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By David Hoffman 

Washington Post Service 

AFULA. Israel — A powerful car bomb was 
detonated sear a crowded bus stop here 
Wednesday, killing eight people and wounding 
more than 40 in what Islamic guerrillas claimed 
was retaliation for the Hebron mosque massa- 
cre. 

The driver of the car, a 19-year-old Palestin- 
ian, was also killed in (he explosion, which 
ripped into the from of Bus No. 348 as it 
stopped to pick up passengers on a tree-lined 
street in the center of this farm town in north- 
ern Israel 

The attack prompted rightist Israeli politi- 
cians to call for suspension of the peace talks 
with the Palestine liberation Organization over 
self-rule for Palestinians in the Gaza Strip and 
Jericho. But the Israeli foreign minister, Shi- 
mon Peres, said the negotiations would not be 
affected by the attack, and that Israel would 
“do whatever we can to continue the peace 
momentum." 

Witnesses said the blast created a ball of fire, 
and many of the wounded were treated for 
severe burns. Albert Amos, a driving instructor, 
told reporters that be saw two boys “burning 
like torches” after the explosion. The police 
said the car was packed with natural gas canis- 
ters, nails and explosives, which shredded the 
car and blew open the bus. 

Among the victims were Jewish teenagers 
and at least one Arab who was riding the bus, 
the police said. 

In the streets here and elsewhere, Israeli Jews 
vented anger at the government and at Arabs. 
Crowds gathered in this rural town, chanting 
“Death to the Arabs!" 

Israel announced a complete closure of the 
West Bank and Gaza Strip, barring all Palestin- 
ians from entering Israel proper, and the police 
indicated that all cars with license plates from 
the territories would be barred from Israel until 
further notice. 

The blast came at the end of the 40-day 
mourning period for the Hebron massacre, and 
both the Islamic Jihad, a relatively small group 
of Muslim extremists, and Hamas, the Islamic 
Resistance Movement, claimed responsibility. 

The driver of the bomb-laden car was identi- 
fied as Raid Zakarna of the northern West 
Bank village of Kabatrya. Israeli media reports 
said be had served time in prison (hiring the 
intifada — the Palestinian uprising against Is- 
raeli rule — and had at one point complained to 
the Israeli human rights organization BTselem 
about being raped in prison. 

The car, a blue Opel, was destroyed beyond 
recognition. Witnesses said the bus had pulled 
to a stop to pick up passengers. The car passed 
the bus, then backed up to within three meters 
of the front of the bus, and exploded. The blast 
came at about 12:30 P.M., just as many school- 
children were in the area. 

Shai Bouzaly, 23, a kibbutz resident, was 
sitting in a nearby shelter for bus passengers, 
reading a newspaper. He said be was reading an 
article about the peace talks when he beard the 
explosion and saw “a big rolling fire." 


Mr. Bouzaly, in a hospital interview, added: 
“I started to run away from the bus shelter. 1 
saw my clothes were burning. I ripped than off 
and I ran 100 meters. People started to come 
and help roe, but 1 waited for the ambulance. 

“People all around me were homing, there 
were bodies — people were not complete. 1 
didn't look, it woold be too hard.” 

Two firemen who arrived shortly aTter the 
blast described a gruesome scene with dismem- 
bered corpses and seriously wounded casual- 
ties. An ambulance driver, Shiomo Ohayon, 
said the scene was a “slaughterhouse" and that 
he saw “people were charred, lacking limbs, 
lacking heads" 

The bomb killed the driver of the bus and 
sprayed deadly flying shrapnel around the area. 
The blast ripped off tree branches and shat- 
tered glass at a nearby kindergarten. Many of 
the victims were teenagers coming from a voca- 
tional high school across the street. 

“My little girl was 20 meters away in the 
kindergarten,” said Yoram Aldan, 32, a com- 
puter specialist who lives nearby. “I saw part of 
the car blown into the kindergarten! For me, 
it’s a miracle no one there was hurt. When I 
heard the explosion, I came running fast. 

Five victims were declared dead on arrival at 
AfuJa’s Haemek hospital. Others were flown by 
helicopter to larger facilities in Haifa At least 
10 of the wounded were in serious condition, 
hospitals reported. 

News agencies reported 

Palestinian guerrillas wounded six Israeli sol- 
diers in a grenade attack on an army foot patrol 
on the outskirts of the Shati refugee camp in the 
occupied Gaza Strip on Wednesday, military 
officials said. 

The attackers escaped. None of the soldiers 
was seriously hurt the officials said. 

Palestinian sources initially gave a different 
version of the incident, saying guerrillas shot 
and wounded four Israeli soldiers traveling in a 
command car near Shall 

Earlier in Washington, the United States 
urged the PLO chairman, Yasser Arafat. to 
condemn the Israeli car bombing. 

“We certainly hope thai Chairman Arafat 
would condemn this act of violence." Mike 
McCuny, the State Department spokesman, 
said. “The language would be of the chairman's 
choosing, but it would be helpful if he ex- 
pressed himself on this incident" 

“We condemn, in the strongest possible 
terms, this abhorrent act of terrorism in Afula 
this morning," Mr. McCurry said 

Reading from a prepared statement be went 
on to say, “We extend our deepest condolences 
and sympathies to the families of those killed 
and our sincere hopes for the recovery of those 
injured.” 

He added. “This extremist violence has one 
aim — to stop the momentum toward peace." 

Mr. McCuny said the “best answer would 
be to initiate Palestinian self-rule on the West 
Bank and in Gaza. 

It could be hoped that support for terrorist 
groups would evaporate as Palestinian self-rule 
goes into effect, he said. (A P, Reuters) 


Afmrr FlWtTRM 

Rescuers covering a body next to the bus hit Wednesday by a car bomb in Afnla, Israel. Foreign Minister Shimon Peres said the negotiations with Palestinians would not be affected. 


Southeast Asia Loses Faith in Japan 6 Supermen 5 


By Michael Richardson 

fntenujnonal Herald Tribune 

KUALA LUMPUR — Southeast Asian 
countries, concerned thai prolonged econom- 
ic and political problems may permanently 
weaken Japan, are beginning to doubt its 
reliability as u major player in the region. 

This view, by officials, businessmen and 
analysts, is in sharp contrast to the notion of 
Japan as an invincible economic juggernaut 
that has prevailed in Southeast Asia tor more 
than two decades of its economic ascendancy. 


The idea that Japan may not bounce back 
with renewed vigor after three years of reces- 
sion deeply troubles the nations of Southeast 

Japanese politics is in an uproar after Ho- 
sokawa's remarks about (gritting. Page 6. 

Asia. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Japan 
was the region's largest source of manufac- 
turing investment, imports and aid. 
Southeast Asian countries are worried that 


rising protectionist sentiment will limit their 
exports to the United States and tile Europe- 
an Union. They also fear that China s super- 
heated economy will boil over and falter, 
dosing off another avenue for export expan- 
sion. 

As a result, they are looking to Japan to 
revive its role as a locomotive for regional 
economic growth by increasing its transfer of 
technology and opening its markets more 
widely to imports of manufactured and pro- 
cessed goods. 


Instead, they find that Japan is becoming 
increasingly preoccupied with its own eco- 
nomic difficulties and that Japanese compa- 
nies are diverting investment away from 
Southeast Asia to China. 

“We don’t see the Japanese being as reli- 
able as before,” said Naquiyuddin Ja’afar, 
chairman of Antab Holdings, a Malaysian 
conglomerate with interests in financial ser- 

See JAPAN, Page 7 


* Threat of a New Vote as Rightist Split Worsens in Italy 


By Alan Cowell 

Yti* I'tvi Tunes Service 

ROME — The rift in Italy’s victorious right- 
ist alliance widened Wednesday as the media 
tycoon SiMo Berlusconi threatened to force 
new elections, while his nominal ally. Umberto 
Bossi. cast a net among other parties for sup- 
port in his bid to divide the country. 

Bevond what many Italians took as vicious 
political jousting lay a host of deep-rooted 
issues about the country’s future that Mr. Bossi, 
the intemperate leader of the Northern League. 


has both evoked and obfuscated by beba\ior 
likened by one commentator Wednesday to a 
“grotesque caricature” of Italy's traditional 
politics. 

Among them are serious questions about the 
way Italy will be run if its vaunted “Second 
Republic" takes root, about the relationship 
between Mr. Berlusconi's vast, indebted busi- 
ness empire and his would-be role as prime 
minister, and about the dilemmas facing Mr, 
Bossi as the days of protest at Italy's corruption 
give way to tbr task of buDding a new order. 


negoiM 

forming a new government with Mr. Bossi on 
Tuesday after the Northern League said de- 
mocracy would be at risk if he took power. 

Mr. Boss's crude broadsides drew a host of 
criticism Wednesday from newspaper commen- 
tators, politicians and even some northern fol- . 
lowers of his frequent tirades against govern- > 
ment corruption and his demands for a 
federation to prevent northern wealth from, 
bring siphoned to the south. 

“Here we are in the presence of a man who is. 


to say the very least, bizarre,” said Gianfranco 
Fini, the leader of the neofasrist National Alli- 
ance, the third party in a prc-ekctoral pact with 
the Northern League and Mr. Berlusconi's new 
Fcrza Italia party. Mr. Bossi’s attitudes are 
“infantile and difficult to explain,” Mr. Fini 
said. 

The triumvirate secured an absolute majority 
of more than 360 seats in (he 630-member lower 
house, but, since results were first announced 
last week, Italy’s complicated new voting proce- 

See ITALY, Page 2 


.Peo ple all around me were burnin g, there were bodies. I didn’t look. It would be too hard. 

Gruesome Death 
For 8 as Militants 
Take Revenge 
On an Israeli Bus 


: f - “ y 

trj ' 


. * 
' . 


Blackmun , Liberal Anchor, 
To Leave U.S. High Court 


Rehnquist “some months ago” that he planned 
to step down at the end of this term in June. He 
telephoned the deputy While House counsel 
xlV 


Joel Klein, on Monday to say that be was ready 
to make an announcement. White House offi- 
cials said. 

Justice Blackmun, in his White House an- 
nouncement and at a later news conference at 

Observers of tire Supreme Court see a leader- 
ship void that needs to be Sled. Page 3. 

the Supreme Court, was characteristically bum- 
ble as he described his life on the court and his 
reasons for retiring. 

“It hasn't been much fun on most occasions, 
but it's a fantastic experience.” he said at the 
White House. “I'm indebted to the nation and, 
Mr. President, to you and your predecessors for 

See BLACKMUN, Page 7 


Kiosk 


Greece Gets EU Deadline on Embargo 



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previous dose 

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General News 

The votes sounded off at President Bill Gin- 
ion during a town meeting on TV. Page 3. 
rwna offered the United States a mixed ap- 
proach on trade. Page 6. 

Books 

Bridge 

Crassnord 


page 10. 
Page 10. 
Page 21. 


By Ruth Marcus 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Justice Harry A. Black- 
mum a Republican appointee who emerged as a 
passionate liberal voice and a stalwart champi- 
on of abortion rights during to? 24 ** 

Supreme Court, announced his retirement on 
Wednesday, saying that it was ume to stm 
down from a job that “hasn t been much fun. 

At the White House, discussions jjbout a 
replacement focused on whether to s Jto the 
retiring Senate majontv leader GwwJ; 

Mitchell Democrat of Maine 
ance the confirmation process 
with his critical role m shepherding 
Bill Clinton’s health care program to final pas- 

S3 Mr Clinton, appearing with Justice Black- 
roun at the White House, haDedthe 
justice, author of the landmark Roe v. Wade 

abortion ruling, as a MW 

at the high court. Justice Blackmun fiwndtiw 

England Drops Berlin Soccer Game on Hitler’s Birthday 

— 

much more about his tiun^gon a^ca^. 
saying, “1 think ibis should be Justice Black 


BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union 
said Wednesday it would take Greece to 
court to force it to lift its trade embargo 
against the former Yugoslav republic of Mac- 
edonia unless the measure was repealed in a 
week- 

Tbe EU commissioner for foreign affairs, 
Hans van den Broek, said legal action could 
be avoided only if Greece resolved by April 
13 a dispute with Macedonia over the coun- 
try’s name and symbols. 

Greece imposed the embargo on Frit. 16 to 
back a demand that the Skopje government 
change the country’s name, remove an an- 
cient Greek symbol from its flag and alter its 
constitution. Athens accuses Skopje of terri- 
torial ambitions against die Greek province 
of Macedonia. 

Under EU law. no member can close an 
EU border without consulting its partners, 
and a border can only be dosed if there is a 
threat to national security. 



Spectators at a practice round Wednes- 
day prior to the Masters golf tourna- 
ment in Augusta, Georgia. Page 21. 


Bahrain «« 

Cyprus C.ElW Ljrwov ISN.Kr. 

DenmarfcUOO D.kr. Ornon „..i,ooo Riols 
Finland II F -"*• Qatar 8-00 Ritos 

Gibraltar £0.85 p ep . ]relandlR£l-M 

Great Britain £ 0.85 Arabia 9.00 R 

Egypt E.P- 5000 south Africa i* 

EEs® 


By Stephen Kinzer 

jfenr York Times Service 

BERLIN — The English FootbaB Associa- 
tion announced Wednesday thai it was pulling 
out of a soccer match with Germany on April 
20. saving there was too much danger of vio- 
lence because the date marks the anniversary of 
Hitler’s birth. 

The decision outraged some German offi- 
cials, who saw the more as playing into the 
hands of extremists. 

There was evidence that large gronps of pro- 
sod anti-Nazi demonstrators planning to 
converge in Berlin on the day of the game. 
Critics had warned that the match could be a 
magne t for hooligans from ail over Europe. 

-For a period or over three months, since this 
march was moved to Berlin, we have -ben i WJy 
aware of the risks of disorder. Sir Ben Mflb- 


chip, president of the English association, said 
in announcing the decision in London. “We 
had hoped that these risks might have receded. 
Unfortunately, in our opinion, they have not.” 

G raham Kelly, chief executive of the associa- 
tion, said members feared that the match would 
become “a focus for disorder” and “an unnec- 
essary flashpoint.’* 

The match was originally to have been held 
in Hamburg, and was moved to Berlin after the 
Ham burg police said they did not consider 
themselves able to provide sufficient security. 
Berlin officials volunteered to step in, and 
sched uled the game at Olympic Stadium, which 
was built by Hitler the 1936 Olympic Games. 

-It's an outrage,” Otto Johns, president of the 
Berlin section of Germany's soccer rederation, 
said Wednesday of the English more. “We are 
extremely disappointed and depressed by this 
decision. It’s bad for sport when a tiny minority 


of extremists succeed like this. They’re making 
April 30 a day of glory for the Nazis again.” 
[Franz Beckenbauer, the former national 
coach and star, called it a “very sensible deci- 
sion," Reuters reported. He said playing the 
match would have been “detrimental for the 
participants and it would have been detrimen- 
tal for soccer.” 

[But in Boon, a leader of Germany’s Jewish 
community, Michel Friedman, criticized the 
cancellation as playing into the hands of right- 
ist extremists. J 

Beilin’s city government issued a statement 
saying it regretted the canceflation and under- 
stood “tire disappointment of everyone who bad 
been so eagerly looking forward to this game.” 
But the chief executive of die English profes- 
sional Footballers' Association, Gordon Tay- 
lor. praised the withdrawal. 


“This is a victory for common sense,” he said 
in London. “It is a sensible and correct deci- 
sion, bearing in mind the problems associated 
with this game. We had everything to lose and 
nothing to gain.” 

“It is a shame that a major sport should be 
dictated to like this, but jf you are going to 
choose such an insensitive date, it is inevitable," 
he added, “To consider it in the first place was a 
gross error of judgment.” 

[Both the German and English national foot- 
ball associations will lose mtilioos of dollars is 
television rights and ticket sales. The Associat- 
ed Press reported. More than 30,000 tickets had 
been sold and the money mil likely have to be 
refunded.] 

Both Nazi and anti-Nazi groups bad been 
appealing to their supporters to come to Berlin 
on the day of the match. 


Head of GATT 
Gives Hint of 
Stepping Down 

By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Peter Sutherland, the director- 
general of GATT who last December helped to 
push through the biggest world trade accord, 
hinted in an interview that be might leave his 
job shortly before the establishment next year 
of the World Trade Organization, the successor 
to GATT. 

While stressing he bad taken no final deci- 
aon on his future, Mr. Sutherland made clear 
that he might not remain long enough ro be the 
first head of the World Trade Organization, 
which is scheduled to come into existence in 
January 1995. 

Mr. Sutherland's role at next week's four-day 
conference in Marrakech of the 121 trade min- 
isters who plan to sign the Final Act of the 
Uruguay Round of the GATT talks could 
therefore be one of his last international public 
events as the world's leading trade politician. 

The colorful 48-year-old former attorney 
general of Ireland, who was a high-profile com- 
missioner of the European Union in Brussels 
from 1985 to 1989. played an unusually hands- 
on role last year in pressing leading trade nego- 
tiators to achieve agreement. He has been 
hailed by diplomats as the most able and politi- 
cally influential head of the General Agreement 
on Tariffs and Trade. 

This week, worried that the Marrakech cere- 
monies could be spoiled by controversy over a 
demand from the United States that ministers 
agree to discuss labor standards in the context 
of world trade, Mr. Sutherland is engaged in a 
frenetic round of telephone diplomacy. He has 
called a meeting Thursday in Geneva of GATT 
delegates in an effort to seek a compromise on 
the issue. It has raised the ire of developing 
countries, which fear that the UJ>. argument, 
backed by France; Italy and a handful of other 
developed countries, is an excuse for more 
protectionism against low-wage manufacturers. 

See GATT, Page 7 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 1994 


State Department Balks at Pentagon’s Hands- Off View of Force in Bosnia 


By Michael R. Gordon 

New York Tones Service 

WASHINGTON — Serbian attacks on a 
Bosnian city designated by the United Nations 
as a safe area have sparked a debate within the 
Clinton administration over the use of force in 
bringing an end to the war in Bosnia. 

Defense Secretary Wi lliam J. Perry and Gen- 
eral John M. Shalikashvili, the chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff, have all but foreclosed — 
in public — the use of force at this time to 
protect the city of Gorazde, even though it has 
been designated as a “safe haven" by the UN 
Security CobqclL 

Bui the two officials' remarks, which were 
presented by the Defense Department as repre- 
senting administration policy, were not wel- 
comed by senior State Department officials, 
who are trying to negotiate an end to the war. 

Those officials stressed Tuesday that Secre- 


tary of State Warren M. Christopher and his 
top aides believe that Washington needs to 
keep its options open, especially in its public 
statements, to insure that a UN safe haven can 
be protected and to maintain leverage on the 
Bosnian Serbs in negotiations, ad minis tration 
officials said. 


A State Department official said that Mr. 
Christopher did not believe that the fighting in 
Gorazde “can go unaddressed." 

The dispute between Pentagon and State 
Department officials and the lack of a dear 
plan to deal with the fighting has left the 
a ri minis tration's policy unsettled. ^Tbere is 
confusion over what to do," an official said. 

The debate is being fought on two levels — 
substantive and tactical At one levd, the de- 
bate centers on what military actions the Unit- 
ed States might take with its allies. 

One idea being discussed try National Securi- 


ty Council and State Department officials is the 
establishment of a “no tire" zone around Gor- 
azde, in which Serbian guns that fire at the town 
would be subject to retaliatory air strikes. 

But at a news conference. General Shalikash- 
vili poured cold water on proposals for using air 
strikes in the near future. “Right now, it is our 
judgment that conditions in Gorazde do not 
lend themselves to the use of air power," he 
said. 


strikes to maintain leverage over the Serbs as 
the diplomats try to negotiate an end to the war, 
and not to do anything that might end up 
encouraging Serbian attacks. 

They also say the United States and its allies 
have an obligation to protect the Bosnian towns 
that the United Nations has designated as safe 


Beyond tbe debate over whether to use force, 
another level of disagreement concerns the wis- 
dom of publicly playingdown prospects for 
using force. In doing so. Pentagon officials say 
they are just trying to be dear with Congress 
and the public about the limits of military 
power and avoid raising unrealistic expecta- 
tions. 


' But State Department officials say Washing- 
' ton needs to keep open tbe possibility of air. 


And State Department officials point to an 
August resolution adopted by tbe North Atlan- 
' tic Treaty Organization that threatened the use 
of air strikes to lift the Bosnian Serbs’ sieges, 
not only of Sarajevo, but of other areas. 

Mr. Christopher, officials said, believes that 
tbe NATO resolution provides a diplomatic 
basis for considering military action. 

Seeking to play down suggestions of divi- 
sions within its ranks, administration officials 
said there is broad agreement within tbe gov- 
ernment on the importance of a diplomatic 


resolution to the war. even if tbe Serbs realize 
most of the territorial gains, and that the differ- 
ences are a matter of degree. 

"Where we all agree is that the goal is to 
arrive at a diplomatic solution that discourages 
all of the parties from prosecuting the war," one 
senior official said. 

Trying to put the issue in a more favorable 
ti g ht, another senior official said the adminis- 
tration was gfll in the process of “trying to 
many" the military advice with the State De- 
partment's diplomacy. 

The adminis tration's efforts are also compli- 
cated by the lack of a decision so far from the 
commander of the UN peacekeeping troops as 
to what military steps he thinks are needed. 

One option to afford a measure of protection 
to the town would be to expedite the dispatch of 
the 800 Ukrainian peacekeeping troops, al- 
ready scheduled to go there later this month. 


Talks Set on Truce for Bosnia 


As Serbs Slow Gorazde Attack 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dirpmcha 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovi- 
na — Serbs prevented the United 
Nations military commander from 
visiting the Muslim enclave of Gor- 
azde on Wednesday, but the Serbs 
also slowed their advance into the 
enclave and initialed talks on a 
cease-fire for all of Bosnia. 

Sir Michael Rose's attempt to 
personally assess the situation in 
the eastern enclave came after Ser- 
bian troops broke through outer 
defense lines and fought their way 
to within a few kilometers of the 
city of Gorazde. 

Lieutenant General Rose said he 
believed the Bosnian Serbs were 
moving toward Gorazde partly to 
reUeve”pressure on other fronts and 
partly for political reasons, “in or- 
der to bring people to some sort of 
peace conference." 

General Rose was halted at Pale, 
the Serbian headquarters just 
southeast of Sarajevo, but Serbian 
officials did let three UN military 
observers and eight of the general's 
liaison officers proceed. 

Speaking on the second anniver- 
sary of the outbreak of the Bosnian 
war. General Rose said the Serbs 


had told him that he should not go 
to Gorazde because of safety prob- 
lems. 

“We're not an army of occupa- 
tion,” he said at Pale. “We’ve got to 
accept the fact that if the Serbs say 
the situation is such that they don't 
want us to go there now, we have to 
accept that" 

He said the leader of the Bosnian 
Serbs, Radovan Karadzic, had pro- 
posed a meeting with military lead- 
ers of the mainly Muslim Bosnian 
government to discuss an overall 
cease-fire. 

“I am now going back to Saraje- 
vo to set this up,” he said. 

It was later announced that tbe 
truce talks were to begin Thursday 
morning at Sarajevo aiiport. 

Serbs and the Bosnian govern- 
ment have mostly observed a trace 
around Sarajevo since Feb. 10, but 
fighting has continued elsewhere in 
the former Yugoslav republic. 

A UN spokesman. Major Rob 
Annink, said earlier that the Serbi- 
an advance toward Gorazde, about 
55 kilometers (35 miles) southeast 
of Sarajevo, had halted after run- 
ning into entrenched defenses. 

“Our assessment is that Gorazde 


is not in danger of f alling ," he said. 
“It is very well defended." 

Tbe Gorazde enclave, about 20 
kilometers long and 15 kilometers 
wide, has an estimated €5,000 peo- 
ple, many of them refugees. 


Tbe capture of the enclave would 
give the Serbs a more direct route 
miking territory they hold in south- 
western and eastern Bosnia. They 
would not necessarily have to seize 
the city of Gorazde to achieve that 

ghn 

A UN spokesman said that 12 
people, including three children, 
had been killed and 52 others had 
been wounded in the past 24 hours 
in the Gorazde area. 


This brought total casualties 
since the latest Serbian assault be- 
gan nine days ago to 64 killed. 
Including 10 children, and 301 
wounded, including 36 children, 
said Peter Kessler, spokesman for 
the UN High Commissioner for 
Refugees. 

General Rose said the extra ob- 
servers headed to Gorazde would 
provide more reliable information 
than has been available. 



WORLD BRIEFS 


Rwanda and Burundi Leaders 


Said Aboard Downed Plane 


NgaruJdyintwali said. 


(AFP, Reuters) 


UN 'Concerned’ by Attacks in Iraq 


rir-r F. Mmr'Thc Amccuaed Press 

The UN commander. Sir Michael Rose, barred from Gorazde, ttescribmg his next step Wednesday. 


(AP, Reuters) He was returning to Sarajevo to arrange trace talks. Sergio de Meflo, UN errii affairs doef, is at left. 


-m- -r v • /*TT ~W • • Tf T 9 9 l» * 1*1 ^ denied the charge as “part of the U.S. blind hostility to Iraq." 

U.\ Uejense Lniej Had a Uownsizer s view m yZ Dcnmaier Taiwan jails Hijacker for 10 Years 


By John F. Harris 
and R. Jeffrey Smith 

Washington Prat Service 

WASHINGTON — Shortly before he 
joined the Clinton administration. Secre- 
tary of Defense William J. Perry wrote a 
scholarly article in which he supported “a 
major restructuring and downsizing" of 
the U.S. military in conjunction with a 
new strategy of multinational military alli- 
ances to defeat aggressors. 

The article, published this week, is note- 
worthy not only for its emphasis on U.S. 
cooperation with other major powers in 
taking military action, but also for its 
expansive view of the role that multina- 
tional forces could eventually take in stop- 
ping wan between nations. 

By committing to cooperate in a new 
“multinational expeditionary force," Mr. 
Perry said, the United States and other 
nations could sharply reduce what they 
spend on military forces. UJS. ground ana 
naval forces could particularly be scaled 


back, while military reconnaissance, com- 
munications. stealth and precision-guided 
munitions programs could be expanded. 

The article appears in a book called 
“Global Engagement.” edited by Janne E. 
Nolan and published this week by the 
Brookings Institution. 

A spokesman for Mr. Perry, Kathleen 
DeLaski, said this week: “What be de- 
scribed in the article is not relevant in 
today's world. We don’t have the condi- 
tions today where that is politically possi- 
ble." 

Mr. Perry stated in the article that a 
“cooperative security regime" consisting 
(tf forces drawn from major world powers 
could “create the conditions under which 
military aggression is not feasible" any- 
where in the world. 

This ambition, while similar to aims 
supported by President Bill Clinton dur- 
ing his presidential campaign, exceeds 
anything officially embraced by his ad- 
ministration. After the ill-fated U.S. inter- 
vention in Somalia, U.S. officials have 


recently emphasized a limited U.S. will- 
ingness to intervene in far-flung conflicts 
without any direct U.S. interests at stake. 

Under Mr. Felly’s published scenario, 
however, any nation that took aggressive 
actions would be met first by political and 
economic sanctions and then, as a last 


In the article, Mr. Peny said tbe core of 
a multinational force would be like that 
organized by Washington to attack Iraqi 
ground forces and eject them from Ku- 
wait. with a heavy emphasis on air power. 


resort, countered by a multinational mfii 
tary force that would quickly and derisive 


The U-S- military “would have a special 
tfe to play" in this force, based on its 


Targeted in 
Germany 


tary force that would quickly and derisive- 
ly defeat it. 

“It should provide maximum deterrent 
to any aggressor," Mr. Perry wrote of this 
U.S.-backed military force, although it 
would not be used to intervene in civil 
wars like that in Yugoslavia or halt insur- 
rections like that in Peru. 

The article, entitled “Military Action: 
When To Use It and How to Ensure Its 
Effectiveness,” was written while Mr. Per- 
ry was teaching engineering and arms con- 
trol at Stanford University in August 1992 
and makes reference to' lessons be said 
could be drawn from the successful perfor- 
mance of U.S. forces during the 1991 Gulf 
War. 


role to play" in this force, based on its 
unique military assets. Mr. Petty said. It 
would supply cargo planes to ferry troops 
and equipment, furnish tactical intelli- 
gence systems and deploy Stealth aircraft 
to suppress enemy air defenses. 


Other nations besides the United States 
would play the dominant role in supplying 


soldiers and tanks. Mr. Perry added. He 
suggested these forces could come from 


suggested these forces could come from 
Russia, Germany, France, China and In- 
dia, because each will seek to retain a large 
standing army simply to protect its cmn 
borders. Ships would come from Britain. 
Italy and Japan, while military aircraft: 
could come from any nations with “air 
superiority" capabilities. 


HEALTH CARE COSTS. 
LET US PAY FOR IT. 


ITALY: Split Widens Among Rightist Coalition Trio jjjjjjg 


Continued from Page 1 


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ance. The Northern League now 
claims 122 seats and challenges 
Forza Italia's claim to dominate 
the alliance. 

Nonetheless, Mr. Berlusconi 
cranked tbe stakes a little higher 
Wednesday by saying through a 
spokesman that, unless Mr. Bossi 
fell into line, the nation would face 
■ new elections. 

“If Umberto Bossi betrays the 
political will once more impeding 
the formation of a government that 
governs, there will be no alternative 
but to return to the ballot box," 
said a Forza Italia spokesman, An- 
tonio TajanL 

“Italy is not a banana republic 


Nationality: . 


where the popular will can be be- 
trayed by the first party leader who 


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trayed by the first party leader who 
wants to keep his slice of power and 
to hell with the problems of the 
country." Mr. Tajani said. 

While the bickering and maneu- 
veriug seems, at first blush, to re- 
semble the wheeling and dealing 


that led to virtually all of Italy's 52 
postwar governments, the mffer- 



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postwar governments, the differ- 
ence this time is that time are sub- 
stantive issues on the table along- 
side the jostling for position and 
pre-eminence. 

Mr. Bossi arrived in Rome from 
Milan Wednesday for what an aide 
said were contacts with “all those 


political forces that have accepted 
the turning point toward federal- 
ism" aimed at gathering support 
for a constitutional reduction of 
central government power. 

The issue is central to Mr. Bossi's, 
dispute with Mr. Fini, much of 
whose support lies in Sicily and 
southern Italy and who is ideologi- 
cally co mmi tted to a unified Italy. 

“If federalism means tbe rich re- 
gions hang on to their money and 
devil take the rest, I still say no," 
Mr. Fini said. 

One of many oddities about the 
present dispute is that no one has 
formally asked anyone to form a 
government — a task reserved by 
the constitution for President Os- 
car Luigi Scalfaro. And be can 
name a prime minister-designate 
only after the newly elected Parlia- 
ment meets for the first time on 
April 15 to choose its upper and 
lower house speakers. 

Nonetheless, in embarking on 
the effort to turn the victorious 
electoral alliance into a prospective 
government, Mr. Berlusconi court- 
ed the same intemperate outbursts 
against him from Mr. Bossi as had 
marked the election campaign. 

Mr. Bossi also faces a deep quan- 
dary. The election results showed 
that many of his supporters who 
had followed the Northern League 
when it was purely a protest move- 
ment decamped 'to Forza Italia 


when it came to talk of a govern- 
ment. 

Now. in seeking early conces- 
sions from his potential partners in 
government on the federalism is- 
sue. he is trying to daw back sup- 
port. 

“Right now Mr. Bossi is in a 
simple and tremendous dilemma,” 
wrote Mario Cervi, a columnist in 
tbe Milan newspaper La Voce. “Ei- 
ther be accepts subjection" by join- 
ing a government led by Mr. Ber- 
lusconi “or he risks annihilation? 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

BERLIN — The police in the 
-northeastern dry of Stralsund are 
looking for youths who disrupted a 
showing of the film “Schindler’s 
List” bv applauding as Jews were 
killed on the screen, officials said 
Wednesday. 

The movie is the most popular 
currently showing in Germany, 
with 2.4’ million people having sear 
it in five weeks. 

The distributors. UIP, say prob- 
lems have been rare even though 
the story, about a Nazi who under- 
goes a change of heart and saves 
1,200 Jews from the gas chambers, 
could provoke neo-Nazi anger. 

A few “drunken youths" disrupt- 
ed a late shewing of the movie on 
Easter Sunday in Stralsund by ap- 
plauding as Jews were killed, a po- 
lice spokesman said Wednesday. 

Some people left the theater, 
fearing trouble, the spokesman 
said, and the police were called. 
None of the people in the auditori- 
um were dressed like skinheads and 
no arrests were made, but an inves- 
tigation was continuing. 

Paul Stemschulte. a UIP sales 
manager, said that there was a 
bomb threat directed at a movie 
theater in the western city of Karls- 
ruhe before the premiere of the 
film, but otherwise there had been 


TAIPEI (Reuters) — Taiwan sentenced a hijacker on Wednesday to ID 
years in prison in an attempt to end a spate of hijackings that has seen 1 1 
Chinese airliners commandeered to me island since last April, state 
television reported. 

Zhang Hai. 27, a municipal truck driver in the northern Chinese city of 
Tangshan, could have been condemned to death. The court showed 
leniency because he surrendered to Taiwanese authorities. 

Of the 15 Chinese asylum-seekers who have hijacked Chinese planes to 
Taipei in the past year, 10 including Mr. Zhang have been imprisoned, 
some for up to 13 years, and the rest are awaiting trial. 


Cambodia Says Thais Helped Pol Pot 


PHNOM PENH (NYT) — The Cambodian government has accused 
Thailand of helping Pol Pot. the murderous leader of the Khmer Rouge 
guerrillas, flee into Thailand last month in the face of advancing Cambo- 
dian Army troops. 

Foreign diplomats in Cambodia said Wednesday they had no reason to 
doubt the allegations against Thailand made by the prime minister. 
Prince Norodom Ranariddh, and said that it would be one more example 
of Thailand’s continuing dose ties with the Khmer Rouge. 

Prince Ranariddh said he had photographs of Pol Pot taken late Iasi 
month after the guerrilla leader escaped mto Thailand as government 
troops overran a guerrilla headquarters in the western city of Pailin. 


Anti-Islam Chief Attacked in Algiers 

TUNIS (Reuters) — The bead of an Algerian political party opposed 
to Islamic militants was seriously wounded Wednesday in an attack in 
Algiers, security sources said. 

< Mehdi Abbas AHalou, president of the Assodation Populaire pour 
I'Unite et I’ Action, a small anti-Islamist party, was taken to a hospital, the 
sources said in a report by the official Algerian news agency APS that was 
monitored in Turns. 


U. S . Aide Arrives in India for Talks 


NEW DELHI (AFP) — The U.S. deputy secretary of state. Strobe 
Talbott, arrived here Wednesday for talks aimed at removing irritants 


In his attacks on Mr. Berlusconi, 
Mr. Bossi has sought to focus pub- 
lic attention on one of the ambigu- 
ities of the media magnate's rise to 
power: the apparent conflict of in- 
terest between government office 
and Mr. Berlusconi's continued 
ownership of Italy’s main private 
television networks, a chain of su- 
permarkets. the country’s biggest 
publishing house, a weekly news 
magazine, a newspaper, real estate, 
a big advertising company and Lhe 
Milan soccer team. 

Mr. Berlusconi has said he would 
establish a “blind trust" for his 
Fininvest corporation if he be- 
comes prime minister. However, be 
has not spoken of shedding his con- 
trolling interest, inspiring Mr. 
Bossi to ask yesterday, referring to 
Mr. Berlusconi's television sta- 
tions: “Who will control the con- 
troller?" 


□o problems. 
“We don't 


that have crept into bilateral ties between the United States and India. 

Mr. Talbott, the most senior U.S. official to visit India since Bill 
Clinton entered the White House, said on his arrival that the U.S. 
president attached “great significance" to his trip and wanted “to give a 
new scope to U.S.-India relations." 


“We don’t want publicity on this 
because it could encourage right- 
ists, but the potential is there,” Mr. 
Sieinschulie said. 

Meanwhile, figures published by 
tbe Interior Ministry on Wednes- 
day showed that the number of 
foreigners seeking asylum in Ger- 
many has fallen dramatically since 
Bonn imposed tough limits on refu- 
gees last summer. 

Tbe ministry said in a statement 
that a total of 35,822 refugees ap- 
plied for asylum in the first three 
months of this year compared with 
118,081 in the first three months (tf 
1993, a drop of 69.7 percent. 

The ministry said 12,181 refu- 
gees, most of them from Eastern 
Europe, applied for asylum in 
March this year, compared with 
10,487 in February and 13,154 in 
January. 

In March 1993, 43,731 refugees 
applied for asylum. { AP. Reuters) 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Transport Strike Is Called for Paris 

na nvn j-n v ■ . ■«■ ... _ 


PARIS (Reuters) — A strike will severely disrupt Paris buses, under- 
ground trains and RER express suburban network on Thursday, the 
RATP transport authority said Wednesday. A spokesman said the 
stoppage would start on Wednesday at 9 P.M and end Friday at 7 A.M. 

Unions called on all RATP personnel to stop work to protest plans to 
transfer Paris public transport and its financing to regional authorities. The 
spokesman said the plans were still at an eariy stage and largely undefined. 


Greek tobacco growers ended a five-day blockade of the national 
highway and rail system in northern Greece early Wednesday after 
accepting a government pledge that bulk prices would be reviewed. (A P) 
Dubai has intrrxtoced curbs on visitors' visas in a effort to stem 
immigration and other violations, the daily Gulf News said. Visitors 
spooled by individuals will have to pay a deposit of 5,000 dirhams 
(SI 360), to be refunded only if the visitor leaves the emirate on time, it is 
apparently intended to curb arrivals from Eastern Europe. (AFP) 
Most major museums in Paris were dosed Wednesday by a strike of 
employees, tbe Culture Ministry said. (Reuters) 



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V V From MCI 




Man}- of the Ukrainian peacekeepers are still 
in Kiev, but U.S. planes may be used to ferry 
them to Bosnia. 

VS. warplanes could then be called in to 
deliver air strikes to protect the peacekeepers. 
While there is debate within tbe administration 
over using air power to protect the Muslim 
enclaves, there is no dispute over using air 
strikes to protect peacekeepers. 

“It is our judgment that heavy weapons are 
not the principal cause of the death and de- 
struction" around Gorazde, General Shalikash- 
vili said. “It is more small -unit actions, and air 
power in that particular case would not be 
nearly as effective." 

Some US. Air Force officials have argued 
that warplanes could strike Serbian command 
centos, communications sites and ammuni tion 
dumps in rear areas. But General Shalikashvili 
aigued that proposals for rear-area bombing 
were built on “wishful thinking ." 


PARIS (Combined Dispatches) — A plane believed to be carrying the 
presidents of Rwanda and Burundi crashed Wednesday at the airport in 
the Rwandan capital, Kigali, and the two presidents may have died, the 
French Foreign Ministry said, quoting its ambassador in Rwanda. 

It said tbe plane was bringing President Juvenal Habyarimana of 
Rwanda and President Cyprien Ntaryamira of Burundi back from a 
meeting with other African leaders in Tanzania on bow to curb ethnic 
violence in Rwanda and Bur undi. The ministry said details of the incident 
were still sketchy. 

Earlier reports from Brussels only mentioned Mr. Habyarimana as 
being in the plane and said it bad been shot down. The reports said the 
plant*., believed to be a Frencb-buili Mystere- Falcon jet. was ablaze at the 

_• i Tl n 4 a DaIimihm tamnivwc Mnani. 


airport. The Rwandan ambassador to Belgium, Francois Ngaru- 
kivintwali. said in Brussels that he had spoken to tbe head of the 


president's office in Kigali. Enoch Ruhiara, about the incident jThe 
aircraft was shot down as it approached Kigali. It is burned out." Mr. 

t- - . / J 77 T> I) **.,— k 


UNITED NATIONS, New York (Reuters) — The UN expressed 
concern Wednesday over an increase in attacks on its personnel and other 
foreigners in northern Iraq and said the situation would be discussed with 
representatives of tbe United States, Britain and France. 

Joe Sills, a UN spokesman, declined to speculate on the reason for the 
spate of incidents in the mainl y Kurdish-inhabited region, noting that the 
identity (tf those responsible was not known in most cases. He said the 
UN was “extremely concerned" and about tbe effect this was having on 
UN humanitarian operations in the area, where more than 200 UN 
guards are stationed. 

He was also unable to confirm a U5. State Department allegation that 
the Iraqi government had offered a bounty of up to $10,000 to anyone 
killing a UN relief worker or other foreigner. An Iraqi spokesman has 
denied the charge as “part of the U.S. blind hostility to Iraq." 








Printed h\ S'eirdax Intematumal. Lurntm RegLvmd ui a newspaper at the post office. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 1994 




Page 3 


THE AMERICAS/ ON THE DEFENSIVE 


i>Mn . 

■ n' Ip' 

iv' 



Commer ce Chamber Fires Top Lobbyist 

tocMobbvi^^^^ Chamber of Commerce fired its 

business ^ ° f d ‘ sa S reem enis within the nation's largest 

ssr how conriua ’^ *• *■*« «- 

jJJjSSH l0 , sour “? within the chamber, William T. Archey 
heen riiminn/S UI T , ? e lT ?- m a fami,y vacation that his position had 
SSnr m? A d ^ ^har figure on Capitol Hill biown for his 
^ rche .y joined the chamber stair seven years ago after 

fSdepaSmenu ^ jobS in *** TrcaSWy ’ Commerce and 

r2H!!L,!*u J* 51 .v 3 /’ a . group of conservative Republicans in 
had Publicly cnticized the chamber, and Mr. Archey in 
l or ^ ai ‘ n 8 to la k e an early and strong stand against the 
.r n l h^ 1 * 1 plans. Each barrage from the group, 
which calls itself the Conservative Opportunity Society, generated 
angry calls irom business owners to chamber headquarters in 
Washington, and the chamber found itself in the embarrassing 
position of having io clarify or backpedal its announced position. 

- 10 011 j recenl . incident, the chamber's board in February 

sus pended an earlier statement that businesses had a “shared 
responsibility with their employees to finance the nation's health 
care system - a position not dissimilar to that of the Clinton 
administration. Cheryl Womack, a chamber director who owns an 
insurance firm in Kansas City, Missouri, said that statement had 
resulira in “a fax onslaught of people threatening to resign their 
chamber membership.” She added, “The feeling was that we had to 
get this fixed, to stop the fallout.” \ WP ) 

‘Cumulative Voting* Ordered In Maryland 

WASHINGTON — A U.S. judge ordered a county on Mary- 
land's Eastern Shore to adopt an unusual method of voting to give 
blacks a chance for coumywide office, a ruling that advocates said 
may be the first of its kind in the United States. 

U.S. District Court Senior Judge Joseph H. Young ordered 
Worcester County to employ “cumulative voting" in its election of 
county commissioners. Worcester's five commissioners voted to 
appeal the judge's opinion. 

Cumulative voting gives each citizen one vote for each open seal 
on the commission. A voter, for example, would have five votes for 
five seals. AH five voles could be cast for one candidate or in other 
combinations. 

Cumulative voting is one of the methods advocated by the former 
Justice Department nominee Lani Guinier as a way to increase 
minority representation. It allows minority groups to concentrate 
their votes on one candidate even though they may not have a 
majority in a district. ( WP) 

Wonted Americans See a Gloomy Future 

WASHINGTON — Despite signs of accelerating economic 
growth, Americans remain “highly dissatisfied" with the state of the 
nation and are fearful about their own financial prospects, accord- 
ing to a national poll. 

The survey, by the Times Minor Center for the People and the 
Press, showed that many Americans consider themselves financially 
overburdened, a concern that some analysts said could restrain 
future buying decisions and slow down the economic rec overy . 
Many respondents also expressed concerns about violent crime, 
their jobs, and public and private morality. ... . 

Overall. .Americans were more worried about their futures than 
they were in the WSOs. and they generally viewed problems atthe 
national level as more serious than those in their communities. Only 
24 percent of respondents said they were satisfied with the coimlrys 
course, while 68 percent expressed satisfaction with trends m tbnr 
j local communities. (LAI) 

Quote/Unquote 

President Bill Clinton during a televised “Town Meeting’’: “I 
think vou ought io trust me. You are free to disagree with me, but 
disaereemem is different from trust. We ought not to mix apples and 
oranges" ( /tenters i 


Televised Town Meeting 


By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Service 

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina — President Bill 
Clinton, at his most recent televised town meeting, 
came under repeated and sharp questioning from 
voters who challenged him about his foreign policy, 
his candor and even his use of tax money to attend a 
basketball game. 

In an event designed to showcase once again his 
proposals for crime and health care, and in a forum 
where he usually shines, Mr. Clinton found himself 
forced several times to defend his role in the 
Whitewater matter and his wife’s lucrative investment 
in commodities futures. 

Just minutes into the town meeting here cm Tuesday 
night, Mr. din ton was confronted about those issues 
by a young woman who told him, “Some of ns axe 
having a bard time with your credibility.’' Later a 
television host and a man appearing via satellite from 


Austin, Texas, raised the same issue, with the Texan 
? <Aing bluntly, “Why should we believe you?” 

Clearly less than pleased by the thrust of the ques- 
tions, Mr. Clinton devoted much of his 90-minute 
appearance to a fighting defense, insisting that he and 
Ins wife, HHlaiy, had exposed themselves io scrutiny 
of their fManraal affairs and that he had been as 
faithful as posable to his campaign promises. 

“I have been the subject, sir, of false charges,” Mr. 
Clinton said in a sharp-toned, finger-pointing re- 
sponse to the televised image of the Austin man. 

■^people saying things abont me that are not true don’t 

rnaifp my credibility an issue. They make their &edi- 
bility an issue." 

The confrontation came as Mr. Clinton opened one 
of his most intensive campaigns yet for ha plan to 
overhaul the health care system. With Congress in 
recess, Mr. Clinton is scheduled to take his message to 
at least five states this week in an effort to recapture 


dominance in what he called “the great debate" on 
Capitol Hill about health insurance. 

After beginning the campaign Tuesday morning in 
rural Troy, North Carolina, Mr. Clinton continued it 
ihm evening in the first of three televised town meet- 
ings scheduled across four days. The session, broad- 
cast live, allowed Mm to questions from studio 
audiences in Roanoke. Virginia.; Bristol, Tennessee, 
Charlotte and Austin. 

Within minutes of bis opening statement on his 
administration's accomplishments, Mr. Qmton was 
confronted by skeptics, such as a young woman, 
Rebecca Fairchild . instructed, like other mem bers of 
the studio audience, only to be respectful to the 
president, Ms. Fairchild frrel complimented the Uni- 
versity of Ar kansas on its newly won national champi- 
onship in basketball — “How about them Razor- 
backs!” — and then turned to Whitewater, asking: 
“How can you earn back our trust?” 


In the first of what proved to be a series of blunt 
responses, Mr. Clinton insisted be had opened his 
books to a special prosecutor’s scrutiny. 

“Let me be president in 1994 while someone else 
worries about what happens in 1979," he said of the 
prosecutor, Robert B. Fiske Jr. 

Mr. din ton sought particularly to defend his wife 
a gainst the accusation that she got special treatment in 
transforming a SI .000 investment into nearly $ 100,000 
during 10 months of speculation in commodities fu- 
tures in 1978-79. 

But his defense included several apparent new in- 
consistencies. He said Mrs. Clinton had released docu- 
ments detailing her trading records “as soon as they 
acWrt about them," although the White House in fact 
refused for more than a week io release those records. 

Mr. Oinum also was challenged over his policies 
toward North Korea, Bosnia and Haiti. 


Away From Politics 


Filling Supreme Court 9 s Leadership Void 


By Joan Biskupic 

Washington Pool Service 

WASHINGTON —Justice Har- 
ry A. Blackmon, a slight and soli- 
tary man, is the last traditional lib- 
eral voice 'oo the Supreme Court. 
His opinions have rung with un- 


But milik e his onetime ally, re- 
tired Justice William J. Brennan 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Jr., he has not been a leader or 
consensus-builder, something ob- 
servers believe the court now needs. 
The court has been in such flux in 
recent terms that a new justice, par- 
ticularly one who fills the leader- 
ship vend, could have influence weD 
beyond a single vote. 

The internal dynamic at the 
court plays out broadly for all 
Americans. The court continues to 
set the terms on decades-old con- 
troversies — the death penalty, 
abortion and job discrimination — 
and will likely do the same on new 


the judicial system: over rights for 
homosexuals and physician-assist- 
ed suicides. 

The balance of power has shifted 
wildly from term to term. A fresh 
voice could seize an opportunity 
for leadership, particularly if the 
appointee were less the bold liberal 
Justice Blackmun has become and 
more the politician who could in- 
fluence the conservative centrists 
on the fence: Justices Sandra Day 
O'Connor, Anthony M. Kennedy 
and David H. Souter. 

One thing is plain: The unbend- 
ing conservatism of Chief Justice 
William H. Rehnqirist unsettles 
enough of the current justices that a 
single new justice could make all 



□ny Hadno/RAKD 

Justice Blackmun: Hie court's 
last fractional liberal voice. 


the difference in a new judicial ap- 
proach. 

In recent years. Justice Black- 
mun has been a liberal touchstone, 
constantly introducing the human 
factor into Ms writing, 

“Poor Joshua!" Justice Black- 
mun wrote in a 1989 case involving 
an abused Wisconsin boy whose 
death was blamed on the neglect of 
social workers. 

in Justice Blackmun’s recent de- 
nunciation of the death penalty — 
a change in position after nearly 25 
years on the court — the justice 


began by detailing what a con- 
donned prisoner undergoes as in- 
travenous tubes are attacbed to bis 
arms and a lethal fluid begins to 
Dow. 

In his most famous opinion, the 
1973 Roe v. Wade; Justice Black- 
mun carved out a new concept of 
constitutional due process of law to 
give women a right to abortion. He 
continued to favor individual au- 
tonomy and personal choice over 
the interests of government 

As the court became more con- 
servative, stocked with the appoin- 
tees of Presidents Ronald Reagan 
and George Bush, Justice Black- 
mun dug in his liberal heels. And 
the court became fractured, defy- 
ing labels beyond a general conser- 
vatism. 

“I think there is a possibility for 
real change on the court’' saidChai 
, Feldblum, who was a law clerk to 
' Justice Blackmun in 1986 and 1987 
and is now a Georgetown Universi- 
ty law professor. “There was a real 
solid conservative bloc for some 
time," she said, referring to court 

S from 1988 to 1991. “But 
in that bloc are moving, 
a leader may emerge among 
the justices there or in a new per- 
son.” 

Much will depend on the charac- 
ter and views of the new justice. If 
an appointee duplicates Justice 
| Blackmun’s liberal voting pattern 
and style, the succession could be a 
. wash. 

; At this point few major contro- 
: varies loom on which a single vote 
f will make a decisive difference. The 
figh t is over who can claim the 

. justices at the center and help form 

- a majority that will set the course of 
i the law for the next 25 years. 

* Indicative of the recent shifting 


alliances, two years ago, Justices 
O’Connor. Kennedy and Souter 
prevailed as a bloc in the most 
controversial, closely decided 
cases. They stopped the other con- 
servative justices from overturning 
Roe v. Wade and resisted their ef- 
forts to sanction prayer at public 
high school graduations. 

But that centrist trio split apart 
last term, and Chief Justice Rehn- 
qnist, joined by Justice Kennedy, 
dominated in the most fractions 
cases: church-state conflicts, voting 
rights and job discrimination. 

Generally, a “conservative" jus- ' 
lice believes that the courts should 
not become involved in social 
problems that have been the do- 
main of elected legislators. Judicial 
“liberals” are inclined to enter the 
sodai policy fray. Without Justice 
Blackmon, the most liberal justice 
likely will be John Paul Stevens. 

Became only 26 rulings have 
beat issued so far this term, in 
fairly dry, inconsequential cases, it 
is too soon to assess how Pres dent 
Bill Clinton's first appointee, Jus- 
tice Roth Bader Ginsburg. ranks 
among her colleagues. She built a 
largely moderate record in her 13 
years on the US. Court of Appeals 
for the Washington. D.C. Circuit. 

Whether Justice Ginsburg, who 
already dominates at oral argu- 
ments and is the only justice who 
has been in the majority in every 
ruling this terra, coiuld herself be- 
come a leader on the court is uncer- 
tain. 

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both navy reserve fiiere aboard. They were practicing touch-and-go 
landing s at Alameda Naval Air Station. 

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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 7 , 1994 


jVt> 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


A 3 0° B 2 0° C 10° 0° E I 0° F 2 0° G 3 0° H 4 0 



Satellite: 


Based London 

Excellent salary + benefits package 


Inmarsat, ts an i n remai lonalh'-oivncd cn-opcmnvc 
backed by 72 countries. With a sysicni cl satellites in 
orbit over the equator, we oiler a mobile 
communications network dial can provide a hyh qiuiliry 
scrvicc to and from virtually anywhere on earth. 

We are currently seeking two Regional Directors 
ro art its ambassadors to Africa and the Arah World and 
to ensure that African and Arab interest aa* represented 
on a day-to-day basis within the optimisation Your role 
will be ro identify and inrcract with key decision-makers 
within these regions, increasing their awareness and 
understanding of our services and the opportunities they 
present. 

The positions, which involve considerable trawl, 
will hnng you into contact with Government Ministers, 
regulatory authorities, regional telecommunications 
organisations, the media and Inmarsat users. You will 
gather information and co-ordinate the development of 
regional strategies, which take into account political as 
well as commercial considorauons. 


ft is therefore imperative that you have senior 
government or. commercial experience and the 
credibility to be accepted at all levels. 

Your qualifications must be supported by a 
detailed understanding of the region, including a sound 
knowledge of its telecommunications operations. 
Alrhough these are not technical roles, you should be 
familiar with developments in global satellite 
communications and their implications for the 
community You must also he Iluent in English and 
French for the .African rule, and English and Arabic for 
the Arah World role. 

Your rewards, competitive and tax-exempt, will 
reflect the high level of competence, experience and 
qualifications required. All necessary clearances for 
working in the UK will be arranged by Inmarsat. 

To apply For either of these positions, please lax or 
mail full career details to: jim Thomas, S+T+C 
Selection, 54 Jermyn Street, London, SW1Y 6LX, United 
Kingdom. Fax: +44 71 499 7546. 


Inmarsat 


Our client Is a renowned multinational company being a major player In the business of selling and seating of long-life 
installations of high technical standard. Revenues are US$ 3 billion and the number of employees exceed 30 000. 

Within the organization a division is dealing with and supporting all 

whom we are now looking for is a member of the Corporate Management, reporting to the Chief Operat ng Officer. 


J Tst 3? ' * f M 'i :'i =• f ifc :: 


In accordance with the corporate policies and business 

ensure on a worldwide basis the international sourcing. 

strategic tasks: 

■ To ensure leadership and coordination for the main 
component plants worldwide, i.e. ir .Vjrope, in the 
U.S.A. and in the Asia/Parific. To e^i r e that these 
units receive the necessary and tim^’’, support and 
guidance from corporate services 

■ To develop and implement the make or buy policies and 
procedures 

■ To organize and monitor the Logistics worldwide 

■ To orchestrate worldwide all corporate purchasing 
activates 


strategies the scope and main purpose of the position is to 
. This Sourcing Function encompasses the following principal 

The qualifications: 

B Good education and high intellect with a university 
degree in engineering or economics 
9 Working experience in a comparable environment i.e. 

first class multinational company and relevant industries 
■ such as automotive, aircraft aerospace, defence etc; 

industries with zero defect products 
a International business experience 
a Knowledgeable In modem logistics as well as production 
technology 


Energetic Candidates with the necessary flexibility to adapt and perform in an international group located in 
Switzerland, should apply. Please send your confidential information to K/F ASSOCIATES, CF.-Meyer Strasse 14* CH- 
8027 Zurich, reference number 63007-12. Should you need any additional information, please call Ms Kristina Rippstein 
(Tel. ##41-1-281 01 00). 


K/F ASSOCIATES 


DeloitteTouche 

Tohmatsu 

& 


Nous so mines run des six grands 
cabinets mondiaux. d'audit 
et conseils. Le developpement 
regolier de notre clientele 
Internationale nous amene a creer 
un poste & Paris. 


Manager Audit 

anglo-saxon 

Apres une formation a nos method es. vous prendrez rapidement en 
charge la direction d'equipes pour la conduite de missions de controle, 
d'evaluation ou de resolution de problemes cbez de grands clients 
intemationaux. 

D'origine britannique ou d’un autre pays de langue anglaise, vous avez 
au moins 5 a 6 ans d'experience professionneUe comme auditeur en 
France chi & I'etranger. Vous parlez correctement le franca is. 

Merci d'adresser vobe candidature, sous reference 0104; a 
DeloitteTouche Tohmatsu, Direction des Ressources Humaines, 

185, avenue Charles-De Gaulle, 92200 Neuilly, France. 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 
TOP CLASS MIS AtO MARKETING 


{French Garrot Engfeh) wxft oden- 
inn experience h services, consume* 
cad hHedi praduca neb position to 
johw your startup prodans. Pen 
hose lekxntdJs m Europe and US. 
Tat +33-1-4603 2 047. fax 4141 9ff4 
AMBHCAN BU5N3SMAN w* M> 
10 yean experience in inti sides nd 
flowing notugemert seeb cW- 
lerajaq position. Reitiy to Box 3581, 
UCTTWidirir. 15, D4Q323 Frunk- 


US. BUSBCSS ATTORNEY seeb Euc- 
q peon portio n n firm or company. 
Technotow, rtemexond, corpcrafo. 
h Era* 4*4. Fax: pI3)-254JS& 

TA iaifcDfrsoa 

ICW YORK AREA-PART TIME Repe- 
Mfttm for al amnanenb. Personal 
amet confideakfiy osured. Tel: 
20 My -424? USA. 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


MCWC BM CONSULTANTS 
kferaafond inv es tment firm reprtnrrf- 
ing a newly formed consortium seeb 
qualified oorautanls fo parfiapato in 
a risk anotyrit of bwnen opportunitiei 
in eraerana hgh risk markets d the 
P na t i c fen. Our current Focus a North 
Korea, hrfviduob should have esnent 
contacts, caea exper+oe and extensive 
ape rienoe in this region. CarnpenjcKxi 
wtl be amnwrounM with qucSfico- 
tans. Pmdperis only. Gonfideritiatfr 
assured. Please send resume to: 

Or. David ChatfMd 
P.a Bax 6060 
121 1 G eneva 6 
Geneva, Witzariasd 


MBJICAL DOCTOR 

I n teracdpnot M tak eli nu Conyaw mdo 
a j aodkai g or retied in c ciiul Doctor 
to act ra □ spokesperson for Mail Order 
Mc x ketng eanpaot in nervspmen and ■ 


magazines tor eastern and Central 
Bitfte. A few hours wrark each year 6 
(4 Ihtrt a required for ibero! royalty ■ 
cocnp eredi on far tnarij years. 
Phase send CV to: 

Mr Doa xreyic OIMER, Bureai 16. 
Rflidence La Onoes. 282 anetm de 
Games, 06210 Mondeieu. France. 
O fae (33) 92 97 20 78 


Bloomberg 

FINANCIAL MARKETS w 


Editors 


Global News Service 


Based London 


Bloomberg Business News, a 24-hour global news service, seeks 
experienced editors for its London bureau. 

Qualified editors will have at least three years experience at a top 
financial news service or newspaper and will have in-depth knowledge 
of the business world and Financial markets of at least one maior 
European country. 

Candidates with strong knowledge of London’s financial markers 
and U.K. companies are especially sought. 

Depending on experience, responsibilities will range from line-editing 
copy to making assignments and managing a reporting staff that files 
from 12 European bureaus through a central editing desk in London. 

Interested applicants should send or fax resumes and any clips to 
The Freshman Consultancy in London, quoting reference IHT/G/J. 


The Freshman Consultancy, Coppergare House, 16 BruncSrrccc, London Et 7NJ, U.K. 
Telephone; (44) 71 721 7.161 Facsimile. (44) 71 72J 7362 


l 


(Expatriate Terms) 

Vietnamese Speaker Vietnam Based 

Our Company, U.S. owned and listed, is a major player in the world of fastmoving consumer goods. 
We have a very strong international presence, with growth rates in volume and earnings well into 
double dgits. We are re-entering the Vietnam market, opening a joint venture, and are seeking a 

Sales & Marketing Director 

The focus of the position will be on tfie identification and appointment of distributors in each province 
and assistance with their organization and training. Marketing activities wffl focus on merchand&ng, 
point of sale, promotions and special events. 

Candidates must speak both English aid Vietnamese fluently. Experience in fashnoving consumer 
goods in both field sales and merchandising or marketing is essential as is a successful track record 
in a well organeed and structured company. Preference wifi be given to candidates with University 
degrees in Business Studies. 

P/ease write will a full c.v. to: 

T.D. Humphreys 

4007 The Atrium, Pacific Place, Queensway, Hong Kong 
Fax No. 1852)827 1917 


POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


I 


intespace 



Laboratory Technician 

Secondment Mission Contract 


In the context of pre-launch operations and under the Department Manager's responsibility, will 
proceed to laboratory and/or on-field measuring and monitoring of environmental parameters and to 
the maintenace and inspeclion of the equipment 

Education : BAC + 2 lor equivalent), preferably in physical measurements or electrical engineering. 
European national except French I nationality quotas) you are fluent both in French and English and wish 
to work in an hightech and motivational env/ronnement 
k Please, send your resume, photo and accompanying letter plus indication of current remuneration to A 
MERCURI URVAL 86 allEe lean Jaures 3 1 000 TOULOUSE 
under reference 487045447, on letter and envelope. 








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Td - Inf 2711W-0Q56. fosScri acfctai - 
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South Africa 


INTERNATIONAL 
MARKETING OPPORTUNITIES 

Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. is expanding its marketing 
presence in Europe, the Middle East/Africa and the 
Far East and is seeking highly qualified applicants for 
sales and sales management positions. Career oppor- 
tunities exist for Marketing Directors, Marketing 
Managers and Marketing Representatives 

An ideal candidate would have sales experience; a 
business, engineering or political science undergradu- 
ate degree and an MBA; military and commercial 


would include excellent writing and presentation 
skills and proficiency with a computer 

Bell offers a challenging high visibility work environ- 
ment with job satisfaction, competitive salaries and 
a comprehensive benefits package. Qualified candi- 
dates are asked to forward a resume and salary 
history to: 


Employment Representative 
Bell Helicopter Tfextron Inc. 
P.O. Box 901014 


Dept. ER-BN 

Ft. Worth, TX 76301 


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1 J.K. Probe on Iraq Another Problem for Major 

Rv RinllOrJ n ■t •» 


Pa*£t* 5 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

*"«irX Times Service 

SBS £yj« 

Mles to Iraq has com- 
Se dradv sh-^K ,tS t^SS- having jolted 

ready until ** 

Bu ^ 

rcpuia lions. fwrnidS^Si^P 011 ^! 

rr„r,“r9 s “ 

invaded Kuwait i n "990 bef ° re lraq 

*** 3 Political head- 

“iifsass 

£ S?Sm ,° p P. os,UOn Ponies over issuS 
this monSr mCTCases “« “<* effect 

. ,T^ e inquiry, which was set od bv Mr 
Major but given complete independence has 
been trying co detenLe w^Con^a- 


tive government of Mr. Moor's predecessor. 
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, ap- 
proved the sales despite a slated policy of not 
supplying arms to Iraq, and whether that 
government subsequently misled Parliament 
over the issue or tried to cover up its actions. 

The witnesses, who have included Mr. 
Major and Lady Thatcher, now a member of 
tbe House of Lords, have left the inquiry 
with a picture of a government that was so 
eager for British companies to win business 
in Iraq that it was willing to break its rules 
prohibiting such sales — or at least to inter- 
pret them with great flexibility. 

Mr. Major, who held several high posts in 
the Thatcher government at the time the 
sales took place, said he had not been aware 
of the sales. 

The inquiry has heard testimony from a 
variety of officials that government ministers 
were at times less than forthcoming in an- 
swering Parliament's questions about the 
policy on arras sales to Iraq. 

The head of the inquiry. Sir Richard Scott, 
a High Court judge, asked whether ministers 
bad failed to inform Parliament that the}' 
were, at the least, interpreting the govern- 
ment's guidelines on arms sales to Iraq more 
loosely than they had previously. 


“The truth is a difficult concept," Ian 
McDonald, a Ministry of Defense official, 
said, testifying about how bureaucrats and 
government ministers sought 10 answer par- 
liamentary questions accurately but not al- 
ways fully. 

The hearings have also been told how the 
government sought to bar the release of doc- 
uments showing that executives of a compa- 
ny that arranged the sale of sophisticated 
machine tools to Iraq did so with the knowl- 
edge and approval of the government. 

The executives of the company. Matrix 
Churchill, were charged with violating the 
export restrictions. They were cleared after a 
former government minister. Alan Clark, ad- 
mitted in court that the government ap- 
proved the sales, saying his previous state- 
ments to the contrary had been "economical 
with the actuality." ’ 

The chier beneficiary of the hearings has 
been Michael Heseltine, the trade and indus- 
try minis ter. Mr. Heseltine emerged from his 
testimony as something of a popular hero 
after telling of his objections to barring the 
release in 1992 of the documents sought by 
the defendants in the Matrix Churchill court 
case. 

A review of the papers sought by the 


defense in the case. Mr. Heseltine said, bad 
convinced him that they should be released. 
He said he had told aides that it might be 
seen as a cover-up if be agreed 10 a recom- 
mendation by Attorney General Nicholas 
Lyell to sign 'a statement telling the court it 
was in the public interest not to release them. 

Only after he was told by Sir Nicholas that 
he had a legal duty to sign the statement did 
Mr. Heseltine agree, and then only with the 
proviso that the trial judge be told of his 
reservations. Sir Nicholas later admitted that 
he had not communicated Mr. Headline's 
position to the judge. 

Mr. Heseltine. whose longstanding hopes 
of becoming prime minister seemed to come 
to an end last year when he suffered a heart 
attack, saw his political visibility and popu- 
larity jump substantially after his testimony. 

A long shot just a few months ago, he is 
now in apparent good health and is consid- 
ered to be neck and neck with Kenneth 
Clarke, chancellor of the Exchequer, as a 
possible eventual successor to Mr. Miyor. 

Mr. Clarke also signed a statement seeking 
to have the Matrix Churchill documents 
withheld, and has .said he would resign if 
found by the inquiry to have acred improper- 
ly in doing so. 


Yeltsin Approves New Bases 

Presence Reinforced in Ex-Soviet Republics 


The -liiiiiimJ Press 

MOSCOW — President Boris N. 
Yeltsin has approved the Russian 
military's plans to establish about 
30 permanent bases jo the former 
Soviet republics, the Defense Min- 
istry said Wednesday. 

Mr. ^ Yeltsin’s decision reflects 
Russia's increasingly active mili- 
tary role in what it calls the “near 
abroad, ” where it has stationed an 
estimated 16,000 troops. 

Itar-Tass quoted General Mik- 
hail Kolesnikov, chief of Russia's 
general stafF. as saying that some of 
the 30 bases would be formed from 
existing units, such as the Skrunda 
early-warning radar facility in Lat- 
via and the 20 1st motorized rifle 
division in Tajikistan. 


It was not immediately dear how 
many of the bases would be new. or 
whether Mr. Yeltsin's decision 
would result in any substantial ex- 
pansion of Russian troops abroad. 
A spokesman for the Defense Min- 
istry said he could not answer those 
questions. 

At the least, however. Mr. Yell- 
sin's decision indicates that Russia 
is not shrinking from its current 
entanglements across the former 
Soviet Union. On the contrary, 
Moscow appears to be making its 
military presence permanent in 
such hot spots as Georgia, Armenia 
and Tajikistan. 

Mr. Yeltsin and Foreign Minis- 
ter Andrei V. Kozyrev have become 
more assertive about Russia's na- 


France Allows Return of 2 Algerians 

PARIS (Reuters) — The French government on Wednesday allowed 
two Algerian teenagers to return to France after a court suspended the 
expulsion order issued at the height of youth protests over a minimum 
wage bill last month. 

Inferior Minister Charles Pasqua, who ordered Abdd HaJdm Youbei. 
18. and Mouloud Malaci, 19, to Algeria two weeks ago. said they could 
return home to France. Algeria had refused to let them in and they have 
been stranded in the transit area in the port of Algiers. 

The court in Lyon ruled the expulsion order was not a matter of 
emergency and must he suspended pending a final decision on whether it 
w-js justified. The youths, longtime residents of Lyon, were expelled on 
March 22 after they were accused of stoning police and looting during 
protests against a bill that reduced minimum wages for young people. 


lional interests in the former Soviet 
Union since Communists and ex- 
treme nationalists won roughly 40 
percent of the national vote in De- 
cember’s parliamentary elections. 

Mr. Yeltsin's decision instructs 
the Foreign Ministry to hold talks 
with neighboring states and con- 
clude formal base agreements. 

Russia's military activity in the 
“near abroad" has included sup- 
port for Tajikistan's pro-Comrau- 
nisl government in a civil war with 
democratic reformers and Islamic 
rebels, some of whom are trying to 
infiltrate from Afghanistan. 

Russian troops also have been 
accused of arming Abkhazian sepa- 
ratists in Georgia and supporting 
the self-proclaimed Trans- Dniester 
Republic in Moldova. 

Russia has withdrawn all its 
forces from the Baltic state of Lith- 
uania. and has agreed to remove 
most of the 12,000 troops still in 
Latvia. But it prodded Latvian offi- 
cials into agreeing last month to 
allow several hundred soldiers to 
continue operating the Skrunda ra- 
dar base, part of ihe former Soviet 
early-warning system against mis- 
sile or bomber attacks. 

About 1300 Russian troops also 
are stationed in Estonia, and the 
latest round of negotiations on 
their withdrawal ended Wednesday 
without agreement 



MOHR 



: . x.x.r r *< i / / -/f .-*. 6 st l 

■■ : / S’ -v..' C H**.? £ t 

AJeundcr MwnsLm.Reuim 

MOSCOW PROTEST — A nuclear power station worker 
leaning on a picket sign during a demonstration Wednesday at 
the Russian Parliament building, lie workers said govern- 
ment failure to pay their wages could lead to a nuclear disaster. 


U.K. Spurns 
New Appeal 
By IRA as 
Truce Starts 


The Associated Press 

BELFAST — The Irish Republi- 
can Army began on Wednesday a 
three-day cease-fire aimed at pres- 
suring the British government into 
talks with its political ally, Sinn 
Fein. 

But a letter delivered by Sinn 
Fein to Prime Minister John Major 
of Britain, pressing tbe demand for 
a meeting, was rejected. 

“We won’t be responding direct- 
ly to this," a spokeswoman for Mr. 
Major said in London, reiterating 
bis position that Sinn Fein and tbe 
IRA “know what they have to da" 

Tbe British and Irish govern- 
ments in December offered Sum 
Fan a place in talks if the ERA gave 
up its 24-year-old campaign of vio- 
lence aimed at forcing a British 
withdrawal from Northern Ireland. 

The Irish News, which has a 
mostly Catholic readership, filled 
its front page with cease-fire analy- 
sis and asserted it was “the most 
critical 72 hours in Northern Ire- 
land's history for decades," The pa- 
per criticized Mr. Major for failing 
to address “how such a cease-fire 
can be extended." 

The Ulster News Letter, winch 
reflects tbe pro-British views of its 
mostly Protestant readership, 
shunted the issue to the inside 
pages and assailed the cease-fire as 
“a meaningless gesture" that prob- 
ably would end with more IRA 
attacks on Saturday. 

Sinn Fein widely publicized its 
position Wednesday in London 
and Belfast, stressing its view that 
tbe British, not the IRA, were being 
inflexible, 

“It's really an occasion for John 
Major to grab the opportunity of 
the three-day suspension and to 
talk to Sinn Fein," said the party 
chairman. Tom Hartley, who deliv- 
ered the letter to No. 10 Downing 
Street. 

Unionist groups have killed five 
Catholics this year, and said Tues- 
day that the cease-fire might offer a 
good time to add to the toll 

More than 20,000 soldiers and 
11,000 police were on alert 
Wednesday in the province. 


For investment 
information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the IHT 


EUROPEAN 

TOPICS 

European Ex-Pate 
Shun Parliament Vote 

Millions of Europeans thong 
outside their own country in the 
European Union gained the 
right this year to vote in Euro- 
pean Parliament elections in the 
country of their residence. But 
while this is being portrayed as 
a great symbolic leap forward, 
registration for the June 12 elec- 
tions appears to be low. 

In Belgium, for example, 
460,000 expatriate Europeans 
have the right to vote, but only 
7.000, or 1.5 percent, have 
signed up. And in France, of 1 .3 
million Europeans eligible, only 
“a few thousand” have regis- 
tered. with just over a week left 
to do so, said Alain Laxnas- 
soure, minister-delegate lor Eu- 
ropean affairs. Registration has 
closed in other countries, except 
Germany and Britain. 

Officials cite many reasons 
for the low response, primarily 
a lack of time to organize public 
information campaigns. The 
EU directive was adopted in 
December. 

But other factors reflect 
poorly on hopes for European 
integration. In Belgium, the Eu- 
ropean affairs minister wanted 
to translate informational bro- 
chures about the vote into the 
nine official languages of the 
EU but was blocked by the In- 
terior Ministry, which said Bel- 
gian law allows public informa- 
tion to be distributed only in 
the country's three national lan- 
guages. 

And British Embassy offi- 
cials quoted by Le Soir of Brus- 
sels said that some 20 British 
voters in the commune of Ant- 
werp were told they needed not 
just a passport but a “proof of 
nationality" document that 
would cost 750 Belgian francs 
($201 and require a trip to the 
consulate. Few followed up. 

Around Europe 

Has Britain become a nation 
of cbeafi? According to The 
Observer, there are wonying 
signs that it has. A recent Plym- 
outh University survey found 
that one in eight students had 
copied from neighbors during 
exams: 8 percent had used crib 
sheets, and 5 percent had whis- 
pered answers to others. Cheat- 
ing m business seems to be on 
the rise: Trade in counterfeit 
goods, from fake designer 
clothes to car parts, now ex- 
ceeds £200 million ($290 mil- 
lion). And the Inland Revenue 


estimates that ibe country's’ 
black economy has reached £50 
billion, more than twice the de- 
fense budget. In the sports 
world, athletes use vicious tac- 
tics or take drugs; a soccer play- 
er from Wimbledon was fined 
£20,000 for making an instruc- 
tional video cm how to play 
dirty. 

Some blame tbe cheating in 
school on simple laziness: oth- 
ers note that jobs have become 
scarce and students have grown 
desperate. For the overall rise in 
cheating, the collapse of reli- 
_ is cited. So is the 
example of political lead- 
ers, such as those members of 
Parliament who speak out for 
family values and then are 
caught cheating on their 
spouses. 

Tbe French, who rely on nu- 
clear power more than any other 
peopfe. are remarkably ambiva- 
lent about its dangers, a survey 
shows. As Le Figaro points out. 
it is tbe only country in Europe 
where public protest has not 
forced the government to re- 
think its nuclear program. Six- 
ty-one percent of those sur- 
veyed by the BVA polling firm 
said they were confident that 
safety regulations are observed 
in France's 60 reactors, but 52 
percent said they Feared that an 
accident as serious as Cherno- 
byl's could occur in France, and 
71 percent said no more reac- 
tors should be built. France gets 
75 percent of its electricity from 
nuclear reactors. 

Dogs bare been trained in 
Finland for years to find drugs 
and mushrooms, but now they 
are being used to find drowned 
persons. The police department 
of Kuopio, in eastern Finland, 
has trained six dogs; each works 
from an electric boat, since gas 
fumes would interfere with the 
dogs’ sense of smell. Hundreds 
of people drown each year in 
Finland's vast waterways. 

Double or nothing: A Ger- 
man restaurateur sem 5 -Deut- 
sche mark notes (S2.9G) to 400 
people selected at random. His 
goal was not self-impoverish- 
ment. Uwe Roister, 54. of Min- 
den, offered recipients three 
choices: keep the money, return 
iL or send it back with a Utile 
extra — for a Unicef children's 

E rogram. So far, 142 people 
ave returned the 5 DM. while 
130 added something extra — 
for a return of about 10.000 
DM on tbe 2.000 DM sent out. 
Most miserly among those he 
wrote to, Mr. Roister discov- 
ered, were the doctors: "I got 
next to nothing from them.” 

Brian Knowlton 


Master reading and language 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 1994 


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Hosokawa’s Remark on Quitting Roils Japanese Polities 


By David E Sanger 

AW York. Tunes Service 

., T^*KYO — Japan's embattled prime minister. Mor- 
’ s °l £awa . further destabilized his government, 
on w . ‘■'day after apparently telling his dinner 
partners U; previous evening, perhaps in jest, that he 
was thinking about resigning. 

Within hours of the nme that his guests, two mem- 
bers of parliament from a minor parly, stepped out- 
side the restaurant and told reporters that the 56-year- 
ojd prime minister had talked of quitting, Mr. 
Hosokawa denied making the statement 
The two men seemed to suggest that the increasing 
attacks directed al Mr. Hosokawa because of his 
family's financial dealings, combined with infighting 
within his governing coalition, had exhausted Mr. 


Hosokawa and led him to question whether he was 
making progress cm his ambitious agenda to clean up 
and deregulate the cooniry. 

While one of the two politicians said he thought the 
prime minister was quite serious, the other said he. 
thought Mr. Hosokawa was joking 
As the news raced through the city. Mr. Hosokawa 
called a news conference a little after midnight to deny 
that he bad talked at aO about giving up his post “I 
never said anything about quitting,” he said with a 
smile. “I said absolutely nothing that could have been 
taken to mean I would resign.” 

But the damage was done, and Mr. Hosokawa's 
enemies leaped on the remark. Even his chief cabinet 
secretary, Masayoshi Takemura, who is ostensibly 


supposed to serve as his spokesman, chastised the 
prime minister for “speaking carelessly,’’ and said “he 
must be more careful about making remarks that can 
give rise to misunderstandings.” 

Mr. Takemura, originally one of Mr. Hosokawa's 
greatest allies, has been at sharp odds with the prime 
minister for weeks, and reportedly sees himself as a 
possible successor. 

Senior government officials said that the reported 
comments, whether true or not, further damaged Mr. 
Hosokawa’s political credibility at a rime when his 
approval ratings are Tailing and bis program to rrin- 
vigorale the country seems stalled. Moreover, they 
seemed to mesh with a growing sense that Mr. Ho- 
sokawa is withdrawing into his office and losing much 


of the drive to fight the bureaucracy and party leaders 
in his own coalition. 

“He hurt his image, and his room for exercising 
political influence:” a government official said- “Some 
people think be could abandon the whole thing.” 

Mr. Hosokawa has been under tremendous stress in 
recent days, as the parliament, or Diet, has demanded 
details of a SI million “loan” he received nearly a 
decade ago from a tracking company at the center of a 
major political scandal. He has denied any impropri- 
ety. but refused to allow aides to testify about their 
involvement in the deaL 

Meanwhile, all action on the government's budget 
are being held hostage by Mr. Hosokawa’s opponents, 
in an attempt to get him to dissolve the Diet. 


A Mixed Approach 
By Beijing to U.S. 

Dissidents Jailed, Firms Wooed 


The Asxoctuicd Press 

BELJING — China is muring a 
policy of defiance and incentives in 
' its increasingly complicated deal- 
1 ings with the United Slates. 

Chinese leaders began the week 
with a challenge to U.S. appeals on 
human rights with their detention 
of a leading dissident, Wei Jing- 
sheng, and his assistant. Tong Yi. 

They will end the week by stress- 
ing to Washington the stake that 
American business has in main- 
taining good relations. 

That message will be carried to 
the United States on Saturday by- 
Song Jian, minister of the State 
Science Commission, who will con- 
: duct talks on scientific coopera- 
tion. including business opportuni- 
ties in environmental protection 
and energy. 

Mr. Song will be followed closely 
by Trade Minister Wu Yi, who will 
be shopping for bidders on 800 
investment projects. The Xinhua 
news agency said Wednesday that 
Miss Wu’s delegation also plans to 
place orders for hundreds of mil- 
lions of dollars worth of U.S. 
goods. Xinhua said she will lead 
China's largest trade and invest- 
ment promotion ever in the United 
Sta’es with symposiums in Los An- 
ge' s and New York. 

i:.‘ putting on such a promotion 
now, when the future of U.S.-China 
trade is strongly in doubt, China is 


Albania Editor Is Sentenced 

TIRANA. Albania — The chief 
editor of the weekly newspaper Po- 
pulli Po, Ilirian Zhupa. 37, was 
convicted Wednesday of slander-' 
ing the slate security police and 
sentenced to one year's probation 
in connection with an article on the 
whereabouts of former agents of 
the Communist-era secret police. 


hoping to enlist even more U.S. 
businessmen as its advocates in the 
annual springtime battle over its 
most-favored-nation trade status. 

President Bill Clinton must de- 
cide by June 3 whether to renew 
C hina ’s most-favored-nation sta- 
tus, which entitles it to the lowest 
available tariffs on its exports. Mr. 
Clinton renewed China’s privileges 
last June but said it would have to 
improve its treatment of dissidents 
and Tibetans and take other mea- 
sures to win renewal this year. 

China’s disregard of the U.S. 
conditions was made dear Tuesday 
when the police announced that 
they were holding the country’s 
most prominent dissident, Mr. 
Wei, and considering new criminal 
charges against him. 

On Wednesday, the police con- 
firmed (hat they were also holding 
Mr. Wei's assistant. Miss Tong, his 
English translator. They said die is 
being investigated on suspicion of 
committing unspecified crimes. 

Mr. Wei was jailed from 1979 
until last September for writing es- 
says and wail posters criticizing the 
Communist government and de- 
manding democratic change. 

U.S. officials, anxious to renew 
most-favored-nation status with- 
out going back on Mr. Clinton’s 
contritions, have been arguing that 
China has already made progress in 
the desired direction. 

But Robin Mimra, the Hong 
Kong director for H uman Rigbis- 
/Watch Asia, said that these argu- 
ments “would just all ring terribly 
hoDow” if Mr. Wei were sentenced 
to a new prison term. 

Xinhua quoted Miss Wu, the 
trade minister, as saying in an in- 
terview Wednesday that the United 
States should take positive and. 
pragmatic steps to put aside “man - 
made obstacles” to trade. 

A separate Xinhua report later 


Seoul Won’t Deal Itself Out 

It Rejects North’s Plan for Talks With U.S. 


Rent m 

Tong Yi, aide to Wd Jingsheng, 
has been detained in China. 

quoted the Chinese foreign minis- 
ter, Qian Qicfaen, as saying that 
China was willing to cooperate in- 
ternationally on human rights is- 
sues, as long as countries show mu- 
tual respect and don’t try to 
interfere in others’ internal affairs. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SEOUL — South Korea has re- 
jected a renewed North Korean 
proposal that would effectively cut 
Seoul out of the negotiations oh the 
Korean nuclear dispute: a govern- 
ment source said Wednesday. 

North Korea wrote to the United 
States late last month offering to 
allow a fresh inspection by United 
Nations officials of its nuclear rites 
if Washington agreed to negotiate 
with it and stopped pressuring it to 
exchange envoys with South Ko- 
rea. according to published reports. 

An exchange of envoys and full 
nuclear inspections have been pre- 
conditions set by the United States 
for holding high-level talks with 
North Korea on economic aid and 
diplomatic recognition. 

Early this week. Deputy Foreign 
Minister Hong Soon Voung of 
South Korea stirred controversy by 
suggesting that Seoul should at 
least consider shelving the envoy 
exchange as a way of helping per- 
suade North Korea to open its nu- 


clear program to fresh inspection. 

At a meeting Tuesday, cabinet 
officials concluded that such a con- 
cession would be inappropriate, the 
source said. 

South Korean officials worry 
that with the envoy swap off the 
agenda, their country would be 
sidelined in the nuclear negotia- 
tions. 

North Korea says its nuclear 
program is peaceful but its year- 
long refusal of full inspections has 
deepened suspicion that it is devel- 
oping atomic bombs. 

Tensions are high on the penin- 
sula. with North Korea threatening 
war if it is pushed too hard. It 
rejected a call by the UN Security 
Council last week for full mid ear 
inspections and has declared that it 
will “nor malize ” its nuclear activi- 
ties. 

It did not define “normalize;” 
but officials in Seoul fear this could 
mean North Korea will resume 
producing plutonium, which can be 
used to make nuclear weapons. 


The ILS. Central Intelligence 
Agency believes that the North has 
enough plutonium to make at least 
one atomic bomb. 

U.S. Defense Secretary William 
Perry’ is to visit Seoul later this 
month to review the security situa- 
tion. The United States already has 
derided to deploy Patriot missiles 
in South Korea. 

In Vienna, a North Korean dip- 
lomat said his country had to prac- 
tice self-defense to prevent itself 
from being “suffocated” by the 
United States. His interview with 
the independent daily Der Stan- 
dard was published Wednesday. 

The diplomat, Yun Ho Jin. advi- 
sor to Pyongyang’s embassy in Vi- 
enna, charged in the interview that 
“The United States objective is to 
suffocate North Korea.” 

“What would your reaction be if 
someone wanted to kdl you?” he 
asked rhetorically, and answered, 
“Self-defense." ‘ 

(AP. AFP) 


Mexicans Suspect 
Sinister Forces 

Killing Hits Regime Stability 


Army Boosts Natal Forces to Back Vote 


Reuters 

JOHANNESBURG — The 
South African Army sent reinforce- 
ments to the Zulu heartland in Na- 
tal on Wednesday while the Inde- 
pendent Electoral Commission 
said that elections would go ahead 
there despite widespread violence. 

More than 1 10 people have died 
in Natal and the KwaZulu black 
homeland since President Frederik 
W. de Klerk imposed emergency 
laws last Thursday to halt the vio- 
lence and enable the country's first 
all-race elections to proceed 

The army sent 700 more men in a 
mechanized combat force to Natal 
on Wednesday, bringing the total 
there to about 2.000. 

Captain Kim van Niekerk. a 


spokesman, said the army would 
deploy the group in the north of the 
province and in flashpoints around 
Durban- 

More troops are to be deployed 
in die region around April 13* 11 
days before polling begins. 

A working committee of the elec- 
tion commission and the South Af- 
rican and KwaZulu governments 
issued a report this week saying 
that “in the current political' cli- 
mate. elections cannot be held in 
KwaZulu.” 

But the commission chairman. 
Johan Kriegler. said this did not 
mean postponement of the April 
26-28 polls for the KwaZulu-Natal 
legislature that comes into exis- 
tence at the end of the month, or 


for the national assembly. 

He said the commission was “di- 
recting our efforts to enable as 
many people in that province as 
possible to vote.” 

The African National Congress 
leader. Nelson Mandela, echoed 
Mr. Krieglers remarks an Wednes- 
day in a speech in Durban. 

“There is talk that the elections 
might be postponed in this prov- 
ince,” he said. “Let me tetf you 
there will be do postponement of 
the elections in this province: We 
won’t postpone our freedom.” 
Violence has risen in the region 
despite the state of emergency and 
the increase in the number of sol- 
diers deployed to help police the 
area. 


Most of the fighting, which has 

rlanrird more than 10,000 lives in 
the last decade, is between Zulus 
supporting the ANC and the In- 
katna Freedom Party of Chief 
Mangosuthu ButhdezL which is 
boycotting the elections. 

Mr. de Klerk. Mr. Mandela, 
Chief Buthdezi and the Zulu king. 
Goodwill Zwelithini — who has 
called for a sovereign Zulu state in 
Natal — are to meet on Friday. 

Mr. Kriegler said the commis- 
sion was undertaking a crash pro- 
gram to boost the capacity of poll- 
ing stations in Natal, in order to 
allow people unable to cast their 
ballots in KwaZulu to vote outside 
the homeland. 


By Tod Robberson 

Washington Past Service 

MEXICO CITY — Maybe 
international drug traffickers 
ordered iLOrperhaps it was the 
result of a political battle inside 
the ruling party. Or possibly a 
settling of old scores within die 
government 

Mexican authorities have dis- 
closed no information on who, 
if anyone, was behind the team 
now accused of killing the lead- 
ing presidential candidate, Luis 
Donaldo Cdosia In the ab- 
sence of an explanation, many 
Mexicans found that the gov- 
ernment investigator’s state- 
ment Monday, that at least sev- 
en men plotted the 
assassination, raised more ques- 
tions than it answered and fu- 
eled doubts about Mexico’s po- 
litical system. 

The horror that Mexicans ini- 
tially expressed over Mr. Cok>- 
sio’s March 23 killing, when die 
government indicated the gun- 
man was deranged and solitary, 
has been replaced by nervous- 
ness that a broader plot may be 
afoot, and that unknown, sinis- 
ter forces are undermining 
President Carlos Salinas de 
Gortari’s government. It is a 
perception not merely among 
peasants and impoverished 
street vendors but also among 
well-educated, wealthy Mexi- 
cans. 

According to a top business- 
man here, members of Mr. Sali- 
nas’ cabinet are discussing a 
supposed “hit Hst” that targets 
top officials, and tiey have de- 
manded increased security 
around their homes and offices. 

Rumors spread through 
stock markets here and in New 
York on Tuesday that the Mexi- 
can billionaire Alfredo Haro 
Hdu, a dose friend of Mr. Sau- 
nas who was kidnapped March 
12 on a Mexico Gty street, had 
been lulled. An official denied 
the report 

“1 don’t know what is hap- 
pening to my country,” said 
Francisco P&redes, a police- 
man. “My people never thought 
we would be seeing something 
like this.” 

The announcement of a plot 
behind Mr. Colosio’s assassina- 
tion is only the latest incident to 
rattle the Salmas administra- 
tion and talto- the image of sta- 
bility and modernity it has tried 
to cultivate. 

A year ago, a Roman Catho- 


lic cardinal was killed in a shoo- 
tout between rival drug gangs in 
Guadalajara. On Jan. 1, as Mr. 
Salmas was.toasting the start of 
tbeNorth American Free Trade 
Agreement, Indian peasants 
launched an armed uprising in 
southern Mexico. A week later. 
Mexico Gty residents were sent 
into panfc when car bombs ex- 
ploded in two underground 
parking garages. A week. before 
Mr. Haro was kidnapped, fed- 
eral and state policemen en- 
gaged in a shootout over drugs 
in Tijuana. 

In such an atmosphere, the 
existence of a plot in Mr. Colo- 
sio’s assassination seemed dear 
from the start to many Mexi- 
cans. 

In a country where leaders of 
the r uling Institutional Revolu- 
tionary Party often have been 
accused of cheating, threats and 
bribery during its 63 years in 
power, conspiracy does not 
seem to be out of the question. 

“Our politics are undertaken 
in the darkness, and because of 
this, we Mexicans believe in 
conspiracy,” said Danida Gar- 
cia, a secretary in a government 
office. 

Last week, when government 
officials were portraying the as- 
sassination of Mr. Colosio at a 
campaign rally in Tijuana as the 
act of a lone, crazed gunman, a 
poll by the magazine Este Pais 
showed that 70 percent of re- 
spondents did not believe their 
government was telling them 
the truth about the Wiling 

Theories of why members of 
the party would order the kill- 
ing of their own presidential 
candidate vaiy widely. Some 
Mexicans suggest that when 
Mr. Colosio was serving in 1 989 
as party president, be angered 
the party s old guard by ceding 
state gubernatorial elections in 
Baja California, where Tijuana 
is located, to the conservative 
opposition National Action 
Party. It was the first-ever loss 
by the party of a governorship, 
and witnesses say protesters in 
Tijuana shouted “Death to Co- 
losio” on election night in 1 989. 

Another theory suggests Mr. 
Colosio had angered the old 
guard this year with pledges of 
major political reform aim pri- 
vate threats to investigate 
wealthy party members who 
may have gotten riefa through 
illegal means. 








V V > 

r 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 1994 


<Jrp.il 


0^7 Attack on Jews in N.Y. Called Revenge for Hebron U - S - Hunts More Moscow Moles 

Reuters ^ ITT n • - /~\ /¥*• • I OT • IT • 


t**!'*- t 




. Reuters 

Who aUtfgeSv^n^i^ banese rab driver 
Jwish firtf 0n a v anload of 

Yo * la * 

roassSr? a ^ Heb ™ 

- Mid 

JW Lebanese-born man craned 

S h b e“iX S ^ Sashid 

driver ““ ° ne under »“«* by the 

Sv in theT 3Cled 04,1 of «if- 
o^fh A rabbinical stu- 

wa?Vn^ L^ Lu l xlv,lcher Hasidic sect. 
l.GT • U1 ,he March 1 incident. 

lmkMoMSS p ff ' ckls 1 P la ^ ed any 
links io Middle East violence and the kill- 


j5§°f 29 Aj^s at a mosque just four days Mr. Reyati 

before. Bui statements from a co-defen- also a Jordan! 


dam released Wednesday said Mr. Baz 
had said he wanted to kill all Jews respon- 
sible for the Hebron massacre. 

When the killings occurred, “Ray was 
very angry and mad," said Jordanian-born 
Bassam Reyati, 26, owner of the Brooklyn 
taxi service that employed Mr. Baz. “He 
said we should kill all the Jews who did 
rius." His statement was made to police 
after his arrest last month. 

"He was always very short-tempered," 
iw. Reyati told the police. Mr. Reyati 
referred to Mr. Baz by his nickname, Ray, 
throughout his handwritten statement. 


Mr. Reyati and Hlal Mohammed, 32. 
also a Jordanian, are charged with hinder- 
ing the prosecution and weapons posses- 
sion in connection with the case. They are 
accused of helping Mr. Baz after the as- 
sault and are each free on $20,000 bail. 

In his own statement to police, also 
made public Wednesday, Mr. Baz said the 
van carrying the students across the 
Brooklyn Bridge cut him off and the stu- 
dents in the van “began shouting and 
cursing" at him. 

As the two vehicles tried getting onto 
the bridge, Mr. Baz said he observed the 
driver of the van point a gun in. his direc- 
tion and fire a shot at his car. 


“At this point, Baz said he took a gun 
from under the front of his vehicle, a 
weapon be described as an Uzi automatic 
pistol," and began firing at the van. shat- 
tering his own passenger-side window, the 
police said. He also told the police the van 
suddenly stopped on the bridge and two or 
three people got oul “and pointed a gun at 
him." 

Police reports on the incident made no 
mention of the driver or passengers in the 
van having a gun. 

Mr. Baz faces murder, attempted mur- 
der and weapons charges stemming from 
the shooting, in which Aaron Halberstam. 
16, died four days later. 


Ex- Communist Official Triggered Inquiry 


By Walter Pincus 
and Pierre Thomas 

Washtn$Hm Past Service 

WASHINGTON — A former 
Communist official who in early 
1993 pointed U.S. investigators to- 
ward the alleged spy Aldrich Hazen 
Ames also provided information 
that has triggered investigations of 
other retired or current employees 
at the CIA, State Department and 
FBI, according to government 
sources. 

Details of the investigations are 


being closely held within the gov- 
ernment. and senior officials nave 
declined to discuss them. It could 
not be determined how many indi- 
viduals had been targeted or in 
what specific arras they worked. 

But the government expects to 
move eventually against other cur- 
rent or former officials for espio- 
nage activities during the 1980s. At 
the same time, administration offi- 
cials cautioned that such investiga- 
tions can take considerable time 
and could In some cases stretch 
over years. 


" Sutherland Gives Hint of Stepping Down as the Director-General BLACKM1JIN: Liberal Justice to Quit High Court 

fin,, r. J £ v 


— nuuu, uuui rase i 

such as Mdavria and Singapore. Although he 

states ^M^SuthS 31 ? ^ plans lo merab ^' 
Sw at S l “t made d «u in an inter- 

Sfs uSikeU^!^ - m V D TBesda ? ^ ^ 

was unJtkeh to remain at GATT much beyond 

Sssasss 

ru, f 31 GATT ' wbicil he ha s 

DSnS.Wh u M , Julv - Mr - Sutherland ex- 
K2 1 , 1 bad completed most of the tasks 

Sf to , He «lied the conclusion 

or the Lruguay Round accord last Dec. 1^ “a 
defining moment in the latter part of thiscennz- 

L T he i lX ^ ked fonvard 10 lauoch ^ 
the World Trade Organization. 

bought «n. I was asked to take this job 
with the first and primary function of bringing 
the l ruguay Round to a conclusion,” said Mr. 


Sutherland. “That will be achieved at Marra- 
kech." 

Referring to the setting up of the World 
Trade Organization, he said "dearly over the 
next few months there is an implementing pro- 
cess of concern to me." Asked if he expected to 
remain at GATT beyond the formation of the 
WTO. Mr. Sutherland said: “I am not prepared 
to express any long-term commitment to being 
an international civil servant." 

An aide to Mr. Sutherland explained that the 
GATT chief had not discussed any specific new 
plans or career moves, but he noted: “We don’t 
expect him to stay here much beyond the next 
12 months." 

No obvious candidates have been put for- 
ward to succeed Mr. Sutherland, who has not 
until now discussed his plans to move on. 

In Geneva, where GATT envoys will most 
Thursday. Mr. Sutherland was busy on 
Wednesday trying to bridge the gap between 


Washington and Paris on the one hand, and the 
many developing countries who strongly op- 
pose efforts to link workers’ rights with trade on 
the other. 

Although If.S. officials have stressed that 
without a commitment to discuss labor stan- 
dards they wifi block the final declaration at 
Marrakech as well as the work of the prepara- 
tory committee for the WTO, Singapore's rep- 
resentative — Ambassador Krishrtasamy Kesa- 
vapanv — on Wednesday night expressed 
cautious optimism. 

“It is better lo find a solution in Geneva than 
in the charged atmosphere of Marrakech," be 
said.- 

If a compromise is not reached Thursday, the 
issue of workers’ rights and trade will be dis- 
cussed by ministers next week in Marrakech. 
Mickey Kan tor, the U.S. trade representative, 
is already scheduled lo meet with Gferard Lon- 
guet the French trade and industry minister, to 
discuss the subject. 


Continued from Page 1 

putting up with die like of me." 

Explaining his decision to retire, 
he said: "Eighty-five, dial’s an aw- 
ful lot of years, and I don't want o 
reach a point where my senility 
level reaches unacceptable propor- 
tions. 1 don’t want to set any re- 
cords. And I suspect a lot of people 
feel that I’ve been here too long." 

The Associated Press reported: 

Early speculation oo a successor 
to Justice Blackmun centered on 
Mr. Mitchell, who is a former fed- 
eral judge, and Interior Secretary 
Bruce Babbitt 

"I think either one could be con- 
firmed," said Senator Patrick J. 
Leahy, Democrat of Virginia, a 
member of the Senate Judiciary 
Committee. 

Mr. Mitchell, speaking in South 


JAPAN? Southeast Asian Countries Lose Confidence in the Model of Economic 6 Supermen 9 


Continued from Page 1 

rices, the oil and gas industry and 
manufacturing. 

‘They are still here in strength 
but it does seem as though they 
have discovered another favorite 
son.’ he added, in reference to Chi- 
na. 

In the six months to September. 
Japanese investment in China 


Pakistan Pipeline Blast 
Disrupts Gas Supplies 

tuci-i - r uit<.c Fre.w 

ISLAMABAD. Pakistan — Fuel 
and power supplies to several Paki- 
stan. cities have been slashed fol- 
lowing an explosion that set ablaze 
a pipeline near the county's main 
gas resen e> >n southwestern Balu- 
ciustan. officials said Wednesday. 

Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto 
has ordered an investigation into 
the causes of the blast that set the 
high pressure pipeline on fire on 
Tuesday Local officials ruled out 
the possibility of sabotage. 


jumped 58 percent to $695 million, 
while in Hong Kong, which serves 
as a gateway to China for many 
Japanese firms, it rose by 35 per- 
cent to $6 IS million. 

In the same period, Japanese in- 
vestment in Indonesia, Malaysia, 
the Philippines and Thailand 
dropped by 33 percent to $984 mil- 
lion. In Singapore, it increased by 
just under 3 percent to $331 mO- 

C. H. Kwan, senior economist 
and head of Asian research at No- 


six months to September. 


According to Japanese figures, ic rim nations warned that fore- whether they should continue to 
Japan’s surplus with non-Cotnmu- casts of 1.1 percent growth in Japan rely too heavily on Japan as an 
mst Asian nations in the period was this year, and 2.7 percent in 1 995,, economic partner. 

$28 billion, up from $19.5 billion a might be too optimistic and that afl"* ' Mahathir bin Mohamad, the 
year earlier. economies in the region would feel .Malaysian prime minister, com- 

Many Southeast Asian business- ■ ; plained the other day that Mitsubi- 


dropped by 33 percent to $984 mil- year earlier. economies in the region woul 

lion. In Singapore, it increased by Many Southeast Asian business- ; 

just under 3 percent to $331 mil- men and officials are concerned 
Lon. that weak coalition government in 

C. H. Kwan, senior economist Japan, as well as nagging trade con- 4 Sndiuipsp Airlinoi* 
and head of Asian research at No- fHctbetu-een Tokyoand Washing- ^uaiK^e wnuKT 
mura Research Institute Lid. in To- ton, are undermining chances of a Is Hijacked to Egypt 
kyo, said that more and more Japa- Japanese economic recovery. ~ ^ * 

nese firms favored China over Reflecting that view. Mr, Na- Room 

Southeast Asia "because China, quiyuddin noted that “afi the eco- CAIRO — A Sudanese mi 


kyo, said that more and more Japa- 
nese firms favored China over 
Southeast Asia "because China, 
with its large population and high 
growth rate, promises to become an 
important market over the medium 
term.'* 

He added that this consideration 
had become u ali the more impor- 
tant as riring protectionism and the 
prolonged recession in the industri- 
alized countries has prompted Jap- 
anese companies to develop new 
markets.” 

Mainly because Japan sells far 
more than it boys from the region. 


Reflecting that view. Mr, Na- Room drag its feet 

quiyuddin noted that “afi the eco- . ^AIRO — A Sudanese man hi- The venture is part of an ambi- 
nonricallv successful regimes in Jinked a Sudan Air Boeing 737 air- tious plan to industrialize Malay- 
.Aria today have strong, stable gov- . CT 010 Wednesday to the Egyp- si a 

emments.” ban town of Luxor where he “Our imitation of the Japanese 

Mohammed SadH, a former In- s^rreodered and asked for political model of economic development 
donesian cabinet minister, said that as y lun L airport and security was always based on the belief that 


he was surprised to find on a visit sourccs s “ d - 
to Japan that Japanese business- Officials i 


urccssailL Japan was a success story." said 

Officials at Luxor airport said Lee Poh Ping, a Malaysian political 


men were no longer confident as none of the 93 passengers and six scientist who specializes in rela- 

they had been in previous races- crew aboard the Sudan Air flight tions between Southeast Asia and 

sions, that the economy would were injured. A Luxor airport Japan. 

bounce back. spokesman identified the hijacker “We no longer believe they are 

“This crisis of confidence may 


Aria replaced the European Union upturn” in Japan, Mr. SadH added, the impact if Japan failed to recov- 
as the area with the biggest current- In a recent report to the Pacific &■ 

account deficit with Japan in the Economic Cooperation Council, a With Japan in trouble. Southeast 

panel of 18 i economists from Pacif- Asian countries are questioning 


whether they should continue to 
rely too heavily on Japan as an 


shi Motors Corp. was too slow in 
transferring key technology' for 
Malaysia’s national car and said 
that he could turn to European. 
American or other Japanese com- 
panies if Mitsubishi continued to 
drag its feet 

The venture is part of an ambi- 


delay and weaken any economic med Ahmed, 35. 


spokesman identified the hijacker “We no longer believe they are 
as Add Mahjoub Hussein Moham- supermen," be said. “It is clear they 


are prone to error. 


Portland, Maine, said, "Nothing 
has been offered to me. so I have 
nothing to consider at this time," 
He added that if he woe offered 
the job. "1 will consider it, as I will 
consider any option that is present- 
ed to roe.” 

Other possible choices included 
two federal appeals court judges, 
Richard Arnold of Arkansas and 
Stephen Brcyer of Massachusetts. 
Judge Breyer was a finalist before 
Ruth Bader Ginsburg was picked 
for the Supreme Court last year. 
Other possibilities indude Walter 
Dellinger, a Justice Department of- 
ficial and Josg Cabranes, a federal 
trial judge of Connecticut. 

Justice Blackmun’s successor 
could provide a key vote on a court 
badly split on such volatile issues as 
cburdi-sLaie relations and affirma- 
tive action. 

“The speculation in the Senate is 
that Senator Mitchell is the dear 
favorite.” said Senator Hank 
Brown. Republican of Colorado, a 
Judiciary Committee member. 

Justice Blackmun’s authorship 
of Roe v. Wade made him one of 
the most vilified Supreme Court 
members in history, although he 
remains a hero to proponents of 
legalized abortion. He also said re- 
cently that be no longer would vote 
to uphold the death penalty. 

He said of his vote in the land- 
mark abortion rights case. "1 think 
it was right in 1973 and 1 think it 
was right today.” 

Abortion opponents said their 
satisfaction over Justice Black- 
mon's pending departure was tem- 
pered by the knowledge that Mr. 
Clinton would nominate someone 
with similar views. 

justice Blackmun. the court’s se- 
nior member, was appointed in 
197ft by President Richard Nixon. 

In a 1983 interview with The 
Associated Press on the eve of his 
most famous decision’s 10-year an- 
niversary. Justice Blackmun re- 
peated the phrase "author of the 
abortion decision” slowly and soft- 
ly- 

"We all pick up tabs," he said. 
"I’ll carrv this me to my grave." 



Senator George J. Mitchell is 
considered a leading candidate 
to succeed Justice Btecknnm. 


Central Text 
Of Roe Ruling 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Justice 
Harry Blackmun. who an- 
nounced his retirement from 
the Supreme Court on 
Wednesday, was best known 
for the opinion he wrote in 
1973 in the case of Roe vs. 
Wade, a ruling that legalized 
nationwide a woman’s right to 
have an abortion. 

The nub of the argument 
that the majority of the court 
endorsed was this; 

“The right of privacy, 
whether it be founded iri the 
Fourteenth Amendment’s 
concept of personal liberty 
and restrictions upon state ac- 
tion as we feel; or, as the Dis- 
trict Court determined, in the 
Ninth Amendment's reserva- 
tion of rights to the people, is 
broad enough to encompass a 
woman’s derision whether or 
not lo terminate her pregnan- 
cy. The detriment a state 
would impose on a pregnant 
woman by denying this choice 
altogether is apparent ” 


A counterintelligence source said 
the information provided last year 
by the unidentified Communist of- 
ficial bad not named Mr. Ames or 
anyone else as a double agent, but 
was stronger iban any general the- 
ory about the existence of one or 
more moles in U.S. intelligence, 
and helped investigators narrow 
searches they bad already begun. 

Since 1991. FBI and Central In- 
telligence Agency investigators had 
been studying 'intelligence files 
from East Germany and other for- 
mer Warsaw Paci countries for 
leads to possible moles inside the 
US. government that would ex- 
plain the loss of at least 10 U.S.- 
paid Communist double agents 
during the last half of the 1980s, 
sources said. 

Mr. Ames had been involved in 
CIA counterintelligence efforts 
against the Soviet bloc rn the 1980s 
and had come under suspicion by 
1991 as one of some 20 possible 
suspects. But he was not made the 
subject of an FBI criminal investi- 
gation until May 1993. according 
to court records. 

The Communist official, who 
was knowledgeable about Soviet 
intelligence matters, provided in- 
formation that led investigators to 
focus on specific areas and ulti- 
mately cm Mr. Ames, another law 
enforcement source said "When 
the CLA got that information, 
that’s what really got us geared 
up." this source said 

Although investigators are pur- 
suing the possibility that Mr. .Ames 
received help, either knowingly or 
unknowingly, from other U.S. gov- 
ernment employees, sources dis- 
couraged the idea of a single spy 
ring operating inside the U.S. gov- 
ernment. 

The only public reference so far 
to the extensive inquiries now un- 
der way came last month when the 
director of central intelligence. R. 
James Woolsey Jr., was asked in a 
television interview if "Ames was a 
rogue operative or part of a larger 
problem?" 

“There are today," he said. "3 
number of counterintelligence ef- 
forts under way with the FBI, and 
with the FBI looking at other gov- 
ernment agencies as well as our 
own." Mr. Woolsey added that 
sources abroad were providing in- 
formation for the inquiries. 

Mr. Ames and hts wife, Rosario, 
were arrested Feb. 21 after months 
of investigation that included co- 
vert searches of his office and 
home, wiretaps and physical sur- 
veillance. Prosecutors have alleged 
that Mr. Ames began spying for 
Moscow as early as 19S5. ’ 

Mr. .Ames himself may turn our 
to be a source of information for 
government investigators, if he de- 
cides at some point” to plead guilty 
and tell the CIA and FBI of any 
espionage activities. 





