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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Monday, April 4, 1994 


No. 34,553 


* West Debates 
Significance 
Of Moscow’s 
Deployments 

Reinforcing of Flanks 
In the North and South 

Exceeds Planned limits 

By Michael R. Gordon 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Russian military 
has repositioned forces along its northern and 
southern fl a n ks as they return from Central 
Europe, raising concern among NATO and 
U.S. officials who say the redeployment ex- 
ceeds limits scheduled to take effect next year 
under a treaty reducing conventional weapons 
in Europe. 

The deployments, and Moscow’s effort to 
renegotiate the treaty to accommodate than, 
are emerging as a major irritant in the Penta- 
gon’s efforts to forge closer relations with the 
Russian militar y 

£ Along with the Ames espionage case, Rus- 
■ sia’s increasingly assertive foreign policy and its 

mixed signals on cooperation with NATO, the 
deployment is helping to stimulate a wide de- 
bate over whether Moscow is a partner that 
Washington can work with or a rival deter- 
mined to use its military power to intimidate its 
neighbors. 

[Defense Secretary William J. Perry said Sun- 
day that the United States would not consider 
revising the treaty, Agence France-Presse re- 
ported from Washington. 

[“I have talked with the leaders of those 
countries” next to Russia, he said on NBC 
television. “They scan very uninterested and 
unwilling to make that change."! 

Administration officials say Russia's moves 
reflect its military’s unhappiness with the arms 
control Emits negotiated by the Soviet Foreign 
Ministry during the Gorbachev era and deter- 
mination to maintain a strong presence in the 
volatile Caucasus region. 

Some Western experts sot the concerns cited 
by the Russian mili tary are legitimate, given the 
etiunc fighting in Russia's own southern territo- 
ry. recent cavil wars in Georgia and the five- 
year-old conflict between Armenia and Azer- 



Pentagon Sees Risks 
In U.S. Korea Policy 


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Others argue that relaxing. the Emits would 
give Russia too modi flexibility in projecting 
power that threatens the “near abroad,” as the 
adjacent forma Soviet republics are known. 

Russia’s moves are also 'a major worry for 
Turkey and the Sea ndmavianxocm tries, which 
do not want to see an expansion of Moscow’s 
mihiary power in their regions. 

Other Western specialists argue that accom- 
modating Russia on the limit an conventional 
forces in Europe would invite other countries to 
seek changes m the treaty after years of painful 
negotiations. 

Undo: the treaty, there is still time for the 
Russians to reverse the buOdap before a Emit 
on the forces on its flanks formally takes effect 
in November 3925. _ > 

But so far, Russia’s generals have insisted 
that instability in the Caucasus makes the hnril 
unreasonable- The Russian Defense Ministry 
has repeatedly proposed revisions of the treaty, 
which covers conventional arms from the At- 
lantic to the Urals, to give the Russian mffitary 
more leeway. 

When Defease Secretary WtiHam J. Perry 
recently visited Moscow, General Mikhail Ko- 
lesnikov, the head of the Russian general staff, 
proposed a “clarification” of the treaty that 
would have the effect of raising the number of 
See RUSSIA, Page 7 


URBIETORBI — Pope John Pud II gyving Iris Easter Messing from St Peter’s Baszficsni the Vatican to the city of Rome and to 
the world. In it he appealed to world leaders to promote family fife, which he said faces threats to “the very roots of its existence.” 


Russian Crime Gangs Take On the West 


By Steve Coll 

Washington Pest Service 
LONDON — Russian organized crime 


and hired by opemng borders in Europe, have 
acquired enoagh independent finanaal dout 
to cause serious problems in Westers Europe 
and the United States, according to senior 
law enforcement officials. 

Complex criminal cases in London. New 
York, Germany and elsewhere, as well as 
ongoing investigations, indicate that these 
groups are moving rapidly from racketeering 
at home to criminal activity in the West 
lucrative enough to be self-s up porting, the 
officials said. 

The most serious activities include traffick- 
ing in cocaine and heroin and in unlicensed 
weapons, financial fraud, large-scale car 
theft, and the laundering of ulidt profits 


through Western banking and offshore cen- 
ters, they said. 

“It’s a condition that’s not only deplorable, 
bol from our point of view, directly threaten- 
ing," said Lotus Freeh, director of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, in a telephone inter- 
view. “We have emerging particularly in 
Russia, an incredibly well-organized and 
powerful and weH-asseted organized crime 
problem. It’s one of growing proportions. It’s 
now got the ability to finance its own opera- 
tions?’ 

“There is a difficulty and a threat that 
confronts the whole of Europe,” said David 
Veness, London’s assistant police commis- 
sioner for special operations. “The word that 
I would ure to describe the changing threat is 
‘mobility.’ ” 

Organized crime task forces across West- 
ern and Eastern Europe are finding, Mr. 


Veness added, that “unless you're vigilant 
about Russian organized crime groups, the 
speed and extent of the problem will overtake 
you." 

One of the greatest concerns is emerging 
evidence of the substantial amounts of cash 
available to these Russian crime groups, par- 
ticularly in Western banking centers. 

For example, court proceedings in London 
disclosed last week that two Russians from 
the crime-ridden enclave of Chechnya, who 
were murdered and dismembered in a luxury 
flat by two .Armenians last year, left personal 
estates worth more than S2 million, as well as 
a number of swank British properties, ac- 
cording to Detective Superintendent Ken- 
neth Woodward, in duuge of the case. 

In a statement to the police before he 

See CRIME, Page 7 


For the Chinese, 
Arms Scenario 
Is a Nightmare 

By Patrick E. Tyler 

New York Times Service 

BEUING — North Korea's nuclear program 
is such a nightmare for China that senior mili- 
tary figures here tdl foreign visitors there is no 
reason, other than the guesswork by American 
intelligence, to believe that such a thing exists. 

“They rally don't like this issue," said a 
Western specialist. 

It is a nightmare for two reasons: first, China 
does not want North Kora to become a nucle- 
ar power, especially if this pushes Japan and 
South Korea to pursue their own nuclear op- 
tions. 

Second, China fears the consequences of an 
aggressive campaign to force North Kora to 
live up to its commitments under the Nuclear 
Nonproliferation Treaty. 

“We in the West focus on the nuclear issue," 
a Western analyst said. “But the Chinese, be- 
cause they are residents in the neighborhood. 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

are not only genuinely concerned that North 
Korea not acquire a nuclear weapons capabili- 
ty, but they are also extremely interested in 
avoiding a breakdown in the regime or in pro- 
voking the regime to the point that it lashes out 
militarily." 

Risking a conventional war is a much graver 
concern to China's leadership than a bomb or 
two in North Korea's basement, because war 
directly threatens China’s economic and politi- 
cal stability, Chinese and Western analysts say. 

This cautious policy explains the compro- 
mise that Chinese diplomats sought at the Unit- 
ed Nations last week to soften international 
indignation ova North Korea’s refusal to grant 
full access to UN inspectors. 

The compromise supplanted a strongly 
worded Security Council resolution offered by 
the United States with a milder statement call- 
ing on North Korea to reopen nuclear installa- 
tions to inspection. 

With the compromise, Beijing and Washing- 
ton demonstrated that their overarching inter- 
ests are the same. They also demonstrated that 
their need to cooperate on Asian security is 
another reason- for them to resolve their dispa te’ 
over China's poor human rights record. 

The compromise, however, could be veiy 
short-lived if North Korea again obstructs the 
nuclear inspectors. Thus the contradiction be- 
tween China’s desire to keep the Korean Penin- 
sula free of nuclear weapons and its unwilling- 
ness to confront its longtime ally will continue 
to frustrate China's friends and irritate its crit- 
ics. 

The government spokesman, Wu Jiamnin, 
reiterated Lhe policy toward North Korea: “We 
believe dialogue is the only correct way. We 
hope to see peace and stability because the 
maintenance of peace and stability is the pre- 
condition for these countries to develop weir 
economies and to improve the livelihood of 
their people.” 

In effect, Mr. Wu was articulating China’s 
national security strategy, which is to remove 
ah foreign-policy impediments to its rush for 
domestic economic development. 

It is not that China lacks common cause with 
Japan and South Kora over North Korea’s 

See BEUING, Page 4 


Nuclear Program 
Must Be Stopped 
Despite Danger 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Defense Secretary Wil- 
liam J. Perry said Sunday there was a risk that 
UJL actions could provoke North Korea into 
starting a catastrophic war, but he said the cost 
of American inertia could be immense because 
the North Koreans might soon be capable of 
producing up to a dozen nuclear arms a year. 

Although he emphasized the volatility of a 
situation where the United States was attempt- 
ing to curb North Korea's nuclear ambitions, 
Mr. Perry was quick to state: “We're not on the 
brink of war. This is not an immin ent crisis and 
I don’t believe war is going to result from it” 

Mr. Perry said that despite U.S. and United 
Nations efforts, first to inspect and then to stem 
the North Korean nuclear program, Pyongyang 
was plunging ahead to enlarge its weapons- 
m akin g capacity. He confirmed a Washington 
Post report that North Korea had nearly dou- 
bled its capacity to produce plutonium for 
nuclear arms and was proceeding with related 
reactor programs as it fended off foil scrutiny 
of its nuclear installations. 

The defense secretary said the United States 
had rejected either acquiescence in North Kore- 
an nuclear aims or a preemptive military strike 
to stop them. 

“That takes us to the third alternative, which 
is the one we are pursuing, and that is imagina- 


tive and aggressive diplomatic actions as long 
as there's any hope for those actions,” Mr. 
Pen-y said on an NBC public affairs program. 
“We don't have to have results thisweekornext 
week. The problems we’re concerned about will 
take a year or two to unfold, so we can be firm, 
but we can be patient, too 

“Now, if we run out of hope on those diplo- 
matic actions, if there's no hope for them, then 
we’d have to start putting pressure, and that 
gets us into a higher risk area, and as we get into 
that higher risk area, we have to be prepared to 
defend ourselves. We have to take prudent, 
defensive measures." 

He continued: “We do not want and will not 
provoke a war over this or any other issue in 
Korea, but we will take a very Arm stand and 
very strong actions. It’s conceivable that those 
actions might provoke the North Koreans into 
- unleashing a war, and that is a risk that we’re 
taking. 

"We compare that with the risk of letting 
them develop the bomb and look at the various 
problems that could cause us not only (m the 
Korean Peninsula, but the possibility of their 
prolif era ting this bomb to the Mideast, where 
they’re now selling their missiles, this is a mat- 
ter of very, very great concern to us." 

Mr. Perry said the United States would not 
initiate a war and that be believed that North 
Korea, “looking at the catastrophe that would 
occur to their country if they initiated a war, is 
not going to, other.” 

He spelled out UJS aims within a timetable 
that allowed the North Koreans some flexibili- 
ty. What the United Stales wants “fust is to 
freeze this nuclear program," he said. “It 
doesn’t have to be today or this week, but freeze 
it socm: we’re talking about months, not years 
from now. And the second is roll it bade To the 
extent they actually have one or two nuclear 
bombs now, we want those to be removed. 
That’s a very clear objective. It’s going to be 

See KOREA, Page 4 


Mass Evacuation Cleared 
For Muslims and Croats 


Kiosk Asians Rally Against Wage- Trade Link 


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ZAGREB, Croatia — Bosnian Sabs on Sun- 
day gave Red Cross officials a guarantee ofsafe 
passage for thousands of Muslims and Croats 
who wiD be evacuated from northwratan Bos- 
nia to save them from nationalist Serbs bent on 

wiping them out. 

But ai the same time, the Serbs continued 
their military campaign elsewhere. In the east- 
ern Muslim enclave ofGora^r^dmts otw- 
ered in shelters under heavy Serbian bombard- 
ment, the Bosnian radio reported- The town has 
been under a Serbian siege for more than a year. 

In Washington, Secretary of Defense W3- 
Ham J. Perry said the Unj“d Staus would not 
intervene through NATO to stop the shdhng, 
as it did in Sarajevo. 

Asked if the United State was v^lmg to let 
towns fall to the Serbs, 

notemer the war to^stpp that from happening. 
That is correct, yes.” 

Rado«u. Karadzic, leader of tl 

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Gabon.......W0CFA Spain -2D0PTAS 

Greece -300 Dr. Tunisia ....1.000 Dm 

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ley, spokeswoman in Sarajevo for the Interna- 
tional Committee of the Red Cross. 

La Zagreb, Robyn Thompson, a Red Cross 
spokeswoman, said a letter had been received 
from Mr. Karadzic “which guarantees we will 
have safe passage both for the Red Cross and 
for crossing the frontiers with (he civilians we 
will transport from Prijedor." 

Details and timing still had to be worked out, 
she said. 

“We are talking about getting a laige number 
of victims out trf the area,” she said, adding that 
Red Cross officials would meet Mr. Karadzic 
an Monday in Pale to confirm his pledge and 
work out details. - 

Red Cross worirera were in Banja Luka, east 
of Prijedor, on Sunday to prepare for the evacu- 
ation, which would take several days to com- 
plete, she said. 

On Sunday. Mr. Karadzic also ordered the 
airest of (hose responsible for what he called 
the “events” in Prjjcdor, the Bosnian Serbian 
press agency reported. This amounted to Mr. 
Karadzic’s first impfidt admission of Serbian 
involvement 

In Washington, Mr: Perry said the United 
States would not send any more air power into 
Bosnia despite new attacks by Bosnian Serbs on 
several Muslim strongholds. 

“We’re not looking at extensions of the use of 
that air power today, but you canid conceive of 
another situation like Sarajevo arising where we 
mjght consider it,” he said, trf cmng to the 
bombing of a Sarajevo market in March which 
prompted NATO air strikes. 

He also said that the United States would 
send ground troops only to enforce a peace 
agreement although the British c ommand er m 
Serbia, Sr Michad Rose, said that the presence 
of American troops would. accelerate moves 
toward peace. Lieutenant General Rose ap- 
peared on the same television program. 

“We are prepared to send a substantial num- 
ber of troops to sustain a peace agreement once 
a peace agreement is reamed,” Mr. Perry said. 
But he said that lhe United States would remain 
a minority of the NATO fooe s on the ground 

See REFUGEES, Page 7 



PITCHING — Chan Ho Park of South 
Korea is od die Los Angeles Dodgers’ 
roster as the major league baseball sea- 
son opens. Previews, Pages 14 and 15. 


- By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Southeast Asian nations 
have agreed to work as a group to oppose 
attempts by the United States and European 
countries to include a “social danse” linking 
trade and labor standards in future internation- 
al trading rules. 

The issue looms as a major bone of conten- 
tion when minis ters from about 120 countries 
meet next week in Marrakesh, Morocco, to 
formally conclude the Uruguay Round global 
trade pact 

Analysts said Sunday that the decision by 
members of the Association of South East 
Asian Nations to act as a bloc on the issue 
despite major disparities among them in their 
levels of wages aim working conditions reflect- 
ed deep suspicions by virtually all developing 
countries in Asia about the West's motives in 
pressing for such a link. 

Southeast Asian nations have made extensive 


export gains in Western markets in recent 
yews. __ 

The ASEAN countries are concerned that 
Western states wiD use any social clause as a 
device to force developing nations either to 
raise their iabor costs to agreed minimum levels 
or face special tariffs on their goods to compen- 
sate for the fact that they are produced with 
much lower wages. 

ASEAN comprises Indonesia, Malaysia, the 
Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Brunei 

President Suharto of [Indonesia said .last week 
that industrialized nation* were pushing devel- 
oping countries on snch issues as raising the 
minimum wage because they faced internal 
economic problems and declining competitive- 
ness. 

Mr. Suharto's comment takes on added 
weight because he is also chair man of the Non- 
aligned Movement, which has 110 members, 
mainly from the developing world. 

The Malaysian prime minister, Mahathir bin 


Mohamad, said that Western nations were try- 
ing to weaken developing nations by imposing 
nummum wages. 

Such a measure could lead to rising unem- 
ployment and discontent in Asia, he said, be- 
cause it would remove one of the region's major 
competitive advantages — lower labor costs — 
and force factories to close. 

U.S. and French officials have agreed that 
the World Trade Organization should enforce a 
connection between trade and labor conditions. 
The organization wiD replace the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade as a more 
powerful watchdog over the global trading sys- 
tem from 1995. 

France wants the body to apply standards 
that wiD prevent countries from exploiting chil- 
dren, prisoners and bonded workers as a means 
of gaining trade advantages. 

The United Stales wants to set a broader 

See ASEAN, Page 11 


White House , Year 2i A Loose-Ends Shop 


Few Bother to Vote 
In St Petersburg Poll 

MOSCOW (Reuters) — Russians 

stayed home again in droves during coun- 
cil elections in Sl Petersburg on Sunday* 
and this could leave the city without a 
viable government 

Itar-Tass news agency said turnout by 
midday showed 53 percent of residents had 
voted m a second round. Just 25.1 percent 
of voters took part in the first round two 


Arkansas and Doke in Final 

Arkansas and Duke wiD play for U.S. 
college basketball’s championship Monday 
night, the Razorbadcs having pressed Ari- 
zona into submission, 91-82, while Duke 
came from 13 points bade to beat Florida, 
70-65, in the semifinals. Page 15. 


Books 

Bridge Pfrge 4 * 


By Ann Devroy 

Washington Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — The White House chief 
of staff, Thomas F. (Mack) McLarty, was de- 
fending the Clinton White House once again 
last week, saying that its sometimes “uneraf 
performance was “not unusual in the first 
year” 

But tins is Year Twa And there is little to 
suggest that the wild ride the country took with 
Biuand Hillar y Rodham Clinton in 1993 was a 
function of first year settling-in. It appears to 
be a way of Efe. 

Despite endless efforts to tighten the reins 
and even outthe ride, the Clinton White House 
continues its br eathtaking lurches. It remains a 
place constantly reinventing itsdf with new 
people learning their jobs and three sets of 
hands at the helm: the president's, the first 
lady’s and sometimes the vice president's. 

11x6 lines of authority resemble a plate of 
spaghetti: Everyone seems to be in charge of 
everyone so that no one is hdd accountable, 
there is little hierarchy, and there ate loops of 
influence and access that collide, coincide or 


work in blissful ignorance of one another until 
some fiasco looms 

Interviews with several adminis tr atio n offi- 
cials. direct observation, and disensriAns with 
outride advisers suggest that it is sot that the 
Clintons like chaos, but that they are unwilling 
to give up central control because political 
scientists say that is how the White House 
■should operate. They also are reluctant to be- 

NEWS ANALYSIS ~~ 

lieve that the friends they brought to the White 
House from Arkansas and elsewhere are not 
always up the jobs they hold. 

AD evidence suggests that until its final days, 
this administration will be apabbe roller-coast- 
er ride. 

The tedious business of government — what 
one aide calls the “bade mice” of the White 
House, as compared to die policy initiatives 
that occupy the front office — is of ten ignored. 
There is no serious disciplinarian. One official 
said so many people attend meetings of Mr. 
Clinton's top people that the sessions “could be 
held in Yankee Stadium.” 



With two deputy chiefs of staff and three 
senior aides without portfolios, plus a dozen 
others with access to the Oral Office and a 
string of outsiders with full entry, it is difficult 
to know, even among the staff, who’s in charge 
of what. 

Staff turnover has bees huge. A sometimes 
self-defeating compulsion toward privacy, par- 
ticularly bj[ Mrs. Clinton, endures: Tms has 
been true in the case of Whitewater and a 
number of other questions r elating to the Cha- 
lons’ financial dealings before Mr. CEnton be- 
came president. A web of Byzantine personal 
and political relations and numerous loops of 
infonnation and influence all but ensure that 
coDirians await around some, if not many, 
corneas. 

Mrs. CEnton is widely seen in the White 
House as the major force of resistance to the 
broad release of information she considers pri- 
vate, even when disdosure would tend to re- 
sol veor m i ti g ate doubts. And r umring afoul of 
the first lady on issues of secrecy, policy and 
personnel is considered a ruinous career move. 

In the CEnton White House, there are HxDaiy 

See CLINTON, Page 7 


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■m Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, APRIL 4, 1994 


Leader of Hamburg Greens Rehearses a National Show ^j^M*o.s.iuwAa. 


By Brandon Mitcfaener 

International Herald Tribune 

HAMBURG — Krista Sager bas a knack 
for theatrics. 

fn 1991, when Hamburg’s parliament tried 
to give itself a raise, she and a colleague from 
the Greens party showered fake 1,000-Deut- 
sche mark bills from a spectators’ gallery in 
front of rolling cameras just as deputies 
raised their hands to vote. The action made 
national television, and the city government, 
ashamed, stayed the raise even after it passed 
the parliament 

Locals know the soft-talking, hard-bar- 
gaining career politician, head of the Ham- 
burg Greens, as “the one with the bike” 
because of another stunt of hers. 

it involved a campaign to get an official 
city bicycle instead or the chauff cured limou- 
sine to which she is entitled by rank. When 
the city refused on the grounds that she could 
not work on a bike, she arranged to be photo- 
graphed, working, on the back seat of a 
tandem rigged with a cellular phone and 
desk. 

“The whole country laughed," says Ms. 
Sager, who is still trying to get a city bike. 

Far from dismissing her as a down, voters 
last September rewarded the Greens with 
13.5 percent of the Hamburg vote, their best 
result in this Hanseatic city-state of 1.6 mil- 
lion. The Greens also made big gains March 
20 in state elections in Schleswig-Holstein, 
where Ms. Sager helped campaign. 

If her luck holds out, she could well be- 
come the first Greens politician to win a 
direct mandate to the lower house of the 
German parliament, the Bundestag, in feder- 
al elections this October. 

A strong Greats role in federal govern- 
ment remains a scary prospect for many in 
politics and business, but the fear is probably 
exaggerated. The Greens are considered like- 
ly to remain in the political opposition even if 
they make large gains on a national level. 

In Germany's biggest cities, meanwhile, 
pragmatic, mainstream Greens like Ms. Sager 
inspire few fears. 

Editors at the local Hamburger Abendblait 
find her “sober, dear, and competent,” for 
example. Even members of the Christian 
.Democrats, who lead the local opposition, 
pay her grudging respect. One former repre- 
sentative, who has since left Hamburg poli- 
tics. said die couples “credibility with charis- 
ma." 

Ole von Beast, the current head of the 
Christian Democratic Union in the Hamburg 
parliament, said she has won the respect of 
the local business community by arguing in 
its own language. She recently told a perenni- 


she wants — and how to get it," said Mr. von 
Beust, noting that Ms. Sager has led the 
Greens for almost four years despite the par- 
ty’s traditional inclination to rotate its top 
post. 

Although her career is just blooming at age 
41, Ms. Sager is an old hand at political 
activism. 

She belonged to a Maoist student group in 
high school and was arrested at age 15 while 
trying to tear down a poster for a rightist 
party in Bremen, where she grew up. (Among 


practical means of transportation, not an 
ideological statement “I don’t do it to 


Up and 
Coming 

An occasional series about 
the leaders of tomorrow. 


ally loss-making steel company, Hamburger 
Stahhverke, that it would have to shut if it 


failed to survive without subsidies, despite 
the cost in unemployment 
“She’s incredibly sweet but knows what' 


her childhood idols, “for lade of women ho- 
mes in those days," was the untamed charac- 
ter played by Marion Brando in the 1954 
movie “The Wild One.” “There was some- 
thing lonely and sad about him.” she says. 
“Young people love thaL") 

She later became active in the anti-nudear 
movement and marched in protests against 
the Vietnam War. 

Ms. Sager joined the Greens in 1982 in 
Hamburg, where she studied German and 
history and planned to become a teacher to 
please her father, a German painter, and her 
mother, a Dane. Her academic concentra- 
tions of choice would have been political 
science and psychology. 

One reason she dedded to ran for the city- 
state legislature for the Groms was her rage 
at the decision of the Social Democrats to 
replace a woman on the ballot with an older 
man, who, she said, had “the charisma of an 
old slipper.” 

If she could rale Germany by decree for a 
day, her Fust task would still be to outlaw 
atomic power plants, but Ms. Sager otherwise 
considers herself a “Reala," or realist, not a 
“Fundi,” a fundamentalist. “I think with 
power the Greens start to be a little more 
pragmatic;" she says. 

Indeed, when given the chance to choose 
governmental responsibilities for the Greens 
in June 1 991 , Ms. Sager passed up a chance to 
take charge of foreigners, women's or chil- 
dren's issues to tackle the city budget as head 
of the economics committee. If elected to the 
Bundestag, she would again choose financia l 
and economic affairs over the environment, 
she asserts. “I don’t know enough about it," 
she says, smiling. 

A large part of Krista Sager’s attraction is 
that she resists being stereotyped. Her taste in 
music, for example; is as variable as her 
politics: Joe Cocker, Bruce Springsteen, Mo- 
zart 

She rides an old, six-gear bike to work as a 


sweat,” she insists. She also owns a car, taboo 
for many Greens, bat cleared her conscience 
by having a catalytic converter installed in 
her old-fashioned Volkswagen Derby. 

Her borne and office are devoid or plants, 
she explains, because “every life needs care 
and I wouldn’t have enough n'tne to care for 
them properly." She and her companion, a 
sociologist, are constantly on the got Ms. 
Sager tends to spend her sporadic vacations 
at her mother’s home in Denmark, where she 
spent four years as a child. 

A once-divorced former Protestant, she 
says the worst thing that can happen to peo- 
ple is to “lose then soul." but she left the 
church and does not hold much store in 
organized religion. 

The virtues she treasures most, she says, 
are honesty, generosity and humor, in that 
order, and the vices she is most likely to 
forgive, both pillars of the German national 
character, arcdisorderiiness and unpunctua- 
lity. Her own greatest vice, she adds, is impa- 
tience. 


In the geopolitical arena, Ms. S 
with many Greens who oppose 
military force for any reason. 


Being half-Danish makes her look at marry 
tines differently, she says. “I can see things 


things differently, she says. “I can see things 
from the perspective of a small country." Sie 
feds it was vand to ask whether the West was 
making a moral mistake by not aiding Bos- 
nia, a small state in need 

She opposes the construction of a magnetic 
levitation train from Hamburg to Berlin. not 
because the technology is untested, but be- 
cause she thinks it is too expensive. And even 
if die government is budding the train as an 
example of Germany’s technical prowess, 
“Why not spend billions on renewable ener- 
gy; instead?” she asks. 

Like the heroines in the fantasy novels die 
likes to read, Ms. Sager sees herself as a 
mediator between rivals in society and within 
the Greens party itself. 

“I think the Greens are the only small 
paity 'm Germany that has a chance of break- 
ing out of its niche,” she says. “A lot of 
people still consider us eco-freaks and leftist 
fundamentalists, and it’s important that we 
overcome these prejudices on a local level. 
That's where personalities come in.” 

Especially for a Grecos politician, it is 
important to know how to make the best of a 
silly situation. Ms. Sager was recently photo- 
graphed at a party convention standing be- 



Sa’s southern coast a U A Embassy spokesman in Phnom Penh 


The spokesman said Mdissa Heinz and probably three Cambodians 
were bemghdd near Kampot, and tire Khmer Rouge asking for wdls 


to be due for the group before it would release the hostages. Ms. Ham 
was working for Food for the Hungry International, a pnvaie organiza- 
tion based in Bangkok, the sptticesmmi said. ___ . . 

Unc o nfir m e d reports said she and C aimx xnaa starters were s ei z ed 
after they wait toKampot, about 120 kilometers (75 miles) southwest of 
Hmom Path, to negotiate the release of a Food for the Hungry vehicle 
allegedly stolen by the Khmer Rt 
badly needed, kidnappers in Camh 
rather than assistance of this land. 


t wdls are scarce and 
have asked for money 


Alg eria Warns Neighbors on Islam 

TUNIS (ReutenJ — Algeria’s president, faced with an accelerating 
armed insurrection by Mestizo muitants, told his North African neigh- 
bors Sunday that they were all bang threatened by Islamic fundamental- 
ism. 

“Certain foreign forces are trying to take advantage of this situation to 
strike at the unity and stability of our country whue hiding behind our 
religion and our most sacred values,” President Liamme Zeroual said at 
the aid of an Arab Maghreb Union summit meeting of Algeria, Libya, 
Mauritania, Morocco and Tunisia. 

Diplomats in the region say that other members of the Maghreb union 
fear that unrest in Algeria, the only member that borders all the others, 
may spread and undermine their societies. 


East German Neo-Nazis Battle Police 


BONN (AF) — Neo-Nazis battled with the police twice in Easton 
Germany, leaving one officer with a broken skull and five others with 


The violence occurred Friday mght and Saturday night in Branden- 
burg state. Four neo-Nazis were arrested after they attacked police 
offices who stopped them during a road check Friday night sear the 
community of Raihenow. 

Trouble erupted "g™ about 24 hours later at a discotheque in 
Oranienbuig, just north of Berlin, wires a group of neo-Nazis broke 


windows of tire establishment and harassed youths trying to enter. When 
the notice showed up, about 30 more neo-Nazis rushed out of the disco 


the potice showed up, about 30 more neo-1 
and started fights with them. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Europe-Cairo Pri< 


CAIRO (Renters) — Seven West European airlines have called a trace 
in a price war for customers flying to Europe from Cairo. The agreement 


tween two other top Greens, one of whom 
made rabbit ears behind her head just as the 
party was trying to emphasize bow responsi- 
ble it was. 

Far from bang angry at the prank, Ms. 
Sager gave it a spin. “Actually, it looks like 
the sign for victory," she said. 



says the airlines have undertaken not to offer discounts on most fares for 
two years starting April 1. The carriers are Air France, Alitalia, Austrian 
Airfares, British Airways, KLM, Lufthansa and Swissair. 

The accord says the airiines hope that EgyptAir, the Egyptian national 
carrier, trill also sign. As soon as that happens, Air France and British 
Airways will abandon some residual reduced fares to Paris and Loudon. 
Any of the seven aidmes can back out of the agreement by giving the 
others written notice. 


Mc&f-ftbcKkEaa 

Krista Sager in Hamburg: Going all out for an official bkyde. 


DUTY FREE ADVISORY 


A 4-Nation Poll Finds Deep Distrust 
Of Russia, but Other Views Diverge 


Fierce winds eased In coastal Sp&n after Easter weekend storms and 
raging seas dainwt at five lives and left seven people missing, authorities 
said. Thousands of drivers returning bone after the Easter break were 
warned to take extra care due to the strung winds. (Reuters) 

Taxi Aivera in Athens dedded to go oa strike — foDowing the example 
of doctors and lawyers — to protest plans to impose suffer taxes. Some 
15,000 drivers win stop work an Monday and Tuesday to protest a 
government proposal to introduce a mnthnnm tax on tbeir takings and to 


fear that the vibrations would worsen the tower's tilt. Scientists said last 
month that counterweights placed at the base had started to reverse the 
tilL (Reuters) 






m m 


By Steven Greenhouse 

Hew York Times Serriee 

NEW YORK — Showing widely divergent views of 
the work!, people in the United States and Britain say 
the Middle East poses the biggest threat to world 
peace, while Gomans believe the former Soviet bloc 
nations pose the major threat and Japanese are split 
over whether the United States or Russia is the biggest 
menace to peace. 

In Japan, one of the four countries surveyed in the 
first half of March, 21 percent of the respondents said 
Russia “posed tire biggest threat to world peace;” 
while 22 percent tiled the United States as the major 
threat — evidently a reaction to America’s nrifitary 
might and to what the Japanese see as bullying by 
Washington. 

More than 1,000 people were surveyed in each of the 
four countries — the United States. Japan, Germany 
and Britain. All four nations showed a deep distrust of 
Moscow, despite Russia’s moves away from commu- 
nism and its overtures toward tire West 


The four-nation poll involved The New York 
Times, The Guardian in Britain, Der Spiegd in Ger- 
many and Asahi Shrmhtm in Japan. Each news organi- 
zation conducted the poll in its home country, using 
identical questions. Each organization analyzed the 
results. 

Sixty-four percent of Americans said that they felt 
“not much” trust of Russia or that they trusted it “not 
at all,” while 77 percent of Gomans and 80 percent of 
Japanese said they distrusted Russia. Polls of such size 
have a margin of sampling error of phis or minus 3 
percentage points. 


Although Russia was one of the world’s two super- 
wers for four d eca de s, not more than a tenth erf 


powers for four d eca de s, not more than a tenth erf 
people palled in any of tire four countries raid Russia 
was the strongest candielale to join the United States 
as world leader ewer the next few decades. 

Americans were evenly divided about whether Ja- 
pan. China or Western Europe was the strongest 
candidate to join the United States for world 
leadership. 


Hus Holidays 

Banking and government offices wiH be dosed or services curtailed in 
the following countries mid their dependencies this week because of 
national and religious holidays: 

MONDAY: Andean, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Bdghna, Befo g, 
B enin, Botswana, Britain, Bn Aim Faso, Central African Republic, Chad, Croatia, 
Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Gabon. Germany, Ghana, Gibraltar, 
Guinea, Guyana, Honjt Kong, Hungary, Inrlimd, Iirkad, Italy, Ivory Coast, Jamai- 
ca, Kenya. Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Macao, Madagascar, MaE, Mona- 
co, Namibia, Netherlands. New Zealand, Niger. Nigeria. Norway, Poland, Rwanda, 
Senegal. Stem Leone, Sorakia, Slovenia, Son* Africa, Spain. Snriname, Swaziland, 
Sweden, Switzerland, Tahiti, Taiwan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vatican City, Zim- 
babwe. 

TUESDAY: Hong Kong, Korea, Macao, Taiwan, Vatican City. 

WEDNESDAY: Ethiopia. Sooth Africa, Thailand. 

FRIDAY: Liberia. Sources: J.P. Morgan, Reuters. 


Teen’s Role Seen in Russia Air Crash 


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per draw, priced at Db-500 (USS 138) each, 
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The prize money may be collected in cash, banker’s 
draft, cheque, or paid directly into your bank accounL 
Buy vour ti cket the next time you fly through Abu Dhabi. 

For more information telephone 706 5690. 


Los Angela Tima Service 

MOSCOW — A teenager report- 
edly allowed to play pilot in the 
codqrit may have caused the crarii 
of a Russian-leased Airbus that 
killed 75 people, Moscow media 
reported. 

The Russian commission investi- 
gating the crash in Siberia has yet 
to announce its official findings, 
but it did say Saturday that tapes 
from the plane’s “Made box” re- 
corder shewed that guests were vis- 
iting the cockpit before the Airbus 
A-310 went down last month. Four 
Moscow newspapers reported that 
“children’s voices” were heard on 
tire cockpit tapes. 

The commission’s specialists are 
still working on identifying the 


voices, a spokesman told the Inter- 
fax news agency. Bui Russian me- 
dia were already full of accounts of 
how the pilot’s son may have acri- 
den tally sent the Airbus into a no- 
sedive by hitting a switch that 
turned off the autopilot. 

The Airbus, made by a consor- 
tium based in France, appears to 
have been mechanically sound. 

According to the English-Lan- 
guage Moscow Times, which car- 
ried the most complete account of 
tire crash, the flight from Moscow 
to Hong Kong on March 22 had 
been underbooked, so about 30 air- 
line employees and family mem- 
bos came along lot a free trip. 

Among them was the 15-year-old 
son of Captain Yaroslav Ku- 


drinsky, the Moscow Times said, 
which quoted Aeroflot and Trans- 
portation Ministry officials, who 
asked to remain anonymous. The 
plane flew under the aegis of Rus- 
sian International Airlines, the in- 
ternational branch of Aeroflot. 

“Cockpit voice recorder readings 
indicated that the youth inadver- 
tently knocked off tire autopilot 
and fell against the control column 
as his father and other crew mem- 
bers stood behind him,” the Mos- 
cow Tiroes said. 

When the plane then plunged 
into a nosedive from its cruising 
altitude of 33,000 feet, the adults 
were appar ently thrown off their 
feet, unable to reach tire controls 
immediately. 


France Bumps Vets 
To House D-Day VIPs 



|J £jul/ . . 

Abu Dhabi 
Airport Duty Free 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHBOtfS • HASTffi's • DOCTORATE 
FcrWotKlMBardAceOrntBpedmoB 
Ttm&ConoiertHanB Sizy 
C310)47V0306ext23 
ijgSJK RK (3100471-6456 


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The Associated Press 

LONDON — More titan 100 Canadian and British veterans of the 
D-day landings have lost the hotel rooms they booked to celebrate 
their part in liberating France from the Nazis. 

The Hdtd du Golf in Deauville, France, has canceled tire veterans' 
reservations cm orders of the French gov ern ment to make way for 
VIPs participating in the 50th amriversaiy commemorations this 
June, the Bntish Defense Ministry has confirmed. 

The French government has offered the former paratroopers 
fin a n c i a l co m pe n s ati on and sought to secure accommodation /or 
them in local names, a ministry spokesman said. 

E n g li sh and Canadian organizers of the French reunion are livid. 
Angus Cross said be booked places 15 months ago for more than 100 
of his Canadian comrades who, like him, served in the 6th British 
Airborne Division during the D-day assault. 

“The French holds were being Moody-minded and firing for a 
hefty deposit, so we paid than,” said Mr. Cross, 69, of Folkestone, 
E n gl ami ‘Now some bloody jumped-up French official is saying 
they need the space. I'm extremely annoyed." 

“These chaps are coming ova - from Canada,” he added. “They've 
-been saving up for years. How the devil can we go to ah tire 
ceremonies together when we are all over the town?” 

Tom Jackson, a veteran of the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, 


Jew yc 


told The Daily Mail newspaper he was “devastated." 

“We spent three months living in French ditches after we’d landed 




PacfficWestenUiHvansit 

Q00N.SeputodaBtal.Depl.23 
Los Angeles, CA 00040 


6 4 4 


on D-day, and now they’re throwing us straight back into the dhch," 
Mr. Jackson, a resident of Brampton, Ontario, was quoted as saying. 

The m a n agement at theHdtddu Golf and the nearby H6td Royal 
said that they were ordered last month by the French gove rnmen t to 
clear inmdrals of rooms for visiting heads of state and their waffs. 

_ The 50th anniversary of the Wood War II invasions has sparked 
high demand for hotel rooms in Normandy, where the allies stormed 
ashore on fivft h earKhwaHc rm T im* fi | 1944. 



efrSy 


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1* 


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►531 O* 1 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, APRIL 4, 1994 


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A LEAK 


+ POLITIC Ar. NOTES* 


jj gagan Upda t e; Keeping Time for Himself 

h y been BOV'S around among old 

doing f0nMr P res,d “> “ d rust lady an 

andSySw* mSISi ”“0- ^ trade off 

*& he’s lea^pl7KS“ y - 
this ® f bcmusei and entranced, with the idea that 

reflected James M rv?® 311 w * en be leaves the presidency,” 
imrkSV^ D M ‘ C ^5 on ’ **“ veter an Republican who once 
2“ JLS? Jw L White House. 1ft so typical of the Sl 
. 5^ hooses the Habitat far Humanity/or 
SKJ* heU 11 — . And Ronald Reagan Uann, 


AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


RiakofCaijaddng 
Same as Crash Death 

Carjackings — random, un- 
predictable and usually involv- 
ing guns — have increased in 
the past few years until they are 
as common as fatal car acci- 
dents, according to the U.S. 
Justice Department. 

From 1987 to 1992, an esti- 
mated 177,500 carjackings or 
attempted caijackings oc- 
curred The annual risk of being 
victimized by a carjacking is 
about 1 in 5,000, the same as 
being killed in a vehicle acci- 
dent. By comparison, about five 
of 5,000 people are victims of 
rape each year and 25 of every 
5,000 die of heart disease. 

Although most carjackings 
do not end in injury or the 
death for the victims, “In terms 
of people feeling vulnerable, 
this is precisely the kmd of 
crime that would heighten those 
feelings, - said Daniel Rosenb- 
latt, executive director of the 
International Association of 
Chiefs of Police. “It is random, 

mm • n.1«l M— / lift 


wm 


crime that is extremely personal 
with a great potential for 

ha Sriadring is “l>art of a , trend 
of more violence in relation to 
crime,” said Bob Sadly, execu- 
tive director of the National As- 
sociation of Police Organiza- 
tions. “Years ago. the person 
would be happy jost to 
car and would want to avoid 
confrontation. Now violence 
seems to accompany crime 
more” 


Short Takes 


i — 

Peoole with heart disease 
more than double the risk of a 

heart attack whaato £■£ 

cry. Harvard Medical I 

Searchers unsurprisingly re- 

Srtand the danger lasts two 

ESs after their anger has sub- 
sided. 

A compute? spedaifei wg 
SffiD ASD! Within seconds. 

SS rf p-pi* at Witco 


Whitewater Frays White House Ties With the Treasury 


m RaI Airnt, - “ecutrve and movie cowpoke sitting 

Utde “ or 

caUet l J ^ r - Reagan-s Los Angeles office to check 
i® the musical rumors, the Former president replied with a humor- 
ou^hand-wnium rote sent by fax. “Is ibis an April Fool’s spoof?" 
wSr jj Unfortunately, I’m not taking music lessons and 
probably should be. Tve always liked the harmonica, but can barely 
play a tune. My repertoire is limited to ‘Red River Valley’ and I play 
for my own self amusement exclusively — usually when 2 don't have 
my hearing aids in." 

presidents who could play the harmonica, with varying 
degrees of skill, were Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, Cooiidge and 
Eisenhower. (NYT) 

Hillary Clinton Defies the Odds Again 

NEW YORK — After falling last month, the approval rating of 
Hillary Rodham Clinton has increased to 43 percent, despite nega- 
tive publicity about her lucrative commodities investments 16 years 
ago, according to a Newsweek poU 

But 32 percent of 753 adults polled also said Mrs. Clinton took 
advantage of improper or unethical deals in her commodities invest- 
ments in 1978 and 1979, when she turned 51,000 into about 
$100,000. Thirty-seven percent said she was merely lucky and wise; 
31 percent said they did not know or would not answer. 

Forty-three percent of those polled said they had a favorable 
opinion of the first lady, the ma gwrinf* said in its April 1 1 edition. 
Thirty-six percent said they had an unfavorable opinion and 21 
percent said they had no opinion. 

Forty-six percent also said Mrs. Clinton’s public role in the 
Clinton administration was larger than it should be. 31 percent said 
it was just right and 1 1 percent said it was not enough. 

A March 1 1 Newsweek pofl found that 38 percent had a favorable 
opinion of Mrs. Clinton and 42 percent had an unfavorable view. In 
February, her favorable rating was 50 percent. (AP) 

Quote/ Unquote 

The mother of Representative Jill Long, Democrat of Indiana, 
U J21, if the Clinton health plan gets through, will I be able to choose 
my own doctor?” (NTT) 


Away From Politics 

• Contradicting a widespread perception tint New York Gfy violence is 
worse than ever, the Ponce Department released its official 1993 crime 
statistics, which show that repeated incidents of violent crime decreased 
modestly for the third year in a row. The^ 4 percent overall decline in seven 
major crime categories roughly follows the national trend, in Much crime 
rose steadily through the 1980s, peaking around 1990. 

• Requests for earthquake assistance hi Sootiwm CaKfontia, already at an 

all-time high for a U.S. disaster, are soar expected to tep 500,000, as 
applications keep pouring is. So far, government agencies have received 
497,626 such requests, and uproved more than S1.4 billion in aid to 
businesses and individuals. Victims of the Jan. 17 quake have received 
checks for everything emergency housing to ngjlacmg,!ost 4 W.tures. 

• An analysis of fish stocks prepared for a joint lUL-Canadian scientific 
panel has declared that “fish resources in Puget Sound have seriously 
declined and harvests are at their lowest level in over 55 years." 

■ Tlie Biosphere 2 project north of Tucson, Ariwma, has been seized by 
off-duty federal marshals acting on behalf of tire Texas billionaire 
Edward P. Bass, ousting the managers who conceived and constructed the 
SI 50 million, state-of-the-art surrogate planet. “This is not an April 
Fool’sioke," said Chris Helms, a Biosphere spokesman. “It is a manage- 
ment dispute.” NYT, LAT. 


Carp, in Wooddiff Lake, New 
Jency, , darted through the maze 
of cubicles at the chonical com- 
pany to help Jack MDler, the 
man who had messaged for 
help. Several administered car- 
diopnhnonary resuscitation un- 
til an ambulance arrived. Mr. 
MDler, 56, said, “Forme, e-mail 
means emergency mail. 1 was 
going, and nobody would have 
noticed.” 

The oldest McDonald’s res- 
taurant has probably served its 
last Big Mac. McDonald’s 
Carp, dosed the building in the 
Los Angeles suburb of Downey 
after it was damaged in the Jan. 
17 earthquake. Preservationists 
say McDonald’s was locking 
for an excuse to dose it and that 
the damage was slight. McDon- 
ald’s officials said the buildrng 
was not profitable because it 
lacked both a drive- through 
window and indoor seating. 
“We respect the architectural 
and historic significance of the 
1950s restaurant design,” a 
spokesman said. “Thars why 
all along we have wanted to 
preserve as many dements of 
the Downey restaurant as posa- 
ble. It’s unfortunate that this 
will not be possible.” 

Garbage incinerators are 
making a comeback as they be- 
come more efficient. Today’s 
incinerators, which can cost 
hundreds of rmTK ons of dollars, 
dispose of trash more cleanly, 
bunting away 90 percent of the 
volume and producing usable 
amounts of steam ana energy. 
But the 10 percent of the vol- 
ume that remains as ash can 
c ontain toxic metals, and has to 
be disposed of in landfills lined 
with day or plastia In I960, 30 
percent of rubbish in the Unit- 
ed States was incinerated. This 
dropped, to 8 percent in 1980 
but has since climbed back to 
20 percent 

Ebbets field in Brooklyn, the 
late lamented former home of 
baseball’s Dodgers, had Stark 
the clothier’s “Hit Sign, Win 
Suit" sign in right-center field, 
Stan Isaacs, a former sports col- 
umnist for Newsday, recalls in a 
New. York Times article. 
“Dodger right fielder Cari Fur- 
Qlo caught most of the balls that 
might have hit the sign,” Mr. 
Isaacs writes. “After he com- 
plained that he ought to get a 
suit fra protecting the sign, 
Stark sent him a pair of slacks.” 


By Owen Ifill 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The strong bond between the 
U.S. Treasury Department and the Whiu House — a 

link that has been central to the Clinton administra- 
tion’s effort to turn the economy around — has been 
strained in recent weeks by the fallout from the 
Whitewater investigation. 

White House officials said they believe that damag- 
ing disclosures about two of the president's top advis- 
ers. George Stephanopoulos and Harold Ickes, were 
tire wort of Roger Altman, the deputy Treasuxy 
secretary. 

Many Treasury officials are equally convinced that 
Mr. Altman rook too much of the early blame for 
participating in a White House discussion of the 
investigation by the Resolution Trust Corp., the agen- 
cy he heads that is charged with unraveling the savings 
and loans collapses. 

Mr. Altman, who once routinely roamed the balls of 
the White House to attend various meetings about 
economic strategy and health care, has spent more 
tune lately with lawyers. He denies that he leaked any 
damaging information about White House officials. 

But the suspicion has taken at least shallow root in 
the administration because of the workings of the 
grand jury that is investigating the government's over- 
sight of Madison Guaranty, the faded Arkansas sav- 
ings and loan that was owned by James McDougal, a 
former Clinton business partner. 

A number of administration officials have acknowl- 
edged holding “inappropriate" conversations related 
to the matter at a time when the Resolution Trust 
Carp, was investigating Madison. 

Morale and trust have been undermined at both 
Treasury and the White House, officials at both insti- 


tutions said. Leaks to the press have been traced and 
speculated upon with an in tensity that belies the 
officials seek to project. 

One piece of evidence: President Bill Clinton and 
Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen discussed the 
frayed relationship as they new on Air Force One to 
Dallas recently. 

In the hallways of the White House,-senior officials 
who used to casually pick up the telephone or stop to 
chat with Treasury officials in the West Wing hallways 
now hesitate before they make a call, and avert thor 
eyes when they see a colleague coming who may have 
testified before the grand jury. 

"There is a much higher level of distrust, and it's 
affecting the way people deal with mpH other,” an 
official said. 

But as the distance between officials working in two 
braidings separated only by a narrow street has grown, 
some senior officials have said that the cm re nt flurry 
of finger-pointing will not cause lasting <twmag<»_ 

“I think it's understandable that in the last few 
weeks there’s been a fair amount of stress on the White 
House, on people who serve there,” said David Ger- 
gen, the counselor to the president. “I think people are 
bearing up pretty well under the circumstances.” 

Much is at stake. Treasury and White House offi- 
cials, who worked together closely to mount successful 
campaigns last year on behalf of the administration's 
economic plan, the North American Free Trade 
Agreement and on trade policies toward Japan and 
China, still have a full plate. 

Last week, Mr. Bentsen met with officials about 
Treasury’s role in the gun-control provirions of the 
anti-crime bill, and on Monday, Mr. Altman will 
resume his seat at the health-care strategy planning 
sessions run by Mr. Ickes. 


High officials, including Mr. Bentsen, Mr. Altman 
and Mr. Stephanopoulos, have been attempting to 
clear the air through intermediaries. 

“i think the White House knows that the Treasury is 
totally supportive,” Mr. Altman said. 

“As far as Tm concerned, we're still a team,” Mr. 
Stephanopoulos said. “We're still a close team. We’re 
a team that produced a tot-" 


“The feeling before all this was that Treasury was 
working like tfodswork," an official said. “There were 

? roblems at Justice, Defense and State, but not at 
reasury. Now that’s not the case. The cdlegiality is 


A White House official complained that personal 
friends are now "setting up Chinese walls in private 
conversations.” Another said. “Everybody is skittish.” 


Haiti Terror Drive Killed Hundreds 


.Vw York Tuna Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Hundreds of sup- 
porters of the Reverend Jean-Bertrand Aristide and 
other civilians have been killed in Haiti in recent 
months in the bloodiest wave of political tenor since 
the army overthrew Father Aristide as president two 
and a half years ago. 

H uman rights experts say the violent camp aign 
gained momentum last fall, after the military recog- 
nized that diplomatic efforts to restore Father Aristide 
to power bad failed. The violence accelerated this year, 
with 50 or more bodies turning up in the streets of the 
capital Port-au-Prince, each month. Many were badly 
mutilated or bore clear signs of torture. 

Diplomats here said the campaign, aimed at wiping 
out resistance to army rule, has relied on other tech- 
niques such as bunting down entire neighborhoods to 
flush out suspects and raping and kidnapping the 
wives and children of political organizers who are 
sought by the authorities. 

Ejqjerts said that with a United Nations effort to 
monitor rights larg/dy restricted to the capita they 
could not offer a reliable toll of a simultaneous cam- 
paign being waged in the countryside by the Haitian 


mili tary and its armed civilian allies. The first UN 
monitors arrived in Haiti in February 1993. 

“If you compare the statistics we are getting now 
with the beginning of the mission, things are 100 times 
worse,” said Tiebue Drame, depu ty director of the UN 
human rights monitoring group in Haiti. 

“It’s bard to imagine the number of suspicious 
deaths we are seeing these days,” he said. 

He indicated that 30 bodies had turned up in the 
Gte Soldi shantytown of the capital, some of them 
badly disfigured. “It seems Cite Soldi is being targeted 
because it is such a concentrated population,” he said. 
“They are sending the political message to the country 
that if we can gpt you here, we can gpt you anywhere.” 

A 33-year-old man described a yearlong series of 
arrests and torture by Haitian soldiers and paramili- 
tary thugs that ended only when he went into hiding 
with the bdp of some foreigners. 

Like many other victims of the recent terror, he 
recounted being taken one one occasion to the bead- 
quarters of the police anti-gang unit, where be was 
repeatedly tortured during interrogations, beaten with 
a heavy wet towel. He was released, he said, after his 
relatives paid a hefty bribe to a police captain. 



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'BEIJING: 

J Fears of North 




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nuclear threat; it is that the Polit- 
buro cannot predict the outcome of 
a pressure campaign against the 
government in Pyongyang and is 
unwilling to risk the consequences 
of a new Korean war. 

“Are the Chinese right in saying 
that we cannot push North Korean 
too far, too fast?” an analyst said. 
“Fmnot sure we know the answer ” 

For now, China is Kkely to stick 
to a path that sees inaction as a 
useful tooL 

But at the same time China is 
quietly stepping up its private dip- 
lomatic campaign to convince 
North Korea, the last unrefonned 
Stalinist state; that its best future 
lies in economic reform, political 
openness and a nonnuclear mili- 
tary strategy. 

As part of Bening's effort, two 
Chin ese rnffitary leaders, both vet- 
erans of the Korean War, have 
played important roles in the mili- 
tary talks between Beijing and 
Pyongyang. One is Hong Xuezhi, 
who headed the logistics branch of 
the Chinese Army until 199 2. Th e 
other is General Xu Xin, a longtime 
army deputy chief of staff. 

In a recent interview. General 
Xu said be had led two delegations 
to North Korea for talks on the 
nuclear issue. 

“So long as it contributes to the 
interest of peace in the region,” he 
said, China “wfll be making an ac- 
tive contribution” on the diplomat- 
ic front 

The Chinese military also has 
been takin g North Korean generals 
on tours ofChina’s economic boom 
towns to impress on them the bene- 
fits of economic reform. 

J Despite Beijing’s initiative, an 
analyst said, “The Chinese are not 
r sure the message is getting through, 
* and there is a lot of frustration in 
dealing with North Korea in gener- 
al." 



Mind 

Puts India Back on the Map 


VnaBucd/A{eDccFia»nBK 

A woman laying flowers at the scene of the fatal shooting of two Japanese students, Taknma Ito and Go Matsmira, in San Pedro, 
California, during a recent wreath dedication ceremony for them that was attended by hundreds of people. Two snspects are in custody. 

Japanese 'Gunslingers 9 Zero In on Guam 

.44 Magnum and S5Q for an Uzi or 
Thompson submachine gun. 

Other galleries offer the experi- 
ence of firing M-16 and AK-47 
assault rifles. MAC-1 1 submachine 
guns and assorted pistols, rifles and 
shotguns made by Beretta, Brown- 
ing, Glock, Winchester. ColL and 
Smith and Wesson. 

For many Japanese, “if you’re in 
America, its the Wild, Wild West," 
said Mxkel W. Schwab, an assistant 
U.S. attorney here. 

Shooting ranges are not the only 
attractions that serve a largely Jap- 
anese clientele here. With a strong 
yen making foreign travel attrac- 
tive, Guam drew a record 1 10,000 
tourists last month, mostly Japa- 


By W illiam Rrani gm 

Washington Post Service 

TUMON, Guam — The adver- 
tisement in the “Guam Now" tour- 
ist guide shows a Japanese-looking 
man in a camouflage bush hat fir- 
ing a handgun at a watermelon. 
The color photo freezes the mo- 
ment of impact. Bits of red pulp fly 
in all directions, creating a crimson 
blur against a backdrop of trees. 

Except for the name of the estab- 
lishment, World Gun Shop, and a 
few designations for firearms such 
as “AR-15" and “AK-47," the ad is 
entirely in Japanese. Indeed, this 
and other shooting ranges like it on 
Guam cater almost exclusively to 
Japanese tourists, who make up 


about 80 patent of visitors to this 
U.S. territory in the Pacific 

While many Japanese blame the 
wide avaQabQity of guns in the 
United States for the kind of vio- 
lence involved in the shooting 
deaths of two Japanese students in 
Los Angeles on March 25, thou- 
sands of their compatriots travel 
about 1,000 kilometers (about 600 
miles) to enjoy the dubious thrill of 
the American gun culture. 

“They like to shoot,” an employ- 
ee of the Top Gun Shooting Range 
said of his Japanese clientele. 
“They can’t shoot in Japan.” 

In the absence of such installa- 
tions in their homeland, where pri- 
vate gun ownership is prohibited 
Japanese tourism have created a 


niche for shooting galleries here. 
About a score of them have opened 
since the early 1980s. Most of them 
are indoor ranges near the hotels 
that line Tumon Bay, just north of 
the seat of government in Agana. 

S imilar gun ranges cater to Japa- 
nese tourists on the nearby islan d, 
of Saipan and at beach resorts on 
the central Philippine island of 
Cebu. 

At the Top Gun. upstairs from 
the Asahi Duty-Free store and fea- 
turing camouflage-painted walls 
lined with American flags aud pic- 
tures of guns, weapons can be fmed 
at a paper target Wring the like- 
ness of a hdmeted rifle-brandish- 
ing soldier. The rates for 36 rounds 
are S35 for a 38 revolver, $45 for a 


neseL. 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Was hi n g ton Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton administration 
has discovered India. , . , 

Strobe Talbott, in his first trip abroad as deputy 
secretary of state, beads for New Delhi this week to 
meet Indian officials upset by a year of what they see 
as slights, neglect and policy miqudgments by 
Washington. . , 

Meanwhile, the Commerce Department nas de- 
clared India one of 10 “big emerging markeu merit- 
ing special attention from Washington because of the 
potential for UJS. economic expansion in those mar- 
kets and their growing impact on world affairs. 

With U.S. investment pouring into India after de- 
cades in which it was virtually prohibited, the econom- 
ic side of the U3.-India relationship is much more 
harmonious than the political ride, where relations 
have deteriorated rapidly over the past year. 

On what promises to be a difficult first mission, Mr. 
Talbott is also going to Pakistan, ai a time when U.S. 
officials are concerned that the two countries are near 
what a UJS. State Department official called "a dan- 
gerous threshold” of nuclear confrontation. Washing- 
ton fears India and Pakistan could go to war over their 
rival to Kashmir , the region in the Himalayan 
foothills where Pakistan is supporting Muslim sepa- 
ratists in a guerrilla war against Indian rule. 

Mr. Talbott will be the highest-ranking representa- 
tive of the Clinton administration to visit India. Al- 
though India is the world’s second-most populous 
nation and biggest democracy, it has lackoi a U.S. 
ambassador since early in the Clinton administration. 

Acknowledging that India has some reason to feel 
slighted, the administration is about to name an am- 
bassador, Frank G. Wisner, the undersecretary of 
defense for policy. Mr. Wisner is a respected career 
diplomat whose nomination will ease India’s feelings 
of neglect, according to U.S. and Indian officials, bat 
cannot be expected quickly to overcome all the irri- 
tants in the relationship between Washington and 
New Delhi. 

In particular. India has reacted negatively to a U.S. 
proposal to ship F-16 fighter jets to Pakistan as an 
inducement to halt Pakistan’s development of nuclear 
weapons. By concentrating on curbing Pakistan's nu- 
clear program, U3L offi cials hope to take a step 
toward achieving a similar “cap" on India's nud ear 
program. 

The roots of U.S.-India tension can be traced back 
about 40 years, to early in the Cold War era when 
Secretary of State John Foster Dulles was enlisting 
Pakistan as a South Asian ally against the threat of 
communist expansion. India, while < officially non- 
aligned, had dose ties to Moscow. 


Washington backed Pakistan in the 197Hvar with 
India that led to the secession of Bangladesh, and 
developed further dose ties with Islamabad whjk 
firing Pakistan as a base for aiding rebels fighting to 
oust Soviet troops from Afghanistan in the 1980s. 

During much of that time, nationalistic govern- 
ments in India also barred most foreign investment, 
effectively excluding U.S. business from the huge 
Indian market. 

The end of the Cold War and a radical shift of 
economic policy by the Indian government of Prime 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Minister P. V. Nararimha Rao changed the dynamics 
of the uA-India relationship. 

U.S. investment in India rose from less than $40 
nrilB on in 1989 to more than SI.1 billion last year. 
Overall trade between the two countries, once negligi- 
ble, was $73 billion last year, according to the Indian 
Embassy. 

