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INTERNATIONAL 


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tribune. 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Paris, Wednesday, April 6, 1994 



No. 3055 




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W&ZZ Street Bounces 
But Bear Still Lurks 


By Lawrence Malkin 

International Herald Tribune 
NEW YORK — Wall Street bounced back 
Tuesday in a sign of the volatility that traders 
pud they expected to last for weeks if not 
re ^ nt «*“»*• *** frightened 
“iSf 1 * J°nd market set the tone! 

Within a half-hour of the New York Stock 
Exchanges opening bell the Dow Jones in- 
dustrial average had risen 54 points, more 
thffli erasing Monday’s loss of almost 43 
points. The surge Tuesday forced the imposi- 
tion of computerized trading curbs, which 
work on the upside as well as the down, for 


the second straight day. Advancing issues led 
dediners by an almost 7-to-l ratio, the re- 
verse of the situation during Monday’s slide. 

The Dow hovered near mat levd for most 
of the rest of the day. and closed up 82.06. 
points at 3,675.41. Other indices also rose; 
especially the Nasdaq index, which gained 
22.64 points, to 750.05. 

Fund managers were looking for bargains at 
the start of the quarter and snapped up every- 
thing from small stocks to blue-chips such as 
Caterpillar and J. P. Morgan to utilities, which 
have suffered from rising interest rates. 

The gains were a breather from the mar- 


30-year Treasury bond yield 
in New York, %. 


■UOQ 


Dow Jones industrial average 





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AfRfiS 


Source: Bkxjmberg 

.kei’s 10 percent decline this year. Lany_ 
Wachtd, of Prudential Securities, said turn- ' 
arounds like Tuesday’s “can sustain a bounce 
fora couple of days, but you never see a crack 
like that and then find yourself in a bull 


ImeiTauoaal Herald Tribune 


market I think the free-fall is over, but not. 
necessarily the correction.” 

Interest rates on 30-year Treasury bonds,. 

See MARKET, Page 5 


Serb Forces Advance 
Into Bosnian Enclave 

U.S. Efforts 
For Peace Near 
A Standstill 




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Frustrated, 
Berlusconi 
Halts Talks 
With Alliance 


By Alan Cowell 

Hew York Times Service 

ROME — After a week of bickering within 
his triumphant, rightist electoral alliance, the 
media tycoon Silvio Berhisconi said late Tues- 
day he was suspending negotiations with his 
truculent partners aimed at welding together a 
government-in- waiting. 

It was not dear if the development meant 
that the rightist affiance had fallen apart com- 
pletely. However, the announcement threw 
Italian politics into disarray and lode much of 
the luster off an electoral landslide just one 
week ago that many cast as a herald of change. 

Mr. Berhisconi had believed be could bring 


The ItaEan election ranked a 
change to wmuer-takes-afl poBtics. Page 2. 

Milan's snappy business to govern- 

ment. But he found himself in a collision with 
the more f amiliar logjams of political maneu- 
vering and 01-disgnised power-plays. And his 
decision to suspend the negotiations raised the 
stakes to their highest levels yet 
“Enough of the duplicity and the old games 
of the old politics,” Mr Berlusconi declared. 

“From today we willnotgo tolhe League or 
to anyone else.” he said in a reference to the 
separatist Northern Lea g u e , whose rough- 
tongued leader, Umberto Bossi, issued his latest 
broadside against the media magnate Tuesday, 
calling him “Berhiskaiser” and saying democra- 
cy would be jeopardized if the businessman 
fulfilled his ambition to become prime minister. 

While there was a dear element of political 
maneuvering in Mr. Berlusconi's announce- 
ment, he said that, rather than pursue negotia- 
tions, be would wait until President Oscar Luigi 
Scalfaro derided whom to ask to form a govern- 
ment. 

Under constitutional rules, Mr. Scalfaro can- 
not do that until the new parliament elected in 
the March 27-28 elections meets an April 15 to 
dect the speakers of its upper and lower houses. 



Ah 

GOINGHOME— Patesthuandqwrteesembracmgbdforetbeooeat left returned to the West Bank Tuesday from Jordan. Page 5. 

Panel Throws KwaZulu Vote Into Doubt 


By Paul Taylor 

Washington Pan Service 

EMPANGENI, South Africa — Voting is 
not feasible in the blade homeland of KwaZulu 
in the current dimate of fear, intolerance, in- 
timidation and violence, the commission run- 
ning South Africa’s first democratic, multira- 
cial election announced Tuesday night in an 
interim finding. 


$ 


With just three weeks until the April 26-28 
If that process failed to produce a government, ^ gloomy report from the Independent 

Mr. Beriusccni said, “we have no fear of going Electoral Commission’s chairman, Johann 
bade to the electorate,” apparently raising the Kriegler, will increase the pressure cm a politi- 

possiWlity of new elections to pressure bis allies 

back into line. , , 

In last week’s ballot, a 366-seat absolute 
majority in the 630-member lower bouse went 
to the rightist alliance composed of Mr. Berius- 
confs Foraa Italia party, the Northern League 
and the neofasdst National Affiance led by 
Gianfranco Fmi. Official results gave Mr. Ber- 
hisconi 155 seats, Mr. Bossi 106 and Mr. Fini 
105, although Mr. Boss now says his party won 
more. The figures mean that all three compo- 
nents of the affiance are vital to retaining a 

Mr. Berlusconi had planned to meet Wednes- 
day with Mr. Bossi to continue the weeklong 
effort to agree on a government platform and a 
sharing of portfolios so that the alliance could 
respond quickly to a request by Mr. Scalfaro to 
form a government w 

However, in a typically unruly made, Mr. 

Bossi renewed his objections to Mr. Berlusconi 
becoming prime min i s ter. 

“Beware of Berluskaiser Mr. Bossi said, 
r unnin g Mr. Beriusconi’s name together with 

the title of the German kaisers of yore. 

“Berlusconi is the problem because, thanks 
to his TV, be can manipulate pubhc opinion, 

he said. “Because of this we say we are m a state 

See ITALY, Page 5 


cal summit on the KwaZulu crisis scheduled for 
Friday. 

It will be attended by President Frederik W. 
de Klerk, Nelson Mandela, leader of the Afri- 
can National Congress, Chief Mangosuthu 
Buthdezi of the Inkatha Freedom Party and the 
Zulu king . Goodwill Zwdithmi. 

Mr. Mandela said Tuesday night he had 
“grave reservations" about the election com- 
mission’s report and said any delay in the 
balloting “would be playing into the hand of 
those who don’t want the election to take 
place:” He said be had “new proposals" to 


make to the king in the hope of breaking the 
impasse. 

Both Mr. Buthdezi, who is chief minister of 
KwaZulu, and King Zwefithini have called for 
an election boycott, saying the new post -apart- 
heid constitution does not give enough power to 
the regions and fails to accommodate the Zulu 
assertion of sovereignty. 

KwaZulu is the largest of South Africa’s 10 
black homelands created under apartheid and 
is home to some 55 million blacks, the vast 
majority of them Zulus. All 10 homdands are 

See VOTE, Page 5 


U.S. on Spot Over Jailed China Dissident 


By Lena H. Sun 

Washington Pent Service 

BEIJING — The rearrest of China’s most 
prominent political dissident, Wei J ing s hen g, 
appears to set the United States and China on a 
collision course over human rights. 

Unless Mr. Wei is released soon, this second 
arrest is likely to seriously undermine efforts by 
the CHntrm adminis tration to argue that China 
is making the kind of pro g ress on human rights 
needed to merit an extension of Beijing's nonre- 
strictive trading status known as most-favored- 
nation status. 

“When they’ve arrested China’s most impor- 
tant dissident, it is very hard tar State Depart- 
ment officials to say China is making signifi- 
cant progress on human rights,” said Robin 
Monro, Hong Kong director for Human Rights 
Watch/ Asia. 

The move appears to be a calculated risk by 
the ailing Chinese C ommunis t Party. Despite 
negative repercussions over Mr. Wei's deten- 


tion. Chinese leaders seem to be betting that 
American economic interests will ultimately 
prevail ova human rights concerns. 

The commonly held belief among Chinese 
officials and Western analysts here is that the 
United States, fearful of being shut out of the 
world’s biggest emerging market, will find a 
way to renew China's trading status in early 
June. 

Mr. Wei, 43, was detained Friday by seven 
carloads of police as he was returning to the 
capital from the nearby port of Tianjin. He 
spent most of last month traveling outside of 
Beijing, apparently unda pressure from the 
authorities. 

The authorities are now saying that Mr. Wei 
is “being interrogated and placed under surveil- 
lance by the Beijing Public Security Depart- 
ment” because “he violated the law on many 
occasions and he is suspected of having com- 
mitted new crimes when he was deprived of his 
political rights and on parole," the official Xin- 


hua press agency said. U did not say what the 
new offenses were, ot where be was being held. 

In Beijing, the U.S. Embassy said it had 
“expressed concern about Mr. Wefs situation" 

See CHINA, Page5 


By Roger Cohen 

New York Tunes Service 

PARIS — After six weeks of rapid progress 
that raised hopes for an overall Bosnian settle- 
ment, U.S. attempts to settle the Balkan con- 
flict are floundering, beset by a worsening mili- 
tary situation on the ground and a diplomatic 
impasse over what territorial concessions are 
needed for peace. 

On the one hand, U.S. officials said, a Serbi- 
an offensive on the Muslim-held eastern Bosni- 
an enclave of Gorazde and on Muslim ovilians 
in northwestern Bosnia has posed the question 
of whether the Bosnian Serbs are seriously 
interested in a settlement 

On the other, they said, the Muslim-led Bos- 
nian government has been showing growing 
resistance to an American proposal that it 
should accept a peace settlement offering the 
recently formed Muslim-Croai federation 51 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

percent of the territory of Bosnia- H erzegovina, 
and is pressing for considerably more land. 

The Bosnian Serbs, after two years of war, 
control 72 percent of the territory and would 
thus have to reduce their share to 49 percent 
under this U.S. proposal, which has been 
agreed on with the British, French and German 
governments. 

“We’re not prepared to go beyond 51 percent 
for the Muslims, which is the postion we have 
agreed with the Europeans and that Bosnian 
President Alija Izetbegovic had indicated last 
year would be acceptable,” said one official 
close to the US. diplomatic efforts. “But the 
Muslims are now saying they want all ethnical- 
ly cleansed land bade, and there’s just no way 
you can fit that into 51 percenL” 

The combination of Serb brutality in Gor- 
azde and Pnjedor and the hardening position of 
Mr. Izetbegovic’s government has brought the 
diplomatic efforts led by theU.S. medal envoy, 
Charles Redman, to a virtual standstill, officials 
said. 

“Right now, we're treading water." said a 
second offi cial. “There was enormous move- 
ment in recent weeks and a hope that the 
improvement in Sarajevo would have an ame- 
liorating effect elsewhere. Those hopes are 
floundering. There are wonyiug troop move- 
ments on all sides and no sign of a turnaround 
across the board.” 

Conflicting reports exist on the intensity of 
the Serbian attack on Gorazde, and U.S. offi- 
cials believe accounts from Sarajevo radio are 
probably exaggerated. 

But whatever its true extent, the attack is 
dearly not compatible with an earnest Serbian 
desire for a settlement Indeed, U.S. officials 
believe it lodes more like a way to buy time — 
and a reflection of the divergent positions 
among Serbian leaders in both Serbia and Bos- 
nia. 

These divergences appear to be increasingly 
marked. President Slobodan Milosevic of Ser- 
bia is eager to find a settlement because his 
priority is to ensure the lifting of crippling 
sanctions on the rump Yugoslav state. 

But the Serbian suHtary commander in Bos- 
nia, General Ratko Mladic, is opposed to the 
surrender of any captured land, and convinced 
that the goal of a “Greater Serbia” is best 
served by the prosecution of the war. 

“Mladic remains hard-core,” said one offi- 
cial “He's not budging from land where Serbi- 
an soldiers have sacrificed their lives.” 

The latest Serbian offensive in Gorazde and 
the wave of killings and forced evictions of 
Muslims in Pnjedor followed a shattering per- 
sonal tragedy for General Mladic. His 23-year- 
old daughter. Ana, a fifth-year medicial student 

See POLICY, Page 5 


Troops Only 
2 Miles From 
City of Gorazde 

By Chuck Sudetic 

New York Tima Service 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia- Herzegovina — Na- 
tionalist Serbian fighters poured through 
breached Bosnian Army defense lines around 
the UN-declared “safe area" of Gorazde Tues- 
day, setting fire to a dozen villages in their path 
and forcing more than a thousand Muslims to 
flee, United Nations officials here said. 

“The Sobs are going for it," said a UN 
official. “They are going to at least try to take 
over the eastern end of the pocket and push the 
Muslims over the river.” 

The official who spoke on condition of ano- 
nymity, referred to the Drina River, which 
bisects the Gorazde pocket. 

“The Serbs moved ahead one kilometer north 
to the river," the official said. 

Another United Nations official said the 
Bosnia Serbian forces had advanced northward 
to within two miles (three kilometers) of the city 
of Gorazde, which is jammed with refugees. 

[In Washington, the chairman of the U.S. 
Joint duels of Staff said Tuesday that the use 
of allied air power would not be appropriate to 
break the siege of Gorazde, Reuters reported. 

j“l think the conditions were wry different,” 
said General John Shalikasbviti, referring to 
Sarajevo, where the United States supported 
the threat of intervention with air power to 
force Serbian forces to pull back. “Those same 
conditions might once again come to pass in 
Gorazde, and then Fm sure NATO will re- 
evaluate its stance,” he said.] 

Bosnian radio, whose accounts from Gor- 
azde over the last week have mostly been borne 
out by subsequent United Nations reports, said 
Tuesday night that a total of 73 people had 
been killed and about 300 wounded in the 
eight-day-old Serbian offensive. 

The spokesman in Sarajevo for the UN High 
Commissioner for Refugees, Kris Janowslri, 
said that UN aid workers in Gorazde had 
confirmed 52 dead and 249 wounded. 

“Refugees from about eight villages have 
arrived in Gorazde,” Mr. Janowski stud, esti- 
mating that about 1.500 uprooted people bad 
sought shelter in private homes, schools and 
other institutional buddings in Gorazde. 

“Practically all the civilians south of the 
Drina bend have been dislocated," he said, 
indicating that some Muslims fleeing villages 
south of the town of Gorazde had crossed the 
Drina River from the east bank, seeking shelter. 

The Serbian offensive showed no signs of 
easing despite the fact that the senior UN 
military commander in Bosnia, Lieutenant 
General Michael Rose, was scheduled to visit 
Gorazde on Wednesday. 

Serbian infantry and tank assaults late Tues- 
day were most bitter from the direction of 
Ustipraca, a Serb-held village north of Gor- 
azde, Sarajevo radio said. New, heavy Serbian 
artillery barrages began on front-line positions 
in the area about 4:30 P.ML, it said. 

Except for penetrations of Serb-held territo- 
ry by Muslim commando units, Gorazde’s 
65,000 people have been cut off since last May 
from die central swath of Bosnia that is con- 
trolled by Bosnian Army forces, 

Bosnian Army officers in Sarajevo said that 
the defenders of Gorazde were dangerously low 
on ammunition. 

UN observers reported last week that one of 
the Serbs' objectives was to take ova a weap- 
ons-assembly facility on the Drina’s east bank 
inside the town. 

The Serbs clearly covet Gorazde because it 
lies along the Drina as well as a main highway 
finking Serbia’s capital, Belgrade, with the 
Sab-nod towns farther upstream and the Cro- 
atian resort city of Dubrovnik. 


Zhirinovsky and Friends: Quite a Party 


By Celestine Bohlen 

New York Times Sendee 

came to power. 


introduction of guests, including a German 
neofasdst, a delegation sent by President Sad- 
dam Hussein of Iraq, and a Russian genera l 
recently freed from prison fa his role in the 
- against Preadeut Boris N. Yeltsin in 



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But the crowning moment came when the 
343 delegates, with not a single dissenting voice, 
not even a whimper of debate, raised their pink 
party cards in unison and voted to make Mr. 
Zhirinovsky their dictator, with full powers to 
centred all party affairs, from finances to ap- 
pointments, until April 2, 2004- With the same 
vote, the dekgates also agreed not to bother 
meeting again until 1997— one year after Mr. 
Zhirinovsky, by his most conservative estimate, 
will have become president of Russia, heading a 
“one-party government” 

“The leader and the party are (me and the 
same,” Mr. Zhirinovsky sard in his opening 
speech. “This regime is m its final agony. And 
when a rick man is lying on the operating table, 
you need a angle doctor, not a team of consul- 
tants." He also took his first swipe, indirectly, 
at Mr. Yeltsin, describing the 63-year-old presi- 
dent as ailing and in need of eariy retirement 

There is no letup from the bombastic Mr. 
Zhirinovsky, whose party turned Russian poli- 


tics upside down four months ago by winning a 

quarter of the votes in the parliamentary elec- 
tions. Though his outbursts have elicited guf- 
faws or outrage here and abroad, they have also 
had as unmistakable effect on Russian and 
international politics. The Yeltsin government 
has absorbed the “Zhirinovsky factor," notably 
in its foreign policy, which now puts c on s id e r - 
able, wnd repeated, fm ph«is on the need to 
assert Russia’s great-power status and on the 
interests of the 25 million ethnic Russians living 
outride the country. 

What is less dear is his success at building a 
so&d base for future electoral campaigns. His 
party did poorly in recent local elections, and 
polls continue to show that a majority of voters 
do not regard Mr. Zhirinovsky as a serious 
contender fa the presidency. 

In a sutvct of 1,500 people by the Russan 
Center for Public Opinion and Market Re- 
search at the end of March, 63 percent said they 
did not trust Mr. Zhirinovsky at all 

“It was some kind of a splash," said Gennadi 
Burbulis, a political strategist dosehr allied to 
the Yeltsin camp , referring to the December 
results- “Three months were enough to realize 

See RUSSIA, Page 5 



Kiosk 


U.S. Says Saddam 
Offers Bounties 


WASHINGTON (Reuters) — The United 
States charged Tuesday that Saddam Hus- 
sein’s government was offering bounties of 
up to $10,000 to anyone lolling UN workers 
and other foreigners in northern Iraq. 

“The United States strongly condemns re- 
cent attacks against United Nations person- 
nel and journalists in northern Iraq ova the 
past several weeks,” a State Department 
spokesman, Michael McCurry. said. 

At United Nations headquarters in New 
York, a spokesman said two UN guards were 
wounded Tuesday in an attack on a convoy in 
a Kurdish region of northern Iraq. 

A Kurdish group blamed Mr. Saddam for 
the dearii of the only permanent foreign jour- 
nalist in Kurdish-controlled northern Iraq. 
Ussy Schmidt, 35, a German a free-lance 
correspondent for Agence France-Presse and 
German media, was shot dead along with ba 
bodyguard in an ambush Sunday. 


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CHAMPIONS— CorfissWflHamson, right, and Corey Beck embracing on the coot 
after Aiiansas beat Duke, 76-72, to win its first NCAA basketball title. Page 17 


Books 

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In Italy, Election Marks a Shift to Winner - Takes- AU Politics 


By Alan Cowell 

Nor York Times Service 

ROME — If Italy’s ejection turns out 
to herald the peaceful revolution some 
forecast before the vote, the reason will 
not just lie in new faces and new promises 
of change after years of corruption and 
stagnation. 

Rather, the most fundamental c hang e 
will be in the relationship bet w een win- 
ner and loss, between a government and 
an opposition that will have to digest the 
most shocking implication of the vote: In 
Italy’s new political system, the winner 
takes almost everything and the loser gets 
virtually nothing. 

for more than 40 years, Italian politics 
developed on a system the Italian s cal l 
consocunivismo, which denoted the com- 
promise and pain-easing that co-opted 
the government’s opponents into the ma- 
chinery of power. Even in opposition, the 
Communists — now called the Demo- 


cratic Party of the Left — kept a solid 
dare of the spoils. 

The Communists controlled one of the 
three state-nm television channels, just as 
the Christian Democrats and the Social- 
ists did. They provided tire speaker of 
Parliament and the heads of important 
parliamentary commissions. Business co- 
operatives set up by the party shared in 
big state contracts. ' 


on labor 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


nwi a, j KriiMt nia mm mmuw muw 

eoserious opposition to successive Chris- 
tian Democrat-led coalitions as politi- 
cians and businessmen plundered the- 
state coffers. 

“They were never in government,” said 
Paolo Viola, a historian in Palermo, “but 
they were always part of the power struc- 
ture.” 

Last week, thoug h , when a rightist alli- 


ance ted by the media magnate Silvio 
Bezlusconi surged to victory, it did so 
under a newly legislated political system 
that broke with the proportional repre- 
sentation underpinning this unwritten 
pact bet w een government and opposi- 
tion, the central principle of Italy’s politi- 
cal culture 

And now, the left — embedded in 
Italian politics for decades, since the 
struggle against fascism — faces a reap- 
praisal as profound as it confronted after 
the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. 

Signs that Mr. Berlusconi's alliance 
wants to play these new rules to the full 
are already apparent. 

Gianfranco Fini, the neofascist leader 
whose 103 pariiamralaiy seats are crucial 
to the right’s 366-seat majority in the 
lower house, said in a recent interview: 
“Enough with consociativistno in man- 
agement, in government. Nobody can 
stress it more than me.” 

He threatened “a radical renewal of 


the 40-year-old nomenclature of this 
country” — a warning that applied as 


much to tire left as it did to the former 
Christian Democrats, who emerged from 
the election with only 46 lower house 
seats. 

Massimo d’Alema, deputy leader of 
the forme Communists, has expressed 
fears th«» “delicate balances” wiu be up- 
set by ihe vote. 

“If the majority does not respect the 
minority,” he said, “we will end up not in 
Europe but in certain parts of Latin 
America.” 

Under the new doctoral system, Ital- 
ians chose three-quartets of the lower 
house of Parliament under a direct-vot- 
ing system in each district, and the re- 
maining 25 percent under the old propor- 
tional system. Voters cast one vote for an 
individual candidate and rate vote for the 
party of their choice. 

In the party vote, the Democratic Par- 


ty of the Left ran a close second to Mr. 
Berfusconi*s Forza Italia party. 

Forza Italia secured 21 percent of the 
vote and the former Communists 20.4 

percent, which is 4 percent higher than 
tfadr share of the ballot in the last nation- 
al elections in 1992. They were bolstered 
by surprise victories in part of the conser- 
vative south, which had traditionally sup- 
ported the defunct Christian Democrats. 

Because Forza Italia is aligned with 
two other major rightist parties, its coali- 
tion has 58 percent of the seats, while the 
former Communists and their weaker al- 
lies have only 34 percent of the total. 

But the fact that the leftists showed 
such strong voter support gives than rat- 
son far hope. Moreover, they remain 
probably the best-organized, deepest- 
rooted and widest-spread group among 
the main playeis to emerge from last 
week’s election. But they have yet to 
define how they wiD buDd credentials as a 
credible alternative. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Britain Bars Talks During lRA Truce 

DUBLIN (Reuters)— Hours before the Irish RepttifenAimy’sxaost 
important erase-fire since 1975, Britain stuck firmly on Tuesday to its 
view that the unilateral three-day truce was not enough to unlock a stalled 

^Bnt Sinn Fein, the IRA’s political wing, said it still hoped that Loudon 
would use the break in fighting to oontact it to raplain al British-lrish 
peace offer. The cease-fire could then become open-ended, Sinn Fein has 
hinted. But Britain remained unimpressed. 

“What is needed is not a three-day cease-fire, after which the killing * 
would brain a gain, but a permanent end to violence,” a British govern- 
spokesman said Tuesday. 


<4. 

IU 1 


i a 


meat spot 


New Tally of Space Shots Gone Awry 


Japan’s Reactor 
Puts It on Path to 
Fuel Independence 


By T. R. Reid 

Washington Post Service 

SHIRAKt Japan — Japan took 


an important step along its bold 
rial 


and controversial course toward 
energy independence Tuesday 
when engineers flawlessly started a 
sustained nuclear reaction in an ex- 
perimental plutonium-fueled pow- 
er plant 

The Monju reactor plant, a big 
inverted concrete thimble, is a $6 
billion prototype of a chain of 
breeder reactors the Japanese {dan 
to build around this archipelago, 
which has no fossil fuel resources. 

Breeder reactors have been run 
on a smaller scale in the United 
States for decades. They are de- 
signed to breed new fuel at the 
same time they produce heal — like 
a fireplace that burns all night but 
has more logs the next morning 
than it started with. 

When the Monju reactor was 
planned a generation ago, this 
seemed perfect for a power-hungry 
industrial nation that has to import 
virtually all its energy supply. But 
today the plan looks less attractive, 
because the fuel it breeds is pluto- 
nium, a dangerously toxic material 
that can be used for nuclear bombs, 
and is currently in oversupply 
around the world. 

Mindful of criticism, particularly 


from foreign environmental 
groups, officials here are now 
stressing another aspect of their 
breeder-reactor concept: with some 
design changes, a reactor like the 
Monju can be made to consume 
rather than breed plutonium. 

If that is posable, breeder reac- 
tors might be beneficial to the U-S. 
and other countries now saddled 
with plutonium supplies — left 
over from Cold War nuclear weap- 
ons — that nobody has found a 
good way to dispose of. Burning 
the plutonium in electric power 
plants might provide an alterna- 
tive. 

Whether or not it turns out to be 
helpful, the breeder reactor tech- 
nology has been expensive. The 
plant here was years behind sched- 
ule in reaching Tuesday’s chain re- 
action, or “initial criticality,” and it 
cost far more than a normal reactor 
plant of the same size. 

This has been embarrassing to 
Japan’s utility industry and the 
government, particularly since 
there is a glut of uranium fuel and 
plutonium is more expensive and 
more dangerous. 

But the Japanese are thinking 
ahead “This is a plan for the 21st 
century, or the 22d century,” said 
Satsuu Fda, director of Japan’s 



WASHINGTON (Reutera) — Since the space age began, 27 1 missions 
have failed or malfunctioned and two-thirds of the failures were Soviet or 
Russian, according to a new study released on Tuesday. 

Of the 271 missions cited, 108 were considered failures. They included 
infamous tragedies, such as the 1986 shuttle Challenger disaster, as wdl 
as less costly, unmanned missions that went awry. He study by the 
Virginia-based Teal space consulting company said 71 of the payload 
failures since 1958 were Soviet or Russian in origin, and 34 were 
American. It did not give the total number of successful missions. 

The Soviet-made Cosmos satellite accounted for more than half of the 
Soviet payload failures. Most of the US. payload failures occurred 
during the 1960s. About one dozen of the failures were unmanned 
planetary probes in that decade, but three major missions failed in 1992 
and 1993. 


Malaysia Warns on 'Schindler’s List’ 


.1-t V. 

■ir'k> ■■ 


KUALA LUMPUR (AP) — Malaysia warned the distributor of the 
"Holocaust film “Schindler’s List” on Tuesday that it could not demand 
that the movie be shown here uncut 
The warning followed a cabinet decision last week to lift a ban on the 
film, which Malaysian censors had rejected as propaganda designed to 
gain support for Israel and Jews. Al the time, it wassaid that the fum stiH 
migh t be subject to cuts, particularly of scenes depicting sex or violence. 
U nited International Pictures then said that the Acad emy Award-win- 
ning movie, directed by Stcvea Spielberg, would not be screened in 
Malaysia if any scenes woe cul 

“don’t point a pistol at us while asking for something,” Deputy Home 
Minister Megat Junid Megat Ayob said on Tuesday. “Spielberg does not 
run this country.” 


,,-n* 1 


iiii 


lk 


Children Were in Cockpit, Panel Says 


Gtigprr DokoV Rouen 

WARNING FROM RUSSIAN NUCLEAR WORKERS — A midear power station worker <v>n fmn t m g Russian officials T uesda y 
ilmrhb* a protest at the parliament bmfafeig in Moscow. TTie workers warned that failure tn pay their wages mnVJ tn a mg j ^r ifoeasfor 


Science and Technology Agency. 
“Japan is poor in energy resources, 
so we have to use the power of our 
technology to build a future for 
ourselves.” 

Japan is the Financial and tech- 
nological leader of Aria, and its 
commitment to nuclear plants to 
meet future power needs is being 
followed all over the world’s most 
populous continent While nuclear 
development has been stalled be- 
cause of political opposition in Eu- 
rope and the United States, China, 
South Korea, and the developing 
nations of Southeast Asa are mov- 
ing strongly into nuclear power 
production. 


An electric power plant is basi- 
cally a big tea pot. Water in a large 
pot is healed, and the steam drives 
turbines to make electricity. 

A coal- or oil-fueled plant works 
something like a kitchen stove, with . 
a fire to boQ the water. This is 
cheap, at least far countries with 
ready access to coal or oil, but it 
produces air pdluticm and the 
“greenhouse gasses” some believe 
cause global warming. 


The downside is that nuclear 
plants pose the threat of an atomic 
accident, like those that made 
Three MDe Island and Chernobyl 
part of everyone’s disaster lan- 
Disposal of used fuel is also 
Scuta. 


In a nuclear plant, a controlled 
atnmir reaction releases h«»t ener- 
gy to replace the fire. With no 
b urning fuel, there is no air perfla- 
tion and no increase in global 
wanning 


This possibility has not yet prov- 
en to be a political block to nuclear 
development here. 

The Japanese have more faith 
both in the wisdom of government 
regulators and in the virtues of 
technology than have Americans 
and others. Moreover, the Japanese 
safety record in the 42 reactors op- 
erating now has been excellent, ac- 
cording to Allen E. Dobberiey, a 


General Electric engineer who was 
the U.S. observer hoe. 

Accordingly, the Japanese public 
has been essentially passive — not 
eagerly supportive of nuclear pow- 
er, but not agitated against it, ei- 
ther. Most of the opposition to Ja- 
pan's plutonium reactor plan has 
come from American and British 
anti-nudear groups. 

Tuesday’s long-awaited chain re- 
action at Monju was the chief news 
of the day all over Japan. But only a 
scattered group of protesters gath- 
ered on the sunny beach here, beat- 
ing drums and chanting a planned 
demonstration in Tokyo, mean- 
while, drew just right people, ac- 
cording to news reports. 


MOSCOW (Reuters) — A Russian government commission investigat- 
ing the crash of an Aeroflot Airbus 310 that killed all 75 people aboard 
confirmal Tuesday that one of the cockpit crew was showing ms children 
how to pilot the plane minutes before it went dawn. A commission 
statement did not say directly that this was the reason for the March 23 
crash in Siberia. 

The statement said the flight recorders showed the scheduled flight 
from Moscow to Hoag Kong was proceeding without any problems until 
it had passed ova the Siberian dty of Novokuznetsk. 

It then said: “It was established that present in the cockpit were the son 
and a daughter of a crew member who, in violation ctf flight rules, was 
demonstrating and exp laining to them the principles of piloting a plane. 
Four minutes after passing Novokuznetsk, the plane diverted to the right 
more than it should, winch resulted in a sharp loss of altitude and 
collision with the ground.” 


Delhi Protesters Attack Trade Pact 


NEW DELHI (Reuters) — Several policemen and demonstrators were 
injured Tuesday as tens of thousands of people protested against the 
government’s acceptance of a world trade agreement 
Witnesses said the police had been hurt by stones thrown by some in 


the crowd protesting the pact readied late last year for the General 

itifiedo 


Pyongyang Sees Shades of 1950 

War Could Break Outat Any Moment, North Korea Says 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — The official North 
Korean press agency said Tuesday 
that war clouds were banging ova 
the Korean Peninsula, with the sit- 
uation closely resembling that on 
the eve of the 1950-53 Korean con- 
flict 

In an alarmist assessment of 
events related to the crisis ova 
Pyongyang’s suspected midear- 
weapons program, the Korean 
Central News Agency said, “A 
touch-and-go situation is prevail- 
ing on the Korean Peninsula in 
winch a war may break out any 
moment.” 

The agency said the United 
States was planning to stage pro- 
vocative large-scale war games, de- 
ploy Patriot missiles in South Ko- 
rea and ship in additional troops 
and weapons to counter an antici- 
pated North Korean attack. 

"The U.S. military has worked 
out an operational plan to hurl 
600,000 troops, more than 200 war- 
ships and 1,600 aircraft and so on 
from the U.S. mainland within 80 
days in case of an ‘emergency 1 on 
the Korean P eninsula, " the agency 
said. 

“On bellicose orders from the 
U.S. ruling quartos and undo 
their aggressive war plan, 48 U.S. 
missil e launchers and a more than 
800-man Patriot missile unit are on 
their way to South Korea at pre- 
sent.” 

It added: “Overseas-based war- 


planes of various types are flying 
into U-S. Air Force bases in South 
Korea one on the heels of the other, 
and the airlifted aggressor troops 
and lethal equipment are bring de- 
ployed in operational zones. 

“And U.S. vessels including a 
nuclear aircraft carrier are at so 
dose & range that they can reach 
the coastal area of Korea within 24 
hours.” 

The news agency dted the call by 
South Korea’s president, Kim 
Young Sam, to his military chiefs 
to set up what it called a thorough- 
going alert posture against the 
North, a South Korean military 
atert and a visit by the country’s 
prime minister to frontline units. 

These and several other ominous 
developments, the agency said, 
“tdl that the situation on the Kore- 
an Peninsula resembles dial on the 
eve Of the pa st Korean War.” 

Although North Korea insists 
that U.S. and South Korean forces 
attacked northward on June 25, 

it was'dle^lo^ 1 ^ launched a 
massive invasion cm that day. 

The war seemed lost for the 
United Stales and South Korea un- 
til General Douglas MacArthur 
landed a UN-mandated force at 
Inchon, on the Yellow Sea coast, 
threatening the North’s supply 
lines and c gnring Firing to inter- 
vene on North Korea’s side. 


In Seoul on Tuesday, meanwhile, 
more than 2,000 students fought 
with police officers during a protest 
of South Korea’s agreement to de- 
ploy the Patriot missiles. Dozens of 
students were injured in dashes 
with about 1,000 riot police offi- 
cers. About 300 students were ar- 
rested. 


Protesters shouting for Sooth 
Korea’s president to resign 
marched onto a busy street after a 
two-hour campus rally. They also 
Mr. Kim’s 


accused Mr. Kim’s government of 
haring made too many concessions 
in lowering barriers to foreign rice 
and other farm products. 

(Reuters, AF) 


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Loe Angeles, CA HOMO 


The war became stalemated, and 
it was not until 1953 that the two 
sides signed the truce that has 
maintaine d a tense peace on the 
peninsula eva since. 


Chad Says Libya to Start 
Leaving Disputed Area 

Agence France-Prase 

NDJAMENA, Chad —The gov- 
ernment said Tuesday that Libya 
would begin to withdraw troops 
and officials occupying Chao’s 
northern Aozou strip April 15 and 
complete the operation by May 30. 

Under an agreement readied 
Monday, after the settlement of a 
long dispute ova the uranium-rich 
territory, the troop withdrawal and 
mine-lifting operations are to be 
supervised by a team of 25 Libyan 
ana 25 Chadian officers. The agree- 
ment provides for joint patrols an 
the border of the territory, which 
was occupied by Libya in 1972 and 
which the International Court of 
Justice in The Hague ruled two 
months ago belonged to Chad. 


U.S. Recalls Crayons , 
Citing a Lead Hazard 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Consumer Product Safety Co mmissi on 
on Tuesday recalled 11 brands of crayons imported from China 
because they contain lead. 

“Throw these crayons in the trash or take them back to the store 
for a refund,” said Ann Brown, chairman of the commission. 

The commission said three of the brands “contain enough lead to 
present a lead-poisoning hazard to young children who might eat or 
chew on the crayons.” 

They are “121 Jumbo Crayons," distributed by Concord Enter- 
prises; “Safe 48 Non-Toxic Tm a Toys *R’ Us Kid! Crayons,” 
distributed by Toys *R’ Us, and “12 Crayons, Glory” and “18 
Crayons That Paint,” distributed by Glory Stationery Manufactur- 
ing Co. 

