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INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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London, Thursday, August 4, 1994 


No. 34,658 



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By Bffl Keller " ; 

W*» Tor* Timet Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Courting South Africa last 
year the advance scoots of Western awney' brought 
an alluring message: Makepeace and take thefree 

uiaricet pledge, and a thousand prefects wffl blocttn. 

But 10 months after Nelson Mandela formally 
invited foreign business to come back, and three 
months after the elections that secured tiris rebom 
c apit a li st the presidency. South Africa has yet to see 
the surge of investment needed to fuel growth and 
jobs, . 

The country reached an almost miraculous politi- 
cal consensus, leading to the end of **xfFTOPiic sanc- 
tions and the resultant isolation. Mr. Mandela has 


ew South Africa, Foreign Investors Hold Off 


V V adopted a sober, growth-oriented economic policy. 
-» - But' investors have found a host of reasons to hold 


The labor force is costly, unskilled and militant. 
-Trade barriers and currency-exchange controls have 
yet to faR There are doubts about the government’s 
long-term commitment to capitalism, and about 
whether Mr. Mandela can contain the expectations of 
the impoverished majority. 

As an investment opportunity, South Africa is an 
oddball —part Third World, part First World, situat- 
ed at the bottom of the globe and attached to a 
continent that Western investors tend to see, at best, 
as. terra incognita, and, ax worst, as doomed. 

*Th just about every presentation, there's some- 
body who stands up and asks me, *Wfaat about 


Rwanda? 1 ” said Charles H. Allison, executive direc- 
tor of New Africa Advisors, a U.S. company that has 
been trying to get pension funds to buy a stake in new 
South African businesses. 

Rwanda, that tiny country ruptured by ethnic 
hatred, is 1,500 miles to the north and is as economi- 
cally relevant to South Africa as Bosnia is to Boston. 
Bui to many overseas investors, it is all Africa. 

Mr. Allison, whose company is owned by African- 
Americans bent on opening that psychological fron- 
tier, believes the money will come, and so do many 
business- savvy South Africans. They point to South 
Africa's sophisticated business infrastructure and 
natural bounty. 

But so far, it is still an open question whether Mr. 


Mandela will ever get tbr kind of investment be 
needs, the kind that produces exports, growth and 
jobs. The foreign capital inflow so far has consisted 
mainly of bargain-seekers buying shores in long- 
established companies listed on the Johannesburg 
Stock Exchange. 

U.S. and British investment bouses set up funds to 
buy South African stocks and bonds, and at the turn 
of the year net purchases jumped to 1.094 billion 
rand, or 5299.6 million at current exchange rates, 
more than double the 440 million rand in December. 

Bui since April more foreign money has flowed out 
than in, a trend that brokers attribute partly to a 
worldwide anxiety about stocks, but partly to cold 




See AFRICA, Page 4 


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The Merger 
Is Back and 
The Players 
Look Global 


By Lawrence Malkin 

International Bardd TrSmtf 

■ NEW YORK — Mergers are returning 
' to the business would in a huge new wave. 

Unlike die mania of the 1980s that was 
- driven by financial engineering and corpo- 
rate ego, today’s mergers are based on 
globalization, chang in g competition and 
rationalized new strategies. 

Within the past 24 hours, mergers, 
buyouts or takeovers have either been an- 
nounced or settled that will reshape such 
diverse fields as the U.S. pharmaceutical 
and insurance industries, the paper and 
' ing industry in Europe and the 
rated. States, and Britain’s waning super- 
market chains. (Page 9) 

The largest was an $8-5 bflfion offer 
Tuesday by American Home Products for 
American Cyanatmd Co, the richest in a 
recent wave of consolidations by U.S. 
pharmaceutical companies, which along 
with hospitals are ontepuhlic pressure, to 
cut costs and offer wider and more effi- 
ciently organized Hues of products and 
services. Bat that is only part of the story.. 

“This wave has been under way aH year 
for strategic reasons: tougher world com- 
petition naans more ccwsoEdation*'* jtgijH 
Martin Sikora, editor of Mergers ^ Acqui- 
sitions magazine, who tcacbes tbc snbject V 
at the University of Pennsylvanians Whar- . 
ton School of Business. . ...... i; V- ; = ■ 

“The Big Fonr, in addition to health 
cam, ore defense, where the nwtibcx tnie 
customer, the Pentagon* is buying-less; 
financial services, where the reasons range 
from interstate banking to the. globaliza- 
tion of markets, and the information su- 
podtighwsy companies, where everyoneis 
reshuffling the cards for the right mix.” - 
Accurate figures are- hard to gather at 
the height of the struggle, bin in the United' 
States Mr. Sikora’s magazine has found 
2,045 mergers during the first half of the 
year worth $84.4 billion, compared to 
1,892 worth $703 Wffion for the first half ‘ 
of last year. ...... . 

That is an annual rate of 4,090 for this 
year — and die second half of the -year 
usually produces more than the first — 
compared to a low of 3,513 mergers worth 
$138 bOlkm in 1991. The merger wave has 
alto hit less glamorous industries, such as ' 
automobile parts, where the dominant 
companies in mature industries are caittiog - 
costs by rationalizing their suppliers. 

Another kind of rationalization w as rep- 
resented in the deal arranged for Jefferson 
Smurfit Group, an Irish paper and card- 
board manufacturer in Europe and the 
United Stales, to buy the paper and pack- 
aging operations of France s CSe. de St 
Gobain SA for 5.63 bShan francs ($1-04 
billion). The French company, Mr. Sikora 
noted, was spread too thin over half a ' 
dozen businesses, while paper and packag- 
ing is a mature industry that gobbles up' 
capital and must strategically position its 
operations worldwide to be profitable. 

Most dramatic of the latest deals is the 
offer by American Home to buy A meri c an 
fy anamid for $95 a share, about 50 per- 
cent above Tuesday’s opening price i of 
$6235. Before the bid came to snatch it. 
away, Cyananrid was negotiating with the 
Anglo-American pharmaceutical giant 
SmithKime Beecbam to swap divisions ... 
and possibly sell off the Cyanamid agricul- 
tural chemical and pesticide untts. 

Stock analysts reckoned that the sale- 
value of those nomnedkal ‘ “ 



- M-j-jf Mwur-'Apner FKBcr-Pmic 

UNEASY FREEDOM — Taslizna Nasrio, a Bangladesh author threatened with death by Muslins militants, leaving 
a court in Dhaka on Wednesday after posting bail. She came out of hiding to face charges of insulting Islam. Page 4. 


Fighting Flares 
In Bosnia as 
Serbs Reject 
Partition Plan 

Cemp&edby Our Staff Front Dispatcher 

PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina — Defying 
the international community as well as 
their supporters in Serbia, the Bosnian 
Serbs' self-declared republic assembly vot- 
ed Wednesday to reject the latest peace 
plan for Bosnia. 

The lawmakers voted instead to hold a 
referendum Aug. 27-28 on the internation- 
al plan that would divide Bosnia roughly 
evenly between them and their Muslim- 
Croat enemies. 

The Bosnian Serbs’ latest denunciation 
coincided with an increase in fighting is 
troublespots across Bosnia. 

The referendum on the territorial divi- 
sion of Bosnia between the Serbs and the 
Muslim -Croatian federation is expected to 
confirm the Bosnian Serbian leadership's 
rejection of the plan, lawmakers said. 

The major powers that drafted the peace 
plan — the united States. Russia, Germa- 
ny, France and Britain — have called for 
stiffer sanctions against Serbia and its 
Montenegro ally if the Serbs in neighbor- 
ing Bosnia reject the peace plan. They say 
a referendum is a time- wasting measure. 

The vote to reject the plan also puts the 
Bosnian Serbs on a collision course with 
the Serbian government, which on Tues- 
day threatened to cut off all aid. 

The leader of the Bosnian Serbs, Rado- 
van Karadzic, said in a speech to the as- 
sembly before the vote that the Bosnian 
Serbs would have move to a full war foot- 
ing and prepare for dosed borders with 
Serbia. “Probably we shall have to declare 
a state of war, full mobilization and ra- 
tioned supplies,” be warned. 

As the Bosnian Serbian assembly gath- 
ered, United Nations officials reported a 
surge in fighting in northern and north- 
eastern Bosnia and more sniper fire in 
Sarajevo. 

Before the vote, a statement denouncing 
the peace plan was issued by SKNA, the 
Bosnian Serbian news agency, from the 
stronghold of Pale, just ease of besieged 
Sarajevo. It said the Bosnian Serbs' leaders 
deemed the partition plan unacceptable, 
saying it had been “deliberately compiled 
in such a way as to be unacceptable for the 
Serb side.” 

“Acceptance of such a thing would rep- 

See SERBS, Page 4 


Police Kill 3 Protesters as General Strike Paralyzes Lagos 


Cenftita! by OurSuff From Dispatches 

LAGOS At least three people were 
killed Wednesday during, dashes between 
the police and protesters demanding the 
release of the politician Moshood ICO. 
Abiola, witnesses and pro-democracy 
campaigners said. - 

The violence occurred on the first day of 
a genera? strike also aimed at securing 
Chief Abiola’s freedom. At least six people 
were insured in the dashes, as protesters in 


Lagos lit bonfires and blocked roads, a 
member of the National Democratic Co- 
alition said. 

The National Labor Congress ins trad- 
ed die 5 million members of its 41 unions 
to join a strike by oti workers that began on 
July 4. Lagos, the main commercial center, 
was largely deserted. 

Bola Tinnbu, a former senator, said the 
demonstrators had paraded the body of 
one of their dead colleagues around the 


of the traditional ruler of the city. 
)ba Oyekan. He said the protesters had 
also reported that two other demonstrators 
had been lolled by the police. 

“They wanted the Oba to know that the 
police are killing our people,” Mr. Tinubu 
said. 

Groups of youths trying to enforce the 
strike attacked merchants with machetes. 
Four traders with deep cuts were taken to 
the hospital, and several others were hurt 


Chief Abiola, a business tycoon who is 
presumed to have won an annulled presi- 
dential election last year, appeared in 
court again in the federal capital Abuja on 
treason charges filed after be declared him- 
self president His lawyers have asked that 
the case be dismissed.' 

The court postponed until Aug. 16 a 
ruling on whether it has jurisdiction to 

See LAGOS, Page 4 


In Europe’s Sizzling Summer , Even the Railroad Tracks Wilt 


By Craig R, Whitney 

JVtfw York Tones Service 


could beasmgnas op™,wu.w-™.» of a heat, wave, w 
justify American Home’s high cash but — 3g degrees 

and that might make the company anm- Poland la te r Sis \ 
viting target for someone else now that it is day. 

™fn1mflndfll sarvices»Ame^an General 
Coro, of Houston bid $2.6 bflhon m cash 
for Unitrin Inc- after the Chicago firms 
board had injected wo pKvmts offers to 
tpaintain the company s inde penden ce. 

The bid represents a 30 pwceat pramrai 

over TuesdVsstoc^pncc.Amencan Gen- 
eral spedabzes in consumer finance and is 
one of the largest U5- prOTders of 
retirement annuities, vife 
with Unitrin’s major hues m hfc health, 

1 .Ia .1 TfMJPtnPT 


, BONN — Much of Europe is baking in the sixth week 
of a heat wave, with the temperature expected to reach 
nearly 38 degrees centigrade in eastern Germany and 
Poland later Sis week. No relief is forecast before Sun- 
day. 

Last month was the hottest and sunniest on record in 
most places from the Netherlands to Hungary and Po- 
lnnd/Harnhitrg and Stockholm, normally cool and breezy 
even in the su mm er, registered the highest average tem- 


perature for July ever, 2 1 .6 degrees centigrade O I Fahr- 
enheit). 

Except for brief respites produced by severe thunder- 
storms, the heat has been unabated across most of Eu- 
rope since the end of June. 

In the Czech Republic, it got so hoi that railroad tracks 
bent out of line and the state railways ordered a speed 
limit of 60 kilometers an hour (38 miles an hour) between 
noon and 8 P.M. 

The Baltic Sea. nonnaBy a frigid place where bathers 
may need bodysuits even in August, has wanned up to 23 
degrees (73 Fahrenheit) off the German coast, producing 


a bloom of red and blue algae that has caused some 
swimmers to break out in a rash. 

Now, brownouts caused by shortages of electricity 
loom in Aruheim, the Netherlands, and Hanover, but not 
because power plants are overwhelmed by demand from 
air-conditioners. 

The water in the Rhine and the Weser rivers that the 
plants use to cool their turbines became so warm — 
nearly 26 degrees (78 Fahrenheit) — that the plants 
would have to shut down if the water got any hotter. 

Sec HOT, Page 4 


5 Frenchmen 
Shot to Death 
By Guerrillas 
In Algiers 

Attackers Tried to Park 
Booby-Trapped Car at 
Embassy Housing Area 

By William Drozdiak 

(VasUngton Far , r Service 

PARIS — In one of the most brazen 
attacks yet on foreigners living in Algeria, 
five French citizens were shot and lulled 
Wednesday by suspected Muslim guerril- 
las who were attempting to drive a car 
bomb into the French Embassy's main 
housing complex. 

The French defense minister, Francois 
Ltotard, said three gendarmes and two 
embassy officials were killed in an ex- 
change of gunfire when they intercepted 
the attackers. The guerrillas were trying to 
park a booby-trapped vehicle in a residen- 
tial area of Algiers where more than 70 
members of the French community live 
under tight security. 

The bomb was subsequently defused, 
preventing what could have been a much 
worse incident. But the four gunmen ap- 
parently managed to flee before Algerian 
authorities sealed off the area. 

In Paris, the government of Prime Min- 
ister Edouard Balladur condemned what it 
called “a barbarian act” and urged all 
French expatriates whose presence is not 
essential to leave Algeria immediately. 
About 2.000 French citizens, not including 
perhaps as many as 75,000 Algerians who 
claim dual nationality, are estimated to be 
living there. Foreign Ministry officials 
said. 

Following an emergency cabinet meet- 
ing, Mr. Ltotard and Foreign Minister 
Alain Jupp£ flew to Algiers to assess the 
security situation and to offer condolences 
to relatives of the victims. Mr. L&otard said 
that France would increase protection for 
those citizens who remained and demand 
greater efforts from the Algerian govern- 
ment to guard the foreign community. 

At least 56 foreigners. Including 15 
French nationals, have been killed since 
radical members of the Islamic Armed 
Group announced 10 months ago that they 
would target foreign residents for assassi- 
nation as part of their campaign to topple 
the army-backed government. 

Ever since the authorities canceled a 
general election 30 months ago that the 
Islamic Salvation Front appeared poised 
to win, clandestine warfare between secu- 
rity services and Islamic militants has 
killed more than 4,000 people. 

Besides secular foes, including promi- 
nent intellectuals, teachers and lawyers, 
Islamic insurgents have been going after 
the dwindling expatriate community, 
which has helped the government sustain 
the petroleum and natural gas industries. 

In the past month alone, seven Italians 
and seven East Europeans were found 
dead with iheir throats slashed, a method 
that has become the brutal signature of the 
Islamic Armed Group. Diplomats and oth- 
er experts on Algeria say this radical 
group, led by veterans of the Afghanistan 
war, appears to have broken operational 
ties with the Armed Islamic Movement. 

France and other Western governments 
have been pressing the government of 
President Liamine Zerouai to seek a politi- 
cal settlement with those fundamentalists 
willing to renounce violence. But his two- 
track policy of trying to crack down on 
guerrilla activity while encouraging a dia- 
logue with Islamic moderates seems to 
have failed on both counts. 

After a lull during the spring, Islamic 
guerrillas have escalated their attacks this 
summer against government targets and 
foreigners. Meanwhile, Mr. Zeroual's at- 
tempts to initiate contacts with the Front’s 
railed leaders have foundered over the 
Front's demands for an unconditional am- 
nesty and restoration of free elections. 

Fearing a tidal wave of immigrants if 
Algeria should descend into economic cha- 
os and civil war. France has successfully 
lobbied its Western allies to join in re- 
scheduling Algeria’s $26 billion foreign 
debt in order to give Mr. Zeroual's govern- 
ment a new lease on life. 

But in spite of its clout as the former 
colonial power, France has not convinced 
other countries, notably the United States, 
that a secular government in Algeria must 
be supported at all costs or Islamic regimes 
will sweep across North Africa. 

To tbe dismay of French and Algerian 
authorities, the Clinton administration has 
nurtured contacts with Front representa- 
tives in order to court a more friendly 
relationship with a new regime that U.S. 
diplomats say is bound to include an im- 
portant Islamic component. 


Song of Lidia: Lyrics for the Liberated ’90s 

rement annuities, which would . ; O * 


households and gross W baton ayear. 


Newsstand Pries* 


Bahrain ...0.800 Din 
Cyprus — .C £ 1 ,00 
DsnmarfcRM O.Kr. 

Finland-....-!! F-M. 
Gibraltar~..—£0^5 
Great Brftain£0.85 

Egypt E.P-3000 

Jordan 4 D 

Kenya K- SH- 150 

Kuwait— ... J00 FiiS 


Malta i.-35C 

Nigeria JtWO Naira 
Norway — 15 N-Kr. 

Oman 1,000 Rials 

Qatar.--— 6.00 Rtals 

Rep. irehmdiRfi 1-00 

Saudi Arabia 9.00 R 

South Africa R<S 

UA£. —.8.50 Dirh 
U.S. Mil. tEurJS 1.10 
Zimbabwe Z7rr>420.00 


I have blue eyes. 

What diall I do? 

• J June red tips, 

What.shail I do? 

Sogvjexy . . . 

People cal me sexy. 

— From a Hindi film song 

. ; By Molly Moore 

Wasfatgian Paa Scrtitz 

- NEW DELHI — AD of India is in an 

uproar over sex. - 

Sex in film songs, that is. 

Mothers of young children are angry. 
Women's organizations are outraged. 
Moviemakers are op in aims. Tbe prime 


minister is faming. The government censor 
board is wringing its collective hands. And 
the music shop salesmen are making a 
lolling . 

"My sales have doubled because of these 
vulgar songs," boasted Dh&rmendra 
Mchra, who runs Welcome Audio- Video 
in one of New Delhi's busiest shopping 
districts. 

The emotional controversy is India's lat- 
est episode of cultural conflict as it strug- 
gles to open its economy audits society to 
greater Western influences while trying to 
preserve its own traditions and social mo- 
res. 

“Our society is going through a massive 


transitional phase,” said Ranjana Kumari. 
director of New Delhi's Center for Social 
Research. “Things are changing too sud- 
denly, and we’re not prepared." 

In a country where it is taboo for men 
and women to touch in public, preschool 
children are prancing around their houses 
singing (he shocking I to Indian sensibil- 
ities) “Sexy, Sexy” song. 

It all started with MTV, which one Delhi 
newspaper columnist recently compared 
to “temriies eating away at our own tradi- 
tional values." MTV was first beamed to 
India via the Hong Kong satellite channel 

See INDIA, Page 4 


Kiosk 


Release of French Doctor Blocked 



Dow Jones 


Down 

w ** 

3792.86 
The Dollar 

Now Vort. Wed. dose 


DU 


1.5757 


pnwiQMdOM 


1J3825 


Pound 


1.5427 


1.5355 


Ysn 


100.275 


100.34 


FF 


5.3878 


5.408 


Book Review 


Page 8. 


PARIS (Reuters) — A French prose- 
cutor blocked the release of a former 
health official, jailed in 1993 in a scan- 
dal over AIDS- tain ted blood transfu- 
sions, after a judge ordered the man 
freed, judicial sources said Wednesday. 

An appeals court anil decide on Fri- 
day if Dr. Jean-Pierre Allain. who has 
served just over half of his two-year 
sentence, wQJ leave jail, the sources said. 

Science 

Nicotine is addictive, a panel tells the 
Food and Drug Administration. Page& 



Pagc2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1994 


*** 


Radicals Rack Tran’s Pragmatists Into Corner UN General WORLD BRIEFS 

Cy -w nr*- 


By Chris Hedges 

New York Times Servlet 

TEHRAN — After years of internal 
political struggle for control of Iran’s 
Islamic revolution, the pr agma tic fac- 
tion led by President Hasbemi Rafsan- 
jani has been backed into a corner by 
resurgent hard-liners. 

The advance of the Islamic radicals in 
the last few months appears to put an 
end, at least for now, to foreign diplo- 
mats' perennial expressions of hope that 
Iran win mend its relations with the 
United States and other Western coun- 
tries and will end its support of Islamic 
revolutionary movements abroad. 

Ominously, the rapid ascendancy of 
radical clerics and the waning power of 
Mr. Rafsanjani have coincided with the 
bombings last month of Jewish targets 
in Buenos Aires and London, which 
many diplomats here and abroad have 
linked to the Iranian government. And 
three Iranians are awaiting trial in Bang- 
kok on charges of trying to plant a ton of 
explosives in March outside the Israeli 
Embassy. 

The Buenos Aires and London blasts, 
which (eft nearly 100 dead and scores 
wounded, follow by days the assassina- 


tion of two Christian leaders in Iran and 
a new crackdown on internal political 
dissent. Parliament, now firmly in the 
radicals' hands, has stymied the govern- 
ment's economic changes, even as rising 
unemployment, hyperinflation, low oil 
revenues and a shortage of housing are 
plunging Iran into crisis. 

Mr. Rafsanjani and his Western- 
trained technocrats have always had to 
share power with the clerics who formed 
the hard core of the country’s 1979 revo- 
lution. But despite widespread discon- 
tent with the more repressive aspects of 
Islamic rule, the clerics have made a 
persuasive argument that his economic 
program serves only the rich and that 
politically he is tepid and gutless. 

“President Rafsanjani has lost all 
arcdibOity,’* said a senior Western diplo- 
mat, and so have the policies he advo- 
cates. "Re is openly attacked in the 
Parliament, and even his old supporters 
are deserting him. These bombings are 
probably our notice that the radical cler- 
ics, who call for blood and holy war, are 
again on the loose ” 

Iranian officials deny any involve- 
ment in the terrorist attacks or the kill- 
ing or persecution of dissidents, saying 


that many of the killing s are the work of 
enemies who are trying to discredit 
them. 

“The Westerners are admitting that 
Iran's Islamic slogans and ideas have 
transformed Egypt, Algeria and some 
other places in the world," Iran's su- 
preme religious leader. Ayatollah Sayed 
AH Khamenei said recently. “This is 
considered a great threat to Western 
capitalism. Therefore, Islamic Iran, 
which possesses a powerful weapon tike 
the dynamism of its ideas, logic and 
words of justice, does not need to resort 
to terrorism.’* 

A sense of economic gloom has de- 
scended over die country. 

In the government-run hotels in Teh- 
ran, waiters sit smoking at tables as a 
few diners pick at a desultory selection 
of stale bread and wilted greens set out 
haphazardly on dirty table cloths. Be- 
cause of a shortage of raw materials and 
spare parts, factories are shut down or 
on reduced shifts. The few foreign com- 
panies here have reduced their invest- 
ments or are pulling out, because of a 
refusal by Iranian banks to honor their 
own loan commitments or to pay for 
goods and services. 


Tbe economic misery has been 
matched by a new political clampdown. 
Radical groups, such as the Islamic Rev- 
olutionary Councils, which . are sup- 
posed to oversee tbe religious zeal of 
government workers, are muscling their 
way back into power after a dormant 
period. 

A blast that killed 24 Muslim wor- 
shipers in a Meshed mosque in. June is 
now widely believed by western diplo- 
mats to have been the work of militants 
from the minority Sunni Muslim com- 
munity, which was outraged by the de- 
struction. of a Sunni mosque earlier this 
year. A conflict between the 3.5 million 
Sunnis and the Shiite leadership could 
tarnish Iran’s patronage of Islamic fun- 
damentalist groups abroad, most of 
which are Sunni- 

All this should come as good news to 
“cy planners in Washington. The 
iton administration, pursuing what 
it calls a policy of containment; has 
sought to keep Iran economically crip- 
pled and diplomatically isolated But 
European diplomats, and many Irani- 
ans, say that the isolation and miseiy are 
ushering in a government with a much 
more violent and narrow agenda. 


Speech Aids 
Berlusconi, 
And So May 
The Season 

By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 

ROME — With most Italians 
soaking up heat on the beach or 
heading for Lhe hills to avoid it. 
Prime Minister Silvio Berlus- 
coni seemed Wednesday to 
have won a respite from crisis, 
evidently hoping that his coun- 
try’s traditional August torpor 
will blunt political tempers, too. 

With a televised speech to 
Parliament on Tuesday night 
that enabled tbe tycoon-politi- 
cian to capitalize on his skills 
before the camera, Mr. Berlus- 
coni overcame rifts within his 
coalition. They had been 
prompted both by worries over 
the conflict between his busi- 
ness and political interests and 
co n cerns over his increasingly 
touchy relationship with the 
country’s investigating magis- 
trates. 

The speech came just days 
before Parliament was to close 
for the summer recess. So, 
many commentators said 
Wednesday, Mr. Berlusconi 
seemed to have put his troubles 
on hold at least until Septem- 
ber. 

Despite indications from re- 
cent opinion surveys that his 
popularity is slipping, Mr. Ber- 
lusconi turned the 40-minute 
address into an occasion to re- 
assert his claim to legitimacy as 
the people’s choice m national 
elections in March. 

“Maybe I’m just an incurable 
optimist, but I see nothing 
black in the day that is drawing 
to a close,” he said, repeating 
his by-now familiar threat to 
friends and enemies alike that 
the only alternative to his con- 
servative coalition is new elec- 
tions. That is a prospect no one 
in Parliament seems to relish. 

“This message is not only for 
the chamber but for all Italians: 
There will be no government 
crises,’* declared Umberto 
Bossi, tbe leader of the North- 
ern League, which is allied with 
Mr. Burlusconi’s Forza Italia 
party. 

Mr. Bossi has been among 
the most outspoken critics of 
Mr. Berlusconi's dual role as 
prune minister and owner of the 
Fininvest business empire em- 
bracing commercial television, 
publishing and advertising. 

Mr. Bossi seemed to suggest 
that if Mr. Berlusconi had won 


some breathing space with his 
speech, it would not be for long. 
He repeated his contention that 


the prime minister’s proposals 
Tor a trust to oversee his busi- 
ness empire were not enough. 

“He will have to seU," Mr. 
Bossi said. 

While many commentators 
gave Mr. Berlusconi a victory 
for media mastery, be scored 
much lower on substance. 

“In television terms, that was 
without doubt the clear out- 
come,” said a columnist, Mar- 
cello Sorgi, “In political terms, 
it is equally beyond doubt that 
the contest got nowhere.” 



m 

Pjuidi Bdt/A|nKC I-fsAcr-PieK 

Israeli F-15 fighter jets escorting Jordan's King Hussein as he flies the royal plane over Jerusalem on Wednesday. 

Jerusalem Abuzz as Accord Is Ratified 


By Joel Greenberg 

New York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — Accompanied by an 
Israeli fighter jet escort and a blaze of 
official publicity. King Hussein of Jor- 
dan flew over Israel on Wednesday, 
passing over Muslim holy sites in Jerusa- 
lem on his way home to Amman from 
Europe. 

Tbe flyover, announced to Israelis by 
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin's office, 
was an attempt to show quick changes 
following last week’s signing in Washing- 
tern of a Jordanian- Israeli declaration, 
ending tbe state of war between tbe two 
countries. 

Mr. Rabin said the king had requested 
the flight in order to demonstrate one of 
the dividends of the agreement, which 
provides for accelerated negotiations on 
opening an international air corridor be- 
tween Israel and Jordan. 

Before the Jordanian king’s private 
airliner swept over Jerusalem, the Israeli 
Parliament had overwhelmingly en- 


dorsed tbe Washington Declaration by a 
vote of 91 to 3. 

In another sign of change, part of a 
fence marking the border between Israel 
and Jordan was taken down near the 
southern Israeli city of Eilat in prepara- 
tion for the opening next week of a new 
border crossing. 

Escorted by three Israeli F-15 fighters, 
the king's plane passed over Tel Aviv and 
circled Jerusalem at low altitude, passing 
twice over the Al Aqsa mosque and the 
gilded Dome of the Rock before beading 
out toward Jordan. 

The dome was recently renovated by 
Jordan, whose role as custodian of Jeru- 
salem’s Muslim shrines was formally rec- 
ognized by Israel in tbe Washington 
Declaration. 

Speaking to the king by radio as he 
entered Israeli airspace, Mr. Rabin said, 
“Welcome to Israd, even though it's in 
the air.” 

The king replied: 

“It’s wonderful to be overflying your 
country for the first time in a civilian 


aircraft I hope, sir, that we meet before 
too Jong. To the people of Israd and 
yourself, all our best wishes arid our 
prayers for peace, shafom.” 

After arriving in Amman, the king told 
re pot tere that seeing Jerusalem alter a 
yeais-long absence had. been “a very 
emotional experience.” 

Jordan controlled East Jerusalem be- 
fore it was captured by Israd in the 1967 
Arab- Israeli war. 

■ Arafat Laments Rifts 

Tbe Palestine Liberation Organization 
chairman, Yasser Arafat, said in an in- 
terview published on Wednesday that he 
was in despair over lack of aid for self- 
rule and rifts with Israd over tbe future 
erf Jerusalem, Reuters reported from Je- 
rusalem. 

In an interview with an Israeli daily, 
Ha’aretz, Mr. Arafat accused Israd of 
driving a wedge between Jordan and tbe 
Palestinians, and said its Shin Bet secret 
service was plotting to foil the Israeli- 
PLO peace accord that launched self- 
rule in Gaza and Jericho. 


In Rwanda 
Sees Troop 
Shortfall 


Camptfed by Oar $Wff From Dispatches 

KIGALI, Rwanda lhe 
United Nations commander in 
Rwanda, whose troops are to 
take over a "safe haven” in 
southwest Rwanda where hun- 
dreds of thousands of refugees 
are sheltering, said on Wednes- 
day he was short of soldiers to 
do so. 

French troops now patrol the 
security zone but are doc to puff 
out by Aug. 22, andaid workers 
fear that if tbe handover to UN 
forces is not assured, there 
could be a fresh exodus of ' 
frightened refugees. 

“August 22 is a concern.” 
said Major General Romeo 
Dallaire, commander of the UN 
Assistance Mission in Rwanda. 
“One, whether I have enough 
troops, two, if I can deploy 
them and they are capable of 
giving credible defease for the 

* >C So far, only Ghana has a sub- 
stantial presence of 557 soldiers 
on the ground within the UN 
force, which currently numbers 
about 1,(XW troops. Tne UN Se- 
curity Council has voted to 
boost the force up to 5,500. 

On Wednesday, theU.S. gov- 
ernment offered to airlift Ethio- 
pian and Zambian troops to 
Rwanda as part of the UN 
force. The assistant secretary of 
state for African affairs, George 
Moose, told & news conference 
in Kigali that the UnitedNa- 
tfous had asked for assistance in 
the rapid deployment of peace- 


CIA Is Targeting Industrial Bribery 

.LONDON 

^fiSSSIw tf^cysudiaan. 

Jane’s Defense Weekly that 

UJS. Stale Department godd bea 

■■ 

Ranking Beijing Official in Taiwan 

TAIPEI (Renters) — Bering's 

arrived in Taiwan oh Wednesday, becoming die ’higher i™g 
Chinese visitor to cross the Taiwan Smuts in 

affidals escorting him the airport 
“Taiwan independence,” the protesters shouted. 

Pretoria to lift Controls on Province 

CAPE TOWN (AFP) — The state of emwgency in 

Nalal Province, imposed to curb mounting 

Gist all-race election in South Afnca last April, is due to be lifted. 

Justice Minister DuHah Omar indicated Wednesday. 

Mr Omar said in ParfLament that the safety and s«cunty 
minister, Sydney Mufamadi, bad recommended the Mtingof 
amagency role, Imposed on March 30 after an upsurge of violence 

™He jatb^rimfesne was being discussed by President Nelson 
and Chief Maugosuthu Buthdezi, whose Inkatha Free- 
dom Party narrowly won control of the province in the election. . 
Buthdezi has called for tbc end of the state of emergency. 

France to Restart Nuclear Reactor 

PARIS (AP) —Nuclear regulators gave the go-ahrad Wednes- 
day to- restart Supeiphfcntx, the fast-breeder reactor idled for four 
years to repair leaks in a cooling system that uses flammable" 
liquid sodium. The plant could start up by Sunday, said its 
director, Andrfe Lacroix. 

. Enviro nmentalists have I 


; tried to prevent renewed operation 

rt : M \ ___# — t T ,inn on si nll/*lmsr 


* 


to have since been in direct 
contact with the Ethiopian and 
Zambian units we understand 
are ready to deploy,” Mr. 
Moose said. He did not say how 
many soldiers were involved. 

Rwanda Patriotic Front 
forces, which routed Hutu gov- 
ernment troops last month, 
have yet to assume* contra! of 
the southwest even though a 
new government was set up two 
weeks ago. 

On Tuesday, a French mili- 
tary official said the new goy^ 
eminent had agreed to affdw the 
area to be demilitarized and put 
under UN control when the 
French leave. 

The new administration in 
Kigali has promised that the 
mainly ethnic Tutsi troops of 
the Patriotic Front would enter 
the area unarmed, said Lieuten- 
ant ’CoforieT Alain Raxnbeau, 
spokesman for the 1 French 
forces in Goma, Zaire. 

About \2 milli on Hutu have 
already fled from the northwest 
into eastern Zaire, where they 
are now dying by the thousands 
from disease. 

Many of the displaced per- 
sons in the southwest — esti- 
mates of the population in the - 
zone range up to 13 million — 
could also flee in panic if the 
handover from the French does 
not go smoothly, aid workers 
say. 

“For afl. erf us, how the popu- 
lation will react in the south- - 
west is a huge question marie, 7 ” 
said Jean-Ftanqois Sangsue, the 
chief Red Gross delegate in Ki- 
gali 

(Reuters, AFP) 


of the plant, 50 kflometere <30 miles) east of Lyon, and nuclear 
officials have not ruled out the possibility erf new leaks occurring. 
But the $5 plant, designed to incinerate waste and create 

plutonium fud/is a key part of France’s unclear program, which 
provides 75 percent of the country's electridty. 


Correction 

A dispatch in Wednesday’s editions about the crash of an 
Airbus A- 330 during a test flight June 30 in France incorrectly 
reported the whereabouts of the plane’s captain. A preliminary 
investigation did not find that he was out of the cockpit, according 
to The Associated Press. - - 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

Longer British Rail Strike Planned 

LONDON (Renters) ; — The trade union at the heart of a 
dispute that has <Esrap ted Britain’s railway systemTor eight weeks 
has announced plans for further stoppages on Aug. 12, a Friday, 
and. the following Monday and Tuesday. That would be the 
stoppage so far in the dispute- 


workers in the Rad, Maritime and Transport union 
staged the latert cf a series of one-day strikes on Wednesday, 
fbroM thousands of people to find other ways to get to work? 

So rai^many commuters have supported the union’s campaign 
for a higher wage offer, swayed by reports that some signalmen 
are earning less than unskilled station workers and that two 
months ago the government vetoed a 5.7 percent offer that could 
have solved the dispute. Bet a poll Wednesday showed an almost 
even split of opinion. Of 470 commuters questioned at London 
rail stations, a bare nugority of S&2'perceat backed tbe strikes. - 

Several European afafines have removed bans on smoking on 
international flights because the prohibitions drove passengers 
away, a British pro-smokers’ lobby group said Wednesday. The 
Freedom Organization far the Right to Enjoy Smoking Tobacco 
cited KLM Royal Dutch Airlines,. SAS, Lufthansa Goman Air- 
lines, Austrian Airbnes and Lauda Air. (Reuters) 

Tim British Htf^Conmiatiiou fa Nigeria announced the closure 
of its visa office m Lagos for security reasons as the main labor 
federation began a general strike Wednesday. . (AFP) 

' Sydney’s dify center and airport wfll be Bilked by a 600 million 
Australian dollar (5440 million) underground rail line in time for 
the 2000 Olympics, the New South Wales state government 
announced Wednesday. (Reuters) 


Citing Nuclear Disarmament, Ukraine Chief Urges US, to Keep Word on Aid 


Canqnkd by (hr Sufi From Dapankes 

KIEV — President Leonid S. 
Kuchma said Ukraine was 
meeting its obligations on nu- 
clear disarmament but had re- 
ceived only a tiny fraction of 
the aid promised by tbe United 
States, a local news agency re- 
ported Wednesday. 

Interfax- Ukraine quoted Mr. 
Kuchma a s saying that his 
country bad received only W 
million of the $350 million 
promised by Washington. His 
remarks, made at the Pervo- 
maysk strategic rocket base in 
southern Ukraine, came only 
hours after a meeting with Vice 
President Al Gore. 

“I very clearly raised this is- 
sue.” Mr. Kuchma said 

Mr. Gore, who visited Kiev 
on Tuesday, said the United 
States felt confident that 
Ukraine was fulfilling its side of 
a disarmament accord signed in 


January by then-President Leo- 
nid M. Kravchuk, President BUI 
Clinton and President Boris N. 
Yeltsin of Russia. 

Mr. Gore said that a senior 
U.S. delegation was due to visit 


Kiev next week to discuss fur- 
ther assistance for disarmament 
and to expedite the flow of 
funds earmarked for Ukraine. 

Ukraine, which inherited nu- 
clear weapons deployed on its 


soil when the Soviet Union fell 
apart in December 1991, has yet 
to accede to the 1968 Nuclear 
Nonproliferation Treaty. 

Under the January trilateral 
accord, Ukraine was to transfer 


Russia Predicts Ouster of Chechen Chief 

Mr. Shakhrai’s comments followed a day of 
political confusion surrounding Chechnya, a 
Caucasus region of 1-2 million people that has 
declared its independence from Moscow. 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — The self-declared president of 
the breakaway Chechnya region of southern 
Russia, Dzhokhar Dudayev, is likely to lose his 
hold on power within months, a senior Russian 
official predicted Wednesday. 

“A political ‘critical mass’ has emerged in 
Chechnya, and it will force a solution in the form 
of free, democratic elections and will make 
Dzhokhar Dudayev go,” said Deputy Prime 
Minister Sergei Ait Shakhrai. 

“This is the only peaceful solution possible,” 
Mr. Shakhrai said in an interview with the Inter- 
fax news agency. 


Russian officials including Mr. Shakhrai sided 
Tuesday with an opposition group that asserted 
it had seized power in Chechnya. Authorities in 
Chechnya responded by ordering the arrest of 
the group's leader, Umar Avtorkhauov, and de- 
nied reports of an opposition takeover. 

Mr. Dudayev accused Russia of plotting to 
invade Chechnya, and said opposition leaders 
were traitors backed by Moscow. 


its more than 1,600 nuclear war- 
heads to Russia for dismantling 
in exchange for about SI billion 
in compensation, most of it in 
the form of fuel for nuclear 
power stations. 

Mr. Gore offered strong sup- 
port for “comprehensive eco- 
nomic reforms*' to stabilize the 
co nutty’s ailing economy. 

“This is an extremely impor- 
tant priority for the United 
States of America,” said Mr. 
Gore, who was tbe flirt foreign 
leader to visit Mr. Kuchma 
since he defeated Mr. Kravdruk 
in elections last month. 

“A strong and prosperous 
and independent Ukraine . is a 
s tabil i z i n g force for peace in 
Central Europe and throughout 
the entire region," the vice pres- 
ident said. 

To bolster this point, Mr. 
Gore invited President Kuchma, 
to meet with Mr. Omton on 


Nov. 29 in Washington. He also 
reminded Ukrainians that it 
was Mr. Clinton who pressed 
the leading industrialized ooun- 
tries to offer Ukraine a $4 bd- 
licm aid package last month. 