This liberalization of the Indian economy has 
earned India a place oa the Commerce Department’s 
list of “big emerging markets.” These, according to 
Undersecretary Jeffrey E Garten, merit special con- 
rideration from US. policy-makers because of their 
regional influence and their potential as customers. 
The others are C hina, Indonesia, South Korea, Mexi- 
co, Argentina, Brazil. South Africa, Poland and 
Turkey. 

This new economic relationship is moving ahead 
rapidly, but political relations have been on a slide 
since April 1993, U.S. and Indian officials agree. 

With the Indians already miffed because the high- 
profile U.S. ambassador, Thomas R. Pickering, was 
transferred to Russia after just a few months and the 
post was left vacant, another State Department offi- 
cial, John R. Maloti, gave a speech in New Delhi in 
winch he criticized excesses committed by Indian 
security forces in Kashmir. 

“The United States was also leaning on Pakistan at 
the same time for supporting terrorists in Kashmir, 
and the Indians loved that,” a U.S. official said. “Bui 
the Malott speech set them off. There was a very 
strong reaction to John’s visit” 

Subsequent remarks by Robin L RapbeL, assistant 
secretary of state for Strath Asian affairs, were per- 
ceived by the In dians as questioning India's sovereign- 
ty over Kashmir. Indian newspapers blasted her for 
saying in an October interview that the Clinton ad- 
ministration did not believe Kashmir was “forever- 
more an integral part of India.” 

U.S. officials insis t that Ms. Raphel only restated 
long-standing U.S. policy toward Kashmir. 


KOREA; Pentagon Sees Risk of Conflict in U.S. Policy on Arms Program At a Beijillg Cemetery, ’89 Crackdown Lives On 


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Continued from Pla ge 1 

vay difficult to achiev e it, but it’s easy to state 
iL” 

Mr. Perry repeated a CIA estimate that 
North Korea might have as many as two nucle- 
ar bombs already. Looking ahead he said, 
“They are embarked on a program of develop- 
ment which could get than a dozen or more 
bombs a year." 

■ Capacity Has Doubled 

R. Jeffrey Smith of The Washington Post 
reported from Washington: 

North Korea has nearly doubled its capacity 
to produce plutonium for nuclear arms and has 
forged ahead with related reactor programs 
while refusing full international inspection of 
its nuclear installations, according to U.S. and 
diplomatic officials. 

This picture of North Korea’s expanding 
effort is based on onpublirized reporting by 
international inspectors, who visited the North 
Korean nuclear complex at Yongbyon in 
March. The inspection, in the words of a U.S. 


Official, showed North Korea is now 1 
go forward” in its nuclear weapons effort 

Officials said Hans Blix. director of the Inter- 
national Atomic Energy Agency, disclosed 
some of the inspection results in a closed-door 
briefing March 24 to the UN Security Conned. 
Bui Mr. Blix deliberately omitted the details 
from a written, public report because of the 
agency's uncertainty about Noth Korea's mo- 
tivations, the officials said. 

Indications of North Korea’s expanded nu- 
clear program woe first reported last week in 
Nucleonics Week, a trade publication. 

According to accounts of last month's two- 
week inspection provided by four knowledge- 
able sources, who asked not to be named, the 
most worrisome nuclear-related construction 
has taken place In a large baildmg at Yongbyon 
that houses a reprocessing “line,” a set of vats 
and cauldrons for extracting plutonium from 
spent nuclear fuel. 

The CIA has said that this reprocessing line 
was used by North Korea from 1989 to 1992 to 
produce enough plutonium for one or two nu- 
clear weapons. During their recent visit, inspec- 


on 

s 


tors were barred Irom seeing all of the huge 

b uilding 

After a week of diplomatic negotiations, the 
Security Council issued a non bin ding a 
Thursday night calling on North Korea to 
inspectors to finish their work at Y< 
ana asking Mr. Blix to report on North 
compliance next month. 

But the sources said that despite the hin- 
drances, the inspectors already have seen 
enough to conclude that North Korean engi- 
neers have not been idle while the country has 
haggled for a year over full international access. 
They saw. for example, that operators of the 
reprocessng plant have nearly finished con- 
structing a second reprocessing line in the 
building that is virtually identical to the exist- 
ing line. 

The new line currently lacks diagnostic 
equipment and instruments needed to monitor 
the complex process of dissolving spent fuel to 
separate plutonium. But when completed in 
roughly six months, the sources said, it would 
effectively double North Korea’s pluior'um 
production capacity. 


By Lena H. Sun 

Washington Post Serrice 

BEIJING — On a day when 
hundreds of Chinese filled the Wan 
An Public Cemetery*, the graves of 
Wang Wetping and Duan Chang- 
long showed no signs of visitors, 
except for plain clothes police and a 
foreign reporter. 

This is the time of year when 
Chinese mourn the dead. On this 
balmy spring morning, families 
streamed into the cemetery to lay 
flowers and food in the Chinese 
tradition. 

Mr. Wang and Mr. Doan were 
killed in the bloody 1989 army 
crackdown on democracy demon- 
strators during which hundreds of 
people died. That incident remains 
a major political taboo, which may 
be why Mr. Wang’s and Mr. 
Duan's graves seemed untended. 


A visit by this reporter to the 
cemetery ended in a two-hour in- 
terrogation. indicating how sena- 
tive authorities are about anything 
related to the crackdown as the 
fifth anniversary approaches. 

In this atmosphere, seven car- 
loads of police detained China's 
most prominent political dissident, 
Wei Jingsheng, on Friday as he was 
returning to Beging from a self- 
imposed exile in nearby Tianjin. 
Mr. Wei. released from nearly 15 
years in prison last year, was picked 
up last month by authorities as part 
of a wave of detentions surround- 
ing Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher's trip to Bering. 

The offirial Xinhua press agency 
confirmed Saturday that police 
“summoned" Mr. Wei and “had a 
talk with him” on Friday, but said 
that Mr. Wd “left the bureau im- 
mediately afterward.” Mr. Wei’s 


associates told reporters Sunday 
they had no news of him and as- 
sumedbe was still in official hands. 

Though many of the victims of 
the 1989 crackdown were cremat- 
ed, some were buried in Wan An. 
which means Eternal Peace. 

No family members or friends 
were seen at the graves, two of 
which had black-and-white photos 
affixed to the top, but two police- 
men were carding the area. 

Wang Werpine was a gynecolo- 
gist at the People's Hospital. An 
inscription says only that she “per- 
ished in the disaster” in June 1989. 

- Duan Changlohg, who in his 
ihoto appeared to be a serious- 
looking youth in glasses and a suit 
and tie, was a chemical engineering 
student at Qinghua University. 
China’s equivalent of the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. 
He also “perished in the disaster” 


t 


in the early hours of June 4, 1989. 

1 was interrogated after leaving 
the cemetery and then returning to 
find some notes dropped inadver- 
tently. I was taken to a budding 
there for questioning. 

During the interrogation, at least 
six different police officers were 
present Later on, Xinhua said I 
had been questioned by the police 
“after having taken photographs in 
a graveyard without having gone 
through necessary procedures.” 

“Yon have violated the regula- 
tions because you did not have per- 
mission in advance from the Beij- 
ing City Foreign Affairs Office to 
visit the cemetery,” the officer in 
charge told me, before letting me 
leave. 

The session dosed a short time 
later and I was allowed to retain 
home. 


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DIPLOMACY 

By Henry Kissinger. Illustrated 
912 pages. $35. Simon & Schus- 
ter. 

Reviewed by 
Michiko Kakutani 

TT7TTH Henry Kissinger's “Di- 
VV plomacy,” the reader actually 
gets two books in one. 

On one level, the volume is an 
elegantly written study of Western 
diplomacy, from Richelieu through 
Metternich and Bismarck to mod- 
em times. This book tries to give 
the reader an understanding of four 
centuries of Western politics and 
history, as well as an appreciation 
of the highly divergent traditions in 
statesmanship found in Europe. 
and the United States. 

Like Henry James, Kissinger 
contrasts European cold-blooded- 
ness and sophistication with Amer- 
ican innocence and naivete; U ke 
Tocqueville, he wants to examine 
the consequences that optimism 
and democratic ideals have had on 
America’s practical conduct. 

The second book, which emerges 
as a subtext, is more subjective and 
cunnmg. To begin with, it attempts 
to place Kissinger’s own policy- 
making exploits (as national securi- 
ty adviser and secretary of state 
under President Richard M. Nix- 
on) in context with the policymak- 
ing records of such giants as Met- 
temich, Casttereagh and Bismarck. 

While making an impassioned 
case for such Kissingerian concepts 
as triangular diplomacy, linkage 
and balance-of-power negotia- 
tions, the book also tries to spin 
recent and not-so-recent history to 
support Kissinger’s own embrace 
(both as scholar and policymaker) 
of the power-oriented pragmatics 
of reaipohtiL 

For instance, the fail are of the 
Western democracies to recognize 
the dangers of Nazi Germany eariy 
on, Kisanger suggests, can be at- 
tributed to those countries' failure 
to heed traditional balance-of- 
power tenets, which “should have 
made it dear that a large and 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Annie DiOard, who wot a Pu- 
litzer Prize in 1975 for “Pilgrim at 
Tinker Creek,” is reading James 
McConkey’s “Court of Memory 
"This memoir is a treasure be- 
cause of its extraordinary depth of 
feeling. The ihoughtftilness he 
brings to bear on his life, his mod- 
esty, and his rare literary ability to 
push events through to meanings, 
make this memoir a rich find ror 
people who love literature.” 

(Brian Knowhon . IHT) 



strong Germany bordered on the 
east by small and weak states was a 
dangerous threat,” regardless of 
Hitler’s motives. 

Such arguments, of course, serve 
another purpose: they provide a 
resonant historical backdrop for 
Kissinger’s efforts to explain and 
vindicate his own handling of for- 
eign affairs far Nixon. 

After all, as Kissinger well 
knows, bodes have the capacity to 
help shape one’s place in history (or 
at least affect how one’s efforts are 
perceived): his second book, “Nu- 
clear Weapons and Foreign Policy” 
(1957), made him an intellectual 
celebrity at age 34, while his later 
books, including his best-selling 
memoirs, helped cement his fame. 

In this respect, “Diplomacy" can 
be seen as a kind of response to the 
publication of recent books (from 
Seymour M. Hersh’s angry diatribe 
“The Price of Power” to Walter 
Isaacson’s comprehensive biogra- 
phy, “Kissinger”) that have provid- 


ed less-than-flattering portraits of 
die former secretary of state. 

Indeed, the last portion of “Di- 
plomacy” rehashes events dealt 
with at length in Kissinger's two 
volumes of memoirs (“The White 
House Years" (1979) and “Years of 
Upheaval” (1982), including the 
end of the Vietnam War, detente 
with ' the Soviet Union and the 
opening to Ghma 

Whereas ihe sheer amount of de- 
tail in Kissinger's memoirs often 
shrouded the larger policy goals of 
his tenure in the Nixon administra- 
tion, “Diplomacy” provides a suc- 
cinct overview of both his base 
philosophy and his interpretation 
of individual events. 

The reader finishes the volume 
with a vivid sense of the author’s 
dark, Hobbcsian view of the world 
and the political implications of 
that vision. 

Moving from the philosOThic to 
the anecdotal with ease, Kissinger 
holds the reader’s attention with 


colorful cameo portraits of states- 
men, and sharp apergus about the 
practice of power. 

Kissinger argues that, the con- 
duct of U.S. foreign policy has 
historically divided into two domi- 
nant schools: the realist school ex- 
emplified by Theodore Roosevelt 
and Nixon, and the messianic, ide- 
alist school exemplified by Wood- 
row Wilson and Ronald Reagan. 

He argues that America’s univer- 
salis! ideals, combined with its ad- 
vocacy or collective security, has 
sometimes blinded the country to 
the cultural differences of other 
countries. And he argues that the 
United Slates, alone among na- 
tions, has “rested its claim to inter- 
national leadership on its altru- 
ism,” a darm that possesses “a 
certain aura of unpredictability'' 
for other countries used to blunt 
calculations of national interest 

Such assessments of America's 
role in the world should win Kissin- 
ger a new set of readers, even if 
“Diplomacy” itself fails to solidify 
the place in diplomatic history Kis- 
singer would uke. 

While Kissinger’s focus on na- 
tional interests and geopolitical re- 
alities frequently led to criticism 
that he lacked an inna te feel, as a 
policymaker, for American values 
and mores, his very position as a 
philosophical outsider makes him a 
provocative observer and essayist, 
the roles best ratified by this 
shrewd, often vexing and consis- 
tently absorbing book. 

Michiko Kakutani is on the staff 
of The New Yale lanes. 


BRIDGE 


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By Alan Truscott 

S UPPOSE you are South, play- 
ing six diamonds on the dia- 
gramed deal Cubs are led and 
continued, forcing dummy to ruff. 
Would you expect to make (he slam 
in real life, with the East-West 
cards hidden? 

Those who answered in the affir- 
mative may have peeked. It is quite 
true that you can succeed by work- 
ing on spades, with or without a 
finesse, but that requires a favor- 
able spade position, roughly a 50 
percent chance, pins a 3-2 trump 
spliL 

Modi better is to play on hearts, 
planning to raff the third round in 
the dummy and then draw trumps. 
This needs a 3-2 heart split, and 
South may be able to deal with a 
singleton bean queen. He can han- 
dle a 4-1 tramp split easily if the 
hearts behave. 


South was Brad Moss of Man- 
hattan, an options trader on (he 
American Stock Exchange, and he 
gave himself a fractionally better 
chance by cashing the diamond 
king before tackling hearts. But 
wheat be played the long and ace of 
hearts. West ruffed and it was all: 
over. 

In the post-mortem he gloomily 
noted that he could have succeeded 
by an inferior line of play. But here 
were two silver linings. The rival 
South player, Jaap Bralleman of 
the Netherlands, matched bis cor- 
rect declarer play and went down in 
the slam. Ana, along with Ravindra 
Murthy, Michael Polowan and 

Sam Lev, he was en route to victory 

in the Forbo Inter national T eam 
Tournament, one of Europe’s lead- 
ing team events, played in xnict- 
Februaiy in Schevening, the Neth- 
erlands. 


NORTH 
4AEJ832 
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O K 10 8 2 

* J 

WEST (D> Ej 

♦ Q 10 7 4» 9 5 

VQ1I 

0073 054 

• Q 10 7 6 4 3 *AK 

SOUTH 

* 6 

V A J 9854 
O AQ JO 
*08 


North and South wore vuhterab 


The bkkUiig: 

West North 

East 

South 

Pass ] * 

Pass 

20 

Pass 2 4 

Pass 

30 

Phss 3 0 

Pass 

40 

Pass ‘4 4 

Pass 

50 

Pass BO’ 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 

West led the chib six. 


















uT 


Hap 


eain 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, .APRIL 4, 1994 


Page ^ 


- V ... - 4^0 


:. 1 




Lives On 


Q A: Where Berlusconi Is Headed 



■ Lasa ^ na »™ S*io 
^wnu4r Mmpa^i manager. He dis- 

future ofa sZh 1 ^ Wec ' /o " “"<* < he 

Ml ^“f^^onalHe, 

Q. Your party, Forza Italia, has been ar 

otpradw’Sf 5 Iha " kS 10 “ ovcr| y sliet 

B,0n How do you 

A- Italian law allows a new poliucal party 
SEC «" tf budget of Sp r?8 
less ^ 15 b ^ OT bre 

andlS^S^f 70 P*"* 01 of the campaign. 
££; * P™ .was posters. The slown — 

iJb Jj nCW I ^ aj3 oracle” — was invented 

Stih^i^ 001 ^ mse ^' ^ 80 Was ibe party’s 

. .Q' B V t werai’t you abusing the power of 
Mr. Berlusconi s own television stations with 
a flood of commercials? 

A. The birth of a new political party re- 
quires lots of exposure, and the same expo- 
sure was offered to all the parties. The other 
parties did not seem to understand the fact 
that the law said no television advertising 
would be allowed in the last 30 days of the 
campaign. So we concentrated our first 30 
days on television, and then we went to post- 
ers. 

In mid-February I decided to take Berlus- 
c onioff the air for eight days in order to avoid 
overexposure, and be certainly didn’t love me 
for it But then 1 put him back on the air in 
the last 10 days so that 80 percent of the 
audience saw him at least 10 to 12 limes. 
■ 

Q. Bui critics say that there was too much 


sloganeering. How about substance, policies? 

A. We had 45 specific policy positions, 
with the problems and our solutions. These 
ranged from taxes to pension funds to unem- 
ployment and public spending. Our oppo- 
nents had generic manifestos. We tried in the 
campaign, and will try in government, to give 
people nope that the incredible weight of the 
Italian bureaucracy will be lifted. 

Q. You are a professional advertising exec- 
utive, the former chairman of the Milan sub- 
sidiary of Saatchi & SastcbL How did you 
manage the Berlusconi campaign? 

A I arrived to find many of the dements of 
the campaign already in place, including the 
music, the television spots and the staff. My 
task was to make sure the machine worked 
well. I created the organizational structure 
and ran 25 different parts of the operation, 
from media to budget to security. 

Each morning I had a meeting with 20 
people reporting to me from 9:30 until 1 1 
o’clock. Each evening we met until 10, gath- 
ered data from around the country, and made 
projections. Then five or six of us went to join 
Berlusconi at his villa with a progress report 
and a flow chart I devised, showing for exam- 
ple that we had three days to go to a certain 
event, 30 days to election, and so on. We 
sometimes spent nearly the whole night talk- 
ing with him. 

• 

Q. What was the key to your electoral 
success? 

A Aside from Berlusconi’s courage, it was 
a campaign that responded to the Italian 
people, who no longer wanted to leave their 
affairs in the hands of incompetent and cor- 
rupt politicians. We were also helped by the 
former Communists, who thought they had 
victory wrapped up until Berlusconi arrived 
in January, and then went into a state of 
panic. 


Q. How can one accept that Berlusconi will 
keep separate his vast private holdings and 
public policy to avoid a conflict of interest? 

A. I know this man well, and Beriuscom is 
now responsible for afl of Italy, for 60 million 
people, and that is over and above any posoo- 
al, private financial interest he may ever have 
dreamed of having. 

• 

Q. The outside world is very unsettled by 
the possible presence of your electoral allies, 
the ex-Fasdsts, in the government. What can 
you say about the Fascists? 

A. The reaction is fair, but based on a lack 
of knowledge. Berlusconi will certainly con- 
trol the ex-Fasdsts, and he has no ties or 
leanings towards traditional Fascism. The 
Italians wouldn’t stand for it. Fascism is 50 
years ago, and it is dead, buried and part of 
history. 

Q. What are Berlusconi's foreign policy 


A He wants a straightforward, NATO- 
oriented Italian government. We want to re- 
join the European exchange-rate mechanism 
as soon as posable. We are in favor of a 
united Europe 1,000 percent, and liberal eco- 
nomic policies. Berlusconi also wants good 
relations with the Clinton administration, 
and he tfanlre of the United States as Italy’s 
greatest ally. 

Q. What are the most dramatic changes we 
can expect from a Berlusconi-led govern- 
ment? 

A First of all you will see one government, 
a angle unit, and not 20 different special 
interests and subparties as it used to be. The 
three parlies in our coalition will get together 
and run the country. It will seem like blood 
sport for the next 10 days while they haggle 
over forming the government, and then you 
will get lour years of solid government. 


Italy’s Health System Lingers on Sick List 

Corruption, Waste ami Overcrowded Hospitals Are Endemic 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

ROME — In the Misericordia 
public hospital in the town of 
Prato, just north of Florence, a 
58-year-old woman lay dying 
from cancer in a cot placed in the 
corridor because no other beds 
were available. 

Moved by her plight. Franca, a 
patient who had just been operat- 
ed on for a tumor, offered her bed 
to the dying woman and took her 
place on the cot ‘To die in such a 
manna- would just not be Chris 1 
tian,” Franca said. “Anybody in 
my place would have done the 
same thing .*’ 

The story of Franca’s compas- 
sionate gesture, which was widely 
publicized in the press and on 
television, has evoked admiration 
across much of the country as 
Italy celebrates Easter week dar- 
ing one of (he most turbulent 
phases of its postwar political his- 
tory. - ■ • • — i ■ . 

Yet, it has also stirred outrage 
that in a democracy that is the 
world’s fifth largest economy and 
where the constitution guarantees 
the right to proper health care, 
people are still left to die in hospi- 
tal corridors. 

The cradle-to-grave health care 
system enjoyed by most societies 
in Western Europe is often cited 
as an inspiration behind Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton’s attempt to re- 
vamp medical coverage in the 
United States. 


Bat in Italy, national health 
care has become an embarrassing 
showcase for the kind of rampant 
corruption, fraud and waste that 
led Italian voters last week to 
refect its traditional governing 
class in favor of the media mag- 
nate Silvio Berlusconi and his 
rightist allies. 

Italy’s health sector has pro- 
duced some of the most spectacu- 
lar cases in the massive bribery 
and kickback scandal that over 
the last two years has devastated 
the careers and reputations of 
more than 5,000 members of Ita- 
ly’s political and business elite. 

The former health minister. 
Francesco De Lorenzo, has been 
accused of taking kickbacks 
worth milli ons of dollars from 
pharmaceutical companies to 
keep prices pegged at artificially 
high levels. Until now, he was 
spared indictment because he en- 
joyed parliamentary imm u n ity. It 
lapsed with the elections last 
week. 

In another case, police investi- 
gators are looking into illegal 
trafficking of corneas that were 
extracted from corpses in Rome’s 
public hospitals to be sold for 
transplants by ophthalmologists 
in private clmics. The corneas 
were removed without permis- 
sion from the families of the de- 
ceased. 

Contracts to build new hospi- 
tals became a notorious prize in 
the awarding of public works 


contracts that reportedly deliv- 
ered a 10 percent kickback into 
the coffers of party treasuries, 
even if the facilities were not 
needed or did not get buQL The 
San Valentino hospital near Pe- 
scara. for example, has been un- 
der construction for 40 years. 

Meanwhile, the overcrowding 
of public hospitals that com- 
pelled Franca to surrender her 
bed is craning under fire as the 
inevitable remit of a dysfunction- 
al system in which the state reim- 
burses a public hospital accord- 
ing to bed occupancy. 

“There are absolutely no incen- 
tives fra efficiency, ” said Carol 
Beebe Tarantdii, an American- 
born member of the Italian Par- 
liament and a health care special- 
ist for the opposition Democratic 
Party of the Left. 

“Since hospitals get paid by 
having their beds filled, they are 
encouraged to keep people there 
fog much longer than necessary. 
And if those beds are occupied by 
people who are not so sick, then 
the hospital management figures 
it is so much the better because 
they require less care and atten- 
tion. But meanwhile, people wbo 
really need h are stranded with- 
out help.” 

As a result, ambulances carry- 
ing somebody who is seriously til 
or injured often must race around 
to as many as eight or nine hospi- 
tals in search of an empty bed. An 
emergency phone number to find 


oul which hospitals have vacan- 
cies was put into service three 
months ago. 

“People often have to wait up 
to 20 days in the hospital for tests 
to be done, because the labs are 
only open four hours a day,” Miss 
TarantdH said. “So they stay 
there occupying a bed that could 
be used by somebody who is seri- 
ously ill, all because the hospital 
is happy to get money from the 
state for a patient who does not 
require them to lift a finger.” 

Since 1979, Italy’s health sys- 
tem has been decentralized so 
that local councils have 
more responsibility for managing 
health care. As a result, in 
wealthy regions such as the north, 
the public health care is consid- 
ered good, while south of Flor- 
ence — as income declines — the 
care gels progressively worse. 

Local control, however, has not 
slowed the exorbitant expense 
that has driven the cost of health 
care to U percent of the country's 
gross national product, the high- 
est in Europe. The primary rea- 
son fra the soaring costs remains 
overstaffing and medicine, which 
is often ovoprescribed 

But even if the price and care 
policies are reformed, the abuse 
of patronage remains a troubling 
issue in a country where political 
parties have long taken care of 
their voters and supporters 
through the distribution of jobs. 


Praise for Mussolini Broke Law, Lawyer Asserts 


CompUed bv Oar Staff From Dispatches 

ROME — A lawyer has lodged a formal 
complaint alleging that comments by the neo- 
fascist leader, Gianfranco Fim, praising Be- 
nito Mussolini, the framer dictator, are 
against Italian anti-Fasdst laws. 

Mr. Fmi sought Sunday to play down the 
remarks, saying that Ins admiration for Mus- 
solini was similar to praise for Napoteon or 
Julius Caesar. 

“History never repeals itself,” be said. 
“The judgment I made was exclusively his- 
torical A political judgment and an historical 
judgment are two different things. 


Giosufe Calabria, a lawyer in Bologna, said 
that Mr. Fmi’s comments that Mussolini was 
“the greatest statesman of this century” 
breached a 1952 law banning any public 
apology of Fascism. 

Mr. Futi was quoted by L’lndipendente 
newspaper, a small Rome daily, as saying 
that the criticism directed at him was “the 
same old polemics of the left because it is 
short of arguments.” 

“If I say that NapoMon was a great Euro- 
pean statesman or Julias Caesar was a great 
man, nobody can think that I want to rebuild 
the Napoleonic or Roman empires.” 

Mr. Calabria said the 1952 law could lead 


to prosecutions against “anyone who publicly 
exults the officials, the principles, the facts or 
the methods of Fascism.” 

Mr. Fmi. whose National Alliance was in' 
the three-party rightist coalition that swept to 
a landslide victory in the elections last week, 
made the comments praising Mussolini in an 
interview published Friday in the Turin 
newspaper La Stamp a. Mr. Futi added that 
Stivio Berlusconi, whose Forza Italia dorm- 
nates the winning alliance, was no match fra 
B Duce. 

“Berlusconi will have to run hard to show 
he is part of history like Mussolini,” he said in 
the interview. (AFP, Reuters) 





Israel Arrests Fugitive Extremist Leader 


By Clyde Haberman 

New York Tuna Service 

JERUSALEM — Five weeks af- 
ter he was declared an outlaw, the 
Israeli police caught up Sunday 
with the fugitive leader of the anti- 
Arab Kadi Party, arresting him 
and ordering that he be held with- 
out trial for three months. 

In a cat-and-mouse chase laden 
with faro cal dements, the K«rf> 
leader, Baruch Maori, had rinded 
the police for weeks even though 
Israeli and foreign journalists had 
iMiwgwt to find him for interviews 
in which he repeatedly taunted his 
pursuers. 

Mr. Marzel, who succeeded Rab- 
bi Meir Kahane as head of Kach 
after the rabbi’s assassination in 
1990, was arrested in the West 
Bank settlement of Pnei Hever. He 
was at the home, the police said, of 
i a Jewish settler standing trial on 
charges of having shot to death an 
Arab wbo had been bound hand 
andfooL 

Pnei Hever is about 7 kilometers 
(4 mfles) from Hebron, where Mr. 


Marzel is among 450 Israelis whose 
presence in that predominantly 
Palestinian town has become a 
do minan t issue since the Feb. 25 
massacre there of at least 29 Mus- 
lim worshipers by a Jewish settler. 
Dr. Baruch Goldstein. 

With the arrest on Sunday, the 
Israeli authorities captured the last 
Kach figure who was still at large in 
a post-massacre crackdown that 
has seen that group and the spinoff 
Kahane Lives movement outlawed 
as terrorist organizations. 

Mr. Marzel was a wanted man 
even before the Kahane-rooted 
groups were banned three weeks 
ago. He now joins seven other set- 
tler extremists under “administra- 
tive detention” — arrest for 
months without formal charges. 

Mr. Marzd. 35, who told The 
Associated Press last week that he 
had changed hideouts nearly 40 
tinv»«, was caught while and 
no force was needed, the police said. 

As a sign of how realities have 
changed in the occupied territories, 
the Israeli was put under arrest for 


anti-Arab activities at the same time 
that the government agreed to the 
imminent return of several dozen 
Palestinians wbo had been deported 
years ago for anti-Israri activities. 

It was not clear bow many de- 
portees would be allowed back in, 
or exactly when, although some 
may begin entering the West Bank 
and Gaza Strip as early as Monday 
or Tuesday. A Palestinian leader, 
Faisal Husseini, put the number at 
49, but a senior Israeli official said 
it probably would be closer to 32. 

In any event, some of those com- 
ing home were important local 
leaders or are dose to Yasser Ara- 
fat, tire chairman of the Palestine 
Liberation Organization. They in- 
clude people expected to p re p are 
for the arrival later in the week erf a 
first contingent of Palestinian po- 
lice officers to Gaza and the West 
Bank town of Jericho, the targeted 
areas for Palestinian sdf-iule and 
an Israeli troop withdrawaL 

Hie return of the deportees, the 
anticipated Palestinian police and 
plans for 160 lightly armed foreign- 


ers to help keep Hebron peaceful 
are all signs of how Israel and the 
PLO are trying to put the massacre 
behind them and to pul their nego- 
tiations on carrying out the Gaza- 
Jericfao plan on fast forward. 

Those talks resumed Sunday in 
Cairo with both sides looking to 


13, the original target dare for com- 
pleting the Israeli withdrawal from 
Gaza and Jericho. 

Another post-massacre phenom- 
enon is an Israeli state inquiry into 
the Hebron killings. 

The inquiry commission's five 
members had summoned Dr. 
Goldstein’s wife, Miriam, to ap- 
pear Sunday, but she refused. 

But the panel did hear from Zvi 
Ka trover, mayor of the Kiryat 
Arba settlement outside Hebron 
where Mrs. Goldstein lives. Mr. 
Katzover, who acknowledged that 
“there are crazies and fanatics ” in 
his community, warned that anoth- 
er massacre could take place if Jew- 
ish settlers did not feel safe from 
Arab attacks. 


Leaders Set Meeting on Natal Violence 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — South African lead- 
ers who favor and oppose this month’s all-race 
general election will meet Friday to seek an end 
to violence that is continuing in Natal despite 
the imposition of a state of emergency in tire 
province. 

President Frederik W. de Klerk; Nelson 
Mandela, leader of tire African National Con- 
gress; Goodwill ZweHthim, tire Zulu king, and 
Chief Mangosutbu Butbekzi, head of the Zulu- 
based Inkaiha Freedom Party, agreed to the 
meeting when they met for a religious ceremony 
in Moria. in northern Transvaal, a presidential 
spokesman said. He did not say where the 
meeting would be held. 

Chief Bulbdezi. who wants an autonomous 
Zulu state, is boycotting the election. 

The police said 19 people were killed in the 
region during the night from Saturday to Sun- 
day, nine of them ANC supporters knifed or 
hacked to death in a single attack south of 
Durban. 

The killings raised to 40 the number of peo- 
ple who have died in political violence since Mr. 
de Klerk declared the state of emergency last 


Thursday in a bid to establish calm for the 
elections. - 

Mr. Mandela said soldiers needed time to 
bring violence under oontroL 

“We shouldn’t have exaggerated or unrealis- 
tic expectations,” be said. ‘The security forces 
are busy establishing themselves and it might 
take some time before they actually master the 
situation.” 

He added that he hoped the state of emergen- 
cy and planned meeting Friday would help 
solve the problem. 

About 300 Sooth African Defense Force re- 
inforcements arrived in Natal on Sunday, 
bringing the total military contingent to 1,200. 

Mr. Mandda said Saturday that he hoped the 
summit meeting, delayed from last wen: after 
53 people were killed during an Inkatha march 
through Johannesburg, conld lead to a quick 
lifting of the emergency rules. 

An opinion poll conducted in three of South 
Africa’s nine regions in early March and pub- 
fished Sunday showed that Mr. de Klerk’s Na- 
tional Party had gained support in the last four 
months while backing for the ANC had slipped. 

The poll in the Sunday Times, conducted in 


Sooth Africa's most densely populated regions, 
supported a nationwide survey last week that 
showed the ANC could expect to gain at least 
59 percent of tire votes, less than the two-thirds 

AMiinnHi Kq/ 1 nnOinAllcltr VWO/IiMmI 


A two-thirds majority would allow the ANC 
and its communist allies to re-write the interim 
constitution by themselves. 

Shopkeepers and travel agents reported that 
many whites anxious about security during the 
election period were stocking up on food and 
candles or booking flights out of (he country. 

Gun dealers reported sharply higher sales of 
weapons and ammunition to both blacks and 
whites. Major political parties have called the 
panic unfounded. 

The emergency regulations that went into 
effect late Thursday give tire security forces 
broad powers to disperse crowds, arrest sus- 
pects without warrants and bar the carrying of 
weapons of any kind. 

Mr. de Klerk’s declaration was tire first state 
of emergency decree since Jane 1990. when he 
lifted emergency regulations that had been im- 
posed by President P. W. Botha in 1985 to quell 
anti-apartheid protests. (Reuters, AFP. AP) 




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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 
Pfc. 

J Toward Israeli Withdrawal 


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Oxziy weeks ago, in the wake of the outrage at 
Hebron, Israeli and Palestinian talks on auto- 
nomy in Gaza and Jericho looked to be in 
serious jeopardy. Now they are about to re- 
sume, with a promise of dramatic eariy results. 
Their swift rescue is a mqjor development that 
narks a mutually reassuring wish for accord on 
both sides of the Middle East divide. 

In a display of shrewd leadership. Pome 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin has been able to turn 
the Hebron tragedy to good political purpose. 
He used it to start isolating the defiant funda- 
mentalist core of (he Jewish settler community 
and to assert the interests of the Israeli main- 
stream that elected him. This is how Israel 
comes to accept a first armed international 
presence in the occupied territories and eariy 
deployment ctf Palestinian police in the intend- 
ed autonomy area. It is how Mr. Rabin comes 
to start cracking the ice that keeps 400 ultra- 
Orthodox Jewish settle living provocatively in 
downtown Arab Hebron. The new internation- 
al presence amounts to 160 Europe a ns, with 
pistols, assig ned temporarily to “monitor*’ He- 
bron. The Labor government saw it as a tacti- 
cal, mostly symbolic response to resonant Pal- 
estinian cries for protection against the 
occupation. The Likud opposition denounced 


iz as an incursion on Israeli sovereign daimsL 

These observers in Hebron w31 likely matter 
much less than the Palestinian police due to 
arrive in Gaza and Jericho next week as van- 
guard of the larger force that win protect Pales- 
tinians under autonomy. Israeli military with- 
drawal, meant to start last Dec. 13, has not yet 
begun. Still, Israel now pledges to try to meet 
the original April 13 target date for completion. 
All the tough issues involved in a final peace, 
including borders, security, settlements and Je- 
rusalem, lie unresolved. Each side has its legion 
of doubtera and armed ron-compromisas. Yet 
it is good news that Mr. Rabin and PLO 
Chairman Yasser Arafat are riding out the 
Hebron storm and converting it to mutual gain. 

The Israelis have had to make concessions, 
on the international monitors, the Palestinian 
police and the overall pace. The hard-pressed 
Mr. Arafat was forced to cut way back on the 
political compensation he sought u> squeeze 
from Hebron. The key fact remains that both 
are now committed to deliver the first major 
tangible fruits of the autonomy talks: the onset 
of Israeli military withdrawal For 800,000 Pal- 
estinians and in barely a week, a heavy and 
hated 27-year occupation is calculated to end. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A Trade Policy for Arms 


The Pin ion adminis tration was expected to 
annqiinre its policy oo curbing arms sales last 
September. But it remains silent as Americans 
grab an increasing share — more than half, by 
the latest count — of the global arms market. It 
is time to seek limits on sales, starting with the 
most explosive regions, the Middle East and 
Asia. To be effective, such limits have to be 
adopted by other states as weH. 

US domina tion of this shrinking market 
puis the administration in a good position to do 
something about that It could start by curbing 
American sales and by getting anns-exporting 
nations to notify one another in advance of 
major arms deals, so that conceited diplomacy 
can head off dangerous transactions. 

American industries have pushed aims ex- 
ports to compensate for steep cuts in orders 
from the Pentagon. Defense Secretary Wiliam 
Perry has rightly warned U.S. amts makers 
against “during this illusion that foreign mili- 
tary sales are going to save the day for them.” 

But he has done some promoting of sales 
himself. Making an exception to Pentagon poli- 
cy, for instance, be offered to sell radar-jam- 
ming devices to South Korea and Finland last 
year in otter to secure deals to boy UJ5. lighter 
planes. Last month the Pentagon spent more 
than half a millinn dollars to dispatch 20 top- 
of-the-hne aircraft and 75 U2L military person- 
nel to peddle U.& products at the Singapore air 
show, a major showcase for Asia’s booming 
aims bazaar. In effect, the Pentagon is acting 
like a salesman for private industry. 


American taxpayers foot a sizable hQl to 
subsidize UJL arms exports. According to Wil- 
liam Hartungof the World Policy Institute, the 
government spends S500 million a year directly 
on arms export promotion. It finan ces foreign 
aims purchases with an additional S3 .2 billion 
in grants and S800 million in subsidized loans, 
and millions more in foreign aid to arms buyers 
— which really amounts to indirect subsidies. 

To make purchases of Unarms attractive to 
foreign governments, some companies steer 
business to aims-buying countries that they 
would Otherwise give to USi manufac turers. 
The biggest cost of all is that some of the aims 
may end up bring used against US. troops. 

The crucial next reform — advance notifica- 
tion of arms deals — is just the job for a 
proposed agency that would succeed COCOM, 
the Coordinating Committee for Multilateral 
Export Controls, which used to restrict high- 
tech trade to the Communist bloc. But a re- 
vamped COCOM will succeed only if it is 
broadened to include Russia and China. And 
W ashingto n, which has alienat ed allies like 
Germany and Japan by trying to use the new 
body to isolate Iran, would be better off aban- 
doning that cramped focus and add ressing 
aims trafficking elsewhere as well 

The administration needs to devise a policy 
far more selective about the arms it sells and 
the countries it sells to. And it needs to enlist 
the other major exporting nations in a world- 
wide dampdown on this deadly trade. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


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The Clinton administration has chosen a 
difficult moment to jade up a diplomatic cam- 
paign to increase the isolation of the mflitaiy 
regime in Burma. The effort is unfolding as 
Communist China, which bad no difficulty 
embracing the regime from the start, extends its 
economic ties. The prime minister of Singa- 
pore, like China a purveyor of arms to the 
generals in what they call Myanmar, has just 
become the first head of a foreign government 
(except for Communist Laos) to visit Rangoon 
since the aimed forces crushed a pro-democra- 
cy uprising four years ago. Thailand is reported 
to be inviting Buima to attend July’s meeting of 
the Association of South East Asian Nations. 

Not China, winch can hardly care about the 
nature of the regime, but the other countries 
moving to take mdlilary-ruled Burma into the 
regional fold produce a familiar argument It 
evokes the American debate an China- “Con- 
structive engagement," as it is called, offers the 
people of Burma trickle-down benefits as the 
gjenerals move into a free market phase, and 
eventually tbe regime itsdf wffl soften. 

In the abstract, this argument always has 
allure for its promise, automatidty and pain- 
lessness. In the specific Burmese circumstances, 
it has a cynical aspect In tbe 1980s Burma was 


setting out on a viable democratic path. The 
generals ruddy took Burma off it But even 
today a face-saving exit from authoritarian rule 
is available. The junta could don a patriotic 
cloak and open a political dialogue with the 
imprisoned authentic opposition leader Daw 
Aung San Suu Kyi, a Nobel peace laureate. 

The U.S. government realizes that other 
countries are broadening their connections 
with Burma. It means to avoid the ineffective 
symbolism of unilateral economic sanctions. 
The theory is that a show of reasonableness, 
but impatient reasonableness, may induce Bur- 
ma’s trade and investment partners to draw it 
onto the political road with Daw Aung San Sun 
Kyi. Regardless, it is worth keeping pressure on 
a repressive regime that, in addition to its 
crimes against its awn people, main tarns ties 
with tbe drug traffickers responsible for most 
of tbe heron that arrives in America. 

“Constructive engagement is not construc- 
tive,” a politician from Daw Aung San Suu 
Kyfs party said recently. “It’s destructive op- 
portunism. We are in a time of trouble, and 
when the government is oppressing its own 
people, [other governments dedng business with 
the regime] shouldn’t do it.” 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


For Clemency in Singapore 


For spray-painting can and other vandal- 
ism, Singapore has sentenced an A m e r ican 
teenager to six lashes of a bamboo-like cane. 
This is no minor corporal punishment The 
cane delivers skin-splitting whacks so excruci- 
atingly painful that strong men pass out in a 
state of shock If Michael Fay, the convicted 
18-year-old, does lose consciousness, stan- 
dard practice would be to revive and re-tether 
him to complete a flogging certain to leave 
permanent scars on body and spirit. 

Singapore, an ultramodern, order-con- 
scious city-state, has the undoubted sovereign 
power to cany out this brutal punishment on 
a young viator who engaged in mischief. But 
it would shock many Americans and people 
everywhere who value humane punishment. 
President Bill Clin ton has rightly readied 
out to seek some form of clemency. 


Is there brutality elsewhere in the world? 
Of course. The United States, with a Con- 
gress spoiling to add dozens of death penal- 
ties to the lawbooks, joins Singapore and 
cuily a handful of other advanced countries 
that c&ng to capital punishment That makes 
the United States on odd nation to argue for 
civilized penalties. Yet this grossly dispro- 
portionate flogging punishment, akin to tor- 
ture, cries out for condemnation. 

Singapore officials defend their ancient pe- 
nology and ridicule Americans for tolerating 
graffiti-soiled cities. Overkill can indeed be a 
powerful deterrent and keep the streets dean, 
but such superficial neatness can mask a re- 
pellent sense of justice. The brutality that 
Singapore threatens to inflict would be felt all 

over tiie globe and redound to its shame. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



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A Lesson for Clinton in the Nixon Parallel 


W ASHINGTON— Did America, thinking it 
was electing John F. Clinton, get Richard 
M. Qinicai ins trad? Horrid question, be thee 
N ixonian or Gmtonesque. But it rises from the 
Madison- Whitewater-Red Bone swamp, a murky 
and expanding territory located at toe conflu- 
ence: of money and power as h flowed through 
the state of Arkansas a decade and more ago. 

Hie latest Washington buzzword in the < 
ing, unrelenting spilling out of the Clinton fa 
sa ga — which connects Balzac to “Dm of Oar 
Lives” via Robert Penn Warren — is “legitima- 
cy.” The unlikely Nixoa-Qinton comparison is 
spun around this word tty some of the capital's 
political cognoscenti. 

Tbe most cogent version goes like this: Just as 

coukT accep^Richard Nixon^as ^legitimate” 
president, neither can a large segment of conser- 
vative political opinion today accept Bill Gin- 
ton’s Intimacy — no matter what he does. 

In two administrations separated by a political 
gmeration, four other presidents mid a Cold 
War, opponents do not simply disagree with or 
the politics of the commander in chief. 
They believe that ] ' 
fled him from the i 
He is not amply to be i 
down, or at least bloodied and nullified. 

Mr. Nixon's sJasb-and-burn politics. Red-bait- 
ing and smarmy sanctimony earned him the 
undying enmity of otherwise tolerant liberals 
long baore he turned the crime of Watergate 
into a fatal political blunder. 

For Mr. Clinton, draft ducking, taking on a 
marijuana cigarette and a family fife mat he 
acknowledges has not been perfect create tire 
miiw effect — he is unable to establish moral 
authority with opponents who might otherwise 
be open to his centrist style and policies. 

The comparison would be unacceptable to 
both men. Mr. Clinton came to office conscious- 
ly modeling himself on John F. Kennedy. But the 
continuing fallout of the Bold and the Beautiful 
Back Home in Arkansas carries Nixonian traces. 

Mr. Clinton seems thus far unable to rise 
above this debilitating controversy. He is mired 
in a running battle with critics and media on their 
level mining corner after oomer only to find new 
machine gun nests going op on the next street 
The Qmtons remain at the center of tbe con- 
troversy. It was not in Mr. Nixon’s nature to 
move into the shadows if a fight was at hand. The 
Clintons also seem to be uncomfortable if they 
are not at the center running things, even when it 
means being in the line of fire. 

They do not deflect one of Mr. Kennedy’s 


By Jim Hoagland 

favorite maneuvers. Kennedy the pol itic ian was 
like the morning dew. liquid and mueizable. Mr. 
Nixoc and Mr. Clinton, different as they are as 
individuals, are both political whirlpools, draw- 
ing all in toward their personal vortexes. 

Tiy*» ibrir opponents — and their supporters 
— they see political combat in extremely person- 
al toms, enra ged that their families as weH as 
themselves draw fire. And like Mr. Nixon, Mr. 
CKnton sees —correctly —that a certain part of 
the electorate wi 11 treat every act by him as 
illegitimate- Many conservatives do not believe 
that he deserves morally to be president. 

Tbe Nixon presidency, with its enemies list, 
demonstrated the dangers of exaggerating how 
large a shoe of the opposition such people repre- 
sent Disaster lurks in believing that all opposi- 
tion or criticism springs from personal animosity 
and believing that only a conspiratorial unques- 
tioning few «n be trusted. Down that road Bcs 
the poisonous atmosphere of a royal court and 
tiie self-defeating obsess on of news managing 
and leak plugging at all costs. 

The disclosures about HUlaiy Clinton’s man- 
ey-making flair in playing the cattle futures mar- 
ket with the help of broker Robert L. “Red” 


Bone add fud to the bonfire of moral vanities 
that Clinton critics are building. How dart 
Bubba and Bride lecture us about greed? ask 
Ronald Reagan’s friends. 

Here a Nixon analogy may be helpful to the 
Clintons, now that they have been forced to dis- 
gprge information both on Whitewater losses and 
on Red Bone gains that they kept out of the 1992 
campaign. If the Gmtans had a sense erf irony, this 
modest proposal nri^n have appeal: 

TnVfflH of running away from a S 100,000 profit 
that pmnf nf Hillary Chnion’s business acu men , 
the president and the first lady should flaunt h — 
treat h Eke Richard Nixon gong to China. He 
adopted his opponents’ agenda; be disarmed them 
and kept his own supporters, who have become 
the champions of good relations with the Com- 
munists in Beijing. In like manner, perhaps liber- 
al feminists may now see playing cattle futures as 
part of their sdf-fulfillioent- 

The key question is this: Would those who 
voted for Bid Clinton in 1992 doom their votes 
now on the basis of the Madison-Whitewater- 
Red Bone disclosures? My guess is that most 
would noL For them, and for his opponents, 
Bill Clinton is still the one. And he still has time 
to prevent his presidency from ending in a 
political train wreck. 

The Washington Post 



The Bottom Doll Is Explosive Russian Disillusion 


I ONDON — The way things are 
* these days, you can take your 
choice of Rusaas. There is Russia, Son 
of Evil Empire, growfing about past 
glories, glowering at its near abroad 
and demanding to be treated as the 
equal of America. There is Russia the 
Good Balkan Neighbor, helping to 
sort dungs out in Bosnia and Croatia. 
And there is Russia the Balloon About 
to Go Fop. The trouble is that the rest 
of us may have only a few months to 
work out which is the real Russia, and 
we had better not guess wrong. 

The current favorite is the Russia 
that is apparently being so coopera- 
tive in the Balkans. The Russians 
have just negotiated a cease-fire bo- 
tween Croatia and tbe armed Serbs 
who occupy a third of prewar Cro- 
atian territory. Good. They had pre- 
viously helped to make Bosnia's 
Serbs poll thor guns away from Sara- 
jevo, and applauded the American- 
organized reconciliation between 
Bosnia's M uslims and Croats. Fine. 
And all this, reassuringly, within a 
few weeks of the explosion of here- 
we-come- again nationalism fol- 

lowed the success of the tight in De- 
cember's Russian elections. 

So is this the Russia to 
money on? Maybe; but 


By Brian Beedham 


couple of reasons for being cautious 
before you place tbe bet on the table: 

One is the fact that it is still far 
from dear what son of peace the 
Russians are Hying to bring about in 
former Yugoslavia. The West wants a 
peace in which Bosnia's Serbs hand 
back wmdi of the land they have cap- 
tured, and in winch both Bosnia and 
Croatia keep tbdr pr e war frontiers 
(while giving their local Serbs plenty 
of self-government). The Serbs, on tbe 
other hand, want to stay where they 
are, and to keep open tlx door to a 
Greater Serbia that includes large 
chunks of Bosnia and Croatia. 

Those are two radically different 
pictures of the future: Unfortunately, 
almost all tbe help the Russians have 
so Ear provided has been hdp in ar- 
ranging cease-fires along the existing 
lines of battle. Tbe existing lines 
marie the extent of the Serbs’ expan- 
sion. To leave the lines unchanged 
would make the creation of Greater 
Serbia relatively easy. If this is bow 
the war eventually staggers to its end, 
the West will not have got what it 
considers a just peace, the Sabs will 
say thank you to Russia, and the 
Russians wfll beam proprietoriaHy. 


R USSIA today has neither aspirations nor resources to again become a 
global rival of tbe United States — - not today and not tomorrow. But 
Russia cannot be an American satellite, other. By virtue of its aze and 


resources, Russia remains a great power with many legitimate interests in 

for the most part 
them. 


do not conflict with 


adjacent regions. These interests 
America's, and many are quite compatible with 
This has been the case historically. Pre-Soviet Rnsaa and the United States 
were among the very few great powers that never fought each other and 
cooperated more than they competed. Now, after the aberrations of the Cold 
War and its aftermath, we are returning to this historical norm. In fact, we can 

S tove on h, since the new Russia is closer to tbe United States politically 
culturally than its predecessor. Bat Americans and Russians have to 
rediscover this historical norm and learn to live with its ambiguities. 

— Vladimir Lukin, a forma- ambassador to the Urmed Slates 
and now chairman of die foreign affairs committee 
of Russia’s parliament, comnenting m The Washington Post 


There is anyway reason to wonder 
just how nwirh the Balkans mantr io 
Russia's new* nationalism The area 
farther north, between Germany and 
Russia, matters far mare, and hoe the 
Russians are being as uncooperative 
as ever. They hare already stopped 
NATO from extending membership 
to Poland. Hungary and the Czech 
Republic. Now they may be success- 
fully diluting the Partnership for 
Peace proposal that NATO has po- 
litely offered as an alternative. 

The original aim of tins proposal 
had been, in the NATO jargon, to 
“differentiate” — to offer the Poles, 
Cze ch s and Hungarians a much clos- 
er partnership with NATO than Rus- 
sia goL It now looks as if the Rus- 
sians, if they can overcome some of 
their own generals* opposition to any 
sort of link with NATO, will try to 
insist that there be no differentia- 
tion. If they succeed, they will have 
slapped a double veto on NATO. 

Is the bear resurgent the true picture 
of the Russia that the West has to deal 
with? Well, here too, yes and no. 

To be sure, Boris Yeltsin and his 
people still stand on tbdr new agenda 
of nationalism. The Russians insist 
that they have an ominous “special 
relationship'’ with the other parts of 
tbeex-Soviet Union. They claim their 
veto in Central Europe. They say that 
their voice must cany as much wdght 
in the world as America’s. Their ex- 
liberai, neonationalisi foreign minis- 
ter, Andrei Kozyrev, explains that 
Russia's interests wfll often differ 
from America’s — meaning that Rus- 
sia will then set out to block what 
America wishes to do. Iiisalong way 
from the arm-in-arm Russian- Ameri- 
can fellowship that Bill Clinton was 
so recently counting on. 

Yet there is something slightly un- 
real about it afl. Mr. Kozyrev's sud- 


A U,S, Tempest in a French Demitmse 


By Jacques To abort 

The writer is French minister of culture. 


P ARIS — Tbe French and many 
other Europeans, as well as the 
Japanese, often have unfair impres- 
sions of the United States. And vice 
versa. American press comments 
about France, especially when it is 
preparing to adopt a law on tbe use 
of the French language, generally 
have been amusing. 

You would think we were dedar- 

gating them from the Frerchijut- 
guage, and even preparing to send 
violators to prison, as some news 
services have incorrectly reported. 

True, in France we would rather 
use “logidd” with our “ordina- 
teur rather than software with 
oar computers, yet the main pro- 
blem lies not with the infiltration 
of English words. It is therefore a 
pity that focusing on such trivial 
things distracts everyone from the 
essence of the debate. 

I would like to reassure our 
American friends. France is mere- 
ly taking measures that everyone 
else took a long time ago and that 
exist In part in European Union 
language regulations — namely, to 
require the use of the French lan- 
guage in France. 

So that employees can under- 
stand their work contracts and so 
that product instructions and safety 
warnings are written in the lan- 
guage of the consume' and the 
worker. So that a scientist at a col- 
loquium is not asked to desist if he 


starts speiking in French in front of 
a majority of French-speakers. So 
that public documents are in the 
langnage of the country. 

Such a law therefore serves 
French dtizeos. It does not purport 
to police the language, since every- 
one may continue to speak it as he 
chooses, as a living language. 

France waited until 1992 to write 
into its constitution that French is 
the language of the French Repub- 
lic. In America, where some news 
reports have accused us of wanting 
to legislate in an area that infringes 
on private life, more than a dozen 
states, including Florida and Cali- 
fornia, have adopted laws an tbe 
use erf English. 

Representative Toby Roth of 
Wisconsin has proposed an “Eng- 
lish language” amendment to the 
constitution. Several federal 
des, including the Food and 
Administration, long ago ii 
the use of English. 

The Supreme Court has recog- 
nized linguistic rights. It is perfectly 
normal for consumers and employ- 
ees to be provided with information 
in their own language. The issue is 
in the forefront far both Engtisb- 
and Spanish-speaking Americans, 
and has given rise touvdy debate. 

By contrast, the French over- 
whelmingly approve the govern- 
ment's dedsioa, as shown by a 
recent poU. 

All this goes to show that the use 


of languages — not thor quality — 
is a legitimate subject of public pol- 
icy, like other issues, and that polit- 
ical leaders have a responsibility to 
mandate certain requirements. 

Why should the French and the 
other Europeans not have the same 
linguistic rights? Unless one implic- 
itly considers that the world’s citi- 
zens have no right to wish to spend 
tbdr lives using any langnage other 
than Anglo-American. 

Admittedly, Americans may 
have some difficulty in understand- 
ing that a problem exists. Europe- 
ans would not assume that Ameri- 
cans, who are known for not being 
loo open to foreign cultures and for 
pursuing their own cultural protec- 
tionism, understand foreign lan- 
guages. Many Americans, on the 
contrary, often forget that one has 
the right in other countries not to 
understand their langnage and to 
speak another one. 

It is hard to tmagtim that anyone 
would find the French govern- 
ment’s proposals anything but emi- 
nently logical. Yet they have caused 
impassioned comment in America. 

This is proof, contrary to some 
commentators, that what France 
does still generates interest in the 
entire world. It is probably because 
France defends a certain concept of 
freedom and diversity that some 
people are iroubled. 

France remains, to paraphrase 
Diaries de Gaulle, tbe country that 
sometimes feels compelled to say 
“no ” not out of egotism but out of 
a sense of what isrighL 

The New York Times. 


den new nationalism is so patently a 
reaction to Vladimir Zhirinovsky's 
success in the December elections. 
Mr. Yeltsin still beams and winks at 
Weston visitors. And Russia so man- 
ifestly stiD needs the West’s goodwill 
Even its conservative prime minister, 
Viktor Chernomyrdin, turned him- 
self inside out last month to promise 
the International Monetary Fond 
that Russia would henceforth start to 
practice the economic virtue that the 
West has been urging upon iL 

Here is the finger pointing to the 
third possible Russia, the one that 
could be about to bursL Behind the 
smile in Bosnia, and behind the 
scowl behind tbe snrile, there may lie 
a breaking heart. 

Toget a paltry $1J billion handout 
from the IMF. Mr. Chernomyrdin 
had to promise to gel Russia’s budget 
deficit under control. The facts make 
this look deeply unlikely. The pro- 
posed budget for 1994 already plans 
to spend half as much again as it 
reckons wifi be collected in taxes. But 
nobody believes the budget's calcula- 
tion of tax income. The spending 
minis tries are threatening to spend a 
lot more than the budget says they 
should. The anti-austerity parliamen t 
has yet to get its hands an the whole 
project- On this reckoning, the deficit 
will be even vaster than advertised. 

To prevent that, Mr. Chernomyr- 
din would have to increase taxes and 
slash spending to an extent that made 
Russians even poorer than they are 
now, and put even more of them out 
of work. But if he does not stop it 
from happoaing the result will be yet . 
more inflation, which will duly make 
the poverty and the unemployment 
still more appalling. Either way, the 
result could be an explosion of rage. 

It is hard to resist the suspicion 
that, while we outsiders fuss about 
Russia’s behavior abroad, 
is approaching made Russia it 
that makes concern about its foreign 
policy seem academic. A country go- 
ing through an internal crisis as big as 
the one that could be about to bat 
Russia may be in no condition to 
have any serious foreign policy. It 
may have to withdraw from the world 
until it has sorted itself out. 

It is those Russian dolls again. 
The object on display presents the 
cheerful face of Deputy Foreign 
Munster Vi tali Churkin going about 
his peacemaking business in Bosnia, 
lift his head, and underneath you 
find the grimacing visage of Vladi- 
mir Zhirinovsky. Lift his head, too, 
and at the bottom there is a stick of 
dynamite, with fuse lit 

International Herald Tribune. 


A Chance 
For Labor 
In Asia 

By Takashi Iznmi 

The writer is general secretary cf the 
JCFTU-APRO, the International Con- 
federation of Free Trade Unions, Asian 
and Pacific Regional Organization. 

Q INGAPORE — Proposals by de- 
jj vdoped nations led by the United 
States to include a “social danse" 
linking trade and labor standards in 
the final declaration of tbe Uruguay 
Round global trade pact dne to be 
m mid-April in Marrakech, 
Morocco, have aroused strong oppo- 
sition from developing countries in 
Asia and elsewhere. Many fear that 
such a link would turn out to be a 
disguised form of protection in West- 
ern markets against imports from 
economi es wit h lower labor costs. 

The ICFTU-APRO, which repre- 
sents free trade unions in 28 countries 
of the Asia-Pacific region, believes 
that it is now possible for developing 
stales to agree m Marrakech on how a 
proper study of an anti-protectionist 
social clause could be conducted. 
Sw h a clause would improve the le- 
gitimate interests of workers. 

The ICFTU, whose affiliated trade 
unions in 120 countries represent 
more than 120 million workers, has 
studied how a linkage between work- 
ers’ rights and trade could be estab- 
lished Rather than opening the way 
to protectionist measures by rich 
countries against low-cost exporters, 
this linkage would strengthen filesys- 
tem of opai trade which the Uruguay 
Round tO rnhsmr*r 
Members of tbe new World Trade 
Organization — which will take over 
from GATT in 1995 as a watchdog 
with gnhgTMg-H powers to safeguard 
and enforce the rules of global com- 
merce — should agree to apply a list 
of basic International Labor Organi- 
zation standards. The ILO is the UN 
specialized agency on labor matters. 
Its standards, if applied would com- 
bat exploitation of workers and es- 
tablish wrinimmn rights for them tO 
have a say in how their conditions of 
employ ment a re decided. 

The ICFTU-APRO does not thmk 
that it is possible or desirable to set a 
worldwide minimum wage Negotia- 
tions between employers, unions and 
governments within countries, which 
take into account productivity and 
other factors, are the best way to 
ensure that as trade and devdooment 


progress, wages and other conditions 

of work improve. 

What needs 

ally is that ifamminatinn, 
bor, especially by chfldren, ana restric- 
tion on workers’ ability to farm free 
trade imimrre to baigain with empkty- 
as are unacceptable in an increasm^ly 
global mariceL Developing countries 
in Asia that are trying to improve the 
conditions of workers me in fact the 
most vulnerable to effects of such 
practices on die competitiveness of 
their products and services. 

