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INTERNATIONAL 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 



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IMF 
Slow Growth 
For Europe 
And Japan 

^ Overall World Increase 
Of 3% Would Be Best 
Expansion Since 1989 

By Paul F. Horvitz 

... . Jw«to/ Herald Tnbun e 

■ e *™^ HTNG 7 0N - ^ hearty economic 

?«E^ der W3V - 111 North “d 

m **“ ^ esca P e much 
nl, « '^duMnalized world this year, (he Jnter- 
nauonai Monetary Fund predicted Wednes- 

™ eraiI ' world economic output will 
■; :r ftS 1 ljus yeaj ' best performance 

21 econ °m>- since 1989. and it ail] 

nse to 3.7 percent in 1 995, the IMF forecast in 
its semiannual 'Acrid Economic Outlook. 

'• Jne lending and monitoring agency's ana- 

• j.vsts generally praised efforts by t& industrial- 
ized nations to keep inflation at hay but called 
or a ruig! of actions in particular countries 
that it believes will hasten sustained, gradual 
growth: 

• Japan, it said, should open its markets for 

• foreign goods. 

• Italy and France need to reduce their bud- 
get deficits. 

• Russia, China and India must continue 
down the road of steady reforms. 

I Separately, a senior IMF official said the 
U.S. Federal Reserve should raise short-term 
interest rates to between 4 and 5 percent to keep 
the recovery on track and ward off inflation, 
Agence France-Presse reported. 

[But while the rise in long-term rates, cur- 
rently ai more than 7 percent, is basically nor- 
mal. they should not go any higher, the IMF's 
research department director. Michael Mussa, 
told a press conference.! 

The I MFs positive global view was tempered 
by the large disparities it sees between highr 
growth nations like the United Slates, Canada 
and China, for example, and the still struggling 
economies of Western Europe and Japan. 

The 3 percent prediction for thus year, for 
example, was slightly lower than the 3.2 percent 
estimate the IMF released in October. 

Beyond 1994. the picture brightens. The pace 
r..‘ l'I.u in ai’: product 3.7 percent growth for 
1995. the IMF said. “Gradual recover/* is 
continuing, it declared. 

The IMF said that the real gross domestic 
product which accounts for inflation, would 
rise 2.4 percent in 1994 in ibe industrial coun- 
tries. that consumer prices would rise 15 per- 
cent in those nations and that unemployment 
would average 8.3 percent. 

Overall, the former Communist nations, in 
the midst of a wrenching transition from com- 
See IMF, Page 4 

$1.5 Billion IMF Loan 
Gives a Lift to Yeltsin 

Roam 

WASHINGTON — The International Mon- 
etary Fund approved a SI .5 billion loan for 
Russia on Wednesday, a deal that represents an 
endorsement of President Boris N. Yeltsin s 
centrist policies. 

The IMF said its loan would back up a 
government program that is designed to reduce 
inflation through a light budget and high inter- 
est rates, selling the stage For economic growth 
and improvement in Russian living standards. 




A REFUGE — AmanamrmginGant,BanHKli, 
has spread to the southern border. Mean 


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Ws children froni the boat he used to escape the fighting in Rwanda, which 
peacekeeping mission is nearing collapse amid the chaos. Page 2. 


Sfe '• : - 



Clinton Escalates 
Plan for Air Strikes 

He Wants to Shield All ( Safe Areas 9 
While Allies Renew Diplomatic Tack 


IS 


Kohl Assails Banks in Schneider Fiasco 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tnbune 

FRANKFURT — Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
on Wednesday added his weight to the charge 
that some of the country’s largest banks were 
responsible for the spectacular crash of a prom- 
inent real estate investor. 

In the case of Jfirgen Schneider, who amassed 
more than 5 billion Deutsche marks (S3 billion) 
in debts before his disappearance two weeks 
ago, Mr. Kobi said banks appeared to have 
exercised a double standard, lending millions 
with less caution than they would normally 
exercise on “a loan of 100,000 marks to a 
foreman.” 

“When a bank gives a loan, whatever it is 
called, one expects it to examine the line of 
credit with caution,” be said on German televi- 


sion. Mr. Kohl added that German banks 
should ask themselves, “Why have you adopted 
principles different than for the foreman? 

Mr. KoU's question echoed the sentiment of 
many in recent days who have said that Mr. 
Schneider's 40 or so creditor banks had neglect- 
ed their duty to scrutinize a major client 

Earlier Wednesday, a German prosecutor 
even said banks might be investigated for “aid- 
ing and abetting" alleged criminal activity by 
Mr. Schneider and his wife, wbo controlled one 
of German/s biggest property development 
groups, which now faces bankruptcy. 

Such comments have breathed new life into 
an ancient debate on the power and influence 
of a handful of big commercial banks in Ger- 
man society. 


In addition to lending to and controlling 
major stakes in German industry, German 
hank board members often serve on the boards 
of major corporations. 

Though Mr. Kohl said no new laws were 
necessary because the fault here toy with the 
banks, other critics of the German banking 
system are urging better supervision and a new, 
social component in banking and bankruptcy 
regulations. 

“It cannot be that these kinds of cases rou- 
tinely leave small and medium-sized businesses 
to foot the bin. sometimes with their existence, 
with the rest of the risk borne by the state and 
the general public through tax losses, in this 
case maybe in the billions of Deutsche marks,” 

See KOHL, Page 1] 


Compiled bv Our Stuff From Ditpmdm 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton 
jressed on Wednesday for more aggressive 
IATO military action to stop Serbian attacks 
on “safe areas” in Bosnia. 

“We must make the Serbs pay a higher price 
for the continued violence.” Mr. Clinton said at 
a White House news conference. 

Reacting to carnage in Gorazde, he proposed 
extending the NATO air-strike umbrella 
around Sarajevo to afl six UN-designated safe- 
ty zones in Bosnia-Heizegovina. Mr. Clinton 
also said the United States, Russia and Europe- 
an allies planned “a major diplomatic initia- 
tive” to end the strife. 

NATO ambassadors meeting in Brussels pro- 
visionally endorsed the proposals but delayed 
final approval to allow military advisers to 
consider the best way to proceed 

“Air power alone will not settle this conflict,” 
Mr. Clinton said. “This conflict mil have to be 
settled through negotiations.” 

Before speaking, Mr. Clinton conferred by 
phone with President Boris N. Yeltsin of Rus- 
sia, President Francois Mitterrand of France 
and Prime Minister Jean Chretien of Canada. 

Mr. Clinton said that he and Mr. Yeltsin 
were in “broad agreement" on objectives in 
Bosnia but that it remained to be seen whether 
they are in complete accord on policy. 

“1 had a good talk with President Yeltsin, but 
I believe frankly we have to read and get the 
details all written out,” Mr. Clinton said during 
a photo session in the Oval Office. Only then, 
he said, would it become dear if they were in 
complete accord. 

“I’m hoping that we will be,” Mr. Clinton 
said. “I felt very good about the telephone 
conversation 1 had with President Yeltsin.” 

Asked about Moscow’s view of the situation, 
he said, “They are very upset with the Serbs.” 

“My own view is that we have a chance to 
have a common policy." be added. 

Earlier, Mr. Yds tin was quoted by the Inter- 
Tax news agency as reiterating his opposition to 
widened air strikes against Serbian forces and 
maintaining bis view that die UN Security 
Council should be consulted before any intensi- 
fied military action. 

“We’re going to do what we can to exert 
whatever pressure and take whatever initiative 
we can to restore a climate in winch a decent 
and honorable agreement can be reached,” Mr, 
Clinton said. 

The approach used last month to break the 
siege of Sarajevo, the Bosnian capital, involved 
setting up a zone around Lhe city and making it 
off limits to heavy guns. Serbs were required to 
pull back their weapons 12 miles From Sarajevo. 
They complied under the threat of NATO air 
strikes. 

“If there is any violation by anybody, there 
can be air action.” Mr. Clinton said Wednes- 
day. 

Under the previous policy, NATO air strikes 
could only be called to protea UN peacekeep- 
ers. The only exception had been in Sarajevo. 

Asked if it was “too late” to save Gorazde, 
Mr. Clinton said, “No.” 

“It’s too late for a lot of people who have 
been killed there,” he said. But he said that the 
Muslim enclave could yet be restored as a safe 
haven if the Bosnian Serbs would end their 
assault 

But as he spoke, the Serbs continued their 
attack on the city, including shelling of the 
hospital. 

Mr. Clinton also said he expected the UN 

See CLINTON, Page 4 


e Original Sin 9 
Anda4rYear 
Tale of War 

By Steve Coll 

Washingt o n Pm Service 

LONDON — The aftermath of Yugo- 
slavia continues. Carnage in Gorazde, Ser- 
bian triumphalism, unspeakable Bosnian 
civilian suffering, despair in Washington 
and Europe, brave talk of a new Western 
approach — these are the latest headlines 
of a story now some four years in the 
making. 

To understand the state of affairs in 
Bosnia, a place to begin is June 1991, the 
moment Jonathan Eyai, director of studies 
at the Royal United Services Institute m 
London, “the original sin.” 

The Berlin Wall had fallen. The Soviet 
Union and the Cold War were moribund 
but not quite dead. The United States and 
its allies were fresh from triumph in the 
Gulf War. In this atmosphere, James A. 
Baker 3d, secretary of state at the time, 
went to Belgrade, then the capital of a 
unified Yugoslavia, desperately groping 
far its post-Communist future. 

Yugoslavia’s various republics — Slove- 
nia and Croatia most prominently — were 
making noises about independence. A 
fiercely nationalist Serbian leader, Slobo- 
dan Milosevic, was cm the rise. The Yugo- 
slav economy was a wreck. 

Prime Minister Ante Markovic prom- 
ised reform and the perpetuation of Yugo- 
slavia as it had existed. The Bush adminis- 
tration decided to back the status quo. In 
retrospect, some analysts argue, tins was 
the first miscalculation. 

Mr. Markovic had “succeeded in alien- 
ating almost every other actor in the Yugo- 
slav drama,” writes Misha Gtenny, a jour- 
nalist. Yet Mr. Baker endorsed Mr. 
Markovic and his program and sharply 
warned Slovenia ana Croatia not to with- 
draw from the Yugoslav union. 

A 3 a result, Mr. Eyal said, “we sent the 
wrong message to both sides.” According 
to some analysts, Serbian nationalists were 
convinced that the West would turn a 
blind eye if they tried to hold Yugoslavia 
together by force. Slovenia and Croatia 
were convinced they should embrace inde- 
pendence before Western pressure intensi- 
fied. 

The Serbian military command saw 
those statements by Mr. Baker and others 
in the West “as a green light to attack,” 
said the historian Mark Wheeler at the 
University of London's School of Slavonic 
and East European Studies. 

So the war began, first in Slovenia, then 
in Croatia. Ithas shifted ground since then 
but it has not ended. Nor has the Western 
dQemma over how to respond. 

An initial phase of the violence, until the 
late autumn of 1991, was dominated by 
Western Europe's post-Cold War ideal- 

See HISTORY, Page 4 


‘Recovery on Crutches’ Leaves Little Hope for Jobless 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 
PARIS — Europe’s long-awaited economic 
recovery is finally taking hold, but it will be so 
faint that the average citizen is unlikely to reel 
better off until 1995. . P 

Despite signs of economic nnpro vemen ti fcu- 
rope will face a bittersweet rebound in 1994. 
with unemployment in nrgor economies suen 
as France and Germany rising to record levels 
and consumers, with few excepuor^ sull ner- 
vous aboot spending money, a number of lean- 

have poliucalimpta- 
lions for leaders such as Hetinut 
many, and Edouard Balladur, of France — 
both of whom are trying their ^ econ- 

omies into a stronger upturn and enhance their 
chances for success in upcoming elections. 

The main progress that has been spotted 
inrrfti»«g* in export orders — is attributed large- 


ly to the strength of the U.S economy or to 
exchange rate considerations that make Euro- 
pean goods relatively cheaper on world mar- 
kets. But domestic demand is still depressed in 
much of Europe and increases in investment 
spending are negligible. 

“This is a recovery on crutches,” said Alison 
Cottrell, international economist at Midland 
Global Markets Research m London. 

Kermit Schoenholiz, director of economic 
analysis at Salomon Brothers in London, said 
Europe's recovery in 1994 would be “quite 
mild.” He noted that “job losses, falling real 
wages, higher real taxes, and reduced social 
outlays will keep confidence low and prompt 
consumer retrenchment.” 

Britain’s economy, now into its second year 
of post-recession growth and expected to ex- 
pand by 25 percent in 1994, is the exception. 
The consensus forecast for average economic 
See RECOVER, Page 4 



lnenuifam] Herald Tribune 


Touvier Gets a Life Term 

First Frenchman to Be So Convicted 


By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 

VERSAILLES. France — Almost 50 
years after he ordered the execution of seven 
Jews while he was serving in a pro-Nazi 
militia, Paul Touvier early Wednesday be- 
came the first Frenchman to be found guilty 
of crimes against humanity during World 
War IL 

Now a frail 79-year-old man suffering 
f rom prostate cancer, Touvier was sentenced 
to life imprisonment. He showed no visible 
emotion as Judge Henri Boulard announced 
the verdict, which the 12 members of the 
jury reached after five and a half hours of 
deliberation. 

Touvier never denied sending the seven 


Jews to their deaths on June 29, 1944, at 
Rihieux-la-Pape, near Lyon. Bui he said be 
did so to save 23 others. 

Given the last word before the jury with- 
drew, he said: “I have never forgotten the 
victims of Riflienx. 1 think of them every 
day, every evening.” 

The trial assumed special significance be- 
cause it was the first time a French court had 
examined any aspect of French persecution 
of Jews when the country was under Ger- 
man occupation between 1940 and 1944. 

“Shall we bury history or shall we have 
the courage of carrying out the reflection to 
the very end?” France's chief rabbi, Joseph 
See TOUVIER, Page 4 


,-5 
<■*“ * . 


Kiosk 


Court Defends Its Neo-Nazi Ruling 


KARLSRUHE. Germany (AP) — - Re- 
jecting Jewish criticism, Germany* highest 
appeals court on Wednesday defended a 
mtingit made five weeks ago that coukl 
make it harder to prosecute neo-Nazis who 
deny that the Holocaust happened. 


The Federal Appeals Cant said denying 
the Holocaust could not be considered a 
violation of human dignity. It also noted 
that it did not acquit Gamer Deckert, leader 
of the extreme-right National Democratic 
Party, but sent his case back for retrial. 


Maastricht 2: A Hot Comer of Drugs and Tolerance 




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By Marlise Simons 

finr York Times Service 

MAASTRICHT, Netherlands —These days, most clients at 
the Easy Cafe and the Smoky saloon, places where the police 
permit the sale of hashish and marij uana, are day trippers from 
across the border. Some tight up and linger in the half-dark. 
Others buy little stashes and leave. 

“The skunk is especially good,” said a young German who 
had picked out the potent,Tocally grown marijuana. He and his 
friend each bought the maximum allowance — enough for 
about two dozen cigarettes. 

They are known here as “lhe drug tourists,” the shoppers 
drawn by the permissive rules for soft drugs in the Nether- 
lands. Often rowdier and more demanding than the local 
smokers, they have set off a wave of anxiety in a border region 
of farm ng villages and small trading towns. 

But most disturbing to Maastricht and its small police force 
is the scene in the park along the Meuse River, where dozens of 
addicts gather daily to shoot heroin. Most are young people 
from Germany, Belgium, Luxembourg, and as far away as 

northern France. _ „ . 

Two years ago, this Dutch city near where Germany. Bel- 


gium and the Netherlands meet was proud to be chosen for the 
signing of the Treaty on European Union. Yet, the triple 
bonder is proving to be not only a symbol of togetherness, but 
also a handicap. 

As Europe integrates and its internal borders virtually disap- 
pear. many national laws, including drug policies, remain far 
apart. And with more and more neighbors flocking to the 
Netherlands to take advantage of its lenient drug rules, tire 
question in many minds here is: Should the Netherlands go on 
paying the price for being different? 

The Dutch took years to agree on what they see as a 
reasonable way to deal with narcotics: permitting (not legaliz- 
ing) the sale of soft drugs to diminish crime and to fra; the 
police to damp down on trafficking in heroin, cocaine, and 
other bard drugs. Possession of small amounts of bard drugs 
for personal use is tolerated because addiction is seen as a 
public health problem that is attended by a large network of 
treatment programs. Lenience, the Dutch argue, has given their 
country one of Europe’s lowest and most stable ratios of heroin 
addiction and deaths. Crack is rare here. 

Amsterdam used to be the mecca Tor the young drifters who 
came to use and abuse drugs and eventually moved on. The 


police finally dosed Amsterdam's drug-rehabilitation pro- 
grams to nonresidents. 

Yet, in the last two yeare, since custom controls in the 
European Union have disappeared, “drug tourists” have been 
commuting in droves to Dutch border towns. 

“You'd thfwk we were holding country fairs,” a police officer 
said, citing towns like Maastricht, Hecrien, Arnhem, Breda, 
and Rotterdam whose marijuana cafes and street dealers 
prosper because of foreign cheats. “Of course we're sot happy 
with this.” 

Maastricht, & handsome medieval town of 130,000 inhabit- 
ants, gets about 1,000 foreign tourists looking for drugs each 
day, the police estimate. The police complain that 80 percent of 
lbartimeignow taken up by drug-related crimes — car thefts, 
assaults, and burglaries mat serve largely to pay for drug needs. 
Maastricht has 140 local addicts, the police said, most of whom 
receive free methadone treatment. 

On a recent weekend, tourists at the Cool Running Cafe, 
young men and women who spoke German and French, 
studied the menu and bought skunk and super-skunk The 
dealer behind the counter chopped Moroccan hashish into bits 

See DRUGS, Page 4 


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UN Force Begins 
Rwanda Pullout 

Its Mission Is Near Collapse 
Amid Chaos and Massacres 


KIGALI, Rwanda — Terrified 
UN soldiers scrambled aboard 
planes evacuating Kigali on 
Wednesday as the UN peacekeep- 
ing mission in Rwanda neared total 
collapse amid bloody chaos. 

Shouting at eadi other and 
mumbling prayers, 252 Banglade- 
shi peacekeepers rushed onto 
planes loaded with dozens of UN 
military observers and refugees. 

UN officers said they had been 
told that the rest of a force that had 
numbered 1500 would soon leave 
the country. 

They said the decision had been 
triggered by the refusal of govern- 
ment forces to hand the airport 
over to UN control. About 250 UN 
peacekeepers would stay in a final 
attempt to broker an end to two 
weeks of civil war and ethnic 
bloodletting. 

“IT they do not reach an agree- 
ment on a cease-fire, it must be 
very clear we sbaQ not stay here,” 
the UN special envoy to Rwanda. 
Jacques- Roger Booh- Booh, said 
late Tuesday. 

In chilling new evidence of 
spreading slaughter in Rwanda, the 
UN High Commissioner for Refu- 
gees said Wednesday that the po- 
lice had executed people sheltering 
in a stadium in a southern town. 

In a statement in Geneva, it said 
Rwandan police officers and mili- 
tiamen were preventing 6,000 peo- 
ple from leaving the stadium in the 
town of Cyangugu. 


It said it had received field re- 
ports that "60 people had been 
pulled out from the stadium by 
police and that 16 of them were 
subsequently executed." 

The UN High Commissioner for 
Refugees cited reports from local 
authorities, missionaries and relief 
workers in Cyangugu that 10.850 
people had been killed in the dis- 
trict since violence spread from the 
capital of Kigali 

As many as 100,000 people may 
have been killed in the post two 
weeks, the U.S.-based Human 
Rights Waicb group said in a letter 
to the Security Cbunrii made pub- 
lic late cm Tuesday. 

Aid agencies said Tuesday that, 
according to unofficial estimates, 2 
million people may have been 
made homeless by the fighting. 

Piles of corpses litter the streets 
of Kigali and the hilly countryside, 
roost of them minority Tutsi butch- 
ered by government soldiers and 
machete-wielding Hutu militias. 

Thousands of civilians can be 
seen trekking aimlessly in the coun- 
tryside, trying to avoid battles be- 
tween rebels and soldiers or ma- 
rauding Hutu militias. 

In nearly every valley, smoke 
rises from burning villages, and the 
stench of death is everywhere. 

“These people are behaving like 
animals.” said a UN military offi- 
cer. He added: “If we pull out of 
here, a lot of people will argue why 
should we stay in places like Bos- 
nia.” ( Reuters, AP) 


In Zulu Heartland, 
A Sigh of Relief 


By Kenneth B. Noble 

New York Times Service 

KWAMASHU, South Africa — 
Most South Africans here in the 
Zulu heartland of Natal Province 
reacted jubilantly to the news that 
the Inkatha Freedom Party had 
ended its boycott of the elections 
□ext week, predicting that the 
agreement would almost certainly 
lessen the threat of election-related 
violence. 

Since mid-March, when Zulu na- 
tionalists led by Chief Mangosuthu 
Buthelezi issued their appeal for an 
election boycott, the black town- 
ships and villages of Natal have 
erupted in an spree of killings and 
boose burnings. 

The province has a fifth of South 
Africa’s population, but is believed 
to have been the scene of nearly 
half of the country’s political kill- 
ings in the last decade. A state of 
emergency has been in force here 
for the past three weeks, a tacit 
• . acknowledgment of failure to find 
■ a political solution to the endemic 
i unrest. 

• Most people interviewed here — 
;; many of whom have been victims 
j* of the internecine violence — ex- 
pressed relief at Inkatha’s agree- 
■■ mem to end Lhe boycott. 

“We’re overjoyed," said Selby 
Thwala, a laboratory technician 
and a senior African National Con- 
- gress official in this black township 
'* about 16 kilometers (10 miles) 
north of Durban. 

ir. “Everybody here was wailing 
\i anxiously Tor the seven o'clock 
news tonight to see with Lheir own 
.; eyes if Buthelezi would actually 
come out and say,‘let's vote.’ No- 
body around here missed the 
news.” 

i He added: “We definitely expect 

i£ the violence, killings, and mass 
{£ marches to stop, because there's no 
I,* reason for them to go on now." 

"t Eric Ntombela, 33, a truck driv- 
er, said Tuesday evening was the 
first time in months that be dared 
walk after dark in this section oT 
KwaMashu, not far from several 
hostels that are believed to be in- 


iiT, 

Im 

Sb 


habited mostly by Inkatha support- 
ers. 

This area, in the heart of the 
sprawling township, has reverber- 
ated with the sound of gunfire vir- 
tually every night in recent weeks. 
Mr. Ntombela said. 

“I think it's safe here now." be 
said, adding that with the Inkatha 
Freedom Party now running in the 
elections, “they have no reason to 
fight anymore." He said his older 
sister. Absena, 35, a mother of five, 
was killed while walking along the 
same path two months ago. 

But Williams Sithole, another 
African National Congress official, 
took a slightly less sanguine view. 
Although he, too, thought the vio- 
lence would diminish after In- 
katha’s decision, he said he feared 
that there would almost certainly 
be some postdection violence if, as 
expected, the ANC wins big. 

“The community is stfll very 
much scared of the ANC and 
scared that they might not take it 
well if we win the elections," he 
said. 

. Maphoyasa Magwaza, an ANC 
organizer, said that while he was 
pleased with Tuesday’s announce- 
ment, it was unfortunate that In- 
katha had delayed an agreement 
until the 11th boor. 

KwaZulu, the homeland carved 
out of Natal Province for the coun- 
uy’s 8 million Zulus — South Afri- 
ca’s largest ethnic group — is a 
scattering of fragments, predomi- 
nately rural and wretchedly poor. 

In recent years, more urbanized 
and educated Zulus have tended to 
support the African National Con- 
gress, while more traditional and 
conservative rural Zulus tend to be 
devoted to Chief Buthelezi and the 
Zulu king. Goodwill ZwdithinL 

While most South African party 
officials and political analysts woe 
generally enthusiastic about the ne- 
gotiating breakthrough on Tues- 
day, some cautioned that it was sdQ 
too early, to tell whether tensions 
between Inkatha and ANC sup- 
porters wiQ really di minish. 


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Petals and Power Juxtaposed in Tokyo 


By T. R. Reid 

Washington Past Service 

TOKYO— The biggest social event on the 
spring calendar for the Japanese establish- 
ment is the gala gathering formally called 
“The Prime Minister’s Cherry Blossom View- 
ing Party.” But when the poUtico-diplo-in- 
dus trial elite turned out 7,000 strong for the 
annual rite on Wednesday morning, two fair- 
ly important things were missing: There were 
no cherry blossoms, and there was no prime 
minister. 

Actually, that is slightly exaggerated, on 
both counts. 

Here and there around the rolling green- 
sward of theShinjuku Gardens there actually 
were some sakwv trees still lined along the 
bough with the delicate pink hues of Japan’s 
favorite flower. But most of the flora had 
already fallen, the faded blossoms blowing 
like driven snow before the morning breeze. 

Moreover, there actually was a prime min- 
ister present — but he, too, is a fallen blos- 
som. Blasted by fickle political winds. Mori- 

Talks Drag On 
Over Taxes and 
Security Policy 

By Steven Brull 

International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Having settled on Foreign 
Minister Tsutomu Hata as the next prime 
minister, Japan's governing coalition failed 
again on Wednesday to nominate him, ex- 
tending to 12 days a drawn-out, messy and 
complicated process. 

Despite the delay, as talks among the coali- 
tion's seven parties remained stymied over 
tax and security policies, Mr. Hata began 
siring up possible recruits on Wednesday for 
his cabinet. 

H agreement is reached on Thursday, he 
could be named prime minister as soon as 
Friday. 

“I have no idea what they’re talking 
about,” said Ichiro Ozawa of the Japan Re- 
newal Party, referring to the back-room deal- 
ing on Wednesday. “Could it be they want to 
create a new welfare tax?" 

The fight is over how to pay for a 6 trillion 
yen (S58 billion) income tax cut that coalition 
members want to extend from this year 
through 1995 and beyond. 

The Socialists, the largest bloc in the coali- 
tion, are opposing a proposal try the Renewal 
Party that Japan increase consumption taxes 
to pay for a reduction in income taxes. In- 
stead, they want the current 3 percent con- 
sumption tax be scrapped and replaced with 
an undefined new type of indirect tax. On 
Wednesday, the Socialists rgecied a compro- 
mise proposal. 

The feuding was another reminder that a 
Hata government is likely to be fragile. 

To those familiar with Japan, the extended 
maneuvering is hardly surprising. The need 
to reach consensus and save face engenders a 
drawn-out process of posturing and position- 
ing that allows everyone to pretend in the end 
that harmony has been preserved. 

But the dillydallying has delayed passage 
of the national budget for the fiscal year that 
began this month, which includes the hefty 
tax cut to breathe life into the recession- 
bound economy. 

It has also meant delay in compiling eco- 
nomic policies to soothe trade tensions with 
Washington, and two weeks of uncertainty 
over how Japan will deal with North Korea’s 
suspected nudear development program. 

The delay helped to drive down the Tokyo 
stock market's Nikkei index by 310.16 points, 
or 1.5 percent, u> 19,882.18 on Wednesday. 

The leadership vacuum also posed a grow- 
ing threat to Japan's trade relations. The 
lent look the embarrassing step 
ay of canceling trade talks with the 
i Union, which bad been scheduled 
for Friday and Saturday in Tokyo. Aides to 
Sir Leon Britton, the EU trade commissioner, 
said he “fully understood" the reasons for the 
cancellation. 

The political maneuvering, away from 
from public scrutiny, harks back to the ways 
of the liberal Democratic Party, which was 
removed from power last summer after 38 
years. Those who led the rebellion against lhe 
Liberal Democratic leadership, a group of 


hiro Hosokawa announced his resignation 
two weeks ago and is now serving merely as a 
fill-in until a new leader can be chosen. The 
bittersweet task of bring host to this annual 
assemblage was quite likely his last official 
duty. 

Asked how he felt about this twist of fate. 
Mr. Hosokawa glanced around at the wilting 
blossoms, flashed his enigmatic smile, and 
replied: “Not great." 

Also sipping sake amid the wind-blown 
petals was Tsutomu Hata, a politician whose 
bud is just about to blossom. 

A close ally of Mr. Hosokawa’s and a co- 
leader of lhe historic political realignment 
that has swept over Japan since summer, Mr. 
Hata is the consensus choice to become the 
next prime minister. 

But life is not exactly a bow] of cherries for 
Mr. Hata right now, either. In this consensus- 
minded country, he cannot take office until 
the seven-party governing coalition agrees to 
a policy platform for the new Hata adminis- 
tration. 


To dwell on such dark political clouds 
seemed almost uncouth, however, on a lovely 
spring m orning when the nation’s finest don- 
ned their finest — ■ for men. dart suits and 
white shirts; for women, very short skirts or 
very long kimonos. 

Refreshments ranged from the domesuc 
favorite sushi and beer to an increasingly 
popular import, American southern-style 
fried chicken- 

And there was. of course, sake, the Japa- 
nese rice wine, served the way sake should be 
served: scooped directly from the wooden 
keg into fragrant square cups of virgin pine. 

The Japanese have been enjoying the sim- 
ple pleasures of hout-rru (cherry blossom 
viewing) for thousands of AprOsJt is the 
ephemeral nature of the flowers — they bud. 
blossom, and blow away within a matter of 
days _ appeal to the Japanese aesthet- 
ic. 

Always enhanced with chary blossom 
metaphors, the media here went wild with 
headlines in the manner of “Spring Brings 
Falling Petals — and Politicians. Too." 



taqi Kufrirtx Afmcc Ftancc-Plrene 

Mr. Hosokawa and his wife, Kayoko, at Wednesday's blossom-viewing in Tokyo. 


relatively young politicians led by Ichiro 
Ozawa, boasted of more consumer-oriented, 
politically responsive government. 

It is possible that Mr. Hata will be elected 
prime minister in a parliamentary vote on 
Friday, exactly two weeks after Morihiro Ho- 
sokawa, symbol of a new era of clean and 
more transparent politics, announced his in- 
tention to resign. Mr. Hosokawa was brought 
down for his mishandling of personal and 
campaign finances, inducting a 100 million 
yen loan from a mob-linked trucking compa- 
ny. 

When Mr. Hosokawa said be would resign, 
coalition leaders said they wanted to name 
his successor within a week. Mr. Hata, the 
genial foreign minister and deputy prime 
minister, was the obvious front-runner. But 
the outlook became cloudy when Michio Wa- 
tanabe, tire gruff, outspoken Liberal Demo- 
cratic faction-leader ana former foreign min- 
ister, threw his hat in the ring. 


It seemed to matter little that among the 
Japanese public. Mr. Watanabe was emblem- 
atic of the corrupt, anti-consumer policies of 
the liberal Democratic Party. Strategically, 
Mr. Watanabe was simply too valuable nor to 
consider. 

After days of dropping hints. Mr. Watan- 
abe signaled on Sunday that he would leave 
tbe party in a bid to become prime minister of 
the coalition government. The next day. 
though, he backed down, having realized he 
could not convince enough Liberal Demo- 
crats to defect to offset the loss of Socialists 
in the coalition. 

His aborted effort, however, encouraged at 
least 12 Liberal Democrats to bolt the party. 

With Mr. Watanabe exit, Mr. Hata is the 
unchallenged front-runner. Bui with the co- 
alition still bickering internally, it was a start 
reminder of strains that may bind Mr. Hata's 
hands just as they did Mr. Hosokawa's. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Galapagos Fire Bums Out of Control 

QUITO, Ecuador (Reuters) —A fire has irored aaws the largest of 
the Galipasos islands, burning more than 2^00 acres and threatening 
one oftoev&s most unique and treasured 

The fire on Isabda Island, home of the mammoth Galapagos tunics 
and scores of other unique varieties of plants and reptiles, was out control 
on Tuesday night and beading toward a natural wfldhfe reserve, fccus- 
dor’sdvO defense chief, Laeroo Almeida, sakL 

Officials asked otter countries for help, but a avfl defense spokesman 

said that it would take heavy rain to put out tbe flames. The mp stalled a 

week ago. A quarter of the shore fish, half of the plants and almost all the 
reptiles exist nowhere else. 

Standoff at Iraqi Embassy in Beirut 

BEIRUT (Reuters) — Iraqi diplomats who have been ordered out of 
Lebanon after diplomatic ties were cat are refusing to leave the embassy 
unless all its stall axe granted safe conduct. Lebanese Foreign Ministry 
sources said Wednesday. • 

Lebanon has ordered the embassy dosed by Friday, it has told all staff 
to leave except for a diplomat and a guard whose surrender it has 
demanded. The two ore suspected of involvement in last week’s killing of 
an Iraqi disside nt in Beirut. 

“Either all the embassy crew leaves Lebanon without any one being 
arrested or no one win leave." one source quoted the Iraqi charge 
d'affaires, Awadh Fakhri, as telling a senior Foreign Ministry official last 
night. 

Senior Police Officer Slain in Egypt 

ASYUT, Egypt (Reuters) —Three Muslim militants shot and killed a 
senior police officer in the southern town of Asyut on Wednesday, 
security sources said. 

Brigadier Shareen AH Fahrai, head of local security forces, was the 
second senior policeman to be killed in Egypt this month. Tbe police said 
he was hit by a hail of automatic gunfire as he left home to go to work. 

Brigadier Fahmi’s bodyguard fired bade and in the exchange of fire one 
of the attackers and the brigadier’s driver were wounded. The bodyguard 
was Irifled, the police said. They said the wounded gunman gave informa- 
tion about his fellow attackers. 

Greece Cites Tersecation’ in Albania 

ATHENS (Renters) — Greece accused Albania on Wednesday of 
“unprecedented and continuing persecution" of its large ethnic Greek 
minority. 

Foreign Minister Karolos Papoulias leveled the unusually tough 
charges shortly before the two Balkan countries began talks over an April 
10 border incident Tirana charged that men in Greek military uniforms 
had kilted two soldiers in Alb ania. Greece has called the assertion 
unfounded. 

The Greek government, Mr. Papouhas said, “condemns and denounces 
with an ger and indignation the unprecedented and continuing persecu- 
tion of lhe Greek minority by Albanian authorities." His comments, 
made during a trip to the United States, were released by the Foreign 
Ministry on Wednesday. 

China Snubs U.K. Clemency Request 

BELTING (Combined Dispatches) — China rt^ecied Britain's request 


for clemency for a jailed journalist, Xi Yang, on 
case was China’s “internal affair. 


Wednesday, saying the 


“Chinese judicial departments’ trial of Xi Yang according to law is 
China’s Internal affair, a Foreign Ministry spokeswoman said when 
asked about Ambassador Robin Mac Loren’s appeal for clemency. “The 
sentence given to him by our judicial department is appropriate,” she 
said, referring to the newspaper reporter's 12-year sentence in March for 
allegedly stealing state secrets. 

Tic journalist's arrest followed tbe publication of a report on Chinese 
financial and banking policy. Hong Kong reporters, meanwhile, said 
Wednesday that to protest the sentence they would boycott aD Chinese 
press events until the end of May. (AFP, Reuters) 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

Sri Lanka Says Tourists Are Safe 

COLOMBO (Reuters) — Sri Lanka assured a group of ambassadors on 
Wednesday that foreigners were safe despite threats by a Tamil group 
involved in recent bomb attacks in city holds. 

Diplomats said that Foreign Minister Shah ill Hameed told the group 
that foreigners were safe and that “there is nothing to worry about 
because precautions have been taken." 

Diplomats have been concerned about the April 8 bombing in three 
city hotels cl aim ed by apreviously unknown Tamil group. A week later, 
the group, styled the “Eualau Force," wanted it would kill tourists and 
investors. 

Regobr passenger tram service between South Africa and Mozambique 
has resumed after 10 years’ paralysis due to Mozambique’s civil war. 
Mozambique’s railroad company CFM and South Africa’s Spoornet will 
operate a train on the revived route three times a week. (AFP) 

ItaKan rowferide gaa station attendants wfll continue a strike until 7 A.M. 
on Friday. Attendants at expressway pumps were staging a more limited 
stoppage. (Reuters) 

British meadows don’t have enough cows, according to visitors to 
Britain interviewed in a survey published Monday. “We’ve had some 
strange complaints in our time but I’ve never previously been aware of 
customer concerns about the absence of the good old cow in tbe British 
countryside," said Andrew Grieve of tbe privately run tour group 
Discover Britain. (Reuters) 

PUgrims fond carrying harmed political books, pictures or leaflets at 
this year’s hag, (he annual pilgrimage to Mecca, wul be punished, Saudi 
Arabia’s Interior Ministry has announced, ws (Reuters) 


In Caning Case, Questions About Police Brutality 


By William Branigm 

Washington Post Service 

SINGAPORE — The case of an 
American teenager sentenced to be 
caned for vandalism is raising new 
questions here about a long-stand- 
ing complaint against tbe police: 
the mistreatment of suspects incus- 
tody. 

As Michael P. Fay, 18, awaits the 
outcome of a clemency appeal, oth- 
er young people arrested with him 
have voiced allegations that the po- 
lice physically abused and threat- 
ened them to elicit confessions. 

In the case of a 15-year-old Ma- 
laysian, a medical report describing 
a ruptured eardrum appeared to 
corroborate Mr. Fay’s account of a 
severe beating that the boy says he 
received from police interrogators 
when both were detained last year 
at a Singapore police station. 




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Mr. Fay has said that be himself 
was also physically abused, threat- 
ened and subjected to racial insults 
while in police custody in October 
1993. 

In a statement Tuesday night, 
the Ministry of Home Affairs, 
which has jurisdiction over the po- 
lice, rejected Mr. Fay’s charges that 
a confession be signed was coerced 
and that tbe police had abused him. 
it withheld comment on other 
cases, including that of the Malay- 
sian, on grounds that they were still 
before the courts. 

[In a final attempt to spare Mr. 
Fay from a caning, lawyers asked 
Cheona for 
As- 

reported. The con- 
tents of the plea for an executive 
pardon were not made public. A 
decision is expected within days, 



and there was no sign that an ex- 
ception to Singapore’s tough crimi- 
nal lam would be made.] 

Lawyers made final arguments 
Tuesday in the trial of Shiu Chi Ho, 
16, from Hong Kong, who also 
faces caning for four vandalism 
charges that indude spray-painting- 
cars with Mr. Fay. He denies the 
charges. 

During his trial, Shiu Chi Ho 
asserted that oral and written state- 
ments he made to police in October 
were coerced by beatings and 
threats. Police denied the allega- 
tions, and the judge ruled that the 
confessions were admissible as evi- 
dence. 

He told the court that police in- 
terrogators had punched him in tbe 
chest, slapped him in the face, 
struck him with elbows to the back 


of the neck and beat him on tbe leg 
with a ruler. 

Nine young people, including 
three Americans, initially were ac- 
cused of tbe vandalism, although 
only five were eventually charged. 

According to Mr. Fay. one 
American who was not charged, 
Todd Bailey, was kicked, punched, 
slapped and struck with stolen road 
signs that police had recovered 
from Mr. Fay’s room. Another, 
Stephen Freehill, is to be tried 
soon. 

Mr. Fay alleged that the worst 
abuse was meted out to one of two 
15-year-old Malaysians, who can- 
not be named because they are ju- 
veniles. Mr. Fay said that after tbe 
Malaysian was interrogated, “he 
told me that tbe investigator had 
punched him in the nose, smacked 
his ear and hit him with some kind 


of baL" The beating left him with a 
bloody nose and impaired bearing, 
Mr. Fay said 

■ Lee Denies It’s Barbaric 

The former Singapore prime 
minister, Lee Kuan Yew, denied 
Wednesday that the lashing sen- 
tence handed down to Mr. Fay was 
barbaric. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Canberra. 

“If you think it is barbaric, then 
please don’t bring your 17- or 18- 
year-old son with you to Singa- 
pore,” Mr. Lee told reporters at die 
National Press Gub. “If you do, 
please warn him of the conse- 
quences." 

Mr. Lee, who was prime minis ter 
fra 31 years before stepping down 
to become a senior minister in 
1991, said he was responsible for 
the legislation authorizing lashings 


Taiwan Toy 
Held Inmate’s 
Flea for Help 

The Associated Press 

PALISADE, Colorado— A 
man who bough t a toy glider 
for his son said it contained a 
plea for bdp from its maker, a 
Taiwan prison inmate 

Ed Tucker of Grand Junc- 
tion, son, said his son found 
the note with tbe glider’s in- 
struction s_ “Hey lucky 
friends," the note read. “This 
toys make in prison Taiwan." 

It called for Taiwan to be 
investigated for human rights 
abases. 

“It is legal to have prisoners 
work when they are serving 
their terms," Taiwan’s Justice 
Minister Ma Ying-jeou said. 


V 

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I L— Li! ESss- a E3fe »4i^aEi is & 

Head of CIA Cedis Gangsters a Major Global Problem 


gangs have 


By Tim Weiner 

create economi^Md'nJS? “ nd 5 rmine governments, 

^Innuhr ““^^^S^saidWecta^J^ 3 ’ ** 

Janie? WwL^ 1 jJ’SvcSeS a? Sen J le .committee. R. 
of Russian wSnbJf lo the power 

syndicates P 1 ™* Be said -00 large criminal 

IawSi^m 2 T?rr ha ^ government and 

most of the na»i<w%f ICia *i *"*? ^ 10514x1 monev from 
He oun, J 5 newly P nvalized businesses. 

JfC N '- Yd ™' S *“«>»■ 

problem'Marin? r < ^ rime was “ lhe No. 1 

reports that pam^' 3, a . nd C1,ed lnterior Ministry 
KS Sf "" 6 ft 8 bribe T “1 mnhr to 
•‘OrSiSn man >' ° f lhe ration's banks. 
Organized enme probably doesn't control the Rus- 


sian government, but it’s a major influence on Mime 
parts of it,” Mr. Woolscy said. “Organized crime is 
causing substantial numbers of people in Russia to 
lose faith in their government and to yearn for an iron 
hand" — an authoritarian government. 

‘There is a real threat that the surge in crime will 
sour the Russian people on Mr. Yeltsin’s reform 
program and drive them into the arms of Russia's 
hard-line political forces," he said. 

Appearing at the start of a two-day hearing orga- 
nized by Senator John F. Kerry, a Massachusetts 
Democrat who sits on the foreign relations and intelli- 
gence committees, Mr. Woolsey delivered a broad 
overview of the rise of international criminal gangs, 
prepared by analysts at the CIA. 

The picture they painted was stark. It showed crimi- 
nal organizations, wealthy from drug smuggling and 
weapons trafficking, buying politicians as ifthey were 
baseball players, infiltrating governments, influencing 
legislation and investing in banks and legitimate busi- 


nesses — behaving, in short, like 19th century robber 
barons. 

Senator Kerry, using the language of lhe Cold War 
to describe such groups, called them "an invisible 
enemy" with “a vast army and equally vast wealth." 
This kind of crime has not tradition ally been seen as a 
national security issue, be said, but it must be ad- 
dressed that way today. 

Surveying the globe. Senator Kerry said that "por- 
tions of Mexico, Peru, Turkey. Burma, Colombia, 
Suriname. Ukraine and China, among other countries, 
are effectively under the control of criminal gangs." 
He focused on the power of the Cali cocaine cartel in 
Colombia, which he said had and corrupted that 
nation's legislators to consolidate its power. 

Senator Kerry said cocaine and heroin syndicates 
posed a threat to the United States equal to or greater 
than the Soviet Union during the Cold War. 

"It took the West 50 years and a few trillion dollars 
to win the Cold War,” he said. "I would argue that the 


mafias is already 
into our streets ana 


threat presented by _ 
greater, because its tentacles 
our school yards." 

As an example of the interplay between internation- 
al and domestic crime, Mr. Woolscy died the work of 
Chinese triads, criminal syndicates financed largely by 
heroin trafficking. He said they smuggled as many as 
100,000 immigrants into the United States last year, 
and indentured the new arrivals to pay for their 
transit The newcomers are often recruited into crimi- 
nal gangs after they arrive; he said. 

Investigating such networks is difficult, Mr. Woot- 
sey said. For example, an investigation of the Chinese 
syndicates could involve "unraveling local Chinese 
dialects used by some triads, tracing money transfers 
through three continents, or piecing together drug 


niggling operations." 
Toe beam 


bearings are scheduled to continue Thursday 
with testimony that the Cali cocaine cartel bribed 
diplomats from a number of nations in order to 
protect its operations, Senator Kerry said. 


Clinton Discusses Violence With Worried Students 


By Ruth Marcus 

H ashingttn Pas , Service 

WASHWCTON - President 
Bill Clinton has responded to the 
recent shooting of a teacher at a 
*“ h bu T ban Washington high 
school by saving the federal gov- 
ernment should help pay for secu- 
rity measures such as metal detec- 
lo ? “ schools that need them. 

‘Until we get guns out of the 
hands of our young people, every 
school that needs it ought to have 
whatever security is needed to 
take care of that." Mr. Clinton 
said. “You ought to be safe at 
school." 

Mr. Clinton made his com- 
ments Tuesday night at a 90-iran- 
ute forum on violence on MTV, 
the cable network where he 
wooed younger voters in a cam- 
paign appearance nearly two 
years ago. He was responding to a 
question from Brandon Dortch, a 
16-year-old junior at Largo High 
School in Largo, Maryland, who 
referred to the recent shooting of 
a teacher. Barrington Miles, by a 
student who was trying to sell his 
father's service revolver, 

“We can't afford to have metal 
detectors on our doors because we 
have too many doors, and we 
can't have hand-held metal detec- 
tors because we have too many 
students,” Mr. Dortch said. 
“What can you do for a school 
like ours to get funding for some- 
thing like this?” 

Mr. Clinton, who is appearing 
at a number of crime events as the 
House debates the crime bill, not- 
ed that the Senate version of that 
bill contained $300 million in 
funding for safe schools that 
could be used to- purchase metal 
detectors. 

“I think every school that needs 
it ought to have this kind of secu- 
rity." be said. "People should be 
safe in the schools and they ought 
to know when they get there 
they're going to be safe." 

The forum, which included 300 
youths aged 16 to 20 , was largely 
devoted to such sober subjects as 
teenage suicide, gun control, the 



now Wjl-JvThc Auocutcd Prar. 

A 12-year-old girl being rushed by helicopter to a Philadelphia hospital after she was shot in the face as she got off a school bus. 


lure of drug dealing and the utility 
of prison to punish drug users. 

Henry Culpepper, a Washing- 
ton student representative on the 
US capital’s Board of Educa- 
tion, wondered aloud how a teen- 
ager who is making thousands of 
dollars dealing drugs can be ex- 
pected "to leave this negative be- 
havior.” 


Dalia Lyons, 17, of Bethesda, 
Maryland, told Mr. Clinton that 
the recent suicide of the Nirvana 
singer Kurt Cobam “exemplified 
the emptiness that many in our 
generation Ted, the lade of impor- 
tance that we place on life." 

But in a free-wheeling session 
at Lhe end, Mr. Clinton also ad- 
dressed questions on: his choice 


of underwear (“Usually briefs”), 
his meeting with the Seattle band 
Pearl Jam ("My daughter was 
jealous”), his favorite song (Ray 
Charles singing “A Song for 
You”) and Ins favorite jazz saxo- 
phonist ("probably Stan Getz”). 

On a more substantive from, 
Mr. Clinion said bis administra- 
tion was considering expanding 


local programs to buy bade hand- 
guns on a nationwide scale. 

Mr. Clinton also disagreed with 
the use of mandatory sentences 
for drug crimes, a tactic that Con- 
gress and some stales have adopt- 
ed recently but that has come un- 
der criticism from judges who say 
the resulting sentences are overly 
punitive in many cases. 


President Soft on Haiti, 5 Democratic Senators Say 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Peat Service 

WASHINGTON — Five liberal Democratic senators 
have charged Lhai President Bill Clinton’s policies have no 
chance of restoring democracy lo Haiti, and they have 
introduced legislation to impose new sanctions ag3insl the 
Caribbean republic's military rulers. 

“President Clinton is a good and decent human being, but 
his policy toward Haiti is unconscionable;” said Senator 
Tom Harkin. Democrat of Iowa. “It is bankrupt, morally 
and politically." ^ 

At a news conference Tuesday, the senators, Jed by tbns- 
topher J Dodd, a Connecticut Democrat, joined the swelling 
chorus of legislators and human rights advocates who have 
charged in recent days that the administration's inaction has 
enabled the Haitian military to pursue with impunity a 
campaign of murder and terror against supporters of the 
deposed president, Jean-Bertrand Anstide. ..... 

They called the existing oil embargo imposed by the 
United Nations "a joke” and cited a front-page article in The 
Washington Post describing bow lhe Haitian military is 
enriching itself by selling gasoline and diesel fad smuggled 
from the Dominican Republic. 


The senators sought to differentiate then statements 
about Haiti from charges that Mr. Clinton has gone back on 
his campaign promises to maintain a strong stance against 
aggression and human rights abuses in other parts of the 
world such as Bosnia and China. But they acknowledged 
that failure to stand up to what they called “thuggery" in 
Haiti seems certain to damage US credibility throughout 
the world. 

“If we can't stand up for democracy and human rights in 
our own hemisphere, then what do the Serbs have to fear?” 
Senator Harkin asked. “What do the Chinese have to fear? If 
we can’t even do it in Haiti, in our own hemisphere, then bow 
can we stand strong a half a world away?" 

The administration has said that it was reviewing its Haiti 
policy. But it has resisted calls by Father Aristide and his 
backers to seek toughened economic sanctions that would 
cut Haiti off from all but essential food and humanitarian 
supplies. The administration also insists it will continue its 
pobey of Intercepting Haitian boat people hying to flee lhe 
island and forcibly sending them home. 

Mr. Dodd, chairman of ibe Senate Foreign Relations 
subcommittee on Hemispheric Affairs, and the other four 


senators introduced a bill intended to force the administra- 
tion to change its approach. The proposed legislation would 
impose a complete commercial trade ban on Haiti, cut off air 
links with the United States, deny visas to members of the 
Haitian armed forces and their civilian backers and freeze 
any assets they have in this country. 

The bffl also would block continuation of the refugee 
policy by barring funds for the return of any boat people 
who are denied a proper hearing for their claims to be 
political refugees entitled to asylum in the United States. In 
addition, it would cut off U.S. aid funds to any country that 
refuses to cooperate with the embargo. 

Mr. Dodd declined to speculate about the legislation's 
chances for passage, but said the sponsors hoped it will help 
to persuade the administration to change its policies, making 
congressional action unnecessary. Mr. McCurry said the 
administration “will look very carefully" at the biU as part of 
its policy review but does not have a position on it at this 
poinL 

Joining Mr. Dodd and Mr. Harkin as co-sponsors were 
Carol Moseley-Braun of Illinois, Paul D. WeJlstone of Min- 
nesota and Russell D. Feingold of Wisconsin. 


Away From Politics 


■ The space shuttle Endeavour landed at Edwards Air ForwBase, 
CaSSbiSon Wednesday after it was rerouted from Honda because 
of had weather It beean its journey on Apni y. 

• RSarcberT’sakl kWood test combination designed to detect 
fetuS^tiTDown's syndrome could eliminate most iunntocttittis 
Safer women over 35 and save mtihons of dcjars m heaJtii rare 
costs. Theproposal was outlined in‘ Thursday's New England Jour- 
nal of Medtidneby researchers in California and Moure 
A dW left breast was removed after a misdiagnosis of 

A woman , 7 . _ u v - ; urv that ruled all four doctors. 



. 1 £*** **.'■» 

kUlimifive students in Gainesville, Florida, in 1990. Danny Rolling. 
SWSedXiy Feb. 15 to five counts of Orst-degrc murder. 
SK 2 , Af the nation’s waterways are too polluted to use for 

fodSSilfSMorbSting. the Environmental Protection Agency 
swimming,! nshmg OB slales - je ports of the conditions 

rivers, stream and coasts in 1991 and it is not a 
reliable indicator of trends. „ n. ap. .vtr 


College Crowd Cheers Racist Speech 


The Associated Press 

. WASHINGTON — Nearly 
2,000 people cheered Khalid Mu- 
hammad as the Nation of Islam 
member denounced Jews as “bon- 
kies’’ and said God had spoken to 
Colin Ferguson, lhe Jamaican 
charged wiih killing six people on a 
New York commuter train. 

Mr. Muhammad, once a spokes- 
man for the Muslim organization, 
spoke at Howard University on 
Tuesday. Hours earlier Frank! vn 
Jenifer, the school president, had 
defended studenis’ free speech 
rights but said he was deeply con- 
cerned that a student group was 
providing a platform for Mr. Mu- 
hammad's anti-Semitic rhetoric. 

Mr. Mohammad told his audi- 


ence: "I am going to be like a pit 
bull. Thai is the way 1 am going to 
be against the Jews. I am going to 
.bite the tail of the hankies.” 

He said he “loves Colin Fergu- 
son. who killed all those white folks 
on the Long Island train.” 

“God spoke to Colin Ferguson 
and said, ‘Catch the train. Colin, 
catch the train,' " he said. 

Outside, Rabbi Avi Weiss of 
New York called Mr. Muhammad 
a racist and “an anti-Semite of the 
worst order." 

Howard, one of the oldest U.S. 
black colleges, has also come under 
fire for postponing a speech by the 
historian David Brion Davis. He 
had been scheduled to speak on an 


18th century slave uprising, but 
postponed the lecture until Sep- 
tember. Mr. Davis, a Pulitzer Prize- 
winning Jewish scholar, had ex- 
pressed reluctance to give the 
lecture after reading about a Feb- 
ruary rally where Mr. Muhammad 
ike and students chanted anti- 
litic slogans. 

Mr. Jenifer said that “there is a 
very small number of people who 
articulated sentiments about other 
ethnic groups that are the views of 
‘that small number of people.” 

“While we must protect the free- 
dom of speech of our students,” he 
said, “we have the responsibility to 1 
speak out and send out our mes- 
sage loud and dear that is the view 
of a very small group of people." 


Senate Vote 
Gives Kelso 
Retirement 
At4 Stars 


By Helen Dewar 

Washington Peat Service 

WASHINGTON — A sharply 
divided Senate has agreed to let 
Admiral Frank B. Kelso 2d retire at 
four-star rank despite complaints 
from all seven female senators that 
A dmira l Kelso, as chief of naval 
operations, shared responsibility 
for the Tailhook scandal 

The vote was 54 to 43, with 36 
men joining in the unprecedented 
show of solidarity by women to 
protest the Tailhook assaults, the 
U.S. Navy’s investigation of the in- 
cident and what they described as 
poor and insensitive leadership on 
the part of its top brass. 

At issue in the tense and at times 
bristling debate late Tuesday was 
“leadership," “accountability," “a 
38-year career of honor and ser- 
vice” and $16,873 in annual pen- 
sion benefits for Admiral Kelso. 

Without Senate approval four- 
star rank automatically reverts to 
two stars at retirement, with a pen- 
sion of $67,467 instead of $84,340. 
Rarely if ever has tbe Senate denied 
retirement at full rank to & chief of 
a military service- Memories of tbe 
firestorm that greeted the Senate's 
handling of Anita F. Hill’s allega- 
tions of sexual har assme nt against 
tbe Supreme Conn nomination of 
Care nee Thomas — and contribut- 
ed to tbe election of most of the 
women — ■ bung over the chamber 
as it debated the matter. 

The memories were made more 
vivid as nine female House mem- 
bers, repeating a trek they made 
during the Thomas-HiO controver- 
sy, walked across Capitol Plaza to 
the Senate, where they stood silent 
vigil to show solidarity. 

Most male senators seemed in- 
tent on keeping any fires con- 
tained. But nerves grew taut as the 
debate continued. Senator Ted Ste- 
ven a. an Alaska Republican, and 
Senator Carol Moseley-Braun, 
Democrat of Illinois, clashed when 
the Alaskan questioned her under- 
standing of a point in the debate. 
Senator Moseley-Braun indignant- 
ly said it "defines chauvinism" to 
suggest such a thing 

In the vote, 23 Democrats and 31 
Republicans favored retirement at 
four stars, while 30 Democrats and 
13 Republicans voted against 

Among Republicans voting 
against the higher pension was Sen- 
ator Bob Packwood of Oregon, 
who is under investigation by the 
Senate ethics committee for possi- 
ble sexual misconduct. A slight ma- 
jority of senators up for re-election 
this fall voted no. 

, Admiral Kelso should be held 
accountable because Tailhook and 
the “bungled investigation'' of it 
happened on his watch as navy 
chief, the women argued. 

In perhaps the day's most emo- 
tional speetih. Senator Patty Mur- 
ray. Democrat of Washington, said 
sbe often encountered young wom- 
en who want to be aviators, astro- 
nauts or senators. “What do ) tell 
them about Tailhook if they want a 
career in the armed forces?” sbe 
asked. High-ranking officers, in- 
cluding Admiral Kelso, were at the 
convention or naval aviators and 
didnothing to stop the assaults, she 
said. “So much authority, so little 
leadership.” 

But leaders of the Armed Ser- 
vices Committee, which approved 
four-star retirement, rallied to his 
defense, decrying the Tailhook 
“outrage,” as Senator Sam Nunn, 
Democrat of Georgia and commit- 
tee chairman, described it, but sug- 
gesting that Admiral Kelso’s con- 
duct did not warrant punishment 
by the Senate. They also said he 
had done more than any other na- 
val chief to bring women into re- 
sponsible positions in the navy. 

In an MTV interview. President 
Bill Clinion also came to Admiral 
Kelso's defense, saying: “That’s a 
very severe thing to do, and I don’t 
believe the evidence warrants it." 


| — 

Studies Find Race Bias in Medicare Treatment 

... .... . T I I.L Turn Liter ho [fa 00' 


,\ew York Times Senmv 

NEW YORK — Seriouslv 
Medicare patients who are 1 
and poor receive worse rare ^ 
other equally sick Medicare pa- 
tients in every type of hospital in 
America, a study has found- 
Bui the disparity is farjess sen 
ous in big dty-teactung hospjj®"* 
where the majority of dderiy black 
Medicare patients go for ueaunent. 
the researchers said. And because 


these hospitals provide better care 
than other types of hospitals, poor 
black Medicare patients paradoxi- 
cally end up getting care that is just 
as good as that provided to other 
groups over alL 

The finding is troubling because 
ii suggests that the quality of care 
varies with a patient's race, and 
not, as other studies have suggest- 
ed. based on whether a person has 
health insurance. 


Medicare provides health insur- 
ance for the elderly. 

A second study found that in 
Veterans .Affairs "hospitals, blacks 
suffering from heart attacks receive 
less medical treatment than whites, 
even though both groups have 
identical access to care. But sur- 
prisingly, 30 days after their heart 
attacks, blacks had an 18 percent 
higher survival rate than whites. 


Two years later both groups had 
equivalent rates- 
Although black and poor pa- 
tients did not experience higher 
death rates in alter study, said Dr. 
John Z- Ayanian. a medical in- 
structor and health care analyst a! 
Harvard Medical School, their 
quality of life after receiving medi- 
cal treatment was clearly lower 
than for white patients with similar 
conditions. 


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POLITICAL NOTES* 


CIA Warns of Russian Crime Network 

WASHINGTON — Expanding Russian criminal organizations 
are becoming part of a global crime network and could threaten 
President Boris N. Yeltsin's reform program, the CIA director, R. 
James Woolscy Jr., said Wednesday. 

Mr. Woolscy was testifying at the sum of Senate hearings on 
international crime, much of it based on trafficking in narcotics and 
illegal i mini g rams and money laundering. 

Mr. Woolsey said Russian organized crime groups had forged 
links with Italian and Colombian narcotics groups and were in- 
volved in tbe illegal transport and sale of narcotics, antiques, icons, 
raw materials, stolen vehicles, illegal immigrants, weapons and some 
nuclear materials. 

The Central Intelligence Agency chief said Russian (.Time groups 
drew their power largely from their ties to corrupt government 
officials and were a major influence on parts of the government. 

Russian c rimin al groups had helped Colombian cocaine traffick- 
ers develop new routes into Europe and were transporting narcotics 
from Iran, Afghanistan. Pakistan and the Central Asian states to 
Russia for transshipment to Europe and North America, Mr. Wool- 
sey said. f Reuters! 

Does Congress Have Prinking Problem? 

WASHINGTON — The Sierra Club charges that Congress is 
hypocritical when ii comes to practicing and preaching on the issue 
of safe drinking water. 

The environmental group did a survey and round that 91 percent 
of House members and 86 percent of the senators buy bottled water 
for their offices, most at taxpayer expense. 

Of course, cue reason the Senate's percentage could be so high is 
because tbe water system in the Dirksen Senate Office Building is 
under repair due to high lead content. 

Almost halT of the Americans who buy Lhe bottled variety, 
spending nearly $3 billion in 1 992, according to the .American Water 
Well Association, say they do so because they arc worried about 
health problems associated with tap water, according to the survey. 

“One would think that with an overwhelming percentage of the 
Senate purchasing bottled water and significant concern regarding 
drinking water safety apparent across the nation, the Senate would 
be poised to strengthen the Safe Drinking Water Act.” the Sierra 
Club argues. 

But the dub's survey counted 47 senators who drink bottled water 
in favor of legislation that the organization argues would “cripple” 
the federal law. Fully 206 House members “who purchase bottled 
water for their own or office use" arc also on board to weaken the 
law. (WP) 


Senators Keep Their Parking Privileges 

WASHINGTON — Congress has eliminated its free health care 
and gym privileges, but the Senate on Wednesday drew the line in 
the parking lot. It defeated a resolution to wipe out lawmakers’ Tree, 
reserved parking at Washington's National and Dulles airports. 

Before his resolution lost by a 53 - 10-44 vote. Senator John S. 
McCain 3d, Republican of Arizona, said that declaring World War 
HI “would probably evoke less emotion" from his colleagues. He 
was right 

Senator John Danforth. a Missouri Republican, passionately 
attacked the proposal saying that it promoted the false impression 
that lawmakers, with some work weeks reaching 100 hours, were 
"ripping off the country by perks and by pay." (A Pi 

Quote/ Unquote 

President Bill Clinton, responding to the question. “Why have 
kids?” in an interview with Parents magazine: “Apart from the fact 
that it keeps civilization going —someone's got to do it —I think the 
experience of putting someone else first, constantly, in a way that is 
full of joy even in the tough limes, makes you a better person^ a fuller 
person, more whole.” t A P) t 


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Nixon, Following Setback, Is Fighting for His life 


Compiled by Our Sitiff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Former President 
Richard Nixon was fighting for his life in a 
New York hospital Wednesday after a 
Stroke left him in critical condition. 