Mr. Kuchma’s overture to 
the West isaremaikabteitver- 
sal of his campaign statements 
about integrating with Russia. 

But instead of a post-victory 
flight to Moscow to heal bad 
relations with Mr. Yeltsin, Mr. 
Kuchma ha is entertained West- 
ern dignitaries and agreed to 
draw up an economic reform 
program with the Inte rnational 
Monetary Fund by October. 

“We’ll always have time for 
Russia,” said Volodymyr O. 
Kuznetsov, an aide to Mr. 

Kuchma. “We need to use the 

opportunity we haver now to 

meet with the West.” 

(Reuters, NYF) 


Russia Applies 
Foreigner Tax 

The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — In a bid to 
raise state revenues, Russia 
has begun enforcing a 60 
percent tax on some per- 
sonal belongings erf for- 
eigners, except diplomats, 

. entering or leaving Russia, 
customs officials said 
Wednesday. 

A customs official said 
the move was aimed at 
stopping people from using 
personal shipments as a 
cover for avoiding tariffs 
on goods to be resold. 

. Officials were vague 
about what goods fall un- 
der the new guidelines. 
Oleg Savin, a customs offi- 
cer, said: ^No personal be- 
longings like pots and pans 
or your favorite dog or 
couch are supposed to be 
taxed.” ■ 


Improve 
The World's 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1994 

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By Maureen Dowd 

New York Times Sariar 

WASHINGTON — At the 
aid of his diary entries, Joshua 
L Steiner would sometimes 
lraw morals for hinw^f similar 
o the ones the birds and foxes 
md grasshoppers learned at the 
aid of Aesop’s fables. 

Testifying before the Senate 
Banking Committee, which is 
coking into Treasury Depart- 
ment contacts with toe White 
House on die Whitewater mat- 
ter* Mr. Sterner, the 28-year-old 
toief of staff for Treasury Sec- 
retary Lloyd Bentsen, was 
asked to read aloud the Wes- 
sons” that capped one of his 
February entries. 

It was a remarkable moment 
on a day wben the numbing 
Whitewater hearings c ame viv- 
idly to life. Mr. Steiner now 
found himself in the excruciat- 
ing position of holding a 
“smoking’’ diary, pointed in the 
direction of ms boss. Deputy 
Treasury Secretary Roger C 
Altman, and toe white House. 

“Lessons,” be said, reading 
his own words to the senators, 
the discomfort evident in his 
dark eyes. “Do what you think 
is the right thing early (recuse); - 
remember that everything 
might eventually be asked un- 


der oath; don’t let the WH get for those who would succeed in Haitians 

involved m any way. Washington. One is: Don’t 

If Mr. Steiner . had lived write anything down, but save r CTT T 9 

through abit more Washington everything that anyone else Ilf HfllJPTLS 
history, he would have known writes down. Another is: Don’t Xi ^ w 


that ddsg the right thing early do anything in private that you 
and keepmg the White House would not want to see on the 


from getting' involved are aims front page of the newspaper. 

that have often been at Gross- 

purposes. | Denial by Bentsen 

Hc i SK SSib l y Mr. Bentsen testified 

young, earnest m«l nenr^ tt- Wednesday that he did not 

bww about contacts between 
^onc at toe gram feh-covered his staff and the White House 


OT ."W*"-* n«a well after 
scaMiora a<Mressod hma amply the meetings had occurred, wire 


11 f ii<* * m ' UA. UIWUMU unu WWIUtlM, WUC 

as Joshua or Josh. «™cfcsrewni«L 

A couple -of other lawmakers rqXHTea 

offered tan fatherly, and moth- 1 kwe tamed the Treasury 
eriy, advice to spend some time, D ?P a *^ eot “P 51 ^ down,” he 
drmiohg a" ax-pack perhaps, toed my memory 

witbOTe of toe respected, tasOe out. We went through 
gray-haired veterans around thousands and thousands of 
town who might be able to documents md can’t find one 
teach Mm enough about politics wntten ibnefing tome on these 


to salvage his career. 

Most of the Democrats and 


White House meetings.’’ ■ 
The Banking Committee 


Republicans alike seemed dis- chairman earlier admonished 
m^edasMr. Steiner tried to ^ Bentsen to instruct his 
explain that his diary was to be more forthcoming to 

meant tobeinmressmiistic,not Congress, 
realistic — a Monet, not a Me- Senator Donald W. Riegle 
net. It seemed disingenuous to Jr., Democrat of Michigan, told 


several senators. 


him that Mr. Altman had “ac- 


Tbe gray-haired veterans knowledged answers not as 
might have warned Mr. Stoner complete as they could have 


that there are immutable rales been.” 


(AP, Reuters) 


Filibuster on Health Care Bill 
Unlikely, Senate Leaders Say 


Compiled by Oar Stqff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — George 
J. Mitchell, the Senate majority 
leader, voiced confidence on 
Wednesday that Congress 
would pass health reform. Both 
he and the minority leader. Bob 
Dole, indicated a Senate filibus- 
ter on the trill was unlikely. 

Mr. Mitchell said his com- 
promise plan to get 95 percent 
of Americans covered by toe 
turn of toe century rep resented 
an attempt “to come up with a 
rational and coherent plan that 
represents what is best for the 
country and has some reason- 
able chance of being enacted.” 

Mr. Mitchell, Democrat of 


flexibility” to push a bill His plan would try to restrain Representative Dan Click- 
through. soaring health care inflation man Democrat of Kansas, and 

Mr. Mitchell has conceded largely by retying on insurance; Representative Benjamin A. 
that he does not yet have toe law changes to foster competi- Q jfcnan, Republican of New 
votes to pass his bffl. But he tion, though it would impose York, said m separate state- 
said: “l believe in the members taxes on expensive insurance meats Tuesday that Mr. CUn- 
of the Senate I believe in their policies as a backup. He would ton should seek congressional 
desire to do what’s right for this cut the growth of Medicare, but approval in addition to the UN 
country. And I-hope that ulti- offer new prescription drug authorization before commit- 
matdy a majority can be per- benefits ana long-term care in ting forces to Haiti, 
suaded, bipartisan, to support exchange. [The Senate unanimously ap- 


soaring health care inflation man Democrat of Kansas, and 
largely by relying on insurance Representative Benjamin A. 


country. And I-hope that ulti- 
mately a majority can be per- 
suaded, bipartisan, to support 
this.” He said debate would be- 
gin next Tuesday. 

Under Mr. Mitchefl’s plan, 
employers would be required 
only to helpinsnrctheir work- 
ers jn 2002, and then only if the 
95 percent level had not been 
reached in 2000 and Congress 


ting foi 

exchange. [The Senate unanimously ap- 

Some moderate Democrats proved on Wednesday a poinf- 
wbo have dug in their heels ed statement to Mr. Clinton 
against any forced contribu- that Congress has not approved 
dons by employers expressed an invasion, Reuters reported, 
misgivings about Mr. MjrcbelTs [By a vote of 100 to 0, it 
backstop provision. passed a non binding “sense of 

And Mr. Dole said Wednes- the Senate” resolution stating 
day on NBC television, “You that the UN approval of the use 


Maine, introduced the plan on - had adopted no alternative just can’t sell mandates to the of all necessary means to oust 
Tuesday. ‘ . plan. At that point, most em- united States Senate.” Haiti’s military leaders does not 

But Mr.Dole, ReratoHi^Q.oL pl^fe would be' jequired to • “There’s no filibuster strate- constitute congressional ap- 

' ' gy»” be said. “But let’s faoejt, proval of an invasion. 


Kansas, said Mr. Mitchell, pay ''.50- percent ^'o^^fflbiuin 
would “need a- great deal, of : coste.' " • ■ ■" 


+ POL m CAL \ O TES + 


Snatw Appro*— Spacw Station Fhndlnq 

WASHINGTON — The Senate approved 52.) biDion on 
Wednesday to continue work toput aU.S. space station in 
orbit aronnd the Earth by 2002. The action came on a vote of 
64 to 36 rejecting an amendment .to a National Aeronautics 
a nd Space Administration appropriations US killing toe 
space station. The House approved toe funds last month. 

Senator Dale Bumpers. Democrat of Arkansas and the 
author of the amendment, called the space station a “turkey” 
and said it was too expensive and would not provide enough 
benefits to justify its construction. Supporters said tire station 
was needed to continue space exploration and research and to 


we need a long debate on it' 


[Theresolution was proposed 


Mr. Mitchell, at a breakfast by the Senate Republican lead- 
with health reporters, said, “1 er. Bob Dole of Kansas, who 
don’t th i nk there’s going to be a accused Mr. Clinton of seeking 
filibuster. I don’t have any UN approval of a Haiti inva- 
plans to break a filibuster.” sion but rejecting calls for prior 


plans to create a nu ouster. sion but rejecting calls lor pnor 

He said he was certain that approval by Congress. “There 
health care reform would be cn- should be no mistake: The UN 
acted, but added, “there is not a action on Sunday does not give 
chance in the world that this bill the president legal authority to 
will pass the Senate un- invade Haiti,” Mr. Dole said.] 


changed.” 


it provides for 


The White House spokes- 
woman, Dee Dee Myers, said 


keep toe United States 


in technology. 


(Reuters) 


Health Cwi a Batttofleki Alter Shooting 

WASHINGTON — Since last week’s double slaying at a 
Florida abortion clinic, both sides in the debate have redou- 
bled their resolve over how ihe anerging health care bills 
should cover abortion. . 

Abortion-rights proponents say that the killings at a Pensa- 
cola clinic underscored toe necessity of makingabortion part 
of a basic benefits package. Not to do' so, said Eleanor Smeal, : 
president of the Fund for a Feminist Majority, would “mar- 
ginalize” women and abortion providers and set them up for 
being “picked off, terrorized and tortured.” - 

Doa^as Johnson, chief lobbyist for toe National Right to 
Life Committee, said the proponents were “expiating” toe 
kflfings “to further a legislative agenda that has veiyhtfle 
public support.” (NTT) 


slower, less certain passage to Mr. Clinton would continue 
the “health care that is always consulting with Congress on 
there” by which President Bill Haiti, “but would not support a 
Cfimon has sought to define his resolution that would require 
presidency, Mr. Clinton approval" because such an ef- 
promptly embraced the Mitch- fort “would interfere with his 
efl proposal. He said it “pro- ability to make foreign policy.” 
vides for universal coverage, en- About half a dozen countries 
ables Americans to keep their have agreed to accept refugees, 
current insurance and their but the administration’s new 
doctor and maintain quality policy has apparently stemmed 
health care, and provides great- the flow of boat people. 


er opportunity to keep health 

coverage affordable.” ■ Politician’s Wife Accused 

SSSLS A Haitian wrnan who ao- 
Friday by toe Democratic lead- ^ country’s military of 

mbp sadcs nwvHsal wyaage “ feu he^tindantos- 

hM bMOMCOMd of 
pay 80 percent of work ere in- “provocation” by the police 

andtold to present herself at 
health ^ dC y' S P 0 ^ 06 Station. 
Reutere rtponed Wednesday 
wi«ram for toe aged, to m- Irom 

STU 111 a communique sent to ra- 
But House leaders, too, lack ^ stations from toe bead of 

the city’s police department, 

m? Mario-Helena Georges was ac- 

M r. Mi tchell s proposal would f ^ gHn E fecasations 

undercut support for the House agflinsltbepoh J inoomments 

(AP, NYT) on Monday. 


Politician's Wife Accused 

A Haitian woman who ac- 


Pemocratlc Party and Chicago Soal Doal 

WASHINGTON — After weeks of haggling ovct conuact 
detolls, the Democratic National ^numttee and Chicago 
have closed a S32-1 million deal for theaty tohwt tot : pan£s 
1996 presidential nrannalmg convention. Zt win be fbo wst 
time Chicago has hosted a national political convention, since 
1968,Wbmthe Democratic nlbomg wra maired by wotent 

protests against the Vietnam war. - [Art 


A Uttle PoBth for a Tarnfehetf Inwigo 

WASHINGTON — When President Bill Ctintcm showed 
up in toe Roosevelt Room for bssottiy 
he encountered a fmnffiar fac^ Dooglas Balks of San Diego 
had predicted daring a 1992 Chmon campaign »wpat ha 
dimbmldina company that the Democrat would foi^ct him 
his tiwwSdtteever made it to the Hou^. - 
But Mr. Clinton did not forget his pledge to bdp the 
shipbuilding industry with a goverMaent-ba^rf low i pro- 
S Amdtoe White House, facing whal 1 an (rffiaal cafled toe 
problem” that Americans thmk Mr. Oimon has 
f Snwie promises than he has kept is using events 

edging toward the record 
? JZ -7 1 ,:, jest V ear, and with congressional elections only 
‘Si president’s tSviseis say it is “critic^” 
^ c5 wedcs to make a better case for fas 

accomplishments. ' ' 


Ou&tm/Um pwto 

Representative Michael G. Oxley. Republican of 
afterbrcakmg his wrist early in toe Republican team s vtctwy 
?ve? toe^ocrats in the' Roll-Cafl CongresaoMl BasebaU 
Game' “Good thing my health care is covered. Clinton will 
probably call a news conference tomorrow and declare that 
all of our constituents should have toe same health care as 
Oxley.” ....... . 


Simpson Case Witness 
Is Said to Be a Con Man 


The Associated Press 

SAN FRANCISCO — The 
mystery witness in the O.J. 
Simpson murder case who re- 
portedly said he saw two white 
men r unnin g from the crime 
scene is a con man who has 
given police false leads in other 
cases, a newspaper reported 
Wednesday. 

The San Francisco Examiner 
identified the witness as Frank 
Cfauchiolo. The identity was 
confirmed by a Los Angeles po- 
lice detective, Dennis Rayoe, 
the newspaper said. 

Mr. Chrochiolo claimed in an 
interview unto the Examiner a’ 
year ago that he, not the Mafia 
boss John Gotti, had killed mob 
boss “Kg Paul” Castellano in 
1987. Mr. Gotti was convicted 
of the murder. 

Mr. Chiuchiolo, whose last 
address was in Happy Camp, a 
tiny community near toe Ore- 
gon state line, also contacted 
police in the case of Polly 
Klaas, a riti who was abducted 
from her bedroom in Petaluma, 


■ ■ *14 . >vV 


,.S^4C£.;. y/' 

" • ■ v 

■Sr ‘ ■ ■, 

'X --f- • 


would not want to see on the By Eric Schmitt 
front page of the newspaper. New York Tima & mce 

WASHINGTON — No 
■ Denial by Bentsen longer faring a flood of “boat 

Mr. Bentsen testified P«Vl=" u ? vm * th ', U „ ni , 1 ; 

Wednesday that he did not «iSta® has delved apian u. 
knew about contacts between housed al a US. 

his staff and tie While House 

on Whitewater until wdi after ^ “ ^bean counmes. 


Officials in the Pentagon and 
the State Department said that 
for now it was cheaper and 
more convenient to keep the 
more than 16,500 Haitians at 
Guantanamo Bay in Cuba than 
to spend tens of millions of dol- 
lars building camps elsewhere. 

If the flow of refugees, which 
has dwindled to a trickle, 
should {tick up again, officials 
said, Washington may revive 
toe idea of sending Haitians to 
third countries. 

The lack of urgency, howev- 
er, has not altered toe pace of 
planning for a possible invasion 
of Haiti, the officials said. They 
said the administration had be- 

ted** 1 N atio^^jpr oval on 
Sunday of a resolution autho- 

S intervention if sanctions 
to dislodge toe Haitian 
military -backed government. 

And they said toe White 
House would continue lining up 
support among other countries 
as weD as with Congress and the 
American public, beginning 
with a prime-time news confer- 
ence by President Bill Clinton 
on Wednesday night. 
Representative Dan Glick- 



Joe TrmfRcutau 


DERAILMENT HURTS 125 — Workers near Batavia, New York, where an Am trak train passenger derailed early 
Wednesday, injuring 125 people, some seriously. The Lake Shore limited, en route to Chicago from New York, 
screeched off toe tracks in a wooded area. Nine cars were flung down an embankment No deaths were reported. 

U.S. Allies Soften Line on Asian Rights 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herat J Tribune 

SINGAPORE — American 
influence on human rights is- 
sues in Asia is being eroded as 
Western countries that previ- 
ously supported the United 
States* punitive approach 
switch to a softer line. 

Analysts said Wednesday 
that the shift reflected a clear 
priority by the Western govern- 
ments to develop smoother po- 
litical relations with the boom- 
ing economies of East Asia to 
increase export sales, contracts 
and investment opportunities, 
many of which are under slate 
control in Asia. 

They said it was also an ac- 
knowledgment that quiet but 
persistent persuasion through 
diplomatic contacts might be 
more effective in improving hu- 
man rights in the region than 
threats of isolation or sanctions. 

In toe most recent sign of the 


lower-key approach to human 
rights problems now being tak- 
en by many Western nations, 
Australia this week offered to 
expand military training for In- 
donesia. This was despite a vote 
by U.S. lawmakers Iasi month 
to ban small- arms sales to Ja- 
karta Ivrause of alleged repres- 
sion by Indonesian security 
forces in East Timor, a former 
Portuguese colony annexed by 
Jakarta in 1976. 

After an earlier decision re- 
lated to human rights concerns 
in East Timor, the United 
States no longer provides mili- 
tary training or education to the 
Indonesian armed forces. 

Robert Ray. Australia's de- 
fense minister, said in Jakarta 
that Indonesia was finding that 
its opportunities to get military 
training in toe Umied States 
were much more limited than in 
the past and Australia was 


3 Air-Cargo Theft Rings 
Broken Up in New York 


By David Firestone 

Nr*- York Timm Stmee 

NEW YORK — Three major 
air-cargo theft rings that stole 
millions of dollars in merchan- 
dise from warehouses around 
Kennedy International Airport 
have been shut down with toe 
arrest of 22 suspects, many with 
connections to organized crime, 
law enforcement officials said. 

Preferring stormy weather 
because it caused a flurry of 
alarm-system breakdowns, toe 
thieves broke into dozens of 
warehouses over the past three 
years, stealing everything from 
Dom P&rignon champagne to a 
51 million shipment of Kodak 
film, said Richard A. Brown, 
district attorney for New 
York's Queens borough. 

Investigators said they could 
document $5.5 million worth of 
merchandise stolen by the rings 
but believed toe actual amount 
was in the tens of millions. 

Mr. Brown said toe investiga- 
tion shut down an important 
revenue pipeline for organized 
crime and helped ease the 
threat (hat toe mob's infiltra- 
tion erf toe cai^o business posed 
to the region’s economy. 

“Years ago, we lost the ship- 
ping industry and toe docks as a 
result of cargo thefts," he said. 
“I don’t want to see that happen 
to the air cargo industry.” 

Sprawling through southern 
Queens, Kennedy Airport and 


its huge air-cargo business have 
long been a target of organized 
crime, most notoriously in toe 
Lufthansa toefi of 1978. wben 
55 million to 56 million in cash 
and jewelry was stolen from an 
airport storage area. 

In recent years, however, toe 
Port Authority of New York 
and New Jereey, the agency that 
operates Kennedy, has cracked 
down on thefts from toe air- 
port, forcing thieves to turn 
their attention to toe large num- 
ber of air freight companies 
that store their merchandise off 
toe airport premises, mostly in 
the Springfield Gardens area 
just northeast of Kennedy. 

The warehouses, known as 
container stations, take over- 
seas merchandise in large con- 
tainers from airline docks and 
break the shipments down for 
distribution to domestic points. 

The arrests ended an investi- 
gation that began when one sta- 
tion, Sdara International Inc., 
reported the theft of $500,000 
worth of women’s shoes in May 
1992. Acting on a tip, a state 
trooper found some of toe shoes 
at a flea market on Long Island. 

The three crews did not oper- 
ate in concert, Mr. Brown said, 
and did not interfere with toe 
others’ territory. Investigators 
said several leaders of toe crews 
had lies to toe Garobino orga- 
nized crime family. 


California, and murdered last 
year. 

He also approached authori- 
ties in Siskiyou County, Cali- 
fornia, several years ago with 
information about a murder 
case there. . 

“He had people up here dig- 
ging in an area looking for bod- 
ies, but none were ever found,” 
a faw-errfarcement source told 
the Examiner. “He apparently 
is just a nut. He’s a con man.” 

He has served time in prison 
for forgery, grand theft, escape, 
auto theft and burglary, the 
newspaper said. 

Mr. Simpson is charged with 
murdering his former wife Ni- 
cole Brows Simpson and her 
friend Ronald L. Goldman. 

According to toe Los Angeles 
Times, the mystery witness had 
identified himself as a burglar 
and told defense investigators 
that he was casing homes in toe 
neighborhood the night of toe 
slayings when he beard a wom- 
an scream and saw two white 
men fleeing the crime scene. 


Away From Politics 


• The Los Angeles Gty Council has approved payment of 53.8 
million to Rodney King, effectively ending the black man's 
legal battles over his 2991 videotaped beating bv white police 
officers. Approval had been expected since last week when 
Mr. King agreed to drop two appeals in his lawsuit against the 
city. In return, toe city and a former police officer dropped 
efforts to make Mr. lung pay part of their legal costs. 

• The deputy chairman of die Postal Service board of gover- 
nors has asserted that blacks are “overrepresented” on the 
postal work force in a number of large cities and Hispanics 
are seriously underrepresented. The official. Tirso del Junco, 
blamed black postal managers in those dries. 

• In a new attack against welfare fraud, computers that 
compared public assistance rolls in six states found more than 
4.200 people who apparently received benefits both in New 
York and in another state. 

• It could be two months before ashes cool from wildfires in 
Washington's Cascade Mountains. “I have no doubt that 
somebody's going to have to baby-sit these fires that are 
banting right now for a long, long lime,” toe head of the 
unified fire-fighung force in toe area, Stanley Kunzman, told 
The Seattle Times. 

• Every bouse in a county in New Mexico should contain a gun 
for safety reasons and to counter threats against the right to 
bear arms, toe Catron County commissioners recommended 
in a non binding resolution. 

• A New York Gty man was ordered held on 510,000 bail after 
he tried to sell his 4-roonth-old son to strangers on toe street 
for $1,000, toe police said. 

• Three iwt * convicted of killing a businessman in a robbery 
13 years ago were to be executed by lethal injection Wednes- 
day in Arkansas amid a national controversy over administer- 
ing toe death penalty to several persons at once. 

A F. Rmm. H P. N YT. A FP 


“willing to fill pan of that 
void." 

He said that Australia had 
excess training capacity be- 
cause of cuts in its defense 
forces, so it would be “quite 
easy to accommodate those de-' 
sires from Indonesia and I think 
beneficial for toe relationship.” 

The Labor government under 
Prime Minister Paul Keating 
has made expansion of Austra- 
lia’s economic links with Asia 
one of its key programs. Indo- 
nesia is among the fastest grow- 
ing markets in the region for 
Australia. 

Earlier this year, European 
countries and virtually all Asia- 
Pacific nations, including Japan 
and Australia, refused to sup- 
port the U.S. policy [inking 
continuation of China's trade 
privileges to improvements in 
its human rights record. This 
rejection was one of the factors 
that prompted the Clinton ad- 
ministration to renew China's 
access to the U.S. market at toe 
lowest prevailing rates of duty 
without any further conditions. 

Last month at a meeting in 
Bangkok with the Association 
of South East Asian Nations, 
toe F-uropean Union. Canada 
and Australia moved further 
away from toe U.S. policy of 
trying to end human rights 
abuses in Burma and restore 
democracy by severely limiting 
political contacts and aid. 

ASEAN, which groups Bru- 
nei, Indonesia. Malaysia, Phil- 
ippines, Singapore and Thai- 
land, has argued that toe most 
effective way for toe interna- 
tional community to influence 
the military regime in Rangoon 
is to increase contacts, trade 
and investment- 

while Western human rights 


groups regard such arguments 
as simply serving vested eco- 
nomic interests. Western gov- 
ernments have shown increas- 
ing willingness to try policies of 
“constructive engagement” 
with Asian states that have hu- 
man rights problems. 

Australia, Canada and the 
EU all said that they had start- 
ed. talks with Burma on political 
reform or were prepared to do 
so soon. 

Andr6 Ouellet, the Canadian 
external affairs minister, said 
that it was “through dialogue 
that we can improve the situa- 
tion” in Burma. 

But he said that providing 
Burma with the things it want- 
ed, such as political acceptance 
and foreign aid, should be 
linked to a series of benchmarks 
of progress such as release of 
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and 
other political prisoners, resto- 
ration of democracy and fair 
treatment of ethnic minorities. 

Gareth Evans, Australia’s 
foreign minister, said that there 
had been some progress in eas- 
ing repression and improving 
rights in Burma over toe past 
couple of years, although it had 
not gone nearly far enough. 

He said toe improvement was 
probably due in part to “the 
policy of hands-on dialogue en- 
gagement and encouragement" 
pursued by ASEAN. 

Hans van den Broek, toe EU 
commissioner for external po- 
litical relations, said that while 
the EU continued to have seri- 
ous concerns about toe situa- 
tion in Burma, ‘‘we want to 
work together very closely with 
the neighbors of Burma, nota- 
bly the ASEAN countries, to 
see how we can encourage 
change there.” 



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Page 4 




«~i — '‘--■W.'fc J x =-f- w ' -■ 


CVTERINATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY., AUGUST 4 , 1994 


** 




'M 




Old Order Shakes as Japan Demolishes Party Syste: 


rw 




SI 


33 


*1 


«*s- 




we? 


3Sni^.- 




'mJp; 




B ^i a Sfr I ^S 1 ^ 0jd Murayama has called a “dovish" party 

TOKYfi Prim u* ■*** ~ opposes any international military 

m.!™ K YO . ™ I ^““ ster Tomudu role and seeks to create what is effectivS. 

the Countl ^ recend y a welfare state, with government^ 
tbseveral bold announcements. tervention and industrial pS?SwM 

1 he military, one of the largest in the of providing for the sodtt/s welfare, 
world, is legal, he declared; the coun- Contrary to expectations that there 
try's nuclear reactors, providing about a would be feverish opposition and a split. 

Quarter of Japan’s electricity, will not be l 

shut down, and the flag and the anthem 'Siwfaliete? 

praising the emperor will remain the socialists. Inereare 

national ^.bok no Socialists. Everyone ig 

Normally, acknowledging the status » •* 1. . , J 

quo is not news. But considering that the a ^P^Slis* HOW.’ 

new prime minister is the head of the Kaa»Nnh»*w, ... 

Socialist Party, which had previously KazDO,Volt *«*«>»I<>bbyi«for 
rejected all these as either imconstitu- cor P orabon8 

tional, threats 10 the people or symbols — ■■ ■ ■ 

P f mmtarist past, the statements few complained about Mr. Muravama’s 
turned at the pragmatism driving poll- unilateral declarations, which many at- 
tics as Japan fitfully tears down and tnbuted to the seductiveness of cower 
reconstructs its party system. and his surprising personal popSariw 

after his first month in office.. 




■>: 




w « 
% 


uiguiy conservative Liberal Democratic *u*naanea policies mat 

Party last summer after 38 years of one- ? ver ? J cen . tral *° Socialists’ left-lean- 
pany rule. “8 identity and brought the party more 

. The Ubeial Democrats fell after be- 

mg spin by factional infighting. But with the Socialists’ ooaliticmSrti^ 

E? 5 0dal - He moved Japan?lZbted polit- 
^ “coed laigest in the old ical world a step closer to the model his 
politica] order, was in effect erased — party had once said it mnrased- mm 
wthout a vote or a tattle. Stria parte vj^ for 2^' "" 

It was transformed mto what Mr. up- 


r — - — and one of tfi© 
few Socialists who spoke out against the 
declarations, said he imposed not Mr. 
Auirayama s abandoning his personal 
priiKaplcs but his pushing the entire par- 
ty along the same path. He indicated 
that he would have preferred a fuzzy 
stand that left the party with its head in 
the coahtion and its heart outside. 

• “If the party adopts the °»mp posi- 
tions as the Liberal Democrats, then it is 
denying its own raison d’etre,” Mr. Ya- 
tabe said. U I could even say it is commit- 
ting suicide” . .. 

But most responses were like those of 
Nagateru Tokuyama, secretary-general 
of the Japan Teachers’ Union, a staunch 
supporter of the Socialists. 

“The changes were unavoidable for a 
party m power he said, sighing. “When 
the Socialist Party was in the opposition, 
its policies were j ust slogans, not policies 
it expected to be implemented.” 

Kazup Nokazawa, a senior official of 

nnflnnm c -« 1.1.1 • 


It is becoming dearer that what 
brought the Socialists and the Liberal 
Democrats together was their common 
desire to - mawifain many aspects of the 
status qua What has distinguished the 

neoconservative rebels who originally 

ousted the Liberal Democrats last year 
is their embrace of an agenda of change. 

The neoconservative reformers, who 


I s ; 



fcvcajcBae u * capitalist now. 
So much for ideology. But while most 
Socialists swallowed deep and embraced 
the realpoKtik that has given rtwm a 
taste of power after four decades in the 
political wilderness, indi cati ons of the 
differences- between the two groupings 
emerged last week. 


have pushed 

tional role for Japan. 

But the governing coalition has made 
it dear that it is reluctant to press for a 
permanent seat on the UN Security 
Council, for example, and that it wifi 
maintain the current strict restrictions 
on the military’s ability to operate out- 
side Japan. 

A tougher issue is economic deregula- 
tion. The reformers have said they want 
to open the coddled Japanese economy, 
in large measure because the plethora of 
regulations are harming the competi- 
tiveness of Japanese corporations. 

The new governing coalition has as- 
serted that it, too, favors deregulation, 
but many businessmen are skeptical. 
The Liberal Democrats and the Social- 
ists together built and sustained the old 
system, which relied on oppressive con- 
trol of the economy by government bu- 
reaucrats. 




V.Jfl 


OP!-**** lawmakers shouting anfi-gtaerrnnem slogans Wednesday foN™ SS 

Sit-In Targets Indian Finance Aide 


Bangladesh Author Leaves Hideout 


Continued from Page I pany that buys South African 

n Nlo» n.iu: 1 fpM nlvnii Cm.tk A C—i itr.i sharN iTtainltr «.«.! J “ ■ _ . 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dapaicka 

NEWDELHI — Sixty opposition lawmak- 
m held a sit-in outside Parliament on 
Wednesday 10 demand the resignation of a 
cabinet minister whom they blame for a 19Q~> 
financial scandal 

Tire protest came one day after more than 
opposition lawmakers walked out of Par- 
liament, leaving behind only the governing 
Congress (I) Party and a few supporters. 

The opposition lawmakers said they would 
not return anti] the government accepted 
blame for the scandal involving 20 domestic 
and foragn banks. They were accused of 
illegally diverting government bonds to make 
funds available to stockbrokers for specula- 
tion. 

The walkout, which effectively paralyzed 
Parliament, could force Prime Munster P. V. 
Narasimha Rao to bold early elections 


An investigation conducted by an all-party 
parliamentary committee found that Finance 
Mmister Manmohan Singh and two other 
cabinet members had allowed the $1.3 billion 
sotm by failing to properly supervise the 

^^ h “r 8 ^ Las ‘ .’ reek “i« government 
ngected the findings, infuriating the opposi- 
tion. rr 

. The ®’ t ’“ on Wednesday lasted for an 
nour. Remove the corrupt ministers!’' pro- 

122* « governing party lawmakers 

entering the building- 

.«.9 < ?£ re £? P?«y deputies said Wednesday 
that Mr. Singh had told a party meeting he 
would resign rather than withdraw the gov- 
ernment s partial rejection of the report on 
tne scandal. 

The finance minister, architect of India's 
market reforms, was not available for com- 
ment on Wednesday. (AP. Reuters ) 


feet about South Africa. With flares, mainly in gold mining, 
great fanfare, dozens of foreign He recently spent a week in the 
companies, led by computer country making rounds of 
and software concerns and in- kanJrere, businessmen and offi- 
cluding such brand-name giants cu *ls, investigating other oppor- 
as Pepsico and Sara Lee, have tum ties, and left a skeptic. 

in -5 M “ il AW »- 150,1111 Africa, he said, docs 
. most are either reacqurr- not fit the profile of other 

SfnS b 2f ia ? es 111311 aaer ^ «oSi 4 ££ 

SSSJESSP J* 1 ** ^ ^ does il haw the skills and 

mdustrial technology base to 

y4^of the Investor ^ ~ 

mL^wS^tra^S 1 ^?' a ? d J aiwan ’ ( or 

that monitors trade with ^th b ^* lheir . mus ? ula r 

Africa said multinational com- eXP w tmfi 

parties “can serve the 40-mil- dothm 8 and. working up to 
lion-strong market in South Af- 100116 < f°P ^f fr :at . e d goods, a 
rica with goods produced routc ^ » taking, 

elsewhere.*’ She added, “South But dial route starts with 
Africa is not seen as a major ehea P labor. In South Africa, 
point for exporting die manufacturing work force is 

0 hMvilv nninnlMil 



In Japan, Too, the Weather 
Creates Unwelcome Records 


globally. 

With good reason, said Rob- 
ert A. J. Irwin, chairman of 
ASA Ltd., an investment com- 


HOT: Europe’s Sizzling Summer 


Agency 

33 of the — ^ ^ 

ttnwghout the countiy are saving 
washing dishes to flush toilets. Consum- 


heavily unionized, costing em- 
ployers almost $5 an hour in 
total remuneration, double the 
cost in Mexico or Brazil 
eight times the cost in fThing 
Productivity is low. 

A recent outbreak, of labor 
unrest has been an unnerving 
reminder to investors that 
German Weather Service in Of- wmkers have not necessarily 
fenbach. bought the new government’s 

Just because no July as hot as message of restraint In the firat 
the one this year had been re- ax months of the year. South 
corded in the Netherlands since Africa lost 1.2 million worker 
record-keeping began in 1706, ^ to strikes, up from 700,000 
or in Germany in the Iasi 100 * ago. according to An- 
years, does not mean that the drew .^ cv y A Associates, an in- 
cumate had changed irrevers- d us trial relations consulting 
ibly. firm. 6 


DHAKA, Bangladesh — 
Tasl iroa Nasrin, a feminist an- 
ther who has been threatened 
with death by Id antic funda- 
mentalists, emerged from two 
months in hiding Wednesday to 
face a chaige of insulting Islam. 

Dr. Nasrin entered the court- 
room flanked by an army of 
lawyers headed by former For- 
ago. Minister Kama! Hossain. 
She was dressed in a sari and 
with her head covered- by a 
scarf, in the tradition of Muslim 
women. She was freed on $125 
mu on a charge of violating a 
lyth-century law against of-, 
fending religious sensibilities. 
No trial dale was set 

Fundamentalists were en- 
raged when an Indian newspa- 
per quoted Dr. Nasrin, a 32- 
year-oid physician, as saying 
she wanted the Koran, the 1^ 
kmtic holy boot “thoroughly 
*™ed” to protect women’s 
rights. 


She has said she was mis- 
quoted, bat would like to see 
changes in Islamic laws to pro- 
tect women’s rights. ' 

Fundamentalists put a 
$5,000 bounty on her head, and 
authorities followed up June 4 
by iss uing a 'warrant for her 
arrest, which led Dr. Nasrin to 
go underground. Her case pro- 
voked almost daily dashes be- 
tween fundamentalists and her 
secular defenders. 

Her appearance Wednesday, 
which came two . days before a 
de a d line set by a judge last 
month , caugjht opponents off 
guard- No . protests occurred 
outside the courtroom, appar- 
ently because the public had 
not been told about thehearing. 

It was the first time Dr: Nas- 
rin has appeared in public since 
June 4. 

After her brief hearing Dr. 
Nasrin drove to her apartment 
budding, where more flan 100 

police stood guard, and had an 


emotional reunion with her 
family. 

Hugging ho- mother and cry- 
ing, Dr. Nasrin refused to say 
where she had hidden for two 
months. She said she was tired 
of living in hiding, and decided 
not to flee the country because 
she loves Bangladesh and her 
family. 

“During these days in hiding. 
I fdt I was dying every moment 
I was not allowed to use the 
telephone, and 1 lived in a dark 
room,” she said. “It was like 
living in a jail cell or in exile. ” 

While she was in hiding, the 
European Union offered her 
political asylum, but Dr. Nasrin 
said. she had no plans to leave 
the country and did not know 
whether net bail, provisions 
would even allow her to visit 
another countiy. 

. H convicted, she could be 
jailed for up to two years. 

(AP Reuters) 


Tokvo ^ i^wpic w 1 aim. un Wednesday 

0*^0 suffered the hottest day in recorded history. y — 

in J 9 degrecs ^ tfgrate { 102 Fahrenheit) "^ed 30 <86 Fahrenheit j. ac- X?” 

^ atyfmeshartowmg the record heaiwpectid to S S? 1 ^ «> Paul HageL d^uty £“ a 

SH ^ w “ k - “ wcauS”^ SE £ y 

temperature is 20 (68 Fahren- - - 

by a SCnes of ^ “Many Japanese companies 
In Germany, Environment f £ oni invest . “ Southeast AsSbe- 

Mhuster Klaus Topfer told 


firm. 

le hot weather in Europe Nor are Westerners alone in 
this summer, they say, has been shunning South Africa. 

y a series of hiph- “M»n« _ 


bureau bega^^^g ^ weather f alrao ^P heric ^rbon dioxide 

(101 FahraSdt)m 1953 1^™?^ ?“, 38 * 4 de8re *? ^ lU S rade from human activities. 


a 

newspaper over the weekend 
that he was afraid the unusual 
warm weather signaled a possi- 
ble climate change from the 
much-predicted “greenhouse 
effect” caused by the increase in 


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Sed' S^°^ baVe raV_ EVC ° ^ Africa iT^S 

IfiAL 1- ^ wcslera Eg** fa 1116 dcvclopcd 

-i — 

i ... 

j LAGOS; 3 Protesters Killed 

Couthmed from Page I 
; bear the case. Participation in 
i tne general strike appeared 
j strong in Lagos and other 
i southern dries, where support 
' for Chief Abiola. a southerner, 
is greatest. 

: . Many people have been stay- 
ing home in support of the 
strikes because serious fuel 
shortages have cut power and 
crippled public transportation. 

Others fear the video I gangs of 
strike enforcers who have tried 
to keep merchants from operat- 
ing- 

Even civil servants in Lagos 
stayed borne Wednesday, de- 
spite the military government’s 


Cartoned from Page 1 
STAR TV more than three 
years ago. MTV put visuals to 
American music, which had 
wag been popular among In- 
dia s middle class and younger 
generation. But its greatest im- 
pact was spreading Western 
music and attitudes Beyond the 
big a ties of Bombay and New 

Ddin to small towns across the 


broadcast warnings to them 
Tuesday night to go to work. 
Aminu Saleh, an official in 


. / --“’V 

tetevisKHi stores b«an bu 
cheap satellite dishes an* 
stringing cable wires to village 
huts for a few rupees a month. 

Also, for the first turn in 
modern Indian entertainment 
nutoiy, audiences had an alter- 
natiw to indigenous film pro- 
ductions and the staid govern- 
ment-controlled television 
ii^woric Doordarshan snidely 
referred to by one television 
critic as “the last upholder of 
middle-class morality* in India. 

Even m the poorest of the poor 

Slums nnakhnH *>• 


ggafassast eSSSw 

goverament censor tack on “ 

^“l^^-tbepop ’’other ZSSSTfZZ 


ODumry. wbCTesavry ^“^bjeaed to review 

suggestively on the 


suggestively on the choli 
stretched tight across her am- 
ple, heaving bosom as she re- 
plies, coyly, “In the chdi is zny 
heart, and this heart I will give 
to my lover.” . 

