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INTERNATIONAL 



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tribune 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Wednesday, August 3, 1994 


No. 34,657 


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Workers Resist the Idearof Sacrifice 


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By Brandon Mitchemer 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Ah, the good old 
days of recession. 

No sooner h a d Germany. begun to • 
pul] out of a slump that some experts 
consider the worst m its postwar histo- 
iy, than some people started ge tting 
nos^lfflc about the falling orders, dort- 
ened shifts and plunging profits' of the 
recent past 

Apparently, t hings are looking up sa 
f ast f or German industry that many a 
worker’s motivation to keep making 
sacrifices for restructuring-addicted 
employers is quickly wearing- thin. 

„ J*Wc notice it everywhere we go,” said 
Wilfried Sihn, a director of the Stutt- 
gart-based consultancy Fraunhofer In- 
stitute for Production Technology and 
Automation. 

“When people are worried about 
their jobs they are willing to change hut 
when things look like they are going 
well, they’d rather leaving everything as 
it is.” 

While most German companies insist 
that their current drive to cut costs and 
become more competitive has only just 
begun, managers from Munich to Mttn- 
ster are worried that Mr. Sihn could be 
right 

The phenomenon he described ap- 
plies to businesses an over Europe, 
where bulging order books’ and rising 
consumer confidence signal that happy 
days are near again. 

France reported Monday that sea- 
sonally adjusted unemployment had. 
fallen for uml first. time. ip. four years. 
Switzerland expects 13 percent to 1.7 
pezemt ecorkmnc growth this year. The 
Organization for Economic Coopera- 
tion andDevelqpmeiit expects the aver- 
age growth rate among its 25 member 
countries, most ofwhKb are in Europe; . 
to reach 3 percent in 1995. . 

In Germany, one oflbe last Earopo- 
an markets to enter recession, the recov- 


ery- has- arrived with a particular ven- 
geance;'.' 

. •German chanical companies ex- 
pect double-digit growth in pretax; earn- 
ings after several years of watching 
the m fo™"* ~ 5 ~ 

; • Volkswagen. AG, which forced em- 
ployees to take a 20-percent pay cut and 
four-day workweek m exchange for job 
security last week reinstated a five-dry 
workweek at one of its German plants. 

• Bfontocbe Motoren Wierice AG, 
where manufacturing plants are operat- 
ing at MI capacity, reported a 14 per- 
cent surge in group net profit and a 7.4 
'p a te n t increase m sales for the first 
hatf of the year. . 

. -While Germany’s domestic con- 
sumption, remains sluggish, export-ori- 
ented manufacturing is booming. The 
Economics Ministry said Tuesday that 
seasonally adjusted West Goman in- 
dustrial production expanded 1 percent 
from May to June and was 32 percent 
. greater, than a year earlier. Wholesale 
sales, meanwhile, rose 1.1 percent in the 
month and were unchanged with re- 
spect to a year earlier. 

OvefaB, German companies are oper- 
ating at their highest capacity in two 
years arid finding it hard to accommo- 
date a flood of incoming orders. 

' A lot of companies’ surging profits, 
according to Gcrt Schmidt, a senior 
economist at Deutsche Industriebank 
AG, can be attributed to a global re- 
engineering currently under way. "The 
upshot of the restructuring is that cost- 
cutting and the economic resurgence 
are producing enormous productivity 
growth” as fewer' workers produce 
won, he. said. 

A spokesman for Fiat SpA in Turin 



[have to continue cutting fat 
to compete in increasingly global mar- 
kets. “Our restructuring carries on,” he 
said: “It's not something we’re going to 

> r S ee REOOVERY f Page4 

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Arafat 


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By Caryle Mur^iy 

WasMaponPHi^Senke . 

JERUSALEM ■— IsraePs recognitionof 
the “special role” of KingHnssdnin over- 
seeing Islamic holy shnnes in Jerusalem 
has ignited a Utter dimate. between the : 
Jordanian ruler and rite Palestinian leader; 
Yasser Arafat. 

The Israeli move, contained in the- 
1 ‘Washington Declaration” of last week, 
that was meant to normalize rdatfons be- 
tween Israel and Jordan, fflustraleshow 
the battle for Jerusalem’s future ■—! 
eddy postponed for two years —is 
on. . 

It also highlights how that battle re- 
volves around not only Israeli and Pales- 
tinian claims, but also intra-Arab rivalries 
for a role in the disputed city, which laud 
claims as its “undivided and eternal capi- 
tal-” 

' In the latest evidence of the intensifying 
Jordanian-Palestinian competition. King 
Hussein articulated Mr. Arafat’s most 
dreaded nightmare: that the king will ar- 
rive in Jerusalem before the head of the 
Palestine Liberation Organization. 

; have received several invitations to 
visit Jerusalem,” King Hussein said to re- 
porters Monday in London. “I fed it is my 
right as a Muslim,* Hashemite and as an - 
Arab to visit Jerusalem and. Hebron, and 
when I do so, I wiO do so without any- 
body’s permission.” - 

Asked when he might visit, the tog 
responded: “As. to when, I don t know but 
it will happen some time, soon, God wilt- 
ing.” • • • - 

; King Hussein appeared to be respond- 
ing to an eatifer statement by _Mr. Arafat 
rejecting Israel’s authority to mvite King 



D— A d Sft » frm«rt 'Rrmq» 

“Jerusalem te in oar sights,” posters 
of Yasser Arafat In the dty prodann. 

Hussein to visit Jerusalem and pray at 
Islam’s revered. A1 Aqsa Mosque. 

The Israelis “haven’t a right to offer any 
invitations,” said Mr. Arafat, who las, 
pointedly, not been asked by Israel to visit 
Jerusalem. 

- Mr. Arafat said ic was his duty and 
responsibility to offer invitations to visit 
the holy city. 

*T appreciate very much that King Hus- 
. See RIVALS, Page 4 




Kiosk 


An Accord to Patrol Haitian Border 


The Pentagon said Tuesday that. it 
would send helicopters, military scoots 
and technical exports to the Dominican 
Republic this month to hdp stop smug- 
gling of fuel into Haiti, 

Eighteen US. mffitary scouts will be 
part of an international team of 8e 
observers that will, patrol the border 
under an accord signed between the 


United States and the Dominican Re- 
public, it sad. 

• Six hehcoptexs wDl be scot, and up to 
20techxrical experts to maintain, them 

and other equipment. (Page 4) . . 


Book Review 
Crossword.. 


Page 8. 
P*ge 18. 




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A Sarajevo man ducking behind French soldiers Tuesday, trying to avoid being pawgfar in the open by Serbian snipers. 

Berlusconi Digs In, but Signals He’ll Deal 


CompSed by O*- Staff Fmm Dtporeto 

ROME — Buffeted by a conflict-rtf- 
interest scandal, a defiant Prime Minister 
Silvio Berlusconi on Tuesday rgected calls 
to divest himself of his vast business hold- 
ings. 

He was helped by a pledge of support 
from the Northern League leader, Umber- 
to Bossi, the most difficult of his allies in 
the ruling conservative Freedom Alliance 
coalition. 

. “I will never give in,” Mr. Berlusconi 
declared during a debate in the Chamber 
of Deputies, the lower house of Parlia- 
ment. 5 *The constitution gives no one the 
right to expropriate private property. We 
are not in the Romania of Ceausescu.” - 

Mr. Berlusconi. wholast week presented 
a- plan fo.put ins Finlnvest empire is the 
hands of a trust, repeated that he was 
willing to put his links with the group on. 
hold but said he would not surrender its 
freedom to function as a business. 

Mr. Bossi said his party had no intention 
of bringing down the four-month-old gov- 
ernment. He told the deputies, “This mes- 
sage is not only for the chamber but for all 
Italians: There will be no government cri- 
ses.” _ 

The neofascist leader Gianfranco Fini, 
another member of the government, on 
Monday accused Mr. Bossi of working 
against the coalition’s interests by criticiz- 
ing Mr. Berlusconi’s controversial plan to 
put his $7 btilion-a-year Fininvest compa- 
ny in the hands of a trust. 

Mr. Bossi said his sometimes blunt criti- 
cism of Mr. Berlusconi was not intended to 
stir up trouble but to ensure that the con- 
stitution was respected. 

Mr. Berlusconi indicated he was impa- 
tient with Mr. Bossfs sniping. “If Bossi 
wants to be a kidnapper, he is free to do 
so,” the prime minister said. “But he needs 
a willing hostage and this will never hap- 
pen.” 

Following a bribery scandal involving 


Fininvest, opposition leaders have called 
on Mr. Berlusconi to seO off all or part of 
the company. But the prime minister stood 
firm Tuesday, defending his proposal to 
distance himself from his business empire 
by placing the company in a blind trust run 
by a special committee. 

The scandal broke when a senior Finin- 
vest official admitted to having bribed 
government tax auditors and said the pay- 
offs had been bankrolled by Mr. Berlus- 
coni's younger brother, Paolo, who is now 
under house arrest 

Things got worse for Mr. Berlusconi 
when he met at his Milan residence with 
Fininvest officials and members of his gov- 


ernment, apparently to discuss the investi- 
gation, prompting charges that he was un- 
able to distinguish between his roles as 
prime niinistgr an d businessman. 

The scandal came on the heels of a crisis 
last month when Mr. Berlusconi issued a 
decree to trim the powers of magistrates 
investigating corruption. He was forced to 
withdraw the decree after a public outcry 
and opposition from within his own right- 
ist coalition. 

On the decree, Mr. Berlusconi said 
Tuesday, “It is dearly wrong to depict this 
government as being an enemy of judges.” 

(AFP. Reuters) 


United Europe Offers Mobsters 
A New Window of Opportunity 

As such groups evolve into international 
corporations with wide arrays of interests, 
they have discovered that the emergence of 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Smicr 

AIX-EN-PROVENCE, France — Ever 
since the Romans staked out this region as 
one of the principal outposts of empire 
more than 2,000 years ago, there has been a 
comfortable marriage <tf interests between 
the Mediterranean cultures of France and 
Italy. 

But as the European Union creates a 
single market, eroding national borders, 
there are growing fears that Italy’s plague 
of organized crime is choosing southern 
France as a favored place of exile. 

The decline of borders in the European 
Union, and the removal of the Iron Cur- 
tain that once divided East and West, has 
created opportunities for organized crime 
syndicates in Italy, Russia, South America 
and Japan to expand into new turf abroad. 


a truly global economy offers new oppor 
tunities to launder “dirty” money from 
drug and prostitution rackets into legiti- 
mate businesses. 

As Italy has hounded the Mafia, jailing 
many of its leaders and scrutinizing its 
activities, the Italian crime syndicates have 
sought refuge abroad. 

France and other European nations are 
discovering that the Cosa Nostra, 
N'Dragheta and the Camorra — the Sicil- 
ian. Calabrian and Neapolitan branches of 
the mob — have moved into their econo- 
mies in ways difficult to uproot. 

^ “The Mafia's penetration is no longer 
confined here just to selling drugs,” said 

See CRIME, Page 4 


Accept Plan, 
Bosnian Serbs 
Are Warned 
By Belgrade 

Serbia Says It Witt Cut 
Support if Partition 
Proposal Is Rejected 

By John Pomfret 

Washington Pen Service 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Heraegovina — 
President Slobodan Milosevic threatened 
Tuesday to cut ties with the self-pro- 
claimed Bosnian Serbian Republic if it 
continued to reject an international peace 
plan for partitioning the disputed land. 

Mr. Milosevic’s pronouncement warned 
the Bosnian Serbs that they would be com- 
mitting “treason” and “crimes against 
their own people” if they did not accept 
the peace plan. 

Tbe plan would force them to surrender 
a third of the land they now occupy in 
Bosnia and would divide the country into 
two roughly equal sections: rate run by a 
Muslim-Croatian federation and the other 
by the Sabs. 

Implicit in the strongly worded letter 
was a threat to dose Yugoslavia's border 
with the breakaway republic, denying it 
weapons, soldiers, money and fuel all crit- 
ical to its domination of more than two- 
thirds of Bosnia. 

However, unless Mr. Milosevic carries 
through on his warning, his move will be 
like many other ploys he has made in his 
efforts to r emain the pre-eminent power 
broker in the region and leader of all the 
Serbs. 

A Western diplomat said Mr. Milosevic 
appeared to be learning from the Western 
powers, who have made a habit of threat- 
ening the Bosnian Serbs and then not car- 
rying through. 

He said Mr. Milosevic was doing his 
utmost, short of concrete steps, somehow 
to separate Yugoslavia and the Bosnian 
Serbs in the minds of the United States, 
Russia, Britain, France and Germany, the 
five powers that drew up the plan. 

The reason, he said, was that the five- 
power “contact group” decided over the 
weekend to tighten sanctions on Mr. Milo- 
sevic’s Yugoslavia, comprising Serbia and 
Montenegro, because the Bosnian Serbs 
refused to sign the plan. 

Among the new techniques would be 
efforts to stop the flow of hard currency 
into Yugoslavia and halt the inflow of 
goods masquerading as humanitarian sup- 
plies, which are exempted under the sanc- 
tions. 

Mr. Milosevic wants those sanctions, 
which have devastated Yugoslavia's econ- 
omy for the last two years, to be lifted. And 
he is, at least symbolically, increasing pres- 
sure on his Serbian brothers to achieve that 

aim, 

Such pressure has been applied before, 
in the spring of 1993 when he claimed he 
would riiuc Yugoslavia's border with Bos- 
nia if the Serbs did not accept the now 
moribund peace plan drafted by former 
U.S. Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance 
and Lord Owen of Britain. 

That threat was never carried out, lead- 
ing to speculation that Mr. Milosevic was 
simply posturing to ensure his internation- 
al status. 

Mr. Milosevic’s letter followed a similar 
pronouncement on Sunday by the presi- 
dent. who is widely believed to have 

See SERBS, Page 4 


Over the Hill? Stones Prove They’ve Gathered No Moss 

Jagger & Company But Woodstockers 

Yield Satisfaction Are Staying Home 


By Richard Harrington 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — You can’t always get what 
you want at a Rolling Stones concert but, often 
enough, you get what you need for genuine satisfac- 
tion. 

Kicking off their first tour since 1989, the Stones 
sauntered into RFK Stadium on Monday night for a 
three-hour, 27-song stroll down memory lane, with 
perhaps a tad too many stops along the way to 
showcase songs from their new album, “Voodoo 
Lounge.” 

They started off with a rock chestnut. Buddy 
Holly’s ^Nol Fade Away," its chunky Bo Diddley. 
beat testimony to original inspiration and its theme a 
reflection of both- the audience’s devotion and the 
band’s stubborn persistence. 

Given that it was opening night on what win be a 
43-city stadium tour, it was not surprising that the 
show was a bit uneven, particularly in its pacing. 
There were literal fireworks after the finale of “Juxn- 
’ Jack Flash,” but the song equivalents would 
vc been more effective spaced through the show 
rather than bundled at the end, when the gut punch 
numbers woe “Start Me Up,” “It’s Only Rock V 
Roll,” “Street Fighting Man v and “Brown Sugar." 

Early in the sold-out show, the Stones seemed to 
have tne flow down: A terse “Undercover (of the 
Night)” gave way to “Tbrnblmg Dice,” its primordial 
riff and roiling groove underscored by a punchy horn 
section and the. wise use of a large video screen to 
bring the band, if not to life, to size. When you roll 
that combination, you come up a winner. 

But from there, things were alternately rocky and 
rolling. To its credit, the band dusted off some 
seldom-played tunes: the suggestive “Rocks Off,” 
whose insouciant sexuality and ragged energy kicked 
off “Exile on Main Street," and “Monkey Man" 

See STONES, Page 4 



Mick Jagger playing to file crowd during file Rolling 
Stones 1 opening night of their first tour in five years. 


By Marc Fisher 

I Vaskington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The Woodstock Generation 
would rather stay home and waich cable. 

The Reunion at Yasgur’s Farm, a re-creation of 
the 1969 Woodstock concert at the original site, has 
been scratched. 

Promoters hoped for a crowd of 50.000 at 595 a 
pop. By Monday they had sold precisely 1.657 tickets 
for the alternative Woodstock concert. 

“Interest did not materialize,” said a statement by 
Harry Rhulen. promoter of the Bethel. New York, 
conceit, which was to have featured such Woodstock 
originals as Richie Havens and John Sebastian. Mr. 
Rhulen said he had lost more than 52 million on the 
abortive venture. Ticket holders will gel refunds, Mr. 
Rhulen said. 

Nor do the young people of Generation X seem 
quite as keen to commune in the fields with a 
quarter-million grungy strangers as their boomer 
parents were. 

Sales for the other big 25th anniversary concert — 
Woodstock *94, the root extravaganza being staged 
by the same folks who created the 1 969 festival — are 
lagging nearly 100.000 tickets behind projections. 

From the start, Woodstock '94, which aims to 
gather 250,000 rock fans for 28ft hours of music 
Aug. 13-14, has not targeted those nostalgic for the 
original counterculture event. Instead, they have 
tried to woo kids by offering hot alternative bands 
such as Nine Inch Nails. Spin Doctors. Arrested 
Development and the Red Hot Chili Peppers, sup- 
plemented by senior citizens such as Aerosmilh and 
Bob Dylan. 

The organizers — Joel Rosenman. producer of 
both the original Woodstock and this year’s show in 
Saugerties, New York, and his partner. John Rob- 
erts, a venture capitalist, joining with Polygram, the 

See WOODSTOCK, Page 4 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1994 


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Remnants of Routed Rwanda Army Ponder a Comeback 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Raymond Bonner 

.V«i' York Times Service 

MUGUNGA, Zaire — At the refugee camp 
here and on a stretch of road beyond, one imme- 
diately notices something different about the 
people: Among the throngs of weak and sick, 
women and children in tattered and dirty 
clothes, there are great numbers of men in uni- 
form, the camouflage combat uniform of the 
Rwandan Army, the government troops who 
were routed last month by the Rwanda Patriotic 
Front. 

These are also the troops, mostly Hutu, who 
are widely accused by the United Nations and 
human rights groups of having massacred hun- 
dreds of thousands of Tutsi in Rwanda. Some of 
their officers talk freely about being on a list of 
accused killers drawn up by the new, Tutsi- 
dominated government in Rwanda. 

At one point along the road past the camp, 16 
kilometers (10 miles) northwest or Goma, a piece 
of brown paper stuck on the end of a stick 
identifies the soldiers lounging under the trees, 
drinking Primus beer and playing cards, as mem- 
bers of the 74th Battalion. A framed picture of 
the late Hutu president, Juv£naJ Habyarimana, 
hangs in a tree near a military tent. Off the road. 


concealed in the scrub, military pup tents are 
scattered about. 

It is a camp of Rwandan soldiers, and Outsid- 
ers asking questions are not welcome. 

To the extent that they will talk at all. the 
soldiers say that they, too. are suffering and 
dying. But when asked what they wanted from 
the international community — food? medicine? 
water? — a soldier said without hesitation: “Bul- 
lets, so that we can go back to our country." His 
comrades cheered. 

Though the army was routed by the Rwanda 
Patriotic Front, which now governs the country, 
units are being kept together, the command 
structure is intact and soldiers are being paid. 
And the soldiers are talking of the day when they 
wil) take back the country, just as the Tutsi- 
dominated front giew from refugees into an 
army that defeated the soldiers here. 

The chief of staff of the Rwandan Army, 
General Augustin Bizimungu, said that there 
were 15,000 Rwandan soldiers in Zaire. “We are 
busy regrouping,” he said in Goma. 

The more immediate threat the soldiers pose is 
to the relief effort for the million refugees. 

“It is a serious problem, and we are getting 


week as a political leader in one of the camps, has ^ 
a simple answer when people ask him about 
returning home: Don’t go. Tne new, Tutsi-dorm- the 
na ted government in Rwanda is killing Hutu por 
who dare to return, he says. sok 


An Overreaction 
At Buchenwald? 

Bonn Officials in Quandary 


By Rick Atkinson 

Washuigion Post Service 

BUCHENWALD, Ger- 
many — The scene at this 
former Nazi death camp was 
hardly the public relations 
image that a liberal, demo- 
cratic Germany wants to 
project to the world. 

Twenty-two neo-Nazi 
skinheads tumbled out of a 
rented bus and cavorted 
across the compound where 
a quarter-million victims of 
the Third Reich once were 
imprisoned. Shouting “Sieg 
Hal!” and giving the Hit- 
lerian stiff-armed salute, the 
intruders broke a couple of 
windows, overturned a dis- 
play from the concentration 
camp and threatened a su- 
pervisor before the police ar- 
rived. 

The July 23 incident set 
off the familiar ritual after 
similar demonstrations of 
the rightist violence that has 
plagued Germany since re- 
unification four years ago. 
The Bonn government 
voiced regret and shame. Is- 
raeli and U.S. diplomats 
showed up at Buchenwald to 
express outrage and alarm. 
Local police were pelted 
with accusations of incom- 
petence. The culprits were 
arrested, released and. fol- 
lowing a public outcry, rear- 
rested. 

The Buchenwald rampage 
illustrates the predicament 
of German officials, foreign 
diplomats and the news me- 
dia in reacting to such epi- 
sodes. Should a minor act of 
vandalism be magnified into 
an international incident? 
Are neo-Nazi skinheads a 
pathetic lunatic fringe or a 
genuine threat to German 
stability? Does the attention 
given to a band of social 
misfits encourage similar 
ploys? 

A close look at the events 
of that recent Saturday re- 
veals both farcical and 
alarming aspects. The 22 
suspects, whose names have 
not been released, range in 
age from 18 to 27 and are 
associated with the skinhead 
scene in the central German 
state of Thuringia, accord- 
ing to the police. They re- 
portedly chartered a bus in 
the town of Gera with inten- 
tions of attending a rock 
concert in Bavaria, but upon 
learning that the concert had 
been canceled instead wan- 
dered aimlessly through the 
countryside. At one point, 
the group ordered the driver 
to stop at a highway rest 


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area where at least one of 
them allegedly punched a 
Turkish flower seller and 
stole his flowers. 

The bus eventually rum- 
bled into the parking lot at 
Buchenwald, which had 
closed for the day. Whoop- 
ing wildly, the gang raced 
the 600 yards to the former 
site of the concentration 
camp barracks. After tossing 
the stolen flowers near the 
mass graves of Nazi officials 
and other Germans who 
died during imprisonment at 
Buchenwald after Soviet oc- 
cupiers took over the camp 
in 1945, they heaved rocks 
through two windows and 
upended a cart once used by 
inmates to haul stones from 
a nearby quarry. A supervi- 
sor who tried to intervene 
said one intruder warned, 
“We'll set you on fire.” 

Wi thin 12 minutes after 
the alarm was sounded, po- 
lice arrived to make arrests, 
according to Thuringjan of- 
ficials. All of the culprits but 
one, who was wanted on an- 
other warrant, were quickly 
released. Most have been re- 
arrested and charged with 
vandalism and trespassing; 
only the lone female among 
the group has not been 
charged. Two police officials 
have been suspended, and 
disciplinary action is pend- 
ing against three others for 
failing to take action earlier 
in the day. 

By the next Monday the 
“Buchenwald riot,” as it was 
dubbed in the German 
press, had become an inter- 
national incident. Ambassa- 
dor Avi Primor of Israel ar- 
rived at the camp to declare 
that “People who profane 
such memorials are a minor- 
ity but this minority is dan- 
gerous.” Throughout the 
week protests poured in, 
from the Anti-Defamation 
League and from organiza- 
tions of former Buchenwald 
inmates in France, Italy and 
the Netherlands. The author 
Elie Wiesel, a Buchenwald 
survivor, showed up on 
Thursday, 

The federal government 
has tried to make the case 
that rightist crime in general 
is declining, an assertion 
supported by recent statis- 
tics. 

At Buchenwald, at least, 
the authorities hope to pre- 
vent a repeat of the episode. 
Officials have announced 
that a new police station will 
soon open next to the con- 
centration camp. 


more and more concerned about it," Ray WiDrin- This politically loaded message is becoming JJenort nn Fatal Airh^lfi A-330 CtRSD 
son, a spokesman here for the United Nations gospel in some camps, and is m a king rapid ■* j-* % r -4 

High Commissioner for Refugees, said this week, repatriation of refugees more difficult and p:] At Frmr anfl Other rRClOTS ’ 

Thesoldiers are taking food that should be going unlikely. rU<H £<rro1 A „ n 

to women and children, the sick and weak. But “I know many people die here of disease, but if PARIS (AP) — The fiery crash of an Airbus a-j jupassoigiav 
that is a minor concern. they go back they will be killed,” said the teacher, during a test flight that killed all seven crew inemocp 

-n** soldiers, alone with the former govern- ®deon Hakuzwumuremyi, as he sat on the Hoot attributed Tuesday to human error and a oombmauon oioma 
& MfcwE of 'sum ho. holding notebooks listing food factors. A pSn, 
called intimidatitmtokeep refugees from return- distributions to his refugees. 

ing to Rwanda. The former government does not Still, the deterrent to returning is most visibly tteaash June 30, bin ^coulde^am u passengers. 

SSut the refugees to return* because it bdiews represented by the Rwandan sobers. Since the Jle twoengme 

the new government wfll be seen in a bad light if soldiers poured across the border two weeksago, -tadHi .m an wuitoahned mm ijtorvy ^ 

thousands of Rwandans remain outside of the along with hundreds of thousands of civilians, Aiibuslndustae s maximum power 

country. UN officials have tried to get them to take off According to the ***•*%*£" 

Mr. ™nn»n said it was urgent <ha, the S^^ot&in^d^ ri.e plane’s ^ t™P 

soldiers be removed “as far as possible from the Ul ™« ve5 mio me mugee , mnch more sharoiv than normal fora commercial plane. The crew 

camps. “Then they will not be as effective in their But the commandos here have told the United had tmnhle ascertaining what mode the automatic pilot was in. 
intimidation,” he said. Nations that they will not disband, a point nn- Tbe co-dAoI. meanwhile, pulled the stick back to the point die 

Nor is it only the military that is spreading the derscored by General Bmmungu. plane was almost looping The report said The captain was not in 

“stay put” message. The soldiers would take off their uniforms, he {he cockpit, occupying himself with test procedure®, 

A 28-year-old high school teacher, chosen this sai<t if it were necessary to go into the canq» to alowin retaking control of the plane. “if manual Mtjtf bad *** 
w4^a^UUc£]5dffS»crf£^,Si S* f00d - .effected three or four seconds other, the acadcpt could have been 

a simple answer when people ask him about “Wc can take our uniforms off and remain in avoided,” the report conduced. 

returning home: Don’t go. The new, Tutsi-dorm- the army” he said during an interview on the « „* Aiwntitinik Aimnrt 

nated government in Rwanda is kzllxzig Hutu pordh of a home near the lake here. “Wc can send DOffil) JLS fOUllu at ATgCIlllllC ivirpon 
who dare to return, he says. soldiers to the camps and call them back." BUENOS AIRES (AFP) — A police bomb squad detonated 

Tuesday an explosive device planted at Buenos Aires s Jorge 
Newbexy airport, officials said. - . .. 

No one was injured in the incident, officials said, and no one 
immediately claimed responsibility. The bomb was located in the 
washroom, of a shack bar an the airport's ground floor. Expats . 
took the devise to a nearby vacant lot, where it was detonatea. 

On July 18, a car bomb leveled a seven-story budding housing a 
Jewish enmity in Buenos Aires, killing at least 95 people and 
injuring more than 200. 

Arms Sales to Hurd World Fell in *93 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — The United States increased its 
share of anns sales to the Third World last year, but overall sales 
to those co nn t ri es continued a decline that started at the end of the * 

Cold War, the Congressional Research Service reported. 

Overall, arms sales to Third World countries fell 22 percent, to 
$20.4 billion last year from $26 .2 billion in 1992. Sales from the 
United States to Third World countries edged up, to $ 14.8 biilion 
in 1993 from $14.6 billion in 1992; but the shareof America's sales 
in that period jumped to 73 percent from 56 percent. 

Russia, the third-Iargest Third World supplier last year, behind 
the United States and Britain, increased its sales to Si.S billion 
from $1.6 Uflion in 1992, and had 9 percent of the market. 

Nigerians Set for Nationwide Protest 

ABUJA, Nigeria (Reuters) — A Nigerian court trying Moshcod 
K. O. Abiola on charges of treason was adjourned Tuesday until 
Wednesday, the day a nationwide general strike is to start if be is 
not freed. Chief Abiola won a national election more than a year 
ago bat the mifitaxy government canceled the results. 

Judge Mohammed Mustapha said Tuesday that he was ad- 
journing the trial because ofthe prosecution's inability to respond 
to a defense motion asking. for the case to be dismissed and for. 
Chief Abiola to be released. 

Oil nninns striking for an end to military rule and the release of 
ms MidatisKmcn Chief Abiola said the adjournment would not help. Their strike. 
Iwandan Army, suffering from cholera, outride a dime at a refugee canqrin Zaire. now in its fifth week, has paralyzed Nigeria. The 35 million- 

strong umbrella Nigeria Labor Congress is to join the strike on 

_ Wednesday if Chief Abiola is not freed. 



Two soldiers of the defeated Rwandan Army, suffering from cholera, outride a dime at a refugee case in Zaire. 


Aid Officials Fear a New Surge of Deaths Iran Says Bombing Suspect Is Dead 

MimCIA Hw mom mMBM in ‘4 Inn* Ivwih 111 


The Associated Press 

GOMA, Zaire — Dysentery, which is 
potentially far more deadly than cholera, 
threatens to become the major disease af- 
flicting Rwandan refugee camps in eastern 
Zaire, relief officials said Tuesday. 

.Samantha Bolton, a spokeswoman for 
Doctors Without Borders, said deaths in 
the camps were set to surge again. Children 
will be hardest hit, she said, among the 
more than a million Rwandans jammed 
into camps along Zaire’s eastern border. 

“This is going to strike kids more than 
adults.” she said. “It's going to be very 
expensive and time-consuming to treat, 
and you're going to see an upsurge in 
deaths.” 

Cholera and dysentery are both spread 
by fecal contamination of food and water. 
Cholera is treated with an infusion of liq- 
uids and minerals to replace those lost by 
the body through vomiting and diarrhea. 


Dysentery requires Five days of costly anti- 
biotics. 

Ray Wilkinson, spokesman for the 
United Nations's refugee agency, said 
Tuesday that the number of reported 
Heath* m the camps had fallen to an esti- 
mated 800 to 900 daily, down from 1,800 
to 2,000 early last week. 

‘That figure undoubtedly will go up 
when the dysentery moves up in scope,” he 
said 

The United Nations has appealed for 
$434 million in donations to help the refu- 
gees, and representatives from about 40 
countries met Tuesday in Geneva to 
pledge funds. 

Sadako Ogata, the UN high commis- 
sioner for refugees, told the meeting that 
the agency faced a cash shortfall of $65 
million. Despite a huge international aid 
effort, she said, the agency desperately 


needed help improving sanitation and 
camp and road facilities. 

On Monday. Unioef estimated 50,000 
people had died in the camps in the past 
two weeks, much higher than the high 
commissioner’s figure of 20,000. 

■ BritWrTrooprBrKigaE - 

An advance team of British troops flew 
into the Rwandan capital of Kigali on 
Tuesday, Renters reported. 

Lieutenant Colonel Michael Wannby 
and 20 troops from the 5th Airborne Bri- 
gade strode off transport planes at the start 
of the first major British deployment in 
Africa since the end of the colonial era. 

Joining forces from the United States. 
Canada, Australia and a handful of Afri- 
can nations, the British will send medical 
teams to the northwest of the country to 
treat refugees trying to make it home from 
camps in Zaire. 


NICOSIA (Reuters) —The main suspect in a June bomb attack 
that IriDed 26 people at Iran’s holiest shrine died in a Tehran 
hospital on Tuesday of bullet wounds he received during his 
apprehension, the Iranian news agency reported. 

Mahdi Nahvi with bullet wounds in the abdomen and spleen 
and under his collarbone, died a day after security agents caught fa 
up with Him in east Tehran and seized him after a shoot-out the 
agency said. 

The.- Iranian -chief of Jntdligence, Ah Fallahiyan, said the 
suspect had confessed to belonging to the Iraq-based Mujahidin 
Khalq organization. - 


Correction 

An article in Friday’s editions misstated French trade figures 
for May. France had a surplus of 7.6 billion francs, compared with 
a revised 73 billion franc surplus in April; that brought the 
surplus for the first five months to 30.7 billion francs from 29.9 
bUEon francs in the comparable 1993 period 


Rwanda’s Leaders Promise Quick Genocide Trials 


WasUnpon Pan Service , 

KIGALI, Rwanda — Rwanda’s presi- 
dent and prime minister called Tuesday 
for genocide trials to begin as soon as 
possible against those who planned or- 
dered and executed the murders of hun- 
dreds of thousands of Tutsi in April. 

In separate interviews, both leaders said 
they envisioned their three-week-old gov- 
ernment setting up a genocide tribunal in 


which the international community would 
participate as observers. 

They said that to allow the international 
community to control the tribunal, as in 
the Bosnian conflict, would lead to unac- 
ceptably long delays. 

“We want a transparent system, but we 
don’t want to wait as long a time.” said 
President Pasteur Bizimungu, a moderate 


Doubt Cast on U.K, Advance Tip on Pearl Harbor 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New York Times Service 

LONDON — A newly de- 
classified document suggests 


that Britain did not have ad- although there were warning have no option but to enter the 
vance warning of the Japanese signals about Japan's in ten- war. 

attack on Pearl Harbor, casting tions, Britain did not know in The document said that as of 
doubt on the theory that Prime early December 1941 that a Dec. 1, 1941, British intdli- 
Minister Winston Churchill de- Japanese force was preparing a gence placed four Japanese air- 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

locide Trials British Brace for Another Rail Strike 

LONDON (Reuters) — The British rail system is facing its 
Hutu who was installed in office last strike in eight weeics on Wednesday, Mien signal workers 

month after the forces of Tutsi-dominated 9?* ror 24 hours in a pay dispute. The strike is to begin 

Rwanda Patriotic Front overran the army ?* forcing many commuters to find other ways to get 

of the former Hutu-dominated govern- “S? Wednesday and back to wodc the next morning, 
meat. . 1IiC sdes met at the offices of the government's concilia- 

Prime Minister Fanstin Twagiramungu h°u serv ice on Tuesday, but a Rail Ma ritime and Transport union 
noted that Rwanda already hada special spokesman sauUater: “We don’t see any dramatic breakthrough 
provision in its criminal justice system that “ roo ^ Dent * 

called for death by firing squad for anyone , Fr ance is preparing fora hot August after a storm on Sunday 
convicted of genocide. brought a few days of respite, according to France Meteo. Tem- 

pastures (»i Thursday are to rise to 36 centigrade (97 Fahrenheit) 

m northern France and to 38 centigrade in the south. (AFP) 

n Pearl Harbor ■ disrupted servioes1n?ari^ Madrid and Viao^in northwest Spain 

and to several Portuguese towns on Tuesday. The rail workers* 

, warning have no option but to enter the 

s in ten- war. w a British woman to death m a suburban 

know in The document said that as of - a “v >1 bom ? wer the weekend, the Foreign Office said as it 
1 that a Dec. 1, 1941, British intdli- to travelers. ^ The victun was Carol Winter, whose 

sparing a gence placed four Japanese air- nusDand » Adam, surprised four men in the house (AFP) 


called for death by firing squad for anyone 
convicted of genocide. . . 


jua ask the butter... 

Vhvrt unite 11 tmylbrmg yea warn! U it fa. 




Minister Winston Churchill de- Japanese force was preparing a gence placed four Japanese air- nusDana > Adam, surprised four men in the house (AFP) 

liberately withheld such infer- srnpnse attack on the American craft carriers in the South China . Albania’s only airfine has halted its flights because of continuing 
mation from President Fran k lin naval fleet in Hawaii. Sea near Formosa and four oth- toss® and failure to find a buyer for the Austrian partner’s shares. 

D. Roosevelt in an effort to Some historians, citing Brit- er camera in Japanese home A joint venture between Tyrolean Airways and the Albanian 

make sure the United States en- ain’s extensive intelligence op- waters, Mr. Best said. Two oth- state ‘ run Albtransport was founded in January 1992. (API 

tered the war, a historian here erations against Japan at toe er carries were placed nearSai- Scwdnuivian Airlines Systems wffl open six new evening flights 

sud- . tune, have questioned whether pan on Dec. 4. from Stockholm to Copenhagen on Awl 14 and fiveSriv fllShS 

Anthony Best, a lecturer m ChurchfllfuUy shared rnforma- Irreality, two of toe carriers from Copaihagen toStoddX on W 15 More fSsWeako 
international history at the tion with Roosevelt in the that British intelligence thought planned Uniting Copenhaeea and CMn • More a* 6 also 

London School of Economics, weeks leading up to Pearl Har- were in the South China Sea Japan Airlines nlan« rednctimK 


5-» «■» l»yer for fiSSSKSH 

T 10 ^ Airways and toe Albanian 
state-run Albtransport was founded in January 1992. (AP) 

ScMBfiMjton ^Urines Systems will open six new evening flights 

“ ** > 4 "VC eariy flights 


Kuala Lumpur and Sydney. 







*V;- 



*?&***£'* - A ■ »- • 




o* [i£& 



CVTERWATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 3, 1994 


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hnalty in Simpson Case 


.rrr-' 1 nas cauea on meLosAnzdes 

^SSr to «* forihedeaih. 

penalty mainst Mr. Sampson. 

- Ms. Allred contended that if Mr. Garoeki declined 
to seek the maxzmtzm penalty, it would be a sign be was 
Jowmg favoritism to a celebrity deftmdanl IS mani- 
festmg msuffiaenl concern about the plight ot bat-' 
tered women. . . 

“ “ w ^e ilnot a celebrity defendant," she said, “it- 
seems highly likely that he would ask for the death 
'** * nvolv * n E » np g* Hrmg erf 

Ms. Allred noted that in recent months Mr. Garcct- 
b s office had asked for the death penalty in two cases 
where women were charged with having lwed Some- 
one else to murder thdi husbands. 

“If Mr. Simpson committed the murders with which 
mis charged, she said, "he certainly shouldn't get a* 
break from the DA on the death penalty 'because he ‘ 
the crime himself ratherthanJiiring others 


To busier her contentions, Ms. Allred brought 
alrag an anti-abortion activist, Susan Carpenter Mc- 
Millan, and a woman whose husband is in prison for 
spousal battery. The trio demanded that Mr. Garcetti 
meet with women's groups about the case, as he did 
with dvD rights leaden on July 19. 

The women stressed that they were not making any 
statement on Mr. Simpson's guilt. Rather, they said, if 
"W 0 ? conv wrfs him of murdering his former wife, 
Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend Ronald L. 
Goldman, it should be able to decide whether the 
death Moalty is appropriate. Mr. Simpson has pleaded 
not guilty to the charges.. . 

An all-male committee of Mr. Garcetti and senior 
deputy district attorneys is to decide whether to ask for 
the death penalty before the trial’s start set for SepL 

■ PoKce Detective Threatens Suit 

A police detective who testified that he found a 
bloody glove at Mr. Simpson's estate will sue unless 

the defendant’s attorneys retract riainw that he plant- 
ed the evidence, The Associated Press quoted his 
lawyer as writing. 


A July 25 article in The New Yorker magazine 
quoted unidentified leading members of the defense 
team as saying they might argue that Mark Fuhnuan 
found two gloves at the murder scene, then planted 
one outride Mr. Simpson’s mansion. Mr. Fuhrman 
denied p lanting the glove. 

Mr. Fuhnnan’s attorney, Robert Tourtelot. de- 
manded a retraction and apology from Mr. Simpson's 
chief defense lawyer, Robert Shapiro, for “immeasur- 
able” pain and anguish suffered by the officer and his 
family. 

“You can help ease die humiliation and hurt they 
continue to experience." Mr. Tourtelot wrote to Mr. 
Shapiro. 

The New Yorker article said the defense would 
aiguc that Mr. Fuhrman was motivated by racism, got 
pleasure from intimidating criminals and sometimes 
beat suspects. 

Mr. Shapiro later said that race would play no role 
in the case and that defense lawyers would more likely 
argue that Mr. Fuhrman is not a reliable witness 
because he once asked to be removed from the police 
force because of a mental disorder. 


Jackson Mum on Marriage 

Lisa Marie Presley Says He Indeed Said ‘I Do’ 


Woman Cadet Loses 
Plea to Save Hear 


K * L «?!> 


By Mary Jordan . 

Washington Pm Service 

n " CHARLESTON, South Car- 
> olina —"Shannon Faulkner, the 
first woman admitted to the 
formerly all-male Citadel, the 
military school, must agree to 
let her long hair be cut off, a 
federal judge has ruled. 

, Judge. C. Western Houck of 
U.S. District Court stunned 
Miss Faulkner and her lawyers 
on Monday when he turned 
aside their argument that she 
would be a “freak." He agreed 
to the Citadel's request that she, 
like male students, sit before a 
barber who m 12 to IS seconds 
turns their heads to stubble: 

The issue of to shave, or not 
to shave, is huge hoe. A morn- 
ing radio talk show conducted a 
poll on the question. Those de- 
manding her locks be cut won 
by a landslide. 

Miss Faulkner and her attor- 
neys hurriedly left the federal 
courthouse, clearly disappoint- 
ed, after other details of her 
admission were derided. -- 
For instance, she .will not 
sleep in the barracks with other 
male students but in a special 
room in die infirmary. Unlike 
men, who have to perform at 
least 40 push-ups in two min- 
utes, she will be required to do - 
1‘jmly 18 in that time. 

' But no issue raised as much 


emotion as the rule about shav- 
ingthe head. 

“Unless everyone adopts a 
Sinead O’Connor hairstyle, she 
will be stigmatized," said Miss 
Faulkner's attorney, .Val Voj- 
dik. 