(A spokeswoman the Toys ’R’ Us headquarters in Paramus, New 
Jersey, told the International Herald Tribune that its stores outside 
the United Stales did not sell the tainted crayons and that few were 
sold made the United States. The company has not purchased the 
crayons since 1990, she said.] 

The Glory crayons also indude the legend “Conforms ASTM D- 
4236” the commissioa said, which is supposed to be an indication 
that the formula has been reviewed by a toxicologist 


New Exhibit 
Planned lor 
Buchenwald 


Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and due to be ratified next week in 
Morocco. The protesters, from trade anions and agricultural, youth and 
women's groups, said the agreement was against India’s interests. 

The government denies roe demonstrators’ claim that the pact would 
allow foreign companies to patent the high-ridding seeds that in the 
1960s set on the “green revolution” that mad* India largely sdf-suffident 
in food grains. Some of the protesters also say that India’s new market- 
oriented economic program favors the rich. 


Rutskoi Calls for Ouster of Yeltsin 


The other eight brands, the panel said, “do not contain enough 
level ab 


lead to increase the blood level above the threshold level fa lead 
poisoning” for a child typically chewing on small pieces of lead- 
containing crayons ova a span of tune. 

But the agency added that it was “very concerned about these 
crayons because they add to the overall ‘lead load* to children who 
may eat them.” 

Lead has long been recognized as a hazardous substance, especial- 
ly to young children and infants. It can cause irreversible brain 
Hamagff and can impair functioning. 


Reuters 


BONN — Germany will unveil a 
new museum plan fa the former 
Nazi concentration camp at Bu- 
chenwald tins week to show how it 
was used not only by the Nazis but 
by Soviet occupation forces and 
East German Communist propa- 
gandists. 

The new exhibit, deagned by 
leading historians, will explain fa 
the first time bow Soviet troops 
interned captured Nazis and other 
political opponents there from 
1945 to 1950, a fact kepi quiet dur- 
ing four decades of Communist 
rule. 


MOSCOW (Reuters) — Forma Vice President Alexander V. Rutskoi 
began a campaign on Tuesday to remove President Boris N. Yeltsin from 
office, dealing a new blow to the Russian leader’s hopes fa a political 
truce. 

In a confrontational interview published in Pravda, Mr. Rutskoi, 46, 
called Russia’s leaders swindlers and villains and ruled out any chance of 
reconciliation. In October, Mr. Rutskoi led a violent uprising against Mr. 
Yeltsin, whose five-year term ends in mid- 1996. Mr. Rutskoi was freed 
fromprison in February after he was granted amnesty by the parliament. 

“There should be no iDusions about the posabOtay of any changes fa 
the better under this president and this government,” he said. “That is 
why it is accessary to stop playing with consensus or agreements and get 
down to work — to change the authorities by legal methods.” 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Strike May Shut Paris-Area Museums 


60 Gravestones Are Damaged 
In Slovakia Jewish Cemetery 


jua ssk die butter... 




N -G- A-P-O- R-E 


Wim iKTwiti ii ..yihiug jr»» ml it t« b. 


Reuters 

BRATISLAVA, Slovakia — 
Vandals damaged more than 60 
gravestones al a Jewish cemetery in 
western Slovakia during the week- 
cud, Slovak Jewish leaders said on 
Tuesday. 

Some tombstones were “uproot- 
ed with great force, but none ap- 
peared to have been hit with a bam- 


rnurnty Lea< 
Frantisek Alexander, told Renters. 

Mr. Alexander, who visited the 
wrecked cemetery at Vrbove. said 
the damage occurred at the end of 
last week, coinciding with the Jew- 
ish Passover and Christian Easter 
religious holidays. No suspects 
have been identified. 


It wiD also redesign the existing 
exhibit on the Nazi era, an East 
German display that glorifies the 
resistance work of Communist in- 
mates at Buchenwald, the museum 
directa. Wanna Brans, said. 

The historians, who wfl] unveil 
the plan on Saturday just before 
sumring inmates mark the 49th 
anniversary of them hberation, pro- 
pose a smaller separate museum on 
the Stalinist era so that the mam 
focus remains on the Nazis’ crimes. 

“You simply cannot put what 
the Soviets did on a par with what 
the Nazis did,” Mr. Brans said. 

About 56.000 inmates died un- 
da the Nazis in Buchenwald. a 
hilltop camp near Weimar in East 
Germany, and another 10,000 fell 
victim to harsh Soviet post-war in- 
ternment (here. 


PARIS (Reuters) — Labor unions threatened to dose some of France's 
leading museums in a 24-hour strike planned fa Wednesday to back 
demands for higher wages and better waking conditions. 

The Democratic Labor Federation said the stoppage could dose the 
Louvre and Orsay museums in Paris and the Versailles palace near the 
capital, and cause severe disruption at other museums. Four unions are 
organizing the strike, saying the museums’ staff of 2^00 were getting 
insufficient pay fa increasingly complex duties. 

Paris authorities braced for a subway and bus strike Thursday over 
feared job losses in a proposed transport reform bill for the capital region. 
The work stoppage, called by most of the transport unions, is expected to 
be widely observed and cause major disruptions. (AFP) 

Lego, the Danish toymaker, said it would build its first theme park 
outside Denmark at Britain ’s old Windsor Safari Park, to the west of 
London. (Ream) 

Greek tobacco growera Hocked road and rafl Boles between Athens and 
the northern port of Salonika fa a fifth day on Tuesday lo protest low 11 
prices. (Reuters) 

Foreign tour groups alarmed by bombings at Istanbul’s historic sites are 
canceling vacations to Turkey in large numbers. A Spanish man and a 
Tunisian women were killed and 13 people were wounded in a bomb 
exploaon al the city’s 15-century covered market on Saturday, the second 
attack on the bazaar in 10 days. Four people were hurt in a blast there tm 
March 24. Three tourists were iqured in a blast in the garden of the 6th- 
century Haghia Sophia basilica on Match 27. (Raders) 






-I- . 


Austria President to Mideast 


Reuters 

VIENNA — Austria’s president, 
Thomas JQestil, will be on state 
visits in Syria and Jordan from Sat- 
urday to Wednesday, Austria 
Presse-Agentur reported. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. APRIL 6, 1994 


Page 3 


TSEAMERICAS /the PRIC 



CADILLAC VERS 



Aides Raise Clinton Welfare Plan’s Cost 


% t. 


By Jason Dcparle 

ffo* York Times Service 

WASHINGTON - Pnaidem 
Bilj Clinton's plan io overhaul the 
welfare system could cost much 
more in the long run than previous- 

disclosed. possibly adding S58 
billion to welfare costs over 10 
years, according to a memorandum 
presented to Mr. Clinton. 

The document also says the pres- 
idem should understand that “in 
rare arcumstances" his plan to en- 
force a two-year limit on welfare 
benefits could leave families 

Jomd«* or raab]c tQ ^ f 

their children. 

The memorandum, drafted by 
the administration's working group 
on wdfare, provides ibTmost de- 
tailed information yet about the 
decisions Mr. Clinton faces in try- 
ing to fulfill one of his most popu- 
lar campaign pledges. 


Mexican 
Inquiry 
Still Seeks 
A Motive 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MEXICO CITY — The assassi- 
nation of the presidential candi- 
date Luis Donaldo Colosio last 
month was a conspiracy, but au- 
thorities said Tuesday that investi- 
gators were still trying to determine 
who had ordered the killing and 
why. 

Miguel Montes Garda, the gov- 
ernment's special investigator, said 
Monday that five suspects, includ- 
ing the alleged killer, were in custo- 
dy and that two others were being 
sought in the murder of the govern- 
ing Institutional Revolutionary 
Party’s candidate in the election 
scheduled for August 

But in his second statement since 
be was put in charge of the inquiry, 
Mr. Montes was suli unable to pro- 
vide a motive for the killing on 
March 23 or to say who might have 
been behind it 

Mr. Montes did not ever) say 
whether there was any link among 
the seven suspects, alt of whom — 
apart from tbc alleged killer. Mario 
Aburto Martinez, 23 — hindered 
the movements of Mr. Colosio as 
he was leaving a campaign rally In 
Tijuana. 

He said the suspects had been 
identified from photographs and a 

lin fllTtr 

swercd, perhaps the most intrigu- 
ing is why two 38-caliber bullets 
fired at Mr. Colosio had opposite 
trajectories; right to left for the one 
fired into ins temple, and left to 
right for the bullet that pierced his 
abdomen. 

Mr. Montes also said nothing 
about the security arrangements 
for Mr. Colosio's rally, or on why 
its venue had been changed at (he 
last minute, depriving him of an 
emergency escape route. 

The new evidence contradicted 


The memorandum outlines what 
aides are calling a “Cadillac ver- 
sion" of a welfare proposal, but it 
acknowledges that its cost may 
force Mr. Clmton to adopt a more 
modest plan. 

The president deferred that deci- 
sion at a cabinet meeting two weeks 
ago. An administration official, 
who asked not to be identified, pre- 
dicted on Monday that the presi- 
dent would adopt a version that 
would add S35 billion in welfare 
costs over 10 years. 

Mr. Clinton has promised to de- 
liver a bill this spring that would 
expand training programs for peo- 
ple on welfare and require those 
stfll unemployed after two years to 
join a wont program. 

Financing the new program has 
become the most problematic as- 
pect of the proposal in recent 
months. Cabinet officials have re- 


peatedly rejected the program cuts 
or tax increases suggested by mid- 
levd officials. 

Aid to Families with Dependent 
Children, the main federal welfare 
now costs about 522 bil- 
a year. By 1999, the full Clin- 
ton plan would increase that figure 
by about 57 billion a year, accord- 
ing to the document 

The memorandum suggests that 
long-term costs would be even 
greater than previously known. 
Earlier estimates suggested 
that the proposed changes would 
cost about SIS billion for the first 
five years. The memorandum says 
that in the second five vears, costs 
would more than double, t eaching 
568 billion over 10 years. The costs 
rise because the program is being 
slowly phased in. 

While the plan to impose a two- 


year limit on welfare benefits 
sounds like it would save money, it 
would actually be much more ex- 
pensive, at least in the short run, 
than simply mailing a welfare 
check. Thai is because the adminis- 
tration will create (raining, educa- 
tion and child-care programs, and 
subsidize the wages of the recipi- 
ents it puts to work. 

The document outlines possible 
cuts or taxes that would raise tens 
of billions of dollars over the next 
decade, but it calls all of the op- 
tions undesirable, 

“Each faces serious political 
problems and raises some substan- 
tive concerns," the memorandum 
said. The document was provided 
by a source who believes that the 
money for the welfare changes 
could be belter spent on other pro- 
grams for low-income Americans. 


Uproar Over Guns in Cabin 

Airline Crews Await a Decision on Law Officers 9 Rights 


By Don Phillips 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Captain Paul Boyer of 
American Airlines was reviewing paperwork last 
fall before the departure of Flight 1363 from Jack- 
sou, Mississippi, to Dallas when he discovered 
forms indicating that 1 1 aimed law officers were 
aboard, several of them with more than one weap- 
on. 

Law enforcement officers on official business 
are allowed to carry weapons aboard airliners if 
they are declared to the airline, and Captain Boyer 
had seen numerous copies of airline ‘Tonn E-2” 
before. 

But 1 1 seemed an unusually large number, and 
he decided that their .business, returning to Los 

* j ,5. 


lion, was not official. He demanded the guns be 
checked, and refused to take off. 

Some of the officers, he said, were dressed in 
shorts and tank tops and could not have been 
following requirements that the weapons be con- 
cealed on their bodies. 

The ensuing dispute, which ended when his 
airline ordered him to depart with the gun-toting 
officers still aboard, was evidence of a long-run- 
ning behind-the-scenes battle among airlines, pilot 
unions and the law enforcement community over 
gun policy. That battle has Drovoked the Federal 
Aviation Administration'! 


clarify government guns-in-the-air policy. 

More than 20 aviation and law enforcement 
groups are involved, including the Air Line Pilots 
Association and the FBI, as part of the Federal 
Aviation Administration's Flight Security Com- 
mittee. 

FBI agents and aviation agency air marshals, 
who have jurisdiction over airline hijackings and 
terrorist activity, have had special training in the 
use of guns aboard aircraft. Pilots and airlines do 
not dispute that they should be armed. 

But any law officer, from a police chief to a 
rookie deputy, maycany a gun aboard a commer- 
cial flight if the officer's supervisor signs a letter 
asserting that the officer is on official business and 
needs access to the weapon. In practice, most 
officers carry their gun aboard on any trip, often to 
be certain it isn't stolen from checked luggage, 

“There’s a lack of understanding in law enforce- 
ment as to what their responsibility is,” said Chris- 
topher Chiames, a spokesman for the Air Trans- 
port Association, which r e presents major airlines. 


"Does this person need to have this gun, or is he 
just avoiding the pilferage issue? Does Sergeant 
Friday just nave a deep affection for his gun?" 

Lynne Osmns, director of Civil Aviation Securi- 
ty Operations for the Federal Aviation Adminis- 
tration, acknowledged that regulations were open 
to misinterpretation. 

However, she said the agency and its Flight 
Security Committee were on the way to a consen- 
sus on firmer rules on who could cany guns 
aboard, and on standardized training. 

Training is the big concern for pilots. A gun 
fired into the wrong part of an aircraft fuselage at 
3S,000 feet can cause it to blow apart Pilots also 
have expressed concern that a law officer not 
trained in control of hy ackers might interrupt 
special procedures being carried out by the crew, 
making any hijacking worse. 

“The majority of the people have no training in 
aviation," Captain Boyer said. 

After pressing his case in letters to the agency, he 
was informed by Cathal L Flynn, assistant admin- 
istrator for rivil aviation security, that American 
Airlines followed the correct procedure in allowing 
.the officers on board, but “it is not dear that the 
officers really needed to cany weapons on the 
flights." 

The letter said that “we agree it is time to fix all 
the problems you identify concerning the carriage 
of weapons aboard aircraft," and promised that a 
proposed rule would be for public comment by 
October. 

Captain Boyer said he was still concerned that 
agency rules would not address the question of 
tighter security, particularly verifying that an offi- 
cer is not only who he or she says, but that the law 
enforcement agency signed the authorization let- 
ter. He said he fears that terrorists could use the 
system to slip guns aboard. 

Riot union representatives are not as bhmt as 
Captain Boyer, but their concerns over the training 
issue have persuaded the Federal Aviation Admin- 
istration to move ahead with new training stan- 
dards before other gun regulations are adopted. A 
task force of law enforcement, airline and union 
representatives have devised a training program 
that the agency said it expected to adopt soon. 

The program outlines the reasons, such as pris- 
oner escort, for carrying a gun, details the dangers 
of firing a gun inflight and makes officers aware of 
the flight crew's training in how to handle passen- 
gers who create a disturbance. 


A Wave of Panic in Guatemala 

the theory put forth by .some gov- 

Child Kidnapping Rumors Spark Anti-Foreigner Attacks 

man acting alone. 11 ° * 


"These people spent tune in the 
police, ana it would seem that they 
were professionals," an official fa- 
miliar with the investigation said of 
two of the new suspects. As to who 
nnght have hired them, however, he 
said, "That is still not at all clear. 

Just ova a week after the assassi- 
nation, the PRJ r- which has never 
lost a national election since com- 
ing to power in Mexico in more 
titan 60 years ago — chose Ernesto 
Zedillo Ponce de Le6n, 42, os its 
new candidate . (AFP.NYT) 


New York Tima Servlet 

GUATEMALA CITY — Fed by 
rumors that Americans were com- 
ing to kidnap children, cut out their 
vital organs, and ship them to the 
United States for transplantation, 
an extraordinary wave or panic has 
swept Guatemala during the last 
month. 

Tourists and other foreigners 
have been attacked by mobs in at 
letul three recent incidents, the lat- 
est of which left a 52-year-old Alas- 
kan woman in a coma. 


The situation has become so seri- 
ous that the U.S. Embassy is recall- 
ing about 200 Peace Corps volun- 
teers from the countryside to the 
capital for their protection, and the 
State Department has warned 
Americans not to travel to the 
countiy unless they have to. 

Diplomats and human rights ad- 
vocates fear that the rumors are 
part of a campaign to destabilize 
the administration of President Ra- 


miro de Le6n Carpio by weakening era is precarious, 
the influence of the U.S. govern- Heightening the 

Wlity, the head of ti 


AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


Big Business Uses a Name Game 

Trying to Carve Out Small Niches 
Marketers spend large amounts of time and 
JSpKttSS ibSWi oam« m ***** 
identities. But sometimes, The New Ymk Turns 
notes, thev take equally elaborate measures to 
cloak the origin of their products usually for 

also markets the somewhat 

Kofates — but under the name of a subsidimy 

™ 0C0 “", a Javmes wine coolers were 

S&gggggSg 

SnTUBCSSSKE™ 

SffisSSESSE 

brewed beer is hv Muler, anotb- 

name from 1855 to 1873. ^ laxuiy-«r 

lower-priced nameplate. 

.About People ^ HfofRma u 

Peggy Noonan, wh ° writing on 

Reagan and re-reading 

her own, which “ 

march,’ " the George House, in the 
reissued by her pu v^eadds, “Have you no- 
Modern Library days? No one ever 

iSSSKSS —* 

mg Trollope. r 


Mol SaM, the 1950s stand-up political satirist 
who is performing again in his trademark V-neck 
sweater, slacks and button-down shirt, says he has 
no nostalgia for the Eisenhower yean despite re- 
cent bodkspushlng a revisionist view of the era as 
exciting. “The ’50s were rigid, uptight and sani- 
tized for your protection," he says. “All I remem- 
ber was that everything mod you had to sneak in in 
a plain brown wrapper . 

Short Takes 

Federal Judge R Russel Ho&and has dismissed 
dabns by Alaska natives who say the 1989 oil spill 
harmed their traditional lifestyles. Judge Holland 
said, “Even catastrophic cultural impacts cannot 


lose die will to pursue a given way of Hfe. If — and 
we think this is not the case — the native culture 
was in such distress that the Exxon Valdez oil spill 
sapped the will of the native peoples to carry cm 
thetr way of life, then a native subsistence lifestyle 
was already lost before March 24, 1989.” 

Half-tame coyotes at the Death Valley National 
Monument in California gather in the middle of 
the road to encourage drivers to stop and rive them 
food, the Los Angeles Times reports. They also 
cadge from hikers, and occasionally bite those who 
do not come across with a sandwich quickly 
enough. The problem, according to park rangers, is 
the result of tourists feeding coyotes to get dose-up 
photographs. It is a 550 misdemeanor to feed wild 
animals in a national park. The coyotes also know 
when to make themselves scarce. Ken Wagenk- 
neebt, a volunteer park worker, said, “When they 
see a ranger in hU-uniform they run away." 

Boxing Notes: The promoter Don King ob- 
serves, “I never cease to ampt myself. I say this 
humbly " • The 1950s middleweight barer Art Ar- 
agon recalls a fight where be had to lose too much 
poundage to make the required weight: “That 
night I became the first fighter in history to be 
carried into the ring." 


Arthur Higbee 


Ten days ago, a Swiss volcanolo- 
gist was injured when villagers in 
another area attacked a group of 
scientists whom they accused of 
stealing children. 

The Alaskan woman, June D. 
Weinstock, was attacked by a mob 
in the northern village of San Cris- 
tobal VerapAz after a local woman 
said her 8-year-old son was miss- 
ing. She was stabbed right times 
and suffered two broken arms and 
a fractured skull. She remains in a 
Guatemala City hospital where her 
room is being guarded by Marines 
from the U.S. Embassy. Doctors 
say she may have suffered perma- 
nent brain damage. The missing 
boy was later found. 


ment, which has been an ir 
source of support for the emt 
Guatemalan leader. 

The idea that there may be a 
political motive for spreading ru- 
mors of Americans eviscerating 
children reflects the deep insecurity 
frit in the country after years of a 
rivil war in which more than 
100,000 people have been -killed, an 
estimated 40,000 disappeared, and 
the bold cm power by civilian lad- 


U.S. Report 
Ties Nigeria 
To Global 
Drug Trade 

By Elaine Sdolino 

.Vew York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The State 
Department has charged that Nige- 
rians, with the help of ibcir govern- 
ment, have created global drug 
trafficking networks in Europe ana 
Asia that officials estimate provide 
35 lo 40 percent of the heroin that 
enters the United States. 

In its annual global survey of 
drug cultivation and traf ficking , 
the State Department also detailed 
an explosion of Russian criminal 
groups involved in smuggling and 
distributing heroin from Central 
Asia, Afghanistan, Iran and Paki- 
stan, as heroin production contin- 
ues to increase. 

The report was raanrfaigri by 
Congress m 1986 as a way to with- 
hold aid and block international 
loans from countries found to be 
not “fully cooperating” with Wash- 
ington's anti-drug efforts. 

But it has become an annual ad- 
mission of the worldwide inability 
to devise a strategy for curbing the 
production and export of cocaine, 
heroin and marijuana. 

No ally of the United Stales has 
ever been economically penalized 
for lack of cooperation. In a memo- 
randum with ihe report. President 
Bill Clinton announced penalties 
against nations with which the 
United States has no relations or 
only severely strained relations: 
Burma, Iran, Nigeria and Syria. 

Nigeria, whose citizens have 
been arrested in almost every coun- 
try where heroin has been sazed — 
from Poland to Saudi Arabia — 
was placed on the list for the first 
time this year. Last year, the Nige- 
rian authorities ignored repeated 
appeals by the administration to 
crack down on traffickers and 
failed to apprehend and extradite 
several major traffickers under in- 
dictment in the United Suites. 

“Nigeria has become a major 
source of trafficking around the 
world, as Nigerian trafficking orga- 
nizations have become rate of the 
most extraordinary, organized phe- 
nomena of carrying heroin and co- 
caine both into the United States 
and Europe,” said Robert S. Gel- 
bard, assistant secretary of stale for 
international narcotics matters. 
“We calculate that some 35 to 40 
percent of all heroin coming into 
the United States conies from Ni- 
gerians who bring it into tins coun- 

He said Nigerians involved in 
the drug networks were “not ran- 
dom mules, or individuals who are 
doing this on a free-lancing basis.” ' 
“These are people wonting for 
very organized groups, which we 
have felt is with the protection of 
government officials/ he added. 

In his memorandum, Mr. Clin- 
ton singled out Afghanistan, Boliv- 
ia, Laos, Lebanon, Panama and 
Peru, as other countries that did 
not cooperate sufficiently with U.S. 
anti-drug efforts, but waived eco- 
nomic sanctions because of unspec- 
ified “vital national interests." 

The report also noted that in 
Southeast Asia, heroin cultivation 
increased 7 percent last year, while 
production rose 10 percent. Global 
production of heroin increased 5i 



sense of insta- 
ity, the bead of the Constitution- 
al Court was shot and killed in 
front of his home late Friday. 

The police have not publicly giv- 
en any motive for the killing of the 
justice, Epaminondas Gonzalez. 
But his intervention to block the 
attempted seizure of authoritarian 
power by Mr. de Leon's predeces- 
sor, Jorge Serrano Ellas, was widely 
seen as critical in preserving civil- 
ian rule last year. 

Mr. de Leon met with advisers 
on Monday to consider suspending 
some constitutional guarantees. No 
decision was reached. 

Diplomats say that the rumors 
about the theft of children had 
bees growing for months before 
the first violent incident took place 
on March 8. In that episode, an 
American tourist from New Mexi- 
co was arrested after residents of 
Santa Lucia Cotzumalguapa, a vil- 
lage in southern Gu a t em al a , ac- 
cused her of trying to steal a child. 
The tourist, Mriissa Larson, was 
irited from the village by the au- 
orities, When residents came to 
the jail and found that she was not 
there, they ransacked it. Ms. Lar- 
son was imprisoned for nearly two 
weeks in a nearby town before bo- 


rings. 

Cocaine production, by contrast, 
declined slightly last year, but not 
because coca-producing countries 
had curbed production. Rather, 
Peru, which produces about 56 per- 
cent of the world's supply of coca, 
lost 16 percent of its crop m l993 to 
a fungus. Cocaine use, which was 
once a peculiarly American phe- 
nomenon, has become “a world- 
wide scourge," the report said. 

Although the report, known as 
the International Narcotics Con- 
trol Strategy Report, was issued on 


Manila Elevates Genera] 
Who Helped Stop Coop 

Ratten 

MANILA — President Fidel V. 
Ramos has appointed an army gen- 
eral who helped defeat an attempt- 
ed coup in 1989 as chief of the 
Philippines’ armed forces. 

Lieutenant General Arturo En- 
tile, currently the army command- 
er, will become chief of staff of the 
106,000-member military April 12 
when General Usandro Abadia re- 
tires. on announcement from the 
ndenlial palace said. General 
played a major role in end- 
ing a 10-day revolt against Presi- 



finanrial district of Manila to re- 
turn to their barracks. 



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POLITICAL NOTES 


Talcs of the ’92 Campaign 

WASHINGTON — The people running Presi- 
dent George Bush's 1992 campaign found their 
biggest problem was not Bill Canton but a White 
House they said was tone deaf to politics. The 
people involved with Ross Perot's independent bid 
never had a due about what he might do next. 

Given that opposition, the people managing the 
Clinton campaign had relatively smooth s ailin g 
but still were lucky to win. 

That, at least, is the picture drawn by key opera- 
tives for the presidential contenders, who met at 
the Institute of Politics, part of Harvard’s John F. 
Kennedy school of government, a month after the 
election. The discussion was off-the-record, but an 
edited transcript, “Campaign for President: The 
Managers Look at ’92," has been issued by Hollis 
Publishing Co. in Hollis. New Hampshire. 

The managers spoke with rare candor about 
their frustrations. For example, Mary Matalin, the 
Bush campaign political director, said his chief of 
staff, John H. Sununu, had “the political sensitiv- 
ity’ of a doorknob." She added, “There was this 
wall, and we didn’t even know what kind of infor- 
mation was gening to Geoige Bosh.” 

David Carney, the campaign's national field 
director, said the situation "became even worse" 
when Samuel K. Skinner replaced Mr. Sununu at 
the end of 199!. “Skinner tried to fix the problem 
without changing anybody," he said. 

Rich Bond, then chairman of the Republican 
National Committee, said Mr. Skinner had wanted 
to clean house but was told by Secretary of Com- 
merce Robert A. Mosbacber, a close friend of Mr. 
Bush's, that he couldn't do it 

Whatever the communications problems on the 
Bush side, the Perot people had even more hair- 
raising stories to tell about their candidate's ways. 

"I deny that we ever had a strategy," said Tom 
Luce, chairman of the Perot Petition Committee. 
Referring to Dan Butler, an aide to former Califor- 
nia Governor Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr., who 
said he learned Mr. Brown's plans by driving him 
to some events, Mr. Luce remarked, “i never was 
allowed to drive with Perot, so I never knew what 
the strategy was." 


The Clinton team admitted only a few errors 
and miscucs. Stan Greenberg, campaign poll-tak- 
er, said early surveys in New Hampshire showed 
that Mr. Clinton's original slogan “The New Cove- 
nant,” a vague reference to citizen responsibility, 
“was not something New Hampshire voters spent 
a lot of time thinking about." 

They bad a well-rchcarsed response when G co- 
nifer Flowers made public her allegations of a i 
affair with Mr. Clinton, but were less 
several said, to deal with the revelations about the 
candidate's efforts lo avoid military service in 
Vietnam. (WP) 

On th# Road to Sell Health Plan 

CHARLOTTE. North Carolina — President 
Qiiiton. suggesting that Americans are weary of 
Whitewater and confused about his health care 
plan, is opening a new offensive on behalf of that 
proposal and other domestic programs. 

Mr. Clinton, fresh from a weeklong West Coast 
vacation and a day of watching baseball and bas- 
ketball, said he wanted to “re-emphasize the basic 
building blocks” of his plan. 

Mr. Clinton was touring Montgomery Memorial 
Hospital in Troy, North Carolina, on Tuesday. He 

E burned an evening town hall meeting at a Char- 
ge television station. Hillary Rodham Gin ion, 
head of the task force that prepared the adminis- 
tration's health care plan, scheduled appearances 
in Rochester and Syracuse, New York. 

“We're going to go back to the town hall meet- 
ing, like we did last year, and once again re- 
emphasize the basic building blocks of this plan,” 
Mr. Clinton said earlier in Geveland. “We believe 
that, by doing that, we can build support among 
the people to encourage Congress to act this year 
to adopt a responsible plan.” (AP) 

Quote/ Unquote 

President Clinton after his favorite team, the 
Arkansas Razorbacks, won the national college 
championship basketball game against Duke: “It 
was an unbelievable game. It was uie way a nation- 
al championship ought to be. close to the very 
end." (AP) 



Smr ikhcr/Thf AMflcialcd Pnw 

COMRADES IN ARMS — Oliver L North speaking to a police group in Virginia that endorsed 
die former Marine officer's bid for the Republican nomination for Senate from the slate. 


Away From Politics 


to a 


• NASA postponed Thursday's lunch of the space 
shuttle Endeavour to check the main engines for a 
defect that could cause a catastrophic explosion. 
The lift-off is now scheduled for Friday. 

• A Federal Aviation Adndnbtratloa inspector sold 
pilots' licenses to students whom he had neither 
tested nor, in most cases, met, accord' - — 
federal indictment. Edward Anderson Mi 
59, of Atlanta, was charged with conspiracy to 
and use fraudulent pilot licenses and with 
counts involving the actual sale and use of fr 
lent licenses. 

• One of four white police officers accused of 
beating Rodney L King said Monday he was 
mistaken when he previously said a colleague 
struck the black motorist repeatedly on the head 
with his baton. Ted Briseno, testifying at a civil 

siting $9.5 million ii 


trial in which Mr. King is seeung sv.5 million in 


damages from the riw of Los Angeles, said on 
enhanced videotape of the March 3, 1991, beating 
bad made him see his error. Mr. Briseno had 
testified in a criminal trial, and again during a 


that another officer, 
ir. King over the head. 



. shooting 

death of a man in the city last summer. The judge 
upheld a grand jury's conclusion that there was 
probable cause that the defendants committed the 
crimes. 

• California’s aggressive anti-smoklns campaign, 
which uses humorous television and billboard ads, 
is credited with contributing to a $1.6 billion 
decline in cigarette sales in the state in five years. 
Consumption has declined by 1.1 billion packs, or 
27 percent, three times faster than elsewhere in the 
countiy. 

• A 16-year>old honors student was shot in tbe back 
and killed after he got caught in a staring match on 
the New York subway. The police arrested an 18- 
year-old for the shooting of Rashad King and were 
looking for the suspect's 24-year-old brother. 

AP, Reuters. NYT 



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Bhutan Refugees Accuse Regime of a Drive for Cultural Purity 


By John Ward Anderson 
and Molly Moore 

Washington Past Service 

SAM CHI, Bhutan — Reme- 
shoor Ghaley and men than 40 
/datives and neighbors fled their 
nearby village last month after po- 
lice officers demolished their 
homes and threatened to kill them. 


eminent terrorists destroy a local 
bridge. 

Mr. Ghaley said the villagers had 
no thing to do with the bridge-raz- 
ing. Znstead, he said, the vfljagars 
had been forcibly evicted from this 
isolated Buddhist kingdom — their 
homeland for generations — be- 


cause of their ethnic Nepalese and 
Hindu heritage. 

Refugees accuse the government 
of Bhutan, a kingdom of about 
600,000 in the Himalayas, of expel- 
ling up to 15 percent of its popula- 
tion in three years to be rid of 


people it does not consider true 
Bhutanese. 


The refugees charge that the 
monarchy i$ intent on preserving 
its national culture, noting that afi 
citizens are required to wear native 
dress and buildings most conform 
to traditional architecture. 

They told us to leave the coun- 
try” said Mr. Ghaley, who was 
st o ppe d at a border checkpoint en 


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route to southeastern Nepal, where 
85,000 people now live m refugee 
camps. 

Mr. Ghaley said rite refugees 
were legitimate dozens of Bhutan 
who had been thrown out by secu- 
rity forces. 

There are reports of brutaliza- 
tion. rape and torture. Officials 
1 deny committing atrodties or forc- 
, ing from the kingdom. 

But the officials assert that their 
country and culture are being 
swamped by so many illegal Nepa- 
lese i mm i g r a nts in the south that 
they might soon outnumber the in- 
digenous, ruling-elite Drukpas, Ti- 
betan Buddhists who inhabit the 

mountainous north. 

Unlike more high^proSe con- 
flicts, the problems in isolated Bhu- 
tan have r emain ed nearly invisible 
to the rest of the world. 

Closed to outsiders for centuries, 
Bhutan has diplomatic relations 
with only 18 countries. The king- 
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journalists and other foreigners ad- 
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citizens abroad. 

Inside the country, the govern- 
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robe-like clo thin g, bans television 
satellite antennas and discourages 
mar yjag e of its people with non- 
Bhutanese. The effort to protea 
the nation's culture and traditions 
has coincided with the kingdom's 
le a p , in a angle generation, from 
medieval society to 20tb-cennny 
state. 

“We did not have military might 
, or economic strength," said King 
I Jigme Singye Wangchnk. 38. “Our 
only safeguard was to follow a poli- 
cy of isolation. Obviously, we paid 
1 a very heavy price. When every- 
| body dse was busy starting schools 


and braiding roads, we were lotally 
and comp letely isolated and had no 
development program. 

Un til 1 962, Bhutan had no 
roads, no dectndty, no hospitals, 
no schools and no postal system. 
While the country remained what 
the World Wildlife Fund has la- 
beled “one of the ecological won- 
ders of the world,” with 5,000 spe- 
cies of plants, 160 species of 
mammal^ ?nd more than 770 types 
of birds, the people of Bhutan suf- 
fered some of the highest poverty, 
infant mortality and illiteracy rates 
in the world. Then in the' early 
1960s, King Wangchuk's father, at 
the time the reigning monarch, rec- 
ognized die need to enter the mod- 
ern age. “We started from scratch," 
his son said. 

Concerned about China's domi- 
nation of Tibet in the noth, Bhu- 
tan forced to India, w hich sur- 
rounds it on three sides, and 
abdicated its foreign policy deci- 
sions in return for New Delhi's fi- 
nancing most of the country’s bud- 
get India bnflt the first paved 
roads and paid to send promising 
Bhutanese youngsters to school in 
the Indian MU slams so they conld 
bring administrative skills back 
home. 

Bhutan nurtured relations with 

amall, nrmthneargmng European 

nations. Denmark, Sweden and 
Switzerland financed programs to 
build schools and medical dimes, 
improve agricultural production 
and train cxv3 servants. The coun- 
try depends on foreign aid for 65 
percent of its annual budget but is 
aiming for self-sufficiency. 

Today, with 90 percent of its 
people engaged in subsistence 
farming and a literacy rare of about 
38 perce n t, the country is strug- 


gling to increase its standard of 
living and evolve into a more mod- 
em society without destroying its 
environment, culture and religion. 


U.S. Bishop 
Backs Flogging 
In Singapore 


“We’re trying to modernize our 
country, not Westernize it,” said 
Foreign Minister Dawa Tshcring. 
“W« feve not allowed satellite TV. 


“We nave not allowed satellite TV. 
We fed it will erode onr country in 
no rinw — within a year or two our 
value system would change.” 

Many of Bhutan's brightest 
young people, salt abroad for edu- 
cation, return with ideas that dash 
with the country's efforts to protea 
its culture. 


Higher education levels and 
blossoming private businesses are 
luring young people off the farms 
and into rapidly growing towns, 
raising fears that there will not be 
enough labor to tend the fields, and 
that outside-world problems of ur- 
banization Mil begin to blight Bhu- 
tan. Already, officials say, crime 
rates and drug use are rising. Fost- 
ers nailed to bridges ana trees 
along sidewalks warn residents of 
the perils of ADDS. 

“There’s too much wishful think- 
ing behind the intent to preserve 
their cultural identity," said a 
Western aid official who has 
watchc d^thc country’s ra^id 

coukfhave said!^WeTp stay°isolat- 
ed.’ Nowit’s too late. There are too 
many educated young people.” 

