to pa«^ 


was one of a dozen people to re- along histories in. the Hmong cul- 
cd ve the United Scales’s highest mre - which only recently acquired 
award for folk artists. a written language. Hmong tribes- 

Mua. a shaman, or spiritual lead- raen were identified as being in 
er. of his tribe in the mountains of southwest China at least as ear! v as 

2255 B.C. and migrated to Laos 


Danish Famine Benefit 
Said to Raise S 700,000 


The Assn-iuied Press 


COPENHAGEN — Organizers 
of a nine-hour outdoor "Rock for 
Africa" benefit say ticket sales, do- 
nations in a simultaneous fund- 
raising campaign and other reve- 
nue amounted to more than 7 
million kroner (S700.000) in famine 
aid. 

Despite cold winds and drizzling 
rain at the end Saturday night, the 
televised gala, with top names in 
Danish rock performing in a soccej- 
stadium, was attended by almost 
30,000 people, including’ 1 7-\ ear- 
old Crown Prince Frederik. ’ . 


and Vietnam in the 1800s. 

The main musical instr umen t 
played by Mua is called a 
Made of bamboo, the instrument is 
a. woodwind that produces a high- 
pitched sound. Mua teaches 


this small textile center, which 
since the 12th cenuuy has special- 
ized in cotton and embroidery. 

Low cm quantity but high on 
quality. Swiss textile companies 
had 450 outfits in the Paris couture 
collections in July, of which 250 
came from the bouse of Abraham 
AG in Zurich. The Rencontre was 
presided over by Hans Georg 
Rhouheimer. a partner in Abra- 
ham. This was the second such 
gathering since 1982; another is 
planned for 1987. 

The international forum gath- 
ered about 50 students from 16 
fashion schools. Representatives of 
manufacturers; major retail stores 
and designers from several coun- 
tries — especially West Germany. 
Switzerland and France — alw at- 
tended. Among the retailers repre- 
sented were Marks & Spencer of 
London. Italians attending includ- 
ed representatives of the dothlng 
manufacturer Genny, the shoe and 
ready-to-wear maker Ferragamo, 
and Gruppo FInamdario Tessiie, 
the manufacturer that hantiks Va- 
lentino and Ungaro ready-to-wear. 
Foreign designers attending in- 
cluded Janice Warn wright of Lon- 
don and Poppy Maremaf Fans. 

Moreni did the commentary on 
the show of students’ designs (using 
Swiss fabrics) that opened the two- 
day event. Most fashion schools 
presented three students, ■ each 
bringing one deagn. The outfits 
ran the gamut from lingerie to 
menswear. 

Many of these students have won 
prizes in local fashion competi- 
tions. Their clearest overall influ- 
Jean-Paul 



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Design by Estevan Ramos of Los Angeles fashion institute. 


me. Jetty Van Wezel, from the Arn- 
hem (Netherlands) Akademie voor 
Beeldende Kunsten, talked to the 
'Munich-based sportswear manu- 
facturer Willy Bogner. Bogner, who 
also came in 1982, said he fell that, 
of all the students, van Woel had 
the most Innovative approach to 
sportswear. Nicola Gnflo of the 
Domus Academy in Milan was ap- 
proached by another German com- 


..... ernes were Jean-Paul Gaultier’s nmacneri hv»rm*h«-r 

Hmong refugees to play the instru- ■ layerings, Azzedine Alala’s nanv Etienne Aimer 
men t and has given performances .“gme-oonscious silhouette (these v „ 

■ ■ ■ ■ estevan Ramos of Los Angeleses 


aspect of the weekend was seeing 
all these young, hopeful designers 
together, ’ an impressive sign of 
fashion's strong magnetism and vi- 
tality all over the world. With fash- 
ioa -houses increasingly becoming 
business multinationals, it was" re- 
freshing toberemi tided that the 
most important ingredient of suc : a. 
in this profession is still takaiL--* 


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cess 


at schools and community events. 
Such performances, together with 
some Social Security benefits and 
income from his wife’s work as a 
seamstress, support the couple and 
their extended family, all of whom 
live in one small apartment. 

Jan DeWeese, a Portland music 
teacher, discovered Mua while put- 
ting together a community folk mu- 
sic festival. DeWeese has written 
several grant applications for Mua, 
including the one to the National 
Endowment, which sent represen- 
tatives to hear his music. 

“It makes me happy to play the 
music, but it also makes me lonely 

for the eood friends and relatives 


were the most enthusiastically it c l- ... — — ~~ - — - 

reived by the audience), Claude S“ Institute of Design and 
w ■ • •- - — Merchandising is a brflliantartist 

who could make a career in fashion. 


Montana's shoulders and Gianni 
Versace's sportswear. Japanese stu- 

dents from the Bunka College of “E?” rf nollun 8 «*«. Infhi- 
Fashion in Tokyo were obviously “jV Versac ^ whom be saidhe 
influenced by Issey Miyake an<£ ap™ 1 ™ “ore than any other de- 
lit- signer, Ramos had fun with wittv 


like him. came up with unusual 
fabric combinations. 

The most interesting part of the 
meeting was discovering that there 
are so many fashion schools In the 
world, some in remote corners. 

Some of the best offerings origi- 
nated in the Netherlands and Los 
Angeles. Students from the Royal 
College of Art in London had the 
most professional hand. Those 


signer, Ramos had fun with witty, 
comic-strip-like designs that, 
caught the attention of companies 
from Switzerland, Mexico .and 
Spain. Ahotber Los Angdesstu- 
dent. Heather Lawrence; who wait 
around with hot-pink hair aid pink 
suede chaps over lacey pantaloons,. . 
had mischievous, gutsy desi gns 
The second day of the Rencontre 
was devoted to speeches from fash- 
ion professionals. The designer 


. v.- 

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.;V,- V*' , 7U • 
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w. 


Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung 
ranks number 1 amongst 
senior businessmen in the Federal 
Republic of Germany 



Franklurler 
AUgemeine Zeitung 


ing for them. 

By leaching the young to play 
die instrument, Mua said, he is Dy- 
ing to pass along Hmong traditions 
that otherwise would die. He par- 
ticularly wants the music to contin- 
ue in marriage and death ceremo- 
nies, he said. 

Though Mua said be realized 
that some diseases could be best 
treated by doctors* he believes his 
music can rid people of other ill- 
nesses. 

“In the future I hope to again use 
music to attract good spirits and 

make the sick healthy again," he Milan’s Galleria Gets 
said. 

Its First Renovation 


from the Fashion Institute of Tech- faTV . . . _ * 

nolpgy in New York had a fresh if S™ emotion in creation, 
not very adventurous approach. raised the itchy problem of 


not very adventurous approach. thj . lo „. - . , — e r 

Tbe free-wheeling Studio Bereot in “f world «»ogmU<>n for 

Paris produced the most theatrical 


_ West German designers. . . 

designs; its students were distinctly BcTgd preadentofYves^ 

under the influence of Thieny L ™ nt » ®ned.witb Jean 

Mualer 3 Cocteau s line: "Fashion is born 


Ttie meeting achieved at least 
one of its purposes: Many of the 
students were approached by pro- 
fessionals. Lejaby. a large French 
lingerie firm, talked to students 


and dies every season." He intro- 
duced Dominique Waqupt, who 
will direct the Institut Fran^ais de 
la Mode, a Paris fashion school 
scheduled to open in January. 

Gustav Zumstcg, president of 


from Leicester (England) Polytech- GiKtay . -- --- — 

^ ' 3 Abraham, an outs tanding designer 

of couture textiles for 50 years and 


58% 


Der Spiegel 


Capital 


Handelsblatl 


48% 


53% 




Wiitschafts- 

Hoche 


55% 


43% 


DIE ZEIT 


25 %i 


Manager 

Magazin 


47% 


ESCADA’ 


in Paris 


at European 
export prices 

[Marie-Maitine 

8, Rue de S&vres, Paris 6th. 
TeL: (1)222 18 44. 
Cnedit cards 


Reiners 

MILAN — One of Milan’s most 
distinctive landmarks, the Galleria, 
a glass-covered arcade housing ca- 
ffis. restaurants and shops, is un- 
dergoing the first major facelift of 
its 118-year histoiy. 

The arcade’s mosaic walkway 
links Milan's cathedral and La 
Scala opera house. Restoration 
work started several months ago, 
including the cleaning of the ar- 
cade's centerpiece, a gla.« dome 
sheltering a large hexagonal space. 
The project is expected to cost at 
least 1 billion lire (5530,000). 


one who has collaborated with 
Saint Laurent for 25 years, spoke 
on “Creativity: The challenge fac- 
ing the Swiss textile entrepreneur.” 
He credited his association with 
artists such as Braque, Picasso and 
Miro for developing his creativity. 
Although he has a reputation for 
innovative changes in use of fab- 
rics, he said; “We’re only the sup- 
pliers of materials. I feel like the 
Paul Klee Tightrope Dancer 1 — 
which 1 own." 

There were no awards at .the 
Rencontre, no official recognition. 
The students were dearly intro- 
duced in print and in person, and, 
in the end, what mattered was not 
whether or not there was a genius 
among them; the most appealing 


§ 




Source. The European Businessman Readership Survey 1984 Mflcrage Issue Readership ) 


franffurterJUIgemeine 


ZEiTUNG FUR DEUTSCHLAND 


Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. P.O. Bo\ 100808. D-6000 Frankfurt am Main l. Telephone 7 59 10 


The Director & English speaking staff of 

Mappin & Webb 


INTERNATIONAL 


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licralo**^ (tribune. 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


II.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 12 


24, 1985 


Page 11 


FUTURES and QWftw< 




The Tide of Hedging Trade 

By HJ. MAIDENBERG 

Sew York Times Scntte 

™ ^ dopds Of uncertainty thicken 

ketsL Londrwf'if 6 WOr d s hoandal and currency mar- 
°P dons markets, which are 

ssssss^Tasri 1 z**!?™** mHSs 

ereHanover Trust Co of New York. “One reason is that the huge 
Chicago financial-fiuures markets have had a big head start ovS 
our Lem don International Financial Futures Exchange.” 

n °" 01 Amerlran “ d “ h ' r 


The London futures 
exchange has been 
doing more than 
just waiting. 


fina n cia l community, he said. 

' “Attest count,” Mr. Bass not- 
ed in a recent interview in 
London, “we had over 400 
British and foreign banks 
dealing in all kinds of frnan- 
rial instruments and curren- 
des among themselves. This in 
and of Itself constitutes a mar- 
keL” . 

London International Financial Futures Exchange. 
■-T which will mark its third anniversary Monday , has been doing 
more than just wait for business, it has been expanding its line of 
futures and options and now has the broadest range of interest 
rate contracts of any exchange. 

“While LIFFE is always being compared with the Chicago and 
other financial-futures markets, the comparison is not valid on 
several accounts," said R_ Brian Williamson, the exchange’s 
chairman. "For one, we do not have anywhere near the number of 
‘locals’ on our floor as the American exchanges have. Jn fad, we 
only have 45 such independent floor traders out of a total 
membership of 373 in our futures market and 177 in our options 
rings." ' 

By comparison, the Chicago Board of Trade and Chicago 
Mercantile Exchange each have hundreds of locals, who are 
constantly trading in their financial-futures and options markets 
on their own behalf, as well as for outride customers. This activity 
not only puts the locals in the key role of market makers but also 
creates the vital liquidity on which all markets thrive. 

A related di fferenc e, said Mr. Williamson, is that most of the 
members of LIFFE’s markets are “corporate locals" who are 
executing orders for their employers. 

“While this may not enhance volume figures, it represents a far 
^ more accurate measure of actual dealings." he said. 

M ICHAEL N.H. Jenkins, chief executive of LIFFE, said 
in the same interview thaL banks made up more than half 
the membership of his exchange, which is a higher 
percentage than on any foreign market. 

Given the fact that most British and other banks have tradi- 
tionally preferred over-the-counter dealings in cur rencie s and 
debt instruments, their growing involvement with LIFFE is one 
of the exchange's biggest accomplishments thus far. 

As a result, Mr. Jenkins said, about half of LIFFE’s volume 
consists of “outride paper," or actual orders from commercial 
hedgers and traders. In Chicago, he said, about a third of the 
volu me eac h day comes from outside customers. 

“LIFFE is not without its problems," he said. “Trading in our 
Financial Tunes 100-share index has been disappointing, largely 
because our stock market has been doll' And Few equities-fund 
managers indicate any interest In this hedging instrument." 

The gftirte hesitancy has been noted among U^S. mutual-fund 
and other investment managers. One explanation is that most 

(Contimed on Page 17, CoL 4) 



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Austral 5 1428 * 

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EaYM. pound 1 J 3 


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Indian rupee 112249 

Inda. rupiah 1.12200 
irisn c 0*149 
Israeli shek. 148000 
KmsaHi dbiar OJM* 


Currency pe 
Malay, rlno. 
MM. peso 

None, krone 

PMt peso 
Port, escudo 
SowH rival 
Stoo-S 
5. Ate. rand 


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14615 
38000 
8048 
1843 
17300 
16515 
2.168 
15974 


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soon, peseta 
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1 WM M 
Turkish Hra 
UAEdirMnn 
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Rnandalnjar^^^ 105 ^ 


Guna Sees 
Big Deficit 
In Trade 

$18.3-BiUion 
Gap Is Expected 

Untied Prrx.\ InirmaiinnuJ 

BEIJING — China's merchan- 
dise trade deficit, fueled by an ear- 
lier import spending spree, is ex- 
pected to leap to $18.3 billion by 
the end oT 1 985, the State Statistical 
Bureau said Monday. 

The official Xinhua News Agen- 
cy said the deficit, which compares 
with .last year's shortfall of $1.1 
billion, would “seriously affect” 
China's foreign-exchange reserves 
of about $10 billion. 

A sweeping decentralisation of 
government and industry late Iasi 
year led u> a surge of imports as 
enterprises took advantage of Chi- 
na’s “opening to the outside world" 
to spend billions of dollars on for- 
eign goods. 

Beijing has since taken stringent 
measures to put a lid on imports. 

Total trade for 1985 — the sum 
of imports and exports — is fore- 
cast at a record of nearly $70 bil- 
lion, up $20 billion from last year. 

State officials said the nation's 
1985 imports are forecast at $43.91 
billion, and expons at $25.88 bil- 
lion, leaving an $18.3-bi!lion trade 
deficit. 

“Five years ago, the country’s 
foreign trade was only $38.14 bil- 
lion. including $20.02 billion of im- 
ports and 518.12 billion of ex- 
ports,” 3 bureau report quoted by 
Xinhua said. 

In volume, China ranked 16th 
among the world's exporters Iasi 
year, but a considerable number of 
its exports are primary products 
carrying low prices. Failing oil 
prices have had a major effect on 
export receipts, since petroleum ac- 
counts for more than 20 percent of 
the country's exports. 

Imports over the past five years, 
on the other hand, have shown a 
dramatic change from grain, cotton 
and other agricultural items to ex- 
pensive manufactured goods, con- 
sumer products and raw materials 
such as steel, copper and alumi- 
num. 

During the past five years, grain 
imports fell 13.1 percent a year as 
China's farmers increased yields in 
response to a number of economic 
incentives offered under the coun- 
try's agricultural reforms. Cotton 
imports dropped at on average an- 
nual rate of 49.4 percent. 

But imports of manufactured 
goods rose by an average of 18.8 
percent annually over the five 
years, the State Statistical Bureau 
said. 

Japan is China's leading trade 
partner, followed by the United 
States. 

Times Mirror Agrees 
To Sell 3 TV Stations 

The Attvciuied Press 

LOS ANGELES — Tunes Mir- 
ror Co., publisher of the Los Ange- 
les Times, said Monday that it had 
agreed to sell three of its seven 
television stations to Smith Acqui- 
sition Corp. for $84 million in cash. 

The three stations are in Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania, and Syracuse 
and Elmira. New Yoik. 


Untted Technologies’ Pratt & Whitney 


1 ,000 Engine Shipments 

Annual unit shipments of 
Pratt & Whitney's JT8D engine. 



Profits 

Contribution of the Power division's 
operating profit to United 
Technologies' total operating profit, 
in percent. 1884 operating profit 
SI .08 billion 



•The Power division primarily consists of 
the jet ermine manufacturer Pratt & 
Whitney, in addition, the division includes 
International Aero Engines. Etbott Co.. 
International Fuel Cells Corp.. and 
international Support Systems. 


Tna Saw iv> 


Crashes Raise Concern Over JT8D, 
Airline Industry’s Workhorse Engine 


By Agis Salpukas 

Mew York Times Sen-ire 

EAST HARTFORD, Connecticut — In the 21 
years since the debut of Pratt & Whitney's JT8D 
jet engine, it has made its mark in avutioa history. 
This engine powers nearly half or all commercial 
planes flying today, and it has compiled a record of 
having riown more hours than all other commer- 
cial jet engines combined. 

It has “paid the rent" for Pratt & Whitney 
Group, a part of United Technologies Corp. The 
JT8D remains the higgesi Prau & Whitney prod- 
uct and still accounts Tor a substantial share of the 
group's revenues and earnings- Engines in the 
JT8D series sell for SI. 6 million to $2.2 million 
each, depending on the power of the model. 

The reach of this product makes recent acci- 
dents involving the engine a matter or great con- 
cern to both the industry and the company. 

On SepL 6, a Midwest Express DC -9 crashed at 
Milwaukee, killing 3 1 persons, when one of its two 
JT8D engines failed and the other had a partial 
power loss. 


A few weeks before that, Aug. 22. a JTSD- 
powered Boeing 737 belonging to British Amours 
had an accident at Manchester. England, and 55 
passengers were killed. 

These were not the first problems tntolrine the 
Prau & Whiuiey engine. Occasional engine fail- 
ures are considered a fact of aviation fife, and 
planes are usually able to land whenever an engine 
quits functioning. 

The JT8D engine, considered one of the most 
reliable, had 121 failures on the more than 7.4 
million flights that it powered in a recent 1 2- month 
period. That means one turnback for about every 
60.000 flights. 

What set the recent accidents apart was the fact 
that they were the first in which the JT8D was 
linked with a loss of life. The engine is now under 
the scrutiny of British and U5. government au- 
thorities. and of experts at Pratt & Whitney itself. 
Perhaps for the first time, company officials are 
not shutting out the possibility of some kind of 

(Continued on Page 17, Col 5) 


Unemployment 
In Europe Seen 
Rising to Record 


Compiled by Our Siafl from Dispatches 

PARIS — Unemployment in Eu- 
rope is likely to continue rising 
slowly and could reach a postwar 
record of more than 1 1 percent in 
the second half of 1986. the Organi- 
zation of Economic Cooperation 
and Development said in a report 
released Tuesday. 

The 24-oation organization said 
in its annual Employment Outlook 
that employment growth in the 
United States and Canada was like- 
ly to slow as the economic recovery 
rases: that it could grow by 1 per- 
cent to 1.5 percent in Japan and 
that there may be above average 
employment gains in Britain. West 
Germany, the Netherlands, Den- 
mark. Norway and Finland. 

However, it said that the project- 
ed employment growth “is unlikely 
to match the continued growth in 
the labor force so that OECD un- 
employment may resume its up- 
ward drift, reaching 31.5 million in 
the second half of 1986, an unem- 
ployment rate of 8.5 percent.” 

But unemployment in Europe 
seemed set to rise to a new postwar 
high, topping 1 1 percent, or nearly 
20 million people, in the second 
half or 1986. it said. 

Worse, it added, unemployment 
was increasingly concentrated 
among the weakest members or so- 
ciety. such as school-leavers and 
long-time unemployed. 

“In many European countries 
and Australia, young people and 
adults out of work for over a year 
comprise between 60 and 80 per- 
cent of all unemployment," the 
OECD said. 

“A significant reduction in un- 
employment requires greater effort 
directed at finding the right mix of 
economic, labor market, social and 


educational policies. Piecemeal ef- 
forts will be inadequate." the re- 
port said. 

New jobs created by economic 
growth were still not emerging fast 
enough in most industrial countries 
to match the number of children 
leaving school, it added. 

The report by the Paris-based 
organization said there was little 
prospect Tor improvement for the 
two groups most affected by unem- 
ployment — youth and long-term 
jobless persons. 

“While the youth unemployment 
rale in North America in 19Sb may 
be slightly lower than in 1984 and 
remain stable in Japan." the report 
said, “it may continue to rise in the 
four major European countries — 
Britain. France, West Germany 
and Italy — to nearly 23 percent." 

The report said a particularly 
disturbing feature was the sharp 
increase in the number of persons 
who have been unemployed in 
many European countries for two 
or more years. 

It appears that “many of the peo- 
ple who entered unemployment 
during the last recession have re- 
mained trapped in unemployment 
since." the report said. 

Discussing the report at a news 
conference at OECD headquarters. 
Ronald Gass, director for Social 
Affairs. Manpower and Education, 
said the figures in the report were 
“disturbing and unsatisfactory.” 

He said Europe's jobless prob- 
lem stems from weakness in de-‘ 
mand relative to the United States, 
rising labor costs, a squeeze on 
profitability and rigidities in the 
labor, capital and product markets 
of many countries. (AP. Reuters). 


U.S. Moving to Unburden Thrift Insurance Unit 


By Nathaniel C Nash 

New York Tunes Sen he 
■ WASHINGTON— To the relief 
of many leaders of the U.S. savings 
and loan industry, the Federal 
Home Loan Bank Board is expect- 
ed to decide within the next 10 days 
to form a new institution that 
would relieve its beleaguered de- 
posit insurance unit of about $3 
billion in troubled assets. 

Not only would this new unit 
free the cash-strapped Federal Sav- 
ings & Loan Insurance Corp. from 
the burden of selling illiquid prop- 
erties, such as half-finished office 
buildings and undeveloped land, 
but it also would give the FSLIC 
more than $2 billion in highly liq- 
uid securities that it con cash in 
whenever it needs fresh infusions to 
prop up or take over tottering thrift 
institutions. 

“We are taking this recommen- 
dation under serious advisement," 
said Donald L Hovde, a board 
member. He added that the board 
was meeting this week with the 12 
regional Home Loan Bank presi- 
dents to discuss the issue and that 
he hoped the bank board's staff 
would give the three- member 
board a detailed recommendation 


to vote on bv its next meeting on 
Oct. L 

Industry sources said that the 
new corporation, which will essen- 
tially liquidate the FSLICs non- 
cash assets over time, would be 
financed with a 5400-million capi- 
tal infusion from the 12 regional 
Federal Home Loan Banks and an- 
other 5400 million from the FSLIC 
itself. 

They said this intensive care unit 
for bad thrift unit assets should 
give some breathing room to indus- 
try officials and regulators who 
have cast about for months for a 
way to stave off a funding crisis ar 
the FSLIC and a possible forced 
merger with the larger and stronger 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 

Losses in the thrift industry have 
been so great and the number of 
insolvent institutions has risen so 
high that the bank board has been 
unable to close down and liquidate 
the number it should. Moreover, 
the assets of FSLIC have dwindled 
so that the collapse of a major thrift 
unit could potentially wipe out its 
estimated $5.5 billion in usable re- 
serves. 

As a result, the bank board has 
had to keep dozens of thrift institu- 
tions afloat with more than S100 


billion in total assets. Moreover, 
the few small thrift units that the 
bank board has closed this year 
have absorbed much of its avail- 
able cash, according to industry 
sources. Thus, a plan to reliquefy 
the deposit insurance corporation 
has been the No. 1 priority for the 
bank board this year. 

In that the new liquidation unit 
could be 50-percent-owned and 
100- percent operated by the 12 re- 
gional Federal Home Loan Banks, 
it would come under the umbrella 
of the strongest element in the 
thrift industry. The home loan 
banks, with 590 billion in assets, 
have capital levels of almost 10 
percent — twice the required mini- 
mum in the thrift industry — plus 
more than $2 billion in retained 
earnings. And the new liquidating 
corporation would be able to bor- 
row from the Home Loan Banks on 
top of its $800 million of equity. 

But some industry officials fear 
the possible side effects of such a 
plan. They say the S3 billion in 
problem assets could drain finan- 
cial strength from the regional 
home loan banks. 

They also fear that the actual 
liquidation value of the assets 


of the creation of such a unit, bor- 
rowing costs by the Home Loan 
Banks in the credit markets have 
already risen. 

Moreover, they say that the li- 
quidating corporation could at best 
only give extra time to the thrift 
industry and that the costs of such 
a unit would be no less than other 
rescues. 

“This is no panacea," said a top 
aide at the Senate Banking Com- 
mittee. “It is an important dement, 
an increment to a total solution.” 

'•There is still no such thing as a 
free lunch," added Anthony M. 
Frank, diaiiman of First Nation- 
wide Savings Corp. in San Francis- 
co, even though he said he enthusi- 
astically supported the idea. “It’s 
going to have some effects on the 
industry." Mr. Frank noted that 
the dividends the regional banks 
pay member thrift institutions 
would likely be reduced and that 
borrowing from the banks might be 
tightened somewhat. 

“In effect, it could be like anoth- 
er special assessment" Mr. Frank 
added, referring to extra insurance 
premium costs the bank board has 
assessed thrift units this year. 

And some analysis noted that 
some of the regional bank presi- 


Taiwan Scandal Alarms Foreign Banks 


could be much less than S3 billion. 

And they add that in anticipation (Continued on Page 14, CoL 6) 


Japan Assails 
ILS. Attitude on 
Trade Situation 

United Press Intcmaliuiuit 

NEW YORK — Foreign 
Minister Shimaro Abe of Japan 
on Monday criticized the focus 
on what he called “negative as- 
pects" in the UJS.-Japan trade 
imbalance, which is expected to 
reach $50 billion this year in 
favor of Japan. 

“I am very much concerned 
that the discussion of unde is- 
sues at present tends to be too 
much focused on the negative 
aspects of the problem,” Mr. 
Abe told the Japan Society. 

He said neither Japan nor the 
United States will benefit from 
a negative altitude especially 
when Americans criticize Japan 
for being “unfair’' and Japanese 
say “The Uni Led Stales is mak- 
ing unilateral demands," 

Mr. Abe did not say what the 
negative aspects in the trade 
dispute are but he urged Japa- 
nese to realize that the United 
States “needs Japan’s coopera- 
tion in sharing responsibilities 
to main lain free trade.” 


rjTJ au Banelia t Brussels >■ Banco COnrniorclotr Uadona (MKan)/ GtemteW 
tdnar. rtroL dkhomi. Other data tram Reuters ondAP. 


A«jan Dollar Deposits 

SepL 23 

1 (THwtti ah. 

2 monte* »-»*'- 

3 month* B **-»■>• 

tmonttt* 8 *••**' 

1 year 

Source; Reuicrs. 

UJS. Money Market fftawta 

5*jpc- 

Merrill Lv»«* ***** , , 4 

& 4a* outrun yield ■ 

Tel*-rat* ln«rr*l *** '****■ 7 -™ 

Source: Merrill i-*™*- Tefemte. 


Reuters 

TAJPEJ — Foreign banks have 
become more cautious about lend- 
ing to companies in Taiwan, fol- 
lowing a series of business failures 
climaxing in a mayor scandal that 
ted to the resignations of two cabi- 
net ministers. 

Because of the failures, foreign 
financial institutions have had 
problem loans here amounting to 
about $600 million over (he past 
two years, according to Eugene Slo- 
boda, senior credit officer of Bank 
of America. 

The trouble stemmed mainly 
from corporate failures because of 
economic recession, but were ag- 
gravated by the recent hank scan- 
dal involving the Cathay industrial 
group, he stud. 

“The chances of recovering the 
loans are slim,” Mr. Sloboda said 
in an interview. “Many banks al- 
ready regard these as operational 
losses.” 

Cathay’s failure was triggered by 
runs on two of its banks in Febru- 
ary, when the equivalent of $650 
million was withdrawn in three 
weeks. 

Eighty-seven people, many of 
them senior Cathay executives, are 
facing fraud, forgery and embezzle- 
ment charges in the affair, which 
forced the resignation of the eco- 
nomics minister, Hsu Li-teh, and 
the finance minister, Lob Jen-kong, 

Steven Champion, general man- 
ager or Continental Bank, said for- 
eign banks had been forced to 
tighten their credit lines jn recent 
months for fear of further losses. 

In turn, the squeeze in lending 
has resulted in more failures in Tai- 
wan. More than 300 companies 
have failed since January. 

Kuo Rung-mo, dean of Chung 
Using University’s business de- 
partnwfll. said most of the compa- 
nies had borrowed in order to re- 
pay debts but were eventually 
dragged down by the interest 
charges. , . - , 

A number of foreign bankers 



Eugene Sloboda 

also blamed the failures on unreli- 
able accounting practices and lax 
company rules. 

Mr. Sloboda said accountants 
had helped clients disguise their 


true financial situation, causing 
trouble Tor foreign banks. 

“We have to rely on our experi- 
ence to do business with local com- 
panies because we cannot count on 
finan cial reports from local ac- 
countants," he said. 

A European banker who de- 
clined to be named said foreign 
banks would now deal only with 
state-owned companies like Tai- 
wan Power Co. and Chinese Petro- 
leum Corp.. and with established 
private companies that had been 
thoroughly checked. 

He said this would reduce ibeir 
lending by at least 20 percent to 30 
percent this year. 

Government planners said the 
scandal and its repercussions 
would seriously affect Taiwan's 
economy, and they estimated that 
this year's growth would reach 6 
percent, 2.5 percentage points less 
than anticipated. 


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Page 12 


UNTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1985 


5 * 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Hi« Law Last dm. 


21 % 21 % 
3 *W. 35 % 

l»* 127 % 
82% Blft 
O 42% 
43% 43 
47V. 46* 
50% 48% 
32 38 % 

to » 

52% 58% 
.22% 91% 
112 110 % 
20 29% 


21 % 

36 +1 

+% 

128% +1% 
81% — % 
42% + * 
43% 4 % 
47% +2 
42% - % 
38% + % 
28% + % 
59% 4 % 
92 + % 

111 % + 2 % 
22 % +% 


Indus 13119* 132152 130531 131631 4 1SJ7 

Trans 652.15 66444 64064 fSlfll + 0 .67 

Ulll 153.78 15470 15265 1382 + 0-72 

Camp 53766 54X40 53455 53261 4 468 


Previam Today 
High low Close 3P64 
' Composite 10430 105J9 10439 10456 

Irxtastrklb 121.27 12005 I2D0S 12206 

ESSE. 10460 1 £51 IK61 ttttt 

Uf llillOS 55J9 5M? 55*49 5&B0 

flMTCT WJ5S 10W 109J04 11040 


Mond^ 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


Tmex Most Active^ 


High Lew 




date Pray. 


advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


292 252 

262 278 

226 334 

780 744 

7 5 

11 M 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 

B onks 

Transit. 


weee Tear „ 
Close Noon *ga 
28435 28566 2gJ» 

sa -“sa 

334J7 - 33141 

26938 — 

TOAJ7 — 298w 

25SJ9 - »065 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


BAT in 

WcnsB 

EctioBs 

WDIfllH 

KavPh 

SIICdB 

Astrotc 

Mayflw 

Wick® 

auMAs 

DomeP 

HrrwGn 

AAA Inti 

Data Pd 

HOSbrs 


ft 

16% 15% 

13% 13% 
Bft 

10 9% 

14% 14% 
1% 1% 
22 20% 
4% 4% 

20% 20% 
2 % 2 
m i«* 
2 % 

12% 12% 
30% 


Lost aw. 

3fc 15 

I + ft f 

PMi — W— 

14% + »■ ' 

20% -1;? 

4Vi - ,1 

20 % -£ 

3ft 4 » 

16% ^ 

3% - 

12 % 

30% +H* 


f P<* 


.■'it 1 


Clow Prar. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages I 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Prey. Today 
Close Noon 
7962 7967 
7657 7668 
8267 8266 


Advanced 
Declined 
unchanaed 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


1072 733 

494 796 

443 470 

200« 1999 

IB 26 

29 22 


’included In the sales ffeurat 


Boy Bain *SftYt 

152.107 372626 30704 

133631 341,253 1X235 
149418 379606 5624 

1394115 371.946 U30 

13X395 323646 1,042 


VaLaUPJA 89J7MS0 

Prtv .3 PALvoL ttHMOO 

Prat consotidoted dose 117664530 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


AMEX Sales 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
upfofhe dasins on Wall street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 
Via The Associated Press 


Previ o us Today 

High Low Cfose 3 PAL 
Indus! rink 20546 20280 20200 20567 

TWa* 16X20 16X06 1654)6 16768 

Utilities 8163 B&9I 80.91 61 JO 

Finance zun 2X18 aun 21.11 

Composite 18X99 1S24M noiw ]J4jo 


amex Stock Index 


3 PAL volume 
Prev. 3 PAL volume 
Prev.cens. volume 


piwwi iTii 

Hied Law Close IWJ 

23098 21968 228.98 


i2Manm 
High Law stock 


Sts. Close 

100a High Low Buot.Qfe 


N.Y. Stocks Are Sharply High er 


UMon» 

High Low Slock 


Sh. daw 

into Wok Low Qumorao 


12 Hoorn 
Moh Uw stock 


Sh. QoS* 

Dhf.Yld.Pe TOBl HWl Low fluol.< 


12 Month 
waft Low Stock 


«. Qom _ n 

Dhf.Yld.PE lMKHloh Lpw , 


24% 16 AAR 66 26 
17% 9% AGS 
16% 9% AMCA 

21% 13 AMF 751 
50% 26% AMR 
23% 18% AMR of X1B 96 
25% 23 ANR pt 267 116 
M% 7% APL 
61 % 34% ASA 260 62 
27 11% AVX 62 26 18 

28% 19% AZP 2J2 116 7 


M 15 ]f 197 lift S% + % United Press latemuriouji believes ihe resolve of the so-called Group of 

JSI 98 106 iS 5 13 % Ii 2 + “■ NEW YORK — Prices on the New York Five nations cut the value of the dollar and ”*■ ft* 
19 H St 2 % * S Stock Exchange were sharply higher late Mon- oppose protectionism will be extremely posi- to 

“ n% fm h% day in active trading. live" for the U.S. economy. “Cyclical stocks will J* i* 


22% 16% 
5 4 

5% 4 
9% 7% 

% 

32% 22 

20 11 % 


1 23% 23% 23% 

179 9% 9 9% + % 

515 38% 38 38% +1% 

91 12% 12% 12% — % 

741 23% 23% 23% 


live" for the U.S. economy. “Cyclical stocks will 3 2 % m 


24% 12% AcmeC 
lav, 7 % acttvbE 

19 15% Ada Ex 

20 13% AdmMJ 

17% B% AdvSys 
37% 22% AMO 
13% 6% Ad vest 

15% 9% Aerflex 


60 19 93 14 12% 13% I 

32b 42 11 9 7% 7% 7*— % I 

182el0J 140 IB 17% 17% + % 

32 1.9 7 114 17% 16% 16%—% 

631 441 19 S3 13% 13% 1316 + % 

16 3886 38% 27 27 

.12 1J 20 99 «% 9 9 

11 92 13% 12% 12% — % 


me 32% AatiTLf 264 56 16 4138 45% 45% 45% + % I 


Technology, cyclical and multinational issues be the place to be,” Mr. Hinkle said. j?v 5 15 % 

. advanced on news that the United States and Hugh Johnson, head of the investment policy S* 19 % 

'■$ £ If ^ m£-% I four other nations — West Germany, France, committee at First Albany, was more skeptical. ■££ ,f* 

... - - “Wall Street is always anxious for fireworks si* 

Although prices in tables on these pages are from and the meeting of the Finance ministers and m% io% 
the 4 PM close in New York, for time reasons, central bankers provided an excuse for a move is% 
this article is based on the market at 3 P. M. up," Mr. Johnson said. “But in economics there g* ]g£ 
— — are no solutions, only tradeoffs. * 


13% 9% 
19% TSU 
21% 17% 
35 19% 

4% 2% 
22% 13 
50% 31% 
17 9% 


i?% 20% AhfniK tS*'i9 a 753 ioife OT& + % Britain and Japan — had agreed on coordinated "After the initial applause, the market will 43% 32% 

57 3 * .r 168 28 12 4 § sS sSS sM + 1 % efforts lo lower the foreign exchange value of get back 10 business as usual and focus on the ™ ’ 4 * 

Vl'UiSSZ ft % 13 ^ 2 f , + Va thedoUar. underiymg economic andmonetaiy conditions , 

2 9 V. 23 % AiuPpf U 4 d 98 a 27 % 27 % 27 % ^ ^ xhe Dow lones industrial average was up here and abroad, he said. In two or three *- — — — ■ 

^ J SE a » 1 « + ,fc ,7 14 iol 315 0 ? an^hmir before tiie dost days, the markets will come back to where they 3 5 RFo. S 8 h 1 iS 

£% i^iS’ A 1 SSiSJS" W Advances led declines by a 2-1 ratio. Volume were." . J 2 S , 5 * * 29 a * ^ 

3 was 91.4 million shares, down from 101.4 mil- AT&T was the most active NYSErhsted issue ™ 

16 % 11 % Atonco l.M 76 10 29 13 % 13 % 13 %—% t: nn : n .u- neriitd Fridav and Up SUghUV. 16 % 11 % Fairfd .18 16 9 . 07 

£* 1 J 3 S SS?ft ir s j| ** i§ *S 5 %% X % ? n ^were hit& active wding of Ameri- Anwng other actively traded issues, Nynex £% !S£ S 5 3 « f 2 “S 

355 IST dk i * 7 S iS SS SS can Siock Exchange issues. . was off a biL American Express was gaining g* g* Eg* M A9 \ ± 


6 1 % 
9% 2% 
12% 3% 

43% 32% 
17% 14% 
54% 41 


260 36 35 326 


»% 41 T * 

•fi’K ^ <% 4%-% 

-8> 93 loon 5% 5% 5% + % 

61 102 fiOQz. 9 8% 9 + % 

239 % 

32 32 9 139 22% 23% 22% + % 

i -J6 M 13 22S 18% 17% U% + % 

160 78180 mi 21% 21% 21% + % 
160e 5.9 347 20% SJTO 20% - % 

21 28 2% 2% 2% 

71 11% 11 11% 

2500146 94 17% 17% 17%— % 

136 72 11 65 19% T9 19 — V3 

1.1* 16 16 86 31% 31% 31% +1 

613 4% 4 4% + % 

231 118 23 19% 1916 19% + Vi 

132 19 9 100 44% 44% 44% + % 

.16 13 | TO 12% U% 11%- Vi 

30 26 13 58 12 12 12 + % 

M 28 U 138 21% 21 2MS 4- V, 

.«lb 28 16 3 28% 28% 28% + % 

Tt X? 23 171 18% 17% 18% 

M 26 U 2729 ZJ% 22% 23 +% 

255 1% 1% 1% -Mi 

4 88 2% 2% 2% 

a 2 3% 3% 3% 

1J2 42 11 115 41% 40V> 41% 4- % 


39% 31% HWrtPk J2 l IS 7m TOi Wt OTJ +% 
33% 24 Hoxcol 60 22 IS 123 H? S 34 ^ + H 

33% 14% HISheor 60 26 9 71 20% ® 30% 

U% 9% HVWt 37 16 7 108 11% 11% I1W“ * 

2&% 18% HiMbnJ 84 22 14 3 M5 t 

73% 49% Hilton 180 38 12 SB 59% 58% g% + % 

37% 26% Hitachi J3e 1.1 10 1238x29 » » +2 

57% 35% Molldav 1JM 28 12 500 51% SI Sltt + % 

83% 65 HOUyS 180 16 39 19 7T% 70% 71% 

20% 10% H0m*O 

27% 16% HfllFSD _ — 

9% 7 HmoGpfl.10 11J 18 9% ... .... . iT 

2B% 20% HmslIW 30 852 1B79 26 25%2S% + * 
IB 10 HmstFn M X0 4 13 lgi 12% 13%-% 

43*. 46% Hondo 60e 3 9 1359 56% 55% 54% +2 

53% Homrall 2Mi 3J 13 2477 65% 64% 64% + % 

15 20% H rmBn 1.12 X7 10 5 30% 30 30 — % 

<su% 

30% 25 Hotolln 260 89 14 12 29% 2S% 29% + % 

42% 28% HoushM .H 26 13 34 36% 36 36% + % 

19% 13% HOUR* 68 36 12 34 14lt 14% 14% _ _ _ 




ft 34 % + VilW, 

s 13 — %-r.- 


160 38 12 5B 59% 58% W% + % macom 64 1J 18 1073 18% 17% 17% + % 

is “ » ” £s 8» gsiaKLiia, 

«• 5. iS£ 3 a " H 2* as I!’"' 


26 448 12% 11% U% 

5 645 20 1$% 20 + % 

is n m m— % 


34 14% 14% 14% 


38 27% MDU 2J2 78 9 “ £. S M 

tT *Wi »Gr M |5 M 13 ^ 1 ™ if*- % 

s-^-jsgaa 

11% 2% MGMuwt ^ 3 E5 j2 7%+% 

,?s 


39% 2B% Houslnt 161 5.1 9 35% 34% S* + % 


18601 LI 8 14% 14% 18% 

360 6.7 B 7171 50% 50% 50% -I- % 


81% 67 Holntpf 825 XI 

^9% 20 Houlnd 264 98 7 

15% • HUdOR 1.780183 

a HUhJq. 60 25 29 


27% 23% HubfanJ 23B 96 11 


2% 1% A! Moo i .100 50 

29% 23% AtaP Pf X74a 98 
33% 27% AtaP PtA 3.97 128 
B% 4%AloPdDf 87 11.1 
82 44% AhiPpf 9JB 11 3 

IDSL. 96% AloP pi 1180 10 l7 

74 59 AlaPpt X16 120 

75 58% AloP pt 828 11.* 

16% 11% AkmOO 1JM 76 10 

26% 11% AtokAir .16 8 8 

25 12% Albrtos J8 10 17 

33% 26% Albtsns .76 X7 II 

31'4 23% Alcan 1-20 <6 27 

J8% 27% Alcostd 180 36 12 

32 21 AlexAlx 180 35 

2S% 20% Atoxdr 22 

89% 72% AllyCp 1541 28 

24% 74% AtaCA P» 286 108 

28% Site Aroint 160 66 

20% 14% AJglnot 119 112 

90 85 AlolotCllJS ill 

34% 26% AlkjPw 2J0 9J 9 

23% 15% AllenG 600 19 14 


23% 15% AltdPd 
43% 42 Akisonn 
43 62 Aids f>IA 

43 60 AldS pIC 674 118 

111 106% AidS ptamM 118 

101% 101% AJdSprF 


,10o 58 It 2 1% 2 

274o 98 8 27% 27% 27% 

3.93 128 4 30% 30% 30% + % 

87 11.1 33 7% 7% 7% 

980 117 102 77% 77% 77% — % 

180 107 1B0Z103 102% 102% 

116 120 502 48 68 48 —1 

828 11.9 302 69% 69% 69% + % 

1JM 76 10 29 13% 13% 13% — % 

.16 8 B 844 20% 20% 20% + % 

J8 18 17 99 21% 20% 21% + % 

.76 17 II 171 27% 27% 27% + % 

170 sji 27 1542 24% 25% 26 + % 

170 36 12 74 33% 32% 33 + V* 

180 35 802 28% 28 28% + % 

22 22 24 23% 23% 

1541 28 12 77% 77% 7716 + % 

286 108 15 26% 26% 25% „ 

160 46 181 22 21% 21% + % 

119 112 4 18 17% IB 

ITS HI 21 93 92% 93 + % 

270 9J 9 441 29% 29% 29% — % 

60019 14 49 20% 20% 23%—% 

12 37 17% 17% 17% 

7685 44% 43% 44 + % 

13 44 ’A 44 64U +1% 

674 118 130 42% 61% 61% „ 

280 118 11 11D 109 109 —2 


13% 9% Huffy 

15% 12% HWOHTI 


17% HuflhSp .32 18 12 


AT&T was the most active NYSE-listed issue 
and up slightly. 