Miss Vojdik showed the 
court pictures of women of who 
had thrir heads shaved as pun- 
ishment far collaborating with 
Nazis during World War H 

A Justice Department attor- 
ney, Sandra Lynn Bcber, also 
s pok e up, arguing that U S. mil- 
itary academies Eke West Point 
had a reasonable solution: 
“hair cropped short, collar 


Beber said there were 

plenty of mili tary roles already 
existing regarding women's hair 
such as “multipigtails out" 
“must accommodate appropri- 
ate headgear." Her point, she 
said, is that . equal education 
does not mean equal haircuts. 

But Judge Houck would hear 
none of it. The tenor of his 
remarks daring the four-hour 
hearing over the conditions of 
Miss Faulkner's admission this 
fall was that he did hot want the 
court “to take over the running 
of the Citadel” 

The hearing on Monday was 
to decide the details of her liv- 
ing on campus this fall the lone 
woman among ^OGO men. 



Compiled bf (hr Staff From Dapaiches 

LOS ANGELES — The 
family of Midtael Jackson re- 
mained silent Tuesday on the 
announcement by the only 
daughter of Elvis Presley that 
she and the pop superstar had 
married in a secret ceremony 
1 1 weeks ago. 

Mr. Jackson's spokesman. 

Lee Sellers, refused to com- 
ment, and John McLaughlin, 
die Jackson family spokes- 
man, said the f amil y had no 
commem on Lisa Marie Pres- 
ley’s disclosure. 

Her mother, Priscilla Pres- 
ley. who divorced ihe “King 
of Rock and Roll” several 
years before his death in 
1977, said through her 
spokesman that she was “very 
supportive of Lisa Marie and 
everything she does." 

The developer Donald Trump said the cou- 
'e was staying on the top floor of Trump 
'ower in Manhattan. He added that he had 
known their secret “few a long time.” 

Entertainment industry publications and 
tabloid newspapers have been filled with 
speculation about a Jackson-Presley marriage 
for more than two months. Officials in the 
Dominican Republic said the pair spent time 
in the country in late May, and a Dominican 
newspaper, Lis tin Diario, published a picture 
of what it said was their marriage certificate. 

A statement by Mrs. Presley-Jackson, 26, 
was issued Monday by Mr. Jackson’s produc- 
tion company, MJJ Productions. 

In the statement, the only child of Elvis 
Presley said: “My married name is Mrs. Lisa 
Marie Presley- Jackson. My marriage to Mi- 
chael Jackson took place in a private ceremo- 
ny outside the United States 1 1 weeks ago. 

“It was not formally announced until now 
for several reasons, foremost being that we 
are both very private people living in the glare 
of the pubic media. We both wanted a pri- 
vate marriage ceremony without the distrac- 
tion of a media circus. 

“1 am very much in love with Michael; I 
dedicate my life to being his wife. I under- 
stand and support him. " 



Lisa Marie Presley said 
she wed Michael Jackson. 


S 


The wedding unites two of 
the richest people in show 
business. 

Mrs. Presley-Jackson’s as- 
sets from her father's will are 
estimated to be 5 ISO million, 
while her new husband is be- 
lieved to be worth more than 
5250 milli on. 

The couple had their first 
date on Feb. 2, when they 
went to Las Vegas to see a 
show by the '60s groups The 
Temptations and The Fifth 
Dimension, according to 
news reports. 

At the time, Mrs. Presley- 
Jackson was estranged from 
her husband, Danny Keough, 
a musician. The couple re- 
portedly got a “quickie” di- 
vorce in Santo Domingo in 
the Dominican Republic on 
May 6. 

Mrs. Presley -Jackson and Mr. Keough sep- 
arated after she began seeing Mr. Jackson, 35, 
who has never been married. She and Mr. 
Keough, who were married in 1988, have two 
children, Danielle, 5, and Benjamin, I. 

A judge in the Dominican Republic, Hugo 
Alvarez Perez, who announced last month 
that he had officiated at the couple's mar- 
riage, said they were wed in a brief ceremony, 
complete with a kiss and gold rings. 

Judge Alvarez Perez's announcement was 
initially greeted with skepticism by the 
world’s press. 

“It was a normal ceremony, more or less 
lasting 12 minutes, 1 ’ the judge told a television 
station in the Miami suburb of Hialeah on 
Monday. 

“He was a little nervous,’’ the judge said, 
adding that Mr. Jackson presented his bride 
with a “very nice ring.” 

The judge also said the newlyweds ex- 
“a little kiss” before they were 
away by bodyguards. 

Last year, a 13-year-old boy alleged in a 
civil lawsuit that Mr. Jackson had sexually 
molested him. Mr. Jackson denied the charges 
but settled out of court for a sum reported to 
be between S5 million and $20 million. 

(NYT. Reuters) 


Youth Caned in Singapore Scuffles With Father 


Lew K.ra>*>/The Auoclaicd fte*» 

Shannon Faulkner on her way to hear a judge rule on her fife In the Gtadel. 


The Associated Press 

KETTERING, Ohio — Michael P. Fay, the 
teen-ager whose caning in Singapore for vandal- 
ism drew international attention, scuffled with 
his father after coming home late and intoxicat-* 
ed, the police said Tuesday. 

George Fay, Michael's father, called the police 
to his home shortly after 1 A.M. on July 22, a 


month after Michael had returned home from 
Singapore, a police spokesman said. 

Mr. Fay had supported and defended his son 
during the Singapore case. Michael, 19, was 
imprisoned for vandalizing cars and lashed four 
times with a rattan cane. Michael denied the 
vandalism charge and said he had been coerced 
into confessing. 


• > \ • - 

l •' - 1 • *- 


h*‘ r i»--- 




+ nom n:n \o n;s+ 


Clinton BaoM a AHpnMitiy» He al th Plant 

WASHINGTON— The Senate majority-leader, George J. 
Mitchell of Maine, introduced, a health-care reform bill 
Tuesday that aims to coyer. 95 percent of Americans by the 
year 2000 without requiring employers tb pay their workers' 
insurance. . * "■ 

The White House endorsed Mr. MitcheD** plan. as well as 
one proposed by the House majority leader^ - Richard A. 
Gephardt of Missouri. Both bills axe scaled-down versions of 
President Bill Clinton’s initial proposal. * (AP) 


2 Senate VoteB Concern Homo— xnaBty 

WASHINGTON — After a display of what critics called 
“disgusting” pamphlets, the Senate has voted to cut off 
federal money to schools that teach acceptance of homosex- 
uality as a way of life. 

The measure, proposed by two Republican senators, Rob- 
ert C. Smith of New Hampshire and Jesse Helms of North 
Carolina, passed by a 63-to-36 vote. 

Bui shortly afterward, the Senate passed another measure, 
offered by Edward M. Kennedy, a Democrat from Massa- 
chusetts, intended to blunt the effect of the Smith-Helms 
amendment. Mr. Kennedy’s proposal passed by a 99-to-0 
vote, would cut federal money to schools that encourage 
sexual activity, whether homosexual or heterosexual (NYT) 

Bepubllcaii Rival* Gang Up on Jeb Bush 


WASHINGTON — Jeb Bush is. well ahead- of his oppo- 
nents in the Republican primary race for governor of Florida, 
j’. But to make sure things stayed that way in the month until 
i the election, Mr. Bush stunned histwo closest rivals last week 
‘ bv attacking them in a television commercial. 

" In a highly unusual, if not unprecedented, alliance, the two 
” other candidates have jointly produced their own advertise-, 
merit. Even nastier than the Bush ad, this one blasts away at 
the character and business dealings of Mr. Bush, a son of the 
former president. (NYT) 

Qnote/Unquote • • . • • •• 


President Bill President Clinton, on health-care: “This 

- decision rests no longer in my hands alone. Die Congress has 
' been under enormous pressure. Don’t let the Fern 1 mongers, 
■ don’t let the dividers, don't let the people who disseminate 

- false information frighten the United State Congress into 
walking away from the opportunity of a lifetime. • 


Ex-Smokers Have Edge on Healthy Eaters 


Carpikd by Our Stiff} From Dopascha 

CHICAGO — People with 
healthy hearts who cut the fat in 
their diet will live only a few 
extra days ox months on aver- 
age, but smokers who kick the 
habit will add years to their 
lives, a study has found. 

Researchers at Montreal 
General Hospital found that 
quitting smoking increases life 
expectancy by approximately 
two to four years for men and 
about two to three years for 
women. 

But before ordering that hot 
fudge sundae, consider: Ex- 
perts point out that if you watch 
what you eat, too, you can make 
those extra years of life more 
eqjoyable and Alness-free. 

“I would never suggest to 
anybody that a prudent diet or 


lifestyle is a bad idea," said Dr. 
Steven A Grover, the study’s 
author and director of clinical 
epidemiology at Montreal Gen- 
oa! Hospital and McGill Uni- 
versity in Montreal 

The study found that cutting 
saturated fat to no more than 10 
percent of calories consumed, 
as recommended by the govern- 
ment, would extend the life of 
an average man who is free of 
heart disease by anywhere from 
11 days to four and two-thirds 
months. 

The same change in diet 
would extend an average wom- 
an's life from 3 Vi days to just 
undo two months. 

But quilting smoking would 
extend the average male smok- 
er’s Hfe 2 Vi years to 4V4 years, 
and the average female smok- 


er’s life 2Mi years to 316 years, 
the authors found. Smokers 
also were assumed to be free of 
existing heart disease. 

The findings, based on com- 
puter models of government 
.health data from the United 
States and Canada, were pub- 
lished in the August issue of the 
American Medical Associa- 
tion’s Archives of Internal 
Medicine. The study used data 
from federal surveys and ex- 
aminations of large population 
samples in both countries. 

Although study results indi- 
cated that dietary modifications 
help prevent coronary heart dis- 
ease, “the benefits of smoking 
cessation are more uniform 
across age and sex and are sub- 
stantially greater than those 
predicted for dietary change.” 


Too much fat in food, partic- 
ularly saturated fat, can boost a 
person’s cholesterol levels, clog- 
ring the arteries and promoting 
heart disease. Fatty diets are 
also believed to promote some 
forms erf cancer. 

The study looked only at the 
effect of smoking and diet on 
life span — not at whether peo- 
ple lived with heart pain, short- 
ness of breath or fear of suffer- 
ing a heart attack. 

Such “quality of hfe” issues 
are one reason experts urged 
people not to ignore the impor- 
tance of eating right, too. 

(AP, Reuters) 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH AFFECT 
YOUR UFE THIS YEAR: 



Away From Politics 


• The abortion doctor who was shot and killed 
Friday outside a clinic in Pensacola, Florida, had 
been offered police protection six months ago, 
cxtyjpolice said. Dr. John Bayard Britton and the 
clime’s directors refused, saying it was unneces- 
sary, the police department said. 

• An experimental nicotine nasal spray designed 
to help smokers quit cigarettes can be just as 
difficult for some to stop using as cigarettes, a 
Food and Drug Administration’s advisory com- 
mittee said. It said the spray should be strictly 
controlled if approved. 

• TheUJS. Naval Academy has a new command- 
er, Admiral Charles R. Larson, 57. He replaces 
Rear Admiral Thomas G Lynch, 52 who stepped 
down, amid praise from navy officials but whose 
tour of duty was maned by a cheating scandal 

• Russians! send a 

the western United 


m 


. The Russian Ministry 


of Emergency Situations said the plane, a re- 
equipped Q-76, had helped put out huge forest 
fires in Russia last year. 

• A Vermont man convicted erf killing a teenager 
who gave him a ride in bis car been executed by 
injection in Huntsville, Texas. 

• CUff erosion in the northernmost U.S. settle- 
ment has revealed human remains that could be 
hundreds erf years old, a spokesman for the North 
Slope Borough of Alaska said. The discovery was 
made at the same mound where the remains of 
three Inupiai Eskimos, judged to have dated from 
the 17th century, were found in the 1980s. 

• An expiation rocked the headquarters of the 
UJ>. Naval Ordnance Center at Indian Head, 
Maryland, officials said. There were no reported 
injuries at the base, which houses navy weapons 
and ammuni tion. The blast was contained in a 
single building, a base spokesman said. 

NYT, AP. UT. VFP. Reuters 


In Whitewater Case, Altman Apologizes to Senators 


WASHINGTON — Seeking 
to temper congressional fuiy 
over his misleading Whitewater 
testimony. Deputy Treasury 
Secretary Roger C. Altman 
apologized Tuesday for under- 
stating insider efforts to k«p 
Ubs on an investigation that 
threatened to embarrass Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton- 

“I do not have perfect recall, 
and I may have heard or-under- 
Stood questions in a way that 
was not intended by thes«iator 
asking the questions, said Mr. 
Altman, the key witness on a 
day that cut to the heart of the 
a dmini stration's Whitewater 
explanations. 

"If I did so, I sincerely apolo- 


gize to all members erf the com- 
mittee." 

. to testimony to the Senate 
Banking Committee, Mr. Alt- 
man also said he had made no 
effort to impede an investiga- 
tion of a faded Arkansas sav- 
ings and loan concent that was 


itOBL 

He testified that no one in the 
Treasury Department . or the 
Resolution Trust Corp. “im- 


tiw£! about the inverag^tion to 
the White House. 

Mr. Altman islbekey figure 

in the affair, which centers cm a 
tangle of investmentsTnvrfvmg 
Mr.-Clinton while hewas gover- 
nor, of Arkansas and allegations 


that the White House tried to 
interfere with an investigation 
related to them. 

The Republicans assert that 
he knowingly deceived the same 
committee on Feb. 24, whoa he 
said that he knew of only one 
conversation between the Trea- 
sury and the White House 
about the investigation' into the 
failed Madison Guaranty Sav- 
ings and Loan in Arkansas. 

The senators are investigat- 
ing whether. -the Resolution 
Trust Corp.’s probe, of the 
failed Madison firm in Arkan- 
sas was thrown off course by 
administration acts. 

One of Mir. Altman's top 
aides, Joshua L. Steiner, 28, 
sought to convince skeptical 


senators that his written por- 
trayal of the Clinton adminis- 
tration's handling of the 
Whitewater affair was in error. 

Among Mr. Stoner’s entries 
was one that said Mr. Altman 
was under “intense pressure 
from the White House’’ to con- 


tinue 
vestigation of 
Under 

crats and R 


the RTCs in- 


Steiner said, ‘it was not my 
impression at the time he was 
under pressure.” 

- Mr. Stoner testified that he 
kept the diary merely “to reflect 
on events and drew lessons 
from my personal and profes- 
sional experiences’ 7 
In another development re- 


lated to tile inquiry, the White 
House acknowledged that that 
reporters had been misled 
about the timing and circum- 
stances of the handing over of 
Vincent Foster’s Whitewater 
file to a Clinton family attorney 
after his death. 

A key pant was left out of 
the earlier White House story: 
Hillary Rodham Clinton's chief 
erf staff was given the file first, 
and she stored it in the Clin- 
tons’ residence fa- five days be- 
fore turning it over u> the law- 
yer. 

Owning up to the administra- 
tion’s lapse, the White House 
spokeswoman. Dee Dee Myers 
said, “I think that was a mis- 

(AP. Reuters) 




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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1994 


^4 Trendsetter Finds Burma ‘Certainly Not All Wrong* ^ Border of Haiti 


By Philip Sheaon 

.Veil- Font Times Service 

RANGOON — Her two- tone Chanel pumps 
were not made for wading through puddles. 
But there was Miriam Marshall Se gal, a white 
smock pulled over her couture-clad frame, 
touring her new shrimp-packing plant in a 
warehouse district in this most dilapidated of 
Asian capitals. 

“Now this, this to me is human rights." Mrs. 
Segal said, admiring the work of her young, 
stern-faced Burmese workers as they cleaned 
and packed handfuls of the morning's catch of 
meaty Black Tiger shrimp. “We are giving jobs 
to 200 people here. These people have pride in 
their work. And that is what human rights is all 
about,*’ 

Remarks like those set teeth on edge among 
human rights campaigners, who say this Man- 
hattan businesswoman has been doing the dev- 
il's work here. 


Mrs. Segal, they say. is a callous apologist for 
a military government that imprisons, tortures 
and sometimes kills those who dare stand up to 
it. Nonsense, says Mrs. Segal who might seem 
an unlikely candidate for a one-woman crusade 
to burnish the image of one of the world’s most 
notoriously repressive governments. 

“‘Most of the people who claim to have great 


thoughts about this country have never been 
here," she said. 

For someone who made a name for herself as 
an arbiter of fashion — in the 1960s, she 
opened trend-setting accessories boutiques at 
Henri Bendel Nriman Marcus and other ex- 
pensive department stores — Mrs. Segal could 
not have picked a less fashionable cause. The 
junta has almost no friends in the outside 
world. 

“The criticism doesn't worry me because I 
know what I believe,” said Mrs. Segal, whose 
designer clothes, long crimson fingernails and 
ruby-encrusted jewelry make her an unusual 
sight on the crumbling streets of Rangoon. She 
has been doing business here for the better part 
of two decades, traveling here often from her 
home in New York. 

“1 am not a political person,” she said. “I’m 
here to do business. But I think most of the 
reporting about this place is wrong. This coun- 
try is certainly not all perfect, but it’s certainly 
not all wrong, and we need to recognize what Is 
right.” 

Mis. Segal says Burma is unfairly singled out 
for international scorn even as larger Asian 
countries with equally serious human rights 
problems — notably China and Indonesia — 
are accorded U.S. trade privileges and diplo- 
matic recognition. 


Her praise for the junta puts Mrs. Segal at 
odds not only with human rights groups, but 
also with Washington. The United States has 
long refused to sell arms to Burma and, as a 
result of the violent crackdown on the democ- 
racy movement in the late 1980&, has refused to 
send an ambassador. 

Although the junta has embraced the free 
market and welcomed foreign investment, few 
large U.S. corporations do business in Burma. 

Simon Biiienness, chairman of the Coalition 
for Corporate Withdrawal from Burma, a Bos- 
ton-based human rights group, said Mrs. Segal 
“has an unseemly eagerness to provide this 
regime with character references.” 

With its globe-trotting rags-to-riches drama, 
Mrs. Segal's life story could have been dreamed 
up by a romantic novelist. She was bom on a 
fishing boat off the coast of Palestine, the child 
of Polish Jews eager to fight to establish a 
Jewish state, and was raised in Australia until, 
at 18, she made her way to the United States. 

There she broke into the world of high fash- 
ion in New York and made a fortune with her 
Port of Call boutiques. She will not disclose her 
age. 


. WASHINGTON — The 
Pentagon will send helicopters. 


become an issue until after the mifitaiyYciack- • \ ; . 

down on the democracy movement, in winch ‘ w n , n 

Multinational Force to Draw 

She remaizu' in detention. h0QSeairBL | OnUS.Troops and Aircraft 

But as Burma was turned into a pariah state, ■* 

Mrs. Segal expanded her business ventures,. CanpUedlyOv Sag Fnm Dapat** 

setting up a fishme company three years ago in . WASHINGTON — The 
a joint venture with die junta. The company is a Pentagon wiQ send helicopters, 

showpiece of the government’s efforts to open, mili tary scouts and technical 
up the economy to foreign investors while bold- ' oipertstothe Dominican Us- 
ing tigh t to power. . public fofc month to help stop 

Asked about the government’s brutal actions smuggling of fad acrossthe, 

in the late 1980s, Mbs. Segal says “it was a very baron- into Haiti, a spokesman 

panicky situation — when you are faced with a said bn Tuesday, 

situation fibs that, what do you do?” ' Thc.step is intended to bol- 

As for Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, who was ster a trade embargo that Wash- 
awaided the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize and who is mgtan hopes will pcnaiate ihc 

beloved by nwHirms here for her willingness to nnfitary leadership . to . 

defy the junta, Mrs. Segal offers an appraisal leave the country voluntarily, 

that is some thing less than flattering , . The United Nations Security 

“I think she’s become a prisoner of theNobcl Council voted Sunday tosortfao- 

Prize because it’s an incredible thing to live up area U*S.-led invasion of Haiti, 

to,” she said. “I don’t have criticism of her, but - bat Washington says it^nts to 
I feel that there chnrtid be compromise on her leave time for the trade ban to 


experts to the Dominican Re- 
public this month to help stop 
CTmiggimg of fad across the, 
bonier into Haiti, a spokesman 


tan should get congressional 
approval before ordering an in- 
vasion of Haiti. 

Dan Gtickman, Democrat of 
Kansas, and Benjamin A. Gil- 
man, Republican of New York, 
said in separate statements that 
Mr. Clinton should not rely on 
the UN resolution as his autho- 


said on Tuesday. the UN resolution as ms auuw 

' The step is intended to bol- Oration 

stcr a traw embargo that Wash- overthrow the Haitian govern- 


Mrs. Segal first came here in 1976 in search part and on their part You can’t be defiant in a 
of Burmese handicrafts that she could sell as marriage. You can't be defiant in politics. You 
fashion accessories. Her business ties did not can’t be defiant in business.” 


mgtrin hopes will persuade the 
nnKtary leadership of Haiti. to 
leave the country voluntarily. 

. The United Nations Security 
Cotmcil voted Sunday to autho- 
rize a U.S.-led invasion of Haiti, 
but Washington says it wants to 
have tirni* for the trade ban to 

work. 

US. officials have repeatedly 
said an invasion wasnot“hmm- 


xoent. 

Mr. Gtickman, who has ac- 
cess to US. intelligence reports 
on Haiti as chairman of the 
House intelligence committee, 
said in a letter to Mr. Clinton: 
*T am not aware of any infor- 
mation by which that situation 
could legitimately be character- 
ized as an emergency.” 

“As a result, 1 could not sup- 


RT^iLS: Battle for Jerusalem 


SaiOiOl UlVtUHW WiUiim l U iAAAA die - --1- 

nent” but President Bffl dm-. ^thenrerfU^ for £??£?* 
ton 1ms refused to rule out mfli- out an authorization by Con- 


nnTiTin taiy action against the Haitian 

SERBS: A Warning From Belgrade 

Costumed from Page 1 meat: that the Bosnian Serb W9* coup, 

sparked Bosnia’s war 27 Republic had been recognized Effltccn U.S. imHtaiy scouts 


Continued from Page 1 
scin might come to visit, and 
this is an invitation for him, '* 
Mr. Arafat added. 

Israel's promise to give “pri- 
ority” to King Hussein’s “spe- 
cial role” over the Islamic 
shrines in eventual negotiations 
infuriated and frightened Pales- 
tinians, who see it as an attempt 
to undercut their claim to East 
Jerusalem as the capital of a 
future Palestinian state. 

“Without the holy sites, Jeru- 
salem is nothing,” said a Pales- 
tinian journalist, Nihaya 
Qawasmi. If the Jordanians 
control the holy shrines, he said 
theywill control the city. 

“There will be nothing foT us 
and we are worried,” he said. 

Mr. Arafat said last week: 
“No one has the right to talk or 
negotiate on Jerusalem except 
the Pales tinian side, represent- 
ed by the PLO.” 

Three days after the Israeli 
agreement with Jordan became 
known during King Hussein's 
historic meeting with Prime 


12 Die in Egypt Bus Wreck 

Ageitce France-Presse 
CAIRO — Twelve people 
were killed and 40 injured when 
their bus and a truck collided 
on the highway linking Cairo to 
Aswan, it was reported here 
Tuesday. The truck driver, who 
was arrested, was said to have 
lost control of his vehicle, 
smashing into the bus at high 
speed. 


Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Isra- 
el in Washington on July 25, an 
angry Mr. Arafat banned distri- 
bution of a pro-Jordanian 
newspaper in the self-rule areas 
of Gaza and Jericho. 

He also dispatched a senior 
aide, Faisal Hussdni, to Am- 
man to discuss the matter with 
the Jordanians. And on Mon- 
day, arguing that Israel had al- 
ready begun negotiations on Je- 
rusalem with Jordan, Mr. 
Arafat demanded that talks on 
the city’s final status begin im- 
mediately. 

Those talks are to start no 
later than May 1996 under the 
Israeti-Palestinian agreement 
signed last September. 

“If they have decided to start 
now then we are insisting to 
stan now,” the PLO leader said. 

Meanwhile, Jordan has dis- 
puted that its historical guard- 
ianship of the Islamic holy 
shrines undercuts the Palestin- 
ians' fight for some kind of po- 
litical rule over East Jerusalem. 

“I am amaygH at this furor,” 
Prime Minister Abdul-Salam 
Majali said last week. “We have 
to know that from 1948 and 
even before, Jordan exercised 
religious jurisdiction in the holy 
shnnes, this matter was a 
right” 

Jordan lost control of East 
Jerusalem in the 1967 Arab-Is- 
raeli war. but has continued to 
administer the Old City’s A1 
Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of 
the Rock, from which Muslims 
believe the Prophet Moham- 
med ascended to heaven. 





* 

- ; V 


• / ■ 


" X . A - 




m-t.. 


Coc thiu e d from Page 1 meat: that the Bosnian Serb 

sparked Bosnia’s war 27 RcpnbSc had been manned 
months ago. In the °y wofld community and 

the Serbian Dresden t demand- that changes to the peace olan 
ed that the Wtian Serbs ao- njap of Bosnia were posable, 
cept the peace plan. Netther daim has been em- 

On MaadavV^wever, the braced by the five wwera&at 
Bosnian Serbian Assembly re- drew up the map, and the Serbi- 


out an authorization by Con- 
gress,” be wrote. 

Mr. Gilman said, “Before 
reaching the point of no return 
on militar y action. President 


Eighteen U.S. military scouts CEnton should exhaust .way 
lire part of an interiwtional possible diplomatic solution. 


changes to die peace plait 
i of Bosnia were possible. . 
either claim has been em- 


wffl be part of an international 

team of 88 observers that wffl The White House press secre- 


patroV the border under an ao- taiy. Dee Dee Myers, said there 
cord signed Monday between was “an increasing sense of iso- 
the United States and the Do- lation in Haiti, which is having 


Bosnian Serbian Assembly re- 

jeeted it, daman ding that its au- UUpiCS 
thors first grant the breakaway 18 
Serb republic international rec- deman( 
ognition and make some 
changes in the proposed map of „ R . 

Bosnia. The contact group u * 
snubbed the new demands. R *P u b 1 
On Tuesday, the Bosnian * 

Serbs announced that their as- 
sembly would reconvene “ c . wa ‘ 
Wednesday to decide whether ^S 8 ^* 
they would hold a referendum l ectin 8 

cm the peace plan. 

The Serbs held a referendum ' 

in spring of last year to decide ^ rowi 
about the VanceOwen plan. 

They voted it down '• WAl 

Significantly, Mr. Milosevic’s people 
statement repeated an dement drowm 
present in Sunday's pronounce- biisteri 


an presklent couM be seeking to a Pen 
gain tacit recognition of those ■ Boxx. 
demands under the guise of six 
pressuring the Serbs to accept £ 
the plan. cal ex 

“If it is not enough that the 
Republic of Srpska exists,” he said. ' 
said, “and that peace is offered matron 
on that basis, then you are on int end* 
the way to committing a crime canse 
against your own people by re- 


mini can Republic, according to an effect” 
a Pentagon spokesman. Dermis “There are some signs of fis- 


Boxx. sure and pressure being placed 

Six IIS. helicopters wfll be on the mmtaiy by some of their 
sent, and as many as 20 teduri- former supporters.” she said. 

. J ... w. w.. < 1 .., ilu 


cal experts will go to maintain Ms. Myers said that while the 


amt other eq ui pment, he Clinton administration had 
sai d. The e quipm ent and infer- cleared a diplomatic hurdle to 


by the team is military at 
to b«4p the Domini- vote, there 


action with the UN 
re was no “time line” 


cans enforce the trade embargo. Tor an invasion: 

The six UH-IH utflity bdi- - “I don’t expect we’ll set any.’ 


copters will be flown by pilots sheadded. 
from the Dominican Republic. . The sanx 
The Pentagon will also send 50 nr and sea 


pFowmi^Reoord in Boland' 

Raaers cles, six small boats, 106 rad 

WARSAW — A total of 54S and 100 binoculars, he said, 
people, including 169 children. Two senior members of the 


The sanctions have cat most 
air and sea traffic to Haiti, but 


off-road vehicles, 45 motarcy- straggled fud has continued to 
des, six small boats, 106 radios flow across the land border be- 


tween the Dominican Republic 
and Haiti, which share the Ca- 


drowned in Poland during a U.S. House of 


blistering hot July. 


meanwhile, said 


raxtatives, 
Mr. Om- 


and Haiti, which share the Ca- 
ribbean island of Hispaniola. 

(A P. Reuters) 



STONES: Still Giving Satisfaction WOODSTOCK: Staying Home 


C VlaJiuar Ms&aiin.'Apnr France- Frew 

MARKING THE TIME — A boy standing in front of 
Russian officers dressed in World War I conforms as 
they listened Tuesday to a Divine Liturgy marking the 
beginning, 80 years ago, of the war in Moscow. 


RECOVERY: Economic Growth in Europe Makes Cost-Cutting Harder 


Coutuxued from Page 1 
switch off because the market 
picks up.” 

The rigors of international 
competition, which is increas- 
ingly preventing companies 
from raising prices like they 
used to, often leave efficiency 
gains as the only way to im- 
prove profitability. 

But while most companies 
say they intend to stay attuned 
to the need for continued re- 
structuring, the chairman of 


BMW, Bemd Pischetsrieder. re- 
cently said he was alarmed: “I 
worry that the economic upturn 
could spread the illusion that all 
ourproblems had been solved.” 

The conservative Bavarian 
company’s current philosophy 
is to pretend the recovery did 
not exist. 

“We need to continue to po- 
sition ourselves as if we were in 
recession.” said Walter Glo- 
gauer, a spokesman, adding: 
“Even in big companies there 


are sectors that are resistant to 
change-” 

Many large corporations are 
still trying to thin out their mid- 
dle management, and manufac- 
turing companies big and small 
are in the unpopular process of 
shifting labor-intensive produc- 
tion abroad, for.example. 


better absorbed in social 
terms.” 

“The economic rebound 


helps a lot of companies solve songs have a familiar comfort 


their structural problems, but 
we still have to reduce our costs 
in Germany in order to become 


UKumoeo uwu rag e l 
from “Let It Bleed” — sinewy 
and surly R&B, though it de- 
generated into something of a 
m ummer ’s play on stilts. 

Less impressive dust-offs 
were the pair from “Black and 
Blue”: ^Memory Motel,” a 
wonderfully awful ballad 
powered by Mick J agger. Piano 
Man, and “Hot Stuff,” a groove 
number intended to stump the 
audience and the band. It was 
followed by a boisterous read- 
ing of A1 Green’s “Can’t Get 
Next to You,” which had the 
benefit of a hook, lyrics and a 
point of view, compared with 
*Hot Stuff’s” riff-and-attitude. 

Some of the Stones' new 
songs have a familiar comfort 
to them, as if they are drawn 
from a La Brea time pit: They 
included “You Got Me 


Jagger himself proved inex- C on tinued from Page 1 
haostible as anger and show- music conglomerate — haye 
man, prowling the stage with sold 150,000 tickets, bat Man- 


reptilian energy, his loose- day they extended ticket sales 
limbed strut as cocksure and and relaxed parking rules to 


canny as ever- He’s the primal 
focal point, of course, though 
the band’s deep groove and en- 
ergy remain essentiaUynndilut* 
ed despite the departure of 


seem'd to bring a httlemme d agents,” Mr. Rosenman said. 

Cost is another problem: A 
worked m loc k-rhythm with ticket to Woodstock I cost 818. 


Watts, who remains the master » £*7535^ M31A 
of i mm uta b le snnphaty and Tlcketinasterpadcage including 
power. He s the propdlo' to the admission and bus service from 


^.nc^incpropcuwwiae admission and bus service from, 
band’s surprisingly plain muse. Baltimore costs S252. 


It’s Keith Richards who is the (Bring your own tent, bat no 
Stone to the bone, of course, stakes. Promoters fear they 


and his mere presence lends an could be wielded as weapons.) 


more competitive international- Rocftn,” “i Go Wild.” “Brand 


he said. 


The only advantage of the 
recession, according to Mr. 
Schmidt of Deutsche Industrie- 
bank, “is that change can be 


Mr. Sihn, the institute direc- 
tor, described the new recession 
nostalgia as a challenge for top 
managers. 


Caitlin Thomas, Wife of Dylan Thomas, Dies at 81 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Caitlin Thom- 
as, a boozing, brawling partner 
in marriage to the Welsh poet 
Dylan Thomas, has died at age 
81- 

Mrs. Thomas died Sunday in 
Catania, Italy, according to a 
daughter. The cause of her 
death was not announced. 

She once described life with 
ber husband as “raw, red bleed- 
ing meat,” a torment of mutual 
infidelity. It was a famously dis- 
cordant marriage, with infidel- 
ity on both sides and angry 
scenes in public. Dylan Thomas 
was notorious for extraordi- 
narily bad behavior, from never 


repaying debts to fouling walls 
and carpets of friends' homes. 
He died in New York in 1953, 


chef whose innovative ways 
with seafood at his Manhattan 
restaurant, Le Bemardin. influ- 


New Car” and “Love Is Strong’' 
(out came the usual inflatable 
surprises, much stranger and 
spookier this tune than the hon- 
ky-tonk women of yore). 

Some decades ago, Mick Jag- 
ger said he could not imagine 
singing “Satisfaction” at age 50. 
At 51, hey, hey, hey, he sang it 
quite satisfactorily, though in 
truth, the full house took the 


authentic weight even to the 
band’s weakest efforts. Rkh- 
■ o. ra °H ards, who traded the occasional 


bracing solo with Ron Wood Holiday Inn in Km«nn JUU C * U 8 U5Q ’ senior 

** usaal *^338.85^? *«2ht 


. C onti nu e d from Page 1 dder than it had been in 1969. 

music conglomerate — — haye **I wouldn’t go back unless 
sold 150,000 ticket*, bat Man- someonepaid my way and flew 
day they extended Afre t me in a helicopter,” said John 
and relaxed parking rules to Kofant, 37, a Washington writer 
spark interest m the festival. In- who attended die original festi- £. 
stead of a mzmnmai four-ticket *#1 with his older brother and 
package, rock fans . now may wound up with a bad cold. 
ouyjtitiketsiB.paira: - / .Woodstock *94 organizers 

“An imnedhnent has' Imn riot yet worried 

bassist Bfll Wyman. His re- ^ per plexed I? 001 falEn 8 short of a sellouL 

about how to bctheirowntrai- tfctesoftendo mn sell 

seemed to bring a little more d agents,” Mr. Rosenman said, ontil the final days, Mr. Rosen- 

Cost is another problem: A . . 

ticket to Woodstock I cost $18. some young people say 

Ibis time, tickets run $135. A ^ rould ra ? cr hye 

ndcetmasterpackaceinclndine cxpenaice and watch the big 
idmission and bus service from, ^owon pay-per-view T^.For 
lay, Baltimore costs $252: $49.95, the 23 million American 
Bring your own tent, bat no homes connected to that system 
•takes. Promoters fear they 811 28-plus hours of 

mild be wielded as weapons.) ^ concert — no mud, no traf- 

mSSSSS sa&SSSSlrs 


Area holds are charging $200 


and tip per night for the festival 
weekend. The press rate al the 


you, said Jim English, senior 


quitted hingdf vocaUy <«_the vnMfiM Ventures. ™ 


enogized “Before They Make 
Me Run,” but “The Worst” was 
yet to come. 


collapsing after a night of heavy enced a generation of American 
drinking in Greenwich Village, cooks, died Thursday. He was 


“Ours was not a love story 
proper,” Mrs. Thomas wrote in 
a memoir published in 1982. “It 
was more of a drink story. Pre- 
dominantly a drink story be- 
cause without the first aid of 
drink it could never have got on 
to its rocking feet.” 


49 and lived in Manhattan. Mr. 
Le Cote had a heart attack 
while working out at a health 
dob. said Eric Ripert, chef al 
Le Bemardin. 


ReinaMo Povod, 34, the au- 
thor of the plays “Cuba and His 
Teddy Bern - ” and “La Puta 
Vida Trilogy,” died Saturday. 
He lived in Brooklyn. The cause 
of death was tuberculosis, ac- 
cording to a friend. 

Rosa Ch a ceL 96, a Spanish 


At 51, hey, hey, hey, be sang it , I f, tbc oldies provid- 

quite satisfactorily, though in edtheevemng’smagndic reso- 
truth, the full house toolthe ^c, the conart set by Mark 
pressure off by shouting along *“ eJfec ^ Ive 

so loudly that Jagger could have albeit one that 


>le to pJvmmn,’ of Viewer’s Choice, the corapa- 
>letoPoiygnim Dr- ny marketing the cablecast. Mr. 

Mr. Rotem™ said he tar- 

ittation that recalls cert,” which drew 250,000 
concert because, homes, 
m fte taBUtess of “Young people ate techool- 


the 1969 concert because, 
“we’re not in the business of 
doing.ro-creafions.” 


simply mitped itT looked like a cross between a 

Other vintage standouts in- f utonstic indusfii^ playground 
eluded “Shattered,” with some “5 a of s P ld cr Worn- 


ajs? 


h racing vocals from Jagger, ^ Occasionally dwarfed 

the insmuatmely soulful “Beast set, the Stones benefited 


tion can only be offered a great 
rock and roll party. It’s not 
about politics.” 

The canceled concert was the 


Objections range from cost 
and convenience to a lurking 
suspicion that this festival is an 
effort by materialistic boomer 


of Burden. 9 


uatingly soulful “Beast oy me set, tne stones benefited one pitched at wilted flower _ * 

SFEEtodiE some outrtandmg, and of- childSTTv^ to tavuX 


Gilbert Le Coze, 49, 
Respected New York Cbef 


In addition to the restaurant 
in New York, Mr. Le Coze and 
his sister, Maguy, owned Bras- 
serie Le Coze in the Coconut 


novels and poetry, who was in 
exile during most of the Franco 


... were what seemed to start the t® 1 very clever, video support, a 

writer of complex, intellectual crowd up, from “Tumbling ^ bveHonx muac television 
novels and Doetrv. who was in " y? Programming. 


Dice” and “Satisfaction” to 
“Honky Took Women,' 1 which 


programming. 

The Stones’ revdistic sound. 


children. It was to have been 
hdd at Max Yasguris form in . 
Bethel about 60 miles from the 
Woodstock ’94 site. 

Organized by Sid Bernstein 


ora. dial Wednesday in Madrid was accompanied by an Oscars- 8 bit muddy at first, soon —the New York promoter who 


The event’s commercialism 
also drew the ire of Michael 
Wadldgh. director of the 1970 


of heart and lung failure. 
Pierre Foueeroo, 67, former 


UAMUUHiUW UJ dQ vscaiy — J M13V, 1 WUU U1K 11CW 1 ont ■promoter Who ilnmm: I imr. V . , ' 

type montage that was decided- cleared up and caught the stqv brought the Beatles toSheaSta- 


NEW YORK (NYT) — Gil- 
bert Le Coze, a French-bom 


Grove section of Miami, and president of Otis Elevator Co.’s 
they recently opened another Paris- based European and 


restaurant with the same name transcontinental operations. 


!y funnier, and ruder, than tele- pie nuances of the rhythm seo- dium and later promised the 

vision might allow. Set off by *jon,ihe boisterous bans under reunion that never happened 

drummer Charlie Watts’s cow- direction of the veteran the Bethel show billed itself as 
bell beat, the song tumbled Bobby Keys, Chuck Leavefl’s the real 25th anniversarv trib- 


in Atlanta. 


“This new one will be put on 
r the Establishment, for the 


the Bethel show bfflSftedf as # Mr. Wadleigh 

the real 25th anmyerem-Ttrih! f S5 Q&A..session 


died Sunday in New York. ’ along into edebratory exhaus- rofling piano rolls and /agger’s ute. 


anniversary trib- 


generaSy strong vocals. 


But its andience was 25 years 


with users of the Prodigy on- 
line service. “1 might as well go 
to a man.” 


“THE FRONT PAGE 1887-1992’ 


A BOOK OF GREAT FRONT PAGES FROM THE 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
REPORTING THE MAJOR EVENTS OF THE PAST CENTURY. 


Reproductions of 1 50 from pages, man) with Herald Tribune excludvc 
articles; like first-hand reports from the sinking Tlranic, the Dreyfus trial, the 
I9K1 Foiled coup in Madrid, the hurried departure of Marcos from Manila — and 
ihe Venice campanile caught in mid-ci jJlapM.- hy a Tribune phmographer! 

Follow coverage of the Rrst World War hy one of the few newspapers 
tiiat stayed in Ports and was virtually edited at the from. 

Read about people — Queen Viaoria. Lindbergh, jack the Ripper, the 
\X indaurv Khomeini, (iorhaehev — a century of news headliners and the events 

i luii surrounded them. 

Hardcover. 2” \ 5~emstlH.fi x H ins). IfiH pages, readahle-si/e text. The 
hook Ls divided into six chronological stations, each with an intnxluerion 
describing the period front historical and journalistic xiewpoints. 

THE FRONT PAGE 1887-1992 is a dtsiinaive personal or business 
gilt, t hder one — or several — today. 


ltcralo =S s£fe.enbunc 

Keium rour unk r to IntenuiHiiul Herald Tribune (Men. lambnxi Road, london SW20 Dl.W, England. 



CRIME : France Fears a Fast- Spreading Infiltration of Its South by Mobs 


Coatbned from Page 1 
Claude Salavagione, the prose- 
cutor in this southern French 
dty. "They have managed to 
infiltrate themselves into virtu- 
ally every sector of the econo- 
my.” 

Banks in Marseille, Avignon 
and Monaco reportedly have 
embraced money laundering as 
a source of lucrative profits, a 
study by the French Parliament 
baa reported. 

In the past, the relatively 
open French-Italian border 
brought southern France pizze- 
rias, petty crime and smug gling 
rackets, people here said. 

Purse snatching has been re- 


have found crushed birds on 
their doorstep or wheelmrfo 
loosened on their cars. 