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Page 8 


THURSDAY,. APRIL 7, 1994 


OPINION 


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lieralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



eribunc 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The Fed Should Wait 


The Dow Jones industrial stock average 
soared more than SO points on Tuesday, 
bringing relief to anxious investors. But the 
ups and downs of the stock market are more 
important to them than to other citizens. 
Even severe gyrations in the stock market 
often have no effect on jobs or the rest of the 
American economy. President Bill Clinton 
points out what truly matters: The economy 
is expanding at a brisk pace, employers cre- 
ated a huge number or jobs Iasi month, and 
inflation is subdued so far. 

The 'White House knows that keeping re- 
covery alive is paramount That is why it got 
upset about the recent run-up in long-term 
interest rates. Companies use long-term 
rates to calculate whether it makes sense to 
invest in new plants and equipment If these 
rales were to stay high, let alone rise further, 
business investment could be choked off and 
recovery stunted. Administration officials 
railed this week against high interest rates, a 
signal that they wanted the Federal Reserve 
Board to put off further rate increases. The 
Fed would be wise to take heed. 

It brought about short-term rate increases 
of a quarter of a percentage point in both 
February and March because the economy 
had grown at a surprisingly brisk pace at the 
end of 1 993 and looked poised to continue to 
grow quickly. The strong growth raised fears 
in financial markets that inflation would pick 
up. Those fears would cause lenders to boost 
long-term rates to offset the expected infla- 
tion, thereby threatening to attenuate the re- 
covery. The Fed hoped, by raising short-term 
rates early, to convince financial markets that 


it would not let inflation get out of hand. That 
way, long-term rates coaid stay low. 

That was the theory. The markets, for un- 
known reasons, reacted otherwise, driving up 
long-term rates despite the Fed announce- 
ment. Yet most economists and, at the time, 
the Clinton a dminis tration agreed with the 
Fed’s policy. Waiting too' long to control in- 
flation can be fatal; once inflation rates march 

upward, they can be controlled only by clamp-, 
ing down hard on the economy. In the early 
1 980s die Fed pushed the econcony into a steep 
recession to overcome an inflationary surge. 

There are experts who say the Fed’s pre- 
emptive strike against inflation was prema- 
ture. They bolster their case by pointing to 
data indicating that the economy is not over- 
heated. Unemployment rates, though down, 
still exceed 6 percent; inflation remains in- 
consequential, and growth has slowed since 
the end of last year to a modest 3 percent 
annual rate. For these critics, the Fed’s rate 
increases were unwarranted. 

Whether the Fed or its critics are right is not 
dear. What is certain is that the Fed has acted 
responsibly. But the chaotic events of the past 
week, especially in the bond markets, should 
caution it against proceeding with any further 
rate increases lest they have unpredictable 
effects. The fed set out in February to slow 
recovery from its brisk pace and thereby keep 
inflation under control. The economy has 
slowed; interest rates rose; prices are rising 
slowly. The prudent course would be for the 
Fed to declare tentative victory and wait be- 
fore damping down any harder. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Not Quite a Crash 


While some investors have suffered tremen- 
dous losses on the stock market in the past 
week, the deep slide in prices does not — so 
far — constitute anything like a crisis. That is. 
the losses do not threaten the performance of 
the rest of tbe U.S. economy. Banks and bro- 
kerages have lost money, but not enough to 
jeopardize the stability of the financial system. 

Of the three sharp drops in the stock market 
in tbe past decade, this one appears to be by 
far the least dangerous. From tbe middle of 
March through Monday, stock prices fell by 
about 7 percent and then recovered about 
one-fourth of that loss on Tuesday. In the 
crash of October 1987, prices fell by 20 per- 
cent in one day alone. In the mini-crash two 
years later the fall was less, but it took place 
amid the collapse of the junk bond market 
and at a time when the cleanup of the thrift 
industry had reached a crucial point. The 
banks are generally much stronger today than 
they were then, and the chance of institutional 
failures is far smaller. 

But if the general outlook is more reassur- 
ing than after the last two downdrafts in the 
market, even this latest one carries a clear 
warning. It is a reminder that speculative 
markets are inherently volatile and that the 
amounts of money at stake there have been 


rising rapidly — much faster than (he rest of 
the economy has been growing. These markets . 
are now closely integrated with others abroad, 
which means that no one country’s govern- 
ment is, by itself, able to control or regulate 
them adequately. Meanwhile, ingenious trad- 
ers have invented a profusion of new instru- 
ments which, while they may not make the 
markets lea stable, certainly make them more 
complex and harder to oversee effectively. 

All of these changes together — more mon- 
ey on the markets, more complexity in trading 
techniques, much larger international flows of 
money — are producing great and continuing 
turbulence in the financial world. America's 
success in getting through three stock market 
convulsions in seven years does not mean that 
public policy can relax and ignore them. To the 
contrary, it is only because of the vigilance and 
skill of several government agencies, primarily 
the Federal Reserve Board, that the market’s 
slides and crashes have done little harm other 
than to individual investors. If the United 
Stales is lucky, this latest episode will bun out 
to be relatively minor. Bui even tins one will 
require, when it is over, a careful examination 
to ensure that all of the financial system's 
bulwarks held up firmly under the stress. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Russian Troops Off-Limits 


Russia, having withdrawal its forces from 
Eastern Europe, wants to redeploy some of 
them near its southern borders, especially in 
the troubled Caucasus region. But that would . 
exceed the farce limits that were negotiated 
before the breakup of the Soviet Union and 
are due to take effect in November 1995. 
Moscow has asked tbe United States and 
other signatories to rewrite tbe treaty to 
permit the redeployment. Washington is 
right to oppose it, since more Russian troops 
in the rejpon would increase insecurity 
throughout Eastern Europe. 

But Washington could find other ways to 
satisfy Russia's concerns in the Caucasus, and 
in so doing bead off attempts by army hard- 
liners to use this issue against Boris Yeltsin 
and to rally opposition to the treaty as an 
unfair restriction on Russia’s sovereignty. 

The treaty cutting conventional forces in 
Europe was signed before the breakup of the 
Soviet Union. The idea of limiting forces on 
tbe southern and northern flanks of the old 
Soviet Union came from Turkey, with backing 
from Nordic members of NATO. They worried 
that forces (hat had been withdrawn to satisfy 
ceilings in Eastern Europe would be redeployed 
in the Soviet republics near their borders. 

Last September, Russia tried to have thei 
limits suspended because it wanted to put 
more fences in the Caucasus military district 
to counter restiveness in that region. And it 
warned darkly about the rise of fundamental- 


ism farther to the south and east in Central 
Asia. Ukraine joined in the effort to get the 
treaty changed because it stipulated that no 
more than 7 percent of Ukraine’s forces could 
be stationed in the Odessa military district 
abutting Russia — winch takes up nearly one- 
fourth of its territory. 

But nothing in the treaty would prevent 
.Russia from redeploying some forces from 
north Id south within the flank area, h may 
also transfer additional armored personnel 
carriers from the army to intonal security 
units, thereby getting around the treaty limit 
on combat vehicles. That would satisfy its 
need to secure regions within Russian without 
unduly alarming Turkey, whose borders are 
now buffered bran Russia’s by the newly inde- 
pendent republics of Georgia and Armenia. 

Tbe more difficult issue ts whether to permit 
Russian troops to be sent to Georgia, Armenia 
or Azerbaijan, ostensibly for peacekeeping. 
That troubles Turkey. It also stirs fears in 
Washington of a revival of Russian imperial- 
ism. A Russian redeployment m^^ be permit- 
ted under tbe conventional force reduction 
treaty but only for peacekeeping missions ap- 
proved by the Conference on Security and 
Cooperation in Europe or tbe United Nations 
Security CouudL That would doty the imperi- 
alists in Russia an excuse to throw their weight 
around, both at home and abroad — or to 
breach limits on forces in its flank areas. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Britain a Lonely little Nation 

We are a much more fragmented nation than 
.we used to be, and the class diviaoos are still 
pretty deep in society. There is a growing gap 
between rich and poor. Tbe education system, 
which used to be second to none, is now pretty 
mediocre. We are not giving teachers tbe re- 
sources or the kind of salary that wall motivate 
them to say “This is a job really worth doing.” 

Hie kind of picture I’m describing is one of 


a fragmented, divided society which has lost 
its empire The Commonwealth doesn’t really 
mean very much anymore. We’re not quite yet 
Europeans and committed to it We’re in a 
very big world and we’re now very lonely. 

We have lost nearly all our navy and air 
force and so on. We’re a pretty ordinary little 
nation and yet we don’t realize it 
— Excerpts from remarks by the archbishop 
of Canterbury, George Carey, as quoted in 
The Daily Telegraph (London). 


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' Like I said earlier — cattle futures! 9 


The President Can’t Lead by Following Congress 


W ASHINGTON — On health care, jobs and 
other domestic priorities, the Senate and the 
House are for Bill Clinton movable objects: legis- 
lative bodies susceptible to -the force of persuasion, 
leadership or horse trading. But when it comes to 
foreign policy, the 535 Right Honorables of Capi- 
tol Hill suddenly become King Congress: a policy 
behemoth who must be placated, whose clear sup- 
port must be present, up-front, for Mr. Clinton to 
take on the hard cases of world leadership. 

Challenge the a dminis tration on its overall ti- 
midity on the Balkans, confusion on human rights 
and China or inconsistency of purpose on Somalia, 
and officials will trot out opposition by King 
Congress as a major part of the reason why they’ 
cannot do more, or why they did what they did." - 
Secretary of State Warren Christopher retains 
from a controversial trip to Beijing feeling that his 
critics are off base because they ignore tire fact that 
the administration’s China policy has been craf ted 
to defuse congressional pressure to punish C hina 
as well as prodBeij ing into action on human rights. 

Defense Secretary William Perry’ begins a dis- 
cussion with reporters about the use of force 
abroad by listing the support of Congress as the 
sine qua non. At the While House, the National 
Security Council staff director. Nancy Sod er berg 
defends decisions on Northern Ireland' and Greece 
by explaining, “If you uy to make these decisions 
in a vacuum, without tbe support of Congress, you 
will lose the support of the American people."' 

Some of this is commonplace, some of it a 
rationalization for avoiding unpopular decisions. 


By Jim Hoagland 


President Clinton's foreign policy team seems at 
rimes frozen in a pose of looting over the shoulder 
at congressional and public reaction to their mili- 
tary and political initiatives. But something larger 
is happening as a president who is interventionist 
and liberal at home defers frequently and openly 
to Congress and to public opinion on foreign 
affairs. He makes Congress more than a coequal m 
■foreign policy. He makes it a lodestar. 

The half-century era of the Imperial Presidency 
is being laid to rest in the Clinton years. This 
president's formative political experiences in- 
volved controversies over the arrogance of power 
and its abuses in the Oval Office. He has communi- 
cated to his aides his distaste for and distrust of the 
mode of leadership that led to excess. 

At one leveL that change is prudent and salu- 
tary. Vietnam. Watergate and Iran-contra were 
products of the Imperial Presidency mentality. The 
Clinton approach echoes the American public’s 
disillusion with risk-taking abroad as the threat of 
a nuclear Doomsday recedes. 

Mr. Clinton's Uminperial Presidency also match- 
es tbe financial constraints that de&ri reduction 
imposes. Congress refuses to provide the money 
required for an innovative foreign policy. Defense 
spending will by 1996 be 40 percent lower than it 
was a decide earlier, according to Mr. Perry. 

But running scared in from of Congress, and 
operating as if the United Stares were too poor to 


lead and' too divided to rule, has a downside. With 
its conflicting constituency interests, Congress can 
never lead on foreign policy. It can only react, 
criticize and restrict when that suits congressional 
self-interest- On foreign policy. Congress is a large 
ship without an anchor, bo uncing from swell to 
swell and swamping those who follow in its wake. 

President Clinton is likely to be re-elected, or 
defeated, in 1996 on the strength or weakness of the 
economy in that vear. His political advisers, such as 
James CarviDe, feel that foreign policy will play 
almost no role in that campaign. Their implicit 
message to Mr. Clinton: Don’t tangle with Congress 
on foreign policy. Most of all don’t tangle with the 
Democratic leadership. Make trade-offs to get your 
domestic programs passed. 

That message fits the tendency of Mr. Clinton’s 
generation to have overieamed the lessons of Viet- 
nam and of his a dminist ration to over! earn the 
lessons of Somalia, a case that coaid have turned mil 
differently and more positively with applied and 
consistent presidential leadership. 

On trade and other international economic issues, 
this administration understands that faffing to lead 
when tbe opportunity presents itself is faflrng peri- 
od. Other actors and forces would fill the inevitable 
vacuum, bringing anwdeome results fa 1 the nation. 
That remains true in the area of traditional diplo- 
matic and political global strategy as wdL 

A modem president's fate is to lead at home and 
abroad. Mr. Clinton wiD have to be a lodestar on 
foreign policy, nuher than following one. 

The Washington Post 


Their Confidence in a New Hong Kong Is Misplaced 


H ONG KONG — Bqiing’s policy 
for Hong Kong, which becomes 
a “Special Administrative Region" of 
China in 1997, is inconsistent and 
bewildering. Like a kaleidoscope, it 
presents a different picture from 
instant to instant. 

One moment Beijing promises 
loudly that the economic and social 
systems of the British colony will re- 
main unchanged for the first 50 years 
of Chinese rule. The next moment it 
swears that it will demolish the ad- 
ministrative and legal framework 
that has supported Hong Kong’s im- 
pressive economic growth, to create 
systems more like China's autocracy. 

Chinese investment in Hong Kong 
certainly amounts now to tens of bil- 
lions of dollars, although the exact 
figure is unknown. That money ap- 
pears to pledge that Beijing will make 
use of. not destroy, tbe territory's fi- 
nancial and commercial power. Yet 
Beijing's representatives denounce the 
bidding of a major airport designed 
partly to ensure that the territory re- 
mains a hub of trade and finance. 

In the beginning, such contradic- 
tions and abrupt drifts in policy 
alarmed the people of Hong Kong. 
Shares would plummet, as did land 
values. The highly competent middle 
class, prime mover of die Hong Kong 
miracle, would nervously search for 
safe havens outside the territory’. 


By Robert Elegant 


These days, consternation no longer 
follows every switch in Beijing’s pro- 
nouncements. And most of those who 
are able to leave have already done 
so. or found bolt-holes abroad that 
they can fly to should the need arise. 

Instead of panicking, the makers 
and shakers of Hong Kong assure 
themselves that the territory and ad- 
jacent Southern China now form a 
single integrated economy. Most of 
Hong Kong's industrial production 
has moved across the border to ex- 
ploit cheap labor in Southern China. 

Whatever was going to happen, 
members of Hong Kong's elite tell 
each other, has already happened. 
They then get back to making vast 
sums by speculating in land, build- 
ings and shares. 

Tbe menial gymnastics required for 
such specious self-assurance are sim- 
ple. The fai cats of Hong Kong are 
deeply interested only in amassing and 
displaying wealth. They can therefore 
readily convince themselves that the 
takeover wiD change nothing that truly 
mailers because Beijing encourages its 
own people to grow riot and tolerates 
tbe consequent ostentation. 

Besides, they say. Beijing will not 
act against its self-interest: to preserve 
Hong Kong as a source of foreign 
exchange, capital and know-how. 


This self-deception overlooks some 
major factors. The Chinese Commu- 
nist leadership consistently values po- 
litical goals above economic well-be- 
ing. Why rise the massacre, televised 
worldwide, of hundreds of students 
and workers in 1989? Such atrocity 
was certain to hurt China’s economic 
growth, but the autocrats chose to 
exert raw power to preserve their per- 
sonal authority and privileges. 

Clearly’. Beijing’s priorities and view 
of its self-interest are not the same as 
Hong Kong's. Besides, the economic 
consequences of 1989 were soon over- 
come China’s sheer size as a potential 
market and enormous manufacturer 
has virtually overwhelmed the initial 
international horror at Beijing's bar- 
barity. From Japan to Europe and 
North America, entrepreneurs are 
rushing to invest and seu. 

Another complication is Beijing's 
faltering grip on tbe regions. More 
and more, the decrees of the center 
are ignored or diluted in tbe prov- 
inces. Effective devolution of power 
could work in favor of Hong Kong. 

However. Beijing is likely to re- 
main strong enough in 1997 to exert 
direct control over Hong Kong. Beij- 
ing will be eager to prove (hat it has 
not given up ns commitment to be a 
“socialist market economy.” It is of- 


ten fancifully argued that it is in Chi- 
na’s interest to treat Hong Kong so 
that it is an example to Taiwan of the 
benevolence Taiwan could expect if 
reunited with the mainland. In fact, 
Hong Kong is more likely to be made 
an example of firmness to those ele- 
ments within China that seek to 
shake off Beijing's rule. 

Beijing may allow the fat cats of 
Hong Kong to continue amassing 
and displaying wealth for a few 
years after 1997. But in the end it 
must interfere substantially. China's 
Communist cadres cannot admit 


that they do not understand the cap- 
italist marketplace, and so they will 
not be able to keep their hands off 


They Mind Other People’s Business 


B ANGKOK — Memories of 
Treaty Ports, the Comintern, 
even tbe Crusades are seeping back. 


There has been in recent times a rise 
in assumptions of extraterritoriality 
— the idea that one group's laws or 
practices are so superior that they 
should be enforced on others. 

Most wortyingly, some of these 
moral arrogaticras are being driven 
by mankind’s better instincts. Tbe 
principle is harder to challenge if 
the objective appears noble. 

Cah/omia may have initiated the 
resurrection of extraterritoriality by 
trying to tax corporations doing 
business in the state on tbe basis of a 
portion of their global incomes. That 
could have beat rebuffed as U.S. 
imperialism at work. But there were 
pi ratty of companies and govern- 
ments (including the U.S. federal 

government) on hand with their own 
self-interested motives for opposing 
iL The ethics/ imperialism question 
did not have to be addressed. 

But now we have more difficult 
issues. Stan with whether labor 
rights questions should, as the 
United States and France want be 
included in GATT discussions of 
what is or is not free and fair trade. 

Those familiar with developing 
countries know that child labor and 
other labor abuses exist: they also 
know that these are tiny factors in 
competitiveness. They are most 
common in countries that play a 
small role in international trade. 

Such abuses are being seized on 
for the most obvious protectionist 
purposes. But such crude agendas 
work. In the developed world, well- 
meaning, cause-oriented people 
latch on to them. The developing 


By Philip Bowring 

world is immediately on the defen- 
sive because few dare utter the 
words “So what, that's our busi- 
ness. they’re our children." 

Extraterritoriality on labor rights 
can at least be spotted easily as 
having some identifiable economic 
objective. But what should we make 
of Australia's determination — fol- 
lowing the Scandinavian example 
— to prosecute its own citizens for 
sex offenses committed in other ju- 
risdictions? This is as outrageous as 
citizens of those countries expect- 
ing to be treated abroad under tbe 
same laws — for example, on drug 
possession or murder — that would 
apply at home. It is an affront to tbe 
foreign countries (mostly Thailand 
and Die Philippines), implying that 
Australia is both more moral and 
more effective in law enforcement. 

Certainly, tbe Philippines is not 
very effective in prosecuting sex of- 
fenses against minors. But the same 
judgments could be applied to mur- 
ders in the United States, police 
corruption in Sydney or drug deal- 
ing in most of Europe. 

How will an Australian court as- 
sume that it can convict on the basis 
of evidence that must be gathered 
in Thailand but is not even the 
subject of a prosecution in Thai- 
land? But Australians apparently 
“feel good about" their blow 
against sex crimes overseas. Few 



example 

anj ayatollahs who may wish to 
prosecute Iranian women returning 


home for “immodest” behavior 
abroad. It is also a tine of argument 
similar to that used in Libya in 
refusing to allow those accused in 
the Lockerbie bombing to stand tri- 
al where the crime was committed. 

The flip side to this is that certain 
Asian countries are making a na- 
tionalistic song and dance about 
subjecting foreigners to the laws 
and punishments that apply locally 
— then proceeding to make exam- 
ples of the foreigners by imposing 
extra harsh penalties. 

Another extra territoriality issue 
is emerging from the anti-tobacco 
crusade that is gaining momentum 
in the United States and is sure to 
copied down to the last contrived 
cough in Britain and Australia. 

U.S. firms (more because of pres- 
sure from a few zealots (ban be- 
cause of the democratic will or 
management imperatives) are im- 
posing the politically correct U.S. 
norms on societies which have de- 
rided that smoking is an acceptable 1 
vice — ■ not good, bur less harmful 
than tbe various alternatives. It 
must be especially galling for citi- 
zens of societies such as Japan and 
South Korea, known as much for 
their discipline and longevity as for 
their consumption of cigarettes, to 
find that even their own workplaces 
have to abide by such rules. They 
find it even more amazing when the 
anti-smoking obsession comes from 
a nation built on the tobacco trade. 

Co mmunis m may be dead but 
Orwell’s vision is noL One can al- 
most hear an animal chorus march- 
ing out of Washington chanting 
“Colas good, tobacco bad ...” 
International Herald Tribune. 


the machinery. They want a Chinese 
financial ana commercial center, 
not one tinged by British rule. 

Most portentous is the dedication 
of a powerful group in China to de- 
stroying Hong Kong's preeminence 
and shifting its functions to Shang- 
hai, which was once tbe financial and 
commercial hub of East Asia. 

Shanghai is being developed with 
frantic haste, as if bricks and steel, 
skyscrapers and highways were re- 
sponsible for Hong Kong’s preemi- 
nence, rather than the skill and ambi- 
tions of its people, or the hospitable 
environment for growth created by 
reasonably evenhanded British rule. 

The Pu Dong area of Shanghai, 
east of the Huang Pu River, is bring 
transformed by construction of office 
buildings, hotels and apartment 
blocks in great numbers. So far Pu 
Doag has many vacant buildings and 
very few inhabitants, but powerful 
figures in China are determined that 
Shanghai will supplant Hong Kong. 

Those who believe that the territo- 
ry will endure the transition with ev- 
erything important unchanged are 
wrong. After 1997, Hong Kong will 
be very different. 

The writer, a forma- Asia correspon- 
dent whose novel, “ The Everlasting Sor- 
row," has just been published is a fellow 
at the Institute of Advanced Study m 
Berlin. He contributed this common to 
the International Herald Tribune 


A Mystery: ^ 
Less Birth, 
More Death 

By Nicholas Eberstadt 

W ASHINGTON — The strange 
population trends that have 
gripped the forms 1 Soviet Union since 
the fall of commuman in 1989 — 
many fewer babies being bom. mam- 
mon: people dying — have been wide- 
ly reported in recent months. But the 
demographic calamity covers a much 
broader region than these reports 
would have one believe. 

Statistics from official agencies in 
Russia and Eastern Europe paint a 
portrait of a vast and diverse region 
seized by a common convulsion. From 
Leipzig to Vladivostok, birth and mar- 
riage rates are plummeting and death 
rates are soaring. No one. East or 
West, predicted such violent tremors. 

These trends are no statistical fluke. 

When birth and death registration is 
nearly complete, as it is in aD these 
countries, population data can easily ^ 
be checked for inconsistencies. 

There is nothing intrinsically wor- * 
risome about declining population 
growth, or even declining population. 

West Germany, after all, did rather 
well in the 1970s and '80s. But sudden 
sharp changes in birth and death 
rates are indicators of societies in 
extreme distress — societies unable 
to cope with health problems that 
were once routine. 

From 1989 to the first half of 1993. 
according to official data, the birth- 
rate fell by more than 20 percent in 
Poland, around 25 percent in Bulgar- 
ia, 30 percent in Estonia and Roma- § 
nia, 35 percent in Russia and more 
than 60 percent in Eastern Germany. 

In (be past, such abrupL shocks 
were observed in industrial societies 
only in wartime. 

Perhaps even more alarming is the 
surge in mortality in the former Sovi- 
et bloc. Even sturdy age groups have 
been stricken, even in relatively well- 
off areas. From 1989 to 1991. the 
death rate rose by nearly 20 perceni 
for Eastern German women in their 
late 30s, and nearly 30 percent for 
men of the same age. la 1992 and 
1993. Eastern Germany buried two 
people for every baby bom. Infant 
mortality is reported rising not only 
in Russia but also in Bulgaria. Latvia. 
Moldova, Romania and Ukraine. 

Tbe posl-Communist population 
crisis is puzzling — and all the more 
disturbing, — in that it does not seem 
to be associated with any particular 
social conditions, economic policies 
or political arrangements. 

A leap in death rates may be all too 
understandable in Russia, where the 
medical system has broken down, an- 
tique diseases like diphtheria are out 
of control and dozens of homeless 
vagrants die in train stations even, 
month. But how to explain tbe leap in 
Eastern Germany, where unification 
has led to major improvements in j 
living standards and medical care? 

Or in Poland, where the falling 
birthrate and rising death rate have 
coincided with “shock therapy” mar- 
ket reforms and the transition to 
democratic pluralism? 

Uncertain though the causes may 
still be, it is all too apparent that the 
adjustment to life after communism 
is proving traumatic. Is it entirely 
coincidental that every Communist 
regime with falling death rales is still 
in power — China, Cuba, North Ko- 
rea, Vietnam — while virtually every 
post-Comrminist government is re- 
porting sharp deterioration in health? 

A significant exception is the 
Czech Republic, where post-Commu- 
?hic shocks have been 


nisi 

mildest and liberalization appears to 
be moving forward most smoothly. 

The demographic shocks warrant 
concern, and not only on humanitar- 
ian grounds. In. the modern world, 
where health progress is all but taken 
for granted, significant and general 
increases in mortality always betoken 
social instability, governmental fra- 
gility or both. A debilitated labor 
force augurs poorly for the transition 
to an affluent market economy. 

Tt is ominous that three of the coun- 
tries in demographic crisis — Russia. 
Ukraine and Belarus — have nuclear 
weapons. For that reason if no other, 
policymakers in Washington would 
be well advised to pay close attention 
to the population trends of the posl- 
Communist regions. 

Demography may not be destiny, 
but until stability is achieved and the 
post-Communisi landscape becomes 
familiar to Western eyes, mundane 
tallies of births, marriages and deaths 
can help make sense or this troubled, 
confusing and potentially explosive 
expanse of the globe. 

The writer, a researcher with the 
American Enterprise Institute, con- 
tributed this comment fo 77ic New 
York Times. A longer version will 
appear in the summer issue of The 
National Interest. 



IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: An Indian Rising 

NEW YORK — The military au- 
thorities at Fort Reno, Oklahoma, 
have received further information of 
the Indian outbreak. It is known that 
at least thirty lives have been lost 
Several groups of settlers have al- 
ready gone to the scene of trouble to 
render what assistance they can Tbe 
Indians engaged are not under tbe 
leadership of Chief Whirlwind, as was 
at first believed, but are followers of 
Red Moon. Fighting is taking place on 
the banks of the Wichita River, about 
1 15 miles west of El Remo. 

1919: Poland’s Cause 

PARI S — M. Paderewski, the Polish 
Premier, who incarnates his country's 
passionate yearning lor free, national 
life, reached here yesterday mo rning 
rA ‘1 *]. He has come to plead at the 


Peace Conference the cause of Po- 
land, to justify her claims and aspira- 
tions. The HERALD'S special corre- 
spondent, Mr. Cameron Mackenzie. 


reports: M. Paderewski will fed that 
he has lost, if at the Peace Conference 
be cannot win those things which he 
deems needful for a strong, an inde- 
pendent, a unified Polish state. Very 
probably he feels that the common- 
wealth of his vision must have a port, 
it must have its fud supply. Also 
there must be credit to re-establish 
the nation's industries, stripped and 
left stagnant by the Germans. 

1944: Italian Coalition 

SORRENTO, Italy — [From our 
New York edi tion:f Leaders of the six 
Italian opposition parties virtually 
agreed inlay [April 6] to participate 
in a coalition “war government” of 
liberated Italy if and when King Vic- 
tor Emmanuel HI retires, by desig- 
nating Crown Prince Humbert as his 
“lieutenant.” The Junta of the six 
parties expressed confidence that tbe 
initiation of negotiations would 
“bring a complete and quick solution 
to the present Italian crisis without 
wailing for the liberation of Rome.” 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY,. APRIL 7, 1994 


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OPINION 



Page 9 


flie Monsters 9 Mediocrity 
Makes Them No Less Evil 


=e*w3faR*aEKr 


@S* 


By William Pfaff 


SSSPrax-aS 

gau None of them — Touvier, Barbie, 
among others — has demon- 
^Propria* to the evil 
“2* m w *wh each figured. 

ViJhl' iSS"’ ^ ^ewartime 

Vichy French political police, is charaed 
with a crime against humanity" for his 
m the execution of seven Jewish 
» in 1944, in reprisal for the 
1 Resistance's killing erf the Vichv 
government s information minister 

He turns out to have been an unim- 
portant nudkvel officer in the paramili- 

People insisted that nothing 
connected with Hitler's 

genocide could be caUed 

*banaL' But that, as the 
Touvier trial reminds us, 
is exactly the horror of it. 

lary “Milice” an anti-Semitic function- 
ary of limited responsibilities and 
modest intelligence. His lawyer has 
claimed that he was actually “a 
Swindler" who saved Jewish lives by 
reducing the number of hos tages actual- 
ly kflled from the 30 allegedly demanded 
by the German authorities to a “mere” 
seven. This presumptuous line erf de- 
fense collapsed when Mr. Touvier' s 
notebooks from the 1980s were pro- 
duced in court, rife with hatred and anti- 
Semitic comments on current events. 

The only interest connected with this 
insig nifi cant figure is bow be managgri 
to find sympathy over the years among 
well-meaning French Catholic clergy, 
and why President Georges Pompidou 
could have been persuaded to lift the 
sole legal constraint weighing upon him 
in 1971, an interdiction on residing in 
the area of his f amily home. 

The statute of limitations by 1971 
prevented his retrial on the charges for 
which he was twice sentenced to death 
in absentia immediately after the war. 
However, presidential clemency actu- 
ally attracted attention to hu case 
and eventually resulted in the present 
trial on a new charge of crime against 
humanity, for which, in France, jeopar- 
dy is unlimited. 

At the time of the Eichmann trial 
in Israel in 1960, Hannah Arendt pro- 
voked much controversy, which per- 
sists even today, by characterizing the 
evidence of Adolf Eichmann’s crimes 
as demonstration of the “banality” 


of evil People insisted that nothing 
connected with Hiller's genocide could 
be called “banaL" 

But that is exactly the horror of it: 
Monstrous crimes are committed or 
abetted by mediocrities like Fiphnumn 
and Touvier, merely following standard 
procedures. Even those l<V the German 
officer Klaus Barbie; sentenced to life 
imprisonment for atrocities committed 
as SS chief in Lyon, who demonstrated 
personal enthusiasm in torturing his vic- 
tims, seem more sadists than Swnms- 

These trials have turned up no Meph- 
istopbdes, and di« is why they fr u s tr ate 
the public. People want to believe that 
enormous evils, like the Sboah, require 
exceptional executants. If the people 
who commit these crimes are twnai and 
ordinary, why are they different from 
the rest of us? And if they are not in 
fact so different, what does that suggest 
about ourselves? 

They pose the possibility that in given ' 
circumstances the rest of us might find 
ourselves committing crimes against hu- 
manity. For Americans, one of the les- 
sons of the Vietnam War was that well- 
intentioned young men can in extreme 
conditions commit atrocities, as was the 
case for the American Division platoon 
that massacred 347 unarmed civilians at 
My Lai in 1968, and whose members 
were never punished in a mann er appro- 
priate to their crimes. 

The political interest of the Touvier 
trial lies chiefly in its having again posed 
a problem of the national responsibility 
of France for the Vichy government and 
its crimes. Conservatives have mostly 
/erred to equivocate cm this subject, 
it Socialist President Francois Mitter- 
rand has himself explicitly and repeat- 
edly refused to acknowledge that the 
French Republic bears any responsibil- 
ity for the Vichy regime and its acts. 

The events of the period now are much 
studied and discussed, but official France 
treats the Vichy period as a parenthesis in 
French history, possessing no political or 
moral connection to what went before or 
came after. Yet, the facts are that the 
property elected parliament of the French 
Third RepuhBc, in legal session, voted 
full pewets to Marshal Philippe Pfctam in 
July 1940, after France's defeat by Ger- 
many, by 569 votes to 80. The Pfctain 
government’s legitimacy was contested 
only long after that vote. 

Great crimes do not demand great 
criminals. This is an unpalatable fact, 
but to resist it is to resist not only the 
evidence of history but responsibility for 
what could lie in the future. Those who 
believe that great evils are only commit- 
ted by exceptional people will be at a 
loss when they find themselves in cir- 
cumstances where the easy course, the 
persuasive course, the ail but irresistible 
course, will be to do what is asked and 
not t hink about the consequences. 

International Herald Tribune. 

© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 



The Line Gets Ever Thinner 
Between Gay and Straight 

By Anna Quindlen 


N EW YORK — At the conclusion of 
the incomparable “Angels in 
America,” a dying man named Prior 
Walter has the last word. Prior has seen 
and angels, love and betrayal. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Selective Memories 

Regarding the report "A By of Berlus- 
coni Praises Mussolini as * Greatest 
Statesman " ( April 2 ) by Alan Cowell: 
Too few people outside Italy realize 
how many Italians — including those 
who consider themselves antifascist — 
retain a high regard for Mussolini. 
Many are perfectly happy to think that 
be was a brilliant man who was either 
misled by his more strident advisers or 
brought down by circumstance. “He 
was O.K. until he allied himself with 
Hitler,” is a common argument. This 
way, some Italians can feel a little less 
foolish for having followed “the 
clown” down the road to ruin. 

But the police slate suppressions and 
the imperial adventures predated the so- 
called Pact erf Steel, and Italians should 
take note lest their hazy memories lead 
them astray. Even as a pale imitation of 
Hitler, Mussolini was a monster and the 
peroetrator of crimes against humanity. 

Gianfranco Ftni is a fascist: he must 
be understood and dealt with as such. 

THOMAS L. SCHUMACHER- 
Florence. 

State of ike Lahore 

Regarding “ A U.S. Tempest in a 
French Demitasse ** (Opinion, April 41 
by Jacques Toubon: 

Not until 1 read this article by Mr. 
Toubon, the French culture minister, 
did I realize the seriousness of the state 
of French culture in general and of the 
French language in particular. 

I am certain that few Americans are 
aware of France's language crisis. Those 
who care and read about international 


events are more impressed by France's 
radical right, its stonewalling on GATT, 
the continual caving in by the Bahadur 
government to any public displays of 
displeasure, the shrill French govern- 
ment reaction to the obvious popularity 
in France of American movies and tele- 
vision programs. 

I had wondered why France, unlike 
the United States, would need to have a 
culture minister. Having read this arti- 
cle. I know why. 

K. W. BONNER. 

Madrid. 

On Sett-Determination 

Regarding “ Two Keys to Peace in the 
Balkans' ' (Opinion, March 26) by Ste- 
phen S. Rosenfeld: ■ 

Mr. Rosenfeld is wrong to assert that 
the Serbs “want it both" ways" on the 
issue of sdf-deienninaiion. 

National self-determination is not a 
universal! v recognized right of peoples 
living within federations like ex-Yugo- 
slavia or multiethnic empires such as the 
now defunct Soviet Union. However, it 
is a practical criterion of the strength of 
a people's will and identity: and it has 
therefore frequently proved to be the 
outcome of internal conflict. 

In the case of the Serbs, this has been 
clearly established since the middle of 
the 19th century- In the case of the 
Kosovo Albanians, it is still unproven. 

Tbe situation in Kosovo is unsatisfac- 
tory ami is further complicated by social 
and political manipulation of human 
rights claims. Any improvement can be 
achieved only through meaningful dia- 
logue with the Belgrade government. 
Such a process has brought fresh encour- 


agement for a cessation of hostilities be- 
tween Croatia and the Krajina Serbs. It 
seems the Kosovo Albanians have neither 
the desire to follow (hat example nor any 
wish for stability in the Balkans. 

VLADA VJESTICA. 

Neuilly-sur-Seine, France. 

Squeeze Play for Peace 

The irony that generous British subsi- 
dies to the Northern Ireland economy 
may have hindered, not helped, (he 
peace process deserves attention. 

If financial aid were reduced, or if a 
reduction were threatened, then both the 
economic costs of violence and the politi- 
cal price of peace would be clarified. 
Unionists ana nationalists would then 
have an incentive to work out a mutually 
acceptable form of self-government. 

if IRA and Protestant extremists dis- 
covered that living standards — theirs 
and their supporters — were going to 
decline, they might modify their goals 
and enter tins democratic process. 

MICHAEL HAMILTON. 

The Hague. 

Fear o! Homecoming 

From time to time, you publish travel 
advisories issued by the U.S. govern- 
ment about travels in potentially dan- 
gerous areas. 

I am going to the United States with 
my children and would appreciate a 
travel advisory about areas to avoid on 
the East and Southeast coasts. 

I am afraid to go home. 

J. SCHMITT. 

Paris. 


lesions blooming on his body and the 
deaths of many friends. 

But in the end, as be speaks of AIDS, 
America and tbe human condition, 
some of the things that this monumental 
play is about, be bas a kind of peace so 
profound that you must genuflect before 
its grandeur, greater than any seraphim. 

“This disease will be the aid of many 
of usT he says, “but not nearly all, ana 

MEANWHILE 

the dead will be commemorated and win 
struggle on with tbe living, and we are not 
going away. We won't die secret deaths 
anymore. Tbe world only spins forward. 
We will be dozens. Tbe time has come. 1 * 

Tbe time has come. You can fed it, in 
a hundred tittle ways, ltis so certain and 
inevitable, that the next century will be a 
time in which it is not simply safe, but 
commonplace, to be openly gay. 

Tbe countervailing forces continue to 
be at walk. Tbe Ikea furniture chain 
gamers a great deal or publirity by air- 
ing a commercial in which two men buy 
a table together. Tom Hanks wins an 
Oscar for playing a gay man and pays 
public tribute to his high school drama 
teacher, the genuine article. 

But the bishop of Brooklyn uses the 
bully pulpit of his position, this Easter, 
to reiterate his belief that homosexuality 
is intrinsically eviL And in the mail come 
two letters, one from a gay college stu- 
dent who was beaten up at a bar and 
another from a gay couple who say they 
are being harassed by neighbors. 

It is repulsive to Save to note that a 
group of protesters, taking tbe Lord's 
name in vain, held up signs outside tbe 
memorial service for the writer Randy 
Stilts reading “God Hates Fags.” It 
is wonderful to report that there were 
{fewer than a dozen of them, and that 
>t lost fasu 

fould you say you are a typical 
homosexual?" a Mormon mother asks 
Prior Walter. “Me?" he croons. “Oh, !'ra 
stereotypical.” The mother asks because 
she has lust discovered her married son 


they got 
^Wou 


lasm 

is gay. wives, mothers, sisters, brothers, 
fathers, friends: Tbe line between ste- 
reotype and reality, gay and straight in 
daily life is as thin as a whisper. 

Next month the novelist Robb For- 
man Dew will publish a book entitled 
“The Family Heart: A Memoir of When 
Our Son Came Oul” 

En many ways it will be a familiar 
story to tile parents of gay children. Ms. 
Dew gpes over and over the questions 
she asked, the ones she didn't, the fears 
and pain she feels and feels ashamed of 
feeling. Who can blame her when she 
blurts out: “But Steve, what about Jessi- 
ca? You remember? In the seventh 


grade? Or Amy? You took Amy to her 
prom.” American dreams die hard. 

But in tbe end Robb Dew knows she 
has what die has always had: two good 
and bright and wonderful sons, one 
straight, the oiber not. 

“whenever it's necessary to engage in 
deception in order to keep" a secret.’ she 
writes, “it’s a good bet that you are 
indulging in a bit of concealment that 
is damaging to the soul.” 

Anyhow, why should Steve deceive? 
“J*d tike there to be a person 1 love who 
loves me,” he tells ms parents. Amen 
from any mother, every mother. 

There are loo many mothers and 
mother’s sons lor hatred to prevail 
When Steve reads Sam Nunn’s argu- 
ments against gays in (be military in die 
paper and tells his mother. “I [eel it’s 
wrong to exist,” she has precisely the 
reaction that any good mother would 
and should have:' She is enraged. 

And that rage, and the love that goes 
with it are why things wilt chang e , have 
changed. As much as laws, it's love that 
does iL You feel the truth of that every 
day, as the ice of concealment and fear 
continues to crack and melu 
“Angels in Amenta” is about many, 
■many things, from religion and politics 
to death and forgiveness. The most lov- 
able character has AIDS, and so does 
tbe most detestable one, but it is no 
more a work or art about AIDS than 
“Anna Karenina” is a book about a 
train accident 

It is a brilliant, brilliant play about 
love and the human condition at a time 
when our understanding of what it 
means to be human and loving has, 
thankfully, expanded The world only 
spins forward. The time has come. 

The New York Times. 

A 'Seal of Approval’ 

A MERICANS have just seen the first 
mainstream TV commercial star- 1 
ring undeleted gay consumers 
for merchandise other than coni 
The spot opens in an Ikea store, where the' 
slightly testy Steve and his unnamed 
companion hunt for a dining-room table. 
The action then moves to their home, 
where the characters let on that they've 
been together for three years. The gay 
couple is as im threateningly pseudo-het- 
ero as posable. They are monogamous. 
They look like brothers, not lovers. 

Yet ads are made to sell not to promote, 
social change. As Stuan EhioU, advertising 
columnist of The Tunes, puts iL these men 
are there to give lkea's merchandise “the 
Gay Housekeeping Seal of Approval” 

My friend Robert, who is gay, is deeply 
cynical about a company using gay men to 
convince straight clients that it is “new, 
different and cooL” He would rather 
watch the strip teasing construction worker 
in the Wet Coke commercial any day. 

— Frank Rich, The Aw York Times. 


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a«e 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY* APRIL 7, 1994 


HEALTH /SCIENCE 


Jarring a Delicate 
Mechanism 

Hi^vimpact aerobics might harm 
balance by displacing tiny 
Qranutes catted otoBths. They / 
float in a gel in two inner-oar /s' 
chambers, the utricle and ( f 

saccule, and transmit I ( 

information on position 1 1 

by stimulating hair-liKe \V 

stalKs finked to nerve Vn 

fibers. In the delicate OtoHms \ 
cochlea, sound / \ 

impulses are $985881. 

transformed into i . . .* ■ v 

nerve signals for I- ■ fc .■ 1 

transmission to tire . IL 

brain, Jap ■/•PT* 

Source: The ClBA W.lf. a 

CoHectbn of Medical 

frustrations' ■' 


Common 

canal 


mrimizm 

' •• J • 

-Utricle ' 


■ Gelatinous 
membrane 
Hairfuft 
- Hair cell 
Membrane 
Nerve fibers 


Cochlea 


Saccule 


The New Y«»V Tape 


Not So Easy on the Ear 


' — r — — “ the area who were similarly affected but refused to be 

Bv Jane L. Brodv examined e'en though the S3,000 worth of tests were 

-■ Yew >Vvt Times Sen nr being offered free. He also questioned 144 other par- 

- _ ticipams in the fitness activity who were free of the 

HL H EW YORK — People who engage in de- symptoms. 

flLH mandiog physical activities might expect Among participants examined symptoms were 
to suffer occasional injuries to die body worst among aerobics instructors, who typically lead 
_ "R parts directly involved. But few devotees several 40- to 60- minute sessions a day several times a 
of high-impact aerobics are likely to guess that their week. Enthusiasts usually take four classes a week, 
jumping and bouncing to music could damage their Dr. Weintraub found that 80 percent of those with 
inner ears, causing symptoms like persistent vertigo, symptoms had suffered fomagr to the pans of the 
’dizziness, imbalance, motion sickness, ringing or inner ear involved with balance. He said he suspected 


By Jane E. Brodv 

Y<n York T i nit’s Sertltt' 


fullness in [be ear and high-frequency hearing loss, that the n 
Yet just such a syndrome has 
been identified in a group of JO 
otherwise healthy women in the rr* i ■ 

.Westchester County area of New tllffll-inipilCt 
; York who regufarlv do high-impact - 

aerobics, which involves a lot of d^FODlC C5iFFClS(5S 
■bouncing up and down, often with f „ _ „ _ , 

.both feet off the ground at once. ttl&\ 1 3.U&C 
In a paper published last week in 
.The Journal of Sports Medicine »vdi/ii«, lOi??. 

and Physical Fitness. Dr. Michael I. 

iWeintraub, a clinical professor of 

^neurology at New York Medical College in Valhalla, room is n 
extended a previous observation of suspected inner- Manv ( 
ear damage related to high-impact aerobics. sickness v 

In an interv iew. Dr. Weintraub said he had prelimi- ^ V erti°c 
.nary clinical evidence that other jarring activities. like ^ re 
.professional volleyball and high-miJeage running. ^ y#. 
.could cause simi lar injuries to delicate structures in the 
ears that govern balance. 23o! 

He noted that the astronauts who had the most percent o 
.'trouble with motion sickness were those who were the !^ [s u j i 
. roost physically fit because they did the most running. 

Dr. Weintraub’ s study gave no measure of how - , “ 1CS S I ? 
often the problem occurs in connection with high- coc ™ 
impact aerobics. Most people who engage in the actlvi- ne ^T 
•ty apparently do not develop symptoms. But Dr. ^ , h(:su 
Weintraub estimated that as many’ as 20 percent to 25 . mu 

E ercent of those who regular! v do high-impact aero- sess,ons - 
ics might be affected. " In mo; 

He said he gathered the 30 cases cited in his report considere 
.in just five months, and learned of at least 20 others in pauooal ! 


that the repeated jarring loosened tiny stonelike struc- 
tures called otoliths, jamming them 
^ down among the hair cells that 
transmit information to the brain 
?t about the body’s position in space. 

“Once otoliths are knocked off 
Tri5ft? their perch, they don’t go back, and 

therefore continue to send the 
SOU 7<? wrong signal to the brain.” he said. 

This can result in a persistent off- 
”■ balance sensation, doziness, a dis- 

oriented feeling (for example, the 

sensation that the person or the 
room is moving! and difficulty navigating. 

Many of those with symptoms experienced motion 
sickness when riding or trying to read in a car. as well 
as vertigo in response to changes in barometric pres- 
sure. as when scuba diving, flying or swimming. 

Dr. Weintraub found that 67 percent of those with 
symptoms had ringing in their ears (tinnitus) or a 
sensation of ear muffling or fullness. In addition. 83 
percent of the instructors and 67 percent of enthusi- 
asts had high-frequency hearing loss. 

These symptoms indicate damage to the hair cells of 
the cochlea, the spiral-shaped organ that transmits 
nerve impulses for sound to the brain. Dr. Weintraub 
said he suspected that this problem was caused by the 
loud music typically played during the exercise 
sessions. 

In most cases, the noise level is well above that 
considered safe for prolonged exposure by the Occu- 
pational Safely mid Health Administration. 


BOOKS 

BORN NAKED 

By Farley Mnwal. 25ft pages. 
S2I.95. Houghton Mifflin. 

Reviewed bv 
.Frances Siead Seilers 

I N 1936 14-year-old Farley 
Mowjt interrupted his parent’s 
dinner party: "I’ve found them!” 
■he shrieked and thrust under one 
lady's unsuspecting nose a (in plate 
bearing the testes of a freshly dis- 
sected hairy woodpecker — along 
with a magnifying glass for examin- 
ing them. 

Whether the guest finished her 
dessert we do not leant (some did 
not), but her husband, owner of 
Saskatoon’s daily newspaper, was 
intrigued and invited the irrepress- 
ible teenager to write a column 
about birds for the Star Phoenix's 
Saturday children's supplement. 
The project was shortlived: 
Mowat's outspoken criticisms an- 
tagonized the hunting community, 
and his enthusiastic familiarity 
with the intimacies of avian sex (the 
ruddy duck apparently achieves the 
act under water) so appalled mem- 
bers oT a women's church league 
that “Birds of the Season” never 
again appeared in ihe Star. 

" r But Mowat had developed a 
taste for writing, and his impas- 
sioned, partisan descriptions of the 
northern wilderness and its inhab- 


itants have continued to provoke 
strong reactions. A persistent and 
outspoken champion of the op- 
pressed. he has written more than 
30 books, including “People of the 
Deer" (1952). in which he de- 
nounced government and mission- 
aries' treatment of the limit peo- 
ples. and the best sellers “Never 
Cry Woir M963). “A Whale for 
the Killing” { 1972) and “The Dog 
Who Wouldn’t Be” ( 1957), the pro- 
tagonist of which is Mowat's own 
childhood companion. Mutt. Re- 
cently he has turned to autobiogra- 
phy with ‘‘My Father's Son” 
(1992). a personal and grimly fun- 
ny account of his experiences in 
Europe during World War II, and 
now this evocative memoir of his 
boyhood, “Born Naked.” 

Conceived in a green canoe. 
Mowat lived near or cm Ontario's 
Bay of Quime until he was 12. when 
the family moved west to Saskatoon, 
Saskatchewan, and the prairies. But 
he never was to share his father's 
passion for sailing. He developed 
instead an intense “desire to become 
at one with the wilderness and its 
native inhabitants.” It is this longing 
that informs Mowat's earliest mem- 
ory. of accompanying his father on 
an expedition to tend their hives: “I 
see. in my mind's eye, a large and 
strikingly marked honey bee stand- 
ing on an anthill near where I sit. 
This bee is resolutely and briskly 


directing am traffic away' from me. 
much as a policeman might direct 
members of an unruly crowd away 
from some important personage.” 
Expert apiarists have since cast 
doubt cm the veracity of such recol- 
lections. but, writes Mowat, “ever 
since I have been as kindly disposed 
to [bees] as they have to me.” An 
only child, he soon developed the 
same sense of kinship with the myri- 
ad rats, bats and mice who shared 
the family’s decaying frame bouse, 
and even harbored hopes of be- 
friending a huge bear who visited 
the somnolent boy one night, “wear- 
ing a checked tweed cap.” 
Memories of such humorously 
anthropomorphized animals give 
way in Mowat’s narrative to a more 
serious fascination with the animal 
world, just as naturally as the arid 
young reader's choice of books pro- 
gressed from Beatrix Potter, 
through Kipling’s “Just So Stories" 
to the works of Ernest Thompson 
Seton and Charles G. D. Roberts. 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Praxedes Lcrtner, librarian at 
the Max Planck Institule in Berlin, 
is reading "Jurassic Park" by Mi- 
chael Crichton. 

“I think this is really a good read 
so far. I find it fun. In addition. I’na 
learning quite a bit about genetic' 
engineering, and the author ex- 
plains things in a rather entertain- 
ing way.” 

t Michael KaUenbach, IHTt 



: : -W 


By Alan Truscott 

N EW scientific evidence sug- 
gest that a slow bidder is less 
likely to make a well-judged caH 
This is plausible in a bridge con- 
text, though hard to prove. What is 
certain is that the slow bidder, or 
player, often gives information to 
his opponents, as witness the dia- 
igramed deal from the Macallan In- 
' lernationa! Tournament. 

East and West were Ron Rubin 
and Michael Becker. North and 
South were Irving Gordon and Bar- 
net Shenkin. who landed in a 3-4 
heart fit and were the only pair to 
play four hearts. The last bid came 
slowly, so Becker inferred correctly 
that South held only three hearts. 

South won the opening club lead 
with the ace, and finessed the heart 
jack. West ducked smoothly to con- 
fuse the issue. “It was unlikely that 
taking the king would lead any- 
where.” sayd Becker. 


Seeking an Evolutionary Reason for Suicide 

C/ . , .1 . _ ,1.-,, nn UAllld ft! Hrtir — :in. 


By Natalie Angjer 

■Vw York Times Serried 

EW YORK — Considered on its 
face, suicide seems to flout the 
laws of nature, slashing through 
the sturdy instinct that wills ail 
bdngs to fight for their lives until they can 
fight no longer. 

Yet to some evolutionary geneticists, sui- 
cide cannot be entirely explained as a violent 
aberration or a human pathology lying out- 
side the ebbs and pulls of natural 'selection 
and adaptation. 

These researchers note that suicide, for all 
its private, tangled sorrows, is surprisingly 
common in most countries, accounting on 
average for nearly 1 percent of all deaths. 
And when the number of serious suicide 
attempts is taken into account, the preva- 
lence of the behavior jumps considerably. 

That sort of incidence, the evolutionary 
geneticists say, is simply too great to be 
accounted for by standard explanations like 
social malaise or random cases of psychiatric 
disease. 

Instead, the scientists suggest that the per- 
sistence of suicide at a fairly high rate across 
mast cultures suggests an underlying evolu- 
tionary component, a possible Darwinian 
rationale for an act that too often appears 
starkly irrational. They propose that the ten- 
dency toward suicide could be a concomitant 
of a trait or group of traits that at some point 
in evolutionary history conferred benefits on 
those who bore it. 


In other words, strickle my not be a freak 
event, or a complete breakdown of the natu- 
ral order of things, but a behavior that by the 
sometimes cruel logic of natural selection, 
may make enough sense to maintain at a 
certain low but significant level 
Dr. Daniel Wilson, a clinical psychiatrist 
at Harvard Medical School and an anthro- 
pologist at the University of Cambridge in 
England, emphasized that nobody argues 
that there is a single gene for suicide- or that 
suicide or mental illness should be thought of 
as good. But he and others said there may be 
plausible evolutionary explanations for at 
least some self-destructive acts. 

What is more, the tendency to commit or 
try suicide often runs in families, suggesti n g 
that a predisposition toward self-murder is 
partly inherited. And while suicide occurs in 
□early all countries, it is far more common 
among some ethnic groups. 

The Hungarians and the Finns, for exam- 
ple, suffer from suicide rates two to three 
times those in the United States and most of 


itself but is simplv the most tragic outcome that no sane monkey would go near — and 
of another trait that may be selected for — so me times perishing in the exercise, 
the tendency toward depression. They pro- So similar is monkey' depression to human 
pose that bouts of depression may be useful depression, some scientists say. (hat the symp- 
forcing people into a kind of emotional hi- toms of melancholy dissipate when the pri- 


bemation and giving them time to ponder 
their mistakes. But such a strategy, if sus- 
tained too long or repeated too often, be- 


mates are given antidepressants like Prozac. 

Researchers know too well how easily a 
Darwinian explanation for complex beha- 


comes maladaptive and even fatal the re- viors can be overdone and oversimplified, 
searchers emp hasize d, showing itself as the Certainly, the affairs of animals much sim- 
h arrowing disease called mqor depression- pj^ people have been mirinteroreied in 

Some researchers haw looked to other ^ For example, the idea of suicide in 
spedes for insights into the genesis of de- non h un ian species invariably raises the 
pression and suicide. The expose is fraught famed example of lemmings, rodents that 
with pitfalls. Nanhuman animals obviously wcre j^g thought by scientists and the pub- 
do not leave behind anything as dear as a to kill themselves en masse bv run nine 
note, nor are they likely to have sufficient huo the sea. as though cued bv a group alarm 
awareness to do something as deliberate as indicating that today is a good da\ to 

jumping off a cliff. ^e. 

LT biologists have identified nu- r B “* bave , ? a ™ d lhe ljltf 

merous examples of creatures that of the suiadal leramrog is false. The rawnv- 
sacrifice themselves for their kin. die ty ^ group, but that, 

from termites that explode their 11 tura * O' 11 *.* a ° f an eTT f or J ud S' 

_ , , T . .... mpnr I ffllnunKan* f he IiYIK enf 


sssrsfzi 

sponsible, but also for Finns and Hungarians rather than ride spreading an infection to u*™*. 

whoeiragrated to other countries, agam hint- oth« m thar bmrow. 


More compelling^, scientists recently have 


Vta cS&ib. Mentis* recemly to* a ** “> 10 

in trying to fathom what that substrate determined that many species of nonhuman across - 
might be, researchers propose that the im- primates will suffer serious depression when “That's fine if it's a pond or a stream,” 
pulse to kill oneself may be an expression of stressed. And upon falling into an episode of said Dr. Paul W. Sherman, a behavioral 

^ 1 aaJF r foe a<w^ nW'inrk^li.' flv» mmL'mrc mav i>n. Mvtlnotcr at P I Initimirv if vKm* 


in trying to fathom what that substrate determined that many spedes of noohuman 
might be, researchers propose that the im- primates will suffer serious depression when 


an instinct toward self-sacrifice for the good melancholy, the afflicted monkeys may en- ecologist at Cornell University. “But if they 


of surviving relatives. 


Other evolutionary biologists suggest that like refusing food until they die of malnutri- 
suicide may not be an inheritable behavior in non. or swinging from dangerous tree limbs 


gage in all sorts of life-tiucatening activities — happen to hit a lake or on the ocean, well. 


they discover too late that they just can't 
make it” 


Fetal Muscle Used to Repair Hearts of Mice 


By Gina Kolata 

Mew York Times Scmce 

EW YORK — Scientists 
working with mice have 
found that fetal heart 
muscle transplanted into 
adult hearts can incorporate itself 
and flourish. 

The discovery raises the possibi!-' 
tty that fetal heart tissue might 
some day be used to patch hearts 
damaged by heart attacks. Adult 
heart muscle does not regenerate 
itself, and so investigators have 
sought a source of new heal thy cells 
to replace those dial die after a 
heart attack. 

Dr. Loren J. Field and his col- 
leagues at the Indiana University 
School of Medicine in Indianapolis 
report in Science magazine that 
bean muscle cells from 15-day-old 
mouse embryos attach themselves to 
adult heart muscle cells and form 
the proper channels for transmitting 
electrical signals between the cells ~ 

The researchers have not shown 
that signals actually pass through 
these channels but they note that 
hearts witii transplanted tissue beat 
normally. Mouse gestation is 20 to 


Mowat portrays himself as a 
grubby, self-sufficient rant. Re- 
garded by his peers as a sort of 
intriguing eccentric, he gradually 
won a small clan of followers in 
ventures such as his “Saskatchewan 
National Animal Museum,” in- 
stalled in the family bouse until his 
parents got wind of it and ousted 
the putrid remains. 

Mowat is an accomplished writer, 
and his lively, unpretentious memoir 
of boyish pranks and pocketfuls of 
decomposing treasures makes de- 
lightful reading. It also explores the 
roots of a sense of injustice [hat 
would incite controversy throughout 
his career. Mowat had a natural af- 
finity for outcasts — human or ani- 
mal — that developed during his 
adolescence in the Depression into 
an acute awareness of the “fearful 
inequalities that exist between the 
haves and the have-nots in the hu- 
man world.” It may be humility, or a 
laudable aversion to pseudo-psy- 
chology. that prevents Mowat from 


21 days and the scientists speculat- 
'd that at 15 days, the tissue would 
be most likely to grow in the adults. 

The finding is aovel said D». 
Donald A. Fischman. chairman of 
the department of cell biology and 
anatomy at New York Univeraty- 
Comell Medical Center in New 
York. 

Dr. Fischman said that much re- 
search needed to be done before 
scientists could consider implanting 
human fetal heart muscle to help 
people who have had heart attacks. 

“It’s intriguing.” said Dr. Daniel 
Garry, a molecular cardiologist at 
the University of Texas Health Sci- 
ences Center in Dallas. He ex- 
plained that when a person has a 
heart attack, blood vessels leading 
to the heart are blocked, starving 
the heart of oxygen-rich blood Ar- 
eas of the heart that are normally 
nourished bv blood from the 
blocked vessels die. 

When this happens, the heart 
tries to repair the damage. Connec- 
tive-tissue cells move into the area- 
and create a sort of scaffolding in 
an attempt to remodel the bean. 
But without the muscle cells that 
are needed lor the heart to contract 


delving further into Ins peculiar un- 
derstanding of the animal world Or 
perhaps it simply can’t be explained 

Self-deprecating wit and occa- 
sional invective against the modem, 
motorized invasion of Ms boyhood 
Eden spice up Mowat’s nostalgia for 
simpler, if no less troubled times. 
Bui be leaves us with a profound 
sense of sadness for the passing, not 
only of youth, but of that uacircum- 
scribed world of the Others that he 
enjoyed as a teenager. 

Camping out under the prairie 
sky in the summer of 1937. Mowat 
and his friends speculated whether 
they would ever again see such an 
abundance and variety of wildlife as 
had passed overhead that day. “We 
were not to be that lucky.” be con- 
dudes. “I doubt if anyone else will 
ever be either. 1 think it is too late.” 

Frances Stead Sellers, a free- 
lance writer and editor, wrote this for 
The Washington Post. 


properly, the organ’s function of- 
ten continues to deteriorate, lead- 
ing eventually to heart failure. 

Dr. Gam* said there was no way 
to restore the dead heart musefc 
cells, and although new methods 
were bang tested to try to limit the 
damage from a heart attack, noth- 
ing could prevent it completely. 
One way to repair an injured heart, 
he said, might be to graft on some 
new heart muscle. 


R- FIELD said that be 
and Ms <Y»ikflgn« began 
thinking about how to do 
this two years ago. They 
made a list of tissues they could cry 
and started experiments to see 
which might work 
The)' began with skeletal muscle, 
taking sections of tissue from an 
animal's own large muscles. The 
tissue successfully grafted onto the 
bean. Dr. Held said, but it failed to 
make the connections needed to be 
part of the heart's signaling system. 

Heart muscle, he explained, has 
an unusual structure that allows 
messages to pass quickly from cell 
to cdL enabling the muscle cells to 
contract in unison. 

Skeletal muscle is very different. 
Instead of being made up of indi- 
vidual cells that communicate with 
each other, its ceils fuse to make 
much larger cells with many nudd 
that work together as single ceils. 
When the skeletal muscle cells were 
put in the heart, they never became 
part of the heart's elaborately con- 
nected communication system. 

Dr. Fidd and his colleagues test- 


Toward Refsafrfng Weakened Hearts 

in mouse hearts, scientists are encouraged iff find that 
transplanted cefe. forth not onty physical connections, 
caBed desrnosomes, but signaling osnnections. called 
gap junctions. ■ . 


FgamsntsnchGr 


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Gap junction 


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Source Dr. Mar* Sooapaaflh&mVnh&^'&a8icftiGiokx&' 


Foment anchor 


■rtstoio&' (Lange) 


ed heart muscle cells from adult 
mice that were cultivated in the 
laboratoiy. Those cells “didn’t do 
anything.” Dr. Field said, failing 
even to attach to the surrounding 
heart muscle cells. 

Finally, the investigators turned 
to fetal bean cells, their third 
choice because fetal tissue is more 
difficult to get and because abor- 
tion foes have raised etMcal ques- 
tions about the use of tissue from 
aborted fetuses to treat diseases. 


blank 'The v-fi V .tt Tinr. 

Researchers are alieady testing 
the use of fetal tissue transplants to 
provide brain cells for people with 
Parkinson’s disease, a progressive 
neurological disorder, and pancre- 
as cells for people with diabetes. 

A scientist in England has pro- 
posed transplanting eggs from fetal 
ovaries to infertile women, and in- 
vestigators in Sweden have shown, 
in animal studies, that fetal brain 
cells can correct brain cell loss (hat 
makes animals lose (heir memories. 


Indians: Science vs. Tradition 


By Eugene L. Meyer 

H'ashrnpon Past Servo* 


A nnapolis. Maryland 

— Inside a dozen locked 
metal cabinets in a se- 
cured area on the third 
floor of the old Hall of Records 
here lie the re mains of more than 
100 American Indians. 

But they rest not in peace. 

The collection of bones, once re- 
garded as a treasure trove of clues 
to life and death before European 
settlement, is now the subject of a 
bitter dispute between scientists 
who want them and American In- 
dians who want them reburied. 
Two years after the legislature 
passed a law designed to accommo- 
date both groups, the bones are off- 
limits to study and are no closer to 
being returned to the ground. 

Further, what state officials per- 
ceived to be a consensus on the 11th 
draft of regulations to implement 
the new law fell apart last month 
after some American In dians com- 
plained they weren't consulted. 

“It's back to the drawing board,” 
said Mervin Savoy, tribal chair- 
woman of the Piscataway-Conoy 
Confederacy and a member of the 
burial task force of the Maryland 
Commission an Indian Affairs. 

At issue are not only conflicting 
views of what should be done with 
human remains but also difficult 
questions of group identity as 
American Indians without a writ- 
ten history, a reservation or a treaty 
strive for official recognition to val- 
idate their claims. 

Of Maryland's more rhan 4 mil- 


Soulh led a diamond to the nine, 
losing to the queen. If East had 
made a club return. South would 
have raffed, cashed the heart ace. 
crossed to dummy with a diamond 
lead and led a trump, making his 
game. 

But East shrewdly relumed a di- 
amond. and South won in dummy 
and ruffed a club. He then cashed 
the bean ace and tried to enter 
dummy with a diamond lead, but 
East ruffed with his Iasi trump and 
the defense still scored the heart 
king and a club. 

Notice that if West’s ducking 
play with the heart king had been 
made slowly, betraying his posses- 
sion of that card. South might well 
have made his game with a cross- 
ruff. He could have cashed the 
spade ace, ruffed a spade, and tak- 
en two diamond winners. Then 
three black-suit raffs and a spade 


lead from the South hand would 
score the heart queen en passant 
for the tenth trick. 

NORTH (D) 

* 5 

OQ 7 B 4 

0 A K 9 8 2 

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West led the dub seven. 


to me is just like a book." said 
Douglas Owsley, a forensic anthro- 
pologist with the Smithsonian. ”lt 
can tell you so much about a person 
— age, sex, race, stature, body 
build, health.” 

“It is through careful study that 
we can determine the cultural affili- 
ation of individuals.” said Dr. Ows- 
ley, who said he has examined re- 
mains of Plains Indians at the 
tribes’ requests. “If it’s going to 
benefit anyone, it's Native Ameri- 
cans, because it’s their past.” 

But many Western tribes oppose 
what they term “destructive analy- 
sis” of human remains that in- 
cludes the taking of tissue for lab- 
oratory study, said Andrew Othole. 
cultural preservation coordinator 
for the Zuius of New Mexico. 

“f can understand the scientific 
interest in it” said Chief Billy Red- 
wing Tayae, of the Piscaiaway In- 
dian Nation, “but for us, it’s not 
science, it’s a religious belief. Our 
ancestors are being held hostage.” 


Exploding Star Keeps Growing Brighter 

NEW YORK (NYT) — A new exploding star in a nearby galaxv. 
discovered Saturday, is growing steadily brighter and may be one of ihe 
most spectacular supernovas in recent years, astronomers say. 

The stellar explosion, the ninth detected this year, was observed in the 
Whirlpool Galaxy by amateur and professional astronomers in the United 
States and Japan. The explosion occurred 15 million veais ago, but because 
of the galaxy’s distance, light from it only reached Earth on Saturday. 

Astronomers said the supernova would not match the luminosity of the 
spectacular event observed in the Southern Hemisphere in 1987. One of 
the nearest supernovas in centuries, the one in 1987 occurred only next 
door in astronomical terms, 150.000 light- vears a wav near the Large 
Magellanic Cloud, a companion galaxy to the Milky Way. 


lion residents, about 12.000 identi- 
fied themselves as Indian in the last 
census. However, no tribes are offi- 
cially recognized by the federal or 
state governments. 

The American Indian remains 
stored in Annapolis come from 16 
sites across Maryland and date 
from 800 B. C„ officials said. Also 
in the collection are non-American 
Indian remains from 1 1 rites in the 
state. Some dug up were donated; 
others were unearthed during exca- 
vations for houses or roads. 

The state law is modeled after a 
federal statute enacted a year earli- 
er. Maryland’s law is more lenient 
in aUowinggroups to establish their 
“cultural affiliation” to remains by 
a “preponderance of the evidence.” 

However, if there is no direct de- 
scendant or if a group filing a claim 
fails to meet the standard, the bones 
will be available for scientific study. 

That, scientists argue, is a good 
thing, for the tribes themselves and 
for the rest of society. “A skeleton 


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International Herald Tribune, Thursday, April 7, 1994 




Page II 



3JHJE TRIB INDEX: 1 10.40fif| 

280 intenmtiQnn^' 1 ^ n ^ >une World Stock Index ©, composed at 
byBoombarg 








Appro*. netghnng- 32% 
Close: 125.90 Pnv.- 124.5S 


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Close: If 0.61 Pwv.: 10920 



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N D 
1993 


A N 
1994 1993 


F M A 
1994 


America 


Appro*, weighing: 26% 

Close 91 .20 Prev 91 .50 


; 


Approx, mining: 5K 
Close: 13221 Prevj 131 




N D 
1993 

Wore iiWax 


The m dm tracks U.S. data/ values of stocks in: Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Betgiun, Brazil, Canada, Chita, Danmark, Attend, i 
Franca. Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico. Motherlands. New Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore. Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Vanometa, For Tokyo, Now York and , 
London, the mdex ts composed of the SO top issues in terms of market cBpitakrotian, 
dhemnse me ten top stocks are tracked. 


Industrial. Sectors 


w«L Pn«. % 

doae do— dangt 

Energy 105 ,30 104,01 +124 Capital Goods 

Utilities 128.90 128.65 +0.19 SwHSrUs 

Finance 11428 113.07 +1.07 Consumer Goods 

Services 11521 115.75 +0.14 ffisceflaneous 


Wad. Pm. % 
daw doe changt 

109.70 109.06 +0.59 
124.96 12324 +1.4Q 
96-56 96.17 +0.41 

12526 123.71 +1.33 


The New Stock-Market Diplomacy 

U.S. Decisions on Asia Reverberate on Wall Street 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — As the US. govern- 
ment weighs revoking China’s preferential 
trade status and imposing trade sanctions on 
Japan, a new factor is creeping into its calcula- 
tions: What impact would such moves have cm 
volatile global stock and bond markets? 

The diplomacy of the stock market is an 
increasingly important calculation for Amer- 
ican officials. Fifteen years ago. the impact of 
foreign-policy derisions on financial markets 
might only have been a small consideration. 
Now, however, it is being taken much more 
seriously because American interest rates, 
growth rates and pension Funds are more 
directly tied 10 Asian and European econo- 
mies and their financial markets. 

A decision in Washington can affect inves- 
tors in Asia, which then reverberates back to 
Wall Street This linkage is especially on the 
minds of officials as the world's markets 
gyrate wildly, as they have in recent weeks. 

“Whenever you have (ins kind of instabil- 
ity it creates caution and conservatism in 
derision mak ers." said David Hale, chief 
economist at Kemper Financial Services. 
“There is so much integration now, everyone 
is terrified of being blamed for causing a 
global stock market crash.*' 

While government officials insist that how 
China handles human rights remains the par- 
amount consideration in the decision about 
whether to renew Beijing's trade benefits, 
dearly the impact of such a move on financial 
markets has to gnaw at them. 

“You cannot have tensions with your big- 
gest supplier of foreign capital — Japan; the 
biggest country hr the world — China, and 


the area of the world that is right now the 
most dangerous — the Korean Peninsula — 
without it having a significant negative effect 
on markets,” Robert D. Hormats. vice chair- 
man of Goldman Sachs Joreroanonai, said 
Many analysis said stock-market diploma- 
cy is already apparent in U.S. de aling s with 
Japan, where President Bill Clinton has qui- 
etly told aides he wants to maintain a low- 

'Everyone is terrified o! 
being blamed for causing 
a global stock market 
crash/ 

David Hale, chief economist at 
Kemper Financial Services. 

level approach to persuading Japan to open 
its markets. 

Stock-market diplomacy is something that 
seems to come naturally to Mr. Clinton, who 
may not have much of a feel for traditional 
diplomatic issues, such as arms control or 
Bosnia, but clearly has a strong intuitive 
grasp of the seamless relationship between 
global markets and political trends. 

As Japan's ambassador to the United States, 
Takakazu Kuriyama, put tt: “He understands 
international economics and the interaction 
between domestic and international policy 
belter than any president I have seen." 

Mr. Clinton's whole foreign policy vision is 
based on the notion that global economic 
growth will be the engine for growth in the 


United Slates and other industrialized de- 
mocracies. 

AO the more reason, then, for the president 
to be keeping one eye on the markets as be 
makes these foreign policy derisions on Ja- 
pan and China. 

But while acknowledging that fact, aides 
insist the president will make his derisions on 
Japan and China with more than just the 
Dow Jones industrial average on his mind. 

Clearly, though, the linkages cannot be 
ignored. It was the threat of a U.S.-Japan 
trade war, after February trade negotiations 
had collapsed, that drove the value of the yen 
up and the dollar down. 

A depredation of the dollar, whether 
across the board or against one major curren- 
cy, tends to push interest rates higher, be- 
cause the cheaper dollar forces (he U.S. gov- 
ernment to offer higher interest rates to 
attract foreign capital to buy its Treasury 
securities and finance the deficit. 

At the time of Lhe impasse, traders said, 
Japanese Finance Ministry officials hinted 
that they would not rule out heavy selling by 
the Japanese of American bonds, which could 
exacerbate the situation. 

It was a subtle reminder to Washington 
that two can tango when it comes to applying 
financial pressure. It also was a reminder that 
in today’s financial markets, what goes 
around comes around. 

“Let’s face it," Mr. Hormats said, “the guy 
who bolds a mortgage in Paducah, his interest 
rate depends on whether Japanese investors 
buy American bonds. And the guy whose 
pension fund is partially invested in Aria will 
be affected by what the president does with 
China." 


Tokyo Offers Worker-Rights Settlement 


For more tnfotmanan about the Index, a booklet is availattla free of charge. 

YJme to Trib Index. 181 Avenue Quotes de GauSe. 92521 Neuifiy Codex. France. 

P International Hwakf Tribune 


By Steven Bruil 

Iniemuioaol Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Japan, acting at the 
behest of developing nations in 
Asia opposed to linking workers’ 
rights to international trade talks, 
has proposed a compromise that is 
likely to prevent the issue from be- 
coming part of new trade roles, the 
government said Wednesday. 

The demand by the United 
States and France stands as the last 
major obstacle to a declaration that 
will accompany the signing next 
week in Marrakesh. Morocco, of 
the Final Act of the Uruguay 
Round of the General Agreement 
on Tariffs and Trade. 


Washington last week threat- 
ened to delay the declaration unless 
there was a commitment to have 
GATT’s successor, the World 
Trade Organization, discuss work- 
ers' rights. 

The United States contends that 
countries that export goods made 
by poorly paid workers have an 
unfair advantage and distort trade. 
France, in particular, wants to ap- 
ply standards that would prevent 
the exploitation of children, prison- 
ers and others. 

But developing countries in 
Southeast Asia, as well as Brazil, 
are opposed, fearing that the link- 
age would be used to force in- 
creases in wages, eroding the com- 


petitiveness that has helped them 
expand into markets in the indus- 
trialized world. 

Nobutoshi Akao. lhe Foreign 
Ministry’s ambassador for interna- 
tional economic affairs, said it was 
“unreasonable" to ask developing 
nations to accept the proposal 
which was made only a matter of 
weeks ago. But at the same time, be 
said, "the United States cannot 
leave Marrakesh without any- 
thing." 

Japan's compromise, he said, is 
to issue a statement that would 
allow the preparatory committee 
overseeing the transition to the new 
trade organization to add items to 
its agenda after April 15. and 


Calm Descends 
On Wall Street 
After Turmoil 


would simply mention labor stan- 
dards as one of the possible topics. 

“Many developing countries are 
opposed even to leaving the door 
open, even without specifics," he 
said. 

“But in practice, without an 
agreement on a new agenda, devel- 
oping countries don't need to wor- 
ry loo much about being dragged 
into a discussion of this matter, he 
said. Since developing countries 
make up the majority of GATT’s 
member states, be said, they could 
overrule the handful of developed 
nations. 

Japan's compromise proposal re- 

See TOKYO, Page 12 


Compiled Ay Our Staff From Dupardm 

NEW YORK —Wall Street sta- 
bilized on Wednesday, taking a 
breather from the recent wild price 
swings as investors reassessed pros- 
pects for strong first-quarter corpo- 
rate earnings and the longer-term 
direction of interest rates. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed up 4.32 points, at 
3,679.73, while gaining issues out- 
numbered losers by a 4- to- 3 margin 
on the New York Stock Exchange. 

Stock investors rook their cue 
from a calming in the government 
securities market, where the price 
of the benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond slipped 1/32 point, to 87 
28/32, ana Lhe yield finished at 
125 percent, steady with Tuesday. 

The bond market was stabilized 
by a Washington Post article quot- 
ing Federal Reserve officials as 
saying the central bank would bold 
off on any changes in monetary 
policy until the financial markets 
settle' down. Only then will policy- 
makers decide whether to resume 
the course of raising short-term in- 
terest rates begun in February. 

Susan Phillips, a Fed governor, 
also soothed the market by saying 
she saw no signs the economy was 
“overheating." 

The remarks mean “we’re going 
to slay here until we have an infla- 
tion problem/' said Michael 
Strauss, chief economist at Yamai- 
chi International (America). 

“The market has stabilized and 
will probably move up pretty signifi- 
cantly," said Thom Brown,' manag- 
ing director of Rutherford. Brown & 
Calherwood Inc,, in P hilade lphia 
“There are no inflationary indica- 
tions around at the moment" 

The tranquil braid market al- 
lowed stock investors to focus on 
setting positions before the on- 
slaught of first-quarter corporate 
earnings reports, which is to begin 
next week. Earnings are expected 
to be the strongest in years. 

But some traders' were edgy 
about the potential for further 
losses after the nearly 10 percent 
drop in the Dow since the record 
high set in January. 

“There were more bears visible in 
Wall Street last week than in Yel- 


lowstone Notional Park." said Alan 
Ackerman, executive vice president 
at Reich & Co. a New York invest- 
ment firm. “This may not yet be a 
decisive turn but a bounce from an 
oversold condition, and it is lowered 
the anxiety levels." 

Stocks sensitive to economic cy- 
cles, such as auto, papers and heavy 
machinery, performed wdl. Those 
stocks were the hardest hit during 
the market's most recent downturn 
after leading the stock market's ad- 
vance this year. 

Tdfefonos de Mexico was the 
most actively traded stock on the 

See MARKET \ Rage 12 


IMF Tells U.S. 

ITs Likely to Need 
More Rate Rises 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The Inter- 
national Monetary Fund has told 
the United States it will probably 
have to raise short-term interest 
rates to keep inflation under con- 
trol and the economy growing. 

That advice is contained in the 
IMF's World Economic Outlook, a 
semiannual report that was being 
considered by the Fund’s directors 
Wednesdav, sources said. 

Although the IMF has no way of 
compelling the United States' to 
follow its advice, its recommenda- 
tions cany weight because of the 
central role it plays in the interna- 
tional monetary system. 

The report was compiled by the 
IMF's stafr about three weeks ago 
and thus does not contain any dis- 
cussion about the recent declines in 
lhe U.S. slock and bond markets or 
the Federal Reserve Board's March 
22 increase in short-term interest 
rates, its second such move in the 
last two months. 

But sources said the Fund seemed 
to favor the actions already taken by 
the U.S. central bank in tightening 
monetary policy to head off infla- 
tion as the economy expands. 


rriONAL MANAGER 


Back to Incentives at Avon 


Bv Claudia H. Deutsch 

,V«n Y< -rfi Timer Service 

N EW YORK— There is a flowering 
plant on Christina A. Gold’s desk. She 
L, not sure whether it is an azalea or a 
hibiscus or what. But she loves that 

B iant every bit as much as the more famfliar 
looms she tends at home. 

■*A sales rep sent it to roe," Ms. Gold said with- 
visible pride. “The note said. Thanks for bringing 
springtime back to Avon.* ’’ 

Avon Products Inc. has gone through a senes of 
emotional seasons every bit as harsh as the past 
winter was across much of the United States. 

In November, after 24 years with Avon s Cana- 
dian division. Ms. Gold was called to New York to 
become the first woman to bead the United States. 
Canadian and Puerto Rican operations of the 
direct-sales beauiv- products company. She re- 
placed Walker Lewis, who had resigned after only 
19 months. 

Avon insiders say Mr. Lems, a former man age- 
mem consultant, ran Avon entirely wuh tus he^ 
Now Ms. Gold is trying to put heart back into the 

pl “Walker was a brilliant strategist.” said James E. 
Preston. Avon's chief executive. “Bui now we need 
someone whose first priority is to reenergize the 

^ Lewis declined io comment, but Avonmsid- 
ers iv i t was no accident that Mr. Preston said ^ 
SSie.- not simply “energize." For five months, 
Ms. Gold. 46. has been reassembling some of the 
employee incentives that Mr. Lew* bad socarefnl- 

* TyS thehist few years, the whole program for 

lu^^hom^ tom to^uAeast 


had abolished. “The push was^ toward advertising 
and chasing fringe customers." 

Actually, though, many of Mr. Lewis's ideas did 
wort. A new toll-free telephone number that al- 
lows customers to bypass the traditional Avon lady 


and buy directly from the company has added 
incremental sales: Avon's new high-technology 
skin-care product Anew, has been successful as 
has a line of skin -care products for men; and 
analysis have high hopes for the tine of lingerie 
products that Mr. Lewis helped to set up. 

Avon's stock, which bottomed at about S19 Eve 
years ago. was quoted at S 57.875 in New York Slock 
Exchange trading Wednesday, down 25 cents on the 
day. The company has stayed independent, despite 
ChartweU Inc.’s attempt to take it over in 1990. 

Avon is in fact still reding from 1 993. when sales 
in the United States dropped 1 percent and pretax 
profit .ank 22 percent Part of the reason was a 
money-draining giftware tine, as wdl as increased 
costs in marketing and sales. But part was also a 
general loss of motivation among the Avon ladies 
— the now politically incorrect term that most 
people outside the company still use for the 
400,000 women who sell Avon products door-to- 
door. 

“Walker had some interesting merchandising 
ideas, but he did not grow the sales staff like he 
should have,” said Jack Salzman. an analyst at 
Goldman. Sachs & Co. Ms. Gold concurred: “The 
sales reps were worried and they were alienated, 
and they simply were not selling as aggressively as 
we would like,” she said. 

During his short reign. Mr. Lewis reduced the 
travel awards, commissions and other prizes that 
sales representatives could earn, stopped sending 
birthday presents to high performers and, accord- 
ing to insiders, even tried to end the practice of 
giving porcelain statuettes of Mrs. P -FJE. Albee, 
See AVON, Page 12 


AT&T Weighs Response to a Merger Roadblock 


By Lawrence Malkin judge said no and asked AT&T for 
Inumadtml Herald Tribune UlOre information. 

NEW YORK — Lawyers and *T Ws “ P*J °J huger 

officials oT America’s largest cellu- “S 1 ®* 01 *>I Bdls to get 

lar-telephone and long-distance restiicuonsUfted [thatprevent them 
companies huddled Wednesday to from intercbmgmg cellular calls, 
consider a potentially major new said R°ben B. Wilkes, acelecoro- 
barrier to SST plais to merge: mtancalionB analyst a t Brown 
Their merger now may have to wait Brothers Hamman ■ 
for a new national tdecomnuuuca- usmgn* leverage j has to challoige 
tions law to emerge from Congress. ^ and whole thmg 

Federal Judge Harold H. ®3 FSat 

Greene, who ordered the breakup . H * s ? d McCaw and AT&T 
of the Beti System monopoly in rnight wm a waiver by takmgthe 
1984 and has in effect been Wing Los Angdes and Houston markets 
U.S. telecommunications poiicy «£ of * e d^ ^ *“1 would 
from his chambers in Washington r ? £ * u “ 1 ^ va *P? 
since then, on Tuesday blocked the ti°tL They widd ab^ slot* to 
$12.6 billion purchase, agreed to S*™* of thor uma. but that 
last summer, of McCaw Cellular «mSbi necesntate BellSouth selhng 
Communications inc. bv American services, 

Telephone & Telegraph' Coip. ™w dotted I the ' mad com- 

Executives of both companies in- my would willingly do so. 
sis ted the merger would be com- 1 President Bill Clinton has pro 
pleted cm schedule this summer, 1 posed legislation to Congress to 
but tire stock market was not so help define the boundaries of local 
sure. McCaw's Stock was down regional and national telecom- 
S1.75 a share at $48, while AT&T muni cations service, with the aim 


partly owned by one or another of ship of 52 percent of Lin Broa ti- 
the regional Bell companies. casting Inc. 

t j >■ „ . _ „ The issue is more treacherous 

Tuesday^ ruling turned mi a ^ n, e problem is that 

Se -!2.'!L 8 , 1 LS h ,T C iL McCaw & agreSnou 10 diher 

raised tty BellSouth, which owns 60 purch ase all the remaining shares 
pCTCMlofltwLos Anjeles Inm- of Lin in 1995 or sell the shares il 
chise and slightly less duo 50 per- nmlUy owni -py, 

cent of the Houston system. choice mates il difficult to spin off 

McCaw is a minority owner in the disputed properties without un- 
both systems, through its owner- raveling the Lin deal. 


While leaving room for AT&T 
and Me Cave to come bade with a 
more persuasive case, the judge 
said the proposed merger raised 
serious antitrust concerns. 

“There is a real danger that at 
least some of the strides, that have 


vMtihsiiuj vmu. » uvk^Hup, — — 

choice makes it difficult to spin off been nude in the last decade would 
the disputed properties without un- be nullified or diluted," he wrote in 


raveling the Un deal. 


the opinion released Tuesday. 


Alcatel Looks Past Current Woes 


By Jacques Neher 

International Herald Tribune 


Mr. Suard said earnings would suffer this year 
because of difficult economic conditions for the iele- 


PARIS — Despite prospects for a 10 to 20 percent communication business in Europe, particularly Ger- 
fall in profits this year. Pierre Suaid, chairman of nuiv and Italy. Bui be said he hoped that profits 
Alcatel Alslhom. said Wednesday he saw a “rosy'” w«dd begin to grow in 1995. 
future as the company positioned itself to supply . H . e P«*kcted Jhal mulumedia would be one of the 
sophisticated equipment for lhe developing multime- *^6 forces of the company in the coming years. 


dia market. 

Already, the company has signed to supply equip- 
ment for British Telecom PLCs video-on-detnand 


Wednesday. 


The legislation has generally 


requiring heavy spending on research and development. 
The company spent 152 billion francs on research in 
1993, nearly lO percent of sales. Jraef Cornu, head of 
corporate development, said Alcatel was “one to two 


Jl.iJ A alUUC 4L 10*10) Wlliic A 4. UU 1 lutuuMvuwvu.’ •. n - ■ « * r u¥<wvi/umii. -•****> « «v %* 

was off 75 cents at $51.25 on of getting it passed this summer, pDot program, as well as 3 years ahead” of its competitors with its line of products. 


The judge acted on a complaint been welcomed by the industry as a 
from BeUSouth Carp^ one of the potential road map for the infor- 
seven regional U.S. phone cotnpa- matron superhighway and a way of 
nies that feared the deal would ending the anomaly of baling na- 
bring AT&T into their backyards tional telecommunications policy 
as a competitor via the rear door of set by a judge, 
local cellular-phone links. Edmund L Andrews qf The Nerv 

BellSouth owns cellular sendees York Times reported earlier from 
in Houston and Los Angeles in Washington: 
partnership with McCaw, so its Judge Greene said Tuesday that 
complaint was essentially techni- the AT&T-McCaw deal raised the 
cal and AT&T lawyers had sought specter of recreating the monolithic 
its riiCTriicsal on technical grounds Bell System because several of 
and asked for a special waiver. The McCaw’s cellular networks were 


Bell to deliver films from Hollywood directly to the- 
aters electronically. In a few weeks, an executive said. 


The potential market for electronic film distribution 
is “enormous” he said, noting that Hollywood cur- 


« r, 1 _ U VUVI lUvtk’i UV OWUi UUII 1 IVIII WM|- 

the French company win announce u is teaming up spends $2 billion ayear to copy films and ship 
with one of the regional Bdl operating companies to them J ^ w movie theater! 
launch a v,deo-on-demand system in the Untied Under Mrs -Cinema of the Future" test, 
5>U5tes ‘ Alcatel will supply a video codec, which compresses a 

As expected, the telecommunications, power and movie into digital form, and its asynchronous transfer 


transport equipment company reported net earnings mode switch, which acts as a video hub to transmit the 
in 1993 of 7.1 billion French francs (SI billion), about Glm to multiple destinations via a fiber-optic network. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


April 6 

Cross Bates D Fl ^ S-F . Y «n c% p*** 

1 ‘ MW SM5* U2H iw- un UWS* 

amturaum io z* 3 “2 mm- iim — sum un =* 

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, ojA. FJ=. Lira D.fi m=. =>■*-. 

■- a S s as-- = 

3U=n tins fl-ws* W" 1 UBa " l1MJ 

JSf f2? Mil win va* u* ^ 


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cauma m amHerdam. London. 

a: To bvr one pound- TB w 
avcUtUfie 

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Peri CorrenW 3JSS S. Alr.rtmd ISM 

InM-tW ClW 1 ereck 1£ t^'i N- Zealand % JAM 7«S7 

l«i7 S3 narw. krone ™ 

S^oi,l. HonW«rt"* ^ PM. peso ^ 

mis ,K polish I WV ffltt 25** 


C turner w* 
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Autfrat-i l^ 1 ' 
AHtr. icnil. iiW 8 
Brazil eras. WS 1 * 5 
Chtaescywa fc£ ’ 727 
Czech koruna V s7 
Ocnitt krone srtcS 

Egypt. MUM 
Fin. markka ZSTS 


OrmACrac. 

SS s 
fj 

Ijrtfiiuiek. 

MMav.rinfr 


Curreucv Wt 
MU. P**a 3JSS 
H. Zealana i L?a« 
Harw. krone ?4M7 
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Polish z WV »iM- 
Porl.euuao ! ‘^ <M 
Ross, roote XTJiM 
€rmet rival Xrnrs 
5no!l 1-S W 


Currency Peri 
s. At. rand 1534 
SL Hot. wan 800JC 

swefl-krono 7J357 
Taiwan i VCU 

Thai MM 2S28 

Twhlablire XfOSl 
UAEdtriMte 2471 
V«MH.Whf. "M0 


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3 ro oatta lyi 4 : »-4 1. 5<A-5ta 5®W/o 2 *---2 

SiRontta M SVs-5Sfc 4-Ha SW- 5V» SM«. 2V. -S 3 

1 year a V. Sta-Sln 3 *«-« m. 5*fc-5V. SAA-6 2 V2 

Soanes: HauUnkUoyas Bank., 

Holes enonmutrio tnterbonk dapositsotfi minion minimum foroauhttUmO. 


Key Money Rates 

UttHed States Close 

Dtscomt rate 

Prime rote 

Federal tunas 

S+nonth CDs 

Carnot, paper IS3 mm *.1B 

3-jaontt Treasury bill *56 

1-ytor Treasury bfll w 

i-yrarTreakaryoolB f* 

5^w Treasury note M] 

7 war Treasury nota 
lOwcor Treesarr note AW 

.36-ytorTreosiaTbonC 
McrrUl LyncbSHtaY fUadvastet 2£7 


100 

1D0 

BankboM rata 

5V. 

SWi! 

4'i 

4’ii 

Coll money 

£O0 

fLa 

Ms 

» 

1-month IntertKmK 

5*1. 

SVi 

353 

341 

tatedSMutaik 

SW 

5 h. 

4.18 

4B5 

6+nanHi IntertMuik 

5 V. 

59k 

356 

364 

10-ywrCllT 

7J9 

742 

4M3 

448 

France 

iBtcrvemiofl ran 



£37 

£56 

M0 

7.25 

541 

642 

£57 

£73 

7.25 

5.90 

190 

Cah nwner 

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6 

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6M 

£00 

34naatti toterbmU 

5 

£00 

6-numth intarheak 

PV 

5 

2£7 

W 

10-year OAT 

6M 

U7 


Forward Rates 

Currency 
Pound SterW* 
OMfSCftCMort '2 j 

Swtufrm: ’ 


Currency 
Coatee® 1 ite*te |r 
Japanese rw 


3a-tm ***** ***** 
usn USB usee 
■ gj -r 10*22 HMM 


3 tun ' ,,, lBnxsx is <; Banco Commirdaie namv 

— — * — 

rwi i pwterxantfAF. 

I Toronto ' iS&* 1 Crt!vfr 


Dtsawnl rate 
Coll money 
r-tnoMi hdertwP l e 
S^noatfa Interbank 
Irmoatn hilertiank 

T» year Oorcn tm Hit bona 

Oeranttar 
Lonhantrale 
Con money 
WnonU) Intefbonk 
SdMeUifAtef'Mak 
frwnth teiertonk 
1 e-year Bond 


Lvac/b Bank fit Tokyo, Camarentrank, 
CrearmoUMOntopu, Crtatt Lvonaah. 



A ML 

PM. 

Ch'ge 

Zurich 

34,95 

38430 

— JJ5 

London 

335.10 

383 JO 

— 1135' 

New York 

38&80 

387.10 

+ 148 

uJ. dollars per ounce. 

London afne/af fix- 

fngs: Zurich and New York wtmkm and dor- 


tap prices; New Tor* Comer fjm») 
Source; Herders. 


New Structure 
At Lyonnais 

Compiled fo Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

PARIS — Credit Lyonnais 
shook up its senior manage- 
ment Wednesdav, creating 
new positions including those 
of group treasurer and heads 
of country operations. 

Chairman Jean Peyrd evade 
said Eric Blol-Lefevre would 
become central treasurer for 
the state-owned bank, which 
lax month reported a loss of 
6.9 billion francs (SO billion). 
Credit Lyonnais also named 
one person to oversee the 
bank's operations in each ma- 
jor country, rather than have 
executives in various depart- 
ments report back to Paris. 

Robert Cohen, the banks ex- 
ecutive wee president and gen- 
eral manager of Credit Lyon- 
nais USA, was named country 
bead for the United States. Ba- 
llard Darmayan, director of 
capital markets in Paris, was 
given chat position for Britain. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


lbesameasin 1992, despite 4 percent decline m sales, 
to 156 billion francs. 


A true collector’s item. 
The only coin watch 
for the connoisseur. 


Glm to multiple destinations via a fiber-optic network. 

He said the ultimate image quality was as high as 
theorigina] films. 


CORUM 

Mattres Artisans dHorlogene 







The Coin watch by Comm, handcrafted from a genuine gold coin. Water resistant 
For a brochure, write to : Comm. 2301 La Chaux-de-Fonds. Switzerland. 


INTERN ATION AJL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 1994 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


Dollar Holds Gains 
But Its Rally Stalls 


Vio Assoewted Presi 


* CiUhfiiled by Our Staff Fran Dupatthct 

■ NEW YORK — The (krflar post- 
ed. mild gams on Wednesday, but 
analysts said that there were not 
Enough bulls jumping on board to 
push it much higher yet. 

; They said that the timing of the 
□ext U.S. interest rate rise and a 

■ Foreign Exchange 

feck of major new data on the econ- 
omy were keeping dollar buyers at 
bay for the moment. 

The dollar dosed at 2.7150 Deut- 
sche marks on Wednesday, up 
slightly from a dose on Tuesday at 
1.7145’ DM, and at 104.550 yea np 
from 1C*4_335 yea 
; “1 think the market hasn’t built 
up enough of a head of steam to 
test the 1.7180 mark level” said 
Adrian Cunningham, a currency 
economist at Union Bank of Swit- 
zerland in Londoa 
! Pan of ihe cautious tone, dealers 
said, stemmed from an article in 
the Washington Post, which quoted 
Federal Reserve Board officials as 
saying they were unlikely to change 
short-term rates until financial 
markets calmed and the economic 
effect of a fall in stock prices and a 
rise in long-term interest rates 
could be determined. 

Some dealers said that a more 


MARKET: Bear Takes a Break 


Continued from Page 11 

New York Stock Exchange, rising ] 
to 58 J .'< in step with the Mexican 
market. In late trading, Mexico's 
Bolsa index was up MS percent. 

Philip Morris fell Vi to 48^ in 
-active trading, burdened by a class- 
action lawsuit filed against the 

U.S. Stocks 

company late Monday alleging it 
knew for years nicotine was addic- 
tive but denied it to keep cigarette 
sales and stock values anuically 
high. 

Smaller stocks were mixed as the 
collapse of a planned merger be- 
tween Southwestern Bell Corp. and 
Cox Cable Communications raised 
concern that other agreements may 
un ravel. The Nasdaq index of over- 
the-counter issues slipped 0.21 
point, to 750.74. 

A federal court ruling that dealt 
a setback to a planned merger be- 
tween American Telephone* Tele- 
graph Co. and McCaw Cellular 
Communications Inc. added to 
those concerns. 

McCaw lost l v« to 48. Tele-Com- 
munications Inc. fell to 20Vi, 
Southwestern BeU lost % to 394 
and BeU Atlantic fell 4 to 49' ». 
AT&T feU to 5 m. 

Casino- related stocks were help- 
ing to depress the market, plunging 
after defeat on Tuesday of a Missou- 
ri constitutional amendment that 


would have allowed use of slot ma- 
chines in that state. Station Casinos 
fell 3 3/16 to 14k Hilton Hotels lost 
3>4 to 574 and Prom us slumped 34 
to 374. 1 

President River boat Casinos suf- 1 
fered with the added burden of re- 
porting a loss for the fourth quarter. 
It was the most actively traded Nas- 
daq stock, plunging 64 to 1 1 } 4. 

Consolidated Freighiways fell 4 
to 264 as thousands of truckers, 
dock workers and mechanics threw 
up picket lines in a nationwide 
strike by the Teamsters against 22 
trucking companies. 

(Bloomberg. AP) 

■ U.S. Car Sales Surge 
U.S. vehicle sales by Detroit car- 
makers climbed 16.5 percent in 
March as warming weather 
brought buyers into showrooms 
and early income tax refunds gave 
them money for down payments, 
according to a dispatch from 
Bloomberg Business News from 
Detroit. 

General Motors Corp.. Ford 
Motor Co. and Chry sler Corp. sold 
a combined 1.07 million domesti- 
cally made new cars and light-duty 
trucks, up from a year ago. Chrys- 
ler s U.S. sales posted a record for 
any month in its 69-year history. 
GM and Ford had record truck 
sales for the month. 

General Motors led a surge in 
share prices in the sector, rising I Vi 
to 584. 




cautious Fed stance had already 
been factored in and that ultimate-, 
ly this could help the dollar. 

On the other side of the interest j 
rate equation, the Bundesbank 
gave dollar bulls a little more hope 
as it trimmed its key repurchase 
agreement rate again by a slight 
margin. Analysts in Frankfurt said 
this was not enough to signal an 
i mmin ent cut in the German dis- 
count rate, although speculation 
continued in some quarters about 
such a move. 

Some traders said the dollar’s re- 
bound from last week's weakness 
bad also been capped by investors 
locking in profits. It might have also 
been partly checked by speculation 
about dollar sales by European cen- 
tral banks. 

Against the yen, the dollar 
brushed against the 105 level in the 
course of the Wednesday session 
even though Japanese authorities 
affirmed their opposition to a 
strang currency. 

Against other currencies, the 
dollar inched up to close at 1.4489 
Swiss francs from a Tuesday clos- 
ing rate of 1 .4470 f rancs and rose to 
5.8705 French francs from 5.8593 
francs. The pound firmed to 
$1.4685 from S 1.4640. 

(Reiners. AFP) 


■ ■■ * ■ ri W V 

■■ • r.V-frl '• v V 




NYSE Host Actives 


TetMex 

GoMotr 

Woiwiti 

Airtoucn 


Annexe 

WelMrts 

RJRNab 

AT&T 

GenB 

Merck 

Pnomuss 

MerLyns 

Exxon 


Vet HkUl 
SUV 

S9V) 
I S' A 
nv, 
5M 

<*Vft 
29H 
26* 
t'A 
S3* 
W'i 
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61 V, 


NASDAQ Host Actives 


VoL Mgti 

LOW 

Last 

Chg. 

125923 19U 

9 'fl 

I3'/I 

— Sto 

40141 23 Vb 

22fe 

7P+ 

—VS 

3*470 1BW 

17Vfc 

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35599 48K, 

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18857 57 

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17816 17'/. 

ISVft 

161ft 

+ m 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Mflh LAW Loti 0>fl. 

Indus 3483.18 349505 365503 3679.73 -632 
Trails 1647.77 163636 1642/3 165108 *3.97 
Ulfl 19747 198.13 195/2 19648 —1.92 
Qjmp 1311-25 1315/2 1303.13 1310.23 +0l22 


Standard A Poor’s Indexes 

Utah Ur* One Ch'se 
Industrials 536/5 520.78 S26B3 —175 

TransP. 402J8 3MM 4MLM + &39 

IMintlM 155/4 154.13 154,93—058 

Finance a5* 42.10 42/9 +036 

SP 500 44943 44450 44JLM- 024 

SP100 414/3 411/4 41632 —069 


NYSE Indexes 


Mata low lu) an. 

Composite 24926 747.08 248.66 +0/5 

Industrials 307 JV 30687 301/0 - 0.02 

Transp. 75X32 25308 25445 *0-77 

■Utmry 208.43 206/4 30724 —026 

finance Jffltii 20447 206.47 + 1/9 


NASDAQ Indexes 

Mata loh Last Chg. 

Composite 751/7 74SJO 750/4 —021 

toSuWrtSl 707.51 781.11 70AM +027 

BonXs 67325 671JJ1 67272 *1/5 

Insurance 88442 878.7? 882- 0B + 1 J50 

Ftotance 87X4B 86923 67X48 + 2/0 

TrarcsE 75X53 748.01 750/D —328 


AHEX Stock Index 

Man Law Lad oa. 
44X50 43948 44098 —001 


Dow Jones Bond Averages ; 


PresRvs 

MCI 5 

Moved*. 

Te<CmA 

ascot 

McCaw 

MWl 

Centacor 
AST 
SunMic 
MJcsft 5 
Cmcsps 
StatnCera 
NwbNfcs 
Ackrim 5 


AHEX Host Actives 


vol High 

Law 

I 

CIlO. 

BS99 4V U 

3 

3'/u 

— a 1 *!. 

7828 I2te 

12 

I2te 

— Vft 

5309 289k 

26Vi 

27 


£145 443/ 0 

44 Vi 

44Wg 

— Vp 

4825 2SV. 

25 

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7 

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66, 

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+ v» 


5blCU& 

Echo Bay 

ChevSft % 

SPOR 

IvaxCo 

Hanvbir 

Vtoco 

OirtMed 

ExnLA 

Amdhl 


Market Sales 

Today 
4 ml 

NYSE 30020 

Amn 1724 

Nasdan 261.14 

In millions. 


20 Bands 
10 Utilities 
I 10 Industrials 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Tafof Issues 
New l-Gghs 
New Lows 


AHEX Diary 


Advmcsd 
Doctined 
Unchanged 
Total issue* 
New Highs 
New Lows 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
NewHitte 
New Lows 


1266 7152 

961 315 

562 353 

3809 2820 

17 6 

76 100 


323 487 

274 175 

219 159 

816 821 

4 2 

30 31 


1651 2509 

1513 879 

1807 1579 

4971 4967 

31 26 

95 88 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 
Metals 

or a* ar-u 

ALUMINU M (Hiph Grade) 

MMmpwnwtriKtM 


E^ wn iaSx ijwo iwlm 5SS 

pSSmrd 131 1 JO 131X00 131i» 1316-00 

CORREA CATHODES (High Gf«»> 

ware i» 

rtrword W9XBQ 189600 W05i " 

LEAD 

DoHonpermelrtctoii _ 

e— t 441,00 44X00 441® ***« 

ISUrt 454J0 455JM 45AM 

nickel 

RhMrd 5565/# 37500 5OT/0 562500 

TIN 

Bfl^owinolTKhM^^ 5«5re54llire 
S47X0O Imre sSreMMM 
Z IN Ct Special Hlsta Grade) 
O^nrtperin ^t OH nsJXj 93^ 

Financial 

High Low Close Change 

WMorrro sterling (liffbi > 

cdum - pts or in pet n . 

Jan 9456 94/9 9450 +M3 

Sea 94 1* 9426 WJ1 + 0.09 

K 94JI6 9195 94JD +0.13 

Mar 9356 9356 9352 +0.14 

5w nS SlS 93.18 +0.17 

9X82 9272 9X77 + 0.19 

DOC 9249 9X38 9X41 +0-16 

Star «21 9XS 9X17 +0.19 

Jim 91.99 91.98 01.94 +0.7 

Sep 91 JO 91/4 91/6 +0.17 

Sec 9152 9156 91 JB + 0.17 

f£rr 9146 91X2 91X1+0.17 

i Esl- volume: 74/51. Open Hit: 477/92 
MMMTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

ST million - pH ot 100 Pd 
Jan 95J9 9553 9554 +007 

Sep 95XG 94.98 94/8 + 0.10 

Dec N.T. N.T. 9437 + OJffl 

nSu 94.17 94.10 94.12 +CL11 

jS N.T. N.T. 93J0 +0.12 

Sep N.T. N.T. 9X50 + 012 

Esl. volume: 557. Open Ini.: 9549. 

MMONTH EUROMARKS { LIFFE) 

DM1 million -ptsollOOpct 


Close area 

99.91 +0J5 

9&04 +030 

101/8 — 0.10 


Job 

*65B 

94/4 

9654 

Sea 

9685 

94.B0 

*682 

Dec 

*£D4 

9696 

94/9 

Her 

9S.1S 

*SJM 

9SJ19 

Jun 

*£0B 

95.02 

9SJB 

Sep 

9687 

94/1 

9686 

Dec 

9662 

94/6 

96A0 

Mar 

9644 

*638 

9642 

Jon 

9626 

94/1 

9 *35 

Sep 

*607 

9606 

9606 

Dec 

91*1 

9X8* 

9389 

Mar 

9X73 

9378 

9X72 


Esl. volume: 10X1 Da Open Inlj 945J2X 
&MONTK FRENCH FRANC (MATIP) 


FF5 million 

- pts of 100 pd 




9618 

94.T3 

94. M 

Unch. 

sea 

9640 

9636 

9637 

+ OOS 

Dec 

94/1 

9656 


+ 0LM 

Mar 

94/5 

94/7 

9471 

+ 007 





+ 0JH 

Sep 

96S1 

9443 

9446 

+ 0iK 

Dec 


9622 


+ 003 

Mar 

*61! 

9608 

+ 04K 


Es}. volume: 47,164. Open Ini.: 2S0J7A. 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) 

E50M6 - Bis « JJtadS O) 160 pd 
Jua 100-31 107-20 108-06 +0-15 

Sen N.T. N.T. 107419 +0-12 

Esl. volume: 79453. Open Inf.: 148514. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND IL1FFET 1 
DMaMNi-pts of lOOpd 
Jun 9736 96J6 97J5 +021 1 

Sep 96J4 96/3 96/1 +118 i 

Est. volume: 134^35. Open InL: 206.901. 
10-YEAR FRENCH ODV. BONDS (MAT IF) 1 
. FFSOMOO-PtsotiaOpct ■ 
v^Jon 12L38 12X78 12X90 +0L26 i 

Sep 12X46 123JJ4 12X14 +024 1 

Dec 12256 12X56 12X44 +024 

Est. volume: 2Z7, 908. Open Ini.: 140259. 

industrials 

High Low Lost Settle dree- 
GASOIL (IPE) 

415. dollars per metric ton^tots of HO too* 

Air 147 JO 14425 14525 14525 — LOO 

May 144/5 14250 14350 14X50 —125 

JUD 144 JO 14225 14X00 14X75 —150 

Jul 14550 14X25 14350 14X50 —150 

Aug 146.00 14475 14S50 14550 — 1JH 

Sep 147 JO 147 JO 147 JO 147/S —075 


Utah lm Last $ettle W« 

Oct isore 14W5 1«.73 IMJO -ore 

May IS2JQ 151/3 151/5 15225 —1^ 

SM 1M50 15X73 15425 15425 — T7S 

job 15U3 15173 134/5 134/S — -25 

iSL NX N.T, N.T. 154-3 —\JS 

NX N.T. N.T. IS.00 — 123 
Est volume: 14213 . Open Int. 124530 

ire. barn-6 

S; M U20 WS 14A5 +OM 

jS 1450 1422 1442 MA4 +0J4 

M 14JB T«4 U$4 U54 UKA 

Aug 14J8 14.44 1453 UA3 — OA4 

o5 {3re u« lJw 1480 -ana 

g k St: St?: gg=g 

N.T. N.T. N.T. ISL08 —008 
Est. volume: 50032 . Open Hit. 164503 


Stock Indexes 

High Lew Close Oicmge' 

FTSE ISO (LIFFE) 

OS per index poior 

Jun 31360 3)242 31332 +6A 

S NX N.T. 315 1* +7X 

oSc N.T. N.T. 316X0 +6J 

Est. volume: 13257. Open InL: 55.941 
CAC 40 (MATJF) 

FF260 per mow point 

APT 3147X3 712X00 313620 +2820 

Mot 214X00 213750 3137 JO +2750 

Jun 2I30JD 210000 21 2D JO +2BJ0 

5«P 2139 JO 2135iSt® 71 37 JO +2X00 

Dec N.T. N.T. 216850 +2X50 

Mar 2200 JO 219X00 219SJ0 UnctL 

Est. volume; nm. Open Int.: an. 
Sources: Mail/. Associated Press, 
London Inn Financial Futures Extdtanan 
tort Petroleum Exchange. 


Dividends 


Per Amt Pay Rec 
IRREGULAR 


MFS Inlerm tnco 
MF5 Muttmkt Inca 
Minorca ADR 
Sabin* RavalTr 
Unilever ADR 
o-approx amount. 