Bhutan’ s isolation has also con- 
tributed to confusion over who is to 
be believed in the dispute about the 
tr eatmen t of the country's ethnic 
Nepalese. There are few indepen- 
dent expats, and travel restrictions 
impede verification of claims that 
e thnic Nepalese have been brutal- 
ized and forced out 


The Associated Press 

SINGAPORE — An 18- 
year-old American deserves to 
be caned for vandalizing cars 
and is typical of many teen- 
agers in the United States, ac- 
cording to a US. clergyman. 
In a letter published by The 
Straits Times on Tuesday, the 
Reverend Montgomery Grif- 
fitb-Mair said Michad P. Fay 
“is a perfect example of many 
of today’s American teenagers 
who are running amok without 
fear of punisbmeot" 

Mr. Fay pleaded guilty to 
vandalism, mischief and pos- 
session of stolen property. He 
was accused of spraying paint 
and tossing eggs on cars last 
year. His appeal against the 
sentence of six strokes of a 
bamboo cane, four months in 
jail, and a fine was d ismiss ed 
last week. 

Bishop Griffith -Mair, pre- 
riding bishop of the National 
Anglican Church and co-bish- 
op of the An glic an Rite Synod, 
said Mr. Fay “is a product of 
an American society that 
deems itself so ’enlightened’ 
and ‘humane* that it refuses to 
correct and discipline its law- 
breaking and anti-sodal teen- 
agers with the rod." 

“Drive a lesson into Fay 
and thousands of other flip- 
pant teenagers like Mm? Most 
certainly. And the quicker the 
better,” the bishop wrote. His 
church is a onafi Anglican ju- 
risdiction with headquarters in 
Wentworth, New Hampshire. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 1994 


Page 7 


opinion 


This Caning in Singapore 
Won’t Make America Safer 


By Richard Cohen 


WASHINGTON - Singapore is a 
./ T 4 ^ a £ d Place, or, as some wag pur 
*V®*^ ae P^ 06 - Vou can get fined for 
almost anything — littering, chewing 

W-Wfiisa^a 

an even weirder place. From the evi- 
*■** seems that most Americans 
think Singapore’s threatened flogging of 
an 18-year-old Ohio native for vandal- 
ism is just terrific. 

On Monday morning I awoke to James 
FaHows, a commentator on the suppos- 
rfly liberal National Public Radio^owig 
ms reluctant approval to the sentence of 
six lashes to the buttocks. A caD-in survey 
by the National Polling Network (23,000 

Instead of Americans 
protesting thefloggmg of 
one of their own, they have 
let fear of crime prompt 
them to embrace this 
barbaric punishment. 

callers) found that S3 percent thought 
seme good whipping would do wonders 
in America — but not, you can be sure, 
to anyone they know. 

The Singapore Embassy in Washing- 
ton says it has received little but approv- 
al from Americans, and in Dayton, 
Ohio, hometown to the unlucky youth, 
die Dayton Daily News reports "a sig- 
nificant number of calls expressing sup- 
port,” said Max Jennings, the editor. 

Almost predictably, the Clinton ad- 
ministration seems to have moderated 
its indignation. Once the president 
himself called the sentence “excessive” 
and hinted at dire consequences, but 
the administration now prefers to say 
nothing much. “We’ll see how h plays 
oat,” was the latest ultima nun from 
a White House tqiokesman. 

This controversy is not about Singa- 
pore at all but about America. The scru- 
tabte Singaporeans clearly took the 
pulse of American public opinion when 
the government said it did not want its 
city-state to become another New York. 
“We do not have a situation where acts 
of vandalism are commonplace, as in 
dries like New York where even police 
cars are not spared the acts of vandals,” 
the Home Affairs Ministry said. 

It was talking to countless mflUans of 
Americans who have actually seen New 
York or think they have in movies and 
television shows. A person could con- 
clude that half the population there is up 
at night spray-painting the place 

Would truly harsh penalties turn New 
York into a Disney World with sky- 
scrapers? Indeed, would these sorts of 
punishments reduce dime in die United 
States? Those, essentially, are the ques- 


tions that Americans are asking them- 
sdves— and many of them, it seems, are 
answering in the affirmative. 
a That is understandable. Certain felo- 
nies may as well be called misdemeanors 
because they are so rarely punished. 
Auto theft is one; so, too often, is any 
“serious" crime if it is a first offense. As 
for misdemeanors such as defacing 
property, .the last person caught for that, 
never mind punished, undoubtedly 
wrote his name and Social Security 
number on a police station wall. 

The law is dearly up against iu With- 
out punishment there can be no deter- 
rence. If a teenager has no money, he 
cannot be fined. If the jails are full of 
hardened c riminal^ he cannot be im- 
prisoned. If he has no real prospects, he 
will not care iT he has a record. If he 
thinks be has nothing to gain, then he 
thinks he has nothing to lose. He cannot 
be hurt — unless, of course, be can be 
physically faun, as is done in Singapore. 
Are they on to something? 

Not really. In the first place, there is 
no likening an Asian society on the tip of 
the Malay peninsula to the United 
States. America’s societal problems, its 
racial difficulties, its cultural differences 
have to be taken into account Singapore 
is not a boot camp for civilians merely 
because it has tough rules, but also be- 
cause it is a different society. In plenty 
of places in the world you can walk in 
poor neighborhoods with a bulging wal- 
let and not be mugged, and harsh laws 
have nothing to do with it 
Second, the punishment facing the 18- 
year-old American, Michael Fay, 
amounts to torture. The six strokes to 
the buttocks are inflicted with a half- 
inch rattan cane and administered by a 
martial arts expert. The pain is so great 
that many prisoners go into shock be- 
fore the whipping is completed, and al- 
cal scars remain, 
anyone not think that (me lash is 
more than enough, that the $2^500 fine 
would have sufficed or that, when you 
think about it, justice would have been 
saved if Mr. Fay were merely given the 
boot —sent had: to Dayton ana forced 
to live among the yahoos who favored the 
brutal p unishment? Singapore, contemp- 
tuous of supposed American softness, has 
chosen the most obnoxious course 
But instead of Americans protesting 
the flogging of one of their own, they 
have let fear of crime prompt than to 
embrace barbarism — as if the caning 
of Michael Fay would make tilings safer 
in American dries. 

The young man should be punished; 
his vandalism streak was no spur of the 
mom ent impulse but was conducted over 
the course of 10 days. But what Ameri- 
cans* own constitution would prohibit as 
“cruel and unusual p unishme nt" is hardly 

mayrwTie ‘‘unusual" in Singapore, but 
“crad” it most certainly is. 

The Washington Post 


The Euphemism, Treadmill: Nowhere Fast 


p AMBRJDGE, Massachusetts -* The new 
Los Angeles limes manual “Guidelines on 
Racial and Ethnic Identification," for the news- 
r’s writers and editors, bans or restricts some 


ISO words and phrases such as “birth defect," 
“Chinese fire drill," “crazy." “dark continent." 
“stepchild,” “WASP" and "to wdsb.” 

Defying such politically correct sensibilities. 
The Economist allows the use of variants of “he" 
for both sexes (as in “everyone should watch his 
language”), and of “crippled” for disabled people. 

One side says that language insidiously shapes 
attitudes and mat vi gilan ce against subtle offense 
is necessary to eliminate prejudice. 

The other bristles at legislating language, seeing 
a corrosion of clarity and expressiveness at best, 
and thought control at worst, changing the way 
reporters render events and opinions. 

Both arguments mak e assumptions about lan- 
guage and how it relates to thoughts and attitudes 
— a connection first made in 1946 by George 
Orwell in his essay “Politics and the English 
Language,” which suggested that euphemisms, 
cliches and vague writing could be used to rein- 
force orthodoxy and defend the indefensible. 

We understand language and thought better 
than we did in Orwell's time, and our discoveries 
offer insights about the P.C. controversy. 

First, words are not thoughts. Despite the appeal 
of the theoiy that language determines thought, no 
cognitive scientist believes it. People coin new 
words, grapple for le mot juste, translate from other 
languages and ridicule or defend P.C terms. None 
of this would be possible if the ideas expressed by 
words were identical to the words themselves. 

This should alleviate anxiety mi both sides, 
reminding us that we are talking about style 
manuals, not brain programming. 

Second, words are arbitrary. The word “duck" 


By Steven Pinker 

does not look or quack like a duck, but we know it 
means duck, for we hare memorized an arbitrary 
a ss o c i ation between a sound and a meaning. 

Some words can be built out of smaller pieces 
and their meanings can be discerned by e xamining 
how the pieces ore arranged (a dishwasher washes 
dish e s ), but even complex words turn opaque and 

MEANWHRE 


people become oblivious to the logic of their deriva- 
tion, memorizing them as arbitrary symbols. (Who 
thinks of breakfast as breaking a fast?) 

The Los Angeles Tunes manual seems to assume 
that readers are reflexive etymologists, for h bans 
“invalid" (literally “not valid" ana thus offensive), 
“New World” (ignores the indigenous cultures that 
preceded Columbus's voyage) and “Dutch treat" 
(offensive, presumably, to Netherlanders). 

But 1 doubt if Americans associate the dozen- 
odd. idioms in which Dutch means “ersatz” 
(“Dutch uncle," “Dutch oven") with the Dutch; 
presumably, the sting has worn off in the three 
centuries since the English coined such terms to 
tweak their naval rivals. 

The bewildering feature of political correctness 
is the mandated replacement of formerly unex- 
ceptionable terms by new cares: “Negro" by 
“blade” by “African-American,” “Spanish- Amer- 
ican" by “Hispanic" by “Latino.” “shim" by 
“ghetto" by “inner city" by, according to the Los 
Angeles Times, “slum" a gain. 

How should a thoughtful person react? 


Respect means 
be treated, beginning wr 


ile as they wish to 
names. That is why 


there is a dear need for guidelines. One wonders, 
though, why the Los Angeles Times's style panel 
apparently did not consult those it defends. 

Many deaf people insist cm being called “deaf," 
not “individuals who cannot hear,” and as one 
who was taught to revere the' Wailing Wall, I was 
surprised to learo that the term is “highly offen- 
sive” rather than merely obsolete. 

But if users of new ethnic terms have responsi- 
bilities. so do those who promulgate the terms. 
What are their motives? What are the effects? 

Occasionally, neologisms are defended with 
some semantic rationale: “Black" emphasized pari- 
ty with the corresponding “white." “Native Ameri- 
can" is a reminder of who was in the Americas first 
and eschews the inaccurate label “Indian." 

But when new terms replace ones that had been 
justified in their own day with equal moral force 
and when offensive and sanctioned terms are near 
synonyms — “colored people" and “people of 
color," “Afro-American’ and “African-Ameri- 
can,” Negro (Spanish for “black") and “black” — 
something else must be driving the process. 

To a linguist, the phenomenon is familiar: the 
euphemism treadmill. People invent new “polite" 
words to refer to emotionally laden or distasteful 
things, but the euphemism becomes tainted by 
association and the new one that must be found 
acquires its own negative connotations. 

“Water closet” becomes “toiler (originally a 
term for any body care, as in “toilet kit*), which 
becomes “bathroom,” which becomes “rest 
room," which becomes “lavatory." 

“Garbage collection" turns into “sanitation," 
which turns into “environmental services.” 

The euphemism treadmill shows that concepts, 
not words, are in charge. Give a concept a new 
name, and the name becomes colored by the 
concept; the concept does not become freshened 



by the name. We will know we have achieved 
equality and mutual respect when names for mi- 
norities stay put 

People Irani a word by witnessing other people 
using it so when they use a word, they provide a 
history of their reading and listening. Using the 
latest term for a minority often shows not sensitiv- 
ity but subscribing to the right ma gazines or gang 
to the right cocktail parties. 

Shifts in terms have an unfortunate side effect. 
Many people who don't have a drop of malice or 
prejudice but happen to be older or distant from 
university, media and government spheres find 
themselves tainted as bigots for innocently using 
passe toms such as “(Mental" or “crippled." 
Arbiters of the chang in g linguistic fashions must 
ask themselves whether this stigmatization is real- 
ly what they set out to accomplish. 

77it? writer, professor of brain and cognitive sci- 
ences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
and author of "The Language Instinct, ” contributed 
this comment to The New York Tones. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Tangible Help for Bosnia 

lam an American actor who has lived 
in London for almost 20 years. I am also 
a Jew. And as a Jew, I find the concept 
of “ethnic cleansing” to be anathema. I 
have been unable to bear the suffering of 
the people of Bosnia. 

Last week I went to Bosnia. 1 volun- 
teered through an organization called 
Convoy of Mercy (714 Seven Sisters 
Road, London N1S 5NE) to drive into 
Bosnia to deliver food. I had never driv- 
en anything bigger than a Volkswagen 
bus, but now T can drive a nine-ton 
Bedford track anywhere. 

At first I gave money, but felt that was 
not enough. I volunteered to drive. On 
March 16 1 left with three other drivers 
for Split, Croatia. It took us three days 
to get there. On the way we made an 
unscheduled stop at a Muslim refugee 
camp. I was tired, disoriented and an- 
noyed. Then, out of the twilight, from 
under a thick canopy of pine trees, 
groups of people drifted toward us like 
specters, clustering silently around. 

One young woman held ha hand over 
her mouth in obvious pain. I asked for a 
lock and she revealed missing or decay- 
ing teeth. I took out a bottle of medicine 


for mouth sores and showed her how to 
rub it into her gums. She smiled wanly as 


1 put the bottle back in my pocket, 
realized what 1 was doing, took it out 
and gave it to her. Her toothless smile 
evaporate, 
drove 


: day we drove into Bosnia. 
There were eight of us driving six Bed- 
ford tracks carrying 30 tons of food, 
enough to feed 3,000 families for one 
week. We crossed the front lines six 
times. I found out how different it is to 
see the destruction of war first-hand. We 
drove through rained towns and vil- 
lages. I saw people staring out of holes in 
the walls of their houses made by shell 
explosions. We drove through potholes 
big enough to swim in. 

We had been warned about “Bon-Bon 
Alley." Children stand by the potholes, 
and when the trades slow down, they 
stretch out their hands and yell “bon- 
bon?" There were hundreds of them but 

we were under orders to give them noth- 
ing. Several had been injured or killed 
when they swarmed around other tracks. 

We unloaded three trucks in Nova 
Rila. Then onto Vitez where we unloaded 
the other three. We spent two nights at 
British Army bases. On the third day, we 


* 7 i 


drove back to Split. I had been in Bosnia 
for two and a half days. It was hard work, 
like being an army recruit, but it was the 
best work f have ever done. 

Convoy of Mercy needs mechanics, 
carpenters and teachers. The group is 
particularly interested in mechanics who 
can stay in Split for two or three months 
in order to service the vehicles before 
go into Bosnia. 

am like the rest of us who sit and 
watch the television night after night 
and wish someone would do something. 
1 can now say that I have helped in a 
truly tangible way. I was asked if I 
would go back. Wouldn't you? 

RON BERGLAS. 

London. 

A Plea for le Fair Play 

Regarding “A U.S. Tempest m a 
French Demitasse' , (Opinion, April 4) by 
Jacques Toubort: 

The French ban on English (a ban 
with teeth, since breaches of the law 
will, theoretically, lead to criminal pro- 
ceedings) is not, as the French culture 
minister claims, intended simply to en- 
able French employees to “understand 
their work contracts." It is a laughingly 


nationalistic measure designed to root 
out English words in everyday use and 
to propose French alternatives so clum- 
sy ana contrived that even the minis- 
ter's subordinates, who wasted so much 
time devising them, know there is no 
likelihood they will be used. 

The English language has taken over a 
□umber of French words for which there 
was no En glish equivalent and angKfied 
their spelling — pork, beef and mutton 
are obvious examples — with no outay 
from Anglophones. Perhaps the French 
could gaSicize the spelling of some of 
the English words they have borrowed 
and declare them to be French. 

I am sure that millions of French 
soccer fans mil continue to shout “cor- 
ner” even at the risk of heavy fines. 
But perhaps Monsieur Toubon’s soifde 
grandeur would be satisfied if the word 
were to appear in future French dictio- 
naries under a new indigenous spelling, 
like “cornaire.” 

Or is the new “anti-Franglais" legisla- 
tion no more meant to be applied than 
the recent drastic anti-smoking legisla- 
tion, which remains totally unenforced 
in French restaurants and caf6s? 

EDWARD BEHR. 

Paris. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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Third World S ummi t 

Regarding “Delhi Summit Vies With 
G-7 in Cost and Empty Pomposity ” (A pril 
1) by John Bums: 

tiie article reflects the teas of West- 
ern correspondents against the Third 
World. The G-15 is a group of like- 
minded countries that seek to be of 
service to all developing countries by 
promoting pragmatic cooperation. 

In criticizing the agenda as passd, Mr. 
Burns appears unaware that it ad- 
dressed, among other issues, the con- 
cerns of developing countries about the 
global dcdaon-maJring process as well 
as the attempts by the United States and 
some European countries to introduce 
protectionist conditions into the final 
agreement of the Uruguay Round of 
world trade talks. 

The writer suggests that the G-15 
group has little appeal for Malaysia. 
Malaysia is, in fact, fully committed and 
has initiated some of the group’s sub- 
stantive and successful projects. 

RENJI SATHIAH. 

Brussels. 

The writer is the Malaysian ambassa- 
dor to Belgium. 


ti 

s 

D 

t, 




«f» TTriSTn VJ* 5 1* «« S.< Y T T >3¥F- EfERT 33 FE.P-fe* S 5 S? S g, E. B - >U 

































- -*■ 



■ International Herald Tribune 

■ Wednesday. , April 6, 1994 
i Page 8 


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STAGE /ENTERTAINMENT 


Paris American Center, With New Team, Plans June Opening 


By John Rockwell 

New York Times Service 


P 


ARIS — There it sits, a 
marbled, fully functional architectural 
abstraction. It is surrounded by a 


nearly finished dty park and 
irthe 


by 22 busy people. But for the moment, at least, 
it’s a shell 

This is the current state of the new American 
Center in the Bercy district of eastern Paris. 

Frank Gehry’s building, winch cost a big 
chunk of the $40 million the center obtained in 
1987 what it sold its old quarters in central 
Paris, was pretty modi completed months ago. 

But the center's board had decided in the fall 
of 1992 that it did not have enough money to 
proceed with long-range plans for this com- 
bined museum, performance space, educational ■ 


facility and community center. The program- 
ming staff was messQy fired : 


i and uneasy silence 
settled on what was to have been a major 
showcase of American culture in the French 
capital 

Now, signs of life can be discerned moving 
warily through the conceptual wreckage. 


The board of trustees has been reorganized 
with what seems like a more distinctly Ameri- 
can cast New leaders have emerged, both on 
the board and on a transition leadership com- 
mittee. New money — tangible, if not yet over- 
whelming in quantity — is coming in. A skeletal 
programming staff has been assembled. And an 
opening date has at last been set: June 7. 

In keeping with die modest profile the center 
is trying to assume, the day is being billed not as 
a flashy gala but as an amiable marathon lead- 
ing to the par t ial, gradual opening of the center 
and set just before the summer vacation, when 
nothing much cultural happens in Paris, any- 
how. 

On the other hand, the new team hints that 
President Bill Clinton might stop by on his D- 
Day rounds, so hopes are not all that modest 

The new power at the center is Frederick B. 
Henry, who joined the board a little more than 
two years ago. Henry, the president of the 
Bolden Foundation, is a longtime New York 
arts figure, active at the Whitney Museum and 
on other arts boards. He is already co-chairman 
of the center’s board with Judith Pisar, the 
former sole chairman. 

Henry said in a recent interview that Pisar 


had already withdrawn from her functions as 
chairman , as had Henry Pfflsbury from his 
longtime role as executive director. (Pfflsbury is 
still much in evidence, however, puttering 
about the empty budding he had so modi to do 
with instigating.) In September, Hemy said it 
was “the plan” to name Pfflsbury board prea- 
dent (which ranks under the chairman in the 
peeking order) and for Pisar formally to relin- 
quish her post. 

In the meantime, Henry set np a transitional 
“special committee,’’ headed by himself and 
Rachel Newton Bellow, who is currently serv- 
ing as board president, to run the center be- 
tween mid- 1993 and the end of 1994. Bellow 
has taken a leave as program officer for arts and 
culture at the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation 
in New York. 

If the center's previous sin was pride — 
hurting up a huge building and assuming mon- 
ey would materialize to support activities with- 
in it — Henry and Bellow suggested the prob- 
lem now was to adjust 1980s expectations to 
1990s realities. 

“The center's problems were an opportunity 
for it to redefine itself at this moment,” Bellow 
argued. The original plan was to open in Sep- 


"Billboards’ Rescues Joffrey Ballet 


By William Harris 


have 


N 


EW YORK — The dance world is 
in a funk. Financing is tight, 
bookings are scarce and, worse. 


few dance events are generating 
l that mil 


the kind of must-see enthusiasm 
broaden the audience base. 

There are, of course, exemtions, notably 
Mi lr hail Baryshnikov's White Oak Project and 
the Joffrey Ballet’s “ Billboards.” “Billboards,” 
the four-part, fun-length ballet set to a medley 
of 14 Prince songs, was conceived by the 
Jeffrey’s artistic director, Gerald Amino, and 
choreographed by Laura Dean, Charles Moul- 
ton. Margo Sappington and Peter Pucci. 

The reviews have been mixed and some 
balletomanes have bellowed, but “Billboards” 
has become a money-making phenomenon. 

Since its premiere in Iowa City in January 
1 993, this rock ballet has already been seen 
by close to 200,000 in 16 cities across the 
United Stales — the equivalent of “Angels in 
America” playing to capacity on Broadway 
for six and a half months. 

It consistently packs houses — drawing 
mostly younger audiences — and has gener- 
ated $2.5 million in income for the Joffrey, 
according to Cedi C. Conner, the company^ 
executive director. 

Thanks to the success of “Billboards.” the 
Joffrey has attracted 12 new board members 
and additional financing sources. The troope 
can also finally afford to present a repertory 
season in its home dty of New York for the 
first time since 1991. 

The cost is $850,000, but Conner is confi- 
dent of recouping the money. “We hope to sell 
at least SI mutton worth of tickets,” be says. 

Beginning Wednesday, the company will 
begin a two-week stay at the New York State 
Theater at Lincoln Center. It will present two 
programs of mixed repertory and nine perfor- 
mances of “Billboards." 

Although “Billboards” was seen in New 
York only five months ago as part of the Next 
Wave Festival at the Brooklyn Academy erf 
Music, Arpino and Conner are betting that its 
potential audience has hardly been tapped. 

“Men who have no previous experience of 
dance," says Arpino, “have gone out and 
bought tickets to ‘Billboards’ and taken 
their girlfriends and families. I have con- 
verted so many people.” Will they return to 
sample the other ballets being offered? 


“Yes,” he insists. ‘The rep pros 
sold better when played with "BilF 

The popularity of “Billboards” wuiu uui 
have cozne at a better time. Since 1989, the 
Joffrey has weathered a series of financial 
and morale crises. But is there a downside to - 
this megahit? Has the 38-year-old Jeffrey lost 
its credibility as a classical ballet company? 

What comes next “Billboards Q”? The 
normally talkative Arpino won’t cite specif- 
ics, saying only that a number of things are 
percolating; the postmodern choreographer 
Ralph Lemon, for one, has been asked to 
create a new ballet 

“ ‘Billboards’ has allowed us not only to 
introduce but to seduce a new* audience into 


The four-part dance work 
set to a medley of 14 Prince 
songs is a cash cow for the 
struggling troupe. 


Consider the repertory evenings to be seen 
at Lincoln Center. Included on the programs 
is the Joffrey’s much-anticipated New York 
premiere of “Les Prfesages,” a reconstruction 
of Leonide Massine's 1933 ballet set to Tchai- 
kovsky's Fifth Symphony; “The Garden of 
VBlandry,” choreographed in 1979 by Mar- 
tha Clarke, Felix Blaska and Robby Barnett, 
and the world premiere of “A Tri-Fling,” an 
dght-miaule dimes commissioned from Ran- 
dy Duncan, a Chicago-based choreographer, 
set to a score for solo viola and percussion by 
Tommy Mother. 

In addition, there win be revivals of three 
works by Arpino, “Italian Suite” (1983), 
“light Rain" (1981) and “Valentine" (1971), 
as well as Jin Kylian's “Return to a Strange 
Land” (1975) and Sir Frederick Ashton’s 
“Les Paiineurs” (1937). 


The Joffrey was the first American troupe 
to dance work by Kylian, who is artistic 
director of the Netherlands Dance Theater. 
It was also the first ballet company to em- 
brace the work of Twyla Tharp, who in 
1973, created “Deuce Coupe” for the en- 
semble, a hip precursor to “Billboards” cho- 
reographed to Beach Boys songs. 


recognizing the magnificence of the an of 
dance,” says Arpino, 66. who co-founded the 
company with Robert Joffrey. “ ‘Billboards’ 
is the appetizer to the rest of the menu that is 
to come. The direction of the company is to 
continue to explore, to experiment and to 
introduce what is possible in dance — to be a 
catalyst.” 

In other words, Arpino isn’t quite sure 
what’s nexL For ihe moment, it doesn't mat- 
ter. “Billboards” has given the Joffrey some 
breathing room. 

New touring options have opened, the Jof- 
frey has a refurbished visibility and a steadier 
flow of cash. Following its New York season, 
the company hits the road once again, stop- 
ping in 1 1 cities. Last year, the Jeffrey danc- 
ers worked 32 weeks; this year, they will work 
40 weeks. 

Arpino will probably continue to do what 
the Joffrey has always done: To showcase 
young dancers in an eclectic mix of dance 
styles that juxtaposes the sexy, pop-culture 
aesthetic and the experimentation of down- 
town dance with the more formal sensibility 
of classical ballet. 


“The Joffrey has always been different 
from other ballet companies,” says Arpino. 
“I was not brought up in the European style 
of ballet or with a highly intellectual appre- 
ciation of a it This is an American company. 
I'm involved with people finding dance for 
the first time. One must know tradition, 
which is why 1 do 20th-century classics. But 
1 don’t want to be caught up in and rehash 
the past.” 


Like many dance troupes, the Joffrey has 


been hit by AIDS. Company dancers such as 
Glenn Wnite. 


Gregory Huffman and Ed- 
ward Stierle have dial. 


10 still keeps near his desk a photo of 
Stierle. 23, the dancer and choreographer he 
says he was grooming as a possible succes- 
sor. 


“I love the voices of the young,” says 
Arpino. “Yet adversity is what the Joffrey 
was brought up on. I never do what people 
expect me to do.” 


William Harris, a consulting editor of Dance 
Ink, wrote this for The New York Tones. 


BOOKS 


WHO WE ARE: A Portrait 
of America Based on the 
Latest U. S. Census 


By Sam Roberts. Illustrated. 306 
pages. $18. Times Books J Ran- 
dom House. 

Reviewed by 
Cullen Murphy 

I N “Who We Are,” Sam Roberts 
has probably done as good a job 
as can be done in making the results 
of the 1990 census accessible to the 
general public. He has broken the 
census down into sensible thematic 
chunks. He has spiced the data with 
material of other kinds: the perspec- 
tives of social history, anecdotes 
from the news, interviews with 
scholars, government officials and 
ordinary people. He has provided 
graphs, char ts and maps that are 
wed designed and easy to compre- 
hend. He has written his book m a 
style that is always professional at 
times buoyant and even jaunty. 

Unfortunately — and Roberts 
must be beW exempt from blame — 
the term “eye-opening" does not 


consistently describe the experience 
of reading this bode. The problem 
lies with the navel-gazing nature of 
our culture. During fee past few 
decades, Amcricansnave become so 
addicted to self-assessment — the 
continuous monitoring of society’s 
every vital sign — that the results of 
the decennial census no longer pack 
much of a surprise: We have been 
getting flash estimates all along. Is 
there a newspaper reader unaware 
erf the rise in the number of teenage 
mothers and single-parent house- 
holds and poverty, fee growing 
prevalence or mothers in the work 
to 



proportion 
the increase in the age of the average 
woman at first chfldbinh, the trend 
toward greater income inequality, 
the influx ctf Hispanic and Asian 

im mi gr a nts, the continuing advance 
of the service economy, the vitality 
of “edge dties”? 

Roberts, fee urban affairs colum- 
nist tor The New York Times, af- 
fixes up-to-date numbers to these 
and a raft of other demographic and 
economic phenomena and looks at 


the numbers every which way, but 
fee ph e no m e n a themselves are al- 
most always old friends. 

That said, some information 
does come as a surprise. About 30 
percent of all households in New 
York State are caries? (the highest 
pacentage in the country). The me- 
dian age of all the houses and 
apartments in the United States (26 
years) is less than the median age of 
the people living in them (32 years). 
In 1990, there were 36,000 people 
in the United States more than 100 
years old. Because of more accurate 
measurement of fee size of lakes 
and ponds, and also because of 
coastal erosion, the size of the U. S. 
land mans was statistically small er 
than at any time since the purchase 
of Alaska, in 1867. The population 
density of the United States is 70 3 
persons per square mile, a statistic 
that Roberts puts into perspective 
wife this i observation: “A suburban 
tract with one- acre zoning and 
three people per house would ac- 
commodate more than 1,800 peo- 


ple per square mile.” The most 
densely populated community in 
America is Hoboken, New Jersey, 
wife 25,690 poop leper square mile. 

“Who We Are” may not always 
offer fresh insight, but it is a valu- 
able book. There is something to be 
said for a group photograph, even 
if the individual faces are already 
familiar. The book comes with a 
good index, which, together with 
the maps and charts, makes it a 
friendly reference volume lor any- 
one not interested in slogging 
through the arcnnal Statistical Ab- 
stract of the United States. More- 
over, there is one group of people 
for whom, if anecdotal reports of 
their state of general knowledge are 
to be believed, large swaths of 
“Who We Are” may come as reve- 
lation. I can’t think of a better book 
to add to every high-school reading 
list in America. 


Cullen Mwphy. managing editor 
of The Atlantic Monthly, wrote this 
for The New York Times. 




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Ufa 

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FICTION 


3 THE BOOK OF VIRTUES. 

by William J. Bennett 

kTA*S DIARY, by 21au 


LM Weeks 
Wk aa List 


HE 


1 THE CELESTINE PROPHE- 
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2 ACCIDENT, by Danielle 


Steel 


3 DISCLOSURE, bv Mfctad 
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4 THE BRIDGES OF MADI- 
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James WaDcr 


5 MIDNIGHT IN THE GAR- 

DEN OF GOOD AND EVIL, 
by John Benodt 

6 SOUL MATES, by Thomas 
Moore 


7 MAKES ME WANNA HOL- 
LER, by Nathan Me Cafl 

8 HAVING OUR SAY, by Sa- 
udi and A. Elizabeth Dekay 


5 SLOW WALTZ IN CEDAR 
BEND, by Robot James Wal- 
ler 


4 86 


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JUU5NT TAKE NOTH- 


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6 LUCE WATER FOR CHOC- 
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7 ROGUE WARRIOR II:Red 

CdL by Richard Man-inko 
mvt Jotm Weisman 8 

8 THE CAT WHO CAME TO 
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NOW , by Maya Aneekw 

10 SEINLaNGI)/ — • ' 


SeinfeW „ 


jAGE, by Jerry 


11 A DRINKING LIFE, by Ptte 

RaihITI .. .i. i .t .i,, — i 

12 THE HIDDEN LIFE OF 


DOGS, by Elizabeth Marshall 12 
13 REENGINEERING THE 
CORPORATION, by Mkiuel 


9 FATAL CURE, by Robin 
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10 FAMILY BLESSINGS, by La 

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11 RlVER GOD. by Wilbur 
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7 6 

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RUN WITH 


14 WOMEN WHO 

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15 LEAVING HOME by Art 

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33 


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Hoffman 1 14 


13 MCNALLY'S CAPER, by 
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14 RAMA REVEALED, by Ar- 
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15 BAD LOVE by Jonathan Kel- 

krman — 


ADVICE, HOW-TO 
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NONFICTION 

1 EMBRACED BY THE 


LIGHT, by Betty J. Eadie — I 47 


1 MAGIC EYE, by N. E Thing 

Ent erpr ises 

2 MEN ARE FROM MARS, 

WOMEN ARE FROM VE- 
NUS, bv John Gray 

3 STOP THE INSANITY! by 

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4 FIRST THINGS FIRST, by 

Stephen R. Convey. A. Roger 
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1 II 


tember 1993 with an ambitious exhibition of 
commissioned art called “Landscape as Meta- 
phor," which butt a budget of SI 3 nriHion- 
Now, prog ramming ideas call for more varied 
and modest events, wife fee average item bud- 
geted at $150,000 to S250.000. 

Most of these events, winch fill the calenda r 
with a few gaps for the center’s first 18 months 
of operation, were planned by volunteers 
drawn from American arts institutions. Some 
projects are overtly collaborative, in that fee 
shows or performances will also be seen in fee 
United Stales. Most are collaborative in fee 
sense that fee Americans, whom Henry and 
Bellow described as mostly young and venture- 
some, brought fee frkViTiess aocf originality of 
fee American arts scene wife them. 


P ROGRAMS have been divided into 
four areas: visual arts, perfo rm a nc e s, 
film and video, and conferences. 
Among fee many more or less fixed 
plans are “Pure Beauty: Some Recent Work 
From Los Angeles”; “Stations," a video instal- 
lation by Bill Vida; “Griot New York,” a week 
of performances by fee Garth Fagan Dance 
Company, a piano recital of John Cage’s muse 


by Margaret Leng Tan; “Banned in fee 
U. S. A-.” censored American films from 1916 
to the present; “Exchanges in the Dark: Film 
Noirin France and Hollywood”; and “War and 
Memor y in France and the U. S-,” a conference 
cm World War II, Vietnam and fee Gulf War. 
In aiMitiwi, several French troupes are sched- 
uled. 

Henry said feat when the old board first 
realized the extent of fee center’s financial 
crisis in nrid-1992, fee reaction was desperate. 
“Among some members of fee board, there 
was a real sense of panic.” he said. The new 
ream warns to look both prudent and bold. It 
feds action is necessary to quicken interest 
among potential donors, but is unwilling to 
commit to programs or staff without money in 
hand. 

“Money itself is nol the problem,” Bellow 
argued. “ What fee American Center needed 
was a plan, and programs, in all areas. But we 
discipline ourselves- We won't commit to pro- 
jects we haven’t the resources for.” 

For the center to be fully operational, the 
financial goals r emain the same as in 1992: an 
annual operating budget of 55 million to $8 
million wife an endowment of S25 million. 


Henry said fee center had S6 million in hand 
and pledges for another $4 million fox its 
endowment. Only S23 million has come in so 
far for the first operating year, but he said feat 
was tolerable since fee center now was “not 
springing fully developed onto fee Pans 
stage.” 

Despite the role played by OHvier Brunei, a 
French banker who is fee center’s new vice 
president and treasurer, much of fee fund- 
raising knowhow is American. Given French 
reliance on government subsidy. Bellow said, 
“there is no way to find that level of not-for- 
profit expertise in France." Of the 27 major 
in di v idual and co r p ora te sponsors for fee cen- 
ter’s opening year, 5 are French. 

S HU, in thin rime of increased cultural tension 
between France and the United States, both 
Henry Bellow are determined that fee 
center not be perceived simply as a display- 
window for American art Many of the planned 
programs reflect French and American links or 
reactions to common problems. 

Henry had the simplest possible explanation 
for this dual «» phasis_ “The cents' is Ameri- 
can, but it's located in Paris,” he said. “It’s a 
united operation.” 


LONDON THEATER 


Psychodrama (Not by Chekhov) 



*- i • I i ft 4 * 



Helen Mirren as Natalya itt 
Turgenev's "A Month in the 
Country, " at the Alherv. 


In-* 


Nobby Oak 


By Sheridan Morley 

Imemanonat Herald Tribune 


terms wife Russia in fee mid-19th century or 
at least the summer-house lives of its ruling 


L ONDON — u A Month m the Coun- 
try” is fee one that isn’t by Chekhov. 
He even claimed not to like it very 
much, which seems a little ungrateful 
considering feat within 40 years be had bor- 
rowed most of its plot and all of its characters 
for several other works, including “Unde 
Vanya.” 