“There has always been trou- 
ble from a certain initial that 
came up from Marseille, but it 
never was tike this.” said one 
politician who insisted on ano- 
nymity. *T really think. that or- 
ganized crime has such a lock 
on the region that it can never 
be defeated,” 

Some fear that the growth in 
France of a Mafia presence has 
brought political terrorism- Hie 
country was stunned when 
Yann Piat, a legislator whowon 


prominence for denouncing 
links between organized crime. 


fur mtuiv. Lu urtkr !«)■ <h J-Hl j 

llca-c ■■cikI me vnpk> •»! THE FRONT PAGE. 


NAMk 

AlXlRfitfi _ 


placed by gangland-style mur- 
ders, ana the contraband routes 
that once carried cheap ciga- 
rettes and olive oil are used now 
to transport heroin and cocaine. 

Local politicians who have 
refused to cooperate with de- 
mands for tax leniency or dis- 
pensations from zoning laws 
from the “Octopus,” as the 
French call organized crime. 


I'nccpermpi: I'KJl.49i 1 '•Svi). plu>. pu-a^a.-. 
liiAipr .ti.WJpcTii)pi: 

KvM •»! wnrki' .VI 

IIi-.im.- allim up in ilmv xM.vk.tlur ikiiu-n 


(i K VTKS — 

l*a>ninii i>h\ mtio iwl imh. I lure (turfs' in mifii ianl 
□ □ ,\mrt O IJiikt. □ mnn-aol O .vtwaiml □ Vm 

< jnl V. LUJUJ-LU-L I till J— I Expiry dale _ 


Njaunn _______ 

Omipain LH.V.M' 'n»V 


links between organized crime, 
property speculation and poli- 
tics on the Riviera, was shot to 
death in her car in February. • 
Shortly afte- her death, se- 
nior French and Italian investi- 


gators -met here to study the- 
“internationalization” of. crime 


syndicates. 

Participants said the investi- 
gators. noted the accuracy of a 
prediction by Giovanni Fal- 


cone, an Italian prosecutor who 

was killed two years ago by a 

Mafia bomb. 

He had noted that Sicilian 
and Neapolitan crime f amili es 
were pouring much of their 
drug profits into real estate, ca-_ 
' sin os and restaurants in France 
and Eastern Europe. 

- . ^ going to become 

the biggest beneficiaries of a 
free Europe,” Mr. Falcone told 
asooates at the time. “There 
witt be no frontiers for crime, 

and there should be no frontiS 

for justice,” 

_ He urged his counterparts 
ihronghott Europe to set iroran 
information network on oraa- 
mzed crime before syndicaS 
manned to spread across Eu- 
rope by recycling their money. 

At the recent Group of Seven 
summit conference in Naples, 
traders of the major industrial- 
iMd, democracies vowed to ex- 
pand efforts to fight organized 

mme after leanSg fiSTe*! 

pats that the volume of laun- 
dered dreg mon ey in Europe 


and North America had sur- 

S 1 $1 trillion in the last 
e. 

. Naples will be host to a con- 
“■reace in October, sponsored 
by the United Nations, on how 
to expand the fight a gains t or- 
ganized crime and to see how 
laws can be harmonized to com- 
bat iu growing power. 

But within Europe, some be- _ 
lieVe tiie battle baa already been 

“It'S almost impossible to 
stop the spread of organized 
arunc once these groups recycle 

criminal profits into legal actr^ 

ities,” said Liliana Ferraro, Miv* 
Falcone's successor as Italy’s 
leading Mafia fighter. “You . 
can’t fight than in courts, and 
you -can’t fight public opinion 
Among those who need jobs.” 

A- French commission found 
last year that oiganized crime 
had taken advantage of a deep 
recession to invest in casinos, 
golf courses, restaurants and 
premium real estate along the 


IS.. 


\ 






rs 


* ,> t 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1994 


Page 5 


s i - : 


■« 7- 


•• -.c ,*r .■ 


V: 


XJ 


*<; j 


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it z-.: 






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EUROPE 

PARK !HQ) Td (1146 77 53 65. 
Fa». (1)4637 7270. 

ANJ088A: Td.. 28 264. 
fax. 23 204. 

GSMANV AUS1BA6CB4RAL 
EUROPE:. Frtakkvt 


Tel 1C69J726755 
Fw 1069] 727310 


B&GUM A IUXSWOURG Brjisds. 
Id 34316.99.243-1514 
Fr34deG351 
GSSCE A CYPSU5: A*ens 
Td P0)1 6535246 
Far 054 5513. 

D& W A BK: Copnrhq j w. 

U: 31 429325 
FMAMk Hefeinlo, 

W. 64 74 1 2 
Far 612 11 12 

IMLftMfoio 
TaL 56315726. 

Fcsc 5S32D93C 

tCMHANDS: Anatbu. 

Tel -31 20684 1 OM 
foe 2120.6681274 

NORWAsr&swset 

Barom Norway. 

Te); [47155913070. 

Fcx (47)55913072 

PORTUGAL Labor. 

Td: 351 -I -457-7293 
Fax. 351-1-457 7352 

SPAMAtaM. 

Td 35C87B9 
Pw 3509257 
SMQBRAMKPuly. 

Td- (021)728 30 21 
Fbl- (021)728 3091 


EUROPE 

TURKEY u— b.: 

T6..9^i2 31 7223. 

Far ,^2:2. 247 9315 
UMTBUNGDOttlmx. 

Td C71 83i 48C2 
Too 262309 rax. 3422254 

AUDD1E EAST 

BAMAStVcr-s-s. 

Tw^Fsl 591734 

ISRAEL. To Aw. 

Tei 972-S.5SS245 
772 7-536241 
Foe 572-9.5Etoe5 

XXQAN.4v-=rzr- . 

Te. ;2443«: 

■U^rur^ 

WVAIF: Lxac". 

TaL 27T £25 4c£2 
Fax C7I Z4C 2Z54 

1SANON, SYRIA: ta-J 

Te -9H11 2" 041! 
rex l«i" -^65:3 

OMAN MaSn z Ceboas. 
Te-6C24I2 

QATAR: 3dc 

To.- 4 16535.41 r 1 7? 

Fax 412727 

IMIS ARAS OfSAlES: Steqah. 
Td!D6i35J»a 
rc» . TO(3”4353 
Tdec 0&454T3NSif 

RBPIBUCOFYEMBt 

TeL I967-11 275016/I75G19 
Foe ;9i7 !l 274167. 


AFRICA 

EGYPT: Cwo. fcyW. 

M 34 99635 
7b. 21274VIP0OUN. 

For 3444 429 

SOUTHERN AFRICA 

bryantxi 

Tec 70c 14 09 Tu 421059 
Fac 735 34 66 . 

NORTH AMBMCA 

MW YORK: 

Td (2! 2* 752-3890. Tolhw 
1803) 572-7212 Tlx 427 175 
Fr 2I2-755-B7B5 

CHICAGO: 

Td i312|201-9392 
For 312 201 9398. 

TolFree 525- 4209. 


HAMMR 

FbnoUv. HI 96816. Td. 
7359188 Fax (308)-737.| 

LOS ANGELES: 

Td. (2131850-8339 
TeJ tree (800)846.4739 
Fax. 21 3-851- 15CS 

SANFRANQ5CQ. 

T« 415-364 8329 
Foe 475362 5474 

TEXAS: Heutro 

Td rax712 49»9eCG 
TolFree 8 t«> 526-7857 

CANADA 

TORONTO: 

Td (416)833*200 
Fax 1416) 833 21 16. 


LATIN AMERICA 

LHUGUAY: buenovAiras. 

Td 322 5717 
Tlx 9900BOO1HAR. 

oat 

Td- [562)234 10?) 

Fax (562)2229442 

COSTA OCA; Sen Jbw. 

Td [506)240642 
Tlx 1050FACSA. 
far. 1530) 254652 

ECUADOR: 

TeL 328161/325248. 
1k319arAJ>2UlE> 

Fax 321 266. 

PANAMA: B Doratb. 

Td (507) 490511 
Fax. [£07)69 0580 

PBBhUno. 

Td. (5114)417852 
7or204c9GYDSA. 

Fax 416422 


ASlA/PAQnC 

HONGKONG: 

Te- (85219222- 11 68 
Hx 4U70 H1HX. 

Fax 18521 «22M 190. 

MXA: Bombcy 

Td. (91-221412 2399. 
lie 11&5171 ADLN 
Ft |91-I2)4l3739e 

NDOFESM: Jabvta Anti. 
Td .162-2 1|57C>- 3123 
TU. 65722 ICKAIA. 

Fx: [62-21)5736077. 


AgA^PAOFjC 

JAPAN Tokyo. 

Td. 3201 02 10 
Tx 133673 Fx 3201 0209 

KOREA: 

110-170 
Td. 734 12 87. 

Tdex 28504 UN-PUB. 
fax 2 73® 0054. 

MA1AY5M: P»*iq Jaya 
Td j (6031 71 7^35 6 
Fax 1603)717-5370 

F0AL Katmandu, 

Td. 221-576 
Fisc 227 336. 

Tlx. 2606. MEDREP 

PAI05TAN KanxK 
Td: 522 628 
Fx 568 3933 
Tlx. 24601 NS PK. 

MUNCSMdDMde. 

Td: 632 B92 4476 
Fax 632 B16 4876 (Draft 

SNGAPORE, BRtMEfc Srcppon. 
Td. 223 6476 
fax 224 1566. 

Tdex 28749 IHTSN. 

TAIWAN Toad. 

Td [6865767-7390 
Frix [8662) 760852. 

1HAIAND, BURMA: Bangtek 
Td 267 9164.267-9165 
Fax 267-91 66 

AUSTRALIA 

MHBOURte: 

Td- (03) 6960288 
fr.- (031 6966951. 


BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 


ShiYin* £ 

BMPQ 8 T/EXPO 8 T 

SUGAR 

' MS ARE LOOKMG for Franch and 
BaBro deagned. dathra. Expert to 
Rmia rod Africa Pleree (Wk-fA 
761-37 79 8 Q 51A. Gennraiy. • . . 

(Fade A refired . , 

remcnablr priced 

'-K: 

• MXJ0O1] 5007504MMIM 

4 - fc- • • * . -« . 

USB) inn 5011 Quito jn» 
dnect from USA biobfc nippSer. 
free 503/6268749 USA • •.' 

VMMGE OOHNSi Im\ aT 
dytal & urates. Cwdurtnr & owrdras, 

■ do Lee A Wrwcfcr, fro - (212 302- 
506, Tefc ptTTsaTm USA 
/>Uheo*r Vtotage Oadeeg Caspar/ 
of America. • 


OflOBI Frazea whale pr qaortan. 
Bast prica royvwreel 

Fax uSAr 5167597053 * 1 


v- 


\ailh 


4 ■' 


x *1 


.J*,i - 

•- 1 "*■ 


Serviced Offices 
Directory 


Attention 

LH.T.saevKB) omcb 


npabunad&a . . 
Wodoedny {/ *rh mOth 

KBFYOutcorrn * ' 
wnmtmst 


YOUR OfflCEM PARK 


...sraewa 

• My fondtond tnottan rtfaw 

oner conference ioodb io rant b f Hm 

hoar, day, merth, «*e 

• Your taekeaf or pe niM M rt bait., 

• precrige natao a»mK. Al iwwm 

91. Fg ShHeoav 75008 PAIS 

Td H) 4L71J6J6. Poe p|426&lS£ar 


YOUR MUNCH OFFICE 

dadcie addrea and u tWnfrerion. 
»Tpl 0». F« W36T 7094 


YOORORKEM 

DtiSSBJXXF 

Cro^iequfopedoffia 
dhMi 


11x39 1240 


Tefc [4-491211x39 151 
Fax I +^2)1 


nUSSaS -BEGUM 

. taw dfct B di w nii iw . 
Tefc 31-2-514 B5 54 
lta>m4MIB77 


CTWAO 

nrviets. Mainra/timfodxx, Tefc 
4- 31 JO 6847777 foe 688T37L -■ 


YOUR OTfKE IN .STOCKHOIM 

■Beganty (asNwd tdfioes.and mt- 
mg rooaw. Teiephoae ronrerofl *er-l 
« rod .jeaetarid urvicet. tat 
|+46frW5B18ccfa« +46&9«C06B 


TVANKHJRT- WH 

yff - Trjjjfrj 

uma onsM. t nnxi uisn, i* 
■ [iryiT 


Lfll 


- YOUR ADDRESS M G»tV A - 

Td ! 4ia31offiB^?4l[2231^2l'| 


YOUR ORW M LONDON, 70p pw 

Wfc'tel&MCT 


LONDON W1 USPES OMR M 

flaAta, 24 howi ocean. TeL IX M 
■ 71 9354048 fax (441 71 9357979 m 


DOSSaDORF AREA/ RUHR AREA 
JfctoBd m foe heort e4Gmw»y. 
Td +49-20179900. 


MONTMAl- CA NADA. T OW qffitt 
* rao<f dtepAf fambod & (roroadi 
. Tab 5t^3&-WB fax 5H3745C76.B 


lOfBON - ROND STIffT. Your of&a 
- - all --service. 
Td 14*711 499 9192 fiaa 499 7517 


LOWON JNAME ARCH 
Fbowa. b te W A rovrad doe 
Td 71 7M®73 or Fro 7T 724 5766 


OPPBMB JME L£D0 pieces bond 
awed color oede green priced be- 
low aowfadSSw carts. W9 bw 
10,000 edp of park with heath off. 
Frier nxnt be OF Kuaia Fro. Sen 
Shtxan. 7185489355 NYU Eng wee 
rod hang i*x bnreededely rirg agon 
torogogefax. '. 


USB) tfifB 501% SlTi & pan 
JSode 1 h % ISA^tdllO^lW 

ftee 5T 0/233-1 583 U5A. 


IMPORT ANYTNNG FROM USA on 

W dew open andL Tefc BTO) 369- 
93V, Froftotf) ZF6-1561 USt. 


FOR SA1E feW mitary hcaptd unt* 
1 uaitfor 400 pNiwti and 2 «h for 
200 patients. ILS. manufacture, 
packed fci broee. Ready far mmirirer 
delivery to ate atywriere m Ihe world 
Ccmpldt. with dl surged egupeaeri 
vaotora packed, beds, bkeuw etc- 
Dental i nti unmet . qpe«M new. 
packed in on^nd EeoMxtiy seded 
awes, fcepedkw upon requfft Com- 


Fox [34) 52 78 67 


d'Group'Ud Spain. 
16/7*y» 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


• • INVESTORS WANTH) - 
Fpr SpedaoriarNt . . 

HDCOPIBt WTIHOUT AN BtODC. 

Yfctuol docMi ooft. Three pnidyfcs 
tesHfow* soansfoly. USzes gxod 
fvd feta tdt cBcyan/wxxx. Gtergy 
Of fe frtweJ C« 3*offTfed from 
■a rod trade. Tramendoca dab»y- 
We wdccae ideas hum tanutar prin- 

wen toon can nxwe ^fwenaon tr new 
source n koeport. raw 
who you ere.. We *J not re 
. Io. broken or cu i m wd ro e 
Fax: ++41 -91 -6*8248. 


MTBMATIONAL MASKETV4G FSM 

D fl i wl in its sale corporoeoai or 
erf w d u a h vdm current, or Rw ahAfy 
to estcfcfeh strong banking rdarion- 
ships for our rapid epraon in new 
nxxkets. Conm oa ai up In S50J100 
USD per motdt with no aptal neces- 
my, ody ttonp broking osrtads. 

i2£. 


WHOfLBAU GR OUP. O u r atup roy • 
sp*oc4zod it brapa nunc 


AVARAHE CAPITAL 

Mid East rod OHere ccfdd sources 
notable for invostawta wnricMde in 
red adds, tuns starivpe or defat 
u xaufctakoru Long tarn*, bat ides 
broker foes paid and artteoed. 

ttZESZEXtL 

■ Altar Hnrorid Dep w t n ie rt 
taro {507} 63 ffbatroo). 


URBBff ANNOW A B W a di rod 
any persons and/or ofgjnmljui vfe 
hove contacted or are. eontadmn 
tatafos wtt SBARNA, SALSA 

ID contort bat 36/1, LM. 1 , rneo- 
nchro. 15. W0323 ftonkfcrt/Mdi 
Genoaty. We am o private 909 of 
mrfvxtaob who are trying la rearor 
our aroh/iaraittrainlT. ml wouta kbr 
to coroemle <mA rod oboMmbb in o 
ifcdor poatton. 


LOANS, RINDS AVAAABU fcr d 
bsroea proftm. tafa POB 6. 55/5 
AE Laytagcdefc Nadwrimk 


prodads. We at ksolung for 
morktai in Eoaeni cmd Weston tar- 
opero co ro rtes. We have peimonent 
Brick » sport *on rod eppanta. We 
are interested n deoSna wdi other 
troops ft* in. No traderv Fro Be- 
taiura -F32^541 77 33. 


WORLD CLASS MANUFAOURMO 
and Tedded Braratae in FS, NBR, & 
PtfCgtarto. Av afafc} for jort <*r*jra, 
portnemp tx MLiuKiclunnQ dBvvfip- 
Sent Aon to World Morfcete. 

Reply to P.0. 8m 8649. 

• • Cairo. OKo 44711 USA 


SWISS ENTOEFtfNEUR EXCHANGS 
The end ndusve HIT fat sol 
aider in the world highest ax*y, 
eorafart, refcroce). BoJt in 1990 bf fe 
nest prestigious Dutch shipyard 

mm n»M huuwua cinotAwng w 
S8^M Tei/Fac n) 809-3574W9 


QSIBCH owesw [the ofer red 
med + hide & father^, tat « 
Wroduen you to the premier ogre 
kwedmeN of the Wt Beds or* 

rorxK ExocflenTratem eqtected. Cd 
817/5954 909 USA (24 ho«4 Leove 
telephorw rod fat numbers. 


MARKE1MG R0RES84TAIIVE5 
AutasAirptono-Yodta 
Protected Territory - High Co 
Contort: BUST tat 
FAX. US pi 3) : 


SHffi> LEATHBL 100 JXX) ureh of 1* 

n toother, 


her, dry rod 
+ +54-1-811 



DtsnauTots/AGBm wanib. 

100* fieri no wod and orgarac cotton 
MMrv 100* AtEtaafcro mode rod 
raowa, in eronol rod navy. Bishco 
Fanron Ca Foe. 61-2356 4117 Tefc 
61-2-357 4492. 


OHSHORE BAMC wdh Ooh A Sconce. 
F 16 tserahonl or comae rid baft 
powers. Tax free venue. Inwfc*: 
■rarsfer. US 525,000 London 44 71 
394 5157. Canada 16041 942 6169. 

COMMERCIAL/ BUSINESS RNANCE 
avoid* for rov viable projects 
worldwide. Fro rod tynopst in 
Engtah to Coraorde Arira nan. 44- 
2?35l300. Oeate ft* 71 

HOME-SAFETY-PRODUCT frem 
Gerruroy, ideal 0 pramotfand too. 
Waned: oggrerovc tfcrribnors cd 
• orer Europe and beyond.- AJSCO 
GriWt Fax D - a 763469779 

“SBI. MOfET." Become a loan Bra* 
lari Free de**. Decs. IT-326, frov 
dd nano, 126 iSh St, Brooklyn, 
NY I1215USA O 7686803 (a 
200 Q4 HraJ FAX CHB 9653400 

FDR SALE E5TABU9B pWm/ 
heMing Ixbxws, eidudei BBOO i^tr. 
biASnglw Akxnoi New Mecca 
Coa £ 75 , 000 . Ccx3, Tefc 505662- 
2902/505662.5040. fro 5056623956 

WANTS USS SHREDOBB rod 
gnawkaon far electric otalo. pko 
rotated emmet DAG. Ud, PO 
Bw 573. We, 70654 braeLTri- 972 
W37S3S. Fox ■fr?443Q21R 

Sat AN INCREDIRLE coroteririf 
detector pro wWi wort erih 143 
ckffeert croenbro Tefc 9144251935. 
Fro: 914-C51443 USA 

Din SOCIETY OF HNANOaS 
Prafrsocnd rmereberdxp nervflik for 
Merer ftenen. free Atf-MoBed fcpro. 
7042S2-SW FAX 704251-5061 LBA 

TOP OrtWUWTY TOR CUJLS. non 
food, cement, food, dedan rod mow 
o*w toppte* Very dieop. Tefc + 41- 
1-»146®Fro +4M-5S934 

1BMS SPORTSWEAR, high do*, 
era* in Getmony, 2000 ptacB, 40% 
cSscourt frorn foctaiy price. Reree 
Feet +49761-27 79 ® SLA Gerraoey. 

2nd TRAYS. DOCUMENTS. Driving t 
areas. GM 2 FWiraw, Voofcorain, 
Alhem 16671. Greece. Fox 8962152 





1966 LODGE 1 SMPtEY LATTff 1SD- 

ndl bed, e x c e fcrt ihspe. J24^09 
‘ - 31*929^112 USA. 


WANTH), 

per year . Frira ... . 

SWTTZEELAM) +41 32262 32. 


10WCO torn 


FOR OFKHORE FURPOSES to to 
lecse 2 smdr boob rod 1 htOmpte*- 
Fro 662 237 0698. 

SAFE OFFSHORE BANKING. AI oc- 
caunts eeetea frera any ksofcon. Info: 
FOB 6, 5575AE U^ksgestel, ML 

BUSINESS SERVICES 

ILS. BUSMESSB A IMMIGRATION 

A fel service coopany afforiro busmes 
flcqaatai (wUmitft kjc and sangro- 
eon counseling and faraiy hourog ond 
educroan yjfcjung for At iternead 
bueres investor. 

Coatart.BtS.bic. . 

FAY: Ui. { BT3) 229-3075 ' 

NO OHSHORE COMPAHY1 Becorae a 
ttardv longegrttan 8 rofcxned. 
NaUxaSy everything fa diontaMe. The 

watdi»a«ar operates m 205 cmrtiej 
and afl bfare of SF9 are tax 0 
empted. You becon* ov«™de or 
darted milh yoie own churdc No brt 
_l Diof from trie handsel of jar tax. 
haf 852 1727 5500 code 87784 

THE ONLY GBRJ1NE FACTS 1 

Did from hrodiet of yore fax: 
6alffi2 1727 5500 ft enter cocfc 

87/83 casfxrerfo card gride order 

B7783 2nd trarel docurent & D wide 
87783 Or.? PhD? M5c» Acoedtetf 

WANT TO DO BUSINESS in the Mri- 
dte Eesf rod faro T Arrow Sermcei wft 
provide Sul fra, phone, aai reran 
ro yore beridL Inreeseng brofcmg 
services a ranged. Maw usefri nor*. 
todl Fax 97T 6 544465 to Project 
Manager (a details. 

06995 STATE BUIIDMG ADDRESS 
Trie nod istrajeried addess n LEA. 
Mai, Phone. feTTel (212) 7366072. 
Fax: (2121 564-1135. 

JAMH41A15GN ft BE SERVICE 

Caxxkro, ffaete Jroanwe, sfalfed. 
Onto based. FAX 81-75741.1056 

YOUS OFFICE M USA Ai servos. 
Afro, setup of 15 corporroons. Tefc 
305923.204. Fere 305TOO151 

CAPITAL WANTED 

CANTALNBXED 

Estobfcshed NY broker reeks tang/fen- 
tenn finanarw fa ekerts - needs 

S50K- S3M. bfcrercra on request. 

EVBtTT BAED AS50OATH MC 
Postal Drroter 329 
UwwVJw.NY 1156WJ329 

Tefc 516759j9Wfau 5167^4906 


NBI $1 MILLION for targe Ml 
'. secured, very good reton. Tet 
I. Fax (909^6-tfel USA. 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


VENTURE CAPITAL 

USS 3M rod up front Mnqpd 
Straight equity rod/ or 
uquity/deht combos for 
s fcnl wpe - roprodoo - d n u d epre ro t 

We car dso provide loan Funds on 

good from with nsmnorn eeanhy 

through private Trust 

FORWARD PROJECT OUTUNE 
NOW TO 

B4VESTMB4T SUISSE SA 

Bdvriotoone 86. ETAGE 5 
Zurich 8001 Switzer irori. 


INIBtNAUONAL LEASMG 
iMMSAAmy AVAILABLE 

FORFB4ANONG 
of purafirae ol heovy ei^apmef^, 
arcrafn, merchonr and pteaswe 
shro, irdustnc! red estate 

Broker's eoerrxiaon guororteed 

For ony B ito np o hon 

1 MiPXB. rod Cm. 


fWANOAL WSTTTUnON 
Biro^ta- bq£H^a 

fox. 32-7 534 02 r & 32^-538 47 91 
TELEX 20277 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 

FOR 

ALLBUShBS PROJECT5 
ORFCR 

IfTTBSOfCiaXT 

sam: guaranths 
oma ACCEFTASLE COLLATSAL 

Srcfcer s c onsTKBon guaranteed 

Mrostoto hLLPXB. £ Oje 
FMANOAL INSinUTlON 
■saGiUM 


bdorraom by to 32 2-534 02 77 
or 32-2 38 47 9» 

TEEX. 20277 


UNUWTH) MTBMADONAL fang 

term hvdng/taare from prmory 

legdL outanad, 

• BlL 


btiwng tftsfttuhons. 


PROJECT RNANCE 
VBmiRE CAPITAL 

* Mroton USSSOOilOO 

* No Mmdinim 

* Term Loros 

* Equity Finonce 

1 Broken Protected 
Anglo Americro Group He 

Fox +44 924 201 377 


CONFRMABIE DRAFTS 
BACKED BY CASH 

• Isioed ui Your Nome 

• Confirmed by ttap kel Banks 
to Prove Avoriobily of Forth 

■ Bocied by ftrirae hwnsion 

M CAPITAL SUPPORT COW. 

Ui (714) 757-1070 Fro 757-1270 


•* IMMEDIATE i UHJMfTffi •* 
Ccprnl cwcsfable for 
AU buanea pmertsi 
MIN Ui S2 trd_'no max. 

(717) 397 7490 (Ui FAX) 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 


RJNDMG PROTLEMS ? 

Venture Cap* 3 * - Loans 
Beal Esnne • Busmess 
Rnanang - Long Term 
Golmerol Sipyxvted Grorroces 

Brokable nuroxtoes to secure tuning 
fur nabie praterts arranged by. 

Bancor of Asa 

Coancraion eared only ixcn Fining 
Broker's Commsson Assured. 

Fax (63-21 8 10-9284 
Tel: (63-2) 810-4570 or 812-3429 


FINANCING AVAILABLE 

woRmwtw 

ALL COMMERCIAL PROJECT5 

NO FS 

NATIONAL BUSMESS 
REPORTING BUREAU 

Tefc 212-7024821 Fro. 21 2-867. 5777 


INTERNATIONAL HJMMNG 

D & B Bated Corrgany. 

30 Yens in Busmess. 

fMANONG 

• Venture Capital 

• Buanem Lom 

• New Project ftno ra Jig 

• Comnefod led Eurae 
• No Advance Fees 

G.C.C. RJPOMG GROUP 
TEL 407-3943901 USA 
FAX 407094-4568 U5A 


FACILITES AVABAB1E 

FMANOAL GUA1ANTSS 
MVSTMB4T PROGRAMS 
VBrtURE CAPITAL 

Contort- OC Ltd. Fa. +4631-137165 


DISCRETE PRIVATE BANKING^ xv 
vestmei* rod fidixiny services. For 
brochure. World Monetary Exchanoe, 
Bax S33 | Auddand. New Zealand. 13 
(6425? P57-777 far «H 9) 377 7228. 


CONFIRMED VB4TURE CAPITAL 

Cash or equvdtnfs for hnemottand 

Busxxa Prigeos. $1-5100 ML USD. 

Tel 4074839096 Fax 407488-2664 US 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


PROJECT VBflURE CAPITAL 
Avaktale From 
Ore ndfaxi Ui DoUora pfcn 
nepmeenr term Ttrae to Ten yoros. 
Irt NT. + 599W3453/43667 
Fro. I NT. + 597543449 
(ST. MAAITOfl 


30% PBt ANNUM RETURNS N 
Gem Store Muter. S5XB0 minawn 
■nvesmenr Tefc 4166097003 Canada. 


GOU) & CURRENCIES 


! BUYING GOLD: 

nan ref i ned, m ponder, 
Skan erta, f rognients . eta. 
AI guontrtes, nxAe offers 
by fist (32-2) 5 34 11 5 2 
Belgum. Telex.- 20277 


READERS ARE ADVBED 

that thm Inte r nat i onal 
Harold Tribune o rannof be 
held reapondble for Iota or 
dmnagms omened m a im- 
udt of traneaeSiom wheat* 
from adept tiiamontt 


which appear ktovr paper. 
It m t herefore reaemmead- 
ed that re ader* make al- 


tering aria roly bhtdeig 


PURCHASE ft SALE 

| ■*' | ol currencies Informaban 
by fax (32 ? S34 16 88 
Bdffunt Tefex 20277 


COMMERCIAL 
& INVESTMENT 
PROPERTIES 


OFnCES FOR SALE 


MONACO -OffiCES 
500 SOM - WME LOCATION 
Pbrt of Monaco - FF24.15IXOOO 
tndudng relcu + 6 porbngs. 

Fro (U) 92 16 70 II 


RENTALS 


poAats 

PLOT TD IET - 614 stun. 
W NDUSTBAL AKt 

BEsrorm. 

FAX: 30-1-4112335 


EXCSYTONAL POSITION, non core 
mental cento. Grand Rue. presngous 
restored btASin. 3 Roars, 3 x 60 
_soa Fro Luxentaowa 352 - 401631 



COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 


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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1994 


OPINION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Snb Utt £ The Rwanda Massacres Should Have Been Prevented 


t 


PI HI IMIHi mill THt: NKW lOKh TIMM AMI THfc H ViHIMiTm POST 


Prosperity Requires Peace 


While the world has grown much richer 
during the past generation, that hew 
wealth has distributed itself very uneven- 
ly. Incomes have risen faster in the rich 
' industrial democracies than in any region 
of the developing world except Cast Asia, 
where growth has been phenomenal. The 
poorest of the poor are stiU in South Asia, 
meaning India and its neighbors, but the 
'performance there is quite promising. In- 
come — to be precise, gross domestic 

- product per capita — has nearly doubled 

- in the past three decades, rising slightly 
faster than the worldwide average. The 

- greatest cause for concern now is in sub- 
Saharan Africa, whose people are no 

■ richer today than they were in I960. 

Sub-Saharan Africa was growing a lit- 
tle more prosperous until the late 1970s, 
but since then a steady decline has taken 
back all of those gains. These figures 
• come from the World Bank, which, as the 
largest source of development aid to poor 
countries, has been watching this process 

- with dismay. The long slide in Africa has 
taken place despite the investment of 
billions of dollars in development loans 
and, even more important, many more 
billions in oil revenues. Nigeria, one of 

■ the world’s leading oil exporters, is poor- 
er today per capita than it was before the 
revolution in oil prices began in 1973. 

A generation ago. the developing coun- 
tries of East Asia were much poorer than 


die sub-Saharan Africans. Now they are 
substantially richer, and rising fasL The 
reasons for that difference are the subject 
of much learned debate, but they seem to 
come down to four things. 

• East Asia has been at peace during 
the past generation, while Africa has 
been entangled in a succession of wars. 
Most of die world’s poorest countries, in 
Africa or anywhere else, are those in 
which there has been prolonged righting. 

• Next, East Asians have been effi- 
cient in holding down birthrates — some- 
times, as in China, resorting to cruel 
methods of doing it — and Africans have 
noL Where wealth is measured per capi- 
ta, rapid population growth explains 
some of the decline. 

• The East Asians have done an ex- 
tremely effective job of mass education, 
and now have large numbers of people 
ready to work in the advanced techno- 
logies. Africa has not. and does not. 

• Finally, there is the doctrine of 
open and competitive markets — to 
which most African governments have 
come only belatedly. 

If the gap between rich and poor is not 
to grow wider, the World Bank’s develop- 
ment loans and advice will continue to be 
essential. But there are other necessities 
as well, be ginning with good schooling 
and, above all else, peace. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


No to Invading Haiti 


If it persuades Haiti's military leaders 
to leave on their own, then Sunday’s UN 
Security Council resolution authorizing a 
U.S.-leo invasion will have done some 
good. The resolution contains no dead- 
line, and the Clinton administration has 
no plans for an immin ent military strike. 

Perhaps only the threat of force will 
convince Haiti’s top soldiers that they 
should depart- They viscerally oppose 
the social and economic changes that 
they believe President Jean- Bertrand 
Aristide would make if he returns. And 
they are reportedly profiting handsome- 
ly from the status quo. 

But the threat to use force implies a 
willingness actually to use it if the mili- 
tary leaders hold fast, and an invasion of 
Haiti In present circumstances would be 
a big mistake. Meanwhile, the adminis- 
tration’s strained interpretation of the 
UN Charter to classify the Haitian situa- 
tion as a threat to regional peace and 
security damages the United Nations’ le- 
gitimacy and invites trouble. 

The resolution, orchestrated by Wash- 
ington, envisions several countries taking 
part in any invasion, but the operation 
would remain under direct U.S. military 
and political controL Presumably, the 
■Clinton administration wfll heed its con- 
stitutional duty and seek congressional 
approval, which it may not get. But even 
a properly authorized invasion would 
•add to the long string of dubious U.S. 
military interventions in the Caribbean 
-basin during the past century, including a 
19-year occupation of Haiti itself. 

Some of these actions had nobler ends 
than others. But very few did any lasting 
.good, and each poisoned U.S. relations 
with the rest of the Western Hemisphere. 
One of the two Latin American members 
of the Security Council, Brazil, abstained 
on Sunday, while nonmembers Mexico, 

* Uruguay, Venezuela and Cuba all spoke 
- out against an invasion. The other Latin 
member, Argentina, voted “yes.” 

Even though Father Aristide implicitly 
endorsed the resolution, an invasion 
could weaken his domestic legitimacy 


while diminishing Haiti's sovereignty. 
And despite plans to quickly hand off 
peacekeeping authority to a more broad- 
ly based UN force, an invasion would 
saddle the United Stales with political 
responsibility for controlling the violent 
vendettas that might erupt once the pre- 
sent repressive structure is disarmed. 

To justify the use of UN force, Wash- 
ington recklessly stretched the bound- 
aries of what constitutes a threat to inter- 
national peace and security under 
Chapter Seven of the UN Charter. Lieu- 
tenant General Raoul C4dras’s violation 
of the pledges he made in the Governors 
Island agreements last year is legiti- 
mately an international issue. So is the 
tide of refugees and systematic violation 
of human rights. But none of these is- 
sues now rise to the threshold necessary 
to justify invasion. On many of the same 
grounds, Cuban emigres might well lob- 
by the Clinton administration to seek 
UN authorization for invading Cuba. 

Having taken its lumps trying to be a 
world police force, the United Nations 
has now fallen into the unhealthy habit of 
licensing great-power spheres of influ- 
ence. In recent weeks, the Security Coun- 
cil has commissioned France to send 
troops to Rwanda and endorsed Russia's 
“peacekeepers” in Georgia. Now the 
United States is authorized to lead an 
invasion of Haiti. Such crude power poli- 
tics damages the United Nations' stand- 
ing as an organization valuing the sover- 
eignty of all its member states. 

Licensing big-power armies was justi- 
fied in cases like the Gulf War and the 
Korean War, where the necessary level of 
force could be supplied only by major 
military powers. But it is surely not justi- 
fied in Haiti, with a 7,000-man regular 
army and a comparable number of lightly 
armed paramilitary troops. 

The Clinton administration, under at- 
tack from critics on the left and right for 
alleged timidity in deploying U.S. mili- 
tary power, now reveals a dangerously 
low threshold for using force in Haiti. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 

The Risks of Helping Rwanda By f zn ^ 


Americans should not pretend, as they 
once did in Somalia, that a humanitarian 
mission can be a feel-good, risk-free mis- 
sion. In Rwanda there will be casualties, 
there will be ugly incidents. But what is at 
stake is another test of die American will 
to take on world leadership burdens no 
other country can remotely approach. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 

Hie Asian Traveler Pays 

Travel [in Asia] will remain unneces- 
sarily expensive so long as Asian airline 
policy remains guided more by national 
ego than by economic horse sense. 

In a world economy fast moving toward 
multilateral agreements, air travel remains 
complicated by bilateral arrangements. A 
hypothetical Cathay Pacific flight from 
Manila to Hong to Seoul would require 
agreements with both Seoul and Manila: if 
Cathay were then to take the flight from 
Seoul to Los Angeles it would have to 
negotiate U.S. approval not only for the 
last leg but for the Hong Kong and Ma- 
nila portions. The upshot of ml this is a 


Byzantine array of separate agreements. 

In Asia, the Orient Airline Association 
wants to take another look at these agree- 
ments, which it says unduly favor the 
Americans. What the OAA really wants 
is to renegotiate these agreements to re- 
strict outside access to the region — with 
the hapless Asian air traveler footing the 
bill in the form of higher prices or taxes. 

This, of course, is absurd. Just as every 
country cannot expect to have its own auto 
industry, every nation cannot hope to sup- 
port a competitive airline. A 1993 Merrill 
Lynch study that compared the average 
cost per available seat-mile found that 
most Asian carriers had higher costs than 
their American counterparts. Nor can this 
be attributed to better service. Singapore 
Airlines’ service is second to none, yet its 
costs were less than most U.S. airlines’ — 
and Singapore itself operates perhaps the 
most open airport in the region. 

Adam Smith would not be surprised to 
find airlines trying to protect themselves 
at the cost of everyone else. But he might 
be startled by the number of governments 
that let them get away with it 

— Far Eastern Economic Review 
(Hong Kong). 


C OLLEGE PARK, Maryland —The 
organized massacres in Rwanda be- 
gan on April 6 . A 2,500-member United 
Nations observer force was present at the 
time, but without Chapter Seven authori- 
zation to use force. 

Chapter Seven of the UN Charter al- 
lows “such action as may be necessary” 
to respond to any “threat to the peace, 
breach of peace, or act of aggression.” 

From the moment the massacres be- 
gan — committed mostly by Hutu militia 
against the Tutsi minority and the mod- 
erate Hutu opposition — the disaster still 
unfolding in Rwanda has been a case 
study of international failure. 

Without the mandate to act under 
Chapter Seven, what is the United Na- 
tions’ purpose in Rwanda? How can the 
international community respond in the 
future to crises on this scale? 

The United Nations has authorized 
the use of force sparingly’ — in the Kore- 
an War, in the Congo, for the U.S.-led 
coalition that fought Iraq after it invaded 
Kuwait, for the U.S.-led forces in Soma- 
lia and the UN troops who replaced 
them. Force is also authorized for some 
of the missions that the United Nations 
has been assigned in the former Yugosla- 
via, although it has rarely been used. 

Such a consensus has failed to develop 
behind military intervention in Rwanda. 

After Belgium decided in mid- April to 
recall its 440 troops from the UN observ- 
er force, when 10 of its soldiers were 
killed by Hutu extremists, the remaining 
troops stayed in their barracks. 

The UN secretary-general, Butros Bu- 
tros Ghali, recommended to (he Security 
Council that the entire observer force be 
withdrawn. Such a retreat was consid- 
ered to be too great an embarrassment, 
so the Security Council voted to allow 
270 troops to remain. 

The Organization of African Unity 
criticized the UN decision to withdraw 
all but a symbolic force as “a sign of 
indifference or lack of sufficient con- 
cern” for Africans. Yet not a single Afri- 


By Milton Leitenberg 

can state sent new or additional troops to 
Rwanda, except for a Senegalese unit 
that joined the French forces. 

Scxm after the killing began, estimates 
of those massacred reached 50,000. By 
April 29, three weeks after the killing 
started, Mr. Butros Ghali reported that 
200,000 people had been killed. 

At this point, having reversed his re- 
commendation of early April to with- 
draw the peacekeeping troops, he asked 
for Security Council approval of a plan 


Until the great poteen in - 
the Security Council are 
willing to act together, 
there will continue to he 
after-the-fact hand+armging 
and emergency aid efforts. 


to send in 5,500 additional troops, still 
without the provision to use force. It was 
understood by all that it would take 
months for the troops to be raised, 
equipped and actually deployed. 

Again, Security Council members from 
African countries and other developing 
wminns favored more forceful action. But 
the United States opposed the secretary- 
general’s proposal, and no African na- 
tion volunteered troops. A resolution was 
not passed until May 17, by which time 
senior aid officials in Rwanda were quot- 
ing a figure of half a million dead. 

The major reason for U.S. opposition 
was President BID Clmtcm’s admonition 
that the United Nations had to learn 
“when to say *no.* ” The United States, 
the administration warned, would agree 
to UN-authorized troops only under cer- 
tain conditions, HmuinHii^ to know in 


advance, for example, who -would con- 
tribute the troops, where they would be 
deployed and what their roles would be. 

But another reason was cosL The Unit- 
ed States would have to bear some 30 
percent of the eventual expense for any 
new peacekeeping deployment, white al- 
ready deep in debt for bast assessments. 

On May 25, Mr. Butros Ghali an- 
nounced his failure to raise contributions 
of military forces from UN members. 
The UJ5. government had instructed its 
spokesmen not to label the deaths in 
Rwanda as genocide, since doing -so 
would have made it harder to stand aside 
and watch die slaughter continue. 

Two days later/roesdcat Clinton met 
with Mr. Butros GhaEf arid declined to 
commit any U.S. troops. • ’ 

On June 3, die leaders of 14 African 
states, stung by Mr. Batros Ghalfs remark 
that the situation was “a scandal,” offered 
to send troop contingents— at some inde- 
temnnate time, after they were armed and 
sonp lifld by Security members. 

jFot its part, the US. Defense Depart- 
ment consumed weeks in disputing with 
die United Nations tfee fevd of repay- 
ment that it should receive for supplying 
50 armored personnel carriers. In mid- 
June, the department was still demand- 
ing that the united States be reimbursed 
S15 mil H on for shipping spare parts and 
equipment to and from Rwanda. The 
vehicles did not arrive until mid-July. 