- J46 +15 +29 

- 547 +15 4-39 
a .19 +a 5-ie 
_ .1190 +15 +79 
a 1-39B5 +14 5-27 


STOCK SPLIT 
input -Output Inc 2 tor 1 split. 

INCREASED 

Factory Sirs Am O M +15 5-6 

McGrath RentCorp O .11 +18 +29 

INITIAL 


Amer BncpOHn 
Leaner Corpn 


- .125 +11 +15 

- J25 5-6 5-16 



RE5UMED 

North Am WOtch _ J2 +16 +29 

REGULAR 

Q « +11 +15 
O .10 5-13 62 

M JSS +15 5-2 

M -058 +15 5-2 

Q .10 54 518 

Q J65 +21 5-26 
M MS +15 +29 
M iM3 +15 +29 
M J5B +15 +29 
Q .12 +10 7-1 

_ JS +18 53 

M JB +15 4-29 
Q JB +16 +28 
a-cnaoal; ggaynM in Canodtan fUadfi rt> 
. monthly.' d-auorterly; s-semLemmal 


Spot ConmodHiaa 

Conimodktv Today 

Aluminum, lb 0583 

Coffee, Brut, lb 0/7 

Copper electrolyllc lb ftS2 

Iran FOB. ton 213JTO 

Lead, lb 0/4 

Silver, rroraz 544 

Steel (scrap), tan 13653 

Tin. lb X630T 

Zinc, lb 0445 


Teamsters Strike 22 Trucking Firms 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands of truckers, dock workers and 
mechanics threw up picket lines Wednesday in a nationwide strike by the 
Teamsters union against 22 trucking companies 

The walkout by up to 75, (XK) union members began at midnight over a 
plan by the companies to give more work to part-time workers and use 
trains more often. “Some things you’ve got to fight for, and we've got m 
fight for this,” said Les Gregor, picketing outside Yellow Trucking in 
Spokane, WashingtoDL 

Bul Michael Wickham, preadent of Roadway Express of Akron, Ohio, 
said that using part-timers is “absolutely vital" to reduce costs. 

America West Creditors Accept Bid 

NEW YORK (Knigfat-Ridder) —America West Airlines said Wednes- 
day that Am West Partners* amended investment plan has received 
support from its unsecured creditors committee, in addition to approval 
by us directors and stockholders committee. 

The unsecured creditors’ committee previously had objected to the 
proposal from AmWest Partners, a limited partnership led by Air 
Partners UP. Tbepartners’ investors include Continental Airlines, Mesa 
Airlines Inc. and Fidelity Investments. 

AmWest Partners is to invest np to $244.9 million in return for a 33 J 
percent stake in the reorganized airline. This investment will include a 
$1 149 million equity purchase, plus 5100 million to $130 million of 
senior unsecured notes. Unsecured creditors will be allocated 59.5 per- 
cent of the equity in the company, but they can chose to receive up to 
$100 million cash instead of the shares. Current shareholders will get 5 
percent of the equity plus warrants to buy 6.2 millio n additional shares. 
GPA Group PLC, a secured creditor, will receive 2 percent of the equity 
plus $30.5 million in cash or notes and warrants to buy 1.4 million shares 
of the company’s stock. 

• Continental Airlines said Wednesday it planned to cut about 1.000 
jobs by the end of 1994 as part of its restructuring into a low-cost air 
carrier. The Houston-based carrier said the cuts will be throughout the 
company's operations, which include about 43,000 workers. (Reuters) 

Lehman to Exit Merchant Banking 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Lehman Brothers, in an attempt to 
conserve its capital is getting out of the merchant-banking business, a 
managjng director said Wednesday. Merchant banking is the use of a 
securities firm's own funds to invest in stocks and bonds. 

Lehman is leaving merchant banking because it is bong spun off by 
American Express Co. to shareholders. Without the backing of its parent, 
the company cannot afford to hid illiquid investments, the executive said. 

The securities firm will not raise a new merchant banking fund to 
replace the $1.25 billion pool that stopped making new investments in 
March, said the executive. It will sell shares of companies it helped 
acquire over the past five years and keep much of the profits, he said. 

AT&T Service Targets Foreigners 

NEW YORK (IHT) — American Telephone & Telegraph Co. Wednes- 
day moved to outflank its foreign telecommunications competitors by 
offering their individual customers worldwide calling service while they- 
are traveling abroad. 

The new service, similar in concept AT&T's worldwide data networks 
for multinational corporations, is to start April 18 and would allow 
business and other travelers to dial a toll-free number from any one of 40 
countries and be connected by phone using voice, fax, or computer to 
most countries in the world. 

Joseph P. Nacehio, president of AT&T's Consumer Communications 
Services, said he expected about 85 percent of the subscribers to the 
service would be non-Americans whose home phones would be outside 
AT&T's traditional LLS. market The annual fee for the service is $70. 
which includes separate billing for each call and consumer services 
including individual mailboxes and foreign-language interpreters. 


AVON: Executive Seeks to f Re-energize’ Sales Force TOKYO: Compromise Offered 


Continued from Page II 

the first Avon lady, to the most 
productive ones. 

“The district managers rose up 
like a tidal wave when Walker tried 
to do away with the Mrs. AJbees," 
said an Avon veteran who insisted 
on anonymity. “Women leave these 
figurines to their daughters and 
granddaughters, they are so proud 
of them. Walker just didn’t under- 
stand." 

Still, Ms. Gold and Mr. Lewis 


are alike in many ways. He paid 
more attention to sales reps than 
his "strategy only” reputation 
might indicate. 

But Ms. Gold's budget strategy 
has been the mirror image of her 
predecessor’s. She has cut spending 
on fliers and brochure inserts and 
insists on testing marketing plans 
before rpiting them out nationwide. 
She is plowing the money saved 
into sales incentives. 

Avon had long given its sales 
reps points for sales that could be 


traded for various gifts. Mr. Lewis 
made them redeemable only for 
savings bonds. Ms. Gold's staff has 
rushed to put together a new cata- 
logue of gifts. 

Ms. Gold also has gone back to 
sending birthday gifts to high per- 
formers. About a month ago she 
asked every salaried Avon employ- 
ee, from forklift operators to Mr. 


Preston, to write, by hand, 100 
brief thank-you notes to sales reps 
for delivery by March 19 — de- 


clared as Avon Representative Day. 
by the company four years ago. 

J ennife r Evans, a sales rep in 
Brewster, Washington, says she re- 
ceived a letter of encouragement 
from Ms. Gold when she . is a few 
thousand dollars shy of t 75,000 
in sales she needed to win > 'rip to 
Orlando. 

“Sure, I would have worked hard 
without it, but the fact that she 
took the time to write it meant a 
lot," said Ms. Evans, who did win 
the trip. 


Continued from Page H ■ Pessimism in Tokyo 

im,K. Chances are slim that the United 
SiiratitS Sltta and Japan can break .he 
. • impasse in economic talks when 

A5ia " officials meet in Morocco next 

Japan, for its part is not op- week, a Japanese Foreign Ministry 
posed to discussion of the issue, official said Wednesday, according 
But officials said it believed the to a Reuters dispatch from Tokyo, 
topic should be studied “more qm- 1 am not that optimistic that 
erfjT in the Organization for .Eco- they would find a breakthrough on 
noxnic Cooperation and Develop- the spot, although the meeting 
ment, a body that discusses issues would be instrumental in exploring 
bat, unlike the GATT, has no au- the possibility of resuming the 
tbority to make rules for trade. tafles," the official said. 


■![»• piilii i ■ 

■rh* 

>. I Kih 


WORLD STOCK 


U*S. FUTURES 


Samoa Season 


Demon Season 


Agencc Franco Frmje April 6 


Amsterdam 

ABN Amrg HU 
ACF Holding 
Aegon 
Ahold 
Akzo Nobel 
AMEV 

Bds-Wesscnen 
C5M 
DSM 
Elsevier 
FokLer 
Gtat-Brocades 
hBG 
Helnefceti 
Hoogowgns 
Hunter Douglas 
IHCCatand 
Intor Mueller 
Inti Nederland 
KLM 
KNPBT 
Nedilavd 
OceGrlnten 
Fakhocd 
Philips 

Polygram 
Robeco 
Rodamco 
RaUnco 
Rorento 
Royal Dutch 
■Slorfc 
Unilever 
ivon Ommeren 
VNU 

IWolters/K lower 
; FOE .index : 41181 
■Previous : 40X40 


Helsinki 


Anwr-Yhlymo 

Enso-Gutim) 

Huhtamakl 

K-OJ 3 - 

Kvmmciic 

Metro 

Nokia 

Pohloto 

RbpoIo 

Stockmann 


i» 123 
38.il 38 

200 193 
12/0 10J0 
109 MB 
193 185 

399 387 

89 89 

B9.80 89 

299 299 


Prudential 
Rank Ora 
Reckiit Col 
Red and 
Reed mil 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Rolls Rovn 


XD9 JJ9 
ifl7 us; 
6.14 +11 

548 553 

8.40 177 

19JJ] 19/5 

9.61 9/8 

142 1.79 


Rattuim (unit) X92 185 

Royal Scot AH 4J9 

RT2 X47 8/5 


S EX Index JT7U* 
reytavs : 172X58 

Market Closed 
The slock market in 
Johannesburg was 
■closed Wednesday for 
■ a holidav. 


i Hong Kong 

BX East Asia 3X25 32/5 

Cothav Pacific 11.10 1060 

Cheung Kong 40/s 39/5 

China Ugh IPwr 40.75 40 

Dairy Farm Infl 12 17/0 

Hong Lung Dev 15L30 1490- 

Hang Seng Bank 51 51 

Henderson Land 42 42 

HK Air Eng. 42.75 42 

hk China Gas lv.70 

HK Electric 2180 

HK Land 23/0 


Sainsburv 
Scot Newcas 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 
Shell 
■ Slebe 


M7 835 
164 368 

573 574 . 

4.14 470 1 

1.16 1.14! 

562 560 1 

670 660' 

5.94 5J»5 


: 5mltti Naatiew 137 138 


Smith K I me B 
Smith (WH) 
Sun Alliance 
Tate & Lyle 
Tesca 
Thorn EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
Utd Biscuits 
Vodafone 


3JS8 181 
533 5L48 

334 3731 

A42 468 

2.14 2.14 

10/0 IMS 

263 249 

215 214 

1.70 1X17 

X45 143 

£46 535 


war Loan 3W 4560 44J1 


Weffoome 

Whitbread 


567 566 

5.13 5.16 


WlllkunsHdgs 189 365 

Willis Corraan 223 270 


Clmenfs Franc' 

Club Med 
Elf-Aqullaine 
Ell-Sanofl 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Eaux 
Havas 
1 metal 

Latarge Oxwee 
Legrand 
Lyon. Eaux 
Orewl (L'l 
L.VJA.H. 
Matro-Hachette 
Mlchelln B 
Moulinex 
Partoas 
Pechlney Infl 
Pernod- Rlcard 
Peugeot 
Prlnlwnps (AUl 
Radtotechnkme 
RfvPoulencA 
Raff. St. Louis 
Redoule(La) 

Saint Gobam 
S.E.B. 

5 re Generate 
Suez 

Thomson-CSF 
Total 
,UJLP. 

Valeo 
CAC 48 index : 212872 
Previous :2»U5 


Sao Paulo 


N Broken Hill X4» 332. 
Pac Dunlop £19 501 

Pionwr Infl 104 zn 
Nmndy Poseidon 215 2I8| 
OCT Resources 174 179 
Sonias 197 184* 

I TNT 208 2fl4 

Western Mining 775 7Jffl 
Wesiaoc Banking 4/1 462 

Woods We 4.19 464 

.«ses»ir !, ~i 


Tokyo 


Akal Electr 
Asahl Chemical 
'Asaht Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
-Bridgestone 
Canon 
'Casio 


485 499 

719 701- 

1160 1130 
152B 1518 
153C 1530' 
1630 1610 
1260 T2SB 


Madrid 


Brussels 


AG Fin 

Arbed 

Bar co 

Bekaert 

Cockerlll 

Cabana 

DeltKHze- 

Elecfrabci 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevoeri 

Kredletbank 

Pelrofina 

Powerfln 

Roval Beige 


2700 2620 
4425 4400 
2358 2315 
24850 24000 
185 187 

tasa eoio 

1372 1400 
6150 6140 
1560 1570 
4330 4350 
9S00 9590 
6900 6910 
10100 10100 
3200 31 DO 
5340 5250 


Sac Gan Banaue ttOTo 8320 
Sac Gen Befgwue 2o70 2655 
Soflna 14925 14400 

Salway 14650 U550 

Traclebei 9940 9940 

UCB 22950 22S75 

Union Mfniere 25711 2585 


Frankfurt 

AEG 

AJItanr Hold 
Alfono 
Asko 

BASF 
BavtM- 

Bov. Hvno bank 

Bav Verelnsbk 

BBC 

BHF Bank 
BMW 

Commerzbank 
Conllnenlal 
DalmlarBenz 


HK Realty Trusl 2160 
HSBC Holdings B».5C 
HK Shang Htls 11.70 
1 hk Telecomm ix® 
HK Ferry IDjsu 

Hukh Wtiamcaa 33 
Hyson Dev 24.90 
Janflne Merth. 5360 
Jardlne Sir Hid 27 
Kowloon Motor 15 
Mandarin Orient 11 
Miramar Hold 2250 
New World Dev 27L50 
SHK Proas 55 

sreiux 435 

Swlra Poe A 56 

TaJ Cheung Pro* 1130 
TVE 368 

Whorl Hold 30/5 
Wing On Co mu 13 
Wlnsorlnd. 1150 

K5S aMfc'""" 


London 


B8V 3170 3155. 

Bco Central Hl»>. 30* 2970 
Banco Santander 6470 mvj 1 


Banco da Brasil 
Banema 
Bradesco 
Brahma 


25 26 

1171 1170 
1140 13.70 1 
20X01 205 


Par an a na n ctno 2070 19/0 


Banasto 
CEPSA 
’DragadoB 
1 Endesa 
Eixros 
Iberdrola I 


Tabacalera 

Telefonica 


790 819 
2818 2790 
2295 22701 
7030 6990 

13 1S7 . 

997 990 

4345 4220 
3®W 3640 
1780 1730 
: 32469 


Peirobras 
Telebras 
Vale Rto Doce 
Vartg 


12160 120 
3769 3760 
103 100 

N.T. 164.99 


WtfSZ+teii 14355 


Singapore 


HJ Dl Boncock 
1 Deutsche Ban* 
Douglas 
Dresdner Bank 
Fetdmuehle 

L F KrunpHoexh 

Harpaner 
Henkel 
— Hachtlot 
HoeChsI 
Hohmorui 
Horten 
u IWKA 
u Kail Sals 
Karslad) 

■ Kouftot 

KHD 

• Kloeckner Werke 
— : Unde 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Manrwsmcni 
1 Me la Horse 1 1 
£n Mueneh Rueck 
I Parscne 

SK5X 9 ” 9 

RWE 

— Wieirtmetoll 
Scfterlno 
SEL 

.• Siemens 
I Thvssen 
Vorlo 
r . Veba 
L‘vew 

^Vlog 
'Volkswagen 
— Wello 

■ DAX.iadex : 219178 


Abaev Natl 
Allied Lyons 
Ar|o WhHlna 
Argyll Group 
Ass Bril Foods 
BAA 
BAe 

Bank Scotland 

Barclays 

Bass 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boots 
Bowater 
BP 

Bril Airways 
Brit Gas 
Brit steel 
BrH Telecom 
BTR 

Coble Wire 
Cadburv Sch 
Co radon 
Coats Vlvel la 
Comm Union 
Cowl aulas 

ECC Group 

Enterprise Oil 

Euroturmef 

Flsons 

Forte 

GEC 

Getn acc 

Glaxo 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hhlsdown 

HSBC Hides 

IC1 

ineftcape 

Klnollsher 
Lodbroke 
Lend Sec 
Loporte 
Lavno 

Legal Gen Gn> 

Lloyds Bank 

Marks Sp 

MEPC 

Non Power 

NotWesf 

Nttiwst water 

Pearson 

P&O 

PU ktngj on 

PowerGen 


Banco Comm 

Bailool 

Bene lion group 
CIR 

Credltal 
Enlchem 
Fortin 
Fortin Rlsa 
Flat SPA 
Finmeccanica 
Generali 
IFI 

ItaJcem 
I taigas 
llalmobillare 
Mediobanca 
Montedison 
Olivetti 
Pirelli 
RA5 

Rlnascenfe 
Soloem 

Son Paolo Torino 

{ME 

Snla 
Slanda 
Slot 

Toro Assl Rlsp 

nwSS^iiH* 

Montreal 

Alcan Aluminum 3I»6 31 

Bank Montreal 2691 237* 
Bell Canada 44V, n 
BombaraterB 21 vo 
Camblar 20% »'* 

Casaxtos r*« 7^ 

Domlnton Text A 7k 71, 
Donahue A 25^., 26’* 

MOCMilkm Bl 20% 204* 
Natl 8k Canada We 9H 
Power Corn 2H% 21 pe 


Cerebos 770 775 

atvDev. 7.10 £95 

DBS 11.43 11.10 

Fraser Neave 17 1660 

Gentlng 16 1530 

Gotoen Hone PI 218 214 

Haw Par 114 3.14 

Hume Industries aw 4/0 

Inchcaoe 5 478 

Keppef 9.95 9/0 

KL Keoong 273 268 

Lum Chang 179 165 


5 478 
9.95 9/0 
273 268 
169 165 


Malayan Bonks 235 JU0 


OCBC 

OUB 

OUE 

Sembanang 
Shongrila 
Shoe Darby 
SIA 

ypgre Land 
50ore Press 


1160 1178 
770 im 
7 660 
1170 1DL90 
462 480 
3.70 364 
775 770 
445 £70 
1380 1360 


Sing Steamship 360 370 

Slwre Telecomm 138 374 

Straits Trading 370 122 

UOB 1060 193 

,UOL 1.91 188 

11^,^:2,1577 


Stockholm 

! AGA 417 415' 

[AseOA 592 586 

'Astra A 165 158 

Alias Copco m. ! 

Electrolux B 377 367 

' Ericsson 344 337 

Esselle-A no 5 K4 

Handel iban ken 719 13® 

Investor B 177 171 


Toravlnd. 

! Toshiba 
; Tavola 
Yamal chi Sec 
a: x W0. 

Nikkei 295 : 1H97 

Topbr Index : W8B 
Previous r 1589 


695 665 

765 74] I 

1940 2000 
849 835' 


Quebec Tel 
Quebecgr A 
QuebecorB 
Ttieotobe 
Unlva 
video iron 


23M 23 

30V> 20%. 

aw. aoi% 

214k 20%. 

6'm 

I4'A 1«H 


Norsk Hvdro 232 235 

ProcordidAF lie its 

Sgndvlk B 118 114 

5CA-A 138 130 

KE Bon ken SB 5SJSS 

fkondla F 15B 154 

swmako 187 1B4 

5KF ISO 144 

Sloro 414 402 

Treiiabora BF 98 93 

votvo 649 817 

PJKSS5TGSSS# 


AWtlW Price 
AonicD Eoiile 
Atr Canada 
Alberta Enen 


Alberta Energy 
Am BajTldc Res 
BCE 

Bk Neva Scolla 
SC Cos 
BC Telecom 
BF Realty Hds 
Bromolro 
Brunswick 
CAE 
Caiadov 
QBC 


Toronto 

•rice ine itv. 

Eagle 17 17 

sda 6=ki 644 

Energy I9W 19. 


Ipdg strtoU Index ; 1889.13 
Previous : 185681 


Accor 6«0 693 

Air UauWe 803 622 

Alcatel A to lt i em 673 6M 

Axa 1310 1320 

Banco Ire <Cle) 559 565 

BIC 1371 1394 

BNP 2S7 252.90 

Bouvgues TIM 690 

B5N-GD BSD 842 

Cwretbur 4037 4006 

CX-F. 24824660 

Cerus 13680 13569 

charaeurs 1490 1460 


Sydney 


*'K or 9A5 9AS 

AW 469 480 

onr 16/4 1676 1 

fwal X74 125 

Bougainville 0.90 088 

Coles Myer ijJ SJ?; 

Cwnaico 4.95 4.95 

CRA 10/6 1668 

CSR 4.70 4/0 

[Fosters Brow 1.18 1.19 

Goodman FWd 168 165 

tci Australia 10.40 1070 

Maoelicui 205 205 

.MIM 304 104 

■Nat Aust Bank ujb 1178 

: News Cora J.is J.12 

Nine Network £10 


Canadian Pacific 214» 2l4e 
ConTIreA Illy 1H6 

Cantor 45 « 

Cara 416 430 

CCL ind B Bin 5%< 

anno** 460 4k, 

Camlnco 202* 20Jv 

Conw«t Expi "a z w 
Denison Min B an 0.11 
Dickenson Mki A ^ Wi 

DyMXA M0 XJ0 

Eetto Bay Mines 16% 16% 
Equity Silver A 069 069 
FCA Inti S/B 170 

Fed ind A 7>1 

Ftolcner Chall A 201« 20N. 
PPI 41k 4U 

Gen fro 060 %» 

GoldCora _ 9 

GuNCdaReS 189 199 



Dal Nippon Print 1810 1800 
Dalwa House 1560 1560' 

Dahw Securities 1630 1590. 
Fanuc 4220 4iai 

Full Bank 2220 2200 

I Full PhOtO 2130 21BS 

1 Fujitsu IMS 1030 

.Hitachi 941 914 

Hitachi Coble 794 775 

Hondo 1660 1700 

iru Vokado 5600 5550 

Itochu 703 702 

Japan Airlines 669 657. 

.Kniima 908 905 

•Konsal Power 2680 2650' 
Kawasaki Sred 366 35B: 
r.lrin Brewery 1200 122a. 
Komatsu 947 901. 

Kubota 675 658' 

Kvocera 6510 6500 1 

Matsu Elec tads 1710 1690 
Matsu Elec Wks U5o tim 
M itsubishi BK 2830 2800 
Mitsubishi Kosel 495 488. 

Mitsubishi Elec 605 594, 

Mitsubishi Hev 667 663 

Mitsubishi Cora 1130 1130. 

Mitsui and Co 775 740' 

Mirsukashl 993 964 ■ 

Mitsumi 2140 2140; 

|NEC 1120 1100. 

NGK Insulators taflO hmo, 

'Nlkko Securities 1250 1250 
'Nippon KogaKu 1050 1040 
Nippon Oil 718 7TB 

Nippon Sleet 336 336 
Nippon Vusefl 58o 576 

Ntam 829 817 

Nomura Sec 2250 2210 
NTT 9000a 9060a 

Olympus Optical 1W0 kmo 
P ioneer 2590 M9Q 

Rican 873 855 

.Sanyo Elec 506 498 

Sharp 1690 was 

Shimazv 693 692 

Shlnetsu Chem 1990 1940 
Son* 5990 6000 

Sumitomo Bk 2120 2120 
Sumitomo Chcm 491 488 

Suml Marine 900 878 

.Sumitomo Metal 266 266 
Tofseicorp 665 664 

TalshO Marine 819 m 
Tofcrda Chem 1280 1240 
TDK 4520 4320 

Tallin 489 470 

Tokyo Marine 1220 
Tokyo Elec Pw Ex 3Jf s 

Toppan Priming 1330 1330 



Hees inti 
Hein lo GW Mh»s 
Hoi linger 

Horahom 
Hudson's Bay 
imasco 
Inco 

mterprov pipe 
Jan nock 
LabOtt 
Lab law Co 
Madcenzle 
Magna Inti A 
Maple Leaf 
Marl time 
MrpkRes . 

MacLean Hunter 
MolsanA 
Noma Ind A 
Noranda me 
Naranda Forest 
Noram Energy 
Ntftern Telecom 
Nava Cora 
Oshama 
Pag-jrin A 
•Piccer Dome 
■Paco Polrotown 
pwACora 
Ray rock 
Renaissance 
Rogers B 
Rothmans 
Royal Bank Can 
Sceptre Res 

Scott's Hoso 

Seagram 394* 

Sears Con 8 

Shell Can 38*6 

Sherrill Gordon 12 
SHL Svstemhse lift* 
Souiham 1W» 

Soar Aerospace 1726 
Stem A 8to 

TtHlsmon Energ 30to 
Teek B 24Hi 

Thomson News 175» 
Toronto Damn 2OT> 

T arstur b TOJk 

Transolto Util I41h 
TransCda Ptoe 18 
Triton Flnl A 4*. 
Trlmoc 16V« 

Trizec A O-BO 

Unicorn Energy 1 40 
T3E 3*0 index :«S1 370 
Previous : *0130 


Zurich 

Adla Inti B 225 223 

Alusulsse B new 616 611 

BBC Bran Bov B 1203 1182 1 
Oba Gelov B 933 928 

C5 Holdings B 634 625 
Elektrow B 3630 3680 

Fischer B 1335 1 330 

Inter-discount B 2450 2450 


Jelmoll B 848 MO 

Landis Gyt R 936 990 

Moevenptck B 430 «5 

Neslle R 1197 1189 . 

Oeriik. Buetule R 158 1S5 

Poraeso Hid B 1570 1560 
Roche Hdo PC 7120 TIMS 
Satoo Republic 12619X50 
SanaozB 39X 3900 

Schindler B 7380 7300 ■ 

Suiter PC _ 1004 1012 

.Surveillance B 2190 2196. 
■Swiss Bnk Corp B 420 «8 . 

Swiss Reinsur R 600 586 ' 

SwtSialr R 77© 745 , 

UBS B 1195 1183* 

Winterthur B 715 70s 

Zurich Ass B 1320 1905 

1 fc's&xsr 


33 33K 
SOU, 499k 
27 s *. 27V. 
'5*» I5H 
2448 73P, 

(ua 8JB 
05 0J7 
9U 9*6 
m 7Ni. 
445 4J» 
31 Wt 31W 


TO OUR 
READHM 
IN 

GRffg 

It’s neve- 
been easier 
to subscribe 
and save. 

Just call 

today-. > 

(1) 99-1 9-328 ' I 

in Athens. . 


Via Auodated Preu 


SetBon Season 
Won Low 


Law Oase Cb9 Qp.W 


High 

Low 

Open 

High 

Low 

Cose 

ujb 

942 Oct 94 

11.17 

11/9 

lira 

11/7 

lira 

9.17 Mar 95 

10,98 

lira 

1UM- 

lira 

1148 

1057 May 95 1UB 

lira 

I2W 

lira 

lira 

10/7 JlP 95 

10.99 

lira 

IU.W 

lira 

1140 

10/7 Oct 95 

10.99 


10.9! 

nra 


Mar 96 

1X95 

1695 

1095 

lira 


Oaen rtoh Low Close Chg Op. ml 


Grains 


Est sales 27.113 Toe's, vrti 69309 
Toe's open i nt 

COCOA (NCSE) ID moMc rant- S par tan 


WHEAT 

(CBOT) MOOtsiniinimiim-tManpwlHjstftH 



1368 

978 May 94 

1105 

1139 

lira 

1125 

X72 

X00 May 94 120'J 

347 

1371ft 

346'6 +0raVft 15/59 

1365 

999 Jul 94 

1135 

11(9 

1135 

1154 

156 

X96 Jul 94 131 

136V, 

’A 

136 

*006% 71/31 

1177 

1020 Sep 99 

1157 

1189 

1157 

1179 

157’4 

102 SepM 1311ft 

3JBV, 

131 


+006 V, 

6261 

1389 

1041 Dec 94 

1190 


1198 

1218 

X65 

X09 Dec 94 340 

346ft, 


346'i 

+ L06 

£6X' 

1382 

1077 Mar 95 



1232 


3/64 

33* Mar *5 142 

3464*1 

X41 

144*. 

+ O04fe 

220 

1*0 

Mil May 95 

1262 

1275 

1267 

1274 

£35 

114V, May 95 



146 

+ 004 

1 

M07 

1225 Jul 95 


1295 

1294 


342V, 

111 Jul 95 123V, 

ISO 

X23V, 

130 

+0J5 

64 

1350 

1273 S«P 95 

1319 

1J1* 

1715 

1318 

Est sales 1&an Tub's, sides 11/39 




1437 

1232 Dec 95 

1350 

1350 

1340 

nso 

Tub's open Int 47/73 off 147 





1385 

1385 Mtr 96 

1385 

1385 

1385 

1385 

WHEAT 

JKBOTj SJMi Mi ooAarf Mr busnei 



Est.sdes 

11795 rue's, safes 

9/74 




379>J 259 May 94 340 345 XJWi X4JW *D.0» XDO 

3.55 2 SI Jul 94 X29tt X3SVi 1W 333'* tOJAi 12015 

XHV» M2 V: Sod 9* 131 134 X30W 135 HUH 7.977 

340 XI2^D«Cto 136 341 W JJa 340 «L04M 1/26 

XS3V. X32 Ma-95 U7V, 147V, XJ TVi 34) V* »0JHU 317 

Est sales HA. Tue's.sdes A 967 

Tug's open H 2X079 off 1094 

CORN (C80T) MBeBumInlniwn-diiewSiMrlk>eM 

XMU 238V, MOV 94 2/69J 270 17434 27714 +0JT4 98J29 

3.169, 241 Jul 94 201 7/1 V, 27(14 2014 9-flLOI to, T714NM 

292 VI 240 ’4 Sep 94 270 271 269 270« HUJQV1 26J43 

27314 3-3* 14 Dec 94 240V, 241 250U 26016 *200)5 <6.260 

279V, 25314 Mar 95 266V, 267 V, 2i5Vi 267V, HJJBV, 4,759 

2J2 264V,Muy95 270 270V. 269 27P6 tOJO’A 414 

203V, 249 All 95 171 2729, 271 272V, 144S 

25814 249V5Dec9S 250 251 24»Vi 251 1JI8 

Esl. sales *SM& Tue'u Wks 45.SM 

Tub’s open Int 3H.074 cH 1614 

SOYBEANS (CBOTJ UHSIxj mftVmwrv Oo»ar, DwOu«n*l 

741 5.92V, May 94 654 6J«V, 6J5 650 * 0JM 49410 

7 JO £94 V, Jut 94 6J7 6JV6 6J6 6.50 W ‘OSQ'h 5140! 

135 62* Ana 94 653 654 6.50 Vk 653W *(UQV, 8,433 

64914 617 5epM 6/6 637* 634 637 *001 £000 

7J?'i £5597 Nov 94 631V, 634 650 623W +QJ2V, 32538 

670 618S Jan 95 636 639V4 626 63914 *033 2832 

6/3 S 637 Mar 95 632)4 43414 631 6J4W -20141 597 

£70 630 Mav95 6J*W*0JIW 56 

£73 £31 Jul 95 £3* 630S £36 637 *OJOS 315 I 

65DV4 £01 V, Nov 95 60S 6J5 600 604 *031 1,130 

Est. sales 40J00 rue’s, sales 61313 

Tue'saaenM 153X70 up 632 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CflOT) Whm-oriW.Hrfen 

23200 104/0 May 94 18030 108J0 107.10 107J0 *0.10 24,104 

ZXU» 105/0 Jul 94 10X30 188-70 I07ZO 107.90 +&1S 30J15 

mm 185.00 Aug 94 18730 107/0 IS 6JS3 11730 *030 9. SC 

210.00 1 84.00 5«l 94 18650 1*6.50 1CL50 liSJ» — OJO 7^01 

20600 78220 Od 94 IMJO 18438 1B3J0 18250 -050 3378 

209 JO 4JJOTC94 18200 18120 1BU0 11280 10.910 

snun 11150 Jan 95 IBXen lCLBO 182M TB2B0 — A40 UQ0 

194.M 1 8X50 Mar 9S 1(530 IB5JM VHM 1(450 *210 273 

19X50 IB5J»May 95 18750 18750 IfcUfl 1B600 -030 168 

I80J0 18650 JUI 93 IB7J70 U7J0 187 JO 117 JO <050 13 

Ed. sales auno Toe's, soles 27.779 

Tue’s Open W 88.134 uo 2360 

SOYBEAN OR. (CBOT1 tMMRa-doOanpar IHSh. 

30.45 21 JOlUlav 94 2755 27/4 2752 27/1 *0/3 2S5H 

29/0 2155 Jul 94 2750 27.70 2738 2756 *033 26230 

29/D 71 AS AM 74 27/0 2730 27.19 2739 *030 HUMS 

2X40 2240 Sep 94 2655 77 JO 2650 2750 *032 9.109 

TIM 22.1000 94 46AS 26.15 1409 76.11 *0.17 7,366 

27J5 0.90 Dec 74 2£42 2SJ0 2SJ* 2£56 *0.17 13567 

2L85 2265 JCn 95 2530 2557 2530 MAI -0.16 1579 

2645 2£UMar95 2537 *212 259 

2640 2i ID May 95 2SJ0 2548 2530 7540 *210 78 

2640 2510 Jul 95 2537 -217 56 

Est. sales 25000 rue's, safes 47Z8S 
Toe's open int 97524 up 317S 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMEHI 40000 erv- an, p*r ih. 

82.75 7X20 Apr 94 7752 77 JO 7752 77/1 *232 12912 

7527 7135 Jun 94 7445 74.95 74/$ 74J? *0.12 29^10 

TDD 7220 Aug 94 72JS 7292 72/$ 7210 *218 17,4(6 

74.10 71 J)7 00 94 7X95 7X97 TUT 7190 -DJ2 11153 

7430 7235 Dec 94 7X97 74J0 7X87 7X97 *0J3 2232 

T43S 7M&F*to95 71W 7X90 Tin 7172 *0JB IJU 

75 KJ 7X20 Apr 95 74.90 7500 7445 74.90 *210 216 

Est. sales 84*2 Tue'LWHw llJle 
Tub's open n* 76173 <*l 427 
FEmaOTTLE (CME») «unu.-cirtiHr6 
8580 79/0 Apr 94 8140 (147 81/5 8130 —220 1099 

8440 78/6 Mov 94 8145 81/5 BI/7 >132 -0/8 16B 

BU0 795SAUB98 81.90 8217 81/0 81 JO —0.15 1226 

B1J0 7950 Sep 94 (140 (145 8148 H147 -213 540 

0135 793DOct94 (130 8130 81.15 8130 -210 ill 

88.00 7745 Nov 94 1IJ7 8140 81JD 8152 —Oja 269 

H.90 to JO Jan 96 8280 80JO KUM (200 -0J5 2J 

EDLsaim 1343 Tue't. safes 1388 
Tub's open M 11422 oH USB 
HOGS ICWER) AMBL-MlMri 

51/2 3957 APT 94 4fJJ 4647 4640 4647 -945 3,751 

56/7 45/7 Jun 94 5X50 5272 5230 5245 -037 15,730 

5537 *£30 Jul 94 51/5 51.92 51J5 51.72 -4)30 4,969 

5340 4635 Aug 94 4U5 49/8 4937 4935 —0.15 2,911 

49/5 43400c! 98 4165 45/5 45j0 4557 -0J* 1,764 

KUO 4X30 Dec 94 4535 4610 4577 41B7 —0/0 2321 

nan 4M0Feb9* 4640 4£« 4£20 44/S —A IS 261 

**aa 4X90 Apr 95 4440 4445 4430 4435 — OJS 1S2 

SI JO 4*40 Jun K *70 «7B 4840 -fee! — OJS 33 

Est. safes +647 TUB'S. Idles 4362 
Tue'saaenM 31380 up 152 
PORK BELLES [CMER1 «MtB6-mmiaertL 
61 JB 4X50 May U 5440 54.70 5X47 5185 —1.47 4JI3 

62JB 3930 Jul W 54.75 5490 5X80 5430 —140 1909 

J9JO AHAugM 5250 5270 51.65 5135 -U2 616 

<1.15 19. 10 Feb 95 56/5 56/7 5625 56JD -0/7 106 

6QJ0 3460 Mar 95 5635 5635 5625 56/S . -0.75 ID 

613D $9/0 May 95 $645 5665 5645 57J0 8 • 

, Esl sales +(15 Tue-tsoes ijm 
. Toe's oPenW </$1 up S 


COFFEE C (NCSE) 

90JB 6X75 Mav 94 8040 8X30 toJO 8KB *2/5 26177 

87 JO 6490 Jut 94 8M5 8495 8130 8470 *265 15.595 

•69 66»5e094 82/0 8425 17.40 8400 424$ 6821 

9180 77. ID Dec 94 B6JD I7J0 8480 8735 *235 +131 

>8610 7X90 Mar « 16118 8650 8665 86*5 4 258 1/98 

8610 8Z5DMOV95 89-50 i2J0 284 

89 JO 8530 Jul 95 9030 +2JB 16 

(9 JO B9 JO Sep 95 91 JO 1 235 T 

Est safes 19,975 Tub's, safes 6520 
Ttafseoenkt 56437 oH HI 
SUGAR-WORLD II (NCSE) (izaaaM.-aMNPW+ 

1247 630 Mav 94 11.15 1138 1143 1U6 *033)6441 

1250 9.15 Jul 94 11-53 1142 1142 I1J0 *615 41/54 


I TUB'S ooen int 86464 up 171 
ORANGSJMCE (NCTNJ lUBftkn.- crrVspva 
13690 89.00 May 94 lSl/0 10150 101/0 

I3SJ0 101 JO JUl 94 10600 10650 ID5J0 

13650 10650 Sep 94 107.90 11130 107.90 

13400 10680 Nov 94 18600 ISMS 10600 I 

132JB 10X50 Jan 95 109/5 11200 109 JO 1 

12425 HKJ0MJT95 11200 J13J0 11200 I 

ESI. safes X0Q9 TWS sales 4251 
Tue'sopenlnt 20487 up 72p 

Metals 

M GRADE COPPBt (NC MX) 160081*- am 
9X25 74JBAarf4 6695 86.9S 85/5 

1DX20 7X60 May 94 87.10 8735 B£>5 

91/0 7610 Jun 94 

10295 7420 Jul 94 8740 87 JO 8650 

10X30 7490 Sep 94 B740 8740 86J0 

101.90 75.75 Due 94 87JO *7.50 86.00 

(040 7690 Jan 95 87/0 B7/0 B7/0 

99 JO 7U0Feb95 57 JS 87 JH 87 JS 

107 JO 7X00Mnr95 87/0 (7/i 87 JO 

91/0 71.85 May 95 87JS 87/S 87*0 

91/0 78.00 Jm 95 (600 8600 B600 

9135 7630 Aug 95 

91 JS 79.1BSep»5 8040 8840 8620 

90.15 76200095 

8830 77/5 Nov 95 

91.93 8130 Dec 95 8675 NJO 867S 

89 JO 09JDJW1H 

Est. safes 16000 Tue's. safes 6606 

700*6006011* 60417 off 2910 

5ILVER (NCMTO UMlWK-cMiDgrlnitgL 


+ OLIO 36909 
■*618 MJ19 
•111 1.966 
*618 1365 
*614 3S6 

♦ 614 S 


*24 2X507 
*22 25405 
+ 22 16532 
+20 7474 
*24 16561 
+24 54*7 
+23 2423 
+24 751 

+25 324 


*3-70 7/73 
♦3/5 7488 
*170 2,114 
♦+U 1,157 
*4J0 2.109 
*130 346 


—120 695 

-140 30407 
—125 735 

-120 15/38 
-1/0 4468 

—1/0 4/54 
—1/0 106 
—120 

—1/0 1,780 
—140 sn 
—140 449 

—120 

—140 300 

—1/0 177 

—1/0 

—140 239 

-140 JB 


M/30 90/10 Jun 95 9X760 9X840 9X700 93410 + 50197,543 

MJ20 91 410 Sep 95 93JS0 73/50 9X400 9X520 +60163441 

Ma» 91.1(0 Dec 95 9X240 91240 9X080 9X200 * 60129.74$ 

94/20 90.750 Mv 96 9X130 91148 92990 9X110 *40119.39* 

Est sales (A Tuft safes 642,190 
Toe's open ini 2463423 UP 12243 
BRriBHPOUND (GMER) ip*r»ound- 1 pom mum uunai 
1-5131 1.447* Jun 94 U610 1.4*30 14542 M64B *52 42463 

14980 1.4440 Sap 94 14610 IA630 1.4580 1.4614 .a 

1-4950 1.4500 Dec 94 1.4393 *52 jj 

Mor96 1.4580 *52 1 

Est. safes NJL Toe's, sales 22/99 
Tie's open int 4X406 UP 62S 

CMMJMMDOLLAR (CMSt) 1 meM. 10006- 

0/805 0/1 13 Jun 94 a/200 0J23S (L71B3 0/189 -73 40J26 

0/7« 0/068 Sep 94 0/185 07102 0/148 X71S2 -23 1.759 

0/670 0.7038 Dec M 0/160 07170 0/120 0.7125 —33 I.1J0 

8J405 OJttJOMar 95 07145 fl/150 0J388 0.710 —23 603 

07522 KOTO Jun 95 0/072 0-7075 07072 0/077 -23 SI 

EsLiafes 8LA. Tug’s, safes 11^31 
Toe'S CpenJnt 43/74 att 405 

GERMAN MARK laiERI S oer rrvrk- \ tx*r+*ciuaft S04D0I 
0A133 OJOTAmM OJS09 0LS83* 26*02 26811 *4 9X918 

06793 06904 06787 Q6796 +S XS86 

a ®° 250 0J7W '* "B 

_ . . .. . . _ 06804 * 3 610 


—23 1,759 
—a 1.130 
-23 603 

—23 58 


86133 25607 Jun 94 25809 25934 26902 26911 

04065 06400 Set) 94 067*3 25904 26787 26796 

06953 25590 DftC 94 06795 

_ . .. . 06804 


EsL safes N-A. Toe's, sdes 71619 
Tue'sapennt 96/32 up 1034 
JAPANESE YE H (CMEHJ * — .■>. 1 mIm— 
M0»«BM71JunM 0 ^12200967^JI075400J»9«1 -3 44.520 

MOWOOBjmMKep 94 ^WO JXWMSnjItWOSOXWSM —5 21S 

OOWOOIUXW? 4TOOWWOJM971 9 -6 448 

Est. soles HA. Tue'kscles 29/02 
rue's open int 67,ioi up 792 

FR ^Jt£. fLMER) spwtmc- tpsuieauaKgucoi 
0/H5 26590 Jun 94 06077 20976 0.6(78 06900 +7 34,247 

S-JISM wras 0J922 Qino 2lS5 .7 m 

0/130 86950 Dec W 0492* *7 « 

Ert-satos NA Wi soles XJK f7 * 

TWsaPMafl 34614 att 2376 


5710 

5)80 Apr 94 




549/ 

5*3-0 

3710 May *« 5530 

357/ 


BIO 


54*0 Jun 94 




43X0 


371.0 Jul 94 

5570 

5620 

5450 


5*05 

3765 Sep 94 

5660 

S6SJ 

5510 

5i VU 

5970 

3800 Dec 9< 

56*0 

57X5 

5570 

5665 

5640 

4010 Jar t5 




4663 

UMO 

416JMar9S 

5710 

57X0 

5610 

5760 

1065 

4180 Mav 95 

5710 

5750 

57X0 

5396 

BOO 

4200 Jul 95 

5850 

5B10 

5780 

5B£J 








5KODK9S 

8000 

6060 

5990 

600/ 


JWIV6 






+ 250 1057 
+ QJB 

+240 nstt 
*040 9/47 
*238 im 
+ 230 14.166 
+ 238 X7BB 
*235 +262 
+030 5.T3S 
*030 75* 

*233 

*230 4487 
+220 


Esl. safes 2US® Toe's, sales 70.1S2 

Tbe'SOPenM 117410 aft 733 

PIATNUI* WM e B | «im 4M4MI W prime. 

33600 Apr 94 *6-00 407.00 40X00 409. M #140 727 

437 JO 36760 Jul 94 *9 00 41300 405/0 41270 *238 22943 

43340 3*2000094 «9.00 41208 40760 41240 * 270 1414 

42968 374-BO Jan 95 41200 41208 41200 414/0 +270 6M 

<2208 39200 Apr 95 41100 41L00 411JH 41L* *730 857 

Est. SPfeS 219ft Tee's. SWes 3422 
Tue'saoenint 22762 oil 333 
SOLD (NCMX) MmveL-dolknHriiPyar. 

<1250 335/0 Apr 94 38250 38£80 38340 

39260 37250 May *4 

<17/0 33940 Jim 9< 38640 389/0 385-30 

41540 0*1 60 AU0 04 389/0 39040 38210 

<1740 3444000 M 39140 3*140 391.60 

47660 30.00 Dec 94 79500 397.10 39280 

41140 34360 F*b *5 

<1740 36460 Apr 95 401/0 40160 *1/0 

<7260 361 30 AriVS 

41250 38050 Aug 95 

<1X38 412300095 

<39.00 <0240 Dec 9S 41640 41640 <1640 

43250 43250 Feb 96 

Est. sales MAX Toe's. safes 32m 

Toe'S open Ini 1326** Oft 4B75 

Financial 

US T. BILLS (CMER) SI mdton. pa tt IN act 

96/6 9547 Jun 94 T4.00 9640 9£*7 9£*B + OHS <2996 

96* 9U7SepM 9S65 9SJS 9£42 *1* *0M 9425 

«£12 9290Dee94 9548 9£0* 9295 9541 #UH XB37 

53.75 94.63 Mar 95 M73 « 

Est. soles HA Toe's, sates */6i 

Toft'S OPen W 52648 up 1*7 

3YR.TREASJRY (OOT) IIOOPOODrin- oHS, Dnoiof IMdct 
11MB 1M-23 JURWW4I 1B5-J15 WW19 I0M4S+ 06 177,906 

110- 19510+06 Sep *<10+26510+ 295 10+14 10+99* 065 4(5 

Escsaies 64/00 Tue’s.saies 67403 

TUft^OPCnH 178/91 Bit. 3175 

10 yr. treasury icbctj ueu>scnn-D*is.B)vMg>ixih9 
115-21 103-00 Jun 94105-17 105-28 10+26 10^19+ 07 3X15* 

J 15-01 103-30 Sep 94 10+14 106-23 103-27 10+18 * 0) 2077 

11+21 HU-00 Dec 96103-14 103-22 10X04 103-19 * 07 678 

111- 87 101-09 Mor 95102-39 102-29 102*12 HU-25 + 07 11 

105- 22 103-22 Jim 95 109-0 ♦ V ) 

Est. safe* 12X000 rue's, safes 173409 

Tu*ri aP*l frit 339,123 M 12268 

USTRB*WRY BONOS (GMT) npa-fM*40+4Ms8iZtadftDiHBpa, 
119-99 9146 Jun*4 105-00 105-10 10+04 105-00 • 0* 420.743 

11+36 10*11 5«P 94 10+01 10+13 18+0) 1D+B3 + OS <2,971 

118-0 *1-19 OocWUn-13 103-30 102-19 10J-12 + OS 30/27 

11+20 188-10 MorVSI 02-02 102-13 101-31 189-21 * 05 1.171 

11+19 IMS JuoK 192-0 ♦ 05 69 

I IMS W+B Sep M 101-14 10M9 101+01 101-19 * OS 13 

113- 14 108-23 DftC 93 101-03 + 05 31 

114- 06 99-04 Mar 96 708-71 + 05 V 

EA SOWS 578/00 Tuft'S, safes 621.552 

Tue's open Ini <9X897 up *51 i 

MUNPCF’AL BONOS (CBOT) tiggh ™g.-po£ nncniV uepa 

106- 07 87*06 JunM 89-26 90-08 89-03 90-04 * 23 04.7*5 

M-17 #4*12 Seojl 89-03 89* IJ 8849 89-10 • 23 174 

Esl. safes 10/00 Tuft's, sales iiae< 

TlMfSOOenM 36,969 up 283$ 

EMMOOLLARS (CMER) ti mBfem-onoi left net 
, S JWI 9tm 95/98 95J50 + 500X780 

9X570 9B/60 Sep 94 W.940 95JB0 94.900 944*8 * 60367/38 

«■!« W/19 P«C 9 4 94/40 96*40 912I0 963*8 +60797/47 

nsm 98/40 MOT IS 96150 96178 96020 96138 +58253,917 


*5048X780 
+ 60367/38 
» 602*2/47 
+ 58253,917 


Industrials 


2«J***** .TUftHs.-oj+mfl 1 

2-S JS-J! 76M 7605 76/5 + 0.92 19/49 

fl0»15 58*30 Jul 7(uOQ 77.15 7 4B ) 77 JH *n K ic jaq 

g-222.?. ri*» ;8S 

JJ9! S’SSr*'?! 70 - ,a hl-15 70.00 70. »5 i £45 1X052 

Urn SPSS'S 2-5 710 31,11 71-7$ *DJ3 m 

7130 nJ ° 7X00 72J0 -0J4 » 

7600 78J0Jul*S 7J.K1 in ,r nS 

EA safes 2X000 Tine's, safes 15.71? 58 

Tee's wen lie S62M m W 

HATING OIL fNMERJ 43^53 Bot.4wwp.oot 

S-2 41.0OMcy M 45.85 JX8S 46*0 4SJ1 -401 50.73 

saoo 41 AO Jun 94 45/8 *5_50 mm Zi, 71 2, Jilt 

5X60 4270 Aug *4 46.15 4645 4&.0B m n h i, jS 

S'+n luaSrEStt* 4730 47^Jfl — 077 

57/0 46HOd 9< 4 8 *5 48/0 43/5 48.48 n 17 nnci 

Sm S' 30 *-* S * > ' t3 —622 

SWM 46/0 Dec 94 Win en-w ®«j aim inw™ 

~jf nm ~ tLJ> * as 

SJJO 5100 51 ,fl 51 - 00 -0/7 9.MS 

S£M 4UUAPTM 5b8 

2® ft00WOY« 4X55 48J» 48JS 48J8 I«J2 

31J0 46/9 Jun 95 48,13 fl 7 7 oil 

5026 47/5 Ju IIS Sm Si 

. 4MSSep9S Ss zSS 

EsL safes 32.445 Tub's, sales 35/77 
Tuft'S open im 17X999 anKM 
y£ nrSW 31I£” JDe tNMERI iAMbol. oans, w, im 
TO® 1X90 May 94 ISJJ is^g ix*! 15.77 .dinning 

%% IHi is£ itw .ao?^S 

2"™ Inua^^l, !H? 1 * , 05 1560 1£B4 +0J1 41/7* 

SJb IKS }f w riS 

ijJeffSi: *0-00 16-OS 1 1£80 1£00 +0JTI 2X111 

J+6S0094 1601 1604 IS.90 1£08 *101 1X213 

5m M 1 10-H ISAS I6J7 *O0t 9/78 

£16 16/7 16 07 I £26 -OO 2£» 

]W 1 £15 Jon *5 1£25 16/4 16/0 16/4 -Bill TTS 

!?-« 1*^ 16/5 i£S iu ;“! Siw 

1 pH “ “ “ g ;ss 1 

I 111 1 1 ^ k is: - 

I III ” « “ | ® J 

EAJOfel 96 sm Tue-x sates 13X829 -aln 

Tutf*& OQen I'll *tt7.4£A off 707i 

TWfm BT?pre»* 

as afisrS 8 IS 

««SSn« ItiS «« SS ziw I'isa 

Tue-s Stees 37,955 _A,J 150 

Tuesooenmi Ii*,i3> up ■» 

Stock Indexes 

rsi;] ITass six 

Tue's cuen kn in/iT up *s '™ 

m " WJ, 86S®!MBaa4B 


-4/1 50.738 
«UU5 
— 0/2 79,705 
—0.22 11/67 
—032 9/39 
-0/3 6/51 
-0/2 £090 
-632 UU*B 
— 0/7 6585 
—0/2 3.845 
—0/7 Ml* 
—0/7 *73 

— 032 

—0/7 50) 

-631 WO 
— 0-37 
-0/7 


+ XtJl 9X039 
*0.01 79/54 
*0.01 41/73 
*0/1 2X644 
+ XD1 2X111 
+ X01 1X313 
♦OLfll 9/78 
-0/1 25/22 
+ (£01 8/13 
+281 £505 
*201 7/Afi 
+XB1 

♦ 201 6179 

♦ 0.01 1£7<7 

+8/31 2X4 

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rgd 

*21* 56537 
+21* 3X380 
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•OJW «J34 
— WS 6065 
—0.11 i.124 
-21! 2J03 


Moody's 
Rtuiera 
DJ. Futures 
Com. Research 


Commodity Indexes 

Close 

13*00 

. 14003 

T . 22127 


Previous 

NA 

1J2&J0 

139.90 

234/8 


1 - 






■H 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 1994 




Page 13? 

EUROPE 


Turkish Plan 
Fails to Halt 
Slide in Lira 


Bundesbank 


Bugatti Weighs New Issue ^ 

Luxury Carmaker Looks to Wall Street Edge Lower 





CcnpiUd by Our Staff Fnan DUpauJm 

— ^ ie ^kes on 
the Turkish lira failed on Wednes- 

day^ the curacy suffered a 19 
Potent fall against the dollar and 
traders forecast further drops. 

After an effective 28 percent de- 
v ®J uau °“ °f the lira on Tuesday 
when Prime Minister Tansu Ciller 
announced emergency economic 
measures, the dollar rose 7.500 lira, 
to end at 39,500, on the interbank 
market on Wednesday. 

The lira, which was devalued 12 
percent against the dollar on Jan. 

. 1 “®s lost 60 percent of its value 
since the start of the year. 

“The market has spun out of 
control.’ said Ismail Yantk, trea- 
surer at Turk Ekonomi Bankasi. 

15 a situation. Banks 
can t cover themselves. There is a 
lack of dollar supply.” 

Traders said the dollar’s latest 
spurt was prompted by the central 
bank s decision on Tuesday to ease 
its grip on the lira and let its official 
rate float in line with the market. 

The bank’s decision followed an 
economic stability program an- 
nounced by Mrs. Ciller, who said 
she expected the measures to help 
restore confidence in the lira within 
days and curb inflation, now at a 
two-year-high rate of 73.4 percent. 

A further drag on the lira tanvi 
from large falls in overnight inter- 
est rates to 90 percent from a peak 
of 1,000 percent last week. 
Sky-high interest rates have 
brought industrial output to a 
standstill in the first quarter and 
forced many companies to liqui- 
date their assets and lend money 
overnight to banks. 


After Renault, 
Volvo to Focus 
On. Core Units 


STOCKHOLM — Volvo 
AB. stung by a failed marriage 
with French carmaker Renault, 
said Wednesday it would con- 
centrate more on its car and 
truck divisions in the future. 

Chief Executive Soreu Gy 11, 
who ousted Pehr GyOenham- 
mer four months ago as the 
Renault link-up went stair, said 
Volvo “must be guided towards 
the company’s core activities. 
The truck anil car division must 
get full attention.’’ 

Volvo posted a net loss of 
3.47 billion kronor ($438 mil- 
lion) in 1993, largely due to 
huge costs involved in dissolv- 
ing the ambitious cross-owner- 
ship deal with Renault. The 
loss occurred despite a 34 per- 
cent increase in sales. 

Mr. Gyll market conditions 
for car and truck sales re- 
mained difficult. 

He gave no indication that 
Volvo was considering quitting 
other activities, such as its 28 
percent stake in Pharmacia 
Biotech AB and its majority 
stake in Branded Consumer 
Products .AB. the former food 
operations of Prcwordia AB. 


Mrs. Ciller’s belt-tightening ‘ 
package included ingredients econ- 
omists had long urged: price in- 
creases of up to IGO percent in 
state-sector monopoly goods such 
as petroleum and sugar, along with 
tax increases, layoffs at govern- 
ment-owned companies and in the 
government, and privatizations. 

The program sparked protests on 
Wednesday, especially in Istanbul. 

Several thousand truck drivers, 
tax-office employees and wenkers 
gathered in various places in Istan- 
bul, critkz&ng the government and 
demanding Mis. Ciller’s resignation. 

The taxageocy employees’ union. 
Turn Malrye-Sen, said the govern- 
ment was trying to “destroy demo- 
cratic freedoms to be able to cany 
out these anti-worker measures.’* 

In Gdcuk, in the west of Turkey, 
about 8,000 people demonstrated, 
calling on Mrs. Glia' to resign. They 
included shipyard workers, civil ser- 
vants and workers from a petro- 
chemical plant that is to be dosed. 

Yet the sharp fall in the Bra made 
it uncertain if Mrs. Goer's program 
would be sufficient to restore confi- 
dence in the economy. “If these 
measures were taken a few months 
ago. then the central bank would 
nave got enough dollars to control 
the market,” said Mr. Yank. 

Central bank reserves shrank to 
$4.7 billion for the week ended 
March 25, down from $7.7 bdhon . 
on Dec. 31. 

Stocks rose, however, with the Is- 
tanbul exchange's index up 7.7 per- 
cent, at 18,858.17. In lira terms, the 
market has gained 39 percent in the 

last five sessions. _ , 

(Reiners, AFP) 


By Jacques Neher 

Inumwonat Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Bugatti Automobfli SpA, the Italian 
carmaka simultaneously trying to revive the Bu- 
gatti brand and resuscitate Group Lotus of Eng- 
land, is facing a cash squeeze and might attempt a 
stock offering on Wall Street thus summer, a com- 
pany executive said. 

Mario Baibieri, vice chairman, also conceded in 
an interview that since last fall, Bugatti has been 
100 percent owned by its founder, Romano Artioli, 
and his fam ily . 

In an International Herald Tribune artide about 
Bugatti last month, Mr. Artioli, a former Ferrari 
dealer, had d aimed that be held only 18 percenL in 
the carmaker, with the r emain der owned by Lux- 
embourg-based Bugatti International, whose stock 
be said was split among five European industrial 
groups be would not identify. 

In the later interview, however, Mr. Barbieri said 
that Mr. Artioli had been a majority owner since the 
company’s founding in 1987. but had sought to 
downplay his personal holdings in public because he. 
wanted to focus attention on the car — which sells in 1 
Europe for around $450,000 — rather than on 
hirosdf, and because of his “Calvinistic” nature. 

“You will never find Artioli aboard a private 
yacht or playing in a casino.” Mr. Barbieri said. 
“These are distractions which are completely alien 
to his nature." 

He said that, following the acquisition of Lotus 
from General Motors Corp. last August, Mr. Ar- 
tioli “exercised options” to buy out the other 
shareholders, whom be described as suppliers to 
the auto industry. He said Lotus, which offers 
sophisticated engineering services to the auto in- 
dustry, would have been affected in the market if 
its customers suspected the company was in the 
hands of their competitors. 

BugpttL based in Campogalliano, near Bologna, 
says it has invested i 30 bflhon lire ($80 million) to 
develop and build tbe two-seat EB-1 10, the fastest 
touring car m the world, with a lop speed of 219 
miles (350 kilometers) per hour. The company 
hopes to bring to market next year a high-perfor- 
mance luxury sedan called the EB-1 12. 

The company recently appointed CS First Bos- 
ton Inc. to advise it on either a debt or equity 
financing p lan, and it engaged Price Waterhouse & 


Co. to prepare the company’s accounts for an 
outside fund-raising exercise. 

Though a financing decision is not expected yet 
for several weeks, Mr. Barbieri said he envisioned 
making a public offer on Wall Street for perhaps 
20 percent of Bugatti's equity, although he could 
not quantify tbe amount he hoped to raise. 

“We don't need a lot of money — we’re not 
desperate,” he said, adding that Wall Street was a 
“logical” place to float an issue because Bugatti is 

*We don’t need a lot of 
money — we’re not 
desperate.’ 

Mario Barbieri, vice cfaainmn of 
Bugatti. 

counting on the U.S. market to eventually account 
for 30 to 40 percent of tbe company's car sales. 

He said the current market turmoil would not 
affect a decision on an Initial public offering, which 
would not be made, at the earliest, until June. 
Bugatti aims then to launch tbe EB-1 10 on the U-S. 
market through a dozen selected Lotus dealers. 

However. Mr. Barbieri said the company is still 
working to make the car conform to U.S. safety 
and emissions regulations. 

EB Etlore Bugatti, an associated company 
which designs and markets a line of prestige goods 
under the Bugatti label would not be affected by 
the financing plan, be said. 

A spokesman for CS First Boston in London 
said the cash- raising exercise would be “an offen- 
sive move, not a defensive one.” 

Mr. Barbieri said the purchase of Lotus, for an 
undisclosed sum. had created a need for cash to 
fund new product development at Lotus and main- 
tain current production schedules at Bugatti. 

Lotus in 1 994 plans to build 630 of its Esprit and 
Han models. He said it also was working on a new 
“entry-level” small car, to be launched m 1996 or 
1997,' with a price tag under £20.000 ($29,250). 

He said Bugatti this year would build 140 EB- 
1 10s — which he called the breakeven point — and 
start production- =>f the EB-1 12 in the second half 
of 1995. 


Reuters 

FRANKFURT — The Bundes- 
bank gingerly nudged German 
short-term interest rates lower on 
Wednesday, sanctioning a small 
cut in its securities repurchase rate, 
which sets the tone for other mon- 
ey-market interest rates: 

The Bundesbank allowed tbe se- 
curities repurchase rate to drop 
three basis points, to 5.73 percent 
from 5.76 percent the prior week. 

Tbe tiny cut represented a slow- 
ing in the pace of recent declines. 
Analysts said this could be an ef- 
fort to forestall market speculation 
of a cut in the 5.25 percent discount 
rate, the floor to Goman money 
market rates, at the Bundesbank's 
next council meeting on April 14. 
Both rates are charged on loans to 
banks that are collateralized by 
government securities. 

“They could be sending an early 
sign that they still have room left 
before cutting the discount rate,” 
said Gerhard Grebe, an economist 
at Bank Julius Bar. 

Tbe small cut allowed the Bel- 
gian central bank to cut its key 
centra] rate to 5.95 percent from 
6.05 percent. A spokesman said the 
German easing had paved the way 
for tbe Belgian cuL 

By allowing a decline, the 
Bundesbank continued a trend of 
gradually easing monetary policy. 

Tbe Bundesbank had held tbe re- 
purchase rale steady at 6 percent 
from December, but last month 
started to let it ease. Tbe pace of cuts 
has slowed in the past two weeks. 

Mr. Grebe said the ratecould fall 
to about 5.40 percent before it 
would begin to put pressure on the 
5.25 percent discount rate. 

Many economists said the 
Bundesbank was likely to hold off 
on a discount rate cut until May, 
when it has access to April inflation 
data. 


2,T9T2» 

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+0.9& 

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Sources: Reuters. AFP 


“ 1,15&00 -+1.30- 
■2.10025 +1.33 ' 

1,734-37. +223.- 
457,07 y -+0-5S 
:'9a4f17=:. +0.9,1 

ImmuDotol Herald Tribune! 


Very briefly: = 

• J. SazDShtny PLC, the leading supermarket chain in Britain, formed a*-. 
allian ce with three other European chains to share market information. 
The other chains are Essehmga SpA, of Italy, Docks de France SA, and 
ETS Ddhaize Freres & Oe. of Belgium. 

• European Union finance ministers will meet Friday in Athen> to 1 
consider ways to fund an ambitious public works plan that would create*' 
milli ons of new jobs by the end of the century. 

• Swissair’s net profit in 1993 fell nearly 5 percent from the previous veai.., 
partially because of a decline in revenue caused by the creation of uj 
separate food-service operation. The Swiss national air carrier will omit a. 
dividend for 1993: the dividend was 10 Swiss francs (69 cents) in 1992. j 

• Britain has granted six new telecommunications licenses to inueasc 
competition for long distance service.. Licences were granted to Spring 
Corju, tbe WorldCom anil of IDB Communications Group Iwx, Groupv, 
Videotron Lt&e, Tefia, Telstra Corp- and Noroeb PIC. 

• Escada AG, the German fashion company, trimmed its operatic:; loss 

by 50 percent in 1993 from 1992 and experts to turn a profit this year 
because of reduced costs and a smaller workforce. - 

Reuters. A R. Rldwerg. A F.V5 


SCA of Sweden Cancels 
Plan to Acquire Otor 



Conqtiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

STOCKHOLM — Svenska Cd- 
lulosa AB, the Swedish forestry- 
products company known as SCA, 
said Wednesday it had canceled 
plans to buy the French packaging 
company Otor Holding SA after 
f ailing to reach an agreement with 
Otor’s principal owner, the 
Bacques family. 

SCA said on March 29 it had. 
reached a prehminan* agreement to 
buy the family's 89.8 percent stake 
in Otar for 239' billion kronor 
($302 miffionV 

Sten Lindhoim, an SCA spokes- 
man, refused to give details of the 
two sides' differences. 

SCA also said it had called off a 
proposed 1 billion kronor share of- 
fering to help financ e the purchase 
and canceled a special sharehold- 
ers’ meeting scheduled for Monday 
to vote on ihe rights issue. 

Mr. Lindhoim said tbe cancel!^ 
non had nothing to do with any 
daim that Otort minority share- 
holder, Stora Billenid AB, a unit of 
Store Kopparbergs Bergslags AB. 
had first rights to the majority stake. 

Stora Bflkiud’s president. Lais- 
Ake Hdgessoo, said the company 
was willing to sefl its 103 percent 
stake in Otor to SCA and was not 
interested in buying tbe rest of Otor. 

Mr. Lindhoim said SCA bad not 
abandoned its strategy of trying to 


strengthen its position in the Euro- 
pean packaging industry through 
acquisitions. 

“We are still looking ai all tbe 
big markets — France. Italy and 
Spain — where we are not present 
at all at the moment.” be said. 

(Bloomberg AFX) 

■ Astra Expands Role 

Astra AB said it had raised its 
stake in a joint venture with Fu- 
jisawa* Pharmaceutical Co. to 90 
percent from 51 percenL Reuters 
reported from Stockholm. 

The Swedish pharmaceuticals 
company also said it was taking full 
manag ement control of the Japa- 
nese venture. Fujisawa- Astra. and 
had acquired all rights to sales of 
local-anesthetic products from Fu- 
jisawa. 

Astra said it had paid 1.8 billion 
kronor to Fujisawa in the transac- 
tions. 

The company also said it was 
considering taking a 50 percent 
ownership stake in Astra/Merck 
Group, a venture with Merck & Co. 
that sells a range of Astra products 
in the Urn led Stales. It said it ex- 
pected to make a decision late this 
year. At present, Astra receives 
royalties from tbe venture rather 
than a share of its profiL 




{ ■■ ; *\v V. 

■■•’V ' 


CREDIS Money Market Fund Management Company 

(formerly CS Money Market Fund SFR Management Company) 

Societe a nonyme 
13, rue Beaumont 
L- 1219 Luxembourg 
R.C. Luxembourg B 36832 
(the “Management Company") 

To the unitholders of 
CS MONEY MARKET FUND SFR 
(the “Fund") 

. *; the above-mentioned Management Company and by consent 

B > if ^Suisse Luxembourg <S. A.) as custodian bank, the management regu I a- 
uf Cred ‘^ u !^ N j FY MARKET FUND SFR are being revised and the Fund re- 
ri0nS an umL“a ?und known as CREDIS MONEY MARKET FUND, 

siructured MONEY MARKET FUND SFR will correspond lo ihe 

As " r 1 . 2 rR ED IS MON EY MARKET FUND SFR. 

suhlund C RED subfund or CREDIS MONEY MARKET 

The 1"™*“*"* .StM rfCS MONEY MARKET FUND SFR. 

FUND is ,dent,ca of CRED is MONEY MARKET FUND SFR diners 

The admission struuu maRKET fund SFR in that the management com- 
1‘rom that of CS M tY net asset value of the subfund per month, but 

mission amounts ■ on the su bf U nd’s securities transactions. Total costs to 

SS££ r re w. ~ 

^^^CREI^IS^MO^IeY^MARKET^H-IND 

FUND- «J^ V tSu3 to holders of CS MONEY MARKET FUND SFR units 

at the ratio of 1 to I- MONEY MARKET FUND SFR can be 

Unit certificates f lhe n ew certificates (of equal denomination) of the cor- 

exchanged at any ume ^ r ^ FY MARKET FUND subfund. Even before the 
responding CREDIS MONE^MARK^ ^ ^ ^ ^ of 

exchange MARKET FUND SFR. 

CREDIS MONEY dered flt any time at a paying agent - i. e. a. an 

Unit ^isw in S^tzerland or at Credit Suisse (Luxembourg) S. A. in 

Luxembourg - for mSt FUND SFR can be relumed to the cus- 




b^k working day. subject from the paying agents, . 

FUND prospectus 

The merger lakes effect on 12 April 


CREDIS Fund Service 

A member of ihe Credit Suisse Group 



jpgsc % r • 






It’s the right size to fit 
in your hand and the 
right weight to feel 
comfortable in your 
pocket. It gives you the 
right connections to a 
portable computer or 
fax: you can charge it 
and use it conveniently 
at your desk, in your 
car, in a hotel room. 
The Nokia 2110 is the 
most portable phone. 




NOKIA 

Connecting People 



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m Dual Futures Fd a A Unils S 
m Dual Futures Fd a C UnIKS 
m Maxima Ful. Fd Ser. 1 Cl. AS 
mMaiimaFuI. FoSer. ICI. BS 
in Maximo Fut. FdSer.2CI.CS 
m Mo > ima Ful. Fd Ser. 2 Cl. Dl 
mlnoosue; Curr.a A Unds—S 

m Indasuez Curr. a B Units S 

PNA-3 S 


d ISA Asian Growth Fund. 
d ISA japan Peg. Growth Fd.V 

a iSA Pod He Gold Fund s 

d ISA Aslan Income Fund 5 

d mdosue: Korea Fund S 

w Shanghai Fund S 

w Himalayan Fund 5 

w Manila Fund . 
w Malacca Fund - 
>v Siam Fund. 

d indasue: Hang Kona FundJ 

0 Oriental Venture Trust S 

d Nunn American Trust 5 

d Suigapfii/Aaiay Trull S 

a Pacific Trusi HKS 

j Tcsman runo . 
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* -V^nocted Trusi . 
a Japan Wananl Fund — _-S 
a Worldwide Growth Fund — S 
» indwue: HKrtl YIO Bd Fd A5 
w nwosue: High Yld Bd Pd B5 

p Mail Franc* FP 

w Ma aI France 95, FF 

BANQUE S CAN D I HAVE A LUXEMBOURG 
B5S UNIVERSAL RIND (SICAV) 

C Eurosec ECU A IDIv) -Ecu 

d Eurasec ECU B (Cap) Ecu 

d inleisec USD A (Dlvl * 

0 inleisec USD B ICopI — — S 

d intdbcnd USD A l DM 5 

d lRtetttsnd USD B (Caul — J 
a f itmsec Gtooal FM A (Dlvl FM 
a Finnsec Global FM B (ConiFM 
d Intelbond FRF A 1 Dlvl — FF . 
d imeJoana FRF B (Cop) — FF 

d Far East USD A CDIv) S 

d For East USD B I Coni * 

d Jam JP Y A IDIv) Y 

d japan JPY B (Cop) Y 

d Parsec FRF B (Cop! FF 


12878 

10664 

10672 

12972 

11866 

127146 

116753 

102596 

103743 

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111.192 

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35530 

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17605 

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92.19 

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1415704 

1431784 

20.9051 

225837 

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150.1145 

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11306455 

11305455 

1226991 

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162406. 

161406 


w CaBandor F-iw 
wCattander F-Aiotrlai. 

wCoOnndor F-&mbh. 


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14136 

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ADVERTISEMENT’ 


wCoflanderlMJSHeaimCaro* 
w Callander Swtn Grawtn__SF 
CAWBELL CBERMUDAJLTD 
w Gtbl IhstltutlanQt 11 Anri - .s 90.19 

CAN ADUH IN TERN ATI OHJO. GRQUI*' 

a Cl Canadton Growth Fd cs 441 

d Cl North American FdJZIa Wl 

d Cl Pacfflc Fund cs 143] 

d Cl Global Fund cs 941 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


AprflS, 1994 


.. . . ■ n e t , 11 i mulMInnf 1 ai mpB i iI TlT 

■»^M T - ^ 1 | |»i^ |i n i l i n ii t (f1 " — T f~T ' ■ M r n "M*- W «■**■***!. (•wrytwwwoMa^ M-ro»X«rtmW-lwi“ woeldr. W- 


d Cl Emero Mnrtcets Fd 
d Cl European Fund. 


0 Canada Guar. Mortgage FUCS 

CAPITAL lint RELATIONAL 

w Capitol Inn Fund 1 

w Capital itaUaSA « 

CDC IHTERNATIOHAL 
wCEP Court Tptu ui — 


PINMAHASEMENT SA-LMOW44U1/23SHO 
wDtlta Premium Corn.—— —6 117758 

FOKUS BANK AS. 472 fit 555 
iv Scanionds Inn Growth FdJ 158 

FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID) 


_FF 

>FF 


ir GFl Long Terme 

C1NDAM BRAZIL FUND 

d Qixtam Equity Fund s 

d Clndom Balanced Fund— Jt 
CITIBANK (LUXEMBOURG! SJL 
FOB 1373 Lmienitiourg Tol. <77 95 71 
d ClHnvust Global Bant— s 
tf Clttnvest FGP USD S 


12961 

4374 


17304026 

151728860 


1797244 

1075364 


PXL Bax 2001. HamtHoa. Bermuda 

mFMGGtstxd (20 Feb) S 

m FMG N. Amer. (28 Feb) __s 

mFMG Europe (28 Feb) % 

in FMG EMGMKT (28 Feb)_S 
mFMG G (S Feb) 


FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA} LTD 
w Concepts Fcvex Fund, l 
GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 
wGola Hedge II 5 


d a (invest FGP ECU. 

d C II Invest Selector i 

d CltlcumenelesUSD— s 
d Cfikurrendns DE M — rm 

d CRtairrendesGBP— ZZt 

d gtkurrencto Yen Y 

d attport NA. Eautty s 

E Sure Equity JEai 

d attport UK Empty [ 

d Cltlport French Eaultv FF 

d attoort German Equity DM 

d atiport Japan Eaufiv Y 

d athxjrt iapfp « 

■d attoort Eamec S 

Kt ail part na S Bond } 

d Cltlport Euro Band Ecu 

;d Manned Currency Fund_S 
'CITIBANK (PARIS) SLA. 
w CUt 96 Cap GM S 

cititrust 

w US S Eaultles s 

w US S Mangy Martlet s 

w US S Bands _ e 

w On land. 


mattoertormance PHI STL. 

w The Good Earth Fund 

COMBUST (33-1! 44 7B 75 II 
wCamnest AHn 


wComgest Eu 

•CONCEPT FUND 

p WAMGtatxri Hedge Fd s 

b WAMIntIBd Hedge Fd I 

COWEN ASSET MANAGEMENT 
Cmwn Enterprise Fund N.V. 

vCkto AShs 1 

w Class BShs. 


10057 

122867 

127&25 

14476S 

162254 

14154 

161X1 

1237150 

23157 

18477 

14168 

147753 

9S.44 

47B150 

21L91 

16855 

15970 

15662 

14168 

9980619 

254.97319 

1572003 

1757877 

1G4J92BJ 

1555431 

1369065 

122039 

121459 

101 855 
99063 


■vGaia Hedge ill 

■v Gaia Swiss Frwic Fd_ 
IV GAIA Fx. 


-SF 


m Gala Guaranteed CL I . 
hi Gala Guaranteed CL it 
GARTMORE MDOSUEZ FUNDS 5/M/M 
Tel: (3521 44 54 24 470 
Fax : 1352] 46 54 23 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 
d DEM - . 

d Diverbaad— JNS252. 

d Dollor Bond Dls224. 

- d European Bd— Dis 1X1 .Ecu 

1 d FTencJi Franc DIs 1863. — 

d Global Band Dis 217. 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 
d ASEAN, 
d- 


1439 

1T31 

1L30 

1361 

1059 

1032 

13954 

1544 

SOTS 

11173 

8563 

8466 


at Hermes Gold Fund 5 41831 

INCOME PARTNCRStASIA! LIMITED 
wAstoi F ixed In come Fd—S 10229 

INTERIMVEST (BERMUDA! LTD 

C/a Bcnkof Bermuda Tel: 0092954000 
m Hedge Hop & Conuerv Fd_5 9J7 

urreRNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
2 Bd Rovai. L-2449 Luxetnboura , 

w Euraoe Sud E Frn 9765 

INTERNATIONAL MGMT INCOME FUND 

d Amertquedu Nard S 100.17 

d Europe Conilnentole- DM ...10 062 

d i tone LH 100618.® 

d Zone AMatlaue —Y lOOHLOO 

IMveSCO INTL LTD, POB 271. Jersey 
Tel: 44 534 73114 
d Maximum income Fund 

d Sterllna Mngd PHI 

d Pioneer Martels 


d Okasan Global Strategy, 
d Asia Super Growth. 


d Nippon womxri Fund » 

dAsta Tiger Warrant S 

d European warrant Fuad — I 

d GM N.W. 1994 S 

PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 
d American Growth 


d Amerioxi Enterprise. 

tf WM!*- 

u Doilor Rtl®rvt_ 


d CanUnentm Europe— 
d DeveiepinoMartots. 
d France 


d Internationa!, 
d . 


d Europeai Enterprise ^ ■ S 
d Global Emerging Marteb-S 

d Global Growth * 

d Nippon Enterprise 5 

d Nippon Growth 5 

d UK Growth. 


d Sterling Reserve. 


d North America, 
d Swltzerlond- 


O United Kingdom - 


-JF 


RESERVE FUNDS 

d DEM Ob 5674 DM 

d Dollar. Dis 2588 S 

d FrencJi Franc FF 

d Yen Reserve. 


GEFIMOR FUNDS 

London : 87MIM171. Geneva : 41-22355530 


CREDIT AGRICOLE 
INDEXIS 

d hvtacta U5A/S&P 580 S 

d Indexls Japon/NikKel— .Y 

d Indexls G Brei/FTSE i 

d indexls France/CAC m FF 

d Indexls CT FF 

MONAXIS 

d Court Terme USO S 

dCourl Terme DEM DM 

d Court Terme JPY. Y 

d Court Terme GBP t 

d Court Terme FRF FF 

d Court Terme ESP Pin 

d Court Terme ECU Ecu 

MOSAIS 

d Actions inn DIversMees FF 

0 Actions Nora-Amer katana _S 

d Actions Joponobes Y 

d Actions Angtabes t 

d Actions Alfemondes DM 

d Actions Francoises FF 

d Actions Esp. & Port Pta 

d Adlans ItoHwincs Lit 

d Actions Bassin Poclftaue S 

d Oblio mn Diversmaes ff 

d O&iig NonFAmertcoliies — 5 
d Obi la Japonalses— — Y 

d Obfig AnolnlSM 1 

d O irfla AHemondes JDM 

d Otadg Francoises FF 

d Obilo Esp. & Port Pto 

d Obiig Convert. Intern. FF 

d Court Terme Era Ecu 

d Court Terme USD — _S 

d Court Ttnne FRF. 


134669 

167458 


T7J0 

174123 

1354 

152JW 

T15.M 

1652 

3866 

2272.96 

133S 

13664 

293459 

19.76 

12775 

23.14 

190859 

14.11 

4050 

14936 

373439 

3720969 

3334 

11437 

1827 

234770 

1364- 

2966 

15554 

271079 

IBM 

2177 

1730 

14Q67 


iv East Investment Fund S 

wScntlhh World Fund 5 

Hr5tale 31. American S 

GENESEE FUND LM 

w |A) Geneses Eagle 5 

iv IB) Genesee Short. 


w IG Genesee Opportunity, 
w (F) Genesee Mon-Equity _ 
GEO LOGOS 

w II Straight Bocxl B 

iv II Pacific Bond B. 


62060 

4425132 

34857 

13758 

6672 

15113 

12466 

105235 

143454 


GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 
OFFSHORE FUNDS 
11 Alhol SI Axigtasj of Man 44424624037 


•vGAMArbttrae- 
wGAM ASEAN. 


w GAM Australia, 
iv GAM Bosteii . 
mGAM-Cmtn Mtonetunha. 

iv GAM Combined 

ir GAM Cross-Market. 

w GAM European 

iv GAM Francs. 


-DM 


w GAM Frunc-voL 
* GAMGAMCO. 
w GAM High Yield. 


W GAM East Asia Inc . 
w GAM Japan. 


iv GAM Money MMsUSS S 

d Do Sterling C 

d Do Swiss Franc SF 

d DO Detitadtemark- 
d Do Yen. 


__DM 


CREDIT COMMERCIAL DE FRANCE 
d Ehrsees Monetoire FF B92S7.M 


d Sam Acficash USD B. 
CREDIT SUISSE 
d C5F Bonds. 


d Bond Valor Swl SF 

d Bond Valor US - Dollar 1 

d Bond Valor D-Mark DM 

d Bond Valor Yon Y 

d Bond Valor C Sterling 1 

d Convert Voter Swt SF 

d Convert valor US- Dollar _S 

d Convert valor (Storting 1 

d CSF International-— SF 

d Actions Suhses. — SF 

d Create Smil-HHld Cap SwttzISF 
d Eurapa Valor— —SF 

•d Eoerale- Voter SF 

d Pacific - Valor SF 

U CS Gold Valor S 

d CS Tiger Fund S 

d CS Ecu Bond A Ecu 

d CS Ecu Band B. 


_FI 


d Latin America USD A (DIvlS 

a Lalln America USDS (Cools 

d NorihAmericoUSDAlDlvIS 

d North Amer USDB iCopi— 5 

BANQUE SCAND1NAVE EN SUISSE-GENEVA 

iv Intelbond CM 5F 84.M 

nr Intel5ec CM SF 21738 

iv r>tt — SF 17x17 

BANQUE SCS ALLIANCE-CREDIT BANK- 
(41221 346-1231, Geneva 
w Pleiade North Am Equities 5 
w Pleiad* Europe Ecniltln — Ecu 
«• Pleiad* Asia Padfic Eq — » 

» Plelaoe Envinxvneni Ea — 5 

m PtekiBf Dollar Bonds s 

w pieiade ECU Banos 

a Pleiode FF Bonds ff 


.j Pleiode Euro Conv Bonds — SF 

j> Pleiad* Doflar Reserve * 

«r Piewde ECU Reserve _ — Ecu 
w Pieiode SF Reserve. SF 

sMimSm SSF**** 

Kano Kong, Tel: 18521 02*1900 

d aunoiPRCl > 

a Hcng Kong » 


10153 

13269 

*852 

9357 

9757 

10760 

M763 

9465 

102.19 

10168 

1(031 


d CS Golden Bend A - 

d cs Gulden Band B. 

d CS HJsaano ibertoFd A— Jfia 
dCSHIspano Iberia Fd B — Pta 

d CS Prime Bond A DM 

tfCS Prime Band B DM 

dCS Eurapa Bond A DM 

dCS Eurapa Band B DM 

d CS Fixed I SF 7% 1/96 SF 

d CS Fixed I DM 1% 1/96 DM 

d CS Fixed I Ecu81/4Nil/96_ECU 

tfCSSwtas Franc Band A SF 

dCSSwta Franc Bond B SF 

d CS Bond Fd Lira A/B Ut 

d CS Bond Fd Pesetas A/B— Ptas 
a CS Gernxray Fund A, . . DM 
d CS Germany Fund B —JDM 

d C5 Euro Blue Chips A DM 

dCS Euro Blue Chips B DM 

4l CSShart-T.BandSA S 

d CS Shart-T, Bond! B S 

rf CS Shorl-T. Band DM A—DM 

d CS Short-T. Bond DM B DM 

OCS Money Market Fd S S 

d cs Money Market Fd DM— DM 
d CS Money Mcrtwt Fdt_ c 
tf CS Money Market Fd Ycn_Y 
DCS Money Market FdCS — CS 
d CS Money Markat Fd Ecu— Eat 
d C5 Money Market Fd SF —SF 
d CS Money Market Fd HFI-FI 
0 C5 Money Martel Faut—Lfi 
d CS Money Market FdFF— FF 
d CS Money Mariwt Fd PteL-Pta 
d CS Money Martel Fd BEF-BF 

d C5 Oeko-Protec A DM 

d CS Oeko-Protec B_ DM 

d CS Nortfi-Ameriaxi A, — —5 

d CS NorttvAmericon B S 

d CS UK Fund A 1 

d CS UK Fund B C 

d CS France Field A FF 


11IQJ1 

88J2 

11457 

12261 

1155? 

10787.90 

10471 

17069 

20414 

9052 

13152 

B2754 

23856 

232S7 

14459 

14155 

13750 

111968 

££ 

as 

2966530 

3106730 
105X3 
15364 
24239 
352.19 
106.16 
10673 
107 JO 
27361 
30270 


26737 
27837, 
IDT 35 
15954 
10255 
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40X49* 
21171 
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10151 
13157 
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190296 
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57560 
86174 
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10131 
10055 
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136.18 
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mjhietmrttsirasse I71CH SMCZirt* 

d GAM (CH) America SF 15569 

d-GAM (CHI Europe SF 9639 

d GAM ICHl Mondial SF 17170 

d GAM (CHI Pacific 3F 277JD 

SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 
135 East S7rd StroeLNY W022212588-GD0 


15260 - 
27130 
55530 
16590d 
226400 
23000 
43300 
36500 
96200 

*5400 

9.9900 

113400 

57600 

53580 

*3300 

67500 

56210 

8 atm 

55900 

55060 


d North Amerlcao warrant ^S 55408 

d Greater CNna Owa- S 72200 

ITALFORTUNE INTL. FUNDS , ^ 

wdasi A (Aggr. Growth ItaLlS 793068 

wCtouB [Global EtuiBvl — s Jin 

IV Cta-aC [Global Bond) * MV 

iv r in., n ( Fni Bond ) ■ Fru 1137 

JARDI HE FLEMING , GFO Box THM Hfl iKO 

d JF ASEAN Trust S ®J4 

d JF Far EnM WmtTr S 2628 

d JF Global Conv. Tr S 1474 

d JF Hong Kong Trasl 5 1M1 

d JF Japan Sm. Co Tr- Y 

d JF Japan Trust V 127ffiJ6 

dJFMolaysfcl Trust 1 2151 

d JF Padfic Inc Tr % 1130 

d JF Thailand Trust 1 34.10 

JOHN GOVETT MART (LOlMJ LTD 
Tel: 44624-629420 
» GoveH Man. Futures— —3 

w Gavett Man. Fut. USS s 

w Govott 5 Gear. Cut— S 

» Govctt S GIW BaL Hdgo S 

JUUUS BAER GROUP 
d Boer bond. SF 


d Eauibaer Europe. 
d SFR-BAER. 
d Stockier, 
d Swissbar. 


d Europe Band Fund, 
d Dollor Bond Fund, 
d Austro Bond Fund, 
d Swiss Bond Fund, 
d DM Bond r. 
d Convert Bond Fund, 
d Global Band I 
d Euro Stock Fund. 
d US Stock Fund. 


d Padfic Stack Fund- 
d Swiss Stock Fund — 
d Snectef Swiss Stock, 
d Japan Stuck Fund. 


w GAM Allocated MTO-Fd 5 

iv GAM Emerg Mkts MU l-Fd J 

iv GAM Min- Europe USS I 

W GAM MID- Europe DM DM 

tvGAMMHLGtabal USS * 

w GAM Moricet Neutral S 

iv GAM Trodi«l DM DM 

w GAM Trading USS S 

w GAM Overseas— * 

wGAMPadfic. 


d Gorman Stock Fund. .. . DM 

if Korean Stock Fund 5 

d Swiss Franc Cash SF 


d DM Cash Fund, 
d ECU Cash Fund, 
d Storting Cash Fund, 
d Dollar Cash Fund. 


W GAM Selection S 

iv GAM Singaporc/Mo tarsia -S 

w GAM SF Special Brad SF 

v GAM Twite S 


ir GAMut Investments . 
iv GAM Value. 


w GAM Whitethorn 

iv GAM Worldwide 

w GAM Bend USS Ora- 
te GAM Band USS Snedal. 

* GAM Band SF 

teGAM Bond Yen. 
te GAM Bond I 
teGAM Bond £. 


d French Fume I 
nr Mult ladvfaor Forex Fd—S 
KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT IRC 

rn Key Global Hedge S 

m Key I lodge Fund Inc s 

m Key Hedge Inve s tments — S 
KIDDER, PEABODY 

D Chesapeake Fund LM S 

b ill Fund LM S 

b inti Guaranteed Fund S 

b Sion 


1360 

939 

1109 

113539 

95255 
191&J9 
241178 
169171 
112630 
252535 
310452 
22530a 
15200 
12X50 
126938 
12330 
11930 
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9410 
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125J0 
12670 
167.90 
14170 
964000 
10X10 
89 JO 
119763 
124809 
1265JB 
109800 
104000 
1WJM 
10105400 


EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO IUSS) 

d Class A- 1 DM 

d Class A-2 DM 

d Class B-l S 

d anus B-2 S 

POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 
d CntegarvA . . . 4 


US DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
d Category A 


YEN PORTFOLIO 
ft Category A 


MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 

d Class A S 

d Class B s 

US FEDERAL SECURITIES PTFL 

dOossA S 

d CtaSsB S 

MERRILL LYNCH 

EQUITY / CONVERTIBLE SERIES 

BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 

d Class A S 

d doss B s 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

d C toys A S 

d Class B S 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL (USS) 

tf Class A S 

d Class B S 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

d Clan A S 

d Class B s 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

d Clan A S 

d Class B S 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

ddOKA S 

d Class B S 


16JO 

1500 


13X7 

1114 


1305 

1277 


2232 

2171 


1426 

1166 


1436 

1307 


1032 

1037 


1301 
1306 

15X9 

15.19 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 

d Class A S 11.53 

d Class B S 1107 


DRAGON PORTFOLIO 
dCiossA. 

d Class B . 


1507 

1407 


MERRILL LYNCH INC t PORTFOLIO 

d Class A S 063 

d Class B I 363 

dClanC— S 863 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

d Mexican Inc SPtf) Cl A S 900 

d Mexican Inc 5 Ptfl Cl B i 9J0 

d Mexican inc Peso Ptfi Cl A 0 907 

d Mexican Inc Pesa Pino B0 907 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
w Momentum Novel Her Peri— S 9604 

m Momentum Rotnaow Fd—S T5R3J 

m Momentum RxR R.U S ' 8951 

m Momentum StoefcmosteT- JS I41R 

MORVAL VONWILLER ASSET MGT Co 
v Wll lertunds-Wlltertiond Caps 1568 

iv WHlertunds-Wlllerbond Eur Ecu 1254 

w Wlltorfunds-WiHercq Eur Ecu 1376 

teWniertunds-WlOeraq Italy _U1 1366800 

te wniertundvwiltoroa NA 5 

MULTI MANAGER N.V. 
te Cash Enhancement ...J 
tv Emerging Markets FdL ■ S 

w European Growth Fd Ea 

« Hedge Fund 5 

w Jppcnrse Funri . — — Y 

te Market Neutral —5 

w world Bond Fund. 


1104 


ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DEI 
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w Aslan cratted Holdings FdJ 
iv Da Iwa LCF Rothschild Bd J* 

iv DahM LCF Rottach Ea S 

iv Faro* Cash Tradition CHF JF 
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b Pri Challenge Swiss Fd SF 

b Prieaultv Fd-Euroae— .Ecu 

b PrtoouMy FtaHehreiio 5F 

b Prlequlty Fd- Latin Am S 

h Pri bond Fund Ecu Ecu 

O Pribona Fund USD s 

a Prlbond Fd HY Error MfctlS 

■vSetodhM Invosl SA % 

b Source S 


w US Bond Plus. 
iv Vartapius- 


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ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
OTHER FUNDS 
d Asia/ Joan Emero. Growths 

.te Esortl Eur Partn Inv Tst Ecu 

■v EuTOP Stratea InvestmM— Era 
t> integral Futures 


44L33 

101484 

1O2O0B 

mziji 

253674 

6007 

99503 

1157.17 

113X75 

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134.151 

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1181033 

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1729040 
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m Nernrod Leveraged Hid — J *4900 

BAFD1E GROUP/ KEY ADVISORS LTD 


O Oatlaest Global Fd General DM 
b Oplteest Global Fix income dm 

d padfic Nkw Fund s 

wPermal Drakkar Growth 
NV S 


r SetocttM Horizon. 
0 Vlctelre Ariane. 


-FF 


d Korea — 

NEW TIGER SEL. FUND 
d Hang Kong ... 
d, 


d Philippines, 
d Thailand — 
d Malania— 
d indaneslD. 


d USS LhiuMhr- 
d China 


THORNTON TAIWAN FUND 
d Eauttv Income ......6 

d Equity Growth * 

d LfewWItv. 


USBERSEEBAHK Zurich 
d B - Fund. 


a E-Fund- 
d J-F=und- 


-SF 


d M- Fund. 


JF 


cu 


d UBZ Euro-mcame Fund. — SF 
d UBZ world income Fund — E~ 

d UBZ Gold Fund S 

d UBZ Nippon Convert — SF 

d Asia Growth Convert 5 PR -SF 
d Asia Growth Convert USS-J 

d UBZ DM- Brad Fund DM 

d UBZ D- Fa ■ 


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118907 

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165.10 

10901 

1147rf 

9674 

95X7 


d UBZ Swiss Equity Fund, 
d UBZ American Eq Fund. 

UNI0M*BAHCa!rE < A 3SET MGT (UBAM) 
INTERNATIONAL. NASSAU 
wArtMbt 


w Bocal 


iv BecMnvest. 
wBnielnvgst. 
wCresptnvesl 


iv Dlrrvest Asia J 

iv Dlnvesi inti Fix Inc Strat—S 

w Jqgtnv iwt i .5 


1106802 

14615 
12029 
14877 
13169 
12L71 
1UL46 
11207 
18508 
1573* 
11570 
14765 
1828 1 
1004' 
10104 
9667 
10679 
103.16 
8705 
9106 

104759 

120037 


NICHOLAS- APPLEGATE CAPITAL MGT 

wNA Flexible Growth Fd S 1590*78 

w NA Hedge Fund S 1340151 


NOMURA INTL (HONG KONG] LTD 

d Nomura Jakarta Fund 5 

NOR IT CURRENCY FUND 

mNCF USD — 5 

mNCFDEM. 
mNCF CHF. 


JF 


mNCF FRF 

mNCF JPY r 

mNCF BEF BF 

ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
21 Grnsvenor SIXdn WIX 9FEX4-71-499295 


B.95 

820.95 

89509 

92429 

444000 

8269S0O 

2703300 


d Oder European. 
wOdev European- 


wOdev Europ Growth Inc. DM 
iv Oder Eurap Growth Acc — DM 
. wOdev Euro Grth Star Inc — L 
27476 I w Ode» Euro Grth Star Acc _J 
14771 OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL INC 
M54W .WKItams House. Hamilton H MI1 . Bermuda 
^ Tel: 809 292-1018 Fax: 809295-2205 

w Finsbury Group 0 

teOtvmpiaSeaxtteSF SF 


15203 
151 Jl 
1SD06 
15131 
60.17 
6839 


m Key Diversified Inc Fd UdJ 
SAFRA RE PUB UC HOLDING 

te Republic GAM s 

w Republic GAM America S 

■v rbp GAM Em Mkts Global J 
w Rep GAM Em Mkts Lot AmS 
Hr Republic GAM Europe SF JF 
IV Republic GAM Europe USS J 
w Republic GAM GTMrlh CHF JF 

w Republic GAM Growth I i 

0 Republic GAM Growth USSA 
w Republic GAM OpportwiilvS 
w Republic GAM Padfic. ■ ■ 5 
0 Republic Gnsev Dot Inc — 5 
te Republic Gnsev Eur Inc — DM 

■v Republic Lai Am Alloc S 

w Republic Lai Am AreenL _S 
nr Rcfumfic Lot Am Brazil — S 
» Republic Lai Am Mexico — S 
iv Republic Lot Am venez. — S 
■v Rep Salomon Steal Fd Ltd J 
SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 

mComrmxider Fund 5 

m Explorer Fund. 3 

SKANDIHAVI5KA E745KILDA BANKER 
-5-E-BAN KEN FUND 
d Eurapa Inc. 
d FlarranOstornlnc. 
d Global Inc, 
d Lakamodeilnc. 
d Van den Inc. 
d Joann Inc. 
d Mllto inc. 
d Sverige me. 
d Nordomerika Inc. 

d Tetaalagi Inc-. 

d Sverige Rartrtand Inc Sek 

SKAND1FONDS 

d Eaultv infl Acc S 

d Equity mn Inc- s 

d Equity Global S 

d Equity Nal. Resources 5 

d Equity Japan Y 

d Equity N ardic- 
d Equity UJL. 

d Eaultv Continental Eurooe .5 
d Equltv MedBerraneon— — S 

d Equity North America s 

d Equity Far East S 

d mn Emerging Markets — S 
d Band Inti Acc. 
d Band inti Inc. 
d Bond Europe Acc. 
a Bond Europe Ine- 
rt Brad Swoden Acc . 
d Band Sweden In 
d Bond DEM Acc. 
d Bond DEM me. 
d Brad Dollar US Acc. 
d Bond Dollar US Inc- 
d Curr. US Dollar. 


ur Mamin vest. 


wMourlnvert. . 
w Maurlnvert Comingled . 
wMourtnvest Eoi. 

0 Puisar. 
w Pulsar Overtv. 
teOu 


ivTudbiuest 

teUrsbwest 


2515.10 z 
112070 z 
112BJ5 z 
130204 z 
111002 Z 
1075.15 Z 
1D7706Z 
271022 z 
108071 z 
942.18 z 
2042.13 X 
97B73z 
123803 Z 
133L28 Z 
3621981 
99629 z 
164506 z 
190809 z 
185109 Z 
2650X61 
150195 1 
297408 z 
114009 Z 
49116 Z 


UNION BANCA1RE ASSET MGT (UBAM) 
INTERNATIONAL LUXEMBOURG 

tv UBAM I Bond S 

iv UBAM DEM Bond -DM 


u UBAM Emerging Growth. 

teUBAM FRF Bond — 

w UBAM Gormmiy 

w UBAM Gtabal Band — — 
w UBAM Jraan. 


w UBAM Storing Bond. * 

te UBAM 50»Padt8r Asia S 

» UBAM US EquHlOS — S 

UNION BANK OF SWTTZERLAND/IHTRAG 


113926 Z 
111493 > 
90907 Z 
550412 Z 
1197X51 
141U2Z 
974300 z 
9650B 
19173 l 
125704 Z 


d Amen- 


d Brii-mu 
d Canac. 


JF 


rt Convert- Invest. 
d D-Maric-invesL- 


JF 


d ESPOC- 


JF 


d Eurlt.. 

d Fonsu 

d Frmclt- 
d Germac. 
d Gtobtove 


d Gukton-iiwest. 
a Hahretlmast. 


d Holtand-lnvest- 
d l toe. 


d Japan- Invest _ 
d Padttc-lnvesl. 
d Saflt. 


a Skandlnavton-lnvest. 

d Slerilng- Invest — 

rt Swiss F ran c- In ve il — 
d Sima 


2462X0 

111700 

129658 

165507 


JF 


w GAM cspedal Band . 
w GAM Universal USS- 
teGSAMCommsHe. 


8704 

14702 

19118 

8505 

17801 


teGAM Global. 

wGAM Internatfawot— ! 

teGAM Norm America i 

iv GAM padfic Basin . .. J 
IRISH REGISTERED UCTTS 
Earisfort Terr oteJXibl in 1 S5J-V676M3U 
te GAM Americana Acc__ DM 8901 

w GAM Eurapa Act DM 13322 

w GAM Orient Acc- — J3M 1031 

te GAM Tokyo Acc DM 17159 

teGAM Total Bond DM ACC—DM 10116 

teGAM Universe! DM ACC — DM 17906 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTV 
Bermuda: (80?) 2950000 Fax: (0091 2954188 
JWH GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 
iv IQ FlnandU & Metals —J 
te(DI KT Global 


LATIN AMERICAN SECURITIES 
Tel: London 071 628 1234 
rt Argentinian invest Co SicavS 
d Brazilian invest Co State _S 
d COiombhm invest Co Slcav J 
d LaftaAmer Extra Yield Fd 5 
d Latin America Income Co_S 
d Latin American Invest Ca-0 
d Mexican Invest Co Slcav -J 
d Peruvian Invest Co Sicay-S 
LEHMAN BROTHERS 
d Asian Dragon Part NV A — S 
d Asian Dragon Port NV B — S 
d Global Advisors 11 NVA — S 
d Global Advisors 1 1 9<VB — S 
d Global Advisors Part NV AJ 
d Gtabal Advisors Part nv B J 

d Lehman Cur Adv. A/B 5 

d Premier Futures Adv A/B J 
UPPO INVESTMENTS 
14/F Upaa Tower Centro, 89 QueenswayJiK 
Tel (8521 867608 Pax (8S) 5960388 
t Java Fund. 


w oiymoia Stars Emerg MktsS 
.* Winch. Eastern Dragon, 
te Winch. Fran Her. 


2416 

3236 

1726 

100908' 

908 

10X6 

3801 

1501 


1073 

1008 

70J 

975 


,te Winch. Fut. Olvmnta Star-0 
.iv Winch. Gl Sec Inc PI I A) — S 
' w WlnclL Gl Sec Inc PI (C) — S 
te Winch. HMa lid 1 ! MadborL— Ecu 

w Winch. HWg Inti Ser D Ecu 

te Winch. HMg IntT Ser F Ecu 

te Which. Htdg Ol v Star Hedges 
iv Winch. Reser. MuNL Gv BdJ 

wWInchesler Thailand J 

OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 
73 Front SL Homlltra Jormuta 889 2954658 


21853 

173.17 

95495 

1771 

28421 

14972 

908 

922 

1469.18 

173105 

171804 

115771 

18.99 

3811 


d Curr. 5wedUh Kronor 3c* 

50CIETE GENERA LE GROUP 
SOGELUX FUND (5F1 
w SF Bands A U0A. 


r SF Bands B Germany . 


w SF Bonds C Franco, 
te SF Bonds E G£ — 
teSF Bonds F Japan. 


.FF 


te SF Brads G Europe - 


901 

900 

1229 

1862 

1906 

11.18 

779 


d CS France Fund B. 

d CS Euroreal 

d CS Italy Fund A — 
d CS Italy Fund B. 


J»M 


d CS NefMrtmcK Fd A_ 
rt CS Netherlands Fd B_ 

d CS FF Bond A 

d CS FF Bond B_ 


d CS Cctoital SFR ! 
d CS Capitol DM 3MB - 
d CS Capitol DM 1997- 
d C5 Capital Ecu MM. 
dCS Capita FF M 


.Ea 


.FF 



0 Philippines 

d Singapore 
d Thailane. 
d South EcrJ Asia 
BDD GROUP OF HIND5 

w SOD USS Casn Fund 

» 3DD Ecu Cosh Fund— — -f|U 

nr BDD Swto f^ancCMn— _SF 

w BDD Ini. Bond . 

te BDD ml. Brad F «S£f 1 g'E^ aJ 
w BOON American EtojIW Fds 
w BDD European equity FufldtaJ 
m£DD Aslan Eaudv Fund — j 
mBDO US Small COP Fimd— S 
w ExTOtinocioefe Fixed line — FF 
te EuratlnMulDCv W Fd~— 
bAiNVEST A8GMT (GSY) LTD 

te BeltovesJ-BrazM 

w Selinvest-GKboi. { 

i> Bel -Israel-— — 

w Beimvest-Muiilbcnd . 

vr 8rtlnvesl-5uww_ 

BNP LUXEMBOURG 
INTER CASH 
J Front* Mraerolra- 
/ France Securlie — 

1 mier Cosh DM 

t trier Cash Ecu. — 
t inter Casn GBP 


I inter Cash USD » 

w Privatisaiions mil mvesr — J 

w Teiecam invest-; 

INTER OPTIMUM s 

m mterttond USD- 
wBEFiLUF. 


.FF 


w Mutfidevises DM 
w USD 
i» FRF 

IntIrstrategie 
n Austroiie — — — 

te France — — 

iv Europe* Nora. 

w Europe do coma- 

te Europe duS™ 

w Japan — - -rr 

wAmerwueita w«™. 

i> SuJ-Esi Astoiwue- 

r Eurcooan i Attantlc 

t Pccitle. 


9.113 

34«07 

13002 

10766 

12798 

23062 

26027 

15.973 

32.739 

33072 

528808 

404970 

5041-55 

5425.18 

704505 

5D99XS8 

616523 

157174 

104703 

1HB6X1 

9613X9 

1272.15 
987 Jl 
81501 
104307 
103775 


I4NMS 

1755805 

273870 

190877 

147451 

123871 

165061 

12B7479 

992X8 

141775 

10650300 

299449 

134007 

15493X9- 

123370 

1202X8 
11807 JB 
125*04 
283904 
99204 
118731 
1523M 
154102 
33706 


d CS Japan Megatrend SFR-JF 
d CS Japan Megatrend Yen _Y 

d CS PorH inc SFR A/B SF 

rt CS Portf Bol SFR SF 

d CS Porlf Growth SFR SF 


d CS PorH Inc DM A/B DM 

d CS PorttBal DM DM 

d CS Parti Growth DM DM 

d CS PorH Inc USS A/B S 

d cs part* Bai uss J 

d CS Portf Growth USS S 

d CS Ea Fd Emero Mkls- S 

d CS Eq Fd Small COP USA — S 

d CS Ea Fd Small Enr DM 

d CS Eq Fd Lot America S 

CURSITOR FUND 

rt Curd lor Era! Aslan Eq S 

d C uni tor GIW Gwth Sob-Fd J 
DARIER HENTSCH GROUP 
Tel 41-2270848 37 
d DH Malar Mortete Fixid — SF 

d Hcntsch TroasujY Fd SF 

d Samurai Purttoiio SF 

DISCOUNT BANK GROUP 

w Malrtcurr. Bona SF 

iv Dofirol Brad — - A _ 

ivEurova! Equity—— 
ivN.Aniertoo&xjlty- 
iv Padfic Equity. 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
d Coocentru + — — — 
d Inti ReolttHand +_ 


233706 

14415972 

129301 

137604 

5804X3 

nmajs 

613416 
12375770 
5659971 
243X9 
2409 
24405 
251X4 
TMX4 
11877 
10*3-36 
111903 
1B2Z) 
27445500 
28113870 
411X8 
41906 
1091.15 
116908 
1SS7J7 
145577 
174906 
14367* 
143251 
26105 
2578900 
J0S&X7 
1037 JO 
103824 
106205 

1077.13 

1374.13 
98562 
100904 
102101 
112874 
1QBL24 

970-60 

930X3 


1845200 

1073800 

32768 

1413.15 

11B9JQ 

1304X7 

138446 

119879 




* (H) Yen Financial— — — S 

te U1 DWenifled (b* AA S 

wllO Infi Currency & Band_J 
te JWH WORLDWIDE FND_5 
GLOBAL FUTURES A OPTIOTB SICAV 


14807 
10872 
97.19 
170.15 
119 JB 
11401 
18X4 


wAseon Fixed inc Fd -J 

w IDR Money Market Fd J 

te USD Money Marker Fd — S 
nr Indo n es i an Growth Fd- — S 
iv Asian Growth Fund. S 

teAslan Warrant Fund J 

LLOYD GEORGE MNGMT (8331 8454413 

te Antenna Fund — 5 1804 

te LG Asian Smaller Cos Fd-J IB04S 

wLGlixBaFundLW — 

LLOYDS BANK INTL • BAHAMAS) Ud 
Uayds Americas Partfid to (809) 12-8711 
w Balanced Modern* Risk FdS 9J8 

LOMBARD. OPIER A C»E • CROUP 
OBU FLEX LTD (Cl) 
a Multicurrency S 


i» Optima Emerald Fd Ltd. 

w Optima Fund s 

iv Optima Fuhten Fund — S 

te Optimo Global Fund S 

iv Optima PericuiaFd Ltd- 5 

iv Optima Short Fund S 

PACTUAL 


d Elerntry Fund Lid— 

rt Infinity Fund Ltd 

d Star High Yield FdLM- 
PARIRAS-GROUP 

te Luxor. — 

d Parvest USA B 

d Porvesl Japan B __ 
d PmvoslAsla PocH B_ 

d Pcrvesi Euraoe B 

d Pnrvesi Holland B- — 
d Parvest France B. 


ill FFM InJBdPrw-CHFajF 
GOLDMAN SACKS 
w GS Adi Rate Mori. Fd II — S 

mGS Global Currency S 

teGS Gtabal Equity S 

w GS World Band Fund. 


iv GS Wortd income Fund S 

GOTTEX FUND MANAGEMENT 
waswraFund. 