Standards in these areas have been 
defined by the ILO. It also has a 
sophisticated procedure for monitor- 
ing application of these principles 
and hdjping its member states to put 
them into practice. When the new 
World Trade Organization takes over 
from GATT, it should build on tbe 
HQ’s long experience and establish a 
mechanism by which its members 
agree to strengthen application of la- 
bor standards. 

In doing so, it would ensure that 
any unilateral protectionist measures 
were subject to a dear multilateral 
discipline in which developing coun- 
tries would have a strong voice. This 
would strengthen free trade and open 
market access. It would ensure that as 
trade grows, workers in developing 
countri es dar e die benefits of growth. 

Tbe ICFTU's proposals meet fully 
the concerns expressed recently by 
Peter Sutherland, the director-gener- 
al of GATT, about those who are 
trying to erect barriers against im- 
ports from developing countries. Mr. 
Suthedand has opened the way for a 
serious* rational negotiation on social 
matters in tbe post-Uruguay Round 
trade agenda. 

Just as a consensus for the tfiscus- 
sionof the relationship between envi- 
ronmental issues and trade has been 
acknowledged, it should now be pos- 
sible for developing countries to 
agree in Marrakech on the toms of 
reference for a study of how an anti- 
protectiamst soda] danse would wort 
Reports of the position that the 
European Union is prep ari ng to take 
on workers’ rights at Marrakech indi- 
cate, that many indus trial natio ns re- 
cognize that an equitable balance 
must be found with the developing 
countries as a matter of urgency. 
Asian states should now seize the 


International Herald Tribune. 


IN OUK PAGES; 100, 75 AM) 50 YE/iRS A an 

1894: Furious Artistes 


NEW YORK — An outrageous arti- 
cle appeared in the Chicago Times in 
regard to Mmes. Melba, Calvt and 
Nordica charging that they accepted 
entertainments by prominent society 
men. The artistes are furious. Mine. 
Melba threatens a suit against the 
paper for Si 00.000 and says she did 
not even know the men. Mmes. Calvfc 
and Nordica are indignant and de- 
mand retractions. “I can't write Eng- 
lish," writes Mme. Cahrfe, “but Itdl 
you in good French that I can’t find 
words strong enough to characterize 
the calumnious article.” Mme. Nor- 
dica is equally vigorous, and de- 
clares there is not a word of truth in 
the defamatory story. 

1919: Council’s Progress 

PARIS — The Council of Four was 
extremely active yesterday [April 3J, 
bolding two meetings, one ... at 
which the questions of reparations 
and of Poland were discussed, and 


A! 


another — during wfuchthe Yugo- 
slav situation was presented. Signor 
Orlando, the Italian Premier, absent- 
ing himself during this phase of the 
discussion. The mat ter of reparations 
is slowly but surely approaching an 
agreement, and it waslearaed yester- 
day that it has been virtually agreed 
to make Germany pay a stated sum 
.each year until the total bill of dam- 
ages is settled. The amount of the 
indemnity will be agreed upon within 
a few days, it is said. 

1944: American Apology 9 

WASHINGTON — (From our New 
Ymk edition: ] Secretary of State Cor- 
dell Hull expressed today [April 3] 

“my own and all American/ deep 
regret over the tragic bombing by 
American planes of the Swiss tiwof 
Schanhausco” cn Saturday [April 11 
and pledged that the United States 
government “wiU make appropriate 
reparations for the damage resulting 
from this unfortunate event in so far 
as that is humanly possible.” 






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RUSSIA: 

Debate on Arms 


fora» lhai could be si^Uoned in 

■*°n the positive side, they pro- 
f«s a commitment 10 ihe integrity 

P/jff 11 2 tr “ u ? s aj,d have show-nOex- 
ibtiity offering ideas for change " 
said a ranlong U-S. official. "On 

the other side of the ledger, none of 
tins B acceptable. Al! the Russians' 

suggestions^ dale sli » allow too 

f naM “ lhe ey« or 
most NATO countries.” 

Another official remarked: 

they are not reacting positively to 
the pressure we are putting back on 
them to forget about the idea of 
changing the flank limit. Thai docs 

feeling" y ° U 3 ** nn Suzz y 

To address Moscow's concern 
about instability in border regions, 
one important exception was in- 
cluded in the accord. Under the 
treaty, Moscow can keep an unlim- 
ited number of armored personnel 
earners on its flanks if they are 
manned by its internal security 
forces and not by its regular army 
units. The exception does not apply 
to tanks and artillery pieces. 

But the Russian Army does not 
like the idea of turning over its 
armored personnel carriers lo the 
interior security forces. 

U.S. officials sav the Russians 
are reducing their "overall number 
of weapons as the treaty requires. 
But Washington is worried because 
the Russian military seems deter- 
mined to keep Tunneling forces into 
the Caucasus region and is not 
making compensatory steps to stay 
within the overall flank limit by 
reducing excess forces m the north. 

While the limit does not take 
effect until November 1995, rede- 
ployment of troops is complicated 
and costly, and the Russians are 
not investing in the infrastructure 
that would be needed for the north- 
ern troops that would have to be 
pulled back. 

According to a classified projec- 
tion by U.S. intelligence analysts, 
Russians will have at least 2,000 
armored personnel carriers, 400 
tanks and 500 artillery pieces more 
than the flank limit allows if they 
keep to their current course. 

That estimate reflects the shift of 
forces to the southern area as well 
as the failure to make cuts in the 
forces already on the flanks. 


Malaysia Stinks to ff.K. Ran 

Reuters 

LONDON — Prime Minister 
bin Mahathir Mohamad of Malay- 
sia said Sunday that his ban on 
awarding government contracts lo 
British companies would stand un- 
til the British press apologized for 
allegations of corruption. The ban 
was imposed in February; 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, APRIL 4, 1994 

*, : CLINTON: What Ki 


Page 7 


(HINTON: What Kind of Place Is the White House? A Loose-Ends Shop 


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So^a Ttana/Rcairp 

A group among 34)00 Russian nationalists and communists gathering Sunday near the White House, 
the Russian parliament building, in Moscow to moon victims of the faded October 1993 coup. 

CRIME: Russian Criminal (kings Take On the West 


Continued from Page 1 
committed suicide in prison, one of 
the Armenians said he had bent 
sent by his government to dissuade 
the Russians from going forward 
with an illicit missile deal in Europe 
related to the war between Arme- 
nia and Azerbaijan. Mr. Wood- 
ward said The second Armenian 
made no statement in his defense 
and was sentenced to life in prison. 

In New York last year, two mem- 
bers of a Russian immigrant group 
and a pair of ludian-American or- 
ganized crime figures were convict- 
ed of working together to import 
large amounts of heroin into the 
Umted States. The cases have led 
investigators to believe that the 
Russians are becoming formidable 
rivals to the Sicilian Mafia and, in 
some instances, collaborators. 

German law enforcement agen- 
cies continue to confront scores of 


cases involving Russians and East 
Europeans engaged in illegal weap- 
ons trafficking and the smuggling 
of low-grade nuclear materials for 
sale in the West. 

Agents of the U.S. Drug En- 
forcement Administration and oth- 
er law enforcement officials say a 
pattern also has emerged in which 
Colombian cocaine exporters, 
seeking to expand their multi- 
billion-doUar markets in Europe, 
are routing their product through 
Russian organized crime partners. 

Growing political turmoil the 
convertibility of the Russian ruble 
and the relaxation of strong border 
controls have produced rising drag 
trafficking in and through Russia, 
the U.S. Stale Department report- 
ed recently. 

Colombia's dominant Cali co- 
caine cartel has had a relatively 
difficult time in securing direct. 


Continued from Page 1 

Rodham Clinton circles of authority, campaign 
veteran circles of authority'. Friends of Bill 
circles of authority. Vice President Al Gore 
circles and a half-dozen alliances and a dozen 
back-channel lines as well. 

The White House counselor, David R. Ger- 
gen, was asked last week whether he had been 
pushed outside the loop because he ran into 
trouble with Mrs. Clinton when he argued that 
the Clintons should disclose more of their per- 
sonal financial data. There are loops and there 
are loops,” he answered. 

The members of the loops keep changing. In 
little over a year, one deputy chief of staff, Roy 
Neel has left; one. Mark Gearan, moved on to 
be communications director; two new ones, 
Philip Lader and Harold I ekes, were added. 
The personnel director, Bruce Lindsey, turned 
into a roving adviser; the communications di- 
rector. George Stephanopoulos. turned into a 
senior adviser. Mr. G eigen was brought in. 
heavily utilized, then isolated, and now resur- 
rected as pan of the Whitewater defense team. 

The lop three jobs in the counsel’s office have 
changed hands; the legislative shop has 
changed hands: the scheduling, political affairs 
and intergovernmental affairs operations have 
changed hands. The national security team has 
been reconfigured to add a new secretary of 
defense, and a team of media advisers is being 
added at the White House in the national secu- 
rity area. Extensive revamping is said to be 
going on there at lower levels. 


“You and I are accustomed to Republican 
White Houses where there is a hierarchy, where 
there is a chain of command, where there are 
consequences for screwing up and where every- 
one knows who reports to whom,** said a Re- 
publican familiar with the Clinton operation. 
"President Clinton didn't want that kind of 
White House. And be sure didn’t get jL” 

That so many advisers have kibitzing rights 
with Mr. Clinton is evidence of the freewheel- 
ing Clinton White House. So are the three 
senior advisers — Mr. Stephanopoulos, Mr. 
Gergen and Mr. Lindsey— with no line author- 
ity. Relatively junior staff members can bend 
Mr. Clinton’s ear almost at wiB because the 
president is said to like such discussions. 

"You want lo know what model this White 
House follows?" an aide said. “Well you aren’t 
going to find it in Presidential Quarterly. You 
aren't going to find it period. IPs the Bill 
Clinton model’ 

Mr. Gergen, who served in three Republican 
White Houses, said, “Democrats have a differ- 
ent concept" of bow to run things. But he added 
that, fundamentally. "Staffs are a reflection of 
the desires of the person in the center." 

“The person, this president, likes a staff in 
which many diverse views are expressed," he 
said. 

Mr. McLarty. the chief of staff, said that Mr. 
Clinton should be judged by his results in 
legislation and in the state of the nation and the 
world, not by episodes of trouble. He and Mr. 
Geigen point to last year's budget agreement 


and approval of the North American Free 
Trade Agreement, plus lesser successes, as well 
as the introduction of health care refonn, the 
work this year on education, crime and other 
issues as evidence that however messy the Clin- 
ton operation looks, it is effective. 

No one disputes that how the White House 
nms is important. In an era in whidi the White 
House has become a complex and central place 
for the making and execution of policy and the 
focus of increasingly huge amounts of media 
attention, the While House operation has been 
seat as vital to presidential success. 

But Mr. Clinton, Us aides have said, gave 

significantly Jess thought to the White House 
staff than he did to the cabinet. Mr. McLarty, 
in large measure, did not select the staff he 
oversees, many of whom have relationships 
with die president or first lady that put than 
outside of bis control. 

It is not always easy to figure out what Mr. 
McLarty does. His advocates say that is be- 
cause one of his major roles is giving private 
advice to Mr. Clinton at difficult times. 

Much of the work of the White House seems 
to go on without Mr. MoLart/s direct involve- 
ment, whidi he suggests is the way he planned 
it 

"Information does flow through my office,” 
he said. "1 know what’s going on," he added, 
insisting that he could intervene if need be. 

With each controversy, the question for the 
White House has been: Who’s in charge? Die 
answer has been; On what subject? 


REFUGEES: Evacuation Is Set 


routes for cocaine smuggling to 
Western Europe because, unlike in 
the United Slates, there are not 
enough expatriate Colombians to 
provide secure networks on the im- 
port ride, investigators say. Thus, 
the Colombians require partners. 

This trend was highlighted by 
the seizure of a metric ton of co- 
caine in Sl Petersburg last year. 
Investigators said the dregs were 
produced by the Cali cartel and 
imported by Russians for eventual 
shipment to Germany. 

Though Russians are acquiring 
the most substantial financial as- 
sets, crime groups from Ukraine, 
Belarus and Poland are also be- 
coming significant players in the 
West, Mr. Freeh and other officials 
said. One difficulty is that the po- 
lice in these countries lack the re- 
sources to be of much help to their 
Western counterparts. . - 


Continued from Page 1 

in the former Yugoslavia once an 
agreement was reached. 

(Reuters, AFP) 

■ Prijedor Toll Is Put at 19 

Chuck Sudetic of The New York 
Tunes reported from Sarajevo: 

At least 19 Muslim and Croatian 
civilians have been killed since 
Wednesday in the Serb-held town 
of Prijedor. 

Aid workers expressed fear that 
the decision to evacuate the threat- 
ened minorities could encourage 
nationalist Serbs to mount new at- 
tacks on Muslims and Croats. 

The aid workers also said they 
feared that a flood of desperate 
Muslims and Croats could pour 
into Prqedor from nearby towns 
where Serbian gunmen have for 
months used killing s, rape and ar- 
son to pry them from their homes. 

"I am sure ihe Serbs are not 
going to cry about it,” said an aid 
worker. "Die danger now is that 
this is a precedent It may encour- 
age the Serbs and encourage people 
to seek evacuation even if they are 
not under great duress.” 

“We want to avoid a stampede," 
he said. “We’re worried that we 
could get a situation of crowds be- 
sieging us and getting out of con- 
trol” 

The planned evacuation from 
Prijedor would be one of the largest 
mass movements of people in the 
Bosnian war, which has uprooted 
about 2 million people and killed 
.an estimated 200,000. 


UN officials estimate that there 
are 3,000 Croats and 6,000 Mus- 
lims left in Prijedor and nearby’ 
villages. There are about 55,000 
Serbs now living in Prijedor, which 
had a Muslim majority before the 
fighting began. 

The Red Cross plans to bus those 
who wish to leave Prijedor north 
across the Sava River at Novska, 
where they will be handed over to 
the UN High Commissioner for 
Refugees for placement in camps in 
Croatia - 

Red Cross officials confirmed 
that workers were already gather- 
ing buses in the Croatian capital 
Zagreb, for the evacuation. 

During a similar, much smaller 
evacuation a year ago from the be- 
sieged M uslim enclave of Srebren- 
ica, Muslims desperate to flee 
crushed each other to death in the 
rush to jam into UN trucks. 

Speaking by telephone from Ge- 
neva, Thierry Gennond, the Red 
Cross delegate-general for Europe, 
said that despite numerous prom- 
ises. high-ranking and local Bosni- 
an Serbs had not acted to quell 
months of brutal violence against 
minority group members in north- 
western Bosnia. 

“Our objective is to grant protec- 
tion to the people where they are," 
Mr. Gennond said. "Now one has 
to recognize that our efforts in this 
area have not been a success. The 
international community has not 
been able to guarantee a basic secu- 
rity in spite erf numerous approach- 
es.” • 


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IT FEEL? 


How does it feef? When you do meet a refugee, 

Imag ^ t} rtjntiwiirBfe at peace. Horne, The fed is, refugees are just Bke you irnagmeforanxjmentwhatitmustbe 

Youte&jeo you* ^ me, except that they hare nothing- like, and then show her your anile. 

feuiOy, ^ changes. And thafs exactly what theyH always Instead of your back, 

warning, neighbours hare unless we help. It may not seem much. But to a 

Oenugnl ^ Tanks prowl We’re not askingfor money (though refugee it can mean everything, 

become lifetohB b ‘ Mortar every cent helps), bnt only this: UNHCR is a strictly humanitarian 

the streets an ^ b ^ es ' Rockets organization funded only by voluntary 

shells shatter the mosques. , contributions. Currently it is responsible 

silence the church ben ^ ^ V|V a for more than 19 million refugees 

Suddenly ^ jf 'JjjF x AM around the world. 

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Continued on Page 12 




















































































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* 4 




International Herald Tribune, Monday, April 4, 1994 



Page 9 


€B€L 


the architects of time 


>r- 

a’s 


^■^AUMARKETrs^ 

U.K. Bonds Led the Rout 

hi the Year’s First Quarto 


P 


By Carl Gewirtz 

A T> to ~ . ,n,er J tiof ^Hrrald Tribune 

bidi3?^!2S£;£Si * co.’s «SS5 


Executives 
Step Aside 
In Inquiry at 
Woolworth 


bond md« nv^, ■ r r ; Mor S azj * Ca’s government 


EiST 0 " 01 m to 6J Britain. The 

aghth worst, with a loss of 2.7 percenL 


^ fn ®h““* wwiaL ’ wi n a loss of 2.7 percent. 

vo l urDe * h was the secOTd-most-active 
SI 34 billion of . by Sal°m<® Brothers Inc. shows 

7 6 T v-i-j-i M.t issues on the international market, down only 

rim *— » > ~J 

In recent weeks, issuance has 


xu reran weeics. issuance has , 

dramatically. Neither ™eimer investors nor 
shdl-shocked investors nor un- j 
derwriters are willing to commit underwriters are 

new money to markets that do 

not yet appear to have hit bot- ™«ng to Commit 


tom. Issuers, meanwhile, have newmonev. 
no incentive to try to force them- J 

selves on an 


to try t° f< 
unwilling 


market as 


mc«t belike the deterioration in absolute borrowing levels (rising 
yielg) and relative terms (widening spreads to government bench- 
marks) are not justified by underlying economic fundamentals. 
Ajthou^hpnces on most European markets rallied sharply on the 


last day of trading, analysts are unwilling to say the seD-offis over. 

Kim Schocnholtz, London-based analyst at Salomon Brothers, 
said the dimmation of the many uncertainties now plaguing the 
market are the key to fostering a favorable bond market.” Those 
worries, he added, center on the strength of the VS. recovery and 
the impact on inflation as well as the inflation outlook in Europe. 

‘‘Markets will continue to trade nervously, with a Was to lower 
prices,” said Malcolm Robots of Union Bank of Switzerland, also 
London-based. “Although fundamental value is good in Europe, a 
key condition for a recovery in bonds is that the Bundesbank 
signals its latest shift to ease less obliquely.” 

Over the past month, the German central bank has allowed the 
key money-market rate to decline in small slices by a total of 24 
basis points, nearly a quarter percentage point Nevertheless, there 
remains considerable confusion about the size and tuning of future 
reductions and a dearer sig nal is needed to convince markets that 
German — and subsequently all European — rates are headed 
substantially lower. 

Even then it may be difficult to get a sustained rally under way. 
Jan Loeys at J.P. Morgan in London warned of strong head winds: 
Many investors are only waiting for better prices as an opportunity 
to sell, and borrowers who have been forced by market conditions 


See BONDS, Page 11 




Weekending April, 111 

daily dosings. m 
Jan. .1992= 100. loa f 


131 


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intfe TliTis 12333 -1JM ******* 11B371223 -3.44 

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Services 116.47 118.42 -1£5~ Miscellaneous 124.74 12890 -323 


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Argentina. Aurtrafl^Aurtrta, Kaxieo, Nslhirtanda, Near 

Hfirt Ftm end Venezuela. For 

Zealand. Vot S!Si‘^fSSn'^hdv beonposudcflhnSO top Issues ti wm> 

. ■ C Hamsfona! Herald Trtwa 


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^ - - -» 


NEW YORK — The chairman 
and die chid financial officer of 
Woolworth Carp, have temporarily 
resigned pending an investigation 
into accounting irregularities, the 
retailer said on Sunday. 

Woolworth had announced 
Thursday that it would initiate an 
inqinry, by a spedal committee of 
outside directors, into previous ac- 
counting procedures. It added that 
in this connection i t would restate its 
finandal results for the year aided 
Jan. 29 to “correct gross margins.” 

On Sunday, the company said 
William Lavm, the rhairman and 
chief executive, bad temporarilyre- 
signed pending the conclusion of 
the investigation. 

Mr. Lavm, a forma chief finan- 
cial officer of the company, will be 
replaced by John Adams, who has 
boat chairman of Woohvorth’s au- 
dit committee and of the special 
committee of outside directors. 

He is a director of CT Financial 
Sendees Inc. and is the fanner 
rhairman and director of EMCO 
LtcL, in London, Ontario. 

Woolworth added that Charles 
Young, senior vice president and 
chief financial officer, had volun- 
tarily relinquished his positions on 
the same basis. No replacement 
was named for Mr. Young 

Mr. Lavin and Mr. Young de- 
nied any wrongdoing. 

After Woolworth's announce- 
ment Thursday, two of its factors 
— the credit intermediaries that 
guarantee payment to its suppliers 
— reportedly advised the suppliers 
tO halt jhipmaiK. 

But the company said Sunday 
that it had been in loach with its 
major suppliers, all of whom indi- 
cated they wiQ crmtin rig to ship to 
the company, and that creditors had 
confirm ed its existing credit lines. 

Woolworth repeated a statement 
made Thursday that the investiga- 
tion was expected to have no mate- 
rial effect on its financial position. 


Small Investors 
Fight Back Panic 


By Jerry Knight 
and Maryann Haggerty 

Washirtpem Post Service 

WASHINGTON — After anxiously watching the stock market 
for months and sweating through five difficult days as the Dow 
Jones industrial average skidded almost 200 points, Stacy Grant 
made her move: She switched her retirement accounts from mutual 
funds that invest in stocks to a money market fund. 

“I wasn't going to sit there and get run over” the 36-year-old 
electrolysis technician said. 

But now she wonders whether she did the right thing last week. 

»ru.. L. " : j n: l. 


“That might have been too hasty," said Miss Grant, who is still 
ith h 


debating with ha friends, ha boyfriend — and herself — whether it 
was smarter to get out of the stock market now or to ride through this 
down cycle. 

A three-year surge in the U.S. stock market, combined in an 
unprecedented way with historically low interest ratespaid on bank 
savings accounts and certificates of deposit, lured nrimoos of small 
investors into the market, many for the first time. 

Now, with professional analysts uncertain whether last week’s 
slide marks a short-term dedine in an otherwise rising market or the 
be ginning of a long, sustained dedine in stock prices, many of these 
market amateurs share Miss Grant's dilemma: What now? 



Friday, a stronger- than-exp ected government rep ext on new jobs 
triggered another round of rising interest rates in the bond markets. 
That, many analysts said, likely win send stock prices stiH Iowa 
when Wan Street opens Monday. 

Interviews with more than a dozen Washington-area investors 
found that, for the time being ai least, they are embracing the widely 
recommended strategy of holding stocks for the long run. 

“Most of the people who try to time the market usually don’t." 
said Steve Paulson, 62, a pharmacist “They sell at the wrong time 
and they buy at the wrong time. Studies have shown that people who 
buy and hold do better.’' 


See STOCKS, Page li 



dy 

&h 

lv, 

u- 

p er 

al 


Of Import Restrictions 

Lecturing Microsoft A GATT Warning 


k 

■er 

JL 

■O' 

ii- 


Bloomterg Business S'ovs 

BEIJING — A Chinese o ffici al hw threatened to 
ban sales by Microsoft Carp, if the world’s biggest 
software maker does not support Beijing’s plans to 
promote domestic programs, tbs China Daily reported 
on Sunday. 


Yang Tianxing, director of the computer depart- 

industry, 


was 


ment at the Ministiy of Electronics 
quoted by the official newspapa as saying that Muro- 
arft products will be banned if they are not compatible 
with software standards being deraoped by the minis- 
try and domestic producers. 

Microsoft can sell the English versions of its prod- 
s in C hina and the localization work should be 


ucts 


dgence Ftancc-Pnase 

BEIJING — China will go only so far to ensure its 
entry into GATT and wifl revive import controls 
should its bid to rqoin the world trade body be 
rejected, an official newspaper reported Sunday, quot- 
ing a senior trade ministiy official. 

'■‘The bottom line is equal treatment," said the foreign 
trade mmis&y's deputy director for internati o nal rela- 
tions, Li Longzbou. He stressed that China was not so 
desperate that it would pay any price for membenhip in 
the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

Mr. LI quoted in the Qrina Daily’s Business Weekly, 
accused some of China's trading parmos, especially the 
United States, of using the GATT membership issue to 


UL 

of 


or 

>ial 

ue 

es 

:5. 

o- 


done by Chinese." the paper quoted Mr. Yang saying. 

nViM.ii! ... j. — ir * 


‘Microsoft should not do everything by itself.’ 

H. Gates 3d, trav- 


extract unreasonable concessions from Beijing. 

U of Chin a* i 


Microsoft’s chairman, William 
ded to Beijing two weds ago to launch a Chinese- 
language version of an office applications program. 

But Mr. Yang criticized Microsoft for refusing to 
coopoate in setting up a Chinese software standard 
rather than developing its own products, the paper 
said. It is not dear how much weight the minis try's 
polities carry. 

The leading company in China's infant software 
industry, SunTendy Cx, has developed a competitor 
to Microsoft’s popular operating system Windows, 
called Chinese Star. 


While acknowledging that a rejection of China’s bid 
would hurt the country's trade expansion and slow the 
pace of reform, Mr. Li said steps could be taken to 
ensure China's competitiveness if it woe left outride 
the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

M A passive remrn to import substitution in paraDel 


with continued investment incentives may actually 

ise local 


the 


Mr. Yang said a Chinese version of Windows, 
launched in China by Microsoft six months ago, was 
harmed. However, the fTiin* Daily mid “unauthorized 
sales channels” rendered the ban ineffective. Within 
half a year, Chinese Star’s market share dropped from 


encourage greater foreign investment because 
production would then be favored ova imports,' 
China Daily quoted Mr. Li as saying. 

Import substitution is a policy of restricting manu- 
factured imports and encouraging domestic industry 
to make the products instead. It is considered antithet- 
ical to free trade. 

The world trade community has a choice between 
accepting China as an equal trading partna by granting 
it GATT membership, or competing for access to the 
Chinese market on a recrorocal basis." Mr. Li added. 


See GATES, Page 11 


The trade official also assailed the United States for 

See TRADE, Page 11 


In U.S. Business, John Welch Is a General’s General 


By Frank Swoboda 
and Warren Brown 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON —As he works 
to resurrect the fortunes ti General 
Motors Coqx, John F. Smith Sr. 
often turns to an unlikely source 
for help: the General Electric Co. 
chairman, John F. Welch Jr. 

Mr. Smith, CM’S president and 
chief executive, is regularly on the 
phone with Mr. Welch, seeking ad- 
vice on subjects ran gin g from corpo- 


Paris Notebook 


Government Can 
Survive a Bum 
On Heavy Hand 


Dirigisme, the French slate’s historic rdlex to control the levers of 
capitalism, has not had a good name in recent years, and the scandal 
over huge losses at Credit Lyonnais certainly is not helping matters. 

But specialists say the dingiste roots run so deep in the country's 
power elite that when the storm clouds dissipate, dirigisme will 
emerge, once again, as the underlying force in the national economy. 

Jean-Yves Haberer, forma chairman of the state-owned bank, 
ignited the fire last week when he asserted that the institution’s 
catastrophic losses were not all his fault, that the then-Socialisi 
government that had hired him in 1 988 had pressured him to support 
money-losing ventures in the interest ti the economy and jobs. 

John Stuart MacDonald, professor of international business at 
Kings College, University of London, said that the French stale had 
long held a firm hand ova the financial sector, and he doubted that 
the current debate would change that. He contends, in fact, that 
dirigisme in banking has worked well for the French economy, 
providing companies with low-interest credit which has helped 
stimulate trade and given a boost to export industries. 

“It would be unwise to jump to the conclusion that the state-bank 
relationship should be abolished,” Mr. MacDonald said. 

Even if there was a popular will to do away with dirigisme, he said 
the reflex would take years, if not generations, to eliminate. Privati- 
zation would have only a minor effect. 

One reason, he said, is that it would prove difficult to oust the 
Enarques, officials who dominate the top financial and government 
offices. Tbe name is taken from the French initials of the prestigious 
National School of Administration. “The Enarques are unique, a 
caste ti extrordinarily bright people who osculate between the 
public and private sector,” he said. 

Another is cultural. “In France," he said, “it is taken as part of the 
furniture that social and political questions will be mixed into the 
economy.” 


Mickey Sidles Up to Paris 

Euro Disneyland may be saved by last month's deal between 
banker s and Walt Disney Co. — the finandal restructuring accord is 
stiH bang studied by more than 60 banks — but its name could be 
headed for the scrap heap. 

The company has quietly lagged on the wad “Paris" to the park s 
name, and Paris Disney watdiers suggest that within a few years the 
company wfll likely drop the “Euro." leavingjust “Disneyland Paris." 

“lt*s got to be Euro or Paris, it eanjt be beboth," adda marketing 

SadIto*aiKUhen officially erase thelEuro.' " 

A company spokesman said Paris was added to emphasize that the 
park, at Mame-la-Vallfee, « very close to Europe’s biggest tourist 
ca pital He maintained that “dropping Euro is not being considered.” 

Across town. Canal Plus SA, France’s pay-TV company, is also 
looking for a name for its Dew theme cfaannd about European culture 
and lifestyle that does not have the word Euro or Europe in it. Michel 
Tboulouze, head ti theme channel development for the company, said 
mariryt studies had shown that that “Euro" was not appealing to 
foreign audiences. He said that using the name ti a city such as Paris, 
Monte Carlo or Venice would cany a lot more punch. Suggestions are 
wdcome. Stay tuned 


France as Retirement Haven? 

Governments ti recent years have worked diligently to “take 
France attractive for U.S. investment by relaxing fiscal conditions 
for American expatriate postings, but in doing so, they have acci- 
dently ynadft the country attractive for wealthy American retirees. 

“Fiance has turned into a retirement haven.” said Jack Anderson, 
tax specialist at Ernst & Young in Paris. "It is encouraging Ameri- 
cans not only to work in France, but to retire there.” 

For example, he said, payouts from U.S. pension plans are exempt 
from French income taxes, as are passive earnings from U5. invest- 
ments <nK-h sc remital game interest, dividends or rental income. 


irran rrenen income taxes, as are passive eannuga * 

meats such as ca pital gams, interest, dividends or rental income. 
Though this income must be included in French tax returns to figure 

Ihe effective tax rate, if the retiree had no active income to report, his 

French, tax till would be zero 


Jacques Neher 


rate restructuring and management 
reorganization to labor relations, ac- 
cording to sources fannHar with 
both ends ti the conversations. 

What makes the relationship un- 
usual is that GE is a customer, 
supplier and, in some Gelds like 
locomotive manufacturing, com- 
petitor of GM. 

Call it the CEOs’ chib, for the 
Smith-Wdch contacts illustrate a 
larger point about management in 
the *90s. In today’s increasingly 
competitive climate, traditionally 
inbred corporations are being 
forced to look outside to keep up 
with the best business practices. 

This need for corporate outreach 
helps explain the parade of CEOs 


to GFs Fairfield, Connecticut, 
headquarters to consult with Mr. 
Welch, an executive who has been 
through restructuring ware and 
prospered. Since taking over at GE 
13 years ago, Mr. Welch has ex- 
panded its revenue from S26 billion 
to more than $60 billion, halved the 
work force and positioned the com- 
pany so that every line of business 
is first or second in its industiy. 

The list of visitors includes such 
corporate figures as Louis V. 
Geretner Jr„ the new chairman of 
International Business Machines 
Coip.: John S. Reed, the Citicorp 
chairman; and George M. C Fish- 
er, who recently took over as chair- 
man of Eastman Kodak Co. 


When top executives are not ask- 
ing to see Mr. Welch, be invites 
them ova to share ideas. Mr. Welch 
long has preached the need for exec- 
utives to get out into the world and 
see what works best and then bor- 
row those ideas. He spends a lot of 
lime visiting other companies. 


The problems Mr. Welch faced 
when he took ova at GE are mud) 
the same as those facing GM to- 


day: the need to cut the work force 
in half. 


dose manufacturing facili- 
ties and attack a middle- manage- 
ment culture that rivaled that ti the 
UJ>. Postal Service. 


Today, by Mr. Smith’s estimate, 
GM is about 60 percent along the 


way toward achieving its restruc- 
turing goals. In 1993, the company 
had its first profit in its North 
American operations in five years, 
eliminated thousands of jobs and 
dosed some ti the operations tar- 
geted in the restructuring plan. 

Mr. Smith shares what an asso- 
ciate calls “a natural Massachusetts 
affinity” with Mr. Welch, both hav- 
ing grown up as the sons ti Irish 
Catholic working-class parents in 
the state. Two years apart in age, 
they were students together briefly 
at the University ti Massachusetts 
in Amherst. 

Mr. Smith’s calls are coming as 

See WELCH, Page 12 


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FOR BUSINESS ORDBIS, PlEASE NBCAlE^ YOUR Yfil NUMBER: 


(HTVAT ruiier FR 7473202 H 261 ] 

□ Mr.n Mn □ Men FAM4Y NAME. 


RUST NAME, 


PBMANB^T ADDRESS □ HOMED BUStGSS. 


OTY/CODE. 

COUNTRY— 


TB, 


FAX_ 


i < international m ♦ 4 

iieralo^^eribune 


Fwussse wn* I*e w vonn ms AM? the WAsamcnw i 


fac 3114637 065!-%t 33.14^1061 

oiler is gvoifabfe to rwwr s u bscri b e s only. 




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rnrs* SPoSS.^f ¥ C2«?p. E,? B )( 7 Sfi F-eLP-EP SB$s S. 6 L B\* 









Page 10 


mutual funds 


Close of boding Friday, April 1. 


IGrpManw Wtdr 
I FdNome Last Out 

i 


GjPNwiw Witty 
FrtNoroe Lest Owe 


AAL Mutual: 

Borxlp ,84 —68 
CWrp 1429 — J7 
104? -.22 
_5mCustx hm 4 — 85 
AARPtnvyfc 
BoB&B 0x1*36 — .40 
CtuKSrn 3147—1.62 
GrteMn 15.16 —.13 
Grwlncm3145— 184 
HQBdn 15.74 —.14 
TxFBdn 1724 —29 
ABTFundv 
Emergo 1429— 1 .00 
R.HI 1027 —24 
FLTF law —.19 
Gwtfllnp 10.19 —52 
Utainc B 1145—34 
AFLgCapnx983 —42 
AHA Fonts: 

Baton n 11.92 —24 
Full 976 —06 
Urn 1021 —32 
AIM Funds: 

AtfiGvp 974-61 
Aorsvp 2453—151 
BatAP 1540—45 
Chan p 8.74 —24 
Canstl p 1723 —.99 
Go5c O 9.58 — 57 
GnhB I 1122—53 
Grtti p 1126—53 
HYMAp 950-23 
HYlOBt 979 —24 
lIKDP 721 —.12 
IntfEp 1248—17 
LimM p 10.01 —21 
MuBp £13 — .14 


941 
1069 —17 
1062 —.11 
1225 —20 
1224 —31 
21.10 —86 
21.12 —28 


Summit 
TeCT □ 

TFlnt 
Uinp 
UtflBI 
VaiuBt 

VatuP 

Wein&p 1629 
AMF Funds: 

AcfMtp 9.73 
IntMlgn 963 —24 
IntHjqn 1067 -22 
Art Seen 1065 —27 
ARK Funds: 

CasGrn 1023 —51 
Grlncon 10.14 —36 
Income 9.72 —10 
ASMFdnx 963 —37 
Accessor Fields: 
IntFxIn Rx 1 1 76 —14 
AccAAortgll.Tfl —.11 
5hilntFxx1263 —27 
Acondn 1525 -21 
AcmFd Ilia —51 
AdsnCOP 20.95—121 
AdvCBrip 10.11 —29 
AduCRein 1022 —TO 
AdvestAdvant 
Govt np 931 —.13 
Gwtti npx 1624 —79 
HYBdP 923 — 21 
Inca npx 1140 —43 
MuBdNat 925 —22 
Spdnp 2024—141 
Aetna Funds: 

Aetna n 1053-22 
Bond nx 9.99 —.11 
Grwinca 1070 —29 
IntlGr n 1121 —.03 
Ataer Funds 
Growttlt 20.08 —26 
IncGrr 


GrpNama Wkty 
Fd Same Last Owe 


HiYWnvA pms —.17 
MiYkSpx 446 —.17 
AAuBA P 9.98 —.19 
MunBBpx 9.99 -.17 
PQCflAp 1124 —45 
PoceBP 17.78 —45 
TEHiYA P1079 —.16 
TErtYBpl079 —.16 
TaxExIA nl 1.13—14 
TxEtBp 11.12 —.15 
TXMSAp 979 —.18 
UTBAp 820— .15 
Amtriam Funds: 
AmBalP 11.95 —21 
Amcpp 1244 —43 
AmllAutt PZ127 —46 
BondFdP 1366 —20 
Cop maip 3222 —40 
CopWWp 1569 -JH 
CaaWGr 1747 —27 
Eupocp 31.95—25 
Fdlnvp 1751 —56 
Govrp 1359 —73 
GwthFd P 26.08 — 124 
HI Trap 1452 —34 
IncoFdP 1355 —24 
InlBap 1367 —II 
■nvGOAp 17.93 —49 
LMTESd 1421 —21 


10.91 —.17 
An 1622 —97 
TffldA 1167 —IB 
Boulevard Funds: 
BJChiP 850 —21 
Moraine 966 
SlroBal 9.7B —06 
Brinson Funds: 
BrinsnGI t 1051 — .17 
BTimGIBF 9.76 '23 
MUSEqty 956 —.16 
Bmdvwnn 24.94— 126 
Bruce n 10027— 175 
BrundaSJ n 10.45 —06 
BalKBearGp: 
GfelncnmSJ, —27 
Gotdlnv npl677— .94 
GavtSecnpl524 — 24 
ArtuHiCP 1623 —26 
GuriGthp>341 
SoEqp 2024—176 
USOvsnp 7.92 —27 
Bundiamp2062 —54 
C&SRRvr 3345— 129 
COM Funds: 

AmerTF 927 —23 
CnpOev H3671 —176 

Fxdlncn 1061 —27 
MuHn 2750 —.95 
Galmos p 1322 —52 
CATFIn 10.12 — .18 
Cdfemia Trash 
Catlncn 12.10 —24 
ColUSn 1063 —10 
S&PSOOn 1071 —55 


Grp Name WWr 
Pd Name Lost Chge 


NwEcon P2924— 1.15 SBrf’Mid 1179—59 


NewPerp 14.75 —29 
SmCpwa2226 —94 
TaxExPf P1160 — 23 
TxExCAp 1S2V -28 
TxExAAD P14.95 — 28 
TxExVADl546 — 26 
WsnArtut P1675 —48 
AmGwth 923 —27 
AMvitg n 1.26 —28 
Amer NaftFup 


Growth AOS —.14 
Income 2076 — 66 
Triflex 14.94 -25 
API Grfpn 12 27 —51 
Pei tin i iv 


Ami . 
Bondx 
Equity 
JmSdx 


951 —27 
1121 —53 
1043 —24 


Catvat Group: 

Ariel 2858—1.42 
ArielAp 2178—1.14 
GtobEq 17.79 —.16 
mco 1667 —.18 
MBCAI iai4 —.12 
A/lunlnt 1025 —.11 
SoaalO 29.16—72 
SocBd 1421 —.12 
SocEq 20.98—1.12 
TxFUdn 1068 —.01 
TxFLng 1621 —21 
TxFVT 1527 — 50 
USGov 1422 —12 
Com h rMoeFdsc 
CaPGrA 1451 —45 
GvlnA 1321 —.11 
GwtttA 1521 —76 


AmUtlFd nx207J —7* i MuincA 1464 — 26 
AmwyMutf 741 -23 CcoGrBI 1447 —46 
AnaM*: nx 1 146 -31 GvIrrB t 1323 —.1 1 
AnchCdP f 1974 —.95 QwttlB f is.?] —71 
' IncGrBt 1477 -44 
AZTF 1023 —22, MuincBt 1466 — 26 
COTF 10.12 —19 jCaprtrtkldx no 64 -.42 
HlTF --Jf IcimtolEan 953 -50 

KY TF 1055 —17 . CapilriFI n 9.94 —08 
NjpnsfTF 946 -27 ;ojpph*j Rastrmore: 
ORJP >G46 -66 EmgGr n 1227 —21 
TxFUT 926 —25. Grwtti 1148 —50 

lsFuB f co ,c I CopoietUtl 927 —27 
ice n 959 —25) Qipstone Group: 

'SE" « « 1 Fund SW 1491— 166 

. Jq cn . 9 77 — M : Gvtlnc 479 
Art* Funds [ wuxSis 1823 -60 

--I5 1 NZtana n.13 -24 

Em Grtti 1 1^8 —It \ . Njnrxm jkr 01 

10.14 -67 i — 47 

GnXnc 1255 —44 -r— ritrviL Family 

a— ’ aS “to ■ Bctancea 9.95 -23 
Fund 1252 -J8 
AHantaGrP 1052 -58 | GcvTCttig 827 -55 

wi»i „ ICarilCo 12.95-25 
’Hi “■?! CamMOHTE958— 12 
inS— Jl-CnKBiA 1525 -.15 
itto TTto ICnKBlB 1522 -.15 

... NoMurri 1053 —25 1 SSJshPn 0 MAB Z Jf 

1134 — 7B BB&T Funds: CnUyShr n 2268 —51 


SmCopt 2128—128 

Affiance Cop: 

Alienee D 659 —22 
Baton P 1326 — 21 
BatanBt 1424 —45 
B ondA p 1324 —47 
Canada P - 

Costvlnv 1058 —.09 
CpBOBp 1324 -41 
CpBdC P 1324 —41 
Could P 1664 —74 
GlbSAp 1129—45 
GcvtAp 8.09 —Oil 
GovtB P BJJ9 —07 
GovtC p B.09 —37 
GrtKncp 229 — JJ7 
GwrhC 2021 —35 
G«thFp 2191—1.00 
GWIllBI 3020 —36 
GdncB p 228 —.07 
GrinvB 11.75 —21 
InMAp 966 —.19 
IruMuB 967 —.18 
IiuAACp 9.66 -.19 


GUt 857 
GibOivt 1031 —.17 
FedSett 927 -57 
HBtlScI 1025 —51 
HtYfcH 774 —.11 
AAuA2 1 10.06 — 26 

Intmdt 9.70 —.04 
LtdAAuni 961 —22 
AAuCAt 10.14 —27 
ArtUR.t 1026 -26 
MUNJt iai9 —26 
MuOHp 10.18 —26 
MutfPA 1 IB19 — 28 
NYTxFt 1160—25 
NIRsI 1126—70 
PacGrt 19.14 —25 
Prcrtrtr 11.90—28 
Premier p B.90 — .03 
SeUMup 11.92—39 
Mancsed I1DL73 — 16 
ST Bd 965 —53 
STUSp 1052 — 53 
Stroll 107 —46 
TaxEx 1156 —25 
USGvtt 837 —07 
Uhl rtf 13.19— 23 

VolAdt 1940 —77 
WWInc 8.75 *56 
widwdt rails —26 
TCBdP 9.44 —24 
TCCort 12.10—64 
TCInep 1045 —24 
TCLMt 1134—53 
TCNOrip 965 —54 
TCSCPt 9.48 —.91 
DelGroinft 
Oed lx 1574 —50 
Dehvrt x 1754 —47 
DfcPt 2552— 127 

Dfctil 657 -.11 
TsvRSI 9.54 —55 
Delaware Group: 

Trend p 13.15—81 
Value P 20 15 —37 
Detamp 2543—126 
Oectri IS7< —50 
Dectr 1 1 px 1227 —57 
Delaw Q 1733-67 
lnlCqpx 1175—28 
DekTip 637 —11 

V£Tp p 

TxUSP 12.13—12 
Txlnso N54— .10 
TxFrPoP 826 —11 
Dtmemioinl Fds: 
USLrg 1135 -.44 
USSrrt 825 -50 
US 6-10 n 1125—68 
Japann 2&B8 *53 
UKn 2357 —43 
Certtn 1507 -.14 
DFAR1ESJ1057 —59 
Kxdn 101.68 -51 
GGd 10058 -23 
Govt n 10287 —27 
IrrtGv 10926 —75 
irtdHBrtrt 11.17 —.16 
LCanlirt 1256 —.12 
PncRim 1626 —26 
USLoVa 10.18 -22 
USSmVd 1128 -5B 
Dodue&Cac 
Baton n 4521 —71 
Incomen 1127 —55 
Stock n 5220— 151 
OamSoOcI 1175—40 
Dreman Funds: 

Cortm 1324 —.47 
HJRtn 1529 -62 
SmCaVal n1057 — 46 
Dreyfus: 

A Band n 1428 —16 
Asrecnp 1A14 —26 
AssetA0nl228 —20 
Balnat 13.13 -27 
CafTxn 1459 —26 
Callnt n 1358 -27 
CTIntn 1278 —22 
Dreyfus 1267 —25 



Grp Name wktylGrpI 

Fd Nome Last Owe Fd 


FLIntn 1204—23 
GNMA np 1464 —12 
GnCA 1118 —27 


aemnx r.oj ir ™ ; 

GrolncTnxia98- 34;OW«rth ^29— i.14 

IntGOvT flx9.7J - 07 |O*sM 1»76— 467 
SlGovT nx 956 —54 
dca Cfliwfe. I CnuocGnn 

cjubPI 2152 —59 'ChubbTR 1423 —85 
mflE? 19.02 -29 : gtpwr.V 4764-1.97 

SlflFxtn DX1193-53 Ct^dFim*: 

BFMShOun 951 — 03' IntEatP 1959 — 58 

SJbSap 11JD -55i COTE A 757 -.16 | GArtBdP 1466 -20 

1 GNYP 1971-43 

Giincn 1650 —54 
GwthOpn 10.14 —34 
InsMun npl750 —43 
irtfermn 1378 —23 
MerEqp 1552 —27 
InvGNn 1435— .11 
MAlntn 12.91 —25 
MA Tax n 1577 —27 
MunBdn 1229 —28 
NJlrttn 1358 — 26 


mcBoSP 840 —21 
MimBd 977 —36 
STTsyp 5574 *53 
SpcEqtP 7.75-53 
TrodGvt 1157 —57 
Tradlnvp 7.05 —20 
T«dT0t|p823 —14 
EcSpEan 13.15 —.73 
EcSpBalx 1821 —.7? 
EnaraU Fluids: 
EmEat 1127 —50 
EnvfdUS 1028 —.06 
FLTE 1056 —28 
SmCaeln 932 —74 
EmPBkS 1746 —28 
Endow 1656 —28 
Enterprise Group: 
CapApp 2974—163 
GvSecP 1137—14 
Gwtti np 859 —33 
GrlPCP 1723 — 67 
HYBdP 1124— 23 
InttGrp 1651 —27 
SmCo S25 —71 
TE Inc p 1327 —29 
EdtvStn 30A1— 129 
Evenpeen Funds: 
Evrpmn 1371 —68 
Found n 1264 — 25 
GloRen 1395 —46 
LtdrtAldn 71.16— 1.08 
MunCAn iaoe —59 
MurtFn 1023 — 59 
Muni Ins n 9.90 —29 
Retire n n.T9 —21 
TatRtn 1829 —63 
ValTm n 1476 —66 
ExcelAAidQS 4.18 —.09 
ExInvHio 767 —15 
FAMValn 19.60 — 55 
FEU. Series: 

BJChiP I 17.93—65 
Growth l 1320—50 
HiGrBdt 1029 —05 
KfYBd t 1027 — 21 
Monad t 1173 —23 
FFBi-exicon: 
ConAppx 115s —43 
Fxdlnx 10.15 —.10 
InIGvx 1059 -.08 
SelVtSue pV3.43 —27 
FFBEO 1029 -43 
FFBNJ 1049 —25 
FFTW Funds: 

IntflHdB 

US Shari 9.96 
WWHedg 958 —.11 
WM'Fxrtrr *54 —.06 
FMB Funds: 

DivECPX 1155 —26 
OivE I x 1155-26 
mGCp 10.14 —55 
IntG I 10.14—55 
MiTFp 1027 —14 
ArtiTFI 1027 —.14 
FPA Fonts: 

Capit 1920— 1.10 
Newtnc 1031 —56 
Pormnt 1317 —66 
PertO 2128—53 
Fairmtn 2362—131 
Fasaanon 1725 —62 
Federated Fuads: 
ArmSSpn 937 —31 
Arm I n 932 —01 
ExOlFd 116947—236 
RgtlSn 1046 -.03 
FSTilsn 892 —.01 
FGROn 2227— 128 
FHYTn 9.09—16 
FITISn 10.14 —.04 
FIT 55 p 10.14 —04 
FsWtSn 1029 —31 
FsighiSSp1029 —01 
FSTn 2469 —92 
FST1SSP 892—01 
GnmcXS n 1136 —39 
GamaSP 1156 —59 
FWSSP 1046 —03 
1MTIS 1047 —.15 
Max Cap TU2 —27 
Minicap n 1145 —69 
ShrtTerm 10.19 —53 
US Govt n 972 


Wklyi Grp Marne WUylGniftane Wldy 

None Last Owe! Fd Name Lari Owe : Fd Name Lari Owe 


Trans r 2159 —.93 
Uhl r 3529—l.H 
FUeRySparm 
AgrMun n 9.70 —25 
CAHY m 1022 — 28 
CTHYnr 1076 —26 
FLMum 1047 —26 
GNMAn 9.76—58 
Gavin n 10.19 — 10 
KRilnm 1258 —27 
hllMunf 9.74—21 
InvGrBd nllLOO —10 
LtdGv 975 —56 
LTGn 1153— 59 

MO Mum 936 —26 
Munln r 1053 —28 
NJHY r 1071 —26 
NY HY m 1027 —28 
PAHYm 1026 —26 
Shtlncn 962 —05 
SlntGvn 930 — 56 
StdkiMun 9.79 —.09 
FWuCapn 1868 —72 
SVWrtSimri: 

EuroEq 2975 —20 
PocBsn 3833 —77 
Sm Co 1172—78 
TxFSJ 10.16 —53 
FinHorGvt 1063 —59 
FlnHorMu 1059 —32 
First Amer Fds C 
AstABI n 10.15 —29 
Balance! nI030 —.18 
Ealdxl n 1026 —34 
Fxdlnd n 1076 —53 
GovBdl n 920 —02 
inthKl n 977 —04 
Lldlncln 9.93—01 
MiaSed n 1053 —54 


NYlnlmlTTOn -21 
IntlEqp 1324 —15 
KYTF 1049 —32 
LATF 1159 — 21 
MO IF 1037-24 
MOSSTF 1126 —.19 
NlidlTxF 11J9 —21 
MNIns 1172 —20 
rtrtOTF 1145—24 
MJTF 1123 —23 
NYlns 1074 —31 
NY Tax 1172 —16 
NC TF 1140 —24 
OfliOlTF 11.90 — 25 
ORTF 1123 -2D 
PacGrwttnbVSS —34 
PATF 1021 —.15 
PremRtx 6.13 —21 


Hwnmrt? 2123 —72 
Hypsn 951 —01 
HybSDS 920 —01 
lAATrGr 1534 —23 
1A1 Funds: 

Baton pn 1026 —33 
Bandar 922—11 
EmgGr pnlSTS — 68 
Gavtpn 978 —56 
Grlncp 1191 —59 
intFdn 1345 —29 
ItttiBd 926 —57 
Mldcopn 1367 —75 
Region np2074 — 89 
Resrvpn 9.98 
Value n 1163 — 31 
IBM Muted Foods: 
UuaeConhUS —35 


ernName WWv GrpN®ne VTJdy Grp Name WWy GUBNaine i nd Qrq-el^Pa Last 

Milted Lari OW i RnS* Lari Owe Fd Name Lari Owe Fa Name Last Chat FdNoT* LBS Otsei r« 



PuerTF 11 26 — 21 ! MuniBd 959—19 


SI Gov 1020 —54 
SmCapGr (072 —76 
TAGOtf 1021 —15 
TxAiHY 847 —21 
TX TF 1123—17 
USGov Sc 6.78 —07 
Utilities 955 —16 
VA TF 1126— 20 

FrankfinMadTn 
CarpQual p 24.19— 54 
lnvGradep&97 —.03 
RlsDivp 1421 —25 
FnmkSfl Tempi: 
GfatXP 1173 —II 
HordP 1250 *51 
Hilncp 1122 *.05 
Fremont Fuads: 

Globed n 1256—15 
Growth n 1061 —40 
CAInt 1032—17 


MunBdl n 1021 —17 i FundTrust: 


RegEnln 1170—69 
SaecEqlnlS53 —66 
Stocfcln 15.97 — 43 
First Amer Foods: 
AstAlIp laia —28 
Bcdanp 1030 —.18 
EqiAtyp 1553 —46 
EqldxB 10.27 —34 
Fxdlncp 1075 —54 
GovBd p 920 —52 
Intlncp 977 -54 
Ltd me 9.93 —01 
MtgSecp 1053 —54 
MunBdp 1021 —17 
ReoEap 11.93 —49 
Stockp 1651 —40 
FriBaslGx 927 — ra 
FsT&gtnr 1554 —68 
FrslFdE 1046 —26 
071 


AaaresfD 1 319 


SmoflConl749 —91 
US Trees ftdJB —09 
UfiTBv x 9.99 —23 
DEX Groan: 

West 1107 — 47 
2GtobAp 15127 —32 
2GrawApl7J7 —53 
2TaxEx 11.11 —.11 
2lncRtAp 1024 —58 
10 bc3 1458 — 3B 

IFbdnAp 928 —iff 
IDS Group: 

BkiCp px 6.15 —20 
Bandp £.10 —58 
CATEP 520 —59 
DElp 735 —26 
CSscovp 1128 -36 
EnuitPIpxlOTl —45 
Extrin p 429 —.10 
FedJne p 4.91 —51 
GkfcBdp 553 —55 
G ioCrp 635 —12 


Gwfhfp 1361 —31 
Incofp 1050 —57 
MstTTR{pl15S —.19 
Fundamental Funds: 
CAMun np 845 —17 
NYMunnpl58 — 52 
US Gov n 133—01 
GAM Foods: 

Global 15123*124 
Ifltl 197.02 *I3B 
Pocfias 17842-453 
GEehmS&S: 
Dtversfdnl341 —32 
Gktedn 1637 — 24 
Incomen 1124 —os 
. SSSLnonli.17 —.09 

... _.! S&SPMn3520— 123 

PtHwMU 1074 —17 I TaxEx 1147 —23 
First investors: : Trusts n 32.19—1.16 

BKMap 1 £04 —J3 I GE Funds: 


Groin tp 1540 — 46 j Growth p 1753 —53 


EdEUnd 1226 —23! SBF An 1610 —23 


BJBIEoAp 1106 -23 ConTEA 726 —19 
BNY HamStorc ; ltL5 S —'13 

Ealncnx 1057 — ,40| FL l^A J-iS — 3? 
IntGcvt 944 —58 ' FundA 7.97 —21 
NY TE n 9.94 — .13 ■ GrwthAp 1156 — 72 
Babsan Group: i HiYWA 651 —13 

BondLn 136 —01 j lnaimeAp6J7 — 59 
Bond Sn 9.95—56' IntGrA 1054 — 22 
Enterp2n 17.19 —.74 i ArtATxA 736 —.17 
Entrpn 1614 —38 1 Ml TEA 676—16 
Gwtnn 1247—29! AIN TEA 750—14 
Inti 1622 —14 1 NatResA 1226 —M 
Shadow n 1221 —32) NY TE A 659 —18 
TaxFrS n 10.64 —11 ' OhTE A 7.0S — .18 
TaxFrLn 83B — 23' 5mStkp 1749— 150 
InttAp 1771—11! UMBBn 1151 — 57, StrtlncA 7.05—10 
MrtgAp 8.74— .13 i UMB Hrt n 928 — 21 ' TxExAp 1215 — 29 

MrfgBp 674—13) UMB St n 1696 —49 TxInsAp 7.96 —.IB 

MrtgCP B.74 — .13 Value n 2553 — 53 i USGrA 1144—27 

MtoTrAo 952 —51 iBaaardBieM&Kaiser: * USGvA 654 —.05 


RdeCty Advisor: 
EqPGR 2846 —35 
EqPtnc 1477 —36 
G&IReSC 1634 —37 
Gov In p 923 —59 
GrwOppp2550 -55 
HI MU P 11.68—22 
HIYIdpn 1136— 29 
IncGtp 1458— 21 
Ltd TER p 9.90 —19 
LtdTBR 1055—03 
LtdTEI 9.90 —.19 
OuseaP 1330 —.12 
STFiP 9.71 —59 
StralOPR 1946 —32 


Giablp 5.92—12 
Govrp 11.07 — .09 
Gralncp 642 —74 
HJphYdP £18 -59 
Income p 454 —59 
InuGrdP 977—15 


GlobctC 1877 —20 
IncameC n1144 — .10 
IntCaOn 1444 —.14 
SfrogC 1529—29 
USEoDn 1532 —34 
GEUSE 1531 —34 


HTYdTEp 447—10 
insrTE p 529 —12 

Inflp 1051 —.16 
MgdRp 1159 —48 
Mass p £25 —12 
Micho £39-10 
rtm TED 618-11 
Mutt px 1155—43 
NY TE B £16—11 
NewDp 1357—49 
OhiOP 629—10 
PrecMtp 844— £7 
FVooreSD 643 —30 
Select p 9.12 —57 
Stock PX 1688 —83 
SfrAgpf 1639—69 
StrEafx 9.17—35 
Sfrlnct 623 -59 
SfrST t l.W 
StrWGt £37 —58 
TEBndP 354 — 10 
Uhllncp 638 —18 
ISJ Funds 

Murien 1028 —23 
NoAmp 933 —08 
Trstp 974 —05 


li? ZTl '■ laST 1345 —45 • MtfTAn 10.17 -08 STfivrBp 248 - , «« _« bninn 1478 —53 

LtMtfms 90— Ini Gfcblt 1124 —21 ] MDllp 1032 —2D SmCapBtlO^ -25 R*Oi ( Qppart 2930—1.16 

MMDEfri 995 Tl9 1 Govtlx 825—10' MDTTA 1333—20 SUB ?73 -. 3 SdSferV 3556-U8 

mSuu*?? Sm— id' N^sGoJd 11047 —44 ' MBS TA n 940 — 58 • Uf3Bp 858 —15 CjAS® —22 Sctrodm on2146 — 21 

VaU=£? 16§ —26 ' TxrehT 957-24 MuftlTA 1039—39 CbITOp 1081 -24 -M Sender 821-45 

va«|rin 1033—26 15.13-36 MunlAo 1039 -31 USGvBt 931 -.08 . | i^^Fuads: 

T£3S— 2H Volt 1635—57, SIGvlAp 413—02! AltDB 1542 —0. ^nflf 11 94 CASln 955—09 

0^2 2 1651 -481 ManwriS Fteds: SGvICt 413-52' CapAO If JO — £ 854 CATFn 1023 -28 

S«4t £?J —14 CapApnx244B— 1.18 SIGvTAn 413—52' CnmTecp 902 — 26 ' Gv^Wn klo3 — J 

§S?t 9^ -78 1 §in . CTlnTAn ,79 Dv^p 1959 -« GYtS|?* ,956 10.10 


SScit 830—41 IncEqnx 3640— 156 • STInlNl 979—52 EuGrD 
SSeThi 2228 —56 ■ ShonGv n 14B6 -54 : STWCt 929-02. OGID 
CusS3t 9.13 —47 ' inWUB nx 1833 
CusS4 1 853 —39 : St Bond x 3036 


953 -57 1 GrttiB ! 