Mr. Nixon was suffering from swelling 
of the brain, a complication from the 
stroke that left him partly paralyzed on Yus 
right side and unable to speak. 

“One has to say his prognosis is guard* 
ed,” said Dr. Fred Plum, chief of neurol- 
ogy at New York Hospital -Cornell Medi- 
cal Center. He said the brain swelling was 
the most serious threat. 

A statement issued later in the day by 
the hospital said, “President Nixon re- 
mains in critical condition in the intensive 
care imiL” ft gave no further details. 

For the first time since Mr. Nixon was 
stricken Monday evening, doctors de- 
scribed his stroke as major. 


Mr. Nixon, 81, was put back into inten- 
sive care Tuesday evening after being 
moved earlier into a private room when his 
condition had seemed to be improving. 

“We thought Mr. Nixon was doing quite 
wen," Dr. Phrni said. But after he was 
moved to the private room, “it was appar- 
ent he'd taken a turn for the worse. 

Strokes are the third leading cause of 
death in the United States, suiting about 
500,000 people annually and killing one- 
thinL Brain swelling is common in stroke 
victims and is serious. Dr. Plum said- 

He said Mr. Nixon’s doctors had been 
treating him for several years for an irregu- 
lar heartbeat, known as atrial fibriflation, 
which can make a person susceptible to 
blood dots. The clots are believed to have 
caused the stroke. 

Mr. Nixon was stricken about 5:45 P.M. 


on Monday at his home in Park Ridge. 
New Jersey, where he had spent the day 
working on a speech for Republican fund- 
raising events. Just that day. the page 
proofs Tor his latest book, “Beyond 
Peace,” had arrived at his office, which is 
about a mile from the house. 

Kim Taylor, a spokeswoman for the 
former president, said be had been in high 
spirits on Monday. 

“He came downstairs, and it was a 
beautiful evening, so be went out on the 
deck," Ms. Taylor said. “He had a glass of 
Pellegrino water in his hand. He dropped 
the glass, went into the kitchen where 
Heidi Reiter was preparing dinner. She 
saw be was disheveled or however people 
lode when they have had a stroke, helped 
him to a sofa and called an ambulance and 
Police Chief Robert Rey." 


While it is usually standard practice to 
take someone with an acute stroke to the 
nearest hospital, the former president was 
driven to New York Hospital on Manhat- 
tan’s East Side, by the local volunteer 
ambulance corps, which made the trip in 
about 45 minutes, Ms. Taylor said. 

The stroke is believed to have resulted 
from a blood dot that formed in one of the 
upper chambers of his heart, then broke 
off and traveled through an artery to his 
brain. 

Mr. Nixon was receiving an anticoagu- 
lant. coumsdin, as a standard therapy. He 
was also treated with injections of a sec- 
ond anticoagulant, heparin, after a CAT 
scan, administered at about 9:30 P.M. on 
Monday, indicated that the stroke resulted 
from a blood dot, not from bleeding into 
his brain. (AP. SYTi 


Exercise Is Postponed in Gesture to North Korea 


By R. Jeffrey Smith 

Washmfion Post Semce 
SEOUL — The South Korean 
government announced Wednes- 
. day that a major joint military exer- 
cise with the United States known 
; as Team Spirit would be deferred 
. until late this year and could be 
canceled altogether as a gesture of 

■ goodwill in exchange for a new in- 

■ spection of North Korean nuclear 

■ sites. 

- The announcement came after a 
90-minute private meeting between 
the South Korean defense minister. 
Rhee Byoung Tae. and the U.S- 
defense secretary. WQliam J. Perry. 
Mr. Perry said that he felt "com- 

. plete solidarity" with the Smith 
Korean position on Team Spirit 
; and other military matters. 

’ The decision to put off the exer- 

• rise until what the government 

■ called “the November tune frame" 
, was meant to avoid provoking 

North Korea while American and 

■ South Korean diplomats try to per- 

• suade it to allow a full inspection of 
its declared nuclear sites. Washing- 
ton is hoping to renew a dialogue 
with mid-levd North Korean dip- 

; Iomats within a week or so. a senior 
' administration official said. 

• North Korea has denounced 
past Team Spirit exercises as an 
unwarranted preparation for mili- 
tary attack and has threatened to 
respond by halting any dialogue on 
nuclear issues. But American and 
South Korean officials declared in 
February that the exercise would 
go forward after North Korea kept 
international inspectors from see- 
ing all portions of a nuclear com- 
plex that could be used to develop a 
nuclear arsenal. 

South Korean officials publicly 
attributed the delay in the joint 
military exercise to a need to safe- 
guard freshly planted rice seedlings 
in areas around Seoul where the 
•exercise is usually conducted by 
nearly 100,000 troops. But they pri- 
vately acknowledged that it could 
have been scaled back to curtail the 
disruption. 

Mr. Perry’s decision to back the 
delay — in the middle of his public 
campaign to increase the readiness 
of forces here to defend against a 
North Korean attack — reflected 
Washington’s underlying desire to 

■ avoid any immediate confrontation 
over the nuclear issue, U.S. officials 
said. It sets a timetable For Team 

- Spirit roughly on a par with a 6- 
: mouth deadline for the inspections 
: that Mr. Perry recently set and Sec- 
retary of State Warren M. Christo- 
pher subsequently endorsed. 

; But it also reflects the view of 
many American officials that bold- 
ing Team Spirit will not add many 
military skills to those already pro- 
vided by a busy schedule of smaller 
■and lesser-known joint exercises. 
Mr. Perry is scheduled to witness 
. one such exercise, involving prac- 

■ lice firing at simulated North Ko- 
'rean artillery, by the U.S. Array’s 
2nd fafantiy Division north of 
Seoul, on Thursday. 

Among the issues Mr. Perry said 
he intended to raise during his two- 
day visit here was his desire lo see 
South Korea boost spending on 
modern weapons systems such as 
counter-artillery radars, tactical he- 
licopters, and advanced antitank 
munitions. But South Korean offi- 
cials largely preempted the discus- 
sion by publidy announcing a deri- 
sion to accelerate its purchases of 
some of these weapons. 










■ -t-'- v7s 


.jSul-.-'.-rC, 





__ YbbIj: HutmgThc AundzadPra, 

Defense Secretary Perry , left, and his Sooth Korean counterpart, Rhee Byoung Tae, saluting during ceremonies Wednesday. 

RECOVER: European Economic Growth Won’t Be Felt Anytime Soon 


Con tinned from Page 1 

growth among the 12 member countries of the 
European Union, meanwhile, is a modest 1.6 
percent, compared with a contraction of 0.3 
percent last year. 

On Wednesday, the International Monetary 
Fund forecast 1994 growth among EU mem- 
bers of just I J percent. The European recovery 
rate is thus likely to be significantly weaker 
than the 2.6 percent experienced in the United 
States in 1992, when it was emerging from 
recession. 

In fact, economists said, the weakness erf 
recovery in Europe means that Mr. Kohl and 
Mr. Bafladur could soon risk some of the same 
political problems that dogged President 
George Bush daring his failed 1 992 re-election 
campaign. 

Two years ago, Mr. Bush grew hoarse as he 
stalked America proclaiming that recession was 
over and recovery was just around the comer. 
“I happen to think the economy is better than 
most of the people in America think." Mr. Bush 
said in June 1992. He was right, but American 
voters didn’t believe him because they didn’t 
fed the recovery. 

The European economic cycle this spring is 
extraordinarily s imil ar to the path followed by 
the United States two Years ago, said Nigel 
Newman, European economist at Barclays 
Bank. The main difference, however, is that the 
European recovery is likdy to cake longer. 

The reasons why Europe’s recovery is look-, 
ing gradual and timid go beyond issues of 
consumer confidence and unemployment 
Companies are busy adjusting to tougher times, 
but industrial output is on average Tower now 
than it was a year ago. Europe’s real estate 
market is struggling to get off the bottom. 
Economic growth in 1994 of 1.6 percent is wed 
below Europe's potential annual growth rate of 
2J percent, which the Fund said would be 
attained only in 1995; the figures for both years 
are depressed in part because much of Germa- 
ny is still stagnating. 

None of this stopped Mr. Kohl who is facing 


a tough general election in October, from con- 
tending on Tuesday that "springtime has come 
for (he economy.” The phrase was snappy, a 
good headline grabber. But his statement was 
quickly shot down as a politically motivated 
stretch. “We should not talk about springtime 
in the German economy." said Norbert Walter, 
chief economist at Deutsche Bank. “Here we 
are still debating about whether we have left the 
trough. And if we have, it will be a jobless 
recovery." 

Tyll Necker, president of the German Indus- 
try and Trade Association, said that while there 
were sig n s Germany was pulling out of reces- 
sion. the chances for a sharp economic recovery 
in the coming months are limited. "Signs of 
improved competitiveness and an upturn in 
exports cannot hide the fundamental problem 
of continued weakness in domestic demand." 
Mr. Necker said. 

Any day now, undaunted by, the doubters, 
the economics minister Gunter Rexrodt is ex- 
pected to produce yet another rosy upward 
revision of Germany’s 1994 growth prospects. 

“Mr. Rexrodt will be talking up the German 
economy, but the German economy will not be 
following him." said Ms. Cottrell “The coun- 
try’s export-led recovery is not enough lo 
achieve the job creation that a politician faring 
October elections would wish for if be is to 
avoid the unemployment queue himself." 

The same is true in France, where Mr. Balla- 
dur, his popularity dropping steadily in opinion 
polls, claimed recently that economic growth 
this year would exceed his government’s previ- 
ous forecast of 1.4 percenL 

The Fund projects a growth rate for France 
of only 1.2 percent, and a French government 
official conceded Wednesday that consumer 
spending was not likely to improve until later 
this year, while unemployment will exceed the 
ream! 112 percent over the next 3 months. 

George Magnus, chief international econo- 
mist at S.G. Warburg & Co. in London, agreed 
that the weakness of the European recovery and 
its two-year lag of the U.S. turnaround could be 


problematic for politicians in France and Ger- 
many. “A recovery is now taking hold on the 
Continent, but it will be weaker and will hold 
back growth in spending, especially in Germa- 
ny. which has been hit by tax increases." he 
said. 

Among the stronger recoveries. Mr. Magnus 
said, were those bong experienced by Italy and 
Sweden, both of which nave begun to experi- 
ence a pick-up in expons thanks to currency 
devaluations that have served as “a mini turbo- 
charge behind their recession-bound econo- 
mies." 

Yet, Italian voters recently helped elect Silvio 
Berlusconi as their new leader at least partly 
because hr promised, rather lavishly, to create I 
million new jobs — and this in a country where 
the unemployment rate among those between 
18 and 25 years old is 47 percent, or twice the 
European average. 

Although Europe’s overall economic growth 
is expected to reach 2 J percent next year, 
economists agreed this would still not be 
enough to generate more than extremely mod- 
est job creation. 

In addition, the cost of German reunifica- 
tion, about 5100 billion a year for the next few 
years, will continue to slow the German recov- 
ery. and in turn that of Europe as a whole, said 
Didier Maillard, chief economist at Banque 
Paribas in Paris. Mr. Mallard added that 
France also faced recovery-slowing increases in 
social costs such as pensions and health care 
that "are far from bong controlled.” 

Economists across Europe agreed that one 
way for Europe to accelerate its recovery would 
be for the Bundesbank to speed up its reduction 
of short-term interest rales, causing other cen- 
tral banks to follow. Members of President Bill 
Clinton's administration have been making this 
case since being appointed. On Wednesday, the 
Fond said as much when il suggested' that 
interest rates needed to reflect the weakness of 
economic conditions in continental Europe 
"for there to be a sufficiently robust upswing.” 


IMF: Europe and Japan Likely to Lag Behind North America in World Economic Expansion 


Castrated from Page I 
maud to market economies, will 
experience substantial declines in 
economic output, the IMF said. 
And the short-term outlook for the 
poorest countries “has not im- 
proved substantially.” 

In Europe and Japan, signs are 
emerging that the economic trough 
has been reached, but economic 
recovery may not firmly take hold 
until (995, the IMF said. 

Following are key IMF estimates 
and predictions for a sampling of 


industrialized nations and develop- 
ing nations: 

• United States: Growth of 3.9 
percent for 1994, matching the 
1988 level. But the 1995 estimate 
falls to 2.6 percent, largely because 
of monetary policies hang fol- 
lowed by the central bank designed 
to curb future inflation. An infla- 
tion rate of 2.8 percent is predicted 
for 1994 and an unemployment 
rate of 6 2 percenL 

• Canada: Growth is expected to 
be 3.5 percent in 1994 and 4.1 per- 
cent in 1995, but persistently high 


unemployment, 10.8 percent esti- 
mated for this year, will continue to 
be a major restraint on growth. 

• Britain: This is one of (fie few 
bright spots in Europe, along with 
the Nordic countries. Growth rates 
of percent Cor this year and 2.8 
percent for 1995 are predicted. Ris- 
ing British consumer demand, ac- 
companied by a drop in household 
consumer debt, seems to be a major 
factor in the turnaround, the IMF 
said. 

• Japan; This country accounted 
for the hugest downward revision 


in growth for 1994 from the Octo- 
ber estimate, a drop of 1 J percent- 
age points from October’s 2 per- 
cent estimate. The 1994 prediction 
of 0.7 percent growth in this major 
industrialized country should ad- 
vance to 2.3 percent growth in 
1995, the IMF said. 

Hius. the agency sees 1994 as a 
turnaround year for Japan, helped 
by an announced tax cut. added 

public works expenditures and 
boosts for residential and business 
investment loan programs. 

• Germany; The IMF termed 


economic activity in Germany as 
"subdued” and said its prediction 
of 10 percent unemployment for 
1994 would probably not ease until 
1995. Weak consumer confidence 
in the face of uncertain job pros- 
pects would very likely hobble do- 
mestic demand. The IMF expects 
0.9 percent growth in 1994 ana 2.1 
percent in 1995. 

• France: Growth is forecast at 
\2 percent for this year, rising to 
2.6 percent in 1995, despite unem- 
ployment estimated at 12.4 percent 
for 1994. 


Serbs Pound 
Gorazde , 
lOKiUed 
In Hospital 

The Associated Press 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Heizegovi- 
na — Three rockets slammed 
Wednesday into the hospital in be- 
sieged Gorazde, killing 10 people 
and wounding an unkn own nutn- 
besraid sources reported. 

Serbs were pounding the town 
despite pledges to cease fire and a 
declaration by the Bosnian Serbian 
leader, Radovan Karadzic, of a 
unilateral peace: 

The first rocket wounded an un- 
known number of people. The sec- 
ond bit the emergency room, (tilting 
10 people and wounding 15. There 
was no casualty count from the 
third rocket, aid sources said, in- 
sisting they not be further identi- 
fied. 

The hospital is close to the front 
line and has been severely battered. 
On Tuesday, aid workers reported 
that its roof was blown off. 

UN officials have said the suffer- 
ing of Gorazde daring the three- 
week-old Serbian offensive was 
among the most serious of the two- 
year Bo snian war. Nearly 350 peo- 
ple have been killed and more than 
1.100 wounded. 

UN officials had expressed hope 
that a cease-fire agreement signed 
Tuesday might hold. Bosnian Serbs 
have ignored several previous 
agreements during the latest as- 
sault On Gorazde. 

UN officials reported only spo- 
radic shelling and shooting in Gor- 
azde during the night But starting 
at 11:15 .AM. Wednesday, shells 
b egan f alling at a rate of one per 
minute, UN officials said, citing 
staff reports. 

"Oar own people saw at least 
five shells impact in the ary cen- 
ter.” said Ron Redmond, a spokes- 
man for the UN High Commission- 
er for Refugees in Geneva. 

As Mr. Karadzic’s forces shelled 
the town, he issued a statement 
saying; "The Serbian ride unilater- 
ally proclaims peace in Gorazde. 
With this, the Gorazde criris comes 
to an end.” 

The Serbs maintain that their at- 
tack on Gorazde has been in re- 
sponse to a government offensive. 
But UN officials have said it is 
dearly a Serbian offensive. 

Aid officials in Gorazde gave 
harrowing accounts of Tuesday’s 
heavy shelling, which killed 43 peo- 
ple and wounded 112, raising the 
casualty toC over the past three 
weeks to 345 killed and 1.087 
wounded. 

“All of us are chronically fright- 
ened.” a UN doctor said in a report 
to Geneva refugee commission 
headquarters. 

In other developments Wednes- 
day: 

• Bosnian Serbs released six of 
eight teams erf UN military observ- 
ers who had been detained after the 
NATO air strikes, and reopened 
some checkpoints around Sarajevo, 
including ones along the airport 
road. 

• They returned 18 anti-aircraft 
guns they had taken from a UN 
weapons collection rite at Lukavica 
barracks in Sarajevo. The guns 
were among weapons the Serbs had 
surrendered in February under a 
NATO ultimatum to withdraw 
heavy weapons 20 kilometers away 
from Sarajevo or place them under 
1 UN protection. 

DRUGS: 

Border Problems 

Continued from Page 1 

the size of bouil/oo cubes. Some 
clients listened to reggae music and 
others played billiards. 

The scene seemed peaceful 
enough. So why did the dealer keep 
a man-eating Rottweiler at his feet? 

"Sometimes tourists get diffi- 
cult” said the dealer, a young 
Maastrichter in a baseball cap. 
“Not everyone wants to stick to the 
rules.” 

Police rules for the drug cafes 
are: no hard drugs, only cannabis 
derivatives; no sales over 30 grams 
(about 1 ounce); no noise; no ad- 
mission for tbose under 18; no al- 
cohol. The Maastricht police said 
they had recently closed six of the 
20-odd cannabis cafes in the city 
because of violations. 

More troubling are firing street 
sales of cocaine and berom. for 
which they blame big-city dealers 
from Amsterdam and Rotterdam 
operating here and in other border 
cities- "This is a new plague,” said 
Henk Mostert, the district police 
chief. "We keep charing them so 
they get no fixed outlets.” 

In the debate on how to confront 
drug tourism, the minister of jus- 
tice has recommended forbidding 
sales of soft drugs to nonresidents. 
Critics rejected the idea as imprac- 
tical 


TOUVIER: Collaborator Becomes First Frenchman Convicted of Crimes Against Humanity 


Continued frost Page 1 
Sitruk, asked last week during bis 
testimony. One prosecution lawyer, 
Alain Jacubowicz, said: “The pain- 
ful page in our history cannot be 
turneef before it is written.” 

Although 10.000 French citizens 
were executed or assassinated after 
the Liberation for aiding the Ger- 
mans, it was only 30 years later that 
it became widely known that the 
Vichy government had helped to 
round up 76,000 French and for- 
eign Jews for deportation to Nazi 
death camps. 

in the 1980s. charges of crimes 
against humanity committed 
against Jews were brought against 


four aged Frenchman. But even 
then, arguing that the wounds of 
the past should not be reopened, 
the French political and judicial 
authorities were reluctant to bring 
than to trial. 

Two of the men arc dead: Jean 
Leguay, indicted for organizing the 
first mass roundup of Jews in 1941 
died of natural causes in 1989: he 
was 79. Rene Bousquet, charged 
with ordering the deportation of 
2,000 Jewish children, was shot and 
killed by a gunman last June; he 
was 81 

Jewish groups also believe (bat 
Maurice Papon, S3, who was the 
police chief of Paris under de 


Gaulle in the 1960s and budget 
minister in the 1970s, enjoys 
enough political protection never 
to be brought to court. He was 
charged in 1982 with taking part in 
the deportation of Jews from Bor- 
deaux, but no date has been set for 
his trial. 

French Jewish groups called 
Wednesday for the speedy trial of 
Mr. Papon. 

Mr. Papon is. accused of deport- 
ing about 1,600 Jews while he was a 
high- ranking administrator in the 
Bordeaux region. He went on to a 
brilliant postwar career as Paris po- 
lice chief and government minister. 

Touvier, the French militia's in- 


telligence chief in Lyon from early 
1943 to the summer of 1944, was 
lone considered the least important 
of lie four. He was arrested in 1989 
after almost 45 years hiding in con- 
vents and monasteries. 

Under French law. a crime 
against humanity occurs only when 
it is executed on orders of a Euro- 
pean Axis power seeking “hegemo- 
ny,” in this case Germany, and 
when its victims are chosen for ra- 
1 dal or religious reasons. 

The seven Jews were executed in 
Rillieux in reprisal for the assassi- 
nation of Philippe Henriot, the VI- 

-i f o in- 


sistence fighters, Touvier said the 
Gestapo had demanded that 100 
people be executed, that his militia 
chief reduced the number tu 30, 
and that be was able to save all but 
7. 

But die state prosecutor and 30 
lawyers representing relatives of 
Jews and other victims of war-time 
crimes were able to present extor- 
sive evidence showing not only that 
Touvier was anti-Semitic but also 
that he actively collaborated with 
the Gestapo in an Li- Jewish actions. 

The chief defense attorney, Jac- 
ques Tremolet de VDIers. called 
Tuesday for an acquittal. He ar- 


gued in a four-hour summation 
that the events at RiBieiix 50 years 

ago represented at most a war 
crime and that Touvier was par- 
doned for war crimes in 1971. 

He also said that the trial was 
only of Touvier, “not of a Symbol, 
not or history, not of Vichy, not of 
France.” And he went on: "You 
are France, not the man in the 
dock. You are France, and you will 
give a historic verdict, but not a 
verdict on history." 

After quoting the view of three 
French presidents — de Gaulle, 
Georges Pompidou, and Francois 
Mitterrand — that France's war- 
time past should be buried, he ar- 
gued that Touvier was now “a tired. 


Russia Hardens Stance 
On Bosnia Air Strikes 


Hauers 


MOSCOW Foreign Minister Andrei I. Kozyrev said Wednes- 
day that Russia would not support air strikes Serbs 

before a common stance on the oias was rwched by Moscow. 
Washington, the European Union and UnttedNations. 

He was speaking after meeting with Lord David Owen and 
Thorvald Stoltenberg. the co-chairmen of the peace conference on 

^I^^St^mN/feitsm, angry about a lack of consultation with' 
Moscow when NATO launched two air strikes on Bosnian Serbian 
positions last week, on Tuesday proposed a summit meeting among 
Russia, the United States and the European Union on the ensis. 

Mr Kozyrev said he was sure that Serbian “attacks on civil sires, 
hospitals, Red Cross sites and UN observers cannot be justified; 
they violate the interests of Serbs and Russia alike. But. he said, he 
could not agree with “the logic of threats from NATO. He added: 
“ft would be a mistake to apply any decision on air strikes at. feast 
without working out a coordinating policy." 


HISTORY: Wrong Messages 


CoatiiBied from Page 1 
jj.cm. Europe sought unity and lead- 
ership in the “new world order.” 

The Bush administration was 
happy to let Europe take the lead. 
So Europe stepped forward with 
peace mediators, led by Lord Car- 
rington, and military monitors. 
Cease-fires were negotiated and 
routinely violated. 

By November, after a stream of 
reports erf Serbian aggression and 
atrocities. European leaders had to 
decide whether the independence 
erf Croatia and Slovenia should be 
officially recognized. 

Britain opposed recognition of 
the political changes wrought by 
war. Newly reunified Germany ar- 
gued that the spirit of the new 
world mder meant the right to self- 
determination, and that Slovenia 
and Croatia should be recognized 
as independent. 

In December 1991. Britain 
dropped its objections in exchange 
for a German concession cm the 
Maastricht Treaty on European 
Unity — a concession that had 
nothing to do with the Balkans. 

Bosnia-Herzegovina was a trou- 
bled but peaceful republic, still part 
of Serb-d ominat ed “unified” Yu- 
goslavia. Its intermarried, geo- 
graphically intermixed population 
of Serbs, Croats and Muslims 
meant that if Bosnia were infected 
by the nationalist virus, it faced 
disaster. 

By recognizing Croatia and Slo- 
venia — and by saying, when the 
decision was announced, that rec- 
ognition could be extended to other 
former Yugoslav republics — the 
West inadvertently pushed Bosnia 
toward a fateful decision. The car- 
rot of Western recognition was 
tempting, promising integration 
into Europe’s exhilarating, free- 
trading. post-Cold War dub. 

In January 1992, Cyrus R. 
Vance, tbe former U.S. secretary of 
stale, helped negotiate a cease-fire 
in the Scrbian-Croatian war. The 
Serbs removed their heavy weapon- 
ry. but instead of taking it home 
they moved it to Bosnia and pre- 
pared for a new phase of conflict, 
analysts say. 

Large numbers of UN troops 
were deployed to keep the peace in 
Croatia. But while UN peacekeep- 
ing headquarters was put in Saraje- 
vo. Bosnia's capital the troops and 
much of the administration were 
sent to Zagreb, Croatia's capital. 

As a result, when war erupted in 
Bosnia, tbe senior UN generals 
were pinned down in Sarajevo, but 
the men they commanded were iso- 
lated across the mountains in Cro- 
atia. That remains the case. Rede- 
ployment has proved tricky, 
politically and logistically. 

In March 1992, Bosnia held a 
referendum on whether to declare 
independence. The Serbs boycott- 
ed iL The pro-independence vote 
prevailed. The Serbs attacked, say- 
ing they were defending Bosnia’s 
Serbian population. War began all 
over again. 

In this phase, the crescendo 


tory — 
The 1 


Germans Lurch 
Ahead, French 
SliponAlcoIwl 

Room 

BERLIN — Germans have 
replaced the French as tbe 
world's leading consumers of 
alcohol according to a study 
released on Wednesday by the 
German Federal Health Of- 
fice. 

“In per capita alcohol con- 
sumption, Germany has now 
surpassed France, which led 
the world for many years," tbe 
office said, ft said each Ger- 
man drinks on average the 
equivalent of 12.1 liters of 
pure alcohol each year, triple 
the amount consumed in 1950. 

Germans drink more than 
140 liters of beer each year, 
about 27 liters of wine, and 10 
liters of other alcoholic bever- 
ages, the office said. It said the 
French consumed U .9 liters of 
alcohol per capita in 1991. 


came in August 199 2. when haunt- 
ing television and newspaper re- 
ports depicted gaunt, weary prison- 
ers of war — mainly Muslims and 
Croats — confined in Serbian pris- 
on camps. 

Heavy Western pressure fell on 
the Serbs to commit themselves to 
peace: They responded. At a peace 
conference in London in late Au- 
1992, President Milosevic, (he 
Serbian leader, Radovan 
Karadzic, and others agreed to the 
“early lifting of the sieges of towns 
and rides.” 

But the sieges continued. West- 
ern governments were moved to 
take two decisive — and contradic- 
— actions. 

UN Security Council autho- 
rized comprehensive economic 
sanctions against Belgrade, appear- 
ing to take sides in the war. But at 
tbe same time. Britain, France and 
other countries, under UN auspic- 
es, sent troops to Bosnia to deliver 
humanitarian aid to victims on all 
sides. The West seemed to want to 
be partisan and neutral at the same 
time. 

This apparent contradiction was 
accentuated a year later when 
NATO and the United Nations 
adopted yet more resolutions, re- 
sponding to public outrage over the 
shelling of Sarajevo and other Mus- 
Hm-dominated towns. 

Some resolutions tightened pres- 
sure on the Serbs by establishing 
safe havens for Muslims, threaten- 
ing air strikes against aggressors 
and authorizing a war crimes tribu- 
nal While the tenor and force of 
these resolutions was directed at 
the Serbs, the language remained 
neutral — the resolutions could be 
applied to any of the waning par- 
ties. And the ambition of neutral 
humanitarian deliveries was rein- 
forced with more troops. 

Some analysts say this apparent 
contradiction is an advantage, al- 
lowing the West to remain involved 
in efforts to end the war but almost 
ruling out escalating military en- 
tanglement on ibe ground. 

Among other things, these ana- 
. lysts point to the recent U.S.-bro- 
kered peace deal between Bosnian 
Muslims and Croats and the cease- 
fire around Sarajevo as evidence 
that this approach can bear fruit 

“A lot of the politicians should 
get the credit actually, for doing 
'nothing,” said Colonel Andrew 
Duncan of tbe International Insti- 
tute for Strategic Studies. 

Yet others in the West see the 
approach as fatally flawed. 

“It was from the beginning — 
this is what people usually forget — 
a very haphazard set of resolutions, 
(me piling up on another," Mr. 
Eyaisaid. 

“Some woe drafted so as not to 
annoy the Russians too much, 
some to assuage Western concerns 
about not becoming too involved, 
and some to respond to Western 
public outrage,” he said. “The idea 
that the UN is impartial or should 
be impartial is of course utter non- 
sense." 


NATO: 

Clinton’s Backing 

Continual from Page 1 

Security Council to authorize addi- 
tional peacekeepers, “which we will 
support." 

There are no Americans among 
the UN forces now on the ground 
in Bosnia. (AP. AFP) 


sick old man” who had already 
paid the price of 50 years of ostra- 
cism. 

Judge Boulard then asked the 
accused if he had any final re- 
marks. After Touvier expressed the 
nearest be has come to remorse, the 

judge told the members of the jury 
that they had to deliberate until 
they reached a verdict. 

After tbe verdict was announced, 
Mr. Tremolet de Viilers said he 
would file an appeal Asked on 
what grounds, he said: “We will 
find a reason” Jn criminal cases 
tried by jury in France, an appeal 
can be broaghl only on specific 
legal or procedural grounds and 
not to review the facts presented in 
the triaL 


Craig K Whitney of The New 
York Times reported from Brussels: 

Tbe NATO allies provisionally 
endorsed on Wednesday a request 
from the United Nations to autho- 
rize air strikes to protea "safe ar- 
eas” in Bosnia from attacks like the 
Serbian assault on Gorazde. 

Ambassadors of the 16 NATO 
countries, meeting in the alliance's 
North Atlantic Council considered 
tbe request from Secretary-General 
Butros Butros Ghali "in a favor- 
able light” a spokesman said. 

But a formal decision was re- 
served until military commandos 
reported on what targets in the six 
UN-designated safety zones could 
be struck, and bow effective such 
strikes would be. 

Officers at NATO's southern 
command in Naples, which carries 
out air operations over Bosnia- 
Herzegovina and coordinates them 
with UN officials there, said that 
the NATO commander in Southern 
Europe, Vice Admiral Leighton W. 
Smith Jr. and his staff would coor- 
dinate with the top-ranking UN 
official m the forma* Yugoslavia. <0 
Yasushi Akashl before reporting 
back to the alliance. 

The NATO secretary-general 
Manfred Warner, called Mr. Bu- 
tros Ghali on Wednesday after- 
noon and told him that die UN 
request for broader authority to 
call on the alliance for air strikes 
bad met a positive response,- a 
spokesman said. 




1 



A : ■ 

K,r *< 


- •/. .. 


H \ K ,, 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 21- 1994 



Page 5 


-E UROPEAN 
— TOPICS 

Cradsdown on Petty Crime 
Pays, German Giles Hope , 

Cf fiSlSSPr* °” seri ® us crimes in pans 
«^atern Germany have soared, Some 

SC 1 ™™ cracking down hard on 
l,, H B P***y 35 double-parking, 
in Hannover and Baden-Baden ren«t 

S: 

iSSSf° Vlsil «*“* work places and 
interview Iheir neighbors. And in Berlin 


and Hamburg, cars can be towed away 

lUlflMM An t .■ ■ • . J 




come more dependent on revenue from 
fines. But the crackdown has produced 
resentment among many law-abiding Ger- 
mans, it adds. 

Figures for serious crimes, meanwhile, 
are up drastically in Eastern Germany — 
as much as 49 percent in Brandenburg 
state and 33 percent in Tharingen. But 
eqjerts play the figures down: Iney cite 
the unreliability of Communist-era statis- 
tical bases and an increased trust in die 
police, meaning people are quicker to re- 
port crimes. 

Crime rates did fall in two big West 
German dries, by 5 percent in Bremen and 
7 percent in Haml 


Around Europe 

Sentences for rape in Italy are shock- 
ingly mad, says the weekly L'Espresso. As 
an example, it dies the recent case in 
Rome of a man charged with raping 10 
women while on probation after admitting 
to another rape weeks earlier. 

The weekly blames a trend toward 
American-style plea bargaining since a pe- 
nal code reform in 1989: “The accused 1 
admits to the crime in exchange for a lesser 
sentence. The prosecutor accepts and 
that’s the end of u.” Though such bargain- 
ing was intended for lesser crimes, the 
magazine says, the effect has been to de- 
penalize sexual violence. 

It notes that rapists risk life sentences in 
Belgium and 20 years to life in France, 
compared to 3 to 10 years in Italy, or less. 

France has begun investing in wind-gen- 


erated electricity, though in a modest way. 
Its first “wind farm” — five huge propel- 
lers mounted chi 45-roe ter-high (150-fooO 
pylons, generating 2_2 megawatts of power 
— has opened outside Port-1 a-Nouvdle, 
south of Narbonne. The state-subsidized 
installation appears to have a mainly sym- 
bolic role in nuclear-dependent France. 
Germany, Spain and Britain already pro- 
duce several hundred megawatts of wind- 
generated power each year, and Denmark 
has set an ambitious goal of 10 percent 
wind-generated energy by the end of the 
century. But environmentally friendly 
wind power has lost some of its appeal: 
Many people find the towers, often locat- 
ed in attractive settings, to be ugly and 
noisy. 


Brian Knowlton 


No Rush on Cabinet, Berlusconi Says 


Compiled by Oof Staff From Despatches 

ROME — Italy’s new deputies 
met Wednesday to form parlia- 
mentary groups as the expected 
next prime minister, Silvio Berlus- 
coni, indicated he would take his 
time in putting together a govern- 
ment. 

The 630 deputies and 315 sena- 
tors gathered in the Montedtorio, i 
which houses the Chamber of Dep-' 
ulics, and the Palazzo Madama, 
which houses the Senate, to form 
their political groups and announce 
who would lead ibem. 

On Thursday, the parliamentari- 
ans, 69 percent of whom are new- 
comers to the legislature, will elect 
four vice presidents, the final for- 


mality befo re the process of form- 
ing a new government can officially 
begin. 

The vice presidents will serve as 
deputies to the new speaker of the 
lower bouse, Irene Pivetri of the 
federalist Northern longue, and 
the Senate speaker. Carlo Scogna- 
migbo of Mr. Berlusconi’s Forza 
ItaKa party. 

Onoe the elections are held. Pres- 
ident Oscar .Luigi Scalfaro will be- 
an consultations late Thursday or 
Friday with political leaders on 
choosing the new prime minister, 
with little doubt that it will be Mr. 
Berlusconi. 

But neatly a month after his 
Freedom Alliance swept general 
elections mi March 27 and 28, Mr. 


Berlusconi indicated that Italy 
would have to wait a while loagef 
for a new government. ; 

Mr. Berlusconi, who met foj 
three hours Tuesday night with 
Northern League and National Al* 
liance partners, said there shouicj 
be no rush in choosing a govern; 
ment The important thing, be said) 
was to choose a “good team.” . ; 

Mr. Berlusconi also said he 
hoped that “the prime minister^ 
designate will have full responsibil- 
ity for choosing the government 
team.” | 

“And 1 hope I can also count i 
ministers, men and women, ft 
outside the majority,” be said. J 
(AFP, Rattersf 
1 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


. i 


LIST OF VACANT POSTS 


Republic of Lebanon 
Council for Development and 
Reconstruction 

VACANCIES ANNOUNCEMENT 


The Council for Development and Reconstruction (CDR) needs 
to expand its team of professionals and is currently 
looking for planners, economists, engineers, architects, financial 
and accounting experts, computer specialists, lawyers, and per- 
sonnel managers. Candidates wishing to join CDR should be 
Lebanese nationals for more than 10 years, be fully proficient in 
written, read and spoken Arabic and English and/or French lan- 
guages, and possess an academic and professional profile compa- 
tible with the required specialties. 


Typical qualifications and relevant experience requirements for 
the various vacancies are summarized below. CDR employment 
conditions allow in certain cases for academic qualifications 
slightly lower than required to be offset by longer relevant ex- 
perience. 


Interested candidates are required to fill out a standard CDR ap- 
plication form which they may collect at CDR Headquarters: Tal- 
Iet-al-Serail, Central Beirut, (tel: 01-643980-3) or receive by fax 
(CDR fax Nos: 961-1-864494 or 1-212-4781622). Candidates 
must specify the reference number of the post they a re interested 
in, and the job summary together with relevant information and 
instructions will be supplied with the application form. 


All application forms duly filled out must be received at CDR 
Headquarters not later than May 31, 1994. Receipt of the forms 
will not be acknowledged by CDR. An initial short list of can- 
didates will be compiled by CDR after careful examination of all 
applications. Short-listed candidates will then be contacted for a 
formal interview in Beirut, after which the final selection will be 
made. 


Post 

Ref. No. 

Required degree (or egntolent) 

MIbIbiuib yttfl of nAprftnt experience || 

I-rctakal AdvixM- 

POl 

Master cngtoerlag 

doeoniiinli far worfcs and consa honey contcaete 1 

First Document Syetena Spectafid 

POl 



Depnty Heta of Ptaantog DKtaoa 

PL1 

PhD rcontitnio (Major: Barmetonumirs iocL •coooeectrfaa) 

9 years mcL 3 in managerial wysrinw fl 

iScmier Sectoral Plnanto| Ecamondet 

PL3 

w|[) m emnnesin or tinihnmi 

7 years iacL S in project plamdng, managinunt g monitoring H 


PM 


8 years fl 




Ptamdmg SgecMidi 

PL5 


7 year* 

fhwnriol plsaaiiif) 


PM 

Master ecnsomics (major: esscrori oooiaia isd noesodrla) 

7 yaan 

it trier Ti ■■umit Ptonien rmn.mlrl 

PL? 

Master economics 

7 year* transport economics A planning 




StderTmmpBrt Plnnwlag Eopnoer 

PLI 

Bochelor chril nn^jmrr 

7 years transport engineering A ptoanlng 

Seslor Edocodoo Plsaedag SprcteUst 

PL9 





|Scaier Btaata Ptonfag Specndmt 

PLI# 


7 years edoc. sector, mainly aaiversfly/lugher education 

fe—ler NMte Heottb P1e^Q|j 

PLtt 

Master public health 

7 yaore health eoctor. public health plennlag A laenegimint 

fjFfnt Tb i nlii|nn en* B—n| Bee— niet 

PLU 

Matter eranomict (major. dmtepDcal ptemuog) 


■Ptoi Rr^e— f PtonojngEroaeitvl 

PLU 



pfaaaiaf) 


(pul rtiaafni r~t — 

PLI 4 

Bachelor tivH w^ya wring 

2 years planning litfi neti urtare projects 

jjnrat Ed— U— Pfennin Specioihl 

PL15 

Master education or educational administration 

2 yeans sdne. eoctor, mainly lochM/rocnt edac. A training 

^Sealer Architect 

PMI 

Bachelor andtftectae* 

7 years ind. 3 m eonior capacity 

BSemlT S— Uory Eagkoeer 

PM2 

Bachelor sanitary engineering, or Bachelor civil engineering (major: 
water, waste water A itrfro— t) 

7 year* lad 3 in senior capacity 

fata Irripdne Ebjtoer 

PM) 

HocWer rrripUmm enginrrrfnfc or Bachelor cnH rnflin oaring (major 
■oils, hrlgatiea A mechanisation) 

7 yams lad, 3 in mater capacity 

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m d o R^.na’a S’S'S'K' 


Page- 6 


.THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 1994 

OPINION 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NKW YORK TIKES AMD THE WASHINGTON POST 


Good Deal lor South Africa 


Snbunc jjft the Arms Embargo and Give Bosnians a Chance 

THE WASHINGTON POST |f 


The deal struck on Tuesday in Pretoria has 
mercifully removed a hazardous roadblock to 
a .democratic transition in South Africa. In 
return for face-saving concessions. Chief 
Mangosuthn Buthdezi and his Zulu-based 
Inkatha Freedom Party will now take part 
M3tf week in the country’s first election open 
to candidates and voters of all races. This 
substantially eases but docs not eliminate the 
threat of further bloodshed, especially in Na- 
tal Province, the Zulu stronghold. 

1 Chief Butbelezi had demanded but did not 
get a postponement of the April 26*28 vote. 
He did obtain a promise from President Fre- 
derik de Klerk and Nelson Mandela to pre- 
serve the legal position of the Zulu king. 
Goodwill ZwdithinL and to have foreign me- 
diators consider some measure of future au- 
tonomy for KwaZulu, a tribal homeland that 
legally disappears after the election. 

South Africa’s last white Parliament is ex- 
pected to approve the needed changes in the 
interim constitution on Monday. This deal 
evidently was brokered by a Kenyan diplo- 
mat, Washington Okumu, who kept on work- 
ing after better-known negotiators like Henry 


Kissinger and Lord Carrington ended their, 
mediating efforts last week. 

Bar ring surprises in the fine print, the accord 
deserves Mr. Mandela's praise as “a leap for- 
ward for peace, reconciliation, nation-building 
and an inclusive election." Already poised to 
win an electoral landslide, Mr, Mandela’s Afri- 
can National Congress can only gain from 
ma gnanim ity to likely losers. With millions of 
black South Africans casting their first vote, the 
country’s first democratic government deserves 
a respite from ethnic strife. And for Chief 
Buthdezi. who longs to be viewed as something 
more than a tribal warlord, the deal opens the 
way to assuming a national role. 

It is far from clear that any of ihe principals 
— Mr. de Klerk, Mr. Mandela or Chief Buthe- 
lezi — can contain bis own violent fringes. But 
so much which is astonishing has already 
happened in South Africa thaL the world has 
grounds for hope. And because South Afri- 
cans are so new to the ways of political com- 
promise, the deal takes on even more symbolic 
importance. The pity is that it was not struck, 
as it might have beat, months ago. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Markets Misread the Fed 


From the Federal Reserve Board's point of 
view, the markets’ reaction to its tightening of 
credit is irrational. Its purpose is to brake, 
very lightly, the American economy's recent 
acceleration and ensure that there will be no 
significant rise in inflation. But the traders 
and investors in the markets, who say they are 
spooked by the possibility of returning infla- 
tion. have responded to these reassuring mea- 
sures as though they intended just the oppo- 
site. Interest rates have leapt upward and 
slock prices have fallen. 

The Federal Reserve's decision this week 
to tighten was its third since early February, 
and the reaction to each has been the same. 
One explanation is that, since no one can see 
any signs of inflation ahead, speculators may 
have concluded that the Federal Reserve 
must know something that they don't. But 
there is no hint of that. Another factor is. no 
doubt, a certain suspicion that eventually a 
Democratic president will succumb to the 
temptation to try to push up employment 
regardless of the costs in inflation. But the 
conduct of the White House and the Trea- 
sury during this sequence of tightening has 
been exemplary. They have been carefully 
neutral in their comments — unlike, for 
example, the Bush administration's Treasury 


Department, which repeatedly and loudly 
needled the Federal Reserve. 

This latest attack of market anxiety seems, 
fortunately, to have been both mild and brief. 
Stability has, for the present, returned, at least 
partly because of the bad news on Tuesday 
about trade figures. America's trade deficit in 
February, the government announced, turned 
out to be larger than the bond traders or most 
other people had expected. A rising trade 
deficit has the same effect on the economy as 
a lax increase. Both drain off purchasing pow- 
er and tend to slow it down. 

The administration hopes to keep the eco- 
nomy on the three-ond-three track that it 
forecast at the start of the year — 3 percent 
growth and 3 percent inflation. But in early 
March the government's statisticians reported 
that in the last three months of 1933 the 
growth rate had reached a spectacular 7.3 
percent a year (since revised downward a bit). 
Ever since then the financial houses have been 
haunted by the ghosts of inflation post. But 
during (he winter the rate clearly dropped, 
and it seems to be back in the zone of safety. 
Perhaps the bond traders will now decide that 
on second thought they have bid interest rates 
higher than circumstances really warrant 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Beware of Gun Sweeps 


The danger to public housing tenants in 
America from marauding drug gangs and 
rampant gunfire is so obvious and seemingly 
so intractable that normally sensible public 
officials are grasping at unconstitutional 
means to deal with it The Chicago Housing 
Authority has resorted to wholesale police 
sweeps of entire apartment buildings. And now 
President Bill Clinton, in an otherwise sound 
program to increase public safety, offers a 
remedy of highly dubious constitutionality. 

Two weeks ago. Judge Wayne .Andersen in 
Chicago's federal court declared unconstitu- 
tional the Chicago sweeps — room-by-room 
weapons searches undertaken without search 
warrants or even probable cause to obtain 
warrants. A moderate Republican appointed 
by President George Bush, Judge Andersen 
agreed that the dangers to innocent citizens 
were real, but he rejected the authority's de- 
fense of urgent necessity. He noted that all of 
the sweeps occurred at least two days after 
violence broke out, and that even in an emer- 
gency the searchers needed probable cause. 

One of the things that made this case fasci- 
nating and even poignant was that many ten- 
ants had intervened on the side of the Housing 
Authority. The judge observed that because the 
tenants were "apparently convinced by sad 
experience that the larger community will not 
provide normal law enforcement services to 
them," they were "prepared to forgo their own 
constitutional rights” against seardi and sei- 
zure. Any citizen can abandon just about any 
constitutional right if the waiver is truly volun- 
tary. But the judge said this did not give the 
tenants or the Housing Authority the right "to 
suspend their neighbors' rights as well.” 

This was a courageous ruling, but Mr. Clin- 
ton, among others, seems to have missed the 
point In a radio address on the subject of 
violence in public bousing, he constructively 


proposed faster funding from the Department 
of Housing and Urban Development for great- 
er security' in all public housing. He noted that 
the police were free to search open spaces and 
vacant apartments, places where more weapons 
are discovered than in sweeps of occupied 
apartments. Yet among his proposals was the 
highly suspect idea of requiring public housing 
leases to include a tenant’s waiver of the very 
privacy rights that Judge Andersen ably vindi- 
cated — a standing consent to a warrantless 
search. What could be more coercive than an 
implicit demand for a waiver of rights as a 
condition of shelter? It is hard to imagine a 
waiver provision in a lease form that an appli- 
cant could feel free to reject Nor is it easy to 
imagine such a waiver surviving a constitution- 
al challenge in Judge Andersen’s courtroom. 

Mr. Clinton did not directly criticize Judge 
Andersen's ruling, but he gave no sign that be 
recognized its correctness. Instead, like oth- 
ers, he drew a false distinction between ten- 
ants' constitutional rights and what be called 
the rights of children “to walk to the corner 
without fear of gunfire” and other dangers. 

He says his plan can serve as a national 
model for coping with urban terror. Insofar as 
it commits resources for tenant security and 
commends lawful enforcement techniques, it 
can set a strong example. The ACLU, which 
represented the plaintiffs against the Housing 
Authority, has been urging them for years. 
The tenant waiver, however, is a poor idea. 
Governments are clearly defaulting on their 
end of the social compact that should guard 
the safety of children and their parents in 
dangerous neighborhoods everywhere. But 
this maddeningly difficult challenge must be 
met by safeguarding what the constitution has 
long promised: the right to be secure from 
government’s Intrusions as well. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Serious D-Day Remembrance 

For the wartime generation, [D-day] was an 
undertaking [awaited} for three years of, at 
times, very dubious battle. Most of those who 
remember D-day can also remember the Battle 
of Britain, the Blitz, the disasters in Greece and 
Crete, the ignominy of Singapore, the slow, 
potential strangulation of the Battle of the 
Atlantic The victory in Normandy was an 
extraordinary reversal of the tide of fortune, a 
genuine deliverance from the specter of defeaL 

D-day heightened suspense. AD day, people 


huddled around the wireless set, trying to catch 
any nuance of encouragement in the unchang- 
ing message: “This morning. Allied navies, 
supported by strong Allied air forces, began 
landing Allied armies on the coast of France.” 
It was the fear of a disaster that animal**! the 
British nation on June 6. 1944. Why should any 
of this be disguised from a generation which 
owes its immense personal freedom and, by any 
comparison, great material prosperity to the 
victory of the Second World Wart 

— John Keegan, commenting m 
The Daily Telegraph (London). 



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W ASHINGTON — Just Iasi month, the 
United States presided at the creation 
of a new Bosnian Federation. Today it is 
presiding at its destruction. U.S. lack of re- 
solve and loss of credibility make America an 
accomplice to a Serbian conquest, not the 
architect of a better seulemenL 
The peace process begun with hope in 
Washington is about to go to hell in Gorazde. 
In the face of fresh Serbian outrages 


dent Bfll Clinton has apparently chosen to 
steer a neutral course among the “warring 
parties” and avoid further NATO actions. 
The results will be morally, politically and 
militarily indefensible, with disastrous con- 
sequences not just for Bosnia but for a sta- 
ble. democratic Europe and the viability of 
NATO and the United Nations. 

Confronted with the complexities of war in 
Bosnia and brazen Serbian violence, America 
has simply retreated. It pursues negotiations 
at any price rather than creating the condi- 
tions for a workable peace agreement. 

Incredibly, Washington maintains the crip- 
pling arms embargo against Bosnia even as it 
talks of easing the trade embargo against 
Yugoslavia. Everybody but the Serbs has fall- 
en hostage to the U.S. peace process, because 
Washington did not back it with enough force 
to convince the Serbs that more war gives 
them more pain than gain. 

For two years, Bosnia has appealed for the 
means to defend itself. Instead, America gave 
it unenforced Security Council resolutions, 
unchecked genocide, impotent mediators, lec- 


By Jeane J. Kirkpatrick and Morton I. Abramowitz 


tines on realpolitik, unsafe "safe havens, 
peacekeepers who can barely protect them- 
selves, and now an un consummated marriage 
of force and diplomacy. 

Let America drop the pretense that it can 
do better, or at least that it will. 

If it is unwilling to give the Bosnian Serbs 
(and Belgrade) an ultimatum to withdraw 
from their sieges or endure punishing air 
bombardment, then NATO and the United 
Nations should get out of the way and give 
the Bosnians the arms to fight for their own 
country and their own lives. 

President Clin ton, who has halfheartedly 
supported lifting the arms embargo, recently 
said it was not clear under international law 
whether it could be ended unilaterally. It can 
be. The embargo is inherently illegal and 
invalid with respect to Bosnia. 

The embargo was originally imposed on all 
of former Yugoslavia in 1991. But Bosnia is 
now a United Nations member in its own right 

fully entitled to defend itself against aggres- 
sion under Article 51 of the UN Charter. 

Neither Bosnia nor anyone else is bound by 
an embargo that contravenes this fundamen- 
tal precept of international law. Belgrade cer- 
tainly has no compunctions about arming the 
Rnwiian Serbs in violation of the embargo. 

The right to self-defense cannot be super- 
seded by any UN resolution unless the Securi- 
ty Council itself undertakes to ensure Interna- 
tional peace and order, a task that it has 
utterly tailed to fulfill in Bosnia. 


The embargo is not just illegal. It has pre- 
lected the Serbs' advantage in heavy weapons. 


United States should be no less willing. It 
would initially lead to more killing, but the 
killing has been going on for two years and 
almost all the dead are innocent Muslims. 


ittaSedlhe Serbs to conquer 70 percent It would put UN forces and humanitarian 

of sovereten Bosnian territory and drive 2 workers m jeopardy, but they are already in 
rnOHrai people from their homes. And it flies lbeSerbumcrffishaire. Their alternative is to 

u _i _ . . Btanetmft hv tahnlntinff the cflmnm and 


in the face of UN resolutions authorizing “all 
necessary means" to ensure delivery of hu- 
manitarian relief and protect safe havens. 

If the embarso cannot be removed by the 
Security Council because of Russia's veto, it 
must be removed by individual nations, start- 
ing with the Unitetf States. America’s Europe- 
an allies may balk, but in the end they need to 
worry more about America deserting them 

than it needs to worry about them deserting it. 

Also misplaced are fears that unilaterally 
lifting the arms embargo for Bosnia would 
lead nations to abrogate the embargoes 
agains t Serbia or Iraq. The cases are not 
analogous. Belgrade and Baghdad are proven 
aggressors. Their self-defense is not an issue. 

A U.S. move to lift the embargo and en- 
courage other countries to do the same would 
be welcomed by an overwhelming majority in 
the United Nations. Indeed, a majority has 
gone on record against its validity. And now 
that Russia’s diplomacy has failed with the 
Serbs, it would save Moscow the added em- 
barrassment of a veto. 

Granted, a phased withdrawal of UN 
forces under U.S. air cover and a steady 
a rming of the Bosnians could make matters 
worse before they get better. But that is a 
price the Bosnians are willing to pay, and the 


keep standing by, tabulating the carnage and 
treating the casualties, while CNN records it 
all in living color. 

Humanitarian aid from the West would 
still be necessary, but the new Bostdan-Cro- 
atian Federation would bear the brunt of 
ensuring the delivery of relief. 

The armed Bosnian forces might suffer some 
early reversals, but the federation will make it 
easier to deliver needed weapons, Bosnia 
should be given the chance to work out a better 
solution than acquiescing in its own destruc- 
tion- The Bosnian array has wiU, disopitue and 
manpower. If America lifts the arms embargo 
now, it gives the Bosnians a chance to do more 
than go down fighting. It gives them a lease cm 
life and a basis on which to build a viable peace 
—a peace that they, not Americans, will have 
the means and the duty to keep. 

Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, who was U.S. repre- 
sentative to the United Nations in the Reagan 
administration, is senior fellow at the American 
Enterprise Institute. Morton I. Abramowitz, a 
former U.S. assistant secretary of state for 
intelligence and research and ambassador to 
Turkey, is president of Che Carnegie Endow- 
ment for International Peace. They contributed 
this comment to The New York Times. ■ ., 


The Bosnians 9 Cause Is Lost , but Croatia Might Still Be Saved 


W ASHINGTON — Depicted in 
diplomatic cables and news 
dispatches as psychopaths com- 
manding a ragtag miliua, the “gen- 
erals” who lead Bosnia's Serbs have 
inflicted a severe embarrassment on 
the politicians who presume to lead 
the world. Mafia dons would not 
have stood for the dishonor and 
disrespect that the international 
community's presidents and diplo- 
mats swallowed this week. 

“General” Ratko Mladic called 
the bluffs of Bill Clinton. Boris Yelt- 
sin. Butros Butros Ghaii and their 
aides on the battlefield of Gorazde. 
These Serbs have proved once again 
that they are despicable, bloodthirsty 
thugs. They are also the only players 
in the Bosnian tragedy who know 
what they want and bow to get it. 

Paradoxically, the creeping Serbi- 
an victory in Bosnia could inflict 
greater immediate political damage 
on Mr. Yeltsin. Serbia’s nominal 
ally, and on Mr. Butros Ghaii than it 
does on the Western leaders who 
dragged the Russian president and 
the United Nations secretary-gener- 
al into this conflict. 

The American president stays in 
tune nnth public opinion and with 


By Jim Hoagland 


the noninterventionist mood of the 
Pentagon by resisting significant U 5, 
involvement in the Bosnian war. He 
dings to the rhetorical high ground 
by talking about lifting the arms em- 
bargo that penalizes Bosnia's Muslim 
government in its war with the Serbs, 
while refusing to adopt or outline a 
strategy that would.gjve validity to 
that alliance-straining step. 

Such a strategy could be devised 
But it requires making some tough 
choices, rather than letting wishful 
thinking and rhetoric dominate the 
American approach to Bosnia. 

After the Serbs predictably re- 
sponded to last week’s limited use of 
American air power around Gor- 
azde by escalation. President Gin- 
ton countered by calling White 
House meetings to search for “new 
options" — thereby acknowledging 
that be had not thought through the 
probable battlefield consequences 
of the air raids before they occurred. 

He spent most of Tuesday clos- 
eted with his principal foreign af- 
fairs advisers searching for a way to 
rescue American credibility. Their 
conversations reportedly centered 


on using air power to prevent the 
other UN-protected areas from 
mee ting the same fate as Gorazde. 

The president is not managing 
this crisis in the same time frame in 
winch it is occurring. He lets events 
determine where he wQl go. He de- 
liberately builds time lags into his 
responses, as if hoping that events 
win narrow the admittedly unpleas- 
ant options he faces, or at least de- 
flect criticism onto others. 

For days before the climactic as- 
sault . the' Serbs were known to be 
shifting artillery and other weapons 
out of the Sarajevo theater into the 
hills around the UN-declared “safe 
haven” of Gorazde. The U.SL, UN 
and NATO response was to stand by 
and count on Russian diplomacy to 
save Gorazde. Thai was miscalcula- 
tion. The Russians now acknowledge 
that they cannot deliver the Serbs to 
the negotiating table. Mr. Yeltsin 
thus appears ineffectual on the inter- 
national scene and at home, where he 
is strongly criticized by extreme na- 
tionalists' for letting the Serbs be 
bombed in the first place. 

His independent-minded Balkans 


negotiator, Vitali Churkin, on Mon- 

3 blistered the Serbs for systemati- 
y “lying” to him about their ac- 
tions in Gorazde: “The time for 
talkin g is over. The Bosnian Serbs 
must understand that by dealing with 
Russia they are dealing with a great 
power ana not a banana republic.” 

But why should the Bosnian Serbs 
understand that? They hare just 
shown that they are dealing with 
great powers which do not hare the 
resolve or unity of purpose to prevent 
Ratko Mladic from overrunning 
Gorazde, a town of 30,000 refugees 
that the United Nations has solemnly 
declared to be under its protection. 

In the Bosnian war, the “great 
powers" are not so greaL The citizens 
of a huge country sbouJd wony when 
their diplamats feel compelled to in- 
sist that they do not live in a banana 
republic. Mr. Churkin’s defensive 
declaration contains a kernel of ad- 
mission that Russians will not miss. 

Rnsaan-ui. cooperation, already 
under strain, is tikdy to suffer signifi- 
cant new damage if the Bosnian end- 
game continues in this manner. Mos- 
cow and Washington ore already 
Warning each other for the failure in 
Gorazde and will escalate that criti- 


cism if the Bosnian debacle deepens. 

Avoiding such damage should be 
a priority of the Clinton administra- 
tion. That argues for joining the 
Europeans in a realpolitik solution 
of accepting the Serbian victory in 
Bosnia and shutting this war down 
now. That in turn means dropping 
the smoke screen talk of lifting the 

best surrender' terms possible for the 
vanquished Bosnian Muslims. 

Arming the Muslims now is a lost 
cause. There is an alternative to sur- 
render. Once the fighting in Bosnia 
dies down it is certain to resume in 
the Serbian-hdd portions of Croatia. 
Lifting the embargo, or amply ignor- 
ing it, makes sense only if America is 
ready to start arming Croatia io fight 
the Serbs in a war to the finish. 

The Croatia option is a bloody 
route that will certainly drive the 
Russians into bitter opposition to 
American policy. The only thing I 
can think of that would be worse 
would be continuing the present con- 
fused policies that seem to be based 
on spreading false hopes and mean- 
ingless promises to get the adminis- 
tration through the next news cycle. 

The Washington Post 


Shades of the Bay of Pigs, With the U.S. Congress Out to Lunch 


W ASHINGTON — The slovenly, lethal 
improvisation erf U.S. policy regarding 
the Balkan civil war has made America morally 
complirit in carnage while it remains politi- 
cally impotent and militarily inconsequential. 
This wreckage of feeble intentions may at 
least demolish the notion that the United 
Nations can be a surrogate for U.S. self- 
determination, or a repository for U.S. sover- 
eimity. or a substitute for a U.S. presidenL 
The United Nations’ fatuous proclamation 
of “safe havens" is mere diplomatic noise. 
Many cruelties have been inflicted on Bosni- 
ans, whose misfortune it is to be in the path of 
the creation of “Greater Serbia.” Among 
those cruelties is the United Nations' pretense 
that it can plays role for which it is incurably 
unsuited, that of peacemaker. There will be 
no peace until Serbia’s appetite for conquest 
has been slaked, or until Serbia's victims nave 
arms sufficient to produce stalemate. 

When President George Bush was asked 
why the arms embargo should not be lifted so 
that Serbia's victims could defend themselves 
or die resisting, he flippantly replied that the 
trouble in the Balkans was not an insufficien- 
cy of weapons. Nor, in the same way. was that 


By George F. WIU 


the trouble when Germany crushed the Jew- 
ish rising in the Warsaw ghetto. 

Mr. Bush’s secretary of state. James Baker, 
said of the Balkan civil war that “we don’t 
have a dog in that fight.” But .America now is 
a bewildered dog in that fight, although it 
denies that it is in it and continues to defer to 
those who bold its leash and pull it deeper in. 

A Japanese diploma.! named Akashi. repre- 
senting an Egyptian rivO servant named Bu- 
tros Gnali who is hired by the governments 
represented in the United Nations, decided, 
with a British general named Rose, that U.S. 
aircraft assigns to NATO would drop a few 
bombs on inconsequential targets. The invest- 
ment of U.S. prestige was inversely propor- 
tional to the force involved, and the exercise 
was of a fecklessness not seen since the Bay of 
Pigs. Where, one wonders, is Congress? 

During the Cold War, the presidency ac- 
quired a constitutionally anomalous indepen- 
dence regarding foreign policy, but Congress 
constantly skirmished with presidents about 
involvement in decisions about uses of force. 


Now that the hair-trigger XJ.S.-Soviet stand- 
off has passed. Congress could prudently, and 
in accord with constitutional assumptions, 
become more assertive. 

This president does not disguise the fact 
that he would rather be, and usually is, think- 
ing of things other than foreign policy. His 
lack of interest has translated into a casual 
willingness for U.S. force, military and moral, 
to be tangled up in tines of authority (Akashi, 
Butros Ghaii. Rose) resembling linguae. 

His desire to keep America distant from a 
civil war — a war that it might not be able to 
influence without an investment of force and 
prestige disproportionate to its interests — is 
defensible. But his indefensible pretense that 
America must be a mere partner of that moral 
cipher, the United Nations, winch pretends to 
represent that political fiction called “the 
world community,” is producing the entan- 
glement that the president wants to avoid. 

Ejup Ganic, Bosnia's vice president, says to 
Americans. “You have to reverse the results of 
ethnic cleansing if you want a stable peace." 
Otherwise “you might send your troops one 
day to keep results of ethnic cleansing.” If the 
United States is called upon to keep its promise 


to send thousands of soldiers for “peacekeep- 
ing,” the United States wiU indeed wind up 
ratifying the results of Serbia’s war crimes. 

Enforcing a peace produced by Serbian bru- 
tality is unappetizing; doing what Bosnia's 
government wants is unthinkable. Mr. Ganic 
says that until land seized by Serbia is returned 
to Serbia’s victims, his government cannot sign 
a peace pact Asked if Be was asking NATO to 
“reverse Serbian conquests” because his gov- 
ernment lacks sufficient military force to do so, 
he says: “You took that force from us because 
you introduce an arm embargo on Bosnia; you 
put our bands tied and you create this out- 
come. Ether reverse the outcome or give us 
weapons we can do by ourself.” 