GRANITE CAPITAL INTL GROUP 

wGrimitoCimltal Eautty S 

te Granite CapiM Mid Neutrals 


10006 

903 

123706 

11.93 

1038 

9-79 

120872 


d Dollar Medium Term. 

d Pal lor Lon g Term 

0 Japanese Yea 
d Pound Sterling, 
d Deutsche Mark . 

d Dutch Florin 

d HY Euro Curronctos- 
d SwissFronc- 


te Granite C apital Mortgage 
6HftNASEMENT 


00911 
60219 
074630 
(IRELAND) LTD 


-DM 


1300 

14X4 

13.19 

1404 

23.95 


0 FnKlItox-OOl.F**'* 156Lg 

It BrudUuj - oat Eura 936678 

174060 
851700 
167278 

13102 


GUBIN & W1EW A^ MAMAGWIENT 
Tei : (8891 945 MOO Fax : 18091 945 «88 
b Hlgnbridoe Capital Cora_J 1M7.18 

mOveriook Peitomance FcLJ TTM.” , 

m Padfic RIM Op Fd _J M60BE| 

EBC FUND MANAGERS’ UnWl LTD 
seal* SL SI Heller ; B534-3A33T 
EBCTRADED CURRENCY FUND LTD 

d Cordial * “ 

INTE^NAT K3NAL INCOME FUND 

te Erm ltage InterRqte Sird-DM 

te iimiito ^^ He« fFd-S 1] 

te Ermltage EmoMtaF !j 

te Ermltage Crosby Aslo Fd_5 l 

tt Ermttoge Amer Mol Fd-— 0 ' 

te Ermltage Enter Mkts Fd— J l 

?UMPAFUNp^6*rreO 

d American Ew«v Fund J 2fc 

5 American Option Fund S T4 

iv Asian Equity M— 1 « 

SMSFaNKTanSni ™ 

m Fwgnat QlOtTQf tnN L W - S y 

FIDELITY IHTL INV. SERVICES <U*J 
d Discovery Fund — . - — 0 xaai 

d For En« Fund— ... 

d Fid Amer. AsKte—- 

d FkL Amor. Values IV- 
d Frontier Fimd. 


GT ASSET 
TM: (44)71-7104557 

dGTAseaaFd A Shares S 74 

d GT Asoan Fd B Shares * 75. 

d GT Asia Frad A Stowes S 21 

d GT Asia Fund 8 Stowes % 23. 

d GT Aslan Small Como a ShB W. 

dGT Asian Small Comp BShJ 19. 

d GT Austrafio Fd A Shares— S 3J 

d GT Australia Fd B stwrra-J n 

d GTAudr-SmallCoASn — S »■ 

dGTAusir. Small Co BSh — % » 

d GT Berry Jwm Fd A Sh — 5 a 

d GT Berry Joponl Fd B Sh — S a 

d GTBondFflAainres S » 

d GT Bond Fd B Snores s .. 19. 

d GT Dollar Fond A Sh S 36 

rf GT Dollor Fund B Bi - J 3* 

dGT Emerging Mkts A 9i-J 19 

d GT Emerging Mkts B 5h _J 20 

d GT Em MU 5moll Co A ShJ | 

d GT Em MU Small Co BSD J ’ 

0 GT Euro Small Co Fd A ShJ C 

teGT Euro Small Go FdBEbJ £ 

d GT Hong Kong Fd A Swess 73 

dGT Kang Kong WBShorgS W 

d GT Honshu Pathfinder A ShS 13 

dGTHonsw Pomander 8 SM 13 

teGT Jop OTC Stacks Fd A Sjs ]- 

iv GT JOP OTC Stoda Fd B ShS 13 

iv GT Jao Small Co Fd A |h — 5 1! 

■rGT Jan Small Co FdBSn_S U 

iv G.T. Latin America Fd L. — s 23 

d GT strategic BdFd A Si — s < 

dGT Strategic BdFd BSh _J ( 

d GT Telecomm. Fd A Shores; 1; 

d GT Telecomm. Fd BSharesS « 

r GT Technotogy Fund A aj s 

r GT Technology Fund B Si -5 s. 

GT MANAGEMENT PLC (44 ri 71I4S67) 
d G.T. Btatedi/Heoim Fund-J Z 

d G.T. Deuhchland I Fund S T 

4E.T. Europe Fund , -J s 

nr G.T. Global Smafl CoFd — S X 

d G.T. Investment Fund S Z 

ivG.T. Korea Fund 


-Ecu 
JF 

d US Dollar Short Term * 

d HY Euro Curr Divtd Pay — Ecu 
d Swiss MUttlCUriHICV— — SF 

d European Currency- Eai 

d Belgian Franc BF 

d Convertible * 

d French Franc. FF 

d SwtB Mu ItF Dividend — — SF 

d Swiss Franc Stoirt-Tenn SF 

d Canadian Dollar C5 

d Dutch Florin Mol II FI 

d Swiss Franc DIvW Pay SF 

d CAD Mulllcur. Dtv a 

d MedUerraatan CWT SP 

d Convertibles. 


MALABAR CAP MGMT (Bermuda) LTD 


33X1 

25.11 
2008 

497900 

2703 

1802 

1804 

1471 

1309 

1203 

1105 

17.18 
2250 
13903 

15.12 
16119 

1074 

10676 

1304 

15X5 

1050 

1270 

11.18 
1803 


FF 

rt Porvesl Germany B - -.-DM 

d Porvesl ObIWtallcr B S 

d Parvest Obll-DMB DM 

d Porvesl OMFYen B Y 

d Porvesl OMFGuiden B FI 

d Porvesl ObiLFronc B FF 

d PorwestOOII-Sler B 1 

d Porvesl OMFEcuB .Ecu 

a Porvesl ObH-edux B LF 

d Parvest S-T Doltar B S 

d Parvest S-T Europe B_ 
d Porvesl S-T DEM B — 

d Parvest S-T FRFB 

d Porvesl S-T Bof Plus B. 

d Parvest Global B 

d Porvesl I to Bond B 

d Parvest Obi FLlraB — 
rt Porvesl Ini Equities B- 
d Parvest UK B. 


JDM 


d Parvest USD Plus B 1 

d Parvest S-T CHF B _ .S F 
d Porvesl aWI-Canodo B_C» 

d Parvest OW'i-DKK B_ DKK 

PERMAL GROUP 

I CommodIHw Ltd 1 

t Drakkar Growth N.V S 

I Emerging MMs HWgs s 

/ EuroMIr (Ecu! Lid. Ecu 


m Malabar tail FwxL. 


MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 
in Mint Limited - Ordinary — I 

m Mlnt Umlted- Income 5 

m Mint GW LM - Spec Issue _0 

mMMGW Lid- New 2882 S 

in Mint GW Lid -Jan 1994 S 

mMInt Gtd Ltd - Dec 19W S 

OJ MM Gld Lid ■ AW 1995 S 

in Mbit Gtd Cixrtndea » 

ntMInt GW Currencies 2fflfi_J 

in Mini Sp Res LM (BNP) 5 

mAlhena GW Fulwes. » 

toAtnero GW Currencies. % 

mAlhena GM Fkwidals IncJ 
toAJhona GM Financials Cap.S 

IWAHL Capital Mkts Fd- S 

m AH L Commodity Fund — S 

m AHL Currency Fund 1 

mAHL Real Time Trad Fd — 5 
no AML GW Real Time TnJ — s 
to Mop Guaranteed 19W LkL_S 
/a MOP Leveraged Recov. LM5 
in MAP Guarantasd 2QG9— — * 
m.VUntGGL Fin 2603 


IV G.T. Newly in dCouMrFd — S 
w G.T. US Small CompantoS-J . __ 

GUERNSEY CAPITAL MANAG EMENT LTD 
I GCM Global SeL Eq.. -J W7J2 

GUINN KSFLI GHT FD MHGRS (Gnwy)Lkl 
GUINNESS FUGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 
d Monaoed Currency S 3»J9 

d Global Band » 37 


d Global High I: 
d Gin tt t Bond— . - 

d Euro High Inc. BotoL. 
d Global Equity -—— 
d Amerlcnn Biue C hlo- 
d Japan and PoeMle — 
d UK. 


ne Band-0 


d European. 


GUINNESS FLIGHT INTL ACOJM FD 

d DeuticbeiTrart: Marwv DM 8 

d 1)5 Dollar Money——— — J 
d US Dollar HBnYd0rad__0 2436 

d I nil Bakroced Grth- —0 JjS* 

HASENBICHLER ASSET MANGT S«X^L 

• HosenWchierComAG. 
te Hasenblchler Cara inc. 

0 HaseabicrUer Dw 

teAFFT. 


e Frucfihix ■ CMrtJer r^ 
d Froanux-DM 0 " 

gaess— 

AS - Aostrak^n 
Lit -Man u^a: I 

Motr ' 

e-i 


d Global Ind Fond — — 
d Global selecfira Fut 

d international Frad- 

d New Europe Fono- 
d Orient Frad. 


d pbcWc Fund- — 
d SPecta Growth Fund, 
d World Fund—, 


HEPTAGON FUND NV 1599MUJH} 
f HeptagonGLBFixta J 

KSSSbet maSagS^nt ltd 
ws 4000. Lux: I3S2J4H 64 61 
Final Prices _ . 

m Hermes Earooeao 
nr Hermes North American FdS 
m Hermes Aslan Frad— — J 
m Hermes £«r«roMkte MFradJ 

m Hermes StraUta« Fond — 5 

or Hermes NeutrM I Fw» 5 

m Hermes Globotr 
oi Hermes BondFi 
m Hermes Storting Fd. 


2055 

49.17 
14J4 

30.17 
2409 
22.14 
1«X3 
1675 
1821 
1005 

11873 
1203 

973 
1007 
I IX* 
1274 
10X5 

974 
1818 
1073 

906 
1105 
1103 

803 

MAfimME MANAGEMENT LTD 
73 Front SJ Hamilton Bermuda i [809)292 vm 
te Maritime Mil-Sector I Ltd J 1M1A9 

teMartttmoGttl Bata Series _5 864X4 

te Maritime GM Delta Sartos 0 84137 

w Marfihne GRH Tau Srrles-J 844 

MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MGT 
EMERGING ASIAN STRATEGIES FUND 

m Class A S ]*» 

d Class B x 11579 

in Pacific Convert. Slrot — --7 9152 

MAVERICK (CAYMAN) (8171 049-7942 

MCKINLEY UkPtT AL PARTNERS, LTD 

m The Carsoh- Fund LM -7 112.17 

MEESPIERSON _ 

Rafcin 55, HH2idi, Amsterdam (2DSZI1 188) 

* Asia Pan Growth Fd N.V. - J 40x6 

» Aslan Capital Holdings * *073 

iv Asian Selection Fd N V— -FI 1 DW1 

te DP Amer. Growth Fd N.V. _S 3701 

teEMS onshore Fd N.V. __Fi 'WX5 

te Europe Growth Fund ILV.-FI 

te Japan Diversified Fund 5 5470 

w Leveraged Can Hold 1 40® 

te.TWWBPac HaM. N.V S 349J7 

MERRILL LYNCH , 

d Dollar Assets Portfolto 5 1J» 

d Prime Rote Portfolio — — j ltt» 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TERM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 
d Class A 7 

GLOM LCU RRENCY B DNDSSRI ES 
AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

d Category A ** 

d CatBwrv R 

CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
d Category A. — a 

d Category r 


f Invesl mere Hldgs N.V 5 

f Media l> Cam muni cat tons— S 

l Masco I Lid — S 

PICTET* CIE- GROUP 

m PXLF UK VOt (Lux) 1 

w P.C.F Germavol (Lux) DM 

w P.C.F Naramval (Lux) J 

te PC.F Vallber (Lux) Ptas 

teP£.FVo0ltoIlolLuxl LM 

w P.CF vattfoncr (Lux) FF 

>v P.U.F. volbond SFR (Lux) JF 
te P.U^. Volbond USD (Lux) J 
w P.U.F. Volbond Ecu ( Luxj -Ecu 
w P.U.F. Volbond FRF (LuxJ_FF 
* PJJ.F. Volbond GBP (Lux) J 
te P.U.F. Vatoond DEM (Lux) DM 
wPUF.USSBdPtfULur)_0 
nr P.U.F. Model Fd — Ecu 


11102 
1832 
1700 
1404 
1005 
6X6 

3120298 

490.7238 

1230666 

806 

2304 

575800 

6604 

26.13 

13571 

126632 

689.18 

1775.94 

192107 

16283000 

163807 

208204 

16201 

13702 

1722100 

12022 

13004 

542.91 

181022 

1047208 

775800 

7108 

54779000 

10721 

91.93 

9007 

2513 

18804 

97107 

95402 

289906 

91704 

172525 

1319J71 

104605 

1777X6 

6356 

90.19 
2043 

1036108 

11592800 

1332X4 

29604 

23104 

18705 

980.17 

95.19 
29124 

10118900 
raw 
192X9 
149 J6 
151.12 
22724 
67125 
47772 


IV SF Bonds H Wortd Wide— S 

teSF Bonds J Belgium .BF 

te SF Ea K North Amor ka _0 

iv 5 F Eo. L W .Europe Ecu 

teSF EqM Padfic Basin Y 

teSF Eq P Growth Countries 5 

teSF EqQ GM Mines 5 

teSF EaR Wortd Wide 0 

ir SF Short Term S France— FF 

teSF Short Term T Eur. Eoj 

SODITIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC. 

w SAM Brazil f a*M 

te SAM Diversified —5 ™ 

teSAM/McGarr Hedge S JO104 

h SAM Opportunity » W3J 

iv SAM Strategy — * JJMB 

m Alpha SAM S 12905 

teGSAM Composite * 34U1 


1602 

32.12 

131X3 

1278 

2391 

1801 

1876 

WIM 

1725 

1676 

1511 

1727 

3376 

15.19 

1690180 

1671 


d UBS America Lai too SF 

d UBS America Latino S 

rt UBS Asia New Horizon. SF 

J UBS Asia New Horizon 5 

a UBS SmaU C Europe SF 

d UBS Small C Europe— — DM 

d UBS Port Inv SFR Inc SF 

d UBS Port Inv SFR CraG-SF 

d UBS Part Inv Ecu Inc SF 

d UB5 Port Inv Ecu Inc Ecu 

d UBS Pori Inv Ecu Cop G— SF 
d UBS Port Inv Ecu Cap G— .Ecu 

d UBS Port Inv USS Inc I 

d UBS Port Inv USS Inc SF 

d UBS Pori Inv USS Cap G—5F 

d UBS Port Inv USS COP G S 

d UBS Port lm DM Inc — -JF 

d UBS Port Inv DM Inc DM 

a ubs Port inv dm cap g — sf 
d UBS Pari lav DM Coe G — DM 
d Ycn-lnvest - ■ — — Y 

d UBS MM invest -USS 5 


IV F.l.T. Fund FF 
te FJAP. Portfolio. 


w FoJrfkrfd mn Lta. 


te Fairfield Sentry Ltd 

w Fairfield Strategies Ltd . 
m Fatum Fund, 
in Firebird (feerseas Ltd. 
w First Eagle I 


m First Ecu Lid 

or First Frontier Fund 

■in First infl Investment Lid. 
w FL Trust Asia. 


w FL Trust Switzerland. 
d Farxfltalto- 


w Fonlux 3 - Inn Brad — 

0 Formula SatocUon Fd— 
m Future Generation Ltd. 
mGEM Generation L1d_ 
m Gem fail Cays Ltd. 
rn Germ Progressive Fd Ltd— 5 

or German SeL Associates DM 

mGFMC Growth Fund 5 

iv Gtabal 93 Fund LM t 3 

iv Global Arbitrage Lid SF 

b Gtabal Cro Fd BVl Lid 5 

■r Global Futures Mat Ltd — J 

m Globe* Monetary Fd Ltd 8 

w fionnoffi 

rt GrcenLkie France. FF 

si) GuorarMea Capitol limn *4 LF 

nr Harbinger Latin Amer S 

t Houssmam Hktos N.V 5 

wHB investments Ltd i 

m Hemisphere Neutral Feb 285 
d Heiil age Cap Growth Fd LklS 

w Hast la Fund. s 

b MghtolthK CaritoiCorp s 

te Horizon Fond FF 

IV Ibex Holdings Lid SF 

w IFDC Japan Fund Y 

A n fl-inn x 

A ILA-1GF S 

b ILA-INL. 


te Indlga Currency Fd LM. 

r Inn Securl lies Fund 

d intertundSA ... 
d Investa DW5. 


» jam Pacific Fund — 
m Janan Seiectfon Asses, 
te Japan Selection Fixid . 
iv Kratnar Gld. Series 2 . 
w Kenmar Guarantaed _ 
m Kt Asia Pacific Fd Ltd. 
te KM GlobaL. 
d kml-ii High Yield. 


iv Korea Dynamic Fund 5 

w Korea Growth Trust 1 

to LF. YleM & Growth Fd s 

w Lo Fovefie Holdings Lid — S 
m La Jolla ini Grin Fd Lid — s 
A Later man: CM tenure Slrot _s 
iv Leaf Sr'-"* y 

to LOU Performance Fd S 

w LF Internafional __S 

nr London Porltollo Services— 5 

m LPS Infl H.P.B. S 

Luvtund 5 


d UBS MM InveN-tSt. 
d UBS MM Inwsi-Ecu. 


.Ecu 


SB GLO BA L F UND LTD 
mSR Aslan. 


mSR inlernotlonol. 


SVEN5KA HANDELS BANKER SA. 

146 Bd ae la Pelrusse. L-2330 Luxembourg 


9706 

9802 

181.91 


A She Bond Fund. 


te svensfco SeL Fa Amer Sh — S 
w Svenska SeL Fd Garmanv-J 
te Swftska SCI. Fd loti Bd ShJ 

nr Svenska SeL Fd tail Sh S 

» Svenska SeL Fd Japan Y 

w Svenska SeL Fd Mlti-MM _S*k 
w Svenska Set Fd Ftoclj Sh_J 
» Svenska 5eL Fd Swed Bds—Sek 
w Svenska SeL Fa Sylvia Sn -Eai 
SWISS BANK CORP. 

d SBC 100 index Fund — SF 

d SBC Equity Ptfl-Australla-AS 
d SBC Equity PiD-Canada — C8 
d SBC Equity Ptfl-Euroue. — Ecu 
a SBC Eq PHt-Nethertands — FI 

d 5BC Govern Bd WBI- > 

J SBC Bond PMI-Austr SA — AS 
d SBC Bond Pm-AustrSB — AS 
d SBC Bond PUVCanS A— — <3 

d SBC Band PtfiCanJ B CS 

d SBC Bond Ptfl DM A DM 

d SBC Bond PW-OM B DM 

d SBC Band PTH-Dui* G.A-FJ 
d SBC Bond Pfff-Oufch G. B— FI 

d SBC Bend Ptfi-Ecu A Ecu 

d SBC Bend Ptfi-Ecu B Epi 

d SBC Bond Ptfl-FF A FF 

d SBC Bond Ptfl-FF B— — FF 

rt SBC Bond Ptfl -Ptas A/B — Ptas 
d SBC Bond Pifl-Stertlna A — c 
d SBC Bond PHI-S»r1tra B — l 
d SBC Bond Porttollo-SF A — SF 
a SBC Bond Porttalio-SF B — SF 

d SBC Bond PttHISS A 5 

d SBC Band PtH-USS B.. ■ 5 

d SBC Bond Ptfl -Yen A Y 

d SBC Bond P Ml- Yen B Y 

d SBCMMF-AS AS 

d SBC MMF ■ BFR .BF 

d SBCMMF-CmJ 


121602 

1369.95 

131804 

128409 

1502.17 

119177 

39X0 

3828 

1607 

072 

15J77 


CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 

d OassA-l -A 

d Ckns A-2 -5 

d Class B-l — — * 

d Class FT * _ 

DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 
d C ot wry A —DM 

EUROPEAN BONO PORTFOLIO I DM) 

a aossA-i — — — * 

d Clan A-2 J 

d Class B-l 0 

d C30SSB-2 — S 


18X3 

1812 


1359 

1309 


1504 

1607 


i* P.U.T. Emero Mkts (Luxl-S 
iv P.U.T. Eur.Opport ILuxI —Ecu 
b P.U.T. Global Value I Lux) -Ecu 
w PJJ.T. Euroval I Lux). — — Ecu 

d Pictet vabulsse (CH) SF 

mlnfi Small Cap tlOM) ■ — S 
PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 
c/o P.O. Bax HOD. Grand Cavman 
Fax: (®f I WM993 
m Premier US Equity Fund— i 
bj Premier Ea Risk Mgt Fd—S 
m Premier Inti Eq Fund— — S 
m Premier Sovereign Bd Fd_3 

to Premier Global Bd Fd S 

m Premier Total Return Fd— 5 
PUTNAM _ 

d Emerging Him Sc. Trusi — 5 
w Putnam Em. Into. Sc. Trrali 
d Putnam Glob. High Growth 0 
d Putnwn Hiatt Inc. GNMA Ftn 

d Putoom infl Fund S, 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 

■v Aston Oevetooment — s 

te Emerghig Growth Fd N.V— J 1*8.11 

w Quantum Fund BLV.. .7 1576807 

te Quantum Industrial — - — 5 

teOuonlum Roolty Trust S 13528 

te Quantum UK Realty Fund J 1M.V6 

w Quasar Inti Fund N.V S 1«S23 

iv Quota Fund N.V S UL47 

QUARRY MANAGEMENT LTD 
Toleghone : M9-9I7-0858 
Facsimile : 809-949-000 _ 

d Atkn ATOHroge Fd Lid 5 *029 

if Hesaeris Fund Ud S HJ8M 

dMirkfian Hedge FdLM s/s S '8-59 

d Zenith Fund Ltd s/s —2 8602 

REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 

iv New Korea Growth FtL 5 12x6 

w Nova Lot Pacific Inv Co — s 4S« 

w Padfic Arbitrage Co * 9.13 

m RJ_ Country wrulFd— — J 27U6 

d Regent GIW Am Grth Fd—S f£46 

d RegenlGIbi Euro Grth FdJ 3AS 

d Regent Gib) Hitt Grth W * ™ 

d Resetd Gtbl Jea Grth Fd—S 25246 

tf Regenl Gtbi Padl Basfai — S 4X0B 

a Regent GW Reserve -J 2.1667 

d Regent Gtal Resources S 

d Regent GKU Ttoer S 32970 

,d Rogeru Glbl UK Grth Fd — s 10« 

te Regent Moghul Fd Ltd J iS 

at Regenl Pacific HdoFd S 1130529 

d Regent Sri LonkaFd — J J1-* 

w Undervalued Assets Ser I -J 1006 

ROB ECO a ROUP ,. J| , u , J ,_ r|J 

POB 9737080 AZ RalterdanUnllO 2241224 

d RG America Fund FI 14320 

d RG Europe Fwd FI 13400 

d RG Podtlc Fund F 14578 

d RG DMrenre Fund JFI 5430 

. tf RG Money PhaF FI FI 113.18 

d RG Money PhAFS ]014» 

d RG Money Ptas F DM DM 11T.19 

d RG Money Plus F 5F SF M6X4 

More Robeco see Amsterdam Stocks 


d SBC DM Short-Term A DM 

d SBC DM Short-Term B dm 

d SBC MMF ■ Dutai G. FI 

tf SBC MMF - Ecu Ecu 

d 5BC MMF ■ ESC— ESC 


tf 5BCMMF-FF. 

tf SBC MMF -LI! 

tf SBC MMF- Ptas 

d SBC MMF -Schilling 
tf SBC MMF - Sterling- 
d SBC MMF -SF 


.FF 


tf sac MMF - US- Dollor 

tf SBC MMF - USS/ 1 1 

d SBC MMF -Yen 


d SBC Gtat-Ptfl Sf Grth. JF 

d SBC G HU- Ptfl Ecu Grth Ecu 

tf SBC G Ibl-Plll USD Grifi 1 

a SBC Glbf-Pffl SF Yld A SF 

d SBC GiM-PIll SF YtdB SF 

d SBC Glbl-Pfff Ecu Yld A — Ecu 
d SBC Glbl-Ptfl Ecu Yld B — Ecu 
tf SBC Gttd-Ptfi USD Yld A — S 
a SBC GM-PIfl USD Yld B— J 

tf SBC Gim-PMISF Inc A SF 

d SBC Glbt-PHI SF Inc B SF 

tf SBC Glbl-Ptfl Ecu inc A Ecu 

tf SBCGlbPFin Ecu inc B — Jcu 
a sac GlW-Ptfi USD IHC A — S 
tf SBC GIW- Ptfl USO Inc B — 3 
d SBC GUM Plfl-DM Growth —DM 
d SBC GIW Ptfi-OM Yld A/B -DM 
if SBC GUM PtfHJM Inc A/B -DM 

tf SBC Emerging Morketfl S 

rt SBC Small & MM Caps 5w _SF 

d AroerkaVator — — J 

a Angiovator — c 

tf Asia Portfolio —* 

d Convert Bond Selecfira >F 

d D-Mark Band Selection DM 

d Dollar Bond Selection J 

d Ecu Band Selection-- Eai 

d Florin Bond Selection — — FI 
rt FranceVolor — - ■ ■ — ff 

tf German la valor -DM 

d GoWPartfoito 7 

d Ibertavalor -Pta 


tf Start Ino Bond SetecHra— — t 
d Sw. Foreign Bond 5eiedlra7F 

d SwtaValor — SF 

tf Universal Brad Seiecrton - JF 
d Universal Fund SF 


5S0S 

1428 

1126 

12X5 

5706 

391 

H3J9 

725 

142529 

1441X9 

181300 

21000 

21800 

19800 

38000 

1007X8 

17274 

121X4 

11USI 

12627 

mm 

101-73 

17127, 

18277! 

HUM 

131-94' 

60206 

686X2 

971400 

5662 

6106 

1149.98 

1408.11 

1D40J 

11007 

11030200 

11541700 

4381X1 

11179600 

4477X2 

102101 

132106 

733R52 

374306 

45257800 

2509174 

534566100 

36126600 
3189824 
201906 
5889.19 
72D2J6 
208678 
59757600 
118342 
1287X2 
118703 
1112X6 
121305 
121803 
1343X3 
107034 
117720 
10*5X1 
111404 
114618 
116679 
1007X1 
103101 
1079-36 
105904 
104639 
1124X5 
533JD 
34002 
22601 
648.17 
10684 
11707 
13645 
10509 
1310 . 
218528 
53776 
37474 
686620 0 
50082700 
2462808 
1MJ9 
11125 
58925 
7025 
1W Jl 
1182508 


tf UBS MM Invest- Yi 

tf UBS MM Invesl-LII Lit 

tf UBS MM Invest-SFR A SF 

tf UBS MM Invest-SFR T SF 

tf UBS MM Invest-FF FF 

tf UBSMM Invest -H FI FI 

tf UBS MM Invast-Ccm S CS 

tf UBS MM Invesl-BFR BF 

rf UBS Short Term Inv-DM — DM 

tf UBS Bond Inv-Ecu A Ecu 

tf UB5 Bond Inv-Ecu T Ecu 

d UBS Bond Inv-SFR SF 

tf UBS Bond Inv-DM DM 

d UBS Brad inv-USS S 

tf UBS Bond Wv-FF FF 

tf UBS Bond inv-Can* CS 

tf UBS Bond Inv- Lit LU 

tf UBS BJ-USJ Extra Yield — 5 
d UBS Fix Term lnvms$94_S 
tf UBS Fix Term imrtSt 94__t 
tf UBS Fix Term InwSFR 96-SF 
tf UBS FIX Term lnv-DM«6_DM 
d UBS Fix Term Inv-Ecu !6_Ecu 
a UBS FI* Term inv-FF 96 — FF 

d UBS Eq Inv- Europe A DM 

tf UBS Ea Inv-Eurene T DM 

d UBS Eq lnvSCanUSA—0 
tf UBS Port I Fix we (5FR)_J5F 
tf UBS Part I FU Inc (DM) — DM 
tf UBS Port I FU rnc (Ecu)— Ecu 
tf UBS Port » Fh me (USW-S 

tf UBS Con lnv-90/10 SFR SF 

tf UBSCOPlnv-fO/lO USS 5 

a UBS Cos lnv-90/10 Germ — DM 
WORLD FOLIO MUTUAL FUNDS 

if * Daily Income 5 

tf DM Doily income DM 

tf i Bond income. . 1 

tf Nra-sr 
tf Gtefeiir 
tf Global Balanced— —J 

tf Gtabol Equities 5 

tf US Conservative Equlltos—S 

tf US Aoracsiw Equities s 

tf European Equities. 0 

tf Padfic E (tattles * 

tf Natural Resources. 


4500V 

59.10 r 
14400 y 
0O0Ov 
14370 V 
21200 V 
11209 y 
1120Oy 
17600 V 
36208 V 
32800V 
21400 V 
26300 V 
11800 V 
243009 
27970 V 
18440 V 
32900 V 

18100 V 
36400V 
45650 V 
19800 y 
26100 V 
21456 V 
211X0 y 
23000 
187/:. 
KKJSy 
74X3 V 
8900 V 
62X5 y 

103.10 V 
12270 V 
IBJJOy ■ 
11025 y 
W1S5V 
*201 y 
10505 V 
6678 y 
7323y 

10S.MV 
10500 y 
7173V 
9660V 
11690 V 

mssv 

11920 V 
9058600/ 
1011.71 
408.79 
51107 
10090500 
1(0535400 
smji 
539109 
5129X5 
1022.91 
1015X9 

-umwiwi 

S2X3 
107.9) V 
1(0.79 V 
104.11V 
10603 V 
9973 y 
111676 V 
10244 Y 
118853600 v 
9502V 
110.14 * 
111.71 V 
11103V 
11651V 
11610 V 
llSXSv 
23617 V 
244X1 » 
12690 V 
10657 v 
103X9 V 
10453* 
9809v 
10637V 
10502 v 
12508 V 

100 

1JKI 
17X2 
2505 
MX 
1616 
17.70 
1406 
1408 
1022 
1114 
606 


to Lynx Sel. Hokttngs- 
teM 1 Mull I- Strategy- 


JF 


w MKInwton Offsnore. N.V — 5 
m Master Cop 6 Hedge Fd—S 
w Maflerhorn OtWiore Fd— 5 
wMBE Japan Fund. I F 

in McGinn fa. Global I Feb 26)_s 

mMCM Ini. Limited 5 

iv Millennium internoUotial— S 

toMJM i ni emotional Ltd i 

m Momentum Guild Ltd l 

w Multi futures FF 

d New Millennium Ful. Lid —S 
tf Newbank Debentures- 


inNMT Aslan Sel. Porttoilo 5 

w Noble Partners infl Lid 1 

nrNSP F.l.T. Ud * 

in Ocean Strategies Limi led— 5 

wOid Ironside Inn Lta 5 

m Dmega Overseas Partners J 

mOPPenheliner US. Arts S 

te Optimal Effect Ful. Ltd A _i 
iv Optimal EHed Ful. Ltd B_SF 

m Optimum Fund I 

te Oracle Fund Ltd S 

m Overlook Performance S 

to pocfl RIM Opp BVl Apr 4 _S 
m Pan Fixed Inc Fd I Jon 31 U 

m PAN Internal tonal Lid 5 

wPancurrl inc. — X 

m Panda Fund Pfc- 


m Panpipes Ottshore (Feb 31 S 

to Paragon Fund Limited .5 

m Parallax Fund Ltd .— — — S 
mPequol Inl'l Fund ■■■■.* 

w Pharma/Whealth S 

w Plurigeslkm Ptontore, FF 

w Phirioeslian Plurivaleur — FF 

w Plurlvast Slcav FF 

to Pomfiay Overseas Lid — -5 

mPortuauese Smaller Ca S 

m Prima Bond Plus Fd LM — S 
m Prima Capitol Fund Lta — 5 
m Prime Muttt-invesi J 

mPrimeo Fund.. 5 

0 Proflrenl SA.. 


0 Pyramid inv Fd Corp s 

tf RAO InL Inv. Fd, S 

d Regal tall Fund Ltd — — S 

1 Ric Inavest Fund B. 


w RM Futures Fund Slcav- 

Hi Sailor's Inll Equltv 

w Sailor’s Inll Fixed 

rt Sanyo Kle. Spain Fd 

tf Sarokreek Holding N.V. . 
te Saturn Fund. 


.Ecu 

.Ecu 


to Savoy Fund Ltd ■ .. . 0 

mSC Fimdom. Val BVl Lid— 0 
tf SCI / Tech. SA LuxembouioS 
msdmliar Guar. Curr Fd — 3 
rn Scimitar Guaranteed Fd — S 
ni Seteda Global Hedge Fd— J 

tf Selective Fut. Ptfl Ltd S 

mSe modes -S 

iv Sinclair MullHund Lid 5 

iv SJO Gtabal (60*1921-6695 — 5 
» Smith Barney Wrldwd Sec J 
iv Smith Barney Wrldwd SoecS 
w SP International SA A Sn _S 
iv SP inlernattanoi SA B Sn-J 

inspirit Hedge ttid s 

m Spirit Neutral Hid 5 

n Stanley Ross Futures Fund Fr 
n- Stein harm Oseaj Fd Lid— 0 
wSteinhardt Really Trust — S 

m Stricter Fund -J 

m S frame Othhore Lid S 

tf Sunset Gtabal ill Lid- S 

tf Sunset Global Gne S 

mSiBsev McGarr S 

mTns Currency. 


YIELD ENHANCEMENT STRATEGISTS 


tf Enhanced Trees. Returns— 5 


Other Funds 

n> Actlcroflraunce Slcav. 

0 Act HI nonce Skew 

wAcfifutures LM. 


te Acfiaestlw Slcav 
w Actives! mn Slcav 

m Advanced Latin Fd LM — 
in Advanced Pacific Stmt — 
w Advanced Strategies LM. 
w AlG TahMn Fond— 


teAauDa Infernal fauxil Fund J 
teArbifln Investment. — - — 5 

w Aram Fund Batanced SF 

te Araus Fund Band. 


a Asia Oceania Fund. 

te ASS (Aslenl AG _ . 

iv ASS (Derivative) AG DM 

wASS (Zeros) AG DM 

in Associated investors Inc— S 

te Albena Fund Ltd S 

ivATO Nikkei Fund — J 

w Banzai Hedged Growlh Fd J 
iv Beckman Inf Cop A rr S 

te BEM Internattonai Ltd S 

tf BlkubenWtonnjI EEF - ■ F eu 
tf Bkanar GttU Fd [CoymanlS 
d BJecmar Global (Bahoms) S 

d C.CLL— — — S 

to Cal Euro Leverage Fd LU-S 
m Capital Assured imfla Fd — S 
d CB German Index Fund — JJM 

toCervIn Growth Fund S 

m Chilian Inti IBVI) Ud S 

te CltadtH Limited — ■ SF 

tf CM USA J 

te CM I investment Fund S 

to Columbus HoMtoOS S 

m Concorde inv Fund 


wCwt West Actions Inti— BF 

te Conthrefl OMI Beta* CT BF 

wCortiveStOMI World DM 

» Convert. Fd Inrt A Certs — S 
»v Convert Fd inti b Certs — s 
to Crow Drill Cop— — — S 
mCrescoi Aston Hedge Fd — 5 

mCRM Futures Funa Ltd J 

w Comber inn NV.. 1 

te Curr. Concept 2000- 


tf D. Witter WW Wide ivt Tst J 

te D.G.C. — * 

d Dahua Japan Fund— Y 


d DB Aroeflllno Bd I . _ 

d DBSC / Nafto Bond Furta_5 

w Derivati vo Anset Alton — —5 

d Drevtas America Fund I 

*f dvt Performance Fd—S 
to Dynasty Fund- 


d veil Bond Soledhm— Y 

TEMPLETON WJWIDe INVBST64ENTS 
GROWTH PORTFOLIO 

d CknsA-1 J 1»^ 

d Class A-2 O -5 16M 

tf Class A-3 -1 1425 

tf Class B-l — * JIM 

tf Class B-2 S ISLES 

INCOME PORTFOLIO 
d ClaaA 

tf QassB 


THORNTON MANAGEMENT LTD 

tf PncH invt Fd SA c 1 

d Port! Invt Fd 5A DM -DM 

tf Eastern Crusader Find S 

if Tnor. LI til Droaons Fd Ltd J 
tf Thornton Orient me Fd Ltd* 

tf Thornton Tiger Fd Ltd s 

tf Managed Selection .5 


w EOS Overseas Fteld LM — J 

m Elite Wortd Fund Ltd SF 

tf Eml Beta. Ind. Plus A BF 

rf Eml Bela. Ind. Phis B — BF 

tf Eml France ind. Phis A — .FF 
tf Em) France Ind. Plus B—FF 

tf Eml Germ. ind. Plus A DM 

d Eml Germ. Ind. Plus B DM 

tf Eml Noth. Index Plus A — FI 
d Em) Nerh. index Plus B — FI 

tf Eml Spain ind.PUaA Pto 

if Eml Spam ind. Plus B Pto 

tf Eml UK Index Plus A E 

tf Eml UK Index PhisB 1 

m Eautetar Offshore Ud__S 
te EvIr.Sto Inv. M Ecu Bd FdEcu 
te Esplr. Sis inv. 5th Eur Fd_3 
a Europe 1992. ... .3 


d Europe Obligations. 


.Ecu 


1.11937 


54417 

9SS03 

119659 

6B6.7I 

2726 

188678 

189.10 

10430 

163X4 

106517 

971607 

539X0 

99650 

122445 

112223 

1420 

995JB 

xm 

41470 

947J4 

10415 

941.48 

59S47B 

108 

1107 

119X7 

47558 

42901 

4805 

2564606 

100 

15226 

104X4 

1015474 

148X6 

28129 

»S1J0 

mm 

126138 

10525X0 

49927 

SUM 

7&S0 

14127 

75503 

512X5 

10U06 

2826 

32009 

6931 

938300 

1101126 

>26508 

2126 

10700 

108 

1B6308 

1009105 

1094600 

1168308 

977X9 

100405 

105.95 

109X8 

66104 

674X9 

122*600 

1279000 

12634 

13901 

11615 

10602 

608 

TBJ3 

18409 


w Tecnno Growth Fund sf 

d Templeton Gtabal Inc 5 

toThe Bridge Fund N.v._ — S 
in The Geo-Global Offshore — S 
tf The Instil Multi Advisors — S 

mine J Funa B.v.I.Lia S 

w The Jaguar Fund N.V. — — S 

a The Larin Equities Fd 5 

d The NYA-R-5 Fd 5icov A— 5 

tf The M'A’R'S Fd Sicnv i DM 

to The Seychelles Fd Lid 5 

m The Smart Band Ud SF 

te The Yellow Sea Invt Co 5 

iv Thema M-M Futures S 

m Tiger Selec Hold NV Bid — 5 
b TIIC (OTC) Jan. Fd Sfcav-X 
b Tokyo (OTC) Fund Slcav— S 

■r Trans Gtabal Invt Ud 5 

d Transpacific Fond. 


1674J3 
191439 
1051 
1300 
158*25 
10620*06 
132306 
97633 
27.74 
947.«5 
68864808 
10903 
62471 
1529X0 
11509 
T07S 
21300 
12577.10 
13801X4 
259.13 

2446600 
1254 
1109 
10JC 
lOUfl 
31X8 
4009 
8606 
I65JM 
6481 

223X0 

114500 

1300 

110 * 

939700 

hlbUB 

2143JI 
3496 
l«BX3 
160.73 
17703 
108802 
116980 
1050644 
118908 
I2JK 
11022 
132X1 
15903 
I1CC.11 
1773 
100JK 
1526501 
2O630C 
1263.lt 
239.71 
1411 
111.98 
9904 
61.49 
1051X8 
124*00 
327X9 
1 7405 
113 
7463* 
11665 
1550658 
16301 
66702 
54436 
2850.70 
10801 
2203.99 
10808 E ! 
1059* 
158.480 
204.73 
99.958 
110X4 
1021 
9104 
20131 
*5.18 
95009 
6040 
6621 
106207 
12.46 
9404 
12108 
84135 
4.45 
134700 
305 
1440.16 
12995604 
94.14 
2050457 
132102 
138705 
8.91 
14 M 
148803 
115105 
1I94JI 
1674 
704 
900 

11661*1 
420.17 
12904 
107999 

111502 

5 r.*) 

297 95 
13812XJ 
952074* 
17502 
11100 
75 « 
104353 
9Jo.lt 
. 131 

:wto 

S*t:-5 
jsr.r 

I’CSM- 
a:.to 
44 55 
0A» 
1201 
115551 
13C0» 
IC170I 
5SJ90 
:<i9a®9^ 
i9s*.r 
308103 
*txri 
«4807 


w Trtnify Futures Fd Ltd. 
to Triumph l 


to Triumph HI. 
m Trtumnn iv. 


tf Turouolse Fimd 
m Tweedy Browne IntT nv.. 
w Tweedy Browne n.v. Cl A_ 
w Tweedy Browne ruv a B_ 

rf UbaFutures — 

tf UOa Futures Dollar 

f Ultimo Growth Fa Ltd. 


tf Umbrella Debt Fund LM — 5 

tf Umbrella Fund LM 5 

wUm Bond Fund Ecu 

ivunl Capital AUemcwre DM 

w Uni Capital Convertibles — Eat 

w Uni-Global Slcav DEM DM 

iv Uni-GInbal Slcav Ecu Ecu 

te UlM-Gtabal Slcav FRF FF 

te Uni -Global Slaw FS SF 

n> Unl-G tonal Slcav USD % 

d Unico Equity Fund — DM 

tf Unico inv. Fund — 


mUnttrodesCHF. 
m Unit redes CHF Reg- 

m Unltrodes FRF 

m Unllrades USD 

te Ursus Inll LM 

m Victor Futures Fund. 


JF 


b Voyager investments Pie — 2 

w Vulture Ltd — * 

m writes wilder mil Fd 5 

iv Wilier Japan Y 

teWHIer South Eosl Asm S 

wWIDowbrtdae InllCFM S 

d Win Global Fd Bd. Ptil Ecu 

if Win Gtabal Fd Eq PHI Ear 

tf Win Global Fd Res Ptfl SF 

d world Balanced Fund SA—S 

m Worldwide Limited 5 

w WPG Fortier Oseas Pari —5. 
idWW Caeirot Grrh Fd Ltd — 5 
mY subo- 


rn Zeptrvr Hedge Fund. 
mZweB lari Lid 


12.148 
97 Jb 
I05 1 
401 

2167900 

1042xn 

14IA93 

87654 

84127 

85456 

16352 

214336 

4701 

1754 

35169.74 
530650 
6.70 
12103 
197X1 
234900 
364136 
153339 
125615 
127103 
M99.H 
1192.73 
I7JI.II 
7007 
6656 
132309 
1149*9 
14331 16 
121136 
445400 
14897 
23036 
1IJMF2 
2777 77 
96*54 
21E0H 
1545 
107837 
1-riXO 
12937 
22175 
12.95 
9234 
158B2DS 
1068 05 
21567 

77109 

19S164W 


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l fie>»^nfi^oiP>Siff*aiop55§S55ia>aS?TanS^53'>6s«cc:-iHl£ , «r^T-iiooonnni»5r-ncB5%co-nnin6HloonB«5«>eno6 


ge 16 


NASDAQ 

Wednesday's 4 p jn. 

This list compiled by the AP. consists of the 1.000 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value. It is 
updated twice a year. 


HOT Low Slot* 





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_ - 22 7*5 16 15* 16 

32 1 20 268 25 24 ?4i'> ‘H, 

94 J II 2016 29* 28 28*3 -4. 

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41 O 21 S 23* 23 23’. -V. 

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_ 40 1215 19* IB Vi !S*j —V] 

_ _. 44 129. 12'1 12*. — * 

- - 309 14'4 13V» 135. — '.! 

-.1009 S«S 21 30 20V l, — ’V t, 

_ 170 17* 17* I’ 1 . •% 

_ 1740 9W S* 8* — * 

_ - 117 30V. 30 30'. —V, 

_ J1 3354 20 1B»4 19’.— IV. 

- 110 3912 20V. 19* 19V, 

- 17 703 19* 18* 19* _. 

.96 l!5 25 2910 50* 48* 49* *| 

ij* 43 fi 2 ^ B%f4irJ% 

- 31 270 73* 70* 71 —I*' 

_ 48 3S0 17* 16* 17* — *. 

Jt 1JI 94 1206 20* 19 * 19* — * 

- 35 2909 53* 52. 53* +‘V„ 


-69 24* 23V, 23", .. 

_ 46 1*91 17 14* 15* -1 

_ 2D 244 19 18 18* -1 

_ 12 206 17* 16* 16*4 — * 

4 - 03 2^ ff* wimgzti 

= « ® sfi & Ife 

_ 19 2276 If . 15’i 15* — * 
_. 34 868 34* 33% 34* - 

, u 1 1 & 1% B i*u* 



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_ . . Wednesday's doslna 

.Jf^ii2.' nc,ut * a 018 nB flOnwicle prices up to 
S*™«J *nd & n* reflet 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


17 Worth 

i-fcan Low son 


^ **m pe loos man i »m.i 


Sr'lSlSALC 5 ^ 143 49 « ,1 s9 ** »W B% —14 
n fVsAMintin "■ 33 14 ‘? ^ ^S a S* +, u . 

lVu ^AMlnurt — .3 W 9*hi — Vb 

ijK 722jSr wl - 12 'V* ■*, ’Vu— U U 

= * S fifiTa :a 

4S£s3&jp* = - a J^JS 2s +* 

av u HuASR J3B1SJ ” ,5? ^h. 02 ?!! ,Vl 

’I5‘KSS5S, “• " : Ig £ <$ $ .« 

f... i&aSES 4 - - . J *5 »£ »2 +%. 


BIO 3% ActcCom 
S 35’i.Acfnau 

3 1 -* 1 56 Act ion 100 iuT “>■ ,** s/,'* ~ - ** 

= g « r\ef s 

’JSSSSSt - " 11" w d .I£ ik :st 

lffiS a^AdMfirt" - “ « »/* '£ «* s 

510 3% AdvPnot i? 5vs S£ Sw. +w 

3 V. 2% Aeroion I n 2? 3}* iT 

16V. B AlrWot ~ 8 -U S! £5* V “ 

.» aas? ~ si “ ,F £ £ = 

- an »« itS.JS +% 

?a rasssf = 2 3 £ $ % •* 

64 254 Alpftoln M S iu = 

174 6VlAlptnGc ” “ JIB 7 «£ 7 — * 

114 6%AttnEno 1 M m Iv. u. 

1>0 WAmoxGwt ~ ,1 tSr uT » tS 

ffi =: : " 3^ * «S S8 iw 

■. «• . _ % Amwth _ 30ft i Ul . n?" 


- - 22 IVu 14 1V„ _ 

._ 4 41 7 64 64 + VO 

- I« 125 9% 9% 94 _ 

40 34 34 34 —4 

- - JIB 7 - 64 7 „ 

- ~ 1 64 64 64 — % 

- . . 3277 7 64 64 + Vo 


h&iiSafSp 5 1J5 iu :: “2 ,> , ^ _* 

tit" ioil*SPr" !-12 e — 27 174 17'% 17 1 - ■» 4 


'■» ® ,B 2 as ^ a-A ;s 
I^S^voSS^Ls ,s J u ,2 ^ -a ^ ; v v * 


14’0 34AIMB4 1^4e37> B 151 yj7 VS 42 _wT 

J6> 1?. AUUIBS IA4 10J 10 103 uS 14 144 +yt 

144 llVoAtUBBn Jle 33 10 74 imo 1"4 124 \0 

15 ll^AlWBBn J60 2.1 11 u l” i5"2 12-S ZS 

47 31*4 Alstwl l ose 24. IS 32 41 Va 41W 4110 + 4o 

iStSliioilS^? 5 •?^’ 3 H J 9 7 16*2 lfi4 1M0 tlS 

'S5. 3-5 WB 12 1910 194 19% — Vo 


14'0 9V»AmPaon _. ... 197 invo inu, 10% 

9 r* J^AREInvn M la.B Z 3 '/% + W 

’lif S> m 10% 10% 10% —w 

Bl* 31iiASCfE _. ... is 44 4 4 

4*4 '"ttAmStirtl _ _ 235 *Vu u % 1/7 

,5 ?>{ T echC -13OT 3« 3% 3% +10 

13'0 7 1 ,. AmpcM _. 41 4 9V0 9 9 % 

tr^ f, S! ,esI ■“ 18 8 5 1216 — v» 

53j? ?I’ ! f nd S« ,s - 78 *0 1510 15% 15V, — % 

3*. IViAnsAMg _. .. 19 390 3W,« — 1 ■/■■ 

15% VoAnoPar 14_S0c _ I 21 1*2 1 1 % " 


SlOl’VuAnuhco 
14>* 5Ufl«wn 
IIO SV« ArKRsI 

3% “-'u Amitru 
10 5', AmniA 

IS'o 5*o Artivlh 
4% 2VOA9TOIC 
12*4 % Atari 

6*4 4*0 Atlantis 
>6 'iAIKCM 
3’Vw 1 Atlas wt 
\B% 7%A«Ktuo> 
4*4',. VgAudre 
13 6 AurorEl 


- ... 15 4% 4 4 _ 

- _ 235 *V„ % % — */* 

-13 70 3% 3% Jto +% 

- 41 4 9% « 9 —'A 

LB B 5 12% 12% 12% — v» 

- 78 *0 15% 15% 15% — % 

_. .. 19 3V0 3Wi 6 3V. — >7,, 


- 16 105 5% SVO SVi «*A 

- - ID6 lj*i 13% 1340 *% 

... 15 5 9 9 9 — % 

- -Ml 11 _ 

- 17 2 9 9 9 4% 

- 19 76 6% 6M 6H — % 

.. 28 75 3% 3 3% +% 

- ... 866 6% 6% 6% —V. 

■Me S 9 95 6 S% 5*0 iW 

. - 69 % V„ Vu -. 

- - 16 3 3 3 

-. n 979 IS 14% 14% 4% 

- _. 1057 1V„ 'Vu *Vu — Vu 

- 77 450 B% B% BVi +% 


1% 'VuDIInd 
6% 21ADRCA 
3% 1 toiEteScoJet 0 

2 . 40DcAo4wt 
8% 5%OanlHd 
4% lVuDahvnt 
11% 4%Dfdaratn 
7% 4%Davsfr 
4 HODavstwt 
B% SMDaxor 
12% 7 % Decor at S 
9 5Vi DelEtc 
27**17% OevnE 
4% 2% Dido A 
4*Vu 2 CHfltcon 
19*0 6%Dimnr1ts 
10 lMDiOdas 
9% l%DtvCnm 
TV 4%DixnTJc 
14*612%DrPeppt 
21% l4%DoneHv 
10% 7%D»vCrt 
11% 9%Drv»Mu 
11% TVODrytNY 
BVo 6 DrivHor 



T % 4>.PIFm 
8*4 7»oaM 

9% 3'i‘^MICP 
j% l'tCSTEflt 
13’ 4 »0 CVBRi 
5*. Jv.CVD Fn i» 
V.. n u C.\R 
72 !94,Cobivsn 
U-, .i.Calprop 

l'-i/Colionn 

24*1 18V. CanWx 
13% 10 CM or CO 


39 5% 5*A 5% -% 

72 I 7% B 4% 
93 8% 7% 8 — % 

B14 1% 1% I'll —Vo 

6 12% 12 12% +% 
139 3% 0 3% J’ L -*u 

42 'Vu % <Vu ~ 
954 46% 45% 46 -3% 


8% 6 DrfuHnr 
4Vu 2%Ducom 
11% 9%DutdeK 

4 %EO ElW 
5% l%EZServ 

17% MVoEstnCo 
24% 17 Estop 1 
48% 26%EchBFpf : 
15% 5%EchoBav 
IBM 12% EcdEn 

5 in/ k Edtek> wt 
12% 6'AEtSstO 
B*V» SMEtHek 
47% 27% Elm 
32% 14% Ban wt 
36% 20% Elan tin 

9% 6%Eldorad 
B% 2%Ehinor 
9% 8%EJSwTh 
6% 544EtnpCar 
4% 2’AENSCO 
31%20%ENSCpf 
6% 2%EnwiTc 
31% 6%EnzoBI 
24 ‘A 13*4 Epitope 
16%12%EqGthl 
12V. 10 EaGth2 
12%10%EaGttl3 
IBM 9 Euuusll 
8% 3%Escaon 
50V,37%E5qRd 
5% %Ess*Fn 
13V4 6 EtzLvA 
16% 7 EtO_av 
31 15% Excel 
1% VuExpLA 
36% 29% Fab bids 
15 8% FalcCbl 

7% VuFaroMKI 
39M10 Ffcrbd 
71% 60% Find 
14% 9 FIAuSt 
11% 9%FAusPr 
7% 4%FlOlltt 
19 I7*6FCtzBslt 
12% 10 FstCSlv 
1S9 132‘AFlEtTip 

10% 6%FIUter 

22% TMFtechP 
22 16MFWU1 
34%24%FiaRck 
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spicy eastern dishes. And those who like it both ways are sure to have a return ticket to any 
of our 44 international destinations in 40 countries around the world. Our 


choice of hot in-flight cuisines is just another reason to look at us n ow 


























































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Page 18 


Amid Fiscal Crisis , 
Athens Puts Heat 
On the Tax Evaders 


Reuters 


ATHENS —The Socialist government levied new taxes on the 
wealthy and declared war on a notorious legion of tax evaders in a 
reform bill presented on Wednesday. 

Finance Minister Alexandras Papadopoulos painted a picture of 
fiscal chaos, with public debt exceeding 26 trillion drachmas (SI 00 
billion) and revenue growing by 13 percent over the last three 
months, compared with a 23 percent target in the 1994 budget. 

“Widespread tax evasion has led the country to a fiscal crisis,** he 
said. 

The most agnificant change introduced by the tax bOL which is 
due to go to parliament this week, is a long list of income criteria to 
be applied to hundreds of professional groups. 

Professionals like doctors and lawyers are often accused by 
officials of grossly underestimating their income to evade taxes. 
Greece's “black” economy, all outside the tax net. is estimated at 
more than 30 percent of gross domestic product. 

“We will try to expand the tax base with the introduction of a set 
of objective criteria to determine income of professional groups.” 
Mr. Papadopoulos said. 

Criteria include the value of property where businesses are locat- 
ed, office equipment, years of practice, size of staff and academic 
credentials. 

Lawyers, for instance, declared an average annual income in 1993 
of 1.6 million drachmas, doctors 3.0 million drachmas, accountants 
1.6 million, dentists 1.8 milli on, and actors and musicians 1.3 
million, national Economy Ministry data showed. 

Wage-earners and pensioners declared more than 2 million drach- 
mas on average in 1993. The bill will give fixed-income groups a 
break by raising their annual deductions by 40 percent in 1994. 

The government has targeted the wealthy, levying higher taxes and 
pro misin g a detailed examination of all income sources, except fur 
money invested in the stock market, Mr. Papadopoulos said. 


Rising Rates Compound Canada’s Debt Problem 

w A. . merits. Canad 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

A’r» York Tima Service 

TORONTO — Though Canada 
may deserve plaudits for its low 
inflation rate, a plummeting Cana- 
dian dollar has forced interest rates 
higher, threatening the country's 
recovery from double-digit unem- 
ployment and its most severe reces- 
sion since World War n. 

The currency’s dive to its lowest 
point m almost eight years mainly 
reflects nervousness over the gov- 
ernment's ability to control the ris- 
ingpublic debt. 

• The risk of secession by Quebec 
is also rattling foreign investors. If 
the separatists who are now leading 
in the opinion polls win the prov- 
ince’s elections this year, there is 
concern that they could persuade a 
majority of Quebeckers to approve 
sovereignty for the province in a 
referendum. 

“Canada's chronic dependence 
on foreign capital to finance bloat- 
ed payment shortfalls leaves the 
financial markets very exposed to 
sudden shifts in investor confi- 
dence," said Aron GaxnpeL, vice 
president and assistant chief econ- 
omist at the Bank of Nova Scotia. 

The Canadian dollar fell Mon- 
day to 71.60 U.S. cents, its lowest 
point since August 1986. It has 
since recovered slightly, standing at 
72.15 cents in late New York trad- 
ing Wednesday. That is still three 
cents below its value at the begin- 
ning of last month and down from 
nearly 90 cents at the end of 1991. 

As a result, interest rates, includ- 
ing those for mortgages and install- 


ment payments for cars and home 
appliances, haveju raped one to two' 
percentage points since early 
March. 

Although rates have also 
climbed in the United States, the 
rise has had more impact in Cana- 
da because Canada is more depen- 
dent on foreign capital to finance 
its deficits. 

As a percent of gross domestic 
output, both the balance-of-pay- 
rnents and budget deficits are twice 
as high in Canada as in the United 
States. 

Canada’s reliance on foreign 
borrowing, chiefly from the United 
States, to finance its national 
health, unemployment insurance 
and other domestic programs has 
caused its foreign debt to more 
than double since the early 1980s. 

The foreign debt stood at 252.8 
hinirm Canadian dollars (SI 83 bil- 
lion) at the end of 1993, represent- 
ing 8,792.61 dollars for every per- 
son in the country, a little more 
than three times the per-capita for- 
eign debt of the United States. 

fjiniiHii has one of the lowest 
inflation rates in the world, cur- 
rently 1.8 percent. Yet Canadians, 
with their huge debt raising ques- 
tions of creditworthiness, must pay 
one to two percentage points more 
than the United States pays to bor- 
row money. 

Many blame the Liberal govern- 
ment's budget announced by Fi- 
nance Minister Paul Martin on 
Feb. 22, and its lack of deep spend- 
ing cuts. Major retrenchment oc- 
curred only in defense, which is not 



The Se» York Times 


a big dement in Canada’s govern- 
ment spending 

Sherry Cooper, chief economist 
at the investment firm of Burns. 
Fry LuL, echoing Lhe view of many 
in Toronto’s financial district said 
the currency's weakness reflected a 
loss of confidence in the govern- 
ment’s ability to significantly re- 
duce the budget deficit 


do so was Toronto- based Domin- 
ion Bond Rating Sendee Ltd. 

Dominion lowered Canada's for- 
eign-currency debt rating to AA 
from AAA In a statement explain- 
ing its action, it said that il Mr. 
Martin wanted the AAA rating re- 
stored, “meaningful expense reduc- 
tions must be achieved.” 

Canadian Bond Rating Service 
Inc. of Montreal a year ago lowered 
all Canada’s federal debt to AA- 
plus from AAA In October 1992, 
Standard & Poor’s Corp. down- 
graded the foreign -currency debt 
from AAA. Moody's Investors Ser- 
vice Inc., however, still rates all 
Panattian government debt as Aaa. 

The higher interest rates needed 
to attract money from abroad com- 
pound the problems of reducing 
the deficit, slow down consumption 
and thus could abort Canada’s 


meets, Canada would need a cade 
surplus of more than $25 billion. 

The decline in the Canadian dol- 
lar is fell by business executives 
such as Serge Racine, chief execu- 
tive officer at Shennag Inc* a furni- 
ture maker in Sherbrooke. Quebec. 

Sfaermag’s sales jumped 90 per- 
cent last year, and it expects a gain 
of 50 106 O percent this year, chiefly 
as a result of US. business. 

But Mr. Racine worries about 
“imported inflation," as Shermag 
buys hardwood lumber and fabric 
in the United States. 

“We don't want the dollar rate 
getting too kw,” he said, “because 
then our costs start really going up.” 



1 


Mr. Martin projected the budget 
deficit for the fiscal year 


rency market. “We are on track for 
our deficit targets.” he said recen tly 
in the House of Commons, adding 
that there was “sufficient room to 
man aiver, given the number of 
variables." 

But many private econo mis ts do The five-month-old Liberal goy- 
not agree. They say the overall fed- eminent had counted on economic 
era] debt of 570 billion dollars growth to pm Canadians back to 
translates almost immediately into work. A though by economists 


fragile recovery. 
The! 



<1? J*- 


year that began 
Friday at 39.7 billion dollars, down 
from 45.7 billion dollars in the year 
just ended. 

But the rise in yields on Canadi- 
an government bonds and Treasury 
bills since February already has in- 
creased the annual debt-servicing 
cost by 1 billion to 2 billion dollars, 
wiping out a fair amount of the 
expected sayings. 

Mr. Martin said his budget was 
intended to withstand the son of 
volatility that has shaken the cur- 


enormous added interest costs. Ev- 
ery rise of one percentage point in 
interest rates adds about 1.7 billion 
dollars to the deficit. 

Mr. Martin wants to reduce the 
budget deficit to 3 percent of the 

the fiscal year just endedf the defi- 
cit was 6.4 percent of GDP, com- 
pared with 3.9 percent in the Unit- 
ed States. 

Canada’s financia l imbro gl i o has 
not escaped the notice of bond- 
rating services, three of which have 
downgraded its debt. The latest to 


measurements the recession offi- 
cially ended in 1992, Canada still 
has more than 1 i percent unem- 
ployment, compared with 6.5 per- 
cent in the United States. 

A positive element is the help 
that the cheap Canadian dollar is 
giving to exports, especially goods 
sold in the United States. Canada's 
U.S. trade surplus is at a record 
S15.8 billion, although its deficit 
with the rest of the world reduces 
the overall surplus to $8.6 billion. 

To balance all its international 
accounts, including interest pay- 



NYT 


A User-Friendly Tourists’ Guide to Getting Around and About in Internet 


3-. 


By Peter H. Lewis 

Hew York Tuna Service 

NEW YORK — The Internet is the virtual 
equivalent of New York and Paris. It is a 
wondrous place full of great an and artists, 
stimulating coffee houses and salons, towers of 
commerce, screams and whispers, romantic 
hideaways, dangerous alleys, great libraries, 
chaotic traffic, rioting students and a popula- 
tion that is randy characterized as warm and 
friendly. 

In truth, the Internet and its metropolitan 
analogues are home to many friendly people. 
(The Internet population, by the way, is rough- 
ly equivalent to that of New York City and 
Paris combined.) It is just that new visitors do 
not often meet them. First- time visitors may 
discover that finding the way around is an 
ordeal, especially if they do not speak the lan- 
guage. 

Newcomers to the Internet are warned re- 
peatedly to avoid annoying the general popula- 
tion with their questions. They are urged to 
consult the FAQ, a data file consisting of Fre- 
quently Asked Questions amt in most cases, 
answers. Almost every service on the Internet 
has its own FAQ file. The following are Inter- 
net FAQs for people thinking about the Inter- 
net 

Q. What is the Internet? 


HTFs Services 
Available On-Line 


The International Herald Tribune is 
among the many publications embracing on- 
line technology. Articles from the Trib, going 
back to July 1991, are available through the 
on-line database services of Mead Data’s 
Lexis/Nexis and of DataTimes. 

The editorial department of the Herald 
Tribune can also be readied through Inter- 
net The newspaper's Internet address is: 
I HT@eu rokom j e. 

Readers may send their comments, submit 
letters for publication in Lhe Letters to the 
Editor column, or ask for a subscription to 
the newspaper. For the last two items, the 
writer’s full name and “snail mail” address 
are required. 


A When two or more computers are linked 
together to share files and electronic mail, they 
form a network. Some individual networks con- 
sist of thousands of computers. The Internet is 
a network of thousands of networks, linking 


schools and universities, businesses, govern- 
ment agencies, libraries, nonprofit organiza- 
tions and millions of individuals. As networks 
go. the Internet is dwarfed in size by the world- 
wide telephone network, but because it links 
computers instead of telephones it has vastly , 
more power. 

Q. Is the Internet the same thing as the 
“information superhighway” everyone is sick of 
hearing about? 

A The Internet is a sort of prototype for the 
data highway. Originally designed as a high- 
speed commumcatioos network for uni versifies 
and military research sites, the Internet has now 
spread its tentacles to include private and com- 
mercial clients. It may eventually be a back- 
bone for the so-called data superhighway, or it 
may become the equivalent of Route 66, by- 
passed by newer and wider roads. As described 
by the Chnton. administration, the highway will 
probably consist of computer networks, cable 
TV, interactive phone services and other tech- 
nologies. 

Q. What can I find on the Internet? 

A If you can imagine it, you can probably find 
it You can check the card catalogue of the 
Library of Congress, retrieve free software, get 
the latest news, said and receive electronic mail, 
complain about the Mets with fellow sufferers, 
get all the song lyrics from “Mystery Science 


Theater 3000 ” look at dirty pictures, view 
NASA satellite images, reach the world’s leading 
authorities on marsupials, look at dirt)’ pictures 
of marsupials, and so on. There are literally 
thousands of “interest groups” on the net. 
Finding things in such a vast data repository 


deciding what level of Internet connection you 
want 


is not easy. Tbere^ is no comprehensive road 
‘ the fun is exploring. 


map or directory. Part of the . 


Q. What do I need to get onto the Internet? 

A. For now, the requirements are a personal 
computer, a device called a modem, a commu- 
nications program, access to a telephone line 
and an account with an Internet service provid- 
er. The computer does not have to be too fancy, 
although the ability to use Windows software or 
the Macintosh operating system is a definite 
plus. The modem should have a speed of at least 
9,600 bits per second; 14,400 bits is better. 

Q. What is my first step in getting onto the 
Internet? 

A Go to the bookstore and get an Internet 
introductory guide. There are at least two dozen 
of them out there now. My favorites are, for 
Macintosh, “The Internet Starter Kit” by 
Adam Engst ($30 and well worth it, from Hay- 
den Books), and for other computers, “The 
Windows Internet Tour Guide” by Michael 
Fraase ($25, Ventana Press). Then, approach a 
local computer users' group and ask for help in . 


Q. What level? You mean there is more than 
one? 

A There are essentially four different ways to 
tap into the Internet. In descending order of 
power, complexity and cost, they are the fol- 
lowing: 

• The direct route, becoming an actual 
“node” on tbenetwork. This is not an approach 
for the faint-hearted, unless you want to be- 
come a Unix system administrator. 

• The dial-in direct account. This is the 
equivalent to tapping into an Internet artery, 
typically through a company called an Internet 
service provider. The advantage is that you get 
to choose the types of software and services you 
wfll use on the Internet instead of having some- 
one else choose them for you. You will have 
access to power tods. 

• A dial-in terminal account, which is more 
like tapping into a narrower vein. Most Internet 
service providers offer simpler and cheaper 
ways to connect to the Internet through their 
computers, but they choose what services are 
available, and they determine what software 
you’ll use. 

• The mail account If all you care about is 
exchanging mail with people on the Internet 


and other services, get a mail account from 
Prodigy, CompuServe, America Online or some 
other commercial on-line service. 

Q. You mean I cannot get onto the Internet 
through America Online or those other popular 
commercial services? 

A. Not yet, and a pox on those services that 
suggest otherwise in their advertisements. They 
can plug the user into the Internet electronic 
mail system, but there is a big difference be- 
tween sending mail to someone in Paris mul 
actually strolling down a Parisian boulevard. 
These popular services wfll probably begin of- 
fering direct Internet connections later this 
year, however. 


Q. How much does it cost to connect? 

A. Prices range from free to more money than 
you imagined. Some people pay hundreds of 
dollars a month for unlimited direct connec- 
tions, while others pay hourly fees that average 
$2. For a typical dial -up connection, figure on 
$20 to $30 a month. For a dial-up direct con- 
nection, figure on a one-time connection fee 
that can be as high a several hundred dollars. 
Some services charge as Kttle as $30 a year but 
limit the time you can spend on the system. A 
growing trend is for cities to establish “free 
nets," for no-cost or low-cost public access 
through libraries. . - • , ^ ' 


gs a 


The 25 key world markets 
reported in a single index 
— daily in the IHT. 



108 , 


International Herald Trfcune World Stock Index C, composed of 
280 Memadonaty hwestabte stocks from 2S couitnes, compted 
by OoamDerg Business News. Jen. 1. 1992 ■ too. 






World Index 

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The Trib Index, the IHTs exclusive 
global equities index, tracks share price movements in all the world's 
major markets and industrial sectors. 

This unique index provides a quick, selective benchmark on the 
state of the world's stock markets and, indirectly, the international 
economy. 

It is the only major world equities index to carry a Latin 
American component. 

The Trib Index appears daily in the International Herald Tribune. 


3 feralbS$ributtc 


njBUSHKD »mi Tfrt Nil* MIRK TIMES *W THE WASBRCinM POST 


I Washington & World Business 


April 20 


April 22 


Ronald H. Brown U.S. Secretary of Commerce. Mil be 
our guest speaker at the opening dinner to be held at the 
Corcoran Gallery of Art. 


Apri l 21 


A FOREIGN POLICY FRAMEWORK FOR THE POST COLO WAR ERA 

■ Warren M. Christopher U.S. Secretary of State 

A REPUBLICAN RESPONSE 

■ Senator Malcolm Wallop R.. Wyoming 
BEYOND THE URUGUAY ROUND 

■ Ambassador Rufus Yerxa Deputy U.S. Trade 
Representative 

AMERICA'S GLOBAL TRADE OBJECTIVES: STRUGGLING 
TOWARDS EQUITY 

■ Senator Max Baucus D.. Montana 


THE ADMINISTRATION'S DOMESTIC ECONOMIC PROGRAM: 

IS IT ON TRACK? 

■ Robert E. Rubin Assistant to the President for Economic 
Policy 

AN OUTSIDER S VIEW 

■ Hobart Rowen Columnist. The Washington Post 
THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS: ARE THEY 
DOING THEIR JOB? 

■ H. Onno Rudlng Vice Chairman. Citicorp/Citibank 

U.S. ECONOMIC RELATIONS WITH EUROPE 

■ Lawrence H. Summers U.S. Under Secretary of the 
Treasury for International Affairs 


Bomb; 

Radii 


THE HEART OF THE MATTER: COMPETITIVENESS IN AMERICA. 
EUROPE & ASIA 

■ Peter J. Neff President & Chief Executive Officer, 
Rhone-Poulenc Inc. 


THE CLINTON ADMINISTRATION: SUCCESSES & SETBACKS 

■ Senator Nancy Landon Kassebaum R.. Kansas 
THE CHANGING U.S. FINANCIAL SERVICES SECTOR 

■ Robert D. Hormats Wee Chairman, Goldman Sachs 
International 


THE PRESIDENT'S ECONOMIC AGENDA 
■ Roger C. Altman Deputy Secretary, Department of the 
Treasury 




THE INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS RACE 
& THE AMERICAN INFORMATION SUPERHIGHWAY 

■ Larry Irving Assistant Secretary for Communications 
& Information. U.S. Department of Commerce 

■ Gerald H. Taylor Executive Vice President. MCI 
Communications Services 


Conference Location 


EXPANDING BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES IN THE MIDDLE EAST 

■ Arrnion Neubach Economic Minister. Embassy of Israel. 
U.SA. 

m Sari Nusseibeh Fellow. Woodrow Wilson Center, 
Washington. D.C. 

■ Toni Verstandlg Deputy Assistant Secretary. U.S. 
Department of State 

a Moshe Werthelm President, Israei-American Chamber of 
Commerce & Industry 

THE CHANGING BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT IN CENTRAL 
& EASTERN EUROPE 

■ John Baltay European Counsel. Shearman & Sterling. 
Budapest 

m Marcefo Selowsky Chief Economist for Europe & Central 
Asia. The World Bank 

m Frank Vargo Deputy Assistant Secretary. U.S. 
Department of Commerce 

HEALTH CARE REFORM: THE IMPLICATIONS FOR BUSINESS 

■ Gregory Lawler Head of the Health Care Campaign. 

The White House 

m Dana Priest Principal National Desk Reporter on 
Health Care Reform. The Washington Post 

■ Tom A. Scully Partner. Patton. Boggs & Blow. 

Washington. D.C. 

■ Donald Shrfber Counsel. U.S. House of Representatives 
Committee on Energy and Commerce 


The Willard Inter-Continental Hotel, 

1401 Pennsylvania Avenue N.W., Washington, D.C. 20004. 
Tel: |1) 202 628 9100 Fax; |1) 202 637 7326 
To reserve accommodation at a preferential rate, contact the 
reservations department at The Willard as soon as possible. 
Please notify the hotel that your reservation is in connection with 
the ECACC/IHT conference. 


Registration Information 


The fee for the conference is US$ 1.250. This includes the 
opening dinner on Wednesday. April 20. both lunches, the cocktail 
reception and ail documentation. Fees are payable in advance 
and will be refunded less a US$ 125 cancellation charge for any 
cancellation received in writing on or before April 14, after which 
time we regret there can be no refund. 


Registration Form 


To register 1'ui th«- conference, please complete the form I 

belmvaiid send il n.; j 

Sarah WhiiefieJd, International Herald Tribune. 63 Lone Acre, i 
London WC2ESJH TeL- ,44 71 J 836 4802 Fax: <44 71)8360717 j 

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InirrnniHinnl Herald Tribune. 5 i 

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Unemployment 

Surges Amid 
China’s Boom 


'7'’n» number of job- 
less workers m Chinese cities will 
25 perce* *2™ 
to 5 mflhon, according to an esti 
mate published Wedn&day 
The government said Dreviouttv 

Iheir^SbJ 8 J'.OOO city workers lost 
thar -«. j b , .J? unn 8 the Erst nine 

months ofl 993 and that a total of 4 

mJJjon city residents were jobless 
at the end of the year. About 20 
P«cem of them hid been out oT 
work for more than six months 
■ »ime, the Commu- 

mst Party newspaper People’s Dai- 
ly said the urban unemployment 
rate would not rise above 3 percent 
tor this year and next year, up from 
2.6 percent last year. 

“The rapid change of the eco- 
nomc structure has increased the 
difficulties of employment," said 
the People’s Daily. “This year and 
next year, the employment situa- 
tion wil] be extremely grim." 

It referred to China’s bold moves 
awa _y from the socialist planned 
litafist-i 


economy to a more capitalist-style 
market economy. The moves have 
exposed failings in many unprofit- 
able state enterprises, sifil the back- 
bone job providers for China’s U 
billion people. 

“China s employment situation is 
«dremdy difficult, and the country 
now is raced with unprecedented 
challenges in deploying all the job- 
less. said Li Boyong, minister erf 1 
labor. The official Xinhua news 
agfflicy. which quoted Mr. Li. said 
China would try to register its un- 
employed to get some control over 
the situation. 

Economists said China's unem- 
ployment statistics are misleading- 
ly low because they do not include 
the large mass of rural unemployed 
and underemployed and mask 
much of urban joblessness behind 
euphemisms like “youths waiting 
/or work." 

The People's Daily also said that 
a huge army of roaming laborers, 
who criss-cross the country looking 


for work, now topped 20 milW 
Most of them come from a pool of 
130 million surplus rural laborers. ! 

The problem of unemployment 
is a sensitive one for the Commu- 
nist Party leadership, which wor- 
ries that social unrest could shake 
its hold on power. 

One top economist, who is also a 
parliamentary deputy, warned last 
month that rising unemployment 
could be a bigger danger than rising 
Inflation. 

Many workers fear that China’s 
economic reforms will eventually 
lead to bankruptcies among state 
enterprises, which in addition to 
providing work also offer homes, 
medical care and other benefits to 
millions of workers. (Reuters, AP) 

■ Car Market Set for Growth 

Private cars, currently the pre- 
will be within reach o^ord^^ 
Chinese families by 2010 if trends 1 
keep cm at present rates, a govern- 
ment statistician said, according to 
a Reuters dispatch. 

State Statistics Bureau Deputy 
Chief Lu Chunheng indicated that 
Beijing saw the domestic automo- 
bile market as a main motor of 
industrial growth. 

“China, with its population of 
about 1.2 billion, is now the woritTs 
single largest automobile market," 
Mr. Lu was quoted as saying by the 
China Daily on Wednesday. 

The report coincided with the 
grand opening of Beijing’s first im- 
port showroom, a move reflecting 
the car’s shift from a tool of privi- 
lege into an ordinary commodity. 
Beijing CIM Auto Mall is sdttn$ 
cars made by Ferrari, Audi, 
Honda, Lancia, Volkswagen and 
Mitsubishi. 

Mr. Lu said improving living 
standards, coupled with Ming do- 
mestic production costs, should 
make Chinese-made sedans “af- 
fordable to ordinary people by 
2010.“ 


On Japan Trade, EU Speaks Softly 

Low-Key Talks Strike a Contrast With U.S. Approach 


Las Angeles Times Service 

BRUSSELS — It was almost exactly five • 
years ago that France’s then- minister of Eu- 
ropean affairs, Edith Cresson, lectured a pair 
; of American reporters about the abysmal 
.U.S. trade (Midi with Japan. 

“Americans don't see what's going on with 
the Japanese," she said. “They are like ants, 
eating yon up. You just don’t notice it. don’t 
fed it, don’t see iL" 

Pausing, she added. “We plan to be firm 
with the Japanese." 

’ The Europeans did try firmness. 

They worked to keep limits on Japan's auto 

dally tight quotas to guard 
industries. Since 1989, the 12 countries of 
what is now called the European Union have 
launched 26 anti-dumping charging Japan 
with unfair pricing. Occasionally. EU coun- 
tries also took a page from the Japanese book 
of subtle but effective nontariff barriers. 

French customs authorities; for example, 
decreed that all imported Japanese videocas- 
sette recorders had to be cleared at Poitiers, a 
city nearly 100 miles from the nearest port 
ana staffed try a single customs inspector. 

The collective impact of these measures, 
however, hardly dented the Japanese trade 
juggernaut. 

i ‘ For Europeans, as for Americans, the im- 
ports kept growing. Japan’s borne market 
remained dosed, and trade deficits swelled. 

But as a frustrated United States reaches 
for a hammer to resolve its trade disputes 
with Tokyo, the Europeans are now trying a 
gentler approach. 

While the United States has opted to revive 
its feared “Super 301" legislation, enabling 
President Bill Clinton to impose sanctions on 
Japan, and forced showdowns with Japan in 
areas such as cellular telephones and semi- 
conductors, the Europeans are engaging the 
Japanese in a quiet dialogue to try to move 
Tokyo toward greater openness. 

“We agree with the Americans' goal but 
not their means.” said Peter Guilford, the 
EU’s chief spokesman on trade matters. In 
the area of made; he said, “The Americans 
give the impression they can’t venture out the 
door without a gun and holster." 

It's hardly surprising that the Europeans 
have changed tactics. 

In the years since Ms. Cresson vowed firm- 
ness, the ElTs cumulative trade deficit with 
Japan has reached $142 billion — a figure 
even greater than the American deficit with 
Japan, when expressed as a percentage of 
total trade. 


Japan’s combined trade surpluses with the 
United States and the EU, the world’s two 
other great industrial trading powers, came to 
$3843 billion over the past five years. 

While the EU’s trade imbalance with Ja- 
pan narrowed slightly in 1993, few saw that as. 
the start of a trend. And there are other 
problems. For instance, Japanese direct in- 
vestment in the 12 EU stales was running at 
about IS times the level of European invest- 
ment in Japan, based on 1992 figures. 

The core of the present European strat 
is something called a trade assessment i 


The Americans give the 
impression they can’t 
venture out the door 
without a gun and holster.’ 
Peter Guilford, EU trade 

spokesman. 


anism, in which groups of Japanese and Eu- 
ropeans review the flow of trade in about 30 
product areas to see where problems may lie. 

In the 15 months since they were estab-; 
lisbed, the groups have met eight times, 
though many of the initial sessions were de- 
voted to groundwork such as having statists-' 
dans from both sides explain their methods 
and databases. 

“This has been an intensive exercise,” said 
Tetsuo Yamashita, a trade specialist at Ja- 
pan's mission to the EU. “People have gotten 
to know each other well We’re hoping for a 
positive outcome.” 

In an attempt to keep the talks away from 
the glare of publidty, both sides have agreed 
to a virtual news blackout on their contents,' 
refusing even to name the product areas un- 
der discussion. 

The first real test of their effectiveness is 
expected to crane toward the end of next' 
month, when the Elf's trade commissioner, 
Sir Leon Brittan, travels to Tokyo for talks 
with Japanese leaders. 

Some analysts say the Europeans could 
benefit from the intensity of Japan's dispute 
with the United States. 

“The Japanese will be under pressure to do 
something,” an EU trade official said. 
“They’ve got to show that there's a softer way 
to resolve these issues, that something less 
than browbeating works." 


The Europeans' low-profile strategy also 
reflects in part the different images Japan has 
in Europe and in the United States. 

Despite its steady gains, Japan still ac- 
counts for only about 10 percent of the EU 
nations’ total trade. Partly because of this, 
“Japan-bashing" has yet to become much of a 
political sport in Brussels. In the United 
States, by comparison, the Japanese share of 
total trade runs around 15 percent. , 

One reason is that, since the fall of the- 
Berlin Wall in 1989, West European politi- 
cians have been focusing more on the poten- 
tial impact of the new, low-wage emerging 

.democracies just to their east than on Japan. 

“Experience has shown that Japan only 
reacts to pressure, but that pressure can’t just 
be brutal demands,” said Helmut Latimer, a 
director of the Munich-based If o Institute for 
Economic Research. “The consciousness in 
Japan has grown enormously that something 
has to be done. Now is the time to work 1 
careftrUy." 

- Despite their criiiasm of American tactics. 
'Sir Leon mid other EU trade officials have 
begun to talk about a three-sided approach to. 
the problem, in which they would work with' 
the Americans and Japan lor more balanced' 
trade. 

But they say the United States has failed to 
share information from its contacts with To- 
kyo that is necessary for increasing U.S.-EU 
cooperation. Some question the sincerity of 1 
American calls for closer coordination 

StilL there are signs that even supporters oT 
the EU’s tactics are growing impatient for 
results as the deficit with Japan persists. 

Some point out, for example, that while 
negotiators from the EU and Japan last, 
month concluded an agreement that offers 
Japanese automakers a slight increase, to 
about 12 percent, in their share of the EU 
market in 1 994, Japan’s commitment to open 
its auto market to European cars has yielded) 
few concrete results. 

■ Japan Sees a 'Brighter’ Economy 

The Bank of Japan's governor, Yasushi 
Mieno. said Wednesday the country’s econo- : 
n» was improving, but be declined to say: 
when be thought it would elimh out of its 
‘three-year stagnation. 

“The economy is brighter and dose to 
bottoming out" Mr. Mieno said after three, 
days of meetings with central bank branch: 
managers. 

But despite “growing expectations" of a 
recovery, Mr. Mieno said, “we have yet to see 
definite changes." 


Investor’s Asia 


t tt* .TV-ai 



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Tokyo. V '■ 
Nikkei £25 .■ 



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Sources: Reuters, AFP 


< ~ ; "-y ■ ,-2.049,17 . . . +3sa 

liHmuiitHUI Herak) Tnhunr 


Very briefly: 


• Sooth Korea will sell a 49 percent stake in the state-run domestic 
telephone monopoly, Korea Telecom, by 1996 in a series of stock 
offerings. Finance Ministry officials said. 

• rhmfl said it would become the seventh member of the .Asia Pacific 
Preferential Trading Arrangement, known as the Bangkok Agreement. 

• So. 2 Weave Band Factory of Shanghai has become the first state- 
owned concern in that dty to file for bankruptcy, and 10 more state 
companies are expected to follow, a Hong Kong newspaper controlled by 
Beijing reported. 

• The National Science Council of Taiwan awarded a S6 1 million contract 
to TRW tnc. of the United Slates to design and make the first satellite to 
be placed in orbit by Taiwan; a council spokesman said the launching was 
planned for late 1997. 

• India's leading private forecasting institute said the government's deficit 
in the fiscal year that began this month would be 668.96 billion rupees 
($21 billion), or 7.8 percent of gross domestic product, compared with the 
government’s own initial projection of 6.1 percent of GDP. 

• New Zealand's gross domestic product grew 4.6 percent in 1993 hut 
showed no growth in the last three months of the year. Statistics New 
Zealand said. 

• Chinese Petroleum Coip. said it would cancel a contract with a unit of 
Brown & Root Inc. of the United States over what it said were improper 
dealings between the contractor and the imprisoned former president a 
Chinese state-run iron works. 

Bloomberg, KmghiRidJcr. Reuter*. AFT 


Earnings at Japan Banks Depressed by Bad Loans 


Compiled by Our Staff Fmm Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japan’s 21 biggest 
banks, trying to rebuild their deteri- 
orated asset quality, will announce 
larger drops in profit for the year to 
March 31 than earlier forecast be- 
cause of aggressive write-offs of bad 
loans, analysts Wednesday. 

Results are likely 10 improve this 
year as the economy moves into a 
moderate recovery, the analysis 
said. - - 

The daily Nihon Keizai Shim bun 
reported pretax profits at the 21 
city, crust and long-term credit 
banks probably fell 40.8 percent 
from the previous year, with total 
write-offs for bad loans reaching 
36.99 trillion yen ($354 billion). 
Bad loan write-offs totaled 14.72 
trillion yen in 1992. 

If the actual results match that, 
report, they would be the worst of 
the latest business cycle. 

“Banks have been far more ag- 


gressive in setting aside provisions 
for bad loans," said Mark Faulkner, 
an analyst at & G. Warburg & Co. 

Standard & Poor’s Corp n which 
last week lowered debt ratings on 
three dty banks, Sumitomo Bank, 
Bank of Tokyo and Mitsubishi 
Bank, said it expected had loans to 
affect some banks for several years. 

Analysts said that unless there 
was a sharp recovery in the price of 
real estate, which is collateral for 
many of the problem loans, banks 
wil] be forced to restructure or 
abandon loans for some time to 
come, which will continue to dent 
pretax profits. 

“In terms of earnings, a full- 
fledged rebound is not likely until 
well after the year to March 1996," 
said KatsuMto Sasajima, an analyst 
at Nikko Research Center. 

Mr. Sasajima said be expected 
the pretax profits at major banks to 
be down an average 25.8 percent in 


the year to March 1994 and down 
3.5 percent in the following year. 

Some analysts said their predic- 
tions for 1993 results do not in- 
dude any last-minute sales of equi- 
ties the banks may have done in 
order to shore-tro the bottom line. 
Banks often self equities to offset 
bad loan write-offs. 

Alicia Qgawa, an analyst at Salo- 
mon Brothers Ino, said she thought 
most of the banks intend to buy 
back shares at current market val- 
ues in the year to March 1995," 
which would offset the positive im- 
pact of the sales. 

“You’re getting a decline in the 
valued disclosed bad debts, but an 
increase in the low or no-yield as- 
sets on the balance sheet" Ms. 
Ogawa said. 

Analysls added that buying back 
portfolios at market prices also 
would leave the banks more vulner- 


able to stock market declines in the 
future. 

Ms. Ogawa said realizing capital 
gains could help ease present con- 
cerns about bad loan problems 
while •“setting the stage for deterio- 
rating profits in the future." 

A rebound in the bond market ra- 
the dosing weeks of March aiso 
may have helped stem losses on 
bond trading. 

Mr. Faulkner said the current 
pace of nonperframing loan write- 
downs remains an encouraging sign. 

“The underlying story is actually 
quite good,” he said, “the edge has 
come off base profitability, out it 
hasn't come off as fast as the mar- 
ket had expected." 

Mr. Sasajima agreed. “They real- 
ly should give priority to write-offs , 
of bad debts over earnings recov-. 
ery.” be said. 

Some help for earnings this year] 
should come from lower interest 1 


rates, which cut the cost of funds, 
analysts said. But a strong recovery 
is unlikely if bank lending remains 
at the low levels of the past year. 

Lending by Japan's 1 1 commer- 
cial banks peaked in 1990, when 
loans rose by around 10 percent 
almost every month, according to 
statistics from the Federation of 
Japan Bankers Association. But 
then lending started losing steam. 

In November 1990, the growth 
dropped to 7.5 percent and by Jan- 
uary of this year, lending slipped 
0.7 percent from the previous 
month. This is the first negative 
year-on-year growth since the asso- 
ciation started tracking data in 
: 1954. (Reuters. AFX. Bloomberg) 


To subscribe in Germany ' 

jusf call, toll free, , 

. .. 013QB4 8585 


Head of Bombay’s Bourse 
Promises Radical Change 


.-I Crib I* Frunte- Pretse 

BOMBAY — The head of the 
Bombav Stock Exchange vowed 
Wednesday to push ahead with 
radical changes to India’s premier 
bourse so that it would catch up 
with world standards. 

Bhagirath Merchant, elected as 
the exchange’s president on Mon- 
day. said bis one-year tenure woitid 
see far-reaching changes 
trading system and also said he 
wanted to improve relations be- 
tween brokers and regulators. _ 
“Reforms, computerization, 
transparent functioning and coop- 
eration with regulators are the 
tasks I have set Tor myself, me 
former chartered accountant and 

stockbroker said. 

-We plan 10 introduce screen- 
based trading on Oct. [■ -Ail the 
cash-share groups will be traded 
through computer terming is — a 
precursor to an options and futures 

market here." he said- 
Mr. Merchant also expressed 
support for reforms that the market 
regulator, the Secunue* and tx- 
dSnge Board of India, istryingto 
introduce. The board l*s been 
working to improve transparency 
in market dealings. , . 

India's stock market collapsedm 
1992. apparently after brokers used 
massive amounts of 2 

rowed from banks to inflate stock 

Pr S£ MOTfcwi said he *ould! 


speed up computerization on the 
Bombay bourse to brio,'; about 
greater efficiency and try to have 
longer trading hours. 


Bank “Ecorazvitie’ 


Minsk, Republic Belarus, 
informs that it only works 
with Belorussian currency 
and therefore any bills, 
guarantees ore other 
obligations of present bank 
in hard currency, issued In 
favour of any juridical or 
other persons, are not valid 
and will not be examined 
by the bank. 

Bank "EcorazvttJe", Minsk 


Weekly net asset 
value 

un 31.03.94 

US $ 60.87 

I jsted on die 
Amsterdam 
Stock Exchange 


Infomiau-in: 

MeesPierson Capita] Management 
Rt.ldn 55, 1012 KK Amsterdam. 
Tel.: + 5 1-20-52 1 1410. 




1 — Ilcra. — - 

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CS Money Market Fund £ Sterling Management Company 

R.C. Luxembourg B 22 838 

(sodetes anonymes 
56, Grand'rue, Luxembourg) 

(the “Management Companies") 

To the unitholders of 
CS MONEY MARKET FUND LIRE 
CS MONEY MARKET FUND PESETAS 
CS MONEY MARKET FUND £ STERLING 
(the “Funds") 

Merger resolution 

By a resolution of the above-mentioned Management Companies, by consent of 
Credit Suisse Luxembourg (S. A.) as custodian bank and by agreement with 
CRED1S Money Market Fund Management Company, the above-mentioned 
Funds are being merged with CREDIS MONEY MARKET FUND, an invest- 
ment fund under Luxembourg law. 

CREDIS MONEY MARKET FUND has an umbrella structure and thus consists 
of a number of subfunds. 

The investment policies of the CREDIS MONEY MARKET FUND subfunds 
whose names reflect the reference currencies of the old Funds are identical to 
those of the old Funds. 

The Funds* assets and liabilities are being transferred into the corresponding 
subfunds of CREDIS MONEY MARKET FUND. However, new units of the 
CREDIS MONEY MARKET FUND subfunds will be issued to holders of the 
relevant CS MONEY MARKET FUND units at the ratio of ! to 1. 

Unit certificates of the existing Funds can be exchanged at any time for the new 
certificues (of equal denomination) of the relevant CREDIS MONEY MARKET 
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the same number of units of the corresponding CREDIS MONEY MARKET 
FUND subfunds. 

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Luxembourg - for exchange purposes. 

Units of the corresponding subfund of CREDIS MONEY MARKET FUND can 
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R.C. Luxembourg B 37 120 

CS Money Market Fund US-DolIar Management Company 

R.C. Luxembourg B 2i 821 

CS Money Market Fund Yen Management Company 

R.C. Luxembourg B 23 089 

(societes anonymes 
56, Grand'rue, Luxembourg) 

(the “Management Companies") 

To the unitholders of 
CS MONEY MARKET FUND BEF 
CS MONEY MARKET FUND CAN-DOLLAR 
CS MONEY MARKET FUND DM 
CS MONEY MARKET FUND ECU 
CS MONEY MARKET FUND FF 
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By a resolution of the above-mentioned Management Companies, by consent of 
Credit Suisse Luxembourg (S. A.) as custodian bank and by agreement with 
CREDIS Money Market Fund Management Company, the above-mentioned 
Funds are being merged with CREDIS MONEY MARKET FUND, an invest- 
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subfunds of CREDIS MONEY MARKET FUND. However, new units of the 
CREDIS MONEY MARKET FUND subfunds will be issued to holders of the 
relevant CS MONEY MARKET FUND units at the ratio of 1 to 1. 

Unit certificates of the existing Funds can be exchanged at any time for the new 
certificates (of equal denomination) of the relevant CREDIS MONEY' MARKET 
FUND subfunds. Even before the exchange transaction, they confer the right to 
the same number of units of the corresponding CREDIS MONEY MARKET 
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Units of the corresponding subfund of CREDIS MONEY MARKET FL*ND can 
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net asset value on any bank working day, subject to the provisions of the CREDIS 
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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL 



TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. APRIL : 


Canada’s Big ChilL’ Hockey Heads South to Seek Fortune in America [o 


By Anne Swardson 

! Washington Pm Serna 

TORONTO — Canada, originator of toe hockey and 
supplier of most of the game’s prof essional players, is in 
danger of losing laz$e chunks of its national spon. 

, On the eve of this season's National Hockey League 
playoffs, professional hockey has never been more Ameri- 
can and less Canadian. Of the 26 in the league, 18 
are based in American cities, indudiiig three of the last 
four new franchises. 

■ The game that the Montreal star Ken Dryden once said 
was “weaned on long northern winters uncluttered by 
things to do" is being transformed by fans is shorts: The 
American Sun Belt alone has nearly as many NHL teams 
as does all of Canada. 

■ Of the eight NHL teams in Canada, four say they are 
fdcrag financial difficulties and may conrider moving to 
U.S. cities that would be delighted to have than. Both the 
NHL and the players' association are run by American 
lawyers, and players from both countries are more and 
njiore reluctant to be traded to small-market Canadian 
teams. 

| It is a sony time for a country that worships hockey. 
Middle-aged Canadian men slap the puck around public 
rinks on Saturday mornings the way American men play 


pickup basketball. More than L5 million fans watch after the league was founded. Three years later, Maclean’s the c^J^arive westemeL^lS timlast year, said ShenSrew, the club president 

Hockey Night in Canada every Saturday through the long m ag azin e of Canada complained that "hockey has put on °PP 0SltI ?I 1 , ^ a. maw* ofthedty “Our hope is to keep the ream in Winnipeg,'’ he added. 

winter months. During the six weeks or so of playoffs, the a high hat” as millionaire American owners moved into uSr^cni^WiiiflrkfiL are at odds over who “but we’re not gong to sit here and lose S5 million to $10 

viewing audience doubles. Even the Canadian Broadcast- the sport. million a year Winnipeg can have a hockey team.” 

v n ; a hti v r* i n ~e * j : : should nay for a new arena, ahq wippcg um uwameu ~ j ~-—ro , . /v—k— 


viewing audience doubles. Even the Canadian Broadcast- 
ing Corp.'s nightly news, normally on at 9 PAL, is pushed 
back by playoff games, often until as late as 1 1 P.M. 

“Hockey is probably the most unifying f orce there is in 
Canada,” said Barry Shenkarow, president and part-own- 
er of the Winnipeg Jets. “It’s what baseball is to the 
United States.” 

Hie woes of pro hockey in Canada include the need to 
replace old arenas with new. the lade of a local corporate 
hue to support sky boxes and other amenities; the high 
costs for small teams of spiraling player salaries, and the 
reluctance of Canadian local governments to chip in 
taxpayer dollars. 

In addition, players from both countries are demanding 
that their contracts with Canadian teams protect them 
against high C a n adian taxes. And when they are traded to 
a Canadian team from an American one, they demand to 
be paid in U.S. dollars — more expensive for Canadian 
team owners as the value of the Canadian dollar keeps 
falling. 

American involvement in hockey goes back a long way. 
The Boston Bruins joined the NHL in 1925, eight years 


ep the ream in Winnipeg,” he added, 
to at here and lose S5 million to $10 


Players also are reluctant to play for some Canadian 
teams. Hie reasons vary. In the last few weeks alone, two 


Decades later, all of Canada went into mourning when ^ stadium for the Jets. Players also are reluctant to play for some Canadian 

the superstar Wayne Gretzky moved from the Edmonton .. r^rv the leacue teams. lie reasons vary. In the last few weeks alone, two 

Oilers to the Los Angeles Kings in 1988. The NHL c p m ^^ lc ^ 1 an , Q ^^ [£ams - c^ada.^a^a P^yere for American teams have balked at moving to 

But hockey old-timers say they are hard-pressed to 1 i“P vear with the minors cf Vancouver; one finally went Earlier in the year, another 

remember a period when Aniricais have hadWe con- ifeung m initially turned his nose up at Quebec. Hie smaller mar- 

trol of the game and when its presence in some parts of the four smal^k* cities, he said he was optimistic tbe kels e^edally are considered undesirable. 

Canada has become so weak. ;h ;♦ would take maior contributions “Coaches have been known to call a player into their 

“The whole aftifniV has rhinos ” did A I Sirs chan. But Beaman said it would take major conmpuuOTs .m rm «.ina tn 


Canada has become so weak. 


“The whole attitude has changed," said Ai Strachan, XI hXvXTn TXh^iand nf Canada, office and say, ‘If you don’t smarten up. I'm going to trade 

hockey columnist for the Toronto Soil “Hockey used to Z lo Quebi’ " id StmAen. .heToLlo WJumnisL 

fvT^nrtrJfhprnnadSan VrtwiVca hnrtnm. mi- ^Out special preference is to Keep teams in Canada, ne « , 


“Coaches have been known to call a player into their 
office and say, ‘If you don’t smarten up. I'm going to trade 


bepait of the Canadian mystique. Now it’s a bottom-line 

operation concerned with TV and making money, run by said. “But the fact is there are [American] a ties wilting to reserve noarev even u u maxes some ot toe 

American lawvm and armimtanu " do things to attract and keep a major-league team. nea»sary to preserve noexey. even u it marasome ot me 

Montreal Canadiens. The Sna in Winnipeg, for instance, is 60 yeareold-Tbe small markets uncompetitive. by a sport lacking salary 

winner oHast* year’s Stanley Cud and 23 others before Jets owners have given the city and the province of caps for players or revenue-sharing among owners, a 
S^^dur^ro^bk ^e^fo^tohtook Le^andthe Manitoba until June 30 to say how much andunder what disparity among team finances ts inevitable. They ako 

the conditions they would contnWe toward budding a new hold out hope that a possible new pay-per-vtcw tackey 
Ottawa Senators Dull in resoectablecrowtL even with the arena. Bettman implied that is what it will take to retain channel will give team owners the revenue they need. 

the Jets north of the 49th parallel. Besides. Canadian fans say. Canada still dominates 

S tiwOTly thing keeping the Edmonton Oilers from Tbe arena .is not the Jets' only p«^m. like all Cana^- 

moving to Minneapolis uaoxirt injunction. a° teams, they must pay players who arrive from U.S. NHL players come from Canada, of the 297 


Canadians recognize that tire new, higher profile may be 
necessary to preserve hockey, even if it makes some of the 


But the only thing keeping the Edmonton Oilers from 


260 of the 297 


moving to Minneapolis is a court injunction. a° teams, mey musi pay piayers woo amve irom u.a. r„ 7. 

10 renovate trams m American doUan. Three-fourths of the Jets people tn Toronto s Hodtqr Hall of Fame are Canadtan. 


) 

Delgado’s Plate-Glass Special 
Again Helps Make Jays’ Night 


I The Associated Press 

1 If Carlos Delgado continues bit- 
ting this way, the hottest ticket at 
t|ie Sky Dome soon will be for one 
cif the various restaurants overlook- 
ing the Reid. 

One game after startling several 
patrons of the Hard Rock Cafe 
high above the rigbi-fidd fence 
with a homer off the glass of the 
bar. Delgado went one better in the 
Blue Jays' 5-3 victory over the Chi- 
cago White Sox in Toronto. 

He sent Alex Fernandez's fast- 
ball off the glass of Windows Res- 
taurant, 445 feet (135 meters) from 
home plate. 

And while Dennis Cook, wbo 
served op Monday’s homer, is no 
slouch, Delgado said Tuesday’s 
shot was sweeter, considering who 
pitched iL 

“The guys on the bench were 
telling me Fernandez likes to throw 
hard. I know he's a great pitcher,” 
he sakL “But he left a fastball over 
the plate and 1 was looking for iL” 

Paul Moiitor made Delgado's 
blast even sweeter when he doubled 
home the tying run in the sixth 
inning, then scored the go-ahead 


run on Robin Ventura's fielding Munoz, in 7% innings. The loser, 
error. Ed Sprague singled in anoth- Kevin Tapani, allowed seven runs 
er run for a 4-2 lead. on 10 hits and three walks in 3% 

Julio Franco hit his first home innings, 
run. a two-run shot to right field off 

Dave Stewart to put the White Sox , II, Athletics 7: Milwau- 

kee broke its six-game losing streak 
77 n/Yr minim “ bome openers, winning on an 

AL ItUUIvUUir afternoon when the wind-chill tem- 
perature was zero Fahrenheit (mi- 
up 2-1 m the sixth. Joe Hall got his mis 17 centigrade), 
first major league RBI and first hit nn , _ . , , ± . 

with a broken-bat single to trim tbe . Bffly Spiers and Alex Diaz, both 
Blue Jays’ lead to 4-3 a the top of «« tte lineup because of trgunes. 
thp pnVhrh combined to drive in five runs. 

me eagnm. n.,- xm u_.i r u:.- c 


Carter restored Toronto’s two- 
ran cushion with his first home run 
in the bottom of the inning. 

Angds &, Twins 2: Bo Jackson 
drove in two runs in his California 
debut and the Angels opened the 
season with a victory at die Metro- 
dome. 

Chili Davis drove in three runs 
and Damion Easley scored three 
times. Jackson had a single and a 


" walk in his first game since being coldest opener in Brewers history. 


released by the White Sox. 

The winner. Mark Langston, 
gave up right hits, including home 
runs by Dave Winfield and Pedro 


Dodgers Suspected Drug Problem 


By Rick Weinberg 

New York Tuna Service 

LOS ANGELES — Signs of drug use by Darryl 
Strawberry were evident as far back as last season, 
according to Fred Claire, the Los Angeles Dodg- 
ers' general manager. 

“When someone is late for a meeting or a game, it 
makes you ask if something is wrong, and those 
questions arose until Darryl,” Claire said before the 
Dodgers won their season opener without Strawber- 
ry. Their No. 3 bitter was placed on the disabled list 
Monday after telling the team be had a drug prob- 
lem and agreeing to undergo treatmenL 

Strawberry missed the Dodgers’ final exhibition 
game on Sunday and did not notify the dub untO 
nearly 1 1 hours after he was supposed to arrive at 
Anaheim Stadium. As the first step in his treat- 
ment program. Strawberry flew to New York on 
Tuesday to meet with two doctors. 

Last season. Strawberry was late many times for 
treatments on his ailing back On June 22 he 


showed up in the fourth inning of a day game, 
thinking the dub was playing a night game. 

When Claire suspected a problem last season, he 
said he spoke to Strawberry. “He was asked about 
it numerous times.” Claire said. “We did not sweep 
it under the nig. We confronted him. But unless 
you catch him or have hard evidence or the player 
steps forward, you cannot accuse the player ” 

Claire expressed sympathy for Strawberry, but 
he said that he and Sam Fernandez, the team’s 
general counsel were looking into the possibility 
of voiding or reducing the team's financial obliga- 
tions to Strawberry, who has two years left on his 
contract at $4 million per season. 

Strawberry flew to New York to meet with Dr. 
Robert Mfllman. who represents the commission- 
er’s office, and Joel Solomon, who represents the 
players association. 

When be played for the New York Mets, Straw- 
berry enteral the Smitbers treatment center in 
Manhattan for an alcohol problem. 



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Dave Nilsson had four hits for the 
Brewers. 

Oakland, which had won six 
straight openers, took a 5-0 lead in 
the first inning after a grand dam 
by Terry Stembach off Cal Hired. 
But Bobby Witt could not hold the 
edge as the Brewers went ahead 
with a two-out, five-run rally in the 
sixth. 

A crowd of 52,012 watched the 


Snow was on the gronnd b ehin d the 
right-field bleachers, and it was 31 
degrees Fahrenheit with a 29 mfle- 
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Glavine’s Fastball 
Hurtles the Braves 
Past the Padres, 5-1 


The Associated Pros 
Ir was a vintage performance, 
and Tom Glavine knew iL 
“That's probably as good as I've 
thrown since *91, when I won the 
Cy Young Award,” Gfavine said 
after striking out nine while giving 
up just two nhs in seven innings in 
Atlanta's 5-1 victory over the Pa- 
dres in San Diego. “That's pretty 
much what I felt all spring training 
. . . and I just frit it a g ain tonight.” 
“Ifsjust a matter of fedmg a hole 


Defino Shields crossing the plate to score tbe Dodgers’ first run of tbe season as tbe Florida catcher 
Benito Santiago bobbled the ball in tbe first imiuig in Los Angdes. The Dodgers went on to win, 4-3. 


bly the last two years," said Glavine, 
who struck out seven before San 
Diego got its first hit, a fourth-in- 
ning angle by Derek Bell “1 really 
don't tnmk I've had that land of 
fastball in over two years. When I 
hove that kind of fastball I can 
move the boll in and out, and I end 
up gening a lot of my strikeouts 
from the inside part of the plate.” 

Tbe Braves offense was provided 
by two rookies. Ryan Klesko and 
Javier Lopez homered as the 
Braves pounded five Padres pitch- 
ers for 14 hits. Klesko, who bo- 
moed for the second straight game, 
went 3-for-5 with two RBIs as the 
Braves scored one run in each of 
the first five innings. 

Mark Wohlers pitched a hitless 
eighth inning, but Steve Bedrosian. 
who came on in the ninth, was 
touched for San Diego's lone ran. 

“Glavine was being himself," 
said Phfl Clark, who had one of the 
two hits off Glavine. “He's got a 
great changeup. You could teu ev- 
eryone was swinging through his 
pitches. He’s a smart pitcher, as 
well as having good pitches.” 

Grants 2, Pirates 0: Bill Swift 
pitched seven strong innings and 
San Francisco shut out visiting 
Pittsburgh for the second straight 
day. 

Swift gave up three hits, struck 
out three and walked none. 

The Giants, who won 8-0 Mcm- 
day, had never started the season 
with consecutive shutouts. The Pi- 
rates had never been blanked in 
their first two games. 


Steve Cooke allowed a ran in the 
sixth ot singles by Willie McGee 
and Barry Bonds and a sacrifice fly 
by Todd Benringer. The Giants 
scored in the seventh on a wild 
pickoff throw by reliever Joel John- 
ston. 

Dodgers 4, Matins 3: Pinch-hit- 
ter Jeff Treadway lifted a tie-break- 
ing sacrifice fly in the eighth in- 
ning. and Los Angeles beat Florida 
in its home opener. 

Tbe Dodgers played without 
Darryl Strawberry, wbo is going 
into a substance- abuse clinic. 

Henry Rodriguez, Strawberry’s 
replacement in left field, opened 

NL ROUNDUP 

the eighth with a walk from loser 
Jeremy Hernandez. Pinch-runner 
Mitch Webster stopped short on a 
steal attempt when the Marlins 
pitched out, and escaped a run- 
down when rookie shortstop Kurt 
Abbott made a wild throw. Tread- 
way hit a sacrifice fly in his first al- 
bal for the Dodgers. 

Expos 5, Astros i: Larry Walker 
hit a two-run homer, leading Ken 
Hill and Montreal to victory in 
Houston. 

Hill gave up six bits in six in- 
nings. and three pitchers finished 
with scoreless relief. 

Mets 6, Gibs 2: Newcomers Pete 
Smith. Kelly Stinnett and Jose Viz- 
caino each helped New York win 
again at chilly Wrigley Field. 

Hie Mets also started out last 
season 2-0 before finishing 59-103 
for tbe worst record in tbe majors. 
Chicago is 0-2 for the first time 
since 1987. 

Smith (1-0), acquired farm At- 
lanta in November, gave up two 
runs in seven innings. Stinnett, a 
rookie catcher, had a two-run dou- 
ble for his first hit in the majors. 
Vizcaino, traded by the Cubs for 
pitcher Anthony Young at the end 
of spring training, drew two walks 
from Jose Guzman and scored both 
times. 


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To Be Bold or Not to Be Bold? Welcome to Augusta and the Big Debate 


By Lairy Dorman 
aii r-iJS? rw * r "’ , ° 

Ss^2 { ^IilS^ a ~ Even n °w. Gene 
S^^ remembers it as though it were hist 

£*SWwith ** 

aSa?sjia-&3fi 

Sa ^ en ' ^ “ He «id to me: X>i weVe 
got nothing to lose. Let's go for i?” 
oarazen went for iu and it went in the hole. 
fro “ 232 yards oul for double eagle. * 
TTiat shot m 1935, which propelled Sarazen 
into a ne with Craig Wood and a subsequent 
jJSgJ. vh ?? 1 >1k next day, has coSTS 
symbolize the Masters, which starts Thursday 
To go for it or not to go for iu to be bold or 
to play safe. Those are the choices, the two 
occraaatmg dilemmas, when each player in 
die field reaches the par-five 13th and 15tb 
boles at Augusta National Golf Club. 

the answers often vary, and very often can 
determine the outcome of the tournament 
the Masters probably has been lost more 
frequently than won cm these holes. A short 
litany of the lost: 

• Curtis Strange, who blew it in 1985 when 
he tut his second shot into the water at both 
holes on Sunday. 

• Sevc Ballesteros, who dumped it in 1986 
when be hit tns 4-iron into the pond at the 15th. 