Those two tines packed the 
theaters, resulted in record mu- 
sic sales and changed the Indiah 
movie industry. 


™ an bers of the movie industry 
often sit on the board. 

And even if the censor board 
deletes a scene or a song, local 
theatera routinely splice the 
banned footage back into the 
ium- Thc goverament is now 
considering creating a special 
pohee force to raid theaters and 
arrest owners and distributors 


upi Jm anesi owners and distributors 

rh.S b i, was , suU on tbe who are showing censored bites, 
charts when the so-called .But Mr. 


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— — on uuiudi m 

the rating junta, said on roecial 
television and radio broadcasts: 
“Any failure to heed this advice 
will be viewed as a sign of dis- 
loyalty to the goverament and 
will be handled under existing 
civil service regulations.” 

The general strike had much 
t 5 c *' ec * northern areas of 
the country. Northerners have 
always dominated the military 
and have used their historic 
control of Nigeria’s authoritar- 
ian governments to divert the 
nation’s vast oil wealth to the 

a0rt * L (Reuters. AP) 


their rupees to rent television 
sets and began watching cable 
movies rather than going to the- 
aters. 

If the conservative politic ian^ 
MTV as a 


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— HcralbSEnbunc - . . « 


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and pundits viewed 
termite eating away at Indian 
values, a nervous “Bollywood” 
~T the world’s biggest fflm in- 
dustry, which chums out more 
than 1 ,000 movies a year —saw 
■mi v eating away at its morir^ 
and its profits. So Bollywood, 
whose show tunes dominate the 
muac indusoy charts, decided 
to fight back. 

Tire first blow by Subhash 
phai, a filmmaker, was a 
knockout punch that trans- 
formed the movie industry al- 
most overnight “The Villain." 
released last year, starred the 


-o A, . “ c so-caueo 
oexy. Sexy hu the streets with 
a disco beat that repeated the 
wmi “sexy” more than 100 
S?* 5, Jhen came the movie 
Rqa Babu” and the refrain 
Drag your cot next to mine." 
And others. 

India .went ballistic. Every 
cab driver in Bombay was sine- 
sexy.” The iZ 
played “Choir” ad nauseam. 

Conservative politicians and 
women’s organizations were fu- 
nous; Lawyers sued movie stu- 
dios m an effort to shut down 
what they considered vulgar 

l 50 

tne flm du fundamentalist 
Bhmatya Janata Party stormed 
a theater in Bombay a few 
months ago, throwing black ink 
on the screen, ripping up mar- 
quees anddbasing patrons out. 

even Prune Minister p. y 


^The Villain,” and others say 
th®e are no easy solutions. 
. . problem is constantly 

outiook and belief,'’ he said. “In 
o™«, people want Indian. In 
outlook, they want WesL” 


SERBS: 

fighting Flares 

Continued frutspage I 



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the economy. 


rjent a masochistic crime ai 
which the devil would laugh - 
the statement said. 

The Bosnian Serbs have been 
under intense international 

£2^5“ *° rev * rsc ^ 

mine Minister P V would divide I toe^orrS 

?»sssis - gssattiSE 

enemies. 

The measure requires the 
“P about a third 

sSSSsteas 

sssfassvs 

jSwSates 

after h<avyp«^ 

tional^ b ^ RuS5ia -^- 

n V. 


President Slobcv- 





- . . for inciting the con- 
W , U1 Quest for a Greater 
appears to have had 

Nations economic 
teve helped make 
^^S 1 * cr, *5 ,e8 of Serbia and 
°^ y ^Publics 

A m?* Yl JfiOsIavia. 

Rrth - Spokesman, Major 

Mareh in the noiS 3 JSSS 

(Reuters. AP) 




Page 5 




1994 Reader Survey 

Thanks to you, over US$ 7,000 were donated to charity 


A 1_an<rt' Aflf 1 


You are mostly of die male variety: 79% vereus 21%. Your 

Arr-rce or a Higher qualification; in feet, one in 7 of 
61% read 5 or 6 issues a week. 

sss ~ 

country other man lu * j in your present 

SSK XSencITo/er 11. so you seem to be fairly 
settled. 

2 ££* “e or o T i! 6 “ 

trips take you all werthewo Middle East, 

USA, 40% die Asia^aofic while away on 

burinSs^^* nights a year in hotels. 

As far as cars are concerned, 46% of you have 2 or more 

«„ ^ .nd the «=~ «* or you, ™» 

vehicle is US$31,800. 

Practically * of *-*« “S^SS?SS 
63% invest to ^S£home), 34% in collectibles, 

^di M^name but a few. The average value of your 


Almost one fifth of you (19%*) work in organizations 

whose principal activity is manuf^ 1 ™^^^*^^’ 
financial or other business services, 17% m tne proics 
So%* in the government or the diplomatic service. 

You are successful in your working life: 89%* have 

hdr&zsttsnzz ss 

operations. 

The international nature of your job requires that _you 
22%* Japan. 

per household being US$ 14 / .600. 
educated, successful, mobile and affluent. 

couple of years time. 


* Based on aU in employment (85%) 


Ueralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


published with this new York 


TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON pOST 






... •■-. ... ■ , , - **"*" ~ '' ' '' ■'■' - 





Page 6 


THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1994 

OPINION 


13 


Reralb 


iiNTEffiVATIONAL 



PbsusnEti wm» me new voak times and the Washington tost 


Speed Up Rwanda Relief 


Siribune Decaying Parts of Africa Need Benign Colonization 

THE WASHINGTON TOST %/ V V . 


How can it take so long for the indus- 
trial powers to deliver emergency sup- 
plies and equipment that are desperately 
.needed to save the lives of Rwandan 
refugees? As refugees began to be rav- 
aged by cholera and dysentery from 
drinking contaminated water, relief 
workers begged for a clean water supply. 
American equipment was rushed m to 
purify a mflfcan gallons of drinking water 
a day. But relief workers complain that 
pure water is not much good unless it gets 
to the refugees; they say 200 tanker 
trucks are needed to deliver it. About 20 
have arrived. Where are the other trucks? 

As the dead began to pile up by the 
thousands, further endangering the liv- 
ing, a call went out to Washington from 
squalid refugee camps for dig ging ma- 
chines and bulldozers to bury the bodies 
before they could infect the Living. A 
week later, the equipment had yet to 
arrive. What is the problem? 

When the h umanitarian nightmare be- 
gan in Rwanda, Washington was at first 
slow to respond. But it is not the main 
source of delay now. The principal bottle- 
necks are at the United Nations, with its 
maddening bureaucracy and paperwork, 
and on the ground in Africa, where there 
is a shortage of airport space to land and 
unload cargo planes. Both bottlenecks 
need to be eliminated promptly, so that 
relief can reach Rwandans fast 

Requests to the United States to air- 
lift relief equipment such as tanker 
trucks, are referred to the Pentagon, 
which has to find the gear on far-flung 
bases and arrange to fly it to airfields 
near the camps. The Pentagon is now 
processing requests expeditiously. 


Washington is picking up only part of 
die tab for Rwandan relief; other mem- 
bers of die United Nations have to pay 
their share. To assure that it is eventually 
reimbursed, the Pentagon has to get UN 
approval before acting on requests. But 
the United Nations does not just give the 
go-ahead. Its procedures often require 
that requests for equipment and the air- 
lift to deliver it be put out for bids by 
member nations. The Pentagon, with its 
surfeit of equipment and logistical prow- 
ess, is often the low bidder. But no matter 
— the United Nations in New York solic- 
its bids before drawing up a contract That 
can take two days — more on weekends. 

Once the Pentagon gets the go-ahead 
from the United Nations, it runs smack 
into another roadblock. The airfield 
nearest the camp at Goma, Zaire, lacks 
runway space to park and unload more 
than one large transport plane at a time. 
And the unloading can be painfully 
slow. With only a few flights each day, 
the UN High Commissioner for Refu- 
gees in Geneva has to decide what flies 
m first. Water purification equipment 
has had a higher priority tjian tanker 
trucks or digging equipment 

Now relief workers can use the air- 
fields at Entebbe, Uganda, and Kigali, 
Rwanda, which can handle more cargo. 
Ships will soon be landing much larger 
volumes of supplies that can be delivered 
overland to Rwanda if road and security 
conditions permit As for die paperwork, 
why can’t the United Nations draw up a 
blanket agreement with Washington bun- 
dling together much of the relief equip- 
ment and airlift to shortcut contracting? 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Why Invade Haiti? 


The American government is conduct- 
ing a shadow play intended to make an 
invasion of Haiti unnecessary by making 
it seem inevitable. This is the meaning of 
the attack authorization that the United 
States extracted from the United Nations 
this past weekend. The invasion count- 
down does not mean that American troops 
are all set to go in and throw out the junta 
that ousted Haiti’s elected president, Jean- 
Bertrand Aristide. It is the latest tighten- 
ing of the screw in an effort to force the 
junta to step down without a fight. 

If it works as planned, the Clinton 
administration will be able to claim a 
foreign policy success. But, regardless of 
the result in Haiti, a price will have to be 
paid, ft is a stretch and then some to say 
that the junta’s internal cruellies imperil 
international “peace and security,” the 
UN Charter's test for armed interven- 
tion. A question of consistency arises 
when it comes to applying a similar stan- 
dard to friendly authoritarian countries, 
like some of those that voted to back the 
United States in Haiti. A. precedent is 
being set that would allow, say, Russia, to 
seek a similar license in policing what it 
calls its near abroad. 

Nor does the international authoriza- 
tion translate easily into the approval 
that President Bill Clinton is going to 


need at home. The prime factor pushing 
the administration to do something, the 
specter of Haitian boat people flooding 
into Florida, rises and falls with the daily 
traffic, currently very low. Popular en- 
thusiasm for Haitian democracy and 
compassion for Haitian suffering must 
vie with the widespread apprehension — 
which we share — that an invasion of 
Haiti would be a colonial solution. It 
would likely saddle the United States 
with lone responsibility in a virtually lim- 
itless swamp of occupation. 

At this late point, many politicians 
find it awkward to be an invasion skeptic. 
A seemingly irreversible commitment of 
presidential prestige has been made. How 
can Bill Clinton dimh down now? Noth- 
ing else is “on.” The thugs in Haiti, more- 
over, are quick to take comfort from 
utterances made in the context of Ameri- 
can debate. Most skeptics, we guess, 
would join the general relief if the junta 
in Port-au-Prince thought better of its 
initial defiance of the UN resolution and 
stepped down. But this does not absolve 
the administration from continuing to 
seek a political solution. It should not 
drift into a position where it feels com- 
pelled to invade because it can’t think of 
anything else to do. 

— THE WASHINGTON TOST. 


Tabloid Love Story 


Somewhere above reality — somewhere, 
let us say, between the earth and the ether 
— there lies a land whose only manifesta- 
tion is in those fabulous tabloids that greet 
America’s supermarket shoppers just be- 
fore they reach the cash register. The 
checkout line becomes a reading room. In 
this land, 99-year-old women give birth to 
babies almost every day. Some of these 
women have 15-year-oW boyfriends. Oth- 
ers were partnered, if only temporarily, 
by gentlemen who are not only out of this 
world but out of this species. 

In this land, a cat eats a parrot — and 
talks. A two-headed man holds conversa- 
tions with himself. A cheating wife's head 
(she had but one) explodes. 

In this land, life is eternal. The occa- 
sional death is reported, true, sometimes 
accompanied by a photograph of the de- 
ceased in his coffin. But very often the 
dead are seen again, at gas stations or 


peering in a window or waiting at a bus 
stop, and they are always looking good. 

This week, the daughter of tins land’s 
undisputed King (and most persistent 
rev en ant) confirmed the rumors (and the 
certificate produced by a Dominican 
judge) and announced her marriage to 
one of its most prominent residents, a 35- 
year-old entertainer and friend of its un- 
disputed Queen, a violet-eyed beauty (as 
she is forever known) named Liz. The 
happy couple, Michael and Lisa- Marie 
Presley-Jacksoo. are honeymooning in an 
apartment lent them by Donald Trump, 
another regular guest in this land. 

Previously, many readers of these an- 
nals did not believe everything reported in 
them — the alien impregnations and Mar- 
tian kidnappings, for instance — and that 
story about the baby who was born wear- 
ing wooden shoes. Now, perhaps, they do. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 

Don’t Help Russia With Thai 


The Soviet Union “needed” nuclear 
weapons because it was challenging the 
United States; why, then, does Russia 
need them? What business is it of ours? 
And what difference does it make if they 
have a right if we Americans do not have 
the power to take them away? 

It does make a difference, however, 
whether Russia needs nuclear weapons or 
has a right to have them, because the 
Russians are spending money to keep 
those weapons, and they are asking us for 
money. We cannot ask them to give up 


their religion, traditional symbols of their 
nation or weapons they need for self- 
defense or self-respect as the price for 
giving them economic assistance. 

But if they do not have a right to 
nuclear weapons and do not need them, 
we have every right to say that we will not 
provide money to them while they con- 
tinue to spend money on maintaining 
their nuclear weapons. The least we can 
do is deduct From the assistance we pro- 
vide tile amount they could save by dis- 
mantling nuclear weapons. 

— Max Singer, writing in the 
Hudson Briefing Paper ( Indianapolis j. 



P RETORIA — Much of contempo- 
rary Africa is in the throes of decay 
and decomposition. Even the degree of 
dependent modernization achieved un- 
der colonial rule is being reversed. The 
successive collapses of the state in one 
African country after another during the 
1990s suggests a once unthinkable solu- 
tion; recoianization. 

To an increasing number of Africans, 
this is the bitter message that has 
emerged from the horrifying events in 
Rwanda. While Africans nave been quite 
successful in uniting to achieve national 
freedom, we have utterly failed to unite 
for economic development and political 
stability. War, famine and ruin are the 
postcotoma) legacy Lot too many Africans. 

As a result, external recolonizatioa un- 
der the banner of h mnani tarianism is 
entirely conceivable. Countries like So- 
malia or Liberia, where central control 
has entirely disintegrated, invite inevita- 
ble intervention to stem the spreading 
“cancer of chaos,” in the words of J. 
Brian Atwood, a dminis trator of the U.S. 
Agency for International Development. 

The colonization impulse that is resur- 
facing, however, is likely to look different 
this time around. A trusteeship system — 
like that cS the United Nations over the 
Congo in 1960, when order fell apart with 
the Belgian pullout — could be estab- 
lished that is more genuinely international 
and less Western than under the old guise. 

Administering powers for the trustee- 
ship territories could come from Africa 
or Asia, as well as from the rest of the 
United Nations membership. The “white 
man’s burden” would, in a sense, become 
humanity’s shared burden. 


By AH A. Mazrni 

In the 21st century, for example, might 
Ethiopia (which will by then presumably 
be more stable than it is today) be called 
upon to run Somalia on behalf of the 
United Nations? After aD, Ethiopia was 
once a black imperial power, annexing 
neighboring communities. Why should it 
not take up that historical role again in a 
more benign manner that has legitimate 
international sanction? 

Might Egypt re-establish its “big 
brother” relationship with Sudan? 

Might the United Nations implore 

Africans need an African 
peace erf arced by Africans. 


port-apartheid South Africa to intervene 
to end the Angolan civil war? 

Surely it is time for Africans to exert 
more pressure on each other, including 
through benevolent intervention, to 
achieve a kind of Pax Africans based on 
regional integration or unification of 
smaller stales. 

Some African countries will simply 
need to be temporarily controlled by oth- 
ers. Inevitably, some dysfunctional coun- 
tries will need to submit to trusteeship 
and even tutelage for awhile, as Zanzibar 
did when it was annexed by Tanganyika 
in 1964 to form Tanzania. 

If Burundi and Rwanda had bom simi- 
larly united into a larger state, where the 
balance between Tutsi and Hutu would 
have been part of a more diverse popula- 


tion, the savagery we have witnessed in 
the past months would very likely not 
have happaed on the same scale. 

If reccionization or self-colonization is 
the path Chat lies ahead for Africa, there 
musi be a continental authority to ensure 
that such an order does riot merely marie 
base aims of exploitation. What I pro- 
pose as a longer-term solution to prob- 
lems exposed by today's crises is die 
establishment of an African Security 
Council composed of five pivotal region- 
al states, or potential pivotal state, 
whkto would oversee tbe continent. This 
council would have a Pan African Emer- 
gency Force, an army for intervention 
and peacekeeping, rtite dispose 

There would also be an African High 
Commissioner fw Refugees Indeed to the 
United Nations? refugee agency. While. 
Afrjca accxHnftsfoir cme-tcnth of the 
world's population, it accounts for half 
of the wood's refugees. 

The African Security Council mat 
should be formed over the coming do- 
cades would be anchored in the north by- 


future, it will be one of the major actors 
in Africa in the 21st century, takingBu- 

nmdi and Rwanda under its wmg. Zmre 

w population and resources to play 

a major «Se. In tbe next century it wxU 
surpass France as tbe largest French- 

speakmg nation in the wori<L 

As permanent members of an African 
Security Council, die five states would 
coordinate among cadi other and with 
the United Nations- , . 


very troubling limes, Nigeria would be 
the pivotal sta te in West Africa. Its size 
and resources could give it the weight of 
if it can. find political stability. 

In East Africa, the pivotal country is 
still in doubt Ethiopia, among the most 

is the most Hkcay anchor because of its 
size. Kenya is more stable but far smaller. 

In central Africa, the presumed region- 
al power of tbe future, Zaire, is currently 
itself in need of trusteeship. If Zaire can 
avoid collapse into , chaos in the near 


day in Europe, in North America, in East 
Ada and even, tentatively of coon* to 
the Middle East If Africa does not fol- 
low tins path, the lack of stability and 
economic growth will push the entire 
continent further mto the desperate mar- 
tins of global society. 

- Tr» tynifan with the efforts of the Unit- 
ed Nations to establish a peaceful worid 
order, Africans need an African peace 
enforced by Africans, from Angola to 
Rwanda arid Burundi. 

These are no doubt frightening ideas '• 
for proud peoples who spilled so much 
blood and spent so much political wul 
fr eeing themselves from toe control of 
European powers. To be sure, self-colo- 
nization, if we can manage it, is better 
than, colonization, by outsiders. 

Better still would be self-conquest. But 
that implies an African capacity lor self- 
control and sdf -discipline rarely seen 
since before colonialism. 

The writer, a Kenyan author of more 
than 20 books, is editor of Volume 8 of the 
Unesco General History of Africa, “ Africa 
Since 1935." This comment was distribut- 
ed by the Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


Take Prudent Note of the Successes in Clinton’s Record Abroad 


P ARIS — The condemnation 
of niNinn administration for- 
eign policy has become a self- 
perpetuating refrain, tra la la 
without attempting to make sense 
of the words. 

It is hard to tdl at this point 
whether this is just another part 
of the general attack on a presi- 
dent who, for his critics, can do 
nothing right, from feeding refu- 
gees to taking a vacation; or is 
due to poor explanation of issues 
that tlx White House does not 
want to become a distraction from 
its prime domestic concerns; or is 
a subtle way for Americans to con- 
vey that they don’t want foreign 
policy on their agenda now, so 
write it off as hopeless. 

It is not an accurate picture of 
what the United States has been 
doing in the world since Bill Clin- 
ton moved to Washington. There 
have been pluses and minuses. 
Naturally, the failures draw more 
attention, even on relatively nu- 
nor inaws, than the decisions that 
don’t go wrong. And continuity, 
which has beat considerable, is 
less reassuring in a world keenly 
aware of rapid change. 

But it is already possible to 


By Flora Lewis 


draw up an interim balance sheet 
because some major decisions 
have been made that are already 
sh a pin g the future. And it mat- 
ters, because the United States 
can’t opt out, doesn’t really want 
to, and needs both for itself and 
its partners a steadier assessment 
of now it is doing in its shift from 
Cold War leadership to more con- 
scious partnership. 

First, though* ri is important to 
keep in mind that this is happen- 
ing just when many governments 
which must be the major partners 
are themselves handicapped by 
severe internal troubles un- 
certainties. Of the industrial 
states at last month’s Naples 
summit, Taman and Italy are rac- 
ing deep political transformation, 
Britain is at ebb tide, France is 
consumed with next year’s presi- 
dential election, and Russia ny art 
getting started on a historkreoqr 
vatiotu The United States must 
deal with them as they are. 

Whither Russia is the most crit- 
ical issue far international affairs 


stantial achievement. Yegor Gai- 
dar. the former deputy prune min- 
ister; revealed reoently mat be had 
to release huge amounts of nuE- 
taiy food reserves and that with- 
out massive foreign relief supplies 
the country would not have made 
it through the first couple of win- 
ters after the Soviet collapse. Now 
shortages have been overcome and 
the economy is starting to func- 
tion, although grossly distorted by 
the horrendous spread of orga- 
nized crime — which the West 
could help to limit by energetic 
monitoring of money Mundauog . 

The agreement with Ukraine on 
disposition of nuclear weapons 
promises solution of the biggest 
security threat. The Partnership 
for Peace compromise, while fully 
satisfying none, is taking hold, en- 
abling NATO to move into a new. 
; erif, and bridging the security con- 
'oems of East Europeans as they 
consolidate their independence. 

There has not been a dramatic 
breakthrough; that was not to be 
expected, given the enormous 


at this stage. What has not gone problems. But the whole area is 
wrong has to be considered a sub- advancing toward stability. 


The new policy chi Western Eu- 
rope, 1 accepting, its will to orga- 
nize defense plans on its own 
while detracting nothing from 
NATO, removes an old irritant. 
There isn’t now. and isn’t soon 

g rig to be a real “European nil- . 

” to Use John F. Kennedy’s 
term, with which America can deal 
as a unified equal. But tbe three- . 
Don is set and wodccan go ahead. : 
.Momentum fas been sustained 
toward peace in die Middle Eart. 
Grave issues remain, but the wa- 
tershed has been crossed. 

The North American Free 
Trade Agreement has been rati- 
fied and the GATT agreement 
has been signed, still to be for- 
mally put. into effect It was a 
political miscalculation for Mir. 
Clinton to try to launch a new 
stage of trade negotiations at Na- 
ples, so soon after what might ' 
Jiaye been a nasty trade wan was= 
averted. But the error- wa^, ■■ 

caLThe^straxegy iawOsung wdL* £ 

.. After an-unwisc start that 
threatened to fray relations, Wash- , 
ington and Tokyo are back on a 
more; cooperative course. It is jaot *- 
unwise or indecisive to notice a 
mistake quickly and correct it ■ 


The Nation-State Is Declining, but No Replacement Is at Hand 


I ONDON — The phrases “in- 
/ ternational community” and 
“shared sovereignty” are both, if 
not quite oxymorons, at least 
charged with wishful thinking. 
They are much used in today's 
talk of foreign affairs, perhaps in 
the hope that, like some failed 
hollaadaise sauce, their incom- 
patible ingredients can be made 
to blend tty beating them togeth- 
er bard enough. 

Such a technique has worked 
before. The term “nation-state” 
shows what long repetition at a 
wishful thought can achieve. Al- 
though nations and states are 
fundamentally different things 
we have all come to accept that 
the blend of them is tbe basic 
ingredient of the “world order” 
— to cite yet another fashionable 
emulsion. 

Yet there is a feeling abroad 
that the era of the nation-state 
may be fading. 

The collapse of the confronta- 
tion between two superpowers 
and ideologies fas left mankind 
having to rethink how best to 
structure government This un- 
certainty plays a lug part in the 
rich world's present feeling of 
drift and disorientation. 

Too much of what goes on in 
modem life transcends the na- 
tion-state and its gov ern ment. 
Yet systems of government that 
attempt to follow by transcend- 
ing national administration have 
not achieved loyalty and le gjtima- 
cy. Meanwhile, nation-states go 
cm suffering the pains they have 
always known whenever e thnic 
feeling rebels against imposi- 
tion of state frontiers or laws. 

These pains are intense at pre- 
seat because of an outpouring of 
ethnic pride uncorked by the end- 
ing of Communist hegemony* a nd 
also because electorates sense 
that modem governments are no 
longer able to shield their societ- 
ies against change, alien competi- 
tion or waves of im mig r an ts 
The horrors of Yugoslavia, the 
discrediting of tbe United Na- 
tions, the worries over the futures 
of Russia and its ex-satellites, 
Ross Perot and “the great sucking 
sound” of free trade with Mexico, 
Ear roe’s post-Maastricht tension 
— all these are partly traceable to 
these two problems. 

Restated briefly, they are that 
supranational government is in- 
evitable but still not acceptable, 
and that even well-established na- 
tion -states can no longer confer 
as adequate sense of identity 
upon their peoples. 

While the term “nation-state” 


fas a noble ring of fittingness — 
one people who have sensibly 
decided to obey one government 
— most nation-states had to be 
cultivated with much ingenuity. 

France created a “state na- 
tion" and gave it an almost hu- 
man persona. America created 
toe ultimate idea-based nation. 
Even Britain embraced a num- 
ber of nations within its state. 

Such civic state-building was 

The nation-state, once an 
engine of progress, is 
becoming a comforting 
symbol of die past 


By Nicholas Colchester 

of fittingness — ever they may < 


helped by the expanding reach of 
government, by railways, by 
telegraphs, by the spread of suf- 
frage, by flags, anthems, jingo- 
ism, rewritten histories and oth- 
er 19th century paraphernalia. 

So successful was the formula 
and so appropriate to its times 
that it was projected potently 
abroad to create state-empires, 
such as France’s, or nation-em- 
pires, such as Britain’s, where 
that admirable tribe the “Eng- 
lish-speaking peoples” were ei- 
ther m control or ought to be, 
and ran thfngs from En glish 
country houses like Ditch) ey. 

Yet those same technological 
advances that made nation- 
states and empires governable 
now whisk capital and informa- 
tion ungovernably across their 
frontiers. These advances have 
created enterprises that can no 
longer act as national champions 
if they are to survive against in- 
ternational competition. Edu- 
cated elites no longer advance 
only within their nations; they 
move in galaxies — of film , fi- 
nance and fashion — that be- 
stride nations. 

And where nation-state gov- 
ernments once reveled in their 
newfound power to control up to 
40 percent of their economies, to- 
day they are matching away from 
these commanding heights, put- 
ting them up for sale and explain- 
ing to their electorates that jobs 
are scarce because of internation- 
al forces beyond their controL 

The supranational challenge 
goes beyond the economic. The 
rise of the electronic media 
is changing a basic tenet of 
the post- World War II order — 
.that nations are inviolable, how- 


ever they may decide to behave 
within their frontiers, provided 
that they do not misbehave 
across them. 

Events in Iraq and Yugoslavia 
have prompted the emergence of 
a faltering international consen- 
sus on acceptable behavior, al- 
though there are already signs of 
a cultural fault tine developing 
between fast-growing Asia and 
the mature West over the 
amount of harshness permissible 
in government. 

So. is toe coming of inter- 
national government now logi- 
cally unstoppable? 

Yes, but it will advance with 
much difficulty, because two of 
the three ingredients of the rise 
of the nation-state — identity 
and legitimacy — are still miss- 
ing at the higher level. While 
the principle of noninterference 
in the affairs of nation-states 
may be weakening, the willing- 
ness of people to die to impose 
toe world's standards is weak- 
ening. People must still look 
to the nation-state for their 
military security. 

Meanwhile, toe nation-state 
has acquired a perverse new eco- 
nomic role. It used to be an en- 
gine of progress. Now, in the 
West at least, it is becoming a 
comforting symbol of toe past, 
something to hang on to against 
toe disturbing forces of change. . 

It is to the original definition 
of nation — “place of birth" — 
that people now turn, away from 
a world homogenized by interna- 
tional brands and Hows. 

These then are the ingredients 
of our disorientation. Suprana- 
tional government is needed but 
unwanted. Subnational identity 
is wistfully desired, but is too 
often little more than a costume 
parade. Nation-state govern- 
ment is still modi desired but is 
being undressed, as it were, from 
above and below. Well-meaning 
internationalists talk intermina- 
bly in smoke-filled rooms. 

Seething realists wish that 
conviction politics would return 
and show that this claimed need ' 
for a world order would vanish 
if only the older extroverts 
among toe nation-states could ... 
Walk tail again. 

Given some grave danger of 
war, which is not hard to imag- 
ine, those realists might yet be 
proved right, because toe nation- 
state remains the one entity that 
people are ready to die for. ' 

But it is just as plausible to 


predict a dispiriting phase of in- 
ternational ghcttoization in 
which outrages exist tide by side 
with civilized behavior, and. the 
media perpetually tnt-tnt and 
■ there is neither the motive nor 
the will in the international nou- 
commanity to crack down upon 
toe nastiness. .’ 

In such an era of leaderless 
despond, toe faint of suprana- 
tional government would slowly 
take hSd. 

It is interesting to note that 
the much vaunted “new world 
order" is floundering in matters 
of politics and morality but is 
taking root in toe economic 
sphere, which is, as fas been ex-, 
plained, where toe need for it is 
hardest to deny. 

The United Nations fas been 
discredited by Yugoslavia, but 
the General Agreement on Tar- 
iffs and Trade has been strength- 
ened. The political and institu- 
tional parts of the European 
Union are set for a phase of 
painful wrangling, but tbe ex- 
tremity intrusive rules system of 
its internal market has held up 
through recession. 

Even the political aspects of 
supranational government have 
something going for them. Au- 
thority above toe level of the 
nation-state paradoxically helps 
the amour prop re of smaller na- - 
tions and regions. Portugal holds 
more sway within toe European 
Union than it would outsideit 


The flag of Europe flies more 
often in Scotland* Catalonia, 
Rhdne-AJpes and Bavaria than it 
.does in London, Madrid, Paris 
and Bexim, precisely because it is 
& symbol of a counterweight to 
those old, aloof capitals. 

The tentative upshot of a& 
these thoughts Is that the nation- 
state is far from dead. It is still 
the main repository of loyalty 
and legitimacy. Asian nation- 
. statesare moving into the phase 
of high self-confidence that pio- 
neers of the nation-state knew in 
toe 19th .century. The birthrate of 
nations is particularly high, as the 
Russian empire dissolves and the 
newcomers experience the nor- 
mal posteokmial agony of poorly 
matched states and peoples. 

Nevertheless, the role of toe 
nation-state is evolving. Govern- 
ment will become a more strati- 
fied affair, with power, and 
a little identity, shifting up 
above national capitals — and 
identity and a little power shift- 
ing down below them. 

Westminster, Paris and Wash- 
ington wBl detest the sensation. 
Beijing and Moscow will adapt. 
Brussels and Bonn/ Berlin will 
smile knowingly. 

The write is editorial director of 
The Economist Intelligence Unit. 
This comment was adapted by The 
Hew York Times from a report on 
a conference at the Ditehley Foun- 
dations, in Oxfordshire, England. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1894: Spain Fights Anew *naimt Of Bela Kan and the 

PARK— A fighting spirit is ani- ■ 9 f ® new , Soci * list 

mating the Spaniards and th*=v 18 Wwrod by Rou- 

rtwaysat war. TfayfaJ? faulty SSvedSv 
mated with the Moon of Met o ^ Bu f a P est 1 * Eu- 
rocoo, and now they have begun ^ *** 

to fight into the people oTtfa 86 ™ r6 & DK K smccre - 

■^4* Army Halts Strike 

^^^pt^^ty because they are - (From our 

K tohaiiim cdam. Theyare testable New York edition;] The United 
wamonj ,and if the Spanish think States Army, acting on enters of 
they toII soon get the better of ftwident &o«*dL inkorer 
tten theynrenSikcn. HuUddphtts 

1919: Hungarian MEWSES’ 

PARIS — Tlie an Hungarian ™ w and 

ottatxHmfry.ig^ 


Bosnia, toe whole Yugoslav is- 
sue, has been a failure, by all of 
the powers. It is Pollyannaisb to 
be consoled just because toe war 
fas been kept from spreading. 
That most remain a concern, to 
■ be handled better. 

There has been too much noise 
about using force in Haiti, which 
won't fix what axis that benight- 
ed country, and too much blow- 
ing hard about what is in store 
for North Korea. 

The frustrations about not be- 
ing able to whip minor players 
into line do tarnish Washington's 
image, especially in its own eyes. 
It is not satisfying that nothing 
irreparable has been done on 
these fronts, but this is better 
than, disastrous plunges. Rwanda 
has to be considered an example 
of wfat lies alread in many places 
if the niriwon is encouraged that 
thc.aaoridcaa look after j,tsej£ and 
meed not bother to foresee and 
head off disaster. 

This is not a bad record. It is 
far from pezfecL The chance for 
inrozovmg it can be spofled if 
roly failures axe counted. Trou- 
bles averted are successes. 

© Flora Leris. 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1994 


Page 7 


opinion 


For the Post-Gold War Era 
He Offers a Novel Agenda 


%JimH<N^and 


YYT’ASHINGTON — Protecting 
the global environment and 


empowering women around the 
world are more than noble thoughts 
fw ’Rm With, a State Department : 
official. He wants than to become 
njqor objectives of US. foreign pol- 
icy under President BID CHnton. 
Now Mr. Wirth’s quest is about to 
burst into public view. 

The quest is to fashion a CHnton 
foreign policy agenda beyond Hxr 
cont ain m eat of communism. Amer- 
ica’s post-Cold War agenda, he says, 
must deal with the “unfamifiar diat 
Icnges” of a world imperiled not by 
Soviet expansionism bet by “re- 
source scarcities*' dial trigger social 
injustice and chaos. 

But for critics, who come from the 

ranks of centrist Democrats as well as' 
the Republican right, adopting Mr. 
Wirth’s ideas would twaV ff political 
correctness a guiding principle of 
US. foreign policy . 

Mr. Wirth, a former Democratic 
senator from Colorado and now the. 
undersecretary for global affairs at 
the State Department, laid oat the 
agenda in detail in a recent conver- 
sation with reporters at The Wash- 
ington Post and in a July 12 speech 
at the National Press Chib. 

He aired positions that he wiD be 
championing at a make-or-break 
event lor him, the Cairo Conference 
on Population and Development At 
the Sept 5- 12 conference, the Gimori 
admin is tration will seek internatio nal 
acceptance of a population control 

philosophy that ha« triggered hawfti 

denunciations by the Vatican. 

Mr. Worth’s positions on environ- 
ment, population and women's 
rights as driving forces in the new 
global politics amount to an alterna- 
tive foreign policy for President 
Clinton, who has been widely pillo- 
ried far ineptness abroad. 

Elected with a mandate fbr change 
the presided has shown signs of un- 
easiness with the traditional way in. 
winch Secretary of Stale Warren 
Christopher has run foreign policy. 
But Mr. Clinton has thns far bom 
unwilling to commit himself fuDy to a 
radical conceptual departure like the 
one Mr. Wirth urges. 

Mr. Wirth’s New Age foreign pol- 
icy strongly echoes the environmen- 
talist ideas dial Vice President A1 
Gore has advocated. But Mr. Gore 
has been careful not to show opera- 
tional support for Mr. Wirth in the 
Coloradan’s battles to get th** Qt ' f te 
Department to focus on eiwuw 
meat and population as dear na- 


tional security threats, admhustra- 
tkm insiders tefl me. 

“Resource scarcities are a mot 
cause of the violent conflicts that 
lave convulsed civO society is Rwan- 
da, Haiti and Chiapas” in Mexico, 
Mr. Wirth said in ius National Press 
Qnb speedulhese conflicts, he add- 
ed^ “offer a aim foreshadowing of 
the anarchy mat could' engulf more 
and more nations if we fail to acL” 

Mr. Clinton faces an immediate 
test in tins area as he weighs an 
American-led invasion of Haiti. 
More by drift than White House 
design* it is in a Third World basket- 
ed nation, ravaged by all the long- 
term evils that Mr Wirth warns 
against, that Mr. CKnton is being 
urged by has political and foreign 
policy advisers to demonstrate U-S. 
resolve through force. 

Freed from the Cold War con- 
frontation. that dominated the for- 



Shriver’s Flair and Daring 
Made This a Better World 

Bv Colman McCarthy 


iton could be drawn into making 
the Third World the focus of the 
energy and attention he invests in 
foreign affairs. Deep involvement in 
Haiti's problems could bring a 
Third Woridization of Clinton for- 
eign policy, enhancing Mr. Wirth's 
doctrine of “sustainable develop- 
ment” and “human security.” 

Mr. Wirth terms “the promotion of 
the social, political and econonnc 
ri ghts of women” as “extraordinarily 
important resources for growth and 
agents of change.” When I pressed 
him on how empowering women po- 
litically in other nations would serve 
VJS. foreign policy goals, he asserted 
that women’s groups usually fight for 
causes — protecting the environ- 
ment, reducing population pressures 
and resisting . — that in- 

crease global stability. 

From most others, snch an argu- 
ment mixing worthy but ethereal 
goals could have fallen flat. But Mr. 
Wirth is an unusually commanding 
and persnasive figure. He was wide- 
ly expected to become Mr. Omton’s . 
energy secretary but was passed 
over and given a completely new 
and shapeless portfolio at State. 

He has used the global affairs 
platform to fashion Wirth's World: 
the most intellectually challenging 
(and I think ultimately the most po- 
litically controversial) proposals 
coating out of the administration. 
That is tile risk you run when you 
grve a talented and determined poK- 
Hnm the time, Space and mandate 
to think up something new. 

The Washington Post 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Saddam Hasn’t Budged 

1 am writing on the anniversary of 
Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Ku- 
wait, which took place on Aug. 2, 
1990. Much has happened since, but 
vital facts remain: Saddam refuses 
to recognize the sovereignty and 
borders of Kuwait, and He is sol] 
keeping the 625 civilians whom his 
forces kidnapped from Kuwait. 

His painfully slow compliance 
with selected aspects of the UN reso- 
lutions is designed to hoodwink 
members of the United Nations into 
believing tint he is becoming a civi- 
lized statesman. His refusal to export 
limited amounts of cal, as permitted 
the UN, and the resultant haid- 
i to the Iraqi people is an attempt 
to Marfrmafl die world into releasing 
him from all constraints on oO ex- 
ports. He would be able to crush and 
subdue all opposition internally, then 
to apply his goals externally. 

FAISAL aLSABAH. 

Kuwait Information Center. 

London. 

^rse Ilian Hiroshima? 

The article on the Smithsonian 
Institution’s planned exhibit on the 
atnmir bombing of Hiroshima and 
Nagasaki ("Spin of Smithsonian’s 
Hiroshima Script Under Fire," July 
22, by Eugene L Meyer) quotes a 
historian as saying that the exhibit 
refers extensively “to the brutal na- 
ture of American strategic bombing, 
mid to Japanese casualties and suf- 


fering.” while saying little about 
Japanese aggression and atrocities. 

Allow me to say something about 
Japanese aggression and atrocities. 
The battle for the liberation of Ma- 
nila. which lasted from Feb. 3 to 
March 3, 1945, claimed 100.000 
lives. The city was first torched by 
the defending Japanese forces. Most 
of the renaming structures in the 
battle zone were then destroyed by 
the artillery of the liberating U.S. 
forces. Through those 28 days, the 
Japanese defenders preyed on Ma- 
nila’s defenseless civilians. 

The Smithsonian exhibit should 
include photographs of Manila mas- 
sacre scenes such as San Marcelino 
Church, Sl Paul's College, the Span- 
ish Consulate, the Red Cross Build- 
ing and more. In a city under Japa- 
nese control, uoncombatant residents 
suffered a fate certainly comparable 
to that at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. 

JUAN JOSE P. ROCHA. 