But Turgenev wrote this one. in 1 848. which 
means it is fee first modern psychological 


drama despite the fact that it lay unperformed 

: fuflv make its 


for almost 20 years and did not 
mark until a famous Stanislavsky production 
in 1909. 

Since then it has been around a good deal, 
and we have it now at fee Albery in a superbly 
cast and thoughtful Bill Bryden production that 
brings both Helen Mirren and John Hurt back 
to fee West End after long absences bat at fee 
very height of their considerable form. 

Mirren’s Natalya Petrovna is a constant and 
starry center for the dozen equally enthralling 
characters who revolve in her orbiL Most are in 
midlife crisis or the pangs of unrequited love, 
and they are fee creations of a writer who was 
first and foremost a novelist rather than a 

dramatist 

So not a lot happens very slowly. 

Natalya decides, early in fee evening, that' 
she is bored of her country life wife the faithful 
if dull husband (Gawn Grainger) and equally 
bored of her platonic lover (Hart). Eater, con- 
veniently, a young tutor (Joseph Fiennes, some- 
what low in charisma for fee role) and exit three 
hours later virtually all the men in her life, 
leaving Natalya to reflect ruefully but none too 
passionately on the problems of loving not 
deeply but too readily. 

Long on languid romantic boredom, short 
on fee brutal reality of its consequences, “A 
Month in fee Country” allows us to come to 


classes. 

In an evening of great performances — any 
of which would do credit to a subsidized bouse 
wife a permanent company and twice the 
rehearsal time — fee best of all comes from 
John Standing as fee cynical, self-hating doc- 
tor later to be recycled by Chekhov for “The 
Three Sisters.” Standing has always been a 
remarkable and underrated character actor, 
bom out of his stage tune, but here his ludi- 
crous, pathetic, opportunist, hopeful doctor, 
forever poised on fee borderline of tragedy 
and comedy until he turns his own marriage 
proposal into a vaudeville routine, is far and 
away fee best supporting performance in 
town. 

Elsewhere we get Polly Adams as the unfor- 
tunate object of his affections, and Anna Li via 
Ryan as the young ward, Vera, whose life is 
almost casually ruined by Natalya's inability to 
sort out her romantic affairs. 

What Bryden has realized is feat this is a 
company play rather than fee star vehicle 
through which Ingrid Bergman and Michael 
Redgrave used mournfully to trudge. It is also 
a bleak and black comedy about people who 
don’t know what they want and don’t like it 
when they get it, and it is fee work of a writer 
who, working in almost constant parenthesis, 
is happy to go off and explore fee life of a 
minor bystander at just the moment you ex- 
pect something climactic to happen to his 
central figures. 

As Rakitin, John Hurt turns in a perfor- 
mance of wondrous lethargy and ebanvotve- 
meat, so that periodically the effort even of 
speaking seems too mnch for him; when finally 
he senses it is time to leave an affair that has 
never quite managed to become even feat, you 
worry where bell find the energy to pack. 
They’ve all got this one dead right at last. 

In six years as director of fee National The- 


atre, Richard Eyre has made very few major 
repertoire mistakes hut “Johnny on a Spot” 
(Olivier Theatre) is certainly me of them. Origi- 
nally seen on Broadway in 1942 for four nights, 
this is Charles MacArfeur’s farce about a 
Southern-stale governor in romantic and Finan- 
cial difficulties, running for office on a man-of- 
fee-peopte tickeL 

Although fee hope might have been for 
[Whitewater relevance, the truth is that “John- 
ny” did not dose in New York originally 
because of its author-director's alcohol prob- 
lems in rehearsal, nor becanse Pearl Harbor 
had just been bombed. It dosed because the 
play itself is a bomb, a one-joke disaster that 
no amount of frantic stage business can kick 
into life. 


M ACARTHUR without Ben 
Hecht (wife whom he wrote 
“The Front Page” and other 
classics) was like Moss Hart 
without George S. Kaufman: only half a play- 
wright, unable to drive his own machine in any 
meaningful dramatic direction. 

The one running gag here is feat fee candi- 
date has recently died in a brothel but has to 
be elected regardless. A group of eccentric, 
larger-than-Hfe misfits is duly assembled in 
his office, as they were in the newsroom of 
“The Front Page,” but MacArfeur can never 
get their fireworks to ignite, and the result is 
about Page- 14. 

There is a wealth of ’30s and ’40s Broadway, 
from Odets and Behnnan through Sherwood 
and Saroyan to HeQman and Wilder and Philip 
Barry, urgently awaiting rediscovery over here, 
which makes it all the more mysterious that 
Eyre should have turned his considerable trans- 
Atlantic interest and energy (“Guys and 
Dolls,” “High Society,” “Suddenly Last Sum- 
mer”) to this dire and derelict farce, which even 
a cast of 35 can never quite kick into life. 
Johnny just never finds his spoL 


In Paris, What Makes Hamlet Mad? 


By Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS —Terry Hands, a British direc- 
tor who has staged several Shake- 
speare plays at fee Cara6die-Fran$aise 
to Parisians’ satisfaction, is presenting 
“Hamlet” in a French translation of his own at 
the Th&fitre Marigny on fee Champs-Elysfes. 

“It is said that Hamlet is the first modem 
man — so obviously he must be insane,” Hands 
wrote in the program. One of fee great Hamlets 
of this century, Johnston Forbes- Robertson, 
believed otherwise, maintaining that Hamlet's 
appearance of madness is simply a ruse to 
misguide his enemies. Actually, the prince may 
have gone crazy on encountering some of Johan 
Engels’s decor and costuming. 

Here is the Denmark throne hall attempting 
to look like Versailles Palace, built centuries 
later; the players arriving at Elsinore are clad as 
1880 Ibsen- Bjornson troupers; Horatio. Ham- 
let’s faithful friend, is done up as a bespecta- 


cled clerk straight out of Chekhov, and the local 
population seems to have been dressed by the 
Salvation Army. 

Francis Huster, a matinee idol of young 
France, acquits himself in fee tide role wife his 
customary elegance. His Hamle t is frequently 
fascinating, as when he breaks into “To be, or 
not to be,” but not when he conducts a whirl- 
ing-dervish dance to bewilder fee king. 

The supporting company is erf fee first rank 
with Genevifeve Castle as the imposing Ger- 
trude and Michel Aliment as the treacherous 
Claudius (both formerly of fee Comtdie-Fran- 
caise). Guy Trajan nearly steals the evening as a 
hilarious Polonius and Jacques Spiesser is the 
eccentric Horatio. 


An alert theater collective — “La Bouche 
d’Ombre” — has restored a famous French 
play to the public (at fee Dix Huit Theatre): 
Georges de Porto-Riche’s “Amoureuse,” 
which had its premiere at the Odton in 1891. 
Porto- Riche's play illustrates feat even in the 
most passionate affair, one loves more than 


the other, by revealing a wife who dotes on her 
husband too often and destroys his scientific 
work. 

Dominique Verrier has assembled and di- 
rected a sound company, talcing fee a ss i gnm ent 
as the hapless husband, wife VaJ6rie Durin 
giving a strong performance as the wife, Phi- 
lippe Pomy as the deceptive friend, and Cath- 
erine Thferouenne as the husband's former mis- 
tress. 

This fine high comedy of the Belle Epoque 
retains its brilliant wii and deep knowledge. 

Tennessee Williams’s “Cat on a Hot Tin 
Roof,” first seen on Broadway in 1955, has 
been fitted out with a new French ada ptation 
by A nne Tognetti and Claude Baign&res at the 
Mariga/s Salle Popesco. Michel Fagadau’s 
roise-en- scene has spread Deep South witchery, 

and here we are again with Big Daddy (Bernard 
Fresron), Maggie “fee Cat” (Candice Patou) 
Md Big Ma (Claire Manner), while Bruno 
Woikowitch plays the young man who is 
mourning his brat friend's death with a large 
glass of rum. Its revival is a deserved success. 


SHORT CUTS 


• MILTON NASCIMENTO, 
“Angel us” (WB): The Brazilian’s 
magic tenor voice floats, mostly 
ballad mode, in Portuguese and 
English above lash strings, wood- 
winds and soft percusaon in tan- 
dem wife guests Wayne Shorter. 
James Taylor, Herbie Hancock, 
Nana VasconceJos and Peter Ga- 
briel. Beautifully produced sub- 
stantial stuff. For repealed listen- 
ing as richer furniture or food 
(check out fee fat sound on his 
cover of fee Beatles’ cover, “Hello 
Goodbye.”) 

• CHARLIE HADEN'S 


QUARTET WEST, “Always Say 
Goodbye” (Verve/ Gitanes Jazz): 
Appropriate technology. The at- 
mosphere of Raymond Chandler’s 
’40s and '50s Los Angeles — oh 
happy days, you could always find 
a parking space — digitally sam- 
pled into a contemporary mix. In- 
troduced by the voice of Humphrey 
Bogart from “Ihe Big Sleep” (“My 
name is Marlowe ..,”), it fea- 
tures Stfcphane Grappelli and 
Django Reinhardt spliced into the 
Quartet’s version of “Ou Es-Tu, 

Mon Amour?” and Chet Baker’s 
voice ditto on “Everything Hap- 


wdl- 
and above 


pens to Me.” Fi 
tooled romanticism 
afl. The last track: 

Lauren Bacall: “You’ve forgot- 
ten one thing. Me.” 

Bogart: “What’s wrong wife 
you?” 

Bacall: “Nothing you can’t fix.” 


Mike Zwerin, IHT 


Charlie Haden: Fine- 
grained, well-tooled 
romanticism. 



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International Herald Tribune, Wednesday, April 6, 1994 



Page 9 



Z3L1SB."g«.:.ip9-82^ 

compil'd 

120 


Costly Lesson for Wall Street Whiz 

Askin and Investors Find There’s No Perfect Hedge 







Asta/Pacific 


Approx, weighting: 32% 
0090: 124.55 PIhvj 12327 


■■■ 1 

1994 

bubri 

■ 1 IIJ.4.J— — ■ 

Arhox. weighting: 37% 

Close 10920 PfH»J 109.38 

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1993 

1994 

9 North America 


Approx, wefrfing: 26% 

mm 

Ctase: 91.50 Pict„- 90.09 

150 

ii 


Latin America 


Approx, weighting: 5% 
GOSS 13258 PlW- 116.7 







By Saul Han sell 

New York Tunes Service 

-NEW YORK — David Askin entered the 
small conference room of his Lexington Ave- 
nue office on Monday, March 28, to face his 
investors: blue-chip corporations, pension 
funds and wealthy families. 

They had entrusted him with S600 milli on in 
what was billed as a low-risk approach to 
investing in bonds backed by home mortgages. 
But as interest rates shot up in recent months, 
hiS tWO funds lost more than $100 million. 

Several dozen investors were there in per- 
son, and 20 more were on the speakerphone. 
What they heard did not please than. 

Mr. Askin said Ik needed $40 million to S50 
milli on in capital immediately because broker- 
age bouses were seeking money to cover the 
firm’s losses; if the cash could not be raised, 
their entire investment was in jeopardy. 

In the days that followed, bond prices 
continued to plunge, and the size of the 
bailout needed mushroomed to S 120 million. 
Then came word last Wednesday that broker- 
age firms were liquidating the funds’ holdings 
in a siring of fire sales. When the markets 
dosed for the holiday weekend on Thursday, 
it appeared that most — if not all — of the 
funds had been wiped ouL 

Like others on Wadi Street, Mr. Askin par- 
layed his years of experience in finance into a 
theory about how a small corner of the finan- 
cial markets behaves. 

Perhaps, it would seem in retrospect, that 
he came to believe too fiercely in his theory 
that he could invest money so deverly that it 
would bring a handsome return with only a 
smidgen of risk. 


In any case, he played too close to the edge 
with vast sums of borrowed money. He had 
so intricate and subtle a model of how his 
investment portfolio would behave that he 
forgot how crude and brutal financial mar- 
kets can become when traders lose their nerve 
and fear lakes over. 

“This is not a story about a flamboyant guy 
putting SI billion on one roll of the dice,” one 
of Mr. Aslan’s major investors said. “This is a 
real investment strategy, practiced by others, 

A market-neutral 
strategy went terribly 
wrong for Granite 
Capital. 

but it requires hard work and discipline, and 
it got away from this guy, and no one knows 
how yet” 

On Monday, as the markets plunged fur- 
ther, investors continued to ask what went 
wrong. Mr. Askin remained holed up in his 
office, toting up the losses, trying to learn 
what, if anything, was lefL 
With the decline in the Dow Jones industri- 
al average of around 10 percent from the high 
set Jan. 31, and bond prices also battered, 
many investors have suffered big losses. But 
the collapse of the Granite funds is believed 
to have been an isolated incident. 

Mr. Askin. 43, a respected bond analyst, 
had worked at Drexd Burnham Lambert Inc. 
and Daiwa Securities Co. before going into 


business on his own. His two main funds, 
Granite Capital and Granite Fanners, prom- 
ised investors IS percent annual returns with 
low risk, and over the last two years they had 
delivered such returns. 

The list of investors who had pia«*i funds 
under Mr. Asian's management reportedly 
included such insurance companies as Capi- 
ta] Holding and the American Internationa] 
Group, foreign banks, pension funds, includ- 
ing that of McKinsey & Co., and charities 
like the Rockefeller Foundation. 

But it seems that Mr. Asldn pushed his 
strategies to their limit — using enormous 
leverage to buy esoteric securities that cannot 
be readily sold for cash. 

Thus, after the Federal Reserve Board in- 
creased interest rates on Feb. 4, and bond 
prices, which move in the opposite direction 
from rates, plunged, Mr. Asian's funds had 


Dollar Gets a Lift 
From Big Bally 
On Wall Street 


do margin for error. 

After his time at Drexd and Daiwa, Mr. 
Askin met various other firms proposing his 
theory of market-neutral mortgage investing, 
that is hedging positions so that profits could 
be made no matter which way the market 
turned. 

Eventually, he was hired by Whitehead- 
/Sterfing, the firm set Up mainl y to manage 
the money of Edwin C. Whitehead, a wealthy 
industrialist, who started Granite Partners in 
1989 with $130 million of his own capitaL 

The Granite fund was originally meant to 
buy complex mortgage securities from the 
portfolios of failed savings and loan associa- 

See HEDGE, Page 13 


90 N D J F M A NDJFMA 
„ 1983 1994 1983 1994 

Worid Index 

The index tracks U S. dokar values of slocks Ire Tokyo, New York, London, and 
Argentine, Australia, Austria, Belgium. Brazil, Canada, CtiHs, Danmark, Finland, 
Franco, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, S w i tze rla n d and Venezuela. For Tokyo, New York and 
London, the index is composed ot toe 20 top Issues to tBtms ot markat capitalization, 
otherwise toe ten top stocks am tracked. 


EU Urges Tighter Limits on Foreign Programs 


| industrial Sectors § 


Ton. 

Pm. % 


TUL 

Aw 

% 


CfaM 

dm ctwnge 


cbn 

don 

dwape 

Enwnr 

Will 

10458 -055 

Capital Goods . 

f 09.08 

108.04 

+054 

UWles 

12aS5 

11858 48.13 

Wm, llwtailbh 

HawwnfliHi 

12354 

11754 

44.85 

Finance 

113JJ7 

11152 +1.12 

Consumer Goods 

96.17 

95.05 

+1.18 


Sendees 115J5 115.35 4&3S Wtatoneoitt 123.71 123.47 40.19 

For more information about the Index, a booklet s BvaSabte fme of charge. 

Write to Tito Index, 181 Avenue Charles do GaiOe, 92521 NeuSy Cedex, France. 

OMemadonal Herald Tribune 


By Tom Buerkle 

Inumcowna/ Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Union should tighten its television 
quotas and gear subsidies to pan- 
European programming and dis- 
tribution if it wants to have a vibrant 
film and television industry in the 
21st centuiy, according to a report 
by the European Commission. 

The report, a copy of which was 
obtained by the International Her- 
ald Tribune, has been eagerly 
awaited since the United States and 
the European Union dashed over 
film policy in the closing days of 
the world trade negotiations in De- 
cember. The commission, the 


Bartley’s Whitewater Ride 


By William Glaberson 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — Who is Robert Bartley? 

Before Whitewater turned The Wall 
Street JoumaTs chief of ed it o rials into a 
media personality, he was already the 
darling of conservatives. But a headline — “Who Is 
Vincent Foster?” — and its aft ermath have broad- 
ened his role. At 56, Robert L Bartley, editor of the 
Journal, has become a star in the very “liberal 
media” be abhors. His role: Whitewater sage. 

With a Dew prominence that began with the 
editorial attack last summer on Mr. Foster, the 
deputy White House counsel wbo died on July 20 
in an apparent suicide, Mr. Bartley slashes away at 
the administration of President Bill Clinton. 

He sneers at the Democrats, Little Rock and 
anyone who calls the 1980s the decade of greed. 

Sometimes he even appears to scorn the reporters 

at his own newspaper. 

The open secret at the Journal for years has been 

the discomfort such sentiments sometimes cause 
employees of the newspaper’s news operation and 
the ridicule some of them apply to the paper's 
editorial positions. 

The news division is separate from the editorial 
page and its employees report to a Afferent top 
editor, Paul E Steiger, the newspaper’s managing 
editor. Mr. Steiger and Mr. Bartley report sepa- 
rately to Peter It Karin, the Journal's chairman 

“scSne^nws department employees consder 
themselves political liberals. Some also find tbar 
news reports occasionally contradicted ^ under- 
cut by their own newspapers editorials. 
Whitewater has provided a new senes of such 

opportunities for conflict ■ 

The editorial page has sometimes heaped praise 
on news organizations other than the Jmnnal fw 
Whiiewattr tedi. Ite New 


York Past has been especially warmly appreciated. 
At times, ft has appeared the Journal's editorial page 
is insulting its own news qperatkm by omission. 

The differing approaches of the two sides of the 
same newspaper have begun to attract outside 
attention. The New Republic's recently took note 
of two Journal headlines from the March 14 issue 
that reported the start of an investigation by the 
Whitewater special counsel, Robert B. Flske Jr. 

A Journal news headline that day: “Fiske Gets 
Off to Fast Start in Whitewater Probe by Moving 
Forward Aggressively on All Fronts.” 

The editorial page headline the same day: “The 
Fiske Cover-Up D.” 

The Journal’s senior news editors insist they are 
not insulted. But Alan Murray, the Washington 
bureau chid!', does acknowledge that “there is this 
tradition of not just separation but competition — 
or enmity.” 

Mr. Bartley denies that the editorial page has 
trial to embarrass its own news division. Bat he 
acknowledges long-standing tension between the 
news and editorial sections. “There’s always been 
this undercurrent of disagreement,” he said. 

1950s proved a standard of values tefmeasure 
current events, appears to be reveling in the role he 
calls spokesman for the loyal opposition. “There’s 
a certain kind of fun that we're having again now 
that we had during the Carter years," Mr. Bartley 
said of the mood among his staff of 30 or so 
conservative editorial-page writers and editors. 

“You get up in the morning and say, ‘OJL, what 
are they doing now that we can criticize?’ ” Mr. 
Bartley said. 

Before the current “bumbling presidency,” as 
the JoumaTs editorials like to call it, the soft- 
spoken Mr. Bartley may have been best known 
among conservatives for editorials that helped es- 
See EDITOR, Page 11 


Union's executive agency, was ex- 
pected to approve the report at its 
weekly meeting Wednesday. 

The stakes are huge, the report 
says. Europe has lost 80 parent of 
its movie box office to foreign pro- 
ducers, mainly Hollywood. But 
with demand for entertainment 
soaring, Europe should be able to 
generate 2 miffion to 4 million new 
jobs in the sector by the year 2000 if 
it revives its industry, which em- 
ploys at least 1.8 milli on today. 

The report says the Union’s 
broadcast directive was too vague 
and gave national governments too 
much leeway to decide whether and 
how to enforce a requirement that 
television stations show 51 percent 


Comments by 
VW^s Lopez 
Investigated 

Reuters 

HAMBURG — State prosecu- 
tors in Hamburg on Tuesday said 
two sworn statements by the em- 
battled Volkswagen executive Josfc 
Ignacio L6pez de Arrioittia in hear- 
ings last year were contradictory. 

“We have determined that two 
sworn statements contradict one 
another,” said Rfldiger Bagger, tire 
spokesman for the state's attorney. 
“Now it is a question of how to 
judge this legally.” He said he was 
not sure if Mr. LApez would be 
charged with perjury. 

The review of Mr. LApez’s com- 
ments, made during hearings on a 
trade-secrets dispute between he 
and General Motors Corp., came 
because two magazines have re- 
ported that Mr. Ltipez could face 
charges of industrial espionage. 
Authorities in Darmstadt have 
been conducting a preliminary in- 
vestigation into allegations that 
Mr. L6pez and several former GM 
employees stole secret documents 
from GM and it German subsid- 
iary, Adam Opel AG, before mov- 
ing to VW last year. 

David Herman, the chairman of 
Opd, told the daily Bfld newspaper 
on Tuesday that he expected 
“charges to be pressed in the next 
few months in the U.S. and Germa- 
ny against Ldpez for embezzle- 
ment, suppression of evidence and 
violating competition rules.” 


European progr amming . France 
and Belgium, for example, are 
pressing the commission to take 
Britain to court over its licensing of 
Ted Turner’s TNT. a cable channel 
showing almost exclusively old 
American films and cartoons. 

The report did not propose rais- 
ing the quota for European pro- 
gramming, but it did suggest extend- 
ing quotas to nascent technologies 
that are not covered today, such as 
video-on-demand. These services 
are expected to show strong growth 
in coming years and competition 
will be distorted if they are not regu- 
lated, the report contends. 

The U.S. government’s report on 
unfair trading practices last week 


cited Europe’s broadcast directive 
as a key barrier, and Trade Repre- 
sentative Mickey Kan tor has ar- 
gued against any extension of quo- 
tas to new video services. 

The report did acknowledge that 
any new protective measures or 
subsidies would have to be of a 
“limited duration,” given that the 
Union agreed to include film and 
television programming in the 
world trade accord. 

Elsewhere, the report calls on the 
Union to break down barrios be- 
tween its national film and televi- 
sion markets so the European indus- 
try “can take advantage of the scale 
of the European market” 


Bloomberg Barmen News 

NEW YORK —The dollar ral- 
lied against major currencies Tues- 
day, rising to a four-week high 
against the Deutsche mark, as a 
rebound in stocks and bonds re- 
stored confidence in U.S. assets. 

“The buck is back,” said David 
De Rosa, director of foreign-ex- 
change trading at Swiss Bank Carp. 
‘There’s a massive dollar-buying 
binge going on.” 

The dollar rose as high as 1.7180 
DM, its highest level since March 8. 
It closed at 1.7145 DM, up from 
1 .6965 DM on Monday. The doDar, 
which has been particularly weak 
against the yen, rose to 104.335 yen 
from 103.145 yen. 

The dollar also rose to 5.8593 
French francs from 5.7958 francs, 
and strengthened to 1.4470 Swiss 
francs from 1.4250 francs. The 
pound fell to $1 .4640 from $1.4665 
on Tuesday. 

Plun g in g stocks and bonds de- 
pressed the dollar last week. The 
root in the bond market ended 
Tuesday, with the yield on the 
benchmark 30-year Treasury bond 
falling to 7.25 percent from 7.41 
percent. Declining interest rates 
helped stocks rebound. The Dow 
Jones industrial average closed up 
82.06 points, at 3,675.41, after fall- 
ing 3.7 percent last week. 

“People became more interested 
in buying dollars because the stock 
and bond markets appeared to sta- 
bilize," said Tran Berner, director 
of foreign-exchange trading at the 
Bank of Montreal. 

It is too early to say if the (Mar 
has turned the comer and is head- 
ing higher, said Ezra Zask, presi- 
dent of Ezra Zask Associates, a 
currency-trading fund that is based 
in Norwalk, Connecticut and has 
$150 million under manage ment. 
“But today's rally should make 
people reluctant to sell it aggres- 
avely." 

Flows of capital into UJS. stocks 
and bonds pushed the dollar high- 
er, Mr. Task said. Those flows are 
important to determine exchange 
rates now because so many curren- 
cy speculators have been “blown 


out of the market” by huge losses. 
Mr. Zask said. 

“Capital flaws are (hiring every- 
thing right now,” he said. “A lot of 
the speculators are on the side- 
lines.” 

Many currency speculators suf- 
fered when the dollar fell against 
major currencies in the first quarter 
of this year. George Soros, one of 
the premier speculators, said that 
his hedge funds lost $600 million 

See DOLLAR, Page 10 

U.S. Bulls Take 
European Stocks 
Along for Ride 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispaxha 

LONDON — Nearly every Euro- 
pean stock market rose on Tuesday 
after staging a recovery that owed 
much to a surprise singe in share 
and bond prices on Wall Street 

The New York Stock Exchange 
surged as dealers took bean from a 
revival in bond prices. Wall Street 
regained considerable ground after 
the bear markets of the last several 
sessions. 

The enth usiasm spilled over into 
Europe, where financial and oil 
shares were particularly strong. 

European bond prices fell and 
their yields rose, however, on con- 
cerns about inflation as (til rose as 
much as $122 a barrel to $14.42 
following a rise in prices in New 
York on Monday on concern that 
violence in Algeria could disrupt 
oil supplies. 

The Frankfurt mark et was a star 
performer as the DAX Index 
surged 1.18 percent to 815.66, 
while the CAC-40 Index in Paris 
rose 0.88 percent to 2,10025. In 
London, the Financial Times- 
Stock Exchange 100-share index 
gained 0.97 percent to 3,1 1620. 

A tiring dollar, however, sent the 
European component of the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune Stock In- 

See STOCKS, Page 10 


Our Banking Relationships 
Are Based on a Strong Tradition 



T rust. It’s the basic 

tradition of banking. 

At Republic National 
Bank, it’s a living tradition, as 
vibrant today as it was 500 
years ago. 

We believe we must earn 
the trust of our clients every 
day. So we dedicate ourselves to 
protecting their funds through 
all economic climates. We 
respond to their needs with pru- 
dent, carefully-crafted products 
for today’s financial environ- 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Ratos 

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Ucw York and Zurich, rixtoas In ether centers; Toronto 
ant donor; •: Units of MS; »» •exited; *X; net 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


nrw Torn mi — , ~ ftj 

PmU Itu 15U2 M* 11* 111 

» 5S S o« w* « 

2 £° " *2 SS S 

,i< ri777 USD UBD W 

1 ECU T- M rCu U3M 22 

1SDR MD5 UW 

aostrjos In Amsterdam. London. Hew York 
*»* 

available. 

Other DoBar Values 

° ttnaa MM5 

Anwt.pe» WWJ SSoKbiwS 1Tn 
AssfroLt MW notf 

Antr.tdiB. 1 UB F'StlL S1J5 

CUtoesu wo aow “T7. o MH 

set 


itts 

Swiss 

Franc 

Sterling 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

April 5 

ECU 

4«4r4VSi 

5 HrS H, 

5<Hr4H> 

2 Hr2 v. 

Mfa-Mi 

4VMH 

SH-Sh 

S<Mt« 

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4-4 h 

5tW5n> 



M-44 

4-4 Hi 

SNvSft 

5 AW «. 

23b-2V1z 

A-6M 


Sources: Reuters. Uovds Bonk. 

Ratesaivltcidde to hderixtnk deposits o/VmililonnUnimom (oreaulvalatt). 


Key Honey Rates 


Curraocv 

WM.POM 

ILZaatand* 

MsnfcKrw* 

PULpae 

PoUs&zIotY 

PorLocude 

miM.nl* 

SawBrtwH 

Staff, s 


Cmtmcv Port 
S. Mr. Rata 1SI3 
S.DGor.wM B9MD 
SwaLknm 73225 
Talwcra 5 

TtaUMbt J5JO 
TurteUHra 23054. 
UAEtarfcara 1671 
VtnH-boRv. 115.15 


r " ardBat £, SSS^ “SR ‘SE’SS 

1/046 1«S“ ***** terussalsN Banco Comnwrdaie tSoUana 

«w; IMS Bonk of Tokyo tTekrot; norm Bonk ot Canada 


unwed Stqtw Close 

mount rate 100 

PrlnwratB 4* 

ratal u! lands 3tt 

hmtnCDf 341 

Coma, paper UMavt 405 

Imam Traanrv Mil 344 

1-vearTrsanmrMH 
ImTiwanriota 141 

HrearTreasonr note &42 

7-»*ar Treasury notn 457 

IHraarTreanwraoM 4.93 

MvnrTtaarrbMM 7-23 

Marmt Lnai »dav taodvauta 117 
Japan ' 

DbcBmtTato 1W 

CaHmmy 2Vk 

l-OMMtti Interbank 2<4 

3- mptab In t erbank 2H 

4- tnMth Mertowk 2U 

lbrtar C owunm e ol hand 157 


Lombard rate 

CoH moony 
1 -nMwth Interbank 
Xntwtb interbank 
6-nwntt laterbmk 


Me Mi 
5.90 » 

IBS 5J5 

5* » 

145 545 
6M 447 


mtata 

Book baM rate JJ 

Cab money “*■ 5? 

l^naatk Interbank ** 2? 

s^noatb interbatt f* 

tmonlb Mwbank ' 

Ktavcn 142 744 

ftroice _ 

InttnwpHan rate W® 

Call money f ~ 

VmMm interbank 4« 400 

iHBaalfe lalerbaak ** WB 

Mumi kbderbaafc ** *!! 

lUVEBf OAT M/ DAI 

Sources: Routers, BtoombetV, AtarBl 
Lynch, Bank of Tokyo, Commemanx. 
Greanwett Montagu, Credit Lvonaokt 

Gold 

AJH, P44 CbVe 
Zurich 38BJ5 38475 -245 

London TOM 384.75 -WS 

New York 30450 3B4JO — 

US. dollars per ounce. LorKtonPWeWflr- 
toBV Zurich and New York aneidng and etes- 
Ira or Ices: rim York Comex IMaml 
Sauce: Reuters. 


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Page 10 


market diary 


STOCKS: European Shares Rise 


Goalhttied from Page 9 


d« down 0.16 percent, to 109.1 
The index is calculated in dollars, 
so declining European currencies 
overwhelmed the equity advances. 

Interest-rate speculation in Eu- 
rope centered on Germany, where 
investors expect the Bundesbank to 
lower its securities repurchase rate 
by several bass points Wednesday 
for the fifth consecutive week. The 
speculation, combined with hopes 
that the Bundesbank would lower 
its discount rate at its next policy 


UJ5. Stocks 


meeting on April 14, brought in 
some foreign buyers, traders said. 

The Madrid exchange rose by 
0.76 percent, to 314.93, rebounding 
from a bear market on Monday 
when Spain was the only major 
European market open after the 
Easter holiday. 


Among other markets, Amster- 
dam and Stockholm posted slight 
gains while Milan, Brussels and Vi- 
enna dosed weaker. 


The Helsinki exchange was a 
special case, plummeting by 15 
percent, amid concerns that rising 
bond yields and long-term interest 
rates would stifle a rally that made 
the Finnish market one of the best- 
performing in Europe last year 
with a gain of 91 percent. 

Bonds fell and their yields rose 
amid nervousness about the pace of 
f alling European interest rates, 
economists said. 

' The yield on the 10-year British 
government bond, or pit, rose to 
734 percent from 731 percent In 
France, the yield on the benchmark 
10-year Treasury obligation rose ro 
63 perce n t from 6.46 percent The 


DOLLAR: Currency Rallies , Too 

Continued from P^ge 9 lar gain on Tuesday, traders said. , 
, , „ ... . , The Canadian dollar rebounded 

when the dollar tumbled against i 0 ws against tl 


the yen in February. 

Concern about Prime Minister 
Morihiro Hosokawa’s political fu- 
ture helped the dollar gain against 
the yen. The yen fell after Japanese 
news services reported that Mr. 


from seven-year lows against the 
U.S. dollar, rising to 72J4 U.S. 1 


U.S. dollar, rising to 72J4 US. 
cents from 71.60 cents on Monday. 


Foreign Exchange 


Hosokawa was eager to resign, 
traders said. Mr. Hosokawa denied 
the reports, according to Nikkei 


English News. 

Critics assailed Mr. Hosokawa 
when he failed to pass political re- 
form legislation and could not ne- 
gotiate a trade agreement with the 
U.S* said Amy Smith, currency- 
market strategist at IDEA, a con- 
sulting firm. His administration 
has been under fire since, she said. 

“Hosokawa looks weak and vul- 
nerable," Ms. Smith said. “Many 
people expect him to be oat by this 
summer." 

Renewed faith in American as- 
sets, as well as factors specific to 
fjinaria, helped the Canadian dol- 


That Monday level represented 
an eight-year low for the Canadian 
dollar, which has been hard-hit by 
concerns about Ottawa's budget 
deficit and about inflation, Agence 
France-Pressc reported from To- 
ronto. 

Three things happened Tuesday 
to put a floor under the Canadian 
dollar. The Canadian stock market 
rebounded, the Bank of Canada 
raised its discount rate to 6.21 per- 
cent from 5.64 percent to defend the 
currency, and the central bank gov- 
ernor, Gordon Thiessen, pledged to 
maintain tight control over infla- 
tion. The discount rate had been 
raised last week, from 5 percent 


Mr. Thiessen said the best way 
monetary policy can contribute to 
maintaining Canadian living stan- 
dards “is to seek to protect the 
value of the money we use in Cana- 
da from being eroded by inflation.” 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Amsterdam 


Helsinki 


Amer-YMymo 

Ens+Guball 

Huhtormflci 

IGOP. 

Kvmmm 

Metro 

NoUq 

PoWolo 

R jBP ota 

SfoduTKmti 


123 

126 

30 3770 

193 

195 

HL5> 1120 

IBS 

no 

185 

197 

387 

395 

89 

91 

89 

92 

299 

303 




Rodfond 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Grew 
Rolls Rove® 
Rotttrrm (unit) 
Royal Scot 


Market Closed 
The stock market in 
Hong Kong was closed 
Monday for a holiday. 


Johannesburg 

AECI 71 21 

Aitecti w n 

Anuta Amur W5 202 

Bar lows 2775 2075 

Blwoor 9JD 8 JSB 

Buffets 47 <7.» 

do Bean 99 102 

Drfefonteln SO 5475 

Gal cor 090 9.10 

GFSA 95 97 

Harmony 26 26 

HfflhveM Steal 2150 23 

Kloof 43-50 *125 

NedbankGrp 26 2650 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 1994 


Vfe AuDdatad Pro* 


?The Dow 


Dow Jones Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 

Weather Pulls Down U.S- Indicators 

-R « ■ .f - 


yield on Germany’s 10-year Bund 
rose to 636 percent from 631 

(Raaers, Bloomberg, AFP) 

■ Wall Street Jumps 

Stocks rallied sharply on Tues- 
day in a broad-based recovery, 
more than erasing a 43-point drop 
on Monday which had dragged the 
index to its weakest level in six 
months. The Associated Press re- 
ported from New York. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age dosed at 3,675.41, up 82.06 
paints from Monday. 

Big-volume institutional inves- 
tors were the most active buyers on 
Tuesday, and they were concen- 
trating their purchases on economi- 
cally sensitive stocks that could be 
expected to rise the most during an 
economic recovery, traders said, j 

Small investors, if they were buy- 
ing at all, were doing so gingeriy. 

Volume on the New York Stock 
Exchange surged to more than 
366.01 million shares, even higher 
than the heavy trading leva of { 
342.86 minion shares on Monday. 

Among active issues, General 
Motors rose 214 to 57W and led a rise 
of issues sensitive to economic cy- 
cles, which suffered the most in the 
recent slide. GM also had its earn- 
ings estimates raised at Furman 
Sdz. Another strong gainer in the 
sector was Catepillar, up 3 to U6M. 

Wool worth dawed back part of 
its recent plunge, rising 1% to 14 35. 
The slock has tumbled recently 
amid allegations of accounting ir- 
regularities. 

In over-the-counter trading, Mi- 
crosoft firmed 3V4 to 8734. Hancock 
Institutional Equity Services raised 
a rating on the stock saying the 
software company was weQ posi- 
tioned in the markets it serrves and 
the shares are inexpensive at their 
current levels. 