• Billy Joe Patton, the amateur who led the 
1954 Masters on the 13tb tee oo Sunday and 
then watered his second shot at both the 13th 
and 15 th to lose the tournament. 


• Mike Reid, who laid up in 1989 and then 
deposited his wedge shot, ms de for the lead 
and chances of winning into the pond at 15. 
. One flip side would be Niddaus's 300-yard 
drive and heroic 4-iron into the 15th at 1986 
to set up the eagle that propelled him to his 
most dramatic — and probably final — Mas- 
ters victory. 

Nowhere are a player’s choices more mag- 
nified than at the Masters, and nowhere are 
they more likely, for good or ill, to be woven 
into the fabric of the game. No one forgets 
either the worst — Tommy Nakaj una’s 13 at 
the 13th in 1978 — or the best — Sarazen’$2 
at the I5lh in 1935. 

It could be argued that Sarazen’s “shot 
heard ’round the world” single-handedly re- 
cast the Masters from a dubby little gather- 
ing of Bob Jones’s golfing pals into the mega- 
event h is today. It remains the standard 
against which all decisions are measured. 

Take Chip Beck’s choice during the final 
round last year. He laid up short of the pond 
at the 15th hole when he was three strokes 
behind Bernhard Longer. The decision by 
Beck, who finished second to Longer, 
prompted more argument than any shot in 
the last 10 years. He debate has yet to abate. 

Many of the reactions were visceral little 
attention was paid to the four factors that 
come into play when a golfer decides whether 
to lay up or' play safe: distance, lie, wind 
direction and situation. 

Only when all these are computed does the 
final element — a golfer’s unique psychologi- 
cal makeup — enter the equation. Beck had 
236 yards to carry the water, 249 yards to the 
pin. His lie was fair, bat likely to produce a 
high shot. He had the wind in his face, hurt- 
ing 20 yards. He didn’t feel comfortable. 


“It’s a 90-95 percent chance that I wouldn't 
have had a chance of getting there,” Beck said 
recently. “I mean, ] was 8 to 10 yards up 
ahead in the practice round and 1 couldn’t get 
there with a wind that wasn't as hard. It 
wasn’t a question of whether I would hit a 
gpod shot At that point, you don't warn to 
hit a good shot and be dead.” 

Given all this, it is reasonable to conclude 
that Beck made the correct decision last year. 
If a player is 90 percent sure be isn't gang to 
make it, then it's virtually 100 percent certain 
he isn't going to make it. 

The brilliance of the strategic design at 
Aimusta National is embodied in the 13th 
and 15th holes. On the surface, they appear 
tame. Both are short The 13th is, at 465 
yards, the shortest par-five in U.S. tourna- 
ment competition and the IStb is a mere 500 
yards, much of it do wnhill. 

These holes should be easy, and they are. 
for most of the tournament Routinely, either 
hole plays to the lowest stroke average of the 
week. But come Sunday, they are trans- 
formed freon inviting Utile cupcakes into 
steaming cauldrons of pressure. 

Even if a player decides to lay op, par isn’t 
guaranteed. Rad’s fat wedge shot in 1989 is 
the grimmest reminder of that And even if he 
goes for the green in two at either hole and 
hits dry land, 5 isn’t automatic. That’s espe- 
cially true on Sunday, when nerves are frayed 
and mistakes are ma gyi Hied. 

ln the end, each golfer must factor in the 
variables and make his de^rinn, Sarazen fig- 
ured be bad nothing to lose in 1935. He has 
said that if all the money at stake today bad 
been at stake then, he might have law up. 
Thai's a decision that thankfully, we haven't 
had to live with. 



Mie UArf Baum 


The Masters crowd was already assembled as Nick Faldo, a two-time winner, chipped out of a bunker during a practice round. 


Basking in Victory , Razorbacks Harbor Visions of a Dynasty 


By Malcolm Moran 

.V*» York Tima Service 

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina — As 
much as the question always seems prema- 
ture when the uniforms have not yet been 
removed on the final night of the college 
basketball season, it inevitably barges its 
way into the thoughts of the players, a 
verbal offensive foul. 

The national champion Arkansas Razor- 
backs were in their dressing room at Char- 
lotte Coliseum Monday night, acknowl- 
edging ihai not even the personal 
congratulations of President Bill Clinton 
had caused their new status to sink in. 

Their 76-72 victory over Duke was as' 
fresh as their dried sweat when Corliss 
Williamson, having just posed with the 
championship plaque, was asked about 
next season. 

This time, though, it was obvious that he 
had already given the matter some thought. 
Williamson gave no indication that he was 


considering an early departure for the Na- 
tional Basketba ll Assoaatiou. 

The sophomore's look ahead appeared 
like a lode way back, to when be was in 
high school, and the confidence of the 
Nevada- Las Vegas Rimnin’ Rebels com- 
manded national attention. 

That is Williamson's vision —-a powerful 
defending national champion with as ability 
to draw upon the memory of past accom- 
plishments. When he imagines the 1995 Ra- 
zorbacks, he sees the *91 Runnin' Rebels. 

U 1 remember how they used to go into 
another arena and say, ‘We don’t care 
who's here. We're men,’ ” Williamson said. 

Arkansas had only two seniors. Roger 
Crawford and Ken fiOey. who occupied six 
of the team's 170 starting spots this season. 
But the tournament's recent history has held 
several reminders that an indication as sim- 
plistic as the number of returning players 
does not necessarily project a champion. 

North Carolina had four returning start- 


ers from the 1993 championship team, phis 
two of the most intensely recruited fresh- 
men in the nation, and still failed to go 

When the Arkansas 
sophomore Corliss 
Williamson imagines 
the 1995 Razorbacks, he 
sees the ’91 Runnin’ 
Rebels. 

beyond the second round for the first time 
since 1980. 

Duke's 1991 and 1992 champions, the 
only back-to-back winner since 1973, need- 
ed the pass of Grant Hill and the shot of 
Christian Laettner to combine for the last- 
second overtime victory over Kentucky — 
one of the most stunning moments in the 


history of t Lc tournament — simply to 
reach the 1992 final Four. 

A first national championship in Razor- 
back history came only after Scotty Thur- 
man’s high, tie-breaking three-pointer, 
with the shot clock down to 1 second and 
the Duke forward Antonio Lang lunging at 
him with 50.7 seconds to play. 

And merely to have that opportunity, 
Arkansas had to respond to a 13-0 run by 
Duke that put the Razorbacks 10 points 
bade with 17 minutes, 8 seconds to go. 
Seven seconds later, when Coach Nolan 
Richardson called time, Arkansas needed 
to re-establish itself. 

Richardson, whose feelings that his 
coaching ability is underappreciated became 
an issue during the weekend, fust reminded 
his players that the game was 40 minutes 
long and they were taking shots quickly. 

Then he emphasized that Williamson — 
Big Nasty, the coach called him — should 
touch the ball on each possession. 


“ ‘No.3, which is the most ii 
You better get your butts on defease,’ 
Richardson remembered saying. “'And 
step it up to the next level' ” 

“They did all three.” he said. 

After a long pause, Richardson smiled 
and added one last reminder of what he 
feds is a widespread lack of understanding 
about the coaming process. 

“I didn’t draw up any plays,” Richard- 
son said, and chuckled. “1 didn’t draw up 
any X’s and O’s. I just talked to them. 
Because they already know the X’s and O’s. 
because we work on them every day. See. 
you coach people. You don't coach X's and 
O’s. That was the difference in the game. 
And it has been that way the entire year. 
That’s how we talk.” 

“Once in a while I’ll get my board out 
and pretend 1 know what I'm doing,” he 
added “Especially if I think TV is looking 
at me.” 


an on Pelt the game's roost renowned star, provoked fierce 
criticism of Havelange’s autocratic style and led to rumors of a move to.) 


SCOREBOARD 




NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 



W L 

Pel 

GB 

,-New Yor» 

51 20 

JIB 

— 

Orlando 

43 29 

-597 

Bib 

Miami 

» 34 

-534 

13 

Mew Jersey 

38 34 

528 

131* 

Boston 

36 45 

.266 

25 

PTnlodelpmo 

31 St 

292 

30 Vi 

Wasniooton 

21 51 

Central OivMoo 

J9T 

30» 

«■ Atlanta 

50 22 

594 

— 

x-cnicogo 

49 24 

571 

t»3 

Cleveland 

43 31 

575 

BV3 

Indiana 

3* 33 

5*2 

11 

Charlotte 

32 39 

.451 

17V3 

Derroli 

JO 52 

278 

30 

Milwaukee 

19 53 

284 

31 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MW wen (MvlKMt 



W L 

pel 

GB 

*- Houston 

51 20 

JIB 

— 

n-San Anianio 

52 21 

J12 

— 

*-uton 

AS 28 

518 

7 

Denver 

35 38 

A 93 

18 

Minnesota 

19 52 

245 

32 

Dallas 

9 83 

pacific Division 

.125 

*213 

v-Seanie 

55 17 

J*4 

— 

x -Phoen U 

48 24 

567 

7 

*-Partteid 

44 30 

595 

n 

Gohten stale 

42 30 

583 

13 

LA. Lakers 

32 39 

.451 

2213 

i_A.CZ ipoers 

24 48 

361 

29 

Sacramento 74 48 

*.<llr»ched oiaTott berth 

433 

31 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 



BOttC 27 34 21 32-f* 

mZ/jmer 34 M 25 »-124 

B: Pinckney 6* W 14 7-10 17. 

NJ.: Benkunine-i tw Jfl. «— fl Wi-1 » 
williams MS l-l 19- i 

I Pinckney 8). New ** sev ** 

Assist*— Boston 73 tO-Brown. Douglas »>• 
New Jersey 3* lAnderson in. 
iltln lriir 19 19 D 

32 25 21 35-1*4 

M: Nos 

Strong 7-10 7-9 22. O: 

Hardowav 8-20 5-6 21. 

54 (Edwards 71. Orlando SI 

■Jits— Milwaukee 24 (Murdock 61. OrkmOo w 

24 21 21 20-“ 
***“ 33 3i If 2§— H8 

■nS EwtnoS-UM 18. D«w«3 4-135-5 IS. «: 


Lena 7-15 1-1 15. Sal lev *-15 3-5 IS Smith 4-10 tt- 
15 20. RCtaund*— New York 49 (Ewing 111, 
Miami 57 (Long m. Anuta— New York 21 
(Harper *1, Miami 19 (Snow 8). 

J1 22 22 26- ft 
17 38 23 35-MS 
Charlotte: Moumlnp 9-11 i-4i9,Currv 8-161- 
1 22. Cleveland: WIHIaimB-16 7-9 2X Higgins ft- 
II M 20L fto fr nu ti awrtowe 49 (Jofraun 
101, Cleveland 48 (HU1 13). AntoH-Chartatte 
30 (Booties 11), Cleveland 21 (Wilkins 8). 
Detroit Jl 28 23 25— 89 

Indiana 25 31 2# 29—105 

D: EmnM 5* 54 17. Mins 8-19 84 20. I: D. 

DavlS 8-13 3* 19. A. Dovts 7-1 1 84 18. Williams 
Ml 4-5 ML Rrftneortf Hgfnjft 52 (Anderson 
18). Indiana S3 ID-Davtol4). Assists— Detroit 
23 (Hunter 8). Indiana 30 (Workman 11). 
WasUngtoe 27 20 22 if- 88 

ancnga 31 21 35 27— 1M 

W: Chapman i-13 5-5 18. Cheoney 8-12 2-2 19. 
C: PiPPcn 10-15 24 22, Armstrong 6-13 4-4 17. 
Redound*— KUMn 52 (Butler 9i. Chica- 
go 88 (Williams 14). Assists— Washington 20 
(Adams 9). Chicago 30 (Pi open io). 

GoMea state M 28 25 27—104 

San Antonio 17 3? 34 21-181 

G: Webber 9-17 34 21. Owens 10-14 80 2 a 
Sprewell 11-22 2-2 28. 5: Rabtnson 12-23 54 29. 
Anderson 7-12 1-2 te. ReOoendt— Golden State 
43 (Owens 10), San Antonio 47 (Rodman 19). 
Assists— Golden Stole 21 (MuUln. SpreweH. 
Webber 5). San Antonio 19 (Robinson 6). 
LA dippers 15 SS 25 17—92 

Denver 24 IS n 30-9J 

LA.: Grant 1M7 M 2b Woods M2 2-2 30. D: 
L. EUla 9-183321. AMut-Kauf 8-774421. Rogers 
7-18 1-2 15. nebo— tf» lw Angeles 50 (vougM 
12). Denver 71 IMutombo 18). Assists— Los An- 
geles 24 (Harper 7). Denver 22 (Pack 10). 
man 25 15 71 18-79 

Seattle 15 21 22 28-88 

U : Malone 6-11 44 IE Chambers 5-10 54 15. 
S: Kemo 4-11 7-10 1 5. SedresnM.4-iC.a9 17. 
Perkins 611 4-4 IS Rebo u n ds— U ta h 49 IMo- 
ione 9), Seattle 44 (Kemp. Perkins SI. As- 
tbte-Utoh 23 (Stockton 12). Seattle w (Par- 
ian. McMillan 4). 

Dallas 22 17 t8 30-88 

Saanmeato 22 18 19 23- « 

D: D. Smith 7-124-4 I&jockson7-152-216.S: 
Simmons 7-16 44 IS. Richmond 8-27 *6 22. 
Rebounds O ollmiQ IRuofcs 101. Sacr am e nto 
51 fPotynleo 16). Assi s ts Da I log 71 (Jackson 
7), Sacramento 19 (Webb ll). 

Pboesu 38 21 72 34—113 

Portland 79 40 32 34-05 

P: Cebattos 8-17 4-4 2a Barkley 10-146427. 
P: C Robinson 9-14 54 Z3, Strickland 9-10 84 
IS. R eb o u nds— Phoen be 53 (Green 13). Port- 
Hold 54 (Strickland. Drealer 8). Assists— 


Phoenix 23 (Kjormson 11). Portland 32 
(Strickland 2D). 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Enri Dtvtstoo 



W 

L 

PCt 

GB 

Toronto 

2 

a 

IJM0 

— 

Baltimore 

1 

0 

1500 

*3 

Boston 

1 

0 

1500 

W 

New York 

1 

0 

1500 

93 

Detroit 

0 

) 

500 

193 


Control Division 



Cleveland 

1 

0 

1500 

— 

Milwaukee 

1 

0 

1500 

— 

Kemscn Cttv 

0 

1 

500 

1 

MhmesoTo 

0 

1 

500 

1 

Chicago 

0 

2 

500 

IS* 


WSStDMsifll) 



California 

1 

0 

1JU0 

— 

Oakland 

0 

1 

508 

1 

Seattle 

0 

1 

500 

1 

Texas 

0 

1 

500 

1 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



East Division 




w 

L 

PCI. 

GB 

Atlanta 

2 

0 

1500 

— 

New York 

2 

0 

1500 

— 

Philadelphia 

1 

0 

1500 

W 

Montreal 

1 

1 

500 

1 

Florida 

B 

1 

500 

IW 


Central DMsIoo 



dncftmaTl 

i 

1 

500 

— 

Houston 

l 

1 

500 

— 

SL Louis 

1 

1 

500 

— 

Chicago 

0 

2 

500 

1 

Pittsburgh 

0 

2 

500 

1 


West DivhloR 



Son Francisco 2 

a 

1500 

— • 

Los Angeles 

J 

0 

1500 

93 

Colorado 

a 

i 

500 

1V» 

San Dteoo 

0 

2 

500 

2 


Borders. W— Stewart. 1-0. L-AJ=emandez. 0- 
1. 5v — SfoMemyre (1). HRs— Chicago. Fran- 
ca (1). Toronto. Carter (1). Delgado (2). 
California 240 US 008-8 15 • 

810 SOI BIS— 4 9 ■ 

Langston, Lewis (8) and Myers; Tapani, 
Casks! (4), Garagoso (9) and Wolbec*. 
W — Langston. La L — Tapani, 8-1. HRs— Min- 
nesota, Winfield (If. PJAvnaz (11. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
New York 105 880 088-8 6 1 

Chicago MB 148-7 9 0 

Smith, Hgrsi IB) and Stinnett; Guzman, 
Basfcle (3). Boatfaio (6), Plesoc (8) and Wil- 
kins. W— -Smith, l-a L— Guzman. 0-1. 
Pftisberce see see soo-o 4 2 

San Francisco bos mi lex— 2 7 0 

Cooke, Johnston (7), Tomlin 17), Dewey (I) 
and GaH; Swift. MUackson (8), Beck (9) and 
Manwartng. W— Swift, va 1 — Cooke. 0-1. 
Sv-Beck (1). 

Florida 010 SO* 3M-3 5 4 

LM Angeles 2M SM llx— 4 7 1 

Hough. Perea (71. J .Hernandez (7) ana San- 
tiago; Hereniser, Got) (71, Worrell («) and 
Plana W— Gott, l-a L — J -Hernandez, 0-1. 
Sv— Worrell (1). hr*— F lorida, conine (1). 
Abbott (1). 

Mo nt i e m M HO wi-4 9 1 

ffeesfoo 8)0 ON BS6 — 1 1 1 

lOtlll, Show (71. Heredia (B).Wettetand (91 
and D.Fletcher; Drobek, B.WUhams (7) and 
Servo is. Taubensee <71. w— K.HHI. l-a 
L— Drobek, 8-1. HR — Montreal. I_ Walker (11. 
Atlanta 111 no sees m t 

Son Diego om oh 001—1 3 1 

Gfavlne. Wohlers (0), Bedroskm (9) and 
J -Loner; Whitehurst, Mauser (4). MJJavls 
(6). Sager (71. GeJIarrts (9) and Ausmus. 
W— Glav(ne.l-4.L— WhltehursLU. HRs— At- 
lanta, Klesko (2), J. Lopez (I). 


s-Boston 

Quebec 

Hartford 

Ottawa 


27 13 91 270 239 

40 t 72 242 271 

48 0 58 212 271 

54 9 35 108 363 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Ceatrol DWtsioo 



w 

L 

T Pts OF GA 

x -Detroit 

45 

27 

B 

•8 

339 263 

Jt-Taramo 

47 

27 

12 

*4 

261 238 

x-Daiias 

40 

20 

12 

92 

270 2S0 

x-si. Louis 

3B 

31 

10 

B6 

2S3 263 

x-aucogo 

38 

35 

♦ 

81 

236 at 

Winnipeg 

23 

47 

9 

55 

234 323 


Pacific Division 



K-Cafgory 

38 

28 

13 

89 

2B2 2*4 

x-Vimcouver 

3f 

30 

3 

01 

272 287 

k-San Jase 

32 

33 

15 

79 

3G 2S4 

Anaheim 

31 

a 

5 

67 

228 246 

Los Anooies 

26 

42 

11 

63 

280 384 

Edmonton 

23 

44 

12 

58 248292 

x -clinched oiavoH berth 





Florida 


NHL Standings 


Tuesday's Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Oakland 500 001 Ml— 7 B 1 

MBwoafcee 113 005 81*— 11 13 0 

a.Wltt, Ontiveros M). Nunez (8). Taylor (7). 
Brtseoe IS) and steinbacsv d e ma nd (»; 
Stored. Kjeter (8). Orosco 17). Fetters (B> and 
Nilsson. W— Kiefer. Ml L— Ontiveros. 0-L 
HRs— Oakland. Neel (1). SMnbocti 11). 
Chicago 8M 002 018-4 4 1 

Toronto 010 041 Olx—4 1 I 

A J eroandez- McCcsfclU (7). Awnmodur 

(8) and Korkovfce, Lavadlere (8); Stewart 
Timlin It). Castilla (8), Stottlemvre 19) and 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Altanlfc Divided 



W 

L 

T PIS GF GA 

x-N.Y. Rangers 

58 

23 

7 

187 

2*5 2)9 

x-N«w Jersey 

45 

S 

11 

101 

290 208 

Washington 

38 

34 

10 

82 

257 248 

Florida 

32 

33 

IS 

79 

222 222 

N.Y. islanders 

33 

35 

11 

77 2U 2S2 

Philadelphia 

34 

3> 

8 

78 

282 303 

Tampa Bav 

77 

41 

11 

85 

209 240 

Northeast ttvfstoo 



x-PMsburah 

42 

25 

13 

97 

289 268 

x -Montreal 

39 

28 

M 

92 270 233 

x- Buffalo 

41 

30 

9 

91 

273 211 



TUESDAY'S RESULTS 

1 2 8 8-4 

• I 2 8-3 

First Period: F Lomakin 19 (Medanby. 
Barnes). Second period: F Barnes 21 (MeF 
lanbyj; O-Bassen 13 (Suiter, Wokrtn); F Be- 
langer 14 (Munety. Betming). (pa). Third Per- 
tad:0-Kom«i*kv27 (SundkvSoUc),- 04aUc27 
nmrenkaRlccU.SbgtsDn goal: F ion Fben 7- 

11- 44-21 Q (an Fitzpatrick) 11-12-15-2—40. 

NY. Islanders 8 0 3 1—4 

Washington 1 8 2 8-3 

First Period: W-Eurrtdee 25 (Juneau, 

Hatcher). <pp). Thlnt Period: W -Miller 11 
(Hatcher); (sh)N.Y.- Hogue 32 (Ki-upp, Ko- 
sparottts); NV^Turgeon 35 (Thomas) ;W-PL 
vonha 11 N.Y.-FefTnro W (Hogue, Mclrmts). 
Overtime: N.Y.-Hoawe 33 (Ferrara Dal- 
gomo). Shots oa good: N.Y.(an Beoupre) 813- 
7-1—77. W (on McLennan) 1*4-54—27. 
Chicago • 1 4—1 

SL LOOte 1 I 3—5 

First Period: SL-Shonahan 44 (Jonnev). 
(pp)J5ccoad Period: C-Camer 3 (Amoriia 
Ruuttu); SL-Shonahan 45 (Housley). Third 
Period: SL-Hull 54 (Stastny); SL -Miller 23 
fJonney.TUIev),- (pp). SL-Nedved4 (Jonnev. 
Joseph), (pp). Shots oa goal: C (on Joseph) 17- 

12- 18—40. XL. (on Beltour) 18-74-3L 

T or ont o 3 1 3-8 

Dados 1 T 2—4 

FW Period: T-Borschevsky 10 (Ollmeur. 
Andreychuk); (pp). T-Mcftao 1 (Clark. Ma- 
enun) ; T-Eostwood 7 ( Mondervlde, Rouse) : D- 
EkJund X Second Period: T-Gcrtner 32 (GH- 
mour. Gill); lap). D-Modano 48 (N Broten. 
Evason). (pp).Tklrd Period: oCralg 13 
(Kkrtt. Donned W; D-Kkm 13 (Croat Evason); 
T-ManOervirle 7 (Eastwood, GUI) ; lT-Osbome 
8 (Lelebvre). (enl. Shots on goal: T (on Moos) 
11-18-9—34. D (on Potvlnl 12-7-14— 3X 
Detroit 4 2 7-8 

Vancouver 1 2 0-3 

First Period: D-tConstonitaov 12 (Kozlov, 
accaretfl); EFaccorgill 25 (York, S hep- 


Despite Dispute, Pele 
Backs Havelange Term * 

Reuters 

ROME — Die legendary soccer star Pete on Wednesday glossed over 1 
his differences with FIFA's president, Joao Havelange. and applauded 
the decision to grant Havelange another four-year term as head oP 
soccer’s governing body. [* 

“I think these four more years represent a tribute to what Havelange' 
has done for world soccer,” Peli said of his fellow Brazilian. “He is like a r 
father to me and it’s obviously good for Brazil too.” 

The FIFA president caused controversy in December when he barred" 
.Pele from the World Cup draw in Las Vegas over a dispute between the 
former player and Ricardo Teixeira. Havelange's son-in-law and head of 
the Brazilian soccer federation. 

The ban 

criticism of Havelange’s autocratic styt 

oust him. Havelange, Tl. has led FIFA since 1974. But the five contineo- . 
tal federations who form FIFA on Tuesday agreed to support Have-’ 
tange's candidacy for a sixth and final four-year term. 

UEFA, the European governing body, dropped plans to propose an ■ 
Italian, Antonio Maiarrese. as a rival candidate after receiving unspeci- • 
fied guarantees from the ruling body. . 

SIDELINES 

Intrum Justitia in Whitbread Lead 

SOUTHAMPTON. England (AP) — The European yacht InUum ; 
Justitia became the third trader in three days Wednesday on the fifth leg 
of the Whitbread Round the World Race. 

Intrum Justitia sailed to a lead of 1 nautical mile (1.8 kms) over 
Tuesday's front-runner, (he Japanese-New Zealand entry Tokio, and was’ 
3 miles ahead of the Japanese-New Zealand boat Yamaha, which had led. 
two days earlier. All three boats are Whitbread 60s. ; 

The lead also changed at the head of the Maxi class, where the French,' 
entry La Poste held a 2-mile advantage over Merit Cup of Switzerland.; 
New Zealand Endeavor dropped from first to third, 3 miles adrift. The 
leading Maxis trailed the leading Whitbread 60s by 23 miles as the fleer 
sailed north cm the fifth day of the 5.475-mile leg from Puma del Este,‘ 
Uruguay, to Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 

Austria Soccer Club Faces Insolvency , 

VIENNA (AP) — Rapid of Vienna, 29-time Austrian soccer league, 
champion, winner of 13 Austrian Cups and a 1985 European Cup’ 
Winners’ Cup finalist is insolvent but may survive if a sponsor is found.. 

Rapid, winch hasn't won a league title since 1 988 and cup crown since 
1987, shows assets of 880,000 schillings (S73.300) and liabilities totaling 
31.9 million schillings. Its declaration of insolvency on Tuesday came a 
day before its sisler corporation. Rapid Finanz AG, a financing and 
puWk relations company, also declared its insolvency. 

The financing company, largely owned by Bank Austria, will discorr- 
tinue operations after a debt settlement is approved, but the club hopes to 
keep playing. Club officials said that Rapid will continue playing for the 
rest of the 1993-94 season, and players will be paid from a state 
insolvency fund until a settlement with creditors is reached. Founded in 
•' 1899 , Rapid won its first league title in 1912 and its first Austrian Cup 
seven years later. 

Holyfield Signs Casino Deal Until ’97 : 

LAS VEGAS (AFP) — Evander Holyfield, the world heavyweight 
boxing champion, has signed a contract with Caesar's Palace to be the silk 
of any title defense through 1997. officials erf the resort carino said. ■ 
The agreement indudes defenses against Lennox Lewis, the WB£ 
champion. Riddick Bowe. the former 1BF champion, and the former 
champion Mike Tyson. Holyfield defends his IBF and WBA titles at th£ 
casino on April 22 against Michael Moorer. 

For the Record 

Guido Bucbwald, 33, a long-time regular defender on the German 
national soccer team, confirmed Wednesday that be was transferring ig 
Urawa Red Diamonds in the Japanese league after the World Cup finals 
end m July. (AP) 


para); Idp). V-Burgss (CourtnaiLCmvon); 
DClccoretH 28 (Coffey. Yasrmanl.- (ppl. D- 

Y rtf man 23 (Lapointe). Second Period: V- 

Mcintvre 3 (Bcsxrcti); OCIoorclII 27 (Yzor- 
mon. Cottey); D-CJccarolll a (Coffev. 

Yzorman); V-Chorbwnoau 7 ICourtnalL 

Burg). (pp).THM Period: lD-Primeou 27 
(CIccarelll.Yzennon); iD-Lapoime7 (Drao- 
er). shots ee goal: D (on McLean) W3-S—3A 

V Ion EsMtisa) 9*4—26. 

5«» Jote 1 1 0—2 

i M /^nodf> ■ 0 i l 

First Period: XJ.-Bakor 11 (Falioon,wtiit- 
nv). Second Period: SJ.-Baker 12 (Falloaa 
Odgtrs). Thtnt Period: LJL-Robltomo 41 
(KurrL Gretzky); (pn).5kotsoogociJ;sj. ion 
stouber) 134-5—3*. LA. (on IrIM) 44-13-2X 


DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
SC It e ere n ve e n i PC Groningen 0 
FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Nantes X Paris S.G. 0 
Marseille % Angers I 
Cannes 2. Auxerre I 
Bordeaux 4. Soriioux 1 
Strasbourg 0, Mantnelller I 
Monaco a Lens 0 
Toulouse X Metz 2 
Line X Coen l 
Le Havre X Morttgues 0 

GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
FC Nuremberg I, vtB Stuttgart 0 
Hamburg er SV & Borussla Dortmund 0 
FC Cologne X Wotteractaeid 2 
Borussla Moencttengfadtioch X Bovem Mu- 
nieft 0 

FC Kaiserslautern l. vfB Leipzig (ns) 


SEVENTH ONE-DAY INTERNATIONAL 
Soots Africa n. AertraBe 
Wednesday at HewtawU. Soutb Africa 
Australia Inti hiss: 743-6 (50 overs) 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Asuckrfloo 
Indiana— S igned Lester Conner, guard. 
Put Pooh Richardson, guard, on Inlured ON. 

PORTLAND— Signed Buck WIlBarrw for- 
word, to Xyeor contract extension. 

HOCKEY 

Matioool Hockey Leagoe 
ANAHEIM— Recalled Scott Chortler, Oe- 
to nse man, tram San Diego, IHL. 

BUFFALOS— Recalled Matthew Barnahy, 
left wing, tram Rochester, ahl 
PITTSBURGH — Recoiled Rob Daman, 
aooltonder, tram ctevekaia ihi_ 
WASHINGTON— Signed Jason Aiiboa cen- 
ter, to 4-veor contract. 


ACROSS 

i islands 

iPacihc group) 
s Pink end 
is Type of music 
iBGenenc 
i?Wh«iever 
t« VCR user s 
need 

IB Props (up) 
anraitn 
37 N B A S 
Arctnsald 
23 Kmd ol crazy 


24 Tennis score 
29 Perplexed 
2s Arch site 

27 Complamt 

28 Chemical salt 

31 postal abbf 

32 Monte 

39 Marshaled 
3T ApOl'o 

component 
39 Having 
rectangular 
cells, as a 
ceiling 


Solution to Puzzle of April 6 


QBBB 


Sosas saflg |g§n 

mOQUEEJ 
oddd ar 
ascio a 
aaao a 


Th a 
T lAlN 


:eh 

a 

m 

a 


43 Hue and cry 

44 Wyoming's 
Simpson 

«9 Lose R 
oa Early stock 
speculator 
Russell 

SO Common side 
order 

si ' See you' 

52 In 

(doubled up) 
9 « Serve 
SB Moolah 
»t Heartfelt 
99 Almost any 
letter in 
Washington 
so Kind of exam 
si A day ago. 

dialectally 
62 Stopped 

down 

1 Naroem 
aviation 

2 Hello and 
goodbye 

3 VCR user’s 
need 

4 Gets stuffed 

5 Word repealed 
Before "Show 

6 The Beatles’ 

-Yes 


7 Info on a French 
passport 
a Big name m 
sm^l 

construction 
•On the ocean: 
Fr. 

10 Word with block 
or test 

11 Temper 
fa Lori of 

'Petticoat 

Junction' 

13 Make thin 

14 Yielded 

*1 Singer Coolrdge 
23 Dipsomaniac 
2S Throat 
problem? 

27 Bushed 

29 'Up and •’ 

30 GOVt. 
investigator 

32 Graduates’ 
celebration tone 

33 Correspondent 

34 Conjures up 
3s Auden verses 
so Big blow 

40 Hugged 

41 Eddie Murphy 
flick 

*3 Something 
remembered 


44 Hoaxing 

47 Forthwith 

48 Respired, 
dog-style 


so Clydesdale 
outfitter 

S3 Rock music’s 
Motley 


S4 Some live by 
them 

9S Culture starter 
SB Smalt note 



PaarH By rmO Pacop 
O (for 1’nriL Times Edited by Will ShorK. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAl, APRIL 7, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


Cigarette National Park 



WASHINGTON — The dga-, 
yy relic companies are worried 
that the anti-smoking eampnign jg 
catching Tire and the U. S. govern- 
ment may issue stronger regula- 
tions concerning the use of tobac- , 
co. 

Many government and private 
bunding have “No Smoking'’ reg- 
ulations, as do 
airplanes, trains 
and massage j 
parlors. Golf 
courses are seri- 
ously thinking 
of banning 
smokers, as are 
schools, shop- 
ping mall* and 

even football 
huddles. . 

So where do Bocnwald 
people go to fill their lungs with 
nicotine? The government is work- 
ing on it. 

One suggestion making the 
rounds here in Washington is that 
the government set aside a piece of 
land somewhere in the United 
States where smokers could go 
when they wanted a cigarette. Yel- 
lowstone Park has been mentioned, 
but conservationists have opposed 
the idea because they fear that sec- 
ond-hand smoking would make all 
the grizzly bears sick. 

The Mqjave Desert in California 
is also bang studied, as are Las 
Vegas casinos. 

□ 

A member of the search commit- 
tee, Minnie Broderick, told me: 
“We'd like to make the smoking 
areas as convenient as possible but 


Pompidou Center 
’Will Not Close 

Return 

P ARIS — The Georges Pompi- 
dou center will be overhauled 
in sections. Culture Minister Jac- 
ques Ton boo said Wednesday. 

The 440 million franc (S75 mil- 
lion) protect will entail closing part 
of the museum from 1997 to 1999. 
Opened 17 years ago. the center is 
unable to cope with hordes of visi- 
tors. 

The Paris Opera's Palais Gamier 
is also being renovated. It will be 
closed from mid- 1 994 to early 1996 
for the 350 million franc project. 


we don’t want to upset the ecologi- 
cal balance; which is what cigarette 
smoke is suspected of doing. Hie 
main problem in choosing an area 
for smokers is that no state in the 
union wants them." 

“Why should we get the nicotine 
from New Jersey?" a Florida legis- 
lator asked after hearing that 
Washington was going to buy the 
Everglades and turn it over to 
smokers. In a debate on the House 
floor he ydled. “Doesn’t anyone 
here give a damn about alligators?" 

The smokers were not too 
thrilled about the government idea 
either. A two-pack-a-day lobbyist 
from Greensboro declared, ‘Tm 
not going to Nebraska just to light 
up. I have a right to smoke here at 
home. You can take North Caroli- 
na out of the smoker, but you can’t 
take the smoker out of North Caro- 
lina." 

□ 

To make life more pleasant for 
those who would be going to the 
smoking “reservation.” the govern- 
ment is seriously thinking of get- 
ting the Army Corps of Engineers 
to build gambling casinos. 

Minnie Broderick tried to ex- 
plain: “We realize that we are in- 
conveniencing people by making 
than go so far away to blow smoke 
rings. But it had to come to this or 
ban smoking in the entire country. 
Once everyone giets used to the idea 
we will all be better off.” 

The tobacco companies are 
fighting the idea like mad. “No- 
body has proved conclusively that 
cigarettes are bad for you.” said 
Dina Tuft, an industry lobbyist. 

“As a matter of fact, the doctors 
under contract to us have proved 
that a cigarette inhaled after some- 
one has been shot can save that 
person’s life. If Congress takes part 
in this giveaway well see that every 
incumbent is defeated by refusing 
to provide ashtrays for their fund- 
raising dinners.” 

Other sites still being considered 
are the tundra in Alaska, the Rocky 
Mountain Arsenal in Colorado and 
(he Whitewater River in Arkansas. 

Minnie Broderick admitted that 
there could be a delay in opening 
up the smoking area because the 
tobacco states also intend to fight 
the plan. As one Virginia senator 


Is Anybody Playing Really New Jazz? 


put it, “Everyone worries about the 
spotted owl but nobody gives a 
damn about saving the Marlbon 


By Mike Zwerin 

Internationa} Herald Tribute 

P ARIS — People are always asking me 
questions like: “What have you been 
listening to lately? Is anybody playing 
really new jazZ? What records should I 
buy?” Having trouble thinking vertically, I 
generally panic and mumble. 

The talented under-30 post-Wynton 
Marsalis generation of tradition and 
blues-oriented players has installed itself- 
as the immediate future. It is being called a 
movement. They build on the past and 
may one day leap into the future, but for 
the present most of them sound like other, 
mostly dead, people. They are well-be- 
haved. intelligent, highly specialized tech- 
nocrats. They communicate to the intellect 
and the ego. not the souL 
I began taking notes in caffe. Gulp! I 
was listening mokly to dead people too. 1 
made it a point to look for livingjazz in the 
present tense. It is not ladling — John 
McLaughlin, John Scofield, Dennis 
Chambers, Joshua Redman. Charlie Ha- 
den. Trilok Guxtu, Abbey Lincoln, Niels 
Lan Docfcy. Tom Harrell . . . 

The search led me to La Villa, a small 
and spiffy dub in Saint-Germain -des- 
Prfe, on a slow and drizzly night to hear 
the young electric guitarist Wolfgang 
MulbspieL He was almost literally pushed 
up several notches by his percussionist and 
drummer Don Alias. Listening to Alias is 
definitely worth a detour. A tall, proud, 
dark-skinned man with short-cropped 
sted-gray hair, flashing eyes and lots of 
dignity, swing and savvy.' he has played 
with Joni Mitchell, Jsco Pastorius, NGIes 
Davis and just about everybody else, and 
when Don says, “Wolfgang’s for real” it's 
an endorsement to take seriously. 

I decided to talk to the little-known but 
highly touted Austrian to learn something 
about how young people are coping with 
the weight of history. 

Muthspiel is a thin, timid, pale, boyish 
and above all very serious man just getting 
used to saying he’s 29 years old. Growing 
up in a musical family in Graz, be was a 
good boy who adored practicing the violin. 
IBs parents entered him in competitions, 
he won his share. At the age of 14, howev- 
er. he said, looking down embarrassed, 
“The big revolution happened.” 

He hesitated: “I got kicked out of 
school . . . had trouble with my parents. 
... I was ... er ... I started to 
smoke cigarettes, hang out with girls, cut 
class. It was a process of finding myself.” 
Picking up courage, he continued: 'Teach- 
ers wanted to break me. There are still 
some very authoritarian teachers in Aus- 
trian schools. I already knew what I want- 
ed to do at this point and h had nothing to 
do with the violin.” 

I feared the worst. He grew hair down to 








fe-Svr 1 







--V1 •• ; • 









Wolfgang Muthspiel: “We will only be able to talk about my music in 30 years.* 


his waist, dyed it green, dropped Ecstasy, 
played Led Zeppelin licks with high dis- 
tortion on electric guitars ana then 
smashed them to pieces. His poor parents. 
But no, Muthspiel’s story always seems to 
tuck itself back in. 

He switched to the un threatening acous- 
tic classical guitar and played Bach lute 
suites, flamenco and u'me folk music. 
Coming from classical, “the middle 
ground” of the esoteric German label 
ECM appealed to him — such people as 
Jan Garbarek. Teije Rypdal and John Ab- 
ercrombie. After a year of “intense dra- 
ma.” he reconciled with his parents. His 
father, a classical conductor, “realized that 
the only way we could continue to hang 
out together was for him to learn about 
improvised music. He was cool.” 


We learn to be cool from our children. ■ 
Tucked in. 

By the age of 22, Wolfgang was in the 
U. S. and discreetly plugged in. playing 
electric guitar with the vibraphonist Gary 
Burton's tasteful quartet. Burton controls 
his musical environment, his choice of 
tunes and accompaniment leads bis side- 
men to play what he wants to hear. He's 
known for building up young players who 
leave him to become leaders on their own 
just as they mature. 

“It must be hard for Gary to have that 
happen all the time,” Muthspiel said, “like 
losing sons. Gary is so dear, be defines his 
musical space so well you can see the 
reflection of your own ideas in it All the 
time 1 was with Gary I thought about 
doing my own thing.” 


Burton’s concept was: You basically al- 
ways play the tune. Muthspiel was more 
interested in extended, risky, improvised 
composition. This is less commercial but 
he doesn't care. He makes a living playing 
music he wants to play, which is a privi- 
lege. and -he appreciates that. But his view 
is more long-term: “We will only be able 
to talk about my music in 30 years. Every 
step should be a universe within itself, but 
it’s the continuity that interests me. Rigfaj 
now I'd jnst like to have a steady band.” 

His wife is a stage designer who likes 
European theater better than the Ameri- 
can and they moved to Vienna a year ago. 
The jazz scene is too limited there and that 

road still leads inevitably to New York. 
They will return. 

“How do you fed about it?” 

“A little lost. Homeless. I wouldn't want 
to have a family right now because f don't 
want to come home to a kid who doesn't 
recognize me. Tm a nomad now. that’s 
what real jazz musicians are. I like the 
road Spending my time in neutral places 
like airports and hotels forces me to create 
my own space on the bandstand for two 
hours in the evening. Being alone is 
healthy for a musician. On tour, the muse 
grows and grows. 

“Tm really jealous of Don Alias, he 
played with Miles. Boy. 1 wanted to do 
that to learn how to use space from him. 
but be died on me. That whole generation 
of originals died — Miles, Dizzy, Getz, 
Dexter, Chet. It’s as though Mozart, 
Brahms. Debussy and Stravinsky all died 
within five years of each other. How can 
we survive that? 

“Now we are in a strange direction. 
Young people are playing in reference 
bock to dead musicians. These cats love 
their forefathers, they’re serious and 
they’re humble and I like that but some- 
how they don't reach me. 1 want to play 
new music, 1 don't care if you call it jazz or 
not Tm trying to think of somebody who 
■=aik to me more directly and personally in 
the present. ...” 

After reflecting for a few beats, the same 
name came to both of ns. “Keith Jarrell.” 
we said in unison. He continued: “The 
Keith Jarred Standards trio is right on the 
money. Gary Peacock and Jack DeJoh- 
nette. On the corner. They are able to 
make the old new ngain. They are stream- 
lined. Their music is clean, elastic, origi- 
nal. intelligent and honest. Thai's the way 
Td like the future to be.” 

He brightened up then immediately 
glum, like he’d been balled out by an 
authoritarian Austrian schoolteacher. Not 
tucked in this time. “The only problem,” 
he said, “is that I don’t think the future is 
actually going to be like that” 


PEOPLE 

A fine and a Warning: 
Stay Away From Taxis 

A London magistrate granted 
bail Wednesday to the Marquess of 
BbndfonL the troubled heir of the 
Duke of Marlborough. The mar- 
quess. 38. who has had several 
brushes with the law and has ac- 
knowledged a drug problem, spent 
Tuesday night in jail after failing to 
appear in court on charges of steal- 
ing a checkbook and not paying a 
taxi fare. Magistrate Smut Black 
fined Blandford £200 l$300) for 
missing the court date, ordered him 
not to take any taxis and freed him 
on £5.000 bail. Last month the 
trustees of Blenheim Palace, which 
Blandford trill one day inherit be- 
gan proceedings to limit his eventu- 
al control of the estate. 


Tbe asking price for Barbra Strei- 
sand's Malibu, California, estate 
went up by millions of dollars just 
before she gave it to a conservation 
agency, raising questions about the 
size of the tax break she may get 
When the gift to (he Santa Monica 
Mountains Conservancy was an- 
nounced in November. Streisand's 
agents said the property had been 
valued at $15 million. But an ap- 
praisal of the properly failed to 
mention that the property had gone 
unsold at $1 1.9 million. 

□ 

Jean-Qaude DuvaEer, tbe former 
Haitian president, has departed his 
luxury home in tbe hills above 
Cannes on the French Riviera, leav- 
ing a string of unpaid bills, accord- 
ing to his landlord's lawyer and oth- 
ers. He left no forwarding address 
when he departed, after a local court 
ordered him lo pay 500,000 francs 
($85,000) in damages and interest on 
unpaid rent. For the last four years 
he had rented the villa for 800.000 
francs a vear. 


The actor Tony Cnrtis. 68. was 
resting comfortably in a Los Ange- 
les hospital after undergoing heart 
bypass surgery. 

□ 

Wesley Somes was thrown from 
his motorcycle but not seriously 
hurt after a police chase, the Flori- 
da Highway Patrol said. He was 
given a ticket for reckless driving. 

I^RJWIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears an Pages 4&9 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


Europe 


Alpsnre 

AraamjBfn 

Ankara 

Mm 

BocMona 

B>*TrofW' 

Berta 

Brussels 

Budopoar 

CbAdDc?^ 

Oiijta 

Esfatourgh 

norm ico 

Frorktat 

Genoi u 

Hrtarta 

Istanbul 

Las Ratams 

Usbon 

London 

UmM 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Wealher. 


Srabourg 

Tabu 

VbtSpp 

Vnrra 


Today 
High Low 
OF <3F 
St/TO 1203 
0/46 409 

■Ml 3737 
17*3 0/40 

17 HO 10/60 
14/57 3/37 

9/40 1/34 

9/40 3/37 

12/53 2,35 

0/46 1/34 

21/70 14/57 
B/40 3/37 

7/44 4/39 

14(57 7*44 

7/44 307 

12/53 4/39 

7/44 3/37 

16/61 7*44 

23/73 1742 
19*0 11/52 
9/40 3/37 

10*4 7/44 

15/50 7/44 

0*43 0/32 

9*49 1*4 

16/61 0*46 

7/44 0*32 

17/82 11*2 
12/53 4/39 

10*0 2/35 

3*7 104 

14*7 6/43 

4/39 -1/31 
8/46 2/35 

11/52 3*7 

7/44 3*37 

14*7 Bi-40 

10/50 2/35 
11/S2 2*6 

12*3 4/39 


Tomorrow 
W High Lm W 
OF OF 

■ 22/71 13*5 pc 

M. 11/52 0/43 ta 

pc 14/57 3/37 ah 
PC 17*82 0/46 pc 

pc 17*2 11*2 pc 
Ml 14/57 4/09 Ml 
C 9*40 1/34 

I (1*2 4(39 r 
sh 13*6 307 pc 

pc 0/46 104 A 

3 22/71 14*7 pc 
3h 0/46 -1/31 I 
Sh 11*46 3/37 Sh 

Sh 10/01 4/39 pc 

r 0.-40 1/34 pc 

nh 11*2 3/37 pc 

r 0/46 ->OI f 
Sh 13/56 7/44 I 

s 23/73 17*2 pc 
s 20*0 12*3 e 
Mi 11*2 5*41 Mi 

pc 10*6 0/46 e 
sh 16*1 5*41 a 

c 1102 307 c 
Sh 11*2 002 C 

sh 15*0 0/40 pc 

sh Btffl -1/31 nh 

pc 18--6I 12*3 pc 
Mi 11*5 6.43 r 
C 12*3 1/34 O 

Ml 7/44 .1/31 c 

■ 1203 4/39 Ml 

Ml 11*2 0.32 C 

r 4/39 t/34 r 

Ml 14*7 409 Ml 
r 7/44 -lOi r 
pe 16*1 7/44 pc 

pc 11/52 ZOS pc 

r 9*48 1/34 c 

Ml 13/56 3/37 c 


Oceania 



KHgLbitaBK. 

•MMream 

North America 

Atlanta to New York City wfl 
have miW weather Friday 
Into the weekend A storm In 
the nation's mklsection wfl 
bring rain and a taw heavy 
thunderstorms from Mem- 
phis lo Chicago. Heavy 
snows wffl blanket northern 
Minnesota and western 
Ontario. Los Angeles to 
Phoenix wit be dry. 


Europe 

Another powerful storm wfB 
Invade northwestern Europe 
Friday and last Into the 
weekend. London and Parte 
wilt have strong winds and 
heavy rams Saturday. 
Madrid and Lisbon will be 
mostly sunny. Scattered 
heavy rains will occur bom 
Greece to western Turkey 
this w eekend . 


Asia 

Much of Japan. Incfudng the 
Tokyo area, wilt have dry, 
mild weather this coming 
weekend. Central and east- 
ern China, tndudkig Shang- 
hai end 8efng. wfl have dry. 
pleasant weather. Rain from 
the ramnants of Tropical 
Storm Owen wilt move into 
northern Vietnam. Bangkok 
wfl be sunny and vaiy warm. 


Mkkfle East 


Tata Tomorrow 

ttp Lor W Up Law W 

OF OF OF Of 

21/70 12*3 e 21/70 13/50 C 

24/75 11*2 a 28/79 10*0 pc 

21/70 0*43 • 21/70 7/44 pc 

13*6 9*40 a 19*8 10*0 c 

34/B3 16*1 Mi 34*3 13*5 * 
34/93 21/70 s 35/95 19*00 s 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow 

Mgh Low W tfigh Low W 
OF Cf OF OF 

BuonosAwwa 23/73 11*2 a 22/71 11*2 pc 

CaraoB 30*6 24/75 pc 31*0 24/75 a 

Urn 23/73 10*4 pc 24/75 18*4 po 

IMedOW 23/73 12*3 pc 20/79 12*3 po 

nodaJWnto 27*0 22/71 pc 28*2 22/71 ah 

Srtogo 21/70 6/43 a 21/70 4/39 pe 


NMan 
Capa Tom 


Today Tomorrow 

Mgh Low W Mgb Low W 

OF OF OF OF 

35/95 94/75 * 30*7 20/79 pe 

18*4 5*41 pc 10*4 10*0 pc 

25/77 21/70 pc 25/77 21/70 C 

32*9 23/73 pa 33*1 23/73 pc 

31*0 12*3 ■ 31*0 14*7 ah 

19*0 6*41 a 10*1 5/41 pc 

19*S 1203 Ml 21/70 12*3 pc 

32*0 23/73 pc 32*3 23/73 Ml 

26/79 19*0 pc 36/79 10*4 c 

17*2 8*40 Ml 16*1 4/39 pa 


19*06 13*5 a 19*0 13*6 pc 
23/73 17*2 9 24/75 14*7 pc 
23/73 1102 0 22/71 12*3 pc 
22m 8*40 pc 27*0 10*0 pc 

31MB 96/79 * 32/09 26/79 ah 
23/73 1305 pc 24/75 14*7 pc 
17*2 11*2 Ml 19*0 0*0 pe 


North America 


Honohiu 
Houston 
Lob Angara 


21/70 14*7 « 20*8 14*7 pc 
22*71 14*7 B 33*73 16*01 pc 


LsgwHfcseumy. pc-patey ctoudy, cOcudy, sh-Mwaws. tex a i d wteorm s . r-rah. 8/ -Snow Burrtes. 
new. Hob. W-Wtaaher. AS maps, forecasts aw) data provided by Accu-WMttwr, Inc. C 1994 


S 7/44 
l pc 23/73 
' Mi 13*5 
I pc 12 *1 
C 14*7 
1 pc 10/50 
I pc 28*2 
! a 25/77 
> a 22/71 
pc TUB 
b 9*40 
1 *1 3/37 
a 29*4 
c 12*3 
• 20/79 
PC 17/82 
Ml 11*2 
e 7*4 
pc 13*5 






Resort L U1 

Andorra 

Pas de la Casa 90 140 
Sgjdau 70 150 

Austria 

Ischgl 20 170 

Krtzbuhe! 0 1 10 

Otoergurgi 25 115 

Saaibach 0 50 

SLAnton 20 350 

Rases 

Alps d'Huez 100300 

Les Arcs 55 256 

Avoriaz 170 210 

Chamonix 5 470 

Courchevel 90 180 

Les Deux A! pea 40 310 
I sofa 30 00 

MOnbeJ 20 260 

La Plagne 150 330 

Seme Chevalier 10 120 
Tignes 130 315 

Val d'ksfefa 110 270 

Val Thorens 100 2S0 

Germany 

G arm tech 0300 

Oba/stdorf 0 150 


Plates Pistes State Snow 


Good Some 7a r 
Good Open Pwo 

Fair Open Hvy 
Fair Qsa Spmg 
Good Open Var 
Poor Cted Spmg 
Good Some Hvy 

Good Open Var 
Good Open Var 
Good Open Pwdr 
Good C«a Pwdr 
Good Open Fhwdr 
Good Some Var 
Fab Open Var 
Good Open Pwdr 
Good Open Pwdr 
Fab Art Var 
Good Opan Pwar 
Good Open Pwdr 
Good Open Pwdr 

Good Cted var 
Good Cted var 


4 -6 Resort 90S Open. Hash snow 
4.6 Assort My open superb skono 

J A AS Uts open greet upper runs 
4*5 19- 6-1 Mts open, fresh snow 
4/5 AB lifts open, powder off pate 
4/5 AS arts men parch? conations 
4. J 32.35 Ms open, groat up too 

4>4 63-88 Uts open, new snow 
4*4 56: 64 bts open, good met 2000m 
4/5 aji 4 i tits open, emtent powder 
4.4 31-46 UfB open, lots of powder 
45 AH 64 Uts Open, great up top 
4 6 60 63 lifts opart good 
4-3 22 -26 Btts Open, n tacmgstopcsck 
4 4 48-49 Bits and 64 -68 pstes open 
4 5 ICO 112 Bits open, good up top 
4 *4 57: 77 bus open. good oner 2000m 
4.4 50*55 «ts open heavy enowtafi 
4/4 46-51 Uts open, wonderful 
4*4 AM SO Uts open, great sking 

4 6 14:38 Uts open. zugspfKB good 
4'5 22 27 Ms open, mper slopes oh 


Bormio 

Cervmta 

Cortina 


0115 Farr CJsdSpmg 4*4 13: 1 7 Uts open. 70cm at 2000m 

25 265 Good Opan Pwrir 4 4 AS Ms Open, upper slopes excBt. 

0 60 Good CtsdSprng 4*5 20 40 Bits Open, upper slopes ok 






Cou/mayeu/ 

Livigno 

Sestrtere 


Depth Ml On. Snow Last 
L UPMn Pistes state Snow CammwiMa 

20 110 Fair Cted Spmg 4-4 25 -27 Bfis open, upper stipes ok 

30 120 Good open Var 4/4 23 28 Ms open, n slopes good 

30 95 Fas Some Spmg 4/4 13 Si Uts open, best sksng m $m 


GteHo 85 95 Good Open Var 4/4 All Ms open, great spmg conus 

Spain 

Baqueire Beret ISO 250 Good Open Pwdr 3*26 AH 22 Ms end 40'43 pistes open 


Open Var 4.3 AS 16 Mts open. arcM powder 
Cted Pwdr 4*5 33'40 Mts open eft prsle powder 
Open Pwdr 4/4 34/36 Ms open, fresh snow 
Cted Var 4/53 l33Mtsopen.uppe>rptsiesgaad 
Worn Spmg 4*4 AS 64 uts open, n slopes good 
CJsd Pwdr 4*4 35 39 Mts open good ever 2CfOQm 
Cted Var 4/4 14 23 kits Open, taubemom good 

Fair Pwdr 4 4 7P 73 Uts opn fresh stww 

Open Spina 4*5 AB 6 lifts open 
Open Var 4*6 18-19 60s open 
Open PcKd 4/5 24.30 Mis open 
Open Var 4/6 AB 14 uts open 

Open Pwdr 4/5 AB 19 Mts open 

Open Pwdr 4/4 AB 10 Ms open 

Open Var 4/4 AB 25 Ms open 


Ctans Montana 20 150 
Davos 30 205 

GrindaiwaM 0 40 

St.MoritZ 20 185 

Vertner 10 320 

Wengen 0 50 

Zermatt 0 ibo 

UJ6. 

Aspen 175(85 

Keystone 150 16S 

Mammoth 125 145 

Park City 195 205 

Steamboat 125 205 

Teiiuride 150 175 

Vail 125 170 


Whistler 60 265 Good Open Spmg 4 '5 AO Ms ana psies open 

Kov LUtfept/. m cm on ion# and upper stapes. Mtn. Pbtes Mouniaaitede p*ies Res. 
PlataaiRms leedmg ro resort vilage. Arr Artificial snow 

Repons supplied ty the Sc/ Club of Great 


Iirwd in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


/OKT Access Numbers 
How to call around the world. 

I . Using the eti art btikw. find the cminiry you jrt culling In 1111 . 

- Dial the enrresponding rtUff Aue* Number. 

5. An AJXT English-speaking O|icrator or voice prompt will ask for the plione number you wish to call or connect vou to 3 
cugomirr scnltt: n-pmscnutivc. 

To receive your free waDcl card of XBSTs Access Numbers, jua dial the access number of 
Cite country you’re in and ask tor Customer Service. 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 
ASIA/PAQHC 

Australia 0014-881-011 


(WiB,racw 
Guam 

Bong Kong 

India* 




Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
the US. directly from over 1 25 countries. Convene with someone who doesn’t speak your 
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convenient Access Numbers on your righL 


ATsT 


Japan* 

Korea 

KbteaAA 
Mafayata- 
New Zealand 
1 p liiHppj li nff * 
Saipan* 
Singapore 
Sri Lanka 
Taiwan’ 

Thailand* 

Armenia** 

Aaatrta”** 

Hdgiunr 

ISulparb 

Croatia** 

Czech Rep 

Denmark* 

Finland* 

France 

G e rman y 

Greece* 

Hungary* 

Iceland** 


w 10811 

01frS72 

800-1111 

000-117 

001^801-10 

0030-111 

ooy-ii 

ir 

8000011 

000-911 

105-1 1 

Z35-2S7Z 

Hoooiii-ni 

430-430 

0080-1028041 

001*991-1111 

EUROPE 

8*14111 

022-903011 

078-1100)0 

OO-lHOO-OOlO 

99-384)011 

0042000101 

8001-0010 

98PM00-10 

19*0011 

01300010 

00800-1311 

00*80001111 

WflO! 


COUNTRY 
Ireland 
Italy* ' ' 
Ikchttnrttinr 

1 Man illa , 

Luxemhoura 

Main* 


- 7 - — 

NqncnJUWr 

Norway* 

Poland**** 

Portugal* 

Romania 

RB86fa~*(Mascpw) 

Slovakia 

Spain 


Bahrain 

Cyprus* 

farad 

Kuwair 


*Y ACCESS NUMBER 

1 -800-550000 

172-1011 

Wcto* 15500-11 

» 8*196 

0-8000111 . 

0600890-110 

19*0011 

■fa* 06-02Z-91II 

800-190-11 

“ 0*0104800111 

05017-1-288 

01-800-4288 

ftwcow) 155-5342 

0042000101 ' 

9009900-11 

020-795-611 

ad* 155-00-11 

0500090013 

MIDDLE EAST 

800001 

080-90010 . 

177-100-2727 

800-288. 


COUNTRY 

Colombia 

t CoSQ Rjca*lT~ 

Ecuador* 

a5alvadoi*te 

■Guatemala* 

Gnyana**- 

Hondurag*» 

Mexico*** 


ACCESS NUMBER 

980-110010 ' 

114 

119 

190 

190 

165 

123 

95-8004624240 


Pacangoa (Managua) 

Panama* 

Peru* 

Suriname 

Uruguay 

Venezuela** 


J91- 

156 

00-0410 

80011-120 


CARIBBEAN 

Vabrnnag 1-800*72-2881 

• Bermuda* 1-800872-2881 

• British VI 1-800872-2881 . 

Cayman Maoris 1-800872-2881 


Lebanon (Beirut) 420801 

Saudi Arabia 1-800100 

Ttarhcy* 00800-12Z77 * 

AMERICAS 


. Grenada* 
Haar 
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NakAnia 
^Sl Kius/Nevis 


1-800-872-2881 . 

001-800-972-2883 

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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Paris, Friday, April 8, 1994 


US. Compromises 
On Labor-Rights Issue 

Deal With Third- World Countries 
Paves the Way for Signing of GATT 



By Alan Friedman 

. Iniernammal Herald Tribune 

wSl? 18 “ The United States and Third 
co ™ tncs reached a compromise 
Thursday that ends a rancorous dispute over 
wasftjnaon s demand that workers’ rights 
hnked to trade issues and paves the way 
tor toe formal signing next week of the 
GATT world trade agreement 

"The diplomatic breakthrough, which was 
brokered m Geneva by Peter Sutherland, the 
dir^ior-genera] of the General Agreement 
on Tariffs and Trade, eliminated a contro- 
versy that had threatened to overshadow 
GATT ceremonies in Marrakesh, Morooco, 
between April 12 and 15. 

The compromise allows the United States 
to raise the subject of walkers’ rights but it 
does not allow for any substantive discus- 
sion during the ceremonies next week. 

In recent weeks, the United States and 
France have led a drive to force discussion 
erf what they see as unfair trade advantages 
for countries that export cheap goods thanks 
to poor working conditions. 

. The initiative has triggered strong opposi- 
tion from the rapidly growing and export- 
driven economies of Asia, and especially 
among governments such as Singapore, Ma- 
laysia, and India, all of which have been 
criticized in the West as unfair fa their 
treatment of workers. Until Thursday, most 
Third World delegates to GATT refused to 
accept any discuss ion of labor standards, 
contending the issue was merely an excuse 
for protectionism. 

While France and other members of the 
European Union have sought compromise 
behind the scenes, Washington has threat- 
ened to block the final declaration by 121 
trade officials who will be in Marrakesh to 
sign the final act of the Uruguay Round of 
GATT talks. The United States also said it 
would hold up the work of the preparatory 
committee that is planning the start of the 
World Trade Organization if other countries 
failed to agree to discuss workers’ rights. 

Mr. Sutherland said in an interview that 
the compromise was “an equitable solution" 
that would insure the harmonious faimrlwng 
of the World Trade Organization. Hie orga- 
nization, scheduled to come into existence in 
January, is to absorb the GATT secretarial. 


The diplomatic deal calls for the issue of 
workers’ rights to be mentioned in the dos- 
ing statement by Sergio Abreu Bonilla, the 
Uruguayan foreign minister who will chair 
the Marrakesh meeting John Schmidt, the 
chief U.S. trade negotiator, said the state- 
ment would isdude |?mgnag»» requested by 
the United States referring to “requests for 
an examination of the relationship between 
the trading system and internationally rec- 
ognized labor standards.” 

In addition. Third World diplomats 
dropped their resistance to the trade-and- 
labor link being added to the agenda of the 
preparatory committee as part of its man- 
date. 

In Washington, Mickey Kantor, the U.S. 
trade representative, hailed the break- 
through, saying that “global trade ultimate- 
ly depends on dang standards erf hying." 

In an apparent reference to Congressional 
demands that the subject be included in the 
GATT context, Mr. Kantor added: “En- 
forcement of international labor standards 
helps to maintain support fra trade liberal- 
ization in developed countries by assuring 
them that they do not have to compete with 
exploited workers and by assuring them of 

rTpflivting marVfJg abroad.” 

In Paris, a French official said Thursday 
the compromise followed a frenetic round of 
telephone consultations in recall days in- 
volving Mr. Kantor, Girard Longnet the 
French trade and industry minister. Sir 
Leon Brittan, the European trade commis- 
sioner, and Mr. Sutherland. Among the oth- 
er diplomats who achieved Thursday’s com- 
promise were representatives from 
Singapore, India, Brazfl, Malaysia. Sweden, 
and Morocco 

' Singapore’s ambassador to GATT, Krish- 
nasamy Kesavapaoy, claimed that while the 
United States had nwHg progress on work- 
ers’ rights and trade, “we have protected cur 
position.” In particular, he played down the 
significance of labor conditions being dis- 
cussed by the preparatory committee for the 
World Trade Organization, saying it would 
be only one of a dozen new agenda items 
that would be raised by Japan, the European 

Union and other parties to the GATT ac- 
cord. . | 





4 >* ' 


Cadi OtnBo/Thc Anocnwl Pna 

Israeli pofice guarding (he site of the shooting in Asbdod, Israel MSHants threatened more attacks in revenge for the Hebron massacre. 

Bloodletting Sweeps Rwanda Capital 


Hollywood to the Rescue 
As Culture War Abates 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Pest Service 

NAIROBI— Rwanda appeared in the throes 
of political anarchy Thursday, with soldiers and 
civilians rampaging through the streets of the 
capital, Kigali, following the deaths Wednes- 
day of President Juvenal Habyarimana of 
Rwanda and Preadent Cyprien Ntaryamira of 
Burundi in a plane crash possibly cajiyd by a 
rocket 

Reports from Kigali said automatic weapons 
fire, mortars and heavy machine guns echoed 
throughout the capital for most of the day 
beginning at dawn, the fire was concentrated 
around the' presidential palace aiyi in neighbor- 
hoods housing government ministries as rival 
military factions battled fra control and gangs 
of youths roamed the streets hacking civilians 
to death with machetes and knives. 

[A United Nations spokesman in Kigali said 
the Rwandan prime minister, Agathe Uwilin- 
gjynnana, was killed on Thursday near the 
presidential palace, Reuters reported. “We are 


stiD trying to find out how it happened," the 
spokesman said. 

[Mrs. Uwflingiyhnana. a Tutsi, was appoint- 
ed in July last year and was one of Africa's first 
women prune ministers.] 

“It’s still very chaotic in Kigali’’ said Pat 
Johns, the coordinator of African programs for 
Catholic ReBef Services, which has an office in 
tbecapitaL “There are reports of alot of shoot- 
ing going on and we have reports of a number 
of assassinations. The military appears to be 
using this as an opportunity to go after mem- 
bers of the government.*’ • 

bodies of IFBdgin UN soldiers were 
found Thursday after they were kidnapped by 
members of the Rwandan presidential guard, 
Agence Frsmce-Presse reported, quoting a 
spokesman for the UN mission in Kigali. The 
spokesman, Moctar Gueye, said that three oth- 
er Belgian military observers earlier reported 
dead were safe.] 

There were persistent reports, from witnesses 


and diplomats on the scene, that government 
ministers were bong rounded up bv soldiers 
and that some had been executed Belgian 
BRTN Radio reported that several minist ers 
and top officials had been killed, and other 
sources in Brussels and Paris said many govern- 
ment officials had gone into hiding. 

Kigali’s airport remained dosed, and a group 
of journalists who tried to enter on a charter 
flight were diverted to neighboring Uganda. 
Telephone communication to Rwanda was ex- 
tremely difficult and many of the specific re- 
ports of violence is the capital conld sot be 
confirmed. But those who were in contact with 
Kigali painted a picture of a city gone com- 
pletely out of control with no government in 
charge and lawlessness on the streets. 

There are 2^00 UN peacekeepers in Rwanda 
monitoring a truce readied last year between 
Mr. Habyarimana’s Hutu government and re- 
bels of the Tutsi-dominated Rwandan Patriotic 

See RWANDA, Page 4 


By Tom Buerkle 

Internationa/ Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — In a notable cooling of the 
trans-Atlantic culture war, backbiting has 
given way to deal- making between Ameri- 
can and European filmmakers as both rides 
cooperate to revive Europe’s ailing film in- 
dustry. 

The seven major Hollywood studios have 
begun a discreet dialogue with European 
producers aimed at increasing U.S. invest- 
ment in film and television production and 
distribution in Europe, and giving European 
movies wider play on U.S. screens, industry 
officials say. . 

In addition, the studios on then own have 
been yoking co-production deals with Euro- 
pean producers and broadcasters. Twentieth 
Century-Fox recently became the first 
American studio to invest in a co-produc- 
tion aimed only at the European market, 
buildin g a 515 million sdence-fiction fanta- 
sy set in London for a game show that wm 
air m Britain, Spain, Germany and Scandi- 
navia. . . 

“We recognize that there is a need for us 
to be involved in programming that has 
Euro pean content," said Doug Schwalbe. 


vice president fra co-productions at 20th 
Century-Fox International Television. 
“That is a growth area fra us in what is 
basically a mature industry." 

The new spirit represents a deliberate ef-t 
fort by both sides to prevent a fresh political 
dash over movies like the quarrel that nearly 
undermined the world trade negotiations 
under the General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade in December. 

“Since GATT, the atmosphere has 
changed quite radically and it’s infinitely 
more encouraging," said David Puttnam, 
the British producer of such films as “Chari- 
ots of Fire and “The Killing Fields" and 
former head of Columbia Pictures. 


U.S. Foreign Policy’s New Heavyweight 


mission gree n paper cm nun ana television 
policy, winch was formally made public 
Thursday. 

To be sure, the paper was written in a way 
to provoke debate rather than controversy, 
posing questions about policy alternatives 
instead of proposing new barriers to enter- 
tainment imports or subsidies fra local film 

See DEALS, Page 3 


By John Lancaster 

Wadnnpm Pea Service 

WASHINGTON — Defense Secretary William J. Perry is emerg- 
ing as the unexpected heavyweight of the Clinton administration's 
beleaguered foreign policy team. 

The mild-mannered former engineering professor hardly seems 
suited for the role. His background tends toward technology and 
management, not grand strategy. He trembles visibly in front of 
television cameras. He recently said he could “think of about 16 
reasons" to have passed up the defense secretary’s job and gone home 
to California. 

But hardy two months after he took over the post from Les Aspin, 
Mr. Perry, 66, has already made bis mark, staking out firm — and at 
times controversial — positions on such high-priority national securi- 
ty matters as Russia, Bosnia and North Korea. 

At the same tune, uniformed leaders say, he has restored a sense of 
order and discipline to the Pentagon, streamlining the department's 
policy’ shop by eliminating two of six assistant secretary jobs and 
conducting crisp, dear meetings that begin on time and often end with 
a decision. In the process, he has helped repair the Clinton adminis- 
tration's sometimes prickly relationship with military leaders, who 


chafed under Mr. Aspin’s lax management style and perceived habit 
of limiting major decisions to a small cirde of civilian aides. 

“He’s doing terrific.” said General Merrill A. McPeak, the air force 
chief of staff, citing the Korean scenario as a premier example. “There 
was a feeling of disconnectedness, and all of a sudden Bill Perry 
stepped on stage as the spokesman of the policy as well as an obvious 
player.” 

Visibility has its price. Some State Department officials bridled at 
Mr. Ferry’s recent effort to define the administration’s Russian policy 
as one of “pragmatic partnership” — Mr. Perry’s own coinage, 
according to an aide — and suggested that he had overstepped his 
authority. 

State officials also grumbled about bis statement on an NBC TV 
program last Sunday that the United Stales would not use force to 
prevent Serbs from crvemmnmg the UN-declared safe area of Gor- 
azde; critics described the statement as a virtual invitation for 
continued Serbian attacks. 

Pentagon officials noted, however, that Mr. Perry also left open the 
possibility of NATO air strikes against the besieging forces if dreum- 

See PERRY, Page 3 


Europe Sets Sights on 'Son of Concorde’ 


By Jacques Neher 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Fearing Europe will be left behind 
in the international effort to develop a long- 
range supersonic airliner, the l bree l^estfcn- 
ropean aerospace companies said Thursday 
theywould mount a $100 mflhon-a^ear re- 
search program to dcrel<ro tedmologies that 
could be used in a “Son of Concorde. 

Aerospatiale of France, Britfch Aero^aa 
PLC and Deutsche Aerospace AG —the man 
partners in the Airbus consortium -—said they 
Eould seek backing from lh«rMpecttveg^ 
eraments for the joint research effort, which 
they describe as preliminary to determining the 


feasibility of an airliner that can cany 250 
passengers across the Pacific at half the conven- 
tional travel time and for little more than the 
price of a first-class ticket. 

The 25-year-old Concorde, designed by an 
Anglo-French vesture; carries 100 passengers 
with a flying range that hunts it to trans- 
At^^^fli ghts.' ^ t highly 

bitity of the concept, the research accord was 
welcomed by the U.S. aerospace industry, 
which has been working on the same concept 
with the financial help of the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration. 

Officials said the agreement was aimed at 


thing Feuds Sp 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune ^ 

KUALA LUMPUR — Competition for 
dwindling stocks of fish is 
tension in the Asia-Pacific region, 
navies ready 10 use force to protect their cotm 
iris’ fishing zones against poachers. 

j Newsstand Prices _ . _ — 

! Andorra 9.00 FF Luxembourg 60 IL. Fr 


Although part of the military buildup relates 
to uncertainty about the intentions of countries 
like North Korea, China and Japan, rivalry for 
control of ™«tiine territory and resources is 
also a major cause of friction. 

M It is a serious problem," said Najib Razak, 
Malaysia’s defense minister. 

He said that one of the reasons that Malaysia 

was pt awning to spend SI-6 billion rat a pro- 
gram to build 27 naval patrol vessels over t be 
next 15 years was to “supervise and enforce” 


Andorra 9.00 FF u«em«wra 12Qh DIOtecI ion in its “exclusive economic zone" 

Antilles — .1 US FF R ia fs ££er 4c terms of the United Nations Canven- 

Reunion ....11 .20 F F tiofl 4e Uw of the Sea. 

‘ SoudI Arabia -9.WR- The 80-meter-long pauol resseis, with 2 dis- 


F ranee 9.00 FF ....WOCFA 

Gabon 960 CFA soato!....^» P™ 5 

Greece....... J00 Dr. Tunisia .... 

ivory Coast. 1.120 CFA Turkey 

Jordan 1JD U.A.E K50 Drfti 

Lebanon ...US51.50 U-S. Mil. CEur.l SI-10 


giving Europe a significant role to play — along 
with the United States and Japan — in the 
airliner’s eventual development, winch could 
cost between $10 billion and $20 billion. 

“We’re trying to sensitize our governments to 
the fact that Europe should be up to the Ameri- 
can effort," said Patrice Pr&voL, spokesman for 
Aerospatiale. “It’s absolutely essential for the 
future." 

European industry leaders have been lobby- 
ing their governments in recent months to sup- 
port supersonic research and development, 
with one executive wanting that if the Europe- 
ans did not act, they would end up as only 

See FLY, PHge 3 


Australia have all complained of increased 
poaching by foreign fishermen and said they 
would apply increased naval power to control 
the problem. 

In Northeast Aria, Japan was warned by 
Moscow earlier this month that the R ussi a n 
militar y would use force to keep Japanese 
trawlers away from rich fishing grounds around 
the disputed Kuril Islands. 

The wanting followed an incident in which 
Russian patrol boats and combat helicopters 
drove five Japanese fishing vessels out of the 
area. 

The 1982 UN convention was supposed to 



No. 34,557 


Palestinian 
Kills Israeli 
In New Attack 
Of Revenge 

Territories Sealed Off; 
Peres Says Gaza-Jericho 
Talks W ill Go Ahead 

By David Hoffman 

Washington Past Service 

JERUSALEM — A Palestinian from the 
Gaza Strip opened fire Thursday with a subma- 
chine gun on a bus stop near the port city of 
Ashdod in southern Israel, killing cue Israeli 
and wounding four. Bystanders returned fire 
and killed the Palestinian. 

For the second day in a row, Islamic guerril- 
las claimed responsibility for the violence, say- 
ing it was revenge for the Hebron mosque 
massacre. 

As victims of a car-bomb attack Wednesday 
in the Israeli town of Afula were eulogized at 
funerals attended by thousands of mourners, 
angry demonstrations broke out and a repre- 
sentative erf Rime Minister Yitzhak Rabin’s 
government was jeered and had to be escorted 
away by the police. 

Israel sealed off the West Bank and Gaza 
Strip, denying aU Palestinians permission to 
enter Israel’s pre-1967 borders and barring all 
Arab cars from crossing at checkpoints. A par- 
tial closure had been in effect since the Hebron 
massacre on Feb. 25. Prior to the closures, 
about 50,000 Palestinians were crossing into 
Israel each day for work. 

Israeli officials expressed disappointment 
and anger that Yasser Arafat, the chairman of 
the Palestine Liberation Organization, had re- 
mained silent on the Afula car-bombing, al- 
though several other prominent Palestinians 
condemned it In Cairo, Mr. Arafat was repeat- 
edly asked about (he bombing and refused to 
condemn it 

[The United States said Thursday it was not 
satisfied with the PLO’s reaction to the murders 
erf Israeli civilians and expected Mr. Arafat to 
condemn the killings, Reuters reported from 
Washington.] 

Shimon Shetreet, the hawkish Israeli eco- 
nomics minister, called for a postponement in 
the Gaza-Jericho talks until Mr. Arafat con- 
demned the anode car-bombing, winch killed 
eight people, including the driver of the car. 

But Foreign Minister Shimon Peres said that 
the talks in Cairo would not be derailed by the 
attacks, and Israeli officials said negotiations 
would resume early next week. 

However, Israelis said the discussions hit new 
snags this week on issues which they thought 
had been settled in earlier rounds, such as 
which roads in the Gaza Strip and Jericho will 
be used by the Palestinian police. As a result, 
the expected arrival of Palestinian police offi- 
cers has been delayed, officials said. 

The Afula and Ashdod attacks were both 
directed at bus stops inside Israel, and have 
unleashed new fears among Israelis of a wave of 
revenge for the Hebron massacre, in which an 
Israeli settler opened fire on Arab worshipers, 
killing at least 29. Mr. Rabin's government is 
under pressure to respond, and he summoned 
his security cabinet to a rare Friday meeting to 
discuss the security situation. 

The attack on Thursday occurred at 9:30 
AJ4. along the main road between Tel Aviv 
and the Gaza Strip, at a busy intersection near 
Ashdod where soldiers and workers often hitch- 
hike. 

Ali Taleb Amawi, a resident erf the Beach 
Refugee Camp in Gaza, had permission from 
the Israeli authorities to cross into Israel At the 
junction, he opened fire on toe bus shelter with 
an Israeli-made Uzi submachine gun. 

Israel radio reported that the weapon had 
been stolen recently from a Gaza army base. 
The shooting killed a civilian, Yishai Gedassi, 
31, and wounded four others. Two bystanders 
then opened fire and killed Mr. Amawi. Police 
said tliey had found six additional ammunition 
dips on his body, as well as a knife. 

Also on Thursday, two Israelis were stabbed 

See ISRAEL, Page 4 


Kiosk 

Pope May Delay 
Trip to Lebanon 

VATICAN CITY (Reuters) — The Vati- 
can gave a strong signal on Thursday that 
Pope John Paul would delay a planned visit 
to Lebanon, which has been hit by recent 
bomb attacks. 

Its dnef spokesman, Joaquin Navairo-Valls, 
said the Pope was determined that die visit, 
which has been tentatively scheduled for late 
May, should take place, bin added that it bad 
to be staged “at the right moment." 

“The problem is that the people who go to 
Masses must have the required security,” he 
added. “These risks always exist and we most 
always work so that th^y don’t exist.” 

Lalsiire 

When hi St Petersburg, goby the bode, and 
follow the steps of Raskolnikov. Page 8. 


i ^ UW tcSTiin be well ®d disputes over fishing and the exploitation 


donesia. Burma. Vietnam, 


See FISH, Page 4 


Borin CWUk AimM Fm& 

DISTRESS SIGNAL — Three Vietnamese refugees flying an SOS flag Thursday 
from a barracks roof at a Haig Kong detention crater. They are enveloped by tear 
gas fired by guards to break up a potest by bmdreds of refugees facing deportation. 
A 27-year-old woman who fed from a roof was hospitalized in fair condition. 


follow the steps of 

Crossword 
Book Review 
Bridge 
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Page 2 


* * 


Vatican Honors 
Holocaust Victims 



Ceremony , a First for Pope , 

Is Sign of Whrming Relations 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Tuna Service 

ROME — Pope John Paul II 
joined the chief rabbi of Rome on 
Thursday at a solemn concert to 
honor the memory of the victims of 
the Holocaust 

It was the first time that the Pope 
has officially honored the memory 
of the millions of European Jews 
killed by the Nazis on the day Jews 
have set aside for this. 

“Many at that time mourned, 
and their lament resounds stfll" 
the Pope told 5,000 guests in the 
audience hall next to Sl Peter’s 
Basilica. “We hear them here, too. 
Their lament did not perish with 
them, but lifts up strong, strug- 
gling, heartrending, and it says, ‘Do 
not forget us.’ " 

Just before the Royal Philhar- 
monic Orchestra of London began 
Max Bruch’s “Kol Nidrd,” which 
evokes the prayer spoken cm Yom 
Kippur, the holiest night in the 
Jewish year, the Pope came down 
(he red-carpeted main aisle accom- 
panied by Rome's chief rabbi, Hio 
Toaff, and the president of Italy, 
Oscar Luigi Scalfaro. 

Earlier, six survivors of concen- 
tration camps, one raising a grand- 
daughter aloft, lit six candles on a 
large menorah, the ceremonial can- 
delabra, <me for each minio n of the 


Indeed, some among the roughly 
100 Holocaust survivors, with chil- 
dren and grandchildren in tow, felt 
they were somehow experiencing 
the impossible. 

At an audience earlier in the day, 
Jack Eisner, a survivor of the 1943 


Warsaw Ghetto uprising who lives 
old the Pope: “My 


in New York, tolc . _ 

Grandma Hannah had 11 grand- 
children. My Grandmother Masha 
hart 20 grandchildren. Only I alone 


“As a young boy growing up in 
prewar Warsaw, 


r . I feared crossing 

the sidewalk next to a church,'’ he 
said. “Now, some 50 years later, the 
unthinkable is happening.” 

Tufiia Zevi, the president of the 
Union of I talian Jewish Communi- 
ties, said the concert was as an 
important step Catholic-Jewish 
recon alia don. 

But she and other Jewish leaders 
m»dg dear that they were still dis- 
satisfied that the Vatican had not 
issued a long-promised papal docu- 
ment “that not only condemns the 
Holocaust and pays homage to the 
victims, but also ties it to a sincere 
analysis and reappraisal of the im- 
plications and consequences of 
centuries of preaching of contempt 
for the so-called killers of Christ.” 


Dresden Starts to Rebuild a Symbol 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Tima Service 

DRESDEN — Nowhere in Germany are 
memories of World War □ and its conse- 
quences more painfully alive than here, in 
what was the most beautiful city on the Elbe 
until it was shattered in the firestorm that 
followed the Allied bombing raids of Feb. 13- 
14, 1945. 

For nearly 50 years, the most poignant 
symbol of that destruction was a pOe of 
blackened stone on the site of the Protestant 
Church of Our Lady, whose elegant Baroque 
dome, shaped like a great stone bell, was 
immortalized by Canaletto in his 18th-centu- 
ry paintings of the riverfront. 

The ruins became a complex symbol of the 
futility of war and of German penitence, but 
also, for the Communists who ran East Ger- 
many until it began dissolving in 1989. a 
silent reminder that American and British 
bombas, not the Russians who later occu- 
pied the city and imposed communism on it, 
bad destroyed its cultural heritage. 

Now, after much soul-searching and de- 


bate, the dome is about to rise again. Sup- 
of the reconstruction hope for help 


from abroad, but say they also want the 
rebuilt church to be a monument to reconcili- 
ation. 

’Hite trill to rebuild the church never dis- 
appeared,” said Eberfaard Burger, the engi- 
neer in charge of the project. Already, 9,200 
stones have been recovered and numbered to 
be used in completing the reconstruction by 
2002, in time for die city’s 800th anniversary 
four years later. 

“We want to bear most of the financial 
responsibility ourselves, but we hope for 
some help from abroad as a contribution to 
restoring something of what all in the war 
bore some common responsibility for de- 
stroying,” Mr. Burger said. 


He and others say that rebuilding the 
church would also be a symbol of encourage- 
ment to the city’s 500,000 people that reunifi- 
cation and the end of communism brought 
not rally temporary hardships like unemploy- 
ment but also more lasting political, econom- 
ic and spiritual renewal 

“Some people thought that the rubble 
should be left as it was, as a memorial” said 
Hans-Hdfried Richter, 62, who was visiting 
the ruins the other day. “But the remaining 
walls were be ginning to fall apart and ex- 
perts said they would collapse soon if nothing 
was done to S tabilize them.” 

Mr. Richter, who was evacuated from 
Dresden as a teenager after the firestorm and 
later became a mpsieian is Hamburg, has 
returned to live in a house on the racy’s 
outskirts. His wife is an assistant to the direc- 
tor of the Dresden opera house, designed by 
the 19th-century architect Gottfried Semper 
and restored to its prewar splendor under 
Communis t rule. 

IBs grandfather Oskar was a pastor of the 
church eariy in the century. “I think it's 
wonderful that it’s going to be rebuilt,” Mr. 
Richter said. 

After the Communist authorities kept de- 
ferring church requests to rebuild the land- 
mark, along with parts of the Saxon royal 
palate and its nearby Baroque Roman Cath- 
olic cathedral the ruins themselves became a 
place of pilgrimage for the East German 
peace movement, out of which grew the resis- 
tancelhat finally brought down the Commu- 
nists peacefully in 1989. 

The movement to revive the plans to re- 
build the church began in 1990, under the 
chairmanship of Ludwig Guttler, a trumpet 
virtuoso, over objections from those who be- 
lieved that the ruins were their own most 
effective memorial. 

The foundation for the reconstruction has 


raised about $7.5 million so far of the esti- 
mated $150 million cost. It is trying to raise 
the rest through devices like offering mthwj- 
nal stones to donors for “adoption" at Slpw 
apiece. 

Saving an important symbol of the futility 
of war and ideological confrontation is also 
the object of a citizens’ initiative 80 kilome- 
ters down the Elbe in Torgan, where Soviet 
and American soldiers met on April 25, 1 945, 
as the Allies were dosing in on Berlin. 

Pictures of the encounter, on a steel high- 
way bridge across the Elbe, went around the 
world, and even during the Cold War Ameri- 
can and Soviet war veterans met periodically 
at a memorial on the west bank. 

In Torgan, unification brought a new 
bridge, a concrete and steel span next to the 
old one. The authorities want to tear the old 
one down, but Uwe Niedersen, a history of 
science professor, and Philipp Schreck, an 
engineer, want to preserve it as a monument, 
if they «m raise the $3.4 million or so that it 
would cost 


Mr. Niedersen, who gets American and 
Russian soldiers to come back every April for 
what his citizens' group calls a “down by the 
riverside” weekend featuring American and 
Russian jazz bands, said he hoped to have 
Preadent Bill Clinton and President Boris N. 
Yeltsin of Russia attend the 50th anmversary 
celebration next year. 

“The first really genuine citizens’ celebra- 
tion was right after the fall Of communism in 
1990,” he said. 

Now, he said, “People sometimes ask me 


why we are celebrating a German defeat I 
teflt' * 


[them that what we want to preserve is the 

lessoiuhat what divides^^^^S leads to 
wars is less important than die common val- 
ues that unite them." 


6 milli on Jews who perished in Eu- 
rope. 

“The caudles lit by some of the 
survivors,” the Pope said, speaking 
in Italian and briefly in English, 
“seek to demonstrate symbolically 
that this hall has no narrow limits, 
but that it contains all the victims: 
fathers, mothers, sons, brothers, 
friends.” 

“In our memory they are all pre- 
sent,” he said. “They are with you, 
they are with us.” 

The menorah has particular reso- 
nance for Rome’s Jewish communi- 
ty, since the original candelabra 
from the Second Temple was trans- 
ported to Rome by soldiers of the 
Flavian emperors after they de- 
stroyed Jerusalem in 70 AD., and 
is depicted in the forum on the arch 
erected for the Emperor Titus, who 
also settled thousands of Jewish 
slaves in his capital. 

Rabin Toaff did not speak at the 
-concert, but in a statement he said 
the Pope’s effort to commemorate 
the Holocaust “was much appreci- 
ated by the Jews.*" 


Hostilities Ease Among Italy’s Rightists 


The Pope was visibly moved, and 
manyinthe! 


: hall wept openly, as the 
actor Richard Dreyfuss read Kad- 
disb, the Hebrew prayer for the 
dead, to the composition by Leon- 
ard Bernstein. 

The Pope’s allowing of a service 
of largely Jewish inspiration within 
the Vatican was seen by most Jews 
present as a measure of his efforts 
to embrace the world's Jews as the 
“elder brothers”af Christians. 

The concert, which was largely 
organized by the American con- 
ductor Gilbert Levine, who is Jew- 
ish and a dose acquaintance of the 
Pope, came a little more than three 
months after the Pope ended along 
hesitation and agreed to formal 
recognition by the Vatican of Isra- 
el 

Some Jewish leaders said the 
Pope had revived the revolution in 
Catholic-Jewish relations set in 


motion by Pope John XXUI and 
d Vatican Council of 


the Second 
1962-65, which rejected the long- 
standing teaching amp n g Roman 
Catholics that Jews were collective- 
ly responsible for Christ’s death. 

“Vatican and Holocaust, this is 
not an oxymoron anymore,” said 
Mr. Levine, who first met the Pope 
during his tenure as music director 
of the Philharmonic Orchestra in 
Krakow, Poland, where the Pope 
formerly was the archbishop. 



Royal Plaza 

MONTREUX 




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Like the one 
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Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ROME — The federalist leader 
Umberto Bossi held talks on 
Thursday with Italy’s neofasdsts, 
outlining his proposals on forming 
a new government and decentraliz- 
ing power from Rome. 

“It was a positive meeting,” 
Gianfranco Fun, leader of the neo- 
fascist National Alliance, said fol- 
lowing the unexpected one-hour 
meeting. 

The encounter was thezr first 
since last week’s general elections 
delivered a landslide victory for the 
rightist Freedom Alliance, a three- 
party grouping of Silvio Berlus- 
coni's Forza Italia, Mr. Boss’s 
Northern League, and Mr. Fun’s 
National Alliance. 

The triumph has since been 
clouded by squabbling within its 
ranks. 

Mr. Fini said Thursday’s that the 
talks centered on League calls for 
federalism, the mam condition Mr. 
Boss has put on joining a govern- 
ment. 

Asked if the League hid dropped 
its opposition to the National Alli- 
ance taking part in a future govern- 
ment, Mr. rani said: “I think that 
problem has been overcome”. 

Roberto Maroni League leader 
in the lower bouse of Parliament, 
said his party would even be pre- 
pared to drop objections to Mr. 
Berlusconi leading the next govern- 
ment if the administration made 
federalisn its main objective. 

“We have managed to convince a 
party that is the main inheritor of a 
strong central state to sit down at a 
table and discuss federalism,” Mr. 
Maroni said on state television of 
the meeting with the neofascists. 

The Thursday meeting was a wa- 
tershed in relations between the 
neofasdsts and Mr. Bossi who 
contemptuously branded the Na- 
tional Alliance the “gallows party” 
during the campaign. 

The meeting also raised hopes 
that Mr. Bossi and Mr. Berlusconi 
would bury their differences over 
the shape of the government. 

On Tuesday, Mr. Berlusconi sus- 
pended talks on trying to form a 
government after Mr. Bossi deliv- 
ered another broadside against 
him. He has threatened to force 
new elections if the League contin- 
ues to block progress. 

The tycoon kepi up a war of 
words on Thursday with Mr. Bossi 
who has dubbed him “Berlus- 
kaiser” and called him unfit to be 
prime minister because of his vast 
interests in the media and other 
businesses. 

“Bossi is as dangerous and as 
unpredictable as a wounded wild 
boar.” Mr. Berlusconi was quoted 
as saying in La Stampa newspaper. 

(Reuters, AP) 



Korean Says 

Bomb Gould 


Deter Japan 


M- Bnatalti/AaaKr Fnar-Pmc 

Umberto Bossi, the Northern League leader, after a meeting with members of bis party in Rune. 


Fresh Troops Move Into Natal 


Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ESHOWE, South Africa — 
Hundreds of troops in armored ve- 
hicles rolled into Natal province on 
Thursday to bolster a state of emer- 
gency in the Zulu heartland less 
than three weeks before South Afri- 
ca’s first all-race election. 

A security force statement said 
20 blacks had been killed in H 
separate attacks that took place 
during the 24-hour period from 
Wednesday morning to Thursday 
morning. The report did not at- 
tempt to distinguish between polit- 
ical and criminal attacks, but much 
of the fighting occurred in areas 
with long-running political feuds. 

The bra d of the national election 
commission said the violence 
would not force a postponement of 
the balloting in Natal and the Kwa- 
Zulu black homeland. The election 
is set for April 26-28. 

“The ultimate message about 
KwaZulu-Natal is that the show 



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will go on,” Johann Kriegler, chief 
of the Independent Electoral Com- 
mission, said at a news conference 
in Johannesburg. 

As pari of (he effort to stop the 
violence; a convoy of mechanized 
and motorized infantry of more 
than 600 men moved Thursday into 
the military base of Eshowe in 
north era Natal. 

Colonel Eddie YQjoeo. northern 
Natal operations commander, said, 
“We must create a stable platform 
for peace and stability or else we 
will see ravages like in Angola and 
elsewhere.” 

Most of the soldiers were white 
civilian reservists from NataL 

More than 120 people have been 
killed in the region since March 31 
when President Frederik W. de 
Klerk declared a state of emergen- 
cy to stop unrest and safeguard the 
elections. 

The army reinforcements bring 
to more than 3,000 the total num- 
ber of troops deployed in Natal 
province and the KwaZulu home- 
land, stronghold of Chief Mango- 
snthu Butbdezfs Inkatha Freedom 
Party, which is boycotting the elec- 
tion. 


To subscribe in Switzerland 


jujtcafl, tofl free, 
155 57 57 


Colonel Viljoen said hundreds 
more reservists were being readied. 
The slate of emergency was 
by a surge in fighting 
supporters of the African 
National Congress, which is widely 
expected to win the election, and 
Inkatha. More than 10,000 people 
have been killed in a decade-long 
conflict between the two parties. 

A joint report by the South Afri- 
can and KwaZulu governments 
and the Independent Electoral 
Commission said on Tuesday that 
free and fair elections would be 
impossible in the present political 
climate in Kwazulu. 

Sectoral commission officials 
flew to Natal on Thursday to assess 
the situation, a spokesman said. 

The violence wifi dominate a 
meeting Friday between Mr. de 
Klerk; the ANC leader. Nelson 
Mandela; Chief Buthelezl who is 
KwaZulu's chief minister, and the 
Zulu king , Goodwill ZwdsthinL 

Chief Buthdezi and the king 
have called for the elections to be 
postponed and are demanding vir- 
tual autonomy for KwaZulu-Natal 
in a post-apartheid South Africa. 

Mr. Mandela has said be plans to 
bold a two-hour meeting with the 
king before the full talks get under 
way. The meeting, at an undis- 
closed venue, is the first that will 
bring all four leaders together. 

(Reuters, AP) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatckm 

TOKYO — The main objective 
of a Noth Korean nuclear arsenal 
would be as a deterrent to Japan, 
according to a North Korean diplo- 
mat 

The North Korean government 
insists, in the face of worldwide 
summons, that it has neither the 
intent ion DOT the ability to build 
midea r bombs. 

However, Pyongyang’s ambassa- 
dor to India. Cha Song Ju, said in 
an interview with the South Korean 
news agency Yonhap in New Del- 
hi “Our nuclear aims, if devel- 
oped, would be primarily designed 
to contain Japan.” 

North Korea has regularly as- 
sailed Japan for its brutal 1910- 
1945 colonial rule of Korea and 
accuses the Japanese of seeking to 
return to militarism. 

North Korea and Japan have no 
diplomatic relations, having failed 
in 1990-1992 bilateral talks to end 
their long enmity and come to 
terms. 

There was no official reaction 
from the Japanese government on 
Thursday to Mr. Cha’s remarks, 
which were made on Wednesday. 

Many Japanese officials and 
commentators have said, however, 
that they feared North Korea 
would launch a preemptive missile 
attack on Japan if the current crisis 
over the North’s suspected nuclear 
program triggered hostilities. 

“The first obvious targets for 
these missiles are the U-S. bases in 
Japan,” a military commentator, 
Kensuke Ebata, said in a recent 
interview. 

“Such an attack would serve two 
purposes: to take out thrir primary 
enemy forces in a preemptive strike 
and serve a warning to Japan.” 
North Korea's Rodong-I missile 
is reported to have a range of about 
1,000 kilometers, enough to hit 
western and central Japan. 

U.S. bases that would fall within 
range include the U.S. Navy base at 
Sasebo, on Che East China Sea 
iu Island, and the 
atlwakuru. 
government officials 
iy said North Korea 
try to take advantage of the 
historical Korean enmity against 
Japan. 

In the interview with Yonhap. 
Mr. Cha said that North Korea 
would not target South Korea or 
the mainland United States with 
any future nuclear missiles. 

Yonhap quoted Mr. Cha as say- 
ing that Japan’s intention to devel- 
op its own nuclear arsenal was an 
“openly known thing.” 

In a related develop menu the 
Sankei Shimbun reported Thurs- 
day that North Korea had targeted 
some of its surface-to-surface mis- 
siles on Chino. 

The newspaper said Chinese mil- 
itary intelligence had tdd South 
Korean sources that Scud-C mis- 
siles launched from several of the 
North's sites could reach industrial 
areas in northeast China. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


coast of K: 

nearby air 
Japanese 
have privat 


nave pr 
would u 


WOULD BRIEFS 


Greece Rejects Deadline on Embargo 

ATHENS (API — Greece said Thursday that it wmdd net give ia lo the 
European Union's demand that it lift its embargo on ibe toner Yi ugosav 
repubfic of Macedonia by April 13 or face a lawsuit m the European 

Instead, it called on the European Commission, the EC's executive 
body, to rescind its decision to send the issue to the court- we tope that 
the European Commisson will consider the facts m a more coo tamed and 
mature way, and change its position,” a wjyemmcnt spoke^sud 

The spokesman reiterated Greece’s stand that it wiD only mt the Feb. 16 
embargo once its neighbor stops using an ancient Greek symbol on its flag 
and r hang* its constitution so as not to reflect what Greece rails expan- 
sionist ahrtc. Greece argues that its neighbors use of thename Macedonia 
implies dams on the northern Greek province called Macedonia. 

dose Mitterrand Aide Kills Himself 



PARIS (AFP) — A dose associate and personal friend of Presid ent 
Francois Mitterrand of France, Franqois de Grossouvre, committed 
suicide is his office at the Elyste Palace cm Thursday, sources said. 

Mr. De Grossouvre, 76. an associate of the president for 30 «• 
resigned as a presidential adviser in 1985 but was still officially r mr 
as an organizer of presidential hunting expeditions. Widdy re^ 
an influential backstage figure, Mr. De Grossouvre carried out several 
ran fi/ton rial and d e flate missio ns abroad, notably in the Middle East 


Acted Alone, Mexican Gunman Says 


MEXICO CITY (AP) — Investigators are mt 
act i vi s ts about a possible conspiracy to kill the country’s leading presi- 
dential contender, but die man who admits pulling tbs trigger says he 
acted alone. 

Mario Abuno Martinez, 23, a factory worker, testified Wednesday that 
he did not know any of the other four men charged in the March 23 
slayingof Lois Donaldo Cotesio in Tijuana and said the killing “was not 
premeditated." 

“I want to clarif y that those you are accusing are innocent, Mr. 
Aburto «irid He made the statements as he was charged with c rimin a l 



hired to guard Mr. Coiosto, pleaded not guilty and > 
Aburto. 


knowing Mr. 


itors on 


an 

ranz Sdionimoer, a far-right leader and 
or accusing two Jewish leaders of indting anti- 


Far-Rightist Not Charged in Germany 

BONN (Reuters) — German ~ 

attempt to brio 
former Waffen 
S enti tism 

The public prosecutor's office in the Bavarian town of Landshut, near 
where Mr. SchOnhuber publicly attacked Ignatz Bubas and Michel 
Friedman, said his accusation did not amount to a general incitement to 
race hatred. “The statement was against two dcariy named personalities 
and cannot be seen as a comment about the Jews living in Germany,” the 
prosecutors office said. 

Mr. Stirtnhuber last month accused Mr. Bubis, who is head of the 
Central Council of Jews in Germany, of being ^ “the worst inciter of hatred 
in the country” and “the real cause of anti-Samtism.” Speaking after the 
first synagogue firebombing since the Third Reich, he later included Mr. 
Friedman, h««d of die Frankfurt Jewish community, in the same catego- 
ry- 


lor Lbei 


Bhutto links India to Nuclear Halt 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) — Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto said 
Thursday she would reject any US, demands to stop development of a 
nuclear arsenal unless India agreed to similar limi ts. India exploded a 
bomb in 1974., and Pakistan is believed to be able to assemble one. 

Strobe Talbott, the UiL deputy secretary of state, who is to arrive in 
Pakistan on Friday from India, was expected to offer Miss Hiotto a deal: 
Pakistan could get delivery of 38 F-16 fighter jets, but only if it freezes hs 
nuclear-weapons program and allows international verification. 


France to Lodge D-Day VIPs in Paris 


PARIS (Reuters) — France, which sparked an outcry when it canceled 
D-Day hotel bookings for Canadian and British veterans to mate room 
for foreign said on Thursday the officials would probably be 

lodged in Paris, far from the action. 

“These commemorations are for the veterans and there can no question 
of Hning any thing that could hamp er them, ” Veterans Affairs Minister 


Philippe Mestre said at a news-conference. “Right now.it looks like we Partner CLr 
will lodee 


wfll lodge (heVlPs in Paris,” he said. The Normandy beaches are about 
250 kilometers from the French capitaL 
The government earlier this week backed down on apian to push about 
200 veterans out erf a hotel in Deauville, near the invasion beaches, to 
provide space for the foreign officials. 

AZT Use Fails to Prevent AIDS Onset 


\ 


LONDON (Reuters) —The anti-AIDS drug AZT does not prevent the 
development of the fatal disease in people who are infected with the virus 
but have not yet shown any synqitoms, British and French researchers 


reported. 
The so- 


e so-caned Concorde report, published in Friday’s edition of the 
British medical journal Lancet supports initial findings that the drug is of 
little or no use in preventing the onset of AIDS in people who have 
become infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, or HTV, winch 
causes the disease. 

AZT, known genericaUy as zidovudine, has been shown effective in 
prolonging the life of patients with full-blown AIDS. “The hope was that 
use of zidovudine earlier in infection might delay disease progression and 


therefore farther improve survival,” the Lancet report said. “The results 

of zidovudine in symptom- 


of Concorde do not encourage the eariy use 
free HIV-infected adults.' 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Paris Paaralyzed by Transport Strike 

DA Die / A CH\ A - — -1 x n _ 


PARIS (AFP) — A 24-hour public transport strike paralyzed Paris and 
the surrounding region on Thursday, virtually shutting down Mttro and 
bus sendees. Massive traffic jams built up as people tried to get to and 
from work by car while thousands walked in rain or waited for taxis. 

Officials said main highways around the capital were dogged by a total 
of 230 kDomders of traffic jams in the morning. The stake hardened 
during the day and by evening tune out of the 13 Mfexo lines were shut 
and 236 bus routes were running at 10 percent of capacity. Regional 
express ! commuter trains, known as the RBI, were also severely curtailed, 
but trains run by the national rail company operated normally. 

TIk Ihtited States oolbrasd^wuraed to citizens in Algeria to leave if 
they lacked “effective protection” and advised travelers to stay away 
because of politically-motivated violence targeting foreigners. (AFP) 
The first mtam fi nnil bridge over die Mekong River opens on Friday 
between Thailand and Laos, bringing the vision of an Asian superhigh- 
way from Singapore to China doser to reality. (Reuters) 

Zorich's co mm u te- rad system vriB deploy a team of 75 “guardian 
angels,” or una r med security guards, in October, officials announced. 
Like those who patrol the New York subway system, they will wear easily 
identifiable green jackets and baseball caps. (AFP) 

Edbhogfc’s monument to So- Water Scott nfl stay doty, the city 
council has ruled, ending a four-year dispute over a £2 miBiop plan to 
dean it up. Objectors had said the chemical cleaning of the 150-year 
monument would damage the stone. (Ratters) 

Plans to MM die world’s largest anise finer, a 100,000- ton monster 
that will ply the Caribbean, were announced by the Peninsular and 
Oriental Steam Navigation Co. in London. The vessel wiD be built by the 
Italian firm Fincantieri for S385 million and put fnra service in 1997 -(AP) 


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Page 3 



Cash Fails to Improve Segregated Schools 


By Mary Jordan 

Washington Put Service 

~~ Two decades and hun- 
dreds erf millions of dollars after the U.S. courts 

8Ut es , financially compensate cer- 
wws^^ted schools, a HarvaidUriveraty 
^^/^’“ded that there is “no imticS? 

i£\£^ on of ^ ninodt y stodeoES 

fonr school districts 
. f^d to spend extra money on ovcrwhdm- 

an/i ^ die expensive programming 
m^oney has redressed the harms of 

The “Still Separate, Still Unequal" reoon 

W 00 eviden<?tha thelSS 

SSS^? pr0vcd scores - 10 ^ «*ool 
|™2* scores show that the disparity 

on < ^?o2 r ?2?’ director 01 ** Harvard^S 
M School Desegregation, said an extensive ex- 
ammation of spools in Prince George's Coun- 
Liule Arkansas; Austin, 
Texas, and Detroit showed that the “solution 


proposed by the courts is not working and not 
even being attempted.” 

The findings are significant because federal 
coons continue to order states lo pay huge 
sums of money to predominantly blade schools 
to compensate for past discrimination. One of 
the most widely publicized cases is the $32 
milli on spent on a single school in Kansas City. 
Missouri. The school built to be (he finest m 
the country, has not shown measurable educa- 
tion improvement. 

“Just putting money into schools is not likely 
to produce benefits,” Mr. Orfidd said. He add- 
ed that schools have more responsibility than 
spending money on disadvantaged children. 
Nobody has bothered to find if this has had an 
effect,” he said. 

But Edward M. Fdegy, the Prince George’s 
County superintendent of schools, called the 
report “unfair" and “misleading.” 

He said the court ordered 21 of its schools to 
reduce class size and add programs and teach- 
ers; it never instructed the sdiooi district to 
monitor the educational progress of the stu- 
dents. 


“This is not milling of dollars wasted," be 
said. “This money has been put to excellent 
use." 

“It’s totally unfair for someone from Har- 
vard years later to say there should have been a 
different goal." he added. 

Mr. Felegy said that everyone would like to 
know wfaat the educational impact of the extra 
funds has been. In fact, he said, his school 
district was recently turned down for a federal 
grant that would have paid for such an assess- 
ment. 

Around the country, many states welcomed a 
1977 Supreme Court remedy in the in the Mmi- 
ken v. Bradley case involving Detroit public 
schools. It freed states from being forced to 
order unpopular busing in cases where schools 
were deemed extremely difficult to integrate 
because they were located far from white neigh- 
borhoods. 

“There is tremendous incentive to go down 
this path," said Edward Kirby, a chief author of 
the study. “It’s politically easier than busing." 
But he said that “there is tittle to no evaluation” 
to see if it helps. 


APOLITICAL VOTES A 


Allies Said Ready to Talk to Help Wife 


, ^ S ™ G T°* — W"th the CIA and FBI determined to learn 
wneuier Aldrich Hazen Ames had confederates ins ide the intelli- 
gence agency, the accused spy is showing his first willingness to 
Sr^his wife " 1 * 1 “ vestigat0rs< bul on ty if they recommend leniency 

Mr. Ames has virtually no chance of negotiating leniency for 
himself, considering the damage investigators believe the 31-year 
Central Intelligence Agency veteran caused to U.S. intelligence 
interests and his possible complicity in the deaths of U.S. intelli- 
gence operatives in Russia. 

Mr. Ames, 52, and his Colombian-born wife, Maria dd Rosario 
Casas Ames, 41 , were arrested on espionage conspiracy charges Feb. 
- 1 - Tbe deadline for a grand jury indictment, typically 30 days after 
an arrest, was extended an additional 30 days to give 
attorneys time to examine documents recovered by the FBI. 

Prosecutors are intent on putting Mr. Ames in prison for life, 
according to sources dose to the case. But the prospect of a possible 
deal for Mrs. Ames is a more complicated proposition. She has been 
suffering emotional distress since her incarceration, a factor said to 
be adding to Mr. Ames’s desire to strike a deal for her. (LAT) 

II.S, Lobbies for liberal UN Abortion Plan 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton administration is lobbying for- 
eign governments for more liberal abortion language in a draft 
United Nations plan aimed at stabilizing the world’s population. 

The State Department instructed diplomats in a cable last month 
to contact foreign governments and stress the U.S. wish for “stron- 
ger language on the importance of access to abortion services” in the 
draft document being prepared for a UN -sponsored conference in 
September. 

The draft of a 20-year population stabilization program already 
has come under attack by Roman Catholics and anti-abortion 
forces. But the administration wants the document, which outlines 
goals and actions that participating countries should take, to sup- 
port broader abortion availability. 

In New York, delegates from more than 170 countries are 
drafting a 20-year plan for adoption by countries at the Internation- 
al Conference on Population and Development in September in 
Cairo. (AP) 

Ex-Clinton Partner Gvta Whitewater Pata 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton has sent copies of 
Whitewater records to his former business partner, James McDon- 
gal who had complained publicly earlier this year that he was 
unable io prepare his tax returns without tire doenments. 

David E. Kendall, Mr. Clinton’s lawyer, said in a letter to Mr. 
McDougal’s attorney that he sent the records — about 2,000 pages 
of land sale contracts, escrow receipts and Whitewater bank account 
statements — to Mr. McDougal on Monday. Mr. Kendall’s letter 
was released by the White House on Wednesday. Neither Mr. 
McDougal nor his attorney coukl be readied for comment 

The records, which the White House has declined to release to the 
public, include the collection of Whitewater-related papers that were 
m the possession of Vincent W. Foster, the White Home deputy 
counsel who committed suicide last summer. 