Manila. 

Don’tPmushAQ Artists 

As a concert p racist, 1 was dis- 
mayed to read in the Political Notes 
column of July 28 that the Senate had 
approved a bill that would cut the 
budget of the National Endowment 
for the Arts by $8 J rafflim. Why 
should serious artists and musicians 
— all those who have devoted their 
lives to the presentation of America’s 
cultural hen Inge and to the diffusion 
of beauty so essential to the soul — 
thus suffer the consequences of the 


dubious “performance” of a de- 
praved crank? Understandably. Ron 
Athey*s “artistry" — in which paper 
towels soaked with blood from an 
AIDS sufferer were hung over the 
beads of an audience — offended 
some senators’ sensibilities. Yet 
would it not be more intelligent to 
better control the way in which En- 
dowment money is distributed, be- 
ginning with guidelines to safeguard 
against automatic promotion of the 
superficially provocative, the philis- 
tine and the ideological? 

True artists, those who have ac- 
quired a sound technique and a mas- 
terly knowledge of tbeir craft, 
should be recognized. They are in 
dire need of public support! 

ERIC Le VAN. 

Miltlach. France. 

Points About Proliferation 

Regarding “ Nuclear Crisis Ex- 
tends Well Beyond Korea " f June 2 ” J: 

Contrary to the news report, next 
year’s conference of the parties to 
the 1968 treaty on the nonprolifera- 
tion of nu dear weapons will not 
consider whether the treaty is to be 
extended, but rather for bow long it 
will continue: indefinitely, or for a 
fixed period. Neither is the confer- 
ence entitled to alter the treaty, as 
asserted by the author. Amend- 
ments may be adopted only through 
a special procedure unrelated to the 
extension of the treaty. 

JOZEF GOLDBLAT. 

Geneva. 


W ASHINGTON — Of the nine 
Americans chosen by Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton to receive on Mon- 
day the Medal of Freedom — the 
nation’s highest civilian honor — 
the one whose public service and 
radical ideals have directly im- 
proved or comforted the most lives 
is Sargem Shriver. 

Consider some numbers. At least 
ID social programs he began in the 
Kennedy and Johnson administra- 

MEANWHILE 

lions — including Peace Corps, 
Head Stan, Legal Services. Job 
Corps. VISTA. Community Action. 
Upward Bound and Foster Grand- 
parents — are operating 30 years 
later in hundreds of US. cities and 
serving millions of citizens. 

One reason I can rattle off these 
programs is that I was on hand — 
Mr. Shriver s right hand, for awhile 
— about three decades ago when 
Congress began funding them. Ii bad 
an ample supply of liberals who be- 
lieved. like Mr. Shriver. that the best 
government is a caring government. 
Dare talk like thai in the House or 
Senate today and you risk being 
jeered by the Dole-Gmgrich-Gramin 
claque or invited on “Crossfire" to be 
shouted down by Patrick Buchanan. 

In the two years or so in the mid- 
1960s that l worked for Mr. Shriver 
— from lugging suitcases to lighter 
lifting that included looking up Teil- 
hard de Chardin quotes for speeches 
— I was too new to Washington to 
realize that he was an authentic rar- 
ity. He could inspire college stu- 
dents to look within and find their 
better selves, and express it by vol- 
unteering for Peaoe Corps or going 
to urban slums for VISTA. Nearly 
200.000 idealists have served in 
those programs. 

Politically. Mr, Shriver was an ear- 
ly decentralist: Funding would come 
from Washington but die disbursing 
of money for Head Start. Legal Ser- 
vices and the others was up to may- 
ors. city councils and governors. 

It is almost forgotten except when 
nostalgia overcomes the Shriver 
alumni club — a group of former 
aides that includes Bill Moyers, 
Frank MacJriewjcz, Charles Peters, 
Donald Dell — that in 1976 Mr. 
Shriver ran for president. Besides 
winning the Mississippi primary — 
contested though not exactly body — 
he recorded two memorable onlys: 
the only candidate regularly to give 
campaign speeches about family life 


and the effect of government pro- 
grams rat parents and children, and 
the only candidate to deliver a paper 
on “Rnigion and the Presidency." 

He pledged: “If I am elected presi- 
dent 1 shall establish a Council of 
Ethics Advisers, similar to the Coun- 
cil of Economic Advisers. Most presi- 
dential problems have ethical, not 
just financial, scientific, military or 
political dimensions. Frequently, the 
more important question is. ‘Should 
we do it?’ not ‘Out we do it?’ ” 

Mr. Shriver’s decade of govern- 
ment service — at Peace Corps and 
the old Office of Economic Oppor- 
tunity, which nurtured Head Start 
and the others — can be seen now as 
a period of limbering up for the 
equally enduring Special Olympics. 

Beginning in the early 1980s, Mr. 
Shriver internationalized the pro- 
gram — founded by Eunice Kenne- 
dy Shriver on the lawn of the cou- 
ple’s Maryland home — by 
establishing Special Olympics in 
more than 120 countries. It has be- 
come the largest sports program in 
the world, even if much of the sports 
world tends to ignore it because the 
mentally retarded in Special Olym- 
pics are not, well, athletes. 

That’s almost right, if by athletes 
you mean players who strike for more 
money, or hue agents to hustle en- 
dorsement deals, or brawl or scow] 
when they lose. The 940,000 Special 
Olympic athletes — some mildly re- 
tarded, some profoundly — who 
have taken to the field in the past 
quarter-century have been models of 
joyfulness, effort and fervor. 

It is more than a coincidence that 
those are the goals to which Mr. 
Shriver, now 78, has been pushing 
himself in the past four decades. At 
a Peace Corps reunion a few years 
back, he spoke of his philosophy of 
service: “The politics of life is per- 
sonal initiative, creativity, flair, a 
little daring. The politics of death is 
calculation, prudence, measured 
gestures. The politics of life is spon- 
taneity, grace, directness. The poli- 
tics of death is fear of youth. The 
politics of life is to trust the young to 
their own experiences." 

At Monday’s White House cere- 
monies, Mr. Shriver will be in stellar 
company with other Medal of Free- 
dom winners, including Herblock, 
Barbara Jordan, Dorothy Height, 
James Grant and Lane Kirkland. If 
that isn’t a group that has practiced 
the politics of life — “creativity, flair, 
a little daring” — which one has? 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


GENERAL IN EWS 


EUROPEAN 

TOPICS 

Proposed OrganTransplflnllALw 

Sparks Dispute in German Stale 

A proposed law on organ transplants has 
caused a stir in Germany’s Rbrndand-PalatL 
nale state. Under the draft law, backed by 
Rudolf Scharping, the state’s premier and the 
Social Democratic candidate for German 
chancellor, organs could be removed from the 
body erf anyone who died in the state — even 
tourists — unless the deceased had left specif- 
ic written instructions to the contrary. 

The proposal would reverse the emphasi s 
of current German law, under which organs’ 
may be removed only with the family’s dear 
penmssiem. 

Even physicians, who have complained for 
r foyarfea about the inadequate supplies of liv- 
ers, kidneys, hearts ana corneas for trans- 
plants, expressed doubts, according to the 
weekly Dcr Spiegel They said the proposed 
law migh t raise fears and reduce the number 
of donors. 

The proposal is on hold for now:. Christian 
Democrats in the state parliament blocked its 
implementation. A referendum is bang com- 
siaered. 

Around Europe 

Tbe number of deaths in Italy has exceeded 

the number of births for the first time smee 
1914. Figures for 1993 show that the fertility 
rate hasdropped to only 1-21 chfldren pet 


woman. That is die lowest in Europe, which 
has an average of 1.55. The trend, particularly 
marked in northern and central Italy, reflects 
the aging of die population and a desire to 
hunt family size, says the National Statistical 
Institute. Rit the Vatican newspaper, 1’Osser- 
vatore Romano, blames “selfishness” and “a 
sense of self-satisfaction” among Italians who 
regard divorce and abortion as “something 
natural." 


A Bavarian book has acknowledged that it 
often refuses to open accounts for blade Afri- 
cans. The daily Suddentsche Zdtung quoted 
an unnamed official at the Bayetischc Hy- 
potheken- & Wechsel-Bank AG as saying that 
the institution, known as Hypo-Bank, had a 
s tanding rule: “No accounts for blades.” A 
spokesman for the Munich-based bank, Hart- 
mut Pfeiffer, denied that. But lie acknowl- 
edged that bank officials had become “overly 
cautious” in dealing with blacks after some 
had overdrawn their accounts and then disap- 
peared. Such caution is not standard practice, 
(insists GOnther Ziegler, spokesman for the 
Bavarian Banking Association: “ B lac k s and 
whites should be treated equally.” 

It’s die easiest test they *8 ever take. The 
Belgian Defense Ministry wants to give 
across-the-board raises to enlisted men next 
month in order to make a career in the new 
alLvolimteer army more attractive. But under 
Belgian law, the soldiers' pay can be raised 
only if they pass an exam. So the army is 
distributing 85 questions — plus the right 
answers — to each soldier, ana, just in case,, 
offering courses on where to put the right 
answer. 

. . Brian Knowlton 


Robin Cook, English Crime Write* 
Who Had Cult Following, Dies at 63 


New York Times Sehitx 

Robin Cook, 63, an Em 
writer who won a toy* 1 
in* with the dark 
graphic crime novels he wrote 
Sr the pseudonym Iterek 

Raymond, has died m London, 
where he lived- 
The cause his death, which 
occurred on Saturday, was can- 
cer, according to Reuters. 

Mr. Coble’s first novel. 

Crust on Its Uppers, pu 
Iished in 1962 unda hisc^ 
name, grew put of Ins expen- 
* encesasayoung ro^^ 
belled against his middle-cms 
background and 
for gangsters from theEast £rid 
of London- That book and bis 
early novels, including 

2E jS of ihe stiff Upper 

Lip ” gained a cult following. 

fe-ZfgiiSGt- 

a S“iW«^>» rs,Suare/ ' WCrC 




written under his pseudonym, 
which he said be took to avoid 
coufusion between himself and 
another Robin Cook, the au- 
thor of “Coma,” “TenninaT 
and other books. 

Mr. Cook’s fiction grew out 
of his diverse experiences and 
associations with small- time 
criminals, dissidents and others 
who led unconventional lives. A 
sou of a textile magnate, he was 
bam in London in 1931 and 
named Robert William Arthur 
Cook. 

After attending Eton, be 
worked as a front for a gang- 
ster’s real-estate companies, 
and he combined writing with 
stints as apomographer and an 
organizer of illegal gambfing- 
He also drove a taxi wb3e try- 
ing tp earn a living as a writer. 

Francisco Raster, 58. a per- 
cussiomst and band leader who 
performed under tiie name 
Kakb ind was best known for 
his advocacy of Puerto Rican 


rhythms and song forms, died 
Saturday in Fort Worth, Texas, 
after a heart attack. 

Valerie Worth Bah&e, 60. a 
poet and novelist for young 
readers, died Sunday at her 
home in Clinton, New York. 
The cause was cancer, her fam- 
ily said. She was most widely 
known for her “small poems” 
for children, composed in sim- 
ple free verse. 


Mortar 'ffbonds 3 in Ulster 

Keuters 

BELFAST — Three soldiers 
were wounded Wednesday 
when suspected IRA guerrillas 
fired a mortar shell at a police 
and army base at Newtownha- 
mifeon in Northern Ireland, the 
police said. The IRA political 
inn, Shm Fein, recently reject- 
ed British-Irish .offers for it to 
join peace talks if it renounced 
violence. 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


A major U.S. fast-mooing consumer goods company which 
markets and sells more than 50 well-htoum international brands 
is looking for a 

GENERAL MANAGER TURRET 

The company has a fully fledged operation in Turkey, includ- 
ing a new factory, and a solid, high potential Management 
Team. 

The high calibre General Manager should have the following 
profile: 

Most have: 10-15 years of blue chip fast-moving consumer 

goods experience; 

strong leadership and management skills; 
strong financial skills; 
multi-country exposure. 

Desirable: hyper-inflation experience; 

government relations experience; 
business experience in or with Turkey. 

A very attractive base package, including all expatriate allo- 
wances, will be available. 

Please reply to IHT, Box No. D418 , 92521 Neuilly Cedex. France. 




WWF 




Senior International Management Opportunity 

DIRECTOR OF FUND RAISING 


Forming part of a small highly-motivated team the Director of Fund 
Raising will be responsible for developing the significant financial 
support available from individuals, trusts and foundations. 

WWF International is one of the world’s largest independent 
conservation organizations. The position will be based in the 
International Secretariat 30 kms from Geneva. 

The Ideal candidate will: 

• have 2 ! least 10 years high level experience in a senior 
management position: 

• have a record of high persorial achievement in tund raising in a 
ssr.foe industry or profession. 

• be a charismatic man or woman; 

• possess excellent pavers of communication and persuasion; 

• have a high degree of diplomacy and infercutturai skills; 

• have drive, initiative and be a strong team builder; 

■ have excellent English and at least one other major European 
language, preferably two; 

• tave a dedicated commitment to conservation. 

AppBeations including afiil CV and recent photograph should be 
sent before 2 September 1994 to: Director at Human Resources, 
WWF International, Avenue du Mont Blanc, CH-1196 Gland, 
Switzerland. Please no phone calls. 


Engineering 

INTERTEK, an international 
leader in providing temporary 
contract professionals to 
industry, has immediate part- 
time contract opportunities in 
the Southern Mediterranean, 
Mideast and Near East 
Nations, specifically Greece. 
Egypt. India and Pakistan Tor 
experienced Manufacturing 
and Quality Assurance 
professionals 

Ideal candidates will have 
experience in inspecting and 
surveying: materials, 

manufacturing processes and 
quality management systems 
Other contract Manufacturing 
Professionals worldwide are 
welcome to reply For 
immediate consideration, fax 
resume and references to 17031 
273-4124 or mail to-. 

Inch cape Testing 
Services/I ntertek 
9900 Main Street, Suite 500 
Fairfax, Virgin® 22031 USA 


£. I nehrape Tali or Serv ice}* 

" Mm 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSIHONS AVAILABLE 

LANGUAGE SCHOOL wfa 

dynoMic nw!f*f 
Hecton hr M foe poUiom. 

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EDUCATIONAL POSITIONS 


INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE 
1 OF HOSPITALITY 

ADMINISTRATION - BRIG 


university college programs in international 
HOTEL MANAGEMENT - A JOINT VENTURE WITH THE UtllVERSiTV OF 
MASSACHUSETTS USA 

For the next semesiers commencing in autumn 1994. the College ss 5ttkmg 
full-lims and part-time appointmenrs tor the Wiping positions: 

Lecturers: Personnel Mgt 

Tourism 
Business Law 

Canidates should ha ve a minimum cl 2 Master's Dsgiw wilh iiifcUy and ar 
teaching experience. 


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ina m 
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optionee 30 jean envence in 
proem, paver tn d twang 
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fa NY + 1-212-221 59M rum Co* 
dmoon Egnbfc 

SAUDI NATIONAL feeded .n fgip. 
Swe^U.S. Uimemlf O'Oduote AM 
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Free to howl For- (65) 73E 56U 


DO YOU HAVE A DEA13. Mowrki 

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ra* enhoncemert. creation of offxxd- 
mg copy and ttienairm par ercef- 
fenee. Arj lucia*yf cfeaT cMd ered 
an pariontnnee refcfed txao or i* 
n partapde Col +4* 89? 
gr bn +4i B92 664770, 
BtPlHBKHJ mOfBSKJNAl (BSE) 
r am ite n with E. Europe. » 

Aofch aid few Seedung ponwn 
•nth mt e m o wnd company, hp USA; 
P17) W-TOA. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


HUMAN BGKRWATTH 
a nonym H iwwl ntran ngh» c»- 
gcraonon that mondori & promfto 
turnon riefys waW«ll( »(fe if* W- 
lowng two tenor jurff patriae: 
ARM? reaKT OMSCTO* • tower- 
see research & ocfvococy on haiEtef a 

weapon to & horn ab BWBtf 

menu & opposunn croup; seek tx* on 
ptafuchon. croon & we e< femfewei; 
Mjpeme srall dnH wit* & etll 
reports, candod wd inwShgaWw, 
unrferofcf fad totBng. bperwice n 
hutnai rights fiefcf re* arch, m oritcnng 
the omc. trade, w both g orwriy 
dewed UN SffiENTATIVE to he 
the pnnopd uubspenen fa H8W to 
fie UN: condua wrerigohye mrsuarB 
{onuming ztt nor UN nekf opertoWs- 
Pawl to ad&es Get*roL«ed UN 
botoe. toqures wedfeni axnmn*»- 
eon dels, expenera cs to) othacste. 
Strong perwnto itaanc, wbstartw 
ejpenm « it* hutnai rights Md l 
tofinWvtfY wifh the UN. Send resumes, 
references & wnwg sanpte to: 

Dprut worn Hinnan Rights Wtodi. 
«5 Fifth Art., New Tort. NT 10017 


biternakaad Qnniaton 
oi Gains is lowreig fur a 
PRESS omen 

who should be a »ung and dyramc 
woman with a ur»cn ir, degree. She 
shoritj Se of Fngbdi mother krnguO with 
cn rjcrlrn hmwledij® ti French. 
German and' 1 ’? Spartth. should be ra- 
Citode ci WOrting under pressure on) 
Aw*3 he iite to We toso re 

owe oil e/r-ttml rr-vtnwhon. betafed 
uudemw. «lli a 'tee* pharu^ofii to 
be sent to 

'J - 1 IM7ft to FirUC'lr/, 
f 1 i'l I 


ATT9RMNT/ GUARD 

fnratel, bringud Engfsh/ 
. for ddl work induing rughs 
and weekend wadi on a rosier bant 
AitoroSai nmioiw*» reqrwod. 
Sdtryt 9>S? frano pnr month pkn 


rrenat, 


penJties. A p p faMont s hoirit ba 
lu mantled te fetomd 


4 roe Jeon 
{before dose 


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75724 Pais Cede* 15 
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SPUXA GROW RICH 
Join the tovog SeR Enwwrrrwi 
senator movement 8, earn SiODK com- 
mEsaa Mwwgen 8. fcyonto Deecton 
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a histonr of emning SVK per fear. 

Tetrtc-sasoo wtoaaJsn usa 

BY AUGUST 8, \m 

COMWIBI mr WANT® Export oil 
Compaq concerto wt»d» has locos - 
ento Ptafewjnto 2 flw" rrieody r> 
sened phe the owwi own motored 
reqwed to thow owner him to corrj 
out ample «o>d pracessn^ ariflbng 

S moao. Garina AdterMer let 
93 70 63MorFo*P3 70 71 03, 
mormgs 0B0D to 1000 « w u»» 
Mtto he wriw u»y reach to Graac. 
FREE-LANCE JOURNALIST MAJOR 
INTBINA'nOhW. ares. Cover news 
Obeut fashion »snds, fashion and tor- 
Ue mduaries. Mud have wcebto 
wtfiten English. Send resume. 


to PiArisher, Sorts 500, 6 Wed 
St. New York. NY 10001. Fme (712) 
6&72SV. 

GIKERAJ. POSmCWs"" 
WANTED 

BJROPEAN/ AUSTRALIAN wrth ejqse- 
nence m marketing red odrnnsfttoion, 
fnowfedg e of camptoen »eVj d«* 
le aging poirton worldwide from 
SejiL/Od. Contoct hto. C. Eganer, Td: 
<47-361215103, Fa. (42 2| 6D15165 
TO YEARS EXPERIENCE POUOE 
OFFICER 31 B ree d an French Eviera, 
seeb position as pnwrte semfirey, 
bodyguard, eH. fheri French, baton, 
foe bnfeh. Enioys sports and b free 

to tfa& FtereeSa CT 93 41 W 84 
WARM, PRETTY, BRIGHT 
Woman seeks pad fcoin hreaekee^ 
ieg position fa a busneanion too 
1 to mate a horns. USA Free <612} 


MOZAMBIQUE KJnaxfi mcfrnrbd 

busmen creTOOi foceang fa eon- 
ogemert txmnriufi re safes position 
fa company nknestod in the county. 
Td- 201^26-2403 ha 51fr£falt86 ife 


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seeks pnvrde seer etory/ co re cknotor 
podkon on coonxs boss. Free to 
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AMESICAN STOCKBROKER 


TenrJt/Engfcsh), to far 
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Rente seed fatti. Of ordchxo to 
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YOU SAW 
THIS AO. 

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MH-r«rfiil rrarim. 

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yuw nt niitittnii nr L\ in flip 

nut u.n mi a cm;? 





cry i ■ ' ' 1 p 


Fage8 


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! - 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1994 



HEALTH /SCIENCE 


Nicotine Is Addictive, FDA Panel Declares 



By Philip J. Hilts 

Nor York Tinta Service 


S ilver SPRING. Maryland —A 
federal advisory panel to the 
Food and Drug Administration 
has found that nicotine was ad- 
dictive and that it was the chief reason 
people smoke cigarettes. 

Of the nine panel members convened by 
Commisskmer David A. Kessler, eight 
said they agreed with (he surgeon gener- 
al's findings in 1988 that nicotine was 
addictive and that it was the substance in 
cigarettes that caused addiction. 

One member declined to vote on that 
question but later voted with the other 
eight on a question of whether nicotine “is 
likely to lead to addiction in the typical 
smoker." 

The panel's votes are a step in the 
FDA's investigation of whether to regu- 
late nicotine as a drug and took the agency 
farther than it has gone before in estab- 
lishing control over nicotine. 

A negative vote by the committee could 
have ended the investigation. When the 
investigation is completed. Dr. Kessler 
must decide whether to regulate nicotine 
and bow to do so. 

The decisions came after two days of 
testimony from experts on nicotine and 
addiction, some of whom told the panel 
that regularly smoking five cigarettes as 
day is enough to cause addiction in some 
people. 

Scientists speaking on behalf of the To- 
bacco Institute, the lobbying group for the 
largest tobacco companies, said they be- 
lieved that addiction was a term that 
should be reserved for intoxicating drugs, 
like heroin and cocaine. 

The chief witness for the tobacco com- 
anies at the hearing was Dr. Domenic 
'iraulo, a psychiatrist at Tufts University. 
Though he said he had never studied nico- 
tine addiction, his work in heroin, alcohol 
and cocaine abuse led him to believe that 
intoxication was the most important fea- 
ture of addictive drugs. 

But several expert witnesses, most of 
whom were academics with different 
views than the witnesses working on be- 
half of the tobacco industry, suggested 
gradually reducing the nicotine in ciga- 
rettes over 10 to 20 years to a nonaddicdve 
level. 

They proposed requiring tobacco com- 



Experis Rate Problem Substances 


Dr. Jack E. Henntngfietd of the National Institute on Drug Abuse 
and Dr. Neal L Benowitz of the Untversty of Cafiforma at San 
Francisco ranked six substances based on five problem areas. 


QaVStWW.fDQWcEfSBG 

wffiwfaswaf 8ywpwa&-: 


1 -Worst 

6-Losal serious 




iHenningfietd Ratings 1 

SUBStan 

wmdrttmi IWplQmwwnt Tolerance popandanca me* tendon 

ftJcoons 

3 4 

.3.... 

. . T . . 

. . 6 ■ 

Heroin 

2 3 

1 

2 

2 

Cocaine 

4 1 

4 

3 

3 

Alcohol 

1 3 

3 

4 

1 

Caffeine 

5 6 

5 

S 

6 

Marijuana 

6 5 

6 

6 

4 


th*iiufcstanc»'& tn human' : 
agaS i aada ^sgAndgi:^ .; ■'* 

Totwiabte'tto^ > 

substance tert&ded lb ,;<• . 

tocf8a^crtw^lor:^B^?h»-:' 
te*4 c#s 

. ■ y • : 

Dapmdettcei ftow t&fo&IfCL , ■ 




Benowitz Ratings 


BuWUnea WHMrewu I Wntou ewnt TUnnH OopdiKtonco MovtcaSon 


Ntootir* 

3* 

4 

* 4. 

1 . 

* ■ 

Heroin 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

Cocaine 

3' 

1 

1 

3 

3 

Alcohol 

1 

3 

4 

4 

1 

CaHetne 

4 

5 

3 

5 

5 

Marijuana 

5 

6 

S 

S 

4 


rata.tteptacecKag&ofj 
^flvertuatebaconvftv 
■ cfeperafehVfrB «a&»p $&&&&:' 
/their own need for tteaAetaaa*' 
and me-ctegra® tewWch the/ . . 
subetancew^toused^the; -A 
tacd^aMtanoetaeDtcttHsas 


"Equal ratrKW 


tiftm^aekVa^gf : 
cddrtBdedawaasttteBf; . 
adUktSonto^seaLmale^df ■ ■■ 
totorfoaiion & associated. . : 

flOraCSwi aw.JrlCIBBBw »»• 
personal ^octsOcaBictamagQ B-' ; 
substarcdmaydo,- 


is only somewhat effective in helping peo- 
ple quit heroin. 

• Only a few percent of smokers suc- 

ceed each year in quitting cigarettes, a rate 
CTtnflar to that for heroin addicts quitting 
their habits. • 

• Some regular users-of nicotine do not 
become addicted, just' as some regular 
users of heroin and other drugs do not. 

• Two-thirds of nicotine, heroin and 
cocaine users relapse soon after treatment 
starts, and more and more relapse until 
only a small percentage are still abstinent 
at the end of one year. 

• Cigarettes deliver more nicotine to 
the brain faster than any other method, 
including intravenous injection. 

Scientists at the meeting offered several 
recommendations to help the FDA decide 
how to regulate cigarettes. 

Dr. Kozlowski recommended that to- 
bacco companies be prohibited from char- 
acterizing cigarettes as “light” or “ultra- 
light” because the terms do not indicate 
bow much nicotine smokers receive. 

He and Dr. Benowitz presented studies 
showing that there was little or no rela- 
tionship between the government's offi- 
cial numbers for nicotine yield of a ciga- 
rette and the amount taken in by smokers. 

, As many as half of the smokers of tight 
cigarettes may be getting as much tar and 
nicotine as smokers of brands that have 


much higher tar and nicotine ratings. Dr. 
Kozlowski sai< 


The New Yak Tunes 


£ 


ponies to include nicotine that would al- 
low people to smoke 20 to 30 cigarettes a 
day without inhaling more than 5 milli- 
grams of nicotine. They said this was a 
level at which few if any people would be 
addicted. 

But scien Lists testifying on behalf of the 
tobacco industry said such a level would 
produce a cigarette similar to a low-nico- 
tine Philip Morris brand called Next, 
which was taken off the market because it 
was unpopular. 

The nine members of the panel the 
Drug Abuse Advisory Committee, most of 
whom are medical doctors, comprise a 
standing committee that regularly handles 
drug abuse questions for the agency. 

They were asked to respond to seven 
questions about the addictive properties 



The scientists who testified, including 
Dr. Lynn T. Kozlowski of Pennsylvania 
State University and Dr. Neal L. Benowitz 
of the University of California at San 
Francisco, presented studies showing that 
nicotine was s imilar to heroin anri Pfiramp 
in these ways: 

• Nicotine therapy using a patch is as 
effective in controlling withdrawal symp- 
toms as methadone is for heroin, but the 
nicotine patch is only somewhat effective 
in helping people quit, just as methadone 


said. 

This is because light and ultra-light cig- 
arettes achieve their lower tar and nicotine 
ratings primarily by using tiny, usually 
invisible holes in the filters to dilute the 
smoke inhaled by government-approved 
smoking machines. Human users com- 
monly block the holes, intentionally or 
not, and give themselves far higher doses. 

Testifying for the Tobacco Institute, Dr. 
Ciraulo bad said that the dregs be consid- 
ered addictive were those that were so 
pleasurable that they took “control of a 
person's Me, displacing other important 

thing s in life.” 

Dr. Kessler asked Dr. Ciraulo about 
people who were unable to quit smoking 
even “when that interferes with, messes up 
their lives so that they must face up to 


Dr. Ciraulo said those health risks for 
smokers were “so distant it’s not really 
motivating for them." 


Studies Cast Doubt on Benefits of Fish Oil 


By Jane E. Brody 

New font Tima Semes 


heart attack. Some preliminary research 
also indicates that fish oils may help to 




EW YORK — The words are big 
— eicesapentaenoic add and do- 
cosahexaenoic add — but the 
sales are even bigger, exceeding 
S45 million a year in the United States. 
These are the' scientific names of two 

E rominent fatty adds in fish oils, better 
□own as omega-3s, supplements of which 
have become hot items among die health 
consdous. 

Despite the popularity of fish oil cap- 
sules, most researchers in the field say this 
pill popping is scientifically unjustifiable 
and may even be dangerous. Furthermore, 
some of the early claims for benefits attrib- 
uted to fish oils have not yet been borne 
out. 

The enthusiasm for fish oils began with 
the observation that Greenland Eskimos, 
whose diet is rich in marine oils, rarely 
sufrer heart attacks or strokes caused by 
blood dots. Several effects of fish oils have 
been died as the probable explanation. 

First, the oils lower blood levels of artery- 
damaging fats called triglycerides. Elevated 
levels of these fats can increase the risk of a 


prevent a potentially fatal disruption in 
near! rhythm called ventricular fibrillation. 

But, most important, fish oils were 
found to have a potent antidotting effect. 
Since most heart attacks and strokes are 
caused by clots trying to squeeze through 
arteries narrowed by fatty deposits, any- 
thing that inhibits dotting would logically 
lower the risk. 

The claims for fish oil then went hog 
wild, with hints of benefits being turned 
into established facts. 

One was the suggestion that fish oils 
lower blood pressure. And indeed they do, 
in relatively large doses in people who have 
both high blood pressure and high blood 
cholesterol levels or atherosclerosis. 

Bui according to a recent review of 31 
studies involving 1,300 patients, in the ma- 
jority of people with hypertension, fish oils 
at practical doses have at best a very mod- 
est effect on blood pressure. 

More promising has been the association 
between fish oils and prevention or treat- 
ment of autoimmune diseases like lupus, 
kidney disease and rheumatoid arthritis. 

The Greenland Eskimos are reported to 


have a relatively low incidence of certain 
disorders that involve the immune system, 
including multiple sclerosis, asthma and 
psoriasis. 

Most of the studies have been done in 
laboratory animals that are prone to auto- 
immune diseases. But studies of patients 
with rheumatoid arthritis found fish ofl 
supplements (about six grams a day) can 
diminish morning stiffness and joint ten- 
derness. 


A LTHOUGH this may seem unre- 
lated, studies of chronic migraine 
sufferers who did not respond to 
other remedies showed signifi- 
cant relief associated with very large (20- 
gram) doses of fish oil supplements given 
every day. 

The anti-inflammatory effects of fish 
oils are believed to be responsible for the 
new finding that frequent consumption of 
fish helps to protect smokers from chronic 
obstructive pulmonary diseases, like 
chronic bronchitis and emphysema. 

According to the study of 8.960 current 
and former smokers, published in The 
New England Journal of Medicine, those 
who ate two and a half or more servings of 


fish each week halved their odds of devel- 
oping these lung diseases. There is also 
some preliminary evidence to suggest that 
fish oils may inhibit the spread of some 
cancers, particularly breast cancer. 

Hie omega-3 fatty adds are thought to 
inhibit proliferation of tumors by prevent- 
ing the formation of tumor-stimulating 
prostaglandins. In a study in mice pub- 
lished last November in. The Journal of the . 
National Cancer Institute, spread of hu- 
man breast cancer to the lungs was inhibit- 
ed in animals fed a diet rich in fish oils, but 
no such benefit was observed in mice fed 
primarily com pH, which is rich in the 
omega-6 fatty add, Hnoleic acid. 

Despite the suggested benefits of fish 
oils to the heart, no major health organiza- 
tion, including the American Heart Asso- 
ciation, recommends taking fish oil sup- 
plements outside of a well-designed 
research study. There are good reasons for 
their reluctance. 

The clot-inhibiting properties of fish oils 
have an unfortunate downside: they in- 
crease bleeding tendencies. In the Green- 
land Eskimos, the diet rich in fish oil 
appears to raise their risk of suffering usu- 
ally fatal hemorrhagic strokes. 


Odd Disorder Offers 
New Glues to Brain 


By Sandra Blakeslee 

New York Times Service 


Williams Syndrome A^txaahon and the 

sXSitote for Stu i^. 

Dr. Ursula BeUugL director of the 

*> _ _ ** *-■ 




EW YORK — At age 18, Wen- 
dy Verougstiuete had high am- 
bitions. “You are looking at a 
— — professional book writer ” she 
said cheerfully. “My bodes will be filled 
with drama, action mid excitement And 
everyone will want to read them. I am 
going to write books, page after page, 
stack after stack. Fm going to start an 
Monday.” 

Bui that Monday never came. 

Although she composes love song lyr- 
ics. has a rich, vocabulary and tells won- 
drous stories, Ms. Verougstraete has an 
L Q. of only 49. Sbecannot tie her shoes, 
set a table, cross the street alone or make 
rfiang ft for a quarter. Her reading, writ- 
ing and drawing skills are like those of a 
first-grader. Now 25, she lives in a group 
home for mentally retarded adults. 

Ms. Verougstraete has WBBams syn- 
drome, an enigmatic birth disorder 
caused by the loss of one copy of the 
gene that makes elastic, a protein that is 
the chief constituent of the body’s elastic 
fibers, and possibly by tbe loss of anoth- 
er gene or genes of unknown function 
that tie next to elastin on chromosome 7, 

The result of this snail genetic loss is 
far-reaching. There are severe malforma- 
tions throughout the brain and heart, yet 
the capacity for language is remarkably 
unaffected. If anything, language and 
sociability are enriched. 

Williams syndrome children, who . 
have distinctive rifin features, are ex- 
tremely social, verbal and adept at recog- 
nizing faces, but most cannot expect to 
live independent lives. 

Cognitive neuroscientists say Wil- 
liams syndrome, first described in 1961, 
presents an unparalleled opportunity to 
probe the deepest mysteries of the brain. 

What are the genetic origins of lan- 
guage and sociability? What do we mean 
by intelligence? Which genes determine 
the brain’s basic architecture, controlling 
bow it is wired during fetal devrfop- 
ment? How does a young child’s bram 
compensate for inborn deficits by rewir- 
ing itself in alternative circuits? And how 
do genes contribute to complex beha- 
viors such as personality? 

Williams syndrome may also help re- 
solve the huge debate m cognitive psy- 
chology over the nature of language, said 
Dr. Albert Galaburda, a neurologist- at 
Harvard University Medical School 

“Is it special from, the word go, under 
the control of special genes and located 
in special parts of the brain?” he said. 
f 'Or doesrr piggyback on general mental 
function and intel lige nce? WTTiia’ftis chil- 
dren suggest language is unique because, 
there is a genetic defect fffifnspares it” ' 


Stffidvc studies of WUlxams syndrome 

ago after a late-night phone call from 
Nancy Verougstraete, Wendy's motiier, 
who had just read a magpie aracteby 
Noam Chomdcy on the biological basis 

^-rronfyou to meet my 

Mrs. Verougstraete said, “She s retarded 

_ . J l n .miaci» I think VQO 



ine cmiu, 

was puzzled," Dr. Beflugt said m a recent 
interview. “She had a wry unffiwal pro- 
file. Her grammar was complex and 
without error. Her word use was nch, but 
zeneral cognition and problem solving 
wer e very Impaired. She had been placed 
in a school for the mentally retarded but 
her teachers did not know how w deal 

with her" . . . 

Williams syndrome occurs m I m ev- 
ery 20,000 births. Many of the children 
have elevated levels of calcium in their 
blood during infancy, which is thought 


Williams syndrome 
helps with questions of 
intelligence and the 
origins of language . 


to make them extremely cranky. All 


extremely 

have heart defects, typically a narrowing 
of the aorta or pulmonary arteries. 

WQfiams children have similar faces, 
with an upturned nose, wide mouth, full 
lips, small rfrin and puffiness around the 
eyes. Those with blue or green eyes have 
a prominent starburst pattern on their 
irises. Their voices are hotuse. All are 
mentally retarded on standard L Q. tests 
but to different degrees. Although some 
can attend regular classrooms, most re- 
quire special education. 

Williams childr en are typically late in 
. every aspect of development. Dr. Bellugi 
said, including language. But when 
grammar develops, often around age 4, 
she said, it- takes off with remarkable 
.speed. 


A .T -a meeting last week in La 
Jolla, California, the world's 
leading experts on Williams 
syndrome presented their latest 
explorations of the biological links be- 
tween genes and behavior. 

Efforts to forge such links in studies of 
other behavi orally complex disorders, 
such as schizophrenia ana manic depres- 
sion, have not been very successful. But 
Williams syndrome researchers say they 
have an advantage in knowing theexact 
locus of a genetic defect that results in a. 
remarkably consistent behavioral pro- 
file. The meeting was sponsored by the 


and valleys of- Williams syndrome, Dr. 
Befiugi and her colleagues abandoned 
standardized L Q. tests and .developed a 
battery "of experimental probes for spe- 
cific domains of intelligence. For the 
sake of comparisou, she gave the same 
tests to children with Down's syndrome 
matched fra: age, sex and L Q. 

- In general problem solving, children 
with Wilbams and Down’s syndrome are 
very sinrilar. die said. But in linguistic 


probes, the groups are very different. 
On vocabulary tests, Wui 


fUEarns chil- 


dren display a predilection for unusual 
words, Dr. Bellugi said. Asked to name 


as many animals as they can think of in 
one minute, they come up with creatures 
such as ibex, Quhaubua, saber-toothed 
tiger, weasel, crane and newt. Children 
with Down’s syndrome give simple ex- 
ampleslike dog, cat and mouse, she said. 

When Williams syndrome children tell 
stories, their voices come alive with dra- 
ma : and emotion. Dr. Bellugi said. 
Down's syndrome children tell simple 
stories without emotion. 


BRIDGE 


BOOKS 


By Alan Truscott 

I N tbe diagramed deal. South 
played six spades and re- 
ceived a club lead. This came 
very slowly, so he was sure that 
it was not a singleton. He bad to 
worry that East might hold a 
singleton and therefore won the 
first trick with the club king. 
East played the eight, which 
made it harder for West to ap- 
preciate what was happening. 

South led a spade toward the 
ten. West took his king and had 
to make a crucial play. The first 
trick had fooled him about the 
:'ub position so be returned a 
• rump. A heart would have 
been better. 

South overtook the spade ten 


with the jack, cashed the ace 
and queen, and thoughtfully 
threw a club and a diamond 
from the dummy. Four rounds 
of hearts followed, declarer- 


throwing two diamonds and the 
dub jack from the closed band. 


WATERGATE: 

Hie Corruption 'of Ameri- 
can Politics and tbe Fall of 
Richard Nixon 


to reach the ending at left be- 
low. 

Now South ruffed the heart 
nine, catching West in a criss- 
cross squeeze to make bis slam. 


By Fred Emery. 525 pages. $25. 
Times Books. 


Reviewed by 
Elizabeth Drew 


well as his enlightened domestic 
policy proposals. 

But it’s one thing to not want 
to kick a man at such a time; it's 
another to engage in, and en- 
courage, collective amnesia. 
This itself was a distortion. So. 
HI take Clinton up on his chal- 
lenge: HI look at the entirety of 
Nixon’s career if he'll read this 
book. 