Open IflBti LM Lai Chp. 

India 3449J0 360030 399X25 367541 -82.06 
TrtttS 1630.77 1649.53 1606.94 1647.11 -40.17 
liN 194.90 196.13 19299 19880 +581 
Camp 1296.11 1311 J6 1379 J39 131081 + 3043 


Metals 


Htefc Low wj* Settle am 


data Prwr to oi 

Ml Ask Bid Aik 

ALUMINUM (HM Grade} 

%2? nPertt 1$&5 n ' 1291.00 129000 1291-00 
Forward 131X50 171 ADO 13MJ DQ 131XX 
COPPER CATHODES (MtoBOnnfeJ 
Drtteraperpawctep -gj 

Forward 190600 190500 186880 188050 

LEAD 

Dollar* p«rine*rtc ton 

Spat 442JD 44250 44650 445-2' 

forward 45680 457 JM 457 JO 45000 

NICKEL 

Dollars per metric ton _ 

Spof S5AU0 S575J30 558SJ0 

ftSWrd HaS 362X80 5440M 564580 

TIN 

Donors per metric ton 

I Spot 540100 541 1D0 542000 543000 

Farwurti IffiXW 5440 Bp 547000 500M 

zinc (Snew HU Grade) 

Dollars per metric faa 

Snot 92500 93600 93480 B5W 

forward 95500 95600 95*80 9X500 


A Poor’s Index** 


Industr ials 

Tnsnsp. 


Hioti Lew Close Chtee 
52479 51114 £478+1184 
4002 39226 40021 +7.95 
15553 15143 15X51 + 288 
4224 4122 4223 + 0.94 
448-29 43692 44629 +9J7 
415-03 40690 415411 +611 


NYSE Indexes 


Law Last CXns. 


24601 263.14 24641 *527 
30669 3004)0 306.68 +666 
253.93 24636 3SL64 *532 
20616 20627 20609 *682 
205.10 20095 20508 *423 


14600 145J5 
UUB 14650 
15350 1502$ 
15620 15225 
15350 15320 
N.T. N.T. 
N.T. ALT. 
.volume: 27262. 


14600 14630 +600 
14675 15120 + 7.50 
imw 15350 + 125 
wm 15620 +825 
15320 15600 + 775 
NX 15650 +600 
ALT. 15625 +6D0 
Open Int 114,967 


WASHINGTON (AP) — TJe govranmenf's ^g^u^ of _ future 
ononric activity suffered its first declme tn seven months, the iCoro- 


BRENT CRUD E OIL tjP 61. , |rT f | , 

UJ. dollars per tarreHob o» MOO wtw 
M s, 144] 14115 1420 V40 +1.15 

ItS UX2 14J9 1440 +126 

4rt 1*5« 1*2* 1454 1634 +127 

AM 1646 1636 1668 1A£7 +126 

Efr UJO 1 **» 1680 1677 +124 

gS uS US9 1620 1628 + 1-02 

Not 1675 1675 1475 16.95 +0-90 

Die 1479 1439 1479 152S + 6 M 

, Si N.T. M-T. H.T. 15.16 +026 

Estwtarce: 65245. Opel Ini. ZM91 


economic activity suffered its nut decline w wvcu V ”“T 

merceDeparrment said Tuesday, but much of ihe weakness was caused 

bv severe winter weather. , 

'The department's index of leading indicators slipped 0.1 penpal m 
February, following a revised 0.4 percent increase m January and a 0.6 
percent spurt in December. The index of 1 1 forwaid-p^ungstatisticsjs 
designed to predict economic activity six to tune months down the road. 

rflT. ikh ifirliMr nmc nullffi flAWD DV 3 511210 uTOn in 


designed to predict economic acuvity six to tune monins oown roe roaa 
Goveromeat analysts said the index was pulled down by a sharp drop m 
the length of the manufacturing woikweek and a fall in building pamits. 
both of which they said were affected by February's severe weather. 


the length oi roc marouHuuuiu^ wuim™ — or-- 

both of which they said were affected by February's severe weather. 

U.S. Grounds Lorenzo Airline Plan 


95520 95620 95600 9S520 


Stock Indexes 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Ntaft Low Lott cats. 


NYSE Mont Actives 

VoL HU Low La 

at 


Composite 

Industrie** 

Bss-tte 

Insurance 

r tn once 

Tramp. 


75025 739.15 75DJJ5 *2224 
7B5JM 77328 78534 *2656 
671L56 46520 67038 +723 
87924 871.16 B7924 * 15L25 
87121 86532 S7D24 *10.16 
75162 74349 75162 +1923 


TMMm 

WBiwttl 

WaiMrts 

GnMalr 

Oirve" 

AWik 

RJRNcb 

Exnai 

PMMr 

Cocoa 

BankAm 

AMD 

AT&T 

atfeorp 

AmExp 


AMEX Stock Index 


Ma* Law Last Cfc*. 
44120 434.13 44099 +626 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
loumittn 
10 Industrials 


cm. art» 

9926 + 029 

9724 —0.10 

10128 +038 


Flnandai 

Htah Low ObR Cbwwe 

3-MONTH STERLING (LIFFE) 

■SSQ 200 - pt> at 1 M pet _ 

Jan 9651 9*39 9647 — 024 

£2 M M -D27 

DOC 9X9* 9178 9191 —8.1* 

5 S' ^ Sfi =£16 

SW ttB «A M -0.17 

M 9128 92.10 9225 — 11* 

Mar 9220 9124 91.98 -029 

Jan 91J7 9129 91 "2 — 

Sm oi a 91JD —0.06 

5S 9l5 9122 9L41 -024 

U~ 9,17 91.17 9124 —026 

E*t vq1uttto: 7UZ7. open Int: 473257. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 
nmiinaa.pte^mp^ ^ 

SS US SS » =S2 

5T W. ^ =S 

cm N.T. N.T. 9138 —0*3 

1st volume: 313. Open Int.: 9417. 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

DM 1 million .ptaenoopet 

jnp 445B 9*52 9*57 + 

]n 7683 9676 96B3 + 022 

DK KW M.13 «m +021 


Hten Low Close OWN 
FTSE IN (LIFFE* 

S" r “ 5 W ■». S2S tss 

Dec 3C73S 3075.0 31572 + S3J 

Eat. volome: 16382. OlMn InL: 57259. 

CAC40 IMATin 

^per^po!^ 2iflU>0 

£Sy 211120 2)6920 21 W-» +£•» 

Jm 299520 235320 2B9ZD0 +21-50 

«Lf 211020 2D7820 210920 +1920 

SK 221850 ZI0620 214650 +2320 

Est. volume: 23786. Open Int.: 71*42. 

Sources: Motif. Asspcl a trd ^ rea- 
London inti Financial Futures Exchasae, 
Inti Petroleum Exchanoe. 


WASHINGTON (Combined Dispatches) — The government on Tues- ■ 
day ngected the airline application of ATX In&, a company with ties to- 
Fiank Lorenzo, the former chairman of Continental Airlines. The Trans- 
portation Department died past safenr and regulatory compliance prob- 
lems experienced by airlines ran by Mr. Lorenzo and said Ik failed to* 
demonstrate adequate commitment to safety and legal requirements. 

Eastern Air T inea and Continental Airlines, while they were controlled 
by Mr. Lorenzo, had operational, maintenance and labor-related prob-. 
Ians that were among the most serious in the history of U.S. aviation, the 
department said. 

Mr. Lorenzo blamed trade union influence for the rejection and said; 
ATX would appeal the decision in the courts. ( Bloomberg, Reuters ) . 


Southwestern Bell Halts Cox Plan 


Spot ConwwdWi 


9524 9693 9521 + 021 


Commodify Today Prw. 

Aluminum. IS 0566 n * 1 

Coffee. Bnc.Hi . iw £77 077 

Copper eleerotylic 16 
Iran FOB, tan ZllM 

1 15 034 034 

SH^.treVOI 52B 

Sfeel Iscrao), ten 13623 14020 

Tin. Lb rLO. 1£33 

ziSLo a*4S 04486 


SAN ANTONIO, Texas (AP) — Southwestern Bell Corp. said Tuesday 
it was csd&igoff its $45 MKon cable television partnership with Cox Cable i 
Communications, Naming increased regulation of the cable industry. 

The announcement marked the second big partnership between a 


NASDAQ Wort AcBvm NYSE Diary 


NovoBs 

litfoRu 

Mril 

ascos 

Max 

SWIMIC 

Omctas 

TxtCmA 

NUcsflx 

Softwx 

Lohn 

Ltaxi 

NvANkB 

GFFnd 

AdabxSx 


VOL 

HU 

Law 

Last 

74535 

18W 

17V, 

IBM 

Ai,;. 

14% 

12M 

14 

""vV 

69 

67*4 

6SV> 


35V, 

XWi 

35 


33M 

72Vt 

211% 

22 V, 

21*6 

22 Vi 

■V'/r 

33M 

316% 

33V U 


31 fe 

20W, 

301% 

31465 

8746 

05 

B7V 

31013 

141A 

1416 

14*% 

25559 

72V, 

47Vi 

72 


IVo 

5CW 

9% 

S3 

1 

54*% 

f ■*// 

18*6 

17V 

IBM 


26 M 

23M 

2616 


Advancad 
tfecfliwl 
Unctemoed 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


2153 376 

320 2121 

346 321 

2819 2818 

6 3 

102 629 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 

Deciinad 


AMEX Most Actives 


Tom Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


486 128 

175 550 

159 168 

820 846 

2 5 

31 99 


MOT 95-13 9521 «.J1 +Wn 

Jnn 9522 9693 9520 + 023 

s£ Sm 9671 9420 + 023 

DK 9427 9648 9454 Uncfe 

iZr 9*36 9L2I MJd Uncfe 

Jnp 9*30 9610 9620 -r-0112 

■S Wx N.T. 9601 -022 

DK 9325 9325 9125 —021 

NUT 9163 9328 9328 —022 

ESL vommerKIDS. open feL: 939,166. 
3-MONTH FRENCH FRANC CMATIFJ 

FF5 million- nts of lOOprf 

Ju 9615 9609 9614 —021 

5n 5*37 9628 9634 -023 

DK 7*55 9*48 9652 — CE1 

Ma- SS 9656 9664 —022 

Jon 9659 9*49 9657 -022 

Sep 9638 9635 9637 —024 

OK WJT M-)5 96)8 —OB3 

N&- 9422 9326 9422 -024 

Est. volume: 29241. Open hit: 250739. 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) 

(SUM • ptS A 32odS Of IN pet 


Dividends 


Compear Per JUnt Pay Rec 

IRREGULAR 

Modena sirtet a 2619 4-n 4-21 


United Stales, called off a merger, also Naming cable regulation and 
lower rates. 

San Antonio-based Southwestern BeD provides local phone service in the 
Southwest. Atlanta-based Cox Cable, a unit of privately-held Cox Enter-, 
prises Inc. of Atlanta, is one of the hugest cable systems in the country. • 


Jon 107* 106-18 107-23 -0-15 

5eP N.T. N.T. 106-29 — 0-10 

Est volume: 61217. Open Int: 148J90. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 

DM 250000 -PlS of 10D PCt 

Jun 9626 9620 9624 +027 



VoL HU 

Low 

Last 

SPOR 

VtaCB 

11789 44Bfe 
7488 351% 

40 Va 
251% 

4446 

25*% 

lunxCn 

6745 25 1 /, 

24 

25V* 

EehoBav 

5402 72*1, 

1 21 * 

72ft 

HanvCXr 

5248 6*6 

66 % 

6 ft 

Btn 

5120 325% 

311% 

32 

ExPLA 

4853 1V% 

1V B 

IVu 

ChevSffs 

4731 38 

37 

27ft 

JanBeH 

4344 6 V% 

5ft 

6 

ChrTMed 

4070 24 Vi 

23ft 

24 


NASDAQ Diary 


o-GPWax enwrt per ADR. 

INCREASED 

Wanes IRC Q 265 4-15 +29 

YEAREND 

Am Ccn Enterprises - 245 +4 +15 

REDUCED 

Blue Chip Value Q 23 +15 +29 

INITIAL 

Gabfes Resteend . 325 +15 +29 
REGULAR 

M 225 +12 +22 


Novell Set to Name New President 


SAN FRANCISCO (NYT) — The software 
Tuesday it was naming a new president to sue 
Robert Frankenbezg, vice president and gex 


pany Novell lac. said 
Raymond Noorda. 


Mr. Frankenberg had been hired with the understanding that he would 
eventually succeed him. 


A<francad 

DecHned 

Uncfxjnoea 

Total issues 
New Mohs 
New Laws 


2509 791 

879 2754 

1579 141B 

4967 4963 

26 14 

88 387 


Sep 9630 96-10 96-53 +027 

Est. volume: 94.145. Oaen Int.: 207363. 
18-TEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATtFJ 
FFSOOOOO - ats el TDD pet 
Jim 12368 12274 12344 — 020 

Sep 12284 122.10 122.90 —020 

Dec 12140 121 A 0 12220 —020 

Est. volume: 159,170. Open hit: 141276 


Aim Strategic 
AriCsb iPcaTr 
Bankers Corn 
dares? Inc 
CoHecHve BnoJ 
DuffPheto UHITxF 
Fidelity Fed SB VA 


Freeort Me CoodG 
Home Fedf Find 
Kemper Hi inenTr 
Kemper inti toed 
Kemper MulUMW 
Kemper Mam Inca 
Kemper Steal Muni 
LCS ladust 
MFS Charter Inca 
MFS GvMMs Inca 
MFS lafermed 
MFS Momnsfct 
MFS Muni l no 
58PM lac 
Resort Incn Inv 
Sucer FaxI 
United FtedBncp 


MwfcvtSalM 


Industrials 


Today 
4 pun. 

NYSE 86621 

Amex 19^ 

Nasdaq 30U6 

In minions. 


For invtttfmut infa rm qfion 

Read THE MONEY RTOKT 
every Saturday in tfie IHT 


HIM Law Last Settle Ctrge 
GASOIL (IPE] 

U3. dollars per metric ton-tats of 100 tea* 
Aar 14650 14320 14320 14625 +850 

Mot 145-00 I4L50 14220 14475 +875 

Jun 14650 141-25 141jn M475 +875 

Jol 14520 14220 14275 14520 +850 

Add 7 4650 14420 >4420 14650 + 800 


M 2537 +15 +29 
Q .TO +15 +30 
O .155 +15 +29 
a .15 +18 4-29 
M 28 +15 +3 
Q 23+14+35 
Q .15 +15 5-1 

0 .76 +12 +15 

M 275 +15 +29 
M 2915 +15 +29 
M 28 +15 +29 
M 2725 +15 +29 
M 268 +15 +29 
Q 225 4-4 +25 

M 265 +15 +29 
M 243 +15 +29 
M JM 6 +15 +2 9 
M 247 +15 +29 
M 258 +15 +29 
Q .13 +15 +39 
Q 775 +15 5-13 
Q 29 5-20 6-15 
O 275 +18 +39 


Lehman Values Itself at $2.7 Billion 


NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. moved a 
step closer Tuesday to breaking its decade-long tie with American 
Express Co ? filing for its planned spin-off from the travel and credit-card 
company with the Securities and Exchange Commission. 

In the filing, Lehman values itself at about SZ7 billion. American ; 
Express plans to distribute 98.7 million shares in a tax-free transaction ! 


o-amuxti; g-parnb H la Canadian fond*; m- 
raonttiy; a quarterl y; +aemFaanaal 


that will separate it from L ehman by the end < 
American Express will receive one Lehman sh 
they own. 

As part of the plan, American Express will 
L ehman and will break even on its foray into 
American Express rose IK to 28% on Tuesday. 


the end of June. Shareholders of 
hnign share for every five shares 


□p $1.1 billion into 
brokerage business. 


GATT Chief Seeks Compromise Formula on Workers’ Rights Plan 


Suez Swings to Profit 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — Peter Sutherland, direc- 
tor-general of GATT, began a round of 
consultations Tuesday with diplomats in a 
bid for a last-minute co mp romise on the 
controversial U.S. demand for a discus- 
sion of workers’ rights and world trade. 

Washington last week made clear that 
unless the issue was addressed, it would 
hold up the declaration scheduled to ac- 
company the signing next week of the 


Final Act of the Uruguay Round of the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 
in order to discuss workers' rights. The 
United States wants the subject brought 
up in the context of the new World Trade 
Organization that is to succeed GATT and 
has threatened to block the work of the 
preparatory committee on the WTO. 

Washington has said it believes unfair 
working conditions distort trade and give 
an unfair advantage to those countries 
exporting goods under such circum- 


stances, and it wants the GATT declara- 
tion to introduce the objective of protect- 
ing workers’ rights. A number of 
developing countries, including Malaysia, 
Singapore, India and Brazil, have reacted 
negatively to the U.S. initiative. 


Mir. Sutherland said Tuesday he hoped a 
compromise could be found ahead of the 
GATT a g nin g in Marrakesh. Morocco, 
next week. “Clearly, the trade-labor issue is 
not acceptable to a large number of coun- 


tries,” he said. “We should seek ways to 
avoid a North-South divide.” 

A U.S. diplomat stressed, however, that 
Washington would not go ahead with the 
work of the preparatory c ommi ttee after 
Marrakesh unless GATT members agreed 
at least to discuss the issue of workers' 
rights. “Nobody is going- to go ahead with 
the World Trade Organization without 
us.” the U.S. official said, noting that 
GATT decisions must be taken on the 
baas of consensus. 


Raaers 

PARIS — Compagnie de Suez 
SA, a French financial holding 
company, said Tuesday that it 
moved back to a net profit of 1.58 
bflHon francs ($277 million} in 
1993 from a loss in 1992 of 1.87: 
billion francs. 

Suez said the turnaround partly 
reflected good prices on asset sales. 
Suez said it had decided to inject 2 
billion francs in capital to Crfcdi- 
suezand buy financial assets worth 
1 billion Danes from this unit. 


U.S. FUTURES 


Season Season 
High Urn 


Open High Low Oase Che OPJm 


Season Season 
HWi LOW 


Open Mgh Low Oase Ow OoJnt 


Toronto 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 
Boro! 

Bougainville 
cotaMyer 
Comatco 
CRA 
CSR 

PateeraBrew 
Goodman Field 
ICI Australia 
Maoeltan 
MIM 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Corp 
Nino Network 
. N Brofcan Hill 
m ££ 1 f* 06 Dunlop 
WD I pioneer Inn 


Sydney 

9A5 949 
•MS *75 
1636 1628 
375 370 
villa DJffS 82® 

rer am 4 j« 

4.95 528 
1648 1666 

438 4.65 

Srew 1.19 170 

n Field 155 155 

ratio 1830 urn 

1 ZDS 225 

324 2.98 
Bank 1138 1138 

rp 9.12 875 


BJOi 

nx 

"w 

OLA 

192 

383 

■57 

»l 

950 

584 

580 

140 

143 


Nmndv PweWoa 
OCT Reso urces 
Saihn 


Wostpac Bonkli 
WaodsMe 


5.10 5 

332 325 
821 5 

233 250 
ZW ZSB 
179 178 

184 326 
224 222 
728 7.12 
662 457 
424 391 


&$ssr&aBir i[ 


Sao Paulo 

Banco do Brasil ..26 25 


1170 1051 
1370 1620 
205 205 

?WB W 
120 116 
3740 3110 
100 95 

N.T. 16699 


TtMDres 
Vote Rla Does 
Varto 


BS 2 ESL l !*9EU vm 

ptiwui . mi 


Singapore 

Cerates 726 

CltvDav. 695 

DBS . 11.10 

Frmpr Naova lajq 

oratfne isjo 

Golden Hopa Pi 2.14 

How Par 3.14 


725 695 
695 665 
11.10 11.10 


1640 1650 
1 SJ 0 1690 
2.14 229' 
114 616 


Home Industries 670 660 


Inchcape 
Kopaei 
kl Kaaang 
Lum Chang 
M^an Ban 

ii 

Samtewara 


« a 

& “ 
1130 TOJO 
770 725 


SlKWlla 
|lme Darby 


770 725 
69 UD 
1090 1020 

SI 358 
s58 SS 


JTPorw press 1340 1370 
5tnBStaanaMp 370 326 


TOOURREADffiSINVEVBY/MONIRHJXAREA 


Stere Tefecomn 
straits Tradtrs 
UOB 
UOL 


334 33J 
372 116 
1030 10 

128 126 


HaneWtdivwy of the iHT 
is now available on day of publication. 

Just coll toil-fres; l55 57 57 


mmus 11 


Stockholm 
A SI 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBOT) 1400 Du mWnan- OoUan vr bupiil 

372 100 MOT 94 U 6 Vi 139 Vj US’4 33744 *02IW 16-569 

354 Zfe M9 i 1» 331 127 37W 22470 

35TJI 322 SeP 94 330 132 Vi 129 131 V5 -022V1 4237 

365 109 Dec 94 137 V; 141 137V. 340''. *0225. 5.103 

35695 134 Mar 95 140 142 139Vi 142 *022 176 

115 114 V, May 95 342 *022 1 

342%. Ill Jul 95 125 * 0.02 64 

EAsates 8200 Man's. sales 10,141 

Mon's open int 46020 up 431 

WHEAT (ROOT) SMBb m rum i wuni. 46n awnupm 

17919 290 May 94 135 130% 134V, 338 *02314 6766 

155 297 Jul W 1265, 12915 125U 1316*02314 12317 

355VJ 3J2ViSep94 127V, 138 337 130 -02* 3253 

1M 112 Vi Dec 94 13414 3J» 33314 3JS 1 * *0JU 1320 

35316 132 Mar 95 336V. *022 'A 317 

Eli- sales NLA. Men's, sates 1*94 

Mot's open ini 26172 off 117 

CORN (CBOT) UOObu minimum- Honan po binhri 

116V. 3389, MOV 94 UVA 177 3-72% 174 V> -WWV, 100^56 

116V4 241 Jul 94 178 220V, 2J7V. 2JBV1 +O.I» , *122.159 

29254 240145epR4 26756 27051 1675U 27D *023% 24298 

173% 236’ADec94 2J7V; 160W 257 7-40'A ■■02J’4 65264 

279% 25316 Mar 95 26416 3-6*54 26* 2666. *023% *487 

281 166 Vi MOV M 2£75v 17016 16T6 278% *02216 3J2 

28354 169 Jul 93 249% 27254 24956 27216 *023 MOS 

2-3*56 24956 Dec 95 230 231 24916 151 *03016 1JR7 

Esi- soles 50200 Man's, rales 08,960 

Man's open im JZ7.48* oft 773 

SOYBEANS (CBOT) saaaiwniVimm. agBareeareuM 

7J1 69ZV6MOT9* 6JBV, 657 6*1 65* +00156 50496 

7-59 59416 JUM 656)6 436 621 6lS4U. -02254 SDJ05 

725 628 Aug 94 650 621)6 645 651 fe +02*5. 1273 

6-89 V, 617 Sap 9* 42* 63*16 629 634 * 02354 *624 


1251 9.15 Jul 94 11.98 1207 1121 

11.98 94200 9* 1126 1128 11.17 

1122 9.17MOT 95 1 1-33 11.26 1083 

1128 I027AHOT95 11 JO 11 20 1095 

1123 1027 AH 95 1125 1127 1025 

1120 10270095 11.11 11.11 1088 

Mar 95 

Est.sales 69205 Man's. soles 22272 
Men's open ini 1 382*1 on 1112 
COCOA (NC5E) m metric tons- sot* ran 
1368 978 Mot 9* 1117 1122 1101 

1365 999M9* 1146 17 J1 1U® 

1337 1020 Sep 94 117* T178 1155 

1389 10*1 Doc 9* 12)5 1215 1196 

1382 1077 Mo- 95 12*8 12*8 1227 

1400 till May 95 1244 1265 1255 

1407 1225 Jul 95 1388 12B8 1Z75 

1350 l27SSep9S 13ffl 1300 13S3 

1437 1 333 Dec 95 1332 1333 1332 


-072 39,963 
— 037 31,133 
—045 14,733 
—04* 1.951 
-4142 1,044 
—039 3*9 

5 


Est. Steel 7458 Mates, solas 1X489 
Mon '5 open int 86293 a« T454 
ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) IMSOtov-antiMr 
135-00 B9J00May9* 10135 10240 99J5 
135LOO 10X50 Jul 94 10450 10540 101 JO 
134.58 10SJOSep94 107.25 107 JO 10650 
13600 10650 NOTH 10600 107 JO 10500 

13300 10150 Jan 95 I07O0 10670 10695 
17425 10600 MOT 95 10675 I HUM 10675 
Est.sales na Motes. rates 5JU 
Men’s open Int 20.16a up 425 


—21 24.708 
SO BA612 
—23 10,398 
—30 7.117 
-24 I0JD9 
— 20 6309 
-17 2409 
—17 731 

—17 320 


+020 7JU 
-0JB 6879 
-0-50 11S1 
+020 1,156 
♦005 1127 
-025 242 


*4730 90710 Jtei 95 91610 93780 93400 93740 +170197,738 

94520 91210 Sep 93 93210 9X170 91290 91460 -I70142J17 

94290 91. 180 Dec 95 91990 91150 91970 91140 +T7D131244 

94220 90.750 Mar 94 91900 93JP0 91880 91050 +170I160C 

Est sates na Motes, sides 55SJOO 
Mates ansi inf 2251280 off 58S2 
BRITISH POUND (CMER) Iperuou+J- 1 taMmmieLOOSi 
1-5150 1 .4474 Jun 94 1.443* 1A6J4 1A574 1ASW -38 36338 

I 1A980 1 2440 Sep 94 12400 12410 12550 12542 -40 777 

1 12950 12500 Dec 94 12570 12580 12530 12548 -42 32 

Mot 96 12SH 1 

Est. rale* NA Motes, sates 20254 
Mates arm Int 37.148 up 6361 

CANADIAN OOLLAR (CMBU ios®-l own raucu HLfldffl 

07805 071 13 Jun 94 07130 07218 07135 07712 +77 40234 

07740 07068 Ssp 94 07098 07177 07098 07175 +82 1750 

07670 07D3BDac94 07075 07150 07075 07148 +87 1.111 

07605 07820 Mot 95 07118 07113 07113 07125 *92 431 

07522 02990 -lun « 07063 07115 07M0 07100 +9* 55 • 

Est sates NA Mates, sates 9,090 
Motes Open lf« 0,981 up 627 

CERfMANMARK ICMBU litefiTMrlr. I Raw Mutes (82001 
02133 05607 Jun 9* 05871 0-5395 IL57W 05305 -74 91.906 

02065 02600 3op 94 015063 05863 05784 05791 -74 25« ■ 

05753 05590 Dec 94 05821 0J328 05790 05791 —74 114 . 

Mot* OJ807 6)0 

Est. «*s na Mates sates 4X286 
Moteiopentet 95,191 Off 7440 

JAPAfCSE YEN (CMER) SjWjMV; I te«mk 10400001 


S^VkNOTW 4.19 672 6.15fe 671 -00* 3X168 

6.169, J?n 95 6J4 62615 6J1 6 l 6 te +QJM 3.20J 

628 Mot 95 6309i 633 627 63P4 *0JVH* 617 

63) May 95 635 + 025 55 

631 Jul 95 636 636 V, 6J3 636% +0X15% 399 

52) Vj How 95 603 60* S97 6 JD +OQ5 U»S 


EsL sales 70200 Motes, stees 9*216 

Man's open Int T52JQ0 up 711 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) lOOtcns-CMcmKrioi 

23200 18470 May * 11700 1 3600 10600 18770 +2JW 2*245 

23000 10620 Jut 94 18690 18650 18631 1H7O0 +120 30266 

22300 1SSO0AU0 94 10650 187 JO 185-50 18700 +1O0 8267 

21300 18400 SeP 9* IBSOO IB650 W458 10609 *170 62*7 

20600 132780094 )83Jf: 13470 18258 18400 *170 X913 

2B9JM 4.60 Dec 94 1810D 18350 13150 1BL80 • IOO 10274 

200-80 131 50 Jtei 95 13280 18130 18280 183J0 +1A0 1817 

19480 13350Mt:rV5 18488 IMS IfiaJfl l&Lffl *053 258 

193-H 1B580MOT95 18680 53750 18580 18620 *078 83 

18880 13650 Jul 95 T8S80 18880 13650 13650 4 

ESI. sates 20200 Mates, sates 48509 

Motes Open Int 3X774 up 7812 


3X45 

21 JO May 94 

278* 

2784 

37.11 

2788 

-039 3X8# 

2970 

21 J5 Jul 94 

2771 

2775 

27.10 

2783 

-0-28 26,662 

29 JO 

2185 Alio 94 

27 J4 

273* 

2685 

27.19 

-019 

9717 

2X40 

22 # Sep 94 

2685 

2685 

26.55 

2678 

- 0.11 

0933 

2780 

22.1DOCT94 

2X95 

2X95 

2X85 

2X95 

-O.Q5 

7JD6 

2785 

aw Dec M 

2X84 

2X84 

2X85 

2X39 

-085 1X706 

2685 

2285 Jot 95 

2SJ0 

2X30 

■K IW) 

25 JO 


1865 

2685 

2X30 Mar 95 

2X25 

2X25 

2X00 

2X25 

—085 

215 

2680 

2 X 20 May 95 2X15 

2X30 

2 X 10 

2X30 

+005 

60 

3640 

2X25 JUl 9S 

2X10 

95 211 

2X10 

95M 

—085 

47 


Ed. stees 33200 Motevrates 3X0W 
IMOT'SCPHlM 94449 Off 5263 




0 809943U10M 71JOT M B3097T2QJB97S008095700J09304 —130 5X374 

880990Bl808942Sep9* 08097720.0997840.00962508119631 —131 X1B5 ' 
0809n008095293acM 0809725 — <31 448 

Bt sales NA Motes, sates 22203 
Motes opai int 56309 up 1 M 8 


SWISS FRANC (CMER) l(V 
07115 66970 Jun 94 07015 


2-215 OJ ® 7 0^87 0.6993 -123 36640 

07115 04300 SepM 07027 07027 05095 04902 —127 30* 
0J13Q. 06935 Doc 94 05921 —12* 46 

Ed. sates NA. MaTLsates 15532 
Motes cpenlnt 36290 off MM 


Industrials 


cqrroN* weno sunm-otoMTh 

7980 5E47MavM 7785 77 JD 7585 


WJB TJX 7682 

766S 5951 Oa 94 7383 7X90 7385 

7480 5953 Dec 94 71J6 7155 7055 

7450 6250 Mot 95 7280 7200 71J0 

7580 6480 May 95 7170 7270 7227 

7600 70-50 Jul 95 

EM.itees NA. Motel. sales 7261 
Motes open int 55873 up 151 

JAATtNGOU ftiMEH} 428 QDCX+ CMttAro 
WJ0 41 80 May 94 4575 4375 4485 

5X00 41 80 Jun 94 4X50 4570 4475 

5780 41. 70 Jul 94 4578 4620 45J0 

M50 «-70Aua94 4680 4660 4600 

2-E 4^®SCP« 37 JO 4750 <7.15 

2-2 4IUS 48J0 «jo 

SS 49 J0 4980 #80 

«LWD0CM #80 9)M 4950 


7583 —170 2083 9 * 

7630 —153 1 5216 . 
7125 —055 3233 . 

7050 — 025 147M 

71.43 -061 73* 

72.14 —08* 299 

7225 —042 68 


«»JOT95 5075 51.10 5073 
5BJ5 47 .95 EOT 95 5080 SOSO 5020 

S2 Mot 95 5080 5050 5080 

5580 4385 Apr 95 

3150 4780 May 93 

51.00 437V Jun 9S 

3024 <725 Jut 93 

#20 4720 AltelS 

»*aa 4325 Sep 93 

NA Motel, sales so.976 
Motes op en Int 17XD5 off 2330 
USKT SWEET CRUDE WMEH) ijnieu 
1350 May 94 1570 1580 1583 

£■£ ,MS 1W » 
S-S 4.15 Jul 94 1575 life 1550 

“70 *J0fepM 1323 1683 1573 

M73 1 4.45 Oct 9* 1558 1615 1S97 

SS M£Nw*4 1480 1624 1623 

473 Dec 94 1643 1625 1611 

JJJB 1X15 Jot 95 1680 1623 1680 

15JBPOT95 1623 1632 1643 

SI ,wo ^ 

l!£5Ew 16» iJS 

7-2 6052495 1723 1723 1688 

JJ!S ]H*AW9S 1X13 17-15 17.10 

IS-fJ 1 4^ Sep VS 1782 1782 17.17 


-635 54835 
—882 4056B 
— 0.14 ZB 239 
— 0-09 11,751 
-089 92H ■ 
—089 4727 
-089 5208 
-089 1X734 ' 
-II8» 4599 ■ 
—089 3207 

-ao» 1206 . 

-089 

-089 501 ' 

—089 512 i 

—089 
—029 
—089 


rM 6 

— 083102297 
-089 78790 
— 0.12 41230 

— 0.M 27264 . 
—0.16 21286 
-080 1X997 

-023 9745 
-085 24895 ' 
-087 7277 
—083 6*U , 
— 030 7223 
—033 4791 ■ 
—029 +115 . 
-03011730 . 


Financial 


» MSI ™ ™ ft 

Moti*s open int 41+537 up zn* 
UNLEAMmOASOLJNE (NMERJ 4LBBBOUU, 
S'* OaMayM 49 JO 49M 43.10 

<120 44.10 Jun M «J5 *9.55 4881 

60JO <4.10 am 94 4870 #2D AO 

6020 43.90 Aue 94 *373 4B25 4035 

5480 4X90S4PM 47.90 4b£ #20 

4670 4X10MM 4620 SS 4620 

4320 4X75NOTM 4689 4629 46# 

rates NA Mates, sates 51,413 
Man’s open M 119266 up 1262 


9050 

6X25 May 94 3050 

81.10 

0030 

BOX 

— OiO 2SV743 

BU0 

44.90 Jul 94 

wo 

3275 

81.90 

B28S 

-OlO 15833 

3050 

6050 SepM 

3370 

3400 

8385 

B3L55 

—085 

6735 

9180 

77.10 Dec 94 

0X20 

6X80 

8475 

8690 

+005 

4.1X 

8010 

7090 Mot 95 

■AM 

3680 

8580 

8X95 

—005 

1747 

3880 

82JDMay 95 >780 

>780 

878D 

8780 

+020 

234 


8X00 Jul 9* 




BB8D 



B9J» 

e»J»Sep95 

B7JRJ 

3980. 

99.00 

89.15 




MatetteMriM 57,1 £7 

SUGAR-WORLD II (NCSE) li 220 De^craisB 
1227 BJ0MOT94 1122 1172 1050 


UST.BHJL5 (CMBRI IlirltokMrilHia. 

9676 9527 An 94 9582 95.M 9928 9583 +025 42272 

96# 9S87SOTM 9521 9X47 9X33 9146 +089 9.91! 