According to Mr. McDougal, whose account is not disputed hy 
the White House, Mr. Foster obtained the Whitewater-related 
papers from Mr. McDougal before Mr. Clinton took office. At the 
Clintons’ behest Mr. Foster had offered to prepare several years of 
corporate tax returns for the Whitewater Development Coxp. — the 
firm formed by the Clintons and Mr. McDougal to bufld a resort 
community in the Ozarks. Mr. McDougal apparently neglected to 
prepare and file the returns. (LAT) 

Quoto/Unqiiotc 

James Carville, the Lousianan who was campaign adviser for Bill 
Clinton, an Arkansan, on allegations that the moral standards m 
Louisiana and Arkansas are lower than in the rest of the nation: I 
resent the hell out of il" (PIP) 


Lelyveld Is Named 
Top Editor at Tii 


es 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — The New 
York Tones announced a major 
shift in its newsroom leadership on 
Thursday, elevating Managing Edi- 
tor Joseph Lelyveld, a former Long- 
time foreign correspondent, to the 
post of executive editor. 

Mr. Lelyveld, 57, will succeed 
Max Frankd 64, who held the top 
editorial position at the paper for 
the past eight years. 

In a surprise step, Mr. Lelyveld 
announced that Eugene L Roberts 
Jr., a former Tunes editor and for- 
mer executive editor of the Phila- 
delphia Inquirer, will become man- 
aging editor at The Times, the 
second-ranking position in the 
newsroom. 

In 18 years as executive editor of 
(he Inquirer, Mr. Roberts’s news- 
room staff won 17 Pulitzer Prizes 
and he was credited with complete- 
ly overhauling the paper's news op- 
erations. 

He left the Inquirer in 1990 and 
has been teaching journalism at the 
University of Maryland. 

The New York Times is a 50 
it owner of the International 
I Tribune. 

Mr. Lelyveld was named manag- 
ing editor of The Times in 1990. 

He was foreign editor from 1987 
to 1989 and had reported for The 
Times from posts in London, New 


quicker,” Mr. Lelyveld said in an 
interview. 

He praised Mr. Frankd, saying 
that The Tones had “increased its 
journalistic ambitions almost geo- 
metrically" during the Frenkel 
years. 

If Mr. Lelyveld represents The 
Times’s widely acknowledged lead- 
ership in foreign news, Mr. Roberts 
represents experience in national 
affairs and newsroom manage- 
ment. 

A North Carolina native who 
once covered local farm issues, he 
worked as chief Southern and civil 
rights corespondent for The Times 
in the mid- 1960s, was a Times cor- 
respondent in Vietnam and served 
as The Times’s national editor from 
1969 to 1972. 

Some of the best young reporters 
hired at the Inquirer under Mr. 
Roberts are now employed by The 
Times. 

Under Mr. Frankd, The Tunes 
lured a number of younger report- 
ers and editors and sought to bring 
more diversity to its newsroom and 
to the top editing positions in the 
newsroom. 

A Pulitzer Prize recipient, Mr. 
Frankd reported for The Times 
from Easton Europe, the Soviet 
Union and from its Washington 
bureau. 

Before being named executive 
editor, he served as editorial page 



MiU Ndm/Agcncr France-Pro* 

ROUND-THE-CLOCK REPAIRS — A anew working on the Santa Monica Freeway in Los Angeles, which was closed after 
snffering heavy damage in the Jan. 17 earthquake. The highway is sche&led to reopen Tuesday, several months ahead of schedule. 

Away From Politics 


• Lawyers representing breast ""phw* pa- 
tients say they have uncovered a 1975 study 
by researchers at Dow Corning Corp. show- 
ing that the silicone in the implants harms the 
imm une system of mice. The lawyers exam- 
ined 2 milli on pages of scientific documents 
provided by the company as part of a class- 
action suit against it The 1975 study found 
that a particular type of silicone gd in puri- 
fied form is highly toxic to the immune sys- 
tem. Mice that received various doses of the 
silicone suffered from impaired immune re- 
sponse. 

• Suspected drank drivers who fa3 a breath 
test in Virginia will lose their licenses on the 
spot under one of the toughest driving-whfle- 


intoxicated laws in the country, signed by 
Governor George Alien after its approval by 
the state legislature in March. 

• An earthquake shook much of Southern 
California, causing a few cracks in buildings 
near the epicenter and sending some rocks 
onto a highway. No (njuries were reported 
Hie Wednesday quake measure 4.8 on the 
Richter scale. 

• Two persons who Bred for two years fawMe 
Biosphere 2, an experiment to create a proto- 
type Martian colony, were arrested on 
charges of breaking into the domed complex 
and v andalisin g it. Abigail Ailing, 34, and 
Mark Van Thillo, 33, were taken into custody 
at a hold in Tucson, Arizona, by state police 


acting on an anonymous tip. They had been 
suspended from their jobs with the project 

• A leak in a fuel (me (fiscovered at the launch 
pad is so slight it will not interfere with the 
launching of the space shuttle Endeavour 
from Cape Canaveral Florida on Friday, the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administra- 
tion said The leak was discovered as hydro- 
gen was being loaded into storage tanks 
aboard Endeavour. NASA stopped loading 
the highly flammable hydrogen while engi- 
neers assessed the situation. They determined 
the leak was small enough to manage safety, 
and the operation resumed several hours lat- 
er. 

NIT. WP. LAT. Return. AP 


Disk Jockey’s Ploy Devastates a Library 


iirnca iruiu m lmuwu, t 

E^JIong Kong and South Afri- ■ at “ 


The Associated Press 

FORT WORTH. Texas — People stormed 
the Fort Worth Public Library, tearing pages 
from books and throwing volumes on the 
floor, after a radio stationmsk jockey, hoping 
lo encourage reading, announced that he had 
hidden money in the stacks. 

People were “climbing the shelves, step- 
ping on each other and elbowing people in 
the face" to get at books, said Marsha Ander- 
son, spokeswoman for the library. 

When h was over, the library was a sham- 
bles, with several thousand dollars’ worth of 


damage- No one was hurt. The radio station 
said it would pay for the Ham»w» 

Listeners of A. W. Pantoja, a KYNG-FM 
disk jockey, told library workers that the 
country music station had hidden up to 
$10,000 in the bodes. But the station’s pro- 
gram director, Dan Peatman, said Mr. Pan- 
toja had offered only $ 100 . 

“He thought putting a few dollars here and 
there might motivate people to go to the 
library,” Mr. Peannan said. “It was never my 
intent to destroy a library. The last thing in 
the world I would want is to destroy a li- 
brary.” 

About 4,000 fiction, reference, philosophy. 


religion and soda] science books were strewn 
across the 100,000-square-foot (9300-square- 
meter) building. 

Mr. Pantoja bad not asked the library for 
permission first 

“It was kind of a last-minute inspiration.” 
Mr. Peannan said. 

Several hundred people were in the first 
wave to hit the library. Librarians said they 
thought it was some kind of joke. 

“I made an announcement over the public 
address system that the contest was over." 
Miss Anderson said. “That worked real welL 
Three hundred people kind of vaporized.” 


ca. 

He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1986 
for Ins book on apartheid, “Move 
Your Shadow” 

Mr. Lelyveld, who joined The 
Times in 1962, also reported from 
the paper’s Washington bureau 
and had served as a staff writer and 
columns! few The New York Times 
Magazine. 

Mr. Frankd announced plans to 
step down. The Tunes said in a 
prepared statement, and will be- 
come a columnist for The New 
York Times Magazine, writing 
about communications and the me- 
dia. 

Mr. Roberts, 61, will take a 
three-year leave from the Univerai- 


Policy Stalemate Erases U.S. Optimism Over Haiti 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — After months of 
struggling over bow to restore democracy to 
Haiti, the Clinton administration faces a 
stalemate. 

With its pqKries blocked by both sides and 
no new solutions in sight on now to reinstate 
Haiti’s exiled president, the Reverend Jean- 
Bertrand Aristide, a growing number of offi- 
cials have concluded that he will probably 
never be restored to power. 

Despite President Bill Omton’s commit- 


1991 show no sign of wavering in thdr oppo- 
sition to his return. He has refused to make 
the moves the Clinton administration says 
are needed to from a broad-based govern- 
ment to press the military to step down. And 
the administration is adamant in rejecting 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

the request of Aristide supporters to use UjS. 
troops to depose the junta. 


mem to help reinstate Father Aristide, Secre- 


These gloomy conclusions are not univer- 

_____ __ _ salty ' stand in the administration, but even 

ty of 'Maryland to work at The tarv ofState Warren M. Christopher has told wh? are optimistic about restoring 

Times and plans to returato teach- other administration officials that of all the F at^ArutidesayfOTthattohiq>pen,s<w- 
mg Om he »d» u* Time’s fond*. poHcy ense he fee, mdmJing Bos. 4*S? 

trade embargo against Haiti and 
Father Aristide to do more to 


This downbeat outlook is a far cry from 
the early days of the Clinton administration 
when officials, confident that it would not be 
hard to dislodge Haiti's military, thought 
Haiti would be an easy foreign policy vic- 
tory. 

But officials now voce exasperation that 
the mflitary leaders are dug in and that the 
embargo has failed to loosen the military’s 
grip. 

Administration officials refuse to say pub- 
licly that the chances of restoring Father 
Anstide are slim, partly because that would 
embolden the nnhiary to dig in further and 
itwouldbei 


'because it 


an admission that 


retirement age of 65. 

The announcement of Mr. Ldy- 
veld’s elevation was made by Ar- 
thur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., publisher 
of The Times. 

‘T hope we will get sharper and 



: time see mg 

an eventual resolution. 

The reason, administration officials say, is 
a standoff on all sides. The military leaders 
who deposed Father Aristide in September 


did a broad coalition. 

Even then, many officials would put his 
chances of returning at less than 50 percent 


partly beet 

U.S. Haiti policy is failing. 

Trying to put dm best face mi their strug- 
gling policy, administration officials pledge 
to continue working with Father Aristide to 
help oust the military. 

But this is made difficult by the distrust 
'between him and administration officials 
and by thdr often conflicting strategies. 


DEALS: U.S. and European Filmmakers Move to Join Forces 


PERRY: Defense Chief Is New Foreign Policy Voice 


Contfnoed from Page I 

makers. In particular, it declined to 
endorse or to reject recommenda- 
tions by a panel of six lading in- 
dustry experts, including Mr. Putt* 
nam, for tighter import barriers 
over 10 years and 2 bfflion Europe- 
an currency units ($235 billion) of 
new aid a year for the European 

industry. „ 

Those ideas “would really stir up 
a hornet’s nest” if th<w were adopt- 
ed as policy, said a U.S. official 
The commission paper steerea 
clear of preconceived ideas, sard 
Joafi de Dors Pinheiro, the Portu- 
guese who is the EC coomissiprier 
in charge of film and TV policy. 
“We don’t wish to exclude any idea 
that is worth looking into. 

Still the paper was not without 
controversy, ml strongly suggests 
that the European Union should 
to ugh en enforcement of a broaa- 


costs, and blames much of the Eu- 
ropean industry’s decline on the 
failure of filmmakers to produce 
popular fiinw. 

The paper aims to lay the 
groundwork for several months of 
debate among industry leaders and 
government officials, leading to ac- 
tual policy recommendations from 
the commission around October. 

The stakes are huge. Mr. Pin- 
hdro said Europe's audiovisual in- 
Frank Tonim, deputy managing dustry market was worth 260 bQ- 
director of the Motion Picture As- Kon Ecus a year and employed at 
sodatkm of America's Brussels of- least 1.8 miIU 0 nprople,figm«that 
fict f-niinri the commission paper’s could double by the year 2000. But 
proposal to coordinate national deep inroads by Hollywood over 
“ ■ ■ | and its suggestions the past decade have left Europe 

quotas ''somewhat with a deficit of 3.6 billion Ecus a 


cast directive, currently flouted 
Britain, that requires at least 51- 
percent of television programming 
to be European, 

That's tantamount to censor- 
ship, the U.S. official contended. 
“If you watch too many American 
movies, do red lights start flashing 
and your television tom off?” he 
said. . . . „ 

The commission itself remains 
deeply divided on the issue. 


on broadcast 
troublesome. 

But he welcomed the paper’s 
overall tone, which treats movies as 
an industry rather than a cultural 
icon that needs protecting at all 


year on programming. 

It is the very weakness of the 
European industry that has 
spawned the new cooperation with 
Hollywood- European filmm a ker s 


'recognize the need to 
with American studios to 
ate the funds needed to revive 
their industry, while Americans see 
a threat is tire overall decline of the 
European dnema audience and the 
political fallout from the GATT 
dispute. 

In a bid to foster cooperation, 
rep r e sen tatives of the Hollywood 
studios held an initial meeting with 
mem bers o f the Paris-based Euro- 
pean Producers Club in early Feb- 
ruary in Brussels, and are due to 
meet here again at the end of this 
month. 

Although both sides agreed to 
keep the talks secret to avoid in- 
flaming passions, industry sources 
involved said discussions covered a 
wide range of possible cooperation, 
inrind mg a proposal to WM± for 
wider acceptance of dubbed movies 
in the American market 


FLY: Together, the Europeans Look Toward a ‘Son of Concorde ’ 


Continued from Page 1 

suppliers to the Americans Boeing 

Randy Harrison, a 

Co- said the Seattle orntpany had teawaie 
of the agreement, and •« 

European aerospace giantsonp 

ed front to thdr governments in order 
obtain research subsidies. 

A US. aerospace 

dement in the ^^^J^^^currcnilv 
tually obtain access to the r ^J^J. SDOnsore d 

being conducted m 'whichhKludcs 

High Speed Research S 

Bodn&McDonnell Douglas Cotp, 

Becmc Co. and 

United Technologies Corp. U.S- 
prohibits NASA-sponsored research Irom m 
ing shared with foreign companies. 

-The Europeans know we CjuTshareRAU 
with them now. and there would be 
law would change if they didn t put up equal 


effort,” the source said. “It wouldn’t be fair to 
UJ5. taxpayers.” 

Since 1990, an international study group has 
been looking at the technical, economic and 
environmental issues at play in the feasibility of 
a long-range supersonic transport- The group’s 
ori ginal members were Boeing, McDonnell 
Douglas, Aerospatiale, British Aerospace and 
Deutsche Aerospace, with aerospace groups 

from Italy, Japan and Russia joining subse- 
quently. 

This group wiQ continue its work, Mr. Ham- 

son said- _ . , 

The technical challenges center on devetop- 
ment of a variable-cycle engine that can aa as a 
conventional jet engine on takeoff, and then act 
more like afighter jet engine at higher altitude. 
The engine also has romeet current standards 
for ground level noise for conventional aihson- 
ic aircraft and emits much lower levels of toxms 

^ Th?o*CT environmental issue is rhe need to 


eliminate the sonic boom over heavily populat- 
ed areas. One answer may be to design the craft 

to operate at subsonic speeds over land and 
then speed up io 2.4 times the speed of sound 
the oa 


over 


; ocean. 


Richard W. Stevenson of The New York Times 
reported from London : 

The European companies said they believed 
that ai rlines would ■purchase between 500 and 
1,000 of tire new planes. Because of cost and 
environmental concerns, British Aerospace and 
Aerospatiale sold only 14 Concordes, seven 
parh to British Airways and Air France. 

The European partners said they have now 
derided on the general features of the plane, 
including a range of 6^00 miles (about 10,000 
kilo meters), 2^00 miles more than the Con- 
corde and sufficient to reach Asia from the 
United States or Europe. The plane would have 
a passenger capacity of 250. 150 more than the 
Concorde, and would offer three dasses of 
service to Concorde’s one. 


Continued from Page 1 
stances changed. On Wednesday, a 
State Department spokesman, Mi- 
chael McCurry, played down the 
appearance of a rift, saying that 
SeCTetary of State Warren M. 
Christopher had reviewed the full 
transcript of Mr. Perry’s remarks 
and agreed with their overall 
thrusL 

Mr. Perry’s rising prominence 
within the administration may have 
less to do with making policy than 
explaining iL In frequent speedies, 
interviews and several television 
appearances, be has established a 
reputation for lucid and unambigu- 
ous statements, such as his declara- 
tion last week that the United 
States would not permit North Ko- 
rea to develop “significant” num- 
bers of nuclear weapons. 

In that respect, he benefits by 
comparison with Mr. Christopher, 


Bonn Sets 3- Year Ban 
On Land-Mine Exports 

The Associated Press 

BONN — Germany wfll ban ex- 
ports of anti-personnel mines for 
three years and will push for inter- 
national controls on mine export 
and use. Foreign Minister Klaus 
Kinkel told the Weserkurier news- 
paper in Bremen on Thursday. 

Mr. Kinkel called for an interna- 
tional ban on mines that do not 
self-defuse over time, and on all- 
plastic mines, which are hard to 
detect 

Blast at UJK, Rightists’ Office 

Reuters 

LONDON — A letter bomb ex- 
ploded at tbe headquarters of the 
far-right British National Party on 
Thursday, slightly injuring one 
man, the police said. 


who has been criticized for lack of 
leadership and clarity, and the na- 
tional security adviser, W. Anthony 
Lake, who has largely avoided the 
limelight. 

“The p 


siast who lzkely would mai n tain a 
lowprofile. 

The first sign that those early 
forecasts may have been wrong 
came in February, when a mortar 
perception is that he was a shell explosion in the Sarajevo mar- 


safe choice 
himgrif 

gon, but in fact he has stepped 
rather smartly as an articulator of. 
strategy,” said Loren B. Thomp- 
son, deputy director of national se- 
curity studies at Georgetown Uni- 
versity. 

Mr. Ferry’s relative bluntness 
may have cansed consternation in 
some parts of the administration, 
but it also could prove a political 
asset to a president who has been 
accused of dneiring hard choices in 
foreign policy. In effect, Mr. Perry 
as defense secretary can take the 
tough positions while President Bill 
Clinton casts himself in a more 
statesmanlike role. 

Mr. Christopher, in a telephone 
interview this week, called Mr. Per- 
ry “a very gifted communicator” 
and added, “1 don’t regard him as 
being tougher or different than I 
am. *** 

On the other hand, he said: 
“There is an obvious differentia- 
tion of functions. My job is the 
overall foreign policy and his is the 
military dements." 

Mr. Perry was not supposed to 
make this much of a splash. A 
mathematician by training, he di- 
rected Pentagon research during 
the Carter administration and re- 
turned to the Defense Department 
in 1992 as Mr. Aspin’s deputy. In - 
between, he made a fortune as an 
entrepreneur in California’s Silicon 
Valley and taught engineering and 
arms control at Stanford Universi- 
ty. 

As the new defense secretary, he, 
generally was greeted by pundits; 
and military analysis as a bright , 
but uninspiring technology enthu- 


The U.S. response — using the 
threat of air strikes to force the 
withdrawal of Bosnian Serb heavy 
weaponry around Sarajevo — was 
a State Department initiative, and 
Mr. Perrys first instinct was to 
warn against hasty intervention. 

Subseqnently, however, he 
played a key role in orchestrating 
allied support for the plan, person- 
ally telephoning more than half of 
the 16 NATO defense ministers to 
invite them to a Feb. 19 meeting at 
Aviano Air Base, Italy, on the eve 
of the deadline for removal of tbe 
weapons. The result was an effec- 
tive bit of diplomatic theater — 
with Mr. Petty reviewing allied pi- 
lots on the flight line as the dock 
tidied toward midnight —that cul- 
minated in Serbian acquiescence to 
the NATO demand. 

More recently, Mr. Perry de- 
fended the adminis tration against 
charges by conservatives that it had 
not been sufficiently vigilant in its 
policy toward Russia, m a speech 
and subsequent trip to the region, 
Mir. Peny said that the United 
Stales should combine vigilance 
with continued aid to Russia, not 
as a mat ter of altruism but of self- 
in teresL 


wn^i Aristide supporters talk privately, 
they often say that, at a minimum, the threat 
of force or, preferably, military intervention 
is needed to return Father Aristide to power. 
But administration officials oppose the idea. 

Senator Christopher J. Dodd, Democrat 
of Connecticut, who is chairman of a Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee subcommittee 
on Western Hemisphere affairs, said: “I 
don’t think there is any appetite for militaty 
action in Congress or the American public. 
There’s no question that we have the military 
capacity to succeed. The more difficult ques- 
tion is wfaat happens the day after you oust 
Haiti’s military. What do you do? How long 
doyoustay?” 

Some officials say U.S. troops might have 
to stay several years after reinstating Father 
Aristide to prevent another coup and to 
maintain order in the streets. 

“You end up as an occupying force ” an 
administration official said. 

Aristide Ends 
Refugee Pact 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The Rever- 
end Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the de- 
posed president of Haiti, has in- 
formed President Bill Clinton that 
he is abrogating the 1981 treaty 
under which the United States 
claims the right to intercept Hai- 
tian refugees at sea and forcibly 
return than to the island. 

White House officials confirmed 
they had received a letter from Fa- 
ther Aristide to Mr. Clinton but 
declined to comment immediately. 

The Washington Post obtained a 
draft version of the letter, in which 
Father Aristide said he was re- 
nouncing the agreement because 
the United States had violated its 
obligation to provide refuge for 
people fleeing persecution and was 
endangering repatriated refugees. 

UJS. officials have said previous- 
ly that they would not abandon the 
policy, instituted by President 
George Bush in May 1992, of halt- 
ing and sending home Haitians 
who try to safl to Florida. 

In the draft letter. Father Aris- 
tide charged that repatriating the 
refugees puts them in danger from 
Haiti’s military government. 

But Michael D. Barnes, a for- 
mer Democratic representative 
from Maryland who is Father Ar- 
istide's principal U.S. adviser, said 
that his action was not a call for 
Haitians to try to escape to the 
United States. 


i jus ask the butler... 


'fjjh 


S-l-N-C-A-P-Q. R . E 


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U.S. and Allies Seek 
Quick Dispatch of 
UN Force to Gorazde 


' WASHINGTON — The United 
States and its NATO allies are urg- 
ing the United Nations to quickly 
dispatch hundreds of Ukrainian 
and other peacekeepers to Scxb- 
endrded Gorazde in eastern Bos- 
nia, Clinton ad m i n istr a tion offi- 
cials said Thursday. 

British and French peacekeepers 
may be redeployed to join the 
Ukrainians m Crymg to protect the 
65,000 civilians in the town. 

“The plan is being put on a fast 
track,” a senior U.S. official said. 

The United States stands ready 
to transport the Ukrainians, most 
of whom would come from Kiev, lo 
a staging area, said the officials, 
who added that it was not dear 
whether the Serbs would try to 
block the peacekeeping mission. 
Approval by the United Nadbas 
was considered a virtual certainty. 

The size of the peacekeeping 
miss ion has not yet been deter- 
mined. Ukraine offered about 800 
soldiers. There may be more, in- 
cluding British and French forces 
already in (he Balkans, the U.S. 
O fficials said. 

Serbian nationalists shelled Gor- 
azde for (he 10th day in a row 
Thursday as the United Nations 
commander. Lieutenant General 
Michael Rose, shuttled between 
Bosnian government and Serbian 
commanders in a new bid to broker 
a lasting, nationwide cease-fire. 

On Thursday night the two sides 
separately announced an immedi- 
ate 24-hour countrywide cease-fire 
designed to allow the United Na- 
tions to get negotiations under way 
on Friday for a more durable cessa- 
tion of hostilities. 

Earlier this week. Secretary of 
Defense William J. Perry and Gen- 
eral John ShaHkashvQi, the chair- 
man of the U.SL Joist Chiefs of 
Staff, ruled out U.S. military force 
to try to lift the siege of Gorazde. 

But other administration offi- 
cials asserted a g ain Thursday that 
the United States stood behind a 
NATO commitment to protect 
peacekeepers with air power if they 
came under attack in Gorazde. The 
town was designated a “safe area” 
by the UN Security Council last 
year. 

President Bill Clinton's national 
security adviser stressed Thursday 
that the peacekeepers would be 
protected by NATO air power. 

“We stand by that commit- 
ment,” said W. Anthony Lake in a 
speech at Johns Hopkins Universi- 
ty in Baltimore. He also said the 


UN forces should be on their way 
to Gorazde as soon as possible. 

“We must make dear to the 
Sobs and to the Serbs of Bosnia 
that the costs of continued intransi- 
gence are high,” he said. 

“Neither the president nor any 
of his senior advisers rules out the 
use of NATO power to help stop 
attacks such as those against Gor- 
azde,” Mi. Lake said. 

The statement was drawn care- 
fully to make it dear that Mr. Perry 
and General ShaHkasbviH support- 
ed the ul timatum. 

The U.S. mediator on Bosnia, 
Charles E Redman, is trying to 
revive peace talks to end the two- 
year-old war in Bosnia. 

Mr. Redman is to visit Sarajevo 
this weekend after stopping first in 
Zagreb, the Croatian capital. 

General Rose was considering 
whether to dispatch peacekeepers 
to Gorazde. Three UN military ob- 
servers and eight of his liaison offi- 
cers were permitted to proceed to 
the town amid mixed reports about 
its fate. (AP, WP, NH) 


% 


f'v.r 

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V* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRILS, 1994 

Russia’s Entangled Leadership 

Signals Get Crossed, Again, on Bases 


7 .: 





Th* U ranian Kgrhign mimnanrf er, General Ratkn Mladic, speaking to reporters in a Sarajevo subwh 
as the UN commander confirmed efforts Thnraday to arrange a lasting cease-fire throughout Bosnia. 


RWANDA: Bloodletting Sweeps Capital After Killing of 2 Presidents 


Controlled from Page 1 

Front, who have been camped around the par- 
liament building since last year. 

Belgian sources said the reluctance of Mr. 
Habyarimana, 57, to comply with the terms of 
that accord to bring Tbtsis into a tramitionaJ 
government may have led to the attack on his 
plane. The two presidents were killed after 
returning from a conference of East African 
leaders in Tanzania. 

Also among the victims of Thursday's vio- 
lence were 27 Rwandan priests, who were exe- 
cuted by soldiers, accenting to Belgian news 
agency reports. 

French and Belgian officials said that their 


military forces at bases in other Central African 
coun tries had been placed on alert and were 
ready to move into Rwanda to protect the lives 
of expatriate workers as well as to bolster the 
UN peacekeeping contingent there 
International relief groups said they were 
also standing by to respond to a likely emergen- 
cy situation in Central Africa if the violence 
continued in Kigali and spread to other areas. 

A spokesman for the UN High Commission- 
er for Refugees in Nairobi said that after the 
ethnic conflagration in Burundi last October, 
700,000 Burundian refugees fled across the 
country’s borders in three days. 

In contrast to the orgy of violence in Kigali 


the Burundi capital, Bujumbura, was reported 
calm Thursday after receiving the news of Mr. 
Ntaryamira’s death. 

A former agriculture minister, Mr. Ntary- 
mxra, 38, became president only a month ago as 
the consensus choice of the country’s feinting 
political factions following the assassination 
last October of the country’s first democratical- 
ly elected president, Melchior Ndadaye. 

The assasanations occurred as the two lead- 
ers were returning from the Tanzania confer- 
ence having pledged to work toward ending the 
tribal violence that has made Rwanda and 
Burundi the two prime examples of ethnic trou- 
bles in postindependence Africa. 


ISRAEL: Palestinian Gunman Kills Israeli as Revenge Attacks Mount 


Continued from Page I 
and slightly wounded by Arabs at 
entrances to the Gaza Strip. 

The violence came on a somber 
holiday in which Israel memorial- 
izes victims of the Nazi Holocaust 
with nationwide siren blasts during 
which Jews stop ewaythiiig for two 
minutes of silence. The sirens went 
off as the wounded were being 
evacuated from the scene of the 
Ashdod attack. 

At the Gaza refugee camp where 
he lived, Mr. Amawi was praised 
for the killing. As members of the 
Islamic Jihad erected a mourning 


tent, his brother A wad, 38, a teach- 
er, said, *Tm really proud of what 
my brother did.” 

He said Ali Amawi had been 
shot and injured eight times in 
stone-throwing dashes with Israeli 
troops during the Pales tinian re- 
volt He said his brother was a 
follower of the militant Islamic Ji- 
had. It took responsibility for the 
attack by Mr. Amawi 
Earlier Thursday, the military 
wing of Hamas, the Islamic resis- 
tance movement that said it had 
earned out the Afula attack, issued 
a leaflet pledging to cany out four 
more violent attacks. 


“You turned the Id al-Fltr Holi- 
day into a black day, so we vowed 
to turn your Independence Day 
into hell” the leaflet said, referring 
to ihe Islamic feast that ends the 
holy month of Ramadan, and next 
Thursday’s celebration of Israel’s 
creation in 1948. The leaflet asked 
merchants and citizens to slock up 
on food supplies “because an atmo- 
sphere of real war will take over the 
Zionist soldiers and the enemy 
leadership in the near future.” 

The leaflet demanded that set- 
tlers leave the West Bank and Gaza 
Strip, saying the Hamas military 
wing “wifi barrage their bones vrith 


rockets that God sent ns recently .” 
The reference to rockets was un- 
usual. 

The Td Aviv daily Ha’aretz re- 
ported Thursday that Israeli offi- 
cials believe Hamas members 
gained skills in building car bombs 
after they were deported to south- 
ern Lebanon last year. 

Thousands of Israelis attended 
funeral services in Afula for the 
car-bomb victims. Nficha Gold- 
man, deputy education minister 
and a member of parliament who 
represented the government, was 
jeered and forced to leave the fu- 
nerals under police escort 


By Steven Erlanger 

^(heig^a^nbe- j* “^f^rities, white qinramSw. in fact the Russian 


both offuaals and diplomats, Presi- Moldova, for exampi a, urau 

dent Boris N. Yd£n on Thursday with the pet^ssion of 
amended an order about military cept an unr^^ brea^w^ 
bases he issued a d ay earlier that statelet on the east bank of the 

his foreign minister. Andrei V. Ko- Dniestr River. 

SrcTS he had never bad MB. Ihc Rnssum mihtaiy would 
a like to keep Sknmda, and Baltic 

The incident follows a similar leaders, who do not bdong to the 
episode of diplomatic constema- Commonwealth, are ali^wra- 
tioTover apparently crossed sig- ned that new nationalist nmses 
nals between Mr, Yeltsin and ms from Rn»ia endanger the final 


L I O I O UMOWU nu. JHtSJU ami me , " r. — e — v 

foreign and defense ministries over pullout of all Russian troops rrom by tdcranaiioualisi party led by 
when Russia might sign the frame- Estonia and Latvia. . . Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky in Decem- 

woric agreement for the North At- Already gone from Jjthnarna, ^ g[ ect jQ as> and by the impres- 
lantic Treaty Organization’s Part- Rtttaan troops remain in Latvia f * gm ^ ^ Russian military, with 
nership for Peace program. “B* Estonia, and negotiations are jjnle civilian oversight, is making 

The order Wednesday, which in- contmumg on removing them by jts own foreign policy in places like 
structs the Foreign Ministry to ne- Aug. 3 1 under a prelimmaiy agree- Moldova and Azabagan. 

gotiate permanent military basing meat reached last Augurt. But Rni- Russian behavior has 

jsssSS-KS 

drawn m De- peated to the Estonians on and RMnjeq^ ftat 


But there is a growing concern in 
the West that Russia harbors impe- 
rial ambitions, at least within the 
former territory of the Soviet 
Union, known as the “near 
abroad.” 

These concerns have been fed by 
an increasingly nationalistic tone 
coming from Mr. Yeltsin and Mr. 
Kozyrev since the strong showing 
by me ultranationalisi party led by 


woik agreement for the North At- Already gone from Uthuama, 
lautic Treaty Organization's Part- Russian troops remam in Latvia 
nership for Peace program. Estonia, and negotiations are 

The order Wednesday, which in- continuing on removing them by 


drawn up on the advice of the De- 
fense Ministry. — — ---- . , . _ . 

The Gst of bases, which are re- Tte Estonians, who are fiwng 
ported to number about 30, indude with less than 3,000 Russian 
the- ff^ r ty-q raminp m d ar in troops, reacted strongly to what 


troops, reacted strongly to what 


Latvia, whose o fficials reacted an- they perceived as Russian pressure, 
gji^wami^ of “Rosaan imperi- which includes a demand for J23 
alism.” And, according to the text million from the Estonians to bdp 
of the order, published Thursday build housing for the Russian 
on the front page of the official troops in Russia. Russia also wants 
gazette, Rossiskiye Vesti, it was Estonia and Latvia to allow fainter 
also approved by the Foreign Min- Soviet soldiers who sored in the 
istry. Baltics and retired there to remain. 

But Mr. Kozyrev said Thursday; While the Russians have com- 
“We don’t know where this order plained bitterly about the treat- 


“We don’t know wh ere this order 
comes from or with whom h was 
agreed. Both diplomats and the 
mili tary are standing with tbdi 
mouths han g in g open.” 

At first, Mr. Kozyrev called the 
plan for the 30 bases a “newspaper 
phantom,” saying it was “intended 
to sow disharmony between the 
president and the government, the 
Foreign Ministry and the Defense 
Ministry.” 

Mr. Kozyrev continued- accord- 
ing to Interfax news agency: “No 


Bot Russian behavior has 
changed little in the last few 
months, and Russian requests that 
the United Nations bdp it monitor 
the peace in the “near abroad” 
have been met with steady refusals. 

There is increasing; worry, how- 
ever, over Mr. Yeltsin’s weakening 
position and reports of bad health. 
While he is accustomed to interven- 
ing suddenly in governmental mat- 
ters with a quickly signed decree, 
which sometimes must be amended 
the next day, such incidents are 
occurring more often, and Mr. 
Yeltsin has been taking frequent 
rests. 


FISH* Disputes Fuel Naval Buildup 


one consulted the Foreign Ministry 
on anything of die kind. When such 
incidents occur, like tins one with 
the presidential order, we are pot in 
a very unpleasant situation.” 

As for Mr. Yeltsin, his spokes- 
man, Vyacheslav Kostikov, said 
Thursday that listing Sknmda had 
been a “t echnic al mistake, " since 
Russia and Latvia have already 
agreed to a four-year leasing ar- 
rangement for the early-warning 
station. 

“There is no question of creating 
any land of bases on the territory <rf 
Latvia,” Mr. Kostikov said. The 
other bases to be negotiated arc on 
the territory of the Commonwealth 
of Independent States, where Rus- 
sian troops continue to be sta- 
tioned, r emaining there after the 
collapse of the Soviet Union. 


Continued from Page 1 

nautical miles of their shores. How- 
ever, Joseph R, Morgan, a fellow in 
the program an international eco- 
nomics and politics at the East- 
West Center in Hawaii said that in 
cases where than were overlapping 
claim* or disagreements involving 
marine areas with valuable re- 
sources, the threat or use of naval 
force could be used to 'Influence 
the results.” 

Overfishing in Asia-Pacific wa- 
ters and the predatory operations 
of countries with large . trawling 
fleets, such as Thailand, Taiwan, 
China, Sooth Korea and Japan, 
have raised political tempers. 

Officials in Malaysia, Burma, In- 
donesia and Vietnam have accused' 
many Thai tra w lers and their crews 
of operating without regard to in- 
ternational law and of using force 
to evade anest 

Noting that a number of Thai 
trawlers were armed and larger 
than Malaysia’s existing naval pa- 
trol vessels, Mr. Napb said that 
some alro had “reinforced bows to 


enable them to ram oar patrol 
craft” 

He said that r amming had oc- 
curred on several occasions and in 
one incident last year two Malay- 
sian sailors who had boarded a 
Thai trawler as part of an arrest 
operation for poaching had been 
thrown overboard. One of the sail- 
ors drowned. 

“It’s a well-known fact that most 
of the prisons in the region are full 
of Thai fishermen” arrested for 
fishing illegally in other countries’ 
waters, Mr. Najib said. 

He said that hundreds of Thai 
poachers were in Malaysian jails. 

Tbe Vietnamese foreign minis- 
ter, Nguyen Manh Camh, said after 
a recent vial by Prime Minister 
Oman Leekpai of Thailand to Ha- 
noi that tin onus was on Thailand 
to control its fishing fleet. 

In January, the Indonesian Navy 
was called in after hundreds of lo- 
cal fishermen in more than 40 boats 
drove seven Thai trawlers into in- 
ternational waters after they were 
caught fishing dose to Aceh, on the 
northwest coast of S umatr a- 


U. 



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11 

1* 


[ Washington & World Business s, 

| THE OUTLOOK FOR GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP } 

I WASHINGTON, D.C. APRIL 2 1-2 2 , 1994 * j 


April 20 


Ronald H. Brown U.S. Secretary of Commerce, will be 
our guest speaker at tbe opening dinner to be held at the 
Corcoran Gallery of Art. 


April 21 


A FOREIGN POLICY FRAMEWORK FOR THE POST COLD WAR ERA 

■ Warren M. Christopher U.S. Secretary of State 

A REPUBLICAN RESPONSE 

■ Senator Malcolm Wallop R.. Wyoming 

BEYOND THE URUGUAY ROUND 

■ Ambassador Rufus Yerxa Deputy U.S. Trade 
Representative 

AMERICA'S GLOBAL TRADE OBJECTIVES: STRUGGLING 
TOWARDS EQUITY 

■ Senator Max Baucus D., Montana 

THE CLINTON ADMINISTRATION: SUCCESSES & SETBACKS 

■ Senator Nancy Landon Kassebaum R., Kansas 

THE CHANGING U.S. FINANCIAL SERVICES SECTOR 

■ Robert D. Hormats Vice Chairman. Goldman Sachs 
International 

THE INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS RACE 
& THE AMERICAN INFORMATION SUPERHIGHWAY 

■ Larry Irving Assistant Secretary for Communications 
& Information. U.S. Department of Commerce 

■ Gerald H. Taylor Executive Vice President. MCI 
Communications Services 

EXPANDING BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES IN THE MIDDLE EAST 

■ Amnofi Neubach Economic Minister. Embassy of Israel. 
U.SA. 

■ Sari Nusselbeh Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center. 
Washington, D.C. 

■ Toni VBrstandig Deputy Assistant Secretary. U.S. 
Department of State 

■ Mosbe Werthelm President. IsraehAmerican Chamber of 
Commerce & industry 

THE CHANGING BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT IN CENTRAL 
& EASTERN EUROPE 

m John Battay European Counsel. Shearman & Sterling. 
Budapest 

a Marcelo Selowsky Chief Economist for Europe & Central 
Asia, The World Bank 

m Frank Vargo Deputy Assistant Secretary. U.S. 

Department of Commerce 

HEALTH CARE REFORM: THE IMPLICATIONS FOR BUSINESS 

■ Gregory Lawler Head of the Health Care Campaign. 

The White House 

a Dana Priest Principal National Desk Reporter on 
Health Can? Reform. The Washington Post 
a Tom A. Scully Partner, Patton. Boggs & Blow, 

Washington. D.C. 

■ Donald Shriber Counsel, U.S. House of Representatives 
Committee on Energy and Commerce 


April 22 


THE ADMINISTRATION’S DOMESTIC ECONOMIC PROGRAM: 

IS IT ON TRACK? 

■ Robert E. Rubin Assistant to the President for Economic 
Policy 

AN OUTSIDER'S VIEW 

a Hobart Rowen Columnist. The Washington Post 
THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS: ARE THEY 
DOING THEIR JOB? 

■ H. Onno Rudlng Woe Chairman, Citicorp/Citibank 

U.S. ECONOMIC RELATIONS WITH EUROPE 

■ Lawrence H. Summers U.S. Under Secretary of the 
Treasury for International Affairs 

THE HEART OF THE MATTER: COMPETITIVENESS IN AMERICA. 
EUROPE & ASIA 

a Peter J. Neff President & Chief Executive Officer, 
RhdnePoulenc Inc. 

THE PRESIDENT’S ECONOMIC AGENDA 
a Roger C. Altman Deputy Secretary. Department of the 
Treasury 

Conference Location 

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-- V 



y 


ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUIVE, FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1994 



Page 5 - 


In Burma’s Far North 9 Reprieve From Decades of War 


^*5?? Shenon stream that borders their thatch-roof 

MYnvv^i A n ruw homes, 

world’s o!/W A 1 ® urm ^ — One of the D *w Khung Htoi is a member of the 
farmers in JSf 5 J liay ? ver - And rice Kachm, a mountain people who are one erf 
era tarv surroun ^ m 8 this north- the lar B csl ethnic groups in Burma. As die 

Se i?£ SS, lhal for ^ tended to the chickens that roam her gar- 
nieht with™* ,0* ?ey flWe to sleep at den * she didaot say which group took away 
fear lhe * tonsVnll the men of the village, the Burmese Army 
ntoram & ortheKariunrdidi 

. . there was a knock on the She would say only she was glad that the 


ethnic minorities — Christians, B uddhis ts 
and animisis — as different from one an- 
other as they are from the ethnic Burmese 
who dominate the government and mili- 
tary. 

The Kachin populate mountainous re- 


gions in the far north, in the foothills of the 
Himalayas. Many of the 1 J million Ka- 


y* ™* appa rently over, ended by a ceasc- 
KTinng HtoL 30 .TES!^ — Daw fil ^ bctween Burma’s military government 
tiny^mta-shad^ tiTW^’^. 1 Kawnan ’ a “ d the 8.000-soldier Kachin indepen- 

milw) north^f t SS! a SlS s ^ 5n S esl * *e a™? 1 


main market tow^ 3 ^^ ** Ze * m ' s 


JSTff**? ^ vi % e are as f amiliar 
< ? ack of Stm&e and mortar 
rounds as they are with the bubble ofthe 


insurgent groups still operating along the 
borders of Burma 

Since Burma won its independence from 
Britain in 1948, the army has been con- 
stantly at war with a welter of insurgent 


chin are Christians, a i 
of Western missionaries who once flocked 
to this predominantly B uddhis t land. 

The decades-old Insurgencies help ex- 
plain why Burma, despite great natural 
resources, is one of the poorest and most 
backward countries in Asa, with the army 


the only institution with real power. Battle- 
fields have at times consumed as mu 


ending because of the realization by both 
the rebels and the Burmese Army that 
neither side can hope to win. Several other 
ethnic groups — the Wa, the Kokang, the 
Palaung. the Shan — have already made 
peace with the junta. 

“This dvil war has been going on for so 
many years and both sides know that they 
are not able to achieve victory,” said the 
Reverend Saboi Juni, general secretary of 
the Kachin Baptist Convention and a me- 
diator between the government and the 
Kachin rebels. 

He insisted that the peace talks were not 
rebel arnr 


A few kilometers away, in from of an 
altar draped in pink silk, the parishioners 
of the Gets Baptist Church joined in Ka- 
chin-language hymns to celebrate the ces- 
sation of fi tting . 

“By the grace of God we will have peace 
in the Kachin State." said the Reverend 
K_ R. Zau Nan. 

“In my lifetime, this is the best situation 
we Kachin have ever had." 

A cease-fire has been in place since Oc- 
tober, when the powerful head of Burmese 


Balladur Tells China 
France Won’t Push 
Human Rights Issue 


mOitaiy intelligence, lieutenant Genera] 
Kbin Nyunt, visited the Kachin state and 


much as a 

third of the country. 

The war with the Kachin appears to be 


a defeat for the rebd army, which lost offered “national reconciliation among na- 
thousands of its soldiers in rattle. tional brethren." 

“The civil war goes cm for 33 years and _ A final peace agreement is expected to 
nobody wins," he said. "Only the people give the Kachin some autonomy over trade 
suffer. The people are weary of the war." and education in their region. 


Compiled by Our Stag From Dispatches 

BEIJING — Prime Minister 
Edouard Balladur of France gave 
assurances Thursday that France 
would not ‘’interfere” in China's 
internal affairs, including the hu- 
man rights issue, a Chinese official 
stud. 

Offered at the start of an official 
visit here, the assurances followed a 
statement by the French foreign 
minister, Alin Juppe, that French 



Erik dc CaMm/HcMcn 


LAST-MINUTE ATTITUDE ADJUSTMENT — A Vietnamese officer rearranging the cap of an honor guard member prior to 
tfae start of a welcoming ceremony for Prime Minister Carl B3dt of Sweden at the presidential palace in Hanoi on Tfaimsday. 


U.S. Sanctions Urged on Taiwan Wildlife Exports 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

New York Times Sendee 

WASHINGTON — An interagency commit- 
tee has recommended to President Bui Clinton 
that he impose trade sanctions on Taiwan /dr 
illegal trafficking in rhinoceros horns and tiger 
bones, but forgo for now imposing similar sano- 
tions on China, which has also been accused of 
involvement in the trade of exotic wildlife parts. 

White House officials said that the interagen- 
cy recommendation had not yet gone to the 
president's desk, but that he was expected to 
deal with it soon. 

If he went ahead with the recommendation, it 
would mark the first time that the United Stales 
has imposed sanctions on another country for 
trafficking in endangered species. 

Adminis tration officials said that the sane-, 
tions against Taiwan would hkdy be laigdy 
symbolic. The United States would bar au of 
Taiwan’s wQdhfe product exports, which total 


slightly less than $25 milli on a year to the 
United States. 

U.S. officials say the case highlights the 
growmg awareness that as trade becomes more 
global, the environmental impact can be enor- 
mous. They say governments most be increas- 
ingly prepared to use trade measures to protect 


is 


with developing 
countries, which fear that talk about linking 
trade and die environment is a veil for industri- 
alized nations to protect certain markets by 
imposing onerous environmental conditions on 
trade. 


iy used in Asia as medicinal potions and 
aphrodisiacs. In addition, advances in hunting 
and (he marke ting of wddlffe in recent years 
haveririven tigers and rhin oceroses almost to 
extinction. 

The world’s tiger population is estimated to 
have fallen from 100,000 to 5,000 in the 20th 


century. The rhinoceros population has also 
been de cimate d, with wildlife experts estimat- 
ing that only about 10,000 survive in the wild. 

- Administration offi cials insist that the deci- 
sion to recommend sanctions against Taiwan, 
and not China, was made not out of a desire to 
avoid offending Beijing, but because the Chi- 
. nese authorities had taken some steps at Wash- 
ington’s behest to limit the trafficking of tiger 
and rhinoceros parts, while Taiwan had not. 

Some wildlife officials, however, say the 
trade in tiger and rhinoceros parts has not been 
adequately reduced in China, despite what ap- 
pears to be the start of a real effort to deal with 
the issue. 

In 1993, South Korea, which also practices 
traditional medicine, imported 1 J urns of tiger 
bones from China, after that country had 
banned tiger exports, according to South Kore- 
an records. It takes more than 200 tigers to 
produce U tons of bones, wfldhfe experts say. 


BOOKS 


NEW & COLLECTED 
POEMS 


WHAT THEY RE READING 


By Geoffrey Hill 228. $29.95. 
Paperback, $14.95. Houghton 
Mifflin. 


Reviewed by 
Michael Dirda 


L AST December, in Book 
World’s holiday feature about 
writers who deserve the Nobel 
Prize, the poet and man erf letters 
Donald Hall named Geoffrey Hffl 
“the best English poet of the 20th 
century." Many readers, Fm sure, 
were taken aback by the awful dar- 
ing of this sweeping assertion. Bet- 
ter than Auden? Better than Lar- 
kin? Better than Graves, Lawrence 
and Housman? Just who was this 


• Ebiite Steinbeck is reading 
"John Steinbeck: A Biogvqjhy" by 
Jay ParinL 

“I couldn’t be happier. I like it 
better than any other bode ever 
written about my husband." 

(Miranda Haines, IHT) 


and the lost delicate stators who 
could sing. 

“The Eve of Saint Mark" 


Geoffrey HOI that weshonldbe so 
mindfuic 


Hfll 


Crack of a starting-pistol Jean Jau- 
ris 

dies in a wine-puddle . . . 
DidPeguy kin J aura. f Did he incite 
the assassin? Must men stand by 
what they write 

as bv their camp-beds or their weap- 

— j onry 

Though only 200 pages tong. ^ shell-shocked comrades while they 
ill's “New and Collected Poems ^ 


of government, the shadowy in- 
scrutabilities of the sooL About all 
these matters, about even the very 
art be practices, HID remains im- 
passioned but deeply ambivalent; 
In one of his essays be quotes Cole- 
ridge's observation that “poetry — 
excites us to artificial feelings — 
makes us callous to real ernes." Lit- 
tle wonder that tins transplanted 
Brit is now a inriveisity professor of 
both English literature and religion 
(at Boston University). 

The jacket of a previous edition 
of HHTs work blazoned forth a 
painting of a man and a winged 
being, possrWy Jacob and the an- 

been, untouchable you were not") ^^•^ wiesUi S or 

dense, HHTs lyrics look Wee emt ^ r ? cmg? _9 r u 
md “• “■ 

^'itaxjghaul his oeuvre Hill faces ***** rmd a better, richer image 





mindful of him? Happily, Hall end- 
ed his pitch by mentionm* that 


Hill’s collected poetry i 
published early this year. 


be 


those mysteries that trouble most 
of us: religious faith and doubt, the 
horrors of war and genocide, the 
past’s inexorable putt, the twists 
and betrayals of language, the cor- 
ruption of noble causes, the nature 


for the reader overwhelmed by 
Geoffrey HfiTs powerful and se- 
ductive poems. 


Michael Dirda is on the staff of 
The Washington Post. 


represents 40 years’ wok; five pre- 
viously issued volumes, supple-, 
mented by a dozen or sonew po- 
ems. I was momentarily chagnnea 
to see that Hill dedicates the vol- 
ume to Donald HalL and 1 fater 
discovered that the two are old 
friends. No matter. Geoffrey Hnl 
lives up to his advance notice. 1 ms 
is as thrilling a book of poems as 

one will ever read. . 

Actually. Hill’s particular fine- 
ness — a haiku-like profundity to 
each exacting word, coupled with a 
spiritual seriousness ami 
door outlook on life — • tong 

been recognized. Harold Bloom, 
Christopher Ricks, John Baytey 
and many other eminences agree 
about the severe beauty of HDls 
language — and the slipperiness of 
his meaning. Certainly his poans, 
steeped in history, blood and amb - 
gudty, make some tough demands 
l the reader, but they also display 


“The Mystery of the 
Charity of Charles Pegny” 


BRIDGE 


Why do I hare to relive even now. 
Your mouth, and your hand 


By Alan Truscott 


running over me 

Deft as a heard, like a smew oj 
water? . 

“A Song from Armenia 

Most erf us, and most poets too, 
write slackly compared to this state- 
ly muse. Seamus Heaney, who 
should know, rightly says, “Hill ad- 
dresses the language . . . hke a ma- 
son addrtssmg a block. . . - Words 
in his poetry fall slowly and 
tike molten solder, and 
to a dull glowing nub." 

Resolutely counter to the tenor of 
our poetic times. Hill eschews the 
lax and confesatmaL Indeed, he has 
nothing but scorn for those who 
suppose “that the poem is merely a 

vessel to contain the spontaneous 


jP OR anyone who owns a set of 




most other verse looks pale, under- 
nourished and mumportani- 
A few snippets will show what J 
mean, though one does violence ip 
these tightly packed poems, mW 
every rift loaded with ore. by tag* 
lighting the more obvious beauties. 

Yourghoto-albims loved by the bey- 

preserved sepia waiergfoss the souls 
of distant cousins, virgin nil they aea 


jw ... ’HBJ may occasion- 

ally use Ins childhood, as'he does in 
“Mercian Hymns" (stunning prose 
noons that blur the life of the an- 
oent King Offa wiih that of Oe 
H%. but be dc«to«th 

ie same passionate conmdheM- 


rrJ* savage moments. (Cbnader 


causL with its daddy punning 
lure; “Undesirable yon may hare 


_ duplicate boards — eight will 
do in a ranch — it makes sense to 
gather aght players for a social 
evening of home duplicate. You 
can play a straight head-to-head 
tram game, or players can have an 
individual, which requires knowi- - 
fri g* of the appropriate movemenL 
The diagramed deal from such a 
game was played in early 1993. 
Larry Markes sat South and was 
the declarer in four spades. A dub 
was led to the ace, and East shifted 
to the heart ten. 

South won with the ace and set 
about trying to score as many 
trump tricks as possible. He 
crossed lo die spade king, ruffed a 
dub and returned to the spade ace; 
reaching this position; 

NORTH • 

*52 
v 96 
0 83 
*Q!9 

EAST 
♦ - 

•CK82 
.O Q 10 7 4 

*8 

SOUTH 

* J 18 
v> J5 
0 A K 6 2 

* — 


Now South ruffed a chib, cashed 
bis diamond winners and ruffed a 
diamond. Then another dub was 
raffed, and dummy’s last trump 
scores en passant Markes thought 
he might nave gained for his team, 
but virtue had to be its own reward. 
In the replay the South cards were 
played by John Swanson. After get- 
ting some help in the heart suit be 
played similarity to make an over- 
trick. 


NORTH 

* A K 5 2 
9984 
*83 

* Q 10 9 4 


WEST 
*Q86 
<?Q73 
0 J95 

*K J62 


EAST 

*3 

C K 10 8 2 
9 Q 10 7 4 
* A 8 7 5 


SOUTH <D> 

* J10B74 
■7 A J 5 

❖ AK02 

*3 


WEST 

*Q 

UQ3 
0 J95 
*KJ 


Both sides were vulnerable The 
bidding: 


south 

l * 
4* 


West 

Pass 

Pas 


North 

3* 

Pas 


East 

Pass 

Pass 


Wes led tee club ram. 


Hong Kong Sees a New Threat 

China’s Jailing of Reporter Heightens Fears Over 1997 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribute 

HONG KONG — Fears for 
Hon g Kong's legal protections un- 
der Chinese rule have been bright- 
ened by the harsh prison sentence 
imposed on a reporter for a 
Kong newspaper who was < 
of spying in Beijing. 

Many people here see the impris- 
onment of the reporter, XI Yang, as 
a threat to Hong Kong’s way of life 
once the territory reverts to Chi- 
nese sovereignty m 1997. 

“This has touched a raw nerve in 
Hong Kong." said a political com- 
mentator, T. L Trim, of Mr. XTs 
secret trial and 12-year sentence. 

“There is increased awareness of 
the issue of press freedom in Hong 
Kong," said Mr. Trim. “But it goes 
beyond that. There is deep concern 
about China's judicial system and 
Hong Kong’s future." 

The Australian foreign minis ter, 
Gareth Evans, said of the sentence: 
“On the surface it does appear an 
extraordinarily severe term and, an 
the face of it, it does seem to have 
an element of sending a t»*s«*e* to 
Hong Kong." 

“It is both unnecessary and un- 
fortunate," he added. 

Mr. Evans stopped in Hong 
Kong after a visit to China, where 
the discussion of human rights is- 
sues figured heavily in his meetings 
with Chinese leaders. 

To protest the secret trial and 
March 28 sentencing, three senior 
editors and several colleagues of 
Mr. Xi. a Chinese citizen working 
for the Hong Kong newspaper 
Ming Pao Daily, began a hunger 
strike Thursday night 

Although the paper had taken a 
low-profile approach to Mr. Xi’s 
arrest and six months' detention 
for obtaining information about 
China’s central bank policies and 


future sales of gold reserves, its 
editors are now at the vanguard of 
public protest. 

“We didn’t want to see the issue 
bring politicized in the tense atmo- 
sphere of the Sino-British row,” 
said the paper’s executive chief edi- 
tor, Cheung King-bor. “But now 
the 12-year sentence has told us the 
method we tried in the past was 
useless." Mr. Cheung’s comments 
Thursday came during interviews 
with local newspapers. 

Anson Chan, Hong Kong’s chief 
secretary and deputy to the gover- 
nor, said: “There lias been wide- 
spread dismay m response to the 
treatment mapped out to Xi 
Yang." 

“We have many reporters going 
about their legitimate business in 
China. ” Mrs. Chan said. “They 
need to know dearly what the rales 
governing news gathering in China 
are, so that (hey can ensure that 
they comply with these rales." 

Beijing already undo- interna- 
tional pressure ova - the arrest of 
China’ s most prominent political 
dissident, Wei Jingsheng, and his 
secretary, Tong Yi is refusing to 
elaborate on Mr. Xi’s case. 

“I don’t think there’s any need 
for further clarification," a Chinese 
Foreign Ministry spokesman said 
at a weekly news briefing. Reuters 
reported from Beijing. 

“This case has been decided be- 
cause be stole national secrets of 
China, and he was given a criminal 
punishment by Chinese judicial or- 

E " said tire spokesman, Wu 
sin. “This is within China’s 
sovereignty." 

With British diplomatic efforts 
limited by Mr. Xfs Chinese nation- 
ality, the Hong Kong community is 
looting to local pn>China political 
Figures to intercede in the dispute. 
“Someone has to get the message 


through to Beijing," said Emily 
Lau, a Legislative Council member. 
“This incident is having a lot of 
repercussions in the community." 

Evidence that self-censorship by 
local journalists and media propri- 
etors alike is growing in Hong 
Kong has sparked concern about 
the future of the colony's indepen- 
dent press. 

The hire of expanding into the 
Chinese market has proven too 

Hong Ivong to risk Beijing's ire 
with aggressive reporting on Chi- 
nese affairs. 

But the depth of public concern 
over the Xi Yang case may force 
proprietors and pro-China politi- 
cians running in future elections to 
take a stance that may prove unpal- 
atable to Bering. 

“People in Hong Kong now feel 
it’s not just the problem of Xi Y ana 
or Ming Pao Daily or journalists 
only,” said Daisy Li, head of the 
Hong Kong Journalists Associa- 
tion. “They see this and wonder 
what mil be the fate of Hong Kong 
after 1997." 


Prague Moves to Block 
Military Exports to Iran 


The Associated Press 

PRAGUE — The Czech govern- 
ment has blocked the export of 
military technology to Iran bring 
planned by a military trading 
group, a Defense Ministry official 
said Thursday. 

The RDP Group associating 40 
Czech arms producers applied ear- 
lier this year for a license to export 
maintenance technology for Sovi- 
et-designed T-72 tanks to Iran, the 
Defense Ministry said. But the deal 
was blocked by the government . 


officials would express their dissat- 
isfaction with Chinese treatment of 
political dissenters. 

Mr. Juppi said the French in' 1 
tended “to say in our talks with 
Chinese officials that this problem 
concerns us." He' said they would 
“possibly give lists of names to 
draw their attention to individual 
prisoners, as we have done in many 
other countries." The foreign min- 
ister's remarks were in an interview 
published Thursday by the Paris 
newspaper Liberation. 

After Mr. Bahadur’s opening 
meeting with Prime Minister Li 
Peng, the spokesman for the Chi- 
nese Foreign Ministry said the 
French prime minister had stated 
that “France has no intention of 
interfering in the internal affairs of 
other countries and France is will- 
ing to discuss the issues with other 
countries on an equal footing.” 

The spokesman, Wu Jianmin, 
said Mr. Balladur’s comment came 
as the two leaders discussed ^»™n 
rights at a meeting of their defla- 
tions. “It is obvious that China mid 
France have different views on the 
human rights issue,” Mr. Wu said. 
“We also noted that the French 
side will not interfere in the inter- 
nal affairs of other countries.” 

The spokesman said Mr. Baha- 
dur did not bring up the arrest last 
week of C hina ’s most prominent 
dissident, Wei Jingsheng. 

Bernard Brigouleix, a French 
spokesman, said Mr. Balladur had 
stated that France “has a tradition- 
al interest in human rights every- 
where in the world." 

Mr. Brigouleix also said Mr. Li 
had agreed to his suggestion of a 
private meeting to discuss human 
rights, including the issue of Tibet, 
but gave no details. 

Mr. Balladur s visit is the first to 
China in 16 years by a French bead 
of government. It comes at a time 
when France is seeking outlets for 
its exports as a way of reviving a 
depressed economy. 

In contrast to its evident satisfac- 
tion with the French approach, the 
Chinese Foreign Ministry said 
Thursday that U.S. expressions of 
concern about Mr. Wa constituted 
meddling in China’s affairs. 

“It is China's internal affair that 
China's public security organs are 
interrogating Wei Jingsheng ac- 
cording to the law,” the ministry 
said. “It is inappropriate for any 
foreign country to make irresponsi- 
ble remarks on this matter.” 

Mr. Wu, declared that Mr. Wei 
“has broken the law and must be 
prosecuted.” 

{AFP, Reuters, A?) 







■ - v 'A#': 


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^ Page 6 


FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1994 

OPINION 


Hera lb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Eribunc 


PUBLISHED wrra THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Don’t Let Hamas Prevail 


. Hamas again proves that it is good at kflfing 
innocents. Bui how good is the Islamic resis- 
tance movement at politics? Hie car bomb for 
which it solicited credit oo Wednesday was 
intended, Hamas said, to disrupt the autono- 
my bandwagon. In fact, it appears that many 
Palestinians favor the autonomy now on the 
cusp of completion by Palestinian and Israeli 
negotiators. They see it as woefully short of 
immediate statehood but better than contin- 
ued Israeli occupation. By its terrorism, Ha- 
mas may be flouting not so much the Israeli 
will as the Palestinian will Whether the orga- 
nization diminish es or strengthens itself in its 
political competition with Yasser Arafat's 
mainstream PLO is the question of the hour. 

After the atrocity by an Israeli terrorist in 
Hebron on Feb. 25, tire general expectation set 
in that there would be a high-visibility Palestin- 
ian response. Hie bomb at Afula, north of 
Jerusalem, may be it, although one hesitates to 
conclude that the savage cycle of violence is at 
an end. Just as the Hebron crime allowed 
Israel’s leadership to isolate Israeli extremists', 
however, so the crime in Afula challenges the 
Palestinian leadership to do the same. It can do 


so by combating terrorism and keeping negoti- 
ations on trade. If it succeeds, then the pro- 
spects of political coexistence between Arabs 
and Israelis may yet be advanced by these 
back-to-back events, horrendous as they arc. 

At least until Wednesday, the beginning of 
the end of the Israeli occupation was only 
days away. It is still in Israel’s interest to stay 
on schedule. To ease the rage that makes the 
occupation dangerous to Israelis as well as 
Palestinians, thing s must change on the 
ground. That means pulling out Israeli troops 
and i nstalling self-rule promptly in, first, 
Gaza and Jericho. Not all die burden falls on 
the two parties. Other Arab states are moving 
too slowly to deal Israel openly into regional 
affairs. Prospective donors to a new Palestine 
cannot fall behind the pace of Palestinian 
readiness. Syria, Jordan and Lebanon must 
catch up at their respective peace tables. But 
already Israel and the PLO were starring to 
beef up the content of autonomy and to take 
on issues (land use, water.) barring cm the 
next-stage final-status agenda. Afula cannot 
be allowed to break the negotiators' stride. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


China Makes It Difficult 


Beijing’s domestic political anxieties proba- 
bly explain the latest charges against Wei 
Jingsheng, C hina ’s leading democracy cam- 
paigner, and the criminal investigation of his 
office assistant, Tong YL Deng Xiaoping has 
always put political control ahead of China’s 
international reputation, and Mr. Wei. fear- 
■lessly outspoken since his release from a long 
prison tom last fall, has had a special knack 
for getting under the paramount leader’s skin. 
In fact, Mr. Deng is widely reported to have 
boasted to party colleagues a few years back 
that the indifferent reaction of foreign govern- 
ments to Mr. Wei’s earlier incarceration 
proved that China could take a hard line on 
dissent without damaging its basic interests. 

But this time Beijing may have miscalculat- 
ed, badly. Mr. Wei is too symbolically impor- 
tant, and the May deadline set by the Clinton 
administration for deciding the future of U.S.- 
Chinese trade relations too near at hand, for 
Washington to look the other way again. Con- 
gress and American public opinion would 
rightly see such a show of indifference as 
legalistic hypocrisy. 

Beijing has correctly concluded that the 
Qinton administration — including human 
rights champions in the Stale Department as 
well as trade and economic officials — is 
looking for a plausible way to justify renewing 
favorable tariff status this year. With that goal 
in mind. Secretary of State Warren Christo- 
pher has been scrambling to portray his recent 
bumpy visit to Beijing as a pragmatic success. 
But Beijing's latest high-profile crackdown — 


which also includes a draconian sentence im- 
posed on a Hong Kong journalist this week — 
threatens to make full renewal of China's 
trade privileges politically impossible. 

That is surely not what Beijing wants. Chi- 
na, despite its public posture of indifference, 
knows that the economic development plans an 
which the Communist regime's survival de- 
pends would be devastated by trade sanctions. 
But without some timely bdp from Beijing, die 
Qinton administration could be forced into 
imposing those sanctions, harming American 
economic interests as well as Chinese. 

The freedom of Wei Jingsheng is not one of 
the explicit conditions that Bffl Clinton set 
down last May as the baas for deciding 
whether to renew China’s trade privileges be- 
fore they run out tins July. On the two abso- 
lute conditions, policing prison labor exports 
and p u ra vin g freer emigration, China is al- 
ready within reach of compliance. The other 
conditions deal with issues like treatment of 
Tiananmen Square prisoners, respect for the 
Universal Declaration of H uman Rights 
(which includes the right of aD people to 
freedom of opinion and expression), honoring 
the distinctive traditions of Tibet and ending 
the j ammin g of Voice of America broadcasts. 
On these, nothing more is required than a 
j udgmen t call by the secretary of state tlyu 
there has been overall, significant progress. 

But that judgment call will be hard to make, 
and to sustain in Confess, if China continues 
its provocative campaign against all dissent 
— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Govermneiit at Its Worst 


Millions of Sudanese are hungry, displaced 
or in full flight to other countries. The econo- 
my is in a free-fall brought on by horrendous 
mismanag ement and a ruinous 10-year-old 
civil war. Yet the Sudanese government offers 
an astonishingly positive assessment of its 
performance. Authorities in Khartoum say 
Sudan offers a model of a successful Islamic 
revolution that other Islamic nations will 
want to emulate. The suffering and misery of 
the Sudanese people speak otherwise. 

When it cxxnes to the abuse of human rights, 
the government of Sudan has few sovereign 
peers. From summary executions to torture 
and other cruel and degrading treatment to the 
practice of the slave trade, Sudan ranks right up 
there with the worst practitioners. Freedom of 
association, and conscience are honored in the 
breach. To fredy practice one's own religion in 
Sudan, when the religion is non-Islamic, is to 
invite intimidation and harassment. And Suda- 
nese children, it seems, have borne the brunt of 
their government's excesses, being made vic- 
tims themselves of slave trafficking. Cases of 
flagrant abuses have been documented and 
highlighted by the United Nations Human 
Rights Commission as well as the Gin ton ad- 


ministration — all to little avaiL In the face of 
evidence erf rights violations or a llegatio ns erf 
support for terrorism, Sudan contmnes to re- 
sort to weak rationalizations and de ni al s on a 
scale dial would embarrass most nations. 

Nothing seems to faze the authorities in 
Khartoum. Sudan points with pride to its isola- 
tion from international credit m arkets and to 
the fact that it is one erf the few countries in 
the world with no foreign reserves. The World 
Bank will not do business with the Sudanese, 
and the International Monetary Fund is 
poised to pm them out the door. In fact, 
economic conditions are so dire that even with 
decent crop production, export earnings are 
wiped out with the purchase of the small 
quantities of oil and gas that are used to keep 
the country’s wheels barely turning. 

For all the sorrows that the government is 
heaping upon its own people, Sudan pretends 
it is the envy of the Islamic world. In fact, it is 
woefully out of step with other nations that 
respect the rights and freedoms of all people 
within their borders. In its present form, Su- 
dan does indeed offer a model It is the epit- 
ome of government at its worst 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Labor Standards: No Easy Way 

The move by the United Slates and France 
to make market-opening in rich countries con- 
ditional an the developing world adopting 
“universally recognized” labor standards and 
Other, as yet unspecified, social reforms is arbi- 
trary and deplorable. Coming just days before 
the Uruguay Round package is to be signed at 
the GATT ministerial meeting in Marrakesh, it 
amounts to a last-ditch attempi to keep the 
protectionist option open. 

This is quite apart from the fact there already 
exists a body — the International Labor Orga- 
nization —whose mandate is precisely to push 
for certain mnrim um labor standards around 
the world. It is not dear why its territory should 
be taken over by GATT or the soon to be 
formed Wodd Trade Organization. 

What of the economic and humanitarian 
merits of linking trade with labor standards? 
At first sight, these may appear obvious. Who 


would object to, say, putting an end to child 
labor? But the reality in the developing world 
is complicated- We are talking about coun- 
tries where governments do not have the fi- 
nancial or administrative resources to ba3d 
elaborate social safety nets; where families, 
not factories, are usually the baric unit of 
production; where the choice is often between 
a child working and a child starving; and 
where the legislation of minimum wages in the 
presence of a huge mass of surplus labor 
would throw tens of millions out of work. 

In the last century, things were not much 
different in the United Stales or Europe. Mech- 
anisms of social protection evolved as those 
societies became more prosperous and sophisti- 
cated. In much of the developing world that 
same evolution is now taking place. Yes, there 
are countries where it needs to be speeded up. 
But threatening such countries with cutting off 
access to markets is hardly the way forward. 

— Business Tunes (Singapore). 



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Appeasers 
Score an 
Own Goal 

By Josef Joffe 

M UNICH — Where is Winston 
Churchill when we need him? 
The great wartime leader stood ready 


English won’t resist and certainly 
won’t invade. They have canceled a 
soccer match against Germany in 
Berlin for fear of neo-Nazi violence. 

O JL, April 20 is not just any date 
in the calendar. It happens to be the 
birthday of the late and unlamemed 
Fflhrer. Also, the chance of violence 
was real, given that Nazi punks from 
all over Germany were planning to 
converge on Berlin for some memo a 
mono celebrations complete with 
beer bottles and baseball bats. 

Still, the day will live in infamy, to 
borrow a Hne from Churchill's World 
War II colleague Franklin Roosevelt 
And the decision to cancel the match 
is not just a British failure. British 
reluctance to get caught in (he cross 
fire between neo-Nazis and German 
anti-Nazi demonstrators is ah the 
more understandable in that En glish 
dubs — more precisely, their hooli- 
gan fans — 5tiU nave a fearful reputa- 
tion to live down. After the Heysel 


stadium mayhem in Brussels in 1985, 
English duos were banned from £u- 


Fated to live With a Nuclear-Armed North Korea? "raffissitfs 


C ANBERRA — As the Korean 
crisis deepens, the international 
community confronts the bleak reali- 
ty that none of the policy options 
currently being canvassed is likely to 
prevent North Korea from acquiring 
midear weapons, if it has not already 
made a couple of erode bombs. 

So far, U.S. policy has been to 
tempt Pyongyang with the offer of 
political and economic rewards in ex- 
change for abandoning its nuclear 

cal enough, rince^eec^^yof^ 
world’s last Stalinist state is m deep 
crisis. To get the external economic 
assistance that it desperately needed. 
North Korea had to submit to rigor- 
ous international inspections, not 
just erf the nuclear facilities it has 
declared to the International Atomic 
Energy Agency but also of any sus- 
pect undeclared rites. 


By Andrew Mack 


However, for three years Pyong- 
yang has stalled and hedged cm the 
inspection issue. 

Optimists, whose number included 
much of official Washington, argued 
that the North was “playing the nu- 

Bombing would not knock 
out secret underground 
facilities that might exist, 

dear card" and that once it had ex- 
tracted maximum concessions from 
the United States h would concede 
on the inspection issue. But Pyong- 
yang has never given the slightest hint 
that it would be willing in any cir- 
pn instances to agree to mtrnsfve spe- 


sUe^&itbout such inspections, no 
one can be sure that the North has no 
clandestine nuclear facilities. 

The reality is that the beleaguered 
S talinis t regime sees acquisition of 
nuclear weapons as a viral national 
security interest — an interest far 
more important than acquiring exter- 
nal economic assistance. 

The North perceives itself to be 
threatened by U.S. nuclear weapons, 
and by the military forces of the 
fonth as the conventional military 
balance on the peninsula moves inex- 
orably in the latter’s favor. Pyong- 
yang is also acutely conscious of the 
loss of its nodear ally since the col- 
lapse erf the Soviet Union. 

Nuclear weapons offer the North 
a relatively cheap strategic equalizer 


White House Distraction Does Matter 


By Flora Lewis 

P ARIS — The press frenzy about Whitewater seems 
to have subsided for the moment, but it would be a 
mistake for people outride the United States to think 
that the storm has passed and they can forget about iL 
It is sure to distract American and White House atten- 
tion for some time to come, and thal is the biggest single 
impediment now to American action in world affairs. 

A special investigation is under way, and both the 
House and the Senate plan their own bearings, tele- 
vised, so the worst of the spectacle is yet to crane 
regardless of what is learned. A perverse attitude has 
taken hold in Washington. There is no evidence of 
crime, bnt that is not blowing the scandal away. On the 
contrary, it is taken as a sign that probers must dig 
deeper because heinous facts are so well buried. 

This reaction is akin to the reennent Kennedy assas- 
sination plot theories holding that since there has never 
been the slightest proof of a conspiracy, it must have 
been terribly broad and sinister to remain hidden. 

Of course, the murder was a crime, and both Richard 
Nixon’s Watergate and Ronald Reagan’s Iran-contra 
scandals started with much lessee yet still dearly iden- 
tifiable illegal acts. But nothing like that has surfaced 
with Whitewater. It is all atmosphere and shadowy 
suspicion, nothing to do with policy or even the White 
House, except that the Clintons moved there from the 
governor’s mansion in Arkansas 
But the brouhaha about Qinton finances more than 
a decade ago has necessarily become a presidential 
concern about running for reflection in 1 996, and that 
is what it is really all about. 

Wihy-mpy, it is taking precious White House time 
and attention away from urgent affairs of state. How 
much more Bill Qinton would be involving himself in 
critical foreign issues otherwise is hard to say. 

He started out determined to give priority to the 
economy and social questions. He learned soon enough 
that even the economy was inextricably linked with 
foreign relations, and mat crises abroad would neither 
untangle themselves nor quietly wait their turn for an 
American decision on whether and how u> intervene. 

He was moving to an awareness that it is both 
dangerous and against U.S. interest to leave the vacu- 


um that American passivity creates in how the world is 
run. He has organized his government, however, in a 
manner suitable for a president who wants to take a 
strong, dominant band in wodd affairs, like a Roose- 
velt and not like an Eisenhower, with an executive 
officer and not a concept man as secretary of state. 

Both he and Secretary of State Warren Christopher 
understand that the world has changed since the Cold 
War and that, as Mr. Christopher said recently, 
“we’re now in an uncharted area where we have to 
define the national interest much more broadly." It 
cannot be done in a ample word or sentence, the 
secretary said, listing six priorities. 

They are the right ones, and while one may disagree 
with the order, (hey reflect Qinton administration 


acceptance that the United States has to show active 
concern if it wants a world climate in which it can 
reshape America as it seeks. 

As Mr. Christopher named them, they are: global 
growth to promote economic security; Russian reform 
to prevent a new confrontation; ‘‘modernizing’’ NATO 
ana relations with Europe; Asia — particularly China 
and Japan; the Middle East, to promote peace; and the 

latiotifnonprolfferatioti. narcotics and terrorism. 

It’s a big menu, and delivery rakes constant, hands- 
on, top-level effort 

A French analyst commenting the other day on 


Clinton were putting die energy into a Middle East 


siveaess turned Sarajevo and Bosnia around, but they 
have not followed up enough to keep progress on trade. 
There arc other examples of Qinton starts, now freeing. 

That is the importance of Whitewater, noi that it 
da m ages a lively president’s image but that it takes his 
mind and therefore public attention away from what 
be should be encouraged to do. America's partners in 
the world can lose by iL They need to allow for it and, 
to the extent they can, clamor loudly enough fra die 
American press to notice what is being overlooked. 

O Flora Lewis. 


Help Can Work in Renascent Cambodia 


P HNOM PENH — Cambodia is 
recovering much faster from two 
decades of death and destruction 
than many thought possible just a 
year ago. The country was then in 
the midst of a turbulent campaign 
for elections in May, supervised by 
the United Nations but boycotted 
by the Khmer Rouge. 

Despite Khmer Rouge intimida- 
tion and harassment, survivors of the 
killing fields turned out in strength. 
More than 90 percent of registered 
voters went to the polls. A democrat- 
ic government was formed and a con- 
stitutional monarchy adopted. 

Norodom Sihanouk, who was king 
of Cambodia in the 1940s and ’50s. 
was elected to the throne a gain He is 
to return to Phnom Penh this Friday 
after treatment for cancer in China. 
As long as be lives, he wiB provide the 
nation with a sense of stability and 
confidence. But it is important that a 
succession plan be agreed upon to 
ensure continuity. 

Cambodia’s coalition government 
faced two major problems when it 
came to power last year; the Khmer 
Rouge and tire parlous stale of the 
economy. The lOuner Rouge danger 
appears to have been greatly reduced, 
and the economy is improving. 

The once fearsome Communist 
group, responsible for the deaths of 
perhaps as many as 3 million people, 
is being marginalized The Khzner 
Rouge made a fatal mistake by first 
boycotting and trying to sabotage the 
UN-supervised elections, then seek- 
ing to be part of the government. 

Government faces have recently 
overrun Khmer Rouge strongholds in 
the west and southwest — including 
the most important center, Pailin. 


By Sichan Sxv 

which gave the guerrillas access to 
miEonsof dollars in rax revenue from 
valuable g«n mining and lo gg ing. 

China stopped supporting the 
Khmer Rouge after the Paris peace 
accords of 1991. Tbe Thai govern- 
ment has said it will abide by the 
agreemenL Without extensive back- 
ing from outside and from the Cam- 
bodian people, Khmer Rouge troops 
have no chance of retaking power. 

With the security situation improv- 
ing, it is time for Cambodia to press 
ahead with moves to eradicate cor- 
ruption, improve the efficiency of 
government, introduce sound eco- 
nomic development policies and 
spread the benefits of growth from 
urban centers into the countryside to 
ensure that radical groups like the 
Khmer Rouge no longer have tegiti- 
mate grievances to exploit. 

Some stew have already been tak- 
en by the Phnom Penh administra- 
tion. A new investment law allows 
foreign companies to repatriate pro- 
fits and have long-term land teases. 
The National Bonk of Cambodia has 
been able to stabilize the currency, 
the riel: for the past six months, offi- 
cial and unofficial rates have been 
kepi at about Z500 riels to the dollar. 

If the country is to regain over the 
next five years tbe level of prosperity 
it had in the mid-1960s, foreign aid 
and investment will be needed. Tie 
Clinton administration has main- 
tained the US. commitment to help 
Cambodia that was started with the 
Reagan and Bush administrations. 
Through the International Confer- 
ence for the Reconstruction of Cam- 


bodia, which met recently in Tokyo, 
the United States has provided aid 
amounting to more than $135 million. 

There are considerable investment 
opportunities. Cambodia needs many 
thmgs. from consumer goods and 
medicine to electricity, tdecommuai- 
catioos and major infrastructure. It 
has many resources to pay for imports 
and attract investment 

Tourism could be a major currency 
earner. There is great scope for min- 
ing, fishing, agriculture ami agribusi- 
nesses. In the late 1960&, Cambodia 
was a big rice exporter. Oil and gas 
have recently been found, although it 
is too early to know whether they 
exist In commercial quantities. 

The government is fighting corrup- 
tion. Contracts and licenses with bo 
benefit to the country, and those ap- 
proved under the table, are being 
reviewed. Officials involved in graft 
are being punished. As state revenues 
increase, more pay can be given to 
civil servants, the mititaiy and the 
police. Qean leadership will also help 
eliminate corruption. 

Many Cambo dians who have lived 
and worked in the West are returning 
to assist in the reconstruction and 
development of their country. They 
can provide a bridge between a low- 
cost work force that is eager to be 
trained, and foreign capital mid know- 
how which can help to ensure that 
Cambodia will never return to the 
dark night erf civil war and tyranny. 

The writer, a Cambodian-born U.S. 
arizen who recently revisited Cambodia, 
is senior vice president of Common- 
wealth Associates, a New York invest- 
ment banking firm. He contributed this 
comment to die Herald Tribune. 


against die South's future superior- 
ity, a countervailing deterrent 
against the perceived American nu- 
clear threat and compensation for 
the removal of the Soviet nuclear 
umbrella. Weapons of mass destruc- 
tion will also give the North a politi- 
cal status in the region that it cannot 
hope to achieve by other means. 

No economic or political carrots 
are tempting enough to persuade 
Pyongyang to give up a nuclear pro- 
gram that usees as vital to its securi- 
ty. U.S. policy ignores the reality 
that even repressive totalitarian re- 
gimes can nave genuine perceived 
security concerns. 

The sanctions option win also fa 3, 
even if Him* goes along. Sanctions 
will not affect the ruling elite in 
Noth Korea; they win hurt ordinaiy 
people who have no power and who 
may well believe the relentless mes- 
sage of a wat* propaganda marfmi* 
that Mamas all of the nation’s trou- 
bles on th e marhmaiinng nf the “im- 
perialists and their lackeys.” 
Intelligence ecti marten ait that the 
North may have diverted enough plu- 
tonium for one or two nuclear weap- 
ons. In 1995 a new nuclear reactor 
wfll become operational It win pro- 
duce winngh fi n fl C material for an 
additional 10 or 12 bombs. Herein 
lies the central problem with the 
sanctions option. They take yearn to 
work against totahtanan regimes, so 
the Noth could 'produce a sizable 
nuclear arsenal well before sanctions 
had the desired effect 
This prospect gives rise to two 
nightmare scenarios. Hist, that once 
North Korea has enough nuclear 
weapons fra its own perceived secu- 
rity requirements it will start selling 
the excess production, as well as tbe 
missiles to deliver them, to states 
like Iran, Iraq and Libya. Second, 
that a North Korean bomb will im- 
pel South Korea and possibly Japan 
to go nuclear, too. 

It is to forestall such possibilities 
dial hawks in Washington and Seoul 
advocate bamhmg the North's nucle- 
ar facilities before it is too late. But 
the bombing option is not likely to 
succeed, either, and would almost 
certainly trigger a war in which hun- 
dreds of thousands of Koreans on 
both rides could be killed. 

While military strikes could cer- 
tainly destroy the North’s declared 
above-ground nuclear rites, they 
could not hit any secret underground 
facilities that might exist Nor could 
they destroy hidden stockpiles of al- 
ready produced plutonium. 

Moreover, it would be politically 
impossible to resort to military strikes 
until all other options had bran tried 
and had faded. By (hen die North 
might already have not just plutonium 
bat also deliverable unclear weapons 
or at least a midear derice assembled 
in a tunnel under the Demilitarized 
Zone that divides the peninsula just 
north of SecuL In these dream- 
stances, conventional military strikes 
could cause a Korean midear war. 

Thus, alarming though the pro- 
spect may be, it is time for the inter- 
national community to consider se- 
riously what has previously been 
unthinkable; hcrw to live with a nu- 
clear-armed North Korea. 

The writer, professor of internation- 
al relations at the Australian National 
University, is author of "Asian Flash- 
pant; Security and the Korean Penin- 
sula.” He contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


man, and thereon hangs a larger tale. 
Tbe venue was to have been Ham- 


and tumors of violence, Hamburg po- 
litical authorities begged to be relieved 
of the honor. After much hemming 
and hawing, the buck was passed to 
Berlin- It was a fateful misstep. 

Whatever the bald-headed boys in 
leather jackets and para troop boots 
had planned, now they were surely 
emboldened. Hamburg’s demurral 
meant thal the latter-day swastika 
brigades were being taken seriously! 
Hitler’s great-grandchildren had a 
shiny victory without lifting a base- 
ball baL Indeed, they had done much 
better than their elders, who fail 
abysmally at the polls whenever they 
try to field a new Nazi party. 

Now mighty Berlin, the wannabe 
capital, has fallen long before a single 
Vandal marched up to its gales. 

True, Churchill’s heirs caved in by 
canceling the match. But it is no se- 
cret that the (En glish ) Football Asso- 
ciation had received plenty of hints 
that such a move would be counte- 
nanced with grateful understanding. 

Nor was Bonn about to expel the 
British ambassador. The government 
was surdy consulted by the German 
Football Federation, as were tbe law- 
and-ordcr authorities in Botin. This is 
standard procedure before politically 
sensitive sports events. The bottom 
line is thal everybody —in the soccer 
and (be Boon maardnes — was re- 
lieved to tet the EngEsfipIay Cham- 
berlain and withdraw from the field. 

So the official statement register- 
ing “great disappointment” rax tbe 
part of the German federation rings 
hollow as wefl as self-serving. 

Franz Beckenbauer, tbe former na- 
tional coach, opined, “No football 
game is worth riots and bloodshed." 
On the face of it, be may be right. At a 


iish cop-out betrays a larger and sad- 
der truth. Germany's powers- that-be 
saw the enemy, a few hundred at 
worst, and bunked. They let the 
would-be storm troopers cany the day 
without resistance. 

In the first place, nobody should 
have bestowed any significance on 
{filler's birthday. There is nothing 


magic about iL It is a date that should 
simply be ignored. 

Secondly, if one is worried about 
the new Nazis, one does not fight them 
by preemptive surrender —first yield- 
ing Hamburg, (hen capitulating in 
Bolin. The Germans are justly proud 
of their postwar democracy, wit pride 
of possession implies a readiness to 
resist democracy’s enemies. 

Sometimes force may indeed be the 
cost, but Berlin itself offers a most 
useful lesson for dealing with fascists 
of whatever color. In 1989. left-wing 
punks threatened to turn the Berlin 
meeting of the World Rant and the 
International Monetary Fond into a 
violent “revolutionary” happening. 
In response, 10,000 policemen from 
all over West Germany converged 
on Berlin, deterring the nasties by 
their mere presence. 

On April 20 at the Olympic Stadi- 
um it could have been done with 
one-tenth that number. Would the 
overtime pay for Berlin’s finest have 
bran too nigh a price? Sadly, a far 
higher price has been paid. It is 
called appeasement — of those who 
will not be appeased. 

The writer is editorial page editor 
and columnist at Suddeutsche Zeitune. 
He contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


I i’J-' 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894; Hogue in Disguise* 

BERLIN —The Government insists 

de grace to the Tration^RrformBin 
by a formal rejection of the measure. 
Taxation measures are like the 
“worm that never dies.” When the 
dcrfidl which up to now has been 
carefully concealed, once becomes 
apparent, our legislators must Just 
swallow the leek and vote the Gov- 
ernment proposals. Fra the moment 
the pro visional flourishes.“Suffident 
unto the day is the evil thereof.” But 

as a Goman proverb truly says, “the 
provisional is a rogue in disguise." 

1919: Pigeon Saves Flier 

NEW YORK — A earner pigeon, 
after battling in a strong offshore 
wind late rax Saturday night [April 51 
fluttered in (he window of a hotel at 
Atlantic Gty, where it dropped ex- 
hauted, bearing a message from En- 
sign Howard Finch, adrift off the 
shore in a seaplane without gasoline. 


A search was immediately started. 
After several hours Finch was locat- 
ed. Although having fought against 
heavy seas for nearly twenty-four 
hours, his first thought upon rescue 
was for the pigeon, which ne ordered 
to be given the best meal an Atlantic 
Gty hotel could famish. 

1944: A Silent Death 

HEADQUARTERS, AMERICAN 
AIR COMMANDO FORCE, Ihdfc- 
Burma Border — [From our New 
York edition;] This is the stray of an 
American farm boy who drowned 
rather than ay fra help and disclose 
the position erf his friends.- Sergeant 
Estd L Nienaber, of RJF.D. Na 2,. 
Columbia, Mo., was tire crew chief of 
a glider which was faced down ova 
enemy territory in Burma. Half way 
aaoss a river a swimmer escorting 
Nienaber became tired and went un- 
da. When the swimmer came up it 
was too late. With his lips damped 
together, Nienaba sank below the 
surface without making a sound. 


feapor 











OPINION 


A Justice Busy ' Dealing With People 

B dSSLrS' news stories all 


U r < ? esc nbed him the same wav 

iff"* ^ the aX 

of the portion decision.’* The byliire 
on onedeoaon foUowed him through 
h^s years on the bench. Now it follows 
him into retirement. 

It is the byline that brought protest- 
« to the cotmhouse. hii the name 
[hat brought hate letters to the mafl- 
box. It is the name that bred scores of 

wi«. 

Srnely, there are labels this gentle. 

preferred. He 
to call himself “Old Number 
Three; a humble reminder of the fact 
Ti h j; chosen by Richard Nixon 
after tw> other nominees were rqected 

by the Senate. He wanted to be toown 

m a good woriter in the vineyard who 
had his own and contributed generally 
tothe advancement of the law.^He saw 
hnnself as someone who ngected labels 
m favor of justice. 

But from the day the Minnesota son 
of a grocer reluctantly agreed to write 
the decision of a lifetime, he became 
Justice Blackman, the author of the 
abortion derision.” 

“We ail pick up tags," he once said 
later and philosophically. “TO carry 
this one to my grave.” 

This pivotal opinion that heaped so 
much emotion — ■ so much gratitude 
and so much vitriol —at his doorstep 
was conceived with caution and com- 
promise. Though Justice Hugo Black 
had once cautioned him never to 
display agony in his decisions. Jus- 
tice Blackmun broke with this cool 
legal tradition in an opening that 
rings true today: 


By Ellen Goodman 

“We forthwith acknowledge our 
awareness of the sensitive and emo- 
tional nature of the abortion contro- 
versy, of the vigorous opposing views, 
even among physicians, and of the 
deep and seemingly absolute convic- 
tions that the subject inspires. 

“One’s philosophy, one’s experi- 
ences, one's exposure to the raw edges 
of human existence, one's religious 
training, one's attitudes toward life 
and family, and their values, and. the 
moral standards one establishes and 
seeks to observe, are all likely to influ- 
ence and color one’s thinking and con- 
clusions about abortion.” 

When these words were first pub- 
lished, back-alley abortion was not just 
an expression and the coat was 
not just a symbol on a political button. 
They were real So were the women. . 

unlike others on the court, Justice 
Blackmon never narrowed his range of 
vision to see only abstract principles. 
"We’re dealing with people,” he liked 
to say. One of them was a Texas wom- 
an known as Jane Roe. In 1973, Harry 
Blackmun was among the seven jus- 
tices who voted to ovotuzn the law in 
48 states. He was just one in a solid 
majority who determined that a wom- 
an’s fundamental right of privacy was 
“broad enough to encompass a wom- 
an’s derision whether or not to termi- 
nate her pregnancy ” 

But over the years, Justice Blackmun, 
the author, became Justice Blackmun, 
the defender. Through the 1980s the 
pro-choice majority dipped to a margin 
of three, two, and then one. When 


someone wrote asking if he would retire 
so a Republican president could ap- 
point someone more conservative, he 
responded: “Dear Mr. So-and-So: No. 
Sincerely, Hairy A. Blackmun." 

As a new conn nibbled and then 
chewed away at the right to abortion, 
he warned ag ain and again “3 fear for 
the future . . . the signs are evident 
and a drill wind blows." But as pro- 
choice activists worried about his 
health and age, Justice Blackmun held 
on tenaciously into bis 80s and the 
1990s until the tide tinned. 

This modest, conservative father of 
three daughters also grew in his own 
understanding of what abortion 
meant. The right to abortion was not 
just a matter of privacy, not just the 
business of doctors and patients, but 
a matter of liberty. 

On Thursday he said, “I think it was 
right in 1973, and 1 think it is right 
today. It’s a step that had to be taken 
as we go down the road toward the full 
emancipation of women." 

Today, prodxrioe people worry less 
about the Supreme Court overtunring 
Roev. Wade than about the stalehouses 
under mhring it The prolife attempt to 
mak e abortion iEegaJhas turned into an 
attempt to make abortion unavailable. 
The controversy that Justice Blackmun 
described eloquently in his opening 
words continues and so does the long- 
ing in the country to move on. 

Soon, attention will turn to his suc- 
cessor. Bui those of us who remember 
the bad old days owe a lot to the man 
named, tagged, labeled “Hairy Black- 
mun, the author of the abortion deci- 
sion" — and a man of justice. 

Boston Globe Newspaper Company. 


Pit y the Satirist in a Self-Lampooning World 


W ASHINGTON — A few weeks 
back. The New Republic pub- 
lished an extremely unnerving story 
about 23-year-old twins who murdered 
their parents by shelling their home with 
105mm howitzer shells and hand gre- 
nades for 20 mmntcs. then strafing Mom 
and Dad with submachine-gun .fire. 
Then, when they ran out of ammo, they 
borrowed money from their not-yet- 
dead mother to go out and buy more 
ballets so they could finish her off. 

The story went on to describe the 
tactics of the Zeichner brothers' lawyer, 
who tried to persuade a jury to acquit 
(he boys an grounds of “imperfect self- 
defense,” That is, from years of watch- 
ing TV, movies and being exposed to 
their playmates' vicious, non-nurturing 
parents, the Zeichner twins had come 
away with the idea that “normal parents 
arc confrontational, contemptuous and 
abusive," whereas their parents were 
alanningiy affectionate and supportive. 
This aberrant nicer ess convinced the 
boys that (hey were the victims of a 
perverse form of child abuse and that 
their parents were secretly preparing to 
kill them. So they killed than first 
The detidoosly idiotic story was writ- 
ten by the satirist Mark Leyner, who 
claimed to be covering the trial for the 
German magazine Der GuntmiknuppeL 
Of course, the story was a complete hoax, 
a fact signaled not only by the banner 
headline on the magazine cover, “Mark 
Leyner A Meceodez Fantasy,” but by a 
number of absurd details: Mr. Zeichner 
was such a swell dad that he even under- 
went rotator cuff surgery so he could 
pitch batting practice to his kids; Mrs. 
Zeichner, du ring pregnancy, “commuted 
to work with Walkman earphones 
splayed against her pregnant belly so that 
Aaron and Joshua could listen — in utero 


Singapore’s Assertion of a Right to Torture Is Intolerable 


W ASHINGTON —The verb “torture” is defined 
vv in Mariam- Webster’s Tenth Collegiate Dictio- 
nary as “the infliction of intense pain (as from burn- 
ing, crushing or wounding) to punish, coerce or af- 
ford sadistic pleasure.” The dictatorship of Singapore 

has found an American teenager guilty of spray- proud of his country's reputation for keeping order by 
painting cars and sentenced him to four months in inflicting pain. Moreover, his diplomats m the United 
prison, a $2,000 fine — and torture. States report that many Americans endorse the lashmg 

Singapore's torture of choice is flogging by rattan to be meted out to the young offender. 


By William Satire 

and Trinidad and Tobago) stands aloof from the uni- 
versal condemnation. Singapore’s dictator is actually 


cane, which elicits the screams satisfying to the torturer 
and scars the lorturee physically and mentally for life. 
Torture is an act of savagery as old as avalization. 
Demosthenes described it as the surest mpans of ob- 
taining evidence; Tomas de Torquemada issued de- 
tailed ins tractions for its use in the Spanish Inquisi- 
tion; in England, the Star Chamber employed the rack 
to stretch the witness’s body until the bones cracked. 

In our century, the Nazis delighted in finding new 
scientific methods for the infliction of pain, while 
“tiger cages" were an Asian contribution. 

But now the civilized nations have a Covenant on 
Civil and Political Rights that declares: “No one shall be 
subjected to torture or to cruel inhuman or degrading 
punishment." The United Nations has a “Convention 
Against Torture," and Principle 6 of its protection of the 
imprisoned states: “No arcumstances whatever may be 
invoked as a justification for torture.” 

The government of Singapore (along with Malaysia 


That some people in America i 
torture is undeniable. One sap cm the street 'in Wash- 
ington told a New York Times reporter “If you’ve ever 
had your antenna ripped off your car, you can sympa- 
thize with the government of Singapore. Lash him." 

I have had more than a few antennas ripped off my 
car, and a few swastikas sprayed on my house, and fat 
a smgc of mindless fury at the perpetratois. But I have 
also seen a Kurdish patriot crippled far life by one of 
Saddam Hussein's torturers, and witnessed the misdi- 
rected setf-loatiring on the face of a rape victim, and I 
do not thmk that any person or government has any 
right to inflict physical pain on another human being. 

If anything in life is morally wrong, torture is. 

Is this bang soft on criminals? Of course not; there is 
no socb thing as a “good thrashing.” The only civilized 
punishment is loss of property (a fine) and/or loss of 
freedom (a jail sentence). Taking away & convict’s free- 
dom punishes but does not inflict pain. What about the 


r in America? Not gstmane; that retributive 
justice' by lethal injection is painless. 

Those who suggest that we Americans not impose 
our standards on the Singaporean “culture" flirt with 
racism. Asian society is no more intrinsically cruel than 
any other dvihzed society. 

This issue is not about degrees of h»rdme« It is a case 
of a state asserting an intolerable “right to torture." 

On Tuesday, President Bill Qmton sent Singapore's 
Prraidait Ong Teng Cbeong a peraonal plea to avert the 
infliction of agony on one of America's citizens in the 
hope that “quret diplomacy” would elicit clemency. (Can 
you imagine if the teenager were black or a woman? 
“Fatheads alive or Raisoh dead" —to quote Theodore 
Roosevelt's effective message to the Berber chieftain 
RaisuH who had kidnapped an American, Ion Perdi- 
caris.) But the issue goes beyond demency. 

If the dictator continues to espouse state-sponsored 
torture; bow might Americans react? Three hundred 
thousand of us could stop going to Singapore each year, 
or flying its airline; stockholders and customers of 
Seagate computers, Caltex, Mobil, Hewlett-Packard and 
Texas Instruments could rethink corporate investments 
and purchases; tbe use of (heap Singapore labor to “add 
value" to U-S. exports to Asia could De examined. 

Torture is a crime against humanity. How long can 
Singapore prospa as a lawless stale? 

The New York Times. 


By Joe Queenan 

— to Telly Sava! as reading Pindar’s Epin- 
idan odes in ancient Greek.” 

Not every New Republic reader got 
the joke. A Los Angeles radio station 
expressed an interest m airing a segment 
about tbe trial. And Denis Collins, a 
professor of business ethics at the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin at Madison, was so 
taken in by the story that he told his 
students to read it and prepare them- 
selves for a discussion of the concept of 
conscience tbe following week. When a 
law student told him that the story was a 

MEANWHILE 

hoax, a furious Mr. Collins faxed a letter 
to the magazine calling tbe staff “a 
bunch of jerks” who had betrayed jour- 
nalistic ethics by sating a trap for their 
readers, noting, “I donh want, nor have 
tbe time, to check out all the supposed 
facts in all of your articles.” 

In Mr. CoDuts’s defense, he said that 
be skimmed tbe snide late at night 
when he was really tired. 

That Mr. Leyner’s demented report- 
age could be taken seriously by some 
New Republic readers did not come as a 
surprise to me. In February, I published 
what I thought was a completely idiotic 
article about tbe rise of tbe lateness- 
rights movement. The article discussed a 
bogus federal court’s ruling that an em- 
ployee could not be fired from his job 
just because he had shown up late for 
work every day for nine years. The arti- 
cle died a fictitious court case ratting a 
fictitious factory worker named Snuffy 
Bo ding against a fictitious corporation 
named Allied Polymers in a fictitious 
court room presided ova by a fictitious 
judge named Purvis Waffler. 

To make sure that no one reading this 
idiotic story took h seriously, I intro- 
duced such seeming giveaways as a dis- 
ease called “tardialamtrakia" (“a chron- 
ic inability to arrive anywhere on time"), 
and a lateness-rights advocacy group 
called Late Rape run by one HadiBeau- 
jolais. 1 also included a discussion of an 
organization called Citizens for Olfac- 
tory Equity headed by Ptolemy “Stinky” 
Garrison, a vehement defender of the 
work-place rights of the smelly. 

The day after the story ran in the 
Washington Post Outlook section, 1 re- 
ceived a telephone cab from a producer 
at a major network news magazine pro- 
gram seeking more information about 
the lateness-rights movement and ex- 
pressing the emphatic hope that Heidi 
Beaigdais la) existed and (b) was reach- 
able by telephone. That same day, edi- 
tors of were besieged with calls from 
readers demanding to know if the late- 
ness-rights movement actually existed. 

The credulous response to what I still 
fed was a transparently ludicrous story 
reaffirms someming I have grudgingly 
learned ova tbe years: that no matter 
how ridiculous vour story is. some people 
— even a Jot of people — wD not get the 
rtlv Mcause 


joke. This is partly because some 
— mrhtrimg most columnists for editorial 
pages — have absolutely no sense of 


humor. Partly this is because people as- 
sume that anything that appears in print 
in a publication such as lie Washington 
Post or Tbe New Republic must be true. 

Yet. this is only a small part of the 
explanation. The real reason that absurd 
stories about the Zeichner brothers or 
lateness rights are accepted at face value 
is that American life has become so 
weird that nothing seems implausible or 
ridiculous anymore. Who could have 
dreamed up Tonya Harding? Mi chad 
Jackson? Lorena Bobbin? Tbe Menen- 
dez brothers? John Bobbitt? Hillary 
Clinton, commodities trader? 

Thai is why the Wisconsin professor, 
Mr. Co llins, was so easily ensnared by 
Mr. Leyner’s zany story. As he ex- 
plained 'it to me, “America is so strange 
and so outrageous that when I read 
Leyner’s story, my critical faculties 
didn’t say to me: This is a satire. Instead 
I felt: ‘Yeah, this could happen.’ " 

I began to notice the fauurc-to-get- 
the-joke trend about six years ago, 
when I wrote a story in The New Re- 
public describing a ro ck co ncert in As- 
pen, Colorado, called CFP Aid, which 
was held to raise money to help, not 
fanners, victims of hurricanes or AIDS 
patients, but unemployed Certified Fi- 
s. Tne stor 


nancial Planners. 


f was stupid. 


story' 

Nevertheless, I received several calls 
and letters from New Republic sub- 
scribers demanding to know why the 
event had not been covered by the local 
media, including one from a Certified 
Financial Planner in Atlanta who 
wanted to discuss the possibility of 
holding a similar event in Dixie. 

Another place where some readers 
missed the joke was Barron’s, the bible of 
Wall Street, to which I have been a con- 
tributor since 1987. In 1992, 1 wrote a 
story discussing a number of exotic new 
mutual funds such as the Et Tu Brutus 
Fond, a $1.6 btfikm fund which invested 
its assets among firms whose names in- 
volved famous victims of assassinations: 
Caesars World, Lincoln Financial etc. 
The story also mentioned 
called the Weighted Portfolio Fu 
which invested in companies that sound- 
ed large (Titan, Giant, Ponderosa) or 
were actually run by fat people. Tbe 
story was fabulously stupid. 

Nevertheless, two weeks lata, I found 
myself on tbe phone consoling a morti- 
fied mutual fund publicist when he 
called fra- more information about the 
fund and was disconsolate when I ex- 
plained to him that the whole thing was 
a gag. Listening to him a pan of me 

felt: How could anyone be dumb 
enough to fall for that story? 

Tbe article had also mentioned the 
Elvis Fund, which “bolds potions is 
Presley and Singer, and is available to 
anyone with sideburns and a minimum 
$2*500 to invest.” I felt that such ideas 
were i 
sit down 

these funds is any more imbecilic — or 
risky — than a dozen real-life Third 
World Funds that invest in countries 
that may not even have the same name 
tomorrow. And when I reflected back on 
genuine news stories I had written ova 
the years about publicly traded compa- 


: utterly preposterous. But when you 
town and mink about it, none erf 


nies selling ostrich burgers or funeral 
videos, I had to admit that tbe Et TU 
Brutus Fund wasn’t so farfetched. 

Nor was the Home Mutual Fund 
Shopping Network, an imaginary start- 
up cable TV network that 1 wrote about 
in a 1993 issue of Barron’s. That story 
dealt with a fictitious 24-hour cable TV 
channel that sold not only mutual funds 
but authentic mutual fund managers' 
clothing (the Na Asset Value Collec- 
tion) that home viewers could order 
through an 800-number. That way, mu- 
tual rand buffs could wear dark suits 
and conservative ties just like their fa- 
vorite mutual fund managers. 

Since that article ran in October, 1 
have received calls from journalists, law- 
yers and prospective investors. One call 
came from a guy involved with a start- 
up operation called 1-800-FUNDS who 
was worried that HMFSN had beaten 
him to the punch. Then I got a call from 
a New York lawyer who was trying to 
start his own home mutual fund cable 
shopping network, but had not yet 
cleared regulatory difficulties. 

Now I wish that 1 had copyrighted the 
concept so I could make a few dollars off 
tbe idea and gw out of the satire racket. 

Faced with a barrage of pbone calls, 
letters and faxes from readers who have 
been confused by what seemed at tbe 
time to be perfectly ridiculous satirical 
pieces, the editors of the Outlook section 
recently decided that henceforth tbe au- 
thor of these stories would be described 
in their thumbnail bios as “satirists." This 
seemed like a good way to wain readers 
that these stories were not to be taken 

wd^^iisticated than emblazomn g arti- 
des with a banner reading: IDIOTIC 
STORY. DON'T ASSIGN IT AS MAN- 
DATORY SEMINAR READING MA- 
TERIAL OR ANYTHING. 

Unfortunately, using the term “sati- 
rist" isn’t going to get tbe job date. Last 
month, the Washington-based satirist 
Robert Hirschfdd wrote a short, com- 
pletely ridiculous article chronicling the 
rise of the “Lawya Rap” movement. Tbe 
stray, focusing on the fortunes of a com- 
pany called Forda Records, described the 
exploits of such fictitious “Lawya Rap" 
groups as Ice Briefs and 2 Live Sue, and 
mentioned such songs as “Litigate 'til 
Yoo Humiliate" and “Baby lien on Me.” 
It was eririhratingty silly. 

Tbe next day, a woman from Patrick 
Buchanan's office called Mr. Hirschfdd 
to sa up an intenriew with some of the 
people he had mentioned in the stray. 
Mr. Hirsdifeld thinks that his days as a 
satirist could be numbered. 

“It’s getting to the point where what's 
being passed off as legitimate news cov- 
erage, particularly in Washington, is 
blurring the distinction between inten- 
tional and unintentional humor," signs 
Mr. Hirschfdd. “For us few satirists, 
this is becoming an onerous task." 

Tell me about it 


Mr. Queenan used to be a satirist in 
Tarrytown, New York; his latest book is 
“If You’re Talking to Me, Your Career 
Must Be in Trouble " He contributed this 
comment to The Washington Post. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Spare the Rod, or Not 

Regarding “This Caning in Sin- 
gapore Won’t Make America Saf- 
er ” (Opinion, April 6) by Rich- 
ard Cohen: 

Thank you. Mr. Cohen! I have 
been deeply distressed by theover- 
wbelnring support, at least to judge 
by some opinion polls in the Unit- 
ed States, for the caning sentence 
given to young Michael Fay by a 
Singapore coon. Contrary to what 
many think, caning is not an Eng- 
lish school-boy punishment It is 
barbaric and leaves permanent 
physical and emotional scars. 

I was in Singapore the day after 
the sentencing. I spoke to Mr. 
Fay’s motbra and to several stu- 
dents and parents at tbe Singapore 
American School. I watched many 
sign a petition that was salt to 
President BiH Clinton protesting 
die sentence. I saw others refuse to 
do so for fear of retaliation. 

They agreed that Mr. Fay de- 
served to serve prison time and pay 

the 52,000 fine. But all but one 
condemned the caning and saidit 
seemed clear that Mr. Fay was be- 
ing used to send a signal to Singa- 
pore's foreign community. 

When I returned to Paris, I 
cursed those who have liberally 
covered the city’s buildings with 
graffiti. I wished that they would 
be heavily fined and forced to 
ri^an the results of thor artistic’ 
forays. But never did I think that 
they should be brutally c aned. 

KAREN FAWCETT. 

Paris. 

Regarding the report £ 

op Backs Flogging in Singapore 
(April 6): 

I applaud Bishop Montgomery 
GrifSh-Mair for «pressmg ™ 
millions of law-abiding citizens are 


thinking about Michael Fay’s can- 
ing sentence in Singapore. 

Of course such news would not 
have made the headlines 40 years 
ago. Should I have been found 
guilty of destroying property, my. 
father would have caned me per- 
sonally without instructions from 
the coral Many parents did in 
those days, and vandalism such as 
Mr. Fay engaged in was rare. 

That President Bill Clinton 
should ask fra demency, thereby 
creating an international issue, 
is beyond belief. 

My idea of justice is that Mi- 
chael Fay’s parents should have to 
share the punishment — say, three 
strokes each —plus helping scrape 
tbe paint off the cars he defaced. It 
is unfortunate that Weston politi- 
cians today do not understand that 
crime should be punished. 

CORNELIS van VUET. 

Cannes. 

Turkey and Terrorism 

Regarding “An Appeal to Tur- 
key’* (Opinion, March 18) from Ber- 
nard Kouchner and Bernard Dorin: 

As Turkish academics living in 
Britain, we found the letter from 
Mr. Kouchner, the forma French 
minis ter of health and humanitar- 
ian action, and Mr. Dorin, a 
French ambassador, to be serious- 
ly misleading. 

First, the Turkish government 
and army are not alone in wanting 
an end to terrorism in southeast 
Turkey — virtually all T urkish citi- 
zens agree. It is untrue, irresponsi- 
ble and extremely insulting to say 
that Turkey “is on the verge of 
co mmit ting genocide.” Tbe intent 
is by no to destroy the 

Kurdish population bnt rather to 
restore security in the area; the 



action is rimed only at terrorists, 
not at the civilian population. 

Tbe Kurdish Workers Party, or 
PKK, winch has organized tenur- 
ist activities, is in a difficult posi- 
tion now. The Turkish government 
does not trust in its trustfulness fra 
a peaceful settlement This mis- 
trust comes from experience. In 
1993, PKK suffered serious losses 
and seemed positive about a peace- 
ful agreement But after a short 
cease-fire, the Knrtiish Workers 
Party executed 33 Turkish soldiers, 
continuing its bloody terrorism. 