The first corrective after 


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A T Richard Nixon’s funeral. 
President Bill Clinton ex- 
horted the nation: “May the 
day of judging President Nixon 
on anything less than bis entire 
life ana career come to a close.” 
President Nixon, Clinton said 


those days of misfired attempts 


almost in passing, “made mis- 
takes.’* Clinton's eulogy was 


WEST 


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west ted to*? the dub live. 


only raie attempt among hun- 
dreds in the days leading up to 
and including Nixon's funeral 
to put — dare we say the word? 
— Watergate into “perspec- 
tive.” In the plentiful commen- 
tary. oblique references were 
made to Nixon’s “dark side." 
We were reminded about his 
foreign policy achievements as 


to avoid speaking ill was the 
pubtication, in late May, of 
'The Haldanan Diaries: Inside 
the Nixon White House,” which 
took us right into the cave of 
resentments, paranoia, betray- 
al, anti-Semitism and major de- 
ception that was Nixon’s White 
House. 

Even if all erf Nixon's accom- 
plishments amounted to what 
his most enthusiastic boosters 
say, however, that doesn’t by 
any stretch of the imagination 
make the collection of crimes, 
abuses of power, threats to the 
Constitution and personal lib- 
erties that came to be called 
“Watergate" a sidebar, merely 


• Richard G Holbrooke, the 
U. S. ambassador to Germany, 
is reading "Diplomacy" by Hen- 
ry A. Kissinger. 

“One does not have to agree 
with every one of Dr. Kissin- 
ger’s conclusions to recognize 
that this book is of direct rele- 
vance to one of our most press- 
ing challenges: creating a stable 
international political frame- 
work in the post-Cold War 
world.” (Douglas Sutton, IH7T) 



“What marked out Nixon's 
people was that when they were 


thwarted by die FBI and the 
decided to act thera- 


CIA, they 
selves.” The obsession with 
Daniel EBsbiatg, leaker of tbe 
Pentagon papers, led to the 
most alarming of all the crimes 
— the fairing of fe break 
into Ellsbeig'sjpsydiiatrist’s of- 
fice and take EUsberg’s fife. 


one aspect of Nixon's presiden- 
cy 

Fred Emery's new book, 
“Watergate,” makes that clear. 
Written in conjunction with a 
five-part BBC series, Emery’s 
work is a compilation of much 
tiiat was known and some that 
is new about that period. Em- 
ery has written a densely de- 
tailed bat ultimately compel- 
ling book. The story is andhas 
always been more important 
than any specific detail, but the 


cumulative impact of the details 
is devastating. 

Emery shows that the origins 
of Watergate were earlier man 
usually thought — in Nixon’s 
reaction to his close election in 
1963 and his fear that be would 
be opposed by Edward M. Ken- 
nedy in 1 972, and in his anger at 
opponents of the Vietnam War. 

E mer y does point out that' 
the Kennedy administration 
and Lyndon Johnson had re- 
sorted to bu gging, but adds. 


Emery's book contains fresh 
details about this break-in. He 
suggests that Nixon and John 
. Ehr lich ma n, his chief domestic 
adviser, were aware of it ahead 
of time, and that, contrary to 
several reports that the raid 
came up empty, material was 
found and used. 


The book also adds new ma- 
terial about the Watergate 
break-in hsdf and the frantic 
hours after the burglary was 
discovered. 


. Where that are disputed ver- 
sions of what happened in these 
or other events, as in the deed- 
skm. to ask Attorney General 
Richard Ktemdieast to spang 


ESxabeOi Drew, whose book 
on the Clinton presidency will be 
polished in foe fall, wrote this 
for The Washington Post 


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• He also rives us fresh re- 
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the tone he set 

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sively that Nixon's efforts to see 
to it that his 1972 opponent was 
George McGovern — whom he 
rightly thought he could £ 
trounce — were instrumental in 
producing that result. But the 
book does demonstrate how 
hard Nixon tried to subvert the 
political system* using such . 
methods as generating fake- 
polls showing McGovern doing 
well in the tnal heats. 

But more important than the 
specific revelations is the book’s * 
overall effect — the hour-after- 1 
hour, con versa ti on -after-con- > 
versafion, picture of the presi- 
dent of the United States 
ru nnin g a c riminal conspiracy 
nght in the Oval Office. 



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THE TRIB INDEX- 1 16.27H 


Wortd ^ Index ©, composed ol 
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Saint- Gobain’s Expansive Choices 


Cutfyikd by Qv Siatf Fnm Oupaiches 

PARIS — Compegnie de Saint-Go- 
bain will probably expand its mam glass-, 
making business into Southeast Asia or 
Eastern Europe after the 5.63 billion 
French franc ($1 billion) sale of its paper 
and packaging operation, analysts said 

Wednesday. 

Analysts applauded the sale of the 
division to Jefferson Smurfit Group P LC 
and said the issue for Saint-Gobain now 
was whether to lake the benefit on its 
balance sheet by cutting interest costs or 
to use the money to expand its industrial 
glass business in emerging markets. 

Saint-Gobain declined to comment, 
saying it was too early to say, but ana- 
lysts reasoned the company would rah* 
the latter course. 

“My belief is that they’ll want to ex- 
pand their industrial materials busi- 
ness.'* said Alan Coates at Paribas Capi- 
tal Markets. “I ihinfc they certainly want 
to develop Asian business.” 


Jean- Louis Beffa, chairman of Saint- 
Gobain, has been signaling for several 
months that the company wanted to ex- 
pand in emerging markets. In April, it 
said it was building glass plants in Brazil 
and Chile, adding to its glass interests m 
Brazil and Argentina. 

At that lime, Mr. Beffa nominated Asia 
and Eastern Europe as the next targets. 

Analysts said investing in Asia would 
probably be expensive because there 
were no indusmal glass manufacturers 
of any note there, so Saint-Gobain would 
have build an entire operation. But they 
added that Asian expansion would prob- 
ably be Fruitful because of expectations 
for increased construction activity. 

Saint-Gobain and Jefferson Smurfrt, a 
and cardboard producer, said they 
to complete the transfer of the 
and packaging subsidiary. Cellu- 
lose du Pin, in early November. 

The sale ends Saint-Gobain - s 70-year 
involvement in paper and packaging, a 


sideline that has long irritated investors, 
analysis and traders said. 

Bui investors did not cheer the deal 
Wednesday. Saint-Gobain shares finished 
at 694 francs, down from 699 Tuesday. 

Jefferson Smurfit shares in LoodoD 
rose 22, to 396 pence ($6_5Gj. The acquisi- 
tion doubles the size oi Smurfit's Europe- 
an operations and moves into the top 10 
packaging companies in the world. 

Smurf it does not intend to restructure 
or shed jobs. Marc de la Fosse, the man- 
aging director of Smurfit-France, said 

Analysts said the timing of the acquisi- 
tion was ideal because it raised Smurfit's 
profile in the market at a potential boom 
time for the sector. Liner board prices in 
the United States are rocketing and are 
expected to rise further amid rising glob- 
al economic growth and demand. 

The transaction includes taking over 
debt at the Saint-Gobain unit, which the 
French parent assured Smurfit would 
not exceed 2.9 billion French francs. 

t Bloomberg. AFP) 


Tesco Knocks Out Sainsbury in Bid for Low 


Cemptkd by Our Staff Prom Dispatcher 

LONDON — Tesco P LC 
appeared to win the battle to 
buy WilHaxn Low PLC on 
Wednesday after it outbid J. 
Sainsbuiy PLC for the Scot- 
tish supermarket operator. 

Tesco raised its offer for 
William Low to £247.4 mil- 
360 

it 

s offer 


hon 


or 


($380 millionX 
pence a share, 18 
higher than 
last week. 

. Sainsbuiy said it would not 
top Tesco’s offer. Sainsbuiy, 
the largest food retailer in 
Britain, entered the fray last 


Thursday by offering £210 
milli on for Low. 

Low said it was “delighted” 
with Tesco's new cash offer 
and would consider making a 
formal recommendation to its 
shareholders. 

The skirmish between Brit- 
ain’s two biggest supermarket 
operators, however, has not 
been without its casualties. 
Tesco’s new offer is at a 60 
percent premium to its initial 
offer made on July 14 — a fact 
that has prompted some ana- 
lysts to claim a partial victory 
fen- Sainsbuiy. 


“Sains bury had no choice 
in making tbe offer, and they 
couldn't lose: If they bid an 
interesting price, they may 
have won. and if they didn't 
win they could ai leak make 
Tesco pay top dollar,” said 
Nick Bubb. a food retailing 
analyst at Morgan Stanley & 
Co. in London. 

The struggle has been a 
boon for William Low share- 
holders; the stock finished at 
359 Wednesday, up 23 from 
Tuesday and up from 169 on 
July 13, before it became a 
takeover target. 


Tesco shares closed 6 pence 
lower at 238, while Sainsbuiy 
shares finished unchanged at 
420. 

Some analysts said the Brit- 
ain’s supermarket chains 
would now focus their atten- 
tion on acquisitions abroad. 

Such takeovers appear to 
one of the ways for supermar- 
ket chains to safeguard prof- 
its, which have been severely 
eroded for over a year by a 
vicious price war between the 
groups. 

f Bloomberg, Reuters) 


U.S. Data Show 

Growth, but Fed 
Cites Slowing 


Compiled by (hr Stiff From Duparcha 

WASHINGTON — In the 
latest signs of a slowing econo- 
my. the government's chief eco- 
nomic forecasting gauge rose a 
modest 0.2 percent in June, but 
the Federal Reserve on 
Wednesday reported scattered 
indications of a slowdown in 
business activity. 

The Fed said in its latest sur- 
vey of economic conditions 
compiled from its 12 regional 
banks showed that the economy 
was continuing to expand “at a 
solid pace” but that a number 
of the banks had reported 
“scattered indications of some 
slowing or slight declines.” 

The Fed report, or the so- 
called Tan Book, noted a de- 
cline in housing construction in 
several districts hut said this 
weakness was offset somewhat 
by an improving performance 
in retail sales. 

Tbe economic outlook will be 
used by Fed officials when they 
meet Aug. 16 to consider 
whether to raise interest rales 
for a fifth time this year. Ana- 
lysts are split on what the Fed 
might do, with some contend- 
ing that the latest signs of eco- 
nomic slowdown will convince 
the Fed to bold off on further 

rate increases. 

But others said the Fed re- 
mained concerned about infla- 
tionary pressures and would act 


Time Warner Will Buy ATT Equipment for Cable 


■ . . O Inttnotioniji Herak> WTOUIB 

*- - - • — * • V«v amjas ; luia ».• . ,. " . - . ,*11 . . . - , 


The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — A unit of Tune 
Warner Inc. wiH purchase phone switch- 
es and network equipment from AT&T 
Corp., a major step toward offering local 
ie connections in places where Time 
r amer runs cable systems. 

The five-year agreement announced 
Wednesday is valued at several hundred 
milli on dollars, a large contract - for 


AT&T’s Network Systems division but 
not one of its largest. 

lime Warner, tbe second-largest 
American cable-system operator, said 
its first installation of phone equipment 
would be in Rochester. New York, 
where in May it reached an agreement to 
share connections with the local phone 
company. 

“This ought to demonstrate to anyone 
who wondered whether we were just 


posturing or serious about being in the 
phone business that we are going full 
force into it.” said Thomas Morrow, 
president of Time Warner Communica- 
tions, the telephone division of Time 
Warner Cable. 

But he said the installation of phone 
equipment in cable systems beyond 
Rochester will hinge on changes in state 
regulations. If rules change quickly. 
Time Warner will offer phone service in 


about 25 more cities by 1999. Mr. Mor- 
row said. 

New York is the only state where 
regulators have allowed cable systems 
and local phone companies to work out 
a way to connect competing systems. 

Time Warner’s arrangement with 
Rochester Telephone is expected to 
serve as a model for similar U.S. ven- 
tures. In Britain, cable-television sys- 
tems already provide phone service. 


a g ain to push rates higher be- 
cause of this. The new outlook 
noted that in some cases tighter 
labor markets- bad resulted in 
faster wage growth but said this 
trend was “concentrated only in 
a few skilled occupations'' and 
did not appear to be wide- 
spread. 

Meanwhile, the Commerce 
Department said that the 0.2 
percent rise in its index of lead- 
ing indicators followed an even 
more modest 0.1 percent May 
gain. The index did not move at 
all in April. 

In a third report, the govern- 
ment said that orders to U.S. 
factories rose for the fourth 
straight month in June, climb- 
ing 0.8 percent and matching 
the previous month's increase. 
The June advance nudged the 
index of leading economic indi- 
cators up to 10 1.5, its high since 
the government initiated the 
measurement in 1948. 

The index has now risen in 10 
of the last 1 ) months. 

Five of tbe 1 1 components of 
tbe index advanced, led by 
higher raw material prices and 
fewer weekly initial claims for 
unemployment insurance. Also, 
there were more unfilled orders 
for durable goods, more busi- 
ness orders for plant and equip- 
ment, and higher stock prices. 

On tbe negative side were 
smaller money supply, fewer 
building permits, a shorter av- 
erage work week. Taster busi- 
ness delivery times that usually 
.ire a sign of decreasing orders; 
a lower index of consumer ex- 
pectations and fewer factory or- 
ders for consumer goods. 

Wednesday’s report and oth- 
er recent government data sug- 
gest the economy is expanding 
at a moderate pace as consumer 
spending, which accounts for 
two-thirds of the nation’s eco- 
nomic activity, has slowed dra- 
matically. Consumer spending 
rose just 0.4 percent in June. 

(AP, Reuters) 


- 3 


*30 




INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 

Trying to Change Olivetti 


By John TagBabue r :; 

Ww York Tima Service 

1VREA, Italy — At business school, no- 
body told Cpnado Passcra ft might someday 
become this difficult 
Two years ago, Mr. Passera was given the 


provide 
Italy an< 



r ; not bad 

a profit since 1990, and over the -last three 
years it has recorded losses of more than $1 
billion. But Mr. Passera, chief executive of 
Olivetti, plans to break even by year-end. 

“It's been a painful and difficult process, 
but we've now succeeded in growing with 
fewer and fewer people,” said Mr. Passera, 
who has overseen much of Olivetti’s effort to 
cut 22,000 jobs since 1989, reducing the.work 
force by 40 percenL 

Mr. Passera is attempting what amounts to 
a make-over of Olivetti. He means to trans- 
form Olivetti from a company daat makes 
most of its money seffing compu ter hardware 
into an information technology company that 
within a few years would derive one-third or 
even half its revenue from computer services 
and telecommunications. 

Already, Olivetti has fanned outa lot of its 
computer manufacturing, including a deal 
with Digital Equipment Coup, freeing the 
company to concentrate more on designing, 
installing and rowintainmg computer net- 
works for big European customers such as 
Barclays Bank PLC. , 

And in recent months, Olivetti has signed a 


cations companies — including Bell Atlantic 
Com Pacific Telesis and General Motors 
Corp?s Hughes Network Systems amt — to 


wireless communications services in 
Italy and elsewhere in Europe. 

In expanding beyond computers, an indus- 
try bled in Europe by cutthroat price cutting 
and the region’s long recession, Olivetti must 
contend with bigger competitors that made 
such moves earlier, including Siemens NiX- 
dbrf and AT&T Corp.’s NCR computer divi- 
sion. 

The mainstay of OSvettfs strategy is a net- 
work of alhanoes, most with the goaiof putting 
Olivetti more squarely in the world of telecom- 
munications. Indeed, the move reflects the lat- 
est fag h jp" in Europe’s computer industry, 
where companies are following the American 
.example of helping their computer customers 
set up local orfong-distance networks capable 
of sending voice, data or images. 

Olivetti was one of the first to test the 
waters. In 1984, the company sold a 22 per- 
cent stake in its badness to AT&T for $260 
imUian- But the deal came “too early " ac- 
cording to Bruno Lamborghini, Olivetti’s se- 
mor vice president for corporate strategy. f 

The relationship soured in the late 1980s 
when AT&T proposed acquiring all of Oli- 
vetti and Mr. De Benedeth turned down the 
offer. 

Under Mr. Passera, Olivetti turned to an- 
other big partner. Digital Equipment, which 
acquired 10 percent of tbelialian company in 
1992 for about $300 million. Although tbe 
deal gave Olivetti access to Digital's techni- 
cally advanced Alpha microchip technology, 
so far Digital has sold far fewer Alpha-based 
through Olivetti than expected. 

. drive into tdccommunicaiioos in- 

See OUVETTl, Page 11 


Russians 

Still Find 
MMM Good 

Bloomberg Business New 

MOSCOW — Small inves- 
tors scrambled to buy shares in 
MMM, Russia’s largest invest- 
ment company, despite last 
week’s price collapse and a gov- 
ernment wanting that it would 
penalize the company if it did 
not open its books. 

MMM’s shares lost more 
than 99 percent of their value, 
to 950 rubles (46 cents), last 
week after the president, Sergei 
Mavrodi, said the company did 
not have funds to support the 
ever-increasing guaranteed 
buy-back price. 

On Moscow's commodity ex- 
change, MMM shares had 
jumped about 10 times from 
rock bottom and were trading 
in the range of 9,500 to 10,000 
Wednesday. 

About 4,000 small investors 
gathered outside MMM bead- 
quarters on Wednesday, and 
roughly two- thirds of them 
wanted to buy. The remainder 
were there to seU 

“1 paid more than 60,000 for 

rid of them,” said Olga Bsdi- 
mova, 33, an accountant 

“I bought these shares for 
3,000 rubles when everybody 
was panicking last week,” Igor 
Alexashenko said. “You can 
have them for 6,400.” 


CURRENCY 8k INTEREST RATES 


Cress RstM 


Aug. 3 

a JP. %F. /Ym . Ci- Pfeffin 


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Eurootirewncy Deposit* 

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bn 

Uf 

Source; Reuters, 




FROM GUINNESS FLIGHT V ^ 


% 




J? Usmre Martels SKmeramg Marten 

We believe investors should hold up to 10% 
of their international equin portlolios in the 
Emerging Markets - to secure exposure to some 
of the world's fastest growing economies. 

Guinness Flight's new Global Emerging 
Markets Fund offers a number of advantages: 

GOOD TIMING 

The recent correction in many of these 
markers (shown clearly in the graphs above) 
offers j qood opportunity to establish long term 
positions in these economies. 

ASSET ALLOCATION APPROACH 

Guinness Flight's particular approach to . 
managing a global emerging markets fund 
nil) be to emphasise fnitb a policy of 
wide diversification) asset allocation between 
markets. Initially, the fund will be 
weighted inwards the rapidly growing Asian 
markets. To minimise the problems of poor 
liquidity, exposure to embryonic markets 
uill be achieved principally through country 
funds or internationally traded privatisations. 
v,y fccii «*:. .•*£ ns* ten ss?* uj*' *w *m* is r? 

Rrtum Cudiku Flight Fund Managers iCucriui-'Vi Limited, Guinness Flight House. PC Bux 2SU. 

Si P^er Port Guernsey. GVI 3QH. Teb (4-1) 4S1 712176 Fax. {44) 4g| 712U6? 

Pleaw ier.d me acUib of the new Oumnw Flight Global Emerging Markets Fund. 


Sources Guinness Rajhi Oara stream 
utilities or similar stocks. 

FOCUS ON CURRENCY RISK 

Particular attention will also be paid to 
potential currency risks and opportunities, 
offered by these markets. 

Asset allocation and currency analysis are 
areas of proven expertise at Guinness Flight, as 
evidenced bv major Micropal Awards received 
in 1991. 1992 and 1993. 

launch discounts 

Until 30 September, 1994, there is no 
initial charge on the fund for investments 
of £30,000 or above. Investments of less 
Will receive a 1% discount, off the hind's 
normal initial charge of 5%, during this period. 

Return the coupon today, call our Investor 
Services Department on (44) 4SI 712176 or 
contact your Financial Adviser. 

GUINNESS FLIC HT 


GLOBAL EMERGING MARKETS FUND 


Title 


.Initial . 


. _iVa.ur. 


Acdm.- _ 


. Connin'. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1994 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


Merger News Keeps 
Wall Street on Edge 


Via AuoduMftvH 




■ Cat ^h f O»S^FnmDapatcha 

■ NEW YORK _ BluMhip 

t00 ^ mo ^ e St losses 
• Wednesday in a day that saw 
investors absorbed by a flurry 
of takeover bids, merger talk 
and earnings reports. 

The overall market was 
routed, however, .showing little 
.direction as action focused on 
individual stocks. Traders and 

U.S. Stock* 

analysts said Wall Street was 
; digesting its recent run-up 

, ahead of the closely watched 
report oa U.S. July payrolls 
: that is due Friday. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
crage slipped as much as 15.54 
, before regaining some ground 
to dose at 3,792.66, down 3.56 
1 points for the day. 

Advancing stocks led de- 
- din ers ! 1 to 9 on (he New York 
Stock Exchange, where 282.37 
million shares traded, down 
•from 294.73 million Tuesday. 

Drug and health-care compa- 
nies continued to post gains in 
the wake of American Home 
Products’ $8.5 billion hostile 
.’lad for American Cyan amid. 
-The offer, made late Tuesday, 


raised hopes that more mergers, 
and acquisitions in the industry, 
were coming. 

Schering-Plough, which ad- 
vanced 3% points Tuesday,: 
added jumped 1% to 67%; Up- 
john rose % to 32%. and 
Warner-Lambert, which surged 
4% Tuesday, powered ahead by 
4 to 72%. 




Dm* Jones Averages 

Om low uut ckg. 

378578 379055 378068 3792X6 —056 
Trans MUJt 1*17.85 T6Q1X6 161133 +0X1 
Un T90S5 19200 190.15 19100 +155 
Camp 1?14X1 1319.1 8 1312.17 13I&7B *275 


Standard ft Poor 1 * Indues 


Industrials 

Trow. 

uraum 

Finance 

SPSS 

spin 


tugb Low On Wr 
537.75 53134 537J1 +OSA 
39139 3S7J2 391J4 +138 

leun won vnxa +043 

4138 ej» 4127 +0J0 
MM MSI 461X5 +089 ; 
42748 4BM +013 




NYSE Indexi 


• 72%. • 

The two-year hiatus is '%? ££• 1 

r," said Samuel Isaly, port- Vl - i>-V ^ 


over,” said Samuel Isaly, port- 
folio manager of the SIO million 
Medical Research Investment 
Fund. “Mercers are in high gear 
once again because there are a 
variety of companies with an 
uncertain future.” 

Microsoft closed at 53%, up 
9/16. The software company 
was named the “Focus I” stock 
of the week and upgraded to 
“buy” from “above average” at; 
Merrill Lynch & Co. by analyst. 
Stephen McClellan. 

Stocks failed to rally along 
with Treasury bonds, which 
rose in late trading after major 
automakers reported weak July 
car sales. The yield on the 
ben chmar k 30-year bond fell to 
7 J8 percent from 7-40 percent. 
Tuesday. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg )• 


WOT LOW LOW C&B. 

Composite BUB 25X46 2$U3 4-043 

Industrials 31X59 31X40 31X43 +0X9 

Trmn. 34090 244. £3 247.92 +1,41 

UWV 21168 21X71 21X4B *029 

Hnonce 213X4 21X98 21X83 +042 


BimOPEAli FUTURES 
Metals 

setts* 

ALUMINUM OUOT Grate) 

Mlara nr hMcin 

SfW U3&0D 143X00 U41J0 1442JB 

grtaOrd 166X90 146400 147088 147100 

ws^sss^ tHM>enm) 

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Spat SUO 577X0 38288 S838D 

FOggJ SnM SHat »MB 000X0 

Miss per metric tan 
Spot 8MUM 4070X0 410000 611080 
SwB 419880 6H080 SWUB 4195X0 
TIB 

DeOara per metric Tan 

Spot 5WX00 381 UB SIMM 5120X0 

Patten per mite jc tap 

»Jt 937 s: 93050 94488 94588 

Forward «0OO 961X0 96730 968X0 


Wo* Law Last Settle Mi, 

fi" wus tojd +us 

fab T72J0 17150 T7200 T72XS +U0 

a? nws 1*956 Hus na +u? 

N.T. N.T. NT. 149X0 +£3 

Mpf N.T. N.T. KT. 16025 +Z80 

esLvoBifM.-PXlS. OHAM. 1 UM 


MBNT CRUDE OIL (IPS) ’ * I 

UX. rlnl a ri i Per bon U Pt m uooba fete 

& jg as as sk=k 

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Jg RS ' 17 JB —0X4 

Pob 17X2 17 JB 17JQ 17X4 —005 

Mr T7JS 17X6 TO* T7X5 — SS 

Apr 17X4 1754 17X2 17M — OTO 

jS Sfi H- 55 IZ- 57 l ™ ~ aa 

T7M 1750 T75J ' I7J9 —8X1 

■Hr N.T. . NT. ' NT. 17X8 —0X2 

A»* NT. NT. NT. 17X7 -SB 

EM. vMwm: 40738. Open tat. MQXS3 


Scott Paper Cuts 2,200 More Jobs 

Durr mtr PITTA TRfliteral — ScOU PaPCT Co. disdOSI 


or rautngns m Its previously aiuw^ ,*V“ S' * 

the 1993 woddwide lotaL The canpany 
reduce capacity at certain older, higt+cost P^^^ 1 ^_ tI c e t v 
The company said it wanted to complex 

prewous plan called for 8^00 job cots over three years. 

Qiase WiD Acquire Mortgage Group 

NEW YORK (Combined Dispatches) —A rndt of Chare Maa- 
hatran janfc wfli acquire American Re s idential Hoki^g Corp. for 




NYSE Most Actives 


Vat Hob Law 


A Cvan 
■ToWACT. 

• EWCAuto 
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NASDAQ Indexes 

Hfgb Law Lari aw. 

CorrrpaiUo T25M 72X92 72U5 — 0J3 

mdu*«afct 727X9 723X7 726.14 — 2.M 

Banks 76975 768X6 789.17 +OM 

Insuran 91XX4 W7.18 906.62 + 21.19 

RnatCO 944.0 W3J4 944X2 +071 

Ttaw 73263 726X1 73X63 +4X6 

AMEX Stock Index 

HW Uv Lad Ow 
440X1 439X3 44059 +085 


Jones Bond A 


WltlffltWs 
10 IndHtrfaJs 


NASDAQ Most Actives iivse »Nary 


Dollar Slips on Fears 
Of Weakness in Jobs 


snewBvs 

NewDNk 

Amgati 

AntftasM 

MJcsfl* 

mo 

SioTcG 

IDBCmi 

Trimea 

Sequnt 

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•Skvscion 


Bloomberg Businas News 

' NEW YORK — The doUar 
skidded a notch against most 
major currencies Wednesday 
'amid speculation that Friday’s 
employment repon will show 
. that the economy is not growing 
fast enough to prompt the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board to raise in- 
terest rates. 

The U.S. currency started its 
decline after the Commerce De- 

Forolgn Exchange 

partment said the index of lead- 
ing economic indicators rose 
slightly more than expected in 
June, confirming the notion 
among many traders ib.it the 
economy is growing more mod- 
estly now. 

“This is about what people 
expected,” said Earl Johnson, 
foreign-exchange adviser at Har- 
ris Trust & Savings Bank in Chi- 
cago. “It’s nothing to trade on.” 
The dollar closed at 1.5757 
Deutsche marks, down from 
1.5825 DM on Tuesday. It 
slipped marginally to 100.275 
yen from 100.340 yen. 


Mr. Johnson said people 
were waiting to see the UiL 
employment report on Friday 
for more dues about whether 
the U.S. economy was growing 
fast enough to prompt the Fed' 
to raise rates. 

“The leading indicators were 
a tick away from expectations, 
so they didn't matter much,” 
said Jerry Egan, director of for-, 
eign exchange at MTB Bank. 
“The employment report is 
what matters to the Fed.” 

The Fed has raised interest 
rates four times this year. Trad- 
ers suspect the Fed will post- 
pone a fifth increase if the em- 
ployment report shows the pace 
of growth is slowing. The Fed's 
policy-making Open Market 
Committee will meet Aug. 16. 

The dollar also fell to 1.3320 
Swiss francs from 1 J375 francs 
and to 5.3878 French francs 
from 5.4080. The pound rose to 
$1.5427 from $15355. 

Tlie U.S. currency turned up- 
ward slightly in London as con- 
cern about poor U.S.-Japanese 
trade relations faded. 


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Ttfnl issues 
NewKteru 
New LOWS 


AMEX Diary 


Decreied 
Uncha n ged 
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NewHKko 
New Laws 


6684 

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NASDAQ Diary 


28237 3096 
14510 2025 
76338 309J6 


Unrtwnwed 

Total issues 5DC 

NewHUfa } 

New Lows 9 

Spot Commo dl t iWB 

CommoOty Today 

Aluminum, lb 0X51 

Copper ele ct! UH L lb L14 

Iron FOB. ten 21100 

Lead. Uj 033 

54tver.ti"Oy oz £210 

Steel {ktop), tan 119X7 

Tin. tb 3X845 

Zinc lb 0X675 


Financial 

HM Low am Chaw 

S-MOMTH STERLING CL1FFG1 

88*899- *8 Dt 198 0C2 

- 99P 94X1 94.14 94.18 —0X3 

0»C 9151 9138 93X3 Uncb. 

Mar 9253 92JM 92X6 +UJ2 

S WXB 92JB 92X0 +833 

93X9 91X8 92X1 +IUM 

,EMC «U> 91X9 91 JO 

; tikr 7151 91X5 91X4 +ftW 

Jm 91 JO 9TXI 91 JS +033 

5«P 91.17 71.11 91.12 +082 

Pee 7097 9089 9892 +0^3 

, Mar 9082 >079 70X1 +QX& 

JH 9072 7849 9070 + 0X6 

E*t. volume: 84778. Open int- 582X44. 

. 3-MONTM BURODOUAU tUFFE> 
ti Milan* pis w no pet 
S8P 9452 9452 9451 —054 

oec N.T. NT. 94JS —037 

Ihr NT. NT. 94X2 —006 

7rn NT. NT. 9X71 —006 

SOP NT. NT. 93X5 —0X5 

est. volume: 342. Open mt4 A744. 

, S4MONTH EUROMARKS OUrFEI 
DM1 mBBOT - Pis e» Ml pa 
SOP 95.15 95.13 95.15 UncfL 

Dec 9i« 9537 95X9 — O01 

MOT 9492 MXB WO —a 01 

JOT 94X6 94X1 94X4 +081 

SOT 94JB 94X5 9438 +0X2 

DOC 94.14 9437 94J19 +BflJ 

MOT 93X9 93X6 93X9 + 8D3 

JOT 93J2 93X4 9171 +0JM 

SOT 9151 93X9 93X1 +002 

Dee 9129 9127 9338 +0JD 

MOT 7112 9110 9115 +O0S 

JOT 9100 92J0 9100 +0X4 

Est volume: 64X1 7. Open mtr 771896. 

BSSaraSKSSP 

SOT 94X7 94X3 94X4 UncfL 

Dec 94X2 9426 9427 —0X3 

MOT 94J2 94X8 94X8 -0X2 

JOT 9190 93X6 93X6 —062 

SeP 93X9 91X4 93X7 Unch. 

Dec 9141 9138 93X0 +O0I , 

tear 9121 933) 9321 +BJ1 1 

JOT saw 9380 9107 —081 

Bet. volume: 29800 open tnt: 182X24 
• LONG GILT OLIFFE) 

00888 - pie A 3OT8S of 118 pet 
Sep KO-Z7 102-22 103-06 UncfL 

DflC NT. NT. W2-22 —(KB 

. e*. volume: 60X26. Ooen ML: U8.12L 

itS ma?g^» R i?MS ,T mtw cu ™ 

SOT 9418 9192 9409 +8X3 

Dec 93X5 93X9 9140 +S£ 

’ Est volume: 91254 Open kit: 187,161 

F RANCH GOV. BONDS (MATIP) ■ 
frMlMI-pClOf W pa 
SOT 11408 117X6 117-90 — 8.14 

DtC 117.16 11476 1T7X2 — 410 

tear 114X4 11416 116X0 -Q2S 

.JOT NT. N.T. 11552 —0X0 


Stock Indexes 

. Hteb Late Cte» OMN 

FTJEMflJFFD 
Q3 pvMnpiM 

SOT 21840 31440 STTSjO — IX 

BK 3T88A 31850 3UBX —75 

Est volume: 8,M>. Open hit: 4060a 




An rtx» 211380 2127X0 —580 

Sw 213*50 2123X8 214088 Unch. 

D«J -. NT. NT. NT. Unch. 

Doc 2157X0 215450 2169X0 Uncb. 

Mar 7182X0 2182X6 ZT96JB Unch. 

Est volume: lMC.Ooan MU 62758. 

. S ource s: J Aatff, Associated Ptess, 


900 10-15 
7-29 8-1 I 

8-2 8-10 
8*10 806 j 


IRREGULAR 

: SS 

•MFS Strat Inc A _ X65 

Snumord strpe _ X4 

CORRECTION 

Ca rnival Cx> .U 

cwTodUm Oates. 

Womood Swmnc 

Inc .13 

Cl arif y h »i nnme of comp o ay. 

VEA8EPD 

LFBQP , XO 

INITIAL 

amljrmm _ xa 

Hanna MAn _ .125 

MartMortettoMM Z .n 

INCREASED 

[ciareor Inc Q .1575 


811 822 
817 812 
81 800 


- MCDaoalO&Cp Inv a xe 

US Heattticare Q XI 

US fte ot tf m re B Q .189 

STOCK SPLIT 
NeweM Co 2 ter 1 split 

SPECIAL 

Menan PMTrCPSer _ X0 

REDUCED 

I nil R ee e ar c n Dtv q jobs 

REGULAR 

Q .xiS 

D ’3 

HaroMHanrlnd a .M 


1814 WOt 
817. 81 
817 *04 


I*. 1 . 11552 — 420 

Est volume: U7J75L Open bit: 137X15. HrtteTOlrSflec 

- IE Indus 

Industrials Kin 

HM Lorn Last settle Ofoe 
GASOIL Cl PE) PECO Enerov 

OS. OTilon per metric iHHotseflW tarn .PMirxxFd 

An 162X0 16 150 M2xe 162X0 Unch. SW Water Co 

SOT 166X0 164X0 Us£! 1M5D +0^ UW Cities Go* 

Oct 16850 16475 76425 16425 +L2S - - 

Nov 170X0 149.25 T7BX0 T7UX0 +1X0 ^^PANtP PCTT 1 

Dec 17150 T70X0 17150 171X5 +050 [v ** -6 *™ m W " r 


819 9+ 

811 8+ . 

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841 fN 
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8M 187 

812 831 
89 181 

1812 10-27 
815 81 . 

81 .-815 
84S 81 

Ml P30: 
834 831 

830 1829. 

831 815 


Germany Seeks EU Compromise on World Trade Pact 


Conqtilcd br Our Staff From Dtspatdia 

BRUSSELS — Germany will try to set- 
tle a European Union power struggle and 
enable the bloc to ratify the recent world 
trade accord by getting EU member states 
to agree on a code of conduct on dealings 
with the new World Trade Organization, 
an EU source said Wednesday. 

The plan, due this month, is an attempt 
by Germany to end a dispute about wheth- 
er member states should control decision- 
making on new trade areas such as ser- 
vices, intellectual property and the 


environment, or whether such decisions 
should remain with the European Com- 
mission, the EU executive agency that tra- 
ditionally has handled tradepohey. 

Tbe dispute has stalled EU ratification 
of the trade accord and threatens to hold 
up^the planned January start-up of the 

“Germany wants member states to send 
in detailed comments on the code of con- 
duct text,” the source said. “It will then 
produce a detailed text in mid-August." 

In Washington, meanwhile, the Senate 


Finance Committee on Tuesday approved 
legislation for the expanded General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, a big step 
toward ensuring American ratification of 
the trade accord. 

But the committee created a problem for 
the administration by rejecting the White 
House’s request for a renewal of so-called 
fast-track authority. Thatjmovision allows _ 
a president to negotiate trade agreements 
and submit them to Congress for expedit- 
ed consideration with no amendments al- 
lowed. (Reuters, NYT) 


OVvUi fffraaiwij Ufb wmy innw — » __ 

rhm» Manhattan Mortgage Holdings wifl seek to acquire all 
the outstanding common mares of American Residential at 
S28-25 a sharemrough a tender offer. 

Fred Koons, head of - Chaser* mortgage urnt, said tot the 
purchase would generate cost savings of $25 million, in iw- 
Amcrican Residential, based m La Jolla, California, sixdahzes 

in residential mortgages, with a loan portfolio of about $ 1 5 billion. 
• AEG AG, a Daimler-Benz subsidiaiy, Wd $10 a share, or $265 

milHnn 1 for Elcctrocom Automation Inc^ see kin g to strengthen its 
already dominant position in the postal automation cquipmat 
industry. News of the bid sent Electrocom shares surging S3.625 
to $9.75 on the New York Stock Exchange. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 

Viacom and TQ in Merger Talks 

NEW YORK (Reuter)— Viacom Inc^ the e nt e r tai nm ent and 
communications company, said Wednesday that its executives 
xmt Tele-Communications Inc. had continued talks started 

- mon ths ago onavarietyof possible business ventures but declined 
to details. 

“No decisions have been made, and any discussion would be 
premature,” a Viacom spokesman said. 

The spokesman refused to comment on a report the companies 
were near a deal to merge some of their operations, settle an 
antitrust law suit and sell Viacom’s Madison Square Garden 

- businesses to Tele-Communications. 

QVC Will Consider a Stock Buyback 

WEST CHESTER, Pennsylvania (Reuters) — The board of 
QVC Inc. is expected to consider launching a stock buyback or 
adopting a rights offering in reaction to a $44-a-share cash bid 
: from Comcast Corp. and liberty Media, a company spokesman 
said Wednesday. 

“Everything mat is conceivable is open for discussion, including a 
stock buyback.” said WHfiarn CosteOo, QVC executive vice presi- 
dent and chief financial officer. Tm not ruling out anything.” 
QVC put itsidf in play when it agreed to a merger with CBS Inc. 
in July. The merger was scrapped when Comcast made its origiaal 
bid for QVC. 

A Comcast executive declined comment on the status of its bid, 
which was sweetened when Comcast was joined by liberty Media 
to make an aD-cadt offer for the cable television retailer. . 

Dow G>rniiig Setfles Implant Cases 

HOUSTON (Bloombcig) — Dow Coming Inc. settled 18 
sOicone breast-inqilant lawsuits in Houston as jury selection 
began in two of the cases, & plaintiffs’ attorney said. 

Lawyers for both tides declined to- discuss settlement terms. 
Richard Miihoff, who negotiated on behalf of two women, said 
“We’re very, way pleased.” - 

Dow Corning, a 50-50 joint venture of Dow Chemical Co. and 
Coining Ina, toed to stop the lawsuits from going to trial with a 
l ast-m inute appeal to die Texas Supreme Court But the state's high 
court will allow the cases involving tingle plain tiffs to prooeed. 

USAirlkuonBiidges on Wages 


WASHINGTON (AF) — - The unioo representing pilots at 
USAir offered the financially ailing arfinp. $750 million in wage 
concessions Wednesday in return for part ownership. 