9610 VUOOeeM 94S6 94.99 9671 9699 *029 3216 

9583 96# MOT 95 9472 +089 31 

Ed. sates NA Matex (tees 1X731 
Mott’s C*» Int 56331 up 5645 

5 VR. TREASURY (CBOT) lHUUHli.pntMPia«t 

112- OS 1W-23 JunH 104-27 105-32 104-26 105-135* 245 ISOABI 

110-19510+05 Sen 94 10+24+ 245 S15 

Esc s ates 6X600 Mates, rales 55201 

AMtes open Ini 1B1.2M un 1153 

10 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) tioojm BTla-lM63ZnUioMD0pcl 
115-31 H3-30 JOT 9* 104-05 1125-15 10+03 105-12 +109 336,909 

113- 01 103-30 SCP 94 102-25 10+13 1(0-09 10+11 +109 3793 

114- 21 TttMM Dae Ml 02- JO 100-16 HB-1B 103-12 *109 679 

11T-07 MI-09 MOT VST 01-27 102-21 101-25 102-13 +109 10 

105-22 103-22 Jun 95 101-23 +109 1 

EsL sates 120200 MeteB-safes 105284 

M a n's open im 3*1791 tip #3t 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) flnn tltnuwi imt UnrUnciMiiu] 
119-29 91-06 JUI94 103-11 105-02 101-09 10+36 +113 *12226 

11+26 90-12 SOP 94 102-14 10+03 10-13 103-39 +1 lg "W 

118-08 91-19 Dec 94)01-34 10-13 101-34 101-07 +117 3l3S 

ll+» 100-30 Mot 95101-25 102-33 1«-1< 10MB +117 )3l 

1IS.I9 98-13 API 95 101-31 +117 O 

112- 1 S 104-39 Sap 95 101-14 *117 n 

113- 14 103-23 Dec 95 100-30 *117 33 

114- 06 99-04 MOT 96 100-16 +117 34 

ESLWteS #0200 Matex safes 445,724 

Mot’s open M 4B9JB6 ua 1850 

MUWCIPAL .BONDS (CBffT) noaox *. 32nd, ot too PC 

104-07 87-13 Jut 94 (7-25 89-14 87-06 89-13 +13 3X992 

95-17 16-20 Sen 94 3721 88-19 86-13 B8-19 +l3 152 

EH.Htts 1X000 Matex soles 14288 
MotetapsiM 34.144 UP 1006 

WALK'S (CMER) timwn-atoM BCL 
95890 90.400 JUn 74 9X400 95830 9X400 95SX +80486221 

»X570 TOJM5OTW 94790 9US0 94790 96930 

90710 Dec 9< 94220 94840 94700 94330 +|lSSS 

95JM WWMar9S 91970 94110 93.M0 94080 +160351440 


— 0-29 4,73 
-085 

—034 10255 , 
—085 


#86 -280 0,112 
#20 —07* SJB1 
#70 — 0.10 HUM 

49-05 —0.10 9217 

4325 —089 520 

4771 —087 X131 

4641 -889 220* 


Stock Indexes 


SAP COMP. INDEX (CMER) 

SS ££%%%%££ $2 V 

gJS «145 n£w 4 * M *** 

KYSH COMP. NDBMNWQ 

tarn 245J0 24980 348A5 + 525 4803 

249 JS 31X80 M8 +XM 

2*630 237.ISOKM 3#40 3#20 2*920 SS +1« *3 1 

E*>- safes NA^Stotes.**, 

Motes open Hit 4,1M Wut 


Commocffty Indexes 

ChssB 

Jtaodvs pla 

ftcutars 182680 

DJ.Fuhires 13950 

Com. fteseardi 22448 


.Prtvtnn 

171580 





ri"' kl 


■.r-mnit- n * 


1YS 


5 I r 



























'S' : ' r '' y ^ik 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 1994 


, 6 

— ■ .-V ! ■ S» 

~ " ■ ■ ■ ' -■ . " i'^/ :: 4f 
" ■"*-; 

HaSuCoxp^ 


Lira Devaluation 
Ignites a Rally 
In Turkish Stocks 


Eurotunnel Settles With Builders 

Deal Gears Way for Rights Issue, but Not Opening 


Fnmfcftnt 

DAX ;. v - 


Page 11 

EUROPE 








New P r 




'evident 


^*lf atSS.TBiUiu 


Compiled by Our Staff From Disnucha 

ijFjft NBUI* • — Turkish stocks 
ralhed 7 percent on Tuesday and 
the central teak knocked 28 per- 
cent off the dollar value of the lira 
after the government annn ^ced a 
series of long-expected belt-tieht- 
etung measures. 

Prime Minister Tansu Ciller’s 
stark program of taxes, firin gs sell- 
offs and price increases to brake 
inflation, stabilize the currency and 
boost exports, was applauded by 
most bankers and economists, who 
urged its swift implementation. 

“The economy was heading full 
stream towards a Latin Amencan- 
style tragedy if these measures were 
not imposed," said Mrs. Ciller, an 
economist by training. 

"An improvement in the Turkish 
economy will be seen in the second 
half of 1994," she said. “Inflation 
win drop sharply and economic 
balance will be reestablished." 

Many economists were less opti- 
mistic about the timing of results 
but agreed with the strategy. 

“We may start seeing positive 
results in 1995," said Sedat Alpglu, 
chairman erf the Economic Devel- 
opment Foundation. “The pre- 
scription is correct, but the targets 
will be realized only if these mea- 
sures are implemented without any 
concession." 

“We must all back these bold 
steps,” said Melih Araz, a manager 
of Interbank. “Turkey had come to 
a turning point and now these mea- 
sures, winch aim at curbing the 
public sector, require a consensus.” 

As expected, the government 
raised prices of many slate monop- 
oly goods, including gasoline, to- 
bacco, alcohol, sugar and fertilizer, 
by up to 100 percent to raise public 
funds. The state airline raised tick- 
et prices by 53 percent 


Mrs- Cilia said some unprofit- 
able coal mines and steel milk 
would be closed as part of the 
rounuy's privatization plan, which 
is expected to raise the equivalent 
of S3 J5 billion in revenue in 1994. 

In addition to the thousands of 
layoffs involved with these deci- 
sions, the government announced 
thatits official staff abroad, includ- 
ing the foreign service, would be 
cut by up to 20 percent and that the 
work force employed on a contract 
basis in the state sector would be 
reduced by 25 percent. 

The government also said it 
would no longer subsidize the agri- 
cultural sector except for wheat, 
sugar and beets, while the produc- 
tion of tobacco will be limited. 

“We must all back these bold 
steps," said Melih Araz, general 
m a n ag e r of Interbank. “Turkey 
had come to a turning point, and 
now these measures, which aim at 
curbing the public sector, require a 
consensus.” 

The central bank, in addition to 
lifting the dollar to 32,053 lire from 
Monday's rate of 23,078 lire, issued 
new regulations to stabilize mar- 
kets and also said that it would 
disclose a new monetary program 
later this month. 

The Istanbul Stock Exchange 
jumped 7 percent, to 17,500.97, on 
the bullish mood created by thft 
privatization plans and falling 
overnight interest rates, which 
dropped to 130 percent on Tuesday' 
from 200 percent on Monday. 

The country's largest labor 
group, the Turk-Is confederation, 
reacted angrily to the measures. 
“The measures are against the in- 
terests of our people," said Bayram 
Meral, the group’s chairman. 
“They will increase unemployment, 
poverty as well as social and politi- 
cal unrest." (Reuters, AP, AFP) 


By Erik Jpsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON —The long-delayed rail service 
between Britain and France via the Channel 
tunnel is still without a starting date, but on 
Tuesday the project's beleaguered sharehold- 
ers got a bit of good news ahead of schedule. 

Eurotunnel PLC said it had cleared up its 
biggest financial uncertainty by agreeing to 
pay the tunnel's builders a total of £1.14 billion. 
(52 billion) at 1985 prices. This means in 
current money, Eurotunnel will pay the build- 
ers an additional £70 million to »5 million. 

Analysts said that the settlement, which 
covered cost overruns on the project’s fixed 
equipment such as air conditioning and elec- 
trical systems, has cleared the way for Euro- 
tunnel's planned rights issue this spring. Thai 
issue is expected to raise from £500 miuion to 
£750 million, a sum that has grown with every 
new delay in commencing service on the £10 
bQhou project At the same time, Eurotunnel 
is expected to nuse a similar amount of fund- 
ing in the debt markets. 

“The settlement removes one of the biggest 
doubts over-hanging the rights issue and as 
such is certainly good news," a British analyst 
said. 

The builders, a consortium of five British 
and five French companies called Trans- 
Manche Link, had claimed they were owed 
£1.95 billion in 1985 terms and not the £620 


miffion set forth in the original contract. A 
spokesman for the builders' group said the 
companies were pleased with the settlement. 

“You have to understand that in the con- 
tracting wodd you tend to put in the absolute 
maximum that you are looking for but you 
don’t expect to get it," John Davies said. 

Eurotunnel was quick to point out that the 
settlement amounted to less than the builders 

Both sides were anxious 
to end the dispute. 

were seeking “We believe that this settlement 
is very much in the interests of our sharehold- 
ers," said the co-chairmen of Eurotunnel, M. 
Andri Binard and Sir Alastair Mortem. 

The final sum paid to the TransManche 
will depend on the success of the rights issue, 
with a higher share price being rewarded with 
a higher cash payment to the contractors. 
Analysts said that factor should give the 
builders an added incentive to cooperative 
with Eurotunnel m speeding the commission- 
ing of the tunnel 

Tests of the various fixed systems plus the 
rolling stock have already forced (he compa- 
ny to toss away its plans to start freight 
service last month and automobile shuttle 
service on May 9. Service was originally to 
have begun in the spring of 1993. 


“It gives the contractors a very good finan- 
cial incentive to make sure all goes ahead as 
smoothly as possible.” said Brian Kedan. a 
managing director at Swiss Bank Corp„ 
which acted as financial adviser to the con- 
tractors' consortium. That incentive will be 
strengthened by TransManche’s unusual 
agreement to underwrite £75 mfllinn worth of 
the rights issue itself. That agreement would 
make it the owner of the shares should the 
rights issue fail. 

Both sides of the dispute expressed sur- 
prise Tuesday at how quickly it was settled. 
Mr. Kedan said the Trojan War had lasted 10 
years and that there had seemed “every pros- 
pect" of Eurotunnel and the builders battling 
it out for just as long. Mr. Davies noted that 
contracts on even run-of-the-mill road-build- 
ing contracts typically take four or five years 
after the completion erf construction to iron 
out. “This is incredibly fast," he said. 

People dose to the negotiations, which ran 
throughout the Easter weekend, said that in 
the end. both sides faced their own pressures 
tocuia deal Eurotunnel was keen to dear the 
decks for the rights issue, the prospects for 
which grow dimmer with every new delay in 
the tunnel's opening. TransManche’s mem- 
bers were eager to get their cash and move on. 
Both sides also wanted to ovoid incurring the 
immense legal bills that would come with 
years of litigation. 









- i .. , ■ •• :!:1 






htti&SSZZ rSS 




Sources: Routers, AFP 








Inw»xitxiiiyfcf*UTribttic 


Very briefly: 


German Industrial Output Perks Up 


Reuters 

BONN — Industrial production 
in Western Germany rose in Febru- 
ary, the Economics Ministry re- 
ported Tuesday, but economists 
said there had not been as much 
improvement as the single month's 
performance seemed to indicate. 

The ministry said output rose 12 
percent from January and was up 
1.1 percent year-on-year. 

But comparing January and Feb- 
ruary combined against the previous 
two months, a method that reduces 


the effect of monthly fluctuations, 
production was unchanged. 

Production in Januaiy-February 
combined rose just 0.1 percent 
from the corresponding two 
months in 1993. 

However, (here were noticeable 
gains in basic production goods 
and in construction on a two- 
month comparison; economists 
said this could represent a glimmer 
of hope for the economy. 

Stefan Schneider, chief econo- 
mist at Nomura Research Deuisch- 


Government Incentives Lift French Car Sales 


"■it j 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

PARIS — Sales of new cars in France rose 
143 percent in March from a year earlier, 
boosted by a government trade-in plan, the 
French canmkers association said Tuesday. 

The association said sales in April should rise 
at a similar pace, based on increased orders. 

Passenger-car sales in March rose to 188,600 
from 165,040 a year earlier, while car and light 
truck sales rose 133 percent to 216,100 from 


NYSE 

Tuesday's dosing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere, l da The Associated Press 


12 Month 
Ugh Low Bode 


190,850. During the first quarter, sales rose 115 
percent. 

“This is the first dear sign that the govern- 
ment Incentive plan is working, and working 
better than expected," said Patrice Sdaro, an 
analyst at Natwest Sellier, in Paris. 

The French government l ate in January began 
to offer 5,000 French francs ($870) to people who 
traded in a car at least 10 years old for a new 
model a bonus most carmakers then matched. 


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land GmbH, said he was encour- 
aged by the 4.3 percent year-on- 
year rise in basic production goods 
on a two-month comparison. 

“They are normally something of 
a pointer to the future," he said “1 
see these figures as support for cau- 
tious optimism but nothing that 
would knock you off your chair." 

The Economics Ministry revised 
its January output data down to 
show a fall of hi percent from 
December and a 1.7 percent drop 
year-on-year. 


Alison Cottrell of Midland 
Global Markets in London said the 
latest data confirmed that whatever 
strength there was in West German 
industry came from the export side. 

“When you look at whore the 
strength is coming from in manu- 
facturing, it's all the basic and capi- 
tal goods, which are the export sec- 
tors,” she said 

Consumer goods, which were es~ 
sen dally domestic markets, were 
down in both month-on-month 
and year-on-year comparisons. 


• Z 0, a Russian car plant famed for making tbe black limousines long 
used by Kremlin officials, said it was sending more than 60,000 erf its 
100,000 workers mi forced leave for one week. The company said unpaid 
bills had fenced the suspension of its main production line. 

■ Royal Bijeokorf Beheer NV, a Dutch retailer, said it planned to sell 13 
million new shares in a public offering that would raise 148.9 million 
guilders ($79.4 million) to finance expansion. 

• Maunesmami AG, the German industrial company, said it planned to 
merge VDO Adolf SdrindBng AG, an auto components subsidiary, and 
Hartmann & Braun AG, an electronics unit, into the parent company. 

• HoechstAG of Germany and Comtudds PLC of Britain said they had 
merged units to form the second-largest fiber producer in Europe after 
Italy’s Enaction SpA. 

• Royal Gist-Brocades NV, the Dutch biochemical company, announced 
an agreement to sell a unit that makes industrial enzymes in Kings tree. 
South Carolina to the division's managers. 

• Lego A/S, tbe Danish tqymaker, said it would build a theme park west 
of London, its first park to be set up outride Denmark. 

• Montedison SpA said it had signed a contract worth 50 billion lire ($31 
million) to help buQd a chemical plant in the Chinese province of 

Heilongjiang. Reuters. Bloomberg, AFX. AF 


EDITOR: Wall Street Journal’s Bartley Is Riding High on Whitewater 


Last week, carmakers extended their match- 
ing bonuses to the end of April and executives 
said they may run them longer than that. The 
government plan lasts through June 1995. 

French carmakers benefited the most from 
the rise in sales, while Japanese carmakers saw 
sales fall 17 percent in March. 

PSA Peugot Citroen SA led car sales with 
62,100 units, a 29.6 percent increase from the 
previous year. Renault's car sales rose 8.4 per- 
(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Cottfinncd from Page 9 
tabHsb the supply-ride economic 
underpinnings of Ronald Reagan's 
years as president. He was favored, 
too, for commentary that described 
how the 1960s nrined the country. 

But lately, Mr. Bartley has been 
reaching a wider audience. He is 
seen on “Meet the Press" one day 
and on “Charlie Row" another. 
New York magazine is describing 
the rambunctiously conservative 
editorial page he has edited since 
1972 as “smart, ferocious and very, 
very powerful” 

The “Who Is Vincent Foster?" 
editorial that started all this atten- 
tion was one of several last summer 
that criticized Mr, Foster and other 
administration lawyers from the 
Rose Law Firm in Little Rock. 

A note found in Mr. Foster's 
briefcase after his death said, 
among other things, that “the WSJ 
editors tie without consequence." 

This winter, there have been new 
“Wbo is" editorials. They have 
been aimed at “Friends of Bill” and 
“Hillary," as Mrs. Clinton is often 
called on the Journal's editorial 
page (as in “Hillary in the Pits," the 
headline of an editorial last week 
on her commodities trading prof- 
its). 

The Journal's editorial page has 
beat boisterous in its suggestions 
that the adminis tration has been 
tainted by “congenitally violent" 


Little Rock, and that Mr. Clinton's 
aides are involved in cover-ups. 

Souk of the editorials off a - new 
information dug up by the Jour- 
nal's editorial-page staff. These 
“reported editorials,” as the Jour- 
nal calls them, have delved into tbe 
Clintons* Arkansas connections 
and raised questions about the in- 
vestigation into Mr. Foster’s death. 

If there is criticism — and there 
is — that the tone of the editorial 
page turned taunting after Mr. Fos- 
ter’s apparent suicide, Mr. Bartley 

does not appear concerned. “If you 
have a good story, ran with it,” he 
said. 

Some Journal watchers say they 
are offended. To me, it’s so mean- 
spirited,” said Stephen Hess, a me- 
dia analyst at the Brookings Insti- 
tution and a Republican who has 
held government positions. 

“It seems to take such joy in 
every foot fault of the president 
and everyone dose to him," Mr. 
Hess said. “It’s as if they are really 
trying to bring down a presidency. 

Mr. Bartley denies that. Stitt, af- 
ter an interlude following Mr. Fos- 
ter’s death last summer, the Jour- 
nal's editorial page returned in 
mid-December to its “Who Is Vin- 
cent Foster?” themes. 

All the respectful attention from 
the media lately, Mr. Bartley said 
in his office at the Journal last 
week, is “the other ride of the 


coin.” He said the reaction was tbe 
opposite of what occurred after Mr. 
Foster's death. 

“People.” he said, “were assign- 
ing us a sense of responsibility.” 
Bat a newspaper cannot be held 
accountable for die effects of de- 
pression in an official it covers. 

Mr. Bartley said he did not un- 
derstand criticism that the Jour- 
nal's editorials are mean in tone. 
“Lot*,” he said, “we write lively 
editorials." 

The Journal's editorial page has 
never been shy, at least since Mr. 
Bartley took over in 1972. It has 
had clear likes (Oliver North, Rob- 
ert Bork, Ronald Reagan and the 
junk bonds of Michad R. Mflken) 
and dislikes (cultural elites, Lani 
Guinier and “frantic propagan- 
dists” and “left-wing lobbyists'’ 
like Common Cause and the Na- 
tional Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Colored People). 

Mr. Bartley won a Pulitzer Prize 
for editorial writing in 1980. 

IBs top deputy, Daniel Hen- 
ninger, wrote one of the best- 
known recent Journal editorials, 
“No Guardrails," in March. It con- 
cluded that it was possible to speci- 
fy Mien America “began to tip off 
the emotional tracks. 

According to tbe Journal it was 
in August 1968, during the antiwar 
demonstrations at the Democratic 
National Convention in Chicago. 


Mr. Bartley’s stewardship of tbe 
editorial page clearly has the sup- 
port of senior executives of Dow 
Jones & Co., which publishes the 
Journal Mr. Bartley has been a 
vice president of the newspaper 
and a member of the company’s 
management committee for a de- 
cade. 

In an interview last week, Mr. 
Kann called Mr. Bartley “one of 
the genuine intellectual leaders of 
America.” 

In person, tbe bespectacled Mr. 
Bartley is so deferential that he 
appears to cringe at being the ob- 
ject of interest. His sentences are 
interrupted with pauses and it is 
nearly impossible to detect the ta- 
ble pounding that is so familiar an 
his editorial page. 

Mr. Kann and others who have 
known him for years say it is part of 
Mr. Bartley’s writer’s personality to 
reserve his passions for the printed 
page. Mr. Bartley was briefly a re- 
porter for the Journal in the early 
1960s and joined the editorial page 
staff in 1964. 

What he perceived as the hypoc- 
risy of the left in the 1960s, he said, 
began his drift from moderate Re- 
publicanism toward the right. As 
tbe foundation of his thinking, he 
rites his youth in Ames, Iowa, 
where society's structure and the 
values of individual responsibility 
made sense. 


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Malaysian Finance Chief 
Denies Link to Losses 


Copied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

kuala Lumpur — Maky* 

sa s finance minister, Anwar Ibra- 
,pjnm, songfat Tuesday to absolve 
■ tnmsett mm Mame ever the central 
banlfs t wo year s of hefty losses from 
foreign cuneocy trading, saying h 
wMdnetonngudgment at the tot 
* serious error in iudz- 
meBtt “?* ^ Anwar, who is alM 
depnty prime minister. 

poKtwl ORwsitian is press- 
ing mm to rcagn under ihe principle 
imriiflmal accountability, although 

Prizne Minister Mahadnr bin MbS- 

mad appears little inettn ed to lay 
blame at las deputy's door. 

Mr. Anwar said that be was told 
18 months ago that Bank Negara, 
Malaysia’s central bank, was losing 
money on international currency 
markets. He then ordered the hanir 
to cease trading in forward foreign - 
exchange contracts, be said. 

“My policy instructions were 
very dear," Mr. Anwar said, “As 
far back as in 1992, 1 had told the 
bank not to trade excessively in 
reserves." 

B a n k Negara, long known as a 
sw ashb u ckl ing player on currency 


markets, admitted on Thursday it 
lost S.7 billion ringrit (S238 bil lion ) 

from forex transactions last year 

. Governor Jaffar Husson re- 


9J billion ringgit in trading l ow s 
in 1992. 6 

The cabinet is to meet Wednes- 
day to discuss the losses, but it is 
not known whether Mr. Jaffar’s 

successor will be named. 

Mr. Anwar said the bank incurred 
hefty losses last year because ft was 
adhering to bis instructions to un- 
wind and dose all forward and long 
currency positio ns . 

Bank Negara has since banned 
all forward deals and is trading 
currency only on a spot basis. 

The size of its deals now are only 
about 10 percent of the transac- 
tions of between $500 matron and 
$2 billion it used to execute unto 
early 1993, traders said. 

Bank Negara bank is stiD fairly 
active in markets such as New 
York, though its presence in Singa- 
pore — its past playground —has 
declined sharply in the past year. 

Bank Negara is probably less ac- 


tive in Singapore now because it is 
too dosriy monitored for its com- 
fort, dealers said. 

One former official of the central 
bank warned that H mi rin g trading 
to spot deals “doesn’t mean no 
losses.” In fact, some of Bank Ne- 
gara’s forward-related losses were 
bad spot positions that had been 
rolled over, dealers said. 

Bat Mr. Mahathir, who was 
overseas when the fiasco unfolde d, 
said over die weekend that the 
losses would not weaken Malay- 
sia’s financial position. 

“On the whole, we made a profit, 
and our losses actually came from 
profits made in forex Heating* jg 

preceding years,” he said. “If that is 

not the case, how can we have a 
strong reserve of 70 billion ringgit, 
Mudt can sosiain the nationVim- 
ports for up to eight months?” 

“1 cannot just pick on the year 
Mien we record losses without tak- 
ing into consideration the years we 
make profits,” the prime minis ter 
said. “I think that would be un- 
fair.” 

(AFP, Knight-Ridder) 


Investors Rebel 
Against Direction 
Of China Vanke 


India Assails Trade Barriers 


Ream 

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister P.V. Narasunba 
Rao of India said Tuesday that Asian and Pacific 
^countries should guard against moves by the devel- 
oped world to use environmental and social concerns 
to set up trade barriers. 

Mr. Rao issued the warning at a meeting of the 
Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the 
Pacific, a body that represents more than half the 
wodd population. 

“While developing countries and developed coun- 
tries alike must share action to deal Men genuine 
social and environmental concerns, we should not 
countenance any moves to put these concerns on the 
trade agenda,” he said. 

“Legitimate concern for environmental preservation 
and Degradation should not, however, be made an alibi 
for raising protectionist trade barriers,” he said. 

Developing countries have expressed growing con- 
cern in recent months over international efforts led by 


the United States to look at countries' records on 
human rights and the environment as part of trade 
negotiations. 

Mr. Rao said environmental concents bad become 
inseparable from development but appealed to indus- 
trialized countries to appreciate the desire of the 
developing world to catch up with them. “Tbe need of 
the times is for cooperation, not confrontation.” 

Mr. Rao also said he hoped fresh impediments to 
free trade would not come up before the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade agreement is signed 
in Morocco next month. 

Leaders of the Group of 15 developing countries 
meeting in New Delhi last month insisted that they 
would reject non tariff barriers in the agreement They 
also said that they would reject a U.S. -sponsored move 
on labor standards, including a proposal that would 
effectively increase wages in developing countries, as 
well as the mrinrip n nf human rights and gnvi mninen - 
tal conditions in the agreement 


Reuters 

SHANGHAI — Rebellious 
shareholders have turned on 
one of Qrina’s publicly traded 
companies, si gnaling a wider re- 
volt against management ex- 
cesses as stock prices slide. 

China Vanke Co , which has 
catapulted from a sleepy office- 
equipment importer to a large 
real estate and stock concern in 
just a few years, is fighting a 
securities house that is trying to 
engineer a boardroom coup. 

On Tuesday, tbe two sides 
took their battle to the Shang- 
hai Securities News. Vanke 
management ran a front-page 
advertisement hinting at legal 
action and the brokerage, A & J 
Securities, defiantly proclaimed 
itself a champion of neglected 
shareholders. 

The company has issued class 
B shares to foreign investors 
and class A shares to domestic 
buyers. 

From its base in the Shenz- 
hen Special Economic Zone, 
the company has pursued the 
real estate boom up the coast to 
Shanghai, Qingdao and other 
dries, developing luxury resi- 
dential projects. 

When it raided a Shanghai 
company last year, Vanke 
gained an image as a tough cor- 
porate player — a style reflect- 
ed by top managers who sur- 
round themselves by young 
aides in double-breasted suits 
and dark glasses. 

But as Vanke flexed its mus- 
cles, its share price languished. 
Its dass B snares have rarely 
risen above their issue price. 

Shareholders wondered 
whether the company was being 
run by professional managers 
with a long-term plan or by mav- 
ericks out for a quick profit. 

Questions about Vanke’s 
management style exploded in 
public last wedc, Mien A&J 


Securities called a news confer- 
ence to demand a company re- 
structuring. 

A & I, saying it was a proxy 
for four shareholders owning 
10.73 percent of Vanke’s equity, 
demanded the replacement of 
dght to 10 members of the 14- 
member board and a retreat to 
its core business. One of the 
four shareholders, Shenzhen 
New Generation Industry Co ., 
later distanced itself from tbe 
att ack and threw its weight be- 
hind the board. 

In its advertisement on Tues- 

The discontent 
portends wider 
disappointment 
with Chinese 
corporate 
management. 

day, Vanke claim ed that rebels 
held a mere 3.17 percent of die 
company. 

Nevertheless, bickers said the 
unprecedented boardroom chal- 
lenge was a warning to many 
other listed companies that have 
followed Vanke’s erratic profit 

C With the s h ww h en and 
ghai stock markets slump- 
ing, investors have started to 
look above the bottom line: The 
Shanghai A-share index is now 
at hs lowest level since last year 
and its Shenzh en counterpart is 
a deeper slump 

B- share investors, unim- 
pressed by a string of average 
corporate results this year, are 
spooked by fears of national in- 
flation and are in a generally 
gloomy mood because erf a steep 
slide in Hang Kong share prices. 


Japan Posts 
Small Rise 
In Surplus 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japan’s trade surplus 
e dg e d op to a record in February, 
hot the small rise from 12 months 
earlier indi c at ed that export growth 
has stopped, a development that 
would bdp tbe government in its 
relations with the United States and 
other industrial countries. 

The current account surplus, the 
wide measure of trade in goods and 
services, edged up 0.1 percent, to 
$11.94 billion, from SI 1.93 MDion in 
February 1993. The surplus actually 
declined in yen terms, reported by 
the government as 1.27 trillion yen 
in February, down 12 percent from 
1.442 trillion yen a year earlier. 

E co nomist s said the yen figures 
were not widely followed, but they 
flhtstrated the so-called J-curve ef- 
fect Because the yen has been rising 
in value, largely a result of trade 
tensions between Japan and tbe 
United States, the dollar amount of 
exports rase even though fewer units 
were shipped. The J-curve effect 
predicts that the rising cost of Japa- 
nese products will eventually reduce 
Remand and thus unit xhipinwirs , 

Whether this MB happen was a 
subject of debate. 

“There are no clear signs that the 
surplus will decrease from this giv- 
en the slow economic recovery in 
Japan,” an analyst at an American 
securities firm said. “Tbe surplus 
will not start falling until the Japa- 
nese economy emerges from tbe 
current long-lasting recession.” 

But Mineko Sasaki-Snrith of Mo- 
rgan Stanley Securities Japan said: 
“It’s a positive sign. The surplus is 
an the verge of turning a comer to- 
ward stability and gradual decline.” 

The long-term capital balance; 
which measures direct investment, 
trade credits, loans and securities 
transactions, posted a record sur- 
plus of $17.5 billion, reversing a 
deficit of $8.4 billion a year earner. 

The mam factor behind the re- 
cord surplus was foreign buying of 
Japanese stocks which hit a record 
of $ 1 1 J brUion, surpassing the pre- 
vious record of $10.6 bulion the 
previous month. (Reuters, 

Bloomberg, AP, AFP) 



Soadtti d’lnvestissement 0 Capital Variable 
Registered Office: 

L-1528 Luxembourg, 5, Boulevard de la Foire 
R.C. Luxembourg B 26T49 

Shareholders are invited to attend the 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS 

whkh will be held at 5, Boulevard de la Foire, Luxem- 
bourg on April 15, 1994 at 10.30 a.m. with the following 

agenda : 

1. Reports of the Board of Directors and of the Auditors. 

2. Approval of the financial statements as of 
December 31, 1993. 

3. Acceptance of the Directors recommendation to pay 
no dividend for tbe yeor ended December 31, 1993. 

4. Discharge of the Directors and of the Auditors in res- 
pect of the carrying out of their duties during the fis- 
cal year ended December 31, 1993. 

5. Election of the Directors and of the Auditors. 

6. Miscellaneous business. 

NOTES: 

Holders of bearer shares may vote at the Meeting: 

— in person by producing at the Meeting either share cer- 
fificxrtss or a certificate of deposit issued by their bank 
which will be issued to them against deposit of their 
share certificates 

— by proxy by completing the form of proxy which will 

be made available to them against deposit of the share 
certificates as aforesaid. 

Shore certificates so deposited will be retained until the 

Meeting or any adjournment thereof has been concluded. 

The Board of Directors 


ALFRED BERG SICAV 

Sod£t£ d’lnvestissement 6 Capital Variable 
Registered Office: 

L-1528 Luxembourg, 5, Boulevard de la Foire 
R.C Luxembourg B 26150 

Shareholders are invited to attend the 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS 

which will be held at 5, Boulevard * fo Foi^Lmcen^ 
bourg on April 15, 1994 at 1 0.00 a.m. wrth the fonowmg 

agenda: 

7. Reports of the Board of Directors and of the Auditors. 
2. Approval of the financial statements as of 
December 31, 1993. 

3 ‘ JjSH forlhey^ended^^^^ 1 ^/*!* 3 ^ 

cal year ended December 31, 199 . 

5. Election of *o Di<*»n and of Hw 

6. Miscellaneous business. 

NOTES: 

Holders of beorer may vore of .tie Meeting: 

_ m person by by itieir bank 

3JU belt's =9°“ depMit ** 

share certificates 

Meeting or any adornment Hi ^ ^ ^ 


HEDGE: A Wall Street Whig and His Investors Relearn Some Old Lessons 


C —ti n n wl from Page 9 

tions that were being unloaded by Resolution 

Trust Coip. 

After Mr. Whitehead’s death in 1992, his heira 
wanted to reduce their investment but the com- 
plex securities could not be sold quickly. Instead. 
Whitehead/ Sterling was sold to Mr. Askm and 
renamed Askm ChpilaL 

Mr. Askin is a specialist in analyzing the 
value of collateralized mortgage obligations, or 
CMOs, amo ng the world’s most complex secu- 
rities. At their core are bundles of home loans 
that have been packaged together by mortgage 
bankers and then sola to investors. 

Wall Street firms can divide a pod of mort- 
gages into three dozen separate securities — 
some conservative and others highly specula- 
tive. 

Mr. A skin’s strategy took advantage of the 
fact that some of these mortgage-backed securi- 
ties are intended to increase in value as interest 
rates rise. That is the opposite of most bonds. 

Mr. Askm figured that if he bought both 


yet be market neutral — largely immune from 
interest-rate moves. 

In theory, a market-neutral portfolio should 
be less volatile than rate tied to market move- 
ments. In fact, other funds that invest in mort- 
gage-backed securities ostensibly with strate- 
gies simil ar to those of Mr. Askin say they have 
made money this year. 

Mr. Asian’s track record, short as it was, 
seemed to support his claim offaigh return with 
low risk, ana his funds grew from about $200 
minion m the begriming of 1993 to $600 million 
in February. 

His strategy appeared to work relatively wdl 
for a Mule, even as interest rates bottomed out 
last fall and then started to climb. 

On March 10, Mr. Asian sent a letter to 
investors saying that the funds were down 1.7 
percent in February. “That leaves returns 
above many other investment strategics,” he 
wrote. And as late as March 16, Mr. Askm told 
Capital Holding executives that be thought the 
funds would be up in March, Mr. Tumbler said. 

But in reality, things were not so rosy. As 
uncertainty about interest rates grew, the entire 
market for sophisticated mortgage-backed se- 
curities dried up. So prices fell on all Mr. 
Asian’s securities, even those that woe sup- 
posed to rise as interest rates did. 

“There has been no liquidity, no bids for four 
to five weeks,” Mr. Askm said in an interview 


last week, calling tbe prices be was quoted by 
dealers “hysterical” 

Mr. Asian’s choice, Mien confronted with 
these prices, was perhaps the most significant 
cause of his downfaH When he compiled his 
February report to investors, he did not use the 
prices quoted by brokerage firms in valuing the 
portfolio. Instead be used his own estimate of 
what a fair value would be for the securities — 
an unusual but not unheard-of practice. 

Mr. Askm was betting that prices would 
revert to those called for in his mathematical 
models. But by Match 23, be was losing the bet. 
On that day he cut short a vacation in Florida 


Tf it looks too good to be 
true, maybe it is.’ 

One of David Asian’s investors 
and flew to New York to face a series of margin 


are known. 

The prices quoted for the securities in bis 
funds kept falling, and several brokerage firms 
simultaneously demanded more money. 

■So me firms, which had required Mr. Asian to 
post a margin deposit in cash of 10 percent of the 
ygyri ties purchased, raised the percentage to 15 
or 20 percent, investors sakL This, combined 
with the falling value of the positions, created an 
accelerating demand for money. 

Only two days later, after the margin calls 
began to eat away at the value of the fund 
significantly, did Mr. As kin tell investors, 
through a ux, that there was a problem. 

He disclosed that Us funds had lost more 
than 20 percent of their value in February — 
not the 1-phis percent he had previously report- 
ed. 

By the time tbe investors gathered the follow- 
ing Monday, there was a far greater problem 
than margin calls. Financial specialists familiar 
with the portfolio say the funds had become 
dangerously unhedged, and would lose value 
quickly if rates kept rising — as (hey did. 

There is a substantial disagreement as to why 

the funds were no longer market neutral. 

Mr. Asian's explanation is that as he had to 
sell securities to raise tire cash for the margin 
calls, and the only securities that were salable 
were the ones that were increasing in value. 

But some mortgage-backed securities dealers 


who saw Mr. Aslrin’s investments question 
whether his hedging strategy was constructed 
properly. 

They suggest that some of the securities that 
were meant to appreciate as rates rise; were 
actually the kind that reverse direction and 
start falling in value if the rate increases contin- 
ue, as they have. 

Some investors are also questioning whether 
Mr. Askin, in fact, chose to be unhedged, bet- 
ting that interest rates would fad. 

While other investors were deciding whether 
to add more funds, tbe Rockefeller Foundation 
and two other investors who bad separate ac- 
counts managed by Mr. Askin opted to pm up 
mare money — equal to an additional 30 per- 
cent of then invested capital — to meet the 

mar gin calls . 

But first they dismissed Mr. Asian, and hired 
a new manager for their investments. 

The other investors, however, could not 
reach agreement Their outside advisers — 
Trust Co. erf the West a large money manage- 
ment firm, and Chn ion Group, another in vest- 


gage strategy — were having trouble pricing the 
portfolio. Then brokers started selling Mr. As- 
lan's holdings. 

Mr. Asian is bitter about the experience. “We 
were being threatened a lot,” be said. “Some 
dealers sold our positions, but (fid not give ns a 
lot of details. Urey forced our hands and made 
us walk off the plank.” 

Tbe brokers were afraid that the value of 
their collateral would disappear and they would 
face huge losses. 

In fact, however. Mien tbe brokers auctioned 
off Granite’s holdings Wednesday and Thurs- 
day, tbe prices they received wee higher than 
they had expected. 

Yet now, as Mr. Askm sweeps op the remains , 
of his business, and as the investors hire lawyers 
for the expected lawsuits, everybody involved is 
considering what lessons have been learned. 