10.70 —2- ' GtOOB t_ 1135 


—04 

^"iSSil 


—54: srmic: 977—02 . gigid ra.ru— garSte bj — looor 1223—44 

— 53. SCiTAft I022-.I5 OTxDo 1138 —29 S2Sf ,fn Tnl* SITFBdP 957 — 10 

. —26 • StFTA n 979 -58 GrmO 1924-1.08. Wgl*. ' SmCrtOx 9.77-43 

miT 746—15 Bond nx 2159— 46. TXTTAn 951— 17- GflnDt 1025-56. Wglil lltl 17n — [SOTwSl 1433 — 13 

PC PM lx to xx 147' InHEan 3549 — 27 VriueiAP1326 — 44- HilncOP 679 — .15. IperE .... «r ' sajdder Fu n ds : 

TxETrt 1045— 24 .Mariner Fuad*: VaiueTA 1177-45 invGD 1045 -.16 , MulhB 72s aSancednll73-26 

TaxFrt 731 -18 Fxdtnc 951 — 56 | VAITAnl046 — .16 NYTxDP 10.43 — 27 'TSc n] CafTxn 1052 — 24 

i NYTF iOSS -27 ' VAllAp 1046 -.16 JMHDp 10.16-24, STGSB B.« -51 CgTXn 


KnrriHWAiiMrKL j S x Fx | nc 9J7 — JO! Nationwide Fds: 

CAP^ 9J7-M1 i TREa . 1232 -41 , NtBwd 


STGwtDp 346 - MimArjl 1138 —24 

922— .14. StnSSo 1026 — 35, Mug-* 



'753 — 21 GthlnAx' 955 — 26 1 NYCDCn 970 —49, VcdGr 1460—72 
,42 —27 1 VaEaA px 947 —43 ! PtsTnrs n 1971—1.15 1 ParistoM A Sfcfi 


CccGtn 
Develop n31 72 —229 
BmMIdnc 1056 —35 
GNMAn 1423 —17 
Gtabin 2454 —45 
GGmCa 160 — 46 
Galdn 1379 —48 
Grwlncnel&60 — 7B 
Income nelXI7 —15 
Iniemati rvO.95 —29 
MfBd n 1252 —51 
LafAmrr 2135 —61 
MATxn 1X17—22 
MedTFnelOJA —21 
840 —20 


MunOttt 1158— 21 J ^ 840 

WridBA x 931—12 Marshall Fundi: SeSSektn 2232 -52 , BoncS=d 936 — 58 j MbPot 10^—20, WTXn lag — » 

RxBt 1027 — 26- Bolnx 956 — 26 . URraBdn ,33 — 51 ! EauilvA 1556 —79 1 N Wb W* ,*nf 

FCL«! 1031-25 Eqrncx . 944 -31 iNewAIW =927-130. HEqA. M-H -34 gruette H47 -M j 

CJuoJGr n 1327 —62 
ST Band n 1156 —05 
STGWn 11. IS 


UfeBCp 1351 —461 USEqA 1549 — 35 I IndOneGT 957 -55 r KPE! 23.11 -57 | DevCon liK — 21 'Warwra Foods: 


GtOcBt 1677 —57 1 Gvttncnx 944 -10 [ NewCnlfP 1148 —46. lotGovA 9J3 —56 

GvSBtx 959-32: tntBdnx 938 -59 ;NewUSAa 1173 -.90 IntSltsA 1322 US© vt tin 979 ^10 

IrndBtx 926 — 59 1 ArtidCapn 934 —57 .MriMtas Group: LbWteA 974 —.03 ! UgB" 931 -27 

PTxFBt 10.98 — 27 : STIncnx 950 —03. WcMn 51.10— 225 ' AUMuA I03S —.13 , iffro n . f^MYn 1159 — 37 

Sea 7S-2I! Slock nx 953 -30. Nehiln 25S-LZ1. SmCcA 2174-159, ActBoin H? to 

T^ratx 951—2*! VolEqnx 979 —41! f&Nncn 345 -57 USGvtA 951 -55 • Bain 

GtOoCt 1853 — 31 I Mathers n 1471 —28, NchLdn 1827 —71 Pm fcsIon eCSbs: G W151- ■— j. 

TXWtx —27! Maxus Fonde lnGeMasAppiegria: BalanCn 11.18 — 5 I t 4^^1143 — 33 

FtxCt 1028 — 28 1 Eqwtyfcnl324 — 29 BalGUlB r3L54 —48 BondCn 934—5, £t&tkn —-23 JAW 4? 

FOACt 1032 —25! income t 1033 —17 ■ CoreGlhA 1225 — 7B SauOy CnlS57 —79 . StkKU n 1070 —25 { BIGtX 1424—^ 

GvSCtx ,70—32 1 Prism ton 978—211 CareGrthBlXlS— 78 i Gvtlnc C ,51—54 «* 

ImdCfx 955— 09.Men»G1h 1346—71, CoreGrthQ125fi-7S Hl^qCnlAll -34 — ,3 

PTxFCI 1150 -27 'WientShn 11.93 — ffi EmsGrA 1210-130 htfGvtCn 952 — 56 AfiAB 

S»Cr 755 — 21 1 rtrtergerFd Ptfl.09 —15! EmgGrB 12.07—1.10 , MCn 1329 -52 1 Asx^.P '355 — U EquBv 6» — H 

K1ARF 952 -;*terkto 0 2687-15B, EmaGrOutlJS— 154 1 LtdMtC 9.74 — 52 , |«vAP S« ISKt Uro 

Kidder Group; Mena Lyndc i moGrAx 1616 — 59 ' rtrtIMnC 1037 —13 AJJE 856 —«9 Grincx —39 

ARMGVA1Z51 *51 ! AmerlnA 9.1* —27 IncSrBx 1428 —69' Mu8dC 1022—11 CAT*4, U I *« 

ARMtnsfBIZ50 - 1 AtHRAP 935 -.01 1 IVWGrS 1486—34 StnCopC 2753-2® . CcrT^rTPl920 —26 *« — « 

AstAlB 1252 -43- AZMA 1025—24- WWgr 1694 — 34 1 Ponficl n* 1628 —55 | CpAT 4228 —74 

BalA 1157 — 25 Nomura id 16C3 — J2 .Parnassus 3257 — 129 OvGrP 945 ^26 

BasVIA 2253— 51 .Nortb Am Funds PBsodena Snwp: 

CAMA 927 —24 : ASAIlP 1156 —34 BafftmA 2052 —63 
CaVAnA 1123—261 GJGrp 1613 —07 : GrowthA l£0i — 55 

CapFdA 7746 —AS , GwttlP 1439 —70 N«yS0 1628—57 

Consuttp 1246 — 08 ' Grlncp 1229 —30 PaxWcrtonlUH —23 

, CoJ-fiA S5S — 17 USGvtAp 977 — 54 PayswiBInxllTl— 45 

1625 —12! OnvGdA 112S —U NelnvGrn 2603 —64. Pefiam 1138—45 

1157 — 30' OrfTA 1131 — 14 .NelnvTrn 1035 — 26 PenCnpA £76—33 


EmMktA 1153 —36 . 
EmMktB 1131 —.17 , 
G»Eqfin 1669 —25 , 
GbEnCn 1654 —24 i 
GlbEoA 1651 —34 
GtoFxB 1Z12 *56 
G*FxA 1212 *-56, 
GvtAt 
kitFlA 


DvrinAp 1228 —12 
EnRsAp 1134 — 55 
EdlnAP 824 — JO 
EuGrAP 1177 —53 
Fedlnp 952 — 54 
FLTxA 3.83 —IB 
GeaAp 1321 —21 
GSGvAO 1428 —02 


LiteHYn 1073 -24 
USA np 1141—35 
MATFp 1133— 22 
MiTFp 11.98—28 
NJTFp 1252 —27 
NYTXFrp1424 —24 
PATFp 1223 —28 
SoecBd 11.71 -27 
SpSitP 1733 — .95 
TaxExPtP 955 -21 
TotRetp 1136 —28 
UtdbKSP 624—13 
VATFp 1Z14 —20 
Hfri MUt . 9 .17 —33 
Rid Omaha: 

Equity n 1034 -25 
Fxdlncn 9.95 —.06 
SlFxInn 953 — 53 
FPOvAstp 1241 —25 
FPrtrtuedoll53 —IS 
First Prioriy: 

Equity Tr n f02S — 29 
FxdincTr 9.99 —56 
LtdMGv 951 —52 
First Union: 

BaTTn 1153— 27 
BalC in 1154—27 
BcffiP 1153 -27 
FxInBp 1054 -57 
FxInTn 1005— 56 


Grrimrst 
EaSocn 2131 —59 
TFNatln 9.98—26 
TxFrVA nl052 —20 
GTGWtafc 
Amer p 1856 —50 
EmMkt 1610 —41 
EmMktB 1655 —41 
Europe P IQ32 —05 
EuroB 1046 —35 
GvincA 921 *59 
G vines 921 *.08 
GrincAp 6.05 -38 
GriiKfi 656 -5* . 
HOCrB 18.11 —89 1 
WlncB 11.98 -50 
HilncA 11.99 —50 
HlthCrp 1119 — 90 
inflp 10A6 —16 
InftB 1040 —16 
Japaip 1258 * 26 
LofAmG 257-37 
Lot AmGB 2350 -38 
Pocilp 1200—17 
PocifB 1192 —.17 
StrotAp 11.01 —33 
StrotB 1131 —23 
TeieB 1625 —31 
Tetecom 1623—51 
WTdwp 16.63—41 


PAMunlp 1058 — 26 1 GIGrAp 923—16 

— 1 MuniBdA 1058 — J6 j DntgA 1558 —14 AdSUST 9.91 —53 Per f orm an ce Fds: ! ©[InAP »256 — 44 

Opportp 1059 —35) SmCocA 1133—1.05 | EuroA 15JM — 35 1 AdiGavA 950—53, EqCoopx 1123 — 46 WthAP 2457—1.11 

Suriovtp 979— 03'LMHn 1755 — 37 . FedSecAp?38 — 08. COTFA 939—37 Sains ax 1123 —46 | WfdAP 1236 — M 

TRgdP 953 —19 r Landmark Foods: , R-MA 971 —30 ! GwttncTr 944 —56. InFICp 1058 —37 . HYAdP 10.18 — ^ 

•• " incmAp A9u — Jit 

irrvA p 755 —24 

rtrtnlnAp 859 —19 

AAaTxll 958 —19 

rtATTxll p 851 —18 


TRGrp 11.96 —31 1 eSovI 1164 —37 FdFTA 1458—31 GvTlncA 9.44 —37 , blFHn 1058 —07 

InvResh 431 —58 EauiTvn 1420—54, GIAIA 1324 — JO ; InccmeTV 931 — 59 MCpGd X 934 — 47 , 

iBVSer Opfifd: Mine 9.46 —58 GlBdA 935 * 51, InccmeA 9.93 —58. STFICpn 957 -51! 


CopGrl 1251— 57 I IntSd 1253 -25 ; GCvA 


1077 —16 ' TFlncA 939 — 34 STFiln 957 —01 
GCHdA 1359— 24. TFlrcT 950 — W Perm Port Funds „ 

GtRsA 1603—71 VaiuGrAxl724— 73 PermPt n 1754 —26 1 MurXAp —21 

. GlUlA 1257 —20' VSuGrT xT720 — 74 ' TB31n 6554 * 54 AAnTxllP 877—37 

Dynmo 1242 —70 Bdncdn 970 —77 | GriRA 1751 — £6 Noveen Funds: VBondn 5436 *31 ■ N-JTxAO 851 —21 

Emgrthpnll37 — 59 1 Inttnlnnx 1034 — 58 • He<»iA 350 —IS CA Ins 10.12 —24 PeriTOn 1221 — 31 ; NwOpA 02331— 133 


OuaBtk 1351 -30 
USGvt 9.65—05 
Imnscae 


NYTF np 1072- _ 
USGvn 955— 53: 

Laurel Funds: 


Ifltro £90 
Selected Funds: 
AmShsnp1X99 — 31 
StXShsnp 974—51 
USGov on 855 —56 
Sefigman Gram 
FronfierA 1051 
CapFdA 1646 —88 
COTxA 720 —34 
CmSJkA 1276 —41 
ComunA 1452—98 
ComnumD 1356 — 97 
FLTXA 7.48 —16 
GATxA 753 —.19 
GbEmrsAOB? —29 
GIEmgO 1050 —39 
GrowthA £07—37 
fncomeA 1352 —27 
IncomeO 1379 —27 
tntlA 1611 —23 
LATXA 8.12 —17 
MassTxA 7.79—16 
MDTxA 756 —19 
MlTxA 843—15 
MmnTxA 751 —13 


Energy n 1054 -77 S&PSM 955—32 Insrtnp 9.97 —SB CAVoi IC.F? -73 PTt&/=und 643—22; NYT^AO US — « | AWT*A Ifl 

— - — . _ . . ■ — ■- * “ * * — NYOpAP 864 — 31 | Natl I xA lJtt — .24 


NJrtrtunn 13.10 — 27 |Fide»Y BntStalS 
NwLdr 3324—153! EaPGIn 2837 — .M 
NYlTxnp 1173 — 23 I EaPIln 1455 — 36 


trttgTB p 953 
MtgTrCp 953 
7AI11GC 954 —36 
Mlfinr 155 
M/AS A o 8.47 *52 
MMSBI B48 -53 
fMCAAP 1006—36 
fAuCAB P1056 —36 
rtAuCACpllL06 —.16 
MuFLCp 924 —22 
1CATA 1271 —26 
MuHCAB 1271 —26 
ArtINBp 1053 —.17 
MuOHCp 925 -21 
ArtuNJBP 927 —20 
rtrtuNJCB 927 —20 
/ANYA 929 -36 
MuNYBb 929—16 
MuNYCp 9M — .JS 
NArtuAp 1053 —16 
NflMuCa 1053 —36 
NEurAp 1221 —54 
NAGvA 923 -23 
NAGvBP 921 —.73 
NAGvC 922 -23 
PrGrthAplUB —48 
PrGfttiB pi 120 —M 
OtsrAp 2292-126 
STMIop 8.95 -.01 
ST Mil 1 195 -51 
Teehp 2722— 156 
Wldtncp 1.87 
AmSouth Funds; 
Balance 1138 —28 
Band 10.76 —.06 
Equity 1429 —34 
Gvtin 951 —.04 
LtdMd 1028 -53 
ReflEq 1626 —13 
Amraomc 1234 —46 
Ambassador Fid: 
BdncF 9.91 —23 
Bondn 953 —57 
CareGrF ntA.09 —86 
Growth n 13.16 —74 
WxStkn 1134— 28 
miBond n 957 —55 
InttStkn 1265 —28 
SmCnGrn l330 —50 
Ambassador Imn 
Band n 963 —.07 
—56 
i —74 
. . —05 

InttStkn 1264—29 
StnCoGrnl349 —90 
TRrrtBdnlO.17 —12 
Ambassador Ref A; 
Bond! 963 —07 
CoreGr 16.08 —56 
Grwth ms —24 
tfttBond 967 —55 
IntlS Ik 1264 — 29 
SmCoGr 1149 —90 
TFlidB df 10.17 —12 
Amcore Vintage: 
Equity 1055 —34 
Fxlnco 9.9J —55 
IntdfTF 9.91 —.17 
Amer AAdvanb 
Bakin n 1159 —27 
Equity n 1120—44 
imtEatvn 1254 —26 
LtdTrmn 959 -53 
AmerOtetot 
CmriAo 1536 —36 
CmstBo 1537 —36 
CpBdBpx 654 —09 
CorpBdA px654 — 09 
EmGrC 2641—149 
EGAP 2636— 130 
EmGfB p 2412 — 148 
ErtlA p 1134 —38 
EntBp 1178 57 

EqtytncAp628 —.17 
EqtncBt 528 — 36 
EntncCp £28 —37 
ExchFd 107.06 — 438 
FdAAgA p 1221 — 52 
FrtrtgBp 1222 —03 
GiEQAB 1146 —17 
GlEoB Pn 1129 —17 
GKjvA px 834 —51 
GtGvBpnx 838 -51 
GiGvC ox 833 
GvSCAo 1025 -57 
GvScBp 1025 —08 
GvScCp 1024 —57 
GvTh97 p 1323 —30 
GvTtA u —21 

GvTIBp 835 — JJ6 
GVT1C P 835 —06 
Grlncp 1227 —46 
HarbAp 1624 — 31 
HartaB 0 16.19 —31 


NY Tax n 15.05 —23 
NYTEp 1765— J1 
Peooindt 1631 —30 
Peaftrtidml633 —63 
ShlnGvn 1157 —52 
ST flic pn 1212 —55 


Diversa n 1247 —22 ! UlRAp 1241 —25', ShlnTp 1352 — 58 


InfiFi n 9.43 


IrrttEqn £07 -58 CATEBf 757 —76 | ThdCiiRn 850 -24 
-58) CTTEB1 726—19 


Baird Funds: ! FedScBl 1036—13 

AtSInc 9.9J _ FLTxBt 739 —23 

BIChipp 1756— SS- FurWBt 757 —21 
CanOev 02352 -57 , GEqB 1213 —28 
Bankers Trash GwthBt 1330 —.72 

iRriAMgt 961 —22 i HYMuBt 962 —20 
InstEqn 1028 -24' HY5ecBt 681 —13 
InvtmTF 1054 —.16 ! Incomes 627 —.09 
InvtntEq 1320 —12 1 HGrS 1052 -21 
InvUtRn 1055 -27; MATxBt 736 —17 
ItwEqlx 10.17 -23 I NatResBtl233 —34 
BcronAStn 7069— 123 | NY TXBt 669—18 
Bartlett Funds: I OHTxBt 7.05—18 

BOSCV1IK1689— 47: StrtlnBt 755 -30 


TxExBt 1615-29 
TEfnsBf 726—28 
USGrBt 1136-26 
USGvBt 654 -55 
UWBt 1241 -25 


CoreGr n 16.08 
Grwth n 1115 
IntBondn 967 


Fixedl n 1052 —54 ! 

VI Infix 1246—17, 

Boscom Bed 21.96 —24 ' 

BayFunds Injtt 

ST Yield 961 —52 , 

Bondn 953 — 55 1 Cotundda Funds 
Equity x 1045 -31 Bcmncenx 1730—39 
' ComStk nxl4.96—33 
'. Fixedn 1265 -.10 
[ Govt 8.17 -56 
Grtti n 2654—121 
InttStkn 1231 —21 
Munin 1201—31 
I Spedn 1963 —89 


IShlGv 9.59 —85 
LIBIA 1066—03 
FideSty Invest: 
AflrTFm 1143 —26 
AMgrn 1433 —24 
AAAgrGrnl363 —26 
AMerin n 10 J7 —59 

Bafcmc 1263 —26 

USTlnt 1299—57! BtueCh 3426 -66 
USTLhO 1439—13; CAInsn 1057 —21 
USTShn 1525 — 53 CATFn 1142-21 
Dreyfus Comstock: Canada n 1731 —59 

CaaValA 1211 *33: CapApp 1636 -.49 
Cop Vote 1 1137 *.U , Cap>ncanr9.74 — 21 
PS«gA P 9.70 —57 
PtSBVOI 9.70—07 


BayFunds Invest: 

STYleidn 931 —52 
1 Bondn 957—05 
Eaufly nx 1045 —31 
BeocHOI 2958 —3= 
BSEmgDbt B3B — 33 
Benchmark Funds: 


B«danceOn9.92 — 26 , Common Sense 
BondA n 1943 —88 I Govt 1037 —10 
DivGrA n 1023 — 39 1 Grolnc 1533 — 36 
EqldxAn 1043 —34 Growth 1463 —64 
FocGrA n 10.19 —43 1 MunB 1333 — 20 
IntlBOAn 2023 *33 " ‘ ' 

InllGrAn 966 —14 
ShtOurn 1052 
SIBdAn 19.95 —03 
SmCoJA 1158— 68 
USGvA n 1962 -54 
USTldxAm929— .10 
Ben ham Gram 
AcSGovn 925 - 51 
.17 


CaTFl n 1060 
CoTFInn 961 —21 
CaTF5n 10.12—05 
CoTTFHn 953—18 
ColTFLn 1062 -25 
EoGronx 1130 —45 
EurBd nx 1063 —55 
GNAAAn 1035 —10 
Gotdlnn 1327 —43 
IncGrun 1430 —30 
LTreosn 938—12 
NITFin 1037—15 
NTTFLn 1133 —25 
STTreas n 966 —52 
Torl995 n 9A56 —58 
TorTDOO n 6H80 — .69 
TorttXHn 4668 — 51 
TarOTO n 33.91 —61 
TarSOISn 2531 —47 
Tar2020n 1741 —48 
TNolen IMS — M 
Ulillncon 925 —34 
Berner Group: 

100 pn 1657 —66 

101 pn 1124 — 38 
SmCoGr 233 —16 

Bernstein Fds: 

GvShOu nl234 —01 
ShttXrn 1250 —03 
IntDurn 1102 —57 
CaMun 1334 —14 
OfvMunnlll7 —15 
NYMunn 1116 —15 
InflValn 1636 * 54 
Berwyn Fd rf 855— 157 
Berwyn I ncnl!67 —JO 
BhfludMCG 1 123 —92 
Bfltmare Funds: 
Bcrionced 1057 —24 
Equttv 1059 —22 
Eaindex 1006 —32 
Fixed Inc 948 —07 
STFixlnc 926—51 
5CMuni 1060 — 31 
Btondxrd Funds: 
AmerEnn 944 —34 
HxTFBd n 461 —.12 
Flexlncn 493 —52 
GIGr np 1006 —28 
PrcMnp 929 —16 
ST Gin 161 
ST Bondn 295 —01 
BdEndow 1726 —14 
Boston CO litSU 
CaApBo 2744 —68 
Boston Co Ratait 
AtocAp 1464 —48 
CopAAp 2744 —68 
ItgsAp 1267 —.05 
IntA 1113 —15 


Eqtylncoxl212 — 33 
Fxdlnx 1038 —11 
Growth x 1061 —30 
InHEq 1119 —.19 
IntIFl 1068 * 53 
MunBdx 1029 —25 
NJMunx 1062 —26 
Shrtlntx 1034 -57 
Composite Gram 
BdStkp 1146—30 
Growth p 1201 —41 
IncoFdP 862—13 
NW 50 p 1447 —32 
TaxEx p 744 —18 
USGov p 1034 —II 


Equity 1453 —61 
Incm 1029 —06 
LfdMat 1033 — 53 
Om Mutual; 

Govt x 1057 —14 
Grvrth 1479 —56 
Income x 93t —10 
TotRet 1117 —33 
Capteyn 1951 —55 


BakmAnxlD23 —32 
Eqtdx 2034 —79 
GffldAn 946— 54 
GrEaA nx 9.74—49 
intBdAn 960 —04 
IntlGrAn 1298 —24 
ValEqS prtfl.1 2 —63 
CowenlGr 1067 —29 
CowenOp 1225 —62 
OafabeHusaR: 
ASTAUp 1260 —4} 
Equity p 1673 —67 
OR Mun N1222 —17 
Speckdn 1278—68 
CresfFunds Trust 
Bond n 964 —.11 
SIBdn 963 —55 
SpEqn 11.17—69 
Value n 1577 —41 
VAMu n 967 —23 
CuFdArfin 9.99 —.01 
CuFdST n 9 26 —53 
Cutler Trust 
ApvEq nx 9.77 —28 
Eqtylnaj nx962 —27 
GovtSecn 9.99 —54 
DFAlntVai n 963 —14 
□G Investor. 

Equity 1040 —29 
Gavflnco ,65 —55 
LTGovt ,27 —02 
Munilnc 1056 —27 
Dean Witter: 

Am Volt 2220-1.10 
CalTxF7M24B —23 
CnpGntt 1162 -40 
Convt! 1063 —33 
DvGtht 1736— 136 
DtvGtht 2926 —84 
Divlnt 963 —57 
Eqtlncf 837 —12 
Eurot 1230 —11 


Droytas Premier: 

MunA 1266 —24 
MuA 11.83—25 
1563 —49 
CTMuBt 1162— 25 
FLMuttA 1441 —32 
GtoUrvAnl£32 -32 
GtomvBl 1520 -32 
GomcA 1427 —13 
GnmaBt 1428 —13 
MA MunA] 1.70 —21 
MD MunA 1233 —52 
IVU MunA 1628 -31 
MNMunAM.74 -32 
MDMuB r 1233 —32 
MuBdBt 1367 —41 
MuniBdA 1367 —4! 
NC MuA 1278— Jt 
NCAAuBt 1277 — J8 
NY MunA 1414 —29 
NY MuG 114.14 -J9 
OH MuA 1275 - 

OHMuBI 1276 —22 
PA MunA 1653 
PA MuB 1 1653 _ 
TX MuA 2040 —48 
VA MuA 1659 —47 
VAMuBI 1659 —47 
lie 

p 3367 —26 
P 3941 —58 
Income o 1363 —10 
InvA 2026—153 
InvBt 2059— 151 
DteroeMuteft 
IntGovn 1019—10 
KYTFn 737 —57 
KYSMfti 621 —52 
EBI Funds 
Equity p 5766— 1.90 
Flexp 5161— 133 
Income P 47.19 —16 
Mulftflx 39.11—135 
EatanVOaeric 
China p 7.94—18 
EL Ltd P 948—16 
GovtP 961 —06 
NttlMunp 922 —25 
Eaton V Marrihoa: 
OHUdt 923—16 
STGbit 061 —17 
CALtdl 1005—15 
CWnat 1134—26 
FLLtdt 1056—17 
AAALtdt 9.96—16 
MJLW1 966-16 
Natl Ltd t 10.16—15 
NJLtd I 1053 —16 
ALTxFt 10.15—31 
NYLtdt 1054 —16 
AZTxFI 1034—31 
PALWt 10.10 —16 
ARTxFt 9.97—31 
CalMimlt 926—22 
COTxFt 9.94 —31 
CTTxFt 1055— 29 
Ealntx 1068 —44 
FloTxFI 1054 — 30 
GATxFt 961 — 58 
GavtOU t 960 -56 
Hilncf 745 —19 
KYTxFt 961 -30 
LATxFf 9.9S —37 
MDTxFt 1051 —32 
MATxFt 1029 —27 
MITXFf 10.14 —2, 
MNTxFt 1O00 — 58 
MOTxFt 10.19 —32 
NJTxFI 1044 — 29 
NYTxFt 1072—29 
NaHMunl 966—26 
NCTxFt 9.99 —29 
OHTxFt 1027 —31 
ORTxFt 1009 —30 
PATxFt 1033—30 
RJTxFt 9.27 —33 
SCTxFI 9.91 -31 
TNTxFt 9.95 —31 
TatRtn 1 9.09 —is 
VATxFI 1020 —56 
WVTxFt 932— JO 
Eaton V Traditional: 
China p 1676—31 
EVStk 1250— 33 
Growth p 7.62—38 


Cnnorttrl 4432 -220 
Contra 30.13—126 
CnvSecn 1269—27 
Destimi itll — 63 
Destiny 1 1 27.11—154 
ObEqn 17.90—88 
Dtverinti nil 63 —.17 
DivGlhn 11J7 —67 
EmoGrorl£53 —54 
EmrMkt 1679 —33 
Equftnc 3160— 151 
EQtln 1863— 63 

Eqkbc 1650 —65 
ErCapApnll.12 — 59 
Europe 1946 —22 
ExCtlFd n 9731 — 227 
FtdelFdn 1871 -60 
Fifty 1029 —47 
GNMn 1047— .10 
Gtafld 1162— .19 
GtoBoln 1228 —38 
GvtSecn 9.77 —57 
GroCb 2854 —99 
Grolnc 2161 —73 
HJYld 11.99 — J1 
InsMun n 1132 —35 
bitBdn 1033—51 
InlerGvt n 966 —55 
InllGrtn 17.19 
tnvGBn 740. 
Jtteinn 1336 — 55 
LalinAm n 1461 —64 
LtdMun 933 —31 
LowPrr 1739 — 66 
Ml TF n 1137 _ 

MNTFn 1064 —35 
Mogeitan 6972—118 
Artkttrti nr 3356 —1.10 
rtrtATFn 1150 
MtgeSecn1061 
Muncpln 7.98—23 
NYHYn 1174 — 33 
NYlns n 1120— J2 
NewMktnlUM —42 
NowMm 1175—67 
OTC 26S5— 1.22 
OhTFn 11.11—26 
Ovisea 2850 —21 
PacSas 1854 — 25 
Puritan 1652 —41 
RealEstn 1172 -68 
RetGrn 1749 —63 
SWTBdn 920 —05 
STWWn 963 — 59 
SmaPCap 1044 —7* 
SE Aston 1264 -.19 
StkSlcn 1869 —67 
StrOppf 1965— 52 
Trend n 56M— 352 
USBIn 1054 — 56 
Uffilncn 1422 —41 
Value n 4029—132 
Wrtdw 1323 —22 
FtoeWy Selects 
Airr 1613—67 
AmGaklrZUi —45 
Autor 2369— 126 
Bioferfir 2462—147 
Eldest r 2241—140 
Broker r 1676—70 
Chemr 3071—143 
Campr 2674—151 
CanPrdr 1426 — 60 
CstHour ISM — 155 
Of Aero r 1837 —77 
OevComrl828 — 153 
Etoctrr 1748 —69 
Energy r 1692—156 
EngSvcr 1079 —90 

Envlror 1065 —71 

FinSvcr 48.90—166 
Foodr 2252—157 
Health r 91.18— 2.19 
HomeF 2466— 156 
teEqpr 1942—1.15 
IndMatr 2156 —69 
Insurr 1360—42 
Le isrr 4236—242 
MedDelr 1927-122 
NalGasr 9.14 —65 
Paper/ 1763 —67 

PrecArtetr 1*45—1.20 
RegBnk r 1769 —23 
Rriailr 2439—1.19 
Softwrr 2579— 1.10 
Techr 4042—1.18 
T el ec o m r3694— 152 


FfiGdTFB p1D40— 33 WWwB 1662 -42 
HiGdTFC 11040 — 23 Gabeffi Funds: 
rtrtnBdT n 9.91 —11 , A8CP 10.12 —54 
NCMunCt 9.70 —29 , Asset np 2263 —66 
USGvtfip 961 —.07 1 ConvSCPnl164 — .15 
USGvtCr 961 —57i EqlncPX 1126 -42 
VotueBp 17.01 —39, GllntCPn 9.90—59 
ValueCtn 1751 —39' GiCanvn 1038 —.14 
VcttueTn 1751 —331 GrTelP 968 — 21 
FrstFdFn 9.66 —06 I Growth neCT .90—150 
Flue Investor*: . SmCcoG 1676 —67 

EmGthp 12.10 —69! value P 1137—46 


LstAmArl645 —60 
MnlnsA 7.93 —.19 
ArtunLidA 923—52 
ZrtJtnTrA 965 —18 


Brnrimn 668 —35 Stack n 1764 — 62 
Europen 1277 — 03 I Lazsrd Group: 

FinSvcn 154)1—481 Equity 1377 —60 
Galdn 663 — ,13 mif£a 1263 —.19 
Growth no £28 —27 I InttSC 11.16—16 
HtmScn 3366— 225; SmCaD I55P — 69 
HiYWnp 7.03—21! SpEq 1566— 29, 

(mflncD —47, SfrgYd 
IntGovn 1236 -5S l LebenNY 
InttGrn 1612 —II 'Leetirtr n 1072 
Leisure n 21.9*— 136 ' LMB ArtasOK 
Pacfiasn 1536 -58] AmerLd p 969 -26 
Sell nan ns 622 —59 GbIGovtD 966 -53 
TxFreenplSJ* — 41 ' Gvtlndna 1C.15 -53 
Techn 2266-142 j HYldO 1471 -.14 __ 

TatRtn 1743-41' IrrvGrna 965-66 STGiAp 443 


InttEqA 11.13—17, FLVc) 961 — 26 
MlArtuA 967—291 tnsMun 1325—25 
/ANM11A 10.15 — 24 MDVd 960 


960—67. MNartA 1 2.11—27 


748 -22 

..14. 


NJMA 1065 —25 
NYMflA 11.13 —33 
P3CA 2253 -.10 
PAIWA 1058 ■ 

PhnxA 1118 —59 
SoVlA 
SlrDvA 


MAins 
MA Vd 
Ml Vet 
MuniBd 
HlYot 
NY ins 
NY Vo! 

0HV31 
PAVsI 
VA Vd 
1683 —67 DVB Fends: 

1222 —55 . CCSAPBAR963 —AS 



BakznFd 1632 —31 1 OTCEp 1083—79 
P 1354 — 24 ' OhTxIlP 682 — .15 


1853 

1763 —40 . 
P 734—25' 
2039 —67, 
HfYWdx £79— 27 
InGrAp 938 —22 
InGrS t 938 —22 1 
Ml 1245—02, 
MulFtAp 1271 —15 
MuIFIBp 1269 —.15 
StsctcFd 13.18 —38 
TE Bd 1088 —24 ' 


PATE 951 —17 
TxExAp 875 —21 
TFlnAO 1462 —32 
TFHYA 1426 —30 
TFHYBt 7424 -30 
TFlnBt 1463— 32 
Texas P 888 —IB 
USGvA p 1264 —II 
UtilAP 9.11 — 23 
VstuAp 731 —36 
VovAp 1124—61 
AdiBt 1034 —02 


EmGrmA n926 —90 TotRefp 1610— 201 AstoSf 1659-71 


VcdEq 1668 -60! Splrrvno 2164— 137 
irtvPfUiP 9.92 -51 TxFrlnt n 1496 —16 
invPfNY 1268—19: TotRefnp 1154 -46 ; 
InvTrGvtS I 945 —08 vofTr np I860 —74 • 
istelFdnp 1439 — 54 LexioiBofl Gm I 

JP Growth 1631 -67 CnvSecn 135? -39 
JP income 941 —09 CLdr 12.13 —53 
JPMtnstto I GNMA me 7.99—10' 

Bondn 942 —07. Gtotxdn 1363 -29 ! 
Drvervfd n 964 —21 ' Goldfdn 641 


BiGvBt 477 -.04 
CATxBt 823 —19 
ConvBt 1854—56 
Dvrinat 1234—13 
EuGrfit 1178—03 


?3?!Sh pi 235 -35 I EqtVal 125* —37 | ^ SriEqW ro ciO^ 1 


USGovt np 734 —63 ! MdTFp 1170 —24! TeciA £17 —.03 GavtSecA r?62 — 37 USGvSx 932 —11 

I Utiln 922-30 PATFp 1560 -29 TX MA 1G37 -22 OddteSn 1363—79 WldOpp 1040 — 57 

— - VVitcncA 166—11 Oskmrk 2192-61 PwsaalFds 

AdiRB 968 _ Oricrnrh 1463—35 Bondn 1055 —07 

Amerln3 5 9.18 — 27 .Gberwers r 24 —2.15 TtBandnllAO — .13 

AZMSt 1025 — 24 ,DcecnTEBlC47 — 12 Emg/AEa N.13 —26 1 GeoBt 1616—31 

BcIBt 1175 —36 OfEhvn 962—16 nx 1878 — 65 GIGvBt 1437 

BcsVS t 2220 —62 QTfK! J1C5 — 22 CcsAppn22.W— 1.16 

Cal/.lnBt '.123 — 26 CtoDacrtin 1361—70 IrtEqn 1069—12 
CAMB 937—24 OtymprC Trust P5BcxSG 1223—1.13 

CssFdBt 275* —Ai Ectcrcedrtl35 —52 PMgrimGrs: 

CPKIBt US -.55, Eetncmx 5655 — 63 ARSU1 721—61 

ClnvGCB 1124 —.14 LUfn 17.14 —27 ARStV 733 — 51 

CsJTBf 1131 —'.4 LawDur 1102 _ AUSI-A 760—02 

DrogB p 1603—14 One Group; A&USIV 7.16—52 

EltroSt 1449—65 AseiAuPx 967 —27 ARSI 7.11—61 


imtnp 1020 — .06 . Galaxy Funds: ErmMkEqhl5 -26 : GrWncn 1666 -78 

InfTro 1274-20 AssetAUnl065 — 17| IntlEqty n 1023 -.11 | 51 Govt n 963—01 

MMunip 1028 — 23 ! CT Mon 955 —25 I ST Bond n 961 —63 , StSfl 433 -55 

0 1243 —43 | EqGrfti 1334 — 34 I SmoflConl036 — 54 ! Stlnv 228 -23 


NJTXA 

NYTxA 

NCRxA 


-37 i TE Bd nx 10.11 -39 1 FedSecSl 93 -65 . 5 !lCEcAxI263— 47 ARSI-A 724 —61 


TotRTsyp974 -55! Ealnatin 12.10 — J? Jocfcsan Nattonofc ; V/ldEm 1225 -34 R-MBt 971—33 
Value p 1133 — 27 HiQBd 1032 —10 Growth 1059 —35 Liberty FamBy: ■ FdFTBt U57 — 6C 

FlagsMp Group: . InfBd 10.10 — *6 Income X 9.91 —.14 ArnLdr 1458 -53 FdGrBl 9.60—35 

AATEop 1054 -34 I intEatn 1246—14 TaxEx x 10.14—23' CapGrA p 1262 -66 . GiAIBI 1369 — 25 

AATECp 1053 — 24, MAAAun 944 — 26 TatRtn 1045 -23; EqlncAn 11 14 — 29 GtBeBt 955 - 61 

AZTEAp 1038 — 25 J NY Mur 1026 -26 Janus Fund: , EqlncCt 1123 -301 GtCvBt 1051—26 

CTTEAp 10.15 —23 STBdn 9.99 —02 BrScnced rt£J55 —25 1 FTiefn 1839 — 25 GtRsB > MJ7 -70 

COTEp 957 — 22 SmCoEqn12O0 — 69 Enteror n 20.99 -.97 FTTrft 1079-69 , GflJSf 116'. -23 

FLTEp 1035 —24 TE Bond nl035 —22 FedTxEx n£73 — 18 , HilncSd 1169—19 GrIRBt 1671—63 

GATEAP 10.18 —23 Gateway Funds: FTxlncn 945 —68 MnSC 1120—17 1 Heafll«l 358 —14 

GtoRbP 1728 —46 GavtBdn 9.91 „ Pundfl 1868 —40! US GvtC px7.93 — 64 totBaBt 1122 -28 

IrrtTEo 10.(1 —20 1 indxPinx 1537 -51 * 

KYTEAp 1061 —331 SWRWG 1364 — 43 


PseVdA xi220— 53 
EsrnCxAxllAi— 40 
GvArmA n974 -62 
GvBdAp 9.62 -.09 
IncEoAx ’362 —46 
tecsmeBdxVAS— .12 
IntFxl x 9.9a —ID 
IrdTFAx 1052 — 24 
InflScAn 1228 —EA 
LgCsSrx 1125—41 


FLTxBt 867—18 
GIGrBI 929 —16 
GrlnBl 1267-45 
HttnBt 247V — 1.11 
HiYldBI 1262 — 29 
tncomeBt 668 —67 
InvBt 779—35 
MATxBt 967 — 20 
Munat 873 —20 
NJTxBf 861 —21 
_ NwOpbB 12344—152 
697—621 NYTxBf 873 —22 
7 08 —62! OTC Bt 1075-79 
768 -62 ! TxExB t 875 -21 
767 —21 USGvBt 1260—12 
1107 -70 Utast 968-22 
£29 —25: VStoBt 726—37 
1165-50 


725—01 


xl >41 —3? P8lqr Funds: 


AR31I 
AsSUS 
A4GUS1I 
AUS1II 
Cpuh p 
GNMA 

tCYIdP 

MooCnp 1204 —44' VovBt 

STMMU 754 * 62; 

ShrtTrp 676 *62 I BastForGrlO.18 —66 


! BastGrw. 


KSTEp 9.76—29 
LATEAp 1043 —24 
LtdTEP 1058—12 
MITE A p 1128 —24 
MOTEAP1047 —26 


Grthlncx 1426 —56 ' USGvSeCAiL93 —65. GiHdB 1265 — 34 Lf/dA x‘ 1050 — 67 BdGrAnxlQJl — 30 j BasNumOlfj3— 121 
IntGvt £97 —63, UfilFd 1159 — 25 LtfAmBIlAAl —50 OHMoA«1053 — 28 EaA«Anx1265 — 59 ; BasNum01£47— 1.11 


GnSecn 1237—12 AlercWY 1256 -46 ; UKIFHC t 1159 — 25 < MAMBI ID28 -3, SirCoGrxISM -63 EaGrAiwlOJO -40) Oinst For Votoe: 


Giatri Group: ■ ShtmBdn 2JH -m 'Liberty Fbrencfcd: IWMuBt 957 -29 . TFSdA 975—1: SqlnAx 1055 -39 : CATE 1055—21 

_ 1052-32 MNMBt 10.19—24 IllCcra 955 — 6t Fxd 


Erisanp 2619-156 
GinflFdn 1357 —S3 


MITECPI127 —23 
NCTEAP 1068 -22 
NMTED 950 -27 
NYTEp 1037—26 
OHTE Apll29 -21 
PATEAp 1065 —.18 
TnTEAp “ 


Equity n 1265 — 55 
IntGovn 1028—07 
Intn 1323 —15 
Muntntn 1014 —13 
SroCopn 1189 —73 
..... . . JtreeMA 963 —M 

10.76 —23 'GdderxxiXCXB27 —37 
UIBAp 9.97 — 25 1 Goldman Sachs Fmty: 
VATEAo 1031 -24 : COPGr 1552 —76 
Flex Funds: Gtolncx 14.19 — 06 

Band no 1947 *65' Grtnc 1661—66 
Gibtn on 9.40 — 41 { fnflEa 1671 -27 
Growth npl335 -46 j Munilnc 1353 -32 
Muirfdfpn 536 -67 | SelEa 1600 


Fo r tamer '059 —34 
Fortls Fonts: 

AstAlIp 1467 — 53 
ConAOP 2339—1.14 
Creritl p 1£95 —.75 
Rducrp 2750—131 
GtoGrth p 1464 —64 
GovTR p 8.44 —69 
Grwth p 2762— 150 
WYld P 859 —14 
TFMN 10.15—22 
TFNat 1053 —22 
TFNY 1890 —.15 
USGvt 934 —11 
Fortress invsb 
AxSitt 9.74 
Bondr 956 —12 
GISIrra 861 —64 
Mutdnct 1051 —24 
Ort=ortp ia?l —26 
Util r 1239— 27 

44 Wan Eq £39—23 
FaramFteds: 

InvBnd 1038 —10 
flwStk 230 
ME Bnd 1041 —.13 
TaxSvr 1037 —67 
Founders Group: 
Btdnp 861 —33 
BtoeChpnp£44 — 79 
Discvp 2021— 158 
Fmfrnp 2£»— 143 
GavSec 945 —07 
Grwth rw 1228 —Si 
Passprin 965 — 25 
Sped Pfl 741 —42 
WIdwGrp 1762 —51 
FOanMs Squve Fds: 
Balanced 941 —27 
GovtSec 979 —04 
MidCap 10.12—43 
OuaTBd 923 —SB 
QualGr 952 -35 
FraTOcfin Grouse 
AGE Rnd 275 —67 
MSU5P 946 + 61 
ARS 963 -62 
ALTF 1134 —23 
AZTF 11.15 —17 
Bdlrtvp 2143—54 
CAHYBdp922 —25 
Colins 1163 —24 
CA iroermt8L22 —14 
CafTFr 7.12 —09 
CO TF 1141 —23 
CTTF 1078 —18 
Cvtsec 1231 —42 
DNTC 953 —26 
Equity 656 —29 
Eqlnc 1353 —44 
R5TARSP054 -62 
FedlntermlQ42— .17 
FedTx 1165 —.18 
R-TFtnp 938 —34 
FLTF 1135— .19 
GATF 1154 —20 
GIGvtnc 855 —.15 
GWWP 1243 — 19 
GoM 1568 — 59 
Growth 1379 -51 
HYTF 1055 — Ifl 
HlMuBdPhUS —29 
IncaSW 239 — 66 
IN7F 1151 —22 
Inst Adi 9.3) 

InsTF 11.99 -21 


Twenn 2351-161 ! Gthlnc 


955— 66 FxdlnA 10.10 -69 1 Fund 


Verttrn 47J9-221 J tnsArtuni 1039 -26. MnrnsBI 773 — .19 ■ IllCorNC laiO —21 tremGvAnlOOB— 05 1 GEa 


WrldW 2461 —48; TF Bond 1026-19! MnLtdSI ?.?0 — 62 OppeaheinierFd: _ NjMuAn 1024 — 18 I GrtncAx 959 


1172-40 
1363 —31 


JammFdn 1207 *64 USGov 8.94 —06 /AutotB 955 —18 AsseiAp I25£ — 37 STlnvAn 9.97—01: invQin 
Jotui Hancock: um 1161—23. rtANatIBT 10.11 -26 CA TE A plILW —20 , Pioneer Front NaflTE 

CATE I 11J1 — 24 LTMFIVP 975—10 NJrtABt 11155-26 ChpHYP 1258 —27 Ealncp 1643-52 NY TE 

DiscvB f 874 - 59 LmtTrm p 973 —61 NYMnB f 11.13 -31 OxFOp 3635-220 , Americp 1074 —65 Oppori 

Growth p 1406 -.90 Lindner Fund* NCMBf 1066 -26 EqincAP 953 — 29 Bonds 934 —67 SmC«> 

llAcore 1253 -37: Divn 2679 —69 1 CfrtrtABt 1037 -36 ' EclncEt 9 50 -29 ; CapGrp 1528 — TV]- USGov 

LTGvAp 854 —61! Fundn 22.93 — 1.13 j PocBt 21.15 *69! 

MATE! 1143 -28 Utiln 1045 -50 PA /.IB I 1058 —25 . 

MflTEB 1122 -22 Lewids Seyfes PhnxBt 1275 -57 


GIBtoP 20.91— 1.13 
p 1478 —25 ' 
P1BJ9 — J9 . 
DB70 — 50' 
1 3576 —59 . 
Gofdp 1408 


TE tP 1170—25, Bondn 1130—18 STGtBt 843 _ 

STStrotB 854 -62 GibBdn 1055 - SpVffit 1649 -56 

SpdEAp 7458-171 Growth n 1ZJ1 —49, SlrOvBt 1219 -55 

SpcJEBP 1459-120 I Gfilnp 1231 -49 TechBI 568 -63 GvtSecApl079 -64 

, SpOpsA 862-441 flltlEqn 1291—19 TXMBt 1037 — 22 “ 

SmoCOP 2064 —77) SpcOpsB 860 —44 SmQron 13J9 — 73 UtllnBt 875—16 

GridmanSochstast: | SJrtncfp 73* -.10 Lord Abbrit WldlncBt 886—10 

AdiGv 9.92 +51 | TaxEx tp 1047 —22 I AffBtdp 1026 — 32 iMerrfmroiRlK 

GcvAh 9.72 *61 J Hancock Freednt j BondDebo955 — 17 1 AstAIInf 1157—11 

971 —67 AvTech 1076 —52 ! DeveiGth p9.91 —55 < CapAjwf 1052 —II 


Gold 867 — 27 
Growth p 1161 —63 
Income p 975 —.13 
Europe p 18.19—61 
PionrFdp2249 —76 
PlnMBdOl069 —18 
IntlGr 2139 —35 


WYWA 1378 -30 Ptonrllp 1820 —£J 
WYldBr 1292 —30. Ro7hroe«67— 1 60 
Ins TEA p 1454 -34 STInc 290 
IrtrTEo U37— 21 TaxFreepTITB -37 


Gov A3 
ShrfTF 
ST Gov 9.85 —.03 
Govett Funds: 

DvlpBd 770 
Emsrtrtk 1£11 —51 
GtGvtn ,38 +62 
InflEq 1239 -.14 
Ptcstg B52— 16 

SmCos 1551— 152 
Gvt£qty nx 2259 —90 
GrodfionMcDoaakt 
EstVcd pn2259 —72 
Govlncp 1275— .12 
OHTFp 1275—11 
OPPVol p 17.94 —.74 
GHMNTE 956 — 21 
GHNaTTE 1814—16 
Groenspmgl426 —25 
Gaardai Fund* 
AstAfloc 1077 
GBGlnfl 1207—68 
Bondn 11.94—66 
PorkAv 2751— 131 
Stock n 28.10—134 
TaxEx 930 
USGovt 1060 —65 
HTlnsEqp 1251 —41 
HTMgR p HUM —63 
HonitpCota 969 —02 
Hanover Iqy Fds 
BIChGr 9.95 —31 
ST Gv 9.71 —62 
SmCpGr 920 —M 
USGovt 975 —67 
HorhcrRxjds 
Bondx 107? —22 
CopAppnl£90 —75 
Growth n 1273 — 72 
Inttn 2354 —45 
IntlGr 1035 —23 
SitDurnx 965—66 
Value nx 1245—55 
Heartland Fds: 

USGvt p 955 —11 
Vtfuep 2299—1.17 
W1 TxF 954 —16 
HroatoBI Front 
EuroWI 1063 —10 
LAmrVa IBJ9—35 
NAmrGrln946— 33 
PdBVal 1810 —IS 
WWBd 947 —.02 


CapApp DU22 —70 
Divmcp 10.17—11 
IncGrp 11.15 —35 
LMGOVP 931 —61 
SmCaPS pl£92 —98 
HtabMrok Reids 
Batoncanx94< —19 
Bondnx 1030—11 
GovfBdnx 959 —67 
Growth rtx 9 57 —49 
JncGrnx 957 —29 

IncuEax 1140 —39 
SpGrEq n 1190 —46 
HflTordGr 15.17 —42 
HomstdSd n £10 —61 
HomstdVl 1430 —41 
HorocMnn 1939 — 58 
HudsonCap 1298 —60 
Hunmer1nd£10 —69 


EnvraAp 842-35 Eq1990P 1372—01 RexBdfn 1825 -61 
GilnBf 9.05 *64 FdVafcj P 1243 —M Grin 1294 —.13 i 

GtabAp 1294 —39 GIEqp 1232-.14 M«LifrStnT«St 
GtobBt 1250 —39 1 Gtlncp 846-62 CopApA 973 —56.' 

GilnA 9.05 -631 GovtSec P 250 — 63 Cap Ape 958 -54 

GtobRx 157B— 149 j NOfTFTr 45S —.12 CapApC 977 —54 


tovGrAp 1041 —69 
rtrtnS-CA 11.97-21 
MSlncGrA7I43— 1X6 


USGvp 979 —08 
WnthREI 1227 —51 


MtgincA 1341 —10 
NYTaxAi _ 


GTTeOi 1750 -75 
GofdA 1543 -.19 
GaldBt 1558 -20 
Pocflcs 1449 -22 
RBSkA 2051 -48 
RgBkBl 2042 —49 
J Hancock Sovargrc 
AchA 1177 —32 
AchB I 1171 —32 
BoJAp 1030 —31 
BdBp 1029— 21 

BondA fp 1454 —17 
InvA P 1448 —34 
tovBP 1447 — 33 
USGvA P 9.88 —.04 
USGvBI 957—04 
J&VBdx 1277 -43 
KSMun 1220 —77 
KSIMunLI 1260 — 20 
Koufmaire’ 340 —34 
Kemper Finds 
A«Gov 849 
BtueChp 1227 —46 
CaOf 723 —13 

ttvlnco 8.16 —JO 

EttvSvc 1238— 53 
FLTx 1063 —19 
Gfctnc 851 -63 
Grth 1615 -58 
rtYieto 9.90 —25 
Income 83* —67 
rroiFund 1033 
MuniBd 9.90 -20 
NYTF 1073 —IP 
QHTF 940 —.18 
Reflrel 11.15 —27 
Retires 1278 —26 
Reflre3 1037 —24 
Refire4 9.19 —21 
Retires 846 —.17 
STGiob 7.14 —62 
SmCpEti 529—36 
Technol 1013 -44 
TXTF 1062 —.19 
Totfietm 9J8 —31 
USGvt 851 —.04 
Kemper Invsk 
Kvtnc I 465 —15 
Gvtt 7.11 —64 
Gwthl 1444 -.94 
WYldl 811 -20 
ST Git 7.12—62 

Shftntt 821 —61 
&nCDEatll.lB —66 
TotReff 1262 —47 
K«mi*W Premier: 

Divin £07 —.14 
Gvt 7.12 —SO 
Growth 1761 —.95 
WYld 813 —20 
5TGI 7.14 —62 
Shflrt 824 —01 
SmepEq 11J4 -46 
TatRt 1348 -46 
KM Funds: 


TaxFrp 1092—28 
TFCTp 959—24 
TxFrOd pi 04? -32 
TFFLp 434 —14 
TFMOp 604 —14 
TFNJP £06—12 
TaxN Yp 1057 —28 
TFTXP 950 -25 
TFPAp 458 —14 
TFHlp 454 —14 
TFM1 450 —13 
TFWAP 453—13 
ValuApppll29 —57 
USGovt 472 —05 


_ _P 1174—26 

EmerGr 1936— 166 
Govtn 9.14 —69 

Grtnc 9.99 —29 

•nsfGv 1055 —23 


OxA Pi 234 —27 
NYTxB tn 7234 — 28 
Oppen 1053 —37 
.. . . __ PATE A pH 59 —22 

EqMCA 1135 — 49 ! SPeUAP 2769— 1.13 1 InriGvAH 951 — 62 
EqtncC 1135—48 1 StrincAP 493 — 68 ‘ MNTE 1051 — 25 

EqliwstA 1256 — 60 I StrincSt 493 —09' NoHTE 1042 —32 

EqlnvC 1270 —591 StoSTLAp 470 —62 PacEurG 1454 —30 

GovSecA 7.15-641 SHnGrAp 492 — 14 Sector P 1765—55 

SlrtnvAP 490 —64 Value p 1849 —S3 


16 

1058—34 
1073—34 
1101 —M 
1622 -73 
1131 -.10 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


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(Continued From Page 4) 


LONDON BRAZILIAN Escort 

Swwce 071 72t 5597/91 Open 7 don 


— **• — TOKYO “• *“ — 

.... ••TOP FOR TOP 

Ey/ JAPAN &con & Gude Agmcy. 
JH: TOKYO m 3&7lSo. Wf - 


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BroHTYd 9.45 —26 
Fundx 1692 —67 
Income 650 —69 
Muni £19 —.19 
OppGr 9.95—68 
MAS Fuadv 
Batancednll31— 2J 
EmerGr n 1636—167 
Equity n 2037— 65 
Fxdlnlln 1163— 64 
Fxdlncn » 56—66 
GIFxin 1035 +63 
HYSecsn 925 —20 
InttEqn 1437 — 36 
LWDurH nl(L4I— 63 
MtgBkFC 1025 -64 
MunFxl 1030 —23 
SelEa n 17.13—54 
SelFtn 1037 — 63 
SeA/cIn 1256—39 
SmCpVl n 1668—' US 
SpFln I2JJ3 —06 
Vcttuen 1268 —35 
MFS: 

MITApx 1123—3* 
MIGAP H45— 63 
BondA P 1190— .10 
EmGrAP 1649—1 3B 
GrOpAp 1091 —61 
GvLfAp 873 —03 
GvMBAP £58 —05 
GvScAp 931 —05 
HlIncAp 622 —13 
InOpAp 779 —10 
LJriMAp 721—04 
RschAp 1199 —81 
SectAP 1129 —74 
TotRAp 1183 —32 
Ut*Ap 7.1* — 20 
VcfuAp 971 -JS 
WoGvAp 1148 +.14 
WoGrA 1622 -83 
WoTctApxlOJ? — 23 
MuBdA 1084 -26 
MuKA £94 —14 
MuUA 7A5 —.08 
MwALA p 1027 —21 
MuARAD 9 M —22 
MuCAAp £47—12 
MuFLAp 985 —27 
MllGAAplQ38 — 25 
MUMAAplOJO 
MuMDAplOJ? —25 
AltalMSAp ,.I9 
MIA4CAP118I 
MuNYAPlOJO —23 
MuSCAp 1179 _ 

MuTNAp 1026 -20 
MuVAAull.lS —26 
MuWVApTTJO -23 
CcpGBt 1385—40 
Bend B 11W —1? 
EmGrBT 1883 — 12| 
GoldBt 674 
GvMaBI 688 —.04 
GvScfif 920 —05 
HiinBI £22 —.13 
irnmBt Z59 *sn 
MA ITBx 1120 —37 

Mu&ffl 1043—26 

Secret 1127—74 
TC4RB I 1283 —20 
WoEoS t 1621 —39 
WpGvS 1184 +.14 
WoGrS 16.17 — 63 
WoTotB X 10 J6 —21 
MuIrtBt £56 —17 

MIMPMAi „ 

Bdtncn ora —23 
Stklncn 9.96 —35 
SrtcGrwn 1086 —83 
StkAP n 1474—126 

MIMLJCRiadK 
AsriAflX 1128 —41 
Fxdfnem 939 — M 
Invl X 1671 —71 
MtoSecS 9.98 —.12 

MMFlGtn ,83 —J? 