The plan,' which could cost plots at USAir more than 20 
percent of their average $ 1 00 , 000 -a-year salaries, would not put 
-thccaoxer’semployccsm control a&did atimflar. moveat United 
Airlines. . _ 

“This is an offer to invest and not an-erffer to bay” said Peter 
Gauthier, head of . the Air Line Pilots Association executive 
council for USAir pilots. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


*8«» Fitro hm Aug- 3 


Amsterdam 

ABN Amro Hid 62.90 62X0 
'ACF Holding 44X0 _45 
Amon 101 jo isaio 

Ahold 47X0 47X0 

Akza Hotel 21950 21950 
AMEV 77X0 76X0 

B a te - W a M on w 39.16 39X0 
C5M 4950 6950 

DSM 14556 147X0 

Elsevier 16470 16490 

Fafcfcer 16-10 16-10 

GiJ+Brocaftcs 50X0 50 

HBG 29+50 300 

Helneken 23B50 23180 

HOOOTvem 77.98 7970 
Hunter DaushB 7850 74X8 
IHC CaKnd 41X0 41J11 
Inter Mwdcr 81 81 

Inn Nederland 8X20 KL40 
KLM _ 5480 SSJO 

K.NP BT 49 J8 41X0 

KPN 5080 50X0 

Nedlfcml 72X0 72.70 

OcxGrintcn 79 19.10 

POTIWOT 5X20 51X6 

PMItaB 5620 5i90 

Polygram 79X0 7950 

Rateco 11430 118X0 


Royal Dutch 

5tork mjv 4bxo 

Uni tew 196 I95.ro 

VanOmmeren 5450 5420 

1 VNU 147.90 18850 

I WotersIKhnw 120 118 


U.S. FUTURES 


Law Owe aw (MW I Hteh Low 


Opwi HOT Low Oote Qw OpJnt 


Clou Prev. 


■RWE 

Rlwmmetoll 

Scherino 

Stomera 

Thysson 

varto 

Veto 

VEW 

Vloo 

Volkswagen 

Walla 


451 449 

330 327 

959 90 
6955069330 
3T3 30550 
320 315 

52750526X0 I 
3S5 355 

492490X0 
52051450 
1033 1034 


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Brussels 

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1 CAR 
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1 Colruvt 
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Royal* Beiae 
Sac Gan Baww 
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*• AltknvHoM 
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I* Bar, Hypo B«k 424 «i. 

v Barvoraimte 44i 473 

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Enu-Gutrett 43X0 4X70 
HlfflamokJ 180 179 

KX3.P. 1050 10 .ro 

KTOium 123 755 

Metro 170 173 

Nokia 515 512 

PohtoW 73 73 

Rotojo «B 96 

Stockmann 220 715 

Hong Kong 

8k East Asia 32X0 
Camay Padflc 1X75 
Omni Kona 38.10 
OllnoUBMPwr *0X0 
Dalrr Form um 11X5 
hoot mm Dev U70 
Hang Sana Bank 55 
Henderson Land 4050 
HK Air Ena. 4670 
HK China Gas 14.70 
HK EMCtrlC 2X45 
HK Land _ 20.95 

HK Realty Trust 21 J5 
HSBCHokimos 95 
HK Sumo Hits 11X5 
HK Telecomm 1SJS 
HK Ferry T5JS 

Hutch mnrnpoa 35JU 
Hyson Dev 2X95 

Jardlne Math. 6150 
Jardlrw Str Hid 2975 
Kawtoon Motor 1650 
Mandarin Ortent 10X5 
1 Miramar Hotel 21X0 
Hew World Dev 25X5 
SHK Proas 51 

.Stekn X12 

Swire Poc A 6450 
Tal Cheung Prpi 1X55 
TVE 3X5 

WhorfHokl 31X0 

wtnoOnComn uxa 
wmsarlnd. 1155 


fj Johannesburg 

Ueci 2150 z 


-GEC 

Genl Acc 

.Glaxo 

GnmdMat 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

HIIHdown 

HSBCHWgs 

ICI 

inchcaoe 

Kingfisher 

LadDrake 

Land Sot 

LOTorte 

Losmo 

Legal Gen Grp 
UoydiBaik 
Motto Sp 
MEPC 
Hall Power 
NatWest 
NthWst Water 
Pnrsan 
P 40 
PIHdrtoton 
P awar G ew 
PrudenJtol 
RankOrg 
RecKItt CM 
Rea tom 
Retd Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Rolls Rover 
Roitimn (until 
ROTl Seal 

SalnstJurv 
Seal Newcas 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

State 

Smite Nephew 
Smite Paine B 
Smith (WH) 

Sun Alliance 

Tote & Lvte 

Tesca 

Thom EMI 

Tomkins 

TSBGrauo 

Unilever 

ura Biscuits 

Vodafone 

(War Loan 3<4 

Wellcome 

Whiteread 

Williams Htfas 

WlHteCorraon 

F.T.»Mex:2 


Dominion Test A 
Donahue A 
FCA ten 
MocMIltoiBI 
Nail Bk Canada 
Power Corp. 
Provlgo 
Quebec Tel 
Quetecor A 
QuetwcorB 
Teteatobe 
VMeofron 

KSSSS 1 ^ 


7 7 

1288 124* 
420 4U 
18* 18* 
8 * 8 * 
19* 19* 
6* 4 

19* 19* 
U* 17* 
.18 17* 
18* 18* 
12* 12* 
1918115 


HOTdetahaiikea 105 IDS 

Investor B 183 1B5 

Norsk H ydro 2575023750 
Procardia AF 118 119 


Seaton Seaton 
Mak Law 


Toronto 


Qaen HOT Law 


ScndvQtB 123 120 

SCA-A 1)9 US 

S-E BCTiken 4680 49.18 

Skandlo F 11B 121 

Starofca IXfl 162 

SKF 151 ill 

SteTO , 426 425 

Tref labors BF 108 JIB 

Volvo 8F 769 780 

^gSSS^SSi infM 


ill 119 *“«« Price 18* 17* 

I S 120 Awiteo Eaota 16* UH 

l» m AlrCanodo 7 6* 

UZ JH Alberta Enersy zi* 21 * 

U8 in ^ Borridi Res 30* am* 

jH !g BCE 46 45* 

151 151 Scotia 2S* 23* 


BC Gas 

BC Telecom 

Bramotea 

Brunswick 

CAE 

Cmpoev 

CJBC' _ 


15* 14* 
» 23* 
D26 076 
10 TO* 
7* 7* 

4X6 4X0 
38* 3d* 


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AneteAmer 
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Btwoor 9 

Butte* 

Da Beers 
DrlefonJeln 
Gencor 11 

GFSA 

Hormonv 25 

Htafweld Steel 37 

KiOOl 

Nedbank Grp 33 

Randtolteln 46 

Rusplal l 

SA Brews V 

Sf Helena 

Stool 21 

Western Date) 1 


2X30 2350 
120 118 
252 254 

3« 34 

9 JO 935 
47 NA. 
1U 11250 


44 677S 
11J5 11X0 

124 124 

2550 2X50 

3 


FifiEitem 
Previous :jis 


Madrid :| 

BBV 3155 3175 

Boo Central HOT. 2755 2770 

Banco Santander 3300 5390 

Banesto 1020 1015 

CEPSA 54 ; 3340 

Drooados 2200 7180 

Endesa 6240 6230 

Ercros m 188 

Iberdrola ftu 754 

ResOTl 4235 4275 

Tabocolera 3630 3820 

Telefonica 1055 1880 

K«W" ! “ 


Accor 
Air Lkrolde 
AfcaW Atateom 
JWa 

BOTcaire (Cle) 
BIC 
WP 

Bte/TBues 
Danone 
Carrefour 
CCF. 

C enti 
aarwura 
aments Franc 
Ciab teed 
Ert-Aauttolne 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Earn 
Havas 

I rrletal 

Lafaroe cwuee 
Lesrond 
Lyon. Eaux 
oreat (L'J 
L.VJMJL 
AAOtra+ktoiefle 
MtowllnB 
Moulinex 
Paribas 
Pechlney Inti 
Pernod- RTcard 
Pewoeat 
Plnautt Print 
Rodto t e c i Btew e 
HtePwtenc a 
R aft St. Louis 
Satwfl 
Saint Gobain 
S.ELB. 

SKGenerota 
Suez 

Thomson-CSF 
Taw 
UJLP. 

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Sydney 


cmocBon pacific 22 * 22 

Can Tire A 11 * 10* 

Cantor 20* 29 

if Cara 195 3X0 

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l-s 2-S a neotax B* W*' 

19X4 tomlnca 23V. S*. 

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BaugofnvHle 0 x 2 6» SteS** 21 * 21 * 

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cl^ 4^ ^4X5 JB °£ l 

Pastors Brew 1.14 1.12 jt 

Goodman FieW 1X5 1X5 .m riS - 

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'iS '13 i5J i«S 

HfintiPtium yea \7r l ^ ia9r I?z? Is* 


Grains 

WHEAT laOJJ OTWirauK-Mmui 
1ST* HE Sen 94 X34V. X3TA X33 
1X5 119 Dec 94 3X9 15t 147 

3X4)9 127 Mar 95 154V, 157 ID 

J54VJ 3.J6ttMov95 X4« W>, XM* 
X4W XII JulfS 1 U 133 131 

_ Dec 95 

ESLsatas 11 X 00 TOTk.K 6 es 1)J54 
Tue-sqpe nim 66 X03 UB 144 
WHEAT (XBOT) um Bwmxeeury. deem m 
XSVj iravi5ep« 1X3 3X6 1X2* 

140 112)5 Dec 94 150ft 1574* 149ft 

159ft 125 Mar M 151ft 153ft 3X1 

149ft 171 ft May 95 3X4 144 3X1* 

iS* 3JD,S “ 

_ . DecS 

Est. «Xei NA Tub's, lefts 6JM9 

Toe’s open Irt 38X18 OB 49 

CORN (CBOT) UB OTW ftOTeeem i 

JWW 2-MISotM 2.1» Xlift 2.15 
277 XI7 Dec 94 XI9*. 271ft 219 
2 X 2 ft 276 Mar95 2 J 8 ft 2 X 0 227* 

2XS 132 ft May 93 225 2361* 2J4M 

2 XSft 2J6ftJul}5 239 2 X 1 UK 

270Y, U9 ftp 95 24161 2X11* 2X1 ft 
XK1 235ft Dec 95 2X1 2X2* 1X1* 

- A** 

Estsatas 25X00 Tlw'vbXm 22X59 
Tue'saominl 214X65 oil MM 


9J7A4CT9S 1L54 11X3 11X4 
WLS7Moy9S 11 JB 1LS8 11X0 

ss® - ViS ia -i» 

1^96,1X3 ,1X5 


134 _ttin«N191 

3X7* -002* 34.128 


XSM-LOlft 8X31 
is* -oxoiC on 
135ft +0X0* 1X56 
142ft +0X0* 7 


1M1D6CM 1509 

aBM" 

1225 JW 93 1560 


3XJU-OD1 15X40 
3XK-0X2 17X30 

051 *-0X1* 4^89 
3Xlft-M2ft 366 
133 +041 386 

234 +8X1 I 

3X1 +0X1 1 


2.15*— QX2 ft 4X50 
2.19* — 0X2 OJXI7 
UBft — 6X2* 24.991 
2X5 -Old* 9X84 
X39ft-0X2 6X0) 

2X1*— 0X1 600 

242 -assn. *JK 
LSTft— flXSft 


1472 

MOS 

1419 

1517 

MM 

1465 

15B 

1495 

1964 


isa 

1595 

19(0 

1549 

1611 

HR 

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1998 

1615 


to irt 75X0BIW 113 
:JUKE (WHO UMto-onw 
16X5 SOT 94 9610 99 JO Men 
»Sltoy94 100X0 16275 100X0 
93X0 Jon 95 UDJ0 10530 103J8 
96J0MW95 TD7X0 109.16 107X0 
97X0 May 93 118X0 11030 110X0 
161X0 AX 95 11X08 11200 112X0 
105X0 Sep 95 • ■ 

U2X0 tov 95 
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POT^I^I 773 2% 

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30ft 29ft 
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Banco do Brasil 21X6 2L51 

Banesua 8X5 8XS 

Bradascs 8X2 4-55 

Brahma 264+9 250 

Cetnta 93 90X0 

Etatroteas 266 232 

Itoubanca 217X9J01X9 

Lleht 345 336 

PBfonooanema V5X0 15 

PHiroOra 125 127 

Sauza Cruz 6ia 6iw 

Teieoros 400 44.10 

Tetaifl 453 OS 

Uslmhos 1.17 1.16 

vale Rio Dace 1MX0 116 

Varta 106 98X0 

BevOTpa Me* : 43921 
P revie w 5 42167 


Tetasp 

Usiminas 


Tokyo 

AkdEiectr Ml 489 

Atoftl Ctiemlcal 773 776 

AsaM Glass 1220 IBS 
Sank of Tokyo 1530 1520 

1643 1440 

1740 1750 

Casio t25D 1J20 

Dal Nteean Print 1910 192b 
Datwa House 1508 1480 
Deheo Securities mm moo 
Ponoc 4600 4310 

Full Sank 
Rill PHOTO 
Fujitsu 
MWortrt 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 
Ita Yokodo 
Itochu 

>man Aldtnes 
Koiima 
Kortsal Power 
Kawasaki SJ**t 
Kirin Brewery 

Kubota 


LobtawCo 71 21 

^ Mackenzie 8ft 7ft 

teaona Inti A 57ft 58ft 

3 287XM A*cote Lent lift lift 

Morinme 23* 22ft 

teorklfts 9ft 9ft 

MalsonA 31ft 21ft 

- NomalndA 5* 5ft 

Norondo Inc 2SMi T4ft 

Naronda Forest lift lift 
Ml Me WuranEtOTW 16ft 15* 
SI Si NtTm Telecom 44ft 46 

42 >42 yyqce rp 135 % ws 

o»ww 19ft trti 

PpOTrtnA W. 3J0 

Placer Dome »ft 28ft 

Ppco Petrntavm 9* eft 
PWACorp 0X5 0X5 

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Roltmia« „ 78 n 

Rovrt B ank Can 28* 38M 

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7X7* 5X9 Nov 94 5X3 5*4 5X1 

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7X5 5*9*Mar9S 569 579 569 

7-Mft 575V. May 95 577 546 577 

7X6* 578* XX 95 SJ0 589 5J0 

594* 579 Alto 95 5X0 557 510 

579 578 Sot 95 577 530 577 

6JDM 578*Noy95 541* 587 5U 

JMM 

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Tue-iopenrt 122X01 
SOYBBAN MEAL (CBOT3 na+Mnu 
mxo 176X0AUO94 U4J0 17630 17190 

225 JSSSSS 152 mxo 

707X1 T75-Z0QCT94 171X0 17X90 17130 

TOX6 1 72X0 Dec 94 171X0 174X0 17140 

K7XQ 17130 Jem 95 172X6 175X0 172.10 

207.30 174X0 Mar 95 1700 17546 17X76 

207X0 llLXMay 95 17660 17640 I74JD 

284X0 17576 JdH5 17740 17940 176J0 

mx ]79xfi*n9i ijw tt9xo itsxo 

182X0 161 XI Sep 95 17X50 12940 11X60 

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3045 21X5 Aug 94 

2034 22.40 Sot 94 

29X4 22.1000 94 

TLB 22X0 Dec 94 

»X5 22XSJari« 

2SX0 2233 Mar 95 

26X5 22.93 May 95 

27XL 23X0JU19S 

2746 235 Aug 95 

2L7S 2L95SOTW 

2116 21100095 

23X0 22X0 Dec 95 

EsLocto 13X00 Tub's. stees 1SXH 
Tursopenmt UMt up IB 


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5X6 -0X0* 5X74 
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540 -041 17 

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1 74X0 -0J8 18X79 
17290 -0J0 9,939 
1^20 -020 30.929 
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17730 —0.10 1^02 
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BX5 -04S 16S8 
22X4 — 0X2 22X16 

23X4 -041 14X49 

2145 —041 37372 
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2141 —0X3 <278 

21X1 —8.90 1287 

73S3 1X97 

2132 +0X1 133 

3337 ,0X4 m 

2112 tOJV 1 
2342 +087 2 


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W-2S —295 11X36 
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18890 — 240 241 

10*35 —2X5 2X07 
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lgJO —030 8D4 

20645 -160 535 

104X0 —236 60S 

106JO —3X5 aid 

207X0 -020 327 

wj -«0 722 

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10170 —030 T22 

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5A Brews S7 JO 8775 

St Helena 45 4550 

Snsol _ 2U0 21 

vmternDeteJ m its 

tistsF.'m 5 ™ . 


London 


Abbey Nofl 
Allied Lyons 


198 191 

Anted Lyons iro 532 

Artawmtns z.fa 1 93 

ATSyll Grow 2JB 274 

AssbrlfFoods Ml Ml 

BAA 673 9X3 

BAe 5L1! 5.13 

Bar* Scot to« 1X5 1XSI 

BorckJVS W0 

Bass 5X5 5X9 

BAT 4X1 4x2 

BET U? !.» 

Blue ande 171 |2 d 

BOC Group 7.0 7X2 

Boats 5X3 5JD 

Baxter 4X1 «4 

BP 4.10 

Brit Airways * J1 «D 


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39&S0 390 

14013&50 
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506 4ft 
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1 Bril Gas M0 

Brit Sled 1 X 8 1 ^ 

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Kiaeckner Wctke 15715^ 


ijiidi "■ on 976 

Lufthansa ,,7 .aj«i3 

“AN 4**5 

MannesmaAD 

Metaiigeseji 7| 5 J 50 71 ’^9 

Muencn Pueck 2990 2«s 

Porsche ** »fS 

Prevvto) J7*,^45 

PWA 2472NS0 


BTP 

Cable wire 
Co dbunr 5ch 
Coradon 


3X9 MS 
455 4« 

4X2 

308 7X8 


476 4*6 

26721850 


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Comm l/ninn 5.S0 55» 1 

Court oukh 5X5 5.60 

ECC Group 3.95 3U] 

Enterprise Oil <36 4 37 1 

Eutolunnel 334 i 

F I Son 5 1*6 1.43 

Forle 3 38 238 


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Banco Conan 
Bostoal 

Benetton or 6UP 
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SM6 
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PrevOTs r&sx 

Stockholm 

Montreal ACA n 

Alcan Aluminum 35 ^ ML AkoA 631 

Bail Monlreal 24ft 26- y Astra A 173 

Bell Canada 6* 41ft Allas Copco 9M0 

Bqmbqrther B 19W Electrolux B TO 

Comclor 18 Er^ssan O* 

Cascade-, PA 7>> Esselte-A 1M 


7X5 8 

7 JO 7J0 
11X0 11X0 
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274 272 
132 132 
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5X0 5X0 
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176 37A 
1X9 150 



Cerebos 7X5 0. 

atv Dev. 7 JO 7 JO 

DBS 1150 11X0 

Fraser Heave 17.10 T7 
GenKnp I1M TXM 

GoWen Hoee PI 274 272 
How Par 132 132 

Hume Industries 8 595 
Inchcaoe 5X0 5X0 ! 

Keagd 1050 103U 

KLKWOng 176 370 
Lum Cnang 1X9 150 
Mawvun Bcrtto »XS 935 
OCBC farefen 1420 MJO 
OUB 655 4X0 

OUE 9 M0 

S e mb awa n g ML98 1130 
Stosnorlla 550 5J0 

51 me Darby 4J0 434 

SIAteretsn 1330 uxo 
S-pore Land 7X0 7X0 
S-core Press 16.10 16.10 
ShiBSteamAta <18 <12 
S pore Telecomm 150 3X8 
Siralts Trading 258 358 
UOB (omen 14.10 M 
UOL 227 2JT 

smite Times Ind. ; 2267J3 
Prevton : ficuo 


70 71 

631 628 

173 m 

9950 99 

393 394 

474 <35 

106 107 


Kyaccra 7re mo b* 3 ’' 1 zh* S 

Matsu Elec Inds 1730 172D' 

MOteuEiecWks 1150 113 JSSSSpot. 

Mttto*teWBk 2600 ana ISSftfefJ 1 * ^ 

Mm*tsWKase! 515 525 t+SSi^" 1 * AJJ * 

AfJtwWtod Elec 696 69 9 , ’fj! 

Mitsubishi hot 806 K9 v*™* Energy im ixs 

AAWtotbtstdCora 1180 1220 !«POT »;j8l6 

Mitsui ond CD B5a 854 Ptvvlew : 41908 

MIHutaaJi; 1040 1Q3 

MJtewnl 17S0 T750 ~~ _ ~ — 

NEC USD urn Zurich 

NGKirauiatan too idto au*, 

NKdw Securities 1280 HM0 S 

Kispen Koeoku TOO ito ™ 

647 M9 SiUgjtopB 5W ^ 

79,1 T ’ss Pi**v r0l n B ,S£ 3® 


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Plate 

Sanyo Elec 

SWtp 

SWnxnw 

SWnetsu Chetn 

Sony 

S umi to mo Bk 
5umltomoQiem 
Sunil Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
Toted Cora 
Totano Marine 
TakodaCbem 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tafcm Marine 
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790 7M Etektrow B 

WordiscountS 


960 939 
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Nippon oa 
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_ Nestle R lift he0 

2090 2080 Jgg y.jWj.gC 360 500 

5948 6000 3 °"? «w«oc 115 115 

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3W Skto. 2Jg 3130. 

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1230 UB5B* rR ,?S 

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1315 1330 • 


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J4V0 *17605 94 7100 73X7 7X16 73Jt 

700 67.20 Dec 94 n-* 71J2 71 JD 71 J1 

7*75 673 Fab 9? 7H9 70X7 7B3 7DXD 

7110 69X0 Apr 71J7 71X5 71X0 71XS 

89 JB 66X0 A» 95 M» 6US 68X0 68J5 

6UB 66J0AUO9S 67,90 

Etotodes 15X56 TUe^ctoOes KM 
Tiers awn Irt 7*5+3 off 3486 
FEEDER CATTLE KMBO CUtoOT-euteperOk 
SUO 71. 10 Aug 94 8025 m2 BQ 7S 80X7 

81-70 71 JO SOT M 7935 7»J0 79,12 79.12 

a 1X5 TDXSOctW 78X5 7I5S 7SX5 78. « 

SSJO 72X0M0VW 19.15 79JS 7US 79J0 

3095 72J5 Jon 95 7U5 7877 7145 78X7 

TLB 72X5 MOV ft 7W0 75X0 7^20 75X0 

B0XS 7ta«rte 7640 76XS 76AJ 76X7 

7490 72X5 Apr 96 75X0 75X5 7140 71*5 

Eat Stef 1X07 Tub's, setas 2XC3 

Tim's open W 11 JR off 210 
HOBS ICMEJt) <Mto-a<4|HrA 
5140 62X5AUOW *143 OJ1 4120 035 

4M5 39*00(294 4130 *1X7 4030 ZS 

56X0 79 JS DOT 94 41J0 41X5 43X5 ALB 

380 3U0FOT9S 4227 40X0 40.10 401! 

*080 30C Apr 95 37X5 3973 39X0 39M 

47X0 075 Jibs 95 4430 44J5 4420 4430 

4U0 41ft JU 95 *4.15 44JD 4U» 4UB 

66X6 <2X0 Aug 95 <275 

4000 397000 95 39J2 

EsI, 55*35 7.05 foe's, totes 5X12 
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PORK BELLIES (GMStt OtHfe+Minrh 
59 JO 26X0 Aug 94 J6J5 274Q 24JS Z7JS 

6005 4100 Fib 95 035 4300 OJS 42*9 

6020 MMMirtS 4240 4UD CJ5 42X0 

«.IS 4200 Mar 95 „ <305 

340Q 6125 JAfS *425 4425 *400 440) 

5126 4)00A4M95 0.13 0.15 <115 4115 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1994 



Page 11 


EUROPE 


Akzo and DSM Say 
Net 



RoombpBmwNen . 
AMSTERDAM —DSM NV 
and 'Akzo Nobel NV said 
Wednesday that economic re- 
coveries in Europe and the 
United States had combined 
wth cost-cutting measures to 

Akzo Nobel, 5ie^ Largest 
chemicals company in the. 
Netherlands, said ft earned 288 

mOlion guilders (SI 62 million) 
in the second quarter, op 33 
percent from a year carikr. 
Sales rose nearly 6 percent to 
5-56 billion guilders, and oper- 
ating profit was 52 percent 
higher at 547 mUHou. 

-Hie yeai-caiiicr remits were- 
stated ou a pro-forma basis to - 
be comparable after Akzo’s 
merger with Nobel Industricr 
AB, which was completed in 
February! 

DSM, Akzo’s rival, said it 
earned 98 minio n guilders in. 
the quarter, up from only 4 mil, ' 
Bon in the 1993 quarter, as the- 
company continued a recovery 
that started this year. The com- 
pany posted a loss of 118 mo- 
tion guilder* for all of 1993. 

Sales rose 8 percent, to 227 
billion guilders, as volume - 
made up for lower prices. 

“The results are vtry good," 
said Fenny TaltersaH, chemi- 
cals analyst with Barclays de 


Zocte Wtdd in London, “They 
confinn what's going on with 
chemical companies all over 
EuroperThe trend clearly is one 
afrepoway;” 

Loes Sdiolten, chemicals an- 
alyst with Robeco Effektea- 
bank NV, said earnings at both 
dunucal companies were better 
. than aqweted but that Abm 
Nobel's improvement, notably 
an 86 percent rise in operating 
income at' its chemicals divi- 
sion, , to 173 million guilders, 
outstripped DSM’s. 

"The recovery in their chemi- 
cals division was very much a 
' * factor,” Ms. Scbolten 
“still heavily, .do* 
t on the fact that it doesn’t 
any tax p r e ss ure and de- 
pends on its income from ener- 
gy activities.’’ 

DSM, 3 1 3 percent-owned by 
the Dutch government, receives 
130 xnStion giiOdexs in tax-free 
fees' amniaBy for its manage- 
ment of the Netherlands’ natu- 
ral gas reserves.: DSM also is 
still raxaving tax breaks be- 
cause (rf its losses last year. 

Both Akzo Nobel and DSM 
had to surmount lower product 
prices and higher raw-materials 
pricfts.' 

Akzo Nobd’s fibers division - 
tocut prices to compete with 
fiber makers in Aria. 



Russia’s Market Matures 

Firms Resist Selling Shares Cheaply 


Ratten 

MOSCOW — The Russian company direc- 
tor emerged beaming from a meeting with 
prospective shareholders. “Great,” he said. “I 
persuaded them not to boy our shares.” 

It may sound like a joke, but the comment, 
reported by a Western fund manager in Mos- 
cow, sums up the problems investors face m 
the turbulent world of Russian equity trading. 

Many companies are not keen on outside 
shareholders. Others think it’s imm oral to let 
foreigners boy Russian assets cheap. Add to 
this the problems of ever-changing regula- 
tions and soaring crime. 

But despite the chaos, laughing at the idea 
of a Russian share market now seems passL 
_ “In three to four years, the Russian securi- 
ties market will look like New York or Hong 
Kong,” said Jonathan Bulklcy, a m-mapng 
director at the consulting firm KPMG Peat 
Marwick, which is creating an over-the- 
counter market in Russia. 

The joint KPMG project with the Russian. 
Securities Exchange Commission will link 
trading in Moscow, Vladivostok. St. Peters- 
burg and Yekaterinburg on computer by the 
end of 1994. 

The impetus to the Russian market came at 
the end of June, when cash sales replaced the 
voucher plan. More than 15,000 state enter- 
prises have issued shares for vouchers. 

Sales erf vouchers dismantled the command 
economy with lightning speed, creating more 
than 40 million shareholders and attracting a 

^Companies were soi^ridiculously cheap 
for vouchers,” said Mark Jarvis, vice presi- 


dent of Fleming’s Russia investment fund. 
For vouchers, bankers say oil companies were 
sold for only four cents for each barrel of 
proven reserves, compared with 57 a barrel in 
the United States. 

Phone companies also go for a s mall frac- 
tion of world prices. Shares of St. Petersburg 
Telephone Co. sell at SIS. With 25 million 
telephone lines, this gives it a value of 5150 
for each access line, compared with more than 
51,600 in the United States. 

Another example is Vnukovo Airlines, an 
Aeroflot offshoot now handling domestic 
flights. A recent voucher auction valued the 
aimne, which has 59 planes, at S! million. 

“If you take this aircraft, melt it into blocks 
of metal and sell it, even that would give a 
much higher value,” Mr. Jarvis said. 

Fleming has bought a stake in Vnukovo 
and hopes to secure a seat on the management 
board soon, Mr. Jarvis added. 

“Russian companies have begun to mature. 
People who were brave enough to pick certain 
company shares cheaply will probably be able 
to pay for their investments,” said Jeffrey 
Hammer, head of investments at the U.S.- 
owned Newstarfund. 

Enterprises will have to value themselves at 
prices the market is prepared to pay. Compa- 
nies will be allowed to keep 51 percent of the 
return, which can be expected to multiply the 
offerings. 

Compared with voucher privatization, the 
stakes will be higher in cash sell-offs. Big 
investors will oulgun smaller ones at tenders, 
when companies mil be sold to the highest 
bidder. 


Metall Back in Profit Outside U.S. 


Reuters 

FRANKFURT — The non-U.S. operations of 
MeCaQgpseftschaft AG had an operating profit in 
June for the first time since the metals group 
almost went bankrupt in January, a company 
spokesman said Wednesday. 

“The group, without MG Corp., reported a 
positive operating result again for the first time 
in June 1994,” he said. 

The coa^pany also said thjit talks aimed at 
extricating it from costly ties with Castle Energy 
Corp. started this week in New York. 


MG Corp. owns 432 percent of Castle and is 

Castle’s «rfe supplier and customer^^ced con- 
tract prices.mean MG has been pouring vast 
amounts of cash into Castle. 

The spokesman said MG Corp. had sought to 
limit its losses and set up a new strategy. This 
included a new hedging plan for oil contract 
trading. 

. . Under a reorganization plan, MG Corp. was 
also withdrawing from some operating areas, 
setting holdings and cutting jobs, he said. 


EU Approves VW Subsidies 
For Units in East Germany 


Mortgage Demand Lifts Vereinsbank 


Bl oom be rg Businas New 

MUNICH — Bayerische 
Vereinsbank AG, Germany’s 
third biggest listed bank, said 
demand for mortgage loans acid 
a decline in loan-loss provisions 
offset a net loss on own-trading 
income, allowing it to post an 
8.7 percent increase in first-half 

operating profit. .;.. t 


it' — earnings 
before tax but after risk provi- 
sions and own-trading income 
— rose to 574 mfltion Deutsche 
marks (5373 m3Boo) from 528 
mflKonDM in the first half of 
, lS!93, jthe bank said. 

- Art operating profit fefl 1.1 
percent when compared with 
'E_tiOasjf|jreafs. total. 


iii»m 


NYSE 

WU nwd iy’s Cl oning 

Tables Include the nationwide prices up to 
Ona closing on Wafl Street and donor rnSect _ 
tala trades elsewhere. Wa The Aaaoctated Press 


■ r>*Jinr», ~ifi 


German banks generally use 
this pro-raled comparison when 
reporting earnings because it 
helps smooth out fluctuations. 

The main reason for the drop 
was a net loss in trading income 
of 7,9 million DM, compared 
with a profit of 150 million DM 
in the 1993 first half, the bank 
- .. ; . ; . >I I 


Bloomberg Business Non 

BONN — The European 
Commission approved 645 mil- 
lion Deutsche marks (S408 Bul- 
lion) in government subsidies to 
Volkswagen’s operations in 
Eastern Germany, the Econom- 
ics Ministry said Wednesday. 

The decision followed three 
years of discussions between 
the German government and 
European Union officials. 

“For the more than 2,500 em- 
ployees, this approval means 
more security for their jobs, and 
for VW an invitation to contin- 
ue its engagement in Saxony.” 
said Gtinter Rexrod t, Germa- 
ny’s economics minister. 

Further funds to help expand 
production facilities still await 
approval, but Mir. Rexrodt said 
he was “optimistic” that these 
would be approved. The subsi- 


dy, which would bring the total 
to 1 billion DM, will be exam- 
ined by the European Commis- 
sion, the EU’s executive arm, 
this month. 

The aid already approved is 
earmarked to fund investment 
and cover losses at three plants 
in the state of Saxony. 


Germairf 
Will Cut 
Borrowing 

emptied bp Our Stag From Dapadta 

BONN — Germany’s bor- 
rowing needs will fall by almost- 
a third next year because the 
TreuhandanstaJt will not need 
further funding, a Finance Min- 
istry' official said Wednesday. 

the Treuhandanstalt, which 
is responsible for privatizing 
former East German state- 
owned industries, will not issue 
bonds next year, said Jurgen 
Echternach, parliamentary 
state secretary at the ministry. 

That should slash about 60 
billion Deutsche marks (S38 bil- 
lion) from the credit needs of the 

public sector this year, which 
was 188 billion DM, he said. 

He said the abolition of the 
German Unity Fund, which this 
year required 5 billion DM of 
funding, and improved finances 
in Eastern Germany’s state and 
local governments also would 
keep borrowing down. 

Economists agreed that di- 
rect calls on the capital markets 
to fond restructuring in Eastern 
Germany had peaked. But they 
waned that the cost of servic- 
ing debt and the need to cover 
loss of revenue from eliminat- 
ing some taxes meant borrow- 
ing estimates may rise after Oc- 
tober’s general election. 

A court ruling barring tax on 
minimum incomes has not been 
taken into account in the gov- 
ernment’s p lannin g. 

Another look at Germany’s 
economy will come Thursday 
with employment data for July. 
Economists and officials said 
they expected the jobless total 
to rise despite an upturn in the 
West German economy. 

But Bernhard Jagoda. presi- 
dent of the Labor Office, said 
an average unemployment level 
of less than 2.6 million was pos- 
sible for 1994. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters ) 



Frankfurt 

DAX ' , 

London . . 
FTBEtfiOIndex 

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GA&ta • : 

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1994 . • .. 1W4. 

Bprftehge . ’• ,'tatte* ' ■ - - '.. 

. Anwterdnn. . 'AEX . 

IBM... • . / ; . 

iWadnasdw 'Ww.' 

- Close Close Change 

420^8 41924 ,+0.39 

:Sruweht \ . 

Skicfcindmtv.- 

7&5JM 


♦0.4J- . 

Frantfuit ■ 

DAX . : ■ ' ... 

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Frankfurt . \ 

k FAZ . ■ ....... 

■ 82&81 

82424 

-♦0.19 

ttetslnkl ....: 

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1J87BB6 

+0.4 V 

London - 

Firienckd Twjws 30 2,463.40 

. 2,456.10 

+0J0 

London - 

Ftszm ■ 

3,160,40 

'3,157.50 

+6.09- 

Madrid 

General Index ■ 

321.09 


-051 

WRari : -;'- 

MB 

. 1,161 jOO 

-'1.156 

+0.43 

Parte -. . 

CAC40 

2,11Sj07 

2,l»ri3 

-0.10 

Stockholm 

AAteravaerkSen 

i^79A2 

1,985.71 

*0^2’ 

Vienna 

Sax* index - 

NJL 

460.41 

- 

Zurich .. 

S8S 

931-77 

332.1S 

-0.05 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


1inrtpann<al Herald Tursnk 


Very briefly: 


• GKN PLC, the British engineering group, has signed an agree- 
ment to end a dispute between its unit Westland Helicopters and 
the Arab Organization for Industrialization over cancellation in 
1979 of that organization’s order for 250 helicopters. 

• Petrofina SA, Belgium's largest industrial company, said fust- 
half profit rose 31 percent, to 5.44 billion Belgian francs ($167 
million); it cited cost-cutting and a recovery in the industry'. <. 

• Germany’s Finance Ministry has earned 3.68 billion DM (Si 

billion) from the sale of former military property in the four years 
since Goman unification, a Bonn official said. - 

• Russian officials said that the country's grain harvest was 
expected to amount to 91 million to 92 million tons in 1994, down 
from 99.1 mfllion tons in 1993 and an average of 103.3 million 
tons during the last five years. 

• Volvo AB said that its sales of passenger cars in the United State* 
surged 26 percent in July from the same month a year ago and 
were up 20 percent for the first half of the year. 

• Matra-Hadiette SA said its sales totaled 26,73 billion French 
francs (55 billion) in the first half, up slightly from 2625 billion 
francs a year earlier. 

Reuters, Bloomberg, AFP. AP. AFX, Kiughi-RtAhr 


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Nordic Video Unit Aims 
To Freeze Others Out 


Bloomberg Business News 

COPENHAGEN — 
Three Nordic telecommuni- 
cations companies said 
Wednesday they had formed 
what would become Eu- 
rope’s second-largest sa.uA- 
-Hte-television distributor 
when it begins this fall 

Nordic Satellite Distribu- 
tion AS will distribute televi- 
sion channels in a bid to 
screen out the dominating 
European distributor of sat- 
ellite TV, Soctete des Satel- 
lites. 

The Scandinavian market. 


seen as a rapidly growing 
sector, now has a heavy mix 
of foreign shows, especially 
from the United States. 

“We are aiming for 10 to 
15 channels fairly quickly ” 
said Gregors Mogensen, di- 
rector of Tele Danmark AS. 

The other two parent 
companies are Tdeverket 
Norge and the Swedish 
holding group AB Kinnevik. 
Mr. Mogensen said he ex- 
pected other competitors to 
enter the market for distri- 
bution of satellite television 
directly via dish. 


Sun’s Guru of Bad Taste 
Fads His TV Screen Test 

Reuters 

LONDON — Kelvin MacKenzie, the newspaperman 
known for legendary tasteless headlines who came off No. 2 in 

S rer struggle at Rupert Murdoch’s television broadcaster 
B, could be just the tonic for Britain's weakest mass- 
et newspaper, the Daily Star, media analysts said on 
Wednesday. 

Mr. MacKenzie resigned from BSkyB on Tuesday after 
seven months. The Independent newspaper reported that he 
disagreed with Sam Chisholm, BSkyB's chief executive, over 
the style and content of programs and news. 

‘‘There’ll always be demand at that end of the market for 
what are increasingly becoming national comics,” said An- 
thony de Larrinaga from the broker Panmure Gordon. “But 
it’s a shrinking market; It’s enormous, but its best days are 
probably gone.” In Mr. MacKenzie’s 12-years as editor of 
The Sun, the tabloid that has Britain’s biggest circulation, 
good taste frequently fell victim to audacity. 


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Continued ou Page U 


OLIVETTI: Attempting Change 


Continued from Page 9 
volves deals with big American 
companies. Olivetti is the lead 
partner in a group that includes 
Bell Atlantic and Pacific Telesis 
and was authorized by the Ital- 
ian government in late March 
to build Italy’s second cellular 
telephone network. The net- 
work would compete with the 
cellular network operated by It- 
aly's state-owned telephone 
company, Societi Fmanziaria 
Telefonica, 

In June. Olivetti struck a deal 
with Hughes Network Systems 
to offer satellite communication 
systems in Europe using the 
email High antennas that enable 
large corporations to distribute 
information among Lbeir big of- 
fices, 

Tel ecommunica tions in Eu- 
rope, as deregulation strides 
forward, is a fast-growing busi- 
ness. But the- frenzy of arrange- 
ments Olivetti has entered only 
serves to underscore the need to 
play catch- up in a quickly mov- 


ing new business. Michael 
Grant, a telecommunications 
consultant in Cambridge, Eng- 
land, said that Olivetti was 
coming late to the field. 

Yet, some analysts give Mr. 
Passera at least an even chance 
of succeeding in his strategy for 
Olivetti. 



Holdings 

r ^ 


Weekly net assec 
value 

on 29.07.94 
US$259.11 

Listed on the 
Amsterdam 
Stock Exchange 


Information: 

MeesPieison Capital Management 
Rolan ?5, 1012 KK Amsterdam. 
Teb + 31-20-5211410. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1994 


Page 1^*1 


ASIA/PACIFIC 



Yuan Shares Continue to Rise 

Boosted b) Reforms 

Taiwan Regulator 
Cools Stock Market 
With His Remarks 


: Dispatches 

SHANGHAI —Hie index for shares reserved 
[or Chinese bayerson the stock exchange here 
dosed 22 percent higher Wednesday, propelled 
by strong market sentiment in the aftermath of 
robnns announced last week. 