If U.S. forces someday participate in patrol- 
ling a partitioned Bosnia, (be lines of partition 
should reflect some results of armed Bosnian 
self-defense rather than merely the satiation of 
Serbia’s appetite for conquest over people 
whose crippled capacity for self-defense is a 
casualty or a lunatic notion of “evenhanded- 
ness” (hat only the United Nations could con- 
sider just and only a president in full flight 
from responsibility could ding (o. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Look to Africa’s Precolonial Past for Hope to Escape the Present 


Pas.UK: Midori Cm: S50 Hunt Am. New York N.Y. 10021 Td f 212) 752-ASM Fax: (212) 75 W® 
U.K. Advertising Office: 63 bmg Acre, London WC2. TeL \07l) S36-4B02. Fax: (07/1 210-2254. 
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ۥ IW. bBemaAnJ Hendd Trihue. AS rights reserved. RSN: (DHS0S2 


L ONDON — In tbe year 1879, at 
r about four o’clock on a tropical 
afuauocm, a Scottish botanist readied 
the outskirts of a village in an un- 
known East African region far from 
the coast, and “boldly marched in.” 
He had little or no idea of what await- 
ed Mm, but had just celebrated his 22d 
birthday and was full of confidence. 
Young enough to shake off fears of 
peri 1, be was, at any rale, aware of his 
own ignorance — more than could be 
said of many such explorers. 

James Thomson was prepared for 
surprises. He was given than. They 
were not of a kind to match East 
Africa's tough and turbulent reputa- 
tion. Tbe infamous East Coast slave 
trade was scarcely ended, and what be 
could expect was misery and mayhem. 

“The scene that opened before 
me," be recalled a couple of years 
later, “I beheld with astonishment: It 
seemed a perfect Arcadia.*’ 

Amid “a magnificent grove of ba- 
nanas,” he found handsome village 
huts arranged within the shade of im- 
mense sycamores, while everywhere 
about them “all seeds, garbage and 
things unsightly” had been carefully 
cleared away. The village people were 
resting after their day’s work, enjoying 
a siesta and gosap before their evening 
meal, utterly naked as God had made 
them but “unconscious of any wanL 
and apparently fearing no danger.’* 
They made him welcome. 

Thomson traveled far but found no 
reason to unsay these opinions of a 
place and people a few hundred miles 
south of today’s bedeviled Rwanda 
and Burundi, where tens of thou- 
sands are said to have been killed 
after the two countries’ leaders died 
in an airplane crash. 

Were his opinions those of permis- 
sible but unreliable exaggeration? 
Tbe odd thing is that in the East 
African interior of those times, be- 
yond and outside tbe devilish reach 
of tbe slaving caravans from the 
coast Thomson’s opinions would not 


By Basil Davidson 


have sounded strange to other long- 
distance wanderers. Indeed, they 
would have fit with their own. 

Modem historians, looking back 
before the slave trade and the colonial 
dispossessions, have not found Arca- 
dia. But neither have they found any- 
thing like tbe hell on earth that erupts 
and bums across so much of Africa 
today. That old Africa had built a 
world of tolerance and compromise. 

If this remains hard to believe, con- 

The Tutsi and the Hutu 
shared life together, 
depended upon one 
another, and upheld 
beliefs in a valued 
coexistence. 


sider only the case of the kingdoms of 
Rwanda and Burundi lying not far 
north of Thomson's route. We have 
no worthwhile external descriptions 
before the 1890s, and few .until the 
early 1950s. But then came a notable 
harvest of hardheaded information 
on the nature of these kingdoms be- 
fore the colonial dispossessions. 

Ethnographers well-respected in 
their time and place, older than 
Thomson and infinitely better pre- 
pared in their scholarship, described 
communities of stability and good 
sense, equipped with laws and cus- 
toms such that the peoples of these 
kingdoms, tbe Tutsi and tbe Hutu, 
had been able to live peacefully to- 
gether, and over a long period. 

These ethnographers were working 
in the midst of a remarkable reassess- 
ment of historical Africa that got into 
its stride after World War II and the 
onset of decolmization. Hie task they 


so fruitfully undertook meant quarry- 
ing for dates and sequences, but, more 
important, they were concerned with 
the inward and innate process of this 
unresearched history. They wanted to 
understand Africa’s cultures in their 
conceptual and aesthetic dimensions. 

This has been an enterprise with 
many and large enlightenments to its 
credit, even if the world at large has 
stiU to come to terms with its insights. 
In projecting their findings, the histo- 
rians have had one great difficulty: 
that of steering between the Scylla 
of being suspected of spinning fairy 
tales, and tbe Cbarybois of writing 
with such difficulty — admittedly 
on difficult matters — as to be un- 
readable or, at any rate, unread. Ad- 
mirably often, however, they have 
brought their cargoes of unfamiliar 
knowledge safely into port. 

Perhaps healthily, skepticism on 
all this stays vividly alive, ic seems to 
be hard even for sympathetic readers 
to accept that the influence of centu- 
ries of African precolonial develop- 
ment. political or social or aesthetic, 
must have a therapeutic value for the 
solving of present ills. Yet, the evi- 
dence goes in that sense: 

On the crucial issue of controls on 
the abuse of power, for example, or 
on the efficacy of systems of concilia- 
tion between neighboring peoples, tbe 
experience of the African past does 
indeed, and repeatedly, point to atti- 
tudes and concepts, ana even to in- 
strumentalities, tnai may usefully ap- 
ply in the ferocious conflicts of today. 

A frequently heard reply to this is 
that there were, in fact, no such con- 
cepts and principles outside the reach 
of heated imagination, or else, at best, 
that those old ways of reconciliation 
were no more than rustic folklore. And 
yet today, there are the examples or 
Rwanda and Burundi, as described by 
our ethnographers of long years ago.' 

What they made perfectly clear 


was that the twin peoples of these 
now ravaged countries, the Hutu and 
the Tutsi, did in fact achieve, centu- 
ries before any European arrival, the 
development of an effective system of 
mutual rights and duties, and one 
that long stayed intact. 

Today, after some 90 years of colo- 
nial dictatorship and pos [colonial 
confusion, all that well-tried toler- 
ance seems entirely swept away, its 
old structures unreajverable and its 
old social and artistic amenities ban- 
ished from the scene, while years may 
pass before current passions of hatred 
are assuaged. Hie certain fact is that it 
was nor so in precolonial times. 

With no more than the frailties and 
abrasions of everyday experience. 


these two peoples lived together in 
cultures of a flexible amity such as 
can be barely imagined now. 

In that past, however simple in its 
material capacities, the Tutsi and the 
Hutu shared life together, depended 
upon one another, intermarried with 
each other, and upheld beliefs in a 
valued coexistence. How and why 
they were able to do this, and by 
means of what ideas and beliefs, must 
surely compose a body of knowledge 
that may inspire new hope in the 
miseries of now. 

The writer’s most recent book on 
African history is “The Search for Af- 
rica. ” He contributed this comment to 
the Los Angeles Times. 


IN OUR PAGES? 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1894: Dynamite in Spain Versailles to take delivery of tbe 

* X Treaiv and take it Vkv-Ip ».■> Wnmar 


MADRID — The Madrid press pub- 
lishes this morning (April 20] alarm- 
ing reports of the existence of a large 
store of dynamite in the centre of the 
city of Bilbao. The telegrams received 
by the authorities, however, diminish 
the importance of the matter. Steps 
will be taken to prevent explosives 
being stored in inhabited centres. 

1919: German Insolence 

PARIS — Germany does not seem to 
be convinced yet that she cannot con- 
tinue to play with the Allies with 
impunity. After endeavoring to wrig- 
gle out of her engagements entered 
into at Spa concerning the transport 
of General Haller's troops to Poland; 
after intimating that she would refuse 
to sign this or that clause of the Pre- 
liminary Treaty, her Government has 
launched an insolent message which, 
being interpreted, means that instead 
of proper plenipotentiaries, she 
would send mere functionaries to 


;.r:7il»!V 


*'v: : 


Versailles to take delivery of tbe 
Treaty and take it back to Weimar. 
The Allies will naturally refuse to 
accept any such proposition. 

1944: A Jew’s Ordeal , 

ODESSA — [From mr New York 
edition:] I know of no roan in Odessa 
. ® r anywhere else in Russia, who has 
had such extraordinary experiences 
during enemy occupation of a city as 
Robert Kantorowitch, a forty- three- 
year-old Jewish engineer. On Ocl 23-, 
I Wf, a week after Odessa was o ecu-; 
pied, he and four other Jews were' 
marched along to be banged. Jews 
had to build the gallows for this 
hanging, and had to slip the noose 
over thrir condemned brethren. The 
families of the condemned were 
obliged to witness the execution. A 
Romanian oflwer in charge of the exo- 
cution surveyed Robert at Imgth and 
said: “Let the engineer live. Hell work 
o 5- ” *he death of the others. 

|he Romanians demanded that the on* 
lookers applaud and shout “Hurrah!” 







if zn< 


I INTERN \T10iY\L IIERALD TRIBUNE. THU RSDAY, APRIL 21. 1994 

O P I N I O N 


'need 


La at 



Toward a Compromise That Increases Japanese Imports 


T H^kawa'sISS Jp me ^° Jlis,cr Moriluro 
BHI ClintM on wilh **** 

headlines like “Talks B«Lk h rw CWS -P a ^ rs had 
tions Fail - Down. ‘Negotia- 

reading these Irn/tP 30 * N °’ 10 U.S.” On 

rtsappoinS’beSS! h , dp fec,in S extremely 

merBh ad SeSfSSS; ?!“ laS ^ year h 0 * * we ™- 
a process *°waid a compromise — 

b W 

al colfiSFjf “devemu- 

!3Sfa?2 °L nlinUe “ ** raad e »° put bilateral 

JaDai h ^Sk thC j iifr,c “ ,t circumstances both in 
^ COlls . lram our options. 1 believe 

doSSuT, i BVB ® el rid of idea of a 

ST™ Jap ¥* “W “ no ~ and avoid an arro- 
gant approach toward America. The Japanese 

no? n ^ 1 in ““dong clear that itcoSd 

nniiSoF 1 ? umencal targets” However, the 
untied Mates is not the only country asking Japan 

SnR 61 ! ^ m ^ el5 - ir J “P an starts saving “no” 
all the time, it will be headed toward isolation. 

secondly, it is clear that any solution must lie in 
Japan s initiative in reducing the economic imbal- 
has already begun to move forward 
with the release or the highly detailed “Outline of 
external Economic Reform Measures." These 
measures include domestic demand-led economic 
management and further improvements to the 
market mechanism centering on deregulation as 
well as improvement or procedures for govern- 
ment procurement, and they express Japan's re- 
solve to achieve a reduction of the current account 


By Nobuo Matsunaga 

surplus. It remains for Japan to implement ihese 
measures effectively and resolutely. 

My third point is that we have to grasp the real 
reason wh y" a compromise was not reached in 
February. There appears to be a common view 
that the Japan ese-u.S. talks ended in failure be- 
cause the American side insisted on “numerical 
targets,” or. more precisely, “objective criteria.” 
But I believe that what interested the American 
side most was expansion of domestic demand in 
Japan, which would lead to a more vigorous 
economy and a more vigorous market, in turn 
allowing many more imports into Japan. 

An initial Japanese government package to 
stimulate the economy, including a “one-year tax 
reduction,” regrettably did not meet wilh Ameri- 
can appreciation. However, we hope to see a more 
pcsiuve response as the new and ambitious mea- 
sures, including tax reform toward domestic de- 
mand-led economic management, continue to be 
fi n is h ed out and implemented. 

In addition, we should take into account the 
situation in the United States. One pan of Ameri- 
can society is in the mood to bosh Japan. This 
group's protectionism and isolationism are ex- 
pressed in calls for sanctions and a stronger yen in 
Congress, the administration and American in- 
dustry. But this is certainly not a majority opin- 
ion. In visiting the United States, I have found 
that the average American feds no animosity 
toward Japan or Japanese people; rather, the 
general feeling is one of broad-minded goodwill 
At this delicate time, we must be extremely 
prudent. The American government is putting an 
enormous political stake on health care reform, 
which requires the support of Congress, where 
strong protectionist pressure exists. We must 
lore consider the political climate in the 


United States when we look at the revival of Super 
301 trade legislation. 

Having now outlined Japan's external econom- 
ic reform measures, we can ask what Japan should 
do next. First of all, wilh regard to measures to 
stimulate the economy, the Japanese government 
must brush away the negative repercussions of the 
“one-year tax reduction with a political declara- 
tion stating clearly a tax cm for at least three 
consecutive years. Ideally, such a declaration 
would implement a permanent individual income 
tax reduction, in keeping with the intention ex- 
pressed in the recent measures. 

Such a statement should not be bureaucratic or 
pedantic, but full of political vigor and charisma. 
Furthermore, advance implementation of the cur- 
rent economic reform measures should be made in 
a truly effective and transparent way. 

Secondly, be ginning with the framework of the 
recently announced “Government Actions for 
import Promotion” in fiscal year 1994, the Japa- 
nese government should draw up and announce 
concrete import plans envisaging government 
procurement of foreign goods, as objective crite- 
ria with which to measure effects on imports. The 
government should also consider further govern- 
ment support to encourage talks between private 
enterprises to address the difficult problem of 
importing automobiles and auto pans. 

Thirdly, we must address a more basic problem: 
the need for decisive policies that increase imports. 
Moving beyond the 1994 “Government Actions for 
Import Promotion.” current tax deduction mea- 
sures to facilitate imports should be drastically 
expanded. In addition, the government should an- 
nounce a new strategy aimed at increasing imports, 
with results projected for the next few years. Such 
import-promotion measures should be applied on a 
worldwide baas. We may thus even aim at a SO 
percent reduction in our trade surplus. Such in- 
creased imports, combined with economic recov- 


ery. would also lead to higher living standards. 

And fourthly, there is the questioncf deregula- 
tion. In the past, government explanations on 
deregulatory policy have tended to be vague when 
actually realized, lea ding to wide dissatisfaction 
and criticism. Since deregulation is an important 
pillar of trade talks between the two governments, 
the decisions in the current package — including 
the work to be done for a fast-track package in the 
sectors of real estate and land; information and 
telecommunications; distribution and flow of 
goods; licenses, approvals and inspection stan- 
dards; and finance, securities and insurance — 
should be implemented so as to avoid any chance 
of misunderstanding or criticism. 

In concluding, J have two suggestions. One 
concerns ambitious steps to deregulate and im- 
prove the tax-deduction system that encourages 

K rivate contributions. To be frank. Japan could 
am a great deal from the American tax-deduc- 
tion system, which is very effective in helping 
industrial transformation and improvement of 
the distribution system. 

Tbe other suggestion is to consider the possibil- 
ity of transferring Japan's capital out of Tokyo. 
Historically, every few centuries or so tbe Japa- 
nese capital has been moved. Since the greatest 
impediment to Japan's internationalization is 
price differentials, centering on the exorbitant 
price of land, I believe that if Japan wishes to 
continue to develop further within the global 
community, moving the capital out or Tokvo 
seems to be unavoidable. Such a huge, public- 
financed undertaking would also be an unprece- 
mlus to the i 


dented stimulus 


economy. 


The writer, a former ambassador to the United 
States, is president of the Japan Institute of Interna- 
tional Affairs; he was a senior member iff Japan's 
delegation at the recent CA TT signing in Marrakesh. 
He contributed this common to the Herald Tribune 


Spare the Contempt, Please, 
For Suicide Is Not Painless 


By Anna Quindlen 


N EW YORK — It was not surpris- 
ing, watching “60 Minutes” ou 
Sunday, to learn that Andy Rooney 
had never heard of Kurt Cobain or the 
band Nirvana. It was uot surprising 
that Mr. Rooney, who has made a ca- 
reer as a camera-friendly curmudgeon, 
took issue with ripped jeans and was 
perplexed by grunge. 

And it was not even surprising that, 
speaking of Mr. Cobain’s suicide at the 
age of 27, Mr. Rooney brought to the 
issue of youthful despair a mixture of 
sarcasm and contempt. After all. that 
has long beat the attitude their elders 
have brought to tbe pain of those far 

MEANWHILE 

younger than they: in Mr. Rooney's 
words, “What would all these young 
people be doing if they had real prob- 
lems like a Depression, World War 11 
or Vietnam?” 

No, not surprising, but worth noting 
because in 1994 that sort of attitude is 
as dated and foolish as believing that 
cancer is contagious. 

Suicide re mains the great mystery. Of- 
ten we can never know precisely why: 
why, for Vincent Foster, one day be- 
came more unendurable than the ones 
before, why Kurt Colain balked at one 
last sunset. Some people (till themselves 
because they have troubles they cannot 
surmount; others are already ride and 
do not want to get any sicker. Many are 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Singapore: Crime, P unishme nt and More 


Regarding "Singapore’s Assertion of a 
Right to Torture Is Intolerable" (Opinion. 
April Si by William Safire: 

Singapore is not a dictatorship and 
does not have a “dictator." Nor is it a 
“lawless state.” Michael Fay, the 18- 
year-old American convicted cvf vandal- 
izing cars, was sentenced in accordance 
with the written law of Singapore. 

JERRY PURSLEY. 

Singapore. 

Regarding “ Some Sense in the Singa- 
pore Approach" ( Opinion, April 9) by 
Charles Krauthammer: 

I applaud Mr. Krauthammer's article, 
i had started this letter as a response to 
William Safire's ignorant and short- 
sighted views of Singapore's justice sys- 
tem. but Charles Krauthammer has 
done the job for me. 

The United Stales has nothing to 
teach Singapore about criminal justice, 
and judging by the way things are going. 
1 don’t think it ever will. Asking Singa- 
pore to listen to the United States on 
this matter is like asking Nancy Kerri- 
gan to allow Tonya Hardrag to give her a 
lesson in sports ethics. 

JONATHAN P. TAYLOR. 

Orlando. Florida. 

Say it ain't so. Bill! Please. Mr. Safire. 
tell us. your admirers in readership land, 
that someone hijacked your byline. 
Whupping a vandal six times does not 
meet any reasonable person's definition 
of “torture." It is punishment, and hi 
this case it is much better than jail time, 
judging from the furor in the press, it 
seems to send a message, too. 

JAMES L KIRTLEY Jr. 

Zurich. 


Wi lliam Safire criticizes caning as the 
fruit of Singapore's authoritarian soci- 
ety, yet be defends America's death pen- 
alty. Nothing is more anti-democratic 
than capital punishment, -the use of 
which embodies the fascist idea that the 
state is all, and all-powerful. 

Charles Krau thamm er writes that 
“punishment is most effective when it is 
swift and sure.” Assuming that be nwans 
effective at deterring criminals. I believe 
that he is more wrong than right. Com- 
mon sense and experience tell us that 
what deters criminals is not severe pun- 
ishment but the certainty of being 
caught and convicted — and sentenced 
to a reasonable punishment 

Public hangings for petty theft in 1 8th 
century London did not deter pickpock- 
ets from working the crowd of execu- 
tion-watchers, because police work then 
was shoddy; whereas in efficient police 
slates like Nazi Germany, Communist 
Czechoslovakia or today’s Singapore — 
where anyone could become an “out- 
law” at the drop of a bat — even pvny 
public acts of unorthodoxy are resisted, 
because people know that the police 
have almost unlimited powers of investi- 
gation and arrest 

CHRISTOPHER HOUSTON. 

Milan. 

America is in no position to lecture 
other countries on the use of cruel and 
unusual punishment so long as it enthu- 
siastically embraces the death penally. If 
caning is considered a form of torture, 
“an act of savagery as old as civiliza- 
tion.” how would William Safire de- 
scribe state-sanctioned executions? As 
long-term cellular interruption? 

LARRY SHAPIRO. 

Calgary, Alberta. 


While the U.S. public and media have 
been consumed by concern wilh Michael 
Fay’s caning sentence in Singapore, the 
US. Congress has just voted to add 63 
offenses to the two that are already pun- 
ishable by death under federal law. 
American lawmakers have thus approved 
a greatly increased use of a barbaric prac- 
tice in the absence of any real public 
discussion. How easy it is to focus with a 
chauvinistic eye on a relatively minor 
incident in a distant land while ignoring a 
major legal and moral issue at borne. 

ALAN KENNEDY. 

Paris. 

P artin g as a punishment is not a new 
or novel practice in Singapore. It has 
been earned our since colonial times. 
Yet before the present case there was no 
protest from die U.S. government or the 
American press. What sets Michael Fay 
apart from those who have been caned 
before him? It is not the crime; Singa- 
poreans have been caned for vandalism 
in the past. The difference is that he is 
American and he is white. 

LOW SOON HENG. 

Singapore. 

It is my perception that the United 
States would not have cared much about 
caning in the Singaporean judicial sys- 
tem bad it not been for the fact that 
American buttocks are being threat- 
ened. It does seem that some buttocks 
arc more equal than others. 

F. H. LOH. 

Oermont-Ferrand, France. 

William Safire casts the Singapore 
caning in terms of a “lawless” state's 
perpetration of a criminal act of torture. 
Vandals are placed alongside rape vic- 
tims and Kurdish patriots, and defended 
in the same terms. Somehow tbe differ- 
ences are lost on Mr. Safire. 


The hollow call for diplomatic and 
economic sanctions against Singapore 
has a mysterious motivation. I don't 
believe that states which stone adulter- 
ers or take a limb or two off thieves have 
ever faced Mr. Satire's ire. 

KENNETH WILLIAMS. 

Oxford, England. 

While reporters and columnists be- 
moan the severity of Michael Fay's sen- 
tence, none has addressed the punish- 
ment Michael has already experienced. 
Coming from a broken family, he has 
already been psychically punished, 
scarred for life. 

1 read that Kurt Cobain, the rock star 
who recently shot himself, had a rela- 
tively happy childhood until his parents 
were divorced when be was 8 years old 
and he was subsequently shuttled back 
and forth between relatives. 


COMMrrtEPftkCraWElN 
IHEU&.j&if. MUTOER. 
I COUU7VE GOTTEN 
ncuoff wrm\ , 
SLftPoNTHeWRlStf 


Ah, the invisible scars a child collects. 

Michael Fay’s parents and step- 
parents will share his pain and scarring 
for the rest of their lives. Ironically, this 
pain may help them to mend tbe wound 
that existed in their lives even before he 
was sentenced to be caned. 

JEANETTE F. HUBER. 

Kinsafe. Ireland. 

This is a worst-case “ugly American” 
scenario. Acts that are ami-social and 
unacceptable (not to mention illegal) in 
every culture are even more heinous 
when committed by an American in a 
foreign country, for then the behavior 
reflects on Americans in general. Like it 
or not, all Americans who live in foreign 
countries are “ambassadors" for the 
United States, for better or worse. 

International companies and organi- 
zations should uy to select their repre- 



sentatives more carefully, and then brief 
and prepare them — and their families 
— more thoroughly before sending them 
abroad We cannot impose American 
standards on other cultures. 

FAITH M. TOWLE 
Merges, Switzerland 

Michael Fay is being punished to put 
it bluntly, to serve as an example. Critics 
will say this is a violation of individual 
rights. But which countries punish with 
do view to deter? Certainly America is as 
guilty of this as is Singapore. Our pun- 
ishments may seem harsher, but our 
crime rates are lower. 

So if you think we have no justifica- 
tion for punishing Michael Fay, first 
take the beam out of your own eye. 

LEONG CHING CHING. 

Singapore. 

A plea for clemency in the case of the 
misunderstood young Mr. Fay is not 
necessary. All you need do is pass the 
hat for air fare on Singapore Airlines to 
fly the Menendez brothers’ defense law- 
yers to his rescue: 

ALAN DAVID SHEAR 
Dun, France. 

There is one good reason for Singa- 
pore to grant clemency to Michael Fay. 
and to do so in a way that preserves 
Singapore’s “face”: Keep the jail term 
and fine and waive the caning, on the 
simple ground that if Mr. Fay is caned 
he will become a cause oelfcbre in Ameri- 
ca. and thus, doubtless, a millionaire 
from the sale of book and movie rights. 

Michael Fay does not deserve all these 
gifts from the Singapore government. 
Let him serve time in jail and pay a fine 
— and then let him fade into obscurity. 

GEORGE FORRAI. 

Hong Kong. 


old; some are young. Of those last, we 
are fond of saying that they had their 
whole lives ahead of them. 

“A lot of people would like to have the- 
years left that be threw away,” Mr. Roo-' 
dct said of Kurt Cobain. He went on to: 
ricficule the young, many of whom found- 
enlightenment of a kind through Nirva-i 
na’s music. “What’s aU this nonsense: 
abcvt how terrible life is?” be asked. 

Speaking rhetorically to a young; 
woman who had wept at the suicide, he; 
added, *Td love to relieve the pain 
you're going through by switching my, 
age for yours." -» 

I wouldn't. J wouldn’t be 17 again on 
a bet 1 have known a number of young 
women of about that age who seemingly, 
had everything to live for and yet who, 
somehow wanted to die. Or perhaps not. 
to die so much as to rest. You coul<£ 
lecture them about their future and their 
good health and fine homes and nice^ 
schools, and they would understand the) 
rightness of the position but not, for the; 
life of them, feel it in their souls. They' 
would tell you that they felt always as if' 
they earned a backpack Full of bricks .' 
And some of them can figure out only 
one way to put that pack down. 

Why would 1 tax those young women 
wilh the foolishness of their feelings and 
lord over them the lessons I have learned? 
Why would anyone facetiously advise 
them and thdr counterparts, as Mr. Roo- ' 
ney did, to “wipe the tears from your 
eyes, dear"? What they feel is real, f 
cannot understand why this is (he one 
kind of pain we want to deny or deni- 
grate, or why we would imagine that the- 
young are immune to it any more than 1 
they are Immune to AIDS or pneumonia. 

In Newsweek, William Styron wrote : 
of an evening with friends some years- 
ago that passed uneventfully for ail but ■ 
him; he remembers it vividly because 
between pasta and conversation he ob- • 
sessed about killing himself. 

He writes of “a pain that is all but 
indescribable, and therefore to everyone 
but the sufferer almost meaningless.” 
Thai pain was not ameliorated by his 
best-selling boob or his Pulitzer Prize. 
Good fortune does not preclude inner 
darkness, whether the good fortune of 
youth or of accomplishment. 

Mr. Rooney said Mr. Cobain's suicide 
made him angry. It makes me angry, too. 
not because I want his wasted years — ' 
such things are not transferable — but 
because Mr. Cobain had a 2-year-old 
daughter who will grow up fatherless. 
Suicide often seems selfish and senseless * 
to the survivors. It often Teels inevitable 
and necessary to its practitioners. It is a 
waste, but not an indulgence. 

“Why?" people say afterward. Mr. 
Styron's dinner companions noticed 
nothin g amiss the night be remembers as 
black as a hole. He bad hidden the pain 
wefl. Young people who fed an inner 
agony, in Mr. Styron's words, as “exqui- 
site as any imaginable physical pain” • 
often do not reveal themselves because 
they suspect that some adult will scoff 
and say that what they feel is “non- 
sense,” that they have no “real prob- 
lems." Sunday evening, some adult did 
just that, and on national television too. ! 

The New York Tunes. 


Utters intended for publication 
should be addressed “ Utters to the 
Editor" and contain the writer’s sig- 
nature, name and full address. Ut- 
ters should be brief ami are stdffea to 
editing. We cannot be responsible fee 
the return of unsolicited manuscripts. 


u»_ 

in 


BOOKS 




LETHAL PASSAGE: 

How the Travels of a Single 
Handg nn Expose the Roots 
of America’s Gun Law Crisis 

By Erik Larson $272 pages. $2). 
Crown. 

Reviewed by 
John Schwartz 

W HEN Nicholas Elliot shot up 
two of his high school teach- 
ers at the Atlantic Shores Christian 
School in Virginia Beach. Virginia, 
in December 1992. the story chdn t 
eel a lot of media play outside of 
the immediate area. Tlie everyday 
tragedy — just another tailing, ar- 
ter°all — made Page B6 of The 
Washington Post. 

The sad, stupid sLory of how 13- 
year-old Nicholas Elliot was able to 
purchase tbe awesomely lethal Lo- 
bray M-l 1/9 (a semiautomatic pis- 
tol capable of shooting a 32 -bullet 
clip in seconds) becomes tiie narra- 
tive that propels Erik Larson s Le- 
thal Passage." A real hit with 
crooks and kooks, the Cobray, its 
manufacturers bragged, in ads. 
“made the Eighties roar. 

Nicholas Elliot’s story is compel- 
ling. He was one of a few black 
students at Atlantic Shores: his 
mother, a nurse, had enrolled him 
there hoping that her son wouldgei 
special attention for his dysj««a- 
Many of the tads there found hun 


good-natured, if shy. They were im- 
pressed by his deep and detailed 
love of firearms: He'd thumb 
through Guns and Ammo maga- 
zine at lunch, and had decorated 
his locker with glossy ads for hot 
guns. Some of the Atlantic Shores 
kids picked on Nicholas, especially 
one bully who seemed to constantly 
taunt him with racial epithets and 
slap him around. 


Nicholas was too young to buy a 
gun legally hims elf. Instead, he per- 
suaded an older cousin to drive him 
to a shop. Guns Unlimited, and 
buy the Cobray, slipping the cash 
to him just a few feet from the store 
clerk. Nicholas took his new toy to 
school to hunt down his enemy and 
fatally shot a teacher. Karen Far- 
ley, seriously wounded another 
teacher. Sam Marino, and terror- 


ized a classroom of lOth-graders 
before the gun jammed and anoth- 
er teacher tackled him. 

In tbe tangle of trials that fol- 
lowed, Nicholas went to prison, as 
did the cousin who falsely regis- 
tered tbe gun as his own. The fam- 
ily of Karen Farley won a land- 
mark $100,000 negligence 
judgment against Guns Unlimited 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 
7TNNERS of major titles usu- 
W ally have solid partnerships 
backed bv years of discussion and 
practice, "but the Open Pairs com- 
petition that took place at the 
American Contract Bridge 
League’s Spring Nationals repre- 
sented and exception. 

Allan Falk of Okemos, Michi- 
gan, and Uoyd Arvedon of Med- 
ford. Massachusetts, formed an im- 
promptu partnership shortly 
before play began, and they singed 
lo victory in the two final sessions. 

The winners of the North Ameri- 
can Open Pairs, Ken Schutze and 
Jim Griffin, both of Austin, Texas, 
were aided by tbe diagramed deal 
on which they were North and 
South- By crowding the bidding, 
and reaching five spades in short 
order, they put pressure on their 


opponents. East chose to double, in 
tbe belief that his ride could not 
make a slam, but South's contract 
was unbeatable. 

The opening dub lead was won 
in dummy with the ace, and South 
immediately surrendered a dia- 
mond trick. The defense could take 
a dub trick, but South took tbe 
remainder by crossruffing. He 
would have had a harder task if 
North had been declarer for East 
would have had an oppomnrityto 
lead two rounds of trumps. The 
1 1th trick would then have come by 
establishing the fifth heart in the 
North hand. 

Six dubs by East would have 
been interesting. South might well 
underiead his spade ace in tbe hope 
of reaching his partner's band fo a 
heart ruff. This would faiL but 
North would understand the pur- 


pose of the underiead: he would 
grab the first trump lead and play a 
heart to defeat tbe slam. 


NORTH 
4 K 10 9 7 3 
CJ1070-4 

*A4 

EAST(D) 
*82 
A K92 

* K6 

♦ Q8765 


WEST 
♦ — 

V J853 
0 A Q 10 9 3 
+ K J 109 


SOUTH 

* AQJ 654 
C - 

087542 

♦ 3 2 

East and West were vulnerable. 
The bidding: M _. 

East South West North 

1 ♦ 3 ♦ DbL 5 ♦ 

DbL Pass Pass Pass 

West ted tbe chib Jack. 


for participating in the purchase 
charade. 

Larson offers a sharp critique of 
America’s approach to firearms 
regulation. The Bureau of Alcohol, 
Tobacco and Firearms, for exam- 
ple, “is a bastard agency to which 
America had grudgingly assigned 
the well-nigh impossible task of en- 
suring that the companies that 
make and distribute booze, ciga- 
rettes and guns — together the na- 
tion’s most prolific killers — pay 
their taxes and operate within a set 
of rules designed not to prevent the 
killing, but to keep it honest." The 
federal form that gun buyers must 
sign, Larson writes, asks whether 
the buyer has a criminal record or 
history of mental illness; “the law 
asks Lhose people who arguably 
have the greatest motive to lie 
about their backgrounds to step 
forward just this once and come 
dean, even though doing so will 
automatically void the purchase 
they had felt so compelled to 
make.” Larson observes that tbe 
irony “would be comical if not for 
its lethal effect." 

When the story stays focused on 
Nicholas; the book comes alive. 
When Larson goes over the much- 
trod ground or the history of gun 
control and the patchwork of laws 
that do little to protect us from guns 
or crime, however, his work be- 
comes another book about guns. 

There is really only one book 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Cfive Crook, art director of 
German Ole magazine, has just 
finished “ Paper Tigers ” by Nicho- 
las Coleridge. 

This book is just wonderful, a 
great read. There is a sharp insight 
mto tbe roles and philosophy of all 
the major media players in the 
world, from New Yore and Lon- 
don. to tbe Pacific Rhn, India and 
Turkey." 

(John Brunlon. IHT) 



about guns, and myriad authors 
just tackle it over and over again: 
Take Robert Sherrill's acerbic 1973 
classic, “The Saturday Night Spe- 
cial.” It's all there: the absurd laws, 
tbe chilling anecdotes describing 
unnecessary deaths, tbe awful sta- 
tistics and tbe deeper questions 
about whether gun lust is an indeli- 
ble part of tbe American character. 
Yet while Larson earnestly wrings 
his hands, Sherrill takes on guns 
with a vituperative sarcasm that 
makes his book so lively it seems lo 
vibrate in your bands. 

In Sherrill’s book, the best esti- 
mate of annual gun fatalities was 
20,000; by tbe time Larson gets to 
the issue." the number has jumped 
to 30,000. Sherrill's book warned us 
about the proliferation of cheap 
handguns during the 1960s and 


early 1970s. In the intervening 21 
years, technological progress has 
"brought us semiautomatic pistols 
that cost less than a decent televi- 
sion; semiautomatics can fire off 
bullets as quickly as the shooter can 

S iueeze the trigger. The result; 

rime regularly spills well beyond 
its internecine boundaries, and tbe 
United Slates becomes a nation of 
innocent bystanders, writing for 
tbe random bullet that has some- 
one’s name on iL 
The reason anti-gun authors keep 
writing the same book is that we 
haven’t gotten the message and car- 
ried out meaningful reforms in our 
gun laws. If we did, taka led writers 
could move on to other issues. 
That’s one more incen tive to try. 

John Schwartz is on the staff oj 
The Washington Post. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 1994 


< Pa 


HEALTr/ SCIENCE 


sa 


e 

U _ 


The Truth About Beans 


L OS ANGELES — There Is no getting 
around it — beans cause flatulence. The 
degree to which different beans affect 

different people varies, but the truth is f )ean ^ are boiled lor three minutes 

inescapable. And there seems to be little a cook can (effectively wrong the bean and allowing the sug- 
doaboutiL ars to pass through the cefl walls), then allowed to 

“Whether to sbak beans prior to cooking or not 5{and f or ^ hours. That water is poured off and 

is simply a culinary question,” said Gregory Gray. ^ beans ^ covered and soaked for another two 

who has been studying beans foMO years at uie hours. Then they are drained, covered and soaked 

U.S. Department of Agriculture's Western Re- another two hours before being drained and rinsed 

gional Research lab in Albany. California. “It may a R nfl ) ^oe. This method succeeded in ridding the 

shorten the cooking time, but^ other than that, beans of 90 percent of the troublesome sugars, but 

there's no effect [on flatulence]. ... as yon might expect, there was a side effect. 


By Russ Parsons 

Los Angela Times Service 


a pi 
Am.; 
e C ... 

C si *; 

0 in 


pan witlLlhem gladly. “Wien you soak beans in 
cold water, the beans are actually still alive and their 
cell walls are stiD functional” Dr. Gray said. "Those 
walls arc designed to be a very good barrier — to 
take water in. but not to let the seed nutrients out” 
Dr. Gray and his colleagues developed a method 




\ v' 

s;> 1' 




for extracting most of the aipha-galaclosides from 
beans. The beans are boiled for three minutes 






uiu u o uv uivw (uu 

Louis B. Rockland, who has been studying beans ' 
even longer — at Albany and now at his own 
research firm. Food Tech Research in Placentia. 
California, concurs. “There arc lots of old wives’ 
laics [about reducing flatulence] — people use bicar- 
bonate of soda, ginger, sulfur, castor oil . . . But 
there’s no evidence that any of them — including 

soaking — work effectively.” 

The problem with beam is well -documented. At 
its root are two factors. Fust, beans are high in 
fiber, which most Americans do not eat much of 
and which ean cause flatulence. Second, beans 


contain complex sugars called alpha-galactosides. 
The human bodv does not produce enzymes to 


The human body does not produce enzymes to 
digest these sugars. Mainly raffinose and sta- 
chyose, they pass through the stomach undigested 
until they reach the large intestine. There they 
ferment, producing gases — hydrogen, carbon di- 
oxide and — in some people — methane. 

It was thought that soaking beans in cold water 
li-arh^H these su ga rs out of the bean. Throw away 
the water and you throw away the gas — it has a 
simple appeal Unfortunately, it isn't true. These 
sugars are part of whal the bean uses for nourish- 
ment as it grows into a plant, and the bean does not 


as yon might expect, there was a side effect. 

U I used to do this blanch-soak method all the 
time at borne and it works vety nicely,* Dr. Gray 
out “The one thing people who ate dinner with us 
have noted is that you do lose some flavor.” 

What's more — without going into details of 
what they measured and how — suffice it to say 
that even with almost all of the alpha-galactosides 
gone, there wasn't a consistent marked decrease in 
human flatulence. “We reduced the alpha-gal act o- 
sidc content by 90 percent but we haven't done 
anything to dietary fiber,” said Dr. Gray, “and 
dietary fiber produces similar effects.” This casts 
doubt not only on thisparticular presoaking meth- 
od bat also on the effectiveness of enzyme addi- 
tions that supposedly supply the chemicals neces- 
sary to break down the problem sugars. 

fit fact, it seems, the surest cure for flatulence 
ranged by beans is eating more beans. “Apparently, 
if you eat beans regularly, the microflora [which 
ferment the sugars causing gas] adjust somewhat.” 
said Dr. Gray. “If you eat bean-and-cheese bunitos 
every day . . . you probably won't notice it at all- 
in cultures that routinely eat beans, you don't bear a 
lot of complaining about flatulence.” 


iiS 





//,/ 


A Hopeful Result on DDT 


By Jane E. Brody 

New York Times Service 


EW YORK — A new study, the largest of its 
kind to date, has found no evidence that 
breast cancer is caused by pesticide residues 
that accumula te in body faL The new find- 
ing, published in The Journal of the National Cancer 
■■ institute, comes amid a debate about the possible role of 
>L environmental contaminants in causing breast cancer. 


than average blood levels of DDE, a breakdown prod- 
uct of the long-banned pesticide DDT. The new study, 
directed by Dr. Nancy Krieger of the Kaiser Founda- 
tion Research Institute in Oakland, California, found 
no mean increase in DDE levels in those who devel- 
oped breast cancer, and did not find evidence of a link 
between the level of PCBs in blood and a woman's 
chances of developing breast cancer. 


A recent report from the New York Slate Health 
Department found that women who had lived on Long 
Island near chemical plants were more likely to develop 
breast cancer after menopause. 


The Kaiser study was based on a gi 
women examined in the mid- to late- 1 
followed for more than two decades. 


up of 57,000 
60s and then 


The new finding contradicts the results of a smaller 
study published in the same journal last year. The 
earlier study showed a link between a woman's risk of 
developing breast cancer and the presence of higher 


For the analysis, 150 women who later developed 
breast cancer were matched with a comparable group 
of healthy women — whiles, blacks and Asians — to 
serve as controls. When known risk factors for breast 
cancer were taken into account, the researchers report- 
ed, no clear relationship was found between the 
amount of pesticide contamination and breast cancer 
rates. 


ADWRTISEMENT 


ADVERTISEMENT 


AN APPEAL TO EUROPEAN OPINION 


NOT TO BE DELUDED BY PREJUDICE 


AND MISINFORMATION AGAINST TURKEY 


We, the undersigned Non-Governmental Agencies, wish to record our anger at the constant misrepresentation of events in Turkey’s 
south eastern provinces and at calls to suspend it from the Council of Europe. 

For ten years. Turkey s democratically elected government has been fighting one of the most vicious terrorist organizations anywhere on 
the globe, the PKK. Most of the victims of the PKK have been Turkish citizens of Kurdish origin: civilians including old people, women, 
children, and even infants. 

The PKK’s international activities, from drug smuggling to extortion and murder, have caused it to be banned in Germany and kept 
under constant police surveillance in France and elsewhere in Europe. 

Yet the PKK has forged close links with some sections of public opinion which accept it and its fellow travellers as the representatives 
of Turkey's citizens of Kurdish origin. This is despite the fact that there are over 150 Deputies of Kurdish origin in the Turkish Grand 
National Assembly, including government ministers. 

Needless to say they are against the PKKj its goals, its claims, and above all its methods. So are the millions of people they represent. 

It is an outrage to suggest as some people in Europe now do, that these freely elected representatives of the people do not count while a 
handful of the PKK’s allies do. Just as no Department of France can be extricated from the rest of the country, it is quite wrong to describe 
one pan of Turkey as the “Kurdish provinces”, as if they do not belong to the country as a whole. 

Do the people who do these things consciously realise the profound moral irresponsibility of what they are doing and the bloodshed to 
which they may contribute? 

The PKK's sympathizers ignore the fact that the PKK uses the gun to try and shut down all other political parties and that it attempts to 
ban the sale of all newspapers except its own. 

There are occasions in all countries -when members of the legislature face legal proceedings. A small group of Turkish Parliamentarians is 
currently in this situation. The charges involved are grave in every case and are quite distinct from legitimate political activity. They include 
direct operational contact with the PKK leadership, sheltering fugitive terrorists, and praising bomb attacks and murders. Parliament, not 
the Government, took the decision to allow legal proceedings to go ahead in a free vote. 

No moderate person supports the Khmer Rouge or tbe Shining Path. The PKK is no different - except for those people whose only 
knowledge of Turkey is derived from their prejudices against it. 


Tbe signatories of tbe Appeal are: Centre d’Etudes et de Recbercbes sur les Droits Humains / University d' Ankara, Foreign Policy Institute of 
Turkey, Turkisb Democracy Foundation, Center for Turkish Studies / Essen / Bonn / Bruxelles. Business Club / Pays-Bas. Netherlands Turkish Fed. for 
Sports and Culture, Assembly of Turkisb American Associations. Turkisb-A merican Cultural Society, Federation of Turkisb-American .Associations, 
Anatolian Club, Southern Neu • England TACA. ITU Alumni Association, Conseil de Coordination des Ass. Turques tie Munster, Union tics .Ass. Turques 
des Parents d'Eteves/Munster-Deltmold (17 Ass.), Deutscb-Turkische Geselscbaft E V. Munster Von ip] 6. Council of Turks in Holland. Dutcb-Turkish 
Academicians Association, Conseil de Coordination Tttrc du Rbeiitland-Pfalz et du Saarland (49 Ass.). „4ss: Culturelle Turque Koculcpc/Copenbague. 
Ass. Turque/Isboj, Ass. Turque des TravaiUeurs Immigrts Turcs/Slagelse. Ass. CultureOe Turque/Abboj. Ass. Culturelle Tttrque-lslam/Kogc. Ass. des 
Immignis musulmans/Esbjerg, Union Famtliale des Ecotes Turques /Copenbague, Ass. Culturelle islamiqtie Turque de Marignane. Ass. d'Entraide el 
de Solidarity des TravaiUeurs Turcs de Marseille/Grenoble. Ass. d'Entraide des Turcs de Perpignan, Ass. Turque - Islam de Bordeaux et ses Environs, 
Ass. Culturelle et de Solidarity Turque d'Aveyron , Ass Culturelle et d'Entraide aux Communautts Turques de Narbonne/Bursur-Aube/BeUegarde . Ass. 
Solidarity des Turcs/Brive/Terrasson. Amicale des Turcs de Digne. Ass. Culturelle Turque de Mazamet, Ass. tl'Alde Pour la Culture Turque ct Islam de 
La Grande-Combe, Fed de Solidarity des Ass. Turques en Suisse (23 Ass.), Ass. dAmitie Franco-Turque de Culor. .Ass. Amicale des Turcs/Romans. Ass. 
des Parents d'Eltves Turcs/Romans, Ass. d'Entraide des TravaiUeurs Turcs/ Pont-de-Cberuy, Ass. ties TravaiUeurs Turcs/Vienne/CIcrmont-Ferrand/ 
Oyonnax, Ass. Culturelle Turque/Mdcon, Ass. de Solidarity des Parents d’El&ves Turcs/Annecy. Anatolia/Lvon. Ass. Culturelle Turque de 
Lyon/ViOeurbanne, Ass. Amicale des Turcs/Lyon, Club Turco-AUemand/Francfort. Union des Arcbitcctes et Ingenieurs Turcs/Francfort. Conseil de 
Coordination de Hessen/Frarufort, Conseil des Homines d Affaires Turcs/Francfort, Conseil des Entrepreneurs Turcs/Francfort, Union Liberate Turco- 
AUemande/Francfort, Conseil des Ass. Turques de la Bavi&re du Sud. Conseds de coordination et Ass. des Hnmmes d' Affaires runs de Basse Saxognc et 
de Bremen, Union des Ass. Turques/Bremen. Communautt Turque de Hanovre et environs. Fid. AQemande des Ass. du Patronat Turco-Aflemand, 
Union des Entrepreneurs Turcs de Rbin-Westpbalie du Nord. Conseils de Coordination des Ass. Turqucs/Cologne, Brancbe des Socio-Dvmocrales et des 
Femmes turcs de Cologne. Ass. Turco-.Mlemande de Cologne. Ass Cidtureile et dAmiitt de Mevhma/Argenteuil, Folklore Anadolu/Giens. Ass. Culturelle 
ct Sportive Tur ques/Pa ris. Ass. Culturelle Turque-Islam/Pontoise . Ass. des Etudiants lures de France. Ass. culturelle Turque-lslam/Vendome, Turkisch- 
Deutscben Kultur und Wirtscbaftsurdeningsverbands fur Mltteldeutscbland, Conseil de Coordination des Ass. Tnrques/Dusseldorf. Assemble de 
- Coordination des Ass. Turques/Krcfeld, Ass. des Enseignants/Dulsbourg. Turkiscbes Gemeinde Zu Berlin, Turkiscbe-Islamlscbe Union Fur Kulturelle 
Und Soziale Zusdmmenarbeit In Osterreicb, Ass. Belgique-Turquie/Bruxetles, European Research Office on Turkey. Central Asia And 
Caucasia/Brussels, Koordinierungsrat der Turkiscben Vereine in Wurtemberg. Deutscb-Turkiscb Gesellscbaft EVyStuttgart , Union Turkiscber 
Akademiker EV./Stuttgart, Botkyrha Turkisb Cultural Association, Turkisb Parents Association and its Women's Branch in Gothenburg. Rinkcby 
Turkisb Cultural Association, Tensta Turkish Cultural Association. Fitya, Fleminsberg. Tensta. Haninge and Goteborg Turkish Islamic Cultural 
Associations. Ass. des TravaiUeurs contemporains turcs/Kiel, Union des Parents dClCves/Klel. Ass. ties lelegraflstes turcs/ Hamburg. Conseil de 
Coordination/Baden (70 Ass.), Ass. des Academiciens turcs/Heidelberg, Ass. d'amitie Turco-AOematide/ Karlsruhe. Ass. Turco-AUemande/Kiel (fj Ass.), 
Conseil de Coordination des Ass. Turques/Hamburg et Schleswig-Holstein, Ass. des Hommes d’Affaires Turques/Hamburg. Centre Culture! et de 
Jeu nesse/Lubeck, Ass. des Professions Independantes Turques/Hamburg. Fid. des Ass. Sncio-Demncrates/Hamburg, Ass. CultureUes des Femmes 
Turques/Hamburg. Asa dAmiti6 des Femmes Turques Scblesu Hg-Holstei. n. Union des Parents Tuns/Hamburg, Ass des TravaiUeurs Turcs/Kiel et ses 
emirons. Union des Parents d'Eteves/WUbelmsburg, Union des Families Turques/Hamburg, Communaute turque/Hamburg, Tiad Verein Turkiscben 
Unternebmer und Akademiker E.V. in Nord Bayern. Tian-Turkiscber Inguniere, Arcbilekten und Natur Wissencbaftler Verein £ V Erlangen, 
Koordinlemgsrat Der Turken Nord Bayern EV, Verein Turkiscber Arbeitnebner in Scfotveinfurt und Umgebung £ V., Turkiscber KullurVerein £ V, 
Furcbeim, Turkiscber Kulturverein £ V. Furtb. Diyanet Turkiscb-Islamisber Kulturverein £ V. Numberg, Turkiscfjer Familienrercin in Numberg und 
umgebung £ V, Turkiscber Kultur und Sportiierem Neumark IJ). OPF. EV.. Turkiscber Wohltaetlgkettsverein Anbenger Von Ataturk EV. Furtb. 
Turkiscber Gemeinscbaft “ Turkocagi " EV. in Numberg. Turkiscber Kultur Verein Erlangen £ V., Inter-A cadem ie/Cologne. 


How Spiders Build 
A Better Insect Trap 


— insects. And because these signals are the cues insects 

By Natalie Angier use to forage for food, the creatures are not likely to 

New York Tima Service ' evolve a means of detecting and avoiding the trickster 

— webs without simultaneously jeopardizing their skill 

FW HAVEN Connecticut — The room for finding a meaL 

batons warmly and widely, lighted high In an outpouring ^reports pul togeito over the 
miKrtieari hv eladdenins bulbs that recapilu- last several months, Dr. Craig offers evidence for a 


e'&'yn 


beckons warmly and widely, lighted high 

_ Stettebriiance^spectral range of the 
sun. But as you step into tins parlor of a laboratory 
just try not to jump, or at the very least stiffen. 

In every corner, under every surface, dangling into 
one’s hair, brushing against one's shoulder, are 
dainty, lacy, spi ralin g, glittering spider webs. And 

ending each of these webs is a Targe, undainty, big- 


__jal range of the genuine spider revolution at an unknown point in the 
tis parlor of a laboratory past, resulting from minor modifications in the silk 
le very least stiffen. proteins of which webs are built 

surface, dangling into She focuses on the subtle details of the webs, trying 
one's shoulder, are large, to understand how the visual and mechanical proper- 
tering spider webs. And ties of the silks that make up the webs may have 
is alarge, un dainty, big- changed over evolutionary time and contributed to the 


beltied? generously appendaged spider. extraordinary success and explosive diversification of 

There are dozens and dozens of spiders, some of orb-weaving spid«5. , 

them j’cDow, some biownish-black. some pale cara- nBmotaalardiaira^i»^tostrenphel» 
md. And all of than are weirdly frozen in place tHaty and versatility of web silks and allowed the 


because — what do you know! — ^ — 
spiders really are more scared of 
humans than most humans are of JJj. 

“A spider's first impulse when rirph as a / 
something larger comes along is to * VUJJ 1X0 a 
stop moving and hope it goes urMnnn fit 
away," said Dr. Catherine L. Craig, * y G d r Uf J U 
an evolutionary ecologist at Yale f n Jtjrp nn 
University, who is studying theevo- LtJ ^ i 

lution of spider webs. She taps on a 

web to prod the little architect from 

its stupor. It skitters briefly and freezes again. 

“There are cultural biases against spiders,” Dr. 
Craig said, with some understatement. 

“Most people look at my roomful of hanging spi- 
ders and it's a nightmare for them. I had one student 


Dr. Craig views the 
web as a cunning 
weapon designed 
to lure prey. 


ancestral orb- weaving arachnids to 
emerge from their obscurity in tbe 
• ,r dim forest undersuxy and begin 

'lews me laying traps in the open sun and 

• other theretofore forbidden habitats. 

innin g where whole new classes of prey be* 

^ J came available for their dining 

llgnea pleasure. 

v As a result of the evolution of a 

V‘ refined type of silk, she argues, the 

number of orb-weaving species in- 
creased by a stupendous 37-fold 
over the more primitive orb spinners that predated 
them. They have branched off into at least 10,000 
different species, which means they represent almost a 
thir d of all spiders described to date. 

The latest results will be presented in three papers to 


. . ^ . , _ . , . f j # t,_ IUG MU.W IKOUIW mu uvuiwvuMV u* wiw n* 

who came lo my lab and volunteered to feed the ^ qv^ the next several weeks in the jour- 

spiders, but wb® she saw the spider room, her face ^ Ani - ma | Behaviour; Evolution, and Behavioral 
contorted Uke this — Dr. Cnng gives her freckled ^ SodobioJogy. In tbe studies. Dr. Craig 

face a Munchian twist — and she said, allude 


contorted Uke this” — Dr. Craig gives her freckled 
face a Munchian twist — “and she said. 
‘EEEUUUWWP ” 

No such squeamishiiess for Dr. Craig. “1 can't think 
of any place I'd rather be,” she said, “man sweating in 
the sun in Panama playing with spiders.” 

Dr. Craig divides her time between field studies at 


sne saiu, ^ ^ ^leagues combine detailed spectral analysis 

. .. . . of spider silk with field studies of how stingless bees— 
can t think „ JT- r_, 


*«uMtinoin a major source of prey for orb weavers — perceive and 
in sweating m rcspon( | to variations in spider web design. 


The results have far-reaching implications for un- 


the S mithsonian Tropical Research Institute on Barro demanding essential questions of ecology and evolu- 
Colorado Island in Panama and laboratory work at lion, among them the nuances of predator-prey inter- 
Yale with ber in-house coBection of tropical species of actions, and tbe mechanis m through which new 


spiders that weave orb webs, including Argiope argen- species arise. Dr. Craig secs the spider web as a 
iota — a relative of tbe common garden spider found beautiful means for weaving a molecular approach to 
in the Eastern United States — and Nephila davipes. biology with a more holistic view of animal behavior. 


in the Eastern United States — and Nephila davipes. 

These are the spiders that generate the cobwebs of 
Halloween fame, as well as the less-familiar ladder 


“It's a way to tie together evolutionary studies of 


nauowjen iw « weu as uk less-ianuum macroprocess like foraging behavior with consider- 

webs, funnel w£s, hating web f, ations at the level of th?geSes.” Dr. Craig said, in this 

plain or fancy. Thor weteare called orbs m the old- ^ the genes that direct the spiders iSj-importont 


fashioned sense of the word, meaning circular. ^n. 

To Dr. Craig, a spider web is not a passive structure prouu 


or a simple sieve that eatrim* insects that blindly fly Dr. Craig also believes that by understanding the 


into it, as had long been believed. Instead, she views complex spectral features of a spider web, scientists 
the web as among the spider’s most dynamic and can get a handle on how insects see their world. 


Midod Rodnnm/Tbc Nc» Ynit Tme> 


responsive traits, a cunning weapon designed to lure 
prey by exploiting an insect’s fundamental need for 
food, flowers and open spaces. 


“Her work has been very interesting for a lot of us,” 


said Dr. 


By shifting patterns of struts in their webs, spiders seem 
to interfere with the bees* ability to learn front mistakes. 


George W. 
itYofCincir 


Uetz, a professor of biology at the 


She proposes that spiders incorporate into their University of Cincinnati who has studied spider forag- 
webs visual si gnals tike attractive zigzag designs and mg behavior. “It’s made ns look at insect-spiderweb 

e n a i >« . • .*ti « J. tnfMMr'tiniic rfiffMMitlu " 


faux floral colors that are irresistible lo a wide range of interactions differently.' 


Making a Final Diagnosis 
On Mental-Disorders List „ 


IRMA’ 


By Daniel Goleman 


New York Times Service 


EW YORK — Perhaps 
tbe most powerful psy- 
chiatrist in the United 
States at the moment is 
Dr. AQen J. Frances, tbe man who 
has been directing the fourth major 
revision of his profession’s diag- 
nostic bible, the Diagnostic and 
Statistical Manual of Mental Dis- 
orders, to be published next month. 

The decisions made under his 
direction will dictate for (he next 
decade or so the alignment of that 
thin membrane separating diagnos- 
able psychiatric disorder from tbe 
ordinary travails of life. One practi- 
cal implication of the positioning 
of this line is financial: Whether or 
not patients' problems can be 
named — riven a diagnosis from 
the manual — is crucial in deter- 
mining whether their psychiatric 
care will be |jaid for by insurers. 

That practice may soon become 
official federal policy: in the pro- 
posed Gin ton health plan, a prereq- 
uisite for reimbursement for a men- 
tal impairment is that it be linked 
with a diagnosable mental illness. 

“D.S.mT-IV,” as the fourth edi- 
tion is called, is distinct from its 
predecessor, D.S.M.-III-R (the 


ends each month in a small office at 
the Columbia University medical 
school in New York with his closest 
collaborator on the project. Dr. Mi- 
chad & Fust, a psychiatrist there 
who is editor of the new manual, 
under Dr. Frances's direction. 

Dr. Frances said the American 
Psychiatric Association had chosen 
him as head of its (ask force on the 
revision because they “needed 
someone Uke me who had dabbled 
in many Adds.” 

At Cornell University Medical 
College and afterward be trained as 


ent reviews of scientific findings on 
different questions that arose. 

The validity of 12 new or refor- 
mulated diagnoses was tested in 
field trials with more than 7,000 
patients. Different psychiatrists 
would examine the same patient 
the see whether they came up with 
the same diagnosis. A grant from 
the MacArthur Foundation under- 
wrote the costs of tbe research. 








While Dr. Frances and others in- 
volved in producing the new diag- 
nostic hail it as a mark of 

psydnatiy’s coming of scientific age. 
controversy clings to the new vol- 
ume. Some object to the fact that 
most previous diagnoses were in- 
cluded without question. 

“DKM.-TV is just more of the 
same, resulting as much from polit- 
ical compromise and psychiatric 
tradition as from science,” said Dr. 
Stuart Kirk, a professor at the Co- 
lumbia University School of Social 
Work and co-author of “The Sefl- 
ingof D.SJVL” (A! dine de Grnyter, 
1992), a book critical of earlier edi- 
tions of the manual 


third edition, revised), in the great- 
er degree of scientific evidence re- 


er degree of scientific evidence re- 
quired for proposed new diagnoses. 

It is different, too, in being more 
user-friendly, with diagnoses 
streamlined so that even a harried 
psychiatrist in an emergency room 
can remember the major factors. 
And the makers of Ibis fourth edi- 
tion have tried to free it of psychi- 
atric ideologies, turning to the ob- 
jective eye of science as arbiter of 
debates over its contents. 

“Even a passionately argued view 
can evaporate in the face of data,” 
said Dr. Frances. “There’s been a 
stronger em phasis on research data 
than with previous revisions. That 
has made people less contentious." 

Dr. Frances, chairman of the psy- 
chiatry department at the Duke 
University School of Medicine since 
1991, has spent two or three week- 


Dtcme HiD lot Tbr Nc« Yni Tina 


Dr. Allen J. Frances 


a psychoanalyst, but be has also 
done research on other therapy ap- 
proaches, including studies of med- 
ications for depression and anxiety. 

He appointed the heads of each 
of the dozens of committees that 
considered each of the diagnoses 
included in the revision and, with 
the chairman of each, picked the 
committee members. He also sat in 
on the main meetings. 

Whenever a proposed change 
was in dispute, Dr. Frauds insisted 
that any available data be reana- 
lyzed before a decision was made. 
He also commissioned 150 differ* 


A century or so ago, psychiatric 
diagnoses were based not so much 
on scientific studies as on psychiat- 
ric bore and theoretical arguments. 
In 1917, the American Psychiatric 
Association developed a diagnostic 
system that haled 59 disorders. 

By 1952, when the first diagnos- 
tic manual was issued, there were 
106. The second manual, in 1968, 
listed 182; by 1975. when the third 
was issued, the number had mush- 
roomed to 265. And by 1987 the 
revised manual enumerated 292 
psychiatric disorders. 


“We didn't want to disrupt clini- 
cal practice” by elimina ting diag- 
noses already in wide use, Dr. 
Frances said, although a dozen 
were dropped or combined with 
others in the new manna! 

Much higher standards were ap- 
plied when it came to adding new 
diagnoses. Eight were added, out of 
more than 100 that were proposed, 
and four others were reformulated. 
An additional 30 were included in 
an appendix for further study. 


Star Performance by Telescope 


By Kathy Sawyer 

Washington Post Service 


W ASHINGTON — 
The giant new Keck 
Telescope, perched 
a top an extinct volca- 
no in Hawaii, has astronomers 
“dancing in tbe dark” over one of 
its first observations. 


A team led by Antoinette Son- 
g apa and her husband, Lennox 
Cowie, of the University of Hawaii 


used the 33-fooi-diameter (10-me- 
ter) telescope to take unprecedent- 
ed measurements of a rare, heavy 
form of hydrogen —called deuteri- 
um — in the distant universe. The 
isotope could oily have been creat-' 
edinthe dense hot soup that exist- 
ed about 100 seconds after the Big 
Bang explosion that, in leading th£ 
ory, created the cosmos. 

If the team’s findings hold up, 
they imply that the primoidia] soup • 
was kss dense with neutrons and 
protons (the components of ordi- 


naiy matter) than expected, and 
therefore there is less ordinary mai- 
ler in existence than previously bad 
been thought. Specifically, the as- 
tronomers' report in Nature maga- 
zine suggests that at least 99 perceni 
of the mass in the universe is com- 
posed of exotic, invisible and so far 
indescribable stuff. 


The team used Keck’s high-reso- 
lution spectrograph to measure deu- 
terium beyond the Mflky Way. 
audymg a gas cloud backlighted by 
a Wight though more distant quasar.- 







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International Herald Tribune, Thursday, April 2 J. 1994 


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Page 9 


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the architects of ti 


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bVBIaomberg C0m ‘’" 6d 



1001 


World Index 

4/2 C/9 4 Close: 109.54 
Previous: 11C.24 


9 Q -i. » i T ■ 1 ■ i f _! .. T t M 'i . t:-r i i \'l *V. .^V 

N 0 J F 


1903 


M 


A 

1994 



130 


110 


90 


5^: 


V- 


"V* 


. !' 