Estimates of the dead had now reached 

500,000 to 800,000. 

On July 20, with a cholera epidemic 
spreading among the 12 million refugees 
who fled into Zaire after the victory of 
the Ttits-daminalcd Rwanda Patriotic 
Front, the Clinton administration an- 
nounced that 4,000 U.S. troops would 
join the relief effort - 7 - but only for hu- 
manitarian aid, not for peacekeeping. 

Last Friday, Mr. Clinton asked Con- 
gress for $320 milli on to help the xefu- . 
gees. UN officials were faced with derid- 
ing whether it was safe to urge the 
refugees to return to Rwanda and wheth- 


er a costly repatriation effort would di- 
vert resources from the camps in Zaire, 

All of this, four months after the 
Hoops and money could have prevented 
the catastrophe in the first place. 

The history of the disaster in Rwanda 
proves the necessity for a new UN pohey 
^catastrophic deaths of civilians. The 
United Nations should adopt automatic 
thresholds of civilian casualties that 
would compel deployment of large multi- 
national forces within a matter of days. 

There are two circumstances m which 
this, should be considered a mandatory 
requirement: outright massacres 01 civil- 
ian populations, and premeditated ac- 
timiitSttead to large-scale civilian star- 
vation during war or armed conflicL 

Any deployment would have to take 
place under Chapter Seven, giving the 
troops the mandate to use deadly force 
without waiting for the approval of the 
combatants or of the government in pow- 
cilTvto sides warring fa 1 powa:or slaugh- 
tering thdr own populations wfll not sud- 
denly agree to invite in UN forces. 

The UN observer mission that was in 
Rwanda when the kflHng started should 
have been supported immediately by sub- 
stantial reinforcements from other na- 
tions. And the Security Council should 
quickly have authorized it to use force. 
Nations feared France’s motives 
could have resolved such doubts by join- 
ing the French in contingents of equal sze. 

LJntil the great powers in the Security 
Council are wihirtg to act together, and to 
absorb, comparatively small numbers of 
casualties to prevent the large-scale 
slimyftrar of innocent people, there will 
continue to be after-the-fact hand- 
wringing a nd emergency aid efforts. 
Again it will have Ixea too late for 
everything except the grief. 

The write, a senior scholar a the Center 
for IruematUmaLcnd Security Studies at the 
University of Maryland, is preparing a book 
on humanitarian intervention. He contribut- 
ed this comment to The New York Times. 


The New Challenge Is Dogged Advance Work to Prevent Chaos 


W ASHINGTON — Bosnia, Haiti, 
Rwanda — these troubling and 
unique crises in disparate regions of the 
globe share a common thread. They are 
the dark manifestations of a strategic 
threat that increasingly defines Ameri- 
ca’s foreign policy challenge. Disinte- 
grating societies and failed states with 
thdr civil conflicts and destabilizing re- 
fugee flows have emaged as the greatest 
menace to global stability. 

Containment of co mmunis m defined 
America’s national security policy for 
nearly half a century. A previous genera- 
tion of Ameri cans built new institutions, 
alliances and strategies in the wake of 
World War II to meet the demands of 
that era. Now we must forge the tools 
and policies needed to meet a threat that 
can best be summarized by the word 
“chaos.” It is a threat that demands a 
response far more complex than the zero- 
sum arithmetic of the Cold War. 

Increasingly, we are confronted by 
countries without leadership, without or- 
der, without governance itself. The pyre 
of failed states is bong fired by common 
fuels: long-simmering ethnic, religious 
and territorial disputes: proliferating 
military stockpiles built dangerously high 
during the Cold War; endemic poverty; 
rapid population growth; food insecurity; 
environmental degradation; and unstable 
and undemocratic governments. 

Pre-crisis Rwanda was the most dense- 
ly populated nation in Africa; per capita 
rood production was in decline, land was 
in dispute and political power was jeal- 
ously guarded. Extremists exploited those 
volatile conditions, precipitating the orgy 
of genocidal violence that ensued. 

The horror of Rwanda is but the latest 
of the many faces of chaos. 

The debate over this tragedy has led us 
to ask critical questions about the nature 
and speed of our response. Was it too 


By J. Brian Atwood 

The writer is administrator of the U.S. ■ 

Agency for International Development 

little, too late? Is United Nations ma- 
chinery adequate to handle disasters of 
this magnitude? Should we have sent 
peacekeepers into a civil war? 

These questions are inevitable in a de- 
mocracy, and they are important. But 
they deal with response to crisis, not with 
any efforts to prevent it If we do not 
question our collective responsibility to 
treat the causes of such social implo- 
sions, we are doomed to a future of ever 
escalating global trauma. 

Failed states and the misery they cre- 
ate are extracting an unprecedented 
price. The international community spent 
more on peacekeeping operations in 1993 
than in the previous 48 years combined. 
In that same year, investments in devel- 
opment declined by 8 percent Reversing 
this trend — and reducing the security 
risks, human suffering and economic 
losses it represents — will require a much 
greater emphasis on prevention. 

This effort is already under way. The 
Clinton administration has made crisis 
prevention a central theme of its foreign 
policy. The UN secretary-general has 
embraced the need for preventive diplo- 
macy. Our common objective is dean to 
help societies build the capacity to deal 
with the social, economic and political 
forces that threaten to tear them apart. 

The building blocks of a successful 
Cold War foreign policy were military 
alliances, nuclear deterrence, interna- 
tional organizations and a body of inter- 
national law that formed a framework 
for cooperation, dispute resolution and 
interstate relations. Geostrategic consid- 
erations dominated the policy approach, 
and relative power, measured in econom- 


ic, political and military terras; was a 
constant measure of success. 

This system and those considerations 
cannot be abandoned ov e rnig ht, nor 
should they be. But we are in a transition 
period. We are just beginning to wrestle 
with, the necessities, and the frustrations, 
of multilater al di pl omacy 

A highly dynamic and increasingly in- 
dependent set of nongovernmental vari- 
ables — information and finan cial flows, 
international citizen networks, prolifer- 
ating and accessible weapons of war. and 
milli ons of migrating people— are chal- 
lenging our analytical capacity and un- 
dermining traditional diplomacy. We are 
stfll in the process of defining the de- 
ments required to combat the new, multi- 
dimensional threats. 

. Some of tte components arc dear. We 
cannot prevent failed states with a top- 
down approach. No amount of interna- 
tional resources or organizational capaci- 
ty can serve as a substitute for budding 
stable, pluralist societies. New partner- 
ships and new tools are needed to 


■^^ERY little new money and hardly 
V any new commodities are being 
brought to bear on the Rwanda disaster. 

A favorite bureaucratic tactic is to rob 
Peter to pay Paul A claimed $40 million 
worth of UJS. food aid for Rwandans was 
diverted from such places in need as 
Mozambique, Somalia, Ethiopia and Su- 
dan. The World Food Pro gram will have 
to replace these commodities,' Tnit ship-' 
ping lanes are long and delays of many 
months are sure to follow. 

There is also the matter of the AID 
disaster assessment and response team 
taking two months to get fully operation- 
al in the region. Yet the Rwanda tragedy 
was foreseen last September, when Bu- 
rundi’s first Hutu president was assassi- 


streagthen the indigenous capacity of 
people to manage and resolve conflict 
witfim then own societies. 

Technology should be better exploited 
and shared to e mpo w er individuals and 
enhance the networking of nongovern- 
mental groups, increase food supplies, 
slow population growth and preserve 
natural re sources. Sustainable develop- 
ment that creates chains of enterprise, 
respects the environment and enlarges 
the range of freedom and opportunity 
over generations should be pursued as 
theprindple antidote to social disarray. 

finally, we need to acquire a quality 
that wc Americans are not known for 
patience: We will not transform societies 
overnight. Dramatic victories will be rare 
and setbacks common. Consensus boild- 
. ing and development require long-term 
commitments and staying power . These 
are the techniques of crisis prevention, 
and our. political system wul have to 
accommodate than, or we will fail in 
these endeavors. 

The Washington Past. 

anted, along with several members of his 
cabinet, and a massacre of 50,000 to 
100,000 people ensued. Now (he worst 
has happened. Where was AID's early 

warning system? Why dki coordinating a 

U.S. response take more than three 
mouths? Why is it so paltry? 

Tbc Office of Foreign Disaster Assis- 
tance is losing stature as America’s hu- 
manitarian lace abroad. Partly this is due 
to money (there is little available, always 
too little for Africa), politics (spheres of 
influence, aversion to foreign aid) and 
cynicism (“What, again?”). But mostly it 
involves a need to break out of bureau- 
cratic molds andjjut victims first rather 
than last in the aid equation. 

— Richard M. Walden (Los Angeles Times). 


In Sri Lanka, the Majority May Have Had Enough of Qvil War 



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C OLOMBO — For more than 
a decade, Sri Lankan politics 
has alternated between horror 
and misery. There has been war 
between die Sinhalese majority 
and the Tamil minority, terrorism 
by the state and both ethnic 
groups, pogroms, death squads, 
massacres, assassinations and 
many other abuses. 

Sri Lanka’s democratic tradi- 
tions have been flouted. Sections 
since 1982 have been marked by 
fraud, thuggety, flagrant persecu- 
tion of opposition parties and in- 
timidation of voters. 

To make matters worse, every 
important political force has long 
been locked into a position that 
discouraged any hope of change. 
The government and the Tamil 
Tiger guerrillas have stubbornly 
bled each other to a standstill in an 
unwinnable war. Leaders of the 
governing United National Party 
have taken an extreme anti-Tamil 
line, believing thdr Sinhal ese con- 
stituents to be such committed 
chauvinists that they would always 
prefer war to accommodation. 

For a long time, there were few 
signs to the contrary from the 
majority community. Politicians 
of the ruling party have diverted 
government resources into their 
own pockets and developed gangs 
of toughs who commandeer prop- 
erty and bully opponents. Oppo- 
sition parties have been frag- 
mented and ineffectual There 
seemed no way out of this situa- 
tion — until recently. 

In March, the governing party 
faced an alliance of opposition 
parties in a regional council elec- 
tion in the Southern Province. 
The opposition was led by Chan- 
drika Kumaranatunga. who was 
representing her ailing mother, 
former Prime Minister Sirimavo 


By James Manor 


Bandaranailcc. Mrs. Kumarana- 
tunga ran as the representative of 
a new generation of politicians, 
eager to overturn the corrupt, 
brutish ways of the ruling party. 

She appealed to the war-weari- 
ness of Sinhalese voters and ar- 
gued that compromises with the 
Tamil minority and an end to 
armed conflict were essentiaL She 
was opposed by an aging presi- 
dent who dung to the time-hon- 
ored tactic of Tamil- h ashing 

To the astonishment of many, 
the opposition won handily. 

Its success needs to be kept in 
perspective. The Southern Pro- 
vince harbors special grievances 
against the government It was 
there in the late 1980s that securi- 
ty forces and death squads were 
most flagrantly indiscr iminat e in 
their slaughter of young people 
suspected, often wrongly, of fa- 
voring the anti-government insur- 
rection. Nonetheless, Mrs. Ku- 
maranaUmga’s victory suggests 
that Sinhalese extremism, which 
the government has long used to 
maintain popularity, may have 
lost its appeaL 

President D. B. Wijetunga, who 
could wield immense power in Sri 
L a nk a’s French-style political sys- 
tem, has responded by calling a 
parliamentaty election for Aug. 
16, six months ahead of schedule. 
Many observers believe that if 
this election is fair, the opposition 
alliance, which Mrs. Kumarana- 
tunga continues to lead while her 
mother recovers from surgery, 
could gain a majority. 

Resentment at the govern- 
ment’s sony record is compound- 
ed by depressed prices for tea 
and food crops. This has created 
widespread anger among small 


the powers of the presidency may 
ease things 

farmers, a sizable group of voters. Opposition activists, who have 

The desperation of the govern- taken a frightful pounding from 
ing party and its willingness to the governing party for 17 years, 
engage in chicanery should not be will want retribution. The last 
underestimated. But there are time a government chang ed in 
good reasons to think that the 1977, the victors took savage re- 
election may be largely fair. venge. Mrs. Baxtdaranaike was 
President Wijetunga appears to hounded through the courts and 
lack the organizational skin to stripped of her civil rights. Re- 
coordinate an effective operation stnrint this time will be hard, 
to intimidate opposition parties Negotiating a durable peace 
and voters, or to ng the result His with the obdurate Tamil Tigers is 
predecessor, Ranasinghe Prana- likely to be even more difficult 
dasa, assassinated in May 1993, The day will come when major 
was a master at this game, but he concessions to Hindu Tamils 
chose Mr. Wijetunga as his No. 2 have to be sold to the Sinhai^, 
because he was too ineffectual to 

become a threat 

The security forces, and most ™ ATTP m ri7C , 

crucially Lbe police, seem unwill- "UK rAGES; 100, 

ing to permit the ruling party to " — 

use strong-arm tactics this time. lofw. t n , , 

Opposition parties have assured AssassmmDock 

than that they will not be victim- PARIS — Santo Jeronimo Ca- 
rced after u» election for therms- serio, the assassin of M. Carnot 
deeds of the old regime. Such president of the French Republic! 

promises in the recent Southern appeared in the dock yesterdav 
Province pbQ secured die neutral- [Aug. 2] at Lyons, to answer far 

ity of the police. his crime. When all had taka, 

Finally, the election commisr their places the president beean 
sioner who oversees the process the examination of the prisoner 
has a reputation as an effective, who replied without any of that 
responsible civil servant He has bravado which has distinguished 
assembled an international team other notorious Anarchists, 
of observers that includes people 

who wfll not be easily hood- 1919: Stockings Stfll 

winked. This is an important ■■ . ° 

change from the last election. . NEW YORK — The first young 
Even if the election this month woman to avail herself of the op- 
is fair and the opposition prevails, poitymty to walk stockingless 
uncertainties will remain. The a 11 / the fashionable New 

strong executive presidency and York hold dining-rooms made 
P arliament will be controlled by “W way to. a table in the Plaza, 

rival parties, at least until a presi- crossed her knees in true Parisian 

dential election in November. aD & ordered a sandwich. A 

This could prove dangerous, al- as blasfc as she, 

though the apparent willingn ess walked to her table and whis- 
of both major parties to reduce - P®ed something to her. “What!” 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894s Assassin in Dock she said “it’s berng done, sir!” 

PARIS - Santo Jeronimo Ca- ^ **? 

serio, the assassin of M. Carnot, ***** ^ B Hotel 

1944: U.S. Hit General 

[Aug. 2] at Lyons, to answer for SUPREME HEADQUARTERS 
hisenme. When all had taken £Ified Expeditions™ Force — 
therplaccs the president began grom our New York edition:] 
the exanunation of the prisoner. The death in Normandy on July 

E5? r S h ^?^ 0ul J - an - y <* 25 of Lieutenant General Lesley 

bravado which has distinguished J. McNair farmor 


me taamamaon ot me prisoner, 
who replied -without any of that 
bravado which has distinguished 
other notorious Anarchists. 

1919: Stockings StiH 

NEW YORK — The first young 
woman to avail herself of tne nn_ 


York hotel dining-rooms made 
her wzty lo a table in the p laza, 

crossed her knees in true Parisian 

style and ordered a sandwich. A 
waiter, quite as bias* as she. 
walked to her table and whis- 
pered something to her. “What'" 


J. McNair, former commander erf 
United States Army ground 
f orces , was caused by a bomfe 
topped by an American plane iff 
tne jmnpmgKjff attack at Sl L 6 , 
headquarters revealed 
™y [Aug. 2]. It was announced 
atfir st that General McNair had 
been killed by enemy action. The 
rumor soon spread, however. 

• kiLS* 0,6 vtet™ 

shorr bombing by American 
planes. Knowledge of this was 
^gorously denied by air press 
representatives and continued to 
oe denied tonight. 


majority. When it does, their be- 
lief that Buddha charged them 
with the task of maintaining the 
island as a sacred redoubt for the 
faith may impede reconciliation. 

Sri Lanka's troubles are not 
over. But for the first tim e in 
more than a decade there is hope 
that tire island may return to its 
democratic traditions and that 
terror, hate and war will no longer 
do min a t e its politics. 

The writer, director of the Insti- 
tute of Commonwealth Studies at 
the University of London, contri- 
buted this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 



- -< -"*-■*«, • V 

— «S;j. 


tf.jrri-?-.- 






n^ZTiisc 


1 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1994 


Page 7 




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Civil ? 


OPINION 


Rwanda cis Seen From the Moon 


o * 


JERUSALEM — These have 
** been momentous days. A man- 
tnade tidal wave o£ un yp^taM f f&. 

rooty is engulfing millions fa Afrfcfi. 

Aloog the Ionian River, meanwhile, 
pe^ belk ring^ Yei in Bw»«k Aires 
and London, vidous explosions,' set 
o« by enermes of peace, leave us 
stunned. Am^ all tius, we have been 
odebranng man’s first landing on 
the moon, 25 years ago, with a fin- 
gering sense of awe. 

The immensity of the Rwandan 
catastrophe registered slowly in the 
■world’s capitals. 1 Governments ’ 
were still nursing wounds suffered 
in earlier attempts to provide suc- 
cor or bring peace. Caught off 
guard by the extraordinary dimen- 
sions of m assacre and pestilence, 
they moved hesitantly. In the face 
of a savage tribal rampage, other - 
African countries offered littlecan- 
crete assistance to their Rwandan : 
brothers. The United Nations re- 
stricted itself to the role of a com- 
miserating bystander. 

The raief operation bcigan to 
gather serious momentum only af- 
ter President Bill Clinton gave the 
signal for a massive effort. 

But fry then, hundreds of thou- 
sands of people had perished, and 
others, survivors of the. monstrous 
k i ll i n g s , sat scattered and scarred on 
the barren volcanic ground, suc- 
cumbing, hollow-eyed and resigned, 
without food, water, shelter or medi- 
cine, to epidemic and exhaustion. 

Neva 1 had the world witnessed 
such infernal scenes as television 
brought us from Rwanda. Never 
had the ordinary citizen seen such 
overpowering pictures of fear, 
pain, disease ana death on so horri- 
fying a scale. 

How could this carnage be toler- 
ated? Why didn’t the powers antici- 
pate the terrible result of the war? 
Could the Organizationof African 
Unity not have rushed an interven- 
tion force to the scene? The slaugh- 
ter, after all, was not perpetrated 
behind an impenetrable vdL 

Another tragedy of cataclysmic 
dimensi ons occurred in Europe, of 
course, when mflfioiis of Jews were 
incinerated in the ovens of Nazi 
death camps. Tins, too, was met 
with international lethargy. But the 
excuse then was that the Allies were 
fi ghting the Nazi monster, and little 


By Gideon Rafael 

was known of the “Final Solution,” 
The East-West rivalry left African 


importance. It induced them to ma- 
neuver between the superpowers 
while neglecting to put then own 

- houses in order, Habitually they dis- 
missed foreign criticism as racial- 
ism. This led foreign states to adopt 
an attitude of benign negflect. - - 

Now is not the time for mutual 
recrimination; however, for wring- 
ing .of. hands and pious exhorta- 
tions. The disaster that is Rwanda 
is the direst of human emergencies. 
Several steps are urgently needed: 

• Let the United Nations pro- 
claim global mobilization for a War 
farUfc. Relevant UN special agen- 
. ries, including the World Health Or- 
ganization, the Food and Agricul- 

- ture Organization, Unicef and the 
Office of Disaster Relief, as well as 
voluntary organizations, must be 
called on for total invotamem. 

, • m and abandoned children, ly- 
ing stricken on the ground or wan- 
dering aimlessly in search of lost 
relatives, urgently need to be moved 
.from their contaminated surround- 
ings to shelters elsewhere, Unicef 
and the International Committee of 
the Red Cross should be authorized, 
financed and equipped to move the 
children to countries ready to re- 
ceive them. The organizations 
should establish reception camps, 
homes »nd orphanages, by 
the governments of host countries. 

. A special Save the Children of 
Rwanda Fund should be launched. 

• Humanitarian compassion 
most be backed by effective militaxy 
measures to maintain peace and se- 
curity. One lesson of Rwanda is that 
the international community needs 
a standby rapid relief force com- 
posed of specially trained and 
equipped units from participating 
countries. It should have easy access 
to relief supplies and be able to 
move quickly, to a crisis zone. 

Such aforce does not yet exist, so 
African peacekeepers 'should be 
rushed to Rwanda. Non-African 
forces are needed, too, following the 
French and American example. 
Refugees will return to. Rwanda 
only when assured by the presence 


of credible international protection. 

•The Cold War yeah demon- 
strated that a clearly drawn strategic 
trip wire does deter potential aggres- 
sors. The world community must 
draw a line against excesses of inhu- 
manity that would nigger a power- 
ful international reaction. Human- 
ity has as much right to collective 
sdf -defense as do individual states. 

While a cloud of depravity and 
destitution hovers over the heart of 
Africa, a new dawn begins to 
brighten the Middle Eastern sky. 

The Israel-Jordan agreement 
signed on the White House lawn 
extends the prospective area of 
peace in the Middle East from the 
upper reaches of the Nile to the 
frontiers of Iraq. It is a major step 
toward the final settlement of the 
Arab-Isradi conflict. A beacon of 
light to the peoples on both sides of 
the Jordan River, it testifies to the 
depth of American commitment to 
the destinies of the region. 

To complete the structure of 
peace, a sustained effort will be 
needed. All sides must be prepared 
for mutual accommodation, helped 
by active American involvement. 
The fair implementation of the Is- 
raeli-Palestiman leg of the peace will 
shore up the recent Washington 
agreement Accelerated progress on 
the Syrian-Isradi track will bring a 
c o mpr e h ensive Arab-Isradi peace 
nearer stilL 

The region, however, remains one 
of the workTs most dangerous storm 
centers. Sudden gusts have blown 
away many promising blueprints, 
and their designers. Pledges m this 
region are not known for their dura- 
bility. Rewards for their observance 
must be attractive, but they must 
not be premature. 

Relations between the Hashem- 
ite kingdom of Jordan and the 
leadership of Israel had long been a 
surreptitious romance, progressing 

S r ins tallm ents. For years King 
ossein tested the waters but hesi- 
tated to take the final plunge- But 
in Washington he did so splendid- 
ly, in the presence of President 
Clinton, Prune Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin and Foreign Minister Shi- 
mon Peres of Israd, and a distin- 
guished anriieocft. 

The present darkness in the heart 
of Africa and the new dawn in the 



<9 W 


Middle East coincide with the com- 
memoration of man's first landing 
on the moon: It was, indeed, a giant 
step in the history of human audac- 
ity, an unsurpassed achievement of 
scientific prowess, governmental re- 
solve and dedicated wor kmanshi p. 

It revealed to the moon's daring 
discoverers the barrenness of outer 
space and the earth’s position as a 
speck in an infini te universe. 

It brought nearer the realization 
of mankind's age-old dream to 
reach to the stars. But the view 
from the moon also offered a new 
perspective of our planet, more 
than two-thirds of its surface cov- 
ered with water and uninhabitable 
deserts, its population compressed 
in the remainder. 

This sight, televised to earth, 
created a new sense of proportion. 
It is quite different from the per- 
spective we have on earth, where a 
small hand held before man’s eyes 


conceals the highest mountain. 

The moon landing, the horror of 
Rwanda and the new dawn in the 
Middle East have something in 
common: the capacity of humanity 
to rise to incredible heights by mus- 
tering its willpower, ingenuity and 
resources, and to descend to abys- 
mal depths of depraved inhuman- 
ity when losing its moral bearings. 

Humankind, in the throes of 
distress and disarray, must take a 
giant step on earth to lift its inhab- 
itants from the scourges of strife, 
anguish and misery. Rwanda is a 
warning signal, the Middle East a 
signpost of hope and the men on 
the moon proud testimony that 
the impossible can be done. 

The writer is a former director gen- 
eral of the Israeli Foreign Ministry 
and ambassador to the United Na- 
tions. He contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


Electric Cars Cut Through 
The Big-Oil Smokescreen 

By Noel Perrin 


T HETFORD CENTER, Ver- 
mont — In 1998. the slate of 
New York is to join California, 
Maine and Massachusetts in requir- 
ing automakers to begin selling elec- 
tric cars. Not many — just 2 percent 
of the cars a manufacturer sells in 
the slate that year. But that is still 
loo many for the oil companies, 
which don’t want to lose any pan of 
iheir gasoline market. 

In their campaign to prevent the 
New York regulations from going 

MEANWHILE "" 

into effect, these companies have 
been r unning scare ads. The ads fo- 
cus on money. They could hardly 
focus on quality, because the quality 
of modem dectric cars is too high. 

Earlier this year, when the maga- 
zine Popular Science test-drove a 
General Motors Impact, a proto- 
type, it reported that the vehicle was 
“not so much a surprisingly good 
electric car, but possibly the best- 
handling and best-performing small 
car that GM has ever turned out." 

A Mobil advertisement I saw in 
June quoted a study asserting that 
electric cars could cost at least 
510,000 more to manufacture than 
comparable gas-powered cars, and 
maybe as much as S27,000 more. 

Who could pay thaL much? Al- 
most no one. 

Therefore, the ad maintained, the 
auto companies will artificially re- 
duce electric-car prices to the level 
of gasoline-powered cars — and lose 
money on every one. They will then 
recoup iheir losses by raising prices 
on all other cars. 

The Mobil ad predicted that if the 
new regulations go into effect, ev- 
eryone in New York buying a gaso- 
line car in 1998 could get zapped an 
extra $600: 49 buyers of convention- 
al cars all banding over $600 to 
subsidize one environmental maniac 
who wants an electric car. 

The math is a little funny here. 
When I multiply $600 by 49 people, 
I get $29,400. 1 thought the maxi- 
mum difference was $27,000, and 
the more probable difference 
around $10,000. If it’s $10,000, the 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Invading Haiti Won’t Help 

As thefonnerU-S. ambassadorto 
the European headquarters of the 
United Nations and an internation- 
al human rights activist for 30 years, 

I fail to understand the American- 
led push for outside nnEtary inter- 
vention in Haiti. .. ; . ' 

There are many human 
tragedies worldwide which, in 
magnitude and severity, exceed the. 
dire circumstances in Haiti. The 
United States has recently extended 
its hand to many oppressors: Viet- 
nam, Chi-ia (on trade), North Korea. 
— the list is long. Certainly ! t would 
never rid: the lives cf American sol- 
diers to redress human rights viola- 
tions even in such criticafareas. 

Some argue that the United Stales 
did so recently in Grenada and Pan- 
ama. But in Grenada, a super- 
bomber airfield was under construc- 
tion with Soviet help. In P an a ma , 
protection of the Canal is a contiini-' 
ing and vital interest. . 

True, Woodrow Wilson, one of 
America’s most idealistic presidents, 


sent the marines to Haiti m 1915, 
and they remained there until 1934. 
But they were dispatched in the 
midst of German mititaiy victories 
in Europe and at a time when the 
Kaiser was displaying interest in 
the Western Hemisphere* 
TheEhcydopedia Britannica altri-^ 
.botes the Haitian invasion to dreum- 
stances within that country winch 
were “an invitation to European in- 
tervention*’ in breach of the Monroe 
Doctrine. In particular, “the U.S. 
government suspected Germany, es- 
pecially, erf a desire to build up its 
influence in Haiti, possibly with a 
view to acquiring Mffle Saint-Nkolas 
(a port] . : . which several other for- 
eign powos coveted as a strategic 
position of great importance.” 

Nor is there any reason to invade 
to stem the flow erf refugees (no one 
would think erf doing the same to 
Mexico or China). * 

So there is so reason to invade 
Haiti, other by American action 
alone or under a UN disguise. 

MORRIS B. ABRAM. 

Geneva. 


Hie Voices of Taiwan 

Reading the New York Times edi- 
torial “Taiwan Deserves Respect" 
( Opinion, July IS), was both exciting 
and hunriHating for me and un- 
doubtedly for many other Taiwan- 
ese reading in the United Stales. 

It was exciting to see respected 
publications like The New York 
limes and the International Herald 
Tribune openly acknowledge the 
plight of Taiwan’s diplomatic isola- 
tion and boldly call for Taiwan’s 
representation in regional as well as 
international organizations. It was 
humiliating because my land — a 
nation of 21 million peace-loving 
people, with a democratically elect- 
ed government and the 20th largest 
economy in the world — remains an 
outcast of thejglobal community. 

Although China’s “bellicose op- 
position” to Taiwan’s representa- 
tion in international organizations 
may be an obstacle for Taiwan in 
achieving international recogni- 
tion, the main obstacle is the inabil- 
ity of the ruling Nationalist govern- 


ment of Taiwan to face reality. The 
myth of “one China” continues to 
haunt the people of Taiwan. Until 
Taiwan's government goes beyond 
denigrating itself as a “separate po- 
litical entity” from China and seeks 
international recognition as. an in- 
dependent sovereign nation apart 
from China, the voices of Taiwan’s 
people will never be heard in an 
international forum. 

The Clinton administration has 
kowtowed one too many times to 
the Communist Chinese — from 
disregarding human rights and ex- 
tending China's most-favored-na- 
tion trade status, to bowing to Beij- 
ing’s pressure by not allowing the 
democratically elected president of 
Taiwan to stay overnight on Ameri- 
can sod. If the administration con- 
tinues to bend to China’s threats 
and pressure, ii will one day find 
itself without influence in Asian- 
Pacific affairs. The administration 
must regain its moral imperative, 
leadership and respecL A step in 
the right direction would be to 
stand up and lead the fight for 


representation of Taiwan in the 
international community. 

EDGARS. LIN. 

Washington. 

Doing Business in Russia 

Regarding “Russia: Not for the 
Timia (Business/ Finance, June 21): 

Rather than experiencing a mon- 
ey supply that “pours in” from the 
West, Russian companies are forced 
to borrow money from domestic 
sources at interest rates of around 40 
percent a year (correcting for infla- 
tion). This results from the domestic 
banking industry’s focus on non- 
credit services, but more important- 
ly, it seriously weakens the position 
of Russian firms when they form 
partnerships and make purchases. 
The staggering cost of credit renders 
them uncompetitive. 

I am a legal adviser for a Russian- 
American law firm with a large Rus- 
sian client in SL Petersburg. This 
dient, despite a good credit record 
and impressive sales figures and prof- 


it mar gins, is forced to spend the bulk 
of its lime pursuing creative acquisi- 
tions and buying property to estab- 
lish collateral — a waste of energy. 

HOLDEN STEEN. 

Sl Petersburg, 

Offended by an Honor 

Regarding the headline in your 
July 29 issue, “Pope Offends Jews 
by Granting Waldheim a Knight- 
hood”: Surely it is not only Jews 
who are offended. 

r. J. McCarthy. 

Paris. 

Candor and Confidence 

Anthony Lewis's “Wrong, and 
They Don’t Apologize" (Opinion, 
July 19) is most commendable. It 
would indeed help enhance reader 
confidence, somewhat fragile in this 
period of uncertainty, if the regular 
press were absolutely candid about 
its occasional errors. 

MONTAGUE MARCH. 

Geneva. 


zap per buyer of gasoline cars drops 
to S204. But never mind the math. 
The whole premise is absurd. 

Take ray dectric Audi, my beauti- 
ful, steel-gray commuter car. Last 
year I paid 510,250 for in I can 
and do drive to work in iu ripping 
down the interstate at 60 miles (95 
kilometers) an hour. 

True, I can't drive very far — 
about 45 miles before recharging 
overnight. But that gives me enough 
power for short trips around town, 
and the cost of recharging is negligi- 
ble. No one has given me a subsidy. 

Granted, mine is an old Audi, built 
in 1983 and converted io electric in 
1992 — not by me. But it is unlikely 
that 1 could find a 1 983 gasoline Audi 
in perfect order for $ 250. 

Or lake the current stock in trade 
of Green Motorworks. an electric 
car dealer in southern California. 
Its cars start at $9,995. 

But Mobil isn't talking about used 
decide cars or about converted gaso- 
line cars like my Audi, or like the 
Electric Leopard at Green Motor- 
works. It is talking about new dectric 
cars, built from scratch in 1998. It is 
claiming (hat they will cost from 
$ 1 0,000 to $27,000 more than compa- 
rable cars with combustion engines. 

Can this really be true for a car 
that is simpler in design? One that 
does not yet enjoy the economic 
advantages of mass production but 
will well before 1998? 

Compare a gasoline engine and an 
electric motor sometime and see 
which has more moving parts. Con- 
sider which vehicle needs a catalytic 
convener on the tailpipe — and 
which one needs a tailpipe at all, or a 
muffler, or a fan belt, or antifreeze, 
or motor oil. 

Oh. I admit the oil companies are 
getting some support from Detroit. 

There is a man at Ford, and a very 
high-r anking one, who says that a 
decent electric car would cost 
$100,000 to build. Chrysler is selling 
a few dectric vans right now. The 
price: $100,000 each. Scary. 

But Detroit is not the only place 
where cars are built. There is 
France, for example. 

Both Renault and Peugeot Ci- 
troen will begin production of dec- 
tric cars next year. Peugeot Citroen 
plans an initial ran of 10,000 cars. 

Now listen to Jean- Yves Helmer, 
the head of Peugeot's car division. 

“The production cost of an elec- 
tric car is lower than a standard 
car," be said in an interview in Auto- 
motive News this spring. 

Mr. Helmer expects to be selling 
dectric Peugeots and Ciirofins in 
France next year for $10,700. He 
thinks he could price them the same 
in the United States. What about the 
scare-figures thrown around by Mo- 
bil and Ford and Chrysler? 

“Their cost estimates seem to be 
highly inflated," be says politdy. 

And an electric Peugeot at 
$10,700 is still not going to be the 
cheapest electric vehicle in the 
world. A company in Taiwan ex- 
pects to be making and selling an 
dectric car for just under 55,000 (1 
admit it is a small vehicle — about 
the size of a golf can.) 

So whom to believe? The oil com- 
panies with their dark predictions? 
Or Mr. Helmer, who will be selling 
inexpensive dectric cars next year? 

The writer teaches environmental 
studies at Dartmouth College. He 
contributed this comment to The 
New York Times. 


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Wednesday, August 3. 1994 
rage S 


STAGE /ENTERTAINMENT 


‘Lady From the Sea’: 
A Lack of Grandeur 


ysk&i I#*®-;: - ■ ? •• ? • v fjM 


\ ; •’ ‘-V-’ ' l 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — “The Lady From the 
Sea” has always been the uneasi- 
est of Ibsen: none of the feral 
power of “Ghosts,” no epic like 
“Peer Gym,” no stunning central figure 
like “Brand” or “Enemy of the People.* no 
clenching drama like “Ghosts” or “A 


Doll’s House.” Just an unhappily married 
xide whether i 


second wife trying to decide whether or not 
to run off to sea with a mysterious sailor, 
and agreeing finally not to do so only when 
she is told that she may. 

Feminism is here, of course, and the 
power of the sea, and the sexual impera- 
tive, but all in such dramatically formless 
shape that neither Lindsay Posner’s 
drowsy production not Josette Simon’s 


BRITISH THEATER 


powerful but wildly miscast central perfor- 
mance ran kick this show to life on the 


stage of die Lyric Hammersmith, from the 
West Yorkshire Playhouse, where a mis- 
conceived staging first was seen. 

By all accounts, Eleanora Duse made 
this one work around the turn of the centu- 
ry, and Vanessa Redgrave once managed 
it, but “Lady From the Sea” requires a 
kind of rnflnic grandeur, with EHida Wan- 
gel as a female Captain Aiiab forever hop- 
ing to see there maybe something unob- 
tainable on land. The more you try to 
make the play make sense, the less it does. 
You have to go with the flow, unlike this 
production which fatally tries to root itself 
m some kind of 1880s Norwegian reality, 
only to find a lot of symbols where the 
characters should be standing. 

Not since Tommy Steele first opened 
“Half a Sixpence” (more than 30 years 
here) has there been a more engaging, 
energetic star debut in a London musical 
than that of Peter Duncan in “Tbe Card” 
at the Open Air in Regent 1 s Park. This, too, 
derives from a best-seller of the 1920s, by 
Arnold Bennett rather than H. G. Wells, 
and this, too, had been around a bit. “The 
Card” as a movie confirmed the reputation 
of Alec Guinness in 1949, and the musical 
made stars of Jim Dale, Mfllicent Martin 
and Marti Webb in 1973. 

What it didn't make then was much at 


the box office, but its loving and unde- 
terred producer Cameron Mackintosh has 
now commissioned (from Anthony Drewe) 
a new set of lyrics, and for the Park, Ian 
Talbot has given it a lively new production 
that emphasizes the show’s origins and 
brings back a great Tony Haich/Water- 
house & Hall celebration. 

Like “Cinderella” and “My Fair Lady” 
and all the best fairy tales, “The Card” is 
about someone going to a ball, in this case 
Demy Machin, the local boy made good 
who is the card of the title, a likely lad for 
whom no moneymaking scheme can ever be 
resisted. Set in the Five Towns of the Potter- 
ies, on a set literally made of broken pottery, 
“The Card” has always had a plot that 
lurched along, with muai of it taking place 
on board ship as the finale is about to begin. 

The second half of the score is almost 
entirely reprises, and elsewhere almost 
nothing happens, very slowly. Yet, in first- 
half showstopper after showstopper, “The 
Card” establishes its Hiring, lyrical charm. 
Not only the starry Duncan but Jessica 
Martin and Jenna Russell as his girlfriends, 
and Hayley Mills as the softly spoken 
countess who comes to tds financial rescue, 
are wonderfully in tune with a period piece 
that stunningly reasserts the supremacy of 
the small-scale, book-based musical 

Nofil Coward and Cole Porter were both 
born toward the end of the last century, 
eight years and several worlds apart. Both 
were gay and looked for most of their lives 
like very wefl-preserved old Chinese char- 
acter actors. Both wrote the words and the 
music. Both wrote of London and Paris 
and New York, and of formidable dowa- 
gers. Both were largely self-taught about 
everything, music included, and what set 
them apart from their contemporaries was 
a Sondhrimesque belief that the lyrics 
rather than the music should come first. In 
photographs they wore looks of clenched 
amazement, and they were ageless because 
those who hug life to them, though they 




FfmM ftror 

After its production of the “Ring, ” the Wagner festival presented “Der Fliegende Hollander ’'with Bemd Weikl and Sabine Haas Tuesday. 


In Bayreuth, an Uneven and Unusual ‘Ring’ 




By Edward Rothstein 

New York Tuna Service 


grow older, never grow old. They were the 
or western worlds. 


playboys of their 

But then there was the pain. Listen hard 
to their lyrics, look below the apparently 
jokey top key of their songs, and you wifi 
hear another voice, that of the emotional 
outsider who could never quite find love. 

Coward and Potter are currently being 
celebrated at Chichester in a cabaret-con- 
cert called “Let’s Do IL” 



B AYREUTH, Germany — What a 
peculiar production of Wagner's 
“Ring des Niebelungen” this has 
been at Bayreuth. It wasn’t until 
“GoUerd&mmerungj was performed on 
Sunday night that the director, Alfred 
Kirchner, and the designer, billed only as 
Rosalie, gave the slightest inkling that they 
had any knowledge of how to design a 
coherent evening of opera. This was tbe 
only work in the tetralogy that had a focus 
and style, and the only one that worked 
without swerving into gimmickry and mis- 
cellany. 

And it did so not by bong avant-garde 
but by finally settling on one of the inter- 
mittent virtues of tlx; production so fan 
using an abstract, simple set — a domed 
floor and black background — against 
which the characters play out their fates. 
The one innovation was having Hagen 
( menacing ly sung by Eric Halfvarson) be- 
come a passive lump of a man as his dream 
image of A1 bench spurred him to villainy. 
Otherwise convention ruled, starkly and 
strikingly executed. 

Moreover, this worked despite the fact 


that most of the singing was not particular- 
ly rfistingirigheri, Wolfgang S chmi dt al- 
most turned Siegfried into a character 
part, bat moved more naturally on the 
•rtapi» rhan his voice did on the musical 
staff, and Deborah Polaskfs BrQnnhflde, 
with some strong moments, suffered from 
the same weaknesses she has displayed 
throughout this cyde: an unsteady top, 
edgy tone and broken ph rasing . Falk 
Struckmann’s Gunther and Anna Linden's 
Gutrune were merely average. The veteran 
Hanna Schwarz was more impressive as 
Waltraute, suffering some intonation 
problems but proving to be a supple inter- 
preter and fierce proponent of the gods’ 
needs. James Levine’s conducting was the 
most cogent and focused of the entire 
cyde. 


If in succeeding years the directorial 
team refines this production, as is the usual 
practice here at the Festspielhaus, they 
akc Ink ; 


ive two choices: to make this a nihilistic 
comic “Ring” by expanding the approach 
they used in “Das Rhemgold.” or to try for 
a well -designed traditional “Ring” by 
stripping away gratuitous sets and gestures 
from the first three works and basing the 
production on the ideas in “GotterdSm- 
merung.” This is not a casual choice: 

Indeed. Bayreuth itself may be at a point 


of transition. For despite the important 
insights in Patrice Cretan's 1976 “Ring” 
production (which started a mho-tradition 
at Bayreuth), experimental productions 
may now have run their course; it is all too 
easy to predict the attitudes and interpre- 
tations of the “RiogT that are considered 
“advanced.” Casting alone will not hdp 
Bayreuth retain imposition as the leader of 
the Wagnerian Universe; only truly origi- 
nal interpretations ' can. And original no 
Imager necessarily means avant-garde. 

There were times in the past week when, 
despite the longueurs of - some perfor- 
mances, I fdtthe fun impact of Wagner's 
“Ring” in its original home. In the Fest- 
spidhaus, winch is not air-conditioned, the 
tempera tore readied 110 degrees. I came 
out of “Siegfried” on Friday shivering in 
the night heat, for wtrilemy ears had been 
bathed in Wagner's music, my body felt as 
if it had been in a sauna. Wagnentis may 
have something to do with a hack of oxy- 
gen. As Nietzschecried after he turned 
against the composer: “Air! More air!” 