MMPXIntn 9J8 —66 

MSBFdn 1448—72 

MadcenztoGra 

AdfGvAp 973 —61 
AmaFdPl229 — J2 
CAMun 0x9.97 — « 
Canada 10.17 —32 
Fixlncpx ,62 —18 

Global 1112 —iO 

utyiflupx ion —is 

NYMUHPX985 — 17 
NaJMu px 989 —19 
N Amer px 686 —30 


FfilncA 683 —13 
WlncB 682 —13 
flfflEqp 1031 —67 
IrdfFxInf £16 +.11 
MedAstB x£92 —33 
MgdAriAx£94 —35 
MgdAstCx£95 
RsctfiaX;x9.13 
TaxExA 783 -.16 
Tx£xB 763 —16 
MIMufnc 10J? —.19 
Midwest 
AtfiLGGvt 9.97 
Govt p 965 —.10 
ITOGvp 1085—09 
LeshUfilANL52 —23 
LwhTsvA 855 —07 
QHTF 1163 
TFlrtp 1072 —16 
USGovLM 759 —69 
Moorito J6J3— 767 
MonettMC 1288 —59 
Artddflor Funds: 

Fxlnl p 2054 —14 
Gwthl p 26 T9 —53 
OhTII p 2122—19 
FxInT X5J —.14 
GrwthT 2619 —52 
IttEcT 2159 —87 
MtgBk 967 —10 
Oh TFT 2121 
SIBcTT 2064 —04 
MontrGtd p 1080 —63 
MonltrSIp 1659—14 
Montgomery Fds: 
EmgrtrtW 14.14 —21 
GtobCom 1607 
GtobOppnl381 —41 
Growth n 14.95 —47 
InriEMfctrttOS _ 
IntlSmCopttJJ —45 
ShDurGI 9.94 —63 
SmCaon 1667—1.19 
MorgStnaFdE 
AslonGrA 1456 —30 
AstonGS 1450 —20 
GlobEqA 1163 —28 
Gtofa&B 1175—28 
Morgan Grenteft 
EmergEq 921 —24 
Fxlnan 10.15 —13 
lntSrrCpnlOJ3 
MuniBd 1051 —15 
MroKsSop 13.11 —41 


Taroetp 2565— 16*'PiprTr1D 985 — 07 
TxFrBI 981 —21 I RcrTrShD 966—02 


OlinaAf 95 -24 
IvyEoA 1769—167 
GrttlAP I486 — 87 

’■*! — H 

W1AP 2663 —84 
ManStov Finds 


ActOrvn 1149 - 
Asian Eq 020.14 - 
Bat 925 - 
BnGr 1653 - _ 
EmMkt 1723 —40 
EmMkDtot *63 - 
EqGrn 1189- 
Fxdlnc 1023 
GJEqtv 1365 —77 
GFxInn 1051 +63 
«Yldn 1083 - 
flmscn l£is —13 
irttEq 1485 -68 
ReaJYWn 977 + 63 

VaiueEanTI 87 — 34 
SCVdn 1078 —36 
MutitonkmDlRil7 —71 
MuirCATF1571 —42 
MunMIGB 1032 —40 
MutfBnfl 1758 —34 
Mutual series 
Seaoann 3135 — B2 
Drscawy 1346 —36 
Ouctfdn 2688 —76 
glares n 7887—267 
NCC Funds: 

Equttylp 1328 —41 
Fxdtnci P 1088 —08 
OHTElp 1046 —19 
EqulfyR pi 329 —42 
FxdlncR D1054 — 68 
OH TER P 1042 —l, 
NDTxFrfm ,63 —08 
NWILNBrtMDr 
WYWA 4.9* — 69 
fltcGrA 9.93 —36 
MutHA 461 —.10 
NYLtatfttFdte 
EAFE 1245 —13 
Band 9.71 —66 
GrEd 1420 —.93 
tetxBd 1075 — 67 
IndxEq 1131 —44 
rtrtultA 1121 —33 
STBd 1036—02 
VolEa 1242 —83 
Ntflnd 1221 —24 


AdlRtlAp 960—62 
AdiRTTA n 960 —JO 
BalINt 1081 —60 
BdTA n 1083 —60 
CpGTAn 11.13 —JO 
DrvBVf 1026—12 
DMT An 1026 — -.12 
EmGTA 1063 -88 
EqlnONf 11.13 —33 
EqfldA 11.12 —34 
EqtnTA 11.14—64 
ElntfTA 982 —62 
FkilnfM 10.10—18 
CAITAn 1033 —18 
GvtTAn 9.97—11 


TxFrAp 982 —20 1 PtonJTNtx 1£14 
Timep 1735 —91 J Portico Fete 


-.16 


TatRtAp £35 
TalRtBth 830 —39 
USGvt P 946 —67 
VotStAp 1353 —45 
OveriBad Express 
AstAUAx 1143 —26 
CATFA 1065—17 
MuincA 1041 —29 
5tndGfA 1287 — 163 
ST Govt 5161 —63 
USGvtA 1034 —11 
VRGA 966 -63 
PBMGGrn 15.15 — *2 
PFAMGoFdS 
Baton 1030—20 
CapApn 1314 
DivLown 1147 


EmerBMIctl443-27 
BnhEan 1144 „ 
Eqlnc n 1131 —35 
Intln 1177 —.13 
MsdBdJ n 976 —69 
MidCap 1175—66 
Sm&G 1037-123 
SmCpV 1282 — 88 
UttStk n £98 —27 
PlMCORmdK 
TotRto n 1025 —68 
TRJII 9.18 — 65 
LowDurnl064 —.03 
LDJI 954 -64 
SharlTn 952—51 
Frann 10.18 +64 
Global n 965 - 62 
WYld 1082 —25 
Grwth nx 1380 —87 
LTUSGn 9.96 —IS 
PNC Funds 
BotanceS 12.15 —27 
Bo tone 1214 —28 
CoreEal 982 —33 
CoreEqS 982 —63 
Growth! 1064 —60 
IdxEq 1085 —65 
IntmBdS ,63 —66 
IntGvtS 9.99 —65 
InfTBdl 933 —66 
IntGovn 9.99 —05 
InflEq 1360 —14 
InflEqS 12.99 —.15 
Allanagedll027 — 67 
ManoaedS 1027—67 
PATFp 9.91—26 
STBdl 979 —62 
SmCapvS 1£I8 —74 
SmCopVl 13.18 —75 
Vduel 11.18 —40 
Values H.18 —40 
PRARflynx9Ji —89 
POCificUS ,2D — 69 
PoctflcGrth ,8 3 —32 
PodflcHariisK 
AgGrp 24.19—145 
CATFp 7.14—14 
Gapfncoxl481 —89 
USGv 987 —69 
PucKcoFds: 

APresnt 10.11 —62 
Balance x 117, —44 
CA TF 108* —22 
Eavalx 12.14—82 
Govtnco 1062 — 68 
ST CAP 9.93 —IB 


BalKiw 3267— 52 
Bdktxx 3680— 82 
Eqlndxx 3144—121 
Grtnc nx 2227 —57 
IntBdM 9.96 —67 
MidGrL 1X2132—91 
ST Bondn 1022 —03 
SpGrnx 3265-1.99 
TxEmBdn953 —10 
Profaned Groak 
AssetAnx1045 —30 
Fxdtn n W60 —07 
Growth n 1329 — 85 
Intln 1264—22 
STGovn 968 —62 
, Valuen 1127—39 
Price Funds: 


ASSlAp 1167—41 
ATLAP 1589 —44 
BlueA p 147, —73 
Carr An 1082—23 
COPAAP 1185—70 
CmTcA ,65 —36 
DvGrAp 1952 —74 
EurCrAn ,73 +60 
GBlAt 1160—71 
GilnA P 1087 —06 
GIGIA p 1060 —24 
GrthAp 1,86—' 169 
HlflAp £77 —15 
IncAp 97* —16 
tovGAp 1045 —16 
MHInAp 10.16—24 
NTaxAa 1120 —29 
NYTXA P 1043 —77 
RagFAp 1892 —80 
STGvfAp 246 - 

SmCapA 103, — 36 
USGvA p ,80 —69 
UHAP 808 —15 
AsstSt 1142—42 
ATLBt 1633—44 
BtUflBt 1442 —71 
CaTTBI 1062 —24 
COPABt 1262 —72 
CmTcS 963 —36 
DvGrBt 1964 —74 
EuGrBt 988 *68 
GrttiB t 1922— 167 
GfEnSr 1164 —77 
Gilrfil lftS— 06 
GIG IB t 1048 —25 
HiinBI 877 —IS 
tncBt 975 —16 
invGBt HUS —.15 
MHtoBt 10.16—73 


AdWS 473 
Bdonc*xll46 —33 
BIOrG 10.94 —35 
CoTTXne 9.91 —34 
CapAprn 1286 —26 
DivGro 1x1165 —41 
Spine nx 1692 —74 
EqWxnx 1284 —84 
Europe r» 1155 —05 
FS*n 1381 —n 
FLlnsIntnKUH —16 
GNMn 962 —08 
GATFne 976 —32 
GfoGv 985 + 62 
Growth n 1959 —86 
Gwthlnnx1574 —48 
HiYMn 885 —28 
income ne 883 —13 
inttBdn ,.n +69 
rnttDttn 1767 —ii 
IMSHtn 1187 —10 
Japain 1124 +67 
LatAmn 936 —33 
MdSWn 564 —01 
MdTxFrne956 -22 
M/dCaon 1454 —40 
NewAm n2649 — 146 
N Aston 1772—47 
NewEran2067 —80 
NwHrm nl£56 —57 
NJTFne 1081 —24 
NYTxFn»1039 —38 
OTCn 1452 —67 
Scrrchn I860 —.91 
STBdn 893 —01 
STGfcn 484 
Smcvl 1488—64 
SCecGf 1149—40 
Spedn 1085 —15 
TxFroene 9.17 —24 
TxFrtfY nellTI — 35 
TFinslne 1035 — 17 
TXFrSIn 626 —62 
US Into £20— JM 

US Long e 1066 —10 
VATFna 1048 —25 
PriniryT n 10.92 —46 

Pm cM Phetv: 

DtvAchX 1284 —42 
GovtPrt 946 —08 
InsTEx 970 —28 
SP100PIX1441 —56 
TS»rt. 872 —24 
PrinMBS 989 —13 
Priacer Funds: 

BIChp 1143 —33 
Bond 1067 —.15 
CbpACC 1946 —85 
EmgGr 2385—1.16 
Govt 1087 —16 
Growth 2942—135 
Managed 1234 —33 
TE Bd 1147—32 

Ulffittes 981 —.18 
World 764 —.13 
ProgrsVl 1024 —51 
PIFFxdtncn,67 —67 
PlFlrrtMu fp1Q73 —17 
narhvCHacL 
EndvGtf 1085 —41 
InriGrth 1694—42 
SmCapGr 12.01 —88 
PrudSpcnp 6.98 —48 
PruderdfainindK 
MctlA 1241 — 79 
IfltJ* 1264 —77 
Adi A f 940 +61 
BJadtGv 942 —62 
CAInA P 1066 —JO 
Emit A P 1341 —J3 
EqtncA 1339 —40 
ROiAf l£W —77 
GfabAp 1387 — 22 

GlAstA 1.B4 +41 
GUtAI 1178 —.18 
GvPIAlp £84 —68 
GtQpAp 11.91 —72 
HfYTdAfp £38—19 
kiVerAfp 1170 —47 
MuflMp 1366 —45 
MuHiA 1075 —1, 
PacGrA 1852 +65 
STGlAp B.H —61 
UiJAfp 9.14 -26 
CMMul 1124— 34 
AtSBI 983 _ 


RBBGvtp 956—06 
RCMFund 2059—163 
RSI Trust 

AdBd 2644—17 
Core 3193—166 
EmGr 3153-238 
flrtBd 2548 —11 
STtF 1865 
Vdue 2548 — 87 
Rainbown 522 —19 
ReoGnip 1320 — 32 
Regis Fun* 

C&BBdf 1185— 23 
C&8 Eq 125* —35 
DSIDv 1086 —38 
DSILM 981 —66 
FMAspc 1028 —.13 
ICM5C 1629 —71 
SAAMPMn980 -61 
SirSpEq n l£lf — 169 
SVGwth n 981 —3* 
SirSTRn 1067 +61 
SflBidn 981 —24 
SterSTFn 953 —03 
SttrBtn 1143 —21 
TSWEq 1084—42 
TSWFTX 1064—07 
TSW mti u.13— 22 
RdiTangrutl724— 93 
Rcmtxaodt Funds 
Asian £90 —12 
BaTIfn 987 —24 
GtFxIfiTr nlD73 +68 
GwthTrmt 9.97 —85 
tnttEqTrnl283 —69 
SJGvFIT 973 —07 
SmCOpT 1IL00—M 
TEHTrnx9JS8 —23 
TaxFirrnx981— .11 
VdueTr IK976 —30 
Reflre tov Trsh 
Balanced 1658 —47 
EaGro 17.98 —70 
Eqlncom 1782 —88 
income 7656 —72 
RevnBtCh 1463 —43 
Riqhtime Group: 
BtoeChp 3273 +63 
RT Fd nfP3S50 — 69 
GovSecp 1117 +62 
Growth P 2582 +61 
MidCap p 28.15 +62 
SocAwp 2489 
RimcoBd 980 —04 
RkncoStk 1187 —38 
RtvertnEx jail —37 
RJverftGVlx946 —.12 

Riverside Q*t 

Equity 1173 —81 
Fxdln 974 —.10 
TMMuCb 985— 21 


784 —17 
784—22 
748—21 
863 —14 
1TXA 784 —15 
■ATXA 789 —17 
CAHvTxA 640—09 
CAQTxA £54—16 
SCTxA 777 —19 
USGvtAp 653— 63 
KiYBdAp 675 —13 
Serdtnef Group; 
Bdancedpl4J2— 31 
Bond P 622 —07 
CornSIk p 28.12 —32 
EmGrp 546-33 
GvSecSP 983—09 
Growth P 1689 — 8* 
PATFP 1256 —17 
TFlncp 1366 —23 
World p 1288 —20 
SentrvFdn 1484 —86 
Stoquaton 5380— 189 
Seven Seas Series: 
Matrix n 1143—43 
S&PMidnlt41 —58 
SPSOOn 10.17 —34 
STGvtn 974 —01 
YWPln 1060 
17*4 Funds 
GovMed 986—09 
Gratae nX 1089 —49 
AAATElnn 973 —22 
TExrtrted n 979 —16 
SbawmBtFdsr-toveri : 
Fxdlndn p 980 —08 
GrEatyln P959 ■ — 47 
GrlrEqfn p 1025 —28 
krtGvmln p976 —67 
SmChanM89 —58 
S huwmU tFds-Trost 
FxdincTr n981 —07 
GrEtjlTr 959 —47 
GflncETr 6025 -20 
IntGvTTrn 976 —67 
LTJncTTn 970—03 
SmCpET 1059—58 
Storm Trost 
ColMup 1082—28 
CWncP 1049 —17 
EmrGrp 1384—06 
FLIihp 943—29 
Grtnc px 1131 . 

Growth p 1174 —42 


STARn 1986 —66 
SmCpEani726— 385 

S Ro^nT tR 1180 —30 
SWIorFd 1131 -JT 
USGvInc 972 —86 
StertjraGv 982— 65 
SnrbStMii pIS27 —14 

a £i!Z iB Ts,-* 

Diversifd 879 —29 
Ft ugr e5 5 1145—55 
TaxEx 1088 —10 
USGov p 4.98—65 
9FwmFds 
Brian n 3046 —85 
Gwffm 2139 —80 
Interim ia.19 —64 
MWtin 826—11 
StStreet Rerit 
CATFC 778—18 
CapttriA 980—51 
CaolO 944 —82 
CapFdC 984 
QsriralB 943 —82 
E xclf d > 8 8882— 784 
EnerwA 1085 —52 
GEngyB 1081 —52 
GvttncA 1229 — 67 
GvttnB 1227 —08 
GlftCn £21 —39 
InvTrBx £25—39 

AtvTrAPX 827 —40 

tnvTrCx 829 —41 
NYTFAB 769—16 
NYTFC 750—16 
SmdtCaeB9.02 

SteadaKn Funds: 
Amtnd n 141 —08 
ASSOC n 77 —64 
Invest n 124 — 68 
Ckxangn ZJF —10 
SetoRoeFtfs: 
Cap0ppn3085— 18B 
Gvtlnc n 975 —69 
HyMunn 1160 — 22 
Incomen 985—11 
totmBdn 885 — 66 
IntMtinn 1160—18 
LMMfltn 979 — 02 
MgdMun £75 —18 
PrfmeEfl nlAOB — 85 
Spedn 2239—97 
Stodcn 22.98 —70 
TotlRM n 2679 —01 


Brian p 1147 - 
GrEqp 14.15- 
IntBd 1020 —06 
LMGovAn981 —63 

VQlMorperi32 7 —49 

5t ndlw iFbnds: 
Dividend n2&69— 89 
Grwth n 1984 - 
SmCapn 25.9* - 


fldlGrp 1086—14 
Nrirtrtu P 1099-24 
STGip 231-61 


Advtgn 10.12—01 
AmUttn 984 —25 
AriaPacn 983 —27 
CntSHtn 1736—72 
Discovn 1684 — 89 
GovScn 1021 —07 
Growth n 1088 —81 
KYI MU 988 —17 
Incon 980 —12 
InsMun 1081 —36 
Intin 1349 —38 
trtvstn 1843 —36 
MuriBdn 989—25 
Oootnty n2732— 120 
STBondnlOOl —05 
STMunn 1066 — 10 
Total n 2384-135 
SutAmerica Fds: 
BalAselAfflt33 —52 

BalAsetB 0A28 —53 
DiVtncSB 479 —08 
EmGrAp 1673.— 93 
ErriGrS 1687 —93 
FSdScBP 7022 —67 
GrowthA PT356— 80 
HitncBp £03— IB 
HilncA p 862— 39 
TE 1mA pU55 —25 
USGvA 829 —03 
USGvSp £39 —03 
ValueB 1478 —68 
TARGET/ 

fliterBdfn 957— 65 
InflEq n 1334—18 
LgCcvGrn948 —33 
LoCapV 977 
MtaBkdtn 988 —68 
SmCacG 1182 — B2 

SmCdPV 1248 — 89 

TofRIBd 983—67 

the 

AcRUSAp 739 —02 
BafanAp 1188 —32 
Brians 1185—32 
BdlncAp 1180— 11 
CA TF A p 741 —09 
QriGrAp1452 —58 
CapGrBnn1487— 88 

GtobG Apll-53 +63 

GrOpAP 12.15—39 
GvScAp 1130—67 
GwthAp 10.02 —31 
HimcAp 964—18 
bdEaAp 1530—69 
ln<EnBpnl623 —10 
LMUSA 12.11 —65 
rtrtassT A pi 559 — 37 
TxExAp 726—18 
VriUeAp 787 —29 
IRAK RMs 
IntrFxn £07-65 
toflEan 1012 _ 

hOFxn £33 +66 
LsGrwn 940 —M 
Lgvaln 881 -32 
MtgBkdn 782 — 66 
Munln £64 —26 
SmGrwn 1220—127 
SmVrin £87—45 
, TlffUnn £10 — •** 

I Templeton Group: 


3KG«P efc 987 -12 

K ' 11041 -31 
10.17 —04 
U5lnCTn 10.17 —04 
VriEaltn 1182 —44 
VolEctTn 1182 -44 
VaMuT n 1081 —20 
VoMunlt 1081 —20 


1084 —13 

Morthlyln 989 —.18 

SpEquO n 1788— 161 

SpEauWI 1082—63 
Smdh Baraay A: 
CacABA 1420— 80 
GtGvTA 1239 —69 
lncGroAp1282 —44 
falcRetA 981 
MIA 1741 —13 
MoGovtA 1238 —10 
MuCriA 1237 —32 
rtrtuFL A 1282 —27 
MuLtdA 655 —07 
MunNtA 1335 
rtrtuNJ A 1333 „ 

flftuhfY A 1283—27 
SHTSY 466—01 
USGvtA 13.11 —11 
UHAP 1240 —29 
Smith Barney BAG 
kUfC 1740 —13 
CapApB 1486—60 
irrtfe * 


Contra n 1239 +24 
EmGrp 1881— 180 
ValPlus 1385—1.12 
RodierierFds: 
BdGrowpl321 —34 
RoMup 1785—37 
_LtdNYj3_ £2 2 —64 
Rodney Square: 
Dtvlnp 1288 —06 
Growtbp 1577—82 
liillEq p 1243 —10 
Royca Funds; 

PerxtMu £22 —30 
Eqlnc 546 —.14 
OTC £52 —10 
Premier n £46—11 
Value in 989—35 
Rurti more Group: 
AmGas nxl16B— 86 
USGLon 949 —14 
US Ifltn 921 —10 
MDTFn KLS6 —22 
VATFn 1083— 22 
RydxNuva 9 ja — 46 
Rydax JRSA nlOJO _ 
SBC Wl din ,48—02 
SBC WldGr 1585 - 

cnec rinuti- 

CapGrn 789 —36 
Convrtbt nft]74 - 
SBSFn 1530- 


Batoncp 1176 —41 
Bondnp 108I —ID 
BOfiXUP 1069 —67 
OsGrn 1146 —87 
CorpOtnpnl.W 
GNMAp 940—13 
IrimxJBd P066 —69 
SWGvnp ,87—62 
IrtttFxhlP 1026 
IntMnp 1039 —.17 
IrttGvt np ,24—65 
Intlp 1082 —.17 
Eqlnc no 133* —41 
Ealndx npiS67 — 80 
KSTF 1040 —.15 
MidCGp 11.16 -84 
PA Mun IXJ1049 —13 
SmCte pnllW— 167 
Value no 1044 —24 
CanAnp 1521 —8, 
SIFE Trust 183 —.10 
SITFundw 
Grthlnc ZLB8 —.92 
Growth n U.,6 —87 
tort 1485 —13 
TaxFreen ,43 —.16 
USGov. 1080 — 63 
STlCbuic 
BaTTrnz 9jg — m 
CooGrl pxl]86 —55 
CgpGrT x 1166 —88 
toCTT 10.08 —67 
InGrBmp 1069 —06 
InGBtVP 1089 —10 
InlQdr n 1087 —10 
SwtoEqT 0x9 71 —83 
9sl — A3 
ShTTrTrn V.B9 —61 

VallncTnx9.96 —44 
yatln dnx 9.95 —42 
Sofecn Funds 
CafTFr n 1181 —28 
EquOynx 13.05 —62 
GNMAn ,38 —11 
Growth n 19.12—186 
HiYMn £90—20 
tocamnx 12.11 —71 
Munien 1337 —36 


1726 —13 
MuLtdB 684 —08 
SrttftbBrnjrShraiA: 
AtSGvAp 987-61 
AdvsrAp 2582— 133 
AgGrAp 2547—182 
ApprAP 1DJ0 —32 
TeiGAp 1187— 82 
Tel In 10149—183 

AzMuAp 978—34 
CoMuAP 1531 — 34 
DhFSSttncp£«7 —08 
FdValAp 779—26 
GKXtAp 29.15—47 
HilncA I 1183—28 
bUCAA £13 —14 
IntNYA £14 —16 
Ltdrtrtup 868 —06 
UdTrp 7M —05 
MgGvA P 1287 —68 
MgMuAp1582 —39 
MaMuApl230 —34 
NIMuAp 125S —33 
NyMuAp M44 — J7 
PrtrttAp 2056 — 1.18 
SPEqAp 1883-183 
PrTRA I £46 — J, 
LttOAp 1377 -22 
WlncAp 640 +63 
WWPAp 150 
SiMBraySnaBt 
AgGrBf 2522—141 
ApprBt 1087 —32 
CoMliSI 1541 —34 
ConvBt 1474 —42 
DvsInSt 867 —08 
EuroB t 1465 —63 
FLMuBf 984 —38 
FdVaWt 778 —26 
GWdBf 1585 +64 
GOpBI 2884 —47 
OvScfit 988 —06 
GrlnBl 970 —34 
HtmcBl 1183—38 
fltvGdBt 1261 —15 
MflGvBlnl287 —68 
MgMuB 1 1582 —29 
NJMuBf 1255—33 
NVMuBl 1644—37 
PTMtBI »74— 1.17 
PmtTRBH546 —39 
SactrBt 1458 —85 
SpEqBt 1846— 182 
9rinBt 1686 —39 
TeiGBI 1146—61 
TXExB f 17.18—38 
UWB I 1377 —32 
WlncB t £40 +63 
SmShBrnyShrat Fds 
PmRet 943 —13 
Prtnir p 786 —13 
_ Prtn'trp 787 —as 
SmBrShDfn 9.97 —06 
SmBrShGf 9.90—06 
SoGmFundri 
Gold 1142 —39 
flttrrl 2332—32 
1184—06 
Sodefy Funds: 

Boianae 983 —.17 
DwradSt 118, — 39 
GrSIk 985 —J4 
!"tlGr 1231 -66 
Wrmlnc 984 — 64 
InvOIBd 985 — 66 
LfdJn 10.14 — 89 
OHRrpSJ 1468 —78 
OHTF 1082— .18 
SHGrStk ,86 —55 
SMVaiSt 10.15— 80 
Slklnx 980 —31 
USGvHn 1077 —08 
VotSIk 987 —39 
SaunctShn 1641 —41 
SAM SC 1389—48 
SAM vain 1783 —85 
SoTrVtenBd tat, —66 
SoTrVlcnSJ 1064 —37 
SpPtSJk 3482—1.90 
SaPtCash 985 
StagecaudiFundK 
Aset Ate x 1766 —83 
CATFIn 1067 —67 
CATF 1034 —34 
OpSlknx3l84— 1.19 
Dvsln x 1085 —43 
GNMA 1080 —.12 
GWnex 14.17 _3i 
USGovt 1473 —12 
VRG 1089 —63 
SteWSrillnvriJ 
Equity rot 30.10 — 141 
FxancmtfAOS —59 
GlFxlh nx 1879 —26 
InflEriv n 25.17 — 81 
IntfFxln nx 2247 —39 
MATEBOBLI9 —37 
Securnx 1941 —50 


AnwTrr 1330 —48 
CcpAtX 1562.— 33 
DevAAto P 1484 — B9 
Forynp 943 —09 
GtobOpp 1273 —0 
Growth p 1744—41 
tnaxnp 936—11 
WEstp 7347 —32 
SmotCap 788—23 
World P 1581 —40 
TwredritnfltdR: 
EmMSp 1234—12 
ForEaS 13.10 —.10 
FEsriS TD74 —68 
GrwthS 1147 —22 
ThinlAvV 17.11 —42 
Ttxmsaa Gnxsc 
EqtnA 1132—51 
GwthA 1133—74 
IncoA 782 —12 
InNA 1225 —23 
OporA 2884—179 
PreMtA 1275-70 
ShlGvA 985 -62 
TargetA 1226—62 
TExA 1142 
USGvA 9.14 —36 
EqtnB 1220 —82 
Grwthflf 20,94—73 
Inc o me O t 787 —12 
IntlBT 1J.95 —23 
OporBt 2782-175 
PrecMetB1244 — 89 
ShlGvB 985 — 62 
TaxExBt 1141 —34 
Targets 12.14 —82 
USGovBt 9.10—07 
'nwnibu,BFd& 

MMu 1285 — 19 
LWTln 1267 —07 
LfdCal 1258 —12 
LtdGvtp 1240 —65 
LfdAVXl p 1331 —.13 
NMInt 1282—15 
TOCqUev 1284 —47 
Tower Foods: 

CraApp 13.13 —M 
LAMun 1083—17 
Tote*? ef 982 —05 
USGv 10.15 —05 
Trodemork Froxtc 
Equity n 1033 — 37 
Goyttncnn980 —68 
KYMunn 978 —30 
a Govtn 982 — 04 
TVmisanerica: 

AdSGvA 989 —02 
CATFA p 1060 —38 
CupAp p 1267 —93 
EmGAp 2520—182 
Gvtncp 7.98 — 86 
GrinAp 1168—44 
GvSecp 789 —07 
InsIGv 25.10 
Uivaurip £71 —68 
Trad A 1065 —30 
TntsomariczGpd: 
BKJtot 1135 —57 
CATFB 1060 —38 
EmGBf 2489—177 
Gvflicf 933 —66 
GrtoBf 11.11 —AS 

HYTFt 9 39 —30 
HFYWI 789 —17 
NrtR*t 1460— 163 
TFBiSr 1065 —30 

TrudFOrCrodUre 
G? 989 + 61 
MSP 979 —02 
TMP1 996 987— 62 
I t-hirrr 

TomerGE 10269 —82 
TvwedyGVl236— .12 
2Mi Ceatury- 
Brilnvnx 1578 —40 
G«n 1660—180 
Growth n 2231 —.93 
Hertnvn 10.19 —60 
toflEqn 742 —.16 
LTBgndw ,84 —65 
Srierin 3784— 13S 
TxESTn ,87 —02 
TxElntn 1033 —68 
TtcELTn I(U7 —13 
UWjn 2160 -83 
USGvShT n947 —61 
Value nx 560 —is 
.Vi rion— 954 —71 
USLoriKSfkn4JS— 18 
USAA Group: 

AesvGth m£,i —132 

Brianced 1U.I6 —at 

CA Bd n 1063 — 30 
COrnstn 2289 —84 
GNMA 9.97— £S 
Gridn ,.i, —a 
GrUncnx —80 
Grwth n 1683 —59 
tocStk nx 1236 -87 
flW^TOHJS— 24 
toil n ]£89 _jo 
W ratf" 1033—29 
gUTBretn 984 —64 
TOT" £98 —30 
TxEfT n 1288 —33 
TxELTn 1320 —30 

TxEShn 1088 67 

VABd 1071 —34 
WldGr n 1231 —24 
UST Muster: 

Asia 1064 .15 

EMJfe £66 ! 

EmaAmr 930 —29 
Eautty 19.17—162 
incGro 11.94 —0 
totMylln £83—07 

InttFd 1084 ,11 

IriTE £64 —.16 
LTTE 887 —32 
Madfll 887 —09 
NYTC £18 —35 
£03 —03 
ST&rSec £93 —61 
ST TaxEx 68, —04 
UaBadFuadsT 
Accumrittv7.04 —37 
Bond £01—06 
Cortlnc 2087 —87 
GoktGvt 986—46 
GvtSec 533 —04 
Htog' 4.15 —12 

Halite: ,30 23 

Income 2485 —77 

ln«Wi 964 —15 


Muricpl ?61 —18 
MunHf 5.17 —10 
NwCcpt 10.94 -85 
Retire 7.70 —24 , 
ScTedi M87 -83 
Vansward 2.13 —28 
iMMSamceF 
AOAmn 20.11 —86 
437 —13 
n £19—37 
240 —28 
n 588 -36 
toain 1289 —42 
RealEstn 1029 —86 
SpTrGvt n 9.95 —62 
USTxFrnl148 —29 
mtaaani7M —67 
VaHtoron 981 —10 
Value Lin* Fd: 

AdiGv n 981 —05 
Assrtnn 742—16 
CanvFdn 1287 —35 
Fund it 17.12 —92 
tncamen 636 —19 
LevGT 2337-122 
NYTEn 9.96 —23 
SaCtSitn 1£16— L12 
TaxEx n KL39 — 26 
USGvt n 1188— 14 
Van Eric 

AstoDynBl£42 —19 
AstoAp 1247 —19 
Galdiesp £23 —22 
flrtttov 1*57—139 
WrkUncpx£42 —05 
WridTmp14J3 —29 
VtHKanpeaMer: 
CATFAp 1646 —47 
GwthAp 1££J —62 
HfYMAP tail —12 
HiYldBI 10.11 
ftiTKAp 1840 —44 
fllTFBt 1£37 
Mun InAP 1484 —35 
MuIncBI 1481 —36 
PATFAp1£72 —42 
PATFB 1671 —42 
STGlAp 882 +82 
STGBt £52 *62 
StpbiAo 1273 —35 
StuInBf 1272 —25 
TxFHBt 1481 —27 
TxFrHApI481 — JO 
USGvBt 1471 —15 
USGvAp 1472 —16 
UKWyAp 1380 — 40 
UMB t 1347 —80 
Vance Ex c hange: 

COPE 16630 — 5.99 
DepBstnx8285-U9 

Oven rod 6773— 532 

Ebas 19687-679 
ExFd 23784-7.40 
FdEx 14187—534 
SriRd 12449— 4JO 
Vanguard Grow 
ArinJTn* 986—08 
AdmLTnc987 —30 
AdmSTne 9.99 — 05 
AssetAn 1379 —36 
Convt n lljffl —46 
Erincn 1283 —44 
Explorer nH71 — 231 
Morgan n 1183 —47 
Prrncp n 1829 —81 
Quant n 1539 -47 
STARn 1360—30 
Trintln 3188—32 
TrtJS 3021—1.40 
STTsrynelD-13 —65 
STFedne 10.10 —m 
STC erpn mss-iu 
mwne 10.16— .M 
GNMAn 988 —10 
rrcorpn 947 —.09 
LTTwne97B —15 
LT Coro n, 883 — IB 
HYCoron 760—19 
Proton ,63 —14 
ktxTofSne984 —68 
IdxSTBn 988— 04 
tdxTTBn 974 —68 
fltxBaf 1045—27 
1(1x500 n 4186— 129 
flKtxExtnlBto,— 1.02 
htxTotn 1120—45 
IdxGron 970 —30 
kfxVrin 11.18—40 
IdxSmC 1536— 96 
khcEUrn 1160—14 
IdxPacn 1081 —17 
htxlnstn 4224—140 
Artu+SYdnlQJO —25 
Muni Intn 1282 —18 
MriJdn 1088 —65 
iMuLonanl(U7 —28 
Mutntan 1187— 27 
MunShtn 1549—02 
CAlnSLT n!0A5 — 23 
FT Iran 1022 — 34 
NJlrttn 1166 —72 
NYlns n 1036— 20 
OHJnsn 1160— 21 
PAtnsn 1073 —22 

SPEnrgr 1487— 167 

SPGridr 1277 —86 
SPHfttir 3247-132 
SPServr 2268— 160 
SPTechr 1845—1.05 
Spun 1051 —23 
USGron 1481 —44 
IntlGr 1327 —.14 
Weftstyn 1865 -33 
Wriltnn 1942 —54 
Wndsrn 1346—46 
Wndsll 1638 —83 
Verdure AcMsers 
tori’! 5.14 —36 
Muni id 9.17 —06 
NYVen 1186 —47 
RPFBt £15 —01 
RPFGRI 1423— 84 
RPFGI 1099—50 
RPFCV 1683—61 
VkfDTy Fundc 

SS 

Equity 1035 —41 
Govted. *60—07 


ShtGvtnn 
Vctta Funds: 


BaiAx 1080 -33 
Band pnx 1086 —12 
CAInt x 945—17 
CnpGr 3138-148 
CapGrBt 3133—147 


X 1130 —11 

Grlnc x 2974—1.15 
GWWshP 1488 — 43 
GrtoBrx 2946—1.14 
IntEqA 1188—11 
NYTFx 1131 —25 
STBd P 1061 —04 
TF Incm *1141 —27 
Voiumef 1474 —71 
VorngearPds: 

Azins 1089 —21 
COTF 1037 —20 
FLtnsd 1036—20 
GroStkp 1734 —41 
IA1T 985—14 
MNIns 1033 —17 
MXxUnt 1073 —69 
MJnrTF 1107—18 
MOfltt 1060 — 30 
NcflTF 1003—20 
NDTF 1083 -30 
USGv 10.10 —12 


ToiRet 1189 —42 
Growth 1468 —76 
LtrfTerm 984 — Oi 
Muni 10.12 —36 
G total 937—33 

WaBSl 787 —80 
W/arb ia g Wfl cus: 

Grtnc n 1X98 —88 
CnnAppnl3L27 —78 
EmGthn 21.16— 135 
FbodJncn 9.97 —67 
GtoWFxtl itBTl —06 
hHEaun >£45—43 
InstEqn 1474 —35 
hdGvtn 1002 — 85 
NY Muni nl£14 —.12 
WosotriiAg 1968 — 135 
webs Peck Greer. 
Djvtnc 1177—51 
Govt 986 — 69 
Grtnc 2281—169 
Gwth 1 1239— £49 

QuontEan 535 — 19 
. Tudor n 2262— 187 
WeitzPVal n 935 —39 
VYeftrVrin 1548 —57 
WettsFands 
AstAfl nx 977 —24 
Bondldxnx981 —10 
Gw1hSlknl080 — 79 
S»P 500 nx 9.99 —39 
USTAUnx 932 —.13 
Waste ore: 

AZTF 1043 —.13 
BdaPl 1443 —69 
LT Bd 983—12 
ModVri 1245 -47 
ORTE 14.18 — 34 
Brilnvtn 1782 —33 
Bos VII n 2056 —S3 
Eqlnln 1039—43 
GNMA I n 1585 —15 
IntBdln 1Q31 —07 
MTDCOI n 16JJ5 —98 
STGovfl 1546 —01 
BoflnvR 1780 —34 
GNMAR 1584 —15 
MtoooR 1£07— 98 
STG ovlR 1545— 61 
Westwood Funds: 
BoJInst 766 —26 
Eqlnst 538 —35 
mtBdt 969—08 
BalS ve 764 —35 
EqSvc 537 —25 

Growth n 938 — 80 
toccme 1034 —63 
totlGlh n 1380 —67 
IMraiflaat 
PernSqp 1080 —35 
PATxFr 10.92 —68 
~-<79 

USCov 1021 -68 
Wood Brothers: 

WinR (n 1068 —OB 
WlnGrtn 1049—42 
WflnMTp 941 —17 
WoGI in 1360—44 
WinAGtn 1547 —52 
Woodward Fds: 

Band 989 —06 
Eqldx 1044 —15 
Grval 1084 —32 
toffid 1084 —05 
totrm 1088 —34 
MIMun 989 —23 
MurtBd 9.98 —32 
pBpOrt 14.15 —77 


OKSro 1164 —61 
Cirincx 1038 —II 
, GtBri 1070 —40 
World Funds 
NwpOTg 10.12—22 
VantEP 1634 — jo 

Ojrtn 1034 —12 
GvObn 1335 —16 
tosiai 13.19 —0, 
8WCh 1142 —80 
NearBdn 1041 —06 
OulCbr 12.11 —43 
SeSChn 1436 —49 
TaMetn 1221 —.13 
Yaetctmn npx,39 — 39 
YamGtob 885 —34 
Zwef g Ponte 

StratA 1286— 22 

ZSAppA I486 —J7 
ZSMAA 12.17 —.1] 

a GvA p 10.10 —63 
JPAP 1235—40 
siralB 1285 — 33 
ZSAPPB 1435— J8 
«MA8 1114 — li 
ZSGvB 1067 —63 
ZSPB 1224-41 

















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, APRIL 4, 1994 


Page II 


Bond Issues 

Gomp ‘ fed by Laurence Desvilettes 


Issuer 


fcr 


* shi Ki 


Fhad-Coupon, 

Deutsche Finance 
Netherlands 

Beta Finan ce 

Atlas Capital 


Am °“ nl U_* COUD. Prfce 

(mffiant) Price end 

week 


For Lots of Investors, It’s Not a Pretty Sight 


Term* 


DMl ' 000 1999 5,4 101JJ — koforad of 99.37. NoKoSofate. Foes 2%. (Dauucho Bo^ 

199 5 7jq 1Q3X 


1998 6% 99.ro 


ft n_ ■ : — ,T7 ° «> 

Bonkof Austria in 170,000 2004 9» 


100 % 


— Mnnrolpb lB. Fee s not dWotod- |>M*m Coptfrt Mortten.) 

— Noncrfobto- Few 035%. flta'qw Paribas.) 


f** 1 "** ^WOMriw- n 97.US 



Fraice 



’’•Tit! : fc 

z?* 

: 

Min-i * 

ABN-Amro Bank 
Sweden 

Df500 

Sad6»8 GAnfcrate 

Australia 

DF400 

*r*75 

’ • -?LV- 

Mteubtshi Carp. 

Finance 

Y10B00 

"" :■* 

Equtty-Unfced 



2000 6% 10031 
1998 5% 10038 


1997 7 loo.* 


Calotte at par in 19% Foes 2%. (Banco Conwnorodc 
lalanaj 

— NancrtbUe. Fungible with outttanduig awe, rosng total 
emouni to 300 btion Sre. Fan UHL (IP- AtorgcmJ 

— Keotfared at 99M. NoncgBoble. fan 1%. ( AHMAroro Bonk.) 

— Beoffered at 9953- NantefloMe, fate 1%, (ABMAwro Bonk) 

— NoncaWabte. Feo UHL [Bwcfoyt «*i Zoet* »/.dd) 


1997 


330 100.188 — Interest w« be 330% 1 «« July 19% thereafter 4%. Cafabte 

at par m 19% foes 0.1875%. (Sanwo httl) 


— "®obal Mark kifl $500 1997 3V4 100 


■ ■-*:?** 
v-- 

- -.- - ■■■., ,v^s» 
... 

■ - -c r . 

-'I 

, ■ ■ "■'“sn.t 


. "“S'*® iStlif 

‘_' r / r ; '*-9HT3 s 


'-' r_:- 


• 


: _■»_■ - r . 
• ' L ~; 


• :: m c »:• 


■ x. — 




- J-' . 

. ■ •> 







-jil C 


Interest w3 be 316% in fire year, 9% m second year and 6% 
thereafter. Mandatary conversion into Indofood Sufcsos Me k- 
mur stock at 7,692 Indonesian rupiah per share and 9 2,142 
rup>ah per dollar 8 months after IPO. Fees 3%. Deno mi norion s 
*10,000. (UBS.) 


By Kenneth N. Gilpin 

New York Tunes Senice 

NEW YORK — After playing 
host at a three-year party for the 
stock market, die Federal Reserve 
Board in the first quarter did what 
a former chairman, William 
McChesney Martin, once said I he 
central bank inevitably had to do: 
It took away the punch bowL 

Not surprisingly, stocks were not 
ready for the music to stop when 
the Fed oa Feb. 4 nudged up shon- 
tenn interest rates, making n more 
expensive to borrow money. 

It was not the sot of message 
that stock investors wanted to hear, 
especially after they piled money 
into shares as the Fed sharply low- 
ered interest rates over ute fust 
three years of the decade. 

As such, the first three mouths of 
1994 ended on a decidedly more 
discordant note for the stock mar- 
ket than they began. 

Analysts are now nervous about 
the stock market’s outlook for the 
second quarter, following Friday’s 
'SdD-off in Treasury hoods, which 


pushed the yield oo the 30-year gw- 
enunem issue to a 14-month high of 
X26 percent. Rising interest rates on 
bonds reduce the attraction of 
stocks for investors. 

Bond prices fell, in thin trading, 
in response to the government’s un- 
expectedly strong report on US. 

U-S. CREDIT MARKETS 

employment conditions in March. 
The stock market had no reaction; 
it was dosed in observance of 
Good Friday. 

The 30-year bond lost 1 29/32 of 
a point, to 87 27/32, and its yield 
rose from 7.08 percent an Thurs- 
day. For investors holding 30-year 
bonds, the price decline meant a 
loss of $19.38 per $1,000 invested. 

Yields of other short- and inter- 
mediate-term Treasuries were also 
driven higher. The discount rate on 
three-month Treasury lulls rose 13 
basis points, or hundredths of a 
percentage point, to 3.60 percent. 
The yield on the five-year Treasury 
note rose to 6.43 percent, from 62.1 


percent on Thursday, while the 
yield on the 1 0-year note jumped to 

“’iSebond market wasreacting 
to the fact that credit demand is 
alive and wdl," said David Shill- 
man, chief equity strategist at Salo- 
mon Brothers Inc. For the stock 
market he said, “that means Mon- 
dayis not going to be a pretty day.” 

The first quarter was not pretty 
for stories, either. 

The steep rise in interest rates 
that occurred in the first quarter 
took a toll on a wide range of 
stories, many mrfnHM in the close- 
ly watched market indexes. 

But the quarter was a good one 
for a large number of stories, espe- 
cially those whose fortunes axe ned 
to a healthy economy. 

Of the nearly 6JX30 issues tracked 
tty Media General Financial Ser- 
vices, more than 3,700 declined in 
value during the first quartet, while 
almost 2,100 moved higher. Just 163 
emerged unchanged. 

The bnint of the damage was 
done cm the New York Stock Ex- 


place with a market share of 9.6 


BONDSt UoKo Led Quarter’s Rout 

Coatmoed from Page 9 

to postpone selling new paper will 
eventually have to come to market. 

The unwillingness to accept the 
sharp back-up in bond yields was 
demonstrated last week by Bri tain 
which raised £X5 billion via its 
first-ever sale of floating-rate notes 
paying interest at ooe-eighth per- 
centage point below the interbank 
bid rate. likewise, Belgium has re- 
financed only 58 percent of debt 
maturing in the first quarter with 
new bonds. The remainder was 
raised through the sale of short- 
term paper. 

The only positive aspect to the 
first-quarter sell -off has been the 
increase in trading volume for the 
dealing systems. Partial data from 
the weekly figures provided by 
Brussels-based Euroclear indicates 
that secondary-market trading in 
straight Eurobonds, which rose to a 
record high last year, expanded a 
further 9 percent in the quarter just 
ended. 

Hie data from Salomon Brothers 
shows the U.S. dollar's share of the 
overall first-quarter issuance at a 
relatively stable 43 percent Ster- 
ling. however, catapulted to second 
place — its best ever — with a 
market share of just over 10 per- 
cent But that turns out to be bad 
news for investors or underwriters 
holding inventory as the British 
market suffered the biggest drop in 
the quarter. 

Tne Dent 


Deutsche mark took third 


percent The yen was a distant 
fourth with a 7.5 percent market 
share, followed by the French franc 
with 7 percent. 

The Italian lira regained a 3.4 
percent share that it fust enjoyed in 
the second and third quarters last 
year while the Cana d ia n dollar, with 
a market share of 3A percent, lost 
considerable ground from (he aver- 
age 6 percent it took all of last year. 

According to the Morgan data, 
the British government bond mar- 
ket lost 6.7 percent in the first quar- 
ter. due mostly to fears of rising 
inflation and diminishing pros- 
pects for a cut in base lending rates. 
Canada, next worst, lost 5.3 per- 
cent because of concerns over 
pending provincial budgets and a 
weaker currency. Australia was 
down 3.8 percent. 

Japan, with a loss of 3.5 percent, 
was battered by prospects of in- 
creased heavy issuance as a result of 

loathe Netherlands *dae* decline 
amounted to 3.25 percent and in 
the United States 2.7 percent. 

France followed with a decline 
of 2.6 percent and then Sweden 
with 23 percent. 

The German market lost 2.1 per- 
cent. Better performances were put 
in by Belgium, with a decline of 
1.94 percent; Denmark, 1.34 per- 
cent; Spain, 1.33 percent, and Italy 
0.12 percent largely because short- 
term yields did not rise as much as 
in Germany. 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, April 4-9 


STOCKS. Small Players Hold On 


Qnthiidfawftigt 9 ' " 

Holly Eaton, 35, a lawyer, 
learned that lesson by hanging tight 
through the stock collapse of 1987. 
“1 lost all kind of stuff when the 
market dropped in '87, and it all 
came back,” she said. *Tve always 
been a long-term investor, saving 

for retirement.” 

Miss Eaton said last week’s mar- 
ket dive did not affect her thinking. 
“It’s when you panic and sell out 
that you lose everything, or lose a 
lot,” she said. 

Dan Caplan, 35, a mortgage 
banker, said he knew that as toe 
low interest rates that had made his 
business boom began to rise, the 
stock market was likely to fan. He 
said he derided to “pretty much 
wah it out ff I were to dk> anything, 
it would be an overreaction.*’ 

Robert Houston, a retiree, said 
be tries “to make a distinction be- 
tween the world of finance and the 
real world. In the world of finance, 
you have lots of ups and downs that 
aren't related jo what’s going on in 
the economy.” 

Mr. Houston subscribes to Stan- 
dard & Poor's Corp.’s weekly news- 
letter, which has wen recommend- 
ing for several months that 
investors move some of their mon- 
ey out of the stock market and into 
cash. He and his wife, who invest to 

preserve the capital they have and 
to bring in income to supplement 
their pensions, have berm following 
that advice. 

“That helps account for my raa- 
tfvely «alm view,” he said. ‘The 
cash is not being affected by what s 


dine “hasn't bothered me one way 
or the other," he said. “I just stay in 
there. The short haul is for some- 


A schaduto at this waah's ecanomta and 
Bnanaai events, compdadtortholntama- 
tfonai Herald Tribune by tBoomborg Busi- 
ness News. 


Agg-Pacfflc 

• AprflB Singapore Nlppecrafl Ltd., a 
deskorganber motor. doses WtUtf puWlc 
offering. 

Canberra Australian retail sale* lor Feb- 
ruary. Forecast gcaeona8y adyuatad itaa 
o( 0.5 percent. 

Sydnijf Reserve Ban* of Australia's 
March index of commority prtceo. 
Melbourne Australia i Now Zealand 
Bar* to mease March Index ol Job vacan- 
cy advertisements. Forecast: Rtee of 
about 5 percent. 

Canberra Prime Minister Paul Keating 
leaves for thailand, Laos and Vietnam for 
trade talks. Through April 13. 
e Aprfl e Waffingtoa New Zealand’s 
gross domestic product for quarter to 0»- 
camber. Forecast Ouaneriy rise between 
05 percent and i percent. 

Hong Kong American Indian Trade and 
Development Council leads e delegation 
of American Indiwi and Alaakan native 
repreaantailvea on a trade mtaaton to 
Hong Kong. 

• Aprfl 7 Cmberra March Jobe data. 
Forecast: Employment to rise about 
13.000 and joble ss rets to drop to 104 
percent 

Canberra February retail trade. Fore- 
cast Rtae ot 05 percent 
She nz hen. China Shanghai Automation 
Instrumentation, which manufactures 
measurement and control instruments, 
holds news conference ahead of hs 
planned cl ass-B- share listing on the 
Shanghfl Securities Exchange. 

Hang Kong US. mutual fund house Ft- 
dsHty Inv estm e n t s holds n e w confe re n c e 
to discuss its global inv estm ent outlook, 
e Aprfl fl Bangkok Prime Minister 
Paul KaMing to open Australian-funded 
and-bullt bridge over the Mekong River 
benreen 7hafland and Laoe. 


unemployment rata. Forecasc 53 percent 
m March. 

Frankfurt West German Industrial pro- 
duction. Forecast Up 03 percent In Feb- 
ruary. 

Frankfurt Manufacturing orders. Fore- 
cast Up 03 percent M February. 
Amsterdam Consumer price index. 
Forecast Up 0.6 percent m March, up 2.9 
percent In year. 

Copenhagen Danish unemployment 
rate. Forecast 123 percent In February, 
a Aprfl s Frankfurt German railways 
four-year notes auction deteHs to be an- 
nounced. 


Americas 


a Aprfl 4 Caracas Venezuela's col- 
lapsed bank Banco Latino n reopen tor 
depositors who have as much as 10 mil- 
lion bolivars (587,108) in deposits. 

Bstepegs. Now York Grumman Corp. 
announces a winner in the dosed-bid 
auction of the aerospace company be- 
tween Northrop Corp. and Martin Mariana 
Corp- Outlook: Neither bidder was ex- 
pected to rase ns bid much beyond the 
S82 a snare earitar otlered by Norterop. 
Earnings expected Advanced Micro De- 



Europa 


i wee k Basel Sates Ea rnin gs expected 




London UK. Chartered institute of Pur- 
chasing Managers butv oy. 

Parts Bank o « France securiues repur- 
chase lender. 

Stockholm Swedish Rlkahank board 
meeting. 

s April A London March official re- 
serves. F orecast 550 million deficit. 
London March M-0 money supply, 
e April 7 Frankfurt West German 
March unemployment. Forecast Up 
25.000; East German rate. Forecast 
□own 35.000. 

London Manufacturing output Fore- 
cast Up 04 percent In February, up 1.7 
percent in year. 

London Februaty housing starts. 

Paris Bank of France council meeting. 
Parts hKfcjstrial production. Forecast 
Up 04 percent In January. 

• Aprils Atiwns EU finance ministers 
meeting. 

Drasdner Bank AG. 


• April S Jeftereen City. Mtssourt- 
Votera consider an amendment to state 
constitution that would allow games ot 
chance to be played on rwerboat casinos. 
W as h in gt o n February leading econom- 
ic Indicators. 

Tampa, Arfxoue Nation a l A ss oc iat ion of 
Purchasing Management relse w e da in- 
dues tor February. 

Bno Paulo Inflation tor March. Outlook: 
Up to 42 percent 

Brass Rubens Ricupero is scheduled 
to be sworn In as economy minister. 
Caracas The Supreme Court • expecs- 
ed to dscuss a lower court’s probe into 
tha coBapee of Banco Latino. 

New York Johnson Radbook research 
service releases its weekly survey of 
same-store sales at department discount 
and cham stores. 

New York international Business Ma- 
chines Corp. schedules announcements 
ol new parallel processing computers and 
mainframe systems. 

San rtanrism Annual computer stor- 
age exposition. Through April 7. 
Laramie, Wyoming Kansas City Fad 
President Thomas Hoanig to speak at 
University of Wyoming. 

Toronto Bank of Canada Governor Gor- 
don Thlessan to spook to members of the 
Canadian Ck*. 

Toronto Dennis Gortman, author of the 
Gartman Latter, wW apeak about futures 
and options markets at a seminar spon- 
sored by the Toronto Futures Exchange. 
New York CJt. Palmer, chatiman of 
Rowan Cos., makes presentation to the 
New York Society of Security Analysts. 


Boulder, Colorado VMSiam Smtthburg. 
Chief executive of Quaker Date Co., wfl 
speak at the Unherflty of Colorada 
New York Freedom Forum Media Stud- 
tes Center at Columbia UnWere B y con- 
ducts two-day conference on press cov- 
erage of the Morreatton superhighway, 
including state by Time Warner Chairman 
Gerald Levmon the future of news. 

* April • New York American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co. to announce an- 
hsneements to its global eommuniesslons 
services for International travelers. 
Caracas Fkst snerehoklera’ asse mbly 
of cement producer Venazoiant dal Cs- 
manto BACA smee tha company was 
bought by Mexico's Cemex SA. 

New York The Conference Board holds 
two-day Business Re-Engineering Con- 
terenes. Gerald Isom. praridentofOGNA 
Property & Casualty Cos., will be keynote 
speaker. 

Earnings expec ted Circuit C4y Stores 
lr*c, Lakfiew Inc. 

■ Aprfl 7 Washk tgte o Weakly Initial 
jobless claims. 

Washington February consumer credit 
VtetousU&ctttos Major retailers report 
their March sates results. 

Me xi c o Cfly Consumer price index for 
March. Outlook: Monthly rtee of be t wee n 
OS percent and 03 percent 
Ottawa March help-wanted Index re- 
port. 

Mnnheel Royaf Bar* of Canada wfl) re- 
man an economic update and ftoanctel 
outiook tor 1BB4 and 1805. 

Eteohigs so rpse to rt Acclaim Entertain- 
ment Inc., BurSngton Raaourcee Inc., 
Daw Jones 5 Co., Family Odar Stores. 
Food Lien Inc 

• April S Ottawa March labor tore* 

survey. 

Springdale, Arkansas Tyson Foods 
Inc. 'a hostile tender offer of S30 a Shore 
tor WLR Foods me. into expire. 

Loa Angelas Northrop Corp.’s 560 a 
share cash tender otter tor Grumman 
Corp. expires at mUrtigM. 

Mton—pofls President Bfl a Won wlfl 
hold a forum to p romote Ms health-care 
plan. 

Earnings expo rte d Abbott Laborato- 
ries, Computer Data Systems Inc. 

• AprflB Event!. Washington Boeing 
Co. unveils its latest alrtinw. tlw 777. 


change, where declining issues oat- 
numbered gamers by a ratio of 
more than 2 to 1. Losers also out- 
numbered winners on both the 
American Slock Exchange and the 
Nasdaq market, bnl by a much 
ctwiIW order of inflgninifte. 

That weakness dragged down the 
Big Board’s important averages: 
the blue-chip Dow index fell 3.15 
percent, the Standard & Pom's 500 
index dropped 4.43 percent and the 
New York Stock Exchange com- 
posite index feD 4.29 percent 

More important according to 
Mr. Shnlman at Salomon Brothers, 
was the year-to-year change in the 
S A P 500 index. For the first tone 
since 1990, he said, the index ended 
a quarter lower than it had been 
during a year earlier. 

Among indnstiy groups, the quar- 
ter’s best performers were gemxaOy 
those dosely tied to upswings in the 
ecooomy, a group that included en- 
gineering sod construction compa- 
nies, semiconductor manufacturers 
and trucking companies. 

toierest-sensttov stocks like those 
of UJSL savings and loan associa- 
tions had a miserable three months. 


as did antinfts, oil and gas (JriUers 
and houseware manufacturers. 

Rising auto sales, a dear sign of 
healthier economic tones, worked 
wonders for Breed Technologies, toe 
Big Board’s best performer during 
the quarter. Breed, an air-bag manu- 
facturer, saw its share pnee rise 
nearly 114 percent in the quarter. 

Many investors in emerging mar- 
kets got roughed up, thanks to ris- 
ing interest rates and political un- 
certainty. But people who had 
invested in two Hungarian tele- 
phone ventures were all smiles. 

Hungarian Tdeconstruciion was 
toe best-performing stock in Nas- 
daq trading last quarter, rising by 
more than 240 percent. Shares of 
Hungarian Telephone, toe other 
company, rose 88 percent 

In a quarter littered with losers, 
there were nevertheless some spec- 
tacular falls. On the Big Board, 
Pharmaceutical Resources saw hs 
shares lose nearly half their value 
after price cuts hurt sales of generic 
drugs. Two companies that lost big 
postal contracts in toe quarter. EJec- 
trocom Automatics! and U.S. Bank- 
note, fared almost as badly. 



ring. 

The confidence to ride out a 
downturn comes easier for older 
investors who pul money in tne 
market in years when it was not 
doing much of anythin* ; and who 
survived the collapse m 1987. 

*Tve been involved in the Stock 
market for a number of years, and 
I’ve had good years and bad years, 
said Bill Camarinos, 55 , a real es- 
tate agent. , 

TTie stock market’s recent co- 


investors who do watch the mar- 
ket every day, such as Jerry Add- 
son, say their advice “is to keep a 
level head and patience.” 

Mr. Addson. 41, figures there 
are two kinds of investors: "You 
have toe players and the people 
who are stared stiff of playing." He 
thinks of himself as a player. He 
and his wife live completely off toe 
income from their investments. 

“Right now we live and breathe 
the stock market,” he said. “It gets 
a little scary sometimes, especially 
tunes like this week.” 

He said be had spent the week 
buying stocks, not selling what he 
holds. “Since our goal is basically 
income, it’s a good time to pick up 
some income stocks." 

Julie Jones, 30, said she and her 
husband were buying stocks now. 
They have money in a 401 (k) tax- 
deferred retirement account, an in- 
dividual retirement account and 
are beginning to save for their year- 
old son’s college education by set- 
ting aside a percentage of their in- 
come each month. 

The stock market’s drop didn’t 
chan ge that decision. “Everything 
we're into is long term," she said. 

She said she had studied toe mar- 
ket and derided to put money into 
growth mutual funds, but picking 
toe right investment vehicle is a 
vexing problem even for people 
who firmly believe they ought to 
stay in toe stock market 

“It’s scary” said Karen Porter- 
field, a baby boomer who is trying 
to figure out how to reinvest toe 
six-figure proceeds from toe sale of 
a large block of utility stocks from 
her parents’ estate. 

The utilities had to go, she said, 
because they were sens live to in- 
terest rates and had been declining 
in value. Finding a new investment 
in toe midst of a stock market de- 
cline has been daunting, though. 


TRADE: China Warns on GATT Last Week’s Markets 

Cantoned from Page 9 


making the renewal in June rtf Chi- 
na’s most-favored-narion trading 
stains conditional on progress in 
Beijing’s human rights record. 

By attaching human rights con- 
ditions to toe status, which assures 
a nation of the lowest tariffs on 
offer, Washington was going 
against the spirit of the world trade 
body, Mr. Lt said. 

China's entry to GATT “has 
been complicated by noneconomic 
factors, and toe negotiation has 
been delayed for an unwarranted 
period,” he added. 

Along with Mr. Li's warning to 


toe West toe China Daily carried a 
contrasting article that said China 
was considering a law against mo- 
nopolies to make its trade regime 
conform more with GATT, Bloom- 
berg Business News reported. 

The law, which would supple- 
ment an nnfair competition law is- 
sued in December, would target 
restrictive business practices and 
nnfair restraint of trade by public 
utilities such as coolacg-gas and 
electrical-supply companies. 

Ma Y arding , an official with toe 
State Administration for Industry 
and Commerce, told toe newspaper 
it could be at least a year before the 
law is approved. 


AO ftauros ore as of dote of trading Friday 

Stock Indexes 

Hailed Slteca 
DJ Induk. 

DJ UtiL 
DJ Irani. 

SAP TOO 
S&P500 
SAP Ind 
NYSECp 
B rttete 
FTSE 100 
FT 3D 


Money Rates 


DAX 


API 1 

Mar. 25 ora 

UmitedStntet 

Art l 

343556 

177473 — 168% 

Discount rate 

330 

19628 

202.15 —290% 

Prim* rate 

6% 

I43Sl19 

171446 —445% 

Federal funds role 

400 

41243 

44577 

521.16 

247JJ6 

348640 

4ZS.97 — XW% 
46048 — X22% 
53945 —339% 
25639 — 340% 

112900 — L3A% 

Discount 

Coll money 

3-month Interbank 
German' 

1% 

23/16 

23^4 

Lomoord 

6% 

2439. TO 

247240 —135% 


Coll money 

5% 

1W77.16 

1943640 —282% 

3-month Interbank 
Brttnjp 

Bonk base rote 

5% 

213X11 

213046 +0.14% 

SVt 


Call money 

5% 

WBSL9T 

93301 —221% 

3fnonth Interbonk 

5H 

Odd Art 1 

Star. 25 

599.70 

aa. — % 

London pm flxS 38930 

371 30 


100 
6 V. 
3V* 

m 

200 

23/14 

6% 

Ok 

5J0 

SVft 

5V5 

51* 


GATES: Microsoft Gets Lectured 


MSCIP 

World Index From Manon Stanley Capital littX 


ADVERTISEMENT 


1 


Schlumberger 


NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS 



Jay, Curacao, Netherlands Antilles, on Wednesday 13 April, 
1994, at J0:30 o'clock io the morning (Curasao time), for the 
following purposes: 

I. To elect 1 1 directors. 


Statement of Income for the year ended December 31, 1993 
and the declaration of dividends bv the Board of Directors as 
reflected in the Company's 1993 Annual Report to 
Stockholders. 