NDJFMA ndjfma 

1993 1994 1993 ISM 


North America- * Lntin Arriorica 


150 


AupiOK weighting: 2fi% 
Close 91.39 Prev.:90iiQ 


Aopnw. weighting: 5% 
CJosk 97.47 Pibv: 


130 


no 




■ IT*- VV. v !!> •' ■;■■■■ ■'! .•* 

N D J F M A 
1993 1994 


The index tracks U.S. dollar values of stocks in: Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brad, Canada. CWle, Denmark, Hntand, 
France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico. Nothoriamta, New Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Sw i tzer lan d and Venezuela. For Tokyo. New York end 
London, the index is composed of the 20 top issues in terms of market caprtattzation, 
otherwise the ten top Slocks are tracked 


1 Industrial Sectors . 


Wat Pm. % 

dost dose dung* 


Wat 

dm 

Pm. 

dm 

t 

change 

Energy 

109.19 110.06 -0.79 

Capital Goods 

109.15 

110.07 

-0.64 

UtfiWes 

116.76 117.75 -0.84 

Row Materials 

12032 

120.99 

-0.56 

Finance 

114.75 116-34 -1.37 

Consumer Goods 

95.61 

95.72 

-0.11 

Services 

11429 114.19 +0.09 

ttsceflaneous 

123-29 

12239 

+0.74 

Fur more information about the Index, a booklet is avaBaoie tree of charge. 

Write to Tnb Index, 181 Avenue Charles do GauBe. 92521 Neufty Cedex. France. 


Hong Kong Boom on the Brink 

Thin Line Divides Cooling and Chilling Real Estate 


By Kevin Murphy 

fiuemanonol Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — The car owner wbn 
recently spent 4 million Hong Kong dollars 
($518,000) Tor a single parking space will not 
be pleased: This city's high-flying real estate 
market appears to have crested. 

Many investors /ear (hat prices, rather than 
level out for a while, could fall as quickly as 
they have risen in the latest, crazy stages of a 
10-year bull market that has brought prices 
here within striking distance of the world's 
most expensive real estate, that of Tokyo. 

Tough talk from an otherwise laissez-faire 
Hong Kong government, rising interest rates 
and a sense among speculators and home- 
owners alike that even the world's fastest- 
rising major property market cannot ignore 
gravity forever have irombined to cool a red- 
hot market. 

Governor Chris Patten's recent pledge to 
acL decisively on real estate prices has trig- 
gered a drop or 10 percent to 15 percent in 
rents. Tails of 5 percent in prices and a 60 
percent decline in recorded transactions in 
the past two weeks, according to local news- 
paper reports. 

“The basics underpinning this market are 
largely intact, but there has undoubtedly 
been a sudden change in psychology," Peter 
Cfaurchouse, a managing dinxtor at Morgan 
Stanley & Co. in Hong Kong, said of the 
British’ colony's twilchy residential market. 

“The question is whether we have a short 
sharp ICko-20 percent correction over the 
□ext six to 12 months or a shaip sustained 
change, where prices fall from 35 to 60 per- 
cent," said Mr. Churchouse, who along with 
most property analysts has predicted the for- 
mer scenario. 

Apartment dwellers whose rents are set to 
more than double and middle-class families 


squeezed out or home-ownership by dizzying 
prices and restricted bank lending will rejoice 
if indicators of falling prices hold true. 

That celebration would spread to Hong 
Kong’s nonproperty businesses if failing 
prices spread to the commercial market, 
where some office rents now eclipse Tokyo, 
the world's most expensive major business 
city, and sale prices have rocketed as much as 
40 percent in the past three months. 

Hong Kong residential values in Novem- 
ber were the second-highest in Asia and were 


'People outside of Hong 
Kong cannot understand 
how such high levels of 
household income go 
toward housing. 9 

Qive Weedon, research director 
of Asia Equities. 


poised to surpass Tokyo, according to Brooke 
HiUier Parker, a property surveying and con- 
sulting company. 

But slock market investors are worried 
about the potential for real estate market 
slide because roughly half the Hang Seng 
index consists of property companies whose 
health is of vital importance to the banking 
sector. 

On Wednesday, several Hong Kong devel- 
opers' share prices were wobbly, contributing 
to much of the downturn in a day when the 
Hang Seng finished down 8190’ points, at 
9.221.01. 

For three at the biggest developers in Hong 


Kong — Henderson Land Development Co.. 
Cheung Kong ( Holdings ) Ltd. and Sun Hung 
Kai Properties Ltd. — all with little debt and 
strong profit growth last year, it was their 
sixth straight day of declines. 

“People outside of Hong Kong cannot un- 
derstand how such high lev els of household 
income go toward housing, " said Clive Wee- 
don. research director or Asia Equities. “But I 
believe income levels are vastly understated 
here. The bubble will deflate, but it is not a 
collapse.” 

With two notable interludes, after the con- 
fidence-shaking Tiananmen Square violence 
in June 1989 and when local banks intro- 
duced mortgage-lending caps in December 
1992, Hong Kong’s real estate market has 
been powering ahead since the early 1980s. 

ft has quickly gathered pace in tbe past 
three years, fueled by negative inflation-ad- 
justed interest rates for local depositors and 
massive flows of often shadowy investment 
from China seeking a haven from rasing 
inflation, new taxes and currency devalua- 
tion. 

Increasing personal wealth among Hong 
Kong's middle class, restricted land supplies 
and an influx of deep-pocketed international 
businesses targeting tbe booming Chinese 
economy have combined to push residential 
and office properties to stratospheric prices. 

“This market is like a rubber band; right 
now it is really stretched,” said Paul Schulte; 
a strategist with CS First Boston in Hong 
Kong. “We were predicting a 15 percent 
appreciation in rents and 10 percent rise for 
capital values in 1994. Well, the market has 
already passed those targets. Something has 
to give." 

In June last year, the local developer Swire 

See LAND, Page 10 


Volvo to Exit 
All Businesses 
Except Vehicles 


Bundesbank Acts, Fed Stays in Spotlight 


efenemntiarulHarakrrribvw 


Compiled hv Our Staff Frm Dispatches 
FRANKFURT — The Bundes- 
bank on Wednesday announced a 
sharper-than-expecied drop in a 
key interest rate, but bond-market 
traders appeared more concerned 
about rising in U.S. rates. 

The central bank said its securi- 
ties repurchase rate, which serves 
as a guideline for German money- 
market interest rates, had fallen to 
5.58 percent this week from 5.70 a 
week ago. The drop was larger than 
market forecasts, which envisioned 


a faO of one-tenth of a percentage 
point at most. 

But economists said the German 
bond market, where prices Tell, ap- 
peared fixated on developments in 
the United States, where die Feder- 
al Reserve Board has raised interest 
rates three times this year to tiy to 
combat inflation before it starts to 
rise. 

One German economist said, 
“When it conies down to it, the 
most important central bank for 
the German bond market is not the 


Bundesbank but the U.S. Federal 
Reserve.” 

Bond traders were also apparent- 
ly worried that signs of recovery in 
the German economy could signal 
an end to the German trend toward 
lower rates. 

But some economists said these 
fears were unjustified, especially in 
light of optimistic inflation fore- 
casts from the German central 
bank. 

The Bundesbank last week cut its 
discount and Lombard rates by a 


quarter-point last week io 5.00 and 
6.50 percent, respectively. The two 
rates serve as a floor and ceiling on 
short-term interest rates in Germa- 
ny, with the repo rale used by the 
Bundesbank to guide the market 
between the two. 

The German central bank's 
moves have intensified speculation 
that the Bank of France, whose 
monetary policy council meets 
Thursday, might cut its interven- 

See MARK, Page 10 


Bloomberg Business ffetvs 

GOTHENBURG, Sweden — 
Volvo AB said Wednesday it would 
devote all its efforts and financial 
resources on its core vehicle opera- 
tions and divest other operations. 

Soren Gyll, the president and 
chief executive of the company, 
said the restructuring would be 
completed during 1996. 

“Volvo is to be developed into a 
streamlined automotive company," 
Mr. Gyll said “Its operations trill 
be concentrated on passenger cars 
and trucks and buses, supplement- 
ed by marine and industrial en- 
gines. aircraft engines and a major 
stake in construction equipment.” 

He said Volvo would retain 100 
percent ownership at its vehicle op- 
erations but he did not exclude co- 
operation in various forms with 
other manufacturers. 

"We know that effective cooper- 
ation with other manufacturers is 
viable and we will intensify efforts 
to find partners in various areas,” 
he said. 

Volvo shareholders in December 
criticized the plans of the compa- 
ny's former chairman. Pehr Gyllen- 
hamm ar, to mage Volvo's vehicle 
operations with Renault, the 
French car company. 

Since then, Volvo and Renault 
have dropped the plan, and Volvo 
has swapped back Renault's 25 
percent stake in Volvo Car Corp. 
lor its 45 percent stake In Renault 
Vehicules Industries. Volvo also 
can buy back Renault's 45 percent 
stake in VolvoTruck Corp. by Nov. 
30 for 4.5 billion French francs 
($78 million) 

“The costs of dissolving the 
cross-ownership between Volvo 
and Renault were high during 
1993." Mr. Gyll said. "The move 
was, however, a logical conse- 
quence of the aborted merger plans 
and a necessity so that each party 
could independently decide its own 
future." 

Volvo still owns a 20 percent 
interest in Renault SA, and Mr. 
Gyll did not comment on the com- 
pany’s plans for that stake. 

Mr. Gyll said divestiture of its 
noncore holdings would be 


achieved in various ways, depend- 
ing on what are considered to be 
the best interests of Volvo as whole 
and the units affected. 

tn 1993, 446 million kronor ($56 
miliioD) of Volvo’s 1.5 billion kro- 
nor operating profit came from 
Branded Consumer Products, 
which is 73.6 percent owned by 
Volvo. Mr. GyU said the best way 
to prepare that division for sale 
would be Tor Volvo to first buy the 
part of the company it does not 
now own. Branded Consumer 
Products comprises the former 
food operations of Procordia AB. 

"One hundred percent control of 
the BCP Group will facilitate a 
well-planned and professional di- 
vestment, and thereby ensure that 
Volvo will realize the best possible 
return from the transaction," Mr. 
GyU said. 


Peugeot Has Loss 
In 1993 Despite 
A Better 2d Half 

Agence France- Presse 

PARIS — PSA Peugeot Citroen 
SA said Wednesday that it posted a 
loss of 1.413 billion francs ($242 
million) in 1 993 in spite of a signifi- 
cant recovery in its financial situa- 
tion in the second half. In 1992, the 
company had reported a net profit 
of 337 billion francs. 

Jacques Calvet, president of the 
company, said that it would recom- 
mend to shareholders at the annual 
meeting on June 22 that die divi- 
dend be waived for the first time 
since 1986. 

The company said it posted a net 
loss of 292 million francs in the 
second half- of the year while re- 
cording an operating profit of 952 
million francs. 

The company had finished the 
first half of the year with a net loss 
of 1.12 billion francs and an oper- 
ating loss of 1-25 billion francs. 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 

Berlin Firm Scents Success 


By Ann Broeklehurst 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

BERLIN — The rail of communism left Berlin 
Kosmeiic in drastic need of a corporate makeover. 
Although the company Had been known in much 
of the former East bloc for its brand name lip- 
sticks. shampoos and other makeup products, its 
sales plunged from the equivalent or 100 million 
Deutsche marks ($59 million) before 1990 io 6 
million DM in 1992. 

The loss of market was due not only to Eastern 
women looking for a new Western look, it was also 
unused bv the sudden breakdown of traditional 
trading and purchasing structures m the countries of 
Eastern Europe and the former Sonet Union. Ewn 
consumers who still wanted to use Berlin Kosmetik 
products unlikely io be able to find them. 

Raymond Learsy, the American business execu- 
tive who hough i Berlin Kosmeiic from the Treu- 
hand privatization agency for 39 million DM in 

1993 has made it a top priority to try and rebuild 
those old trade avenues and cater to ihe demand 
that he believes still exists in old markets. He is 
also trying to find new markets as far east as China 

and closer to home, in Western Germany. 

“The products are very well known in Russia 
and hieJib regarded, and now it's a matter of 
getting them back on shelves as we ^ doing, be 
said. Sties rose to nearly 12 million DM jn 1993 
and Mr. Learsy expects them to reach 30 million in 

1994 He also hopes ihai the company will break 
into ihe black by the end of this year. 

Berlin Kosmetik GmbH, as 
of the pieces of what was formerly a giant state 
oongloroerate with S.500 employees. As a showcase 
manufacturer in the German Democratic Repub- 
Eftad had some of the country s most up-to- 
dateequipmem and that has now been mmdtoa 
SgfenSr faclor >- in ^ eastern Berlin suburb of 

Marzahn. 


“Part of my discussion with theTreuhand was to 
organize this factory on a footing that was was 
competitive,” Mr. Learsy said. In exchange for 
extensive investments by the Treuhand, he agreed 
to guarantee 110 jobs. He notes that staff has 
increased by 35 percent since he took over a year 
ago and that there is plenty of unused capacity and 
room for it to expand further if sales increase. 

Mr. Learsy. who paid for his purchase with 
private funds, previously ran a family trading 
company based io New York and had no experi- 
ence in the cosmetics business. He bought the 
company because he wanted to gel into tbe con- 
sumer-goods business in Eastern Europe. 

He bas used outside consultants and hired two 
American employees as well as a West German 
marketing manager with a cosmetics background. 
But apart from that, the management team re- 
mains as it was and Mr. Learsy considers the 
employees' knowledge of Eastern markets as one 
Ins company's greatest assets. 

In addition to its Indra makeup and Koivo hair- 
and body-care products, Berlin Kosmetik has also 
introduced a new Rainbow line tbaL includes bub- 
ble baths, bath and shower gels, deodorants and 
body lotions. Packaging and labeling have been 
redesigned, color ranges have been expanded and 
new skin care creams have also been added to the 
Indra line. 

The company's flagship store, in a prime loca- 
tion in Fas t Berlin, is currently promoting the new 
Unterden Linden perfume, named after the city's 
grandest boulevard. 

Prices for the shampoos, about 2.50 DM, are in 
line with the lower-priced products of competitors, 
while lipsticks and nail polish sell for 7.95 DM, not 
the lowest prices available but still a fraction of the 
cost of luxury cosmetics. 

In order to recapture its lost East German and 

See COSMETICS, Page 11 


Compaq Net 
Doubled in 
First Period 

Bloomberg Business Nuns 

HOUSTON — Compaq Com- 
puter Corp. said Wednesday that 
first-quarter earnings more than 
doubled on increased sales of its 
more profitable products, but it 
warned the trend might not last. 

Compaq, the seven th-largest 
Ui>. computer maker, said earn- 
ings were $213 million, or $2.40 a 
share, compared with $102 million, 
or $1.23 a share, a year earlier, and 
exceeding average analyst esti- 
mates of around $1.73 a share. 

Revenue leaped 41 percent, to 
5228 billion from $1.61 billion, 
also surpassing expectations of 
about $2 billion in sales. 

Compaq's shares, which had 
jumped nearly $6 to just over $104 
earlier in the day, were quoted at 
$100.75, up $2. ra late New York 
Stock Exchange trading. 

Analysts said they were im- 
pressed by Compaq's gross profit 
margin, which widened to 27.1 per- 
cent from 23.7 percent in the previ- 
ous quarter. 

Margins in persona] computers, 
an $80 billion industry worldwide, 
have generally shrunk since 1 992 as 
a result of price competition. 

Compaq's president, Eckhard 
Pfeiffer said its sales surge would 
continue but warned that margins 
and profit might fall because Com- 
paq expected to increase sales of 
consumer items, which have rela- 
tively low prices and thin margins. 



Cross Hates 


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GROWTH IN L'OREAL'S CONSOLIDATED RESULTS 


MS “Million of $ 

$ = US dollar 

1993 

/ % compared 

to 1992 

Consolidated sales 

S 6,811 M 

+ 6.9% 

Profit on ordinary activities before taxation, employee profit-sharing 

$762 M 

+ 12.1% 

Net profit before capital gains and losses and minority interests 

$498 M 

+ 133% 

Net profit before capital gains ond losses and after minority interests 

$ 438 M 

+ 12.5% 

Net earnings per shore and investment certificate 

$750 

+ 125% 

Proposed dividend 

$1.83 

+ 125% 


This year, as in previous years, Mr Lindsay 
OWEN-JONES, Chairman and Chief Executive 
Officer, has invited analysts, journalists and inves- 
tors to L'OREAL's Head Office to announce and 
review the 1993 results of the L'OREAL Group. 

Despite o difficult international environment in 
1993, L'OREAL continued to record volume growth 
and to increase its market shares. Group strategy 
remained focused on internationalisation of trade- 
marks, research and development and the launch- 
ing of innovative products. 

L'OREAL's consolidated turnover amounted to 
$ 6.8 billion, representing an increase of 6.9%‘com- 
pared to 1992, and 7% on a comparable basis of 
identical structures and exchange rates. 

Total managed sales, including sales generated 
by agents whose industrial and commercial activi- 

BREAKDOWN BY DIVISION OF 1993 
MANAGED COSMETICS SALES: 

$ 74 billion (as a percentage) 


ties are managed by L'OREAL, reached $ 8.6 billion. 

Net profit before capital gains and losses and 
minority interests reached $ 498 million, an increase 
of 13.3% compared to 1992. 

Asa result of a slight increase in minority interests, 
consolidated net profit before capital gains and los- 
ses and after minority inlerests, increased by 12.5% 
to $ 438 million. 

Net earnings per share and investment certifi- 
cate increased to $ 750. 

The Board of Directors of the L'OREAL Croup 
has decided to propose a net dividend of $ 1.83, 
an increase of 12.5% over 1993, at the Annual 
Shareholder's Meeting to be held on Tuesday, the 
31 st of May, 1994. This dividend is payable to both 
ordinary shores and the few remaining investment 
certificates still in circulation. 

GEOGRAPHIC BREAKDOWN OF 1993 
MANAGED COSMETICS SALES: 

$ 24 billion (as a percentage) 



FRANCE 

USA AND 

326% I 

-/CANADA 226% 

LATIN 

BFSTOF 

—A AMERICA 

EU«T'P£ k— ' — ' ’ 

A5IA 5.7% 

EEC 

REST OF THE 

JEXCU 30 — WJK1D 0.1% 


Further Information on the Group worldwide can be obtained by writing to Ihe Investor Rel ationsond Business Information Deportment of tb© 
L'OREAL Group, Office No. A 0403, 41, rue Marl re, 92117 CUCHY (FRANCE)! or by fax.- (33-1) 47 56B002. 


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Face 10 


INTERNATIONA L HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY,. APRIL 2 1, 199_4_ 


( Pa 


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MARKET DIARY 


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Interest-Rate Woes 
Hit Cyclical Stocks 


Compiled by Our Stuff Front Dupatdm 

NEW YORK — Worries that 
rising interest rates would impair 
economic activity and crimp corpo- 
rate profits sent the stock market 
tumbling Wednesday, with cyclical 
issues leading the way down. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver’ 
age closed down 21.11 points, at 
3398.71. Losing issues on the New 

U.S. Stocks 

York Stock Exchange outnumb- 
ered advancing ones by a 2-to-l 
ratio in extremely active trading. 

In the eyes of investors, the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board's miring of in- 
terest rates this week and prospects 
for another increase soon over- 
shadowed a downtick Wednesday 
in yields on 30-year government 
bonds. The yield cat the benchmark 
30-year issue slipped to 7.32 per- 
cent from 7.37 percent Tuesday, 
while the price rose 16/32 point, to 
87 5/32 

Healthy quarterly earnings suite- 
meats from several corporations 
did little to offset concerns about 
the Fed's switch to a tighter mone- 
tary policy. Among issues lifted by 
strong earnings were Dean Witter. 
Discover., which rase 2 to 35%, 
Pfizer, which gained 2 to 57%, and 
Colgate-Palmolive, which added 
1% to 57%. 


Colgate said it earned a net 
$149.6 millio n in the first quarter, 
reversing from a loss of S217.4 mil- 
lion a year ago, thanks to increased 
spi es in Aria and I .a tin America. 

Not all the earnings news was 
good. Lotus Development, for ex- 
ample, tumbled TYi to 56% in over- 
the-counter trading after reporting 
revenue below analysts' expecta- 
tions even (hough net profit was up 
from a year ago. 

Cyclical issues, those sensitive to 
long-term economic cycles, suffered 
the largest losses. Caterpillar 
plunged 4% to 103% despite report- 


Cbrysler dropped Vk at 46*4 in 
active trading despite reporting re- 
cord first-quarter profit this week. 
General Motors and Ford also 
slumped in active trading GM lost 
ft to 54% and Ford fell 2 to 54%. 

- Some selling also was spurred by 
jitters about the impact on earnings 
from trading in derivatives, or fi- 
nancial instruments that derive 
their price from an underlying se- 
curity or commodity. 

Mead, for example, said its first- 
quarter earnings rose 7.8 percent but 
it took a $7.4 mOliou charge to end a 
leveraged interest-rate swap with 
Bankers Trust. Mead, which rose ft 
to 39%, was the third corporation to 
report first-quarter losses related to 
derivatives sold by Bankers Trust. 

(AP. Bloomberg) 


MARK: Focus Stays on U.S. Rates 


Continued from Page 9 

lion rate, which guides French 
money-market rates. 

The speculation has helped drag 
down the French franc against the 
mark. The Goman currency traded 
as high as 3.4400 francs Wednes- 
day. its highest this year, compared 
with 3.4284 francs Tuesday and 
above its former European Mone- 

Foreign Exchange 

tary System limit of 3.4305 francs. 
The mark was quoted in New York 
on Wednesday afternoon at 3.4317 
francs. 

But although the fall in the Ger- 
man securities repurchase rate 
might seem to make it easier for the 
Bank of France to trim its interven- 
tion rate, currently 5.9 percent, sev- 
eral analysts said such a move 
would go against the grain for the 
French central bank. 

“We're served the same old story 
again: ‘France’s weak economy is 
in need of a rate cut,' " said Jane 
Edwards at Lehman Brothers. “But 
;hai does not stand up to scrutiny. 
France’s economy is stronger than 
Germany’s." 

The French economy shrank 0.7 
percent in 1993, but economic out- 
put has rebounded recently and 
gross domestic product is expected 


to increase about 1.4 percent this 
year. 

French monetary authorities 
have long made a strong franc a 
priority, principally to keep infla- 
tion in check. A strong franc makes 
imported goods less expensive, 
keeping a lid on prices. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg, AFP 

■ Dollar Loses More Ground 

The dollar was lower in New 
York in thin trading, AFP-Exte! 
News reported, on a combination 
of technical factors and investor 
concern about doUar-denominated 
assets as Wall Street stocks fell 

The dollar closed at 1.6873 DM, 
down from 1 .6957 DM a day earli- 
er and itself a two-week low. It also 
stood at 102935 yen, off from 
103.15 yen. 

Win Thin, an analyst for MCM 
Currency Watch, said some Ameri- 
can institutional investors ap- 
peared to be testing dollar support 
levels against the mark and the 
Swiss franc. 

He said the decline in the dollar 
had started after a support level of 
1.4370 Swiss francs was broken, 
causing the dollar to fall to a low 
for the day of 1.4300 francs, down 
from 1.4434 francs Tuesday. 

The U.S. currency also was 
quoted at 5.7950 French francs, 
compared with 5.8375 francs. The 
pound rose to$1.4949 from $1.4805. 


Vfa AvMjcWld ft- • 


Apr] 20 




UTT 

NYSE Most Actives 


VoL Wah 

Law 

Last 

Chg- 


73904 49% 

45% 

46ft 

— 3ft 


69290 54ft 

50% 

51ft 

S' A 


56706 44 ft 

42% 

43ft 

—ft 

CnMotr 

46861 56 

52% 

54ft 

—ft 

Merck 

42022 29% 

28ft 

29ft 

+ 1 

FbrdM 

42011 56% 

53ft 

54% 

— 2 

WHMrtf 

39516 34% 

73ft 

24 



TimeWa 

37651 37% 

34V, 

35ft 

— Ift 




6V, 


PhOMr 

32554 53% 

52 

52% 

tft 

DuPont 

32493 57% 

55ft 

56 

—ft 

AT&T 

31191 52% 

51% 

52% 

+ 1% 

Compaq 

29962 104% 

99 

101% 

+ 3% 

GTE 

29829 32% 

32 

32% 

,1ft 

MBel 

29157 3% 

3 

3ft 

— % 


NASDAQ Host Actives 



VoL High 

Low 

Lost 

Chg. 

Intel s 

77389 58% 

56 

57% 



69263 28% 

36ft 

26ft 

—1 

Lotos 

40569 60ft 

54ft 

56ft 

—7ft 

DSC 

55055 56% 

53ft 

55ft 

+2% 

Osco s 

48363 30ft 

28ft 

29 

—ft 

Netframe 

46364 10ft 

8ft 

* 

— Jft 

TetCmA 

43864 19% 

18ft 

IBft 

— % 

'Oncsps 

42340 15ft 

14ft 

15 

— Ve 

Mas 

41327 24% 

22ft 

24% 

+i% 

USHHti s 

38614 43ft 

40ft 

41ft 

—2 

PricCxts 

37646 14ft 

14 

14V l. 


DedCpir 

32804 27% 

24ft 

24ft 

— 1% 

Micsfls 

32687 89ft 

87 

89% 

+m 

ApptoC 

25166 30 

28 

toft 

—% 

Pinciss 

24108 21ft 

20 

20% 

“ 

AMEX Most Actives 


VoL Kata 

Law 

Last 

Chg. 


OwSitS 15173 25V* 21 Mi 22ft —2 
EctwBov S757 WA 10 —Vi 

SPOR 5080 4W U 44Vn 44¥u — Via 

CkcoPti 43® 10ft 9% Iff* + %i 

ExpLA 4327 IV,, 1 1 _ 

RoytfOs 3758 4 3W* 4 _ 

ALC 3345 36ft 33ft 34ft —1ft 

TopSrce 3178 6 5ft 5ft —ft 

Atari 3131 5ft 4ft 4ft —ft 

Hefionef 2523 4V» 3>Vu 4 *%. 


Market Sales 



Today 

Prev. 


4(UTL 

cons. 

NYSE 

36191 

905X59 

Amex 

1*09 

20X69 

Nasdaq 

30*67 

32*192 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Man Low Lasl Ctu. 

Indus 3C37JU 3M6X0 3570.15 35V8L71— 21.11 
Trans 156123 136962 154021 154422 — 

UN 19SJ6 1 99.64 14SJ6 199.64 +U1 
Comp 127*42 1282-77 126281 127045 -033 


Standard A Poor’s Indexes 


Hteh Low Lost aw. 

SPIOO 409 A0 404X3 406.95 +001 

SP 500 44Un *39-40 441.96 —0X8 

owustrlas 515.01 M7J0 SUMS -ZZl 

Ttorap. 382.92 375,98 37822 — 1 JO 

UtififlW 16236 158.07 16134 +427 

Finance 4425 43-62 4023 —022 


NYSE Indexes 


High Lew LaiT On. 

Composite 44627 34323 24466 -fljT 

Industrial* 301-41 297JO 29820 —12* 

Tramp. 343-85 ■ 239.47 240.1? —1.99 

WiKfy 21322 20947 21X50 +4JB 

Finance 2Q9X3 207.15 207X7 —148 


NASDAQ Indexes 


HM LOW LON C3v. 


CompasBe 

Industrials 

Braks 

Insurance 

finance 

Transp. 


717.64 70422 
749.93 73477 

60037 676-92 
87145 aq> 9? 
89127 889.14 
731JS 717-42 


70551 —754 
735X3—1070 
677 JT —0X2 
853.91 — 1440 
891.10 +1JM 
720.16 —753 


AMEX Stock Index 


Moll Law Lad an. 
432X4 4Z7JJ1 427X0 —350 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
to utilities 
10 Industrials 


Close C*De 

98X9 —0.10 

96J0 +0JB 

10065 —025 


NYSE Mary 


Advmced 

Declined 


Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


837 749 

1420 1491 

544 564 

2801 2804 

5 10 

167 215 


AMEX Diary 



Close 

am 

Prev. 

203 


397 



223 

208 

Total issues 



New Htfltu 



New Lows 




NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 

DecSned 

Unchanged 
Torn bsues 
New Highs 
New lows 


Otose Prev. 
1150 1179 

2046 2036 

1789 1765 

4905 4900 

35 32 

251 238 


Spot Commodities 


Aluminum, lb 
Coffee. Braz. lb 
Copper electrolytic. lb 
Iron FOB, tan 
Lead, lb 
Stiver, tray az 
Steel (Kraal, ten 
Tin. lb 
Zinc lb 


Today 

0574 

8765 

am 

213J89 

054 

522 

13433 

3X1A4 

04337 


0575 

0795 

091 

21100 

034 

5.16; 

73433 

34288 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 

Close - 

DM ASK BW Aik 

ALUMINUM (HM Grade) 

BT^WUl 06050 mg 
Forward 129050 1291 JO 1291J0 129150 
COPPER C ATHOD ES CHHMl Grade) 

SS WSPer,, Wa"lWJ# 1071 JO 1872« 
Forward 1893,80 1594 JO 189350 189400 
LEAD 

Delian aer metric tea 

Spat 425 50 42650 43150 <3250 

ftnrord 44000 441 JO 44450 447 JO 

NICKEL 

Pollan per metric tea „„„. 

Spot 537500 5ZS5J0 5325 JJO 533500 

^rwonl 53SDJOO 535520 5400X0 54 1W10 

TIN 

SoT"” rl, SSlO B WoO 5335X0 5345J0 
Forward 53S5J0 536000 539000 540000 
ZINC (Special HM Grade) 

Dollars per memctaB ___ 

Scot 910J0D 911-00 90000 909 JO 

Forward 93250 933J0 93000 93150 


Financial 

KM Lew OM# OHoge 

3460 NTH STERLING (LIFFE1 

isauu-pnefiolpO 

9477 
9452 

94.10 
9353 

93.11 
9253 
9230 
9157 

n» 

9150 
91 J7 

EsL volume : 109X76.' Open Int : 43*399. 
MMONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 
Slmffllon-pfsoMMiKl 
Jan 
Sep 
Dec 


9*60 

9*63 

— 0.12 

903 

906 

— 0.13 

93X5 

93X9 

-0.17 

9X34 

55135 

—■0.22 

nm 

92X3 

— *23 

9133 

92J8 

— R23 

92 J» 
1*1 J5 

92J01 

91J6 

— *24 
— 022 

9155 

*1X6 

— 0J1 

91X1 

91X1 

— 031 

91 J7 

n J# 

— 0J1 

91.14 

91.14 

-021 


9*34 

9SJM 

9*33 

4-0X1 

9*60 

9*60 

9*60 

+*01 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9*11 

+ 0X3 

N.T. 

N.T. 

93X4 

+ 0X1 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9152 

+ 0X* 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9327 

+ *06 


5SE. 

Dec 


Jm 

s#p 

Dec 

Mar 


Est- volume: 170 Open int: 9X11. 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

DMi mBBon-ptsaf ieepa 
Jm 94.71 9457 9169 Unctl. 

Sep 9194 9106 9188 —am 

MC 94.W 9454 9456 -007 

Mar 94-95 9450 9454 —OHS 

9477 9*40 9453 — 0.10 

SOP 9454 9139 9450 —Oil 

Dec 9432 9115 94.18 —0.10 

Mar 94.14 9481 9481 — 01 0 

Jna 9393 9154 9359 — 010 

Sep 9354 9377 9376 —008 

Dec 9165 9165 9167 —086 

Mar 9356 93X9 91B — 007 

Est. volume; 212X67. Open int.: 982,972. 
3-MONTH PIBOR IMATIF) 

FF5m 
Jan 
Sep 
Dec 
Mar 
Jen 
Sep 


Est. vgtatne: 66579. Open Int.; 228.130 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) 

BUM -Pta» Staffs Of 100 pet 
Jan 106-31 105-10 105-20 — 0-25 

Sep N.T. N.T. ltM-23 -0-25 

Est volume: 119,162 Open Hit: 142511. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFE) 
DM 259X80 -pts Of TMpct 
Jen 95.19 9116 9128 —049 

Sep 9183 9199 9182 —0X9 

Est. volume: 2S26Q1 Open tat: 211557. 
18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS IMATIF) 
» -« 

S«P 12056 119 JO H9.38 —094 

EMC 11934 11934 118X2 —094 

EN. volume: 350925. Open InL: 156561 


pts of 110 net 
94J6 9*19 

9*23 

+ 0X1 

94X7 

9*36 

9*40 

Unch. 

9*58 

906 

9440 

— 8JJ3 

9444 

9*30 

9*34 

—006 

9*2* 

9*10 

9*13 

— 008 

9*0* 

nsr 

93X7 

— 0.14 

93X1 

93X7 

9368 

— *10 

9368 

935* 

9357 

— *11 


Industrials 

Hteb Lo« Lost settte arpe 
GASOIL UPE) 

UXL dollars per metric tan-tots of IN Ians 

14835 14730 147J5 14730 —208 

147 JO 146J0 14625 14625 — L75 

14730 14650 14630 14630 —LOO 

14875 14825 14825 14B25 —130 

15025 14730 149.75 13000 — 1J0 

15100 15230 15230 15030 — 1JM 

15430 15425 15430 15430 — WO 


Jon 

Jot 

Aee 


Nay 


J«a 

15X5 

1*70 

1*73 

Jal 

i*» 

1*30 

1*86 

Aog 

1*93 

1*70 

WJI 

Sep 

1*93 

1*73 

1493 

Oct 

1*58 

1*82 

1*18 

Hn 

15X1 

14 IH 

15JB 

dm 

15X8 

1*70 

15X8 

Jaa 

15X1 

15X1 

15X1 

Feb 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


Hteb Law Lari Settle CW* 

Dec 15688 1447 4 13600 15680 — ]-25 

Jen 15680 15680 19680 1562S — IB 

M NT. N T. N.T. 15680 - 053 

Mar n.T. N.T. N.T. 15580 — U* 

Esr. volume: 9X09 . Open Int 95867 

BRENT CRUDE OIL (IRE) 

U3. duB«ws per benreWats of LOW ttorreta 


Est volume: 36811. Open int. 143820 


Stock Indexes 

Mob Lew Close Cbm* 
FTSE Ml (LIFFE) 

OS per Index petal 

Jtm 31560 30928 30950 — JM 

Sip 31368 31198 31133 

DM 314010 31480 31258 -348 

Est. volume: 16381. Open inf.- 53830. 

CAC 49 (MAT IF) 


Apr 215480 21(1120 210200 -+<5X0 

May 215580 209980 209930 -f46» 

JM 213680 mrm 2002X0 -+47^ 

Sep 212830 309930 209830 -+4780 

Dec 215900 71 2? JO 713080 -+4L“ 

Mar N.T. N.T. 216180 -+45J0 

Est. volume: 39X99, Open InL: 74,981. 
Sources : Motif, Associated Press. 
London inn Financial Futures Exchange, 
Inn Petroleum Exchange 


Dhrhtonds 


Company Per Amt Par Rea 

IRREGULAR 

Banal O wl ADR x 26 4-27 5-1? 

Capital SItrwst _ JO 5-16 5-31 

ftetaP Mlg Accept 1 _ 84 M 6-1 

M ean Rqy otty _ J737 4-29 7-29 

N kWOra Mah odlPfC . MS 5-6 6-30 

x-upprex amount pgr ADR. 

INCREASED 

Cha rter One F nct O .15 5-9 5-24 

Dun Bradstreet 3 A 5 6-10 

FrtMCdPltai 9 .U 5-M 6-2 

Fleet Fuel 3 JK 6-3 7-1 

Health Care REIT O 30 36 5-30 

NtaOTiJtaJMfkPwr Q 28 5-6 5-31 

Regot Beloit q .15 6-30 7-15 

Sunoco Prdcn g .14 5.^3 a . 50 

Sterling Bncshrs Q J2 5-2 5-20 

INITIAL 

Savannah Bancorp _ 85 4-29 5-23 

REGULAR 


Alliance WWDIGv 

Alliance WktOI M 
Am InsurMtginvOS 
Am lnsurMtg86 
Am InsurMtoSS 
Anchor BncpWI 
CIMHgYM 
CMAC invest 
Cateon Carbon 
'Calkin Comal 
Cap RltylnvTxExJ 
Core Indus 
FFY Financial 
Fit Fad Bncp FL 
Fsl Marrlsburo 
Flamemaster Carp 
GAB Bancorp 

GTE Corp 
Hernia Gatdg 
Iowa rttl Bkshrs 
Lakehead Pipe 

AMCulffOn fill 
Natl Tech SYS 
Niagara Mah adWA 
Pall Carp 
Ptiimps VnHeus 
Finer Jaffrav 
Red Lion 
ScMwnbnwr 
scorn Hospital g 
Standard Pacific 
Summit Bestirs TX 

UnJW Carolina Boc 

VAFst Fhel 
VanEck intilnvGM 
Village Bncp 


M .14 4-29 5-13 
M .1106 4-29 5-13 
M X9 4-33 8-1 

M sn 4-30 9-1 

M JD7 4-30 fi-1 
O M 5-2 5-14 
M is# 4-29 59 

Q JS 5-6 6-1 

Q 84 6-1B 7-1 

Q 0625 M 5-30 
M .13 4-38 8-12 
Q JU 6-6 6-27 
B .10 4-29 5-19 

- .125 5-2 5-16 

Q .10 M 5-16 

a ja 5-2 5-24 
Q .18 4-26 4-CBJ 
0 X7 5-23 7-1 

.18 66 6-20 

a ji 34 5-11 

Q M 4-29 5-13 
O .19 5-15 6-10 
Q 30 5-2 5-16 

- 81 5-19 6-S3 

_ X06 5-6 6-38 

Q J92S 54 5-16 
G J375 5-17 6-17 
Q .173 5-24 6-7 

O 35 4-30 5-13 
O JO 6-1 7-1 

.13 6-18 7-4 

Q 31 5-13 5-27 
O M 4-29 5-14 
D 30 4-29 56 

. 825 4-29 5-13 
4-3S 5-4 

.11 4-22 56 


monthly; R-aoarterty; s-seaiHumni 


LAND: Hot Hong Kong Real Estate Market Seems to Be on Shaky Ground 


Cwrimned from Page 9 

Properties Ltd. offered apartments 
still under construction in the Mid- 
Levels area of Hong Kong Island to 
buyers at an average of 4,400 Hong 
Kong dollars per square foot (396 
dollars per square meter). 

In March, a batch of identical 
flats of 1330 square feet were re- 
leased at a cost of more than 9,700 
Hong Kong dollars per square foot. 
There was heavy demand. 

Worried that no pause — let 


alone end — is in sight for a phe- 
nomenon now locking first-time 
home buyers out of the market and 
forcing companies hiring expatri- 
ates to dig deeper or deny their 
employees accommodation similar 
to living conditions at borne, the 
Hong Kong government has, un- 
characteristically, threatened to in- 
tervene. 

S imilar rises in commercial and 
retail property in the traditional 
business districts have heightened 
fears that international companies 


will set up their regional headquar- 
ters elsewhere in Asia, or even Aus- 
tralia, and that Hong Kong's over- 
all competitiveness will suffer. 

“I believe that the government 
will continue to look on property as 
a commodity as they do not have 
the political wiD to impose a Singa- 
pore-styie dwelling-creation pro- 
gram,” said Bruce Walker, director 
of Vigers Hong Kong Ltd, a real 
estate concern. “Nor do they have 
the stomach to accept the conse- 
quences of a large fall in property 


U.S-/AT THE CLOSE 

AT&T Net Surges 17% in 1st Quarter 

NEW YORK (CombinedHsp&tcbes) - AT&T Com. said Wed ms- 
davtotitsto-Sarter iacomefrom operations jumped 17 pawnuo 
J^SrS3ri|Snianly by growth m .ts long-dmance serv.ee 

° r ^SSile. Bell Atlantic Ct*p. reported a rise in profit of [8 perai, 

mUmS^mtbe.Brstqtmrter^ddt^n^dcmandroreenular 

on Wednaday from Am™ 

feass SAtsssss^s 

trading, at S51.75. (Bloombtrs, AP) 

LlsW Factor Knocks GE Results 



prices. Increasing the supply of 
land is the only painless way of 
softening price rises.” 

By agreement with Beijing, the' 
Hong Kong government releases 
only 30 hectares (1233 acres) of 
new land 10 the market each year in 
property auctions, and developers 
tend to bid strongly for land in 
areas where they already have hold- 
ings. Every record price paid for a 
new site lifts the value of their ex- 
isting investments. 


SUDSiuiuy wit — ‘ 

GE 1 ^ted 1 ^gs of $L0?' billion, more than triple^ the figure 
recordedayear ago when an accounting rule change reduced profit by 
$862 million, to $298 million. Excluding the accounting adjustment, the 

dwK^^reductioa of $210 mjUion, after taxes, 
that GE took to remove phantom profits that resulted from irregular 
bond trading activities at Kidder. Peabody Group Inc. The brokerage 
firm fired its head government-bond trader and suspended six other 
employees after uncovering the scheme. 

Severe Winter Chills USAir and AMR 

ARLINGTON, Virginia (Bloomberg) — USAir Group Inc. reported 
Wednesday that it posted a loss of $196.7 million in the first quarter of 
1993, widened from $61 million a year ago and a result that many analysts 
think will be the largest among U.S. domestic carriers. 

Meanwhile, AMR Corp., the parent of American Airlines, said 
Wednesday that it posted a loss of $7 million in the first quarter, 
narrowed from a loss of $22 million a year ago. 

The airlines were hurt by a series of severe winter storms (hat blanketed 
the Northeast during the quarter, causing hundreds of cancellations. 

USAir also announced Wednesday that it was canceling a $300 million 
revolving credit agreement. Sane industry observers have predicted that 
without the credit agreement USAir could be bankrupt as early as June. 

Strong Rally in U.S. Bousing Starts 

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. housing starts shot up 12.1 percent in 
March, the government said Wednesday in a report showing home 
buil ding rebounding strongly from its winter slump. But analysis cau- 
tioned that rising mortgage rates could slow construction again. 

In March, starts increased in every region of the country, including a 
30.4 percent surge in the Midwest. 

The Commerce Department said construction of new homes and 
apartments overall totaled 1.47 million at a seasonally adjusted annual 
rate, up from 1.31 million in February and the highest total recorded 
since the rate of 1.61 milli on in December. 

Gaterp31ar 9 s Profit Soars Fivefold 

PEORIA, Illinois (Bloomberg) —Caterpillar Inc. said Wednesday that 
its profit in the first quarter rose more than fivefold, paced by a 21 
percent increase in domestic sales. The heavy-equipment manufacturer 
said net income totaled $192 million, up from $34 millio n a year ago. 
Revenue jumped 22 percent, to S3.1S billion. 

Tbe company said the profit increase came <k an equal mix of improved 
domestic and overseas sales. It has been profitable in the last five quarters 
after losing mare than $620 milli on in 1991 and 1992. (Bloomberg, AP) 

Higher Loans Boost Bank America 

SAN FRANCISCO (Bloomberg) — BankAmerica Corp. said Wednes- 
day that first-quarter net income rose S.9 percent, to $513 million, on 
increased loans, an improving credit portfolio and lower expenses. The 
second-largest U.S. banking company said that net interest income had 
fallen 3 percent, to $1.79 bulion. 

For the Record 

Martin S. Davis, who reshaped Paramount Comm m ic ati oas Inc over 
tbe past decade and presided over its sale to Viacom Inc., said he has 
framed a company to invest in troubled businesses which require radical 
restructuring. (AP) 

Walt Disney Co. would be allowed to cut its stake in Enro Disney SCA 
to 34 percent from 49 percent if the company's share offering is oversub- 
scribed, according to the French daQy Le Figaro. (AFX) 

General Dynamics Covp. said its profit rose 8 percent, to $55 million, in 
the first quarto - , after earnings in its nuclear submarine business rose 53 
percent (Bloomberg) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Aflmu France Prexw April 20 


Amsterdam 

ABN Amro Hid 63 6280 

ACF Holding 5030 5030 

Aegon 97J0 98.10 

Ahold 47.TO 47.® 

AkzO Nobel 224 224 JO 

AMEV 7330 74.10 

■ Bote-Wtesnnen W-S 39.70 

■ CSM 6680 67 

DSM 13230 132 

Elsevier 14S® 16530J 

Fokker 17 irl 

GIsl-BrooodDS 49X0 49.01 

HBG 325 31858 

Hdnoken 235J0 236.90 

IHCCakmd 38J8 39.10 

Inter Mueller 
Inn Nederland 
KLM 


KNP BT 
NaUtard 

Oce Grlntea 
Pafchoed 

PM rips 

Polygram 

Robeco 

Rodamco 

Raiboco 

Room la 

Royal Dutch 
Stark 
Unilever 
Van Om mem 
VNU 


8930 8830 
8U0 80l70 

51 JO SS0 

48.70 48X0 
74X0 7480 
B2 8290 
4980 49 SO- 
5130 5MB 
BUD 80 
12580 126 

6080 6130 
124 18430 
93X0 9X70 
20420 207.10 
<820 40 

20420 20590 
50J0 *jn7n 
mMl 179 


Waiters/ Kiuwer 11180 11230 


Brussels 


AG Fin 

Arbed 

Barco 

-Bckaert 

Cockarlll 

Cabana 

Del ha lie 

Elrctrabel 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevaert 

KredWbcml 

Pehrollna 


Royal Beige 

Soc Gen Braque 


2595 2640 
4750 4800 
2380 2380 
M775 24500 
178 179 

5930 5950 

1350 1354 

6130 6150 

1540 1540 

4320 4330 
9940 9050 

6950 7010 
10275 10350 
3320 3300 
5370 5350 
0370 8310 


Soc Gen Betetaue 2«n shb 
sottna 15075 usiss 

30* way 16050 15825 

TracteOel 10500 18325 

UCB 23150 23225 

Union MJniera 2450 2495. 
Current Stack index : 7495X9 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

AlllonzHoM 
Altana 
Asko 
BASF 
Saver 
Bay. Hypo bank 


176J0 17150 
2540 2520 
60930 609 

1020 1035 

3193031930- 

393.1039250 

456 451 


Bov VerellHMt 47830 470 


BBC 
BHFBank 
BMW 

Com me rebar* 

Continental 
Dataller Benz 


714 710 

4428044430 
867 065 
349 348 

29529230 

86006630 


Degus&a 

5*95055050 

Abbey Nan 

AH ted Lyons 

*62 

*68 

Dl Babcock 

Z7S 271 

576 

37* 

. Devbdte BosiSc 

749 748 

Arllo Wtasta 

2J1 

•m 

Dougkn 

590 591 

Argyll Group 


341 

Dresdner Bonk 

3to 391 

ass Brit Foods 


9JB 


352 347 

BAA 

9,7) 

yju 

F Krupp Hoecct 

i 1 

BAe 

iu 

4JD 

Hdrpener 



1JD 


HCnl-Ol 



LI4 

jjl 

Hochtief ■ 

1B80 1085 


556 

Kfo 

Huedef 

340339 JS 

BAT 

*36 

4X2 

HcrflJTKJttn 

832 855 

BET 

1 JS 

1X1 

Horten 

243 242 

Biuo Circle . 

325 

325 

JWKA 

41*50 416 


*76 

*au 

Kali Salt 

148 145 

Boots 

5J5 

*37 

Karetadl 

580 573 


*28 

445 

Kauflwf 


BP 

380 

3X6 

KH0 



*18 

*15 


Brit Gag 

3 

303 

Undo 

922 918 

anisrees 

15S 

15b 

LuJItWffflO 

201 203 


181 

3X5 

> MAN 


BTR 

3X6 

386 

.-Monneamann 

480 470 

Crate Wire 

453 

*53 

MeiaiigeMii 



*68 

*74 

1 Muench Ruoctc 

2990 2950 


165 

372 

| Poriche 

870 870 


2X2 

2.43 

• PrevKng 

*7*50 475 


1» 

5.94 

. FWA 

242 240 

Caurtatiids 

5X7 

*46 

1 RWE 

4634595D 

ecc Group 

*90 

*98 

I Rhelnmelall 

361 358 

enterprlsoOil 

4X4 

4X3 

I : Seherlng 

1050 1050 


*79 


' SEL 

418417.90 


1X3 

1X6 


726 72* 

Forlo 

136 

237 

1 Tltvssnn 

285 285 

GEC 

314 

31/ 

1 Varla 

35635650 


*28 

626 

Veto 

500 501 


5X5 

555 

VEW 

3715037250 

Grand Mat 

*53 

*56 

Vies 

45150 *»> 

GRE 

1X7 

1.92 

VglkpwoOW, 

54652950 

Guinness 

*63 

*70 

weilo 

87*50 870 

GUS 

6JM 

*07 






PrevtoSTil/zx 

FAX iMtek : MJ7J 
Preywus : 833JD 

h 

Hlllsdown 

H5BC Hidos 

ICl 

1J1 

757 

308 

U9 

7JS 

*20 


CtenPraw. 


Helsinki 


Amer-Ytityma 

Enso-Gutzait 

Huhtamokl 

kxUF 

Kvmmene 


Nokia 
Pori lo*a 
Renata 
Stockmann 


125 126 
40 40 

204 204 

1220 12 
113 115 

193 196 

422 398 

88 88 
91 92 

229 22? 




Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 3238 3325 
Camay Pacific n.io ll JO 
Cheung Kang 3730 38J5 
China LhMPwT 4150 43 

Dairy Farm irm II JO II JO 
Hang Lung Dev 14 i4jo 
Hone Seng Bonk 51 5130 
Henderson Land 3930 41 

HK Air Eng. 4450 m 
HK China Gas 17.W 17 

HK Electric 23J0 23JO 
HK Land 2120 2330 

HK Realty Trial 2240 2250 
HSBC Hatdlnea 0050 08 

HK5t»ng HHs 12 1130 
HK Telecomm 14J0 M 
HK Ferry io.ffl lOJO 

Hutch Wlwmnoa 32.75 32.75 
Hyson Dev 2160 2160 
Jarrilne JWattL 55 55 

Jardlne Sir HM 3050 3025 
Kowloon Motor 15J0 1530 
AAaidailn Orient 10 JO 1050 
Miramar Hotel 2180 72.20 
New World Dev 2550 ThAS 
SHK prana 50 51 

5letux 185 150 

Swire Poe A 56 57 

Tnl Cheung Prps 980 1040 
TVE 3X0 340 

Wharf Hold 3150 3250 
Wins On CO IMl 12J0 1280 
wtnsor mo. ii40 1150 


Johannesburg 


AECI 
Attach 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
Blyvnor 
Butfeis 
Do Been 
DHefOnlein 
Gencor 
GFSA 


HIsftveM Sleet 

reboot 

NedbanLGrp 

Romttanleln 

Rusntat 

SA Brews 

St Helena 

Soso) 
wefleom 
Western Deep 

85B£HBr 


24 23 

93 93 

216 715 

3150 31 

NA NA 
40 45 

10810950 
54 57, 

880 9.10 
99 HO 
2530 25 

WK 

45 4830 

li nsi 

87 8650 

88 88 
43 NA 
23 2175 

NA NA 

176 187 

586081 


London 


indicape 

Kingfisher 

Lodbrafce 

Land Sec 

Loaortc 

Lasmo 

Legal Gen Gnp 
Ltavds Bank 

Marts Sp 
ME PC 
Narl Power 

NaiWest 
Nth Wat Water 


P&p 
Pllkmnton 
PowerGen 
Prudential 
Rank Ora 
RccMttOH 
Red land 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Rolls Rorce 
Rothmn (unit) 
RWfal Scat 

Sahutoury 
Seal Newcas 

Scot Power 

Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

State 

Smith Nephew 
SmtthKBne B 
Smith (WHI 
Sun AlOaace 
Tate & Lyle 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
Tomktm 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
utd Btaculb 
Vodafone 
WarLocnOVj 
Wellcome 
Whitbread 
Will i ams Hdg» 

wnils Carroan 

! .T.; 


5X2 

535 

186 

680 

785 

1X2 

4-SI 

SJ8 

4J1 

4165 

4X0 

430 

430 

632 

HI 

202 

434 

3LZ3 

425 

1636 

5J7 

SJ2 

489 

9J3 

134 

386 

4 
824 
334 
5X2 
385 
05 
586 
7.14 

6.13 
1X3 
385 
583 
126 
*25 
2.12 

11J9 

250 

2.14 
1050 

134 

5 

44.13 

5.14 
5X6 
187 
233 


537 

531 

189 

684 

775 

136 

*76 

536 
43J 
*74 
4X3 
*57 
437 
650 
734 
281' 
SJ3 
129 
*24 
2094 

537 

*80 


330 

*88 

833 

380 

551 

374 

1J5 

117 

7J2 

620 

1X5 

385 

112 

336 

*28 

2.11 

11J8 

253 

2.16 

10X4 

3L38 

437 

4*13 

529 

5X7 


Madrid 

BBV 3105 mu 

Bco Central Hlso. 2860 2890 
Banco Santander mm 6tao. 

750 no 
2680 2690 
22OT 2230 
6250 6340 
156 157 

928 945 

4335 
3620 3700 
1700 1725 
K : 311X7 


Banesta 

CEPSA 

Dragadas 


Ercnc 

ibentaalai 


Tabocotara 

Tetofanloo 


Milan 

Banco Comm 


group 



ToroAssl Rtap 

IB| 


5730 5725 
198 19950 
25200 25510 
2750 2684 

2565 2600 
2780 2790 
2565 3442 
1403 1324 
6490 6300 
‘rnw 3320 
43750 43300 

26150 25740 

16370 15985 
6000 5949 
51000 mm 

HH30 17700 

1491 1455 
2810 2815 

5508 5480 

292SS 

1175011850 

3770 3715 
Torino 11100 10950 
*730 4000 
3900 ms 
2290 2292 
41700 41000 
5865 5838 


33000 32600 


Cantata- 


Montreal 

Alcan Aluminum 38ft 28ft 
Bank Montreal 25ft 25ft 
Bon Canada 43ft tPb 

20ft 20ft 
17ft 17ft 
7ft 7ft 
7ft 7ft 
25ft 25 
19ft 19ft 
9ft 9 
20ft 20ft 
23ft 23ft 
19ft 19ft 

l»v, I?* 

71ft 21ft 

6 6 
14 13ft 

RM 3& :1M7J1 


ear 

•rawer earn. 
Quebec Tel 
QuabecorA 
Quebccar B 

Tel rotate 

Unlva 

VtdeoiTWi 



Ctaee 

Prev. 

Parts 



725 

721 

Air LJqukte 

m 

816 

Alcatel Atsthom 

683 

68V 

AM 

1267 

1380 

Bancalra (Cle) 

540 

567 

BIC 

1300 

1300 

BNP 

24850 

250 

Bauvwes 

BSN-GD 

675 

835 

685 

843 


3978 

4077 

C.CF. 

■ i M 


11220 11350 

□hargeurs 

1492 

1476 

llriiil .ririJi-'u-B 

35050 35070 


■ L 1 1 

Ell-Aaultatne 

39940520 

EH-Sanon 

974 

975 

Euro Disney 

3370 

33 

Gen. Eoux 

2608 

till 


44*80 

EJ 

1 metal 

W1 

602 

LafamCoppee 

44 * 

455 

Legrand 

6170 

6230 


576 

590 

drool (L’t 

1160 

1190 

LVJWH 

855 

Uhl 

Atotro-Hachette 

135 

136 

Mlchelln B 

263X0 

.269 


14040141X0 


419428X9 


173 

180 

Pernod- Rl card 

385 391.70 

Peugeot 

914 

923 


993 

994 


582 

586 

Mi'.Ij 4’Jl. 1 1 "T . 


1 1 *Ti t 1 H M 

rar'-l 

IL -.1 

Redoute (Lai 

895 

El 


699 

710 

S.E.B. 

561 

563 


600 

616 


31ZJ0 317X0 


169X0 

176 

Totol 


UAP. 

rr^.lrrrl 

Valeo 

1412 

14W 



Sao Paulo 





Bonespa 

Bradesca 

Brahma 

13 

JZ40 

215 

19X0 

1290 

13 

220 

19X0 


Petrobras 

94 

104 

TefeOras 

3370 3*50 

Vale Rio Dora 

98 

107 

Varfg 

145 

1800 

KESSF&i 

12838 


1 Singapore 



8 

7X0 

ary Dev. 

DBS 

7X0 


11J0 

11X0 

FrawNaave 

1878 

MAO 

Getdlng 

17X0 

17X0 

Golden Hooe PI 

254 

2X9 

Haw Par 

338 

140 

] Home Industries *20 

*10 

Indicape 

*55 

*50 

Kepfssi 

1*70 

1070 

KLKemmg 

ZJ0 

291 

Lum Chang 

IX« 

1X0 

Malayan Banka 

8X5 

8X5 

OCBC 

11X0 

11.71V 

OUB 

7X5 

7XU 

OUE 

7X0 

7X8 

Smbawano 

1170 

IU» 

Shanarlla 

5X5 

3X6 

*98 

358 

S1A 

7XD 

7X1 

S’pore Land 

7X0 

7X5 

rpore Press 
Sing Steamship 

1*30 

4 

1*30 

196 

5 ‘pore Telecomm 3X0 

3X0 

Strolls Trading 

174 

360 

UOB 

1070 

1070 

UOL 

220 

114 


[ Stockholm 


AGA 

411 

407 

Asea A 

618 

621 

Astra A 

156 

155 

Alloa Capes 

509 

505 

Electraitn B 

362 

368 

Ericsson 

341 

344 

EsscHe-A 

108 

109 

Handebbanken 

102 

IN 

investor B 

179 

188 

fferik Hydra 

23350 

235 

P record la AF 

111 

m 

Sandvlk B 

117 

no 

5CA-A 

125 

i» 

M Baniten 

51 

51X0 

SkandtaF 

130 

137 


183 

183 

SKF 

147 

147 


3M 

396 

Trelteboro BF 

9*50 

98 

Vohm 

680 

6SS 


: £§3*17 

I Prertora: Ul*40 



Sydney 


Amcor 9J5 9 JO 

ANZ *78 *76 

BHP 16.92 1688 

Borol 3X7 3X8 

Bougainville 0J5 0.75 

Cola Myer *76 *73 

Co mo Ico 4 JO 4.60 

CRA 1682 165fl 

CSR *79 484 

Fasten Brew l JO ijo 

Goodman Field 186 1J6 

ICI Australia I0J6 1084 

Magellan 7,2 

MIM 286 285 

Not Aust Bank 11JD 11JO 

News Coro 9js 9.16 

Nine Network 5.16 SJO 

N Broken Hill 122 125 

Poc Dunlop *93 *93 

PMiear Inn 280 28S 

Nmndv Poseidon Zffls 2.12 

OCT Resources 1.18 1.17 

Santii'l 3J9 3.90 

TNT 2j0B 2J7 

Western Mining bju 6X4 

Westpac Banking *69 *69 

woodaide *23 *22 

All en an a r tei Index : 2016X0 
Previous : 2M1X0 


Tokyo 


AkaJ Electr 490 488 

Asahl Chemical 741 743 

ak*i Glass lisa ia» 

Bank of Tokyo 15/fl 1630 

Brtdaestane 1500 i54o 

Canon 1660 1680 

Casio 1380 T300 

Dal Nippon Print 1790 lose 

Dalwa House 1560 1580 

Dahna Securities 1690 1720 

Fanuc 


Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 


Ito Yofcado 
Itochu 

Japan Airlines 
Kollma 
Kansal Power 
Kawasaki Sled 

Kirin Brewery 

Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Etec inds 
Matsu Elec Wks 
Mitsubishi Bk 
Mitsubishi Kovel 
Mitsubishi Elec 

Mitsubishi Hev 

Mitsubishi Corp 
Mitsui and Co 
MltsukasM 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
Nlkko 5eairMes 
Nippon Kagafcu 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 

Ntooan rusen 

Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
NTT 

Olympus Optical 

Planter 

Ricoh 

Sanyo Elec 
Sharp 
Shlmtau 
SMnefsu Chem 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo Own 
Suml Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
TateelCarp 
TaBha Marine 
ToMdaOiem 
TDK 
Teiim 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Glee Pw 

Tappon Printing 

Torevlnd. 

Toshiba 

Toyota 

Yamal cM Sec 

o:xm 

Nl 


4340 4370 
2250 2320 

•nu 1 2240 

1010 1040 
960 977 

010 819 

1728 1780 
5450 WO 
685 701 
7T3 709 

916 930 
2630 2650 
366 377 

1190 1210 
915 950 

664 677 

6410 6490 

1690 1740 

1130 1140 
2790 2850 
S10 516 

610 623 

695 692 

1130 1140 
775 788 

967 987 

2040 2070 
1130 1160 

noo 1100 

1230 1250 
1010 1040 
715 732 

34? 357 

596 6H 

869 US 
2270 2310 

9800a 9070a 

1l» 1058 

36IB 3m 

870 876 

901 511 

1680 1670 

702 702 
2070 2070 
592D 5980 

2170 2320 

485 492 
986 WK» 
292 289 
680 696 
845 854 

1240 1280 
4628 4660 
506 521 

1280 1330 
3170 3230 
1350 1380 
697 700 

783 795 

2010 2020 

865 870 


Toronto 


AMtlbl Price 

Aan»a> Eagle 

Air Canada 
Alberta Energy 

Am Barrtck Res 

BCE 

BkNova5a>tia 
BC Gas 
BC Telecom 
B F Realty Hds 
Bramatoa 
Brunswick 
CAE 
Camdev 


16ft 16ft 1 
WA 14ft 
6ft 6ft 
19ft 19ft 
29ft 28ft 
48ft 40ft 
27ft 27ft 
15ft lift; 
.25 25ft 
083 083 

080 029 

9ft 9 
7ft 7ft 
485 *85 


CIBC 29ft 

Canadian Pacinc 20ft 


Cra Tire A 
Crafor 
Cara 

CCLIndB 
anwpkxx 
COmlna) 
Canwest EjcpI 
Den bon Min B 


lift 
41 
41k 
8ft 
3ft 
20ft 
20 ft 
089 


29ft 

20ft 

lift 

42 

4ft 

Oft 

*10 

20ft 

21ft 

080 


Dickenson Mkl A NjQ. — 


Dofasco 
DylexA 
Echo Bav Mktes 
Enulty Silver A 
FCA Ifttl 
Fed IndA 
Fletcher Chair A 
FPI 

Gen Ira 

Gawcono 
GuHCdaRes 
inti 


21 

075 

13ft 

080 

3J0 

6ft 

19ft 

*83 

0X6 

N.Q. 