Among other actively traded issues, Nynex 
was off a biL American Express was gaining l 


Analysts said after the declines of recent and Peabody International Coip. was ahead 


weeks, the market was primed to respond to a 
favorable piece of news. 

f A ,L. mn.1,.1 ,‘c It TaaIc OrMI " 


14% ID Facet 8 33 

31% 9% Fairchd 70 XI 908 
39% 23% Falrcpf 140 128 53 

16% 11% Fairfd .18 15 9 . 137 

27 15% FomDI S 70 .9 M 284 

19% 13% Fanstel 60 47 12 4 

38% 73 FrWstF 7 1 

28% 15% Farafi 88 4.9 9 46 

13 8% FovOTB 81 U W 158i 

6% 4% Fodvra J» J I 89 


IBM was up, as were Cray Research, Bur - 1 »% Fedic^ i 84 «* 10 


“Any time the market is up. It feels greaL" mem was up sharply, 
said Jerome Hinkle of Sanford C. Bernstein. General Motors. Ford and Honda Motor Co. 
“We think it will last." Mr. Hinkle said his firm were all gaining. 


Toughs. Honeywell and Sony. Digital Equip- 39 30 % fomod is 45 10 
mem was up sharply. g* {2% ESipb jo al 9 

General Motors. Ford and Honda Motor Co. j ™ 1 u 

were all aainina. 1 1 W 1 foswii 80 -l* » 


60% 47% AlldStr 2.12 4J0 7 1447 53% S3 


104 101% I0H6 101% + % HtoK LAW STKk 


1003 Hwk LOW Quot. OlVto 


12 Morin 

HWl Law Wort 


45% 48% FedDSf 254 45 8 454 

32 22% Ferro 1J21 44 15 106 

35 25% Ftocst 180 38 12 36 

11% 5% FlnCpA SSS 1570 

5 1 T 4% FinCopI M 128 4 

37% 27% FlnCoof 4750187 59 

6% 2% FnSBor 42 

22% 14% Flrasm 80 47 14 651 

27% 14 FIAUl 68 28 9 115 

<3 25% FffflcSy 160 45 7 983 

34 22 FBkFI s 180 37 13 28 


HXh HWi Law Owr. dig* 


10% 3% AlllsOl 
34% 34 AlisC Pi 
29% a% ALLTL 184 66 
39% 29% Alcoa 170 36 

20 13% Arran .101 


416 3% 3% 3%— % 
60 29% 29 Vj 29% + % 

184 66 9 51 28% 28 28 

170 14 30 1205 34 33% 33% + & 

.101 655 14% 1446 14% + % 


22% AmHes 1.10 4J 21 1350 26% 25% 25%-% 


140% 98% AHospf 350 3.1 
2% 1% AmAgr 

23% It ABakr 


6 114 112 112 —2 
210 1% 1% 1% 

244 22% 22 22% + % 


70 54% A Brand X90 68 8 439 58% 57 57%—% 

30% 25% ABrdpf 275 96 196 28% 28% 28% 

TO* 57% ABrd pf 247 46 4 57% 57% 57% 


116% 54% ABdesi 160 16 17 331 115W 1ISW 115% + % 


170 XI 14 725 57 
1083 2% 

69j 31 4% 

60 38 10 16 13% 

86 16 11 304 34'-, 

680 75 9 6154 90% 

278 68 30% 

72 U 18 £8 23% 

280 78 » 3457 40% 

80 18 30 47 45 

1-00 XI II 8 33 

280 58 9 235 39% 


30% 19% ABfdM 86 36 15 
28% 20% ABusPr 64 26 14 


41 2SV. 24% 25K, + % hoi 
23 26% 26% 24% + 14 19% 


o0% 47% AmCon X90 57 10 204 56% 55U. 56 


8 33 
235 39% 
1 37% 
150C177VS 
181 16% 


2SV, TL ACmtl ZBO 115 
53% 41% ACanpf 380 6.1 
114L, 103 AConpf 1375 127 


20% 17* ACooBd 270 107 
ZO 'h 25% ACopCv 251e 98 40 

II 4% ACenre 43 10 

57% 44% AC van 1.90 3.9 13 10013 

iru 18% ADT .92 38 23 298 

34% 18% AElPw 276010.9 B 1329 

49% 32 AmExo 178 38 1512092 
25% 12% AFaml s 68 10 15 122 

34% 22% AGttCd 180 36 8 2472 

14 4% AGnlwt 173 


54% 51% AGnlsrfA 587*106 
94% UPft AGfil OfB 580fl 6.9 511 

71% 45V, A Go of D 264 46 409 

34% 27% AHArit 170 35 10 121 

13% 7% AKoat 70 

44% 44% A Home 2.90 58 12 1800 

47% 36% AHOSP 1.12 26 15 2459 

97% 72% Am rich 460 77 9 8744 

90% 62 AlnGrp 64 5 22 2231 

150 112% AIGDPf 585 4.1 25 

28% 18% AMI 72 13 10 4480 


35 24 '4 24 24'4 + «• I 

21 49 48'4 49 + % 

3 112% 112% 112% + % i 
103 20% 20% 20% + % 
40 28 27% 28 + % 

6'm 4% + % 

48% 4914— % 
24 *4 24% 

20% 20% + '* 
42% 42% + K 
23% 23% — % 
29% 29% + % 
10 % 11 — % 
55% 55% 

78% 79% + % 
59% 59% + 'u 
33% 34 + % 

9% 10'-— % 

8 8 S*:fc 


537 5% 

«i e% 


74 18 55 481 13% 
60 26 459 16% 


72 8 18 942 34% 
80 15 17 59 23% 


26 124 1BW 

36 15 3839 18 
56 9 26 34% 

391 19U 


56% +1% 
2 % + % 
4% +- % 
13% — % 
34 + % 

90>k + % 
33% + 'i 
23% — % 
39% + % 
45 + % 

32% - % 
39% + % 
37% + v, 
177% —4 
14% +- % 
5% + % 

8 

13% — % 
]■>% + % 
44% + k, 
22% 

35% — % 
23% 

18 + % 
17% + % 
34% + % 
19% + % 
55% — % I 


35 24% Col Gas X18 95 

48*. 45'h CaIGspf 5.12 It.l 
53 45% CoIGSPf 5J90'O5 

28% 24% CSO pf 365 
21% 16% CSO pi 262 117 
50 33h Combln XI4 XI 7 

IT ; 23% CmbEn 180 19 9 

21% B Comdls 70 18 10 
18ri> 1519 ComMtl J6 XI 15 
32% 8% Comdre 7 

32% 25% CmwE 380 108 7 
18% 13% C*E pf 1.90 108 
18'k 14% CwE pi 280 118 
24% 18% CwE pf 277 97 
45% 49% CwE Pi 774 115 
30% 20' n CamES X52 97 4 


1335 33ft 

1 44 
200 52% 

2 77% 
1 20% 

451 42% 
882 25% 


70 18 10 573 2fl 

74 XI 15 9 16% 

7 1175 9% 

80 108 7 7833 30 

.90 108 60 17% 


712 1BU. 

6 24% 
200Z63 
434 28 


38% 22% Comsat 170 2J is ITS 32% 


35% 23% CPsvc 
35% 231, Com par 
24’ ‘i 15% CompSc 
45% US Cotvsn 


.9 71 2318 39% 
56 8 17 24% 

12 724 53% 
1506 12% 


39% 24V: ConAos 180 18 19 244 34 


4% 2% Am Mol 980 

29 14% APresds 60 28 4 1223 

IP: 5 ASLFIa 11 23 

18% 12’u ASLFIP12.19 148 14 

15% US AShip Ml 5.9 10 


35% 26% AmSld 160 56 


67V, 35% AmStor 64 1.1 10 283 


91% 92 + % 
85% 84% +1% 
144 144 

21% 21% — % 

17% 18% + % 

is &=a 

UM. 1314 + % 
TPti 2B% +1% 


ZJ0 4J 12 192 5ft% 55 

188 13 15 5953 4TS 46% 44% 

1.90 47 19 930 44% 44 441- + % 

1580 X9 4 57 S6'4 56% — 'A 

.10 7 30 101 30% 29% 29% 

152 4.1 10 441 37Va 37% 37W + % 

.92 46 I) 781 21 70% 2H« + % 

U 14 rk 8% 9 

124 87 6 104 39’-: 39% 39% 

1.17 104 51 11 10% II + % 

164 1X9 8 13S 13% 13% — ’* 


20 15% ConnE 160 9J 10 S 18% 

31 21<: CnnNG 260 98 9 4 29 

15% 15% Conroe 60 XI 4 37 IJU. 

38 57% ConsEd 260 7.1 8 1670 34 

47S 34V: ConE pf 465 102 570: 45% 

50 39 ConE of 580 10.3 4 48% 

34 23 CnsFrl 1.10 16 11 480 30% 

47% 37% CnsNG 272 5.9 8 443 40% 

8% 4% ConsPw 1380 7% 

33% 19 CnPpfB 460 147 ICt 31% 

54% 31% CnP pro 7.45 146 SOz 51% 

54 32' * CnPpfE 7J2 15.1 23te 52% 

S 32% CnP DIG 774 US ifflte 53% 

V: 15% CnP prV 460 157 109 29'4 

25% 14 CnPorU 340 1X0 24 24 

28% 14% CnP PrT 178 157 II 24% 

28% 14% CnP prR 480 157 24 25% 

2BW 14% CnP nrP 3.98 1X7 25 25% 

28>A 14% CnP erN 385 154 9 24% 

18% 10% CnP PfM 2.50 157 7 14% 

17 9>A CnPprL 273 157 9 15 

29 15% CnP orS 482 156 7 24% 

13 9% CnP prK 263 15.1 13 14% 


.72 33 8 IC/-M TT* 

160 56 12 75 38% 

188 12 16 3332 58'i 


13 

1.990 44 8 
610X1 14 


78 44% ASIrplA 478 47 

57% 51 AStrpfB 480 128 


4Btt! 49 16 + 2| 
56% 54% + % 

$JK£ + % 

40% 40% + % 
2$% 24% + % 
12% 12% + % 
17% 17% + % 
49 49% + % 

12 % 12 %-% 

36% 3TA + % 

ifil 


34% 17% AT8.T 170 56 1658544 


41% 32% AT8 


« 33X. AT&T pf 174 93 

27% 16% AWtflrs 180 38 
1 j'a 10 AWofPf ITS 98 
SS ITS AmHott 260 136 
72% 60S A xonpr 564 87 
18 6% A xon sc 

40S 24% Ameron 160 47 
SO 24% AmesD 70 6 

29% 19>k Amrtek 80 17 
28% 18% Amfoc 
16 5 Amlesc 


70 6 22 349 
80 17 12 335 
70 

. 3 98 


49 50'v Amoco 3J0b 57 8 1305 44% 43% 
37% 28% AMP 72 12 23 5337 33 32% 


172 4.9 23 
XI2 78 B 
195 11.9 


22 — W 
38% + % 
57% +1% 
5 4 4 4 

44 31 30% 31 +1«. 

B4 28% 28% 38% +1% 

76 1% 1% l%- % 
SB 27% 57% 27% 

25 39% 39% 39%— % 

16 33V, B 33'A + % 

7 21% 21% 21% 


■lICo 260 66 19 1155 41 


23 11% Amoco 

23% 12% Amreo s 
34 22% AmSlh 


72X223533733 32% 32% +1 

70 24 17 373 13% 12 12% + % 

9 16 20 19% 19% + Hi 

60 41 9 65 33% 33 33% +1 


1.03 12 16 477 SO 


180 28 8 2733 35% 

72 14 IS 3*4 33% 

80 47 68 10 19% 

X16 117 ID 18% 

15 19 16% 


10 19% 19 19 + % 

10 18% 18% 18% + % 
19 16% 16% 16% + % 
358 27% 27% 27% + % 
969 43% 61 ’A 43 +1% 

3 6% 4% 6%~% 
71 50^ 50% 50% 


38 19 141 11% 11% 11% + % 


2.60 3.9 17 
72 36 97 


^fs%^ 

45 1% 1% 1% 

~ 3% 2% 2%-% 


Am Sled 160 38 IS 142 41% 41% 41% 


4W1 1% Anoanp 
24% 16% Anion 
27% 19U Anchor 168 
44<« 30% An Clay 1J2 


337 2% 2% 


21 327 20% 20% + 'A 125 


9% ArtdrGr 74 18 IS 


588 25% 24% 24% — % 

63 40% 39% 39% — % 

32 13 12ft 13 


ZDVk CBI in 
48% CBS 


8% A'u CCX 


34% 21V, Anheusy 80 27 12 3611 32-A 31% 31% + % 

71% 48% Anhcu pf 360 56 871 67 66 67 +1% 

19% 13V, Anixtr 78 17 17 232 16% 16% 16% + % 

16% 9 Anlhsm 84 8 19 69 13% 12ft 13 + % 

15V, 10% Arrttmv ,44b 38 9 2 14% 14V, 14V, 

12% 9% Apache 78 26 10 249 11 10% 10% 

2 % ApchP wt 43 1% I I 


19% 15% ApchP unllO 116 
74% 57 ApPwpf 8.12 116 


8 53% ApPwpf 760 117 

21% ApPwpl 265 106 
34% 29% ApPwpf 4.18 127 
31% 26% ApPwpf 380 1X3 


39% 21% ApIDIa 1761 B6 20 230 22 


17 17 232 16% 16% 16% + % 

J 19 69 13% 12ft 13 + % 

38 9 2 14% 14% 14% 

26 10 249 II 10% 10% 

43 1% I 1 

16 332 18% 18% 18% + ft 

16 240z 70% 70ft 70ft + ft 

17 lOOQte 65% 65% 65% +2% 

06 5 2S% 25% 25% + ft 

27 3 32ft 32% 32ft + ’A 

1X3 5 30ft 30'A 30ft + % 


40% 30 CIGNA 
32% 26 CIG pf 
53% 40% CIG pf 
7% 1% CLC 

59ft 28% CNA Fn 
11% 9% CNAI 
28ft 16% CNW 


I6O0 67 334 21% 21ft 21ft— ft 

380 26 20 591 114 113 113'* + % 
9 172 4% 4ft 4% + ft 


10ft 4ft Cant III 16 

4ft ft Cantll rt 
51% 32 Cnflll pf 
4‘ , % ClllHId 

11% 4 Cntlnfo 3 

24ft 20ft ConlTel 180 7 3 8 
38% 16ft Cl Do la 72 19 
2% ft viCoakU 
39 27% Coopr 182 4.1 16 

41ft 31 CoopI pf 190 76 
20% 14% CoprTr 60 17 7 
27 15 Coopvis 60 1.7 15 

17 8% Capwld T2I 

5% 18% Cpwld pf 268 114 
27% 17ft Cardura 84 X« 16 
15ft 11 Coreln 74 4.9 11 
48ft 30% CornGS \ua 17 19 

49% 24ft Cor B Ik 1.00 X2 

11 S Craig 14 

39% 33 Crone 1600 46 10 
52% 23 CrovRs 24 

19% 1 7ft CrckN of X18 116 

52% 491*, CrekNpfl43e 58 

24 18% CrtnpK 170 53 12 

70 40ft CrwnCk 14 


6 31 7% 

124 1% 

3 112 11% 

36*5 S% 
6 W 37% 


33% 

44 

57% + % 
27% + % 
2 r»k 

42% + Vt 
25ik + Vt 
19% + W 
14% 

9% + 9k 
30 + % 

17% + Vk 
18V* + Vk 
24% - ft 
43 +1% 
27% 4- Vk 
32% + % 
29% + % 
24% + ft 
23% + 'A 
12'A — ft 
35ft 
175i 

28ft— ft 
13 — % 
33% — ft 
45% +2 
48% — ft 
30% +1 
39ft— ft 
7%— ft 
31% 

51ft— % 
51% —lft 
53% 

28% + ft 
24 + ft 

24%—% 
25% — % 
25% + ft 
24% — Vk 
16% — U 
14%-% 
26 - % 
14% 

< sr* 

i% 

49ft- % 

lift + ft 
22% 

1B%— ft 

_T4 


<6% 23% F Bests 180 26 12 7B4 


24% 19% F si Chic 172 X? 3208 

53ft «% FChUinf5J4CU6 550 

18% 11 FtBTu 60 57 II 331 
49 35 FIBTxpf 5740138 70 

20ft 6ft Ftatr 7 133 

74ft lift FFtdA z 66D 27 8 437 
60 41 FFB X12 5.9 S 43 

110% 91% FIFtdpfTO.990108 34 

55% 34% Flniste 270 57 7 196 
34ft 23% Flntsl Pf 277 87 9 

U% 7% FiMIss T* X7 9 194 

i 14 FINaton 20 14 

7ft s% FstPa 415 

30% 23% FsIPapt 262 9J 54 


31ft 25% FlUnRI X00 77 14 110 


28% 17% FIVaBk 88 36 10 
.35% 19Vk Ft Wise 170 X7 10 
55% 44% FWisc pf t>JS II J 
43ft 27% Fact* 180 X7 
12ft 8% FlshFd 850 6 
43 24% FUFnG s 172 18 e 

52ft 42% FltF pf 4716 87 
28% 18% Fleet En 64 27 9 


39% 24% Flemnu 180 X7 13 377 

13% lift Ftexipf 181 127 48 

29% 18% FlghtSf S .16 J 19 100 

35 14% FtoOlPf 16 230 


35 14% FtoofPt 

45ft 31 FlaEC 


16 

.160 A 13 


29% SI 1 .* Fla Prg X16 87 8 4348 


16% 11% FloStl 
4% 3ft FlwGen 
21 14ft FJowr 5 
20 1 4l 14% Fluor 


41 U 14 19 

548 

64 27 17 131 
60 26 1072 


47ft FooleC 220 47 11 


51% 40V. FordM 760 57 3 7149 
13ft 10% FIDear 176 IOB 11 
soft 54% FtHowd 184 26 17 338 

W% 10% FostWh 64 38 11 192 

42% 7% FoxStP 68 £7 12 509 

32% 24% Fmtbra 184 61 75 40 

27 22 Foxrnyr 16 300 


13% 9% FMGCn 
70ft 7% FMOG 270024.1 5 

22% 14% Frol Me 60 17 12 
32% 22 Friotm 60 26 29 
28% 21ft FrurW JO 7 S 
32% 25U Fnihf of XOQ 78 


IS 14% 15 + % 


36% 34% Fuaua 


43 

23% 

9% 

11% 

9%— ft , 
2Bk + Ik 
12% + Ik 
22% + % 
14%— % 
37 
18 
BU 
4% 

42 + % 

48 + % 
34% +% 
19% + ft 
17% + % 
27 + ft 

23 +ft 
17% + ft 
56% + % 
27ft— % 
34ft— % 
5ft + % 

5 — % 
34ft + ft 
4% 

15% — % 
74 + % 

35ft + ft 
30%— Vk 
3Bft + % 
22%+ % 
465k — Vk 
lift— % 
«Gft + % 

7 + % 

23% — Ik 
53Vk — % 
110% 

46% + % 
28% — % 
8% + % 
30ft 

4% + Vi 
27 + % 
26% + Vk 
24% + % 
35 + % 

53% 

27% — % 
12% + ft 
34% +1U. 

52 + Vk 
19% + ft 
34%—% 
13% + Vk 
24ft— ft 
27ft + ft 
40% + % 
25ft -V % 
16% + % 

5 — ft 
18ft— % 
1» +% 

53 +% 

b:: 

2SVjj— ft 

^ + u 

9% + % 
16% + % 
^ + 5k 

30 +% 


36% 21% Human 

311k 20% HunUM 
41% 26% HwttEF 


31ft 19% HVtfrrd X00 68 10 


175 XI 438 77tt 77ft 77tt + % . 

E64 98 7 440 27 26% 24% + Vk 1 

1.780187 44 9% 9% 9ft , 

60 27 29 5 16ft 14ft 16ft— ft 

1TB 9JS n 24 34% 23ft 239k + ft 

60 61 II 44 lOtk 9% 9% 

68 38 337 12ft 12% 12% + lk 

72 16 12 23 23% 23% 23% 

60 27 14 3041 30% 29% 30 + % 

60 18 16 32 28% 28 28 — ft 

80 X3 10 1931 36% 34ft 35ft— 1ft 


45% 34 Mocvof 475 97 
18 10% ModROS 


46% 30% MaatCf 180 27 
29ft ift MatAar remc 
lBft 12 Manhln T@ 17 


IQ, 44 *4 44 f W 

ifir ««♦» 

44 12ft lift "•‘TS? 
in 16 14 14 + ft 


27* 14% ManrCS .14 8J1 T S T?v.. X % 

14% 1SVS ManrC wl M 15* 14* IlS T i! 


92 4 1OT 35ft Mft 34% + ft 


23% ICJncI 164 47 
19ft 14% ICMn 75a 38 
11% 8ft I CM 
30 22% ICN pf X7D 1X1 

IB 'A 14% IN Ain 182 118 
■ZTft 23 l p rim n 162B 57 
17% 14ft IRTPrs 170 98 


164 47 12 1094 32% 32% SBk 
75a 38 94 14% 14% 14H— ft 

43 257 9% 9ft 9% + ft 

LTD 1X1 5 24ft 24ft 24ft + ft 

82 118 14X 17% 17ft 17% + ft 

62B 57 14 25 24% 25 + Vk 

70 98 7 219 15% 15% lift— % 


■ft 5Vk vIManvl 
25ft 17ft wIMnvtpf 
3BM 23% IMAPCO 180 28 
5 3 Marnlz 

SM % Moredo- . , 


330 49 48% 4m> 

*U iS IMk 17% — % 

2? % % + « 


HI 1 

iiin a I 


»% 2Sft mSSw 180 58 1 xn 32% Tl* M - * 
18 Marlon 5 78 8 37 375 34% 33% 34% + *1 


36ft 25% ITT C» 180 M 10 4W6 33% 3Z9k 33% + ft 
63ft 49 ITT WK 480 46 4 42% 42% 42ft + ft 


63ft 49 ITT PlK 480 46 

44 49 ITT pfO 580 XI 

45 49% ITT pH 470 78 
19% 11% mint 40 52 
24% 17% IdahoPa 172 86 
18% 7ft IdealB 

27% 20 lUPowr X44 118 
21% 17% HPowpf 2J5 117 
3S4k 28% llPawpl 4.12 11.1 
31ft 27 liPawpf 37B 11.1 
40% 32 HPOWPf 467 117 
37** 28% HPowpf 480 118 


480 46 6 52 ft 62% 42ft + ft 

580 XI 7 61% 40% 61% + % 

470 78 IB 44% 44% 44% + ft 

80 57 1Z74 lift 11% lift— % 

172 86 B 140 2D% 20ft 30% 

594 B 7ft 7ft 
X44 118 6 1567 22% 22ft 22% + ft 
X35 U7 (Sfe 21 21 21 +J 

4.12 11.1 70z 37 35% 37 

3JB 11.1 200z 34 34 34 - 

467 117 30DZ 3Bft 38% 38ft + ft 

400 118 30 34ft 34ft 34ft— % 


lift 8ft MartcC 8 11, " JES JE 

!®9 70 Marrtot 74 8 14 126 9ft W 

73% 47% MrahM 270 19 18 MB » 

44ft 23% MartMs IJ», u „ W9 SM M 

14 OftMaryK 86 21 192 12» TJ 

34 24 Masco 74 18 14 435 32 . 31 


*8 14 116 9ft tBl »! +1{J 

14 Oft MarytC 841 21 192 1» TOj ' 

34 24 Masco 76 18 16 + * 

15% 10% MassMr 20 16 18 3 lWi 1» 1» . „ 

3% 1% MosovF 787 »k 2% + Vk 

30ft 22% MasCp X94ULD 28 29ft29ft29% + % 
12ft 10% Maxine 172 11.1 72 1T% lift lift + ft 

45% 40% MafsuE 2*T J 9 3289 52% 51% OTA +ljf 

17ft 9ft Mattel - 14 1705 13ft 13ft T3% + % 

13% 4ft Mat.1 wt 134 9ft 9% gk + ft 

15ft lift Moacom 4 92 12ft 12% li ft j; ft 

58ft 34ft MayOStr 188 38 ID 614 52% 51ft Sift + ft 

59% 43 Maylg 280 58 11- 1« 54. §% 56 . 


3i% s SW-H «"■ 


34% 24 1TV9 72 26 12 218 30 29 29% + % 

40% 31ft ImPChm 2J3a 58 7 1530 34% 34% 34% +)ft 
12 6% ImpJCp 11 165 SV, 8ft 8V, + Vk 

15* 9ft 1NCO 80 17 2528 13ft 13ft 13ft + % 

IndiMpf 788 1Z1 


_ 50% IndiMpf 776 119 

186% 92% IndiMpniOO 1X0 
19ft 14ft IndiMpf X15 115 
IOft 15% IndiMpf 275 118 


30% 25% Ind jM pf 383 1X1 
28ft 20ft likHGSi 284 87 
10 4ft Inexco 871 
53% 39 IngnrR 280 XI 
37% 28 IngRpf X35 68 
15% 11 IngrTac 74 37 
26 19ft InWSM XT 

48% 38ft InldS, pf 475 108 
lift toft I ml Ico 180b 58 
7% 3ft InspRs 
26ft lift Intense 
28 19 IntaRpf 383 118 

35ft 25% IntoR pf 475 138 
9ft 7ft inttoan 
14% 8 InlRFn 
19ft 14ft ItepSe XI Dal 17 


IngarR 280 £1 17 137 51 % 50 % 51 . .. 

IngRpf X 3 S 68 <2 34 ft 35 % 35 ft 

IngrTac 74 37 28 100 14 ft 14 %. 14 % + % 

70 XT vm 24 % 23 % 24 % + ft 

475 KLO 27 47 % 47 » 47 % + % 

180 b 58 W 153 17 ft 17 % 17 ft + % 

ESS 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft + % .. ._ 

...... * ™ IZ* 1 Z^ 12 * t !* 117 ft 79 ft Merck 370 29 16 2 SS 6 


165 8% 8ft BVk + Vk 

2528 13ft 13* 13ft + % 
Ittz 58% 58% 58% + ft 
Hfflfe 45% 45% 65% — % 
30 zl 00 % 100 % 1001 k + ft 
10 18ft 18 1* 

10 19 Mft 19 + ft 

5 28% 27ft ,27ft— ft 

6 24 U 23ft 23ft— ft 

2S- 5ft 5 5 

137 51% 50% 51 + % 


2 6ft 20ft McOrpj MB 107 8 24% 24% 24% 

30 % 17 % McDerl 180 108 3843 17 ft. 17 ft 17 %— ft 

lift 2 * McDTIwt 144 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft + ft 

10 % 6 ft McDtd 70 XI 15 7 9 % 9 ft 7 ft 

70 / 48 V, McDnld 70 18 14 2439 44 %. Aft 43 ft + ft 

87 43 % McOnD 184 25 8 701 73 ft 72 ft 72 ft- ft 

52 37 ft McGrH 160 37 15 737 44 % 43 % 44 +1 

39 ft ZSft Me lata . 17 2 ift 24 26 ft + ft 

50 37 MCKOES 360 53 12 . 38 46 45 % 45 %—% 

79 % 40 % McK pf 180 XS 1 73 73 H — 1 VJ 

15 9 ft McLean 17 1 ST II 10 ft 10 ft • 

a% 2 % McLaawt 75 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft + Ik 

29 ft 22 ft McNeil 180 O B 256 23 ft 23 23 ft + % 

44 ft 32 % Mead 170 X 9 .10 . 348 41 % 40 % 41 % + 1 . 

W 15% Mesrux 74 1.1 ” 

39% 25ft Madtrn 80 XI 

54% 40% Mellon 280 .58 

30% 24 Motion pi XI 98 


80 O 8 256 23ft 23 23ft + % 

70 27.10 .348 '41% 40% 41% +1 

74 1.1 12 168 22 21* 22 +% 

80 XI 14 500 37ft 37% 37* + ft 

LSI .58 7 144 49 - 48* 49 +* 

m 98 616 28% 2BU. 2S% 


■ ■ • 

. *<\dKfia 

■ 

'vT t^K 
Xt 

- 

"■'.OSWCt 

mi, ta 
m xa*Ttr *1 
. >TVf. 

•ij tv v 


• r * 

.5 • 7 


10 25% 25% 25ft + % 

16 21% 31% 31% 

420 B 7ft 7ft— % 

212 10% 9ft W + % 

33x 19 IB* IBft + % 


48% 35% MrivHI 164 X3 U 1464 43% 43% 43ft + ft 

70 51% Merest 1XO 13 IB 37 40 59ft 40 + % 

117ft 79ft Merck 370 19 16 2556 109ft 109 109% +1% 

00 47% Mrntttl 180 O 13 S 60% 40% 


34* 25% MerLyn 80 X7U5SI0 29*29*29%+% 


73* SSft Inter a, 388 4J 13 409 70 69% 49% — Vk 


158 121% Inter pf 775 57 
13 k 9ft Intrfst 80 X9 
SSft 41 Intrlk X40 57 
12% 8% Intmed 
34% 15* Inf Ah, 72 48 
38% UX IBM 460 36 
29% 16% In, Ctrl 60 18 


775 57 4 149ft 149* 14 9 * 4 ft 

80 5.9 5 457 10* M% 10* 
14057 7 534 45% 45% 45% + % 
1B4 10ft 10% 10% — % 
72 *8 9 5 17ft 17ft 17ft— Ik 

460 36 1316380 12Sft 1X7% 128* +lft 
60 18 10 100 2591 25* 25ft— % 


2V a IntFIav 1.12 37 17 1188 30% 29ft- 30Vk +1 


6Vk infHarv 
7% 3ft lattfrwt 
60 28ft IntUpfC 

42 23 IntHpfA 

34% 19 IntH PfD 

44 34 InIMm X&O 45 


2935 8ft 7ft 8 + % 

203 4ft 4ft' 4ft— ft 

14 53 51* 51%—* 

16 32 30ft 30ft- ft 

254 25 24% 24ft + ft 

426 39ft 19ft 39ft +1 


35 24ft IntMult 176 XI 12 445x34ft 34% 34% + ft 
57ft 47ft intPapr X40 58 54 1439 48* 48% 48% + % 


3ft 1ft MsaoOf , . 633 2% 2% 2% 

2 12% MasaPT- 7 958 14* 16% 16% — * 

35% - 2Sft NlcuR 188* 56 IX 34* 34% 34% 

796 5% Mesab 7Be1X3 7 . 44 5ft 5ft 5ft . 

4ft 2% Mestak 78 3% - 3ft 3Vk 

3* 2 McxFd 72*15.1 1435 2% 2 7ft— ft 

U% 14ft McflER 160 86 11 20 14* 14* 14ft + ft 

7* 4ft MicUby 86 16 30 .2 4% 4% 4% 

53ft 37ft Mldoaa 274 58 9 1*37 48ft 47* 47*— ft 

15% 8ft MfdSUt 1731 3 374® 9% 9ft 9% 

3®% 15% MIdRas 180. 48 v 12 14*14*14* 

32% 25% MWE X74 98 11 131- 29ft 2Bft XV + ft 

15% lOftMIHnR 64 19 15 22 11* lift 11%— W 

04 73* MMM 380 <8 13 4440 74% 75* 74 +1% 

39% 27* MfnPL 276 7.9 8 -99 34ft 3** 34* + ft 

lift 4 Mbnlns 9m 4ft -3ft 4ft 

4* Mltai 284 7ft 7 7 

25% StoWI 220 77 9. 5451 28ft 28ft 28* + * 

% vIMobiH 18 ft ft * 


32% 25% MWE X74 98 

15% 10ft MlltnR 64 19 

84 73ft MMM ISO 48 

39% 27ft MfnPL 276 7.9 

lift 4 Mbnlns 




4* Mltai ___ .... 

34ft 25% Mobil 270 77 9. 5451 28ft 28% 38* + * 

2* % vIMobiH 18 ft ft ft 

ffft 5* ModCert 10 187 4ft 6% 4% 

33ft 17* Mohosc 68 I J 11 M 27 26* 37 — ft 

M* 1% MohfcDf.- 447 1% 1%1% + ft 

^ .««■ ^ if S5-+* 

Moores J2 U IS 515 # ^l|% -Wft + ft 
_ MoorM 184- 45 13 ST ^6 23 23*—% 

31 24* MorMpf SB 98 -10 27% 27% 27% 

54* 34% Moran 1 X2B 48 7 77*7 44% 45ft 44 +1* 

47 29* MoriCnd 168 : 36 M 35 -43* 42ft 43 + ft 

23% 18* MonoS 80 37 34 13 20ft 20ft 20ft 

21 15* MtaRtr/UVolOJ 9 83 I7ft 17% 17ft— ft 
- Morton* M 20 8 jS 3M m ?2* + ft 


14* Tu intfics 
54ft 35% IntMrtti X48 XI 
WFk BZ% IntNtpf 868 9.7 
W0 90 lotNt of H'iiSO 118 


44 11% 11% lift + ft 1 
588 41 40* + % 

30i87ft 87ft . 87ft „+ % 

1 95% 95% *• 1 


43ft 30V; IntpbGp 188 78 .13 250 -39 30% 
19ft USk IrUBOkr 13 25 19ft 19% 


19ft 13ft iraSokr 
22ft 14* IntstPw -lSD 97 
22 18 Inpwpf X20 Tl.l 

13% 9% IntSaca 
21% 15% IcwoEl ISO 98 
35 24* lawlIG 274 X9 

37ft 24'T lowflRs 108 98 
40 29ft Ipcdco 384 89 




13ft 9ft IpcoC p 
40* 27*, k IrvBnk 


X04 89 9 
84 X9 13 
194 54 4 


42ft IrvBkPf 474a 9.1 


25 19* 19% ..... _ 

32 T9* 19*49% - 

410x20% 20% 20%. 

33 10* 10% 

9® 19% 18* 

45 30* 30* 

ISO 33% 33 

196 34* 33* 34* + * 
9 n* 11% 11%—* 

"IPPP 


*ts J 


60 17 15 074 Z3* 22ft 23* + % 
821 23 B% B* 8ft + * 

X68 114 5 IB* IB* IB%- Vk 

84 X* 14 61 25 24% 24*— % 

J4 4.9 11 13 11% 11* ll'.-s— ’A 

I8B X7 19 1822 4BVA 47 4B* +lft 

1.00 28 32 45 44* 45 + 'A 

16 2 10 IB 10 

160b 46 10 7D 36'k 34 34* + ’b 

24 1599 50* 49* 49* + 14 

X18 118 13 IS* IBft 18ft— * 

X63e 58 58 52% 52* 52* 

180 57 12 28 22ft 22* 27* + % 

14 212 48% 67Vk 47* +1% 


ikmapu/i 

b Reffucd 


CIGNA 260 47 35 7B9 54ft 54% 54% + ft 44* 27* CrwZef 180 27 18 212 37VS 37 


41 29* 2®% 29* + % 
237 50% 50 50% + % 

57 2 17b 3 + Ik 

11 271 52 51* 51* + Ik 

10 11 % 11 * 11 * 

317 IB* 18% TB% + * 


44% 25ft CPC Int 280 4.9 12 775 45% 44* 44* +1* 


15* 8* AppIMfl 


23 12% 12% 12* — * 


24% 16% Arch On ,14b .7 12 2489 20 19* 30 + * 

30% 2S* ArlP Pf 3J0 110 2 30% 29* 30% + % 

24* 14 ArkBst 60X59 217 2t 23 23ft + ft 

24% 16 Ark la 188 56 24 1496 20% 19% 19* — * 

* % ArlnRI 222 * + 


* % ArinRi 

15* 11% Armada 

11* 6ft Armco 

22ft IS* Armcpf X10 108 

24* 13% ArrmRfi 60 36 B 

39ft 24* Arm Win UO Ifl 9 

34* 22% AraCp 1X0 42 9 

19* 12* ArowE 80 16 17 
•n IS An, Ins 80 36 9 
27ft 17* A90TCO 
37 23% AshlOII 160 48 

44% JS AshlOpf X94 98 


2 11 * 11 * 11 * 

401 9% 9 9% + tt 

9 20 20 20 + tt 

29 14* 14 14% + * 

413 34% 33* 34V4 + * 
4B 28* 27ft 28* + * 
16 14 13* 13* — Vk 

210 23* 23* 23% + * 
4B9 27* 20* 21 + 14 

9a 33% 33% 33* 

3 41* 41% 41*— * 


» 24 16 CP Nil 160 58 10 19 24% 23* 24 + * 

,1 . 22* 19* CRIIM) 38701X1 40 20* 20* 20* + * 

IB* + * 28* 21* CSX 1.16 48 8 4724 24* 

™* tJft 40% 20% CTS 180 38 32 33* 

65% +2* 12* 7* C 3 Inc 404 207 B% 

25ft + * 33% 20* Cabot S2 4.1 8 118 22* _ 

OTk + % 17* 8% Caesar 14 1571 15% 14ft 15 - % 

Jj* + % 2S* 12% Cal Fed 6B X5 5 910 19* 18% IBft— * 

2D*— 1* 54% 35% CalFdpf 475 96 110 50% 49* 49* 

IBk— * 21 13* Callhn 75b 16 116 IB* 17* IB +1 

22„ t S 15ft 12 Camml .12 .9110 IB 13* 13% 13% 

+ ^ 24 15% CRLku .40 S53 23* 22ft Z3 +1 

?S: + i 4* 2% CmpRo .161 107 2* 2* 2* 

19*—% 40% 30* CamSPS 12 491 37% 34 36 — * 

+ IS* llftCdPacs 68 285x12* 12* 12tt 

’if) . ^ m. 14ft CanPE a 00 51 20% 20 20 + % 

“ 228*150% Capats TO 19 132 205ft 203* 204 
“ 27* 17ft CtmHd s .77 36 B 244 21* 21% 21* 

if}? IS 110*100* CapHpt 901 e 19 1110 110 no — * 

2 12ft 12. Carina a 68 9 10* 10* 10% 

»k + * 40% 28* Carlisle 183 37 9 4 29% 29* 29*- * 

iSf-rS 24ft 18 CaraFt ^0 18 11 237 22* 21* 22* +1* 

»% 22% CarPw 260 97 7 3438 24ft 24* 24% + * 

21+10 26ft 3JV* CarP pf X67 VOJ 3 24* 24ft 24* + * 


160 58 10 79 24% 23* 24 + * 

207elXl « 20* 20* 20* + * 

1.14 4 8 8 4724 24 * 23* 24Vk + * 

180 38 32 33* 32* 32* 

404 207 S* |Vk BVk— * 

72 4.1 8 110 22* 22ft 22% + tt 

14 1571 15% 14ft 15 — tt 

6B 28 5 910 19* 18% IBft— * 

475 96 110 50tt 49* 49* 

.25b 16 116 IB* 17* IB +1 

.12 .9110 IB 13* 13% 13% 

.40 853 23ft 23ft 23 +1 

.141 107 2* 2* 2* 

12 491 37tt 34 36 — * 

68 285x12* 12* 12tt 


50* 43ft CrZel of 463 9.9 

65% 50ft CrZel pfC480 7.9 

35% 22ft Culbra 80 26 IV 

33* 15* Cullnets 23 

88* 58% CumEn X20 36 4 

I Oft 8ft Currlnc 1.10all7 

38% 30ft CurtW 180 38 16 

52% 33* C vc loos 1.10 X3 8 


IB 44* 44* 44* + tt 

3 57% 57% 57% 

19 X 8 34 34 —1 

23 220» 18% 17* 17* + * 
4 72 45% 44* 64% + % 

19 10* 1S% 10% 

16 32 34* 34* 36* — Vk 

8 19 47* 47% 47* + * 


37% 21 
37* 271 
32!* 12V 
78* 54 

10 ft 4 K 
44* 38V 
261* 24t 
24* 20 
fl% 3 
44ft 41V 
35 20W 

15* 741 

22ft 13* 
12% 9V 
12* 10 
SI* 31V 
IB* 14V 
58* 31V 
39* 22V 
20 * 3851 


70 8 13 1135 37* 
170 4.1 13 350 29* 


37* +1 
29* + »% 


10 338 13* 13* 13* + % 
180 18 9 354 44tt Iffik 44% + * 

73 3tt 3Vk 3ft 

4 4* 4ft 4ft 

XI6 XI 8 5B55 39* 39 39% 

XOQ 78 8 25ft 2S* 25*— * 

268 1X0 21 23* 23 23 

TOT 3% 3% 3% 

168 V IB 1853 54 55% 55% + tt 

80 18 25 34 32ft 32* 32* + * 

7W 27 170 B* 8% 8% 

84 30 11 34 18% IB* 18* + * 

96 9* 9* 9% 

40e 36 91 11% Il!k 11* 


35% 20* JWTS 1.12 37 
32 23% jRiver 84 17 

28* 16 Jamswy .12 8 

13% 10% JoppF I.43el26 
47* 34 JatfPlI 182 38 
33* 24% JerC pf 480 1X5 
44* 50 JerCPf 880 126 
45 49 JerCPf 788 128 

18%. 14* JerC pf XIB 126 
12* 6* Jcwfcr 


1.12 37 17 447 30 
84 17 II 1729 35 


29* 30 +1 
33* 33% 


8 11 243x20* 19* 20*+ Vk 
16 _ 652 11* 11* 11* + % 


801 44% 45% 44% + * 
200x32 32 32 

3001 64* 44* 44* 

T000Z 43 43 43 + * 

28 17% 17* 17*— * 
59 11* 11* II* + % 


3%.^ss35s,*iJ ■« j 

T SbSK , a • * 15,1 

st issass,^ a i? 