3. To approve the appointment of Price Waterhouse as 
independent public accountants to audit the accounts of the 
Company for 1994. 

4. To adopt the Schlumberger 1994 Slock Option Plan. 

Action will also be taken upon such other mailers as may come 
property before toe Meeting. 

lip to April 8, 1994 the holders or Certificates representing 5 or 
lOO common shares Schlumberger Limited may give voting 
mstructions to the depositary under deposit of their certificates 
with the undersigned or by surrender of a deposit advice of their 
banks. 

If no voting instructions arc given the undersigned will vote for 
the four matters. 

Copies of the notice of this Annual Meeting of Stockholders and 
of the Annual Report 1993 are available wiu» undersigned. 

PARIBAS ADMIN1STRA11EKANTOOR B.V. 

Amsterdam, March 30, 1994 
Spuislrnat 172, 




INTERNATIONAL! M M ■ 

BusinessWeek 



This week’s topics: 

O Mexico: Can Economic Reform Survive? 

O Korean Business Streams Into China 
O AT&T Is No Smooth Operator In Europe 
O Why Europe’s Youth Revolt Matters 
O McWnse/s New Global Boss 

Now available at your newsstand! 


BusinessWeek International 
14, n d Duchy, CH-1006 Lausanne Tel. 41 -21- 61 7- 441 1' 
For subscriptions call UK 44-S28-23431 Hong Kong 852-523-2930 


SH-, 


Goatiaaed from Page 9 
90 percent to 60 percent, according 
to Pan Jknxin, SunTeody*s mar- 
keting manag er. 

Without protection, Mr, Yang 
said, that snare would drop even 
further. “If Microsoft is allowed to 
enter China, it may monopolize the 
whole market,” the paper quoted 
him as saying. 

Yet Microsoft has already en- 
tered China in a big way. The com- 
pany’s Beijing office manager, Pat- 
rick Tien, was quoted by China 
as saying that 


the 

had trained' 140 domestic 
who are preparing a nationwide 
lecture tour. Microsoft w£D soon set 
^a lO O percent-owned venture in 

Mr. Gates said in Beijing that 
Microsoft bad sold thousands of 
copies erf Windows in China with- 
out involving any ministry. Details 
of his meeting with China’s presi- 
dent. Jiang Zemin, were not re- 
leased. 

In a concession to ministry pres- 


sure, Mr. Gates said his company 
would develop an its Chinese soft- 
ware in China in toe future. 

China’s small computer market 
is growing fast. Last year 500.000 
of the 3S mini on computers sold 
worldwide ended up in China, Mr. 
Gates said. Software sales in China 
accounted for only 0.1 percent of 
the world market, however, be- 
canse of piracy and toe poor variety 
of programs, ne said. 

■ A Boost for Electronics 

Another report in toe China Doi- 
ty quoted a Ministry of Electronics 
official, Lin Yuanfang, as saying toe 
industry would receive priority gov- 
ernment investment and tax breaks 
on land use in a bid to nudge Chi- 
nese manufacturers onto toe list of 
the world's 100 top electronics com- 
panies by the year 2000, Agence 
France- Presse reported. 

The ministry has listed eight 
companies, each with sales last year 

of more ihan 2 billion yuan ($230 
million), that it hopes to nurture 
into electronics giants. 


— Euromarts 

ASEAN: Bloc opposes Linking Wage Levels to Trade At a Glance 


rvrotiiwwd from Page 1 America has “introduced a dan- up but fear lhe resulting Chinese 

connwro gprous dement by trying to impose competition,” Mr. Wong said, 

approach by having a Imk between ^ M developed coun- “Loud complaints about Japanese 
workers’ rights and the world trao- ^ ^ Kesavapany, Sings- competition arc already a feature 

ing system added to the declaration ^>5 permanent representative to oTmtenmtional discourse, and the 

that wifl be made at the April w ^ Uniie( j Nations in Geneva, volume of similar complaints about 
signing of the Uruguay R<HflW much of the international South Korea, Thailand, Indonesia 

trade accords in Marrakesh. l debate on the proposed social and Malaysia is increasing.” 



_ Vo a North-South He sad be suspected that East 
dividcon wxWtrade," he sad. ^SWC 

■—KSrSaa-i ***** ^ ^ a poudetodraw too much attention 

R* 0 ® 1 ne8 ° pore foreign minister who is now to competition from cheap agricul- 

ta ^? C L. 1 «i;*ation is also worried nome affairs ; minister, said recentiy mm] products and manufactures 
^■TSEEKSf! contra- that with the amdusioii of the from the new democracies of East 
^•^“SrtSon would di- Uruguay Round, A^m coratnes Europe.- 
vtr5ial soa ^.^S that needs would face more subtle forms of 

vert attention from motectionism. such as managed _ D ^ „ c , . 

to be done to ensurcthai__ . ^ ^ noniariff bar- ■ Power Grid to Be Speeded 

to liberalize w 0 "” rSHn-arttiallY tiers and social clauses. ASEAN energy ministers have 

in the Uruguay acconis are 


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Reflecting a view that is w iddy 


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Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, APRIL 4,1994 


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SHORT COYER 


WORLD STOCKS IN REVIEW 


Vio Agam Franee-Prena 


Foreigners Fuel Rise in Chinese Pay Amsterdam 


u ' 

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese salaries are rising faster than inflation, 
thanks to a near doubling of pay by foreign-in vested and private 
enterprises, an official report said Sunday. 

In January and February, China’s total payroll outlay was 82.9 billion 
yuan ($10 billion), up 263 percent from the same period last year, the 
China Daily’s Butiness Weekly reported, eating figures from the State 
Statistics Administration. 

Retail prices nationwide rose about 20 percent in January and Febru- 
ary from a year earlier. The report did not say what the average monthly 
salary was. But it said government employees and workers in state-owned 
enleipriscs were paid a total of nearly 65 billion yuan, up 25.8 parent. 
Employees of collectively owned enterprises were paid a total of _ 14.4 
billion yuan, up 18 percent. Workers in foreign-in vested and private 
enterprises were paid a total of 3.7 billion yuan, almost double a year 
earlier. Part of the increase was accounted for by the addition or 690,000 
new employees to the payroll, but the report did not say how much. 

Ukraine to Cede Fuel Company Stake 

KIEV, Ukraine (AFP) — Ukraine will cede a 30 percent stake in its gas 
infrastructure to Russia to settle a $900 milli on debt for the fuel. Deputy 
Prime Minister Valentin Landik said Sunday. 

A presidential decree will be signed soon setting up a share-based 
company to control the import and transportation of fuels, Mr. Landik 
said. Ukraine will retain majority ownership for 20 to 30 years,_he told 
Interfax news agency on Friday. He said that, to date, Ukraine had 
settled $100 million of its debt for Russian gas supplies. 

Philips T lighting to Get New Chief 

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) — Philips Electronics NV is appointing 
Comdis Boonstra to its management board, effective June 1. and also as 
chief executive of Philips Lighting BV from July 1, the company said. 

As a member of the board. Mr. Boonstra will supervise activities in the 
Aria-Pacific region. Mr. Boonstra, 56, was president of Sara Lee Corp. in 
the United States and ehnirman of the board of ma n a g e m ent of Sara 
Lee/DE in the Netherlands. His retirement from Sara Lee in January was 
unexpected and be had been widely considered as the leading candidate to 
become the next chairman of the consumer-products company. 

Turner Seeks to Broadcast in India 


Prices dipped in Amsterdam last 
week in trading shortened by Eas- 
ter holidays, despite successful 
share issues by KIM and VNU. 

The CBS all-share index closed 
the week at 268 points, down from 
272.10, and was predicted to head 
down further this week, depressed 
by dollar trading. 

KLM shares rose against the 
trend, up 5.8 percent to 46.70 guil- 
ders with the issue of 2127 milli on 
shares raising 1.19 billion guilders. 

VNLTs issue of 3.1 mil H on new 
shares raised 524 milli on guilders 
and the publishing' company’s 
stock gained 2.7 percent to 17830 
guilders. 

With dealers staying out of the 
market ahead of Easter, share vol- 
ume fell to 4.4 billion guilders from 
62 billion the previous week. 


Frankfurt 


The stock market made a tiny 
gain last week with most investors 
reluctant to take positions ahead of 
the four-day Easter weekend, trad- 
ers said. 

Tbe DAX index closed at 
2.133.11 points Thursday, up 0.14 
percent from the dose the previous 
Friday, while volume was only 
30.92 billion Deutsche marks 
against 33.18 billion DM for the 
previous, five-day week. 

Financials performed relatively 
wdL Deutsche Bank, which an- 
nounced a 16 percent rise in 1993 
operating profit on Thursday, 
gained 420 DM on the week to end 


at 79030, DresdnerBank 8 to 400, 
and Commerzbank 730 to 35530. 

HongKong 

Hong Kong stocks feQ 12 per- 
cent in lack] os ter trading during 
the week with the key Hang Seng 
Index losing 20430 points to dose 
at 9,029.92 on Thursday. 

Average daily volume totaled 
5.686 billion Hong Kong dollars 
against the previous week's 7344 
billion dollars. 

The market fell Monday because 
of a hike in local interest rates for 
the first time in 20 months. 

It rebounded Tuesday on selec- 
tive bargain hunting in b anking 
and property sector stocks but then 
fdl back again Wednesday and 
Thursday for fear the government 
would introduce harsher measures 
to curb real estate prices. 

London 

John Major's political roller- 
coaster ride dominated the market 
with shares falling as speculation 
mounted over tbe prime minister’s 
r emaining time in office. 

The Financial Times-Stock Ex- 
change 100 share index closed the 
short trading week down 42.6 
points, or 13 percent, at 3,086.4 
points. 

Analysts said underlying eco- 
nomic confidence should support 
the market this week but any new 
political turn would have some 
short-ienn impact making the out- 
look uncertain. 

Last week’s speculation that Mr. 
Major might soon be ousted by 


NEW DELHI (Reuters) — Turner Broadcasting System Inc. said it 
was seeking a deal with Indian state television to broadcast programs 

aimed at the world’s second most populous nation. ____ __ ^ ^ __ __ 

Turner’s regional managing director, Mark Rudolph, confirmed Indi- 

an press reports that the company, which produces Cable Network News \V/ i/T m. r • j* t • <• 

and entertainment channels, had been negotiating with India’s Doordar- tt i^i B j N ifl. iyUlCUJIS LASltt tOr 
Shan network. He refosed to ghe derails of Turner’s proposal. ° ° J 

Sources said Turner was searing permission to lease a transponder on 
India’s Insat-2B satellite to provide “India- specific” programming. 


Cantoned from Page 9 


Hungary Receiving TV Via Holland 

BUDAPEST (AP) — Circumventing a state monopoly on radio and 
television, a Hungarian entrepreneur has began broadcasting from Holland 
to satellite dish owners and cable television subscribers in bis homeland 

Johann Spiscbak’s BP1 channel offers five 30-minute news broadcasts, 
as weD as movies, soap operas, documentaries, cartoons, sports and 
music Programs are beamed to Eutelsat 17 from the Hflversum media 
complex in tbe Netherlands. The first day’s broadcast went from 6 AML 
to 3 P.M. Mr. Spischak said his budget for the first year was $39 million. 

GE Outbid on Three Asia Contracts 

SCHENECTADY, New York (Bloomberg) — General Electric Ca’s 
Industrial and Power Systems Division said it had lost three big contracts 
in Asia to Westinghouse Electric Corp. and Siemens AG. In a letter to 
7,000 employees here, the unit’s president, David C. Genever-Watling, 
called the development a “huge disappointment.'' 

Tbe largest contract went to Siemens, for gas turbines, steam turbines 
and generators at Taiwan Power's Hsu la site, said a GE spokesman, 
Leonard Doviak. Westinghouse won contracts for steam turbines at 
Ligang and Yangzhoo, in China. Mr. Doviak declined on Friday to put a 
value on the contracts. He said competitors were bidding very aggressive- 
ly due to excess capacity and that prices had dropped “drastically” in tbe 
last 8 to 10 months. 

Separately, the Stockton, California-based American Savings Bank 
announced it had sold its $140 million credit-card portfolio to GE Capital 
Consumer Card Co. 


the automaker is trying to move 
into the next phase of the reorgani- 
zation that was started by the com- 
pany's independent board of direc- 
tors in December 1991. In 
subsequent months, the board first 
fired the GM president. Lloyd E. 
Reuss, replacing him with Mr. 
Smith, and then, in the fall of 1992 
fired Chairman Robert C. StempeL 
Mr. Smith was given the chief exec- 
utive’s tide and the retired Procter 
& Gamble Co. chairman. John G. 
Smale, who led the revolt, took over 
as chai rman of GM. 

After nearly 18 months of seven- 
day workweeks, Mr. Smith believes 
the U.S. car business is on the road 
to recovery and it is time he stepped 
back from the day-to-day opera- 
tions of the North American Auto- 
motive Operation, which accounts 
for 60 percent of GWs revenue. 

The front-runner to replace him. 
a source close to the board said, 
was G. Richard Wagoner Jr.. GW's 
chief financial officer. GM general 
counsel Harry J. Pearce also is ex- 


pected to be given “expanded du- 
ties,” the source said. 

At its most recent meeting in 
March, the board issued a 28-point 
guide for corporate governance in 
which it left open the possibility that 
Mr. Smith could become chairman 

But a major concern about mov- 
ing Mr. Smith up to Mr. Smale’s 
job, GM sources said, was whether 
Mr. Smith could provide the vision 
the company needed. Mr. Smith is 
given high marks for being an oper- 
ations wizard, but there is concern 
about his ability to step back from 
the day-to-day operations if be be- 
comes chair man. 

For these reasons, and because 
Mr. Smith and Mr. Welch are such 
good friends, there have been per- 
sistent rumors at GM about the 
possibility of Mr. Welch eventually 
taking over as CM'S chairman. 

But Mr. Welch and his associates 
are quick to reject the idea. They 
note that as chairman of GE, Mr. 
Welch would have too many poten- 
tial conflicts of interest to rake the 
10 b. And besides, aides said, be 
does not want to leave GE 







INVESTMENT 


Aprl-Junc 

jpihjiiw 


\\i\ 


Vtatumca, Number 1 
AOuanatr Wa wn 


International Fund Investment 


-•> - 


t \ 


Market 


Indian Funds' Hot Spring- 
Floods Capacity-: 


* fcri wtfw 1 M geriaMfet’ftwries 1 frw Wra SwrAslcifeg 1 


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to providing unbiased coverage 
of this fast developing sector of me 
financial world. 

Reactions to I.F.I. have been 
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Personality profiles. 


- Hcral o^^^ fcribunc- _ _ 

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members of his Conservative party, 

unhapp y at his handling of Europe- 
an policy, caused the pound to fall, 
reducing possibilities of as interest 
rate cut and pushing shares lower. 

Pearson, winch announced a 38 
percent rise in 1993 pretax grofit 
and the purchase of Software Tool- 
works for $462 miUic®, finishe d 6 
pence higher on the week ax 641. 

Oil prices were generally lower, 
.hit by the OPEC decision to roll 
over production quotas until the 
end of this year. BP lost 233 pence 
to 3493 but Shell rose 3 pence to 
659 at the end of the week. 

Milan 

The election victory of the right- 
ist Freedom Alliance, dominated 
by Silvio Berlusconi’s Forza Italia 
party, sent shares rocketing on the 
Milan exchange last week with the 
Mfbtd index gaming 9.65 percent 
to close at 11,772 pomts. 

Record trading volumes were 
registered ah week. 

Political commentators said 
profit-taking could emerge this 
week with the formation of tbe fu- 
ture government still in doubt. 

SIP rose by 11.67 percent to 
4,860 lira and another telecom- 
munications company STET, 
gained 13.43 percent to 5,818 lira. 

Olivetti rose just 5.04 percent to 
2,707 lira on fears that a license 
allowing it to become Italy’s sec- 
ond celhilar telephooe group might 
be rescinded by Mr. Berlusconi 

Paris 

Rioting students and a govern- 
ment backdown over plans for cut- 
price youth wages depressed share 
prices in Paris. 

The CAC 40 index fdl by 23 
percent in a holiday-shortened 
week to 2.081,94 points, taking the 
index 12 percent below its high for 
the year of 2360 points, reached in 
February. 

Brokers at the Pinatton broker- 
age said tbe market would start to 
show signs of recovery in mid- 
April. when 10-year interest rates 
are expected to level out at around 
620 percent 


The CAC 40 could then start to 
r Kmh bade up to around the 2360 
level seen earlier in the year, Pinat- 
ton said. Other brokers were more 
cautious, predicting more falls in 
the weeks to come and a recovery 
only in the summer. 


Taiwan to Press On 
With Privatizations 


Singapore 


The Straits Times Industrials in- 

2J)80^KHnts, afterfalls in New 
York and Tokyo and an increase in 
tensi on on the Korean peninsula. 

Volume in the holiday-shortened 
week fell to 484.42 milli on shares 
from 98435 million units. 


Tokyo 


Measures to open up Japan’s 
markets to more international 
trade disappointed share dealers in 
Tokyo last week and were criticized 
as “insufficient’’ by Mickey Kan- 
tor, the UJL trade representative. 

The 225-isiur Nikkei Stock Av- 
erage dosed ax 19,277.16 yen on 
Friday, down 55932 points, or 18 
percent, from a week earlier. 

Average daily turnover on the 
major board shrank to 271.89 mil- 
lion shares from the previous 
week’s 37725 mflKn n 

Foreign investors were worried 
that a recovery or Japanese corpo- 
rate earnings would be further de- 
layed by a rise in the yen. Brokers 
said these investors mig ht not re- 
turn to the market unless the yen- 
doQar rate was stabilized. 

Brokers predicted a farther slide 
in toe market tins week with toe 
dollar expected to dip further. 

Zurich 

Share prices fell back last week 
with the Swiss Performance Index 
dawn by 17.69 points or 03 percent 
to 1,805.41 points. 

Trading volume was low with 
many dealers staying away because 
of me long Easter weekend. For- 
eign and Swiss institutional inves- 
tors were largely absent, one dealer 
said. The fall on Wall Street and 
weakness in other European ex- 
changes contributed to the mar- 
ket’s fall 


Reuters 

TAIPEI — The Taiwan govern- 
ment win pursue efforts to transfe 
state companies to private hands 
this year, despite the flop of a_ big 
scD-ofT last month,. Prime Minister 
Lien Chun said on Saturday. 

Mr. Lien directed a meeting of 
economic minis ters to privatize 
“two or three” state enterprises by 
tbe end of 1994. 

Local newspapers quoted offi- 
cials as saying majority stakes in 
BES Engineering Corp., a con- 
struction company that is 831 per- 
cent privately held, and Chung 
Kuo Insurance Co., IS percent pri- 
vate, would be sold bw the deadline. 

The auction of a 60 percent stake 
in state-run Taiwan Machinery 
Manufacturing Cop. last month 
flopped when it failed to attract a 
single bidder. The government now 
intends to break up tbe company 
and sell assets separately. 

Analysts blame the dismal re- 
cord of Taiwan's privatization pro- 
gram, which since 1989 bas faded 
to pm a tingle company into pri- 
vate control on toe speculative na- 
ture of tbe stock market and a poor 
underwriting system. 

The Securities and Exchange 
Commissi on last week announced 
plans to streamline underwriting. 

■ Egypt Beckons Investors 

The Egyptian government has 
accelerated its long-delayed priva- 
tization program with announce- 
ments inviting the private sector to 
invest in and manage five public 
companies. 

A stale holding company. Engi- 
neering Industries Co M asked inves- 
tors to submit offers to invest in 
Nasr Automotive Manufacturing 
Company & Delta Industrial Co. 

Nasr Automotive pioneered ve- 
hicle manufacturing in the Middle 
East in the 1960s and had sales of 
S56 million Egyptian pounds (S 165 
milli on) in 1993. 

Delta Industrial one of Egypt's 
main manufacturers of refrigera- 
tors, washing machines, dish wash- 


ers and sled furniture, had sales of •• 

324 millio n pounds in 1993. 

The bolding company suggested ' 
several possible methods of invest- 
ment: buying up all or some of the 
company shares, buying all or part 
of their factories or using the bo-. * 
tones through subcontracting, leas- 
ing or management contracts. 

Priority will ©5 to investors will- 
ing to modernize toe factories and 
retrain tbe work Forces. 

Tbe state's Holding Company 
for Housing, Tourism & Cinema - 
invited investors to buy a majority - 
shareholding in Egyptian Vine. ' 
yards Co- toe country’s sole pro- . 
ducer of wines. 

The bolding company’s chair- ‘ 
man, Hamed Fahmi. told the gov- 
ernment newspaper al-Ahram that ■ 
the bolding company was also in- 
viting bids for Mist free Shops, the 
c omp any that runs duty-free shops 
at airports and elsewhere. 

He said toe holding company 
was looking for investors willing to ■ 
buy between 50 and 60 percent of . 
toe shares in the companies and the 1 
rest of toe shares would he offered 
to the public later. 

Tbe same formula will apply in 
tbe case of A1 Ahram Beverages 
Co, Egypt’s only brewer. 

The deadlines' for offers are July' 

14 for Al Ahram Beverages, July 16 
for Delta Industrial, and July 31 for . 
Egyptian Vineyards and Nasr ■' 
Automotive. 

The privatization program, • 
backed by loans from toe World 
Bank and strongly favored by all 
Egypt’s aid donors, started slowly 
but is picking up momentum. 

The government has sold three 
major companies by private ar- 
rangement and has greatly diluted , 
its shareholding in Commercial In- - 
temational Bank. 


for hvwlmwt infer mm i m i 

Read THE MONEY REPORT 
evety Saturday in tbe MT 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


OTC Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday, April 1. 

(Continued) 




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KfSSro 

SSSttst - Jif’ft 9% 10% 

inlRsh 38 U .228 3% 3 3*4 -JA. 


1 WH 17% 17% 

_ 2443 4*4 4 4% — *4 

- 5926 26% 22% 23%— 2*4 

- 718 2% 1*4 3 +% 

- 108311% 10 — % 

_ 113 30 18% 18*4 _ 

_ B3 TVt 7% 7% — % 

_ tooaiovs 9'4 10 *% 

- 1218 1% 1% Ift *% 

_ 25 3*4 3% 3% —14 

- 692 3ft 3% 3% — % 

_ 418 8 7% 7% — % 

_ 550 7% 4% 7 — % 

1J8 <5 143729 27*4 28% — *4 

MU 12 ' 932*4 32 32% _ 

JB4 3.1 48*29*4 26% 26*1—2 % 

_ 391 5% *% 5 — % 

_ 2338 14% 13 13*4—1 

.15 38 2279 4*4 3*4 4 *% 

-10a Z4 480 4% « 4% — % 

— I322 4Vh 4Vu 4Yu +Vk» 

- 188 6% 6 6 — % 

M X5 22019% 18% 18% -44 

- 630615 12*4 13*4—2% 

- 192 6% 6 6% - 

- 12911 10% 11 t% 

_ 2588 *4 Vjp <Vb *Vi» 

_ 46 Va 'hi ♦%! 

-38489 24% 22% 23% —1% 

_ 1815 17V, 15 15% — ** 

- 38211 9 10% — % 

- 1555 17 15% 15% — % 

.171 2L7 1313 3 3% 3 —ft 

_ OT M% 13% 13% — % 

_ 9764 13% 10% 11 —7 
_ 177510% 9% 10% - 

- 4567 I % 

- 50 Vi, V* 


Stocks 


Soles 

a« ym raostcoti Law ase cnot 


MK Gold 

MMI 

MNX 

MRIMSt 

MRS Teh 

MRVGm 

MRVwt 

MS Carr 

MSB Bcp 

MTC El 

MTS 

MOrmd 

MBg 

MooeSec 

MCKtiTc 

Mooan d 


MadGE 

MaaPtr 

Maoat 

MosStt 

MvjmP 





- 5180 6*4 5*4 6% — *4 

.14 23 S3 5 4*4 5 —'A 

- 393 15% 14% 14% —’A 

_ 279 5% 4*4 5 —V* 

- 90210 8% 18 — % 

- 99 Sft 5Vn Wu — *Vu 

_ 318 1*4 1% 1% — ft 

- 281525*4 23% 22% —3 - 

J0e U 1*0 18 17% 17V. — % 

-49231 6% 3% 4ft— 2 
Si 1.9 38631% 28% 29 — 2 

M 2J 3026% 25*4 26 - 

M - 58616*4 15% 15% -1% 

_ 1614 4% 3*4 3*4 — % 

_ 177 11« <Vn 1% — 

- 338217 13*4 15 —0 

- 8890 16% 13% 14%—1% 

1JI6 5 J 19932*4 32 37% — % 

_ 110214 13 13% —ft 

- 129 6% 6 6 - 

- 32215 13% 14ft— 1*4 

- 528834ft 31% 22% —2 

J* 1JI 5434% 34 34 

36 4J0 364720*4 19ft 19ft— 1<A 

- 1669 6*4 5% 5V. —1ft 

_ 444 6ft 5*4 5ft —ft 

- 1848 8% 8 8% +'4 

-1888 5 4ft 4% — Yu 

- 185914 13 13ft —ft 

.160 4 1219% 19 19% +ft 

- 73 4 
I - 177 4*4 

21 54 5 6ft 

- 1631 14% 11% 13%— 1% 

_ 2282 27 22*4 24 -2% 

JSe S 282 Bft 8 8 —ft 

_ 43S1 IT A 11 11 -2 

_ 1605 8% 7ft 7ft — % 
_ 8642 6% 5% 5% —I 
_ 8114 25ft 20 20V.— 4ft 

JO 3J .24415% 15% 15% 4% 

- 141620% 19*4 19% ♦% 

J6 3-4 53130 28 28 — 1% 

269 43% 42 42 —ft 

7 7% 7% 7% — % 
984 2ft 1% 2*4 —ft 

- 241 16 15 16 41 

_ 2511 13ft lift 12% — % 

M 43 15710% 10 10% 4% 

M 43 6811% 10% 10ft— 1 

27 195622 21 21 


Sales 

Ov YM MOsHtaft Low case Owe 


i» iyw t n 

2S a =5 

4ft; 4ft - - 


78 3A 


LATSnt - 938 6ft 4ft 5 — *4 

La Mil _ 1943 41% 36% 38% —2*4 

uawfBt 175 <3 40031ft 28% 27 —1 


irttftn 




mmaaf 

WrrCnq 

IntrOn 

IntmetC 


irtlAJrl 

IntCabl 

mtCWe 

Intent 

InOalrA 

InDoirB 


MtTOtiZ _ 354611*4 9ft 10ft— 1 

lntmu _ 2762 9% 8% 9% —ft 

Intro wtB - 75 4% « *% *% 

mipttse - S3 6 5ft 5ft — % 

Intpnt - 53510ft 8% 9ft —ft 

Intpssc - 583 10% 9% 9%— 1 

mtpPLa 2J0 _ 4 23ft 22% 22%—lft 

tnJwsJv _ 262514% 12% 14ft —ft 

tatinec - 1406 5*4 5% 5% —ft 

bitrtms 78 U 141515 13ft 13V4— 1% 
IntvbB - 668 2% 2% 2% —ft 

mtvdcr -761013 10ft lift— 1% 

UltUT _ 7834 40ft 36 3644—3*61 

Invcare - 1908 29ft 25% 25% —3ft 

InvOnki JO 27 121 18V4 17% 18% *% 
VMTm M 3 «6» S 

lorrwoa — 3395 2*4 2% 2%, —ft 

IowoMS M 3S 10524% 23% 24 4ft 
irequol J6 16 1716% 15% 15% - 

IrwtSnS 36 1A 63 23ft 22% -ft 

■SCO 70b 2.1 9910 9% 9% —ft 

HiS - 4365 7% 6% 7*4 —ft 

hnrodx _ 796 1 9% 17% 19 ft +lft 

IsrtLd - 42 23ft 22*4 23ft 4lft 

ItnacSc - 77916ft 15 15% 4% 

noYokd 1768 A 67214*4210 210 — % 

Itron - 1274 17% 16ft 16% — % 

hmrks _ 3411 24% 19% 21 ft -3ft 


j&JSn — 2378 18ft 16% 16% — 1% 

JBRSt - 1322 7% 6% 6% — 1 

JGtnd _ 25 1% 1% 1% 

JLG J08a 7 2764 30% 26% 29 — % 

JMCGP 71814 755 4% 3% 3% — % 

JPG _ 21812% 12U 12ft - 

JSBFn M 2J 219722% 22ft 22% —ft 

JOM _ 850 Bft 7 7ft —114 

JdCkHwt — 5* 12% 10% IT — 1% 

jaCoSac _ 179 8% 8 8 — % 

jgcbsn JO 06 157 14% 13% 13% — % 

JoasrCwt - 310 5 Kb 5 5 —2ft 

JOCOrOn - 248016ft 12 12ft— 3, 

j -s£ 2 n i SB s& 3 m a 

Jasons - 117214ft 11% 12ft— 2ft 

JoyJocb „ 36 2*4 2ft 2ft _ 

JMM _ 176111% 10% lift +ft 

JrtfrGp TO J 841 43% 36<4 37 —6% 

MM1S M 05x1283 20% 18% 19%— lft 
jSlSwLn — 20 B 7ft 7*4 — % 

jetrsva - 174 16% 16% 16*4 +ft 

ss;. = vsf 

jsa ? 

ss? Toeij ^sa^A «■;% 

OHS* - 1574% 14% 74% — % 

jSnaiA _ 1«6S14% 13% 14ft —ft 

SnesM .10 J 1349 13ft 12ft 17*4 — % 

JMtVTl 170 5.1 4303% 73 23% t>A 

junoU 74 17 83119 18'A 19 +V4 

jSsFRVOt - 1694 16% 14 14 —2% 

JWtTdVS - 344 4*4 6 4ft -% 

JMIIns .16 1.1 271914ft 13% 14 — % 


.10 17 187 8 6ft 4ft — 1 

- 37177 27V* TTA 24 —3 
.16 3.1 429 6% 5% 5% —1 

- 214 32% 31% 31% ->6 

75 27 421% 21% 21% +% 

JH J 171311ft 9 9%— 1% 

_ 7193 Sft 3% Sft — % 
718 27 36030% 28% 29% —'A 
_ 306 12 Tift lift —ft 

72 37 1165 22ft 18ft 19% —2ft 

- 28318% 15ft 15ft— 7% 
.12 17 3046 9% Bft lift -ft 

- 252310ft 8ft 9 —ft 
_ 2625 3% 3 3ft — % 

72 1.1 41330% 39*4 Mft + ft 

700 37 17217ft 16ft 16ft— 1 


LCS 
LDOSs 
LDI Q> 

LGFBc 
LSBNC 
LSInd 
LTX 
LVMH3 
LXE 
LobOne 
LocMdeSt 
LoddPr 
LodyLudc 
Lotov AS 
LkaShrc 
LoWdFt 
Lakalnd 

LtavwSv . . 

UxnRss -28131 33ft 27ft 31 —2% 

Loncstrs 70 17 165846 42% 43ft— 2% 

-96 4.9 167019ft 19% 19ft +ft 
_ 1044 13ft 12ft 13ft —ft 

- 2087 23ft 21 22% —ft 

t - 116 8% 7ft 7ft —ft 

-1148511 ra 10% _ 

_ 4275 27% M 24ft— 3ft 

- 6388 26% 23ft 25 — VU 
_ 5957 25% 20% 22% —2% 

- 543 9% 8% 9 —ft 

- 216 9% Bft 9 — % 

i 527 2ft Ss 7* ra 

- 1 1674 15ft 12ft 13% —1*4 

- 4394 6ft Sft 6% —ft 

-1083018% 16 16 — 2ft 


- *4 3 2ft 3 _ 

- 807 14% 13ft 14% —% 


LoncB 

Landdr 

LdmkBc 

LandBnc 

LOmkGoh 

Londrys 


LanopHc 

LosPMd 

LoserPr 

LesnnTc 

Lasrecp 

LaHtoes 

LowrSB 

Lowsn 

LwyrTs 

Loyne 

LeotWFn 

LmsCD 

Le os ewoy 

I 


LocWers 


78 17 xsnnv. 34% 25V?^ru! 
.12 J 2909 15ft 14 14ft— 1 

- 1124 6ft 5ft 6 — % 

- 3642 20ft 19% 19% — % 

- 391514% 15 16 »% 

- 19$S13% lift lift— 2ft 

_ 2560 10% 8 8 —2% 

J2t 57 *510% 9V, 9% — 1 

_ 4211 13% lift 12% — % 
_ 339 5328*4 34 25%— 3% 

- 1091 7% 6% 7% 

- 70 Vu Vu Vli — 

- 893 1 5% 12% 13%— lft 

_ 143813 11 ll%— 1% 

_ 5963 23% 19 19%—*% 

835 15ft 13% 14% —lft 
821 24% 2Jft 23ft —ft 


78 37 
70 2J 
70 27 
78 27 


26628% 27% 27ft 


LepGrp 
Lescos 

LBPol 
LevetOn s 
LexfeisS 
LbtvBc 

UbBcOK ... _ w , 

LMvHA 78 27 41810ft 9% 9ft 

UbMMlA -10812 22*4 19ft 20%— 1% 

UbMedB - 2925 24 24 

UbAAda pi 6J00 87 575 75 75 —4 

UMNBS 78027 137030% 28 28ft— lft 

UbrtyTc - 726 9ft 7ft PA — 1 

Lida _ 319 2ft 3% 2ft +W 

Lid* -21726 5*i 3% 3ft— lift. 

Lid* wf - 3Z78 3% lft 1*4—1% 

LktakwtC - S37 3*4 2% 2ft— lft 

LfcTch 70 17 417 16% 15ft 16% *ft 

LteUSA -13911 12*4 10*4 lift +ft 

Uecoro _ 770 8 6ft 7 —ft 

LfeOst - 341 50% Oft 9% —ft 

UefcieS - 1286 4ft, 3ft 4% — % 

LfHoans - 28411% 10ft ll'A _ 

Ugmd - 31214 12ft 12ft— 1% 

Lilly Ins 70 17 2581 25% 24 25% _ 

UflBcd -4764112 106% 107%— 4% 

Uncoros - 6701 24% 21 21*4—2% 

UncFd - 377 13ft 11% ll'A— 2ft 

UncSB 170 37 78 51% 50 SOU —ft 

Linens JZ 3.2 4024 16% 15% 16% +% 

UncflH J9I117 31 5% Aft 5% - 

Undbro 70 37 186 6% 6 6% * % 

UndSV - 769 35% 31% 32%— 3% 

UnearTc 74 718S72 44 39% 42%— lft 

Uposro _ 5542 6% 6 6ft 


_ 279810 8*4 9% _ 
_ 115411 Bft 9<A— lft 

: r “ 


Uesmpt 1.94 106 

LTl 

UaBoxs 70 
LITchFns JM 
LiteHuse 
Uttsewt 
LtSwIz 
LknJd 


LomA 
LodoEnt 
Loewenp JM 
Loewnain 
Looks 
Lorn* 

LonoOvr 
LsncHnt 789 87 
LnoSStk - 


57819 16 lBVr — ft 

_ OSS 9 7% 7ft 

1.1 14637 35% 36 - 

7 17013ft 12% 12% —ft 

- 887 25 24ft 25 +% 

- 7017ft 17% 17% _ 

- 3393 7% 6ft 6*4 - 

- 2142 8% 6ft 6% —IV, 
-11787 9*4 7ft 8% —ft 

- 104712 lift 12 +% 

- 844 16 14 14 — 1% 

- 1767 27 24% 24% —2% 

- 380 11% 10% 10% —ft 

_ B33 7ft 5% 6 —1 

- 1636 8% 7ft 7 » h — tv„ 


LnoStk 

LoncrvG 

Lotus 


Lay*] 

Lufkin 

Lunar 

LundM 


a 14 % n% i4% — % 
410ft 10ft 10ft 6% 
-295*4 25% 21 23% —1% 

- 3UM 8 7ft 7% —% 

- 8732 12% 11 II —ft 

*% 10%— lft 
-11511774ft 68 70*4 —5*4 

- 37 9% 8% 9% +% 

A0 2.1 929 19% 18*4 19 —ft 

JO 3 A 166 18*4 17ft 17ft —ft 

- 16513ft 12% 12%— 1 

_ 106924ft 30 20% —3% 


M 


E*r " fisfrK 


M-WMue - 710712% IM4 12 — ft 

MG Prod _ - ,1910. 8% io *rn 
MHMIW toe J 5*S5 4% 6% 6*4 *% 

MAP SC I - 28822% 30ft 21% —ft 
MARC - 685 7ft 7% 7ft + % 

MB Com - ISM IB 16*4 17ft — % 

MBLA toe 17 .72 15% 14ft \PA +ft 

Mas .10 J WWW 24ft 23*4 23ft — % 
MOL Mo •_ 1214 7*4 7 7% -% 

MDTCP — 721 6% Sft 6 —ft 

MFBCP - 8365 lift 11 lift — % 

MFRt - 455 8% 7*4 8ft —ft 

MFSCm 28 38ft— 3ft 

MGIPtir - 1374 13% 10ft |1 _2U 


MkTVms 
Market 
Mk*R3 
Mama 
MaoB 
Mtnam 
MrshSB 
MrsWU 
Marslds 
MarstiFn 
Mart* 

Morton 

MartCOl _ _ 

MdFdBc 72 17 157325 24% 2414-1% 

Moskmd J05e 7 471871ft 18% 19%— lft 
MasanOixlto 27 747 46% 47 <•% 

ffaahK 74. Z A 11 35% 34% 35% —1 

Mastec _ 3760 SV. 7ft 7ft — 

Mathstt - 1886 6ft 4ft 4ft— 1% 

MatrxPtl - 112913 10*4 lift— lft 

MatrxSv - 1855 lift 10% 10ft 

Mottiew - 568 Wu 2ft 2ft 

MaxET - 73610% 9% 9*4 

Maxco - 1391 8*4 7% 7ft — 1% 

MaxcrHtt -12797 15*4 12*4 13 -2ft 

MaxhnGp - 3682 13% 9ft 12 — 1% 

AVndG Wt _ 995 Sft 3ft 444 —1*4 

Maxim • — 792851 47% SB% — % 

Maxtor _ 16689 8ft 7ft 7ft — % 

Maxwei J9t 57 15* 9 8% 8% —1 

MayflCo - 19811 1Q% 10ft — 

MaytlGrp - 328 11% 9% 10 —ft 

MnynOt _ 219 5 «ft 4% —ft 

McAfee - 634 10% 8% 8*4 —1ft 

AUcCaw —37136 SI 48*4 49%—!% 

McOn - 43 9% 8% 844 —1 

McCor .48 2710359 22% 21% 21ft — % 
McFart _ 347 4ft 4<Vu 4*Vu — Vk 

McGrm M 25 116817% 16 16 — 1% 

MrftrfcRe - 70 2 lft Ift —ft 

MediTc - 46 3*4 2ft 3ft + % 

Medlrrwn _ 117811% 10 10ft 

MedCfct - SI 7 6% 6ft —ft 

Medi« - 17a 14 13 13% 

Mectaph _ 9322 35% 32 33% —2% 

Modar _ 567914% 10% 12% —2% 

fl4edar®x _ 1404 7 55a 6% 

Medancwt _ 649 2*4 2 2% — % 

Mode* .16 LD 21917% 16% 16% — r 

MadSvBJc Ito 37 566 36ft 34 34 'A — 2 

MedVsn -6526611% 8% 9*4—1% 

MedCmn _ 2485 16% 15 16 —1 

MfidAct - 762 2*4 2% 2% — 

ModDv - 406 2*4 2ft 2% — % 

MedDiaa - 474 4ft 4*4 4% —ft 

MedGr _ 280 7*4 6% 6% — 1% 

Mcdkng _ 2024 *’/u 

MedMkt - 390 27% 27 27 

MedTwT - 536 3% 2ft 2*4 — Vu 

MedTech _ 421 8% 7ft 7ft —ft 

MatSh AB 27 1911 23% 71ft— 1 

MttMcH - 3936 % Yu <V» +%, 

Mafic WtB _ 21 Vu Vu Vu - 

MaJICWtC _ 3 ft ft ft — V u 

ModcUS - 3670 19% 15% 18% — % 

Metfisys _ 626 3% 3% 3*4 — % 

Metfrad _ 733 12 10*4 11% _ 

Medstaf - 361218% 14*4 15%— 3% 

Meacnl - \2S 2 lft 2 *% 

Moufood _ 3840 8 % 6% 7% _ 

MeodhrtE -16681 14% 13V, 13 ft —ft 

Meaatest - 6190 21ft 77*4 18%— 4% 

Mataml _ 422 6 5>A 5V* — % 

MellonP Jfi 6.9 326 5% $ S' A » % 

Memorex - 3435 8% 6ft 7 

MJWSWJ - 118 1% 1 1 

MenWri - 339731% 26% 28%— 2% 

Mentor - 1428 16 13% 13ft— 1% 

MmtGr -24750 16 14% 15*4 —ft 

MrcBkl JB 37 3344 19 1 A 18% 18% —ft 
Mercer -44852 15% 10ft 12%— 314 

MrcBnc _ 149 10ft 9% 9% — % 

MrchBCP JJ90 A 77 73'A 21% 22% +Y4 

WcrBkNY IJO 11 20 51 SI 51 

MarcGns 70 U 2833 28ft 26ft 27 —lft 

Merdnt - 5528 17ft 16% 17% — % 

MndnBc 178 4 A 6646 2714 28% 29 ft —ft 

MwtdDto .12 17 440 9ft 9 9 — % 

Merdins 3AU2A 30111% 10ft 10ft— 1% 


MinrNts IJM 37 528% 28% 28% —ft 

MknEdu - 389513 11 11 —1% 

Mlnrrtc - 676 11*4 10ft 11% —ft 

MissVtY 35 17 145 14ft 14 14*4 

MlteVSr - 5438 15% M 14 —ft 

MltSUt 750 7 1 144% 144% 144% -3 

MoMGs lto 37 35 28% 27% 28% -ft ' 

MbtTet -.4266820 16% 17*4— 2% 

Mobley _ 827 2% 2% 2% — % 

MOCN 70 27 329 8% TV. 7*4 — % 

Mcxfnes 76 17 1861 Z7*S 24ft 25ft— 2 ' 

- 357 1% 1% 1% *%- 

_ 5307 291 26% 27%— 2% . 
_ 2699 10ft Bft 10 - . 

.1 286836% 33% 33*4—2 

.1 148636 33 33 —1 - 

-13333 25ft 19% 20%— 444 

- 150 TO 9 9 —'A 

_ 936 15*4 14% 15 —ft 

- 1916 8 7 7 —1 

- 207 2*4 2 2 —ft . 

- 368 2% 2'A 2ft 
_ 32210% Bft 9% —4b- 

- 849 9% 8% 8% —ft 

7 165820 18% 19ft —ft .• 

7 71 7% 7 7ft —ft . 

- 50417 16 16% — %" 

- 211217ft 14 14*4—2*4 

- 5515ft 15 15 —1 

7 3ft 3ft 3% _ 

229 Sft 8 8—1 

.15 27 1008 7% 6% 6% — % 
74 ,7 5970 12% . 10% 11 — 1%. 


Modtsc 
Mohawks 
MotecDy 
M049CS .04 
WtotocA 74 
MaOenM 
MomenCo 
MonaooC 
AAonocoF 
MonacWt 
MonAvl 
MonCOsn 
Mondavi 
MonevS s 
Mon RE 
MmoM 
MontPos 
MooroP 
MooreHd 
MornGp 74e 7 
MsmGp 
Mos cam 




Maxine 76 17 11031ft 29ft 30ft— 1% 
MottirWk - 1219 19% 18% 18% „ ' 

Mrtdb _ 168 3*4 3 3 *— Vi - 

MotrPrt - 3B39 B*b 7% 8% —ft 

AMnPkFn - 46214 13 13 —1ft 

MnhniaE - 2541 11% 10ft 10ft —ft - 

MCaffee - 3697 15ft 13ft 13% —lft - 

MuellerP 2LOO 67 1533% 33% 33'A *ft 

MuOCfe- _ 4310 9% « 4ft 

Muttcre _ 1010 30% 16% 17ft — 3% 

Mutlmdh _ 772629% 28% 29ft *ft 

MuflAsr 1731 47 306 21% 30ft 21ft _ 

MutSvBS - 923 15% 14% 15% —ft 

Mycron _ 731 11 9ft 9ft -1 

Mylex - 2129 6% 5 5ft —lft 


N 


MerPt83 

MerlsL I 

Merbwl 

MertMd 

MarflCp 

MesaArl 

MafCani 


- 50 4ft 4% 4ft ~~ 

_ 4394 4 3% 3ft — V, 

- 14000 »% 18ft 18% -2ft 

- 679 5ft 4ft 4% —ft 

.12 -5 5994 30 23% 26% -5 

-102173% l?% 3D%— lft 

- 41 2% 2% 2% _ 

- 752 13 lift 12ft —ft 

- 1781910% 9% 10 —ft 

76 7 1777 16% 16ft 16% — % 

- 16263 27% 20% 21 —6ft 

.129 1.1 23810% 9% 10% _ 

“ 18 13 — 1 % 

- .73814% 12% 13% 


-- «*? 3£ ?Vu 2h 


NWau 
MethdA 
Met iliii 
M etraFn 
Motmcan 
MetroBep 

MlamSb 

MlchiF 70 2.1 4706 9*4 9 9% 

Mlcnstr _ 13743 47ft 38ft 41 —ft 

MichPn lto 37 3527% 76 ZTftJJft 

MlctlNt 270 37 173662*4 *0% 61V, — % 

- 131610ft 10 10% — ft 

- 292516 13ft 14ft— 1% 

- JS'i™ l»k 13*4 ♦% 
~ 3Z3 « % Sft Sft —ft 

_ 500449 45 46 — J 

- 9414 30% 24 25ft— 5% 


MlcrBI 

MCTtoC 

Mkftcu 

MkTOHIt 

MicrWar 

MJcrAas 

MicroPro 

MldPro wt 

Micrdws 

Miere 

Mlcrdv 

MJcrotki 

MJcurfx 

Microto 


Mlcrgp 

Man 

AAkJvm 

Miesns 

iwucrnk 

Mlotest 

MldctiSy 
MidOcn 
MUAm, 32 
MkJArn pt 171 


- tun _ 

1 Ift. — v B 

-’aMXl 36ft 38%— 1% 

“ ^ 5% —1 

- 355 Sft 4ft 5 

- ..579 5% 5 Jft — ft 

6 6ft —2% 

1% 1% —ft 

5 5% *ft 


-11176 Bft 

- 250 1*4 

- 2792 Sft 
_ 9939 7ft 

— 1511 73 

— 1007 4% 
-111229 B8 


6*4 7 


23% 24 —2ft 
4 4V U 4 ft. 
Hi W% 84*4—2% 

- 168 6% 5ft 6 4 % 

- 301210% B% 8% —Ift 

“ US l 5 »S»“l" 

- SggJSW 24*4 26% — % 

5.1 30915 14ft 14% — *- 

•a. 4 28% 28% 


A VOANS -3X51747% 3p A 

MdDmn A4 37 11213% 12ft 13% 

MWSOUS 78 2J S3 11 11 11 —ft 
MdsxWot 1JK 57 11920% 19% 19% -2 

MWPn _ 1153 0% 19% 70ft 1 

MMOo — 1998530% 28% 28*4—2 

MidwGr 70 17 73833 30% »% -*4 

M fcehn - 90917ft IJ% l S %_ift 

MOeHnw - 58* 4ft 5ft 5ft — % 

MOrtNd _ 326 3ft 3ft 3ft 

Mfflrw S3 IJ 5338 29% 27% 27% — lft 
MAemin _ 296025% aft 23% — % 

Mflkwe - 118 4% 3% 4 

Mltwlns _ 19911% 10% 11% —ft 


N-Virotnt - 333 7% 6% 7 4ft 

NAB Alt ISOeX-D 53 5% J 5 — ’A 

NACRe .16 7 372 26*4 26 26 — *4 

NAITCS 73 f 47 2027 6% 5% 5% — % 

MBSC 72 27 90 20ft 19*6 19ft — % 

NBTBcp 76b 27 167 18 17% 17% - 

MCI Elds _ 67716*6 16 16*6 *1 

NEC 76e .9 267 54*6 51% 51*4— 1 1 

NFORSh - 4724*4 24 34 —ft 

NPS 78 27 251 17ft 17 17 — % 

NMR _ 654 3*4 2*6 3 —16 

NNBoll _ 478316 15 IS —ft ’ 

NS Bcp 72 1.0 165231ft 30*4 3044 -4b 

MSA Int _ 137 6% 5ft 6 +% 

NSC ltoe28L2 193 4% 3W„ 4% — Vu 

NV1EW _ 926 4*4 3ft 3ft — H 

MYCL - 2121 Yu ft V U 

Nctoam _ 30 7ft 2% 2% *Vii 

NcmTals 71 e .1 111513 11% 11% 


Mamie 

Nanomt 

Napca 

NashF 

Nattvms 

NBAlsh 

NafBov 

Mays 

NOyBn 


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464 1% 11% |% 

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84 22 ft 21 21 — ** 

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3 3614 35 

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NICotr 76 27 566? 13 12% 13 +» 

NtCnvwt - 00 6 5 5% — *4 

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37 47 
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to 47 1693 MV, 18% 19 —1% 

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(Conti mc d ou page 13) 


i 





, o-° 


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a y 

SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, APRIL 4, 1994 


Page 13 



NBA Standings 


eastern CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Dtvfejon 


w, 




*3 


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*r u 






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i es On 


x-NewYork 

W L 
SI 19 

Orlando 

42 29 

New Jersey 

37 0 

Miami 

38 34 

Boston 

3S 44 

PMMBlpNe 

21 58 

Washington 

21 50 

jc-Allorria 

Central Dtvu 

so at 

, -Chicago 

0 34 

Cleveland 

41 31 

Indiana 

38 33 

Charlotte 

32 38 

Detroit 

20 SO 

MUnaukee 

19 32 


Fd 

.729 

sn 

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sa 

362 

2ft 

2ft 

704 

M2 

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SiS 

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western conference 
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W L 

Fd 

x^an Antonio 

52 70 

733 

x -Houston 

50 20 

.714 

x-Utah 

45 27 

J2S 

Denver 

35 34 

_SJ7 

Mtanesata 

19 52 

366 

Deltas 

8 63 

Pocffle Division 

.113 

x -Seattle 

54 17 

761 

x -Phoenix 

0 73 

ATI 

Portland 

42 30 

383 

Golden State 

0 30 

S77 

LJLLnken 

31 39 

A43 

LA. Clippers 

25 45 

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x-d inched playoff berth 
FRIDAY’S RESULTS 

23 If 29 

W: AtocL«an 9-17 10-10 21 OhSnS 5 s>4 

19, B: Fok 0-17 7-12 23, Brown B-17 1-2 17. Re- 
Ooonds— WOshhHjton 51 1 Butter 10), Boston 63 
(Pariah. McDaniel 10). 6mm W ashington 
21 (ChaonOT 71. Boston 24 (DouoUb 10). 
Ortowlo 25 21 30 23—98 

New Jersey 24 21 20 31-9* 

Q: Hcnknmy 1B-177-10Z7,NAndenonMIM 
19; NJ: COtoman 6-16 10-1422, Ednanfe 7-154-4 
11 Rebon*s~Ortondo7l (O’Neal 14). New Jet- 
srvSO (Coleman IIJ. Assists— Orlando 17 (Scott. 
H antowY 4), New Jersey 34 (Wttsfev 0). 
Pomowl M 31 27 39-111 

WWWH 30 20 19 23-IN 

P:C.Rabtnson 12-1654 30>Strtckland 9-1612- 

1 33a Drexter 9-21 3-722; Ph: j. Malone f-16 2-2 
2a Wbolrkfpe 7-11 7-10 21. Rebounds— Port- 
land 53 (Drexter 12). PhitodetoMa 49 CWeam- 
ersooon 16). Amsfo-Porltand 27 (Strickland 
13), Phltadelphta 25 (Barra, 6). 

Indiana - 22 21 29 19- *1 

Miami M 29 20 20-101 

1: D. Davis 10-14 0-5 20. Scott M0 1-1 20; M: 
Rice 7-1B 1-1 17, Salley 7-12 3-4 17. Reboonds- 
Indkma 45 ( DXtovis TS), Miami 49 (Salley 101. 
Anists— indtena 22 (McKey 7), Miami 20 
(Coles 5). 

Detroit 23 32 23 13— 95 

Chicago 26 29 26 23—102 

D: Mills 6-14 3-3 16, Elliott 7-12 11-11 26; C: 

Grant 10-15 2-3 ax Armstrong 7-138-10 2XRe- 
bOMMis— Detroit 40 (ondcreon 10), Chicago 57 
(Plppen 15). Assists— Oefrolt 22 (Thomas 9), 
Chicago 21 (Plppen 7). 

OMrtotte 30 29 27 20— 186 

Daltas 11 27 21 25— 1M 

C: Mourning 10-1654 2S, Curry 8-120-0 20; D: 
jaeuan 7-M 5-5 19. Rooks 7-11 54 19. Re- 
bonads— Charioffe 46 [Mourning 13), Dallas 
SO (Janes II). Assists— ChartOfte 23 (Bennett 
6). Dallas 21 (Jadaan 7). 

Atlanta 24 20 25 10-07 

Phoenix 29 29 19 16-93 

A: FerraB*0 10-11 lEAugmon5-11 5415: P: 
Barkley 10-19 5-0 25, Ceballoa 10-16 4-4 2LRe- 
baands— Atlanta 55 (Willis. Ehto 0), Phoenix 
50 1 Barkley TD.Asslsts-Af tarda 36 (Blaylock 
91, Phmmlx 26 (KJohnson 12). 

Hosston 22 20 » 27— 00 

LA Lakers 21 17 31 30—101 

H: O tollman 11-23 61020. Maxwell *14 1-4 


nVJ^-° ty °f 5 *^H.Van Exel 11-214-131. 
W^QOTds-Ha u st M Si (OteFuwon TJ), La, 
Si®, 13 >- Asshh-Houston 27 

SSI?" » » * 

to8 * ea Stole 29 30 23 26—706 

6-12 3-4 is. RMsr 0-16 2-A 2D; G: 
10-13 1-2 21 . SbrewcU 7-M J-S 2a Re- 
IWHWII.GONIM1SW1 

5). Golden State 45 (Owera. jenrunss 11 ). 

■ M TIiOMri RESULTS 

SSI” 26 19 26 25- M 

•"WWrtOi 9 25 a 71 11 

M: Mormon 7-133-410. Baker 10-13X222; W : 
Macron 11-16 7-0 29. Price S-W MS i». Re- 
eoaeds~ M»wotifcee 49 (Baker 6), Wasnlng- 
lonfl (MocLeon 10). Aadsts-Mlhraukee 20 
(Murdoc k 7), Woshhiaton 22 (Price 8). 

J*™ 25 23 M 21-113 

inaiaaa 27 34 33 Ji m 

O’. O’Neal 13-20 10-14 36. Hardaway 9-14 4-4 
a.- 1; Stmts 11-10 66 at. Miller 11-17 15.35 3s. 
Jta0«md»-Oriancta44 «mwf ID. incffanott 
(A DovIsS ). Assbds-Ortandp 25 (Hardaway 
7). Indiana 33 (Workman 15). 

22 26 22 25—95 
27 H 22 19—60 
C; J.WIinamfl-15 7-e 23. Prfco 10-lf 3-3 24; 
O: Smith 11-23 M 23. Jackson lfr-22 2-2 22. 

Rebo«Mts-aeveiand55 (J.WHitems IIMM- 
ws 53 (Jackson 10). Assists— Cleveland 17 
(PtilllG. J.wuilams. Wilkins. Price 3). Dolios 
20 (Jackson 5). 

Miami 25 22 17 23— D 

*taw Yta* 29 31 20 26— 1M 

M: Salley 7-11 00 14, Miner 44 74 IS; NY: 
Oakley 611 5-6 17. Davts 7-13 5-7 21. Re- 
Mwmds— Miami 51 (Lang IS). New York 66 
(Bonner 13). A s s i sts — Miami 14 (Sham 31, 
New York 22 (Anthony 7). 

CbartoHe 27 27 10 39— lit 

Sou Antonio 30 19 32 20—117 

C: Mourning 10- IS 7-7 27. Curry 7-1 1M20;0: 
ElBs 7-15 00 17, Robinson 9-10 6-11 24. Re* 
h omtds— Charlotte* (Mourntagm.Son Anto- 
nto« 1 Rodman 30). ABobta-OarMte 27 (Bo- 
ms 51. San Antonio 30 (Fiord, Roarrat 0). 
B«W 26 18 20 37— 91 

Utah 27 20 23 23—161 

D: Mutombo 4-9 6-11 14 Abdul- Rauf 6-16 7-7 
19; U : Malone 10-10 11-17 31,Homocek 5-10 66 
17. Rebounds— Denver 36 (Mutombo 16), Utah 
52 (Malone 12). Assists— Denver 17 (R.WII- 
ilams 11). Utah 25 (Stockton 9). 

Gotten State 33 26 26 26-IN 

Seattle 30 32 29 20—119 

G : Mullln 0-15*4 21. So rawed 6-16 2-2 16; S: 
Kemp 10-14 12-16 32. Gill 7-16 >3 18L Re- 
be emt s Golden State 60 Wtebber 16). Seattle 
54 (Kemp 12). Assists— Gotten State 22 
(SprewMI 4). Seattle 25 (Peyton 10). 
Minnesota 21 23 23 20- 07 

Sacramento 04 22 23 23— ua 

M: Kina 0-13 1-4 17. Loettner 0-16 ±6 if; S: 
Tisdale 9-13 64 24 Richmond 7-20 2-417.RC- 
beaade— Minnesota 54 ( Kina 12), Sacramento 
64 (Potynlce 17). Assists— Minnesota 18 
(MWIIIians 51. Sacramento 24 (Webb 8). 

NCAA Women's Tournament 

SEMIFINALS 
Saturday's Results 
Louisiana Tech 69, Alabama 66 
North Carolina 09, Purdue 74 




FIFTH ONE-DAY INTERNATIONAL 
Australia vs. sooth Attica 
Satanhiy In Daman, Sooth Africa 
South Africa Innings; 138 (49.5 overs) 

FOURTH ONE-DAY INTERNATIONAL 
ImHo vs. New Zealand 
Saturday. In Christchurch, Now Zeeland 
India: 222-6 (50 overs) 

New Zealand: 2234 <493 overs) 

New Zealand wan fay six wickets. 

Four -match series tied 2-1 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


0TC Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday, April 1. 

(Contimied) 


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Knicks Increase Streak to 15 


The Associated Press 


Boh Sntwy Ajmer Frnxx-Prexr 

Derek Harpa- ran aver WUBe Barton, while the Knicks (fid the same to the Heat 


There appeals to be no stopping the 
New York Knicks as they spring forward 
to the National Basketball Association 
playoffs. 