But Wagneritis also has something to do 
with the more intangible nature of the 
atmosphere in this haJL It is a hall of 
illusions. A series of five walls with pillars 
protrude into the fai-shaped auditorium, 
getting larger as they reach the stage. 


which seems to be enclosed by KbreepiD- 
wnhmvi, one within the other. Tne effect 
is to die ball seem, smaller than its 
1,925 seats and die stage look bigger than 
it is. The hall provides a sense of both 
intimacy and epic occasion. 

T HAT combination is also present 
in the Festspielhaus’s sound. If 
Wagner's genius was evident no- 
where dse it .would have been 
dear in the acoustic he created when he 
rimmnMsd built this hall- From the 
■ of the aniitarium, die orchestra’s 
j seems to be coming from the full 
die stage, as if projected from a 
skillfully hidden high-tech sound system, 
each instrument fully mixed into a single 
orchestral whole. Tim effect at its best 
resembles that of a well-constructed 
chnrch org an, scenting to. allow the sur- 
rounding space to produce the sound on its 
own, as n without himuin intervention. 

. . The overall impact is uncanny. The sing- 
exs axe heard with unmatched clarity, they 
are also stirred physically by the sound. 
Forget die gods and dwarfs and other 
mythic creatures ou stage. In the Festspiel- 
hans, surrounded by the aura of Wagner's 
imrisic. there are also always, and unfor- 
gettably, human beings singing. And 
.sweating.. 




*»UKI 


Backlists: Publishers’ Hidden ‘Best-Sellers 


' ‘f ** ii 


By Sarah Lyall 

Hew York Timer Service 


American 


N 


EW YORK — Last year, when 
the country’s best-seller lists 
were dominated by flashy titles 
from the likes of Robert James 
Waller, John Grisham and Tom Clancy, a 
1984 work, “The Book of Runes” (St. Mar- 
tin’s Press), quietly sold more than 50,000 
copies. 




Josette Simon in a scene from “ The Lady From the Sea. ” 


At the same time, a 1981 book, “Getting 
to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without 
Giving In” (Penguin), sold 195.000 copies. 
And a 1987 book that describes how to 
fashion wreaths for holidays and other 
occasions, forthrightly titled “The Wreath 
Book” (Sterling), sold 75,000. 

These are among the hidden best-sellers, 
books that sell tens or even hundreds of 
thousands of copies year after year but for 
various reasons do not make any lists. 
Their longevity says much about the en- 
during sensibilities and reading tastes of 
the broad public. 

As humble as such books might seem, 
they are as precious to a publisher as any 
John Grisham thriller, because they repre- 
sent steady, dependable revenue. They 
help to subsidize money-losing literary 
novels and cushion the considerable risks 
that publishers take with new titles. 

But why wouldn't a book like “The 
Audubon Society Field Guide to North 


Birds,” which sells about 
300,000 copies a year in two editions, make 
it onto a best-seller list? In large part. It has 
to do with tbe way the lists are determined. 

There is no magic number that assures a 
book a spot on a best-seller list. Instead, 
the lists, nke those in The New York Times 
and Publishers Weekly, reflect relative 
sales during a given week. 

Because publishers guard their sales fig- 
ures so jealously, it is impossible to say 
with certainty bow many copies of a book 
are sold. The rare successes at the very top 
— Waller's “Tbe Bridges of Madison 
County,” for instance — sell several mil- 
lion copies apiece. Other books that ap- 
pear on the list once or twice might end up 
selling less than 100,000. 

In a busy week, it might take a sale of 
tens of thousands of copies to make a list; 
in a slow week, it might take far less. 
Another factor is the category of the bode 
Because of the short periods involved, tire 
lists include many new books that are 
bring publicized, rather than old reliables 
that sell beautifully over the years but 
never have a spectacular week. 

“While tbe numbers are good, they’re 
not enough to match the rush of books that 
go oat when a book is new and can hit tbe 
best-seller list,” said Carol Schneider, an 
associate publisher at Random House’s 
adult trade division. (One of the steadiest 
sellers at Random House is a 1980 exercise 
book, “Stretching.” which still sells about 
80,000 copies a year.) . 


Such books are important for a publish- 
er’s backlist — its books from past years- — 
because they continue to bring in money. 
Every publisher wants a lucrative baddisL 
That is why DonaldS. Lamm, president of 
W. W. Norton, is delighted that “Mathe- 
matics for the Million,” a 1930s book by 
Lancelot Hogiben, has sold hundreds of 
thousands of copies for the company and 
continues to seO a considerable number — 
almost 10,000 a year — without Lamm or 
his colleagues’ having to do much. “It 
earned its way out in probably 18 months, 
and it’s been a gravy train ever since.” 


T 


Q Lamm, the successful backlist 
books provide an insight into tine 
perennial tastes of readers, par- 
ticularly those who five far away 
from the publishing houses where multi- 
mtifion-dollar advances are paid for celeb- 
rity biographies. 


Hidden best-sdfers also include “The 
HD Book: The Illustrated Guide to the 
Most Prescribed Drags in America” (Ban- 
tam), which was first published in 1979. It 
provides exhaustive information about 
pills, in color. “Many of us at Bantam at 
the time thought, /Who could possibly 
want this except a few hard-core drug- 
gies?* ” said Irwyn Applebauxn, Bantam's 
publisher. They were certainly wrong. The. 
book sells 40,000 copies each month, or 
480,000 a year, in mass-market paperback. 

Some hidden best-sellers might seem 
odd to the reader who reads book reviews, 
searches the front tables of bookstores and 
waits for the next Anne Rice novel. 

Many readers, for instance, have proba- 
bly never heard of Amette Heidcamp’s 
“Hu mmingb ird in My House” (Crown), 
the 1990 stray of a woman who adopted a 
h u mmingb ird that had failed to migrate 
south for the winter. It sells about 27,000 


“Publishers often overlook the heart- 
land, where many of these backlist books 
remain for years and years;” he said. 

Many of the perennial sellers are inspi- 
rational, how-to or service books that have 
been recognized as standards in their 
fields. These include books like the Audu- 
bon Society bird guide, which is derigueor 
in the bird- watching world and is one of 
the reasons its publisher, Alfred A. Knopf, 
can afford to gamble on first-time poets 
(and to shell out nearly $9 miHi on this year 
for a book by Pope John Paul fl). 


copies a year. George Perry's “Complete 

ty Hou), a 


Phantom of the Opera'' (Henry , 

1991 frill-color book about the Broadway 
musical, indudmg the script, still sells 
30,000 to 40,000 copies a year in paper- 
back and hardcover combined. 

And at Walker & Co n a 1979 children’s 
book called “Sam the Sea Cow,” by Fran- 
cine Jacobs, has sold about 25,000 copies a 
year in paperback for the last three years. 
“That book just cranks,” said Ram»ty R. 
Walker, the company's president. “While 
there are a lot of books out there, there are 
not a lot of books about manatees .” 



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BEST SELLERS 


BOOKS 


Hie New Yot* Tiara 

THU list is based on reports from more than 
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Weeks on tiu ue not necessarily consecutive 


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S ! WiTtrirn J, Bennett 

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FICTION 


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JOON SHOT, by Alan Sbep- 
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5 MIDNIGHT IN THE GAR- 
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by Jafm Bertndt 
<STi 


3 32 
S 3 


SEDUCTIVE CINEMA! 

The Art of Silent film 


2 THE CELESTINE PROPHE- 


CY. by James Redfidd 

EG! 


3 THE GIFT, bv Dsnide Steele 

4 EVERYTHING TO GAIN, 
by Barbara Taylor Bradford . 

5 THE BRIDGES OF MATH- 
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TANDING FIRM, by Dan 
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OF THE PARTY, by 
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9 SAVED BY THE LIGHT, by 
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4 21 
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7 7 

3 8 


By James Card 319 pages. S35. 
Knopf. 


Reviewed by 
Michael Co vino 


6 POLITICALLY CORRECT 

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7 THE ALIENIST, by Caleb 
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4 103 


10 SOUL MATES, by 

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11 DAVE BARRY IS 


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8 THE CROSSING, by Connac 


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T OWARD the end of “Se- 
ductive Cinema: The Art of 
Silent Film,” James Carl writes: 
“I cannot conceive of living 
without showing films. Movies 
have been tbe ambrosia of my 
life. To offer that gift to others, 
sharing in their enjoyment of 
the movies l love, is my greatest 
joy.” To that extent, his book 
stKxeeds wonderfully. By tbe 
time I’d finished. I’d compiled a 
list of several dozen silent films 
I was determined to catch up 
on. Living in Berkeley, home to 
tile Pacific Film Archive and 
some of the more eclectic video 
stores in the nation, 1 have a 
better dance than most of find- 
ing these films. But to the extent 
that any of us has a chance. 
Card himself is in fair measure 
suable. 

started collecting silent 


films in the 1920s as a young 
man in Cleveland, and went on 
to become, in 1948, the co- 
founder of the Georgs Eastman 
House of Photography in Roch- 
ester, New York, where for the 
next 29 years he presided over 
its archive. He founded East- 
man House in part because he 
loves films, in part because he 
thought the Museum of Mod- 
em Art in New York City, un- 
der its film archivist, Iris Barry, 
was not exactly doing a bang- 
up job of preserving cinematic 
history due to what Card con- 
sidered Barry's excessively 
“catholic” taste: In fact, while 
Card's love of silent cin ema ju- 
ris much of this book, one of its 
less attractive features is that 
Card, rightly or not, seems to be 
carrying out a vendetta against 
Barry, beating his own dram 
while taking periodic potshots 
at bee. 


fir tile course of the book 
Card makes a case fbr Ead- 
weard Muybridge as the no- 
glcct ed founder of motion pic- 
tures while denigrating the roles 
of Thomas Edison and George 
Eastman. He attacks what he 
sees as the inflated reputations 
of the directors D.W. Griffith 
and Erich von Stroheim while 
making strong cases for the si- 
lent films of Cecil B. DehEU*. 
Moo ta BeD and the little known 
John Collins who worked for 
the Edison Company and died 
young. 


to 


more attention 
movies. 

The angle worst asi 
book is .that at times J 


neglects 


of th 
man 

rha 


gla his sratences so badly 
I rtart^ to get a headache. 

Cta the plus ride, though, v 
be thankful that hedWtal 
tile trouble,, and that we c 

Brooks in T] 
woe of Pandora” the way G.V 
intended her to be seen i 


responri 

Card 


“Seductive Cinema” is both 
an exhilarating and frustrating 
potpourri of memories, anec- 
dotes, information, pleas for 
film preservation and apprecia- 
tions, sure to spark new interest 
in silent cinema. 


Card’s at his best when he 
throws out provocative stuff 
such as his contention that the 
slapstick flmmaker Mack Sen- 
netz “and his cutters had com- 
pletely anticipated Russian 
constructive editing. Years be- 
fore the 1925 ’Potemkin' there 
was Bennett’s wondrously ex- 
hilarating Teddy at the Throt- 
tit’ ”1 would have liked more 

attention paid to the great silent 

comedians, though perhaps 
Card frit that since Chaplin and 
Keaton comedies re main xhe 
most frequently viewed films 
from that era, he should devote 


*' ovino > »hase most „ 
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"T 0 * tf »s for The 
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!f\ 


Fred Ronan 
Tel.: 

(33 1)46379391 

Fax: 

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International Herald Tribune, Wednesday, August 3, 1994 





Page 9 


€B€L 

the architects of time 


THE TRIB INDEX: 11 6.06 

Tribune World Stock Index.©, composed of 
stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
oy Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1 , .1992 = 100. 

120 — ■ . 



150 


Approx, weighting: 32% 
Close: 132.82 Prevj 132^8 


Europ 

e _ _ 1 

EH 

Approjtsw*ghfing:37% 

Ctae: WJUPm; 11&82 



130 



The index tmcks US. doBar values at sucks Ik Tokyo, Now York. London., and 
Argentina, AnMraSa, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada. CMe. Denmaric, Rntand, 
France, Germany, Hong Kong, turfy, Mexico, NeOwriands, New Zeeland, No r w ay , 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela- For Tokyo, Nets York and 
London, the index is composed of the 90 Up Issues to toons of market capkaStaSon, 
otherwise the ten top stocks am hacked. 


1 tndustfiat Sectors j 


Tta. Pick. % 

Mow dost dange 


ToA 

dote 

An 

dost 

% 

cfangt 

Energy 

114.72 114.25 +0.41 

CapBetGoode 

11152 

11722 

+1.11 

times 

12163 122.45 +096 

RhiIIMA - 

13155 

13005 

+1.15 

Finance 

119.11 11149 +062 

Cmeunr Goode 

10155 

100.09 

+1.26 

Services 

12162 120.65 +06? 

Ifiecefeneons 

13122 

131.61 

+122 

For more information about [he fndex.atx)oktBtisovaiabie freed charge. 

Write to TO) Max, 181 Avenue Charles da GauBe, B2521 NeuBfy Cedax, Fiance. 


The Battle for Name Recognition 

Kia Motors Launches a Drive for Its Own Identity 


By Steven Brull 

T/Uemahonal Herald Tribune 

SEOUL — As its sales surge by double 
digits and Japanese competitors re- 
trench, Kia Motors Corp.'s chairman . 
Kim Sun Hong, might have reason to sit 
back, light up a cigar and share some of 
the profits with investors. 

Instead, Mr. Kim, a mild-mannered 
engineer, has slammed South Korea’s 
second-largest automaker into overdrive. 
All available resources are being poured 
into a massive expansion program de- 
signed to aye the carmaker, whose best- 
known vehicle, the Festiva. is a sub- 
compact sold by Ford, a globally 
recognized brand name of its own. 

Kia is frantically expanding capacity 
at home and abroad, making a risky 
gamble to establish a dealer network in 
the United Slates, and undertaking cost- 
ly designs of new models. 

Mr. Kim said Kia has only a few years 
to expand output, increase efficiency and 
enlarge the number of original cars it 
makes beyond the current two. Unless it 
achieves critical mass, it could face an 
uncertain future — most likely a take- 
over by another South Korean company, 
analysts say. 

“Our biggest challenge is to boost pro- 
ductivity and improve quality,” Mr. Kim 
said in an interview at Kia’s headquar- 
ters, which overlook the National As- 
sembly building in Seoul. 

Kia, which began 50 years ago as a 
bicycle maker, is a rare breed among 
major South Korean enterprises: a com- 
pany that is not part of a chaebol the 


Korea's Carmakers | 

■ Sbwtf^pfQ&x^, estimated \ 
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fist . s unit safes; In thousands. 



'. -.’09 ‘90 Vt .'SZ ‘93 *94 

Source: K» Motors 


sprawling conglomerates that dominate 
the country’s economic landscape. 

Employees own 10 percent of Kia 
stock, while Ford Motor Co. owns 10 
percent and Mazda Motor Corp. owns 8 
percem. 

Its independence has made it popular 
in South Korea, where many resent the 
chaebol's power. Kia also has come to 
symbolize the country's ability to pros- 
per by spawning successful companies 
Outside the chaeboL whose size often 
impedes their ability to respond quickly 
and act creatively. 

But Kia’s autonomy makes it finan- 
cially insecure relative’ to its chief rivals, 
Hyundai Corp. and Daewoo Corp. It cut 
back on generous consumer financing 
deals for new cars this year, allowing 
Daewoo to take second place in domestic 
market share, behind Hyundai. 

The company’s net income will rise 93 
percent in 1994, to 36 billion won ($45 
million) but net indebtedness is soaring, 
according to Don Lee, a senior analyst at 
Barclays de Zoete Wedd (Asia) Lid. in 
Seoul This has led to speculation that 
the company may lack the means to fund 
its aggressive expansion. leaving it vul- 
nerable to a takeover in several years 

Kia accused Samsung Co. of planning 
a hostile takeover last year, but Samsung 
instead entered the automobile industry 
through a partnership with Nissan Mo- 
tor Co. 

“Kia symbolizes an honest working 
See KIA, Page 11 


Happy Days Dawning Again for Airlines 


Rotten 

GENEVA — International 
airlines, after four years of 
losses, saw passenger and 
freight traffic surge in the first 
half Of 1994, their coo rdinating 
body reported Tuesday. 

European airlines, which in- 
clude some of the richest as well 
as the worst-hit by the econom- 
ic recession of the early 1990s, 
also reported passenger and 


~-V 


O Hamattanal Haratf news 


1 climbing. 

The International Air Trans- 


port Association said traffic 
growth from January to June 
for its 224 members was 9.7 
percent, against 12 percent for 
the whole of 1993. This advance 
outstripped capacity growth by 
4.4 percenL 

Passenger traffic on interna- 
tional scheduled services was 
up 8 percent both in June and 
over tne first six months against 
die same periods last year, 
while cargo growth was up 16 
percent in June and 13 percent 
since the start of the year. 


In a statement issued in Brus- 
sels, the Association of Europe- 
an Airlines said passenger traf- 
fic for Europe? n and long-haul 
flights had jumped 9.8 percent 
in June and more than 9 percent 
for the year so far. 

Cargo surged by 17 percent 
in June over all operating re- 
gions, and was up on average 
13.1 percent since the start of 
the year. 

1ATA officials in Geneva 
said the returns suggested that 
airlines, some 75 percent of 


which were losing money, were 
on track to record an already 
tentatively predicted overall 
profit of $1 billion for 1994. 

The airlines have amassed to- 
tal losses of $15.6 billion, in- 
cluding $4.1 billion in 1993, 
since their last year of profit- 
ability in 1989. 

Another encouraging indica- 
tor was the increasing load fac- 
tor. LATA airline planes flew 70 
percent full on passenger ser- 
vices during June against 67 
percent in June last year. 


Inflat ion News 
Sends European 
Stocks Surging 


Bloomberg Business News 

LONDON— Tame inflation 
and a growing conviction that 
U.S. interest rates will not rise 
boosted European stocks and 
bonds Tuesday, extending a 
summer rally and giving mar- 
kets some of their biggest gain* 
of the year. 

The Bank of England added 
to hopes of low inflation as 
most European markets closed 
for the day. The bank's quarter- 
ly inflation report reduced its 
British inflation forecast for the 
end of 1995. 

Low inflation, steady growth 
and low interest rates are three 
of the main ingredients for ral- 
lying stocks and bonds. 

Iu Britain, the Financial 
Tunes- Stock Exchange 100 In- 
dex surged 60.1 points, or 1.9 
percent, to 3,157.5. its biggest 
daily gain of the year. 

Leading stock indexes also 
rose more than 1 percent in 
France. Germany, Italy, Bel- 
gium, the Netherlands, Sweden 
and Switzerland. 

“The fear of a rise in interest 
rates in the U.S. has been put on 
hold, and global bond markets 
are rallying." said Peter Lyon, 
chief investment strategist at 
Smith New Court Securities 
Ltd. 

The French CAC-40 Index 
was the day's best performer, 
gaining 47.65 points. 2.03 per- 
cent, to 2, 1 17.23. That is its sec- 
ond biggest one-day gain of the 
year and the index’s highest 
close since May 24. 

The Eurotrack 100 Index of 
leading continental European 
stocks traded in London, the 
closest thing to a pan- European 
index, rose 23.42, or 1.7 per- 
cent, to 1.41 1.1, its highest since 
June 10. The Eurotrack has 
gained 6.5 percent since the end 
of June in a summer rally pro- 
pelled by a recovery in bonds 
and the dollar. 

In Germany, the yield on 10- 
year bunds fell to 6.79 percent 


from 6.80 percent at Monday’s 
close, while the yield on the 10- 
year British gilt fell to 8-26 per- 
cent from 8.48 percent. Ten- 
year French OATs were 
yielding 7.165 percenL com- 
pared with 7.27 percenL 

European markets have beat 
overshadowed for most of this 
year by the prospect of higher 
U.S. rates. An ear lier-ih an -ex- 
pected rise in U.S. interest rates 
on Feb. 4 roiled world stock 
and bond markets, amid con- 
cent that the Federal Reserve 
had detected signs of resurgent 
inflation. 

“There’s lots of evidence that 
the U.S. recovery is coming off 
the boil" said Joe Rooney, an 
equity strategist at Lehman 
Brothers International Ltd. “A 
lot of inflation concerns have 
been laid to rest." 


Rising Rates 
Cut Sales of 
U.S. Homes 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Sales of 
new homes in the United States 
plunged 14.1 percent in June to 
the lowest level in two years, the 
government said Tuesday, and 
analysts blamed the decline on 
recent mortgage-rate increases. 

Sales of new homes ran at a 
seasonally adjusted annual rate 
of 59 1.000 in June, down from a 
revised 688,000 in May, the 
Commerce Department report- 
ed. The May rate initially was 
estimated to be 738.000. 

The June rate was the small- 
est since 584,000 in June 1992. 

The average rate on a 30-year 
fixed-rate mortgage rose to a 
two-year high of 8.77 percent in 

See ECONOMY, Page 10 


11 


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MEDIA MARKETS 


--s' 


Seeking a Brand’s 'Soul’ 


By Sallie Hofmeister 

New York Times Serna 

LOS ANGELES — Ground Zero is the 
point at which an atomic bomb explodes. But 
Kirk Souder, Jim Smith and Court Cr andall 
chose Ground Zero as the name of their tiny 
advertising agency. 

The concept has made Ground Zero into 
what may be the fastest-growing new agency. 

Framed six months ago In the Venice sec- 
tion of Los Angeles, Ground Zero is hot, 
hyvmg beaten out bigger a g enc ie s for an ac- 
count at Walt Disney Co. and won cheats 
including Porsche, JLA. Gear and Virgin In- 
teractive Video Games. 

At the heart of Ground Zero’s formula is a 
belief that brands have souls. “We want to 
discover the soul the essence of a 'brand and 
let it permeate everything a cheat does,” Mr. 
Souder said. Clients have responded to the 
fresh, informal approach and repeat the “soul 
of a brand” concept Hke a mantra. 

In March, Ground Zero beat out almost 40 
agencies for the business of Disney's Bueno 
Vista home-video unit Disney awarded the 
estimated $60 million account to Ground 
Zero and the established San Francisco agen- 
cy Hal Riney & Partners. 

Rather than focus on Disney's animat i o n 
or its char acters, Ground Zero cen tred it s 
pitch on a mother’s ability to make an impres- 
sion on her child in the eariy years, before 
having to compete with soccer, scouts and 

Sll Som5 a So , s bfflmgs already top $35 
million. “You normally wooldn t see that 
kind of growth outside New York, where the 
size of accounts is much toggx, said Grea 
Helm, a partner at Stem Robaire Heim, 


in Los Angeles. To get that many pieces of 
business that fast is impressive.” 

Mr. Helm knows Mr. Souder, 32, and Mr. 
Crandall, 29, from the two years they spent at 
Stan Robaire Helm. They bandied half the 
.agency’s accounts and won six awards, in- 
cluding one fra an spot for Southern Califor- 
nia Acnra dealers. 

If Ground Zero has a soft spot, Mr. Helm 

Butchents stqrthit is Mr. Smith’s^ntnb^on 
to tike mix. To Mr. Sooder*s artistry and Mr. 
Crandall’s way with words, Mr. Smith, they 
say, adds maturity (he is in his early 40s) and 
big-agency strategic planning experience. Most 
recently, he was general manager of the Los 
Angeles office of Lord, Dentsu & Partners. 

The three came together with a shared phi- 
losophy. They believed advertising was insult- 
ing the American public, and that advertising 
had become formulaic because agencies were 
putting a premium on the process to justify 
their sue, losing track of the product 

Companies used to dealing with more tradi- 
tional approaches have also given business to 
Grouna Zero. Porsche Cars North America 
picked Goodby, Siverstein & Partners to han- 
dle the Porsche 911 Carrera account last year 
after a review that included Stem Robaire. 

But it was so impressed with a treatment 
that Mr. Souder and Mr. Crandall created for 
Stein Robaire that referred to the car as “a 
soul wrapped in a body” that it hired their 
new agency to do a sales video. 

“There’s not a word or picture in the entire 
eight minutes that does not speak to the 
motivations of Porsche d r iv ers,” Joel Ewan- 
idfc, general manager of marketing, said. 


Firms to Pay 
$160 Million 
In AIDS Suit 

The Associated Press 

CHICAGO — Two large 
medical suppliers Tuesday 
agreed to pay as much as $160 
millio n to hemophiliacs infect- 
ed with the human immunode- 
ficiency virus to settle allega- 
tions that the companies had 
sold blood-clotting products 
tainted with the virus that 
causes AIDS. 

Baxter International Inc. and 
Rh6ne-PouIenc Rorer Inc. 
agreed to the settlement of the 
Lawsuit. 

Three other defendants — 
Miles Inc., Alpha Therapeutic 
Corp. and the National Hemo- 
philia Foundation — did not 
participate in the proposed set- 
tlement. 

David Shrager, attorney for 
the plaintiffs, said as many as 
6,000 citizens or residents of the 
United Stales may have been 
infected with HlV through 
blood-clotting products that the 
defendants continued selling or 
promoting even after they 
should have known the prod- 
ucts were tainted. 

Under the proposed settle- 
ment, Baxter and Rh&n e-Pou- 
lenc Rorer will pay a total of 
$140 million to $160 million 
into a fund that could also be 
dispensed to families or survi- 
vors of the victims. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Roto* 


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1« 
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2 *. 
21 % 
m 

4X1 

400 

5® 

US 

100 

SuOO 

M0 


amain 

Book ham rate 
CDB money 
7-tnOata fa tertnnfc 
Xnanth liderhaok 
teaaata k rt ert o nfc 
KHmreat 


5W 5U. 
5D0 t* 
5*. 57. 

5W 5*. 
m tv. 
U2 MS 


Wr w i Hon rate LOO 500 

Cod manor 5V> 

1-000 lauterixetk 5 M. 

Mnoafh meftaak 51% 5*. 

Hnwmi hue rtoafc 51% 5H 

re- rear OAT Th 7 Jt 

Sources ; Reuters, Bloombef*. Merrill 
Lynch. Bunk ot Tokyo, Cemmerzboak, 
O reerrweN MbbJobu. CrcdH LveanoH. 

Gold 

aja. pa ate 

Zurich 38159 38045 -140 

Lowtaa 38U3 mtX -US 

NOW York VAM 38440 -500 

US. Honors par ouncm. London official fix- 
ing*; Zurich and New York opening end cko- 
kw oricasj hew York Cemex (December J 
Source.- Reuter^. 


Banking Clients Have Always Expected 
Outstanding Personal Service. 
Today They Find It With Us. 



D uring the Renaissance, 
mist i advisors helped 
administer the finances 
and protect the interests of private 
individuals. The role demanded 
judgment, commitment and skill. 

Today, clients ftnd that same 
personal service ac Republic 
National Bank- We believe that 
banking is more about people than 
numbers. It’s about the shared val- 
ues and common goals that forge 
strong bonds between banker and 


client. It’s also about building for 
the future, keeping assets secure 
for the generations to come. 

This client focus has contrib- 
uted to our leading position in 
private banking. As a subsidiary 
of Safra Republic Holdings S-A. 
and an affiliate of Republic New 
York Corporation, we’re part of 
a global group with more than 
US$5 billion in capital and more 
than US$50 billion in assets. 

These assets continue to grow 

REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEWYORK (SUISSE) SA. 


A SAFRA BANK 

Timeless Values, traditional Strength. 


substantially, a testament to the 
group's strong balance sheets, risk- 
averse orientation and century-old 
heritage. 

All banks in the group are 
locally managed, attuned to the 
language and culture of their cus- 
tomers. They share a philosophy 
that emphasises lasting relation- 
ships and mutual trusc. Those 
values were once the foundation 
of banking. At Republic, they 
have been and always will be. 


HEAD OFFICE GENEVA 1204 • 2, PLACE DU LAC -TEL (022 1 705 55 55 - FOREX: IQ221 705 55 50 AND GENEVA 1201 * 2. RUE DR. ALFRED- VINCENT IC0RNER 
0UAI DU MONT- BLANC I BRANCHES: LUGANO 6901 - I. VIA CAKCWA * TEL. (0911 23 85 32 • ZURICH 8039 • STOCKERSTRASSE 37 ■ TEL >01 1 288 18 IB ■ 
GUERNSEY • RUE DU PRE - ST. PETER PORT • TEL (40fl 711 761 AFFILIATE REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW TORN IN NEW YORK OTHER LOCATIONS; 
GIBRALTAR ■ GUERNSEY - LONDON ■ LUXEMBOURG ■ MILAN ■ MONTE CARLO - PARIS - BEVERIT HILLS • CAT MAN ISLANDS ■ IDS ANGELES - MEXICO CITY - MIAMI • 
M«rTREAL- NASSAU ■ NEW YORK - BUENOS AIRES ■ CARACAS - MONTEVIDEO • PUNTA DEL ESTE • RIO DE JANEIRO - SANTIAGO ■ BEIRUT ■ BEUING • HONG XDNG ■ 


JAKARTA - SINGAPORE - TAIPEI ■ TOKYO 











/ 







Page 10 

WARKIT diary 


#* 


li 


Stock Rally Fizzles 
Alter Early Gains 


Bloomberg Businas Newt 

NEW YORK — A three-day 
rally in shares fizzled out Tues- 
day as rising drug and paper 
stocks offset falling oD issues. 

Drug siocks, down for most 
of the day, got a late boost when 


U.S. Stocks 


American Home Products of- 
fered to buy American Cyani- 
mid for $95 a share. 

The takeover “is going to 
help the group and help the 
market” by showing there is 
still value in stocks that many 
investors believe are already 
priced too high, said Richard 
Gardullo, head trader at Eagle 
Asset Management 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage fell 1.95 points to close at 
3,796.22 after rising as much as 
1230 points. 

About four stocks rose for 
every three that fell on the New 
York Stock Exchange. Volume 
was 294.73 mill in n shares, off 
from 258.17 mill i nn Monday. 

The market was boosted 
from a government 


i government report 
showing slackening sales of new 
houses in June, signaling slower 


economic growth and suggest- 
ing the Federal Reserve will be 
less likely to raise interest rates 
at a policy meeting Aug. 16. 

American Home’s offer for 
American Cyaninrid came ex- 
actly three months after Swit- 
zerland’s Roche Holding Ltd. 
agreed to buy Syntex for $53 
billion. 

In response, drug stocks 
climbed after falling Tor most of 
the day. Schering-Plough 
surged 3V4 to 66M, Pfizer 
climbed 2 to 63 14, Upjohn 
vaulted IK to 31ft, Eli Lilly 
advanced l l A to 49ft, and 
Warner-Lambert soared 4ft to 
6816. 

Paper stocks rose for a third 
day after Stone Container an- 
nounced its fourth price in- 
crease in the past year. The 
stocks also got a boost from 
growing optimism that eco- 
nomic growth would increase 
demand for paper and card- 
board boxes. 

Shares of Georgia Pacific 
surged 3ft to 69, International 
Paper rose 1% to 75W, Weyer- 
haeuser advanced ft to 43ft, 
Union Camp gained 1ft to 49ft, 
Scott Paper jumped 1ft to 60 
and Potlatch gained 1 to 42ft. 


VfaAwKtt'drreH 


*18-2 


The Dow 


DaaydK^r^sbfthe ' .:. 
.DpWJoods industrial, average 



^%"a' M j J A 

.ViW"*' 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open High Low Uk? an. 


Indus 3805.94 381184 379107 370602 —1,93 
Trans 15HJJ8 I6OS09 I SOT 33 160302 * Id 89 
UN 191128 19239 18939 190J3 +006 
Co™ 131504 11UL51 UIMB 1315.95 +4JA 


Standard & Poor 1 * Index** 


urr 


NYSE Host Actives 


ECONOMY: Dollar Advances 


Continued from Page 9 

the week ended May 1 3. During 
June, the rate on a 30-year loan 
eased bade to S.43 percent. 

In addition to borrowing 
costs, home prices rose during 
June. The median home price 
increased 5.4 percent to a re- 
cord $134,900, a government 
spokesman said. The average 


Forolgn Exchange 


price rose 4.3 percent to 
$157300 — the highest since 
August 1989. 

Treasury bond traders initial- 
ly interpreted the housing report 
as a sign “the economy isn't 
poised to lake off from here, and 
there shouldn't be any inflation- 
ary ramifications,*' said Kevin 
Flanagan, an economist with 
Dean Witter Reynolds Inc. 

But private surveys showing 
that retail sales increased in 
July were enough to balance 
that sentiment 

A Treasury official's state- 
ment that U.S. economic 


growth could exceed 3 percent 
lied by a 


this year accompanied 


slight increase in inflation also 
helpe 


aped erase earlier gains in the 
bond market 


The price of the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond finished 


down 1/32 at 86 10/32, with the 
yield edging up to 7.40 percent 
from 739 percent Monday. 

The dollar, meanwhile, rose 
against the yen as concern about 
poor trade relations between the 
United States and Japan faded. 

The dollar finished at 
100340 yen, up from 99.445 
yen Monday, and at 1.5825 
Deutsche marks, up from 
1.5798 DM. The dollar rose to 
13375 Swiss francs from 13312 
and to 5.4080 French francs 
from 5.4000. The pound edged 
up to $1.5355 from $13353. 

Sentiment toward the dollar 
Unproved even though trade 
talks between Japan and the 
United States broke down over 
the weekend, because it looks as 
if the two countries want to 
keep negotiating, traders said. 

U.S. Trade Representative 
Mickey Kan tor set a 60-day 
timetable for resolving the dis- 
pute. After that, President BiQ 
Clinton is authorized under U.S. 
law to retaliate with sanctions. 

“People are looking at the sit- 
uation and thinking, ‘We’ve got 
60 days, that’s plenty of time for 
them to get things sorted out,’ ” 
said Chris Furness, currency 
strategist at the market consult- 
ing firm IDEA in London. 

( Bloomberg, AP, Kaxers) 



VoL Hflh 

Low 

Last 

OKL 

AHRC97n 

«50B 25* 

24ta 

25to 


Tewex 


61 V< 

67to 

*lto 

CortWal 


IO*>', 

lito 

- to 

Compoq & 

79S9S 331* 

22'k 

JT* 

-to 

Pftsor 

li 

6t to 

63to 

-15. 

GnhAcrtr 

28093 

52to 

S3 

+ ta 

Merck 


29ta 

30 

» to 

Motarlas 

21979 521* 

52 

S2H 

-to 

YPF50C 

21629 26 hi 

24*4 

2&to 

-to 

Genets 

20927 50*h 

50lk 

SOto 

—to 

BefhSII 

20688 24W 

23to 

Z3H 

-to 

UCarb 



XiH. 

-l 

IBM 

20479 634k 

62% 

62 to 

—to 

RJR NaD 

70436 6>k 

6to 

6to 



Chryslr 

19368 486k 

464k 

47to 

- to 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


NewoNk 

VoL Mph 
92176 29«to 

LOW 
28 "• 

Last 

28"'.« 

am 

+ IIL 

Mtcstrs 

59211 54to 

S7to 

STV u 

— »; 

PtiyCAs 

57574 23 to 

lBto 

20 

— 2Y« 

IDB Cm s 

W • W 

8to 

8% 

— % 

Ma 

^ s , ’ f 

73 to 

23% 

+ to 

CKCUS 


TOto 

21% 

— Wi, 

SCreBdS 

5 

6to 

—2% 

TktOnA 

XK06 24 

73 V, 

23% 

— i/ u 

Intel 

sum w/. 

59 

S9to 

—to 

DSC s 

3nxs 25to 

34V, 

25 "k 

-to 

AppleC 

34038 33to 

32to 

32*' n 

—tei. 

APnwCVs 

31 MV 17 

16% 

16% 

—to 

MovleGta 

31033 15 1 '* 

Uto 

15 


liSHHtis 

20856 37 to 

37to 

38 

—to 

HitCmp 

19165 34'A 

22% 

23% 

• I 


iMfuatrtala 

Trorvsp. 

Utilities 

Phmce 

SP5W 

5P100 


Hton Law a ox CMn 

53278 535.16 53445 —DJI 
38841 3BSS0 «\9* +TJB 
161 jn 160J9 16040 unctl 
45.44 45.13 45.17 —0.12 
460.77 -mil 46&S6 -MS 
429.18 42606 437.11 —074 


NYSE Indexes 


Hf9h Low Los CM. 


Composite 755.03 25371 254.15 -0.10 

InoustrKds 31A01 31218 31294 —04)7 

Tramp. 26LA2 31651 -1.99 

UtBHy 714J6 21270 21139 *06? 

Finance 21117 21133 21141 -004 


NASDAQ Indexes 


High LOW L nsr CM 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Oon 

Bid Ait 
ALUMINUM IHM8 GnuM) 
Dollars per metric too 
Snot 144 MB 146250 

Forward 147000 147100 

COPPER CATHODES (Hf9H 
Down per metric tat 
Soot 240700 240800 

Forward 241500 241600 

LEAD 

Donors per metric mu 

NICKEL 
DtUanmatMctn 
Spot 618000 611000 

Forward 619000 <19500 

TIN 

(teflon per mctrlctafl 
Spot 511000 512000 

Forward 518500 519000 

ZJNC (Special Hiatt Grade) 
Dollan per metric lea 
soot 94403 94500 

Forward 94700 Nug 


Preview 

BU AS 


141500 mao 
J4790B 147900 
Brode) 


»®0 0 20000 
243300 243400 


58600 58700 
60300 60400 


614000 615008 
623000 623500 


518500 519500 
anoo 5Z7B0O 


94600 94700 
96900 97000 


HIBfl Low LOST Soma tnt 


17250 17100 17175 17105—400 

ITUS 


JM 

FeO - 17175 T710O 17100 moo —475 

Mar 17008 14900 169JS 14900 —500 

AM- 16825 14825 14825 16800 —400 

Mar 16708 16700 16700 16875 —375 

Est. volume; 15013. Often ML 104293 


BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPE1 
Ujl doikn per bamuott of 1001 bomb 
See 1800 1805 BUS 1&51 -039 

OtJ 1851 1815 1036 1826 — 0L37 

N«V 1826 1802 18W 1811 —027 

Doc 1804 1700 1703 1707 - 025 

Jan 1702 1700 ITS 1704 — 826 

Fob 1705 1726 1776 1701 —02* 

Mar 1720 1706 1728 1720 —810 

Apr . 1708 17-08 1705 1705-810 

Mar N.T. N.T. N.T. 1700 — aw 

JIM 1703 1700 1702 1700 —810 

JIT 1708 1728 1728 1Z40 -810 

Am N.T. N.T. H.T. 1725 — 8W 

Ee>. volume; 48245 . open lot 161327 


Slock Indexes 


Financial 


HM Low Close Cham 
MAO NTH STERLING CUFFE) 

XWUW-PtBOflMPCt 


Ste 

dm 


Composite 737.96 72280 73404 —021 

Industrial 719.99 nj.11 73839 *840 

Bants 76974 76677 76803 *815 

Insurance 10009 B8&74 88812—120' 

Finance 944.90 942.18 944.90 *191 

Tmp. 72802 73407 72803 *150 


AMEX Stock Index 


Htgn Low Last cup. 
44801 439.12 43924 *81? 


Dow Jones Bond Avcrcgca 


amt 


20 Bands 
io utilities 
10 Industrials 


9400 

9303 

10206 


+ 824 


NYSE Diary 


AMEX Most Actives 



VoL HWI 

Low 

Lost 

am 

GovtCn 

14258 6to 

6 

£ 


EchaBay 

10656 11% 

11 

11% 

—to 

xa-Lia 

7207 tto 

I'm 

IVh 


IvtBcCp 

5032 17% 

16V. 

17to 

• to 

5POR 

<344 46% 

46%, 

46Vc 

—v. 

5PIPh 

3965 IVto 

18% 

191. 

— 1% 

VlQCB 

3712 34% 

34% 

34% 

— % 

VroCTT, ft 

3177 4*Vu 

4to 

49. 

-to. 

Elan 

3132 34to 

33% 

33'/. 

—to 

Kirby 

3057 lr- 

16% 

16% 

-to 


Advcneed 
Oecflrwd 
Unchanged 
Tan* Issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


1245 I40B 
■M6 m. 
sn 643 
2848 2852 

46 56 

33 29 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


dose 

Prev. 

302 

294 

278 

273 

214 

237 

BU 

004 

11 

17 

7 

7 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New H lofts 
New Lows 


1565 1115 

1993 1469 

1925 2095 

5062 5079 

83 80 

65 68 


Jaa 

Sg» 

Dec 


JIM 

Sep 

Dec 


9400 

9308 

92.90 

9ZJ? 

9107 

9104 

91J7 

91.16 

9898 

9005 

9005 

9001 




9127 

9109 

9107 

9101 

9109 

9890 

9874 

9863 

9851 


9*01 +813 

9143 +813 

920* +811 

9207 +809 

9107 +006 

9106 +009 

91*2 +810 

9L22 +813 

91.10 +813 

9009 +813 
9005 +812 

9864 +813 


Est volume: 78222. Open ini; 532002. 


MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFEI 
(1 bBBob - Pfs VMM PCt 


Sep 

9474 

9432 

9475 

Dec 

94M 

9408 

9402 

Mar 

9406 

f&m 

9408 

Jm 

9374 

9374 

9377 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9350 


Est. volume: 521. Open InL: 6028 


DM1 mil Hoc 

-Ms at IM pci 

Sep 

95.16 

95 .12 

Dec 

95.14 

9508 

Mar 

9475 

9409 

Jan 

9407 

9401 

Sep 

909 

9403 

Dec 

94.10 

9404 

Mar 

9308 

9305 

Jan 

9370 

9305 

Sep 

9351 

9309 

Dec 

9326 

9123 

Mar 

93,12 

93.13 

Jm 

9233 

9273 


99.15 UiKft. 
95.10 —002 


9*01 

9443 

9404 


Unch. 
+ 801 
+ 002 


9*07 +003 

9306 +002 


9347 +602 

9849 +001 


9305 +OIH 
9170 +002 


9196 +802 

Est volume: 87,738 Open hit.: 797015 


MHONTH PI BOR (MAT IF) 
PH minim ■ pti of rot pci 
S« p 9446 9409 


Jim 


Haricot Sales 


Today 

«N 

NYSE 29473 

Amen 1771 

Nasdaq 28404 

In million s. 