Most erf them are variations on the ample ' 
truths that successful people often think they | 

do not always work. Andthere is no replace- 
ment for a cushion of liquidity. 

More simply perhaps, investors say that they 
should have figured mat something was wrong 
with his promise of a 15 percent return with no 
risk. 

“Maybe this sounds to easy to say now," one 
dazed investor said. “If it looks too good to be 
true, maybe it is.” 


ASIA/PACIFIC 






KjJ JprKA' ft J -Fw* : 


Hang Seng. / ^:S 



Hong Kong] 
Stngopbwa^. 


: ! =: v ; \L ■. ‘Change 

SjT&s 


IpllSl 

New 

Sources: neuters. AFP 


n~~2mfF~S?S 

toBnannl Hewld Tribnac 


Very briefly: 

• Japan’s Finance Ministry said net purchases of Japanese bonds by 
foreign investors totaled 776.0 billion yen ($73 billion) in February, the 
highest on record, as government bonds in other markets suffered losses. 

• Rover Japan Ltd. is cutting car retail prices by an average 12.7 percent, 
citing faUbng production costs and the strong yen. 

» Mitsui Pet rochemical Tndwqrigs till, is setting up a $130 million venture 
with Amoco Qynrifal Corp. to make raw materials for polyester textile 
and plastic bottles in Indonesia. 

• Bmfc of Thmland said Japan was the largest foreign direct investor in 
Thailan d last year, at 93 billion baht (S3 68 miUion); the United Slates, 
with 7.7 billion baht, fell to second place; a bank official said the increase 
in Japanese investment was mostly due to the rising value of the yen. 

• PT lndocement Tiwggal Prakarsa, Indonesia's biggest cement maker, 
said net profit fell 5 percent, to 312.4 billion rupiah ($147 million), in 
1993; a broker blamed the service of debt incurred from acquisitions. 

• Petro Vietnam, the state ofl company, plans to begin delivering natural 
gas bypjpdinc from tbe offshore Bach Ho oD field to a power station in 
Vnng Tau by October. Vietnam News reported. 

AFP, AFX, Reuters, Bloomberg, Knight-Ridder 


Australian Market at Lows 


Reuters 

SYDNEY — The Australian 
stock market on Tuesday hit its 
lowest level this year, reflecting ris- 
ing bond Melds. 

The All Ordinaries index dosed 
3.1 points down, at 2,050.0, and is 
118 percent bdow its all-time peak 
of 2^50.1 on Feb. 3. Tbe market hit 
a four-month low of 2,009.8 points 
in eariy trading Tuesday. 

The yield on the benchmark Sep- 


tember 2004 Commonweath bond 
rose 27 basis points, to dose at 812 
percent, up from around 65 per- 
cent in eariy February. 

The equity market “should be 
another 100 to 200 points off, given 
where the bond yields are," said 
Hugh Dougherty, head of research 
at BT Securities. But Winston Sam- 
mut, associate directin' at BZW In- 
vestments Australia, said stocks 
had already had thrir biggest falls. 


LEICOM FUND SICAV 

20, Boulevard Emmanuel Servais 
1-2535 Luxembourg 


Mesaeuis les actSoarares soal convoques par le preset* avis d 

LASSEMBLEE GENERALE ORDINAIRE DES AC310NNADDES 


30, avec 


jour sujvant : 


1. Rapport de gesdon da CoaoefI d’AdadnJMnitfoa; 

2 Rapport An RMaemr dTEsttrepeiaeo; 

8. Adoption des eomptea de IVxerelce an 31 Df- 
cembre 1993; 

4. Affectation dn rtanftat; 

5. Dtdharge mu adMnistratenn et on Revise™* d'En- 
trepviaes; 

6. Nomination des orgnnes sodmnx 2 

- Rcelection des a dm i n istraleura sortants, & {’exception de 
Monsieur Olivier MAlfMUS et C.PA. - VIE PARIS, represent^ 
par Monsieur Jean-Phitippc THIERRY, qui dcmUsronnent; 

- Ratification dc la nomination dc Monsieur jran-Phifippe 
THIERRY, en rant qu’adminislraleiir a dire personnel, et cclle 
de Monsieur Donat B RANGER, en rem placement de Monsieur 
Olivier MAUMUS; 

- Reflection du Reviseur d’Entreprises. 

Les resolutions des action naires lore de 1'Assemblee Cenlralc Ordi- 
naire sc rout vot£es 1 une ma jo rite simple des actionnaires presents 
et volants. 

Chaquc action a un droit dc vote. 

Tout actionoaire peul voter par mandataire. 

Poor la sodete, 

BASQUE DE GESTIOIV EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD LUXEMBOURG 
20, Boulevard Enrnw— d Servafa 
L- 2535 Luxembourg 


Annual figures 1 993 


With a 10.9% increase in neLprafii*) >JLG 2,029 million an fl strong growffi in 
shareholders’ equity, 1993 was a good year for iNGj&roup- 

With handsome results particularly from franking and fife insurance operations profit 
before tax was NLG 2,82l miUtGn, ^ is an increase of-NLG 435 million (+18.2%) 

compared with 1992. Z. * 

The results have been determined on the basis of tbs revised accounting rules introduced 

by ING Group with effect from 1993. 

The figures for 1992 have been restated on the basis of the new accounting rales to facil- 
itate comparison. 


Amounts in Dutch guilders 

1993 

1992 

% 

Change 

(in millions) 




Results before tax 

2,821 

2386 

+ JS-2 

Net profit 

2,029 

1,829 

+ 10.9 

fin guilders) 




Net profit per share 

8.01 

7.50 

+ 6.8 

Dividend per share 

3.50 

3.19 

+ 9.7 

(inbfltions) 




Total assets 

339.4 

322.9 

+ 5-J 

Investments 

132.1 

127.7 

+ 3.4 

Bank lending 

144.9 

138.1 

+ 4.9 

Group capital base 

22.6 

16.7 

+ 352 


ING 



GROUP 


The annual report will appear on April 18th, 1994 and can be obtained at 
the following address: 

Internationale Nederianden Group, P.O. Box 810, 1000 AV Amster dam Holland. 
Tel. (+31) 20 541 54 60. 6x: (+31) 20 541 54 51. 


















































































For 

investment 

information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the IHT 


For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 


The conference program 
will highlight the investment 

opportunities in 

Latin America following the 
region’s economic revival 


Latin America 

A New Investment Partner 


LONDON • JUNE 9 - 10 • 1994 

Hcralb^eribunc B 


KveOtWENTMW 


FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION ON THE 
CONFERENCE: 

Brenda Hagerty 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH, England 
Tel: (44 71) 836 4802 
Fax: (44 71)836 0717 


K.'PBST' S3 PELP-E 5 B2<3s og. 







































































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Page 16 


SPORTS 


Despite Record 3 Homers, Off Gooden, Cubs Still Lose Blue Jays Opener 




The Associated Press 

Find a player with just five home 
runs in 280 big-league at-bats, give 
mm a strong wind blowing out at 
ftiendly Wngley Field, and what 
do you get? 

How about a major league re- 
cord: three homers in his first three 
at-bats of the season? Say hello to 
Karl Rhodes, who did the swinging 
while Hillary Clinton did the sing- 
ing. 

Stitt, it was a sad song for the 
Chicago Cubs, who couldn't man- 
age to beat the New York Mets. 

“I have to tdi you I don’t try to 
hit home runs,” he said after join- 
ing George Bell as the only player 


That made it easy for John Bur- 
kett, who limited Pittsburgh to five 
hits in seven innin gs as San Fran- 
cisco opened the season before 
58.077 people at Candlestick Park. 

Last season. Williams had a ca- 
reer-high 38 homers and 1 10 RBls 
batting behind dark, who left the 
Giants to sign with the Texas 


NL ROUNDUP 


ever to hit three homers on opening 
day. M I go up there and try to hit 
line drives." 

He hit three off New York’s 
Dwight Gooden, but the Mets had 
too much offense of their own. 
They opened the season Monday 
with a 12-8 victory, spoiling the 
first lady's day. 

Rhodes had opposite-field 
homers in the first, third and fifth 
innings, and Cubs fans littered the 
outfield with hats after his third. 

“I saw the hats flying on the 
field, and I was told it was like a hat 
trick in hockey,” the 25-year-old 
outfielder said. “I couldn’t believe 
it. But if you know me, you know 
I’m low-key." 

The first lady, who threw out the 
first ball for her favorite team, was 
on-key when she and Chicago 
broadcaster Hany Caray — starl- 
ing his 50th season behind the mike 
— harmonized in his ritual sev- 
enth-inning singing of Take Me 
Out to the Ball Game." 

“It was typical Wrigley Field," 
said Gooden, whose career record 
against die Cubs grew to 27-4 de- 
spite giving up seven runs on 11 
bits in 5 2/3 innings. Gooden 
didn’t get to face Rhodes — who 
also walked and got a single — a 
fourth time. Asked whether he had 
wanted to, Gooden laughed and 
said, “No, not in that situation, 
with the Cubs at home.” 

Jose Vizcaino, traded last week 
from the Cubs to the Mets for 
pitcher Anthony Young, and Todd 
Hundley hit consecutive home runs 
in the third inning off Mike Mor- 
gan. Jeff Kent, who had four hits, 
led off the New York fourth with a 
home run. Gooden had a bases- 
loaded single in a three-run fifth. 

Reds 5, Cardinals 4: Owner 
Marge Schott who refused to at- 
tend Cincinnati's loss to St Louis 
on Sunday night because the game 
was played on Easter, saw the team 
get its first victory on a 10lh-inning 
home run from Kevin Mitchell. 

When the sports television net- 
work ESPN proposed a Sunday 
night season mener. Schott volun- 
teered. But when she realized the 
date was Easter, she was appalled. 

“You don’t mess with a holy 
day," she said. 

After Hector Carrasco pitched 
out of a bases-loaded threat in the 
top of the 10th, Mitchell homered 
off Rob Murphy. 

John Smileypitcfaed five shutout 
innings, and Cincinnati got two- 
run homers from Reggie Sanders 
and Joe Oliver. But the bullpen 
failed in the eighth. 

Giants 8, Pirates 0: Matt Wil- 
liams didn’t seem to miss former 
teammate Will Clark as he ho- 
mend in his first two at-bats 
against Zane Smith and finished 
with five RBIa. 


Taking over for G&ric, Todd 
Benzinger marked his debut at first 
base with a two-run triple off Ra- 
vrio Manzanillo in the fifth. 

Astros 6, Expos 5: Mitch Wil- 
liams was the Wild Thing a g a in . 
But his new team got him off the 
hook after he walked home two 
runs in the 12th inning . 

Houston's Jeff Bagwell singled 
in one run, and Ken Canhniti hit a 
derisive two-run double at the As- 
trodome. 

Williams, who was pitching for 
Philadelphia when he finished 1993 
by giving up the World Series-end- 
ing home run to Toronto's Joe Car- 
ter, relieved to start the 12th with 
the score tied at 3. After getting two 
outs and allowing two hits, Wil- 
liams walked three straight batters. 

Braves 4, Patbes 1: Two-time 
NL Cy Young Award winner Greg 
Maddux allowed seven hits in eight 
innings, and Deion Sanders and 
rookie Ryan Klesko hit homers as 
visiting Atlanta won its first game 
as a member of the NL East after 
three straight NL West crowns. 

The Padres, who lost 101 games 
in 1993, got off to a bumbling start: 
The game was delayed about 15 
minutes to accommodate fans 
stuck in ticket lines because of a 
computer crash. Four-time NL bat- 
ting champion Tony Gwynn left 
after four innings with a strained 
left calf. And pitching ace Andy 
Boies was the loser. 

Phillies 12, Roddes 6: Snow flur- 
ries created a chilly backdrop for 
visiting Philadelphia, but the de- 
fending NL champions’ bats were 
hot enough to handle Colorado. 

Getting a homer and four RBls 
from Mariano Duncan, the Phillies 
began their title defense by using 
an eight-run eighth inning to win 
before 72,470 at Mile High Stadi- 
um — the fourth-largest opening- 



i Painful for Chisox : 0 I < 


Ken Griffey Jr., scoring in the eighth, bowled over Sandy Alomar Jr. before the catcher and Ms Indians aided 19 on top in the 11th. 


The Associated Press 

On & day when Randy Johnson 
almost made pitching history at 
new Jacobs Field in Cleveland, 
Carlos Dekado was a big hit at the 
SkyDomem Canada. 

Delgado launched a 450-foot 
(134-meter) drive off a window of 
the Hard Rock Cafe in right field, 
Ieadiim the Toronto Blue Jays over 
the Chicago White Sox, 7-3, on 
opening day Monday. 

“He was kind of protecting the 
plate with two strikes on him," 
teammate Paid Moliior joked. 
“Wait ’til he really gets a hold of 
one.” 

Molitor, the World Series MVP, 
and the rest of the Blue Jays got 
their championship rings in a pre- 
game ceremony. Then "foronto put 
on another quality show. 

Roberto Alomar hit a three-run 
homer with two out in the seventh 
off Cy Young Award winner Jack 
McDowell for a 4-2 lead. In the 
eighth, Delgado and Ed Sprague 
hit consecutive home runs. 

There’s no doubt Robbie’s hit 
was the big one,” MoUtor said “It 
gave us the lead. But the guys are 
still talking about the one Carlos 
hit.” 

Delgado, a converted catcher 
playing left field joined shortstop 
Alex Gonzalez as rookie starters 
for the champions. Even with a new 
lineup, Toronto trounced McDow- 
ell. 

He was 0-2 with a 10.00 ERA 
against the Blue Jays in last Octo- 
ber’s AL playoffs. He is 3-7 in regu- 
lar-season games against Toronto. 

That exact team hasn’t been to- 


gether for my six years,” McDowell 
said. “So irs nothing other thaA 
chance.” 

Frank Thomas, the AL MVF, 
went 2-for*4 and scored twice for 
Chicago. The White Sox, who won 
the AL West last season, lost their 
first game as members of the recon- 
figured AL Central. 

Orioles 6, Royals 3: Rafael Pal- 
radio homered in ins Baltimore de- 
but and newcomer Lee Smith got 
the last out for a save as the Orioles 
won at home. 

Mike Mussina was the winner. 


AL ROUNDUP 


dajr crowd in baseball 


was (he Rockies* second-larg- 
est crowd, trailing only the 80,227 
for their home opener last season. 
The Rockies set a baseball record 
by drawing 4,483,350 people in 
1991 

After Andres Galarraga — who 
also homered — and Joe Girardi 
had RBI singles in the seventh to 
put the Rockies ahead 6-4, the 
Phillies rallied on just two hits, six 
walks and ieft fielder Howard 
Johnson’s three-run error. 

• Darryl Strawberry, on the 
verge of being released by the 
Dodgers after failing to show for 
up for Sunday’s game, told team 
officials that he had a drug and 
alcohol problem and would enter a 
treatment center Tuesday, the Los 
Angeles Times reported. 

In an emotional meeting, Straw- 
berry asked the Dodgers for help in 
seeking treatment. They put him on 
the disabled list on the eve erf the 
1994 season opener at Dodger Sta-‘ 
diurn. 

“I would say we were dose” to 
releasing him, said Fred Claire, the 
team's executive vice president. 

Claire said that even with Straw- 
berry’s disclosure, the dub could 
have released him. But after meet- 
ing with Strawberry and his wife, 
Charisse, and his attorney, Bob 
Shaprio, Gaffe changed course. 



Feller Frets, Then Throws His Best Hex 


Jftte York Times Service 

CLEVELAND — For 54 years, Bob Fetter has 
sweated through op ening day, waiting to see 
if some pitcher would repeat a feat only he has ever 
accomplished: throwing a no-hitter in the first 
game of the season. 

Never was that vigil more excruciating than 
Monday, as Feller watched Seattle’s Randy John- 
son come within five outs of duplicating the feat 
against the Cleveland In dians, the team Feller 
once pitched for. 

Fetter, 75, was among the 41,459 fans watching 
for seven and one-third as Johnson threatened to 
nudge his way into the record book alongside the 


Cleveland legend, whose opening-day no-hitter to 
1940 against the Chicago White Sox in the old 
Comiskey Park was the first of three nohitters 
Fella- pitched in his Hall of Fame career. 

That threat ended when Sandy Alomar, Jr., tfae t 
Indians catcher, hit a dean, one-out single to right, 

“I was concerned, but I put the hex on him,” 
said Feller, who was in position to witness the 
effort by Johnson because he had been invited to 
participate in first-ball ceremonies before the inau- 
gural game at Jacobs Field. 


Asked if he was sweating out the nohit bid, 
id, “1 have ever since 1940 because it's 


Fdler said, 
about the only record I’ve got left. 


■ \ .i 



allowing one run on two hits in 
eight innings, before 47,549 fans, -■ 
the largest crowd for a regular-sea- - 
son game at Camden Yards. • 

MjkeDevereaux homered for the - 
Orioles off loser Kevin Appier and 
ninth-place batter Jeffrey Ham- ' 
mends added an RBI double. 

Mike Macfarlane homered for. - 
Kansas City, which lost for the 
eighth time' in nine openers. The - 
Royals scored twice in the ninth 
and had two runners on base before ■- 
Smith relieved and retired Dave-. 
Henderson on a grounder. 

Indians 4, Mariners 3: Randy' 
Johnson, who pitched a no-hitter in - 
1990, lost his no-hit bid in the,, 
eighth inning, then Seattle lost the 
game in the 11th. 

Sandy Alomar Jr. singled after l - 
leadoff walk in the eighth foT 
Cleveland's first hit Manny Ra» 
nrirez tied it at 2 with a two-ms 
double. 

Both teams scared in the 10th. " 
and the Indians won in the Ifth 
when Eddie Murray doubled, ad- ; 
vanced on a fly and sooted ott-a : 
two-out single off Kevin King. ; 

Yankees 5, Rangers 3: Jimmy- 
Key ran his record to 5-0 in open- 
ers, pitching into the eighth isnipg. - 
as Hew York won at home. , - - 

Joe DiMaggio threw out the first . 
ball and then the Yankee hitter : 
took over. Danny Tartabull and . . 
Mike Stanley homered and Watte 

S id four singles. 

idd Texas to five hits he-J 
blcs by Will Clark and Da- r . 
vid Hulsc finished him. Key be- 
came the first Yankee pi tetter ie 
win consecutive opening-day starts - 
since Md Stottlemyre won thrift 
straight in 1967*6 9. ■: - 

Red Sax 9, Tigers 8: Otis Nixanr- - 
signed by Boston to add soak- 
speed, scored on a passed ball in 
the eighth inning to 
Fenws 


t Detroitai 


Tta^S&x won despite Roger t/!/ Yl ('(If 


Gemens giving up eight runs in 4% 
innings. Clemens broke C) 
Young's team record with his scv> . 
enth opening-day start, but coaid . 
not hold the Tigers in his first gams . 
since the worst season of his caraja; 

Boston rallied for three runs in 
the eiririh against loser Storm Da- \ 
vis. Nixon drew a two-out walk , 
loading the bases, and Billy Hatch- ;/ 
er hit a two-run double that tied it 
at 8. With a 2-0 count, a high pitch.'.; - 
went off catcher Mickey Teitieton’r; 
glove, allowing Nixon to score. . - 


Eiipat Oud*fA*nM FmcfrPra* 

Karf Rhodes fait three straight home runs off Dwight Gooden. 


3iwt Onw/Thc A wnri i tri ft— 

Hany Caray, the Cubs' announcer, and HZBaiy Cfintoo belted out “Take Me Out to the Bafl Game.'’ 


To our readers in Frame 

It's mw been easier to subsaifea 
and tarn vdh our new 
tail free service. 

Just caBu* today at 
03437437. 



DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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Id subscrfce and save 
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Frankfurt office 
tqli-free 0130-848585 
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'j-v.v; 























SPORTS 


Page 17 


r * 


' h; * Placating UEFA 

IjCts Havelange 
, 6 th FIFA Term 

■ ZURI CH —■ AH five continental soccer fed- 

a^nn^mc way for his re-election in June. 

The European Football Union, UEFA, had 
^AntoruoMatarre^ its “S 


asa 

. ^^ate but withdrew his name at Dsesd&l 



“We 
World 
and that 

” / — — qui 4UU U| Cl 

' dent Lennart Johansson said. 

Havdange recently promised extra snots in 

10 Asia NwtSSrti 

Um u would •« 

■ -JiS* *?? it was his decision that 

Matanrcse would not opposed Havelange “and 
. this wm be on my head." a 

V UEFA’s executive committee met last week 
to J? IKidcr fielding a Candida? 
hot smd it would not announce its decision 

7 ^ y , S the other conii- 

.ncntal soccer bodies. 

- ■ Johansson, once considered a likely Candi- 
da* ruled himself out of the nmnina. 

' A’s general secretary, whose 

- relations with Havelange are said to he strained, 
said he was not a candidate and I wiD certainly 
. never be a candidate against Mr. Havdange." 

" The decision to support Havdange nT an- 
nounced jointly by the presidents of the confed- 
erations representing Asia, Africa, North-Cen- 
tral America, South America, Europe and 

^Oceania. 

.! “Each president presented his point of view." 
said the 77-year-oid Br a 2 ili.n 1 , who has been 
. head of the governing body for 20 years. “An 
accord was found. This accord is unanimous.” 

• He is credited with encouraging th e sport by 
• FIFA sponsorship programs in developing na- 
tions, for spreading its appeal to new nnHi«w^ 
by staging this year’s World Cup finals m the 
United States, and for turning the World Cup 
into a moltimillion-doQar extravaganza. 

But he shocked many by H anning the soccer 
‘ legend Ptfc from the World Cup draw ceremo- 
ny in Las Vegas last December. 

Ricardo Tdxeira. Havelange’ s son-in-law 
and a member of the FIFA executive board, has 
sued Pelfe for his allegations of corruption in the 
Brazilian soccer league. 

. B latte r, a Swiss army colonel and public 
.relations expert who has won widespread praise 
for the drive to make soccer more attractive, 
was openly upset by the ban on Pde. 

Then Havelange angered UEFA in particular 
by announcing at a meeting in New York that 
be had unanimous support for his re-election. 
The Europeans said later they had not asked 
him to stand for re-election. 



Arkansas’s the Champ, 76-72, 
On a Shot That Bedevils Duke 


Amy SmcrWThr Aaocnled Pie* 

Grant HID, reborakfing, fefl hard 20 seconds into the game, dealing Duke its first Wow. 


By Malcolm Moran 

Netr York Timet Service 

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina 
— At long, long last, Nolan Rich- 
ardson and his Arkansas Razor- 
hacks have earned their 40 minutes 
of heaven. 

It may not have felt that way as 
the Duke Blue Devils took the Ra- 
zerbacks into the final, taut min- 
utes of the national collegiate 
championship game. But the hard- 
earned signature ability of the Ra- 
zorbacks to operate in the most 
stressful moments — a quality 
forged by the intense effort Rich- 
ardson once named 40 urinates of 
something else — helped Arkansas 
win its first national championship. 
76-72, over Duke on Monday night 
at Charlotte Coliseum. 

After overcoming a 10-point sec- 
ond-half deficit, the Razorbacks 
began to feel a title in their grasp 
when sophomore Scotty Thurman 
broke a 70-all tie with a 3-point 
shot with 50.7 seconds to play. 
Thurman’s shot — with Duke for- 
ward Antonio Lang lunging toward 
him with arms outstretched and die 
35-second clock down to a single 
second — created a deficit the Blue 
Devils could not overcome. 

Arkansas, 31-3, prevented Duke 
from w inning a third title in four 
years and joining UCLA and Ken- 
tucky as the only schools to accom- 
plish that feat. The Blue Devils, 28- 
6, lost a championship game for die 
fifth time, the most in the history of 
the tournament. 

Corliss Williamson, the oatstand- 
ing player of the tournament, scored 
a game-hjgh 23 points for die Ar- 
kansas. Grant Hill Duke’s first- 
team all- America, was held to 12, 
more than 5 beneath his average. 

A night that began for HHJ with a 
p ainf ul tumble and crash landing 
on his lower back ended with bis 
leading the Blue Devils with 14 
rebounds. But a variety of defenses 
employed by the Razorbacks, in- 
cluding zones, man-to-man and 
double- teaming, restricted Hill to 4 
of 1 1 shots and helped induce 9 of 
Duke’s 23 turnovers. 

They did a good job of getting 
the ball out of Giant’s hands," 
Lang said. 

“This game was not won or lost 
on one play or one missed shot," 


said Mike Krzyzewski, the Duke 
coach, who acknowledged the fa- 
tigue his players showed as early as 
the end of the first half. "They just 
bad a little more firepower." 

The difference, however, was 
small enough that President Bill 
Clinton, when asked by a pool re- 
porter if be had been worried, said, 
“I was worried the w hole week. 1 
was wearied to the very end.” 

The president, who sat in a pri- 
vate box at the rear of the lower 
level, visited both dressing rooms 
afterward. 

Richardson, who had main- 
tained throughout the weekend 
that his work and that of other 
African-American coaches had 
been underappreciated and his 
team’s intelligence had not been 
recognized, was suddenly at the top 
of his profession. 

Duke had won 18 of its last 19 
tournament games, and the senior 
class of Hm, Lang and guard Marty 
Clark was painfully close to com- 
pleting a third championship sea- 
son in the rarest of college careers. 

The Razorbacks made just 39 
percent of their shots, the lowest 
total in their six tournament games. 


But they held Duke to two field 
goals in the final 4J2. HDJ got just 
(me basket — a 22-foot. BHpoini shot 
that tied the score at 70-arfwiih 1 :30 
to play — in the final 14:48. 

Richardson called time out with 
1:15 left. Then, as the shot clock 
ticked toward a violation, Thurman 
took a pass from janior center 
Dwight Stewart and squared him- 
self for the shot 
He said that, at first, as he left his 
feet to avoid Lang’s reach and re- 
lease the shot, he thought the shot 
doth would run out 
“1 had to get it over his arm," 
Thurman said. “He did get there. I 
just got it of quickly.” 

Williamson, seeing the shot 
dock and Lang’s reach, began to 
pray. “I said, ‘Please, please. Lord, 
let it go in.’ " 

But once the ball was beyond 
Lang’s reach and away before the 
buzzer, Thurman knew the worst 
was over. “I just fdt it was going to 
go in,” he said, and smiled. “1 don’t 
know why he was praying.” 

Duke sophomore Chris Collins, 
whose 12 points included 4 of 8 3- 
point shots, then took a 25-foot shot 
that missed with 35 seconds to go. 
Thurman got the rebound, guard 


Cli n t McDaniel was fouled, and he 
made one free throw with 28.4 sec- 
onds to play for a 74-70 lead. 

Coffins (hen missed on a drive 
with 19 seconds to go. Corey Beck 
look the rebound and was fouled 
by Lang, who fouled out with 17.2 
seconds left, having led the Blue 
Devils with IS points. Beck made 
one foul shot for a 75-70 lead. 

Cherokee Parks, who got 14 
points and 7 rebounds despite hav- 
ing strained his left knee in the 
semifinals, scored on an offensive 
rebound with 10.2 seconds left. It 
was 75-72. McDaniel fouled by 
Coffins with 9 seconds to go, 
missed the first free throw. Duke 
clung to a chance to tie. But 
McDaniel's second shot was good 
for a 4- point lead, and a presiden- 
tial championship celebration was 
seconds away. 

“I think the president's reaction 
was pride,” Richardson said. “The 
president is from a small stale. 
There’s a lot of pride in that state. 
And the Razorbacks are its pride. 
It’s pride and joy. And that, I think, 
is the reason he was probably teaiy- 
eyed when I visited with him. Be- 
cause something great had hap- 
pened in a great state.” 



Bond b«(.lrcJt>l''TW A.-.'-XWcd fttu 

Coribs Wffiamson, buffing by MB and Cherokee Parks, got a game-high 23 points and the MVP trophy. 


The African Nations Cup: Of Marriages and Mastery 


§ ONDON 


Imenutaonal Herald Tribme 

Slowly, distinctly, the African brew comes 
to the boil. Soccer on this vast, emerging continent is 
■ now a blend of European organization and of the skills that 
grow in the wild. 

Thankfully, traces of innocence survive. Thankfully, indi- 
viduals still shoot optimistically when they see the whites of 
the goalposts. And there are stiD players who toy with the toll 
players deaf to gurus screaming that safe play comes first. 

Wednesday’s semifinals of the 19th African Nations Cop 


players inappropriately nicknamed 
epnants," who dodge 
and weave as they scurry 

along fleet of foot- Huahes 

In the evening comes an 
affair of the heart Zam- 


ltV-_ 




bia, risen from last year’s dreadful plane crash, plays Mah, a 
rank outsider which, dared outplay the host n ati on . Tu n is ia . 

Of the four semifinalists. Nigeria, at last harnessing the 
latent resources of a near 100-million population, is heavily 
favored to win the tour n ame n t But expectation is as two- 
-faced in Africa as anywhere else, a strength bnt a burden. 

After Ghana lost 'to Ivory Coast the entire Ghanaian 
coaching staff was sacked on Monday. There is no clemency 
anvwhere. Ask Clement Wesiafiof, the philosophical 
Dutchman who once was fired by Nigeria, and who returned 
to guide that nation to this summer’s World Cap. 

Speaking on BBC World Service. Westahof acknowl- 

• edged that be, too, might be dismissed if Nigeria does not 

• win the Nations Cup. “Sometimes they put you on the top of 

; the mountain," he said “and sometimes they hang you on a 
■tree. It goes with the job ” . . 

■ Westahof knows the score. The Nigerians “respect me, I 

■ respect them," he said “I believe Nigeria has players who 
can win a World Cup. So has Ghana and Ivory Coast. They 

hare the talent but they lack facilities." 

The eternal African equation. Where talents shine on the 
^ntinent they are mined like diamonds, shipped to foreign 
lands, where they cost less than Europeans expect to pay but 
-infinitely more than Africa can afford 


Typically, Rachidi YekinL the African player of the year 
in 1993, is me of 33 Nigerians playing in Europe. Yddni a 
towering, muscular, rapid center-forward has given Nigeria 
more than 70 matches, and performed many times that 
number in Portugal for Vitoria SetubaL 
He personifies Nigeria’s approach. He seems almost dis- 
interested conserving himself for the summer, able to win 
matches by sudden bursts out of langmdhy. Super Eagle 
Yddni swooped for both Nigerian goals to put Zaire out of 
: quarterfinals. His first combined eye-catching delicacy 


the shot, and none would hare intercepted Yekmfs second 
god, a penalty hit with awesome disdain. 

Yddni is a rale model to the young Nigerians who, last 
summer, returned from Japan as the world under-17 cham- 
pions. And Wednesday’s opponents from the Ivory Coast 
also respect him because another brace of Yddni goals 
destroyed tbdr World Cup qualification last October. 

Yet it is fofly to underestimate Ivory Coast, the reig nin g 
Nations champion. It has only this pride to concentrate on 
in *94, and it has ousted Ghana. 

Under the Polish coach Henryk Kasperczak, Ivory Coast 
can flatter to a fault The orange shirts buzz, around mid- 
field, fluidly, industriously, playinga waiting game out of 
which Jod Tlehi and Abdouiaye Traore dart forward to 
scent and to score goals. 

Both did so against Ghana, with a nimbleness that caught 
the G hanaians unaware. Traore dived instinctively to haul 
in the ball at knee height — and when did you ever see an 
elephant do such a thing? 

G HANA’S ONE ANSWER was a tremendous free-kick 
goal by the Cologne-based diaries Akkunor. But the 
other Ghanaian in Germany, Tony Yaboah, had divided 
loyalties. 

In Tunis he wore while boots for an exclusive fee from the 
manufacturer. He also wore the distracted air of a man who 
insisted that, whether or not Ghana made Sunday's final he 
would be flying “home" to lead Eintrach Frankfurt’s attack 
in the crucial Bundesiiga match against Bayern Munich. 


With Yaboah’s priorities divided, with the magic of Abedi 
Pdi waning, Ghana’s coaches stood a less than even chance 
of losing their jobs. 

Meanwhile, Mall with fewer pretensions and no higher 
motives, crept stealthily into this semi Against a dramatic, 
dark bhie evening sky, Mali disposed of Tunisia in Tunis, a 
defeat that wrecked attendance at subsequent games and (fid 
nothing for home defender Taoufik Hickhorl who was sent 
off for two grotesaue fouls. 

Two fouls from trim, two fine goals from Mali — a strike 
at high speed by Fernand Coulibaly and a curled free-kick 
from Abdoul Karim Sidibe. 

C OULIBALY, 23, PLAYS for Saudi Arabia’s Al Ahly 
dub. So do half the Egyptian national squad, but that 
did not deter Coulibaly from orchestrating Mali's quarterfi- 
nal victory over the Egyptians. 

True, Mali rode its luck, and the Egyptians squandered 
chances. Still Zambia wlQ take nothing for granted in the 
semifinal It is rebuilding after the crash that killed 18 
players last April 28. The British consulate provided and 
paid a Scotsman, Iar Porterfield, to coach the new team. 

As a Brit would, he has organized a solid base around a 6 
fool 2 defender, John Lungu. The strategy, to hold and to 
break forward with tenacity, overcame Senegal 1-0, in the 
quarter finals . 

The precious goal reiterated the African’s willingness to 
hit the target from 20 meters and more. Evans Sakala, whose 
main role is defense, has probably never before conjured 
such a lock, or induced such crafty influence on the ton so 
that it dips and deceives a goalie as did his 38ih-minate score 
against Senegal 

He has some tale to take back to South Africa, where he 
earns his rand. But travelers’ tales are plentiful Clement 
Westerhcf has many, among them the Nigerian who kissed 
him and proposed: “Man, bring home the Nations Cup. and 
m give you my wife!” 

Westahof swears he replied: “Don’t do that. I already 
hare one wife, and if I took yours I’d have two, you’d have 
none, and we’d both be in trouble." 

Sob Hughes a on the mff The Tana. 


- 


SCOR EBOARD 


Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
EUf DMstat 

W L PEL 




■ Baltimore 

■ Boston 

' HwYart 
Toronto 
Detroit 


U300 

1-000 

1400 

1400 

400 


ar- 


Oovttona 
- Milwaukee 
' MlllMBOttl 
■ CtUcogo 
Kansas City 

' California 
Oakland 
Seattle 


,il 




*■ 

1 ? 


Central Dl vision 

1 0 1400 

0 0 400 

0 0 400 

O 1 400 

0 1 400 

WettOivtsloa 

0 0 400 

0 0 400 

0 1 400 

0 1 400 

NATIONAL league 
M fOfWslee 

w L **et. 
' Atlanta I 0 '400 

New York I 8 '■■“I® 

PtfflodoUMa ' 0 

FJOTkM 9 o 400 

Montreal O 1 400 

Carfral DNtoloo 

' Housto n 1 0 1JD * 

Cincinnati 1 I -S» 

SI. LWi» 1 » 

'Ottawa 0 1 

^Pittsburgh 0 ' 4“ 

f West Division 

SanFreiKKCB t 0 UW 

LssAnorles B 0 4“ 

Cotarado 0 » 2 

SontMesa 0 1 400 

Monday’* Une Scores 


SB 


Scorn* 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

»1 OH 000 !•-» 1 ] 

WHO IW 7 1 

(II baifnBS) 

RjsOnwLDavh (*I.Avala C*L King 
D.wltton: D l W tf ttnw.Sw«» (Bt.MHa W- 
airisl |10). Wunfc OO) and Alom crW— Wu™- 1 
l l— K ing. M. HR— Seattle. Anmonv 


Texas “0 JM iim 7 0 

Nnv York 102 020 00* — 5 It 1 

Brown, j .Hurst 16). Carpenter (7) and 
drlsuez; Kev. Wlckman (81. Hcromdei 101 
ml s ton lev. W-Kev. 1-0. Ir-Brewn. H. 
5 v— Hernandez (II. HRs— New York. Term- 
ball (11. Stanley (1). 

petroff HO 000—8 it a 

Boston 015 BOO OlX— 7 7 I 

jvwore. GarzHner (3). snavls (7) end Teltle- 

tan; aonen Quantrlll (S>. J-Hesketn (7). 
Bixiklieod (8). RiisseH (9) and VOIta Berrvnllt 
(9>. w— Bankhead. ML L— SJJavls. 0-1. Rw- 
x*tl (11. HR — Boston. Dawson (1). 
eucan 801 ool os! — 3 t o 

Taranto *81 008 Xfic-7 10 0 

McDoweU. DeLeon (SI. Cook (fll end Karto- 
V lee; GuzmmCadoref (B), Timlin (?) andBor- 
Oen. ICnarr (8). W^-Guunon. ML L— MeDowtiL 
9-1 HRs— CMcagot Kartcovle* tll.Torenta Alo- 
mar (1). Detoodo (1). Snrague tl). 