*20 

14ft 


Hernia Gld Mines 12ft 


Holltaoer 


Hudson's Bav 


Inca 

Interprov pipe 
Jwinoa 
Labatt 
LoWaw Co 
Mackenzie 
Maona Inti A 
Maple Leal 

Maritime 

Mark Res 
MocLean Hunter 
Mohan A 
Noma IndA 
Noranda inc 
Noranda Forest 
Nor cm Energy 
Ml hem Telecom 
Nova Corp 
Oshawa 
Poaurln A 
Placer Dome 
Paco Petroleum 
PWACona 
R o yrocfc 
Renaissance 
Rogers B 

lUlliRiMia 

Roval Bank Can 
Sceotre Res 

S cotrs Hasp 

Seagrom 
Sears Can 
Shell COR 
Snerrltt Gordon 
SHL Srslemhse 
Sogltmm 
Spar Aerospace 
Stelco A 
Talisman Enero 
Tecfc B 

Thomson New 
Toronto Damn 
Torstar B 
Tronsolto Util 
TransCda Phw 
Triton FIM A 
Tdmac 
Trtzee A 
umcorp Energy 


it 

17ft 

28 

35ft 

30ft 

30ft 

17Vi 

20ft 

23 

9ft 

54 

13 

25 

9ft 

17 

23% 

5ft 

23 

12ft 

15ft 

36ft 

9ft 

20ft 

3X0 

27ft 

10 

086 

19ft 

29% 

10ft 

01 

26% 

13 

7ft 

38ft 

7ft 

39ft 

lift 

»ft 

19 

17ft 

8ft 

29ft 

22ft 

16ft 

20ft 

23ft 

14% 

17ft 

AS 

17ft 

0X1 

1ft 


21ft 

9JM 

14 

080 

38B 

7 

19ft 

4ft 

0X6 

*K 

14ft 

12ft 

16ft 

17ft 

28 

35 

Xft 

30% 
17% 
20ft 
22% 
Oft 
57 
12% 
25 
9% 
17 
23ft 
5ft 
23 ft 
12ft 
15ft 
36ft 
10 
30ft 
385 
27ft 
10 
0l78 

19ft 

30% 

I7ft 

81 

26ft 

13 

7ft 

39% 

7% 

39ft 

lift 

8% 

19 

17% 

8ft 

29ft 

21 %' 

16% 

2Sft 

23% 

14ft 

17ft 

*60 

16ft 

0X1 

1ft 


Zurich 

Adla I nil B 227 

AkBUbse B flew 660 

BBC Brwn Bov B 1204 
CIDO Gelov B 90S 

CS Holdings B 
ElektrowB 
Ffecfwr B 
Intanttscount B 
Jrtmdl B 
Lratfis Gyr R 
Magvenplck B 

Nestle R 

Oetiik.BwtirteR 161 

Poroeta Hid B 1640 

Roche Hdg PC 
Salra Republic 
5andozB 
ScMndtaB 
Sutler PC 

Sutveiiknee B 

Swiss BnkCaroB 417 
SwjBRetasur R 592 

Swissair R 
UBS B 

Winterthur B 
Zurich Ass B 


620 

370 

1 m 

2175 

840 

920 

440 

1235 


6995 

129 

3790 

8400 

»93 

22a 




804 

1193 

675 

1292 


227 
653 
1292 
911 
621 
367 
13S5- 
2200 , 
850 
916 
435 , 
1340 * 
165 
1650 

this 

131 

3855 

8488 

990 

2225 

425 

611 

W2 

1212 

682 

1303 


B's easy to snfasoibe 

■ Inaboarg 

Mtdi rt fco oi 

0 800 2703 


U.S. FUTURES 


Vio Associated Prsn 


April 20 


Season Season 





Hteh 

Law Open High 

U»w 

Ciaso 

OtB 

OoJnt 


Grains 




WHEAT 

(CBOT) Sxm tu mintnun- CMan nertMihd 



172 

180 MdyM 119ft 120% 

315ft 

317ft — 0X2 

9764 

356 

2X6 Julto 114ft 315% 

312% 

315ft 

,0X1 

27X79 

3J7ft 

3X2 Sen 94 117ft 319% 

116% 


4,967 

365 

3X9 Decto 326 322 

326 

328% 10X7V 

S JDS 

356ft 

327 Marto 329% 332 

33? 

332 

+0X3ft 

376 

335 

316%Mav9S 325% 328 

325% 

328 

,0X3 

1 

3-Gft 

ill Julto 117 117% 

317 

317% +0X2 

67 

Est.stfes 10X00 Toe's, sales 12.781 




Tue’s open mt 48X57 up 158 





WIEA1 

(KBuTI tu 11 *,. rsum- atr bmM 



3J9» 

2X8 Mavto 321 334ft 

120% 

334 

* 1X3 

6634 


2X7 Julto 314% 117 

313% 


155ft 

382% Sep 94 3.17ft 119ft 

316% 

318ft +0X7% 

3J42 

1X6 

11 2% Decto 324 326 

323ft 

125% +0X1% 

2J80 

153V, 

326ft Mar 95 325 327 

325 

327 

,0X1 

340 

124 

123 May 95 321% 121% 

3J1% 

jjr%— 0 x 1 % 

16 

EsL sates NA Toe’s. sc*«, *130 





Tue's open M 25,101 off 521 





CORN (CBOT) U»itairiitnm.*toiMrbu*U 



316ft 

2-38 ft May 94 2X0% 2X1% 

2X9% 

1X0% +0X0% 69J95 

114% 

2X1 Julto 2X4 2X5% 

7X3 ft 

2X4% +0XI%12SX15 

292ft 




,0X2 

28JJ4 

273* 

236% Dec 94 250ft 2X2V1 

*50 

251% ,0X3 

71X00 

279% 

253%Morto 256ft 250ft 

256ft 

358 

+0X2% 

6X84 

2X2 

2J8ftlWuyfS2Xl% 2X3 

2X8% 

2X3% ,0X2% 

748 

2XPA 

250ft JUl 95 2X2% 2X4% 

362% 

264ft ,0X2% 

1X18 

3X8% 

2X6% Dec to 2 MV, 250 

2X8% 

250 

+ 8X1% 

1X86 

EsL saw. 43000 Tub’s, scfcs 47.992 




Tue’S open m* 304J20 on 3208 





SOYBEANS (CBOT} simiiuiiin>nm.iMnHiiiuiM 


7X1 

192% May to iXIft 6X4% 

658ft 

6X4 

,0X5% 36953 

7X0 

194% Julto 658% 6X5 

*56ft 

664% ,0X6 

5*292 

7X5 

628 Auato 653% 650% 

451ft 

*58% ,*05% 

9X49 

*89% 

*17 Sa>94 *32 637% 

631% 

637% ,0X6% 

SX66 

7X7% 

5JS%NovM 614 622 

613ft 

621% 

+ 0X0% 36245 






*73% 

*18 Marto 6.25 622 


632 

+are 


*70 

62T Atavto 628 622 

628 

631% ♦ OSD 

164 


624 JutW *32 635 





*50% 

5X1%,tovW 195% 603 

5X3 

603 

+ 0X0% 

IJ10 

ESL sole 

51800 Tun’s, seta 39X92 




TUo’s opon Inf 140X52 alt 1249 





SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) loatmt-imnoarlan 




184X0 May 94 18750 10.90 

187X0 

18850 

, 1 JD 19X04 



18720 

180X0 

,130 35553 

23300 

185X0 Aug M >8630 187X0 

18610 

187 JO 

+ 1X0 

7X90 

21800 






206.00 

131 50 DCS to 182X0 18*10 

187X0 



4X85 

209 JO 

4X0 Dec M 11120 18320 

181X0 

182X0 

,1X0 12X70 

200X0 

WOXO Janto 111X0 18300 

111.00 

1070 

,1.90 

1,135 

19*00 

11150 Mor 95 18100 18*30 

H100 

IBM 

,*90 

471 

193X0 

«2X0Mav95 


182.70 

,0X0 

226 











Tue'sapanbit 91X45 Off in 









30A5 

71 JO May 74 2*85 2*24 

2728 

2833 


2* JO 

2155X494 27X5 2*19 

27X8 

2*17 

+077 34,520 

29 JO 

J1X{/:::j94 27X8 37X8 

27J0 

2776 

+ *19 11,187 

28X0 

22.40 Sep to 2*95 2724 

2690 

2772 

+125 

9,941 

77X0 

22 . 10 Oct to 2600 2625 

25X0 

2675 

,*25 

7.9S 

27X5 

OXODBCto 25X0 2S5S 

2523 

25X9 

,*22 

16065 

2*BS 




+02# 


36X5 

24X0 Marto 2110 2115 

2*90 

25.15 



26X0 

24X2 Atoy 95 2100 3600 

24X5 

2100 

ttu» 

320 

2640 

24X5 Jut 95 2*90 2*90 

24.90 

2*90 

*0X5 

78 

Est. sales 25X00 Tue’S. seta 2*349 




Tin's optfi mi 102.65? 10 ItE 






Livestock 




CATTLE 

(CMER) 0.444 bv- ama owe. 




8275 

7X20 Apr to 7SXO 75X0 

7150 

75X2 

+ 0X7 


75J7 



72X7 


7387 



71.87 

+075 12J51 

7*10 

rTlTBTLBTl . ■ 


72X0 

+ 0J8 10X16 

7*30 

BrL.. >*a Brf iKrTTl 

72X5 

7*97 

,112 

P 51 

7*25 

mrP '• i“T-»>ri®rTTB 

73X0 

7275 

+*18 

UCB 

7118 

73X0 AorV5 71*7 7190 

rm 

7185 

+*20 




10,121 Tue'S. safes 12504 




TursaoenM 67J21 on us? 





jj = ; 

CATTLE (One*} SUM U.- arm 







79 JO 

—0X2 


B*40 


79X2 

79X2 

,*07 

3,7*4 

83X0 


80X0 

80.18 

,0JB 

*921 

81 JD 

7950 Sett to OWB RUB 

79X2 

79 J7 

,*07 

906 

I1J5 


79J5 

79.95 

+*U 

SM 

mo 

1,7 

8030 

8DJ5 




79X0JBI96 79X0 79X0 

79X5 




BUS 

7BX5MTU 7*95 78XS 

7*90 

7*90 

— 0.10 

X 

EsLftta 

1J97 Tue’S. sates 1589 





Tue's open kit 13025 up 2H 





HOGS (CMER) MCm ewior* 





SI .92 


4190 

€5.77 

— Ol53 


5627 

e ' nl' ■ 

52X0 

2.10 

— *30 

ill, J 

S5J7 

4550 Julto 51X5 52.15 

51X7 

51X5 



|,y I.-, B 

53X0 

4635 Auato 50.10 5030 

4975 

49X5 

-*35 

f iL ^ 


*U0OdH C-1S 4*37 

4*95 

4*97 


Iff' '.1 

5*58 


4635 

45X0 

-*» 

1452 

VI AH 



4SJS 

-*37 

385 

40X0 

40.90 Aor 95 4*15 

4*10 

4*12 

—423 

Itt 

51X8 

48X0 Jllfi 95 


4*S0 

-*42 

58 

Est. sole 

4X41 Tub’s, seta *479 





Tub’s ocen ins jrxfl uo 56 





PORKB&UE5 (OI4ER) «rara..ankiiwr 

b 



61X8 

050 May 94 5387 S*» 

5313 

suo 

—0X5 

KUS 

KUA 

39 JO Julto 5*60 5*90 

5395 

5*25 

• 113 

1115 


42X0 Auato 5235 S2.90 

51X7 

51.92 

,*07 

762 

61.15 

31.10 Feb ?5 5U8 5635 

55X0 

5*00 

,070 

in 

60JB 

38iOMar9S 


SM 

-410 

14 


S6SDM0V9S 


S7X0 


19 

Ed.sales 

2X38 Tue’S, seta 2J97 





Tuo^openW WJ53 0" « 






Food 

C U PPE E C (NCSO_J7je»te-2«n«fJti. 

90X0 63JSMcnr9* 81J5 8285 SIJS 

87X0 6*90 J18M 83J0 8*30 8380 

RUB MJDSeaW 84X0 8180 8*50 

9188 77. 10 Dec M SUO KJ0 8680 

9BJB 7BJ0Mor95 87J0 IUB 87X5 

91 JO B2J0MCV9S B8J0 8UQ 8*30 

49 JO 0100 M 9* 89X0 I? JO B9J0 

SI JO 09.00 SM 95 _ 

Eat. sees 11953 Tue^-stees 50X27 
Tue^iopenM Si8» o« 1613 
SUGAR-WORLD 11 (MC333 lt2XMIn.-cma;i 


[ Season Season 


, ™ P " 




High 

Low Open 

Hteh 

Low 

00*8 

Oig 

OPJM 

12X7 

OJOMoyto loxo 

1&93 

1*74 

1077 

-*M1 18209 

12X0 

9.15 Jill to 11.16 

11.11 

1*96 

1*99 

— *12 43.974 

1IJS 

9X20dto 11X3 

11X6 

10X5 

1*07 

— 4L15 3*390 

11X2 

9.17 Marto 1*78 

1*83 

1472 

1*72 

-0X6 15229 

ll/ffl 

1*57May9S 1*83 
1*57 Julto 

1*84 

1*74 

1*73 

-an 

2,115 




1073 

— *06 

1.190 

11X0 

10X7 Oct 95 1*82 

1*82 

1*12 

1*73 

— *06 

354 

11X5 

IOXBMcb-96 



1073 

— *06 

39 

EsL seta 23J09 Tim’s, soles 16X29 




Tue’S open M 111X88 off 

184 





COCOA (NCSE) tsmcb^HRS-SperiM 




1365 

999X6 94 1133 

1147 

1105 

1109 

—24 39,182 

1377 

IBMScpto 1,40 

1172 

TOO 

1136 

-25 13237 

1309 

1041 Decto 1200 

1309 

1173 

1177 

— 33 

7695 

1302 

HI77MsarW 1240 

1240 

raas 

1210 

-23 10293 

1400 

HOC Marto 1102 

1134 

nas 


—24 

863 

1407 

1225 Ji r 'J5 1279 

1279 

1255 

1257 

-73 

2666 

1350 

1775 SeP 95 



12B0 

— 30 

521 

1437 

1332 Dec 95 1310 

1310 

1305 

1312 

—23 

291 

1315 

1385 Mar W 



1347 

—23 

1 

1340 

1225 May 96 1260 

1260 

1225 

1233 


*951 

ESI.Mta 12X00 Tub’s. BOfea 12X74 




1 Tub’s upot M 






1 ORANCEJUKE U4CTT4J tsaoain^cMmMrm. 



135L00 

89X0 May to 90X0 

99 JO 

9060 

99.10 

+0X0 

*426 

135X0 

18*75 Jut to HUS 

H2X0 

100X5 

10175 

+060 12J48 

13*50 

184X0 Sopto 10*35 

105X5 

10*00 

10*65 

+ *5B 

2JD9 

13*00 

WLISNavto 10*50 

105X0 

10*25 

10525 

+065 

1,131 


1 KLKI Jon 95 T05L25 

106X0 

10525 

106X5 

+ *10 

zm 

12*25 

lOSXOMrato HJBJW 

108X0 

107X0 

108X5 

+0X0 

SM 


MOV 95 



110X5 

+ 130 



Juiw 



110X5 

+ 130 



S«p 95 



110X5 

+ 1X5 


Est. sates 3X00 Tub's, sate; 

3.922 





1 Tue'S open It* 21121 up 667 






Metals 




HI GRADE COPPER (NCMK 





9125 

74X0 Apr M 8*75 

8*90 





102.70 

7360 May 94 8735 

87X0 

0665 

86X5 

—465 17,187 

9IJB 

7*10 Jun M 87X5 

87X5 

07X5 

87X5 

-065 


102.95 

7*20 Jui M 87X5 

•8X0 

0*90 

87 JS 

-470 23719 

183X0 

7*90 Sep 94 87.90 

88X0 

17X0 

B735 

— *45 

5246 

101.90 

7175 Dec « 88.10 

00.10 

8725 

0765 

-QX5 

4.150 

90X0 

7*90 Janto 






99X0 

73X0 Feb 95 






107 JO 

73X0880-95 8*10 

0*10 

87X0 

87X5 

—07S 

2X58 








91 JO 

78X0 Jut 95 08X0 

6SJJQ 

87X0 

S7X5 

-0X0 


91X5 

75J0 Auato 



87 JO 

— *65 



79-lOSBPto 



87X5 

—485 


9*15 

75JBOd9S 



8741 

—0X5 


8*30 

77J5Navto 



•760 




88X0 Dec 95 



0770 

-*« 

X» 

89X0 

88X0 Janto 



0775 

— *95 






Tub’s open «* 56X07 off 419 





SB.VEC 

(NCMX) 5J»frovot-o*»*ipnr*«*r» 



H1X 

51*0 Apr to 



wn 

,46 


5010 

TTIXMoyM 52*0 

S26X 

510X 

S3SS 


5640 

5210 Jun </4 S23X 

52*0 

S73X 

SZ7X 

,43 


5WX 

271XJUIM 52*0 

531X 

5215 

ODfl 


59*5 

mxseaw 52*0 

53*0 

S2&A 




S97X 

38*0 Decto SJ7X 

MIX 

527X 



S64J1 

401 X Jan 95 



S4U 





SOX 





406X 

41*0 May 95 5S0X 

5S0X 

550X 

SUO 

,43 

2688 

41*0 

42*0X695 557 X 

557X 

S57.0 

ISIS 




493XSBP9S 



565.9 

,*3 


62*0 

539XDBCVS 



57*9 

,*3 









ESL sates 2*000 TUB'S, sates 41X96 




f Tun'iopenfrtf 114*547 up 1554 





*ymn 

335X0 Apr 94 



38*90 

+ 170 

64 

437X0 

3I7XO Jul H 38100 

390X0 

303X0 

309X0 


425X0 

36&XOOdM 390X0 

390X0 





429X0 

374X0 JOn 95 391X0 

392X0 

39*50 

392.10 

+ 1X0 

732 

42SJB 

370X0 Acr 95 39100 

393X0 

393X0 

393X0 

+ 1X0 

MS 

EsI.SHin 1«1 ni<rs.«a?m 

5X60 




Tub’s open M 22X14 off 1056 
OOLD (NCMX) anm-amw 

VBVML 




XU 

33120 Asrto 372X0 

372X0 

371X0 

37220 

,*70 

416 

392X0 

370X0 May to 



392X0 

+070 


41 7 JO 

33960 Jun M 372X0 

37*30 

372.20 

37X90 


415X0 

30X0 Aua to 376X0 

377X0 

37*90 

376X0 

♦070 11248 1 

*17X0 

36*00 Oct to 300X9 

379.60 

37800 

379 JO 

,*79 

3276 

426X0 

341X0 Dec M ».10 

38270 

301X0 

082X0 

♦ 079 14,716 

411X0 

343X0 F«b 95 305.10 

an 

mio 

385X0 

,070 


417X0 

36*90 Apt 95 300X0 

308X0 

WfB 

309.10 

,070 


478JD 


392X0 




412X0 

38*50 AW to 



396.10 

+*70 

1XH 

41130 

410200095 



400X0 

+07D 

429JB 

POXODncto 403X0 

402X0 

scaja 

OftlM 

+*30 

4612 

424J0 

41 2X0 Feb M 



40UO 

♦ 070 


Est.Mta 26000 TUB'S. safe 

69X30 




| Tub’s open Int 150X65 im 054 












■1 fc .1 

l* 1 />■! 



fr/ -■! 

tfU 

Will I 

w* 1 ml 


B]L| 

■CtTII 








Financial 

U5T. BILLS ICMBR) sinMM-rata»Ba. 


9676 

9577 Jim 94 

95X1 

95X1 

9578 

9S79 

-403 33JQ0 

96X0 

9ii9Sa>to 

9177 

9S73 

9520 

9573 


10J72 

9*10 

9470 Dec M 

9474 

9478 

9*73 

9*77 

♦0JXJ 

*940 

9SX5 

MXOMOrto 

9461 

to66 

9*43 

9*4* 

►003 

199 


EsL tales NA Tue’s.sttes UP 
Tue^eoenM *7.171 on 1126 
5 YR. TREASURY (COOT) MUPBni-rtiSBiWrflHRi 
112-85106-145 JunH 104-29 1 OS-04 W-24 105-03 « 06 I86J63 

110- 19BB-125 SeoMHMriU UlriD HD- 31 184-07 * 06 IJD1 
EsL soles 40800 TUB'i.adto SUM 

Tue'seostM 1B7JU eH m 

II YR- TR EASURY (CBOT) 1WABgl».MLaia«lflM 
115-21 102-30 JraW HU-77 105-07 182-27 105-86 r ll 336806 

115- GTT Ha-30 SaoW 101-16 104-0 UD-1S 104-02 1 12 12.137 

114- 11 HCrin Dec 9410-38 103-06 lm-W 103-08 * 13 751 

111- 87 Ml -09 Mar 95102-00 1B2-14 101-29 102-M * 14 11 

101-22 100-28 Jim 95 101-24 * 14 

EsL soles 121,121 rue's sates 177 JM 
Tire's own W WJ75 OH 4260 

US TREASURY BOWS (CBOT) OpcMiOB4aB-BK*Obidivi«pai 
119-29 9141 Junto 106-00 HM-16 103-19 104-U * 14 4S1JU 

118-16 98-12 See 94 103-07 183-17 102-21 m-u * u SUM 

118-00 91-19 DMHHOriO U2-26 102-01 182-26 * 14 3L799 

116- 70 U0-26 Mar T5M1-I5 HBriH 181-14 107-06 * 14 2J8I 

115- 19 98-15 Jun95 101-19 t 14 274 

112- 15 99-19 Sep 95 lOlrill t 14 T« 

113- U 99-05 Dec 95 100-17 * 14 39 

114- 06 90-13 Mar 96 lOOria » 1* 34 

Bt.stees 600.000 Tub’s. sates 52SJ0Q 

Tue ^raen W 

MU4W3PAL BONDS (CBOT) imiMn-MSjMie was 
104-87 57-06 Junto «W» 91 -U 89-29 91-04 ♦ 31 32X82 
95-17 06-13 Sopto 09-M tOri» 89-05 90-09 , 31 Ml 
Eg.sota MOO TUB’S, soles 7,107 
Tue^ open ini 32.771 uo nas 


Seogat Seram 
High Low 


Open High Low Oom Chg OoJnr 


BJHPOOU-ARS (CMER) stmerawMiof Mem 
95X90 90X00 Junto 9U20 95JSD 95310 9S330 —10441,312 

95X70 90360 Sep 94 9*660 9*710 9*650 94410 398X68 

95.100 98.71 ODBC 94 9*120 9*130 9*060 9*120 , 3031*787 

955*0 90340 Mor 93 93X20 50870 93X00 93X40 ,40273X78 

9*739 90J10 Junto 93X10 92X70 93X90 93X40 ,50205X91 

94X20 OUlOScmto 93230 93310 93320 93J00 ,60179X39 

9*280 91.180 DOC 95 92X60 93JS) 92X50 93X40 ,70141X08 

9*220 90750 Mar 96 92X20 93X00 92X00 92X90 ,70129394 

Est. ides NA Tub’s, stas 492X75 
Tup's open W 2X70X21 up 3450 
BRITISH POUND (CMBt) inrnn|.lnWNid>ttlM 
13150 1X474 Jun 94 IXH0 1X908 1X774 1X901 ,120 45X38 

1X9*0 1X44BSCP94 IXtoO 1XS7B 1X00* 1X878 +116 968 

1X950 1X500 Dec 94 1X870 1X870 1X870 1X170 ,114 32 

1X660 1X640 Mar 96 1.4366 +116 2 

Est. seta NA rue's, sates 5X0 
Hue’s open ini 42X49 off 3875 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) M*-lpaHi 


*7005 

*7113 Jun 94 

*7198 

*7224 

*7187 

*7213 

+ 15 38234 

07740 

07068 Septo 

*7154 

*7175 

*7154 

*7176 

+ 15 

2X15 

07470 

07038 Decto 

87136 

*7140 

*7131 

*7148 

,15 

1217 

*7405 

*7020 Marto 




*7126 

+ 15 

597 


0X990 Jun 95 




*7103 

+ 14 

84 


Septo 




07000 


1 


EsL sales NA Tim's, sates *671 
TuesoranM 

6ERMANMARK (CMER) iparram- ImMtaucftiULlKn 
0X133 0X6taXm94 0JB73 0X906 OSK1 0X890 ,3195X36 

06065 OJiflOSeoM OJB* 05802 0XK7 0J8B8 , 32 3,163 

ILSMI 05590 Dec 94 0X090 ,32 133 

UMT OXSIOMtato 05902 ,32 619 

Ed. sales NA Toe’s, soles 62,995 
Tub’s open, i nt 99J51 up 37 

JAPAfg SEYB l (CMER) sptrra- 1 ■xMmatsUXUOOin 

OJOW2COJlW77SO.a7?OTOJ09721 S3J76 

IMWaUWffiBiil 0X097600309782*0097500X09779 2X52 

000 w ®®X095aSDecto0J09B400X09*te0X09D4BU)098O 666 

. Jun95 0X09987 2 

Bt.tOta NA TWLSOta 2A028 
Tue^S Open ire 56X96 oil 708 
SWBS FRANC (CMSi) trattanc IwHeMteMOM 
njlis 0X390 JraW 06929 0X983 0X919 0X970 ,43 39X81 

07115 06600 Seo 94 0XM2 06995 06930 06985 , 43 361 

07130 06455 Dec to 06595 0X993 0X995 07012 ,43 333 

ER. spies NA Tug’s, soim 19X21 
Tue'S Open Int 40X79 Off 404 


Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NCTTO SSXM«H.-cmtsBerm. 

81X0 57X7 May 94 BUS 8170 1051 80X9 -076 HUM 

BOS 81 J5 8872 80X2 -0X0 25X13 

&SS ZfrU 7i75 7S75 -037 3586 

S'22ri : S I 175 73J0 -OX3 16J9* 

6ZAMarto 74L5D 74X5 74J0 74J0 — *J3 1X85 

74X0 74ta 7*40 74X0 -0J3 440 

7125 7575 75J0 7465 -020 78 

0095 7175 HLSO 

Est. sales 10X00 Ws-sata 9,186 
Tue’sepenH S7XM up 406 
tEATWGOO. (NMER) 42.BMeH-«rai»rra 
STM 41 JO May 94 46.17 4666 4570 MX 0 —4,17 32X55 

41X0AH194 46.10 46J6 4575 46X0 —41X6 48.200 

41 JO Jut 94 4*30 46X0 4*10 x w — fl.fll 34X82 

47M 3*75 S5 ToSnxa 

52 5-S 48JB +8J4 7,142 

46X0MWM 49X0 49 JO 49X0 49 Jo ,QI4 1Z30 

50X5 50.95 SOM Sffl ,8X9 12^9 

2-3S 2*0 ".la 9.10 +0J4 *805 

51 - 70 31 - 70 n-w si.10 +0X4 

SfiWPB »25 SUO 30.10 50JS ,1139 1X63 

8S3K? S3 S3 S3 £3 

Tue-so mwirt 165X 03 eH 973 

nwBOL 

1190 Aar to 16X6 1Af] 1*14 urn xn.,1 Sfljw 

1W2 'MW '«} ,aiat§877 

uwfLTL 3“* 16.17 +4L12 49.161 

^5 * 5-9* 14.15 ,111 38X31 

1*50 Sop to 16X6 1*20 1*98 1*11 ,0JK ZLE1 

U650OW 1*13 1*25 1*10 *T8 .DJI ^ 

Jfll 1*15 1*15 .0X2 1*95 

1*93 Dae 94 1*28 1*35 1*13 14JJ7 J1 10 27X34 

IsxIfSot t*2 ,i2S W-tt 9109 7,117 

1*30 1*J0 I6J0 1430 5774 

lfiSSSSfe? IH1 1MG +W4 un 

IMS ,fca| itsfl ttu>T 5,55 

unffi? ItS It-® ,fc57 1tsr * aja it* 

1573 Junto 1665 1646 1*60 +BJB 1&433 

iUKJulW 1662 1*62 |*S uS JJg W 

17X5 17JJS T7JH HOPIIJW 


9J9 

7*65 

7*00 

7*60 

75X0 

176X0 


57X0 

3360 

57.17 

5730 

3030 

59X0 

6223 

SITS 

5730 

5SXO 

sort I 

49 JO 


21X5 


1738 


1968 

1933 


iHSMwto 4US 49X4 mS~ ySIl^SHa 6*121 
«■«■*"« 4SX5 4935 ,0X9 42X69 

»« *90 49X2 +0.14 17681 

2-?S ® J0 mjB ,«U1 I1JS5 

4111 4635 47 JS «X7 ,026 7J4S 

*L8S 46JS 4*85 4*97 +BJ6 

SOte ^ , ’« 4 

Tue-soPonH 127 J15 up T34 


61X0 
1 6030 
60X0 
15*00 
<760 


Stock Indexes 

SIPCOMP.MOCX (CMSR) 

44*50 4)930 44270 —040191, 

SV W NA°^Jk^ ^ t 

nTScCOMP, mex (NYFE) — 

Mm SSf;! 4 tosxe 24*3 IfUS * atlQS -ii« li 
s£m W*75 2*7 JO S<JB 2*5X5 iSS 

wa-^aavu^ 


Moodrt 
Reuters 
DJ. Futures 
Com. Research 


Commodity Indexes 

Close 


iai3xo 

UMJO 

135X8 

22059 


Previous 

1 . 21*88 

13588 

22021 




^Billion 


NY! 


. Wedfie^dgy's 
















1 




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5 


^ v. 


Page 11 



Falling Sales 
Hurl Daimler’s 
Aerospace Unit 


ConjH/arf b> Our Staff From Dispatches 

T Deutsche Aero- 
P AG, a umi of Daimlei-Benz 
AG, announced Wednesday that it 
pwted a net loss of 694 million 
Deutsche marks ($408 million) in 
1993, more than double its 1992 
loss of 341 million DM. 

The company also said that stag- 
nant sales would lead to a loss 
again in 1994 before cost savings 
from a massive program of layoffs 
and plant closures make a return to 
profit likely in 1995. 

Like most European aerospace 
and aviation companies, Deutsche 
Aerospace has been badly hit by 
the recession and by cutbacks ii) 
defense budgets following the end 
of the Cold War. Since its creation 
in 1989 from a merger of two air- 
craft companies, Deutsche Aero- 
space has only once made a profit: 
50 million DM on sales of 12.5 
billion DM in 1990. 

Manfred Biscfaoff, the compa- 
ny's finance director, said that 
there would be a "definite improve- 
ment" in earnings in the current 
year, although there would still be a 
loss. He said that the company 
would return to profit in 1995 "if 
we don’t have any more special 
costs and if events in the area of 
politics don't surprise us." 

He also said that sales in 1994 
would not exceed those recorded 
last year. Sales in 1 993 bad fallen to 
17.3 billion DM, down 7 percent 
from the previous year. 

Jurgen Schrempp, chief execu- 


tive of Deutsche Aerospace, said 
that the company’s reorganization 
program had led to a one-time 
write-off of 1.1 billion DM this 
year. He said the restructuring 
would include the dosing oT six 
domestic plants by 19% and the 
reduction of the company's work 
force by more than 10,000, to 
70,000. 

Mr. Schrempp said that a down- 
ward trend in orders had forced the 
company to take drastic action. 
“This is one of the factors that is 
forcing us to reduce capacity, be- 
cause we can only support those 
activities that we'll need in the long 
term" be said. 

Orders fell last year to 15.6 bil- 
lion DM, down 82 percent from 
1992. 

The company said that military 
sales have fallen over the past four 
years from more than 50 percent of 
total sales to 27 percent as spend- 
ing by governments fell and as 
Deutsche Aerospace extended ac- 
tivities in other brances. Mr. 
Schrempp said more than half of 
the company's spending on re- 
search was bong devoted to nonde- 
fense products. 

Regarding the new Eurofighter 
model being developed by Germa- 
ny, Britain, Italy ana Spain, be said 
that the German government 
should pay extra development 
costs of 570 million DM or possibly 
face an even higher bill. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters) 


U.S. to Rule on Merieux Vaccine 

'Tangled Web’ Over Control ol Rabies Treatment 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — A decision is due this 
week in the battle between a French pharma- 
ceutical giant and a smaller American compa- 
ny over who will provide a life-saving rabies 
vaccine to Americans and at what price. 

-It’s a very tangled web," said Dr. F.T. 
Satalowich of the National Association of 
Public Health Veterinarians. 

For years, the French company Pasteur 
M6rieux Serums & Vacdns SA was the only 
source for the human rabies vaccine sold in 
the United Stales. American doctors com- 
plained that this monopoly caused the drug's 
price to jump from $30 a dose to $100 in six 
years and sometimes led to shortages. 

So when Institut Mfaieux SA — Pasteur 
Mferieux’s parent and a unit or Rh6ne- Pou- 
lenc SA, France's leading chemical and phar- 
maceutical company, bought a company that 
was about to launch its own rabies vaccine in 
America, the Federal Trade Commission in- 
tervened. 

In 1990, the FTC said Mferieux could not 
acquire Connaught Laboratories Inc. unless 
it relinquished its monopoly on the vaccine. 
Mfaieux signed a consent order agreeing to 
sdl Connaught's rabies vaccine and to lease 
the buyer its manufacturing plant so produc- 
tion could begin immediately. 

Four years later, however, Merieux still 
owns both vaccines — and now is asking the 


FTC to lift the consent order so it will not 
have to sell to the prospective buyer. North 
American Vaccine Co. The FTC’s decision is 
due by Friday. . „ 

“This is going in the wrong directum. 
North Amencan's lawyer. Dan Abdun-Nabi, 
said. He said the monopoly had "sent prices 


The French company 
says the monopoly it was ‘ 
asked to give np no 
longer exists. 

up and supplies down when people really 
need a reliable source." 

But Don McKibbin, a spokesman for Mer- 
ieux-Connaugbt, replied: “There is no monop- 
oly any more. The economic environment has 
r franpvt significantly for the rabies vaccine. 

Raines is an increasing concern in Amenta, 
where at least three deaths were reported from 
the disease last year. Anyone bitten or 
scratched by un vaccinated animals must im- 
mediately get about five vaccine shots. Once 
symptoms of rabies appear, death is inevitable. 

About 26,000 Americans will need the vac- 


cine this year. But whose shots they will get is 
up to Lhe FTC. 

Doctors do have another vaccine source: 
The SmithKfine Beecham Pharmaceuticals 
anil oT SmithKline Beecham PLC has just 
beau) selling 10,000 doses of vaccine from 
laboratories owned by the state of Michigan, 
and two European companies are seeking 
U.S. approval to sdl their own vaccines. 

But critics say Michigan’s 10,000 doses wifi 
not go far and that more competition is 
needed now to lower the drug's cost and 
ensure supply. 

"Rabies is the disease where we shouldn't be 
thinking and talking about monopolies," said 
Dr. Charles Ropprecht, rabies chief for the 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

But Mfcreiux says Michigan's vaccine elim- 
inated the monopoly and complains that 
North American Vaccine “has never actually 
produced or sold vaccine in commercial 
quantities." 

North American, which pledged to lower 
the drug's cost, has vaccines in the final 
phases of testing funded by the National. 
Institutes of Health. Thau Mr. Abdun-Nabi 
said, should be proof of the company's capa- 
bilities. 

“Clearly aD they’re saying is, 'We don’t 
want competition,' ” he said of Mfrieux. 



Sources: Reuters. AFP 


Inlctnuinral HeraU Ttihuoe 


KOHL: Chancellor Says Banks Might Share Blame in Schneider Case 


$4 Billion Banesto Loss 


Compiled hy Our Staff From Dispatches 

MADRID — Banco Espahol 
de Credito, which was pul un- 
der state control at the end of 
.1993 amid reports of heavy 
losses, had a pretax loss of 577.9 
billion pesetas ($4 billion) for 
the year, the national commis- 
yon for the stock market re- 
ported Wednesday. 

The commission said doubtful 
loans at the bank, known as 
Banesto, rose to 784.8 billion pe- 
setas at the end of 1993 from 
188.7 billkm pesetas at the end 
of 1991 The Spanish govern- 
ment dismissed the board of 


Banesto and installed its own 
a dminis trators on Dec. 28. 

The government has since of- 
fered Banesto for sale and is 
expected to decide next week 
among three potential purchas- 
ers: Banco de Bilbao- Vizcaya, 
Banco Santander and the state- 
owned banking concern Argen- 
taria Corporacidn Ban can a de 
EspaAaSA. 

Banesto is estimated to need 
an infusion of 605 billion pese- 
tas, with 320 billion pesetas to 
be provided by the bank itself 
through a new owner or other 
private sources. 

(AFP. AFX) 


Continued from Page 1 

said Ernst Welteke, finance minister of the state 
of Hesse. 

Most bank loans to the Schneider company. 
Dr. Jflrgeu Schneider AG, were at least parti al- 
ly secured by property, while thousands of 
gm»T1 contractors were left in the lurch. 

In an interview, Mr. Welteke proposed 
rhangp-s m Ge rman regulations affecting banks' 
reporting of rainy-day reserves, the jurisdiction 
of the federal banking supervision office and 
bankruptcy laws. 

“Our system of universal banking also has its 
advantages, but right now we have to appeal to 
banks' sense of responsibility and ethics,” Mr. 
Welteke said. 

Economics Minister Gunter Rexrodt has 
ncVml banks to come up with “unconventional" 
ways of assisting small businesses in trouble as 
a result of the Schneider bankruptcy. 

Last week, the federal government said it 
would consider changes in the country’s bank- 
ruptcy code to aid small businesses that rely on 
banks’ estimations of their diems’ solidity. 

Though the banks are not yet the subject of a 
formal investigation, Hans-Hermann Eckert, a 
s poicfgiryffl for the Hesse state prosecutor's of- 
fice, said an ongoing probe of afieged fraud and 
embezzlement involving Mr. Schneider and his 
wife extended “in all di m e n sions." 

That includes the possibility that banks or 


individual bank employees had aided the 
Schneiders’ alleged deceptions by accepting 
bribes or knowingly overlooking inconsisten- 
cies in loan applications, he said. 

His statements coincided with the announce- 
ment of a second criminal charge against the 
Schneiders, for embezzlement. 

Deutsche Bank AG, the biggest single credi- 
tor of the missing couple, said it welcomed an 
investigation, which it said “would show that 
there is no proof of criminal activity on the part 
of the bank.” The bank has accused Mr. 
Schneider of lying on an application for a loan, 
which constitutes fraud. 

But the prosecutor, echoing recent comments 
by real estate and construction industry special- 
ists, openly doubted that the Schneiders could 
be proved guilty of deceiving the banks. The 
banks “know the real estate business and nor- 
mally would not allow themselves to be de- 
ceived in that way," he said. 

Deutsche Bank has grudgingly conceded a 
need to reexamine its lending procedures after 
tying forced for a second time to defend itself 
against charges that it failed to adequately 
scrutinize a minor client. The bank also bad a 
major role in tire recent near-bankruptcy and 
bailout of Metal! gesellschaft AG. 

In both cases, critics say. banks ignored wdl- 
publidzcd warning signals that risky specula- 
tion might end badly for their clients, thero- 


Very briefly: 

• British unemployment dropped by a seasonally adjusted 30J00 in March. 
tairir.p the overall unemployment rate down to 9.7 percent from 9.8 percent 
inFebruaiy — a 21 month low. The government also said its debt in 1 993- 
94 was £45.9 billion ($68 billion), below its projection of £49.8 billton. 

» France's investigation into past management practices and steep losses at 
state- run CrMit Lyonnais will be dosed to the public and the only official 
information about the investigation will be released in afind report. The 
bank had a loss of 6.9 billion French francs ($1 bObon) in 1993. 

• Swiss Bank Corn, expects “satisfactory" results in 1994, despite weak 
operating profit in February and March, because of increased commis- 
sions. The bank did not release any specific figures. 

• Hedrotux AB agreed to sdl its U.S. subsidiary, Btaw Knox Construction 
Equipment Cwm to dark Equipment Co. Tor 1.14 billion kronor ($144 
mi^nXBlaw Knox is part of its White Consolidated Industries Inc. 


selves and thousands of individual employees, 
shareholders and taxpayers. 

Deutsche Bank officials said they never had 
any reason to suspect Mr. Schneider of decep- 
tion or hwnfl in fi nancial difficulty until he 
asked for a“ transitional loan” in a letter re- 
ceived April 7. the same time it learned of his 
disappearance. 

But numerous banking, building and real 

estate industry sources We countered that — 

Schn eider fiasco was avoidable. 

■££ Dior Posts Profit, Sees More 

empire was based, said authorities first order 
of business was “to ask how it’s posable that 
one individual can collect such a volume of debt 
in such a short time." 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispasckes 

PARIS — The fashion house 

ChristianDiorSA,oneofthecom- 

‘People have a right mask us, the politicians, that controls the hntury- 

at’s happening in a land where a n ormal mods maker LVMH Louis Vuitton 

MOet Hennessy SA, said Wednes- 
day that profit after minority rnter- 

a nwmni lad vnr and WAS 


what c - . 

citizen who wants a mortgage on his house has 
to do a song and dance act while someone like 
Mr. Schneider can colled a debt of a billion 
marks," he said. 

According to Bundesbank records, the 
Schneiders’ debts more than doubled between 
July 1992 and the end of last year, to 5 billion 
DM from 2.4 billion DM, even as the German 
real estate market showed signs of stalling. 

Because the Schneider empire was organized 
as a limited liability partnership, it was not 
required to disclose details of its finances. 


UIM UMUVU-M 

ests rose9 percent last year and was 
on course for a considerably larger 
gain, this year. 

Dior, which has a 55 percent 
stake in Jacques Rbber SA, a bold- 
ing company that in turn owns 45 
percent of LVMH, said 1993 profit 
aune to 876 million French francs 
($150 million). 

Of Dior's total profit, 116 mil- 


lion francs was contributed by its 
dot fa cs- deag ning and fashion busi- 
ness, it said, with the rest coining 
mainl y from LVMH. 

The company said that if the 
trend of the last "few months contin- 
ued, there would be a “very signifi- 
cant increase" in profit this year. 
Dior said sales for the first two 
months of 1994 were up 27 percent 
from the year-earlier period. Sales 
rose 10 percent in 1993, to 24.6 
billion francs. The company rec- 
ommended a dividend of nine 
francs a share for 1993. compared 
with 8.40 francs for 1992. 

{AFP. Bloomberg) 



COSMETICS: A Berlin Story 


Continued from Phge 9 

European markets, Mr. Learsy said 
it would be necessary to keep prices 
down due to consumers' “very lim-’ 
tied purchasing power." 

“We can afford to have low 
prices with reasonable volume," he 
said. 

Mr.' Learsy hopes such a policy 
will enable the company to sdl its 
products in Ubma. He traveled 
there earlier this month with Ber- 
lin’s mayor to sign a joint venture 
agreement. 

The company plans to invest sev- 
eral milli on dollars in China to 
build a plant that will sell products 
under its brand names. 


Closer to home. Beilin Kosmetik 
is looking to break into Western 
Germany, but so far its efforts have 
not been particularly su ccessful 
apart from a few department stores 
in the Berlin area. Last fall, Mr. 
Learsy criticized potential West 
German business partners for not 
giving him a “fair opportunity to 
market oar products.” 

“We’ve had experiences where 
many distributors or chains have 
not even given us a meeting to show 
our products for seven to nine 
months after we asked for an ap- 
pointment,” he said. “There’s enor- 
mous resistance to accommodating 
Eastern German products in the 
German marketing chain.” 


Fiat Italy Prospects Dim 


AFP-Exui News 

TURIN — Fiat SpA’s share 
of the European export market 
in the first few months of this 
.year jumped between 12 per- 
cent and 14 percent from the 
previous year, but prospects re- 
main “not brilliant" in Italy, the 
company's managing director 
said Wednesday. 

“The economic recovery does 
not appear to be so obvious. It's 
slow and labored,” Paolo Can- 
tardla said of Italy in compari- 
son with signs of recovery seen 
in other European markets. 

“We well know that the pros- 
pects for a market recovery, 


above all the Italian market, are 
not brilliant in the short term,” 
he said. 

Mr. Canlarefla also said Fi- 
at’s Alfa Romeo unit would 
launch a family-model Alfa 145 
on Sept. 1. as (art of the compa- 
ny’s plan to launch six new 
models in the next two years. 
He said family-sized models ac- 
counted for 50 percent of Alfa 
Romeo’s sales. 

Fiat will invest 1.4 trillion lire 
($86 million) in its Alfa Romeo 
plant near Milan between now 
and 1996. be said. Fiat has in- 
vested 3.6 trillion lire in the 
plant since 1987. 


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1NTKRN \TlOM.\l, HERALD TRIBINE, THURSDAY. APRIL 21. 


rule} Fe 



Page 13 

ASIA/PACiii 


ar °f Unrest Inhibits China’s Reform Efforts 


B v Lena H. Sun 




reform siaie-owned SSL*.! 6 slo *' n L 8 thcir *ffori to 
nas economy, for ■ lhe backbone of Chi- 

-guanai^ in Beijing S^ng w,d «P read labw 

^rough^i/cuSe 0 ^ *f!f K vf mcia \ l slate sector 
credit is at the ha!f rfoSSS'S Md 1,ghtCTUn£ 
socialist planned rffon 10 move rrom a 

lack or progreS nSkSl? Ir?? 1 *, a markei economy, 
measures s^h as d l fficuJt 10 g° on to other 

. a wSSTJSffiS 2 ?™. 


offidT^..^ *his vor was that 


miglu affect ^ 

«a>nomv C as S thf < Pf^ 1 r 0a formally embraced a markei 
and the ca,„„mvThi”V!. e "?“S Communist Pam, 


The government is battling its highest inflation rale 
since 198V. when soaring prices and panic buying 
fueled the pro-democracy protests that were violently 
crushed by lhe army near Tiananmen Square. 

Prices in major cities were up nearly 25 percent in 
the first quarter of this year, according' to official data 
released tins week. This year, for the first time, the 
government is publishing inflation statistics monthly, 
an indication of how seriously it views the problem! 

Many cities and provinces are trying to reimpose 
price controls on various commodities. In Beijing, a 
recent survey found rising prices to be among die top 
concerns of residents. Many complained that even the 
arrival of large amounts of fruits and vegetables this 

iiididinth 


spring had not brought down prices as it did in the past. 

China's fight against inflation is being stymied by 
the need to pump money into the cash-starved state 


4JJU me CCOnnmv , , — d - i »*«*"*v ***' w sun 

succeeding v**™ n srcw 3 each of the enterprises that account for nearly 50 percent of the 

that further r^'rir 1 now ' lhc S^ ve mment is finding country's industrial output and employ more than 100 
explosive 0163115 grappling with politically miDion people. The government fears that without 

r The nerirJi Tf , subsidies and cheap credit, these enterprises will fail, 

tained nnw f Ve ™ ra P ld economic growth, sus- leaving millions of unemployed, 
chickens lw ,? **® rs » is bringing a Jot of China is afraid “that one spark could ignite a la/ge- 

roost. a Western diplomat said. scale protest” like that of June 1989, said Liu Nian- 


ebun, who is trying to organize an independent union 
to represent workers and peasants. 

There have been numerous reports of strikes and 
worker protests in major cities such &> Xian and 
Tianjin, Mr. Liu said. In China's industrial northeast 
a series of strikes has hit several cities in Liaoning 
Province since March because of wage cuts and price 
increases, according to a Hong Kong newspaper. 

The resulting slowdown in reform nas left struggling 
factories not only still in business, bui pulling down 
more robust competitors. “Those that should die do 
not die, and those that live cannot live well.” a report 
by the China News Service said. 

The ultimate goal for enterprise reform is to make 
state factories responsible for their own profits and 
losses. A much-publicized experiment announced last 
year to overhaul 100 large state-owned factories is still 
on the books, but the names of the factories chosen 
have yet to be made public. 

Many workers fear that China’s economic reforms 
will lead to bankruptcies among state enterprises, 
which provide housing, medical care and education 
benefits as weO as employment. 

At least two-thirds of state enterprises are losing 
money, surviving on subsidies and bank loans that are 


draining government coffers and the state hanking 
system. Bur tight credit, poor nianagemem and accu- 
mulating long-term debt are causing growing layoffs 
as slate-run factories try to pull out ’of the red. 

Of nearly 2.000 enterprises in four major cities of 
Hebei Province. 42 percent were running losses, and 
nearly half of the workers were either not being paid or 
receiving only a portion of their wages, according toon 
official report last week. Some of the enterprises had 
paid no wages Tor five io six months. Others had 
halted medical coverage. 

Even the Beijing Capital Iron & Steel Works, con- 
sidered one of the country's most successful state 
enterprises, needed bank loans to pay wages in Febru- 
ary, according to a China News Service report. 

These concerns make it difficult ro proceed with 
reform in banking, and that, in turn, makes it hard for 
the government to bring down inflation. 

Economists point out that while wages have more or 
less kept pace with inflation, the average wealth of 
Chinese workers is being eroded because bank depos- 
its are not sufficiently indexed to inflation. 

Prime Minister Li Peng has said the government 
wanted to slow economic growth to about 9 percent 
this year. 


Vietnam Resents 
U.S. Energy Firm’s 
Chinese Concession 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

HANOI — A simmering dispute 
over the Spratly Islands heated up 
on Wednesday when Vietnam ac- 
cused an American company 
backed by China of “a very serious 
new escalation.” 

Vietnam was responding to 
Crestone Energy Corp.’s an- 
nouncement on Tuesday that it had 
begun a search for oil in the South 
China See near the Spratly Islands. 
China, Vietnam and Taiwan each 
claim all of the Spratlys. while Ma- 
laysia. the Philippines and Brunei 
claim parts of the archipelago. 

Crestone was granted its pro- 
specting rights in 1992. and Hanoi 
and Beijing have waged a war of 
words since then. 


L 


The Vietnamese Forei gn Minis try 
did not directly criticize Beijing. But 
it said: “No other country or com- 
pany is allowed to carry out explora- 
tion and exploitation of resources 
chi the continental shelf and the spe- 
cial economic zone of Vietnam with- 
out the permission of the Vietnam- 
ese government. Crestone will have 
to take all responsibility Tor conse- 
quences caused by their activities.’’ 

Crestone; an independent oil 
company based in Denver, said it 
was staning work in the disputed 
area about 300 kilometers (190 
miles) southeast of Ho Chi Minh 
City “with full support and protec- 
tiou from China.” 


it said it would would dig explor- 
atory wells under the protection of 


the Chinese navy, which has stepped 
up operations in the Spratlys. Cres- 
tone has said the exploration area 
has an estimated 1 billion bands of 
ofl. The company will have access to 
25,155 square kilometers (10,000 
square miles), the largest area ever 
included in a prospecting contract in 
Southeast Asia. 

Crestone made its announcement 
a few hours before Vietnam signed 
contracts with MobO Corp„ Russian 
and Japanese companies Tor explo- 
ration of the Thanh Long (Blue 
Dragon) field. This lies west of Cres- 
tone's Chinese concession and with- 
in China's territorial claim. 

Hanoi and Beijing normalized re- 
lations in 1991 after a war on their 
land border in 1979 and a dash in 
1988 over the strategic, potentially 
oD-rich Spratly Islands. They signed 
an agreement last year not to use 
force to resolve disputes. 

Vietnam said it had exercised its 
right to sovereignty over its conti- 
nental shelf, inducting the Crestone 
contract area, for years by offering 
exploration blocks for bids. 

The U.S.-backed government of 
former South Vietnam, defeated in 
the Vietnam War in 1975, claimed 
its sovereignty over the area and 
Hanoi tfid likewise after die war. 

Vietnam bad scientific and oil- 
services facilities, including a sea 
lighting system and a meteorology 
station, in ibe area, the Foreign 
Ministry statement said. 

(Reulers. AFP) 


40% Air-India Sell-Off Seen 


Reuters 


BOMBAY — The government is expected to sell 
as much as a 40 percent slake in Air-lndia and tap 
global markets for some of the $2 billion the state- 
owned carrier needs to expand its fleet, Air-India' s 
new managing director said Wednesday. 

Durga Mathur, who took over last month, said 
the government was expected to make an an- 
nouncement on Air-lndia's partial privatization 
soon. “I think die disinvestment will be around 35 
to 40 percent.” he said, adding that he expected the 
stake to be sold over a period of four to five years . 

He also said Air India, winch now has 26 planes, 
planned to buy three A-3I0s from Airbus Industrie 
and two U.S.-made Boeing Co. 747-40Gs by 
1996/97 and a further eight to 12 planes before the 
turn of the century from a selection of U.S.-made 
McDonnell Douglas Carp. MD-iis. Airbus A- 
340s, Boeing 777s and the lL-96s from Russia. 


Mr. Mathur also said Air-India planned to make 
both an international and a domestic bond issue to 
fund “somewhere near half” of the 52 billion 
modernization of its fleet 
He said the carrier was considering five non- 
Indian companies as possible managers for an 
expected Eurobond issue. 

Mr. Mathur said Air-India was replacing aging 
aircraft and bringing down the fleet's average age 
to around six to seven years from the present 11 
Another source of pressure on Air-lndio. be 
said, was the new routes it is seeking, to East Asia 
beyond Singapore and Jakarta, as well as to both 
eastern and western coasts of Australia. 

He said the Asia-Pacific region would be the 
toughest battleground for expansion of Air-India, 
which be acknowledged had been losing market 
share even within India “by remaining static, by 
just aot expanding our fleet, not expanding our 
routes, not trying to seek new markets.” 


Strong Yen 
Cuts Japan 
Car Exports 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 
13000 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 



6000 v irmne 

1983 1994 


Exchange 

index 

Wednesday Pnev, % 

Close Cta3e . Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

9^21.01 9;303.91 -0.59 

Singapore 

Striate Times 

2J3&M 2^21.00 \ +0.39 . 

Sydney 

ABOrdinarifes 

’SSpEso 2^1.40 -0.’^ ' 

Tokyo 


19&SL18 20,192.34 -134 

| KuataLurepur Composite 

1JQ39.68 .1,93604 +6^5 

Bangkok. 

.SET ' 

ifiS&SB H&4JQ2 +0j66 

Seoul ' 

Composite Stock 

8ML84 = 885.8S -0^7 

Taipei - 

• 

5fiBL3Z 6,875.75 *0^9 

Manila 

PSE ' , '•• •; 

2JM8J& 2,812^5 +1JZ3 

Jakarta 

Stodtifictex - ■ 

.468.46- ,465.78 • -i &7\; 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 . . 

4,1074^ 2,104.70 +&13 ■ 

Bombay - 

hteafonaltectex. 

•Clpserf.^ 1^64.03 - 

Sources: Reuters, AFP 

Inmutiotul Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


3 Small Japanese Banks to Merge 


CcnpiMby Our SuffJ From Dispatcher 

TOKYO— While they arc hard- 
ly brand names in Japanese fi- 
nance, three small banks from 
northern Japan that announced 
plans Wednesday to merge could 
represent the start of a consolida- 
tion of the nation's struggling re- 
gional hanks and credit unions. 

Tokuyo City Bank Ltd, Kita- 
Nippon Bank Ltd. and Shokusan 
Bank LtcL. all based in the northern 
region of Tohoku. said they 
planned by January to form a new 
concern called Heisei Bank, in 
which they will have equal stakes. 
The three banks had deposits total- 
ing 127 tnJEon yen ($22 bShon) at 
the end of March. 

“You could construe it as the 
beginning of a shake-up in the 
whole regional financial system,” 


said David Snoddy, an analyst at 
Jar dine Fleming Seoul ties. He said 
regional consobdation bad long 
“been an idea” in Japan and “it 
could be that this is finally going to 
start happening.” 

Some analysts said hints of eco- 
nomic recovery in Japan might 
prove a catalyst for more such 
mergers. But whatever the reason, 
they said, it is certainly not coming 
too soon. 

“It’s not particularly surprising 
that you will see neighboring region- 
al banks come together, because Ja- 
pan has loo many banks." said Da- 
vid ThreadgokL, an industry analyst 
at Barclays deZoeie Wedd. 

As oflast month, Japan had 129 
regional banks, II commercial 
banks, three long-term credit banks 
and seven trust banks, according to 


the Federation of Japan Bankers 
Associations. In addition, there are 
42 8 credit unions known as shinkin. 

But with Tokuyo City and Kita- 
Ntppon saddled with considerable 
bad debt on their books, tbe merger 
may be more than a marriage of 
convenience. As of September 
1993. Tokuyo had 9.1 billion yen 
outstanding in loans to bankrupt 
clients. 

Asked whether tbe deal amount- 
ed to a bailout, Hiroshi JCamata, 
managin g director of Tokuyo City 
Bank's Tokyo branch, said he did 
not see it that way. “I understand 
that this is an equal merger,” he 
(Bloomberg, AFX 1 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — The two biggest 
automakers in Japan said Wednes- 
day that exports declined in the 
year to March 1994 as they shifted 
production overseas to avoid the 
impact of the strong yen and trade 
friction with the United Stales. 

Nissan Motor Co. said exports in 
its 1993-94 financial year plunged 
30 percent from the previous year, 
while domestic production fell 14. 1 
percent. Toyota Motor Corp.'s ex- 
ports fell 13.5 percent in the period 
and production fell 1 1.4 percent. 

Sluggish demand in Japan be- 
cause of the struggling economy 
contributed to the drop in domestic 
production, the automakers said. 

Analysis predicted the trend of 
falling exports would continue as 
the Japanese automakers increase 
overseas production and cut back 
at home. Japanese automakers 
haw tried to increase overseas out- 
put in recent years, in part to avert 
criticism from abroad about car 
exports bong a main factor behind 
Tokyo's huge trade surplus, which 
was 5122 billion in 1993-94. 

A Toyota executive has said the 
company would increase overseas 
production by 50 percent by the 
end of 1996 and would double the 
output capacity of its wholly 
owned U.S. plant in 1993. 

(Reuters. AFP. Knight-Ridder) 


• Toshiba Cbrp. and Seagate Technology Joe of the United Slates 
announced that they have agreed to share all patents relating to computer 
hard disks. " 


• STAR TV said that its launch of a pay-movie channel in Taiwan would 
not be affected by a threatened boycott by cable operators who lost out in 
the competition to become STAR’S Taiwan agent. 

• Sharp Corp. said it would post a rise in its parem company pretax profit 
and revenue in the year ended in March 1994. the first growth in three 
years. The company said that strong sales of electric equipment and video 
cameras bad buoyed results. 

• Pioneer Electric Corp. will market a compact-disk read-only memory 
changer that holds 500 disks, a sign of the rapidly growing popularity of 
the computer-data-storage medium. 

• Northrop Corp. has offered to help Taiwan upgrade its F-5E warplanes. 

• Vietnam said industrial output in the first quarter of this year was 1 1.4 

percent higher than a year ago as exports rose 18 percent and imports 
climbed 20.6 percent. Reuters, a p. a f.y. a fp 


China Raids Pirate-CD Sellers 


The Associated Press 

BEIJJNG — Authorities an- 
nounced a crackdown Wednesday 
on compact-disk piracy that has 
drawn international condemnation 
and a threat of American trade 
sanctions. 

Police raided 400 music stores in 
five southern Chinese cities where 
the pirated disks have nearly driven 
legitimate CDs from lhe market, a 
television news report said. 

By Wednesday afternoon, the re- 
port said, officials in Canton had 
seized more than 53,000 pirated 


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CDs, 2,700 pirated cassette upes 
and almost 100 fake laser disks. U 
said the next step would be a crack- 
down on manufacturers. 

An international industry group 
complained three weeks ago that 
China was exporting tens of mil- 
lions of pirated CDs and threaten- 
ing to destroy die world’s legiti- 
mate CD industry. 

The United Stales wanted China 
in December that it might face 
trade sanctions for widespread 
copyright and trademark viola- 
tions, including CD piracy. 


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International Herald Tribune 



* A Special Report 


Thursday April 2 L 1994 
Part II 


Germany 


Shaping a New Identity, and Trying to Conae to Terms With thePast 


By Marc Fishe r 

T Ssie?| E fr MANS ^ lo ^ m uch 

^ ier lo figure pul. The Wall made 

^ts S, ffe C -K iUliSLs here - wmmu - 
K Sled’ S 

leaded ihrough wxacty, erasing ciass 

Cold wHS? The end of .he 

hralhr d lhe f ? 11 of lh * Berlin Wall 
S?i,^n Pr0mi ^ ° f u a new GCT manv. along 

S?” ,hat lhtfrc w:,uId ** ™ 

Germany. This was going to be confusing. 

bJkf* on the reunited Germany halcm- 
n - eV " so f n,ewha! dizzying kind of 
SLV* °* e 1%u < uficr another, its been one 
stepTorward, one step hack. 

Chan ^! 0r Helmut Kohl repeatedly pro- 
nounced himself and his countrv rcadv to take 
^ n k"^J nleri ?i ilional responsibifiiies, including 
fh-f'iwc 0l,,,,a ^ ro,e * a permanent seat on 
die UN Security Council, and a stronger say in 
turopean leadership. But the Bonn govern- 
ment remains stalemated over how to use its 
troops abroad, and the failure of Europe to 
make any difference in the Balkan conflict has 
l^world skeptical about German rhetoric. 

lhe Treuhand. the agency in charge of pri- 
vatizing Eastern Germany's old communist 
enterprises, declared its work Finished, but 
German industry is exporting jobs bv the hun- 
dreds of thousands and unemployment in both 
parts of Germany has soared to levels not seen 
since the Weimar Republic. 

The Germans seem finally to have asserted 
some command over the angry young toughs of 
the far right, as police and courts have gotten 
more serious about combating violence against 
foreigners. But despite nice wonis of intent 
from Mr. Kohl and other politicians, no move 
has been made toward the immigration and 
citizenship reforms promised during the wave 
of neo-Nazi assaults over the past three years. 