11* MufOm 164 1B6 • 
1* MyerL . . 


13* IS* + % 

2 2 


1 33b 37 50 384 45* 44* 45* +1% 


47* 30% JohnJn 1J0 28 15 5054 44* 45* 45% +1% 

44% 38% JahnCn 184a 46 9 255 41 40% 40% 

51% 50% JftnCPf 475 8J 4 51* 51* 81* 

27% 21* Joraan 180 48 IS 4 34* 34% 34% 

26ft it% josttna 


51 20% 20 20 + % 

132 505% 203ft 204 


244 21* 21% 21* 

i no no no — * 

9 10 * 10 % 10 * 

4 29* 29* 29*— * 


3 24* 24% 24* + * 


35* CarTec X10 56 14 275 37% 37ft 37% + * 


34ft 24V, AsdDGs 160 A3 II 325 32* 32 32% + * 

24% 18* Athlone 160 88 11 54 20 19% 2D 

29% 22% AtCvEI 288 96 9 70Z7 26* 37 + ft 


lift 4ft Carrot JR 18 10 
24% IB. CarPIrs 60 XI B 


91 4* 4* 4ft + * 
24 19* 11* 19* 


44% 47 All Rich 480 67 
434* 208 AMRCpf 180 7 

101* 32* AHRcpf 201a 28 
153 100* AHRcpf 280 10 
17% 10ft AHasCp 
29ft 18% Auacl 60 1.7 24 
54% 34* AutoDt M U 21 
5% 4% Avalon n 9 

31% 17* AVEMC 60 10 15 
39* 28% Avery 60 1.9 13 
24% 10 Avlalln 13 

38% 77 Avne! 80 18 23 
25* 17* Avon XM B6 12 
28* 16ft Avifln II 


2J8 ?6 9 70 27 26*27 + ft 

480 67 3239 59* 59 5V* + * 

180 7 I 402 402 402 +1 

201a 20 200x101* iaitt iai* + % 

280 20 6 141% 141 141%- ft 

57 11* 11% 11* 

60 1.7 24 149 23ft 23* 23Vk + Vk 

88 1J 21 625 52* 52 52* +1 

233 s 4* 5 - ft 
60 28 15 6 30% 30* 30ft 

80 1.9 13 189 32ft 31 32ft +1% 

,13 *7 24 * 24 % 24 % 

80 18 23 409 32*32*32* + * 
280 86 12 4228 23* 23* 23* + * 
18 48 21* 21% 21% + ft 


21% CartHw 182 46 22 158 24* 25» 241k + * 


44* 22 CartWI 82 18 11 

IBft 11% CascNG 180 78 7 

14* 9ft Ca&hCk 
29 15% CstlCof 188k 

15 12 CstICpf 80 48 

3*% 28* CatrpT 80 16 

?7% 19* Coco .76 38 10 


35 33* 33* 33* + ft 

28 15% 15* 15*— * 

1038 12ft lift 12 

9 26* 25ft 25ft— ft 

259 14* 14% 14% 

4270 34% 35* 34% +2* 

9 24* 24ft 24ft 


129* 68ft Celanse 4.40 36 II 438 122*120*122* +3* 


IS 7* Cengv 840 6 25 290 9% 9 9%— % 

45 34% CifiM 238 57 9 1045 41% 41* 41* + * 

S* 3L. J 25 I-l 1° 1305 23* 21% 22ft +1 

27 19ft CanSoW 7.0? 86 7 1373 24% 23* 24 

3 % 20ft CenHud X96 118 6 456 26* 25* 25% -1% 

44 34% CnlLtn, 480 108 30x41* 41ft 41ft— % 

2L* 14* CnllPS 164 90 10 771 18% 18ft 18% - ft 

29ft 20% CrtLoEl 286 06 7 44 25* 24% 24ft— * 

37 31 CLdEIpIXIB 1X3 9 34% 34 34 

13* 0% CeMPw 160 108 10B 241 13ft 12* 13 + ft . 

21% 14ft CV1P5 180 96 6 32 19* 19* l»ft + % I 


■121 _ 252 

60 28 10 12B 
.92 56 13 1335 


164 28 13 6 

30 18 489 

12 64 

170 S0 B 321 
48© ion sox 

J» 17 11 218 
J7e 10 2x 

170 26 10 148 
260 5.1 5 33S 


89e 1.9 
X04 X! 6 
1.12 46 8 
80 58 
4.91ellJ 
Tg.,22 

260 87 12 



7%- % 

23% + * 

14* +* 

21* + * 

1* + * 

4ft — ft 

2 £3! i£* SJunpin -57 X4 xm 

ISJ— ^ Z7V, 2CM Qimlpt 180 69 16 

u «* awnl Pf 4Mt 92 17 

21% — ft 9* 7% ClramSp 60 48 15 103 

fi*. . j* 4ft 1 viChrtC 134 

S e2lxi? ** 1* viChrlpf .48 

S? + X “ft 39% dx»» 380 76 5 849 

48ft 39% ChaaBPf 5125 116 2 

jL ± P M% 50 Chase pf 6J5el2J 154 

+ 12 ££* 51 OW3e pnxuezu) 38 

S-ft — 2 22* 14* Chelsea 72 U 9 18 

g*— * 32% 24* Chemad 1J2 £2 12 51 

^ ™ 44* 27% aim NY 268 6.9 5 673 

InSlv 56% 51 ChNY Pt 4B3e 7J 2B3 

fiS + i SUP 32 Chew* 174 38 10 302 

“w— 1 3S* 31 ctwsPn mo ti » ui 

is! 34. ® 29% Chevrn 260 46 8 1933 

25 Sl S 200 130 ChiMlw 100 8 

6 gk + « 00 % 53 * ChlMJ pf 16 

W 16 * Chi PnT 80 a 17 9 29 

ISi + 5 ? 11W 7 % ChfcFuH 841 38271 24 

Chmcr 6 St .9 243 

« T ,3 * s * Chrlshi 23 

“ +2 13 * 9 * Chroma 40 745 

»k + * 54 44 % Chrmpf I 

F* + * 38 % 25 % Cftryslr 180 27 3 «»4 

" -r 2 77 44 % Chubb X 34 13 12 344 

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I.VI KKN ATION XL HKRALU TRIBINK. Tl F.SD XX, SEPTEMBER 41, 19«5 


Page 13 


*cSS 

'. ‘nielli ^ 


Profit for First Half Reportedly in 

Merger Talks 


Peat Marwick Murdoch to Buy Rest of Fox Studio 


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Reuters 

TURIN — Hat, the Italian in- 
dustnal eonalomeraie and auto- 
maker, on Monday announced a 
share increase in overall operating 
profit For the first half of 1985 and 

S redacted full-year figures would 
emuch better- than in 1984 .- - 
The. company said the group's 
operating, profit, which does not 
take into account tax and debl- 
sememg. ousts, rose to 1,215 billion 
lire (SG25 million) in the fust half 
_Jh c year, a 413-percent increase 
Too 860 billion lire in the like 
period last year. 

,,9E^££? Ics .5 re "' I U percent to 
13,006 billion fire. Saks rose in all 
main divisions, although the big- 
gest increase was is industrial vehi- 
■des, which saw volume advance by 
19 percent, while sales in the robot- 
ics division jumped by 27 percent. 

Saks , of .cars, which, account Tor 
more than half the entire business, 
rose 9.8 percent to 7,462 billion lire. 


the company reported. Rat held 
unto its dominant position in West 
Europe with a 13.4-percent market 
store after a big surge in British 
sales and a buoyant performance in 
West Germany. 

Fiat gave no net profit for the 
first half, but said it could confi- 
dently predict that profits for the 
full year would be substantially 
better than 1984, when net profits 
more than doubled from 1983 to 
627 billion lire. 

The first-half results confirmed 
that the group's intensive effort in 
the past five years to automate its 
production luies was paying in- 
creased dividends. 

Group officials said that al- 
though the results showed that Fiat 
was outperforming most of its Eu- 
ropean competitors, its profits were 
still well behind major U.S auto- 
makers. such as General Motors 
and Chrvsler. 


Hanson Trust Considers 
Raising Its Bid for SCM 


f ... Jffyjjgg 

NEW YORK — Hanson Trust 
PLCsaid in a document filed Mon- 
day with the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission that it is pre- 
pared to make an offer for SCM 
Corp. “in excess of S74 per share** 
under certain conditions. 

The conditions include the drop- 
ping of so-called “lock-up options" 
in SCMTs own leveraged buyout 
plan which provide for the sale of 
two SCM businesses to Merrill 
Lynch & Co. in the event the 
buyout plan is terminated. 

Merrill Lynch and SCM man- 
agement are partners in a Super- 
store offer to acquire SCM. 

In its filing with the SEC Han- 
son said SCM advisers offered to 
buy 3.4 million SCM shares held by 
Hanson. 

According to the document. 

: Hanson responded that it was “not 
interested m selling" and is “pre- 
pared to pursue a business combi- 
nation in excess of $74 per share** if 
the lock-up options are dropped. 

SCM has charged Hanson in a 
federal lawsuit with illegally ac- 
auirinp the 3.4 million shares after 
dropping its earlier $72~per-share 
offer. 

Hanson has filed its own suit 


contending that the SCM manage- 
ment offer is unfair to sharehold- 
ers. 

Separately, the SEC said Mon- 
day that it is conducting a private 
investigation into SCM's charge 
that Hanson violated federal secu- 
rities laws when it purchased large 
blocks of SCM stock shortly after 
terminating its hostile tender offer. 

“The commission agrees that at 
this early stage in the litigation. 
SCM has raised a serious question 
going to the merits of whether the 
Williams Act may have been violat- 
ed," the SEC said in a legal memo- 
randum submitted to the second 
circuit U.S. Court of Appeals. 

The appeals court is considering 
a lower federal court’s temporary 
order honing Hanson from acqiiir 
ing any more SCM stock. 

Hanson first began its lender of- 
fer for SCM stock on Aug. 21. at 
$60 per share in cash. 

After SCM and Merrill Lynch 
announced a competing plan for a 
leveraged buyout of SCM at S70 a 
share, Hanson responded by rais- 
ing its offer to $72. 

Finally, when SCM and Merrill 
raised their bid toS74<jn Sept 11 
Hanson announced it was term! 
nating its bid.- 


Volkswagen Is Said to Want 
Job Reductions at SEAT 




Realm 

MADRID — West German car 
manufacturer Volkswagen is ask- 
ing the Sodedad Espafiola de Au- 
lorooviles de Turisrao, or SEAT, to 
dismiss 4,500 workers before tak- 
ing a majority shareholding in the 
Spanish state-owned automaker, 
sources dose to the negotiations 
said Monday. 

They said that VW planned to 
sign the agreement by the end of 
the year but was unwilling to take 
on the burden of SEAT'S 
23 , 000 -person work force. 

A SEAT spokesman said a top- 
-heavy payroll was one of the major 
factors contributing to the compa- 


ny’s continued losses. He declined 
to confirm that a layoff demand 
hod been made. 

VW and SEAT signed a joint- 
venture agreement in 1982 under 
which the Spanish automaker now 
produces 120,000 VW vehicles a 
year under license. SEAT also im-. 
VW and Audi vehicles to] 


Under the draft agreement VW 
wiD upgrade SEAT'S production 
and marketing facilities, largely fi- 
nanced with low-cost Spanish gov- 
ernment loans, and initially take a 
5 1 -percent stake in the crenpany.i 
acquiring almost ail its shares by: 
1990 from the sole stockholder, In- 
sliirno Nadonal de Industria. 




m 

Istituto Fmam&ario Industriale 

Soctotft per Azkmi 

Corporate offices: 25, vte Iterance, T “rtn, Italy 
CapttH slock Ura 104.000000000 My pm 
T urn togtsky of tha Compantes no. 327. So 2370/27 

Increase of capital stock to lire 1 23.500.000.000 
Offer of unexerdsed rights 

As of the end of the period for subsenpdon ta ^ caprt^fna^e 
authorized by the shareholders meeting of June 3rd 1985 the offering 
was subscribed to for the 99,88%- 

the unexerosed rights amount to No. 129,648 granting the subscription 
to No 16,206 preferred shares. 

by the broker Datt Franco hotte, wa S. Teresa 12, Torino, on rhe 24, 25, 

26, 27 ond 30 of September 1985. . . , . 

tu_ of the rights wiB be entitled to purchase two preferred 

£ m o> Lire 4000 each, for. ev^y 16 nghts 
32*?. S. new shares will have dwdend ocaumg from April, 

£ m noyment of the new shares must take 

Ota, ™ c™ 

Marenco 25. lonno. ^ ^ D , RECTORS 


• INVESTMENTS — UJLA.- 


jisis* 

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- INVBIHlovi* — 

INCOME producing real estate 

ullrt Funds and tang. G~up» 

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3 . Total Management 

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• -JL- MlDW fOS 




yinV^glM 


Reutm 

LONDON — Peai Marwick 
Mitchell & Co. and KMG Interna- 
tional accounting group ore hold- 
ing preliminary merger talks, a Peat 
Marwick spokesman said Monday. 

The spokesman stressed that die 
talks so far had been exploratory. 
He was referring to press reports 
that discussions were under way 
that could combine (he companies 
into the world's largest accounting 
group, with annual revenues ap- 
proaching $25 billion. 

Industry sources said the pro- 
posed merger between Price Water- 
house and Deloiue Haskins & 
Sells, which was dropped in 1984, 
was the last major merger proposal 
among international accountants. 

A KMG spokesman in London 
said preliminary contacts between 
bis firm and Peat Marwick were 
taking place mainly in Amsterdam 
and New York. KMC has received 
a number of recent merger ap- 
proaches, he added. 

In New York, KMG said it was 
discussing the possibility of a merg- 
er with another accounting firm 
and expected to make an an- 
nouncement within (wo weeks. 

Sam Marks, a spokesman for 
KMG. declined to confirm that the 
company was holding preliminaiy 
talks with Peal Marwick. 

He said KMG has been ap- 
proached by six major firms in the 
post year, but “we haven't really 
entered into any forma) talks or 
discussions" with Peat Marwick." 


The AttorttartJ Press 

LOS ANGELES — Rupert Mur- 
doch. the publisher who bought 
half of 20th Century- Fox Ffim 
Corp. six months ago for $250 mil- 
lion, wifi buy the rest of the studio 
from Marvin Davis, a Denver oil 
man, a spokesman for Mr. Mur- 
doch said Monday. 

Mr. Murdoch will pay $325 mil- 
lion to Mr. Davis’s bolding compa- 
ny, TCF Holdings Inc., for the re- 
maining 50 percent or the studio 
and its valuable film library. 

Mr. Davis will retain TCPs 
stokes in resorts in Pebble Beach. 
California, and Aspen, Colorado, 
plus other real estate, including 2.7 
acres (1.1 hectares! of land on the 
Fox properly. 

“The deal has been done,” said 


Howard Rubenstein. a spokesman 
for Mr. Murdoch, an Australian - 
bom financier who recently be- 
came u U.S. citizen to overcome 
federal rules limiting the ability of 
foreigners to own U.S. broadcast 
properties. 

Mr. Murdoch had initially 
sought to acquire all of Fox last 
year, but Mr. Davis demurred and 
Mr. Murdoch settled for half in 
March. Mr. Murdoch paid SI 62 
million in cash tor hair of TCF 
Holdings and also gave the studio 
an SSS- million advance. 

Mr. Murdoch was brought in as 
a partner in TCF Holdings, Fox's 
parent, because the studio was 
strapped for cash because of heavy 
losses caused by poor showings at 
the box office. 


However, last summer Fox tod a 
hit movie. “Cocoon.” which has 
grossed more than S70 million. 

For the nine months ended May 
25. the company lost S80.1 million 
on revenues of' $468. i million. In 
fiscal 1983, the company lost S89.7 
million. 

Mr. Davis and Marc Rich, a 
commodities trader, bought Fox 
four years ago for $722 million. Mr. 
Davis paid about SU6 million last 
year to buy out Mr. Rich. 

Mr. Davis and Mr. Murdoch had 
considered joining to buy pan of 
Metromedia Inc., but Mr. Davis 
pulled out of the agreement. Mr. 
Murdoch went ahead alone and 
agreed in May to pay S I -55 billion 
for six Metromedia television sta- 
tions. 


COMPANY NOTES 


British Aerospace PLC con- 
firmed that it was conducting talks 
with the Soviet Union on the sale of 
the Advanced Turboprop airliner. 
But a company spokesman, com- 
menting on the figure of 1 .000 
planes reported by The Sunday 
Times, said, "We haven't talked 
numbers." The spokesman said a 
contract would take at least two 
years to negotiate. 

Broken Hill Pty.’s managing di- 
rector, Brian Loton, advised share- 
holders not to sell their holdings. In 
heavy trading last week, several 
brokers said that Adelaide Steam- 
ship Co. and Robert Holmes a 
Court's Bell Group Ltd. between 
them held about 14 percent of Bro- 
ken Hill. 

Ford Motor Co. resumed pro- 
duction Monday at its assembly 


plant in Loraine, Ohio, after 5 J00 
members of the UnUed Auto 
Workers voted to end a two-week 
strike over local health and safety- 
issues. 

Mustek Malaysia Sdn. a subsid- 
iary of. United Technologies Corp., 
saicl it, was cutting back operations 
at its Penang plant because of the 
prolonged downturn in the semi- 
conductor industry- Most of its 
output is exported to the United 
States. 

Richardson- Vkk.s Inc. said Mon- 
day that it had increased to 7 mil- 
lion the number of its common 
shares it planned to repurchase in 
resisting a takeover offer from Un- 
ilever. h said it tod repurchased 
about S million shares as of Friday. 

Sodett Metaflurgiqiie le Nickel 
announced parent company net 


profit of 144 million French francs 
(S16.6 million) in the first half of 
1985. after a loss oT 67 million 
francs in the 1984 period. It said a 
decline in the market and develop- 
ments in exchange rates would 
have an unfavorable influence on 
results in second half 1985. 

Technip SA, the French engi- 
neering group, is to build a plant in 
Egypt to produce 100.000 tons of 
flat glass annually, under a S 107- 
million turnkey contract signed in 
Cairo. 

United Pared Service said it 
would begin* service between the 
United States and Western Europe 
cm Oct. 7. European countries 
served will he Belgium, Britain, 
France. Luxembourg, the Nether- 
lands and West Germany. 


IFHutton 

US. BROKERS AND 
INVESTMENT BANKERS 

is seeking 

Account Executives 

for its London-Curzon St. Office 

Candidates should be registered 
and have experience in the 
securities or commodities 
brokerage industry, or finance 
or banking, or related fields. 

Please send your curriculum vitae to: 

Mr. Harry Romney 
EJ=. HUTTON & Co [Securities] LXd 
Princess House 

152-156 Upper Themes Street 
London EC4R 3UK England 


INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 
INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE 

ATLANTA INVESTMENT BRIEFING 

Sponsored by 

ATLANTA ECONOMIC 
DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION 

Wednesday, September 25, 1985, 5-7 p.m. 

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LONDON 

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vote of confidence — 


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Page 11 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1985 


ECReports 
No Inflation 
For August 

Reuters 

LUXEMBOURG — Con- 
sumer prices in the European 
Community showed no month- 
ly increase For August, the fust 
time prices have stood still since 
the EC was created more than 
27 years ago, die statistics agen- 
cy Eurostat said Monday. 

It said the halt in monthly 
inflation bad cut the consumer 
price increase in the EC to an 
average annual 53 percent last 
month. From 5.8 penxm in July 
and 6 percent in August 1984. 

The most successful in Fight- 
ing inflation in August was 
Luxembourg, where prices fell 
0.4 percenL Prices also dropped 
0.3 percent in West Germany 
and 0.1 percent in Denmark. 
Price rose in 03 percent in Brit- 
ain and Greece and 02 percent 
in Italy. 

Annual consumer price in- 
creases were lowest in West 
Germany, at 2.1 percent, and 
the Nethoiands, at 2.3 percenL 

At Lhe other end of the scale, 
inflation was 17.8 percent in 
Greece. 


Manila IMF Credit Seen in Jeopardy 


By Dinah Lee 

Washington Past Service 

MANILA — Only nine months 
after formal agreement on a S637- 
million standby credit to rescue the 
Philippines economy, the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund is to meet 
this week in Washington to consid- 
er suspending those credits. 
According to banking sources. 


onW 1.5 percent for the first half of Earlier this month. Prime Minis- 
this year.* 4 ter Caesar Virata warned that cora- 

At peril is the third tranche of an plete stagnancy in the economy, 
IMF credit, amounting to $106 mil- due to tight monetary targets, has 


lion, and a possible delay in the 
second tranche of a S925-miilion 
credit package, amounting to $175 
million, from the country's over- 
seas bankers. 

The banks conditioned their 
loans to the Philippines on its abili- 


undenmned his government’s abili- 
ty to collect taxes. With $26 billion 
in external debt, the country is ex- 
periencing its worse economic cri- 
sis since World War II. 

Factories are reported to be op- 
erating at only 40-60 percent of 
capacity, unemployment has more 
than doubled in tbe last year, to 15 
percent from 7 percent, and the 
number of under-employed has ris- 


the IMF may put a hold on funds loans to tne t^ppmes on usaon 
due to Manila because the govern- tytoget^ drelMf stondby creiL 
ment of President Ferdinand Mar- The second tranche of the IMF 

cos has fallen out of compliance ^ *JF* £ 
with the terms of an austerity pro- ■ gntd the IMF was satisfied 
gram on which the loans were con- Philippines bad fulfilled perfor- ““^percenL 
ditionaL This, in turn, jeopardizes mance entena set for Iasi March. However one 
loans from the nation’s commer- But banking sources m Manila say IMF inspectors found during a re- 
■ i h ._i. , j that “footdragging by the govern- cedi visit to Manila in August that 

“There is definitely a question ment had worsened, and “the IMF tax laws were largely not being im- 
markover thewhole IMF^tandby may be forced to take a hard-line plemented and that “onty half of 
crediL now "said one Manila bank- attitude. ^assessable tax was being wl- 

er. “The only argument that may In particular, die sources said, lected. 
mitigate in this government's favor the government has flowed the 
■e irr aufwie in i n n>iiArt country's money supply to grow 


is its success in bringing inflation 
down from last year’s 60 percent to 


Thailand Scraps Rice Tax 

Reuters 

BANGKOK — Thailand will re- 


Moreover, the banker said, tbe 
country’s money supply to grow IMF is disappointed in the lack of 

about 6 percent faster than allowed progress in dismantling crippling 
under the IMFs terms and has monopolies in the coconut and sug- 
faiied to reduce government spend- ar industries, which are controlled 
ing and increase revenue. The bud- by close associates of Mr. Marcos, 
get deficit is now believed to be Earlier this month, the governor 
running at double lhe level set by of the central bank suggested 
lhe IMF of 0.9 percent of gross amendments to the letter of intent 
domestic product, tbe measure of under which the IMF lending oper- 


move its 23-percent tax on exports — r , , ,, . . . 

of newly harvested rice, effective goods and services produced in the ales. However, it is unclear whether 
around next January, a government country minus income from opera- his proposals were in time for con- 
spokesman said Monday. lions abroad. siderauon this week. 



Competition Is Driving City of London to Sobriety 

• V? • J v rider ai 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — First came a gin 
and tonic, or maybe two. 

Then there woe both white 
and red wines to rinse down a. 
weighty meal featuring, say, roast 
lamb and soggy vegetables, fol- 
lowed by dessert — known as 
“pudding" no matter what it was 
— plus pat or brandy, and a 
cigar. A few years ago this was a 
fairly common lunch in the City 
of London. 


It is now typical to start with 
orange or tomato juice, have a 
couple of glasses of while wine 
over lunch and then move 
straight to the coffee. 

- in part, -xhe new habits are 
merely a local manifestation of 
the obsess on with health that has 
overtaken much of Europe and 
North America. They also are a 
consequence of a transformation 
of London’s financial district. 


where moves toward freer compe- 
let members compete on fee 


lion in London’s financial dis- 
trict. Faced with growing 
pressure to stay alert, bankers 
and brokers are tending to eat 
lighter, drink less and rush back 
to their desks. 

“Clearly, over the last 10 years 
the amount of alcohol has 
dropped off," said John Tysoe, 
who follows electronics shares as 
well as social trends at the stock- 
brokerage of Grieveson, Grant & 
Co. “The port and brandies have 
completely disappeared" 


rather than charge standard rates 
for trade in securities. 

The competitive threat has 
pushed many brokerages and 
merchant banks into defensive 
mergers and bloated the salaries 
commanded by top securities 
traders and analysts. It also has 
hastened the demise of tbe Cry’s 
old, genteel ways, such as over- 
looking a partner’s drinking 
problem and tolerating marathon 
lunches. 


“Time is getting shorter for ev- 
erybody.” said John Robert*®- 
senior partner at Wedd Diff 
lacher Mordauni & Co., one o 
the two top jobbers, or mantel 
makers, in Bntish securities. Mr. 
Robertson, whose firm is being 
acquired by Barclays Bank, saia 
he usually has a working lunen 
and limits himself to an hour or 
so. 

Edward Dove, a bond-fund 
manager at Lazard Securities 
Lid, hurries back to bis desk by 2 
P.M. to watch the opening of the 
U.S. bond market on his Reuters 
screen. He says bond traders have 
it even tougher than fund manag- 
ers. 

“You can't have people coming 
back three sheets to the wind and 
making prices.” he said “They’d 
just get picked off.” 

' Long before it was fashionable, 
the merchant bank of S.G. War- 
burg A Co. was noted for austere 
lunches. The. bank has two sit- 
tings in its executive dining 
rooms, one at 12:30 and the sec- 


“We use our lunches as 3 

a Warburg executive. To J 
Mient tbe discussion is n«« inter 
exl **Jj’ hv i Iinc i, " As for the 

edible and presentable 

Not to be outdone, a spot »• 

man for Kleinwori.BensonUd 

one of Warburgs 
said: “As far as we re wncernefl. 
lunch is very much part of the 
working day." 

As dog eats dog in tbe Lit> 

some executive even resort to a fc*. 

sandwich at their desks. If such j? 
barbaric behavior is comr P° r ‘ m 
Wall Street, however, it stm 
meets resistance on Thrjjgmjjj®" 
Street according to Bany Ph«P*- 

who tas spent 25 years ui the City 
as a fund manager, journalist and 

public relations man. 

He recalls having eaten at nis 
desk onto a few times in his long 
career- He describes it as * a hor- 
rid idea!" 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Sept. 23r 1985 

r value aaotattem are tap*! fed Or lhe Fuad i Usted with the excerfloo of some quotas Based anfmte irlee. 
i Indicate frequency of quotations supplied :ldl -daily; (w) - weekly; (bl -bi-monttilv. (rl -regularly. (U-urtttulurlV. 


Net asset i 
The marginal symbols I 


AL MAI. MANAGEMENT 

.(w) Al-Mal Trust. &a_ 


BANK JULIUS BAER A CO. Ltd. 

-I d » Bow-bond. 

-1 d I Contxir 

-I d 1 Dollar-Baer band Fd. 


-I d I D-fnark-Bow Band Fd. 

-I d ) Eaulbaer America -- — 

-( d ) Eaulbaer Europe 

-I d > EaulBoer Pacific 

-Id) Grotiar „. 

-I d I Sti ‘ 


BNP INTER FUNDS 

( w> Interbond Fund 

-(wl Infer currency USS- 
-f mi Inwncuirency dm. 


SF 91100 
SF 123ZJM 
_ S ID03J30 
DM 1029-00 

. s 1130.000 

SF 1785.000 

SF 11 WHO 

sf imi.oo 

SF 1570X0 


DM 


■Iw) iniarcurrencv Sterling— _ 

■Ini Intmauifv PacfHcOlfer— 

-twi mteraauitv N.Amar. Offer 

BANQUE INDOSUEZ 

-.1 d > Asian Growth Fund — - 

-|w) Dtverbona S 

-Iwl FiF-Amerlca 

l*| F IF- Europe 

-IwJ FIF-PoclHr 

■Id ) Indosuei Mulllbonds A— . 

-( a I Indus uez Muff mends B 


110.76 
1007 
J0J5 
10.10 
eat 
HUB 

1021 
8550 
1B07 
1X06 

1724 
9922 
_ 16X53 

-(d) IndBMMX USD (IWJA.FI _ S 1025.00 

BRITANNIAJ'OB 271. Sf. Heller, jersey 

-lw» Bril. Dollar Income . S 0277- 

■I w t Brlf 2 Manoq-Curr - S 9Ae 

-Id I Brlt.IntlAManouPOrtf % 1274 

-td I Bril. imu ManaaJtartf c 1132 

-Iwl Brit. Am. Inc. & Fd LJd-„ S 1276 

-Iw) Brlt-Gold Fund S 0-7X5 

-lw) Bril JMonag.Currencv — c 1X84 

-I d I Brlf. Japan Dir Peri. Fd 5 0987 

■ fwl BriUenev Gill Fund c 0223 

-(d) Brtt. World Lei*. Fund S 1.136 

-I d I Bril. World Techn. Fund S 0692 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-iw) Capital Inn Fund 

iwl Capital Iloilo SJ 


CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 


38.18 

1524 


-( d I Actions Suisses 

■id] Bond valor Swt 

Id ) Band Valor D-mark 

-( d ) Bond Valor US-OOLLAR 

-I d I Bond Volar Yen 


SF 42250 
SF 107.95 
DM 114.20 
_ S 12207 

Yen 1109000 

( d I Convert Valor Swf SF 119.15 

I d I Convert Valor US-OOLLAR - s 121-25 

•id) Canasec SF 709JJ0 

(dl CS Fonda Bonds SF 7750 

rdi cs ponds- mri 5F l>175 

Id) CS Money Market Fund S 1089.00 

Id 1 CS Money Market Fund _ DM 105X00 
•Id) CS Money Market Fund — _ c 1027.00 

I d ) Energte-Votor SF 1*750 

i d l Ussec SF 84X00 

I a I Euraaa-Valor — SF 169.75 

fd! Pacific -valor SF isi 25 

DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
Winchester House. 77 London Wail 

LONDON EC2 101 9209797) 

■(ml Finsbury Group Lid— 5 12*51 

-<m) Winchester Diversified. i 2154 

(ml Winchester Financial Lfd._ S 1009 

(ml Winchesler Frontier- S 105.02 

Iw) Winchester Holdings FF I05J9 

— — _ S 1141 

lw) Worldwide Securities S 4504 

(wl Worldwide Special S 1*17.71 


BIT INVESTMENT FFM 

-+( d ) Concentra 


DM 

DM 


3150 

9259 


-Hdl Inli Renienfond . _ 

Dunn S Haraltt 6 Lloyd Gearae. Bnmals 
(ml DBH Commodity Pool — . S 340.01 

(ml Currency & Gold Pool S 1*1.67 — 

(m) winch. L He Ful. Pool SS60JI9 — 

im) Trans World Fur. Pool $854.44 — 

EBC TRUST CO.(JERSEY) LTD. 

1-3 SoaJe Sl-St. Heller :0534- 36331 

TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

_ Id (inL: Bid s 1053 Offer SI0J66 

(d)COP.: Bld_ — S llASOffer 111.989 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 
I d I Short Term 'A' (Accuml $ MVS7 

-Id) Short Term 'A' (Dtalr I S 1.0013 

Id I Short Term 'B' (Accum) S 12373 

Id) Short Term'B' IDhlr) S 09213 


•Iwl Lotto Term. 


S 23-38 

FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1. Laurence Bounty Hill. EC4. 01 -623-4680 

-(w) FAC Alkmllc S 11 

-I wl F&C European S 13JM 

-fw)F&C Oriental S 26.91 

FIDELITY POB <70, Hamilton Bwmtuda 
-(ml American Values common— S 91.45 

-Im) Amtr Values Cum.Prel S 10354 

-( d ) Fldeiliy Amer. Assets S 68J1 

-( d I Fidelity Australia Fund S 1054 

-Idl Fidelity Discovery Fund— s 10.19 

-( d l Fidelity Dir. S«s.Tr S 12454 

Id) Fidelity Far East Fund. s 30J8 

-(d) Fidelity Inn. Fund S 6357 

-(dJ Fidelity Or len I Fund— — S V21 
Hdl FkHHiTY Frontier Fund — — S 1111 

-( d i Fidelity Pacific Fund s 13345 

,-( d ) FloellfY SpcL Growth Fd. S 1459 

-(d) Fidelity World Fund S 3X40 


FORBES PO MI7 GRAND CAYMAN 
London A Bern 01-839-3013 

-lw) Dollar lnram» S 


-(w) Forbes Hlsh me. Gill Fd. 
-<w) Gold Income- 


-iwl Gold Appreciation 

-(ml Strategic Trading 

GEFINOR FUNDS. 

(w) East Investment Fund, 
-(wl Scottish World Fund 


132 

9850 

758 

433 

1.19 


(w) State Sf. American. 


S 33166 
E 11641 

S 16052 

London :01 -4914230. Ganeva: 41 -22355530 
GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 
PB 1 19. St Peter Pari. Guernsey. 0481-28715 

-(w) FuhifGAM SA. S 11X15 

-|w> GAM Arbitrage In r S 12956 

-(w) GAMerlcn Ine— S 133J6 

(w| GAM Australia Inr S 102.11 

-(wl GAM Boston Inc S V»J5 

(w) GAM Ermlfoue S 1X29 

-lw) GAM Franoval SF 10751 

-(w) GAM Hang Kang Inc. S 9*50 

( w) GAM International Inc.— S 118.96 

-(w I GAM Japan Inc. S 9924 

(wl GAM North America lnc-_ % 10554 

Iwl GAM N. America Unit Trust. HHXSa 

(wl GAM Pacific Inc S 11X73 

(w) GAM Pens. X Char. WorKSw._ lOOOdp 
(wl GAM Pens. & Char. UJ<. Fd.„ IOOlOOp 

(wIGAMrint— S 110.01 

Iw) GAM SmoanorE'Matav inc S 99.40 

I wl GAM Steri & Inti Unit Trusl_ 13540' p 
‘ i 101-25 

S 15436 
S 114.99 


(w) GAM Systems Inc _ 
(Wl GAJM Worldwide Inc. 


'-■fiwl (Joyds Infl Europe 

—Kir) LUjyds mil Growth— 

-H wl Lloyds Inl'l Income 

-K wl Lloyds Inll N. America. 

-+(w) Lloyds inn Pacific 

-f [wl Lloyds Int'L Smaller Cos 
NIMARBEN 

-(d) Class A 

-<w ) Class B - U5- 

-lw ) Ctoss C - Jaw 


OBLIFLEX LIMITED 
Iwl Multicurrency — 
-(wl Dollar Ailed lum Ter 
-(wl Dollar Long Term. 

-(wl Jaoarwse Yen 

•(w) Pound Slerilna — 

(w) Deutsche Merit 

Iwl Dutch Florin . .. 
-tw) Swiss Franc 


SF 12030 
SF 178.40 
SF 32X50 
. S 105.15 
SF 13X80 
. S I4L3Q 

_S 8731 

S 98-20 

S 8X73 


_FL 

.SF 


11.1 

10.97 

10.94 

1131 

1U» 

1030 

1056 

10JJ9 


(w) GAM Tvche SJL Class A 

G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK! Ud. 

(d) Berry Pac. Fd. Ltd.- 

( r ) G.T. Applied Science. 


I d 1 G.T. Asean H.K. Gwth^d 

(d) G.T.ASh) Fund 

( a ) G.T. Australia Fund 

id) G.T. Europe Fund. 


Kw) G.T. Etira Small Cos. Fund. 
( r ) G.T. Dollar Fund—— 
Id) G.T. Bond Fund. 


931 

1X43 

1233 

184 

2437 

1152 

1239 

1430 

1030 

1158 

2339 

17.93 

3957 

2117 

1X99 


( d ) G.T. Global Techn tgy Fd 

( d I G.T. Honshu Pathfinder 

I d ) G.T. Investment Fund 

-I w ) G.T. Japan Small Co_Fund_ 

I rl G.T. Technology Fund 

(d I G.T. south China Fund _ 

HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT. INTL. SJL 
Jersey. PO, BO* 61 Tel 0514 7602* 

Berne. P.O. Baa 2622, Tel 4131 224051 

d I Crossbow { Far East I SF 951 

rtl riF mmnnrrnTI SF 2S.93 

dllnlnL Band Fund S 1054 

( d ) Ini. Currency U-S S 2655 

•I d » ITF Fd (Technology) S ’ 1355 

[d)0-SeasFd IN. AMERICA) __ S Z750 

JARDINE FLEMING. POB 78 GPO Kg Kb 

r I J.F Currency 4 Bond S 1X48 

r ) J.F Kong Kong Trust S 3446 

r ) J.F joo&Poc Conv Y 2230 

r I J.F Japan Trysl Y 4492 

r I J.F Japan Technology Y 17388 

r I J.F Pocinc Sec-S.IAcc) S 5.95 

LLOYDS BANK INTI. POB <38. Geneva 11 
-Wwl Uovds tnri Dollar — S 11650 


ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PB BS57B. The Hague (0701 469670 

-I a ) Sever Belegglngewt-f S 2850 

PAR1SBA5-GROUP 
•Id) Carle *o InlemaHona) — — S 

(d) ECU PAR ECU 102250 

-IwlOBLI-OM DM124252 

-(W)OBLIGESTION SF 9S.2S 

-( w) OB LI -DOLLAR S 120453 

(W)OBLI-YEN Y 10492930 

-Iw) OBLI-GULDEN FL1115.17 

-Id] PAROIL-FUNO— » 9232 

Id) PAR1NTER FUND S 11X94 

•(d) PAR US Trees. Bond’d B'_ S 111.17 
ROYAL B. CANADA.POB 246.GUERNSEY 
-9(wl RBC Canadian Fund LtCL_ S 1157 
-+( wl RBC Far East&PocIflc Fd. 1 1033 

-Hw) RBC InFI Capital Fd. S 2X68" 

-+(wl RBC Inri Income Fd. S 11.18 

-+(d I RBC Man. Currency Fd S 2443 

■HwJ RBC North Amer. Fd S 9.70- 

SKANDIFOND INTL FUND (463-236270) 

-I w I Inc.: Bid S 540 Offer S 536 

-(wlAcc,: Bid 5 54J Offer,. S 5.98 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

17 Devonshire So Jumdon-01 577-80*0 

-( r » SHB Bond Fund I 2328 

(wl SHB lull Growth Fund- S 2352 

SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES) 

(dl Amerlcn-Vaior SF 48830 

(d I D-Mark Band Selection— DM 12X73 

( d 1 Dollar Bond Selection S 1X08 

( d 1 Florin Band Selection fl 126.96 

Id ) Irrtervolor— SF 8355 

-Id) Japan Portfolio. SF 8I4JJ0 

(d) Sterling Band Selection— _c 10689 

- • ■ ' SF IQ955 

SF 34940 
SF 83.75 
SF 11640 
-Y 1046930 


-( d J Swiss Foretan Bond Set — 

-( d I SwUsvalar New Series- 

-I d ) Universal Band Select 

-I d > Universal Fund i_ 

-I d I Yen Band Selection. 


UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

-Id) Aims U-S- 9i SF 3440 

-( a ) Bond-invest SF *755 

-(d) Fonsa Swiss Sh.. SF 15840 

-Id] Janan-lrtvrat SF B574D 

•( d I 5afit South Afr. Sh. SF 35530 

-( d ) Shna (Stock price) SF 20240 

UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

-< d I UrilretTla DM 4600 

■in Unitwk DM 28.10 

-«M unlrah DM 8125 

-Id ) UNIZINS DM 11675 


(w 


Other Funds 

Actlbonds Investments Fund . 
Act Ivon inn.. 

Allied Ud — 

Aaulia Inlemattonol Fund 

Arab Fl nonce I.F— 

Arlene— 

Trust cor Ml F«L (AEIFI. 

Bondseiex- Issue Pr. 

Canada GW-Mortgoge Fd. 
Capital Preierv. Fd. inlt. 
Cliodel Fund. 


(w 
(r 
(r 

lw 
Iw 

13 

(w 

( d I C-J.R. Australia Fund. 

I d I CJ.R. Japan Fund 

(ml Cleveland Offshore Fd.. 

w) Columbia Securities 

r I COMETE 


s 2240 
S 11.19 
S 455 
5 14833 
S 89157 
S 1727.91 
t 10.15 
SF 13745 
S 943 
S 1147 
S 132 
S 942 
8 10.12 
S 2175.12 
FL 110.19 
, S 74239 


I w) Convert Fd. Inn A Certs, 
(wl Convert. Fd. Infl B Certs, 
(w) Doiwa Japan Fund— — 
Iwl D.G.C . 


8 1033 

S 2831 
Y 10.112 

S 07.19 

Id! D. Winer WldVfWe ivt Tsl 3 1149 

( r ) Drakkar Invest.Fund N.V *110149 

( d I Dreyfus America Fund S 942 

( d ) Drevfus Fund Inrt S 38.19 

(wl Dreyfus Inlercontlnenf— S 3X64 

(w) The Establish menl Trust S LW 

(d l Europe OWtoaflons Ecu 6X37 


S 1661X25 
. S 87752 
. S 1049 
SF 19665 
- S 759 
SF 6356 
. S 3078 
. S 87.97 
DM 4443 
. » 12442 
. S 10117 
. *121627 
SF 11452 
* KL01 
S 1043 
. 8 1645 

. * 29742 

( d I InlermlMng Mut. Fd. CL B _ s 83741 
(rl Infl Securities Fund— * 11.9* 

I d I Investa Dws DM 5452 

( r ) invest Atianftaues— — S a AS 

( r } I la I fortune Inti Fund SA S 1AM 

(w) Japan Selection Fund * 11449 

Iw) japan ffacBIc Fund. .. s local 

(ml Jotter Ptna. mtt. Ltd * 1 161X91 

I d I Klelnwort Benson inn Fd. S 2145 

(w) Klelnwort Bens. Jap. Fd_ S 7U73 

(wl Korea Growth Trust. 


lw) First Eagle Fund. 