30893 

1500 

26906 


Spot Commodities 


Commodity Today 

Aluminum, R» 8655 

Copper eledrotyifc lb i.u 

Iron FOB. tan 71300 

Lead, lb 038 

Sliver, trov a 5705 

State (scrap), ton 11907 

Tin. lb 30949 

Zinc, lb 00682 


8646 

1.15 

21300 

0J8 

5795 

mm 

85316 

00575 


9404 + 806 

9403 9475 9470 +006 

94.12 9402 *4.10 +000 

93.90 9302 9308 +008 

9307 9301 9307 +808 

Dec 9301 9333 9539 +007 

Mar 9823 9514 9120 + &S? 

Jon 9110 9302 9308 +811 

Est. volume: 37,168 Open Int.: 188384. 
LONG GILT (LIFFEI 
ISAM - pt* A lands M 100 pci 
Sep 100-12 101-19 10306 +1-20 

Dec 102-01 181-07 102-24 +1-26 

Est volume: 72055. Open hit.: 117056. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFEI 
DM 258000 - PtS Of 1M PCf 
Sep M26 9003 9406 + 006 

Dec 9150 9110 9837 +006 

Est. volume: 134,111 Open Int.: 180287. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT IF) 
FF9880N-PISM HO vet 
Sep 11826 11708 11806 +800 

Dee 11732 11562 117J0 +878 

Mar 11514 11504 11550 +878 

Jon N.T. NLT. 11572 +878 

Est. volume: 140377. Oven hit.: 138365 


Industrials 


woh LOW Lost Settle atm 
GASOIL OPE] 

1LS. dot hoe ner metric to w te n eH88 torn 
Ads 16500 16100 16200 16200 — 4JS 

S«V 16705 16475 16475 16500 —475 

Od 169 JO 14650 16750 14750 — 475 

Nov 17050 16650 16900 14900 —450 

Dec 17250 17825 17073 17075 —450 


HM Low dm Don 
FTSE1M (LIFFEI 
(25 per index point 

SCP 3107 0 31170 31830 +750 

Dec JT7S0 313M 3HW +770 

Est. volume: 19.178 Open hit: 55586. 

CAC 40 (MAT IF) 

FP2M per Index point 

AMO 213200 209200 213200 +5500 

Sep 213800 210108 Z14A00 +5500 

Od N.T. N.T. N.T. UnefL 

Dec 215900 212900 nmm + 5500 

Mar 218600 218000 219450 +5300 

EsLvotvme: 27,347. Open Int: 68908. 


Sources: Motif, Associated Press, 
London lull Financial Futures ewIWsb 

Irrfl Petmttvm Exchange. 


Dhrlttentte 


Company 


Per Amt Par Rnc 

IRREGULAR 


AMLl Redd 
Duke Really Inv 
PetrotanelncB 


. 02 8-11 8-23 

_ 07 W7 8-31 

_ 0747 9-13 M9 


REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Canton Indite 1 lor 10 revamp spat. 
STOCK SPLIT 


Danko Business 2 tor I apltt. 
KewF u neM Inc 2 far 1 milt. 


Kennametal Incn 
Premier Rnln 
Vital Stans 


_ .15 5-10 8-22 

. 0467 8-15 8-31 
_ 02 8-U 8-18 


BBAT Fhll 
Baxter inti 
Brush Wellman 


INCREASED 

Q 33 9-1 9-15 

O 7425 9-7 10-3 

O 08 9-16 M0 
REGULAR 


U.S./AT THE CiOSI . I 1 


IDB to Restate First-Period Earnings 

LOS Angeles (Bloomberg) — The audli rnerttfr 
QmwaunicatiottS Group will restate its results for . 

ter, putting an end to atroubled penod for the ^ 

acquisition by LDDS Communications Inc., executives said lue* 
d ay, r. ... 

IDB win restate its results to eliminate about $6 
pretax' income fdated to the sale of transponder capat n v ^id 
purchase accounting adjustments, the executives said. LUU2> sa 
Moada" idr fnr nHnut $721 million in siock. 


urenase ««v> iTDnng acuusunenut, ure — . , , 

tonday it would acquire IDB for about $721 million “I s ™' 
IDB became embroiled La controversy after auditor DeiotUt « 
Tooche resigned in May, saying it wasn't convinced the compa- 
ny's first-quarter results were accurate. Deloitte questioned aw. u 
one third of IDB’s $155 million in pretax first-quarter earnings 


McDermott to Build Ships for Export 


WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — McDermott International 
Inc. .won a contract to build container ships for a European 
shipping company, with the $829.5 million project contingent 

' upon financing guarantees from the US. government, the compa- 
ny and the government announced Tuesday. 

The McDermott project and a second planned by a Tenneco 
Inc. subsidiary would represeni the first ships built in the United 
Stales for export since 19^7, according to the U.S. Departments 
Tnma>ortatioii. 

The loan guarantees are designed to offset subsidies oftpn 
provided by foreign governments to shipbuilders in their nations, 

McDermott has contracted with Saracen Group of Geneva to «'* 
- build 10 multipurpose container ships ax its shipyard near Morgan - 
City, 'Louisiana. 


GTE to Cany Video on Phone lines 


IRVING, Texas (Bloomberg) — GTE Telephone Operations,^ 
subsidiary of GTE yorp-. i 


_______ a said Tuesday it would roll out video-on- 

demand service to businesses in five states using telephone switch- 
ing equipment from AT&T Network Systems. 

The switches, winch cost $1 milli on to $2 million, will give GTE 
customers access to movies, surveys and educational program- 
ming over more rhannrig Currently, such programming is trans- 


mitted mainly through cable-based systems, not telephone line& 
Terms of the GTE-/ 


ApacMCorp 
BmcAmerlcaCF 
Baar Steams 
BtadcADadtar 
Carnival Cp 


Coral vail 

Chlautta HM 
Cohen Stow Tat 






EmarvMMs Fit 
Emahvay* Find 
FstSacurCp 
Gilbert Amoca 
G ttPtnrsine 
Gaodvaar 
KarcuMalnd 
HtYkUnoo 
IPSOO Inc 
I luted Indus 
Iroquois Bcp 
Liberty Bcp 
Loot coo Inc 

Mentor incFtf 
Mercarrm«Ba> 


O 07 9-38 10-31 

O 00 +21 9-11 

Q .15 8-12 *26 

Q .10 9-16 

Q .14 8-15 *31 

a 05 *21 9-7 

M 08 *15 *JT 

M 088 *15 Ml 


Si M » « 


8-11 *31 

Q .15 FT 9-15 

a 76 *23 9-6 

a JO B-TS 9-9 

M .1187 *11 M 

O 3D *16 9-15 

Q 06 9-16 1*1 

M 0725 *15 *31 

B .12 *9 9-38 

M 9-U 1*1 


Mld-AH RHy 

.ECoSfo 


Myers LEI 

Pacific Telecom 
Ptcadlly Cafe 
PetombcEi 
Protective Uto 
ReiMta 
Seven HIUsHn 
Tandy Carp 
UNSLFhif 
Waver tv Inc 
ZwetaToiRet 


Q 34 *9 *31 

a .15 *19 9-2 

Q 08 9-1 1 1*11 
M 08 *15 831 
G 78 *10 1M 
. 31 -831 935 

Q 055 *31 *15 
Q 03 *19 *5 

Q .12 *9 1*3 

Q 015 830 *39 
Q 08 *15 *1 

M 06 *15 831 
_ .05 *18 *31 

a a wo "w 

a % nv 


e-amiwd; ff-nayaMe la 1 


i feeds; re- 


AT&T Corp. contract were not disclosed. 
GTE’s announcement raises the stakes in the race to connect \ 
teiq>hones to televiaon and computers. 


Delta Union Ready to Drop 2% Raised 

ATLANTA (Bloomberg) — Delta Air Lines’ pilots union 
agreed Tuesday to forgo a 2 percent pay raise and said it hoped the 
carrier would use the proceeds to add flights and rehire some 
pilots. 

The Air Line Pilots Association, which represents 9,000 Dd}a 
pilots, said it would meet the carrier’s pay-freeze request. The pay 
raise would have cost the ailing airline $26 milli on a year. 

: Meanwhile, TJSAIR Group Inc. said it would lay off about 400 
workers at Allegheny Commuter Airlines and sell a big chunk of 
the unit’s assets to Mesa Airlines Inc. of Farmington, New 
Mexico, an independent carrier that offers some of its flights 
under the banner of USAir Express. 

"This transaction is definitely a win-win situation for both 
parties.” said Clark Stevens, president of Florida Gulf Airlines 
Mesa’s East Coast unit 


J 


Wheat Futures Rise on Trade Accord; 


Possible Release of Nigerian Politician Dents Oil Prices ?G3SSEteS£sS 


CHICAGO (Bloomberg) — Wheat futures rose Tuesday after 
Canada agreed Monday ^ to substantially limit its wheal shipments 
to the United States for one year. The agreement awaits final 


Reuters 

LONDON — Oil prices fell Tuesday on 
market beliefs that Nigeria’s military gov- 
ernment would announce the release of 
Moshood Abiola, the undeclared winner 
of last year’s annulled presidential elec- 
tion. 


Brent crude oil for September delivery 
fell as much as 55 cents before recovering 
in late trading to $18.64, still 26 cents 
below Mondays settlement price of 18.90. 

Oil prices had risen to their highest lev- 


els in more than a year on Monday as the 
month-old strike worsened. 

“The market is cooling down here. From 
a trading point of the view, the market is 
expecting the release of Abiola, which 
should take the price straight back down,** 
said Peter Gignoux, head of the London 
energy desk at Smith Barney Shearson Inc. 

But other traders said it remained to be 
seen whether Mri. Abiola or the striking 
unions would accept the release quietly 
and not insist that Mi. Abiola be installed 
as the country’s president 


Mr. Abiola was arrested last month-arid 
charged with treason for proclaiming him- 
self president; his freedom is one of the key 
demands of striking oil workers. 


Analysts said the Nigerian gov ern meat 
might be eager to stop the crisis before the 
powerful 3.5 mflhon-member Nigerian La- 
bor Congress joins the strike Wednesday. 


Oil. prices have gained more than- $2 
since the oil workers began their strike in a 
push to get the military government to step 
aside in favor of Mr. Abiola. 


fader the tentative accord, the amount of durum and hard red 
stung wheat shipped to the UJS. from Canada will be reduced. 
Durum Hour is used for pasta, and hard red spring flour is used for 
bread. r. 

The benchmark wheat contract for December delivery at the 
Chicago Board of Trade rose 4.25 cents, to $3.5175 a bushel. ” 
Gains in wheat futures were limited because the restrictions will 
affect only a small portion of total U.S. wheat supplies and 
because the agreement had already been anticipated, traders sai<£^ 

For the Record 

. Bmfir^tontndnslrieslnc. said third-quarter profit from opera- 
tions rose to S33.8 million from $28. T million as demand for its 
products increased. ( Bloomberg) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agvncv Front* Pmu« Aug. 2 


CtoMPrav. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amra HM 
ACF Holding 
Aegon 
AhoM 
Atac Nobel 
AMEV 

Bote-Wmonen 
CSM 
DSM 
Elsevier 
Fofcter 
Gl Si-Brocades 
HBG 
Helneken 


6200 60.10 
45 4408 
100.10 9800 
4700 4600 
Z190D 21630 
7660 7500 
3900 3908 
W0O W 
14700 14400 
14690 14100 
1610 1610 
50 e/M 
300 300 

Tina DU 

Hwjovww 7900 80 

Huiler Dountas 7680 
I HC Color*) 

Inter Mueller 
InTI Nederland 
KLM 


KNPBT 
KPN 
Neditovd 
Oce Grtnfvn 

PpMwed 

Philips 
Pal to ram 
Rrtieco 
Rodamco 
Rollnca 
Rarenta 
Raval Dutch 
star* 

Unilever 

vanOmmeren 

VNU 

MM ters/K tower 


76 

4100 4100 
B1 81 
8300 8100 
55J0 55.10 
4900 4900 
5000 5000 
7230 7250 

79.10 7830 

5300 51 JO 
5500 5540 




paw?* OP 


11700 

5500 55001 
I2O40 119.10 
87.90 8700 
WO 19900 
4830 NL30 
19500 19000 
5400 5300 
18850 1EL40 
■118 11850 


AG Fin 

AJmanii 

Artted 

Barca 

BBL 

Bekoert 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

Cocker III 

Crtaopa 

CBInjvt 

DeHnlze 

Etedrabei 

Electron na 

GIB 

GSL 

Gevaert 

Gtowrbel 

ImmotM 

,-flte li, I, ,||. 

I>J LURIUW* 

Masons 

Petroftna 
Power! hn 
Recncel 
Rovale Batoe 


Brussels 

2640 2605 
77 00 7450 




Sac Gen Beletaue 

Safina I 

Salvav I 

TMHdderlo 1 

Trocteftel i 

UCB : 

Union MinKre 
WoBoraUM 




Frankfurt 



— '.Hyoottank 

Bar verelnsfiA 

BSC 

BHF Bank 

CammetTbank 
Continental 
Daimler Benz 


18270 179 

3ffl 365 

2493 2473 

615 610 
1000 999 

379.20310-50 
372. 36150 
431 432 

473 470 
715 715 


870B61J 


27S2BJ8 
81820 BOO 
50649050 


W Babcock 

Deutsche Bonk 7420073170 
Douglas 510 496 

Dmdner Bank 39338850 
FeWmuehie m 309 

P PCriwo htoesdi 2183021500 
Har v cnet 331 333 

Henkel 604 599 

MOCMtof 934 926 

Haechsi 3585034500 

Hdizmann 
Horten 
IWKA 
Kail Soiz 
Karstadt 
Kauftwf 
KHD 


KteKkner werke 15350 


21850 218 
390 386 

13850 138 

5B0 sa 

496 4«2 

1312012840 

I 


Lufthansa 
MAN 


2n2ii„ 

45100 446 

Mannesman* 446 *40 

Metalloeseii msemsi 

MuenchRueck 2995 2995 

- 845 840 

4664S17D . 
23850 235} 


Porsrte 

Preusuni 

PWA 



Helsinki 


Amer-YMyma 

Eneo-Gutselt 

Huhtamau 

5-0 J*. 

Kvmmene 

Metro 

Nokia 

Poll Into 

Repota 

Stockmann 




123 12S 

43L7T* 4300 
179 179 

10.90 1070 
125 125 

173 174 

512 51 
73 49 

96 9*50 
215 21 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Ask! 3200 3230 
Camay Pacific 12.95 1200 


Cheung Kang 3800 39.10 
— • Ight Pwr *100 *100 


4690 44J0 
1405 1400 
2X55 2170 
21.15 2005 


China Light 

Dairy Farm Inn 1105 1100 
Hang Lung Dev 1400 1*05 
Hong Seng Bonk Suo 5550 
Henaenon Land 4890 4870 
HK Air Eng. 

HK China Gas 
HK Electric 

H K Land 

1C Realty Truel 2100 
HSBC Holdings 9675 9*00 
HKShangHfls 11.95 110S 
HK Telecomm 1500 isjs 
HK Ferry 1865 1500 

Hutch Whamuoa 3630 3500 
Hvwi Dev 2110 2200 
janflne Mam. 4305 4075 
jardlno Sfr Hid 
KOtelOOn Motor 
Mandarin Orient 1030 10.10 
Miramar Hard 2175 2170 
New World Dev 
SHK Props 

SMinc 
Swire PocA 
Tol Cheung Pros 1270 1200 
TVE 300 300 

wharf Held 3X50 USD 
Wing Ones Iffil U0O 1100 
Wlnsor [ nd. 1173 1105 
: 949503 


2570 2505 
52 5275 
209 205 
6575 6575 




Johannesburg 

2300 24 


A6CI 
Al»ch 

Anglo Amor 

Bartow* 

Biwoor 

Buitata 

De P eers 

Oriotanteln 

Gencor 

GFSA 

Harmony 

HlghveW Sleet 

Kloof 

NedbgnkGrp 
Randtamein 
Rusaiai 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sasol 

Western Deeo 
Composite 
Pravton : 


118 ill 
254 250 

34 ' 
975 *900 
HA 45 
1120011175 
67.25 4775 
1100 1100 
126 124 

2500 25 

X 

59 

XL25 33 

49 4825 
104 103 

8779 8680 
4S0C HA. 

28 2B 
198 194 

5712J1 


London 


Nan 101 304 

AlliM Lyons 5L9S S01 

Arlo Wiggins 193 209 

Argyll Group 274 2 09 

As* Bril Foods 192 572 

BAA 903 972 

5.13 4.99 

Bmk Scotland 105 105 

507 JJS4 


?ET 

Wu* a«» 

BOC Group 


Bawatar 

BP 

Brft AJrnavs 
Bril Cos 
Brit Steel 
Brit Telecom 
BTR 

Cade Wire 

- - Scti 


coots VI Velio 
Comm Union 
Courtauto* 

ECC Group 
Enterprise OH 


509 U4 

402 645 

1.U 1.1 B 

370 115 

702 707 

130 STB 
404 401 

4.19 4.13 

430 4.17 

200 174 

108 106 

& $ 

6*9 475 

3M || 

539 509 

500 i» 
303 300 

637 43? 


Eurotunnel 336 373 

F Isorts 102 174 

Forte 278 278 


CkteeProv. 


203 

603 

503 
623 
105 

sm 

206 

109 

8415 

80S 

402 

514 

ITS 

673 

700 

105 

657 

504 
475 
670 


470 

508 

401 

680 

103 

518 

XII 

415 

612 

502 

706 


GEC 
GenlAac 
Glaxo 
Grand Met 
GRE 
Guinness 
GUS 
Hanson 
HlUsdown 
HSBC HUos 
ICI 

Inchcape 
Kineftelwr 
Ladbrok* 

Land Sec 
Laperte 
unmo 
Legal Got Grp 
Lloyds Bank 

Marta Sp 
ME PC 
Non p 
NofWest 
NttiWst Woter 
Peorwi 
PIO 
Piiklngtan 
P w wr G e n 
Pruteentled 
Ror* Org 
Rcdcmcol 
Redtand 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 

Rolls Royce 
Rotnirm limit) 

Royal Scot 
R7Z 

Salnsbwry 
ScoTNewcss 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 
Shell 
Stehe 

Smith Nephew 
SntWIKIftle B 

Smith (WH) 

Sun Alliance 375 1 

Tate 5 Lyle 602 4 

Tosco 204 2 

Thorn EMI 10.48 K 

Tomkins 276 2 

T5B Group 207 2 

Unilever 1X44 ig 

UM Biscuits 374 3 

Vodafone 1.92 | 

war Loan Ita 4172 41 

Wellcome 600 6 

Whitbread 596 5 

WUIIatmHdgs 173 3 

Willi* Corroon 105 1 

;X»iM^ae6ie 


282 




70S 




Madrid 


BBV 3175 3155 

Bco Central Hbp. Z7JD 2770 
Boned Santa nde r 53» 5 — 
1015 1 


CEPSA 
Dragodas 
6nde*o 
E rente 
Iberdrola 
Retool 
ratmeatera 
Tolefanlca 


3340 331 

TOO 211. 

6230 6260 
188 187 

956 970 

ss as 

3830 3700 
1000 IBID 


Milan 


Banco Cemm 4870 4800 

Bastedl 140 140 

Benetton grow mao saw 

_ ins ms 


Credltal 

Eniehem 

Ferfin 

Pertta Rlw 

Flat SPA 

Flnmecctmlca 

Generali 

IF I 

IFIL 

itatoem 

Itatoos , 

Itaimoblllare 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

PlnNll 

RAS 

Rlnaseente 
Salpem 


2630 2485 
224S 2 730 
305D son 
2840 2025 

i960 mo 

7035 6940 
1890 1*55 
42750 4250 
29700 295S0 
4645 6005 

13350 13270 

5540 5480 

44500 44750 
15300 15200 
1514 1494 

7430 2*00 

5270 5180 
24400 26150 
10490 IU0B0 
4195 4190 


San Panto Torino 9030 9738 

SIP 4430 4505 

SME 3m 3095 

Snto 2520 2440 

S Sonde 34250 342S0 

Stef _ 5390 5250 

nroAssi Rlsp 2800028850 


mib index j US* 


Prevto w : 


Montreal 

A Icon Alum (men 34V 341fa 
Bonk Montreal J4V*j si 
Bell Canada 41* 45* 

Bom tardier B 19H TWh 

Cembtor ink 18 

Cascades 79* 74 

Dominion Test a 7 7 


CtoMPrev. 


Donohue a 
FCA Inti 
MacMillan B! 
[toll Bk Canada 
P ow e r Com. 
Quebec Tel 

Quebecar A 
QuebecarB 
T elegtobe 
Vtoeofran 


8S 


l»k 129k 
4V6 416 

1896 1896 
jjjk 899 
19*6 1994 
19J* 19*6 
179* 1796 
1716 1796 
!8*» 
1296 12Vk 
: 191677 


Paris 


Accor m 678 

AIT Llnuldc B2S BOP 

AkHteTAisthofn 6SP 658 

Axa . 27370 265 

Banco! re (CleJ 519 513 

8IC 1310 1297 

BNP 245.4025B60 

Bawygues 629 61* 

Danone 866 835 

Carretour 2723 2051 

CCF. 2319938^9 

Cerus niso ns0O 

Charaetn 1417 1425 

aments Franc 325 32100 

Chib Med 41100 412 

EIFAaUltoinc 42541650 

Euro Disney 900 mio 

Gen. Ecu* 582 365 

Haws 45900 452 

) metal 405 581 

Lafarge Caoaee *519044110 
Legrand 6730 66*0 

Lynn, f'aux S56 345 

Oreal (L ) mo 1229 

L.VJVLH. 

a^achoHe 



Michel In B 
Moulinex 
Paribas 

Pechlnev Inti 

Pernod-Rtcnra 33700 33770 

pmki era ear 

Plnault Print 946 777 

Radiotedmlaue 510 483 

RtePputonc A 135.10 12850 


RaHLSr. Louis 
Sanafl 

Salta Ga&atn 
5.E_B. 

Ste Generate 


1644 1631 
965 959 

699 675 

564 544 

607 597 

__ 27800 272.10 

Thoiraoo-CSF 17100 16670 
Total 3310030900 

UAJ». 15*60 mSB 

Vataa 28140290J0 


Sao Paulo 


Boko do Brasil 7101 2000 
Bansspa 80S 618 


Brahma 
Cam la 
Eietrobras 
Itoubteico 
UoHT 

Poranapanemc 


Sousa Crtn 

Tdatarra 

Tefasp 

Uslmlnss 

vole Rio Doce 

VBrtg 


6H 500 
230 235 

9000 8610 
2D 241 

■IS ^ 

336 329 

15 1400 
12711909 
6110 6810 
44.10 43.10 
425 420 

l.tt 1.18 
11611149 
980010000 
43107 


Singapore 

csrfe. 

DBS 

Fraser Heave 
Gentlns 
Golden I 


Hope PI 
Haw Pw 
Hume industries 
H W i cu P B 
Kennel 
JCL Keaanp 
Lum Chang 
" ‘ . Bankg 
OCBCtoretan 
Dub 
OUE 


Shangrlla 
5ln» Dfirtir 
5(A foreign 
5 ‘pore Land 

S!3» 

StaoreTetecemm 
Straits ^ Trading 
UOB foreign 
UQL 


MS 


I 778 
7 JO 7.10 
1100 1100 
17 T7.W 
1X60 1300 
272 201 
132 ua 
199 6 

640 500 
1070 1000 
376 374 
100 109 
975 900 
UJO UM 
600 600 
600 60S 
1120 IOM 
130 LIS 
434 4332 

1300 mo 

700 70S 

M.M 

NA 

108 
158 154 
U 1370 
271 225 
224130 


Stockholm 

71 


AGA 

AeeoA 

Astra A 

Altai Capce 

EtearwwB 

Ericsson 

Es»etta-A 


&w 

171 169 


99 

JM 


Close Prav. I 


HandetsSanken 
Investor B 
Norsk Hvdra 

Procardia AF 

Sandvlk B 
SCA-A 
5-E Banken 
SkondJaF 
Skanska 
SKF 
Stora 

Treiieborw BF 


105 104 

185 183 

25700 254 , 

NA - 

120 116 
J18 118 , 

49.10 4600 
J2T 118 
162 161 
151 147 

425 425 

105 IDS 1 


Toronto 


AWflW Price 
AgnlcD Eagle 
Air ( 


Alberta Energy 
“ Tick Res 


Sydney 

934 922 
400 402 
1902 1900 
308 160 
BBS 085 
402 40* 
5.18 STS 
187* 1684 
435 481 
1.13 1.11 
105 105 
1130 1108 
1.95 1.95 
2M 102 
1100 1102 
880 8.90 
433 431 
162 148 
405 403 
191 103 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 
Borol 

Bougainville 
Coles Myer 
Carnal cd 
CRA 
CSR 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Field 
[Cl Australia 
Mosel Ian 
MIM 

Ned AUS> Bank 
flows Can* 

Nine Network 
N Broken Hill 
Pec Dun kip 

Pioneer ion . 

Nmndv Paseidan 209 3.17 
OCT Resawraes 107 10* 
Santas 197 196 

TUT 260 260 

Western twining 7 jo 705 
westooc Banking 470 470 
WtoodsUto 485 485 


Amparrfck 

Bk Nova SCOtto 
BC Gas 
BC Telecom 
Bra ma loo 
Brtmswlck 
CAE 
Camdev 
C1BC 

Canadian PodWc 
Can Tire a 
C antor 
Cara 

CCL ind B 
CineatoK 
Cam taco 
Camnesf Exrt 
CSAMal A 
Dofasco 

Dylex A 


T7W 1714 

169k 17 

6W 6%5 
TIM 21V 
304 31W. 
45« 45* 
25V. 249k 
Mto 141* 
23» ZH* 
036 007 

io* 10 
7 n 7ta 
<8 48 

3(H1i 29W 

22 am 

HH* KHk 
20 20U. 
180 180 
916 9 

5*> 5U. 

22 *, 22 
2416 24 V5 
9W 996 
2186 21* 
073 072 


U.S. FUTURES 


Via Ateodoted ftn 


Aug. 2 


Season Seasvi 
HWi Low 


Open Htoh Low CUM Oh OPJrd 


Sean Season 
M0h Low 


Oeen Kgh Liter Oose On Op. Inf 


Season Season 
Low 


ft«wi HW» Low Close dot Oom 


12.10 

110 * 

1287 

1170 

1180 

1104 


9.17Mar9S 1169 1170 1105 

!&5JMaytS 1164 1164 1101 

10070095 1162 11J9 1100 

1007 OCt 95 1107 1109 1101 

mniwirta 

1106 May 96 


Grains 


***7 jspojl Mewnekim- 6BWn or fau»w 

131 134,4 131 13S»u ♦OJB’4 14777 

XA5 109 DfCM Xttft 150 X4Slii 14916 +0,04^ tuEm 

14 to 127 Mcr?5 in ia>, ISlJ? iSStSSS 

64%. 530V. Ml 339% 3018* rtU»8k 1JM9 

gLtatos lao^^rcsatos 70*5 " , * +0 - ra ‘ 2 

JHpAT tKBOT) MUM miniiniiii- uQb uir immu 
3-55W la? 14 Sep 94 1*1 V* 14 341 144%4-^OJM 1549S 

XS31fc 153 4.956 

37115Mav95 304 *084 368 

3331* 3.16HA49S 309W 331 129V4 331 46838* 3W 

131 *083 1 

140 


71006 (Man's. sdes 0058 
AtoYiyy.lta VHJto up 5N 
COCOA (NCSE) BmwlckB-INrlB 
1543 hQDSapM 1438 1480 140 

JMO 1041 Dec M 1521 1525 1499 

IfK TSSt ' 1SB ‘ 1520 

1612 1W8MOV95 
1600 - 12258495 

ten 1 265 sen K 

I6B3 1290 Dec 95 

g-es graWSL '& "■ 


H01 

1108 

1102 

1100 

11.17 

1121 


160 

-0.18 20TO 
—0.14 1031 
-0.14 210 

-aw 5 


94220 . 90750 Mm M 91130 <0.190 93.140 MIO 
niBO 9262O0M96 91030 93800 KLoS 93SOD 
Ettsoiet NA. Man's, satos »fc»74 
Mon's. open g* 2055034 off 64U 


•40128714 
* 50104071 


EkT 32805 


1463 

1506 

1545 

1566 

1386 

1006 

1631 

1656 


I 33023 
’71 SB 
I 7,915 
2.MI 
- 2045 
-f 1892 
—8 4047 
-0 1075 


3J3 


309 


Ertn Bov Mines 15S4 MAk 


trySHver A 002 082 
PCAIntl 4 V, 415 

PM Ind A TV. TVS 

Fletcher OnH a I7ta 17V, 
FPI 5ta 5ta 

Gentra a** 

GuH Cdo Res 5*S 5*k 

Heesital 12% 12te 

Hemla gw Mines 13V. I3ta 


Moll Inner 


Hudson's B4tr 


Inca 

IPL Energy 




Tokyo 

Akof Eiectr 

Asahl Chemical 

AsafU Glass 1 

Bank of Tokyo 

Brlftaesfone 

Canon 

Casio 

Dal Nlooon Print 


.1 


Latatl 
LoblawCo 
Mackenzie 
Magna Inti A 
Maole Leaf 

Maritime 
Mark Res 

Motion A 
Nome Ind A 

Noronda Inc 
Noranda Fares! 

Norton Energy 

Nitei Tetocon) 

Noon Cara 


\% 1“ 




a 


Dal wo House 1480 1450 ] 
1600 15 


POCO Perroiewn 

g 2*Cora 

KUVFOCK 


Dafwa Securities 

Foauc 

Full Bank 

Full Photo 
Fulltsu 
HI toe hi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 
Ho Yokada 
Itochu 

Japan Airthies 
Kail mo 
Kansai Power 
KamvikISteM 
j Urtn Br ewery 
iccmcrsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 


010 4260 
2290 2360 
2290 2220 
1070 W30 
1010 969 

894 - 

1750 1710 


Rgyql Bank Con 2Sw 


m i» 
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251k 2SW 

36 3S9li 
39Vk 31 
29W 294k 
MW MV 

20 19^ 

21 20* 

T* t 

5*to 57ta 
Tlta HM 
724k 22th 
9Vi m 
21M 20*4 
S*. S*. 

24H 243k 
UM MM 
m U4i 

46 44 ta 
123k 12th 
19<h 19% 
380 380 
281k 29 

V* 9* 
0L55 IL55 
14M IS 

2996 2*Vh 
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78 78 


277 

202V, 

285 

2JOW 

203 


410*1 

mw 

25801 
*0801*1 9066 


Seen 
Deew 

gsLsoes I4A. Mon's, setn 3.751 
38067 nH V 

CORN (CBOT) ' Unnuntoinm.ttAni<FIuM 

2.931. JlJUStoW 2.J7M 119 2.161k 2.174k 

2.17 Ore 94 2011k 273 270 27116 

276 Mar 95 2J0 202 12816 20016 

2J2ViMay95 207 3JHM 23FU 237 I A _ 

VVA 2«h trn 14 I V,-iSvi 8074 

209 5a>95 243 241 242 20216 *08016 SfJ 

20SV5D6CM 24JV, 204V5 203 206? *08016 4^ 

Erf. sdea 14800 Man's.staes 25075 158 

Man's open i N 715J Z5 up 462 
SOYBEANS (CBOT] sjMBunSBkwniW imuu knUwl 

STJtoAuBM 58716 SJUY, 1829,-08215 11015 

7881k 502 Sap 96 5.7115 574%. 507V, 50916—082% 14087 

S3 6 Nov.96 161 545 S58 £6B JJS 

HK 1 ' 525* sTSM-aoiv* — 

JMVi MT9» 503 -amu 

5.90 585 S86V4-088V, 5081 

5841k 121 

581 —082 17 

184VI 583V, 585 *08115 2008 

593W— OOllk 


13450 

13*80 

13280 

12475 

11475 

11980 

I11J0 

11200 


9685 Sep 9* 9S60 W85 9505 
89.I0NOVM 9980. 10050 9875 
9380 Jan 95 10200 BRIO 10280 
MjSMarK 10680 W7JD 10680 

32-gJuffe 11080 11880 11080 

1 0580 lap IS 
1120ONOU95 
JrniM 

Aden’s, xdes J018 


9705 

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■0780 

11080 

111.95 
1138S 
11575 

115.95 


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non *■»■*- 1 now mAuo,, 
KHHSSSI 23S 07199 oltim anae 

niS? 2m2EE:!i 55,47 117174 17,41 07167 
ug SfflSJSS? 07102 87taJ 07100 07W8 

Morrs OBOttef 3375B «+ 1477 1 

««“«***!« fCMaU tsar mane- 1 

«S595 114394 WSW 063U —27 4071 

L»0Mtr9* O0»4 _3 I.Dda 

^775_ Man%_KteM _ 3CUM2 ^ l,BW 


-1 39.962 
+ 1 7.531 
*1 603. 

♦ 1 501 

*1 69 

+ 1 6 



Atom's open ltd 23042 ad 


Metals 


7871k 

7JJ4 

7.05 

703V6 

?86'.1 

iMV, 

579 

dJOVi 


501 Jan 95 506 
U9>Ma-fS 577 
575 W May 95 i53 
5J0V%JU19S 587 
579 Aug 95 
578 Sep 95 
570V, Nov 95 586 
Jut 96 

Est. sales 30800 Atom’s, sates xw 

Man^menmr 122006 off 418^^ 

WTBEAHMIBAL CCBOn Ittm-Mnwln 

17*00 fug 94 17600 17470 17509 175100 — 050 10.763 

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* * 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1994 


Page II 


EUROPE 



Z?.«l 

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r 


— National 
Westminster Bank PLC, Brit- 
ain's sewmd-largest retail bank, 
said Tuesday that first-half pre- 
.xaxprofit surged 83 percent as a 
revival m the economy cut its 
problem loans, but analysts ex- 
pressed concern over a squeeze 
on income. 

. Bolstered by a 40 percent 
drop in provisions against bad 
;dcbi$, pretax profit climbed to 
£767 million (51 billion.) in the 
.first six months of 1994 from a 
restated £419 million a year ear- 
lier. 

. “The principal immediate 
driving force in our i mpinv^ 


Offer 1$ Increased 
On Funerals firm 

Bloomberg Business Hews 

. LONDON — Service Corp. 
International, the world’s larg- 
est funeral home company, 
raised its cash offer Tuesday for 
£ Great Southern Group PLC by 
14 percent, to £99.1 million 
(5152 million), and accused the 
British company of distor ting 
its earnings. 

; Houston-based Service Coro, 
said it would now offer 630 
pence for each ordinary share, 
up from 600 pence, and 271 
pence for each convertible 
share, up from 239 pence. 

. It also charged that Great 
Southern last year Hsted as 
fit some surplus payments 
not yet hej£ 


results is a marked reduction in 
provisions,” theNaiWesi chair- 
man, Lord Alexander, said, 
adding that debt provisions had 
fallen more (prickly than execu- 
tives bad expected. 

■■ "With the improvement in 

earnings, we are now in a posi- 
tion to draw: our confidence in 
the future by inareasing our in- 
terim dividend to 7-3 peace,” 
Lord Alexander said. 

The rise in profit, however, 
was mostly due to the sharp 
drop in bad-debt provisions, to 
£370 million from £619 wiiiH«n 
Net interest income fell to £1.79 
bSHon from £1.82 billion. 

“NatWest is still struggling 
tomake progress at the operat- 
ing level, said Martin Green, a 
bank analyst at Smith New 
Court. 

A reluctance of Britons to 
borrow after thdr longest reces- 
sion since the 1930s helped cut 
Nat West’s operating income by 
about 2 percent. 

So far, NatWest is the only 
British bank to report a decline 
in fust-half operating income. 

NatWestV net interest mar- 
gin — the difference between 
what the bank earns an loans 
and what it pays to depositors 
— dropped to 2.6 percentage 
points from 2.8 points a year 
earlier because of slack demand 
for loans and stiff competition 
from other banks. 

"There’s a lot of competition 
for what business there is, and 
we’ll be fighting to keep our 
share,” the bank’s chief execu- 
tive, Derek Wanless, said. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


BTG: Want a Better Mousetrap? 


By Erik Ipsen 

Inlcrrumaaal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — British Technology 
Group is not a company that believes in 
overnight success. In what could be the 
most lucrative deal in its 45 years of 
existence, it licensed Ford Motor Co. to 
produce a revolutionary gearless trans- 
mission it calls Torotrak — a transmission 
BTG has been refining, patenting and 
promoting for more than three decades. 

If the Torotrak system is a success, it 
win only be one of a long series of them 
for BTG, which calls itself the world’s 
hugest technology-transfer organization. 

Set up by a Labor Party government in 
the 1940s to patent and promote British 
inventions, BTG was sold into private 
hands three years ago and its ownership 
was transferred to managers and finan- 
cial institutions. It will soon be floated 
on the London Stock Exchange. 

After a British discovery, p enicillin, 
went on to become a worldwide financial 
success, the government decided to set 
up BCG. The bulk of its patents remain 
on British products. 

Its notation is expected to raise as 
much as £20 million. It would value the 
company, which had pretax profit of 
£3.7 nriDion on revenue of £29 milli on m 
the year ending March 1994, at around 
£50 minion. 

The flotation would follow the suc- 
cessful sale of 3i Group PLC, which was 
opened to public ownership last mnnth. 
That company, formerly caned Investors 
in Industry Group PLC, was also formed 
by the British government Just after 
World War n to finance small business- 
es. Shares in 3i Group closed Tuesday at 
295 S peace ($450), up Z 

As perhaps befitting the market leader 
in the patenting and promotion of tech- 
nology, BTC’s boast is that its technol- 
ogies typically revolutionize their mar- 
ketplaces. But far from being lionized, at 
least initially, BTG’s more common ex- 
perience is one of rejection. 


Thirty years ago it happened with pv- 
rethrin. a then-revolutionary type of in- 
secticide based on natural substances. 

“At the time, none of the existing 
insecticide manufacturers would touch 
it,” said Ian Harvey. BTG’s chief execu- 
tive. The first license went to Sumitomo 
Corp. of Japan, which liked the technol- 
ogy enough to start a new unit to pro- 
duce it Today, pyrethrin accounts for 
one-fif th Of the world insecticide market 
Magnetic imaging, the successor tech- 
nology to many types of X-rays, is anoth- 
er case in point BTG took out its first 


BTG calls itself the 
world’s largest 
technology-transfer 
organization, bat 
it does not believe in 
overnight success. 


patents in the mid-1970s and today holds 
a chttch of patents underpinning a S!5 
billion-a-year business. 

With its patents on pyrethrin now 
nearly all expired and its magnetic- imag- 
ing patents well past the middle of their 
lifespan, BTG’s big bet on ToroLrak 
could fill a large gap. To date it has 
invested £6 million in ToroLrak, which 
alone accounts for 300 of BTG’s 10,000 
patents and patent applications. 

Early tests on Torotrak have indicated 
potential fuel savings of 15 percent and 
emission reductions of nearly a third. 

Those gains come from a system that 
instead of miring an engine’s power to its 
wheels via a fixed series of four or five 
gearing ratios does it with an infinitely 
variable ratio. It is like the difference 
between an ordinary off-on fight switch 
and a dimmer switch. In Torouak’s case, 
instead of gears, the system uses a box 


filled with a series of disks, bearings and 
traction fluid. 

The basic idea for such 3 device dates 
to the 1 9th century. Getting it to work 
cheaply and smoothly is what is new. 

“if it delivers on the promise we have 
seen, it could be a very important devel- 
opment,” said Adam Slirren, manager of 
power-train research at Ford in Britain, 
wbo expects to have an answer by the 
end of 1995. 

Torotrak is fighter, simpler and cheap- 
er to make than conventional transmis- 
sions, and what is more, it can be used on 
any size engine from the largest truck 
motors to autos. 

“The Ford license is very important,” 
said Geoff Soares, a Torotrak project 
manager. “In the auto industry, compa- 
nies fixe to be No. Z not No. 1, with new 
technologies.” 

Mr. Soares said that others ranging 
from truck manufacturers to bearing 
makers and oil companies are charging 
in “since they now see it as having poten- 
tial.” 

With years of tests still to come, even if 
it pans out the first commercial version 
of Torotrak will not be available until the 
turn of the century. 

An even more striking example of a 
BTG technology that has proven pain- 
fully far ahead of its time is a relatively 
simple device called a grain snipper. By 
in essence combing the grain off its stalks 
instead cutting the stalks off at the base 
and then threshing them, the device can 
harvest a field at twice the speed and 
with half as large an engine as a conven- 
tional combine. 

Mr. Harvey says the device could cut 
costs in the harvester market by as much 
as 75 percent. 

BTG signed its first licensing agree- 
ment with a small British manufacturer in 
1987 and only recently was able to sign up 
Massey-Ferguson Ltd. in Canada. 

BTG promises its inventors that it will 
more than double their expected reve- 
nues. In return BTG gets a 50 percent cut 
of all fees. 


Investor’s JEUrope 


Frankfurt 

DAX 



London 

FTSE 100 index 

3500 
3*00 
3303 
3300 
3100 



2900 — 


M AM JJA 
1994 


'W aUTXa 

1994 


b’ITB j j a 

1994 


Exchange - 

Index 

Tuesday' 

Close 

Prev. 