K mifl S CBy 800 TOO «W S 3 

BoWmora too 113 1 ta~4 n _P 

Appier. Beflnda »). arewer (6). Pteborto C7J. 
Montgomery (8) and Mocfartone^M^na 
Poole (91. Mflts (9), LSroltti (9) and HoHe* 
w— Mussina, l-a L— Apeier. 0-1. 5v — ISmim 
n». HRs— icoraos Cttv. Mactortane (1). Balti- 
more. Deveraoux (1). Polmrtni ID. 

NATIONAL league 

880 BO 818 0-4 13 I 
800 400 080 1-6 9 O 

(18 UMlaSSl 
Cormier, Mabyaft (5), RJlodrtewez 16). Sat- 
ellite (8). Mon*v (*) and PasPas; Smiley. 
Pugh W.McEirov (8). Brantley l 9_).Corra aa» 
(10) and Oliver, Dorsefi { w.w-Ca mao.i; 
0. L— Murphy. (H- HRs-CInonnBii. Mitchell 
fit. R^mdere (2), Oliver ID. . 

Uw York TO Ol 011—12 M ■ 

JSL*, ») 320 001—1 14 0 

Gooden. Hillman (61. Madtfu* («»• grants 

■si ml Hundiev; Mwvoa iwev »). Bui- 
l bluer 1 7), Plesoc (9» and Wilkins. 
deftl-a L— Morgm. (M - HRs— ^ NswYort.^ vl=- 
caino fl). Hwndiev 111. Kem ID. CnkOBB, 

H1 ' 838 800 080 883—5 6 B 
£«t*T DM m 008 BO-6 13 1 
(12 monies) 

Fassm. BOi® »«• wetteuaid (91. 5a»« 
m).Slx»v()g).B»ictier(»iP naDJ>e{ ™‘ 
Soenr HD); Ham Hen, Revnatts (8). Hampton 
(»». T Jones (18). MWlinems (121. Edens 1121 


and ServoH. Toubensee 112). W— Edens. ML 
L — Short, o-i. HRs M on trea l, Burry (1). 
Houston. Bagwell (1). 

Plt lsMli eh 880 800 000—0 6 2 

San Fnaxbco 80 031 Ota— 8 7 0 

ZJoWnv Minor (5), Monnrnfflo (5L BaOord (7) 
andSlaueM; Burkett, Mcrtetecne (8). Rogers IV) 
and Manwartaa-W— Burkett HLL— ZSmfltUH. 
HRs— Son Preachers WLWUUams 2 (2). 
ASanta Qio Dll 180-4 s 1 

sen Diego 808 800 001—1 » 1 

GJUloddux. McMIchael (91 and Lopez; Be- 
nes, PAMortlne: (81. Sager 19) and Ausmus. 
W— GJHcddux, ML L— Bones. O-l. HRs— At- 
lanta, Sanders (D. Klesko ID. 

PMloderaia 082 on bo— 12 9 o 

Colorado 81? on 200—4 U 3 

Schilling. BJAwnz (7). Stoeumo (71. West 

(8) aid Daahoo; Revnoso, Ruffin (71, 5J*eed 
f7J.MMunaz (TJ.Holmes 18). Blolr (8), Moore 

(9) and Glrardl. W— Slocumtk ML 
L— MAtonaz,fri.HR9-^ , nnadeipnia,Dia>can 
(D. Caiarada Burks 11). Ganrtm (1). 


x-SL Louis 

37 

31 

10 

>4 

248 282 

xOikagc 

36 

34 

9 

81 

237 224 

Winnipeg 

23 

47 

9 

55 

234 322 


Pacific Division 



x-Catoanr 

38 

28 

13 

89 

282 244 

x-Vancauver 

39 

37 

3 

11 

269 259 

5cm Joee 

31 

33 

15 

77 

241 2S3 

Anabeim 

31 

43 

5 

67 

220 240 

Lai Angela 

26 

41 

11 

63 279 302 

Edmonton 

23 

44 

12 

58 

248292 

x-dlnrtied playoff berth 



If* 


0660-8155 
or fas 06069-175413 


ARKANSAS 7k DUKE 72 
DUKE (2*41: Hill 4-11 3-5 12. Lang 44 M 15. 
Parks 7-10M HCOPM6-M UK Collins 4-11 
M lZCIark 1-6 V2 X Meek 1-2 U 2. Totals: 29- 
OS 7-11 72. 

ARKANSAS (31-3): WUIaniSOO 10-24 3-5 23, 
Bllev U U a Stewart 3-11 U 4. Bade 5-11 *8 
15. Thurman 4-13 0-0 IS McDaniel 2-5 34 7, 
Robinsan l-SUZ Dillard 1-51-24. RlmacO-1 0- 
0 a Wilson 2-2 U A Totals: 3877 11-19 74. 

Hamate: Arkansas 34. Duke 33. 3- Point 
aorta: Duke 7-20 (ColllrK4A. Cape! 2-4. H I lll-«. 
Clark 0-2). Arkansas 5-18 (Thurman 3-5. 
McDaniel l-X Dillard TK Beck 0-1. Ste wart 0- 
5). Foaled aal: Lons: Rebounds: Duke 44 (Hill 
Ml. Arkansas 44 (Beck TO). Assists: Duke 17 
(HUI 4). Arkansas 15 (Stewart. Bock 4). Total 
tads: Duke 18. Arkansas 17. 

NCAA CHAMPIONSHIP SCORES 

1939 — Oregon 46, OWo Stole 34 

1940 — Indiana 60. Kansas 42 

1941 — Wisconsin 39, Washington State 34 
1*0 — Stanford 53, Dartmouth OS 

19C — Wyamlne 46, GearaetoMi 34 
19*4 — Utah 42, Dartmouth *a OT 
1945 — Oklahoma A&M 49. NYU 45 
1944 — Oklahoma ASM 43. N. Carolina 40 
1*47 — Holy Crass 5W Oklahoma 47 

1948 — Kentucky 58, Baylor 41 

1949 — Kentucky 46. Oklahoma State 36 

1950 — CCNY 71. Bradiev 68 

1951 — Kentucky A Kansas Slate 58 

1952 — Kansas 90, 5T. Johrrt 63 

1953 — Indiana 49, Kanscs 68 

1954 — lo Salle 92. Bradley 76 

1955 — San Francisco 77, Lo Salle 63 

1956 — San Frtmdsco 83. inwa 71 

1957 — North Carolina 54. Kansas 53, SOT 

1958 — Kentucky 84. Seattle 72 

1999 — California 71, West viraWta 70 

1960 — Ohio Slate 75, Contorrto 58 

1961 — Cincinnati 70, Ohio State t& OT 

1962 — Ctodnnori 71. Ohio State 59 

1963 — Loyola ML 60. Cincinnati 58, OT 

1964 — UCLA 96. Duke 83 

1965 — UCLA 91. Michigan so 

1966 — Texas Western 72, Kentucky 65 

1967 — UCLA 79, Dayton 64 

TM8 — UCLA 78. North Coroftna 55 

1969 — UCLA 92. Purdue 72 

1970 — UCLA SO, Jacksonville 69 

1971 — UCLA 48. VI I Ionova 43 

1972 — UCLA 81, Florida State 74 

1973 — UCLA 87. Memphis Slate 44 

1974 — North Carolina Si. 74, Marquette 44 

1975 — UCLA 92, Kentucky 85 

1976 — Indiana 66. Michigan 48 

1977 — Marquette 47. North Carolina 59 

1978 — Kentucky 94 Duke 88 

1979 — Michigan State 75, intfana State 44 

1980 — Louisville 59, UCLA 54 

1981 — Indiana 63, North Carolina 50 

1982 — North Carol Ino 63. Georgetown 42 

1983 — North Carolina State 54 Houston 92 

1984 — Georgetown 84 Houston 75 

1985 — Vlltanovo 66, Georgetown 44 

1986 — LomsvtBe 72, Duke 49 

1987 — imSana 74 Syracuse 73 

1988 — Kansas 83. Oklahoma 79 

1989 — MkMeon so. Seton HaU 79, OT 

1990 — UNLV 183, Duke 73 

1991 — Duke 72. Kansas 45 

1992 — Duke 7), Michigan 51 

1993 — North Carolina 77. Michigan 71 

1994 — Arkansas 74, Duke 72 


Winning for Richardson 
Comes as Easy as 1, 2 , 3 


By Anthony Cotton 

Washington Past Service 

CHARLOTTE. North Carolina 
— There is nothing like a hand-in- 
your-face, beat-the-clock 3-poinl 
shot to make a man a smart coach. 
And when Scotty Thurman sank (he 
biggest shot of Arkansas’ victory in 
the NCAA tournament, Nolan Rich- 
ardson was looking pretty smart, 
even if he wouldn’t say so himself. 

“Being smart in basketball doesiT 
mean you’ll win the game," the Ar- 
kansas coach said. “What I tefl my 
kids is to make good derisions." 

But when Thurman got the bas- 
ketball on the right side of the court 
with 51 seconds to play and the 
score tied at 70, there was no time 
to make any kind of derision. 

“I was hoping that the ball would 
come to me," be said “J had just 
missed a couple of shots, and one 
was a bad one.” 

Early in the second half it ap- 
peared that Arkansas would be in 
no position to work any last-second 
magic. Duke's 13-0 run turned a 
38-35 Arkansas lead into a 10-point 
deficit with 17 minutes left. 

But the Razorbacks hadn’t lost 
any of their bravura. 

“Every team can’t do somet 
like that to us,” said point 
Corey Beck. “But even so, I don’t 
think we were giving them that 
much respect that we would let 
them keep on doing it to us." 

Beck said his team was “unfo- 
cused” during that stretch. Rich- 
ardson. having called a timeout, got 
their attention again. 

“There were still 17 minutes left, 
we can score 30 points in five min- 
utes,” be said “I told them this 
ain’t nothin' new; we'd been there 
before. 

“I told them three things: 1, we 
were taking too many early shots; 


2, 1 wanted ‘Big Nasty’ ” — center 
Corliss Williamson — “to touch 
the hall before we took a shot; and, 
3, most important. I told them 
they’d better get their butts after it 
on defense. We did aQ three.” 

And in the next nine minutes, 
Duke turned over the ball nine 
times. 

■ From the Duke locker room, 
Ken Denfinger of The Washington 
Post reported 

Holding an ice pack to a tailbone 
he'd injured on the game's first pos- 
session, Grant HUI said, “No ques- 
tion I’m disappointed. But I'm 
proud of the team, proud that we 
were able to position ourselves for 
the national title. I can’t hang my 
head low." 

The Blue Devils had seemed ca- 
pable of pulling off a victory. With 
a flurry three minutes after half- 
time that included points from all 
five starters, they had a 48-38 lead. 

“But you can’t stop a great team 
like that," Hill said. “Sooner or 
later, they’re going to explode." 

Twenty seconds into the game, 
while trying to grab a rebound, Hill 
had hit the floor with such force 
that Duke’s coach, Mike Krzy- 
zewski, leaped off the bench and 
rushed to ins side. 

After more than a minute on the 
floor. Hill was up and walking to 
the bench. A minute later, be was 
back in the game. 

“Lost my balance,” he said. “I 
think it affected me more after the 
game. You can’t gel tired in a game 
like this. ” 

Then there was Thurman's shot, 
taken from well beyond the 3-point 
line as Antonio tong flashed to- 
ward him. getting a hand in his face 
as Thurman let fly. 

“I still don’t know how it went 
in,” tong said. 


NHL Standing* 


51. LO*** 
Ctoctawtt 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 


x-N-Y. Rangers 

■ w 

58 

L 

23 

T PS OF OA 
7 107 285 219 

x-Ncw Jersey 

45 

23 

11 

101 290 SB 

Washington 

36 

33 

10 

82 254 244 

Florida 

X 

33 

14 

7B 219 219 

PhUadetotoo 

34 

38 

S 

76 282 an 

N_Y. Islanders 

22 

35 

11 

75 262 249 

Tampa Bay * 

27 

41 

11 

65 209 240 


Dtvbkm 

x-PIlfcOintfi 42 25 13 97 H « 

x -Montreal 39 26 14 «2 Z7C 231 

x -Buffalo 41 30 9 91 S3 III 

x-B«ton 39 27 13 9) CO 239 

OuSaT 32 * 7 * » » 

ho mom 25 44 8 58 za 271 

Ottawa * 56 9 35 IDS 363 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Central Division 

W L T Ptt GF OA 
-Detroit « 27 B « OT » 

xSarw® « Z7 12 98 255 =26 

40 27 12 98 266 2« 


MONDAY’S RESULTS 

1 2 1-4 

1 4 1-6 

Not Period: B-DovreS (Badger); Q4undla 
32 (Kamensky. Young). Second Period: Q- 
Ricel 28 (Young. Sundln) (pel; Q-Rkxl 29 
(Youna, Strain! (eol.-Q-Sutter K»Soklc26 
(Gusarov); B-Audette 27 IBaucfter, May) 
<pp); B- Sutton « iMogUny, Mov). Third Port- 
ad: B-Soucher 6 (Mag liny, Homan); O-Bas- 
%m 12 (Stale. Sutter). Shat* oa goaf: B (on 
Flset) 11-8-9— S9.Q (an Futir, Hasefc) 9-13-5—27. 
Tampa Bay 1 8 *— 1 

Pittsburgh 2 8 8-8 

First Period: T-QvmAk is (Cretoliton); P- 
Jor 30 (Lemleux. Murptivl ; FSandifrom 22 
(G. Brawn. Ramsey). Shat* oa goal: T lot 
Barasso) 10-7-18—27. P Ian Be rg er on. 
Young) *8-4—22. 

Florida 8 1 7-9 

N.Y. Raws 8 13-3 

Second period: N.Y.-Beukcboom 8 
(Noonan); F-Brawn 3 (Belanger I (PO).TMid 
rcrlOif N-Y.-Nemcttlnov 22 (Gilbert); N.Y.- 
Lanner 19 (Maneou, Kovalev); F-Mellanbv 
28 (Barnes. Lomakin) loo). Shots on god: F 
(ail Richter) 11-11-9— 31. N.Y. (on VanWes- 
brauefc) T7-14*— 4L 

PUtadelpBla 18 1 5 — 5 

Wfctttae* 0 2 8 9-2 

First Period: P-Canrny 4 1 Berane*. Lamb). 
S maaai Period: W-Tkadtuk 39 (Kennedy) 
(til); W-Ttaetn* « (Steen. Utanov). Third 

period: P-Olneen 18 (DiMotaCallev). SMS 
cegoel: P ton CnevctSoe) 199-125— 3B.WI on 

SedeiffrOTH »**-i— 24. 




ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Swindon 0 . Sheffield Wednesday 1 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 1994 


OBSERVER 


PEOPLE 


Hard-Boiled Children Lisa HenSOIl, Highbrow Mogul A House of Discord 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — I never be- 
lieved in (be Easter Bunny. 


IN lieved in (be Easter Bunny. 
Even when I was just six months 
old and should have been extreme- 
ly gullible, I knew that rabbits 
didn’t lay hard-boiled eggs. 

Too many people had already 
carried me out to the backyard 
where the chickens lived, and into 
the henhouse where the eggs had 


Well of course, when the reward 
for being credulous of nonsense is 
candy galore it would take a very 
foolish child to play the skeptic. 
What goes on in the heads of chil- 
dren I cannot say, but I do have my 
own experience of bang a child. 


By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Times Service 


L OS ANGELES — At the age of 33, Lisa 
Henson is the youngest studio head in 


and it was probably completely or- 
dinary. ana rather typical. 


just been laid. Those eggs were laid 

by chickens. 

The people carrying me made 
that so dear that a six-month-old 
child could grasp it, even though be 
wasn't yet at ease with syntax and 


English vocabulary, 
i admit to lanxua 


I admit to language limitations. 
To me at that primitive age the 
chickens idling in the backyard were 
just chickens. Only recently have 
chicken sellers taught me that they 
were actually Tree-range chickens." 

I am pleased to learn this. For 
many, many years now I have 
thought of that backyard where the 


chickens pecked as just another 
backyard. Now I practice thinking 
of it as a range. 

This is not easy. Besides chickens 
we kept a couple of hogs back there 
in a pigpen. It is no great feat to 
imagine chickens roaming the 
range, but bogs are hard. 


A range is a place where deer and 


antelope play and where chickens, 
stupid though they are. can oroba- 


stupid though they are, can proba- 
bly at least roam, Hogs neither play 
nor roam. Even when I had only six 
months of worldly experience, no 
bacon salesmen could have per- 
suaded me those were “free-range 
hogs” bade there. 

what amazed me was that peo- 
ple 1 trusted asked me to believe in 
rabbits that laid hard-boiled eggs. 
As age corrupted me with gaffe, I 
inquired one day how the Easter 
Bunny managed his distribution 


problems: all that weight of choco- 
late and hard-boiled eeas. and lab- 


iate and hard-boiled eggs, and rab- 
bits such small creatures. Some- 


body grown-up explained that the 
Easter Bunny delivered from a bas- 
ket carried around the neck as be 


loped from house to house. 
I now know it’s hard ban: 


I now know it’s bard being a par- 
ent, andcoping with the EastO' fen- 
ny is one of the hardest partfof [Ik 
work, at least until adolescence 
strikes the house. What is impressive 
is bow willingly small children con- 
nive in the adults' Easter Bonny. 


Foolish 1 was not, not until age 
began to have her way with me. 
Foolishness makes its arrival, I sus- 
pect, with puberty. Industrial- 
strength foolishness sets in — in 
males, at least — at about the age of 
18. This is why the military prefers 
males in the 1 8- u> 25-year-old range 
when there's combat to be done. 

At about 30, foolishness abates 
very gradually until Social Security 
is collectible, though often flaring 
up with adolescent intensity as the 
male approaches SO. I strongly 
doubt, however, that foolishness is 
even possible in children. 

Notice, for example, that people 
who talk about “the joys of child- 
hood" are always adults. Only an 
adult, utterly remote from the reali- 
ty of childhood, could suppose it is 
a time of “^joys.” 

To be sure, these immense crea- 
tures may love you unless you are 
terribly unlucky, and your own in- 
clination is to love them back. Yet 
you arc completely in their power. 
You go to bed at their command, 
eat what they tell you to eat, con- 
fine your movements to the spaces 
they designate. 

□ 

You are, in fact, as much a pris- 
oner as any foolish adult doing 
rime in the penitentiary. Having 
had no experience of freedom, of 
course, you accept your situation as 
the best of all possible worlds, learn 
to make the best of it and usually 
develop a profound love for the 
wardens, your parents. 

Instinctively, however, the child 
mush must know there is something 
more desirable. Freedom, perhaps? 
Thus follows the ordeal of adoles- 
cence. Childhood was comfortable if 
you were tacky enough to be loved 
and safe, but even then it was not an 
age of joys. Joy is being grown up, 
an un-child, free. Not having to 
make some poor adult happy by 
pretending to believe that rabbits 
lay hard-boiled eg^. 

New York Times Service 


L Henson is the youngest studio head in 
Hollywood, one of a handful of powerful 
women here and, most significant, a new 
breed of movie executive. 

“Highbrow?” she said with a nervous 
laugh. “Does anyone really thmlc of me as 
highbrow?” 

Well, yes. 

Henson, the recently appointed president 
of Columbia Pictures, is indeed a far cry from 
the old-time Hollywood moguls, and even the 
current crop, for that matter. 

The old-timers were men without elite edu- 
cations, often from the streets of New York, 
whose visions and fantasies, for better or 
worse, shaped audience perceptions about a 
nation in the grip of economic turmoil, war 
and social change. 

Henson is the only studio chief to have 
majored in ancient Greek and folklore my- 
thology at Harvard. She was also the first 
female president of The Harvard Lampoon. 
Yet she insists that there is absolutely no 
disparity between her privileged background 
ana making movies for mass audieaoes. 

At the same time, she says it is unfair to 
characterize her — and the plethora of Ivy 
League executives and producers rolling into 
Hollywood — as being either out of touch 



with audiences or patronizing them. 
“I worked on the ^Lethal Weapon’ si 


“I worked on the Tethal Weapon’ series at 
Warner Brothers and found (hose movies fan, 
very well-written," she said, sitting in her 
sparely famished office at the Sony Studios in 
Culver City. “Pm a genuinely enthusiastic 
moviegoer. And 1 am very forgiving toward 
movies, not only because I know bow hard 
they are to make but because i have a strong 
and wide appetite for them.” 

Friendly, unpretentious, quick-witted and 
both guarded about herself and surprisingly 
blunt, Henson makes it plain that she abhors 
interviews. Part of the reason is that inter- 
viewers focus, inevitably, on the fact that she 
is the eldest child of Jim Henson, the creator 
of the Muppcts, who died of a streptococcal 
infection in 1990. 

But the major reason is that the process of 
talking about herself does not come easily. 
“When I was elected president of The Har- 
vard Lampoon, I was so myopic and involved 
in my own life that I didn't understand when 
people from The New York Tunes and The 
Wall Street Journal and the news shows be- 
gan raffing me because I was the first wom- 
an,” she said, sipping tea. 

“1 actually said — and I was trying to be 


Stew GoUtou hr Tta New Y*k Time* 

Henson is president of Columbia Pictures. 


sleep many nights. I was not smart at alL" 
Some producers say she can be dismissive, 
chilly ami not especially sensitive, flaws die 
shares with many studio executives. Naturally, 
Henson bristles at such comments. 


She credits her success to Lucy Fisher, the 
executive vice president for worldwide theatri- 
cal production at Warner Brothers, and Mark 
Canton, a former Warner Brothers executive 
and now the chairman of the Columbia Tri- 
Star Motion Picture Companies. Even before 
her graduation from Harvard in 1983, she got a 
job working as the executive assistant to 
Fisher, who had graduated from Harvard a 
decade before, and Canton. 

“It was rigorous training with Lucy,” Hen- 
son said. “She’s a perfectionist, the most 
thorough person with a script that Fve ever 
meL She's also a very strong executive with a 
low-keyed persona.* 

Her father and her mother, Jane Henson, 
played dominant roles in her life. “He was 
extremely inclusive creatively,” Henson said 
of her father. “There were five kids and, as 
each kid grew up, he included all of us in what 
he was doing at the time. I went to pitch 
meetings that he had at studios, marketing 
meetings. He just sat me in the comer ana 


funny — that I slept my way to the job. I had 
no idea that you don’t make iokes. I was 


no idea that you don't make jokes. I was 
horrified. Whatever I said was printed. I did 
evaything wrong. I said everything wrong. It 
was a formative experience. I cried myself to 


said, ‘Be quiet and Estcn.’ I thought all par- 
ents behaved that way.” 

Asked about her father's influence, Henson 
said: “I think about the way he did business. 
There was actual goodwill toward people. He 
created a positive atmosphere where creativity 
and good things cam happen." 

About her mother, who fives in New York 
(her parents were separated at the time of 
Henson’s death), she said: “My mother is 
strong-wflletL People know my Father as a 
gentle type. My mother is perhaps stronger. 
AH the children have these two threads.” (The' 
other four children are involved in Em Hen- 
son Productions or are attending college.) 

At Warner Brothers, Henson quickly rose 
through the executive ranks in the late 19S0s 
and early ’90s and was involved in such films 
as “Lethal Weapon,” “Batman,” “The Last 
Boy Scout,” “New Jack City,” “Free Willy” 
and “Fearless.” 

She decided against ren e wi n g her contract 
at Warners as an executive vice president in 
1992 and spent several months in the Kunalar 
yas, mostly trekking with her sister Heather. 
rater she spent several months in London, 
then returned to Los Angeles to redecorate 
her home in the Benedict Canyon area in 
Beverly Hills. 

“I needed same qtriet time,” she said. 

Her appointment last August by Canton as 
president of production at Columbia came 
during an especially bleak moment at the i 
studio. At the time, and in the months that 
followed, the studio, which is owned by Sony, 
was consumed by rumors of executive in-, \ 
vehement with Heidi Fkass, who was aix 
cused of running a call-girl service. 

Even more problematic, the studio has re- 
leased a series of big-budget flops, notably 
“TO Do Anything” and TSeronimo." 

At the moment, some agents and producers 
say, the studio remains in the doldrums and 
seems not quite as aggressive in pursuing new 
scripts as some of its rivals. 

Henson, who was appointed studio presi- 
dent several weeks ago, insisted that she and 
Columbia are engaged in a search for eclectic 
movies. Her responsibilities, however, are 
more limited than those of rival studio presi- 
dents as she doesn't have (he full authority to 
green-light movies. “I put a slight premium on 
somfrhrng tha t aww imitp i^ a movie that 
distinguishes itself from other movies.” 

Films that have involved her, and are other 
in production or the p lanning stages, include a 
dark comedy about an aspiring television news 


American Hispanic actors are 
cuffing for a boycott of the “The 
House of the Spirits” to protest the 
rearing of non-Latinos os the Chil- 
ean saga's stars. Meryl Streep, Jer- 
emy Irons, Qetm Close, Winona 
Ryder and Vanessa Redgrave star 
in the movie, based on the best- 
selling novel by Isabel ADende. 
“We want to send a message to 
Hollywood," said Del Zamora, a 
Mewcan- American actor who has 

appeared in “Robocop” and 
“White Men Can’t Jump.” “It’s 
time for Latinos to play Latinos 
and non-Latinos in significant fea- 
ture films.” Haney Weinstein, co- 
chairman Of Miramax , which dis- 
tributes the filnij said the cast was 
chosen “based on what they felt 
would be the best artistic ana cre- 
ative decisions for the picture.” He 
noted that two roles are fined by 

Hispanic actors: Antonio Banderas, 
a Spaniard, and Maria Contirita 
Afonso, who is of Cuban origin. She 
appears for only a few seconds in 
tite film. 

□ 

Princess Martha Loose, the 22- 
year-old daughter of the king of 
Norway, has been named co-re- 
spondent in a British divorce suit, 
the Oslo newspaper Dagbladet re- 
ports. Irene Morris, a British gro- 
cery store derk, claims that her 
husband, Philip Morris, had an af- 
fair with the daughter of King Har- 
old V, Morris, a former warehouse 
worker turned professional horse- 


man, met the princess at an eques- 
trian meet in the Netherlands in the 
spring of 1992, and the two were 
later seen together at other events 
in Europe, the tabloid said. Morris 
left his wife in July 1992; she filed 
suit in March in Chester. 

□ 

Vice President A/ Gore shows up 
on Premiere magazine’s annual 
“100 Most Powerful People in Hol- 
lywood” list, as No. 100. He is no- 
ticed for making Washington 
aware of the so-called information 
superhighway of life. Steven Spiel- 
berg tops the list, and the producer 
Sbeny lamting is the highest-rank- 
ing woman. Others: Clint 
Eastwood, Kevin Costner, Robert 
Redford, Ji£)k Roberts and the 
agent Michael Ortiz. 

O 

Police used tear gas and pepper 


anchor, written by Buck Henry, starring Ni- 
cole Kidman and directed by Crus Van Saul: a 
drama, “Higher Learning,” about camp us 
multiculmrahsn, written and directed by John 
Singleton; “Little Women,” with Winona Ry- 
der “First Kmaht,” based on the King Arthur 
legend, directed by Jerry Zudrer, andprobaWy 
starring Sean Cannery and Richard Gere, and 
“Blankman," a Damon Wayans comedy. 


push their way into a sdd-out 
Grateful Dead concert in Orlando. 
Florida. People who couldn’t get 
ticket* began taunting mounted po- 
lice officers, and several hundred 
fans rushed the entrances. There 
were no arrests or injuries and inside 
the arena, the band played without 
incident. The Dead had canceled 
their first show after a band mem# 
bar’s father became HL Fans were 
offered refunds instead of tickets to 
the next night's show. 

□ 

The romance novelist Pat Booth 
has hired the hotshot lawyer F. Lee •/ 
Bailey after a supermarket set-to 
with another shopper in Palm 
Beach, Florida, got a tad out of 
hand. It seems the women went atit ' 
over whose turn it was when a new £ 
register opened up. Booth told The " 
Washington Post that Muriel 
Grant, a local housekeeper, at- : 
tacked her and claims that Grant 
“tried to stuff my whole hand into 
her month, and ended up with my 
pinky between her teeth and 
dragged me for about five Feet like 
a dog on a bona” Sbe should really 
be saving this for her next book. 

□ 

Karen Durbin, Mirabella maga- j 
zinc's arts editor, has been named , 
editor of The Village Voice. She • 
replaces Jonathan Larsen, who re- =j 
signed in February. - 

□ I 

An Austr alian theater company 
has won a United Nations arts ‘j| 
award for its performance at Bogo- -1 
td’s international festivaL The 
Handspan Theatre won the Promo- £8 
tion of the Arts award from Unesco | 
for its play “Four Utile Giris,” | 
written by Pablo Picasso. { 2 


Jodie Foster, a two-time Oscar 
winner who starred in “Silence of 
tiie Lambs,” is neither silent nor * 
sheepish about her abilities. “Yon 
either have it or you don’t,” she ^ 
told Vanity Fair. Tm in the best ^ 
possible position I can be in, be- ;• 
cause I have talent, a commodity f ; V 
can sell, that I can ram down peo- 1 
pie’s throats.” ' 


'ii&X . 


Police used tear gas and pepper 
gas against hundreds of. rode- and 
bottle- throwing fans who tried to 


INTER1VATIOIVAL 

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39 Oscar-winning 
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40 The Wind in 
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character 

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wCapacabana 

locale 

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57 Performer of 
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82 Persian 
13 Deuce topper 
e« Caravel of 1492 
ea Strong tastes 


1 "Star Wars" 
villain 

2 Went up 
aUke some pads 


4Et 

(footnote abbr.) 
s Slippery 
e Spirit 
7 Scads 
■ Make 
antimacassars 
e Bad Influence 
io Cruel employer 
« Folic, e.g. ■ 

12 'Heighol the 
deny oh" 
setting 

ia Tribe in the 
Winnebago 
nation 

ia Early center of 
Cette learning 
23 Sharing 
adjective 
as Daydreamer 

ae Take tor 

the worse, 
as Makes happy 
a* Naval battle site 
of 1813 

30 Comics bulldog 
ai Masterpiece 

32 Superior to 

33 Site of a ’Hoad’ 

■ film 

!s4 Redeemed 
je ’Delta of 
VBnus* author 
38 immature adult 
male 


as Livelihood 
44 Art today 
49 Bridle 
«7ArumBly 
49 Nordic 
4e Chinese weight 


so Actress' 
Anderson etal 
9i Deprived, 
poetically 
ea Subject in Vh* 


93 Furniture wood 

94 Don 

99 ‘Exodus* role. 


t ' j f ' 


s s> Blue Eagle 

agcy-ofthe30's 



leal 


Parri*b)rbJttMn 

.© New York Times Edited by Will Shortz. 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


ABff Access Numbers 
How to caD around the world. 

1. Using the chan below, find the country you are calling from. 

1 Dial the corresponding ABS" Access Number. 

3. An ADsa’Eoglitii-epealdogOperatororvoice prompt wili 33k fbrdie phone numberyou wish to cafl or connect you to a 

customer service representative. 

To receive your free wallet raid of Aim Access Numbers, just dial the access number of 
the country you’re tai and ask far Ctasforcr Service. 


COUNl'RY ACCESSNUMhLK COUNTRY ACCESS NUM BER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

ASIA/PACIFIC Ireland 1-800-530-000 Colombia 980-11-0010 

Anwrea* 0014-881-011 Italy- 172-1DU 777 

Ml u e dggaggtf lgijjMl nc 

Udmni ** aSKES m 

gfrgttgg 80Q-UU uaemhomg ggMHi , icSSS? WO 

India* 000-117 Main- 0800890-110. cowmar ^ — Tf*. 

to* 00 **?- OOWOMO lio-wy 19*41011 H ^Wto 1! 

009^1 Norway* 800-190-11 j gg— g 9 ^00^42^ 

J Korea** 11* Mmd’« a * 0 * 01040001 X 1 g j ^%MMflMaillglia) 17* 

Malay**- 800*011 Ports**!* 05017-1-288 

New Zealand OOMH —"-«»»* • fijgjg W' 

PldBppines* 105-11 . Baesta-pfoeam) 155-5042 Suriaame ^ 

Saipanr 255-2872 : gfcmJda @a-42O-0tilM (XH>410 - 

Singapore 800-0111-111 Sputa 90039-00-11 Veniguda ** 

Sri Lanka 430430 a w u fai * 020-7^6ii CA RIB I MRA N 

Taiwan* 0080-102800 gw Bfang 1554N>-11, W " hTtT> — 1-800872-2881 


khiuni 
fatve I 


Kotcmaa 

Malayalar 

New Zealand 


Q0i>80l-l0 Monaco'' 
0039-111 

_005MLl Norway 

IT ■Rxfandv- 
8004)011 Portn* *! * 
000-911 mom nria 


.Ecuador* 

HSahradofa 

■Guatemala* 

Gnyar 

Honduras'* 

Mntout. 


980-11-0010 

114 

119 

190 

190 

1§5 

m 

95-800-462-4240 


Saipan* 


Sri Lanka 
Taiwan* 
Thailand# 


\ Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 

the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 am knowing they’ll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with ABSC 1 
V-jHvwumwi imOTiwKr® To use these services, dial the AIST Access Number of the country you're in and you’ll get ail the 

help you need. With these Access Numbers and your AEH* Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an AI ST Calling Card or you’d like more information on AKST global services, just rail us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 




Bdpum* 

Bulgaria 

Croatia** 

Czech Bcp 

Denmark* 

Finland* 


G erman y 

Greece* 

W m ig lfy * 

Iceland** 


8004)111-111 Sputa 

430430 PwedCu* 

0080 - 10288-0 gw liatilam i 

ooi9-99i-im nx 

EUROPE M 

3d4lll Bahrain 

02^9034)11 Cyprus* 

078-11-0010 bred 
00-1800-0010 Kuwait 
99-38-0011 Ldbanoa CB 

00-420-00101 Saudi Arabia 

80014)010 Turkey 

9800-100-10 

19*-0011 Aigemtaa* 

03304)010 * 

00000-1311 Bolivia* 

00*-8004 )im Brazil 
999-001 cUfc 


Nkaregia (Managua) 

Panama* 

Peru* 

S»i rinamg 

Uruguay 

Venezuela** 


174 

109 

191' 

156 

00-0*10 

80011-120 


©20-755-611 CA R IBBEAN 

nd* 1554)011, ttoham— 1 -80087 2-2881 

05S08Q001I - Benoudr 1-800872-2861 

MIDDLE EAST BrfrtohVl 1-800872-2861 

800001 C»ynwn Hands 1-800872-2881 

08090010 Qsenada* 1-800812-2881 

177-1002727 ' ***** 001-800972-2883 

800288 ft™**” 08008724881 

qtefrnQ 426-801 W rtb 4nHI 001-800872-2881 

£ 1-800100 ^-KteVNevto 1-800872-2881 

00800-122771 AFRICA ' j 

AMERICAS EgyprtCafwn sKhmoo 

» ' 001-8002001111 Gabon* 00 * 4)01 

555 Gambia* oOlll 

jHjPO-lin Kenya*' rvm-W 

0008010 UbM. 


ATfiT 


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paTsre,moreryinpionBYCV n nB > vTw etj irnn^ihgn70CTM<rtc»«lg — Ca*.t1 riUfc^o^J, P«»or. 

CAM- World Oa«cr-S«vta.'prtcxj' Nra 


797-797* 

101-199^ 


01994 AIST 


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