(rl Fllfy Stars Ltd 

(wl Fixed income Trans 

(w) Fonsetex Issue Pr 

(W) Bm»W.ihI 

(w) Formulo Selection Fd. 

[d | Fondllolla 

( d I Govern m. Sec. Fund* — 

f d 1 Frankl-Trust Interzlns. 

Iwl Hflucmam Hides. N.V 

(wl HeCta Funds 

(wl Horizon Fund.. - — . 

Im) IBEX HohUngs Ltd 

( r I ILA-IGB 

I r > ILA-IGS 

f 0 ) Interfund SA 

(w) Intermarket Fund. 


KW 840166 
— I 946 

— *127666 
— S 17639 

— *134400 
— S 7101 
— S 1761* 
— S 17.95 
Y 1 0X669 JX) 

S IOlSI 

Id) NlkJtoGrowNi Package Fd *770740 

(w) Nippon Fund * 29-52- 

(m) NOSTEC Portfolio — *515724 

Iw) Novotec In vestment Fund— S 88.97 

(w) NAM.F. S 16543 

(m)NSPF.I.T * 171.98 

I d I Pad DC Horizon Invl. Fd S 10*0.14 

(wl PAMCURRt tnc. S 18.99 


I d ) Lei com Find. 

(wl Leverage Cap Hold— 
( d 1 1 IqWbaer 

(w) Luxfund— — 

Im) Magnatund N.V 

I a ) Med Iota num SeL Fd.. 

( r I Mefeore 

(w) NAAT. 


( r) PorianSw. R Est Geneva — 

( r 1 Permal Value N.v 

( rl Pletodes. 


(wl PSCO Fund N.V 

w) PSCO IniL N.V 

d I Putnam infl Fund, 
(r) Prt-Tech. 


(wl Quantum Fund N.v. 
Id) Renta Fund 
(dl Rent In vest 


5F 139730 
*131X77 
S 1013.12 
S 13X90 
S 105.44 
S 6547 
S 84348 
*422830 
LF 277X00 
LF 105S43 
S 110741 
S 124530 


d I Reserve insured Deposits — , 

W I Rudolf Wufll Ful Fd Ltd— 

w) Samurai Portlolta. SF 108.15 

d I SCI/Tech- SA Luxembourg _ s 972 

w I Seven Arrows Fund N.v. S 84X90 

wl Slate St. Bank Equity HdgsNV S 9X1 

Iwl Strategy Investment Fund— - * 22J39 

d) Syntax LldJlC ins* Al‘_ S 940 

w» Techno Growth Fund SF 8141 

wl Tokyo Pac. Hold. (Sea) S 8763 

w| Tokyo Pac. Hold. N.V S 12110 

(w) TrompodltaFwxl— s 7924 

I d I Turouolie Fund S 10533 

I w ) T weedy 3rowne n.v.CkmA— S 221 620 
(wl Twe-dy. Browne n.v.Cta»B— S 15*0.91 
(ml Tweedy^ruwno (U.K.I n.v — S 101347 

‘ d I UN ICO Fund - DM 8260 

d) UNI Bond Fund S 107147 

r I UNI Capital Fund S 114X84 

d I US Federal Securttes— S 1X12 

Iwl Vanderbilt Assets s 1x19 

d I World Fund S-A. S 1142 


DM 
P/V 
Redempl 


i Be ui. l » u 2 , ^ , SIL2i EV Oirtch Florin: LF - Luxembourg Francs) ECU - European Currency Unit: SF - Swiss Francs: a - asked; + ■ Offer Prlces;b - bid change 
S1 ° fl'JJf “•DJ- NA. - Not Available. N.C - NotLammunkatea.-o • New: S - suspended: S/S - Stock Spilt; ■ . Ex-Dividend; - Ex-Rts; **■ . Gross Performance Index July: 
empl- Price- Ex-Coupan; •• - Formerly Worldwide Fund Ltd; 9 ■ Offer Price lrrd.3% prelim, charge; ++ - dally stack price as an Amsterdam Slock Exchange 


Fahd Defends Saudis 
On Oil Output Policy 


imm 


Reuun increase their quotas under certain 

BAHRAIN — King Fahd of circumstances." be said. 

Saudi Arabia says that nobody has , “ We 811 tave arcumstances. We 
a right to criticize his counnVs oU ^ ? PEC ^ remaln ntacL but 
policies, which he said were being nobod >’ a right to object to 
conducted under special circum- others when their interests demand 
stances. that" he sakL“We have to exert dl 

"Nobody has a right to object to efforts to keep an agreement. Other 
the kingdom's policy under special countries have 10 realize that lhe 
circumstances," he toW students of kingdom is also a member of 


circumstances," be toM students of 
Uram al-Qira University of Mecca 
in a q uestkm-and- answer session 
Sunday night. The remarks were 
carried by tbe official Saudi press. 

Recent reports have said Saudi 
Arabia has arranged “netback" 
agreements td sell crude during 
fourth quarter 1985 at prides relat- 
ed to the value of refined oil prod- 
ucts, which .would be lower than 
official crude prices of the Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries. 

Gulf industry sources said Mon- 
day (hat Saudi oil production this 
month has averaged about 3 mil- 
lion barrels a day, up from Au- 
gust's 20-year low of 2 million. Its 
output has been well below its 
OPEC quota of 4.353 million bar- 
rels a day for many months, caus- 
ing severe financial strains. 


OPEC 

“We never say we have extraor- 
dinary powers to do the impossible. 
Saudi Arabia has remained com- 
mitted [to OPEC], and its od pro- 
duction has dropped from I I mil- 
lion barrels two years ago " 

“We have capabilities of produc- 
ing more than 11 million bands a 



King Fahd 


Capital Spending 
In U.S. Is Forecast 
As Static in Half 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — Capital spend- 
ing io the United States is likely to 
reg i s ter little growth in the second 
half of 1985. the Conference Board 
said Monday. 

It said a survey showed Ihji new 
appropriations by tbe 1.000 largest 
U.S. manufacturers fell to S28.6 
- billion in the second quarter, down 
4.5 percent from the first quarter 
and down 1.7 percent from the 
fourth quarter of 1984. 


The manufacturers also have 
sharply reduced their capital 
Earlier this month Tbe Washing- . spending expectations, predicting 
ton Post, reporting the Saadi dea- . joial spending of $96 billion in 


dal bat production dropped in a ® on . 10 ^ Britidwoiade Tornado 1985, up only 6 percent from 1984, 
bid bv the kingdom to work with of U.S. F-lSs, said part the board said. In the first quarter, 

other 'OPEC members in order not °f. payment, would be in Saudi it said U.S. manufacturers were es- 


iSjSJS oO, which Britain would resell. 

prices." he said. 

‘The kingdom is nobody's 


e es- j 

timating that their capital spending f 
would reach $105 billion in 1985. 


. “The latest survey findings now 
suggest little if any grow th in capi- 
tal spending over the next two 
quarters," said Douglas Cliggott, 
associate economist of the board. 


The board said a slowdown in 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


HELLAS YACHTMG. Yadrt Chart** 
Academes 2B, Athens 10671. Greece 


The Daily 
Source fax 
International 
Investors. 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 

LOW COST FLIGHTS 

LOW COST FLIGHTS 

HOTELS 

ACCESS USA 

... „ , Way Round Trip 

New York F15 Uj F2990 

Iro Angetes F2400 F4400 

Ovcogo F2390 F3690 

Momi, F2750 F4190 

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Opflcn FH30 F5170 

Mortied F1870 FX180 

more destinations _ 

IS* dacounl on 1st dess 

PARIS fob m 22) 46 94 
fCor.bc 1502) 

NT ONE WAY $150. Evoryday N.Y. - 
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SWITZERLAND 

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Td 041 / 301)11 Telex 72657. 

US IMMIGRATION vwh, Altys. Spite 
& Rodney. 1925 Bricked Av. Miarrv fl. 
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EDUCATION 

ARTS 

VIBMA. INTENSIVE GOMAN 
courses (Goethe testifutej, beginning 
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SUPtABOAU tapestry, signed 4 num- 
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CoS free from U5^ 1-800-237-0892 
CeB free from Hondo; 1 -000-282-0891 
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LONDON 
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AH major owSf cards accepte d . 


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Td: 736 5877. 


LONDON 

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67 CMtam Stru t 
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01-229 2300 or 01-229 4794 


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128 W^nore Si.. London W.l. 
AB man Cre dit Cards Accepted 
Tefc 437 47 41 / 4742 
12 noon - mrdmght 


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ESCORT SBtYICE 01-834 6607 . 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

GU8JE S ERVICE from 5am 
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THE HAGUE (0) 70-60 79 96 


ZURICH 

Caroline ( wo rt Service 
Tel: 017252 61 74 


ZURICH 


- . + J win service 

Tel: 01/57 7S 96 


MADRID INT’L 

ESCORT SERVKX 
TEL 2456548. CRBCT CARDS 


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TEL 01/ 363 08 64 -022/ 34 41 86 


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CRB}ir CAHX. 2330319 


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TIL 01/47 55 82 


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Tel: 370 7151. 


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MW YORK. MIA, QABRSSiE & Re- 
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Tel: 01-243 1442 


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JEWELER - CREATOR 

IF YOU COME TO PAHS DON’T MISS 
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SECONDHAND, 

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PARIS 8TH 

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el service. Tefc 069/44 77 75 

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LONDON BAYSWATSt ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tefc 01 229 0776. 

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RAMOURT ■ KTRA Eiaxf & Travel 
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guardian, and I told the oil minister TTnnPptni* Viei* 
to tell our brothers in OPEC that AAvUCUiCI " 10*1 
tins is our position," the agency n , • 

quoted King Fahd as saying. I O fi OTIfl rOSSlble 

■ 03 Barter Doubtful United Press International 

5 ^ "J® 4 1 ° BONN — Erich Honecker, the ?P ilaI s P eodin 8 was signaled 

King Fahd said, “Every person is wnllicra Saudi pur- ^ Ctmn9n leader, probably will fV a «« temng in manufacturers' 

Sasrjsawr— 

“Ofl barter is not so far a cqmpo- Bfld said Sunday that Mr. Hon- over the first quarter. • 
nent in the deal, and there is agood ‘ ecker would make the trip- unless. 

chance that it may not form part of the summit meeting in Geneva be- •• The board said manufacturing 
the payments agreement at all tween PresidentRonald Reagan ' profits fell to S19-5 billion in the 
when ii is finalized," the newsletter and Mikhail S. Gorbachev ended in 
said, citing Saudi sources. controversy. 


wants. I don't say this is better , . ; 
What is better is to keep Within tbe 
line," drawn by OPEC. 

“What others allowed for them- 
selves, we also allow ourselves. . . . 
Everybody knows that the king- 
dom relies on oil. We do not inter- 
fere if they sell oil at lower prices or 


first quarter, down from $23.1 bil- 
lion in lhe second quarter of 1984. 


U3NDGN GAMBIA ESCORT Sef- 
vico. Tet 01-229 6541. 


MUMCH WELCOME Eicort Ssrvice. 
Tefc 91 84 59 


AMSTERDAM FOUR R0SB Enrt 

Sente W 3M6&6 


DOMNA 

■ GuteB 


AM5IBDAM ESCORT 

■t i friij irm 


DUSSBDORF-SaK FS Eicon vervfc*. 

Tel: 0211/443741 or 373322. 


Sente. Mff/364656, Cre* Car* 


LONDON U)CY ODBC 6 ESCORT 

Service 221 2B0F 


Sente. Tet 311 79 to or 311 7936 


Tel: 212-581-1948. 


Escort Sente. Tel: 02/7317641 . 


guide service, Tel: 733 07 98 


Tefc 01/42 88 X. 


tenia. Tel 00/55-72-10. Vba ccrdt 


UHOUETTFS ESCORT 
Lorefan 01-899 0485. 


SBtVICE. 


Shipyard Files 
For Protection 

The Associated Press ■ 

SEATTLE — Tacoma Boat- 
building Co., a builder of mili- 
tary and commercial vessels in 
Tacoma, Washington, filed on 
Monday for protection from its 
creditors under Chapter II of 
U.S. Bankruptcy Code in a fed- 
eral court in New York. 

The shipyard, which has been 
in financial trouble for many 
months, listed its assets as 
S 163.5 million and its liabilities 
as S194.6 million. The filing 
came after two groups of banks 
late last week demanded repay- 
ment of nearly SI 18 million in 
loans and credits. Tbe compa- 
ny's directors met Friday but 
made no statements. 


Help for U.S. Thrift Insurance Unit 


(Continued from Page 11) 

dents might resist such a potential 
liability. 


since word of the new liquidating 
□hit began to spread throughout 
the inrfurtiy. ' 

... Nevertheless, supporters say the 
costs will be wrath the results. 

“The FSL1C staff is just too 

nail IA i:...'J.i- ft - 


change for the S3 trillion in assets 
that have already been marked 
down to reflect current market val- 
o-i. l. ^ ues and the $400-mfllion equity in- 

StiU, the 406 Crap — named vestment. The FSUC would then 
after the section in the National be able to exchange, the notes for 
Housing Act of 1 934 that provides cash whenever it needed the funds. 

for its charter — is being welcomed . n .. .« — 

by just about everyone in the indus- To meet payment on the notes. S3 billion in as- 

try, as well as U5. legislators, ^e liquidating corporation would sets, said William B. O'Connell, 
Moreover, it pre-empts any move *» able borrow from the Home of the U.S. League, 

by Congress, which some say could T 0311 Bank System, which in tuna / “ey nave 25 people doing liqui- 
Itad to a merger between tbe would have to sell its debt in the ^ous. That's ridiculous. And the 
FSUC and FDIC — a step that marketplace. This is where market -O™ of Management and Budget 
few want but that many think wiD catchers say they have already seen ™ staff of the entire 

be the only eventual solution. cost of borrowing by the re- PBUC to only 100.” . 

As recommended to the bmk B« OQ ^ nks "*■ - Mr. O’Connell said that the new 

(ward by the U.S. League of Sav- According to Andrew Canon of corporation, whicb win not be un- 
mgs Institutions, the largest thrift Shearson Lehman Brothers, the in- der the control of budgetary discre- 
mdustry group, the FSLIC woold terest rates on Home Loan Bank tion of the UA government, would 
get notes from the new corporation debt has risen 25 basis points, or be able to pay higher salaries and 
worth about S15 billion in ex- one-qnarter of a percentage point, attract more qualified personnel. 


It 


| Lloatmg-HafcNotes 


Sept 23 


Dollar 


SUKKSTAR ESCORT SBIVJCE. Lon- 
don 01-938 3604. 


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Sncti 91 

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INTKHN \T1(>\ 11. HER 41.1) TKIBI NE. Tl'ESOAY. SEPTEMBER 24, 198S 


Page 1-5 


m 


Monda»% 



T«Mh Include ftw nationwide prices 
VP to the dosJmi an Wall street 
rvad Ho no f reflect late tnum elsewhere. 


HMcorti. . ‘ 

HtflhLO* 5HKX 


Phr. -no. PE 


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(Continued from Page 12) 


it 


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Wim pW" 120 41 19 693 29? 82 29% 

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19% T3V> PocRSPO.00 Hi 

im. 1319 PoeScJ Mt 27 11 
B2W- 6I» PocTet* 5X3 80 I 
15> . 9ft PneTkr e U 7 
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KM Poctfoi 4jp 123 


43ft 26ft'PoinWb 49 10 II 
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39 • : 33 PoJmBc 120 16 31 
4l»fa 30ft PonABK 70 17 11 
Vft J PonAm 
lit PenAwl 

21 lift PondcKn 31 u a 
41ft }7ft PanhEC 030 *0 11 
I ' 3b PontPr 3B 

19% Oft Paarefr m 15 
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19%. lift PnrkEI 11 

0% A PorkOrl JH 10 

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21% 1A ParfcPn JW U 48 
jft ift PatPtrl 7 

16U lift PovNP 41 U 11 
23% 13ft PorCsh .16 1.1 13 

lift Ufa PraJMv 70 ‘ 

Ift . ft Penn 

58% 43ft PanCon 12 

S» '44% Penney 236 47 9 
27% 22ft PaPL 276 103 > 
40ft 30ft PHPL of 440 12.1 
40ft 32 -PoPL Df 470 117 
mb 60 PaPLpf BM 1X3 
29ft 24V. PoPl.dPrt.-t2 11.9 
27ft 21ft PaPLdMUO 117 
74 50ft PaPL pr 040 120 
26ft 23ft PoPL **325 114 
31ft 26% PoPL dartXS 124 
100ft 03 PoPL or II DO 10.9 
4lft 34 Pcnwlt 2X0 50 12 
25% 20 -Panwpf 140 
50 30% Psrvuol 270 

91 74ft Pern DfB BOO 
18% 12% PeooEn 170 
24% uWPeoBvs 70 
60ft 39ft PepsiCo 171! 

30ft 21% Pert. El 76 


» 17V. 16ft 17% 4- % 
W J5 M»* lift + ft 
1233 72% 71ft 71ft— ft 
4 nil 12% 12% — ft 
4Q 2Sft 28 28ft + ft 

37 33ft 33 33 ft 

670 30ft & 29ft 

49 2tft 27ft 27% ♦ ft 

4 33ft 33% 33% 

36ft 36 36ft 
3 508 7% 7ft 

233 3% 2ft 2ft 

164 14ft 14ft 14% 

477 33ft 33ft 33ft * % 

453 6% 6ft 6ft 

96 16ft IF- 18% 9 ft 

e& 9ft 8ft 9 + ft 

7 14 13% U + ft 

409 4ft 4ft 4% 

496 33ft Mft 33% +1 

56 l*t* 19% 19% 

288 2ft 2ft 3ft 

1B0 12 lllfa 12 + ft 

802 14ft 14 14 

17 2716719 10% 105: 10% + ft 

197 % $» % 

*74 50% 19% 50 

n»7 49 4817 49 + % 

762 24% 26ft 34% + ft 
4Uz 36ft 36ft 36ft— 1 
200t 38ft 38Vt 3SV) +l<ft 


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lift l?ft SeScMBllg 12.9 40 

tah 13% MC pIC 2.10 17.9 
37ft 17% SeaLnd M 24 8 
Sft 1ft SeoCe 
44ft 29ft Sturm 
21ft 15ft Veaaul .. . . 

32ft 21'- SmtAlr 44 14 17 
12% 22% SnlP* 1.00 £0 1 
45ft 44ft SearteG US J4 1> 

39ft 29% 5 tan \M U 9 

107% P7 Stsfl pt 9 jD 8* 8.2 
»)• IMSKPMlUt U 6 

18% 11% StULI _ .. .. 

4D>: 26% SwCot 48 1 4 1» 

16ft 11% Shut In -72 4 1 23 

26% 15 ShOMln _4° 39 l 

«ft 39ft SIOHl 2J7P 60 8 

30% 22% ShMGto JO 34 S 

40 25ft SttrwHl 92 2-5 13 

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lift 12 StWmrM 40 49 13 

19ft lift SftTPDC 144 93 9 

41 26% Stnaar .* ).* * 

33’i 37ft Moor at 330 II J 

II 12V UriM 41 34 76 

15% 7% SnttMiin 

71ft 50% SmkB 
79ft 45ft Smuekf 
41% >1% finasOn 
15% 12% Savder 
43ft lift Banal 
19ft Tin SonvCn 
37% 22% 5NLU 

32% S6urcC 

23% 18% SrcCpot 240 107 
25V 20 SCiE Irf 150 104 
30ft 231* Solarln 3/0 94 12 

4953 3» n Saudarn 140 U U 

35 S*% So*mk 140 4.1 10 

10 6% 5a«tPS 213*294 43 

.« -r - , 27ft 20ft SCcrtEd J16 « 7 

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6ft 6 2 26V 19V SaniGtl 140 79 ■ 

TV 1 44 »% SNETI 2.M 6l II 

1 39% 11V SoNEet IK 104 

7T* 22ft SoRr at 240 94 

11 34ft SMTflCo >-73 84 

39ft 24% SoutBid 140 2.9 9 

Sift 491* SovttdPl *40 74 ,, 

16% II*- ScRpV 12 .» U 

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51ft 47 SomkPt 6709114 
II 16ft SwAtfl -u 3 17 
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41 47% U t ft 

12ft 13 13ft ♦ 1* 

33% Kto 33% +1 

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40 15ft 1»v lay- — ft 

6 I4ft I6<- 16V 

SJ5 20 19ft 19V - ft 

148 4 V» 4 V 4V — ft 

- “ \l ,J S Sft ^ is i 5 
S S3 SS S3 : 3 

U 64% Lift 64% 

4187 34ft 33ft ,U%- ft 
167 105% 104% lOg* — ft 
1448 36ft 25% 2S%— % 

1 17V 17% 17% 

236 37V 36ft 37% +1 

134 14% 14% 14ft— ft 

62 21% 30% 31 * V 

10ft Sft 39% *9% ♦!% 

100 37% 23% 23% + '<• 

J6ft 35% 36V + % 
7% 7V 7% + % 
Uft 13 13V ♦ V 

18ft 17% IB 
25% 34ft 35% +lft 
31% 31% Sift + ft 
14 13% 13V 

Ift 8 Bft * ft 

3849 66ft 64 '6 65% +1% 

17 77% 76 7*9»-r *■ 

500 35ft 34Vr 35 + ft 

167 15% 15 15ft * ft 

9i» 64 8 903 33% Uft 33ft 6 ft 

3 159 14 13 4336 15% 15% 1S% + ft 

14? M 25 ^ 31ft 31ft lift- % 


ift 6 13 IBM 22 
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502 70 
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28V 28V 
26 26 
70 70 

28 28 


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88V] 63V SwBeD 
29 19% SwEnr 

26% 19% SwtPS 

17% lift Soorton 

27% 15% SPtCtP 
59 34% Snorrv 

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43% 35ft Sooor D 
72% 45 SmrtOh 
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lift 11 SIMOIr 


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188 

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9 22 ft 72 271 1 + ft 

1 24 34 24 — % 

9 27 ft 27 % 27 ft 

101 44 % 44 % 44 % — ft 

U 4 29 % Tflft 39*5 + ft 

77 TV 7 JV + ft 
37 SO 34 % 34 ft 24 ft + ft 

1999 19 % 19 ft 19 % + ft 

lifl 34 33 ft 74 

437 39 % 39 % 39 ft + V 

1 36% 38% 31% - % 

2 36ft 26V 26ft 

94 26% 26 % 36% 4- ft 
1028 3S% 3S 35 

S3 51V SI 5I<- 
453 13% 13ft 13ft — % 
581 7V] 7V 7% 4- ft 

1 49ft «ft 49'.* + ft 
615 25% 3S 35ft- % 
117 12ft 11% 12% 4- ft 
197 16% lift 16ft 
U57 BOV T9ft 80ft 4- ft 

95 76ft 76 26ft + ft 
1156 23% 23V 23 -t % 

73 15 14 % 14 % + ft 

68 20 ft 19 ft 30 ft * % 
4178 50 49 V 49 % 4- % 

I 33 % 33 % 31 % 

M 341 37 36% 36 % + ft 

25 18 1975 49% 69ft 19% 4-lft 
in 32 419 20% 20ft HSli — ft 

27 12 477 21 38% 281) 

U 17 IBS lift 11"< U% 

14 7 2213 44 V 43 % 43 % 9 ft 


59% 4lv UnElnl 6J0 115 

34 V 36V UnLl otlUOO It 

71 53ft UCIML IDO 114 

33 JO 1 -. UnEIPf 1« III 
Sli 15 UnCI ol 2.13 >1-0 
tf 41 UnLl Pi 7 48 11.5 

72 Jlft UCIPtH 8 00 121 

34 32 UnEtpn 
53V UnPoc IH 
115ft B7U unPtPl 725 
71% 12ft Uniroirl 

HI U Umrlpt 
5V IV UntlOr 
32V 10V UnBrnd 
ir.-. «% uordpt 

33% IT 1 - UCOTV5 . 

43% 23% UnEnrO 3 M 
32% 13V UUIum 2 M 
19 12 UHhMW 220 113 

31% MV UlIhlOf 

35 15ft Unillnd 
43ft 3SV Um I inn 
47% 30% UJtrBfa 
Uft ill. UtdMM 

3% 2 UPlMn 
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8% S'. USHom 

43ft 31ft USLaai 
40V 34'- USSTWt 
31V 22'- USBUfl --- 
54ft 49V U55H Pi 7>J0tl40 

31V 34% US5HP4 2.35 

39% H'fa USTob 1.73 
64% 62V ULWoil 5-73 

12 ^«.40U!fiS7g 

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25 19ft Unltel JM «-3 f 1774 

15V UWR 111 73 H 24 


1300f U-. 55 '» JP8-JB 

34 S3 31 V 31V — *• 

100: ni 70 70 + V 

36 J6'6 »;* 26% * ft 

6 19' 1 1«% 19% 

«20l 64ft 64** 441) 

IDOL 64 66 66 —I 

116 33V 22% Z2V ♦ % 

115* 4*’-) 45*6 *6ft +1 

: io* io* io* 

21% 7lft ft 

63 61ft * % 

.. JU 3ft + ft 

II d 21 30V 20V — V 

3 16V l*ft 14V— ft 

53 19 31V 31V 31V 

5 * 32 1415 42V «!% *3 — 

93 ■" 


LLSl Futures 


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18 31- 31 31ft * ft 
1 42 41% 41% — ft 

is ft: tr « * a 

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*1) « A 


M 2.5 13 1033 3ft 36ft 36% + 

19 IS 6655 31ft 30% 31ft + ft 

985 
293 


5.1 II 
75 B 


1935 


53ft 53ft 53 — ft 

11V 31 31ft + ft 
M% 33% 33%—% 
76V 7619 76ft — ft 
7ft 7ft 7ft 
38V 38 38% 4-1V 

34V 33V 34V * 13 
31ft 38li 30% — V 
17% 17% 17% 


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SOTbum.n.ra^-lgWiPtrousMI +ia 

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13800 138JM _P« C. 

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prrNrOar Open lot KLI42 U9 66 
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112000 an.- cents perm- 

905 274 Del 5« 

7 75 10C Jon L70 

933 134 Mar 603 

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Pr*w- Dav Open nil. 93033 up 78 

COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tons- s Per ion 

233? ms Dec 2315 

7310 1955 Mae 2» 

3340 I960 MOV MIS 

7345 mo JU 2*2 

1345 2023 Sep 2430 

2355 2955 Dec 2425 


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9140 8643 

91.15 P-M 

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89.91 8870 

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50 

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3393 

2422 

3435 

2430 

3435 


517 

573 

567 


3294 

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9410 

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572 

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38 31% UnlllFd *.v '« u jTx* n% ilh 

23% 18 UflLeal 1 00 4J B 26 21% 21% 

io% 9 usiieFa i-S8°'S-2 ,, 

»% 21 UlaPL 17? 97 13 

37% 23ft UIPLPl 3 80 109 
28V] S% UIPLpf 790 106 
30 16V UIPL Pi 204 108 

27 17% UIIIICo 1^0,62 1 

34V 1BV UI1IC0W 2.61 111 
35ft 10ft UlllCOPt 4 13 122 


668 
679 
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7.79 
658 
6 74 
678 
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501% 

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577ft 

571 v 

576V 

535ft 

573 

STB 


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i« 571% +-1S 


em. sales Prcy Safts A® 

Preu. OavOaen Int. 20775 UP*» 

ORANGE JUIC E (NYCEI 

VMM 13470 mg 133.95 -lg 
IBOOO 12370 Jan ^ =]| 


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17 10% 10".® 10t* 

390 24ft 23'4 24 
7 35% 35% 25% + ft 
6 37% 26% 27V. + % 
T 18% 18V lift + V 

45 22% 72% 33% + V 

13 Ml) 23ft 73ft 

4 34 33 V 13V- V 


IB400 
14300 
7IUJ0 
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167 00 
14600 
16700 


148-50 

14570 


77 1 
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1.» W * 

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41% 3 Sft VF Carp 1 1? 

14V 5ft V otcro 
25% 14 Valerat 3 44 15.1 
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38V 19 VanDrn 100 4 A 
4 v 2V vorco 

47% 76V. varlan 
13V 9V Varo 
75% lev Veeco 
12 3*t Vtnda 

11% 9’- VeslSe 

57 39% viocom ._ 

49ft 36ft VoEPp 500 189 
73V] 57ft VoEPpI ?-T! 1*0 


28 10 403 40% J9% 397- — V 

™ 447 16V 9V 9ft— ft 

16 I3V Zf i 32 V +■ V 
50 TV 3' j 7ft— V 
63 72ft HV Mft + ft 
199 4 V 4% 4% — % 

458 28V 27V 37ft 
81 12ft 13’ « 12V— ft 
104 17V 17% 17ft 
39 8ft 8V flV + '* 
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To a 1060 tl 45V 46 — % 

loot 46 46 4* 

73am 76'" 70'. 70V — V 


26 9 IS 

40 37 M 
40 27.4 

1 .200104 
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S Prmlan 
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9ft 

16% 

64 31 Petri* 140 34 IS 

3B% 74% PclRs X77B144 

17 M PelRspl 157 97 

6 3VU Ptrlnv .900284 


II X} 1 - 30V 30’. 
140x101 100 100ft + Vi 

159 38% 18 38V + U 

V 34 33% 24 + V 

377 461* 46V 46% + % 

100; 87 87 87 —3 

143 16V 16ft 16ft 
. , 116x »% aft 23% + % 

343 11 4312 60ft 59% 59V * V 
2J 14 1433 26 25 ft 25"] + % 


?*£ 19% 5MMR* 5 44 9 99 12ft 13% 12% 
16V 13ft 5MMKR J* M 1M(J MVJ in. 28 


70ft SPo VOEPPI 7.45 11. 
37% lift Vlshovs 
48V 33ft Vomod 
85 66ft VuIcnM 280 


16 
n 

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1001 67 67 67 

117 25ft 25ft 25' 

5 48V 48V 48'. 

5 BHi 81V 81% + % 


67 
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74 7 
9 18 


53% 33% Pfizer 

34 13% PftelpD 

55 34 PtMlppr 5-00 

46% 28 PWtsrS JS» 


1.14C1S8 6 VS 7V 7% 7% 

163 14% 14ft 14V — % 

91 41 4QV 40V + % 

34 26 25% 25% 

50 16% 16 1613 + ft 

IS 3ft 3ft 1% + ft 


53 PhflEpf 8.75 U.7 
Vu PhilEpf 141 138 


16% 12% PhlloEl 220 14.9 6 
32 73ft PW1E Of -3JB0 1X1 
36ft 71 PhilE of 440 IL9 
69 
II ft 
10% 

61 

10% 

74 
61 
60 
73V 
95ft 


148 11 1410267 47V 46% 47V +2 
1449 20V 19 3SIU +1% 
98 341 51ft 51 +1 

14 20 7037 3SV 37% 37% + % 


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26 15V SftvnJ 120 C8 «5 SS •£ 

33V 36 5lwWm 148 64 17 
14 10 SlkVC Pi JOB 74 

45% 37% STMieW 140 4J | 
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nft 36% StaoShP 1.10 XV 10 
21% 16ft StorEq 1.98 9J 14 

^ 40 J 

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13550 Mrs 

I Esi Soles Prev. Soles 13J79 

| Pi e«. Dav Open Int. 4SJ17 W»235 

SOYBEAN OIL ICBTI 

40 000 Bw- donors oeMOO tbs. 

7037 2043 Oct 2100 

2955 2060 Dec 20J» 

2907 2080 Jan 2ltt 

2&60 21.15 Mar 21J5 

7745 MO MOI- 

IS 35 31.75 Jul 

25.15 3140 AIM 

2405 21 BO 5cfl 

eJfie, ”■“ Pm. sales 14861 

Prev. Day Open HU. 51409 uaJM 

^M C mmLum-<gJU«aer«W|5fl ^ 1J7Vs +j^, 

iSE !S" «». &■ S; S. S *«! 


ISIS ISJS mSC i£io 12650 12600 12LM 

15750 I21M Jul . 12 “° 

EM.Sales 500 Prev. Sale* 3J3 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 4463 up 78 


— 70 
— .75 


3145 

31 .95 

21.95 
21.95 


21.10 
2U4 
3141 
7L80 
?9 IK 
2240 
23-33 
2245 


2040 

2070 

2090 

2140 

2145 

2140 

21.95 

21.95 


2149 

21.19 

2148 

2145 

WIW 

2340 

2335 

2245 

22.15 


+3.10 

+170 

+350 


+350 

+450 

+500 

+300 


+43 

+57 

+5S 

+50 

+58 

+55 

+55 

+55 

+45 


Metals 


COPPER (COMEX) 
25000 IM.- ccfinperlb. 


5BL05 5910 5605 


BA 9 
34 9 
11 


48 


271 

ltf 

60 

628 


48 

242 


% 


.9 9 
74 11 
IS 
142 

144 _. 

-17r 14 
140 34 10 


B PhilEpf 143 135 
46ft PhilE Of 70S 1X8 
7% PhilEpf 148 135 
54ft PhilE of 958 1X4 
47V PhilE Of 700 1X4 
46ft PhilE of 745 135 
15V PililSub 142 64 13 
73% PhliMT 400 54 9 
26% 13% Phi loin 50 25 13 
18% 11V PhllPI 6 180 85 7 
26% 22% PhIPfpt lJHe 64 
28ft 20% PhilVH M 15 13 
35% 23% PtedAl 
34 25% PfeNG 

25 V 14% Pier 1 
611) 38ft Pllsbrv 
34 22% Pioneer 

16% 13ft PlonrEI 
45ft 29% PlfnyB 
Uft 9% Plltdn 
a 17 PkmPIr 
17% 8% PkmRs 
11% 7 Phmfrn 

13% 8% Plovbov 

28% 19ft Plesev 
23 13V PoaoPd 

33% 34V Polarid 
19% 10ft Pondrs 
21 ft 15V PooTol 
22% 14% Pertee 
80ft 73 Partr pi 
21% 14ft PorfGE 
74% 18ft PorGpf 
35% 30 PorGpf 
34% 29% 

38ft 28 P0llti_- „ 

34 22% PolmEt 2.16 75 9 

41% 32V PatElpf 4JM 105 
25ft 18% Preml % 46 15 17 
40% 31 Prlntrk 240 55 


1644 14% 14% 14% + V 

tool 29 29 29 — ft 

10? 34 34 34 + ft 

tin. A* *J *4 

47 10% 10V 10V 

$8 1® 9% 9% 

6102 58ft S7 57 —1 
41 9% 9ft- 9ft — ft 

130x Tl 70 71 

8502 50 V 57") 58% - % 
2901 57V] S6ft 57ft + % 
33 21ft 21ft aft 
3000 77% 77ft 77% +1% 
196 24% 24 24 — V 

2993 11% lift 11% 

245 34% 24% 24% + V 
61 25% 2SV! 2Sft — ft 
1142 30% 30'i 30% + V 
23 32Va 31% 31%- ft 
.. 399 23 22% 22% 

2.9 13 1192 59V 58V 58% + % 
54 i 206 23% 22% 23 — ft 

63* 141] 15% UVS + % 

575 37% 37V 37V + ft 

335 Uft 13% Uft + V 

125 20 TVVl 20 + % 

126 16ft Uft 16V . 

U 10 9% 9%— % 

9 8% 9 + ft 


45 11 
3 13 


16 
1.1 13 
17 70 


88% 38% 

31% 17ft StrtMtn 
19% 14V SlrHRI 
6ft 3% SOOvSIl — 

39 38% SunCh At *A 12 

12ft *% SonEI 
52% 43% SunCo XM 
108% 98% SunC Pt LB 
49V) 40 Sunds'r 1J0 
lift ShSwIM 
7% 7 StKlMpI 1.19 1AI 

38% a SulTref 1J0 X8 
22 14% 5woVol * 

48% 26ft SuoMk l A 

B 2 ;; % p |* |»:s 

?sM Mt 

■ T -I 


r 26% 26ft 26ft— % 
1480Z 13ft 13V 13ft + % 
3 39% 39% 39% 

79ft 27% 29V +1% 
37% 37ft 37% + V 
19% 19% 19% 

3 1% 3 

... U 87% 88 * V 

63 IS 17ft 17% 

37 17% 17ft 17V« — % 
31 5% W SH 

5 349: 14ft 34ft + V 
69 10V » 10 

957 50% 49% Silft + ft 
1 102ft 102ft 102ft 
1B3 47 46ft 46ft + ft 
3111 6 5% S% + V 

175* 7% »ft 7% + ft 
177 Uft 31% 31% + % 
519 19% 19ft ltft + » 
655 44V A 43% +lft 
77 13V 13 13ft— % 


13 .5 


35 

35 13 


a ii u 

.I6B U 12 

13 26 

ffynuJ 

,50 12 121 1JB 


20% 20% ^ + ft 


fso .. 

5J0 75 
1.90 10.1 
250 11.1 
440 1X1 


a 

2681 


Bf a"» n 


13% 13% 
a 31% 
11% 10% . 
17 17 17 

15% 15ft 
lOz 78ft 78ft 
423 18% 18% 

3 23% 23% 

30 33ft 33ft 
23 aft 37V 
V 33% 33% 

453 29 


nr* 


+ % 


20% 14% PrimeC 
36% 16% Prf ' 



^ iS% -3^3“ gSRS?S + 

15 8 PrdRsi 22 M Uft Uft ie* 

47V 35% Proler 140 3A 15 3 3»% »% »%— 
ft 3 PruRCn . • 1*6 gj j 8 — ft 

H» 31V 21.. 2U* + ft 


3% 2 Pro 

'hiL 

71V Pj In Pi 
6ft PSUi pt 
40% PS In df 
52ft P5lnpf 
3ft PSvNH 
Bft PSNH Pt 

Bft PNH pfB 

24% 12% PNH Pic 
a lift PNHOtD 
av 11% PNH PfE 
19% ”? PNHhfF 
20% 9% PNH pfG . 


4V 

»% 

26 

8% 

S3 

71 

8% 

Uft 

17V 





4i 


39ft 71% P5vNM 2JB8 105 9 
37ft 24ft PSvEG X84 ill 7 
15 im* PSEGpr 140 lBO 
71ft 70 PSEGpt 8-U llJ 
23V 17% PSEGpt 2.U 11-3 
73ft 57% PSEG P{ 790 1} J 

X "RSSftt , . un 

T5V t'6 Pueblo .16 U 11 

,r ,t%s5gpWi s 

31% l«% K^otoT 541 3J ‘ 
10V 6% Pvro ' 


& b 1 

4§V «V J9V— V 

“t£ 4 »^6 

srir I- 

IS 

220 27% 2% ^ 

60S 28ft 27% 28V 

3 M 14 U — ft 

70 ?B ; 70 

,0^ 85 69V +1^ 
47 2% Ift V*-* 

s !52 

182 19V 1B% 'Aft + 

97 6% 6% 6%— ft 


53ft U OuofcOs 1A0 W 14 
105 91 OoaO pf 956 95 

S% 16% QuakSO 50 65 « 
10ft 6% Qmpi w* 


24 


646 ®8,S W, 1 S , ' i ' + * 
100)100 106 M® 

m 70ft TCA 20V 
im 7ft 7V 7% + ft 
409 26% 28% 3%- 


SS SftSt^T IS 1» 21% 20% 20%-V 


541 

154 

150 

450 

355 

50 


9% 6% RBInd 

49% 24 RCA . 

40 29% HCAPJ 

112 79ft RCA at 
38ft 31% RCA Pt 
9% 6U RLC 
SS 3ft RPC 
19% 12% RTE 54 
Uft 8% Rod ire 
46% 30ft RoisPur 150 
9ft 5ft Romaa 
jiv 16ft Ran™, M 
7% 2ft RanarO 
78ft 51% Rafail A4 


~~r * 6% 6% 6%— ft 

fep 

“ ? ^ i2% ia \%H 


50'- 38% TDK 
76% 37 T£CO 
13% r.k TGIF 
31% 12% TNP 
26% 18V) TRE 
82 069) TRW 

fAk * lVa TocBOd 

52ft TollBrt 1.14 !J J4 
aft Uft Tofley -15r 
23W 15 Tofftvpf 150 
81 56% TnmBrd 3X0 

36 23V Tandy 

15% 13% Tndvefl 
68V 47% Tefctmx 150 
5V 2ft Tefcom 
293V 228% TeUYn 
34 14% TMrate 52 

48ft 29ft Teh*. 

40% 39% Temoln 54 
45 >a Mft Termcn 192 
104ft 92ft TenCPf 1150 107 
84% n Tencar 7A0 95 
m% 30 Tnrdm 
15 9ft Tesoro A0 4A 
27ft 20% T wor a t 2.J* WX 
40V 32% Texaco 350 
S% 29% TkABc 
46% Te*Cm 
» 26% TenEri 

34% 25 T«*lnd .. 

133ft 86ft Texlraf 200 

3^ 14% To^s ■« I- 2 1J 

4% 2 Te*flfn . 

59% 30ft Teal run IJ0 IB 10 
65 32% Teefrpt 258 4J> 

lift Sft Thock % 

2t 24ft Thackpf 4.15 155 
72 10 ThrmEs „ » 

43V 30ft ThmBel 1X6 15 17 
19% 13% Thomln 58b 19 10 

a 13V ThmMod AO 35 10 
17ft ThrHtv 50 11 13 
34 13% Tldwfr 

10ft 5% Tloerlit 
61% 40 T IM 

S V 14% Tlmphc 
ft Uft TJmeM 
57% 46 TlmKen 
9*A 4% Tllon . 