We beueve that Turkey has as 
much right to combat terrorism in 
southeast Anatolia as France has 
in its struggle with terrorism in the, 
Basque region or Corsica. Turkey 
is a fast-developing country on 
Europe's edge; it is established on 
democratic principles. The letter 
from the two French dignitaries is 
one-sided and almost incompre- 
hensible in its defense of a terror- 
ist group. 

O. TANRIKULU, 

N. TANRIKULU, 
E.AKARTUNA 
and S. AKARTUNA. 

London. 

Enough ol Whitewater 

Regarding ,r Whitewater : The 
Real Crisis Is in the Press’s Credi- 
bility” (Op inion, April 5): 

Anthony Lewis put the current 
Whitewater pieces as dose togeth- 
er as they wffl ever get Despite all 
the smoke; created by the Republi- 
cans and gobbled up by the press, 
we taxpayos find oursoves paying 
rmiHnnn to investigate a pre siden ts 
personal actions. . 

The American people are saying 
enoug h is enough. Let us know 
what President Clinton is doing, 
not what Governor Clin t on may 
hare done 16 years ago. We are 
tired of soap operas from the past. 

There are some important issues 
out thoe. What is happening to the 
domestic programs the Clinton ad- 
ministration is supposed to be fo- 
cusing on? What, constructively, 
are tbe Republicans doing, on do- 
mestic or international issues? 

Was it not Barry Gtddwaia, tbe 
father of modem Republican con- 
servatism, who said, “Let the prca- 
dent get on with his job"? we are 
beginning io wonder if there is any 
longer a responsible Republican 
Party, or press. 

KEN and MURIEL COOPER. 

Le Cannet, France. 

living abroad now for many 

years, I can understand why An- 
thony Lewis was baffled about 
Whitewater. Indeed, what is all the 
hoopla about? Why has it lasted so 
long? My French famfly members 
do not comprehend why the US. 
president and his wife have been 
asked to "take their 1977-78 tax 
returns public. To prove that they 
tost nwnev (because it would not 
have been good to have made 
some)? Was it also vital for the 
American people to know that 


Mis. Clinton checked “no” in the 
box for a SI donation to the presi- 
dential election fund? 

Can you imagine Le Monde call- 
ing on President Franqois Mitter- 
rand to release copies of his pre- 
presidenta! tax returns? 

This undue treatment of the 
Whitewater “crisis" has gone be- 
yond the ridiculous, 

E.C WASYUNA. 
Chantilly, France. 

Don’t Knock the ’50s 

Regarding *A Darker View of the 
‘50s an a Desperate * CarouseT ” 
(Opinion, April 1) by Frank Rich: 

One becomes rather tired of peo- 
ple trying to revise history. As a 
young veteran and parent in the 
1950s I saw quite a different Amer- 
ica from die one Mr. Rich portrays. 
I saw a generous country with a 
larger foreign aid program, pa 
capita, than today, one that offered 
a university education to millions 
through the GI Bffl, a country of 
usually full employment and low 
mortgages that enabled millions to 
escape crowded cities to thor own 
homes in healthy, pleasant sub- 
urbs, a decade that saw the begin- 
ning erf die long overdue equal 
rights movement, and which saw 
enormous UJS. efforts to help build 
vibrant democracies in Germany 
and Japan, plus responsible leader- 
ship ra NATO in containing the 
murderous regimes east of the Iron 
Curtain. I suspect that if the audi- 
ence cried at tbe performance of 
“CarouseT Mr. Rich describes, it 
was oat of nostalgia. 

ALAN DODDS. 

Bologna, Italy. 

Frank Rich writes of “a mean 
class system in which even the po- 
lice and God conspire with the mill 

owna against the working poor” 
and “America’s unending cycles of 
social injustice and domestic vio- 
lence." This sounds like a Marxist 
time travekr from the ’30s. 

As to the “oppressively sunny 
landscape" of “Ike, backyard bar- 
becues and Ozzie and Harriet," is 
Ammca better off with Bill Clin- 
ton, drive-by shootings and “Bea- 
vis and Bntthead”? 

ROBERT M. KELLEY. 

Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. 

Legislating Language 

Jacques Toubon refers to the lin- 
guistic ri ghts of the French (“A U.S. 
Tempest in a French Demitasse,” 
Opinion, April 4). Yet it is an de- 
mentaiy Hngiri-air right to use which- 
ever words you choose. 

If tbe French support this legisla- 
tion as arenvhelminglty as the culture 
tumiaw claims, why do they use 
Fngtfch in tbe first place? My first 
language (Danish) probably borrows 

as from FngKsh as French 

does. Yet I do not understand why 
words can be so dangerous that legis- 
lation and fines are necessary. 

HENRIK O. RASMUSSEN. 

Cambridge, England. 


vs vour 
lire. 



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International Herald Tribune 
Friday , Aprils, 1994 
Page 8 









.<■. -e- 


St. Petersburg, They Wrote: In Raskolnikov s Footsteps 


By Michael Dobbs 

Washuigton Pou Service 


T. PETERSBURG — A well- 


thumbed copy of “Crime and Puu- 
lderm 


o 

. ishmenl” under my arm, I carefully 
traced the 730 steps taken by Rodion 
Raskolnikov on his way to murder the old 
pawnbroker. I crossed a bridge, skirted the 
Yusupov Palace gardens and approached a 
large six-story budding faring the canaL My 
heart beat slightly faster as I climbed up a 
dark, narrow staircase to die fourth floor 
and rang the briL After a short interval, the 
door opened a crack to reveal the suspicious 
eyes of a wizened old lady. “Is this where the 
old pawnbroker lived, the one in ‘Crime and 
Punishment?” I asked, in my most harmless, 
nonthreatening tone of voice. The woman 
nodded, and then slammed the door. “Go 
away. I'm not let ting anyone in.” 

Life has a habit of imitating an in St. 
Petersburg, Russia's former capital During 
its 291-year existence, the city founded by 
Peter the Great as a “window on the West" 
has inspired such literary giants as Fyodor 
Dostoyevski and Alexander Pushkin, Niko- 
lai Gogol and Mikhail Lermontov, Anna 
Akhmatova and Alexander Blok. They paid 
the city back by immortalizing its streets, 
c anals, palaces and tenements in some of the 
greatest works of literature. Much of the 
charm of this most beautiful of Russian 
cities lies in the way in which fact and Action 
are inextricably jumbled together in the pub- 
lic imagination. 

Sadly, this is a side to St Petersburg that 
most foreigners never get to see, either be- 



cause they are too rushed or because they are 
too timid As a Washington Post correspon- 
dent based in Moscow, I visited St Peters- 
burg many times over the past five years. On 
eac h occasion, I would visit some of the 
obvious tourist sights, Hke the Hermitage 
museum or the Peter and Paul Fortress. 

For my last trip, I left behind the conven- 
tional guidebooks and packed my suitcase 
with novels and books of poetry. I am glad I 
did, because 1 was able to discover an entire- 
ly different dry, a city that has in many ways 
changed remarkably little since the days of 
Dostoyevslri and Pushkin. 

Various theories have been advanced as to 
why Sl Petersburg should have exercised 
such a remarkable bold over the minds of so 
many writers and poets. Built on a swamp by 
hundreds of thousands of slave laborers and 
buffeted by frequent floods, it owes its exis- 
tence to the indomitable will of a tyrannical 
ruler. Dostoyevski described St, Petersburg 


as “the most intentional and abstract city in 
the world." 

By building a new capital on the western- 
most edge ol a vast Asiatic empire, Peter the 
Great forced his compatriots to take a fresh 
look at their country. “Hie emergence of St. 
Petersburg was similar to the discovery of 
the New World: It gave pensive men of the 
lime a chance to look upon themselves and 
the nation as though from outside,” writes 
Joseph Brodsky, a Sl Petersburg poet who 
went on to win the Nobd Prize in Literature. 
“There is no other place in Russia where 
thoughts depan so wmingly from reality.” 

The main difficulty in attempting to de- 
vise a literary tour of Sl Petersburg is the 
wealth of original material. A thorough ex- 
ploration of the dty Of Pushkin or Dos- 
toyevski would take months, possibly years. 
Entire treatises have been devoted to such 
questions as whether such-and-such a char- 
acter from such-and-such a Dostoyevski 
novel lived on such-and-such a street, or just 
around the comer. Every other building in 
the center of the city seems to be adorned 
with a plaque, testifying to an association 
with some famous writer. 

But one has to begin somewhere — and 
the obvious starting point is Etienne Falcon- 
et's statue of Peter the Great on the left bank 
of the river Neva. Depicting the czar seated 
upon a rearing steed, his right arm thrust in 
front of him, it symbolizes the willful con- 
quest of nature. One of the best-known mon- 
uments in St Petersburg, it has inspired 
several works of literature, most notably 
Pushkin's poem “The Bronze Horseman.” 

Like many Sl Petersburg writers, Pushkin 
had an ambivalent attitude toward the 


m mm nut 


Jimmy Hollywood 

Directed bv Barry Levinson. 
U.S. 

“Jimmy Hollywood" is the bit- 
tersweet tale of a would-be actor 
who can’t find any usual way of 
breaking into movies. The title 
character is Jimmy Alto (Joe 
Fesd), who at one point has a 
daydream in which he becomes 
so famous that friends speak ad- 
miringly of him in television in- 
terviews. “He's a genius in a 
town that doesn't embrace ge- 
niuses,” Jimmy imagines one 
friend telling the cameras. As 
written and directed by Barry 
Levinson. “Jimmy HotfywxxF 
tries to celebrate the kind of 
quirky, real-world bravado that 
worked so well for ‘Tin Men" 
and “Diner." But this ambitious, 
wildly uneven film takes a con- 
fused view of its hero. On the 
one hand Jimmy is a lovable 
fod, someone who lists acting 


jobs he didn’t get when asked 
about his professional credits. 
On the other, after fate throws 
him a chance to fight for the lost 
glory of Hollywood, be becomes 
a holy avenger. Dark and unpre- 
dictable, this isn’t the antic com- 
edy it looks like in ads. For all 
Levinson’s efforts to emphasize 
the buoyant ride of his stray, 
what works best about “Jimmy 
Hollywood" is the sense of utter 
desperation that colors Timmy’s 
exploits. Peso's edgy, abrasive 
performance is a welcome anti- 
dote to the film ’s efforts to seem 
breezy. 

( Janet Maslin, NYT) 

ComoS «r 
InMz y Dtefvutario 

Directed by Enrique Urrbizu. 
Spam. 

The movie is a perfect vehicle for 
the Staurish leading lady Car- 
men Maura, who pouts, romps 


SCATTERED SHOWERS THROUGHOUT THE BAR 

with infermiffcnf cloudbursts in the billiard room. Not 
surprisingly, even the eldest among the assembled couldn't 
recall it ever raining inside the hotel before. And rhongh 
delighted to have the opportunity to offer ice. water or the 
Northeastern monsoon with their scotch, onr barmen did begin 
to wonder how on earth they would keep the martinis dry. A 
mere drop in the bucket legend that is Raffics. 




I ■ HUES lNTE**\TIOV.«. HOTEL-' 


TEL: (051 131 itft MX: I IS) Hi 5*5# 


and deveriy makes her way 
through this light comedy, 
whose title in English is “How to 
Be Miserable and Enjoy It” The 
stray is based on the popular 
novel by Carmen Rico Godoy, 
also the co-writer of the film 
script A successful Madrid 
newspaper editor around 40 
(Mama) suddenly faces early 
widowhood when ho- husband 
dies of a heart attack. The body 
is hardy odd before the other 
men in her life, from journalists 
to a too financier, start maneu- 
vers to become husband number 
two. Meanwhile, the editor dis- 
covers that her daughter hag a 
personal crisis. The protagonist’s 
response to it all is partly the 
reaction of a savvy, independent 
woman in any western capital 
and partly the result of modem 
Spain’s iwipharis oo improvisa- 
tion in life, which afreets women 
and nv-n The young Basque di- 
rector Enrique Urbizn lets the 
bright dialogue dominate while 

maintaining a crisp rhythm to 
the action. Humor abounds, es- 
periafly in the Pa risian scenes 
that highligh t the antipathy be- 
tween the Spanish and the 
French and in the Madrid apart- 
ment-hunting sequences. 

(Ai Goodman, IHT) 


D2: The Mighty Ducks 

Directed by Sam Weisman. 
U.S. 

Aqy movie can inspire merdian- 
riismg tie-ins like T- shir ts and 


dolls. The 1992 Disney hit “The 
Mighty Dudes" is the only film 
iu history to have inspired the 
creation erf a hockey team, the 
Disney-owned Anaheim Mighty 
Ducks of the National Hockey 
League. It makes the head spin 
just to think about professional 
hockey players wearing their 
bright green jerseys with the car- 
toonish team logo inspired by a 
children’s movie: a scowling 
duck in a goalie's mask with 
hockey sticks crossed behind 
him liifp a kiddie skuD-and- 
crossbones. What makes the 
head spin even more is the mes- 
sage of the movie's sequel Hie 
point of “D2: The Mighty 

n nrlra " >5 that rn mrnerriaKsiTi in 

sports is bad. Emilio Estevez re- 
turns as Gordon Bombay, who 
in the original was a high- 
powered lawyer arrested for 
drunken driving and forced to 
do community service by coach- 
ing a ragtag children's Of 
course, be recaptured his boy- 
hood love of the game. In “D2," 
when the Ducks travel from 
Minnesota to Los Angeles to 
play in the Junior Goodwin 
Games, Bombay loses his sports- 
manlike bearings. The evidence 
of his distraction is that he be- 
comes a peewee-league Pat Ril- 
ey, with slicked -back hair, de- 
signer suits and many 
commercial endorsements. 
Good luck to parents trying to 
explain this to children while 
standing in hue to bay their 
Mighty Ducks hockey shirts. 

(Caryn James, NYT) 


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SUMMER RENTALS 
ft SOUTH OF FRANCE 



founder of the dty. On the one hand, be 
recognized Peter as the political and military 
gwiins who modernized a backward cuipiic 
ntirf bequeathed a beautiful dty to future 
generations. “I love thee, masterpiece erf Peter 
/ 1 love thine aspect, graceful and severe,” he 
wrote. “Be splendid, Peter’s City, and stand, 
like Russia, strong / for la, the vay conquered 

dement has made her peace with thee at last" 
On the other hand, he also felt fra the thou- 
sands upon thousands of victims trampled 
underfoot fra: the greater glory of czar and 
country. “The Bronze Horseman” tells the 
story of a penniless derk, Yevgeni, who loses 
both his fianefee and his bumble living quar- 
ters in the Great Flood of 1824. Yevgeni holds 
the czar responsible fra his loss — Tie whose 
fateful will had based the dty on the sea” — 
anrf goes ntad in front of the statue At the end 
of the poem, he runs through the streets of the 
dty, pursued by the “hammering hoofbeats” 
of the statue, the symbol of the little man 
overwhelmed by powerful Traces be can bare- 
ly comprehend. 

From Senate Square (Decembrists’ 
Square), where Peter’s statue is, skirt the 
dt/s architectural landmark, the Admiralty, 
with its glistening golden spire, and head up 
Nevsky ProspekL 

“There is nothing finer than Nevsky Pro- 
spekt, not in Sl Petersburg at any rate; for in 
Sl Petersburg it is everything,” wrote Gogol 
in a short stray named after the city’s most 
celebrated street. “And, indeed, is there any- 
thing more gay, more brilliant, more resplen- 
dent than this beautiful street of our capital? 
I am sure that not one of her anemic inhabit- 
ants, not one of her innumerable Civil Ser- 
vants, would exchange Nevsky Prospekt for 
all the avenues in the world.” 

The street has lost mnch of its luster since 
Gogol’s day: Its facades are crumbling from 
decades of Co mmunis t neglect, its stores a 
shadow of their former selves. But it still 
boasts numerous literary associations. 

On the right, as you walk up the street 
from the Admiralty, watch out for the Barri- 
kadnaya Cinema (No. 1 5), on a corner facing 
the M oilra River. A neoclassical building 
with two-story-high columns, it once housed 
the Talon restaurant, a favorite gathering 
place for writers and artists. During the 19th 
century, the Talon was an obligatory stop on 
the dally social round: P ushkin' s hero, Eu- 
gene Onegin, drops into the restaurant on his 
way to the theater. In the late 18th century, it 


was the residence of the city’s police chief. In 
Pushkin’s day, the nearby bridge over the 
Motka was called PoUtseUky (Police) Bridge, 
and this is the way it is still known to anyone 
familiar with Russian literature. After the 
1917 Bolshevik Revolution, it was renamed 
Naxodny (People’s) Bridge. 

Almost catty-corner from the Talon res- 
taurant, at Motka 22, Is Pushkin’s last apart- 
ment in Sl Petersburg, now the Pumlrin 
House Museum. 

This is where the poet was brought on JatL 
27, 1837, after being wounded in a duel with 
his wife’s lover. Here again, life imitated art 
In the poet’s apartment you can stfll see the 
bullet-holed blade waistcoat that Pushkin 
wore daring the dud and a carefully pre- 
saved lode of his hair. Two days after the 
duel, Pushkin died. 

After visiting P ushkin 's apartment, relax 
with a ranal tour of tire aty. During the 
summer, small motorboats can be hired from 
the mooring post next to the Police Bridge, or 
a little farther up Nevsky Prospekt on the 
Griboyedov CanaL (Realms cost from $15 to 
S25, depending on how far you want to go). 

These boats are one of tire best ways to see 
Sl Petersburg — and understand its social 
makeup. Part of the appeal of die dty far 
writers lies in the dose p ro ximi ty of several 
vay different worlds, demarcated by ti»^ vari- 
ous waterways. The aristocratic heart erf the 
dty was concentrated in the thin strip erf land 
between the Neva and Moika riven, winch 
were fined with palaces, embassies and mhris- 
tries. Poor decks like Pushkin's Yevgeni lived 
rat the islands, on the other side of the Neva. 
The area around the Griboyedov Canal was a 
natural breeding ground for desperate, Dos- 
toyevskian characters: a demimonde of stu- 
dents, workers and straggling writers. 



T 


HE antipathy between one section 
of the dty and another was rein- 
forced by architecture and urban 
geography. The symbolist writer 
Andrei Bdy contrasted the harmonicas sym- 
metry of the Neva embankment and Nevsky 
Prospekt with the disorganized chaos of tile 
islands and other working class districts. In 
his novel “Petersburg,” described by James 
Joyce as one of the most brilliant works erf 
modern literature, social distinctions are re- 
duced to geometry. “He was cut off from the 
scum of the streets by four perpendicular 
walls,” wrote Bely, describing the thoughts 
of the senator, Apollon Apollonovich, as his 
carriage fHes down arrow-straight Nevsky 
ProspekL “Apolkm Apollonovich did not 
like the Mate the population there was 
rndiiKtriol and coarse. . . The islands must 
be crushed! Riveted with the iron of the 
enormous bridge, skewered by the arrows of 
theprospects . . 

To a large extent, these social and geo- 
graphic distinctions stiB hold true today. 
Had Russia been allowed to develop like a 
Western country, the streets around the Gri- 
boyedov fjmai would have been yuppified 
by now. What was a slum area on the edge of 
SL Petersburg in DostoyevskTs day would 
have become prime real estate. But thanks to 


the deep-freeze effect of communism, it has 
retain ed much of its original character,. 
There are st£Q plenty of poor students, 
thieves, prostitutes, drunks and aged widows 
living in the ramshackl e communal apart- 
ments in the old Haymarket area, many of 
whom could have wandered straight out of 
the pages of a Dostoyevski novel. 

A good starting point for exploring this 
part of town is the KLokushkin Bridge, next 
to the former Haymarket (now called Plos- 
chad Mira, or Square of Peace). Dostoyevski 
tells us that Raskolnikov stood on the 
bridge, garing into its murky waters and 
pondering his destiny. After killing the 
pawnbroker with an ax, he briefly considers 
throwing the murder weapon into the canaL 
but is dissuaded by the sight of the 
passing by and women domg their la 
People no longer do their washing in the 
canal but there is plenty of activity along the 
banks: workers munching sandwiches, 
drunks, strolling lovers. 

After the old lady on the fourth floor of 
Griboyedova 104 very sensibly refused my 
request to inspect her rooms, I was given a 
warm welcome by another old lady on the 
flora below. The place was almost exactly as 
Dostoyevski described it: an entrance door 
held by a chain, a dark hallway, divided by a 
thin partition from a tiny kitchen, and two 
other small rooms. The biggest disappoint- 
ment was the Haymarket, which is described 
by Dostoyevski as the focus of the dissolute 
everyday life of this part of town. You can 
still fin A the root whore Raskolnikov bowed 
down to ask forgiveness, but sadly, most of 
the square has been ripped apart by Commu- 
nist planners. 



Nicflbc Ano/IHT 


At Body Shop, Scent of Harmony 


By Susan H. Greenberg 


L 


ITTLEHAMPTON, England— If 
it weren’t far the faint smell of 
Peppermint Lotion in the air, 
you’d think you were at a self-help 
workshop. “Lighten up . . . dream of har- 
mony . . . relish adventure . . . walk the 
dog . . . dance with the stars . . . follow 
your bliss,” implores a large sign in the recep- 
tion area of The Body Shop headquarters m 
Littlehampton, on England’s Sussex coast. 

For about $525, you can tour the facilities 
where products like Rice Bran Scrub and 
Activist Aftershave are conceived, tested and 
manufactured. At least 100,000 people have 
made the journey since the factory opened 
its doors to the public 14 months ago, many 
returning more than once. Whether they 
come in support of the company’s pro- 
claimed socially responsible practices or for 
the sample of Pink Grapefruit Bath Gei, 
such loyally has helped turn The Body Shop 
into one of the world's most successful gree n 
enterprises. 

The tour begins in the Trading Post, a 
Body Shop megastore where we are invited 
to stock up on everything from Parsley and 
Mint Face Mask, to “What do we think we 
are?” inns. From there, we board a trolley for 
the hundred-yard ride to the entrance. A 
bored-loolring tour guide recites well-re- 
hearsed patter about the inanity of animal 
testing since rabbits don’t wear lipstick any- 
way. Inside we view a short promotional 
video that includes footage of the founder, 
Anita Roddick, protesting something out- 
side the Brazilian Embassy. 

We are ushered into a replica of Roddick’s 
first sparse store, opened in Brighton in 1976. 
At first, rite sold only 25 products, but bottled 
them in a variety of sizes to make tbe shelves 
look fuller. To lure customers, she sprayed 
perfume outside the door. Her neighbors, two 


funeral parlors, initially objected to the name 
The Body Shop, but the tenacious Roddick 
eventually won them over. 

Walking along the stark corridors, we pass 
the quality-control lab, where fresh-faced 
employees in jeans and white lab coats ex- 
amine water content and viscosity to the 
thumping beat of rock muse. In tbe product- 
evaluation clinic, new substances are 
smeared on Body Shop employee volunteers 
for testing. Ubiquitous signs sQentiy chant 
The Body Shop mantra: “Reuse, Refill, Re- 
cycle,” “Against Animal Testing” and 
“Trade not Aid.” 

We stroll on toward research and devdop- 
menL where dear jars of seaweed, adiud 
b eans, Brazil nuts mid beeswax stand amid 
the microscopes on gleaming white counter 
The halls are lined with photos of Roddick 
with various people in native dress: grinding 
millet in Niger, rubbing natural deodorant 
und er her arm in Ghana. 

Tbe trolley meets us outride for the short 
ride to Manufacturing — better known as 
“Anita’s Kitchen" — where enormous mix- 


ers chum op tons of creamy banana sham- 
poo. (The Body Shop goes through 5 tons of 
bananas a month, and still hasn’t found a 
quick WHy of peeling them.) 

In the rawingretfients room, we are invited 
to touch blue com, jojoba beans, cocoa butter 
and aloe vera plants. Crates of Philippines 
coconuts and Sicilian lemons line the shelves. 
In the purple smell diamber, we choke on 
dewberry, which, along with white musk, is 
thccompany’s most popular fragrance. 

i the cavernous warehouse, 


We drive over to i 


■ Tbe Whitney Museum of American 
Art at Philip Morris (funded by Philip 
Moms, of course) is showing “Double 
Foolscap," a “site-specific" exhibition by 
Hillary Leone and Jennifer 
MacDonald. This consists of theiT 
dotiung, which they have shredded 
and cooked into a pulp, and of 
photographs of two women with 
shaved heads. The press release says: 
“The juxtaposition inspires issues of 
soda! and gender identify as contracted 
through clothing. n Now don’t you 
wish you’d come up with that? 


equivalent in size to “26 tennis courts,” we’re 
told. lifelike figures surfing on bananas or 
riding Body Shop bottles are suspended 
from the ceiling. Workers in “Ex trac t is for- 
ever” T-shirts cruise around on forklifts and 
trolleys. Towering metal shelves hold cases 
of products ready for shipment There are 
L053 Body Shops in 44 countries. 

Outside, Body Shop trucks that say 
“Know the stray b ehin d the product” and 
“Practice random kindness and senseless 
acts of beauty” arc ready fra loading. Scat- 
tered billboaras also hammer home the Body 
Slop philosophy: “If you think you’re too 
small to be effective, you’ve never been in 
bed with a mosquito.” 

It is not a place for the politically incorrect 
Employees attend “values meetings,” where 


to them They arc given four hours’ paid leave 
each month for community service. Day care 
is available on-site. Tbe in-house plume list is 
alphabetized by first names. “They’re Gordon 
and Anita, not Mr. and Mrs. Roddick or Sr 
and Madam," says Gavin Grant the head of 
corporate communications. 

We gei our free samples, and are then 
dumped back at the Trading Post As far as 
Anita is concerned, you can never have too 
much Avocado Body Butter. 

Susan H. Greenberg is a journalist based in 
London. 


uissnn 


ACROSS 

1 Uniform material 
tlsfamfc 
pilgrimage 
ia tate opponent 
of apartheid 

14 ‘ da” 

(turndown) 

15 One otme back 
40. perhaps 

li Pole, for 
instance 
IT listens to 
i* ’Candida' 
playwright 
19 Rent 


20 You're looking 
at it 

23 Grow together 
again 

24 Savonarola's 
offense 

23 Uttariy miserable 
23 Be the victim of 
a sting? 
ao Vulgarian 
31 Meals 
3a Semi's front 
33 You're looking 
stir 

39 Laertes, ta 
Po Ion I us 


Solution to Puzzle of April 7 


snaHBiiEiE anaaaa 
asaacaa 
BHilHiQnciB □□□nan 
smasQS saasanaa 
□□aa anna aaaa 
□□an qhsq aaaaa 
□□□□□□□a □□□ 
-nnaas □□□□aa 
aasaanaa 
□□ aana □□□□ 
a □□□□ □□□□ 

_ ananas □□anas 
□□□□□a aaaaaaaa 
□□beies aaaaaaaa 
™Easci aasflBaaa 


40 Knocked in, as 
rputt 

4f F& -rn teed 

42 Admiral 
R recover 

43 " a Small 

Hotel" (Rodgers 
and Hart hit) 

45 Portuguese 
colony until 
1975 

48 Just 
conclusion? 

49 You're looking 

at it 

ss One given to 
stretchers 
5« More than a 
celebrity 

st Reddish-brown 

58 Re 

59 Schedule 
position 

coBrookhaven 

Laboratory site 

•I off (began) 

ex Patroness Of the 
Argonauts 
«3 Hacienda 
hands 

DOWN 

1 Granny. e.g. 

2 Sundowner 

3 Didn't lust pass 


4 Rapids shooters 
s Matched 
precisely 
8 Lacks, briefly 

7 Pina 

8 Pull in 

• Cowboy’s 
music maker 
io Suddenly 
ir Wheelchair 
accessway 
iz Bounders 

13“ Little 

Movement' 
(Dorsey 
Brothers hit) 

2i Go unused 
32 Proust’s “Ala 
Recherche du 

Temps “ 

38 Essentials 
asBtfyn., e.g. 

27 ‘Benny & " 

(1993 film) 

28 MTV 

correspondent 

Tabitha 

2eAnti-D.WJ.org. 
3i Gaueho’s 
weapon 
sa Basil'. e.g. 

33 Part of an 
Adenauer 
epithet 

34 Catfish Row 
soprano 

36 Without 
confidence 


37 Feminine 

38 Animation toy 

42 Flashy car 

43 ‘ 

Waterfowl* 

(Bryant poem) 


44 Minor setback 

45 Major key 
48 Bedlam 

47 Fuel holder 

48 'Animat House* 
house 


so Fruitless 
si Hussein's 
queen 

53 VIII. to Virgil 

33 By and by 

34 Minus 



a 





PtHa.bfOrtdA.RoCT, 


New York Times Edited by Will Shorn. 


























International Herald Tribune . 
Friday, April 8, 1994 
Page 9 


# C 


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F or Insomniacs, Madrid After Dark 


By Alan Riding 

Nrw York Tima Service 


Sage Aual/Sypm 

The Plaza Mayor . the city’s architectural jewel, is in the center of the old city known as Madrid de los A ustrias. 


AUSTRIA 


Vienna 

Museum des 20Jh. tel: 78-25-50, 
closed Mondays. Continuing /To 
June 19: "Picasso: Die Sammlung 
Ludwig." 160 paintings, drawings, 
bronzes and ceramics by Picasso, 
whose works occupy a central posi- 
tion in Hie an collection of Peter and 
Irene Ludwig. 

Osterreichisches Museum for 
Angewandte Kunst, tel: (1) 71136, 
closed Mondays. To July 17: “Tyr- 
anny ot Beauty: Architecture of the 
Stalin Era." Features architectural 
designs, sketches and models dem- 
onstrating the utopian force of Stalin- 
ist architecture, as well as posters 
using the theme of architecture as 
propaganda. 

BELGIUM ~ 

Brussels 

Musde d’Art Modems, tel: (2) 513- 
9630. closed Mondays. Continu- 
Ing/To June 12: “Hommage a Henry 
Evenepoel 1872-1699." 200 palrit- 
ings, pastels, drawings and watercol- 
ors representing street scenes, land- 
scapes and portraits created in 
France and Algeria by the Belgian 
painter who died at age 29. 

Tour Japonalse, tel: (2) 741-7211, 
closed Mondays. To May 15: “Au 
Temps des Shoguns: Les Arts Decor- 
at rfs de I'Epoque Mod erne au Jar 
pon." Features more than 100 works, 
including ceramics, textiles, lacquer- 
work and weapons from the Klnsel 
period. The exhibits, from the Nation- 
al Museum in Tokyo, date from the 
mid-1 6th century to the 1 850s. 

BRITAIN ~ 

Edinburgh 

Royal Museum of Scotland, tel: 
(31) 225-7534, open daily. To May 
29: "Are Medea: Art, Medicine and 
the Human Condition." Prints, draw- 
ings and photographs telling the rela- 
tionship between the history of man, 
medicine and visual arts, included 
are works by Lucas van Leyden, Do- 
rer. Rembrandt, Hogarth. Munch and 


from the Middle Ages. Features illu- 
minated books, pointings by Brue- 
ghel, Dorer, Watteau, Oudry and Mil- 
let, and manuscripts by Victor Hugo, 
Balzac and Zoia. 

Centre Georges Pompidou, Con- 
tinuing/To May 9: "La wile: Art et 
Architecture en Europe 1870-1993." 
Paintings, drawings and photographs 
show how the European towns of 
today were perceived, idealized and 
planned by architects and artists 
from the end ot the 19th century to 
dale. 

Grand Palais, tel: 44-13-17-30. 
closed Tuesdays. Continuing/To 
June 13: "Le Soleil et I'Etoite du 
North La France et la Suede au IBe 
Siecle." Paintings, sculptures, art ob- 
jects and architectural designs show- 
ing cultural exchanges between 
France and Sweden under the aegis 
of King Gustav ill in his efforts to 
emulate the Court ot Versailles. 
Mona Bismarck Foundation, tel: 47- 
23-38-88, dosed Sundays and Mon- 
days. To April 23: "L'Art des Peuples 
Raiiques, 3000 a 300 avant J. C." 


SllberschatzB.” Gold helmets, 
swords and silver treasures represent 
6,000 years of Romanian art. 
Munich 

Kunsthalle Der Hypo-Kulturstlf- 
tung, tel: (89) 22-44-12, open daily. 
To April 24: "Bonnard.” 140 oil paint- 
ings, one screen and seven sculp- 
tures including interior scenes, views 
from the artist's house m Le Canet in 
Southern France, still lifes, nudes and 
landscapes. 

nALY 

Florence 

Maggio Musicals Florentine), tel: 
(55) 211-158. April 26 to July 1: 
Features operas, induding Strauss's 
"Salome," conducted by Zubin 
Mehta ballet performances, an eve- 
rting of Japanese opera cfirected by 
Robert Wilson, and symphony con- 
certs. 

Mflan 

Internationale dell'Antiquario. tel: 
(2) 77181. April 9 to 17: Antique 
dealers from Italy and abroad will sell- 


JAPAN 


v 

in Art Gallery, lei: (41)330- 
5sed Sundays. To April 23: 
ilian Renaissance Print." 
the medium ot prints the 
sees of Renaissance painl- 
j spread across Europe. The 
l features works by Mante- 
nondi and Annibale Carraci. 

I Gallery, tel: (.71) 928- 
oen daily. Conhnuing/To 
"Salvador Dali: The Early 
50 paintings. 50 drawings 
ograpfts reflecting Dali's va- 
tyies, from neo-lmpression- 
mbohsm and Cubism, 
zademy of Arts, tei: (71) 
8. open dally. Continu- 
une 12: "Goya: Truth and 
' Features small-scale palnt- 
KJirtg the surviving oil pamt- 
uced by Goya lor the Sparv- 
Tapestry Factory, sketches 
of his religious works, and 
traits. 

ink Centre, tel: (7n 928- 
iril 26 to May I^Efeno- 
os." A festival celebrating 
imporary Italian composer 
Berio. Features concerts 
d by Berio, including Refi- 
lls re-working of Schubert s 
phony, and a U. K. premiere 
Sal opera "La Vera Stona. 
rdes a performance ot &n- 
vritten especially fw 



Silver and gold ornament from Romania (in Frankfurt). 


CANADA 


ontemporain, tel: 

, dosed Mondays. 
Apnl 24: "Robert 
>spective." A tribute 
otographer, mdud- 
phs tafcen between 

jx-Arts, tei: (514) 

I Mondays. Contin- 
: "Flora Photogra- 
jr m Photography, 
Present.” 200 pho- 
n composition and 
as symbolism and 


Features terra-cotta and bronze ob- 
jects. weapons, jewels and statuettes 
that were part cn the daily Bte of the 
peoples living In Italy before the 
Etruscans. 

Musde des Arts DdcoraUfs, tel: 42- 
60-32-14, closed Tuesdays. Contin- 
uing/To April 30: "La Faience de 
Delft" 200 tin-glazed earthenware 
plates, dishes, vases and decorative 
objects manufactured in the Dutch 
city of Delft in the 18th century. 
Musde du Louvre, tei: 40-20-51-51 , 
dosed Tuesdays. To May 2: "La 
Chimera de Monsieur Desprez.” 65 
prints, drawings and designs by 1 8th- 
century artist Louis-Jean Desprez, 
representing theatrical scenes and 
nightmarish visions. 

GERMANY 

Berlin 

Amerfka Haus Berlin, tel: (030) 
211-07-59. To March 18: Lewis 
Battr Rule Without Exception." A ret- 
rospective of the work of the Ameri- 
can documentanst. induding photo- 
graphs ol tract houses at the foot of 
the Rocky Mountains, the wastelands 
near San Francisco Bay and inner- 
city parking lots. 

Frankfurt 

Schim Kunsthalle, tei: (069) 29-98- 
82-0 open daily. Contmulng/To 
April' 17: "Gold helm, Schwert und 


paintings, sculpture, silverware and 
jewelry, furniture, carpets and tapes- 
tries. At the same time. Sforza Castle 
will exhibit its collection of decorative 
arts. 

Rome 

ViPa Medici, Tel: (6) 676-1 1, dosed 
Mondays. To May 1 : "From Elegance 
to Transgression." 56 portraits paint- 
ed in the 20s by Tamara de LempJcka 
who came to Paris after fleeing Bol- 
shevik Russia and stuc&ed with Mau- 
rice Denis and Andre Lhote. 

Turin 

Galleria Cfvica d'Arte Modems e 
Contemporaries, let (011) 5765- 
3740, dosed Mondays. To May 8: 
"Fedenco Peliti: Un Fotografo Pie- 
montese m India aJ Tempo delta Regi- 
na Vitiorta." Photographs of India by 
this 19th-century Italian artisan. 

Venice 

Palazzo Grass!, tel: (41 ) 522-1375, 
open daily. To Nov. 6: "’Rinasct- 
mento: Da Brunelleschi a Michelan- 
gelo - La Rappresentszione dell' 
Ajchrtettura." Following the restora- 
tion of Antonio da Sangaflo’s 1539 
wood model of the Basilica di San 
Pietro, the exhibit brings together aU 
the major specialists in the field, from 
Actormann and Frommef to Bruschi 
aid Da and features 30 archi- 
tectural models built during the 15th 
and 16th centuries. 


jum of Modem Art, 

open daily- Conttnu- 
^atjara: Aborig.- 
on bark, canvas and 
Abor^m 3 ! ®rtlsis 111 



3. tel: 47-03 - 
jne 26: "Pay- 
»t la Terre en 
'au XXe Sie- 
and literature 



| T - ■ ■ — — 1 

Photograph by Sebasuao Salgfido, in Lausanne show. 


Tokyo 

Museum of Modern Art, Saitama, 
tel: (48) 824-01 1 1 , closed Mondays. 
To May 5: "The Victoria & Albert 
Museum: British Design at Home." 
Drawings, furniture, wallpaper, post- 
era and industrial designs tracing the 
trends in British design from the late 
19th century to the present. 

THE NETHERLANDS ~ 

Amsterdam 

Museum het Rembrandthuis, tel: 
(20) 624-9486, open dally. Contin- 
uing /To May 29: "Color and Refine- 
ment- Drawings from the Unicomo 
Collection." 80 drawings by Dutch 
masters of the 1 7th and 18th centu- 
ries, including Btoemaert, Dusart, 
van de Velde, Prank and Troost. The 
subjects include biblical scenes, 
landscapes, portraits, animals and 
stQl lifes. 

Het Mutiek Theater, tek (20) 551- 
8282. Peter Schafs "Symposlon," 
an opera about the death of Tchai- 
kovsky wiH be directed by Ian Strasfo- 
gel and conducted by Flans Vonk, 
with Dale Duesing, Thomas Randle 
and Harry Paeters. April 29 (world 
premiere). May 2, 6. 9. 13, 16, 19 
and 22- 

SWEPEM 

Stockholm 

KutturhuseUel: (8) 24-23-22, open 
daily. To Aug. 28: "Leonardo da Vin- 
ci." In adefition to models, drawings, 
■facsimiles, manuscripts and paint- 
ings, including "Lady with an Er- 
mine," a number of multimedia ki- 
osks enable the visitor to delve into 
Renaissance thinking, the lite of Leo- 
nardo and the versatility of the man. 

SWITZERLAND 

Lausanne 

Muste de L'Bysfie, tei: (21) 617- 
48-21, closed Mondays. To May 29: 
"La Main de L'Homrne." A display of 
photographs by Sebastiao Salgado 
on the conditions of manual workers 
throughout the world. 

MarUgny 

Formation Pierre Gtanadda, tei; 
(26) 22-39-78, open daily. To June 
12: "Dessms et Aquarelles des Col- 
lections Sutsses et du Musee Rodin." 
Features a lesser-known aspect of 
the French sculptor's creation with 
66 drawings, sketches, prims and 
watercoiors. Twelve monumental 
sculptures are simultaneously exhib- 
ited in the garden of the foundation. 
Zurich 

Kunsthaus, tei: (1) 251-6755, 
closed Mondays. Continuing/To 
May 8: "Richard Geretl: Das Ge- 
sarntwerk." The works of the Austri- 
an Expressionist painter Richard 
Geretl (1883-1908). The exhibition 
features landscapes, life-size por- 
traits. including a portrait of Arnold 
Schoenberg and his wife, and self- 
portraits. 

UNITED STATES 

Atlanta 

Museum of Art tel: (404) 898- 
To May 29: "itaBan and Neth- 
erlandish Drawings from the Steiner 
Collection." A group of B5 drawings, 
dating from the 1 6th to the 1 8th cen- 
tury, and including works by Titian 
and Bronzino, Rembrandt, Parmigia- 
nino and Tiepolo among others. 
Chicago 

The Art Institute, tel: (312) 443- 
3600, open daily. To April 24: 
"Thinking Is Form: The Drawings of 
Joseph Beuys." 1 BO works spanning 
five decades of the artist's career and 
representing the core of his creative 
output The pieces encompass a vari- 
ety ot media: pencil, watercoior, oil, 
blood, beeswax, chocolate and dried 
plaits, and reveal the artist's diverse 
sources inclucfing alchemy, Christian 
tradition, mythology, literature and 
science. 

New York 

Museum of Modem Art, tel: (212) 
708-9400, dosed Wednesdays. To 
May 17: ‘Three Masters at the Bau- 
haus: Lyonei Feininger, Vasily Kan- 
dinsky and Paul Klee." Printed work 
by three masters who taught at the 
Bauhaus during the 1920s, induding 
Kandinsky's pnnr portfolio “Sma/I 
World." some of Klee's color litho- 
graphs, and Fdninger's woodcuts. 
The Plerpont Morgan Library, tel: 
(212) 685-0006. closed Mondays, 
to April 17: “Gutenberg and the 
Genesis of Printing." Features three 
Gutenberg Bibles and a reconstruc- 
tionot Gutenberg's press. Also docu- 
ments the geographical spread of 
movable type aid the change tram 
manuscript to printed-book format 
Washington 

National Gallery Of Art, tet (202) 
842-6353. open daily. To May 8: 
"Egon Schiele." A retrospective of 
70 paintings, watercoiors and draw- 
ings by the Austrian Expressionist. 
The exhibition Includes portraits, 
landscapes and still Mas and his only 
major sculpture, "Self-Portrait."' 


M ADRID — Athens and Rome 
are far older, Paris and Prague 
are more beautiful, but what 
European capital can match 
the voluble, gregarious and insomniac in- 
habitants of Madrid? Not that the city lacks 
fine monuments and museums. Yet, some- 
how, it is the Madrildios who provide the 
real show. They live their city like no other. 
They seem incapable of staying at home, 
they love to rub shoulders in crowds, they 
talk, eat and drink well into the night, 
ramble through streets before dawn 
well, they never seem to sleep. 

So it takes a special energy to get to know 
Madrid And, because its streets are noisy, 
polluted and clogged with traffic on week- 
days, the weekend is the best time to do so. 
The city has 5 million inhabitants and 
sprawls far and wide, but much of it can be 
ignored What entices is the old city with the 
grand Plaza Mayor at its heart, the Madrid 
de los Austrias, as it is known in honor of the 
Habsburg kings who built it in the late 16th 
and 17th centuries. This is where the Madri- 
lefios like to hang OuL 
I am talking of a 3 -square-mile (7.7- 
square-kilometer) area that stretches from 
tire Royal Palace to the broad avenue where 
the Prado Museum stands, from the Gran 
Via to the Fuerta de Toledo and the narrow 
streets that run through the Lavapi£$ district 
toward the Atocha railroad station. And it is 
in this Madrid that a mind-boggling concen- 
tration of tapas bars, tabemas, restaurants, 
dance halls and nightclubs switches on the 
city by nighL 

The Plaza Mayor is the city’s architectural 
jewel and it acts as a magnet for Madrilerios. 
Yet it is a measure of Madrid's relative youth 
that the vast square dates only from 1619. A 
half -century earlier, Rrihp II moved the court 
to what was then a small town while ire buOt 
the monastery at El EscoriaL. 30 miles (50 
kilometers) to the wesL But it was only in the 
17th century that Madrid became Spain's 
capital And that is when Philip IH set about 
building Madrid de los Austrias, starting with 
the Plaza Mayor, where he now sits, an eques- 
trian statue, watching the tourists go by. 

Vehicles are banned from the square, winch 
can be reached through any of nine arches. 
Painted in terra-cotta, the only break in its 
symmetry is the old Royal Bread House, now 
decorated with bucolic frescoes. Arcades, 
crowded on Sunday mornings with stalls sell- 
ing stamps, old coins and odd documents, run 
around the square. Cafes and restaurants oc- 
cupy the periphery of the square. 

A noisier gathering place for Madriknos 
(and immigrants) is the Puerta del Sol. a plaza 
with neoclassical buildings that is consaered 
the center of Madrid — that is, all distances 
from the city are measured from a plaque on 
the. sidewalk in from of the regional govern- 
ment offices. Along Calle AlcaM leading off 
the plaza, however, is the San Fernando Royal 
Academy of Fine Arts, which has works by 
many Spanish masters and complements the 


Prado's larger collection. Also a stone’s throw 
from the Puerta del Scd is the 16th-century 
Convent of the Descahas Reales, which is 
now both a museum of primitive religious art 
and a national monument in its own right. 
Just down Calle Arena! stands the 19th-centu- 
ry Royal Opera House, which has been under- 
going years of renovation. 

B ehind the opera house stand the gardens 
of the Plaza de Orierne, which look out to- 
ward the 18th-century Royal Palace end the 
20th-century Almndena Cathedral both just 
outside the Madrid de los Austrias, as is the 
nearby church of San Francisco el Grande. 
Built by the Bourbon kings but no longer the 
royal residence, the palace is wrath a visit for 
its collection of arms and armor and its re- 
1 cadent Banqueting Hall and Throne 


The Calle Mayor leads back to the center 
through the oldest part of the city. The Plaza 

The old city is a mind-bog- 
gling concentration of tapas 
bars , tabemas , restaurants , 
dance balls and dubs . 

de la Villa, which indudes the 17th-century 
City Hall and the Lujan Tower, a remnant of 
15th-century Madrid, is one of my favorite 
respites from an overactive city. Beyond the 
plaza, there are three churches worth peep- 
ing into — San Miguel San Pedro and San 
Isidro, the last of these containing the relics 
of Madrid’s patron sainL And it is at the 
Church of San Isidro that the quiet of a 
Sunday morning ends abruptly in the dor’s 
busy Sunday flea mark cl Known as El Ras- 
tro, it is jammed with stalls of clothes, leath- 
er goods, jewelry and handicrafts. 

No trip to Madrid is complete without a 
visit to the dry’s "golden triangle” of muse- 
ums, which, strictly speaking, are outside 
Habsburg Madrid — but only just. A visit to 
the Prado, with its collection of paintings by 
VelAzquez, Goya, El Greco, Murillo, Ribera, 
Zurbarin and Rubens, is a memorable expe- 
rience for any art lover, but so is the Thys- 
seD-Bomemisza collection, with works from 
Italian primitives to 1960s Pop Art, winch 
since its installat ion in 1992 has a permanent 
home in the neoclassical Palario de Villaher- 
mosa. Finally, Spanish modem and contem- 
porary ait induding Picasso’s "Guernica,” 
has recently been brought together in the 
Reina Sofia An Center. 

Exhausted? Well before changing gear for 
Madrid’s night life, a though l: The siesta 
may not have been invented for tourists, but 
it is an essential instrument of survival in a 
city where people meet fra dinner at 10 
P.ni, where shows begin at midnight and 
where many nightdubs and bars stay open 
until 4 A/M. or later. Thus revived, where 
better to start than the beer halls and tapas 
bars around the Plaza de Santa Ana? With 
spring in the air, crowds now spill out of the 
CerviKeria Alemana and the Cerveceria San- 
ta Ana; nearby, on the Manuel F. Gonzfilez 


passageway, don’t miss the splendid Viva 
Madrid! bar, with its tum-of-the-century 
tiles and carved wooden Off the 

square in the Plaza del Angel the Cafe 
Central is also very popular. 

The practice of stopping fra tapas and a 
cafia (a glass of draft oera) before dinner is 
very much an institution and, in truth, some 
people never move on, making do with fried 
sqmd or meatballs or ham or blood sausage 
or whatever takes their fancy. For dinner, 
though, the choice is enormous. On this 
latest visit, I discovered la Basilica, a restau- 
rant tucked away on the Calle de la Bolsa, 
that is, as its name suggests, a former church. 
Indeed, at one time it was the chapel where 
those condemned to death could say a final 
prayer before being marched along an un- 
derground passage to the Plaza Mayor. At 
different times it also served as Madrid’s 
first stock exchange, as a Masonic lodge and 
as a warehouse. Now restored, it offers good 
Spanish cuisine — its specialty is fish and 
seafood — in truly grand surroundings fra 
around $150 for two with wine. 

Throughout the old town are all types of 
restaurants, elegant and simple, pricey and 
reasonable. Two people can dine well for 
$150 or for $50 — or fra a lot less if you opt 
for tapes, no doubt one reason you nave to 
elbow your way to the counter in many tapas 
bars. In the expensive range one favorite of 
mine is Juhdn de Tolosa, a new restaurant on 
the Calle Cava Baja that combines the tradi- 
tional deh cades of the Basque country with 
some typical dishes from Navarre, such as 
pork ribs, blood sausages, kidney beans and 
cabbage. 

O N the Cava Baja, I could not resist 
stopping for a sherry in a tiny 
Andalusian bar called La Soled; in 
a room beyond the bar, there is 
always someone playing and singing flamen- 
co to homeack Andalusians. This is not the 
foot- stamping, skirt-swirling kind of flamen- 
co of tourist shows, but the solemn came 
faondo of broken hearts. Later I went to Casa 
Patas at 10 Calle Canizares where, for the $5 
price of a drink, I heard a more professional 
flamenco show, also with only a guitarist and 
a singer. Frequent cries of "OI6!” from the 
mainly Spanish audience assured me this 
was the real thing . 

As the night advances, there is the choice of 
slowing down — tbeBarLasDescalzasontbe 
Plaza de las Descalzas Reales has quiet music 
and soft armchairs — or speeding up: El 
Morocco at 7 Calle Marquis de Leganes is a 
disco that draws the hot names of Madrid's 
movie and fashion world. Students seem to 
favor the smoke-filled tabemas tucked into 
the basements of the Plaza Mayor along Calle 
de Cuchflleros, where student minstrels 
known as tunas perform. Fra the all-night 
crowd, though, there is Calle Huertas, empty 
and scruffy by day but almost impossible to 
walk down at 2 A. M. because of the crowds 
1 in and out of dozens of bars and clubs. 

, like Popular! and the Otono Club, have 
hye music; others, like 47, combine bars and 
discos; none looked empty. 



Rjriurd Bcnarn/IHT 


Exclusive! Golf Course Secrets 


By Robert K. McCabe 

International Herald Tribune 


ARIS — Years ago a Scottish cad- 
die named Lang Willie, trying but 
tries ofi 


92 


P failing to distill the mysteries of golf 
fra a respected but excitable univer- 
sity professor at St Andrews, lost his temper " 
at last “Now hear, Professor,” said Lang 
Willie, "teaching the lads at the college Latin 
and Greek is easy work, but when ye come to 
play golf, ye maun hae a head.” 

Now a head for golf is not an easy thing to 
acquire, as that professor and many others 
have found, but it is absolutely essential if 
one is to play this royal and ancient game 
wdL It is rate thing to bang and blast one’s 
way round a course, damning rate’s dubs 
ana any poor wee caddie who happens to be 
within earshot but it is quite another to 
consider a course as an intricate manmade 
puzzle that with patience and brains can be 
sorted out neatly by reading the hazards of 
greens and fairways. Ulcers to the first; un- 
common satisfaction to the second. 

Who set those traps? One of the best- 
known golf architects in the wodd, a bright- 
eyed, energetic American named Robert 
Treat Jones Jr. He is the 54-year-old son of a 
famed pioneer coorse-ricsigner, and father 
and son are held in high respect — though 
not necessarily deep affection — by golfers 
round the world whoVe been flummoxed 
and bamboozled by his elegantly exasperat- 
ing creations. Jones’s courses brighten land- 
scapes from the United States and Europe to 
Moscow, Shanghai and Indonesia and some 
most surprising spots in between. (But it 
should be noted here that the family is no kin 
to the late Bobby Jones, one of golfs all-time 
great players and a family friend. The youn- 


; father as “the only two Welshmen in the 
world who can't sing.") 

He is a rough man to pin down, this high- 
far-ranging Cahforman-by-way-of - 


New-Jersey, but the other day he paused in 
Paris en route from Lisbon and the Portu- 
guese Open to the opening of a new Jones 
course near Bangkok to talk about his latest 
project. It’s a book — “my first and my last,” 
he says — called ”Golf by Design,” which 
decodes the mysteries of many of the world's 
great courses and off era ideas on coping with 
their assorted physical and psychological 
hazards. Is be emptying all his secrets out of 
his golf bag? Well quite a few — perhaps not 


afi. But he is completely opes about his 
philosophy. 

"Golf is a game of attack and defense, like 
all games,” he says, “and as an architect, I 
am the defender." His defenses stud all those 
lovdy long fairways with their ball-devour- 
ing rough, those jade-liie greens_ 
by crocodile- toothed bunkers, 
ards are not there by 
malicious design, as 
Hhagrin 

To 

ers, course architects long have 


Players round the world 
have been flummoxed by 
the exasperating creations 
of Robert Trent Jones Jr. 

tioaal sand traps and bunkers. Nowadays, 
sophisticates like Jones deal heavily in illu- 
sion as well manipulating light and shadow 
and using even the prevailing winds to hide a 
hole’s horrors from the unwary or to tempt 
rash shotmakers into trying to power past 
unforgiving rough or through implacable 
trees. 

“Golfers shouldn’t go by what their eyes 
tell them,” he says. Distances can be decep- 
tive, targets can be concealed. There’s always 
plenty of hard information available, he re- 
minds ns, and a good caddy’s deep knowl- 
edge of the course can be invaluable: But still 
more important is simple foresight. 

“AU the great golfers have game plans,” 
Janes says. Before a tournament begins, 
stars like Jack Nicklans, Bernhard Laager 
and Nick Faldo pace off the courses them- 
selves, taking meticulous note of distance 
and hawmlK. Golf after all is a matter of 
finding the right way to the pin; Jones’s job 
is io mak e that path as hard to find as 
possible. 

“I am the general under siege," he says. “I 
use moats and towers for my defenses. If 
someone invents gunpowder to replace bows 
and arrows, I have to find new defenses.” 
He takes his time planning those defenses, 
pacing for days or weeks over the chosen 
terrain before turning the bulldozers loose. 
“I listen to the land,” he says. “I call myself a 
nature architect I don't add to a coarse what 


isn’t there. You study the land and winds 
and the temperatures and the surroundings 
and a theme will appear." 

A theme? Sand, salt brush and gales for a 
seaside links, say, or deep woods for the new 
Moscow course, where m summer you can 
play almost all night Or Mediterranean-like 
light and shadow and curves for Perth on 
Australia’s west coast 

Sometimes there’s local psychology to 
consider as weH In Asia, where Jones has 
designed more than 40 courses, there’s less' 
emphasis on challenging the golfer, more 
effort to make the game a simple pleasure.. 
Speaking of his new Bangkok course, the 
President Country dub, he notes its bunkers 
are gentle and its fairways generous. “Play- 
ers in the Far East are generally beginners,” 
be says. “They like to have fun;, hitting the 
ball finding it «nri hitting it again.” 

In China and Japan, in particular, Asian 
preoccupation with “face” or self-esteem 
comes into play. One mustn’t embarrass an 
Oriental golfer. “The Japanese want a 
friendly course,” he says, rate with wide 
fairways, shallow traps and welcoming 
greens. He is convinced the game has a great 
future in Asia. “Golf suits Asians,” he points 
ouL “It does not demand great strength, and 
it rewards braininess and precision.” 

He is a smidgen less enthusiastic about 
~~ in France, remembering that the *90s 
ave seat a falling-off in Game enthusiasm 
after a boutiquey boom in the '80. “With its 
great natural beauty and varied terr ain ,” he 
says, “the country is a natural for golf, and 
the real golfers will stick around.” Mean- 
while, there are golf courses for sale all over 
France. 

How about Russia? His Moscow project 
has been long on the road but now there is 
real progress, just 18 miles (30 kilometers) 
from Red Square. “We’ve got nine holes in 
play there now,” he says, ^and the second 
nine will be open by SepL 1 ” There were 
some major hazards to overcrane, he recalls: 
“The Russians are obsessed by security and 
fora long time refused us accurate maps of 
the terrain." 

And speaking of secretiveness, does “Golf 
by Design" (Little, Brown and Co., Barton 
and London) really give away all his tricks of 
the trade? 

“I still have a few up my sleeve,” he said, 
reluctantly. “And even if T give you all the 
secrets, you’re the one who still has to play 
iL” For most of the world’s golfers, that’s the 
most terrifying hazard of all 
















































































I 


ft 



** 


International Herald Tribune, Friday, April 8, 1994 


Page 11 



INDEX: 11 

“■sssja 1 semes- 

oymoomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 = 100. 



150 


Asaa/PacHi 


Aflpnn twghtng; 32% 
Ctosa 127.08 Prw.: 125.90 


Europe 

■39 

Approx weighting: 37% 
Close: IllJSPravj 11061 

n 


130 i 


110 {«.„■« 



1983 

1994 

1983 

1994 

| North America 


Latin America 


Approx, weighting 26% 
Close: 91 .84 Prey.: B1 .20 

n 

Approx, weighing: 9% 
Close: NAPiw: 13031^ 




N 

1993 

E? World Index 

The index necks US. dakar vnkws cl stocks he Tokyo, New York; London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, CHIo, Danmark, Finland, 
Franca, Germany, Hong Kona, Italy, Mexico, NaOwrianda, Now Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Swit z er lan d and Venazueta. Far Tokyo, New Yarkand 
London, me Max is composed ol the 20 lop touaa to turns of mukat caf d t u & ui ti on , 
otherwise the ten top stocks are tracked. 


Industrial Sectors 


Thu. 

doaa 


Prey. 


Tin. 

etas* 


Prw. 

doaa 


Energy 106.65 105.30 +128 CepMGnodB 109,75 109,70 40.05 

jWMw 119.75 128-90 -7.10 Rawlhtenate 121.78 124.96 -Z54 

Finance 115,42 1142B +1.00 ConsuwGoods 96.46 9056 -0.08 

Services 1 16-55 115.91 4955 MsctfaneoMB 125-56 12536 49.16 

For more information about the Index, a booklet is avafe pfe tree of charge. 

Writs (0 Trib Index, 181 Avenue Charles de GauBe, 92521 NeuBy Cedex. France. 


O International Herald Trflxme 


Olivetti 

Loss 

Narrows 

Revenue Increase 
Shores Up Result 

Bloomberg Business News 

MILAN — Olivetti SpA, the Ital- 
ian computer company, said Thurs- 
day its net loss narrowed in 1993 
because it cut costs and increased its 
share of a depressed European com- 
puter marke t 

“Despite the serious crisis in the 
world information-technology in- 
dustry and a severe economic reces- 
sion, in 1993 Olivetti returned to 
growth and higher market shares,’' 
said Carlo De BenedeUi, the com- 
pany’s rihairmati , 

Olivetti said its net loss was cut 
to 464.6 billion lire ($280 million) 
from 650 billion lire in 1992. It was 
the third straight year of losses, 
bringing the total losses for the 
period to more than 15 trillion lire. 

The 1993 loss included a one- 
time charge of 255 billion lire to 
cover job ehrmnations. 

Revenue rose 7 percent, to &61 
trillion lire, breaking a two-year de- 
cline. The company said prices for 
its products continued to fall in 1 993 
as a price warm European comput- 
ers persisted. But unit sales rose and 
operating costs fell 6 percent as Oli- 
vetti reduced its staff and simplified 
management structures. 

The company said its European 
market share in personal comput- 
ers rose to 65 percent from 62 
percent, in notebook computers to 
6.0 percent from 4.0 percent and in 
ink-jet printers to 62 percent from 
5.5 percent. Olivetti said the 
growth trend was con turning so far 
this year. 

The roughly 30 percent decline 
at the Uni against most major cur- 
rencies last year did not benefit the 
company because any competitive 
gam was wiped out by higher costs 
for imported components, it said. 

The company’s net debt fell to 
797.9 bSUoQ lire from 960.5 billion 
lire, cut by a 903 billion-lira share 
issue last year. 

Olivetti also said it would ad 
stockholders to approve the issue 
of 250 milli on new shares to be 
reserved for a convertible bond 
that will be issued within the next 
few months. 


Rising Rates: So What? 

U.S. Economists Say Growth Is Sturdy 


By Steven Pearlstein 
and Clay Chandler 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The recent turmoil on Wall 
Street reflects the ample fact that interest rates in 
the United States are rising rather than falling for 
the first time in nearly a decade, forcing specula- 
tors and investors to take another look at the 
assumptions upon which they had made their fi- 
nancial bets. 

But the consensus among economists is that the 
rise in rates will not choke off the current expan- 
sion, because the American economy now is strong 
enough to overcome iL 

“Near term, these higher interest rates and mar- 
ket gyrations are scary for everyone," said Allen 
Sinai, chief economist for Ixhrnan Brothers Inc. 
“But in point of fact, the amount of damage to the 
economy should not be great.” 

“The rate of growth in the economy is deter- 
mined by a number of factors, including incomes, 
exports, jobs,” said Gordon Richards, chief econo- 
mist of the National Association of Manufactur- 
ers. “And right now, those factors are providing 
the economy with enough momentum." 

This rabn m the face of rising rates may seem at 
odds with recent economic history. Last year, after 
all , falling interest rates were widely credited with 
getting the economy out of low gear. Would a rise 
in rates now have the opposite meet? 

Not exactly, say economists. How much a rise in 
interest rates win hurt the economy depends in 
large part on what is wmsrng rates to rise. In this 
case, the cause is Kkely to be benign. 

If intoest rates are rising because investors see 
si gns that the economy is growing too rapidly, that 
a rise in rates is a symptom of strength. It means 
that the economy has plenty of momentum and 
that it is taking steps on its own to slow down and 
avoid trig gering an inflationary spiral 

If, on the other bund, rates are rising because 
investors have overreacted in some way — either to 
signals coming from the Federal Reserve Board or 
to speculative excesses of some traders — then 
rates are likely to come bad: down in the next few 


months as this realization sinks in. Many econo- 
mists now expect that long-term rates will drop 
below 7 percent by autumn, which would be about 
half a percentage point below this week's peak. 

Economists also stress that the direct relation- 
ship between interest rates and economic activity 
is often overstated, even in such rate-sensitive 
segments rtf the economy as housing, business 
investment and major consumer purchases such as 
automobiles. 

In the housing sector, Lyle Gramley, consulting 
economist for the Mortgage Bankers Association 


Whether higher interest 
rates hurt the economy will 
depend on why they are 
rising. In this case, the cause 
is likely to be benign. 


and a former Fed governor, said potential buyers 
could look at mortgage intoest rates in either of 
two ways: that rates are higher than at any tune in 
the last 15 months, or that, even at 8 percent, they 
are still near their lowest point in the last 20 years. 

“The average individual will lake the long-term 
view, particularly if he is feeling confident abort his 
job and his income,” Mr. Gramley said. ' 
rates may slow things down a bit, but at these lc 
they certainly won’t kill the bousing recovery.” 

In the short term, in fact, rising rates could give a 
quick boost to the housing market, according to 
Barry Bosworth, an economist at the Brookings 
Institution, by encouraging people who had beat 
planning to buy a house lata- in the year to move 
now, before rates rise again. 

As for investment, spending by American busi- 
nesses on new equipment rose 11.8 percent last 
year, but most of it seemed to have little to do with 
low interest rates. In most cases, rising profits have 

See ECONOMY, Page 12 


Daimler-Benz 

Sets Rights Issue 
And Cuts Payout 


Reuters 

BONN — Daimler-Benz AG 
said Thursday that it would slash 
its dividend on 1993 earning to 8 
Deutsche marks from 13 DM a 
year earlier and would launch a 
rights issue to finance expansion. 

The 38 percent cut in the divi- 
dend was maser than expected by 
analysts. andDaimler’s stock price 
fell 4.10 DM to 868.40 DM. It had 
fallen as low as 865 DM after the 
news was released. 

Daimler, the biggest German in- 
dustrial company said, the divi- 
dend reduction reflected the diffi- 
cult business conditions 
experienced during 1993 and 
caused by the worldwide recession, 
as well as high one-time restructur- 
ing costs for work force reductions. 

Edzard Reuter, chairman of the 
management board, said recently 
that the company’s net profit had 
plunged to around 600 million 
Deutsche marks ($350 million) in 
1993 from 1.45 billion DM a year 
earlier. 

The company, which owns Mer- 
cedes-Benz AG, AEG AG, and 
Deutsche Aerospace AG, plans to 
50,000 jobs from the total 
force of around 373,000 it 
. in rmd-1993. 

Jaiinler confirmed it would 
launch a rights issue, giving share- 
holders the right to subscribe for 
new shares at a discount sometime 
this year, but it did not give details. 
It said the issue was needed to 
support the company's growth. 


chop 

work 


Gerhard Liener, the chief finan- 
cial officer, has said Daimler would 
like to make an issue of shares 
wrath 2 billion to 3 billion DM. 

Hans- Joachim Pilz, chief analyst 
at M.M. Warburg in Hamburg, 
said be thought that Daimler would 
proceed with the issue as early as 
this month or in May. 

Most analysts had expected a div- 
idend of 10 DM. “Then 600 million 

Dresdner Bank plans higher 
payout Page 13. 

mark net profit would have been 
enough even to pay an unchanged 
dividend," said Mr. Pilz. “It reflects 
a terrible operating performance. 
Almost all their businesses except 
cars are deep in the red.” 

A London analyst said the move 
would disappoint U.S. investors. In 
October, Daimler became the first 
Gennan company to be listed on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

Analysts pointed out, however, 
that with Daiml er’s performance 
likely to improve strongly in 1994, a 
higher dividend was in prospect 
Despite the net profit of 600 mil- 
lion DM, which was bolstered by 
heavy drawing on reserves, the cran- 

E is likely to show a loss of 1 
i to 25 billion DM under UJL 
accounting rules, which do not allow 
the use of reserves. 

Daimler will detail its 1993 earn- 
ings next Tuesday. 


Waking Up From Information Highway Dreams 


By Paul Farhi 
and Sandra Sugawara 

Washington Pat Service 

WASHINGTON — The reality 
of the information superhighway is 
meeting up with the rhetoric. 

The recent collapses of three high- 
profile business deals are the most 
tan gible signs that futuristic UCW 
communications services will not ar- 
rive in your living room for many 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


Beijing Raises the Stakes Too High 


By Reginald Dale 

IntemaU<maI Herald Tribune 

W ASHINGTON — China has 
decided to call America’s bluff 
in the high-risk poker game 
over trade and human rights — 
and then raise the stakes some more. But now 
China may be bluffing too. 

By re-arresting the country’s most promi- 
nent dissident, Wei Jingsheng, China u i tell- 
ing President Bill Clinton it does not bdreve 
he will dare slap punitive tariffs on Chinese 
exports by withdrawing most-favored-nation 

treatment. . 

But China is also piling a fistful ot new 
chips on the table. The game is no longerjust 
a test of nerves over Mr. Clinton sthreat to 
suspend the special status unless Otmaag- 
rrifkantiy improves its human nghlsrecortL 
China is now inviting the rest of the world 
to join in. Beijing is gambling with its entne 
international trading status, which means the 
future of its economic raoraw 
Beijing is warning that if too high apnceis 
puto?ta bid to join tbeGenaal Agec^nt 
in Tariffs and Trade. OrnajJ 
dash imports and produce what it needs at 
tome— with the benefit, it ***£*£ 
investment- “The bottom line is equal treat 

mail " said a Chinese official. ^ _ 

If that is really official 
lerous. There is no way GATT ran 
equal treatment to a country the Chi 
na, where the govenunent stai pla^ ^ 
sectors of the economy and murrferes mas- 

to impose 

&ExvS 23£ 


i ail and go home. The kind of import substi- 
tution regime that the Chinese official is 
proposing is a recipe for economic disaster. 

As the World Bank notes in the opening 
sentence of a major new report on Chinese 
trade, “Since the launching of the reform 
program in 1979, the promotion of external 
trade has been centra] to China’s efforts to 
modernize its economy." 

China, in fact, should be heading in pre- 
cisely the opposite direction tqjhat which it is 

By re-arresting Wei 

Jingsheng, Hiinfl is telling 

President Bill Clinton 

that it does not believe he 

will dare slap punitive 

tariffs on Chinese exports 

by withdrawing most- 

favored-nation treatment, 

threatening Indeed, that is the central theme 
of the World Bank repeal, winch calls for 
urgent steps to open up the country to im- 
ports — not least for China’s own sake. 

Although trade is less planned than it was, 
more than half of China’ s imports are still 
subject to controls, as are 15 percent of its 
exports and over 50 percent of its foreign 
exchange earnings. 

The World Bank quite rightly urges China 
to remove these controls and introduce cur- 
rency convertibility. With its current account 
surplus, plenty of foreign exchange reserves 
and price reforms well advanced, now is a 


good time for China to take the plunge. 

Liberalizing imparts would take some of 
the heal out of the ^wiOTay^and shake up 

would smooth China's way into GATT, 
which is in everyone’s best interests, and 
defuse tensions with major trading partners, 
including the United States. 

Unfortunately, the poker game over hu- 
man rights is distracting attention from this 
and other key areas of relations between the 
United States and China. 

The problem is that the Chinese are mak- 
ing it increasingly difficult fra 1 Mr. Cfinton to 
get off the most-favored-nation hook — 
which he would deariy love to do — and it is 
largely his own fault 

As James R. LiHey points enut in the new 
book “Beyond MFN," published by the 
American Enterprise Institute, the Chinese 
have surely been encouraged to challenge Mr. 
Clinton by the way he consistently folds 
when foreigners stand up to him — be they 
Haitian hoodlums or Somali warlords. 

But China now risks going too far. If Mr. 
Clinton is forced to suspend the preferential 
treatment, die World Bank estimates the cost 
to China would be between $7 billion and 
S15J2 billion a year in lost aments. 

Instead of raising the stakes, China should 
be trying to let Mr. din ton leave the table 
with scans of his chips in his pocket. 

Mr. Clinton should understand that the 
best course is to integrate China into the 
world trading system. That will both be good 
for American business and help to create a 
prosperous, educated Chinese middle class. 
AD Asian experience suggests that this, not 
five-card-stud diplomacy, is the best way to 
improve human rights. 


years, despite assurances given by 
industry and government officials as 
recently as a lew months ago. 

“A lot of people are coming to 
realize it’s going to be a lot more 
complicated than we had thought,'’ 
said Dwight Allen, a Washington- 
based tdecotnmuni cations special- 
ist with Deloitte & Touche, the ac- 
counting and consulting firm. 

Companies are discovering that 
creating the much- talked- about na- 
tional communications system is 
laden with problems in funding, 
regulations and technology, ac- 
cording to people both inside and 
outside the businesses that are try- 
ing to build it 

None of them are suggesting that 
the information superhighway will 
not get built, just that early predic- 


tions of its quick completion were 
grossly overstated. Some execu- 
tives, such as Steve Eflros, the head 
of a cable-television trade associa- 
tion in Fairfax, Virginia, now refer 
to the phenomenon as the “infor- 
mation superhypeway." 

Industry analysts, such as Rich- 
ard Shaffer of the New York-based 
consulting firm Technologic Part- 
ners, say setbacks should have been 
foreseen, given the enonnousness 
of the task. Considering that it look 
70 jrears to gel just half of the 
United States wired for telephone 
service, the information superhigh- 
way’s architects are moving quick- 
ly, Mr. Shaffer said. 

Bidding a 21st-century commu- 
nications system should be just as 
daunting, some point out. in view 


of estimates that it would cost as 
much as $200 billion to wire all the 
homes in America with high-capac- 
ity fiber-optic line capable at carry- 
ing enormous amounts of sound, 
data, fax and video signals. 

In addition, there are numerous 
other costs: converting a single 
movie to the digital format re- 
quired for transmission over the 
network costs about $100,000, said 
Gary Aden, a multimedia consul- 
tant in Bethesda, Maryland. 

More troublesome, many phone 
company executives said, is that 
some of the key pieces of hardware, 
such as computers that would de- 
liver thousands of movies on de- 
mand, have yet to be perfected. 
Software company spokesman said 
marketing executives sometimes 



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Fla. markka 450* 


April 7 

„ c Lira BJ=1 BJ=- SJF- Yln ° P “" ,a 

ffSJ- SW UBS IMS' UB7 UK 1 

“g IRS- 18JS M3CS OBI 2UBS 2UI- 

“ .ro* Bare line- UB lifl'ua lar 
jVw 28 m serais inn Vix vast vat 
si- 72 m um K3« hot* not — 
__ hub «JU USMO saw U»S 0 run 
^3 ium U2SI HUB ua WHO M0* 

if? IS* MW Mill uw Sim* ««• 

MM 0IS SMI uei 7MS 710 *22, 

uae* ore 0*0 ■ ww UKS “ — 

SS. 8^ <!*• — UB- U» UW 

~~ 1JSi51 um SMI USE mm uss? bubs 

JS SSS i£ — »* 

York and Zurich, fixings to aftter centers; Toronto 
m dottar; *- units ot MW not nuatsdi MA.: not 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Dodar D-Mark 

1 naoatn 3*fe-3% 

3 months 33*-« 

S months 5ViSVk 

1 year * <*W4 «■ 5 %v5 r > 

Shoos; Ooutors. Uevds Bonk. 


Swiss 

Franc 


4M-4U 


3 VW4 Hi 





April 7 


French 



sterling 

Franc 

Van 

ECU 

SVmSVm 

StbOfa 

2 9V-2K. 

6 *r6fm 

5V.-5K 


2*t-2% 

6 v. 

5Vr5 7. 

5*-6 

2U-2* 

6 Kr6W. 

■34 gyu 

RU 

2 Hr2H> 

-6-6Mi 


Currency 

Greek**. »» 
hoobKhw* 

HOM.WW 

IS TrS* 

IS— s 

srr’S 


N. Zealand! 

dor*, krone 
ML peso 
podsbztrty 

Port, escudo 

Rtm-reUa 
SatxH rival 
SUS.S 


tort 

331 

1JMT 

7^1i 

77M 

22254- 

TXL» 

177am 

17491 

i sa 


Currency 
s.jur.rwd 
SLKor.woB 
Suivd. kroon 
Tehran* 
Thai bob! 

Tm*Mi Hra 
OAIdtrtm 

VsnoLboOv. 


Pari 

15455 

BUM 

vm 

aui 

asm 


Ksy Money Rates 

United States 
Dlicomd rote 
Prune rate 
Federal fonts 
3-moRt* CDs 
Comm, paper 1 M days 
Mnaate Treasury Ml 
l-year Tre asury wn 
3* »«■ Treasury note 
MrearTreamry note 
MMrTnHWTMte 
u*esr Tnnsanr note 

M^SSsHWRaadyasie* 1M 


1471 

11US 


3»<io y M-dar 9Mav 
UU2 U88S U9KI 
HHjDI 7(045 KBJ0 


Formnril Rate* _ — 

Currency JW»T TZc Canadian donor 

Poona Sterdno lAj® Japanese rsa 

Swiss tame l-**® Banco Commsrckde 

tAUamtf Agones Prana .rreMjP^ amumg gpCAP. 
rrawtol / IMF tSDRI. Other dd» from 


tHscoantrate 
CaR money 
Hnoatti totertnnk 
HP«rtt> Irte rPc nk 
Unonte inttrtwnk 

IMreorGtwen una ntftowl 

Germany 
lomteaiinite 
Call money 
Tenant) Interbank 

Senate totertonk 

tomntb interbank 
n-voar Band 


Prw. 
100 
4V4 
3% 

153 
418 

154 
443 
537 
Ml 
454 
490 
7JS 
1S7 

Hi 1* 
2Wl 3VH 
2>A TA 
I'U I'm 
2h VU 
198 W2 


Close 
100 
4U 
3 7m 
153 
420 
352 
4a 
134 
437 
451 
484 

7.21 


Britain 


Call 

1 -axMl* taturOcnk 
K n o ntti Interbank 
tanontti Kderbaefc 
UPnarcm 
France 

inte r ve n t i on rate 
Call money 
Inmonfli IntarOanfe 

S^tontb interbank 
Wtnrntt Werboak 
WtamrOAT 


5 U 514 
4te 550 
59b 5 Hi 

5W 5* 

5 ft. 5h 

751 759 

550 550 

6Vt M 

6 H. 400 

400 591. 

400 51k 

850 848 


8V> 

5.90 

550 

5JU 


8% 

410 

S55 


5J0 555 

422 822 


Sources; Reuter* J 

Lynch, Bank of 

GeoenwonftonfogiLCr&atLYonnatt. 

60111 AJ8 PM. Cti*e 

luridl 305.15 38405 +0* 

Umdoo 38495 38430 +M0 

New York 38750 38410 

MJkdbrftomnwounca London etftuQl 

[na; Zurich and New York opentna and doo- 
ms prices; New York Camx UV»I 
Source: Reuter*- 


INFORMATION FOR RHdNE-POULENC SHAREHOLDERS 


Notice of 

Rhone-Poulenc SJL s General 
Shareholders meeting 


Rhdne-Poulenc shareholders 
are invited to attend the 
mixed General Shareholders 
Meeting which will take place 
on Tuesday, April 12, 1994 
at 10:00 am, at its head- 
quarters, 25 quai Paul Doumer, 
Courbevoie, France In case the 
quorum is not satisfied the 
Meeting will reconvene on 
Friday, April 22, 1994 at 9:30 
at CNIT - La Defense - Amphi- 
theatre Leonard de Vinci, RER 
or Metro "Grande Arche”, 
Parking CNIT, exit Defense 6 
or Parking Central, exit 
Defense 4. 

TO ATTEND AND/OR 
VOTE AT THE MEETINGS 

If you are a shareholder, you have 
to imm obilise your shares at least 
five days before the Meetings by 
notifying the institution where 
your shares are held about your 
intention to attend or vote. You 
should ask for a certificate of 
restriction and send it to: 

Socidtd Gendrale, 

Service Assemblies, BP 1 135, 

44024 Nantes cedex 01,France. 

If you would like to attend the 
Meetings personally, you should 
ask your bank for an admission 
card which you will need to 
present at the Meeting. 


MAIN POINTS 
ON THE AGENDA 

Ordinary 
General Meeting 

- Management report and 
independent Auditors report 

- Approval of the accounts. 

- Allocation of profits and 
distribution of dividends. 

- Reappointment of existing 
Directors, and appointment 
of new Directors. 


If you do not wish to attend the 
Meetings, you may exercise your 
right to vote using the proxy or 
postal method, by requesting the 
appropriate forms from Soci£t£ 
G6n6rale at the address below. 
To be considered valid, postal 
votes must arrive at Society 
Generate at least three days 
before the date of the Meeting. 

To attend the ordinary part of the 
General Meeting and to vote, you 
must own at least 10 shares. For the 
extraordinary part, you need only 
own one share. 


,P 


Extraordinary 
General Meeting 

Board authorization to issue 
various securities. 

\ppro\al of the proposed 
merger with lnstitut Merieux. 

Approval of the proposed 
exchange offer of Cooperation 
Phuriiiaceutujue Franchise 
shares. 


If you would like to receive 
a copy of: 

- a summary of the Meeting's 
minutes, 

- the quarterly shareholders 
newsletter, 

- "Rh&ne-Poulenc in Brief" 

(an Annual Report summary), 

- the full Annual Report, 

Please contact the: 

Shareholder Relations Dept-, 
Rhone-Poulenc, 

25 quai Paul Doumer, 
92408 Courbevoie cedex 
France 

TeL (33.1) 47.68JA83 


e 


w* RHONE-POULENC 


3 

- r 


jr- 

a’s 

dy 

eh 

iy. 

■u- 

'ar 

al 

ks 

■er 

JL 

O- 

ii- 

ut 

of 

or 

al 

re 

es 

5. 

D- 


made unrealistic assumptions 
about how quickly sophisticated 
software could be written. 

Compticatmg the p lanning for hs 
builders is that few companies seem 
to agree cm what an information 
simerhighway would consist of and 
which of its services will be em- 
braced by consumers. No one has 
tested the market fra- services such 
as video on demand among more 
than a few hundred households. 

Recent news about the super- 
highway offers abundant evidence 
of the slowdown: 

The cable pant Trie-Communi- 
cations lac. promised in late 1992 
that it would begin installing special 
boxes by this spring that ultimately 

See HIGHWAY, Page 12 


1 





Page 12 

market diary 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1994 


Economic Outlook 
lifts Stock Prices 


Compiled ty Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Stocks rose on 
Thursday for tbs third consecutive 
day as investors appeared to con- 
centrate on recent strong data on 
the U.S. economy and downplay 
fears of higher interest rates and 
inflation. 

Stocks were also buoyed when 
the bond market erased early losses 
after a speech by Alan Greenspan, 

U.S. Stock* 

the Federal Reserve Board chair- 
man, made it seem that rumors of 
an imminent increase in the dis- 
count rate were unfounded The 
Fed's discount rate, currently at 3 
percent, is charged on loans it 
makes to commercial banks. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed up 13.53 points, at 
3.693.26. 

The yield on the benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond slipped to 721 
percent from 725 percent. 

Advancing issues outnumbered 
dediners on the New York Stock 
Exchange by about a 7-to-5 ratio. 
Volume on the Big Board was about 
285 million shares, down from 
300.80 milli on on Wednesday. 

Among the economic statistics 
released on Thursday, the Com- 
merce Department said American 
businesses plan to increase invest- 
ments in new budding and equip- 


Dollar Edges Higher, 
But Rate Rumor Fades 


Compiled by Our Stuff Front Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
gained against most other curren- 
cies on speculation that the Federal 
Reserve Board would raise interest 
rates soon. 

The dollar ended New York trad- 
ing at 1.7170 Deutsche marks, up 

Foreign Exchange 

from 1.7150 DM Wednesday, and at 
104.90 yen, compared with 104.55. 

The dollar jumped on a rumor 
that Alan Greenspan, the Federal 
Reserve Board chairman, would 
announce an increase in the Fed's 
discount rate, which it charges on 
loans to commercial bonks. The an- 
nouncement was expected to be 
made during a speech in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Although the Fed chairman 
made no mention of interest rates 
or the stock market's recent turbu- 
lence in his talk, currency traders 
still look for an increase soon, pos- 
sibly at the central bank’s policy 
meeting next month. 

Dealers said the dollar also had 
become oversold after slumping in 
recent weeks in step with weakness 
in the U.S. stock and bond markets. 


Vie Aaodated 


meat by 8 percent this year on top 
of last year’s 7. 1 percent rise. 

Analysts generally viewed the 
steadiness of the market on Thurs- 
day as a sign that the recent down- 
trend may be nearing an end. 

"Stocks are searching for a bot- 
tom,” said Steven Eitmorn. chair- 
man of the investment policy com- 
mittee at Goldman. Saras & Co. "A 
fair amount of riamugp was done to 
investor confidence, and that will 
take a bit of time to repair” 

If first-quarter profit figures are 
solid, as expected, slock pnees may 
finally end .their glue-lute attach- 
ment to bond prices and interest 
rales, the analysts said. “Starting 
next week, that will be the beginning 
of a pretty good flow of earnings 
reports ana by and large, those are 
gping to be favorable,” said William 
LeFevre, analyst at Ehrenkrantz 
King Nussbaiim. 

Among active stocks. Gap Inc, 
the clothing retailer, rose 2M to 48?* 
after reporting a 16 percent gain in 
same-store sales. 

Several computer stocks helped 
buoy the over-the-counter market. 
Sun Microsystems, which reported 
strong earnings, rose 3K to 25& 
Bank stocks rallied amid expec- 
tations for good first-quarter earn- 
ings and on the recovery in bonds. 
Many banks hold significant bond 
portfolios. Among lie top gainers 
were BankAmerica, up 1 Vi at 4Hi 
(AP. Knight-RiJJer) 








Dow Jones Averages 


Open High Low Lmf Qm. 

Indus MIU0 3647.29 3657X6 369126 +1153 
Trans 1647,97 1656.17 1639*8 163173 -163 
UHI IM 15 14721 1952} 19601 -073 

CORiP 131129 131480 130230 1314.18 +195 


Standard ft Poor's Indexes 


HW Uw Close urge 
52745 mas 527 JO +127 
40065 19743 60041 — 
15543 15192 15540 +047 
0.16 047 0.16 +047 
451.10 64628 65088 +283 
417.16 41277 41686 +2J2 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


P ro k w 

Big Ask 


1285J0 128600 
1311 JO 131100 
Graft) 


Industrials 

Tjwmp. 

Utilities 

Finance 

5P5QQ 

SP 100 


ff'. 


mm. 


imrnmm 

r- . ■ m ,** • 
i V . r . T i’ ’ .. v - .: 


' ■ v- I \ 

"V ■, . ■ !/ 


a : ^ v - l . ••• 


NYSE Most Actives 


TeUftex 

WolNlrlS 

LoarSM ri 

GrtMotr 

RJRNdb 

Airtouc r 

Otryslr 

Tandy 

PhfWlrtr 

PacTel 

YPFScn 

Gap 

Merck 

BankAm 

ATAT 


Wob 

LOW 

Lent 

am. 

59ft 

58ft 

99ft 

-ft 

27 

26'A 

26ft 

♦ ft 

15ft 

76 ft 

M 


savii 

58ft 

60 

+ ift 

Aft 

6 

6ft 

—ft 

22ft 

21ft 

21 W 

—« 

55 

53ft 

54 

—ft 

36ft 

30ft 

32ft 

—3ft 

»H 


son 

* IH 

32ft 

31 

32 ft 

-ft 

24ft 

24 

24ft 

♦ ft 

49ft 

47ft 

48ft 

♦2ft 

29ft 

29ft 

29ft 

♦ft 

41ft 

39ft 

41ft 

♦lft 

51ft 

SM 

50ft 

—ft 


NYSE Indexes 


HM Low Last Qi. 

Composite 25029 367.95 25023 +1.56 I 

industrials 308.90 305.94 30873 -103 

Transp. 255.73 253*9 25541 -1.16 

U1IH1V 20035 30643 20035 + 041 

RnaKe 20011 205.79 20009 -142 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Web Law Last aw 

Composite 75445 751.26 75445 +173 

industrials 790.91 78773 79091 +378 

BarScs 67649 674-56 <7649 -342 

Insurance *89.10 88279 889.10 + 6.98 

Finance WO) B73.SB 87001 .45! 

Tramp. 75442 79043 75175 — OJM 


AMEX Stock Index 

HMi Low Last On. 
44140 440.17 44176 +078 

Dow Jonea Bond Averages 

am arae 

20 Bonds 9944 —007 

W Utilities 97 M — flWB 

10 industrials lUOS +0 l27 


Metals 

Close 

Bid Aik 
ALUMINUM Orotic) 
Mian pot 

Soot 127UO 127000 

Forward 130040 1»1JW 

COPPER CATHODES (Httfl 
Dollars per teetrjctofj 
Seat 185840 1 52-22 

Forward 187640 W7740 

^ ; 

DMtan per mMrtctpn 
Spot 40340 43640 

Forward WOO 64840 

NICKEL 

Donors per metric ton 
soot 563540 5«540 

Forward 550040 550540 

TIN 

Dalian nr meWctofl 
Spat 5X540 539101) 

Forward 564040 543100 

ZINC (Soedat HlabGrMUl 
Dollars nr mmieton 
Soot mm r&m 

Forward «*J0 9SS40 


Financial 

High Low Close Change 
3-MONTH STERLING (UFFEI 
1500408 - Ft* of IH pet 

JW 9434 9430 9440 UlKjL 

Sta 94J4 94J2 94-JO —0.01 

SS mjm ?3.f» M4o -am 

Mar 9146 9159 0*0 —042 

JM 9344 9116 9X17 —041 

Sep 9246 92J5 9278 +041 

Dec nsa 92*i 92*4 +<un 

9223 92.17 9240 +043 

9241 9145 9L98 +044 

9143 9140 9142 + 046 


44UQ0 64240 
45640 45540 


550040 551000 
556540 557540 


561540 562140 
567940 548040 


Sea 9143 *140 9142 H 

Dec 9 47 9142 9143 + 045 

lEr 91.53 9147 9147 +046 

Eat. volume: 36766. Open Int.: 476435. 
+MONTH EURODOLLARS CLIFFEJ 
SI miinoa - PH of MO act 


Jen 

9536 

95L56 

95-54 

Sop 

. 94*9 

9499 

94W 


94*9 

94.13 

94J9 

9410 

SR 

Jon 

N.T. 

N.T. 

saao 

Sea 

NX 

N.T. 

93J1 

Est. volume: 261: 

557 9.791. 



NASDAQ Most Actives NYSE Diary 


SunMiC 

MO 5 

Adoims 

TeiCmA 

NoveBs 

EncT ADO 

AST 

PresRvs 

InttHs 

Cscus 

MoJecDy 

MicSftS 

McCaw 

MTlTcfl 

OmCSPS 


VOL Hfttl 
51612 2546 
39174 22ft 
38186 19W 
36276 tm 
36189 18ft 
33032 UVn 
26205 22ft 
26162 1M 
26155 7M* 
24558 36 
24388 T 
23881 90ft 
22285 48 
20695 914 
20031 life 


ITVii — 

lift: ♦** 

2116 -2U 

12 ft +’4 
70ft +1 
356* 

6ft — 39* 
8966 + ft 

48 - 

9 _ 

17ft — >A 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

TeM issues 
NewHluta 
New Laws 


I AMEX Diary 


AMEX Most Actives 


They said economic fundamentals 
warranted a stronger currency. 

An analyst at MMS Internation- 
al said the dollar’s rise above 104 
yea meant it could move up to 
105-50 yen before profit-taking set 
in again. 

But some said a rally would not 
get under way until there was more 
evidence of the strength of the U.S. 
economic recovery, perhaps in next 
week’s data on wholesale and con- , 
s uiner-price inflation, industrial I 
output and business inventories. 

Data pointing to strength in the 
Ge rman economy also capped the 
dollar’s gains Thursday. Traders 
speculated that the Bundesbank 
would not have to cut interest rates 
as much as expected to spur the 
country’s economy. Goman inter- 
est rates are more than two percent- 
age pants higher than U.S. rates, 
making mark-denominated depos- 
its attractive. 

Against other currencies, the dol- 
lar slipped to 1.4473 Swiss francs 
from 1.4470 francs Wednesday, but 
it rose to 5.8770 French francs' from 
5.8705. The pound strengthened to 
S1.4730 from $1.4685. 

(AFX, Knigfu-Ridder, Bloomberg) 


VOL Htab 

Low 

Last 

Chs. 

8415 3ft 

3ft 

3ft 

♦ ft 

7060 12ft 

lift 

12ft 


6610 45ft 

44'Vs 

Wp 

*"a 

5143 3ft 

3ft 

3ft 

—ft 

5120 18ft 

18ft 

18ft 

—ft 

5035 Aft 

5ft 

6 

+ H 

5000 Oft 

7 

7ft 

—lft 

4707 27ft 

26ft 

26ft 

—ft 

4457 lft 

1 

1ft 


4266 7ft 

6ft 

7ft 

♦ft 


Sulcus 

EchoBov 

SPDR 

ENSOO 

PcflGM 

JonBefl 

Convrsn 

ChevSfls 

Exp LA 

AUKDil 


Market Sales 

Today 
4 pm 

NYSE 287.75 

Amax 1644 

Nasdaq 24979 

In millions. 


Advanced 
Decline:: 
Unchanged 
TOM bates 
| New Hiahs 
New Lows 


NASDAQ Diary 

O' 

Advanced II 

Declined 1 

Undmnaod !l 

Total issues * 

NewKirts 
New Lows 

Spot Commodities 

Commodity Today 

Aluminum, lb 0579 

Coffer, FCr m- . lb 0L7B5 


1367 1268 

765 956 

648 587 

2780 2M1 

30 17 

52 76 


321 321 
278 269 
198 226 
797 816 


Industrials 


Iran FOB, tun 
Lead, in 
Silver, trov oz 
Site) I scrap), ton 
Tin. lb 
Zinc lb 


MftA Lew Last settle dree 

Oct 15240 15075 151 J? 15050 UUL 

Nay 15275 15275 15275 152J0 +IL25 

Dec 15540 15X75 15L75 156J5 +OJO 

Jan 15649 15640 15640 15645 +0J0 

Fail N.T. N.T. 15X25 15*50 +050 

Mar 155J5 15*40 15X25 15*50 +050 

Est. volume: 16231 . Open Ini. 115432 
i BRENT CRUDE OIL fJPEJ 
U4.do<lcn per barraMats of un barrel* 
May 1440 1*29 1*38 1*39 -846 

: JOT 1*57 1*25 1*34 1*32 —0.12 

i JOl 1*61 1*33 1*35 1*42 —0.12 

AW 1446 1*41 1*T1 1*46 —8.17 

Sip 1*72 1«J 14JD 1*54 — 0.T6 

0<3 1*81 1*76 1*81 1*63 -0.17 

Nov 14 a 1*77 1*77 1*72 —M0 

Dec 1*99 1445 1445 1*89 — M0 

, Jan 1*96 1*96 1*96 1*96 —M2 

Esf.watanw:57J33. Open m. 30073 


Stock Indexes 



Htob 


FTSH M0 (LIFFEJ 
125 per Index poliii 


jun 

3154* 

3186* 

Ste 

3157* 

3137* 

Dec 

NX 

NX 


31374 +44 

31564 +54 


Dec N.T. N.T. 316V, C +44 

EA volume: 1*20* Own int: 0289. 

CAC M CMATIF) 

FF200 per index paM 

Apr 215540 21 1f.CS 213140 — S40 

May 215SJS® 212740 213240 —540 

Jan 213840 210640 211540 —540 

Sep 213240 213140 213240 —SJM 

Dee 216850 2168JD 216340 —540 

Mar 220940 220240 219040 —540 

Est. volume: 2&7l2.0eenM.: 7*440. 
Sources: Matff, Associated Press. 
London mrt Financial Futuna E xc tmot. 
Infl Petroleum Exetnnoe. 

Dividends 


*MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFEJ 
DMT mllUMl-PtsetiaOpCl 
JWI 9446 9452 9*53 —Ml 

Sep 9443 9*80 9*51 —041 

Dec 9540 W JS 9+97 — 042 

Mar 95.10 95JQ5 9547 -ILK 

Jun 9545 95J1 ®42 —041 

Sep 9*89 9*45 9*87 +041 

Dec 9*67 «*61 9*65 +045 

Mar 9449 9*42 9*49 +047 

•lea V4JS2 9*27 «O0 +045 

5(p 9*12 9*0B 9*12 +046 

Dec 9195 9345 »« +046 

Mar 9177 9372 9377 + 005 

Est. volume: 95482. Open Ml-' 94*278. 
3+40 NTH FRENCH FRANC (MAT IF) 

FF3 mHIloa - afs of 180 pd 
JUS 9*17 9*07 9*08 —OJM 

S«p 9478 9*31 9*31 —046 

Dec 9*58 9*51 9*51 —Oil? 

Mar 9*72 «*62 9*62 —009 

Job 9*64 9*57 9*58 —047 

SeP 9*46 9*39 9*39 —047 

Dec 9476 9*19 9*19 —046 

MOT 9*08 «*04 9444 —OJM 

Est. votume: 46.166. Open tat: 251,131. 
LONG GILT (UFFEI 

■sum - pts a rods at leopd 
Jun 108-21 107-20 107-30 — 0-08 

Sep N.T. N.T. 167-01 —04* 

Est. volume: 7JW7H. Open bit.: 146.106. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFEI 
DM 2SMM ~ pts of 100 Kt 
Jen 9770 9740 7745 Undv 

StP 9671 9676 9674 +041 

Est. volume: 102,147. Open Int.: 20*498 
M- YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS CMATIF? 
FF5DB400 - pts of 100 Pet 
Jon 12190 12134 12X46 —0.44 

Sep 12114 12268 12272 — 0A2 

Dec 12244 12244 12242 —043 

Est. volume: 235792. Open Int.: 141.671 


Hied Law Last Settle arse 
GASOIL (I PEI 

US. defiers per metric tan-lets of lft leu 
Apr 14840 14575 M&50 1467S + LSO 

May 14575 14375 14*25 14*25 +075 

Jan 14575 14375 14175 14375 +1JD 

JWI Hi75 144JK) 14440 14*00 + 050 

Ads 1*775 145 jS) I4S50 14575 + 075 

SOP 14925 14801 14800 14775 Uach. 


Company Per Anrt 

IRREGULAR 

Canv Hofdnps Cap _ 4078 

Conv Hhmas Inca . TOM 

Strut GtU inoa M 775 

STOCK 

Kaufman HW Fnd .10% 
STOCK SPLIT 

AmerOtv Business 2 for IwiH. 
Miners Nail Bca> 5 far 4 spOL 

INCREASED 

General Pub Utts 0 AS 

Poc Entervr o jz 

REGULAR 

Air Exams Inti G 45 

All Amer Term M .10 

Amer Waler wrks Q 77 

Banyan sirofRity C .10 

Bay View Cop Q .15 

Gumnaton Resour Q .1315 

GnaeeWR O 35 

LardAbb Bd Deb M 

LordAb&CA TxPr 
LardAtjb SecGIblnco 
LordAb SecLjd USG . . 

LordAb SecTr M JUS 

Lord AbO TxFr Ml 
LnrdAbb TxFr Noli 
LordAbb T xFr PA _ 

LordAbfe tf5 GvfSecs - 4205 

LordAbb Gtalnca M 465 

LordAbb invLtd M 422 

LordAbb SecCA M Mi 

LordAbb SecFL M 421 

LordAbb SeCNOtlTF M 421 

LordAb Sec NY TFr M 421 

LordAbb TxFr CT M 45 

LordAbb TxFr FL M 424 

LordAbb TxFr HI M 434 

LordAbb TxFr MO M 4245 

LordAbb TxFr NJ M 425 

LordAbb TxFr NY M 43 

LordAbb TxFr TX HR JH 

LordAbb TxFr WA M JEM 

LordAbb USGvSec M 43 

MFS Special Value M .1375 

Mercantile Sits Q 755 

New Am HI Inca m .945 

NY Tx Ex Inca M 453 

PNC EtkCe Q 32 

PalnWeb Prm Ini M JHM 

PalnWebPrmTx M 4813 

Patriot PnmDhn M 4667 

Rktttood Hides Q 

Rite Aid O 

Sun Co Q 

TsniptetonGlWlnc M 45 

Templeton dbUIII M 45 

Trfrt A Gvt 1*95 M 4254 

TrlPl A Gvt 1996 M 4417 


+19 +29 
+19 +29 
+15 *29 


+29 5-25 
+20 5-16 


+14 +29 
+15 +29 
+22 5-16 

4- 20 S-3B 

+12 4-29 
+10 7-1 

5-5 6-10 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+7 5-16 
+15 +29 
SOI +15 
+15 +29 
+15 5-2 

+18 +24 
+15 +29 
+15 +29 
+19 M 
+15 6-30 
+18 +25 

5- 10 +10 
+15 +29 
+15 +29 
+15 +29 
+15 +29 


" u.S. /AT tHE CLOSE 

U.S. Businesses Plan to Spend More 

WASHINGTON increastll,; 

the s 0 ”' 

Thursday. t __ nita i emending by 8 percent this year,. 

JSfSB ‘- 4 pemDt ^ inmihe 

for March. Consumer ^ y Wore Earn. 

for the ninth consecuhvcmon^ in FAroaiy to a 

56.376 bilta h, 

aiy, the central bank mQn filed first-lime 

Secrai ties Corp. in New York. 

Greenspan Says Americans Are Edgy' 

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A widening income gap has Americans, 
fearful of the future despite generally positive eoonaanc ; nw- Alan 
Greenspan, the chairman of the Federal .^’ erve f 

Theoounuys top central banker avoided any discussion of mierest 
rates or the stock market's recent gyrations in speaking to the ax-state 
federal reserve district based in San Frandsco. , . 

Instead, he gave a long-range and graeralfy upbeat assessment of the 
U5. economy — but said polls shows the public does not share his 
optimism. The basis for the public’s gloomy outlook appears to be the 
increasing income gap between rich and poor Americans, wmch has; 
widened m the last 20 years after narrowing for several decades before 
that, he said. 

U.S. Teamsters Strike Turns Violent ; 

NEW YORK (AP) — Scattered violence broke out on picket lines 
around the country as T eams ters striking against some of the_ biggest- 
trucking companies in the United States sought to cripple ddiveiyr of; 
everything from toilet paper to auto parts. 

As the walkout by up to 75,000 drivers, longshoremen and mechanics^ 
entered its second day Thursday, its biggest effect had been to create; 
more business for nonunion trucking companies. 

Consumers saw Utile impact because many of the 22 companies haul 
raw materials and parts rather than finished products, and most super-' 
markets and food producers have their own fleets and are not part of the' 
dispute. 

It is the Teamsters’ first nationwide strike since 1979. 

Fo r the Record 

E.W. Scripps Co. will buy the 14 percent of Scripps Howard Broadcast- 
ing that it does not already own in a stock swap. Scripps will exchange 
3.45 of its Oass A shares for each Scripps Howard share. (Bloomberg) 
Dow Jones & Co.’s first-quarter net income rose to S402 million from 
$30.9 million the previous year as all business segments posted higher; 
operating income and revenues. The information services segment led, 
gains. (Knight-Ridder) 

Whirlpool Corp. plans to build a $100 million plant in Tulsa, Oklahoma,’ 
to n™kR gas and electric ranges. Construction is scheduled to begin this; 
summer and production is planned to start in mid- 1996. (Reuters}' 

Hotel Bek Air, in Los Angeles, is being sold by a group Japanese 
investors known as the Sazale Group that acquired it for more than $100; 
million in 1989. The Bd-Air is a favorite haunt of movie stare. (AP) 


ECONOMY: U.S. Expected to Shake Off Rate Rise HIGHWAY: Or Should It Be Called the Hypeway? 


Coatiaoed from Page 11 


Riley, director of economic re- these items have been falling, and 
searrhat A. Gary Shilling & Co. “If auto dealers have learned to offset 


Continued irom page 11 


enabled companies to pay for new it sense a [ 7 percent, it prob- rising rates by-changing the terms would enable conventional tdevi- of several thousand customers, 
machinery or facilities without bor- ably makes sense at 8 .” of loans and leases so that monthly sons to receive 500 channels tx Comorate alliances that 

rowing. Because much of the in- ^ , . navments do not rise as much. more. But TCI said recently techni- . e 

vestment has gone into computers 9 n P“J :h ^ es ' paymen cal standards for such a box had not cc ® cerv ? d 10 * 5 ®®* 

and other equipment that increase d^on ^ t * 5 ® 1 ^ when mterest There is, however, an indirect s^ned. causing it to reschedule nabonal networks have founde 


cause the system was not ready to dealt a setback by a federal judge's . 
deal with the simultaneous demands ruling that the company’s planned 


of several thousand customers. $12.6 billion purchase of McCaw 

n11 - ^ Cellular Communications Inc. vio- 

Corporare alliances that were ^ agreement 

conceived to speed construction of i i.„ _ A tat. 


conceived to speed construction o 
national networks have foundered. 


that broke up AT&T’s telqibone 
monopoly- 


CUM* VU1VI MjWUI UWUG IURI UIVI«NDV . £C “ » T ' ’ , UW4I X|UW> V glLTi U^ iG W IUUUVIAHJ. 

profits by saving on labor and oth- ra l cs tt 86 - consumers put on major knk between interest rates and con- delivery to the end of the year. On Tuesday, the cable company 

er costs, companies still have strong purchases such as autos ana wash- 5 ^^ spending — what econo- Time Warner Inc. was supposed Cox Enterprises and Southwestern The biggest deal. Beil Atlantic 


er costs, companies still have strong piuunwasuwi sumer spending — wnat econo- Tone Warner Inc. was supposed i_ox hnterprises and oou to western ine biggest deal. Ben Atlantic 

incentives to invest, even if they JOB machines i peeause most are call the wealth effect: Rising to flip the switch this month on the Befl Corp. called off a proposed Corp.’s planned $26 billion pur- 
have to borrow at slightly higher bought on credit, and higher rates raJes t0 decline, most ambitious and advanced tde- partnership, blaming new federal chase of TCI, disintegrated in Feb- 

rates. . make the monthly payments go up. ^ in the last month, viaon and telephone system yet, for roles on cable pricing. On the same ruary, With the trompahles blaming 


“Most of the investment we've But many economists now sus- making middie-class consumers 
seen has been about automation, pect that this link has become less confident about their economic 
not increased capacity,'' said Tony weaker, because prices for many of status. 


most ambitious and advanced tde- partnership, blaming new federal chase of TCI, disintegrated in Feb- 
viaon and telephone system yet, for roles on cable pricing. On the same ruary, With the companies Tilamihg- 
residents of a section of Orlando, day, American Telephone & Tde- falling stock prices and the Federal 
Florida. But the test has had to be graph Co.’s plans to enter the wire- Communications Commission's 
delayed until later in the year be- les^communications market were price rollbacks. 




1 

jf:U> 


1YS 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Season Season 
Man Lw 


am Htoti Law Oase Oa QnJnt 


Season Season 
Htoti Law 


Open HWi Low Close Cno Osunt 


Agencr Fiance Preue Apr* 7 

QemPrwt. 

Amsterdam 

ABN Amro HHJ 65190 66.10 
AC F Holding 48J0 47<S 

Aegon 99^0 9940 

Ahold 4820 49 

Akzo Nobel 116 21740 

AMEV 7640 76.40 

Bob-Wessanen 4140 4150 

C5M 6850 4*70 

□SM 12820 128 

Elsevier 167J0 16740 

Fokker 17JS0 17 jM5‘ 

Gbl -Brocades 57JO S2J0 

HBG 309 309 

Hefnefcan 

Hoosavens 5940 »J0 

Hunter Douglas H0J0 7850 

IHC Caland 40.90 4040 

Inter Mueller bus 82 

Inn Nederland 8120 8140 

KLM 4850 <840 

KNP BT <9 JO 4740 

NedHoyd 49.90 6C.«a 

Oce Grin ten B12Q B370 i 

Poktwed 50JQ »4B 1 

pumas S3M 5340 

Polygram 7640 7640 

Robeco 12440 12«« j 

Rodomco 60 6050 ' 

HoUnco 12*80 12*40 

Rarenta W40 .«.TO ■ 

Royal Dutch 19640 193-70 

Stork 4740 47 1 

Unilever 19940 3)140 

Van Ommeren 5020 SO 

VNU 178 17740 

woiters/Kiuwer mio H3 


Helsinki 


Amer-Ylrtvmo 

Erao-Gutzelt 

Huhtomaki 

K.OP. 