Hubert Davis scored 13 of his 21 
points during a 44-17 blitz in the second 
and third quarters as the Knicks matched 
an NBA season high for consecutive vie- 
tones, at IS, with a 110-87 rout Saturday 
night of visiting Miami. 

“Fifteen in a row is something spe- 
cial,” Davis said. "It’s bard to do in this 
league” 

The Knicks. who have 12 games left 
and haven’t lost since Fd). 27. held their 
opponent under 90 points for the 11th 
time in the streak, which equals Hous- 
ton’s 15-0 start. 

Charles Oakley finished with 17 points 


and 12 rebounds, and Patrick Ewing had 
15 points, 11 rebounds and 6 blocked 
shots for the Knicks, who have beaien 
Miami in 1 ] of their lart 12 meetings. 
Anthony Bonner missed eight of his nine 
shots, all from dose to the basket, but he 
led New York with 13 rebounds- ' 

“He is the quintessential role player,” 

NBA HIGHLIGHTS ~ 

Knicks coach Pat Rile? said of Bonner, 
who has started each 'erf the 15 games 
during the streak. “He took four or five 
charges, got three or four loose balls and 
all those rebounds. IPs incredible what 
he has given ns the last 15 games. If 
there’s ever a player that epitomizes how 
we play, it’s Anthony Bonner.” 

Spars 117, Hornets 111: David Robin- 


24 points i 
man had 20 rebounds and a career-best 
eight assists as San Antonio, playing at 
hone, won its sixth straight. 

Somes 119, Warriors 109: Sam Perkins 
led a game- breaking rally with six points 
and Shawn Kemp scored a season-high 
32 as host Seattle won its eighth straight. 
Mi chad Cage of the Sonics played his 
400th straight game, the sixth-! on gest ac- 
tive streak in the NBA. 

Pacers 228, Magic 123: Reggie Miller 
made all 15 of his free throws and scored 
a season-high 38 points, while rookie 

guard Haywood e workman had 15 as- 
sists and Rik Smits contributed 26 points 
as Indiana overcame Shaquilk O’Neal’s 
33-point, 15-rebound game for visiting 
Orlando. 


NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DMcfet 



W 

L 

T Pts GF OA 

x-N-Y- Rangers 

49 

23 

7 

IQS 283 217 

x-New Jersey 

45 

23 

11 

101 

290 208 

Washington 

36 

32 

10 

82 

251 230 

Florida 

32 

32 

14 

78 

217 214 

Philadelphia 

34 

38 

7 

7S 2B0 301 

N.Y. Islanders 

32 

35 

11 

75 

262 249 

Tampa Bev 

27 

40 

11 

<6 

200 238 

Neruteuit Dhrtstaa 



x-Ptttsburgh 

40 

25 

13 

93 

281 265 

x -Montreal 

39 

26 

14 

92 

ZTO 233 

x- Buffalo 

41 

19 

9 

91 

269 205 

x- Boston 

39 

26 

13 

91 

266 233 

Quebec 

31 

<0 

7 

69 

255 272 

Hartford 

25 

46 

B 

58 

212 271 

Ottawa 

13 

56 

9 

35 

186 363 


WESTERN CONFER BNCB 
Ctatral Dtvtaiaa 



W 

L 

T Pts GP GA 

x-Oetrolt 

44 

27 

7 

95 328 257 

x-Toronto 

40 

27 

U 

92 255 226 

x -Delias 

39 

27 

12 

90 260 241 

X-SL Louis 

V 

31 

9 

S3 2*5 299 

4-CNCDOO 

35 

34 

9 

79 235 233 

Winnipeg 

23 0 B 
Podfic Division 

54 232 321 

x*Calgory 

38 

77 

,3 

B9 281 242 

x- Vancouver 

39 

37 

3 

81 289 259 

San Jose 

31 

33 

15 

77 241 253 

Anaheim 

31 

43 

5 

0 220 340 

Las Angeles 

25 

41 

11 

61 273 301 

Edmonton 

23 

43 

12 

58 247286 


x-dlaaied ptemH berth 
FRIDAY’S RESULTS 

B C »-J 
3 I 1-4 
Pint Period: B-Hawarcfauk 33 (Molter, 
Fuhr); B-Phmfo 21 (Mogllnv. Hawerchak) 
(pg) ; Madettaai (ScnettHfc. Moflar). Seaood 
Parted: B-Pr*stay M (si,). Third Parted: B- 
Howardwk 34 (Mogllnv. Ptante] (op). Shots 
oa goal: Bn (on Fufar) 9-11-11 — 31. B (on Co- 
st* RtondNW) 0-10-10—28. 

M gu t itol 8 2 0-2 

H.Y. Ukmters 2 2 1-4 

Pint Parted: N.Y.-Turgeon 34 (King. 
Voske); N-YHOna 30 (Turacon, Malakhov) 
(op). Second PMod: M-Sellaws 32 (Mailer. 
Dcmphousse) (pp); M-DiPlatra 11 (Dfonn% 
Brtscbofs); N.Y^Kurvers? (Graen.Mdnnis) 
(pp); N-Y.-Oatanrao 11 (Hagua, Ferraro). 
Third Period: N.Y.-Thontas 39 (King. Tur- 
gaan). Slots an goal: M (on Kexttdl) 8-7- 
10-25. N.Y. (an Tugnutt) 15*6-29. 

Danas ■ • o-o 

N.Y. Rangers 0 1 3-3 


Second Parted: N.Y.-Laetch 22 (Mossier. 
Zubov) (pp). T hird Parted: N.Y.-Anderson 2D 
(Grows, walls): N.Y^Ko*otev 20 ILaetch, 
Lnrmer) (on); Shots na goal; D ten Rlcm er) 
10-104—28. K.Y. |an MOOQ) 9-8-13— 29. 

St. Loots 8 2 1—1 

Tampa Bay 2 0 3—4 

Find Petted; T-Andorason 13 (CnrigMon); 
T-Joseoh ll (Chambers, Bradley) (pp). Sec* 
end Parted: SL-Proahorav 14 (Montaemary. 
Medved); SL-Prakfaerar 15 (Jonwyl. Third 
Parted: T<ote 19 (JosMtaSavanfl; T-Dratton 
u (Joseph, Cote); SL-Shanahan43 (Houstey, 
Stastny) (pp). Shots op tool: 5i_ (an Bergop- 
serd D14-7-29. T (an Hrvinafc) 164-9-33. 
Winnipeg 1 0 0— l 

VoBcaaver • a 0-4 

Ftrst Period: W -Drake 12 (Tkadwk) (pp). 
Second Ported: V-Lotayetie 3 (Momma Bo- 
bycti); V-Crawn u (Bro*a Bcteydi); v- 
Braien 14 (Momcssa Caartnan) .' Third Period: 
V-Ranrrtng2S (Brown) (oa); v-5iear5 (Adams. 
Unden) iPPl.Sbottonpeal: W lonMcLron) 11- 
►9—29. V (an Chewkfoa) 12-12-17^41. 

New Jersey l ( 6— i 

W as h taa ten ■ 1 1—2 

First Petted: N j.-phu*o 4 (SmHta Semak). 
Second Ported: W-Peake 11 (Konowatdiufc. 
Burrldge) (pp). Third Ported; MUMJMr » 
I Hurler). Shots ee peel: Nj. (on Beauore) 12- 
12-3—27. W (an Tarrerl) 1444-11. 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
Calgary 2 10 0-3 

Detroit 1 2 0 0-3 

First Period: DOcaorem 22 (LJdstrora Fe- 
dorov) (pp) ; C-Patrlck 9 (WMz.Nviander);C- 
Rober1s39 (Yawney. Fieury). Second Ported: 
D-Fcdorav 55 (Kozlov, ucfctrom); C- Roberts 
« (AtacInnK ZokOMkl) (pp); DOxantt 23 
(Fedorov. CaHev) (op). Shots an gaol: C (an 
Osgood) IM-W-3. D (an KWd) 34154-32. 
Edmeaion l 2 3-5 

Los Anpalei 0 2 1—1 

First Parted: E-Amort 32 (McAmrnona 
Matlby). Second Parted: LArRydwl W 
IDroce. Gretzky); E-Thomton 4 (DeBrusk. 
Bodfcereer); E-Grteve 12 (Goer. sioplatanl: 
LA-Long 9 (Btaka Conocher). Third Parted: 
E-Modbv 10 (Okxason. McAmmond); LA.- 
Gretzky 31 fTodd. Blake) (pp); E-DeBnak 4 
(Thornton) (en). Shots oa goal: E (anHrudev) 
1447-27. LA. (an RantonU 519-17—41- 
N.Y. Rutgers 8 4 1-4 

2 8 0-4 


Phot Pelted: NJ^GtiwIn 23 (Milton, Zete- 
pwkhn); N J.-Lemleux 17 (MacLsan. Atbelbi). 
Second Petted: N.Y.-Leetch 23 (GIRwrt); 
N.Y.-Mottewj 19. N.Y.-Kovatov 21 (Lanmer, 
Zubov) (PP); N.Y.4tocTovlsn 17. Shots on 
pool: N.Y. (on Brodeur. Torrtrt) 5144-21 
N-L (on Richter) 8-124—26. 
pwtodetpbia 5 0 1—4 

1 2 3-5 


First Petted: p-undras 43 (Brbvf Amour, 
RDdne),p.Renberg31 (Unaras. Roctne): P- 
Brbtf Amour s (Renberg. Llndros); H-Ko- 
eo re 5 (Caasofts. Ptopp) (pp); P-Boranek 2B 
(Lome); p-undres 44 1 DlMo lev Galley). Sec- 
ern) Period: tPPatvln 2 (Janssens): H-Ccs- 
sellsU (Sanderson, Turcatte) I pp). Third Pe- 
riod: H-Lemteux 15 (Sanderson. Smyth); H- 
Verbegk 35 (Steven, Kren); POIMoto 10. 
(Dlnecn, Racchl). Shots oa goat: P (on Burke) 
12-124-41 H (on Sorter sira m) 640 11 

2 • e 0—3 

110 o-a 
First Period: F-Bctansor IS (Brawn. Ku- 
deiskJj (ep); D- Yashin 28 (Levins. Huffman) 
(op); O-Bouraue l (McLlwafaL Dlnean) (sh>. 
Secoad Period; F-Murpfty »3 < Barnet. Loma- 
kin) (pp) . Shots oa goal : O (on Fitzpatrick) 15 
11-3-3—26. P (on Bllllngton) 1511-7-1—34. 

Baffata 2 t 2—4 

Otehec 1 1 0-2 

First Period: B-Khmylev 24 (Hawercfauk, 
Badger) (pp); B+ druan 4 (sn); O-Sundln 31 
(SoUc Young) (pp). Socend Period: B-Boif 
cfaor 5 (Sutton. Khmylev) (pp) ; O-Komensk v 
26 (McKee. Woionln); B-Khmytov 77 (Smoh- 
11k, Hewerahuk) (pp).TMrd Parted: B-Wood 
20 IHamanl tshl; B-Mtood 2) Ottmcrctiute 
Mob) I n*) tec). Shots on goal: B (00 Cloutier) 

9- 11-7—27. O (on Hasted 7-11*16— 34. 

Toro n to 4 0 1—1 

Anabetai 1 0 3-3 

Fttst Period: ArSocco IB (AAcSweenl (pp). 
Third Period: A-Lhtey 1 (Williams); A-L»- 
BcaulS (Yoke. Lonev); T- Roust 5 (sh). Shots 
an gaol: T Ion Hebert) 5-158—28. A (on 
Rhodes) 9-54—22. 

N.Y. Iktamters 1118-3 

Montreal 2 0 I 8-3 

Pint Period: N.Y .-Hogue 31 (Kasparalfta 
Dateorno); M-Oeslardlns 13 (Brunet. 

Keane) ; M-Cartxpmeou 13 1 Brunet. Od e l o i n). 
Second period: N-Y^Thomas 40 (Targoan. 
Kurvers) (pp). TMrd Petted: M-Mylier 23 
(Dcmphousse, Dee) ord Ins) (pp); N.Y.-Ferra- 
re 13 (Hogue). Shots oa goal: N.Y. (on Roy) 5 

10- 9-1 — 29. M (on Hextoll) 12443 — 33. 


0 2 8-4 

Son Jose 2 2>-7 

First Ported: SJ/Ozollnsh 24 (Makarov, 
Larionov) (pp); SJrOahten 22 (Norton. Fal- 
loanl (pp). Second Parted: S-i^Ellk 2« (Doh- 
taa Duchesne); ^Vancouver Adams 12 (Char- 
bonneau); SJ.-Omllnsh 25 (Larionov. 
Horten) ; VMom rn o 14 (Adams). Third Peri- 
od: V-Qiarbonneau 6 (Adams); SJ.-Bafcer 10 
(MhAarav, Norton); Sa-Dahten 23 (Elk); v- 
Murzvn 4 1 RanninB.Momasso); SJ.-OeMon24 
(Duchesne. Kroupo) len). Shots on poor: V (on 
irbe) 7-1513-31 SJ. (on Wtittmora) 6-94— TL 


im AFRICAN NATIONS CUP 
Qoarterfiocds 
Nlgerto Z Zaire 0 
Mali 1. Egypt 0 
Zambia l. Senegal 0 

DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
PSV Eindhoven 2, Cembuur Leeuwarden 0 
Go Ahead Eagles 2 RKC Waatwilk 0 
MVv Maastricht L Fevenoonl Rottordom 1 
ENGLISH PREMIER LEA8UE 
Locos 1. Newcastle 1 
Arsenal I, Swindon 1 
Blackburn 2, Manchester United 0 
Otofseo 2 S o u ffu mtA on 9 
Coventry L Wimbledon 2 
Liverpool L Sheffield United 2 
Manchester City 3, Aston Vida 0 
Norwich 1, Tottenham 2 
Oldham 4 Queens Park Rangers ) 
Sheffield Wednesday 5. Evertan I 
west Ham Z Ipswich I 
Staodtags: Manchester Unitea 76 points; 
Blackburn. 73; New cast le. 04; Arsenal 62; 
Leedh.56; Llvenjool.53; Sheffield Wednesday 
and Wimbledon, 51; Queen's Park Rangers 
and Aston villa 50; Nontridi 47; Chelsea 
Coventry, Wes! Ham and ipswteh, 41 ; Totten- 
ham, 39: Evertan and OWom. 37; Manches- 
ter City. 36; Sheffield United. 34; Southamp- 
ton. 33; Swindon. 26. 

FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Paris S.G. Z Cannes I 
soehoux 1. Marseille 1 
Angers 1. Bordeaux 3 
Montpellier 1, Lille 3 
Lyon 1. Toulouse 0 
Morflgues 1, Monoc a 3 
Lens 5. Lb Havre I 
Metz a ST Etienne l 
Coen X Strasbourg 1 
Auxerre X Nantes 1 

Standings: Ports- 3G. » polnis; Morse I lie. 43; 
Auxerre. 40; Boroeoux, 39; Naves. 37; Cannes. 
MonMEtar and (.wa 35; Monaco and Las. 34; 
Sa&rt- Etienne, 33; Strasbourg. 31; Sochnux.30; 
Metz, 28; Caen 27; Lille. 25; LO Havre. 24; 
Morflgues. 23: Toulouse. 19; Angers. HL 
GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
Bayern Munich 1. FC Cologne 0 
SC Freiburg Z Scholke 3 
Bayer Leverkusen X Karlsruhe SC 1 
VIB Leipzig 1, ElntrocM Frankfurt 0 
Barussio Dortmund X werder Bremen 2 
Standings: Bayern Munich. 37 points; Eln- 
tracht Frankfurt 33; Bayer Leverkusen, 32; 
Kalserslautern. Karlsr u he. Hamburg, Baras- 
sta Dortmund and Dulsburg.31; VIB5tuttgort 
and Cologne. 31; Borossio Moenchenglod- 
boch,28; werder Bremen. Scnouce and Dyn» 
mp Dresden. 27; Freiburg. 22; Nuremberg. 
21; wottenscheid, IV: Leipzig. 16. 


ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Cremonese X Samndorio ol Genoa a 
Fogsifl 1. Ptacenzo 0 
Genoa 1. Lazio ol Rome 1 
Juvenlusof Turin I, Tnrern oz ionole of Milan D 
Lecce ,, Torino 2 
AC Milan 1, Parma 1 
Respkmo 1, Nopoll 0 
Roma X Cagliari 0 

Standings: AC Milan. 47 points; Juventus. 
4l;3ampdorta40; Parma and Lazio, as : Tori- 
no. 32; Napoli. 30; Foogia 29; Internazlonote. 
Cremonese, Roma and Genoa. 25; Piacenza 
and Cagliari 27; Reggtona and Udlnese. 24; 
Atakinla 15; Lecce, 1L 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
CM la X Real Modrld 2 
Ltekto 1. Barcelona 2 
Athletic de Blteao 7. Sporting do Gifon 0 
Log rones x Real Seciedod B 
Rayo Voltocono CL Albocete 0 
Racing de Santander X Osasuno ) 

AMettco de Madrid X VoUodMId D 
Oviedo Z Deportlvo de Lo Coruno 5 
Tenerife X Zaragoza 3 
Valencia 1. Sevilla 1 

Standings; Deportlvo Coruna 45 points; 
Barcelona 43; Real Madrid. 40; Real Zarago- 
zo and Athletic Bilbao. 36; Sevilla 34; Alboce- 
te Bid TenerHa 33; Radng Santander and 
Vatoncia 31; Sporting Gflon raid Real Socle- 
dad. 30; RoroVolleco no ond Real Ov lode, 25: 
Attetico Madrid. 27; Log rones and Cetta 26; 
Real VollodolM, 23: Lertda 22: Osasuna 18. 

DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
PSV Eindhoven X Combuur Leeuwarden 0 
Go Ahead Eagles X RKC Woolwtlk 0 
MW Moastrichi 1, Fevenoord Ro tter dam 1 

Weekend standings unavailable. 


BASEBALL 


BALTIMORE— Sent Mike Ouulst. Pilcher, 
to Rochester, ll_ 



Restets of 2f5Utemetor world Cup event 
Sunday, la Mcertwke, Belgium: 1. Gianni 
Bugna Italy ; 6 hours. 45 minutes. 20 seconds : 
Z Johan Museeuw, Belgium, same time; X 
Andrei TchmK. Moldavia. *; 4. Franco Baf- 
tertnl Italy, st; 5, Johan Coptot. Belgium, 
1:11; 6. Fable Bakkrta Holy. 1^4; 7. Guido 
Bonlempl. Italy, si; X Marc Sergoant, Bel- 
gium, st; 9. Edwta Van Hoovdonck, Belgium, 
si; K. Frank Carvers. Bteotum, st. 


Major League Scores 

PRE-SEASON EXHIBITION GAME5 
Friday’s Results 

Minor League All-Stars X Chicago Cubs 3 
Pittsburgh 9, Minnesota 4 
Florida X Kansas City 2 
Milwaukee 7, Detroit 7. 10 Innings 
Seattle 7, Colorado 3 
New York Mels 10. Texas 7 
Cleveland X Cincinnati 4 
SL Louis 6. Chicago White Sox & 10 Innings 
Montreal X Toronto 2 
Boston 1L New York Yankees 11 
San Diego X Houston 1 
CoHtomla 2. Los Angeles 0 
Oakland IX San Frceiclsco 8 
Saturdays Results 
Seattle X Toronto 2 
Pittsburgh X Cleveland 4 
Milwaukee X Detroit 3 
Atlanta 4 . Chicago While Sox X 10 Innings 
St. Louis X antennal] 2 
Baltimore 9, Philadelphia 3 
New York Mels X Texas 2 
Minnesota IX Chicago Cubs 8 
New York Yankees X Boston X 10 bmlngs 
San Dtago X Houston 1 
Oakland 5. San Francisco 4 
Montreal X Colorado 1 
Florida vs. Raisas City, cal. wet field 
ColHontla & Los Angeles 2 


SALEM OPEN 
Men's Stogies Semmaate 
Pete Sampras (11. United Stateb del. Andre 
Aaaal (5). United State* 6-X 51; Lionel Roux. 
Froncg, deL Henrik Htem. S weden. 6-X 14.6-1 
Final 

Sampras deL Roux, 6-X 6-2 -0- 

RIVER OAKS INTERNATIONAL 
Metes Staples SentHInate 
Rltewy Renebcra. US. del. Peter Lund- 
gren. Sweden. 7-& 6-3; Magnus Larsson. Swe- 
den def. Jimmy Connors. 6-3. 6-2. 

FAMILY CIRCLE MAGAZINE CUP 
Women's Singles. Semffinate 
Notafla Zvereva (6), Belarus, dot. Mary 
Pierce (7), France. 0-&, 6-16-2; Conditta Mar- 
lines »). Spain, deL Iva Ma loiL Croatia 6X6 
7 (7-3). 64. 

SOUTH AFRICA OPEN 
Metes Singles. Semifinals 
Hendrik Dreekman. Germany, def. Alexan- 
der Volkov (6). Russia 7-4 17-3). 64x7-5; Mar- 
kus Znccke, Germany, del. Jakob Hlosek, 
Swttzertaral 64. 66. 


Stories * CSv Yld latetatfi Low Clse Chge 


Pulses 

PuteeEn 

PureTc 

runiwi 

PieoPd 
Purus 
PutnTr 
PVrrnT 
Pyxis s 


J9 5 3 50716% 

.56 ZJ 130 25 
JO A3 4415 
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_ 511611*1 
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.12 J 345521% 
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tnn 

6727 

„ 30B«13% 
— 57991 27 


-48b l!f 


,4% 15% —to 
24 24 — % 

14% 14% - 

7to 7%— 1 
7% 9 —2 

5% 9 —to 

ito 20% —% 

14% 16 +% 

11% 11%— 1% 
25% 2Sto— 1% 
6% Tto— 5% 
23 26% ‘3% 



1 ■ 


Sales 



Stacks 

Dtv 

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MBsKtet Law Clse Oat 




0,2 6* 

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69413 


RuyOTC 

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1763 7* 
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65419* 

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JMO J 

240 7* 

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RyanF 


- 

8590 8* 

7% 

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- 394 BV. 

- 499315% 
_ 906 7 

- 3944 3% 
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- 749 3% 
S 145627% 
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- 7902 38% 
_ 2925 3% 

- 895 37% 

- 414 5 

- 4614 34% 

- 3849 15 

- 4592 5% 

- 90 2% 

- 189815% 
J 1784 , 5% 
_ 188 3% 

U 193717% 


JJ3e 


35% 36% —3% 
6% 4%— 1% 
llto 12%— 2% 
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2% 2% —to 
16% 17% —3% 
B% te* — % 
15% 15% - 

22% 24V.— 1% 

11% n% —to 

3% 3% —to 
21% 22 *y» 

15 14% —to 

32% 34%— 3% 
2% 7V« —to 
34 36% — 1% 

4% 4% —to, 
20% 21%— 3% 

13 i3%-a„ 

4% Jto — % 
2% 2% —to 
14% 14% —to 

14 14%—, 
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15% 14% — % 


R&BInc 

RFSHM 

RHNB . 

RKSB* 

RPM 

RSFnl 


DulTut 

rvWOYX 

Rtxflus 


.10 


RaHtex 

RainTc 

Ramsay 

RndAccs 

Rormacs 

RartrOp 

Ravens 


ReadRt 

ReodaA 

Recctns 


RecvEns 

Rodman 



RanCp 

RenCom 

Renarm 

RenaAte 

Rrtrak 


Rerton 

ReppsAu 

RepAuwt 

Reptm 

RoAuto 


RepBnk 

gjPtaA 

RepSec 

Repsert 

h.M I frf- 
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ReMnd 

Resound 


Resrtm 

Reetor 

Restrwt 

Rtttx 

ReutMd. 


ReafaaB 


RWhn 


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Katsm 

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RoanEl 
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Robec 
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RehotVs" 
RoteKS 
RchCSpf 
RockTen 
RodcvSh 
RogCortl 
RwllFn 
RsvttFgf 
Roptec _ 
Racers 


RossSIr 


_ 1408 8% 4% 
J46 2J) 81918% 16% 

-06 o J 3810 10 

t _ 156 % tVu 

32 IB 1640 79 18% 

M 2-6 11519 18% 

- 2851 10% 9 

- 1347 7 Sto 

- talk IN 

J 4521 18 17% 

- 4990 Bto 7% 

- M2 4% 3% 

- 1537 31% 26% 
_ 4031 19% ,5% 
_ 4764 9to 8% 

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- 2065 8 7% 

_ 3670 6% Sh. 

3J 7 14% 14% 
_ 4829 4% Sto 

31 u a en% zi% 
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32 2 A 15814 13 

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- 7210% 10% 

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- 79214% 15% 

_ 3676 20 16% 

_ 7912% 11 

- 130 9% 9 

_ 1469 26% 24% 
_ 3851 kfa % 

• z JS & & 

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- 192014 13% 

- 2721 M% 13 

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- 1183 10% 9 

- 7882 22 20% 

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- 969 5% 4% 
_ 13267 3% 3% 

- 2914 Ato 4% 

- 3665 lto lto 
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- 110417 15% 

32 24 366314% 12% 

_ 32 1 % 1 % 

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5?B Stated 

_ 953 3Vu 2% 

- 260 1 9% 16% 

- 1518 10% 9 

- 19204 U 11% 
Jit 4.9 5711% 10% 

_ 46520% 18% 

_ 346 lto lto 
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- 4915 18% 16% 
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Sto 
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2227 TB 16% 
_ 662 Z^u 2% 

- 812310% 9% 

- 84317% IS 

- 400 4to 4% 

- 44 Sto 7% 

„ 524 3% 3 
_ 9132 W 14 

Me A 144622% Vto 
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33617% 16 
2 9% 9% 
_ _ 63 6to Sto 

1J0 X, 982871% 65% 
A xe 35118 ISto 
133 33 

5019% 18 
_ 30 2 lto 

_ 794 9% 7 

_ 3784 30% Sto 
1.9 764 7to 6% 
„ 1131 4% 5% 
_ 4767 77% 15% 
1-75 S3 51931% 29% 

- 444517 16 

_ 82714% 12% 

- 4634 26 24% 

L20 2J 155545% 44% 
X25 5l2 1063 63 

- 227 6% Sto 
.12 A 1189 28% 29 
ASe13J ,394 Yu to 

- 1503 Ifa % 
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_ 342 Sto 
- 3835 6% 
_ 94 6to 

_ 3811 9W 
.16 2J 40 6 
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ISto— 1% 
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3% —to 
14%—, to 
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32% —to 
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6 

67% —3 
16 —lto 
33 -to 
Wk— ito 
ito —% 
0 —ito 
29*4 —to 
AM —lto 
Sto -^to 
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29*4—1% 
16 —1 
13% —to 
74U— lto 
44% —to 
63 —to 
6% -»* 
77 —to 

5 3S 

15% —to 


5K 
SET S 
S3 Inc S 
SBE 

sasys 

SEIs 


SFXBrd 
SGiint 
SHLSy 
Si Hand 
SJkB 

SKF 
SJCI 
SLMs 
SPSS 
STV 


- 70713% 
1JB 28 47538% 

-19795 17% 
.12 S 316 24 
J3elJ 1286 17% 
_ 66814% 

- 4734 21%, 

- 2221 7% 

.10 .9 MB 13 

,14e 1 J 21 . 

_ 24118 
.11 1JI 16412 
-13705 14% 
_ 384 10% 

_ 56 4% 

1J» X4 7384 SS 

Saftat - 31315 

Sofcdun - 1087 15% 

SftvlsJ - 3424 25% 

SattyTtC - 726 12% 

S000TCS - 5322 13 

SlProncb - 52315% 

Stives .12 14 15 8% 

SUude 40 1415088 28 

SHAOTY .14 1-2 TO 13 
StPcufiS JO 1J *48819% 
Stefck - 1330 )9 

SottMox - 931 3 

SomLtJV _ lte 2V. 

ScnvJTc — 433 2% 

SondFm 30 IS 4M17 
ScrsKeu -20 14 277)4 
SondCoP -05e 3 767 16 . 

ScnfBp J»e 3 951 11% 


SuiMitut 

Swvhina 

ScrrtCrt 


SrtwMI 


„ 130 7% 

- 540619% 

- 2146 6H 

_ 471713 

Setter, - 1797 13% 

SatTech - 

Savov — 226615% 

Sayett - 411 S% 

Sovettwl — M % 

SconOp _ 17£ 8 

_ 412027 
_ 986 20% 

J»e 3 5*577 

SchoCp _ 2*07 39% 

IriSnm 36 1J 1C8 32% 

IS& - u ’f 

gss 3 tS’Ato 

sciGme - awae 

StSSrt — 2IO* 7 

SteTch JO 3-0 X191 11% 

Scimed -26g{35to 

SckMNov - 3990 *% 

SdoswIO — 51 3 

Stetex 32 X012444 26 
ScnsBds -1460113% 

Scots, 44 X0 3f t* 

Seems — 9736 20 

Scripn 1J0 14 ilk 

SeocBJc 48 24 2S 18% 

Swtw — 9931% 

sootw I JO *4 WOfflto 
Sersota —49808 25 

S eOPf _ 44 33 liStgS 
SeomanP - 316 12to 

isss d 

S3S&. i3S g 

SccBCP 41 24 66 191A 

SecCemBC 40 2.9 30814% 
ISCdP - 1805 36 V. 

Secgnvs - 49 4% 

SeAtS JO 1.9 15511% 

Seehtn .,2, 4j 22 3 

^ t 

__ 

Setetln 1.13 ID 311 Wri 

_ 323 9 

- 2519V. 
_ *949 Tto 

Seaunf 

Swuol — 6037 6% 

Sersen - 1065 8 

SrvTffi - 559512 

ivcFrci - 533 4% 

- 1469M 

SevEnv _ M’r 4 

Shaman - _«0T0 

ShrMad J4 12 

ShdTech - £ 

Shn*n - ,615 M 

SWIGP - ’^25 

getdl - 10S013 

Shedne J2bX5 Ml» 

Shloh 153 8V. 

ShoeCars - 
~ ' IS — 105923% 

— — - 41 lto 

ShrlnFn 56 13 »»% 

Sharwd - 1J£ J* 

Showbiz - WM 

5hw*n _ lg» 7% 

ssa 

ISt3, Z™! 

SeTTuc -6»*ta 

StemDa -11515 

* iVA W 

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- ^3 - J85 9to 

_ 26510% 

— 1*518 12V* 
_ 64 7% 

- <0*8 13% 

* 'f 

« XB 179023 
_ 3111 5% 


12% 13% — Vi 
37to 38 _ 

KJto llto— 1% 
8% 8% — % 
15% 16 — 1% 
23% 3* ♦% 

17% 1714 — % 
12% 13*— IM 
2Vu 2% _ 

4% 4% — % 

11 11% —to 
8% _ 

17M 17% + % 
11% llto 4% 
11 11%— 0* 
9% 9% —% 
4% *to - 
52% 52% —2 
13% 14% — 1 
13 13to— lto 
22% 23% — 2% 

io* 10*— 1* 
llto 12 —1 
14% 14% —to 
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26% 27* ♦% 
12% 12% _ 
17% 17% — 1* 
16 16 —3 

2 2to —to 
Ito 2 

to to — % 
2 2 —% 

15 15V.— 1 

12 12to— 1* 
14% 14*— Ito 
10 10%— 1 
7% 7H — H 

18 18% —to 
5% 5% —to 
Hto iz —to 
llto 12 — 1% 
6 6to —lto 

14% 14to — * 
4% 4* —% 
% to - 
6% 7%.— 
24% 2*%— 2% 
If 20% —to 
25 24to— 1% 

37 V. 37* -2% 
25* 24*— IV* 
31% 32 —to 

16 14% ■»% 
14* 15% — 2% 
12 1 * 12*— 2% 
2% 2% —% 
22 22 —1 
5* 5* — 1* 

9 10** — 1 

31 34* +1% 

7% 7% —to 
Tto 2% +to 
25 25% —to 

10 10%— ito 

14% 14% _ 

19% 19% — % 
82 83 — 6 

17* 17% —to 
21* 21% —% 
35% 35% —5% 
21% 23M — 1% 
14% 14% —to 
,2% 12% —% 
12% 13% —to 
,1* 13 — 1% 

11 11 - 

mi 19% — 1 ~ 
13% 14 - 

34* 35% —*t 
3% 4% —to 
10% 10* -* 
2% 3 +% 

33 33 *2 

SI* 21% -% 
!% 1% — % 
1* in* ■»% 

27% 27* —to 
7% 8 +to 
19% 19% —to 
4* 7 -to 
12% 13 — * 

4’Va 5%-Wn 
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10 11 — % 
3% 3% -* 
22% 23* -1% 

It » -s 

3% 3%— 1% 
23 23*— lto 

12 12V. ‘% 

IS 15 -% 

7% 7% —to 
llto 11%—,% 
71% 22% 

1% Ito —% 
28% 29 -to 
IS* IS* —to 

13 12. -ft 

6% Tto —** 
BV. 8% -1* 
1% 2 -¥s 

3% 4 + to 

8 B%— 3to 

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SS §5 

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19 19* -2% 
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.as 


— - - - SOB 

Stacks DW Yld 100s High Low Ose One 
.1 2910 38 

- 418011% 

- 162 4Vk 
.11 U 4 8 

_ 5041 22% 

-43054 24% 

- 3583 3** 

- 2X38 7% 

- *39621* 

Soffimg _ 1981 23 

Softkey vd _ 531211% 

- 1S8 to 

- 1253 13% 

- 4146 7% 

_ 106915 

—1*6529 14% 

- SM 4 

- 700 1% 

_ 3*0 % 

_ 3647 6% 

.. *4*1 8 

- 142 13% 

2443 1% 

JOeis sb 

SonlcCR _ 47024% 

SonKSM _ 4691 12% 

SctkxtP s 3* 2 A *885 24* 

SonocPpfZJS A3 124233% 



SoundA 

SMChG 

Sesmr 


B0b4J 
l.09e 5.9 


196 4 
34519% 
433 19% 
1172 9 
3UIB 
41 3 
37 16% 
X7 4377 18% 
- 982 *% 


StnnEnH - 

SoMlnrl JtS XT 

StancSvs AOaZt 

soutras M ' 

Souwol 

SwstBcp B9e J 166 11% 
SwBCSh 1J0OS.9 *19 21* 

Swsttd 1J4 X4 5534% 

SwstScs .12 U 1086 9 

swworr ao aj mo 

SovBcns .10 S 323011% 

SpocBLb _ 700 23% 

SpemAm .10 XI 9A 5* 

SprtMli JlSi J 3856 19% 

SPOCMU - 488 7% 

SpdTv - 1519 10% 

-MB* 

- 71A 4% 

- 1358 9 

- 400 2V. 

- 592 * 
-25*14 9% 
-34C1 3 

. _ - 6460 6% 

Spettrm — .771 13% 

SphlrutP - 7461 514 

Sotaoels JO .9 69012* 

Srtre - 97 4to 

SptOrofl _ 187 4% 

Sprtmrt _ *071 n* 

SoortRec _ 7909*1% 

sutHero - 1*0 lto, 

Spmrwf - 862 H 

- 237 W. 

- 1 135 3% 

- 696 10% 
S *to 

_ 27*3 5* 
_ 2970 6% 

- 2970 3Vu 

- 637 % 

- 9037 4% 

- 1598 7% 

- 8QS617V, 
48 33 65522 

- 1806 19% 

- 218 15% 
06 J 520 17* 

- 449 2% 

- 287 % 

- 20577 29V. 
I JO X8 2814 37 


ShxTc — 

SfcrbCks ..73726 25* 

StaraftAu - 413 10* 

StarTel - 1983 12% 

stofAui .it u an 

SMeBah -20 » 1 J 179 16% 

SFncf 40 13 58 12 

SteArt - 3387 9 

StnSfflcs J6 1J1 - 


1J 16478 37 
- 3988 19% 


SteefTcs 06 


SiriPnWA 

ShvSh. 

StawSrs 

SHmscn 

snkeiv 

StahCrnx 


JO 2J 
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_ 67 9% 

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_ 9362 25% 

71 1.9 195 38% 

‘ 11217 
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5700 43 
M J 3368 26 

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- 29513 
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—1706419 

Stroma 1.10b XI X560Z2M 
Sorter - 175 3te 

SirucD -lM76mk 

Sirvker J7e J29451 30* 
MurtEn - 28 5% 

yurtos - sc % 

SubMler _ 1833 7% 

SubBcp IJlO 2A 91 43 

SubBncp »• A miVA 

SuAurv - 5223 7% 

Sufmrc JO tf W»» 

SuUDni - 2*8218% 

SutnftO JO XB 30 21 to 

SwnBapI 2 j 03 
SummaF 
Summas 
Sumobti 
sumeWA 


SJ 12233% 

- 464636% 

- 41 4% 

- 1647 7 

37 1 $ 67 B* 

J4 4J 164420% 


SumlETX J6 XI SO^to 
SumtCre - ?S55 vfc 
SunWHB Me -9 176710 
SumBTc _ -2820431% 

SunBna, 02 X2 l» 
SSSIr -M2M 27* 

SurAt 6316% 

SunTVs J04 A 
Sunbfft 

SunSav - 

SunSvpt IJ0 03 
SureMne 
SUlGrd 
SwnutaM 
SunBCA 
SunBCNY 


SunUa 

SurxTc 

SunMnwt 

SunWTs 

suane 

SwMac 

SupTech 

Smercut 


8990 11 
TSPVn 
400 6% 
9214% 
_ 99111% 

- 217937 
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.151 AA 61 3% 

- 332 17 

- 79 5% 

- 1440 6 

- 9503 lto 

- 3577 10% 

- 34712% 

- 4360 10 
_ 2270 7 

- 96215* 


34* 34% —3* 
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19% 20%— 1* 
21* 23* «■% 
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17% 19 —3 
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11 11% — 2% 
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9% 14* +3% 
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s% a*— j* 

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Dry 


State 

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Syncor 
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SvnncJ 

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Systmd 

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2% 2% —to 

a* 2% 

13% 14* 

4to 5to — % 
16% 17 —2% 
17% 19% — 2% 


TAT Tc s 
TAT wt 

ToS* 

TPCPnt 
THQ 
TJ intis 
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Tehnol 

Tochne 

TchCom 

TechSol 

Tecrnls 

Teenmtx 

TocuBS 

TocuAS 

TacOnn 

Tekteec 

Teknkrn 

Ttacn 

TefvW 

TMOnA 

TetCmB 

Talobtt 


Te___ 

Tetobsi 

TekOph 

Tduiar 

Teton 

Temtex 

Tencor 

TonnaP 

Termftx 

TetraTcs 

Totro 

Twai 

TexRegl 

ThrTeh 


- 997 6 
_ 2 1% 
_ 3798 73* 

2J0 3311 23 
_ 1 40 4% 

_ 2016 4% 

- 113614 
_ 3882 IV, 
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_ 4123 12% 
_ 7417 10% 
_ 1355 PA 
„ 1571 % 
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163 3% 
7B36 7% 
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1177 3% 
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_ 1295 7, 
_ 2281 14* 
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JJ 726 53% 

JOalJ 3205 51 
_ 623 3% 
_ 284 7* 
_ 523 6* 

_ 34,812% 
424 'A, 
_ 125240 22% 
_ 7025% 

_ 15652 13% 

- 1257,6 
_ 20S 4% 
_ 18881 55 


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_ 4770 19* 
J1 .1 480315% 
_ 142712 
_ 567817% 
L2S 2S B1 43% 
_ 1 3% 

_ 70 20 

_- 1425 7% 
.20 e J 1451627% 
_ 625 II* 

_ 2M1 14* 

_ tn 4* 

TtwrDun — 07 6* 

ThomasG - 705 1 6% 

ThmMA5 Jfi 1J 8617% 
Ttamn 7 0Be 73 402 31 

- J8 U 7023% 


ThmAV 

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3DO CO 

TldeWsl 

ThieMrlc 

Tjgera 

TiirtiSf 

Tocartl 

TodavM 

ToddAD 

Tadhuntr 

TtjktoF 

TokasAAd 


„ 103240 61% 
_ 3890 3% 


_ 99512% 
_ 10 Tto 

- S« 7> 
_ 121 7% 
_ 115 32% 
_ 6610,7% 
JM 15 57 4% 

_ 92213% 
37 6 A 53 60% 

_ - 7sn 4% 

TVnkPttt -506 33 2(615* 
Tampiai lJObjj 2040 
Tapps ^ 4.1 8998 m 
TepsApi — 2380 9* 

TorRov _ 76S 4% 

TotCont „ ,91712 

TdHTel _ 168 21 

TourrAIr _ 06112 

Tracorwt _ 45 6* 

Trocor _ 31* 0% 

TtxSup _ 197124% 

TrokAU _ 39 13% 

TmsFte J6 16 44415* 

TmLSfl - 341 4% 

TmMUB _ 5814 

Tranin _ m i% 

TmsWsf „ «3 3% 

TrWttwfA _ 20 2* 

TrWsJ wfB - SO lift, 

Tmiml _ la 4* 

Thunedv JOi J 2608a 
TmReCp _ 40982, 

Tmsnt _ 1087 20. 

Trtx^dSs _ 217513% 

I rovPrt _ 377 2% 

TnadCO .16 j 286 18% 

Trtmck 1J0 IS 0334* 

7>S£. - 3231 2* 

TrlodGtv - 50717% 

2018 5* 

JrkmBc _ l» 10% 

TrIPote j. 4B56 Uto 

AbU 74« 
XlfcoPa U» 5J 26019 
T22"? ~ 252617% 

Trieurd _ 719516 


5 5% — % 

1* lto —to 
IM 72% —to 
21to 21* —to 
4 A — % 
4 4to — ft, 
11% 12%— 1% 
1%. 7Vd -%» 
22% 23% — 3V, 
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6% Sto — M 
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9% fto— I 
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17% 12% — % 
Wt 3% —to 
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17* 17to— lto 
72* 73 — 1* 
16% 17% ♦* 
3to Tto — % 
2% 2* +to 

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36% 36*— 2% 
10% 11% *1% 
10* 11% — % 
7% e%— ito 

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24% 14*— lto 
11% llto— 1 

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2 2 —% 
16 16 —lto 
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12% 13% —to 
19 21 +2 

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14* 16* -to 
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Stacks 


Sales 

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Law a» Chge 


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Trimark 

Trtmte 

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Trlnzic 


Triples 
TrtquM 
Trten 
Trirtar 
TrustNJs 
TTOJNYS 
Trromcs 
Tkeng 


TUcfcDr 

TueSM 

Tutao 

TUscIn 

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, „ 9B3 6* 

_ 330 10* 

_ 215*10* 
_ 96Q513* 
_ 3616 4* 
_ 1856 6* 

- 2331 16 

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_ 586 5 

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1-00 S3 102319% 
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- 1831 5% 

_ 79 4% 

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_ 45 8% 

JO 1J 469 17* 
-06 J 17803 20% 


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9* 10to 
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6* 6% 
13 13% 

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15% 17* 
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_ 3683 50* 45% 
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_ 13709 20% 16* 

- 665,2* 11 

- 192811% 10% 

- 4909 Sto 5 

_ 3500 ,9% 16% 
_ 617* 17* 

IJMe 1 J 443 80% 77* 
_ 2118 Sto 4% 


25% —3* 
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US Con _ 260917* 

UFBCP JO XT 24225 

UNR -20a 3-5 2357 6* 

UNRWt - 30 4V. 

UNSL 1J0 XT 527% 

USHmcr - T3S2 4* 

I 8390 12* 
_ 06 4% 
- 08 Sto 
_ 1099 9% 


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- 404 S' A 

- 281113* 

- 462 S* 

- B40 6% 

_ 636 12% 

_ 225226% 

-07a 1 J 363 6* 
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- 141A2teu 

- 2725 Sto 
_ 907 3% 


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US Wire 
USA di 
USAAtbi 
USATrS 

USMX 
USTCP 
UltPoc 
Uitrtacs 

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UltraSlap 
UrfCOA 
UrtBexs 
Untace 
Untaen 
Unflob 

Unimed _ 

UnBnk TJ0 5.1 7Z327* 

UnBnkpf 2 M BA 506 25* 
UnBkCP UBe3J 
UnlonBch l-O0e!4-8 295 7% 
pfE UO 50 150 36* 
UnSwJeh _ 2031 22 Vi 

Uniphase — 492 10% 

Urvyrre _ 02 x* 

UnryiTwt - io 3% 

UBHV IM 19 47226% 
UCtxBk JO 17 50 22* 
IX3IG6 1XO 6.2 430 16* 
UnCnsF* JO 1 JJ 065 45* 
URnSCs 12 1J 3022% 
Lff+reC * US 2J 16141 
UGarm - 300 Sto 

Ufcttrn - 07 27 

UrtBrrtHId _ 229735% 
UMcBn JO 23 17336* 

UnOcpNJ 1-00 1) 3-1 
UhMwkP A5e3J 
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LtSBcOR AS 
USBnpf 2 jQ3 


136 32* 
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USRJC) _ 1684 9% 

USHBhS J3 1J 57631 46 
US Pootau - «« 6% 

US Ri£t - 18828 » 


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1285 8% 
130 3% 
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634 W* 
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18 1059 24* 
_ 2175 8* 
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3% 4 — * 

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12% 13 • 

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2* 2Sto~7to 
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5* 5% — * 
8% Bto —to 
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26% 27* _ 

24* 24*— J 
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6* 6* —to 
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21* 22 _ 
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4to 4% — % 
3% 3to tto 
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16 16* — % 
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26* 26* —to 
32* 33*— 7* 
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19% 19% —to 
9to 10* —1 
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25% 26% —to 
39% 40* + * 
7% 7to— 1% 

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2% 2% *'U 
6* 6* — % 
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16* 17* — * 
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23* 23*— 1 
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VSBBCS 

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VWRS 

VdfTech 

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VeteBk 

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Venbbx 

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VofOAm 

vetAmwf 

Vtagern 

VJote 

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.2563813% 13% 
_ 5590 Sto 4to 
3B 13 10 21% 21 

JO X2 313% 12 
JO X6 25011% 10% 
_ 4319 15% 13% 
_ 566 14* 13U 

17 758 36% 35% 
_ 43 2 2 

2J 42313% 12% 
2J 155716% 14% 


Si 


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_ 10202 9* 7* 
_ 3931 30% 27% 
_ 2235 7 Sto 

- 76410% ,0 
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222 16ft 15% 

_ 205 5% 4% 
_ 711 9 
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_ 1250 2%j lto 

40 14 7 7 

_ 5079 3% Tto 
_ 10165 19* 14% 
_ 171 22 19% 

2-3 158 IS 17 
J2CX1 155 IS 14 
_ 605 6% 6* 
_ 102015 13ft 
_ 09014* Uto 
_ 21,4 8% 7* 
_ 735 lto Ufa 
« 924 9* 8% 
_ 211213% 11* 
_ 826438* 24* 
_ ««9216to 15% 
XI 771 25* 24% 
_ 196 Sto 7ft 
«. 179 3% 2% 
- 525219* 15% 
_ 2,8 4% 4% 


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WCTQn _ - 4683 7 5% 

WD40 24DOA7 19020 63 

WURRJ 32 U> 2000 31% 30* 
WPI Grp _ 157 3% 3 

WPP Go JBellJ 2544 3ft, 3ft* 
WRTEn « 201610 9 

WRT pf 235 93 276 25* 34* 


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_ 2415 5ft, 4* 4% —ft 

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- 217 14ft Uto 13% _ 

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113317* 16ft 
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wegMat _ 9iu25 »% 

Weoms _ 62071 74* 68* 

WettPd* _ 25 7 6* 

Werner* .12 J 49S2OTA 27* 

Westxics 34 X0 6528 27ft 

WstCdCA - 66 ten 'ftj 

WtfCUFL JO 1 3 74 12* 11* 

WSlMw _ 348723* ,8ft 

WHMasS JB 1 J 35 16ft 16 


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Page 14- 


MONDAY 

SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, APRIL 4, 1994 


New Season, New Divisions and New Chances 


By Murray Chass 

New York Tuna Service 

Early in spring training, Lou PinieDa 
delivered a message to his Seattle Mari- 
ners: “There’s no reason to assume this 
team can’t get into post-season play. It’s 
our time. We can win.” 

The Mariners have never won a division 
championship in their 17-year history. In 
fact, they have finished only two seasons 
with a winning record. 

But the development of talented players 
c omb ined with a change in alignment of 
the divisions in each league makes the 
Mariners legitimate contenders for the 
first time. 

The American League West, in fact, has 
a 50 percent chance of producing a first- 
time champion. With the Mariners and the 
Texas Rangers, it has two of the three 
major league teams (the Cleveland Indians 
are the third) that have never won a divi- 
sion championship. 

This season, which began Sunday night 
in Cincinnati with the Reds playing the St. 
Louis Car dinals, is the first in 25 years in 
which maj or league baseball has altered its 
appearance through the creation of new 
divisions and expanded playoffs. 

In 1969, the National and American 


Leagu es divided into two divisions each, 
doubling from two to four the number of 
teams that played post-season games. This 
year, each league will have three divisions, 
and the number of playoff teams again will 
double, this time bom four to eight. The 
six division champions will be Joined in 
October by one wild-card team from each 
league: the t eam that has the best won-lost 
record among the non -champions. ' 

The new divisional alignment could 
benefit some teams and hamper others 
during the regular season. 

The Mariners and the Rangers, for ex- 
ample, can compete for first place unen- 
cumbered by the presence of the Chicago 
White Sox, the team that woo the Ameri- 
can League West last year and is heavily 
favored to finish first in the new Central 
Division this season. 

The upstart Indians, on the other hand, 
have to contend with the While Sox but 
they are free of the Blue Jays, Yankees and 
Orioles, the teams that make the East the 
league's toughest. 

In the National League, the San Fran- 
cisco Giants, an also-ran last year despite 
103 victories, are rid of the Atlanta Braves 
in the West, and the Houston Astros and 
Cincinnati Reds have escaped the Braves 


and the Giants. The Cardinals, joining the 
Astros and the Reds in the Central Divi- 
sion, don't have to compete with Philadel- 
phia or Montreal. 

“We also had the possibility of being in 
the same division with Atlanta, and we got 
away with that,” said Joe Torre; manager 
of the Cardinals, breathing more easily. 

The Phillies and Expos, the teams that 
battled for the East title last season, won’t 
have that race to themselves this time. 
Instead, the Braves, geographically correct 
after 25 years, will intrude on chat race in 
their quest to become the first National 
League team to win four consecutive divi- 
sion championships. 

“Based on last year, three of the best 
four teams in the league are in the same 
division,” Phillies Manager Jim Fregosi 
said. “But 1 don’t think it makes a big 
difference. 1 don't worry about things I 
have no control over. We still play under 
the same rules. It doesn’t make any differ- 
ence to me.” 

As much criticism as the new post-sea- 
son format has drawn, the regular-season 
schedule could prove to be the most ques- 
tionable element of the system. Officials 
have changed the divisional alignm ents. 


bat thev have not changed the bala n ced 


they 

Me. 


schedule. 

It always seemed strange that under the 
balanced schedule, in which a team plays 
each of the others in ibe league 12 or 13 
rimes, a lanni would have fewer games 
within Its division (78) than outride it (84). 
But die balanced imbalance grows worse 
this season. 

F-ach ipam in a five-team dr-iaon will 
play 52 games within its divirion (or 32 
percent) and 1 10 outride it Each team in a 
f oar-team division wiD play only 39 games 
in its division (24 percent) and 123 outside 
it 

In other words, divisional games will 
have relatively little impact on the out- 
come of division races. A team could have 
a losing record against each of its division 
rivals and sliB easily finish nbeaA of them. 

Worse, the Astros, one of the favorites 
in the National League Central, will com- 
pete for first place by playing virtually the 
entire months of August and September 
without seeing another Central Division 
team. After they play the Reds July 27, the 
Astros have only three games scheduled in 
their division, a season-ending series 
against the Reds on ScpL 30 and Oct 1-1 

“I don’t tike it," Bob Watson, the As- 


tros’ general manager, said. “But there s 
nothing we can do until we go to the 
nnb" 1 ” 1 "** c Hwrinle. " 

Owners are stubbornly dinging to the 
balanced schedule because they don’t want 
to give up games with the more attractive 
But future schedules should amend 
the mistake that left the Astros with hardly 
a showdown to point to. This year, the new 
three-division format was approved too 
late for this season's schedule to be 
changed. 

“As we make up the 1995 schedule, all 
divisional alignments will be taken into 
consideration." said John Harrington of 
the Boston Red Sox, chairman of the own- 
ers’ sch edul e format committee. “We afl 
reluctantly accepted the inequities of this 
one realizing well change.” 

So all rides wffl be watching with inter- 
est as the races develop this year, when the 
owners have expanded the playoffs to keep 
more fans interested hue in the season. 

The following league previews, the Na- 
tional on this page and die American on the 
next page, also were prepared and written by 
Murray Chass of The New York Times. The 
teams in each league are presented in alpha- 
betical order in their divisions. 



Tmj DqaLTV Anaxacrf fee 

Catcher Don Steught wiB hdp keep die Pirates from faffing flat 


Braves Are Set to Repeat inNL 9 While Reds and Giants Show Promise 


EAST DIVISION 

ATLANTA BRAVES: Embarrassment of 
riches No. I: The Braves, who already had the 
best starting rotation, signed Greg Maddux as a 
free agent last year and he promptly won his 
second straight Cy Young Award. 

Embarrassment of riches No. 2: Ron Gant, 
who last season hit 36 home ruas and drove in 
another 1 17. broke his leg. and the Braves threw 
three top rookies into the scrap for his job. One 
of the three. Gripper Jones, tore a knee liga- 
ment, so the Braves put yet another impressive 
minor leaguer, Mike Kelly, out there to share 
time with Tony Tarasco and Ryan Klesko. 

They aren't the only rookies who are infiltrat- 
ing the lineup of the three-time division cham- 
pions. Javier Lopez will be the catcher. In the 
only other change. Deion Sanders becomes the 
sole center fielder. 

KEY ADDITIONS: The rookies should be 
worth watching. So should reliever Gregg Ol- 
son, if he gets his right elbow working properly. 

KEY LOSSES: It Sanders falters as an every- 
day player, they win regret letting Otis Nixon 
leave; 

KEY TO SEASON: Atlanta has only to 
avoid natural disasters to reach the playoffs a 
fourth straight season. 

FLORIDA MARLINS: Baseball's oldest 
player, 46-year-old Charlie Hough, is the open- 
ing-day pitcher for one of its two youngest 
teams. Hough's status as the Marlins’ No. 1 
pitcher reflects the team's inability to begin 
building a starting rotation. 

If the Marlins are to make any progress in 
their second season, they will probably nave to 
do it behind their offense, which is powered by 
Gary Sheffield. Sheffield has moved from third 
base to right field, opening up his old spot for 
Dave Magadan (when his sprained wrist heals). 

KEY ADDITIONS: Magadan win contrib- 
ute to the offense. So might Kurt Abbott, the 
rookie shortstop. Jerry Browne is a versatile 
backup. 

KEY LOSSES: Walt Weiss was fine at short, 
but now he's in Colorado. 

KEY TO SEASON: If reliever Bryan Harvey 
doesn’t duplicate his 1993 performance (45 
saves and a hand in 72 percent of the team’s 64 
victories), the Marlins might not be as good as 
last year. 

MONTREAL EXPOS: This is a young team 
that seems to keep getting younger, but Felipe 
Alou has displayed an ability to work wonders 
with such a collection. He led his young players 
through the divirion race last year — they fell 
only three games short —and he should do 
same this season. 


One example of the team getting younger is 
the exchange in the pitching rotation of Dennis 
Martinez, 38, for Pedro Martmez, 22. 

Cliff Floyd, who will have at least a share of 
first base, is 21. Last year at first, the Expos 
used anybody who came to the park with a first 
baseman's glove. .Another rookie is Rondell 
White, 22, who will play left field until Morses 
Alou's broken leg heals. 

KEY ADDITIONS: The new Martinez will 
be hard-pressed to contribute like the old Mar- 
tinez. 

KEY LOSSES: Many on the club were dev- 
astated by the trade of second baseman Delino 
DeStrields. 

KEY TO SEASON: They will go as far as the 
manager’s ability to mold his lads into playing 
like seasoned play ers. 

NEW YORK METS: The Mets have had 
such a turnover that in the past week alone they 
traded for half of a new infield, first baseman 
David Scgui and shortstop Jose Vizcaino. They 
also designated a new starting catcher, Kelly 


league placers. 

To return to respectability, they need to keep 
the)' uncover some winning 


the 


Stumett, who was picked up in Decern 
draft of minor league players. 

torespectal 
turning over until they 
players. 

KEY ADDITIONS: The Met s are counting 
on Scgui and Vizcaino to contribute in the field 
and at baL They are wishing Kevin Me Reyn- 
olds would perform like he did in the first few 
years of his first term with them. 

KEY LOSSES: Some of the departed players 
may do well in their new uniforms, but they 
didn’t do it for the Mets. 

KEY TO SEASON: They need lots to hap- 
pen to make everyone forget their 103-loss 
season, but for starters, Bret Saberfaagen (10-12 
in two seasons) has to improve and Dwight 
Gooden has to revert to the winning records he 
had in his first eight seasons. 

PHILADELPHIA PHRUES: They went 
from last to first, and now they are being tested. 
John Kruk was discovered to have cancer. Wes 
Chamberlain tore cartilage in his right knee. 
Larry Andersen tore cartilage in his left knee. 

And the Phillies are supposed to defend their 
divirion championship against the intruding 
Braves. 

Doug Jones, an erratic game-saver the last 
few years, will try to dose games more success- 
fully, holding the job until Norm Chariton’s 
surgically repaired elbow is ready. 

KEY ADDITIONS: Jones is important, but 
so are rookie starter Jeff Juden and young 
reliever Bobby Munoz. 

KEY LOSSES: Mitch Williams saved 43 


regular-season victories and three in the post- 
season. Terry Mulholland was a solid member 
of the starting rotation. 

KEY TO SEASON: The ailing players have 
to get back quickly and the generally has 
to avoid the kind of collapse that can occur a 
year after it has risen zneteoricaHy. 

CENTRAL DIVISION 

CHICAGO CUBS: Tom Trebdhora is the 
new manager, but he could have the same old 
problems. 

Pitching wins games. That's what the Cubs 
hope the>' can do behind Steve Trachsd, a 
rookie who had a 13-6 record in Class .AAA last 
year. Willie Ranks is another newcomer, by way 
of Minnesota, where he had an 11-12 record, as 
is Anthony Young, he of the record 27-game 
losing streak. 

Shawon Dunston is a healthy shortstop a gain 
after two years of back problems, but the layoff 
makes him an unknown factor. The Cubs axe 
looking for run production from their outfield- 
ers. Gfcnaflen Hill, for example, hit 10 homers 
and drove in 22 runs in 31 games in September. 

KEY ADDITIONS; Banks and Young 
could help immeasurably. 

KEY LOSSES: Greg Hibbard was their lead- 
ing winner with 15 victories. Bob Scanlon and 
Chuck McElroy were useful members of the 
relief corps. 

KEY TO SEASON: Maybe Trebelhom can 
find a way to spark a group that is not without 
significant talent. 

CINCINNATI REDS: Injuries picked off 
the Reds one by one last season. But they 
apparently did not fill their quota, because it's 
starting again already. Rob Dibble, the once 
overpowering closer, opens the season on the 
disabled list with shoulder tendinitis. 