11% Bft TNMPI 

aft 26ft 

21 V 15% Tokhrn s - 
21V 16% TrtEOI* Xa 1X0 
29ft 24% TejEd P# 172 113 
XV 79k ToJEdPf 1 W 13X 
X 31ft TolJdPjXg 125 
70% W% TolEdpt X36 1X7 
18% 14ft ToiEdPf 121 114 
X 8% Tonka S 
53% 26 ToolRol 
26% U% Trchms 
17ft iov ToroCo 
5 1 Toko 

17% BftTowje 
41V 25V TavRU s 
XV 17V) Tracrs 

s lawSs***? 

a% 17 Tran Inc XS 10J 
U lift TAWJr « W * 
21ft IS TrnCdanl.12 $9 0 

§H Uft I ME? 2X4 I1X 

tJ?” ^T^IOglOX * 

25% 22 TrGPaf X® 9-9 


77m 2 55 36ft 34 36ft +1% 

“ 7A ,5 3 iw 

IS SiS SB^SSlTt* 

® “ 1 *{8 ”% JS- ft 

,5 t R w s=s 

13 263 13% 13ft 13% + V 

1.9 13 966 51% * lift +1^ 

9 l«i i®.b232 4% 

15 X 966 17ft 17 17ft + % 

u ” 

7M U ’^IMftlKftl^ +lft 

9ft 9ft 
21V ' 


31V) 25% WICOB 2 43 
x% 3S'-i wochov 100 
nv UV) Wad hi 50 
10% 6V walnoc 
56% 37% WaIMfi 
7V% 35 WIMrl wl 
Xv 11% Woiorn s 
25% 17% WkHRlB 
Xft 2» WalCSv - - 
X 1 - 26% WoHJm 150 6-1 
9% 7ft WallJ at 150 «-7 
S3 35U WOlIJ Of 15g 
76% 17% Women B8 

33% 18% WrnCm 
461) W”: WomfL 158 

Oft lift WoshGs lAt . 

XV 19% WshNal 1 08 4J 
Mft 17% WShWI 2*11-5 ,5 
66% 40% Waste -92 J-4 J* 
X% 20'- WOlkJn 36 15 10 

b ite»p s ..3 H * 

KiftSSSH xoeiiio 

Mft 19ft WeinR n 
Xft 33 WefsMa 
*2% 41'- W«ftF XJS *5 I 
M'h 41 WelFol 4.50* 95 
«9"> 23% WelFM X£D 115 10 
19U j? Wendy s 31 
77 1 " 17 WesICo 48 
45V] 34' ■ WPenPoHJO 10J 
45 X W5IP1P 7X0 
B 3V WnAkL 

& ,o^»750 9.1 

si" X* WCNA pf 7X5 19.9 
133 96 WPacI 

xv 5% WUnlon 
53 24ft WnUnol 

S3 7h WnUPfC 

8% 3'- WnU PIS 

U% 4% WnU PfE 
47 20 WUTI pf 

17ft 5'iWUTIplA 
39ft 34 WsUE 1 JO 
41% 34ft Wesl«C 1X3 


11 35' 4 37% 78V + % 
535 31% JO'o lift + V 
77 70ft 19% 19% — ft 
IX 7 6% 6ft 

J J* »|» “S5 ss Sh * u 

** 15 18 S2 IT' +5 

66 Uft 33% 33V] 

256 34ft M Uft + Vl 
80! 9% 4% 9% + % 

2 45% 45% IV- + % 

88 73% 23 13% + ft 

1383 31ft 30'* 31V 
38 13 3101 38% 77ft 38ft +TV 
RQ 9 26 ffl-4 TO'-l 20%- ft 

106 a' 4 aft 73 + ft 

1U 21' : 31'. 21ft , 
m 59% J9'i 59 V + % 

341 33 a a -i 

6 9' a 9 9V« + V* 

3 XV XV. X'- + U 

' X 5 4V 5 — ft 

348 19V 18% 18 ft— % 
305 19% 19') 19'.*]—'. 
43 3! ft 3IH 31%— % 
31 S3' j 52% S3 ♦ V 

300 48% 48% 48% — % 

52 25% 25’* 25% + '- 

15 15 3755 15'. Uft 15 + V 

38 13 108 24% 33% 24% + % 

*- 3301 44'] 43ft gj)- ft 

2*2 39% 38% 39ft + % 

1509 6% 6') 6% 

ISO 3V 7' ■ 2ft 

II 77 21ft 21ft 
1568 3% 7ft 2% 

II 36ft 34' i 36ft 

3 1271.- 127' 127% 

478 12ft Uft 12 — ft 
2 34ft 14ft 34ft 
7 38 a 38 + % 

36 6% 4'. 6ft — V 

37 11% lift UV)— * 

11 34ft 34 14 - V 

36 lift 13 13 

XI 12 9900 39 3B*n 38% + % 
IS 10 89 37% 37% 37% + V 


163 iiT"] May Ul 

1XV) 1X6 Jul ... 

Esi. Sales Prev.SaleS 513 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 1548 uo 75 


1JI +52% 


Livestock 


CATTLE ICME) 
ojjmo IM - cealsper lb. 
aS90 5X30 OCI 

C.7J15 SS50 Dec 

67.45 5455 Feta 

4757 55J0 APT 

66.25 5625 Juh 

4640 55.20 AuO. 


57 A0 
40J2 
59X5 
aOAO 
61A7 
40 A0 


57X5 

61.10 

S9X 

60.95 

61.97 

*nwn 


5A 13 
4 


61X5 

66.15 
70X0 
7095 
7040 

69.15 
68X5 


10 


34 S3 SSSS. m |5 H 3*45 2^9 Uft 26ft + % 

its se ass ^ li ’S 


51% 43% wevrpr 4J0 9 X 
24ft *% vlWhPIl 
31 14ft vJWPII PfB 
32ft 10ft VlWhPIl id 


153 9 Bft 8%— ft 
70z Xft 20ft 20ft +1 
550: 16 15ft 15ft— ft 


Esi 5ales 2X079 P«J,|S. l *l.« J77 
Prev DovQoenlnl. 49X75 u»3l 

FEEDER CATTLE ICME) 
xJNM im ■ cents per lb- 
J2J3 5645 DC 6X35 

73.70 5010 Nov 66.J0 

79 A0 4Q.50 Jan ™.W 

71 70 40*7 Mar 7D.90 

71 « 6060 Apr 70A0 

70.00 60.10 Mar 69.15 

iiSfl 405B Aua 48X5 

E st. Soles 2A37 Prev. Sales 6X37 
Prev. Dor Open ml. 11X93 uo 1 J77 

HOGS ICME) 

TBT'Erfr a ss 

SO. 47 3010 Feb 42A0 43-19 

«7J5 3612 Apr 39A5 

)9J1S 39X0 Jun 4190 4375 

49J5 40A5 Jill 43* 

48 M Auo 4X50 43A0 

41.10 3BJJ7 Oct J9X5 »J0 

49 AO 38X7 DOC. ,40AS *Ji5 

Esi Sales 5.932 Prev. Sates 6A00 
p rev. Dov Open int. 19X69 up567 

PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38JM01M- canhoer lb 
74X0 5575 Feb 42.78 *140 

75.40 55-65 Mar 43X0 &XSS> 

nm stS mov 6 aj» mao 

7600 57 JO Jul *4X5 4 ASSS 

5550 Auo *1X» 

Esi Sales 3956 Prov.Sates L773 
PwKdeSrinl. 4X49 OH 193 


54J3 

6000 

S8J0 

59.75 

6CLB0 

59A0 


44 rw 
6688 
49.17 
49J7 
49X5 
6858 
67X5 


5752 
60X0 
5955 
60 AO 
6IA7 
60.10 


Mtt 

65A3 

49.17 

6917 

69X5 

6850 

67X5 


-JH 
. — .02 
+X3 
+.18 
+.10 
+.10 


—55 
— X3 
-150 
—150 
—150 
—150 
-1X5 


5750 Sop 
6040 6350 Ort 

84X5 5150 Ok 59X5 60.1D 

8420 58.75 Jan 60X3 *098 

5» 59X0 Ater 4IA5 4U5 

74JW 4000 May 62.15 62-15 

74 40 6035 Jul 61-« 6150 

mn 60.90 Sea 6ixo 61 xb 

70X0 6J 40 Dec 63A0 6240 

70X0 64.40 Jen 

67.90 6255 Mar 

SS jS* aji bx» 

EM Sams Prev .Sate 8X85 

Prev. Dav Oaen Int. 78537 up 576 
ALUMINUM (COMEX1 
45JM0 (M- cenre pot lb. 

74X0 4X75 Seo 

Del 
Nov 

7060 43» Dec 

76.50 44 70 Jon 

7X60 44.3(3 Nlcr 

66.75 5395 Mov 

6345 4555 Jul 

5X10 48X5 Sep 

Dec 
Jan 
Alar 

53X5 5335 May 

Jul 

EM. Sam Prey. Sate 150 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 149* oft 53 
SILVER ICO ME XI 
5JSOO Irov or- renii per irav m 


5950 

60X0 

6030 

6065 

6115 

61X0 

62X5 


6620 44J0 6400 
45.15 45X5 45.15 


5845 

5840 

59X0 

940 

5905 

«nyn 

6045 

61JH 

6145 

6X05 

61X5 

6240 

4) IVI 

6140 


4130 

4350 

4390 

44X5 

44 (Ul 

45X5 

4605 

46X3 

4745 

4850 

4885 

4955 

50X5 

50-95 


lieiD 

646.0 

12308 

12158 

11930 

10488 

9450 

940® 

799® 

7890 

7700 

75X0 

7158 

EM. Sales 


S738 

4)Hft 

5900 
5958 
607® 
6190 
6298 
*40® 
hVf o 
47B8 
470® 
6835 
6990 


6310 6310 6150 


Sea 
Oct 
Nar 
Dec 
Jan 
Mar 
May 
Jul 
Sec 
Dec 
Jan 
Mar 
Mqv 

Jui 7230 .7230 
Prev. Sate 13.998 


6390 

4-nn 

Ml® 

6510 

6640 

6210 

6900 


4+1 n 
4i) n 
6458 
653® 
6640 
6318 
6900 


6225 

4-nn 

6360 

6480 

*530 

6210 

6810 


7010 7010 7010 

7210 


6170 

6170 

6210 

6365 

6309 
6394 
648.1 
6570 

6310 
6838 
6880 
698.7 
THU 
73X2 


+05 

+J5 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+X5 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 


+.70 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 


+170 
+I7J 
+170 
+170 
+170 
+174 
+174 
+17X 
— 294 
+I7X 
+17X 
+1TJ 
+17X 
+I7X 


Oaen High Low Clue Cho. 


IMMl 

Sep 92X0 
oec 9xi4 
Mar 
JUO 

Sep 

DM 

Mar 

Prev. Sales 


me 

9X14 


9X16 

91.«* 


9X16 +.10 

9287 +.15 

Oil +.15 
91X7 +.13 

<093 +.10 

9001 +01 

90X1 +07 


91.74 
9140 
9185 
90.73 
9041 
90 XD 

8987 


91.75 
9141 
9185 
90X3 
9041 
90X0 
89 83 


<105 

9130 

SS 

<059 

90X8 

89.99 

89X1 


91A7 +.IJ 
91X1 +.15 

9094 +.13 

on in +.10 
«S +89 
89X9 +0B 

89X0 


4635 

14070 14200 +*S 
i:£oa 14150 +625 


■SS 

.7390 

.7366 

J275 


.7370 

X282 

X263 


p?ov!dS Open hit. L110 of 183 
_UR0D0LLAR5IIMM) 

SI mmiowphafj 100 pci. 

VX0Q 8*80 Dec 

9106 B6.J3 M or 

71.15 8A73 Jun 

9084 8708 Sea 

9003 87X8 DM 

<0X4 8704 Mor 

E sra» ““ 

Prev. Dav Open int.1 12066 UP IX** 

BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

per pound- IPMnlMWahnOOOl vflBO 

14190 10200 Dec l^UH 1^15 J4VU 

14160 186SQ Mar 14200 14350 

IjJSS 1X9U Jun 14000^1360 

EM. Soles 20410 Prev. Sate ,4X57 
Prev. Dav Oaen InL 25X51 wl0ll 

CANADIAN DOLLAR UMMI 

S per air- 1 point oauaUsttfiKIl 

XS66 X006 DM ^ ^ 

.7504 0981 Mar -7339 .7330 

X360 .7070 Jun X305 .7305 

X231 XI 74 5«a -7275 TI7S 

Esi. Sales _1091 , Prav.Sjto 1X85 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 5X83 0H192 

FRENCH FRANC CIMMI 

'SSX™£Sir'S2’?J8Z".<*>* ...« .j=«i 

.11700 .10985 Mor -11W® 

Esi. Sales 24 Prev. Sates 

Prev. Dav Open Inf. Wl 
GERMAN MARK f 1MM) 

t.wrrnork-lPomteaualS^gOl ^ JTH 

^3? 3M SSr X770 J770 X715 ^4 

3759 J335 Jun 

E^Mes SUM Prev. Sales 3SX61 
Prev. Dav Open Ini. 41498 UF 1.965 

JAPANESE YEN (IMMl KKmlmt 

00*338 JNU23B Jun 

Est.Sote 31078 Prev. Sate lOXffl 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. 17.196 up 1 991 

SWI5S FRANC (IMM) 

J?S 3S 5S ,0S 


+87 


JU6 


006480 


4558 

4610 


A4K7 


4600 4600 


4540 

4583 

.4635 


+0* 

+65 


+510 

+580 


+176 

+176 

+176 

+176 


+230 

+23® 

+230 


+220 

+318 

+220 


Industrials 


LUMBER ICME) .. 

,30800 batL-spcr 1000 baH^ j4iiD 1J9J)Q 141JQ +ia 

Jon 14080 141*0 139.90 14X70 +*-® 

MOT 14480 147.90 14480 }«A0 +4X0 


186.10 
187 J00 
19580 
17640 
18X80 
17680 
181X0 
Est. Sales 


13600 
13340 
139 JO 
14500 
1*900 
15X90 
15780 


NftV U80O 151X0 14800 IS1JM +40° 
J^l IMaO 1MA0 15400 15400 
Sep 15800 15800 157X0 157X0 +JM 


^ 2000 Prw.Sales 1043 
Prev. Dov Oaen mt. 70m up 105 


39X5 

41X0 

4105 

3945 

4205 

4125 

42X5 

39X0 

4000 


6000 

A1XD 

6240 

62X0 

60.90 


3903 

42X7 

4192 

4005 

nfl 

4420 

AAS 

39X0 

4000 


<3X5 

63X0 

6455 

64X7 

6X15 


+.10 

+05 

+47 

+A0 

+100 

+00 

+.15 

-40 

+X0 


+148 

+1.10 

+140 

+07 

+.90 


Prev. Dav Open Int. 74082 up 1410 

PLATINUM CNYME) 

50 irov ot- dollars per trov (E. 
34780 391X0 Sep 

39380 25080 

37300 2S70O 

35780 26400 

3*180 27380 

36080 30300 

Est. Soles 


60X9 

S90D 

6005 

6075 

5900 


6030 

5903 

68A2 

6000 

59.70 


530* 5175 5305 


315X0 +1150 

Ocl 31*80 31900 30800 315X0 +1L®@ 
Jan 32080 32080 31200 319.10 41340 
aS? SS 32450 31700 323X0 +1120 
Jul 32*80 32*00 32180 321X0 +1320 

oS moo 33380 a 180 33300 +1120 

Prev. Soles 3030 


3Sgm ,m 280 6X W 53-67, ift 6*%:a 

SI? whlir 100 52 *3 29'- 78% 7?ft + ** 


M% 25ft WhIIC 
34% 19% WhllcM 

B ft I Bft Whlttok 

ft 


100 

00 



6% Wkrtrtdt 

B Wlllrdn . 12 

7ft WlllciG .10 0 5 

36% William 1.40 4.9 15 
2 WIlmEI „ 

6 WlllhrO .10 
30 WlnOlk 174 
8% Winnba 20 

» -5ft Mi + fti K 32 K 

+ ^' 382 ' 



70 26ft 26ft WJ- ft 
131 m% TT-I 32ft 

ti in* nr- ioft ~r ft 
n% lift n% + JH 
17ft 12ft »ft — ft 

aw 28% 

3ft 3ft 

Bft 
*ft 


ss:. 


g% WISE pt B0O 


WIscPL L76 

_. .. »% WIscPS 206 
40ft 30ft WitCO 148 
214 185 WitCO Of 205 

-r- l 16ft 9ft WotvrW _X4 

BS® ‘SiiSKfi'S! 


JO 57 


100 


1X4 29 13 
100a 30 22 


» ,» »J |J»J» 

52ft 53% +% l 


100 

1X2 

48 


“j szs=i 

30 3» 3ff% 30% + ft 

llipis 

8 18 17ft 17% 

504 23U> 21% 3ft +1% 
21 47ft 46ft 47ft + % 
*67 21% 20% 2Wh— % 
- 16% 16ft 1*1* 


4% 7% Wutlizr 
16 10% WytcLh 

23% 15ft Wvnns 


41 ID 1385 
1800 3J 1* HI 


LOO 


L8 V 
30 7 


10 
60 
921 

’1 6ft 
30 33% 

1031 8% 

350 6% 

20 6% 

165 15ft 

'I^Ssft 34% 

1U 36% 36ft 
306 35ft 35% 
5 197 197 

296 13 

49 
4 

•S', 


_ .— % 
3V: + ft 


^(DuiTCTicyOptiore^ 



6%— ft 
• + ft 


29 

100 


+ ft 

36ft + ft 
35ft + ft 
.. 197 +2% 

11% 11%- ft 
48ft 49 +1 

79ft Bfl +% 
3% Ift + % 
11% lift lift— ft 
17% 17% 17% 


1200 

900 

705 


2X5 


1.19 

r 


Puts— LMt 
Sep Dec Mor| 

% tuo 
S 105 
S 285 
S 480 
% r 
r 11JQ 


S5% 35ft X.HU UO M 14 19M gft 51% + % 

55ft 46ft Kero* Pi 545 108 173 Sift 54% Mft 

79 19% XTRA 04 18 12 


X 23% 22ft 23% + ft 


*X 8 

20 17 


30'fa 24% ZotoCP 
19 7ft Zaaata 
57% 31% Zavre S 
77 Uft ZenilhE 
a% 15% Zeros 
37% 22% Zurnln 


1X3 

.12 

48 

.a 

1X2 


40 10 
10 54 
.9 16 
10 

1.7 16 
17 12 


64 27% 27 27% +1 

129 7% 7% 7ft — ft 

107 51% 50V) 51 

965 17% 16% 17 

M 19ft 19 19 + ft 

279 36ft 35% 36ft + ft 


.10 4 7 

480 18 |3 

40 25 10 


J2 


41 16% 16% 16% 

2 ! a S* r*-8 

26 2978 34% 34ft Mft + % 

assaa** 

598 28 27% 27% + ft 

* aft 21% 21ft 

3 11% lift lift „ 

12 18ft 1W6 Uft + JJ 
203 47ft *7ft 47% + % 
250 21 20% 20ft + % 

V 7% 7ft 7% + % 
TOzieOL. 1MU 1WL.— % 
7 25% 25% 25% 

U 9% 9V) 9ft 


j NYSE Higiis-Lows 


NEW HIGHS 18 


AIIMSonl n 
ChrlsCrM 
Heinz wl 

PocLumbr 
Unlievr NV 


AlldSon pfF 
BMC In® 
CoPwld Pf 
nschbCP 
KN Enon 
NUICp 


Banner ind 
Flshor Fto 
KolWAIMpf 
Revlon wd 


b M 7§5+ift 

II 11 II 


srssL’H^MfeSifiaa 


AlldSon pf A 
Drrvlus 
Heinz of 
PoPL liar 
Unlroval 

NEW LOWS 29 

AjdsCherirn AmCentCa 
BankAmodlP Bene«jltvn 
Don Wind B?' Q gSS? 

GeniHome l P'i Prl * n , 
Monti ind Me Derm Ini 

SSSwBai RdoBmadlP 
TacomBoat TowleMfa 


Burrphs 

GAFCorp 

MonorCrewI 

trw me 


AppldData 

ButtesGspf 

vIEvansPd 

meal Basic 

Mlssfanlns 

Rowan 

WstCoNA 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

Option A Strike . 

under! vma Price ‘^^or 

X3.SM Brilleli paendveeats per writ. 

’BPound 120 S r 

lax? 125 S ll^S 

137X9 130 s 0X0 

137X9 135 * 

137X9 1« » LI* 

137X9 145 r 1X0 

137X9 150 r 190 

50000 Canadlao DoUors-emrt* per unit. 

C -' l l \ 

72X1 73 * g- 2 * 

7271 74 S 0-10 

6UM Wni Gerntan Mork»<enis per unit. 

DMarfc » * * T r , 

t. ?n 79 r r r r 

S 3 $ r ; 

M ? 2X2 3X0 S 

M s i 

3SXO 36 9 M? J-S 5 

S5o 37 r 006 1.10 r 

Sjo M r 0X4 r r 

125800 French Francs-lOth* old ceot per unit. 

*a5£ jopoPMe Ym-ieotta Mo cent per uniL 

J vr* 5 i g ;j 

as s i w 9 

iUM^Swtu Frwa-cwK per-unit. 

"St | r r r [ 

2 \ 3X0 r » 

2S S S » j 

2 r oS 104 r 

47J3 45 r 0+7 r r 

TohUcoli voL M lMg f 1 m ppm IS 

T “r^+J5 , rTSdea. +5+S opttonolfMrt 
Last Is premium I wr chose price) 

Source: AP. 


Sq*.20 


Prev. DOY Open Int. 14.127 otf2B8 
PALLADIUM IN YIME) 

WEST'S?™ 10280 101X5 10280 
,4lS 9180 0*C 10*80 UH80 101^ 1^X5 

12700 91.70 Mar 1012 106.10 lO^S IS’?? 

llioo 9100 Jun 10*50 10*05 II? 50 t«X5 

11580 9730 Sep W6-10 

ED- Sate Prev. Sales _ 333 

Prev. Dav Oaen Int. 6496 ual3 
GOLD (COMEX) 
loo trov Of- donorsper trov M. 

Wa5D St®S SS 330X0 M10O 326X0 »4B 

Ndv 33100 

Dec 33600 33600 330X0 333X0 

Feb 34980 350X0 33580 33880 

Apr 344X0 3*580 33980 34220 

Jun 34900 34900 34580 3000 

Aim 35280 35480 352D0 35100 

Oct 3S6J0 35700 35680 35*80 

DM 35600 36580 35*00 361X0 

«nr 372^1 

Jun 7X700 

Prev. Sales 25X10 


49300 
334X0 
48900 
48500 
49*00 
435X0 
42840 
395X3 
39380 
38840 
39400 
Esi. Soles 


32000 

30100 

30*80 

314,70 

32000 

33180 

33589 

34200 

35500 

36900 


+4.90 

+465 

+400 

+6.90 

+4.90 


+900 
+9 JO 
+9.90 
+9.90 
+9.90 
49.90 
+9.90 
49.90 
4900 
+900 
49.90 
49.90 


COTTON 21KYCE) 

50000 Ibs.- cents per 1b. 

7700 57.40 Oct 

7X00 5701 Dec 

76.75 50X7 Mar 

7080 50-90 MOV 

7005 5860 Jul 

4500 5305 Oct 

S9X5 5205 DM 

A*JS 6605 Mar 

ESI. Sales 2800 Prev- 5al« M37 
Prev. Dav Oaen Int. 21.181 on 229 

HEATING OILINY66E) 
esjiooaoi- cents per aal ___ 

aa.w 67.65 Oct 7900 7980 

S3 M0O MOV 8000 WAS 

8020 69-15 DM ® « 

00X5 6980 JO" *1X5 B040 

to K 7080 Feb 79.10 7920 

76JO MIX) Mor 75X5 gJO 

7& no 6880 Apr 7300 7200 

7200 6880 Mov 7IL72 7280 

Dgc 

Est Sales Prev. Sales 9X83 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 29070 ott<57 

CRUDE OIL(NYME) 

1000 hDL- dollars per bbL 
noju 2440 Nov 28.12 28X9 

m QH DM 2700 27.75 

29^ 2*5 Jon 27.15 27X5 

2966 24X5 Feb 26X7 2A85 

2905 74-13 Mar 2*47 2*^ 

tojj n pi Apr 26X5 26X5 

a 96 n*5 ftov 2500 2505 

MX0 ajB Jun 2500 25-60 

Sli MAS Jul 25X5 2540 

Sm 2*W AIM 25.17 25X5 

EsLSoles 1400 Prev. Soles Wl* 
Prev. Day Oaen Inf, 6X155 UP3J0 


59J5 

59.1* 

60X5 

6005 

5900 


6000 —.13 

59X0 —84 

*0X5 — 87 

6007 —.13 

9900 +17 

5405 +X* 

aS +x& 
S4X0 +X2 


Prev. Dav Open lnLl31023 iwlJE 


Finnnciai 


L15 

r 

0.94 


001 

083 

003 

087 

AM 

0X7 

000 

005 

105 

s 

308 


0X7 


0.12 

A1B 

0X3 

006 

009 


93X5 

92.94 

9200 

92X5 

9101 

9102 


187053 

1VM7J 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI milikm-Ptsaf lBOoct. 

9JX3 8*96 SOP 93X5 

9387 85X7 DM W.W 

92J» 86.63 Mar 9209 

92X8 081 J«" 

9781 B080 SeP 9101 

91X8 0985 DOC 9102 

91X9 8908 Mar 

^ P rev. Sate 12004 
Prev. Dav Open Ini 36,941 UPL993 

ID YR. TREASURYJCBT) 

lnnrtrhH 

85-7 7+30 Jun 

SI, K ' 

^^0^1^12^3025 

US TREASURY BONDS CCBT) i 
(i pci-noo0oo-pis&ands oii»p^ 
tiuis 57-3 Dec 76-1 1W 

77^29 57-2 Mor 7+28 75-1 

76-* 56-29 Jun 7M1 

75-31 56-» 5cp 73X 

7+24 56-25 DM »4 

7+15 56-Z7 Mar 71-7 

7+26 63-13 Jun 

72- 77 6T-* SeP 69-18 

73- 18 63-34 DM 68-31 

89-27 a Mar 

67-28 67-2* Juh _ . 

Prov^Dw Open 1 1+22X688 Sf 7X62 

S?7 SS g ft 

75-2 *5 Sen 73-16 73-16 

Esi. Sales ? re Ti« l S»*i3 75 

Prev. Da/ Open Int. 4.15S oft 813 


93X3 

9206 

9203 

9119 

9108 

9108 


8S-I 

8+3 


9X25 

9L90 

9205 

92X0 

9109 

9100 

91X2 

9106 


85-2 

8+3 

83-7 

82-13 

81-22 


I! 

t!i 

is 


m-a 

73-2 

a-* 

71-7 

69-18 

68-31 


74-31 

73-28 

72-29 

Tl 

71 -t 

78-10 

68-28 


75-15 

7+23 

73-31 

73-3 


75-1 

73-38 

72-10 

Tl 

71-4 

10-10 

69-18 

68-28 

68-8 

67-22 

67+ 


75-21 

7+29 

7+4 

7J-8 


— 13 
— 14 
—14 
—U 
-15 
—16 
—17 

—19 

—20 

—21 


79X0 
79 JD 
79.90 
79 JO 
7800 
75X0 
7100 
70.73 


7944 +46 

7903 +J3 

0084 +X9 

7908 +J2 

7805 +40 

75X0 +45 

7240 +05 

7005 +00 

. 08 


2883 

27.46 

2704 

2*08 

S4-H 

2*85 

25X5 

2500 

25X5 

25.17 


2805 +09 

2748 +01 

2705 +04 

2*09 +08 

26X5 +.10 

2*07 T.1S 
25X9 • +.1J 
2501 +X1 

25X1 +X1 

25.1* +X1 

25.11 +XT 


Stock Indexes 


(Indexes compiled shorttv before market dose) • 
SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 

oohmandrenJl ^ m10 18600 18500 1KX0 +1« 
M3X5 18305 Mar 18700 18&J5 W0O 1^J5 +LM 

706XD IB6J0 Jun 1B9X0 190.70 1B9X!J 190X0 +2X0. 

Eit Soles Prev. Soles 7L974 , 

Pri^Dav Open 1 fit. 72035 off UU5 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 

"S iffS^ mSS Sen 19000 19150 19000 191 JO 
217JJ5 Iflfl-BO Dec 192J0 1*SJ0 1J2J0 

20940 19300 Mar 19*40 IW80 19*40 19*90 

Est- Sate . Prev.5ote i02i 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 12029 upl 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 

P ?i t T^i 0ral lor n Dec 10705 107.90 10705 107X0 

1MXS I0*« Ator 10740 109X0 10700 10805 

120^ !»» Jim lltt® HOJO ii 0 - 20 +1J ®. 

Est, Sales Prev. Sales 12.716 

Prev. Dov Open Int. 6,902 ait 1393 


+100 

+2X0 

+200 


+.90 

+1.10 


Commodity Indexes 


Maodv's. 
Reuters . 

□J. Futures . 


Close Previous 

887.90 f 882.70 f 

— ,099X0 1J2LM. 

NA VI4-35. 

Cam. Research Bureau- N-A. 220.60. 

Maodv's : base IM : Dec. 31. 1931. ; 

p - preliminary; f • final 
Reuters : base lOOjSep-TB. 1931. 

Dow Jones : base IM : Dec 31. 1974. 


Market Guide 


CUT: QitaMo Board of Trade 

cmE: Cnlcooo Mcrcanllfe Exchonoc. 

IMM: inftmollonal ManeMjY *Wkef 

: Of Cblcopo Merconme EK ar arioe 

hycsCE: New York Cocoa. Suoar, Coffee tkcnanoe 

KyceT New York Cotton E»c tr»we 

COMEX: Commodity ExcharMe.NevrYork 

NYME; New York Mercantile Ewhanue 

KCBT: Kansas Cllv Board at T rade 

NYFE: New York Futures Exchanoe 






47V. 32ft Revtan 
41 16 41)% Revln wf* 


5SS ft* &!rnm B .70 3X M *i? gft gs jg ^ 

MSffi&BSSfS 53 


^ iSS bSKV • 1M ,s f ft 5 

ff b !J ss% 1S5s-s 


1% UNCRes 
14 10% UBS 

38% 71% USFG 

Sft WJ use 4 

77V) 48ft USG Pt 
19% 12ft U^Frs* 
*3 46 Unflvr 

110', 82 UltfNV 


J g 33% ift'5 

31 36ft 25% 36 - 3J 

ItS tSS m'S 3CJ 1 S 

1’^ Sft 37V| + ft 

9 4»8 Wft b JK + % 

9 ifii as S'* 


aai’g-illi* 
s SETS* 

269 110% 109% HOft +3ft 

jp^HSasw 


London ^ 
Commodities 


Sepu 33 

Cioie Previous 
HMB Lew Bid Ask BM Aik 

SUGAR 

Skerllna per metric ton 
Oct 14500 13800 13800 13800 14000 141X0 

DM 14700 142X0 142X0 14380 14480 145.40 

MOT 15*00 15000 152X0 152-40 15400 15500 

MOV l*xS 15580 15*30 15600 15600 15940 

5S? NX NX 16X00 16380 16580 16500 

Oct N.T. N.T. 16*00 14900 17100 17100 

volume: 1094 lols of 50 ions. 

COCOA 

Sterling pm metric lea 
Sep 1,755 1J45 1X4* L750 

DK 1JB3 1X*0 1X81 1.782 

Mor 1028 10M 100* l »7 

MOV 1040 1070 1030 J022 

Jty 1041 102* 1*2* 1028 

S» 1052 1039 1029 1031 

DM 1045 1020 1032 1024 

volume: 3.927 loisaf 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

SMrlina per metrK ten 


HUB 

SUGAR 

French trades per metric too 
Dae 1020 1485 1490 1495 

Mte 1040 1013 1015 

«£v 1J70 1052 1055 10*0 

1420 1415 1411 14W 

Oct N.T. *LT. 1445 ,4S> 

Dec N.T. N.T. 14*0 1X00 


1J7S I JJ0 
1014 1015 
103* 1037 
1048 1050 
1052 1053 
1058 1062 
1051 105* 


Est. vol.: 1X50 loti el 50 fens. Prev. actual 
sales: 1J*2 tots. Open biteresf : 18J82 


F^SSh fames per 108 ka 
2.15* IMS 


17ft ft 

30z 3*ft 3*ft 38W— w 




40 17 


3% 2 

79 Ii 

43% 24 

12 % 7 % 

62ft 46 


i latest dedoratlon. 

e _ iiquldartna «tl vldendXI 
cld — ccrtftd-71 


ZZ 10% MIMES 

^ H 3 9 i i i- s I :=5SsssasSK=a- 

17 10% 

28% 18% S“5fSJ 

S 14% RussBr 

ftt-S* . 

this veer, an aecumutoflve 
* W " d ‘ V ^I?^?5a^k* The tilat+lowronae Mam* 


1400 10*3' 10*0 I0U 1451 14S3 

1425 1090 109S 1097 1473 1475 

1463 141* 1 41 B 1^2 1XV3 IJ16 

1492 1450 1455 1460 1X15 1X40 

ixil liS lSo 10« 1X6S 1X69 

1X» 1X23 1X20 1X24 '.7*0 1005 

1X60 1XM 1.750 1X00 1000 1015 

Volume: 2.954 lets el 5 tens. 

GASOIL _ , 

U0. Hollar* POT metric ten 
! net 25180 25000 250.75 25180 247X5 247 JO 
246J0 247 JO 247X5 3*3X5 24480 
245X5 243X5 24400 344X5 M180 341^ 
342X5 24100 24200 242X5 MUJ V9M 
23980 23700 73*80 238J0 33400 23*00 
22900 §980 ZK0O 23280 22500 mDO 
323X5 22280 22300 23400 219.75 21000 
N.T. N.T. 21300 23400 21480 22S80 
N.T. N.T. 20580 22*00 20*00 23000 
Volume: 20M lots at 100 tans. 

| sources: Reuters and London Pe/rofeum E>- 
chanoe toasom. 


5ep 

Nov 

Jan 


Mov 

Jtv 


Nov 
Dec 
; Jan 
Feb 
, Mar 
| API 
. May 
Jun 


J* 3.9 


301 g SS SITS 

, s n I iB'i'ih tSS5S3S^'=S- 

SS 8 IS * » ! i 1 i 1 fi J 5 r;:rS£Sr 

aa ,;a % vzz«'” — — J rssssssir*" 

fttg 

,s r« « |f» : a 


D\1 Futures 
Options 

r. Genital *tar».amtw*+CB4Bi*r wart 


** iv* ISwET 


theuiorid 


To IS SoWIW 74801*0 
31% 6 So DBgY 30 IX 

i’lsis®. 


j 35 106 JS; 17% 17ft T S r— dlvKw™ 

« {* 111 ir* '« sEs 

„ ,3! b» ss gj I * 


E£w>. 4 I3il>s STBEIS 


_ mnnlhs-rsllmoled 

- or ek-cBNflbuHon **»• 

3«i 23% SOIF’"' -JJ. 5J |U *=; j:/, g™ S«i — % 1 coin vafuo 
S 2 IlSlSSi. JH'I ** ht *$% ® + *•! U — new yearly nwfi 


t Er s & 

11% 9ft SPaui 


5ta 




nil if ii« 




11^ . 

7 liu 

,7% 1!ft 


.*» s* iscKipt if >j® s k ** SI'S 

y% «> W*Mo 13 J! ", r& @ «■ 


_ tradmo receh«retilper tarina reon»nl*ed ue 

^-when Issued- 
^—witii warronfs- 
"l B ^»videndorK-riafi»- 
^-eyJJGirmutlan- 
*“_ a ,|.hout warrant* . „ 

via— vieW- 

soteMluH- 



Strike Otfedeffle 

Price Dec Mar Jun 

Dec 

IS 

2*5 

320 

179 

0X7 

16 

t.n 

2*1 

MS 

8*6 

37 

1X7 

205 

2*2 

18b 

H 

ut 

10* 

2.15 

157 

» 

060 

122 

— 

1XS 


SrpL 23 

Pub-Settle 


0X3 

1.10 

1*5 

1.95 


183 

105 

1X5 


ENMBtadMtcri Vta 13074 
Cons: FrL*0L 3.959 0*#oW.2S4W 
| puts: Frl MLU49openW.l*S« 
I Source.' CME. 


Treasury Bills 


SrpL 20 


The International Herald T ribune. 
Bringing the World’s Mai 

ImportamNewsioiheWoiid s 

Most Important Audience. 



Offer 

BM 

YleM 

Pre* 

Ylelo 

+manHi 

700 

*90 

7X3 

7X1 

+ month 

7X6 

7X4 

7*5 

7.73 

One year 701 7*9 

Source. Salomon BrotUtn 

88 * 

811 


r Raris-j.. 

Gonuiiodiues 


Sept 23 

ao ** ^ 

Bid Ask Ch'oe 


— 37 

— 31 

— 28 

— 34 

— M 

— 30 


Sep 

DM 

Mar 

Mov 

Jir 

Sea 


2.105 

2.130 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


2089 

L10I 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


2892 

2.108 

2.115 

2.130 

2.125 

2.130 


2,125 -45 
2096 —27 

2.n2 —a 

2.135 — M 

— — 40 

— —40 

— —40 


'em. voL: r n Wei’ 10^ "rotei Prev. ocfuol 
piles: 65 lots. Open Inieresi: 733 


FwG moacs per 108 ka 

SCO N.T. N.T. 1X95 

NOV 1090 10» 

Jan N.T- N.T- 

Mar MW 1XBJ 

MOV N.T. N.T. 

JW N.T. N.T. 

Sep N.T. N.T. 


1070 1090 

iSS iSS 

2810 


— 50 

— 45 

— 50 

__ —50 

— —55 


yprH £010 —40 

Est.voL: lB’iots ots ions. Prey.aeiuol sales 
7 tats. Open Interest: 307 
Source; Bourm du Commerce- 


^^ido i^letal^ ] 


Ctate 
BM 

ALUMINUM 
Start lug per metric ton 
Spot 
Forward 


SrpL 23 

prev loos 
BM Ask 


A850O 68600 70480 70500 
70700 70700 72500 72*00 


COPPER CATHODES (Hlob Grade) 

Starting per metric toj* _ 

Soot 0400 94*00 97700 97800 

Forward 96880 96*00 100200 100X00 

-COPPER CATHODES HtadnSl 
S^Hparerm-rtcte. ^ 

Forward 95080 <5380 96280 

UEAP 

Sterling per melrtc tan 
Spot 28*80 mo* 

Forward 29200 29380 


9*980 


28900 29000 
29700 29700 


NICKEL 

Startlag per metric Ite 
Spat 312000 313660 3220JW 3 23 0.00 

Forward 319900 330500 336080 336500 

'SILVER 

Pure per troy omkc 
S pot 43000 43101 

Forward 


___ 43B80 43900 

44200 44380 45080 45100 


TIN (Staadard) 

IteHtaupnrm^ctad^ ^ ^ 

Forward 8875.00 887800 911000 911100 

ZINC 

Startlna per RMtrie tan 
Spat 47400 47500 47700 49900, 

Forward 6* «* «a M. 

Sourer: AP, 


~ Asian 
Gmunodides 


S*pt23 

HONG-KONO GOLD FUTURES 
UJ0 P*r ounce c|OM 

sro. w *s~“Sms8 

3Sr- H:T: S:T:S5SSSS|?SSiS 

KETOWSSSSSm 

API - N.T. N.T. 34180 3000 m80 334-* 

Auil JW80 25280 35100 35180 34300 34480 
volume: 26 lots ol lOOoz. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJ0I 


Commodity and Unit 
Coffee 4 Santos. Ih 


prlnlctdh 64/30 38 ft, vd — 

Steel Dllleh (PiH.f. Ian 

iron 2 Fdrv. Philo- ion - — 
Steel scran No i twv pm. - 

Lead SnoLlb 

Conner e wet- lb 

Tin IStralts). lb . 


Sea 

Oct 

Dec 


Hian 

N.T. 

N.T 

33300 


LOW 

N.T. 

N.T. 

33*30 


Settle 

329.10 

32900 

33100 


Settle 

319X0 

319.70 

323.98 


Volume: 65 tat* ofiOO ox. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Matavshm cents ear kilo 

Close 

BM Ask 

Oct I B4J0 105-50 

NOV 16*50 ]£■» 

Dec 1*700 18*80 

Jan 18*00 

Feb — - 18980 

Mar 19000 


18900 
19100 

19200 

Volume; 6 lots. 

SI NG APOR ERU BBE R 

Singapore coots P takB o 


Previous 
Bid As 
1*580 1*680 

18*50 18700 

18880 1*980 

1B&JOO 10980 
1*800 19000 

19000 19200 


BM 

165.75 

16600 

15580 

15300 

M9JB 


RSS1 Od- 
RSS I NOV- 
RSS20C1 — 

R5S3 Oct _ 

RSS 4 OCI — 

RSSSOC1- 
KU ALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 


Ask 

,6*25 

16700 

15680 

15400 

15100 

14600 


Previous 

BM Ask 

16*75 167X5 

167X5 167X5 

15500 15600 
15380 15400 

,4908 15100 

14400 14600 



Ask 

Previous 
Bid ASk 

760 

720 

760 

760 

720 

760 

700 

74Q 

7*0 

770 

720 

770 

765 

as 

765 

760 

710 

760 

750 

700 

750 

750 

700 

750 

740 

690 

740 


'volume: 0 tats of 25 tans. 
Source: Reuters. 


S&P100 
Index Options 


SrpL 20 


Price Sen <*> 
IIS - - 

Ul f I 


Mov Dec 


10% 

6% 

IV. 


f% 

. . 6% 

1/16 IK 7W 

lit* VU 1 

- ini '4 n/ii| 

- int l/u - 

- im im — 


Putt-Lad 
S*p Oct NDi 

- 1*16 ft 

- <4 % 

1/16 11/161% 
ft W 14 
Ik Ufa Ht 
111 IB* It 

n - - 


5>U 

ism 

27/16 


TituJ cM nhm H 40 H 
TUM ca* ROM M. IH 4 N 
TOMmtMNm* 174357 
Total out BUM M. 517.969 
Index: 

HMB 1 IU 1 Lew 17 m 
Source: caoe. 


I1J6J5-U* 


Casli Prices 


Srpt 23 


Zinc. E. St. L. Basis, lb . 

Palladium. oz 

Silver N.Y.oz 

Source: AP. 