Frightened to the bone that it will lose power 
ibis year, Mr. Kohl’s Christian Democratic 
Union has launched a campaign designed to 
assure Germans that the insecurities of the 
post-Wall era can be overcome through law 
and order. Instead of realistic rhetoric about 
die difficult choices Germany faces, the CDU 
has offered tough talk from parliamentary 
leader Wolfgang Schauble, who advocated us- 
ing Bundeswehr soldiers on German city 
streets, and Steffen Heitmann, Mr. Kohl’s 
abortive personal pick to succeed Richard von 
Weizsacker as president, who told eastern 
women to stop bellyaching about losing their 
jobs and get back to raising families, and called 
on his countrymen and the world to stop focus- 
ing on the Nazi past and the Holocaust. 

Yet, encouragingly, the German public has 
responded to a paucity of vision from its main- 



Hnbot Link/ AFP 


Berlin's Reichstag, one of Germany's most cherished and ambivalent symbols, will be wrapped by the artist Christo in a shimmering silver coat. 


stream parties not by leaping to extremes, but 
by experimenting with centrist protest move- 
ments such as the aptly named Instead Party. 

Similarly, parliamentarians in Bonn over- 
ruled the chancellor and endorsed the Bulgari- 
an -Amen can artist Christo's longstanding 
plan to wrap Berlin’s Reichstag — one of 
Germany's most cherished and ambivalent 
symbols — in a shimmering silver coat, a bit of 
fancy that only a confident, tolerant society 
would embrace. 

But again, that sign of openness contrasts 
with another symbolic act: Mr. Kohl's insis- 
tence that the country's new memorial to its 
war dead, the Neue Wache on Berlin’s majestic 
Unter den Linden, be consecrated as a monu- 
ment not only to German soldiers, but also to 
their victims.’ By mixing perpetrators and vic- 
tims. murderers and murdered, in a single 
symbolic gesture. Mr. Kohl sends a message of 
insensitivity and false confidence. 

This discomfort with the past, ibis attempt 
to redefine history and see the Germans of the 
Nazi era not as criminals or bystanders, but as 


victims of an oppressive force that was some- 
how imposed upon them, is one of the stron- 
gest new messages to emerge from post-Wall 
Germany. 

Last month in Jerusalem, Gtiniher Gilles- 
sen, a leading editor at the Frankfurter Allge- 
meme daily, Germany’s most important estab- 
lishment voice, addressed a gathering of 
Germans, Israelis and American Jews with a 
plea for the creation of “a new taboo” against 
photographic or film representations or the 
Holocaust “Memory should be permitted to 
sink in the sediment of time,” he said. "The 
Sboah is a closed event. The second and (bird 
generations should be spared.” 

Criticizing institutional efforts to keep the 
past alive — meaning Washington’s new Holo- 
caust Memorial Museum and Steven Spiel- 
berg’s “Schindler's List" — Mr. Giilessen said 
“awful crimes should not be permitted to be- 
come ihe pivot of our lives." He rejected the 
notion that the Holocaust was a unique event 
in history, saying that “Relativization is the 
historian's business." 


Mr. Gillessen’s comments were met First 
with stunned silence, then with vociferous re- 
action from Israelis and Americans. “It hap- 
pened in your country. Dr. Giilessen.” said 
Yehuda Brower, perhaps Israel's foremost 
scholar of the Holocaust “For the first time in 
human history, people were murdered because 
they were bom. Your society, like mine, won’t 
gel anywhere unless it confronts what hap- 
pened.” 

The Giilessen speech was no anomaly, h is 
part of an effort by the Kohl government and 
conservative intellectuals in Germany to reach 
for the normalcy that eluded them during the 
artificial, semi-sovereign decades of the- post- 
war era. From the German government’s stren- 
uous efforts to water down the impact of the 
Washington Holocaust Museum by offering to 
pay for an exhibit on postwar German democ- 
racy. to the Bonn government’s recent attempt 
to discredit an American Jewish Committee 
public-opinion survey that found high levels of 
anti-Semitism in Germany, the years since uni- 


fication have brought ever more muscular ef- 
forts to erase the asterisk of history. 

Helmut Kohl's chancellorship can be viewed 
as one driven largely by a desire for normalcy, 
not by any political or economic nationalism 
unleash ed by reunification. But the divisions 
within Germany — pitting east against west, 
German against foreigner, and the nation 
3gainsi its past — are spoiling Mr. Kohl’s 
dream of capping his career with Germany’s 
return to equality with its allies. 

Although he denies any facility with symbol- 
ic politics, Mr. Kohl knows how to send a Firm 
message: When he visited the graves of SS men 
at Rilburg, when be held a gala luncheon for 
Kurt Waldheim, when he buhbeadedly refused 
to recognize Germany’s bonier with Poland in 
the sensitive months alter the fall of the Berlin 
Walk and when be refused to make any gesture 
of sympathy toward Germany’s 6 million for- 
eigners through two years of xenophobic vio- 
lence. Mr. Kohl said that this new Germany 
wants to be considered on its own merits, on its 


lity. . 

German public tell pollsters they want to draw 
a thick line separating themselves from the 
timid, atoning, shuffling West Germany that 
emerged from postwar American domination. 

Mr. Kohl’s attitudes do not reflect national- 
ism. but a longing to step down from the dock 
and be a country that can make mistakes and 
follow policies — whether brilliant or bone- 
headed — without echoes of gposesieps. 

So this fall, as Mr. Kohl bids to keep his job 
for the bulk of the rest of the century, the 
chancellor trill again play with lhe touchy 
issues of memory and history. Strategists in the 
CDU know they must perform a miracle to 
escape being sucked into a Grand Coalition 
with the long-hapless Soria! Democrats. Ger- 
man party politics is operating under new rules 
this year: Fraying party allegiance, social dis- 
cord, economic troubles, and a level of disaf- 
fection in Eastern Germany not yet accepted 
by the major parties 

This German election will be the last before a 
generational shift more dramatic than the elec- 
tion of Bill Gin ton in (be United States. Mr. 
Kohl sees himself as the last German leader of 
the generation formed by memories of the war 
and the UJS.-kd reconstruction of a devastated 
land Mr. Kohl believes be is the last chancellor 
who wfll feel an emotional bond lo the United 
States, and the last who will view European 
unification as a crudaJ barrier agains! the temp- 
tation for Germany to go it alone. 

Mr. Kohl's self-image may sound grandiose, 
but much of that virion is true. Germany is 
particularly lacking in political figures who 
have a sense of national purpose or identity. 
Being world champion in exports is no longer 
enough. Mr. Kohl’s last chance is to present 
himself as the final essential link between the 
wartime generation and a newly confident, 
secure Germany. 

If many Germans find that image of their 
chancellor bard to swallow, the honest among 
them will find that the opposition has provided 
no more plausible virion of the German future. 
This fall German voters will either muddle 
through with Mr. Kohl or take a chance on 
Rudoiu Scharping, the quiet young Social 
Democrat who is tiying to sound os much like 
Mr. Kohl as he can. In Germany, Mr. Kohl is 
often dismissed these days as a loser. Bui this 
one isn’t over. Recall two facts: Germans usu- 
ally vote for personal security. And in the 
postwar era, changes of government have come 
from internal coalition battles: voters have not 
yet ousted a ruling parly at the ballot box. 

MARC FISHER, former Berlin bureau chief of 
The Washington Post, is writing a book about 
the reunited Germany to be published by Simon 
& Schuster next winter. 



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-*1 solar parking meter, a tea set and the * bebo Sher' electric razor are among East German-designed products in a traveling exhibition. 

From the East, a New Focus on Product Design 


By Ann Brockle hurst 

B ERLIN — In [heir efforts to sell 
ineir wares on Western markets. 
East Germans are concentrating 
f* 1 a sla 8 tf of the manufacturing 
p ocess that was long neglected under 
communism: product design. Although 
mans hast German products had a well- 
deserved reputation for qualitv, especially 
in IMinplogKiil areas, they often looked 
old-fashioned and clunky compared with 
sleek- and modem Western goods. 

And while looks may have counted for 
less in a command economy where many 
products were in perpetual short supply, 
the situation changed drastically with the 
switch to capitalism and the advent of 
competition. 

Design is back in demand and a pool of 
East German designers whose creative tal- 
ents had been stifled for years were called 
upon to quickly give a new look to prod- 
ucts ranging from cola bottles to subway 
cars. The results of their labors can be seen 
in the "New States. New Directions" exhi- 
bition of East German products currently 
touring Germany and soon to be seen in 
Western Europe and the United States. 
The exhibition was arranged by the Inter- 
national Design Center in Berlin and paid 
for by the federal government and the 
Treuhand privatization agency, who see it 
as a business investment. 

"It s known around the world in the 
track -vehicle business that without design, 
you can’t sell.” says Lutz Gelben. manag- 


er of conceptual design for Rail Vehicle 
Development at AEG AG's Hennigsdorf 
operations outside Berlin. "Competition is 
often now decided on the basis of design." 

Although AEG had originally owned 
the plant at Hennigsdorf, it was taken over 
by the East German government and the 
name changed to Lokomotive Qeklrisches 
Werk after the war. Mr. Gelben. who has 
both a technical and design background, 
joined the company in 1981 when it decid- 
ed to involve designers m the production 
or rail vehicles. 

Although he says the quality of design 
was high in Eastern Germany, many de- 
signs were never realized due to a shortage 
of both money and materials. 

Designing a locomotive for the Soviet 
Union, all Mr. Gelben did was choose the 
paint color. And working on a new genera- 
tion of Berlin S-Bahn cars, LEW’S design- 
ers were forced to install two *n«ll front 
windows in the locomotive instead of one 
big one because the size of g lass they 
needed was not produced by any factory 
in the GDR. 

Another designer, Brigitte Retsch, ex- 
plains in the exhibition catalogue that in her 
first job designing electrical industrial ov- 
ens, she could have saved on materials, 
reduced weights and improved manageabil- 
ity. but since the ovens were sold to the 
Soviet Union by weight, it was decided that 
design improvements were not such a good 
idea and they were eventually stopped. 

All of which is not to say that life in 
unified Germany is a designer's paradise. 
Mr. Gelben estimates that some 60 per- 


cent of the designers trained in East Ger- 
many are now either out of work or work- 
ing in related Helds like graphic design. 

And while companies like AEG, a huge 
conglomerate with West German head- 
quarters, can afford to publicize indepen- 
dently die subway train and locomotive 
models designed by Mr. Gelben and his 
colleagues Michael Sohn and Stefan Sid- 
len, for many smaller companies, the exhi- 
bition is a unique chance to become better 
known. 

The 85 designs on display were picked by 
a jury of designers and design instructors 
from among some 250 submissions. Judg- 
ing criteria included practicality, ergonom- 
ics and environmental impact. Aesthetically 
the designs were expected to have a long lile 
and no! be merely fashionable. 

The vast majority of the products select- 
ed were designed by East Germans, al- 
though many of the new packaging and 
labeling designs were created by West 
Germans. Club Cola's labels, for example, 
were designed by a DQsseldorf company 
and Karo cigarettes’ new package is the 
work of a Frankfurt-am-Main advertising 
agency. 

In die case of a tea service produced by 
HB Ceramic Workshops GmbH of Mar- 
witz, Brandenburg, the exhibition is a 
chance to give new exposure to an old 
product TTie form of the earthenware tea 
set was designed in 1934 by Hedwig Bollha- 
gen, who created the light- and dark-blue 
striped pattern in 1948 and who remains the 
artistic head of the workshops today. 

The “bebo Sher” electric razor on dis- 


play is a sleeker version of the shaver used 
for years by millions of men in Eastern 
Europe. Although the razor had a well- 
known name and good reputation, the 
foreign company that took over the con- 
glomerate that made it planned to close 
the shaver department down. Employees 
were convinced that the company was sal- 
vageable; however, and arranged a buyout. 

Since then the management of bebo Sher 
EJectric Appliances GmbH has studied 
Western marketing techniques and asked 
the designer Brigitte Retsch to redesign its 
latest low-vibration razor to accommodate 
such new features as a kxig-hair cutter. Her 
“bebo Sher V” comes in five colors instead 
of just black and is now' complemented by a 
immured carrying case. 

“Basically, the exhibition is an image 
campaign for East German products?’ 
says Angela Schbnberger. the Internation- 
al Design Center's director. 

Ms. Schdnberger believes that much of 
the outride world hears regular bad news 
about the Russian economy and assumes 
falsely that Eastern Germany is in the same 
boat. She hopes the exhibition’s coming 
foreign tour wfl] help dispel some of those 
myths. “The transformation process has 
gone much more quickly here despite the 
bankruptcies, unemployment and social 
and psychological problems,” she said. East 
"German technology was better and it was 
easier to get it up to western levels than it is 
in other countries." 

ANN BROCKLEHURST is a journalist 
based in Berlin. 


Rise in Crime Worries a Safety-Conscious Nation 


Bv Brandon Mitchener 


F 


RANKFURT — A 
slicker on the windows 
of local taxis reads “no 

hundred-mark bills. 

; » please.” The reason is not a short- 
age of small change, although that 

occasionally a problem, but 
more a widespread dread of coun- 
terfeit cash. 

Introduced with considerable 
fanfare in 1991. Germany's new 
50. 100 and 200 Deutsche mark 
hills have become the favorite cur- 
rency of Italian and East Europe- 
an counterfeiters and a major 
headache for tbe Bundesbank, 
which rempved 41.000 fake 100 
DM ($59) bills from circulation in 
1993 alone, a tenfold increase 
from 1990. 

Despite a nationwide mailing 
and awareness campaign, some 
experts say the Bundesbank is 
righting a losing battle against or- 
ganized crime. 

The central bank is not the only 
one. 

While a wave of attacks against 
foreigners, firebombings of refu- 
gee centers and vandalism of Jew- 
ish cemeteries since the fall of the 
Iron Curtain and German unifica- 
lion in 1990 have received world- 
wide attention. German authori- 
ties are at least as concerned about 
an unprecedented rise in other 
kinds 0 r crime that they appear 
laraely helpless to thwart. 

Automobile theft, burglary. 
- robbery, bribery and murder have 
become staple elements of nightly 
newscasts, demoralizing a wealthy 
Nation obsessed with security. 

In a year replete with city, stale 
and federal elections, crime has 
also become a highly charged po- 
litical issue, second only to the 
state of the economy. 

In 1992. German pohce regis- 
tered 6.3 million offenses ranging 
from purse-snatching to murder, 
almost 10 percent more than a 
Year earlier. In the first half or 
1993 (full-year numbers are not 
yeL available), the number of of- 
fenses was up 8 percent from the 
first half of 1992. Cases involving 
murder and violent death dou- 
bled- , * 

Crime has risen elsewhere 
across Europe in the 
years, after a lull in the mid-1980s. 
The total number of crimes and 
misdemeanors reported in the lu- 
nation European Lhnon rose 6.9 
percent in 1990 and 72 percent in 
1991 and has continued to gam 
since then. . 

But Germans seem to take the 
increase most to heart. Some « 
percent of Germans in a recent 
survey said they feel personally 
threatened by (he rise in crime. 
Most were convinced that me 
problem was getting worse. Eighty 
percent said none _ of the cs,a "“ 
lished political parties was capable 
of dealing with the rising tide. 

* The conservative ruling party, 
the Christian Democrats, blames 
the rise in crime as much on ran 
ing respect for social and Jamdy 
values as on the opening ot tre - 
many’s borders with Eastern Eu- 

°A* large number of the offenses 

— some experts say as many as J 
third —are drag-related. Growing 
poverty and uncontrolled immi- 


gration, factors for which the gov- 
ernment is held partially responsi- 
ble. are also to blame. ’ 

But Interior Minister Manfred 
Kanther said crime in Germany is 
also marked by "an increasing in- 
ternational network, modern man- 
agement, high-tech equipment 
and mounting brutality." 

Frankfurt, which is widely 
known for its striking skyline and 
financial muscle, is trying to live 
down another image as Germany's 
capital of crime. There are more 
crimes per capita committed in 
Frankfurt than in any other large 
German city — 141,000 in 1993, or 
one for every 4.5 residents. 

Frankfurt isn’t the only city 
with a crime problem, however. 
“Frankfurt is a crossroads for 
drugs and dirty money,” said Pe- 
ter Borchardt, a spokesman for (be 
local police, “but is not nearly as 
bad as other cities when it comes 
to auto theft and the kinds of 
things that affect tbe average citi- 
zen.*’ 

in fact, nowhere has the change 
been more dramatic than in East- 
ern Germany, where a police state 
has been replaced by under- 
staffed, undermanned institutions 
largely unequipped to deal with 
organized crime. 

In Brandenburg state, which 
shares a 252-kilometer (156-mile) 
border with Poland, tbe total num- 
ber of crimes registered by local 
police rose bv more than one- third 
in 1993 to 328.028. from 244.688 
the year before. 

W HILE that total in- 
cludes illegal border 
crossings and work- 
ing while an applica- 
tion for political asylum is pend- 
ing — crimes that can only be 
committed by foreigners — even 
these crimes carry a heavy cost to 
society, tbe authorities say. 

Interior Minister Alwin Ziel of 
Brandenburg said organized gangs 
from Eastern Europe were respon- 
sible for much of the stale’s auto 
thefts, prostitution, robberies and 
bribery, which together cost the 
stale kttnomy an estimated 8.5 
million DM in 1993 alone. 

In Saxonv, street crimes were up 
132 percent, in Thuringia 44 per- 
cent. and apartment break-ins up 
44 percent and 9 percent in the 
two states, respectively. 

Gang wars with shootouts, 
bombings and executions are an 
everyday occurrence in Berlin, ac- 
cording to Police Chief Hagen Sa- 
berschinsky. who said one out of 
three offenses is drug-related. 

The Federal Police Agency at- 
tributes the rise in crime to Ger- 
many's wealth, liberal laws, and 
central location in an increasingly 
open-border Europe. It said prof- 
its from organized crime schemes 
they uncovered in 1992 totaled 
700 million DM. 

Ulrich Sieber, a Wurzburg pro- 
fessor of criminology who con- 
ducted a study of organized crime 
for the federal police, estimated 
the German profits of internation- 
al auto theft rings to be at least 100 
million DM and profits from pros- 
titution rings and gambling at al- 
most I billion DM a year each. 

Experts estimate the damage 
paiiwi by counterfeiting in Ger- 
many is at least 10 million DM a 
year and rising. 


Wolfgang FelL a vice president 
of the Association of German 
Chambers of Commerce, said or- 
ganized crime is causing business 
losses that are "no longer just im- 
portant for individual companies 
but are instead taking, mi macro- 
economic dimensions." 

Nuremberg police recently 
rounded up and fingerprinted 653 
Chinese in 98 restaurants, almost 
the entire Chinese community of 
northern Bavaria, to break up a 
ring smuggling people into the 
country. Law-enforcement offi- 
cials say the activity of Hong 
Kong-based crime gangs called 
triads is growing in Germany. 

While the number of crimes re- 
ported is rising, the percentage of 


criminals caught is falling. More 
than two-thirds of all crimes in- 
volve theft and fewer than a fifth 
of the cases are ever solved. The 
240,000 police officers in Germa- 
ny — three for every 100 inhabit- 
ants — are barely able to cope. 

The Federation of German Law 
Enforcement Officials, a powerful 
lobby, alleges that two- thirds of all 
reported crimes are never even in- 
vestigated because or a lack of 
resources. 

Authorities are responding to 
the rise in crime with plans for 
speedier trials, new witness pro- 
tection programs, drastic increases 
in sentences and larger police 
forces. Tbe federal government 
has also advanced a controversial 


plan to broaden use of covert sur- 
veillance, but several parties fear 
tbe plan goes too far and invites 
abuse. 

In Frankfurt, the police depart- 
ment recently reorganized to cre- 
ate an 80-man force whose only 
job is to combat organized crime 
involved in drug and arms smug- 
gling, prostitution and money 
laundering. 

As a result of this and other 
efforts, authorities think they can 
at least take a bite out of crime, if 
not thwart it decisively. 

BRANDON MITCHENER is 

Frankfurt correspondent for the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


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Retracing Goethe’s Footsteps 

Inter. 

E 


International Herald Tribune 

RFURT — Goethe 
slept here. So did Schil- 
ler. For that matter, so 
did Martin Luther. 

In fact, there was a time when 
Erfurt and the historic residence 
and university cities nearby — 
Weimar, Memingen, Jena. Ara- 
stadt and Eisenach — were among 
the most culturally significant sites 
in Europe. 

It was in this part of Thuringia 
that Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 
and Friedrich Schiller composed 
some of the greatest worts of West- 
ern literature around the end of tbe 
18th century. Martin Luther began 
his studies in Erfurt in 1501 and 
later translated the Bible into Ger- 
man in the 900-year-old Wart burg 
castle that towers over Eisenach. 
Johann Sebastian Bach was named 
church organist in Muhlhausen in 
1707 and court organist a year later 
in Weimar. 

Several centuries later, tbe East- 
ern Land of Thuringia is starting to 
regain some of its former notoriety, 
litis time among tourists who are 
following its Classical Road in 
search of the roots of German cul- 
ture. 

Beginning less than two hours 
from Frankfurt, the circular route 
winds through Eisenach. Gotha, 
Erfurt, Weimar, Jena. Rudolstadt. 
Ilmen an, Arastadt and Memingen 
and connects castles, cloisters, con- 
cert halls and other historical sites 
in a 300-kilometer (186-mile) road 
that tourists can travel in a week- 
end or over several weeks, depend- 
ing on how much time they have to 
stop along tbe way. 

Four years after the fall of the 
Wall Eastern Germany remains 
uncharted territory for many tour- 
ists. Businessmen continue to make 
up the majority of hotel guests and 
an overall occupancy rate of just 35 
percent versus 50 percent in some 
west German stales, suggests there 
is a lot of potential left 

Though many small communi- 
ties that have lost manufacturing 
industries are staking their future 
prosperity mi rest relaxation and 
recreation, experts say it is unlikely 
tourism will ever account for more 
than 2 percent of the state's gross 
domestic product. But the state 
hopes some visitors will return as 
investors. 

The slate has initiated a cultural 
festival called "Autumn in Thurin- 
gia" that includes more than 70 
concerts, ballet, theater produc- 
tions, folk festivals, street markets 
and guided tours through muse- 
ums, old town centers and the sur- 
rounding hills. Highlights of the 
festival are works by Goetbe and 
Schiller, of course. 



The National Theater in Weimar . 


The region also lends itself to 
weekend outings in tbe summer. 

Erfurt, the 1,250-year-old capital 
of Thuringia, was once known as 
Erfordia turrita for its towers, 
which make it look like a husky 
northern European relative of Ita- 
ly’s San Gimignano. Its famous 
Kramer bru eke, a stone bridge built 
with 32 stucco houses, also rekin- 
dles Italy. It is the only intact built- 
upon bridge north of the Alps and 
is the most vivid reminder of Er- 
furt’s former glory as a center of 
trade along tbe East-West Kings 
Road. The dty celebrates the mem- 
ory every year with a Kramer- 
brOckefesi in June, complete with 
medieval costumes, jugglers and 
street theater. 

Weimar, which recently hosted 
the emperor and empress of Japan, 
is warming up for its role as Euro- 
pean Cultural Capital for the year 
1999 with a cyde of performances 
from Goethe's classes, including 
“Faust" 

A stately town once described as 
a park that contained a dty. Wei- 
mar boasts exhibit! eras and histori- 
cal dies devoted to the memory of 
Goethe, Schiller. Franz Liszt Lu- 
cas Cranach tbe Elder, Gottfried 
Herder. Friedrich H&lderiin, Rich- 
ard Wagner and Thomas Mann. 
Much erf tbe dty was destroyed at 
the end of World War II, but 
enough remains or has been rebuilt 
to remind visitors that this was 
once the residence of the dukes of 
Saxony and Weimar. Tourists can 
eat Thuringia's famous sausages 
and dumplings and drink local ale 
in Goethe's favorite restaurant the 
White Swan. 

The dty celebrates Goethe's 
birthday every Aug 28 and Schil- 


lers on Nov. 10 and holds an inter- 
national music seminar every July. 
Famous forefathers are invoked for 
worldly causes as well: a sticker 
takin g issue with a dramatic in- 
crease in downtown traffic shows 
an unhappy Schiller bolding his 
nose. 

Eisenach is as renowned for the 
small, sputtering cars called Tra- 
bants as for the Wart burg fort 
where Luther holed up to translate 
tbe Bible. Now host to an endless 
stream of foreign visitors, the 
Wartbuig is known as the “most 
German of German castles." Near 
Eisenach is also tbe starting point 
for a hiking path called the Renn- 
stdg. which wanders for 168 kilo- 
meters along the ridges of the Thu- 
ringian Wood. 

Among the other dries along the 
Classical Road, Jena is probably 
the least attractive and most histor- 
ic. It was here that Schiller held his’ 
first lecture at the university that 
now bears his name on “Why to 
study universal history and what 
that means”. . 

Goethe hims elf said “everyone 
who was anyone in Germany^ 
passed through" the undent urn-.# 
versity town in his day. Today, thc-ij 
dt/s sights indude Goethe aod-^ 
Schiller memorials, a notable art. ^ 
collection and a planetarium^ 
named after Carl Zeis?, whose 
cal works made thedty world-fam-,^ 
ous in a later age. ■. 

Pilgrims can follow Goethe's^ 
footsteps along an l8.5-kilometn&* 
Wanderweg that starts at the City.;'^ 
Hall in Ihnenau and ends at one of. .1 
the region’s ubiquitous Goethe-" 2 ; 
ha user in Stutzerbach. ^ 

» r: i"i 

Brandon Mitcheoef>’ 



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Send a brief fax to + 49 69 262 720, 

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INTERN \TIOY\l. IIKRAIJ) TRIBt NE, Till R.SDAY, APRIL 21. 1991 


Germany! A Special Report 


On East German Wr iting: Views From 2 Sides of the Former Wall 

, oil Reunification fn 


As Publishers and 
Books Disappear, 
Cultural Decline? 


By Walter Kaufmann 


B ERLIN — Late in I9S9, from Sep- 
tember through November, vast 
numbers of East Germans took to 
the streets with slogans such as "De- 
Now or Never," "German Problemat- 
ic, ” “Free Passage for Free Citizens," 
i lALin die Government Goes than the Whole 
if the People." Not long after that, as the 

/orkl knows, the Berlin Wall cracked and fell. 

And so did the Honecker government. The 
wo Honeckers, Erich and Margot, were exiles 
n Moscow until Honecker was returned to 
3ermany for trial in Berlin. Later the two took 
isylum in Chile. 

We, who remained, have a new order and are 
tiled, as it were, by Chancellor Helmut Kohl. 
\nd we are in the throes or a cultural decline. 

The writers of the ex-DDR. who played no 
mall part in the demonstrations that rocked 
he Wall, the system and the former govern- 
nent, have been deprived in a way they never 
beamed of. Early on. a multinational media 
jam from the West stepped East through the 
Tack in the Wall and went into the business of 
elling books. 

Across the St rasse der Befreiung (the Street 
of Liberation) in Dresden, where in that event- 
ful November 1 was reading from my latest 
volume of stories to an audience in a book- 
store, Bertelsmann AG had occupied spacious 
quarters to open a Book Club. There were neon 
tights outside and white furniture and well- 
stocked bookshelves inside. Within the week 
they had sold books worth a total of S50.000. 
fSome 35,000 members were enlisted, a figure 
which has since doubled and trebled. 

! Such was the attraction of the hitherto un- 
known, that soon the bookstores in the Strasse 
der Befreiung found themselves desperate for 
customers and local libraries depleted of read- 
ers. In due course, full-page advertisements 
appeared in newspapers all over the country 
and Bertelsmann, which bad already gobbled 
tip book chibs in France and the United States, 
'added new members not only in Dresden, but 
in Leipzig, Erfurt, Magdeburg. Rostock and 
Berlin. 

In Berlin, another Bertelsmann agency had 
.been established, managed by Eberhard Rei- 
‘raann who, until recently, had faithfully served 
|lhe ex-GDR Deputy Minister of Culture, Well 
•acquainted with GDR publishing, Mr. Rei- 
mann, now serving a new master, saw the 
downfall of enterprises that had once been his 
■concern. 

; Bookstores in Eastern Germany have emp- 
tied their sbdvcs not only of books written 
[here, but of all books that were published here. 
■They have returned thousands to the distribu- 
tion or have sold their stocks for a song by 



Since newspapers in East Germany were aU 
made the same way — deadly dull, thin and 
colorless — and the etectroflic media were 
carefully controlled and far from reality, toe 
individual had practically nothing else to inter- 
est him but reading goal literature. This was 
especially important because certain contro- 
vSthemeaMild only be treated under the 


cover of art . _ , .... 

When, occasionally, against all probability, 
a bode appeared in East Germany dint dealt 
with the problems afflicting “real existing So- 
cialism" — as for example in Remer Kunzs 


these books sold out almost immediately after 


publication, and people stood in lines to buy 
them as they did m the years of hunger to buy 


**?£!: difficulty of the East German publishers 

— . -t ... q ciiffiripnl 


was really that they couldn’t print a sufficient 
number of these successful titles quickly 

, n • „ Mn.frinMit' nnnt*r 




'*00 


Customers browse in the Wort & Werk bookstore in Leipzig, Eastern Germany 


Wotfgaag Kluge/AFP 


enough. Prim capacity was insufficient: paper 
was under a strict quota. And too many of 
these costly materials were used to print titles 
that no one wanted to read. 

Leipzig, the publishing capital, was sur- 
rounded by a wreath of old barns, in which 
thousands of tons of unsaleable books were 
stored. Since the roofs of these depots leaked, 
the books had to be transferred if it rained or 
they would just rot in the water. 

The politically correct, but straw-dry litera- 
ture that the party of Socialist unity couldn't 


f ive away to true comrades, lay generally un- 
er plastic sheets in some farmhouse out in the 


'putting them out in the streets in packing cases. 
Worst of all, a vast amount of good and valu- 


able reading matter has actually ended up in 
garbage dumps and disused coal pits. 

More than 91,000 books have been given 
away by (he Buchhaus Liepzig in order to save 
them from being dumped in garbage pits, in- 
siders say. People took books away by the 
carload, among them works by Goethe, Foo- 
lane, Tchingis Aitmatov. Stanislav.* Lem, Ana- 
tole France, Anna Seghers and Erwin Stritt- 
matter. 

In short, books published in this country 
simply had to disappear. If they remained on 
offer, the giants from the West threatened to 
withhold delivery of their publications, and 
that was a threat most bookstores did not 
ignore. They have learned to regret that. For 
the books they have dumped are meanwhile in 
demand again, but nowhere to be had. 

What hope then for a small but renowned 
publishing nouse called Greifenveriag zu Ru- 
dolstadt to whom I had offered my last book? 
No hope whatever — in the house where fine 
literature was oncepublished. travel brochures 
are now printed. The following quote from a 
letter I received from them is in line with 
countless quotes from letters by publishers to 
writers all over this country. 

“ . . . since we wrote you last, our financial 
situation has become calamitous ... so we 
are suggesting postponing the contract we had 
offered you ... we still think highly of your 
work and regret deeply to have to write you in 
this way . . . Yours, with all good wishes. 

Greiufenverlag zu Rudolstadt" 

The postponement foreshadowed the end. 
The contract never materialized, and bearing 
in mind that since the exit of Greifenveriag 


dozens of other publishing houses throughout 
the country have gone out of business, one has 
the situation of the writers here in a nutshell. 

We have been deprived. 

The “Trumpets of Jericho" that shattered 
the Berlin Wall have also shattered the future 
of a good many of our writers, few of whom 
would have been considered merely conformist 
in (he pasL Since the Wall went down, the 
market here is being swamped. 

And if at one time I expressed hope that 
DDR writing might retain its identity because 
it was something special, something specially 
needed, then I am Tar less confident now. 
Specially needed it may still be. but how can it 
surface without publishers? 

Measured by my own efforts to find a new 
publisher after all three of ray former East 
German publishing houses had been edged out 
of existence, the ascent of writers who were not 
as well-established in the West as Stefan Heym 
and Christa Wolf must have been arduous. 

Of the wefl over 100 members of the German 
PEN Center (East) — still so called — I could 
name barely 10 who have accomplished that 
ascent and are making a living solely by their 
craft. 

Our writers are experiencing the decimation 
of their artistic contribution through economic 
pressure — a different kind of censorship than 
the one they often complained of in the past — 
and German literature as a whole is damaged 
in the process. 


SEEN THROUGH THE EYES 
OF IMAGINATION. AGFA. 


* - ? :,r • 




• : 4 ; ' ■ ■■ > ■ 



r tUww IT * 

? -■/ ■ \-)V V . -V‘-r . 

■ .. v:/ v v ■ :&:■ ' -v ( 


Nothing escapes Agfa. Neither reality, nor a product of trie imagi- Photographic paper and photocopiers. X-ray film and cine-film, 


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AGFA 


NOTHING ESCAPES AGFA. 


Do Not Mourn 
Heavy Wooden 
Wares’ of DDR 


country for use some day. 

It isn’t surprising that after the turning point 
of November ’89, crudes loaded with DDR- 
literature arrived at the garbage dumps. 

This is no great loss when it comes to works, 
like the Collected Speeches of comrades Ul- 
bricht and Honecker. And if classics like Goe- 
the, Fontane or Anatole France wound up 
dumped in old min es or used for landfill, it 


shows die inability of the publishing firms 
managemen t to sell these valuable and worth- 
while books. 

Sales woe not the strong point of the pub- 
lishing companies in the former East Germany. 
Words like advertising or retail sales were 
foreign words to these publishers. 

Mismanagement, as in other brandies of the 
economy, was not subject to serious punish- 
ment. Many publishers belonged to the East 
German Communist Party, or “to the people." 

Such publishers couldn’t go bankrupt and 
they could allow themselves to ignore the needs 
of the reader. 

The same was true for many authors. No 
matter how boring their texts were, they gof 
published. Authors bad an assured income, 
even when their books sat like lead bars on the 
shelves. 

The important condition was that they held 
to the correct political line. Bong true to So- 
cialism paid off. 

This <»xplains why the former East Germany 
'boasted more writers per capita than any other 
(country in the world. The SED treated writers 
the way Stalin used to: they were considered 
“engineers of the soul," and trusted to convert 
the reader to Marxist-Leninist orthodoxy. The 
official overvaluing of literature in the DDR 
'comes from this attitude. 


F rankfurt — “H e is. it seems to 
me, too concerned with creating im- 
pressions, so that sometimes one 
misses the intellectual substance." 
So wrote on July I, 1959, a certain “Margar- 
ete." an unofficial collaborator with the Slate 
Ministry for Security, or Stasi. Behind the pen- 
name Margarets was hidden Christa Wolf, 
who was later to become a very well-known 
writer. The person she referred to in that 
phrase of her secret report was her colleague. 
Walter Kaufmann. 

Reading Mr. Kauftnann’s article on the Tate 
of writers and writing in former East Germany, 
one has the sense that the 35-year old judge- 
ment on the writer has not yet become false. 
There are too many impressions, which now- 
are created by bitterness, and not much intel- 
lectual subject matter at all. 

East Germany called itself a “land of read- 
ers" or even “a cultured nation." All told, 
about 6.000 books were published there per 
year, with subjects including letters, science, 
schoolbooks, ideological brochures, etc. In 
West Germany about 50,000 titles appeared 
each year. 


By Karl Corino 


WALTER KAUFMANN. the author of 25 
books . has been general secretary of East Ger- 
man PEN for nearly 10 years. 


Reunification meant the dethroning of most 
writers in Eastern Germany, Suddenly there 
interesting newspapos to read, up-to- 
date and reader-friendly illustmed magazines, 
and a whole new offering of lelerojoo. pro- 
grams. It’s not surprising that shortly after the 
Wall fell, satellite television antennae sprouted 

on Eastern rooftops. • ; 

The public suddenly ergoyed freedom of 
information, which it had never had before. 
What you used to have to look for carefully in 
between rows of books was now available ev- 
erywhere, right in front of your eyes. 

Writers who had lived for years on the basis 
ihat they could remasticate the political buzz- 
words found that there was no longer a great 
public for their heavy wooden wares. 

Their publishers discovered the same- thing. 
The largest part of ihe DDR-litmrure under- 
went a rapid decline after 1989. 

Naturally part of the reason for this was that 
a sizeable percentage of the' writers were in 
contact with the Stasi: the president of the 
Writers’ Union, Hermann Kant, or the world- 
renowned dramatist Heiner Mueller, or. as 
we’ve mentioned, Christa Wolf. 

No doubt, of the three names, was she the 
least harmful. But even she found that she 
could sell wily a small percentage of what she 
did before reunification, with her “What's 
Left" selling only about one-tenth of what it 
did before. 

The turning point came with reunification, 
which hit many publishers and authors in the 
former East Germany like a typhoon. Nothing 
stayed the way it was before. Some af.-the 
publishers that belonged to the SED did s 
management buy-out, sometimes with that 
party’s supporter, the PDS, helping out. Others 
were bought out by Western capitalists, for 
example the former “flagship" Aufbau Verlag 
in Eastern Germany. 

The publishing landscape in Eastern Germa- 
ny today is multicolored: the old Socialist 
cadres are mixed up with growth-hungry mon- 
ey men from the West, established publishers 
with people who've never worked in the busi- 
ness like property speculators. These last are 
mostly interested in the land and buildings 
belonging to the publishers. There are also 
friends of literature. ' 


Not least, there is a number of newly estab- 
lished “Easties," publishers like Christopher 
r .inkc in East Berlin, who did a clever market 
analysis and realized that long-neglected refer- 
ence books published in the DDR offered a 
variety of opportunities. . . 

Know-how, a little capital, a small dedicat- 
ed staff and at the beginning a lot of hard work 
— that is the recipe that is providing surpris- 
ingly good results and promises better for the 
future. Many of the Western companies that 
are successful both in the West and the East 
began as small as Christopher Links, even the 
giant Bertelsmann AG. 

For authors like Waller Kaufman n and 
• many of his generation, the turning point came 
too tot* They can’t break themselves off from 
the old political system, to which they owe 
their lives and for decades their livelihood. 


KARL CORINO is a journalist and author 
based in Frankfurt. 


Thinking global... acting local. 





S. -W V 

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a wam inti Bd Hedge Fd. 
CONCERTO LIMITED 

erNAV 15 April 1994 S 

COWER ASSET MANAGEMENT 
Cawen Enterprise Fund MV. 

V Class AShS S 

w Class 0 Sts S 

CREDIT A OR I COLE 
INDEX IS 

0 indexb USA75&P 500 t 

d Inducts Mon/ N Ikk M. . . Y 

0 indexb G Bm/FTSe I 

0 indexb France/CAC Jfl _pf 

0 Indents GT FF 

MON AXIS 

d Cowl Terme USD i 

0 Cain Terme DEM DM 

0 Court Terme JPY y 

a Court Terme GBP i 

d Court Terme FRF FF 

0 Coart Terme ESP. 


10833 

1224.93 

1212*0 

1417*9 

1434.13 

141*2 

14134 

12375*0 

227.94 

144.77 

145*9 

148247 

97*9 

4948*0 

27439 

18251 

15739 

155*8 

14130 

9119*9 

254*8559 

15.95747 

1494393 

148439283 

I53S431 

13*9065 

raz« 

125477 

10S256 

999*3 


135182 

1479*4 


-Ecu 


17*4 
1111*3 
1231 
157*1 
115*3 

14*2 
38*2 
227031 
1334 
13493 
293897 
1938 

13257 
22*5 
1917.14 
14*7 
42*2 
15154 
1MM 
39138*7 
3431 
1M.M 
1831 
2327*3 
1257 
39*4 
152*8 
272132 
15254 
2135 
1731 

141*1 

CREDIT COMMERCIAL DE FRANCE 

d Elysets Moaetnlre FF 89445.11 

' 1099*0 


d Court Terme ECU . 

MOSA15 

0 Actions Infl DnntrsJfiees FF 

0 Ad tom NortLAmer koines 5 
0 Actkm Japeaabes— _Y 

0 Actions AnglQbes £ 

d Act Iona Afiemandes DM 

0 Actions Francoises FF 

d Actions Espl & Port Pta 

0 Actions Hal leones Ul 

0 Actions Bassin PndBqua S 

0 Obflg inn Diversifies FF 

0 ObHg Mord-Americabies— S 

0 owm Japonatses Y 

0 Oblig Analabes- 
0 Obilfl AliemMe 
0 Oblla F 

0 Oblig Esc 8 Port 



0 Ot»Ho Convert Intern.. 
0 Court Terme Ecu. 

0 Court Terme USD 
0 Court Terme FRF 


0 Sam AcHcash USD B. 

CREDIT SUISSE 

0 CSF Bands. 

0 Bond Valor Swl 

0 Bond Voter US -Dal tor. 

0 Bond valor D-Mark DM 

0 Bond Voi or Yen _Y 

0 Band Valor cSferflng C 

0 Convert Voter 5w( SF 

d Convert valor US- Dollar _8 

0 Convert Voter tSIertlng- i 

0 CSF Internation al SF 

0 Actions Suttees ~5F 

0 GredbSmlHMU Cop SwftziSF 

d Earapa Vat or sf 

0 Energte - Voter— -SF 
0 Pacific -Voter SF 


d CSGoW Valor, 
d CS Tiger Fund- 
0 CS Ecu Bond A_ 

0 CS Ecu Bond B_ 

0 CS Gulden Bond A - 
0CS Gulden Band B. 


-Ecu 


-Ecu 


0 CS Hbpano Iberio FdA— Pin 
d CS Hbpcno tberia Fd B — Pta 

d CS Prime Bond A DM 

d C5 Prime Boat B. 
d CSEuropa Bondi _ 

0 CS Europa Band B. 

0 CS Hxed I SF 7% 1798— —SF 
d CS Fined I DM 8% 17*4— — DM 
0 CS Hxed I Ecu 8 3/4% )/94-Eeu 
0 CS Swta Fronc Bond a. — SF 

0 C5 Swiss Franc Band B SF 

0 CS Band Fd Lire A/B — LH 

0 CS Band Fd Pesetas A/fl— Ptos 

0 CS Germany Fund A DM 

0 CS Germany Fund B_ DM 

0 CSEuraBtaeCMpsA DM 

0 CS Euro Blue Chios B DM 

0 CS Shorl-T. Bond 1 A S 

d CS Short-T. Bands B 1 

0 CS Short-T. Bend DM A DM 

0CS Short-T. Band DM B DM 

0 CS Maaev Martlet Fd $ s 

0 C5 Money Market Fd DM— DM 
0 CS 4toncv MorluM Fd I- — £ 
d CS Money Morfcei Fd Yen— Y 
d CS Money Market FdCS — CS 
0 CS Money Market Fd Ecu-Ecu 
0 CS Money Market FdSF — SF 
0 CS Money Market Fd HR -Ft 
0CS Money Market Fd Lit — LH 
0 CS Money Market Fd FF—FF 
0 CS Money Merkel Fd Pia— Pta 
d CS Money Market Fd BE F -BF 

d CSOefeo-ProtccA DM 

d CSOsko-ProtecB DM 

0 CSNortt^AmertanA 1 

0 cs North- American B S 

d CS UK Find A 1 

0 CS UK Fund 0. 


8874 

1M51 

tWSB 

115*8 

18821*4 

W3.98 

171.14 

28834 

9035 

13469 

837.94 

241.19 

21407 

149*5 

14285 

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105*7 
179.93 
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153*1 
2915438 
3053440 
104.92 
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M7J 
37278 
30137 
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m 

10137 

15891 

HOT? 

155*3 

178897 

174038 

234137 


0CS France Fund A — 
0 CS France Fund B — 

0 CS Euroroal. 

0 CS Italy Fund A 

0 CS Italy Fund B 

0 CS Netherlands F0 A_ 
0 CS Nether mb Fd B. 
0 CS FF Band A. 


-FL 
-FL 

j-FF 

0 CS FF Bond B FF 

0 CS Capital SFRZU0 SF 

0 CS Caoltol DM 2000 —DM 

d Cs Capital DM 1997 dm 

d C5 Capital Ecu 2000 Ecu 

0 CS Capita! FF 2080 FF 

0 cs Japon Megatrend 5 FR_5F 
d CS Japan Megatrend Yen— 1 V 

0 CS Pwif IOC JER A/B SF 

dCSPortf BalSFR SF 

0 CS Parti Growth SFR SF 

d CS Portf Inc DM A/B DM 

0 CS Port* Bat DM— DM 

0C5 Pan Growth DM— — DM 

0 C5 Portf Inc USI A/B S 

0 CS Pom Bat USS —A - 

d CS Portf Growth uss s 

d CS Eq Fd Emera MWs S 

0 CS Ea Fd Small Cap USA-* 

d CS Ea Fd Small Eur dm 

0 CS Eq Fd Lot AmerkB 1 

CURSITOR FUND 

rf Curswar East Aldan Eq S 

d CunHor Giw Gwth Sua-FdJ 
DARIER HEWTSCH GROUP 
Tel 4V» 708 48 37 
0 DH Major Markets Fund — SF 

0 Hentsch Troosurv Fd SF 

0 Samurai Portfolio SF 

DISCOUNT BANK GROUP 

w MatttauT. Band SF 

wDaival Bond S 

w Euroval Equtv— — — Ecu 
w N. America Eoutty s 

w Pacific Ewdlv. 


129455 

137994 

581205 

11973* 

1314092*4 

614454 

124184*4 

5679113 

23934 

240*0 

239.92 

244J8 

11734 

fT9J2 

104237 

1097*2 

1(094 

290410*0 

29740230 

417*5 

«25J4 

1048*1 

1144*1 

1550*4 

1450-75 

175239 

141439 

1404*4 

261*2 

2586590 


BIT INVESTMENT FFM 

0 Concentre +. - 

d infl Ren*entond+- 


_DM 

-DM 


103829 

nm.17 

10(354 

107834 

1074*9 

91034 

180434 

WT3J0 

1114*9 

995*3 

985*6 

8*831 

P7JD 

9951 


10755*8 

10570*0 

wm 

1(1531 

1193*0 

06599 

134231 

133811 

54*0 

7X13 


DUBIM G 5WIHCA ASSET MANAGEMENT 
Tel : (889) 945 1400 Fax : (809) MS MM 
b Highbridae tonfial Coro — S 1253*39 

m Overtook Performance Fd-S IMLJ 

m Pacific RIM OP Fd S W639E 

ESC FUND MANAGERS (tow) LTD 
14 Seale St. St Heller ; 0534-36331 
EBC TRADED CURRENCY FUND LTD 


a Coni 
0 income. 


23*13 

15.120 


INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

0 Lons Term 3 

d Lang Term • dmk ■ — DM 
ERMITAGE LUX (332*073 311 
w Ennltage inter Rate Strut -DM 

zsssj arsfei. 
zaSEB2tt&3* 

w EnhHage Amer Hda Fd_ S 

w Ermltane Errwr Mkts Fd_S 
EUROPA FUNDS LIMITED 
d American Faulty Fwxl - — 1 

a American Option Fund S 

ivAriai Ebultv Fd-— * 

d Dbcavery Fund—— . J 2037 

d Far Eart Fund. * 

0 FW.Amer. Age«-- > 

d Fid. Amer. Vatees IV 
0 Frontier 


X 1.9194 
107.1846 


61*5 

11*8 

1230 

19*9 

9.19 

15.11 

24534 

168*9 

13445 

119*4 

140*2 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


April 20, 1894 


(MtetiaK Htafritad fay tundi Hated. Mel i 


t are aqpgfad by the Fund* Had Oddi th* oxcaptfoa of nma quota baaed on taaoepricM. 


e p *e l4 huBcate h eqer ncy of qu e t e tl im « ro gpBeds (d) - doiyi (tel ■ Mr . W-td ronwtWB Pl f o rte iybrt y bnmytwawaekek (zl- ieg ut«rt). (t} ■ twice we eldr.W- ntd M y . 


0 GJcOO/Seiecttor Fi»Kt__j 
d HderoatlowetFund-. ,j 
d New Europe Fmd — __a 
0 Orient Fund— - * 


0 POdtlc 

0 Soedoi Growth Fundi 

0 world Fund 

nWHAtUGOMEKr 5A-Umnao(4W/zmi21 


284? 

2814 

1854 

13235 

411.96 

42.13 

11492 


w Detto Premium Cbm.. 

FOKUS BANK A*. (72 Of SH 
iv S co n tends infl Growth Fd-i 
FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID! 
PD. Bex 2001. HomUtoiL Bermuda 

in FMG Global (31 Man i 

mFMS N. Amer. (3t Mar) * 

mPMG Eurooe 131 Mar) s 

ei FMG EMG MKT (31 Atari J 

m FMG a fSi Mar) t 

FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA) LTD 

wCsacMts Forex Fund j 

GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 

wGata Hedge ii * 

wGafq Hedge in s 

wGata Swbs Franc fk — i e 
w GAIA Fx. 


1205JS 


1437 

10*3 

1LT2 

13.13 

9*7 

9*2 

132*2 

1455 

50*7 

11193 

85*3 

8454 


mGata Guaranteed CL I . 

m Goto Guaranteed CL I r 

CART MORE INDOSUEZ FUNDS If/Mm 
Tel: (3531 46 54 21470 
Pax: <3521 44 54 23 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 

0 DEM Bond Ob 5*7 —DM 454 

a Dlvwtiond Dblta SF 3.17 

d DaHar Bend Db7J* s 2*3 

0 European Bd — Db ill feu i jsr 

0 French Franc DIs 18X6 FF 1127 

0 Global Bond — 33114 5 2*1 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 
d ASEAN 


d Asia Pacific— 


0 Cunttnenta* Eurone— 
d DeveiooinB Markets. 
0 France. 


-Ecu 


833 

4J0 

153 

4*3 

1138 

5*3 

2*1 

279*0 

752 

1*7 

1*9 


0 Germany. 

0 International. 

0 Jaeon. 

0 North Ameriai. 

0 Swib 

0 united Kingdom. 

RESERVE FUNDS 
d J 

0 I 

0 French Fra 
a Yen Reserve. 

GEFINOR FUNDS 
Uxidon : UTl-xmin. Geneva : 4V223SBBB 

w East investment Find s 612*7 

w Scottish World Fund i 4483231 

w State St. American 5 34897 

OENESEE RIND Ltd 

w (A) Genesee Eagle 5 13437 

wIBIGemnee Short * 4835 

w (C) Genesee Ooaortunltv i 15197 

w (FJ Genesee Non-Equity 5 139*8 

GEO LOGOS 

w II Straight Bond B Ecu M6TJ7 

ir II Pacific Bono B SF 144558 

OLOflAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 
OFFSHORE FUNDS 
11 Aihal SUtouataKl at Man 444M824037 
wGAMerica- 


w GAM Arbitrage, 
w GAM ASEAN, 
w GAM Australia. 
w GAM i 



43418 

39231 
41531 
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1X734 

107*4 
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274*2 
287.19 
154*1 
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B7299 
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181J4 
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10159 
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14819 
173*7 
138*8 
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113*7 
13194 
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198*5 
(9429 
M3JC 
18757 
183*0 
4400*0 
I3L55 
14897 
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^ 339*3 

SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 41-1-422 2(24 
MuhWtadblrasse 173£H SIOAZurich 
0 gam tot) America —JF 15326 

0 GAM (CH) Europe SF 9929 

d GAM ICH) Mondial SF 109.14 

0 GAM ICH) Podfle SF 297*1 

SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 

135 East 57rd SireeiJfY HBZZ21308M1M 

w GAM Europe S 8871 

w GAM Global i U2JI 

iv GAM International i 18723 

w GAM North America —— s 0413 

wOAM Podfle Borin-. S 18834 

IRISH REGISTERED UCITS 
Eortsfcrt TerraceJubfm X mi-4748430 
w GAM Am e ri cana Ace— -DM 9893 

w GAM Europa Ace. JJM 13491 

w GAM Orient Act — OM 148*4 

w GAM Tokyo AK— _ — DM 17799 

w GAM Total Band DM Acc—DM 1D85S 

w GAM Universal DM Acc — DM 176.10 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda:(BB9) 295*888 Fax:(889) 2954180 
JWH GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 
1* (Q Financial t Metals — s 

W(DI KT Gtabel S 

w (FI G7 Currency S 


fliGAMCaradJ Minnetonka —* 

wGAM Combined DA 

w GAM Crno-AAarkel S 

w GAM European 5 

w GAM France 
w GAM Franc-vat 
wGAMGAMCO 
w GAM Utah YUM 
w GAM East Asia Inc 
w GAM Japan 
w GAM Money Mkts U 
0 Do Sterling 

d Da Swiss Franc 

d Do Deutschenwrt DM 

0 Da Yen y 

w GAM Allocated Mh-Fd s 

wGAMEmero MktsMm-Fdjs 

w GAM MttF Europe USS S 

w GAM Mtn-Euraae DM — JM 
w GAM Mill-Global USS - * 

w GAM Markri Neutral S 

wGAM Trading DIM DM 

wGAM Trading USS 5 

wGAM Overseas S 

■v GAM Pacific S 

wGAM Selection — S 

wGAM angaporeJ Malaysians 

w GAM 5F Special Band SF 

wGAMTvche s 

wGAMU-S.. 
wGAMut Investments. 

WGAM Value 

wGAMWhltotharn. 
wGAM Worldwide. 


wGAM Bend U5SOrd s 

wGAM Band USS Special S 

wGAM Bend SF SF 

wGAM Bend Yen. 
wGAM Bond I 

wGAM Bondi 

wGAM (Special Band. 
wGAM Unlveml USS. 
wGSAM Composite. 


w (H) Yen Financial— 
w u) DtversHted Rsk Adi — 5 
w IK) mtl Currency 8> Band _5 
WJWH WORLDWIDE FND-5 
GLOBAL FUTURES A OPTIONS SICAV 


M&49 

99*5 

84.13 

148*1 

117.14 

11494 

1795 


mFFM int Bd Proor-CHF O -SF 188*4 
GOLDMAN SACHS 

wGSAdt Rate Mart. Fd 11 _s 9.93 

mGS Global Currency 9 1237*4 

w GS GloDal Eaultv- S 12*3 

wGSWorkl Band Fund S 1848 

wGSWor td Income Fund_-J 9*1 

G O l l EX FUND MANAGEMENT 
wG.5wa»Fund— ... — Eqj 1151*5' 

GRANITE CAPHAL INTL GROUP 
w Grande Ciwfiat Equity — ~S 0 S703 

w Granite Capital MM Neutrals 89297 

w Granite Capital Mortgage -5 87177 

GT ASSET MANAGEMENT (IRELAND) LTD 
Tel : (44) 71 -710 45 (7 

0 GT Asean Fd A snores 1 76*2 

d GTAseanFdB Shares 5 7454 

0 GT ASta Fund A Shores— _5 74X9 

a GT Ada Firnd B Smr es % 2454 

0 GT Asian SmoH Comp A Sh5 1936 

d GT Asian Small Comp B ShS 1952 

dGT Australia Fd A Shares-* X2J4 

d GT Australia Fd B snoros-j 3288 

a GT Auslr, Small CO A 5h — J 28*5 

d GT Auilr. Small Co B Sh — 5 78*4 

0 GT Berry Japan Fd A 5b — S 2421 

0 ST Berry Japon FdBSh — S 2*25 

d GT Bond Fd A Shares s 19*1 

d GT Band FOB Shams __S 19*8 

d GT Bio S AP Sciences A StU 1853 

0 GTBk) SAP Sciences BStLS IB53 

0GT Dollar Fund A Sh 5 3L« 

d GT Dollar Fund B Sh S 34*5 

0 GT Emerging Mkts ASH — S 19*7 

d GT Emerging MktsB Sh— 5 19*0 

0 GT Em Mkl Sma* to A Sh J 9.19 

0 GT Em Mkl Small to B Sh JS 928 

wGT Eura SmoH Co Fd A Sh_s <2.n 

wGT Eure Small Co Fd B Sh* 42^ 

d GT Hoag Kong Fd A Shares* 7i>0 

0 GT Hong Kong Fd B 5har«S 7801 

d GT Honshu Pathfinder A Shi 11B 

0 G f Honshu PatMhxtor B Shi 73*2 

wGT Jap OTC Stocks FdA Sh* 1392 

w GT JOU OTC Stocks FdB ShS 14*0 

iv GT JOP Small Co Fd A Sh — I 16.15 

w GTJap Small Co FdBSh— J 1424 

wGT. Lai In America Fd. S 21J 

0GT Strategic Bd FdA SO -J 8*5 

d GT Strategic Bd Fd BOi — s 8*5 

0 GT Telecomm. FdA Shores* 14*7 

d GT Telecomm. Fd B Stares* 1440 

r GT Technology Fund A Sh-J M 

r GT Technology Fund B 5h j _SX2 

GT MANAGEMENT PLC (4471 718(5(7) 
d G.T. Btotech/Heolth Fund— 5 2151 

0GlT. Deutschland Fund * 1154 

0 G.T. Europe — * 5194 

W&T. Global SmaN CO i F0 S 2B» 

0 G.T. investm en t F«md * 25*1 

wGlT. Karoo Fund————-* Ug 

w&T. Newtv Ind tountr Fd-i 41^ 

wGT. US SmoH Companies-* _2451 

GUERNSEY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

f GCM Global 5eL Ea.— J* 10LM 

GUINNESS FLIGHT FD MHGRS (BMOYlLM 
GUINNESS FUGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 


d Mcnaoed Currency. 
0 Otabal Bond- 


3943 
34*8 
22*8 
11.10 
23*0 
91*4 
27.11 
12934 
2493 

11291 

GUINNESS FLIGHT INTL ACOJM FD 

d oeutsenemark Money DM 88704 

0 U5 Dodor Money — * 

0 US Dollar High Ya Bond — 5 7840 


0 Global High Income Bond-5 

d Gilt & (Band ■ 1 

d Eura High Inc Band 1 

0 Global Etaltv-— * 

0 American Blue OX P S 

0, ... 

0 UK. 

0 Europe 


0 Inn Balanced Grth - 


- ... . — X4.lt 

HA5ENB1CHLER ASSET MAHGTGesmML 

wHoKnblchier Com AG S 5458*0 

w HsBeoWfftSer Cam Inc S 111*1 

w HawnWchlsr Dlv S JTJm 

-■m — S 1329*4 

HEPTAGON FUND NV (5998*1055) 

I Heptoaen QLB Fund. * 

m Heptagon CMO Fu n d-. IGM 

HERMES ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda: (889)295 4888 Lux: (352 WM 44 61 


Eu 

at Hermes Hortn Amertesn Fd* 

in Hermes Asian Fund * 

m Hermes Emerg Mkts FtmdJ 
m Hermes Sira 


297.U 
384*7 
134*2 
715*1 

m Hermes Naatrai Fund— * 113.17 

raHermes Glabal Fund * MJ-21 

m Hermes B«ia Fund Ecu 12*4*4 

m Hermes SierttaeFd c 1J2-17 

m Hermes Gate Fund J <2**1 

INCOME PARTNERS (ASIA) UMITED 

w Aston Fixed income Fd S 18267 

INTERIHVEST (BERMUDA) LTD 
C/e Bank of BMinuda. Tel: 809 395 4000 
m Hedge Hog & Conserve Fd_* 952 

INTERNATtONAL ASSETS FUND 
L Bd RnyaL L-2449 Luxembourg 

w Europe Sud£ —JS 7 ® 

INTERNATIONAL MGMT INCOME FUND 
0 Amerlouedu Word. * 10030 

0 Europe Canltoaitole DM U8M 

0 Extreme Orient AngtosaxoaA* HBffi 

0 rnw - - -F F 58038 

0 Halle Ul W0943JX) 

d Zone Askniaue— — — Y H»T4** 

INVESCO INTL LTD. PO«27LJenev 

Tel: 44 534 73114 

0 Maximum income Fund — l 1*2$ ■ 

d Sterling Mngd Ptfl. I 22230 

0 Pioneer Market* . 


d Qkasan Gtabtd Strategy. 

0 Asia Super Growth. 

0 Nippon Warrant Fund 

d Asia Tiger Wbrant- 


0 European warrant Fund — s 

0 Gtd N.W. WW S 

PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 
0 American Growth — . ■ J 

0 American Enterprise—* 

d Asia Ttoer Growth s 

0 Dollar Reserve S 

0 Europem) Growth. 


0 European Entororbe S 

d Global Emerging Markets— s 

0 Glabal Growth 8 

d Nb>ooa Enterprise * 

d Nippon Growth 5 

d uk Growth- 


0 Sterling Reserve r 

0 North Americm Warrant-5 

0 Groofer CMm> Oww * 

rTALFORTUNE INTI- FUNDS 
w Class A (Aggr. Growth IlaUS 

w Clan B (Global Equity) * 

w Class C (Global Band) — * 
wClassD (Ecu Bend). 


JARDINE FLEMING, Gpo Bex 174(1 Hg Ke 

d JF ASEAN Trad * 55*2 

0 JF Far East wrnt Tr 1 2728 

0 JF Global Conv. Tr I • MAS 

0 JF Hong Kara Trust S 19.17 

0 JF Japan Sm. Co Tr Y 5140750 

d JF Japan Trust Y 13274*0 


0 JF Motorola Trust- 
0 JF Podfle lnc.Tr— 
0 JF TtaHOnd Trust. 


JOHN GOVETT MART (IXLMJ LTD 
Tel: 44*24- 42 91 » 

wGovetl Mqn. Futures 1 

w Gevett Man. Ful. USS S 

w Govern Goar. Curr S 

w Gavetl* BaLHdoe S 

JULIUS BAER GROUP 
0 Baerband SF 


253? 

12*7 

35A8 


0 Ebuiboer America- 
0 Eooiboer Europe— 
0 SFR -BAER . .. 
0 SH Y* tH T 


d Swbsbar_ 
d LlmiHMMI n 

d Europe Band Fund. 
0 DaHar Bend Fuw. 
d Austro Band Fund, 
di 

0 DM I 

0 Convert Band Fund. 

0 Global Band Fund 

d Eura Stock Fund 

d US Stock Fund— — 
d Podfic Stock Fund— 

0 Swiss Stock Fund 

0 Spedol Swbs Stock- 

0 Jopot Stock Fund 

d German Stodt Fund- 
0 Korean Slock Fund— 
0 Swiss Franc Cadi . 

0 DM Cash Fund- 
0 ECU Cate Fund. 


-SF 


_Y 

_DM 


.Eat 


0 5ter1tog Cash Fund, 
d DaHar Casn Fund——* 

0 French Franc tosh FF 

KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

jh Key Global Hedge * 

mKeyHedaoFwdinc j* 

mKey Hedge Investment* t ... 