The index overcame a psychological harrier at 
500 and ended 9639 points higher at 529.80. 

“Investor confidence is so strong that the up- 
trend has main t a ined momentum all day,** said 
Hu Hiripeng, a broker with Zhoognan Securites. 
“The index will surdy stay above 500 points in 

the coming days." 

Timothy Greaton, who manages the China 
Growth fund for Crttfit Lyonnais, saw it differ- 
ently: “A 59 percent rise in three days — if you’re 
looking for a long-term fimdamentals-based in- 
vestment, that’s going to look like a nightmare." . 

. Shares designated “A" are restricted to Chi- 
nese and traded in yuan, while “B" shares are 
foreign-owned and bought and sold in other 
currencies. 

Analysts said the reform package, winch 
lacked details, was unlikely to usher in foreign 
money. 

But Wednesday’s sharp rise indicated a 
good supply of local capital. 

Total market turnover was 4.56 billon yuan 
($520 mill i on ), the third highest on record for 
Shanghai’s local-investor market 

The market’ giant Shanghai Petrochemical 
surged 0.42 yuan, or 27 percent to 1.95, and 
Maansban. lron St Steel gained 0.40, or 25 per- 
cent, to 2- Tsmgtaa Brewery was up 1 . 38 , or 38 
percent to 5.- 

(Reuters, Kiutfit-Ridder, Bloomberg) 


TAIPEI — A comment by Taiwan’s chief 
securities regulator Wednesday that local stock 
Prices were “high" sent share prices lower' — 
winch analysts said was what the comment was 
intended to do. 

- Limn Day, the chairman of the Securities and 

Exchange Co mmissio n., told thg daridfl^ . inaVing 

F the governing Nationalist Parry that 
prices were high, the stock market’s struc- 
ture was weak and price fluctBatioas were large. 

The Weighted Price Index of the Taiwan Stock 
Ex chan g e mil 156 points, or 1X1 percent from a 
four-year high, ending at 6,723.56 points. Ana- 
lysts cited concern that the government might 
take steps to cool down the market, which has 
gained about 30 percent in the past four months. 

‘ In an apparent departure from Ins laissez-faire 
approach to the market, Mr. F-infn speaking as a 
member of the Nationalist Parly, tola the central 
standing committee that stock prices, as mea- 
sured by price/ earnings ratios, were being driven 
up by a shortage of shares, relative to demand. 

! That “problem” needed to be rcsolvod through 
an increase in the number of shares available, 
new financial products and improvement of the 
over-the-counter market, he said. 


The Raiders Are Circling 

But Goodman Fielder Seems Ready 


Bloomberg Bunw News 

SYDNEY — Goodman 
Fielder Wattic Ltd. should be 
able to fend off recent at- 
tempts to gain control of the 
33 billion Australian dollar 
($2 billion) food company, 
analysts said Wednesday. 

Brierley Investments Ltd. 
of New Zealand emerged this 
week as the latest in a long 
line of contenders for control 
of Goodman, according to 
published reports. Brierly re- 
portedly has been buying up 
shares of Goodman to gain 
an edge if an expected take- 
over battle erupts. 

Several other companies 
also own large chunks of 
Goodman, including Bankers 
Trust Australia Ltd n Agri- 
foods Investments and the 
American institutions Fideli- 
ty Investments, Morgan Stan- 
ley & Co. and Merrill Lynch 
&Co. 

Fidelity said this week that 
it had lifted its bolding to 6. 18 
percent from 5.01 percent by 
buying shares on the open 
market last week. 

Bankers Trust New York 


Corp. disclosed it had in- 
creased its interest in Good- 
man to 6. 1 3 percent from 5.06 
percent after Australian Mu- 
tual Provident Society re- 
duced its holding to 6.47 per- 
cent from 7.63 percent. 

Analysis said they expect- 
ed Goodman to withstand 
any corporate raid. 

“My feeling is the company- 
will continue as it is. aitempi- 


Goodman's 
unprofitable 
divisions may 
save it from a 
takeover. 

mg to return the company to 
good profits," said Andrew 
Martin, an analyst with Bar- 
clays de Zoete Wedd. “That’s 
not to say speculation about a 
takeover wouT continue, but 
my feeling is Goodman will 
withstand it." 

Other analysts said Good- 
man as a whole may not be 


attractive to one buyer be- 
cause some of its divisions are 
unprofitable. 

Goodman declined to com- 
ment Wednesday; the com- 
pany's board is scheduled to 
meet Thursday. 

Goodman's' stock price has 
declined 5 2 percent in the 
past 12 months amid poor 
earnings and management 
problems. The shares hit a 
three-and-a-half-year low in 
late June. They' dosed un- 
changed at 1.45 dollars 
Wednesday. 

Mr. Martin said corporate 
raiders were not the only 
problem facing Goodman. 
“Tbe company is in a very 
competitive market." he said. 

Goodman’s brand names 
are under siege from lower- 
cost generic labels, and the 
company is still trying to re- 
group from a diversification 
spree in the 1980s that left it 
with high debt and sprawling 
interests. 

The company makes a wide 
array of foods, including 
breads, baked goods, flour, 
margarine, salad dressing and 
pastas. 


1 Investor's Asia 1 

Hong Kong 
Hang Song 

Singapore Tokyo 

Straits Times Nikkei 225 


110® 

44UU 

j 







III 

V 

®B0 

7500 m 

1984 

Exchange 

Hong Kong 

ztiE m 



TJa* • 
% 

Oiarige 

-1.13 

J A 

1994 

Index 

Hang Seng 

-JjTf M A M 

1994 - 

Wednesday Pmv. 
Close Close 

9,585.89 9,695.03 

Singapore 

Strata Timas 

2^67,13 

■ 2,263.30 

+0.17 

Sydney 

M Ordinaries 

2^72L30 

2,086.90 

-0.70 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 285 

20JB32.73 20.680.13 

-0.13 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1JD79.06 

1,075.10 


Bangkok 

SET 

1A07J28 

1.390.72 

+QJ54 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

923.47 

027.55 . 

-0.4* 

Taipei 

Weighted price 

8,72356 

657956 

-2J27 

Manila 

PSE 

238428 

2.866.53 

+0.62. 

Jakarta 

Stock Index 

464^5 

459.24 

+iie- 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 . 

ZfiUUlO 

2,074.69 

+0,39- ' 

Bombay 

National index 

2,02456 

2,031.70 

-0.33 ; 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


Very briefly: 


■oaf 


-.ill; 


Firm’s Tip on Southeast Asia: Buy , Buy 


Bloomberg Businas Neve 

HONG KONG — The British securities 
house Khunwort Benson Securities i 
issued a bullish report on most 
Asian stock markets, but it said the Hong 
Kong market’s outlook remained uncertain. 

“Whatever, the market sentiment. Aria's 
economic fundamentals are . strengthening 
rapidly, and this is no time to dither,” said the 
report, written by the head of research, Hugh 
Peyman, and a consultant, (be economist 
Alan McLean. ; ‘ 

' Kksnwort Benson said it expected the Phil- 
ippine Stock Exchange's composite index to 
he (he strangest performer in the final five 
months of the year, rising 21 percent to 3500 
from 2,88438 at Wednesday's dose. 


The markets in Malaysia, Thailand, Indo- 
nesia, India, Singapore, Taiwan and South 
Korea axe Hkdy to rise between 12 percent 
and 18 percent over the rest of the year, it 
. said. 

The only exception to Kksnwon Benson’s 
enthusiasm was Horn, Kong, because of con- 
cerns over whether nima can control its 20 
perceminfiation without sending the country 
mto recession. Hang Kong ana China are 
closely tied through trade: 

’ ‘ The report said a broad-based improve- 
ment in Asia’s economy ami the global eco- 
nomic recovery would drive company earn- 
ings higher than the markets expect 

“For die first time in nearly a year, the 
danger is being underinvested," it said. 


Blast Halts Gold Output at Porgera 


Bloomberg Basaias News 

PORT MORESBY, Papua 
New Guinea — Operations at 
the giant Porgera gold mine 
here are expected to remain sus- 
pended for several weeks after 
two explosions and a fire that 
killed at least 1 1 people. 

Ore treatment could resume 

more qinckfy. possibly in a week. 

The cause of Tuesday's ex- 
plosions was unknown. Porgera 
is one of the world’s largest gold 
minea outside South Africa. It 
produced 1 2 milli on ounces 
(34,000 kilograms) of gold last 
year. 

The blasts occurred in an ex- 
plosives-processing plant and 


Beijing Says TaK Evasion Is Fueling Inflation 


Rearers .» psjnv* ■ percent larger shortfall than at Yhe same 

BEIJING ^ Rising mcomesar^^tf' time last yean 


spread tax evasion -are contri 
flation in China, making it 
country jrifi reach its getf'af 
inflation at l O percem this year, 
minister 


r the. 



Liu ZhangU said in official 
leased Wednesday that tax' 








first half of the year was 22&perceiafr 
from the 1993 rest half, at 197.9, Trillion 
yuan ($23 billion), largely because <& fax 
reforms that took effect ton. 1. : - 


- Meanhfle, tbe_average urban income in 
the first half of the year rase 35 ^percent 

r ; ** j 4 *- ^'*7*' 'A'; ‘i? 

[ iO ffeMi ftg &Bes^how annual inflation iiLt 


35 ma^atits’ in June nunring.at 22.7 
^ire-V paxxni , with grain pric^ 52 percent high- 
er lhan a y ear carii cn ' " 


But he said revenue was still short of 
projections because of tax evasion: Busi- 
nesses still had not paid 163 billion yten 
in taxes at the end of tone, he £' 7T 


” 'Tteriational figure for the first half of 
the yeaer was 19 percent over the compara- 
ble 1993-period, but the official target for 
alt bf'i994is to bring inflation down below 
lO peroenL • s '. 

in a somber front-page commentary 
.Wednesday, the official* Economic Infer- 
matron Daily saidthebighrate of inflation 


was badly hitting those on low incomes 
and retired people. 

It said that, with no new price reform 
measures itjue • td. be implemented in the 
second: haff ei'lhis year ; inflatioa-sbewid 
continue the downward trend begun iri 
February* ‘“But it wffl be very bard to’ 
achieve the 10 percent target,'* the com- 
mentary said. 

Qiu Xiaohua, an economist with the 
state statistical bureau, said there was no 
quick solution to inflation because its 
causes were long-term problems. 

There also were noneconomic causes, he 
said, such as companies exploiting the lack 
of a proper regulatory structure to raise 
prices and exploit monopoly positions. 


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storage area about a mile (1.6 
kilometers) from the main 
works. 

Executives of the Porgera 
joint venture and Lhe manufac- 
turer of lhe explosives, Dyno 
Wesfarmers, were inspecting 
the damage. The blasts were 
beard 80 miles away. 

The Porgera mine is about 
350 miles northwest of Port 


Moresby. It is equally owned by 
Placer Pacific Ltd., r.trnison 
Goldfields Consolidated Ltd.. 
Highlands Gold Ltd. and the 
Papua government. 

“Over the last six months, the 
open pit has produced twice as 
much ore as has been treated by 
the mi EL" said lan Williams, a 
Placer spokesman. 


Reebok Reviews China link 


Bloo mb erg Biautas News 

HONG KONG — Managers 
of a leading Hong Kong shoe- 
making concern met with Chi- 
nese officials Wednesday to dis- 
cuss the living conditions of its 
staff, as Reebok International 
Ltd. threatened to stop doing 
business with the company. 

K.K. Choi, the Hong Kong- 
based managing director of the 
shoemaker Yue Yuen Industri- 
al (Holdings), held talks with 
Officials in the southern China 


economic zone of Zhubai after 
reports had been published £r,.> : 
about 400 workers were being 
housed illegally in a potential 
fuel rap. 

“We can't tolerate this type 
of thing happening in a factory 
making shoes for us," Henry 
Ching. general manager of Ree- 
bok's Hong Kong unit, said. 

Yue Yuen is not one or Ree- 
bok’s bigger contractors in 
Aria, Mr. Oiing said. 


• n» in » said it seized about 6 million books and magazines in the 

first half of 1994 that either violated copyright laws or contained 
what it called scenes of violence or pornography. It did not specify 
the number of copyright violations. ** 

• QingBng Motors, China’s latest overseas stock offering, was 
oversubscribed almost 23 times on an issue of 100 million shares: 

• HKR International said net profit leaped to 3.44 billion Hon{£ 

Kong dollars ($445 million) in the year ended March 31 from' 
295.7 million dollars a vear earlier, including 3.4 billion dollars 
from the sale of of 50* percent of its Discovery Bay housing- 
development to OTIC Pacific. _ 

• Rkoh Co. has filed a complaint against South Korea’s Samsung 

Co. for allegedly infringing on two facsimile patents. t 

• Tooeo Corp. will spend 40 billion yen ($402 million) to build 

Japan's first heavy -oil processing plant, with a capacity of 25.009 
barrels a day. •* 

• Mitsubishi Corp. said it injected $500 million into its U.& 

chemical unit. Aristech Chemical Corp. ; 

• Minebea Co. said current profit in the six months ending Septi 
30 was likely to exceed its forecast made in May of 4 5 billion yen* 

Kmghr-Rrdder. AFP. Reuters. Bloomberg. AFX 


Deng’s Son Heads Group 

Bloomberg Business News 

HONG KONG — Deng Zhifang, a son of the Chinese !) 
leader Deng Xiaoping, bas agreed to head the Hong Kong 
real-estate and investment concern Shougang Concord Grand 
Group, the Eastern Express newspaper reported Wednesday. 

It was the first time a member of Deng Xiaoping’s immedi- 
ate family had taken a prominent role in a public company. 

Shougang Concord shares, which surged 22.5 percent Mon- 
day, fell to 2.18 dollars Wednesday from 2.23 dollars. 


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For 

investment 

information 

read 

THE MONEY 
REPORT 
every 
Saturday 
in the 
IHT 




For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 


The conference, 
Europe’s leading energy forum, 
will be addressed by oil industry 
experts from the world oyer. 



OIL & MONEY 

London • October Z 7 & IS 

The Oil Daily Group lic^b^^fe^bune 


For farther information 
on the conference, please contact: 

Brenda Erdmann Hagerty 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH, England 
Tel: (44 71) 836 4802 
Fax: (44 71) 836 0717 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1994 


SPORTS 


The Bad Boys of Baseball 

Players or Owners? Look at the Ledgers 


BylraBerfcow 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — The baseball owners have 
sent over financial statements to the 
players 1 association in a gesture of what they 
say is good faith, in an effort to avoid a strike. 

They hoped to establish with the union 
their contention that, like baseball owners 
before them and those before them — back to 
the 19th century, to the days of, pardon the 
expression, the robber barons — that they, 
today's owners, are losing money. 

Nineteen of the 28 say they are 
awash in a Red Sea of losses, and most of the 
losses, the owners contend, are attributable to 
the play- 

Safe? Vantage 

coinci- - 


show of gratitude, paid himself 512 million. 

A time-honored tradition of baseball is for 
owners to hide profits in a variety of slick 


ways. Once, for example; Griffith purchased 
! amounts of meat for his extended family 



dentally, by these very same owners, canny 
businessmen whose average net worth is esti- 
mated by Forbes magazine at $300 mil 
lira to $400 million, with Ted Turner topping 
out at $2.2 trillion. 


The players’ association is skeptical of the 
owners audited papers because the owners 
have previously been less than truthful about 
their finances. In fact, they have lied through 
their teeth. 


__ charged it to the dub. 

Owners have even cheated their partners,, 
•as some of Marge Schott's Reds associates 
believed when they sued her recently and 
settled out of court. 

So it is clear why the owners themselves 
keep a squinty eye on their brethren, and 
sister. But an even larger issue is that, as 
businesspersons, they seek to rake in as much 
loot as they can, while upbraiding the players 
for doing same. 

Otherwise, the big-market teams would 
readily share all revenues possible to make the 
smaller teams as stable as they contend they 
need to be. 

The teams do share national television 
money and licensing products, and visiting 
dubs get a cat of the home team’s gate, 20 
percent in the American League and a more 
flexible piece of the action based on ticket 
sales in the National League. 

These figures, however, have re m aine d 
nearly the same for most of this century and 
seem unlikely to change- 


Even baseball owners don’t often believe 
baseball owners. Once, for example, Calvin 
Griffith, the former owner of the Minnesota 
Twins, entreated George Stembrenner to 
have the big-market dobs share their revenue 
with the small-market team. 

■ “If you let me get rid of all the relatives on 
your payroll,” said Stembrenner, Td be glad 
to give you some of my TV money.” 
Steinbrenner, too, has had relatives on his 
payroll, including sons Hank and Harold. 
And the general partner of the Yankees’ hier- 
archy, Joseph Molloy, happens to be Stein- 
brenner s son-in-law. 

How much does Joseph MoBpy make? As 
much as Papa George wants to pay him- An 
owner may pay anyone, including the players, 
whatever he wishes. And some owners are 
more than generous, especially with them- 
jirlvej. 

\-i the former owner of the 
-..o. one season, in a touching 


T HE values of teams keep going up, as do 
the number of teams in baseball. The last 
team to change hands, the Baltimore Orioles, 
was purchased in 1989 by Eli Jacobs for $70 
million and was sold four years later for $ 171 
milli on, after heated bidding, in fact. 

The players have fought for and attained 
the American right to bargain for their ser- 
vices in a free market The owners want to 
socialize them — but not themselves. 

Meanwhile, baseball, despite the owners* 
annual bleats of poverty, continues not to 
contract but to grow and expand, with Flori- 
da and Colorado paying a combined $190 
milli on to the 26 other owners for the privi- 
lege of joining last year. 

And baseball, remember, regularly reports 
attendance gains, and most teams, big market 
and small L r emain competitive in the stand- 
ings. 


So if the books smell fishy to the players' 
union, it is not just because one of the 


franchises is called the Marlins. 


new 




The Asaodtdied Prm .. 

The strike date of Aug. 12 
may come at just the right time 
for the Kansas City Royals. - * 
' Baseball's hottest team, rid- 
ing an R-gaxnc winning streak 1 
that has -energized the city of 
Kansas Q'ty, is playing itself 


AL ROUNDUP 


inio pdstseasoa contention less, 
than two weeks before the 



Cleveland's catcher, Sandy Alomar, got bung up after snagging a pop-qp against Detroit 


6-4, on 
t, the Royals 
climbed within VA ga mes of, 
Cleveland for the fourth and 
last playoff spdt in the Ameri- 
can r jaTgnej with nine days of' 
baseball remaining before a- 
walkout. 

“Who can figure this game?” 
said ri ght- hander David Cone 
(16-4)»wh06e three victories dur- 
ing the streak have put Mm 'in a 
tie with New York’s ^Ermny Key 
far the AL victory lead. “There 
have been lots of times ! patched 
better, but didn’t win,” said 
Cone, who allowed, four .runs 
and eight hits in eight irminfiS- 
Bob Haxoelm doubled - and 
hit Ms 22d homer, tying Bo 
Jackson’s record for a Royals 
rookie, as Kansas CSty extend- 
ed the second-longest winning 
screak in franchise history. The 
1977 team wpn 16 in a row on 
the way to playoffs. •• 

Todd Van Poppel gave up 
five hits and five runs as the A’s 
lost their fourth, in a row. 

Tigers 12, Iwfians 9: Mickey 
Tettlcton hit a two-run homer ' 
to cap a comeback from a. 9-7 
deficit that gave Detroit its first 
victory in five games at home. 
TcmyPMllips led off with a sin- 
gle and scored when Carlos 
Baerga threw wildly, into left 
field 1 after fielding a potential 


Tntn the ! 

for a four-hitter over seven in-, 
as Baltimore held Mhme- • 
at home. ; 

it was Baltimore’s second • 
shutout in 24 hours after going ' 
139 games without one. 

White Sax 61, Rangers 2: At ‘ 
Arlington, Texas, any hopes 
that Kenny Rogers would pitch ■ 
a second straight perfect game \ 
were ended when leadoff batter . 
Norberto Martin singled. Rog- ‘ 
ers lasted only SVi innings in his ‘ 
first outing since becoming the 
first AL left-hander and 12th 
pitcher overall to throw a per- 
feet game.. 

Robin Ventura hit Ms 17th 
home run for file While Sox. - 


Once Again, Montreal Sizzles While Labor Relations Heat Up 


The Associated Press 

The Montreal Expos seem to pick 
troubled seasons to play good base- 
ball. 

The only time they ever made the 
playoffs was 1981, a season interrupt- 
ed for 50 days by a players’ strike. 

With .another strike looming just 
over a week away, the Expos have won 
13 of their last 14 games and improved 


NL ROUNDUP 


the best record in baseball to 67-38 
with a 5-4 victory over the St. Louis 
Cardinals on Tuesday night. 

The Expos have to hope that the 
labor difficulties are solved more 
quickly this time, or there may be no 
postseason to play for. 

“It’s not that we’re confident, we’re 
simply a good team,” said third base- 
man Sean Berry, who hit a two- run 
homer in the first inning. 

*Tbe key is we take advantage of 
whatever comes our way,” said Felipe 
Alou, the team's manager. 


The victory, combined with Atlan- 
ta’s 4-1 loss to the Mets. increased the 
Expos’ lead to 4^ games in the Nation- 
al League East. 

Ken Hill became the league's first 
15-game winner despite not being at 
Ms best against his former team. 

John Wetteland, another hard 
thrower, come on in the ninth to pre- 
serve a 5-3 lead for his 22d save. 

Metises Alou went 3-for-4, including 
his 20th homer, and Wrl Cordero also 
had three of the Expos' 1 1 hits. 

Reds 9, (Sants 7: In San Francisco. 
Barry Larkin homered twice and dou- 
bled, driving in three runs and scoring 
three as Cincinnati overcame three 
home runs by Barry Bonds to win its 
fifth straighL 

Larkin, who homered in the first 
inning for a 2-0 Reds lead, hit his 
eighth homer in the eighth inning. He 
also doubled in the third and scored on 
an infield out by Tony Fernandez, who 
drove in three runs. 

Bonds drove in four runs with his 


three homers, pushing his total for the 
season to 35. 

Martins 3, Cubs 2: Jerry Browne 
tripled in the 10th inning and scored 
on Jeff Connie’s sacrifice fly as visiting 
Florida rallied to end a seven-game 
losing streak. 

Browne Mt a leadoff triple into the 
right- field corner off Jose Bautista. 
Bautista struck out Chuck Carr and 
intentionally walked Gary Sheffield 
before Conine Hied out to left-center. 
Browne scored standing op. 

Pfrates 3, PMffies 2: Lloyd McClen- 
don’s two-out pinch-hit homer in the 
top of the eighth lifted the Pirates to 
victory on the road. 

McClendon’s solo homer, Ms fourth 
of the season, made a winner of Rick 
White and a loser of Bobby Munoz. 

White, making only his fourth start 
of the season, an owed right hits and 
one earned run in seven inning s and 
did not walk a batter. 

Mets 4, Braves 1: In New York, 
Rico Brogna’s two-run homer high- 


lighted a three-run eighth inning for 
the Mets, who defeated Milwaukee. 

Steve Bedrosian, who relieved starter 
Kent Mocker in the eighth, gave up a 
leadoff double to Bobby Bonilla, who 
scored on Jeff Kent’s singl e .One out 
later, Brogna Mt his seventh homer. 

Mike Remlinger won his first game 
for the Mets. He patched eight inning s, 
allowing one run on four hits, while 
striking out two and w alking eight 
Astras 3, Rockies 1: Doug Drabek, 
who had a no-hitter through seven in- 
nings, settled for a two-hitter as Hous- 
ton, playing at home, beat Colorado, 


gave Los Angeles the edge over visiting 
San Diego. 

Tim Waflarih had a two-run homer 
as the Dodgers increased their Western 
Division laid to two games. 

With' two -buts; Efirett Butkx reached 
on an infield single off Tim' Manser 
and moved to second when Ddino 
DeShields walked. Hansen, batting for 
Todd Worrell, grounded a 2-2 pitch up 
the middle for only his second RBr in 
29 at-bats as a pinch-hitter. 


A single by Travis. Fryman 
put immers at first «id third and 
Cecfl Fielder tiedit with a single. 
Kirk Gibson’s sacrifice fly off 
Derek Iiffiquist jmt Detroit 
ahead .10-9, and lettieton Jbl-. 
lowed with Ms 1 6th home run. 


Mariners 10, Angels 2: In 
Anaheim, California, Ken Grif- 
fey Jr. Mt Ms. 37th home run, 
one of four launched by the 
Mariners in snapping a seven- 
game losing streak. 

The opener of a three-game 
series, moved from Seattle be- 
cause of . falling - tiles in the 
Kingdoms drew 11,478, the 
smallest crowd in Anaheim Sta- 
dium since 1978. 


Bine Jots 8, Red Sox 7: Ed 
Sprague had three hits, and 


^ Randy Johnson, the winning 
ntcher, benefited from hornets €/ 


drove in tjftee rims, ajK| Jpgm.' 


y Jay Buhner, Uno Martinez 
and £dgsr Martinez.- 


rflOT. . V. 



Pirates on Seffing Block 


snapgrag a four-game losing stieak. 


Vender Wal, who had four hits 
in Monday’s 8-3 victoiy over the As- 
tros, Mt Drabek’s first pitch in the 
eighth inning over the right-field score- 
board to break up the no-hitter. Char- 
lie Hayes singled with two outs in the 
ninth for the Rockies' other hit. 

Drabek won for the first time since 
June 20. 


The Pittsburgh Pirates’ board of di- 
ed We 


rectors voted Wednesday to put the 
team up for sale. The vote means the 
d ty has six months to find a buyer that 
will keep the team in the dty. The 
Associated Press reported. 

The team has discussed a possible 


sale to groups headed by Lariy Luo- 
iore Orioli 


Dodger? 7, Padres 6: Dave Hansen’s 
pinch-hit RBI single in the 1 1th innin g 


chino, the former Baltimore unoies 
president, and John J. Rigas, chairman- 
of Adelphia Communications. The Pi- 
rates have lost about $60 million since 
the end of 1985. 


. New York Tima Service ■ ■ 

NEW YORK — In a move 
that is certain to raise tbe lewd 
of hostility and Xurther erode 
the chances of. reaching an- 
agreement that would prevent a 
baseball players’ strike Ang. 12/ 
the owners have decided not to 
make a payment of abbot $8 
nriffion to the players’ pension 
plan. 

Richard Ravitch, the owners' 
chief labor executive co nfirmed 
on TbesdOT.nkfat that he had 
informed -Me plan’s adnrinxstia- 
tor, Leonard Gray, in a letter 
dated last Friday that the pay- 


ment, wouldnot be forthcoming 
Ang. 1, as the esqnred benefit 
plan agreement between the 
chibs and the players provides. 

Ravitch and Bud Sefig, the : 
acting commissioner, played 
down the significance of the : 
owners’ dedsicHL saying they 
haid no contractual obligation 
to make the payment But the 
players’ side reacted angrily. 

* received Ms letter Mon- 
day,” Donald Fehr, the head of 
the Bayes Association, said on 
Tuesday nigjht “We had no pri- 
or warning of it I was shocked 
beyond imagination.” 


DENNIS THE MEN ACE 


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' Olerudhita tie-breaking homet-V 
in the seventh, as Toronto TO 
in Boston. . 

Joe Carter added two KBIs, - ■' 
giving him 99 for the season- 
TbcBlue Jttys, winners of 12 of - , . 
■ 17, tied Boston for third in ffie-U 
ALEast . . : : 

Wes Chamberlain’s -grand. ,• 
ste m highlighted a six-rim Red • 
Scot fourth. ; 

Yankees 7, Brewers l: D6n 
Mattingly started a game-win- ; 

with a twenrun ; 

visiting New. York over - MB- -- 
waukee. 

Jamie Navarro surrendered " 
■three straight singles to open U 
the ninth, and Graeme Lloyd 
later walked in two. runs. Male * 
tingiy finished the outburst < 
with a bases-kjaded double. ; •' 
Oribles 10, Twins 0: Make .) 


Mussina pitched perfect ball ^ 
firth inning and settled 


**7 


4 - 













Jdl tLrwh*y/Thr AnodlUrd Pio» 

Paul Azinger, arriving in Michigan, ready to play- 

Azinger’s Back, 
Now 'Pain- Free 9 


By Leonard Shapiro 

- Washington Pat Service 

Paul Azinger has already taken the bab; 
resuming his professional golf career after ' 
diagnosed in his right shoulder late last year. 

On Thursday, the defending PGA champ 
giant leap back into competitive playinthe a 


steps toward 
ttlmg cancer 


On Thursday, the defending PGA champion wiS take a 
giant leap back into competitive play in the first round of the 
Buck Open at Warwick mils CrwntiyChib in Grand Blanc, 
Michigan. 

“I fed strong ami healthy,* 1 Azinger said this week, adding 
that he was “pain free** from the lyinphoma that has kept him 
off the PGA Tour Tot the past nine months and forced mm to 
endure long and occasionally debilitating chemotherapy ami 
radiation treatments. • 

Azinger appeared at anews conference Tuesday ina tent at 
the Buick Open. Wearing a stow hat over a stubble of hair a 
PGA Tour spokesman described as “the Marine-recruit 
look,** Azinger was upbeat and a little nervous about return- 
ing to his UfeVwork this week. -. ... • . . 

‘T have those little butterflies,” he said: ‘Tvebeen getting 
them for the last four or fivedays.^ . •• 

“It’s land of like the beginning oftthe season in January,” he 
said. “There's a little tritHof ama<^y wanting to get off to a 
good startFin sore I J^ y 1 ^ M np ^^tiv e 1 jBiCeswBlsta^gRnyiI^g.’ , 
When he attended a PGA Channxkmship press conference 
in Tulsa on May 17 -r*his first public appearance shoe being 
diagnosed with cancer ia&t^puember — Azinger was Stitt 
recovering Cram chemotherapy that made him in a nd - ca u sed : 
him to lose 20 pounds (9 kilograms) and all his haor. 

He said he was bade to his oomal weight <rf 174 pcamds (79 
kilograms), and five weeks of aerobic and strength condition- 
ing work with a personal trainer has added about 10 pounds 
of musde to his always rail-thin physique. . v 
Azmger said he’s only played abont a half-dozen roimds of 
golf over the past month and has spent some time hitting.bafis 
on the range, but only in moderation at the advice of his 
doctors. He’s also been worftingwith las teacher,John Red- - 
man, and Azinger said “he likes what be sees.” 

“My swing looks tbe same,'’ Azinger said. “When I first hit 
halls a couple of weeks ago for the first time, honesthr it was 
like I never quit. I bad good good rhythm. I nit balls 
for about six days and I was pleasantly surprised at how good 
it looked. But I’m careful I don’t want to overdo it” 

“I fed rmin better shape than Ieverbavebeeotin my HfeC” 
be said. 


Citing ‘Silver Lining’ Clause, NBA Rejects 2 Contracts 


By Robert McG. Thomas Jr. 

New York Tuna Service 

NEW YORK — ■ The National Bas- 
ketball Association rejected two play- 
«s* contracts Tuesday, saying both vio- 
late the 1 clue’s m a ximum salary Emit 

The contracts — between Horace 
Giant and the Orlando Magic and 
between A.C. Green and the Phoenix 
Suns — contain clauses that allow the 
players to declare themselves free 
agents Mart year. 

. . " Citing the silver-lining danse in an 
otherwise adverse court ruling last year 
in the Chris Dudley case, the NBA is 
making a new effort to defend its sala- 
ry cap against imaginative contracts. 

By rejecting Green’s new $26 million, 
five-year contract with the Phoenix 
Suns and Grant’s contract with the Or- 


lando Magic cm Tuesday, the league 
contended, in effect, that Green is getting 
far too and Grant far too link. 

That’s because the two contracts 
represent separate stages in what the 
NBA considers a two-stage subterfuge 
to sidestep the salary cap by taking 
creative advantage of an exception to 
the salary-cap rules, one that allows 
teams to pay any amount in re-signing 
their own free agents. 

First, a player moving to 8 new team 
signs a long-term contract at a salary 
that is at once within the new team’s 
cap but far bdow his own true worth 
while giving him an option to declare 
himself a free agent after one season. 

Thai, the NBA says, is what Green 
did last season when he jumped from 
the Los Angeles Lakers to the Phoenix 


Suns, signing a S1.9 million contract, 
which was as much as the Suns could 

S y under the salary cap but weU. below 
i real worth and the Lakers* offer. 

It is also what the NBA says Grant 
has done this year in rejecting a higher 
offer from his old team, the Chicago 
Bulls, and signing a contract with the 
Magic that win pay him just S2-1 mil- 
lion this season. 

The second stage, according to the 
NBA view, comes when the player 
does declare himself a free agent after 
one season with his new team and then 
signs a huge new contract with the 
same team. 

That, the NBA says, is just what 
Green did this year (and Grant dearly 
plans to do next year) when, as a self- 
declared unrestricted free agent, be 


Signed a five-year contract with the Suns 
paying him an average of SSJ2 million a 
year, almost triple Iris 1993-94 salary. 

How far the NBA gets with ns new 
effort remains to be seen. Last year 
when Dudley rejected a SHI million, 
seven-year contract from the Nets and 
signed a contract with the Portland 
Trail Blazers paying him just S 800.000 
the first season, the NBA voided the 
contract as a transparent effort to cir- 
cumvent the salary-cap rules. After 
Dudley appealed, however, a hearing 
officer and a federal judge both upheld 
the contract. 

It was in the decision by the judge. 
Dickinson Debevoise, however, that 
the NBA found what it hopes will give 
it new ammunition in its attack on 
Dudley-like contracts. 


That was a suggestion by the judge 
that “widespread use of such con- 
tracts’* just might constitute a viola- 
tion of the salary-cap rules. 

Whatever the outcome, that theory 
is likely to be tested since both Grant 
and Green are sure to challenge the 
NBA action. “Over the next several 
days we will assess our options and 
decide what actions are going to be 
taken.” said Jerry Colangelo, the Suns’ 
president. John Gabriel the Magic's 
director of player personnel said, 
“We’ll review it with our lawyers." 

Dudley, who missed most of the reg- 
ular season with a broken ankle; did 
declare himself a free agent after one 
year with the Trail Blazers, but rather 
than si gnin g a huge new contract with 
Portland he has been shopping himself. 


Dream Team II 
Revenge-Seekers 


. , Return 

TORONTO — When the 

U.S. national hadrethall Iwni, 
the oollcctioa of 14 NBA stare 
dubbed Dream Team EL, opens 
play at the warid.cfcanqnon- 
sMps on Thursday, Alonzo 
Mourning wifi be looking for 
one thing; revenge. 

Mourning, the 6-foot-10 (ZD8 
meters) carter with the Charlotte: 
Hornets, is the only member of 
Dream Team II who played on 
the 1990 world championship 
squad at which the United States 
managed just a bronze medal 
Yugoslavia won the 1990 event 
and Russia took die silver. 

. *T wanted to comeback after 
we lost in 1990. 1 know we had a 
good enough foam to win it fin 
1990) but we just Lett short,” 
Mourning said in an interview 
Tuesday. “1990 was an experi- 
ence in zisdf. Right now we nave 
an opport u nity to get that re- 
venae.” 

. The United States, which has 
dominated Olympic basketball 
tournaments, winnin g 10 of 23 
gold medals, has won the world 
championship titles only twice; 


in 1986 and 1954. But most con- 
cede that this year’s team of Na- 
tional Basketball Association 
professionals will emerge with 
the gold medal when the 12th 

WOtld hacV^thntl champ ionship 

concludes here on Ang. 14. 

Sixteen teams will chase the 
world title: Brazil China, Spain 
and the United States in Pool 
A; Australia, Croatia, Cuba 
and South Korea in Fool B; 

Russia in^fool C: and Egypt, 
Germany, Greece and Puerto 
Rico in Pool D. 

-Notably absent from the 
tournament are the Lithua- 
nians, 1992 Olympic bronze 
medalists but losers in the Eu- 
ropean qualifying tournament 
The U.SL squad tuned up for 
the world event by beating Ger- 
many, 114-81, at an exhibition 

r ie on July 27 and by beating 
US. Goodwill Games t«mi, 
113-75, on Sunday. 

Mourning expects the U.S. 
team’s stiffest competition to 
come from Croatia, 1992 Olym- 
.pic silver medalists. 



(jlnncvltaucn 


RECORD-BREAKER — Nourrerfine Morceti of Algeria claimed a tim'd world record Tuesday at the Hercules 
Grand Prix in Monaco, nnnmg3,000 meters in 7 minutes, 25. 1 1 seconds. MorceK, who bolds the records in tbe mile 
and L£00 meters, shaved nearly four seconds off tbe previous mark set in 1992 by Moses Kiptanui of Kenya. 


Ice Follies: Games a Victim of Meltdown sipeuh es 

V E" 11 C‘ 


‘.By Randy Harvey 

Cm Angela Times Semen 

■ ST. PETERSBURG Located on the 

Gulf of Finland, divided into islands by 
branches of the Neva River. St Petersburg 
has long been ruled by its relationship to 
water. But during tbe Goodwill Games, it 
has not been a benevolent despot Organiz- 
ers have found it difficult to swim in, sail 
on or even freeze. 

Tea days after the swimming competi- 
tion was postponed for 24 hoiu-s because of 
a calamity involving the pool’s filtration 
system, -two other events had to be re- 
scheduled Tuesday. 

That was normal for the yachting com- 
petitors, who, as was the Case at the Cen- 
tral Yacht Chib, often have too little wind 
for their sails. With an afternoon breeze, 
they were in 'the water after only a two- 
hour delay. 

But there was nothing normal about the 
day for the short-track speedskaters, who 
did not know until 1 % bouts before they 


went onto the ice where, when or even 
whether they were going to compete. 

Jack Kelfy, president of the Goodwill 
Games, said both the sailors and the 
speedskaters woe victims of the elements, 
a still morning in the case of the former 
and an unrelenting heat wave in the case of 
the latter. “Like acts of God,” he said. But 
there was a suspicion among speedskating 
officials and athletes that humans also 
contributed to their predicament. 

The ice follies began Sunday when a 
power outage in the section of the city 
where the Yubileiny Sport Palace, the 
scheduled ate for speedskating and figure 
skating, is located. That forced the braid- 
ing’s engineer to postpone his ice-making 
arrangements in the main rink, and began 
turning the ice of the practice rink into 

slush. 

Monday brought Day 10 of tempera- 
tures in the high 80s, sustained heat virtu- 
ally unprecedented in Sl Petersburg. As 
YubOeiny is not air-conditioned, the engi- 
neer discovered by nridaftemoon that the 


water on tbe floor of the main rink was 
r emaining weL His response was to borrow 
the refrigeration system from the practice 
rink, which was immediately closed. 

That decision met with no resistance 
from the skaters, who already had given up 
trying to accomplish anything on il 

“There’s been problems in other big 
events I've been to,” said Stephanie 
Stieder, a U.S. pairs skater from Manhat- 
tan Beach, California, “but there has al- 


icgler, a US. pairs skater from Manhal- 
n Beach, California, “but there has al- 
ways been ice.” 

While the figure skaters were transferred 
to another rink for practices Monday al- 


ways been ice. 

While tbe figure skaters were transferred 


ternoon. tbe speedskaters were told that 
they would compete as scheduled Tuesday. 
To anyone who had seen the Yubileiny 
rink, that seemed impossible. But Kelly 
told the Russian organizers to make it 
happen or face the same ridicule they re- 
ceived over their brown pool water. 