MM 

Year 

Aao 

1X3 

1A5 

+61 

0X6 

<7300 

473J0 

21300 

21300 

77-7* 

86-87 

18-20 

22-26 

66-49 

43-65 

*2736 

*1693 

*41 

80+08 

96-96 ft 

127 

*125 

7025 




SrpL 23 


Per Amt Pav Ree 


USUAL 

M X68 12-20 MM 
O 25 ft 10-11 9-27 

a -IS 11-15 10-31 

.10 11+31 10-15 

.10 10-15 10-1 

25 11-1 10-t* 
.12 1G25 10-11 
.11 10-a 10-7 

.13 1+17 1+3 
83 10-1B 5-33 
02 1+11 10-4 

06 11-* 1+11 
Q .12 ft 12-10 IMS 
Q JD4 12-3 1+22 

OA't 1+29 1+11 
a 25 11-4 1+11 

O .15 11-4 1+14 


Amer. Ratal tv Tr 
Amer. Security Co 
Buell indusirlei 
Canada Tna&tn *yta 
Central Banking 5vs- 
Citizens First Biwp 
C itizens Grwth Prop 
Ester line Coro 
Ftl Michigan Cop. 

Lincoln Telecomm. 

Nobility Homes 
Ohio Art 
OshamoGrew) 

Puebla mil IK 
Santa Anita Realty 
Tektronix 
York Federal S&L 
o-anmialj n+monlMv; Ortuarterty; i-sem+ 
annual 
Source: UPl. 


Company 
Results 

Revenue and oronts or tones. In 
million*, an in local cvrrencleaunleas 

otherwise intucmed. 

HaRglUMK 

Wob Kwong Shipping 

Iri Heir ”«| 

Revenue i!:' 

Per Shore—— 0,34 

Full name ol company Is wWi Kimono Snip- 
pina and Investment. 

Italy 


198* 

012 

0275 


W Hi* 

Revenue. 


Fiat 

W 

1301 T 

121 T 


1914 

11JT 

■68000. 


T: trillion. 


KEB* UP TO DATE WITH 

BUSINESS PB 3 PIE 

appeabng each^ whjnesdw 

AM 3 FRHMriNTHEIHr 




Uft a 














Monday^ 

ME& 


Qoaig 


Tables include me nationwide prices 
up to ttw closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


13 Monin 

Hi* Low SNKk 


5H. Clow I llMomn 

Dtv. Yli PE BOs HI* Law Qurt.Oi'Be Ml* Low Slock 


Dfv.VW.PE JfltoHiBhLmv QuaLChgt 


13 Month 
HI* LOW SbCk 


Dlv. YICLPE TO Hi* Uw QttpLOW 


D*v. rst PE TOHWtlLOW 


1514 — (4 
2W4 — to 
2*- to 
5%— v. 
38 

T2* + * 
7V. + to 
2* 

U% + Hi 
2»- V* 
22* — to 
18* 

6*- to 
»*- <a 
33V3 + to 
2? - 14 
38+1*. 


JSD 4.1 13 
JO 16 6 
JIB* 5v4 18 

I 


JO 1.9 7 
urn is » 
s 
18 


17 

16 

J3 lit 19 
56 

.171 1£ 

33 


43 36* 
8 24 
7 11*1 
JO 6U 
afciao 
3 33 
353 24* 
53 1* 

42 33 U 
29 8* 
26 21* 
665 18% 
156 9% 
131 13 


15* 151% 

16 16—1% 

6* 6* 

13 13* 

1W4 in + * 
12* 12* 

81* 81* 

714 714— * 

36* 36*- 14 
234% 24 + Vt 


111* 11* + 1% 

6 614 + * 

TOO 100 +> 

23 23 + to 

24 ;<* +1 
1* l* + to 

23* 22* 

8 * 8 * 

21* 31*- * 
18% lSVa— to 
9* 914— <4 
llto 12 +1* 


J*v* 31 

4* 11% 

1614 10 
13 10* 

34 15* 

23* U 
3* 3* 
15* 8 
8 3 

2Va * 
4* 2* 
5% 2* 
5* 3* 
3* 2 
16* lOftt 

30 Vj 22* 


KnGSDl 4J0 12J 
K%POkC , 2 

KovCp 30 U 7 
KavJ n » U 10 
K Ortwin J09 4J 9 
Kitctim iSt 4.1 15 
KevCowl 

KeyPh JO 11 17 
KevCo 6 

KeyCowl 

KWdewt 

Klrbv 

KrtMfg „ 13 
Kl«fV jnr .9 
Knoll IS 

KoserC 2J2 8J 81 


830x39 
32 3* 
5 12 ** 
1 II* 
3 in* 
6* 16* 


36 37V* +1* 

3to 3U 
T2VS 121* 

1J* II*— 1% 
18* 185*— '4 
16 16 — to 

3* 3* 

9* 9*— * 
3 3-1* 

* * 

3 3 

24% 3 
4* 4* 

214 2V. — U 
15 151% + to 

28* J8t« + 1* 


4* 

^ + to 
19*— * 


13V* + * 

14V* + to 

is*— % 

llto- * 

*% + fc 
Bto — to 
9* 

2* + to 

9*- 1% 


a n n n 

50 17 12 11* II* 

26 2* 2* 2* 




5 M 16 
■40a 12 13 
27e 12 8 


71 121% 1214 12V* 
218 12* 1214 12* 



B 5V« 
55 i* 24 to 
7% Ito 

Tto r% 

9 3* 

6 4Vj 
2* lto 
2* to 
MT* 30 
1314 6Vi 
22V* II 
2 * 1 % 
3 2to 
12 6to 
IS lOto 
404 2=tt 
lto * 
(6* 6* 
llto 9to 
7V* 3Vt 
10* 4to 
10* 4* 

2* to 
23* 131* 


ICEEn 
I CHS 
ICO 
I PM 

IRTCps 
IS 5 .12 
ImpCp .lie 
implnd 
imoOllo 1 j 60 
inflgtil 


0 5*« 

3X2 46* 
30 21% 


127 lto 
11 361* 


Inslms JO ID 22 
ItbISy 8 

irtssvpt jsnao 


9 91% 
8 19% 
755 1% 


20 

S6 L9 63 
37 
22 


19 2* 
70 llto 
17 131* 
87 3* 

20 to 
3 7U 
7 lOto 

21 5to 

755 51* 

47 $•* 

123 V* 
56 211% 


5V. 514— to 

451* 46* +114 
Zto 2 Vh 
2* 2* 

8to 114— V* 
fto 4%— i* 
2to 2* + U 
1 1 — 1 % 
36% 36to + 'A 
Bto Bto— 14 
19 19% + % 

Ws lto 
21* 2to 
llto llto + to 
13* 13* + to 

3 'Z X + 

VI* 714 
10* 10* 

4to 55* + * 
5 5* + to 

5 S'* + * 

* to 

30* »*- u, 



4 to 1% 
21 * 8 % 
13to MW 
15* llto 
11 * 8 * 
231% 15* 
2V* lto 
2 Vj l'4 
1614 llto 
22*8 14 
Bto 5* 
14* 91* 
10 * 6 * 
20to iSto 
15* 10V* 


Ulhnte - 
Untcorp _ 
UnlcPPt J5 E6 
Ualmar 144fU7 
UAirPd .54b H « 
UfoodA .10 6.7 
UFoodB ,, 

ulMed 18 


UFoodB 

UtMMT 

USAGwt 

UnitriV 

Unvon 

UrtNRS 

linlvRa 

UnvPol 


4 1* 1* 
73 1218 }J* 
13 11* 11 
21 13* 13* 
64 10V* 10 
IS 22* 22* 
90 lto 1* 
8 lto lto 
18 15 14* 

3 15* 15% 
20 7* 7Vj 

3 11* ii% 
52 6V 6* 
2 17* 171% 
31 111* llto 


l»% 

11 *- * 
It 

131*- '*1 
lOto + Hr 
2?- 1 
1* 
lto . 
i4to— % 
15*- * 
7* + * 
ii*— 

6* 

171% + to 
11'* + to 


MS 2A 14 124 25* 25 25 


14 


IV 


24to idto 
22* 15* 
17 4 

I6>% 4* 

»to 13* 
74* 18* 
77% HP* 
V.m 3* 
8 4% 

7% 4% 

2% I 
25* 16 
14* 6* 

13 814 


12 

Mi 5 II 


Dh Art J4 1J 
onalnd AO U 77 
Olsten s .24 LO 19 
OOkieo 

OrtoSHA .15 X3 


OriolH B JO 43 
Ormand 

OSuIvns M 10 14 
OxtrdF JD1 63 10 
OzarkH JO 1.9 10 


1 20% 
16 17 

2 5 

2 6 * 
4 19 
1 20 * 
65 23% 
37 4* 

4 4Vi 

3 4to 
1 1 % 

T7 22 
57 13* 
162 ISto 


20* 70*— to 

17 17 — '4 

5 5 

6* 6* + * 
19 19 

20* 20* 

22% 23* +1U 
4‘% 4to + 1% 
4>* 41% — % 

4* 4* 

i% i*— to 
211% 21’.*— V* 
13 131% + to 

Itr.-a I0VS 


T7U, 12 Joctvn JOb 4.1 9 

7* 5% Jacobi 

4to 2to JelAm 8 

lto to JetA w» 

9* fkJgnn .71110.1 12 

6to 3 JahnPd 

11* 7 JohnAm JO 19 10 


11* 6 Jahnlnd 


7* 3to JpipJkn 
36 25 J uniter 


6 12* »3* 1214 
16 5% 51% 5* + to 

S $ ^ V* 

21 7 7 7 — to 

16 3V ( 3 3to + to 
IS 7* Tto 744 

84 8* 81- Bto + * 

17 3to 3 V* Jto + Vs 
13 J6to 36to 36* + 14 


Opening for Talks 
Is Seen In Moscow 


e> iT — m i ,w u it Ha 
%ntk rfw ft- 1 in I <1 



*A'\ 




10V* 9to 
27% 17% 
10 2 * 
23% 14% 
6<% 3% 
13* 8to 
4* 7* 

10% 5% 

9 Sto 
4* 2 

66 53V* 

9% 6to 
12V* 8 


vSTn AOe 65 

Volsors M IJ M 

VMjttC MX 73 

vend! 20 V 

Vertple 

Vkrtech 
vicon 
Vimae 

Volnil _ 

v/lsuoiG 30 38 


40b 2-3 10 
20 12 14 


M 4 <6 11 


45 9* 

1 2414 
22 9 to 
64 17* 

33 ' 4% 
223 9 

16 4* 
25 7% 

7 5% 

15 2* 

2 64* 

7 8 

4 8* 


9to 9* 

2414 24to — * 
8* 9'6 + * 

16* 1714 + to 
4 4 - V. 

81% 9 

4% 4* + to 

7 7% + % 

5* 5V, . 

2Vi 2to + to 
64* 6f* +* 
7% 8 + * 

8% 8% 


m 


m 


8-t 


m 


32 

52 8% 

53 13%. 

7 3* 

24 10% 
87 5V* 

82 16% 
34% 
63% 
lto 

45 Uto 

5 7 ^ 

26 5% 
S 31% 
2 B* 

II*. 
66 llto 
2 II* 
619 ft 

27 16* 

273 «* 

107 14 

8<4 

_ si* 

10 9% 

72 4* 

5 19«% 
6! 17* 
72 25 
35 8 

64 81* 

10 

46 Utto 
is llto 
M 1414 

2 38Y2 
20 1091% 
37 211% 
44 21 to 
2 87 
3 

7* 
61% 
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22to 
72* 


lto lto 
3* Tito + * 

a ssu 

a* b% 

T% 11* 

0% 111% + 14 

T fi 

6* 16* 

9% 9* + 1% 


4to 


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16* -i 

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7% 


114% — 

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17% H 

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8% 5% VonkCo 

11 29 7 6* 6* + * 


AMEX Higjhs-Lovvs 



NEW HIGHS . 7.. 


CaurtauKto 

MacNISdi 

ElsOrSnd 

MoiilnProc 

ImoGrp Ltd 
SfeohnOun 

JueUer Ind 


HEW LOWS IT 


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10% 4* TBor J3t &9 20 27 5* 5* 5% + to 

1£4 7V* TEC .16 1J TO 40 8% 8% 8*— to 

12% 4% TIE 498 514 5 5 —1% 

14 6% Til 26 90 71* 7 7 — * 

7TL. 13% TobPrd JO 1J 13 4 17* 1714 17% 

10's 6'4 TcmdBr 5 17 6* 6* 6*— * 

1554 9% Toatv .40 27 12 6 14* Uto 14* + to 

S* S? 35 3* 3% 3%— to 

3% IT* TdiAm 25 3 2* 3 


The Intemationai Heraki Tribune. 

Rringinpthft WnrkTs Mn%t 

InportantNews to tbe WcdcTs 

Most Important Audience. 


5 17 6* 6* 6*— to 

.40 27 12 6 14* Uto 14* + to 

35 3* 3% 3%— to 

25 3 2* 3 


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I ) l l i i i i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i 


NOTICE OF REDEMPTION 


European Coal and Steel Community 


6** 20-Year Bonds of 1967 Due October 1, 1967 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant la the provisions of the Paying Agency 
Agreement dated as of October 1. 1967 by and between the European Coal and Steel 
Community and The Chase Manhattan Bank (National Association), as American Paying 
Agent, and the European Paying Agents. 51566.000 in principal amount of the above 
Bonds will be redeemed and prepaid on October 1, 1985 at the principal amoOnt thereof 
together with interest accrued to the redemption date. 


The serial numbers of the coupon Bonds to be redeemed are set forth below in groups 
from one number to another number, both Inclusive, except such es shall have been 
previously catted for redemption or otherwise retired: 


M 1801 through 
2201 through 
2401 through 
4401 through 
4601 through 
6601 through 
7201 through 
10201 through 1 


Ml 4001 through 
14601 through ' 
16601 through 
16601 through ' 
18601 through 
19201 through ' 
19401 through ' 


The serial numbers and principal amounts ol the registered Bonds to be redeemed in 
part are as follows: 


Amount 

tab* 

RadMRWd 


R1 S74.000 

R2 3.000 


in case of partial redemption or a fully registered Bond, the American Paying Agent, as 
Authenticating Agent, will authenticate and deliver coupon Bonds or fully registered 
Bonds of authorized denominations in exchange for, and in aggregate principal amount 
equal to. the unredeemed portion of any fully registered Bond redeemed m part 
interest on the above Bonds (or portions thereof) shall cease to accrue on the 
redemption date and on the date the redemption price will become due and payable on 
each of such Bonds (or portions thereof) called lor redemption . 

Payment of coupon Bonds to be redeemed will be made upon presentation and 
surrender thereof, together with ail coupons, if any. maturing subsequent to the 
redemption dale, at The Chase Manhattan Bank. N.A.. Corporate Sinking Fund Opera- 
tions. Bos 2020. 1 New York Plaza. 14th Floor. New York. New Ybrfc 10061 or, at the option 
of the holder, at Banca Commercial Italians SpA. Sede di Milano. 6 Piazza della Scala. 
Milan. Italy: S. G Warburg & Co. Limited. 33 King Williams Street, London. England. EC4 
9AS: Banque Internationaiea Luxembourg S A . 2 Boulevard Royal. Luxembourg, Grand 
Duchy of Luxembourg: Socieie GOndrale de Banque. S A.. Montagne du Parc 3B. 
Brussels. Belgium; or Soci6l6 Generate. 29 Boulevard Haussman. 75009 Paris. France! 
the European Raying Agents 

Coupons which mature on. or have matured prior to. the redemption date should be 
detached and surrendered for payment in the usual manner. 

Payment of registered Bonds to be redeemed will be made only upon presentation and 
surrender thereof at the above mentioned address of The Chase Manhattan Bank N A 
EUROPEAN COAL AND STEEL COMMUNITY 
Syr THE CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, (NATIONAL ASSOCIATION) 

American Peymg Agent 
Dated: August 30. 1985 


-Kingidom of Sweden 
- - 051500,000,000 Floating 
Rate Notes due 2005 
For the six month' period 
IWth April. I9R5 to 
18th October. 1985. the 
amount payable per US$10,000. 
Note win be USS-f 16.84 payable 
on ISth October, 1985. 
Bankers Trust Company 
London 

Focal Agent 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

WCES AT 1&9J& 
A, LJJS. DOUAB CASH J)(M3 

6s MULUCURHB'CY CASH S105B 

G DOLLAR BONOS ST144 

Ds MULT1OJRR04CY BONDS 511.40 

6. STRUNG ASSET £10.95 

FCfBGNA COLONIAL 
MANAGE MENT (j atSEY) LIMITED 
14 MUUCA5IH! S0jffr,ST t-BIFg , (H ttFy r | 
THj 063427351 TRBG 4192063 

FOR OlHBt F A C FUNDS, SEE 
INTERNATIONAL FUNDS UST 


STOCK 
DeVoe- Holbein 
International nv 
Giy-Qock 
International nv 


Quotes as of: September 23, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
bote and the weekly - ■ 

INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


Firat Commerce Securities bv 
World Trade Center 
Stntwiukyiaaa 857 
1077 XX Amsterdam, 

The Nclhertends 
Telephone: i3 1 *20)62 77 62 
Telex: 14507 fireo nl 


• I 




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24-9-85 



































































-St 


INTKKWTION 


VL IIKKALD TKIBl XK. TTESDAV* SEPTEMBER 


1985 


Page 1’ 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


% 




trs***., 

' wuiv. | 

- ■'life 

s T,s ' c “*»t 

; ny*/ 1 . 

; :illon in 5il 

“ -‘V'lCWjJto 

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n Common 
tedly Bai 
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Despite a slight recovery late in alter finance muustep of the ! Umt- 


thc session from the day's'fows. the ed States, Britain, Japan. F^nce 


'CotnfnleJfrOur Staff Fran Dnpauhn 

_ -LONDON The dollar »». mhiuiiuiuuieiu; -• — • • . w- _„ 

plunged 3 percent against major dollar closed at IS-raonth lows in and West Germany met in incw 

currencies Monday to .end at its London. York and announced agreement to 

lowest levels since June 1984 in The currency ended at 2.7280 coordinate a weakening of the dot- 
response to -a decision by the iop DM, down 14 pfennigs from 18493 lar. . , f 

Gve industrial nations to force on Friday; at 8.3195 French francs. They said the aim was to head on 

down 40 centimes from 8.6980. and protectionist sentiment in the unit- 
at 2.2385 Swiss francs, down 11 cd States, fueled by the inroads of 
centimes from 2.3423. foreign imports whose prices have 

The British pound surged to gone down as the dollar has 
SI .4280 from SI. 3680. its strongest strengthened. 

dollar makes U.S. 


down the U.S. currency. 

Dealers said markets were in tur- 
moil with do consensus on whether 
the dollar’s -phinge was short-term, 
or the beginning of a real decline. 


Some predicted a nrild recovery af- dose against the dollar since the 
_ ter themitial selling wave was over, end of July, but it had cased from a 
■_ .**It. was a dash to see who could 


-get <nit of their dollars fastest," said 
a London-based dealer for a large 
" U5r bahki , 

to London, the U.S. currency 
fust about six cents against the Brit- 
ish pound, nearly 14 pfennigs 
against the West German Deutsche 
martr.n centimes against the Swiss 
franc and 40 centimes against the 
French franc. 


A cheaper 

products more competitive with 
midday level of SI. 43 15. foreign goods. But dealers said they 

At midaftemoon in Europe, the were in a quandary as to whether 
dollar was fixed in Frankfurt at Monday's plunge was just a ref lex 
2.7248 DM. down from. 2.8862 on reaction to a major piece of eov 
Friday: at 8.245 French francs in nomic news, and whether the in- 
Paris. down from 8.7990. and at dustrial nations would follow 
1 .831.30 tire in Milan, down from through with concrete measures. 
1.938.00. In Zurich, the dollar a! though the market was clearly 


cowed by the prospect of massive 
dollar sales, several dealers said 
they remained adamant that inter- 


dosed at 2.23 1 S Swiss francs, down 
from 2.3505 on Friday. 

In London, the dollar fell to 

. “W.e were shocked^ one Frank- 231.80 Japanese yen from 241.29. ectlve in the long- 

rurt dealer said. ^Everyone knew Foreign-exchange markets were lcnn lls accompanied by 
there would be a reaction and that closed Monday in Tokyo for a na- fundamental economic measures, 
the dollar would come down, but > tional holiday. . ap JHTl 

don't think anyone expected this." The dollar’s fall came the day f 


Singapore Plans 
Wage Reforms 

Rruicry 

SINGAPORE — The gov- 
ernment of Singapore proposed 
Monday to do away wiih mini- 
mum pay increases and auto- 
matic seniority raises, to link 
incentive payments u> produc- 
tivity and to institute regular 
reviews or wage accords in an 
attempt to reduce labor costs. 

Lee Hsien Loong. minister of 
state for irude and industry, 
said at a university seminar that 
the goal was to make the wage 
system more flexible. He said 
the problem at present was that 
“employees tend to be paid a 
fixed wage regardless of wheth- 
er their company is doing well 
or poorly." 

The National Wages Coun- 
cil, a body representing the gov- 
ernment. employers and unions 
set up 13 years ago, will no 
longer recommend overall wage 
guidelines, said Mr. Lee, son of 
Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew. 


Fatal Air Crashes Raise Concern Over Engine 

T' 


(Continued from Page II) 

flaw in the engine, although they 
call it highly unlikely. 

“As Tar as finding a basic fault in 
the engine — no," said Selwyn D. 
Berson. executive vice president of 
United Technologies m charge of 
the Pratt & Whitney Group. “It s 
been running too long." 

But he acknowledged that the 
possibility of a generic design flaw 
could not be ruled out completely. 
“1 can't eliminate it at this ume. 
he said. 

The questions about the engine 
come at an important time for Pratt 
& Whitney. Any finding of a basic 
defect in the engine could have 
enormous marketing conse- 
quences. „ 

Even though Pratt & Whitney 



sued this month, said the accident, 
and ensuing fire had been touched" 
off by an explosion caused by a. 
rupture in the outer casing of one 
of the combustion chambers in tnt 
planes left engine. 

Pratt & Whitney continues to 
monitor and' test the JTSD engine,- 
according to Ted Slaiby. the com- 
pany's vice president for commer- 
cial-engine programs- 

An entirely different Pratt * 
Whitney engine was involved in 
problems with the U.S. military, 
about six years ago. Congress in- 
quired about troubles with the en- 
gine in the F-100 fighter. 

Also the F-I 6 . powered by a 
Pratt & Whitney engine, began to 
have occasional crashes, some of 
them attributed to engine deficien- 
cies. The F-16. however, has a 
strong safety record, and the Penta- 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Still Awaitmg 
The Trade 


. _ n» N«w Yo* t™b ^ 

has devek^xd An inspector at the Middletown, Connecticut, plant of JJSawSirfdie probtans had 

S , .lfi£S«<!!S Pratt^WlStne,' Group checking a JT8D-217 jet engine. 

mi n gs wmm 

““ scare parts ts ex mriret ^ ^ a market share when SuUveof United Technologies, the 

^liwnhle'effS larger planes such as the Boeing Pnm & Whitney Group continued 


jet engines and spare parts 

S'S have^noiiced^no ^oticeabieeffect larger plan* such as the Boeing Pratt & Whitney Groupconun^ 
$39 billion in ihe previous 10 years, on Pratt & Whitney from the acci- required more powerful mme 


^ nicQ expected to gines than the JT 8 D. . development even when the engine 

The company is F denis. . , p Pratt & Whitney tries market went through a seven: re- 


facc large liability claims from rela- -n, e impact on the company. I But utule Pratt « wtutney market went tnrougn a 

tivcsofpcople who lost their lives slill think. Essentially nil." Wolf- to win back .HmaAet store cess, on from 1979 to 1982 

nr were imured in the accidents. Danish, aerospace analyst for its improved engmes._ rt _ 5U “ Pran & Whitney is the only 


man- 


Focus Is on Novel Issues in Primary Sector 


or were injured ininciiBuw* gang Lrenusn. aerospace anaiy**. iu. — fh - i d “T m ., 

This could depress earnings and fj £ Boston Corp„ said. “The en- considerable attenuon to th ufacturer that has developed totally 

ar much ^ ^ « taT= 

Still most aviation expemare ESZZZSLLa in a combus- 


(Continued from Page 1 1 ) 
stock and other funds are guided 

BKSS'fS- 

. - . wiih the issue oaving9^ per- ume thtta. Because all stock-index nol indicate fundamental design Whatever the findings, Pratt & uon ^ amber 'I" ^ j n Its major competitors— General 

Sri?ttaijS«dpSK futures and opuons markets area naws JT 8 D engine. One |p» Whitnqr.is not likely to easily yield SStha^Siands Electric and Rrifis-Rovce-- are re, 

led b > Salomon Brothers Inter centwe y relatively new phenonienon. and rih|1Uv inv0 | v « the issue ofwheth- its position as the top maker of the ^ n f™*t and this lying on derivatives of exisu 

LONDON — The dollar- national. ^ !ead managers Tor the largely consist of man-made index- the ' engines that failed had been civilian-aircraft engines. U became uk™«s uie turn . ^ Thev argue that such : 

smagtaMinoadne-nte-nottsec- » % . «»*— Co. Bar- his.orical dau maj no, b. Suinuiwl property- , , No 1 in ihc 1960s. wh«. Sc, « etoper a»d 

.. n mnmine eains to end little - My4h Capiul Markets. Wilh u,e bard, still gaming ^ th £ - -ntio^edmn^ g— g -r^ose oj 

repaid being publ£hed a „rr;rini the lead .he linn's share of foreign-exchange planes they onler.do not ajjprario Royce LtO. jor «icn major puui«, Aflep lhe [in>1 


By Christopher Pizzey- 

W% Rrvien 


engines 
Whitney's. 



backed by multifaxraly mortgage 
The issue was quoted on the 
when-issued market at a discount 
of Hi. compared with the total fees 
of 214 percent. 

Another novel issue w-as the ran _ eninll pavs ] 
launching of a doliar-straight by a ^ P • 

cneriallv formed company, which *“ P ntM ^ 


the when-issued market. TSTinie^Trales. wrong with the engine.' 

The other issue in the dollar- [ n a j, L1FFE traded 2.2 million Last January. Pan Am chose 


lower dollar. 

U.S. credit markets began to ease 
and prices in London followed. 

The secondary market did not 
dominate interest Monday: some 
novel issues were launched in the 
primary sector. 

aswsaws &SSSBS& rfsaSESE 3SSai»aw «? 




■he Eurobond market with a recent «>»»» niToScrnt less than its total fees Atlantic ounng 

SlOO.l-mHlion issue of mortgage nore for Bntan. ^ borro^ as ■ the excha nge s offiaals. 

participation cerUficates. Hie is- bearer United Kingdom Securities <>■ “P cram — 


have 

duction as its newer engines come I dropped'' to their lowest level in 
into use. They are more fud-effi- Avia . more dun a year, a monthly survey 

of manufacturing trends by the 
Confederation of British Industry- 
said Monday. 

The organization said the fall «r 
lustra ted difficulties posed by high 
British interest rates, a stronger 
pound and volatile exchange rates. 


Pratt & Whitney's 


Mr. Berson thority. in a preliminary report i. 



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TPage 18 


1MTKR NATIONAL HERALD TRIBINE. TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 24, 1985 


I' = U 4 S fi 7 


Is 1 10 1 11 1 12 M3 |14 


PEANUTS 


15 




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31 132 133 134 



SHE'S ASLEEP 
MA'AM.. 


1 maybe we Ail shoulp 

s JUST TIPTOE OUT OF 

S TUP {MOM AMD l PT 


THE ROOM.ANP LET 
HE R REST, OKAY? 


THAT5 ALL RIGHT... 
IT U?A5 ONLY 
A SUG6E5T10N_ 


books 


GALAPAGOS 


By Kurt Vonnegut. 312 pages. $16.95. 
Delacorte Press. I Dag Hammarskjold Flo- 
ra, New York, N. Y. 10017. 

Reviewed by Michael Bishop 


abuses againsUife and - di;v0 i u ncn. 

hilarious P^' olheJ . 0 m sail '.o ,hc 


hilarious pacm - , p lhc 

Se«n people hilled * "she 

Galapagps k ,an £ h ° /> nlu fv/’ bul a world 

Nature Cruise of the C« my. Mr 


BLONDIE 


C ONSIDER the human brain, urge Kurt 
Vonnegut in “Galapagos." Its size has 
doomed us to evolutionary failure, suckenng 
us down a primrose path of misconceptions, 
neuroses and crackpot notions to inevitable 
extinction. . . 

Suppose we could sidestep extinction by 
jettisoning large pieces of our cerebral furni- 
ture. trading in our hands for flippers and 
dieting exclusively on fish. In the long run. 
wouldn't these sacrifices be improvements? In 
“Galapagos.** which often has the flavor of a 
jeremiad delivered more in sorrowful whimsy 
than in angry disgust, Vonnegut expertly 
stacks the deck to force us to conclude that 
forfeiting our big brains would be far belter 
than ( I ) continuing to inflict our vicious selves 
on this planet or (2) going the way of the dodo. 

To structure this simultaneously funny and 
harrowing novel — his most controlled and 
Inventive since “Slaughterhouse Five” — Von- 
negui has stood a hoary science-fiction cliche 
on its head. Almost to a person, sci-fi writers 
have bought the premise that only greater 
brainpower will ensure humanity's survival. 


k VOUfiEEM . 

"CONCERNED 


I A/A... THE SCHOOLS 
SENT METHtS NOTICE 


THREE OP 1W WHY L 
WOSNEED <AREVOU 
DENTAL CAES/* 60 ■ 

wmrt&KfBEZ 


I ONLY HA/E 
TWO KJDS 


58 80 161 182 


ABOUT | 

^THAT? | 

2 


ACROSS 


I An archangel 
8 Supreme Court 
Associate Jus- 
tice: 1932-38 

15 Intensify 

16 Escorted 

17 Celebrity 
status 

18 Ireland's 

Abbey 

19 Court target 

20 Guitar's cousin 
of yore 

22 Grecian 
mountain 

23 "If Would 

Leave You" 

25 Mr. Kabibble 

26 Mother-of- 
pearl 

29 Cooking 
direction 

31 What is is 

35 Martini 
garnishes 

37 Sept. 20. 1984. 
e.g. 

38 "1 cannot tell 


51 “Ichbin 

Berliner”: 

J.F.K. 

53 Berlin song: 

1915 

55 Cafeteria 
items 

58 Chariot route 

59 Andrews or 
Wynter 

63 Made wavelets 
65 Thief 

67 Disturb 

68 Miss Vicki's 
groom 

69 Straw hats 

70 Cures 


12 Upright: 
Comb, form 

13 Goose egg 

14 Pindaric 
works 

21 Retaliation in 
kind 

24 Neckline shape 

25 People of Cork 

26 Entangle- 
ments 

27 {-ticking's 
partner 

28 Mannerly 

30 N.Y.C. subway 

32 Fly by night 

33 Girder 
fastener 


BEETLE BAILEY 



/ CAM YOU TELL 

* ME WHERE 


MO/ I? 


COBB'S CORNER 

, IS* > 



HE WASN'T 
VERY 
FRIENDLY 


The superman has been a staple in speculative 
fiction from H. G. Wells's “The Food of the 
Gods” through such “classics'* as “Child- 
hood’s End” By Arthur C Clarke. Vonnegut, 
who rigorously eschews genre classification, 
frog-marches the post-Darwinian concept of 
the superman right back to the sea. “Galapa- 


39 Prim a donna 

46 Horn sounds 

42 All-conqueror 

43 Satanic 

44 Drop a pop-up 

45 Assistant 

47 Market 

48 Campus org. 
50 Borscht 

ingredients 


1 Netting 

2 Division word 

3 Phraya, 

Thai river 

4 JeannieC. 
Riley's 1968 
song hit 

5 R R 

(leave) 

6 School, in 
Paris 

7 Nocturnal 
primates 

8 Attractive 


9 Cigar Lip 

10 Ostriches' 
cousins 

1 1 Popular radio 
series: 1930-45 


34 Root and 
ginger 

36 Ship's rear 

41 Riode , 

African bav 
46 Wane 
49 Summits 
52 Moslem 
religion 

54 Ade book: 1896 

55 Kind of door 

56 Latvian 
capital 

57 Neat as 

58 Sept. 13, e.g. 

60 Choir member 

61 Herr’s “no” 

62 Weapons 
64 Timetable 

abbr. 

66 Alfonso’s 
queen 




ANDY CAPP 


Soirtkvi to Previous Pazde 


Smstessssssi 


changed vcur 
r mind vet?.— - 


NO. I HflVENT 

-GET LOST* 


A FULLER RQJRE—*- "> 

yTWN ANBWPrY V RtSHT. 

{ PURSe,«GHr?I R USE 


MfiMSDiitrUnwNnWm LM' 
- Dm evjjewvAaunMlggtaji 


WIZARD of ID 


•C.i I'iew York Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


mm 

TH&? 



-TtitNe# 


YOVSgNPl H6« 
127 TH& 
Mm (5MP 




gco aaaa □□aama 

EEC3 [HD 33 Q33333 
□EE 333u233QE333 
CDuB azaan 33333 
□E3Q3 3QQQ33 
OD3QB 3333303 
QGQ 3333 333330 
□EDE 33300 0303 
ED3Q33 3303 333 
□□QE2H33 33303 
330333 33330 
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EOOG3D □□□□ 330 
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Nature Cruise oI l . n . 0U [brcak flf war be* 
moneuuy crisis and the h disas- 

ters. including the sudden apt ^ 

bactenum that .coders Pj ? 0 f these 

Ecuadoran isles in A. D. 10°™- 

The novel’s narrator is the ghorf «-■ L“® 

centers on the duplicity and domnemn^ arro- 
gance of humanity s three-kilogram brains. 

-Fv«i at this late date, 1 am still full of rage 
at a natural order which would hfwpenmtjcj 
the evolution of something ^ ^sirauin m 
irrelevant and disruptive as S 

brains of a million years ago. If They had Lmw 
the truth, then I could see some point in e«0 
body's having one. But these things lied all the 

time!'* 

The other characters indude Mary Hep- 
burn. a widow and former biology ‘^acber 
from Ilinm. New York: James WaiL who mar- 
ries widows for their money and then deserts 
them: Zenji HirbguchL the inventor of a amut. 
taneous voice translator called Gokubi and of. 
an advanced model called Mandarax that can 
diagnose a thousand human illnesses as well as £ 
disgorge midapropian quotations from world , 
literature; ana the brothers von Kleist: Sig- 
fried. owner of a tourist hotel and victim of 
Huntington's chorea, and Adolf, captain of the 
crutseship and later the unsuspecting progeni- 
tor of all of latter-day humanity. 

Vonnegut has nearly always resorted to.re- 
d actio ad absurdutn to score points against our 
species’ most dismaying follies, and in “Gala-' 
pages” he does so again, as precisely as he has 
ever wielded this instrument I can imagine 
hostile readers indicting him for easy pessi- 
mism or simplistic misanthropy, but Vonnegut 
— in keeping with his advocacy of smaller 
brains? — has never pretended to be a deep 
thinker along the lines of Sartre or Bellow. 


Michael Bishop, author of the novels “Vo 
Enemy But Tune," “ Blooded on Arachne" and, ■ 
mast recently, " Ancient of Days." » rate this.-., 
review for The Washington Post 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


T HE third and last Inter- 
zonal Tournament held in 


REX MORGAN 


Of a YOU HEAR, 
8RADY? 1ST . 
T Go OF HfMfJ 


r YOU BETTER PAY ^ l f YOU 5 Alt? YOU'RE HAVIWG ME ARRESTED FOR 
ATTENTION TO WHAT { POSSESSION AND SALE OF COCAINE / I DON'T 
YOUR WIFE'S SAVING,, i HAVE ANY COCAINE ON ANt? THERE'S LESS 

-nw BISHOP f an J » THAN $IO IN MV WALLET i I DONT KNOW WHAT 

kra p-nT'lM li " ^ yCXI'RE TALKING ABOUT — AND THE COPS WILL 

j vtrML i — — * ■ — — '■ — 






GLAD THEY FINALLY 60T HIM A BICYCLE. Af LEAST 
THAT SHOULD SPREAD HIM OVER A LARGER AREA ! ’ 


GARFIELD 


THAT 9CRAMBLH1 WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, ( 
one tetlef to each square, to fcxm I 
tour ordhary words. [ 


\J tfJ 


GEDUN 




£ V 

fhf> 


SNAP* 

fe)j 


WHAM! WHAM.' 


USSEO 


laTM t7AVfe> 




1 zonal TrBr mnm mt held in 
BieL Switzerland, was won by 
Rafad Vaganian, a 33-year-old 
grandmaster from the Soviet 
Union. His winning score was 
1 2Vs— 4 , .4. 

The Interzonals are the sec- 
ond step in the two-year cycle 
that win produce a challenger 
for the world championship in 
1986. 

The other qualifiers far a slot 
in the next stage, the Candi- 
dates Tournament, were Yasser 
Sdrawan, a 25-year-old Seattle 
grandmaster, who captured 
second place with ll!4-5fe, and 
Andrei Sokolov, a 22-year-old 
Russian grandmaster, who 
took third with 11-6. 

The final qualifier will be de- 
termined in a playoff among 
the grandmasters John Van der 
Wiel of the Netherlands, Eu- 
genio Torre of the Phiffipines 
and Nigel Short of Britain. All 
shared fourth place with 1014- 
6VL 

The Chinese entrant, Zunian 
LL a 27-year-old international 
master, was flustered by an ex- 
change sacrifice in his encoun- 
ter with Vaganian. 

In this Slav defensive varia- 
tion. some recent games have 


seen White aim for a positional 
knockout with 7 . . . N-Q2!; 
S NxP/5, P-K4. Black's coun- 
terplay is not easy to put down. 

There is no special pant in 
Black’s rushing with 7 . . . N- 
QN5, since 8 BxP! prohibits 
8 . - . N-B7ch?; 9 QzN!, BxQ 
in view of 10 BxPmatc. 

Vaganian’s bold attenpl to 
secure - freedom - with 
12 . . . P-B417 soon demand- 
ed an exchange sacrifice to jus- 
tify itself. tEus, on 13 NxB, 
RPxN; 14 P-Q5, PxP; 15 P- 
K517. a retreat with 15 . . . N- 
Kl? yields White a powerful 
attacking position with 16NxP. 
Vaganian was able to afford 
15 . . . R-Kl!? because of 16 





'fife* 


(23 . . . QxN?; 24 QxQ. PxQ; 


25 R-Q7di spoils Kack’s end- 
Rsune chances): 24 N-B3. arris- 


PxN, B-Q3; 17Q-Q2?!, PxB; 18 
QxB?, QxQ; 19 Rx_Q. R- 
K8mate, 

However, Li assured the gain 
of the exchange by 16 B-QN5, 
virtually facing 16 . . B- 
Bl; 17 BxR, NxB. Neverthe- 
less, after 21 . . . QxB, when 
the position had quieted down 
tactically, Vaganian had an im- 
portant center pawn for the lost 
exchange. 

It would now have been cor- 
rect forLi to aim for sunjdificar 
tion and clarification with 22 
N-N5, but instead he pursued a 
will-o'-the-wisp, . with 22 N- 
K4?!, Q-K2; 23 Q-N4, N-K3 


gmne chances); 24 N-B3, arriv- 
ing bade where be was andpay- 
ing Vaganian AveraJ tempi for- 


Li must have already been in 
tnne pressure, as hs awful; “i 
blunders, 26 R-Kl? and 27 R-\ ' .* 
K3?, showed. After 29 . . . K- 
Nl, he gave up. 


1 Km daia w 

2 FW MI 17 U M 

2 £33 53?. S^. 

9 P«*M Ml 20 ML 

■ KO Ml n aa 

1 NO MJ H l«M 

SS 8 SS5S 

H on . Ofl M BHI 
U IHO M 

o ROT P^M 37 M 

a Krff nwr a mi 


THERAH 


GOHBUT 


HOW YOU HAVE 
TO PAY FOR 
SOME KINOSOF 
PLASTIC SURGERY. 


Wbrid Stock Markets 


I id Agence France- Presse Sept. 23 

dosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indi c at e d. 