Close 

% 

Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

■41024 

412.14 

*1.72 

Brussels 

Stock index ' 

7,694.06 

7.637.61 

+0.74 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,186.39 

2,153.79 

+1.51 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

824.24 

815.68 

+1.05 

Helsinki 

HEX 

1,87006 

1,860.82 

+0.82 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2/456.10 

2,408.30 

+1.98 

London- 

FTSE 100 

3.157.50 

3,097,40 

+1.94 

Madrid 

General Index 

322.74 

317.25 

+1.73 

MHan 

MIB 

1156 

1.14&00 

+0.56 

Paris 

CAC40 

2,11753 

2,069.56 

+2.3C 

Stockholm 

Aflaersvaertden 

1385-71 

NA. 

‘ - 

Vienna 

Stock Index 

460.41 

457.33 

+0.56 

Zurich 

SSS 

932.19 

SIS. 15 

+1.53 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


IracmalUiiu] Ikrald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Cost-Cutting at British Petroleum 
Pays Off as 2d-Quarter Net Jumps 


Bloomberg Business News . 

LONDON — British Petroleum PLC said 
Tuesday that second-quarter profit rose a stxon- 
ger-than-expected 40 percent as savings from 
two years of cost-cutting offset a sharp) drop in 
ail prices. ” 

BP, Europe’s second-largest 08 company, also 
said lower operating costs and debt payments 
helped it benefit from an increase In petroleum 
reduction and . a rebound in its chemicals - 
isiness. - 

Net income rose to £367 mfflkxn ($562 million) 
from £261 million oh a replacement-cost basis, 
which reflects current rather than historical costs 
of supplies. 

• Before special items, BP*s replacement-cost 
profit rose 36 percent in the first half, to £640 
million. 

. On a historical-cost basis, net income nearly 
‘tripled, to £530 nulHoix from £182 minion. 

BP shares rose as high as 430 pence on Tues- 
day and still ended at a record ckMcin^r of 4193 
pence a share, up 8 . '.. . .. : - 

The stock has risen 1 1 percent in the past three 


weeks and is up nearly 20 percent since the start 
of the year. 

The better- than-cxpected results followed 
news of profit declines at most major U.S. oil 
companies because of weak refining margins and 
oil prices that fcD 15 percent. 

“TheyVe largdy completed the major part of 
their cost-cutting, and as a result they’re doing 
extremely well,” said Nick Antill, oil analyst at 
Hoare Govetie. 

BP did hot escape the weak refining margins 
that eroded profits for its competitors, but it 
weathered them better amply because it had 
spent about 51 billion, less since ihe.end of. 1992. 

• “Wtfre not going to lose the pedals on what 
we’re doing -with our business,” said David Si- 
mon, BP chief executive, adding that the compa- 
ny has been “‘playing a pretty good game of 
catch-up” with its competitors by reducing, costs 
and debt 

BP will continue to slash expenses and plans a 
new round of cost-cutting targets by the end of 
‘the year, although they will not include massive 
layoffs or asset sales as in the past two years. 


Italy’s Stet Says 
Sales Rose 9% 

Bloomberg Business News 

MILAN — The telecom- 
munications group Stet 
SpA said Tuesday that rev- 
enue in the first seven 
months of 1994 rase 9 per- 
cent from a year earlier, to 
29.8 trillion lire (Si 8.8 bil- 
lion). and that it expected 
higher profit for the year. 

Stet said it would be able 
to finance the 1 1.6 trillion 
lire in investments planned 
for this year from its own 
resources, allowing net 
debt to fall to less than 20 
trillion fire by Dec. 31 from 
22 trillion a year earlier. 

Stet owns 55 percent of 
Telecom Italia SpA Italy’s 
telephone operator that 
will start trading on the 
stock market Aug. 18, U 
was created by merging do- 
mestic and overseas tele- 
phone operators. 


Finally, Iran Opens Petrochemical Plant 


Room 

BANDAR KHOMEINI, Iran — Tri- 
umphing over war damage and the with- 
drawal of its original Japanese partners, 
Iran has opened its biggest petwhearical 
plant 20 yeais after it was begun. 

• The multibiHian-dollar complex, inau- < 
gamed by President Hashemi Rafsanjani 
mi Monday, mdses Iran the second-largest 
iucer of petrochemicals in the Middle 


“I thqnlf the Japanese for starting the 
project,” Mr. Rafsanjani said. “Unfortu- 
nately due to war damages to the site, they 
discontinued their work. They did not 
think we would finish it- Now they proba- 
bly regret it” , 

.jy - Completed with French ass^tance, the 
^plant was begun as a 50-50 joint venture 
with Japanese companies before brans 
1979 Islamic revolution and wrecked by 
Iraqi bombers during the 1980-88 Iran- 
Lraq war. 

■ The plant was about 75 percent com- 
plete at the time of the revolution, but it 
Was repeatedly bombed by IraqL planes 
during the eight-year war, forcing the Jap- 
anese to abandon work- 


A changing petrochemicals market also 
dogged the project and led the Japanese to 
pull oat. 

Project officials said the plant is now 
capable of producing 3 million metric tons 
of petrochemicals a year, increasing Iran's 
total annual capacity to 10 million tons. 

Mehdi Minnoezz, director-general of the 
Bandar imam Petrochemical Co„ said a 
total of 54 billion was spent on the project 
and that 30 percent of its products would 
be exported. 

The plant was expected to help push 
actual production in the fiscal year that 
started March 21 to 8.0 million ions from 
last year’s 5.5 million. 

Officials at the site said the project was 
completed with the assistance of Technip, 
an oQ engineering subsidiary of France’s 
Sodfetfe Nationale Elf Aquitaine and with a 
French credit line of $850 million. 

They said 7,000 Iranian employees had 
been helped by about 200 specialists from 
France, the Netherlands, Italy and Germa- 
ny* 

Ahmad Rahgozar, deputy oil minister 


and head of the National Iranian Peiro- 
chenrical Co„ estimated the value of its 
annual output at between $800 million and 
$ 1.0 billion. 

Iran had sold $900 million of its prod- 
ucts in advance to finance pan of the 
construction, Mr. Rahgozar said. 

He said the former Japanese partners, 
led by Mitsui & Co., had invested SI -5 
billion in the project, while ban had so far 
invested more than S3 billion. 

Two years after the 1988 cease-fire, Mit- 
sui, saying the project was no longer eco- 
nomical in a glutted petrochemical market, 
withdrew from the partnership, paying 
Iran 130 billion yen ($132 million). 

A first phase of theplac t came on line in 
1990, producing 1 million tons of liquefied 
gas a year. 

The plant is fed by natural gas, gas 
liquids and naphtha from Ahvaz and Ma- 
roon fields and the Abadan oil refinery. It 
produces various products, including 
310,000 tons of ethylene and 150,000 10 ns 
of vinyl chloride a year. 


ILIA: Independent South Korean Carmaker Plans Ambitious Expansion 


Continued from Page 9 
spirit, something geniune," Mr. 
Lee said. “But the odds may be 

dow of opportumty JS ban- 
ning to dose is based 00 the 

status of the Migm*** 
highly protected. South Korean 
market, which has tea ' 
finance the automobile indus- 
try’s growth into the counties 
largest sector. 

: W ith sales of 1.64 mflhop 
... ■ 1004 South Korea s 

USSeUs second only to Japan 
of competition 

has made it especially tattJJ 
bought the companjestn^ 
StaSSe productivity, winch, 
lagsfar beW"d Japanese and 
Western rivals. 

Total production by South 

those vehicles for export. 


the United States, Japan, Ger- 
many and France. 

At home. South Korean com- 
panies have had a free ride. Jap- 
anese carmakers are harmed 
from sales of fully, assembled 
vehicles, while Western com- 
petitors face an array of non tar- 
iff barriers that kept sales below 
2,000 units last year, just 0.2 
percent of the market. 

But pressure from the United 
States and Europe forced Seoul 


served for the South Koreans 
will add new competitive pres- 
sures. 

Making matters worse, 
growth in the domestic market 
is slowing. 

While its competitors, abroad 
are catting costs and seeking to 
improve their quality, Kia is in- 
vesting 700 billion won this year 
—about on^sixth of last year’s 
sales — in a massive expansion 


f Kia symbolizes an honest working spirit, 
something genuine* Bat the odds may he 
against them* 9 


to anno unce steps last month to 
imp rove foreign access. Japa- 
nese companies, however, are 
expected to remain banned, al 
least for several more years, and 
it will take an equally long time 
for Western companies to build 
up any significant share. Still, 
their growing presence in what 
had been a market virtually re- 


of capacity and new-model de- 
velopment. 

Global capacity of 740,000 
units at the end of last year w01 
jump to 1.0 million this year 
and 1-5 million by the end of 
1997. Only then, Mr. Kim said, 
would the company have suffi- 
cient economies of • scale lo 
compete. 


Much of the additional ca- 
pacity will be overseas, espe- 
cially in the developing world, 
where Kia sees its inexpensive 
vehicles having an advantage. 
Kia has already begun assembly 
of kits in Taiwan, the Philip- 
pines, Venezuela, Vietnam and 
Iran. Assembly will start next 
year in Germany and new 
plants are planned for Mexico, 
South Africa, India and Paki- 
stan. 

“Korea will be the biggest 
source of demand — we’re still 
only half a country ” Mr. Kim 
said, referring to North Korea. 
Next in importance are the rest 
of southeast Aria and China, 
the world’s fastest-growing car 
markets. 

In the United States, where 
the company is investing heavi- 
ly to set up a dealer network, 
what is important is not so 
much sales or profit as a learn- 
ing experience essential to com- 
peting internationally. Kia is 
advancing slowly, having 
learned from Hyundai, which 
sold more than one-quarter of a 
million cars in the United 
States in 1988. 


Will P&G Pull Ads? 
Soap Opera Continues 


Bloomberg Business News 

AMSTERDAM — Unilever 
Group said Tuesday it had filed 
a complaint against Procter & 
Gamble Corp. with Britain's 
Advertising Standards Author- 
ity over the U.S. company's lat- 
est laundry detergent advertis- 
ing campaign. 

“Things have been said that 
cannot be substantiated,” said 
Tom Gordijn, a spokesman for 
Unilever NV, the Dutch arm of 
the Anglo/Dutch company. 

The Advertising Standards 
Authority oversees the advertis- 
ing industry in Britain. 

Mr. Gordijn said filing the 
complaint did not preclude 
court action by Unilever. 

Over the weekend, Procter 
blanketed British newspapers 
with advertisements saying fab- 
rics could be damaged by laun- 
dry detergents containing an in- 


tent found in Unilever’s 
Power and Omo Power 

soaps. 

While P&G did not mention 
Unilever by name, the ads said 
detergent containing a so-called 
accelerator made from manga- 
nese could cause “holes and 
tears” to appear in viscose and 
heavily colored cotton, even if 
the amount of accelerator is 
lowered. 

To underscore the statement, 
the ads carry photographs of 
severely tattered blouses and 
boxer shorts. 

P&G and Unilever have been 
fighting a fierce battle over the 
$9 billion European detergent 
market since March, when Un- 
ilever launched Persil Power, 

Analysts said the latest spat 
illustrated the difficult market 
conditions the companies were 
facing. 


• Hugo Boss AG, the German fashion company, said that a strong 
rise in licensing income and improved efficiency lifted first-half 
net profit 17 percent from a year earlier, to 26.4 million Deutsche 
marks ($17 million). 

m Marc Rich Co. said the company's name would be changed to 
Gkncore International AG in September. It said the new name 
reflected restructuring measures and a change in ownership an- 
nounced last year when Marc Rich transferred his majority 
shareholding to the company. 

• KLM Royal Dutch Airlines NV said that its unit KLM Cargo 
planned to cooperate with Transavia Airlines, which is SO percent 
owned by KLM, in providing European air cargo services. 

■ Alfianz AG, Germany's largest insurer, said that its French unit 
Affianz Via Assurances SA was poised to receive a cash injection 
of 1 billion French francs (SI 83 million j from Allianz one from 
Ge. de Navigation Mixte SA. its other main shareholder. 

■ Internationale Nederlanden Groep NVs unit MBO has bought a 
49.9 percent stake in FUo SA’s unit Inmolor for 7 1 6 million pesetas 
($5 million), according to the financial daily Cinco Dias. 

• Finland's unemployment fell to 17.9 percent in June from 18.1 
percent in May as the Central Statistical Office said that the 
employment situation had improved in virtually all sectors of Lhe 
economy except the construction industry. 

• Czechoslovak Airlines, the Czech state-owned carrier, narrowed 
its loss for the first six months of 1994 to 273.2 million koruna 
($10 million) from 629 million koruna a year earlier. A spokesman 
said the airline had managed to keep costs steady and increased 
revenue in both Western and Eastern Europe. 

Reuten. A FX. Bloomberg 


Hafslund Profit Falls 13% 

Bloomberg Businas News 

OSLO — Hafslund Nycomed AS said Tuesday its second- 
quarter pretax profit fell 13 percent, to 349 million kroner 
($51 million), after a loss on financial items. 

Operating profit rose 7 percent, to 401 million kroner from 
376 million kroner in the second quarter of 1993. and the total 
of sales and royalties rose 13 percent, to 1,64 billion kroner, 
despite a slight fall in royalties. 

Hafslund, a pharmaceuticals group, said the sales increase 
was due to better safes from its energy subsidiary and the 
consolidation of its Tennant metallurgical group. 

Hafslund said earnings for the first half of 1994 fell to 651 
million kroner from 782 million kroner despite a rise in 
revenue to 3.14 billion kroner from 2.79 billion kroner. 


On September 5th, the IHT will publish a 
Special Report on 

Aviation 

■ Developments of the GE90, a new 
aircraft engine. 

■ Future of mergers and acquisitions in the 
industry. 

■ Importance of the Chinese market in 
aircraft sales. 

■ Privatization of airports. 

■ Secrets of success for the European 
charter industry 

This Special Report comades with the Fambomugh Air 
Show, September 5-11. For more information about this 
Special Report please contact Bin Mahderin Paris at 
(33-1)463793 78. fax : (33-1) 46375044. 

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ENTERWAHONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1994 


Page 13 



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SftwnAoy Business News 

, SHANGHAI — Chinese 
stocks fell sharply Tuesday 
asnid fears that recently an- 
nounced reforms -would have 
little immediate effect. 

■ “What we’re seeing is a dose 
of reahtyseepingin after y ester- 
day’s excitement,” said Th^ g 
Yujdnjan analyst with Shenz- 
hen $ Pingan Insuran ce Co. 

\ The Shanghai A share index 
fefl 15.09 pwma, or 3.4 percent 
to 432.60, after a recordSJ bfl- 
lton yuan ($611 million) of 
Mares changed hands. 

' The Shangha i and Shenzhen 
A share markets rocketed 36 


ChinaSays 
Labor Unrest 




new share listings and would 
gradually open up the market to 
foreign mvestors,- 

The A shares are restricted to 
Chinese investors, unlike B 
shares, which can be owned by 
foreigneis.. 

“Scroe people got the idea 
thatfoagners are going to come 


'Compiled by Our Staff From Dapattdux 

BEIJING — Labor disputes- 


Ministry to call for “preventive 
measures” to prevent social in- 
stability, the official China Dai- 
ly reported Tuesday. 

I Arbitrators and mediators in- 
vestigated 3,104 labor disputes 
in the first three months of 
1994, an increase of 66 percent 
over the same period last year, 
the newspaper reported. 

Addressing the country’s first 
national working conference on 
labor disputes last weekend, the 
deputy labor minister, Zbu 
J isThen, urged a more efficient 
use of existing laws (0 stem un- 
rest 

- “It is important to take pre- 
ventive measures and solve 
these problems in their embry- 
onic stage SO as to maintain 
social stability and promote, 
economic development,” Mr. 
Zhu was quoted as saying. 

Unofficial reports of labor 
unrest — - including illegal 
strikes — have been mcreasmg 
throughout the country for the 
past year or more. 

The C hina Daily said workers 
throughout China had filed 
grievances resulting from nris- . 
management, cutbacks and con- . 
Atroversies over regulations. The 
' 'official media have highlighted 
labor disputes in foreign or joint- 
venture ..companies, implying •' 
that dne are fewer labor {nob- : 
Jems in state-run e nt er pri ses: 

Mr. Thu, while disclosing the 
increase in labor disputes at the 
weekend coherence, said labor 
relations in China in general 
were “harmonious and stable,” 
the newspaper, said. (APAFP) 


said Wang Lrpmg. who heads 
the secuades department at 
Shenzhen's Pingan Insurance 
Co. “Now they reafire that such 
joint-veabu e funds are not going 
to appear right away." 

- Traders wad the sudden up- 
turn in A shares was spariccd by 
large banks and other financial 
institutions based in Beijing. 

“Big institutions from Beijing 
started yesterday's baying 
spree, and the word is they were 
continuing today” Mr. Zhang 
said. 

Traders said news that foreign 
investors would eventually be al- 
lowed to trade A shares had to 
be taken with a pinch of salt 

Traders suspected that the 
. rally had been instigated by the 
government, which had 
watched A share prices tumble 
about 70 percent in the past 
year as a flood of new share 
offerings and tough austerity 
. measures dampened stock-mar- 
ket speculation. 

“Yon have to remember that 
these institutions are very dose 
to the Chinese government,” 
said a' Shenzhen stock analyst 
who asked not to be identified. 


ASEAN Looks to Vietnam 


By Michael Richardson 

Inicmnnonal Hemid Tribune 

SINGAPORE — The surge in trade and 
investment between Vietnam and its South- 
east Asian neighbors — at the expense of 
Western and Amin nations — underlies the 
|?orc|gmierest in Hand’s early membership 

A recent study by the economic research 
department of Singapore's government-con- 
trolled DBS Bank found that two-way trade 
between members of die Association of South 
East Asian Nations and Vietnam rose more 
than 10 times, to more tha^ si . 6 billion in 
1992 from $163 million in 1989, the year 
Hanoi withdrew its troops from Cambodia. 

As a result, ASEAN raised its share of 
Vietnam’s total trade to 32.4 percent in 1992, 
the xno 6 t recent full year for vrindi figures are 
available, from 3.6 percent in 1989. 

At a recent meeting in Bangkok of ASEAN 
foreign ministers. Nguyen Manh Gam of 
Vietnam said Hanoi was making preparations 
to become a full member of the group. 

The current members are Indonesia. Ma- 
laysia, the Philippines, Singapore, T hailan d 
and Brunei. 

While still well behind leading investors 
such as Taiwan and Hong Kong, ASEAN's 
cumulative investment commitments in Viet- 
nam rose sharply to about $ 1.2 billion by the 
end of 1993 from $179 million in 1991. 

ASEAN's share of foreign investment com- 
mitments in Vietnam more than doubled to 
15.5 percent in the three years to Decem b er 
1993. Low labor costs, natural resources and 
economic potential have drawn the invest- 
ment despite infrastructure bottlenecks, an 
inadequate legal framework, bureaucratic in- 
terference ana corruption. 

While Singapore is by far the largest 
ASEAN trader with Vietnam, it is only slight- 
ly ahead of Malaysia as an investor, followed 
by Thailand and Indonesia. 

As of June, Singapore had 60 projects val- 


ued at a total of S567 million, while Malaysia 
had committed to 26 projects amounting to 
$510 million. Singapore's investments includ- 
ed hold, office and resort projects as well as 
manufacturing, ship repair and telecommuni- 
cations- Malaysia’s investments are concen- 
trated in plantations, offshore oil and gas 
exploration and production, banking, and ho- 
tels. 

A Western banker said the lifting of the 
U5. trade embargo in February was intensi- 
fying competition among major industrial na- 
tions. But be said the competitive edge of 
these big players in Vietnam would be in 
high-technology infrastructure projects, man - 
ufactured goods and services, leaving sub- 
stantial segments to be filled by ASEAN 
suppliers and investors. 

Manmindar Singh, an economist at DBS 
bank who wrote the report on business pros- 
pects for ASEAN in Vietnam, said that be- 
cause the country was unlikely to develop 
sufficient production capacity of its own for 
some time, ASEAN countries could become 
key suppliers for items such as telecommuni- 
cations hardware, industrial machinery, 
transport equipment, construction materials, 
petroleum products and chemicals. 

■ Investment Fund Targets Vietnam 

Templeton Investment Management 
(Hong Kong) Ltd. will introduce a §50 mil- 
lion to $100 million country fund to buy 
passive equity stakes in Asian companies in- 
vesting in Vietnam, Bloomberg Business 
News reported from Hanoi. 

It would be the first Vietnam country fund 
to be listed on the New York Stock E xchan ge, 
Templeton's president, Mark Mobius, said. 
“Initially this will look like a Southeast Asian 
fund,” he said. “We will take a passive posi- 
tion in listed Asian companies which are 
investing small in Vietnam but intend 10 
grow.” 


Japanese Investors Check Out of Sydney 


For mvnstmant informatio n 

RaodTHEMONEYRffORT 
every Saturday in As IHT 


Agata Famce-Presse 

SYDNEY — Financially 
strapped Japanese investors are 
Hiring up to check out of Aus- 
tralia’s hotel market, with Ka- 
jima Corp. the first to unload its 
.five-star property. . 

Kajima said Monday it had 
sold the P ark G rand Hotel in 
Sydn^ to ITT Sheraton Coup, 
of die United Stares. 

'• Industry sources said Kajima 
had sold it for about 300 mflHOT 
Australian dollars ($220 mil- 
lion), r ep r esenting a loss of 
about 200 milHon dollars on its 
nriroal investment. 

Despite the loss, market ana- 
lysis said Kajima had pulled off 
a coup by becqnring the first of 
what may be several Japanese 
owners to sell their five-star 
mistakes. ■ j ■ ... t> . 

■ ^“Tbert are ~ other Japanese 
owners in trouble who would 
Eke to sefl,” said Tony Karp, 
director of horek and leisure for 
Colliers Jarifine, which negoti- 
ated the Sheraton deaL 

in first, Kajima 
a good price the mar- 
ket will rise to,” he said, adding 
that other sellers _ may have 
trouble finding buyers of the 
same caliber. 

Kajima’s shareholders appar- 


ently agreed, bidding the stock 
up in Tokyo on Tbesday. The 
stock finished at 979 yen ($10), 
up from 966 Monday. 

Mr. Karp estimated that Jap- 
anese investors had spent be- 
tween 3.5 billion and 4.0 billion 
dollars on Australian hotels 
during the 1987-90 property 
boom. ■ 


“Assets acquired in the late 
1980s would probably realize a 
figure of about 50 percent u 
they were to be sold today,” Mr. 
Karp said "There are probably 
a billion Australian dollars in 
hotel stock that we have identi- 
fied as being salable when the 
owners are able to realize their 
assets.” 


Palmer Considering Bid 

Bloo mb er g Business News 

SYDNEY — Australian National Industries Ltd said 
Tuesday h was making a 191 milli on Australian dollar ($140 
million) bid to take over Palmer Tribe Mills Ltd 

Australian National said it would offer Palmer sharehold- 
ers either 72 of its shares or 64 of its shares plus 13 dollars for 
every 100 Palmer shares owned .. 

Palmer said it would consider the offer and seek an outside 
valuation of the company before making any recommenda- 
tions to shareholders. 

Palmer is a steel tubing manufacturer with operations in 
Australia and Chicago. The company holds about 40 percent 
of the Australian sted tube market. In the United States, its 
Welded Tube Co. has about a 19 percent share. 

Australian National is involved in steel manufacturing, spe- 


cialized engineering, equipment leasing and shipping services. 

Australian National also said it was malting a ph 
32 million folly paid ordinary shares at 1 SO dollars each to 


Australian and overseas institutional investors. The place- 
ment was not contingent on the success of the takeover. 


One analyst, who asked not 
to be identified, said properties 
that might be sold included the 
Sheraton Airport hold in Syd- 
ney and a Novo tel in central 
Darling Harbor, both under the 
control of Long-Term Credit 
Bank of Japan Ltd. The Regent, 
owned by EIE International 
Corp„ and the Nikko in Potts 
Point in Sydney, owned by Ku- 
magni Gumi Co., also are on the 
block, the analyst said. 

Sheraton was not a typical 
buyer, said Mr. Karp, adding 
that most of the big money was 
coming from developers in Hong 
Kong. Malaysia and Singapore 
and from trusts set up to acquire 
distressed hotel properties. 

In contrast to the troubled 
hotd market, meanwhile, the 
Real Estate Institute of Austra- 
lia reported that the cost of resi- 
dential hones in the top 5 per- 
cent of the market had rocketed 
in Sydney as buyers recycled 
gains made on the stock market 

The median home price in 
that group soared to 703,000 
dollars in the three months to 
June from 610^00 in the previ- 
ous quarter and 356,000 dollars 
a year ago, the institute said. 


Japan Tilts 
To Boeing 
As Partner 


Compiled by Our Staff from Dupatthe 

TOKYO — Japanese compa- 
nies are moving away from a 
plan to develop a 7€j-seai air- 
craft with the French -Italian 
concern ATR in favor of a 
slightly larger model in con- 
junction with Boeing Co. and 
Chinese partners, a representa- 
tive of Mitsubishi Heavy -Indus- 
tries Ltd. said Tuesday. 

The final decision will depend 
on feasibility studies scheduled 
for completion this year, said 
Hironori Nakanishi, a spokes- 
man for the Ministry of Interna- 
tional Trade and Industry. 

C hina will participate in the 
study as an observer, another 
official said. 

The decision to call off the 
study of the smaller model has 
virtually cfiminaied the possibil- 
ity that European makers will 
take part in building the plane, 
he added. 

Japanese engineers have stud- 
ied the possibility of using parts 
made by Boeing, an official of 
the consortium Japan Aircraft 
Development Corp. said. 

The consortium, wi th govern- 
ment financing, has been study- 
ing development of a medium- 
sized passenger jet since 1989. 
A 100-seat aircraft is increas- 
ingly in demand in Japan and 
China, Mr. Nakanishi said. 

The Mitsubishi official de- 
nied a report that the Japanese 
consortium formed to develop 
the aircraft had informed ATR 
of its intention 10 shelve the 
plan in favor of a 100 -seater. 
“This is not definite.” she said. 
“We are just studying possible 
cooperation with Boeing.” 

Japan Aircraft Development 
Corp. groups Mitsubishi 
Heavy, Fuji Heavy Industries 
Ltd, Kawasaki Heavy Indus- 
tries Ltd, its affiliate Japan 
Aircraft Manufacturing Co. 
and a Hitachi affiliate, S him - 
Maywa Industries Ltd 

On Monday. Fokker NV said 
that over the next 20 years it 
expected worldwide demand to 
reach about 3.500 for 40-seat to 
125-seat aircraft. (AFP, AP) 


Irivfestof’STAsia 


Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

11000 — 


Singapore 
Straits Times 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 




— 19005 



^'mIh jTT a A Ul J J A’ 


1S94 

1994 


1994 


Exchange 

Index 

Tuesday 

Close 

Prev. 

Chase 

% 

Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

9JB9SJS3 

9,683.66 

+0.12 

Singapore 

Straits Times. 

226 3^0 

2,243.69 

+0.87 

Sydney 

AH Ordinaries 

2,08650 

2JJ82.10 

+0.23 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

20,860.13 

20.271.35 

+1.92 

Kuala Lump iff Composite 

1,075.19 

1.05634 

+1.78 

Bangkok 

SET 

1^99.72 

1. 401.98 

-0.16 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

927^5 

927.97 • 

-0.05 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

837936 

6,720.05 

+2.37 

Manila 

PSE 

2,866.53 

2.883.34 

-058 

Jakarta 

Stock Index 

459^4 

452.72 

+1.44 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2,074^9 

2.033-28 

+2.04 

Bombay 

Nadonai index 

2331J0 

1.981.79 

+2-52 

Source j. Reuters, AFP 


Irnerruriiinal ; IcnU Tnhune 


Very briefly: 


• Asatn Breweries Ltd, Japan's second -largest brewer, said its 
pretax profit grew 17 percent in the first half, to 9.98 billion yen 
($101 million), boosted by a sales rise in all operations except wine 
and real estate sales. 

• Cathay life Insurance Co.. Taiwan's largest life insurer, said 
pretax profit rose 93 percent in the first half of 1994. to 7.2 billion 
Taiwan dollars ($271 million). 

• Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. said its U.S. unit planned to 
move much of its color television production to Mexico to 
increase productivity. 

• South Korean investors have admitted that they hold S4.2 billion 
in hidden assets since President Kim Young Sam launched a 
financial clean-up drive last year, tax officials reported. 

• Hitachi Ltd and Texas Instruments Inc said they were negotiat- 
ing to build a joint $500 million plant in Texas to make dynamic 
random access memory chips. 

• Fujitsu Ltd and Internationa] Business Machines Corp. are 
among 24 companies that have agreed on a new standard for next- 
generation magneto-op tied discs, a Fujitsu spokesman said. 

• Hilton International Co. has signed a preliminary agreement with 
the Swiss company Noga Holds Internationa] SA to develop a 
prime site in Ho Chi Minh City in a project valued at $216 million. 

• Ho Chi Minh Qty sold more than $2 million of municipal bonds 
on the first day of a sale to raise money for road improvements. 

• Daewoo Corp. of South Korea said it would form a joint paper- 
making venture with Mudanjiang Paper M3) of China. 

• China's exports to South Korea rose 40 percent in the first five 

months of the year. AFP. Bloomberg. Reuters, AFX 


70% ofPetron IPO Is Bought Up 


Agence Fnmce-Presse 

MANILA — Philippine in- 
vestors have bought almost 
70 percent of the initial pub- 
lic offering of Petron Corp- 
two weeks after it was 
launched, and energy offi- 
cials said Tuesday that the 
country’s biggest stock offer- 
ing was proceeding as 
planned. 

Energy Secretary Delfin 
Lazaro said 405.9 million of 
the 600 million shares allot- 


ted to domestic individual in- 
vestors had been sold to 
1 84,220 people as of Monday, 
for an average of 2^00 shares 
for each investor. 

The offering period for the 
remaining 194.1 million 
shares is scheduled to end 
Friday. 

Petron, an oil-refining con- 
cern and the largest company 
in the Philippines, has offered 
I billion shares, a 20 percent 
stake, to tbe public. 


Six hundred million of 
those are being sold at a fixed 
price cf 9 pesos (35 cents) 
each to domestic investors, 
300 million are bong auc- 
tioned to tbe highest foreign 
or domestic bidders, and 100 
million have been reserved 
for Petron employees. 

The government will be left 
with a stake of 40 percent in 
the company, having sold an- 
other 40 percent late last year 
to Saudi Arabian Oil Co. 


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Tables Include the nationwide pocos up to ■ 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1994 


ABC INVESTMENT 8 U! 


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international FUNDS 

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n«u lUUAOCMENT LTD I CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 



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Aug. 2, 1994 


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investment 


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REPORT 

every 

Saturday 
in the 


* The program for the conference 

will focus on three key sectors: 

f 

tclccomnuinicacions, 
transportation and energy. .. . 


INVESTING IN NEW 
INFRASTRUCTURE FOR EUROPE 


SKADDEN 
JtfJPS 
SLATE 
MEAGHER & 
FLDM 


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conference, please contact: 

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Page 16 


ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1994 


SPORTS 


Manning to Join 
Suns, Agent Says 


jirmL - :>J:> v.-S : 'M r : 


The Assodaud Press 

CHARLOTTE — Danny 
Manning is close to signing 
with the Phoenix Suns, the 
agent for the National Basket- 
bill Association star said, but 
would have joined the Charlotte 
Hornets had officials of that 
team not postponed their meet- 
ing with the forward last week. 

Charlotte has been interested 
in Manning since before be was 
traded from the Los Angeles 


Clippers to the Atlanta Hawks 
Iasi season. Manning became 
an unrestricted free agent at the 
end of the season. 

The agent, Ron Grinker, said 
his client wanted to meet Char- 
lotte officials on Thursday in 
Kansas but that the Hornets’ 
owner, George S hinn, was on 
vacation and wanted the meet- 
ing pushed back to Tuesday. 


instead. Manning made an 
unplanned trip Thursday to 
Phoenix and decided to sign 
with the Suns, according to 
Grinker. 

“It was Danny's desire to 
play for the Hornets," Grinker 
tola The Charlotte Observer. 
"He liked the team, he liked the 
situation. If we had sat down to 
talk Thursday, I'm confident 
Danny would be a member of 
the Charlotte Hornets." 


Redskins Set 


To Pay Shuler 
$19 Million 


By David Aldridge 

Waihington Post Service 

CARLISLE, Pennsylvania — 
The Washington Redskins of 
the National Football League 
and their first- round pick. 
Heath Shuler, have agreed on 
all the numbers of an eight-year 
contract worth more than S 19 
million to the quarterback from 
Tennessee, according to 
sources. 

That would be the biggest 
contract in team history — but 
there remained one sticking 
point: 

Even through the two sides 
had agreed on the base salary, 
they had not yet agreed on the 
signing bonus of $5 million the 
Redskins reportedly have of- 
fered, and how that bonus will 
be structured, sources said 
Monday. 

Shuler’s salary would double 


Manning's deal with Phoenix 
asn’t official yet because the 


wasn’t official yet because the 
Suns have only a $500,000 slot 
under the salary cap for him. 
Grinker said, but Manning is 
committed to play for them. 

“When we went to Phoenix, 
Danny felt very comfortable 
with the situation there,’ 1 
Grinker said. "They have until 
the start of the season. We’re 
going to give them an opportu- 
nity to come up with the mon- 
ey." 

The Suns made a move in 
that direction by trading Mark 
West, their 33-year-old center 
who, in six seasons did not miss 
a regular-season game, to the 
Detroit Pistons for second- 
round draft picks in 1996 and 
1999. 

The Hornets' president, 
Spencer Stolpen, said that "we 
don’t accept the fact that Dan- 



Tmemazwnal Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — The pace- of modern hving may 
be too hot even tor Americans bom to the 
throw-away age. Alan Rothenbere, chairman of 


throw-away age. Alan Rothenbere, chairman of 
a World Cup which, by any definiuon, last 
month crossed the "Final Frontier” is soon to 
announce what he has drummed up lor the new 
Major League Soccer. ■ ;• - ■■ 

Don't be surprised if the - legacy is less than 
forecast Rothenberg’s deals were too sharp, too 
self-serving for some established World Cup 
sponsors, who declined to board the California 
lawyer’s MLS bandwagon. 

Blaming Rotheabeig as he rides, saddlebags 
laden, into the sunset is simplistic, The corporate 
backers, even those of U.S, 1 origin. ; were just 
passing through. Their marketing wheels turn 
quicker than any wagon train's, quicker than a 
Ferrari* s around Hockenhdm. America is histo- 
ry until the Worid 

aCL* 

exercise. HugjttOS 

The new hoii- ■ — : : — ■ ■ 

zon lies beyond the next stop, France in 1998. 
The year is 2,002, the destination almost certain- 


P'«^ inVeS ‘ ta ' 

J-League because it could not afford to 
220mfflion yen ($12 million) to tun 
time other bidders stepped fomatd. the Jtague 
expanded from 10 to 12 leans jP?.™”,??- 
pEs for 16 teams, phis a second divKwn of 16.. 

* eni- - rh* Tananese SOCifll 


pians iot to reams, * ~-r , 

P Soccer fills a hole in the Japanese socuri mar 

looking for new experiences ana 101 « «-» 


to soccer. 


reejmenicu uirai¥K,iim »* i n w “ - — . , j Q 

T ime WILL TELL if it is a passing fa* * 

quiet rebellion. But one immediate casua^y 
been Japanese baseball, for which atten-. 
__ __ j nr« hane dCCl— 


ly Japan. After the dollar, the yen. 

FIFA has designated- Asia despite the fact 
that that region’s soccer players are less devel- 
oped than Africa's — as the playing field for that 
date. There are two years before the vote will be 


Das D6GIL JHMauac * v * z~ , * ■ 

and advertizing markets are being oeci-- 
matedr by the new sport ■ 

• Furthermore, no one had to point the Japa-. 
nese toward Brazil’s soccer players, whose shuts; 
won back, the Worid Cup this summer. The. 
Japanese were already hiring Zico, Carera. Eau. 
fijeindo, and 20 others for the J-League. Indeed. 
Kazu Miura learned his trade among B razili a n s, 
not bast from teammate mate Ruy Ramos, who- 
has played in Japan long enough to claim 


date. There are two years before the vote will be 
taken, and South Korea, host to a memorable 
1988 Olympics in Seoul, has sworn to bid against 
Japan. But my money is on the yen. . ’ 

There is a pointer to why in this summer's 
most intriguing soccer sale. No, not Hagi to 
Barcelona. Not Klinsmann to London. Not La- 
las to Paduva but Kazu to Genoa. 

- The headlines in. Europe were small, tire an- 
nouncement modest, but the stakes and the fi- 
nancial arrangements are 
Kaznyoshi Miura is the heart-throb of the J- 
League. He has just captained Verdy Yomiuii to 
Japan's new championship and cop double. The 
Kawasaki dub offered him an improved, $2 


Dm id LraigHKcth/'nic Awnehuod Frew 

Carole Force began searching for a teammate to pass to when she found herself 
overmatched against China’s Haixia Zheng. But France won the game, 80-73. 


what Mark Rypien got just two 
years ago — three years, $9mil- 


ny Manning was ours” because 
of "comments made to us with 


years ago — three years, $9 mil- 
lion, with an option for a fourth 


season at $3 million — the sea- 
son after quarterbacking the 
Redskins to a Super Bowl 
championship. 

The Redskins released offen- 
sive lineman Mo Elewonibi in a 
move that made room under the 


salary cap to sign Shuler. 
• Another first-round 


• Another first-round draft 
pick, Greg Hill, a running back 
from Texas A&M, signed a 
four-year contract with Kansas 
City for a package worth about 
$3 million. The Associated 
Press reported. He was to join 
the team Tuesday as it flew to 
Tokyo for a preseason game 
Saturday night against the Min- 
nesota Vikings. 

• Derrick Lassie, who re- 
placed Emnritt Smith during 
the Super Bowl MVFs holdout 
in 1993, injured the quadriceps 
tendon in his right knee during 
Dallas’ exhibition victory over 
the Vikings. The second-year 
r unnin g back from Alabama 
likely will be out three to four 
months, and will be placed on 
injured reserve, making him in- 
eligible to play this season. 


of "comments made to us with 
regards to our (salary) slot, be- 
cause of (Grinker) asking us to 
trade certain players to make 
more room." 

Manning’s decision would be 
a second blow to Charlotte’s 
chances to grab a big-name 
player in the offseason. Power 
forward Horace Gram picked 
Orlando over Charlotte late last 
week when he left the Chicago 
Bulls. 

• In Boston, the Celtics made 
it official by introducing free 
agent center-forward Pervis El- 
lison as the newest acquisition 
in M.L. Can's drive to rerive 
the NBA’s most successful fran- 
chise. 

Ellison, a 6-foot, 10-inch 
(2.08-meter) shot-blocker who 


Goodwill Games Hit Another SUck Spot 


The issoaated Press 

ST. PETERSBURG — The Goodwill 
Games continued to be hit by organizational 
problems Tuesday, when the short track 
speedskating was moved to another venue 
because of ice problems at the main rink. 

The event first was put back six hours. Five 


i ne event fust was put back six hours. Five 
hours later, the ice still wasn’t ready and the 


competition was moved from the Yubiieiny 


slutting events start Wednesday night. He 
blamed the problems on hot weather and a 
power outage Sunday that slowed the process 
of converting the venue from boxing to skating. 

Alexi Zakrcvski, director of the Yubiieiny 
Palace, declined to let reporters see the rink. 
But a photographer who did said firemen were 
spraying water on the rink, apparently because 


Miura — to obtain the loanthis Japanese goals- 
corer for a year. The Italians want to do some- 
thing different: be thefirstSerieA team to field a 
Japanese. 

Yasuhiko Okudera scored for FC Koln against 
Nottingham Forest in the late 1970s. But that 
was for a Goman team, Miura represents the 
first Japanese-Italian soccer, trade. Okudera 
came out of an Asiatic aoccet wfidamen;; Mima, 
is the most popular totem of a brand new wave of 
Japanese culture. 

H E IS, however, taking a calculated gamble. 
He risks what the Japanese traditionally 


Palace of Sports to the nearby SKA rink. 

Jack Kelly, president of the Games, said 
the move was made to ensure the ice would be 
in good condition when the showcase figure 


_^s water supply was insufficient. 
Zakrcvski, asked what was being done to 
get the rink ready, replied: “It’s a secret." 

Pressed on what process was being used, he 
said, "It’s non-standard technology. 


considered any more a rising world soccer newer 
than the United States, moose MLS failed to 
persuade it star defender, Alexi Labs, to , stay 


There is no comparison.- Jqxm is making ha 
bid with more professionalism, more marketing, 
more long term planning, than anyone in Europe 
ever has/let alone those neophytes in the United 


p/im J - * , * 

. Miura was sent to Brazil to hone his touch with 
the- ball. You <-■»»> read the Japanese thinking: 
School him in Brazil, give him experience in 
Italy, mold a complete professional. Now, some 
31 young Japanese are on a year’s learning curve 
under Qntion in Brazil. A further 160 applied for’ ^ 
vacation training in Brazil during 1994. 

The yea cannot buy them talent, cannot put 
the .finishing instincts of Romdrio into these 
apprentices^ But where dse should you go to pick 
up x-ntlmwHCTn for the game? Enthusiasm is, 
second to ability, the essence. Enthusiasm and 
the ambience between players and supporters. 

According to the J-League and the world Cup 
2002 publicity team, there is nothing as fresh as 
Japanese soccer, no one mere committed than its; 
followers. The publicists, streets ahead of Ameri- 
ca's,- bombard you with statistics. 