Kvmnwie 

Metro 

Nokia 

Fofrfota 

RewJta 

Stockmann 


127 128 

39 3870 
198 200 I 

12-20 1220 , 

112 109 ■ 

194 193 

403 399 

89 89 , 

305 299 




Brussels 

AG Fin 
ArUed 
Barca 
Bekoert 
Cockerlll 
Cobepo 
Delholze 
Electrabel 
GIB 
GBL 
Gevoerl 
Kretnerbmk 
Potrwfeio 
Powwfln 

B—jki n — I 

nwnji uerve 

SocGon B undue 
SocGenBeWaue 
soiina 
Sdvav 
Trattebol 

uca 

Union Mlnlere 

SS 3 S^J 3 r :; 


FrankfUrt 

AEG 

AlltamHoW 
Allono 
Asko 
BASF 

Barer 

Bay. Hyoo Bank 
Bav Vereinsbk 

bhf Bank 
BMW 

Commerzbank 
Continental 
Daimler Benz 
Deovsft 
Dt Babcock , 
Deutsche Bank 
Daughn 
D re m in er Bank 
Feiamuehle 
FKrwpHoesdi 
Harpater 
Henkel 
Hochtief 
Hoechst 
Hobmann 
Horten 
IWKA 

Kali Solz 
Korstadt 
Koufltof 
KHO 

KtaocknerWerke 
Unae 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Monnesmann 
Metallseiell 
Muencfl Rveck 
Porsche 
Preussaa 
PWA 
RWE 

RtHMnmetoll 
Setter! ns 
SEL 
Siemens 
Tttvssen 
varta 
Vetto 
VEW 
Vkn 

Volkswagen 
Wella 


Hong Kong 

3340 3325 
1020 lt.10 
402S 4025 
4140 40-75 
7120 12 

1*20 1520 
5140 51 

4150 .42 
4275 4225 
15.90 1920 
2140 2140 
2230 2320 
2120 7140 
8940 8940 
11.70 11.70 
33.4® 13/# 
1130 1040 
33 33 

2420 2*90 

IS 15 
1020 11 
2220 22 ^} 
2620 2640 
5440 55 

*25 *35 
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345 348 
3140 1025 
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1140 1140 

Ksa^?®gi :W8M1 







AECI 

At tech 

Anglo Amer 

Barlows 

Blyvoor 

Buffets 

De Beers 

Drleftmtctn 

Gencor 

GFSA 

Harmenv 

Hlohwid steel 

Kloof 

Weflbaik Crr 
Ranaru/ileln 
Rusotof 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sasol 
Welkom 
Western Deep 


London 


Abbey N*H 

Allied Lvara 

Ariowkralns 

Argyll Group 

AssBrftFooas 

BAA 

BA( 

Bank Scotland 
Barclays 

Bass 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC GrailP 
Boots 
Bawdier 
BP 

Bril Airways 
BrMGas 
Brit Steel 
Biit Telecam 
BTR 

CaMe Wire 
Cadbury Sch 

Carodort 

Coats Vlyelia 
Comm Union 
CourtouWs 
ECC Group 
Enterprise Oil 
Evratunnel 
F Isons 
Forte 
CEC 

Gen’l Act 

Glaxo 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hlllsdawn 

HSBC HUM 

ICI 






1 todex; 247*78 


rassi 


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Cl 20 21 

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»lo Amer 198 195 

rtows 2725 2725 

’voer NJL 940 

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97 95 

2540 26 

2225 2240 

£ £ 
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NA - 
2140 21 

46 46 

175 176 

: 487148 


Madrid 

BBV 3160 3170 

Boo Central Hlsp. aoao 3M0 

Banco Santander 6420 6470 

Bormxfo 776 790 

CEPSA 2810 2BI0 

^ ss 

Ercras 155 lft 

Iberdrola I 1000 997 

Repeal 4495 <345 i 

Tabocalcra 3640 3639 

TetefaVcn 1785 1780 | 

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CIR 

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Ferfln Rise 
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IFI 

italcetn 

Itataas 

Italmablllane 

NWBotmncn 

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Salaem 

Son Poolo Twina 

SIP 

SME 

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Stet 

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MiB I ndex : 1191 
Prevtees : 1178 


VnAnadatedPicu 


Season Season 
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Open HWt Law Oase Ov QpJnr 


Accor 
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Axa 

Baocnlre (Cle> 

BIC 

BNP 

Bouvauns 696 

BSN-GD 843 

Cmrclour 40ra 

Cenis’ 129 

Chargeurs 1 571 

Omants Frenc 3ft 

Chib Med 41640 

Ell-Aqultalne 39740 

EH-SwKrtl 999 

Euro Disney 3140 

Gen. Eaux 
Havas 

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Leorand 
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Pernod- RJcard 
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Prlntcmps IAu> 
Radtatechmaue 
Rb-poularc A 
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Redouts (La) 

So Int Gotoaln 

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Sle Generate 
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ANZ 
BHP 
Bonn 

BauBabtvllie 
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Comafco 
m 704 CRA 
843 BSD CSR 
4008 4017 Fosters Brew 
246 248 Goodman Field 

129 13680 ICI Australia 
ish 1490 MaoeUtPl 
3ft 37V MIM 
1640 412 Nat A ust Bank 

1974039*40 News Corn 
999 1001 Nine Network 
3180 3120 N Broken Hill 
2617 PacDunlop 
51.90 Pioneer lnt*l 


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SOYBEANS*. (COOT] Mb-dwnp* IDObk 


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City Dev. 

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Bell Canada *6M 44ft 
Bombardier B 21ft 21ft 
Cambtor 20ft 20ft 

PtMPdes 7ft 7ft 

Dominion Text A 7ft 7ft 
Donohue A 25ft 25ft 
McMillan Bl 21 20ft 
Noll Bk Canada 9ft 9ft 
Power Corp. 21ft 21ft 
23ft 23ft 
20ft 20ft 
30ft 30ft 
22 21 ft 
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14ft 14ft 


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Noranda ®erest 
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PWA Cora 
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Adla Inti B 225 225 

A/usufiKr B new 43d 616 

BBC Brwn Bov B 1219 1203 
Clba GelBTY B 929 933 

CSHoMInvsB 643 434 
EleklrawB 366 363 

Fischer B 1325 1335 

Intardtacoufil B 2360 3450 
J el moll B S54 848 

LondljGvr R 935 936 

Moeveiplck B *25 430 
nestle ft 1210 1197 

Oerilk. Buenrte ft 164 158 

Pmvna Hid a isao isto 
Roche HOg PC 7155 7120 
Sofra Republic 126 126 

Satdaz B 3980 3930 

Schindler B 7450 7310 
Sutter PC 1038 1804 

Surveilkmce B 219S 2190 
Swisa Bnh Corp B 429 <20 
Swiss Retnsur R 613 600 

Swissair R 750 770 

UBS B 1238 1195 

wmterttkir B 740 713 
Zurich Ass B 1350 1320 


613 600 

750 770 
1238 1195 
740 71S 
1350 1320 


17ft 17ft 
17 17 

6 ft +h 
20 19ft 


?rt ?« Am Bor rick Res 32*. 33 

UZ tiS bce soft aru 

J* {« Bk Nava Scotia 27ft 2714 

’g BC Gas 15ft 15ft 

,g BC Tetewm , 34ft 24ft 

Jg Jg BF Realty HdS OJM 0JS 

Jg Jg Bromnlfb tUS 085 

12 Brunswick w* 

u « CAE 7ft 7ft 

Gomdev 4.95 *85 

4« 4« CIBC 31ft 31ft 

IBOVJM Cmdlon Pacific 21ft 21ft 

Con Tire A lift lift 


To subscribe in Franca 

jusl coll, loll free, 

05 437437 


M.45 7 1 JO Mov W 27.75 27i4 2T.« J7J2 -AT? M^ll 

79.70 2185 JUI 94 2782 27J9 27*1 VjO -*19 28801 

2980 7163 AuS 94 23 Ml 27 JO 22.15 27 JO —0.19 BL5U 

2841 224J*w« nsa 77JS 3675 2680 -A3D 9M4 

DM 72. 10 Oct 94 2610 361S 2490 H40 — <U7 7,101 

27JJ5 DJODcCM 2585 2SJS 2430 2L» -031 11964 

3*85 23*EJonW 2435 3440 3SJ0 1425 — 0J1 1,915 

2*45 2400 Mar 94 75JM 25J5 2414 2413 —0.14 2» 

2640 JS.10Mny 95 2425 2425 2415 2423 -0.17 114 

3*40 2iiOJuf« 2423 -414 56 

240® Wetf4 rales 13816 

WfaflOpeniie 94694 on 1830 

Livestock 

CATTLE laiBU «woo in. -cwnmrn. 

B2JS 73J0APT94 77 32 7782 77.45 7787 —0.15 1*006 

7427 7L25 Jufl94 7487 7*90 74J0 7*37 -UD 30,760 

7387 TOJOAUOM 73.95 72.97 7140 7157 -<U3 I28«! 

7*10 71870094 7195 73.95 7347 7382 -4L28 10J33 

7*30 7235 Dec 94 7195 73.97 7387 73.92 -AOS 

7*21 7380 R9 85 7275 7177 TIB 7X55 —A 17 1JW 

7410 7420 Apr 95 7*tS 7*85 7480 7*60 — 0J0 212 

Est.H** 11846 Wad’6WM5 9,900 
Wad's open bit 76832 UP 6S9 
PtbUBIl CATTLE ICMS7) SUttSk-omsgre 
8400 79 JO Apr W B1JS 41 35 8087 10.97 -OJ3 LOS] 

8440 7870 MdV M *1JD 8145 8087 8MB —007 3471 

BOO ‘ 7985 AIM 94 B1J5 8183 1140 B183 — 0-18 3866 

81.70 7980 SOP 94 B14t> 8147 10.95 81.15 -Ag Sfl 

81J5 79JOOCT94 61.10 #185 I0JO B1JD —W0 * 

BX-d0 7745 NOV 94 9145 1140 81JS 8140 — 0.1Z 289 

8090 7980 Jm 96 «U0 26 

Bts ales UJ71 Wed's. so*» m 

WecrsoswiW H43i up 9 
HOGS (CMBU «mto..n6W6 
5TJ3 MWR 46J0 MJ2 44.10 *422 -OX 7M 

5627 4127 Jun #4 S24Q S2J5 52L25 S247 *U2 16471 

5437 45J0Jul94 5140 S2.07 5182 51-72 5.170 

468SAUP94 4980 SUB 4980 4940 -087 2,968 

etji 41400094 4580 45.95 4550 (562 -005 1.V10 

9J0 4SJ0D0C94 45J5 4612 4570 45.92 '0.05 1404 

5080 <6J0Feb95 4*00 4630 4600 4625 256 

MOD 40.90 ACT 95 6480 4U0 4430 4UJ *0.05 133 

J1J0 4880 Jur 95 . «**} te 

Est sales *433 WeBTiSOtes 1871 
WbCSODWI W 31857 Off 23 
PORK BEUJES (CMER) fASnEs-urtsporb 
6180 4080 May 94 5175 5*90 5280 5*32 +047 *881 

6280 3»J0Jul«4 5*20 S5.10 51« 5*70 HL40 440 

980 4280AUB94 51.95 SL90 5175 JZJ5 tld 666 

61.15 39.10Feb95 5680 5670 5*50 5*70 - 0J0 1ID 

60.10 38-60 Mar 95 S680 5680 5625 5629 9 

<186 59.90 May95 BOO B40 5780 5786 *0^ 11 

Est sales 1046 Wtfi sate *772 
MIHirsaPHtM NU1J UP KB 


COFFEE C (NCSE) yjD0«»-™n»rr»j 
9080 OJSMoyft DJS #<80 KUS 83.95 'A90 2M27 

8780 6*90JuI« BSOO fflJC #580 8385 -A9 1 17-09 

980 6*50 Sep 94 B6W B.70 #660 #7.15 *1.15 *7* 

9WM 77.10DK 94 ##80 #980 0*00 BJ0 >IJS 4166 

■880 78.90 Mar 9S 8*95 «U0 8*95 #980 ♦].« 18« 

#880 E JO May 95 9085 *1.15 27? 

S3 8580 Jut 95 9185 *1.15 If 

n80 #980 Sep VS *180 9180 9180 9285 * l.lS > 

S“whs 16850 Wetfs. sate 1*609 
wetiricMnlnt B.i te 2M3 
SUOAR -WORLD 11 (NCSE) liusom. cmnp« b. 

UMoyM 1182 1137 1 1 JO 1181 -M7 354JB7 


1150 9.15 JU 94 1180 118# 1182 1185 -AM «854 

11.90 9820d94 Ha 1U5 11J3 1185 -*02 3*396 

1183 9.1 7 Mar 95 1187 11.15 11JB 1184 -40 1*734 

1180 1*57 May 95 1180 11.14 1180 1189 *A08 1.960 

1183 10-57 Jui 95 11.12 11.12 1189 1184 1867 

1180 l(L570£t95 11.10 11.11 11.10 IIJ8S *081 370 

ia95 10-95 Mar 96 1185 *08J 5 

EsLsdes 17.795 Wed's, sates 3*75# 

Wed’s open tot 13*173 


COCOA 



+ 17 21*44 



1138 

1144 

1124 

1142 



uto 

1160 

110 

1166 

♦ 12 27*06 



1183 

1195 

11® 

1195 

*16 10*09 

13® 


1225 

1232 

1719 

1232 

+ M 7*80 

1382 

1077 Mar 95 

1258 

1264 

1258 

1265 

+ 14 10*47 

1406 

lHlMav9S 

17/8 

mo 

1278 

1288 

*1* son 

1407 

1225 Jui 0 

1305 

1305 

D05 

1312 

+ 14 2*19 

1350 

1775 See 95 




1332 

*14 621 


1332 Dec 95 




1364 


1385 

1385 Mar 96 




1399 



Est. sues 68» wed's, ides 12875 

WW’s open tor 36810 off 54 

ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) lSMte-cmprA 

13100 SVJQMay 94 10*70 10640 10380 10*05 —1.15 7853 

13580 101 .30 Jui 94 10780 109 JO 106J6 W7.W — U0 7825 

13*50 1 0580 Sep 94 11*60 11280 10980 W980 -080 2,127 

13480 1 0580 Nov 94 111 JO 11280 11180 '09 JO — 1JS 1.155 

13280 1 03-3) Jlta 9S 11180 11380 lit JO III. 10 — *W 2878 

124JS 10&80MP-9S 11380 11*50 nZJO 117 JO —080 450 

Est. sales NA. Wed's, sate 2851 

VW saner tot 20888 off 299 


Metals 


-5J 

—63 6*392 

— 5J 

—63 21857 
— 5J 5897 
—53 9,942 
—S3 

—S3 *433 
—S3 1.919 
—63 836 

—63 


HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 2*000 uer b. 

9125 7*»AprM 1580 8680 BS80 8680 *ID5 666 

102JM 7160MOV94 8SJ0 8685 8620 8680 *1.10 2*735 

91.70 74.10 Jun 94 86.90 *185 709 

102.95 74J0JUIM 81» 87.10 8580 0780 *180 1*764 

10X30 7480 Sep 94 8(80 0780 8695 87.10 **90 4844 

10180 7625 Dec 94 8683 1695 #615 H7J0 *0^ 4,237 

9088 76.WJ0H 95 8730 +OSB H5 

9980 7380 Feb 95 87x5 *080 

IB7_M 7380 Mar 95 KJO 87.10 8660 1780 *025 

9120 7685 May V, BJ.05 87 JO 1685 87J0 *085 575 

*120 7880 Jui 95 87 JO 8780 87 JO 8720 *OM 454 

905 75J0Aua95 8785 **95 

VMS 79. J0 Sep 95 87.50 8780 07.15 8780 *0X5 306 

90.15 /.''.'S-OCt 95 0.15 ♦*« 

#*30 7725 Nov 95 #7.15 *085 IBS 

9125 BOX Dec 95 1880 8BJ0 6000 BODQ **30 247 

! 8920 89 JO Jan « 8885 **1S 58 

Esf.sdcs 15800 Wed’s. solas 15800 
| Woinopantot «JM all 303 

5JJ.VBR (NQMX) iMimrot.-onlJM' >»n 
S718 51 BA Apt 94 5(48 5448 5448 5448 —52 

5BZ8 I7].0 May 94 5508 5618 54U 5452 — 63 4BJ92 

51*8 56*0 Jun 94 5472 —S3 

58*5 371 8 Jd 94 55*0 5552 5488 549.9 —53 21257 

5902 37(2 Sep 94 5532 5598 5515 5514 -SJ 5*97 

S B me Dec M 5478 5478 5608 561J —53 9,942 

8 401 8 Jwr 95 5610 — 63 

40*0 4I65MO-95 57*5 574 5 STM 56*7 —S3 S, 433 

6062 41*0 May 93 57*1 —63 1.969 

6108 42*0 JUI 99 58*0 -63 816 

5650 4938 Sep 95 5868 -43 

6248 SJMDecVS 6008 60*0 597.0 9952 -53 1JB4 

Jan 9* 5972 —53 

Est. sate 15000 wed 1 * sates 21800 
Wersaaenint 116.797 off 613 
PLATWJM (NMER) Stima..ia4nHrimK 
43*50 33580 Apr 94 4(000 40080 40580 407 JO —1.78 234 

43780 357-00*4 94 41*50 41280 40880 41*30 —280 72820 

43580 36880 OCt 94 41280 4TZ8D 41080 4 11 J(J — *40 1817 

42920 37*80 Jot 95 41100 41280 41280 +180 -18) 670 

42*00 39*00 Apr 9S 4)100 41600 41380 41*00 —280 835 

Est. solas ljn Wed's, iotas +196 
Wed's open Ire 25226 UP 784 
OOLD (NCMX) IPHtBL-ggOnparnirtL 
4)820 mTOAPTM 38*60 38580 30100 38*90 —180 M46 
39280 37*50 May »4 38*90 —180 

417JD 33980JUH94 38780 387.90 38640 38*10 — 180 82219 

41600 341 JOAuO 94 30*00 3W.08 SSSJO 36*70 —1.10 9204 

41780 34*00 Oct 94 39280 39280 39120 39120 —180 5.110 

47650 34388 Dec 94 3K.10 39*10 39JJ0 39*40 -t.00 1*232 

41180 36320 Feb 95 397J0 -180 

4)780 36*50 A«r 95 40*80 -180 *36) 

<3820 361 JO Jun 95 *020 40120 43150 40*10 —180 

41220 30020 Auo IS 407JD —180 

413J0 41*20 Oct 95 ^ 411J0 -180 

42980 40280 DOC 95 41620 41120 41620 41*40 —180 4217 

42*9 43*50 Feb 96 417 JD —180 

Est. soles 18800 WedV sates XUU 
weirs open tot 13*097 on 5ft 

Financial 

UST.BLLS ICMS9 simUHn-pngf WHO. 

9*74 9527 Am 04 5*99 M8I 91W K80 *082 47599 

96*8 95J75ep94 95*9 9152 95*1 VLB -087 9,348 

9*10 9420 Dec 94 *681 9S86 9*98 9S8* * 084 less 

9585 RfflMwH *<J8 *0416 to 

Es* sales *095 Wetflsdn 4*99 
Mtef* open tor 55*31 off 713 

SYSL TREASURY (CHCm iMMuH-piSaweMoM 
112-05 10*- 23 Jun 94 105-75 W5-31 10+21 10+295 > 04 178*46 
11+195104-06 SCO 94 10+30 105-0! 104-29 10+01+ 045 J05 

Est. sales SUM Wed's. SU92 
Wed*f open Inf 179,151 ua 710 
10 YR. TREASURY (CBUI) JiOIDMprtn. BN6»xt>oi 100PC1 
115-21 lD-ao Jui 94 105-20 IB-31 105-14 10S-3S + 09 337,977 

11541 182-30 SepM 10+23 104-38 10+15 104-77 » 09 *778 

11+71 102-00 Dec 94 103-79 103-29 103-11 UXM8 * 09 678 

111-07 101-09 MOT95 103-92 t 09 11 

105-22 101-22 Jun 95 102-12 * 09 1 

Est sates max wetrssGes I4L31V 
WTO's wen int 33*397 up 9274 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) Ki»-4iea8U^*2>«H of IodkIi 
11+29 91*06 Jun *4 105-00 10+17 10+Z3 Ktt-M - M 409*49 

11+28 9+12 SepM 10+01 IOt.18 10+26 104-16 * 14 43.113 

11+01 91-19 Dec 94 10+19 10-29 10+05 ffO-M • 14 30800 

11+20 tfl+30 Mor 9510+35 103-OS 10+11 1ICMB » 14 1,170 

11+19 9+15 Jui 95 10-18 *14 « 

113-1 j 101-01 Sop 95 Kl-28 102-00 101-38 1040* II l* 

11+14 10+33 Dec 95 101-16 ♦ 13 33 

114-06 99-04 MorN 101-02 • 13 34 

EaLMM 460*00 tWXTLHte SlXilS 
Wed's open Irt 4H.4M off 1130 
MUNlOnUu BONDS (CbOT) unfa * Jaws ef tweu 

104-07 87-06 JUI94 9O-0 91-14 10-05 91-12 H08 36891 

9+17 1+13 Sep 94 89-18 9+11 B9-11 90-18 *10 179 

ESI. soles 1*000 Wed's, soles 1*091 
MBtrEUfMAM 17870 UP 101 
EURDOOJJjtRS (CMER | n m M frunartepa. 

95890 *0*00 Jun 94 96SM 958*0 9SJOO ttSTO *30477454 

96570 9QJ605OD94 TJJB0 95.00 9*960 9#8<0 * 203M,9M 

91180 90. 710 Dec 94 9*d0 94*50 9*360 94*48 - 50293.711 


14 

409*49 

M 

43,113 

14 

30800 

14 

ura 

14 

69 

li 

16 

13 

33 


34 


96580 90240 Mor 95 M.120 96200 #4890 9*190 +teM,187 

9*730 90710JUI9S 93820 91*90 10780 93880 +70197,20? 

1*920 VIJIOSBilS 9*530 966T0 #3*90 0*00 +W16SJ33 

9*200 91.180 Dec 95 91210 9JJW *3.100 93J2«0 *90 130,151 

9*220 90750 Mu-96 93.138 0810 93890 93J00 -W121W32 

Ed.sdes »IJ0$ Wed's soles <77840 
Wed-snpentol 2*9,039 off 3584 
BRITISH POUND (CMER) sswoomd- 1 pMmbnhn 
1519 1.4474 Jun 94 1*60 1*704 1*624 1*698 + 50 46*00 

1*180 1*64054IP#6 1*630 1*670 1*610 1*663 +41 934 

1*950 l*5RBD«c94 1*6« »« 32 

Mor 96 1*628 +48 I 

I ESI. sate 1*855 Wed's, sates 14146 
WWSOPenH 47*57 UP 3951 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) ipef iSr-lpa W f w m mccoi 
07805 OTIUJWM 07185 A72J1 17187 DJXB -19 39*51 

07740 07068 Sep 94 07169 07175 87148 07175 *73 1791 

07670 0JD38 Dec 94 871« 07145 07145 07152 +27 1,144 

07605 07020 Ma - 95 07100 DJ120 117100 07133 -31 603 

07522 0*990 Jun 9S 07090 07095 07090 07113 +35 60 

EsLsda 4*67 Wed’S. SQte 5*53 
Wfetfs open tor -02 57 off 319 

GERMAN MARK (CMBU ■ p«r mot.- I poke euAnan 
06133 05607 Jun 94 05813 05832 05393 05007 -4 90*86 

0*065 05600 Sop 94 05004 05813 15780 05792 -4 2J98 

05953 05590 Dec 94 05805 05805 05783 05791 —4 118 

_ Mar 96 05800 —4 611 

BK.Stoei 47J37 WTO's.safes 40305 
Wed’s open Inf 93*13 off 3619 

JAMU EEYE H (CMBU s erven- 1 pameauai SAAODBOi 

O8Q9943L006871*in9il DJn96OT0L8O96AXUO9S4HI8O9S7D —J1 51.954 

Q8gmPJOe?OS«i94 08096690M96TO009MHDO19M3 -33 2,140 

Ot®9930080952R)eC W 080W9HU)OW3008096700 009682 -37 620 

Est. sate 26*85 Wert's.*** 26*52 

Wed's open W 54714 Off 2387 

SWtSS FRANC (CMBt) te«r •«- 1 PaM MtolWn 

07J1S 06590 Am 94 0*899 0*923 0*077 0*910 +10 32787 

HI 15 ( 4££ Sep ^ 0JWI5 9JBX 0*885 0*919 +10 311 

0-7130 ILWifDee 94 0*M2 0*942 06M2 0*M0 »12 16 

Ed. tales 23,118 WTO's, sate 247611^ 

Wed's opto ke 34.144 all 470 


Industrials 


cotton 2 menu sums 


7ASS W510CIV4 73*0 74JO 7180 74J0 +0*2 3*17 

74® 59.48 Dec 94 71 J0 71*5 TlS 7l3 *SS 15J66 l 

S^MorW 75.15 72*0 7115 72J5 +0*0 859 i 

75*0 64*0 May 95 710* , n M 337 

70L5QJUI95 73S +0*5 -: 

EO -iifeS NA WTO'S, tales 71,916 •- 

Wursouenlrt 537S3 afl 531 ■ 

HEATMGCHL (NMER) Onge-araairgif t 

SIM 41*0 May 94 4555 45. BQ AiM 41*1 — 07047500 r 

58*0 41 J® Jim 94 45J5 05*5 44*0 aw —054 39*7} J • 

57.® 41 JQ Jut 94 4i70 46*0 SlS SS =3*8 »*«> ^ m 

§-« *W5 4+65 4LW S-K =33"® 

£.17 43*0 Sep 94 47*5 47.45 46*0 47*0 —0*8 &367 J 

57 JO 44.90 Od 94 48J5 48J5 S3 Sft -MB 6*68 “ 

8830 46*0Noi/94 I**B SSo 

4A00DBCM 5QJS W-H rags 4990 —aaSUMB 

62JS 43J5Jan95 51® 51® SO® 50.4Q IJS JS -J 

5875 47.95 Feb 95 51,10 51.10 50.95 041 — 2*17 '* 

s-s VZT 1 ? SMS 50*0 S« S*s w 

55M XUGAern 4+ffl 717 

S1-S0 47® May 95 ad® n«n gjl 

SIM 4879 Jun 95 tfTi ^3 

S0J6 47*5 Jui 95 48® -0*8 606 -> 

49® 47® Auo 95 !!! yS 

4V® O45S8P0 *75 l5S 

Est. tee* 27,104 Wed's, vales 32*45 

WTO5 open int 173*06 off 2993 ^ “ 

LiCHT SWEET CRUDE (NMERt IJeaaCX- I+Mn nrte. 

20*0 13*0 May 94 1574 15*2 15*8 li e — aif 91®4 

7\M 14*2 Jun 94 15*0 1550 ILM US Ia21 iliS > 

,StW ,U0 1L64 — OJO 42*70 

JAMAuOft JS0 15.99 ISJO 1573 —0.19 23.958 

3078 lAJQSeoM lfl.05 14*5 K«l i(M n 10 31797 

1463 Oct « 16.15 14S lig Z£l» 13*0 ^ 

RE l4*!Nwt4 1605 16.15 14*5 IS® nie oJ04 > 

17® 1*2 !HS ,4 - ,D ‘M 7 -0-1* 25.194 5 

I7J8 15. 13 Jan 95 1437 16J7 i t « 1477 wie 7*13 . *, 

19*0 1528 Feb 0 16*7 16*7 l£5 16M Ijw 6,901' > 

]^®Ma - 95 16® 14*2 16J8 16J7 (L19 7*77 < 

?A6 1 555 Apr 95 16*5 16*5 1635 )t« Zjl9 4371 " 

Jo’S 1470 lt - ia S5 - w 16J4 —0.19 4J0 I’- 

ll Mj? 58 ? IS ^ MV > 

B SH B IS as ^ ? 

IHSSS^ 1730 WJD 1: 

SI 3 S- p S 3 33 S =ssls ; S 

CLlOScpfl QJD 47 JQ 4790 -Ji <0 a ji4 J 


SI I SrE 2 s S 3 33 S 3 =S 3 ^S- s 

§8 £! 8 &iS S 3 S 3 23 = 2 S ?*« i 

WTO9 open tot iaj98 up 12®^ i 

Stock indexes . / 

tePCDMP. INDEX (CMQRl Mtm-, , 5. 

SsS *50.95 fl701#LW l 

iS™ sSSs?"??. ®0JW 41170 447*0 452JD +165 6761 r,. 

® 10 429J0DeeO4 449.® 4516Q 419 on jum .nie 5*ta ■ +* 

p - 4 ® M -■ i 

S3 "MU :SS” s. I 


Commodity indexes 

as is 

C^fRTOdl SS 


PreytaB '■ 

UMM I '■ 

1411^’. ^ 
l«fi ( ? 
2255 ? “ * 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. APRIL 8. 1994. 




Page 13 



Germany Makes 
Progress on 
Unemployment 


Bakeries Give Rise to Capitalism 

Last Vestige of Soviet Control Falls to Private Hands 


. . MM r ■ st. !' .s? A.# 


tQ*C4ft‘. - ! V 




&Ben 

BONN — Government anthori- 
ucs aimounwd jygj 

^ unemployment slipped under 

n^y uidusti^ 0 ^^ showed nnex- 
pecied growth, suggest in p the 
counts ba#* 
cry may be gaining momentum 

Economics Minister Gtlnter 
Rexrodt predicted the country’s 
worst post-war recession would be 
over by the autumn 

The Federal Labor Office said 


Dresdner Plans 
Dividend Rise 
For 9 93 Results 

Compiled by Our Staff Fran Dupaicha 

FRANKFURT — Dresdner 
Bank AG said Thursday it 
planned to raise its dividend as 
analysts forecast its 1993 oper- 
ating profit rose 16 percent, in 
line with its competitor Deut- 
sche B ank. 

Dresdner said it would pro- 
pose a dividend of 13 JO Deut- 
sche marks ($7.88) a share, up 
from 12 DM a year ago. 

Dresdner is to be the second 
of the three big Frankfurt- 
based banks to report 1993 
earnings. Deutsche Bank last 
week reported a 15.8 percent 
rise in group operating profit, 
to 5.27 billion DM. Commerz- 
bank is scheduled to report 
next week. 

Dresdner. Germany's sec- 
ond-largest commercial H ank, 
has less foreign business than 
Deutsche, which earned most 
of its profits abroad last year. 
But that could be offset by 
Dresdner s lower ride provi- 
sions and relatively high do- 
mestic profits, largely in the 
mortgage sector, analysts said. 

Some cautioned, however, 
that Dresdner’s provisions may 
be higher than market expecta- 
tions because of its exposure to 
Metallgesellschaft AG, the 
meials-based conglomerate 
that nearly failed last year. The 
bank owns 13 percent of the 
company and is a major credi- 
tor. (Reuters. AFX) 


Thursday that nnadjnsted 
anthon- March unemployment was 3.90 
auyttat Gcr- million, consisting of 2,64 miffion 
supped under in Western Germany and 1.26 mil- 
ts first drop in lion in Easton Germany. This 


compared witha post-war record 
of 4.04 million in February. 

The West German jobless rate 
fdl to 8.5 percent of the work force 
from 8.8 percent in February, white 
in the East, the rate was 16.8 per- 
cent, compared with 173 percent in 
February. 

However, seasonally adjusted 
figures, which economists say give 
abetter snapshot of the labor mar- 
ket, showed 237 milli on people out 
of work in Western Germany, up 
from 2.55 milli on in February ana 
2.17 min inn in March 1993. 

Bernhard Jagoda, president of 
the Labor Office, said the drew in 
unadjusted unemployment reflect- 
ed “the usual spring pickup*’ and 
that structural problems on the la- 
bor market would persist 

Nevertheless, private economists 
said they were encouraged by the 
jobless data and by figures from the 
Economics Ministry showing that 
West G erman industry orders rose 
3.1 percent in February from Janu- 
ary and a year earlier. 

“Both indicators together show 
the West G erman economy is now 
in a recovery phase, 4 said Thomas 
Mayer of Goldman, Sachs & Co. 
“They give reason to hope that in- 
dustrial production will take off, at 
least in the second quarter. Both 
are quite encouraging for the West 
German economy.” 

In a magazine interview, Mr. Rex- 
rodt said be expected dang foreign 
demand and recovery in Easton 
Germany to put the country as a 
whole back on a growth path. 

“We will have left the recession 
behind us by October 1994, 4 he 
said. 

But Rudolf Scharping, the leader 
of the Social Democratic opposi- 
tion who hemes to wrest power 
from Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s 
coalition in October elections, said 
the government was deliberately 
exaggerating (he importance of a 
blip m the jobless figures. 

Peter Fietsch. economist at Com- 
merzbank, said exports would re- 
main the cornerstone of recovery, 
with domestic consumption and in- 
vestment staying fairly flat. “This is 
in line with the usual pattern of 
previous recessions. The recovery 
has come from abroad every time. 4 


Lax Angela Tima Service 

MOSCOW — Outside, an icy wind funnels 
down from the Kxemhn into one of Moscow's 
most popular shopping streets, but inside 
Bread Store No. 755, the air is warm, damp 
and pungent. 

The homey aroma of fresh-baked Russian 
black bread mingles with the unmistakable 
smell of raw capitalism as people surge to- 
ward the counter to buy, buy, buy — even at 
prices they consider extremely high. 

Russia’s last mammoth Soviet-era govern- 
ment monopoly — bread — is ever-so-gradu- 
aDy being wrested from state control and 
placed into private hands. 

It is a politically delicate, even spiritually 
traumatic process. Cheap, plentiful bread 
was the very symbol of the Bolshevik Revolu- 
tion, and Lenm came to power in 1917 on the 
slogan “Peace, Land, Bread. 4 Bread stayed 
cheap and plentiful even in the poorest days 
cf the Soviet Union, the best-kept covenant 
betwem the Communists and the mass es. 

For three decades, the price of a dense, 
round loaf of rye bread remained unchanged 
at 16 kopeks. It was so cheap that peasants 
fed il to their pigs. 

In 1991, as the Soviet Union lay an its 
deathbed, authorities broke a sacred taboo and 
raised bread prices. Then, last October, Presi- 
dent Boris N. Yeltsin decontrolled prices en- 
tirely, and by last week a loaf of rye bread cost 
376 rubles — still only 21 cents, but 2362 
times what it cost just three years ago. 

Consumption has dropped between 10 per- 
cent and 12 percent — not because people are 
eating less but because they are wasting less 
and nave stopped feeding bread to their live- 
stock, said Alexander A. Chistyakov of the 
Russian Committee for Grain Products. 

Today, a new generation of revolutionaries 
is trying to do the unthinkable: make money 


from bread. The owner of store No. 755, 
Natalia D. Pdcnitana, is a former medical 
textbook editor turned bakery entrepreneur. 

In a startling break with tradition, Ms. 
Pelenitsma has managed to train her employ- 
ees not to be surly to the customers — though 
it is impossible to train the customers not to 
be nasty to the workers about the ever-in- 
creasing prices. 

Ms. Petemisina has also instructed em- 
ployees to sell the warm bread first, forsaking 

'With the demise of the 
bread monopoly, the last 
vestige of Soviet rule 
will finally collapse. 9 

Mikhail L. Berger, economist. 


the Soviet eastern of trying to force custom- 
ers to buy up every last soap of old bread 
before letting them have the fresh stuff. 

Bread Store No. 755 has developed a repu- 
tation for always having fresh bread on hand. 
Several customers said they come from other 
neighborhoods to buy it, as well as imported 
tea and cookies; fresh cakes; pizzas; and 
steaming pirori, buns stuffed with pork, po- 
tatoes and cabbage that the employees make 
themselves. 

These and other innovations have helped 
Bread Shop No. 755 Boost sales from 2,000 
loaves a day when Ms. Pdem taina took over 
three years ago to 5,000 loaves daily now. 

She gives much of the credit for the turn- 
around to the Western-style management ad- 
vice she received from Arthur Andersen & 
Co. executives under a program funded by 


the British government. Ms. Pdemisina raves 
about the extensive help she received, which 
included personal business tutorials, a 10-day 
trip to London and a visit from former British 
Prime Monster Edward Heath. 

Inspired by her success, Ms. Pdenitsma has 
borrowed $40,000 and is building a small bak- 
ery of her own in what was the crumbling back 
of the bread store. It wfl] be staffed mostly by 
her ovexeducaied, unemployed friends. 

“At my cash register is the fanner twwt 
engineer far a defense contractor,” Ms. Ftien- 
itsinasaid, pointing out a middle-aged woman 
m a blue apron, tme of 25 employees who earn 
an average of 574 a month. “Of course, it's a 
big comedown for her. Bui since they are not 
bemg paid there, she has to do something else.” 

Political opposition to making money from 
the staff of life r emains high. Although Mr. 
Yeltsin decontrolled the price of bread by 
decree in October, a law passed by the old 
Supreme Soviet that banned reaping more 
than 15 percent profit from baking or selling 
bread expired only on Jan. 2. 

Worried that price-gouging would create a 
political backlash, the bread factories stiD do 
not allow the retail stores they supply to add 
more than a 15 percent marku p to their 
bread. Some local authorities also have im- 
posed profit restrictions. 

Despite the regulatory limitations and the 
deregulatory confusion, reformers have said 
they thought the lifting of government con- 
trols on bread production would bring Rus- 
sians more psychological and economic inde- 
pendence from the slate. 

“With the demise of the bread monopoly, 
the last vestige of Soviet rule anil finally 
collapse," said economist and newspaper col- 
umnist Mikhail L, Berger. “Giving up land 
and bread amounts to giving up power and 
control over the people.” 


Ajjf. 1 ' ' ' jowl 






Sources: Reuters, AFP LittmaDonal Herald Tribune 




bitenuDonal Herald Tribune 


Portugual Predicts Calm in Rate Chaos 


Reuters 

LISBON — The financ e minis ter 
of Portugal said Thursday that tur- 
bulence in financial markets would 
subsude in a few days, but dealers 
remained sfc qwirail as money mar- 
ket rates soared to 100 percent. 

Eduardo Catroga told the finan- 
cial daily Diario Economico that 
the volatile mark et movements had 
“nothing to do with the health of 
the economy or with the direction 
of economic policy and will cer- 
tainly disappear after a few days.” 

But most dealers saw a deprecia- 
tion of the Portuguese escudo as 
inevitable after repeated injections 
of short-term funds by the central 
hank have failed to drag down 
stubbornly high money rates. 

“At the end of the day, it’s the 
exchange rate that will give rather 


than money rates,” said Chris 
Blease, director of capital markets 
at Credit Lyonnnais Portugal. 

A flurry of speculative selling 
last week drove the escudo down. 
The Deutsche mark rose to 104.40 
escudos and the dollar was quoted 
at 172.00 escudos, the highest level 
this year, forcing the Bank of Por- 
tugal to back up its pledge to de- 
fend exchange rale stability. 

The centra] bank suspended its 
regular money market intervention 
rates on Tuesday rather than face 
the embarrassment of raising them 
to meet the crisis. 

Instead it has Injected short-term 
funds at rates of up to 14 percent, a 
full four points above its regular 
intervention rate, last fixed at 10 
percent on March 28. 

Last week, the Bank of Portugal 


intervened heavily on the foreign 
exchange market to shore up the 
currency, but this week the soaring 
money rates have proved enough to 
lift the escudo. The mark hit 100.95 
escudos on Thursday, a seven- week 
low, as overnight loans chang ed 
hands at 100 percent after dosing 
at 30 to 40 percent on Wednesday. 

The turmoil on the foreign ex- 
change and money markets has left 
the bond market paralyzed. An 
auction of 40 billion escudos of 
Treasury bonds flopped on Thurs- 
day, with the Treasury failing to 
sell any of the paper. 

Some analysts said they consid- 
ered the escudo overvalued, but 
few said they thought the crisis was 
sparked by fundamental weakness 
in the Portuguese economy. 

“It's not a question of a cheap or 


pricey escudo — nobody knows 
what its value should be,” said Rui 
Martins dos Santos, chief of eco- 
nomics at Banco Portugues de In- 
vestimentQ SA. 

Mr. Catroga said he saw a return 
to a policy or gently easing regular 
interest rates in the medium term, 
provided Portuguese inflation con- 
tinued to fall and European central 
banks continued cutting their key 
interest rates. 

Portugal whittled one point off 
its regular intervention rates for 
injecting and absorbing funds in 
the first quarter of 1994. 

Prime Minister Anibal Cavaco 
Siva said a month ago that Portugal 
could shave two more pants off its 
intervention rates by the end of 1994 
if inflation, currently at 6.1 percent, 
fdl to between 43 and 5 jQ percent 


Very briefly; 

• Bertelsmann AG said it expected to report record profit for the year 
ending June 30. The German publishing and media concern said its first- 
half sales had risen 6 percent, to 93 billion Deutsche marks ($5 billion). 

• The Bundesbank lowered Germany’s M-3 money-supply growth rate 
for February to 173 percent annually from a preliminary 17.6 percent 

• France's industrial production fell a seasonally adjusted 02 percent in 
January from the previous month, the statistics office INSEE said. 

• Miri> Forsfloring AS, a Danish insurer, posted 1993 net profit of 25 
mrt]inm kroner ($4 milli on), reversing a loss in 1992 of 445 million kroner, 
but it said it would again omit its dividend. 

• Benetton Group SpA said h would ask shareholders to approve selling 
19 millio n shares overseas as part of the clothing maker and retailer's 
efforts to broaden its international shareholder base. 

• Germany’s competition watchdog, the Federal Cartel Office, cleared the 
planned merger of the Cologne-based retailer Kaufhof Holding AG with 
the Dfissddorf-based department-store chain Horten AG. 

• Cap G em™ SogetTs rights issue of 1.5 billion French francs ($256 

mQHon} will be priced at 140 francs a share, the lead manager. Credit 
Lyomuis, Said. Reutm . A FX. Bloomberg 

British Industrial Output Up 

Reuters tile energy output, rose by 0.6 per- 

LONDON — An increase in cent in Ftebniaiy. 

British industrial output in Febru- The figures were stronger than 
ary shows the economy was healthy many analysts expected. Econo- 
heading into the personal tax in- mists have been concerned that 
creases that start in this month, concerns over this month’s person- 
economists said Thursday. al tax increases would cut consum- 

The Central Statistical Office re- ^ding, which has been the 
ported that industrial production * act0r **- . d , nla ™* ec<> ‘ 
rose a seasonally adjusted 0.8 per- n°mic recovery since late 1992 
cent in February after a revised 0.6 u Sc P ar * le .government data 
percent rise in January. show^ 1 housmg starts m Britain 

fell 7.0 percent m the three months 
Production in the manufacturing to February, compared with the 
sector alone, which exdudes vola- previous three months. 


Thursday’s dosing 

Tables include ihe nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wail Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Wa T?w Associated Press 



(Continued) 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1994 


^ Page 14 


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Th/s Hat compiled by tfia AP, consists of fhe T.OOO 
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AMEX 

Thursday's Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the doting on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


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Japan Car Firms 
Set Supply Pacts 
To Trim Costs 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1994 

Beijing to Go Shopping in U.S. 

Officials Will Seek to Press Case for Trade Status 




C^npUed by Our Staff From Dispatches 

a r7n5i YO “ Ja Panese carmakers 
S mcrease toeu supplies 

of finished cars and trucks to one 

^rnher as a way of reducing P “ 
costs, industry sources Lid 

Jf*" Mo '°LCo- and Lsuzu Mo- 
tors ^ Thursday they had 
a^eed to supply trucks to each 
other under an origmal-eqinpmem 
manufactunng agreement.^^ 

. Jikdy we'U see more such 
ue-ups jn the ruture," said Seiichiro 
Iwasawa, senior analyst at Nomura 
Research Institute Ltd., as compa- 
nies aim to reduce modd-devdop- 
ment and production costs by in- 
creasing production volume 

Japanese car and truck makers 
are struggling, posting poor profits 
or even losses amid weak demand 
al home and slow exports. 

Mr. Iwasawa said the pact would 
be profitable Tor lsuzu, as it would 
sdl more trucks than it would be 
buying in vans and pick-up trucks 
in the transactions with Nissan. 

Starting in mid- 1995. lsuzu is to 
supply 14,000 two-ton or three-ton 
trucks to Nissan annually, for sale 
under Nissan’s brand name, and 
Nissan would supply 6,000 vans 
and 3.000 one-ton trucks to lsuzu 
for sale under the lsuzu name, a 
p Nissan spokeswoman said. 

While the arrangement would 
have no immediate impact on Nis- 
san or Isuzu’s finances, Mr. 
Iwasawa said, it will help improve 
their performances in the long run. 

In December, lsuzu forecast par- 
ent-company current profit of 1 
billion yen ($10 million) in the year 
ending in October 1994. against a 
loss ol 10-2 billion yen the year 
before. 

Nissan in October forecast it 
would have no current profit in the 
year that ended March 31, after a 
loss of 26.25 billion yen die year 
before. 

Honda Motor Co. already sells 
lsuzu -made sports-utility vehicles 


name, lsuzu sells Honda-made Ac- 
cord and Domani cars. 

Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd. began 
selling Nissan-made AD vans this 
month, and Mazda Motor Corp. 
will begin selling the vans in mid- 
1994. Nissan began selling Mazda- 
made Bongo trucks on Tuesday. 

Mazda has been using engines, 
transmissions and other items 
made by Suzuki Motor Corp. in its 
minicars since 1989 and plans 


eventually to sell the Suzuld mini- 
car Wagon R. 

Industry sources said Mazda was 
likely to use Jsuzu-made diesel en- 
gines for its new Famiba model in 
mid- 1994 and for its pick-up trucks 
in late 1994. 

The sources also said Mitsubishi 
Motors Corp. was likely to use 
Honda- made dnveshafts in a new 
model at some point. 

“Such ties between carmakers 
are Likely to increase further to re- 
duce production and development 
costs,” a spokesman for Toyota 
Motor Corp. said. 

In November, Toyota signed an 
agreement with General Motors 
Corp. to sell 20,000 GM-made 
right-hand-drive Chevrolet Cava- 
liers in Japan, with the Toyota 
nameplate, in 1996. 

Toyota’s Australian unit sells the 
Commodore model, made by GM’s 
Australian unit, under Toyota’s 
brand name, and GM’s Australian 
unit sells Toyota Camrys and Co- 
rollas under GM’s brand naru e,, 

(Reuters, AFP) 

■ Sales of Imports Jump 

Sales of imported motor vehicles 
in Japan jumped 41 percent in 
March, helped by the yen's 
strength and low-interest loans, 
The Associated Press reported, cit- 
ing figures from the Japan Auto- 
mobile Importers’ Association 

A record 32,440 imported cars, 
trucks and buses woe sold in 
March, compared with 23,051 in 
March 1993, the association said. 

Hie figure surpassed the previ- 
ous record of 25,943 vehicles im- 
ported in March 1990. Yasuhiko 
Yokota, the association’s spokes- 
man, said. 

The strong yen makes foreign 
products cheaper for Japanese con- 
sumers. The yen has climbed about 
1 1 percent against the dollar over 
the last year, but Mr. Yokota said 
the association did not know how 
much of that potential savings had 
been passed on to consumers 


Bloomberg Business New . >■ 

BEIJING — China's latest volley in the 
fight to get its favorable trade status with the 
United States renewed involves a shopping 
spree. 

China’s trade minister, Wu Yl, wfl] lead a 
baying mission to the United States Monday. 
The group is to place hundreds of millions of 
dollars worth of orders, offer what China says 
null be several hundred investment opportu- 
nities and lobby for granting Beijing another 
year of most-favored-naiion trading status. 

That status means that Chinese exports are 
given the same low-tariff treatment as prod- 
ucts from other major trading partners. Its 
renewal has been an mum) issue in the 
United States and an occasion for criti cizing 
Bering's human-rights record since troops in 
Beijing massacred demonstrators calling for 
democracy in China in June 1989. 

During his 10-day trip, a Chinese trade 
official said, Mr. Wu is to meet Secretary of 
Commerce Ronald H. Brown and discuss the 
U.S. threat to revoke China’s favored trading 
status this June if the country has not made 
substantial progress toward respecting the 
human rights of its population. 

China has timed the trips of its buying 
delegations to the United Slates to the period 
just before most-favored-nation renewal ev- 
ery year since 1989, but this is the first year a 
foreign trade minis ter has led the mission. 

“The delegation plans to buy cars, petro- 
leum equipment and other products,” Zhu 
Mincai, chief of information at the Ministry 
of Foreign Trade and Economic Coopera- 
tion, said. 


In April 1993, just before President Bill 
Clinton decided to extend Beijing's most- 
favored-nadon status for one year, a Chinese 
delegation bought 5800 million of Boeing Co. 
aircraft and 5160 million of vehicles from 
Genera] Motors Corp., Chrysler Corp. and 
Ford Motor Co. Mr. Zhu said these might 
also be some aircraft purchases this year. 

China has an inflation rate of 20 percent or 
more and a budget deficit that is forecast to 

r MFN is not a scalpel, 
it’s a dub, and you can’t 
perform an append- 
ectomy with a dub.’ 

Jeff Bell, vice president ol the 
American Chamber ol Commerce in 
Beijing. 

triple this year. But the large sum it plans to 
spend in the United States is far less than the 
amount it would lose if its most- favored- 
nation status is not renewed, analysts said 
China currently has a 522 billion trade sur- 
plus with the United Stales, according to U.S. 
customs data. One Westerner based in China 
estimated that 40 percent of China’s exports go 
to the United States and that the country 
would see its exports reduced by $8 billion to 
SIO billion if it lost its favorable trade status. 

He also said up to 3 million people would be 
thrown out of work in Guangdong and Fujian 


provinces alone. China estimates its urban 
unemployment will hit 5 million this year. 

The purchases the trade delegation plans to 
make will appeal to one of China’s strongest 
allies in the dispute: American businesses. 

Last week, when it was reported that Mr. 
Clinton was considering selectively revoking 
trade privileges of Chinese state-owned com- 
panies, American business was quick to react. 

“MFN is not a scalpel, it's a club, and you 
can't perform an appendectomy with a dub.” 
Jeff Belt, vice president of the American 
Chamber of Commerce in Beijing, said. "This 
proposal could make Congress think they can 
fine-tune this belligerent instrument,” 

Assistant UiL Secretary of State Winston 
Lord recognized the unpopularity of the pro- 
posal when he spoke to a Chamber of Com- 
merce meeting last week in Washington. “I fed 
a little bit like Tonya Harding joining a Nancy 
Kerrigan family reunion here,” he said. 

But selective withholding of most-favored- 
nation status has considerable backing in 
W ashing ton- A bill proposing to withdraw 
the status from Chinese state enterprises in 
the absence of progress on rights and other 
issues was passed by Congress in 1992, only 
to be vetoed by President George Bush. 

Scone form of compromise may be needed 
this time. With China's most prominent dissi- 
dent, Wei Jingsheng, having been detained 
again last week, the gap between China and 
the United States on human rights has wid- 
ened. ’The Clinton administration seems to 
have boxed itself into a corner, and this could 
be one way out,” a European diplomat in 
Beijing said. 


German autos remained the 
most popular, with 13,103 sold, up 
263 percent from a year earlier. 

Imports of UiL-made vehicles 
climbed 48 percent, to 12,1 16. They 
included 6,403 from Honda USA. 
up 40 percent; 1,100 from Ford 
Motor Co, up 92 percent; 1.608 
from Chrysler Corp-, up from 330 
cars sold m March 1993, and 1,349 
cars from Toyota's American 
plant, op 0.7 percent 


Bloo m b erg Business News 

HONG KONG — China ’s decision to im- 
prison a Hong Kong journalist for 12 years 
on vague spying charges threatens to cut 
further the already meager flow of informa- 
tion from one of the world’s fastest-growing 
economies, analysts said Thursday. 

Court authorities in Beijing disclosed tins 
week that X3 Yang, a mainlan d China native 
and a reporter for the daily newspaper Ming 
Pao, had been sentenced at a dosed trial on 
charges of stealing state secrets after writing 
an article on China’s plans to sell gold on the 
international market 

The seventy of the sentence; for a business 
journalist who was simply doing his job, ap- 
peared likely to damage business confidence 
both in Hong Kong and overseas, some ana- 
lysts said, as weU as having a drilling effect on 
those who gather and report the news. 

“It will affect the willingness of foreign 
enmpflnies to give interviews about China,” 
said Bob Broadfoot, managing director of 
Political and Econ o mic Risk Consultancy, a 
firm that advises corporations. 

Newspaper editors in Hong Kong have 
vowed to continue the fight for press free- 
dom, but journalists admit privately that self- 


censorship wiQ inevitably increase because of 
China's treatment of Mr. XL 
“We wiU not change our China reporting 
policy,” Stephen Vines, editor of the English- 
language Eastern Express, said. “We treat 
China like any other news story. If you treat it 
any differently, that would be a step down the 
rocky road to making up news.” 

But Wen Xianshen, chid reporter for the 
United Daily News, which is funded by Tai- 
wan, said, “We have warned our reporters to 
be extra careful when reporting from China.” 
Former mainland journalists who, like Mr. 
XL now work in Hong Kong are considered 
particularly vulnerable. 

“It’s a case of killing a chicken to show the 
monkey,” one such journalist said, using a 
Chtnwa> metaphor for punishing minor fig- 
ures as a warning to the more important ones. 

“Of course I fed very nervous about this,’ 
but I also want to do my job,” the reporter, 
who asked not to be identified, said. “1 wiD 
definitely apply self-censorship if Pm in Chi- 
na and fed a story is too sensitive." 

China’s Foreign Ministry spokesman, Wu 
J ianmin, denied Thursday that Beijing was 
cracking down on the flow erf economic infor- 
mation. 


“To get necessary economic information in 
an effort to boost economic and trade coop- 
eration and relations is totally different from 
stealing economic, trade and financial se- 
crets,” he said at a weekly press briefing. 

“1 don’t think anyone should worry about 
getting normal economic information from 


Editors of Ming Pao planned to fast for 72 
hours, starting Thursday night, to protest the 
sentence outside the Hong Kong branch of 
Xinhua news agency, China’s de facto embas- 
sy in the British colony that is to revert to 
Chinese rule in 1997. 

The newspaper also issued a statement 
condemning the prison term and the secrecy 
of the trial “All this is bound to hamper 
Hong Kong news organizations’ efforts accu- 
rately to rqxxt on China on the ^X)t. to shake 
faith in Hong Kong’s post-1997 free press 
and to harm China’s image among the Hong 
Kong people,” the statement said. 

It added that China was “carrying out 
reforms, opening itself to the outside world 
and moving toward the rule of law and a 
market economy” but that “die way the 
authorities have handled Xi's case dearly 
runs counter to these correct national policies 
and to the spirit behind them.” 


Generous Japanese Bond Ratings Give Too Much Credit 


Bloomberg Business News 

TOKYO — With the deregulation of the Japanese 
bond market that began last year, credit ratings are 
becoming increasingly important in a market that has 
not relied much upon item in the past. 

Japanese credit-rating agencies use looser standards 
than competitors from overseas, so some bond inves- 
tors could get caught with riskier instruments than 
they thought they were buying. In the latest and most 
glaring example,' Nippon Investors Service has given 
its highest rating, AAA, to Nippon Steel Corp. 

At most credit agencies, a triple-A rating indicates a 
security that is essentially risk-free for the foreseeable 
future. Yet Nippon Sled is forecasting an 85 billion 
yen (5825 million) loss for the year that ended March 


31, and Moody’s Investors Service, a US. company, 
gives Nippon Steel a far lower A3 rating. 

The single-A category at most agencies is for issuers 
cousidaed to have strong capacity to pay their debts 
but that may be vulnerable to changes in economic con- 
ditions and corporate drcumstances. ’Hie doubfe-A 

Investors seem to agree with Moody’s about Nippon 
Sted. An outstanding Nippon Steel bond due Feb. 18, 
2000, currently has a yield of 4.46 percent, a h i gh e r 
return than many triple-A issues of lie maturity. 

The high rath® of Nippon Sted by Nippon Investors 
led to a bid ding war among several of Japan’s largest 


securities firms seeking to underwrite the sted compa- 
ny’s next bond, expected to be a 50 billion yen five-year 
floating-rate note. The A3 rating from Moody’s would 
suggest Nippon Sted should pay at least 30 baas points, 
or CL30 percentage point, above a benchmark interest 
rate used by bond underwriters. 

When the dust settled in the bidding for Nippon 
Sted’sproposed offer, however, the prevailing rate was 


only ldbaas points above the standard rate, so low that 
Nippon Sted worried it might damage its credibility 
with investors, said an executive at one of Japan's Big 
Four securities companies. 

The Nippon Sted case follows a pattern. For exam- 
ple, Japan Credit’s most recent riding of Japan Air 
i-faes is AA-mmus, compared with Moody's A2 rating. 


Japan Bond Rating Institute, another rating agency, 
rates the airline A-plus, a sliver higher than Moody’s. 

Why the differing standards between Japanese and 
international rating agencies? “Japanese credit-rating 
agencies tend to judge a company by size and bow much 
profit there is if the company sold its land and securities 
holdings,” said Toshiaki Nakauc, a manager at Asahi 
Mutual Life Insurance Ca’s bond investment division. 

Some ol the analysts that work at Japanese credit 
raters are on loan from companies that have a stake in 
the agency, such as financial institutions or underwrit- 
ers that would benefit from favorable ratings. 

One credit rating agency, Nfilomi & Co., is indepen- 
dent of financial institutions and bond issuers. 


Second Official Leaves 
Malaysian Central Bank 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


Compiled bv Our Staff From Dispatches 

KUALA LUMPUR —The head 
of the foreign-exchange depart- 
ment at Bank Negara, Malaysia s 
central bank, resigned as part of a 
management shake-up after two 
-vears of large trading losses, the 
government said Thursday. 

Nor Mobamed Yakcob’s resig- 
nation followed the departure last 
week of the central bank’s gover- 
nor, Jaffar Hussein. Mr. Nor wfl] 
be replaced by Abdul Murad Kha- 
lid. the head of the banking depart- 
ment, a bank officer said. 

Nr. Nor led Bank Negara’s iH- 
fated move into foreign-exchange 
markets, which resulted in losses of 
5.7 billion ringgit fS2 billion) tot 
year and 9.3 billion ringgit in 19K2. 

Mr. Jaffar. who had been the 
central bank governor since Febru- 
ary 1985. admitted Thursday that 
the losses were caused by an error 
of judgment by the bank. 

The Fiasco has prompted the Ma- 
laysian political opposition tocall 
for the resignation of Anwar Ibra- 
him, the deputy prime minister ana 
finance mininster, for allowing the 


bank’s “aggressive adventurism 
with public funds.” 

But Mr. Anwar has shown no 
signs of bowing to those demands. 
He said he would ensure there was 
no repeat of the Bank Negara for- 
eign-exchange trading blunder. “I 
would have to talk to the governor- 
designate on the need to make nec- 
essary changes to ensure more effi- 
cient management and also ensure 
that past problems do not occur,” 
he said. 

Mr. Jaffar’s replacement is wide- 
ly expected to be Ahmad Mo- 
hamed Don, maniigfng director of 
MaybankBiuL 

Mr. Abdul, the new foreign-ex- 
change adviser, is a career central 
banker who has spent more than 10 , 
years at Bank Negara. He also will , 
continue in his role as head of the 
banking department. 

The bank’s insurance depart- 
ment manager, Zamani Abdul 
Gharri, also is being promoted to , 
adviser. He will be in charge of ; 
general service and branch opera- 
tions, the bank officer said. 

(AFX, Knigfn-Ridder) 


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! i7- ° A lait 

Sources: Reuters, AFP lixentaixml Herald Tntune 

Very brief ya 

■ Videsh Sanchar NIgam Ltd, the Iodiau government's overseas telecom- 
munications monopoly, wiU make a 51 billion issue of global depositary 
receipts on April 11, according to two officials f amiliar with the issue. 

• Thailan d said to Prime Minister Paul Keating of Australia that his 
country was welcome to link up with the free-trade zone established by 
the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. 

• Acer Inc, Taiwan’s largest personal computer manufacturer, said net 
profit in the first quarter soared 37-fold, to 500 mflhan Taiwan dollars 
(519 million), boosted largely by higher earnings at the joint venture 
Texas lnstnmems-Acer Inc. 

• Asian Strategic Investments Corpu an arm of Hong Kong’s Pacific 
Affiance Group, said it raised 5160 million to invest in China’s car parts 
industry. 

• ABB Asea Brown Boren Ltd. announced plans to build India's first 
private sector power plant in the state of Andhra Pradesh. 

■ San Mignd Corp. said net profit in 1993 rose 12 percent, to 4.02 billion 

pesos (5146.2 million), and disclosed plans to invest 5100 million in 
overseas projects. Bloomberg, AP. AFP, AFX 


CmC Paper Rated Prime-2 


Reuters 

HONG KONG — China Inter- 
national Trust & Investment 
Corp.'s first short-term yen bor- 
rowing program was given a Prime- 
2 rating Thursday by Moody’s In- 
vestors Service Inc., the U.S. credit 
rating agency. 

The rating, the second on 
Moody’s four-tier system, covers a 
15 billion yen (5143 million) com- 
mercial-paper program that OTIC 
is scheduled to launch this month. 
Commercial paper borrowings are 
unsecured obligations of op to nine 
months, and the Prime-2 rating indi- 


cates strong capacity for payment 
Moody' s said the rating reflected 
CmCs dose ties to China's cen- 
tral government CITICs founder. 
Rung Yiren, is now a ’Chinese gov- 
ernment official. 

OTIC was founded at the begin- 
ning of China’s free-market reform 
drive in 1979 and has grown into a 
burin e ss em pire. Its largest subsid- 
iary is CH IC Industrial BanJc, and it 

owns me of Hong Kong's leading 
conglomerates, CHIC Pacific Ltd- 
Moody’S also assigns its Prime-2 
rating to Bank of China and Peo- 
ple's Construction Bank of China. 













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Page 16 INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1994 


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1 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1994 


SPORTS 

Rodriguez Gives 
Dodgers a Boost 
Past Marlins 










3N 






The Associated Pros 

In just two games, Henry Rodri- 
guez has turned a big problem for 
the Los Angdes Dodgers into 8 big 
plus. 

Rodriguez, promoted to start in 
left field after Darryl Strawberry 
admitted his alcohol-and-drug 
problem, bomered twice and drove 
in all three nms to lead the Dodgers 
over the Florida Marlins, 3-2, on 
Wednesday night. 

“Fve been working hard every 
day, and 1 fed no pressure on my- 

NL ROUNDUP 

self right now," Rodriguez said. “I 
felt very happy to get the opportu- 
nity to play every day," 

Rodriguez, 26, has hit well 
throughout Ids career in the mi- 
nors, and earned part-time stints 
with the Dodgers the last two years. 
He bomered three limes in 61 at- 
bats this spring, but figured to be- 
gin the season on the beach behind 
Strawberry, Brett Butler and rookie 
right fielder Raul Mondesi. Even 
Cory Snyder seemed ahead of Ro- 
driguez tor a reserve spot in the 
outfield, until he got hurt 

Rodriguez is 4-for-6 in his two 
starts. 

He connected Wednesday for (he 
Dodgers' first homer of the season, a 
two- run shot for a 2-1 lead in the 
fifth inning . He homered again off 
Ryan Bowen (0-1) in the seventh to 
break a 2-2 tie at Dodger Stadium. 

Winner Tom Candiotti (1-0) 
gave up seven hits, struck out four 
and walked two. 

Braves 7, Padres h Rookie Ryan 
Klesko went 4-for-4 and drove in 
three runs, and Atlanta again 
stopped the Padres in San Diego. 
The Braves are 3-0 for the first time 
since 1982, when they opened with 
13 straight victories. 

Klesko, part of a planned pla- 
toon in left field, is 7-for-ll with 
two home runs, a triple and five 
runs batted in. 

John Smoltz (1-0) pitched seven 
shutout innings, allowing four hits 
and striking out nine. 

PhiSes 7, RodriesS: Lenny Dyk- 
stra hit a two-run homer and a dou- 
ble, and started a four-run rally in 
the ninth with a walk that led viat- 
iqg Philadelphia over Colorado. 

Dave Hollins’s RBI single and 
an error by second baseman Ro- 
berto Mqia tied it in the ninth. Tun 
Eisenreich’s two-nut single off 
Darren Holmes (0-1) won it 

Gants 4, Pirates 2: Mark Portu- 
gal won his debut for San Francis- 
co, pitching a six-hitter lot the first 
complete game in the majors tins 
season. Portugal, signed to an $11 
million, three-year contract after 
going 18-4 for Houston, struck out 
eight and walked none at Candle- 
stick Park. 

Pittsburgh, shut out by the Gi- 
ants in the first two games of the 
season, extended its scoreless 
streak to 23 innings before Andy 
Van Slykc hit a two-run homer in 
the axth. The Pirates are 0-3 for the 
first time since 1977. 


Mets 4, Cubs ]: Jeff Kent hit a 
two- run single, giving him six RBIs 
this season, and surprising New 
York wan at Wrigley Field despite 
getting only three hits. 

The Mets, who had the worst re- 
cord in the majors last year, are off 
to their fust 3-0 start since 1987. 

Expos 9, Astros 3: Kirk Rueter. 
8-0 as a rookie last season, won his 
first start of the year as Montreal 
triumphed in Houston. 

The major-league record for 
most consecutive wins by a starter 
to begin a career is 12 by George 
Wiltse of the New York Giants in 
1904. Rueter won despite giving up 
three nms in five innings. 

Reds & Cardinals 8; Gregg Jef- 
feries and Todd Zeile hit home runs 
for St Louis and Kevin Mitchell 
and Joe Oliver each drove in two 
runs for Cincinnati in a game 
stopped in the top erf 1 the sixth by 
bad weather. 

All statistics count. The game 
will be replayed from the start at 
Riverfront Stadium as part of a 
doubleheader in August 









• **... 






*1 

(as&iaSSt 



into G MabtogivAgEKc Fnaceftme ftm Moee/TW Anooaxd Wo* 

Barry Bonds, left, was up after a bomer in San Fraodscoy but Bo Jackson was down in Minneapolis, breaking Us bat after striking out 


Chisox Turn the Table on Blue Jays With 5 Homers 


The Associated Press 

Home runs were bouncing around Toron- 
to’s Sky Do me again. Finally, it was the Chi- 


Chicago, which hit just five homers during 
its six-game loss to Toronto in last year’s 

AL ROUNDUP 

American League playoffs, ma tehad that to- 
tal Wednesday night in a 9-2 rout of the Blue 
Jays. 

“A lot of guys were swinging the bat well 
tonight, and you always want to score 10 
nms if you can,” said Danin Jackson, who 
homered twice despite spending the first six 
innings on the bench. 


Robin Ventura also homered twice, in- 
cluding his fifth career grand slam. Each 
time, teammates followed him over the wall 
—Dan Pasqua in the fourth oft Pat Hentgen 
(0-1) and Jackson in the seventh off Paul 
SpoHaric. Jackson also homered in the eighth 
off Scott Brow. 

“It seems you always try to do Loo much 
the next time up after you hit one out," said 
Ventura, 3-for-5 with five RBIs. “1 was just 
trying to swing hard, make contact and not 
hit into a double play.” 

Wilson Alvarez (1-0) won Ms eighth con- 
secutive regular-season decision, allowing 
one run and four bits in seven innings. He 
beat the Blue Jays in Game 3 of the AL 
playoffs last year. 

Red Sox5,Tigere4: Dave Valle broke a 3- 


3 tie with a two-run triple in the sixth inning 
at Boston’s Fenway Park. Mike Green well 
had tied the score with a three-run homer in 
the fourth. 

Ricky Triicek, claimed last Friday after 
Los Angeles placed him on waivers, retired 
all five batters in relief of Frank Viola, get- 
ting out of a two-on jam in the fifth. 

Angels A Twins 1: John Dopson, unwant- 
ed in the off-season after losing his last six 
decisions in 1993, pitched seven innings of 
four-hit bail for via ting California. 

Damion Easley hit a first-row home nm in 
the fourth, and Bo Jackson — who earlier 
broke his bat across a knee after striking out 
— home an eighth-inning run. 

After Kent Hrbek’s single made it 2-1 in 


Johnson’s Ejection Launches Lakers Over Kings 


The Associated Press 

When his shooters couldn’t hit 
and Ms team couldn’t play defense, 
Magic Johnson turned to the refer- 
ees. 

In just Ms sixth game as the Los 
Angles coach, Johnson got himself 
ejected with 2:12 remaining in the 
third period and the Lakers trailing 
Sacramento, 80-64. With Johnson 

NBA HIGHLIGHTS 

gone, the Lakers rallied to defeat 
the Kings, 128-123, in overtime. 

“It was a smart move,” said the 
Sacramento guard Spud Webb, 
who scored a season-high 32 
paints. "Him getting thrown exit 
tired up the team." 

Mitch Richmond, who led die 
Kings with 39 points, agreed. 

"ft's a game we had control of, 
but I think when Marie went out, 
everything started to fall apart for 
us," he said. *They started making 


shots. Man, they were nialring 
shots.” 

And doing the most damage was 
Johnson's old teammate, James 
Worthy, who scored a season-high 
31 points as the Lakers won their 
seventh straight at home. 

Johnson said he felt getting eject- 
ed was his only option after the 
Lakers failed to respond to ydling 
and cursing at halftime. 

’There’s nothing left I can do 
but get kicked out, so 1 got kicked 
out," he said as he ran his coaching 
record to 3-1. T want to thank the 
fans, because the fans are what 
helped us win this game. They were 
yelling defense.” 

Referee Ron Olesiak called a 
technical against Johnson when die 
Lakers coach walked onto the mid- 
dle of the court arguing about a 
technical called against Worthy. 
He was whistled for his first techni- 
cal with 58 seconds remaining in 


the second period after questioning 
a frail called on Vhde Divac. 

After the technical, the Lakers 
outscored Sacramento, 24-12, in a 
span of 6:12. Los Angeles shot 76 
percent (16 of 21) in the fourth 
period compared to Sacramento’s 
50 percent (12 of 24) from the floor. 

Trailing 111-105, the Lakers 
scored right straight points to take 
the lead with 30.6 seconds remain- 
ing in regulation. Sacramento’s 
Wayman Tisdale then sank a 
jumper to force overtime. 

Hornets 129, Pacen SNh Led by 
Alonzo Mourning’s 23 points and 11. 
rebounds, Charlotte set a franchise 
record for shooting accuracy and 
nudged a little closer to a playoff 
berth as they beat visiting Indiana. 

The Hornets are five games be- 
hind the New Jersey Nets for the 
eighth playoff spot tn the Eastern 
Conference. The Nets next face At- 
lanta at the Meadowlands, then 


play the Hornets on Friday night in 
Charlotte, North Carolina. 

The Hornets Mt 64.6 percent of 
their field goals, surpassing the re- 
cord of 624 percent set against 
Golden State in February 1992. 

Suns 107, Spurs 95: In Phoenix, 
Dan Majerle set an NBA record for 
3-pointers in a season and Kevin 
Johnson handed out a career-high 
and team-record 25 assists as Phoe- 
nix handed San Antonio its second 
loss in as many nigh t* dropping 
the Spurs a half-game behind! Mid- 
west Division-leading Houston. 

Majerle Mt a trio of Sprinters in 
a 67-second span midway through 
the third quarter, the third bring his 
173d of the season, breaking Vernon 
MaxweD’s mark, set in 1990-91. 

Majerle finished with 21 points, 
Charles Barkley had 21 points and 
16 rebounds, and A. G Green came 
off the bench to score 20. 


■ Aria League Shaping Up 

Final plans for an Asia-wideprO' 
f essonaf basketball league win be 
imveOed within a month, officials 
said Thursday in Canberra, Austra- 
lia, The Associated Press reported. 

The Asian Basketball League 
will initially involve seven teams 
from Australia, New Zealand, 
Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia 
and Indonesia. 

The league is expected to begin 
in December and run through 
March 1995. 

Die Perth Wildcats of the Aus- 
tralian National Basketball League 
and an as yet unnamed team ham 
Cairns wifi join the Hong Kong 
Phoenix, Singapore Lions, Kuala 
Lumpur Tigers and teams from 
Auckland and Jakarta in the inau- 
gural season. 

Each team will rely on local tal- 
ent, with a maximum of three for- 
eign players per dub. 


WUdrCard Woes? 
Much Ado About 

Another Wild Thing 




By Ira Berkow 

New York Tuna Service 

N EW YORK — Die pennant race — the supposed purity, sanctity, 
ennobling essence of two or three teams battling and perspiring for 
what used tote called the gonfalon — was read its last ntes, or so many 

It toefe place last year when the owners of major league clubs voted to 
spHt the leagues from two divisions ■ ■ — — 

mtodnee.Or,asJoeJXMag&o,inso Vantage 

many words, asked the other day, - Kf 

‘‘Whore is Cleveland, anyway?” Tins Point ▼ 

is a question asked many tunes in the “ ~~ 

past, but not often in the context of baseball . 

Cleveland, it turns out, is not only m the Central Division of the 

American League, but. after Day Two of the New Day m baseball was 

also imcharacteristicaUy atop H. 

Baseball, now, is bursting with pennant, or division, races. 
l pcT>-aH of two races, as there were, for the most part, for the uist IuQ 
years of baseball, or four, as there have been since 1969, there may be six. 

To the «mm Qjg street, this might seem an embarrass me nt of nches. 

But the baseball fan is not the conventional person; he is a man up to his 
ears in tradition, aflood in nostalgia. 

And one who, in effect constructs Ms own tradition. And he says the 


Most things 
baseball has tried to : 
keep the game 
exciting and salable 
have not hurt the 
sport. 


the eighth, California got two runs in the 
ninth off Mark Guthrie when Gary DiSar- 
cina Mt an RBI double and scored on a wild 
pitch. 

Orioles 4, Royals 2: Rafael Palmeiro and 

Kansas City n emesis Hamid Raines Mt 
successive homers in die axth at Gamden 
Yards. 

Ben McDonald allowed two runs in 6)5 
innings as the Orioles swept the two-game 
series. McDonald (1-0) gave up right Mts, 
struck out three and walked one: 

Palmeiro hit his second srio homer in two 
games to make it 2-2 against David Cone (0- 
1). Baines followed with an opposite-field 
drive inside the left-field foul polk He went 
2-for-3 with a walk and is 15-for-2D with five 
w alks a gainst the Royals at rignvjpp Yards. 


horse race has been taken out of the pennant race. 

The general belief is that baseball has again shot itself in the foot by 
expanding the divisions and adding ■ 1 — ■» 

a second playoff series in each Most things 
league. ® r 

This naans that a wild card, or baseball has tried tO ’ 

keep the game 
idling and salable , 

But what seems forgotten is that havft not hnrt tfiA 
rhk is exactly what was happening 
anyway. Ana several more teams Sport, 
might now be in the thick of things. : : 

Last season, considered a great success, the Braves won the National 
League West with a 104-57 record, a game ahead of the Giants. The 
Phillies won the East with only a 97-65 record. Yet, due to circumstance; 
beyond their control in the playoffs, the Braves did not go on to the 
World Series. j 

This is not uncommon. Just to take some recent seasons, the Braves of 
1991, die Reds of 1990, the Giants of 1989, the Dodgers of 1988 and the 
Twins of 1987 all had worse records than the teams they beat in the 
playoffs. Depending on the beholder, either tins was disgraceful or 
Cinderella comes once a year. j 

C HANGE COMES with difficulty in most endeavors, and change; 
comes particularly hard for fans of basebalL 
The game is seen as name than a game by many, it is viewed as some 
mystical braid between boyhood and fatherhood, between its constitiK 
ems and the Constitution (at least the enduing dements of the Repub' 
He), between, wclLwhatever symbols one ascribes to the bat, the ball and 
even home plate. 

(In the end, Bart Giamatti, the late commissioner of baseball anct 
former Yale president and baseball symbolist supreme, said baseball is aH 
about coming home.) 

Some, like the owner of the Milwaukee Brewers and sometime commis- 
sioner, Bud Sclig, say baseball is quasi-trust, while fighting Hke crazy to 
keep it from being subject to antitrust legislation. That is, it's American, 
but he doesn't want h to be too American. 

Behind the daptrap, however, is a man seeking to make a buck, a 
pursuit that binds that merry band of owners — a fundamental and 
historical aspect of this institution. They simply are trying to compete in 
the enter tainmen t marketplace. 

Football and basketball and hockey have expanded their division race; 
to have more playoff games, and it has paid handsome dividends for 
them, a fact not lost on the merry band. 

Baseball strives so hard to keep young because it fean it will be taken 
as a relic 

So far, most things baseball has tried in recent years to keep the game 
exciting and salable have not hurt the sport, as disgusting as they were; 
artificial turf, designated hitter, domed stadiums, late-late-night playoff 
and World Series games, moronic mascots. 

(Heirs to such old gimmicks, some good and some bad, as juicing up 
the ball bringing in the fences, lowering the mound, putting numbers on 
the backs of uniforms.) 

Once, baseball had the sports world virtually to itself. Now it must 
share the stage with myriad other entertainments. Yet, attendance and 
the sale of baseball caps remain healthy. 

The game will live and die on its merits, on the individual games and 
performers, and not on wild-card teams. Baseball will either outlive its 
entertainment value or solidify its place in show biz. 

Or next season, it can return to two divisions. And, like the soft-drink 
company that rectified a huge blunder, just call itself Baseball Classic. 


Sines 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 



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I RUN IN THE / 

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BLONDIE 

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THAT KMMUD WOW OAK 











CALVIN AND HOBBES 

A _ f EBfiE. tCEHtE. MWEL WX . ! 1 1 ff UE H0UBS, UM,UL. 
V®™ K 11631 THET0EM 


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information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the IHT 


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ON THE i 
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A NICE TOUCH , 
wasnt rr.PEx? 


TITOS FACE 
WHEN HE 
TASTED IT? 


DOONESBURY 



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SPORTS 







Owner Sells NFL Club 
eported $185 Million 


By Richard Sandomir 

York Tima soviet 

YORK-— Afm nine years 

Sj£ TJ ner of lhe PMaddphia 

£?§j es ’ Braman agreed 

SSSfy to "** *c National 
ESSSU-V- team 10 a group 
led by Jeffrey Lune, a film produc- 
er, for a reported S1S5 million. 

That would be the most ever paid 
{E | 1 ^ Jrt ? n f raDchise ' surpassing 
ronton paid Iasi August 
for baseball s Baltimore Orioles. 

Braman, a Miami-based luxury 
car dealer and art collector who 
lives several months each year in 
the South of France, paid $65 mO- 
uon for the team in 1985. 

Although Braman would not 
confinn the sale price, a person 
familiar with the agreement said 
me figure was at least $185 million. 
Braman would say only that he will 
reap “substantially more than what 
was paid for the Orioles.’' 

The previous highest price tor a 
football team was the estimated 


$160 million paid by Robert Kraft 
for the New England Patriots. 
Owners of the new NFL expansion 
teams, the Carolina Panthers and 
Jacksonville Jaguars, paid $140 
mill ton. Wayne Huizenga recently 
agreed to pay $138 millwn for the 
Miami Dolp hins, 

Sports franchise prices seem to 
be skyrocketing, but part erf the 
rationale for the F-agl es and the 
Orioles being so expensive is the 
substantial cash generated by sta- 
dium deals. The Pagl^. for exam- 

S le, get to keep 80 percent of sky- 
ox revenues, according to 
Financial World magazine. 

The sale will be examined by the 
league office and its finance com- 
mittee and requires app roval of 
three-quarters of the NFL owners. 
Depending upon the paperwork in- 
volved, the sale could possibly be 
voted upon before the April 24 
draft. Braman will run the ««i«n 
until league approval is given. 
Braman, who is receiving nearly 


Germans Seeking 
A Game Abroad 
After English Snub 

Roam 

BONN — German soccer officials said on Thursday dial they 
have given up any hope of playing a home friendly on April 20, the 
anniversary of Adolf Hitler's birthday. 

A German soccer federation official Bernd Barula, said the world 
champions were looking for a fixture abroad following England's 
decision on Wednesday to pul] out of a friendly in Berlin on the date 
because of fears of extremist violence. 

“We must reckon that the match will be away," Baruta said. “If we 
planned to have the match at home the discussions would start all 
over again." 

“After England canceled the Berlin fixture a line has to be drawn 
under the whole matter.” be added. “But we have nothing fixed up 
yet.” 

The England match was a major part of Germany’s build-up to the 
World Cup, which starts in June in the United States. 

“The fact is (hat we can't play a game in Germany or even in 
Europe on April 20.” said (he national coach, Berti Vogts. “But 
changing the date to the 1 9th or the 21st is also not that easy" 

“I am disappointed about the way the cancellation came,” he 
added. “There were several meetings with the English in which they 
signaled their agreement with the date and the venue erf the match.” 

The Germans are unable to make a journey of more than five 
hours because of domestic matches. The fixture list of the German 
league and the Italian league, in which several Germans play, make it 
difficult to arrange a match cm April 19 or 21. 

Suggestions have been made that the German team could play a - 
ma ten against an Asian team, at a neutral site within a reasonable 
distance of Germany. Vogts is eager to play Asian opposition 
because South Korea is in Germany's group in the prcnmmaiy 
round of the World Cup finals. 

The Germans play friendlies against Ireland and Austria in 
Hanover and Vienna on May 29 and June 2. Their last test before 
they open the World Cup against Bolivia in Chi c a g o on June 17 is 
against Canada in Toronto on June 8. 


three times more than he paid for 
the Eagles, said nine years as an 
owner were enough for trim 

“I live in Miami and traveling 
the 26 weeks in the fall — wen, 
there's more to life than the Na- 
tional Football League," said Bra- 
man, 61. “I don’t have the same 
euphoria in selling the team that I 
had. in buying it. My life doesn’t 
start and end with football Tm 
active phflanthrqpicaQy and I want 
to do more down here." 

Lurie’s grandfather founded the 
General Cinema movie theater 
chain. Eight years ago. Lurie, 42, 
fanned Chestnut HSU Productions, 
which has made film* fifa “V. L 
Warshawsky. 

“I am very excited at the prospect 
of acquiring the franchise and be- 
coming a Phflatetohian," Lurie said 
in a statement. “Philadelphia is one 
of the great sports cities in America, 
and I look forward to a long and 
suocestful relationship with the city, 
its team and its loyal fans.” 

Redskins 
And Monk 
Part Ways 

By David Aldridge 

Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — The Wash- 
ington Redskins and Art Monk, the 
National Football League’s all- 
tune leading receiver and one of the 
greatest players in the history of the 
franchise, radar! their 14-year rela- 
tionship when the Redskins an- 
nounced that the two rides had 
bear unable to come to contract 
terms for 1994. 

Monk’s agent, Richard Bennett, 
said Wednesday night that his cli- 
ent had been backed against a wall 
by an “ultimatum” given him in a 
meeting between Bennett and Gen- 
eral Manager Charley Casseriy on 
Wednesday afternoon. Bennett 
said the Redskins told him that if 
Monk didn’t sign by 5 P.M. 
Wednesday, they would take their 
care-year, $600,000 contract offer 
off the table. Monk didn't sign, and 
the Redskins acted. 

Last year. Monk signed a $1.15 
miHkjn, one-year contract But on 
Feb. 18, he became an unres t ri cted 
free agent 

Monk was the Redskins’ first- 
round draft pick in 1981, out of 
Syracuse. He made the first of his 
three straight Pro Bowls in 1984, 
the same year he set the league's all- 
time record for catches in a single 
season, 106, a mark since broken by 
the Green Bay Packers wide receiv- 
er Sterling Sharpe. On Oct 12, 
1992, Monk surpassed Steve Lar- 
gent to become the all-time leading 
receiver with his 820th reception. 



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Gary Player of South Africa fining op a putt diving tire opening round of the Masters on Thrasday. 


No White House Party for Harding 


By Christine Brennan 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The US. Olympic Com- 
mittee did not stop Tonya Harding from compet- 
ing in the 1994 Winter Olympic Games, but it has 
made sure she will not participate in a ceremony 
honoring the U.S. Olympic team next Wednesday 
at the White House. 

“She’s not invited and she’s not coming," a 
USOC spokesman, Mike Moran, said Wednesday. 
“We don’t think it would be appropriate far her to 
be there to this celebration of the Olympic team.” 

Hanfing pleaded guilty last month to a conspira- 
cy charge in the Jan. 6 attack on Nancy Kerrigan, 
who recovered from a severely bruised right knee 
to win the silver medal in the women’s Olympic 
figure skating competition in February. 

Harding, who filed a S20 million lawsuit agains t 
the USOC in a successful effort to stay on the 
Olympic tram, finished ei ghth 

Rooert Weaver, Harding’s attorney, said 
Wednesday that Harding didn't know she had not 
been invited. 

“These people — these men — it seems to me 
rather small and impolite of the Olympic Commit- 
tee, but not unexpected,” he said. “Wc had not 


talked about it, but this would not be unexpected, 
considering their treatment of her in the past This 
is not inconsistent with their dealings with her in 
thepasL" 

Weaver said he planned to discuss the matter 
with Harding on Thursday. 

All U.S. Olympic athletes normally are invited 
to attend the White House celebration in their 
honor. But Harding's case has been anything but 
routine. The last thmg the USOC wanted, sources 
said, was for Harding to show up at the White 
House and again steal the spotlight from the 150 
Olympians gathered with President Bill Clinton. 

Said USOC Executive Director Harvey Schiller, 
“We are moving to avoid further distractions.” 

Officials of the USOC and U.S. Figure Skating 
Association might be working in other ways to 
strip Harding of her honors. The USFSA could 
consider taking away the 1994 national tide she 
won after Kerrigan was injured, said a USFSA 
official William Hybl and might also consider a 
lifetime ban on USFSA membership. She resigned 
from the USFSA as part of her plea bargain. 

The USOC is considering taking away her 
Olympic team uniform and other items and gifts 
she received as an Olympian, sources said. 


Allem Jumps 
To Early Lead 
At the Masters 


Compiled Ik Our Staff From Dispatcher 

AUGUSTA. Georgia — Fulton 
Allem, a long-hitting South Afri- 
can, birdied the two front-aide long 
holes on Thursday and took the 
early first round lead at the Masters 
golf tournament. 

Allan played the first nine at the 
Augusta National Golf Chib in 32, 
four under par. 

Left-hander Russ Cochran was 
next after going out in two-onder- 
par. 

Scoring generally was high in the 
early going. Of the first 12 golfers 
to finish, rally Jim McGovern was 
able to match par 72. 

McGovern, making his first ap- 
pearance in the Masters, qualified 
for the exclusive tournament with 
his first career victory last year in 
the Houston Open. 

Most of the favorites — defend- 
ing champion Bernhard Langer, 
Greg Norman, Nick Faldo, Nick 
Price, Raymond Floyd and Payne 
Stewart — were not playing until 
the afternoon. 

Contributing to the scoring diffi- 
culties woe a brisk, chilly wind 
that subsided about noon, and 
greens that remained fast and 
treacherous despite overnight rain. 

Steve Ellington and Nolan 
Henke served as unhappy examples 
of the difficult conditions. EDong- 
ton tied the aH-time tournament 
high score of 7 on the first hole. 
Henke, moving along at even par, 
took a fat 10 on the water-guarded, 
par-5 15th. He finished at 77. 

The 10, however, was not the 
worst score ever posted on the piv- 
otal hole: Jumbo Ozaki of Japan 
made an 1 1 there in 1987. 

The former champion Doug 
Ford didn’t bother to finish. He 
withdrew after playing the front 
ride in 44. 

Hale Irwin, a three-time U.S. 
Open winner, had the lead alone at 
one under par, but bogeyed the last 
two holes and finished at 73. 

Some other early scores included 
the former champion Charles 
Coody, 80; an 84 by veteran Gay 
Brewer, and a 77 by Bob Estes. 

Arnold Palmer, who won the last 
of his four Masters in 1964, played 
the front in 40. 

Johnny Miller, who qualified 
with his upset victory at Pebble 
Beach earlier this season, shot 77. 

The wind, gusting to 25 mph (40 
kpb) and blowing into their faces, 
also hampered three old champions 
who led the Geld off the first tee: 
Gene Sarazen, Byron Nelson and 
Sam Snead. 

Sarazen, 92, who won the second 
Masters in 1935, wore a jacket and 
sweater as be hit the first drive, 
lofting Us ball into the cross-walk 
about 150 yards from the tee. 


Nelson, 82, the Masters winner 
in 1937 and ’42, followed. A bad 
hip restricted his swing and be got 
his low tee shot out about 180 
yards, down the middle. 

Snead, 81, the sweet swinger who 
won the title in 1949, ’52 and ’54, 
hit his lee shot about 220 yards to 
the left ride erf the fairway. 

The three then fulfilled Fuzzy 
Zoeller’s tongue-in-cheek prophecy 
that they were among the few who 
had little chance to win the first of 
the year's Big Four events. They 
left their drives in the fairway for 
the fore-caddies to retrieve, and 
then retired to the clubhouse for 
breakfast. 

Zoeller, 42, a runner-up in each 
of his last three starts, said 
Wednesday that any one of 60 mm 
in the starting field of 86 could win 
the title. 

“Well, who can't win?” he was 
asked. 

With a straight face, Zoeller re- 
plied: “Sarazen's looking pretty 
good, so he might have a chance. 
But Byron tells me he’s only getting 
about 125 yards on his 5-rron so 
unless he has a good game off the 
tee he might be in trouble.” 

In the absence of the PGA cham- 
pion Paul Azinger and the two-time 
Player of the Year Fred Couples, 
Zoeller was one of America's 
brightest hopes to break the foreign 
domination erf this event, which has 
seen foreign bom pros win five erf 
the last six Masters. 

The 1979 Masters 
Zoeller was scheduled to start! 
Thursday in a twosome with Ha- 
jime Meshiai of Japan. 

Norman, the Australian who was 
a heavy pre-tournament favorite to 
win, was scheduled to follow 
Zoeller off the tee with Stewart. 

Norman, the British Open title- 
holder, was a record-setting winner 
of the prestigious Players Champi- 
onship in his last start. 

Langer of Germany, a two-time 
Masters winner, was scheduled to 
open defense of his title just after 
Faldo of England and Price of Zim- 
babwe teed off. (AP, Reuters ) 

■ A Pre-Tournament Jinx 

Tradition says Vijay Singh of Fiji 
can forget any hopes of capturing 
the Masters championship on Sun- 
day, The Associated Press reported. 

Singh won the Par-3 tournament 
on Wednesday at 5- under 22. The 
winner of the preliminary event to 
the season’s first major champion- 
ship has never gone on to win the 
Masters. 

Fred Funk, the former golf 
coach at Maryland who finished 
seventh in last year’s U.S. Open, 
was second with a 4-under 23. 


SIDELINES 




* * 


Lazio ’s Gascoigne Breaks His Leg 

ROME (AP) — Paul Gascoigne’s soccer career appeared in jeopardy 
Thursday when the accident-prone Lazio and England midfielder brake 
his right leg in two places in a tackle during practice. 

It was the same right leg that needed two operations three years ago 
after he tore knee ligaments while tackling an opponent in the English 
Football Association Cup finaL That injury put him ont of soccer for 16 
months. The latest one could sideline him for up to sue more. 

Doctors a t San Giacomo hospital in Rome reported that the 26-year- 
old star broke both the tibia and the fibula. Hospital officials said 
Gascoigne would fly to London on Friday to undergo an operation at the 

Princess Grace Hospital. . ,, . . 

After his 1991 injurv. he needed two operations and a 16-month long 
rehabilitation, which delayed his transfer to Lazio from Tottenham 
Hotspur in a $10 million deaL 

V ilfings and Oilers’ Moon in Talks 

wni kton f *VP> — The agent for the Houston Oilers quarterback 
Moon to begun talkfwith the Minnesota Vikings that could 

^ as*™* ■«* 

new Moon’s current deal nto for him in make 

$3 25 mini on next season. 

Tokio Breaks Mast, Heads for Port 

^ T Sw*ld° V Sc. broke its tnsst T Wry end was forced to bend 
'"iTacdden. db-d 

(16.6-kfloroeter) lead oo fif* ■f|2o’smSbroke in two places as the 

of contention for o^^ory.T^^ d ^thtcAxof Brazil 

yacht was sailing into a 25-kn jusfitia after four legs of the 

« tmiliogi the! European, attryi hi «*' "I 

in a moment bya mj|or ^ 5 

from tire boat- “Shock is gradually suutms 

Germans Pick Grass for Davis Cup 

' j ■ HAMBURG (AP) 

- J and Spain wfll be playrf in* Thursday. 

-J year, also in the Da* Cup 

quarterfinals, before « weD, J® , de ^ mention of whether the three- 
v The German announcement “J. WQuld ^ to the Davis Cup 

time Wimbledon champion ma ^ to return after a year's 
ft learn. Recent reports said Becker, laying instead on 

absence. Germany woo last year > 

Michael SticLthe No- 2 in the world. 

For fllC RCCOrd World Cup finals in 

Michel Platini one of the bv FIFA’s president, Jo5o Have- 

France, on Thursday EE in the event from 24 to 32. (Roaersl 

lame, to expand the number of t . , soccer star, is to rqorn Italian 

Road g 3T31, the sports daily Gazzetra ddto 

champions AC Milan ne 'V K '“ 5 r, 1 j|i l left Milan last summer after six 
Sport reported on Thursday- Gulin (Reuters) 

Season*, moving io Sampdona- 


SCOREBOARD 

ESESaESg 


NBA Stancflngs 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


*- Hew York 

Ortondo 

Miami 

NowJarsry 

Boston 

PWlodeWiki 

Washington 


pel 


sn 

sn 


an 

J01 


AMoattcDMtlm 

w i. 

51 20 
43 29 
40 34 
38 34 
26 46 
22 51 
21 52 


Central Hvtolon 

51 22 Mt 

49 2* 471 

42 31 -573 

39 34 534 

33 39 Jt* 

20 52 an 

19 54 .260 


X-AHantO 
x-Chlcago 
Cleveland 
Indiana 
Charkrtto 
DetroH 
Milwaukee 

WESTERN CONFER EMCE 
MUwed Dtvuloa 

W u Pet 
x-Hou*toO 51 20 JW 

x-San Antonio 52 22 ^03 

X-UM, 45 28 AM 

Denver 35 34 W93 

Mtanasofo » S2 .278 

Dallas 9 43 

PadflcDtvMaa 

* -Seattle SI 17 J64 

x-Phoenlx 49 24 571 

x -Port land 44 30 -595 

Golden Slate 42 30 .583 

UA. Lakers 33 39 458 

LA. Clippers at jo 3St 

Sacramento 24 49 329 

x-cTlnched playoff 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
MBwaafcac 26 25 31 »-m 

Philadelphia 27 24 36 28— US 

M: Norman 10-161-124, Baker 9-164-13 22. P: 

WKnerwoai t-MS-VZbJ. MOMne 11-19 TC-11 
32, Wodridge T2-J9 4-529. Reboand*— Milwau- 
kee S3 (Norman 11), PMtadeWdo SB CWooV- 
rtdoa W). Assists— MBwwikee 30 (Barry «. 
PtiBadelpMa 28 (Dawkins 8). 

Miami 24 28 26 26-m 

Ufsshknlnn JR 77 21 TO 

M: Rice 10-20 00 2V SmHh W4 M 26. W: 
Butler 8-9 10-12 26, Gugflofto 9-17 l-219.ChaP- 
nuni 6-146-6 19. Rebo u nds Mi a mi 46 1 Rice 10), 
WasUnston 40 (Gugdoita 101. Assist*— Miami 
21 (5m Rti 6), W ash ington 12 (Chapman 4). 

22 38 18 26—90 
31 M 29 33—09 
. : a Davis 7-132-4 M, Miller 5-11 54 17. C: L. 
Mounring 8-13 7-11 23, Curry 8-12 Od to. Re- 

Iwopd*— Indiana 4? (WHllonis6].Qwrfctfe 53 

(Moarnino 111. AssMs— I reflow 21 (Work- 
man 5), Charlotte 40 (Bennett 12). 

Boston 30 27 12 *-W7 

ABanta 33 23 26 29-111 

B: Radio 9-14 3-3 3. Brawn 8-15 46 22. A: 
Mamina 11-17 V2Z3.wnns 1 0-19 57 25. Stay- 
lock 8-15 3-6 2L RatKJOOdx— Boston 33 (Radio 
12). Atlanta 48 (Wilts 181. Assists— Boston 27 
(Brown V). Altama 34 (Bier lock 11). 

LA. CHppcrs » « » 

MlH— Ota 24 24 26 36— T14 

LA.: WINKS 1 V28 ivn 34, harper 7-14 44 
ULM: West 11-21 5-6 27. Loettner 6-13 7-Tfl 19. 
ttrliniiniti I in Angelas 55 (vajgM 13). Mkv 

mectaSi ( Lo ottaer 91. AwtaM— Las A nger s 23 

(Grad 9), Minnesota 30 (Uellner. Smffii 7\ 
San AnJoulo 22 28 23 30— 95 

PBS Mb 32 a 33 25-U7 

5: RoMnsonl3397-S3X Knlshf B-132-21LP: 

BarkleV 7-2078 21. Moierte MB 2-2 2L Green 
10-14 (HI 20. Refcaaods— San Anioato 43 1 [Rod- 
man 13), Phoenix S3 (Bartley 16). AsiBfi- 
San Antonio 26 (Krtstt 81, Phoenix 38 
(fcjohnson 25). 

SMtoMh XI 35 25 » »-W 

LA. Lakers 23 21 25 41 15— Ui 

S; Tisdale W-lDMSa RM»nond1>2B 843*, 
WeUi 12-2BS-732. LA-' DAiaeS-ll 4*72Z Wor- 
Rnr 14-20 3-4 31. lUiigw i kli C m mimmn 51 
I Polyrfcr IS), las Angela 51 (Dhac 141. Afr 
sms— Sacramento 29 (Vfetab H), Loo Angelas 
33 (van ExeL worthy. Threat) 6). 


Charlotte 


mMsm 


Major League Stancflngs 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 


GB 

Botttmore 

W L 
2 0 

Prt. 

ijom 

GB 


Boston 

2 D 

UXM 

— 

BVj 

New York 

1 0 

urn 

ft 

12V4 

Toronto 

2 1 

J£J 

ft 

13ft 

Detroit 

0 2 

JOB 

2 

25ft 

38 

Cleveland 

Cenlnri Dtvtstoe 
1 0 

UNO 



31 

Milwaukee 

1 8 

uno 

— 

Chicago 

1 2 

033 

1 


Kamos atv 

0 2 

-000 

1ft 

— 

Minnesota 

0 2 

J»0 

1ft 

2 

9 

CantomJo 

meet DMsJea 
2 8 

LOCO 



12 

Oakland 

0 1 

JB00 

Tft 

1714 

Seattle 

a i 

« 

1ft 

30ft 

Texas 

0 1 

JJOO 

1ft 

32 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 


GB 

Atlanta 

East Division 
W L 

3 0 

Prt. 

UNO 

OB 


New York 

3 0 

1-000 

— 

ft 

PNIorMpNa 

2 0 

1.000 

ft 

7 

ee..— 1 - j 
OTAIII CU1 

2 1 

A67 

1 

16 

Ftortda 

0 2 

soa 

2ft 

31W 

42ft 

Cincinnati 

Cetaral DMUen 
1 1 

SB 



St Louis 

1 1 

SB 

— 


Houston 

1 2 

334 

ft 

— 

Chicago 

0 3 

JXO 

1ft 

6ft 

Pittsburgh 

a 3 

M0 

1ft 

12 

13 

West Division 
Son Francisco 3 0 

1M0 

_ 

22 

Las Angeles 

2 0 

1M0 

ft 

29ft 

Cotorada 

0 2 

JBO 

2ft 

31ft 

San Diego 

0 3 

MO 

3 


Rtator. Heredo it). Scott tft ont 
(XFIatOwr. Webster (9); Kile, Reynolds (6). 
I tam plon (6). TaJones (7). MtwrWams (9) 
and Servals, Eusebio (7). W— Rueter, Ml 
L— K ile. 0-1. HR— Montreal, Aiou O). 
PMtadMpbta IN ON 386-7 18 I 

Colorado 2W IN 116—5 11 3 

DnJackson Mason (71, Djancs (9) and 
Douttei; Hartey.aRutfln (C, Holmes (9) and 
Girard L W— Mason, M L — Holmes. 0-1. 
5v— D-iones. (1J. HRs— Philadelphia Dyk- 
slra (1). Cotorada Bichette 2 (2). 

Honda 000 101 886—0 8 8 

Los Angeles in 8» M»— s s • 

Bowen and SanNaN; Condtottl and Piazza. 
W— CdmflottL M L— Bowen. O-i. HRs— Flor- 
ida Conlne (2), Barberie II). Las Angeles. 
KJtodrlguex 2 (2). 

Atlanta B30 812 M6— 7 8 I 

Son Diego ON NO a-] I 2 

Smoltz. MJtm (8), Slontan (t) and OEiien; 
Ashby.PAMcrtlnez (M, Hoffman (9) ondAu*- 
mus. W# — Smoltz, M. L— Ashby, 8-L HRs— At- 
hsnla, Btauser (1). San Diego, Ausmus 11). 


WESTERN 


»4 3t)n»tt 

x-Toronto 

x-Dailas 

X-St. Louis 

x-Chhoago 

Winnipeg 


CONFERENCE 

DMsIog 

W L T Pis OF GA 
45 27 8 98 339 263 


36 35 9 

23 48 9 

Dtvtslm 

39 28 13 
39 38 3 

32 33 15 
31 44 5 

26 42 II 

24 44 12 


M 261 230 
92 270 250 
86 253 263 
81 238 229 
55 237 327 

91 286 246 
81 272 267 
79 242 254 
67 222 244 
63 280 304 

60 252295 


N.Y. , 


E5S3IB 

NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 


Wednesday’s Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Kansas aty «B 80S N8-3 9 • 

Bcmmre *88 TO 1W-4 6 • 

Co — . Belinda (6). Magnanto (7), Pichardo 
(8) and Mactorkm; McDonald. PenMnrton 
(7). Elchbora (8). LeJmWi 19) and Holies. 
W— McDonald, vft. L— Cone. O-I. Sv— Le*- 

mllti (2I.HRS— Kansas atvjovmer ID. Bam- 

more, Palmeiro Q). Balms (1). 

Detroit ON 288 1*6—4 8 0 

■oaten on an se*— 5 7 i 

Welli. Boever (7) and Kmiter; Vlota. Trll- 
cxk (5), Harris [71. Russell (9) and Valle. 
W — Trileek ML L— Welts 0-1. Sv— Russell (2). 
HR — Boston. Gnenwcll (!). 

Chicago 881 204 501—9 11 8 

Toronto ON m 810-8 6 I 

Alvarez, NtoCaskUl (8). RHemandez (91 
and Lovalflere, Knrkovice (9); Hentgea 
Spollarlc (7). W.Wnikxns (71. Brow (9) end 
Borden. W— Aivorez- V8. l— H entgen, 0-1. 
HRs— CMcoaa. Ventura 2 (2), Pasoue t»- 
Darrin Jackson 2 (2). Taranto, Olerad (11. 
CaBtarata ON IN 012-4 It • 

rillniilwlF ON BN 818—1 6 > 

Demon. Grata (81 and Turner; Deshates 
Willis (8), Guthrie (9) and Wo meek- W Den 
sen. V0. L— Oeshaies, 8-1. sv— Grata (U. 
HR— CafHenifa. Easley CD- 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

SL Louis 2N 5W— 8 9 3 

rwh— m 832 3tX— 4 18 1 

5Vi taotoas, stepped by rale 
Arocha. Urban! |4), Habyan (4). SutdHto 
IS) gad Pappas; Browning, Jarvis (4). J.Ruf- 
Hn (51 ond Oflvrr. HRs— SL Ltato, Jefferies 

nj.Zelleni. . 

New York «N 183 IC8-4 J • 

e Mne ON NO ire-1 s 1 

janes. MModdux (8) and 5lk*x>Tt; Banla, 
ibtav (6). A-Yawre UI. Plew 18). Myers (9) 
and WQkins. W— Janes VO. L— Banks 0-1. 
Sv— MModdux 0). , , 

nhtNR ore re2 ire-a * \ 

s« Francisco «0 W _ » 1 * 

N taels. Dewey (71. White (81 and SkxNM. 
Portugal and Manwartno. w-Portuort J4L 
[_ HhuIl d- 1- HR— Pm s a u rgh, Vai shrM 
[11. San Fronedav Bonds ll»- 
Moetreal » W 13 1 

Hoaston Ml W 806-3 6 1 



W L 

TPH8FOA 

X-N.Y. Rangers 

58 23 

7 

107 285 219 

x-New Jersey 

45 24 

11 

101 291 211 

Washington 

36 35 

10 

82 262 254 

Florida 

32 33 

15 

79 222 222 

M.Y. islanders 

33 35 

12 

78 269 255 

Phltadatohia 

34 38 

8 

76 282 303 

Tampa Bay 

28 41 

11 

67 772 341 

Northeast Division 


x-Pimtxiran 

43 25 

13 

99 292 269 

x-Momraal 

39 27 

14 

92 271 236 

x- Buffalo 

41 30 

9 

91 273 211 

x- Boston 

39 27 

13 

91 27D 239 

Quebec 

32 40 

B 

72 242 271 

Hartford 

25 46 

9 

59 215 274 

Ottawa 

14 56 

9 

37 192 368 


xwCalgory 
x-Vancouver 
*-San Jose 
Anaheim 
La s Angele s 
Edmonton 
x -d inched ptovoft 
Y-ci Inched revision 

WEDNESDAYS RESULTS 

2 6 1 8—3 

0 2 I 8—9 

First Period: N.Y.-Turwxm 36 IKrwp. 
Ktaa); K.Y^Hooue34 (Green, Knipp). Second 
Period: (VSanderson 38 (Kucera. Kron>; H- 
Caxms 15 Penalty shat). (pp).TWnl Period: 
N.Y.-Mcinrds 23 (Ferraro); H-Sanderaan 39 
( Cossets. TdrcaMe). Shots on goal: N.Y. (an 
Burke) BHU—ft H (on Hmdain M444MS. 

• 1 8—1 

8 2 1—3 

P-M. Lemteux 15 (K. Ste- 
vens. Murphy ); (pp). NJ.-C Lemleux 18 (Atae- 
lln,Carperder); P-6A Lemleux 16 (K. Stevenb 
TasHaneffl). Third Period: P-K. Stevens 41 
(Jogr, M. Lemleux). Shots ee goal: NJ. (on 
Barrawo) 6-64—16. P (an Bradawl 5-12-7-24. 
Wasta Baton I 2 2-5 


8 2 1-3 

8 1 8-1 
Second Period: T-Ruff 1 (savant ZB- 
munor);fA-DIPtetral2(Riman.Sevlgny);T- 
Tucker 12 (Beroevln, Bradley). Dikd Period: 
T-Cretahton 10 (Bureau, Hamrllk). Shots on 
goal: T (on Roy) 1M-12-3&M (on Young) IV 
10-3—34. 

Edmonton 6 2 2—4 

Winnipeg 2 I 

First Period: W-Emerson 30 (Rnmcnluk, 
Steen) ;W-Emerson 31 < Drake, Monson). Sec- 
ond Period: E-Oiaueson II (Stopictoa 
Weight); (pp). E-Beers 10 (Wei am, Arno IT). 
(pp).Third Period: E-Grieve 13 (Oaer. Sta- 
pleton); w-DitStannon 20 (Stoea DLShon- 
non); E -Pearson » (Wetght. Rice). Shots ao 
goal: E tonOThdU) 10-11-12— 33. W (on Brath- 
wetto) 14.7-14-38. 

An o tah n 1 1 

Calgary 2 l 

First Period: A-Vaik 16 <Uf(cy|;OKnae3 
(Keczmer, Fteury); C-TMov 26 (Kfsla, Wdb). 
(pp) Jecoed Parted: A-Volk 17 (Semenov, LiV- 
ley); C-Zatopskl 10 (Vlltakaikl. Relchel). 
(pp)-TMrd Period: G-Moc Mis 2ManL Shots 
on goat: A (on Vernon) 1-6-5—12. C Ion He- 
fcert) 19-13-13—45. 




First Period: DMcBata 10 (RumMo, Lev- 
ins): W-Johonsson 9 (Jones. Juneao); C- 
McLtwam 16 (Yashin), second period: O- 
Rumbto 6 (Oatglft McUmOni; W-Cote 15 
(KonnwalctMik); W-Hatetwr is (Johansson. 
Hunter). (pp).Tblrd Period: W-Rldiey 26 
{KrtsHdk Reekie); W-Coto U (Rkfloy. 
Miller); (shKVMcUwaln 17 (YajWn, Huff- 
man); lO-YaNdn 29 (RumMn); lOGulm 5 
(Yashin). Shots on goal: W (on BIIHngton) 7- 
13-6-26. O (on Tabarocd) 6-V9— IB. 


FOOTBALL 

Naltoaal Footbtdl League 

BUFFALO— Signed PMI Bryant, running 
bock. 

CHICAGO— Sto ned Lewis Tillman, running 
bock, to 3-year contract and Robert Green, 
running back; Frank Kmet, offensive line- 
man; and Chris Holder and Grog Primus, 
wide receivers. Waived Steve MeMlchaal de- 
fensive lineman. 

CfNCINNATl— Signed Eric Moore, offen- 
sive lineman: 

DENVER — 5 toned Jeff Carlton, quarter- 
back. 

INDIANAPOLIS — Signed Mike Cook, wide 
receiver. 

KANSAS CITY— Hgnod Tony cosmos, de- 
fensive tackle, to 4-year c ontr a ct Waived 


Harvey VWUtoms. running bock. Stoned Un 
Emo«, Mocekirter. 

NEW ENGLAND— Signed BeftCoataMMir 
and.to4-yoarGontroct.ondPatHartow,affei>- 
slve tackle, and 5coftZaiafc, quarterback. to3- 
vear contracts. Resigned Pat Hortaw, offen- 
sive tackle. 


SEVENTH Oil 6-DAY INTERNATIONAL 
Sooth Africa vs. Austral la 
Wedoraduv nt Newkmds. South Africa 
South Africa innings: 286S (50 overs) 
Australia won bv 36 runs 


ITALIAN CUP 
Final, First Leg 
Ancona Qi Sampdoria 0 

AFRICAN NATIONS CUP 
SeeoMaols 
Zambia 4, Mall 0 

INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLY 
Hungary 0, Slovenia I 

DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Alax Amsterdam 5, NAC Breda o 
FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
5t Etienne 3. Lven 0 

GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
SchaJke L Bayer Leverkusen 1 
Werder Bremen 1 SC Frelbura 2 
Eintrocht Frankf u rt 1, MSV Duisburg I 
Karlsruher SC 1, Dynamo Dresden 0 
ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Regglano Z Parma 0 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Real Madrid Z Sporting de Gilon 2 
Sevilla <, Ccftn 1 
Real Sodedod 0. Valencia 0 
Albacete Z Lagranes 2 
Baraetana 1, Rnvo Vollecano 0 
Zaragoza 1. UeMa 1 
Ososuna 1, Tenerife 0 
Valladolid a Racing de Santander 3 
Oviedo 3, Athtettc de Bilbao 0 


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(Continued From Page 16) 

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