Kevin Mitchell, Barry Larkin and Roberto 
Kelly are healthy, which bodes well for the 
offense. So might the presence at second base of 
Bret Boone, son of Bob. He hit 12 home runs in 
76 gnrags for S c 81 1 !* 

KEYADDITIONS: Erik Hanson, who al- 
ways had more potential than success in Seat- 
tle. helps solidify the starting rotation. Die 
Reds hope Tony Fernandez can adapt to third 
base after a career at short 

KEY LOSSES: Any team would miss the 
scrappy Chris Sabo. 

KEY TO SEASON: They are capable of 
finishing first if everything works well, particu- 
larly the pitching, with Jose Rijo pointing the 
way. 

HOUSTON ASTROS: Their everyday line- 
up is basically solid. One of their few questions 
is how well the rookie James Monton will do 


now that he has won the right-field job over 
Jesse Barfield. Moo ton led the minors last year 
with 126 runs scored and has had 150 stolen 
bases in three minor league seasons. 

But the biggest question deals with the turn- 
around of two pitchers, Doug Drabekand Greg 
Swindell, who combined had a 21-31 record 
after they spied as free agents. 

KEY ADDITIONS: Mitch Williams wiH test 
the stomach of the new manager. Terry Collins, 
but there’s no reason for him not to succeed. 

KEY LOSSES: Eric Anthony won't be 
missed if Mouton performs. Mark Portugal 
coaid be missed in the starting rotation. 

KEY TO SEASON: Collins learned under a 
master, Jim Leyiand, and win use that knowl- 
edge to steer the Astros into contention. 

PTITSBURGH PIRATES: For a team that 
lost most of the key ingredients of a three-time 
cham pion, the Pirates didn’t play badly last 
season. That’s as much a tribute to the manag- 
ing of Jim Leyiand as anything. But Leyiand 
wffl need more help this season. Zane Smith, 
their No. 1 pitcher, is healthy after a two-season 
problem with his left shoulder, but Tim Wake- 
field’s inability to get his krmddebaH dancing 
this spring was a big disappointment. So was 
the stomach disorder that knocked out closer 
Alejandro Pena and will keep him out at the 
start of this season. 

On the hitting from, the man to watch is Jeff 
King, who was slow to develop but became 
legitimate when he drove in 98 runs lost season. 

KEY ADDITION : The Pirates were not very 
active in the offseason. Brian Hunter was one of 
the few acquisitions, and heU back up in the 
outfield ana at first base.- . ... 

KEY LOSSES: Wakefield’s knuckler. 

KEY TO SEASON: The Pirates’ young play- 
ers have to be patient. Their time will come. 
Leyiand knows. 

ST. LOUIS CARDINALS: Die Cardinals 
were underachievers last season. Like their new 
Central brethren, they have a chance to atone in 
a friendlier division. 

Not everyone underachieved Gregg Jefferies 
hit 342, Bernard Gilkey and Brian Jordan each 
hit better than 300 and Mark Whiten had the 
best offensive game ever, hitting 4 home runs 
and driving in 12 runs. In other wards, the 
Cardinals have the weapons for a run at the top. 

Die pitching, on the other hand, could show 
a shortage. Donovan Osborne, who had made 
progress, already is out for the season, and Rick 
Sutcliffe, a veteran free agent, hasn’t shown 
much. Furthermore, they have no established 
closer. 

KEY ADDITIONS: A Sutcliffe revival 


would be invaluable, and Vicente Palacios 
could help in the bullpen. 

KEY LOSSES: The real loss came late last 
season when they traded Lee Smith, the career 
save leader. 

KEY TO SEASON: Die four-man rotating 
outfield has to produce runs, and the pitching 
staff, particularly Perez or whoever doses, has 
to protea leads. 

WEST DIVISION 

COLORADO ROCKIES: Using some of the 
revenue deposited by their nearly 4J million 
fans, they signed a series of free agents who 
could hdp them improve. 

Ellis Burks and Howard Johnson are in the 
outfield, Mike Harkey and Martin Freeman 
ere in the starting rotation and Walt Weiss is 
the shortstop, making him the first player to 
start far both expansion Andres Galar- 
raga may not hit a league-high 370 again, but 
the Rockies should offer a respectable offense. 

The No. 1 aim for Manager Don Baylor is to 
shave a run off the team's 5.41 earned run 


ADDITIONS: If Johnson revives him- 
self in the mile-high Denver air, he could pro- 
duce some awesome statistics. His fellow free 
agents also will be critical to further improve- 
ment. 

KEY LOSSES: The Roddes might kick 
themselves if Bruce Hurst stays healthy and 
wins for the Rangers. 

KEY TO SEASON: Die Roddes would be 
best off if they harbored no delusioins of gran- 
deur in the watered-down West The Rocky 
Mountains are grand enough. 

LOS ANGEX£S -DODGERS: The-effusive-- 
Tomray Lasorda cites three reasons for a dra- 
matic Dodgers improvement: die return of 
Darryl Strawberry, the arrival of Ddmo De- 
Shields and the healthy arm of Todd WorrdL 
DeShields, however, is probably the only sure 


he delayed saying yes for a couple of days while 
be checked to see what the catch was. 

KEY LOSSES: Pedro Martinez, Ramon's 
little brother, may develop into a 
pitcher, but he was worth giving up for 
Shields. 

KEY TO SEASON: Clearly and simply, a 
revitalized Strawberry could carry the team for 
weeks at a time. But he can’t do it playing 75 
games in two seasons and hitting 10 home runs 
and driving in 37. 

SAN DIEGO PADRES: They'll find it a 
long, lonely way back to respectability as they 
play in front of sparse crowds. Their fervent 
hope is to discover a couple more Phil Plantios. 
A disappointment in Boston. Piantier went 
west anef rediscovered his stroke (34 home runs, 
100 RBIs). Maybe Dave Staton, the rookie first 
baseman, can emulate Planner. 

The Padres need a similar development with 
(he pitching staff, which doesn’t have much 
after Andy Benes. 

KEY ADDITION: Bip Roberts returns and 
could create some excitement in the empty ball 
park. 

KEY LOSSES: They suffered them all last 
year. 

KEY TO SEASON: They have to play inter- 
estingly enough to lure fans bade to watch them 
and fund future talent. 

SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS: With Barry 
Bonds established as their superstar and Will 
Oarit slipping offensively, the Giants didn't 
need to ic-rign dark so tfiey made him an offer 
they knew he would not accept and concentrat- 
ed on retaining Matt Williams and Robby 




te Dodgers have another newcomer in Raul 
Mondesi, their rookie right fielder, who batted 
291 in 42 games for them last season. He came 
to camp this spring and knocked Cory Snyder 
out of right. 

But what Lasorda didn’t mention was the 
need for the starting pitchers to attain warning 
records. Pedro Astaao, at 25 the youngest of 
the starters, was the only one with a worming 


record (14-91 Joining the staff is Chan Ho 
Pari, a South Korean with no minor or major 
le experience. 

‘ ADDITION: General Manager Fred 
Claire was stunned when the Expos offered 
DeShields, and he feared he had blown it when 


league e 
KEY 


's departure created a need for a new 
first baseman, and J. R. Phillips showed he 
wasn't ready, leaving the job to Todd Ben- 
zinger. If s a stopgap measure the Giants hope 
doesn't stop them. 

A lack of depth in their starting rotation 
stopped them last season so they signed Mari: 
Portugal and made room for Salomon Torres, 
still considered a rookie despite his late-season 
work. Torres gained the unenviable distinction 
of being the losing pitcher in the only four 
games the Giants lost in their last 18. 

KEY ADDITIONS: Portugal needs only to 
duplicate his 18-4 record with the Astros last 
season, his career best 

KEY LOSSES; Despite his decline; dark 
was a key member of the team. 

KEY TO SEASON: If Bonds can win his 
third consecutive most valuable player award 
and fourth in five years, the Giants wall be on 
their way. 




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DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



You can now receive 
the IHT hand delivered 
te your home or office 
every morning on the day 
of publication. 

Just call us toll free at 

01 30 84“83"S5 























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, APRIL 4, 1994 




JD N D A Y 

SPQBTS 

Arkansas and Duke Will Play for U.S. College Basketball Title 

Arizona Left Gasping, f 91-82 


By William C. Rhoden 

New York Times Semce 

CHAKLOTT £ N.C. — Arkao- 
sas continues to come up with the 
right answers. 


. . ^®chigan asked last wedk 
could win 

if Corliss WilKamson, their bnris- 


never hesitated in the past to ap- 
proach each game in the same beo- 
Uc, fast-paced manner. 

. That uncertainly was apparent 
in the first part of the Erst half 
wnen Arkansas played a slow, half , 
court game and was quickly dis- 
sected by Arizona, which scored on 


ina forward, w-r* iSLET: , J uuua ' WIUC0 scored on 

rli«I* afa, T We J e taPtaMeamed, shon- lo medium-ranee iumo shots 

fesssfip*- ssstfSEF® 


Jk 


response. 
'.:\JS3 But wl 


Arizona asked Saturday evening 
how the fast-breaking Rioibadu 
wotud do in a half -court ganw And 
in the first half, Arkansas took 
some time coming up with the right 


-si* 





lut when the Razorbacks did, 
they socked Arizona with a fero- 
cious fufl-conrt press and a huge 
dose of Williamson. 

The Razorbacks went on to de- 
feat Arizona, 91-52, and catapulted 
themselves into the national cham- 
pionship game for the first time. 

Williamson sowed 29 points, 
handed out 5 assists and grabbed 
13 rebounds for Arkansas. He had 
15 of those points in the second 
half, when the Razorbacks’ defense 
faced eight turnovers. 

Scotty Thurman added 14 and 
Clint McDaniel and Darnel Robin- 
son added 12 each for the Razor- 
backs, who held the hot-shooting 
Wildcats to 38 percent shooting. 

The heart and soul of Arizona's 
attack is its guards, but Arkansas 
took them out of the game. KhaHd 
Reeves made 6 of 19 shots and 
finished with 20 points, while Da- 
man Stoudamire was 5 of 24 and 
finished with id points. Ray Owes 
also added 16 for the Wildcats, and 
Carey Williams 14. 

In the end, the Wildcats' failure 
to control WIQiamsan and deal with 
the Razorback press in a crucial 
stretch proved to be their undoing, 

Going into the game, the Arkan- 
sas coach, Nolan Richardson had 
said be wasn't certain how be 
would approach Arizona, a team 
with size, two outs tanding guards 
in Reeves and Stoudamire. 

“I don’t know how we’re going tc 
he said. “Tm confused. I’ve 
i racking my brain. I*m going to 
get away and think about this. I 
think I need to call Cohnnbo; he 
always has the answers." 

Richardson said he was not sore 
an up-tempo game was right 
against the Wildcats. “We are the 
tagand slow team,” he darined. 

The odd aspect of Richardson’s 
hesitation was t hat Arkansas has 


Arizona led by 15-10 before Ar- 
Jtarwas dropped the pretense of a 
half-court attack and went full 
throttle. 

Four straight baskets put the Ra- 
zorbacks ahead at 21 - 1 5 with 1 1 :55 
left before intermission. They in- 
creased their advantage to 36-24 
when DarneD Robinson marfa one 
of two foul shots. 

But where many teams would 
slow the pace with a 12-point lead, 
Arkansas, which knows but one 
pace, continued to go up-tempo 
and inadvertently let Arizona back 
in the game. 

The Razorbacks missed four of 
their next five shots and committed 
a turnover, while the Wildcats went 
on a 12-3 run, cutting the lead to 
39-36 with 3:16 left on a pair of 
foul shots by Reeves. 

Stoudamire’s 30-foot 3-point 
jumper at the buzzer before inter- 
mission not only tied! the score of a 
game that Arkansas had seemed to 
have well in hand, h sent a message 
to Arkansas that no matter bow 
easy the game appeared in spots 
this would be no early knockout. 

When the Razorbacks weren’t 
launching shots from 30 feet or so 
— and making seven of 24 — they 
relied on Wuhamson under the 
basket Richardson called William- 
son “pound for pound the stron- 
gest kid in the universe,” and his 
forward didn’t do anything to di- 
minish th»i appraisal. 

Williamson’s strength wore down 
the Wildcats in the second half. 
From a halftime tie at 41, Arizona 
pulled out lo 67-62. But the Razor- 
backs broke it open with a 16-3 run 
that put them ahead. 78-67. 

“We picked op the intensity," 
W illiamso n said. **We wanted to go 
to the final game. It feds great to 
get a chance to play in the champi- 
onship game.” 

Neither Arkansas nor Arizona 
had ever reached the championship 
game. Arkansas lost in the semifi- 
nals in 1942, 1945 and 1990. Arizo- 
na's only trip to the Final Four, in 
1988, ended with a semifinal loss. 



Honda, Aheadby 13, Is Beatenby 70-65 


Dan Cross 
and the Gaum 


By Ken Denlinger 

Washingum Post Service 

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina 
— With less than 20 seconds left in 
a game that will linger in the mem- 
ory bank for a while, the ball and a 
chance at the biggest prize in col- 
lege basketball were up for grabs. 

Cherokee Parks retrieved his 
own 10-foot miss from two Florida 
defenders, then followed with the 
layup that allowed Duke to over- 
come a 13-point second-half deficit 
and win, 70-65, in the semifinals 
Saturday of the NCAA national 
championship tournament. 

The 28-5 Blue Devils tty for their 
thud title in four years Monday 
night against 30-3 Arkansas. 

Duke’s coach, Mike Knyzewski, 
called this comeback “a seniors* 
game.” And the three to whom he 
referred — Grant H31, Antonio 

Lang and Marty dark — -provided put me mug lotus aueau tor gooa, 
most of the critical plays. They also 65-63, with a 3-pointer from the 
upped their NCAA tournament re- right baseline on a feed from HU 


Florida point 
with 47 seconds 
down by 66-65. 

Cross thought he was fouled by 
dark. He also was the Gator called 
for charging Lang, and disagreed 
with that call But he did not pro- 
test either decision very strenuous- 
ly and added: “Yon have to keep 
playing basketball." 

And play both teams did. This 
was a game saw both teams at their 
best on defense. The Gators hdd 
Duke to 36 recent shooting the first 
half, then missed two of every three 
shots they tried the second half. 

Florida's coach, Um Kroger, 
had a fine summation: “Grant Hill 
hit some big-time shots, threes 
when they had to have them.” 

“That's why they’re Duke,” Kru- 
ger added. 


Bob tadanSTfarABoaaKdPim 

dint McDaniel helped damp down on guard Damon Stoudamire, one of Arizona’s mam threats. 


cord to an astonishing 18-1. 

Hill had 25 pants and played 
exceptional defense on Florida's 
main outride threat, Craig Brown, 
bolding him to eight paints. T-ang , 
who overcame first-half foul prob- 
lems, drew a critical charge after 
Parks’s basket and scored the final 
points on a dunk. 

Clark stripped the ball from 


SIDELINES 


Whitbread Fleet (Mostly) Is Off Again 

PUNTA DEL ESTE, Uruguay (AP) — Navy cannons boomed and 
thousands cheered as 12 yachts set sail Saturday on the fifth leg of the 
Whitbread *Rotmd the World Race, with the overall leader, New Zealand 
Endeavour, taking the early lead a route to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 

The French Maxi-class entry La Poste sailed without four of its 15 
crewmen, who were detained by police after being charged last month 
with beating an alleged burglar they found in the house where they were 
staying. The departure of the Whitbread 60-class U.S. -Ukrainian entry 
Odessa and the Ukrainian boat Hetman Sahaidachzry was delayed for 
two hours by technical problems. 


Torrance and Crenshaw 
Tied for U.S. Golf Lead 


For the Record 

Erick Wfdder of Arkansas jumped 28 feet, 8% inches (8.74 meters) to 
break Carl Lewis’ 13-year-old college long jump record by 4% inches. 
Michael PDwefl of the United Stales set the world record of 8.95 meters in 
1991. (AP) 

lake Superior State won its second NCAA hockey title in three 
seasons by routing Boston University. 9-1 . (AP) 

Pooh Richardson, the guard whose right shoulder was separated in a 
game last week, may be out for the season, the Indiana Pacers said. (AP) 
Katsuya Omzuka of Japan, rebounding from a fifth-round knockdown 
in Tokyo, scored a narrow derision over Lee Seung Koo of South Korea 
to retain his WB A junior bantamweight title. (AP) 


The Associated Press 

NEW ORLEANS — Ben Cren- 
shaw, his tight birdies having made 
up for four bogeys, and Sam Tor- 
rance were tied for the lead going 
into Sunday’s final round of the 
Freeport-McMoRan Golf Classic. 

Torrance, playing in his first 
US. tournament of the year as a 
warm-up to next week’s Masters, 
shot 5-under-par 67 in the third 
round. Crenshaw, with 68, tied him 
at 205. 

Jose Maria Olazdbal, who shot a 
course record 63 on Thursday, shot 
70 far the third round and was next 
at 207. 

“My game was not all that good 
today,” Olazabal said. “I did not 
strike the ball that well.” 


Torrance began Saturday’s 
round with three straight birdies, 
then had 10 more good birdie 
chances inside of 15 feet during the 
rest of the round, making three and 
missing seven. 

“I played magnificently today,” 
the British golfer said. “I really did. 
Thai’s as good as I can play.” 

Dennis Paulson, who set a course 
record and tied the tournament re- 
cord with a 62 on Friday, ballooned 
to 75 on Saturday for 21 1. 

•Australia’s Wayne Riley shot 
3- under-par 69 to take a one-shot 
lead Sunday in the Lyon Open 


Hill followed with two foul 
shots. Then Duke clinched it with 
the 6-foot, 1 1-inch Parks fallowing 
his miss with 15 seconds left and 
Lang drawing a charge on one end 
and getting that dunk at the other. 

The Gators, very quickly after 
the tipoff, began showing off their 
stuff. 

The front-court tandem of An- 
drew DeQercq and Dametri H31 
introduced themselves by outplay- 
ing the more heralded Parks and 
Lang in the Gist half. 

Then some Gators reserves, most 
notably inside player Marti i 
Kuisma and outride player Jason 
Anderson, got into the act with 
timely scoring and rebounds. 

Arid when the Gators were fin- 
ished with their good work at half- 
time they left with their largest 
lead, seven points, and a standing 
ovation from their supporters. 

The opening 20 minutes were not 
reflected by the 39-32 halftime 
score. It was much closer, with one 
team dong the name sort of things 
almost immediately after the other. 

Want a spectacular block? There 
was the 6-10 DeQereq catchm up 
to Gaik and swatting away hits 
breakaway layup. So, several min- 
utes later. Grant Hill blocked An- 
derson's shot near the basket 

Duke got the first bonus free- 
throw, with 10:27 left before half- 
time. However, it also was first to 


tournament Gabriel Hjertstedt, 22, 
the Swe dish player who grew up in lose a pivotal player to fouls, Lang 
Australia, shot 71 and was second picking up his third and playing 
gang into Monday’s final round, just 10 minutes. 


Lead changes were routine, with 
neither team able tc build more 
than five points muO the late Flori- 
da surge. 

With 3:52 to play, the Gators 
ahead on Anderson's layup. 
Dametri HUl followed with 
two foul shota 

The Blue Devils had been in this 
situation lots of times, and every- 
one expected a burst immediately 
after halftime. 

Bat it was the Gators who made 
the opening two shots. Dametri 
Hill getting the first inside and 
Brown knocking down a two- 
pointer with Grant Hill’s fmnd in 
bis face. Down 1 1 points all of a 
sudden and with 18:44 still left, 
Krzyzewslti called time out. 

“They were just having their way 
with us,” Paries said. “ If we didn’t 
step it up, they’d have been up by 
30." 

Surprisingly, DeClercq hit a 
jumper from the top of the key 
almost immediately after the time- 
out and the Gators had a 13- point 
lead. 45-32. 

But Grant Hill sank a 3-pointer 
and Lang a pair of foul shots and 
the Duke players poimded the floor 
in their traditional sign to get with 
it on defense: 

“Come on,” Lang yelled. 

Slowly, the Bine Devils started 
dang just that. On one possession, 
the Gators had five shots, and came 
away with nothing. 

At the other aid. Grant Hfil was 
scoring on two drives and an open 
shot from thefree-throw line, Clark 
was nailing a 3-pointer and Lang 
was making two foul shots. 

All of a sudden, with 7; 11 left, 
Florida had just a 58-57 lead. 

The Gators made some nice de- 
fensive stops, but the crowd sensed 
something inevitable was taking 
shape. Sure enough, with 4:41 left. 
Grant HOI put a move on Brown in 
the lane and scored on the drive dial 
gave Duke a 61-60 lead Then Hill 
sank 1 of 2 foul shots a minute later. 

Florida refused to mil. But, as 
Kruger later lamented, Duke was 
Duke. 

• Win Case, coach of NAIA na- 
tional champion Oklahoma City 
University, was arrested Friday 
outride the Charlotte Coliseum 
while allegedly trying to scalp three 
Final Four tickets to an undercover 
police officer for $7,000, The Asso- 
ciated Press reported 

The tickets have a face value of 
$195. 


White Sox Are Ready to Give Blue Jays a Rim in AL 


EAST DIVISION 

BALTIMORE ORIOLES: Peter Ange- 
los, the new owner, will expect his expen- 
sive team to win, and it just might 

The Orioles will gam added offense 
from free agents Rafael Palmeiro and 
Chris Sabo. They also eagerly await a full- 
season performance from Jeffrey Ham- 
monds, the rookie right fielder who batted 
305 with 19 RBIs in 33 games fast season. 
But J5d Fernandez continues his recent 
history of afimenis; a boot with bursitis 
has bnp on the disabled list now. 

KEY ADDITIONS: Palmeiro provides 
the additional big bat they lacked last 
season, and Sabo’s scrappiness and punch 
should fuel some rallies. 

KEY LOSS: Goser Gregg Olson left, 
but he still has an ailing elbow. Lee Smith, 
36, the career save leader signed as a free 
agpat is healthy, if aging. 

KEY TO SEASON: Thor chances will 
be especially good if Mike Mussina (14-6) 
and Ben McDonald (13-14) can establish 
themselves as the formidable pitching duo 


they threaten to be. 
BOSTON RI 


RED SOX: Otis Nixon will 
form a miracle, transforming the Red 
. into a running team. The new center 
fielder apparently will not be the only one 
nmning because tire team, whose dreadful 
stden-base record last year exceeded only 
That nf the Yankees, has stunningly led the 



produce enough players to make them re- 
spectable. 

Tun Salman and Chad Curtis axe a good 
start bat they have had to take stopgap 
measures, like acquiring Harold Reynolds 
to 


Pul K- Buck/ Agencc Fra 

Hie Rangers, who wiB play in a new $189 raSfion stadium, inaugurated h with an exhibition game against the Mels. 


exhibition circuit in stolen 
Home runs haven't been nonexistent, 
but they have been lacking. Last season s 
team total of 114 was 30 higher than the 
1992 output but it was still tied for last m 
the league. _ 

• KEY ADDITIONS: Although Nixon is 
the most important Dave Valle should 
shore up the catching. . 

KEY LOSSES: Tony Pena is the best- 

known player gone, but Valle will more 

■ than replace him. _ . _ 

KEY TO SEASON: The Rtti Sox go 
nowhere if Roger Clemens toent ^re- 
bound from his worst season (11-14, 4.46 
ERA). A Frank Viola fully recovered from 
elbow surgery also will be a oittcal lacux. 

DETROIT TIGERSs They contmwto 
haw a wonderful offensive array 
Cedi fielder, Travis Fryman sod M iatxy 
*9 also 

questionable, if not poor, mtdun&jgwjy 
Anderson, the league’s oldest 
dsohasan oH team, 
spring creaks ananatmg from Umw 

^^fafledmhisc^acktffc^M 

aging Kirk Gibson, though, srifl shows 

^Y ADDITIONS: Tim Belcher 
should bdp the 

made a mistake in rdca ? ng S' nr - 
itpV TDSS No one of substance. 

KEY TOSI^lsON: They haw to stop 
’ “ ftomseo «*■»»•*-£? 


. : . V 

' Jk" 


aZ?£ develop - a legitimate 
hey would have as good a 

. Dfj, Wjckman, Jeff Rear 

TfcSKW'-** 

IDITIONS; Terry Mulholland 


should be a solid starter, though not as 
good as Jimmy Key was last year. Luis 
Potania gives them a legitimate, leadoff 
hitter and a base stealer. 

KEY LOSSES: They had Lee Smith, the 
record-holding closer, for a few weeks and 
let him go. Long range, they will miss 
Bobby Munoz as he blossoms into a strong 
closer or starter. 

KEY TO SEASON: Buck Shown! ter has 
to find that closer, get turnaround perfor- 
mances from starting pitchers Jim Abbott 
and Melido Perez and keep the owner’s 
finger away from the detonator. 

TORONTO BLUE JAYS: Ooser Duane 
Ward has bean put on die 15-day disabled 
fist with an aifirig aim and General Manag- 
er Pat Gfflick has been unable to find the 
starting pitcher he wants. But don’t ay for 
them, Canada. They still have a team good 
enough to win for a third straight season. 

They have had a much less severe turn- 
over than they bad last year, when they 
opened without players who drove in 45 
percent of tbrir runs the year before. The 
newest faces belong to a pair of 21 -year- 
olds — Carlos Delgado, a rookie who has 
moved from catcher to left fidd, and Akx 
Gonzalez, the rookie shortstop. 

KEY ADDITIONS: Ddgado and Gon- 
are 

KEY 

Rickey Henderson. 

KEY TO SEASON: They can't afford 
to be long without Ward, whose 45 saves 
tied for first in the league last season. 

CENTRAL DIVISION 

CHICAGO WHITE SOX: The Sox may 
be the dearost-cut favorite to wm an 
American League dmrion title. 

They have Frank Thomas, the best hit- 
ler in the division, and the best quartet of 
starting pitchers in the league, headed by 
Jack McDoweB, the two-time 20-game 
winner and Cy Young Award winner. A 
healthy Damn Jackson has replaced EEs 
Buiks in right fidd, and Julio Franco has 
moved in as designated hitter. 

KEY ADDITIONS: If Franco can 


tony Fernandez and 


avoid knee problems, he w£D add the one 
more productive bat they need. Paul As- 
senmacher should fill the important role 
that left-handed reliever Scott Radinsky 
held until sidelined by Hodgkin’s disease. 

KEY LOSSES: Tatty wfll miss Burks 

and Bo Jackson only if Darrin Jackson and 

Franco don’t produce. 

KEY TO SEASON: If Thomas has 
enough support is the lineup, Ch ic ago 
could have a more successful post-season 
that last year. 

CLEVELAND INDIANS: They move 
into a new park, but it would be too much 
to expect them to move into a new position 
in the standings — though they appear to 
be getting closer to a run at first place. 

Having established a band of good 
young players in Carlas Baerga, Kenny 
Lofton and Albert Belle, the Indians add- 
ed the veteran free agents Eddie Murray, 
T Vnnis Martinez and Jack Morris. They 
also traded for the league’s best defensive 
shortstop, Omar VizqueL This spring they 
saw significant development from Manny 
Ramirez, a rookie, who won the right-field 

J ° KEY ADDITIONS: Murray, Martina 
and Morns may make a major impact 
Chris Nahholz joins Martinez and Morris 
in the rotation. 

KEY LOSS: Vizquel more than replaces 
Felix Feruiin. - 

KEY TO SEASON: The Indians will go 
as far as thdr pitching takes than. 

KANSAS OTY ROYALS: They are 
counting on Vinoe Coleman to ignite what 
last season was the league's most impotent 
offense. But Coleman wffl have to shed the 
poor play and disabled-list time that char- 
acterized his tenure in New York and 
revert to the player he was in St Louis. 

Bob Hamdin, the rookie designated hit- 
ter who last season hit 29 home runs and 
drove in 84 in Gass AAA, also has to 
contribute for pitchers like David Cone to 
avoid low-run losses. 

KEY ADDITIONS: Coleman, Hamdin 
and Dave Henderson for the offense; 


Charlie Lribrandt for the pitching, maybe. 

KEY LOSS: George Brett, in his 20th 
and final season, was not the Brett of old, 
but he was still George Brett 

KEY TO SEASON: They must avoid 
the poor starts of the last two seasoos. 
Lustier hitting could achieve that. 

MILWAUKEE BREWERS: They can 
cheer the return of Ted Hignera (after 
three injury-squandered seasons), bat 
that’s about aH 

B.J. Surboff, Darryl Hamilton and 
Greg Vaughn were supposed to form the 
starting outfield, but all three have had 
sore arms. 

KEY ADDITIONS: Jody Reed gives 
them a solid defensive second baseman 
and Brian Harper adds a 300 batting aver- 
age. 

KEY LOSS: Last year they lost the 
heart of their team, Paul Molitor. Now the 
soul Robin Yount, has retired. 

KEY TO SEASON: Hignera and Bill 
Wegman have to stay healthy. 

MINNESOTA TWINS: Kevin Tapani 
deteriorated from a pair erf 16-victoty sea- 
sons to a 12-15 record, while Scott Erick- 
son completed a two-season slide from a 
20-victory performance to a 19-toss disas- 
ter. They remain 1-2 in the rotation and 
the Twins don't have much after them. 

They also need a hitting revival from 
some players whose production slipped 
last season — Kirby Puckett, Dave Win- 
field, Shane Mack, Pedro Munoz and 
Chuck Knoblauch. 

KEY ADDITIONS: Em Desbaies, who 
was traded to the Giants last August, re- 
turns to the rotation. Catcher Matt WaJ- 
beck was acquired from the Cubs. 

KEY LOSES: The Twins didn’t want 
to pay Brian Harper’s salary, but they will 
miss his 300 average. 

KEY TO SEASON: Tom Kdly has to 
have players who produce. 

WEST DIVISION 

CALIFORNIA ANGELS: They are 
waiting for their minor league system to 


ft. Eduardo Perez, son of Tony, mil play 
first base after beating out J.T. Snow. 

KEY ADDITION: Maybe the Angels 
could ride Bo's good hip into the sunset 

KEY LOSS: TbeyTl miss Luis Polonia’s 
speed and base stealing. 

KEY TO SEASON: Patience while 
those youngsters develop. 

OAKLAND ATHLETICS: Maybe 
Mark McGwire will show what he can do 
when he’s healthy, and maybe Rickey 
Henderson will show that he really has a 
new attitude. Maybe Dennis Eckersley will 
remrn to his immortal state. 

With a mix of winning veterans and 
young players, the A's could do a 180- 
degree turn again this year, especially in 
this wide-open division. 

KEY ADDITIONS: They think it's 
good to have Henderson back, and they 
hope Dave RJgbetti has enough left to help 
bolster the relief corps. 

KEY LOSSES: Rkk Honeycutt gave 
them good years out of the bullpen. 

KEY TO SEASON: The team that al- 
ways won with pitching needs Eckersley 
(10 blown saves in 46 raportumties). Bob 
Welch (9- 1 1) and Ron Darling (5-9) to put 
them back into contention. 

SEATTLE MARINERS: This fran- 
chise, bom in 1977, has bad only two 
winning seasons. But the team has a formi- 
dable rotation, led by Randy Johnson, and 
a productive outfield, led by Ken Griffey 
Jr. 

Omar Vizquel the league’s best defen- 
sive shortstop, is gone, bat his replace- 
ment, Felix Fernnn, is a veteran. Dan 
Wilson, the new catcher, has little major 
league experience. 

KEY ADDITIONS: Eric Anthony 
completes a solid outfield, and Greg Hib- 
bard, a 15-game winner with the Cubs, 
deepens the rotation. Bobby Ayala will 
start as the closer. 

KEY LOSSES: They kt money consid- 
erations force Vizquel and catrihM- Dave 
Valle to other dubs. 

KEY TO SEASON: The Mariners’ suc- 
cess will depend on the success of their 

relievers. 

TEXAS RANGERS: Their strength is 
their trio of renowned hitters: Juan Gon- 
zalez, who had two league home run titles 
by the time he was 24; Jose Canseco, who 
will stick to hitting aftedbow surgery that 
resulted from his derire lo pitch, and Wfll 
Gaik, who has taken Rafael Palmeiro's 
job at first base despite having tailed off 
offensivdy the past two seasons. 

KEY ADDITIONS: Gaik supposedly 
worked more diligently than in previous 
off-seasons to prepare for Ms new team. 
Bruce Horst, tf healthy, would bring a 
veteran pi tchangpresoK*. 

KEY LOSSES: Palmeiro and JuHo 
Franco took a lot erf hitting with them. 
Nolan Ryan took pitching records that 
won’t be matched. 

KEY TO SEASON: If pitchers like 
Hurst, Jack Armstrong and Rick Haling 
can win, the Rangers could, too. 



USA T ODAY’S 
International 
Edition 

Now available 
on Monday 

Your complete source for weekend 
sports results and a weekly 
financial wrap-up. 

USA TODAY’S International Edition 
is printed in Hong Kong, 
London and Switzerland and 
is available in 90 countries 
in Europe, the Middle East, 
Asia and the Pacific. 



TODAY 


INTERNATIONAL 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, APRIL 4,1994 


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Writing in Basque: 
A Question of Scale 


By Mark Kurlansky 

"17TTOR1A, Spain — Bernardo Atxaga 

Y writes in one of Europe's oldest and 
its newest language. An enthusiastic and 
elfin man with thick half-circle eyebrows, 
be talks the way be writes — prolificacy in 
strings of narrative that run in all direc- 
tions. 

When Atxaga was growingup. all teach- 
ers were pro-Franco and Basques were 
punished for speaking their own language, 
Euskera. Atxaga’ s teacher, whom he de- 
scribes as “fascist bat sensible," once 
made Bernardo hold out his fingertips to 
be beaten with a stick. Bat the readier did 
not do this very often because he remem- 
bered his predecessor, who, after beating 
the fingertips of two husky Euskera-speak- 
ing boys, was tossed out the schoolnouse 
window. “We have a guerrilla tradition," 
explained Atxaga. 

Atxaga has published seven novels, 20 
children’s bodes, poetry and song lyrics in 
his once forbidden native language. Trans- 
lated into at least 14 other languages, he is 
the first author to gain broad international 
recognition from writing in the Basque 
language. 

Almost nonexistent 20 years ago, books 
in Euskera today enjoy phenomenal sales 
for a language with only about 800,000 
speakers. Atxaga can sell 30,000 copies of 
a novel. It was with his 1988 novel, “Oba- 
bakoak," that Atxaga became one of only 
10 Euskera writers in history to be trans- 
lated into other languages. After winning 
the Spanish National Literature Prize with 
its Spanish edition in 1989, “Obabakoak” 
was translated into 13 other languages and 
was critically praised in France, Britain 
and, last year, in the United States. 

He is not a quaint local writer but a 
sophisticated man of the late 20th-century 
world, fluent in numerous cultures ana 
mythologies. His poems allude to every- 
thing from Francis Picabia to Otis Redd- 
ing. “Obabakoak" means people and 
things from Obaba. a fictitious mountain 
village in Guipuzcoa, very much like the 
village of the author’s birth. Atxaga cap- 
tures the charms and deficiencies of 
Basque village hfc. But the bode is a con- 
centric series of stories that moves far 
from Obaba. to Hamburg, to mythical 
Arabia, to Orina A writer’s writer, his 
book is really about storytelling itself, and 
he is an inexhaustible spinner of yarns. 

He lives in Vitoria, the small provincial 
city that was chosen in the early 1980s to 
be the seat of the Basque government 
because it was the Basque city most in 
need of an activity. He moved there be- 


cause, unlike the other Basque cities. Vito- 
ria stiD offers low-cost living and though 
he has managed to earn a living as a 
Basque writer, it is not an extravagant one. 

Of bring a Basque writer he says. “We 
have the advantage and disadvantage of 
scale:” He recognizes that writing in Basque 
has a limited audience but on the other 
hand, “We can do many things.” How 
many writers get to do novels, children’s 
books and poetry, write for the local paper 
and do songs for popular rock groups? 

Euskera. preserved in mountain villages, 
is (Hie of only four European languages that 
do not belong to the Indo-European family. 
The origins of both the language and toe 
people remain a mystery. 

Although the first book in Euskera, a 
slim volume of poetry, was published in 
1345. it has been largely an oral language. 
In all of history fewer than 25,000 books 
have been published in Euskera. And yet, 
in 1994 there are 965 titles scheduled for 
publication in Euskera. about a third of 
which are by Basque writers. 


Reading in Basque is booming as never 
before and writers such as Atxaga have the 
opportunity to be pioneers in a new litera- 
ture. This presents challenges. There are 
words in Euskera that are not in common 
usage and he worries that they interfere 
with the flow of narration. On the other 
hand, he finds his language rich in expres- 
sion and poetic rhythm. 

Atxaga was born Jos6 Irazu Gannendia 
in 1931 in Asteasu, a village that then had 
1,000 people, tucked into the velvet green 
mmimarn slopes of Guipuzcoa, a remote 20 
miles inland from the elegant resort city of 
San Sebastian. He grew up speaking Eus- 
kera at borne with hxs schoolteacher moth- 
er, who had been expelled from the school 
system because she was Basque, and his 
carpenter father in an isolated community 
that waited for two Spanish newspapers to 
be delivered once a day by donkey. 


Because Franco’s ultra-natio nalism vio- 
lently repressed all expression of Basque 
identity, Euskera could not be spoken in 
public, and Atxaga never really knew who 
was a Basque speaker, especially outside his 
village. Now when he meets old friends and 
former schoolmates from his San Sebastian 
hi gh school, they will greet him in Euskera 
ana for the first time he realizes that they 
had that language in common all along. 

In die late 1960s the silenced Basques 
began to resist again. Radical groups such 
as the armed militants, ETA, started up. 
“For years the Basque society had beat 
underground like a potato,” said Atxaga. 



Ua Klmc 

Bernardo Atxaga, a writer’s writer and an inexhaustible spinner of yams. 


“And in the 1960s a new Basque country 
was bora.” 

While studying economics at the univer- 
sity in Bilbao, for the first time he beard 
songs, ballads of political protest, in Eus- 
kera. At the age of 20 he saw his first novel 
in his mother tongue and be began meeting 
with underground groups, learning how to 
write in the languag e Leftist intellectuals 
created a modem Basque lan gnage Euskera 
Batna, which unified the various dialects. 

Today Basques have local government 
and thrir own police face. Rood signs are 
in Euskera. Vitoria is also known as Gas- 
teiz, San Sebastian is Donostia. There is a 
jue newspaper in Euskera and a net- 
: of small local dailies throughout the 
region. Classics and best-sellers from Eo- 
: and America are regularly translated, 
offer a choice of education in 
Spanish, Euskera or both. Much of the 
popular music is sung in Euskera and the 
old underground songs are piped into the 
local milk-run t rains that wind their way 
from village to tallage below the jagged 
ridges in the green shepherd’s valleys. 


rope and 
Schools 


Since the success of “Obabakoak" Atx- 
aga has been trying to work the advan- 
tages of two scales. He writes in Euskera 
and sends an early draft to his Spanish 
translator. By the rime be has handed in 
his manuscript the Spanish version is on 
his desk waiting for rewrites. “It’s very 
tiring," he said. 

“Gizona Bere Bakardadean" (The Man 
Alone) has already sold more than 6,500 
copies in Euskera and is about to crane out 
in Spanish. It is about former revolution- 
aries. Since most of his friends and family 
were Basque leftist militants, it is a subject 
dose to his heart “Felipe Gonzalez 25 
years ago was a revolutionary. People who 
walked in the streets with a” gun 25 years 
ago don’t believe in anything now. I have 
many friends who were in prison. It was a 
normal thing. Both df my brothers were in 
prison. Five of my 10’dosest friends." 


Mark Kurltmsky’s most recent book, on 
contemporary European Jewry, will be pub- 
lished this year. 


Shreds of Substantive Information 


W: 


By William Safire 

ASHINGTON — “But did 
you guys have to put the 


word shredding on the limit page;' 
a While House aide complained to 
a benign pundit “and even worse, 
in a headline?" 

"Shred — one of those Old Eng- 
lish words meaning “scrap" or 
“fragment" that appeared a thou- 
sand years ago in Adfric’s Glossary 
— has been getting a bad name 
lately. It all has to do with a ma- 
chine; 

In the 1927 edition of the Chemi- 
cal Engineering Catalog, we see ad- 
vertised a “Universal Pulping and 
Shredding Machine . . . intended 
far tearing apart any fibrous mate- 
rial." 

The fibrous material that gave the 
modem shredding machine a bad 
name was paper, on which mfanna- 
tion was printed that coukl be con- 
sidered evidence. Right from the 
start, the benign purpose of the ma- 
chine was proclaimed in an adver- 
tisonent in the July 1934 issue of 
American Business: “Shred AD, the 
Waste Paper Shredder Quickly 
shreds newspapers, magazines, 
waste paper . . . into uniform rc- 
sflieni strands MmI for packing pur- 
poses." But then came the darker 
qHe- “Especially adapted k> shred- 
ding oonfidezuM records." 

Lieutenant Colonel Oliver L. 
North, and his assistant Fawn Hall, 
made the machine finnans in 1986. 

When North, now a candidate for 
the Republican nomination in the 
U. S. Senate race in Virginia, was 
concerned about a forthcoming visit 
by the FBL he ordered the shred- 
ding of Ms Iran-contra documents. 
To the chagrin of aD those interested 
in shredding technology, the ma- 
chine jammed, wmgng embarrass- 
ment 

And now attention is 
to the destruction of files — 
routine, perhaps not — at the Rose 
Law Fmn in Little Rock, Arkansas. 
The word sends a shudder through 
the body politic; no wonder us 

headline iwe causes onneteinarinn in 

the Whitewater White House. 

If shredding is inflammatory, an- 
other word — incidental — is ame- 
lialory. and has become a Clinton 
favorite. When asked about meet- 
ings with regulatory officials be- 
yond the three that had a 

special counsel to call White House 
aides before a grand jury, the presi- 


dent acknowledged them but 
termed them “ incidental, ” not "sub- 
stantive.” 

These words, found in legal 
phrases like incidental damages and 
CTjfKT/w irfvp due process, are not ant- 
onyms. 

Incidental means “occurring by 
chanc e or without plan"; its ant- 
onym is intentional or planned Sub- 
stantive means “firm or “perma- 
nent" or “essentiaT; depending on 
the sense intended, its antonym 
may be apparent or temporary os 
insignificant 

In law, these adjectives ate not 
mutually exclusive. “An accidental 
meeting,” says Professor J amin 
Raskin of the Washington College 
of Law at American University, 
“which is incidental, could aid up 
in criminal activity, which is sub- 
stantive What about the White 
House’s nse of incidental? “That 
suggests there was no unlawful in- 
tent. To say something is ‘not sub- 
stantive’ is to indicate that the con- 
duct was not c riminal. " 

How do these words work in 
terms of, say, obstruction of jus- 
tice? “If an exchange that was ‘not 
substantive’ took place, it means 
that what transpired did not rise to 
the level of obstructing justice,” 
Raskin explains. * Incidental de- 
scribes the exchange as something 
that was not deliberate." Thus, 
President Clinton's choice of inci- 
dental was a substantive decision. 


You want to learn to write great 
stuff? Read great writers. 

The Op-Ed page is a place for 
polemics. The purpose of a piece in 
that medium is not so much to 
analyze or report as to arouse, in- 
veigh and persuade. 

The opening, or kde, must seize 
the reader's attention and draw him 
into the argument One way is with a 
bald, outrageous or amusing decla- 
ration; a better way is with an irre- 
sistible anecdote; a third way, the 
most difficult to bring off, is with 


Saul Bellow, the author of 
“Humboldt’s Gift” and “The 
Dean’s December,” who teaches 
literature at Boston University, 
tried his hand at an Op-Ed article 
in The New York Times recently. 
His points, which he made with the 
sort of grace that carries great 
force, were (1) that the views of a 
fictional character should not be 


taken as the views of the novelist 
and (2) that what passes these days 
for “rage” is often manipulative 
and censorious, shutting down 
open discussion with charges of 
defamation or contempt for multi- 
culturalism. 

Consider his lede, written in the 
style of a poetic prayer “Snow- 
bound, 1 watched the blizzard im- 
pounding parked cars at midnight. 
The veering of the snowflakes un- 
der the street lights made me think 
how nice it would be if we were 
totally covered by white drifts. 
Give us a week’s moratorium, dear 
Lord, from the idiocies that bum 
on every ride and let the pure 
snows cool these overheated minds 
and dilute the toxins which have 
infected our judgments. Grant us a 
breather, merciful God.” 

Impounding is what police do to 
illegally parked cars, but never be- 
fore has a blizzard done it; that’s 
the sort of original use of language 
that poets strive for. The subject of 
the second sentence, another -ing 
term to suggest a continuing action, 
is veering. Do snowflakes ordinari- 
ly veer? Most of us would use static 
bm the writer is not most of us and 
prefers a word that implies a 
change of direction, which is what 
makes a blizzard different from a 
snowfall. He then lays the mat 
snows atop the idiocies that man, 
thereby metaphorically to cool 
overheated minds; in the process of 
absorbing that heat, the snow melts 
and can that dilute the infecting 
toxins. 

You don't just toss that off; yon 
think about it, tnaking sure you! 
fresh word picture is internally 
consistent, as you conclude the lede 
with a with-it counterpoint to the 
traditional prayer form by asking 
God to grant a breather, a slang 
term far “respite" or “easy test be- 
tween difficult tests.” 

(Before anyone writes in to note 
that Bellow’s “the toxins which" 
should be “the toxins that ” be- 
cause dust have infected our judg- 
ments is a restrictive danse, please 
remember that you get Nobel 
Prizes for literature, not for gram- 
mar.) 

New York Times S&vtce 


INTERNATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Page 4 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Today 


Tomorrow 



Mgh 

Low 

W 

Mgh 

Low 

W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 


/Uganra 

22 m 

12/53 

L 

21/70 

1203 

s 

/wawan 

1HS2 

BM 

«n 

10/50 

4/39 c 

Ankara 

20 AS 

9/48 

PC 

24/75 

B/48 

E 

Athens 

21/70 

13/55 

c 

22/71 

10/50 C 

Barcstona 

16/61 

11/52 

sh 

15.53 

a/46 


Balgratt 

18/51 

7«4 

31 

20/58 

9/48 


Batin 

12/53 

5/41 

sh 

1102 

104 

sn 

Bn/Mab 

13/55 

2 ns 

sh 

1102 

■1131 


BuoapM 

1407 

4/39 

PC 

1504 

8/48 


CuuuJugui 

9/«8 

3« 

sh 

8/48 

104 

sh 

CdhbMSoi 

21/70 

14*7 

a 

21/70 

13/55 


Duran 

7/44 

2/35 

Sh 

9/48 

002 


Edrtaugli 

7/44 

4/33 

sh 

9-48 

307 


Roranoa 

18«1 

5/4| 

s 

15/81 

307 


FttMlDt 

11/52 

5/41 

3) 

1102 

1/34 

sn 

Ganna 

1203 

6/43 

sh 

11/52 

0/32 


HBtenta 

6/43 

0/32 

r 

7/44 

104 

i 

UhM 

1906 

1102 

pc 

23.73 

9/48 


Las Palmas 

24/75 

1804 

s 

24/75 

10/6* 

PC 

LBOOr 

19*6 

12/53 

s 

1908 

12/53 


London 

13/55 

5/41 

pc 

1102 

1/3* 


Maond 

18/54 

8/48 

pc 

17*2 

3/37 s 

Man 

18*1 

7/44 

pc 

1509 

205 

s 

MOSCOW 

*03 

1/34 

■» 

1000 

409 

PC 

Mncn 

11/52 

409 

sh 

11/52 

-1/31 

sh 

NX* 

1407 

8MB 

pc 

14/57 

409 

s 

Oslo 

6/43 

1/34 

r 

9M6 

104 

sh 

Pakna 

15/59 

12*3 

sh 

14/57 

9/48 

E 

Parts 

14*7 

SMI 

sh 

1203 

104 

pc 

Pragu* 

1203 

5/41 

pc 

12/53 

205 Sh 

RrtwUnuik 

3/37 

104 

sh 

4QS 

002 

c 

Roms 

18/84 

6/41 

s 

17*2 

409 

B 

SL panraourg 

i 6/46 

307 

r 

9/48 

2/35 

t 

SweMtokn 

8/48 

2/35 

• 

B/48 

002 

an 

Skaabows 

1305 

5/41 

i 

1203 

-1/31 

*1 

TaBrn 

7/44 

104 

r 

C/43 

2/35 

r 

VMra 

1801 

B/48 

pc 

18*1 

7/44 

■ 

Vienna 

1305 

409 

pe 

1407 

5/41 

B 

Waraew 

1102 

2/35 

pc 

14/57 

8M3 

tfl 

Ztaidi 

1305 

6/43 

sh 

1203 

002 

a 

Oceania 

AuddsM 

21/70 

1407 

PC 21/70 

1509 a 

Byttqr 

23/73 

16*1 

« 

23/73 

1601 

pc 


Forecast tor Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Wealher. 



North America 

Chicago wiR be quite chilly 
lor April Tuesday through 
Thursday and there could 
even be a little snow 
Wednesday. Alter sunshine 
Tuesday, there wffl be rains 
horn Boston to Washowyon, 
D.C.. Wednesday. Los 
Angeles wfl be rather sunny 
Tuesday through Thursday. 


Europe 

It wfl be blustery with strong 
winds and c how ora from the 
U.K., Norway and Sweden 
south into much of France 
and Germany. A Mediter- 
ranean storm wB hit Greece 
and so u thern Italy with soak- 
ing rains and strong winds 
betprming Tuesday: stormy 
weather shifts to the Adriatic 
Wednesday. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Today 

Hflh Low W Ugh Low W 
OF OF OF OF 

B«U 24/75 15/59 s 26/79 17.*62 pc 

CakD 30aS 15/59 E 31/88 13/56 S 

Damascus 24/75 8/46 1 27*0 11/52 ■ 

JenMtera 22/71 1Z*3 ■ 24/75 14/57 s 

Luxor 34/93 18/BI ■ 38/27 18/BI < 

FVyath 31 /SB 17/02 s 33/BI 18/54 a 

net a-aumg^pe-gvdy doudy, c-cfquty, rivahomra, Mtandmanm, r-rah. , afanow ftntas, 


Tatty 

High Low W High Law W 

C/F OP CIP OF 

Bums Aktt 26/79 17/52 Sh 23/73 14/57 pc 

Caracas 30/Bfi 23/73 pc 31/88 24/76 1 

Una 23/73 18«8 pC 24/75 1B/B6 pC 

Marinccy 28/82 12/ra a 29 «4 13/55 a 

RUttjBnskg 26/79 20CB • 27*0 CT/70 pc 

20«8 8/48 S 25/77 9M8 pc 


Asia 

Showers wtH dampen south- 
western Japan as well as 
Shanghai from time to time. 
Eastern Japan such as 
Tokyo will be mid and dry. 
Beqmg and Seoul will have 
warm sun Tuesday; It may 
rafci at midweek Ratos horn 
Owen wffl wet Manila Tues- 
day; Hong Kong and Taiwan 
may be rainy iradweak. 


Asia 


Today 


Tomorrow 


High 

Low 

W 

mgh 

LOW W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 

Bmuk 

34/93 

28/79 

PC 

34/93 

26/79 1 

Bafng 

26/70 

10/50 

s 

25/78 

13*5 pc 

Hong Kong 

25/77 

19*6 

s 

25/77 

71/70 C 

Mania 

3301 

am c 

32*9 

23/73 r 

tow Defy 

3301 

17/57 

pc 34/93 

18/54 S 

Sooii 

21/70 

la/sa 

S 

21 CO 

11*2 pc 

Shanghai 

21/70 

16*1 

Ml 

23/71 

1407 X 

Stogapran 

32/99 

22/71 

PC 

33/89 

23/73 pc 

Ta*m 

26/79 

18*4 

PC 

28/79 

19*6 pc 

Tokyo 

18/84 

5/41 

a 

IB/64 

8/46 OC 

Africa 

A>9M5 

16161 

1203 

pc 

18/5* 

10/50 pc 

Cape Town 

2700 

1509 

a 

26/79 

16*1 pc 

Casablanca 

22/71 

1203 

a 

23/73 

13 *5 pc 

Harare 

23/73 

10/50 

PC 

25/77 

1102 pc 

Lagos 

31 OB 

26/79 

sh 

32*9 

26/79 PC 

Manor 

27 no 

1203 

E 

28*2 

1*07 pc 

Tim* 

1407 

7/M 

PC 

19*6 

6/43 pc 

North America 

Anchorage 

B/48 

0/32 

s 

10/50 

1/34 pc 

Marta 

22/71 

9/48 

a 

22/71 

1203 PC 

Boston 

12/53 

T/44 

c 

1203 

*09 pc 

Chicago 

12*3 

2/35 

8i 

8«e 

307 sh 

Danvor 

11/52 

-3/Z7 

c 

7/44 

-4/25 sn 

□ana 

1407 

3/37 

Ml 

8/40 

3*7 in 

HongOrtu 

28/79 

21/70 

pc 

28*2 

21/70 PC 

Homan 

25/77 

17/92 

oe 

24/75 

15/59 c 


LosAngott 


Now York 
Ptxwnw 
San Fran. 


SIVWMW.Mce,) 


I mops, forecasts and data provtdsd by Acou-Wstther, toe. e 1994 


Toronto 

WaBMngvm 


23/70 12/53 pc 20 *8 
29/84 18/88 S 28/82 
*03 - 7/20 C 4/39 
3/37 - 2/29 pc 7/44 
28*2 21/70 pc 38/82 
13/55 8/46 pc 13/55 

2502 14/57 ■ 24/75 
1908 9«8 a 1804 

1203 4/39 an 1305 
7/44 - 1/01 
17/82 9/48 


DUB 


ACROSS 

1 One who 
reunes 

5 Btc or Parker 
products 

* Loxs partner 

14 Computer 
offering 
is Face shape 
IB Shade of white 

it No ifs. or 

huts 

18 Soho so- tong 

19 Lounges lazily 


20 Stan of a quip 
22 Consumed 

24 Israeli airpon 

25 change 

{magician's 

command! 

29 That was 
dose'" 

31 Honor film 
fhghtener 
24 Oscar dela — 
35 Mimi Sheraton 
subject 

38 Obstinate one 


Solution to Puzzle of April 1 
I j I AIRIS I 


□UL1U1 □UUidUI 
□ HSO □□□Q □□□□□ 
uuiuti Ltiunua Lsuuaa 
UlLlUUUUULiaLriUaUU 
UUU19 LriLJU 
UUUUU □□□ UQHS 
L3UU uuaaa uaaa 
UULUULJUIlULJULaU^Uld 
UJLilUU □UUBU U2U 
UtiULi UULI □□□□□ 
UULil UUUkJ 
UUUUUUUUUatflJUL] 

UUUUU UULJU LJULjy 
ULLILllILti UUUU L3UUU 
U13UUU UkJUU UUUhJ 


37 Middle of the 
quip 

40 Hot. ‘s opposite 

41 at March 

42 French avenue 

43 It’s north of 
Calif. 

44 Chance 

{meet 

accidentally) 

45 Not present 

46 Columbus univ. 

47 One. in Orleans 

48 End of the quip 

55 His beloved was 
Beatrice 

36 Old newspaper 
section 
57 Hide 

59 Rags-to-riches 
writer 

90 Roughneck 
•i Bom beck, the 
columnist 
62 Hops brews 
83 See eagle 
i« Cooper's was 
high 

DOWN 

1 1nternists' org. 

2 Give tem p ora ri ly 

3 Remove, as a 
knot 


4 Daydream 

5 Spud 

s Dodge 

7 European 
defense grp. 

8 Dross 

a Swell, as a 
cloud 

10 Hive nothing to 
do with 

11 Course game 

12 A Gardner 

isFleur-de 

21 OW Nick 

22 Coasters 

29 Utah city 
28 Allude (to) 

*7 nous 

28 Editor’s mark 
28 Part of NOW 

30 Breaks up clods 

31 Company B 
awakener 

32"... in tears 

amid the 

com*: Keats 
33 Ism 
39 Rover's 
playmate 
aoTorm6and 
Gibson 

as Raise the end of 
38 Cacophonous 
tower 


44D06S8 

groomsman's 

job 

45 Whosoever 

48 Bewhiskered 
animal 

47 Author Sinclair 


48 Fabric texture 

49 "Come Back, 
Little Sheba* 
playwright 

so Prod 
si Rating a D 


52 Aboveboard 

53 Florida's 

Beach 

54 Pollster Roper 
esAtinybit 

sa Ecru 



PmaW by Baity Jm yw i 

© New York Times Edited by Will Shorn. 


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AKT Access Numbers. 

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COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

ASIA/PACIFIC 

Australia 

0014-881-011 

CHmM’KCM 

» 10611 

Guam 

018-872 

Hoqlbog 

800-1111 

India* 

000-117 

todoanhi' 

0014601-10 

Japan* 

0039-111 

Korea 

009*11 

Kora** 

11* 

Malaysia* 

8006011 

New Zealand 

000-911 

Philippines* 

105-11 

Saipan* 

Z392872 

Singapore 

8006111-111 

Sri Lanka 

430-430 

Taiwan* 

0080-162886 

Thailand* 

0019-991-1 111 

EUROPE 

Armenia** 

8*14111 

Amu hr" 

022-903-011 

Belgium* 

078-11-0010 

Bulgaria 

00-18006010 

Croatia!** 

99-38-0011 

Czech Rep 

00-42660101 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

France 

19*-0011 

Germany 

01366010 

Greece* 

06600-1311 

Mangary* 00 *- 800 - 01 Xli 

Icdaix^l 

999601 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


1.^1, „,1 

UTyioa 

1-806556600 

Italy* 

172-1011 

Utdaeoslda 1 

15560-11 

T M—i*u 

8*196 

Luxembourg 

0-800-0111 

Malta* 

0000890-110 

Monaco* 

19*6011 

Nulmrianslg* 

06622-91U 

Norway* 

806-190-11 

Poland**** 

0*0164866111 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 

Romania 01-8064288 

Rniwla*tMouuw> 

155-5042 

Slovakia 

06420-00101 

Spain 

9069900-11 

Swakif 

020-795-611 

Swfmdand* 

15560-11 

ILK. 

0506860011 

MIDDIEEASr 

Haliwln 

806601 

Cyprus* 

08690010 

land 

177-106-2727 

Kuwait 

800-288. 

Lebstaon (Beirut) 

426801 

Sandl Arabia 

1-806100 

Turkey* 

0660612277 

AMBnrM 

Argentina* 

001-8062061111 

Belize* " 

555 

Bolivia* 

08061111 

W 0068010 

Qsfc 

00*4312 


COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

Colmnbhi 

980-11-0010 

-Costa Rkafta 

114 

PnwfW- 

119 

El Salvador's 

190 

Guatemala* 

190 

Guyana— 

165 

Honduras^ 

125 

MokXIAAA 

95-8004624240 

Nicaragua (Manaarsa) 174 

Panama 

• 109 

Peru* 

191' 

Suriname 

156 

Uruguay 

060410 

Venezuela** 

86011-120 

CARIBBEAN 

Mm™ 1-800-872-2881 

Bermuda* 

1-800-872-2881 

'British VJ. 

1-806672-2881 

Cayman Islands 

1-800872-2881 

.Grenada* 

1-806872-2881 

Haiti* 

001-000-972-288? 

Jamaica** 

0-806872-2881 

Wah.Anrti 

001-606672-2881 

i5LJ2rt*/Nevis 

1-8068762881 

AFRICA 

Egypt* (Cairo) 

510-0200 

Gabon* 

00*601 

Gambia* 

00111 ' 

Kenya* 

080616 

Iiberte 

797-797 1 

Malawi** 

101-1992- 


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01