Now arrange tbe circled letters to 
form toe surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Std Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tote and Lvle 
Tesco 
Thom EMI 

T.l. Croup 
Trofolvjr Hse 
TMF 

Ultramar 
Unilever t 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Yest entry's I PLAIT SUITE INJECT PASTRY 


Answer The most brutal aspect of boxing these 
days— THE PRICE OF SEATS 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Alg arve 
Amsterdam 
Athene 
Bar catena 


Bertie 

Brassed 

Bucharest 

Swfapest 

CaaenboMn 

Casta Del Sol 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisboa 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Murick 

ITce 

Oslo 

Paris 

Prauue 

Rerklavlk 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Slrasboaro 

Venice 

Vienttd 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

c 

P 



C 

p 

C 

F 


27 

81 

18 

64 

Cl 

Bangkok 

30 

Be 

24 

75 

0 

19 

M 

14 

57 

0 

Bailing 

14 

57 

11 

52 

r 

27 

81 

18 

64 

fr 

Hoag Kang 

30 

86 

25 

77 

d 

77 

81 

IS 

59 

tr 

Manila 

31 

88 

24 

75 

d 

29 

B4 

14 

57 

Ir 

MewOelM 

32 

90 

24 

75 

d 

IS 

59 

10 

50 

0 

Seoul 

71 

70 

16 

61 

0 

20 

efl 

15 

59 

0 

Shanghai 

24 

75 

22 

72 

r 

30 

8ft 

12 

54 

ir 

Singapore 

28 

82 

24 

75 

r 

26 

79 

14 

57 

d 

Taipei 

30 

86 

25 

77 

0 

15 

59 

4 

39 

Ir 

Tokyo 

19 

66 

16 

61 

sh 

30 

15 

86 

59 

18 

13 

64 

SS 

Cl 

vh 

AFRICA 






IS 

SI 

9 

48 

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AHrierc 

27 

81 

19 

66 

Cl 

2* 

84 

13 

55 

fr 

Gdra 

30 

86 

21 

70 

d 

23 

73 

11 

64 

d 

Cape Town 

17 

63 

IS 

55 


24 

75 

10 

50 

fr 

CazaMuPCQ 

25 

77 

IB 

64 

Ir 

11 

52 

1 

34 

cl 

Harare 

19 

66 

11 

52 

fr 

22 

72 

16 

61 

fr 

Logos 

29 

84 

25 

77 

0 

26 

79 

21 

70 

fr 

Nairobi 

24 

75 

12 

52 

d 

26 

79 

17 

63 

fr 

Tads 

28 

82 

18 

64 

fr 

71 

70 

14 

57 

el 




29 

84 

14 

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fr 

LATIN AMER CA 



24 

75 

15 

59 

fa 







8 

4ft 

6 

43 

h 

Beanes Aires 

17 

63 

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46 

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31 

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20 

fr 

25 

71 

19 

66 

tr 

Lima 

.19 

66 

16 

57 

r 

17 

J4 

0 

32 

d 

Mexico City 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 

26 

79 

18 

64 

d 

Made Janeiro 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 

IB 

ID 

64 

so 

14 

4 

57 

39 

d 

Cl 

NORTH AMERICA 




ACF Holding 

AEGON 

AKZO 

AhokJ 

AMEV 

A'Dom Rubber 
Amro Bonk 
BVG 

Buehrmam T 
Caland HWs 
Elsevler-MDU 
Fokker 
Gist Brocades 
Helneken 
Hoogovens 
KLM 
Noorden 
Nal Nedder 
Hedllovd 
Oce Vender G 
Pokhoed 
Philips 
Robeco 
Rodomco 
■Rolbico 
Rorento 
1 Raval Dutch 
1 Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
VMF Stork 
VNU 


Close Prev. 
Hochtief 747 

Hoechst 232 

HoesOl 17930 

Horten 198 

Hussel 39930 

fUVKA 295 

Kail -f Sail 363 

Karstodt 278 

KauWtof 306 

Kloeckner H-D X9 

Kloeckner Werke D 
Kruop Slam 128 

Unde S65 

Lufthansa 220 

MAN 183 

Momesmann 277 JD 

Muencn Rueck i»4S 

NI>dorl S6&50 

PKI 670 

Poractio 1349 

Preussao 263 

PW A MS 

RWE m V ) 

Rhelnmeiafl 375 

Srijorlno 509 

SEL 33Z50 

Siemens 590 

Thyssen 14850 

VebC 24150 

Volkswagen >verk 3XL50 
Wells 660w50 


Harmony 
Hlveld Steel 
Kloof 
Nedtxmk 
PresSteyn 
Rusplal 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sosol 

West Holding 


Close. Prev 
3025 2900 
535 530 

2210 7135 
1220 1175 

6300 <150 
i«G iaso 
760 7*5 

3350 3300 
775 775 

7300 6950 


United Biscuits 
Vickers 
Wool worth 


F.T. 3S lodes : 995J8 
Previous : 100220 
F.T-S.E.10S index : ms 
PrevlBus : 129B70 


Cold Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Neave 

How Par 

Inchcope 

Mai Banking 

OCBC 

QUB 

OUE 

Shanorl-la 
Slme Darby 
SOore Land 
S pot* Press 
S SleomsnlD 
St Trading 
United Overseas 
UOB 


Dunlap 
Elders ixl 
ICI Australia 
Magellan 
MIM 
Mver 

Nat Ausi Bank 
News Coro 
N Broken Hill 
Poseidon 
Old Coal Trust 
Santas 

Thomas Notion 
Western Mining 
Westoac Banking 
woodslde 


2M 2M 

132 3J0 

Z22 115 
230 Z 30 
2S2 2M 
ISO 142 
403 4J0 

7 7 

250 244 

190 3J0 

L57 LB 
£04 495 

215 205 

208 X7S 
478 445 

1J0 I JO 


Canadian stocks da AP 


Nigh Low Oase Chg. 


fif All Ordinaries index : 95979 
lAJ Prev i ous : 94539 


Straits Times Ind index : 7S547 
Previous : 7824* 


Composite Stock index : 1192.10 
Previous : 1169.19 


i AA Cara 
1 Altfed-Lyons 


S12H S12V. 
270 270 


Anglo Am Gold S*7Ui S67U. 
1 Ass Bril Foods 222 222 


Commerzbank index : 153899 
Previous : 1S52J0 


ANP.CBS Goal Index : 2M.IS 
Previo u s : 22130 


30 8« 17 63 tr 

II 52 3 37 fr 

26 79 IS 59 ir 

27 81 15 59 fr 

25 77 15 59 d 

14 57 9 48 Cl 

25 77 II 52 fr 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tel Aviv 


29 84 3 37 tr 

34 93 20 6B fr 

35 95 71 52 tr 

32 90 22 72 tr 

31 80 20 68 d 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 16 61 9 48 a 

Sydney 20 68 11 53 cl 

cl-£loudv: fo-fooov: tr-talr: h-hail; 
sh-Vrawers. swsnow; st-slormv. 


An d w ragg 

Aflenta 

Boston 

Chicago 

Denver 

Detroit 

Honolulu 

Houston 

Los Angelas 

Miami 

Minneapolis 

Montreal 

Nassau 

New York 

Son Fraacbco 

Seattle 

Toronto 

wcshktgtae 


Arbed 

Bekaert 

Cockerlll 

Cobepa 

EBES 

GB-Inno-BM 

GBL 

TJcvoen 

Hoboken 

Intercom 

Kredtetdank 

Peh-onna 

Soc General a 

SofFna 

Satvav 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unerg 

VtelltD Montagna 



Current Stock Index i 299034 
PrevtaM : 250M8 


n mill fin i 


«M>varcost; oc-oortlv 


TUESDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: NA. FRANKFURT: Overcast. Temp. 
71 — 16 (70 — oil. LONDON: Overcast. Temp. 20— IS MB— 59). MADRID: Fair. 
Tcmo.28— 15 (H2 — 9»J. NEW YORK: Cloudy. Tem*L 24 — 17 {73 — 63). PARIS: 
Cloudy early, lair later. Temp. 23 — 14 (73— 6U. ROME: Fair. Tamp. 29 — 17 
if4 —631. TEL AVIV: NA. ZURICH: Fair. Temo. 26 — 13 (79 — 55). BANGKOK: 
Thunderstorms. Temo. 31 — 25 188— 771 HONG KONG: Cloudy. Temp. 38 —29 
lB& — 77). MANILA: Thunderstorms. Temp. 32 — 24 — 75). SEOUL; Rein. 
Tern a 12 — 13 (72 — 551. SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms. Temo. 28 — 25 
182 — 77). TOKYO; Rain. Temp. 10— 17 164 — 63). 


AEG-Teletunken 

Allianz Vers 

Altana 

BASF 

Saver 

Bay Hypo Bank 
Bay verebisbank 
BBC 

BHF-Wnk 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Cant Gumml 
Daimler-Benz 
Degussa 

Deutsche ecbeocfc 
Deutsche Bank 
Dresdner Bank 
GHH 
Haraen^r 


141 JO 14540 
1570 1610 

367 37400 
233 JO 23850 

22S 229.70 

399 401 

400 410 

28! JO 278 

336 330.90 
479 497 

220 JO 22500 
149 156 

95# 906 

368 3665) 
173 190.70 
603 61200 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kano 
China Light 
Green island 
Hang Seng Bank 
Hencerson 
Chino Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HKShang Bank 
HK Telephone 
HK Yaumatel 
HK Whan 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hvsan 
tan City 

Jardine 
JardlneSec 
Kowloon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
New Worta 

Orient Overseas 
SHK Props 
SIHux 

Swire Pacific A 
Tai Cheung 
WahKwang 
WheelockA 
Wing On Ca 
Wlnsor 
World Inn 


2100 2 M0 
1740 17.70 
15.10 15 

005 90S 

4135 42 

2.15 212S 

905 905 

705 7.95 

tOJO 1&60 
95 94J0 
6 605 

700 7.15 

805 B.40 

3.15 125 

6-55 6J5 

2SJ0 2500 
(U0 040 

006 008 
1120 1100 
1X20 1X30 
9 JO 9.10 

4Z50 43 

7,40 7A0 

Susa — 
1240 12J0 
260 260 
2170 24 

1.90 1.92 

,007 006 
Susa. . — 
160 168 
430 4.70 

ids 205 


Ass Dairies 134 116 

Barclays 367 J74 

Bass 574 574 

B-A.T. 2M 271 

Bee cham 320 333 

BICC 223 223 

BL 32 a 

Blue Circle 518 521 

aoc Group 276 278 

Boots 252 201 

Bawater Indus 334 334 

BP 533 534 

Bril Home SI 295 207 

Brit Telecom 2D0 |99 

Brit Aerospace 415 405 

Brllull 203 204 

BTR 355 368 

Burmch 2S? 2£* 

Cable wireless 5#i 9» 

Cadbury StJiw 13* 136 

Charter Cons 190 190 

Commercial U 231 229 

Cons Gold 449 449 

Courtaukts 147 147 

DateetY 421 4^ 

De Beers* 450 438 

Disinters 390 3J9 

Driefonteln Sl9to slate 

Ftsons 353 351 

FreestGed S22te Ek 

GEC 164 164 

Gen Accident 623 623 

GKN 230 Z36 

Oltuuj c 12 51/64 13 

Grand Mel 3J0 M 

GRE 653 2D 

Guinness 274 775 

GUS 872 863 

Hanson 1W M4 

Hawker 315 387 

ICI 637 647 

Imperial Group 194 193 

Jaguar 276 2S2 

Laid Securities 3® 302 

Legal General 671 677 


Banco Comm 

Cenirale 

ewa hotels 

Crea Itai 

Ertdonlo 

Farmltaiia 

Flal 

Generali 

IF! 

I to 1 c» men! I 

Itafgas 

l la l mob! liar I 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

fi AS 

RlnosceiTte 

SIP 

SME 

Snia 

Standa 

Slet 


34450 24500 
3449 3445 
10560 10590 


11140 11212 
12920 12960 
4550 4532 
62250 63300 
11070 10640 
46680 49700 
1775 1797 
116450114900 
128000129000 
2500 2510 
7450 7555 
3700 3222 
1 09030 11 MOO 
10121049V* 
2615 2631 
16011624 V3 
3850 3W1 
14950 14200 
3535 3549 


AGA 

Alfa Laval 

Asea 

Astra 

Alias Copco 

Bofiden 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Esselie 

Handel sbonken 
Pharmacia 
Scab-Scan la 
Sandv Ik 
Skanska 
SKF 

SwedlshMalch 

Volvo 


AflaersvaerldeB Index : ; 
previous : 387 JO 


MIB Current index : 1721 
Previous : 1736 


13* 131 
190 190 
231 229 
449 449 
147 147 


421 426 

450 433 


390 393 

519 'A SI 04* 


353 351 

S22M SZT4* 

164 164 

623 623 

230 Z36 

12 SI/64 13 

MO 331 

683 282 

274 275 

871 863 

199 204 

305 357 

637 647 

I 194 193 

774 232 


Hung Seug index : 
Previous : 1S49M 


279 28X50 
19X50 198 

329 325 


AECI 

Anuta American 

Anglo Am Gold 

Barlows 

Blyvoar 

Buffets 

De Baers 

Drletontetn 

Elands 

GFSA 


770 770 

3400 3375 
19300 18750 
1190 1125 
1475 142S 
7600 7450 
1220 1215 
5325 5050 
l/BO 1760 
3475 3300 


UovdsBank 

Lunrho 

Lucas 

Marks and So 
Metal Box 
Midland Bank 
Nat West Bank 
PandO 
Pll king ton 
•Plessev 
Prudential 
Rocnl Elect 

Rondfonteln 
Rank 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 


309 404 
147 149 
383 373 
154 IS 
485 493 
309 389 
624 629 
405 40S 
Z7Z 280 
132 134. 
687 689 
140 138 

420 413 
694 692 
319 326 


Raval Dutch t 4251/6443 17/B 

RTZ 52 IS 

Soglefti 705 770 

SSRO*. ^ »g. 

US 1 ‘3 


Air Llquide 
AJsmom Art. 

Av Dassault 

Bancolre 

BIC 

Banorain 
BovYbues 
BSN-GD 
Carre teur 
Chargeurs 
Club Med 

Darly 

Dumez 

Ell-Aauitaine 

Eurooe l 

Gen Eaux 

Hachette 

Lafarge Cap 

Legrand 

Lesleur 

I’Oreai 

Martel I 

Metro 

Merita 

Michetin 

Most Hennassy 

Moulinex 

Ocddentaie 

Pernod Rlc 

Perrier 

Peugeot 

Prinlemps 
Radiol ectui 
Redoute 
Roussel Udaf 
Sancfi 

skis Rossianai 
Teiemecan 
Thomson C5F 
Total 


S52 5S4 

201.10 315 

TITO 1205 
630 630 

463 478 

1550 IS9S 
705 720 

2l« 2130 
*w> ww 
712 710 

47X50 483 

1399 1399 

764 765 

IBS 193 

no tv? 

604 419 

1390 1400 

495 502 

2075 2125 
596 591 

2375 2400! 
1461 1510 

1715 1715 
2035 2018 

ion ion 

1870 1931 

72 74 

700 709 

696 700 

444 446JD 
393 392 

299.90 297 JO 
315 311 

1399 1406 

ISIS 1471 
623 626 

1230 1302 

2660 2685 
532 543 

211 2ISl5D 


ACI 
ANZ 
BHP 
Boro I 

Bougainville 

Cast terrains 

Coles 

ComOlec 

CRA 

CSR 


Ad la 

Aiusutsse 

Autephon 
Bonk Leu 
Brown Boveri 
a bo Getev 
Credit Suisse 

Elect rawatl 

Holderbonk 

IfTlerdlscount 

Jacob SLKTwjnJ 

Jelmofl 

Landis Gyr 

Moevenplck 

Nestle 

Oerlfkan-B 

Roche Baby 

Sondac 

Schindler 

Sulzer 

Surveillance 

Swissair 

SBC 

Swiss Reinsurance 
Swiss Vofksbonk 
Union Bank 
Winterthur 
Zurich Ira 


Zi 

Oi- 


SBC Index : SUM 
Previous : 524.10 


not quoted: NJL: not 
available; xd: ex-dlvidend. 


Agefl index: 8BJ7 
Previeut : 3SP 
CAC index :21U0 
Previous : 2\em 


of International Herald 
Tribune readers own 
Stocks, Shares, Bonds 
and Commodities. 


Trib ads work. 


20 Vs 7m 
1716 1716— 16 
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18Vh 1S*+ * 
13* 13* 

18 18* 

12* 12* 

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31* 31* 

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72* 1316 + 16 
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365 365 —10 

430 <30 —W 

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8* 89k + * 

8* 9 + * 

212 214 — 1 

23* 2316+ V6 
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28 2S — * 
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16* 16*—* 
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41* 41* 

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495 . 495 
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524 23* 

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513* 13* 
525* 25* 
520* 20* 
521 '20* 

220 219 

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513* 13* 
531* 31* 
521* 2D* 
523* 23* 
527* 27* 
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122 •• 20* 22 +1 


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iMhntriols Index: 


Close P r ev io u s . 
11036 110.19 . 




17* 11* - 
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3V16 ilE— U. 


1 The Daily 
T Source for 
Inte r n ational 
rwesfans. 












INTON \T1QY\1. HER \L» TRIBl NK- Ti'ESIMV. SEPTEMBKH 2-k 1985 

SPORTS 


pa*;** 1 ** 


Thrashed 
By 49ers 

LonipiU'J K Onr Fr.w Dispun he 

LOS ANGELES — The dinners 
of four of ihe last five Super Bowls 
met here Sunday, and. surprisingly, 
it wasn't much of a contest. 

"They outplayed us." said Los 
Angeles defensive end Lyle ALzado 
after the Raiders were thrashed. 34- 
by the San Francisco 49ers. “It 

NFL ROUNDUP 

was as simple as that." Said Raider 
safety Vann McElroy: “It was a 
total embarrassment." 

Joe Montana threw two touch- 
down passes and linebacker Milt 
McCoU ran 28 yards with a fumble 
recovery for another score as the 
49ers rolled to a convincing Na- 
tional Football League victory. 

It was the second straight tri- 
umph for the defending Super 
Bowl champions, who registered 
nine quarterback sacks in raising 
their record to 2 - 1 . 

Los Angeles also lost quarter- 
back Jim Plunkett. Sacked by de- 
fensive end Jeff Stover. Plunkett 
the game early in the fourth 
quarter with a dislocated left shoul- 
der. He is expected to be sidelined 
at least six weeks. 

Montana fired touchdown 






* 


33^* £ 


“.iw-ftst 
* ' "■*&$ 





:3£ 



Opportunistic Angels Take DivisioncdLead^ 


*■ *3-. ^ 

V 


a it 




. »i homer in the ninth rallied the Cardinals past 

u»V*fa/tn Our Siafj BASEBALL ROUNDUP Montreal and opened their lead in the Eastern 

ANAHEIM. California — The way the Cali- ■ ■ Division to three games. Said Herr, not noted 

fomia Angels responded to mistakes or ‘Sunday. Mark Funderburk had three run-scoring singles for his power hitting: “Every little boyfema- 
ic appears the biggest one of all was to declare [Q ^ Frank viola, who turned in his seventh sizes about hitting the game- winning homer in 
them out or the race. complete game of the year. The Royals have lost *e bottom of the ninth, i can t go up there in 

Only days after being figured for second plow K . pT . • * that frame of mind too often. but if you play the 

in the American League West, the Angels took — . . ’ D D ., game Iona enough, things like this can happen, 

the divisional lead with a slightly miraculous 12- N ankees 5, - 1 B hJS2J*iS^2 Sl Louis has won 10 of its last 1 1 games, 

inning. 10-9 victory over Cleveland. Henderson and Ken Griffey homered an mo- Pu^gs 5 ^ Mets 3: In New York, rookie Bob 


Compiled b\ Our Staff Front Pupatcha RACPRAT I pn 

ANAHEIM. California — The way the Cali- 

fomia Angels responded to mistakes on Sunday. Funderburk had three 

it appears the biggest one of all was 10 declare “ * J FranJc viola, who m 




in the American League west, tne Angeis iook 
the divisional lead with a slightly miraculous 12 - 
inning. 10-9 victory over Cleveland. 


inning. ' 
In the cour 
a third-strike 


j 


run, foliowed a mispjaveo pop Jiy win a uuev- ■ — » — > — ~ ■ r* 0 - “ ~* ■■■** left-hander acquired bv Pittsburgh last month in 

run homer and followed a lith-inning error the £d diaTSS^JoS CandSSa to the Cali- 

with the game-winning run. SSl’SS fomia Angels. Kipper walked three and struck 

California's fifth victory in a row. combined broken nght arm ma fight out four, The last-place Pirates took two of the 

with Kansas City’s loss to Minnesota, put the Watson at a B^Unwre hold. Martin managed ^ weekcnd ^ from che Mels . 

$*£ a £££&£■ 1: In Milwaukee, Paul „ Dodg«, S. CJW. * In &■? fiasco. Orel 

Koyais. coin teams na\e ij g™« ieiu m Molitor’s double down the right-field line with Hershiser won his ninth straight decision and 

m Cdlfon§ 2 rwoDwhen Cleveland shortstop Ju- wo out in the seventh scored Mike Felder from Landreaux and Bill l Madlock homered*? 

Franco muffed Rod Carew's grounder with second with the run that edged Toronto. [“d Los Angeles pasi the Giants. Madlocfc. 

one out in the 12th. allowing Rufino Linares to Red Sox ti, Tigers 2: In Boston, RicbGedman S Si« l U& 3 ' 

Sue from second. drove in two runs and Dwight Evans homered *» battmg streak to 15 games. 

In the first innine. Reggie Jackson swung at a on starter Dan Petry's first pitch of the game to . K f ds 6 - A**”* 5: “ Houston. Dave Concep- 
third strike but was safe at first on a wild pitch help Dennis Boyd to his fourth straight. aon s S 01 ^***^ °J} C out in d 1 ® . m, }“ 1 

to load the bases. On the next pitch, Bobby White Sox 7, A’s 5: In Chicago. Luis Salazar’s scoredDave Parker frorn third and kept Cincin- 
Grich cleared the center-field wall for his fifth twoouu two-run homer in the 10th gave the 5 * * >ac * t ^ Angeles in the 

career grand slam. “Actually, when I siepped in White Sox their victory. Salazar was 4-for-5 for Westem Division. 

the batter's box. I had it in mv mind that fate the day with four RBIs. Braves 7, Padres 5: In San Diego. Clauddl 

was with us.” said Grich. “I could see that Rangers 6 , Mariners 0: In Arlington, Texas, Washington and Glenn Hubbard drawer in two 
everything was going our way — the bases Mike Mason scattered six hits for his first shut- runs apiece to help Atlanta end a losing streak at 
shouldn’t have been loaded." out of the season and Pete O’Brien went 3-for-3, six games. 

In the fourth. Franco lost a pop-up in the sun, including a homer, and drove in three runs to Cubs 9, Phiffies 2: Bob Dernier singled three 
and Doug DeCuices followed with a three-run lead Texas past Seattle. times, stole two bases and scored four runs as 

homer. Cardinals 6 . Expos 5: In the National League. Chicago swept a three-game series in Philadel- 

T wins 7. Royals 3: In Kansas City. Missouri, in Sl Louis. Tommy Herr's two-out, two-run phia for the first ame since 1974. ( UPl AP) 



Yankee Manager Bitty Martin, 
a cast on las broken right arm, 
on tiie job Sunday in Baltimore. 


teKtlMgdftcatonMnd 

Hokie Gajan had a rough Stmday (three fumbles), but New Or- 
leans stitt won its first game of the year, 20-13, over Tampa Bay. 


SCOREBOARD 


passes of 20 yards to running back I 

Roger Craig,' 3:06 into the game. Us. reserve fullback George Wons- kicked two field goals as New York 1— 
and of 14 yards to wide receiver ley rushed for a career-high 170 grounded St. Louis. MaiorL 

Dwight Clark with 2:27 left in the yards to spark the Colts past De- Dolphins 31, Chiefs 0: In Miami J 
third quarter. iroit. Wonsley carried 27 times and Dan Marino threw for two second- NA1 

McColl’s TD came only 24 sec- also caught five passes for 32 yards, half touchdowns and the Dolphins McGw 5U _ 
onds after Gark had scored to cap The victory gave Rod Dowhower recorded their first shutout since Guerrero l-a. 
an 80-vard drive and give the 49ers his first triumph as an NFL head Nov. 20, 1983. Marino was 23 of 35 
a 17-point lead. On the first play coach, while Darryl Rogers suf- for 258 yards and TD passes of Mrr Su _ 
following the touchdown. Plunkett fered his initial NFL setback. nine yards to Brace Hardy and 27 porker cm. 
fumbled when hit by defensive end Saints 20, Buccaneers 13: In yards to Woody Bennett. Miami 
Tim Stuckey: McColl picked the New Orleans. Dave Wilson threw stopped the league’s highest-scor- scioscm i_a. 
ball up and raced into the end zone, two touchdown passes and Terry ing team — Kansas City had scored crui win. 
■flaking the score 27-3. Hoage. playing strong safety in S3 points in its first two games. sl R “om». w? 

Montana completed 14 of 24 place of the injured Russell Gary. Jets 24, Packers 3: In Milwau- mun St. Louis, 
passes for 255 yards with no inter- forced a fumble and intercepted a kee, Tony Paige scored two touch- RB|s; Pur 1 
ceptions before coming out early in pass to lead the Saints to their first downs, both set up by the defense, ^ontreol,' 94 ; 

Jhe fourth quarter. Plunkett hit on triumph of the year. and Cackle Tom Baldwin returned a Moreland. chV 

of 34 for 258 vards and was Broncos 44. Falcons 28: In At- fumble 9 yards for a score, pacing mti^McGee, 
intercepted once. ' Ian la. John El way fired three the New York Jets past Green Bay. cni«M. : m? 

San Francisco had 224 yards in touchdown passes and Rich KarUs Gtargers 44, Bengals 41: In Cin- Doublet-. p< 


Baseball 

Major League Leaders »■* * 


Tie Leaders ^ «*>« nr; eom«. cutajso. lot.- Select 

I Winfield. New York. 10S; Rico. Boston. 103; 

NATIONAL LEAGUE Ripken. Baltimore, 101 

G ab R H Ret. HNv Boast, Boston. 225; Manirtslv. Netv 

140 SkO 10» 200 OS7 v orKIM; BalnekOilCOBOb 113; Pudteil.Mln- 

124 OS n 141 4D1 netofa, 102; Buckner, Boston. 178; Cooper, Alabama 

141 545 106 173 317 Milwaukee. 178; PBrodlev. Seattle. 178. Geo re I o 

140 563 101 17k J13 Doubles: Mattfriolv. New York. 4k; Buck- Auburn 

147 551 92 173 J12 nor. Boston. 40; Boras. Boston, 39; Cooper. Florida 

147 584 78 183 J12 Milwaukee. 37; E. Murray. Baltimore. 35; Kentucky 

142 574 75 177 JOB GWcrtker. Ctilcopa. 35. LSU 

139 479 55 146 J05 Triples: Wilson. Kansas Cl IV. 19; Butler. /Mississippi 

129 387 42 118 JOs Cleveland. 13; Puckett. Minnesota. 13; Bar- M lss. St. 

135 S23 66 157 J00 Held. Toronto. 9; Fernandez, Toronto. 9. Tennessee 

Atlanta, 113; McGee. Nome Anns: Do. Evans, Detroit. 37; Fisk, Vanderbilt 


Football 

Selected U.S. College Conference Standings 


SOUTHEASTERN 


142 574 75 177 

13« 479 55 146 


rlosclo L-A. 129 387 42 118 JOS 

ruz Htn. 135 523 66 157 J00 

Runs: Murpfty. Atlonto, 113; McGee. 


SI. Louis. 109: Raines, Montreal. 106; Cwe* Chlcooo.35; Balbant, KonsasCltv.34: E. Mur- 


place of the injured Russell Gary. Jets 24, Packers 3: In Milwau- moa st. Louis. 101 .- sendbere. ctiicoao. 101 . rov. Baltimore, si; g. T homas, soottie, ji. 
forced a fumble and intercepted a kee, Tony Paige scored two touch- «■■*; Ported, cincinnoti. ns.- hut. sioieit Bases: R.Henaenon. now York. 7<; 
pass to lead the Saints to then first downs, both set up by the defense, ^ < SSTe «■"" 



Conterence 

All Games 


W L T PtsOP W LT PtsOP 

Alabama 

1 0 0 

20 

16 

3 0 0 

a 

36 

Georgia 

a 1 0 

16 

20 

2 1 0 

53 

47 

Auburn 

0 00 

0 

a 

2 0 0 

70 

25 

Florida 

0 00 

0 

0 

I 0 1 

63 

51 

Kentucky 

0 0 D 

0 

0 

1 1 0 

42 

4 ? 

LSU 

0 0 0 

0 

0 

2 0 0 

a 

16 

Mississippi 

0 0 0 

0 

0 

1 1 1 

54 

57 

MISS. St. 

0 0 0 

0 

0 

3 0 0 

75 

37 

Tennessee 

ooa 

0 

0 

0 0 1 

X 

X 

Vanderblft 

0 0 0 0 0 
SOUTHWEST 

1 2 0 

40 

62 


Purdue 

Wisconsin 


Boston Col. 
Mtomi^ta. 
NoireDome 


triumph of the vear. and cackle Tom Baldwin returned a Moreiana. emcaso. w. 

Broncos 44. Falcons 28: In At- Fumble 9 vards for a score, pacing hh»: McGee, si. louksiq; porke r.cmcm - 

Ian la. John Elway fired three the New York Jets pasl Green Bay. gj*' S7S“ 


CITY. 37. 

PITCHING 

Won- LoU /Winning PdVERA: Guldrv.New «■“ 
York. 20-6..769, 3J0 ; Saberttogon. Kansas City, »mu 


first-hair total offense and 352 for added three second-half field goals 
the game. The Raiders logged only as Denver trimmed the Falcons, 
a total of 68 yards in the second Giants 27, Cardinals 17: In East 
half after accumulating 212 in the Rutherford. New Jersey. Phil 
first 30 minutes. Simms passed for three touch- 

Colts 14, Lions 6: In Indianapo- downs and rookie Jess Atkinson 


touchdown passes and Rich Karlis Chargers 44, Bengals 41: In Cin- Doublet: porker. cincmnaiL 4o; Hm. ia-6. jso. zai; Key. Toronto. 14 - 4 . joo. 3J3; 


cinnati. Bob Thomas kicked a 34- si. t-ouis. 37 ; g. wiiion. pniiodHptuaas; wai- 


cowtey, New York, 1 l-S, ABB, 43)1; 5 ore tied Jokw AfcM 
with 667. TCU 

Str Ik pouts: Blvleven. Minnesota 1B7; Mor- T,xo ’ T#cn 


, r - , 1 , ... t 1 - loch. Montreal. 34; Cruz. Houston, 31 with 667. 

yard field goal with four seconds Triples: McG«*.Sr. Louis. 16; Samuel. Phil- Strikeouts: Blvleven. Minnesota 1B7; Mor- 
left to lift San Diego past the 0-3 odelohla U; Raines. Montreal. 11; Coleman, rls. Detroit. 185: F. Bannister, Chlcooo. 178; 
BcmeaLs Chiroer ouarterhack Dan St. Louis. 10: C Reynolds. Houwon.8; Gomtr. Hurst, Boston. 170; Bums, Chicoga 167. 
r 7^6 r W _ -• t. Houston, a Smres: Oufsenberry. Kansas City, 34: Her- 


Conference All Games 
W L T PIS OP W L T PIS OP 
a 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 48 19 

000 0 0 2 1 0 73 *8 

000 0 0 020 3660 

000 0 0 020 37 107 

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 35 23 

0 0 9 0 0 I 0 0 21 17 

000 0 0 110 41 40 

0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 54 35 

0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 II 55 


UCLA 

wastinotn 


0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 64 40 Syracuse 

PACIFIC-10 SJWiSS. 

Conference All Games Louisville 
WLTPtsOP’WLTPtsOP Pittsburgh 
2 0 0 87 67 2 1 0 KM 88 SW La 
200 3524 300 5834 Rutucrs 
10 0 23 20 2 1 0 90 81 Temple 

1 2 0 66 73 1 3 0 103117 «a*v 

0 1 0 28 45 1 1 0 69 52 Vir. Tech 

030 5666 13010487 
000 0011030 12 

0 0 0 0 0 110 33 30 VTT ( 

000 0 0 201 8766 * If Mj k. 

0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 69 74 

BIG EIGHT 

Conference All Games 
WLTPtsOPWLTPfsOP 


NFL Standings 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
■OSI 


Colorado 
lowa St. 
Kansas 
Kamos St. 
Missouri 
Nebraska 
Oklahoma 
OklaSt. 


Fouts was 25-of-43 passing, for 344 
vards and four TDs. (AP. CPU 


loustoa a Saves: Qufsenberry. Kansas City. 14: Her- 

Home Runs: Murphy. Atlanta. 37; Guerre- nandez. Detroit. 29; B. James. Chicoga 28: Virginia 


Exit Holmes — Bitter Ego Intact 


CitiyviW to- Our Stuff From DtspuiJ-.ct 

LAS VEGAS — His biiter ego 
has always been Larry Holmes’s 
toughest opponent. Until he lost 
his heavyweight title to Michael 
Spinks Saturday nighL other box- 
ers had been relatively easy for 
him; he had been unbeaten in 48 
bouts with 34 knockouts. 

But he had never quite con- 
quered himself. 

L- He resented those who confined 
him to Muhammad AJi's shadow 
and as he approached his opportu- 
nity to equal Rocky Marciano's 49- 
0 record, he resented tributes to the 
popular champion of three decades 
ago. His ego wouldn't permit him 
to win graciously. 

And when he Finally lost, his ego 
wouldn't permit him to accept de- 
feat graciously. 

Holmes won 20 title defenses. He 
beat Ali and Ken Norton and Ger- 
ry Cooney, beat Leon Spinks. Mi- 
chael’s brother and a former heavy- 
weight champion. 

But. sadly, he will be remem- 
bered as much for his failure to 
overtake the record — and for a 
diatribe Saturday night — as he 
will for his seven-year reign. 

While indicating he wouldn’t 
fight anymore, he talked about how 
“people sometimes tight candles 
for your defeat." alluding to the 
j Marciano family. 

*«/ 1° l he interview area, he talked 

about how “I’m 35 fighting young 
men. and he was 25 fighting old 
men — to be technical. Rocky Mar- 
ciano couldn't carry my jockstrap.” 

As he spoke, he looked out at 
Marciano's youngest brother, Pe- 


cuse for defaming the Marciano 
legend and family? 

What emerged was a new self- 
portrait — a flabby hull of a man 
who once owned something but 
who lost it and was angry and 
down-hearted to see it go. 

Often. Holmes had seemed only 
to want a pocketful of coins. The 
quest for greatness, for ring immor- 
tality. appeared secondary; he'd 
take that. too. but pay him first. 
“Just give me- the money" — about 
S3 million — was how he put it 
three days before taking on Spinks. 

Once an engaging, spirited fight- 
er who worked hard to earn fans' 
respect. Holmes had become a 
“boxing executive, an entrepre- 
neur." as he described himselF last 
week. 

“1 don't need no more boxing.” 
he said Saturday night. “I made me 
60-something million. . . and I got 
S99 million in the bank." 

On the 30(h anniversary of Mar- 
ciano's Iasi right. Holmes had lost 
his title and much of what precious 
little dignity he had left But his ego 
was intacL f/VJT. HP) 



(AP. UPl J ro. Lfl» AngetM. 32; Carter. New York. 29; 
' Parker, Cincinnati. 29; Sctimlal. PtilloOel- 

ahla 29. 

Stolen Bases; Coleman- 5L Louts. 1Q1 : 
Raines. Montreal, a5; Sandberg, Chicago. 5&; 
McGee. St. Louis, 49; Reaus. Cincinnati. 47. 
§ mm 9 § pitching 

wort- Lost/ Winning Pct/ERA: Horen hair. 
Los Angeles, r 7-3, £50. 246; Gooden. New 
York. 27-4, 646. 157; Franco. Cincinnati. 12-3. 
J00. 231; BSmlth, /Montreal. 16-5. .761 341: 
Darling. NeerYor*. 164. .761 265 
Strikeouts: Gooden, New York, 251; Sato. 
Cincinnati. 200; Valenzuela Lot Angeles. 194; 
Ryan, Houston. 193; Fernandez, New York. 
163. 

Saves: Rearaon. Montreal, 35: Le. Smith, 
Cnlcaoo.30; D. Smith, Houston. 25; Gossoge. 
San Duma. 23; Power, Cincinnoti, 13: 5utr«r. 
Atlanta 23. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

G AB R H Pet. 
BOOQS Bos. 147 601 100 225 474 

Brett K.C 143 506 IDO 169 JW 

Mattingly N.Y. 147 601 94 194 333 

R. Henderson N.Y. 131 506 134 163 J22 


D. Moore. Californio. 28; J. Howell, Oakland, Ga Tech 
26i RtgheHl. New York, 26. N.CaroXt. 

VYk -Fores I 

Major League Standings ° u ' k T n 

AME ^^ ACUE EEL 


Toronto 

New York 

Baltimore 

Detroit 

Boston 

Milwaukee 

Oevelond 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 
w L 
93 55 

l 88 61 

I 79 69 

77 72 
75 74 

e 65 83 


pet. GB 
.628 — 

391 5U» 

S34 14 Illinois 
-517 li-.-j Indiana 
503 Iftvi lowa 
jOT 28 Mldtiaoi 


Boines Cht. 
BerHauaz CaL 
BufJer Cla. 
Gedman Bov 
Cooper Mil. 
Moll lor Mil. 
PBrodlev Sea 


145 582 80 183 J14 

122 382 SI 118 J09 

141 548 99 168 307 

134 457 63 140 J06 

143 585 82 178 J04 

128 526 88 158 JOO 


California 

Kansas Cltv 

Chicago 

Oakland 

Seattle 

Minnesota 

Texas 


SI. Louts 
New York 
Montreal 
Philadelphia 

Molltor Mil. 121 526 88 158 JOO STJ2™*. « Z "TA 

PBrodlev Sea. 146 593 92 178 JOO FI,tyx,rDh J 1 94 M 41 

Runs: R. Henderson. New York. 134; Rip. ” 

ken. Baltimore. 107; E. Murray. Baltimore. T i “1 “ “T ~ 

KEM^^vans. Soslan. M3; WMUeW. New C = h 81 67 54, 5W 

RBIs: Mattingly, New York. 130: E. Mur- SS "2 

Son Francisco 58 91 J89 29 

Sunday’s Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE ”T 

Milwaukee ill 000 100—7 9 a (Irtlf 

Toronto HI 000 000—1 5 3 XTVflA 

Hlguera and Moore; Stteb and Nicosia, ^ ^ 

Whitt (9j. w— Hlguera. 14-7. L — Slieb. 13-12. Top Hn til lers ona earn i pH In the Southwest 

HR— Toronto, Jotmson <131. Colt CTasslcwhictieodefl Sunday an Ihe 7.146- 

New Yartc 003 boo 200— 5 11 g yard, par-72 Fairway Oaks coarse In Abilene^ 

Baltimore 0M 00* 302-4 I 0 Tens Cx-woo In first bole of sudden -deoto 1 

GukJrv, Rigttetti {91 and Hassey; Dixon. Playoff): 


54 97 JSB 40>ti Mien. St. 

sion Minnesota 

85 64 570 — Nrthwstm 

84 65 564 1 Ohio St. • 


West Division 

85 64 570 — 

ttv 84 65 564 1 

76 72 514 8W 

72 77 483 13 

70 79 A7D 15 

I 6? II M0 1AM 

55 93 J72 29W 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 

w l Pa. 6 b 

93 56 524 — 

90 59 604 3 

77 72 517 16 

Ua 71 76 683 21 

70 78 A73 22W 
1 51 96 J47 41 

Wen Division 

•3 87 62 584 — 

81 67 547 5V, 

77 72 517 10 

75 74 503 12 

61 88 -409 26 

(SCO 58 91 589 29 


ATLANTIC COAST 

Con terrace All Game* 
WLTPIlOPWLTMiOP 
I00 24 T3 20C 6428 Drake 
I 1 0 41 42 1 I D 41 43 Tulsa 
110 3S<5 120 5778 S. Illinois 
0 1 0 17 20 2 1 0 77 43 Illinois St. 

0 0 0 0 0 1 I 0 33 37 Indiana SI. 

000 0 0 2 1 0 92 SO W. Tax. SI. 

000 0 0 2 1 0 77 33 WkJtitO St. 

000 0 0 11034 42 

BIG TEN 

Conference All Gomes 
W LT PtsOP W LT PtsOP Al * For** 
000 0 0 120 6397 Gala. St. 

00 0 0 0 2 0 0 79 63 “**»»* 

000 0 Q 2001G6 20 Hawaii 

000 0 0 20056 15 Wyoming 

0 0 0 0 0 110 22 30 Tx-EIPa* 

000 0 020090 31 Brig. Ynu 

000 0 0 1104463 NO" «*»• 

0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 46 20 SlkDleg SL 


CFL Standings 


.0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 57 63 
0 0 0 0 0 2 00 30 20 rr 

000 0 0 300 112 53 

0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 a 50 

000 D 0 0 2 0 40 48 604,010 

000 0 0 1 1 0 65 43 

000 0 0 000 o 0 I*;"-; 

0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 41 26 

MISSOURI A/ALLEY 

Conference All Gomes kJncinna 
WLrPNOPWLTPlsOP 

1 0 0 31 6 2 3 0 79104 

10 0 31 34 1 2 0 48 69 g *" w * r . 
0 1 0 6 31 I 3 0 IB 99 

0 00 D 0 2 0 1 52 25 

0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 55 90 

000 001204055 Ml 

000 0 0 120 4560 

WESTERN ATHLETIC OoU« 

Conference All. Game* N.Y. Gtai 
WLT PtsOP WLTPHOP Sf. Loots 

2 0 0 97 13 3 0 0 156 30 Ptiltadelp 
100 4124 120 5464 WasWaot 
100 2927 300 93 B1 

0 1 0 27 39 0 2 0 54 62 Chicago 

0 1 0 7 49 1 2 0 5* 96 Detrail 

020 3089 040 73 146 Mlnneiall 
0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 109 68 Green Be 

0 0 0 0 0 110 65 59 Tamoa B 

0 0 0 0 0 110 50 48 

nnr LEAGUE LA Rom 

Conference AH Gaines San Fran 
W LT PtsOP W L T PtsOP New Orle 

1 0 0 49 17 1 0 0 49 17 Atlanta 
1 0 0 10 6 100 10 6 



W 

L 

T Pci. PF 

PA 

Miami 

2 

1 

0 467 

04 

39' 

New England 

2 

I 

0 467 

50 

54 

N.Y. Jett 

2 

1 

a 4*7 

66 

37 

Indianaagih 

1 

2 

0 JX3 

30 

81 

Buffalo 

a 

3 

0 J00 

26 

73 


Central 




PittMurgh 

2 

1 

0 467 

72 

20 

Cleveland 

1 

2 

a ju 

48 

S4 

Houston 

1 

2 

0 233 

39 

59 

Cincinnati 

0 

3 

0 JOO 

92 

113 


west 




Seattle 

2 

a 

0 1400 

77 

S* 

Oenwgr 

2 

1 

0 467 

94 

71 

Kansas Otv 

2 

1 

0 467 

>3 

78 

San Diego 

2 

i 

0 467 

93 

99 

LA. Raiders 

1 

7 

0 J33 

61 

70 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 




East 




Dados 

2 

1 

0 467 

■5 

47 

N.Y. Giants 

2 

1 

0 467 

68 

40 

Sf. Louis 

7 

i 

0 467 

85 

78 

PtTltodeJptda 

» 

2 

0 333 

25 

44 

Washington 

1 

2 

0 333 

36 

74 


Central 




Chicago 

■ x 

a 

0 UNO 

9 ! 

59 

Detroit 

2 

.1 

0 467 

60 

« 

Minnesota 

7 

t 

a 467 

03 

70 

Green Bay 

1 

2 

0 333 

46 

70 

Tampa Boy 

0 

3 

0 MO 

57 

89. 


West 




LA Bom 

3 

0 

0 1000 

37 

71 

San Francisca 

2 

1 

0 467 

90 

54 

New Orleans 

1 

2 

0 333 

70 

94 

Atlanta 

0 . 