’. There are television figures claiming 70 million 
viewers, from ajpopulation of 121 million, for 
Japan’* final Worid Cup qualifying, match' 
.against Iraq last October. In it, a last-minute 
Iraqi goal, tying the score, allowed South Korea 
to boast that it has now played in three straight 
World Cups, while Japan has not reached one. - 

But can South Korea match Japan’s five m3- 

Has^wth^jirea^oubled its TV rights to 20' 
miltion yen per league game, as Japan just did? • 

; Can anyone match the turnover of $1 billion' 
an sports and related spinoff merchandise — 
from confcctiohiuy to bicycles to bank cards — 
that have been marketed in the name of soccer in 
.Japan? Evay yen spent earns the teams 3 percent - 
in royalties, and a riestegg toward Japan’s pledge' 
to build IS new stadiums the length of the land! 
for the 21st centner World Cup; 

. Last, but hot least, there is Dentsu. That 
Japanese advertizing giant" bought half of ISL, 
FIFA’s marketing partner, years ago. If that is 
not inrider influence and interest, teal me what is. 

It is time to say goodnight America. And 
ohatyo gpzaimasu — - good morning — Japan. 


played last season for the 
Washington Bullets, is the fifth 
player Carr has added since he 
took over as the team's director 


Canada's Envoy to Ireland 
To Head Notre Dame Sports 


of player personnel. 
Carr got forward 


Carr got forwards Blue Ed- 
wards and Derek Strong in a 
draft-day trade with Milwau- 
kee, then signed high-scoring 
forward Dominique Wilkins 


and guard David Wesley on 
My 22. 


For investment information 


Read THE MONEY REPORT every Saturday in the IHT 


Sew York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Dick Rosenthal, who initiat- 
ed Notre Dame’s recent affiliation with the Big 
East in basketball as well as its NBC television 
pact for football, is retiring as the university's 
athletic director and will be succeeded by Michael 
A Wadsworth, a 1966 graduate of Notre Dame 
who is the Canadian ambassador to Ireland. 

Wadsworth, a native of Toronto, will take over 
for Rosenthal, 61, on Aug. 1, 1995. 

Wadsworth, 51, a defensive tackle on the 1964 
football team, played for the Toronto Argonauts 
of the Canadian League from 1966-70, practiced 
law and attended the Harvard School of Business 
before his diplomatic appointment in 1989. 


Australian Open Women’s Final to Stay 
At 3 Sets as Graf Marshals Opposition 


MELBOURNE — The Australian Open wom- 
en’s singles final next year will not be changed to 
a best-of-five-sets match because of opposition 
led by top-ranked Steffi Graf, the tournament’s 
director, Paul McNamee, said Tuesday. 

Graf, who win defend her tide at Melbourne’s 
Flinders Park next January, was supported by virtu- 
ally all the top women players, McNamee said. 

“Steffi’s coach, Heinz Gflnthardt, told me she 
saw no reason to change from the traditional 
best-of-three set final,” said McNamee, twice a 
Wimbledon men’s doubles champion. 


“I am a little bit disappointed, but there was 
no doubt this was virtually a unanimous view 
amongst the top 10 ranked players,” he said. 

McNamee, who announced the proposed 
change after taking up his position in March, 
said it was intended to provide spectators with 
greater value for money. . 

Last January, Graf defeated Arantxa SAnchez 
Vicario, 6-0 6-2, in a final that lasted just 58 
minutes. 


"The players dearly felt it was not in the best 
interests of the women’s game and we will re-r 


Amunike: Second Signing : 

... Emmanud Amunike, the striker Tor Nigeria's- 
Worid Cup team, has signed a three-year con-* 
tract with Sporting Lisbon after having already 
signed to play for the German dub Duisburg, 
Agence France-Prone reported Tuesday from. 
Lisbon* 

• ’’Amunike only signed" with Duisburg “be- 
cause of pressure from Nigerian coach Clemens 
Werterhoff, who told the player that unless he- 
signed he would not be picker! to play during the 
World Cup,” said Sousa Cintra, president of- 
Sp orting Lisbon. 

“FIFA wBl have to role on this problem,” he 
- • The Pakistan FootbaU Federation, split into. 


sped that view,” said 


ly from all international competition, FIFA 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


SHE'S REAPING 
YOUR LOVE 
. NOTE! ^ 


DIP YOU HEAR MET 
ARE YOU STILL 
BEHIND THE TREE? 
WAVE TOUR HAND.' 


*1* (va 


HE'S STILL 
THERE. .REALLY 
OH, SURE. I 
UNDERSTAND.. 


SUE SAID 
SHE COULDN'T 
READ YOUR 
SMUDGY 
WRITING.. 


AND WHEN I TOLD 
HER YOU'RE IN THE 
SAME CLASS AT SCHOOL. 
SHE 5AJP SHE DIDN’T 
REMEMBER YOU.. 


cm* i A '(Curses ms. 
GET SOME \ FINE . 1 lOUDOHY 
owner need owners. 
l£HSES? 


VE5 I DO.' 'fcURBTCSNE 

wetwre new wort 
OKETW THEWnWfl 
QWGE WE ARE. . ^ 


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BUI IF I NM> CONTACTS, 

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Deion Sanders coukhi’t etude shortstop Royce Clayton, but the Reds beat the Giants on a passed ball in tbe ninth. 

A Quiet Slugger Keeps Pounding Away 


By Claire Smith 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Matt Williams is the 
stealth bomber of major league baseball's 
impressive arsenal of long-ball hitters. 

He will never be confused with Ken 
Griffey Jw he of the hat-backward pa- 
nache and giddy chase of .Roger Mans’s 
record of 61 home runs in a season. Nor 
will Williams be. confused with. Frank 
Thomas, he of the cork-filled arms and 
1 ,000-candlepower smile that lights up aU 
of Chicago these days. 

Those two players, more so than any of 
their contemporaries, have caught tbe pub- 
lic's imagination. And Madison Avenue's. 
But they are far from alone in waging a 
full-fledged assault on home run records 
with Highly publicized power surges. 

Matt Williams of the San Frandsco Gi- 
ants is more than doing his part, too, with 
the41 home runs with which he has surged 
past both Griffey and Thomas. And with 
his 91 runs batted in, another total that: 
ranks among the chic. 

He is now three home Tuns better and 
just 19 RBIs shy of his 1993-totals and is 
quietly having as brilliant a season as Grif- 
fey and Thomas are. And the operative 
word is quiet. V 

“I don’tstq) back, and say, 'Geez, look 
what rvedoaef^he said rebenxfy/“We 7 re 
all in this together and pullingon the same 
rope. So I am concerned, and the rest of 
the guys are concerned, with winning bare-, 
ball games.” - 

So, mention Roger Maris, if you wffl. 

“fa my nrind. Fm not charing any re- 
' J “ T, untu 


play wefl and to help the team win. Fm 
certainly not focused on any records.” 

Besides, he said, he’s still a knag way 
away from No. 61. 

The comparisons don’t end with Mans, 
as W illiams well knows. While visiting 
Philadelphia recently, he was wen aware of 
fynu pflrisnns bang made between him and 
Mike Sdmridl, a player whose prowess 
with both bat and glove at third base surely 
. has payed tire way to Cooperstown. 

“That certainly is flattering to be men- 
tioned in the same breath,” Williams said 

In my mind, Pm not 
chasing any record . 9 

Matt Williams - - 


cord,” he said. “From this day,: until the 
end of the season, 1 want to play every 
game, and I want to do wdVof couise»-to 


of the Phillies’ former great. “How much 
stock, you can put into.it, I don't know. 
Probably not very much.” 

• Schmidt, is, indeed, an Icon for third 
basemen. He redefined the position m his 
16-year career, hitting 30 or more home 
rims 13 times, winning eight National 
League home-run titles and five slugging 
titles. Four times he led the league in RBIs. 
Eleven times he won a Gold Glove. 

Wiffiams, 28, whether he admits it or 
not, is prcrvrag worthy erf the comparison, 
even ♦fay’gfr he is only in his sixth year in 
tire migars. Going into this season, he had 
hit tire sixth-most home runs in tire past 
five years, his 143 trailing only Fred 
McGriff (174), Cecil Fielder (145), Joe 
Carter (159), Barry Bonds (157) and Mark 
McGwire (145). 


Williams also entered the season ranked 
seventh in home runs (159) and ninth in 
RBIs (486) on the career list of Giants, 
moving up rapidly to join the likes of 
Mays/McCovey and OtL 

He has won an RBI title. And, oh yes, 
W illiams has won two Gold Gloves, some- 
thing that would have to earn a tip of the 
rap from tbe HVes of Schmidt and Brooks 
Robinson, too. 

Though it seems be has perfected so 
many parts of his game, don’t tell Williams 
what he has accomplished Like Griffey, 
he points to age — and the need to learn 
everything be can — as reasons why school 
vrill never be out for him. 

“It’s every day that you learn a little 
more about yourself, a little bit more about 
opposing pitchers, a little more about the 
game.” W illiams said “Once you cjuit 
learning, it’s probably time to get out. 

That's how it is with Williams. His is a 
serious approach, with dual overriding 
themes: making hims elf better, yet sub- 
merging individual goals for tire good of 
tire team. 

He is as aware of the Giants' standing as 
he is of his own in the game. A nose-to-the- 
grindstone superstar, a man not bothered 
by tire Bonds, Griff eys and other stars in 
Ms galaxy. Their glow does not interfere 
with his thing , which is to quietly maneu- 
ver his way to greatness. That maneuvering 
is the fun for the Giants* third baseman. 
And main? no doubt about it: The man 
who has a 1 ,000-candlepower smile of his 
own is having fun. 

“Sometimes it can be a grind dining 
those times when you’re straggling,” he 
said “But I can’t think of anything I d 
rather be doing than this.” 


SCOREBOARD 

Major League Standing* 


SIDELINES 


AMERICAN LEAOUK 

EmtDMttaa 

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Oakland 47 57 „ 7?? 

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NATIONAL LEAGUE 
EastDtvlDoa 

W L PCL GB 

^Montreal ** *[ 

Attarta S S 22 iSS 

New York 2 5 « Mfe 

Florida 45 « XO 21V> 

Central OtaWoo 

Cincinnati 62 2 "S 3*1. 

Houston 59 *> ** 

S* ss sss 

ss *».-« * 

West Dlvtsiaa __ 

Los Anastas “ ® 

San Franetseo « * 

Colorado 2 2 » 

SanDtoSO 43 M SW 

Monday’s Une Scores 


i 

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life 


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AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Tomato **• !* * ! 

ST’srssrtjSSS 

KSTKffi«TSE2E: 

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(», Ganderoan (BA Linton (9). O mzo CD and 

Howdey.W— G.Moddux,14^.lj— Jacome^-Z. 

HR*— Atlanta McGrm (SB). Nw Yort. Bon- 
illa (201. _ ' . , 

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Maatrnd aw 0M MO l-B ■ i 

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C7), Webstar (191: H«V. Roh* R1. W»tte- 
hm [91 and Ftatdtor.aponr (»>■ W-welt*- 
lend, u L — Rodrtauer, HRs— St. Louts. 
Whiten OB. G. Pena OD- Montreal. GHnam 
(in, ' 

Colorado 299 913 911-8 « ■ 

8M 2M ISO—* 19 ■ 

PBlntar, Rood (6). Blair (7). B. Ruflln (B) 
and Gtrardt; Harobcft, Veres ISA Homr^n 
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go; Crtm. BWtWa «), vena (B), Mvere 19) 
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SonHaaonO). • , 

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Lo* n Metre MS MB bm 9 i 

Hamilton HoHman <t) ond Ausmu s: Hor- 
sober, Gatt 17). Sooner (M end Plmw- 
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{33V. Mo n de s i 04). 

The Michael Jordan Wateh 

• moNOAV^ W^EtJordanwentWwt«io 

Bocriflee «y ta H» nWh, owundouts i In the 
fourth and slxlti Innlnasando strikeout in Hw 
MantaaleMdti innlnnas the BJmflnohom 
Barons beat Hta O-Hwwa if*™***- 
SEASON TO OATE: Jordon Is now batitna 
191 UMortfl) with 3t runs, 19 doubles, l 

■ssasaasaasESE 

m putauts, five assists and 10 erron as an 
ouHMder. 


Endand Sacks Rn^by Coach Best 

LCWDON (AP) —Dick Best was sacked Tuesday as coach of 
the Enjdand rugby team, nine months before the start of the 
World Cup in South Africa. 

Jade Rowell, manag er since March, will take over as coach tor 
tire two home internationals against Romania and Canada this 
autumn, the 1995 Five Nations Championship and the World 


was inevitable once Jack Rowdl was appointed because it 
was dear he wanted to do it all himself.” Best told London s 
Evening Standard newspaper. 

For the Record 

FtnEppe Affiot of France will replace the suspended Mika 
Hakkmen of Finland on the McLaren-Peuegot team for the 
Hungarian Grand Ptix on Aug. 14, the team said. 

Gerry Cheevers, the fonner coach and star goalie of the NHL s 
Boston Brains, was sentenced in Concord, New Hampshire, to 
three years’ probation and 500 hours of community service for 

income lax evasion. . ' , 

which has not taken part in any major sporpng 

competition in years, wffl said a team ro t ^ e T 5" 5 .^ ulhcas } 
Gaines in Thailand, an IOC official said m Bangkok. (AFP) 

Quotable 

• Vi tas Gerulaitis, who played before the bathroom break in 
l^rric was allowed: “I guess we didn’t have bladders. 


Yomkjri 

HaMMn 

Chunk* i 

Yakut! 

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Yokohama 


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fliMr.iran Pawtucket- ■ • 

OAKLAND— Pul Mont McOwIro. Hnrt 
t* MV BKOMbllllL Recalled 
Eiiita Yauno, ouHteMW, tram Tacoma, PCL. 


HatUMMO 

COLORADO— Opttoood k*ort Ttwnwoo, 

pudwr. to Cotorado Surlrwj 

MIKO Hart*Y, pitehw, from Colocmte Sorw 
NEW TORIWWIOMOJ™ CttBWa 
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BASKETBALL 

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multiyear contHOeL 

DETROIT— Acswlrcd Mart VMA c enter , 
tram Ptmuiix lor HM <mi W99 moon*- 

raond draft rtcfcs. 

PORTLAND— Nanwd Johnny Dovb <W“- 
tent coach. 


FOOTBALL 
( Football 


ARIZONA W ai ved Garonne Gardner, de- 
fend** Dnomaa 

CINCINNATI — WoW*d Orton Mites, run- 
ntno bat*. 

HOUSTOI* S latted Todd McNair. runnlnB 

btgtn 

KANSAS CITY— Sinned Grao HIIL running 
back. « 4-vew euotracl 
MIAMI— wotved Kelly Slautfer. auartar- 

hwr* 

H.Y. GlAHTS-Wolvod Prtwr Nhre. whte ro- 
edvw. 


FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Auxhto 1, Mantua 2 


The Associated Press 

Regardless of whether there, 
will be a baseball strike. Greg - 
Maddux is almost certain to 
win his third straight Cy Young 
Award. 

Now 14-6. he pitched an 
eight-hitter for bis major 
league-leading ninth complete 

NL ROIlNDUP 

ae as the Atlanta Braves beat 
las, 4-2, on Monday night 
in New York. 

Maddux, who leads the ma- 
jors with 185 innings pitched 
and a 1.70 earned -run average. 
Struck out eight and walked one 
as the Braves won for the fourth 
tune in five games. 

Maddux said he was pre- 
pared for a possible strike, add- 
ing: “There’s a lot more at stake 
than what 1 do individually. I 
just hope that if it happens, ev- 
erybody comes out of it OJC 
and that the fans don’t quit on 
us." 

Fred McGriff hit his 2Stb 
homer erf the season leading off 
the second off the Mets’ rookie, 
Jason Jacome, who in his sixth 
major-league start gave up two 
runs on five hits while striking 
out three and walking one in 
seven innings. 

Jacome got that run back 
with an infield hit in the bottom 
of the second, but right fielder 
Jeremy Burnilz got a late start 
on a fly ball in the sixth, letting 
it drop in front of him, and the 
Braves took a 2-1 lead. 

They scored the winning run 
in the eighth when Dave Gal- 
lagher singled to left off Roger 
Mason and reached third on 
two passed balls before Tony 
Tarasoo doubled off Eric Gun- 
derson. 

Bobby Bonilla’s two-out 
homer in tbe eighth was 
matched by Gallagher’s iwo- 
out RBI single in the ninth. 

Reds 4, Giants 3: Cinrinnaii 
hit three bases-empty homers in 
Ran Francisco, then won its 
fourth straight on a ninth-in- 
ning passed ball 

Pinch-runner Jacob Brum- 
field scored when reliever Steve 
Frey’s pitch bounced off catch- 
er Kirt Manwaring’s glove. 

Matt Williams hit his major 
league-leading 41st home run 
for the Giants. 

Expos 3, Cardi n al s 2: Mar- 
quis Grissom beat visiting Sl 
L ouis with an inside-the-park 
homer off Rich Rodriguez in 
the bottom of the 10th in Mon- 
treal. 

Gerald Young got his glove 
on Grissom’s drive in deep cen- 
ter field as he tried to make an 
over-th e-shoulder catch, but the 
ball caromed along the wall and 
Grissom, who never hesitated, 
beat shortstop Ozzie Smith’s re- 
lay home. _ _ 

The National League East- 
leading Expos have won 12 of 
their last 13. St Louis lost for 
the eighth time in nine games 
despite tying the score with two 
outs in the ninth on Geronimo 
Pena’s homer. 

Cubs 8, Marlins 5: Chicago, 
playing at home, handed Flori- 
da its seventh straight loss as 
Rick Wilkins and Rey Sanchez 
reck drove in two runs in a five- 
run first. 

Rockies 8, Astros 3: Mike 
Kingery got four hits as visiting 
Colorado improved to 17-4 
against Houston over the last 
two seasons. The Astros’ fourth 
straight loss dropped ihem 34 
games behind Cincinnati in the 
Central Division. 

Jeff Bagwell hit his 37th 
homer for the Astros, a two-run 
shot in the fourth that tied Jim- 
my Wynn's dub record. Bag- 
well pushed his major league- 
leading RBI total to 107. 

Padres 5, Dodgers 4: Tony 
Gwynn and Brad Ausmus hit 
run-scoring doubles and Luis 
Lopez had three as San Diego 
won in Los Angeles. 

Mike Piazza drove in two 
runs for the Dodgers with a 
fourth-inning homer and an 
RBI single. 


.Pacific LoaM* 

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M*W*ta1fc-V«WkTW'^1V 


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ESCORTS & GUIDES 


No. 2,000 
NoBigDeal 
For Bipkm 

By Mark Maske 

Washington Post Ser.ice 

MINNEAPOLIS — Cal 
Ripken's 2,000th consecutive 
gamp, was memorable mostly 
because be played it, not be- 
cause he did anything magi- 
cal in it. 

Ripken joined Lou Gehrig 
as the onlv men in baseball 
history to' have played in 
2,000 straight games- He re- 
ceived a warm greeting from 
the Metrodome crowd, but 
the rest of the evening was an 
anticlimax in the Orioles' 1-0 
victoiy. 

Ripken made a pair of nice 
plays at shortstop, but went 
hides? in his four at-bats. He 
popped out in the eighth in- 
ning with runners at second 
and third and one out. He is 
1 30 games shy of Gehrig’s all- 
time record for consecutive 
games played, and he was 
typically unimpressed by his 
achievement. 

“It’s something I never set 
out lo do," Ripken said. “I 
still don’t go out there be- 
cause of the streak. It's jusL a 
byproduct of my desire to 
play every day. Managers 
kept putting my name in the 
lineup. 1 kept from getting 
hurt. And suddenly, there 
was a streak.” 

With the Players Associa- 
tion's Aug. 12 strike date 
about to arrive, many teams 
in baseball seem to be strug- 
gling these days to find things 
to play for in a season that 
could "be about to end. For 
the Orioles, it’s come down to 
playing for the AL wild-card 
spot- And maybe for the job 
of tire beleaguered manager. 
Johnny Oates. 

Monday, however, all of 
that seemed far away. The 
Orioles and Twins were play- 
ing to be a part of histoiy. 

Orioles third base coach 
Jerry Narron made out the 
club’s lineup card twice — 
perhaps just to be certain he 

f ot it right for the Hall of 
fame, or perhaps to keep one 
stashed. Without Ripken 
knowing it, the Orioles flew 
his wife, Kelly, into town, and 
she sat in the first row behind 
the team's dugout on the first 
base side of the field. The 
crowd gave Ripken a nice 
ovation prior lo his firsl-in- 



\tm HcuctIiIl TK- V.v.iUlcO fee.' 


*\xm IKIHIULIL IIO, 

Cal Ripken acknowledging the crowd's ovation in Miin 
neapotis: “It's something I never set out to do." 


neapolis 

nin g at-bat, and the shortstop 
tipped his batting helmet 
twice. Assistant general man- 
ager Frank Robinson and 
vice chairman Joe Foss were 
on hand to represent the Ori- 
oles’ front office. 

Other than that, though, 
this was a business-as-usual 
night for Ripken, much like 
every other evening he’s had 
for the past 13 years between 
April and October. 

He hasn’t missed a contest 
since the second game of a 
doubleheader on May 29, 
1982. He's started the past 
1,973 games at shortstop, the 
game’s most demanding posi- 
tion defensively other than 


catcher. He’s participated in 
more than 99 percent of the 
innings the Orioles have 
played since the streak began. 

As it now stands, Ripken 
would break Gehrig’s record 
in late June of next season, 
but the strike could push that 
back. His teammates are con- 
vinced that he’ll break the re- 
cord. Orioles pitcher Mike 
Mussina jokes that Ripken 
will be playing shortstop for 
tbe club even when he has to 
be taken to the position in a 
wheelchair. 

“And,” Mussina said, 
“he’ll still wheel over to the 
ball and make the play.” 


Jays’ Carter Hits Homer 300, 
Yanks, Indians and Royals Win 


The Associated Pros 

On the night Cal Ripken 
reached a big number, Joe Car- 
ter attained a pretty nice mile- 
stone, too. 

Carter hit his 300th homer as 
the Toronto Blue Jays won the 
first game of a doubleheader in 
Boston. 6-2, on Monday night. 
The Red Sox came back to win 
the second game, 4-3. 

“I plan these things out. You 
only nit 300 once,” said Carter, 
who bad asked the Boston 
grounds crew to retrieve the ball 
in the event of a home run. 

“That was a big one,” he said. 
“You never want to lose track 
of those.” 

Carter has said in recent 
weeks that his goal was to get to 
100 RBIs for tire sixth straight 
season. The two- run homer 
over the Green Monster in left 
field, an eighth-inning drive off 
Steve Farr, increased his total 
to 97. 

Pat Hentgen pitched a six- 
hitter for his sixth complete 
game. Aaron Sele allowed seven 


hits, three unearned runs and 
five walks in seven innings. 

Mo Vaughn horaered to cap a 
four- run first inning in the sec- 

AL ROUNDUP 

ond game as Boston’s first five 
batters all got hits ofr Brad Cor- 
nett. 

Yankees 8, Brewers 3: Me- 
lido Perez helped host Milwau- 
kee to five hits in eight innings 
and Mike Gail ego hit a two-run 
homer, tying the score in the 
fifth, before Paul O'Neill’s sac- 
rifice fly scored the go-ahead 
run for New York. 

Perez hit Kevin Seitzer just 
below the left eye with a pitch in 
the third. Seitzer left under his 
own power and was taken to a 
hospital, where he was diag- 
nosed with a sinus fracture. 

Orioles 1, Twins 0: Arthur 
Rhodes pitched a seven-hitter a 
day after being recalled from 
Triple-A Rochester and visiting 
Baltimore scored an unearned 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 5) 


run on Mark McLemore’s sin- 
gle in tire second. 

Indians 6, Tigers 2: Paul Sor- 
rento. Carlos Baerga and 
Manny Ramirez homered for 
host Cleveland, which was play- 
ing without suspended Albert 
BeUe. 

Jason Grimsley struck out 
eight in 734 innings to help stop 
the Indians’ three-game losing 
streak. They pulled within 14 
games of the AL Central-lead- 
ing Chicago White Sox, who 
were idle. 

Royals 4, Athletics 2: Mark 
Gubicza allowed three hits in 
eight shutout innings as Kansas 
City extended its winning 
streak to 10 games, the club’s 
longest in 16 years. Jeff Mont- 
gomery got his 24th save after 
makin g a two-run throwing er- 
ror with the bases loaded in the 

nin th. 

Ron Darling, who had won 
his six previous decisions, al- 
lowed three runs and nine hits 
in seven innings for visiting 
Oakland. 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1994 


OBSERVER 


A Yearning to Serve 


By Russel] Baker 

N EW YORK — Many have 
pleaded with me not to 
seek the presidency in 1996, but 
I must. Call it selfish, but I 
yearn for the utter humiliation 
that only the presidency can be- 
stow. 

/ want to be scolded by colum- 
nists and editorial writers for not 
possessing sagacity and cunning 
as prof mod as theirs. 

I want to watch telegenic 
journalists teQ the country what 
needs to be done to perfect soci- 
ety and belittle me for not doing 
it 

1 want to be held in contempt 
by shrewd veterans of Washing- 
ton politics, and not only that: I 
want to be denounced by them 
as a rustic doR so innocent of 
Washington's magnificent iniq- 
uities that I am unfit to lead the 
country. 

I want investigative reporters 
to dig up absolutely everything 
they can find on my dear moth- 
er, now dead alas, hence beyond 
enjoying the chance to see her 
name in the newspapers. 

I want to be able to pick up 
those newspapers myself and find 
out whether she was really the 
sweet lady I always thought, or 
whether she was secretly leading 
a disgusting life of Byzantine lu- 
bricity. 

I want her passion for play- 
ing high-low-jack- and- the- 
game on Saturday night held up 
to ridicule by the nation's fore- 
most satirists. 

1 want my income tax returns 
for the past 45 years studied by 
the most hflunt tax lawyers 
money can buy, so the opposi- 
tion party can either mock me as 
a boob too dumb to claim aB the 
deductions I was entitled to or 
accuse me of gross and unpatri- 
otic finagling to cheat Unde 
Sam. 

1 want my wife to be por- 
trayed to the entire world as a 
power-mad witch hellbent on 
destroying the American family. 

I want my younger brother's 
indictment for shady real-estate 
speculations as well as his 
drunken-driving arrests to be 
widely publicized. 


I want the whole world to 
know 

• about my unde who was 
schizophrenic; 

• about my 97-pound female 
cousin who beat up a state 
trooper while he was giving her 
a traffic ticket; 

• and about my great-grand- 
father who joined Robert E 
Lee as soon as the Civil War 
began, came home immediately 
after seeing his very first battle 
and stayed home where, having 
granted himself the title “Colo- 
nel," he spent the next four 
years enlisting fresh troops for 
the Confederacy, 


That's not all I want. 

I want to have every detail of 
my sex life fully reported not only 
in the grocery tabloids, but also in 
all the truly important newspa- 
pers so that even the quality read- 
er will be able to treat me as a 
subject for ribald jokes and sor- 
did speculation. 

I want to be used as an exam- 
ple of satanic evil in sermons by 
politically minded parsons with 
vast television congregations. 

1 want to be widely suspected, 
Blanks to suggestions spread by 
these godly men, of engaging in 
criminal activities, including 
murder. 

/ want to be sued too. I want to 
be sued by women I haven't seen 
in years, if at alL 

I want to be sued for sexual 
harassment child abuse, homo- 
phobic utterance, malting racist 
remarks, laughing at ethnic 
jokes, assisting in fllega] instal- 
lation of fuse-box “cheaters,” 
buying beer with forged draft 
cards, lying to a literary man 
about having read “The Golden 
BowL" 

In short, 1 want to be ruined, 
inunlliated, abused, detested, re- 
viled, denounced by sacred der- 
gy and best-seffing schmooze- 
meisters, and treated with 
contenpt by miffions of my 
countrymen. 

Why else would anyone want 
to be president? 

New York Tuna Service 


For ‘Fred Astaire on Add,’ a Joke Pays Off 


By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Tuna Serrice 

L OS ANGELES —-Jim Carrey removes a check 
for S10 milli on from his wallet. It says: “For 
acting services rendered by Thanksgiving, 1995.” 

It's a joke, of course. The star of the weekend's 
No. 1 film, “The Mask,” wrote it to hims elf years 
ago when he was unknown, barely eking out a living 
and seized with fantasies of ea rning a ton of money. 

Actually, he shortchanged hims elf. Carrey’s price 
is now S7 million a film, and he plans to make two a 
year. 



Day by day, Carrey seems in an ever-upward 
spiral. In last year's surprisingly successful “Ace 
Ventura: Pet Detective,” he proved himself an agile, 
physically broad and imp redict ably lunatic comic, 
with hints of Jerry Lewis and Robin Williams. With 
that one movie, Carrey became a bankable star with 
a large audience, mostly teenagers. He calls his style 
"Fred Astaire on add” 

He may have arrived at major stardom all of a 
sudden, but it took him a decade to get there. The 
Canadian-born star had developed a reputation on 
the Los Angeles comedy dub circuit for his imper- 
sonations and manic humor. More recently, his 
reputation grew on television in the three years that 
he played, as he put it, “the token white gay, in 'In 
Living Color,' ” the often wickedly funny Fox televi- 
sion show with a mostly black cast. 

As blunt and shrewd about himself as he is funny, 
Carrey tried to describe his comic sensibility. 

“There's an edge, a danger to what I do,” he said 
in an interview. “And an anger. Even the guys I play, 
nice guys, put their foot down. People are attracted 
to that” 

In “The Mask,” which received mixed reviews, 
Carrey plays Stanley Ipkiss, a Walter Mitty type 
who's treated terribly % bosses, women, even his 
dog. He accidentally Grids an ancient mask that 
transforms him into a crime fighter who’s irresistibly 
char ming , suave and nutty. And it’s accomplished 
with some dazzling special effects. 

Carrey said too many gifted comedians he knows 
seem intimidated by movie cameras. “Fve never had 
any trouble being in front of a camera,” he said. 

Recently, the camera has been rolling a lot for 
Carrey, whose exploding salary has stirred astonish- 
ment, even here. He received $350,000 for “Ace 
Ventura” and an additional $100,000 for “The 
Mask.” But for his next comedy. “Dumb and 
Dumber" (‘It’s about two guys. Guess which pan I 
play.”), he mil receive $7 milli on. And he has at least 
three other movies lined up after that. 

Seated in a suite on the top floor of a hotel near 
Beverly Hills, the 32-year-old performer said that he 
was trying to keep some control over his life, but that 
it was hard. Though many of his fantasies about 
fame and money have come true, success has come 
at its own price. 

“For years I used to drive up to Mulholland Drive 



NmUwb Prodasdoa lac. 

Jim Carrey, as Stanley Ipkiss, catches a glimpse of a sexy lonnge singer in “The Mask." - 


every night and look at the city and sit and imagine 
myself with all this money and being sought after,” 
he said. “It's not the money or the houses. That’s 
really not it. What success means is being at the 
of my game. That’s what I wank What I'm 
looking for.” 

Success has meant buying a home in the Brent- 
wood section of Los Angeles, now famous as the 
neighborhood of the killings in the O. J. Simpson 
case. 

But he is also in the midst of a divorce from his 
wife, Melissa Womer, an actress. They have a 6- 
year-old daughter who lives with him part of the 
time. “It’s so cUchfid,” he said of the sput-up. “But 
there have got to be reasons for cfich&s. 

“Look, Fm a hard gny to five with,” he said. “Fm 
like a caged Fm up all night walking around 

the living room. It’s hard for me to come down from 
what I do. It’s like being an astronaut. You’re an the 
moon all day and then at night you go home and 
have to take the garbage out” 

Though his adolescent years in hardscrabble 
neighborhoods in the Toronto area weren’t exactly 
the stuff of comedy, Carrey is hilariously, and often 
unpxintably, candid in talking about them. His fa- 
ther, Percy, was a professional musician who sold his 
saxophone to pay nis wife’s hospital bills. He wound 


up as an accountant and janitor. For a while, the 
family tived in a Vdkwagen camper and a tent. 

From the third grade on, he started making odd 
faces fear hours in front of the mirror, talking to 
Hlmarif, writing poetry and entertaining the family 
with impressions of neaghbors as well as of tdeviaon 
stars. ’• 

At 15 he was taken by his father to appear at a hip 
Toronto comedy dob called “Yuk, Yules." 

“I got booed off the stage,” he recalled. T was 
dressed in a polyester suit that my mom told me 
would be a good idea, but it didn’t go over so wdl in 
the hip underground world. I went back two years, 
later. I loosed my hair up. No polyester. It was 
fine.” 

At 19 he went to Los Angeles to try the comedy 
clubs. He lived in cheap motels mi Sunset Boule- 
vard. 

His loopy impressions at Los Angeles dubs soon 
caught the attention of Sam Kinison and. Rodney' 
Dangerfidd. He began working on television, had 
small parts in movies. But performing as a comedian 
co m m u ned ban. • . • 

Did he ever believe he'd hit die jackpot so soon? 
“I don’t know,” he. said, after, a pause. “I alwtfys- 
bdieved in miracles. That’s why I wrote that check 
to mysdf.” • 


PEOPLE 


Rpseonne Signs Up 
ForThree More Yean 

Rosemme left Tom Arnold, 

' biit she won’t be leaving “Ro- 
seanne.” The TV star, who 
dropped her last name after 
dropping her husband, has 
struckaaeal with theprtducers 
of the ABC comedy to continue 
her show for at least three more 
years. Production began Mon- 
day for the coming season, ac- 
. cording to a Carsey-Wemer Co. 
spokesman,. James . Anderson. 
He refused w discuss contract 

• details but Daily Variety re- 
ported: she has been making 
more than $450,000 an episode. 

• ••• \ _ ’ 

The sex business entrepre- 
neur ftnd Raymond has topped 
a magazine survey as the richest 
person in Britain. Business Age 
magazine said Raymond was 
worth £1.65 billion ($2.55 bil- 
lion). His empire indudes sex 
m a garfocR ana dubs. Next in 
line came the supermarket mag- 
_nate David Sfunshsey (£1.38 
nnllkra), th& banker Sir Evelyn 
tie KofocfaBd (£1.35 billion) 
and the press baron Lord Rotfa- 
erinete (£ 1.22 billion) 

• P • 

- Two of the former members 

of Led Zeppetin Will reunite in a 

television show, the MTV net- 
work announced. The show, to 
air in October; will bring Robert 
Plant arid Jimmy ftage together. 
They will perform new arrange- 
ments of classic Led Zeppelin ; 
• songs as well as newly written 
material. 

□ 

It’s a whole new world for 
Christ&xa Crawford. The adopt- 
ed daughter of Joan Crawford, 
who wrote about the physical 
and emotional abuse the actress 
inflicted OB her in “MOHBme 

, Dearest,” is the host, chef and 
parlor maid at her own bed- 
and-breakfast in Sanders, Ida- 
ha She xents aut rooms for $65 
to $75 a night, and told People 
magazine; This is a dream 
come true for me.” 


INTERNATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears tm Page S 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Today 


Tomorrow 


High 

Low 

w 

High 

Low W 


OF 

C/F 


OF 

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27/00 

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34/03 

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28/82 

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Dudapan 

33/91 

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33*1 

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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu -Weather. Asia 





CMJ unaaaMnany ’(( Unaaoaonafiiy KJvJImmw Haavy 

— m 2a «■ ISSSB-n && Sron 


North America 

Heavy thunderstorms will 
Tumble ecrom the area from 
Washington. D.C_ to Boston 
Thursday and Thursday 
niam. Dry and oool weather 
wID move In over the week- 
end. The MMwest wdl have 
Sunny and pleasant weather 
Friday and Saturday. The 
scorching heat wava will 
continue over die Rockies. 


Europe 

Cooler weather whh showers 
wt* teach London Thursday. 
Locally heavy rains wM fall 
from Ireland to Scotland later 
thlo week. Intense midsum- 
mer heat will wither crops 
snd lawns from Geneva and 
MareeHa through Bertn and 
Warsaw, Cooling thunder- 
storms wdl reach Parts end 
Smssete. 


Asia 

Abnormal heat and draught 
wB pwstai In Japan throu^r 
Saturday. Tokyo and 
Nagasaki wd continue to be 
unusually hoi. A tropical 
alarm may bring locally 
haavy rains to Taiwan by 
Thursday. Vety warm weath- 
er with a few hit-or-miss 
thunderstorms will be the 
rule from Beijing to Seoul. 


Asia 




Tomorrow 


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LOW 

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Capa Town 

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ACROSS 

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■ In the back 
io Hoarded 
i« 1936 Leslie 
Howard role 
is Nose (out) 
ie Actress 
Nazi mo va 
it Foes at 
Gaugflmela 

20 Mythological 
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21 Whomps 

22 Claire 

23 Loyal 


24 Foes at the tails 
of Rei chen bach 
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22 Leisure 
33 Card 

■■dune honoree, 
for short 

■•Taxable Income 
aa Philippine 
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40 Out of business 

41 Camera 
carriage 

42 Foes at Tray 
4* Fix, srtwtoe 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Mu 

Cairo 

Dwnuoa 

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34*3 21/70 a 
38/87 18*1 a 
28*2 18*4 a 
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High Low W High Low W 

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17/S2 1B*1 C 16*4 15 W C 

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Solution to Puzzle ol August 2 


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ansa naas aasaa 
□Han nnsa naana 
□aaanciaQaninaBa 
anas aaa 
iQBB 0 Sta □□□ DQOa 
ana naans ssas 
□nnHHsssssaaaas 
□□□s □gjbsq mas 
Basra ana aaassa 
use aaras 
BQHQBaSSHHSCiaS 
□anaa qhuh sues 
assBQ oraas aaaa 

□□ESQ UQGJEJ aUSCJ 


47 'Flying Down to 

4* Bundle barley 
si Cosmetic Itenn 
ss Fora at 
Tenochtwin 

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-moppet 
s» Simulacrum 
bo Ferber title 
fli Level 
■a Not stifling 
S3 Levels off 


DOWN 

f Not give 

■ ’Damn 
Yankees* role 

a Sign from on 
high 

. 4 Barber 's cafl 

■ Green Hght 

a Pitot's vision - 
problem 

7 Nirvana 

■ Cabinet dept 

e Group based in 
Geneva 

10 First name In 
the N.BA 

11 Literary 
pseudonym . . 


ix Jack Homer's 
surprise 

is Itar— — — (news • 
agency) 

14 Orca • 

ISAS 

(generally) 

■a ‘Take- — !'. 
a* Tankard's kin 
2s Rival of Sally 
as The Cloister 
and tiie Hearth’ 
author 

*7 N.Y.C. subway . 
line 

■■Busybody 
as'Reb general 
Richard. 

M Dear pelt - 
■4 Fellows 
as Colonial African - 
land 

37 Prefix with 
- Disney • " 

as Mil. rank 

40 Caniff s “ 

Canyon’ 

41 Bishop's 

bailiwick 

43 Oregon's 

JLake ' 

44 Narrow opening 
49 *Hey j 


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denizen 
*»<MginsJ 
Arizonan 
■0 Gannon 

University hom® 


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© New York Times Edited by Will Shorn, 


AKT Access Numbers. 

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COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY AC CESS NUMBER 
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Australia 


1-800-881-011 I Jerttfe n steto * 


155-00-11 Ode 


China, PRC*w* 


10811 TJlfnunria* 


OOa-0312 


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8*196 Crihunhfa 


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980-11-0010 


India* 


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1H 


000-117 Malta* 


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001-801-10 Monaco" 


0800-890-110 El Salvador** 


119 

190 


Japan" 


19*-0011 Guatemala* 


0039-ill Netherlands* 


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009-11 Nbrway 


0&02M111 “Guyana,*** 


190 


Korea** 


11* Poland**"" 


800 - 190-11 Honduras** 


165 


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0*0104800X11 Mexico*** 


123 


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05017-1-288 - gQcarwgoai (Managua) 


PhOippbKS" 


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01-6004288 Panama* 


Saipan* 


235-2872 Slovakia 


153^042 Penr 


95-8004d2-424p 
174 
109 


Singapore 


Sri Lanka 


8004)111-111 Spain* 


0042000101 Suriname 


191 


430430 Sweden* 


900-99-00- U Uruguay 


156 


Taiwan* 


0080-10288-0 SWtiKriUKr 


020-795-611 _ Venezuela"* 


00-0410 


Thailand* 


155-OO-n 


80-01 1-120 


Q019-991-1U1 UK. 


EUROPE 


Ukraine* 


jWWDPll Bahamas 


CARIBBEAN 


Armenia** 


8A14111 


MIDDLE EAST 


Austria"*** 


022-905011 Bahrain . 


8 * 100-11 Bermuda* 
. BrftidiVl 


1-800-872-2881 


1-800372-2881 


1-800872-2881 


0800-100-10 Cyprus" 


800001 Cayman islands 1-800872-2881 


Bulgaria 

. 00-1800-0010 

Israel 

• . 177-100-2727 

Croatia** 

99*84011 

Kuwait 

800-288 

Czech Rep 

. 00420-00101 

Lcbanoo (Beirut) 

426-801 

Denmark" 

8001-0010 

Qbgv. 

0800-011-77 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

Saudi Arabia 

1-800-10 

France 

19*-0011 

Turkey" 

. 00-800-12277 

Germany. 

0130-0010 

UAE." 

800-121 

Greece* . 

00-800-13H 

AMERICAS 

Hungary* 

00*400-01111 

Argenina* 

001-800-200-1111 

tcdand*a 

99W01 

Bdte* 

S55 

Ardand _ 

. 1-SWF55M00 

BdHvfar 

0-800-1112 


080-90010 Grenada!* 


1-800-872-2881 


Haiti* 

001-600-972-2883 

jamater 

- W300-872.288V 

HeoLAmfl 

001-800-872-2881 

St Kite/Nevis 

1-800472-2881' 

AFRICA 

RSypt* (Cairo) 

5104)200; 

Gabon* 

QOa-OQI 

Gombiar 

00111 

Kenya*’ 

0800-10 

Liberia 

. . . 797-797 

South Africa 

Q-8WF99-Q123 


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