“I’m dad I got to see Russia,” said one 
skater, “But as an athlete, I was hoping for 
two things here, edible food and a decent 
rink." 


Eindhoven Signs Brazilian Striker 

EINDHOVEN, Netherlands (Reuters) - The Dutch club PSV 
Eindhoven fought off challenges from Italian giants AC Milan 
and Juventus to sign the 17-year-old Brazilian international strik- 
er Ronaldo from Cruzeiro on Wednesday. ' 

Cesar Masci, the chairman of Cruzeiro, said PSV paid 10.8- 
million guilders (56 million) for Ronaldo, who was a member of 
Brazil's World Cup squad, according to Dutch news agency ANP. 

Rematch for Taylor and Chavez 

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Meldrick Taylor finally gets a 
chance to avenge the most disappointing loss of his career next 
month when he fights Julio Cesar Chavez for the World Boxing 
Council super-tightweighi title. 

The rematch between two fighters is set for Sept 17, nearly 4 Vi 
years alter Taylor was knocked out by Chavez with two seconds 
remaining in the final round. 

Die Minnesota Vikings and Kansas City Chiefs arrived in 
Tokyo Wednesday for Sunday's American Bowl, as temperatures 
reached an all-time high of 39 centigrade (102.38 Fahrenheit).. 
Or g a n izers expect a sell-out crowd of about 50.000. (AP)- 

Rookie quarterback Heath Shuler ended his 13-day holdout by 
signing an eight-year $19 million contract with the Washington 
Redskins on Wednesday and then took part in his first training 
camp practice. 


T* 


Major Uggu»ShgnJjng» 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 





W 

L . 

ftt 

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Now York 

66 

SB 

435 

— 

Bafhmore 

SB 

44 

JSB 

8 

Bastnn 

51 

55 

481 

16 

Taranto 

51 

55 

451 

16 

Detroit 

49 

57 

463 ‘ 

- 18 


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Chicago 

61 

43 

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60 

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47 

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50 

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41 

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47 SB Am UVx 


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NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Ear Dtvtstoo 

W L ft*. 

47 SB S* 

63 43 JM 

51 S4 404 


Tuaaday’aUffttgcoraa 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Toronto -..mm m-e w i 

Boston 08» its Sm-T If B 

StoworLCox W.Hort (*) ondBonfonu He* 
kmttu Bcnthead 171. CM. Harare 147. AWofr- 
Ctez CD met BerryttHL 96-Cox, M. L— Bonfcr 
hood. 3-L HR* — Boston anmbertnfn (4). 

Toronto. Otarud fill. 

Mftotoro ■«'« Uf—W 11 f 
mi— —Mn - Ml MB am— « . « i 

MuiDoa Etahborn ts). MHM (91 and Tor*, 
on; Putfcta, ScfwRsfram W. ThwONV (51 

ondWottodc W Mw M r -1HLL-Pumo>» 

7. **■ *" *»*"* (U) ' s<ajo 

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a— RM on am rm~ t u i 

GoMdogn, Ganfirw 131. Codorrt (6), 
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Morris, M— IS), RUMOR (9). LtTBOuW (91 
■ aids. Atanar.w— codm.1-1. L n u m oli.0- 
L Sv— Groom (1). HRs—Oavtfand. LoHon 
m. TIMM 0*1. Rnmlntz (W. Ootroft. T«t*- 
Man n*J. 

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man a) and IMnbacO; Cana, Mantcemorv 
m and Madaricm. W-Ctno. la-t L— Van 
PonoaC MB. Ss-MaMwNrv 057. 
HR — Kansas CMv, HctnoUn (227. 

Haw Van ICO BBC BBC— 7 W B 

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Kandontarid. dddemon (V)<oW Nofcmond 
Stanley (C); Seaman, Oraoeo <B>,No*«Ta (I). 
Uoyd in, tanasiok in and Wow. WSCo- 
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Yorit. CTNofll (7*). 

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Bor*. DoLoon (77. Cook 181, R. Nmnw 
(7) and Moiv In: Robots. W lttcsMo Ul.Hoaor- 
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W - Bor vn-S, L — RanorX 1V7. HR-CMcnso, 
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Sarnna bm na »-» u .1 


CoWtamia am MS IBB- * * 1 

R. Jotansoo. Ayota (B) and D. WUtani 
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L^-LaflwictbS-IA. HRa — Seoftlak E. MmUnez 
OlhOrWay Jr. l37),Bubnor (lB7.T.AAari1nez 
061. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Florida am BB1 8S1 7-3 * 1 

CktoBBO BM BOB BBC 6 — J 6 B 

171 iaoinsx) 

AnulDO, MatMwS (6). Johnstone (I), Ncn 
(97 and Ncm Santiago (9): FOriar, Plan: 
an. vores (8). Myors <9), Bautista (107 and 
WHkim. W-«taa 5-3. l— aaotttta 4-5. 
aocSmMMI 3B1 MB 410— » M 1 

San FnodKO BB2 Of *7—7 71 * 

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(7). Hldunea (f), Gamm (97 and Manwar- 
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PMtadatpNa ON BM 3 M I 

WMIO. R. MaraanUio (B), Micell (9) and 
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(23. HRs— FtWtodatphkv stocAar 0). Pitts- 
buroh. McCtaidon (47. 

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ACROSS 

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l Healing waters 

in Bottom -of-tetter 

abtw- 
l* Greek 
mckname 
14 'Barney Miller* 
regular Jack 
i »1964 Murray 
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coming to 
gnps? 


is Prom towers 

aoTpostyrord 

si oven fora 
singer? 

as Peking finale 
aaMr.Buchwald 
as Sign maker 
87 'Damn 

Yankees" team 

wen..." 

32 Pope's "An - 
on Man* 

S 3 immensely 
34 Man's name 
meaning ‘red 


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Sobtioo to Punle of August 3 


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CROSSWORD 


- sf Amenable >. 

37 &ig name in lap 

40 

40 Backbiter? 

. «& Govt, help for 
mom-and-pop - 
stores ' 
as “ASce” role 
wRaclsr reception 
47 Come about 
49 "Runaround .. 

Sue* singer 
so Getin return 
Si Skipper’s 
command 
' m Jazrs 

Winding 
55 Oxiike critter 
bc Sea tor a • . 
singw? 

at First name in- : 
tyranny' 

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monogram 
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to Kid rapping. 

grp-- 1374 

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DOWN 

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aifssouthot 
Georgia 

a Tubular pasta - 
eAwardfu 
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■ a Actress frlendol 
Prince Andrew 
a Take up Uke a 
sponge 
70 uenches- 
s Washington 
waterway 
• Staved off 
-lOGraintora 


« Haifa dance 
4> Keystone figure 
4*PtowetIJands 
47 #1 hit lor the 
Cht-UeS. 1972 
4» Wicked one 


49 Family name of 
F.D.R.’s mother 
sa Squash 

5* It comes 
straight from 
the heart 


57 Puppies' barks 
sa Baudelaire’s 
The Flowers 

of ‘ 

ss Orderly 
ee Senate votes 


n Revulsion 
i* Like apple juice 
« Forte for an 
actress? 
s Flavor sensor 
zs Arcana- 
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25 Menu phrase 
-'25 Voyeoe tor an 


31 Maunn— — . 
ss ‘.Xanadu’ rock 
■ grp- 

35 Rareaqu 8 DC 



Nnr Torn OM IW ft « 9 7 

ModK, BedreNan (•). VWMen (•> and J. 
Law RBtmaeer, Franco (9) and SMnnett. 
W — Rarntinacr, 1-4. L — BedraNOft. 0-1 
Sy-Franco m). HR— New YorKBraona (71. 
SL LaaH OM TOB Ml— 4 B 1 

taaotraal am am 19t-d 11 a 

UtmciL Habyen (61, onwaras (7> and Pae- 
nazzL K. Hill, Scan 171. warie kj nd (9) and 
WW M i ar . W— K. HIU, 1S-S L— Urbarri. 2-7. 
Sv- Wat trtand 1723. 

Catarada BM am 01B-1 2 7 

Hamtao an ms tte— l n • 

Or. Harris. CtalfcevMki (71. Uskaok: IB) 
and GlrardU DraMc and Servws. W— Ora- 
Oak, u-4. L— Or. HorrK >IL H Rs H ou st on. 
Scrvats (TL Coktrada VandwWol (5). 

San DtW 3S2 BB1 BOB M-4 13 t 

Las Anastas (13 M M 11-7 14 I 

111 taataas) 

Knwear.Bracsn 15), Tabaka (4),Flort* (71, 
PA. Martinez l»),’ Mauser (10) and Ausrnus; 
Condam, McDowell (SJ.Catt (4), Valdes r7», 
TO. Warren (If) end Piazza CoHemandez 
(IB). W— TO. WorrelL 44. L— Moueer, 2-4. 
HR— Las Anaeies. waiiodi (21). 

The Michael Jordan Watch 

TUESDAY'S OOUBLEHEAOER: Jordw 
wentO-tv-4lnlticBaran( , 74ios<tatneiMft* 
vma Xpram m the Krri Borne of a dovefcheod- 
er and l-far-4 in BlrmlmhanTa 5-3 victory In 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


BBGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

lO NDOWft UttESCOgACBCr 

cmrcMrewaaiME 

UK 077 589 5237 


tt>e seeondgtne . we gn w tectcwr. touted out 
and Btrack out twice In the fkit aame. He 
nnicK out twice. Utad out. sktaled and scared 
tbe ao-atiead run tn ttte second asme. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan Is now boHtns 
.169 (49-tor 06S) wltn K runs, U doubles, one 
triple, arte home run, 4Q RBI&, 39 walks, 91 
strikeouts ana 2 < stolen bases in 39 attempts. 
He has 1Uputouis.fi veasststsonaiOerrorsas 
on outfielder. 

Japanese Leagues 


W L T PCX. CB 

YtWlkJri S 35 D 598 - 

Ctumtchl 44 43 0 JOA 8 

HonaMn 44 45 B 494 9 

Yakut! 41 44 0 4*2 10 

HlrasMma 40 45 D 471 11 

Yokohama 38 47 0 447 T3 

Wednesday's Results 
Hiroshima 5. Vamivri 2 
Chuokhl A Hanstiln 2 
Yakut? S Yoruhomo i 

Pocmc League 

W L T pcs. GB 

5eltw 48 3A 0 571 — 

on* 47 37 1 .540 1 

Dotal 48 31 1 JS8 1 

Kintetsu 45 40 1 529 3W 

Lorre 34 57 0 4)4 IZt 

Nippon Ham 8 M 3 371 17 


wedaosdoY* Reswts 
Lotte 7. seftu 4 
Nippon Ham A. Orix 3 
Kintetsu 15. Dale! 0 


FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Paris St. Germain 1, Lens 0 
Klee l, Socnoux 0 
Montpellier a Bordeaux I 
MartKtues 1. SI. Ellenne I 
Metz I. Bast la 3 
Lille 7, Slrasboura 0 
Rennes a Le Havre 0 
Lvon X Monaco i 
Coen & Cannes I 


ONE DAY INTERNATIONAL 
Sri Laoko *v Ptatstn 
Wednesday, la Colocabo 
Sri Lanka Innlnas: 700-6 


BASEBALL 
American League 

SEATTLE — Sent Alex Rodriguez, snort- 
stop. to Calgary. PCL. 

TEXAS— Mike SdoKla catawr. retired. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


{Continued From Page T3) 


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No»mM> League 

HOUSTON— Put Brian Williams, pitcher, 
an lS-dav disohted list, relrooctlve to Aug. 1. 
Recoiled Ross Powefl. pitcher ham Tucson. 
PCL. 

PITTSBURGH—^ Tronsterred ai Man in, 
owtflelder. Irom 15-<toY disabled list to 40-dov 
resawed list Called up junior Nabaa, inttokf- 
er, hem BuHola, AA. Senl Tony Womoa, ln- 
llekler. Id Buttato. 

ST. LOUIS— Sent Gory BucJtoH. Pilcher, la 
Uxibvliie. AA. Acttvattd Rlteal Cormier, 
pitcher, from 15-aov disabled nit. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Asiockrtto* 

NBA— VOkleo contracts signed by Horace 
Grant, lorward. wllh Oriondo and A.C. Green; 
forward, with ptaenlx. 

CHARLOTTE— Acaol red MldneH Adams, 
guord. from WosMngton for second-round 
dro« Wcfcs in 19« and 1997. 

Cleveland— R e-signed Bobov Pnlili, 
guard. 

WASHINGTON— Resigned Mitchell But- 
ler. guard, to 4-vear contract. 

FOOTBALL 

MotUmU Football League 

ARIZONA— Signed Fred McAtee and Alex 
Smith, running backs. 

BUFFALO— Waived DavMGutladge. safety. 

CLEVELAND— Signed Derrick Alexander, 
wide receiver. 


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CL M 14 





Page 18 


ART BUCHWALD 


Summertime Fare 


Am 



W ASHINGTON — Admit- 
tedly the Whitewater hear- 
ngs are not as interesting as the 
D.J. Simpson court modems, 
wi a man has to watch some- 
thing cm his summer vacation. 

The advantage of the 
Whitewater hearings is that 
there are so many more people 
involved. At a recent one, there 
were 980 mem- 
bers of Con- 
gress and one 
witness. 

It went 
something like 

this ; 

“Mr. Ruth, 
you have slat- 
id under oath 
that you come 
From Calilor- 
nia. As you 

know, I also come from Califor- 
nia, and the good people of that 
stale have elected me to office 
ax times. I am proudest of hav- 
ing passed a bill that provides 
free medical care for every red- 
wood tree in my district as well 
as a cash payment of $100 to 
each tree that has suffered from 
U. S. Army poison gas experi- 
ments in the forest. . 

“Now, Mr. Ruth, I have read 
the record that was put together 
by my able staff, without which 
I could not do my job, and I 
would like to ask you a ques- 
tion." 

□ 

“Will the congressman from 
California yield?" 

. “I will yield to the congress- 
man from Zenda, Oregon." 


Boxing Gloves Fetch 
Championship Prices 

Reuters 

LONDON — Boxing gloves 
worn by heavyweight champi- 
ons Muhammad Ali and Rocky 
Manaano fetched top prices at 
auction. 

Auction house Bonhams said 
a parr of Alfs gloves went for 
£1,320 ($2,033) and a set of Mar- 
ciano’s sold for £1,210. They 
were part of the collection of 
Roland Dakin, a British referee. 


“1 would like to say ' that this 
hearing today is not a witch 
hunt, but it is our duty to find 
out all the facts about 
Whitewater, especially the ones 
being withheld by Special Pros- 
ecutor Fiske. We have been 
man dated by Congress to find 
out if there is a link between 
Whitewater and the White 
House. I was a prosecutor back 
in Zenda, and many times I 
smelled a rat when people were 
telling me they didn't know 
anything about a certain body 
oT water. I have a newspaper 
clipping here from the Portland 
Oregonian, and I would like to 
read from its sports pages." 

“Your time is up. 

“Will the gentleman from 
California yield two minutes?" 

“Yes, and might 1 say that's a 
lovely dress you're wearing to- 
day, Congresswoman Dear- 

C-T J M 


“I reseat the attitude of the 
male members of this panel 
who give the impression they 
are the only ones interested in 
getting to the bottom of 
Whitewater. For the record, 1 
am the only one who has ever 
been kayaking on the 
Whitewater, and I never saw 
any wrongdoing by the presi- 
dent or Hillary while I was 
there." 

“Thank you. We seem to be 
running out of time. Does any- 
one else have questions for the 
witness?” 

“I'd like to ask him what he 
was doing the night the police 
were chasing O. J. Simpson in 
the white Bronco on Lhe San 


-Diego Freeway." 
“You’re out ol 


“You’re out of order. Con- 
gressman Xavier. We promised 
Special Prosecutor Fiske we 
would not ask any questions 
concerning O.J. until Fiske 
questions the president on his 
role in doing all those dumb 


thing s in Haiti.” 
“Well, if there 


“Well, if there are no more 
questions, the witness may step 
down. I would like to caution 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1994 



In 2 Cozy Nordic Towns, a Craving for Jazz 


hoe today may not be repeated 
to the press. We don’t want 
anything to leak out that might 
taint our thorough hearings. 


By MQce Zwerin 

International Hentd TrUmae 

B ANNERS with “JAZZ" writ large 
are unfurled over main streets. 
Dexter Gordon posters appear in shoe 
shops. Millions of upstanding citizens 
from Moscow to Edinburgh and Sidly 
to the Arctic Circle run screaming 
with joy out of the woodwork to hear 
thousands of muskaans play this noise 
nobody can listen to the rest of the 
year. “Fm a jazz mssidan but Fm 
only in it for the money” is suddenly 
no joke. 

Cities like Nice, Montreux and The 
Hague are old copy. Here we are talk- 
ing about the edge* not even the mid- 
dle of nowhere. For a weds at the end 
of July, two otherwise unremarkable 
towns both op the Nordic coasts from 
their capitals turn into Birdland 
theme parks. In both places, jazz festi- 
vals are the biggest public events of 
the year. 

You can see 87 mountain peaks 
from the cozy fjord-port of Molde, ■ 
Norway, population 23,000. listening 
to locals, there appears to be nothing 
but cute little nonpolluting businesses 
here. (The whales are another matter, 
do not talk about whales to Norwe- 
gians.) The landscape reflects the Ice 
Age. Nearby digs have uncovered re- 
mains of nuuh-cencury Vikings* and 
of 20th-century beboppers. At 3 A. M. 
— dawn up hoe — John Hicks plays 
“Relaxing at Camarillo,” named for a 
mental institution in which Bird was 
confined before writing it. 

“Baywatcher” hates Bird and jazz 
in general, except for Dexter Gordon 
because he lived in Scandinavia. 
Mostly he gets his kicks from Norwe- 
gian folk songs. He’s here because it’s 
somewhere to sail his boat for a sec- 
ond honeymoon. I figure he’s a kind 
of seagoing Smokey the Bear. “That’s 
what I am," he says. If you stick a pin 
in Oslo and uncurl Norway, the tip of 
the tail would reach Rome. So 
Baywatcher’s boat, which we are both 
on, is cruising a fjord somewhere near 
Brussels. He shows me “my communi- 
ty” on a nautical map, five islands off 
the Atlantic coast two hours by water 
south of Molde, which in turn is a 
day's drive north of Oslo. Baywatcher 
does not like to go south: “We don’t 
think we're missing much down there. 
We love our islands. People are nice to 
e*dh other. There is no pollution, no 
crowds, no unemployment, no crime.” 
He neglects to mention that there are 
also no minorities. (Do not talk to 



Festival directors Bnar Qjendem (Molde) and Jyrid Kangas (Pori). 


Norwegians about the European 
Union.) 

“Oilman," on the other hand, 
adores jazz. He is vice president of a 
big-time corporate festival sponsor 
and likes to play his flugelhom for the 
fish when he fishes in the Swedish 
mountains (he just came back). Oil- 
man's idea of a perfect Molde summer 
night is to fish for hening and cook 
the catch for family and friends. After, 
wives and children are in bed, the men 
talk about important things and drink 
beer and aquavit. Then they take a 
sauna and shower and go to work at 
7:30. “Look!" Oilman points to the 
cool water, sparkling silver in the low 
which barely really sets. “See the 
s^unon jump?" 

Molde resembles a cute Seattle with 
wooden homes on windy, winding, 
hilly streets. Its international jazz fes- 
tival, stiD rather a family affair, start- 
ed in 1961 with a “Norwegian New- 
port” in mind. Up here, childhood 


sweethearts marry young and expect 
their marriages to endure until death 
do them part. They manage a bank, 
ran a family business, continue to in- 
vest love and energy in jazz. They 
travel south on their own time and 
money to research next year's book- 
ings. This year you could hear Charlie 
Haden, Egbert© Gisi&onti. little Feat, 
Jan Garbarek and Don Byron. 

The director, Einar Gjendem, is a 
soft-spoken man who resembles the 
high school teacher he is about to be- 
come again after his four-year Norman 
Granz impersonation. Glasses sliding 
down his nose over a busby beard, he 
points out a snow-covered mountain 
peak that bears his family name. 

□ 

A chartered propjet flies musicians 
between Molde and Fori, Finland. The 
director in Fad, Jyrid Kangas, draws 
flamboyant overlapping circles be- 
tween taking calls on a cellular phone 


in his office! The reason* he explains, 
that thae are more and morejazz festi- 
vals in increasingly remote and far- 
fTnng {daces is that related music Hire 
folk, sangp, the htaes, samba and rode 
cast in the comers of these aides. 
Jazz, the roost aDrinduave and demo- 
cratic mnac, is the only one strong and 
universal enough to express the central 
theme: *Tfs ah about lifestyle. It’s a 
total. expmencera carnival - 
. Jazz at the jpjbdHxamiozzic 
strawberries. One hundred and fifty, 
concerts by 600 musicians attract 
100,000 viators to Pori, mostly Finn- 
ish The. Ministry nf Qilture publishes 
a f anc y book catted “F innish Jazz.” 
There are 1,000 hotel, rooms, 3,000 
bed-and-breakfasts and schoolrooms 
become dorms. After staying up all 
night to experience the “Finnish New- 
port,” quite a few fans cop some Zs on 
special morning trains running south 
to HeIsnlri.“People do not come to 
Fori just for the music,” says the press 
director, AfikkoPdtola. “Goodinnsic . 
is not.earough. You also have to be 
able to get a good cold giass of beer 
when you want one.” The mnstc con- 
tinues until 6 A. M-, by winch time the ; 
curbs are paved with drunks. 

The Russians bombed Pori to 
smithereens, ft was farther decon- 
structed into a pure example of what 
mi ght be called the “Nouveau War- 
saw” school of architecture. The fastis 
val takes place" on what Kangas calls 
“Forigmaf land.”. He calls himself a 
“trained organizational shade.” like 
in Molde, he is one ofagroup of 1960s 
student jazz lovers who turned their 

systems. ‘nS^^Sval” transforms 
downtown along the riser into .“jazz 
. streets” for one week a year. Aban- 
doned factories are redesigned into 
clubs named' Village Gate, Cotton 
Chib and Riverside Jazz Circus, pre- 
senting acts Hke Herbie Hancock, Al- 
len Toussamt, Tommy Flanagan and 
The Yeltowjackets. . 

Yes, you read right There are a 
bunch of empty factory btrikfings on 
prime downtown Pbri -real estate -51: 
weeks a year. You better believe that 
Kangas has plans to convert aH of it 
into sprightly, ecologically-sound year- 
round endeavors, but he “won’t Eft a . 
fwi gw ' until someone puts 200 rinQiou 
Finnish macks on the table.” /When I 
told himhowmDchllikBd Slide Hamp- . 
ton’s little-big band, Kangas replied 
with a tap-drawer bottom fine: “They 
cost S32,WXJ. They are too expensive/’ 


PEOPLE 


For a Video in Budapest 
Ex-bachelor Mfchad Jack- $■ 
sqO will arrive in Budapest on 
Friday to make a video for his 
next album, “Redeeming East- 
ern Europe,” the Hungarian 
daily Nepszava saM Wednes- 
day. Swoons of the city will be 
cordoned off, the police chief 
said. It was not dear if his 
bride, Usa Marie Presley, 
would be with him: And already 
there & speculation about the 
: size of any prenuptial agree- 
ment by the couple, neither of 
whom has mentioned one. 
“He's worth $100 million at 
least," said Raoul Fdkfer, a re- 
! mowried New York divorce law- 
yer. And Frtsley is reputed to 
be worth about the same. “Oh, 
that would be the mother of all 
- prenuptial .agreements," said 


: □ 

Patti Labefle jumped the gun 
pn IBB CBmodi at a Democratic 
fundraiser outride Washington. 

She sang a selection of her big- 
rest hit* And then she added 
“Happy Birthday" For thepres- 
ident “Arc you -50 yet “r she 
xaQed om to Ointon. “No, I 
have two years to go," he re- 
plied. And several, days, as a 
matter of fact. His actual birth- 
day is on Aug. 19. 

. □ 

•The Philippine government 
plans to auction off up to $30 w 
million worth of jewels belong- 
ing: to the former first lady 
ImeMa Marcos. A member of 
the Presidential Commission on 
Good Government, Reynaldo 
Gufao, said the jewels would be 
offered for sale in Bern next 
May. 

- Henry Kissinger might know 
a thing or two. about national 
security, but that didn’t stop his . . 
car from being stolen in New 
York. A thief apparently took 
the keys, from a locked box at 
the former :secrctary of state’s , 
garage arid drove off with his 
1994 Mercedes-Benz:' 


INXERKAHOIVAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appear*, on Pages 7 & 13 


Europe 


JUnttm 

Aontarttedi 


Ctnta Del Sol 
Dubfa 


FfcJC* 

Bora 

SL Patmtoxg 

S*KM«*n 

SXMbwsg 

Trim 


Teds, 
Mob lorn 
Of Of 
asm. l\m 
24/75 sum 
asm 14/57 
asm M/7S 
3i/m asm 
39/05 21/70 
80/W 17/62 
31/08 21/70 
33191 21/70 
20 m 17*Z 
atm Tim 
19*66 13/55 
1MH 14/57 
34/*3 21/70 
29/64 16*81 
31/M 16/04 
21/70 16*1 
29104 22/71 
26*70 21/70 
34/79 18(06 
20/79 19/06 
34/93 21/70 
33*91 21/70 
Tim 13/66 
2H/IH 16*01 
30100 19/06 
23/73 17*02 
297W 26/70 
32/09 22/71 
2B/0< 16/01 
16*01 11/53 
33/91 22/71 
26/79 16*51 
22/71 14/57 
3JW 18*06 
22/71 15/59 
32/09 23/73 
27/00 17*62 
20*82 15*59 
32/09 16*34 


Oceania 


15/59 7/44 pc 1*4i7 7/44 pc 
19*06 11/48 pc 17*8 9/40 pc 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu- Weather. 





1 UtooronaHy 

Com 


|UiW Mu n n bl|i 
I Hoi 


North America 

A pleasant Canadian air 
mass wtt nettle Into wo east- 
ern united Slates this week- 
end Some el the coolest 
weather »nca early Juno <ril 
occur over the weekend tram 
Boston to Philadelphia. In 
tho meantime, scorching 
hast will continue over the 
mountains Irom southern 
Canada to northern Mexico. 


Europe 

Cool weather with frequent 
rains will occur From tho 
British Isles to northwestern 
Spain from Frida/ Into the 
weekend. Cooler weather 
with stmiom wV narti west- 
ern Scandinavia. Intense 
midsummer hoot nil contin- 
ue to wither craps and towns 
hom Geneva and MaraeiRe 
through Berth and Warsaw. 


Asia 

Abnormal heat and draught 
wit persist in Japan through 
Sunday. Extreme heat and 
htynkHy Irom Tokyo through 
Osaka will extend through 
Seoul into the weekend. 
Tropical Sloroi Caitlln will 
bring heavy rains to south- 
east am China Friday. Heavy 
rains wit persist across the 

north western RhilppinoB. 


Middle East 


Today Towonoa 

Ktgh Low W H*h Low W 

Of OF OF OF 

30-86 23/73 a 32/89 23/73 , 


Of C/F OF OF 

30-86 23/73 a 32/88 23/73 , 

33*91 19/68 a 34*93 21/70 a 

33/91 15.69 a 36/97 16*61 a 

27*00 16*64 „ 29/04 19*8 ■ 

35-97 19/06 a 38/10021/70 a 

391102 22/71 » 42110726/79 a 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow 

Lew W tepb Low or 
Of OF OF Of 

BwnOfAra 20*08 7/44 1 18*4 9/40 pe 

Oman 20*4 19*8 pc 30*6 18*64 pc 

Lira 18*4 18*1 a 18*4 15*9 C 

McrieoOry 24/rs 12*3 pc 23/73 12*53 Id 

rtarMawto 22/71 is*i pc 23.73 17, 02 pc 

5«dogp 23/73 e«3 a 17*2 1/34 JXS 


Tcmmfow 
W Mpi ImW 

c/f or 


HrajCoog 

HawDdH 

SaoU 

arw u/m l 


Today 
High Low 
OF Clf 
32*0 34*75 
32*9 23/73 
30*8 26/79 
30/88 23/73 
34/93 28*2 
33/91 24/70 
34*3 28/79 
31/66 23/73 
32*9 24/75 
30*8 23/73 


Mskn 32*9 23/73 po 30*8 23/T3 pe 

Capo Tone 18*4 9A8 * 19*6 a/46 pc 

Canbhoca 28*2 21/70 a 31*8 21/70 ■ 

Hanna 19*0 1102 I 21/70 12*3 pe 

Lna 27760 23173 * 28*2 24/75 pe 

**a Ml 21/70 1102 po 22/71 12*3 pe 

Hurts 34*3 21/70 a 33*1 22/71 ■ 


Legend; a-smny. pc-partty dourly. ocXxjdy. rti-snrxras. I -thunderstorms, r-rrtn, sl-enow iMries, 
on-snow. Wee, W-weolwr. AI7 maps, forecasts ml data pravhM tiy Accu-WWOKr, Inc. 0 1984 


North America 

Anchmago 21/73 15*9 

Atorta 30708 22/71 

Boaxai etna asm 

C7W» 26/79 13*5 

Dwwar 29/B* 15*0 

Dntai 27*0 14*7 

htonoUo 30*6 24/75 

Hnolan 33*1 22/71 

LnaXegataa 31*8 20*8 

!*■"> 32*9 24/75 

umapefl* 22/71 11*2 

Mwmri 26/79 13*5 

ttoaswi 31*5 24/75 

HawVotk 33*1 23/73 

Hnw 43/109 29*4 

SanFmn 22/71 13A5 

Swam 23/73 12753 

Torortn 24/75 14757 

W«d*igtan 39791 23/73 


a 23/73 
V 30*8 
pc 27*0 
I 22rn 
I 30*6 
I 22/71 
pc 31788 
pc 34*3 
a 30*8 
I 33*1 
i 24/75 
I 23/73 
PC 32*9 
I 31*8 
a 44/iti 
a 24 m 
c 24/75 
m 22/71 
pc 31*0 


1609 pc 
20*8 pc 
15*9 pc 
14*7 a 
15*0 RC 
12753 a 
24/75 pc 
23/73 pc 
18*8 pc 
24/7S pc 
14*7 a 
12/53 pc 
26/77 pc 
19*6 pe 
30*8 a 
14/57 a 
14/57 po 
12*3 a 
20*8 pe 


SATURDAY 



.SUNDAY 


MkxecBrts and due pornoed 
by ApoT-Weemr. vice TOM 


Europe and Middle East 


Europe ml Mdcfle Eaat 


Location 

IMothor 

High 

Low 

MM*r 

irava 

Wind 



Temp. 

Temp. 

Tstnp. 

Haights 

Speed 



OF 

C/F 

OF 


Orth) 

Cannes 

partly sunny 

31/88 

20/88 

28/79 

. 1-2 

E 

10-20 

DeauvOte 

partly sunny 

32/BB 

22/71 

18/84 

1-2 

E 

1080 

Rfeninl 

sunny 

32/89 

2373 

2fi79 

0-1 

NE 

12-25. 

DteMoa 

sunny 

32/B9 

25/77 

25/77 

0-1 

SE 

1225 

Cagtari 

sunny 

34/93 

26/78 

27/80 

0-T 

W 

10-20. 

Faro 

partly sunny 

SBIBZ 

21/70 

20/88 

1-2 

sw 

1540 

Piraeus 

sunny 

32/39 

24/75 

26/79 

0-1 

NW 

12-25 

Corfu 

sunny 

32/89 

24/75 

26/79 

0-1 

NW 

15-25 

Brighton 

partly sunny 

27/80 

iswe 

17/82 

0-1 

W 

1525 

Oatend 

parity sunny 

27/80 

21/70 

1WBB 

0-1 

S 

12-26 


sunny 

27/BO 

21/70 

20*08 

0-1 

S 

1020 

sytt 

amy 

25/77 

18AM 

21/70 

0-1 

s • 

1020 

bmir 

etnas Bid sun 

32/68 

22 m 

26/79 

1-2 

N 

2040 

TelAvtv 

sunny 

28/82 

23/73 

26/79 

1-2 

SW 

2040 

Carfobaan and West Attantte 







Barbados 

Klncpton 

SLThwnas 

partly sunny 
thunderstorms 

32/89 

32/89 

2378 

24/75 

27/80 

28/B2 

1-2 

1-2 

BE 

E 

2035 

25-50 

sunny 

37/99 

24/75 

28/82 

1-2 

E 

2035 

Hamtton 

party sunny 

28/78 

15/59 

Z7Z80 

1-2 

SE 

2(W0 

AdalPacKe 








Penang 

clouds and sir 

31/88 

22/71 

3088 

0-1 

SW 

1020 

Phuket 

ciouas and sun 

32/89 

24/75 

28/84 

0-1 

sw 

15-25 

Bali 

clouds end sun 

31/86 

22/71 

2084 

0-1 

sw 

12-25 

Cebu 

party sunny 

32/89 

24/75 

3088 

0-1 

ssw 

1030 

Palm Beach, Aus 

partly sunny 

1MK 

8MS 

10/51 

2-3 

w 

ao«» 

Bay ol Intends, NZ 
Sroraherna 

showers 

15/58 

7M4 

1BA1 

1-2 

sw 

.23-50 

clouds and sun 

33/BI 

23/73 

28/78 

1-fl 

se 

2035 

Honolulu 

party sunny 

31/88 

24/75 

28/79 

2-3 

BJE 

2550 


Location • 

• WswOmt 

litfi 

Low : 

Wa Mr . 

Wave 

Wind 



Tarop- 

T«*rt- 

Twqp. 

Height* 

Spaad 



CfF 

OF 

OF 


Orth) 

Carmns : 

~ sunny - 

toes. 

21/70 

26/79 ' 

1-fl - 

SE 

12-25 

Dnauvfle 

partly suaw 

2SW 

18/84 

18/84' 

\-Z 

SE 

15-30 

RfcnW 

jaunny 

■32490. 

23/73- 

28/79 

~ OT 

NE 

1020 

. Malaga 

sunny 

.33/91 

■25/77 

28/79 

Ol 

SE 

12-25 

Cagflarf - . 

swmy 

douG»andaiffi 

SGK 

28/78 

27/80 

01 

W 

1020 

Faro 

32/89 

22/71. 

iace 

42 

SW 

15-30 

Piraeus 

swny. 

3301. 

2393 . 

26/79 

oi ■ 

NW 

12-25 

Corfu 

sunny. 

34/93 

23/73 

26/79 

Ol 

NW 

15-30 

fiwgrton 

shown™ 

24/75 

.14/57 

16/BI 

1-2 

W 

2040 

Oswnd 

clouds and sun 

28777 

17782 • 

' 19/68 

1-2 

S 

20-40 

Sdwventngan 

doudsandsun. 

25/77 

17/82 

2088 

.1-2 

s 

15*30 

Sjrtt 

sursiy 

2507 

1&B1 

2088 

Ol 

SE 

12-25 

tenlr 

susviy 

was 

. 22/71 

28/79 

1-2 

N 

20-40 

TelAvtv 

sunny 

2984 

23/73 

2809 

1-fi 

SW 

2040 

Catfcbaan end Waat Atlantic. 







Barbados 

sunny . 

32/89 

24/75 

27/80 

■ 1-2 

ENE 

2035 

Krfostan 

SLlnomas 

party sunny 
sunny 

33/91 

38/97 

23/73 
24/75 - 

28/82 

£8/62 

1-2 

1-8 

E 

E 

25-50 

2035 

Hamtton 

party sunny 

25/77 

13/55- 

Z7/80 

1-2 

SE 

2035 

AsiWPadflc 








Penang 

ctoudsandscr 

31438 

22/71 

8006 

Ol 

SW 

1020 

Phuket 

thundantoma 

33W 

25/77 

2904 

Ol 

sw 

15-25 

Bar 

doudsandsun 

31/88 

23/73 

' 2904 

Ol 

sw 

12-25 

CobU 

party sumy 

32 «B 

23/73 

3008 

Ol 

ssw 

12-22 

Paw Beech. Aus. 

-v— -- — — , 

19438 . 

SMS 

15/68 

2-3 

WSW 25-50 

Bayci Istends, K2 
Shtahamn 

ctoody 
partly sunny 

14157 

32/80 

7/44 

23/73 

18/BI 

28/79 

1-2 

1-2 

sw 

se 

20-40 

20-40 

Honofejki 

ckrodsandaui 

31/88 

24/75 

20/79 

1-2 

ENE 

25-45 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

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AJ&T Access Numbers, 

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COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


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CMm.fltO** 
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Hook Kong 

India* 

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NewZeatmd 


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Sri Lanka 
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ASIA fialjr _ 172-1011 fincdl 

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000-117 Mala* 

001-801-10 Monaco* 

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009-11 Norway 

IT PotonTrir. 

800-0011 Portngar . 
000-911 ttMtBmb 
105-11 IbraabnCMoacoeO 
235-2872 Slovakia 


800-01U-111. Spain* 
43<H30 Sweden* 
0060-102860 Swkzerbnd^ 


• 0800-690-110 BSafvadom 

19a-OOH Guatemala- ... 

06-022-91U Guyana-*- 

800-190-11 Honduras** 

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05017-1-288 rocaragna 
01-800^288 . Panama* 

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, 900-9900-11 ! . Un^uay 
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OOWOIO 

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114 

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0 174 

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0019-991-1111 OX 


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^1994/asa- 


Armenia** 

AiMWa-*- 


Bulgaria 

Croatia** 

Czech Bep 

Denmark* 

Hmfand* 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary* 

Icebafr* 

Ireland 


EUROPE Ukraine* 

8*14111 MBDDI 

022-90 3-011 Bahrain 
_ 0800-100-10 -Cyprus 
_ 00-1800-0010 fcra d 

9»38-00U Kuwafi 

00-420-00101 Lebanon (pdrat) 


9001-0010 • Qatar 
9800-100-10 Saudi Arabia 
19a- 0011 Tarter 


afr • 155-oon Caribbean 

QgOfrOSMWll gihemiw- ~ 1-800^72-2881 

8*100-11 Bemaidg* 1-800372-2881 

MDWBEjOT . BdtidlVl 1-800-872-2881 

_ ' . ' 800-001 Cayman Islands 1^800372-2881 

08090010 Grenada*- - *330-872-2881 

177*100*2727 HaM* 7 001-800-972-2883 

800-288 . Jaqsdcar 0-800-872-2881 

426-801 ZfeflLAntfl . 001-800872-2881 

- ' 0800^)11-77 . SLBps/Nortg 1-800^72-2881 

*? 1-aoO-lO AFRICA 

>> 510-0200 

OOa-OOI 

00111 

0900-10 
■ 797-797 
* 0800-99-0123 


Germany 01300010 u.ar* 

Greece- 00000-1311 

HnagarT OQa-BOOOmi Aigewh 

icebr^-*~ 999001 Belize* 

frefand 1-800-550000 BoW 

'KBS C4h^CBdi»fciMfiibtetaafloxinBiH. AST VMdCrawae 


00000-12277 Egypricatro) 
800-121 Gabttfl" ■ 
AMERICAS ftmw 

. 001-800- 200-1111 Kenya- : 

_ - 555 . Uberi» 

. . 0000-1112 - . South Afrfca 


^S%y^ bwMI11 ” 111111 ' WwaMM. fayfedartfacc '-’ L 9 rp£ * JU£ 

Sfassssa v 
W&SSssastsataa^^ ■ - 


*TWflephooMttqi*cdc 

fitxBnvrV/nxwhoirti 


k»rtdnba.ptd0»«IM1 11