3 

0 400 

71 

107 


Thursday's Result 


Larry Holmes in defeat 



Eastern Division 



Princeton 

1 a 0 

10 

3 

1 0 0 10 

3 

Chicago 31 Minnesota 24 ' 


w 

L 

T 

PF 

PA 

PtS 

Yale 

1 0 0 

10 

9 

1 0 a 10 

9 

Sunday's Results 

Montreal 

6 

5 

0 

229 

217 

12 

Columbia 

0 1 0 

T7 

49 

0 10 17 49 

Dallas 20. Ctevetand 7 

Hamilton 

4 

7 

0 

227 

250 

8 

Bruwn 

0 1 0 

9 

ID 

010 9 

10 

Denver 44. Atlonto 28 

Ottawa 

4 

7 

0 

186 

319 

8 

Cornell 

0 1 0 

i 

10 

0 10 6 

10 

lodtonaoatfs 14. Detroit 6 

Toronto 

3 

7 

0 

226 

273 

6 

Dartmouth 

0 1 0 

3 

70 

OI0 3 

10 

Pittsburgh 30. Houston 0 


Western Division 



MAJOR INDEPENDENTS 


New England 17. Buffalo 14 

Brtt amb 

e 

1 

0 

311 

187 

18 



W L 

T Pts OP 

PhllodetoWa 19. Wastongton 6 

Winnipeg 

9 

* 

0 

347 

155 

18 

Floriaa Sf. 


3 

0 

0 74 

35 

New Orleans 2a Tampa Bay 13 

Edmonton 

7 

4 

0 

290 

277 

14 

Penn St. 


3 

0 

0 *4 

53 

N.Y. Giants 27. St. LmHs 17 

SaskalcSrwn 

4 

7 

0 

232 

296 

8 

Armv 


2 

0 

0 or' 

22 

Son Diego 44. Oodnrwtl 41 

Calgarv 

2 


9 

173 

264* 

4 

doormat! 


3 

1 

0 101 

95 

Mtoml 31, Kansas City 9 


Sunday's Results 
Hamilton 32. Ottawa 11 
Winnipeg 49, Saskatchewan 3 


& Carolina 
W.Vtrglnlo 
E. Cara lino 
Mrrnoh51. 


N.Y. Jet* 24. Green Bay 3 
San Francisco 34. LA. Raiders 10 
Monday* Game 
LA. Rams at Seattle 


Golf 


Ton fl ntshers ona earmow In the Southwest 
Golf Classic. which eadM Sunday an Ike 7.166- 
yard. pot- 72 Fab-way Oaks coarse in AbOenfc 


SPORTS BRIEFS §r 

— P^trv, S< 

FIFA Say s Mexico Remains Cup Host Geoman. 

y JT HR— Bosic 

ZURICH (APj — The International Football Federation said on Mmeio1v 


Havens 171 and Dempsey. W— Guidry, 20-6, 
L— Dixon. 8-4. Sv— Rlghettl (261. HRs— New 
York. Henderwn (23). GrlHev 110). Bom- 
more, Murray (31). Rovford 1161. 

Detroit 000 BID 010—3 I ■ 


k-Hol 5unoa S72XK50 
Mike Reid. S43JOO 
Howard T witty. S37J00 
Richard Zokd. siejoo 


Detroit 000 no 010—3 1 ■ j e w siumon. 514400 

Bestoa 100 too JOx—4 11 • Andy Bean, 514400 

Petrv. Scnerrer i7>. Sloddard 17). Loner (8J Jock Renner, 514400 
ona Melvin. Castillo (7); Boyd, Klsen (8) and Wayne Levi, 512400 
Gedman. W—BorA 15-11. L— Petrv. 15-12. oan Poni. si 1400 
HR Boston. Evans (25). Charles Bolling, sicuoo 

Minnesota MO 320 2SO-7 14 o Pat Lindsey. 510400 

Kansas City eio boo 2fO—a t 1 Bill Sender. S7150 

Viola and Eneie; Joefcsa^. Farr (5). m. willle Wood. 57,150 
Jones (81. Qulsen berry (9) and Sundherg. W — Tom Purtrer, 57,150 


men. and he was 25 fighting old Monday that the World Cupsoccer tournament will takeplacein Mexico K v^ SS" En«e; jortw^F^siV KS.™ 
men — 10 be technical. Rocky Mar- next year as planned despite the last week's earthquake. jonesisi.ouisenBerrvwandsundsers.w- ™ m pw^.’smso 

ciano couldn't carry mvjockstrap. ’ FIFA Secretary General Sepp Blatter said the program was formally vioto ' l4-14 - l— jock son. w-h- hr— K om« curth srrange. 57.150 

As he spoke, he looked out at confirmed at a mating attended by Guillermo Caneda, head of Mexico's ‘ ‘ 7, ‘ 3 « so* ogi 000 - 9 is 1 ^ SESXTtf]? 

Marciano's youngest brother, Pe- organizing committee, and Rafael de Castillo, president of the Mexican camonuo soo 320 boo 001 — it u 4 unov Miner. 17 . iso 

ter. 44. who had been at ringside Soccer Association, Blatter said there was “no need for any change in the _5 a5,erlv ' Huhl8 l5) ' R ^ 1 ,B1, clor1t n, » 8111 8 «mner. 17.150 
along with the late champion’s two schedule” of the tournamenL set to ran from May 3 1 to June 29. l- ST 

cmldren. 32-year-old Mary Ann Caneda said a detailed survey showed that none of the World Cup Ctark - w - nRv-ciewiond, jocobv nai. Tom Lehman, smso 
and 16-year-old Rocky Jr. stadiums had been damaged. He said their “safety is g uaran teed and caiitomto. Decincu* hai. ooua Teweii. ssan 

u. 1 .j . 1 ... : ,u_. .1 , ■ . . 0 , . . 1 I . ° — . Grich (lit. Tam Waivn. uun 


a iP-year-oia kock) jr. siaaiums njd deen damaged. He said tneir safety is guaranteed, and 

He growled that Peter Marciano, that there had been no damage to the hotels where the reams, officials and seeme 


who owns a sporting goods store in media representatives are to be accommodated. Te*n» 

Hanover. Massachusetts, was 

'‘ fr He'S n iS^' V M^rtu h 2iL- :a Sutton Beats Reid in U.S. Golf Playoff 

racist state." and said “there will ABILENE. Texas tAP) — Hal Sutton sank a 15-foot birdie putt on the ^^nsas.mm 
never be a white champion as long first hole of sudden death here Sunday to beat Mike Reid and win the wcndTemeio 
as black chanipions are fighting the Southwest Golf Classic. It was Sutton’s second victory in extra holes this F q !i'J^ 
way they are." year; he defeated David Ogrin in a playoff at the Memphis Oassic. i^r ivi.oakii 

when Marciano tned to say Reid, a nonwinner in his nine years on the tour (he has finished second Kingman 12 s 1 . 
iomeihing. Holmes raised a finger twice), missed the green on the 398-yard Par-4 playoff hole. No. 1. but 
n warning and said. “This is my chipped 10 within a foot for a sure par. Sutton hit the green in regulation nat 

mess conference, you can just shui an< j then canned his putt for his fifth PGA tour victory lifetime^ . 

■p." In so many words, some of Howard Twit tv made a final-round charge with a 3-under-par 69 to Ee*.erstev.B< 
nem obscene, he snapped that if he finish ai 14-unde’r par 274, a shot behind Sutton (a closing 71) and Reid i-oke i»i ; r 
ad hurt Lhe feelings of the Mar- ( 72). A 70 put Richard Zokol alone in fourth place at 275. 

iano family, that was too bad. _ , ^ _ .mlVhi^ 

d for the Rpmrd puntm* 

Then apparently even Holmes * W **** M\eCOTU 
vas stung by the bitterness of his Kebede Balcha of Ethiopia won his fourth Montreal Marathon in seven mono m. Gon 
/ords. He tried to apologize, say- years Sundav. completing the 26 -miJe. 385-yard course in 2 hours. 12 per - L ~ L « 
ig. “Rocky's one of the greatest minutes. 38 seconds. .Arthur Boileau of Canada (2: 13:36 j nipped Ethiopi- 5J^ r u “' 
ighters of all time: for anyone to an Dergc Nedi (2:13:42) for second- (AP) YDum.uH.Bui 

ccomplish 49 victories, even if Lady’s Secret strengthened her bid Tor 3-year-old filly honors with her J® 
ney were all bums, is some ki nd of sev enth straight stakes victory, a four-length triumph over older horses in ^ " 2 . H r£J 

ecord. 1 would’ve loved to have Sunday’s Ruffian Handicap at New York’s Belmont Park. The daughter son 1261 . st. La 

net him. of Secretariat covered the I W miles in 1 :47-2/5, two-fifths of a second off if* 

“If I didn't think he was a great the stakes record set by Late Bloomer in 1978. f AP) H,r,hi^r. ni 

iahier, his pictures wouJdn’l be all The tenuis racker used by Boris Becker. 17, in becoming Wimbledon's bu». wniiom* 
iver the walls" of the hotel he owns youngest champion was auctioned for S 12.750 Sunday in Berlin. The hr^l^amm 
n Philtipsburg. New Jersey. money will go to a handicapped-children’s charily. (AP) 112). Son From 


Doug Tewell, S3A40 
Tom worsen. S3A40 
Mark CaJcovwccnl, 53^40 
Bob Glider, S3J80 


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American League 

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ACROSS 


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Associate 

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status 

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of yore 

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Leave Yi 

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pearl 

29 Cooking 

director 

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35 Martini 
gamishe 
37 Sept. 20. 

eg- 

38 ‘'lcannc 


39 Prima d< 

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47 Market 

48 Campus 
50 Borscht 

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TJ 


THE 


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Yesterday" 


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PEOPLE 


Henson, Lucas Join 


i 


Forces on 'Labyrinth’ 


By Afjc.m Harmetz 

Vm Yi#k Times Service 

L ONDON —There are two bu- 
• man actors and one real baby 
in “Labyrinth." it is necessary to 
keep such scores on Jim Henson 
movies, since the utU, bearded 
puppeteer most. often armors 
Himself with the yak hair, metaJ 
bones, plastic eyeballs and rubber 
teeth of his creations. 

He created Kermit the Frog — 
the first character in what has 
become a Muppet universe for a 
generation of American children 
— 30 years ago at a local televi- 
sion station in Washington, “it 
was so long ago." he said, shaking 
his shaggy head, “thai I can't re- 
member what was going through 
my mind.” 

"Labyrinth" is a S 25-million 
Gothic fairy tale starring 1 4-year- 
old Jennifer Connelly as Sarah, 
who must rind her way to the 
heart of a maze to save her baby 
brother from goblins, and the 
rock star David Bowie as her 
nemesis, the Goblin King. The 
other characters — Hoggle, the 
sweet dumb Ludo. the Wise Man 
with the bird on his bead, the 
Wild Things with their detachable 
arms and legs — are M tippets. 

“Labyrinth" is the first major 
collaboration of the father of the 
Muppets with the wizard of “Star 
Wars." A few years ago. Henson 
helped George Lucas create Yoda 
for “The Empire Strikes Back." 
Scheduled for release by Tri-Star 
next June, 'Tabyrinth”"is a Hen- 
son Associates Inc. -Lucas film 
Ltd. production. Jim Henson is 
the director and George Lucas is 
(he executive producer. 

"I’ve respected his work for a 
long lime." said Lucas. “Puppetry 
is an ancient and completely won- 
derful skill that doesn't gel the 
respect it should." 

The genesis of "Labyrinth" was 
Henson's desire to correct what 
he sees as the one failure of his 
1983 movie. "The Dark Crystal." 
which he co-directed with his 
longtime associate. Frank Oz. 
There were no human beings in 
"The Dark Crystal," which was a 
critical and box-office success. 
The reptilian Skeksis. the gentle 
Mystics and the heroic young 
Geldings fought for control of a 
world without people. 

“The hardest thing artistically 
in ‘The Dark Crystal' was making 
the two leading characters believ- 


able." Henson said of the bland 
mechanical Gel flings who seemed 
to have wandered into “The Dark 
Crystal" from a Disney cartoon. 
“It's a real job making attractive 
creatures believable. Working 
with a live girl makes l Labyrinth* 
immediately more accessible than 
The Dark Crystal.' ” 

“Labyrinth'' is also lighter in 
tone than “The Dark Crystal” — 
Sarah in Wonderland rather than 
planets in jeopardy. After wishing 
that she could get rid of her baby 
stepbrother. Sturah must reach the 
Goblin King's castle in the center 
of a labyrinth to keep the baby 
from being turned into a goblin. 

“The whole Film is more play- 
ful,” Henson said. “We wanted to 
do a story with small, delightful 
relationships. The film captures 
the moment when an adolescent 
girl realizes she U responsible for 
her life. ‘Dark Crystal' had a sym- 
phony orchestra- 'Labyrinth' will 
have the funkier sound of David 
Bowie's music." 

The scene he was filming had 
Sarah being led astray by the 
Wild Things who live in the laby- 
rinth. Fifteen puppeteers shroud- 
ed in black velour, wearing black 
velour gloves and square black 
velour hoods, stood on a stage 
hung with huge black drapes. 
Three puppeteers grasped eacb 
Wild Thing by the rods that dan- 
gle from every body part of those 
skinny, iropical-birdlike creatures 
with huge acrylic eyeballs. Each 
Wild Thing has half a dozen alter- 
nate heads — a dancing head, a 
fully mechanical head worked by 
remote control, and several ordi- 
nary heads. 

Henson has taken over all eight 
sound stages at 'Elstree Studios 
for five months, and each stage 
has its wonders. For the floor of 
one part of the maze, four truck- 
loads of roots and branches arrive 
each day. Most breathtaking is a 
decadent white ballroom covered 
with wax bubbles and 5,000 silk 
roses, spilled wine that turns into 
rubies, and layers of glittering 
cobwebs. There are 10.000 can- 
dles and 100 bags of pearl glitter. 
The candles alone cost $12,000. 

Two of Henson's five children 
were working as puppeteers. At 
one edge of the set, his son Brian 
led a blue-jeoned group of techni- 
cians who work the eyes and eye- 
brows of the Wild Things by re- 
mote control. 


One of Jim 
Henson’s 
creatures in 
“Labyrinth.’' 



The Wild Things are children's 
toys compared to Hoggle. a 
dwarfish creature with huge ears. 

“Hoggle is the most complicat- 
ed figure anyone has ever tried to 
use as a main character in a film," 
Jim Henson said. Inside Hoggle is 
Shari Weiser. a midget, who 
works Hoggle's arms and legs. A 
team of four people, including 
Brian Henson, operate Hoggle's 
face. ‘To get those five people to 


move and act and think as one 
person is the hardest thing in this 
Him." Jim Henson said. 


Hoggle stumbled and fell and 
crashed into walls, despite half a 
dozen rehearsals without the crea- 
ture's head With the head on, 
Weiser can see almost nothing. 

“When we first started,” Jenni- 
fer Connelly said. Td be looking 
in Hoggle's’ mouth to talk to Sha- 
ri. Now I just talk to Hoggle. All 


the creatures seem so real to me 
now that 1 feel dreadful throwing 
the Wild Things' heads around.” 

The creatures in "Labyrinth,” 
which Henson and his team spent 
more than two years designing, 
are even more sophisticated than 
those in "The Dark Crystal," 
whose development, fabrication 
and maintenance cost more than 
$5 million. 

“We thought we'd have to build 
every set above ground so they 
could work the creatures from un- 
derneath.” said Elliot Scott, the 
production designer. “But Jim’s 
got beyond that,” 

All the high tech will be mean- 
ingless if Henson cannot tell an 
emotionally involving story. The 
fate of “Return to Oz.” which also 
dealt with a young girl on a quest, 
is a cautionary tale. Despite the 
wonderfully crafted copper man 
Tik-Tok and the daring Gayma- 
tion Nome King, critics found the 
movie cold and dark, and audi- 
ences stayed away. 

The screenplay for “Laby- 
rinth" is by Terry Jones, the 
Monty Python member who di- 
rected “Meaning of Life," and by 
Laura Phillips, from a story by 
Henson and Dennis Lee. Equally 
a creator of the movie is its con- 
ceptual designer, Brian Froud, 
the fantasy illustrator who wrote 
“Faeries." As the conceptual de- 
signer of “The Dark CrystaL" he 
was responsible for imagining 
chairs, goblets, canes and clothing 
that artificial beasts would be 
comfortable using. 

Fraud described his goblins us 
“forces of evil but very f unn y 
incompetent forces of evil. Gob- 
lins are little balls of fluff in the 
comer of a bedroom, the feelings 
of neurosis you try to brush under 
a carpet. Jim's triumph is creating 
creatures that can be performed 
so that you have spontaneous in- 
teraction between creatures and 
live actors." 

“The creatures are actors, just 
like live people." Henson said 
“What it’s all about is getting a 
performance out of a creature. It's 
more exciting than working with 
people." Yet the 48- year-old pup- 
pet master sighs a little over what 
he has chosen to miss. “Whatever 
we can do with creatures." he 
said, “we can never approach the 
kind of sparkle and depth you get 
with a real person." 


A Successful Artistic Coverup in 



(nhewe), lha AxkkxjMcI Prias .' ■ 


A crew directed by Christo (right), the Bulgarian-born 
American artist, has finished wrapping the; Pont Netrf in 
Paris. His next project: Probably two six-mile strings of 
giant umbrellas being set up simultaneously in Japan and 
the western United States or wrapping the Reichtag in 
Berlin. The bridge will remain wrapped for two weeks. 


An Buchwafd is on vacation. 


The lead singer for the heavy- 
metal rock band Motley Crue has 
been ordered as pan of a plea bar- 
gain in Los .Angeles to pay 52.7 
million to victims or an alcohol- 
related car accident. Vincent Neil 
Wharton, 24, also has to spend 30 
days in the county jail, beginning 
next June, and to continue per- 
forming 20 0 hours of community 
service, which his lawyer said in- 
cluded benefit concerts and 
speeches opposing drug and alco- 
hol use. “I Teel a sentence tike this 
benefits society," said the lawyer, 
Michael Nasatir. “It's an unusual 
case because you have a young man 
with on enormous potential to 
reach teen-agers." Wharton plead- 
ed guilty in July to charges of man- 
slaughter and drunken driving in 
connection with a collision in De- 
cember that killed one person and 
injured two. He was ordered to pay 
S 1.8 million to Lisa Hogan, 18. who 
spent weeks in a coma. The other 
victim. Daniel Snutbers, 20. will 
receive $700,000. and 5200,000 will 
go to the estate of Nicholas Ding- 


ley, 24. drummer for the band Ha- 
noi Rocks, who was with Wharton. 


“Cagney & Lacey," a police 
show that the CBS television net- 
work once canceled and “The 
Cosby Show." the comedy that has 
sparked NBCs ratings comeback, 
dominated the prizes for series at 
the 37th annual Emmy Awards cer- 
emony. "Cagney & Lacey," which 
came back on the air in 1983 be- 
cause of support from critics and 
viewers, upset two NBC favorites 
as best dramatic series: “Miami 
Vice" and “Hill Street Blues." NBC 
won 12 of the 29 awards. CBS was 
second with 11 awards. The Public 
Broadcasting System won four and 
ABC iwo. “Do You Remember 
Love" (CBS), a drama about Alz- 
heimer's disease, was named best 
dramatic special. Joanne Wood- 
ward won an Emmy for her perfor- 
mance in it and Vickie Patik won 
for her script The British- made 
“The Jewel in the Crown" (PBS) 
was named best limited series. 



"Cagney & Lace^i^otBestdireo- . 
tion and best r writmg; and Tyne 
Daly, as Detective Mary Betb Lac- 
ey, won best dramatic acuess for 
the third straight year, defeating 
her co-star, Sbarw^Gfess. “The 


Cosby Show" won/iest coined^ 


writing for Ed Weinberg and 
chad Leesou and bestdirectionf^ \ 
Jay Sandrich. BSD Cosbjv the star, ' 
rejected a nomination, saying he 
didn't believe in competing against 
other performers. 


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SPAIN 


MALLORCA 

AMBASSADOR PARK 


PARADISE FOR THE HAPPY FEW 


An exduuve Medrterranecm village n 
being butt right by ihe seo on the most 
beautiful site or Mallorca Ideal loco- 
hon. 20 mraites from PcAna. Spaoaui 
apartmenti. I to 3 bedrooms, dl with 
large lenooK. Very high quality enn- 
xtruetion and flniuiingi guar d itee d . 


VISIT AMBASSADOR PARK At® 
BE CONVINCED 

For information: 

GLOBE PLAN 5JL 
Av Mon-Repos 24. 

0-1-1 005 LAUSAMME, Switzer laid 
Tel. (21] 22 35 7 2 Tlx 25785 MEUS CH. 


Broker Enquiries Welcome 


sale, rural & 


la> & a pum wib 

beach fccooons. 


low 


prices, gwranieed title (feeds, from 
has 2.450,000. Tr 


Trowl/viewing 
pens® refunded on purchase-' Mr- 


onda Baye (Agents^ 6A East St. Not- 


frngham. NGl 3AY, UK. 
Nofttnghan 470501 . Tlx 37107 


Td 


SWITZERLAND 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRKNCH PROVINCES 


SAINT JEAN CAP FBRAT. Sea v«w. 
wry betwtiful "bourgeois" house, 300 
tq-m. living space. 7 800 sqm paved 
land with trees F5 JOO.OOO. Promotion 
Mozart. Place Mar art. 06000 Nn*. 
Td 93-87 0820 T7. Immozor4ol235 


In Iho charming mounta'n resort of 

LEYSIN: 
RESIDENCE LB FRENE5 

Overlooking a splendd Alpine panora- 
ma. 30 min. from Montreux and Lake 
Geneva by cm. 
you can awn quality resxferces 
with indoor nnmmng pool on d 
Alness facilities n an tried 
enuirorment far lecure aid sports 
Jdu, golf, etc). 

■manonoat low SF. rates 
up to 80% mortgage s . 

Flew contact; 

Rasnfanco fas Fnmh, 1854 Uywn 
SWITZERLAND 

Td: (025) 34 1 1 55 Hx. 456 120 RLAf CH 


LAKE GENEVA area. Foreimers can 
btryi apartment bmktng wdh 8 aport- 
merib, afl tented cut. Si.VMJJOOTh 
5EBOLD SA, 0+1007 Lausanne. Tel: 
21/252611. 


BY TW LAKESIDE, MONTREUX, 100 

sqjn. apartment is available far sate 
to foreigners. Tel ep h one London Ot- 


to loreiaier! 

362 7191. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


HAT TO LET, MENTON. RIVERA. 
Beautiful vmw, surrounded by an alive 
grave. 3 bedrooms. 2 bathroom, 
large nmnq room with fireplace, ga- 
rage. telephone, garden, bng: Monte 


GREAT BRITAIN 


UIXURYFURMSHED APARTMENTS. 

Futy serviced, choice of Mayfar or 
odfoceni to herai n gton Palace. From 
£300 to £550 per vmel. 3 months to 2 
gears.^ Mountain on Managemer* Ltd 


2626. Telex: 


Managen 

299185. 


LARGE LUXURY MAYFAIR flat, 
drawing room, kitchen, bathroo m . 
Iwtn bedroom. Lift, porterage, long or 
short let. ideal for business person 
requiring im-hotal atmosphere in 
heart of town. TeL 01-493 2395. 


IONDON. For the best furnished flats 
and houses. Consult the Specialists: 


Philps, Kav and Lewis. Tel- South of 

- ‘ ‘12 8117 


Pork 35? 8711, North of Pork 722 
5135. Telex 27846 RESIDE C. 


MAYFAIR, NEAR HILTON, superbly 
hvnhhed 2 -bedroom apoi linem. £250 
per week. 01-589 82ZT . 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Elysees-Concorde 

Apartments / Houses 

Short farm i 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 


8 Ave. da Means 
75008 Ffafe 
Tele* 231696 F 


YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
562-7899 


AT HOME IN PARIS 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENTS FOR RENT OR SALE 

563 25 60 


74 CHAMP5-H.Y5EES 8th 


Studio. 2 or 3-raori opmtmen*. 
One month or more. 

IE CLAR1DGE 359 67 97. 


VICTOR HUGO 


avaMik from 1 week onwards 

AST. 9 Rue Rovale. 75008 Pom 
Tel: (1) 2o5 II W. Telex 640793F. 


living, I bedroom*. 

711.500 + dimgex 764 03 17 


SHORT TERM STAY. Advantages of a 
hotel without inconveniences, fed at 
home in nee stuefios. one bedroom 
and mare in Ran*. SOKEL1M 80 me 
de njruverute. Pans 7th; 544 39 40 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

CB4TEH PAMS. Period shut? for 1 
person, 23 sqjn., fuflv equipped, 
phone, long term, available now. Tet 
773 94 63 

BSY IES MOUUNEAUX, near metro 
and RBL 2-bedroom house, F5.000. 
TeL 621 32 71. 

MAKE YOURSELF AT HOME! 7 days 
to 3 months fa Porn. 14 100m apart- 
ments. fuly equtoped. Tel: 30678 79. 

POMPE. Charming 2 rooms, 7th floor, 
balcony, comfort F5300 + heating. 
704 20 47. 

3RD MARAS: Qnrmeig duple* stu- 
tko. hi# bath, kiteheti, well frimuhed. 
quel. F3500. Tel: 720 37 99 

7ffl BABYLONE. 1 bedroom, sdon. 
cSrxng room, study. TOO sq.m., charm, 
beams. P9000. Tel: 621 3271 

14TH ALE51A, large double hvwiq. 3 
bedrooms, well equipped krtchen. 
g<*den, quiet. F6.000 net. 720 37 99. 

SHORT TBtM IN LATIN QUARTER 

No agents. Td: 329 38 B3 

ST GERMAIN DES PRES. 16th cent 
penthouse. 1 10 sq.m Tel; 329 42 94. 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 

14»h: MONTPARNASSE 

duplex. 130 sqjn., reception + 

4 bedrooms. F7&0. Tel. 5*3 68 38 

3 BEDROOMS. 3 baths, luxury apart- 
ment. garage, excellent locution. ‘ 
F6OW1. Td. 709 3775. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


AVE LAMBALLE 

760 sqm., 2 receptions, 3 bedrooms, 
F12J300 4 charges. 764 03 17. 


MARAIS REDONE 

2 rooms, bath. F4000: 563 68 38 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


FRENCH SECRETARY (28). TrSngud 
English, German, seeks dvdleng in g 
serious pceitnn os exeaiinre secretary 
or PA m Europe, preferably Rons or 
Germany. 3 years experience n Ger- 


uermany. 3 years expenawe n Ger- 
many. Sdayi FI 50.000/year. Para 
589 10 65 or write: Bax 2579, Herald 
Tribune, 92521 Necrily Cecfax, France 


COUKCH1I3, 200 SQM., praft£paus 


reception + 3 bedrooms 
equipped knehen, fireplaces. 6fti 
floor, sunny. 51,500. Tek 622 27 57, 


WE5T SUBURBS. Large house m large 
‘tn. reception. 5 bedrooms, 3 
. [31 969 50 20 or f3)96« 37 25. 


SPAIN 


BILINGUAL FRENCHMAN, 27 execu- 
tive. experienced cotrxnerool con- 
tracts. formerly in inti maritime busi- 
ness, seeks new career, patx&iy 
based m Paris, wf I travel Box 271 5, 
Herald Tribune, 92521 NeuJy Cedex 


AUTO CONVERSION 


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Write or 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


YOUNG WOMAN, 30bh. TO ACT as 
secretary, sodol companio n to cou- 
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humor. Wr* m own I mu dwiMn g 
about seif & interests. P lea se enclose 


rite or phone for free brochure. 
GERMANY (Dj 69-7152425 or 
W) 7031 7 223059 


amoucJm 


wn uMnwRtreits 

Oberfndau 76-78 
D4000 Fronfcfurf/Main 


B»A/ DOT 

CONVBSX3NS 
* Customs broloeroge/boncfng sendee 


jjhcto Wnre Bax 4773* LKT, 63 


l Acre, London. WC2E 9JK 


to let law lentais. Long or short stays. 
Hurd 8 beach locations. Agency 
rarvfo B 


Bay«e 


(Agents], 6A East 54. Nottingham, 
NGl 3AV, UK. Id- Nottingham 


478501. Tb 37T07 


REAL ESTATE 


for similar Em ope. Tet p4 l|741U57 


International Business Message Center 


AT7ENTKJN EXECUTIVES 
PubGth year fwsmass motsago 
in lh» International Hardd Tri- 


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U. S. A. 

Fror: erpJonahon oi revolutionary 


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_ Returns Expected For Life- 
time Security. .Wnerral avalabfe in 
cngiiih. F-exH. G erman. Full details 
Tom Bo» 2n02. Herald Tribunr. 
92521 Meixlly Ode.. France 


Enquiriat from Broken Welcome 


Incorparanon and managenwi* in- UK 
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Free explanatory booklet from; 

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Head Office 

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“ ' ' os (5624) 23 
28554 SELECT 


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G 


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"d St.. Londcvi W1 


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Tel 01-493 *244. T7. 28247 5C5LDN G 


HNANCIAL TIMES 


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Wassenoor, Utrecht. 


For subscription delays, 
please contact: 

FT Amsfardtn (WC) 23 94 30 a 

ibu 14 

Europe's Business Newspaper 


U-SJk. BUSBYS. Speoato « USA 
Business, Imnstmanis and finmw ra- 
tion. Contact; MeahomHanna, P-C, 
60 State 5t, Boiton. MA 02109 USA. 
Tel: 617-523-1330 or tele* 95101 < 
FIRSTBOSTON. 


USA 

BUSftffiSSB.B REAL ESTATE 

Business mI«. comireicial. ■ndi'Sirial $ 
rwdemiol rral esiaw sefes & leases 
“roperty man-Ktement & business de- 
■ elepmeri. Wme with rour rMunre- 
ments & financial sores to- 
Hi-son 7rch< 5 Bmness Brcleis. 
’14795 Jeffrey Rd . “770 Imne. 

Ccbfarrxc 977U USA 
Tel T TA<.5! 5030; TV 5'5ClH4. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT. 

tep^ri • 1? countries analyzed De- 
rmis. W.ma. 45 Lyndhurst Terrace, 
Sune 54 Crnfral. Hong P-orifl 


MULTIUNGUAl INTERPRETERS Sec- 
rcrond rasr,rcnce NY 212 68BO054. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


CC.M. LTD 

Companies lormed UJL & wjrldwrcfe 
'■ciudir^ I-Je of Mon Juris S. Cocas. 

Arvjijillc. Panana and Libei ic 


For fijrfne- intarmation. please corned 
us at ■ 5 Lfapei CKkcIi 5f . Dougkss. die 
of Man, ra C-rw Bntcn. tel Douglas 

(0624) 3733. tf. 6779Q0 CCM lOM G. 


LONDON 

fidsatr/ & trust semocs ! Comparr/ 
loTnohons & donxaliation 1 inurncion- 
al las 1 Bcnlr -nounh esiabCdied ' 
General business od nee & asu'-'orce 1 


JfO, 17 Wtdeajre 5f. London El 7HP 
Tel. 01 377 1474. Tl«: 8SJ31I G 


FIDUCIARY BANKING on k>ge «J. 
taeiakzed loon. The art * «nun«i. 
cm! Iwi wuh a representative office 
m London speodkung in ton service. 
Arab Oveiwra Bor* & Trust (WJ ) 
Lid. 28 Ptacl P'inee Road, London 
SET tek 01-725 8171 


HONG KONG LAW FIRM seeks UL 
age with European law firms. If niter - 


Wirt* ?be prmopd, 
Suite 


INVEST WITH CONHD04CE 
15% MINIMUM RETURN 
, FOR 5 YEARS 
of mvoftnienl in afl Unde of 
Mcurihn X properties development 
»n North America. Minimum 
rnvMjment US$50,000/ equivalent 
THE MNMUM RETIWI IS 
PAYABLE HALF YEARLY. FOR MORE 
INFORMATION. WRITE TO: 
SEMAANS & SONS SECURITIES Inc 

SUITE 1006. 575 MADISON AVE.. 

N.Y.. N.Y 10022. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


Your Office in Germany 

_w« are “Al Your Service" 

• Compirte office services at two 
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• Can fcte legally used as your corpo- 
rate f> 


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• Tout business operation can start 
immediately 


Lano Business Services GmbH 
La* CO Mam am Hothouse nport 
JifShmmtnsse ?? 

6000 Frankfurt am Mom l 
Germany 
Tel: 69-59 00 6l 
Telefax. aO-59 57 ?0 
Telex- 414561 


22% REAL ANNUAL RETURN, an 
average hoi been generated by the 
Canfcaran Basin Investment Trust's 
trust mertnaae pool. Derate 
FIRST INTERNATIONAL TSLIST CO 
LTD.. Depi 950. P O . Box 302, 1005. 
Stm Jose. Cos (a Ibca Telev 2851 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 


Tout bes' buy. 

Fine diamonds m any price range 
rS- lowest wholesale prices 
direct from Antwerp 
center of toe diamond wtxkl 
FuH guarantee 
Far free p»ce kst wnte 
Joachim Gelrimtein 


flamtHpwt 
d 1938 


established 
Feblixreiroat 62. B-201B Antwerp 
Wgwn let. {32 3 234 07 5) 

Th' 71T79 iyt b. Al the Diam on d CUl. 
Hetsrt of Antwerp Dromond industry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


Fred fan and Co.. 5ftkcHon. Suite 
903, For East Fmane* Centre. 16 Har 
ecuw Boae. Hgng kjnq. 


MONEY AVAILABLE, long term ■ a 
attractive rates. Buurwss loom • real 
estate. Minimum U£ J5CO.OOO. Comaci 
Venter ey Ltd, Lendon ; 01 24J 6507. 
Tfi. ^52387 Answer Q. 


PANAMA UBBBA, CORPORATIONS 
front USS40Q mradsble now Tel 
(9b24J 20240. Tele.*.- 628352 ISLAND 
G. NraUKl. 


NOW THB2E 15 A CLUB DOING inter- 
national butirtess with excefin* prow* 
for its member]. Fo> opefreabon. IrX 
73 New Bond Street. Lando" Wl. 


YOUR BEST SWISS 
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IN ZURICH 

FUllf INTEGRATED 
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Worp Proceum 


. ling Translation 
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wternattonal oma 

32 Rennweg. CHKOI Zurich 
Tel 01 .' 214 67 11 Tlx 81Za5o INOP 

MEMBER WORLD-WIDE 
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I <KnvcteyiK>n 


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• Modern office equnnenl 

EURO BUSINESS CENTS 
Hotel Euioburiring. JR Junenrz B. 2S03o 
Modnd. Tel 4586061. Tb 22548 Eubl-E 


ZUR1CH-ZURICH-ZURICH 


ON BAHNHOF5TRASSE 52 
YOUR OFFICE AWAY FROM HOME 

• Office 'Management Server: 

• Company Formatiorei 

• How Ip do Business .n.’a.' 

FROM SWITZERLAND 
Buxines* Servian Consult Carp. 
Bahnhofstrwe 52. CH-8022 Zurich 
Tel: 01 -’71 1 9? 07 Tl. 873 062 


YOUR OFFICE IN PARIS: TELEX. 
ANSWERING SERVICE, secretly, 
errands, mailbox., live 24H.’doy 
Td. PAT 609 95 95. 


IMPETUS 

PHONE 


» ZURICH • 252 76 2T. 
TELEX TELEGRAMS 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


ETOILE 

FURNISHED 

OFFICES 

VBIY HIGH CLASS 


CO NTIMN OE ROOMS, 
SHOWROOM. SECRETARIAT-TBEX 
Tel: (1)727 15 59 Park 


UNKHJE OPPORTUNITY for ot Erv 
gfah mother tongue highly maturated, 
respansfale and tupanenced person 


Candidate wfi) be trained an iyaphie 


oampwer. Solory negotiable. 

pfiofo and cv. to Bax 2751, Herald 
Tntxme. 92521 Neuilly Cedex. France 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


SWISS GOLF DIRECTOR, 40 YEARS, 
muMngud, with experience in sports 


management and en^neerma seeks 
interesting jab. Wnte: Ban 2761. Her- 


dd Tribune. 92521 NeixRy Cedex. 
France 


GERMAN FASHION MODEL WeA- 
educaled, muMngual. looks for in ter 
ertmg poatron. London 24547080. 


DYNAMIC young Spnih lady yeeks 
Tood c 
10 pm 


senovs tab Europe/ US A Good cv., 
tnknguA Tek 341 7418351 


SERIOUS 

permanent 

English 


lady, good CV seeks 
Europe 'USA. Perfect 
50914 M«b>d. Spain 


EDUCATION Al. 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


FOR UNGUAGE SCHOOL IN PARIS 

Engk'-h teachers for adults mm mum 4 
years expenence. preferably TEFL, 
M time job. Send CV 4 photo. Bo* 
2739, Herald Tnbune. 92521 Neurfty 
Cede*. France 


WANTH), BCPBUB4CE Tffl Amern 

cans to teach French businessmen, 
warfang peters required Call week- 
days fltxndpn. 622 03 66 Pans 


Pict-up 8 defivary anywhere in the 
IASTi 


Eastern U5. & Texas 
* Professional war* using only Ihe 


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World wxfe deWery 
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sdary References ft phera requested 
Ptee wnte SlMtON, 54 rae Jacob. 
7500o Pans. France. 


BOtCH AND B4GUSH SPEAKING 


lady. 30 to 40. sought to took after 
5.16 or 


Ihiee chikfcen (15, Id and 8). Location 
in Gwo excefleni salexy. mcWng 
pod vocation twice a year. Cook, 
nod and othet servants already on 
the premises. Write to L 18-1)5407. 
Pubnatas. CH-1J7I Geneva 3. 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS WANTED 


29. 


NANNIE/ GOVHNESS. 

NaWy experienced wilhcfaaien. very 
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MERCBXSCARS 
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500 SL 500 5H. 500 SK.wrth both 
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For other 


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TRAVa AGENT 


PAGE 14 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


Inlernaiioaal Secretarial Positions 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


La fficrie d’un groupe Airtericain 


ndwidw la 

SECRETAIRE 


DESON PDG 

parfatement Uingue 

ANGLAIS 

FRANCAIS 

de nceionafite 
angto-saxan. 

Be oTexp6#wneB 
d un paste simikaro 

Lieu de trovaL 
PAHS WDEFB4S 


fawtyer leitfs de condxfatwe 
mtmusente. e.v, pretentions et photo 
6 

Direction des Ressourcet Humcnnes 




^SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


EflWAKrtoatafor trandaor/seoe- 

bune. 92521 Neuflly Cedex. France 


CULTURAL cams needs vounn bSn- 

9rri secratoy (EngtiA - 


gn q»H wgrteng pope,, anerM. 

1J9 Ms- Levtt, Amencnn Cen. 
Jw. 261 Bd Rmpc«L 750l4 Rjg. 


■SBafHScss 

«a«r Wth MK Box 2759. Hk- 
oWJrfaune 92521 NeuiBy Cede*. 


MATURE BCPfiBWCH) domestic to- 
cretory/PA required immacfietely for 
Famy based m the South of France, 
to supervise runimg of estate. Must 
ba totafly fluent. Edmgufa French/ 
Engfah. Knowledge of acauunma 
prafeaWe Musi (Ave. Eweleni wfo 
iy afteed. Far farther detab s*d 
cv.. refatencm aid recent photo to 
Bm 2647. Herald Tnbune. 92S21 
Neuilly Cade*. Franc e 


MJNBtVE 

Engksh, Mom. Dutch or German 
«e«"wtes, fcitowfadoe of French re- 

^ 7s,i 


' P*JtaO: lffl Avenue 
lo Pan*. 


France- Tet 


tNreR NATtQN AL.lAWRRM.nPaw 

seeks English mother tongue bifinguol 
secretary with excellent shjjrthondm 

KSm'gS-- 0 '' 

France 


.92521 Neudy Cedex, 


d &fle French law firm inNeuifly 0 
5 ritart expenmee. word 


.WBamapar** 


N«ge col Pam 


28: 


papers. 


SECRET AftlES AVAILABIT. 


SECRETARIES 

OVERSEAS 


ernto nru<BB cscretanei whose tn- 
gurtic md secretary sUh have been 
if are 

Ptoyer, contact us for the b*rt qdvjca. 
Secretaries . erfi us toarmmZnSS?. 


vtew m &cS! Wtoaf,afl 9’ 0nirt «- 


17 . toteraattoigl Seeretanes 
174 New .fendarwt Ljndon Wl 
TeLDl-491 7100 
wenetmert Consutew. . 


■to Prase ntorion, 10 years mil matt- 
O0«w; mpenenco mduefna PR 

«eh chcfleMfaa pasilMMibwd.iii 

?2***.. or }&J teoe to troveL Bar 
2760, Herald Triune, 92521 Negtfy 
'-ootte. From 


Printed by gdz in Zurich (Switzerland) 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE r 


YOUNG RHK31MAN 34, BAngtdr 
Engfiih mother tongue, 1 0 yews off* . 
rience in nii*ictrtX»«« part, «wa**» 
typmg meed ft oc axu cy. Word 
pracewng, Kiev pleasart jho* . 

■ mmr seeks draBenang jobned 7 
London *1 tall co. w# dm * er « v 
serious famines. Mi P—d..TWJr: 
Vaboire, ?5l1 Parifc Tefe 7TO.W ^ - 


RANDSIAD 

BILINGUAL AGENCY Tufty 

maporaryOtace 
■ • rwsente* 


Sptddbed 1 


Park; 758 12 40. 


flue* 


'■it 


PA B4GUSH MOTHER ----- - - 

asr/3S' : § 

France 


TRILINGUAL & 

J French; leekiPApo^pnM 
level asdoaqer ta P cr rcWn teBto - 
.3, HeraWTSfliei *357 NeeS T. 
Cedex, Fite ic e 


BCPBB«a> SECRETARY, —r_,_ 
n»dier tongue, fluenf freiwi, *4“ . 

nroo nsm i, wda goUooo. Free ncnV;. 

TttSSne; 

lQi45<xnar50 4937qfter7pus_ 


EXPBBENCS) SKSFARY 
•"other tongue, 
teefis porfrhme pcotiOASf* **3’ 
Tet 66124 21 or BoajJW, *** 
Tribune, 92521 NeuflyCedeti Prang. 


YOUNG RENO! G8DL 23 
Ptandt, ErtqfaJt ft'Qrifafe, WtaftC: 
ft seoefonal e fa wfancfl : 

«fmg pootkm dealing with . DP* 1 : 
Confod 722 05 74, -far* 




AMBBCANSWBETAJnf.db*^, . 
from Oct.’T 

yaund, USA 2I2-MP8236. ^.V: 


lOOKMS FOR TOP 
wweffCdl 8teopdritG«»a»(SHv.v.- 
Mu Renofd 7S8 gT»Pfa< /Xgfa 


Vt 


lot*. TrtfSra 70^300 «d- 





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