Kl PACIFIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 


13*9 

894 

1XW 

112539 

95X40 
1924*3 
237UI 
1715*4 
112239 
2515*3 
3I218S 
2254*0 
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1272*0 
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12820 
181*8 
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139*8 

727*8 

132*6 

17240 

14450 

992808 

105*8 

1990 

1199*0 

1251*0 

018*0 

1019*0 

1039*0 

1107*0 

29930 

131*5 

145*3 


mKi Asia Podfle FdLt 
KIDDER. PEABODY 

b Chesapeake Fund Lid * 

b III Fund Ltd * 

b Inti Gu nru iH xil Fund * 

b Stonehenge Ltd. 


1X10 

2705*0 

1117*0 

138877 

14522s 


LATIN AMERICAN SECURITIES 
Tel: London 071 OS 12M 
0 Argentinian invest Co Slaav* 

0 Brazilian Invest Co Slew— S 
0 Catombten invest Co SlcavJ 
0 Latin Amer Extra Yield Fd* 

0 Latin America income to_S 
d Latin American invest Co-3 

0 Mexican invest Co Stow 5 

0 Peruvian invesl to Slcnv S 

LEHMAN BROTHERS 
0 Aston Dragon Part NV A— 3 
0 Aston Dragon Port NV B — * 

0 Global Advisors 1 1 NV A—* 

0 Global Advisors 1 1 NVB— 3 
0 Global Advisors Port NV AJ 
rf Global Advisors Part HV BJt 

0 Lehman Cur Adv. A/B JS 

0 Premier Futures Adv a/B- 3 
LJPPO INVESTMENTS 
24/F UppO Tower Centro. 89 QueenewoyJtK 
Tel (EQ) H7 4088 FOX 1852) 594 0» 
w JuvoFund- ..J 


2415 
27*4 
1438 
18)319 ■ 
9.94 
992 
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1419 

9J9 

9*9 


1841 

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931 

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11.15 

7*5 


w Asean Fixed Inc Fd — 

wIDR Money Marker Fd * 

w USD Money Market Fd — 3 

w Indonestoa Growth Fd S 

w Aston Growth Fund— s 

w Aston Warrant Fund 1 
LLOYD GEORGE MNGMT (052) Ml HU 

w Antenna Fund . — * 17.16 

w LG Aston Smoker Cm Fd_l 19.1197 

wLG India Fund Ltd S 14)0 

LLOYDS BANK INTL (BAHAMAS) LM 
Lloyds Americm Portfolio 1869) 32*8711 
w Balanced Moderate Risk Fra 9** 

LOMBARD, OSIER G CIE ■ GROUP 
OBUFLEX LTD (Cl> 

0 Multicurrency 3 


d Dot tor M edi um Term. 

0 Dollar Lang Term. 

e*o Ye< 


0 Pound Sterna 


d Deutsche Mark, 
d Dutch Florin. 


0 HY Euro Currencies Ecu 

0 Swiss Franc SF 

0 US Dollar Sheri Term— — * 

0 HY Eura Curr Dlv Id Pay —Ecu 
0 Swiss Multicurrency— EF 

0 European currency Ecu 

0 Balaian Fronc EF 


0 Convertible. 
d French Front. 


32.94 
2479 
26*1 
4955*0 
2731 
1803 
1693 
1443 
1337 
12*0 
1199 

£3 

139.19 
15*0 
141*8 
1818 
104*5 
1355 
1557 
1897 
17*3 
11.17 
1815 

MALABAR CAP MGMT (Bermuda) LTD 

mMeUMr infl Fund * 19*7 

MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 
mMM Limited - Ordtoary — _S 

mMint Limited - Income- — * 

mMM Gtd Ltd - Spec IM-3 

m Mint GMLU- NOV 2802 * 

m Mint Gfd Ltd -Dec 1994 3 

mMint Gtd LSd-Aug 1995 3 

mMM GW Currencies—— S 
mMint GW Currencies 2001— S 

mMM Sp Res Lid IBHPI 1 

s» Athena Gtd Futures S 

m Athene Gtd Currencies * 

m Athena G*d Financials inc-5 

m Afflena GM Flnonctob Cap* 

in AML Capital Mkts Fa — _s 

irtAHL Commodity Fund I 

m AML Currency Fund.. * 


0 Swiss Mo Itl -Dividend SF 

0 Swiss Franc Short-Term — SF 

0 Canadian Dot tor CS 

d Dutch Florin Multi FI 

0 Swiss Fronc Ohrid Pav SF 

d CAD Mutttol r. Dlv C* 

0 Mediterranean Curr— — 5F 
d Gaaverflbbs 5F 


mAHL Rem Time Trad Fd — S 

m AHL Gld Real Time Trd — S 

mAHL GM cap Mark Ltd 5 

mMOP Guaranteed 1994 Ltd— 3 

mMap Leveraged Recov. Ltd* 

mMAPGuanmtMdTSH JS 

mMint GGL Fla 2003 3 


14*7 

2934 

2393 

1933 

16.11 

IC 

9*2 

10938 

13.16 

932 

1094 

1114 

1152 

10.12 

9*8 

10J6 

1845 

1033 

888 

1896 

9.92 

7*7 


MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 

73 Front St Hamilton Bermuda (809)2929789 
w Maritime Mil-Sector | Ltd _S 102397 

w Maritime GM Beta Series _» 644*4 

w Maritime GR4 Delta Series* B2433 

w Maritime GMTau Series— * 62413 

MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MGT 
EMERGING ASLAN STRATEGIES FUND 

mdn* S 128*9 

0 Class B S 11531 

m Pacific Convert. Strat———» 9852 

MAVERICK (CAYMAN) (tat) 949-79(2 

pi Mmerlcfc Fd S M73847 

MCKINLEY CAPITAL FARTHERS, LTD 
mThe Corsair Fixx) Lid — — 4 11817 

MEESPiERSON 

Rokte 55, 1012kk. Amsterdam (2042111881 
w Asia PDC. Growth FdN.V.-S 4804 

w Alion Cqgitol HoWtoOS S 4079 

w Aslan Selection FdN.V R ltt*3 

w DR Amer. Growth Fd N.v._* 35*a 

w EMS OHshore Fa N.V. FI 10849 

w Europe Growth Find N.V— FI 4477 

w Japan Divers ifi ed Fund— S S415 

w Leveraged Cap Hold J 4844 

w Tokyo Poc. Hold. N.V. 1 25598 

MERRILL LYNCH 

d Donor Assess Portfolio — _1 1*0 

d Prime Rate PortfeUa * 18*8 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TERM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

d Class A — — — s 858 

d Class B 5 8*1 

MERRILL LYNCH 

GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SERIES 
AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
0 Category A ■ At 

0 Category B. 


CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
0 Category A CS 


1843 

1811 


- Dutch Ruin; 



>4)3 

13*2 


CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 

0 Class A- 1 S 9*8 

0 CtanA-2 S 9*5 

d CtoS B-l s 9.41 

d Class B-2 -_l 9*3 

DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 
d Category A — DM 1333 


0totom>B- 


-DM 


EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (DM) 

d Class A-1 s 1494 

0 Class A-2 * 1815 

0 Class B-l — S 1494 

0 Class B- 2 S I803 


EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO tUSS) 


3S“ 


-DM 


POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 
0 CaiegervA- 
d Category B. 


LJ S_DOLl-A REPORT FOLIO 


YEN PORTFOLIO 

0 Category a 

0 Category B. 


9*7 

1837 

9*7 

>83) 

1893 

15*8 

13(1 

13*7 


MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 

fl Class A S 

0 Class B i 

US FEDERAL SECURITIES PTFL 

0 Class A s 

0 Class B 5 

MERRILL LYNCH 
EQUITY / CONVERTIBLE 5ERIE5 
BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A S 

0 Class B I 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITI E5 PTFL 
0 « 
a pa n b * 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL (USS) 

0 « 

0 Class B S 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A % 

0 Class B * 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A s 

0 Class B _J 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 
0 CUSS A i 

a Class B 5 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 

0 QOU A 5 11*4 

0 Class B l 1899 


22.14 

21*3 


935 

9*4 


14*8 

13*7 


1439 

11.90 


10*4 

HUB 


1818 

9*3 


14X1 

13*4 


1473 

1445 


DRAGON PORTFOLIO 

0 Ctoss A 

0 Class B. 


1598 
1856 

MERRILL LYNCH INC I PORTFOLIO 

0 Oast A S 853 

0 Class B S 853 

d Class C % 854 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

0 Mexican lack Ptfl □ A % 9*8 

0 Mexican toe 8 Ptfl a B S 9*8 

d Mexican tnc Peso Ptfl a a* 810 

0 Mexican Inc Peso Ptfl OB* 890 

MOSAE KTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
w Momentum NaveHierPerf-5 95.92 

R1 Momentum Rainbow Fd 8 12212 

m Moment um RxR R.U S 0739 

m Momentum Mock maser s 156*3 

MORVAL VONW1LLER ASSET MGT Ce 
w Wilier Telecom. 


w wiDortunas-Wlltorbona CopS 
w Wlllerfurats-Wlltertxxid Eur Ecu 

w WiUertwds-wiUercq Eur Ecu 

wWmertunds-WUlerre Italy -Ut 

w wmertureb-wniereq NA % 

MULTIMANAGER KV. 

w Cash Enhancemtnr s 

m Emerging Mtrkets Fd— J 

w Eisaaean Growth Fd Ecu 

w Hedge Fund— s 


9*3 
15*7 
12*7 
1420 
14472*0 
1899 

183) 
2259 
1534 
12*1 
B7D 
11.72 

1254 

M1CHOLAS-APPLEGATE CAPITAL MGT 

w NA Flexible Growth Fd I 147*0 

w ha Hedge Fima % 132.12 

NOMURA INTL. (HONG KONG) LTD 
d Nomura Jakarta Fund— _S 895 

NORIT CURRENCY FUND 

mNCF USD S 82895 

rnNCFDEM DM B95*9 

mNCFCHF— — _5F 92479 


w Market Neutral, 
w World Bond Fund- 


mNCF FRF. 
(D«CF JPY- 


_FF 

_Y 

.BF 


B209SAB 

2703X00 


ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
21 Grosvenor SLLdn WIX 9FEA4-71-490 2998 


0 Odev European. 

wOdev E u ropctxi- 


wOdev Earap Growth Inc— DM 
wOdey E urea Growth Acc DM 


nr Odev Earo Grth Ster Inc * 

w Odev Euro Grth Star Aec — * 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL. INC 
WHUams Haase. Hamilton HMD, Bermuda 
Tel: 809292-1018 Fax: 809298-2305 

w Finsbury Group S 

wOtympla SecurileSF — J»F 


15172 

14930 

153*7 

15453 

61.12 

6134 


w Olympia Stan Emerg MktsS 

w Winch. Eastern Draaen. s 

w Wkich Frontier S 

w Winch. FuL Otvmpia Star -1 

w Winch. Gl Sac tnc PI (A I s 

w Winch. Gl Sec Inc PMC) S 

w wbKh. Hide mtl Modbon_Ecu 

w Winch. H kte I m Ser D. Ecu 

w Winch- Hide infl Ser F, Ecu 

w Winch HidgOty Star Hedges 
w Which. Reser. Mutrt. Gy Bd-S 

w Winchester Tta Bond S 

OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 


214*4 

171*1 

91400 

17*4 

282*1 

149*4 

854 

9*9 

144823 

172178 

171314 

1)2439 

1938 

3830 


73 From SL HomiHamBennuda 8092954450 
w Optima Emerald Fd LM — % 10*7 


MrOatimaFund- _ 

wORkna Futures Fund- — _f 
wOaHma Global Fund— J 
» Optima Pericula Fd LM—S 
w Optima Start Fund ^—S 
ORBITEX GROUP OF FUNDS 
0 Ortttox Asks Pac Fd — — s 

d Ortdtex Growth Fd S 

0 Orbttex Health 8 Envir FiL* 
0 Orbttex Japan Smart Can FdS 

0 OrUtex Natural Res Fd CS 

PACTUAL 

d Eternity Fund Ltd S 

0 lafMly Fond Ltd. 


0 Star High Yield Fd Ltd. 
PARI BAS-G ROUP 
w Luxor . . — 

0 POrvatt USA B 

0 Pcrvesl Japan B 

0 Porvest Asia PadI B— , 
d Poorest Europe B ■ 

0 Poorest Halknd B 

0 Poorest Frances. 


-Y 

-S 

-Ecu 


-FI 

-FF 


0 Panresi Germany B DM 

0 Poorest Obli-Daltor B 5 

d Panresi Obll-OM B DM 

0 Poorest Obd- Yen B Y 

0 Poorest OMI-GuMenR FI 

a Poorest OblFFr one B—FF 


0 Parvesl OWFSrer B_ 
0 Poorest ObIFEcu B- 


_Ecu 

-LF 


0 Poorest ObU-Sehcr B. 

d Poorest 5-T Dollor B ) 

0 Parvesl 5-T Europe B Ecu 

0 Parvesl 5-T DEM B DM 

d Parvesl 5-T FRF B FF 

d Poorest 5-T Bel Plus 
0 Parvesl Global 
0 Panresi Ini Band B 
0 Panrest OblHJro B 



0 Poorest Int Equities B 
0 Parvesl UKB 
0 Parvesl USD Plus B 
0 Poorest S-T CHF B 

0 Panresi OblKonedaB. 
d Panresi OHI-DKK B. 

PERMAL GROUP 
/ C a mmedWesLi d I 

1 Drakkor Growth N.V 8 

I Emerging Mkts Hldgs— — S 

t EuraMlr (Ecu) LM ECU 

f Investmert HUBS N.v S 

f Media 8 Communication*— 1 
f t tosco l Lkl 3 

PiCTET 4 CIE - GROUP 

w P.CF UK Vol (Lux) 1 

wP.CFGermovoJ (Lux) DM 

w PX.F NoranwoM Lux I — * 

iy P.CF Vol tear (Lux) Ptes 

w PjCF VoHtalto (Lux) Ut 

wPX.F VOHrance (Lux) FF 

nr P.UP. VotoeodSFR (Lux) JF 
ur P.U.F. Vofcond USD (Lux) J 
w P.U.F. Vokaond Ear (Lux)— Ecu 
w P.UP. Valbond FRF lUnl-FF 
nr P.U.F. Vafbend GBP (Lux) j 
w P.U.F.VefbandDEM (Lux) DM 
w P.U.F. US S Bd Ptfl I Lux ) —5 
w P.u.F. Model Fd Ecu 


17*9 
1732 
1153 
9*9 
7.15 

5*288 

7*4(2 

49884 

49961 

144141 

249*775 

42 88225 

1249834 

833 

2238 

5919.B 

71*3 

24*8 

1413) 

130135 

rmnn 

1742.13 
1919*0 

14205D£0 

143837 

2057*8 

141*4 

134*0 

17277*0 

12850 

VMM 

54410 

100.97 

1DSD400 

7915*0 

2138 

552452*0 

108*9 

9151 

98*8 

251*8 

18777 

971*8 

95134 

2780*0 

<0875 

170838 

1311.14 
1M1.« 
1743*3 

4151 
9853 
27*4 
9419*0 
128315*0 
1335-00 
29413 
2287S 
mm 
973*1 
95.75 
29AJ0 
99314*0 
125.17 
18775 
153*5 
152*1 
2311? 
48175 
47732 


w P.U.T. Emero Mkts (Lux) —5 
m P.U.T. Eur.Oagari (Lin) —Ear 
d FD.T. Gtebal value (Lux) -Ecu 

w P.U.T. Evwal (Lux) — Ecu 

0 Pictet Vabuisse (CHI SF 

m Inll Small Can (IOM) % 

PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 
c/o P*X Bax 1180, Grind Cayman 
Fax: (109) *494993 

m Premier US Eaultv Fund -J 117894 

m Premier Eq Rbt Mgt Fd S 134733 

m Premier tot) Ea Fund. . .S 1292*0 
m Premier SoimlNi Bd Fd-* 09439 

m tY e ml er Gtebal Bd Fd— J 1(7542 

m Premier Total Return Fd_* 1002*9 
PUTNAM 

0 Emerging HHti Sc Trail 3 3778 

w Putnam Em. Into. Sc Trust* 3434 

0 Putnam Glob. High Growth* 17.71 

0 Putnam High Inc GNMA FdS 819 

0 Putnam Infl Fund s 1538 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 

w Aslan Dev Mourn an t 5 

w Emerging Growth Fd N.V — S 
w Quantum Fund N.V.. 


1B43S 

1598830 

10139 

133*9 

10403 

1M.93 

15033 


ur Quontwn Industrial . . —5 
w Quantum Realty Trust— — s 
w Quantum UK Realty Fund — i 

■r Quasar Infl Fund N.V 5 

w Quota Fund N.V S 

QUARRY MANAGEMENT LTD 
Tekeiwne:809 - 94MQ50 
Facsimile: H9- 949-8062 

d Atlas ATOUreoeFd LM s 

d Hesnerti Fund Ltd — 5 

d MeridkXJ Hedge Fd LM s/( * 

d Zenith Fund Ltd s/s 5 

REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 

w New Korea Growth Fd S 1273 

w Nova Lot Podfle (nv Co I 4729 

w Podfle Arbitrage Co. — _J 9*4 

m RJ_ Country Wrnt Fd j 25*58 

d Regent GW Am Grth Fd S 59264 

0 Regent GU Euro Grth Fd_* 1V51« 

d Regent GRU Infl Grth la s 1323 

d Regent GiMJra Grth Fd—s 10353 


9829 

10890 

101*9 

84*2 


0 Resent «H Pacll Basin S 44MI 

0 Regent GW Reserve S 2,1673 

0 Regent GW Resources S 2*554 

d Regent GW Tiger t 1*084 

0 Regent GW UK Grin Fd— J 1*892 

w Regent Moghul Fd Ltd i 978 

ai Regent Pacific Hda Fa S 1118791 

0 RagemSrl Lanko FO .. S 1L9B 

w Undervalued Assets Ser I _S 11*9 

ROBECQ GROUP 

POB 9713080 AZ RattentonUimt 2241224 

0 RG America Fund FI IJ770 

0 RG Eurooe Fund—— —FI 11570 

d RG Podfle Fund FI U7*S 

a RG EHvI rente Fund — — _F1 5430 

0 RG Money PtoSFFL FI 113*4 

d RG Money Plus FS— * 10X70 

0 RG Money Plus F DM DM 111*1 

0 RG Money Pius FSF SF 104*4 

Mare Robeco see Amsteraam Slocks 
ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
UMU3USE FUNC 


M'Datwn LCF Rotosch Ea S 

w Faroe cash TrodiMan CHF JF 
wLeicom » 


-5F 


b PriOtebengeSwfeiFd. 

b Priemiltv Fd-Ewaae Ecu 

* Prtenultv FfrHetvefta SF 

b Prienudv Fd-Laiin Am 5 

b Promt Fund Ecu Ecu 


._ . _USD 

b Priband Fd HY Enter Adds* 

wSeixctivr invest SA 5 

b Source. s 

w US Band Phis 5 

WWtaWUS Fry. 


ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
OTHER FUNDS 
0 Asia/ Japan Emerg. Growths 

w Esprit Eur Porto Inv Tsi Ecu 

w Estop strateg lavestm Id— Ecu 
b Integral F uteres S 


6079 
101536 
HI 444 
1012270 
254814 
4844 
99734 
HSIJ2 
117384 
1189S2 
138912 
121309 
1VU12 
11*059 
341516 
1843580 
945*30 
TU134 


b Opltgest Global Fd General DM 
b Opttgest Global Fix income DM 
0 Pactflc Nies FuntL^^^^M 


17*4890 

unu 

104300 

101279 

194734 

173301 

8*1 

2899*4 

81145*8 

503809 


nr Permal Drakkor Grth NV— J 

I Selection Horizon FF 

b Vlctalr* Ariaoe S 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT (CJ) LTD 

m Nemrod Leveraged Hid S 841*9 

5AFDIE GROUP/KEY ADVISORS LTD 
m Kev Diversified Inc FdUdJ 11*2414 
SAPRA REPUBLIC HOLDING 

nr Republic GAM S 14137 

nr Republic GAM America S 114*7 

w Rep GAM Em Mkts Global J 14U1 

w Rep GAM Eta Mkts Lot Am4 117*1 

w Republic GAM Europe 5F-5F 12444 

nr Republic GAM Europe USS* 10932 

w Republic GAM Gnvth CHF JF 11030 

w Republic GAM Growth t C 103*5 

ur Republic GAM Growth USS* 154JM 

w Republic GAM Opportunity I 11478 

w Republic GAM Podfle S 145JO 

n Republic Gnser Doll K S 1831 

w Republic Gnsev Ear Inc DM 1039 

w Republic Lot Am Altoc S 98*4 ■ 

nr Republic Lot Am Argent. —3 9411* 

m Republic Lai Am Brazil. 5 105*0* 

w Republic Lai Am Mexico — S 101JM ’ 

xr Republic Lot Am Venn s 9137 1 

■r Rea Salomon Shot FdUd J 9i*i 

SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 
mCommaader Fund— — S 104799 

m Explorer Fond 5 128037 

5KANDINAVISKA ENSKILDA BANKER 
S-E-BANKEN FUND 

0 Fi«MV» I.V t 


0 Florron Ostero Inc- 
d Global lac. 


d Lckaroedet inc_ 

0 Widen Inc 

d Jspaninc— 

0 Minolta. 

0 Sv 


0 Nordame Hku toe. 
0 Teknoiogl UK- 


0 Sverige RonMond Inc. 
SKANDIFONDS 

0 Equity infl Act 

0 Equity inn Inc 

0 EooHy Global 

0 Equity Not Resources- 
0 Equity Japan. 

0 Easily Nars 
0 Equity ILK. 


JL 


0 Equity Coot menial EurapeJ 

0 Eauily Meditemmean S 

0 Equity Worth Amerkn. — t 

0 Eauily For East 5 

0 infl Emerging Markets — S 

0 Band lad Act 5 

0 Bend Infl Inc 5 

0 Bend Europe Acc S 

0 Band Europe Inc 5 

d Bcxid Sweden acc Sc 

0 Bend Sweden Inc Se 

d Bend OEM Acc. 

0 Bond OEM Inc 

0 Bend Dolkr US Acc. 


0 Bend Dollar US Inc. 

0 Curr. US Dollar— 5 

0 Curr. Swedish Kronor Sefc 

50CIETE GENE RALE GROUP 
SOGELUX FUHD(SF) 

wSFBondsA UJA S 

wSF Bands B Germany DM 

wSF Bonds C France — FF 

wSF Bands E CUL C 

wSF Bands F Japtxi Y 

nrSF Beads G Europe Ecu 

wSF Bantte H WDrid wide — S 
wSF Bands J Betotam — — BF 
w SF Eq. K North America — S 

w SF Eq. L WJEurope Ecu 

iv SF Eq. m Pacific Besln — Y 
w SF Eq. p Growth Couvries* 

■r5F Eq. O Gold Mines S 

wSF Eq. R World WUe 5 

wSF Short Term S France — FF 

w SF Short Term T Eur— Eai 

SO DTTIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC. 
w SAM Brazil. 


899 

0» 

IJ» 

0J4 

1JS* 

M0.W 

1*0 

1828 

8V2 

1*4 

10*2 

17*8 

1149 

1*5 

134 

111*0 

1*4 

1*8 

1*1 

1*9 

1*3 

449 

134 

1232 

733 

1*6 

0*4 

1459 

1844 

139 

0*4 

138 

1*4 

1*5 

1231 


15*9 

32.13 

12938 

1220 

2377 

iani 
103* 
831 JB 
14*8 
14*9 
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1737 
3004 
U33 
1781985 
1434 


w SAM Mvemfled— , S 

w SAA4JMcGorr Hedge 8 

w SAM Opp or tunity —S 

■v SAM Strategy S 

mAtotaSAM 5 

wGSAM Composite S 

SR GLOBAL FUND LTD 

r» SR Aston S 

mSR Internal 


20539 

>3841 

10137 

12539 

luun 

179*5 

339*3 

184*7 

9730 

102*4 


SVENSKA HAH DELS BANKER SJL 
144 Bd de la Petnnse. L-2330 Luxembourg 

b SH B Bond Fund 5 5573 

w Svanska SeL Fd Amer Sh — S 1484 

■r SvenskaSeLFd Germany — S 11*4 

w Sverako SeL Fd infl BdSrtJ 1238 

w Svmfca SeL Fd Infl Sh S 5884 

iv SvenstoSeLFd Japan Y 397 

wSivcrafcoSei. FdMRt-Mfci — Sek 115M 

w SvenskaSeLFd Pool Sh — I 7*1 

w SvenskaSeLFd Smd Bds— Sek to>l*4 

nr Sveraka Sd. Fd Sylvia Sh— Ecu 142499 
SWISS RANK CORP. 

0 SBC 180 Index Fund SF 1832*0 

0 SBC Equity Pfff-Australto— AS 7X00 

0 SBC EqUBr Ptft-Canado — CS ■ 209*0 

0 SBC Equity PtDEurope — Ecu 28500 

0 SBC Eq Ptfl- Nether lands— FI 394*0 

0 SBC Govern Bd A7B S S 1HMX1 

0 SBC Bond PtflAurir S A AS 111*0 

d SBC BendPHLAusIrSB — AS 12UU 

0 SBC Bond Ptfl-Can* A CS 11807 

d SBC Bond Ptfl-CtaSB — jCS 12401 

0 SBC Band Ptfl-DiM A DM 171*3 

d SBC Band Ptfi-DMB DM 182*9 

0 SBC Bond PW-Outdi G. A__FI T7BJO 

d SBC Band Ptfl-Dulch G. B— FI 181*4 

0 SBC Band Ptft-Ecu A Ecu 113-57 

d SBC Bond PHI-Eeu B Ecu 131*2 

0 SBC Bond Ptfl-FF A FF 59839 

0 SBC Band Ptfl-FFB FF «t*7 

0 SBC Bond PTtt-Ptra A/B — Ptai 9744*1 

0 SBC Bond PHFSterttoo A _C 5414 

d SBC Bond PKF Sterling B _L 40*4 

0 SBC Band Portolto-SF A— SF 
0 5BC Band PortWtoSF B-JF 1407*0 

d SBC Band PtIMISS A J 1B172 

0 SBC Band Pttl-U5S B S JOB*) 

0 SBC Band Ptfl-Yen A y 

0 SBC Bond Ptfl-Yen B Y 

0 SBC MM F -AS AS 

.BF 


0 SBC 
0 SBC 


MMF-CanJ- 


0 SBC DM Short-Term A DM 

d SBC DM Short-Term B DM 

d 3BCMMF - Dutch G FI 

d SBC MMF- ECU EQl 

0 SBC MMF- ESC. 
d SBC MMF- FF- 
0 SBC MMF - Lit. 


0 SBC MMF - Pias— — Pit 

0 SBC MMF - ScnBIlns- -AS 

0 SBC MMF -Sterling £ 

d SBC MMF- SF SF 

0 SBC MMF - US - DoBar S 

d SBC MMF ■ USS/1 1 1 

0 SBC MMF - Yen Y 


0 SBC GW-PtflSF Grth SF 

0 SBC Glbt-Pffl Ecu Grth Ecu 

0 SBC GRU-Ftfl USD Grth S 

0 SBC GlM-m SF YM A SF 

0 SBC GIW Ptfl SF Yld B SF 

0 SBC GtoFPffl Ecu YRf A Ecu 

0 SBC GtWPW Ecu Yld B— JEai 

d SBC GteLPIfl USD Yld A 1 

0 SBC GW- Ptfl USD YM B — * 

0 SBC GW-Ptfl SF Inc A SF 

0 SBCGM-Ptfl SF Inc B SF 

0 SBCGIW-Ptfl Ecu Inc A— — Ecu 

0 SBCGIWPtfl Ecu Ita B Ecu 

0 SBC Giw-pm USD Inc A — S 
0 SBC GW-Ptfl USD Inc B — » 

0 SBC GW PtfHJM Growth -DM 
0 SBC GW Ptfl-DM Yld A/B JJM 
0 SBC GW Ptll-DM Ita A/B -DM 
0 SBC Emerging Markets — s 
0 SBC Small & MM tops Sw-SF 

0 AmertaAMor S 

d AnubVater f 

0 AstaPortlel t o — S 

d Convert Bona Selection SF 

0 D-Mark Band Selection DM 

d DoUbr Bond Selection S 

d Ecu Bond Selection Ecu 

0 Florin Band Selection FI 

0 Fnmcevator _FF 


10973200 
114734*0 
4334.11 
11203800 
448434 
1023*7 
132445 
734105 
37SL04 
E3C 45452109 
FF 25144*7 

Lit 534123800 
Pta 382341*0 
AS 3194194 

2824*5 
5896*0 
7210*9 
208932 
592928*0 
1217*5 


131234 


d GermanlaVator 
0 GotaPortfoHo- 
0 loertavater — 
0 ItofVolor- 


-DM 

J 

-P10 
— Ul 


d JoconPortfWk) 

d Starting Bond Setedten- — t 
0 S». Foreign Bond SeiectlanJF 

0 Swiss Valor — SF 

0 Universal Band Selec3lan_jf 
0 UTOveraX Fund — SF 


112939 

1231*0 

122852 

1354*4 

107473 

1182.13 
110039 

1119.13 
1MJ1 

1149.13 
1M773 
1031*3 

mam 

1849.14 
105171 
111835 

539-00 

3343 

22809 

M203 

H834 

11442 

13534 

105*4 

120*8 

2137*1 

541.16 

34543 

59509*0 

52)00000 

yeanean 

m*i 

111*1 

59425 

78*0 

121*2 


0 Yon Bond 5eteeHaa». r ^„ . _v 1178300 
TEMPLETON W.W1DE INVESTMENTS 
GROWTH PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A- 1 I 

d Class A-2 S 


0 Class AO. 


0 CtanB-l- 
0 Class B-3. 


INCOME PORTFOLIO 

d Cites A — 

0 CtessB. 


1177 

14*7 

14*7 

1127 

14.17 


THORNTON MANAGeMEKT LTD 

0 Parif Hurt Fd SA t 1 

0 Poctt liral Fd SA DM DM 

0 Eastern Crusader Puna I 

d Thor. Lift l Dragons Fd Ltd J 
a Thornton Orient me Fd Lid s 

0 Thornton Ttoer Fd LM s 

tf Monosod Select ten J 


d Korea 

HEW TIGER SEL FUND 
d Hera Kang 


d Thailand 

0 -MctaVStO- . 
d I n d o n rsln . ■ 
0 USS LtauldHv. 
d anna. 


d Slugwero ... . I 
THORNTON TAIWAN FUND 
0 Equity income I 

0 Equity Growth S 

0 LktekfltY— — S 


UEBERSEBBANK ZnrlcH 

0 B- Fund SF 

0 E - Fund SF 

0 J- Fuad 5F 


0 M-Fu 


JF 


0 UBZ Euro-Income Fund. 

0 UBZ World Income Fund —Ecu 

0 UBZ GaH Fund I 

0 UBZ Nippon Convert SF 

d Ada Growth Convert SFR -SF 
0 Asia Growth Convert USS— 1 

0 UBZ DM- Band Fund- DM 

0 UBZ D- Fund DM 

0 UBZ Swiss Equity Fund— SF 

d UBZ American Eq Fund s 

0 UBZ 8- Band Fund 8 

UNION BANCA IRE ASSET MST (UBAM) 
INTERNATIONAL, NASSAU 
wArtteflnvesI 1 

— % 

— * 


15*1 

3707 

MM 

40*1 

27*2 

52*3 

2231 

1U8 

1444 


2041 

2177 

7*1 

10.19 

15*3 

22*8 

12*1 

M35 

10*8 

1245 IT 
479*9 
398*7 
131178 
1875 
55*8 
12249 
13485* 
1225*1 
114599 
105*2 
114*1 
11599 
9537 
95*2 


w Dtavesi Inti Fix Inc Strat. 
lyjogtavesl 

w Loronlnvesl 

w Mansion— 1 

ur M a ri ta — B 

Mr Mourtnvesl . 


w Mourinues t ConHngfed . 

w Mourtnvesl Fm 

w Puhor. 


2438*7 
197902 

1100*1 

w Bedtimes! 8 1(19*1 

wBrudnvest 1 1114*7 

wCrespinvest » 1159*9 

wDtaftrfures s 1063*7 

w Dtavesi -5 2434.11 

h> Dknrest Asia S 5 105804 

930*5 
198139 
957. M 
1210*9 
131548 
3541*7 
961.95 
110519 

19(134 

w Pulsar 0— nv s 1009*3 

wQuontlnv— t S 755200 

w Qnontlnvesl 93 ■ - . . .. — S U5D32 

wStetota—sl S 2984*1 

tvTudtovest — * 112571) 

w iir— « 58137 

UNION BANCAIRE ASSET MGT (UBAM) 
INTERNATIONAL, LUX EMBOURG 

w UBAM S Bond . S 1144*5 

W UBAM DEM Bond— DM 1)19*4 

w UBAM Emerging Growth _S 98437 

w UBAM FRF Band. FF 549708 

w UBAM Germany- DM 12US3 

w UBAM Gtebal Band Ecu 141505 

M/I1BOXI Irnim - . V l@BJ.-f® 

hrUBAM Sterling Bond t 96437 

w UBAM Sttl Podf & Asia S 199*2 

ivUBAM US Equltlas ____* 119408 

UNION BANK OF SWrTZERLAND/INTRJkG 


0 Ama. 
d Bon04/wesl 
0 Bril-lnuesl. 
d Canoe. 


JF 


JF 


d ComerHnvesf. 
0 D-hAark-InvtSl- 


JF 


0 DoHar-ln—st- 
0 Eonie-lnvesl. 
0 Espoc 


0 Germac. 


0 Gtobinvesi 

0 Goto-iiwesJ 

0 Gulden- Invest _ 

0 He Ivet invest 

0 HoltamKnvesL 
0 ltec_ 


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0 Japan-invest— 
0 Padfic-lmmsi. 
0 Saflt. 


0 Skondinavlen-invesl. 

0 StertlixHnvtst 

0 Swiss FranDHwest-. 

0 Sbna 

0 Swlssrool. 


JF 


JF 


0 UBS America Latina. 
0 UBS America Lcdtaa. 


JF 


0 UBS Asia New Horizon SF 

0 UBS Asia New Horizon— s 

0 UBS Small G Europe SF 

0 UBS Small G Europe —DM 

0 UBS Part Inv SFR Inc SF 

0 UBS Port Inv SFR COP G SF 

0 UBS Pori Inv Ecu Inc SF 

0 UBS Port Inv Ecu Inc Ecu 

0 UBS Part Inv Ecu Cap G SF 

0 UBS Part lav Ecu CopG Ecu 

0 UBS Part Inv USS Inc S 

0 UBS Pari lav USS inc SF 

0 UBS Pari Inv USS cop G _JF 

0 UBS Part inv USS Cap G 5 

0 UBS Pari Inv DM Inc SF 

0 UBS Port Inv DM Inc DM 

0 UBS Port In* DM Ota G — SF 
0 UBS Part Inv DM Cop G— OM 

0 Yen-Invert Y 

d U3S MM Irmat-USS- 


4475 

sm 

145*0 

7775 

141*0 

21200 

111*1 

119*0 

17200 

349*0 

mm 

21800 

120*1 
244*0 
274. M 
104*0 
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19080 
272*0 
41500 

mai 

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21207 

218*0 

230*0 

187*0 

90*0 

9470 

45*5 

105*0 

12430 

109*0 

THUS 

102.15 

4236 

10630 

44*0 

7117 

105*5 

1055S 

7304 

9875 

11550 

1*105 

11930 


d UBS MM lihmri-tSl. l 

d UBS mm tavort-Eco- Ecu 

0 UBS MM Invert-Yen V 

0 UBS MM Invert-Lit Lll 

0 UBS MM Imed-SFR A— SF 
0 UBS MM Invert-SFR T SF 


JF 


0 UBS MM Invert-FF- . 

0 UBS MM Invert-HFL FI 

0 UBS MM Invert-Con ft CS 

0 UBS MM tnvert-BFR— — — BF 
0 UBS 5hprt Term Inv-OM— DM 

0 UBS Bond Inv-Eco A Ecu 

0 UBS Bond tav-£ca T -Ecu 

0 UBS Bond tav-SFR SF 

0 UB5 Bond lowDM DM 

d UBS Bond toYVSX. 


0 UBS Band ImeFF.. .. 
0 UBS Band Inv-Ccn s. 
0 UBS Band inv-Lh— . 


.FF 


0 UBS BJ-USS Extra Yield — S 
0 UBS Fix Term lnv-US*»4_S 

0 UBS Fix Term ImMSi 94 C 

0 UBS Fix Term Inv-SFR 95JF 
0 UBS Fix Term inv-DM95_DM 
0 UB5 Fix Term Inv-Ear N_Ecu 
0 UBS Fix Term lrw-FF*6 — FF 

0 UBS Eq tev-EuropeA-. DM 

0 UBS Eq Inv-Eurooe T . DM 
0 UBS Eq lawS Cap USA— J 
0 UBS Port I Fix inc (SFR)— SF 
d UBS Port I Fix Inc (DM) —DM 
0 UBS Part ( Fix (nc (Ecu) — Ecu 
0 UBS Pori I Fix inc IUSD— S 

0 UBS Can lnv-987UI SFR SF 

0 UB5 Cop Inv-Wld uss 5 

0 UBS Cap lihe907M Germ — DM 
WORLD FOLIO MUTUAL FUNDS 

d s Daliy tacomo s 

d DM Dolly Income DM 

d 1 Bond Income 5 

0 Noa-SBanas- 
0 Global I 
0 Global l 

0 Global Equities- 

0 us Comervative Equities _i 

0 US Aaresilve EquUles S 

d European Equities 5 

0 Pacific Equities s 

0 Natural Rcwrcro J 


Other Funds 

w Acttorotssance Slcov. 

w Actl fi nqnce Sfcav 

wAcflhitures Ltd— _ 
wAtitoestlon Skcnv. 
vAcOim InfTSlcov. 

wAdelaide. 

m Advanced Lotto Fd LU. 

m Advanced Pacific sirai s 

w Atfvonced Strategies LM i 

wAlG Taiwan Fund ..,. * 

mAmo Investmenl * 

w AquHd Into m o ii o nu t Fund -I 

wArUfln Irrvertment 5 

ur Argus Fund Batoncod SF 

iv Argus Fund Band SF 

d Aria OcMxiia Fund l 

w ASS (Aden) AG DM 

w ASS IDeilMut t vel i 

w ASS (Zaras) AG 

at Associated invertors inc. J 

w Athena Fund Ltd S 

w ATO NDckei Fond... ■ s 

w Benzol Kodged Growth Fd J 

w Beckman Int Cap Acc s 

w BEM International Ltd S 

0 BikubtoMorvolEEF Ecu 

0 Bleanar GW Fd ( Cnymon JS 

0 BtecmarGtauKBatamcal S 

0 rrn e 

mCcd Earo Leverage Fd LKL* 
or Capital Assured India Fd_S 

0 CB Germm Index Fund DM 

mCervin Growth Fuad 1 

m CM I tan Infl (BVH Ltd S 

w CHodei Lt mlied SF 

0 CM USA S 

nr CM! Investmenl Fund 5 

mCotombusHetotags » 

m Concorde tov Fund J 

w Coativesi Adlan mil BF 

w Can Avert OM Bate* CT BF 

wConttvertObUfitorid DM 

w Convert. Fd Inti A Certs 5 

w Convert Fd Infl B Certs 5 

m Craig Drill Cog 5 

mCrascot Aston Hedge Mar 315 

m CRM Futures Fund Ltd 5 

w Cumber Infl N.V S 

w Curr. Concept 2000 . 


d Dates Japon Fund. 


0 DB Argentina Bd I 

0 DB5C / Nam Bond Fund _s 

w Derivative Asset Altec 5 

0 Drovfu* America Fund 4 

1 DVT Performance Fd S 

atPvunrtv Furt — e 

wEtBOvaraeu Fund Ltd S 

m Elite World Fond LU SF 


547*9 

928*7 

1059*5 

440*9 

2511 

1128*4 

100*5 

99*7 

M344 

103332 

934275 

55504 

981*2 

1272.11 

1137*4 

14*4 

945*8 

2590 

401*0 

91171 

102*012 

91534 

509035 

131 

10*0 

11934 

CJ7J2S 
40034 
47*7 
25445*4 
088 
153*4 
Batts 
10043*4 
14523 
2S2A8 
1312*0 
21511 
125138 
10WLD0 
1S5D&D0 
509*1 
on an 
74*3 
14137 
102*8 
75SJ1 
58882 
I01JB 
28*8 
318*4 
7055 
93^*4 
10307*2 
12377? 
2134 
10439 
1*0 
1883*0 
9879J0 


0 Emi Beta. Ind. Phtt A JF 
d Emi Beta. ind. PheB ..«JF 

d Emi France ind Plus A FF 

d Emi France ind Plus B FF 

0 Emi Germ. tod. Plus A DM 

0 EM Germ, ind Plan B DM 

0EailNeflt. Index Plus A FI 

d End Nrrtn. Mutex Plus B —FI 
0 Emi Spain ind Plus I 
d Emi Spain Ind Ptooi . 

0 Emi UK Index Phis A. 

0 Emi UK index Plus B. 

raEautoW Offshore Ud S 

w Emir, sto inv.M Ecu Bd FdEeu 

w Espir. Ste inv.Sth Eur Fd— 8 

d Europe 1992 S 

0 Eurnoe OCX battens 
w F.l.T. Fund FF_ 
w F jap. Parttelto-. 
w FalrfloU toil L«t_ 
wFalrlleM Sentry LM 



w Fohflrtd Strategies LM 
mFotum Fund ■ 
m PireHid Overseas LM 
w First Eante Fund 

w Flrrt Ecu Ltd 

FTJFlTM Flutter Fund 

m First inn Irrvertment LM 
nr FL Trust Asia. 


vFL Trust Switzerland. 
0 Fondflana- 


w Fan taxi Money 

w Fantux 7 Devise 

w Fantax 3 - Inll Band. 
wFarmtda Setedten Fd_ 


m Future Generation LM i 

fffGEM Generation LM S 

mGemtalCaysl M. . » 

mGems Praaresstve Fd Ltd-* 

m German SeL Associates DM 

mGFMC Growth Fixid S 

w Glabal 91 Fend LM S 5 

w Global Arbitrage LM 5F 

PGtoMCOpFdBVJUf 8 

hr Global Futures Mgt Ltd % 

m Gtebal Monetary Fd Ltd t 

hrGoenonl SF 

0 Green Line France FF 

mGuanxdeedCaniM town w LF 

w I tarMnser Latin Amer S 

t Houssmam HMgs N.V_ 5 

wHB li nea me nt s LM 1 

laHemtahere Neutral Feb 281 
0 Heritage Cosj Growth Fd LkS 

wHestta Fund 1 

b Htohbridse Capital Corn — S 

w Horizon Food FF 

w Ibex HoKBngt Ltd. 
xr IF DC Japan 1 

b ILA-JGB 

O ILA4GF 

b | LA-INI 

w tndtao Currency Fd Ud. 
r tall Securities Fund_ 

0 Interland SA 

0 InvcrtaDWS. 
w Japan PocWc Fund 1 

ra japon SeiocHon Asses— — Y 
wjtapanS«?ectSnn Fund— I 
w Kenmar GkL Series 2— * 

w Kenmar Gwronfeed 1 

w KM Gtobal S 

0KML-IJ High Yield 5 

ur Korea Dynamic Fund * 

v Korea Growth Trust . 4 
tr La Foyr»eH0k*WS Ltd — S 
m L o JoBa lo t Grth Fd Ud — I 
b Loterman: Oflrtiore Strat—* 

w Leaf Sicav. S 

m Leu Pertotnaace 
w LF International 

m London Portfolio 

mLPS intlHPJ 
m Lux Inll Mgt Fd 



inLynx SeL HoMlMLi 
wm I Maftt-Strateav. 
w MJOngdon Otfshort N.V — J 
m Master CopG Hedge Fd — I 
w Matterhorn Ottshore Fd — 1 

wMBE Janan Fund LF 

JBMcGimsii GtabaMMor 31) -S 

mMCM lid. U mlied 1 

w Millennium international-* 

mMJM International LM J 

m Momentum Guild Ltd s 

w MuttHutures — — FF 

0 New MHleaniwn Ful LM— * 

0 Newtank Debentures— 1 

ibNMT Aston SeL Portfolio S 

■r Noble Partners inti Ltd i 

OtHSP FJ.T.LM J 

mOcaan strategics Ltmttod-* 

woid ironside Infl LM S 

m Omega O v e rs em P artner s J 

mOnnenbeimer U*L Arts 5 

wOnitowt Effect FuLLMA-S 
ir Opdmcrf Effect FtrLLMS— SF 
m Optimum Fund - - - . S 


w Oracle Fund Ltd. 

m Overlook PerionnancB— J 
m Padf R IM Opp BVI Apr 1 1 J 
m Pm Fixed Inc Fd (Jan 31 ) -S 
m pan imenwt i cnoi I 
m PoncurTi Inc. 
w Panda Fund Pie. 


1I1«*0 

11851*0 

1001*0 

103134 

11548 

11437 

488*6 

70178 

11481*0 

1218801 

13030 

14171 

11115 

106*2 

4*8 

11*3 

103.17 

149*7 

0*900 

220.90 

32478 

mo 

135034 

15544 

5941132 


4518 

3*1 

155*1 

14738 

04*4 

943*9 

957.94 

1807.43 

51.77 

98531 

999.13 

1599*5 

191439 

1*51 

13.16 

140527 

1042QUM 

129573 

167.72 

2776 

945*7 

SK3£U» 

109*2 

«n«n 

1JB5I0 

109*4 

7*75 

21542 

1252879 

13801*4 

25454 

24811*0 

12*4 

1139 

1030 

9593 

32*1 

41J4 

8554 

249*4 

4488 

21433 

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1100 

9583*0 

44119 

2T9172 

35*5 

15515 

168*2 

1088*2 

117444 

1034249 

1191.10 
12*3 

11*44 

lOOBJffl 

13141 

154*4 

1102.11 
1741 
10035 

1492554 

209201 

110541 

22545 

1519 

10543 

95*9 

5551 

1IB5.16 

1297*0 

310*4 

175.41 

1238 

119*4 

114*9 

1514433 

157*7 

>V.IK 


m Panpipes Ottehore IMar 31)8 
mPareMn Fund Uaiitad—* 

m Paradox Fund LM S 

mPcquat Infl Fund I 

is Phornw/Wheatth . J 

w PlurieesHen Plortforex FF 

w Pturigertlon Pterivnfeur_FF 
w Ptertvost Sicav __ __ __FF 

mPontaoy Overseas LM * 

m Portuguese Smoder to S 

mPrlma Band Ptui Fd Ltd -J 
m Prime torrtkX Fund Ltd — S 
m Prime Mufli-tovcrt — — J 


0 PraflrentLA. 
w Py ram id Wv Fd 
0 RAD InL tov. Fd. 
ft Regal mtl Fund Ltd. 
t Rlc Inovsrt Fund B. 


-DM 


w RM Futures Fund Sicav—* 

Hr Sailor's Inti Equity Ecu 

w Sol torts imt Fixed — Ecu 

0 Sanyo Kfc. State Fd_ 


dSorcxcreak Holding N.V.. 
wScdurn Fund- 


m Sovov Fund Ud- 8 

mSC Fundom. Vnl BVI LM-J 
d SCI/ Tech. SA Luxembourg* 

m Scimitar Guar. Curr Fd 5 

m Scimitar Guaranteed Fd — s 
mSetocta Gtebal Hedge Fd— 5 

0 Sefecttve Fut. Ptfl Ud S 

m Semades S 

w Sinclair Multttund LM 1 

•V SJO Gtebal (409)921-4595 — S 
m> Smitli Barney WrtchMl Sec-S 
w Smiih Barney WrkhMi Spec s 
wSP International SA A 5b —3 
wSP International &AB5h_S 

m Spirit Hedge hb 5 

m Spirit Neutral HM S 

iv Stanley Ron Futures FundJ=F 
w Stetnhardt Otaxn Pd Ud — S 
■vSteiithartfl Reatfv Trust — 5 

mstrlder Fund. — — S 

Of Strnme Offshore LM S 

0 Sunset Gtebal (II LM — — % 

0 Sunset Gtebal One S 

m Sussex McCon . . 5 

mTas Currency s 

w Techno Growth Fund —*F 
0 Templeton Gtobal Inc .5 

mThe Bridge Fund ILV. s 

mThe Geo-Gtotxd Ottshore— S 
0 The Insffi Mu« Advfsore— 5 

mute J Fund B.VJ. Ltd » 

nr The Jaguar Fund N.V.— — 1 
0 The Latte Equities Fd— I 
d me M‘A‘R-5 Fd Sicav A — S 
0 The M*A*R*5 Fd Sicav I — DM 

mThe Seychelles Fd LU S 

mThe Smart Bond LM SF 

w The Yellow Sea lavl to— J 

w TTietao M-M Futures I 

m Tiger Seicc Hold MV Bid — S 
b TIIC (OTC) Jan. Fd Sicav _J 
b Tokyo (OTC) Fund Stow _* 

iv Trara Gtebal tout Ltd * 

d Transpacific Fund Y 

kr Trinity Futures FdLM S 

m Triumph I - — ■ . - * 


■n Triumph III S 

to Triumph IV 8 

a Turawln Fund 8 

rn Tweedy Browne Infl ilv. — S 
■v Tweedy Browne n.v. a A — 1 
w Ttreedv Browne n.v. Cl B — 5 

0 UboFutures— FF 

a UboFuturei Dottar S 

t uttima Growth FdLtd- 


0 UmtareBo Debt Fund LM 5 

0 Umbrella Fund Ltd I 

W Uni Band Fund— —Ecu 

w Uni Capital Aitemagne DM 

w Uni Capital Convert fixes — Ecu 
tr IM4MM Sfcav DEM — — DM 
tr Uni-Gknai Sicav Ecu— Ecu 

Mr DnLG total Sicav FRF FF 

w Urd-GIobcrf Sicav FS SF 

w IM-Globa) Sicav USD 5 

d unlco Equity n ' 
tf Unlco inv. Fund. 
nunitradnCHF. 


to Unilrades CHF Reg. 

m Unitrades FRF 

mUOHrodes USD 

w Ureus Infl LM. 

mvaixxxie- 


JF 

.FF 


-Ecu 


ot Victor Futures Fund 3 

b Voyager investments Pic — 5 

krVuitureLM 

m Writes wtkfer Infl Fd. 
w Wilier Japan. 


wWtUer South East Aita S 

W Wlllawbridge Infl CFM S 

d Win Global Fd Bd. PM Ecu 

0 Win Gtebal FdEa. Ptfl Ecu 

0 win Gtebal Fd Res Ptfl SF 

0 World Bakmced Fuad UJ 

rniMH-idwkto UmUea s 

» WPG Farter O^ns Part _S 
m WW Capital Grth FdLM — t 

m Young SF 

rn Zephyr Hedge Fund —5 

tnZweia Infl LM I 


1909*2 
108.14 
713458 
10679 E 
105155 
150318 
195*9 
99*82 
1KU5 
1531 
93*4 
m.M 
9122 
94470 
57.90 
6U0 
940*4 
12*4 
9934 
11731 
90134 
9*4 
1154*7 
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lcais 
12413547 
•272 
1983776 
132132 
1387*5 
855 
14*0 
1458.0 
1351*5 
1195*4 
19*9 
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1151.944 
905*2 
12432 
108352 
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58*0 
2950* 

13744.15 
MBS7** 

169 JO 
97*7 
7594 
1038*3 
972357 
13197 
22539 
794*1 
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1105*0 
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4435 
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12*9 
115551 
1044*8 
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555*4 
21053019 
194577 
308 131 
990*4 
945*7 
1505 
1279*9 
9234 
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9*9 
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21834*0 
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nuuM 
4*971 
5(7*7 
585*9 
145*7 
214334 
4490 
1734 
35454.91 
5344*5 
435 
12133 
16437 
2359 jC 
370551 
1S26J2 
1259*0 
127532 
450933 
119437 
1133.10 
7173 
44*3 
unit 

1149*9 

14381.16 
121334 
4592*0 

14476 

22137 

157457 

2729.(2 

90937 

2KJH! 

1439 

937*2 

147.91 

13170 

22169 

1HQ 

89.18 

I59JB48 

1028*0 

212J3 

245*5 

19818*0 


To otir readers in Gemuiv 

0's never been easier 
to subscribe end sowe 
- just mil our 
FranUuri office 
tolHp» 0130-848585 
Ir&c 069-1 7541 3. 

From Austna 
coll m iolHroe 0660 81 55 
or hx; 06069 175413 


For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 


The conference program 
Witt highlight the investment 
opportunities in 

Latin America following the 
region’s economic revival. 


Latin America 

A New Investment Partner 

LONDON • JUNE 9 - t0 - 1994 

HcralbS-Sribunc 


MTEX AtdJIS JIN 



Dfvtwrufjtrs*)* 


FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION ON THE 
CONFERENCE: 

Brenda Hagerty 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH, England 
Tel: (44 71) 836 4802 
Fax: (44 71)836 0717 



«*« TTKST nTP « J* 6 rfS & i** *? ¥ C3?P- &9EK7 a a F-'tLP- g 1 g g £[g Si,tL 


o An ■hifliJ’' 


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20 



|.;i;N \riON VI. 1 1 KHALI) TRiBl NK. Till KS»>AV. AIMUL 21. 199j 


SPORTS 


Orioles Edge 
Angels as Smith 
Sets a Record 


The Associated Press 
For a guy who's supposed to be 
slowing down, Lee Smith quickly is 
putting up some big numbers. 

He preserved the Baltimore Ori- 
oles' 4-3 victory over the California 
Angels on Tuesday night and in 
doing so, set a major-league record 
by getting his seventh save only 12 
games into the season. The old 
mark was 14 by Bruce Sutter of the 
Chicago Cubs in 1980. 

It was the seventh game that 
Smith, 36, had appeared in, and he 
has dosed out all but one of Balti- 


Blue Jays 13, Rangers 3: Three- 
run homers by Carlos Delgado and 


joe Carter in Toronto highlighted 
n-bigh 17-hit 


the Blue Jays’ season- 
attack against Texas. 

Delgado connected for his 


AL ROUNDUP 


more's victories. Furthermore, he 
has not allowed an earned run yet, 
which is exactly what the Orioles 
wanted when they signed major 
league baseball’s career saves lead- 
er. 

“They say I lost my fastball 
about eight years ago, so what’s 
new?” Smith said “You look at my 
record but every year someone 
says teg old Lee Smith is through.” 

“We’re going to have to find a 
way to not kill him,” said Balti- 
more's manager, Johnny Oates. 
“It’s great that he has seven saves, 
but we have to find a way to get a 
few more runs or not have to gel to 
him.*’ 


Delgado connected for his 
league-leading eighth homer in the 
fourth inning, capping a five-run 
burnt that made it 1 1-2. Carter bad 
three hits, including his sixth 
homer, and drove in four runs. 

Kevin Brown tied a Texas record 
by giving up 10 runs. 

Red Sox 13, Athletics 5: Mo 
Vaughn and Tim Naehring twice 
hit consecutive homers and Scott 
Cooper added a grand slam as Bos- 
ton overpowered visiting Oakland 
The Red Sox. who have beaten the 
A’s seven straight limes, hit six 
home runs, their ir. >st in a game 
since Aug. 12, 1981. 

Tigers 9, Royals 5: Kirk Gibson 
broke out of a l-for-15 slump with 
two three-rtm homers in Detroit. 
The 13th multihomer game of his 
career gave him a career-high six 
RBls. 



Sunday’s NFLDraft; 
2 Passers 



Herb Snaou»/A*aicr Fraocr-fto* 

Mike GreemweD hit one of bis team's six home runs — its most since 1981 as tbeRed Sox dnbbed the visiting AlHetics, 13-5. 


Cubs Still Wrigley Doormats 
As Astros Drop Them to 0-7 


Smith relieved with one out and 
a runner on first base. He struck 
out pinch-hitter Greg Myers, gave 
up a single to Damion Easley and 
retired Chad Curtis onafly ball lor 
career save No. 408. 

“He's certainly not throwing the 
strikes he used to against me when 
he was with Sl Louis, but he's 
bitting his spots,” said the Angels' 
manager. Buck Rodgers. 

Jeffrey Hammonds homer ed and 
drove in two nuts at Camden Yards 
and Brady Anderson doubled 
twice. At 8-4, the Orioles already 
have matched their victory total for 
Iasi April. 

However, Jamie Moyer became 
the first Baltimore starter' besides 
Mike Mussina and Ben McDonald 
to win this year. 

Indian* 7 , Twins 6 : Sandy Alo- 
mar Jr.’s two-run single capped vis- 
iting Cleveland's three-run ninth. 

Omar Voquel had three hits, and 
Carlos Baerga and Albert Belle ho- 
mered for the Indians, who 
snapped a three-game losing 
streak. 

Dave Winfield bad four of Min- 
nesota’s 16 hits and Kirby Puckett 
extended his hitting streak to a ma- 
jor league-high 14 games, every one 
the Twins have played. 

White Sox 6 , Brewers 2 : Fjank 
Thomas, Julio Franco and Ron 
Karkovice homered during Chica- 
go's five-nm eighth in Milwaukee. 

Mariners 7, Yankees 1: Jay 
Buhner hit an RBI single in the first 
inning in New York, a bases-empty 
homer in the third and a two-run 
shot in the fifth to give Seattle its 
first road victory this season. 

Greg Hibbard shut out the Yan- 
kees on four hits for eight innings 
to win for the first time since leav- 
ing the Chicago Cubs. 


The A ssociated Press 

The friendly confines of Wrigley 
Field have been friendly to every- 
one except (be Chicago Cubs this 
season. 

They remained the only team in 
the majors without a victory at 
home after a 3-0 loss to Greg Swin- 
dell and the Houston Astros on 
Tuesday nighL 

Jeff Bagwell, Andujar Cedeno 
and Steve Finley homered for 
Houston, dropping Chicago to 0-7 
at Wrigley. The Cubs started out 0- 
8 there in 1957 and 0-7 in 1944. 


“Sometimes you play too hard,” 
said the Cubs’ manager. Tom Tre- 
belhom. “A game like this was 
tough, because we had so many 


Bagwell homered to lead off the 
second inning, Cedeno homered to 
start the third and Finley homered 


to open the eighth. 
Cardinals 


NL ROUNDUP 


great opportunities. We're just a 
little jumpy. We're starting to 
press.'’ 

Swindell extended his scoreless 
streak to 17 innings. He gave up 
four hits in seven innings, then left 
after one pitch in the eighth be- 
cause of a stiff shoulder. 


Players Say Strike Looming, 
Union Slates Meeting July 11 


The Asux iareJ Press 

NEW YORK — While it apt- 
pears that the first half of the major 
league baseball season won't be in- 
terrupted by a strike, the players 
will meet on July 1 1, the day before 
the All-Star Game, to discuss a 
posable work stoppage. 

“I see a 90 percent chance of a 
strike," Randy Milligan of the 
Montreal Expos said Tuesday after 
Donald Fehr, the head of the play- 
ers' union, announced the meeting 
of the executive board. 

Tin pessimistic. History has 
shown that it’s always been a war," 
Brett Butler of the Los Angeles 
Dodgers said. 

In 1985, the year of the last 
strike, die board met in Chicago on 
the day prior to the All-Star Game 
in Minneapolis and set an Aug. 6 
strike date. The two-day work stop- 
page was settled the following day, 
after the intervention of Commis- 
sioner Peter Ueberroth. 


“This is what we normally do in 
negotiating years," Fehr said. 

Fehr said the meeting may take 
place in Pittsburgh, the site of the 
All-Star game, another city near 
Pittsburgh or in Cleveland. He has 
said a strike is a “real possibility” 
because of the lack of progress in 
negotiations and the fear that lie 
owners may unilaterally impose a 
salary cap after this season if 
there’s no agreement 
“I don't have any comment to 
that.” Bud Selig, chairman of the 
owners’ executive council, said 
when told of Fehr’s statements. 


There have been just four negoti- 
ating sessions since the owners re- 
opened the labor contract on Dec. 
7. 1992, and there has been no 
substantive bargaining 
Baseball has been interrupted by 
four strikes and three lockouts 
since 1972, including a 32-day lock- 
out in 1990. 


5, Braves 4: Third 
baseman Terry Pendleton's error 
set up a three-run rally in the top of 
the seventh and SL Louis ended 
Atlanta's six-game winning streak. 

It was only the second loss in 15 
games for the Braves this season. 

The Cardinals trailed, 4-2, when 
Luis Alicea singled to lead off the 
seventh. Pendleton mispiayed Erik 
Pappas's grounder, leading to a 
two-run double by pinch-hitter 
Gerald Perry and an RBI single by 
Bernard Gilkey. 

Mete 4, Padres 3: Bret Saberha- 
gen settled down after a shaky start 
and Jeff Kent got three hits as New 
York won in San Diego. 

Saberfaagen gave up five straight 
hits to start the game, producing 
three runs, but did not allow anoth- 
er run before leaving after the 
eighth. 

Kent went 3-for-5. raising his av- 
erage to .423. He drove in a run, 
and has RBIs in seven consecutive 
games. 

Reds 8 , Pirates 2: Roberto Kelly 
hit a three-run homer and Kevin 
Mitchell also connected as Cincin- 
nati won in Pittsburgh. 

Mitchell had four hits and drove 
in two runs. Kelly's homer capped 
a four-run rally in the fourth in- 
ning. 

Dodgers 8 , Philfies 7: Mitch 
Webster singled home the go-ahead 
run in the ninth and Los Angeles 
woe in Philadelphia. 

Henry Rodriguez hit an RBI sin- 
gle that" capped a four-run rally in 
the eighth that drew the Dodgers 
even at 7. In the ninth. Eric Karros, 
Dave Hansen and Webster singled 
off Doug Jones. 

Milt Thompson hit a three-run 



Corfu Adcgn/Agcncc Fnacc-Prew 

The Rangers' Jose Canseco found striking out funny, tat catcher 
Pat Borders and the Blue Jays had the biggest laugh: 13-3. 


homer for the Phillies, helping 
them take a 7-2 lead into the sev- 
enth inning. 

Expos 4, Giants 3: Moises Alou 
led off the top of ninth with a home 
run and visiting Montreal ended its 
four-game losing streak. Alou went 
3-foM and scored twice. 

Mel Rojas got four outs for the 
victory. With Barry Bonds on-deck. 


Rcjas got Matt Williams to ground 
into a double play with two runners 
on base to end the game. 

Marlins 6 . Rockies 4: Bret Bar- 
berie and Gary Sheffield homered 
as Florida won in Colorado. 

Barberie’s three- run homer in 
the fourth put the Marlins ahead 
For good. Sheffield hit his fifth 
homer of the season in Lhe seventh. 


By Frank Litsky 

Hew York Tima Sente 

NEW YORK — A year ago. the 
first two players chosen m the Na- 
tional Football League draft were 
quarterbacks, Drew Bledsoe by the 
Sew England Patriots and Rick 
Mirer by the Seattle Seahawks. 
Both became starters, which is un- 
usual for rookies, and both made 
excellent progress week by week. 

The NFL draft comes around 
again Sunday and Monday, and 
a gain two quarterbacks, Heath 
Shuler of Tennessee and Trent 
Dilfer of Fresno State, are ranked 
near the top. Both win probably be 
gone by the fifth or sixth pick of the 
first round. . 

Unless the Cincinnati Bengal® 
trade the first pick, they will select 
defensive tackle Dan Wilkinson of 
Ohio State. The Indianapolis Colts, 
who had been leaning toward tak- 
ing a quarterback with the second 
pick, now seem ready instead to 
select r unnin g back Marshall Faulk 
of San Diego State. 

The Washington Redskins, 
drafting third, will take a quarter- 
back, and after wavering, between 
Shuler and Dilfer, people close to 
the Redskins say the team has de- 
cided on Shuler because of his mo- 
bility. If Shuler is gone, Washing- 
ton will take Dilfer. 

The New England Patriots, 
drafting fourth, already have Bled- 
soe. So assuming Dilfer is still 
available, they may trade down and 
enable a team that needs a quarter- 
back to select Dilfer. 

No matter what happens, two 
trams should do well with these 
two quarterbacks. 

Shuler scrambles; Dilfer stands 
in the pockeL Shuler is serious; 
Dilfer extroverted Shuler would 
look comfortable at a grange so- 
cial; Dilfer on a surfboard. But 
there are great similarities, too. 

Both are juniors leaving college 
early because they have little left to 
achieve on the football field, where 
they have both been leaders. Both 
seem to understand the game and 
the college- to-pro transition. Both 
seem willing to pay the price to 
succeed in the NFL Both are so- 
phisticated in unusual ways. 

Consider that before NFL teams 
auditioned Shuler in workouts, he 
auditioned them. He described a 
visit to the Bengals this way: 

“We sat down — the head coach, 
the offensive coordinator, the quar- 
terback coach and me. They put on 
a game film. They said, ‘Explain that 
play.' I did. They said, ‘Do you have 
any questions?’ I said, ‘Areyou will- 
ing to win?* Some people can dodge 

a question like that. But they didn't 
They said, *We want to win, but 
basically we need players.’ ” 
Sutler’s questions were designed 
more for a player choosing a team 
than the other way around. But be 
knows he will probably go to a 
losing team — unless a winning 
team trades up for him — and he 
wants whoever takes him to know 
he will be dedicated to winning and 
be hopes the team will be equally 
dedicated. 

He was thorough in deriding 
whether to declare for the draft or 
stay in colleger 

“I talked to my parents,” he said, 
“to a dose friend, to Rick Mirer 
and Drew Bledsoe and Roger Slau- 
bach. No one said do it or don't do 
it. They all said the decision was 
not dear-cut, and they spelled out 


the barriers. Mirer and Bledsoe 
both said, ‘You'll know .when 
you're ready.’ I fed ready now." 

Dilfer may also be ready now. 
but he was ready for Ettle when he 
frpgan high school as, a Moot, 2 - 
inch, 170-potmd (l&meur, 77- 
kQogram) offensive lineman. He 
became a 6-4, 220-pound quarter- 
back who threw only 10 or 15 times 
a p™ in an option offense. 

Tdidn’t learn- to be a quarter- 
back until I got to college,” he said. 

“When I threw the bdL I tried to 



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I 


1 didn’t understand that, you can 
throw 3 yards to a running back and 
let him run for more yards. I’ve 
improved so much it’s scary. If a 
team with a good quarterback 
coach drafts me, I can be twice as 
gpod a quarterback as I am now.”. 

Some people think he would be a 
better quarterback if he broke out 
of the pocket more often because 
he has tire ability to scramble. He 
disagrees. 

“The only time 2 run,” he said, 
“is when 1 nave to go to my third 
receiver and he's not open. My job 
is to throw the ball, not run it. I 
don’t have 4.4 or 4.5 speed like 
Steve Young." 

Dilfer has run 40 yards in 4.7 
seconds, which is decent enough 
for a quarterback. He is athletic 
enough to have been a high school 
baseball pitcher and a basketball 
point guard and later a two-handi- 
cap golfer. Now football takes so 
much time that, to his regret, his 
hanriirap has slipped tO five. 

* With the draft almost here, these 
two quarterback wonder about the 
future. Could they start as rookies? 

“Yon set your goals at the top" 
said Shuler, the philosopher. “If 
you miss, at least it's at the high 
leveL” 

* "Start as a rockier said Dilfer, 
the unflappable. “Why not?” 

Philadelphia and Arizona were 
each granted an additional draft 
pick as final compensation for last 
year's loss of two free agents: Reg- 
gie White, the Eagles' defensive end 
who went to Green Bay, and Tun 
McDonald, the Cardinals' free 
safety who signed with San Fran- 
cisco. 

The Eagles, who have the 14th 
pick in Sunday’s draft, were given a 
29th pick at the end of the first 
round. The Cardinals, who have 
the I Oth pick, were awarded the 
65th choice, at the end erf the sec- 
ond, round. 

The dubs got .the additional 
picks because White and McDon- 
ald were plaintiff s in the antitrust 
suit that paved the way -for free 
agency and thus could not be re- 
stricted in the subsequent collective 
bargaining agreement that allowed 
teams to retain designated fran- 
chise and transition players. 

• Ken Norton, Dallas free-agent 
linebacker, said he was going to 
sign with the 49ers, whose presi- 
dent, Carmen Policy, had been ne- 
gotiating with Norton oc a five- 
year, $8 million deal (AP) 




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INTERN VriONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 1994 


SPORTS 

^»wed Tom Achilles’ Tendon Ends NBA Career of Pistons’ Thomas 

Are Still Ruling 

(Courts in Europe 


The Associated Press 

AUBURN HILLS, Michigan — To the very 
end, I si ah Thomas was tough. He took the pain 
the way he took the glory, as though he do- 
served it all 

Thomas tore his right Achilles* tendon in 
what was almost certainly the last game of his 
National Basketball Association career, a 132- 
104 loss Tuesday night to the Orlando Magic. 

Th#» inil»rv wall mmhm* iilfiirino 


for the U.S. team in the World Championships 
this summer in Toronto. Yet he refused to feel 
sorry for himsell. 

“I don't believe a basketball player should 
Jay on the floor and cry when he’s hurt," 
Thomas said. 

He has had his share of injuries this season: a 


hyperextended knee, a broken rib. a broken 
hand, a strained arch, a calf injury and a cut left 
hand. Together, they kept him out of 20 games. 

He limped off the court for the last time with 
1 :37 left in the third quarter against the Magic. 
He had scored 12 points in 26 minutes and 
waged a losing battle against Orlando rookie 
Anfemee Hardaway, who finished with 2S 
points. 

“It felt like I got shot with a cannon,*’ Thom- 
as said “When 1 did it, 1 thought it was my 
Achilles'. I had no control of my foot. I don't 
know exactly what happened." 

He was to undergo swgeiy Wednesday and 
recovery will lake about six months, the team's 
physician, Ben Paolucri, said. 

Thomas won't officially announce his retire- 


ment until sometime after the season ends, in 
order to help the Pistons' salary cap situation. 
But there was little question this was his last 
game. 

When he arrived in Detroit, Thomas was just 
19 years old. the second pick in the 1981 NBA 
draft behind Mark Aguirre, his boyhood friend. 
The city and its avid basket ball fans watched 
and marveled as Thomas blossomed into man- 
hood. 

Today, at age 32, he has a wife, two children 
and a carload of memories. And the Pistons 
have two championship banners hanging from 
the rafters of TTie Palace, the bouse thaL Zeke 
built. 

“The thing 1 am most proud of is that I can 


honestly say that I'm a man," Thomas said. “1 
know that sounds trite. But 1 don't mean it to 
be macho. This is the entertainment business. I 
always tried to make it entertaining for me and 
for the people who watched it. 

“I have come through it with my family, with 
my morals and my principles intact I didn't 
settle for what so many people in entertainment 
do, people who went the wrong way." 

“This was Isiah's night," Hardaway said. 
“He is one of the greatest guards that ever 
played in this league. I have dreamed about 


and Isiah. I'm glad I got the opportunity topi 

ti ffll f W Iriah 

“It's sad to watch him go down with this kind 
of injury.” 


In March, Thomas joined Magic Johnson. 
Oscar Robertson and John Stockton as the only 
NBA players to record 9.000 career assists. 
Thomas also is the Pistons’ career leader m 
games played, points and steals. 

“I did an awful lot of stuff in my career." 
Thomas said. “I look back at what I was able to 
accomplish, and it far exceeds anything myself 
and everybody expected of me. 

“I did not waste my talent, did not waste my 
gift, and used it for the best basketball organi- 
zation. I was not stamped with the label of a 
guy who only had potential" 

He added: “You cannot write the script, and 
I have never been one to dictate fate and. 
destiny. 1 was noL about to mess with God's • 
master plan for me." 



Sonics Win West Title, 
Hawks Closer in East 


By Ian Thomsen 

TEL W\\f ma,,anat Herald Tribune 

intends to win viS r 00 ^ someone who 
natural] v hTSt Vei y few coaches express this 
impatiently at a neO? Zetonir Obradovic hunches 

onVdesJndiS S S? ference ’ a Penal 

furthering his Em.Sr Hc ? cpre ^ s - DO mIerest m 
“When did by . means. 

a coach? ffiS'sSSd 1 wS D ^? UrSe!f becomifl S 
lo embellish Z %£%£***' “ 

because I don't 

pU^I^™^ OMC 1 _ sa,d wth a S"**- “As a 
the small teams, the junior 
v , lcams ' so It was a lon» time am” 
sportfyei Serb?* b^ed from international 
SSwtS. ft? “™ ,nue » dominate European 
SSSSn rf? " C ’ a Sert*. has led JovStm 

sWp&S Thfe" mU 3 F* Europeui ^Pion- 

SoVkLT? ^ m Sh l agahist favored Olyro- 
M * be has a cbanreio 
years Of S 0 ^ E H ro P ean champion in three 
sevm «nJ b ll n S! continental champions, 

Yupnsiavia by men from the former 

r ms P ired by “The Professor." 70- 
y ear-old Alexander Nikolic. 

an 03,11101 participate in Europe- 

onlvXSSr lJ |? 0 ’ 0bradovic ' “d it was the 
only heartfelt public statement be had made at 

tbistouxpamenL “We definitely have the quality 
to participate ] hope very soon we will be back in 

rvK lea S ue 31,(1 European competition.” 

UDradowc was a point guard on the 1990 world 
champion Yugoslav [earn with Toni Kukoc, Dra- 
zcn ..^ eir ? v,c ’ Vlade Divac and forward Zarko Pa- 
^palj, who will play against Obradovic's team 
Thursday m the red of Olympiakos. Obradovic’s 
playing career had already been postponed by a 
snort prison sentence served in Yugoslavia for a 
ttafuc accident- Y ugoslav journalists say be killed a 
drunken pedestrian who was crossing a dark road. 

In 1991 the national team was prep aring to 
leave for a Greek tournament that preceded the 
European championship when the point guard ap- 
proached the coach. Dusan Ivkovic, at the airport. 

Obradovic could not go because Partizan B elgra de 
had asked him to become its head coach on one 
condition: Thai he retire immedialely as a player. 

“For sure he was talented," Ivkovic recalled 
Wednesday. “From him you got the sense that a 
great player was going (o become a great coach." 

By the end of his rookie season, Obradovic had 
coached Partizan to the European championship, 
upsetting his current team, Joventut Badalona. 

His paid adviser that year was professor Nikolic. 

He appears to face graver odds this time, for 

Olympiakos is led by a front line of former NBA . „ _ .. , , . . , .... » 

players: Paspalj, who scored 22 points in the 77-72 biah Thomas after tearing the tendon dnring the game against the Magic: “It fat ike I got shot witn a cannon, 
semifinal victory over Panatbrnaikos, and Roy 

Tarpley, who by his own standards was not out- — — - - — - 

standing yet finished with 21 points and 16 re- 
bounds. They will face Badalona’s less sensational n • -» -w-w n n i tv ti -■ -m • ri „ /i f» •> A . I** 1 

s“o^clSb fig Penguins and Devils Both Draw Even, at 1-1, in Eastern Conierence s yuartertmals 

65 semifinal victory against FC Barcelona. 

But the stars of this tournament in recent years 
have been Serb coaches. Bozidar Maijkovic has 
won three championships, including last year's 
shocking victory with Limoges of France. In short 
lime, Obradovic has converted Badalona from a 
fleet of high-scoring sprinters into a team of de- 
fense and ball movement. He would have been 
proud to present such work to his idol. 

“I am always in contact with Mr. Nikolic," said 
Obradovic. “1 would like for him to be here at the 
Final Four, but because of health problems he 
couldn't come." 


into Gnmka/Hig Attoaurd hs 

.x 


The Associated Press 

The Seattle SuperSonics lost, yet 
still won the West. 

The Atlanta Hawks won, moving 
closer to clinching the East. 

On a night featuring several 
games with playoff implications, 
there were plenty of good contests, 
but no huge surprises. 

In the Eastern Conference, At- 
lanta, Indiana, New Jersey and Mi- 
ami woo games they needed to win 
Tuesday night. In the Western Con- 
ference, Seattle and Houston lost 
games they really didn’t need to win. 

It all added up to a slightly clear- 
er playoff picture, although one or 
two upsets in the last five days of 
the regular season could change 

that. 

The Hawks, playing their fourth 
game in five nights, beat the New 
York Knicks, 87-84, in Madison 
Square Garden. If Atlanta wins its 
final two games (at Miami on 
Thursday, and at home against Or- 
lando on Saturday), the Hawks wiH 
have the homecotut advantage 
throughout the conference playoffs. 

The SuperSonics lost in Phoe- 
nix, but they knew by halftime they 
had already woo the West title be- 
cause San Antonio had beaten 
Houston at the Alamodome. Seat- 
tle will have the bomecourl edge as 
long as it stays in the playoffs. 


Atlanta's victory gave it a one- 
game lead over Chicago and a 1 Vi- 
game advantage over New York. IT 
the Hawks and Bulls — both teams 
have two games left — wind up 
with the same record, Chicago wins 
the tiebreaker based on its 3-2 sea- 
son series edge over the Hawks. 

“Winning here means nothing if 
we don't win the next two,” said 

NBAfflGHUGffTS 

Danny Manning, who had 16 
points and 12 rebounds. 

Kevin Wflhs led Atlanta with 23 
points and 17 rebounds. 

The Knicks shot just 37 percent 
and Greg Anthony missed a game- 
tying 3-pointer just before the final 
buzzer. 

Suns 122, S^oSonics 116: Se- 
attle led almost aO the way before 
Charles Barkley took over with II 
points and eight rebounds in the 
final quarter, five of the rebounds 
coming in the last 1:40. 

The Suns overcame a 10-point 
deficit in the final 8 Vi narrates and 
stayed even with the Spurs in the 
race for the No. 3 seed in the West. 

Spins 90, Rockets 80: Negde 
Knight made a 20-foot jumper to 
give San Antonio the lead for good 
with 3:00 left, then buried a 3- 


poinier with 1:14 left to extend its 1 
lead to 81-76. David Robinson, 
who led the Spurs with 22 points, 
made six free throws in the final ' 
minute and Dennis Rodman added 1 
a 3-pointer at the burner. 

Robinson and Hakeem Ola-' 
juwou, the two leading candidates : 
for the MVP award, had trouble' 
offensively. Robinson made just six 
of 24 shots, Olajuwon made II of 
31 

Pacers 111, Bullets 110: Reggie 
Miller scored 34 points and made' 
the deriding basket with 2.8 sec-' 
onds left, while Rik Smiis added 23: 
points on ll-for-15 shooting for 
visiting In diana. 

Indiana can clinch the sixth seed 
in the East by winning two of its ! 
final three, against Cleveland, Phil- 
adelphia and Miami. 

The Pacers led by as many as 26 . 
in the third quarter, but the Bullets 
rallied behind Gheorge Muresan, 
their 7-foot-7 rookie center from; 
Romania, who got 13 points and ' 
five rebounds in the fourth period. - 

Nets 115, 76ere 110: Denick 
Coleman had a triple-double with 
31 points, 12 rebounds and 10 as- 
sists and Kenny Anderson added 
19points and 1 1 assists in Philadel- 
phia as New Jersey, winning its. 
fourth in a row, remained a 
game behind Indiana. 


The Associated Press 

The Washington Capitals were upset 
with the loss, but the Pittsburgh ftoguras 
woe as equally upset with the vidory. 

The Penguins returned to winning 
ou their home ice by edging the Capi- 
tals, 2- 1 , on Tuesday night to even their 
Eastern Conference playoff quarterfi- 
nal series at 1-1. But they weren’t hap- 
py with the way they did iL 

“If we continue to play at this level 
we’ll be out of the playoffs," said Rick 


Toccfaet, who scored Pittsburgh’s win- 
ning goal but lamented that .“we're 

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS 

trying to win games in the first period.” 

Although the Penguins improved to 
8-0 od home ice in Game 2 of a playoff 
series, they only got four shots on goal 
in the final two periods — three in the 
second and one in the third. 


Mario Lemieux scored Pittsburgh’s 
first goal while Washington got back 
within a goal when Michai Pivonka 
scored on apowerplay 57 seconds into 
the second period. 

“We’re trying, but they’re playing us 
the way they're supposed to play us," 
Pittsburgh’s Kevin Stevens said. 
“They’re playing us tough." 

The Penguins’ victory came on the 
outstanding goaltending of Tom Bar- 


rasso, who stopped 34 of 35 shots. He 
was especially sharp late in the third 
period, when be withstood a flurry of 
rushes by the Capitals. 

The teams return to Landover, 
Maryland, for Game 3 on Thursday. 

Devils 2, Sabres I: Host New Jer- 
/s Scott Stevens had a little help 
ien he scored the winning goal with 
6:21 to play: His slap shot deflected off 
the slide of Buffalo’s Yuri Khmylev 
and past goalie Dominik Hasek. 


sty’s 

wnea 


Hasek said he saw the deflection, 
but couldn’t move to stop it 
“There was nothing I could do," said 
Hasek, who had 30 saves. 

Slephane Richer’? goal eariy in the 
second period was matched by Buffa- 
lo's Alexander Mogilny early in the 
third period, setting the stage of Ste- 
vens' game-winner. 

Game 3 of the Eastern Conference 

S iuarterfmal tied at 1-1, trill be in Buf- 
ak) on Thursday. 


• ESPN International said Wednes- 
day that, under an agreement signed 
with Russian State Television and Ra- 
dio, the entire Stanley Cup playoffs 
will be televised throughout the coun- 
try in prone time on a same-day taped 
basis with on-rite Russian commen- 
tary. 

A similar but separate agreement 
was reached with 1CTV Ukraine, a 
spokesman for the satellite sports 
channel said. 



I 





*J 


SCOREBOARD 


Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Eos) Division 



w 

L 

PcL 

SB 

Baltimore 

a 

4 

*67 

— 

Toronto 

9 

5 

MS 

"" 

Boston 

8 

1 

415 


New York 

6 

4 

JOO 

? 

Detroit 

5 

9 

J57 

4 


Oh trot DivfcMO 



Cleveland 

7 

4 

*36 

— 

QHcogo 

a 

5 

415 


Kansas atv 

4 

6 

J00 

IV* 

Milwaukee 

6 

4 

JOO 

1*2 

Minnesota 

4 

to 

-284 

*V3 


Wes! Division 



Oakland 

7 

4 

J3t 

— 

California 

A 

8 

JOS 

1^ 

Seattle 

5 

7 

417 

Tl* 

Texas 

4 

8 

-333 

2^ 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



East Division 




w 

L 

PCt 

Gf» 

Atlanta 

IJ 

7 

Ml 

— 

New York 

8 

5 

415 

4 

Florida 

7 

7 

JOO 

5** 

PtlllerillpMci 

7 

7 

JOO 

5VJ 

Montreal 

5 

9 

357 

7Vj 

Central Dlvlstoo 



Cincinnati 

8 

4 

447 

— 

.'St. Louis 

8 

5 

415 

V^i 

Houston 

7 

4 

J38 

n 

Plttsttursti 

4 

4 

JOO 

2 

Chicago 

3 

9 

.250 

5 


West Division 



San Francisco 

8 

6 

J71 

“ 

Colorado 

4 

7 

442 

lVi 

Los Angeles 

5 

9 

X! 

3 

San Diego 

3 

12 

200 

5^2 


oado 18). 
OftWiOMl 


Tuesday's Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

MB 300 *2> — S 8 > 

ms in n»— « m • 
Welch. Rem (31. Nunn IM. RtoheUnW 
and Stetaboen; Set*. Harris IW and VaHe. 
W— Seie, ML Welch. O-l. HRs~- OofcRWL Ster- 
ns (6). Neel (3). Boston, Graenweil M). 
Vouehn 2 Ml. Noehrtno 2 _ IB * 

Kansas air loo on nM 7 i 

Detroit «30 3*0 9SM-9 II I 

Gtibkza Mogmnta (4). ?****> '*]?■ 
or (B)and Mavito; Moore.Grown IBLGanMner 
(81. Hememcn l*) and TM MrtWL 
1. L— Gubtcza. 0-1. HRs— Kansas Cttv. McRae 
(11. Goans «>. DotnH, Gtt«2 IW- 
Status in «• “ j 

llw York BOO M0 001—1 S 1 

Hibbard. Nelson (9). and W teoiv 

Abbott PoH 14) ond Stan 
L— Abbott 1-2. HR — Seattts. Amaral ML 

Bur,wr 7 ,4 *' „ , 

CMCOBO MI OH 050-4 II 1 

Mllwaokea M2 Mi 800— * * * 

BtrcMcCakU 111 Kar1,0W,c SL?SS 

Orasoo(8I.ScanhM<8»iindHarP«rJW bote. 
2 A L-Bones. W.HR»-Cllte^Tl»ITl« 

Franco (SI. Kortuwk* Ml. 

California M0 1M l»-3 « ■ 

Bonbnore Ml M 

Loftwicft. Patterson (51. Sonyan 4). ond 
Tumor; Mow.Pwwlnston IBLOUdwmMl. 
Pools fit. Smith («r «<>««*- W-Awm. < 

1. L — LoMwtCh.0-1 Sv-Smttti tn. 
lonla. Salmon (3). Hudlor «»- Baftbnore, 

***" BB0 2M BIO— * '■ * 

TaroMO 2M SOI **-1317 1 

* Bro-n. R*cd(4I.Ho«U(««^R0*J^ 

jjOrtlz (I); Gvnrwrt. CMrtAJJJjJ 

and Barden. Knorr Ml- 

L-— Bram*. 0-4. HRs— Torania. Carter (41. on- 

a ’ m •» ■«-» J* ! 

201 111 Ml— 4 1* * 

NOW, «5I. SiK 

lW«MAlemar;TaDanl,C«*«^»-^»^ 
A»uil*ra (fll, Guthrie (91 andW«MJ- 
1 -0- »>' 
HRs-CJeretond, B«enw l». i 21 - 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

M HI M *““* u * 
tn BM *00-7 I 2 


Astoda. Wavne 14). McDawdi (7). Worrell 
(St. Dreifori (9) and Piozzai Schtlllna. Ander- 
son (7). West (8). Janes M) and Dautfen. 
W— WorrelL M. L— Jones. 1-1. Sv— Drcftari 
(1). HR— FMhKMpMlL AILIhompson U). 
Mea t r wd 1M «M 181—4 n 8 

5oa Pramdsce (os m soe-3 t l 

Boucher, Heredio (5). Hendenon (7). Ratos 
(B) end Fletcher, Spehr (71, Webster (B>; Bur- 
kett. Burba (9) ond Monwartns. w— Ralas. 1- 

0. L — Burtxj.D-l.HRa — Montreal, Alou(2). San 
Fnmdsco. WH flams (4). 

Pittsburg MS aw ass-2 2 I 

Cladawxtl III Ml ll»-S 12 • 

NeaHe, Miner [4L Mamanflto (5), Tabaka (7) 
and SkHiaM; Rtta, JJranttev (8) and Darastt. 
w— Rfla VL L— Ncaalck l-i HR»-PitMwretv 
Hunter (2). Clndmll, MiWieH ML Kelly (1). 

BIT MS «1S— 3 7 0 
000 BM BSO-O 4 B 
Swindell RevnoMs (B), MI-WHItams (fiend 
Eusebio; TrachseL Bautista (9) and Parent. 
Wirt Ires (9). W— SwlndeU. WL L— TrachseL W 

1 . Sv^-Mt.WIIIICIIM (2J .HRs— Houston. FMev 
(3). Baawen (4), Cedeno (4). 

St Loots 111 0M JM— S 9 0 

AflantO BM IU M0 — 4 I 1 

Watson. RJFtadrtguez (7). Muraby (8). 
MPerta m ond Posmas; Maadux,Sknton (71. 
Wohlers (7), McMtchaN (9) and Lanez. 
W — watson. 2-0- l^-waddu*. 3-L Sv-MJ*erw 
(5). HR»-Sti_,Zefle (2). AttaMa Sanders D). 
Flortda DB4 MB 2*0-4 8 1 

Colorado 1» BM BB2-4 8 T 

weathers. Perez (7). H cmondeg (Bl. Har- 
vey (9) «d Ttnoiev; Nted, Reed (51. Blair (4), 
Moore IB} and Gtrerdi. w W e at h e rs. 2-1. 
L— Nled. M- Sy— H arvey in. HRs— Florida, 
Borfeerte (3». Sheffield (5). 

New York 112 MB NM M B 

mwm M *M BM-S 12 1 

Saberhaoen. Fnswa (9) and Handler; Ba- 
nes. PA. Martinez (7) and Ausmus. P.Clark 
(71. W saberhaoen. ML L— Benes. (M. 
S»— Franco (3). 

Hie Michael Jordan Watcti 

TUESDAYS GAME: Jordon went HWH 
extenSno Ms htttlno streak to seven games, 
mid scared two nm. He singled to rtghl In the 
second and seventh Innings. He niss grounded 
out and fouled out Jordan, who moved train the 
seventh spat In the order la kadoflbi Mondays 
Mime, retimed to tha seven Ih mot Tuesday In 
a 9-5 rood victory over fhe Carolina Mudcats. 
No bal Is were htt to Id m In HeM field Tuesday. 
SEASON TO DATE: JardMi Is lMor-30 and 
is batting J33. He Is errorless In 14 chances. 


Japanese Leagues 


Yomlurl 

Yokuft 

Chunlchl 

Hanshin 

Hiroshima 


Ceetral Leaaw 

W L T PcL 

7 3 0 .700 

5 4 0 JSS6 

4 5 0 .444 

4 S O A44 

4 5 0 .444 


lib 

24b 

2ft 

2ft 

3 


I 

2ft 

2ft 


Yokohama 4 4 0 -400 

Wednesday's Resells 
Yomlurt 9. ChwdcM 3 
Yakut! 5. Yakflhmna 4 
Htrasbima 5. Harahbt 4, 12 timings 
PacMc League 
W L T Pet 
SeJbu 4 4 0 ABO 

DOM i 4 0 *00 

Nippon Ham * 4 0 *00 

Orix 5 s ■ 

LoHe 3 4 0 sa 

Kintetsu 3 4 0 J33 

WedBe M an Rewtts 
Nippon Ham 4 Satto 3 
Kintetsu 5. 0«let 4, 10 MntnBS 
Orix 4, Lotte 0 


AUSTRALASIA CUP/ S HA R JA H ONE-DAY 
PnKUtoP vs. New Zeotaod 
1st timings. Semt t toa l 
We iMn dOY, IB Slffllrtb OA£ 
Pakistan: 328-2 (5# overs) 

New Zealand: *64-7 (50 avers) 

Pakistan won by 42 run 


NBA Stan di ngs 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 

Atlantic Division 



W L 

Pel 

GB 

V-New York 

54 25 

-484 

— 

x -Orlando 

48 31 

J08 

6 

x- New Jersey 

44 36 

J5D 

10ft 

Miami 

41 39 

.513 

13ft 

Boston 

31 40 

M2 

23 

PtiHadetoWa 

24 55 

JOS 

30 

Washington 

23 56 

Central Division 

Ml 

31 

x-Attonto 

56 24 

M0 

— 

x-Chicaoo 

55 25 

MB 

1 

x-Chweland 

45 34 

jm 

Wft 

>-lndkna 

44 35 

J57 

lift 

Charlotte 

» 40 

AST 

17 

Detroit 

30 59 

■253 

35ft 

fJUhraAae 

19 M 

241 

toft 

WE5TERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest DtvtskMi 



W L 

PCt 

GB 

y-Houston 

57 22 

J22 

— 

x-Son Antonio 

54 26 

-475 

3ft 

X-UtOfl 

50 29 

J33 

7 

x-Denver 

40 39 

J04 

17 

Minnesota 

20 » 

.253 

37 

Dallas 

It 48 

Poctflc Dhrtston 

.139 

44 

z-Soattte 

40 19 

799 

— 

x-Phoenix 

54 26 

STS 

4ft 

x-Golden State 

48 31 

MB 

12 

x- Portland 

46 33 

J82 

14 

LA. Lakers 

33 44 

418 

27 

LA. Clippers 

27 52 

J42 

33 

Socnxvnciilo 

27 52 

J42 

31 


^clinched best conference record 
x -cl Inched p layoff berth; y-dJvWar Mtte 
TUESDAY'S RESULTS 

28 21 35 2B— 112 
se 35 38 27— UB 
M: Norman 1V20 4-B 28. Murdock 10-19 1-2 
23; B: Fax 11-23 W 31. Parish 9-15 7-8 25. 
Ptnctawy 4-10 9-12 21. McDaniel 7-10 44 20. 
Raboeods— Milwaukee 41 iNarman 121. Bos- 
ton 71 (Pinckney 22). Assists— Milwaukee 27 
(Murdock 9), Boston 27 (Douglas 11). 
Atkmto 13 27 22 

New York 24 14 *1 

A: Mamina 4-1444 IA WllllS 9-164^523; NY; 
Oakley 49 9-10 7L Ewing 0-20 B-12 24. Re- 
benedi Atlonta 58 (Willis 17). New York 55 
(Emma 15). Assis ts A tio n t o lB (Blaylock 71. 
New York 14 (Davis. Harper 4». 

New Jersey 35 24 23 31—115 

PUlodebMo 38 25 as 30— lie 

NJ: Coleman 11-27 9-9 31. Anderson 7-20 54 
19; P: Weatherspaon 10-193424, JJSalont 11- 
143424. Wiw e »i«^ Jersey SI (Coiemcai 
12), PhllodetoMa 47 (W e ottierspoon f). As- 
slsts— 4iew Jersey 32 1 Anderson 11). Phi lode l- 
ehie 29 (Bams 7L 

Indiana 34 24 31 2S— 111 

Wmhfci e h ie 29 34 H 37 — 110 

i: Smtts 1V1S 1-1 23. MUIer 14-21 M 34; W: 
Modem to- 10 54 25. Chapman 10-20 44 2S. 
Rebaaods-liMBana O (DJSavta 9). Washing- 
ton S3 (MacLsan 13). Assists— Indiana 30 
(Workman IB). Washington 22 (Adams 5). 

24 27 28 2»— » 
<2 29 24 21—124 
Mb: Lnettner 4-11 1-1 13. Rider 11-182-4 28; 
M: Rice 13-20 90 32. Sallee 54 4-4J4.Be- 
boaod*— Mlnnesata S3 (Jackson 11 ).Miaaii 44 

(Rice. Setkaly 10). AsaWs-Minnesata 23 
(Jackson 61. Miami 25 (Lana. Shaw 5J. 
OrtOBdO 39 42 32 28—1*2 

Detroit 28 24 24 X—1M 

O: Scott 8-18 2-2 20, Hardaway 9-13 5-S 25; □: 
Dunars 9-19 24 25, Houston 6-10 44 14. Re- 
bounds— Orlande 42 (Avert 12). Detroit « 
(Jorttt 9J. A»m*-Ortoodo2* (Hardavmvi). 
Detreif 20 (Thomas 4). 

Honshu If 21 28 2*-M 

Sob Antonio S 32 IB JS-W 

H: Tnorne4-l4 4-7 id. Otaluwon 11^32 3-5 25; 
S: ReblnEon4-241(M222.CumRilnasB-12M is. 
Rebooods— Houston 55 (Thorpe iSI.SaoAido- 
nie43 (Rocerwn 2t iMUsts-Houston u (Cta- 
seU. Smith 5), son Antonio 17 (Rootnson 5). 
LA, Lakers 24 25 31 W- « 

27 M 33 n-HK 


LA: Divac 11-15041 22. Christie 49 2-5 15; □: 
Ellis 12-10 40 28. R.WUDams 4-18 54 17. Re- 
beeuto— Los Angeles 49 (Campbell, DWoc Bl, 
Denver 45 ( EII1& 5tlih 10). Assists— Las Anpe- 
les 19 (Smith 4), Denver 23 (Abdui-Raut 0). 
Seattle 32 2B 34 20—114 

Ptwenhc 31 2B 33 30-l» 

S: Kama 0-14 44 20. Gill 4-12 4-4 19; P: 
Berkley 4-15 8-12 2G Cebofles 9-13 34 21. 
K-lohnson 7-14 99 2X Makerte M7 54 29. Re- 
bouads— Seattle 34 (Kemp II). Phoenix DO 
(Barkley 17). Assist*— Seattle 2d (Payton 7). 
Phoenix 28 (KJchnson 71). 

Web 28 24 32 29— 1U 

Sacra me eto 25 29 24 28— 1M 

U: Motone 1141 8-14 30, Hornaoek5l4»4 28; 
5; Tisdale 7-17 9-11 23, Richmond 8-13 M 21. 
Webb (MB 9-W 28. Reboonds— Utah 45 (Malone 
13). 5oaramenfo 44 (Potvnioe 12). Assists— 
Utoh3B ( Stockton M).5ocramerto» (Webb7). 


Tuesday’s NHL Pfayotfs 


AuMrre 2. Roclno *2- 1 


INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLY 
Romania X Bottvla 8 
Lithuania 1, Israel 1 
Turkey X Russia t 
Saudi Arabia X Iceland B 
Slovakia 4 . Croatia I 
Norway X Portoe a l O 
Denmark X Hungary 1 



BASEBALL 


* t B-l 
2*0-2 

i tied M 

First period— l. Pittsburgh. Lem teux 3 
(Morphv, Fronds). 4:19 (pp). X Pittsburgh, 
Tocchet 1 (Lemieux. Jagrl. 9:06. Penat- 
Ite— Khrtstlch, was. double minor Ihlgh- 
stickina). 3:24; Hunter. Was (highsttcklnol. 
S-J4: Saar. PH (htoh-stickfno). 4 J6; Johans- 
son. was (trbxXno). 10:10; Bwtosso, Ptt. 
served by Stevens (slashing). 13:41; PouNiv 
Was (htoh-stt eking). 14:4*; MiiHen, Pit 
(roughing). 19:40. 

Secowd ported -X Washington. Pivonka 2 
(Hatcher. Johansson). :57 (an). Pename- 
s — UJSamuelsson. Pit (tripping), 10:07; Ste- 
vens. Pit (roughing). 14:»; Stevens, Pit 
(rougnina). 18^1. 

Third period— None. Pe nottl m Khrlsttch. 
Was (holding >.S:1B; Tamer, Pit (cross-check- 
ing), 0:28; Jones, was (takflng stick]. 15:37; 
S (evens. PH (Mglv-sticklna), 15:37; Burridge. 
Was dnierferenee), 17J0; B o rrasso. Ptt. 
served by Mullen (stashing), 17:50. 

Stotts on ge et W a shin gton 1X134— 31 
Pittsburgh 1 3-3-1—17; powenp to y oepertgei- 
Hes— wnshingion 1 of 7; Pittsburgh 1 of 4; 
gocNes— Washington, Dafoe. 0-1 (17 shots- 15 
saves). Pittsburgh. Barrasaa 1-1 (35441. 

* 8 1—1 

■ 1 1-4 

Series lied 1-t 

First perted None. Penalties— Ray. But 
mtoor-malor (stashing, flawing). 6:42; Bou- 
cher. Bui (uns p ort sm anlike conduct). 4:42; 
May, But (unsportsmanlike conduct), 4:42; 
Danovka. NJ (unsportsmanlike conduct). 
4:42; Me Koy.NJ. minor -mclnr -gome miscon- 
duct dnstteator. fighting]. 4^2; Peiuio, 
I rouohlno>.4:42,- Hoiik. nj (unsportsmanlike 
conduct). 4:42; Svoboda. But (stottttna).7:22; 
Carpenter. NJ Itripplnal,l4rt5; Svobada. Bui 
IMah-stlcUna). 19:55; Lemiou. NJ (gootle 
Interference), 2B:00. 

Socsod perted— 1. New Jersey, Richer I (Nl- 
cholts. Aibelln), 1 Ji Penalti es ■ S mith. NJ 
(rooohltt).5:20; Audetto, BuL double minor 
(roughing). 9:40; May. But (roughing). 9:«; 
Nkhons. NJ (roughing). 9:48; MacLcan, NJ 
iroogMi*). 1334; Lemieux. NJ (lilatHdlck- 
Mg>. 15:21; Khmylev, Buf (rougMngl. 19:18; 
Carpenter, NJ (roughing), 19:11 

TMntpertod— a Buttokv Mcrtlny 2 (5meb- 

Uk), :30. X New Jersey. Slovens 1 CNkhoHs. 
Driver). H:» (pp)-Penaliles-M«mL Buf (In- 
t«r«»nroce).7Ll4; MadLeaiNJ lerass^heck- 
msL Sr25; preslev. Buf (tripping). 12:02. 

soots on eort— Buffalo 4-4-w-w. New Jer- 
sey ii-iw-tff; u ew m *ty (Mwrtt d Wttcs- 
_BuHaie a of 7; New Jersey 1 el 4; sorties- 
-Batfato. Hasek. Vi (32shot*30sav«a),Ncw 
Jersey. Brodeur. W (2M)I- 


ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Aram! 1. Wimbledon 1 

FRENCH CUP 


DETROIT— Sent Danny Bautista outfield- 
or. to Tokda l L Recalled Joso Lima Pitcher, 
tram Toledo. 

SEATTLE— Put Edgar Martinez. 3rd base- 
men. on !5dav disabled list. Activated Brian 
Tuning. Infletder. from disabled IM. 

TEXAS— Activated Jan Shove. Infiodler. 
from the 15-day dKobted list and designated 
Mm for assIgnmenL Put Jack Armstrong, 
Pitcher, on 15-day disabled list Bought con- 
tract at Rick Reed, pitcher, from Oklahoma 
CNV.AA. 


HL— Suspended Reggie Sanders, Ctndn- 
notf o u t fie l d e r , tor 5 gomes md fined him on 
undlsct o sed amount lor di ui g li s ond tack- 
ling Pedro Marttnu. Montreal pitcher. In 
game Wednesday. 

Cincinnati— A cquired Eddie Toubon- 
soe, catcher, from Houston lor Ross Powell 
and Marty Lister, pitchers. Put Joe Oliver, 
catcher, on 15-dov tfisctoled list. 

MONTREAL Recalled Rockier Mende r - 

sen. Pilcher, from HceDsburg. EL Sent Ron- 
deH White, outfielder, to Ottawa, l L Put John 
Wettet a nd. pitcher, on I5day cesabled ItsL 
Bought am t rod at Butch Henry, pitcher, 
From Otknm. IL 

PHILADELPHIA— Optioned Mike Wtt- 
llams and Bobby Mumxc, pH then, lo Scranton 
Wilkes-Barre. IL Activated Lorry Andersen, 
pitcher, and Wes Chamberlain, outfielder, 
from I5dav disabled IksL 

BAS KETBA LL 

HOUSTON— Pul Matt BuliardL forward, on 
Inlured list Signed Chris Jert, forward, tor 
remainder of season. 

LA. LAKERS— Put Antonio Harvey, lor- 
wardeenter, on Intured list. Activated Reggie 
Jordan, guard. 


Yamaha Sailing for Record 

SOUTHAMPTON, England (AP) — Yamaha gave up 
ground but still held a lead of 187 nautical miles Wednesday 
as it rounded the Caribbean island of Barbuda on the fifth 
leg of the Whitbread "Round the World Race. 

The Japanese-New Zealand yaefal was on course to break 
the previous fifdi leg record of 22 days. 16 hours, 41 
minutes, set by Steinlager 2 in the 1989*90 Whitbread race. 

Yamaha's lead had been cut by 23 ndes by its dosest 
Whitbread 60 rival Intnun Justitia. The European yacht 
was continuing to average the fastest speed of the fleet, 13.1 
knots and one knot faster than Yamaha. 

Pakistan Pair Set Cricket Mark 

SHARJAH, United Arab Emirates (Reuters) — Inzamam 
ul-Haq and Aamir Sohail set an international one-day 
cricket partnership world record of 263 Wednesday as 
Pakistan amassed 328 for two against New Zealand in the 
semifinals of the Australasia Cup. 

The second-wicket partnership eclipsed the previous lim- 
ited-oven record in international matches of 224, compiled 
in an unbroken third- wicket stand by Dean Jones and Allan 
Border for Australia against Sri Lanka in Adelaide in the 
1984-*8S season. 

The previous second- wicket partnership record of 221 
was established by Gordon Greenidge and Viv Richards for 
West Indies against India in Jamshedpur in 1 983-’ 84. 

For Ike Record 

Moreno Argentina of Italy led his Gswiss team to a rare 1- 
2-3 finish in the Flecfae WaDonne cycling classic in Spa 
Francorchamps, Belgium, with Giorgio Furl an of Italy 
finishing second and Evgeni Berzin of Russia third. (AFP) 

Hie IAAF confirmed that 23 Chinese athletes, including 
the world’s top women distance runners, had passed recent 
out-of-competition drug tests. (AP) 

EamooB Longhran’s WBO welterweight tide defense 
linst Manning Galloway on April 30 in Belfast was called 
' after Loughran injured his back training. (AP) 


Italy’s Under-21s 
Win Soccer Title 

Compiled bp Our Staff From Dispatches 

MONTPELLIER. France — Italy won the 
European under- 21 soccer championship 
Wednesday when Pierluigi Orlandim scored in 
the 97th minute for a 1-0 victory over Portugal 
in sudden-death overtime of the final 

In Nunes, Spain beat France, 2-1, for third 
place. Pascal Nouma scored Tor France in the 
43th minute, Oscar Garcia for Spain in the 53d 
and75tlL 

• Striker Dener, considered one of Brazil's 
most promising talents and a candidate for the 
World Cup team, died in a car crash Tuesday, 
his club, Vasco da Gama, said in Rio de Jan- 
eiro. 

• The Washington ambassadors from the 23 
foreign countries competing in this summer's 
World Cup will don boots and shorts to play in 
a rix-a-ride tournament mirroring the champt- 

-onship. 

“Toe mmimum age is 28 years and the am-, 
bassadorsof each coon try are required to play," 
Gui Barbosa, assistant to die Washington host 
committee's executive vice-president, said 
Wednesday. “All wiD play at least 10 minutes of 
each game. They probably won't be running 
around much but they’ll be ou the pitch." 

• Coach Roy Hodgson of the Swiss team, 
after protests, has relaxed a ban cm sex during 
the World Cup finals partners. 

The Swiss tabloid Blick reported Wednesday 
that wives would be allowed into the squad's 
hotel rooms for a few hours after the opening 
match June 18 against the United States and on 
June 26 after the match against Colombia. 

“Roy’s Boys Can Do It Twice,” triumphed a 
headline in Blick. (Reuters. AP) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. APRIL 21. 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


The Final Cigarette 


\\7ASHINGT0N — When I 

T Y saw the photograph of the 
seven tobacco executives being 
S'vorn in before they testified to a 
congressional committee, the 
fhooght occurred to me that they 
looked as if they were l?ni»d up in 
front of a firing squad. 

The second thought I had was if 
they were about to be shot, they 
should at least be given a last ciga- 
rette. 

1 could pic- 
lure the scene: 

All seven are 
blindfolded and 
the chairman of 

the committee, EafaaSPai 

Representative 

Henry Waxman, » 

asks each one, at fli 

“Filtered or WR fZW' 

nonfilteredr 

“H doesn't BochwaJd 
matter to me,” the fim CEO re- 
plies. “They’re all safe.'’ 

Waxxnan lights a cigarette and. 
puts it into the CEO's mouth. He 
takes a puff and says. “God, that's 
good. I'm glad I’m in this busi- 
ness.” 


“Cigarettes don't kill people. 
Health department regulations kill 
people” 

Waxman asks, “Are yon trying 
-to teD me that cigarettes are safeT 
“Yes. If they weren’t safe, Alba- 
nians,, who are our best customers, 
wouldn’t smoke them.” 

□ 


In Arizona’s Outback, 
Gourmet Dreams 


PEOPLE 



Writer Jim Harrison 
recounts dark days past, and hs 
love for good food and the 
peat outdoors. 


By Nick Ravo 

New York Tuner Service 


S ONOITA, Arizona — Die dark days of reckless phar- 
maceutical excess are embarrassing to recall for Jim 
Harrison, poet, novelist, screenwriter, semi professional 
food critic and seif-described pig. So are his blurry memo- 
. ties of hangovers in Key West, long depressons in n orthera 
' Michigan and fortunes misspent on expensive filling boats, 
■ winters in Palm Beach and a decade's worth of back taxes. 

One recollection remains clear and pleasant however. It 
came in the late ’50s, when Harrison was barely out of his 
teens, jusi off a Midwestern farm, new to Manhattan and, 
as usual, hungry. “I will never forget my fim pastrami 
sandwich,” he says, moaning wistfully. 

Pastrami and Manhattan may figure again in Harrison's 
future as he prepares for a nine-city tour to promote his 
latest book, “Julip” a collection of three novellas, and 
coincidentally, two coming film* for which he wrote the 
screenplays. “Wolf" and “Legends erf the FalL" 

For now', (hough, pastrami is about as hard to find as 
fresh-baked rye in Sonoita, an overgrown truck stop in the 
high desert about 20 mils (32 kilometers) north of the 
Mexican border and more than an hour south of Tucson, 
in an area where Harrison has spent the Iasi three winters. 

Over the course of a three-hour meal, Harrison settles 
for other delights: pasta, a half-dozen appetizers, four 
bottles of wine (three of them 538 1980 Barolos), tiramisu, 
gelato, grappa and double espressos. 

It is an appropriate meal for a writer whose fiction is 
infused with references to eating the way the work of 
Hunter S. Thompson, a bad influence from his past, 
dwells on drugs. The setting is Harrison’s favorite local 
Wining spot. Er Pastaro, a small Italian restaurant of the 
red -checkered-tablecloth variety, improbably placed 
among southern Arizona's sagebrush and sycamores. 

“Believe it or not, 1 no longer eat like I used to, no more 
three-pound porterhouses covered with morels,” Harrison 
says, fishing an anchovy out of a dish with his fingers. “My 
tastes are more refined, less bulk.” Perhaps, but dinner 
with the 5-foot-lO, 210-pound (1.78-meter. 93 kilogram) 
Harrison can still be a Balzacian experience. 

Despite his tastes, Harrison has a bodyguard build, a 
tough-guy m v xftftc hp, combed-with-his-hand hair, a wan- 
dering glass eye (the result of a childhood accident} and a 
wardrobe that seldom varies from blue jeans and beat-up 
polo shirts. “In dark colors, to cover my big stomach.” 

The only other restaurants besides Er Paslaro within 30 
miles are a steak joint across the street and a luncheonette 
called Bob's Family Place about 10 miles away in Patago- 
nia. where Harrison lives with his wife of 33 years, T inrin 
and their English setter, Tess, in a cozy, secluded ran- 
cbette. The rest of the year, they live on a 160-acre farm 
near Traverse City. Michigan. 

Harrison discovered Arizona during a poetry-reading 
tour of Indian schools that was sponsored by the National 
Endowment for the Arts. His house is hard by a bird 
sanctuary. Gray hawks squawk in the distance, and Sonoita 


The congressman says, “You 
don't think that it's going to kill 
you?" 


Waxman goes on to the next 
CEO, lights a cigarette and hands it 
to him. “Do you believe that ciga- 
rettes are safe?" 

“Yes, I do.” 

“Do you also believe In the tooth 
fairy?” 

“if you don’t believe in one, yon 
can’t believe in the other." 

The third CEO stands at atten- 
tion, and Waxman places a ciga- 
rette between his lips. 

. The CEO says, “I not only like 
the taste of it, I also like to breathe 
the secondary smoke that goes with 
iL" 

“How dangerous is a cigarette?” 

“ft's mud) safer than eating an 
Oreo cookie, and it lasts a lot long- 
er." 

“Why do we assume that smok- 
ing can cause health problems?” 

“We’re victims of a vicious pro- 


Manila Lifts Ban 
On The Piano’ 


Reuters 

M ANILA — Philippine cen- 
sors lifted Wednesday a ban 
on the award-winning film “The 1 
Piano” after an uproar over an ear- 
lier decision to stop its public 
showing on the grounds that it was 
pornographic. 

A five-member panel of the 
state's Movie and Television Clas- 
sification and Review Board autho- 
rized the showing of the movie un- 
cut to those over 18 years old. The 
panel reversed a previous board de- 
cision rating the movie as X, or 
unfit for public viewing, because of 
its sex scenes. The film's local dis- 
tributors had appealed the ban. 

The movie won three Academy 
Awards, Including best screenplay 
for the director, Jane Campion. It 
also was a co-winner of the Palme 
d’Or at the Cannes film festival 
last year. 


manufacturers who would like to 
capture the cnal satidaction mar- 
ket” 

Waxman proceeds down the line. 
He pauses in front of another one 
and hands him his smoke. 

“Do your people spray nicotine 
on the tobacco to make the ciga- 
rettes more addictive?" Waxman 
asks him. 

“No, wedon’L We spray tobacco 
with nicotine to keep the weevils 
from developing cancer.” 

□ 

The CEOs were puffing very 
hard because their time was run- 
mug out One CEO said, “ft’s not 
smoking that’s the problem, it’s the 
evening news. How can we ever get 
a fair bearing when all they show is 
congressmen bearing us up?” 

“What message would you like 
to send to the American people?” 

“It’s stOl safer to smoke a Filtered 
cigarette than it is to suck on a stick 
of dynamite." 

Waxman reached the last man 
and stuck a Philip Morris in his 
mouth, “Any final words?" 

“If it weren't for cigarettes, the 
Marlboro Man would fall off his 
horse." 






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TanhafirtbeNe-YakTi 


life With the Arnolds: 
SplU or Ratings Stunt? 

It could be a while before we 
know whether Roseanne and Tom 
Arnold's split is another publicity 
stunt heading into TV ratings 
month, but here's some info that 
w eig hs against that theory: Sources 
told The Washington Post that 
Tom traveled from Los Angeles u> 
New Jssey for Easter weekend to 
visit The Other Woman's home- 
town of South River. It was Kin 
Sdva, a vice president in the Ar- 
nolds’ production company, whom 
they reportedly fought over last 
week, just before Roseanne filed 
for divorce. On the other band, 
Tom says be and Roseanne are 
ready to make up. “I still love Ro- 
seanne and she loves me,” KNBC 
TV in Los Angeles quoted him as 
saying. 

D 

Phffip Rotb has been named the 
winner of the 1994 PEN-Faulkner 
award for fiction. He won the 
$15,000 prize for his novel “Opera- 
tion Shytock,” his 20th published 
book. Four other nominees won 
$5,000 awards: Stanley Elkin for 
“Van Gogh's Room at Aries”; Da- 

O Gflb for “The Magic of 
Fae Myenne Ng for 
“Bone,” and Kate Wheeter for 
“Not Where I Started Fran.” 

a 

Vittorio Gassmaa, one of Italy’s 


leading actors, has turned play- 
wright. His play, “Camper .* 9 wifl be 


“The sign is there to keep away the bird-watchers. I'm a 
bird-watcher, too, but things get out of hand.” 

Harrison, who is 56, has been cm the cusp of literary 
stardom for 25 years, although his books about revenge, 
the outdoors, eco- terrorism and what he call* “nifty guys 
at loose ends” have never been best-sellers. 

Harrison’s best-known work is a set of novellas, “Leg- 
ends of the Fall.” Published IS years ago, the book, a tale 


of revenge involving three brothers in Montana during 
World War L is being made into a film due out in 


thousands of dollars in film options and foreign rights. 

In the next two years, Harrison blew h all on drugs and 
alcohol For the last six or seven years, though, he has bep 
working dutifully and keeping his personal and financial 
affairs tidy. 

His next project may be a cookbook, not so odd a 
■notion, gjvm that Harrison spent two years writing a food 
column, “The Raw and the Cooked.” for Esquire maga- 


zine. He attributes his lust for food to a deprived upbring- 
ing. He often jokes that he decided to leave Michigan 
when he discovered that cooks in other pans of the 
country commonly used an exotic ingredient called garlic. 

At dinner, the table includes his wife as well as their 
daughter Anna and her boyfriend. Matt (Another daugh- 
ter, Jamie, lives in Montana, where she is working on a 
novel} 

Harrison, the pain of his past apparently anesthetized 
by the meal, left * a few tales about shrimpers with tattoos 
on their faces, about how he once got an overnight private 
detective's license in Key West, about how his literary 
agent once slabbed a pimp. 

The behavior gets a tittle more raucous. The cigarette 
smoke eves thicker. 

Harrison readies over and hades at a guest’s dessert ■ 

“Try some of my tiramisti,” he says. 


tember. Harrison’s latest book, “Julip,” wQl be pub- 
ed by Houghton Mifflin on April 29. He has also 


written several volumes of critically praised poetry, six 
other novels and numerous screenplays. His most recent 
screenplay, “Wolf,” has been made into a movie directed 


by Mike Nichols and starring Jack Nicholson that is to be 
released in June. “Wolf,” which is not related to Harri- 


son's first novel of the same name, is about a publishing 
executive who turns into a wolf. 

As it does for many Fiction writers, film work has 
provided a healthy wage for Harrison, who was only 


scratching out a living until his early 40s, when — thanks 
to a loan from Nicholson, whom he met through 


Creek gurgles through tire backyard. Visitors are welcomed 
by a sign: BEWARE OF DOG CHAMPION PIT BULL 


by a sign: BEWARE OF DOG CHAMPION PIT BULL 
BLACK SAVAGE. “There is no pit bull” Harrison says. 


to a loan from Nicholson, whom he met through 
McGuane — he quit poeuy readings, journalism, scroung- 
ing for grants and teaching jobs and went on to write 
“Legends of the Fall” which earned him hundreds of 


wrighL His play, “Camper.” win be 
presented at the Spoleto Festival 
on July 1, the Rome daily La Re- 
pubbtica reported Gassman will 
direct and star in the production. 
□ 

Princess Anne is to become the 
first member of Britain’s royal fam- 
ily to appear in a television adver- 
tisement — for a charity. She will 
appear in the ad to promote the 
Save the Children Fund on its 75th 
anmversary. 

□ 

The pep singer Bobby McFerrin 
was named creative chair of the St 
Paul Chamber Orchestra in Minne- 
sota for the 1994-95 and 1995-96 
seasons. He mil be responsible for 
programming and conducting the 
orchestra in a series of youth edu- 
cation concerts. 


nVTERJNATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Pages 5 & 13 


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Europe 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Wealher. 


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The Northeast, including 
Boston and New Yorfc City 
will be mainly dry and cool 
Friday into the weekend. 
Very warm weather in the 
central United States will 
Wooer a few thunderstorms 
from north Texas to Denver. 
Rain will reach (he West 
Coast from San Francisco to 
Portland over the weekend. 


Europe 

A soaking rain Is fkefy from 
northwestern Spain to the 
western British Isles this 
weekend. Central Europe 
wB be tfcy and seasonable. 
A alow-moving storm will 
bring cooler weather and 
thunderstorms to much of 
Turkey by the weekend. 
Oslo to Moscow wB be dry 
and gradually mader. 


Asia 

North-central China, delud- 
ing Bepig wB have (fey. cod 
weather this weekend. 
Damp, cool weather will 
extend from northern China 
to northern Japan. Tokyo wB 
be mainly dry with season- 
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and Bangkok will be very 
warm and humid with no 
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17 Crude 
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21 “On Golden 
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29 Sax. for one 
so 'Take the * 

33 Road hazard 

34 See 22 -Actosb 

37 N.Y.C. subway 
40* 

Restaurant* 

41 'Amo. — — , I 
love a lass...’ 
45 Sweep at sea 
40 Chinese 
discipline 
47 Pennsylvania 
folks 

4 # Sea 22 -Across 

53 Site of the 
Cambrian 
Mountains 

54 Turkish bread 

55 Palmas, 

Canary Islands 

so Model 

Mecph arson 
57 Equatorial capital 
so Huff and puff 
so Dissembled 
6f Shark's line 
ea Source of sake 

sa -The doth 

protest . . 

64 High point 
os German border 
river 


2 Wail 

ait can eat you 
out of house 
and home 

4Lapreceder 

5 Verdi’s * 

Miller* 

6 Jersey and 
Guernsey 

7 “ walks in 

beauty . . .* 

• Bums's 
birthplace 

• Cut again 

lORowena's 

inamorato 

11 Grate 
expectations? 

12 Six-carbon 
molecules 

14 Farm sounds 

20 Bump 

21 Diva Mirella 

23 Make over 

24 Banquo. e.g, 

25 Astronomical 
butter 


l First name in 
gospel 


44 Not one to trust s2Homeotthe 
47 Sleuth's cry- Trojans 

57 Sine — -non 


42 LOSt 

43 Obliquely 


49 Strapped 
so Home of the 
Trofans 
51 KNO, 


sa Home of the 
Trojans 
' sa Old hand 


30 ‘Anthony 
Adverse* author 
si Making bows 
32 Transportation 
(or Sinbad 


DOWN 

1 Desire 


35 Nuremberg 
defendants 
30 Aforementioned 
37 Dr. Johnson's 
biographer 


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Puzzto bf Tbnattiy S. Lew»» 

,© New York Times Edited by WiU Sham, 


Iravcl in a world without borders, time zones 

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Acer Access Numbers. 

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3 An ABB" English-speaking Operator or voice prompt will ask for the phone number you wish 10 call or connect you L03 

cusicmerservice representative. 

To receive your free waBet card of ABJ!s Access Numbera, just dial theaccessnumberof 
the country youYe in and ask forQfitomer Service. 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 
ASIA/PACIFIC 


Australia 


Mafayafaf 

New Zealand 


Saipan* 

Singapore 
Sri Lanka 
Taiwan* 
Thaflaml* 


cMH»^oawf . | Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 

^ US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
language, since it's translated instantly. Call your clients ar 3 B.m knowi ng they 'U ger the message in 
' your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with ABSI 1 

j P To use these services, dial the ART Access Number of die country you're in and you'll get all the 

help you need. With these Access Numbers and your ART Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an AIKT CallingCard or you’d like more information on ART global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right. 


93M 

,422 

X//\1XC6, 


Armenia** 

ltdigjugr 

Bulgaria 

CwadT* 

QrchBtp 

Denaugfc* 

Hnbnd* 

France 

G ermany 

Greece* 

Hungary* 

Jttfbnd** 


0014 - 881-011 

>» 10811 

018072 

800-1111 

000-117 

001 ^ 801-10 

0039-111 

009-11 

IV 

8000011 

ooo-on 

10501 

235 - 2872 : 

8000111-111 

430-430 

0060-102880 

0019991-1111 

EUROPE 

8 jq 4 iii 
022 - 9034 H 1 
* 078 - 1 1-0010 

00 - 1800-0010 

99-380011 

0042800101 

8001-0010 

988810810 

194-0011 

01380010 

088081311 

004-80801111 

999001 


COUNTRY 

Ireland 

Italy* 

Ucdutnweln* 

Lithuania* 

Luxtanhou/g 

Malta* 


Nelheeirfo d a* 


-pcteKt**- 


KnsrtrtMwcw) 
Slovakia ■ 


Sweden* 


Bahr ain 

Cyprus* 

ggd 

Kuwait 

IdmiBgidra) 
Saudi Arabia 


Argcnflaa* 
Bdtew ' 
Bolfvtr 

Bnafl 

cage 


tY ACCESS NUMBER 

1-808550000 

172-1011 

weta* 1550811 

* 8a196 

UK 8H00-O1H 

0608898110. 

19*-0011 

ida* 06-022-9111 

800-190-11 

- 0*0184880111 

05017-1-288 

01-000-4288 , 

fogCOw) 155-5042 

0842000101 

9089W11 

028795-611 

ad* 155-0811 

0508880011 

MIDDLE EAST 

808001 

080-90018 

177-1082727 

808288 

[Brim) 426-001 

b 1-808100 

0880812277 1 

AMERICAS 

001-808200-1111 

555 

88081111 

0000010 

004-0312' 


COUNTRY 

Colombia 

■Co8»Wca*a 

Ecuador 

HSaivadof 

Guatemala* 

Guyana*** 

Honduras** 

MbdQMM 


ACCESS NUMBER 

98811-0010 * 

114 

119- 

190 

190 ' 

165 

123; 

95800-462-4240 


Pflcara^M (Managua) 
Panama* 

Peru* 

Suriname 

Uruguay 

Venez uela ** 


174- 

109 

191 

156 

00-0410 

88011-120 


i Set 1 


0oi 


Ford R 
ForEic 


ferth 




xtrac 


1 - 

>‘ : Xr;.r . 


■k‘ 


CARIBBEAN 

MM” 1 - 808872-2881 

' Bggmfa* 1-808872-2881 

■ Bddalivx 1 - 808872-2881 

Cayman Island s 1-808872-2881 

Gtgnadir 1-808872-2881 

HaM * 001-800-972-2883 

0808872-2881 1 

Wrih-Anta 

■ S-Kkg/Nevls 1-600-872-2881 

AFRICA 


W * T '.ir . 

-\ •• 

yi. • 

-T j: : -• 


£gypf (Cairo) 
Gabon* 
Gmfaia 1 
Kenya* 

iobeda * "" 

Malawi** 


5180200 

004-001 

00111 

080810 

797 - 797 ' 

101-1992- 


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